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A JOURNAL^-- FLORISTS. SEEDSMEN - '^ NURSERYMEN 




C MOTHERS' DAY NUMBERi: 



II 



The Florists' Review 



Mav 4. i'.t:i 




It certainly is a «<)(xl lookinK job. 

Of course we builil it in is and •J5foot widths, and any lengtlis to suit. 

More About the General Purpose 

Greenhouse for Private Places, 

Institutions and Cemeteries 



You might say it was stripped for tiie run- 
ning. 

A house that has all the lastingness, all the light- 
ness and all the grovving advantages of our 
most expensive house, only that it is not so 
ornamental. 

It lacks some of the grace and beauty of the curved 
eave, and the cornice effect that the moulded 
face gutter gives. 



The construction of this General Purpose House 
makes it possible to cut down on the masonry 
cost without in any way affecting its staunch- 
ness and lastingness. 

It's a clean cut practical purpose house, at a 
price most attractive. 

We'll gladly write you fullest particulars, or 
why not get together and talk it over ? 




<.iyanihama. 



Builders of Greenhouses and Conservatories 



IRVINGTON NEW YORK 

New York 30 Ea«t 42nd St. 

BOSTON- II CLEVELAND ATLANTA 

Little Bldg. 407 Ulmer Bldg. Atlanta Trust Co. BIdg 

Eastern Factory Western Factory 

Irvington. N. Y. Des PUines. 111. 



PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO 

Land Title Bldg. Continental Bank Bids. 

TORONTO 
Harbor Commission Bldg. 

Canadian Factory 
St. Catharines. Ont. 





1 In -:t\v.r lioiiso in another location, just alter a snow. The photo was lalccn from tliis end to sliow vou the ^tan.larH 

«.)iki n, uliicli is so made at tlie factory that it goes up in sections, .nakiuK erection ciniek- -m,! ■,.;.■ '""luara 

' " * ^imv-iv ,iim S(i 1 1 >iact Ion sure 









REMOTE STORAGE fLo 





T"T.,ORrCUITUPE 



to 

•UBSORIPTIOMS 

$2.00 f: 



Per 



?flKZ0r 



A WEEKIY JOUI»)AL'«> TUmStS. SEEDSMEN ^NUBSERYNDL 

riiOBISTS' FUBLISHIiro CO., Sao Outaa BnUdlnc, 608 South Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



VoLXUX. 



CHICAGO, MAY 4, 1922. 



No. 1875. 



GLADIOLUS BULBS 



Fine, Clean, Healthy Stock. 1^ to 3-ln. 

100 1000 

America 

Ctaloaffo W!ute 93.75 35.00 

Kalle7 3.75 /35.00 

Panama 4.00 (^6.00 

Pendleton 6.00 45.00 

PrlmnUnne Hybrids 2.75 25.00 



154 to 1M*1B. 
100 1000 

91.80 918.00 
2.86 28.00 
9jOO 18.00 

3!75 35*.66 



Hydrangeas for Mothers' Day 

Fine plants in bud and bloom, E. G. Hill, Mouillere, Bim- 
benet, Vibraye, etc., 5J^-inch pots, $1.00 to $2.00 each. 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 166 N. Wabash Atc, Chicago 



Fine Stock of 

Chrysanthemum Plants 

In Best Commercial Varieties 

READY SOON 
C C. Pollworth Co. 

MILWAUK^ WIS. 



Greenhouse Roses 



WE graft them in large quantities. 
Our Roses are the standard of 
excellence. We can fill your order, 
be it large or small. Let us know 
your wants! 



^ N. PIERSON, b^ 



CROMWELL, 
CONN. 



Ready May 10th to 15th 

Own Root Rose Plants 

From Selected Flow^ering Wood 

PREMIER $150.00 per in-0 

MME. BUTTERFLY 150.00 per IfKH) 

WHITE OPHELIA 150.00 per 100() 

GOLDEN OPHELIA 150.00 per 1000 

COLUMBIA 100.00 per 100(i 

COLUMBIA, Grafted 225.00 per looo 

THE E. G. HILL CO., Richmond, Indiana 



ALTHOUGH LILY BULB$ 
ARE OUR SPECIALTY 

FRENCH AND DUTCH BULBS OF EQUAL, BEST 
QUALITY ARE FOUND IN HORSESHOE BRAND. 
WE MAY NOT BE THE CHEAPEST IN PRICE, 
BUT OUR STOCK IS THE BEST TO BE HAD. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR ORDER. 

Ralph N. Ward & Company, Inc. 

The Lily House 
K "Zte 25 Murray Street, NEW YORK 




Fresh Crop Seeds 



Phoenix Roebelenii 

$12.00 per 1000; 5000 seeds, $10.00 per 1000. 

For other Palm Seeds, ask for prices. 

Aster Seeds and other Flower Seeds, see page 5. 

See Classified columns for Plant Stock. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 43 W. 18th St, New Ywk Cit | 



■t 



Begonias, Melior and Cincinnati 

Strong, clean 2Ji-in. plants, ready in June, $30.00 per 100. 

For immediate delivery, Begonia Chatelaine, $7.00 per 100, 
$66.00 per 1000; Mrs. Patten and Pride of Newcastle, $8.00 
per 100, $75.00 per 1000. 

Primulas, Obconica and Townsendii 

specially selected strain, none better, $6.50 per 100, $60.00 
per 1000. 

F«ma lor nrnwintr An f.*^? Classlfled ad under Ferns for complete 
.»^J: .? .^. " » ""* °' varieties and prices. Also see Clas- 
sified ads for other stock and write us for our resrular list of BtTLBS 
SEEDS, PLANTS. duxjdo, 

S. S. Skidelsky & Co., !!rl^"i'orK"?r?? 



Gladiolus Bulbs 

^yi"j9"f. ^^^^ '*"**• ^^ o^f"' *'>« following first-class varieties 
01 Qladioli: 

Ist Size 2nd Size 

100 XOOO 100 1000 

AMERICA $2,16 $19.00 $1.85 

MRS. FRANK PENDLETON ... 3I5 

PRINCE OF WALES 6.26 60.66 . 

MYRTLE „ ... 5^ 

YELLOW HAMMER ...;. sw 

PANAMA 3.75 36.00 3.50 

SCHWABEN „.V 4M 

CRACKERJACK 2 25 20.00 . 

AUGUSTA 3.60 88.00 3.25' 8000 

MRS. FRANCIS KINO 2.50 22.00 2jJ iSM 

231-235 W.MadisM St. 
CHICAGO 



$16.00 
35.00 

66!66 

32.00 
32.00 
37.00 



TheW.W.BARIURDa. 



INDKX TO ADvnrnsnMDCTS 



or coNTwra-PAois two and rotm 



1 



, r ■ ■■tir,-'yi^r''^.\ r^7-T-T5^'T»'r>,->rrF7^v---:^n«i.7;3Tj 



iV 



•".y! •ST-"":! • ; '■ 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 




Abby Ave. Ghse 123 

Acker's Fir Store.. 120 

AdiiiiiB Florist 124 

AUuiiis & Sons 117 

AdKUte & Son 122 

Adklsson, Wise 12U 

AUviinic ("o 101 

Akiii's Floral Co. . . .113 

Aljo Mf),'. Co 134 

Alexandria First.. 98-99 
Alkenuide & Son.... 142 

Alleghany Fl. Co 115 

Allen, J. K 135 

AUersnia. H. W 11(5 

Alulia Flo. Co 

112-113-124-128 

Alplia Florist 128 

Alvin Cape Jessa- 
mine & Fl. Co C9 

Am. J!idl> Co 3 

Am. Floral Shop.... 112 
Am. Glis. MfK. O0...III 

Am. llort. Co 133 

Am. Landscape 

School 133 

Am. llose & riant.. liJO 
Am. AVindow Glass. 103 

Amling Co 

49-50-51-52 89 

Amundson Co 79 

Anderson, S. A 112 

Andrews, Florist. .. .125 
AnKermueller, G. 11. 77 
Annavee Fir. Shop. .125 

Aphine Mfg. Co 159 

Archer's Gardens... 90 
Archer's Fir. Sliop..]14 
Archias Floral Co... 113 

Armacost & Co 87 

Art Floral Co... 127-131 

Art Florist 120 

Art Fir. Shop 132 

Artindaie & Son 104 

Artistic Fl. Co 127 

Aschmunu Bros 151 

Aschinnnn, (r lU 

Ashhornc Goldfish... 8L' 
Ashtabula Fl. Co... 123 

Asniiui 110 

Atchison Flo. Store. 122 
Athletic Club First. 120 
Atlantic Citv Shop. 110 

Attica Fl. Co 120 

Auburndale Goldfish. Kl.' 

Aull Bros. Co 13K 

Aurora Oreenhonsc. .118 
Austin Fl. Co. 

104 129-132 

Austin. II 141 

Austin, J 112 

Austin. S. E 1.55 

Avenue Floral Co... 1.30 
Avenue Fir. Shoi)...118 

Avery Florist .' 122 

Avres, S. Bryson. . . .143 
Axcll, J. A 90 

B. 

Bndcr Co.. John.... 155 

Bader & Co 145 

Hiier, Julius 109 

Baker Fl. Co 129 

Baker, W. J 71 

Baker & Son Ill 

Ball. C. B 1.52 

Ball Fl. Co.. 120 

Bancroft & Son 1.32 

Barnard Co I 

Barnes. W. J 112 

Barr &Co.. B. F 129 

liarrows, 11. II 149 

Bassett & Wa.shbnrn 9 
Batenian, Inc.. H. . 

98 99-120 

Batli. John 11 121 

Bauniparten 114 

Baur & Steinkamp. .153 
Baur Windciw Glass. 10.3 

Bausclier Bro.x 117 

Baycr.sdorfer & Co. . 

73-130 

Beagle 129 

Heaven. E. A 79 

Becker's Cons lOS 

Beckcrt's Seeds ....134 
Belmont Fir. Shop.. 108 

Benson Fl, Co 08 

Bentzen Floral Co.. 113 

Berger Bros 70 

Berger's .Sons. Wm.l28 
Berkelov Florist. .. .120 

Beming. II. G 134 

Berternmnn Bros... 120 

Bpsnncon & Co 129 

Bester & Sons 110 

Bethards The First. 70 
Beyer Floral Shop.. 120 

Billings Flo. Co 118 

Bills Floral Co 132 

Binl & Son 104 

Bissinger. J. .\,...110 
BInckistone. Z. D...104 

Blake's 122 

Blessing. J. B 110 

Blossom Shop 130 

T'.hiMnize B. Shop. . .110 
Boas & Co 138 



Bobbink & Atkins. . .149 

Bock. U. G 73 

Bohannou Fl. Co 119 

Bolgiano Seed Co. ..140 

Bonwell, Itobin 118 

Boston Florist Ill 

Boston's Fir. Store.. 110 
Boyle & Darnuud...l27 

Braguc & Son 80 

Braslan Co., N 140 

Brecht Co 04 

Brehmcr Ghse 123 

Breltmever's Sons.. 110 
Bright Si>ot Ghse... 134 
Brinkerhoff Ghses. . .117 
Broadway Florist . . . 

98-99-120 

Broderick, R. T 110 

Brodrib, J. A 109 

Brown, A. C ..117 

Brown Bag Filling 

Machine Co 144 

Brown Bros. & Co.. 121 
Brown's Nurseries. .121 
Brown & Kennedy.. 126 

Brownhurst 131 

Brownwood Flo. Co. 129 

Brunger. C. A 126 

Bruns, II. N 119-144 

Bryan, A. J 151 

Buchbinder Bros. .22-23 

Budlong, J. A 48 

Bunyard, A. T Ill 

Burlington Willow 

Ware 135 

Bums, II. H Ill 

Burns Fir. Shop. ... .120 

Buri'ee Co 141 

Burt, Albert J 125 

Buschardt, Wm. F. .101 

0, 

Cade the Florist 118 

Cadillac Glass Co... 102 
Caldwell, Woodsman 82 
California Florist. . .125 
California Fl. Co... 88 

Callahan. M. J 128 

Callahan Co., T. J.. 161 
Capital City Fl. Co. 114 
Capitol Floral Co... 117 
Caple, Walter W...116 
Carbone, Philip L. .108 

Carek. F. G 122 

Carolina Fir. Store. 131 
Cams & Greensmith.llO 
Casey Florist Co. . . .108 
Casper Floral Co... 118 
Central Fir. Co. 116-124 
Central Fl. Shop... 1-23 
Chandler Flo. Co... 112 

Chapin Bros 121 

Charles, Harry 1.35 

Charleston Cut Flo. 114 
Chgo. Flower Grow- 
ers' Assn.. 53-54-55 .'"lO 
Cincinnati Cut Fir.. 131 
City Floral Co.. 110-1 25 

City Fir. .Shop I'JO 

Clark, C. U r29 

Clark Seed Co 141 

Clarke Bros 12.5 

Chirke's Sons Ill 

Clarke, W. It 92 

Cleveland Soil Co... 161 

Climax Mfg. Co 1.39 

Clody's Fir. Shop. . .118 

Coggan. S. W 110 

Cokal Stoker Corp.. 157 

Cokelv's 10-72-77 

Coles' Fir. Shop 120 

Colonial Fir. Co 128 

Colonial Fir. Shop. . 

112 120 

Colon do Seed Co. . .153 
Columbi.-i Fir. Co... 112 
Columbine Fir. Co. .124 
Conard & Jones.... 148 
Congress Fir. Shop. 119 

Connnn Co 121 

Constien, B. E 123 

Coomlis 109 

Colter Co., C. N 135 

Cotton the Florist.. 115 

Cowan Bros. Co 120 

Cowee. W. J 72 

Cov Seed Co 140 

Cr.iig Co., R 24 

Crane & Hill 110 

Cresoent P.nib Co... 143 
Crescent Garden ...129 
Critchell. C. E.1S 77-81 
Cronch, Chas. W...131 

Crowl Fern Co 82 

Crump. Frank F. . . .124 

Culp & Co 122 

Cimninglinm F. Shot). 129 
Currie & Co.. A 114 

D. 

Banish Seed Imp... 143 

B.inker 112 

Barbee's 127 

Bards Ill 

Biirling's Shop. 98-99-120 

Bant Bros 117 

Davis Co.. J. W 151 



Bavis Flo. Co.. 120 

Bavis & Kishler 110 

Day Co 112 

Deal. S. Jj 1,32 

De Kalb Fir. Shop.. 117 
Denver Wholesale.. 11 
Derr's Fir. Shop... 129 

Dethlefs. Wm 117 

Detroit In'tl Co 143 

Dickinson Co 140 

Diener Co., R 89 

Dietsch Co., A 163 

Dlngleys 105 

Dlttmer the Florist. 132 

Dixon Floral Co 117 

Dodge City Fl. Co,. 122 
Bold Packing Co.,. 160 
Donofrio Flo. Co... 120 
Dorner & Sons Co.. 153 
Dreer. H. A. 147-159-163 
Drevon-'l'egelaar ...144 

Drury, II. F 117 

Dudley Sous Co.... 114 

Duerr. Chas. A 123 

Duluth Floral Co... 124 

Dumke Fl. Co 127 

Dunlop, John H 121 

Durham Floral Co.. 131 

E. 

Eble, Chas 130 

Ecke, Paul 88 

Edwards Floral Co.. 110 

Ehle. Fred G 90 

Eiche Floral Co 121 

Eldred Flower Shop. 126 

Elias & Co 102 

BUtch Gardens 74 

Elk Galax & Fern.. 79 

Ellis Floral Co 120 

Elverson Pottery. . .165 

Engle Floral Co 123 

Enid Floral Co 110 

Enomoto & Co 89 

Erne & Co 64 

Espelln Flo. Co 124 

Evans Co., John A.. 159 

Evenden Bros 129 

Evenden's Sons ....129 
Ever Ready Fl. Pot. 75 
Excell Lal)oratorie8.166 

Excello Mfg. Co 164 

Excelsior Ghses. ...113 

F. 

Faher. Geo 118 

Fallon. Florist.. 114-115 
Fallon Co., J. J. 115-131 

Fallon. John 115 

Fails City Wire 

Works 77 

Feast, S.. & Sons.. .110 
Felton's Fir. Shop. .112 

Fislier & itro 119 

Fisher Governor Co. 158 
F. & I. 'fob. Prod.. 1.59 

Flagg Flo. Co 129 

Flatiron Fir. Shop.. 121 
Florists' Crdt. Assn. 74 
Florists' Sup. Hse.. 75 
Florists' Hail Assn. 103 

Flower Shop 

...108-114 120-130-131 

Foerster Co 69 

Foley Mfg. Co 103 

Forber. G. F 1.32 

Ford, M. C i;!5 

Fordhani Florist. ., .111 
Fox. Chas. Henry. .128 

Fox's. Inc 114 

Franklin Park Flo. .122 

Eraser & Son 89 

Fre<lerick Fl. Shop. .128 
Fred's Fir. Garden.. 131 

Freepcjrt Flo. Co 117 

Frcv, C. II 121 

I'rev & Frey 121 

Frost, Chas 145 

Froute, M 105 

Fuchs, Henry 115 

Fiilbnipe's Firs. ...125 

Furnival & Son 110 

Furrow & Co 110 

F^itterman. Chas.... 135 

G. 

Galvin. Tlios. F.. 97-1 08 
Gammage & Sons... 121 
Garden Citv Fir. Co. 118 

Gnrdiner Flo. Co 132 

Garland Co i."i4 

tiasser Co 123 

Gates. Howard. . .98-99 

Gatliff Flo. Shop 120 

Cause, G. R ]20 

General Bulb Co 145 

(ienteman, H. A.... 117 

Geny Bros 131 

George Bros. & Co. .129 

George. Inc 115 

Gets-There Soap 1.59 

(Jililis Bros 108 

Giblin & Co 157 

Gillett. E. G 81 

Gilson Mfg. Co 1R0 

Ginilwl's 114 



Gleave's Fir. Shop. . 

98-99-127 

Gloeckner, Wm 112 

(;ioede Cons 149 

Gioekier Co., B 133 

Guatt Co., Ove 17 

Goetz Sous lib 

Goldsboro Flo. Co,.. 131 

Goldstein, I l**-^ 

Goo<lbrad Floral ...130 

Gould & Co 128 

Gove, Mrs. C. 109 

Graham llf 

Graham & Son 123 

Grakelow. C. H....128 

Gr. Forks Fl. Co 117 

Grand Metal Works. 75 
Green Goods Supply. 79 
Green the Florist. . .129 
Greenville Fl. Co... 131 

Grever, Wm. H 112 

Grimm & Gorly 113 

Groh, John 157 

Grohe Co.. Fred 90 

Groves Floral Co 122 

(Jroves, Inc., Robt.. 78 

Grulich & Sons 110 

Grullemans & Sons. .144 

Guaranty Nurs 140 

Gude Bros. Co 104 

Guldemond & Son. . .144 

Guilett & Sons 26 

Gumz, A. W 134 

Gurney Gnhse. Co... 117 
Guthrie-Liorenz Co. . .132 

H. 

Habermehl's Sons... 128 

Haeger Flo. Co 131 

Hall & Co., G. J 88 

Hall & Robinson 121 

Halliday, Wm 116 

Hamilton Bros 79 

Hammond Co 115 

Hammond Co., B. E. 91 

Hantling Co 135 

Hannah & Son 129 

Hansen N. & F. Co. 110 
Harkett's Flo. Nur.,132 

Harris Bros 128 

Harris Mfg. Co I«i4 

Harris Seed Co 130 

Harris, Wm. K 149 

Hart, Geo. B 70 

Hart & Vlck 141 

Hasselbring 116 

Hastings, Frank R..128 

Haven Seed Co 140 

Ilayashi & Co 91 

Hayes, James 122 

Ilayman Ghse. Co... 114 
Heacock Co.. Jj(S...1.55 

Heckenkamp 117 

Hecock Floral Co... 123 

Heepe Co 123 

Hell. P. T 113 

Helnl & Son. J. G..120 

Heller & Co 145 

Ilembreiker & Cole. 117 
Henderson & Co.... 

1-142-100 

Henes, Louis J 123 

Henry Co., J l.'iS 

Herbert & Flel- 

shauer 03 

Herron. Dana R....110 

Hess & Swoboda 121 

Hews & Co 105 

Ilielschcr, W. E 74 

Illggins, J. J 121 

Highland Park Ghs,119 
Hill Nurserv Co. 140-148 

Hill & Co.. Bave 128 

Hill Co.. E. G 1 

Hill's Fir. Shop ^^2H 

Hill Co., J. II 1.50 

Hlllver's 129 

HInde & Dauch 1.30 

Hltchings & Co 200 

Hogan & Evers 127 

Hogewoning & Sons. 144 

Holden Fl. Co 91 

llolloway. B. Z 08 

Hollywood Kir. Shop. 120 
HoUvwood Gardens.. 120 

Holm & Ol.son 125 

Holton & Ilunkel . . . 

1.34-130 

Ilonaker the Florist. 115 

Hopper's Ghse 118 

Horan & Son 109 

Horn Fir. Co 122 

Houghton Gornev. . .108 

Howard, P. J 98-99 

Ilowanl Rose Co.... 90 
Howard & Smith. . . 

98-99-120 

Ilumason Co.. A.... 72 
Humboldt Evergrn.. 90 
Humphrey, C. L. ...122 
Hurff, E. F 141 

I. 

Tckes-Braun 1 05 

Idle Hour Floral Co. 117 

Idle Hour Xurs 130 

Idlewild Ghse 131 



Hllnols Malleable.. .157 

lusectonos Ijab 158 

Ionia Pottery Co... 164 

Irwin, Roman J 1-5 

Isett & Son, C. B..158 
Isherwood Ghse. ...113 

J. 

Jablonsky. A 152 

Jackson Cut Fir. Co. 131 
Jackson Fir. Shop.. 118 
Jackson & Perkins.. 148 

Jaeger & Son 127 

Jaanoch Nurs 93 

Jahn, H. H HO 

James, Eric 89 

James & Son HI 

Jensen Bros 118 

Jepsen, Hans 165 

Johnson, J. L 117 

Johnson & Jensen.. 119 
Johnson's Ghses. . . .131 
Johnston, Mrs. 

Stella 110 

Johnston, A. K 112 

Johnston Bros 109 

Johnston & Co 109 

Johnston, Mary 110 

Jointless Fire Brick. 158 

Joliet Floral Co 117 

Jones, Percy 133 

Joseph, B. M 127 

Joy Floral Co 

131-152-154 

Junction Ghses. ...114 

K, 

Kahler Pottery Co.. 165 

Kai, M 90 

Kan. City Cut Fl... 67 

Keller Co., John 115 

Keller Sons, J. B..,lll 
Keller Pottery Co.. 164 

Kemble Fl. Co 132 

Kendlg Florist 71 

Kennedy & Sons.... 110 
Kennlcott Bros. Co. 

60 61 

Kent Bros 123 

Kerr. R. 129 

Keur & Sons 144 

Kiger. N 123 

Kimberlin Seed Co. .140 
Kinder & Bro., S...109 

King Cons. Co 187 

"King" Florist. The.121 

Kinsman. A. N 124 

Kirkwood Fl. Co. ..132 
Kirchen & Glftord.. 70 

Knees & Sons 118 

Koppelman, Jofl. ...135 

Kottmiller. A Ill 

Kramer the Florist. 112 

Kranz, C 132 

Kroeschell Bros. ...156 
Kruchten Co., John. 133 
Krueger Co., C. F..1'28 

Krug Floral Co 118 

Kuehn, C. A 94 

Kuhl, G. A 117-1.53 

Kusik & Co 07 

L, 

La Crosse Floral Co. 114 
Ijagarrte & Speelman.144 
Lagarde & Vander- 

voort 143 

Ijiger & Hurrell 1.50 

liiikeview Rose Gdn.111 

L. A. Floral Co 80 

Ijambourne. E 127 

Ijune, Geo. F 109 

Ling Floral Co 129 

I-ange & Son. R. C.119 

Ijinge, A 119 

Langers Flo. Co 120 

Liingnhr. M 118 

I/inkford. W. A 115 

Larmon. L. L 121 

Laver, J. V 129 

Liwrcnce Flo. Co.. .130 

Leach Fir. Shop 120 

Lciigiie the Florist. 112 
Leavenworth Fl. Co. 122 

lyce & Co.. C. S 79 

Irf-hde & Galley 112 

I/>ighton Floral Co. 122 

Ijftnon & Co 120 

I/>onard Seed Co... 140 

licy & McAllan 121 

Lichtenberger, J. . . 94 
Liclitenberg's. .98-99-120 

Liggit, C. U 25-1.51 

Lindlov Box 1.37 

Ix>hr. Wm. S 118 

I/Ord's Fir. Room... 122 
Ijord & Burnham... II 
I/IS Robles Nursery. 88 

liOtos Mfg. Co 82 

Ijouise Flower Shop. 104 
l/)uisville Pot'y Co. 104 
Liveridge, Chns. . . .119 
I..owe'8 Fir. Shop. . . 

98-99-126 

Lubliner 114 

Lucas Co.. R, M 1.54 

Ludwig Co., E. C. ..128 



K, 

McCallum Oo 75-77 

McOarron, Miss 115 

McCarron Flo. Co,.. 131 
McClenahan Ghses.. 134 
McClure-Coftman ...114 
McCray Refrigera- 
tor 133 

McElroy, T. P 117 

McHutchison & Co.. 141 

McKenna, Ltd 121 

McLellan Co 90 

McLeod & Henry... 157 

McMurray, R. S 151 

McRae-Jenklnson ..129 

Macaw Bros 153 

Madison St. Fir 118 

Mudson Seed Co.... 114 
Majestic Floral Co. 129 

Malandre Bros Ill 

Mangel. John 119 

Mankato Fl. Co 124 

March Irrigator Co.l65 
Margrave, Susan ..122 
Marion Floral Co... 120 

Marret & Miller 115 

Marshall, Geo. W..110 
Martin Grate Co... 158 
Martin & Forbes... 125 

Martins, The 122 

Marvin. Ira 128 

Mas-Art Basket ... 90 

Massmann 110 

Matheson, Hugh M.152 

Mau, Otto F 118 

Mauft Floral Co 124 

May, Harry 110 

Mazey 124 

Meconi. Paul 135 

Meehan. Chas. E... 71 
Megchelsen Fl.Shop.l23 
Meler-Schroeder Co. 114 

Meinhart, J. E 113 

Menand, H. L 112 

Metairie Ridge Nur.130 
Metropolitan Mate- 
rial Co 157-159 162 

Metz Bros 122 

Mexia Flo. Co 129 

Meyer, F. 13 

Meyer Thread Co... 0!i 

Michal, John A 118 

Mlchell Co., H. F..142 
Michigan Cut Fir... 80 
Middlemount Gdns..l31 
Midland Fir. Shop. .113 

Miller, A. L 150 

Miller, H. G 159 

Miller, H. T 122 

Miller Floral Co.91-1'27 
Miller Print Shop.. 130 

Miller, Wm. T 88 

Miller & Son 117 

Mills the Florist... 132 
Minge Floral Co.... 130 
Mission Fir. Shoppe.122 
Missouri Pottery ...l(i5 
Mo. Pott'y Supply.. 105 

Moninger Co IV 

Mono Service 94 

Montgomery Ghses.. 132 
Morehead Mfg. Co.. 158 
Morgenroth, W. ...131 
Morris, Florl8t.98-99-12(> 

Morse & Deals 108 

Morse & Co 140 

Moseley, Mrs. T. A.113 
Mosmiller, Frank... 115 

Moss, Chas. A 131 

Mountain View Flo. 93 
Muehlebach Fl. Shop.112 

Muir. John T 119 

Mullanphy 113 

Mimson Co., H 158 

Muutz, S, E 132 

Murata & Co 86 

Murdoch, W. A 12i» 

Murphv, Co 70-81 

Murray, Samuel. 103-112 
Murray & Co 112 

N. 

Nanz Floral Oo 115 

Narcissi Assn 144 

Navlet Co 127 

Neidingcr, J. G 18 

Neil Flower Shop,.. 122 
Neilsen, Inc., N....124 
New Bruns-wick Nur.148 

Newell, A 102-112 

N. Y. Florists' Sup. 135 
Nicotine Mfg. Co. ..159 
Niednagel. Julius... 120 

Nielsen. Knud 81 

Niessen Co., Leo 70 

Noll Floral Co 00 

Norfolk Floral Co.. 121 
Northern Fern Co . . 81 

0. 

Oakes. 0. B 123 

Obertin. P. N 114 

O'Brien. J. J 108 

Ocean Co. M. & 

P. Co 79 

O'Connell Fir. Shop. 113 
Oelschig & Son 130 



ICONCLUDEOON PAGE 4.1 



T-vTri, r\'J^?V H'-'" '^y^!^-^^'f^y!''j'; ■7'^'.' .' -i- •- ' . , ?' ' 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



_^ . AMERICAN BULB GO. 

*^''Wt^**'^ '72 N. Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL ""'-^r^t^a^^ 




^^GROW YOUR OWr 

GLADIOLUS 

FOR SUMMER CUT FLOWERS 
IS WITHOUT A PEER- ^ 

PLANTING TIME IS NOW 

AND UP TO JUNE ISth 

Healthy Bulbs— True to Name 

NOTB REDUCED PRICES 

• We believe you will find it profitable to plant liberally of standard 
vatietiea as well as a few of each of the newer kinds listed, each of 
which is a "gem." 

Size H4-inch and up is ideal for planting outside. 

1st Size 2nd Size 

1%-ln. andup 1%-in. andup 



100 



1000 



100 



1000 



$19.00 $2.00 $10.00 



40.00 
30.00 

30.00 

3b!66 

25.00 
30.00 



100.00 
05.00 

42.00 

125.00 

35.00 
35.00 
3r..00 
25.00 

65.00 
50.00 
45.00 



40.00 
17.50 



3.75 35.00 



3.50 
2.50 
3.00 



30.00 

20.00 
25.00 



6.25 60.00 



4.00 37.00 



America. Beautiful soft flesh pink. Ex- 
ceptional for cut flowers $2.15 

Arizona (Kunderd). Very fine dark pink 

with dark maroon markings on lower 

petals 4.25 

Autumn Queen. Cream yellow and pink. 3.50 
Chicago White. Pure white, lightly 

marked with lavender 3.50 

Flora. Beautiful golden yellow 7.00 

Oollath 4.00 

Independence. Orange scarlet 3.00 

Lily Lehman. White 3.50 

Louise. The Orchid Gladiolus. Pure 

lavender with blotch of velvet red 30.00 25.00 Xr, 

Mrs. G. W. Moulton. Lilac purple 10.25 mo fin ' 

Mrs. O. W. IluUiday. Delicate pink, 

yellow throat; one of the best C.75 

Mrs. I'>ank Pendleton. Salmon pink, 

maroon blotch. America's "Wonder" 

Gladiolus 4.50 

Negerfurst. Blood-black with black spots 

flamed white and lilac rose IS.OO 

Panama. Clear pink, somewhat deeper 

than America 4.00 

Peace. White 4.00 

Pink Beauty. Early pink 4.00 

PrlmuUnus Hybrids. Mixed 3.00 

Prince of Orange. Grand orange color 

with lighter throat 6.75 

Prince of Wales. Early salmon pink.... 5.50 

Schwaben. Best yellow 5.00 

Willbrinok. Soft pink 

Willy Wigrman. Creamy white, scarlet 

blotch 4.50 

Mixed. Extra fine 2.00 

(25 Bulbs at 100 rate: 250 at 1000 rate.) 

TUBEROSES 
Dwarf Excelsior Peari Double 'PertOO Per 1000 

3 to 4-lnch $2.50 $20.00 

4 to 6-inch 3.00 27.00 

FLOWER SEEDS— For Present Sowing 

Perfected Strains for Florists 
NEW ASTERS 

You must have CALIFORNIA GIANT NON-LATER.VL. The ad- 
vantase of this new class Is that immense size Is obtainable with- 
out the usual tedious work of disbudding — unsurpassed for cut 
flowers. 

Trade pkt. 

Peach Blossom $0.50 

Light Blue 50 

Dark Robe 50 

Dark Purple 50 



3.50 
3.75 
3.50 
2.50 



5.00 
4.25 
4.50 

4.00 
1.75 



32.00 
32.00 
30.00 
20.00 



4!5.00 
40.00 
40.00 

35.00 
15.00 



Per % oz. 

$1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 



ASTER 

Ball's (New) Pure White, H oz., 75c; % oz., $1.35; oz., $5.00. 

Please write for complete list of flower seeds. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS 

True Type (Greenhouse Grown), per 1000, $4.00; 5000, $18.75. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGKRI 

(American Grown), per 1000, $1.50: per 0000, $6.75. 
Plant now for Fall sales 

Bench Roses of '^Supreme'' Quality 

„ Per 25 Per 100 

Russell $4.00 $15.00 

Milady 4.OO 15.00 

White Killarney 3.75 14 00 

Kaiscrin 4.2.". 16.00 

Coliimhta .S.75 14 00 

Ophelia 3.75 14.00 

Prompt Shipment 





^ \_ 










LILIUM SPECIOSUM RUBRUM 
The Ideal Hardy Lily for I'lantlng in Perennial Border 



"Fritz Bahr 
Says" 

(Extract from Florists' Exchange, Issue April 22, 1922) 

RUBRUM LILIES 

"Did you ever plant too many? For the average florist It 
means Just this: He can get along without rubrum Lilies, 
even not miss them. On the other hand, those who once get 
into the habit of using them usually find them such a prof- 
itable and at the same time easily handled crop that they 
try each year to do all possible to prolong the flowering period, 
which with the help of cold storage bulbs is not hard to do. 
Every florist with a retail trade should grow rubrum Lilies. 
There Is nothing finer for decorative work, for the corsage or 
the floral design. A plant grown in a pot makes a showy 
plant, and if not sold as such will frequently furnish you with 
flowers for three weeks from the time the first flower is ready 
to be cut until the last bud begins to open. The further away 
you are located from the larger cut flower markets, the more 
valuable are rubrum Lilies in your own establishment, the 
more necessary It Is for you to try and have a few plants to 
cut from. To plant cold storage bulbs now Into 5-in. or 6-ln. 
pots is about all the work you will have with them, outside 
of watering. They will grow almost anywhere in or outdoors, 
and bloom In late Summer. Try this for a change: Plant in 
6-in. pots now; let the plants come along in a cool house. 
About May 15 take them outdoors and plant pot and all in a 
bed or coldframe, deep enough to cover the top of the pot 
about 4 in. When in flower use the Individual blossoms, or If 
you plant out leave them out all Winter. Every plant will 
flower again the next year and better than before." 

Mr. Balir is a "live" florist-grower In Highland Park, 111., 
and a recoKnized authority on matters horticultural. 



JAPANESE LILY BULBS 
Grow^ Your Own Cut Flowers 

Complete Cultural Directions for the Asking 

3IAGNIFICUM AND RUBRUSI 

1 Per 25 Per 50 Per 100 Per case of 

10 to 11-inch $5.50 $10..''>0 $20.00 $22.00 — 120 Bulbs 

10 to 12-incf> 6.00 11.50 21.00 21.00 — 100 Bulbs 

AURATUM 

Per 25 Per 50 Per 100 Per ca.se of 

8 to 10-lncl? $5.50 $10.00 $19.00 $24.00 — 150 Bulbs 

/ GIG.ANTEUM 

' Per 2.- Per ."0 Per 100 Per rase of 

6 to 8-Inch $4.00 $7.50 $14.00 $47.50 — 400 Bulbs 



»'.w."w.*j.,<f_.iii!f^i.m^»l,^j*ipfi,i,iiii 



'^•fr' ■ 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, l»*22 



OeHterliiiK, Alfred.. 145 

Offerle. Clia». (J 12)1 

Ohio GUbh Co 102 

O'Leary FIoHhI lilt 

Ol88on Co.. H. L.. . W) 

Onarga NurstTy 14S 

Oppenheliii. Manuel. 110 
Oppcrmann, Aiitou. .ll.'t 

Orchid Comiii 154 

Orchid, The ..«K00-12r. 

Osborne Co 133 

Ostertag Bros 113 

Owen & Son 15 

OwosHo Floral ("«... 11(1 

P. 

l'a<'ifl<^ Nurseries .... hh 
Palmer, In<-., F. K. .108 

I'almer & Sou 112 

I'ark Floral Co 124- 

Park Florist Ill 

Parker's Fir. Store. 1.30 

Patrick Fl. Co 128 

Patten, Helen F 106 

Payne's Fir. Shop.. 117 

Pedrick & Son 140 

I'ellcano-Hossi H5 

Penn 107 

Penn Mfg. & Supply 74 

Penuock Co 71 

I'ernian, John W) 

Perry's Fir. Shopp«> . 12.'; 

I'ershing, E. H 120 

I'erstein, Harry ....114 

Peters & Sons 00 

I'eterson Nurserv. . .14K 
Peterson & Son, S. .118 

PfafF & Kendall 158 

PfaltzgralT Pottery. 165 
Phlla. Cut Flower. . 71 
Phlla. Florists' Ex.. 71 
Phlla. Gr'wrs' Mkt. 72 
Phlla. I'ipe Supply. 158 

Philips Hros 110 

Piedmont Fir. Shop. 131 

Pierson, A. N I-lf>l 

Pierson, F. U 150 

Pikes X'eak Flo. Co. 124 
Pillslnir)-, I. L. .lir-161 
Piuehurst Fl. Shop. 126 
.Pittsburgh Cut Flo. 

65-77-1.S.-I 

Plater, E. W 118 

Plath, H »] 

Podesta & I!Hldw-(:hl.l27 

Poehlmann Hros 6-7 

Pollworth Co.I-l»-78-165 
Pomona Fl. Co.fi8-00-127 
I'ooley's Fir. Shop. .127 

Poor. C. 1 120 

Posle Shoppe 12."! 

Potter Floral Co 120 

Power Fl. Shop 115 

Prechtl & Woltella. 88 
Progressive Clay. . . .165 
Pueblo Floral Co. ..124 
Pulos, Christy S. 81-1.33 
Pulverized Manure.. 60 

Purdie & Co 9809 

IMirnell, W. Z 81 

Putnam, 15. J 82 

Pyfer & Co., A. T.. 63 




O. 

gualltv Hrands «'o..l64 
(Juallty Fir, Store. .120 

K. 

Kaebel & Sou 123 

Raedlein Basket Co. 138 

Rahu tc Herl)ert 93 

Kamm's Fir. Shop. .111 
Ilamsburg, (J. S....142 

Ramsay, l^td 121 

Randall's Flo. Shop. 108 
Randall Co 

21-57-58-!5«-133 

Randall Ulsplayers. .133 
Randolph & Mc- 

Clements 128 

Ravlcr & Sons 130 

Reek & Son 109 

Redllne ('o 11« 

Redondo Fir. ("o. . . . 

98-99-126 

Regan Ptg. House.. 134 

Reglna Flo. Co 121 

Held, Eilward 70 

Rclmers & Son Co.. 11 5 
Relnhart & Adams.. 120 

Kelnberg, Geo 133 

HeinlM'rg, P 8 

Reliable Brands Co. 101 
Ueliance Seed Co... 123 

Rennison Co 132 

Ueutschier Flo. Co. .114 

Reves & Co 1.30 

Kibsam. Martin ('. ..110 

Rice Bros 1.34 

Rice ("0., M 28 

Uice Sc-^ Co 141 

Ridenour, Victor 128 

Riverside Fl. Shop.. 132 

Riverside- Chses 114 

Robbius Bros 108 

Robinson Seed Co... 140 

Robinson & ("o 80 

RcK-hester Ghses....l24 

Rock Flowc!r Co 112 

Itockford Floral Co. .118 
Roc'kliu & I^'hnian. .132 

lUH'kmont, luc 124 

R4Kk River Irig. Co. 1.59 

Rodgers. J. W 123 

Rooiirs Co 149 

Rogers, Louis M....121 
Kohnert. Wnldo ...140 

Roos, Jelle 145 

Rosaia Bros 126 

Roselaud Florist 1.30 

RoseuKint Gardens. .130 
Hosendale Fir. Shop. Ill 
Roserv Fir. Shop... 112 
Ross. .1. AV 117 



Hueh, 1). E 130 

Ruoker's Fir. Shop.. 115 

Rumbley Co 76 

Husch & Co 134 

Kuttle, RolH-rt U..115 

Ryan, H. A 108 

Ryan & Culver 1"23 

Rye, (ieorge 120 

Rynveld & Sons 143 

S, 

Saakc, O. C 126 

Sakata & Co 141 

.Salem Fir. Shop 108 

Salzer'B Flo. Gdns. .114 
Samuelson, C. A.... 119 
Sanders Nursery. 106-113 

Sandlford, Chas 112 

Save Mfg. Co 75 

Sayre Fir. Co 129 

Sceery, Kdward 110 

Schaeffer, J. E 113 

Schafer Fl. Co 118 

.Schelnuk, Max 130 

Schiller, J. L 27 

Sc'hlllo, Adam 164 

Schlatter & Son . .* . 161 

Schling, Max 97 

.Sc'hmaus Bros 115 

Schmidt & Meine...l23 

Schneider, A. H 118 

Schneider, First 123 

Scholtz, Florist 131 

Schoorl, Adrian J... 92 

Sclniitheis 128 

Schulz Co., J 115 

Schwake * (;o 143 

Scott, Wm., Co 112 

Scrlbner Floral Co. .116 

Scrim's 121 

Seattle F. & M. Co. 1)3 
.Segers Bros., Ltd... 145 

Selbert. F. C 114 

.Seil)ert. L. M 112 

.><eiuler-IyC'idiger Co.. 114 
Sharp, Partridge. .. .itW 

Shaw, Fred H 132 

Shcclv Bros 110 

Sliellgrnin & Hitter. 127 
.Slienandonh Nurs. . .148 

Sheppard, H. W 120 

Sheridan Gh.se. Co.. 118 
Shoeuuikcr, B. It.. .162 

Shotwell Fir. Co 117 

Siebrecht, .Tr.. H. A. 125 

Sicvers. W. H 112 

Singnian & Co 20 

Skidelsky & Cx) J 

Skinner Co., M. B. .1,'')7 
Skinner Irrigation. .1,5.5 
Sniedlev Flo. Co. ...117 
Sniely, J. M US 



Smith Co., A. W ••1-'^ 
Smith Co.. W. & T.148 
Smith Flo. Co., n..116 
Smith's Fir. Shop... 122 

Smith Ghse. C-o 13» 

Smith Wholesale 134 

Smith & Co 1.'').5 

Smyth, W. J 101 

Souster, George 118 

Speelman & Sons... 144 
Sprlngfleld Fl. Co. ..149 
Springfield Seed Co. 113 

St. Joseph Box 138 

St. Louis Pott'y Co. 165 
St. Louis Seed Co... 134 
St. Louis Wholesale 14 

Stache, H. C 109 

StaUlngs Fir. Shop. 130 
Starr the Florist. ..131 
State Fair T. Co. . .113 

State Floral Co 125 

State Nurserj- Co. . .118 

Stecher t.lth. Co 143 

Steele's Pansies.... 92 

Stein, A. 127 

Stein Co., 1 75 

Stemme & Sons 117 

Stefison & McGrall. .129 
Stevens & Stevens.. 69 
Stewart Iron Wks . . 16ti 
Stiles. Mrs. R. B.. .115 

Stoll, O. A 116 

Storrs & Harrison. .1,50 
Straus Flowers ....105 
Stroufs, Inc-. ..108-1,52 

Stuebe Fir. Co 114 

Stuinpp, G. E, M...105 
Stumpp & Walter.. 141 

Stup|)y Flo, Co 113 

Stuppv Sup, Co t'lO 

Suckling & Chase... 121 

Suder, A. A 122 

.Sunnyside Glises....110 
Superior Dalilia 

Gnrclens 90 

Superior Fir. Co 114 

Suzanne Floral Co.. 127 

.Swnnson's, Inc 124 

Swiinscm the Florist. 119 
Swartley & Sons... 117 

T. 

Tarentum Fir. Co... 128 

Tassano Hros 89 

Tealuin Fern Co. . . . 79 

Tegelaar Bros 144 

Temblett, Wm. H. .123 

Thim. C 105 

Thomas. Victor H..115 
Thomi)Bon, W. W. .. 78 
Thornton Fir. Shop. 117 
Thorsted Fl, Co 127 



Throop-Martiu Co... 162 

Tipton & Hurst 130 

Tenner <*.> 

Toole & Son 148 

Totty Co., C. H....155 
Traendly & Schenck 

20-135 

Trepel, Joseph IBl 

Trepel & Berslmd..llO 

Trimble Co 12-117 

Trinidad Fl. Store.. 124 
Tupelo Floral Co. ..117 

Turner Bros 162 

Turner, Wm. H 1'-'9 

U. 
Union Construction. 133 

United Bulb Co 145 

United Bidb Grs, ..145 
United Cut Fir. Co. 135 
United Flower & 

Supply 91 

t'. S. Cut Fir. Co, ..1.35 
I'niversity Florist . .12^5 

Usinger. W. T 135 

Utica Floral Co 111 

V. 

Valdeslan Nurs. ...148 
Valuer's Floral Co. .117 
Van Aart. John..,. 115 

Van Aken Bros 116 

Van Bochove & Bro.116 
Van Der Schoot. 

R. A 143 

Viindervoort & Co, .145 
Van Heveliugen. H. 92 

Van liindley Co 131 

Van Meter Fl. Shop. 122 
Van Zanten & Sons. 142 
Van Zonupveld Bros. 

& Philippo 143 

Vavrous Sons 129 

Vesey's 120 

Vick's Sons. J 140 

Victoria Nnrserj-. . ..121 
Vicdet Dell Florist.. 132 

Virgin, V. J 180 

Vogt's Greenhouse. .116 
Vos & Son 145 

W. 

Waldbart Flo. Co. ..113 

Waller Seed Co 141 

Walsh & .Sou 108 

Walther. H. C 121 

Walther & Scms 113 

Want Ads S;i 84-85 

Warburtou C lOS 

Ward & Co., R. M. . 1 
Watkins & Simpson, 141 



Wayside Gdns 14ft 

Wax Bro« 108 

Weaver, Wm llo 

Weber, F. C lO'j 

Weber, Fred H 113 

Weber & Sons Co . . 114 

Webster Ghsea 117 

Weeber & Race 163 

Wetland, John 119 

Welland-Rtseh 58 

Weinstock'B 130 

Weir, Inc., James.. 110 
Welch'a Fir. Shop.. 109 

Welke Co 114 

Weller Nurs. Co 148 

Wertbelmer Bros ... 28 
Weat End Oardena.130 
Westman & Oetz...l23 
Westmoreland Odn.132 

Wettlln Flo. Co 110 

White BroB Ii2 

Whltford's 12ti 

WIegand's Sons 120 

Wienhoeber Co. . . . 119 

Wietor Bros 10-13?, 

Wilcox tc Co Sf- 

Wilcox & Sons 132 

Wilks Mfg. Co 168 

Williams, Mrs. E. A. 128 

Williams, Ed 121 

Williams the First. 120 
Willson, Herbert H.121 

Wilson, H. B Ill 

Wilson Floral Co... 122 
Wilson-Crout-Gehr. . 93 
Winandy, Jr., Mlke.165 
Windier Wholesale, .134 

Wlndmlller Co 124 

Winter Floral Co.., 114 

WInterson Co 76 

Witek, Joseph 113 

Wlttbold & Son 

100 118-119 

Wittbold, Geo 119 

Wolf, John 130 

Wolfe the Florist.. .129 
Wolfskin's & Morris 

Goldenson 98-99 

Wood Floral Co 129 

Woodcock Fl. Co... 132 
Woodland Park Co. 93 
M'oodman's Fl. Shop. 122 
Woodruff & Sons. ..141 
Woodruff's Sons. ... 78 

Wood's Fl. Shop 129 

Woodward. A. J 121 

Wright's Fir. Shop. 

96-98-99 

Y. 

Veagle, W. P 149 

Vetter. F. J 69 

Young. Fred M 93 

Young & Ijeater 125 

Z. 

Zane Pottery Co 104 

Zech & Mann 62 

Zetlitz, B. N 122 

Zetlitz Flo. Pro 123 

Zvolanek, A. C 89 



K^ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I'aKc- 
MoviiiK On with Alothc-rs' Day 

(illus.) 29 

Why i'iirlv Acition ('oiiiits 30 

Kor l>istant Mothers (illu.>J.) 32 

National Flower Show 32 

.Vmcric-an Ijegion Kinblcins 32 

.Sc'hlinK Show.s New Way 33 

— New Alt in Dcc-oraticm (illus,)... 33 

Coal Frc-lKht M;iy Go Down S."! 

.\ Competitor for T^acidie? 3!; 

Open I.,etters from Headers 3fi 

— Hospital Day ^fi 

— Grow Better Stock 3fi 

— Keep the Prices Down 36 

Watch the Clock ■''<'> 

— Davliffht SavinK He^ins 36 

I'asacic-na's Proud of This 3. 

— P.-isadena Spring Show (illus.).. 37 

Mav HeRulate Trade Hodles 38 

Floriculture Students' Trip 39 

Who's Who in the Trade and Why. 39 

— Robert I'yle (portrait ) 30 

National Publicity Campaign 40 

The Honeymoon Flat (illus.) 40 

Business Kmbarrassments 40 

Hoard Has Two Hard Days 41 

— Society of American Florists 41 

— Samuel S. Pennock (i)ortrait ) . , . 41 

— George Asmus (portrait) 43 



Page 

Klocicl at Peaidstown (illus,) ,- 4.'> 

Obituar.v 4.5 

— Max I'aul Haendler, . , 4.') 

— Mrs. Rebecca Federle. 4.5 

— Mrs. Flizabeth KruR 45 

— William Mathews 45 

Act .Now 46 

I'lan to r'lant .\nothcT Tree 46 

As < )thers See Us 46 

Mothc-rs' Day Campaign 46 

New York 47 

Baltimore, Md 47 

Chicago 47 

Philadeljihia. Pa 70 

Cleveland. 73 

Providence, R. 1 74 

Boston 78 

Making Friends 83 

Pacific Coast Department 86 

— I>os -Angeles, Cal 86 

— I'asadena Show High Lights 86 

— Portland, Ore 88 

— .San Francisco, Cal...' 90 

— Oakland, Cal 90 

— Seattle. Wash 94 

— Spokane. Wash 94 

Mc)tt-ly Musings 104 

Worcester. Mass 110 



Page 

Kastcr at Port AIle^;anv. Pa Ill 

St, Ijouis Ill 

Rochester. N. V 119 

Kiinsas Cit v. Mo 122 

Pittsburgh. Pa 127 

Milwaukee. Wis 129 

Steamer .Sailings 132 

Seed Trade News 140 

— Canners Face Bad Season 140 

— "Political Petty Larcenv" 142 

— Two Seed Bills in Congress 142 

— Peacock Describes Rise Aii 

News of the Nursery Trade TT46 

— Help Planting Campaign 146 

— California Nursery Kxpands 146 

— Scale on Fiuit Trees. 148 

— Hardy Roses from Cuttings 148 

— Catalogues Received 150 

Cleveland Club Doings ]52 

F:xi)ansioii at Dover. X. H .154 

Grc-enhouse Heating " i.tjfi 

— Using Old Boiler .' ] 156 

— Holding Two Temperatures ! !l56 

Newark, N. J ^r,g 

Washington. D. c . . '. '. '. 160 

Inoianapolis. Tnd 164 

Toronto. Ont 164 

Fort Wa>ne. Ind 166 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



CHOICE FLORISTS' FLOWER SEEDS '•t:^;^:^.;:':!'::^"* 






ALYMUM, LIM* flwa. PraenabMM (CuiMt of 

B«atiMa1l Marniaua (ItalUnc). \k oa.. Ue: 
1 oc. 86o. 

ANTIRRfllNUII. amaliMiw Pwdu wMIm. Sf- 

ImM tMd. Pkt. 

8S:S:*ri:? »«- Bimi'i si-i;ir p/iik: :::::: :*!:§ 

N*irM», D«M Plik and aiaat Y*ll»w M 

PMIH' Wklto •■« t«M>ltt M 

awaalMi ahiat ■rtai* 60 

FMoy UtxU Catan .50 

atldaa Plak tuaw 1.M 

HykrW Plak. Boft Orebld 1.M 

OHuKa LO; 

aal4aa Dallfkt 1-40 

PblMalpkU Plak 1.00 

MPARAaUS. Plaaiawa Naaut, new erap awd. 
Northern Omnhouse Oro(vn, $4.00 per 1000 seetis, 
ftOOO aeeda. $19.00; lathhouse grown, $2.50 per 
thousand seeds, 10,000 seeds, $20.00. 
SfTMIWl, 1000 MWto. $LSO. 

ARDiaiA CRKNULATA (lUd Bwilad). $1.00 par 100, 
$8.00 psr 1000 sMda. 

BLUE LACK FLOWER, DIdltaut Canilta. Tr. Pkt.. 
60o: ^ OB., J1.00: i 01., ts.oo. 

CALENDULA, OraH* Klai, double extra aelected 
strain for forotnt undar slaaa. K oa.. Tie; 1 aa., 
18.00. 
LMaaa Oimmi, % oa., SBo; U oa., BOe; 1 oa., TSfli 

•ANTAUREA, ayaiaaearpa. Du^ Millar. M oa., 15o: 
1 OB., 11.00. 

CaadWlMlaia. H oa., SOc; 1 oa., $8.00. 
SuavaoleBS Yallaw. H oa., 26c; 1 ox., Ttc. 
Cyaaut Daukis Blue (Cornflower). H os., 26c: 
1 oa., 76c. 

InpaHalls Blaat White, ^rpla, rata, 4ee* laven- 
der, ballatnaa aad ailxed, H oa., 86e; 1 oa., $1.00. 

•ANDYTUrr. Maettd aiaat Hyaelath-flawered. M, 



ca.j S6q; oa., 76cj M, lb.. 81.50. 



Safaetad Blaat ^nrrast, M ob., 25e; oa., r6e: 
^ lb.. $1.60. 
UaiMlata, aanalaa, erimtea, raaa, eardlaal. 
laveBder. H os., 86o: ob., T6c. 



CELOSIA. Caaiaaota Chiysaatliellera (Novelty). 
$6.00 per trade packet, (hiltural directions 
on swMlcstlnn. 



DELPHINIUH. Bailadeana, true selected ttrala. H 

oa., 60o: 14 ob.. $1.00; oz.. $8.00. 

Bellamesa, same as Belladonns, only dark blue, 

H OS.. 60o; K oa.. $1.00: oa.. $3.00. 

Farmeeum, daA blue, H oa., 60e; ^ ob., r5c: 

OS.. $1.60. 
DRACAENA. ladMta. U oa., 36o: 1 oa., 60o: 4 oaa.. 

$1.50. 
BYPSOPHILA, Eletaas araigMera. ilaat Hawsrlat 

extra saleeted atrala. 1 .M: 50o; 4 on., $1.00: 

1 lb., $8.60 it^ 

LARKSPUR. Aaaual Tall, ^kle. stack flawarlai 

rose, dark blue, lilac, tliell pink, sky blue, white. 

mixed, H as.. 25c; oa.. 76c. 
HARiaOLD, Afriaaa Tall, Double Oranpe Ball. 

Oraaie Prinea, doable rxtra selected: Lemon 

Ball. H 01.. 26c; oa., 76c. 

Uttle Brewnle Dwarf (Lesion of Honor); Dwarf 

Freneh. mixed, double. 14 oa.. 25c; oa.. »0c. 
I ^aL*I ftEEDft. Phoanix Raabelenll and Keatia 
I Belworeaaa. see front coror ad. 

PANSY SEED. I hare the best seed obtainable. For 
full list refer to Florists' Bxchange ad. 



FIVE eiANt p6ttTLANb PETUNIAS, 1 pkt.. 
1.000 seeds. $1.00 each; 6 pMs., 5.000 seeds, 
76c each. Stnala eiant Elks' Pride. Deep 
Boyal Purple: Slntlo aiant Pride ef Port- 
laad. Deep Boae-Plnk; Single Slant, Irvlnatoa 
Beauty. Peach-Bloasom; Single Slant. White 
Beauty, White; Single Slant, Seariet Beauty. 
Cherry Bed. All the shore are the finest Slnsle 
Slant flowerins frlnsed Petunias obtainable 
for pots, boxes or beddlns. Cultural dlrec- 
tlons with each packet. 



PRIMULA, Primula Obconlca new crop seeda Tbis Is 
Geo. Arends' Bonsdorf strain, tba beat in ths 
world. Sold In his original packeta. Primula 




ZINNIAS 

GIANT DAHLIA FLOWERED. .\11 (X>Iurs iiiUed, H oi.. SOc; V* or.. 75c; 1 uz., $2.50. 

GIANT FLOWERING ZINNIAS, in tlie foilowiiiK colors: Burnt Orange, Orange-Flesh shades. 
White, Buttercup, Crimson, Golden shades. Purple shade's. Pink shades. .Vim ali ouiDis in splrndid 
mixture. _ 

Shrimp Pink. A new color In tlie Giant class. 

La France. Picotee tyi>e. noft plnli, chocolate msritlng. 

All of tlie above tyiM-s of Zinnias art' at the foiiowlng prices: ^.'n oz.. SOc: \'\ oz., 7Sc : 1 oz., $2.50. 



Obconlca GIgantea. blue, salmon, red, rose, spple 
blossom, crisps mixed, laTender, white oculata. 
compacta, also all colon mixed. Prioee on the 
aboTe as foUows: 1 Pkt. 400 seeds. 76c; 6 Pkta.. 
$3.25: 10 Pkta. $4.00: 26 PkU., $10.00. 
Chinenslt. Daflaaea, Xmas Red. La Duebaaaa, 
flesh colv with whits center; blood red, dark ml- 
Tety color: Rosea, bright irink, blue, pure wblta, 
salmon, also all colors mixed, 1 Pkt., 250 seeds 
75o: 2 PMs., $1.25; 4 Pkts.. $2.25. 
Malaoaides, double, rosy-idnk, Tr. Pkt., 76e. 
Malacaidee Superba, new, large flowering, deei 
roay-pink, rery fine, Tr, Pkt.. 75a. 
Malaealdes Alba, large flowering, new, Tr. PkL. 
75c 

Maiacaldss Ulae, Tr. Pkt., 60e. 
Malaoaides, MIxsd, Tr. PkL, 60a. 



RICINUS, Zaazlbaraasis, flnett mbcad; Saaguleaa. 

eibsoall, 01.. leo: U lb., 50e. 
SALVIA, America. A oa., eOo; ^ oa., $1.26: oa.. 

M.50. 

Baaflre (Clara Bedman). A oa.. 86a; % os.. T6e. 

OS., $2.10. 

Zurich. A oa., eOo: K OS., $1.85: oa., $4.40. 

Splaadsns, Tr. Pkt, 25o: k oa., 76o: oa., S8.04. 
SMILAX, ^ oa.. l(c: oa.. 60c; )i lb.. $1.60; lb., 

$4.50. 
SCHIZANTHUS. WlaetaiensU. oboloe selected atrala. 

mixed; Sraadlllarus aarraway'a Hybrids, tt. PkL. 

SOc; H OS., $1.50. 
SWEET PEA SEEDS, LATE SPENCERS. Blaasba 

Ferry. Plak. White, Cauatass, Whita Spaaear. 

Helen LewU and othen. ob., 36o: 14 lb., tl.OO: 

lb.. $8.00. 



EARLY ASTERS 

•UKN OF THE MARKET. Uvander. Wblts. FIssh 

f ■"k. Purple. Rasa. oa.. $1.60; Hl oa.. 60e; )4 ea.. 

oOC. 

IMPROVED AMERICAN VICTORIA TYPE. AzufM. 
pale laivnder; Rasa-Pink, Salmaa-Plak. oa., $8.00: 



Asters, Irwin*s Selected Stnin. Especially griwn for me frem selected seeds 



,y'^»ii<>o:'*"oa.:8Ifcr 



_ .„» "••1 'W. tt OB., »0C. 

Sno.W^J.' *>!h^W *•: 14 oa., «0o; H oa., 85o. 
PURITY. Pure White, oa., $8.l>i: 14 oa., 60e; )4 aa., 

3E>C. 

■Aiy-Y. ROYAL, White. Raea-Plnk. Shell-Plak. 
naaa, Lavandar. Purple, o>., $1.60; 14 aa.. 



Brigbt-Ra_ 

60o: K oa.. SOoi 



EXTRA EARLY EXPRESS, Rasa. WhKa. Dark Blua. 

ox.. $3.60; 14 oa., 80o: H oa.. 60a. 
AMERICAN BEAUTY ASTERS. Sarly Flowering, 

Early Rose, Early Purple, Eariy Pink. Saptember 

Beauty. ShaU Pink. a&, $4.60: 14 oa., $1.86: 14 

oa.. 750. 

MIDSEASON ASTERS 

CARLSON'S INVINCIBLE, White, Pink. Lavsadar. 

Purpla. oa.. $1.60; 14 oa., 60e: 14 as.. $0o. 
KINS ASTERS, Whits. Rasa, Sheil-Piak. Lanidar- 

Plnk. Vlalat. oa.. $1.60-^ oa. SOo; \k «a. tOa 



LATE ASTERS 
SENSATION. New red. oa.. $8.00: 14 oa., lOa 14 as., 
35c. 

AMERICAN LATE BRANCHINB. WhKa. Flash-Plah. 

Raea-Plak. Raee. Peaeh-Blaesam. L^wadsr. Par- 

als, Azursa. bine; SearM. Crimaaa. as., tl.60; 

14 oa., SOc; H os SOc, 
PEERLESS PINK, Os.. $100: 14 oa.. tOa; 14 aa.. 8Sai 
CARDINAL. Red. oa.. $1.50: 14 oa, 60a: 14 OB., 80a 
AMERICAN BEAUTY, Lavaadsr. Saptsmbsr Baaaly. 

ahell-plnk; Rasa, Purpla. oa.. $8.60: 14 ob.. T6a: 

M oa., 6001 



Herbert & rieiskiuer's Asters, Oregon Grown. 1 kive their exclasire eastern agency. Stld in their original packets, listed below 



DAYBREAK, LlAt 
.IM.]^RftL'?SniNl 



EARLY ASTERS 
•UEEN OF THE MARKET, White, Llght-plak. Uv- 
endar. PurplSL as.. $8lOO; 14 os.. $1.06; 14 aa.. 
.Mo: H oa., SOo. 

EAK, UAt pink OS., $3.50; H os., $1.80; 

^ InD^R, Improred Daybreak, ssme 

Prioe aa Daybreak. 1 os.. $2.50; 14 ox., $1.80; 14 

_„ "•ij TOc; It OS.. 40c. 

THE ROYAL, WhIta. Shell-Plak. Rase-Plnk. Laven- 
dsr. Purple, oa.. $8.60; 14 oa., $1.30; 14 oa.. 76c: 

. ...^ <»i/ ♦Oo. 

••*VEHOER OEM, aa. $8.00; H oa, $1.66; 14 ea, 
80c: 14 oa, 46a. 

MID-SEASON ASTERS 
"^KJ. COMET. WhNa. Rasy-Lllae. Azura-Blue. aa.. 
iifufJ-i?*fc.H.Stt •!•••: H oa, 66o: 14 oa. $0c. 
*'HITE FLEECE, ea. $IoO: H oa, $1.05; 14 aa, 

65«: K, oa.. SOc 
'"^llPy^O ROCHESTER. WhIta, Lavender-Plak. 

Sjia^l-Plak. Uveader. Purple, oa, $2.60; H oa. 
..-H-SO; Ji oa, 75a; 14 oa, 40o. 
ASTERMUM, WhKa, pTnk. Azure-Blue, Purala oa. 
,.,.tS.60: 14 oa, $1.80: 14 oa. 75e; H oa.. 40c. 
TRIUMPH MI^ET. #hlU Shall-Piik. aa. $2.60; 

14 aa. tl.80: 14 aa. T6e: 14 oa., 40e. 



LATE ASTERS 
IMPROVED aiANT CREBO, WhKa. Shall-Plak. 

Rese-Plak. Uveader, Purpla oa, $8.60; 14 oa, 

$1.30; 14 OS.. 70a; 14 oa, 40e. 
PACIFIC BEAUTY. Conet type, Lavsadar, ea, $8.00; 

H oa, $1.65; 14 ob„ 80c: 14 oa, 46a. 
DREER'S SUPER LATE BRANCHINa, Whita, Shell- 
Pink, Rasa-Plak. Laveader. Azure-Blue. Purple. 

OS.. $2.00; 14. OS., $1.06; 14 oa, 55c: H as., SOo. 
PEERLESS LATE BRANCHINS, Azursa Blua. «(rhl1a. 

Laveader-Plak. Resa-PInk, Purpla oa. $3.75; 

H oa. $1.40: 14 oa. 76o: 14 oa. 40a. 
GIANT CRIMSON, oa, $1,60: H oa, SOo; 14 oa, 40a 

H (.z., 25c 
KING ASTERS. Crimsaa. Shell-PlBk. WhKa, aa 

$2.00: 14 ea, $l.M: 14 aa. 66a: 14 oa, 80& 



NOVELTIES FOR 1122 
BALL'S WHITE ASTER. ilaBt laU braaehiag type. 

ideal for leog distanas shipping, oa. $3.00; 14 aa. 

$1.55; 14 oa. SOo; H oa. 45o. 
VICK'S YELLOW PEERLESSr branehlag type, aa, 

$3.00; H oa., $1.56; 14 oa. SOo; 14 oa, 46e. 
DREER'S PEERLESS PINK, ilcb SieU-stnk, gsad 

keeper, oa. $8.60; 14 oa. $1.30; 14 oa, 70s: 14 

oi., 40c. 
SENSATION, reddest of aU Istan. ex blood red, 

free brancfalng habit, oa. $8.60; 14 oa. $1.80: 14 

Oft. 70c* ^ ff^ ^Qj_ 
BEAUTY XsTERtC blooma two weeka laUr thaa 

Superb, late branching. Pink. Cherry- Raea Baft- 

Laveader. Deep Purpla Shell-Plak. aa. $8.60: 14 

oa. $1.30; 14 oa.. 70o; 14 oa, 40a 



For all items of Plant Stock, see Classified advertiseanesits 

ROMAN J. IRWIN 



43 WEST 18th STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



j^iiii "11. wiy'T'>-,'T:'^'w"»^'r< "jii-^.'ip. ■' iMijTiyrn'ii.w ,... i». -»y,^i— .-..-t.- i i^ vuif^.tfy ^l^l.^M|l iliiHfffl»pwiny»!t)P'!WHw:7yny,i^.yi"' .')'^i||b;j.'W f .; '"■jT;^" ';-N v vy? " ' 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



Complete Service for Florists 

Use Our New Box With the WordiDg TO MOTHER and Make Your 

"Mothers' Day" 



the biggest in history 



It is a neat, inexpensive folding box, made of White glaze stock, printed in "Fire 
Bronze." Border all around cover and the words embossed. 

A box that will decorate your windows and bring customers to your store. 

A box that can be used every day in the year as well as on "Mothers' Day." 

Costs less and is more attractive than any "Mothers' Day" box yet produced. This 
is your opportunity to increase your "Mothers' Day" sales by giving your cus- 
tomers a service that is individual and appreciated, and one that you can afford. 

Let every package that leaves your store be a REAL "Mothers' Day" package. 
This service will be rewarded. 



>^ 



"MOTHERS' DAY" BOX PRICES 

Per 100 

21 X 5x3 $ 9.50 

24x5 x3}/S 10.35 

30x5x31^ 12.00 

24x8x4 13.75 

28x8x5 17.25 

We have only a limited supply of these new 
boxes and advise placing your orders now 
to guard against disappointment. 

All prices are F. O. B., Chicago. There will 
be no additional printing done on "Mothers' 
Day" Boxes. 



CREPE PAPER 

New Shipment Imported 
"Wassercrepe" 

I'or Roll $ .30 

IVr Doz 3.25 

Per 100 25.00 



DOMESTIC CREPE PAPER 

"PAPYRUS" 
Per Roll, 35c. Per Doz., $4.00 

Per 100, $30.00. All Colors. 

MATS 

24 x 36 — All colors. 
Per Doz .... $2.25 Per 100 . . . . $16.00 



Also remember us when in need of 

Fancy Baskets, Wire Desig^ns, Ribbons, Chiffons, 

Crepe Paper, Wrapping- Paper and 

Supplies in General 

POEHLNANN BROTHERS COMPANY 

The Largest Growers of Flowers in the World 



Lon2 Distance Phone 



CHICAGO 



intf Di^ 

Randolph 3S 

See oar SPECIAL PRICES on SHEEP MANURE and MOSS in Classified Columns 



66 to 74 
East Randolph Street 



v!l 



^S 



^ 



■7.1 :■ T > i 



Mai 4, ld22 



The Florists' Review 




.^ 



Greater Mothers' Day 

PRICE LIST NOW READY 



If you did not receive this "Greater 
Mothers' Day List," write for it today. 
Your order will then be in plenty of time 
to receive the same attention as those 
we have already booked. 

"Record crops" in all stem lengths of 
PREMIER, BUTTERFLY and COLUMBIA 

are assured. 

ORCHIDS, VALLEY, SWEET PEAS, 
CARNATIONS, GLADIOLI, PEONIES, 
DECORATIVE GREENS. 



Our Salesroom and Shipping Department 

will be open Sunday, May 14th, 

from. 7:30 a. m. to 1 p. m. 



rOEHLNANN BROTHERS CONTj 

The Largest Growers of Flowers in the Worl 

CHICAGO ««^ 



Long Distance Phnne 
Randolph 0035 



66 
East Randolph Street 



tW 



»\T1(H^T*^*^?»," 



■^:^":r\^ •"'ir'.r'^^ 



K '"r*-. ■'" ' 



8 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 






_. f Ccatnl ZB40 
L D. PHONES I ^..HKn 3101 



R 



WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS 

30 E. Randolph St., CHICAGO 

A BIG SUPPLY OF 







For Mothers' Day 

Exceptionally fine Russell, Premier, Butterfly and Columbia 

CARNATIONS 

While we have a good supply of Carnations, there will not be enough to supply 

the demand, so push Roses on that day, also 

Peonies - Gladioli - Lilies - Snapdragons 

You will find that the public in a great many cases prefer them to carnations, 
so make allowance for the scarcity of carnations and substitute roses. They will 
move just as quickly. Make up your order for us today. 



Buy Direct From the Grower 

MRS. CHAS. RUSSELL, PREMIER and 
MILADY 

Specials $35.00 

Fancy .5(1.00 

Select •■ 25.00 

Medium $15.00 to 20.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 

BUTTERFLY, OPHELIA and SUNBURST Per 100 

Specials $20.00 to $25.00 

Select 18.00 to 20.00 

Medium 12.00 to 15.00 

Short «-00 to 10.00 



MOTHERS' DAY PRICE LIST 

I'cr 100 



Subject to change without notice 
COLUMBIA i>cr 100 

-'^I'^^'ial-^ $30.00 

l-aiuy 25.00 

^t-'cct 20.00 

^fediuni $15.00 to 18.00 

^hort 8.00 to 12.00 

WHITE KILLARNEY Per 100 

^Pt'^'ial'^ $20.00 to $25.00 

•'^,^''«',^:' 18.00 to 20.00 

■^•^■''""" 12.00 to 15.00 

-'^h'^'t 8.00 to 10.00 

ROSES, OUR SELECTION... p qq 



CARNATIONS— -Assorted $12.00 and $15.00 per 100 

Carnations, Laddie $18.00 to $20.00 per 100 



Sweet Peas, all colors $1.50 to $4.00 per 100 

Valley, order ot us tor the best. . 6.00 per 100 

Adiantum _■ • 1-50 per 100 

Asparagus, per huiuh 50c 



GALAX 

IJronze 



I'er 1000 



$2.00 

<'reen , .„> 

Ferns, per 1000 ^' (^ 



REMEMBER- CHICAGO CLOCKS ARE ONE HOUR FAST 



k"^,. 



' f\%- ■7'^ r^> , ■ ■ -^^ -^wyH^-Ti^' ■ T' ■* 4T7*TV; » '-^ 7' .*;•'■:. 



■r ->r ■?;-' • ,t;,. 



— -_.n-T»T' 1^1.11.. .J!\' <'''7" ■ 1^" ^^^ 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Rorists^ Review 



Mothers' Day Roses 

BUY DIRECT FROM THE GROWERS 

Our Roses 

Have a National Reputation for Quality 
and are guaranteed strictly fresh 

We are Rose growers especially for the shipping trade. We cut our Roses 
more in the bud, and grow them cooler, so that they will ship in better con- 
dition. Especially for a holiday is it best to place your order where the stock 
is guaranteed both for quality and freshness. 

MOTHERS' DAY PRICE LIST 

SUBJPCT TO MARKET FLUCTUATION. 

Popular prices for roses, our selection, consisting of a good selection of 
Premier, Columbia, Russell, Ophelia, White Killarney 

and a few red and yellow, as follows,lln lots of 200 of one grade: 

Choice long stems, our selection, atuthe rate of $16.00 per 100 
Choice long stems, all Russells, $mOO per 100. 
Good medium length, our selectioh, $10.00 to $12.00 per 100 
Good short, in lots of 300 or more, our selection, $8.00 per 100 

Also a limited quantity of short stem roses at $6.00 per 100. 
(These stems are from six to eight inches in length.) 

When ordering please state what grade wanted. 

ASPARAGUS — extra fancy light green, guaranteed fresh at spe- 
cial price, 35 cents per bunch or three bunches for a dollar. 
BRONZE GALAX— extra large leaves, $2.00 per thousand. 

FANCY FERNS— best New England ferns at $4.00 to $4.50 per 
thousand. 

All seasonable flowers we will buy for our customers at market prices. 

A Trial Order Solicited 

In buying direct of the grower you are assured of fresh 
stock at all times, and the most even run of quality possible. 

Bassett & Washburn 



wtsmoNT, lU. 



CMIO Iki^i\ II I Office utf Stare 178 N.WilMfe A 

l>nil>/%tJV9 ■*-■-• !•« DistaM PbMC Ce*al14 



1457 



-;. -^ >^ ^*W»VTJT 



'»^r^'^^*^";w'^^i7iw'?T^'»*7T*Tf^!?:vr?"rrT^ ■-- " 



10 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 




1 

^orBros 



30 East 
Randolph Street, 



CHICAGO 



Wholesale Growers of 



Cut Flowers 



We shall have- 



A Wonderful Crop of 
Roses for Mothers^ Day 

Especially Strong oii Colnmbia, Premier, Sunburst and Russell 

Also a Splendid Supply of Carnations 



Premier Per 100 

Special $25.00 

Select 20.00 

Medium 1 5.00 

Short 10.00 

Russell 

Special 25.00 

Select 20.00 

Medium 15.00 

Short 10.00 

Columbia 

Special 20.00 

, Select 15.00 

Medium 12.00 

Short 8.00 



MOTHERS* DAY PRICE LIST 

Subject to chan(« without notice 

Sunburst 



Carnations 

Fancy 

Good 

CALLA LILIES, Per Dozen, $2.50 to $3.00 



Per 100 
Special $20.00 

Select 15.00 

Medium 12.00 

Short 8.00 

Butterfly 

Special 25.00 

Select 20.00 

^Icdium 15 00 

Short 10.00 



Ferns, per 1000 $4.50 

Galax, per 1000 2.00 



Sprengeri, per bunch, 
Plumosus, per bunch. 



12.00 
10.00 

$0.50 
.50 



ROSES, Our Selection, $8.00 per lOO 

BUY FROM us AND GET THE BEST STOCK IN THIS MARKET AT THE MOST REASONABLE PRICES 



■;_•» ». -.,. . .,.• f~-^v.-»5, y.-f 



Mat 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review ii 



The Denver Wholesale Florists' Co. 

DENVER, COLO. 

The largest and by far the best equipped and most 
centrally located wholesale house in this locality. 

Mothers^ Day Price List 



Francis Scott Key, per 100 . . $10.00 to $25.00 

New crop of this variety now coming in. You 
cannot get along without some of these in 
your store. 

Russell, per 100 $6.00 to $20.00 

Premier, per 100 6.00 to 20.00 

Columbia, per 100 6.00 to 20.00 

Butterfly, per 100 ..... 6.00 to 16.00 

Ophelia, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

White KiUarney, per 100 .. . 6.00 to 16.00 

Golden Ophelia, short, per 100 . 8.00 

Short Funeral Roses, per 100 . . 6.00 

Orchids, Cattleyas, per dozen . . . $12.00 

We are the only wholesalers of Orchids in this 
part of the country. 

Easter Lilies, per 100 $20.00 

Calla Lilies, per 100 16.00 

Carnations, per 100 10.00 

SWEET PEAS, per 100 $2.00 to $3.00 

VALLEY, per 100 6.00 to 8.00 

PANSIES, per dozen bunches 2.00 

ADIANTUM, per bunch .50 

PLUMOSUS, per bunch .75 

SPRENGERI, per bunch .75 

HUCKLEBERRY SPRAYS, per bunch .75 

OREGON FERNS, per 1000 6.00 ' 

GALAX LEAVES, per 1000 2.00 

Supplies and Wire Work of All Kinds 

Prices subject to change without notice 

Wnfnh Thin Pnat» ^* '^*"^"" Wholesale Florists' Co. 
rrciccn inia M^ugc 1433-35 cda.nii. sitmi denver, colo. 




iiH»W-<B!»%W>»V" \-'.fy ■ W J!..i»ii»|IUi||l|tl.J«ii«l^ * 1.UI .; I piif PflWJ!()|!W.W)''(*'«'^.'T^|WVTll(fl{»|(Pi!ipW!^«?J?^?^ • 



■'I" -'■■.•«• ■■•>' 



12 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1922 



« 



TRIMBLE'S 

WILL BE IN 

VERY HEAVY CROP 

For Mothers' Day 

NOTE THE LOW PRICES! 

It will pay yau to order direct 
of the Grower. 

MOTHERS' DAY PRICE LIST 



MRS. CHAS. RUSSELL, 
AND PREMIER 

Extra Specials, 34 to 4S-in . 

Specials, 28 to 32-in 

Select, 18 to 24-in 

Medium, 16-in 

Short. 8 to 12-in 



In Effect May 7, 1922 

COLUMBIA OPHELIA, KILLARNEY, WHITE KIL- 
LARNEY, KILLARNEY QUEEN 

Per 100 
Specials, 20 to 28-in $15.00 



Per 100 
$2.S.0O 



$18.00 to 
1.^.00 to 

8.00 to 



20.00^ 
18.00 
12.00 
10.00 



RICHMOND, red 
Specials, 20 to 28-in 
Select, 16 to 20-in. . , 

. Medium, 16-in 

.Short. 8 to 12-in... 



MILADY, red 

Specials, 20 to 28-in 
Select, 16 to 20-in . . , 

Medium, 16-in 

Short. 8 to 12-in 



.^.00 
12.00 
10.00 

8.00 



1.^00 

12.00 

10.00 

8.00 



.$ 2.00 to 



12.00 

lOOO 

8.00 

4.00 

8.00 



Select, 18 to 20-in 

Medium, 16-in. . 

Short, 8 to 12-in. 
Cecile Brunner .... 
Roses, our selection 

Carnations, assorted 10.00 to 15.00 

Easter Lilies, per hud and 

hloom 

Calendulas 3.00 to 

Yellow Genista 

Sweet Alyssum, per Inmoh. 

Sweet Peas 1 .50 to 

Daisies 

Bougainvillea Sprays 

Calla Lilies 10.00 to 



15.00 
6.00 

6.00 
.50 

2.00 
1.00 

10.00 

15.00 



GREENS 



Ferns, per UXK) $4.50 | Asparagus, i)cr bunch $0.50 

W'c never close— ojjen days, nights and .Sundays 

W. E. TRIMBLE GREENHOUSE CO. 

Phone 2416 Wholesale Florists PRINCETON ILL. 

Write for Pricm Liat on Rooted Cutting* and Potted Planta in Bloom ' 



Mav 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 13 



Fred C Meyer 

WHOLESALE 

Shipper, Grower, Distributor 



Choice Colorado Grown Cut 
Flowers. 

Fancy Roses, Carnations, Sweet 
Peas and all other Cut Flowers 
and Ferns. 

Try some of our Choice Lily of 
the Valley and Giganteums. 

We have them all year around. 

You cannot get along without 
Carnations this summer. 

Start with an order now. 



1720 Rosemary St, DENVER, COLO, 



tAjii.^ii.i^,.-i-... 



J 



' rvr^f ' "^miw^^Ti 



-. j-..v'Vr - ■ Tr".-7-p:*. :-VT. 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



Mothers' Day 

May 14th, 1922 

WE WILL HAVE TO OFFER 

Greenhouse-Grown Gladioli 

50,000 of the leading varieties 
$20.00 per 100; $3.00 per dozen 

Silver Pink Snapdragons 

75,000 which will come in right for this occasion 
$15.00 and $20.00 per 100; $2.00 and $3.00 per dozen 

For the past two years we have 
featured these two specials on ac- 
count of the showing they make 
and their fine keeping qualities. 

Order now, as we will not oversell. 



LARGEST SHIPPERS AND HANDLERS OF 

CUT FLOWERS 



IN THE ST. LOUIS MARKET 



St Louis Wholesale Cut Flower Co. 

1406-1408 Pine St. Long Distance Phone, Olive 4203 St. Louls. Mo. 



*^T\Kf'' 'J V" *• . ^f" •■ ,■.-■■ '.■ • T. " -r '- .''^ 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 15 



PpONIES 

FOR MOTHERS' DAY 

We have ten a^res of the finest varieties. 
Blooms available in quantity. 

PEONIES *TKrr $10.00 to $12.00 to $18.00 



per 
100 



Weather conditions are just right. The bulk of our 
crop will be just right for MOTHERS' DAY. 

Order now for immediate and later shipment. We 
ship on every train day or night. 



Cut Flowrers 

Calla Lilies, best quality, - - - $15.00 to $20.00 per 100 

Snapdragons, medium, very fine, - - 6.00 to 8.00 per 100 

Snapdragons, long, extra fine, - - 8.00 to 10.00 per 100 

Snapdragons, best grades, 1000 and 500 lots, 6.00 per 100 

Columbia, Ophelia, Radiance Roses, 4.00 to 15.00 per 100 

Valley, best quality, 6.00 per 100 

Gladioli, long spikes, very select, * - - 10.00 to 12.00 per 100 

Sweet Peas, - 1.00 to 2.00 per 100 

We are booking orders now for 

PEONIES and GLADIOLI for Mothers' Day Delivery 

Long Distance— Long Distance- 

Day Nos. 233 or 475 Night Nos. 637 or 165 or 233 

T. G. OWEN & SON 

Wholesale Florists Columbus, Mississippi 



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16 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1»22 



COKELY'S 

REAL BARGAINS 



WREATHS 
Box Style 





EASEL 
With Hook 




Special Wreath Offer 



No. 
1—50 each, 10- 
2—50 each, 12- 
3-50 each, 14 
4—50 each, 16 
5— SO each, 10 
6—25 each, 10- 
7—25 each, 10- 
8—25 each, 12- 
9—25 each, 14- 
10—25 each, 16 
11—25 each, 14- 
12—25 each, 12- 
13—25 each, 12- 
14—25 each, 16- 
15—25 each, 18- 
16—25 each, 16- 
17—25 each, 18- 
18—25 each, 16 



n., 

n., 

n., 

n., 

n., 

n., 

n., 

n., 

n., 

n., 

n., 

n.. 

n. 

n. 

n. 

n. 

n., 

n.. 



Sizes 

12-in., 14-in for 

14-in., 16-in for 

16-in., 18-in for 

18-in., 20-in for 

12-in., 14-in., 16-in for 

12-in., 14-in., 16-in., 18-in for 

12-in., 14-in., 16-in., 18-in., 20-in for 

14-in., 16-in., 18-in., 20-in for 



16-in., 
18-in., 
16-in., 
14-in. 



24-in. 



18-in. 
20-in. 
18-in., 
16-in., 18-in., 20-in., 24-in for 



20-in. 
24-in. 
20-in. 



.for 
.for 
.for 



18-in. 



for 
for 
for 
for 



14-in., 16-in 

20-in., 22-in 

22-in., 24-in 

20-in., 24-in 

20-in., 24-in for 

18-in., 22-in for 

19—50 10-in., 25 12-in., 25 14-in for 

20—50 12-in., 25 14-in., 25 16-in for 

21—33 12-in., 33 14-in., 34 16-in for 

22—50 12-in., lOO 14-in., 100 16-in for 

23-50 12-in., 100 14-in., 100 16-in., 50 18-in., 50 20-in for 

24—100 each, 12-in., 14-in., 16-in., 18-in., 20-in for 



$11.00 
13.75 
17.50 
21.50 
17.00 
12.00 
16.25 
14.75 
19.00 
16.75 
13.00 
20.75 
10.50 
12.50 
14.75 
13.25 
13.75 
11.75 
7.50 
9.25 
9.50 
25.00 
40.00 
58.00 



Special Easel Offer 



No. Sizes 

A— 25 each, 21-in., 24-in., 27-in., 30-in for $15.85 

B— 12 each, 24-in., 27-in., 30-in., 33-in., 36-in., 42-in for 16.85 

C— 20 each, 24-in., 27-in., 30-in., 33-in., 36-in for 20.70 

D — 33 each, 27-in., 30-in,, 36-in for 21.60 

E— 15 each. 27-in., 42-in.; 35 each, 30-in., 36-in for 2430 

F— 25 each, 24-in., 30-in., 36-in., 42-in, .' for 24.75 

G — 50 each, 30-in., 36-in., 42-in for 39.60 

H— 100 each, 30-in., 36-in., 42-in for 73^80 

ALL OUR WIRE DESIGNS ARE PAINTED GREEN 

Special Pillow Offer 

No. Sizes 

1—25 each, 14-in., 16-in., 18-in., 20-in for $26 00 

2— 25 each, 14-in., 20-in.; 50 each, 16-in., 18-in for 3600 

3—50 each, 16-in., 18-in., 20-in., 22-in for 55 00 



WREATHS 

(Box Style) Per 100 

10-inch $ 5 85 

12-inch 6.85 

14-inch 8.90 



ALSO SPECIAL— by the Hundred 



16-inch $11.50 

18-inch 13.25 

20-inch 16.00 

22-inch 20.00 

24-inch 22.50 



EASELS 
Per 100 

21-inch $10.00 

24-inch 12.00 

27-inch 14.00 



30-inch $17.50 

33-inch 21.00 

36-inch 25.00 

42-inch 30.00 

48-inch 36.00 



REGULAR GOODS-REAL BARGAINS. NO CHARGE FOR PACKING OR CASES. 

B. E. & J. T. COKELY 

Manufacturers and Importers of Everything in 

201 N. 7th Avenue Florists* Supplies SCRANTON, PA. 

Send for compUtd wiiework list and up-to-date prices on supplies 



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Mav 4, ltt2;j 



The Rorists^ Review 



17 




Wreaths for Mothers' Day 

Solve the Cut Flower shortage by pushing Wreaths for departed mothers 
A FEW ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS APPROPRIATE FOR MOTHERS* DAY 






WOODLAND WBEATH 

Body of wreath Prepared KverKreen, decorated with Cycas. 
Magnolia Leaves, Astral Ferns, Pine Cones and Thistle Burrs. 
Entire wreath sprayed with soft metallic finish of gold or 
silver. 

305 — 18-inch $24.00 doz. 

SOe— 22-lnch 30.00 doi. 

807 — 28-inch 36.00 doz. 

WREATH MATERIALS 



MISMOBIAL WBKATH 

Body of wreath Magnolia Leaves, decorated with Cycas, 
Astral Ferns, Thistle Burrs, Fine Cones. Entire wreath 
sprayed with soft metallic finish of gold or silver. 

300— 18-inch $24.00 doz. 

301— 22-inch 30.00 doz. 

302 — 28-inch 36.00 doz. 



Magnolia Leaves 

GNATT'8 QCBEN QUALITY 

Flexible, Non-mouldy. I.,uHtroU8. If you 
want better Magnolia Wreaths use 
GNATT'S QUEEN QUALITY BRAND 
leaves. Selected leaves, specially as- 
sorted by experienced pickers in the 
south. Our leaves are prepared by a 
scientific chemical process whea dyed 
which gives them that lustrous finish de- 
manded by all florists. The leaves are 
non-mouldy, flexible, uniform size and 
give general satisfaction. Colors: Green 
Brown or Purple. 

PKICES 

Single Cartons $1.40 per carton 

Ten Carton Lots 1.35 per <arton 

25 lb. Cartons 5.00 per carton 

100 lb. Cases 18.00 

Natural Cape Flowers 

In bright Red, Fink, Blue, Lavender 
Purple, Yellow, at $2.50 per lb. Natural 
White, $1.76 per lb. 

One pound contains about !)00 flowers. 

8TATICE 

Natural Imported Statice 

Nice Fluffy Stock 

Per pound $i.25 

10-pound lots, per pound 1.10 

COLORED STATICE 

Sprayed beautiful shades of Pink. Lav- 
ender or Nile Green, Silver, Gold, Pur- 
ple. Yellow, Orange, Blue, two-tone. 

Per pound $1.75 

10-pound lots, per pound 1.60 

PREPARED ASPARAGUS PLUMOSU8 

The natural sprays chemically treated 
and preserved. 

Small Sprays, 15 ins. long. . .$6.50 per 100 
Medium Sprays. 24 ins. long. 8.50 per 100 
Large Sprays, 30-36 ins. long.10.00 per 100 



Ly copodium 

PREPARED EVERGREEN 

Permanently retains its natural color 
and freshness. Can be used for baskets, 
wreaths and design work. 

Our cartons contain full weight of ten 
pounds each. 

Price $3.00 for 10 lb. Carton 
A New CoabiaaiiiM of Wieath Dcc*r«tioai 

Florists' Friend 

Put up in an attractive carton, con- 
sisting of the following: 

1 lb. Assorted Metallic Ruscus $2.00 

1 lb. Assorted Tinted Ruscus 1.00 

20 Assorted Metallic Cycas 1.60 

.'iO Assorted Poppy Pods 1.25 

.''lO Assorted Thlstle.s 1.25 

V4 lb. Assorted Dyed Statice 1.00 



Total $8.10 

$8.10 VALUE, SPECIAL FOR $7.50 





DECORATED MAGNOLIA WREATHS 

A new style Decorated Magnolia 
Wreath, made up with Gray Tinted Rus- 
cus and Miniature Cloth Pink Rose buds. 
This combination makes a verv attractive 
looking effect. Sells at sight. Can be had 
with Red, Pink or Yellow Roses. Also 
Lavender or White Lilac. 

No. 260 — 18-inch $26.00 doz. 

No. 261 — 20-inch 30.00 doz. 

No. 262— 22-inch 34.00 doz. 

No. 263— 24-lnch 36.00 doz. 

No. 264— 28-inch 42.00 doz. 



.Artiflrlal 
Carnations 



Artificial Carnations 

8936. Fiber Carnation. Importpii flower made of soft, flutfy fltwr. 
i.ook3 ju8t like t lie natural. Each spray has 1 flower, bud and 
foliBRe. Natural colors, wlilte, liglit pink, dark pink or red. $1.75 
per dozen, $18.00 per gross. 

««%*« £"■"*♦'<"'»• White, pink, pink tinted or red. Uiistemmed. 
JO.SO per »ro8s; stemmed with foliage. $12.00 per gross 




The Ove Gnatt Co., La Porte, Ind. 

Manufacturers and Importers of Natural Prepared Foliases 
Baskets, Floristo' Supplies and Decorative Novelties/^ * 




18 



The Florists^ Review 



Hat 4. 1932 



BE SURE TO HAVE IN STOCK 

The Recognized Emblem 
of the American Legion 

A floral duplicate of the American Legion Button. 
Used and approved by the leading Florists caterinsr to 
the American Legion Posts. 

An artistic and appropriate emblem, the center a fi^old 
star laid in a field of evergreens, and bordered with 
blue and gold. Finished with large, clear-cut gold 
letters. Each part sharp and clean-cut, stands out in 
bold relief. 

TWO SIZES: 

Large size, 16J^-inch diameter, each $2.00 

Small size, 14>^-inch diameter, each 1.50 

Packed one to a box, does not include Cycas or Easel. 
Used as above the low price makes it a sure seller. 

THE HOUSE OF MERIT 

JOS. G. NEIDINGER CO. 

1309-11 No. Second St. PHILADELPHIA 



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Be Prepared for Mothers' Day 



CLT n.OWER AND PLANT BASKETS. 

Attractive two-tone shades. 
Each from 35c to $5.00 

WOOD-FIBER POT COVERS. 

4-inch, per dozen $1.60 

5-lnch, per dozen 2.50 

6-lnch, per dozen 3.25 

7-inch, per dozen 4.00 

8-inch, per dozen 5.00 



Per bo.\ of 1,000. 



BULL DOG CLIPS. 



. $0.90 



FLORISTS' GREEN THREAD. 

Per box, 12 spools, 2% lbs. net thread $ 2.50 

5 boxes 11.00 



GBEEN SILKALINE. 

Per 1-lb. box, 8 spools , 

5 boxes , 



.$1.35 
. 6.25 



METAL CEMETERY VASES. 

Not the cheapest but the best. 

Medium size, per dozen $5.00 

Large size, per dozen 6.00 

GREEN TIN CEMETERY VASES. 

Large size, per dozen $ 1,80 

Per gross 18.00 

METAI. WREATHS. 

Green and with flowers. 
Each from $1,50 to $2.00 

GREEN HYACINTH STAKES. 

.l-lnch, per 1,000 $0.70 

12-inch, per 1,000 2.00 

18-lnch, per 1.000 2.76 



MOTHER MOTTOES FOB MOTHERS' DAY. 

Framed in either white or gold. each dozen 

Style No. 1 $0.16 fl.70 

Style No. 2 22 2.60 

Style No. 3 26 3.00 

PAPYRUS CREPE PAPER. 

White, pink, orchid, blue, yellow, red, moss and nlle green. 

Per roll $0.36 

25 rolls 8.00 

SILK FIBER RIBBON. 

White, pinl<, yellow, orchid, blue, red, moss and nile green. 

1 -Inch. 50 yard reel $ 1.60 

10 reels 16.00 

NIAGARA CUT FLOWER SPRINKLERS. 

Medium size, each $0.76 

Large size, each 1.00 

MAGNOLIA LEAVES. 

Green, Brown and Purple, per carton $ 1.60 

10 cartons , 13,60 

Red. per carton 1.80 



Per carton 



SHORT OAK SPRAYS. 

Red, green and tan. 



.$2.00 



TISSUE PAPER. 

(480 count, size 24x36.) 

White, No. 1, per ream $1.60 

White, No. 2. per ream 1.76 

Green Wax, per ream 3.00 

White Wax, per ream 2.60 

GREENING PINS. 

Per 10-lb. box $2.26 

10 boxes .'.'.'...'.' 20.00 



C E. CRITCHELL 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

1 5 East Third St. CINCINNATI, OHIO 



■ Jlii|ii I ipp 1 1 iwmimw^lf^ ' '4(4*. ■" *^*m*mviff' 



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Mav 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



19 



A Good Place to Trade 

Special Attractive Prices on Cut Flower Boxes 




MADE IN MILWAUKEE 



Mist Gray, half telescope 



18 X 5 X 3. .. 
21 X 6 X 3V1>, 
24 X 5 X 3y>. 
24 X 8 X 4.., 
28 X 8 X 5 . . 
30 X 6 X 3V,. 



Per 100 
. . .$3.75 
. . . 4.40 
. .. 4.50 
. . . 6.00 
. . . 7.50 
. .. 5.50 



Above sizes are put up 100 to a package, and we 
do not break packages. 



SPRAY BOXES 

Mist Gray, full telescope 

Per 100 

36 X 8x 5... $11.00 

30 X 12 X 6 15.00 

36 X 12 X 6 18.00 

42 X 12 X 6. 20.00 

48 X 14 X 6 28.00 

Spray Boxes are put up 25 complete boxes to a 
package. We do not break packages. 

PRINTING 

$3.00 extra for 500 boxes, $4.00 per 1,000. We 
cannot print the last three sizes of Spray Boxes. 

DESIGN BOXES 

Mist Gray, full telescope 

Just the thing for local delivery or express ship- 
ments for short distances. 

Per 100 

20 x 20 X 8 $20.00 

24 X 24 X 8 23.00 

CORSAGE BOXES 

Per 100 

10 X 7 X 5 $5.50 

12 X 9x 5 6.00 

Printing $3.00 extra for 500, $4.00 per 1,000. 



There Will Be Lots of Weddings in Nay and June 



CHIFFON. Valley Pattern, 4-inch. 8c 
per yard; fi-inch, iic per yard; 10-inch, 
loc per yard. 

■pANCY 6-INCH CHIFFON, wiih ribl^n 
■'■ edge in all colors, l*2Hc per yard. 



M 



ETALLIC BLUE BIRD CHIFFON, 
25c per yard. 



Plain 4-INCH chiffon, all colors, 
■'• oc per yard; fi-inch, fie i»er yard. 

SATIN TAFFETA RIBBON, No. 22, 
$L50 per bolt; No. 40, $1.75 per bolt; 
No. ()0, $2.00 per bolt; No. 80, $2.2") i)er 
bolt. 

"DABY RIBBON, 5(i-yard spools, 6(\: per 
■'-' spool; ")()(t-yard spools, $2.25. 



LOOP EDGE GAUZE SHOWER RIB- 
BON, 50-yard bolts, No. 2 width, 
$2.25; 50-yard bolts. No. 5 width, $8.25. 

SHOWER GAUZE RIBBON, 50-yara 
bolts. JL50. 

METALLIC SHOWER RIBBON, No. 2, 
50-yard bolts, $1.50. 

FEATHERWEIGHT CORSAGE 
SHIELDS, made of fine leathers in 
delicate colors, $B.00 i^er dozen. 

CHIFFON EDGE CORSAGE SHIELDS, 
in all colors, $2.25 per dozen. 

CORSAGE CORDS, with large Tassels, 
$1.00 per dozen. 



"DRIDAL BOUQUET HOLDERS, with 
■■-' Chiffon and lace edge, $10.00 and 
$15.00 per dozen. 



CORSAGE PINS, 3-inch, pink, white, 
violet, and green heads, $1.50 per 
gross. 

FANCY CORSAGE RIBBON, I'^z'-inch 
width, in all colors, fancy patterns, 
$1.50 per bolt of ten yards. 



Plain bouquet papers, with paper 
■*■ lace edge, measure full width. 6-inch, 
90c per dozen; 7-inch, $1.00 ver dozen; 
8-inch, $1.25 per dozen; 11-inch, $1.50 
per dozen. 



All Chiffons run about 40 yards to a bolt. 
Money returned with shipments on any overpayments. 



C. C. POLLWORTH CO., Mawaukee, Wis. 



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20 



The Rorists^ Review 



May 4. 11)22 



Look to the Left and Keep Right 



Extract from the New York Times, 
March 16, 1922. 



Prize for Ro»ea Won by Ntw Entry 

Traendly & Schenck received $500.00 
for what u called best exhibit yet seen. 

First in the big 1000 Rose competition. 

A dask horse as far as flower shows are 
concerned. 

Traendly & Schenck, of New York, 
took the $500.00 prize for what was 
said to be the finest Rose exhibit ever 
shown at the Grand Central Palace. 



However, the above prize was 

won three times at 

three shows. 



For Mothers^ Day 

For a good 'profitable business you should 
have the best the market affords. 

By handling the First Prize Rose Stock, you 

cannot go wrong — you will also have the 
satisfaction of being able to inform your 
customers that you handle only 

First Prize Roses 



We will quote you prices on request. 

We also have the finest Peas, Superb Valley, and a 
general supply of first quality stock of everything re- 
quired in an up-to-date Flower Shop. 



TRAENDLY & SCHENCK, Wholesale Florists 



436 SIXTH AVENUE 



Between 26th and 27th Streets 



NEW YORK CITY 




To the Manufacturer, Jobber, Florist and 
Supply House only, no retail. 

Don't Be 

Caught Short 

Witkint lu patented cudbMid Wreatk Finns 

Experience has shown us that most of 
our trade has paid too much for their 
Wreath Forms because they held badk 
their orders until shipment had to ]ft 
made by express. This increased the cost 
of the merchandise from 25 to 35 per 
cent. Besides, our customers lost busi- 
ness because they did not have the goods 
on hand — their customers would not wait 
when delivery could not be made at once. 
The profit on such specialties comes 
through having the goods on hand when 
wanted. It does not pay to approach the 
Christmas holidays with little goods on 
hand. 

Therefore we saggest to yon that you 
place your orders now for fall require- 
mente In Christmas Wreath Forms. 

Send for our line of samples of cardboard 
Wreath Forms as illustrated in this ad- 
vertisement. Do it now. Prices and 
samples will be sent gratis on request. 
We make the following sizes: 

Wreath Forms--4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 16-iiich. 
Star Forms^4, 6, 7. 9 and 12-inch. 
Heart Forms— 6, • and 7-inch. 
Cross Forms— 14x21 -inch and 18x30- inch. 

V/rite us today about your requirements. 

A. SiNGMAN & Co. 

Manofactorers of Cardboard Novelties 
124 ts 128 N. 7th Street. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 




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May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



21 




cw? 



IVAR RINGDAHL KNOWS TISSUE PAPER 
YOU CAN DUPLICATE HIS EXPERIENCE 



M 




IVAR RINGDAHL 

406-414 ELM STREET 

ROME. NEW YORK 



GROWER or r ANCT PLANTS ta* FLOWERS 

WhalM«l« utJ Ratall 

M.OOe Squar* FMt of Chi« 

li«iiik«r r. T. D. Aaaodaboa 



April 32,1932. 



A*L. Randall Company, 
180 N. Wabash A^e., 
Chicago, 111* 

Gentlemen :- 

About three years eigo I bought, for the first time, a 
bundle of your Tissue Paper from your traveling salesman* Vhllst 
I did realize at the time that the price was quite low I did not, 
until afterwards find out that this paper was to save me quite a bit of 
money and labor. I found that your paper being glased on one side was 
80 moisture proof that it replaced Wax Paper entirely in the boxing 
of my flowers for retail delivery. 

I believe that you are the only firm carrying this quality 
as I have repeatedly tried to get some when short, from several 
wholesale houses in the East. It seems to me that you have. In this 
paper, a wonderful opportunity tosave the Florists real money and I 
know that there are hundereds of florists, especially In the smaller 
towns who will be tickled to find a substltue for wax paper at a 
cost lower than ordinary tissue paper. I fully realize that this will 
mean that your firm will sell less wax paper but the Florist will 
save money and that Is what he has to do these days or the profits will 
dwindle* 

I am, yours very truly. 



V 





We are still selling this tissue paper. Another car just came in. 
It is the best in the country for florists' use. Put up 400 4| 1 1 7 C 
24x36 sheets to the ream, 10 reams to a bundle—special at * 



PER BUNDLE 




A. L. Randall Company 

180 N. Wabash Ave. CHICAGO 

ONLY SUPPLY HOUSE IN THE WORLD 
OFFERING FLORISTS A COMPLETE SERVICE 






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22 



The Rorists' Review 



Mav 4, 1922 



BUCHBINDER 

At Indianapolis, in the Trade's 
Display the Judges were: 

C. E. RUSSELL, of the Jones-Russell Co., who have the newest and finest flower store in Cleveland. 
GEORGE V. WIENHOEBER, the widely celebrated and very successful Chicago retailer. 
W. ATLEE BURPEE, the famous Philadelphia seedsman. 

These men know good work when they see it 

They voted us the S. A. F. Certificate of Merit on the 
design and general construction of our Refrigerator 




ThU U our third inatallation for John Michal, of Chicago 

BUCHBINDER WILL SUPPLY YOU WITH 

A Complete Flower Store Equipment 

INSTALLED AT ANY PLACE IN AMERICA 



(We recently took the contract to do that very 
thing for Cude Bros. Co.. at Washington, D. C. ) 



or we will supply any size of Refrigerator or other Fixture separately 

BUCHBINDER BROS 



'^ipjl!P"mftV'''^I'f»WVfl'1'-"'i'-. .■•'•if.'.IS-' "!;."..«'^." .J---! 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



23 



Gets the S. A. F. National Flower Show 

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT 




This is the 12-foot Buchbinder Refrigerator installed by 
us in the new store of John Michal, 6708 Cottage Grove 
Ave. It is similar in all respects to the one on which 
the certificate was given except that a smaller (10-foot) 
box was shown at Indianapolis. 

Financing the installation of modern up-to-the-minute Flower Shops 
with small initial investments, is an opportunity which the Buch- 
binder service offers. 

It costs you nothing to get the facts. Why not get together or correspond 
regarding this idea? Send for illustrated catalogue, which contains infor- 
mation you should have, and let us tell you how we have done it for others. 



Builders of Better Refrigerators and Complete Flower Store Outfitters 

11 So. La SaUe Street, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



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24 



The Florists' Review 



Mav 4, 1922 



SPRING DEUVERY i 
1922 



CRAIG SPECIALTIES 

Never bjfore have we offered 'o our castomers smh a coiiM)lete line of stock and of such high quality, including both Floweriag and 
Foliage Plants. We are booJiing heavily on Spring orders and suggest to our many customers to either call at Norwood and make 
their selections, or mail order at once so that reservations can be made, to avoid disappointment. Prosperity is here and you should 
pro ect your best interests for bigger and better sales with Craig Quality Stock. 

We cordially invite you to our new home at Norwood Station, Delaware County, Pa., easily reached by the Pennsylvania 

R. R. to Norwood Station, and Baltimore & Ohio R. R. to Holmes Station, or by trolley. 



CROTONS 



The Croton, with Its highly colored foliaKe, 
Is Indispensable during tall and winter. Ws 
have the largest and most complete collec- 
tion of Crotons In the world, carrying at the 
present time for apiing sales over r>0,0(Kt. all 
of the very highest quality ami brilliantly 
colored. Imme<llate delivery. 

4-lneh pots, strong plants, $12 per dosen, 
$7S per 100. 

5-inch pots, strong plants, $16 and 91S per 
dosen. 

6-ineh pots, strong plants, $84 and $80 iter 
dozen. 

8-lnoh pots, strong plants. $4. $S and $4 
each. 

10-inoh pots, strong plants, $7.50 and $10 
each. 

18 and 14-Inch pots, speeimen plants, $15, 
$80 and $86 each. 

CROTONS (NARROW I.BAF TYPE) 
Delicatissima, Otdden Thread and Flor- 
ence. 

These varieties are Indispensable for table 
decoration and we predict a great future for 
them, as nothing surpasses them for use in 
artistic arrangement. 

V/flnch pots, $S5 per 100. 

4-Inch pots, $18 per dozen, $75 per 100. 

5-lneh pots, $18 per dozen. 

«-lneh pots, $84 and $80 per dosen. 

CROTON PUNCTATA 

One of the most satisfactory and finest 
varieties for basket work and centers of 
ferneries. 

8V^-lnch pots, $80 per 100, $175 per 1,000. 

8-lneh pots, $85 per 100. 

4-ln«h pots, $50 per 100. 

Every retail store and grower should fea- 
ture Crotons this spring. We know our stock 
will please you and your customer. 

CROTON LKATES AND SPRATS 

Cut Croton Leaves and Sprays have been 
supplied by ua In the past few years to some 
of the leading florists, who have featured 
them In mantel, table and funeral work. 
Cut Crotons will last In a cool place from 
three to four weeks. We can supply them 
every day In the year. 

Very highly colored sprays at 50o eaeh; 
cut leaves, $5 per 100. 

When you have orders for funeral or table 
work "out of the ordinary," order Craig's 
Cut Crotons. 

DRACAENAS 

There Is no ether variety of foliage plant 
80 attractive as the highly colored Dracaena. 
The small and medium sizes can be used to 
great advantage In making up the popular 
aprinfr baskets, while the larRc specimens 
have always been In great demand for deco- 
rative purposes. We are now growing more 
Dracaenas, in greater variety, than any flrm 
In the country. 

DRACAENA OODSEFFLANA 

Oreen and white leaf, very hardy, fine foi 

8%-inch pots, $80 per 100. 
S-lnch pots, $35 per 100. 
4-inch pots, $00 per 100. 

FANCY DRACAENAS 

We are offering a collection of the oe 
and rare Dracaenas. Very iiandsomc for 
home decoration or for fancy comlMniitioii 
baskets. 

4-inch pots, $9 per dozen. 

6-Inch pots, $15 per dozen. 

•-Inch pots, $18 and $84 per dosen. 

7 and 8-inch pots, $8.50, $4 and $5 eaeh. 

DRACAENA HASSANOEANA 

The variety with the golden stripe down 
the center of the leaf. The best of all Dra- 
caenas for the house. We have an excep- 
tionally large stock, well colored and of tta* 
very highest quality. 

4-Inch pots, heavy, $18 per dosen, $100 p*i 
100. 

•-Inch pots, $8 and $8.50 each. 

8-Inch pots, heavy, $4 and $6 eaeh. 

10-inch pots, heavy, $7.50 eaeh. 

DRACAENA FRAGRAN8 

Plain green leaf. 

4-lneh pots, $0 per dosen. 

•-inch pots, $18 and $84 per doaea. 

8-ineh pots, $6 and $0 eaeh. 

10-inch tubs. $7.50 each. 



DRACAENA LORD WOLSKUET 

One of the very best varieties for Bastsi 
and Christmas, being bright red In color. Ad 
excellent Christmas variety. 

8-inch pots, $80 per 100. 

8-ineh pots, $85 per 100. 

4-Inch pots, $00 per 100. 

6-inch pete, $15 per dozen. 

•-Inch pots, $18 and $84 per dosen. 

7-Inch pots, $8 and $8.60 ettch. 

DRACAENA KEIXERIANA 

One of the finest foliage plants for com- 
binatlon baskets or boxes. Improved Ood- 
sefllana. 

8^ -Inch pots, $80 per 100. 

S-uieh pots, $85 per 100. 

4-Inch pots, $60 per 100. 

8-inch pots, $i5 and $8 eaeh, made np. very 
handsome. 

DRACAENA TERMINAUS 

Bxceptlonally well colored. 

8%-lnch pots, $80 per 100. 

8-Inch pots, $86 per 100. 

4-lnoh pots, $65 per 100. 

5-lneh pots, $16 per dozen. 

6-inoh pots, $18 and $84 per dosen. 

We would suggest ordering the abov* 
early, as the demand is always great. 
DRACAENA DE SHETIANA 

A Strong, vigorous grower, with bold, 
dark green foliage, which becomes beauti- 
fully suffused and variegated. 

4-lneh pots, $7.60 per dosen, $60 per 100. 

5-inch pots, $1 eaeh. 

•-Inch pots, $8 eaeh. 

7-lneh pots, $8.50. $4 and $6 each. 
DRACAENA WARNECKn (NEW) 

Silver and green leaf. Very durable. 

•-Inch pots, $80 per dosen. 

7-lneh pots, $4 and $5 eaeh. 

DRACAENA UNDENH , 

Same type as Massangeana, but with the 
golden stripes on the outer edges of the leaf. 

4-liieh pots, fit per dosen, $100 per 100. 

•-Ineh pots, $8 and $8.50 eaeh. 

8-lneh pots, $6 eaeh. 

10-lnoh tubs. $7.50 each. 

DRACAENA LONOn 

Improved sport of Dracaena WameeklL 
One of the very best novelties in foliage 
plants Introduced for years. Dark green 
outer edge with pure white stripe in center 
of leaf. Stock limited. 

4-lneh pots, $6 eaeh; 6-Inch pots, $10 eaeh. 
DRACAENA TRICOLOR 

One of the finest Introductions In recent 
yesrs, coloring of green, white and pink. 

2V4-lnch pots, .luly d«-llver>, «50 per I(Mt. 

4-lnoh pots, $18 per dosen. 

•-Inch pots, $8.60 eaeh. 



PALMS 



AREOA LCTESOENS 

Perfect plants with rich, dark green fol- 
iage. Our stock Is grown cool and hard. It 
Is In splendid condition and will surely give 
satisfaction. Large sizes are very scarce this 
year. We have the largest stock in all sizes 
In the country. 

7-inch |>otH, $5 and $6 each, made up. 

8-lneh pots, $7.60 and $10 eaeh, made np. 

10-ineh tube, $18.50 each, made np, 6Vi te 
• feet tall. 

PHOENIX ROEBELENH 

Very scarce. Fine for growing on. 

t-lneh pots, 8 to 4 leaf, $86 per 100. 

NEPHROLEPIS 

NEPHROLEPIS NORWOOD 

The most beautiful form of Nephrolepis to 
date, graceful, compact and symmetrical, a 
rigorous and healthy grower. All growers 
are Invited to inspect It at our Norwood 
greenhouses. Strong plants. Orders filled 
■trictly In rotation. 

8^-lneh pots, $8 per dosen, $18 por 100, 
1100 per 1,(H)0. 
NEPHROLEPIS BOSTONIENSIS (DWARF) 

This is a dwarf form of the old Boston 
fern, same character, form and graceful 
habit. 

4-Inch pots, $86 per 100. 

•-Inch pots, $18 per dozen. 

8-lneh pots, $84, $80 and $38 per dozen. 

ll-lncb tnbs, $• and $7.60 each. 

NEPHROLEPIS ELEOANTI88IMA 
COHPACTA 

A dwarf, compact form of Nephrolepis 
■legantlsslma, each plant making an Ideal 
•hape. 

e^-laeit pots, $10 per 100, $90 per 1,000. 

4-lneh pots, $6 per dozen, $4o per 100. 

•-Inch pots, $18 per dozen. 



NEPHROLEPIS TEDDT jrVMIOB 

A grand dwarf Fern. Fine, young plants. 

4-Inch pota, $85 per 100. 

•-Ineh pots, heavy, $18 and $15 per doeen. 

•-inch pots, $84 and $80 per dosen. 

11-ineh tnbs, $• and $7.60 eaeh. 
NEPHROLEPIS HABBISn OR R008KVKLT 

SU-iaeh pots, $10 per 100, $90 per 1,000. 

4-lnch pots, $85 per 100. 

11-lneh tnbs. $7.60 and $10 each. 
NEPHROLEPIS VERONA 

Makes a good plant in all sizes. Mnch 
aner frond than any crested sort outside of 
N. Smithil. The fronds are carried on a 
heavy, wiry stem. We consider it one of the 
best of the newer Introdnctlona 

4-lnch pots, $86 per 100. 

•-inch pots, $18 per dosen, $90 per 100. 

NEPHROLEPIS SCOTTn 
4-lnoh pots, $85 per 100. 
•-Inch pots, $18 per dozen. 

PELARGONIUM EASTER GREETING 

One of the best flowering plants. 
.%-in<-h pott<, $9 per doz. 

OTAHEITE ORANGES 
Stock that is free of all disease. Strong 
plants. 
8^-tnch pots, $16 per 100. $U6 per 1,«00. 
4-inch pots. In flower, $76 per 100. 

PANDANUS TEITOnn 

Well colored plants. 

•-inch pots, $18 and $84 per dosea. 

7-lneh pots, $4 eaeh. 

8-lnoh pots, $5 and $• each. 
10-inch pots, specimens, $10 eaeh. 
FICCS REPEN8 

Fine for small boxes. 

8Vi-inch pots, $80 per 100. 

ENGLISH ITIE8 

We have a large stock of the small leaf 
variety. 

21^-inrh pots, 2 and 3 ronners to pot, $1.0 
per 100, $00 per 1,000. ' 

4-inoh pots, $20 per 100. I 

CYCLAMEN f 

We are growing 100.000 plants tbia year 
and our stock was never in finer condition at 
this time of the year. Orown from the very 
best German strain of seed obtainable. Book- 
ing orders for May and later delivery. Sug- 
gest placing orders early to insure prompt 
delivery. 

8%-inch pots, equal to S-lneh etoek, $1$ 
per 100, $100 per 1,000. 

4-inch pots, heavy plants, July let dellT- 
ery, $50 per 100, $450 per 1,000. 

POINSETTIA8 

Bright red variety. 

We are now booking orders for young 
stock, June delivery and later. 

2%-ineb pots, $18 per 100. $100 per 1.000. 

ASPIDISTRA— GREEN 

June Delivery 
Strong plants. 
• and 7-ineh pete. $8.60. 9$ and $8.60 eaeh. 

SPRING STOCK , 

GEBANITTIIS | 

RIcard. Poltevine. Nntt. AUee Lemon, 
Buchner, 4-inch pots, $80 per 100, 91S$ per 
1,000. 

6-inch pots, Poltevine and RIeard. $60 
per 100. 

SALVIA 
America and Zurich, 4-iach pots, $1S per 
1(K>. 

SWEET ALYSSUM 
8V^-inch pote, $6 per 100. 

LANTANA 
Golden Yellow. 4-lneh poto. $t« per 100. 

BEGONIA LCBIINOSA 
4-lnch pots, $18 per 100. 

BEGONIA PRIMA DONNA 
4-lneh pots. $18 per 100. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

We are pleased to announce that owlnc 
to the recent drop In the price of lumber. 
It enables as to give our eoatomere the 
benefit by reducing the price on paebing 
as follows: 

Full size eases $IJM eaeh 

Three-quarter size easee IJtS eaeh 

Small size cases .M eaeh 

Half size boxes i.$# 



ROBERT CRAIG CONPANY, Norwood Station, DELAWARE CO., PA. 



■■■'— tj^ar" 



May 4, 1922 



The Rarfsts^ Review 



25 



AMERICAN LEGION 

The Red Rose with a Record 

Color, Cerise Red. At a short distance 
it resembles American Beauty. 



Has to 
date 

2 
Silver 
Medals 

and 
4 

First 
Prizes 




Awarded 

First Prize 

at 

Indianapolis 

for 

The Best 

Disseminated 

Red Rose 



AMERICAN LEGION 

Free from Mildew and Black Spot, w^as the highest price 
Rose at Xmas and Easter except American Beauty. 

STRONG OWN-ROOT PLANTS READY NOW 
$25.00 per lOO, $2OO.0O per lOOO 

MYERS & SAMTMAN, CHESTNUT HILL, PA. 

OR 

C. U. LIGGIT, 505 Bulletin Bldg., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



24 



The Florists^ Review 



Mav -I. Iit22 



CRAIG SPECIALTIES 



SPRING DELIVERY 
1922 



NeviT bifc.re liavi" we otfi-red o our castoiiiei> su-;li u complete line of stock and of such hiuh (luality, iiiduiliug both Floweriuy ami 
Foliage I'lauts. We are Iwokiot,' heavily on Spring orders and suggest to our many customers to either call at Norwood and make 
their selections, or mail order at once so that reservations can be made, to avoid disappointment. Prosperity is here and you should 
pro ect your lirst interests lor bigger and better --ales with Craig Quality Stock. 

We cordially invite you to our new home at Norwood Station, Delaware County, Pa., easily reached by the Pennsylvania 

R. R. to Norwood Station, and Baltimore & Ohio R. R to Holmes Station, or by trolley. 



CROTONS 

The Croton, with Ita highly colored follaRe, 
la Indisijensiible during fall and winter. W* 
have the largest and mo.st complete collec- 
tion of Crotons In the world, carrying at the 
|ir..^.iil lijii. Ii.i siniiiu --mI.- (IV r- r,ll,oil<l. .ill 
■■I III'- \'T> limh.sl .|li;ilil> .i!pl l.l-ll ll.i 111 l\ 
■ 'iliil-i il I nun. iii:iti' ill iiv.ri. 

4-incli potH, HtronK pluntH, $12 per dozen, 
«75 per 100. 

5-iiich potf), HtronK plants, (16 und $18 per 
dozen. 

6-incli potH, HtronK plantH, $',24 and $30 per 
dozen. 

K-inch pots. 8tronK plants, $4, $5 and $6 
each. 

lO-lncli i>otH, strong plants, $7.50 and $10 
each. 

12 and 14-inrh pots, specimen plants, $16, 
$20 and $25 each. 

CROTONS (NARROW l.E.XF TYI»E) 

DellcatisHlma, Golden Thread and Flor- 
ence. 

The.se varieties are Indispensable for table 
decoration and we predict a great future for 
them, as nothing surpasses them for use in 
artLstic arrangement. 

2'/2-inch pots, $36 per 100. 

4-inch pots, $12 per dozen, $75 per 100. 

,'>-inrli potf, $18 per dozen, 

6-inch pots, $24 and $:iO per dozen. 

CROTON PUNCTATA 

One of the most satisfactory and finest 
varieties for basket work and centers of 
ferneries. 

SMi-inch pots, $20 per 100, $173 per 1,000. 

3-inch pots, $36 per 100. 

4-inch pots, $50 per 100. 

Every retail store and grower should fea- 

iiin < 'Mitdii..^ thL-i spiiMK. ^Vi- Uiiiiw sliM k 

will plt-asf sun anil >nur- • nslntii-f 

CROTON LEAVES AND SPRAYS 

Cut Croton Leaves and Sprays have been 
supplied by us in the past few years to some 
of the leading florists, who have featured 
them in mantel, table and funeral work. 
Cut Crotons will last in a cool place from 
three to four weeks. We can supply them 
every day in the year. 

Very highly colored spra.V8 at 50c each; 
cut leaves, $5 per 100. 

When you have orders for funeral or table 
work "out of the ordinary," order Crais'i 
Cut Crotons. 

DRACAENAS 

Thtrc is no other variety of foliage plant 
so attractive as the highly colored Dracaena. 
The small and medium sizes can be used to 
great advantage In making up the popular 
-iin'ih'.; Ii:iskits, wliili' till' hiiU' s|i.i iiii. n- 
have always been In great demand for deco- 
rative purposes. We are now growing mor« 
Hracaen.TS. In greater variety, than any flrnn 
in thi' country, 

DRACAENA CODSEFFIANA 

Green and white leaf, very hardy, flne for 
baskets. 

2M:-inch pots, $20 per 100. 
3-inch pots, $35 per 100. 
4-inch pots, $60 per 100. 

FANCY DRACAENAS 

We are ofTerlng a collection of the ne 

.illi! la?'' 1 'r.i' :i. ii:i > \'. r\ hi ni Nniii ■■ N-r 

lii'llli il- riira 1 ji'li m ti.l t.tll»\ - ulii In li.i l ji ni 
liask'ts 

4-inrh pots, $9 per dozen. 

S-incli pots, $15 per dozen. 

ft-lnch potH. $18 and $24 per dozen. 

7 and 8-inch pots. $3.50, $4 and $6 each. 

DRACAENA MASSANGEANA 

The variety with the golden stripe dowii 
the center of the leaf. The best of all Dra- 
caenas for the house. We have an excep 
tionally large stock, well colored and of thf 
▼ ery highest quality. 

4-lnch pots, heavy, $12 per dozen, $100 pei 
100. 

6-Inch pots, $2 and $2.60 each. 

8-inch pots, iieavy, $4 and $5 each. 

10-inch pots, heavy, $7.50 each. 

DRACAENA FRAGRANS 

Plain green leaf. 

4-inch pot«, $9 per dozen. 

6-inch pots, $18 and $24 per dozea. 

8-Inch potH, $5 and $6 each. 

10-inch tubs. $7.60 each. 



DRACAENA LORD WOLSEI.ET 

One of the very best varieties for Bastei 
and Christmas, being bright red In color. Ac 
excellent Christmas variety. 

2-Inch pots, $20 per 100. 

3-lneh pots, $35 per 100. 

4-inch pots, $60 per 100. 

6-inch pots, $15 per dozen. 

6-inch pots, $18 and $24 per dozen. 

7-inch pots, $3 and $3.60 each. 

DRACAENA KELLERIANA 

One of the finest foliage plants for com 
lilnation baskets or boxes. Improved Ood- 
sefflana. 

2V4-lnch pots, $20 per 100. 

3-inch pots, $35 per 100. 

4-inch pots, $60 per 100. 

8-inch pots, $6 and $6 each, made up. Ten 
handsome. 

DRACAENA TERMINALIS 

Exceptionally well colored. 

2V4-lnch pots, $20 per 100. 

3-inch pots, $35 per 100. 

4-inch pots, $65 per 100. 

5-incii pots, $15 per dozen. 

6-inch pots, $18 and $24 per dozen. 

We would suggest ordering the above 
early, as the demand Is always great, 
DRACAENA DE SMETIANA 

A strong, vigorous grower, with bold, 
dark green foliage, which becomes beauti- 
fully suffused and variegated, 

4-inch pots, $7.50 per dozen, $60 per 100. 

5-Inch pots, $1 each. 

6-inch pots, $2 each. 

7-inch pots, $3.50. $4 and $5 each. 
DRACAENA WARNECKD (NEW) 

Silver and green leaf. Very durable. 

6-inch pots, $30 per dozen. 

7-inch pots, $4 and $5 each. 

DRACAENA LINDENH 

Same type as Massangeana, but with the 
(olden stripes on the outer edges of the leaf. 

4-Inch pots, $12 per dozen, $100 per 100. 

6-Inch pots, $2 and $2.60 each. 

8-lnch pots, $6 each. 

10-Inch tubs. $7.50 each. 

DRACAENA LONGQ 

Improved sport of Dracaena Warneckll. 
One of the very best novelties in foliage 
plants Introduced for years. Dark green 
outer edge with pure white stripe In center 
of leaf. Stock limited. 

4-Inch pots, $5 each; 5-Inch pots, $10 each. 
DRACAENA TRICOLOR 

One of the finest Introductions In recent 
yenrs, coloring of green, white and pink. 

!' i-ineli pots, .lul.s (li'lMcry, S.'>(l per HIO. 

4-inch pots, $18 per dozen. 

6-Inch pots, $3.60 each. 



PALMS 



ARECA LCTESCEN8 

Perfect plants with rich, dark green fol- 
iage. Our stock is grown cool and hard. It 
is In splendid condition and will surely give 
satisfaction. Large sizes are very scarce this 
year. We have the largest stock In all sizes 
In the country. 

l-iiH-h iMils. S.'> aiul ,S<i «'iM>li, iii:ide up. 

8-Inch pots, $7.50 and $10 each, made ap. 

10-Inch tubs, $12.50 each, made op, ftV^ (• 

• feet tall. 

PHOENIX ROEBELENII 
Very scarce. Fine for growing on. 
2-Inch pots, 8 to 4 leaf. $36 per 100. 

NEPHROLEPIS 

NEPHBOLEPI8 NORWOOD 

The most beautiful form of Nephrolepls to 
date, graceful, compact and symmetrical, a 
vigorous and healthy grower. All growers 
»re Invited to inspect It at our Norwood 
greenhouses. Strong plants. Orders filled 
•trlctly In rotation. 

2V4-inch pots, $3 per dozen. $12 per 100. 
1 100 per 1,000. 
NEPHROI^EPIS BOSTONIENSI8 (DWARF) 

This Is a dwarf form of the old Boston 
fern, same character, form and graceful 
habit. 

4-Inch pots, $36 per 100, 

6-Inch pots, $12 per dozen. 

8-inch potH, $24, $30 and $36 per dozen. 

11-inch tubs, $6 and $7,60 each. 

NEPHROLEPIS ELEOANTISSIMA 
<'OM PACTA 

A dwarf, compact form of Nephrolepls 
Blegantissima, each plant making an Ideal 

• bape. 

2<4-lnch pots, $10 per 100, $90 per 1,000, 
4-Inch pots, $5 per dozen, $40 per 100. 
6-lnch potH, $12 per dozen. 



NEPHROLEPIS TEDDY JUNIOR 

A maiiil iluarl l'"iiri. h'inr, Vdiiiij; plants 
4-lnGh pots, $36 per 100. 
6-lnGh pots, heavy, $12 and $16 per dozen. 
8-lnch pots, $24 and $30 per dozen. 
11-Inch tnbs, $6 and $7.60 each. 

VEPHROLEPIS HARRISII OR ROOSEVELT 

SH-inch pots, $10 per 100, $90 per 1,000. 
4-Inch pots, $35 per 100. 
Il-inch tubs, $7.50 and $10 each. 
NEPHROLEPIS VERONA 

Makes a good plant in all sizes. Muct. 
Oner frond than any crested sort outside of 
M. Smithil. The fronds are carried on a 
heavy, wiry stem. We consider It one of th» 
best of the newer Introductions. 

4-Inch pots, $35 per 100. 

6-Inch pots, $12 per dozen. $90 per 100. 

NEPHROLEPIS SCOTTII 

4-lnch pots. $35 per 100. 
6-lncb pots, $12 per dozen. 

l'KL.\K(i4>MI M KASTKK <;RKF.ri\4; 

I 1' till' lir.si iliiuiTint^ plants, 

.~>-Mi<-li |io(h, Ms') per doz. 

OTAHEITE ORANGES 

Stock that Is free of all disease. Strong 
plants. 

214-Inch pots, $16 par 100, $126 per 1,000. 
4-lnch pots, in flower, $76 per 100. 

PANDANUS VEITCHn 

Well colored plants. 
6-inch pots. $18 and $24 per dozen. 
7-Inch pots, $4 each. 
8-inch pots, $6 and $6 each. 
10-inch pots, gpecimens, $10 each. 
FICCS REPEN8 
Fine for small boxes. 
2V4-inch pots, $20 per 100. 

ENGLISH IVIES 

We have a large stock of the imall leaf 
variety. 

i'-.-inrli |H>t^, 2 and 3 runners to |Hit, SKi 
per lOO, !i;<)l) per 1,000. 

l-iiirli pots, ,1i'>0 per 1(H). 

CYCLAMEN 

We are growing 100,000 plants this year 
and our stock was never in finer condition at 
this time of the year. Grown from the very 
best German strain of seed obtainable. Book- 
ing orders for May and later delivery. Sug- 
ge.st placing orders early to Insure prompt 
delivery. 

2M:-inch pots, equal to 3-inob atock, $18 
per 100, $160 per 1.000. 

4-inch pots, Iieavy plants, Jaly 1st deliv- 
ery, $50 per 100, $460 per 1,000. 

POINSETTIA8 

Bright red variety. 

We are now booking orders for young 
stock, June delivery and later. 

2>4-inch pots, $12 per 100, $100 per 1,000. 

ASPIDISTRA — (iREEN 

June Delivery 
Strong plants. 
6 and 7-inch pots, $2.60, $3 and $S.SO each, 

SPRING STOCK 

GERANIUMS 
Ricard, Poitevlne, Nntt, Alice Lemon, 
Buchner, 4-lnch pots, $20 per 100, $180 per 
1,000. 

5-Inch pots, Poitevlne and Blosrd, $50 
per 100. 

SALVL^ 
America and Znrlcb, 41-inch pots, flS per 

too. 

SWEET ALYSSUM 

2M>-inch pots, $6 per 100. 

LANTANA 
Gi>lden Yellow, 4-lnch pots, $20 per 100. 

BEGONIA LVMINOSA 

4-lnch pots, $18 per 100. 

BEGONIA PRIMA DONNA 

4-inch pots. $18 per 100. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

We are pleased to announce that owing 
to the recent drop in the price of lumber, 
it enables ns to give onr enatomers the 
benefit by reducing the price on paeking 
as follows: 

Full size cases $1.S0 eaeta 

Three-quarter size cases 1.25 each 

Small size cases 50 each 

Half HJze holes 1.00 each 



ROBERT CRAIG COMPANY, Norwood Station, DELAWARE CO., PA. 



May 4, lS>2i; 



The Florists^ Review 



^ 



25 



AMERICAN LEGION 

The Red Rose with a Record 

Color, Cerise Red. At a short distance 
it resembles American Beauty. 



Has to 
date 

2 
Silver 
Medals 

and 

4 

First 

Prizes 




Awarded 

First Prize 

at 

Indianapolis 

for 

The Best 

Disseminated 

Red Rose 



AMERICAN LEGION 

Free from Mildevv^ and Black Spot, was the highest price 
Rose at Xmas and Easter except American Beauty. 

STRONG OWN-ROOT PLANTS READY NOW 
$25.00 per lOO, $200.00 per lOOO 

MYERS & SAMTMAN, CHESTNUT HILL, PA. 

OR 

C. U. LIGGIT, 505 Bulletin Bldg., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



26 



The Florists' Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



Blooming Plants for 

Mothers' Day 

Well Flowered Stock, ready now 
and for Mothers' Day 

Dwarf Rambler Roses, beautiful plants, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 
$2.00, $2.50, $3.00 and $4.00 each. Magna Charta, $1.25, 
$1.50 and $2.00. 

French Hydrangreas, nice, salable stock, in bud and bloom, 50c, 
75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 each. 

PelarjToniums, low, clean stock, 35c, 50c and 75c. 

Geraniums, 4-inch, in flower, 20c and 25c. 

Genistas, 20c, 25c, 35c, 50c and 75c. 

GuUett's Spring Plants 




Aceratnma, Stell» Gumey and Uttle Bine Star, rooted cuttlnga, 
$1.00 p«r 100, $8.00 per 1000; 2^ -in., $4.00 per 100. 

Alyssum Uttle Gem. single, $3.00 per 100. 

Aaparacns Plumosoa, 2K-in., 6c: 3-in., 10c; 4-in., atrong. 20c; 
S-in., S5c. 

Aaparaarna Sprenserl, 2% -in.. So; 3-ln., 8c; 4-in., 16c. 

Becoala Albo-Picta, 2^ -in., 6c; 3-in., 8c. 

Bevonia Chatelaine, flne, 2^ -in., 6c; 8-in., 10c; 4-in., fine, 26c. 

Beffenla Hra. Patten. 2^ -in., 8c; S-in., 12c. 

Beconia Pride of Newcastle, red, very flne, 2^ -in., 8c; 3-in., 12c. 

Beconlaa, Lnmlnosa and Prima Donna, 2^ -in., 6c. 

Beconla liiimlnosa, 3-ln., 8c. 

Bearonla Coralllna de Lucerne, 2% -In., $10.00; 4-ln., $15.00 per 100. 

Cannan, select list, see classifled. 

Colens, flfteen excellent varieties, rooted cuttings, $1.50 per 100; 
2^ -In., $4.00. 

Cnphea, 2% -In., $3.50 per 100. 

Daisies, 3Vii-in., in bloom, 20c; 5-in., large, in bloom, 40c to 60c. 

DaisT Mrs. Sander, 2^ -In., 5c. 

Daisies, Paris or Marguerite, 214 -in., 5c. 

Dracaena Indlvisa, 2^-ln., 5c; 3-ln.. 10c; 4-ln., 25c. 

Dosty Miller, 2^ -In., 3c. 

Ferns, Boston, Verona, Whltmanll, 4-ln., 30c. 

Boston, Roosevelt, Whltmanll, Verona, Teddy Jr., Scottll and 
Whltmanll Compacta, 2'4-in., $6.50 per 100; $60.00 per 1000; 
Table Ferns, 6 good kinds, $6.00 per 100. 

Feverfew Little Gem, 2^4 -in.. 4c. 

FlcuB Glastica, 5-ln.. strong, 75c and $1.00. 

Fuchsias, excellent assortment, 8 varieties, 2Vi-ln., 5c. 

Packing, 5c on the dollar; 



German Ivy, 2%-in., $4.00 per 100; rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100. 
Geraniums, Nntt. Double Grant, 2U-in.. very flne stock, $5.00 per 

100. Ricard, Poitevlne, Vlaud, 2>4-in., $7.00; Ivy Leaf. 8-ln., 

in bud and bloom, $8.00; strong Nutt and Doable Grant, 4-in., 

about 50% in bud and bloom, $15.00 per 100. 
Heliotropes, rooted cuttings, $1.50 per 100; 2%-ln.. $4.00 per 100. 
Ensllsb Ivy, 2K-ln., 5c; extra strong, 8-in., 8c. 
Impatlena Saltan!, plnlc and carmine, 2^ -in., $4.00 per 100. 
Lantanaa, seven splendid varieties, 2^-ln., 6c 
Lobelias, dwarf and trailing, 2 14 -in., 3c. 
Mesembryanthemums, 2^ -in., $4.00 per 100; rooted outtings, $1.25 

per 100. 
Pelargonlams. 8 leading varieties, 2% -in., $8.00 per 100, $76.00 

per 1000; 8-in., In bloom, $15.00 per 100. 
Petunias, Double Fringed, $6.00 per 100. 
Petunias, single, Dreer's finest fringed. Rosy Mom, Dlener's 

Ruffled, etc., 2 14 -in., 5c. (Dlener's alone, 60.) 
Salvia Bonflre, rooted cuttings, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000; 

2^ -in., 4c. 
Smiiax, very strong 2W-in., $4.00 per 100. 
Snapdragons, 4 colors, $4.00 per 100. 
TradeitcuntiaH, white and green, rooted cuttings, $1.26 per 100; 

rpd leaved. $1.50 per 100; 2^4-ln., $3.00. 
Terbenaa, separate colors, 2^ -In., 3c : seedlings, strong, blue only, 

75c per 100. 
Vinca Variegata, extra flne, strong 2^ -in. plants in fine growth, 

$6.00 per 100; $45.00 per 1000. will soon make good 3-ln.; 

3-in., extra long. $8.00 per 100; 3-ln. select, $10.00; 4-in., 

select, $15.00. 
in pots, 10c on the dollar. 



Own Root ROSES — For Forcing 



Own Root 
2 H -inch Per 100 Per 1000 

Premier $18.00 $150.00 

Mme. Butterfly 18.00 150.00 

Milady 15.00 120.00 

Columbia 12.60 120.00 



Own Root 
2 14 -In Per 100 Per 1000 

Americiin Legion $25.00 $226.00 

White Klllamey 10.00 »0.00 



Bedding Roses, Best Varieties 



Helen Gould .... 
President Taft . . 
Etoile de L.von. . . 
Etolle de France. 

W. B. Smith 

Clothiide Soupert 
White Corhet . . . 
Pink Cochet .... 



2'4-inch, ready for S-lnch 



I 

i 



$1.00 

per doz. 

$8.00 

per 100 



8-Inch, extra strong 



Red Radlanoe . . . 
GruBs an Teplitz . 

Helen Gould 

Pink Cochet 

White Cochet . . . 
Etoile de Lyon. . . 
Clothiide Boupert 



$1.50 

per doc 

$12.50 

per 100 



GULLETT'S REQUISITES FOR SPRING 



(irocn Slieot >Ioss, l;irfjo sacks and large sheets, strictly first 
il.iss muss, iinnitdiate (.lelivery, per sack, $1.75; 10 sacks, 
SHi.dO. 

Neponsct Paper Pots. Note new prices, almost down to pre- 
war .standard, l"4-in., $3.8."> per 1000; 2Vi-in., $4.50 per 1(100; 
;j-ln.. .$(i.lO per KKtO- ri'/i-in.. $S.(IO yu^r 10(11); 4-in., .•pii.il.". per 
1000; .'■.-in., .^iriT),') per 1000; (1-in.. $L'O.S.-| per 1000. 

(ireeiiiiiK I'ins, Chamiiion Hraml, the very best, Jier lb., 25c; 
10-lb. cartons, f.-2.\l'>. 

Cut Flower Boxes, all styles and siz.s; lowest manufacturers' 
priees. Mist Gray, Green, Manila, White Enameled, White 
riatcd. (^uiik servlre. 



Sphagnum Moss. I.aree burlapped bales, $1.25 per bale; 10 bales, 

$10.00; 2,'i bales, .$23.7.1. 
MafOioIla Leaves. Dux .'^uperiora Brand, per carton $1 .lO; ten 

cartons, $13.50; 25 cartons, $32.50. 
Hall's Nicotine Fnnilgator, burns evenly, dues the work, will not 

go out. 10-lb. tin, $S.ri0; I'l/^ Ib.s.. $2.50; 1 lb., $1.25. 
Hall's Free Nicotine, guaranteed 40%; 8-lb. tin, reduced to $15.00; 

2-lb. tin, $4.L'5; Vj-lb., $1.40; 1-oz. bottle, 3nc. 
ChiflTon, best grade, 4-in., S'^c per yard; 0-in., r.%c; No 911 fancy 

Chiffon, s-in., 20 colors, lH'/jC per yard; No. 939, extra flne 

quality Cliifton, S-in., 21 Vic per yard. 



GULLEH & SONS, UNCOLN, ILL. 



rwT?T,. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 




The SIZE of the FLOWER, PURITY of COLOR 



OF 

are not approached by any other strain. Our customers know it. Ask them. There is one near you. 

BIG PROFITS 

with big plants in full bloom for Thanksgiving and Christmas are assured with our December sown Primula Obconica plants, 
now ready from 2-inch pots, at $7.50 per 100, any quantity and any color. 

These December sown plants, grown on in pots or planted out, will make plants for 7 and 8-inch pots and be in full bloom 
in November, with 10-15 flower stems, and will demand a good price for the holidays, when the getting is easy. 

Later sown plants, as usually offered, cannot be grown to the same size that early. They will be ready in June at the old 
price, $6.00 per 100, $55.00 per 1000; orders booked now. 

Primula Chinensis and Malacoides will also be ready in June at the old prices. 

HYDRANGEAS 

Otaksa and a complete collection of French varieties, now riady from 2*i^-inch pots for growing on, winter propagation, 
$7.00 and $8.00 per 100; July propagation, the ones for big plants, $10.00 per 100. Get our list. Grow your own 
Hydrangeas, you can do it and save money in fall. $10.00 spent now will buy as many plants as $40.00 in fall. 

We book orders now for pot grown plants for fall shipment 

J. L. SCHILLER, 929 Prouty Ave., Toledo, O. 



28 



The Rorists' Review 



■ T .■.'■ 



May 4. VX22 



1 



ANOTHER 
NEWS, BULLETIN 

is ready for mailing 

THIS ATTRACTIVE FOLDER 

dealing with Funeral and Cemetery Wreaths, 
Crepe and Wax Flowers, and 

SPECIAL DECORATION DAY WREATHS 

will materially assist you 
in making your selection for this 

BIG FLOWER DAY 

Featuring AMERICAN LEGION WREATHS of 

"Keystone Quality" 

WHte for YOUR copy today — ORDER EARLY 

M. RICE CO. 



Floristt' Supplies That Excel 



1220-22-24 Sprins Garden St. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



W 



PATRIOTIC RIBBONS 

FOR MEMORIAL DAY 

Red, White and Blue combination Ribbons andChittons should be in your stock at 
all times and PARTICULARLY for Memorial day use. 

This year, the liberal use of Tricolor Kib'oons for this holiday is anticipated by many 
Florists. 

We have a ver.v complete variety of Tricolor Ribbons in all widths from the Babv width 
up to 5 inches and in Chiffons we show a complete variety in all thewantea widths. 

AT YOUR SERVICE. 

WERTHEIMER BROTHERS 

THK NATIONAL FI.ORAL RIBBON HOU81 



MILLS 
PATER80N, N. J. - BATH. PA. 



Office and Salesrooms: 17-25 East 24th Street, NEW YORK 



'■l'*",' " ' 



•;^Vll!?.l.' 



"" TiDkRBVIEWjini 



lnf>,f.iih<itlll 



firiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifl 



MOVING ON WITH 

MOTHERS' DAY 

To those who put the most minutes in the hours, Mothers' day offers 
gilt-edged opportunities. Knowing how to angle for business is the special 
knowledge of those most successful. Here is told how the public may be 
brought into the florist's shop this Mothers' day. 




I'ON consideration, one will 
realize tliat there are few 
sentiments that ai)peal uni- 
versally. A short while 
ago the world seethed in 
war and hot, bellicose blood 
moved millions to hate — 
but not everybody. Inter- 
mittently the tickle fire of 
politics Hares in the desires 
of some and thereby ottices are won with 
elation and lost witli chagrin — but not 
by everybody. Some in the span of life 
find a second love, the kind of love upon 
which romantic novels are built — but 
Jiot everybody. So one might go on, 
indefinitely, naming sentiments confined 
to different groups at different times. 

There is one exception — one sentiment 
that is universal. The love for mother, 
whether she be in the present life or in 
memory, jiermeates to every corner of 
the earth. For this first sentiment, 
which takes its beginning with the ad- 
vent of life, is the only affection and 
emotion that remains unaltered to the 
end of life. The centuries have proved 
the fact. - It re(]uires lui 
further evidence. 

Says a fragment of his- 
tory," In the age of Shake- 
s})eare and Queen Bess, 
England designated a day 
to be known as ' Mother- 
ing day," and the first 
flowers of field and garden 
were picked to bring to 
mother. It was a day to 
decorate the home of the 
living and the restijig 
place (tf the dear departed. 
It was left to America to 
revive this tribute of grat- 
itude to mothers." 

History Applied. 

"Left to America!" 
These words recall more 
recent history. E e c a 1 1 
when, in 1908. Miss Anna 
•larvis conceived the idea 
of remembering mother 
with flowers on a given 
day. Recall how the flo- 
rists awakened to the idea. 
Recall how The Review 
played its part by first 
showing the trade the op- 
portunities of the day and 
the magic of cooperative 
advertising. Recall how 
the rhyme, "For mothers 
living, flowers bright; for 
mother 's memory, flowers 
white," developed thou- 
sands of buyers. 

But Mothers ' dav is 



The Mother on the Cover 

Of all the portrayals of mother on stage 
and screen, that of Mrs. Mary Carr in 
the motion picture production, "Over the 
Hill," produced by William Fox, has ap- 
pealed most to popular and critical taste. 
Mrs. Carr won wide fame through this 
film, being repeatedly called the "won- 
derful mother." What more appropriate 
cover could appear on this Mothers' day 
number of The Review than the repre- 
sentation of Mrs. Carr as the "wonderful 
mother" with flowers recognized as sym- 
bolic of the day in her arms ? Through 
the courtesy of the Fox Film Corporation, 
Mrs. Carr posed especially for this cover 
illustration for The Review. 



with us in the present and the future. 
It is with others than those in the trade. 
Kvery year governors, legislatures, city 
councils, churches and other bodies ask 
publicly for the observance of the sec- 
ond Sunday in May. With the florists 
there is much chance for further develoj)- 
mcnt of this day and a greater-than-ever 




Other's 
Day 



Sunday May 8*il 



opportunity fur real service and resultant 
profits. There is room for constructive 
develojiment. How has it been done? 
How can it be donef 
. For Mothers' day, it is absolutely 
necessary for the grower to produce a 
large quantity of moderately priced 
stock and for the retailer to carry that 
stock, in order that the means of honor- 
ing that universal possession, a mother, 
may be available for everybody. When 
once this stock has been produced, the 
next step is to advertise. Advertise, 
then, but do not so much stress the stock 
that is offered as emphasize the senti- 
ment of the day and the fact that these 
flowers are for mother, (let the idea of 
flowers for mother into the hearts of the 
I)ubli( — and the butcher, the baker, the 
candlestick-maker will buy orchids or 
marigolds, if nothing else is available. 
Those who have enjoyed the best busi- 
ness assert consistently that advertising 
is the "open sesame" of the day, and 
these ])ersons are practical florists who 
practice what they ))reach, to the tune 
of success. They, if anybody, ought to 
know. Their example is 
good to follow. 

Upon examination of 
s]»eciniens from various 
sections of the country, 
the advertising done is 
found to fall naturally 
into two groups — that 
done by an individual firm 
for its own benefit and 
that form known as coop- 
erative advertising, which 
makes for the benefit of 
the manv. 



Send Flowers 
by Wire 

— if your Mother it 
in mother city. 

No mattar what diituce ttut 
<ity rnay be — mt Florut can 
trtnamii your Flowar Order 
to ■ reliable Floriat in the 
town fom daiitnate and th« 
Flowera will be datlvared to 

I our Mother withla • ftw 
ourk' tuna. 



MOTHER t^'^:^Z 

always shared with you the laughter and tht 
silences. Mother, whose open arms were a haven 
for you and your troubles. Mother, the only one 
in all the world who ever really knew you and 
loved you for everything she knew. Reverently 
we acknowledge her as lite'« sweetest influence— 
-^d we pay her tribute on Mother's Day knowing 
that in all the world there is no treasure like her. 
Remetnber your mother on Mother's Day. Re- 
member your children's mother on Mother's Day. 
"Say it with Flowers" and they will tell her just 
what your heart wants to say. 

All Flowers are Appropriate for Mother's Day 

Allied Fb»..c' A<.i> 



Early. 

number of 
individual 




First Run in Chicago, This Ad Proved Popular Elsewhere as Well. 



Advertise 

There are a 
ways for the 
concern to make its facili- 
ties known to the public, 
and there is an unlimited 
field for the conception of 
fresh ideas to get atten- 
tion in the columns of the 
local newsjjaper. In a ma- 
jority of cases those who 
use these most successfully 
insert advertisements from 
three to five days before 
Mothers' day and run 
them right up until the 
day itself. Last year the 
Pershing Flower Shop, at 
Logansport, Ind., did this. 
E. H. Pershing, the pro- 
I)rietor. described the re- 
sults later, mo follows: 

"Our advertising was 
based on the percentage 
we could afford to spare 



'rrr 



'.'V," J.T'.- '■ -^ ' ,flt"-.-W»" Wl'W'-"<i>-l.l^lil"f'«^i.WfU"MWI'..^H"»'VI'.'P-f*' 'l'' 'i.,.'. 



30 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 




L __. 










Sunday, May 8th 



Milwaukee Let Mother Speak for Herself. 

out of tlie entire proceeds, should we sell 
out at prices fixed on the entire stock we 
bought. We sold out completely before 
8 p. m. the Saturday preceding Mothers' 
day. We ordered more flowers for Sun- 
day morning and sold out before 11 a. m. 
We turned away many customers and 
had to stop selling for two hours Satur- 
day afternoon until wo caught up with 
orders. One of the last customers Sun- 
day took all our roses without stems. 
Dozens of men went away wearing a 
spray of valley. A mechanic in his 
working clothes bought two orchids, the 
last flowers on the premises." 

In addition to several large advertise- 
ments, the above firm arranged with the 
local newspaper to insert some half- 
dozen notes, one at the head or at the 
end of a column here and there. 
"Mothers' day is Sunday. Order flow- 
ers Saturday — telegraph service for all 
whose mothers reside out of town," was 
the message. 

There are many cases where distinc- 
tiveness counts and, certainly, there is a 
premium on a good idea. Various kinds 
of circulars can be distributed to those 
on the mailing list. I^ast year Fancher's 
Greenhouses, of Binghamton, N. Y., cir- 
culated small blotters, on which was the 
picture of a little boy waving a rose 
aloft and slioiiting, "Flowers for 
Mother!" McKellar's Flower Shop, of 
Columbus, O., sent out still smaller blot- 
ters, Sx.") inches in size. On each blotter 
was a dainty scene, to the left of which 
appeared the admonition, "Don't forget 
mother." Max Schling last year dis- 
tributed artistic cards, 4^/^x7 inches in 
size, on which were ha7id-lettered, in the 
style of his newspaper advertisements, 
the words, "Your mother thought of you 
every day. Think of her on Mothers' 
day. Order flowers for her now, to be 
delivered wherever she may be, in New 
York or a thousand miles away." To 
this was added, "You and your friends 
are invited to call and receive a bouton- 
niere with our compliments." 

The ordinary envelope can l)e put to 
good advertising use, as shown last year 



by Howard E. Gates, of Anaheim, Cal., 
who had printed on each envelope a 
reminder of Mothers' day under an 
appropriate cut. These letters go far 
and wide and create much i)ubli<!ity. 

Working Together. 

Cooperative advertising is more com- 
prehensive and more constructive to the 
trade as a whole than any other form. 
For instance, a number of retailers and 
growers advertising on a full page of a 
daily paper exert an influence for all 
florists. And this pays. The advertise- 
ment used last year by Knoxville florists 
came at a high figure, but it brought re- 
sults that made the original cost of the 
advertisement seem diminutive. The 
same was done in many other places 
with equal results. St. Louis has been 
setting a leading pace in cooperative 
achievement this year, as was witnessed 
at Piaster, when more than $4,000 was 
spent by growers and twenty-five retail- 
ers on double-page advertisements in the 
local press, with big results. St. Louis 
already has her Mothers' day plans laid. 
Such advertising is paying everywhere. 

Organizations throughout the country 
have also done much to build up the day. 
Last year at a meeting of the Ohio dis- 
trict of the National Flower Growers' 
Association it was decided to conduct 
a small advertising campaign to promote 
the use of flowers for Mothers' day and, 
according to the secretary, within a few 
minutes subscriptions were made among 
the men present amounting to more than 
$000. This is exemplary of what is tak- 
ing place in many places. Are you alive 
to the situation? 

This last Easter was a record-breaker. 
And there is no reason 'why Mothers' 
day should not be just as great a success. 
Advertising flowers for the second Sun- 
day in May tells in dollars. For a num- 
ber of years The Eeview has urged flo- 
rists to make the most of the day, to 
!idd to its sales and to its profits. Those 
who have put strong efforts into adver- 
tising the day have made money. This 
year make your advertisements business- 
pullers. Make "Mother" preeminent. 
Introduce a good picture of a mother, 
perhaps like that on the cover of this 
issue; word your advertisement well, 
and look for results. 



WHY EARLY ACTION COUNTS. 



Capitalizing Time. 

"I must take time, for I am in n 
hurry." said Alexander the Great. 
"Haste makes waste" admonishes an 
old and proved proverb. Says another, 
"The early bird catches the worm." 
All these wise bits of advice strike like 
triiihammers in the ears of the florists 
who have seen hundreds of would-hc 
buyers turned away because of a short- 
age of stock, and the thinking trades 
man who learns lessons from the trend 
of business is planning to "take time 
by the forelock" this coming Mothers' 
day. 

And with good reason. The florists' 
trade has reached a point where, to care 
for the demand, generalship is re- 
quired. And the future florist, from all 
indications, will be he who thinks out 
the campaign — and gets started earlv. 
Your flower-loving citizen who used to 
dash into a store at the last moment and 
get his order filled satisfactorily, is 
alive to the fact that in the future he 
will have to order early. Some buyers 
are already ordering two or three davs 



in advance. Since "u bird in the hand 
is worth two in the bush," the wise 
florist will campaign for these early or- 
ders. If he does this, the last-minute 
demand will be decreased and the sum 
total of profits will be greater and more 
sensibly achieved. 

Practice Proves. 

Examples of the lesson learned are 
without number. This Easter, Mrs. T. A. 
Moseley, of Kansas City, Kan., made 
what the firm calls a "clean sweep," 
and more stock could have been sold, 
had it been obtainable. In contempla- 
tion of the big success, the firm writes: 
"There is one important matter to be 
learned from this last Easter's business. 
The tardy customers of former years 
showed they had learned the lesson of 
experience, by placing their orders 
early. One lady, especially, ordered 
thirty days ahead of time, since she was 
disappointed last year and 'got left' 
in her selections. The advantage flo- 
rists gain by placing their orders in ad- 
v.ance is greater assurance in quantity 
buying. This Easter demand was 
greater in most cases than the supply 
at the greenhouses." 

Getting ready early, in its deepest 
sense, implies preparation at all times. 
Accurate notations of what conditions 
are this Mothers' day — the demand, the 
supply, the public's attitude, etc., — will 
go a long way in laying a firm founda- 
tion on which to base judgment at fu- 
ture holidays. And for these occasions 
do that advertising early. 

The McCarron Flower Shop knows. 
This year the firm began Easter adver- 
tising early and, as a result of the plan, 
the company can state enthusiastically: 
"Now we do know the cause of the tre- 
mendous business that we had at Easter, 
especially in corsage work, where we 
averaged eight corsages to any of the 
other orders. Our early advertisements 
in the local newspapers began about a 
month before Easter and we kept this 
campaign up until April 15. By adver- 
tising early we gave people the oppor- 



UoiW^ Day 

Sunday, May 8th 

Remember Mother — 
Flowers Are Most Appropriate 

They can be made so sipiificant of every- 
thing in the heart of the sender. 

Their sweet memories cling long after the 
blooms have passed forever. 

Color or kind matters not— neither the 
quantity. The thought that YOU hatt> re- 
membered even by a single blossom means 
much to her. 



Stnd Mclhcr Flou'eTS or Wear Thtm in Het Honoi 



Roses 

Carnations 
Swerl Peas 
Snapdragon 
Calendula 
Tulips 



iiydranyeas 

Lilies 

Rox Bushv, 

Geraniums 

Doisy Plinlt 

Ferns ' Palim 



VOIR FLORIST CAN SERVE YOU WELL 
The Flower Producers of Clevetand 



Cleveland Growers Ran This Last Year. 



'5^.^'*' 



MAT 4. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



31 




Others 
Day 



N.le« a C»n»d». or* d ihr muif 
I iMiXr btnJ hrmith uo uu* 

ina ^o.» f k>wn CMa h> < ralul'lr 









':7oii^ ;f^ Sunday May Si?! 



Ihe '^riatcst fruntt voii t-vt-r h:nJ. 
Moihtr, uho ^ilw;iys sliarrd with you 
iIk' I.iui;litor .ind iIk- silcni-ts Mothi-r, 
uhosf opiii arms \*crc .i haven for you anJ your trouhlt.-> 
Mutlur, till unlv iim- in ilu- \u>rKI who really kruu you, 
!()\t(l \i>ii (or tAi-ryihini: she kni-w Rt-vfri-ntU wt* ;ii ■ 
kiKiulcil^i- hir .IS hliN sv\i.iHNt infhuncf an J « (• p.i\ hci 
tnbuir on Motlur's l)av InIIox^ ini; that in all thr v*orM 
tlun- !>. no irt-abuu' liki. her 



Itenumbtr youi muthiron Hfothir'n Day. lUmvinbtr 
f/our vhildreti'n mothtr on Mothtr'n Day. ''Say it uHh 
FhwiTH" — from them- florintH ttfionv nervict in an cndfavoi 
to conlrihtiti- to thv mottur nvntiment so luautifully vx- 
prtKhvd i II g ro ui n g floivvring pi ant a and flourts. 

Floriatti of Hamilton 



AikorFtornl, inKair^ t*>* 
AvonJklt Grtfiihouci. Co( Avuk^iI* »b4 

BtMkRMJ 
IcalM k FurtT, IZSa fttrlon S( £..1 
Brrfit HM Fkird turn. Sigory Cini. Om 

Joba Cmm Co. Lnri«4. 69 Kai Si C 

W B Uxlby. Wtltrdowo. (hri 

C F CatW«, BvUat'o", Ox 

H JUb k Mb. BwlMtill.. Onl 
M^iikiU Bt<Akr>. ]7( CwbvU.^ A.t 



»»,»nijei; I' 

Mi.>; E M(MMlM.IHJumSi SMib " 

ii.if If iMi 'l; 

W N•^u^ 7n bHM 5l Eait !j 

PrKf'i Itntr Sk*rpr. 4?7 Km| St. Ci4 I' 

R.)il Fl*.m Siwt. TT Um» Si. lUrth ! 

■^«,ii I, 

Si**tl CnnikMMk W.l(r4«wil. Om j 

C. StarpW*. 9 Mua Si WuI [' 

Fruli B. S.<h C, LiMt*, 33 IC»| St W [j 

«.f.l. I iW j 

a N Smc a Sow, Bftrt uJ Niapri Sti \.\ 

UwfHunM. ', 



lai 








\ Your Mother 

[^J FLOWERS 

ON SUNDAY, MAY 8th 

Mothers' Day 




AM) WK.XK 0.\E 

roatau.F 



MOTHER, ESS^S: 






■*.■( rumtntg ^IHU U4 fliM>n 



Crouch 

Florist 








Baum's 

Home of 
Flowers 



fu(tMl PluitN. frmt and PprIi Bot(~« 

nt h-rd )Hr HMtei H'Ji AwmfW 



MySuKOf Mik 




"Saj/ /^ R'jYA Flowers!" 

MOTBCD'S DAV 

A. H. DAILEY, Florist 




For Mothers' Day 

Wr ut pirpucd lo 1,11 >«jr oidn. t« M.>4Kn . D<> FU 
PUnU (nJ Baikrti Fo> p. ain(« .Ptvite |4a<r yuui aiir, lo^ 

it/ciVutt f7ora/ Co. 




In Hamilton, Ont., Four Days Before. 



In Knoxville, Tenn., Three Days Before. 




In Los Angeles, Cal., Three Days Before. 





*M(Mfms'^% 

Sunday IjJf^' May 8th 



J * 1 Uml let u, tofvrf It' ttiltin,{K ..ml mim-i parw.1. %fif l^ in br tni»int«rd up.«i rtui 
occiwon. A wuji Intnilr d afUtiui — vjiiv iittle ailmr*.*) — thjl in ilw4i ii miIImictiI In U 
Kct know thill the *c*\A *tjll Iac Krr 



R emem ber, Mothers' Day Is Sunday 

Wear Flowers On Mothers' Day 



Mother 



And No Belter Way Gjuld 
You Express Your Love 
lor Her Thin lo 



fc"S^ 



\t 



IDlO ^ 



YVo^^^^ 



TTie Truest Sentimenl That 

Could Possibly Convey 

the Real Meaning 

oJ Love — 



Telegraphic Delivery Anywhere In America 
(hi Mothers' Day 



tvcry Seflsonahlf f-lmver and Floral ArrjuitU*OM-nt Can Bt- Furnished By the Followinii FliKiNts: 



Boyle & Pendarvis Brazos Green House 



Q. & S. Florists 




In Houston, Tex., Two Days Before. 



Here Are Four Full-Page Advertisements Run in Co-operation by Florists in Various Cities Just Before Last Mothers' Day. 



-T v^*rTiT7t;.» . Tf^f^^".?' rT 3SvPt^v^v' '^^Tv^^r^r^^ ' 



«^^?Ti^T=%»,v* -^^ ' V-- ™'7T^'rP-'' 



32 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



tunity of looking us over and also gave 
them i)lenty of time to place their or- 
tlers. And Easter Sunday morning, be- 
fore 9 a. in., we had everything made 
up and delivered in time for Sunday 
school. '.' 

"Mothers' day is just ahead. These 
experiences at Easter should lie i)rofit- 
able. Get the orders early! 



FOR DISTANT MOTHERS. 



Developing Telegraph Business. 

Mothers' day is approaching. This is 
a day when the mind of the public will 
be highly receptive to the arguments 
in favor of the use of the telegraph 
service. This is a day when the tele- 
grajdi service for flowers should be 
pushed to its utmost. The ties that bind 



play is more easily grasped than any 
other method of explanation. 

How Max L. Cohen Cooperates. 

An Easter window di8j)lay, designed 
and arranged by Max L. Cohen, of the 
Jackson Floral Shop, Chicago, is de- 
picted below. One glance at the Easter 
cut reveals a comj)lete cycle of thought 
created in the mind of the observer, or 
the pros{)ective customer, which ter- 
minates by directing the footsteps of the 
j)erson into the store to place an order. 
The small boy fishing, placed so promi- 
nently in the foreground, recalls mem- 
ories to the observer of his or her child- 
liood; memories of childhood days never 
fail to produce thoughts of mother and 
all the worry and care she suffered to 
bring one uj). The flower pots, vases of 
flowers and baskets filled with choice 



.,'■ ^ 



T. ! r I F r. q A f '* 









->^"* > 






^■" ''^j ^' 







Flowers Are the Thing in This Window, but Telegraph Delivery Is Prominent. 



young folks to their parents are not 
broken when young people strike out in- 
to the world for themselves; if any- 
thing, these ties become stronger. A co- 
o])erative effort to get telegraph orders, 
directed in that section of the city 
where the population is the most dense 
and where the people have not become 
accustomed to the use of the telegrajjh 
service, will produce results beyond the 
ex))ectations of the cooporators. 

Rendering a Service. 

In advertising the telegrai)h service 
you really have something to sell. Peo- 
])le will use this means of remembering 
their mothers because it is convenient 
and economical. In order to ])roduce 
these results, however, the public must 
be told how to do it; the fact that flow- 
ers can y)e telegraphed to all parts of the 
world in a short time must be explained 
to them. You will need to sell this serv- 
ice to the public in much the same man- 
ner as any other merchant sells his 
wares. "You've got to tell them what 
you've got and how to use it," said one 
man. One of the quickest and most ef- 
fective ways of "telling them what 
you've got and how to use it" is to 
make a display. The meaning of a dis- 



])lants and flowers surrounding the cen- 
tral figure are suggestive and appropri- 
ate gifts for mother and the thought 
that Mothers' day is apijroaching occurs 
to the spectator. He, or she, would like 
to send mother some of these beautiful 
flowers, but the inconvenience and un- 
certainty connected with sending them 
are so great that he thinks of sending 
somethitig else instead. Then tlie eye 
catches the sign which tells how flowers 
can be sent by telegraph to any part of 
the country; the j)asser goes into the 
store to learn more about it, with the 
result that he ])laces an order and leaves 
the store with a satisfaction that mother 
will be remembered. 

The district commercial superintend- 
ent of the Western Union Telegraph Co. 
saw the window display and stepped into 
the store to compliment Mr. Cohen on 
his striking and beautiful window. Mr. 
Cohen then asked him if he would object 
to having the window display duplicated 
in the windows of the south side offices 
of the Western Union Telegraph Co. 
The superintendent was delighted with 
the idea and told Mr. Cohen to go ahead 
with the work. Throe of the windows 
of the comjiany were trimmed in this 
manner, and the expense amounted to 



over $100, but Mr. Cohen said that he 
had received more than ten times thi; 
amount of this expenditure in .telegraph 
orders. The manager of each store kejit 
the windows lighted all night. One oi 
der was received by Mr. Cohen for flow- 
ers to be sent to Liverpool, England, 
and one went to Edinburgh, Scotland. 
This indicates what can be accomplished 
by cooperation. In order to sell a thin^. 
you must be able either to render a serv 
ice to your customer or you must be abl.- 
to show him where he can profit by do 
ing the thing which will be to your own 
interest. By cooperating with th.' 
telegraph company you can maki 
a more extensive campaign and reach u 
larger proportion of the people. It i'^ 
simply a matter of educating the publii 
to the use of telegraph wires for a pur 
pose which most people have heretofort 
not known about. 



NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW. 



Randall Received Certificate. 

Charles Russell, who acted as secre 
tary to the judges, is full of apologies 
for an accidental omission in the list ot 
awards in the trade section of a certifi 
cate of merit awarded to the A. L. Ran 
dall Co., Chicago, for a magnificent dis 
play demonstrating an up-to-date fur- 
nishing of a retail flower shop and ac- 
cessories in connection with the same. 
The omission is occasion for regret, as 
the exhibit was most notable in the 
trade section. 

Vouchers are being drawn for the 
])reniiums awarded at the show .and, 
with the vouchers for the subscribers to 
the guarantee fund, are being started 
through the regular channel for veri- 
fication, first to the chairman of the 
committee, thence to the president, and 
later to the treasurer, which course may 
account for a little delay in the ulti- 
mate receipt of checks. 

John Young, Sec'y. 



AMERICAN LEGION EMBLEMS. 

In the wake of the opportunity offered 
by the American Ijegion's cooperating 
with the S. A. F. to promote Mothers' 
day, as explained in last week's issue 
of The Review, comes what might be 
called a complementary chance. Un- 
doubtedly, a good many florists through- 
out the country will be asked to make 
uji the Legion insignia, composed of a 
star enclosed in a circle, with a sort of 
fringed border. In the December 1, 
1921, issue of The Review there is an 
explanation of how an American Legion 
emblem was made for a certain occa- 
sion. An illustration of the emblem 
also appears in that issue. Reference to 
the description there given will show- 
how the American Legion emblem is 
done. 

There is also the American Legion 
Auxiliary, composed of women, which 
has its own emblem. This is the same 
as the American Legion emblem, with 
the excejjfion that where the latter- 
mentioned has in the center a star sur- 
rounded by a wreath and bearing the 
initials, "V. S.," the former has only 
the plain star. In the case referred t'o 
an 18-inch wreath was used and the star 
inside it was made of yellow immor- 
telles, the other flowers used being red, 
white and blue. 



Syracuse, N. Y.—A new store has 
been opened by Russell Bros., Inc., 320 
James street. 



•iji g^Jippii.nif |Ji;j ,.j«ii ■! ipjm.i r 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



33 




iij ptsiijijcii?tjippppijpi?i?g«?i? gffipq?g^ 



SCHLING SHOWS NEW WAY 



:: 

I 

I 
F.'M»id!ii"iiV 



NEW AKT IN DECORATION. 



By MAX SCHLING. 



Turns Loss into Profit. 

Flbristry, because of its variation, 
makes work a pleasure and is inspiring. 
This is one reason why florists who love 
their profession are continually on their 
mettle to produce new and better work, 
may it be for funeral or for wedding, 
table decoration or gift basket. No 
matter how much there is of it, it is 
easily accomplished when it can be done 
within our own four walls, but the mo- 
ment there is outside work to be done — 
for instance, house or church decora- 
tions — it becomes strenuous. Should 
such work happen on a day when busi- 
ness is generally going strong, then any 
organization is liable to be in peril of 
disruption. One has to rush through 
work and one doesn 't take care of stock 
as one should. Flowers are often used 
under tEese conditions with less dis- 
crimination than usual. The impres- 
sion one has at the moment makes him 
overestimate the work on hand and 
stock is bought in unnecessary quan- 
tities and it is not handled right. This 
is especially the case where decorations 
are made in the old style and of the old 
type — where extra work, with packing 
of palms, sending them out and carrying 
them into the church or into the house, 
possibly a few stories high, takes much 
time of the employees. When there is 
a rush of business, all that time is taken 
away from other just as important work. 
We all have undergone this kind of dis- 
ruption. Only the florist who has green- 



houses in connection with his shop and 
from them can draw several extra men 
to handle palms and other material,' has 
comparatively easy work. But every 
florist, with greenhouses or without 
greenhouses, knows after he has finished 
such a decoration that it is by no means 
all profit, and often, through careless 
and overanxious estimating, the ex- 
penses so exceed the return that the 
game is a losing one. 

Small Florist Hardest Hit. 

What effort has ever been made to off- 
set the disadvantages of these cases? 
Extremely little. In an ordinary flower 
shop these cases are few and far be- 
tween, and when one such hard day, 
with much work and little profit, is past, 
it is often forgotten and not remembered 
until another happens. It is always the 
little florist who is hardest hit. When 
he learns of the larger florists making 
big decorations, he wonders how much 
money there is in it. He does not know 
that a palm or any other kind of plant 
will stand only a certain strain and can 
be used only a few times for decorative 
purposes and that the loan of larger 
plants, in proportion to their price, does 
not give the right return for their cost. 
Irrespective of expense, he tries to ar- 
range so that he can rent palms in case 
of need. Persons who give an order for 
a decoration prefer to place it with a 
florist who has greenhouses, irrespective 
of whether they are his customers at 
other times. The florist who has no 



greenhouses, anxious to show his ability 
to make the decoration even though he 
has to borrow the plants, often secures 
the order by underestimating, not be- 
cause he wants to beat the other fellow 
so much as because he overlooks the dif- 
ficulties which arise. In securing the 
order he counts transportation, extra 
labor, etc., but in most cases he forgets 
an important item, the dismantling after 
the affair is over, and most florists for- 
get that the plants are damaged most 
in this process. 

Experience is the best teacher, and no 
one knows better and no one has had 
more experience than the one who has 
made mistakes. I am one of them. 
Luckily, I am one of the few who make 
a mistake only once and immediately try 
to find a way to prevent such mistakes 
occurring again. In early years I found 
that I was at a disadvantage as against 
the fellow who had his own greenhouses 
and plants. I found that low charges 
hardly paid for delivery and calling for 
plants, including the wrapping paper 
and labor. If the charges are based on 
a fair profit, the customer believes him- 
self to be overcharged, because he does 
not understand that the change of at- 
mosphere and the packing and repacking 
damages the palms to such an extent 
that the price charged is not compensa- 
tion for the depreciation of the palms or 
other plants. 

Experience's Lesson. 

This is one reason why I tried to in- 
troduce a different type of decoration. 
It was a selfish reason, but I had to have 




Only a Few Ferns and Palms Used, Most of the Decoration G>nsists of Smilax, Hydrangeas and Other Flowers. 



32 



The Florists^ Review 



M v\ 4, \'.\22 



tmiity (il Iddkiiiy iis dvcr .iiid ;iImp ;;.'i\i' 
t hem |i|fiil \ lit I iiiic t o (iliH'r t lii'ir iir 
ilrr>. Ami I'l.-i^trr SuikLiv riKirniii^, Im' 
lull' :» :i. III., \\c liail i'\ rfvt liiliji m:nlr 
n|i ;iml ■idi \ ncil in time t'nr SihkIiiv 

-rlililil. 

Miitllrls' i|;iy i-. just ;i lir.-iii. 'I'Iicm' 
i'\ pel irllcr> :it K.'istcr sliolllii tie |i|-(itit 

.ilile. I ift t \\i- iinliTs carlv I 



FOR DISTANT MOTHERS. 



Developing Telegraph Business. 

MdtluM-^' clay is a |i|irdacli iii;^. Tliis is 
a ijay wlieii t lie mind of tin- |iiililic will 
lie liiijlily ifrrjit i \ !■ td tlir a ij; limen t s 
ill l'a\(il' (if tile use dt' tlir t rlri;ia|ili 
sdr\ iic 'IMii^ i^ a day wlicii the Iclr 
L;ia|ili <i'i\ iri I'm lldwers sliipiilil lir 
|ilis|iid til it> iitliHi^t. 'I'lir t lev that liimi 



|ilay is nidir easily dinsped than any 
dt liei' met hod iit' exjilaiiat idii. 

How Max L. Cohen Cooperates. 

,\ii Kastei wiiiddw dis|ilay, designed 
and arianj^ed liy .\1 a \ l>. I'dheii. (if the 
.larksdii fldiiil Sh(i|i, ('liicati'd, is de 
|iicteil ludciw. One <;!ance at the I'laster 
cut icxcals a cdiniilete cyide (if thoiiiiiit 
ereated in llie mind (if the dliserx cr, di- 
tile |ii'()s]peet i\ (' cnstdmer, which tef 
miiiates hy direcliny the fddtsteps iif the 
|ieis(in intd tlie .stiirc to |ilace an (iiilef. 
'I'lie small liny tishiiie, jdaced sii promi 
neiitly ill the fdfeyroiiml, recalls mem 
dries td the (iliserv cr (if his di' liel' (diild 
iiddd; meiMdi ies (if cliildhddd days nex'ei 
I'ail td pi-diluce tlidUjilits (if nidtlier and 
all the Wdi'iy and care she siiiTered td 
liriii^ (Hie lip. 'I'lie tldwer pdts, vases (if 
ddwcis and liaskets lilleil with (didice 




Flowers Are the Thing in This Window, but Telegraph Delivery Is Prominent. 



vniiii^ lUlks III llieii parent^ ate nut 
liidkeii when yiiiine people strike dut in 
Id the wiiild fur tliemseUes; it' .-my 
lliiiii;. these tii'^ liecdine stnuiiiei. A cci 
dpei'ali\e (Ifdit td ;.;i't ti'leL;iaph iirders, 
directed ill that sdi-tidii iif the cit\ 

wlleli the pdplllatidll i'^ the must dellve 

and where tlie pedple h.-i\c lliit liecdine 
.•iccii^ti.i I td the use dt' the t eleL;r.-i ph 

sel \ Icr. will pMiilnce result- lieXdIld the 
e \ pir t a t inn- lit' the cddper.a t dl-.. 

Rendering a Service. 

In ad\ el t ISllli; the teiee|;ipli -iM\ice 
\(MI le.'llly lin\e -dllletllillL; td sidl. I'l'd 
pie will use )hi- mean- iif remem lii'ii n ^ 
their nidtliers lircail-e It i- cdn\eiiient 
:iiid ecundmicai. In mder In produce 
llie-e results, hnwevei. the piildic mu-1 
lie tnld hdW td dd it ; t he fact that ihiw 
.1- can lie Iide^iaplied tn all parts (,i' the 
wiirld in a -limt time mii-t lie explained 

td them. N'liii will n I Id sidl thi- -er\ 

ice td the piililic in much the -aine man 
iiei a- an\ nthei merchant -i II- hi- 
w:ire-. ••N'liliAe i;(it to tell them what 
\ on '\ e L;dt ami Imw td a-e it.'' -aid niie 
man. ()lie iif the .piickest .'lie; im>-t .1 
t'ectisc ways 'if ''tidline them what 
\ (111 '\ 1' ;;dt and Imw td ii-^e it'' i- In 
make ;i dcsplav. The meanilie m .'i di- 



pl;inl- and Ihiwers -ii riini ml i ii;^ the i-vw 
t la i lieiire .are -ii^^est i\ e and .-ipprdpri 
ate i^it't- I'm nnither and the thdiiuht 
tli.it .\Idtlieis" da\' is appriiachin^ di-ciir- 

'II the -pectatnr. lie. llf she. Wdllld like 
III -end mcither smiie of these lie;i 11 1 i I'll I 
lliiwers. lull the iiiciiiu enieiice and nn 
certainty cmmected with semliiii;- them 
;ire sd eirat that he thinks iif -ending 
-diiiethini^ else in-tead. 'i'hen the e\e 
c.atche- the -iyii which tell- Imw linwel- 
c;in lie sent liy tidei^raph In ;iny part el' 
the c-dlllltrv; the p,as-rr t^ne- intn the 
-tore td learn mure almnt it. with the 
re-iilt that he pl.-ice- ;i n urder .-ind lea\e- 
1 he stiiie with a sat isf,-ict imi th;il iimthei 
will lie leinem lieled. 

'I'lie di-.tiict cdinmiicial -ii peri nt iMid 
lilt 111' the W'e-lelll rilimi Tele^iraph I'll. 
-,aw the wiinldw display and ste|iped into 
ihe stiire 111 ciiinpliment Mr. Cnlien mi 
hi- -trikinji' and lieaiitifiil wiiidnw. .Mr. 
• 'dheii then asked him if he Wdllld iiliject 
In haviiiL; the windiiw di-pl.-iy duplicated 
in the willddW- nf the sniltli si,!,. dUii-r- 
nf the We-tern riiinn Telei^raph ('n. 
'{'lie -iiperiiitendeiit wa- delighted with 
' he l.|e;i .iml tnld Ml . ' 'nhen tii -ii ahead 
with the wiirk. Three nf the windnws 
dt' the cmnp.'inv were trimmed in tlii- 
maniier, ;ind the exjiensc amminted tn 



(i\cr .•fiOO, but Mr. Cdlieii said that h 
had i-eceived more than ten times th 
^ammiiit (if this e.\peii(litiirt' in t(de(;rjip 
ordeis. The nianatjcr (if eadi store ke| ' 
the windiiws Ijeiited till nif^lit. One d 
del was received liy Mr. ('oheii for tlow 
ers to be sent to hivorjxxil, Kiifjiiuii . 
.•mil one went to K(liiil)iirj>h, Scotlanc 
'I'liis indicates what can ))e accoiiiplishi i 
by c(i(>]ieiat ion. In order to sell ji thiiij. . 
yaiu iinist be tible either to render a si'r\ 
ice to your custoiiier or you must be aid 
to show him where he ('.•ui ](rofit i)y di 
iii<> the tiling wliicli will be to your ow 
interest. By coiiixMat iue with tii 
t(dej;rapli company you can uiak 
a more extensive camjiaijiii and reticli ; 
larjicr projiortioii of the jieople. It i 
simply a matter of (MJiictit iiifj; the publi 
to the use of telejir;i]ih wires for a pui 
pose vvhi(di most pe(i|ile ha\(' heretdfdi 
iidt kiidwu aiidut. 



NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW. 



Randall Received Certificate. 

''harles h'ussell, w hii .acted as secre 
l;iry tii the Judges, is full of ajiolofiie- 
for .-111 accidental omission in the list oi 
awards in the tr.ade section of a certili 
c:ite of merit .iwarded to the A. L. I{an 
dall ('ii.. <'|iic;ie(i, for a mae niticent di- 
|ilay deiimiisl rat i nn ;iii ii|ito(late fur 
nishinn ot' .i retail tidwer shd|i and tie 
cessiii-ie- in cdiiliectimi with the siiuie. 
The mnissiiiii i- occisicin foi' refiret, as 
the exhibit w;i- iiio-t iiot;ilile in tin 
t 1 ;ide sect imi. 

\'(iii(dier- ;ire lieini; drawn for tin 
preiii ill III- aw.-irdeij at tlie show and 
with the NdUcheis for the subscribers In 
the n||;||-;| lit ee fund, are beinji started 
thriiunh the reenl,-ir channel for \cri 
ticatidii, (ir-t td the cii.airman nf thi 
ciimmittee. thence to the president, and 
l:itei' Id the treasurer', which course m.a\ 
account for :i little del.'iy in the ulti 
lii:ite receipt of check-. 

.Iiilill \ (illlin, Sec 'y . 



AMERICAN LEGION EMBLEMS. 

Ill the w.-ike of the (ipport unity ofVei'ed 
liy the A iiieiic.iii I.enidn's co()])eratiii^ 
with the S, ,\. I', to |iriimot(' Mothers' 
day. .1- explained in last weidv 's issue 
of The Ke\iew. conies what mij^ht be 
called a cdiiipleiiient ary (diauce. I'n 
diiiilit ediy , a nood many tiorists throunli. 
dill the country will be aske(l to make 
up the l.enidii insiniii;,^ composed of .a 
-t.ir eiicln-ed in ,-i circle, with a sort dt' 
liin^ed lidrder. in the December 1. 
I'.IL'I, i--ue df 'I'lie i{e\ iew there is ;i II 
expla n;it idii (if Imw an ,\meric;in Lenion 
emblem was m;ide fur a certain occa 
-inn. .\ n ill list r;it ion of the emblem 
.il-ii ;ip|iears in that issue. Ket'ereiice to 
the description there eixi.n will sliow 
hdW tin .\ iiiel'ic:i n I.eninn embleiii is 
dune. 

I'lieie i- .ilsii the American ia'dim; 
A iix ili.ary , conipiisrd nf wmneii, wliiili 
li;i- it- nwii einldem. This is the same 
.1- the ,\ inerican heniim emblem, witli 
the exceptimi tli.'it wliefe the IjlttiT- 
nieiitiiiind ha- in the center a star sur- 
rduiided li\ ;i wreath and be.ariiif; the 
initials. ••I'. S., ' ' thr former has only 
the pl.ain st;ir. In the case referre(| to 
.-111 is inch wre.-ith w.is used .and tlie st.ar 
inside it w.a- m.-ide of yidhiw imiiKun 
telle-, the iitlier lliiwer- Used beinn red, 
white :illd lillle. 



Syii'i-cuse, N. Y. .\ new si(,r( lias 

been dpelled li\ Kilssell liros., Inc., liliO 

.lames -treet. 



\nv I. r-"-'ii 



The Florists^ Review 



33 



?5E52Si 



5252S252S25HSH5HS2S25E5H5SSH5SSHSa25H52SH5H525HS2SHSH5HS25HSH5HSHS25HSHS252S2SESE52SHSHS2SE52^ 



i?S25ESES2SHSE5H5HSES2SHS2SaHS?.' 



SCHLING SHOWS NEW WAY 




NEW AET IN DECOEATION. 



Tunis Loss into Profit. 

Fldiistiy, ln'iaiise of its variation, 
iiiaUi'M work a pleasure! ami is iiispiriri<i. 
Tins is one reason why florists who love 
ilicir [irot'ession are continually on their 
iriettle to produce new and better work, 
iii.iv it lie lor I'lmeral or for wedding, 
tal»lf decoration or ii,ii\ basket. No 
irialter how iniuh there is of it, it is 
rasily accoiniilished when it can he done 
within our own four walls, but the ino- 
Mient there is outside work to be done — 
inr instance, house or church decora- 
ii„,,s — it becomes strenuous. iShould 
sill h work ha]t|ien on a day when busi- 
ness is <,'enerally K"»iii« strong, then any 
organization is liable to bo in peril of 
■ lisniiitioii. One has to rush through 
work and one doesn't take care of stock 
a> one shouhl. Flowers are often used 
iimler tlfese conditions with less dis- 
. riniiiuitio!! than usual. The imi)res- 
siiin one has at the nionu'iit makes him 
overestimate the work on hand and 
^toidv is bought in unnecessary (pian- 
tities and it is not handled right. This 
is esi)ccially the case where decorations 
;ire made in the old style and of th<> (dd 
type — where extra work, with jiacking 
III' palms, seiuling them out and carrying 
them into the church or into the house, 
possibly a few stories high, takes much 
time of the emj)loyees. When there is 
a riisli of imsiness, all that time is taken 
:i\v.i\- trom other just as imjiortant work. 
We all have undergone this kind of dis- 
iiiption. Only the florist who has greiMi- 



By MAX SCHLING. 

houses in connection with liis slnip ;nhl 
I'liini tlirm can draw several e.xtra men 
to handle palms and other material, has 
c()ni])aratively easy work. liut every 
llorist, with greenhouses or without 
greenhouses, knows after he has finished 
such a (leitoration that it is by no nu\ans 
all profit, and often, through careless 
and o\eranxioLis estimating, the ex- 
|ienses so exceed the return that the 
game is a losing one. 

Small Florist Hardest Hit. 

What effort has ever been made to off- 
set, the disadvantages of these eases? 
Jvxtremely little. In an ordinary flower 
shop these cases are few and far be- 
tween, and when one such hard day, 
with much work and little profit, is past, 
it is often forgotten and not remembered 
until another liappens. It is always the 
little florist who is hardest hit. When 
he learns of the larger florists making 
big decorations, he wonders how much 
money there is in it. He does not know 
that a jialm or any otiier kind of ])lant 
will stand only ;i certain strain and can 
be used only a few times for decorative 
purposes and that the loan of larger 
plants, in proportion to their price, does 
not give the right return for their cost. 
Irrespective of expense, ho tries to ar- 
range so that he can rent i)ahns in ease 
of need. I'ersons who give an order for 
a decoration prefer to place it with a 
florist who has greenliouses, irrespective 
of whether they are his customers at 
other times. The florist who has no 



grernlioiisi's, anxious to show his ability 
to make the decoration even though he 
lias to borrow the plants, often secures 
the order by undensst itnating, not be- 
cause ho wants to boat the other fellow 
so much as IxM-ause he overlooks the dif- 
ficulties which arise. In securing tiie 
order III' c(junts transportation, extra 
labor, etc., Itiit in most cases he forgets 
an imjioitant item, the dismantling after 
the affair is over, and most florists for- 
get that the plants are damaged most 
in this process. 

Ivxperience is the best teacher, and no 
one knows better and no one has had 
more experience than the one who has 
made mistakes. I am one of them. 
Luckily, I am one of the few who make 
a mistake only once and imnu'diately try 
to find a way to ]ire\ent such iTiistakes 
occurring again. In early years I found 
that 1 was at a disadxantago as against 
the fellow who had his own greenhiuises 
and ]ilaiits. I found that low (diarges 
hardly jiaid for delivery and calling for 
[ilants, including the wrapping iiaj)er 
and labor. If the charges are based on 
a fair profit, the customer believes him- 
self to be o\er(diarged, because he does 
m)t understand that the change of at- 
mosphere ;ind the packing and repacking 
damages the palms to such an extent 
that the priee(-harged is not compensa- 
tion for the dejireciation of the palms or 
ot her plants. 

Experience's Les.son. 

This is one reason why I tried to in- 
troduce a different type of decoration. 
It was a selfish reason, but I had to ha\e 




Only a Few Ferns and Palms Used, Most of the Decoration Consists of Smilax, Hydrangeas and Other Flowers. 






34 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 



an unselfish reason to induce customers 
to let me decorate for them diflferently 
than they were accustomed to. So I 
expressed myself accordingly. I stated: 
" At a wedding or reception in a house 
you clear out of the rooms all unneces- 
sary furniture. "Why? To have space. 
Then the florist brings a lot of plants for 
decorating and takes up more room than 
you saved." Another reason I put 
forth: "You and your friends feel as 
strangers in a house in which you lived 
and which, possibly, they knew, for 
many years, because the decorator did 
not try to preserve the home atmos- 
phere." These arguments helped me to 
introduce my kind of decorations. The 
cost of the old type of decoration did 
not show favorably in comparison with 
the cost and results of my modern work. 

Satisfies Florist and Customer. 

1 gained both ways with my introduc- 
tions. I gave the customer more satis- 
faction and made a profitable transac- 
tion. With churches or hotels it was not 
any different. With the palm decora- 
tion, as in former times, or the banking 
of flowers — which is possible in a church 
only in one space, at the front, where 
the ceremony takes place — decorations 
look more or less all alike, and if a guest 
went to several weddings at the same 
jilaoe he got the impression of having 
l)oen at the same wedding several times 
over. 

Formerly wo made large, showy 
groups of [)lauts, disregarding architec- 
ture of building and disregarding color- 
ing. When we gave an estimate we 
didn't pay any attention to the time of 
the wedding, wliether it was to be in 



daylight or at evening by artificial light. 
We didn't pay attention to many other 
details. At the present time the florist 
has to be certain of all details of sur- 
roundings selected for a wedding cere- 
mony, and the wedding decoration has 
to be made accordingly. In one place 
flowering plants or cut flowers arranged 
in the proper way will give a harmonious 
effect and will make a cheerful decora- 
tion. In some places a decoration of 
green appears gloomy and unnatural, 
and vice-versa. Where the building is 
beautiful and in good proportion, we 
can follow the architecture. Where we 
have to contend with walls which are 
dilapidated or discolored, as is some- 
times the case in old country churches 
where the proper care has not been 
taken of~the building, we have to have 
a green background. We florists should 
liave the ability to brighten gloomy 
buildings and to tone down too bright 
ones. Our instinct should teach us to 
create an atmosphere where there is 
none. 

Tor Illustration. 

We can accomplish wonders with any 
kind of material. Assuming that we 
have a plain wooden country church, 
where architectural beauty was disre- 
garded and where there are many win- 
dows, we can treat the walls as if they 
were the walls of the outside of a house, 
covering them with vines or any sort of 
green, something similar to a wall over- 
grown with ampelopsis. We can inter- 
twine, with the green, climbing roses or 
any other flowers to give color where the 
building is dull, using only green where 
tlie space is bright and sunny. Place 



window boxes covered with natural bark 
in the windows, filling them with flowers 
or with branches of flowering shrubs or 
flowering bedding plants. Use for flank- 
ing the front similar boxes on stands 
the height of the window sill, giving it 
also a background of softer green. 

A decoration of this kind is much 
more impressive than groups of palms. 
This type of decoration will impress the 
customer more and give a better back- 
ground for the bridal party, and because 
the material is all sold and not loaned, 
it is easier for the florist to estimate and 
is more profitable to him. It also gives 
less work and takes little effort to dis- 
mantle. It is the best chance for a 
florist to advertise, and this is one rea- 
son why he should put every effort into 
it. A decoration for a wedding should 
never be severe or cold. It is important 
for us florists to consider the guests, not 
alone the bridal party or the j)erson who 
placed the order. Stepping into a dec- 
orated space, everyone should feel the 
sacredness of the ceremony for which 
this space is prepared. One should not 
need to hear a good musician playing 
Lohengrin to feel touched. Our work 
should impress the holiness of the space 
on the minds of those present without 
any tones. A florist can make and un- 
make with his decoration. He can up- 
lift and he can depress^ and those of 
the poets who wrote about the "might 
of song" might have written about the 
might of flowers. There is no other pro- 
fession which comes so near to human 
nature. There is no other profession so 
closely connected with life, and because 
of that, floral art is above every other 
art. To sculptors and artists, to poets 




Bare Walls of Lecture Hall Covered Without the Usual Extensive Use of Palms. 



",*■■«"'',' v.'f" It ' !'^"T'^T "^ • ■• Tri*'",' y. -.■tt- ■«. 



Ma¥ 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 




Bronze Dahlias Were Used on Pews and Blue Larkspurs Between Distant Flowers, for Wedding. 



and laymen, flowers are and always will 
be an inspiration. 

Hitch to a Star. 

In closing, I remember a little incident 
from my childhood. I was only a little 
tot, when late one afternoon I wandered 
away. An old man, who was my first 
teacher, found me a mile distant from 
the house, in the fields. He asked me, 
"Where did you think of going?" And 
I showed him a big red ball, the de- 
scending sun, on the horizon. He said, 
' ' That 's right. Always try to catch up 
with the sun, and never give up." I 
cannot help comparing that admonition 
with our object. The farther we go in 
our work, the higher our aims in our art, 
the greater our accomplishments. The 
more effort we florists make, the more 
art, the more knowledge we put in our 
work, that much more beauty, more har- 
mony and more love it will mean to the 
world. 

COAL FREIGHT MAY GO DOWN. 

The freight on the florist's coal next 
season will be lower than it was this 
year if an expected decision is handed 
down by the interstate commerce com- 
mission. The rate reductions are ex- 
pected to include a ten per cent cut in 
the freight rate on coal, the continua- 
tion as a permanent feature of the ten 
per cent cut made in the rate of agri- 
cultural products and a similar reduc- 



tion in rates on certain building ma- 
terials. 

The cut in coal rates will save con- 
sumers approximately $110,000,000, ac- 
cording to estimates made by operating 
officials figuring up on an annual move- 
ment of about 450,000,000 tons of coal 
in the United States. The saving will 
average about 25 cents per ton. The 
voluntary reduction in rates on agri- 
cultural products made by the railroads 
last December is expected to be con- 
tiBacd despite possible objections from 
carriers in the northwest. This cut 
was estimated to save the farmers 
about $55,000,000 a year. In addition, 
it is believed that the commission will 
declare for a ten per cent cut on cer- 
tain building materials, such as brick, 
structural steel and stone. It is con- 
ceded that this item may run as high as 
$90,000,000. 

It is explained that the reductions, if 
announced immediately by the commis- 
sion, will not become effective with the 
necessary thirty days' notice until June 
1 at the earliest. Any further delays 
on the part of the rate-making body may 
result in the postponement of the ef- 
fective date until July 1, when it is 
thought that the labor board may be 
ready with its decision in the appeals 
of the managers for reductions in the 
going rates of pay for all classes of 
railroad labor. It is thought the saving 
afforded the railroads bv the reductions 



in wages will about approximate the 
loss of revenue in these rate cuts, which 
total in amount $250,000,000 a year, it 
is estimated. 

That there will be no horizontal re- 
duction in freight rates by the commis- 
sion is a foregone conclusion, it is said. 



A COMPETITOR FOR LADDIE? 

A most delightful young lady is tour- 
ing America, calling on leading concerns 
from coast to coast, and soon is to be 
followed by a carnation bearing her 
name, the variety to be offered as a 
competitor and probable successor of 
Laddie. The young lady is Miss Eileen 
Low. She is the daughter of the head 
of the internationally known firm of 
Stuart Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, Mid- 
dlesex, England. Stuart Low & Co. 
have grown American varieties of car- 
nations for many years and have raised 
numerous novelties which have become 
standard sorts in England. In the seed- 
ling they have named for Miss Low 
they believe they have a successor to 
Laddie. The flower is of maximum size, 
resembles Laddie in color and, as grown 
in England, possesses a freedom of 
bloom much greater than the American 
variety grown under similar conditions. 
American carnations occupy a leading 
position in England, but no English 
carnation ever has come to America and 

(Concluded on page 40.) 



34 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 



nil llliscllisli rrUSdll In iliilllic rllstnliiiTs 
to li't llic (Iccdint (• I'd]' llicill iliH'crrllt l.v 
tliKli tllfV were .•icclist liliird tn. So I 
(■x]ir('ss('(l iiiysclf accoriliiijil y. 1 stilted: 
■'At !i wcililiii^r or ri'ccjit ioii in :i house 
\oii cleiir out of the rooms ;ill mnieees- 
siiry f'liniit lire. Why.' To ha\c siiac-i>. 
Tlieii the llorisi tiling's a lot of [ilaiits foi 
deiorat iiiii ami taki's up moic rooiii tlian 
you sa\cil.'" Another reason I |iiit 
forth: '■^'oll ami your friends fi'id as 
strangers in a liouse in wliieh you liveil 
and wliicli, [lossilily, tiny knew, for 
many years, lieeaiise the dreorator did 
md try to preserve tlie honif .■ilmos 
pliere. " ■ 'I'hi'sr ar;^uineiils hidpcd ine to 
introdiiir ni\- i<iiid u\ dicor;i I ioii'^, 'i"hc 
I'osI ol' I ho (dd i>'J'r ol' di'c-oral inn ilid 
not ^liou fa\oialily in roniparison with 
the losi and n-sult^ of my niodi'rn \\(iil<. 

Satisties Florist and Customer. 

I i;aiiird lioth way-- wilh ni\ i lit ind in- 

tion^. I u;i\r th'' cu^lollh 1 IliOli- ~;itis 

I'ai-lioii and in;idc a pn^hlaKh' t i:i ii>ac- 
linn. With cliniThi'-- ur IminK it w:i^ m^t 
an\ dilTemnl. Witli llm p:ilni dncni':i 
tinii. a^ in fnininr rinii~. or llm lianldn^' 
nl" llnwnis w hii-h is poN-^ilih' in .'I I liiiri h 
nlily in nIK sp;ii-i', ;i( the I'rnnt, wlii'ie 
the iili'innny t.akn^ ph'lcr d ni-nra t inii ^ 
h>nk morn m Ins^ :ill ,■llil^n, and i 1' ;i ^;nn--t 
wniit tn sn\iial wcdilinn., ; 1 1 tlin ^;inin 
pi.'icn he n(,t tin imprn--vi,,ii n f having; 
linen .'It tin- v:iiii,. wnddinu ^n\i'r:il lilni'-- 

(F\ n| , 

l''nllnnrl\ Wn M I : n i n lar^n. vlidW \- 

;jrniip-. Ill' plaiil^. d i-m^n id i n l; amhilm- 
t n In of Iniildiii;^ and d i^i-n'_;:i id i n l; n(dni- 
iiiL;. W'linn Wn ,i;a\n an n-tiin,atn wn 

didn't ]r.,v .-iliy .-it t nlit inn In tlin tillln nt' 
t In' w nddi n^;. w lint hnr il w ,'i-. t n l.r in 



dayiif^lit or at evening by iirtificial liffht. 
We didn't jiay alteiilion to many otlier 
ihdails. At the jircsent time the llorist 
has to lie certain of all details of sur- 
roiimiinjfs selected for a weildintr eere- 
nioii\', and the weildin;; decoration ha.s 
t(p 111' made accordiiij;ly. In one jilace 
llnwerinj; plants or cut flowers arranged 
in the proper way will ni\'t. ;i harmonious 
I'tTni'I and \vill make a cheerful decora- 
liini. Ill some jdaces a decoration of 
nrnnii appears nldojiiy and unnatural, 
and vice \crsa. Whi're the liiiilding is 
lieaiitifiil and in good proportion, we 
r;i)i follow the ar(diitectnre. Where we 
have to contend with walls which are 
dilapidated or discolored, ;is is soino- 
tiinns thn c.'isn in (dd country cluirclies 
wlinl'i' tlin pl'opnr care li;is not lieeii 
l;iknn n\' thn Iniililiiig, we li;i\(' to Inive 
a ^;|■el'll l','ickL;roniid. Wn llnrisis should 
li:i\n llin .'ildlity to lii'inliinii gloomy 
linildiiiL;^ .and to tnnn down ton liriglit 
ones. <)ni' instinct siiould teach us to 

il'C'ltn .'in ,'l t mnsplli'ln wllnl'n lliei'c is 
liniin. 

For Illustration. 

Wn I'fin accompli^li wnndnis with aiiv 
kind ol' iii.'it ni'i.-il. Assnminn tli.'it wn 

li.'ixn ;i plain w Inn muiitry church, 

wimrn arch itnci iii';i I Imaiily wa^ dism 
l; ; I I'd nd .'I ml whnrn llinrn ;ii'n nian\' win- 
dnws. Wn c'ln Ileal the \v:ills as if thny 
wnin thn w.'ilU of llii' initsidn of ;| liousn, 
i'ii\eiil|n tliiMII witll \iljns nl' a 11 \' SnI't of 

gi'cnii. snini'lhing ^iiiiil;ii' to .'i w.'ill oxer 
ni'ipwii with ;iinpnlnpsis. Wn can iiitnr- 
twiiin. with tlin niTcn, cliiiiliing rnsn^ or 

.'in\ otlii'l' llnwi'rs In gi\n ccdnr whnrn thn 
lillildili^' i~ dull, iisine (inl\' ninnn whnrn 
til ' ~pacn is 1,1'inlii ;,|i(l siiniiy, I'lacn 



window boxes covered with natural bark 
in the windows, filling tlioin with flowers 
or with brandies of flowering shrubs or 
flowering bedding plants. Use for flank- 
ing the front similar boxes on stands 
the height of th(^ window sill, giving it 
also a background of softer green. 

A decoration of this kind is nmcli 
mole imjiressive than gi'oups of jialnis. 
This type of decoration will impress the 
rustomer more and give a better back- 
ground for the bridal party, and because 
the material is all sold and not loaned, 
it is easier for the florist to estimate and 
is more ]irofitable to him. It also gives 
less work and takes little effort to dis- 
mantle. It is the best idiance for a 
llorist to advertise, and this is one rea- 
son why he should jiiit e\ cry efTort into 
it. A ilecoration for a wedding should 
nn\ni' lie severe or cold. It is important 
for us lloi'ists to considnr 1 he nnnsls. md 
.alone the bridal party or the person who 
pl.'iced thn ordnr. Stepping into a dec- 
orated space, everyone slioiild feel the 
sticreilness of the ceremony for which 
'this space is ]ii'('parnd. ()ne should not 
nnnd tn lin:ir a nddd musician |ilaying 
k(dinnL;riii tn I'nnl tnuclied. Our work 
--liniild ilii|n'i'ss thn Indiliess of the sp;icn 
nil thn minds (}( those prnsniit williout 
.•iiiy toiins. A florist can make .and uii- 
inakn with his decoration, lie can up- 
lift and hn call depress, and those ol' 
thn ponts who wrote alioiit the "might 
of Song'' minht ha\'e written alioiit the 
minht <d' llowei's. 'I'liere is no idlier ]pi'o- 
fession wliii-h comns so nnai' to linman 
n.'iliirn. Tlinrn is nip ipflinr prcpfnssion so 
clipsnly i-nlinectnil willi 1 1 f n, .-iml Ipnc.'illsn 
ipf lli;it. Ilnr.'il ;ii't is hIkpni' i'\ei'\ iptlini' 
art. To si-iilpt ipi's ,'iml artists. t(p poi'l^ 




Bare Walls of Lecture Hall Covered Without the Usual Extensive Use of Pair 



Ma^ 4. V.)T2 



The Florists^ Review 



35 




Bronze Dahlias Were Used on Pews and Blue Larkspurs Between Distant Flowers, for Wedding. 



.iihl l;iytiifii, flowers uro and always will 
1m' an inspiration. 

Hitch, to a Star. 

In closing;, I rena'niber a little inoident 
irnni my childhood. I was only a little 
tot, when late one afternoon I wandered 
away. An old man, who was my first 
teacher, found me a mile distant from 
the h()use, in the fudds. lie asked nie, 
••Where di<l you think of fjoin^?"' .\nd 
I showed him a lii<; red ball, the de- 
scending sun, tin tile horizon. He said, 
"That's right. Always try to catch up 
with the sun, and never give up." I 
lannot lielj) comparing that admonition 
with our object. The farther we go in 
onr Work, the higher our aims in our art, 
the greater our a('com[ilishments. The 
more effort we florists make, the more 
art, the more knowledge we p\it in our 
work, that much more betiuty, more har- 
nioiiy and more love it will mean to the 
World. 



COAL FREIGHT MAY GO DOWN. 

The freight on the florist's coal next 
season will be lower than it was this 
yar if an expecteil decision is handed 
down by the intersttite commerce com- 
mission. The rate reductions arc ex- 
I'ected to include a ten per cent cut in 
tho freight rate on coal, the continua- 
tion as a jiermanent feature of the ten 
I'lr cent cut made in the rate of agri- 
cultural products and a similar ri'duc 



tion in rates on ceitain biiildinu ma- 
t t'rials. 

The cut in coal rates will save con- 
>nmers approximately $110,000,(i|iii, ac- 
fonling to estimates made by operating 
ofiicials figuring up on an annual move- 
ment of about 4.")<i,()(l(l,(MI() tons of coal 
in the I'nited States. The saving will 
average about IT) cents jier ton. The 
vdlnntary reduction in rtites oti agii- 
cultur.al jiroducts made by the railroads 
l;ist December is expected to be con- 
tin. led despite j>cissib[e oli.jections from 
carriers in the northwest. This cut 
was estimated to save the farmers 
about $.')."),(i(iU,(iiMi a year. In addition, 
it is b(dieved that the commission will 
"leclare for a ten jier cent cut on cer- 
tain building materials, such as brick, 
structural steed and stone. It is con- 
cerled that this item mav run a< high as 
."i^lM 1,00(1,000. 

It is explained that the reiluit ions, if 
announced immediately by the cominis- 
■-ion, will not become effective with the 
iiecess.ary thirty days' notice until .Inne 
1 at the earliest. Any further del.ays 
on the part of the rate-making body m;iy 
result in the postponement ol' tlie ef- 
fective date until July 1, when it is 
thought that tlie labor boiird may be 
ready with its decision in the ajipeals 
of the managers for reductions in the 
goijig rates of pay for all classes of 
railro;id labor. It is thought the s;iving 
.'jfTorded the railroads )iv the reduction^ 



in \\;ii^e-~ will about ai'prox i mat e the 
lo-^ III revenue in these rate cut-, which 
total in amount .•f:i,'(i.(iOO,0(Mi a ye.ai. it 
is estimated. 

That there \\ill be no horizontal le 
d\iction in freight rates by the comrm- 
-ioii i-- a toregone conclusion, it is -.aid. 



A COMPETITOR FOR LADDIE? 

A most delightl'ul voiing lad> is t(Mii 
iiig .\iiu'ric:i. callinu on leiiding concein- 

I I'oni co;i>t to coa-I, .'ilhl -ooli i- I(. In 
t<dlow'i.Ml by a. i-ara.it ion be.aiiiit; liei 
name, tlic variety to be ol'rei-eil a- a 
<ompetitor and prid);ible -mcessc.i ot 
Laddie. Th(> young l;idy i- .Mi-s i^ileeu 
Low. She i- the d,aut;hter ot iiie head 
of the Intel nationall\- known tirni ol 
Stuart Low \- Co., Hush Hill I'.nk. .Mid 
diesex, Kngland. Stuart Low \ ( d. 
Ii;i\e ;;j'owii .\merican v.-irii'ties ol car 
nations lor nianv years and li.axe i.-ii-td 
niimeroii- noveltie- which li;i\e become 
>taiidard sorts in Lngland. In the -eed 
ling they have named for .Miss Low 
they belie\e they ha\e .-i -iiccessoi' to 
Laiblie. The flower i> of riiaximnm si/e, 
resembles Laddie in c(dor .ami. as ;;rown 
in Kngl;ind, ]iosses-es a. freedom ot 
bloom mindi grejiter tli.an the .\inericaii 
\.ariety grown under .simil.ir condition-. 
-American carnations occupy ,i leading 
I'osition in Kngland, but iio l-.'nglisli 
I ,1 1 ii;it ion ever li;is come to .Xmeiic.a .and 

((oiicliiilcd on piiKc 4o.) 



36 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 




ODCN LETTCng^^ KEADEIi6 



HOSPITAL DAY. 

All florists' organizations should 
make it a point to get behind Hospital 
day, May 12. Kenienibor the mothers 
in the hospitals. Adopt some plan of 
cooperation that will encourage this 
day. 

While the day at present comes at an 
inopportune time, being so near Moth- 
ers ' day, plans are now under way, and 
progressing favorably, to induce the 
hospital association to postpone Hos- 
pital day to some time in June. I be- 
lieve that with the right kind of ag- 
gressive work along this line, this can 
be brought about next year. 

Hospital day lends itself to sentiment 
to an unusual degree. It has the same 
qualities that Mothers' day has and, if 
promoted by the florists, can be made 
another big holiday. 

For this reason, it is urged that all 
florists and florists' organizations do 
what they can to cooperate this year, 
in order to hold the interest of the pub- 
lic, 80 that we can make something out 
of the day, if it is postponed until June 
next year. George Asmus. 



GROW BETTER STOCK. 

After reading the advertisement 
written by John Davey, in The Review 
of April 20, on tlie theme, "Do It Right 
or Not at All," I am convinced that it 
is a good motto. If all florists would 
try to do it right, they would soon see 
that it would pay to grow less and bet- 
ter stock. 

I have been a grower and foreman 
for eighteen years and have found that 
a great many florists try to produce too 
much .stock, with as little help as possi- 
ble, with the result that the stock is 
neglected and the quality is resultantly 
inferior. For more than a year I have 
been chief gardener at the National 
Military Home, at Danville, 111., and I 
have had a greater chance to do things 
right, to my way of thinking, than ever 
l)efore. And I am proud of my success 
in growing, both in quantity and qual- 
ity. 

Surprising have been the quality and 
quantity of roses from 1-year-old plants. 
And for sweet peas — I feel reluctant to 
state the number of blooms obtained 
from so small a space as I have, for fear 
that I should not be believed. Carna- 
tions have been away ahead of my ex- 
]>ectations. I have nine varieties; 
many of the blooms measured four and 
one-fourth inches across and Ijaddie, 
four and one-half inches. All the car- 
nations were grown in four and one-half 
inches of soil. They began to bloom 
early; they are good, healthy and clean; 
they have not been off crop all winter. 

?](}ually surprising success have I had 
with blooming plants and bedding 
plants. And the secret of it all is do- 
ing it right from the start; first, in tlie 
making and mixture of tln> soil; then 
in the proper feeding and watering, etc. 
When all these details are carefully at- 
tended to, good stock will be the result. 

My success in producing better stock 



has caused me to love flowers more than 
ever before. The increase of love for 
the flowers and nature makes one desire 
to grow better stock. L. B. Hensley. 

KEEP THE PRICES DOWN. 

Mothers' day is close upon us, and all 
florists look toward that day with a 
smile. It is, indeed, a great day in sen- 
timent, as well as for the florists. But 
the candy men are going out after the 
business in a strong way. They are ad- 
vertising, "Make Mothers' Day a 
Candy Day." 

It seems to me that these men will 
succeed to some extent, and, in a few 
years, the day will be lost to the flower 
growers. The prices for cut flowers and 
plants, in my opinion, have been too 
high for Mothers' day in previous years. 
The flower buyers are kicking, and I do 
not blame them. They can buy carna- 
tions for 50 cents and 75 cents per 
dozen from now until a few days before 
Mothers' day, and then suddenly they 
find that the prices have been increased 
to $2 and $2. .'50, while the day following 



Mothers' dav buyers are again able to 
procure flowers at the first rate men- 
tioned. 

I am confident that the candy men 
will not run the price of candy up for 
Mothers' day. It is true that candy 
and flowers are different. Florists can- 
not speed up production on flowers for 
one day, as the candy makers do. I also 
agree that the supply and demand for 
flowers governs the price, but it is 
wrong to double or triple the price on 
anything just for one certain day. 

I hope that the growers, wholesalers 
and retailers of our trade will view this 
matter in the same light as I do and 
stabilize prices before it is too late; 
before Mothers' day has slipped away 
from the florists' business, after we 
have all worked so hard to make this 
dav a national day for flowers. 

J. Ewart. 



Summerville, S. C— Though J. W. 
Heisenbuttel has been in the florists' 
trade but a short time, he is doing 
a fine business. 

Waynesvllle, N. C. — F. M. Lindfors 
anticipates opening a small florists' 
shop here. He was formerly manager of 
the Eau Claire Greenhouses, of Colum- 
bia, N. C. 

Summit, Miss. — Karl Fach, Jr., is 
planning to erect another greenhouse 
in the fall. His calla lilies are in the 
height of their blooming season and his 
Easter lilies are looking well. 



mjppciopijp cajoijijpcj gqqi^^ 



WATCH THE CLOCK 



db db& dbAAd J Kibd b dbdbi a dsgsHs adbdbigidSfladba 



DAYLIGHT SAVING BEGINS. 



Note Differences in Time! 

Daylight saving began Sunday, April 
30, in more than 500 of the nation's 
largest cities, in about 200 smaller cities 
or rural communities and in every nook 
or corner of several states, notably on 
the Atlantic seaboard. Florists who 
telegraph to the wholesale markets in 
large cities should remember that the 
time in most of them is an hour ahead 
of standard time. Those who send re- 
tail telegraph orders, particularly for 
funerals, should be mindful of the dif- 
ference of an hour made by the adop- 
tion of daylight saving in many com- 
munities. 

Railroads will operate on standard 
time unless a bill now before Congress, 
which would give them permission to 
use daylight saving timetables, is 
passed. 

New York state, after an active year 
of organized farm opposition, is not 
following in the footsteps of its large 
cities. New York, Albany and Buffalo 
will be on daylight time, but such places 
as Syracuse and Rochester, agricultural 
as well as industrial centers, have re- 
pealed local ordinances and will con- 
tinue to live by the old clock during 
the summer. 

Clocks Ahead in Cities. 

In New York city, Philadelphia, Buf- 
falo, Boston, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, 
Wasliington and Chicago the clocks have 
gone ahead an hour. And in all these 
cities action bv the local councils was 



unanimous, except where state laws 
took care of the change. 

Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Mary- 
land and New Jersey, however, will be 
on daylight time on a practically state- 
wide basis. 

Connecticut last year passed a law 
providing for daylight saving only by 
local ordinance. New London and New 
Haven alone adopted such ordinances, 
but this year Hartford has joined their 
ranks and daylight saving will become 
almost statewide by action in cities 
and rural districts all over the state. 

The principal seaboard summer re- 
sorts will be on the new time. Atlantic 
City, Newport, Narragansett and Bar 
Harbor will save daylight. 

Chicago is the center of a middle 
west belt which will have daylight 
time. The city decided last year to 
change its clocks by a vote of the peo- 
ple and the ordinance has not been at- 
tacked since. To keep pace with the 
largest city on the lakes, such places 
as Cleveland, Toledo, Detroit, Racine 
and Milwaukee have adopted time sav- 
ing ordinances. Lansing, last year on 
regular central time, will change this 
year. 

Most of the leading business centers 
of Europe have adopted daylight sav- 
ing permanently. Paris will continue 
It this year, but discard it in 1923 under 
a now law. London took to saving day- 
light on March 26, while all the cities 
of Belgium and France have done so. 
Germany, by a national law, holds aloof 
and will conduct all its business and 
trade on its usual time standard. 



I 



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■• T ■'^■' 



May 4, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 



37 






PASADENA'S PROUD OF THIS 



52SHS2525H52S2SSHS2S 

PASADENA SPRING SHOW. 



Crowns Seventeen Years' Work. 

in 1905 a group of prominent gar- 
deners of Pasadena, having at heart 
the interest of their profession, organ- 
ized the Pasadena Gardeners' Associa- 
tion. Their objective was to interest 
gardeners and the public in general 
in all that pertains to horticulture, to 
create among the residents of Pasadena 
a current of competitive interest in 
the care of their home grounds and 
their flowers. In 1906, to further hor- 
ticulture, the society held its first 
flower show, which was a decided suc- 
cess. This gave encourcgement to the 
organizers, and since that time the so- 
ciety has held twenty-two successful 
flower shows in Pasadena. In 1912, to 
give a more appropriate name to their 
society, the members decided on the 
title of the Pasadena Horticultural So- 
ciety. 

The seventeenth annual spring show 
of this organization opened April 20, 
when a new attendance record was set. 
The show this year was held in the 
Palm room of the beautiful Hotel Mary- 
land, and the largest number of people 
that ever witnessed a local flower ex- 
hibition in three days came to see the 
beauties of nature arranged for their 
benefit. 

Competition Keen. 

Pasadena exhibitors came in for hon- 
ors when judges awarded local florists 
silver and bronze medals for displays 
of brides' bouquets and table decora- 
tions. Siebrecht's House of Flowers 
took first in both classes] Whitford's, 
Florists, second, and Wright's Flower 
Shop, of Los Angeles, third. Los An- 
geles rivalry in the commercial classes 
was keen, and the Crown City victory 



is regarded to be of importance. With 
the Palm room jammed with admiring 
spectators, the winning brides ' bou- 
quets created a sensation. They were 
carried by Mrs. Floyd C. Pond, who 
Mjipeared each evening, so that the dif- 
ferent patrons of the show would have 
the benefit of viewing them as they 
were carried before the judges. 

Friday night, April 21, the judges 
wound up their task of awarding prizes, 
totaling in value above the $1,300 
mark. They included many ribbons and 
certificates of merit. 

The best cut flower display was that 
of W. G. Mather, whose flowers were 
grown by W. F. Asher, with that of 
H. Paopcke second, grown by Julius 
Thelin. 

Commercial Displays. 

The commercial displays were of an 
exceptionally high grade. The display 
of roses staged by Walter Armacost & 
Co., of Los Angeles, excited the great- 
est admiration. Roy F, Wilcox & Co., 
of Montebello, also put on a magnifi- 
cent display of roses. As usual, How- 
ard & Smith, of Los Angeles, had a 
wonderful display of their improved 
cinerarias, which formed a mass of solid 
blue with their wonderful shades of pur- 
ple, lavender and blue. Siebrecht's 
House of Flowers made a magnificent 
showing of potted plants, which occu- 
pied one end of the Palm room. The 
Santa Barbara Seed Co. made a fine 
showing of flowers grown from its seed, 
as did also the F. C. Nash Co. and the 
Campbell Seed Store, both of Pasadena. 
Gold, silver and bronze medals were 
struck for this show for the first time. 
Winners of gold medals were Herbert 
Bateman, Inc., and Walter Armacost & 
Co., for the best commercial showing 
covering 200 square feet or less. 



The judges of everything in this 
show, with the exception of commercial 
florists' tlisplays, table decorations and 
brides' bou(|uets, were Alois Frey, A. 
Martini, J. J. Reeves, Roy F. Wilcox, 
Roliert MacMillan and M. Paige. The 
lady judges of the tables and brides' 
bouquets were selected by the women's 
clubs of tlie vicinity from among their 
uienibership. 

Bateman 's Bridal Bower. 

One of the most interesting features 
of the show was the beautiful bridal 
bower prepared by Herbert Bateman, 
Inc., of Los Angeles, which was 
awarded the first gold medal that has 
been presented at a Pasadena flower 
show in seventeen years. In this dis- 
play, which was arranged for a garden 
wedding, a combination of tamarix and 
Japanese flowering peach was used, and 
on the bench and table was a striking 
combination of baskets of pink tulips 
and delphiniums, with deep blue can- 
dles and metal cloth. The background 
was banked heavily with white wat- 
sonias and huckleberry foliage. 

Miss Bessie Eyton, leading lady at 
the Morosco theater, in Los Angeles, 
was so impressed with the beauty of 
this setting that she consented to be 
photographed in it, wearing the wed- 
ding gown in which she appears in her 
present production, "Abie's Irish 
Rose." This exhibit undoubtedly cre- 
ated more interest than anything else 
shown. 

Table Decorations. 

The table decorations shown in the 
private dining room attracted a great 
deal of interest, on account of this be- 
ing the first time anything has been 
shown in the commercial class. The one 
exhibited by Siebrecht's House of 




Bridal Bower at Pasadena Show, Staged by Herbert Biteman, Inc., with Actress Posing as Bride. 



38 



The Florists^ Review 



Max 4, 1922 



Flowers received first prize; Whit- 
ford 's, Florists, received the second 
prize, while Wright's Flower Shop was 
third. The table decorated by Siebrecht 
had for its center orchids of purple and 
deep lavender, with corsage bouquets 
of orchids for feminine guests, with 
gardeni;is for the men. 

Running this table a close second was 
the one decorated by Whitford's, Flo- 
rists. This was a French combination of 
exquisite roses in pale yellow, with 
Spanish iris and Adiantum Farleyense. 
Corsage bpuquets of like loveliness 
marked the covers for the feminine 
guests at this table, with appropriate 
boutonnieres for the men. 

The first prize bride's bouquet, fur- 
nished by Siebrecht 's House of Flow- 
ers, and the second prize bouquet, fur- 
nished by Whitford's, Florists, were 
carried by Mrs. Floyd Pond and might 



have served at the nuptials of Titania 
herself. Mrs. Pond, in taking the 
bride 's role, represented all the beauty 
of the characterization. She was as- 
sisted by Roy Walker, who is the finan- 
cial secretary of the Pasadena Horti- 
cultural Society. L. A. W, 



MAY REGULATE TRADE BODIES. 



Bills Before Congress. 

Trade organizations will be subject 
to government regulation if the Edge 
and McArthur bills, now before Con- 
gress, are passed. Within the course 
of the next week or ten days, a subcom- 
mittee of the Senate judiciary commit- 
tee will begin hearings in connection 
with Senator Edge's bill, which pro- 
vides for the regulation of trade asso- 
ciations by the federal trade commis- 



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Prize- Winning Bride's Bouquet of Whitford's, Florists, at Pasadena Show. 



sion. The Senate judiciary committee 
recently reported a resolution authoriz- 
ing the appointment of a committee to 
investigate trade conditions with a 
view, among other things, to establish- 
ing the status of cooperative organiza- 
tions as distinguished from illicit com- 
binations in restraint of trade. 

The great educational, economic and 
social value of trade association work 
is at present somewhat underrated and 
grave doubts have crept into the minds 
of the public concerning the real pur- 
poses of legitimate associations, because 
of the activities of a certain group or 
class of associations engaged in ques- 
tionable practices. There is no doubt 
that out of the Hardwood Lumber de- 
cision, the Hoover-Daugherty corre- 
spondence, Mr. Hoover's recent trade 
association conference, and the Edge 
bill, there will come some solution of 
the question as to the real functions 
and powers of trade organizations 
which, Mr. Hoover says, "have been 
well proven to be in public interest." 

Provisions of Bills, 

The Edge bill, Senate 3385, and its 
conipanion by Mr. McArthur, H. H, 
llLie, are lengthy measures. Provisions 
of particular interest may be briefly de- 
scribed as follows: 

Every trade association would be re- 
quired to file with the commission: 

1. Statement of its general character 
and activities; 

2. List of members, officers, direct- 
ors, committees and managing agents; 

3. Copy of constitution and by-laws, 
minutes of meetings, resolutions, agree- 
ments and any modifications thereof. 

4. Statistics collected by, or for the 
benefit of members, concerning produc- 
tion, shipments, stocks on hand, con- 
tracts, prices, credit information, or any 
other statistics respecting the trade. 

T'nless prohibited by order of the fed- 
oral trade commission, associations may 
distribute any statistics so filed among 
their members. 

The commission would be given au- 
thority to prescribe the method of filing 
such information, and failure to comply 
with the order of the commission would 
be made a misdemeanor punishable by 
fine or by fine and imprisonment. 

Trade associations would be required 
to give the commission notice of time 
and place of every association meeting, 
and the commission, if it saw fit, might 
have a representative present at any 
such meeting. 

Commission May Approve. 

On application of any trade associa- 
tion the commission may pass on the 
legality of the association's plans and 
objects, and if such objects or purposes 
are not violative of anti-trust statutes, 
the commission may issue a certificatb 
of its approval of such objects and pur- 
poses. If the association's activities 
seem to conflict with provisions of anti- 
trust laws, the commission may suggest 
alterations in such plans. 

Any association holding a certificate 
issued by the commission inav request 
it to rule with respect to proposed plans 
of operation which the association 
deems in the best interests of the indus- 
try. The commission may, on its own 
initiative, or on request of an associa- 
tion, issue its ruling in relation to pro- 
posed plans, or may call into confer- 
ence members of the association and 
others engaged in the same line of in- 
dustry, for the purpose of agreeing upon 



■ v.- 



M>Y 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



39 



proposed activities or plana of opera- 
tion. If the commission, after agree- 
ment among the trade, finds that the 
proposed practices are not in violation 
of the law, it may approve such plans,- 
but such approval shall not extend to 
consequences or results due to the abuse 
of such practices or customs. 

If the commission shall have reason 
to believe that the conduct of any asso- 
ciation or practice of such association 
is in violation of the anti-trust laws, it 
may summon the association's officers, 
members or agents to appear at a hear- 
ing, and should it be found that the con- 
duct or practices of such association are 
in violation of law, the commission may 
order such association, its members, 
oflfieers or agents to cease and desist 
from such conduct or practices. 

These are the salient features of the 
Edge and McArthur bills. It is likely 
that after hearings by the committee 
the measures, if acted upon during this 
session, will be amended in certain par- 
ticulars. 

FLORICULTUBE STUDENTS' TRIP. 



CommeirciaJ Banges Inspected. 

The iioricultural class and several 
visitors at the Connecticut Agricultural 
College made a trip to a number of the 
commercial greenhouses in the state, 
April 8. Those making the trip were 
Prof. R. H. Patch, instructor; Mrs. 
Boyers, Mrs. Dixon, Miss Wilson, E. S. 
Patterson, C. J. Grant, N. P. Dickens, 
T. R. Gardner, W. Lelash, R. Seymour, 
Mr. King and Mr. Butler. 

At Cromwell. 

The party made the trip by automo- 
bile from the college to Hartford and 
from there to A. N. Pierson, Inc., at 
Cromwell. All the houses of this firm 
were inspected under the direction of 
Mr. Mason. The plants at this range 
were in exceedingly good condition, and 
everybody was busy getting flowers out 
for the Easter trade. While the party 
was there, several large trucks left with 
Easter plants for the markets. 

One large house is devoted to the 
propagation and grafting of roses. It 
was estimated that 1,000,000 Manetti 
stocks liad been grafted during the fall, 
winter and spring. 

Some large cibotiums- were inspected 
and found to be in wonderful condition. 
Another large liouse was devoted to 
Easter lilies, and thousands of lilies 
were seen in bloom. The spira-as were 
large and attractive. 

The east range, across the road, was 
in full swing, growing and propagating 
carnations and chrysanthemums. Some 
of the varieties of carnations noticed 
here were Aviator, Hope Henshaw, Har- 
vester, Enchantress Supreme and Crys- 
tal White. Some lilies grown from gov- 
ernment seed were noticed and they 
seemed to be in good condition. 

With John Coombs. 

This part of the trip took up all the 
forenoon. The party returned to Hart- 
ford, where the members had dinner and 
then visited the greenhouses of John 
Coombs, outside the city. This range 
was inspected under the direction of 
N. C. Osborn. The houses are devoted 
almost wholly to roses and carnations. 
The houses were in good condition and 
the flowers appeared to be healthy and 
strong. Some of the varieties of roses 
grown in this range are Ophelia, But- 



?S?ffS???'g52S?9?gSiSV?S?Si»?S?SiVy^^ 



WHO'S WHO JTrISI and WHY 




S2S252S25252525SS252S5SSSSE525S2525S252S25 




BOBEBT FYLE. 

KNOWN widely as president of the Conard & Jones Co., West Grove, Pa., the 
claim of Robert Pyle to a place in "Who's Who" rests on more than being 
the head of a famous business house. As an authority on roses, as the author of 
one of the most valuable books on rose culture and as the president of the American 
Rose Society, Mr. Pyle has done much towards the advancement of the rose in 
many ways. Those who know what Mr. Pyle has accomplished, but do not know 
his age, will be surprised to hear he is no more than 45, having been born at 
London Grove, Pa., March 7, 1877. After graduating from Swarthmore College in 
1897 and acting as superintendent there for a year, Mr. Pyle entered the green- 
houses of the Conard & Jones Co. in 1898. Next year, therefore, he will celebrate 
the silver anniversary of his connection with the company. 



terfly. Crusader, Columbia, Crimson 
Queen, Aaron Ward and White Ophelia. 
Some of the carnations grown are Maine 
Sunshine, Matchless, Harvester and 
Enchantress Supreme. 

At W. W. Thompson's. 

The party next proceeded to the es- 
tablishment of W. W. Thompson, at 
West Hartford, a specialist in violets 
and sweet peas. Everyone was busy at 
this range, due to the Easter rush. The 
sweet peas were in excellent condition. 
The Aurora variety is considered by 
this grower as one of the best sweet 
peas. The violets were in good condi- 
tion. Double Imperial is ttie variety 
grown. 

One house at this range w;is used for 
growing vegetables, such :is tomatoes 
and radishes, and the owner considered 



this quite profitable combined with 
flower growing. 

Spear & McManus. 

After leaving the Thompson range 
the party visited the retail store of 
Spear & McManus, on Asylum street, at 
Hartford. This store is considered one 
of the best retail flower stores in the 
United States. It has an advantage 
over many stores in having a small 
greenhouse attached at the rear, in 
which flowers can be stored and kej)! 
over. There is an entrance at the rear 
through which all deliveries are made, 
thus not interfering with pedestrian 
trade from the street. The temperature 
of the store and greenhouse is regulated 
by a boiler in the basement. In the 
basement at the front and partly under 
the sidewalk a room has been artistic- 



38 



The Florists^ Review 



Mw 4, l!t22 



l'"li)\v(Ms icfi'i\iMl litst |iii/,c: Wliil 
fiird 's, I''l()iists, rc('('i\ I'd tlic sccoml 
jiri/.c, wliilc Wri^jlit 's FIowim' Shop wns 
third. Tlic t;tldc decorated liy Sicl.iccdit 
hiid for its ci'iitiT orcliids ot' [)ur|)l(' and 
di't'|] lavciKlcr, willi corRagc boiKiiicts 
ol oichids for fciiiiiiiiic yiicsts, with 
yarilriiias for the iiifii. 

Kiiiiiiiii^ this table a i-losc second \va^ 
the one ilccoralcd liy Wliit ford 's, I'lo 
lists. This was a I'mii li coniliinat ion ot' 
('.\i|iiisit I' roses in jiale yelhiw, witli 
Spanish iris aii<l Adiantnni l"a rieyense. 
• 'orsayc lioinpiets of like lovelines- 
ni.-irki'il the i-(i\ crs tor the feminine 
quests at this lalde. with appfopriate 
hoiilonn ieres for t he men. 

The lirst pi-i/.e hride '- lioiicpiet. fur 
riished l)y Siel>reeht 's House ot' I'low 
I'rs, and llie second pii/e houipiet. t'nr 
nished liy W'h it ford 's, I'lorisis, were 
"•anied lis- .Mrs. l''lo\-i| Toad and miiilit 



have ser\('ii at the nuptials of Titania 
heistdt'. Mrs. I'ond. in taking the 
l)iide's role, rejiresentcd all the beauty 
ot' the ( haracteri/at ion. She was as- 
sisted by Roy W.ilker, who is tlie finan- 
cial secretary of the I'asadena Horti- 
cultural Society. L. .\. \V. 



MAY REGULATE TRADE BODIES. 



Bills Before Congress. 

Tr.ade oreani/.ations will be sub.ioct 
to e;()veiiinieiit rejiulation if the Kdye 
,ind .Mc.\rthur bills, now before C^on- 
yiess, are passed. Within the course 
of the next week or ten days, a subeom- 
mittee ot the Senate judiciary conimit- 
tei' will JM't^iii heariny;s in connection 
with Senator Kdire's bill, whiidL ])ro- 
\ ide> for the rc'^ulation of traile ;isso- 
ci.atiiins bv the I'eder.'il trade coininis 




Prire-Winnjug Bride's Bouquet of Whittord's, Florists, at Pasadena Show. 



sioii. The Senjite judiciary eominittec 
recently reported a resolution autlioriz 
in^j tlie appointment of a committee to 
invest ifjiite trade conditions with a 
view, anion;; other things, to establish 
ing- the status of cooperative organiza- 
tions as distiiis:uishe(l from illicit com- 
binations in restraint of trade. 

The great educational, economic and 
soci.al value of trade association work 
is at ])resent somewhat underrated and 
grave doubts have crept into the minds 
of the ](ublic coiu'erning the real pur- 
j>()ses of legitimate a.ss(U'iations, because 
of the activities of a certain group or 
class of associations engaged in ques- 
tioniible jiractices. There is no doubt 
that out of the Hardwood Lumber de- 
cision, the iloover-Daugherty corre- 
si.ondence, Mr. Jloover's recent trade 
association conference, and the P]dge 
bill, there will come some solution of 
the (juestion as to the real functions 
;in(i jtowers of trade organi/ations 
which, Ml-. IIoo\-,'r s.ays, ''liave been 
well proven to be in jiublic interest." 

Provisions of Bills. 

The K,lf.e bill. Senate li.'iS,'., and its 
'■"iiipaiiion by .Mr. McArtliur, U. H. 
lll->t), ;ire lengthy measures. J'rovisions 
of particular interest may be briefly de- 
scribed as f(dlows: 

l-\eiy tiiide .association would be re- 
'lii'i'''! to tile with the commission: 

I. St;iteiiient of its general cliaracter 
and •■let i \it ies ; 

-'• I'i^t of members, officers, direct- 
iTs. committees .and managing .agents; 

■•. <'opy of coiotifution and bylaws, 
minute-, of meetings, resolutions,' ;igree- 
alerlt■^ ;ind .any modifications thereof. 

I. Statisti<-s collected by, or for the 
'"■'I'ti' iif members, concerning ])ro<bic- 
tioii. shipments, stocks on h.and, con- 
tracts, prices, credit inforni.ation, or anv 
other statistics resjiecting the trade. 

In less luadiibited by order of the fed- 
eral tr.ade commission, associations may 
distribute any statistics so filed .among 
their nieinb(>rs. 

The commission would be given au- 
thority to prescribe the method of filing 
such informafion, .and f.ailure to comidy 
with the or<ler of tli(> commission would 
be made .a m isdeine.anor ]Minish.able by 
fine or by line .and ini]irisoninent. 

Tr-ade .asxiciat ions would be refiuired 
'" i^i^'' 'III' commission notice of time 
.and place of every association meeting, 
and the commission, if it s,aw fit, might 
lia\i' .a rc'presentat ive present at anv 
-•ucli meeting. 

Commission May Approve. 

'»ii .application of any trade associa- 
'i"'i the commission may pass on the 
li';;a!it\- of the association's jilans and 
"l'.i''et-. .arid if such idijecfs or iiur[)0ses 
are not \iol.ati\e ot' antitrust statutes, 
llie c-ommission may issue a certificate 
of its ajijiroval of such objects and ]>nr- 
poses. If tli(> associ.ition 's .activities 
seem to conflict with |irovisioiis of anti- 
trust laws, file commission mav suggest 
aliei-,-it ions in sindi ]d,ans. 

.\iiy .association li(ddino ,a cert ilicat !■ 
issued liy the commission ni,i\- reipiest 
if to rule with resp,.,-! (,, proposed pl.aiis 
"'' "|"-i''ition which the .associ.afion 
deems III thi' best interests of the indus- 
try. The commission ni.a>-, on its own 
inifi,ati\e, or on rei|uest of ,aii .associa- 
tion, issii.' its ruling in rcdation to pro- 
posed pl.ans, or ni.ay call into confer- 
ence niemb.'rs of the .associ.af io^ and 
others eng.aged in th(> s.ame line/of in- 
dustry-, for th(^ piirjiose (d' .-lyrei-iiJt; upon 



Mav I, l!»li-' 



The Florists' Review 



39 



pro[iosed activities or plans of opera- 
tion. If the commission, after af^ree- 
nient among the trade, finds that the 
proposed practices are not in violation 
of the law, it may approve such plans, 
liiit such approval shall not extend to 
<'onsei|U(!nces or results due to the abuse 
of such practices or customs. 

If the commission shall have reason 
to believe that the conduct of any asso- 
ciation or practice of such association 
is in violation of the anti-trust laws, it 
may summon the association's officers, 
members or agents to appear at a hear- 
ing, and should it be found that the con- 
duct or jiractices of such association are 
ill violation of law, the commission may 
order such association, its members, 
o!ili<'cis or agents to cease and desist 
from siicii conduct or ])ractices. 

These are the salient features of the 
K.lge and McArthur bills. It is likely 
that afttM" hearings by the committee 
the measures, if acted upon during this 
session, will be ;iiMeii(led in certain par- 
t iculars. 



FLORICULTURE STUDENTS' TRIP. 



Commercial Ranges Inspected. 

Tlir lloricMlt iiral <-lass ;iii(l several 
\ i-iti)is ;it the Connect iciil Agricultural 
(,'ollege iiJ.'ide a trip to a number of the 
commercial greenhouses in the state, 
A[iiil S. 'Diose making tlie trip were 
i'rol. H. II. I'atch. instructor: Mrs. 
j'loyer-, .Mrs. |)ixoii, Miss Wilson, K. S. 
I'attersoii, ('. .1. (iraiit, X. I'. Dickens, 
T. I{. (i.-irdnei-, \V. L.^l.asli, K, Seymour, 
Mr. King and Mr. Hutler. 

At Cromwell. 

The party in;uie the trip by .•luldiiid 
liih- Iroir, the college to Hartford and 
from I hell' to A. X. I'ierson, Inc., at 
Cromwell. All the housi's of this firm 
wi^re inspected under the direction of 
Mr. M.ason. The plants at this ran^e 
were in exceedingly good condition, and 
e\erybody was busy getting flowers out 
for the Kaster trade. While the party 
was there, several large trucks left with 
K.i'^ter |il;iiits for the markets. 

tine l.irge house is devoted to the 
proi)ag;itioii and grafting of roses. It 
was estimated that l.(Hli),()O0 .VlaiH'tti 
stocks had been grafted during the I'mII, 
winter and s[)ring. 

Some large cibotiums- were ins]iected 
.iiul tumid to be in woiiclerfiil condition. 
Allot III r l;iiu,. Iiniise was devoted to 
Kastei lilies, ,iiid thousands of lilies 
were seen in hlooin. The spira'.as were 
larye and attractive. 

Tile east range, across the ro.ul, was 
Ml full swing, yrowiiiy; and pro[iagat inj^ 
carnations .-iiid chrys;mt hemuins. Somr 
•'1 the wiiiet ies of r,-i mat ion ^ miiiIitiI 
here Will. Aviator, Hope 1 1 eiish.i w. ll.ir 
\esler. I'liicliaiit ress .Supreme .■iiid ('iv- 
tal White. Some lilies ejrown friuii go\-- 
"■niineiit seeil ueie noticed and they 
^'■'■1 1 to lie ill ;i I coliilit ion. 

With John Coombs. 

'I'lii^ p;irt ot tile tii]i took up :i II t lie 
toieiio.iTi. The p;iii\- leturiod to llait- 
toid, where the members had dinner and 
then visiteil the ereeiihouses of John 
*'oombs, outside the city. This range 
\\as inspected under the direction of 
^- C, Osborn. The houses are devoted 
• ilniosl wholly to roses and carnations. 
'I he houses were in good condition and 
the liowers appeared to be healthy and 
^t'onn. Some of the varieties of roses 
i;roun in this range .-ire ()pheli;i. P.ut 




ROBERT PYLE. 



ire 



idelit of the Ciin.ird iV .Imie-, Co.. W 
to ;t pl:ii-e ill •'Who's Who'' ri-^ts i 
louse. .Vs ;in authoiit\' on rosi 



KXOWX widely a 
claim of Robert \'\ 
the head of a famous busiiu 
one of the most valuable boid-is on rose culture and as the presiib 
Kose Society, Mr. I'yie has done much tow.irds the ;id\anceii 
many ways. Those who know what Mr. I'yle has accomplishei 
his age, will be sui]iiised to heir he is no more than ■!."), ha 
London (iro\t', I'a., -March 7, ls77. After graduating from Sw; 
1897 and .icting as sii[ieiiiitendeiit there tor a year, Mr. I'v 
houses of the Coiiard .!»: .loiies Co. in IS'.IS. Xext year, there! or 
the siU'er anniversMi'y of his coiiiieit ion with the compaiiv. 



e-t (iro^ 
111 mole I 
■s. .'IS the 
•lit of the 

lent ol' t 
1, but ilo 
villg bee 
irt lillioli 
entered 
!•, he \\ i 



hull be 
,'iut hoi 
.\llieli 

he rosi' 
not Ui 

n burn 

Coll,-. 

the ;.;re 
celebr 



the 

inn 
uL 

i-an 
ill 

M I w 

a I 
in 

ell 
.-It..' 



lertly. ( 'lUs.-nlei', ( 'uliim bi;i. <'rimsoii tlii^- (piite picilit .'i Me eum lii ih'iI with 
<^iieeii, .Vaion W:inl ;iiiil White Ophelia. lluwei ei-u\\iii;j. 
Some of the eai'ii.-it ions ;^iu\\ii ;iii- .M;iilie 



Siinshiiie. .Matehlev., Il:ir\e-ter aiel 
I'lllrha lit ress Supreme. 

At "W. W. Thompson's. 

The party next pinceeileil to the es- 
tablish in ell t ul W. W, Tlmmpsuii, .it 
West Hartford, a -piM-i:i list in viulet> 
and sweet |ie;is. |-Aer\(ilie \\ .i-. liUs\ at. 
this raiiye, due tu the Master rush. The 
sweet peas were in ixrelleiit condiliiiii. 
The Aiiror.a variety is eoiisidere.l liv 

this erower ,IS one uf the best sweet 

peas. Till.' \iolets were in y I cuiidi 

lion. huiible liii[ierial is the \;iriety 
;.;r(iw II. 

')iii' liou-.|. .-It tlii.< ranee was used tor 
urowiny \ceetables. snrli as tom.-itoes 
and r.adishes, ;ind the owner roiisi,|ere.| 



Spear & McManus. 

.\fter leaving the I'huinpsuii r.-iiii;e 
the p.irty \isiiei| the retail stuie oi 
Speai iV .Mc.Maiiiis, un .\syliiin street, .it 
llaitl'urd. 'I'his store is consideieil mi.- 
of the best retail tlower stores in the 
liiited States. It has an a<lvant;ige 
iisei- niaiiv stores in having a sm;ill 
nreeiihuiise attaeheil at the rear, in 
uhi.h ilowers e;iii lie stored and ki'p! 
o\er. There is ;iii entrance at the rear 
tl]lulli;h which ;ill ileliveries .'ire made-, 
thus not interterine with jiedest ri;i n 
trade I rom the stri'et. The temperature 
ui' the store .and greenhouse is remil.ateil 
b\ a boiler ill the basement. In the 
b.asemeni ,it the troiit .and |tartl\ iindet 
the si.leualk a ruoin has 1 n .irtistie- 



-^,f7:.r ^•^jfv"^. 



• .r\ TW*T"JT'l^ •■ 



40 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



ally constructed for show room pur- 
poses. '. ■ 

This ended the trip for the day and 
meinbcTs of the party felt as thougli 
they had learned some valuable lessons 
in floriculture from the growers' and 
from the retdilers' end of the business. 
Roland II. Patch. 



NATIONAL PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN. 



Subscriptions Received. 

Since publication of the last list of 
subscriptions, the following subscrip- 
tions are of record in the secretary's 
oflice and have been paid in: 

Arllnir F. Crabb, Grand Kiipiils. Micli..$ 10.00 

Goorjto Hisohoff. Ann Arbor, Mich 23.00 

J. L,. JolinsoD, DeKalb, lU 5.00 

M. A. Clark, Kllsworth, Me 10.00 

I. li. I'lllBbur.v, Galesburg, 111 l,"i.00 

Harr.v Heinl, Toledo, 25.00 

Joseph Turski, Gross Point, 111 10.00 

Gporge /inuner, Omaha, Nob 10.00 

Kdward Sccery, ratorson, N. J 50.00 

W. II. Elliott & Sons Co., ISoston, Mass. lOO.OO 

A. Glide & Sons Co., Washington, I). C. 100.00 

Harry Tiirno.v, West Toledo, () 10.00 

Kdward H. IJlameuser, Nilos Center, 111. 10.00 

Scottwood Greenhonses, Toledo, 20.00 

H. A. Cook, Oberlln, 6.00 

Sam Schelnnk, IJaton Ilonge, La 10.00 

Krie Buchholz, Munoie, Ind 10.00 

Boehringer Bros.. Bay Citv, Mich 25.00 

Henkes Bros., Watervliet, N. Y 15.00 

A. C. Anderson, Columbus, Neb 10.00 

Otto L. Schmaltz, St. Joseph, .Mo 10.00 

George H. Forber, Davenport, la 12.50 

Charles Bartrher, Denison, la 10.00 

Henry J. Doll, Providence, R. 1 10.00 

John Mlesem, Blmhurst, N. Y 8.00 

Elmer D. Smith & Co.. Adrian, Mich... 25.00 

J. Ralph Benjamin, Calverton, N. Y.. 2.0O 

Henry Schmidt, North Bergen, N. J. . . . 25.00 

Jamos A. Cartwright, Welleslev, JIass. 6.00 

B. V. Engle, Rochester, Pa . . ." 10.00 

Oakland Flower Shop, Oakland, Cal.... 10.00 

E. K. Tauch, Marquette, Mich 5.00 

Alban Harvey & Sons, Brandywine 

Summit, Pa 100.00 

Henry Penn, Boston. Mass 100.00 

Tong & Weeks Floral Co., Ashtabula, 0. 12.50 

Niklas & Son, Portland. Ore 36.00 

Prince's Flower Shop, Iowa City, la... 10.00 

E. M. Kroninger, Allentown, Pa 25.00 

Charles A. Zvolanek, Bound Brook, 

N. J 10.00 

Bills Floral Co., Davenport. la 10. 00 

Truton Floral Co., Monett, Mo 6.00 

Abrams & Stevens, Spring Valley, N. Y. 10.00 
Crlssman Greenhouse Co.. Punxsutaw- 

ney, Pa 25.00 

Davis Floral Co.. Davenport, la 10.00 

L. Menand, Albany. N. Y 10.00 

J. George Jurgens, Northport, N. Y... 10.00 

H. B. Relmers, Spokane. Wash 10.00 

Hughes Greenhouses, Hillsdale, Mich.. 6.00 

W. R. Nicholson, Framingham, Mass.. 75.00 



Samuel Hanson. Troy, N. Y $ r>.00 

Leuna L. Schmidt, Wlnftcld, Kan 5.00 

Will Bros. Co., Minneapolis, Minn 15.00 

Julia Pelletler, St. Louis, Mo 5.00 

Kicliard Lietz, Milwaukee, Wis 5.00 

William MacDonald & Sous, Moosic, Pa. 10.00 

llenrv l^chs, Louisville, Ky 10.00 

Max Schling, New York 14.S.78 

lUilph Deans, Atlanta, Ga 7.00 

1). F. Charlesworth, Cleveland. 15.00 

K. W. Gachring, Philadelphia, Pa 15.00 

Frank F. Crump Estate, Colorado 

Springs, Colo 25.00 

.\ngpl Guardian (Jreenhouses, Chicago. . 10.00 

O. A. Stoll, Hillsdale, Mich 10.00 

John Scott Estate. Brooklyn. N. Y 10.00 

Herbert & Flelshauer, McMlnnville, 

Ore 5,00 

Henry A. Miller, Philadelphia, Pa 10.00 

Myers & Co., BlulTton, Ind 5.00 

Itov E. Neal, Lawrenceville, III 10.00 

.Tones-Russell Co.. Cleveland, 100.00 

S. S. Skirtelsky & Co., New York 60.00 

Gilbert H. Wild. Sarcoxle, Mo 1.00 

a. W. Pfaltzgraff, York, Pa 6.00 

Frederick Flower Shop East Pitts- 
burgh, Pa 10.00 

AVirt Floral Co., Parsons, Kan 10.00 

Bool Floral Co., Ithaca, N. Y 5.00 

Sands Springs Greenhouses, Sands 

Springs, Okla 10.00 

W. J. Smyth, Chicago, 111 50.00 

Harris S. Mueller, AVlchita, Kan 12.50 

Greenville Floral Co., Greenville, S. C. 10.00 

O. F. Eskle, Iron Mountain, Mich 26.00 

McCrum Drug Co., Ijcxington, Va 10.00 

Arnold-Fisher Co., Woburn, Mass 25.00 

George F. Ernest, Washington, D. ■€... 5.00 

Alex Miller, Dallas, Tex 5.00 

John J. Connelly Estate, Roscmont, Pa. 10.00 

.Tohn H. Sykes. Allentown, Pa 25.00 

McDonald & Co., Crawfonlsville, Ind.. 5.00 

Gove the Florist, Burlington, Vt 20.00 

George W. Marshall. Okmulgee, Okla.. 5.00 

H. F. Mlchell Co., Philadelphia, Pa 100.00 

Allied Assns. of Dlinols, Chicago 407,38 

Asman & Dunn, Detroit, Mich 25.00 

William Clowe, Corslcana, Tex 3.00 

Redden Florist. Chicago 10.00 

L. A. Whitmore, Nelsonville, 2.00 

S. J. Goddard, Framingham, Mass 25.00 

Nixon H. Gano, Martinsville, Ind 5.0O 

Arthur Taylor, Boonton, N. J 10,00 

Alfred M. Campbell, Strafford, Pa 100.00 

Wilson Florist Co., Cleveland. 10.00 

Ben.lamin J. Passmore, Malvern, Pa . . . 10.00 

Hollywood Gardens, Seattle, Wash 25.00 

Alps Florists, Montreal, Quebec 15.00 

G. M. John, Okmulgee, Okla 6.00 

Harrv Turney, West Toledo, O- 10.00 

Allied Assns. of Illinois, Chicago 1,1.')7.40 

Alfred Burton, Philadelphia, Pa 100.00 

Total $ 3,806.56 

Amount previously reported 18,365.18 

$22,171.74 

John Young, Sec'y. 



THE HONEYMOON FLAT. 

The accompanying illustration shows 
the honeymoon flat of Arnold Preuss, a 
member of the firm of Rudolph Preuss 



?^^^^^: 



n-t «*• i^ * I 






& Sons, Milwaukee. It also shows the 
firm's new retail store. Young Mr. 
Preuss took unto himself a bride a few 
weeks ago, also a Chevrolet touring car. 
The three, Mr. Preuss, the bride and the 
car, made a trip to Chicago and other 
points south. On their return to Mil- 
waukee Mr. Preuss and Mrs. Preuss 
took up their quarters over the store 
and, though deponent sayeth not, prob- 
ably the Chevrolet is not far away. 

Rudolph Preuss started in the flo- 
rists' business in 1892 at the corner of 
Vine and West Twenty-fourth streets, 
where his operations at first were with 
hotbed sashes. A little later two green- 
houses were built, from which a con- 
siderable range has developed, now in 
charge of Oswald Preuss. The store at 
Twenty-sixth street and Lisbon avenue 
was opened in January. It was out- 
fitted in French gray by the A. L. Ran- 
dall Co., Chicago. A third son, Erwin, 
also is a member of the firm. 



BUSINESS EMBABBASSMENTS. 

New York, N. Y. — Sam Seligman, 
lately dealing in florists' supplies and 
novelties, was adjudicated bankrupt, 
February 27. The first meeting of 
creditors will be held at the oflQce of 
John J. Townsend, referee in bank- 
ruptcy, 299 Broadway, at 11 a. m., 
May 10. At that time creditors may 
prove claims, appoint a trustee, ex- 
amine the bankrupt and transact any 
other business. 

New York, N. Y.— George J. Poly- 
kranas, wholesale florist at 43 Fifth 
avenue, has signed a petition in bank- 
ruptcy. Liabilities of $5,282 are shown, 
with assets of $6,483. The first meeting 
of creditors will be held at the oflSce of 
the referee, Peter B. Olney, 68 William 
street. May 9, at 11:30 a. m. 

Chicago, HI. — Bids are being solicited 
for the tangible assets of the Everette 
R. Peacock Co., by the receiver, Edwin 
D. Buell, 105 West Monroe street. The 
property is that at 160 North Halsted 
street, 4013 Milwaukee avenue and Nor- 
wood Park, and consists of "farm and 
garden seeds, shrubs, bulbs, fruit and 
shade trees, insecticides, farm and gar- 
den implements, furniture, fixtures, 
trucks, machinery and equipment," all 
described in the receiver's inventory 
filed in court. Bids will be received un- 
til 9:30 a. m.. May 11, and will be re- 
ported for approval at 10 a. m. that day 
to Judge Carpenter. Bids must be ac- 
companied by a certified check for not 
less than twenty-five per cent of the 
amount of the bid. In case no satis- 
factory bid is received, the assets will 
be sold at public auction, states the re- 
ceiver, without further notice. 



Honeymoon Flat of Arnold Preuss, over New Store of His Firm, in Milwaukee. 



A COMPETITOR FOR LADDIE? 

K'lmcluilcd from pa«c 3.').) 

established itself in a conspicuous posi- 
tion here. It may be that Eileen can do 
more than the others have done. 

Miss Low is on her third trip to 
America. Harry Barnard, whose death 
was recorded in The Review a few 
weeks ago, came here annually for many 
years as the firm's representative. 
When Mr. Barnard became too old 
longer to make the arduous journey, 
Miss Low took up the task. This time 
she made the trip by way of France, 
Italy, the Suez canal, India and Japan, 
arriving at Vancouver. She will sail 
from New York the latter part of June. 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



41 



iij pijpocxTOCHjiji^g ffffip^i i piipiiP'iFJC^':^ 



BOARD HAS TWO HARD DAYS 



SOCIETY AMERICAN FLORISTS. 



Executive Board Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the executive 
board of the Society of American Elo- 
rists was held in the Woman's Art 
building, Indianapolis, ;ind., Mondajy 
and Tuesday, March 27 and 28. The 
meeting was presided over by Presi- 
dent S. S. Pennock. 

The first session was held Monday at 
9:30 a. m. The president called the 
meeting to order, and directed that the 
roll be called, when the following were 
found to be present: 

S. S. Pennock, president, Philadel- 
phia; Samuel Murray, vice-president, 
Kansas City; John Young, secretary. 
New York; J. J. Hess, treasurer, Oma- 
ha; William F. Gude, Washington rep- 
resentative, Washington, D. C; J. C. 
Vaughan, national councilor, Chicago; 
William L. Rock, Kansas City; Her- 
man P. Knoble, Cleveland; Paul R. 
Klingsporn, Chicago; Thomas C. Joy, 
Nashville, Tenn.; Carl Hagenburger, 
Mentor, O.; Wallace R. Pierson, Crom- 
well, Conn.; Thomas Roland, ex-officio, 
Nahant, Mass.; J. F. Ammann, presi- 
dent Florists' Hail Association, Ed- 
wardsville. 111.; Joseph Kohout, presi- 
dent Chicago Florists' Club, Liberty- 
ville, 111.; Henry Penn, chairman pub- 
licity committee, Boston, Mass.; George 
Asmus, chairman national flower show 
committee, Chicago; Philip Breitmeyer, 
president F. T. D., Detroit, Mich.; W. H. 
Gulp, president Kansas State Florists' 
Association, Wichita, Kan.; S. W. Cog- 
gan, president Michigan State Florists' 
Association, Battle Creek, Mich.; W. D. 
Howard, president American Carnation 
Society, Milford, Mass.; Roman J. Ir- 
win, president New York Florists ' Club, 
New York; Robert Pyle, president 
American Rose Society, West Grove, 
Pa.; W. A. Rowe, president St. Louis 
Florists' Club, Kirkwood, Mo.; James 
McLaughlin, president Cleveland Flo- 
rists' Club, Cleveland; H. M. Joy, presi- 
dent Tennessee State Florists' Associa- 
tion, Nashville, Tenn.; A. S. Gray, pres- 
ident Oklahoma State Florists' Associ- 
ation, Chickasha, Okla., and Richard 
Vincent, Jr., president American Dahlia 
Society, White Marsh, Md. The dele- 
gate members representing the affiliated 
organizations, all having presented 
credentials, were duly seated. James 
McLaughlin was appointed sergeant- 
at-arms. 

Finances. 

Secretary Young read his report of 
the Washington trade exhibition, which 
showed that a profit of $6,520.61 had 
been realized. The total receipts were 
$10,408.43, and disbursements $3,887.82. 
On motion of Mr. Roland, the report 
was accepted and ordered to be made 
part of the minutes. 

The secretary then read the report 
of the auditing committee, first ex- 
plaining that this was a new commit- 
tee of lay members of the society ap- 
pointed at the recommendation of 
Thomas Roland while president. The 
report, submitted by Percy B. Right, 
New York, chairman of the committee, 
endorsed the work of the official audi- 



tors, and the work of the secretary's 
office in the preparation of the various 
accounts, which was enormous. The 
expenditure for auditor's service was, 
in the opinion of the committee, quite 
necessary, and was both nominal and 
reasonable. 

Considerable discussion ensued as to 
the advisability of continuing the serv- 
ice of the public auditors, and it was 
finally decided, on motion of Secretary 
Young, that the services of the public 
accountants be continued, with compen- 
sation not to exceed that now provided. 

The secretary then presented his an- 
nual financial report, which was quite 
lengthy. The report was prefaced with 
the report of the official auditors, 
which certified that balances of the dif- 
ferent funds as set out were a true 
and correct statement of receipts and 
disbursements since January 1, 1921, 
and conformed with the balance as 
shown on the books of the secretary as 
of December 31, 1921. It was shown 
that there was a balance in the perma- 
nent fund of $49,167.68, and in the gen- 
eral fund of $16,653.01. In addition, 
the secretary read a lengthy statement 
from the auditors, embodying comments 
on the system of accounting in force, 
and suggesting a few changes looking 
to its betterment. 

Treasurer J. J. Hess presented his an- 



nual financial report, with official re- 
poitH from the auditors, and bank cer- 
tificates as to balances, all of which 
agreed with the secretary's rejjort. 

At Washington. 

William F. Gude, as Washington rep- 
resentative, stated that while there had 
been no necessity for particularly ac- 
tive service, he might mention that last 
fall he had been privately informed 
that a bill had been introduced which 
threatened the parcel post service for 
florists, and he had at once, through 
the trade papers, called upon all mem- 
bers of the trade to make protests to 
their congressmen against the passage 
of such bill. The bill, he had since been 
informed, had been practically with- 
drawn. He had considered it advisa- 
ble, he said, at the time of the disarma- 
ment conference in Washington, to fol- 
low the example set by the Rotary Club 
and other organizations, and send flow- 
ers to the opening of the conference. 
He had also sent a large basket of 
American Beauty roses in the name of 
the society, but at his own expense. 

Vice-President Murray reported as to 
the renting of the auditorium in Kan- 
sas City for the August convention. 
Secretary Young reported that he and 
President Pennock had visited Kansas 
City and looked over the auditorium. 




Samuel S. Pennock. 

(President <if the Society "f Anierlcan Flciists.) 



40 



The Florists^ Review 



Mav 4, l!l21i 



;illy (-(irist nicl ((1 Im- slmw iddiii imr- 

'J'lii-< I'lulnl the 1ii[i i'or the il;iy .•iinl 
inciiilicis ol the jiarty fell ;is lliou^li 
llii y li;i.| Ir.'inicd some \';iliinl)lo lesson^; 
ill lli'iinilt mc ('rmii llic ai'o\vri-s' aiiil 

lliilli I be ir! :i ilcrs ' rlnl dl' tllr lill^ilKWs. 
IJol.-iihi II. I';itc)i. 



NATIONAL PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN. 



Subscriptions Received. 

Siiicc piiliiic'it idii III tlic l;ist list of 
suliM-ii|it iciii^, llir lOlldwiiii^ siilisc-riji- 
limis ;iic ul' rci-di-d ill llii' MM-ri't :iry "s 
(itlicc ;niil li.'ivo ])vr\i paiil ill : 

Ariliiir 1' CniMi, (IrMii.l KnpiiW, Micli.s Id ihi 

!'■ ^1' i;i--.lM,ir, Ann .\r:iiii. Mi. Ii ur.JH) 

.1 I. .IchnsMii, Ui'KmIIi. Ill .'i.Od 

M. .\. Cl.'irk. i:ns\\(>i'tli, Me 10.00 

I. I. I'ilislMii-x. CmI.sIpiiii;, 111 ir..00 

llMii \ llrinl. Tolc'do, () U.').00 

.l.''.r|,li TiirsKi. Ilros.s l',,ini. III 10.00 

llii.j'u-c- /.iniiniT, Olniili:!, .\ili 10.00 

i:.h\:inl S,rri-v. l':it.rs..n. \ .1 T.O.OO 

W. II. Kllii.ll \- Sons (■«.. r.iis|..n, Mmss. 100.00 

A. (Jiiilc A: .Sdiis ('i>., W:isliinL-t..n. II C 100. (K) 

ll;iiT.\ Tiirn.'.v, West Tulncln, ii 10.00 

Kihvard II. HlmiK'Hsir. Nihs rmiir. III. 10.00 

SriillwcM.d Crcciilionsc^, 'li.l. ■.!... () L'0.00 

H. A C.pdk. oUirliri, (» 5.00 

.s.ini Sc liciiink, r.:ilun i;..u;;.', I.;i 10.00 

Kri.- r.ii.liliol/, :Miiii.i(', IihI 10.00 

r.(.(liiiii;:ci- r.ri.s.. |!:n Cilv. .Mich :;5.(K) 

Ili-nKcs r.n.s., \\:it.r\lni. N ^ l.').(K) 

A. C. .\rHl.-rs..n. C.linnl.iis, .N.-l. 10.00 

lltlo 1.. Srhin.iltz, .Si. .l(isc|ili. .Mh 10.00 

(li'iii-u'i- II, I'.hImt. Il:ivi'n|i.irl. I:i IJ.nii 

Cliiirlis r.:irliln r. Iiiiiis,,n. I:i 10. Oo 

lloiirv .1 Doll, rr<ivi<liinc , i; 1 10.00 

.Inhii Mil's.. Ill, Hliiiliiirsl. .N. V Ti.OO 

KliiiiT II. Smith .V I'.. , .\clri.iii. .Mirh... ^.'.'i.OO 

.1. I{;il|ili r.cn.i.iniiii. Ciilvirlnn, N V.. -J 00 

llrnr.\ Sihniiilt, .Nni-lli r.cTi.'rii. .\ . .1 . . U.'i.lMI 

.linncs .\. Cnr-l wriiihl. \\rlh>li\ . .Mil--- .S.OO 

Ii. V. Klli:h\ Itorhl'Sl.T. I'M 10.11(1 

Oiikliiiiii Ihiucr Sli(,|i. (iMkhin.l. ijl. ... 10(10 

K. It. 'i'iiiiih. .Miirqiictti', Mirh 5. (Ml 

Alli.in Iliirvi'.v & Sims, r.r:inil\ wiin' 

SiiiHinil. Til loo. 00 

I|.ni\ rinii, r...st(.M, Mii.ss KKI.OO 

■Inni: A; Wi-iks Flonil Cii.. Aslitiiliiihi, (), IJ.TpO 

.N'ikhis & Son, I'lirtliiiiil. On' .'iS.OO 

riinii's I'liiw.T Simp, Iowa niv, la... lO.OfI 

K. .M. Kroima'iT. Alli'iilouii. I'.'i 2r..<KI 

Charli-K A. Zvi.liini'k. Itnnn.l I'.i-r.ok, 

.\. .7 10. Oil 

Itills Klonil fc... liaM'iii"'M. la 10 (m 

Trnloii Floral Co.. Moiirlt. .Mo ,T.0O 

Alirams & SIcvfiis, Spring V.iUivv, X. Y. 10.00 
Crissiiiiin (iiii'iiliDiLsc Co.. I'uii.\-^uta w 

iic.v, I'a 2."). 00 

Davis rioi-al Co, Davenport, la 10.00 

I. Miiianil. Allianv, N Y 10.00 

.1. il.-orL'f .Iiirt'ons. .Vorlhiiort. .\. Y... 10.00 

II. !■:. liciniirs. Spokano. Wash 10. (H) 

Hiiirlu's CriTnhoiisi.s, llillMlale, Midi.. n.OO 

W. 1!. M.liolsoii, l-'riiiiiiiiKlnini, Mass.. T.'i.lM) 



Sainnil II.iiisoii. 'Irov, N ^■ $ .'.Oii 

I.i'iina I,. Sohniiill, Wiiiliihl. Kini ."..Oo 

Will Ill-OS. Co., .Mimioapolis, Minn l.'i.OO 

.Inli.i I'llh tiir, SI. Louis. .Mo TlOO 

lii. Ii.'iril Lirlz, Milw.'iiikiT, AVis ,-,.(MI 

Williani Mailiiinalil .V Sons, .Moosi,-, I'.i. 10. (Hi 

IIoiir\ Fn. hs. I.oiiis\ illo. Kv 10. (Id 

Mav S.hliii;;, Niu York I i:;,7S 

Kal|>li Iloaiis, AllanI,!. (la 7 no 

n. I'. Charlosworlh. CloM'l.iml. (I l.'.dd 

r. W" Caoldini:. I'hilailolphia, I'.'I l.'.lld 

I rank I'. Criiniii IMalr, Colorado 

S|,i iii->. Coh. L'.^.Od 

\iiu'il lin.'irdian Crr.iihonsos, Ciiha^'o.. Id. 00 

II. A. Sloll. Ilillsdalo. Mhh 10.00 

.lohii SrotI Fslalo, I'.rookhn. .N , Y .... lO.IHl 
Ilcrlicrt »"c Flcisliancr, .MrMinnvillr, 

Ore o Od 

llciirv A. .Miller. I'hiladiliiljia, I'a... lOdd 

MviTS & Co., Dliitrtoii, Iiiil ."i.OO 

i;o\- i:. Xo.al. l.avvroni'i'Vilh'. Ill 10. (M) 

.lonos-linssoll Co.. Clovcland, () 100. (10 

S. S. Skididskv & Co., Now York od.OO 

(lillirrt II. Wild, Saivoxio. Mo l.Od 

i;. W. I'laltzL'iair. York. I'.a o.dO 

I'rodorhk Flouor Shop I'.asl I'ills- 

l.nirli. I'a in. (Ml 

Will I'loral Co., r.irsons, Kan 10.00 

I'.ool Flor.-ii Co., llhaia, N. Y ."i.Od 

Sands SpriiiL's (!r('i'iiIioiisrs, Sands 

Spriiips, (ikla 10.00 

W, J. Sinvtli, Cliii'aiio. Ill ■'>'>■'»> 

Harris S. Miii'llor, AViihita, Kan IL'.od 

Crconvillo I'loral Co., (;i iivillo, S. C, lO.dfl 

II, I'. lOsUio. Iron Moiinlain. .Mirh L'.",.(Hi 

Mi-Crnni Drnr; Co.. I -oxiiii-'toii. Va Id.od 

.Vniold-Fislior Co:, AVolnirn. .Mass LTi.OO 

(;ior;:i- F. i:rnosl . Wasliiii;.'ton, II. <"... o.OO 

.\lox Miller. Hallas. Tex .'..00 

John .1. Coiinellv FIst.ite. Ito^eiiiont. I'a. 10.00 

.lohn II. Svkes. AllentoHii, I'a t.'.'i.00 

Melion.ilil .V Co., Crau l'or<ls\ ille, Iiiil.. ."..(Kl 

Cue Ihe I'lorist. I'.iiilinu'lon, Xt 2d. (HI 

Ceorui' W. .Marshall. (Ikniidcee, flkla.. .1.00 

II. F. Miehell Co.. I'hiladi Iphia, Fa 100.00 

Allied Assns. of Illinois, Chieauo 107. :1S 

.\sinan .V: Hiiiin. Detroit. Mirh J.'. 00 

William Ch'ue, Corsirana, Tex :!.(MI 

Keddrii Florist. CliieaL'o 10.00 

L. A. Whitiiiore, Nelsonville, ft 2.00 

S. ,1. Codil.aid. Framinirham, Mass 2."..0(i 

Nixon II. Cano. Martinsville. Iiiil .".00 

Arllinr Tavlor, F.oonton, X. J 10. (Hi 

Alfred M. 'Camiihell, Strafford, I'a 100. iHi 

Wils,.n Florist Co., Cleveland, () 10.00 

I'.rniainin .1. I'assiiiorr. Malvern, I'a... Id.OO 

Ilidhwood Cardens, Seattle. Wash 2."i.(Ki 

Alps Florists, Montreal, (Jnelice l."i.(Mi 

i;. M. ,lohii, Okmiilcee, (Ikla r>.00 

llarrv Tnrnev. West Toledo, 10.00 

Allied As-;ns. of Illinois. Cliieajro 1,1.-.7.1o 

Alfrrd liiirtoii, I'liilaiUdpliia, I'a 100.00 

Total $ .s,Ron.,ir. 

.\moniil jirevioiisI\- reported 18,HI'm.1S 

*22.171.74 

.Tdliii YoiinjT, S(^c 'v. 



THE HONEYMOON FLAT. 

Tlid ii('('(ini]ianyiii<; illiistrntioii sluiws 
tlic lioncyiiiodii flat (if Arnolil Trciiss, a 
iiH'iiilicr of tlic firm of Kuilolph I'rcu.ss 




iV !S(iM.s, .Milwaukee. It .also shows tli 
linn's new retail store. Yoiinj; M 
I'reiiss took unto himself a bride a fe 
wci'Ks ajj;o, also a Chevrolet touring cw 
'I'lir tliiee, ]Mr. I'reuss, tlie bride and tli 
e.ir. made a tri|i to (^liica.yo and othi 
points south. On their return to Mi 
w.'iiikeo Mr. Treuss and Mrs. Prou.- 
took up tlieir ((uarters over the stor 
and, thoudli deponent sayeth not, jirol 
.ilily the Chevrolet is not far away. 

Rudolph Prcuss started in the fli 
rists' business in 18i)2 at the eorner (r 
\'iiie and West Twenty-fourth streets 
wliere his oper.ations at first wer(^ witl 
hotbed s.ashes. A little later two drcoii 
houses were built, from wliich a con 
sideiable r;nijj;e has develojied, now ii 
cliat-de of Oswald I'nuiss. The store ai 
Twenty-sixth street and Lisbon avenui 
was opened in January. It was out- 
fitted in h't'eiich sray by the A. Ij. Ean- 
dall Co., Cliie,|o(). A third son, Erwin 
also is a iiieniber of the firm. 



BUSINESS EMBARRASSMENTS. 

New York, N. Y.- -Sam Seli<;inan 
l;itely dealing; in tiorists' suj)iilies and 
iioxclties, was adjudicated bankrupt, 
l-'ebriiary '27. The first meeting; of 
(-reditors will be held at tlie oftice of 
.lohn J. Townsend, referee in bank- 
ruptcy, 2'Jtt ]!ioadw!iy, at 11 a. m., 
May 10. At tliat time creditors may 
]irove claims, apjioint a trustee, ex- 
amine the bankrupt and transact any 
other business. 

New York, N. Y.— George J. Poly- 
kranas, wholesale florist at 4.'! Fifth 
avenue, h;is signed a jietition in bank- 
rujitcy. Iviabilitics of .$"1,282 are sliown, 
with assets of $0,4815. Tlie first meeting 
of creditors will be held at the office of 
the referee, Peter B. Olney, 68 William 
street, May i), at U-.'.'.O a. m. 

Chicago, 111. — Bids are being solicited 
f(H- the tangible assets of the Everette 
K. Peacock Co.. liv the receiver, Edwin 
D. Buell, 10,1 West Monroe street. The 
jn-operty is that at 160 North Ilalsted 
street. -1013 Milwaukee avenue and Nor- 
wood Park, and consists of "farm and 
garden seeds, shrubs, bulbs, fruit and 
shade frees, insecticides, farm and gar- 
den implements, furniture, fixtures, 
trucks, iiiacliiner\' .-iiid e()uipm('nt, " all 
described in the receiver's inventory 
tiled ill court. I-tids will be received un- 
til !t::'.0 a. m.. May 11, and will be re- 
poitrd for apju'dval at 10 a. m. that day 
to .Indge ('ari'enter. Bids must be ac- 
i-onipaiiied by a certified check for not 
less than twenty-five per cent of tlie 
.imount of the bid. In case no satis- 
factory bid is received, the assets will 
lie sold at ]iulilie iuiction, states the re- 
iiiNcr, without further notice. 



Honeymoon Flat of Arnold Preuss, over New Store of His Ffrni, in Milwaukee. 



A COMPETITOR FOR LADDIE? 

I Iiel. .1 lioMi |.,iL'r :;.-,. . 

I'st.-ililislieil itself in a conspicuous jiosi- 
tidii hrn-. It iii;iy be that Eileen can do 
more tli.iii the dtlii-rs htive done. 

Miss I,dw is (,n her third trip to 
AiiHiii-.i. ll.irry I'.ariianl, whose death 
\v;is recorded in The l{e\ iew a few 
wi-rks ;io(i. e,-iirid In re aiiniially for many 
.\r,'ii-s .-IS till' firm "s re]iresentative. 
Whin Mr. liainard liecame too old 
Idiigir to make the arduous journey, 
Miss Low took up the task. This time 
she made the trip by wav of l-'rancc, 
Italy, the Sue/ canal, India and .Japan, 
arriving at Vancouver. She will sail 
iiiiiii Xi-w "i'ork the latter part of June. 



.\i\^ 1. r.'-'t^ 



The Florists^ Review 



41 



BOARD HAS TWO HARD DAYS 

SOCIETY AMERICAN FLORISTS. 



Executive Board Meeting. 

TIk; !iiniii;il iiieotiiif^ of the executive 
l,(iar(l <il' tlic Society of Aiiiericitii Klo- 
ii,t> was licltl ill the Woman's Art 
liiiililiii^, Jiidiiiiiaiiolis, ]iul., Monday 
.•11,(1 Tiicsd.-iy, iMarcli 'J7 and 28. The 
iint'liiii; was ]irfsi(led over by I're.si- 
,lrii( S. S. I'eiinock. 

The first session was liehl Monday at 
;»::;ii a. ni. The president called the 
iiirrtiii;; to orth'r, and directed tliat the 
roll he called, when tlie followiiiji- were 
idiiinl to be present: 

S. S. Pennock, ]iresident, I'liiiadel- 
jihia; Samuel Murray, vice-iiresident, 
i\,ins;is (!ity; .lohn Youn},', secretary, 
New York; ,1. .). Hess, treasurer, Oina- 
li.i; William !•'. (!ude, Washington rep- 
resentative, WashiiiRtou, D. C; J. C. 
\ aii^ili.ni, iiation.al cnuncilor, Chicago; 
William L. Hock, Kansas City; ller- 
iji.iii 1'. Kiiohle, Cleveland; Paul R. 
Klin^^sporn, Chicago; Thomas C. Joy, 
Nashville, Tenn.; Carl llagenburger, 
.Mentor, ().; Wallace R. Pierson, Crom- 
will. Conn.; Thomas Roland, ex-oflieio, 
Nahant, Mass.; .1. F. Ainmann, jiresi- 
dent Florists' Hail Association, Ed- 
wardsville, Jll.; Joseph Kohout, jiresi- 
ileiit Chicago Florists' Club, Liberty- 
\ille, 111.; Henry Penn, chairman pub- 
licity committee, Boston, Mass.; George 
Asmus, cliairman national flower show 
committee, Chicago; Pliilip Preitmever, 
president V. T. D., Detroit, Mich.; \V. II. 
Culp, ]»resident Kansas State Florists' 
Association, Wichita, Kan.; S. W^ Cog- 
gan, president Michigan State Florists' 
Asscjciation, Battle Creek, Mich.; W. D. 
Howard, president American Carnation 
Society, Milford, Mass.; Roman J. Ir- 
win, president New York Florists' Club, 
New York; Robert Pyle, i)resident 
American Kose Society, West (irove, 
Pa.; W. A. Rowe, presid<'nt St. liOuis 
Ilorists' Club, Kirkwood, Mo.; .lames 
McLaughlin, president Cleveland Flo- 
rists' Club, Cleveland; II. M. doy, presi- 
dent T(Miiiessee State Florists' Associa- 
tion, X.ashville, Tenn.; A. S. Cray, ])res- 
ident Oklahoma State Florists' Associ- 
ation, Chickasha, Okla., and Richard 
Vincent. Jr., president American D.ahlia 
Society, White Marsh. Md. The dele- 
gate members r(^i)resenting the aftiliatcd 
organizations, .ill liaving ])resented 
credentials, were (bily s(\'tted. James 
McI,aM;ihliii was ,'i])j>ointed serge.ant- 
at;irnis. 

Finances. 

Secretary "b'onng read his repoit of 
the W.isliington trade exhibition, which 
--liiiw.ul th.at ;i ])refit of .t'i.'i-H.C'l had 
been re;ili/ed. The total reeei]its were 
*H>.^<iS.4;?, and disbursements $:i,8S7.82. 
<bi motion of Mr. R(dand. the r.'])ort 
\v;i- aei-epted and ordered to be made 
p.ait (.r the itiiniites. 

'I'lie secretary then read the report 
"' tlie anditiiiL: committee, tirst ex- 
id.-iiiiing tl,;it this wa^^ a new commit- 
tee of lay members of the societv aj)- 
pointed ,i| the recommeiidat ioii of 
Tli(.m;is ]{(,l;nid while president. The 
r; port,^ submitted by Percy B. Kight, 
^'ew York, chairman of the committee, 
endorsed the work of the olTicial audi- 



tors, and I he wdik of tlie --ecret a ry '.^ 
ollice in the ])re|ial;il ion of the xarioiis 
ai-coiints. whieli \v;is enor'mous. 'I'lie 
ex]ii-n<lit lire for ;iiiilitor's ser\iee w.'is, 
in the o|iiiiioii of the committee, (juite 
ncce-.s:ii'y, and w.as both noiiiiii:il and 
reason.able. 

Considerahb' discussion ensued .as to 
the advisability of continuing the serv- 
ice of the jiiildic auditors, and it was 
finally decided, on motion of Secretary 
Young, that the services of the ]inlilic 
accountants be continued, with compen- 
sation not to exceed that now provided. 

The secretary then jiresented his an- 
nual financial report, which was ipiite 
b'ngthy. The rejiort w.as jirefaced with 
the rejjort of the otiicial tiuditors, 
which certified that balances of the dif- 
ferent funds as set out were a true 
and correct statement of receipts and 
disbursements since January 1, 1921, 
and conformed with the balance as 
shown on the books of the secretary as 
of December 31, 1921. It was shown 
th.at there was a balance in the jierma- 
iient fund of $4!),167.C8, and in the gen- 
eral fund of $10,653.01. In addition, 
the secretary read a lengthy statement 
from the auditors, embodying comments 
on the system of .accounting in force, 
and suggesting ;i few changes looking 
to its betterment. 

Treasurer J. J. Iless [u-esented his an- 



nual liii.i lie iai rejioi't. with oliieial )i- 
poils !|-oiii the .iinlitoi^, and hank cer- 
tilieatev as to li;ilaiiee>. all ot whieli 
agree.! witli till' sicretary's leport. 

At Washiiigton. 

Williaiii I', (■iide, as Washington rep- 
resenl ;it i \ e, stilted that while there had 
lieen no necessity for jiart iciilarly ac- 
Ti\i si'rv ice. he might mention that last 
fall he li;ii| ln.'eii privately informed 
that a liill had been introduced which 
threateneil the' ji.'ircel pcist si.r\ice for 
llorists, and he had at one,-, throiigli 
the trade pajjcrs, calli'd upon all niem- 
bers of the trade to make jirotests to 
their congressmen ag.ainst tlie p.assage 
of siiidi bill. The bill, he had since lieen 
int'ornied, had been practically with- 
drawn. He had considered it advisa- 
ble, he said, at tin' time of the dis.arma- 
ment conference in Washington, to fol- 
low the example set by the Rotary CluK 
and other org.ani/ations, and send flow- 
ers to the opening of the conference, 
lie had also sent a large basket of 
American P>eauty roses in the name of 
the society, but at his own expense. 

\'ice-Pri'sident Murray reported as to 
the renting of the auditorium in Kan- 
sas City for the August convention. 
Secretiiry 'i'oung reported that he and 
President Pennock liad visiteil Kans.as 
Citv and looked over the auditorium, 




Samuel S. Pennock. 



.1 Ah 



7 ^T^ '^^'•^T '_^lff fl* ' JW' ■* ',l^»."l,,iiPP»W-|,lJJ w ,Wrwr !^* • ."« P «jW* ^ ?.,■■ r ■^•y MSVUiPf PI kl • '" * ■* ■!AMrj(^»^f •»■ ' ^iiJV.tm^ if ». ■ V K^JOTU^*', *f „» I 



y^"^-:'' .-V. 



42 



The Florists' Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



and it was found suitable for the pur- 
poses of the society, and it was ar- 
ranged to secure it. It was also ar- 
ranged that the sessions of the conven- 
tion be held in the same building. 
There was an area of 18,000 to 19,000 
square feet available for the exhibits, 
and the rental terms were $1,000 if the 
public were not admitted, and $2,000 
if the building was to be open to the 
public. President Pennock spoke of the 
fine reception he and the secretary ha3 
in the convention city and of the en- 
thusiasm existing among the trade over 
convention prospects. It was arranged 
that details as to trade space and other 
matters bo discussed at a later session 
of the board. 

PubUcity Work. 

Mr. Penn made a verbal report for 
the publicity committee. He stated that 
the work of the committee had been 
satisfactory so far this year, with more 
enthusiasm than had been shown in the 
last two years. The committee was con- 
vinced that the florists' business had 
prospered, and much of the prosperity 
was due to the publicity campaign. A 
meeting of the committee had been held 
that morning, at which it had been 
arranged to spend in national advertis- 
ing at once a further sum of $10,000, 
making a total expenditure of $20,000 
already for 1922. 

George Asmus, chairman of the pub- 
licity finance committee, first referring 
to the fact that a flower stand had been 
opened at the national flower show then 
in progress in Indianapolis, for which 
flowers were donated, and from which 
it was expected at least $1,500 revenue 
might result, all of which was to be 
turned over to the publicity commit- 
tee, said he believed it was possible to 
do the same thing at other shows 
throughout the country. There were 
now, he said, twenty-seven allied or- 
ganizations doing district advertising, 
and a large number of them contributed 
to the national fund. The success of the 
national campaign was not entirely due 
to the magazine advertising; much of 
it was due to the interest it had aroused 
among florists, educating them to ad- 
vertise. It was not only the money 
spent, but the kind of work the com- 
mittee was back of, urging and foster- 
ing, that had much to do with success 
in keeping flowers before the public. 
A better cooperative spirit was now 
apparent. 

The Come-BaM:k. 

J. F. Ammann reviewed some of the 
difficulties which had been presented 
to the ])ublicity committee, particu- 
larly that one in regard to the de- 
ficiency reported some time back by the 
committee, created by the negligence of 
many subscribers in meeting their ob- 
ligations, and removed by a loan from 
the society. That loan had all been 
returned to the general fund, so that 
today the society stood as having not 
contriljuted one dollar to the national 
publicity campaign, while the campaign 
had a good working capital. 

Robert Pyle eulogized the publicity 
work done by the committee, especially 
in regard to an imi)()rtant outcome, the 
establishment of compaigns in local dis- 
tricts. He reviewed the career of the 
nurserymen's advertising campaign, 
which had finished rather badly, and 
expressed his belief that the nursery- 
men would have to come into contact 
with the society's jjublicity enthusiasts 



with the idea of profiting by expe- 
riences exchanged. 

J. C. Vaughan regretted the partial 
failure of the nurserymen's campaign 
and stated that the seedsmen's efforts 
had been quite successful, magazine ar- 
ticles prepared on similar lines to paid 
matter being generally accepted. 

J. C. Vaughan was called upon for 
information as to the working of the 
new office he filled, that of councilor of 
the society in the United States Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Mr. Vaughan made 
a lengthy address, in the course of 
which he touched upon a number of 
subjects pertinent to the relations of 
the society with the chamber. He was 
particularly concerned as to the dis- 
semination of the reports forthcoming 
from the chamber to the society 's mem- 
bers, such reports being voluminous. 
He was willing to make a synopsis of 
matters in these reports of interest to 
the trade. He would like, he said, to 
submit to the board in some way a 
resume of the proceedings of the cham- 
ber, preferably to a committee to be 
appointed from the board, which could 
decide upon any necessary action and 
on advisability of publication. 

On motion of Carl Hagenburger, sec- 
onded by J. J. Hess, the appointment 
of such a committee was directed, and 
President Pennock named it as com- 
prising J. C. Vaughan, chairman; W. F. 
Gude, Carl Hagenburger and Robert 
Pyle. 

President Pennock announced that it 
was necessary that J. C. Vaughan have 
the authorization of the board to act 
as the councilor of the society, and it 
was directed that credentials for 
presentation to the chamber be pre- 
pared, to be signed by the president and 
secretary. 

Considerable discussion was projected 
in regard to the carrying out and ex- 
tension of quarantine 37, but no action 
was taken, although it was arranged 
that at a later session J. C. Vaughan 
should introduce a resolution defining 
his line of action in his relations to the 
United States Chamber of Commerce in 
this and other matters of trade inter- 
est. 

Second Session. 

The board reconvened at 8:30 p. m., 
and President Pennock gave the floor 
to J. F. Ammann, who introduced J. J. 
Davis, an entomologist at the Illinois 
experimental station. Mr. Davis said 
it was his desire to bring to the atten- 
tion of the society the fact that he had 
prepared for publication a book cover- 
ing descriptions of and data concerning 
insects and other pests of the green- 
house and garden. 'The book would con- 
tain over 300 pages, he said, and ap- 
peared to be too large for consideration 
as a publication by any college, experi- 
mental station, or even the Department 
of Agriculture. He did not seek re- 
muneration for the work, but was of 
the opinion that the society might rec- 
ognize its value and assist in some way 
in its production, 

On motion of H. C. Culp, it was de- 
cided that the matter be placed in the 
hands of a committee for consideration, 
and to report at the August conven- 
tion. The chair appointed as such com- 
mittee J. F. Ammann, Prof. H. B. Dor- 
ner and the society's entomologist. 

Kansas City Convention. 

Matters concerning the Kansas City 
convention were then taken up, and a 



long discussion took place. W. L. Rock 
reported conditions as then existing 
in regard to preparations. Some fifteen 
or sixteen committees had been ap- 
pointed, and details appeared to be well 
taken care of. The local florists and 
local and state organizations were work- 
ing together for the success of the 
meeting, and everything pointed to a 
successful gathering as far as housing 
and care were concerned. 

Mr. Robinson, of the convention bu- 
reau of the Chamber of Commerce, 
Kansas City, was present. He imparted 
much information in regard to the con- 
vention city and plans for the conven- 
tion. The auditorium, he said, was just 
about two blocks from practically all 
of the principal hotels. The average 
August temperature in Kansas City was 
not as high as usually experienced in 
Buffalo — did anyone doubt this, there 
were government statistics in support 
of it. The banquet hall at the Muehle- 
bach hotel was cooled by refrigeration, 
something new to many visitors. The 
rental of the hall, he said, was $2,000, 
but his bureau was paying half of it. 
The bureau was also ready to furnish 
all the clerical help, attend to the regis- 
tration of delegates and send out 
quantities of printed matter. The bu- 
reau's publicity men would also be at 
the disposal of the society continually. 
Those traveling by motor, he said, 
would be pleased to find that the old 
trail from St. Louis to Kansas City vpas 
paved about halfway, and the drive 
was usually made in a night, or a day. 
' President Pennock suggested that the 
official program for the convention 
should be discussed. Secretary Young 
explained that the program was gen- 
erally left to the president and secre- 
tary, but the opinions of members of 
the board should be of material assist- 
ance in its compilation. Considerable 
time was spent discussing various sug- 
gestions made looking to an attractive 
program, and a resulting enthusiastic 
attendance. Many ideas were evolved, 
all of which Secretary Young said 
would have careful consideration. 

The rental for space in the trade ex- 
hibition was, on motion, fixed at 60 
cents per square foot. 

Students Seek Union. 

A communication from Robert C. 
Hodgin and Fred J. Gammage, presi- 
dent and secretary respectively of the 
Floricultural Club at the University of 
Illinois, suggesting an affiliation with 
the S. A. F. in some form to be de- 
cided upon, so that, perhaps under the 
name of Junior S. A. F., the club could 
expand into a national organization, 
creating a benefit which should be mu- 
tual, was, after some discussion, re- 
ferred to a committee for consideration, 
and instructions to bring in a recom- 
mendation. The chair appointed Carl 
Hagenburger, Joseph Kohout and W. H. 
Gulp as such committee. 

In accordance with the understanding 
arrived at toward the close of the first 
session, J. C. Vaughan introduced a 
resolution, to be forwarded to the Secre- 
tary of Agriculture, to the effect that 
the board of directors of the S. A. F., 
in session at the fifth national flower 
show, Indianapolis, requested that by 
authority of his office he direct the 
federal horticultural board to make no 
further restrictions in the present regu- 
lations of quarantine 37; and that he 
direct that said federal board take 



,f!«'Ti^;,:"r"^ »?"■;■ ••n;''i'i>'v,j^;ty,V 



Mat 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



43 



immediate measures for relief from 
present drastic restrictions complained 
of by state horticultural societies; 
and, finally, that he direct said 
federal board to proceed no further in 
the curtailment of private or commer- 
cial plant and bulb importations. The 
resolution further stated that the board 
of directors was giving this request 
no press publicity and awaited the sec- 
retary's views and action on the ques- 
tion so vital to the increase and prog- 
ress of the florists ' industry. 

An earnest discussion followed the 
reading of the resolution. Many 
thought it was entirely out of the 
scope of the executive board and was a 
question for the convention, and this 
feeling seemed to prevail. Finally, on 
motion of Robert Pyle, seconded by 
"W. B. Pierson, the resolution was laid 
on the table. 

Tliird Session. 

The first business of the third ses- 
sion, Tuesday morning, was the report 
of the committee in regard to the Flori- 
cultural Club of the University of Illi- 
nois. P. R. Klingsporn read the report, 
which was to the effect that the organi- 
zation of a Junior S. A. F. as outlined 
did not promise benefits of real value 
to the society sufficient to justify such 
a proceeding, but the committee believed 
that if the student body had ultimate 
membership in the society in view, it 
would be of more benefit, mutually, for 
the students to join the society as soon 
as eligible. W. H. Gulp moved the 
adoption of the report, and his motion 
was seconded. After a prolonged dis- 
cussion, however, in which those taking 
part expressed sympathy with the plans 
of the students to connect witli the so- 
ciety in some way, J. F. Ammann moved 
in amendment to Mr. Gulp's motion that 
a committee of three be appointed to 
confer with the students' representa- 
tives before the meeting at Kansas Gity 
and report on recommendations at that 
meeting. The amendment, which was 
accepted as a substitute motion, was 
duly seconded and passed. The chair 
continued the previous committee to act 
on the matter, adding to it J. F. Am- 
mann. 

Standardization. 

Henry Penn, as chairman of tlie com 
mittee appointed at the Washington con- 
vention to consider the question of 
standardization of cut flowers and 
plants, presented a report covering a 
plan prepared by L. F. Murphy, Gincin- 
nati, chairman of the National Flower 
Growers' Association committee, and 
also a report signed by E. Allan Peirce, 
representing the New England district 
of the National Flower Growers' Asso- 
ciation, outlining a plan evolved by the 
eastern growers. The chair explained 
that this question had been referred to 
the executive board at the convention. 
Thomas Roland explained that the re- 
ports presented were to be taken as the 
report of the committee he, as president, 
appointed in Washington at the request 
of the convention, and it was before 
the board for action. The individual 
reports difl'ered in many respects. 
George Asmus moved, and his motion 
was seconded and carried, that inas- 
much as the matter was being taken 
care of by individual organizations, it 
should he referred back to them to work 
out a solution, and that the committee be 
discharged with the thanks of the so- 
ciety. 

The report of the committee on Dutch 




George Asmus. 



I Awiiidcil Ihf S. A. F. (lold Medal ><< Honor.) 



bulbs, expected at this session, not being 
ready, on motion of (ieorge Asmus. the 
committee was directed to present it at 
the August convention. 

A project looking to an establishment 
and observance of Armistice day re- 
ferred to the board by the Washington 
convention was, on motion of George As- 
mus, referred to the publicity committee. 

The advisability of promoting field 
work for meml)ership, also referred to 
the board, was by motion referred to 
the meeting of vice-presidents to be held 
at the Kansas City convention. 

Secretary Young referred to the fact 
that Past-President Patrick Welch, Bos- 
ton, was quite ill, and moved that Henry 
Penn be authorized to send him a mes- 
sage and flowers from the board, con- 
veying sympathy and best wishes for 
a speedy recovery. The chair suggested 
that the message take the form of a 
letter bearing the signatures of the mem- 
bers of the board, and it was so ordered. 

Resolution on Quarantine. 

W. H. Gulp referred to the matter of 

the resolution in regard to quarantine 

No. 37 tabled by the board the previous 

day, and read a substitute resolution 

which he moved be accepted and passed. 

The resolution was as follows: 

To the Honorable Secretarj- of Agriculture. 
WashiriKtoii, I). C. 

The executive l)o!ir<l of the Society of .\nierican 
Florists would resiieetfully urge that you ilireet 
the federal horticultural Iward that no further 
extensions or changes in rulings for application 



cf quai'iintiiie 'M lie made without due notice, 
and op|)(U-tunity for a hearing be given to those 
whose in'erests will be affected by such con- 
templated ruling or change in application. 

A sufflcient time having elapsed since the 
estalilisliing of said quarantine to Hhow its work- 
ing elfli-iency and also where modiflcntions or 
Mdjustnu-nts are needed for its harmonious ac- 
tirm. we would also urge that the board also be 
directed to take up. by conference or otherwise, 
with tliose whose interests are affected and who 
are qnalided to act. the various items and flgures 
which u|) to this tinu' have been brought to the 
iittentioii of the F. II. I!, as being imjust, un- 
necessary or showing discrepancy in the applica- 
tion of said quarantine. This request being made 
not in criticism, but with a view to harmonious 
nd.iustment and a maximum of l)eneflt and ef- 
ficiency in the working of quarantine I?" for 
the g<x>d of tiiose whose interests it is designed 
to protect. 

After a short discussion, the resolu- 
tion, duly seconded, was passed. 

On motion of Secretary Young, it was 
directed that a committee on final resolu- 
tions be appointed, and the chair ap- 
pointed the following as such commit- 
tee: Roman J. Irwin, J. G. Vaughan and 
S. W. Coggan. 

The balance of the session was taken 
up by an informal talk, during which 
the members of the board representing 
affiliated organizations spoke of tlie ac- 
tivities of their various bodies, espe- 
ciallv insofar as thev related to the 
S. A. F. 

Fourth Session. 

Tuesday, March 28, at 1 )). m., the 
board reconvened, and President Pen- 
nock called for the report of the com- 
mittee on .nmendments to by-laws, of 
whicli Thomas Roland was chairman. 



42 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



aiul it was fouiul siiitabli' for the pur- 
poses of the society, aiid it was ar- 
ranged to Hcctire it. It was also ar 
raiijred that tlie sessions of the eorivi'ii- 
tioli lie held in the same liuildinf^. 
There was an area of iS,()0(l to lll.Miio 
S()uare feet available for the exhibit-., 
and the rental terms were $1,(10(1 if tin- 
jmblie were not admitti'd, luwl $i;,ot)i) 
if the building; was to be o]ieii to the 
puhlie,. i'resident rennoek spoke of the 
fine reception he and the secretary liaH 
ill the convention city :iiid of llic iMi 
thusiasm existinj^ aMHiny tlu' trade o\er 
convention ]iros|iects. It was airanned 
thai ilelails as to trade space and other 
matter^ be <li^ciissed at a later -session 
of the board. 

Publicity Work. 

Mr. Penn in.-ide a vi'rb.il lepurt for 
the pnlilicity conimittee. lie '.fated Ih.at 
the work "f the (-(0011111 1 ee had been 
s.at isf.'ictory ^o I'.-ii- tlii^ ye.ar. with more 
eill llllsi.asni tll.UI li.-nl lieeti ~liri\\li ill I lie 
Last two years. The ((iiiiiiiit t ee w,a^ i-(im 
\iiiced lli.at the ll(iri'-I--' liiisine-~s bad 
pnispered. ,iMd iiiiicli (il the pri i--per 1 1 y 
w.a^ due Id the publicitv c.aiii pa ii;n. .\ 
iiieetine (if ihe conimittee liaci been hidd 
that nioriiint;. .at whieli it h.ad been 
.arr.aii^ed In -peiid in n.at iiiii;i 1 a'lvertis- 
iiie ;it (iih-e a lurlher sum nf .■flo.iiOu, 
m.akin;^ a let.al expenditure ,,\ ;i;-j(i_iiiMi 
alre.ady for I'.'l^L'. 

lieorec .\s||ll|S, . ll.airili.l 11 el tin |iljb- 

licity lin.aMce cniiimit tee, lir^t rel'erriii;; 
to the f.act that .a llower --tand hail been 
opened at the n.ation.al tlower -^how then 
in |iiiii;reN> in Indi;! n.ijml is. fur which 

llliWel'v Wele dlill.-llc.l. .1 1 1 . 1 Irnlll wlllell 

it u.l.^ e\|ieelefl .-it lea^l -t^ 1 .."lOi I revenue 
rniyht lesiilt, .all ot' wliirli w.a^ to lie 
tiinii'd over to the puliliritN' coniinil- 
tee, s.aid he b(dievcd it u.a^ p(i--ible to 
do the s.anie thin;; .at otlier shows 
t liroii;;li(int tlie eountry. There were 
now, he s;iid, twenty seven allie(| or 
;;^ani/.ations doin^j ilistrict .nKcrt isin^. 
ami a l,ar;;c iiimiber of them emit ribiiteil 
to the natioiijil fund. I'he nuccc^s of tin 
n.ational camp.aion w.as not entirely due 
to the ina>,'azino advertising; muih of 
it was due to the interest it had .aroused 
rimont; florists, edncif in".'' them to .-ol- 
\ertise. It w.as not only the money 
spent, but tlie kinil of worl< tie com- 
mittee w.as back of, ureini: ,iiid toster 
injj, that had mmdi to do with -uccess 

ill kee[>in!_' flower-, bet'ore tile public. 
.\ better e(i(i|HT:lt i\-e spirit W .a s IIOW 

.a]ip.areiil . 

The Come Back. 

.1. I', .\mniaiiii reviewed some of the 

difliciilt ies whiili h.nl 1 n Jiresrntcil 

to the pllblieilv comillit t ee, p:ir1ieu- 
l.arly th.it one in re^rar^i to the de 
licieiicv rejiorted some time b.ack by th(> 

committee, ere.lteil 1p\ tiie 11 e^ 1 i ;^i • lie e ol' 

iiiaiiv ^ubscrilMis ill meetiiiu: tin ir ob 
li;;atioiis, .-iml removed by :i lo.iii I rom 
the society. Tli.it lo.aii had all been 
returned to the e,.ri,|-;i| luild. so that 
tod.ay the society stood , I s li.iviii;; not 
contribute.] one .loll.ir to the iiation.il 
publicitv c.imp;iie II. while the c.imp.ii^ii 
li.ail .a i|o(i(| \\(lrkin^ caidtal. 

Kobert I'yie eiiloei/cd tile plllilicilv 

work done b\ the committee, i-s[ ially 

in ree.-ird to an import.aiit iPiitcome. the 
est.ablishmeiil of comp.-iioiis in Pk-.-iI di^ 
tiicts. He icvievved the career ol the 
nurservmeii 's .-id v ei t isi n^ c:iiiipai^n. 
which h.a.j tinislo'd r.ither b.idlv. and 
«>xpressei| his beliel' lh;il the lilirscvv 
men would h.ivc to come into cont.ail 
with the societv's |iublicitv cut h iisi.ast s 



with the idea of jirolitin^; by expe 
ricnces exidiaiifjed. 

.1. <". N'aii^'han re}j;retted the jiartial 
f.ailure ol' the nurserymen's campaign 
.and stated that the seedsmen's efforts 
h.ad been (piite successful, niat,M/.ine ar 
ti(lcs picp.-ired on similar lines to paid 
mallei bein;,^ ^,.ner.ally accepteil. 

.1. <'. \auolian was called upon tor 
inlOrmat ion as to the working; of tlie 
new ollice he tilled, that of connidlor of 
the society in the I'liited States Cliam 
ber of ('ommerce. .Mr. \'anj;haii niad<' 
;i lenethy address, in the course of:' 
whiih he t(Mi(die(l upon a number of 
subjects pertinent to the relations ol' 
the society with the (dianiber. He was 
part icul.arly concerneil .as to the dis 
semination ot' the reports forthconiinff 
from the (di.amber to the society's mem- 
bers, such re|iorts bein;,' voliiminoiis. 
He vv;is vvilliiie to ni.ake a syno]isis ol' 
iii.alteis in these reports of interest to 
the tr.lde. He vvdllM like, he s.aid. to 
siiliiuit to the lio.ard in some vvay :i 
la'siimt'. ol' ijie proceeilines of the cli.am 
ber. prel'eiablv to .-i committee to be 
.a|i]i(iiiiled from the board, whi(di could 
decide upon .iiiv necess.arv action .and 
on .ad V is.'ibilit y of publication. 

( )ii motion of I'.arl llaocnburecr, -ec 

olnleil by ,1. .1. Hess, the .•Ippoillt lliellt 

of siich a committee was ilirected. and 
I'resident l'eiiiio(d\ ii.aiiie'l it as com 
prising .1. •'. \ .aueh.an, ch.airman; W. I". 
<iude, C.irl llaycnbiirf^er and Robert 
I'yle. 

President reiiiiock annouiicei] th.at it 
vv.as necess.arv tli.it .1. ( '. N'au^han li.ave 
the ,aiit horiz.at ion ol the bo.-ipil to act 
as the councilor ot' the societv, .and it 
was (lirected tli;il credent i.als I'or 
present .-It ion to the idi.amber be ]ire- 
pareii, to be sieiic(l by the president and 
secret .a ry. 

I 'ollsiijer.ilile discussion vv;|s projccteii 
in ree-.ard to the carryin;; out and ex 
tension of (pi.ar.ant iiie il", but no action 
vv.as taken, .althoii;;]! it w.as .-irr.anycd 
Ih.at .at .a later session .1. ('. \':iiiKhan 
slioiibl intidiliice a resolution detiniiii; 
his line ot' .■iclion in his ndations to the 
I'liited St.ate~ I'h.-imber of ('ommerce in 
this .and other m.atters of traile inter 

est. 

Second Session. 

The bo.ird recoil V elleil .-.t ^:l'.ll ].. 111.. 

.am! I'resiibait I'eiiiiock ,:4ave the lloor 
to .1. I', .\mmann, who introdiicecl .1. .1. 
I>.avis, ,111 enlomolo;.;ist at the Illinois 
e\ perinieiil.-i I station. Mr. D.avis s.aid 
it vv.is his .le-ii( to brin^; to the atteii 
lion of Hie society the fact th.at he had 
prepared I'm piiblicit ion ;i book cover- 
ine descriptions ot' ,ind d.-it.a concerning 
insects and other jicsts of the i;r(>eii 
house ,iiii| L:.'ii'deii. The book vvould con- 
tain ov,r :'.oii I'.iees. he s.aid, and .ap 

peal'ed to be loo l.'iree for c oil S i ( 1 (T.a I i O II 

.as ,a |iuldicatimi Ky .-my colleec, experi 

iiieiil.il st.itimi, or even the Dep.artmcnt 

of ,\ eiicult 111 c. He ilid not seid% re 
iiiuiiei .-it ion lor the work, but vv.as of 

tl pillion that the society mi:rlit rec 

oeiii/,. its value and assist in some wav 
ill its juodiiction 

( 111 mill ion of 11 . < '. < 'ul|i. it w.as ,le- 
cided th.at the matter be ]pl.-ice.l in the 
h.inds of .a conimittee I'or consideration, 
.ami to report ,al the .Xii^iist conveii 
lion. The i-hair appointed as such com 
mittee .1. l". .\mm.aiiii. I'rof. H. I?. Dor 

ller .and the societv 's elltollioloelst . 

Kansas City Convention. 

.Matters concerning the Kaiisa- I'ilv 
colivellfioll Were then taken up, ;ill.| a 



loiiir (li.sciissioii took place. W. L. Kock 
reported conditions as then cxistiu}^ 
in regard to preparations. Some fifteen 
or sixteen committees had been ap 
jiointed, and details appeared to be well 
t.akeii care of. The local florists and 
local and state orjj;anizations were work 
ine together for the success of flu 
iiHetiiiK, and everythiufj jiointed to a 
successful •;atherin}{ as far as housinjn 
and care were concerned. 

.Mr, Kobinsoii, of the convention bu 
re.au of the Chamber of Commerce 
Kansas City, was present. He imparted 
much information in refjard to the con 
vent ion city and jdans for the conven- 
tion. The auditorium, he said, was .just 
.about two blocks from practically all 
of the princiiial hotels. The average 
.Vu^ust temperature in Kansas City was 
not as high as usually experienced in 
liufTalo— did anyone doubt this, there 
wi>re government stati.stics in support 
of it. The ban(|uet hall at the Mu(dile- 
li.ich hotel was cooled by refrigeration, 
soiiKdhing new to many visitors. The 
rental of the hall, he said, was .$'-',000, 
but his bureau was paying half of it. 
The bureau was also ready to furnish 
;tll the clerical help, attend to the regis- 
tr.ation of didegati's and send out 
.pi.intiiies of printed matter. The bu- 
re.-iu's jiublicity men would also be at 
the dispos.il of the society continually. 
Those travidinj,' by motor, he said, 
vvould be jilcased to find that the old 
trail from St. Louis to Kansas Cit,v was 
p.avcil about h.alfway, .and tlie drive 
was usuallv made in a night, or a day. 

President Pennock suggested tliat the 
ofticial proerani for tlie convention 
shouM be discussed. Secretary Young 
explained that the ]irogram was gen- 
erally left to the president and secre- 
tary, but the opinions of members of 
the bo.ard should be of material assist- 
.aiice in its coin|iil.at ion. Considerable 
lime was spent discussing various sug- 
ucstions made lookinfj to an attractive 
liro^jr.am, and ,i resulting enthusiastic 
atieiid.aiice. Many ideas were evolved, 
.all of vvlii(di Secretary Young said 
vvouhl h.avc careful consideration, 

The rental for sp.ace in the trade ex- 
hibition was, on motion, fixed at Hi) 
ci.-nts per s(pi,are foot. 

Students Seek Union. 

A coiiimunication from Robert C. 
Hodyin au'l Fred J. Gammage, presi- 
dent .and secretary respectively of the 
rioriciiltural <'hib at the I'niversity of 
Illinois, sum^csting an afliliation with 
the S. .\.. p. iu some form to bo de- 
cided upon, so that, jierh.aiis under the 
ii.ani.' of .lunior S. .V. P., the club could 
expand into ,i national organization, 
erciiin^' ,a bemlit which should be mu- 
tual, vv,as, after some discussion, re- 
leired to .1 conimittee for consideration, 
aii'l instructions to bring in a recom- 
meiid.ation. Tlu^ idinir ajipointed Carl 
H.a;;enburecr. .losejih Kohout and \V. If, 
•'iilp .as such committee. 

In ,ic,-ordaiice with the understanding 
arrive! :it toward the close of the first 
^'■^^'""- •!• ' '■ \'aut;han introduced a 
resolution, to be forwarded to the Secre- 
tary of .\-riciiltina>, to the effect that 
Hie iioard of directors of the S. A. F., 
Ill -ssion .at the fifth national flower 
sliow, IndiaaaiKdis, requested th.at bv 
■'"iHioritv of lii.s office he direct the 
'ed.r.il horticultural board to m.ake no 
iiirther restrictions in the present regu- 
ImIioiis ot ipiarantine :?7: ;ind that he 
•'"■'•''' tliat s.aid feder.al board take 



MAy 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



43 



inmicdiatc riiciusurt's for r.'licf from 
|,r,"St"iit drastic rest rict ions complained 
<,f by state horticultural societies; 
and, " finally, that he direct said 
lCd('ral l)oard to jiroceed no further in 
tli(> curtailment of private or coninier- 
,.ial i)iant and bull) inijjortations. The 
resolution further stated that the boani 
„f directors was ^iviiiK this re((uest 
no ])ress publicity and awaited the sec- 
retary's views and action on the ques- 
tion "so vital to the increase! and proj;- 
icss of the florists' industry. 

An earnest discussion followed the 
nadiiif,' of the resolution. Many 
thoiij;lit it was entirely out of the 
scojx' of the executive board and was a 
iiiKwtion for the convention, and this 
icclinK seemed to prev;iil. Finally, on 
motion of Robert I'yle, seconded by 
W. 1{. I'ierson, the icsolution was laid 
,111 the t.-lble. 

Third Session. 

The first business of tlie tliiiil si'S- 
sioM, Tuesd.-iy nioruiiiy, was the ri|i(prt 
of' the committee in regard to the I'lori 
lultiir.'il fMiib of the rni\cisit y of Ilii 
iiois. r. It. Klint^sponi read the report, 
wliicli xv.as to the rtVecl that the oiyiilii- 
/at ion of a Junior S. A. I', as oiitiiuccl 
ilhl not |iromisc benelits ot' real \alue 
til the society suHicient to justify siieli 
a |ir(M-eedini;, but the cummittee beiie\ei| 
lliat it' the student iin(i\- liad ultimate 
iriembership in the society in \ iew , it 
wdnld be of more lienelit, mu1iiall\', I hi 
llie students to join the society a- >-ooll 
as elii;ibh'. W . 11. ('ul|l lllo\ei| the 

.'idoption ol' the ri'port, and his nuitioii 
was si'conded. .\fter ;i proldnecj di^ 
iiissioii, however, in which those t.ikini; 
|iart expresse(l syinp;ithy with the pl.-in- 
ul' tlie students to connect with the ^o 
ciety in soin(> way, .1. F. .\ni}n;inn moved 
in amendment to Mr. Culp's motion that 
:i committee of three lie .i]ip(dnted to 
confei' with the st\idents' re|u-esent,i 
ti\cs bel'ore the meet iuji ;it Kansas ('ily 
and rejtort on recommendat ions at th.it 
ineetiufj. The ;iniendnient . wliicli was 
accepted as a substitute motion, was 
duly s(>con(led and passed. Tlu' chair 
continued the previous committee to ;iit 
on the m.'itter, addiuij; to it .1. 1'. .\ni 
ina n ri. 

Standardization. 

Ileniy I'enn, ;is cliainiian ot' the cum 
iiiittec appointed at the \V,ishin^;toii con- 
Neiition to <-onsider the i|iiestion ot' 
standanli/.ation of cut ibiweiN and 
plants. |)resented a i'e|iiirt coverinL; a 
plan prep.ared by I,. F. Murphy, ('iuciii- 
ii.-iti, cli;iirm;in of the Nation.al Flower 
I ■lowers ■ .Association committee, ,ind 
■ il^o ;i rejiort sijrn(.(l by K. .\llan I'eirce, 
lepresentinc; the New Kn>;l;ind districi 
ol the N'ational l'"lowi>r (irowcrs' Asso- 
ii.it ion, (nitliniiit,r a plnn i'\dlved by the 
eastern growers. The iliair ex]il:iiiied 
that this (piestion had bei>ii refi^rred to 
the executive board ;it the cenxeutioii. 
I'lioinas Rohand exjilaiiied that the re- 
l'"its prescnt(>d were to be taken as the 

leport lit' the committee lie, as )iresideMt. 
a|'poiiite,| in W.ashinjiton at tlie reipiest 

"' " oiu'ention, .and it u;is Iiefoie 

"le bo.ir.l for action. 'FJie individiml 
lepio-ls differeil in ni.-iny |-es]pects. 

'■ U'' .Nsmus moved. ,ind hi^ motion 

wa- si.corided .-md carried, that iiias- 
"I'l'ti as the m.-itter was beiiie taken 
'■.■ire lit by individii.al ore;i n i/at ions, it 
^leiiilil be referred back to tliem to work 
"lit .•! solution, and that the committee lie 
dischari,rc,| with the th.-ink^ of the so- 
ciet y . 

The report ot' the committ. n Dutcli 




George Asmus. 

A H ill I In I 1 lie >. A. I ',(... I, I \1,.. 1,1 i ..1 II0II..1 . 



bulbs, expected , ■it t ll i s ses^ii, n . n 1 ;t lieiim 
reai|\'. on niotioii ot' (leori;e .\--niii~. llie 
conilnittee was ililecteil to present it at 
t lie .\iim;st c-on\ I'lit ion. 



'I '|ii:iiioiliii,> ::7 Im' iii.iiIi- xvitliiiiil ilnc notice, 
;mi'I iiii|iiirl unit \ Ii>r ;i ln-ariiii; lie i;ivcn t«» tlios*^ 
ulin^c in'cri-v;., uill Im- ;ilTccti'il l>y such coii- 
t>-iii|iliitc<| riijjni: "r • Iniiii;,- in .'t[i|»]ic;ition 

A siitfnicnt lime li.i\iiiL' chips, mI since tlio 

. II', i-t.ihiishini; <'( ^.-lid i|n.-ir.iiiliii,' In slmw its \v,irl;- 

.\ ]iro|ect IooUiIIl; til an est.-i M ishmelil mi: .■lli.icn. v .-mil ;iU,, whirr in.iilitictitiiins iir 



.■md (diser\;ini t' .\ritii-tice 



.el in-tnicnls .-irc ni'i'il.'ii I'nr it-, hiirinuniiins ;ic- 
, , ,, , , , I ,.• I ■ li'in. «■• woiijil ;i|~,. iirL;c tli.-it llic iHiiiril iils,> Ih- 

lerreij to the lioafl liv the \\ .-isli^iit^t on ili,-,., i,.,i i,, tiiU.. mi. In . .iiitiToiicc or ntlicrwisc 

Willi tliiis,. wli,i>i. inter, -a,, ,irc iifTccti'il mnl wliu 
:ir,- i|ii.ilili,'il In :ic!, till, viiriiiiis items ,•01,1 liunres 

Ulii.h ll|i 1.1 this tinii ||M\e lieell hriitn.'lit tn tlie 

^iitentien iif tin- I' II i; as heini; iin.jiist. im- 
ni'ci.s~ni\ 111' sh.iwiiiL' ills, ri'inincv in the iiiiiiliia- 
1 loll .'f siiiil ,|inir,'iiitine. This rei|iiest lieiiiK iiiailp 
'!<<< Ill . riticisiii. hilt Willi a view li« liiiriiiniiiiiiis 
:i,| iiisiii;,.nt ami a niaxininni uf lienelit ami ef- 
Ii'ieiiiv ill the \Mi|-kiiii: 'if i|iiaranlinc '.l~ for 
Ihi- LMii.l ..r Ih.is,. wli.is,. iiiti. rests it is ilesii; 1 



convention w;is, on niotioii ol' 1 leoree As- 
miis, ret'erred to the publicity committee. 

The aiUisa bilit \- ol' promotiiie liejil 
work tor membership, .-ilso referred to 
the board, was b\- motion rct'erreil to 
the meetine- of \ ice |iresii|ent s to be held 
at the Kans.as <'it.\ convention. 

.^ecret;iry 'S'omin; leferred to the I'.-u-t i" I'f'i"' ' 
that F:ist-i'resii|eiit Patrick Welch, Uos- .\fter a short discussion, the resolii- 

ton. w ;is ipiit e ill, a lid moved t li;it Heui>' t mn, duly seconded, w;is p.assed. 
I'enn lie .authorized to send him a mes ( )n mot ion of . -Secret ii ry N'oiine, it was 

s.aee ;inil Mowers from the board, con- directed that a committ n liii.'il resoju- 

\cyinn- s\nip;itli\ and best wishes t'or 1 lotis I,,, .appointed. ;ini| the cli;iir a|i- 

.■I spi>edv recox , r\ , 'i'l h;iir sn;;-eest e.l pointed the I'oilowiim .-is sinh commit- 

lli;it the iuess;iee t;ike the t'oriii of a tee: Koiiiaii .1. I r\\ in. .1. I . \ .■iiieli.an and 

letter be.-iriuL;- the siMn.at llles ot' t he nielll ^. VV'. <'oon..|||. 

Iieis of the lio.-ird, ,'iiid it w.as so ordered. The li;i La lice of the session \\;is t.-iken 

iiji li.\ .■HI iiil'orm;il talk, during which 
tile members of the bo;trd representing 
W. 11. ("iilp referred to the iii;ilter uf .'i Ihli.ited or-r.-i ni/at ions spoke of the ac- 
tlic! resolution in ree;ird to cpi.ar.-iiit in 



Resolution on Quarantine. 



No. '■'>' tabled bv the bo;ird the previous 
day. and re.ad a substitute ri'solution 
which he mo\-ei| be accejited ;iiiil |):issi.,l. 
The resolution w.as .as follows: 

In the Il.iiiiirahl,. S.>,ret:irv ..f .\-ri. ii|t iir.-. 
Washiiiiitiin, I) c. 

The ..\...iiiive hiiaril nf tlie Sii.i.'t.v .if Amen. , in 

I'hirists wiiiilil r,s|ieitl'iill> iiixe that .V lir.-. 1 

the fe.leral liiirticnitiiral h.iaril that I'm liuili.-i 
.■\t.'lisi,,ijs ,,!■ . haliL'es in iiilinirs |,,i- a |i|il ii .1 1 im 



tivities ot their \;irioiis Ixidies, espe- 
ci.ilU iiisof.ir .■IS thev r«d;iti'd to the 
.<. .\. I" 

Fourth Session. 

Tiiesd.a \ . .M.a nil I'S, ;ii ] p. ni., t lie 

lio;|ld li con \ elled. ;|||<I rresident I'ell- 

nock c.illid t'or ihi- report of the com 
inittee lUi ,-1 niendmeiits to li\ !;iws, oi' 
which Tiiom.as Ridaiid was ch.airmaii. 



44 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



Mr. Roland presented a well tliuught out 
report, the dealing with which took iiji 
considerable time, especially as eiuli 
amendment offered was carefully ex- 
plained, both as to purj)ort and effect. 
The amendments offered were as fol- 
lows: 

1. All nmciidmeiit iirovidiiiK for tho npjxpint- 
inoiit (if till (.■x<'<-iiliv(' cijiiiiiiitti'i', t(i ((insist of 
the iirisiiU'iit, vice-president, junior ex president 
and two directors to be iippolnted liy llic presi- 
dent, to serve one year, on taking otll(o Jamiary 
1. In the intervals lietween the meetings of the 
directors, this conunittee to have charge of the 
affairs of the so<'lety, subject to the general and 
sijecific directions of the society and directors. 

2. An amendment jirovidhiK for the appoint- 
ment of reserve fund trustees, the same to con- 
sist of the treasurer and three past-presidents 
to be appointed liy the president, one for one 
year, one for two years and one for three years, 
memlK'rs to elect their own chairman. This 
committee, in the intervals between the meet- 
ings of the directors and subject to the general 
and specific direction of tlie society and direc- 
tors, to liave the care and management of the 
society's reserve funds, and tlie power to sell, 
oxcliange, invest, reinvest and transfer tho same. 
If adopted l\v tlie society, this amendment wo>ild 
eliminate the finance committee, insofar as it 
functions along similar lines. 

3. Amendment governing the permanent 
fund, to be in future linown as "reserve fund." 
Money accruing from life memliorship payments 
to form a reserve ftind, tlie interest of which 
can be used annually for general or specific i)ur- 
poses. The permanent fund or any part of it 
not to be used for any purpose whatever with- 
out the approval of a two-thirds vote of tlie 
entire Iward of directors, and to receive a ma- 
jority of all votes cast at the annual election for 
otHcers; to be jilaced on the ballot and voted on 
as are elected otlicers of the society. 

4. An amendment defining the treasurer's 
duties and powers. He shall deposit funds in 
bank or trust ccmipany as the board of directors 
shall approve, where his account as treasurer 
shall be kejit and all payments shall be made 
by check. He shall have in his safekeeping the 
bonds, deeds, notes and other evidences of prop- 
erty. He shall give lionds equal in amount to 
the funds in his charge. In the absence or dis- 
ability of the treasurer, the directors may ap- 
I>oint a temporary treasurer, who shall have all 
the powers and duties of the treasurer. 

5. An amendment instituting a budget com- 
mittee and defining its duties, the duties to be 
the preparation of an annual budget, to be 
passed at the midwinter meeting of the executive 
board. 

C. An amendment defining the status of the 
president In regard to committees. He shall lie 
an ex-officio member of all committees, and he 
shall have the right to attend and be heard at 
all meetings of such committees, but, at all such 
meetings, except in the case of the executive 
and budget committees, he shall not vote ex- 
cept in the case of a tie. 

All these amendments were, by mo- 
tions, accepted by the board. 

Other Amendments. 

J. F. Aniniann moved, and the motion 
was carried, that an amendment be rec- 
ommended, directing that the secretary 
be elected by the executive board in- 
stead of bv the convention. 



Secretary Young moved, and hi§ mo- 
tion was carried, an amendment be rec- 
ommended to make the councilor of the 
United States Chamber of Commerce a 
member of the executive boiird. 

Ceorge Asmus moved that an amend- 
ment be recommended making the com- 
mittee on tariff and legislation a con- 
stitutional committee and its chairman 
a member of the executive board, and 
the motion was carried. 

Joseph Kohout, at the request of the 
State Florists' Association of Illinois, 
suggested that affiliated bodies be al- 
lowed to elect their directors for more 
than one year, it being believed that a 
greater interest in the society's affairs 
would thus result. In a discussion of the 
matter, George Asmus, John Young, W. 
R. Pierson and J. F. Ammaiin reviewed 
the proceedings which led to the adop- 
tion of the present regulation in affilia- 
tion procedures, and action on the ques- 
tion was not deemed necessary. 

Gold Medal Awarded Again. 

An interesting part of the proceed- 
ings now took place. The matter of the 
medal of honor recommended by Ex- 
President Roland at the Washington 
convention came up in the regular way, 
being on the business agenda for dis- 
cussion. Secretary Young read the rec- 
ommendation as it appeared in the pres- 
idential address, as follows: 

Many years ago this society established a gold 
medal, wliich, I understand, has been awarded 
but twice in all these years. Now, I believe we 
should not bestow it except after the most care- 
ful consideration, but I cannot but think that the 
progress of many branches of our profession dur- 
ing twenty years might have been rewarded 
wisely through the medal we have had so long 
established. This would tend to encourage and 
to spur, especially those whose work is so val- 
uable and so often not rewarded by financial 
returns. Much of the scientific progress needed 
in our profession is by work for love and for 
knowledge and this sort of work needs our help 
in any way we can give it. 

I therefore suggest that the society reestablish 
this medal as a medal of honor, to be awarded 
by the board of directors annually, to the man or 
w'oman, firm or institution, in the United .States, 
or elsewhere, who has done the most in recent 
years to promote horticulture, using the phrase 
in its broadest meaning, members of our society 
to be eligible for this medal, for meritorious 
service of the same kind. It may be awarded 
once in five years to the members of the S. A. F. 
who, diiring the preceding five years, shall have 
rendered services best calculated to advance the 
largest interest in this society. I do not believe, 
however, that the medal should ever come to be 
considered an internal operation, but that the 
thought of the directors ever should be to en- 
courage others. I would suggest that the board 
of directors decide the award by ballot at the 
annual meeting held about mid-Lent. 




Rose View Greenhouses, at Beardstown, 111., in Center of Flooded Area. 



Mr. Pierson in a short address spoke 
of the significance of an award of this 
kind, and referred particularly to the 
fact that in his opinion no society had 
received more unselfish devotion than 
the devotion of George Asmus to the 
S. A. F. He spoke of the manner in 
which Mr. Asmus had faced the na- 
tional flower show situation in Cleve- 
land, and of how he had the key to it 
in the change to Indianapolis. In rec- 
ognition of this, and his past work of 
years, he wished, he said, to nominate 
Mr. Asmus for the medal of honor, to 
be awarded this year. Mr. Hagenburger 
seconded the nomination, as also did 
H. P. Knoble, Secretary Young, J. F. 
Ammann, Paul Klingsporn, President 
Pennock, Treasurer Hess and Thomas 
Roland, and a rising vote was called 
for, awarding the medal to one who had 
proved himself an unselfish worker for 
everybody selling plants and flowers. 
Mr. Asmus was not in the room at the 
time. Mr. Pierson was directed to lo- 
cate him and present him at the plat- 
form. In the meantime, on motion of 
Mr. Roland, it was decided to make 
formal presentation of the medal at the 
Kansas City convention. Mr. Asmus 
now appearing, amid applause and 
cheers, he was addressed by President 
Pennock as follows: 

Mr. Asmus, there is a medal of honor which 
is awarded every five years to the person who 
lias done tlie most, and made the most sacrifices 
for the S. A. F., and the gentlemen in this room 
have gone over the field carefully and they have 
selected you to be the recipient of that medal. 
It gives us great pleasure today to hand you 
one of the biggest honors that the society has 
ever handed any member. We believe that that 
honor is more than fully merited by the work 
that you have done in the last five or ten years, 
which has been prodigious in every way, your 
time unstintingly given, your business sacrificed; 
not only your business, but your family as well. 
In the case of the flower show, you have given 
every minute, night and day; as some men said, 
you slept on the job and never flinched. Even 
when you had the whole board against you, you 
carried them through with your enthusiasm, your 
push and your energy. 

It gives us a great deal of pleasure to be able 
to award this medal to you, as a small recom- 
pense for the work which you have done in the 
last five or ten years. The medal is not ready 
to give to you at this time. We are sorry It is 
not ready, but it will be presented to you in 
-Vugust, at the convention in Kansas City. 

Mr. Asmus made a feeling response. 
The feeling which prompted the award, 
he said, was quite sufficient reward 
for anything he might have done, with- 
out anything more material. He was 
greatly pleased to accept the confidence 
and thought of the society, and would 
always cherish the token. 

Some further discussion was had as 
to future bestowal of the medal of 
honor, and finally, on motion of Mr. 
Roland, it was decided that the chair 
appoint a committee of three to con- 
sider names and institutions for the 
award. 

Budget. 

A long discussion then ensued on the 
budget. Mr. Knoble, for the budget 
committee, presented a report embody- 
ing a budget for the year amounting 
to $14,230, and an income estimated 
at $16,900. The income estimate, he 
.said, was placed at the lowest possible 
figures. 

On motion of Mr. Knoble, it was de- 
cided that the board recommend that 
the society, at the Kansas City con- 
vention, contribute $2,500 to the pub- 
licity campaign. 

H. P. Knoble, for the finance commit- 
tee, i)rcsented a report. The report 
showed that the permanent fund bal- 
ance of $13,000 had been reinvested in 
government certificates of indebtedness 
of six months' period, and the commit- 



May 4. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



45 



tee had given authority to the treas- 
urer to reinvest for an additional pe- 
riod of six months folloviring the ex- 
piration of the original period. The 
treasurer had been instructed to rent a 
safety deposit box for the needs of the 

society. 

A report from the committee on an- 
nual report embodied a proposal from 
the A. T. De La Mare Co., New York, to 
print the report as a business proposi- 
tion, adding matter to the volume which 
should make it a valuable yearbook. 
Advertising would be accepted for the 
book and the publishers would divide 
with'the society any profit which might 
result over actual cost of publication 
and distribution. The society, however, 
was to appropriate $1,000 toward the 
expense, for a term not to exceed five 
years. 

On motion of Thomas Eoland, the re- 
port was accepted, as well as the offer 
of the De La Mare Co., with the provi- 
sion that the annual be sold for a price 
not less than the annual membership 
dues. 

On motion of George Asmus, the ap- 
propriation for the annual was ordered 
to be made part of the budget. 

Flower Show. 

The national flower show was the final 
topic for discussion. George Asmus, as 
chairman of the national flower show 
committee, presented a lengthy report, 
which included a financial statement of 
expectations, based on returns up to the 
fourth day of the show. He reviewed 
the preparations for the fifth national 
flower show from the start until the 
Cleveland fiasco, and then detailed the 
measures that were taken to sav6 the 
show dates by going to Indianapolis. 

George Asmus bespoke praise for Ir- 
win Bertermann, whose work Mr, As- 
mus eulogized, and whom he described 
as really his partner in the show. Mr. 
liertermann, entering the room at the 
time, was called upon for a few re- 
marks, in the course of which he said 
his relations with those in charge of 
the show had all along been most pleas- 
ant. 

The committee on final resolutions 
presented testimonials of thanks to 
those who had so whole-heartedly sup- 
ported the national flower show. The 
resolutions were unanimously passed. 
John Young, Sec'y. 

FLOOD AT BEARDSTOWN. 

The flood waters of the Illinois river 
at Beardstown, 111., are receding slowly, 
according to late advices from Arvid 
Anderson, a member of the firm of Ede 
& Anderson, which operates the Eose 
View Greenhouses in that town. The 
(laniajje at these greenhouses was large. 
A 50-foot side wall of one greenhouse 
was completely destroyed and carried 
away, but the remaining structures ap- 
pear to be holding up well under the 
strain. The stock of the firm was com- 
pletely ruined by the inundation, and 
business had to be entirely suspended. 
A glanee at the illustration on page 
+4 will give a vivid impression of the 
pliKht in which this firm finds itself. 

The Rose View Greenhouses have 
opened a temporary store at 118 East 
-Mam street, from which it will handle 
what business it can until the green- 
houses can be cleaned up and are again 
Jivailable. As far as it is now known, 
this firm is the only one in the trade in 
this section which suffered from the 
tiood. 



OBITUARY i 



Max Paul Haendler. 

Max Paul Haendler, owner of the Old 
Town Nurseries, South Natick, Mass., 
died at his home April 28, after a few 
days' illAess. The deceased was born 
in Saxony, Germany, and came to 
America when quite young. He was 
always keenly interested in horticulture 
and followed it all his life. He secured 
employment and worked for a number 
of years on the Walter Hunnewell es- 
tate, Wellesley, Mass., later starting 
in the nursery business at Soutli 
Natick, a few miles away. He had de- 
veloped a fine business there and had 
but recently erected new propagating 
houses and was working up large stocks 
of azaleas, rhododendrons, taxus and 
other hardy material. He was only 43 
years of age and in excellent health 
until near the end. He leaves a wife, 
but no children. 

Mr. Haendler had been for many 
years a member of the Gardeners' and 
Florists' Club of Boston. He was also 
a life member of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, New England 
Nurserymen's Association, Massachu- 
setts Nurserymen's Association and the 
A. F. and A. M., belonging to Natick 
lodge and the Royal Arch chapter of 
that town. He was a most industrious, 
intelligent and likable man, and his 
many friends sincerely regret his early 
demise. Funeral services were held at 
his late residence at South Natick April 
30 and were largely attended. Dele- 
gates from the nurserymen's associa- 
tions, Gardeners' and Florists' Club of 
Boston and Masonic fraternities were 
present and there were numerous beau- 
tiful floral tokens. W. N. C. 

Mrs, Rebecca Federle. 

Mrs. Eebecca Federle, widow of the 
late Charles Federle, of Hamilton, O., 
died after a four months' illness at her 
home, on Mount Pleasant avenue, Ham- 
ilton, April 13. 

Mrs. Federle had been engaged in 
the florists' business since the death 
of her husband, six years ago. Besides 
a son, Carl, and a daughter, Catherine, 
both of whom were associated in busi- 
ness with her, she is survived by an- 
other son, Joseph C. Federle, of Day- 
ton, and another daughter, Mrs. Paul 
Saurber. 

Funeral services took place from the 
residence Monday, April 17. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Krug. 

Mrs. Fllizaheth Krug, of the Krug 
Floral Co., Alton, 111., passed away Sun- 
day afternoon, April 23, after a long- 
continued illness. Members of the fam- 
ily had been expecting the end, since 
Mrs. Krug's illness had been especially 
serious during the last few days of her 
life. 

The deceased was the widow of the 
late Joseph Krug, who passed away six 
years ago. She was 8.5 years of age 
and was born in Elizabcthtown, N. J., 
in 1836. When she was quite young, 
her family moved to Dayton, O.. where 
she was reared, and where she was 
united in marriage to Joseph Krug 
sixty-five years ago. 

Ten children survive. They are: 
Misses Barbara, Kate, Elizabeth, Anna 



and Clara Krug; Mrs. William Walter 
and Mrs. George Landre; and Joseph, 
John and Aloysius Krug. Also surviv- 
ing are: One sister, Mrs. Kathryn 
Brumer, of Columbia City, Ind., and a 
number of grandchildren. 

William Mathews. 

In the death of William Mathews, 
which occurred Sunday morning, April 
30, at his home, 947 York street, Utica, 
N. Y., after an illness which had con- 
fined him to his bed for a year and a 
half, there passed away one of Utica 's 
leading florists and an influential busi- 
ness man. This was the first illness of 
his eighty years of life, most of those 
years spent in active work. 

Born near Taunton, Somersetshire, 
England, Mr. Mathews followed the 
trade of florist and when he came to 
this country, in 1869, he was already 
skilled in that line of business. 

In 1873 Mr. Mathews went into busi- 
ness for himself on York street, where 
he established the West View Green- 
houses, since that time conducted by 
him continuously. At one time Mr. 
Mathews added the extensive cultiva- 
tion of grapes, but after a time he gave 
that up and resumed the growing of 
flowers exclusively. 

For many years Mr. Mathews made 
a special study of orchids and gained 
considerable fame as an expert in that 
line. 

Mr. Mathews was one of the oldest 
members of Faxton Lodge, No. 697, F. 
& A. M. He was also a member of 
Yahnundasis Lodge of Perfection and 
served it as master for two years. He 
was also master of Yahnundasis Chap- 
ter of Rose Croix, and a trustee of 
Ziyara Temple, Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He attended St. Luke's church 
and in politics was Eepublican. He was 
one of the earliest members of the Utica 
Florists' Club and of the Society of 
American Florists. 

Mr. Mathews was married in 1864 
to Miss Emily Gridley. She survives, 
with the following children: Fred, who 
lives in Rochester; Edward G., archi- 
tect; Harry S. and Charles M., who are 
in their father's florists' business; Mrs. 
Byron Eogers, of Utica, and Mrs. E. L. 
Crane, of Buffalo. He leaves six grand- 
children and one great-grandchild. 

FEEDING ROSES. 

We have mailed you two rose plants. 
Double White Killarney and Premier. 
The White Killarney died off gradu- 
ally, but the Premier just keeps get- 
ting yellow. We have watered a 
marked space, both heavily and lightly 
and the temperatures have been kept at 
the regulation rose temperature. Can 
you tell us the cause of this trouble and 
a remedy for it? C. E. C— Pa. 



It is difficult to say what is the trou- 
ble with these roses, but .judging from 
the plants, especially the Killarney, 
which have made little growth, and 
from the soil left on the roots of the 
plants, I am inclined to think that the 
plants are suffering from a lack of fer- 
tilizer. The soil, being a light, sandy 
clay, requires a large amount of manure 
and other fertilizer to grow roses suc- 
cessfully. I suggest that the plants be 
given a good top-dressing of fresh or 
j)artly rotted manure, cattle manure pre- 
ferred. Give the roses a heavy water- 
ing before and after applying the 
manure, to prevent burning. 

W. J. K. 



46 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 




(I 



Eatabllsbed \m, 
by a. L OntDt. 

Pabllahed every Thursday by 
The Florists' Publishing Co.. 

S00-B6O OaxtoD BulldlaR, 

SOe Sonth Dearborn St., Ohlcairo. 

Tel., Wabash 8196. 

Registered cable address, 

Florylew, Chicago. 

Entered as second class matter 
Deo. 3, 1897. at the poet-omce at Ohl- 
caffo, IlL, under the Act of March 
8. 1879. 

Snbecrlptlon price, I2.0O a year. 
To Canada, $3.00; to Europe. $4.00. 

AdverUslng rates quoted on 
request. Only strictly trade ad~ 
Tertlalnff accepted. 



n 



Results bring advertising. 
The Review brings results. 

This month of May sliould be a record 
month with nearly all in the florists' bus- 
iness. 

Soft-pedal the carnations for Moth- 
ers' day. Push other flowers. The day 
is properly observed by the wearing of 
any sort of flower. 

Do you print on your invoices and 
statements the terms on which credit is 
granted? If customers know when you 
expect p.ayment, they are more apt to pay 
by that date. 

It was a Virginia florist who said he 
felt lost any week The Review failed to 
arrive on time. "I like to read it on my 
Sunday afternoons, and before I go to 
bed I usually send off ten or a dozen tele- 
grams," he said. 

Mothers' day will be what the trade 
makes it. In communities in which flo- 
rists sit down to wait there will be little 
extra demand, but where florists individ- 
ually or in cooperation advertise Mothers ' 
day and flowers the business can be made 
at least as large as at Easter. Think of 
it! Another Easter! Wake up! Get 
busy! Don't let the opportunity slip. 

A JOINT resolution lately passed by 
Congress allots $200,000 for the reimburse- 
ment of states which have compensated 
farmers for losses due to their being com- 
pelled to abandon the production of cot- 
ton through efforts to exterminate the 
pink bollworm. If the federal horticultural 
board is going to pay the farmers of the 
south because they must grow something 
else besides cotton, why shouldn 't it re- 
imburse florists and nurserymen for stock 
destroyed in the enforcement of quaran- 
tine regulations! 

Plans are being discussed for a Horti- 
cultural Society of America, which shall 
promote all branches of horticulture, with 
the especial view of interesting the pub- 
lic more largely and more deeply in 
flowers, trees and shrubs. A vast amount 
of good might be done by such an organi- 
zation, and in time it might be made one 
of the most powerful agencies of benefit 
to the horticultural trades and to the 
country at large. J. A. Young, of Aurora, 
111., is a prime mover in the undertaking. 
His "Plan to Plant Another Tree" cam- 
paign has been so successful in Illinois 
that it might be made national in scope, 
with tremendous benefit, under the aus- 
pices of a national horticultural society. 



SEvEiiAL cities are not represented in 
the news columns of The Review as regu- 
larly as they should be. If you are lo- 
cated in one of them and believe you 
could furnish an interesting weekly news- 
letter, you are requested to write the 
Editor. 

The 1922 bulletin and schedule of the 
American Sweet Pea Society has been 
just issued, in the same neat and attrac- 
tive form as it has appeared in previous 
years. It contains the schedule of pre- 
miums for the fourteenth annual exhibi- 
tion, to be held at Horticultural hall, Bos- 
ton, June 24 and 25. Instructive articles 
on sweet peas under glass, by William 
Sim ; growing sweet peas in tubs, by A. E. 
Thateher, and growing sweet peas out- 
doors, by Edwin Jenkins, are reprinted 
from previous bulletins of the society. 

At a recent meeting the executive coun- 
cil of the Horticultural Trades Associa- 
tion of Great Britain urged, the ministry 
of agriculture of that country to send an 
accredited representative to the confer- 
ence on quarantine 37 to be held at Wash- 
ington, D. C, May 15. The council also 
drew up a list of the more important 
plants on which it was considered especi- 
ally imjiortant that the quarantine be 
lifted. Mr. Lobjoit, controller of horti- 
culture, will represent the British govern- 
ment at the conference. Representatives 
of the French, Belgian and Dutch gov- 
ernments are expected also to attend the 
conference. 



ACT NOW. 



Last week the Allied Florists' Asso- 
ciation of Illinois ran in the Chicago 
ncAvspapers advertisements urging the 
public to take advantage of the abun- 
dance of flowers to buy at low prices. 
The text read: 

"Warm weather and sunshine have 
greatly increased the supply of flowers. 
The cold, dark days of the past few 
months have held flowers in the green- 
houses from coming into bloom. Now, 
favorable weather is literally forcing 
millions of flowers into bloom. They 
are plentiful and prices are down. En- 
joy flowers now — -in your home — your 
office. Remember vour friends. Just 
'Say It with Flowers.' " 

If florists in smaller communities as 
well as in large ones would make a little 
extra effort at this time, the public 
would be able to enjoy flowers without 
paying high prices for them, and the 
glut which threatens the markets at 
this season would be avoided. 



PLAN TO PLANT ANOTHER TREE. 

The campaign inaugurated by the 
Illinois State Nurserymen's Association 
to promote tree planting has been mark- 
edly successful in the short time it has 
been conducted. Part of this success 
is due to the energy and resourceful- 
ness which the secretary, J. A. Young, 
of Aurora, has shown in arousing in- 
terest throughout the state. Through 
chambers of commerce, Rotary and Ki- 
wanis clubs and other organizations, 
interest in the movement was nour- 
ished in each community. The slogan, 
"Plan to Plant Another Tree," is the 
catchiest originated in the nursery 
trade. In a department bearing this 
slogan at its head, over 200 news- 
papers in the state of Illinois are print- 
ing material from the clip sheet sent 
out by Secretary Young. Even the 
metropolitan dailies of Chicago, which 
seldom use items from clip sheets, are 
running this material in their columns. 



How completely editorial interest has 
been aroused is evident from the fact 
that Mr. Young has received a number 
of suggestions from newspapers 
throughout the state which have been 
mutually helpful. The questions and 
answers corner of this department is 
keeping Mr. Young busy; some of the 
answers are printed on the clip sheets, 
though most of them are answered di- 
rect. Showing real altruism, the clip 
sheet bears articles not only about trees 
and shrubs, but also about vegetables 
and flowers for the home garden. 

The campaign as conducted by Mr. 
Young has so far shown, by its success, 
two things; first, that a national cam- 
paign by nurserymen along this line 
would be as helpful and as profitable a 
piece of publicity as the trade has ever 
done and, second, that the florists in 
their national publicity campaign 
might make use of the clip sheet idea to 
acquaint the public, through the news- 
papers, with the culture and care of 
flowers, and might give the public a 
more intimate knowledge of our highly 
interesting occupation. A "Say It 
with Flowers" column in daily news- 
papers might be made one of the most 
appealing features of the home page. 



AS OTHERS SEE US. 

Writing in the bulletin of the British 
Florists' Federation, J. Wilson, one of 
its members, deplores the absence of a 
trade journal in England catering to 
the retailer's as well as the grower's 
needs. He says the reason no trade 
publication in his country has a circu- 
lation among flower shop owners is be- 
cause none makes itself interesting and 
useful to them. He then remarks: 

I linvc before me while writing this article 
several copies of an American publication, The 
Florists' Review, and a very wonderful produc- 
tion it is, with a very large circulation. It is 
issued weekly; contains about 150 pages, of 
which about two-thirds are advertisements: Is 
Iprightly edited, nicely illustrated, well printed, 
and on good paper, and costs $2 per year. 

I am not suggesting for a moment that a 
publication of that size would be necessary In 
this country— I am fully aware of the tre- 
mendous difference there is between England and 
America in point of size and population: but I 
am suggesting, and verj- strongly, that if a 
journal of this description, of course proportion- 
ately moilitied to suit the requirements, were 
to be inaugurated, it would be of incalculable 
value to the whole trade collectively and could 
hardly fail to be a commercial success. 



MOTHERS' DAY CAMPAIGN. 

Florists who read in The Review last 
week of the splendid opportunity af- 
forded by the publicity committee of 
the Society of American Florists to 
take advantage of the American Le- 
gion's statement in behalf of Mothers' 
day have responded in large numbers, 
requesting matrices of the newspaper 
advertisement reproduced in The Re- 
view and posters to put in their win- 
dows. The florists in a number of 
cities have got in touch with the local 
posts of the American Legion, in order 
to further the local observance of the 
day, and some florists are getting mer- 
chants in other lines of business to dis- 
play the posters described in last 
week's Review. With such coopera- 
tion, the campaign for Mothers' day 
cannot fail of success. But everyone 
must keep pushing. If any florist has 
not received posters, send for them at 
once. They will be sent special de- 
livery upon application to H. V. Swen- 
son, 225 North Michigan avenue, Chi- 
cago, who is sending out material free 
for the publicity committee of the So- 
ciety of American Florists. 



~r:*:j; '. 



MAY 4. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



47 



NEW YORK. 



The Market. 

The cut flower market is not in a 
prosperous condition just now. The 
week just ended was one which merged 
on the disastrous. It could not be said 
that the supply was particularly heavy, 
but the bottom fell out of the demand, 
and several lines in particularly good 
crop went to pieces. Sweet peas suf- 
fered worse than anything else, thou- 
sands going to waste; flowers with long 
Htems and approaching the exhibition 
iiuality were and are moving at as low 
as 50 cents per hundred. Lilies, too, 
were caught in the downward move- 
ment, and sales are reported at as low 
as 5 cents per flower. There seems to be 
no reason ascribed to the downfall. 
Some say, "Oh, we always expect a lit- 
tle turn like this in spring." But, all 
the same, present conditions were total- 
ly unexpected, and there is no explana- 
tion for it, other than that the public is 
not buying. 

Koses are plentiful, but they do not 
clear well. A great deal of stock was 
carried over Saturday, April 29, in spite 
of low prices and concessions beyond 
them. 

American Beauty was selling Mon- 
day, May 1, at anything from 10 cents 
to 30 cents for specials, and clearances 
are being made at figures even below 
the minimum. A quotable range for hy- 
brid teas might be $2 to $15 from No. 2 
upward, but concessions even from 
these prices are far from difficult to ob- 
tain, especially with a large left-over 
holding available at the opening of 
market May 1. 

Cattleyas are in fair supply, with 
prices running 35 cents to 75 cents per 
flower and hybrids and the finer gigas 
bringing occasionally $1 per hundred. 

Carnations are also caught in the 
slump, and the best only move within a 
range of $3 to $5 per hundred. 

"White lilies are not in great demand, 
and the supply is, therefore, too great 
for assimilation. About 5 cents to 10 
cents per flower is the range, with a few 
selected stalks commanding 12 cents 
per flower. Valley is plentiful, but the 
wedding season is commencing, and 
sales have not fallen below the $6 mark 
for top grade. 

Violets are finished and lilac is now 
holding sway, quantities arriving from 
the south. There is no let-up in the 
supply of miscellaneous flowers, and ar- 
rivals fare rather badly with the slump 
in staple lines. Feverfew has made an 
appearance and the supply of gladioli, 
many coming from the south, is in- 
creasing. Other items available are 
daisies, in quantity; snapdragons, some 
of splendid quality; Delphinium Bella- 
donna, cornflowers, pansies galore, alys- 
sum, stocks, bouvardia, narcissi, both 
Trumpet and poeticus; a few Darwin 
tulips, centaureas, myosotis, mignon- 
ette, arbutus, lupines, columbines, 
peonies and fruit blossoms. 

Various Notes. 

_ Gus. Ladiges, the uptown retail flo- 
rist, is leaving for a prolonged Euro- 
pean trip May 6. He will travel with a 
Plattdeutscher party, which has en- 
gaged the whole of the S. S. Hansa, and 
he will not return until near September. 
The project for installing a formal 
flower garden in Central park, in con- 
nection with an exhibition of statuary, 
has been abandoned, owing to pressure 



of public opinion that such a display 
would be a dangerous precedent, in so 
far as the freedom of the park system 
is concerned. 

Dr. N. L. Britton, former botanist of 
the 8. A. F., has just returned from 
Porto Eico, where he has, with a party, 
been studying the flora of the island. 

Visitors last week were S. S. Pen- 
nock, Philadelphia, and Thomas Koland, 
Nahant, Mass. 

Eugene Dailledouze, of Flatbush, 
N. Y., who has been under the weather 
for some time, was able to make a trip 
into the market section last week. 

A meeting of the executive commit- 
tee of the American Dahlia Society is 
called for Tuesday, May 8, at the Hotel 
Grand, Broadway and Thirty-first 
street. 

Hildenbrand & Bartels, of the Eigh- 
teenth street flower market, have been 
receiving cut blooms of erlangea. This 
member of the compositse has never 
been seen before as a cut flower and has 
excited curiosity. Its scented foliage 
and lilac, tubular flowers did not seem 
to find the appreciation expected and 
it is, therefore, doubtful whether this 
native of tropical Africa will figure as a 
regular thing on the market. 

A statement of the bankruptcy pro- 
ceedings in the ease of George J. Poly- 
kranas will be found on another page 
of this issue under the heading, "Busi- 
ness Embarrassments." J. H. P. 



H. Bayersdorfer & Co., of Philadel- 
phia, have opened a store at 144 West 
Eighteenth street, where a member of 
the firm will be in charge. 

The annual meeting of the Horti- 
cultural Society of New York will be 
held in the Museum building of the 
New York Botanical Garden, Saturday, 
May 13, at 3:30 p. m. An exhibition of 
plants and flowers will be held in the 
Museum building in connection with 
the meeting. Schedules for this exhi- 
bition, which will have classes for or- 
chids, herbaceous plants, shrubs, trees 
and various spring flowers and potted 
plants, may be had on application to 
Mrs. George V. Nash, New York Bo- 
tanical Garden, Bronx park, New York. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



The Market. 

There is always a calm after the 
storm. And how true it is in our own 
business! The storm of the Easter rush 
was a terrific one and the present calm 
is welcomed by everyone. 

The market supply at the present 
time is good, but the demand is poor, 
due to the fact that there is a good sup- 
ply of outdoor stock, such as lilacs, 
Darwin tulips and outdoor valley. 
Roses are plentiful and the quality of 
the stock is fine. Carnations are also 
plentiful. Sweet peas are still holding 
their own. The supply of gardenias is 
fine and the supply of orchids is fair. 
Gladioli are just beginning to appear 
locally. Snapdragons are plentiful and 
the quality of the stock is good. 

Various Notes. 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Johnston and 
daughter are enjoying a vacation in the 
sunny south. 

J. J. Perry, of the S. S. Pennock Co., 
is in Philadelphia on business. 

The Women's Civic League is making 
elaborate preparations for the annujil 
flower mart, to be held the second week 



in May. A committee has been ap- 
pointed from the local club to cooperate 
with the league in this annual venture. 
The florists will be given their usual 
space to display their stock. 

It is reported that the recent cold 
spell played havoc with the peony crop. 

Charles F. Feast and Robert T. Pater- 
son left Sunday, April 30, for Detroit to 
attend the F. T. D. directors' meeting. 

E. W. J. 



CHICAGO. 

The Market. 

Notorious for the suddenness with 
which it can change front, the Chicago 
market turned another corner April 28. 
There had been nearly a week of fairly 
active demand, but it had not been 
strong enough to clean up the accumu- 
lation of stock which had weighted the 
market down since Easter. Then came 
a most welcome gentleman from Omaha 
seeking material for a tag day. He 
must have thought our wholesalers an 
exceptionally warm-hearted and hos- 
pitable group. The fact is, he was the 
man they had been looking for. Al- 
though he was limited as to price, he 
needed a large quantity of flowers. 
They helped him out. His shipments 
were made April 27, and the market 
opened April 28 with nothing but fine, 
fresh flowers, and none too many of 
them. There was a good shipping busi- 
ness April 28, and April 29 the city 
trade bought more liberally than at any 
time since Easter. There was hardly 
anything in the wholesalers' iceboxes 
over Sunday. 

With the market once more on a solid 
footing, interest has turned to Mothers' 
day. There being no more flowers than 
are needed now, the belief is general 
that there can not be too many at the 
end of next week. Orders already are 
coming in strongly and from many un- 
usual sources. Numerous stores which 
do not ordinarily handle flowers, sensing 
the fact that nothing but flowers con- 
vey the message of Mothers' day, are 
inquiring about the supply and indi- 
cate a desire to break into the game. It 
would interest the florists in the com- 
munities whence these inquiries come if 
they could know the unanimity with 
which the Chicago wholesalers are re- 
plying that they will have flowers only 
for florists next week. 

It seems certain the demand will be 
the largest ever known, but what of 
the supply? It is a foregone conclusion 
that there will not be so many carna- 
tions as at Mothers' day last year. The 
supply all along has been smaller this 
year. Nor will roses be in unusual sup- 
ply. Easter was so late that rose houses 
then in crop can not be again giving 
a heavy cut for Mothers' day. There 
will be a lot of roses, to be sure, but 
the demand will be so strong there could 
not be too many. 

The one flower which probably will 
be in larger supply than ever before is 
the peony. Not only are the many new 
southern fields now coming into full 
yield, but Mothers' day this year falls 
on the latest possible date and many 
shippers not usually classed as southern 
will have at least a part of their crops 
ready. The supply, therefore, probably 
will be much heavier than last year. 
"Probably" is used advisedly, because 
the peony is a proverbially undepend- 
able crop. Looking fine now, it might 

(CoDtlDued on pa«re 5h.) 



-.-r ':}^-^':i''W'^^-=f*>}vry!m'''n\wvKir'V,''''r^'v^-^j'.i:n<>!WW*^»nnf^ 



48 



The Florists^ Review ^ay 4. 1922 



Send Us Your Order Now 
For Mothers* Day 

L. D. Phonat Central 3120 or L. D. Phomat Daarborn 5145 I 



Use BUDLONG'S Howers 

Line op with the ProgreMive element of the Trade and make yoor business grow. 

Plenty of Sweet Peas and Corsage Roses 

Be sure to include some of these in your orders 



RUSSELL COLUMBIA PREMIER MILADY HEARST OPHELIA 

Select Roses 

Do you vrant a good White Rose? If so, order our 
Double White Killamey, the only good ^vhite on the Chicago market 

SUNBURST BUTTERFLY DUNLOP MONTROSE NESBIT 



Use Nesbit Roses — Can supply in two colors — Light Pink and Cerise Pink. ^M 

CARNATIONS, Quality Stock, IN LARGE SUPPLY 

Gladioli, Calendulas, Callas, Easter Lilies, Stocks, Pansies, 
Lupines and all other Seasonable Cut Flowers 

USE OUR VAULEY FOR YOUR WEDDING WORK 

ONCE TRIED YOU WILL NOT BE SATISFIED WITH ANY OTHER 




II yra wtBt cud itick ud gud treataeBt, biy •! Ckici|t*i Riit ip-ti-date ai Wftlicated Wktlenle Cit Fltwef Hum 

J. IL BUDLONG CO. 



WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS AND GREENS 
QUALITY 
SPEAKS 
LOUDER 
THAN 
PRICES 



Roses; Valley and Carnations our Specialties 
184-t86 North Wabash Ave. 

CHICAGO 



WB AIM CLOSaO ALL DAY SUNDAY 



Wc ir« hi ctMlMt tMck witfe ■arfect ccaditiMn tui wfcci ■ dcdlM lika place yM cm r«iy ipM mitn Mrt n rtcaMig Mcfe bcMflL 




WHIfM"^.',"' "IT.'',".'" '' ' 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



49 



All The Flowers 
In Season 




1 







Are in Large Supply 

AT AMLING'S 

OFFER YOUR CUSTOMERS 
A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT 

For Mothers' Day 

See Mothers' Day Price List C /^ A 1 * i^ i^'L. * 

on Page 3 of this insert. t,. L.. AlTlling l^O*, l^hlCagO 



50 



The Florists^ Review mat 4. 1922 



h 



You could not have too many 

FLOWERS FOR MOTHERS' DAY 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Months ago we arranged for 

Special Crops 

For week preceding May 14. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

We shall have an enormous supply 

in all lines, but the demand will be so 
very large we urge our customers to 
make their wants known to us at once. 

WHEN AMLING ACCEPTS YOUR ADVANCE ORDER 

"IT IS A PROMISE" 



REMEMBER — Amling's prices never are higher 

than others charge IF able to supply an 

equal grade of flowers 



You will make a profit on all you get from us 

E. C. AMLING CO. 



Stor* Opca froa 7:30 A. N. 
to B P. ML, daylight saving^time. 



The Largest, Best Equipped and Most Centrally 
Located Wholesale Cut Flower House In Chicago J 



MAT 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



51 






MOTHERS' DAY 



PRICE LIST 

AMUNG*S QUAUTY ROSES 



PREMIER 

Per 100 

Special $30.00 to $35.00 

Medium 20.00 to 25.00 

Select 16.00 to 18.00 

Short 12.00 

COLUMBIA 

Special $25.00 to $30.00 

Medium 18.00 to 20.00 

Select 15.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 

MILADY and CRUSADER 

Special $30.00 to $35.00 

Medium 20.00 to 25.00 

Select 15.00 to 18.00 

Short lO.OO to 12.00 

BUTTERFLY and GOLDEN RULE 

Special $25.00 to $30.00 

Medium 18.00 to 20.00 

Select 15.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 



OPHELIA and MONTROSE 

Per 100 

Special $26.00 

Medium 20.00 

Select $15.00 to 18.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 

SUNBURST 

Special $25.00 

Medium 20.00 

Select $15.00 to 18.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 

DOUBLE WHITE KILLARNEY 

Special $25.00 

Medium 20.00 

Select $15.00 to 18.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 

CECILE BRUNNER 

For CorsaKes $4.00 to $5.00 

Extra Special Roses billed accordingly. 



List of Other Flowers and Greens 



CARNATIONS 



Large and Fancy, assorted. 
Laddie 



Per 100 

$15.00 
20.00 

[Remember there is a great deal of difference 
in the quality of different growers' carnations. 
These are all good.] 

SWEET PEAS 

Butterfly $2.00 to $4.00 

PEONIES 

^elect per doz., $ 1.50 to $ 2.00 

Select per 100. 12.00 to 15.00 

BULBOUS FLOWERS 

Valley. . per 100. $ 6.00 

SfJf'i^S*** ^'i^' 20.00 

•i^ H?**-r Perdoz.. $l.50to 2.00 

Tulips, Darwm per 100. 8.00 to 10.00 

Jonquils per 100, 6.00 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Snapdragons per doz. . $1.00 to 

Daisies per 100, 1.60 to 

Calendula per 100. 3.00 to 

Mignonette per 100. 4.00 to 

Pussy WiUow per 100, 4.00 to 

Pansies per doz. bunches. 1 .00 to 

Statice, Russian per bunch, 1.50 to 

Statice, other per bunch , 

GREEN GOODS 

Ferns per 1000, 

Plumosus per bunch, 

Sprengeri per bunch, 

Adiantum per 100, 

Smilax per doz. strings, 

Galax, new .per 1000, 

Coontie Leaves per 100. 

Leucothoe per lOOi 



$0.50 to 

.60 to 

1.60 to 

3.00 to 



2.50 
2.00 
6.00 
6.00 
8.00 
1.50 
2.00 
.60 



$6.00 
.76 
.75 
2.00 
4.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 



All Prices Subject to Market Changes 



Insure yourself against disappointment by ordering TODAY. 

169-175 N. Wabash Ave 



Long Distance Telephone 

Central 1977 

1975 



CHICAGO, ILL 



(Turn the page) 



52 The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



r 

! 



You will limit 

Your Mothers' Day Sales 

Unless you arrange to show your customers 

A Complete Assortment of 

FINE FLOWERS 



Include in your order to us today: 

SWEET PEAS VALLEY 

DARWIN TULIPS JONQUILS 
LILIES DAISIES SNAPDRAGONS 

and other flowers, as well as 

PEONIES, ROSES AND CARNATIONS 



Quality 

AMLING'S STOCK is second to 
none in America — there may be 
small lots here and there as good 
as Amling's flowers, but there is 
no other large supply which runs 
such even high quality in all 
varieties. 



Quantity 



AMLING'S STOCK represents the 
output of more glass than is sold 
at any other one store in America. 
You can DEPEND ON GETTING 
YOUR ORDERS FILLED HERE 
— we never are completely sold out 
of flowers. 



Make up your Mothers* Day Order at once— and order enough 

E. C. AMLING CO. 



Store open from 7:3« A. M. to Thc Largcst, Bcst Equipped and Most Centrallv . « ( 

. P M ....;... ,.».;.. H-. Located Wholesale Cut Flower House in Chicago ' ^mRxY *''"■•{ 



169-175 N. Wabash Ave. CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mnthmrm' Dav Price Limt on Precedintr Patie. ^*^*^^»^*^*^a^a^B^^ 



Mav 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



53 




m 



THE HOUSE THAT SATISFIES 




WH<^Lt:SA[r; LP^?Wni^S 'CUl f l^WtPS'- PI ANTS t'; 



182 N.Wabash Avenue 



Chicago 




I 



G>lIection of G>mmercial Cut Blooms Exhibited by the Chicago Flower Growers* Association at Indianapolis. 

—From the Florists' Review or April 6. 

Make a Show 

of fine flowers- the only quality we offer 

For Mothers' Day 

There will be the largest demand ever known, so 

ORDER ENOUGH 



For Complete Mother*' Day Price Liat, turn the page. 



52 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



1 



You will limit 



Your Mothers' Day Sales 

Unless you arrange to show your customers 

A Complete Assortment of 

FINE FLOWERS 



Include in your order to us today: 

SWEET PEAS VALLEY 

DARWIN TULIPS JONQUILS 
LILIES DAISIES SNAPDRAGONS 

and other flowers, as well as 

PEONIES, ROSES AND CARNATIONS 



AMLING'S STOCK is second to 
none in America — there may be 
small lots here and there as good 
as Amling's flowers, but there is 
no other large supply which runs 
such even high quality in all 
varieties. 



Quantity 



AMLING'S STOCK represents the 
output of more glass than is sold 
at any other one store in America. 
You can DEPEND ON GETTING 
YOUR ORDERS FILLED HERE 
— we never are completely sold out 
of flowers. 



Make up your Mothers* Day Order at once— and order enough. 

E. C . AMLING CO. 

Store open tron. 7:30 A. M. to Thc LargCSt, Bcst Equipped and Most Centrally Ung DUtance Telephone j "" 

5 p. M.. d«yiight cio.iD» time. Located Wholesale Cut Flower House in Chicago central |}»J^ 

169-175 N. Wabash Ave. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mothers' Day Price List on Preceding Page. 



Mav 4, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 



53 



W 



ES 



=^ 



THE HOUSE THAT SATISFIES 




^1 WH9LE SALE GD9WEP S / CUT FL9WEPS^-°PLA NTSf/j 



182 N.Wabash Avenue 



Chicago 



■■ 




I 



Collection of Commercial Cut Blooms Exhibited by the Chicago Flower Growers* Association at Indianapolis. 

— I'Yoiii ihe Florists' Ke\it\v of April i\. 

Make a Show 

of fine flowers- the only quality we offer 

For Mothers' Day 

There will be the largest demand ever known, so 

ORDER ENOUGH 



£ 



For Complete Mothers' Day Pticm Liat, turn the page. 



m 



54 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



m 



s 



GKO. C. TVE:IL,AND. President 
FRED SCHRAMM, Vice-PresideBt 
RUDOLPH ELLSWORTH, Secretary 
CHARLES McCAULEY, Treasurer 



■■ 



PAUL R. KLINGSPORN, 
Manager 



Our Customers Want— and Get— the Best There Is 




pf WHOLESALE GD9WEDS -/^CUT fL9WEDS'*>-PLANTS 



182 N. Wabash Ave., 



L. D. Phone Private Exchange 
Central 0282 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



i 



We offer you a 

Complete Supply 
For Mothers^ Day 

ROSES 

All varieties and lengths. 

SWEET PEAS 

The fine, fresh, fragrant spring bloomers. 

CARNATIONS 

A large supply, but don't order them alone. 

PEONIES 

The largest supply we ever have had for Mothers' Day. 

ORDER A FULL LINE 

We aim to serve every buyer so well he will want us to fill another 

big order for Decoration Day. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 




THE HOUSE THAT SATISFIES 




WHOLESALE GD9\VEDS ■/ CUT fL9WEPS^-PLANTS X 



182 N.Wabash Avenue 



Chicago 



MOTHERS' DAY PRICE LIST 

Chicago's Finest Roses 



Premier 



Columbia 



Milady 



Russell 



Crusader 



Per 100 

Special $35.00 

Fancy Long 30.00 

Long $20.00 to 25.00 

Medium 15.00 to 18.00 

Short 12.00 

Special $30.00 

Fancy Long 25.00 

Long 20,00 

Medium $15.00 to 18.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 

Special $35.00 

Fancy Long 30.00 

Long $20.00 to 25.00 

Medium 15.00 to 18.(0 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 

Special $35.00 

Fancy Long 30.00 

Long $20.00 to '-^5.00 

Medium 16.00 to 18.00 

Short 12.00 

Special $35.00 

Fancy Long.... 30.00 

Long $20.00 to 25.00 

Medium 15.00 to 18.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 



Special , 



Butterfly Rjf ^°°« 



Per 100 

$30.00 
25.00 

Long 20.00 

Medium $15.00 to 18.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 



Ophelia 



Sunburst 



White 



Angelus 



Special $25.00 

Fancy Loag.... 20.00 

Long 18.00 

Medium 15.00 

Short $10.00 to 12.00 

Fancy Long.... $25.00 

Long 20.00 

Medium $15.C0 to 18.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 

Special $25.00 

Fancy Long.... 20.00 

Long 18.00 

Medium 16.00 

Short $10.00 lo 12.00 

Special $30.00 

Fancy Long.... 25.00 

Long 20.00 

Medium $15.00 to 18.00 

Short 10.00 to 12.00 



Extra Special Roses Billed Accordin^y. 



Miscellaneous Flowers 



Carnations 

Fancy Assorted. 

Laddie 

Jonquils 

Lupines, fancy.... 
Tulips, Darwin... 



..per 100, $12.00 to $15.00 
...per 100. 20.00 

...per 100, 6.00 

.per bunch, 1.00 to 1.60 
...per 100, 8.00 to 10.00 



Valley per 100, 

Daisies per 100, 

Giganteum Lilies per 100, 

Calla Lilies per doz.. 

Snapdragons per doz.. 

Calendulas, Orange King.... per 100, 



$1.50 to 



1.60 
3.00 



$6.00 
2.00 

20.00 
2.00 
2.60 
5.00 



PEONIES, $12.00 to $15.00 per 100 



Sweet Peas, Spring Bloomers, $2.00 to $4.00 per 100 



Ferns 



Plumosus 60c bunch 

Sprengeri 35c to 50c bunch 

Coontie Leaves $3.00 per 100 

Smilax, strings 4.00 per doz. 



Decorative Greens 

$5.00 per 1000 



Adiantum $ 1.50 per 100 

Galax 2.00 per 1000 

Leucothoe 10.00 per 1000 

Boxwood $12.60 per 60-lb . bag 



Prices subject to change without Notice. 



55 



^ 






■; 



** Service to swear BY, not AT" 

-^ — = 



56 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



E^ 



^ 




r WH9LESALE GD9WEDS ^^ CUT fL^WEPS ''- PLANTS (!■ 







182 N. Wabash Ave.,'"'' 'ctr.^S'^^s^r'"'' CHICAGO, ILL. | 







A View in Our Shippieg Department at Ea(ter. 



i 



In addition to a supply of Cut Flowers second to none 

in America, we have a 

Splendidly Equipped Shipping Department 

Our facilities are equal to the prompt and accurate handling of all 

orders for Mothers' Day, however much the 

demand exceeds previous records. 

" SERVICE THAT SATISFIES " 

For Complete Mothers' Day Price List— Turn bacl< one page 



m 



Max 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 




m 
i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

'/All 

§ 

n 

I 

i 



GOULD'S SELECT 

PEONIES 



For 




4. 


Nemorial 


\0S 


» T 


Day 






$6 

and 






$8 






per 100 







For 



per 100 




A. L. RANDALL CO. 

Exclu»ive sales agents for Gould's Select Peonies 
ISO N.Wabash Avenue CHICAGO, ILL. 

Our series of Peony Farms, stretching from Mississippi to Wisconsin, 
assures you of a steady source of supply of carefully, scientifically 
grown stock, to take care of your trade throughout the Peony season. 

Grown by GOULD COMPANY, Onarga, 111. 
Five Peony Farms 

MiaatMippi Tannmaae* Southern lUinoia Northern Ittinoi* Wiacontin 







l^t'liit J' i^Tr 



56 



The Florists^ Review 



Mav 4, 1022 



E^ 



m 




& WHOLESA LE GD° VEPS "^ CUT fL?WEPS^'-" PLANTS 7 







182 N. Wabash Ave., v'"?r,S"^k'i?'"'* CHICAGO, ILL. 



I 







i 



A View in Our Shippirg Department at Easter. 



In addition to a supply of Cut Flowers second to none 

in America, we have a 

Ij Splendidly Equipped Shipping Department 

Our facilities are equal to the prompt and accurate handling of all 

orders for Mothers' Day, however much the 

demand exceeds previous records. 

"SERVICE THAT SATISFIES" 



For Complete Mothers* Day Price List— Turn back one page 



^ 



fvn wfn^invmii'ff "'.ff^ w 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



57 













n 






Wj 

i 

i 
i 



i 



I 

4| 






c-^^ 



Now booking orders for 

GOULD'S SELECT 

PEONIES 





^^^^M|M^HH^H^^St:7^^^^^^^B^' \ 


For 




Memorial 


W^^" .^if 




Day 


BKgUtM«g||fi| 




$6 

and 

$8 


■ - ^ ■■ * I 


per 100 


'#'^^^^^^^^^H|PK'^: . 







For 



and 



$15 

per 100 




A. L. RANDALL CO. 

Exclusive sales agents for Gould*s Select Peonies 
ISO N. Wabash Avenue CHICAGO, ILL. 

Our series of Peony Farms, stretching from Mississippi to Wisconsin, 
assures you of a steady source of supply of carefully, scientifically 
grown stock, to take care of your trade throughout the Peony season. 

Grown by GOULD COMPANY, Onarga, 111. 

Five Peony Farms 

MtMMuaippi 7enneaae« Southern Illinoi* Northern lUinoU Witconain 




'/.Vl<* 



m 



m 












r.fl 



>»«■ 




"'''~'v->" ' 



.w ••%'■-, '.(*^ ^r\^:--,,\.\> ;■■'. --'.^i 



58 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 








P^^i^^^l^ 


^ 


rt' 


L» \ 




^ii]ji 


1 "^ 




^^!^mi 


iJ'TS^J 




^ 


ip 



RANDALL 



WILL HAVE 







A Very Large Supply 

OF ALL KINDS OF FLOWERS 

For Mothers' Day 

But there will be a BIG demand 
It will be wise to order NOW 

See opposite page 



A. L. Randall Company 

180 N. Wabash Avenue CHICAGO 



i 
n 






i 



cA 




^ ▲ ^ FLOWERS ''at their best'' m^ From Grower Direct ^m 

VfEIIAND-RlSCH Cot 



v^lL FI0WEII CROWERS 



CHICAGG 



(Continued from page 47). 

])C ruined over night. It has happened 
bcforP. A frost might do it, or hail, or 
even a liigh wind might cut the supply 
in half. On the other hand, fine, warm, 
bright weather continued for several 
(lays might add considerably to the ex- 
pected cut. 

As to prices, it is felt that almost any 
price might be obtained for good carna- 
tions, which will be first choice, but 
that 12 cents to 15 cents is as far as 
it is best to go, except for specialties. 



But if carnations are short of the supply 
at those prices, good short-stemmed 
roses should be worth as much. And 
fine, big, showy peonies should be worth 
as much as carnations or short roses. 
So you pay your money and take your 
choice, with the probability that there 
will be a better chance of getting the or- 
der filled in full if it is heaviest on 
peonies. 

There are likely to be enough long 
roses, at from 25 cents up, but another 
good way will bo to push the sale of 



baskets and boxes of miscellaneous flow- 
ers. There will be large supplies of 
sweet peas, valley, daisies, Darwin 
tulips, snapdragons, lilies, lupines, even 
jonquils, and the prices will not be so 
stiff as on the three leaders. 

This week there are indications that 
reluctant spring has arrived at last. 
With the warmer weather locally, there 
are increased shipments from the south. 
Gladioli arc arriving in considerable 
quantity, from Florida, Mississippi, 
(Continued on page 02.) 



Mat 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



S9 




\j 







PEONIES 

Randall's is Headquarters ^The Largest Supply 

$12.00 and $15.00 per 100 

A Good Cut of Carnations 
A FINE SUPPLY OF ROSES 

Especially of Butterfly and Columbia 

SWEET PEAS VALLEY 

LUPINES DAISIES 

GLADIOLI SNAPDRAGONS 

EASTER LILIES AND GREENS 

Don't miss sales — wire or phone to us 
for anything you need 

A. L. Randall Company 

180 N. Wabash Avenue CHICAGO 




ms^^:^sm: 





FLOWERS OF QUALITY 

Roses, Carnations, Sweet Peas, Snapdragons, Lilies, 

Darwins, Calendulas, Valley and other Flowers for buyers 

whose trade demands the best. 



JOSEPH FOERSTER CO. 

Wholesale Dealers in Cut Flowers 

160 North Wabash Ave. 

CHICAGO 



Ask the man who 
Buys from us 



'r^SsTj^e"! ."'ifi^ ' fif'r'yf^'rrf^Trf'^'T 



60 



The Florists' Review 



Mat 4. 1922 



The visible supply of Carnations for 
this market at Mothers' day is below 
normal. But the Rose supply will 
make up for it and Peonies will be 
plentiful. Get away from the one 
flower idea. 

Make no doubt. This year's busi- 
ness will be an increase over last 
year's. 

BE SURE THAT YOU HAVE ENOUGH. 



a 



Kennicot/ 



WHOLESALE 

r 




THERS (5> 

FLORISTS'^ 






f ■ 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



61 



ROSES-OUilLITY STOCK BY aUALITY GROWERS 



Lenirth of 

Stem 
in inches 

8 to 10 Short S. 

12 to 15 Good Short G. S. 

18 to 20 Medium'. M. 

24 to 28 Good Medium .G. M. 

30 to 36 hong L. 

36 to 42 Fancy F. 

PEONIES, "Thoroughbred," Selected, 



r 

Sunburst 
Ophelia 
White 
Dunlop 


Pnce per 100 

Columbia 
Butterfly 


Russell 

Premier 

Crusader 


110.00 


$12.00 .. 


..$12.00 @ $15.00 


12.00 


- 15.00 .. 


.. 18.00 @ 20.00 


$15.00 @ 18.00 


. 20.00 .. 


25.00 


20.00 


25.00 .. 


30.00 


25.00 


....$18.00 @ 30.00 .. 


35.00 


30.00 


85.00 ;. 


40.00 



per 100.... $8.00, $10.00, $12.00 



CARNATIONS— The Best of Chicago's Best 

LADDIE, Sensation $18.00 

Carnations, Fancy $12.00 @ $15.00 

Miscellaneous Stock 

Sweet Peas, Butterfly, per 100 $2.00 @ $3.00 

Daisies $3.00 @ $4.00 

Gladioli $12.00 @ $15.00 

Tulips $8.00 

Tulips, Darwin $10.00 @ $12.00 

Jonquils $6.00 @ $8.00 * 

Easter Lilies $12.00 @ $15.00 

Calla Lilies $12.00 @ $15.00 

Valley $6.00 @ $8.00 

Calendulas, per bunch 50c @ 75c 

Stocks, per bunch 75c @ $1.00 

Forget-me-nots, per bunch 35c @ 50c 

Pansies, per bunch 15c 

Snapdragfons, per dozen $1.50 @ $2.50 

Mignonette, per dozen $1.00 @ $1.50 

Decorative Greens 

Smilax, per dozen $4.00 

Plumosus, per 100 $2.50 @ $4,00 

Sprengeri, per 100 $3.00 @ $4.00 

Adiantum, per 100 $1.50 

Coontie, per 100 $3.00 

Leucothoe, per 100 $1 .00 

Ferns, per 1000 $5.00 

Galax, per 1000 $2.00 

City Summer Time: This Market Closes at 4 p. m. By Your Clock. 

Long Distance Phone: Central 0466 174 N. Wabash Ave,, CHICAGO 



■7r^r^/.'(>^^'. •.•^•^. f'- ir[,~ » ■ 



'*i^'^ - 



C 






T,«>'\>f-x; 



62 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



7*9^^^h^m7*9G 



70^^^H^^^7C1^^^^^^^9fICBMH^^vCl^^H^HM9H^^HHHIH7*9C 



You Will Gain by Sending all Orders to 



ZECH & MANN 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 



so East Randolph Street 



CHICAGO, ILUNOIS 



T 



I 



We offer you plenty of 

Ctit Flow^ers 

in all varieties 

At Market Prices 

NOW BOOKING ORDERS 

For MOTHERS' DAY, May 14 
For MEMORIAL DAY, May 30 



OUR FLOWERS ARE SECOND TO NONE 



&CK 



MIcJ 



MIC 



ot H w e 



TRC 



■rUW 



sac 



3ix=^ac 



sac 



sac 



sac 



sac 



(Contiiiucil fi'oiii page 58.) 
Texas and Tennessee. Peonies from 
Tennessee are reaching the market in 
daily increasing quantities. Thus far 
tlie peonies are cleaning uj), but the mo- 
ment the supply exceeds the day's de- 
mand they will begin to go into cold 
storage, to come out again at Mothers' 
day. 

Wholesalers Have Busy Session. 

The Wholesale Cut llower Associa- 
tion liad a busy evening at Hotel Sher- 
man April 27. The first subject up for 
consideration was making effective the 
new plan of cooperative advertising, 
the sole responsibility for which shall 
rest with the growers and wholesalers, 
letting tlie retailers out. It was de- 
cided to make the new plan effective 
May 1 and on that day the wholesalers 



each sent the following notice to their 
consignors: 

Following thorough consideration over a period 
of several montlm, it was unanimously decided 
at tbe Joint meeting vt tbe Allied Florists' 
Association and the Commercial Flower Growers 
of Chicago, on April 20th, 1922, to increase the 
advertising assessments of Growers to 1% of 
their nut sales and the assessment of Commis- 
sion Dealers to 1% on an amount equivalent to 
15% of their gross business. This plan to take 
effect May 1st, 1922. 

We seeii your full cooperation in this matter, 
which is destined to give the Flower Business 
a fresh impetus in the right direction for the 
mutual benefit of all engaged therein. 

ALLIF.U FLORISTS' ASSOCIATION. 

COMMERCIAL FI^WEH GROWERS 

OF CHICAGO. 

The matter of handling credits and 
collections on the line that is followed 
in the New York market was discussed 
and on motion, President Klingsporn 
appointed a committee, consisting of 
C. J. Michelsen, Eric Johnson and P. C. 



Schupp, to prepare a definite proposition 
to be considered at the next meeting. 

Officers for next year were nominated 
as follows : 

For president — C. J. Michelsen, of 
the E. ('. Amling Co. 

For vice-president — Aaron T. Pyfer, 
of A. T. Pyfer & Co. 

For secretary — A. C. Kohlbrand, of 
the E. C. Amling Co., who nominated 
Fred Price, of Peter Reinberg, Inc. 

For treasurer — P. C. Schupp, of J. A. 
Budlong. 

New Ofacers of A. F. A. 

At the meeting of the board of di- 
rectors of the Allied Florists' Associa- 
tion April 28, held at the Randolph ho- 
tql, the following new officers were 
elected: President, Peter Pearson; 
vice-president, August Poehlmann; 



May 4. 1022 



The Florists' Review 



63 








III 



Use Pyfer 's Flowers and Profit 

A LARGE SUPPLY AND 
FINE QUALITY 

For Mothers' Day 

Mothers' Day Price List 

PEONIES, - - - $10.00, $12.00 to $15.00 
CARNATIONS, fresh fancy stock, - 12.00 to 15.00 



ROSES 

PREMIER, COLUMBIA, RUSSELL and 
CRUSADER Per 100 

Long Select $25.00 

Medium Choice $15.00 to 20.00 

Shorts. Good 12.00 

OPHELIA, MARYLAND, SUNBURST, MONT- 
ROSE and DOUBLE WHITE KILLARNEY 

\. Per 100 

Long Select $15.00 to $18.00 

Medium Choice 12.00 to 15.00 

Shorts.Good 8.00 to 10.00 

SWEET PEAS 

Fancy Spencer.... 1.00 to 3.00 



YELLOW DAISIES Per loo 

Choice $2.00to $3,00 

SNAPDRAGON Per dozen 

Choice, Pink $1.00 to $1.25 

Select, Fancy 1.50 to 2.00 



2.00 
1.50 
1.50 



GLADIOLI 

PANSIES, bunches 

ADIANTUM Per 100. 

ASPARAGUS and SPRENGERI, Per 

bunch 25 to .50 

FERNS Per 1000. 5.00 

GALAX Per 1000, 2.00 



(SUBJECT TO MARKET CHANGES) 

Oar Motto: "Nothing too much trouble to please a Cuatomer." 



L. D. Phones | 



Central 3373 
Central 3374 



164 North Wabash Ave., CHICAGO | 



64 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 



ORDER NOW for MOTHERS' DAY 

IN MOTHERS' MEMORY, FLOWERS WHITE, 
FOR MOTHERS AT HOME, FLOWERS BRIGHT. 



We Will Have A Large Supply of All Kinds of Seasonable Flowers 



Columbia 
Russell 
Sunburst 
Brunner 
White Killamey 
Crusader 
Mrs. Ward 



Premier 
MUady 
Ophelia 
Butterfly 
Orchids 
Jonquils 



Calendulas 
Carnations 
Stocks 
SMreet Peas 
Valley 

Tulips 
Calla Lilies 



Daisies 
Easter Lilies 
Snapdragons 
Mignonette 
Pansies 
Boxwood 
Gal< 



Ferns 
Adiantum 
Plum«>sus 

SmUax 
Coontie Leaves 
Mexican Ivy 
Sprengeri 



We Always Fill Shipping Orders at Lowest Chicago Market Prices 



Remember: Chicago Clocks are one hour fast. Order Early. 



p RNE ^ ft OMPANY 



30 E. Randolph St. 



WHOLISALI FLORISTS 

LD.PIwMlUiiMpli6578 



CHICAGO 



treasurer, Fred Stielow. Hilmer V. 
Swenson was appointed secretary. 

Upon the election of the new officers, 
a rising vote of thanks was given by 
the entire new board for the splendid 
service rendered the association by the 
retiring officers and directors; namely, 
George Asmus, W. J. Smyth and A. 
Lange. With the vote was given a sin- 
cere expression by those who had been 
associated with these gentlemen, for 
the untiring work they had done for 
the association, and the sincerity they 
had shown as representatives of the 
retailers. 

It was unanimously voted by the 
board to cooperate with the American 
Legion in connection with the Society 
of American Florists' campaign for 
Mothers' day. 

The sum of $1,200 was appropriated, 
to be used for newspaper space, in 
which the American Legion advertise- 
ment reproduced in The Eeview last 
week will be run. 

Sunday at Evanston. 

We once knew a florist who was lo- 
cated adjoining a ball park— every 
home run cost him at least one pane 
of glass. The following was on the 
front page of the Tribune May 1: 

FLORIST HAS GOLFERS NABBED FOR 
WILD SHOTS. 

R. F. Gloede, florist, who regards golfing in 
the Ylcinity of his garden and hothouse as an 
overt act, had seven men who were playing on 
the community links at Evanston arrested yes- 
terday afternoon. His establishment is at 1419 
Central street, Evanston, and the place is partly 
surrounded by the golf course. 

Charges of disorderly conduct were made by 
Gloede against the seven defendants. 

Mr. Gloede may have to erect a hail 

screen around his place. 




Refrigerator 



^ 




Means greater sales 
and larger profits. It 
will pay you to display 
your cut flowers in a 
Brecht specially - built 
refrigerator. 

May we tell you why the 
better appointed shops 
are Brecht equipped? 

A postcard brings our cata- 
logue. Address Dept. N. 



Various Notes. 

Harold Gustafson, until recently rose 
grower for Eolf Zetlitz at Dayton, 0., 
has joined the forces of Frank Schramm 
at Crystal Lake. 

There is a new flower store at 752 
East Seventy-fifth street. The pro- 
prietor is H. E. Dorigan, formerly of 



Dorigan Bros., at Sixty-third street am 
Ashland boulevard. Charles Dorigai 
will continue to operate at the old stand 
John Weiland, the Evanston florist 
will not open a new store on Howan 
avenue, as announced a few weeks age 
but there will be a new store there jus; 
the same. He has sold his lease t( 
Charles Swanson, who is doing a pros 



MO 4, 1922 , 



The Florists^ Review 



65 



MOTHERS' DAY, MAY 1 4th 

TUMBLER BASKETS 

We have jost received a new line of Tumbler Baskets. Jnst the kind yon will need for your Mothers' Day trade 

Prices Ranging from 25c to 75c each 



Atiortment of Twelve Tumbler 
Btuheta from $3.00 to $5.00 



Practical Flower Baskets 




Nos. 357-358-359 

These baskets are 
made of braid and 
contain water- 
proof liners. The 
handles are high 
and the bottoms 
flat. Finished in 
assorted colors. 




Nos.389-290-291 

These three num- 
bers are made of 
■)4-in. braid, heav- 
ily enameled and 
finished in two- 
tone colors. Made 
with water-proof 
liners. Assorted 
colors. 



Not.. .•J57-358-359 

\». :i.17 — 1." inches hiKli 33c eKch N'«. 289 — Hound base 

No. ;<.%«--! 7 int-hes hish 45c each No. 269-4 — Made for a 4-ln. pot, No. 390 — (Jvnl liase. . 

No. .■?.">!) — -0 Uuhes high 65c each Price 60c each No. 291 — Squmx- basu 

PITTSBURGH CUT FLOWER CO. 




291 

45 each 
,45 tacli 
45 each 



116-118 Seventh Street 



'WE SERVE TO SELL 
YOU AGAIN" 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 



For Mothers' Day 

PEONIES - - - $10.00, $12.00 and $15.00 per 100 

We shall have them in large supply all season 

CARNATIONS - $10.00, $12.00 and $15.00 per 100 
SWEET PEAS - - - - $15.00 to $30.00 per 1000 



lann 



Roses, Carnations, 

Miscellaneous Cut Flowers 

and Greens 

30 

East Randolph St. 




Send Us 
Your 
Orders 



L. D. Phone : 

Central 6284 



CHICAGO 



♦ ■ • -r " r 



66 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 



STUPPY SUPPLY COMPANY 

Ten-Twenty Oak Street n>o»~(llS:&8?S§ KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Mothers' Day Flowers 

PEONIES - ROSES - EASTER LILIES 
GLADIOLI - SNAPDRAGONS - VALLEY 
SWEET PEAS - FLAT FERNS -VlUMOSUS 

SUPPLIES— A FULL LINE 

LET US QUOTE YOU 
ON ALL YOUR WANTS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



T. J. NOLL FLORAL CO. 



1117-19 McGee St., H.,r.r.235 KANSAS CITY, MO. 

CUT FLOWERS, FLORISTS' SUPPLIES, ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS 

Roses, Carnations, Sweet Peas and Lilies always fresh and ready 
to ship in a few hours after cutting. We are posted on market prices.. 
You get the best stock at reasonable prices. 

You will need the following supplies for Wreaths and Baskets: 

Lycopodium, carton, $3.50. Magnolia, $1.65. Wax Roses, $5.00 per 100, white and pink. 

Wax Carnations, $4.00 per 100. Calla Lilies, $7.00 and $10 00 per ICO. 

Pink and Lavender Dyed Statice, $1.50 per lb., silver and gold. 

Ruscus, Green painted, 75c per ih. Ruscus, Metallic, $2.25 per lb., silver, lavender and gold. 

Also Artificial Flowers, Violets, Forget-me-nots, Nasturtiums, Valley, Heather, Rambler 
Roses, Russell Roses and many others. Samples sent on request. 

We are western agents for the DOZEY FLOWER HOLDER. 



jurdus Vjusiiiess :it 6973 North Chirk 
strcrt ;mfl who is ready to braiieli out. 
Mr. ^V(■ilall<l will iiiodcnii/.c his Wil- 
iiu'ttc store this spriiij; and lias placed 
an order for new fixtures with Buch- 
liinder Hros. 

■ lacoli ]ii(dier, until recent l_v grower 
for the Hatavia (Treenhouse Co., has 
taken cliar^'e of urowiiijj; operations for 
the Loniliard Floral Co., D. J. Abranis, 
liro]irietor. Mr. .\l)rams states that this 
year, contr.'iry to their usual custom, 
they will run jiart of the place through 



the summer without resting the plants. 

.1. H. Holden, wlio formerly was in 
the florists' business on P''orty-seventh 
street and who lat(dy has been a part- 
ner in the establishment of Ilolden & 
Hidiinson, at Kensselaer, Ind., has 
lioujrht out Mr. Kobinson's interest and 
will continue the busrness on his own 
account. 

H. E. Humiston has joined the staff 
of the Pulverized Poultry Manure Co., 
in the capacity of general sales inan- 
afi'er, a position for which he is well 



fitted by experience in both the flo- 
rists' and the fertilizer trade. 

Victor has been dropped at the es- 
tablishment of Wendland & Keimel Co., 
which acquired all the stock of the va- 
riety from the E. G. Hill Co. The bench 
plants were sent to the E. C. Amlinjr 
place near Los Angeles. Victor is a 
beautiful rose, but too single for this 
market. In the better climate of Cali- 
fornia it is thought it may come more 
ih)ub]e. 

The funeral of Andrew Benson, at 



MAY 4, 1922 The Florists^ Review 67 

Bell Plione, Harrison 4310 Home Phone, Harrison 6487 

Klansas City Wholesale Cut Flower Co. 

1108-1110 Grand Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

Best Money Maker for Mothers' Day 

25,000 EASTER. LILIES at 20c. Grown cool. 

PEONIES, home-grown from the field, 8c, 10c and 12c. 

CORNFLOWERS or BACHELOR'S BUTTONS, 
$2.00 to $2.50 per 100. A wonderful seller. 

DAISIES, yellow and white, $1.50 to $2.50 per 100. 

At the last moment when you are sold out, . 
PHONE - 

L. R. BOHANNON, Always at Your Service 



Wholesale Cut jjjg qLDEST WHOLESALE HOUSE Wholesale Florists' 



Flowers 



Supplies 



1016-18 Ncliee St H. KUSIK & CO. Knsas City, Ho. 

For Mothers' Day 

We have to offer a select stock of 

Fancy Roses Fancy Carnations Sweet Peas 

Cut Easter Lilies Snapdragons Fancy Ferns 

Asparagus Plumosus 

And all other Flowers in season 

Wreaths, made up, artificial, very attractive, boxed, $3.00 to $4.00 

All kinds of Fancy Willow Baskets 

Write for our Catalogue on Wire Designs and Florists' Supplies. 
Place your orders with us and get the best stock at the most reasonable price. 



68 



The Florists^ Review 



Mav 4, l'.)22 



CAPE JASMINES 

For MEMORIAL DAY 

The Jasmine Crop is later this year than it has 
been for several years. We will start shipping 
about May 18th and continue until June 15th. 
Stock will be up to the usual standard. Special 
attention given to weekly standing orders. We 
have twenty acres growing and under contract, but 
on account of late season request that you place 
your order early. 

PRICES: 

Class X, 12 to 18-inch stem, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000 
Class A, 8 to 12-inch stem, 2.00 per 100; 18.00 per 1000 
Class B, 4 to 8-inch stem, 1.50 per 100; 12.00 per 1000 

500 at 1000 rate. Cash or C.O.D., F.O.B. Alvin 

We guarantee good condition upon arrival in any part of the United States. 

BENSON FLORAL CO., Alvin, Tex. 




ESTABLISHED 1894 



Cape Jsismine — Grandiflora 

FOR MEMORIAL DAY 

With a large acreage to cut from, shipments will begin about May 18 to 20. Check up your requirements and 
place your order promptly, so you will get what you want and when you want it. Every shipment will have my 
personal attention. 

TERMS CASH, F. O. B. PASADENA OR C. O. D. 

Class X, 12 to 18-inch stems, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000 
Class A, 8 to 12-inch stems, 2.00 per 100; 18.00 per 1000 
Class B, 4 to 8-inch stems, 1.50 per 100; 10.00 per 1000 

500 AT 1000 RATES. 25% OKF ON JUNE DELIVERIES. 

Address D. Z. HOLLOWAY, Florist and Nurseryman, Pasadena, Texas 



WIRE HOUSTON. 



References: State Bank, Pasadena, Texas; Alvin State Bank, Alvin, Texas. 



Hiiis.lalr. April :;!•. was largely at 

tfiidfil. 'I'liiitv ailt I)il('.s followed 

tlic lii'.'iisi' To tiic (•('iiictcry and tiicrc 
well' many riowcrs. Mr. iicnson liad 
l,(.,.|i ill liiaiyc of tlic oit'tMiliouscs of 
Hassctt \ Wasliliiirn for tliirty-foiir 
vears. JJi> |dacc will bo taken liy 
Cliarles Swanson, wlio has been there 
tweh e years and wlio for some time has 
liad cli.-irjic of all work under fjlass. 

Tlie Hri^Ks I'loral Co.. with liead- 
(|Uarters on Sheridan road at Uroad- 
way, elosed the old store in the i^rie^s 
House Ajiril '■'•'> and has removed the 
fixtures to a new location, on Fifty- 
third street near Har]ier avenue, a 
store onee used by W. H. Hilton. 

Will tlie trade take an active jiart 
ill the second T'aec'ant of l'ro<;ross? It 
will open July _!». 



('h.-iiles Cowdeiy, for sexeral years 
in charge of the jjreenhouses of Wietor 
]>ros., will ^o to Roanoke, \'a., to be- 
come forem.'in for I". Fallon. 

Marsliall X. Tyler is biiildint; ;i new 
home ill North Kxanston. 

K. V. Ktirowski, jnesident of the .lohn 
('. Moninjicr Co., has lieeii ;i jijioiiited 
manager \>y the creditors' coniniittee 
now in cliarge of operations. Tlie com 
mittee's first ai't w.as to redueo over- 
head and to speed uj) deliveries. 

W. .1. ymyth and Hilmer V. Swensoii 
were ;it Detroit this we(d< to attend a 
meetiiij; of the directors of the F. T. I). 
Mr. Smyth was one of the i liarter nieiii 
bers of the ■association' ,'ind is one of 
the conservative old wlu'cdhorses wlioso 
sound judjjnient may ahv.ays b(> counted 
on ill the scdectini. of the rij^lit ]iatli. 



■ .hdiii Man^id is one of the most ref^n- 
lar buyers on the market. He knows 
wh.at he w.-ints for his three hotel stores 
and where to ^jet it so it does not take 
him loni;, thoujih liis jiurcdiases are 
heavy. May L' he received many coii- 
t;ratulations on the tifty-eijihth auui 
\('rsary of his birthday. 

<'. .1. Miclielsen • is confident tli.at 
Mothers' d;iy records will be broken this 
yejir. He says the advance orders 
re.-icliiny; the K. ('. Anilin>i Co. ;ire <-on 
siderably more niimeroiis and laijicr 
t h;iu last year. 

roidilmann Bros. Co. is nic(dy settled 
in the teiiipor.'iry (|u;irters of the cut 
flower deii.-irtment in the basement at tWi 
.'iiicl (iH Fast Randoljih street. There is 
a K('od stairway and excellent elevator 
service and for summer use the base- 



MO 4, 1!>22 



The Florists^ Review 



69 




Cape J 



essamine 



Buds 



Cape JeMamine (G andifiora) 



for Memorial Day 

THE QUEEN OF FLOWERS 
The largest Jessamine Farm in the U. S, 

TO OUR CUSTOMERS AND THE TRADE: 

Tlie unusually warnfi and humid atmospheric conditions of the past 10 days 
have develop'ed an abnormal growth in the buds, and from present indications 
shipments will start moving from the 12th to 15th. several days earlier than 
we had previously predicted. However, not more than tiO'/f, of the crop will 
be ready by May 30th. 

Our Buds are tine; we believe in cultivation and fertilization, which costs 
money, but the extra ((uality more than repays it. "S<iuirrel ear" leaves and 
knobby buds do not ro with us. If you have never bouRht of us, all we ask is 
a trial shipment. 

We ship anywhere in the t'. S.; time arrivals and guarantee A-l stock. 
No order too large for us. Place your order where the suppl.v is large, b\il to 
avoid the rush, order earl.v. We are booking orders daily. Special attention 
given regular orders. 

Class X, 12 to 18-inch stems, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000 

Class A, 8 to 12-inch stems, 2.00 per 100; 18.00 per 1000 

Class B, 4 to 8-inch stems, 1.50 per 100; 12.00 per 1000 

500 at 1000 rate. No charge for packing 

50 Choice Buds prepaid anywhere in the U. S. on receipt of $1.50 



Terms: Cash or C. O. D., 7. O. B. Alvin, Texas. 'WBITE, PHONE or WIRXS. If you wire, all that is necessar.v is to state 
number wanted and class (X, A or H). Positively no chang<' in i)ii(e. Awake day and night, ready to serve \in\. 

We are also large shii>pers of MKXU'A.V TI'HKHOSK.S; season starts July 1st, and ends I lec 1st. 

Cape Jessamine & Floral Co. 

ALVIN, TEXAS 



Reference, Alvin State Bank 



Wholesale Florists 




Garden I A.S cape jasmwe 

650,000 or More 

Finest Quality. Packed Right. 

AT OUR POPULAR PRICES 

If weather continues warm, shipments should b^gin to move about May 1 Uh 
and throughout June. Our buds are shipi)ed same day they are picked; no left- 
over stock sent out. 

WE DO NOT CONSIGN, but ship direct from US t.. YOU. 
- fiong distance shipments and regular orders a s|»eclalty. Simi)ly state how 
often you wish them to arrive and same will go forward on time. Write, wire 
or phone rush orders. Prices F. 0. B. 



Terms: Cash or ('. •>. I>. 



.'<Nl ol ii iliis" at l("Kl i:ile- 



Class X, 12 to 18-incb slems $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 1000 

Class A, s to !2-inch stems 1.7S i)er 100; ISOO per lUOO 

Short stems 1.50 i)er 1(<); lO.OO per lOtwi 

" For Jaamines That Laat Longer" 

STEVENS & STEVENS, The Pecanwiy Fbrists, ALVIN, TEXAS 

Members S. A. F.; Texas .State Florists' Assoeii-.tion. 




THK 

SECURITY STAPLE 

The simplest and best 
deyica on the market for 
securely fastening cut 
flowers, sprays and de- 
sicns. 

f 1.75 per box of 500 

For sale by your supply 
house or sent direct by 



ntANKJ.YETTER,nwist 
226 Main St., GREENFIELD, MASS. 



best in the world 
John C.Meyer Thread, Co 

LoWtLL.MASS 

'' Ji:i'ilillt,i:' ;ii!'lllliliii"'ir///J// i 



The Neyer Threads 

are the lunKr-.^t and ^troiiKf.it throad.s in the 
»o 1(1, '2 (luiKos of threiul to oath sikjoI, Iii 
ouncosijf tlirrad to tho iHnind. 

Maniil'jict iircd by th«; 

JOHN C. IMEYER THREAD CO. 

LOWELL, MASS., U. S. A. 
D«pt. ZTZ. 



70 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. l'.»2'J 



meiit has uii(iui'stioiial)ln advantages. It 
was quite a chore to move the ieo iiui- 
chine and the big cooh'rs, but this was 
done by si)e('ialiHts and the ice machine 
was out of service only a few days. 

H. B. Keiinicott says that advices re- 
ceived from peony growers in the south- 
ern part ()f the state indicate that most 
of them will begin shipping before 
Mothers' day. Mr. Kennicott thinks 
many peony growers who never before 
have contributed to the Mothers' day 
8upi)lies on this market will be able to 
do so this yoar. 

Edward Malliuson, manager of the 
Fleischman Floral Co., says busint'ss for 
1922 has been, steadily, a good increase 
over tlie same i)art of 1921. lie expects 
a large demand for Mothers' day, but 
does not look forward to it with pleas- 
ure, saying that tlie ])ublic (luestions 
jirices more at Mothers' day than at 
any other sjiecial flower day of the j'ear. 

Kennicott Bros. Co. received ship- 
iiiejits of ]>oet 's narcissus last week all 
the way from Tacoma, Wash. The flow- 
ers ;irriv('(i in good condition in spite of 
till' length of the journey. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



The Market. 

liusiness was poor all through the last 
Week in April. The weather was de- 
lightfully cool — real flowep weather- 
yet there was no lactivit^. The wed- 
dings, the mainstax^ of thfi week before, 
were a disajjpointme-nh The rose croi) 
was so heavy that many roses had to be 
sacrificed and even then it was hard to 
sell them all. The long season for out- 
door lilac was a disadvantage to the 
market. This season outdoor lilac has 
lasted two weeks, an unusually long 
time. It has been good anu has proved 
exceeilingly jiopular. Hardh' any of 
this lilac goes through the wholesale 
liouses, but it reaches the buyers and 
s.-itisfies much demand. Sweet peas aji- 
pear to be I'ecovering; they are more 
plentiful, of fair quality, and they sell 
pretty well. There are decidedly fewer 
nice carnations. Those that are of high 
(piality sell. The oversupply of Easter 
lilies continues. Beauties and orchids 
have declined in price. \' alley suffers 
from the competition of outdoor-grown 
stock. There are ])lenty of callas and 
an abundance of snapdragons. Darwin 
tulips are coming in from outdoors. 
Greens sell pretty well. 

Club Meeting. 

There was a good attendance of nieni- 
bers and their friends at the Florists' 
Club meeting in the Adel])hia Tuesday 
evening. May 2, to hear Sydney K. Bay- 
crsdorfer review his trip abroad. Mr. 
liayersdorfer sailed from New York 
Feiniiary 7 on the A(Hiitania anil ar- 
rived home April 2;i on the maiden voy- 
age of the Kesolu'te. He had a wonder 
tul trip, saw and heard many interest- 
ing things and returned convinced tli;it 
our florists in America are the peers of 
any florists in the world. 

The Joseph G. Xeidinger Co. exhibited 
an American Legion shield, a likeness of 
the button enlarged, which w:is admired. 

Old Soil. 

There was an important jioint brought 
out in these columns a few weeks ago; 
to wit. the successful use of old soil. 
The case cited was of four benches of 
Laddie in fine shape, but growing in obi 
soil. The soil has been on the benches 
Hirer \i ars. The c;irn;it ions Iwuc been 



ALL FLOWERS ARE IN DEMAND FOR 

MOTHERS^ DAY 

and it is to your interest to make your selection in 
those lines in which you can get the best value. 

ROSES 

This will be the best item for Mothers' Day. The 
supply is large, and the quality is all that you can expect. 
We have without question the finesf lot of Roses we 
ever had. Plenty of all grades from shorts to specials. 

Russell Roses 

Of this variety we have a very large supply, in all 
grades, 12-inch to 30-inch stems. Roses of such a 
quality as we can furnish are a credit to the store that 
handles them. 

PEONIES, in assorted colors 
GLADIOLI, mostly America 
YELLOW DAISIES, fine large flowers 
VALLEY— ORCHIDS— EASTER LILIES. 

THE LEO NIESSEN CO. 

Whole»aie Florists 

Branches: 1201-3-5 Rae« St. 

WASHINGTON PHILADElLtPmA 



BERGER BROTHERS 

WHITE CARNATIONS 

Sweet Peas Darwin Tulips Callas 

Roses Snapdragons 
Easter Lilies all the year around 

1609 Sansom Street PHILADELPHIA 



EDWARD REID 

EXTRA FINE VALLEY 

EASTER LILIES SNAPDRAGONS 

SWEET PEAS CALLA LILIES 

CARNATIONS 

PREMIER COLUMBIA BUTTERFLY 

AND ALL THE LEADING ROSES 

H^«n TTwy'n Rnd'a Thty'rm Right 

1619-21 Ranstead St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



MAV 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



71 




RUSSELL and KAISERIN 

Coming along into wanner weather, no rose has the 
keeping or shipping qualities of these two splendid 
roses. Our growers are cutting freely and of very choice 
quality. 

RUSSELL KAISERIN 

Special $25.00 Special $20.00 

Fancy 20.00 Fancy 15.00 

Extra 15.00 Extra 12.00 

First lO.OO First 10.00 

Second ' 8.00 

A few extra long "Special" Russells at $35.00. 

As a good Mothers' Day Special, we offer our 

ROSE SPECIAL De LUXE — From the Big Four list: 
Russell, Premier, Columbia and Pilgrim; our selection as to 
variety ; all long stems, in lots of 100 or more, $15.00 per 100. 

Everytbing in Cot Flowers, Plants, Greens, Ribbons and Supplies. Send for Price List. 
BVSnrEBS HOUXS: 7 a. m. to 5 p. m. 

S. S. RENNOCK COMPANY 




THE 



WHOLESALE 

FLORISTS OF 



PHILADELPHIA 



NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA BALTIMORE WASHINGTON 

117 W. 28tb Street 1608-1620 Ludlow Street Franklin and St. Paal Sts. 1216 H. St. , N. W. ^ 



Carnations, Sweet Peas and 

all varieties of Seasonable 

Flowers and Greens. 

WM. J. BAKER 

Wkotoaato Florist 
12 Soath MoU Street, PbiUdalphia, Pa. 

SPECIAL FLORISTS' AIR BRUSH 

for painting and shading wickerware, artificial 
flowers, grasses, ahowcards, etc.; positively 
the most useful all-around device of this kind 
for the florist. Complete outfit, $6.60. 
Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Send for illustrated price list. 

KENDIG. THE FLORIST 
Membwr ot the F. T. D. OSWEGO. N. Y. 

glowing in that soil two years. They 
look well. I do not advocate using old 
soil on the benches; it might mean fail- 
ure, but I do advocate giving this mat- 
ter some thought, because, if it can be 
successfully done, it means a big sav- 
ing in the cost of production. 

Roses. 

Tlie jircsent heavy overproduction of 
roses in our market is surprising to 
those wlio are infopued on what is going 
• III ill the rose houses. A large part of 
tlie replanting that was formerly done 
111 Slimmer is being done now. Tliere is 
;< 'Ifiiiand for 2 and :{ year-old green- 
house-grown roses for planting in 
the garden. Variety is not at first im- 
portant; just so the plants are hybrid 
tea roses, strong and healthy, they will 
<-lo. One enterprising chap took orders 
for these rose plants in a booth at the 
New York flower show and sold a fabu- 
lous number. The retail j.riee is said 
t" have l)een 7.1 cents each; ,$.10 per hun- 
dred. 

Various Notes. 

■I'. Hampton Moore will speak before 
the Florists' Club Tuesdav evening, 
•lime 6, D. V. " 

rharles Leisy will build one green- 
'ouse. .-^2x100 feet, on his place at 
" ononah, X. J. Mr. Leisy has placed his 



PLEASE NOTE 

EXTRA FANCY SNAPDRAGONS, 

CARNATIONS, ROSES AND PEAS 

Stocks and all Novelties 

Philadelphia Cut Flower Company 

BeH S "°S'3-804 Whol««d. Florirt GEORGE ABUGLB 

Keystone.'iRace 1112-1118 1517 Sansom St., PUlidelpkia, Pa. Proprietor 



FOR MOTHERS' DAY 

Send us your wants. We have the stock. 



Choice Roses, Carnations, Valley, Lilies, Gladioli 
and all Seasonable Cut Flowers. 

The Philadelphia Wholesale Florists' Exchange 

""'**4hi Golden Rule" 1615 Ranstcad Street, PHILADELPHIA 



Roses 

CaniatioDS 

Sweet Peas 

Snapdragons 

Callas 



CHARLES E. MEEHAN 

4 South Mole Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



ASPARAGUS 

Striags ud 
Bucket 

Adiantum 
And Greens 



contract with the Lord &. Hurnliaiii Co. 
through D. T. Connor. When completed, 
the house will bo planted witli chrysan- 
themums. 

Mrs. Farr, of the Colonial Flower 
8hop, has purchased the business of 



("liarics Duraiid, at liroad street and 
.Sus(jueliainia avenue. This store was 
formerly owned and operated by A. E. 
Beisterand later by Alfred B. Cart- 
ledge, Jr. When Mr. Cartledge decided 
to devote his energies to l\is Wilmington 



72 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 



Gold Letter 




Prices Smashed 



No. 1 Gold 

Pw 1.000 $ 3.50 

Per 5.000 15.00 

P«r 10.000 28.00 



These prices on gold lett^ are Postpaid 

to you no matter whether you are located 
in Maine or California, Oregon or Florida. 
Compartment Boxes 25c each or free with 
orders of 5,000 letters. 

These letters are our regular first 
quality stbck. The kind that will 
stick, STICK and STICK, and won't 
come off. 




No.6 
Par 1000. $3.00 




No.4 
Per 1000.13.00 



SCRIPT 



Father Sister Grandpa Asleep Rest Darling Mamma At Rest Niece Uncle 

Mother Husband Grandma Baby Our Dear Comrade Cousin Daughter Papa 

Brother Wife Friend Sleeping My Too Soon Nephew Peace Aunt Soon 



Per lOO, $3.00; p^ lOOO, $22.50 



B. L and J. T. COKELY, 



ErtabUshcd 25 years 



201 N. 7th Ave., SCRANTON, PA. 

Ml imh<'liiier> and Inpocten of FlarMi' SappUce 



"SERVICE YOU'LL LmS" 



STRAWFLOWERS for Memorial Day Wreaths 

NICELY COLORED, (^ g.SO per 100 
LARGE HEADS ON ^„„ „ ^ , -^- 

8.inch to 13-inch Stems ) *22.SO per 1 000 

Highest Grade Obtainable. ORDER NOW to insure delivery. 

ALLAN HUMASON CO., 448-450 N. WeUs St., t lui..:.. CHICAGO 



"SERVICE YOU'LL LIKE" 



store, he sold tho liiisiiioss to Mr. 
Duraud. 

11. Hjiyci'sdort'cr & Co. Ikivc opeiicd a 
branch s'toro at 144 and 14() West Eifjlit- 
t'ciitli street. New York. A iiieiiiber of 
tlie firm will be in cliarjjc 

Frank R. Hastinfjs has enjoyed a few- 
days' vaeatioii since Easter. Mr. Hast- 
ings is an e.xceedinfjiy hard worker, who 
])uts lots of pep into liis business. 

It is believed that William C. Dun- 
ning will o])en a retail tlowc'r store at 
Fifteenth street and Columbia avenue, 
the old .lacob Moore placi'. 

Samuel McClemeiits, of Randolph & 
McClements, Pittsburgh; 11. (I. I'erry, 
of Dards, New York, and Maik Palmer, 
of W. J. Palmer & Son, Buffalo, were 
hero last week. 

.lohn Kulp, of Wayne .luncfion. has 
closed a c(»ntract with Hitchiiigs & Co. 
to build one gieeiihouse, 4<)xL'iMi feet, on 
/lis farm near Fort Washington station. 
The house will be commenced aliout 
■June 1. When com])leted, it will be 
])lante(l with carnations. .Mi-. Knl|i has 
long ]ihinned this move. 

Ste|)heii Mortensen has com])leted 
tearing down his two oldest green- 
houses, at ISoiithamiiton, and is now 
re;idy for the Loi-d Ac Hurnhani Co. to 
commence erecting two new ones that 
w-ill take the jihK-es of the old ones. 

Samuel C. Sproul has bought hack his 



The Philadelphia Growers' Cut Flower Market 

White Carnati(c/n8 for Mothers' Day 



CHOICE SWEET PEAS 
All Colors 



A fine crop of high gfrade 
PREMIER ROSES 



VIOLETS Extra Fine VALLEY 

A heavy cr p of ROSES in all the finest iort*. 

TO THE BUYER: We ask a trial order. We can and will please you. 

TO THE GROWER: Join us now. .Send .your own flowers lo .vour own L'oniniission house. 

Both Phonct 

"k::;.'^ R/r?.82 No. 7 South Mole Street, Philadelphia ^"'{5?n.%V"^" 



business at Fifty-eighth street and 
Chester avenue. This gives Mr. Sproul 
three flower stores — at Si.xty-si.xth .and 
Walnut streets, at Fortieth .-ind Walnut 
streets, an<l at Fifty-eighth street and 
Chester. 

Tlie .Joseph (i. Xeidinger Co. has en- 
larged the American I^egion button into 
an emblem for sad occasions; this is 
effective and jioimlar. 

.Fosejih Be.'ivis & Son h;ive discirded 
both Killarnev and M.aryland, two re- 
liable old varieties tliat they grew well 
and held until now. 

.losepli .Tones has returned to the Leo 
Niessen Co., after an absence of four 



WIRED TOOTHPICKS 



BERLIN 
N. Y. 



Manufacturod by 

W. J. COWEE, 

10,000, $2.50 50,000, $11.00 
Sample Free For Sale by Dealer* 

years. Mr. .(ones ha<l earned a high 
reputation in our business when the 
war broke out. The marines, with whom 
he was affiliated, then went automatic- 
ally into the navy. Mr. .loiu-s remained 
in the navy throughout the war and 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



73 



The Florists' Supply House of America 



^^E have opened our new place at 

144-148 West 18th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 

ith a full line of Merchandise 

We should be pleased to see the florists 



W 



Cemetery Vases for Nemorial Day 




H. B. C. Special 
Cemetery Vase 

Either galvanized or 
heavy tin painted. This 
is a very durable vase. 

No. 1—4x7, per doz....$ 3.00 
Per 100 20.00 

No. 2—5x8, per doz.... 4.00 
Per 100 30.00 




No. 15 

Glass 

Bouquet 

Holder 

To stick into 
ground. 

10 inches, per 
doz.... $3.50 

12 inches, per 
doz. .. $5.50 

18 inches, per 
doz.... $9.00 



No. 15 



Cemetery Bouquet Holders 

No. X-L 

5x9H-iii- bowl, 
per doz.. $2.00 

Per 100, $13.00 



No. 2 

Painted, 4>^x8- 
in. bowl, per 
100 $8.00 

No. 3 

Galvanized, 5x- 
9K-in- bowl, 
per doz.. $2.00 

Per 100. $13. 00 





No. X-L 



No. 2 
No. 3 



H. Bayersdorf er & Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF METALLIC DESIGNS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



1129-1133 Arch Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



144-148 West 18th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 



Branch Factory: 709 Fir»t Ave., New York City. Telephone Vanderbilt 4976 



then went into shipping. His old .isso- 
••i;ites welcome his return. 

Hers:er Bros, have fine Darwin tulips. 

<'. r. Ligitjit says that the demand for 
young rose plants is largely for grafted 
stock. 

Robert Kift has returned from ("hi- 
**•■'«"• Phil. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



The Market. 

La.st week was one of the dullest ever 
experienced here and the market was 
flooded with all kinds of stock. Roses 
••"•lived in large (luantities, as did also 
iHilbous stock. Carnations the first part 
ot last week were a drug on the market. 
Saturday. Aj.ril 29, however, saw a de- 
<'ided change, for stock tightened up 
•■•lid business took a sudden spurt, witii 




"Knot Wood" Products 

Pots - Vases - Baskets 

For Mothers' Day 



Something really new to the 
trade. A hand-made, expertly 
finished product done by artis- 
ans who know nature — lends ' 
itself completely to plant life. 
Price List and Illustrated Leaflet on the Press 




Sent only by request from 



R. G. BOCK, Florist, r::^ Hamilton, 0. 



74 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



Wire Hanging Baskets 

WELL MADE, PAINTED GREEN 




8-in., per doz., $2.00; per 100, $15.00 
10-in., per doz., 2.25; per 100, 18.00 
12-in., per doz., 2.50; per 100, 20.00 
,, per doz., 3.50; per 100, 25.00 
5.00; per 100, 35.00 



12-in 
14-in 
16-in., per doz 



Wire Work 

Of Every Description 



Florists' 

A Specialty 



S 



Perfection Pot 

(Pat. Applied For) 

A NECESSITY 
IN EVERY 
GREENHOUSE 

FITS ANY POT PERFECTLY 

Well mad* of Heavy 
Galvanized Wire 

Will Last Forever 

Per 100,$ 15.00 
Per 1000, 120.00 



Hangers 




Wm. L Hielscher Co., 



1458 
Randolph Street, 



Detroit, Nich. 



the result that the m.arkct cleaned up 
nicely. 

Easter lilies moved slowly all last 
week, it beiiiy Jilniost impossible to sell 
them. Calendulas have been clearing 
fairly well, as have snapdragons. Some 
exceptionally good ten weeks' stocks 
have been arriving in double and single 
varieties. 

Bulbous stock is about over. A few 
tulips, mostly Darwin, are still coming 
in, while d:iffodils are just about done 
for. There was a great call for valley 
last week. Some good daisies, V)oth 
yellow and white, are putting in an a])- 
pearance. Sweet ])eas of good (piality 
are still arriving. 

Various Notes. 

The latest rej)orts are that there is 
to be another tlorists' dance, Tuesday, 
May !•, but the date, as yet, is not 
official. The correct time and ]dace 
Avill be announced later. Everybody 
should come and, make this dance a 
huge siicccss. 

.). E. Powgill, of f'antoii, O., was 
.again ;) visitor. 

I'aul Sullivaji was a recent visitor, as 
■was Joseph I. Adler, of the Adler- 
Jones f'o. 

.1. lllavatv hiis a new Ford touring 
car. W. A. R. 



PROVIDENCE, R. 1. 



The Market. 

There was a slight increase in busi- 
ness last week, due largely to a num- 
ber of small social functions and an 
increase in the demand for funeral 
work. The storekeepers and growers 
ar(> now focusing their energies on 
Mothers' day and Memorial day, al- 
though the .June graduations will give 
them some activity. 

Serious comjilaints come from all 
jiarts of the state that the winter 
pist passed has been severe and un- 
usually destructive to many kinds of 
shrubs, bushes, vines, hedges and nurs- 
ery stock. This is especially true of 




"PENCO" 
Florists' Metal Supplies 



Basket Liners 

(All Styles) 

Bouquet Holders 

Vases 

Fern Pots 

Window Troughs 

AND ALL 

Metal Specialties 

5 <Jfc Discount 
For Cash With Order 

Special DiKoont to Jobber* ud 

Lw(e Qnutity Biyeri 

Manufactured by 

The Penn Mfg. & Supply Co. 

Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 



No. SOI— 3^x7, : 
Per Gross, $8.00 

No. 502—4x8, 
Per Gross, $9.00 

No. 503— 5x9H, 
Per Gross, $10.50 




No. 504— 

3Kx2Kx6><, 
Per Gross. $10.50 



No excuse for BAD CREDIT RISKS 
when a member of the 

FLORISTS' CREDIT ASSOCIATION 

NATIONAL SERVICE 

CMicral Office: 

1225 N. Ashland Ave. CHICAGO 

Phone: Monroe 3987 



it Pays to Buy Direct {rom the Grower 

Cut Flowers 

THE ELITCH GARDENS CO. 

Wholesale Florists, DENVER, COLORADO 



MAV 4, lit22 



The Florists' Review 



75 




fAyCALLUM 




ORDER^IBY MAIL NOW FOR MEMORIAL DAY 

Fast Mail Order Service ^^^It^^ McCallum Quality Guaranteed 



Cemetery Wreaths 



Plain Magnolia Wreaths 



Av^' 


hiblc i" niiiiiy attruclive (Icsiuns. 11- 


liisii 


.iliiiii sliiiws Olio (if our popiilur styles. 


I^'i 


IS send yon im assort ini'iit of good 


sclli 


1^' styles. 




L'O-iii., $-'4.00 IXT (loz. 




Tl-\\\., $30.00 PIT doz. 




l!4-iL., $30.00 per doz. 



Redy White and Blue 
Ribbons - Chiffons 

Pattern 1852, Satin Ribbon 
,\,.. 40, $2.2,-) jicr bolt; No. 100, $3.2,-) 
|,rr iMilt; No, 150, $3.00 per lH)lt. Ten 
y;inls to lK)lt. 

Pattern 252, Metalline Silk 
I 111 most priK tirul of all red. white 
Miiil liliie ribbons, 5'^ i""- wide, 30 
J Mills to iHilt, 20e per yard. 

Pattern 1008, Striped Chiffon 

K ill, h sillx, white bixly, strliMnl in 
rill, wliite und blue on bonier, Ixilt 
iilioiil 4(1 yiirds. \ht .vard, 24e. 



p^^-m 



Made in our own factory and prircd to 
net real itnitits to you — creen, brown or 
tinted. Two to a liox. 

18-in., $ 0.35 per doz. 

20-ln., $11.00 per doz. 

22- In., $13.75 per doz. 

24-in., $10.50 per doz. 




CEMETERY VASES 

.MacU' of Rroen enameled sheet metal. Conical Style, $1.25 
jier doz., ,$13.50 per gross. Flat Bottom Style, $l.,'i5 per 
(liiz., $15.tKl per gross. 

OTHER ACCESSORIES 

Cycas Leaves. Oak Shrubs, Cones. Teasels, I'oppy Heads, 
Waxed Flowers. Immortelles. Lycopodium, lUiscus — all at- 
tractively priced. Write. 



Artificial Cape Flowers 

(Jenuine Imported Stixk, finest qual- 
ity. You'll need some in red, white 
and blue. 500 flowers to a box, per 
box, $2.fl0. Lots of ten bo.xes, $1.50 
a box. 



Aluminum Foil 

More easily handled, more econom- 
ical than tin foil. 6 or 10-inch width, 
.fl.lO per lb.; lots of 10 lbs., $1.00 
per lb.; lots of 25 lbs., UOc per lb. 
Il4,(i00 sq. ins. to roll of one iK)und.) 



THE McCALLUM COMPANY 



Mail Order Headquarters for Florists 



137 Seventh St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 




rSERVICEl 




M.mM 



iifi«.^ 



•^ TV ■'•■j, 

- --.Va^ 



Ever Ready 
Flower Pot 
G)ver 



No worry, no hurry, 
Qo cuttiDg, no folding, 
no fussing, no ribbon to tie. Drop the 
pot in the cover. That's all there is to 
it. You'll find it so easy; just try. 
Write for sample and NEW REDUCED 
PRICE LIST today. Send 10c postage. 

The Ever Ready Flower Pot Cover Co. 

146 HucliM ATenue. BUFFALO. N.Y. 



BASKET LINERS in STOCK 

fur immediate delivery. Write for prices 

and sizes. Give Quantity needed. 

Special Liners made to order. 

GRAND SHEET METAL WORKS 

^423-25 W. 14th St., CHICAGO, ILL. 

' 'irgeat Manufacturen of Basket Liner* in America 



IRVING STEIN CO. 

ManufacturerB of 

Hand-Painted Metal Baskets 
and Galvanized Vases 

WRITE FOR PRICES 
i09 Rive, St. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Send for a Sample and Test the Water Resisting Qualities of Our 

H. & E. BEAUTY TISSUE 

400-Count Reams 

$11 f\C\ per bundle of 10 reams 

Less 2% cash with order. C. 0. D. from unknown parties. 

FLORISTS SUPPLY HOUSE 

Hartje & Elder, Props. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



The SaVO Steel All-Year-Round Flower Box 

Self-Watering and Sub-Irrigating 

For WINDOWS, PORCHES, 

LEDGES, SUN PARLORS, Etc. 

Leak-proof and rust-proof. No surfaces 
watering. Perfect AIR circulation and| 
drainage. 

A Sales Bootter— A Trade Wiimer— An Eaiy 
Seller. Good Marfin of Profit to Dealers. 
Write for free Catalogue, prices and discounts 

SAVO MANUFACTURING CO., 

1 11 W. Monro* St. CHICAGO Patented Jan. 23. 1917 




76 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 192:j 




Hanging Baskets, iiis »2» 2- *• Miskt 

0"*0 *^^'^*^^*^ STRONG, DURABLE, WEU MADE 

^^ Sis* PwrdoB. Par 100 

Green s-inch $2.00 $15.00 

Sheet 10-inch 2.25 18.00 

iiii^«» 12-inch 2.50 20.00 

iVlOSS 14-inch 3.00 25.00 

Per bale, $1.35 16-inch 4.25 35.00 

10 bales, $12.50 18-inch 6.00 45.00 

so of one siac at lOO rate 

Tl.«, 1U«« M...»^L» r«. 329 Main St, 

Ine VTm. JnUrpny to., Cincinnati, o. 



Huckleberry, $7.50 per case 

THE E. F. WINTERSON CO., l^,^:ZtS,'^iL^^H^, Chicago, III 



rhododciiilroiis, many liiindrcd hushes 
having- hecn wiiitiT-killed. Heavy 
frosts duriiifj the last fortnight liave 
daiiiat^ed tlie peach orchards througliout 
tlie state and many otlier fruit trees 
are ludiexcd to lia\e l)eeu l)adly bitten. 

Various Notes. 

Cli.'irles A. Hand.all lias been granted 
]iermission to erect a greenhouse on 
Weeclen street, Pawtucket. 

Sanuud Kesniek, of Bowers & Ecs- 
iiick, was a business visitor in Boston 
last week. 

Lawreiici' il;iy. of East Providence, 
has ,'iddeil an automobile delivery 
wagon to his shiji])ing dei);irt ment. 

The l;indscii])e and outdoor men all 
rejiort the l)usiest spiing time in many 
years, jin unusual :imount of new work 
being done throughout the state. 

.]ose]ih K. Ko|)|>(dnian m.ade a busi- 
ness tri]i to New ^'ork and I'hiladel- 
l)hia last Wfik. 

I'isher the I'lorist distributecl over 
12,11(10 favors on the o|i<niiig day of his 
new store, at .'{.")•"> Westminster street. 

The C^uidnick (ireenhouses, Inc., are 
contenijilat ing ;i rearrangement of the 
houses at (^uidnick this season. 

.lolin .lohnston, of .lohnston Bros., 
spent seveial days in Boston and vi- 
cinity last week on business. 

Charles M. Hunt, of Murnside street, 
is (•on\:iles<'ing fr(UM a severe bronchial 
cold. 

Samuel Kinder, Bristol, w,is busy last 
week on wedding orders and decora- 
tions. 

("arniicliael Hios., of Sliannock, have 
more th:ni .".IMmi jicony (dumps in the 
tield, which .'ire showing great jiromise 
for this season. 

M. lannotti A: Son, .\twells avenue, 
rejiort an unusually he;i\'y demand for 
funeral work. 

Thomas Cuiley is busy with land- 
scajn' work at the state house grounds, 
on Capitol hill. 

Carl (i. Kngel has commenced the 
erection ot a greenhouse on .\mes street, 
Pawtucket. 

The Westminster (ireenhouses, of 
which .7. Trottier is manager, had the 
decorations and cut flowers for the la- 




Self-Watering Device 

For Hanging Baskets 

MAKE all the hangiiw baskets you fill self- 
wat<^rinK by using the Daisy Self- 
Waterer. Put in any basket after it is 
filled and never seen. Can be regulated to water 
any size basket. Never have to take a basket 
dov?n to water it. With this device any child 
can water them. Always a uniform moisture, 
and plants will grow much better: that means 
more people will want baskets and that spells 
more money for the florist. 

When shown and explained every lady who 
has a hanging basket will want one. DEVICE 
made of galvanizei iron and copper and a sure 
seller wherever shown. TrMrsample order and 
be convinced. * 

Price, $6.00 per doz. 

A sample mailed upon receipt of 50c 
Retails for 75c 

BETHARDS THE FLORIST 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



HART BRAND— Wire Hanging Baskets 

The most practical and best made Hanging Baskets on the market. Order naw for future 



delivery and save any possible delay. 
PLAIN TOP 

10-inch t2.G0 per doz., tlS.OOper 100 

12-inch S.OOperdoz., 20.00 per 100 

14-inch 4.00 per doz.. 26.00 per 100 

16-inch 6.00 per doz., 37.60 per 100 

18-inch 6.76 per doz., 60.00 per 100 



We will ship promptly when needed. 
SCROLL OR ROLL TOP 

10-inch S3.26 per doz.. 121.00 per 100 

12-inch 8.76 per doz., 26.00 per 100 

14-inch 4.76 par doz., 88.00 per 100 

16-inch e.OOperdoz., 40.00perl00 

18-inch 7.60perdoz., 66.00perl00 



^^1?^^^>^^C* C> U i^ 191^ Manofacturer. Dealer and Importer 
Ol!<xJIv\jlJCi D* JTl/^IV I J (FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

47-65 Stone Street, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



KIRCHEN & GIFFORD 

MANUFACTURERS 



Factory: 
Hartfwa, Mich. 

Oakaad 

plhiVed R^Kot Preserved Foliages 

Tinted Rascnt 

Lycopodina 222 W. NidisiD St., CHICAGO 

dies' night of Doric Lo<lge of Masons, 
.at Masonie Temple, I-'ridav evening, 
.\].ril I'H. 

The decor;itions for littiise ;iiid i liiinli. 



Prepared Magnolia Leaves 

In Cases or Cartons 

THE RUMBLEY 

Evergreen, Ala. 



and l)ou(|uets for the Babeoek-dladdinjj 
wedding were furnished by the Colonial 
IMower Shoiijte. 

Frank Anderson. 272 East Centra! 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



77 




WIRE HANGING BASKETS 

NOT THE CHEAPEST BUT THE BEST 
Th« W«ll Mad* Kind Palnt«d, Bound with QalvanlzMl WIra 

• at dozan rata, 80 at lOO rata 

Per doz. Per 100 

8-ineh 12.00 $15.00 

lO-ioch 2.26 18.00 

12-mch 2.60 20.00 

14-iBoh 3.26 26.00 

le-inch 6.00 36.00 

18-mch 6.00 46.00 

Prices on larger size Hanging Baskets quoted on application. 
Write for Price List of Wire Floral Designs. 

^DCCIM GUCCT R>f/^GG long grbbn sheets 
%kM%.EiI!«f^ OFULIL 1 WlKJSyo for hanging baskets 

Per bundle, 91*80; per lO bundlea, 914.00 

CXT i^DlTri^Uiri f Wholesale 

• Edm V^IVl 1 K^EM.ndL^M^j Commission Florist 

15 E. Third Street, CINCINNATI, OHIO 



HANGING 
BASKETS 

Enameled Oreen 
Extra well made. 

8-inch $1.65 per doz. 

10-inch 1.90 per doz. 

12-inch 2.26 per doz. 

14-inch 2.75 per doz. 

16-inch 3.75 per doz. 

18-inch 5.00 per doz. 

QREEN MOSS 

Fancy sheet. 8-bn. sack, well filled. 
XXX QuaUty. 

$1.60 PER SACK 
10 SACKS e $1.36 

Pittsburgh Cut Flower Co. 

116-118 Seveatii St.. PinSBURGII. PA. 



HANGING 
BASKETS 

Made of 

Galvanized 
Crimped Wire 

Woven 1% moah 
Painted Grcon 

NONE BETTER! 

Doz. 100 
lO-in., $2.00 $15.50 
12-in., 2.30 17.00 
14-in., 2.90 21.50 
16-in., 3.75 28.00 

FALU Cin WIRE WORKS 

Ml Srd StrMt. LOUISVILLE. KY. 





Wire Hanging Baskets 

Our baskets are made strong and substantial, well painted, 
have strong wire hangers and are guaranteed to be the 
best on the market. Will outlast many other makes. 
Size (Measure across top) Per doz. 

8 inches $2.00 

10 inches 2.50 

12 inches 3,00 

14 inches 3.75 

16 inches 5.00 

18 inches 6.50 

GREEN SHEET MOSS 

For Uainc Hanfiny Baalnta. Etc. 

Per largre sue bale |i.5e 

S-bale lots, per bale 1)40 

''Green Dyed" Sheet Moss 

Per large lixe bag $4.0| 

S-bag lots, per bag 3.'|0 

Geo. H. Angermueller Co. 

Wholesale Florlsta. 1324 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Get Our List o< Other Supplies— It's Free. 

IfentlOB TI>« B«Tlew wbea yon writ*. 



Heavy Hanging 
Baskets 

Green Enameled Extra Heary 

Hand Made Hangers 

Per Doz. Per 100 

8-inch $».7S $12.75 

10-inch 2.00 15.00 

12-inch 2.25 16.75 

14-inch 2.75 21.00 

16-inch 3.75 27.50 

18-inch 5.00 37.50 

LOG MOSS, $1.50 Z. 

Oar Famous "Bine WMge" Quality 

The McCallum Co. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 




Cokely's 
Baskets 

Na. 1— Plak Styk 



Size Doz. 

10-in. $2.50 

12-in. 3.00 

14-in. 4.00 

16-in. 5.00 



100 

$18.00 

20.00 

25.00 

37.50 



Na. 2-B«ricrcJ Styk 



Size 


Doz. 


100 


10-in. 


$3.26 


$21.00 


12-in. 


3.75 


24.00 


14-in. 


4.75 


33.00 


16-in. 


6.00 


40.00 


Sheet Moss 


Per bag 




...MM 



B. E. & J. T. COKELY 
SCRANTON, PA. 



-t'^" "^TV^.i T" *3**; 



y-^TT"*TKi.,^'' 



^T:I"^V-i, 



78 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, Vjt: 



street, Fraiikliji, is calliu}; for extra 
men for outdoor work. 

Carl Jacobs is now in charge of tlie 
flower department at S. S. Kresjje's 
store, Pawtucket. W. H. M. 



BOSTON. 

The Market. 

Business at the wholesale markets 
continues a bit flat and values are com- 
paratively low. We have had continu- 
ously clear skies now for over a fort- 
nij(ht and production, as a result, has 
been larye. There has been yood retail 
buying, but too many flowers are ar- 
rivinji; to be used in the re}juiar chan- 
nels of trade. Now is the time to <iive 
flowers jiublicity and movi' the large 
suj)plies which liave to be carried over 
daily. Roses have had a ratlier hard 
week and prices have crumpled badly. 
Buyers can secure flowers at inucli tlieir 
own jirices after the early morning rush 
is over. The Kiilarney and ()]>iielia 
roses now coming in are of rather poor 
quality, but ('(dumbia, Scott Ki'y, Pre- 
mier, Ward, Butterfly and tlie reds, like 
Crusader and Hadley, remain gooil. 

Carnations are overdone and ])riees 
are weaker than in tlie last report. 
Cood quality flowers move wtdl, but a 
great many second-grade blooms are 
now seen. Winkler's Morning (Mow is 
now strongly asserting itself, while 
Ward is in excellent demand. Pink De- 
light is somewhat on the wane, ('alias 
and lilies arc selling at low |>rices and 
snajxlragons. although of grand (pial- 
ity, are a veritable drug. It is too bail 
this useful flower comes in with such a 
rush at this season; it is one of the most 
satisfactory of all flowers for keejiing. 

Heavier arrivals of marguerites are 
hard to assimilate. Sweet pi'as are over- 
done, and theic are a good many of in- 
ferior (juality. Daff'odils are neaiing the 
end and there are few tulijis left. C)nl.\' 
•small shi|)ments of gi.'idioll ;iri' coming 
in, as well as some nice S]);inish irises. 
(iyiisojihila is jiopular and sells out 
• piickly, as docs hardy larkspur. 

There ;ii'e fair supplies of cattlcyiis 
.and gardeni.-is, and more \alU'y is 
iiei'deil. Siii;ill sup]dies of orange blos- 
soms are iintcd. Pot plant trade con- 
tilHU'S good. 

Various Notes. 

The (diiet' horticultural e\cnt of local 
interest this week is the great show of 
n.ative ferns and flowers naturally ar- 
raiige<l, which o]iened May .'5 and which 
will continue for at least a week. .\l- 
t hough great expense has been entailed 
in pri'|iariiig this uni<|ue and notable 
♦exhibition, it was decided to make it 
absolutely free to the jiublic, ;ind record 
attendances are looked for. There was 
a i)riva1e view of the show May II, when 
admission was by ticket only. In con- 
iiectif>n with the show, a program of 
lectures on New Kngland wild flowers, 
their jirotectioii and cultivation, was 
arranged for. At '.\ ji. m. May 4 there 
will be an illustrated lecture on ''Why 

)ur Wild Flowers Are Kare,'' by Prof. 
M. L. Fernald, of Harvard. M:iy ."> H. 
W. Faulkner, of W.ashington, Conn., will 
j^ive an illustrated t.'ilk on ''The Con- 
servation of Our Wild Howers.'' M;iy ti 
"The Cultivation of Nature Plants" 
will be handled by Dr. Robert T. .lack- 
son, of I'eterborough, N. 11., and May 8 
Norman Taylor, of the Rrooklyn Ho- 
tanical (iardens, ■ will give an illu-- 




Note Special Prices on 

Wreaths and Easels 

Wire Easels 

Well made, painted gre< q 

Per Do«. Per 1 )0 

15-in...$0.75 $ 6.C0 

18-in... 1.00 8.C0 

21-in... 1.25 lO.CO 

24-in... 1,50 12.00 

27-in... 1.75 14.C0 

30-in... 2.25 18.C0 

36-in. . . 3.00 22.00 

42-in... 4.00 

Per Dob. P«p Doi. ,„. „ 4R-in 6 SO 

12" .$1.00 16" .$1.50 wip,E».ei '^»-m... 0.3U 

14" . 1.25 18" . 1.75 

Well made, painted sreen. 

The Best 

Wire Basket 

and Why 

Made of Galvanized wire and 
crimped. Closer meshed to hold 
moss better and less of it. Sturdy 
and strong. 

Measure inside ring 

Each Doz. ■ » » ■ ■ 

8-in $0.25 $2.50 ^««"i*i •■i^i^Wft 

10-in 30 3.00 

12-in 35 4.00 

14-in 40 4.50 

16-in 50 5.75 

Fresh Log Moss 10-lb. carton, $2.00 

Dyed Log Moss 5-lb. bag, $3.00; 10-lb. bag, 4.50 

Sphagnum Moss 5 bales for 6.25 

C. C. PoUworth Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 





NOTICE TO FLORISTS 

In this Cold Storage Plant 84x98 ft., built by ROBERT GROVES, Inc., for 

proper handling of 

FANCY FERNS 

is stored the largest stock any one dealer has in the U. S. Write for price 
ROBERT GROVES, Inc., 127 Comm.rei.i St.. Adams, Mass. 



PREPARED BRONZE GALAX 

Magnolia, Short Oak for Wreaths 

Other items. Catalogue. 

W. M. WOODRUFF'S SON & CO. 

LOWGAP. N. C. 



Dagger Ferns- Wild Smilax 

Huckleberry Filii^e 

W. W. THOMPSON 

MONROEVILLE ALA 



,;<^^ ^TT ■ 7 ~Tv ■ ?*•"**, vN"^' 



MAI 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



79 





NEW CROP 

SOUTHERN FANCY FERNS 

FINEST STOCK FROM THE SOUTH 

GUARANTEED TO PLEASE 

3000 to 10000 at $2.50 per 1000 

Special price on larger orders 



We give References: 

People's Bank or First National Bank 

of Evergreen, Ala. 



10% off for cash with order 



We ask trade reference or cash 
with order irom all except 
regular customers. 



SHIPMENTS MADE IN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS AFTER ORDER RECEIVED. 

Write, Wire or Phone 

Chas. S. Lee & Co. 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA 





Mention The Re»lew when TOii write 



SHEET MOSS 

THE GOOD KIND 
AT LOW PRICES 

Large sheets, well dried, natural green 
color, 5c per lb. We are handling 
nothing but moss, and you may depend 
upon prompt shipment. Caihwith order. 

Green Goods Supply Shop 

NEWLAND, NORTH CAROLINA 



Mention The Review when you writ e. 

Special Price for Nemorial Day Trade 

THE BEST GRADE 

FLORISTS' MOSS 

tiuarant«ed to be free from sticks and dirt 
and well iHcUed. 
Your money refunded if not satisfied, 
tturlapped. oOce.vtra. 

1 in-bbl. bale $ 4.00 

') lii-bbl. bales 17.50 

10 U-bbl. bales 30.00 

The Ocean County Moss & Peat Co. 

WM. H. STACKHOUSE, Prop. 
WARETOWN, N. J. 



Laurel, Hemlock and Spruce 
Branches, 5c per lb. 

PRINCESS PINE 

Cleaned and bunched lOc per lb. 

HAMILTON BROS. 

Millincton. Franklin Co., Mass. 



FERNS 



FERNS 



Fancy Ferns - - - $2.50 per lOOO 
Summer Fancy Ferns 1.75 per 1000 
Dagger Ferns - - - 2.00 per 1000 

HUCKLEBERRY FOLIAGE 
$2.50 per case 



PROMPT SHIPMENT 



E. A. Beaven, 



Evergreen, Ala. 



Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



GALAX-LEUCOTHOE — Direct from the woods to the Florist 

Green Galax, postpaid, 1 1.50 per 1000. If out of 4tb zone, add 26c for each 1000. 
Green Galax, lesa than half case lota . $1.25 per 1000 ^ Anlr fnr nrinaa nn 

Green Galax, half case Iota (60(0) $5.00 L iJTt. i^* fi „„iio 

Green Galax, large sizes . . »9.00 per caie of 10,000 f 1018 01 10 cases 
Green (iaiax. nienluni iilzes. 18.00 per case of 10,000 J and UD. 
Green Leucothoe, assorted lenirths (12-24 inch), $3.00 per 1000. 

Write for price list on our prepared line of Decorative Greens. 
With our location we can give you better service, and save you money on transportation 

ELK GALAX & FERN CO., JOHNSON CITY, TENNESSEE 

Baylnc stations In North Carolina: Blowing Boek, Boons, Shnlls MIUi, Unvills, PInoola, Banners BIk 
UttI* SwlUerland, Spmea Pine. Llnvilla Falls, etc. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Sphagnum Moss 

CLEAN >: DRY 

CAR LOTS OR LESS 

A. J. AMUNDSON CO^ 
CITY POINT, WIS. 



Fancy Ferns 

92.00 per lOOO 
FIRST-CLASS STOCK 

jXa^han fern CO. 

69% RIVl^R ST., TROY. N. Y. 



,^y ->-. 



-■'■'('•■ ,»— .-■. — ---.1 V- _ '■-■";■ v^ ■■^'» ' " r ■ - 1^;^ z ' "F! i-o '. ■' W '^ ■ .' '■ .?..■. ■•■'--• ;,--^;-7 ^'^^-^ "irrv. -, -^^^ 



80 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



FANCY FERNS jA 



FfaMst stock in th* coaatry 






$4.50 per 1000 



$4.50 par 1000 






SiriblMt to Chug* WHhMrt NsIIm. 

Wild Smilaz, 50-lb. case $ 7JM 

Gram Lracothoc, 100 91JK>; 1000 10.0* 

Magnolia LeavM» sreenand broDze. per oarton 1>80 

10 oartoDB 14.00 

Galax Loavas, green, per case of 10,000 18.00 

GREEN SHEET BIOSS, rery flue for basket work, trimminc 

pote. etc.. per bag SUM 

Sphagnum Moss» per bale 1410 

FULL SUPPLY CUT FLOWERS AT ALL TDIES. 

PDCIDGAN COT FLOWER EXCHANGE, 'tlU Rudolph St,Detroit,NiGh. 










Fancy and Dagger Ferns 

A No. 1 QUALITY 

$3,00 per 1000 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimii 

Henry M. Robinson & Co., Inc. 

2 Winthrop Square :: 32 Otis St. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



tr;iti'(l let'turo on ''Tin- Xaturalization 
of Wild Flowers." 

One result of tliis week 's \nff iiiitivo 
fern and flower sliow lias been the for- 
mation of the New England Hoeiety for 
the Protection of Native Plants, whieh 
lias already secured many members an<l 
which will luidouhtedly secure many 
more durinj; the exhibition. 

Nearly all the material for the native 
jdaut show has been grown in the };reen- 
iiouses of Albert C. Burrage, president 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety, at Beverly Farms, and it cer- 
tainly was a bijj undertaking. 

J'resident Burrage will entertain 
members of the American Or<diid So- 
city at the hincli at the Algon(|iiin Club 
May (i, before the regular business ses- 
sion is held at Horticultural hall. 

Ajiril proved to be one of the driest 
months ever known locally. There were 
twenty-one clear days aiif^ most of the 
small amount of preci](itation came in 
the form of snow, although a shade tem- 
]>erjitur(> of 8(i degrees was recorded 
April 10. The temjierature iiveraged 
below tlie normal during the last weeks. 
Minimums below freezing were recorded 
on five succescive nights. As a result 
of the dry, cold weather, vegetation is 
(|uite backward. 

Fire broke out April 28 on land lately 
ac([uired by the Ariudd .\rhoretum, 



LYCOPODIUM or Princess Pine 

Naw Crop. Ju.t Prepared. New Prices. 

Dyed a light, rich green color and prepared the right chemical way, 
nutking it soft, fluffy and eTerlasting. Finest material for wreaths. 

Send in your order NOW for MEMORIAL DAY 

In cartons of 10 lbs $ 2.00 

10 cartons 25.00 

In cartons of 25 lbs 5.75 

In 60 or 100 lb. casrs 22c per lb. 

Full Weight. Prompt Shipment. 

JOHN PERMAN, Catawba, Wis. 



bordering on South street, .Tamaica 
Plain, and <lid considerable damage. 
Tlie long spell of cool, dry weather and 
the fact that woodlands over a great 
Jirea contain nn immense amount of un- 
(deared debris, a conse(|uence of the 
great ice storm of last November, liave 
resulted in a great number of destruc- 
tive fires breaking out all over the state, 
and a soaking rain is badly needed to 
check this menace. 

B. Hammond Tracy, of Wenham, 
Mass., addressed the members of the 
Boston Horticultural Club May .S on 
gladioli. E. H. Wilson, i)resident of the 
club, is expected home early in .lune. 



L. Be Bra^^e & Son 

Wholesale Dealers la 

CUT FERNS 

MOSS, EVERGREENS 

■"^gg^*^ HINSDALE, MASS. 

He is due at Southampton, England, 
this week from South Africa. 

The following new members have 
joined the New England Florists' Al- 
liance: .1. L. Beaslcy, Arlington, Mass.; 
.John McKenzie, Cambridge, Mass.; 
Max Fine, 198 Dartmouth street, Bqs- 



.•~7 -^ ,*, ■ 



T-fJ^,'?T'^"'7 -^-."•o' v 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



ai 



Ferns 



Galax 



Moss 



Atparag^us Plumosus Sprays per bunch, 35c-50c 

Smilax per dozen strings . . $3.00 

Adiantum per 100 .^ .... 1.50 



NEW rAina rotNS 

Per 1000 14.50 

fiirai LEUCOTHOE 

Per 100 $0.76 

Per 1000 6.00 

BRONZE AND GRE« GAIAX LEAVES 
Per 1000, $1.60; OMe of 10.000, $12.60 



BOXWOOD 

Per lb $ 0.30 

Per 60-lb. sack 12.60 



CHHTON--AII Colors 

4-DL, yd., 5c; 6-iii., yd., 6c 



SPHAGNUM MOSS 

Select quality, large size bale.... $1.76 

6 bale lots, or more, at 1.60 

10 bale lots, or more, at 1.60 

GREEN SHOT MOSS 

Per bundle $ 1.60 

Per 10 bundles 14.00 



Write for price list on Wire Deaigna 

BfOKim, Graen mad Porpla NatfnoUa Lcavea....91JS0 per carton; 10 cartons, 913JS0 
Red Magnolia, rich, bright color per carton, 1.60 

Everything In Florists* Supplies 

Write for price list 



THE LARGEST SHIPPER 
AND HANDLER OF 



CUT FLOWERS 



IN THE 

CINCINNATI MARKET 



C. E. CRITOHELL, 



Wholesale Commission Florist, 
15 East Third Street, 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



Mention The Berlew when yon write. 



Ferns, Wild Smilax, Leucothoe, Galax 



Fancy Ferns $4.50 per 1000 

Green Galax $1.50 per 1000; $12.50 per 10,000 

Sphagnum Moss $1.50 per bale; $13.00 per 10 bales 

Green Sheet Moss $1.35 per bale; $12.50 per 10 bales 

Brown, Grees and Pnrple Magnolia, $1.50 per carton; 10 cartons, $13.50 
Red Magnolia $1.75 per carton 

AH Kindt of Wirework and Decorations Carried in Stock 



CHIFFO N 

4-inch 4c 

6-inch 6c 



THE WILLIAM MURPHY COMPANY 



329 Main Street 



WHOLBSALB COMMISSION nX>RISTS 
Phones Mala 980.081 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



largest Sliippcrs of Hoaie-Grawn Cut Flowers is the Gndnnati Maritet 



BOXWOOD ■ UUREL • HOSS 

LMral BnuMhM, 2x2x4 ft. cms. IS.26 CMe. 

LmnI Stems, lam but 11.26 

CfMaShMtMoss $1.60 bsc. 

W. Z. PUWNILL, SNOW HILL, RflD. 



Natural Green Sheet Moss 

Per lO-ib. bag, S1.75 

Dyed Green Sheet Moss 

Per lO-n*. bac S3.50 

jNUD NIELSEN, ETergreen, Ala. 



Coontie Fronds, $3.00 per 100 Wire Designs, ferns. Supplies 

Mahonia Ilexiflomm, $1.50 per 100 

Plenty of Asparagus Plumosot, 2Sc and 30c per bunch 

E. G. GILLETT, whoi.s.i.^^-«us.,o. Cincinnati, Ohio 



HEMLOCK SPRAYS 

are the most appropriate Oreens now for all 
kinds of Floral decorations. Ferns are scarce 
and sky-high in price. 

We Quote Hemlock Sprays for promot ship- 
ment at S5.00 per 1000; 2500 or mor" at $4.00 
per 1000. TERMS: CASH. PLEASE. 

Northern Fern Co., Schofield, Wis. 



NEW CROP OF 

Fancy and Dagger Ferns 

Green and Bronze Galax Leaves, Laurel 

and all kinds of Eversreens in season. 

Write for Prices. 

CHRISTY S. PULOS 

108 New St. NEWARK, N. J. 



82 



The Florists' Review 



Mav 4, l'J22 



\ 



WE HAVE THEM! YOU WANT THEM! 

Extra fine lot of LONG DAGGER FERNS, $2.00 per 1000. None better. 



BroDie BQd Qreen 

GALAX, $1.25 per 1000 

strictly Fresh and No. 1 Southern 

SMILAX, $8.00 50-lb. cases 



Try one case and you will use more. 




Laarel FestooninK- Fresh stock supplied 
on short notice; nse It tor your weddings and 
other similar decorations; notbinr better. 

Sphavnam BI088, fS.OO per large bale. 

Ground Pine, 12c per lb. 

Branch Laurel, large bundles, SOc. 

Hemlock, large bundles, tl.OO. 



Post Office and 

L. D. Phone Address: 



MILLINGTON, MASS. 



Telegraph Address: 

NEW SALEM, MASS. 



"'^SSI&'ft.Es GOLDFISH 



LARQC, HEALTHY FISH AT 
ROCK BOTTOM PRICES 



OUR PRICES ON FISH 

LARGE. HEALTHY STOCK Per 100 

Medium Selected Goldfish, assorted colors t3M 

Medium Lsj-ge Selected Goldfish, assorted colors S.St 

Large Selected Goldfish, assorted colorr. 8.M 

Per do2. 

Japanese Fantails, small, assorted colors $2.41 

Japanese Fantails, medium, assorted colors 3M 

Japanese Telescopes, small, assorted colors SJS 

Japanese Telescopes, medium, assorted colors 4.SI 

Japanese Comets, medium, assorted colors UH 

Japanese Comets, extra large, assorted colors 3.N 

Japanese Singletails, medium, assorted colors 1.M 

Japanese Singletails, large, assorted colors 2.41 



WATER PLANT AND FISH FOOD 

Water Plant 7Sc per doz. btuches; $&SS per IM 

Wafer Food, large 3-colored package ftJH doz.; I1I.N gross 

Flake Food, large 3-colored oackage JS doz.; (.SI gross 

Natural Food, large 3-colorea package 7S doz.; 7.St gross 

Natural Food, in tin boxes .(S doz.; ^.M gross 

FISH GLOBES 

Good, Heavy Glass, and in Original Cases. 

Half-gallon Globes, 4 dozen to crate $ SJt per crate 

Gallon Globes, 2 dozen to crate U.2S per crate 

Two-gallon Globes, 1 dozen to crate >.5t per crate 

Three-gallon Globes, yi dozen to crate 8.St per crate 



Order your Globes and Supplies to be shipped at once by freight. Fish will follow by express. 

ASHBORNE GOLDFISH & SUPPLY COMPANY 



Hatcheries: Burlington, Iowa; Indianapolis, Ind.; Frederick, Md. 



1313 Agency St., BURLINGTON, IOWA 



ton: (iiiiry W. Hates, Kaiidoliili, Mass.; 
tilt' AriioldFisher Co., rose s|)efialists, 
Wohiirn; I'liilip Rcttiicr, CaiKil street, 
IJostou; Misliawmii Flower C'o., Woburu, 
and Eric R. AiuU'rsoii, Xatick, Mass. 

Harold A. Ryan liiid the decorations 
for the wedding of Miss Eleanor Hrewer, 
at the Unitarian chiireli, .Tamaicii Plain, 
Ajiril 22. T';ilnis. blue hydrangeas and 
jiiiik raml)ior roses were used. Mr. 
Ryan says he had this year 1)y far the 
best EastiT triide since he started in 
l)usineas. 

Prof. Chiirles S. Siirgent, the venerable 
and esteemed heiid of the Arnold .\rbore- 
tiini. ]iasseil liis eightieth milestone April 
24 and received many congratulatory 
messages and gifts of flowers. The pro- 
fessor still lakes an iictive daily jiart in 
till' a<im'inistration of tlie arboretum, 
wliieh he h;is made his great life's work. 
He is taking an active part in the com- 
ing show of native ferns and flowers in 
Horticulturiil hall. 

At the W<.odland Golf Club, Newton, 
Ajiril 20, tliere was a demonstration of 
power lawn mowers from Carter's Tested 
8eeds, Inc., the .7. Rreck & Sons Cor- 
]ioration ami other local tiriiis. This 
demonstration attracted numerous gar- 
deners, florists, golf course managers 
and estate owners. 

Such early shrubs .as magnolias, 
prunus, pyrus .-md forsythias are now 
in beautiful flower locally ami in 
Rrookline wc need only the adilition of 
;i few ]>epper trees, eucalypti and palms 
to make anyone imagine that lie is 
in the suburljs of Los Angeles or Pasa- 
dena. 

A[others' day prospects are excellent. 
Tliere will be a large crop of white car- 
n.'itions.^Tatchless now being loa(b'd with 



There's money in 
Goldfish for You 

Yon can hsva a compellir g 
window display— and tlie 
fiah will piactically Fell 
theRiselvea at a handsome 
profit. We sell aquarium 
■applies of all kinds. Fif- 
teen years' experience en- 
ables as to ship fiah any 
distance safely. 

Send for Wholesale Catalogue 




Auburndale Goldfish Company 



1449 W. Madison St. 



Cliica|[o, III. 



J 







Lotos Mfg. Co. 

1734 N. Halsted St, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS vV.J'ri^Won 

Ask for our Dollar SampU Assortment. 
FLORISTS' SUPPLIES, ETC. 


NEW CROP FERNS 

DAGGER FERNS, 

$2.00 per 1000. 

FANCY FERNS, 

$2.50 per 1000. 

SUMMER FANCY FERNS, 

$1.75 per 1000. 

HUCKLEBERRY FOLIAGE, 

$2.50 per case. 
Prompt Shipment 

Caldwell the Woodsman Co. 

Evergreen, Ala. 




GOLDFISH THE BREEDER 

107 Acres of Ponds this Season 

Write for Bic, New Oatalome 

Globes, AfiariiRi, k^wivn Sippliei, Etc 
PUTNANTS FISHERIES 

gDliMtea. OfSc*. 4C WaiyMtM Sl. Beibls, N.T. 


flowers. Of colored varieties there will 
not be an overabund.'tnce, but all retail- 


ers are endeavoring to get the general 
|iublie away from the purchasing of 



May 4, 11)22 



The Florists^ Review 



83 



cariiatious only, and white and colored 
flowers are being advertised in lieu of 
white and colored carnations, Miss 
Anna Jarvis to the contrary. 

Bulletin No. 1 has just been issued by 
the American Orchid Society to its 
nienibers. It contains a charniing, col- 
ored picture on the frontispiece of 
Cyi)ripediuni acaule j^rowin^- in its na- 
tive habitat. "A ThouKJit," by Albert 
C. Burrage, on the first page expresses 
the hope that succeeding bulletins will 
similarly portray other of our beautiful 
native orchids. The bulletin contains 
the list of officers, by-laws and a mem- 
bership list; the latter contains twenty- 



five life and seventy-six annual mem- 
bers. Of the whole number, forty-four 
are resident in Massachusetts; New 
Wrk, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and 
California come next in numbers of 
members. W. N. V. 



MAKING FRIENDS. 

Advertising in 'i'lie Kcview has many 
interesting features — in addition to 
making money for the advertiser it also 
makes him friends, jirovidcd that he 
sends out good stock. Like this: 

Will siiy we have iiiiidf mtiny friends tliriniKli 
your medium for reHcliliiK the tnide. In many 
instanceH orders were duplicated for delivery 



next M'.isou. We shall he usiup voiir eohiinns 
aKain earlv this fall. -Willis & Ktherington, 
Tlioniasvllle, Ua., April TJ, 191.'1!. 

If you hear a man com|)lain of the 
cost of advertising, you can ))e pretty 
certain he spends a good bit of money 
elsewhere than in The Review. 



Moravia, N. Y. Frank 11. Barnes has 
Just jiiirchased the W. C. Tiithill green- 
houses. 

Ocean Springs, Miss. — The Hivierri 
(lardens have announced that, owing to 
the great increase in business, the firm 
will open a branch office at {iulf|)ort, 
M iss. 




Wanted and For Sale Department 

IV Advertisements under this head, set without 
display, Itt cents per line. In sending remittance 
count SIX words to the line. 

Display advertisements in this department 9^jOO 
net, for one inch space. 

When answers are to be sent in our care, add !• cents 
for forwarding. 

CASH WITH ORDER from thnse wbo do not 
do other advertising. 




SITUATION WANTED— By grower; single; 26 
years' experience. Address No. 275, care 

Florists' Review, Chic ago. 

ITUATION WANTED— Gardener and florist; 

experienced in all lines; married, no children; 

by May 15 or June 1; in suburbs of Chicago; 

flrst-elass references. Address, Gardener, Box 

11, Winnetka, III. 

SITUATION WANTED— By elderly florist; 40 
years; experienced grower of roses, oiirnations, 
mums and pot plants; section preferred; single; 
industrious; state wages. A. (iergen, 214 W. 
9th St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

^JITUATION WANTED— By flrst-elass florist and 
j^ gardener; private or public institution; as 
foreman or liead gardener; married; state salary 
and particulars In first letter. Address No. 283, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

ITUATION WANTED— By working foreman; 
first-class grower of roses, carnations, mums, 
pot plants, etc.; married; middle age; life ex- 
perience; middle west; please state particulars 
and wages. Address No. 873, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED — Experienced rim.' 
grower and son want to rent or operate place 
on shares, or sati8factor>' salary; guarantee best 
references and quality stock; Chicago snburlis 
preferred; can go anywhere. .Xddress No. 278, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

OITT'ATION WANTED— As gardener on a pri- 
»^ vate estate; 18 years' exi>erience grusving 
fruits and flowers under glass and outside; vege- 
tables and landscape work; take full charge; 
please state particulars; married; age, 34; na- 
tionality. English. Address No. 294, care Flo- 
rists' Review, Chicago. 

ITUATION WANTED— By .Tune 1. by work- 
ing foreman; life experience in cut flowers. 
|>ot plants, bulbs and bedding plants: also a 
good propagator and do funeral designing: wish 
II position with a reliable firm where good serv- 
ices are appreciated: full charge and g(ii>d wages 
expefted; 36 years of age; Europeiin: best of 
references: please state full particulars in first 
h'ficr. Address No. 295, care Florists' Review, 
.".OS ,s; Dearborn St., ('hi<'ago. 

HELP WANTED — Good grower of cut flowers 
and potted plants. Noack & Walter, Bata- 
via, N. Y. 

HELP WANTED — Rose grower immediately; 
near Philadelphia. Address No. 47, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

KI-I' W.WTED— Married ni:in for general 
greenhouse work, $:il.00 per week with house. 
F. Browne, 18 Monnier .\ve., Delroit, Mich. 

HELP WANTED^At once; good, reliable yoimp 
greenhouse man; one with knowledge of 
roses; $25.00 per week. Address No. 220, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. ' 

HELP WANTED— Young man for pot plants, 
who can also pack; a good, steady, careful 
worker; $25.00 per week to start. Address No. 
253, ca re Florists' Review, Chicago. 

CTELP WANTED— Assistant capable of gmwing 
•' first-class stock; permanent situation if satis- 
factory; state lowest wages and for wIhipi have 
Worked. Port Allegany Greenhouses, Port .\lle- 
gany, Pa. 

IJELP WANTED— Foreman for pot plants in 
*•• northern Ohio; do a wholesale shipping 
trade with small and large unflnlshed plants 
and want a man who Is able to produce such 
stock economically and In quantity; give full 
experience, where you worked before and how 
long in each place; state wages wanted; we 
■re willing to pay and want the goods; can 
offer B good future. Address No. 252, care Flo- 
rists' Review, Chicago. 



H 

T. 



HELP W.\NTED-^ Florist f(U- ret.iil place; gen- 
eral line of i)ot and vegetable plants; one 
who will work to owner's interest; steady posi- 
tion. Address No. 299, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

UELP W.\NTI<;1) Active young man as gen- 
I eral helper in greenhouses, growing miscel- 
laneous stock for the Chicago market; $;i5.00 per 
we<ik. A. E. Hunt & Co., 2127 Ashland Ave., 
Evaiiston, 111. 

ELP WANTED— Young single man witli 2 or 

3 years' experience to do general greenhouse 

work; state wages expected and references in 

first letter. A, .T. Meyer, Florist, 1702 Portage 

Ave., Soutli Bend, Ind. 

HELP W.\NTED A good, reliable young man, 
with some experience in potting and general 
greenhouse work: a good worker, as assistant to 
foreman: stead.v job: state wages wanted. Iron- 
wood (ireenhonses, Ironwood. Mich. 

ELP WANTED— Man for pot plants: fast 
potter and careful In his work; a steady 
position with opportunity for advancement; give 
full experience; wages $30.00 per week. Ad- 
dress No. 264, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

RELP WANTED -Reliable man for all-around 
greenhouse work; who tmderstands watering: 
(piick potter; (inality o>ir hobby; 10,00(1 ft. glass: 
growing full line plants and cut fluwers as trade 
demands, no cigarette smoker; steady position 
to right p.irty: state wages and references. 
Brundage. Florist, Penn Yan, New York. 

VJO ANTED— Will exchange boilers for glass 
and sash bars. Rogers Heating Co., Ransom- 
ville, N. Y. 



WANTED — To buy old greenhouses to be torn 
down. Address M. Weingarten, 286 Fifth 
Ave.. New Yo'"H- _ 

WANI'ED — To buy greenhouses to dismantle; 
please state particulars and price in first 
letter. I. S\iessernian, 104 Ridgewood Ave.. 

Newark. N. J. 

\XT A NTBD— To buy, retail florist's business; 
first-class, on tlie north or south side of 
Chicago. Address No. 282, care Florists' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

VTfT ANl'KD -To rent with option of buying lo,- 

000 to 20.000 sipinre fed of glass: must be 

near Chicago. Address J. B. ('<das. 1217 West 

.■?lst, Chicago. 

WANTED — To buy on terms, small range; 
prefer.ibly in Wisconsin; possession .Tune 1; 
state varieties of stock on hand. C. Hilmers, 

Fort Coll ins. Colo rado . 

OR SALE — Concrete bench legs 16 ins, high: 

shipment to be made from our Juliet plant, 

Jollet, 111.: write for particulars and prices. 

Davis-Joliet Co.. Davenport. la. 

F1)R SALE — About 10,000 ft. glass, cottage, 
acre of land, on paved street In Chicago, 
north shore suburb; price $12,000.00, half cash. 
Address No, 281, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR S.MiE -Bnind new glass. P.. ilouhle thick. 
16x24, ICxlS: unselecled double thick, 16x20. 
inxlS. 14x20, 12x16, lOxl-J. at special low prices. 
Sec(uiil hand pipe, 1 inch tn 6-inch, threaded 
and cdupled, i>rice upon applica tiim. BOIIjERS 
— We b.ive several sectional and ro\ind tmllers 
at specially reduced prices. Used bars, 2c per 
foot. New Pipe Toids Malleable Hinged Vises; 
No. 1. cipacily. 2'.Vin., .SS 00; No. 2. capacity 
3' .in.. .«4.."i0 ' Stocks and Dies, .\ruistrong pat- 
tern: No. 2R. threads '', to 1 in.. S6 CO: No. 
.SB threads 1 Vi to 2-in.. $9.90. Toledo Stocks 
and Dies; No. 1. threads 1 tii 2 in.. $12.0(J. 
I'ipe Wrenches: IS iu.. grips 2 in.. S2.00: 24in.. 
L'rips 2'. -in., .*2.90. Pipe Cutters. SHunders' 
Patlerns:' No. 1. cuts K to 1 in.. $1.6.'); No. 2, 
cuts 1 to 2 in.. $2.4S. Metropolitan Material Co.. 
12!t9 i:t2:{ Klusbing .\ve.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 



FOR SALE — One Beeman tractor and cultivat- 
ing tools, guaranteed as good^as new, $200.00 
cash. Lee Smith, Gasport, New York. 

FOR SALE — Quantity of greenhouse materials, 
such as good second-hand pipes, glass, sash- 
bars, apparatus, boilers, etc; also complete 
greenhouse. I. Suesserman, 1(M Ridgewood Ave., 
Newark, N. J. 

TTo R^SA LB— About 12,000 feet of glass; lo- 
" cated 23 miles northwest of Chicago; other 
property In connection; good opportunity for the 
right party. Address No. 286, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Tanks: about ."lO extra fine tanks 
practically new; from 119 gallons to .')64 gal- 
lons; price, $15.00 to .$4,1.00; these tanks are 
excellent for water service and liquid manure 
supply. Metropolitan Material Co., 1299 Flush- 
ing Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FOR SALE — -Must dismantle at once; one iron- 
frame greenhouse, Hitchings construction. 
21x100 even span, comidete with all 16-inch 
D. S. glass, sectional hot water boiler and 
2-inch beating pipes; all for $1,000.00 cash on 
car Newark, N. J.; one % span greenhouse, cy- 
press frame, 16-inch D. S. glass, size 18x100; 
all complete, except heating plant, price, $450.00; 
also 5,000 feet I'^-Incli pipe, CVoC per foot; 50O 
feet vent apparatus; $25.00 for complete outfit, 
100 feet, with 2 machines. I. Suesserman, 104 
Ridgewood Ave., Newark, N. J. 

|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiii:iiii!iiiii:iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I SITUATION WANTED | 

U As KTowtT nf rosos. caniatioiis, iimnis. elf. : ^ 

g twctity-ttvp years oxiHTiciicc as foreman a?ul h 

= Krower; first-i'iaa-* ivconimeiidationa; ca.-'tcni. = 

^ middle wt-st and western exiHjrience: west or ^ 

^ southwest preferretl ; iflca.-ii* state wages In reply. ^ 

I Addr.'.-w No. 292. (Htc I'M«)rists' K.-v rw. ."lOS S. 1 

= Dearborn St. , Chicago. 111. ^ 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiirmiiiiiiiiii.iiiil^ 
^Miniiiiiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiiinii:i!i:!iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiii!iiiiii!!iiiini'ni;iiiiiiiiiiiiii'ii:i''nni!iiiiii^ 

I SITUATION WANTED f 

= IliiUander. 22 years of age. well educated, of e; 

^ gentlemanly appcKrance. well a<"<iuainte<l with ^ 

= the florist husiru'^s. having exihTiencc in .t iliffer- ^ 

= cut comitries. Still salesman and reprewenta- ^ 

= tivo of a Holland liulh tlnn. wants a joli till No- -h 

H veinber: like to work hard ; piea.se state wairfs H 

§ and full particulars. .Address = 

i Box 319. i 

= Klverton, N. .T. =i 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii! 
gjililiiiiii:iliiiiiiiiiiliiililiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilliiiiiiilillilllliiiiiilip 

1 SITUATION WANTED ^' 

= By a flrst-elass grower of cut flowers and :; 

= (lotted plants: life e.<iierli'nce in these lines. In i^ 

= Europe and this country; also good on design- ^ 

^ Ing If need be; able to take full charge of the g 

= growing and handling help; steady position s 

= only In middle western states at once; single ^ 

= man of middle age: please give particulars In r- 

= full when answering. = 

1 Address No. 267. care Florlst.s' Review. 608 = 

I 8. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. | 
?.UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!llllllllllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll|l||||||inillllllllllllllllllllllllllir- 
|IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!lllllllll;llllllllll>UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII||lll||ll|||ll|iJ£ 

I SITUATION WANTED g 

= By a married man ; life experience ; graduated = 

= from University of Leipzig, Germany; roses car- = 

g nations, miuns, orchids, pot and bedding plants § 

= for Easter and Christmas; designing and land- g 

= scape work; 16 years In South but willing to g 

^ go anywhere where man Is needed to produce 1= 

= the stock In quantity and quality; can furnish = 

= good references. S 

= Address No. 232. care Florists' Review, 508 = 

H S. Dearborn St.. Chicago. | 
'iiiiiiiiiiilliiiii;iii!iiiii!riiini'i":'!!!ii:!iiN::ii!!:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii[iLi~ 

rTURN TWE PAGE.- 



:^\v%yiv v^^Tf •^^»7""m;j»,'^V' * fV-f" V»^«t' UJ.'^Bllf.i'lV ,.'•*".'" 



84 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



jlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllillllll'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII""^ 

j SITUATION WANTED j 

1 As rUrk III ii-Uil stcjiii or Hs deslgiu'r ; 7 | 

= years' i-xiktU'Ikt 111 the reull liusliu'ss; for 3 g 

1 years owner ami iiiHiiaKer of a retail store: form- g 

= er plaee of liusiiiess, New York City. g 

= Address No. 300. eare of Florists' Review. 508 | 

1 S, DearlMjrii St.. (^Iiiiago. 111. 1 

^itiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii nil mil Ill" Hiiiiiii' iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii? 

giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I" iiiiiiiiiiiii i iiiiiiii ii" liiiiiiiiiiiii 

I SITUATION WANTED | 

1 Hy working foreman to take full iharge of g 

= Krowliig end; flrst-elass glower of roses, eariia- ^ 

= tloiis ami general line of eut (lowers ami (Hit- g 

= t«l plants; single; middle ageil; life exiK'rieiue; g 

= 2.5 years In the Imsliiess; state salary and par- = 

i tleulars In first letter; western states. g 

i Address .No. 289, eare Florists' Review. 508 s 

^ S. DearlMMii St.. Chlrago. 111. 



l^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ ^iiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii!^ 



HELP WANTED | 

High class salesman, well ac- | 

quaintcd with the wholesale floral, | 

seed and nursery trade and allied | 

industries; must have character and | 

reputation above reproach; refer- | 

enccs; excellent for full time or | 

sideline. Apply | 

FLORISTS' CREDIT ASSOCI- | 

ATION, INC., I 

1225 N. Ashland Ave., Chicago, 111. | 



HELP WANTED 

Man with experience in growing 
end to take charge; good .salary to 
right man; no dope or cigarette 
addict; chance for young married 
man to work into the business; 
give references and experience in 
first letter. 

STOKE & STOKE, 
Great Bend, Kans. 



?a iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;; ?niiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii: 

!j|iiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii"iiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiinuiiiiiiiii ^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiig giliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'/; 



I SITUATION WANTED | 

1 As superintendent or head gardener for | 

= private estate or parks; 16 years' experience s 

= growing all kinds of fruits and flowers under = 

= glass and outside, vegetables and landscape = 

g work; age, 33; can furnish best of references. g 

i .lOHN H. PADDON. | 

i Marigold Lodge, Holland, Mich, h 



HELP WANTED | 

Young lady to take charge of 1 

flower .stand; must be competent to g 

buy, make up floral pieces, table dec- f 

orations, etc. H 

KDGEWATER BEACH HOTEU i 
534!t Sheridan Kd., Chicago, 111. | 

ffiiir>iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii uiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ liiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii tr, 

iyiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiii"m"miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiii^ ^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

i Worklngr foreman; 18,000 ft. of glass; | 

= chrysanthemums, general line of Christ- g 

§ mas, Easter and bedding plants grown; = 

= Northwestern Ohio; give experience and g 

g wages expected. = 

1 Address No. 249, care Florists' Re- 1 
1 view, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, III. | 

^illllllllllllllllUlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllii; 

-^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiuiiiii| 

I HELP WANTED | 

I Experienced designer; decorator 1 
1 and salesman; steady job fur right 1 
= rnan; state wages wanted. | 

I SHOTWELI. FLORAL CO., | 

1 Fargo, N. 1). | 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiii:iiiiiiiii{iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii 
^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii]iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii|^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

g A grower to take <liin-(;i' of soetion of p 

= e.vclaiiien, iMiiiisottiiis hikI hoKonias; imist = 

§ l)e able to |)ro<iii<(' A-1 st(Mk; give full p 

= cyclamen, poinsettias and beKonias; ninst = 

i 'IT- I 

1 Address No. 291, ran- Florists' Ucvlew, 1 

p 508 S. Dearborn St., ("hicaito. III. | 

fiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

gllllllli:illllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilMlllllllilllllllllllllllllllll|i|||||||||||li:i|||!lillll!llllll>:: 



I SITUATION WANTED | 

= single, age 27. lifetime experience In green- g 

= house and store: able to take full charge, = 

1 wait on trade, designing, decorating, growing, = 

= etc.; prefer a town of about 10.000 population; g 

i no reasonable salary refused; give full partlcu- g 

= lars In first letter. _ ^„„ = 

1 Address No. 269. care Florists' Review, SOS = 

= 8. Dearborn St.. Chicago, III. f 

fitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii"iiiii»i»i>i>i"'^ 
gii!iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii<ii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiii:uiiiiiiiiiiiiii!i'iiiiiiini!iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

I HELP WANTED | 

i Live agent wanted to sell bulbs on | 
= commission basis. Excellent side = 
i line for capable man visiting florists. | 
i Address No. 509, care Florists' | 
I Review, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chi- | 
i cago. 111. I 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiuiiiiiiii^ 
pi;iiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii::iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiMimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiii;i'iiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiii| 

I HELP WANTED | 

1 FIrst-cla.ss rose grower, able to handle § 

i 18,000 plants, in modern plant; highest | 

I wages to right party; apply with full | 

= particulars. § 

I Address No. 886, care Florists' Re- | 

I view, 508 S. Dearborn St.. Chicago. g 

iiiiiiiii;iiiiiiuiiiii!:iiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii">>ii)i" 
u|imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiig 

I HELP WANTED | 

i W'r want live ■iali'snicii to n'prosent us with g 

= the tincsl line of rolyclinmic Wi'f(l> on llif mar- = 

§ kut; to i-all on ili-partniint st4irrs. winilow trim- = 

= niers anil tlorlats ; al>o Irirzi' wii^illis. funeral g 

= wrt'atlis. florists' rtllcr.s. = 

1 AiUlrrsH No. 290, care Klori-sts' Kcvii-w. .'lOS = 

f S. Dcarhorn St., Cliliago, III. g 

illllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII'llllill""" IIIIIIIIIIIIMIUIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIl'^ 

aiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiMniiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiig 

I HELP WANTED | 

i .Ml-arouiul greenhouse man; pot | 

I plants grown; steady position. | 

I J. \V. ENSWEILER. | 

I 5331 S. Morgan St., Chicago, 111. j 

flllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllll>llll!lllllllllllllllllllll'llll'l'<llll'l""ll>"''"<"<l'llll>'" "^ 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>ii:iiii"iiiiiiiiii"iiiiiiiiiiii"'g 

I HELP WANTED | 

1 (irowcr of pot plants, linislilni; .«aino; also g 

1 pMMl potter and KcncrHl iiiaii: .*:;.-i.(HI jior g 

I week to start; can ofTi'r a food fnlnrc to g 

1 a iiniii of abilit.v. g 

I I Aiti. iiA(;K.\r.iK(ii:i!. 1 

I .Mentor, Ohio. ■ 

fi{iiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>>>iiiiiiiiiii>>"i">i'ii'''i'""''''''"'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''i''^ 

jiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii"'''!"'''''''"'"'"'""'"''"''''''''''''"'''"''''''''''"'''''''^ 

i HELP WANTED i 

= Our line of lithographed metal speclaltle* for g 

= florists proved Itself to be a splendid proposition = 

= during the Easter season; we are developing the ^ 

i line so as to make It a permanent all-year-round g 

= proposition; we desire salesmen who will repre- = 

= sent us eiclusively In large centers on comrais- = 

= slon basis; certain territory is already covered = 

i but valuable territory is still open : write, stating g 

B spoclflc territory you would cover. ,^ .,^ „ , = 

I AMEBICAN STAMPING CO., Elliabeth. N. J. g 

^llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllillli»lli>liuilllllllllllll"l"il'l>"lli>'"i' '- :i'^'" >ilNlllli; 



HELP WANTED 



g (irowcr of rosos. larnations. niniiiK ami g 
1 fancy pot plants: :i.''i,(l(M> feet of ulass; one 1 
g who can pnxliK I' lirst-cl.iss slock: ri'fcr- 1 
= eiiccK rcfiuircd. ^ 

i .\ddrc«s .No. 296, care I'lorists' Ucvlew, 1 
I .■)(»8 S. DearlH>ru St.. Chlcatfii. 111. | 

lfiiiliiiiiliiiliiiliiliiiiiiiililiilliiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiNi]iiii;iiuiiiiijiiiniiiiiiiiiN!iiiiiiiiiiiiii!ii!iiiiiiii.iii>i 
gl'llilllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllilllllllllll!llllllllllllllllliilli|||j|||||ii|||ii||iMii:ii;i||||||ii:i|iii||i<ii|{|i||i^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

i .\ WDrkins foreman for wholi'.salc anil 1 
5 retail place: a perwiii who (an inaiiai,'e help 1 
B and iprodiice in ipiantity: call or write, i 
g statinc whrok. etc.. exiH'cted. = 

I AI.<).\7.() J. IlKVAX. I 

§ Washinetun, New Jersey. § 

.=;imMi:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil i iiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui^ 

|imi:iiiiiiiii:miiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiii i<iNiiiiiiMiiii;iiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiii{ii!i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii||{||ij; 

I HELP WANTED | 

g (iood all-around single man for general pot = 

= : plants and landscape work; permanent position = 

with good pay; room and board. If wanted, = 

on place: (ierman or Scandinavian preferred; = 

state when you can come; place near Pittsburgh, = 

Pa. = 

EMIL JAHING. M 

f B, F. D. No. 3, Brldgevllle. Pa. § 

iillilililiilliilliiilliiiiiililllliiiillliilliHiiiiiiil II iiii I . :. iilililllilllllllliliNlljlliii^' 

jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillilililiiaiiiliiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiNiiii!iiiiii':i:iiiiiiiiiiiiii;;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii{iilliiii>. 
I HELP WANTED | 

= .<?alesmen wanted; live-wire men who 1 
= will conduct buainess on the square- = 
§ deal plan to sell to llorists and other = 
g large consumers in high-grade, non- 1 
g poisonous insecticide; liberal commls- § 
= sion ; address = 

g WM. BRANSON, PROP., 1 

g In.sectonos Laboratory. = 

g Bloomington, 111. g 

^iiiuuii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiii:iiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu^ 



HELP WANTED 

A good, reliable grower of carnations, 
mums and general stock on retail place; 
one who can wait on trade in absence 
of owner. 

H. E. KUNKBL. 
212 N. Tod Ave.. Warren, Ohio. 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii'. 



WANTED 



g Glazing, painting and bulblns by i 

g the hour or contract; best references m 

g furnished; we employ experienced i 

g men only. g 

i E. STENGER. 1 

I Box 225, Rocky River. Ohio. i 

Ifiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
^11 iiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiii 

I WANTED I 

g To buy greenhouse in good, live | 

g town Middle West; place of 10,000 to 1 

g 1,5,000 square feet preferred; .send 1 

g particulars to g 

I No. 288, care Florists' Review, i 

1 508 .S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. § 

lllllllllllll.llHIIIIIIIINIIIIII Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I WANTED I 

= I'.iisiness Hoiists' opinion only of a ni-w. mod- g 

g ern supiio:t for all cut tlowpis, always rea<lj'. g 

H SL'piiorts entlri' Ix'iich as one plant; no twine. !lo = 

g lying, crows with the plants and last as long g 

g as groenliouse; patent pending; drawines and g 

2 particulars sent by Inventor; years' ex|>erlcnce = 
= as working florist. = 
= W.M, ROBIN.SON. g 
= 2.iO Rexford .St.. Blue Island. 111. g 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijj; 
f^ |iiiiiiiii:iinii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiitmiiiiiiimni!iiiiiiii!iiiimiiiiiiii!iiui!iiiii^ 



IIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIT; 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimji 



j WANTED 

g Contracts for greenhouse glazing, 

I painting, bulbing and gutter seal- 

g Ing; best of references. 

1 ^ LEASE & SCHAWEL, 

I 4109 N. Western Ave., Chicago, 111. 

g Phone Irving 8874. 

?riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii:i 

P'liiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

I FOR SALE I 

I A good paying letail pla<e on the i 

i south side of ("hioago; rent reason- 1 

I able; price, $1,500.00. I 

I Addies.s Xt). 287, care Florists' Re- | 

I view, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago. 111. | 
^iiiiiiiiiiillliiiiiillliillillllllii:ii;iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiii{iiiiii;iiii:iiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiif 

giiiiimiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiii'iMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini^ 

I FOR SALE I 

= All np-to-.liite Hower store and 20.000 ft. of = 

s miMiern greeiilionses fully sUK'ked : Im-ated in = 

g an Ohio dtj- of 1l>.()iio iiopulatlon; verv little g 

= eomiK'tillon: a real opportunity: must liavc at g 

I Ica.si $3,000.00 cash: write for particulars g 

g Address Nd. 297. care f'lorlsts' Keview. 508 1 

H S. DearlHirii SL. Chicago, III. g 

':iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinilliiiiiuilil!!lllliilii;iliiiiiiiiii 
i:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii{iiiiiii!iiiiiiiliiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiL- 



iUllllliiiiiiiiiiii 



FOR SALE 



g Well established greenhouse business consist- = 

g Ing of 11,000 sq, ft. of glass devoted to the 1 

g growing of potted plants; 2 dwellings, out- ri 

= houses. 2 trucks, 3 acres of land; one mile I 

g from Chicago city limits. g 

i KAUP BROS., i 

I Oak Lawn, lU. f 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijuiiiiuijimiiiiii 



'^y <rr- 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



85 




I FOR SALE I 

i THIS FINE GREENHOUSE ESTABLISHMENT, at KANKAKEE, ILLINOIS I 

I Excellent start for a large, modern establishment. Two houses, 65x450 feet, and plant house, 20x150 | 

I feet, with connecting passages; concrete service buildings; Custodis chimney; switch track; 10 acres excellent | 

I soil; fine location; exceptional opportunity for some firm contemplating erecting a large modern plant. | 

I Address: DAVIS-KANKAKEE CO., Main Office, Aurora, Illinois. I 

|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiii"i"iiiMii:iiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

J.IIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII l!H!lllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllll!llllll!llllll': Mlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ '!llllllllllllllll:llllllllllllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!llllli:illllllllllll!lllllllllllllll<IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII'ji 



I FOR SALE j 

I Well established retail business i 

I in fine locality in Chicago, doing a B 

I flourishing business; will pay for T 

I itself the first year; full details will "; 

I be furnished on request; will be ^ 

I sold at a very attractive price. n 

I Address No. 268, care Florists' ;i 

I Review, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chi- =i 

I cago, 111. I 

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I""""' '"««"i:i"iiiiimiiiii»i:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiii[|||||^ 

I FOR SALE I 

= At bargain, on account of sickness; = 

H dwelling and 8.000 feet of glass fully 1 

g stocked; Investigate fully but don't = 

I bother unless you have $5,000.00 which = 

I you wish to double quickly. ^ 

= Address No. 247, care Florists' Re- i 

I view, 608 S. Dearborn St., Chicago. g 

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|llinillllllll!lllllllllllllll||l||||||||||||||||||||||||!|||||||||||u||||||||iu<|||||||||{||||||||{!|||||||^^ 

I FOR SALE I 

= An up-to-date flower store In city of g 

g 40,000 In middle west; best location; = 

I great paying proposition; a real bargain i 

= for a live wire; stands closest Inveatl- ^ 

I gation. = 

I Address No. 144, care Florists' Re- I 
I view, 608 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 1 

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I FOR SALE I 

i '111 iic-iouiit <if otiici- husiiics^ on the cciast I 1 

g aiu ,-,,rii,„.i|,.,i t„ ,iis,»,s,. „f ()ii,. cif till- iK-st 1 

g pa.MriK (tri-iTihduses ajjd storenKims in the wvst; ^ 

I "W'twiti- a large .■.ineterj- where they p«v liber- M 

i full ^"lie; no loiniK^lllon near: - houses f 

= AUilress Owner. g 

g ■ 221.^ Jackson. Kansas City, Mo. = 

-.UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllliMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllilllllllllilllllllllllll^ 

|l!llllll!llllllllllllltlllil|l||||!|Mii||l|||||||)l|||||||,|llllllllllll,ll,l |||||||, |,||,|,|||||,||i||,|,||g 

I FOR SALE I 

I .\ii iron -frame Kit'fnhou.se, 20x100, f 
I even .span: also a cypress frame I 
I Ki<-enlioiise, lSxlO(t; -Vj-span: cheap. | 
I I. SUESSKK.MA.X. I 

I 104 Hidgewood Ave., Newark. N. J. | 
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g«ll!lllllllllllllllllllllll|||||||||||l||||||lllllll,llllllllllllllllllllllll„illlllllllll,|,|llllllllllll,,|ll^^ 

I FOR SALE I 

= h.,Ti*'^ ^!^^ paying greenhouse and florists' g 

= »l!^ ^*' *" ">« "«'': 40,000 square feet of glass. 3 

s Jhi P Kreenhouse, thrifty and paying business: 

^ fill!. J -"^^ 1' to be sold to close an estate: i 

I located in the finest climate in the U. S. Write, N 

= 2ia tt- . ^ , ^ •''• KELLEV. S 

j ^is West Gold Ave., AlbuquerQue. N. M. | 

•4UllUUl|li|||i|||||j|ii|||||,||||||||„,,||||||||||||||,||||,,||,||,||||,|||||||||,,||||||||||||||||||||||^ fllllllllll' 



FOR SALE 



I Well established retail florists' bual- | 

H ness; 25,000 aq. feet of glass, modern | 

i construction; well stocked; O-room, | 

1 modem flat above office and workroom; | 

i garages; 6 acres of land; located on | 

1 main traveled thoroughfare; downtown | 

§ store; town of 125,000 population; mid- | 

1 die west; everything ready to step in g 

§ and do business; $85,000.00 cash pay- | 

1 ment required; balance easy terms; only p 

i persons with enough capital need apply; g 

1 possession at once; write for parti- | 

= culara. 1 

i Address No. 118, care Florists' Be- i 

§ view, 608 S. Dearborn St., Chicago. | 

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FOR SALE 



fireenhouse in town of l.DOO population: "on- 
sists of '1 liuuses, numbering al)out 3.500 feet of 
gla.ss: also dwelling house, ,'j moms: Wi arres 
of land: greenhou.se and iiouse are heated with 
a No, '1 Kroseliell liot water lioiler: reason for 
selling, too nmeli business for man of 00 to 
haiulli'; price $,"i,000,0() if talven at oniv. 
A. \VIIJ>>1)S(>.\, 
Britt. Iowa. 



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FOR SALE 



i A flourishing greenhouse business; 25,- = 
g 000 feet glass; in Canada; modern con- - 
= struction; well filled with jilants; In- ' 
i vest In Canada now while the Canadian r 
i dollar Is still below par; it is coming § 
g up each day. p 

i Address No. 56. care Florists' Review, i 
g .nOS S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. ^ 

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FOR SALE 



H A bargain in greentumses: :{,'i,000 ftn't of = 

= glass bK-ateil lielween CUveland and I'lttsliurgh i 

= in (thlo, on main line of IVnnsylvania railro-id: = 

= will sacrittce to settle estate: terms: write for g 

H particulars, p 

1 Address No. 298, rare Florists' Ktvlew. 508 g 

g S. Uearhoni St., Chicago. III. § 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllll lillllllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllllllllillllllMllllllllir 

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FOR SALE 



= Twii gieeidiouses in tile heart of tbe Mnssel = 

= Shoals district: li.nod ft, of glass: everytbing l 

I practically new: dnlng a goml business with all = 

= kinds of r(H>m l<> i;row : if yuu are looking for the | 

= best location obtainable, this place will suit | 

I you to a T, as it is strictly a live wire proixsi- ^ 

- tlon: write or wire fi>r information. = 

(i. W. KEDIS, i 

Tn-City Floral Co.. Hheffleld. Ala. | 
lllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!ll!IJIIIIIIIIilillllllllllllllltlllll:illlllllllllllllllllllll!llll!.lir 

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FOR SALS i 

American steam boiler, will heat 10.000 ft. = 

i glass, price. $390; American hot water, will heat = 

10.000 ft. glass, price. $370; American hot water, g 

■ will heat 6500 ft. glass, price. $230; American = 

; hot water, will heat 5000 ft. glass, price, $180; 1 

i American, will heat 2500 fL glass, price, $140; = 

These boilers are cast Iron sectional and will = 

bum either hard or soft coal. Other good bar- = 

gains In different sizes. Write us your wants, = 

ROGERS HEATINtJ CO., RanwmTlUe. N. T. | 

: ■ ■ ■', :::: ' ' : ' " !!i!illil'llllillllllllllllllimillilil!lii|i!!iiiii!n:i,ii?^ 



I FOR SALE I 

i Twelve greenhouses, iron frame, 1 

I with 8 acres of ground; 30.000 feet | 

I of glass; steam system with two | 

I boilers; city water and lights: filled | 

P with bedding plants ready for the | 

fc market, including geraniums, ferns, | 

l; asparagus, ivy, etc.; sweet peas just | 

g beginning to Ijloom; snapdragons, | 

= larkspur, calendulas, etc.; with 70,- | 

I 000 first size gladioli in bud; 8,000 | 

i£ carnations, Ward, Laddie, etc., in i 

g the field; stock geraniums, poin- I 

f settias, asters, marigolds, etc., be- | 

I ing placed for summer cut; first | 

I class wholesale place; owner | 

i wishes to devote entire time in an- = 

S other city; $10,000 cash, and $10,- g 

I 000 on time. | 

I Address Xo. 293, care Florists' I 

I Review. 508 .S. Dearborn .St., Chi- | 

I cago. III. I 

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-;iiiiililiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiliiiiili:iiiiliiiiliillilliliilillllliliiiiiilllliiiliililllll!lllllllllllilllliiliilllllililllili^ 

I FOR SALE I 

-= ()|ipiirtiiuit.v of a lifctiiiic: (trccnbousos, ^ 

^ lo.IMM) ft., located in tinest imrt of resi- = 

i; dcnic dLstrict: Broiind vcr.v vHliiabIc: Moii- g 

= inner liiiilt houses; Ideal hot water heat; 3 

= two Ihdlers; prettiest store in state: ^ales g 

g of two ieinet4'rles; only urienhouses In H 

y town: finest (font and Krayliiii; fishing in g 

^ v. S.: -.'i-lb. haskel in a coiiple of hours = 

1 coliinion: just the place for two youiiB, g 

i eiiercetlc men: owner Iweii in the husiness 1 

g here for over '!'< years and now wishes to g 

= retire to liis home in Oakland. California; = 

1 prhe. $.">.(MKt,(K( <asli, Imlaiice to suit l>ur- = 

5 chiiser. 3 

g It. M. (;itKl(i, i 

= Anaioiidu, Montana. = 

if:iiiiiiiiiiitii!liiiii:iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii|)iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiliiillil!llliiliiiiilliiiiiiillilililillllilllllilllliij 
^n<iiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiilliiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 

I FOR SALE I 

|; Good second-hand pipe, all sizes, for = 

= water and steam purposes; also pipe = 

g for culverts, grape arbors, fence and g 

p corner posts; cheaper than wood and = 

p lasts longer; send us your inquirie.s and § 

^ let us quote our prices. a 

I MAX ZII<:GLER & BROS., i 

= Muncle. Ind. § 
^iiiiillllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllNllllllllNliiilllliilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillllllllllllJr! 
|iiii:i<llliliiuiiililiillllliiiilllliiliiilliiiiiniill!ii:ii::i{iinmiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii|i^ 

I FOR SALE I 

g Three gifenhouscs. 5,000 ft. glass, good 7-roora s 

= home. No. 1. 6-section Capitol boiler: eventhlng g 

= in best condition; corner property: paved streets; g 

^ one of the most up-to-date small places In city; = 

^ ground to enlarge on; population of over 500.000 = 

H to draw from; will stand closest investigation; = 

= other business requires all my time reason for = 

= selling; biggest snap In the II. S, for $7,000.00. = 

= E. E. STOCKDALE, = 

i 2804 Hiawatha St.. Kansas Cit7. Kan. | 
?llimlllll!lllllllll!llllllllll|||il|ll|l||ll!l|l||||!|l||||in|l|||||||||||i|||!|||||||||;||||||||||||||||||||||||;||||||||,;= 



86 



The Florists'" Review 



May 4, 1922 



r; 



ac 



3C 



3 1 I E 



3C 



ac 



Pacific Coast Department 



ac 



ac 



ac 



ac 



ac 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



The Market. 

^Vllile tliori' was u good ileal of fu- 
neral work last week, it was by no 
means a good one in other ways. Stoi'k 
cleans up fairly well and \here is little 
left over at the market at the end of 
each day. Some magnificent tulips 
have been arriving from the north and, 
with this particular flower, the north- 
ern growers do far better than those 
in the south. The stems and flowers 
of the Darwin tulips are good. Local 
Dutcli and Sjianish iris and I. tingi- 
tana are good and meet a ready market. 
Local daffodils are about over. Flowers 
for baskets, such as delpliiniums, aqui- 
legias and long-stemmed stock gener- 
ally, are much in demand. Orchids, 
valle}-, sweet peas and gardenias are 
taken regularly, with few left over at 
any time. .Shii)])ers say that business 
fell off shar])ly after Kaster, but this, 
of course, was expected. At the time 
of writing, after a few warm days, the 
tempeiature is down again, giving dull, 
cold and cloudy weather, which is never 
good for business here. 

Various Notes. 

I'eter Wilson, who has been for many 
years connected witli the business here 
and is well known and universally 
liked, lias gone into business with his 
brother, T. D. Wilson, at i!()OS) Kast 
First street, under the name of Wil- 
son's Flower Shop. This is what is 
known as the Boyle Heights section, 
and there are few good flower stores 
there, so that these young men should 
lie able to work up a good business. 

Albert Beverley, of Santa Barbara, 
has been in the city and vicinity on one 
of his ]ierio(lic:il buying trips. 

R. Laemell, salesman for Koy F. Wil- 
cox ifc Co., and Frank Lichtenberg were 
to leave last week for Murrietta 
Sjjrings, Cal. Mr. Laemell is much bet- 
ter, but a good rest at the springs will 
set him up. Mr. Lichtenberg has also 
been under the we;ither for some time. 

On the e\'e of his departure for the 
executive meeting of the F. T. 1)., at 
Detroit, A. F. Borden invited all local 
F. T. D. members to his home to talk 
over matters of interest connected witli 
the association. A good attendance was 
on hand and an instructive discussion 
was held. Mrs. Borden served coffee 
and cake. All of those present wished 
Mr. Borden a pleas.-int and profitable 
trip. 

At the si ore of Walter Arniacost & 
Co. another large consignment of bas- 
kets is due. This consignment will be 
ready for the summer trade, which is 
always large. Mr. Williamson says that 
the demand for their collections of bas- 
kets, in which the retailer leaves the 
choice to .\rinacost & Co., and the regu- 
lar collections that are sent out, lead to 
an enormous business in this stock. A 
consignment of chiffon imjiorted direct 
from the Kuropean manufacturers has 
also arrived. 

D. Barron, proprietor of the Alexan- 
dria Florist, lias jiurchased a 30-foot 



jiower yacht, which he will keep near 
his cottage at Balboa beach. This is a 
beautiful boat, well fitted with every 
convenience for cruising and, doubtless, 
Mr. Barron will have a great deal of 
pleasure out of it. Business is reported 
as extra good at tlie store. 

Albert Goldenson reports fine busi- 
ness and everyone is kept on the jump 
at the store. ' H. K.'R. 



WiUia 
tail niai 
and jila 
boulevar 
Californ 
Mrs. M 
known t 
Wilhelm 
with I J. 
Bailey 's 
ticulture 
also lijis 
cultural 



m T. Miller has founded a re- 
1 order business in seeds, bulbs 
nts at 12()<> South (Venshaw 
d. Mr. Miller, who came to 
ia some time ago because of 
iller's health, may be better 
o the trade under the name of 

Miller. He was associated 
H. Bailey in the preparation of 

Cyclopedia of American Hor- 

and other standard works. He 

been a prolific writer on liorti- 

tojjics for a considerable list of 



publications and his knowledge of 
plants probably is as extensive as that 
of any man in America. He adopted 
the American form of his name during 
the war, as lie is a thoroughgoing Amer- 
ican citizen. 



PASADENA SHOW HIGH LIGHTS. 

With only a limited time to look over 
the excellent show put on at the Hotel 
Maryland, at Pasadena, Cal., by the 
Pasadena Horticultural Society, April 
21 and 22, the writer has surely missed 
some fine exhibits, but a few that stood 
out prominently are here mentioned. - 

Fuller report ajijiears on a forward 
page. 

Siebrecht's House of Flowers had the 
first place for a table decoration, which 
was a splendid conception of orchids, 
beautifully carried out. Mr. Siebrecht 
also had a magnificent grouj) of cut 
fiowers and plants. 

The new tulip, Marechal Foch, shown 



Mothers' Day 

Let us supply you with the 
best of everything in bloom. 

L. A. FLORAL CO. 

7%e House of Quality and Service 

236 East 4th Street, LOS ANGELES, CAUF. 

Phone, Pico 518 



VIOLETS, DAFFODILS 

SPRING FLOWERS 

SELECTED FOR LONG DISTANCE SHIPPING 

ALSO THE BEST 

Roses, Callas, Carnations and Peas 

COMING TO THIS MARKET 

Our packing methods insure good results and our prices are right 

on all classes of stock. 

S. MURATA & CO. 

380-386 S. Los Angreles St., LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Oldest and Most Exp«ri«ne*d Skippers id California 

WE NEVER MISS 



MAV 4, 1922 



The Florist^^ Review 87 



Who Wants to be 

a "Dead One" Anyhow? 

The little daughter of the Methodist minister, and the young son of the Presby- 
terian minister got into an argument while playing together. This grew into a violent 
quarrel in which the religion of their respective fathers was soon interjected. The little 
girl poked out her tongue and quoted, 

"I am Methodist born, and Methodist bred. 
When I die I'll be Methodist dead." 

The boy countered with, 

"I'm Presbyterian born, and Presbyterian bred, 
When I die I'll be Presbyterian dead." 

They then tried to see who could say this the fastest. Now Methodist is a shorter 
word than Presbyterian, and a woman always has the advantage of a man when it 
comes to talking. The boy was quickly beaten, but as he picked up his things and 
started towards home, he left this parting shot : "Well, who wants to be a 'dead one' 
anyhow?" 

Now that's a mighty good question. Who does want to be a "dead one?" In the 
florists' business we have a fine bunch of live ones among both growers and retailers. 
We also have a few dead ones. It is pretty easy to pick out the live ones from the dead 
ones. Anything that is alive grows. Just as soon as Easter was over the live ones 
cleaned up their places, adjusted their complaints, sent their unsalable plants or flow- 
ers to the hospital or scrap heap, put in fresh stock and began right away to plan for 
Mothers' Day, Decoration Day, and to map out a plan to get the graduation and wed- 
ding business in June. The Growers got good and busy figuring out what they would 
have for next Christmas, and even as far ahead as next Easter. The live ones always 
find time to interest themselves in the affairs of their own town. Are working mem- 
bers of the Chamber of Commerce and Commercial clubs. You will find them at the 
head of every "City Beautiful," "Village Improvement," or "Clean Up Week," that 
comes along. They always contribute to the National Publicity Campaign, and, of 
course, the retailers are members of the F. T. D. It is like an electric shock just to 
rub up against that live bunch. There are lots of other ways to pick out the "live ones." 
We have just mentioned a few of the most marked symptoms. 

As wholesalers we have tried to belong to the "live" class. If, during the past 
Easter season, we have done anything that would seem to put us in the other class, 
please stick a pin into us in the form of a letter of complaint. We will take it kindly 
and thank you for it. "Who wants to be a 'dead one' anyhow?" 

We wish to deserve fully the title of — 

THE BIGGEST, BEST AND BUSIEST STORE IN THE WEST 



321 East 4th Street LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

WE CLOSE SUNDAYS 



,■ 7* ■>'■ ^■-'t.T.'y:,!;;^^'™*^'' 



""^♦ynW*I'\T 



,ff^\'>»5*'r'->^'^*^^^'"t '■■■■! 



88 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1922 



CALIFORNIA EVERLASTING STATIGE 

IS OUR LEADER NOW 

CUT EASTER UUES 

Carnations, Heather, Roses, VaUey, all classes of Bulbous Stock 

and everything of the best in season 

Geo. J. Hall & Co., 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 

423 East Fifth Street, LOS ANGELES, CAL 



Mail AddrMs 

B*x 26S, Areada 
Los Angalas 



WIra 

GEO.J.HALI.&CO.. 
Loa Ancalaa 



CALIFORNIA FLORAL CO. 

ALL SEASONABLE CUT FLOWERS AND GREENS 
217 Winston Street the best in the west LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



by J. H. Tcckaiiip, is a beauty; the color 
is a radiant, flowing rosy pirrk, hard to 
descrilto but most beautiful. It at- 
tracted a ^ood deal of attention. 

Herbert Jiatenian, Ine., Los Angeles, 
won the gold medal for a display, with 
a eharniing wedding and altar decora- 
tion. 

Wright 's Flower Whop had a splendid 
table decoration of mauve tulips and 
ribl»ons tu match. This was greatly 
admired. 

The \Viiisell-(iibl)s Seed Co. had an 
interesting exhibit carrying out the 
firm 's ideas in landscaping — in minia- 
ture, of course. The magnificent cinera- 
rias and hipjicastruins sliown by How- 
ard & Sniitii were tiie center of much 
attr.iction. They have been so often 
descrilicd th.'it it is only necessary to 
say that they are absolutely unrivaled 
in the trade. 

Waiter .^riiiacost ic Co. put U]) ;\ fine 
exhibit of roses in their usual inimit.able 
stvle. The flowers were magnificent and 
the .•irrangement all that could be de- 
sired to show off the characteristics of 
the v.'irieties. Immense bunches of Co- 
lumliia, ("rusader, Be.'iuty and all the 
]i<)|)ulai commercial varieties were 
shown, a iierfect exhibit. This was 
awarile<l the gold medal in the whole- 
salers ' class. 

Theodore I'.-iyiie made a nice display 
of California native shrul)s and flowers, 
incluiling ;i new berl)eris and some 
liealthy, well grown plants of the Cali- 
fornia Ideecliiig he;irt, which ;ire sel- 
doiTi seen. 

The Morris & Snow Seed Co. and 
Cam]ibell's Seed Store liotli sliowt'cl 
their best. 

Taken all together, it w.as an .attrac- 
tive show. It is a ]iity the society can- 
not secure larger (piarters and more 
eonxciiieiit ly ;irr:inge(l, as now only !in 
aver.age crowd makes it difticult to see 
the exhibits. H. K. K. 



PORTLAND, ORE. 



The Market. 

Husiness last week w;is rather (juiet. 
Funer;il work has been rather light. 
Khodoilendrons, liydrangeas and some 
fine double yellow tulips are the leading 



''California" Plant Tub 



(REDWOOD) 




The "California" Plant Tub Is a special 
product for Florists and Nurserymen. Ex- 
pert workmanship, artistic lines, liarmo- 
nious color and sub.stantial quality. Madu 
from selected No. 1 Redwood, bound with 
electrically welded wire hoops. No better 
tub made. 

NET WHOLESALE PRICE LIST 



Size Each Doz. 

8-lnch .$0.8.-> $ 9.(H) 

10-inch 1.10 ll.r.O 


100 
$ 67.00 
84.00 


12-inch 1.60 16..')0 


121.00 


14-inch 2.2.-> 2.').00 

16-inch 2.60 29.00 


187.00 
212.00 


18-inch 3.25 S.^.OO 

20-inch 3.8.'j 42.00 

22-inch 5.2.5 ."iT.OO 

24-inch 7.25 78.00 

30-inch 10.75 120.00 

F. O. B. Factory, I.oa Angel 
Prlcts Subject to Change Without 


266. on 
322.00 
441.00 
.595.00 
910.00 
PP. 
Notice. 



Roy F. Wilcox & Co.. NontebeUo, Cal. 

Manufacturers 
Wholesale Florists and Nurserymen 



Mention The Review when you write. 



15 Acres of Strong California Field-Grown 

Poinsettia Stock Plants 

Two Red varieties: The True Red, with large, bright red flowers and wide petals, 
and the Early Flovrering variety, famons for holding its foliage and easy to raise. Has 
narrow flower petals and the flowers are not as large or bright as the Tme Ried variety. 

Strong one-year-old plants, 's-in. to l!i^-in. caliper, 116.00, $18.00, S26.00 and $30.00 per 100. 

Plants shipped by second-class express or freight to any part of the Dnited States. 

PAUL ECKE, 1226 Hayworth Aye., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Largest Gro¥fcr of Poinsettia Stock Plants. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



- LOS ROBLES CO. 

FLOWER KIM B , f^ f . SaN TftCROZ. 

, SPfCLISIS I (HI IFORNn 



!>* /J 




Mention The Review when yon write. 



Calilinia Piiret, 2 to 3 ft, $ 6.00 per 100 
Califwiia PriTet, 3 to 4 ft., 8.00 per 100 
Beitoi Itt, Zyear, 2 ft, IS.OO per 100 

Cash with order, please. 

PACIFIC NURSERIES, 

Colma, San Mateo County, CalUomla 



Mention The Review when you write. 



A nnouncement 

I have lliis day founded a retail mail 
order business in seeds and plants at 
the address given below and shall be 
pleased to receive the offers aud in- 
quiries of the trade, 

WM. T MILLER 

SEEDSMAN AND NURSERYMAN 
1209 S. Crenshaw Blvd., Los Angfles, Cal. 



Mention The Kyvtyw whru you write. 



FREESIAS 

IWktl t Wtitelli 



BoxeOS 
Montebello. Oaf. 



Mention The Review wnen you write. 



"^IKl'l A.r'r'" v< "1 7* y!'it, '^'/^'■^r'^v-'^^ '> 



MAY 4, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 



89 



BUY AMLING'S CUT FLOWERS, 
FLORISTS' SUPPLIES AND GREENS 

We are headquarters for the best in the Los 
Angeles market. When you want quality stock, 
real service and good packing — 

WIRE OR PHONE 

E. C. AMUNG CO., 447 WaU St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Tb* Largast, Bmt Eqnippad and Most Cantrally Loeatad Wkolasala Honsa ia Los Aagalas. 



MATS 

For wrapping plant pots. 
Write for samples and prices. 

BAMBOO CANE STAKES 

Green, 3-ft $4.50 per 1000 

Green, 4-£t 6.50 per 1000 

Natural, 6-ft. . . 7.50 per 1000 

PLANT TUBS 

Each 50c 



VIOLETS 

Now ready for shipment. 

DRIED STRAWFLOWERS 

of all varieties. 

ENOMOTO & CO., Inc. 

Wholesale Grower* and Shippers 
35 Saint Anne Street SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



FRASER & SON, Wholesale California Flower Seed Growers 

WRITE NOW FOR OUR 1922 WHOLESALE BULLETIN 

FRASER & SON, Pasadena, California 



pot plants. Flowers of Spanish iris 
arc coniiiig in freely from California 
and, since tlicy are obtainable at a niod- 
iratc price, are beginnintj to sell better. 
I'arwin tnlips, snapdragons, roses and 
'•arnations are of excellent (piality. 
i^wect peas are l)econiing more jjlentifnl 
■iiid find good sale at a moderate price. 

Various Notes. 

riic Wilson-Crout-tielir Co. is receiv- 
'ii« many orders for bedding plants of 
■lil kinds from out-of-town customers. 
• liis firm has several large orders from 
the different oil companies in this city 
•■i'"d is quite Imsy filling baskets and 
'"pxes for regular customers. 

H. Shaunian, who several years ago 
^^iis in this city as a hmdscape archi- 
'•'ft, returned a few weeks ago and is 
'•xaniining conditions for locating here 
l-erniaiientiv. He will follow the same 
^v()rk. 

At the monthly meeting of the Ore- 
;;f>n Florists' cfuh, April 2."), it was 
\ "ted that the same sum of monev as 



Richard Diener Cimpany 

Origiiiaton and Growers 
ti the Largest and Fbest 
Gladioli and Petunias 

Catahgum on Rmgumai 

KENTFIELD 

Marin County CALIFORNIA 



ERIC JAMES 

Wholesale Qrower of 

Palms, Ferns and Flowering 
Plants in Season 

8635 FoothiU Blv<L, OAKLAND, CALIF. 




Our 
Winter 
Orchid- 
Flowering 

Sweet 
Peas 



are now Krown by oyer 8000 commercial florlsta. 
They have no eqnal Send for list. 

Anton C. Zvolanek & Sons, '^Ta^'' 

ADIANTUM 

And all classes of Greens 

WE SUPPLY ONLY THE BEST 
Send for prices on 2-inch Maidenhair. 

TASSANO BROS. 



Artesla Niurserlea 



ARTESIA, CAL. 



^~ 0'" " "•, itt r^-i'Tv^ : " ^' ••• ^' , •■.■■'V ■ 

■-■'■'■_■», 



90 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



J. A. AXELL 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

=== 463 Bush Street :^^= 

San Francisco, Cal. 



WE CLOSE SUNDAYS 



E. W. McLELLAN COMPANY 

Growers and Wholesale Florists 
45 1 BUSH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



last year be subscribed to the 1922 
S. A. F. publicity fund. It will amount 
to about $500 and will be credited to 
the Oregon Florists' Club. After the 
meeting adjourned many members re- 
mained for a social card game. 

Felix Rosaia, of Seattle, and F. Sisler, 
of the Andrew Haxton Co., Yakima, 
Wash., were visitors in our city several 
davs last week. N. V. H. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



The Market. 

Quantities of stock flooded the mar- 
ket last week. Roses are as plentiful 
and fine as they were the previous week. 
Carnations are being cut in large num- 
l)ers; much of this crop is coming in too 
early for the Mothers' day trade, for 
which it was intended. A newcomer 
in the market is the gladiolus, though 
this flower is only to be found in 
two or three places. There are also a 
few peonies. There are choice snap- 
dragons, gillyflowers, many varieties of 
marigolds, good sweet peas and any 
amount of early summer stock. Dutch 
and Spanish irises are ))ecoming fairly 
jilentiful. Tulips are even more plenti- 
ful than they were the previous week; 
in fact, they are almost a drug in the 
market. Violets are jiractically gone, and 
there are few narcissi or daffodils. 
Pansies art> good and reasonable in 
price. Ranunculi and anemones are 
somewhat scarce. Easter lilies are still 
in season, and there are some calla lilies. 
Lilies of the valley and gardenias are 
jdeiitifiil mid good, while there are 
enough orchids to take care of the de- 
mand. Qn.'intities of wild flowers are 
adding to the market surplus. Statice 
and other strawflowers are now being 
cut. 

Various Notes. 

A. T\\ itiliett, a director of the Dahlia 
Society of California and one of the 
leaders in jiromoting the interests of 
the dahlia in this state, said: "There 
has l)een a big demand for California 
dahlia bulbs from the east this year. 
Some of the growers could have sold 
inanv more of their choice bulbs, if they 
liad'liad them to oft'er. ' " Mr. Twitchett 



ASPARAGUS 
PLUMOSUS 



Seeds 



New crop from frostless location — 

just picked, vigorous and clean. 

5000 seeds, $10.00; 1 lb., $18.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri Seeds 

5000 seeds, $5.00; 1 lb., $7.50 

M.KAI, R.F.D. No.6, Box380 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 






Mention The Review when yon write. 

DAHLIA SEED 

Savad from oar onriyaled prixe-takina collection, hybrid- 
ized by hand and rare to give iplendid reaolta. Ninety 
per cent will come dooble. 



60 seeds.... $1.80 
100 seeds.... 230 



500 seeds.. 
1000 seeds. . 



.$io.oo 

. 17.80 



SUPERIOR DAHLIA GARDENS 

49tk ud Figaeroa Sti., LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



Phon* Mmrrttt 691 

HASART BASKET WORKS, Inc. 

Hiflrh- Grade Flower Baskets 

2001 E. FoartMntb St. 
OAKLAND, CAL. 



Mention The ReTlew when yoo wnfe. 



Dahlias - Gladioli - Cannas 

SELECTED DAHLIA SEED 

ARCHER'S GARDENS 

Loe Anselae Coanty 400 No. Marenco ATenae 

ALHAMBRA, CAL. 



Mention The Bevlew when yoa write. 



Aquilesla Caeralea, 2 1-4 In., S3.fi0 per 100. 
Aqulleeia Chrysantha, 3-ln. pots, $S.O0 per 

100; also Lone Spurred Hybrids, same 

price. 
Campanula Persicifolia, blue or white, 3-ln., 

15.00 per 100. 
Pentstemon Hybridnm Grandiflorum, 

ill S separate colors, 2 14 in. pots, (1.00 per 1000. 
Cash Pleaie 
riED BMHE CO., R. F. 0. 4, lax 387. Saita lati.Cil. 



OWN- 
ROOT 

1922-1923 
List Ready July 1st 

ALL FIELD GROWN 

Howard Rose Co. 

HEMET, CAL. 




VteotloD 'i'ta«- Krrlew when yon write 



BEDDING STOCK 

2-inoh pots and rooted onttingi. 

Peters & Sons 

HILLYARD, WASH. 

(We ship from Spokkae) 



Mention The Rerlew when you write. 



MEXICAN IVY 

Fresh from the Northern Woods 

HUMBOLDT EVERGREEN CO. 

FORTUNA, CALIFORNIA 



Mention The Rerlew when you write. 

YtnriDqniries for anything yon may neci 
WILL BE ATPRECUTED 

He L. OLSSON CO., Inc. 

Gnwers *l Quality Plants for the Trade 

Box 494. SPOKANE, WASH. 



Bedding Stock 

FREDG.EHLE 

WHOLESALE GROWER 

224-236 Sanborn Avc^ San Jom, Calif. 

Write for 1988 Price Llat 



■w>pT^- :i ■•^-■;f,. '- 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



91 



MOTHERS' DAY SPECIAL 

CARNATIONS, white, red, piak $12.50 per 100 

ROSBS, any color, short 6.00 per 100 up 

ROSES, any color, medium 10.00 per 100 up 

ROSES, any color, long 12.00 per 100 up 

CALLA LILIES 3.50 to $4 50 per 100 

SWEET PEAS 2.00 to 2.50 doz. bunches 

IRIS 4 00 to 5.00 per 100 

MARIGOLDS AND STOCKS 75 per doz. bunches 

GYPSOPHILA 1 .00 per doz bunches 

STATICE 3.00 per doz bunches 

HELICHRYSUMS 1.50 per doz. bunches 

ACROCLINIUMS 1.00 per doz. bunches 

GREENS: Plumosus and Adiantum 25 per bunch 

Any other seasonable flowers at market prices. Above prices subject to market changes. 

UNITED FLOWER & SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE GROWERS AND SHIPPERS 

448 BUSH ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




CUTTINGS B. L HAMMOND CO. 

Smattlm'a Wholeaale Floritt 

GET OUR PRICES 1008 POST ST., SEATTLE 



Mothers' Day Price List 

EFFECTIVE MAY 8th, 1922 
Subject to change without notice. 

ROSES 

Slioit Mciliura J.oiig 

Ophelia 12c 18c 25c 

Hoosier Beauty 12c 18c 25c 

Columbia 12c 18c 25c 

Dunlop 12c 18c 25c 

Pilgrim 12c 18c 25c 

Dr. Smith 12c 18c 25c 

Shawyer 10c 16c 2i)c 

White Killarney 10c 16c 20c 

White Shawyer lOc 16c 2nc 

CARNATIONS 

Best 8c 

Shorts and Splits 6c 

Laddie 1 5c 

SWEET PEAS, per luiiidrc-d $1.00 and $2.00 

CALLA LILIES, per dozen 2.00 

LILY OF THE VALLEY, each 08 

SPRENGERI, per bunch f,0 

PLUMOSUS, per tnii.ch 40 

HARDY FERNS, per bunch 25 

HiPer Floral Co. ITT ID 

FARMINGTON U 1 iHI 

iiilikMl that "tlie Garden Beautiful," at 
the San C^ueiitin penitentiary, is to be 
niore beautiful this year than ever. 
'The dahlia growing enterprise which 
excites most general interest through- 
out the country is this garden of the 
convicts," said* Mr. Twitchett. 

Frank D. Pelicano, of Pelicano, Rossi 
& Co., has completely sold out his 
dahlia bulbs, the run having been great- 
est in the new varieties which he him- 
self created. It is only two months or 
less since Mr. Pelicano issued his cata- 
logue. In order to have more stock next 
year, Mr. Pelicano has added an aero 
and a half to his dahlia farm. 

The Tycoon, a new tree peony, is be- 



Mothers' Day Plants 

RAMBLER ROSES 

Tausendschoen, Pekin, Excelsa. 



Eucli 



6-inch, heavy flowering $1.25 

7-inch, heavy flowering 2.00 

8-inch, heavy flowering 2.50 



BOSTON FERNS 



6-inch 
7-inch 



Each 

.$0.75 
. 1.25 



Charge for packing, 10 per cent of cost. 



H. HAYASHI & CO. 

2311 73rd Ave., OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Primula Obconica 

My well known strain 

2Ji-mch pots $ 6.00 per 100 

4 -inch pots 20.00 per 100 

Primula Obconica Seed, mixed or geparate 

varieties. 

76c per packase of 1000 seeds. 

Send for price list of Ferns, Kentias, etc. 

H. PLATH 

"The Ferneries" 

^mUlS^^m. San Francisco, Calif. 



ing grown by TI. Avjinsino. lie bought 
."iOd trees from Adrian .1. Schoorl, who 
states that the flowers in their prime 
are fourteen inches in diameter. Mr. 
Avansino is growing thein for stock pur- 
poses, as the trees are now affected by 
((Uarantine No. '^7. 

The California wild flower exhibition 



For Mothers' Day 

CUT DARWIN TULIPS 

6c and 8c. 

OBCONICO PRIMROSES 

6-inch pots, 75c. 

HOLDEN TLOR/iL COMPANY 

1180 Milwankie St., PORTLAND, ORE. 



at the St. Francis liotel was a greater 
success th;ni ever before, according to 
•Julius Ejipstein, florist of the St. 
Fr;nicis liotel. Mr. Kppstein anticipates 
a big business Mothers' day. 

The Fr.'incis Floral Co., a pioneer in 
the inanuf.icture of art baskets, is hold- 
ing a sale, preparatory to moving some 



' %■*. -^^ V"" ' t-' ■ c..^^-'^:.'-': ■'. ' >-=^, ' ' ■ A-.r^^™- T^^'^vr^™'". 



Vt . i ^'^- 7,^^,-v7>T'rvT>^ '*.5 :». "It ' 



92 



fhe Rorists* Review 



May 4, 1922 




SEE LAST WEEK'S AD 
GET CATALOGUE 



Mastodon Miracle Mixed— 1-16 oz. 86c. 
H oz. $1.50, H oz. $2.75, H oz. $5.25. 
1 oz. $10 00, 2 ozs. $19.00. 

Steele's Mastodon Greenhouse— Spec- 
ial mixed (O.K. Outside). 1-16 oz. 66c, 
H oz. $1.00. H oz. $1.75. H oz. $3.26, 
oz. $6.00, 3 ozs. $16.00, 4 ozs. $21.00. 

Steele's Mastodon Private Stock- 
Mixed, 1-16 oz. 65c, yi oz. 75c, H oz. 
$1.50. H oz. $2.75, oz. $5.00, 3 ozs. 
$13.60, 4 ozs. $17.00. 

STEELE'S PANSY GARDENS 

PORTLAND, OREGON 



SWEET PEA SEED 

Xiat* nowerliiff 8p«noer Yariatlei 

Buy yonp Sweet Peas from California, 
where they grow, and get fresh aeed at rea- 
sonable prices. We list only the best com- 
mercial varieties for commercial growers. 

Oz. V4 lb. Lb. 

Barbaj«, salmon-orange $0.26 $0.85 $2.50 

Oonstanott Oliver, salmon... .25 .85 2.S0 

Constanoe Hinton, white 2S .85 2.60 

Counteis Spencer, best pink. .25 .85 2.60 

Debbie's Sunproof, crimson.. .25 .85 2.60 

Debbie's Cream, extra deep.. .25 .85 2.50 

Dainty, white, pink edge... .25 .85 2.50 

Elfrida Pearson, blush pink .25 .85 2.50 

Helen Lewis, orange-pink... .25 .85 2.60 

KiuK Edward, best red 25 .85 2.50 

Lavender George Herbsrt... .25 .85 2.60 

Hand Holmes, crimson 25 .85 2.50 

Mrs. Cuthbertson, pink and 

white 26 .85 2.50 

Kargaret Hadlson, azure-blue .25 .85 2.60 

Xasterpieoe, lavender 25 .85 2.60 

Margaret Atlee, rosy-salmon. .25 .86 2.50 
Xrs. Tom Jones, best deep 

blue 75 2.26 7.00 

Primrose Spenoer 25 .85 2.60 

Royal Purple 26 .86 2.60 

R. F. Felton, pink lavender. .25 .85 2.60 

Rosabelle, giant rose 25 .85 2.50 

Nubian, giant chocolate 25 .85 2.60 

Senator, purple and white 

stripe 25 .85 2.60 

Thomas Stevenson, scarlet.. .25 .85 2.60 

The President, orange 25 .85 2.60 

Wedgwood, best blue 26 .85 2.60 

White Spenoer, pure white.. .25 .85 2.60 

Warrior, giant maroon 25 .86 2.60 

Less 5% for cash. Postage free. 

Adrian J. Schoorl 

255 California Street 
San Francisco, CALIFORNIA 



1000 Coreopsis Lanceolata 6 ets. 

1 000 Campanula Cup and Saucer, 

mixed 6 cts. 

500 Campanula, single, blue and 

white 6 eta. 

300 Columbine, assorted 6 cts. 

1000 Delphinium Belladonna, 

stronK 7 cts. 

1000 Delphinium, mixed 6 cts. 

500 Foxglove 6 cts. 

500 Gypsophila Paniculata 7cts. 

200 Heuchera Sanguinea 7 cts. 

300 Lobelia Cardinalls 6 cts. 

ISO Stokesia Cyanea 7 cts. 

500 Shasta Daisy Alsaka 6 cts. 

N. VAN HEVELINGEN 

34 E. 62nd St., Portland, Oregon 



doors Houtli to ii new iiiul more desirable 
location. The jjresent location of the 
Francis Floral ('o. is at the southwest 
corner of Powell and Sutter streets. 

The Retail Florists' Association of 
San Francisco will hold its annual pic- 
(Contlnueil on page liili.) 

OAKLAND, CAL. 



The Market. 

The demand last week was largely 
for roses, carnations and tulips. Roses 
are plentiful and of f^ood quality. Car- 
nations are a little soft and do not 
stand up well, but there is an abundant 
stock in siji;ht. Tulips are the most 
l)opular flowers this month and large 
quantities of superior stock are being 
brought to the market. The end of 
next month will proliably see the last 
of the tulips. Baby roses are on the 
market in large (juantities now. A 
slight decrease is noted in the prices 
of all of this stock. Many new vari- 
eties of spring flowers are on the mar- 
ket. Sweet peas are arriving abun- 
dantly. Purple lilacs, ranunculi and 
irises are fairly abundant now. The 
Spanish iris is especially fine this 
spring. Snapdragons are also abundant. 
A few bachelor's buttons and pansies 
have appeared on the market. Violets 
have entirely disappeared. Tamarix 
shrubs are becoming pojiular for deco- 
rations. The first gladioli ajjpeared on 
the market last week. 

Vaxious Notes. 
The H. M. Sanborn Co. experienced 
a good Easter l)usiness and managed 
to clean up i)ractically everything. 
W. S. Harmon thinks that the market 
for lilies is decreasing from year to 
year, as it is now possible to have lilies 
for an increased length of time. Most 
of the goods sold this year were reason- 
able in price. Much of the business 
was in cut flowers. Preparations are 
being made for a big Mothers' day. 
This firm received several orders from 
the east on the occasion of the opening 
of the new Reich & Ijievre department 
store. 

Cliff Wageuet is still laid up from his 
attack of blood jioisoning. He is ex- 
jiected back on the jol) next week. The 
business of the Oakland Flower Shop 
has be(>n increasing steadily, in s])ite 
of Mr. Wagenet 's forced absence. The 
shi])ping business here was particularly 
brisk. The business transacted during 
the month of Ajiril is" rather poor, as a 
rule, but this year the volume at this 
store sur])assed that for the month of 
April of 1920 and 1921. A considerable 
number of new customers have been 
booked, whil(> business with most of 
the old ones is steadily increasing. 

llogan & K\('rs have received ])lans 
for a new store. The ])resent (juarters 
of this firm are too small and the new 
store will jirovide the additional s|)ace 
neeile(l, and will give a better location, 
with a larger window frontage. The 
new stere will be adjaceiit to the First 
National bank, on Telegra]>h avenue, 
about half a lilock from the jiresent 
location of the firm. The change will 
not be made liefore August 1, as the 
firm's present lease does not expire 
for some time. The Easter business of 
this firm wa.s fine. The volume of busi- 
ness is estimated to have been fullv 
twice that of Easter in 1921. 

The window of the Thorsted Ploral 
Co. is always sure to have something 
interesting and unusual in it. This is 



LOOK! 



Ready Now 

Unleis otkeiwiie itated 



For shipment from 100 1000 

Pasadena, Calif. rate rate 

BERBEBIS Wilsonae 3-ln. pot... $0.15 

OOTOICEASTER Mlcr. thymifolia 

2-ln. pot 10 $0.00 

DIOSMA Beevesl 3-in. pot 20 

A new, compact, low growing 
type of Dlosma with flowers same 
as common form. 

ERICA Mediterranea 2-in. pot 09 .08 

ERICA Mediterranea bybrida 2-in. 

pot 10 .09 

ERICA Persoluta alba 2-ln pot... .10 .00 
ERICA Persoluta rosea 2-in. pot.. .12>A .11 
ERICA ReKermlnans ovata 3-in. 

pot 20 

(Not ready until May or June.) 
GEL8EMIUM Sempervlrens 2-in. 

pot 10 

MELALEUCA Diosmifolia 2-in. pot .08 

Dwarf Lemon 2-in. pot 20 .... 

A splendid novelty. "Went through the 
freeze uninjured. Bears good lemons freely 
when only a foot high. 

For shipment from San Mateo, Calif. 
NOVELTY ERICA RED MELANTHERA 

A very beautiful thing. Identical with 
ordinary meianthera (the "Scotch Heather" 
of the trade) except in its color, a bright 
claret. Will doubtless take the place of 
meianthera as a cut flower proposition. 
Plants from thumb pots will be ready for 
shipment about May 1, 1922. Price, 900.00 
per 100 — no discount for larger quantities. 
ERICA KING EDWARD VH 

Long tubed, red with white tip. Ready 
now. 2V&-In. pot f2.00 per 10, fl7.50 per 100. 

For shipment from Los Angeles 

GOLDEN ARBOR VITAE 

Grown from cuttings and ready for ship- 
ment about May Ist as soon as well estab- 
lished in 2-in. pots. $16.00 per 100. 

For shipment from Los Angeles 

STATICE CASPIA 

A beautiful new variety. Somewhat like 
Statice latlfolia. but has fine heather-like 
foliage on flower stalks. Splendid for flo- 
rists' use fresh or dried and an attractive 
garden plant. 
2-in. pot stock $10.00 per 100 

For shipment from San Jose, Calif. 

AMPELOPSIS VEITCHII 

Still dormant but must be offlbred at once. 

2 and 3-year extra strong ?|S0.0O per 100 

2-year strong 16.00 p«r 100 

BOUGAINVILLEA UH^ERITIA 

Always scarce on account of being ex- 
tremely difficult to propagate. They have 
recently been shifted from 3-i4jifcts and will 
be ready for shipment in abol%% month, as 
soon as well established. 

4-ln. pot stock 75c each 

No. discount for quantity. 

BULBS 

The following bulbs are offered for de- 
livery at the proper time in late summer and 
early fall of 1922 for shipment from various 
California points. 

FREESIAS 

Purity WHITE Per 1000 

% to %-in $5.00 

.^-in 7.50 

'A to %-in 10.00 

% to ?i-ln 15.00 

COLORED 

Rainbow Mixture Per 100 Per 1000 

\-in. up $3.50 $30.00 

Vi to %-in 2.50 20.00 

% to '^-in 1.75 12.50 

Sunset Mixture 

%-ln. up $4.00 $35.00 

% to %-in 3.00 25.00 

% to >^-in 2.25 17.50 

Spiendens (lavender) and 

Victory (clear pink) 

%-in. up $4.50 $40.00 

'/i to %-in 3.50 30.00 

% to 'i-ln 3.00 ■.:.5.00 

Gen. Pershing (orange and red) and 

Viola (blue) 

Oond forcing bulbs about 

V2 to ••'i-in $4.00 $3.1.00 

ANEMONES 

nemand Is far in excess of supply and 
there will be no chance whatever of securing 
stock unless ordered early. 
Mixed ColorH, $3.50 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

RANUNCULUS 

Kqually scarce. Enough said. 
Hybrids, mixed colors, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 
per 1000. 

W. B. Clarke 

Horticvltural Broker 

San Jose, Cal. 





May 4, l!>aa 



The Florists' Review 



93 



ERICA MELANTHERA 

We offer this popular Winter-Flowering Heather from 2-inch pots 

at the following prices: 

Per 100 $ 8.00 

Per 1,000 70.00 

Per 10,000 600.00 

Quotations for larger quantities on application. These will be ready about May 15th. 
Prices f. o. b. Pasadena. Packing at cost. Cash or satisfactory references. 

JANNOCH NURSERIES 

Pasadena Ave. and Waverly Drive, PASADENA, CALIF. 



SURPLUS OF CYCLAMEN 

3-in. transplanted seedlings, $8.00 per 100, $60.00 per 1000 

Owing to the fact that we had 100% germination of our cyclamen seed, 
we have a surplus of stock which we wish to dispose of quick and at 
reduced prices. Best commercial colors, Salmon and Christmas Red. 

BEST STRAIN. ALL STRONG AND HEALTHY PLANTS. 

RAHN & HERBERT CO., CLACKAMAS, ORE. 



t'.sjd'cially true of orcliid disidays. Poo- 
ple always look to Tliorstcd 's window 
tor all new orchid displays. A most 
unusual display last nioiitli was a l)as- 
kt't of mountain oridiids. The liaskct 
was made of bark and containi'd a 
i|Uantity of moss and a nuinlifr of 
ft'iiis, making; a most attractivi' scttiiifi 
I'M' the orchids. 

In witness of the ])ower of the un- 
UMial to draw attention, Tliomas & Har- 
ris placed a bunch of hujre tulijis in the 
window one day last month with no 
other tiowers to speak of, except ferns, 
wliiidi were used to keep the window 
from looking barren. The tuli])s were 
so iarye that the window attracted more 
attention than if it had been simplv 
<illed with tiowers. 

■I. Sculberjier reiiorts a fine Kaster. 
Musiiies.s since Kaster has been a littb' 
'i"'et, ill Mr. Seiilberf,'er's estimation, 
but a steady and i)rofit;ible business is 
Roing on. 

A iiew store under the name of the 
<'alifornia Floral Co. has been opened 
•It 1707 Broadway. The store is not a 
larjje estiiblishment, but it is attempt 
i"K to cut prices. At present tlie only 
•Jaimnese florist in the downtown dis- 
♦nct is jM. Mori, l.lKl ('lav street. This 
establishment has been run practicallv 
f" an American ])asis. Several other 
attempts have been nuide in the past bv 
lapanese, but none of them h.n's 



.00 

per lOOO 



DAGGER FERNS ?.f 

SEATTLE FERN & MOSS CO. 

2135 Western Avenue SEATTLE, WASH. 

GREEN SHEET NOSS TOR HANGING BASKETS, $1.00 per Sack (2 bushel sacks) 



11 



ROSFS PORTLAND — ROSES 

„^^„^ riddpiw.. n.w«u-iBeit. JsgM^La;'—- 

PERENNIALS Monntun View Ronl Co., Portlu<l. Orefoo. 


Woodland Park Floral Co. 

SUMNER ■ - WASHINGTON 
WheUsal* Growcra of 

Pot Plants and Cut Flowers 


FRED M. YOUNG 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 
Over 100,000 square feet of glass 

41 E. 52nd St, PORTLAND, ORE. 

Cut Flowers and Pot Plants 


ASTER SEED 

Send for list or see ad in The Review of 
Feb. 2nd, Feb. 16th or Mar. 2nd. 

The Home of Astera 

HERBERT & FI.RISHAUER 

McMinnvlUc, Oregon 


SEE OUR LARGE AD ON 

Seasonable Plants and Supplies 

in th* March 30 Iciua ot Tha R.tUw. 

Wilson-Crout-Gehr Co. 

WhoUtaU Florlitc 
Eaat 62nd and Ankanr Sta. Portland, Ora. 






94 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1922 



been successful, with the exception of 
the establishment mentioned. 

The Varsity Gardens, formerly Nor- 
ton the Florist, is now established in its 
new quarters at Berkeley. The new 
store is exceedingly attractive, having 
been entirely remodeled before its oc- 
cupancy by 'the Varsity Gardens. The 
new store has a much better location 
than the old, as it is next to one of the 
more popular refreshment parlors, 
iiatronized bv the university students. 
' • M. M. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Market. 

(leiierMl business last week presented 
uo outstanding features, either as to 
new offerings or the general trend of 
Imsiness. There has been a slight in- 
crease in the number of smaller social 
decorations giving work to the trade, 
but the larger functions have been few. 
The late sjiring is liable to reduce the 
returns from this class of business, since 
the entertaining season is shortened be- 
fore the breaking up for the summer 
holidavs. . . 

There has been a good increase m the 
eut of roses and the demand has kept 
ui. with this in fine order. Tremier is 
about the fanciest variety showing at 
present, but the quality and color ot 
Ophelia have shown a decided improve- 
ment. The carnation supply is also in- 
creasing and the cut of sweet peas has 
increased materially. H. M. 



SPOKANE, WASH. 



Easter Business. 

The Easter trade was good this year 
and the majority of the stores cleaned 
up well. Lilies were not so good as they 
have been in previous years, while many 
of the growers were unable to get their 
stock into bloom in time for the trade 
The bulbous stock was good and movea 
veadilv. Bose bushes in all sizes were in 
V-l condition for the Easter market and 
s(dd well. Hvdrangeas were not so good 
this vear as' they have been m years 
Piist "but bv Sundav noon, April lb, 1:0^ 
remained. "Cut flowers in almost every 
line were of good quality. 
The Market. 

Eoses are arriving in excess of the de- 
mand, but their quality is of the best. 
Carnations are scarce, and at Easter 
thev were almost completely off cro].. 
The qualitv of the sweet peas offered on 
the market is the best that has ever been 
seen and these blooms sell readily. T-he 
spring flowers in daffodils, tulips and 
narcissi make up the current offering of 
,-ut flowers. Potted plants are somewhat 
scarce, but the greenhouses are well 
stocked with spring plants, and their 
quality is good. Indications are good 
for an' active spring trade. 
Various Notes. 

Some attractive windows were shown 
at Easter, which did justice to the flo- 
rists ' trade. The City Floral Co. fea- 
tured an Easter morning scene, which 
included the sun rising between two 
mountains. 

Frank Rpoerhase, of the Spokane Flo- 
rist Co.. tried to find a new use for a 
Ford. He drove it down a river bank. 

Einar Sinclair supplied the tra.le v,-i*h 
some good sweet peas and a good cut of 
roses. R- ^^- 



The Latest Creation in Vases 



Send one along with each 
order for cut flowers 

The graceful appearing, well made, hand- 
somely decorated wood-fiber vases are 
delightfully unique and thoroughly orig- 
inal. Welcomed in every home, hospital 
and church — so inexpensive as to per- 
mit the including of one with each cut 
flower sale. Made in three distinctive 
shapes and nineteen sizes. Decorated 
in delicate shades of colors and extreme- 
ly artistic designs. Send for folder. 

MONO SERVICE CO. Newark, New Jersey 




Mi>nrti>a Thf H*»t»w when too irr1t» 



CLOTH Hb^ ^<^tural 



A good number for corsages 
or any kind of work 
and very reasonable 



VIOLETS 



\^ bunches (with leaves and foil -wrapped stems) tO box 

oo 

1312 PINE STREET ST. LOUIS, MO 



C.A.KUEHN WHOLESALE FlORIST 1* 

1312 PINE STREET ST. LOUIS. MO. X 



POST- 
PAID 



GOLD LETTERS AND SCRIPTS 

Bc«t and Cheapest on the market. Write for Muniriee and prices. 

J. UCHTENBERGER, 1560 Are. A, NEW YORK CITT 



MAV 4, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 



95 





The fl ortoto whose cards appear on the pages carrylnii this head, are prepared to fill orders^ 
""*"■ '""■ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




For SAN FRANCISCO 

the Bay Cities and all Central California 



i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iniiiiiiiii 



PELICANO, ROSSI & CO. 

123-125 Kearny Street 



Members F. T. D. 



OFFER UNEXCELLED FACILITIES FOR HANDLING YOUR ORDERS 



(ndex by Towns of Florists Represented in the Pink Part 



CIW PM« 

AKRON, 0. 

Heepe Co "» 

ALBANY, 0«. 

Smith Grnhse. Co.. 130 
ALBANY. N. Y. 

Danker "2 

Cloei'kner, Wm....lli 
Itosery, The 112 

ALLIANCE. 0. ,^ 

Miller. H. T 122 

Woodman's Fl. ahp.122 

ALTON. III. ., 

Krug Floral Co... 118 

AMARILLO. Tax. 

Cunningham Shop.. 129 

AMHERST. 0. „ 

Hanes. L. J 12S 

AMSTERDAM, Holland 

Tlilm. C 105 

ANAHEIM. CAL. 

Cates. Howard. . .98-99 

ANN ARBOR, Mich. 
Blu Malza FL Shop.llC 
APPLETON. Wit. 
Junction Gmhaea. . . 114 
Riverside Gmtaaeo. . 114 
ASHEVILLE. N. C. 

Brownhurst 131 

Mkldlemount Gar... 131 
ASHTABULA. 0. 
Ashtabula FL Co.. 123 
ATCHISON, Km. 
Atchison S. ft F1..122 
Oro»«B Floral Co. . 122 
ATLANTA, Ga. 

.loy Floral Co 131 

Lawrenre Flo. Co. .130 

SlalUngs 130 

Wclnstock 130 

Wist End Gardens. 130 

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. 

Atlantic City F. Sh.llO 

Crane & Hill 110 

Kihvarcis Fin. Hall. 110 
ATTICA, Ind. 

Attlea Floral Co 120 

AUGUSTA. Ky. 
rhomas. Victor H..116 
AURORA. III. 
iurora Grnhse. ...118 

Smelv. .los. M 118 

AUSTIN. Minn. 

Kinsman. A N 124 

AUSTIN T«t. 
Austin Fl. Co 

.....104-129-132 
HUlyws 114 

BALTIMORE. Md. 

Feast & Sooa Ui 

f-rahain. RobL L..lie 
Hallldaj, Wm. J..m 
Johnston. Mai» ...114 
BASIN. Wyo. 
I'.mnvell, Robin. . . n.s 
BATON ROUGE La 
R"srlantl, Florist. . .130 
BATTLE CREEK, 

MlOh. 

ci^ * ?reensmlth.ll« 
Coggan, 8. W. Ill 

BERKELEY, Cl" 
jwrkelej Florist. ..ia« 
BIDDEFORD. M* 

;:'"""'s ".108 

P'LLINGS. Mont. 

I.IIIMIKS Fl. C0....IIR 

'''''■'"■r s Crnhse. .118 
BIRMINGHAM. Ala. 

teT.f'"*'' }|» 

I'Hiker-R ri'stor;::no 



CltT Pag* 
BL00MIN6T0N. iBd. 
vniln Floral Co IM 

BLUEFIELD. W. Va. 

Flower Shop 114 

Fallon, Florist 114 

BOSTON, Mast. 

Carbone 108 

Galvln. Inc., T. F. 

97-108 

HouRlit^jn. (iorney. .10.S 

O'Brien 108 

Fenn 107 

"Wax Bros 108 

BOZEMAN. Mont. 

lyangohr, M 118 

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. 

Koran & Son 1 09 

Reck & Son. J 109 

BRISTOL, R. I. 
Kinder & Bros., S.IOO 
BROCKTON. Mast. 
Belmont Fl. Shop. .108 
BROOKLINE. Mast. 

Palmer, F. E 108 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Jahn, Hugo H 110 

Trepel , Joseph .... 1 1 
Trepel & Bershad. .110 

Weir, Inc., Jas 110 

BROWNWOOD. Tex. 
Brownwood Fl. Co. 129 

BRUSSELS, Ball. 

Froiite, M lOS 

BUCYRU8, 0. 

Poeie Shoppe 123 

BUFFALO. N. Y. 

Anderson, S. A 112 

Colonial Fl. Shop.. 112 
Felton's Fir. Shop. 112 

(irever. Wm. H 112 

Kramer the Florist. 112 

I*hde & Galley 112 

Palmer & Son 112 

SanfUfnrd. Chas 112 

Scott the Florist. . .112 

Slevers. W. II 112 

BURLINGTON. Vt 
Gove the Florist. . .109 
CAIRO, in. 
Cade the Florist... 118 

CAMBRIDGE. Matt. 

Becker's Conserv. . .1^8 

Bobbins Bros 108 

Ryan, H. A 108 

CANTON, 0. 

Raebel dc Son 123 

CARBONDALE. III. 

Plater, E. W US 

CASPER. Wyo. 

Casper Flo. Co 118 

CEDAR FALLS, la. 
Bancroft & Skjns. . .132 
CEDAR RAPIDS, la. 

Kemhie Flo. Co 132 

CENTRALIA, III. 

Ross. J. W 117 

Webster Gmb8ea...llT 
CHARLES CITY, la. 
Riverside Fl. Shop. 132 
CHARLESTON, 8. C. 

Art Floral Co 131 

Carolina Floral .Str 131 
CHARLESTON, W.Va. 
Capital City Fl. Coll 4 
C.h'ton Cut Fl. Co. 114 
Winti-r Floral Co. . .114 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Flower Shop 131 

."^choltz. Inc 131 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, 
Va. 

Lankforcl. W. A... 11.1 



City *>aie 

CHATTANOOQA,-T*nn. 

Haeger Fl. Co 131 

•lov Floral Co 131 

CHICAGO, III. 

Bohannon Co 119 

Bruns. H. N 11» 

Central FL Co.... 118 

Clody'a 118 

Congress Fir. 8hoi>.119 

Fisher & Bro 119 

Jackaon FL Sbop..ll8 

Jensen Bros 118 

.TohnsoD A Chrooli.118 

Lange, A. 119 

Langs & 80c 119 

Mangd 119 

Michal. John A 118 

Mulr 119 

O'Leary. Florist. ..119 
Samuelson. C. A. ..119 

Smyth. W. J 101 

Snranson the Florist 119 
Wlenhoeber Co., E.119 
Wlttbold Co., Geo. 119 
Wtttbold. H.. * Son 
100-118-119 

CHICKA8HA. Okla. 

John.son. Mrs. S...110 
CHILLICOTHE. Mo. 

Isherwood Gmhses. .113 

CHILLICOTHE. 0. 

Brehmer GreenhouBel23 
CINCINNATI. 0. 

Baer. Julius 109 

Sheppard. H. W...120 

CLARKSBURG. W.Va. 

Dudley & Sons 111 

Ilavman Grnhse. Colli 
Weber & Sons Co. Ill 
CLARKSDALE. MIn. 
Payne's Fl. Shop.. 117 
CLEVELAND. 0. 

Ga-wer Co 123 

Graham dc Son 123 

Megchelsen Fl. Sh.l23 

Temhlett. W. H 123 

Westman A Gets. .123 
CLIFTON FORGE. Va. 
Alleubanv Fl. Co. .115 
COLDWATER. MIoh. 

Van Aken Bros 116 

Vogt's Gmhsea 116 

COLO. SPRINGS. Col. 
Crump. Frank F. . .124 
I'lkes Peak Flo. Co.l21 
COLUMBIA. MO. 
(^ilumbla Fl. Co... 112 

COLUMBUS. Ohio 

Franklin Pk. Fl. Co. 122 
Mission Fl. Shoppe. 122 
Nell Flower Shop.. 122 
Wilson Floral Co... 122 
CORRY, Pa. 

Gould & Co 128 

COUN'L BLUFFS, la. 
Gardiner Floral Co.]32 

Shaw, Fred H 132 

Wilcox & Son 132 

COVINGTON, Ky. 
Ruttle. Roht. D..,.115 
DALLAS. Tex. 
FlaRg Floral Co... 129 

I.ang Floral Co 12M 

DAVENPORT, la. 

Hills Floral Co '.32 

Forber. G. F 132 

DAYTON, 0. 

Abby Are. Gmhses. 123 

Rodgera J, W 123 

Zetiltz Fl. Prod 123 

DECATUR. III. 

Daut Brot 117 

DE KALB, III. 

De Kalb Fl. Shop.. 117 

Johnson, J, L, IIT 



CltT Pas* 

DENVER. Colo. 

Bright Spot Grnh8e3l24 

Central Fl. Co 124 

Columbine Fl. ,Shopl24 

.Mauff Floral Co 124 

Park Floral Co 124 

Rockmont. Inc 124 

DES MOINES, la. 

GuthHe-I.orenz Co. 132 
KIrkwood Fl, Co. ..132 

DETROIT. MIoh. 
Breitmeyer's Sons.. 116 

Central Flo. Co 116 

Scribner Fl. Co 116 

DEVILS LAKE, N. D. 
Valker's Fl. Co.... 117 
DIXON, III. 
Dixon Floral Co. ..117 

DODGE CITY, la. 

nodgc City Flo. Co. 122 

DOUGLAS. Ariz. 

Gatlltr Fl. Garden. 120 
DOVER. N. J. 

.'^unnyslde Gmhses. 110 
DUBUQUE, la. 

Ilarketfs Fl. Nurs.132 
Muntz. S. E 132 

OULUTH. Minn. 

Duluth Floral Co.. 124 

DURHAM. N. C. 

Durham Fl. Co. . . .131 
Fallon Co.. J. J... 131 
Piedmont Fl. Shop. 131 
E. PITTSBURGH. Pa. 
Frederick Fl. Shop. 128 
EDMONTON. Alberta 
Ramsay. Ltd., W..121 

EL DORADO. Arfc. 

Leach Fl. Shop 120 

ELGIN, III. 

Souster, Geo 118 

ELKHART, Ind, 

Van Aken Bros 116 

ELMIRA. N. Y. 

Sheoly Bros 110 

EL PASO. Tex. 

Potter Flo. Co 129 

ELYRIA. 0. 

Hecock Fl. Co 123 

ENID. Okla. 

Knld Floral Co 110 

ERIE, Pa. 

Layer. J, V 129 

Offerle, Cha.s. G 129 

EUGENE, Or*. 
University Florist . . 1 25 
EUREKA SPGS., Ark. 

Poor. C. 1 120 

EVANSTON, IM. 

Welland. John 119 

Wittbold & Son.118-119 
EVANSVILLE, Ind. 
NIednagel. Jullua. . . 120 
EXCELSIOR SP8.. Mo. 
Excelsior Gmh3os..ll3 
FAIRFIELD, la. 
Montgomery Gnh.ies.132 
FAIRMONT. W. Va. 
Weber & Sons Co. 114 
FALL RIVER. Man. 

Warburton 108 

FARGO. N. D. 

Shotwell Fl. Co 117 

Smedley Fl. Co. ...117 
FAYETTEVILLE.N.C. 
Fallon Co., J. J... 131 
FLINT. Mlah. 

Hasselbrins Flo 116 

FORT COLLINS. Colo. 
Espelln Flo. Co 124 



City Par*. 

FORT SMITH. Ark. 

Quality Fl. Store.. 120 

Rye, George 120 

FORT WAYNE. Ind. 
Veeey's 120 

FORT WORTH, Tex. 

Baker Bros. 129 

FRANKFORT, Ky. 

Power FL Shop 115 

FREEPORT, III. 

Bauscher Bro* 117 

Freeport Flo. Co 117 

FREMONT, 0. 

Horn Fl. Co 122 

FULTON, Ky. 
Rucker's Fl, Shop.. lit 

GALESBUR6. III. 

Dmry, H. F 117 

Plllsbury, I, L 117 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 
Goldsboro Flo, Co,. 131 
GOSHEN, Ind. 
Colonial Flo, Shop. 120 
GRAND FORKS. N.D. 

Grand Forks Fl 117 

McElroy's Fl. 8hop.ll7 
GRAND ISLAND. Neb. 

Williams. JM 121 

GRAND RAPIDS. Mich. 

AUersma, H. W 118 

Smith Flo. Co., H.116 
GRANVILLE. 0. 
Duerr. Chas. A 123 

GREEN BAY, Wit. 
Meier-Schroeder ... 114 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 

Van Lindley Co.... 131 

GREENVILLE, Mist. 

Idle Hour Flo. Co.. 117 
GREENVILLE. N. C. 
Greenville Fl. Co.. 131 
GREENVILLE, Tex. 
Adklsson. Wise ...129 
GRINNELL, la. 

Dittmer 132 

HAGERSTOWN, Md. 

Bester A Sons II6 

HAMILTON, OnL 

Connon Co 121 

HANNIBAL. Mo. 

LeaRue 112 

HARTFORD. Conn. 
Brodrib, J. Albert.. 109 

Coombs, John 199 

Lane. Geo. F 109 

Welch's Fl. Shop. .109 
HATTIESBURG. Mist. 

Stemme ft Sons 117 

HELENA. Ark. 

Ball Floral Co 120 

HELENA, Mont 

State Nurs. Co 118 

HIAWATHA. Kan. 

Martrar*. Susan 122 

HIGHLAND PARK.III. 
Highl'd Pk. Omhaet.119 
HILLSBORO. Tex. 
Wood Floral Co... 129 
HILLSDALE. MIth. 

Stall, O. A lie 

HOBOKEN, N. J. 

GruUch & Sons 110 

HOLLYWOOD, CaL 
Hahn. Paul, Co. ... 95 
Hollywood Fl, Shop. 126 
HONOLULU. H. I. 

Straus 105 

HORNELL. N. Y. 

James & Son Ill 

Wettlin Floral Co. .110 



City Pan 

HOT SPRINGS. Ark. 

Flower Shop 120 

HOUSTON. Tex. 

Kerr, B. C 129 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. 

Archer's Flo. .Shop.114 
McClure-Coffman ..114 

HUTCHINSON. Kan. 

Smith's Flower Shopl22 

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. 
Bertermann Bros... 120 

WIe«ands Sons Co.l20 

■RONTON. 0. 
Reliance Seed Co. ..12B 

JACKSON, Mieh. 

Blesalng, J, B 116 

Pumival & Son 116 

JACKSON. Mitt. 
Capitol Floral Co.. 117 

JACKSON, Tenn. 

Jackson Cut Flo,,. 131 
JACKSONVILLE. Fla. 
Mills the Florist.., 132 
JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 
I.akevlew Rose Gar, 111 
JOLIET. III. 
Joliet Floral Co 117 

JOPLIN, Me. 

American Fl. .Shop. 112 

KALAMAZOO. MIeh. 
Van Bochove ft Bro. 116 
KANKAKEE, IM. 

Faber. Geo .^,.118 

Shafer Fl. Co 118 

KANSAS CITY. Kan. 
Moseley, Mrs. T. A.113 

KANSAS CITY. Mo. 

Akln's Floral Co.. .113 
Alpha Fir. Co. .112-113 

Austin. J 112 

Barnes, W. J 112 

• ^handler's Firs..., 112 
Midland Fl. Shop. 113 
Muehlebach Fl, Sh.ll2 

.Murray. .1. E 112 

Murray. Saml. .103-112 
Newell. A. ...102-112 
OConnell Fl. Shop.113 
Rock Flower Co... 112 
KENOSHA, WItw 
OberUn, P, N 114 

KNOXVILLE. Tenn. 

Crouch. Chas. W. ..131 

KOKOMO. Ind. 

Coiet" Fir. Shop,.. 120 

LA CROSSE. Wit. 

La Crowe Flo. Co,. 114 

Saber's Floral GdD.114 

LAKELAND, Fla. 

Westmoreland Gdns 132 
LANCASTER, Pa. 
Barr & Co., B. F. .129 
LANSING, Mieh. 

Bisainger. J. A 116 

LEAVENWORTH, Kn. 
Leavenworth FL Co. 122 
LEBANON, Pa. 

Vavrous Sons 129 

LEXINGTON, Ky. 
Honaker the Florist. 115 

KeUer Co.. J. A 118 

LIMA, 0. 

Zetlltt. Eggert N.. 122 

LINCOLN. Neb, 

Chapin Bros 121 

PCiche Floral Oo 121 

Frey, C. H 121 

Frey & Frey 121 



City Pag* 
LITTLE ROCK. Art. 
Tipton ft Hurst 120 

LIVERPOOL. Eng. 
Dlngleys. Ltd 101 

LOOANSPORT. Ind. 
PoFBhlng. E. H.„..120 

LONDON. Ont.. Can. 
Gammage ft Sons... 121 

LONG BEACH, Cal. 

Art Florist 126 

Lowe's Fir. Shop.9S-0a 
Patrick Fl. Co. . . . 

98-99-126 

LORAIN, 0. 

Carek, F. G 122 

Hecock Floral Co.. 123 
LOS ANGELES. Cal. 
Alexandria First. .98-99 
Athletic Club Flo... 126 
Raieman, H.. Inc. . 

98-99-126 

Broadway Flo 

98-99-1 2« 

Darilngs Fl. Shop, 

98-99-12B 

Howard. P J 98-99 

Howard & Smith.. 

98-99-126 

Lichtenberg's 

98-99-126 

Purdie & Co. ...98-99 
Redonilo PI. Co... 

98-99-126 

Saake. (). C. . . . 126 

Wolfskin's & Gold- 

ensnn 98-99 

Wright's Flo. Shop. 

96-98-99 

LOUISIANA. Mo. 

Seibert, L M 112 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. 

Fuchs. Henry 115 

Marret ft Miller 115 

Reimera ft Son Co.. lit 
Schulz Co., Jacob, ,11s 
LOWELL, Mast. 

Morse & Reals lOS 

LYNCHBURG, Va. 

Fallon Co., J. J 115 

McCarron, Miss. ... 115 

LYNN, Maw. 

Gibbs Bros 108 

MACON, Ga. 

Iille Hour Nurs... 130 
MADISON, Wit. 
Bentschler Fl. Co.. 114 
MALDEN, Mau. 

Walsh & Son. .T. . .108 

MANCHESTER. Ent. 

Dlngleys. Ltd . . . .10.1 
MANCHESTER. N. H. 

Stache. H. C 109 

MANHATTAN. Kan. 

Martina, The 122 

MANITOWOC Wit. 

Madson Seed Q> 114 

MANKATO, Minn. 
Mankato Flo. Co. ..124 

Nellseti. Nell 124 

Wlndralller Co 124 

MARIETTA, 0. 

Dudley & Son 114 

Klger, N 123 

MARION, Ind. 
Marion Floral Co.. 120 
MARION. 0. 

Blake** 131 

MeALESTER. Okla. 

Weaver, Wm 110 

MEDINA. N. Y. 
White Bros 112 



..-r-^--- ^.v^-_w ^.■,,...«,^.|^i^^-ijj^--yBp.^T.-^^-^^- .- '■t^.-i^.-sf jii^i vf ij? y/'-^.'^TT^- 



"'wy 



' ■'" ^W-'v?'^ ■ ''^^'^'t^ ■ * 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1»22 






The flortoto whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders^ 
"■ "~ from other florists lor local delivery on the usual basis. 

Index by Towns of Florists Represented in the Pink Part 



MELROSE. Mast. 

Ca-sey Fluii^t C.i. . . Kis 

MEMPHIS. Tenn. 

FlOWlT SlKip. Tlii..i:il 
Idlewlld (inilisi'S. . l.fl 
.)(iliiisiin (iriihsfs. . .i:u 

MEXIA. T«xaa 

Mexla Fl. Co \.i:i 

MILWAUKEE. Wll. 

Baumgarten 114 

Ourrle. A. A Co.. .114 

Fox'i. Inc 114 

Olmbel's 114 

LubUnsr 114 

Panteln. Hamr 1 14 

Bcmler-LeldlKer Co. 114 

Welke Co.. E 114 

MINNEAPOLIS. Minn 

Adams 124 

Andrews. Flortst...l24 

Mazey 124 

Swanion's, Inc 124 

MINOT, N. D. 

Valker'8 Floral Co. 117 
MISSOULA. MonL 

liariipM City Fl. Co.US 

MITCHELL. S. D. . 

Dathlefs. Wm IIT 

Gumey Gmhso. Co.llT 

MOBILE. Ala. 

CcMMllirad Kl. Co.i:;" 
Mlngc Floral Co ..''<il 
KaviiT A: Sons I'W 

MOLINE. III. 

Knees & Sons 118 

MONROVIA. Cal. 

UruilgiT, I'. A 1-0 

MONTCLAIR. N. J. 

Mas.siiiMUii Florist . .110 

MONTGSMERY. Ate. 

Roseiiioril Canlens. .i;;o 

' MONTREAL. C«n. 
Ball & Robinson.. 121 

Lry Ac .McAlU-ll . . .. IJl 
HcKenna. Ltd. ... 1:11 
MT. PLEASANT MIeh. 
Caple. Walter W...1U 
NASHVILLE. Tan*. 

deny Kr(»^ 1 -'1 

.loy FloiiU Co i:U 

NEWARK. N. J. 

I'liiliits Hro- 11(1 

NEWARK. 0. 

Duerr, Cbas. A 123 

Kent Bros 118 

Perry's Fl. Shoppe.lU 
NEW HAMPTSN. la. 

Di'al, S. L Hi:; 

NEW KENSINGTON. 
Pa. 

i;ii.ii;i' r.n.- IJli 

.McHai'-.l.hlun-ni, . . \\iM 
NEW ORLEANS. La. 

Am'Iiiic Floral ( .. l.'M 

Klilf. Clias l:;i) 

Flowci .siio|: i:iO 

Mi'lairii' Ki.lif'- Viir l.id 

Ki-yi's A: Co Kill 

Sclli-iinik. Mav . . Kill 
Virifin I .1 i;i(i 



City Page 

NEW YORK CITV 

HoHtoi] Florist .... I II 
liuiiyaril. A. T....111 

Burns, II. 11 HI 

Clarke's Sons Ill 

Darils Ill 

Fonlliaiii Florist. . .111 
(Jalviii, Inc., T. F. 

97-lOS 

Kottnilller, A Ill 

Malandre Bros Ill 

I'ark Florist Ill 

Kaniin's Kir, Shop, 111 

SchlliiK, Max 97 

Htunipp, (i. K. XI,. 105 

NILE8. MIeh. 

Hansen N. A: F. Co. 11(1 

Kedline Co lis 

NORFOI K. Neb. 
Norfolk Flo. Co.... 121 
NORFOLK. Va. 
(iforgi'. Inc ll.j 

OAKLAND. CaL 

Clarke Bros 128 

Hogan & Evers 127 

Tliorsted Fl. Co 127 

OAKLAND. Md. 

Wi'hcr «i Sons Co, ,111 

OAK PARK. III. 

Avenue Fir. Sbo[>..118 

Madison St. Fl 118 

Schneider, A. H 118 

OGDEN. Utah 

ArtlsUc Fl. ,Oo 127 

Duink.- Fl. Co 127 

OKLAHOMA CITY. 
Okla. 

Furrow A: Co 110 

OKMULGEE. Okla. 

.Marshall, C. \V 110 

OLEAN. N. Y. 

llerron, Dana H, .110 
OpiH'nlU'ini, .Manut'l.llo 

OMAHA. Nab. 

Hath. John 11 121 

Flatiron Kir, Shop, 121 
He.ss & Swoboda, . .121 

I>arnion, Lee L 121 

Rogers. Louis M 121 

ORLANDO. Fla. 
Violet Dell Florist, 132 

OTTAWA. Can. 

Scrim's Florist 121 

OTTAWA. III. 

Lohr's Grnhses ....118 

OTTUMWA. la. 

Kranz, C 132 

OWENSBORO. Ky. 

Nsnz Floral Co 115 

OWOSSO. MIeh. 
Owosao Floral Co... IIS 

PADUCAH. Ky. 

Sehinaus Bros 115 

Van Aart. John llf 

PARKERSBURG. 
W. Va. 

Dudley A- S.in^ lit 



City Page 

PASADENA. Cal. 

Kldred Fir, Shop, ,12.") 

<>rehld Florist 

98-90-125 

Sielireelit. Jr.. H, 

A 100-12.5 

Whltford's 125 

PASSAIC. N. J. 
Seeery, P^dward ,..110 
PASS CHRISTIAN. 

Mill. 

Adanu & Sons 117 

PATERSON, N. J. 
Sceery, Edward ...110 
PEKIN, in. 

Kuhl, Geo. A 117 

PEORIA, in. 

Kuhl. Geo. A 117 

Loverldge, Chaa 119 

PETERSBURG, Va. 
Stiles, Mrs, Jlobt. B.115 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa. 

llerger's Sons, \Vm, 128 

CallahaJi. M, J 128 

Colonial Fir, Shop, 128 
Fox, Chaa, Henry,, 128 

Grakelow's 128 

Haberraehl's Sons., 128 

Hastings, F, R 128 

Hill's Fir. Shop,,, 128 

KrueBer Co 12S 

Hlilenour, V, I 128 

PHOENIX, Ariz. 
Donofrlo Flo. Co.. 120 
PINE BLUFF. Ark. 

Davis Flo. Co 120 

PITTSBURGH, Pa. 
Alpha Floral Co. ..128 

Harris Bros 128 

Hill Ai Co., 1> 12S 

Ludwlg. E. ("., Co. ,128 
Uandolph & .Mc- 

Clenients 128 

Smith & Co,. A. W.128 
Wlllianw, Mrs, E. A,12,s 

POMONA. Cal. 

Pomona Fl, Co,, 98-99 
Pooley's Fir. Shop. 127 
PONTIAC. IM. 

MUler * Son 117 

PORT ARTHUR, OnL 
WUIaoD. Herbert H.121 
PORT HURON, MIeh. 

Asman lie 

PORTLAND, Me. 
Flower Shop, TliclOS 
PORTLAND. Or*. 

Clarke Bros 125 

MarUn & Forbes... 125 
PORTSMOUTH. 0. 

Oakes, Orrln B 123 

PORTSMOUTH. Va. 

Cotton Fl, Co Il.'i 

PRESCOTT. Ariz. 
Atker's Fir. Shop.. 120 
PRINCETON, in. 
Trimble Grnhse. Co. 117 
PROVIDENCE. R. 1. 
Johnston Hros. . . . 109 
Johnston tc Co., T. 
J 109 



City Page 

PUEBLO. Cela. 

Alpha Floral Co 124 

Pueblo Flo. Co 124 

QUEBEC. Can. 

McKenna. Ltd 121 

QUINCY, III. 

Gentaman. H. A 117 

Heckenkamp 117 

RACINE, Wis. 
Obertln. P. N 114 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

Fallon, J. J i:u 

McCarron, Flo 131 

RED BANK. N. J. 

Kennedy & Sons, , ,llu 

REGINA. Saik.. Can. 
Beglna Flo. Co. ...121 

RICHMOND. Ind. 

Oause. G. B 120 

Lemon & Co.. F.H.120 

RICHMOND. Va. 

Hammond C.o 1 1."» 

Mosmlller. Florist,, llj 

ROANOKE. Va. 

Fallon. Florist . , . .11.') 
ROCHESTER. Minn. 
Bochester Orbs. Co, 121 
ROCHESTER. N. Y. 

Keller Sons, J, K. ,111 

Wlljioii. 11, E Ill 

ROCK FALLS. Ul. 

Swartiey At Sons,,, 117 

ROCKFORD. in. 
Petaiaon & Sons. B.118 
Rockford Flo. Co. ..118 
ROME, Oa. 

Flower Shop KiO 

ST. JOSEPH, Me. 

Stuppy Floral Co. ,113 

ST. LOUIS. Mo. 

Kentzen Flo. Co,.. 113 
Grinun & Gorly. . , , 113 

Hell, Paul T 113 

Mullanpliy 1!3 

Oppermann, Jr., A. 113 

Ostertag Hros 113 

Sanders Nur. ,1()B-113 

.Scha»-(Ter. J. E 113 

Waldhart Flo. Co.. 113 
Walthcr & Sons,,, 113 

Weber, Freil C 102 

Weber, F, H 113 

Wit<«k, Joseph 113 

ST. PAUL. Minn. 

Fulbruge'B 124 

Holm & Olson 1'24 

SAGINAW. Mich. 
Qoetz Sons. J. B...1K 
SALEM. Mass. 
Salem Fir. Shop. . .108 
SALINA. Kan. 
Lelgbton Flo. Co... 122 
SALT LAKE CITY, Ut. 
Lamboume. Ernest. 127 

Miller Floral Co 127 

SAN ANTONIO. Tex. 
(ireen, Edward ,..129 
SAN DIEGO. CaL 
Boyle & Darnaud,..127 



City Page 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Cal. 

Art Floral Co 127 

Brown & Kennedy.. 126 

Darbee's 127 

Jaeger A Son 127 

Joseph. B. U 127 

Navlet Co 127 

Podesta-Baldocchl. .127 
Pellcano. Bossl ft 

Co 95 

Shellgraln & Bitter. 127 

Stein. A. 127 

Suzanne Fl. Co 127 

SANTA ANA. Cal. 
.Morris 98-99- 12ti 

SANTA BARB'A. Cal. 

(J leave's Flo. .Shop. 
98-99-127 

SASKATOON. Sask. 

Victoria Nursery ... 121 

SAVANNAH. Ga. 

(>el"ehlg & Sons.,, 130 
Wolf, John 130 

8AYRE. Pa. 

Sayre Fl. Co 129 

SCHENECTADY, N. Y. 

Rosendalfl FL Shp.107 
SCRANTON. Pa. 

Heagle 129 

liesaneon & Co. ,.,129 

Clark, G, U 129 

Sehultheis 128 

SEATTLE, Wash. 

City Flo. Shop 12fi 

IlollywocKl Gardens, 12(1 
Plnehurst Fl, Shop, 121) 
Kosaia Bros 12B 

SEDALIA. Mo. 

Arehlas Fir, Co 113 

State Fair Fl, Co, .113 

SHEFFIELD, Eng. 

Artlndale & .Kon . , , 1 0.'> 

SKERIDAN. Wye. 

Sheridan Gridis*' Co. 118 

SHERMAN. Tex. 

Hainiah & Son 129 

8HREVEP0RT. La. 

Kueii, I), E 130 

SIOUX CITY, la. 

Art Fl, Shoii 132 

Hennison Co., J. C.132 
Hocklin & J.elunan.l32 

SOUTH BEND, Ind. 

Beyer Flo. Shop 120 

WiUlams. FlorUt...l20 

SPARTANBURG. 8. C. 

FrtHl's Fir. Garden, 131 
-Moss, ('has. A 131 

SPENCER, la. 

W.KKleoek Fl. Co,,i:;2 

SPOKANE. Wash. 

Burt. A. J 125 

City Floral Co 12o 

SPRINGFIELD. IIL 
Brlnkerhoff Qohaea.117 

Brown. A. 117 

Uembreiker & Cole. 117 



City Page 

SPRINGFIELD. Me. 

Springfield Seed Co, 1 13 
SPRINGFIELD. 0. 
Schneider, First... 123 
Tan Meter FL Shop. 128 
STAUNTON, Va. 

Fallon. John 11,") 

STERLING, lU. 
Swartler * Sons. ..117 
Thornton's FL Shop. 117 
STURGIS. MIeh. 
Yogi's Grnhses 116 

SUMMIT, N. J. 

May. Harry O llfi 

SUPERIOR, Wis. 

Superior Fl. Co 114 

SYRACUSE. N. Y. 

Day Co.. W, E,,,,112 
Johnston's 112 

TACOMA. Wash. 
California Florist.. 125 

TARENTUM. Pa. 

Tareiitum Fl, Co, ,128 

TERhE HAUTE. Ind. 
Cowan Bros, ft Co. 120 

Heinl ft Boos 120 

TEXARKANA. Tec 

Majestic Fl, Co I2i) 

THREE RIVERS.MIoh. 

aty Florsl Oo 116 

TITUSVILLE, Pa. 

Munlock, Wni, A,, 129 

TOLEDO, 0. 

Avery 122 

Hetz Broe 122 

Patten, Helen F,,,106 

Sudor. A. A 122 

TOPEKA. Kan. 

Hayes, James 122 

Lord's Flo. Boom.. 122 
TORONTO. Ont. 

Dunlop, John H 121 

Hlggins. J. J 121 

TRENTON. N. J. 
Rlhsani, Florist 110 

TRINIDAD. Colo. 

Park Floral Co 124 

Trinidad Fl. Store. 124 
TROY. N. Y. 
.Menand. H, LouLs.,112 
TRURO, N. S.. Can. 
Suckling & Chase. . 121 
TUCSON, Ariz. 
Burns' Flo. Shop. .120 
Langers Floral Co. .120 
TULSA. Okla. 
Boston's Flo. Store, 110 
TUPELO. Miss, 
T^ipelo Floral Co. ..117 
UNIONTOWN. Pa. 

Alpiia Florist 12S 

Stenson Ai .Mi'Grail. 129 
UPPER SANDUSKY. 
Ohio 

I'onstien. B. E 123 

UTICA, N. Y. 

Baker A: Son HI 

lllca Floral Co 111 



City Pms 

VALPARAISO. IND. 

Belnhart & Adams, 12ii 
VANCOUVER. B. a 
Brown Bros, ft Co.. 181 
VICTORIA, B. C. 
Brown's Nurseriea. .121 

Woodward. A. J 121 

WACO, Tex. 
Wolfe the Florl3t_j^l29 
WALLA WALLA. 
Wash. 

Toung ft Lester 129 

WARREN, O. 

Adsate ft Son 123 

WARREN. Pa. 
Crescent Fl. <iar...l29 
Wood's Fl. Shop. .129 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Blacklstone, Z, D..101 

Gude Bros, Co 101 

Louise Flower Sh.HU 

WATERTOWN, Wis. 

atuebe FL Co 114 

WEBB CITY, Me. 

Meiidiart, J, E llo 

WH EATON, IIL 

Mau. Otto r 118 

WHEELING. W. Va. 

Selbert, F, C lit 

WICHITA. Kan. 

Gulp ft Co.. W. H..122 

WILKINSBURG, Pa. 

"furner, Wni, M 121' 

WILKES-BARRE, Pa. 

Marvin, Ira G 128 

WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. 
Derr's Fl. Shop... 129 

Evenden Bros 129 

Eveiiden's Sons ...129 
WILMETTE. IIL 

Weiland. John 118 

WILSON. N. C. 
Starr, Florist ....131 
WINDSOR, Ont 
Uammage ft Sons. .181 
WINNIPEG, Man. 

"KlnC' Florist 121 

WINSTON-SALEM. 

N C 
Morgen'roth, W. ...131 
WORCESTER, Mass. 
Randall's Fl, Shop,los 
XENIA, 0. 

Engle Florist Co 128 

YAKIMA, Wash. 
Annavee FL Shop. .125 

State Floral Co 125 

YANKTON, S. D. 
Oumey Omhse. Co. 117 
Y0NKER8, N. Y. 

Broderlek, R, T 111) 

YOUNGSTOWN, 0. 
Central Fir. Shop.. 123 

ityan ft Culver 121 

Schmidt A: Meine. .123 

Waliher, U. C 121 

VPSILANTI, MIeh. 
Davis & Kishler, , ,llii 
ZANESVILLE. 0. 
Humphrey. C. L 122 



Member 
F. T. D. 



LOS ANGELES 



CALIFORNIA 




«' 



'7%e Leading Florist** 

HAVE YOU SEEN THEINEW WRIGHT FERN? 



WRIGHTS FLOWER SHOP 

224 W 4th St., Los Angeles 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists* Review 



97 





_The < i< Mfl«U whose cards appear on the pages carryliig this head, are prepared to fill ordera 
'■ — from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




For Mothers^ Day 

Business will be bigger than ever if we make it so. 
A decline in prices does not mean that we advise 
customers to buy less — it means that we give 
them more for the money they spend. 

Again we advise our customers (as we did last 
year) that we do not guarantee the lasting quality 
of carnations, and we urge them to purchase other 
good flowers. 



Our School for Florists 

will begin on June 26th and 
continue for five full days. 
Further information will 
gladly be given on request. 



^ 



For the many courtesies 
extended to lis during the 
Easter period, our sincere 
thanks are hereby tendered 
to our brother florists. 




|7?5 FiFTH AYE- 

• AT 60ti. ST. • 

new yoRj<.- 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiii^^ 




AMERICANS FOREMOST FLORIST 



NEW YORK 



561 5th Ave. 



Established 1847 
Incorporated 1911 






INCORPORATED 
CHARLES F. BOYLE, President 

BOSTON 

1 Park St. and 549 Boylston St. 



A HOUSE WITH A REPUTATION 

FLOWERS OF MERIT 

SERVICE 

SEVENTY-FIFTH YEAR 





The Florists^ Review 



May 4, V.>22 




The floriats whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
*"""" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. ' 

Index by Towns of Florists Represented in the Pink Part 



Cltj Pair 

MELROSE. Matt. 

CUSIV I'lull-I (■,,,, 111-. 

MEMPHIS. Ttnn. 

I'Mowi r S1l..|, TIk' . i:;i 

iciirwii.i (iihhsi.s. . . i:;i 

.lolinsori «;inli^i-*. . . ISl 

MEXIA. Texas 

.Mc.xia V\. I'll lii'.i 

MILWAUKEE, Wit. 

Baumsarten 114 

Cunie. A. & Co... 114 

B'ox't. Inc 114 

Olmbel'g 114 

LubUner 114 

Psrstein, Harry 1 14 

Semler-Leldlger Co. 114 

Welke Co.. E 114 

MINNEAPOLIS. Minn 

Adams 124 

Andrews. Florist. . .124 

Mazey 124 

Swanson's, Inc 124 

MINOT, N. D. 

Valker'8 Floral Co. 117 
MISSOULA, Mont. 

CllKilM CilV Fl I'll, 11^ 

MITCHELL. 8. D. , 

Dothlefs. Win IIT 

(Jumey Gmhse. Co. 117 

MOBILE. Ala. 

ClM.lllllM.l Fl. Cu.lMl 

Minni- Floral I'd, . . liii 

Havji'i \ Si.iis i:;» 

MOLINE. III. 

Knees & Sons 118 

MONROVIA. Cal. 
Uiiiiiin'r. * ' .^ .1 -•' 
MONTCLAIR. N. J. 
Massriiai.ii F!i.ri-t I Hi 
MONTGtMERY. Ala. 
H.iscTiiDlit <;aMli-li^ . '.:" 
MONTREAL, C«n. 
Hall & Robinson. .121 

1..-V \ M.'.MIrli. , . . IJl 

McKenna. Ltd. . . . llil 
MT. PLEASANT MIeh. 
Caple. Walter W. ..11» 
NASHVILLE. Tann. 

Ci'iiv l'.io~ '■:! 

.l.i> Kli.ial r,. !■;] 

NEWARK. N. J. 

I'hilil.^ I!li.- llll 

NEWARK, 0. 

Duerr. Cbas. A.... 123 

Kent Bros 12S 

Peny'a Fl. Sboppe.l2S 
NEW HAMPTaN. la. 

ii.'ui. .-; i- i.v: 

NEW KENSINGTON. 
Pa. 

Ilc.r^,- I'.i..- I. "I 

.McU.ir . I. 1, Kllj~.il, . . IJI 

NEW ORLEANS. La. 

.\\.'i.iii' Fii.iai I .. i:;ii 

i;!il.', Clia- l:;ii 

FidHci .-^lioi i:;ii 

Mrtaiii.' Hiilt:.- Viir. i:;ii 

Ui'Vc.>; <t Cii nil 

S.-lii4iiiik, Mav . .i:iii 
\iiKiii 1 .1 l:;ii 



City Pace 

NEW YORK CITV 

l!(i<t(iii FluM.I .111 

liuiivaul, .\. ■!'. ..Ml 

lillin>, 11. II 11 ! 

Claiki.'.-. .Sons Ill 

l>aiils Ill 

Korillmni Klnrlst. ..Ill 
(ialvin. Inc., T. K 

1I7-1"S 

KuttniilliT. A Ill 

Malaiiiliv Ilnis Ill 

I'ark Fliiiisi m 

UainnrN Fir. Slioii.lll 

SchliiiK. Max 117 

Stuini)|>. (;. K M. . l(i.-i 

NILES. MIeh. 

llalisi'ii N. A: F. Co. 111! 

Kedline Co 116 

NORFOI K. Neb. 
Norfolk Flo. Co. ...121 

NORFOLK. Va. 

(IfoiKf. Inc 1 l."j 

OAKLAND. Cal. 

Clarke Bros 12i 

Hogan & Evers 127 

Thorsted Fl. Co 127 

OAKLAND. Md. 

Wclicr At .•<uii-. ('....Ill 

OAK PARK. III. 

Avenue Fir. Shop.. 118 

.Madison St. Fl 118 

Schnflder, A. H 118 

OGDEN. Utah 

Artistic Fl. .Co 127 

Dlinikc Fl. Co 127 

OKLAHOMA CITY, 
Okia. 

Fiiri.iu ,V Co 1 in 

OKMULGEE. Okla. 

.Marsliall. (J. \V llii 

OLEAN, N. Y. 

Ilcrnin. Dana 1(...110 
()|i|icnli.iiii. -Manuel. 110 

OMAHA, Neb. 

liatli. .lohn II 121 

Flatiroii Fir. Sliop. 121 
Hi'A.s *i ."^Holjoda. . .121 

Lariiioii. Ijco 1j 121 

Kogers. Louis .M 121 

ORLANDO. Fla. 

Viulcl Dell Floret. i;:2 

OTTAWA, Can. 

Scrim's Florist 121 

OTTAWA. III. 

Lohr's (iriihses ....118 

OTTUMWA, la. 

Kiaiiz. C 132 

OWENSBORO. Ky. 

Naiiz Floral Co 115 

OWOSSO. Mich. 
Owosso Floral Co... 118 

PADUCAH. Ky. 

Schmaus Broa 115 

Van Aart. John IIS 

PARKERSBURG. 
W. Va. 

Du.|lv\ .V Smii, .III 



city Pane 

PASADENA, Cal. 

Klihcil Fir. Sliop. .12.". 

t'rcliid Florist 

HS-il!)-12.'i 

Sii'lirt'clil. .Ir., II. 

A 100-12.-. 

Whllford's 12.-, 

PASSAIC. N. J. 
.Scccry. KdwanI ...110 
PASS CHRISTIAN, 

Milt. 

Adains & Sons 117 

PATERSON, N. J. 
Scwry, Kilwaiil ...110 
PEKIN. in. 

Kuhl. Geo. A 117 

PEORIA, IM. 

Kuhl. Geo. A 117 

Loveridge, Cha» 119 

PETERSBURG, Va. 
Stiles. .Mr-s. Iloht. Ii.U.-i 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa. 

ItciKcr's Sons. \\*in.l2.s 

Callahan, .M, .1 12s 

Colonial Fir. Sliop.l2.S 
Fox. Clias. Ilcno'. .12S 

(Jraki'low's 12s 

llat.cnnchl'.s Sons. .12S 

llasthiKs. F. It 12S 

Mills Fir. Slioi)...12S 

Ki'uct,'('i- Co 12s 

Hiilcnour. V. I . . . .12s 
PHOENIX, Ariz. 
Donofrlo Flo. Co.. 120 
PINE BLUFF. Ark. 
Davis Flo. Co 120 

PITTSBURGH. Pa. 

.Ml>lia Floral Co...l2S 

Harris Uros 12S 

Hill A: Co.. I) 12S 

UiilwlK, K. ('., Co. ,12s 
Kanilnlnli .!k: .Mc- 

Clcnicnts lii.S 

.Smith \- Co.. A. \V.12S 
Williams. .Mrs. K. A.12S 
POMONA. Cal. 
Pomona Fl. Co. .OS -119 
Pooley'a Fir. Shop. 127 
PONTIAC. III. 

MUler & Son 117 

PORT ARTHUR. OnL 
Wlllaon. Herbert H.121 
PORT HURON. Mich. 

Asman 116 

PORTLAND, Me. 
Flower Shop, The. .lo.s 

PORTLAND. Ore. 

Clarke Bros 12!> 

Martin & Forbes... 125 
PORTSMOUTH, 0. 

Oakes, Orrin B 123 

PORTSMOUTH, Va. 

Cotton Fl. Co 1 1". 

PRE8C0TT, Arij. 
Acker'i Fir. Shop.. 120 
PRINCETON. IIL 
Trimble Grnhie. Co. 117 
PROVIDENCE. R. I. 

.lohnsn.n Itros Hi'.) 

Johnston tc Co.. T. 

.1 mil 



city Page 

PUEBLO. Colo. 

Alpha Floral Co 124 

I'ueblo Flo. Co 121 

QUEBEC. Can. 
McKenna. Ltd 121 

QUINCY, III. 

Genteman. H. A 117 

Heckenkamp 117 

RACINE, Wit. 
Obertln. P. N 114 

RALEIGH. N. C. 

Fallon, .1. .1 I.'.l 

iMcCarl-on, Flo Kit 

RED BANK, N. J. 

Kcnneily & Sons. . . llll 

REGINA. Satk., Can. 
Reglna Flo. Co. ...121 
RICHMOND, Ind. 

Cause. G. R 120 

Lemon & Co.. F.H.120 
RICHMOND. Va. 

Ilammoinl Co 1 1'. 

.Mo.smiller. Florist. . 11.-. 

ROANOKE. Va. 

Fallon. Florist . . . . U.". 
ROCHESTER, Minn. 
Rochester Grhs. Co. 124- 
ROCHESTER. N. Y. 

Keller .Sons, .1. H. . 11 1 
Wilson. 11. K Ill 

ROCK FALLS, III. 

SHarlle.v Ai Sons... 117 

ROCKFORD, IM. 

Peteiaon & Sons. S.118 
Rockford Flo. Co. ..118 

ROME. Ga. 

Flower Shoii i:iO 

ST. JOSEPH. Me. 

Stn|)py Floral Co.. lilt 

ST. LOUIS. Mo. 

lielit/.en Flo. C0...II:! 
(Jrimm A: (iorly. ...11:; 

Hell. I'alll T ll:i 

Mllllanphy l!:t 

Opiiermann. .Ir.. A.U.'^ 

OstirtaK Itros ll:i 

Sanilers Nnr. .lim-li:t 

Schaetter. .1. K 1 1:1 

Wahlhart Flo. Co..li:t 
Walther A- Sons... llii 

Weher. Freil C 1II2 

Weber. F. 11 11:! 

Wilek. .loseph ll:i 

ST. PAUL, Minn. 

Fulbruge's 124 

Uolm & Olson 124 

SAGINAW. Mich. 
Goetz Sons, J. B...116 
SALEM. Mass. 
Salem Fir. Shop. . . liis 
SALINA, Kan. 
Lelghton Flo. Co... 122 
SALT LAKE CITY. Ut. 
Laraboume. Ernest. 127 

Miller Floral Co 127 

SAN ANTONIO. Tex. 
(ireeli. Filwai.l ...1211 
SAN DIEGO. Cai. 
Boyle & Darnaud...l27 



City Page 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Cal. 

Art Floral Co 127 

Brown & Kennedy.. 126 

Darbee's 127 

Jaeger & Son 127 

Joseph. B. M 127 

Navlet Co 127 

Podesta-Baldocchl. .127 
Pellcano. Rossi ft 

Co !'.■> 

Shellgraln A Rltter.127 

Stein. A. 127 

Suzanne Fl. Co 127 

SANTA ANA. Cai. 

.Moi-ris !is-iiii-l2ii 

SANTA BARB'A. Cal. 

(;ieave's Flo. Shoii. 
IIS-:)1P-127 

SASKATOON. Satk. 

Victoria Nursery. . . 121 
SAVANNAH. Ga. 

Oel-ehiK A: Sons. . . I :tl) 
Wolf, ,lohll i:tu 

SAYRE. Pa. 

Sayre Fl. Co 1211 

SCHENECTADY, N. Y. 

Rosendale Fl. Shp.107 
SCRANTON. Pa. 

IteaKle 120 

Hesaneon A: ('<►. ... 120 

Clark, (i. It 120 

SehUltheis I2S 

SEATTLE. Wash. 

City Flo. Shop 120 

Hollywood (:aldens.l2il 
I'ineliursl Fl. Shoi*. 120 
llosaia Hi'os 120 

SEDALIA. Mo. 

Aichias Fir. Co....l!:i 
State Fair Fl. Co.. 11:! 

SHEFFIELD. Ena. 

Artlmlale «; Son. . .lir. 

SKERIOAN. Wye. 

Slioriclan Crnlise Co. lis 

SHERMAN. Tex. 

Hannah A Son 1 2!i 

SHREVEPORT. La. 

Ituch. D. K llll 

SIOUX CITY. la. 

Art Fl. Shop i:2 

Keiinison Co.. .1. C.i:t2 
itocktin A: i.elinian. i:;2 

SOUTH BEND. Ind. 

Beyer Flo. Shop 120 

Williams. Florist. ..120 

SPARTANBURG. S. C. 

Fred's Fir. Carden.l::! 
.\l..ss. Chas A....l:il 

SPENCER, la. 

W,,odco.'k Fl. Co..i:;j 

SPOKANE. Wash. 

Burt. A. J 125 

City Floral Co 125 

SPRINGFIELD. Hi. 

ISrlnkerhoff Gnluaa.117 

Brown, A. C 117 

Uembreiker & Cole. 117 



City Page 

SPRINGFIELD. Mo. 

SpriliKtield Seed Co.llH 

SPRINGFIELD. 0. 

Schneiiler, First.. .Vi:i 
Tan Meter Fl. Shop. 122 
STAUNTON. Va. 

Fallon, .lohn 11.-. 

STERLING, ML 
Swartley & Sons. ..117 
Thornton's Fl. Shop. 117 
8TURGIS, MIoh. 
Yogt's Gmhses 116 

SUMMIT, N. J. 

May. llariy O Ill) 

SUPERIOR. Wit. 

Superior Fl. Co 114 

SYRACUSE. N. Y. 

Day Co.. W K 112 

.lohnslon's 112 

TACOMA, Wath. 

California FIorUt..I25 

TARENTUM. Pa. 

Tarentiim Fl. Co. . 12S 

TERhE HAUTE. Ind. 
Cowan Bros. & Co. 120 
Helnl ft Bona 120 

TEXARKANA. Tax. 

.Majestic Fl. Co. . . .120 

THREE RIVERS.MIch. 

aty Floral Co 118 

TITUSVILLE. Pa. 

.Muidock. Will. A., 120 

TOLEDO, 0, 

Avery 122 

Metz Bros 122 

I'atteii, Helen F...IO0 

Suder. A. A 122 

TOPEKA. Kan. 

Hayes. Jamea 122 

Lord's Flo. Room.. 122 
TORONTO. Ont. 

Ounlop. John H 121 

Hlggtna. J. J 121 

TRENTON. N. J. 

Ilil.sam, Florist 110 

TRINIDAD. Colo. 

i'ark Floral Co 124 

Trinidad Fl. Store. 124 
TROY. N. Y. 
.Meiiand. II. l.onis. .112 
TRURO, N. S.. Can. 
Suckling & Chase. . 121 
TUCSON, Ariz. 
Burns' Flo. Shop. .120 
Langers Floral Co. .120 
TULSA, Okla. 
Hoslon's Flo. Store. 110 
TUPELO. Mitt. 
Tupelo Floral Co... 117 
UNIONTOWN. Pa. 

All, ha Florist 12S 

St.iison A- .McCrail. 12'.) 
UPPER SANDUSKY. 
Ohio 

ri,iisiii.ii. li !■; I;:; 

UTICA. N. Y. 

I'.aU.l A Son Ill 

Incii Floral Co 111 



City PMt 

VALPARAISO. IND. 

Uelnhart & Adains. 12ii 
VANCOUVER. B. C. 
Bronn Broe. ft Co. .121 
VICTORIA, B. C. 

Brown's Nurseries. .121 

Woodward. A. J 121 

WACO, Tex. 

Wolfe the Florl.st^l2'.i 
WALLA WALLA. 
Waah. 

Toung ft Lester 125 

WARREN. 0. 

Ad«ate ft Son 1211 

WARREN. Pa. 
Crescent Fl. <iar...l2'.i 
Wood's Fl. .Shop.. 12:. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

ISlacklstone, Z. K..1II1 
(inde liros. Co.... 10 1 
Loiiise Flower Sli.loi 

WATERTOWN. Wli. 

Stuebe Fl. Co 114 

WEBB CITY. Mo. 

.Meinhart, .1. K 11:, 

WHEATON, in. 

Mau. Otto r 118 

WHEELING. W. Va. 

Selhert. F. C Ill 

WICHITA. Kan. 

Culp ft Co.. W. H..122 

WILKINSBURG. Pa. 

'furner, Wm. .M !2:> 

WILKES-BARRE. Pa. 

Marvin. Ira G 128 

WILLIAMSPORT. Pa 
Derr's Fl. Sliop...l2j 

Kvenden itros 12'.* 

Kvctuicn'.s Sons ...12'.' 
WILMETTE. IIL 

WeUand. Jotm 11> 

WILSON. N. G. 
Starr, Floiist ....i:U 
WINDSOR. OnL 
Uammage ft Sons. .121 
WINNIPEG. Man. 

"King" Florist 121 

WINSTON-SALEM. 

N. C. 
-M.ilgelirotll, W. ...lal 
WORCESTER. Mat*. 
Kandall's Fl. Shop. 1"^ 
XENIA, 0. 

Eagle Florist Co 128 

YAKIMA, Wash. 
Aiinavee Fl. Shop. .125 

State Floral Co 125 

YANKTON, S. D. 
Oumey Omhae. Co. 117 
Y0NKER8. N. Y. 
lirodc'-ick. It. T. . . .11^1 
YOUNGSTOWN. 0. 
Central Fir. Shop.. 123 

Kyan & Culver 12S 

Schmidt A: .Meil.c.lj: 

Walther. 11. C 121 

VPSILANTI. Mieh. 
Davis A Kishier. . .1 in 
ZANE8VILLE. 0. 
Humphrey. C. L 122 



LOS ANGELES 



CALIFORNIA 




Member 
F. T. D. 



"The Leading Florist" 

HAVE YOU SEEN THEJNEW WRIGHT FERN? 



WRIGHTS FLOWER SHOP 

224 W 4th St., Los Angeles 



MAV 4, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 



97 






_The flortots whose cards appear on the pages carrying this bead, are prepared to fill orders 
from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




For Mothers^ Day 

Business will be bigger than ever if we make it so. 
A decline in prices does not mean that we advise 
customers to buy less — it means that we give 
them more for the money they spend. 

Again we advise our customers (as we did last 
year) that we do not guarantee the lasting quality 
of carnations, and we urge them to purchase other 
good flowers. 



Our School for Florists 

will begin on June 26th and 
continue for five full days. 
Further information will 
gladly be given on request. 



^ 



For the many courtesies 
extended to us during the 
Easter period, our sincere 
thanks are hereby tendered 
to our brother florists. 



t^^ 




Trfi/iri'ts 

All O/ti' 7h« 

CiviliztJ WarU 

kYS? FIFTH AYE- 

1^ • AT 60tm St. • 
I -new yoRj<.- 
•?KdtNt pU\ZA 72fl- 



frmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiniiiiiiiiiii 




AMERICA'S FOREMOST FLORIST 



NEW YORK 



561 5th Ave. 



EstAblished 1847 
Incorporated 1911 






INCORPORATED 
CHARLES F. BOYLE, President 

BOSTON 

1 Park St. and 549 Boylston St. 



A HOUSE WITH A REPUTATION 

FLOWERS OF MERIT 

SERVICE 

SEVENTY-FIFTH YEAR 




98 The Florists^ Review ^^-^ *. 1922 






The flori«t« whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orden_ 
'"^"" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




AND NOW IT IS 
MOTHERS' DAY 



Our Easter F. T. D. business was 
the best on record and we have 
again to thank our many friends 
all over the United States for 
their hearty co-operation. 

Mothers' Day is one of the biggest 
flower giving occasions 

This year there will be an ample 
supply of all classes of stock. 



We ask our friends to look over the F. T. D. bulletin 
of prices before sending their orders, as this will pre- 
vent any misunderstanding as to the value of stock. 



Mat 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 




The flortoU whoce cardc appear on the pages carrying thU bead, are prepared to fill o rders, 
"■ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. ■— - - 




In Pasadena: 

The Orchid, 342 E. Colorado St. 

Member F. T. D. 

In Santa Barbara: 

Gleave's Flower Shop, 9 1 2 State St. 

Member F. T. D. 

In Pomona (Claremont and Mission Inn) 

Pomona Floral Co., 283 N. Gary St. 

In Long Beach: 

Lowe's Flower Shop 



Member F. T. D. 



Patrick Floral Co. 

Member F. T. D. 



In Los Angeles: 



Alexandria Florist, Hotel Alexandria 

Member F. T. D. 

Darling's Shop, 208 W. Sixth St. 

Member F. T. D. 

Howard, Paul J., 1 550 W. Seventh St. 

Member F. T. D. 

Howard & Smith, Ninth and Olive Sts. 

Member F. T. D. 

Lichtenberg's, 9 1 3 W. Seventh St. 

Member F. T. D. 

Herbert Bateman, Inc., 647 S. Grand Ave. 

Member F. T. D. 

Redondo Floral Co., 2 1 8 W. Seventh St. 

Member F. T. D. 

Broadway Florists, 4 1 4 S. Broadway 

Member F. T. D. 

Purdie & Co., 2 1 2 W. Fourth St. 

Member F. T. D. 

Wright's Flower Shop, 224 W. Fourth St. 

Member F. T. D. 

Wolfskin's & Morris Goldenson, 705 W. Sixth St. 

Member F. T. D. 



In Santa Ana (Orange) 

Morris the Florist 

Member F. T. D. 

In Anaheim (Fullerton) 



Howard Gates 

Member F. T. D. 



100 



The Florists^ Review 



Mav 4, 1922 





The fl orUto whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orden 
*' from other fiorists for local delivery on the usual basis. 



Your Chicago Mothers' Day Orders 




HENHX 



Service Unexcelled 



75 East Adams Street 



F. T. D. 

of course 



...CHICAGO... 



In the 
Loop 



EVANSTON BRANCH: Phone Evanston 829 



lill!l!lllllllli:illlllllllllllllllllllll!llllll 



No connection with other firms of the same name 



Telegraph orders for Mothers' Day delivery anywhere in Chicago or 

Evanston and the North Shore Suburbs will receive first-class attention 

and all orders received will be reciprocated in kind. 



m^' 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



101 




The flortoto whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
"*"■ " from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. "" 













'^, %. 



i 



'im'l^' 



«i- * f|\ 



tJ'f^Jti:., ..;<<"'"'vn 






'^■■y^^^^W^L 









•v^ *?^f- 







An Easter View in Our Store, G>mer Michigan Avenue and 31st Street. 



Mothers' Day 
Orders for Chicago 



SENT TO 



W. J. SMYTH 

"The Man Who Knows" Member F. T. D. 

3 101-3 109 Michigan Avenue 



Will be handled as wrell as they could 
be handled anywhere. Ask any Florid 
about the reliability of W. J. Smyth. 



102 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 




le^apt rtJcUvcry ^ epaam^ 



The llorUU whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
■ — from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




For 



Member 
F. T. D. 



K 



ansas 



City 




Let your orders 
go to an up-to-date 
establishment where 
modern facilities 
insure excellent 
service, and whose 
prestige is a guaraoi- 
tee of quality and 
complete satisfac- 
tion. 




Eleventh and McGee Streets 




4326 Olive Street 

ST. LOUIS 



MISSOURI 



At your service, 

MOTHERS' DAY 



....AND.... 



EVERY DAY 



Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 




SAMUEL MURRAY 

The Leading Flower Establishment of 

KANSAS CITY 

Will arrange and deliver orders for flowers, plants or 
design work for the trade in any part of the Middle 
West. All goods and service strictly first-class. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

MEMBER OF FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

SAMUEL MURRAY 



1017 Grand Avenue 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 



1 



w3Krr~;n w^JH"'"-rv^***v»'' V — rr ?'f .rW'^' 



' 'r.'y- 



104 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 




The flortoU whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
'■ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




P 



■ 



Flowers and Giving 

"Consider the lilies of 
the field." How bounti- 
fully they bloom, how 
freely and fully they give 
of their loveliness and 
sweetness. 

Brother Florists, we 
give to you our kindly 
thoughts and best wishes. 
Let us make this Spring- 
time very beautiful. "He 
that soweth bountifully, 
shall reap also bounti- 
fully." 




akw 



POURTBeNTH ♦ M JTRBTli 



»JJU»AA.»A ».«.».».«.«-«A«..ll,».»,lA»,»3 



MOTT-LY 

MUSINGS 

IftiWSHW 



"Being taken somewhat severely to 
task when I made the .issertion at a 
meeting of the Florists' Club that 
though our city is famous as a flower 
center it is less favored than many for 
the blooming of roses under glass," ob- 
served Colin Ogston, of the Kimball 
Conservatories, Kochester, N. Y., "I 
proved the correctness of the statement 
by obtaining and comparing reports 
from every chief point in America, as- 
sisted by the chart published in The 
Review." It was noted that almost 
every new variety of rose, carnation 
and chrysanthemum is grown here, 
though on a limited scale. It is inter- 
esting to test the merits and make com- 
parisons, which the grower for profit 
cannot afford to do. A record is care- 
fully kept and makes valuable read- 
ing. The originally large collection of 
orchids has simmered down to cattleyas, 
cypripediums and vandas, of which 
there are choice varieties and specimens. 
Hybridizing and propagating are slow 
work and will remain in the hands of 
the few enthusiasts who are willing 
and able to care for these aristocrats of 
the floral world. 

• • • • 

J. B. Keller Sons, Rochester, N. Y., 
plan the rebuilding of several houses 
during the coming summer. The orig- 
inal block facing the entrance has been 
removed, affording a fine frontage and 
view of the entire range. A rockery, 
built and planted by the founder of 



^ xwuwith^loweni 



Members 

of the 

F. T. D. 



Members 

of the 

F. T. D. 




GITDE BROS.Ca 

FLORISTS 
1214- F ST.N.VVL 

WASH INGTCHRlbA 



this business, is greatly admired. 
Michael Koeller mentioned it as a valu- 
able aid to their landscape branch. 

• • • • 

F. G. Lewis, Lockport, N. Y., com- 
menting upon the lateness of the season 
and the unavoidable crowding of stock, 
feels that once the weather becomes 
settled there will be a big upset among 
the gardeners in the haste to catch up. 

• • • • 

At a meeting of the Rochester Rose 
Society, of Rochester, N. Y., held the 
evening of April 27, President John 
Dunbar announced the pcrionnel of the 
committee to take charge of the rose 
show to be held sometime in June, de- 
pending on weather conditions. R. J. 
Dukelow, foreman of the park depart- 
ment greenhouses, a constant reader of 
The Review, entertained with a talk 
upon experiments made under glass dur- 
ing the winter as applied to roses. 
Among the list of contributors of prizes 
appears the name of Ilart & Vick, the 
seedsmen, who will donate a silver vase 
for the most artistically arranged bowl 

of roses. 

• • • • 

Charles White, of White Bros., Me- 
dina, N. Y., commenting upon the lim- 
ited demand for a white rose, observed 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Louise Flower Shop 

Oonnectlctit Are. at N St, N. W. > 

Miss Louise W. Dangherty, • • Proprietress 

Phones— FrankUn 3679, 3841, 3842 

Member PlorlBts' Telegrraph Delivery 



AUSTIN, TEXAS 

AUSTIN FLORAL CO., Inc. 

Flowerland, 722 Congress Ave. 

9000 feet glass. 7 acres of Qowers 
AUSTIN'S LARGEST PLACE 



that Medina, being a distinct sport 
from Sunburst, possessed its one weak- 
ness in coming in during January with 
a crooked neck. Butterfly, growing 
with Medina, enjoys the same treat- 
ment, pinched back so as to produce 
every day in the year. None is cut 
back closely at any period. The favor- 
able reports on Medina from various 
growers will be published in due time. 

Ophelia is just grand. 

• • • • 

Terrence Gilbert, Auburn, N. Y., is 

well pleased with the continuation of 



'■XJ*^ 



Mai 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



105 







The fl orUts whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
"*" """ from other florists for local delivery en the usual basis. "" ■ 




FOREIGN SECTION 



TABLE US YOUB ORDERS FOR 

ENGLAND 

With fifteen Important shops in grood centers, we are 
the lanrest florists in Ensland and better equipped 
than anyone else to carry oat cable orders. 

DINGLEYS. Lta. 

HeadOffloe: CambridKe St.. MANCHESTER 

LIVERPOOL Branch, 2 Parker St. 



SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 
WILLIAM ARTINDALE & SON 

FLORISTS SEEDSMEN NURSERYMEN 

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM 

Mr D i^I rr C The Leading FLORIST 
. r KVJU i C>, 20 Roe des Colonies 
Prompt service anywhere In Belarinni, Holland, Germany 

Amsterdam, Holland 

C. THIM, Florist v. Baerlestraat 56 

HONOLULU, H. I. 

Tyg* STRAUS FLOWERS 

liberal patronage, the result of being 
able to hold the good will earned by 
the former owner and increase the vol- 
ume. 

• * * * 

Valentine Gatz, Albion, N. Y., com- 
mented upon the unfair method of a 
grower who opens a store and sells for 
retail at practically wholesale prices. 
It surely does not create larger busi- 
ness and it cuts legitimate profits. A 
fine line of bedding plants is ready for 
Mothers' day, which is expected to be 
a second Easter. Some superfine lilies 
were noted here. 

• * * * 

"It might have been worse," ob- 
served Manuel Oppenheim, Olean, N. Y., 
referring to an accident in which the 
delivery car was smashed by a locomo- 
tive at a local crossing and in which 
the driver escaped with bruises. Moth- 
ers' day will find this company as fully 
prepared as at Easter, which was a 
success from every viewpoint. 

• • * • 

The many florists in the trade will be 
sorry to know the veteran head of 
Hicks & Son, Auburn, N. Y., is se- 
riously ill; speedy recovery is hoped 

• • • • 

Dana R. Herron, Olean, N. Y., will 
cut heavy crops of roses and carnations 

ti './**' ®"' ^*y ^^^ ^^ ^3 announcing 
''■■It fact to prospective customers. 

• • • • 

\Viniam Scott, of the William Scott 
0., Buffalo, N. Y., was potting Be- 
«oma Glory of Cincinnati into 3-inch 
pots and observed that it would not be 
long before next Christmas would roll 
•iround, in the minds of busy workers 
^yio find the daily task all-absorbing. 
-Mothers' day will find a lot of gera- 
niums and petunias, in addition to cut 
lowers. A new house, 40x150 feet, rc- 
laecs old ones that have served their 
purpose, but, as our confrere allowed, 



Too Many of Us 
Stop Ju^ Short of Starting 

There's not an ounce of power in warm water. 

Nor in hot water. 

But when it's boiling, what a difference! 

Then you have steam. 

With steam up, what can't you do? 

Which fact reminds you and me that there are 
a lot of us who have some corking good ideas 
that we start starting, and then because they 
don't start something right at the very start, we 
let them all cool down just when a little more 
heat, so to speak, would have turned them into 
steam. 

Suppose, for example, the starters of the F. T. 
D. had got cold feet just because there were a 
lot of ice water throwers I 

Right now^, suppose we all throw up our hands 
and refuse to do our part in the S. A. F. Cam- 
paign, just because there have been some things 
about it which might have been different. 
Ic got the steam up, that's sure I 
It put over Say It With Flowers. 
If we quit now, the steam will go down and all 
that money spent in getting steam up will be 
next to thrown aw^ay. 
Let's lay aside personal feelings. 
Let's be big enough to help make everybody's 
business bigger ; then ours will be bigger in spite 
of ourselves. 



New York's Favorite Flower Shop 




Phone Plaxm 8190 Fifth Avenuc at S8th Street 



time is too valuable to fritter away in 
antiquated greenhouses. 
* • * • 
W. C. Ehniann, Corfu, N. Y., is 
building a fine family residence, in 
which is a pool room where the traveling 
salesman may indulge in a little relaxa- 
tion, permissible, following booking a 
nice order. A select strain of snap- 



dragons, Buddleia asiatica and chrys- 
anthemums form successive crops and 
a source of large revenue. 
* • * • 
Anderson's Flower Shop, Buffalo, 
N. Y., created a sensation by displaying 
a fine lot of tuberous-rooted begonias 
dressed and forming a sidewalk border 
to the window, which contained a won- 



The Florists' Review 



May 4. 1022 




Th e florists whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
■ -- from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 





Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 



ST. LOUIS 

Mothers' Day 
Orders 

We are ready to 
fill them with 
choice cut stock 
and plants from 
our own green- 
houses. 



END YOUR ORDER 

ANDER 

NURSERY CO. 
623 Qara Ave., ST. LOUIS, MO. 





TOLEDO 

Stock, Workmanship and Service Fir^-class 



SEND US SOME ORDERS 



FOR MOTHERS' DAY 

OR ANY OTHER TIME AND WE WILL RECIPROCATE SOON 



We have been sending out more orders than we have received 

HELEN F. PATTEN, 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 

907 MADISON AVE. TOLEDO, OHIO 



derful di.sjjluy ot' lloral baskets in every 
conceivable design and variety. 



• • • * 



W. J. Palmer, of W. J. Palmer & Son, 
Lancaster, N. Y., was making a casket 
piece composed of Bon Silene and 



Sweetheart roses and he commented 
upon the pleasure of doing the work for 
a dear old lady who lived among flow- 
ers during her life. A wreath of White 
Killarncy roses, white hyacinths and 
lavender sweet peas was another work 



of art. For Mothers' day there are fine 
crops of Ophelia, Mrs. Aaron Ward and 
Butterflj' roses, and Mrs. C. W. Ward 
and Matchless carnations. 



• • * 



Le Roy Adams, Corfu, N. Y., has plans 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



107 




The flqytoto whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill order* 
"'^ "~ from other florists for local deUvery on the usual basis. """' 




III 



Mothers' Day and every day as well 

^MiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiHiiinnmiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 



If I Knew You and You Knew Me 



s 

s 



I 

s 



1. 

If I knew you and you knew me, 
'Tis seldom we would disagree; 
But, never having yet clasped hands, 
We might, perhaps, not understand 
That each intends to do what's right. 
And treat each other "honor bright." 
How little to complain there'd be 
If 1 knew you and you knew me! 

2. 

If e'er we ship you by mistake. 

Or in your bill some error make. 

From irritation you'd be free 

If I knew you and you knew me. 

Or when the checks don't come on time. 

And customers send us nary a line. 

We'd wait without anxiety 

If I knew you and you knew me! 

3. 

Or when some goods you "fire back," 
Or make a "kick" on this or that, 
We'd take it in good part, you see. 
If I knew you and you knew me. 
With customers six thousand strong 
Occasionally things go wrong — 
Sometimes our fault, sometimes theirs — 
Forbearance would decrease all cares. 
Kind friend, how pleasant things would be 
If I knew you and you knew me! 

4. 
So let us trust, rely, confide, 
Have firm good faith on either side, 
Confidence to each other give — 
Living ourselves, let others live; 
And any time you come this way. 
That you will call, we hope and pray; 
Then face to face we each shall be 
And I'll know you and you'll know me. 

— From an "Old Scrap Book." 



§ 

a 



1 24 Tremont St. 







BOSTON 



"When You Think of Boston Think of Penn" 



iililnlllilllliilliiiiiliiliiiili. 



IPIIIHilllllllPIII'l 
lliilliiillliil 



illlliiiilHIIIiilllllllllHIlliiil 




The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



The flortots whose cards appear on the pages carryhig this head, are prepared to fill o rders^ 
"" "~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




BOSTON 

1 Park Street and 
549 Boylston Street 



74th Year 




INCORPORATED 

CHARLES F. BOYLE, President 



NEW YORK 

561 Fifth Avenue 
at 46th Street 




Worcester's 

Shop 

of 

Quality and 

Service 



Randall's Flower Shop 

22 PEARL STREET 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

Member F. T. D. 




Member 
P. T. Do 



FALL RIVER 

MASS. 
33 N. Main Street 

Orders Exeeated for 

BoDtheaBtern Uass., Newport 

and Bhode Island Points 



Brookline, Mass. 

220 Washington Street 

F. E. PALMER, Inc. 

Established 1886 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



I 



Cambridge, Mass. 

Largest Retail Conservatories near the heart 
of Boston, Deliveries in all suburbs. 

HAROLD A. RYAN. Inc. 

Opposite Mount Auburn Cenieter> 



BIDDEFORD, ME. 

NEAR PORTLAND 



@£ 



F. T. D. 




CARNATIONS 



PORTLAND, ME. 

THE FLOWER SHOP 
M. E. McGunigle C!or. Oak and Free Sta 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

ROBBINS BROS. 6;56 Massachusetts Avenue 
Near all Colleges Members F. T. D. 

MELROSE, MASS. 

The Casey Florist G). 93 Maple Street 

Nearest Dealer to New England Sanitarium 

BROCKTON, MASS. 

Belmont Flower Shop "f^l^^ 



Morse & Beals, LOWELL, MASS. 

Home' of Qyality Flowers 

Members Roristo' Telegraph Delivery Association 8 MERRIMACK SQUARE 



Boston, Massachusetts 

44 TEMPLE PLACE 
The Centrally Located Florist Shop 
Yotirs for Reciprocity We cover all points in New England 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 




BOSTON-BECKER'S 

Send us your telegrama. Prompt service IN 
and ROUNDABOUT BOSTON. Our con- 
servatories are In OambrldKe, only 8 minutes 
from the heart of Boston. 

BECKER'S CONSERVATORIES 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



for rebuilding his place, so as to enable 
the further production of the fine car- 
nations for which he is noted. 

• . • . 

David J. Scott, Corfu, N. Y., intends 
putting in a strenuous summer, fol- 
lowing a highly successful winter, by 
building a dwelling for his family. 
The family includes a junior David, who 
promises to perpetuate the name hon- 
ored in the annals of floriculture. 
. • * * 

Commenting upon a thermometer 
presented to patrons of the B, F. Myers 
Floral Co., Dansville, N. Y., Barney 
Myers observed that the mercury was 
rising — particularly noticeable since 
opening the new store downtown. 

• • • • 

The Wyckoff Floral Co., Oneonta, N, 
Y., is experiencing a busy season in 
wliieh much funeral work takes, just 
now, a leading part. In this work Mrs. 
Wyckoff is an expert. Grower James 
De Vyver commented upon the disease 
in lilies and, like many others, received 
consolation when he learned that others 
were similarly unfortunate. Otherwise, 
stock in general, he explained, was all 

one could wish, and sold well, 

• • • • 

"Larger volume, with more charges 
than usual, was the result of our holiday 
business," observed C. D. Allen, of the 
Allen-Rrownhill Co., Cortland, N. Y., 
"but we shall endeavor to reduce be- 
fore the big Mothers' day sales swell 

accounts abnormally." 

• • • * 

Stanley G. Barnes, Binghamton, N. Y., 
commenting upon the success attained in 
manipulating two stores in the same 
town, on the order of W. J. Palmer & 
Son, Buffalo, paid tribute to Cornell 
University for the assistance of two 
embryo florists during the rush. It gave 
an excellent opportunity to notice the 



BOSTON 
MASS 




HOUGHTON! GORNEY 



UNDER THE PARK StCHURCil 



BOSTON 

John J. O'Brien 
67 BEACON STREET 

AT CHARLES 

MEMBER F. T. D. 



CARBONE, Boylston Street, 

BOSTON 

Member Florists' Telegraph Deliverr Asi'n. 



i^^ 


^ERVICE 


u 


LEM FLOWER SHOP 


Essex^^ 


SATISFACTION 


County 
. North 


\ 4 North Street 


kShore 


/alem. mass. 



MALDEN, MASS. 

J. WALSH & SON 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 

Lynn, Mass. ^Tf. 

GIBBS BROS., 231-233 Union St. 



•rf 



May 4, 1922 



The Rorists^ Review 



109 





.The florto U whoM cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orJers_ 
from other florists £jr local delivery on the usual basis. 




QUALITY plus SERVICE! 

I Want Your F. T. D. Business 



in 



CINCINNATI 



To mention Flowers is to think of 



^WW^w^ W^U>s^ 



Member of / \ 

F. T. D. / \ 



138-140 EAST FOURTH STREET 



Ten-Minute Service to Covington, New^port, Bellevue and Dayton, Ky. 



Hartford, Conn. 

Since 1887 








PLEASE Address as above 

A. W. WELCH, Manager 



Hartford, Conn. 




i80 Asylum Street 



Membot 
F.T.R 



Hartford, Conn. 

J. ALBERT BRODRIB 
Store, 639 Main Street 

Deliveries to New Britain, Meriden, Hiddletown, 

Manchester, Rockville, Farmington, Willimantic 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 



BRISTOL, R. I. \ 

SAMUEL KINDER & BRO. 



EST. 
89S 



HARTFORD. CONN. 



Greenhouses: 
Benton St . 



Stores: 
741 Main St 
364 Asylum St 



Member F. T D. 

Orders solicited (or all parts ol G>nnecticut 



BURLINGTON. VT 




^ Mmtitr F. T. D. 

Orders for Vermont and Northern New York Hl'sa ta 
70ur entire satisfscUon st right prices. 



MANCHESTER, N. H. 

H, C. STACHE 



L. D. Phone 

12fil-R 



effect of a college training. A remark- 
able feature was that one student, who 
was not so highly spoken of, proved by 
far the better of the two. An observer 
suggested the wisdom of a try-out by 
any prospective student prior to entry 
at college as a test of adaptability, 
* * • • 
Glen Brundage, Endicott, N. Y., com- 
menting upon the rapid advance in his 
business, paid high tribute to his life 
partner. The latter is desirous of taking 
advantage of Max Sehling's short-term 
school in floral art. The possibilities of 
the j)rofession are exemplified here. The 
hustling owner less than a decade back 
was shaping soles. He has now erected 



BRIDGEPORr) 

CONNECTICUT i 
Certainly! 

John Reck & Son 



F. T. D. Member 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

ames Horan & Son 



J 



943 MAIN STREET 



Largest Growers in this District 
Members Florists' Tklegraph Delivery 



Providence, Rhode Island 
Johnston Brothers 

LEADING FLORISTS 
38 DORRANCE STREET 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assn. 



PROVIDENCE, R.I. 

AND ALL NEW ENGLAND POINTS 

T. J. Johnston & Co. '" '"?5JS^5^c» 



no 



The Florists^ Review 



Max 4. 1022 






The llortota whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
"""" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. _— — ' 




Red Bank, N. J. 

W. W. KENNEDY & SONS 

FLORISTS 

We are in a poeition to deliver in the following 
towns and cities in New Jersey: Red Banic, Fair Ha- 
ven, Ramson, Sea Briirlit, Highlands, Locust, Atlan- 
tic Highlands, Fort Monmootta, New Honmonth, Bel- 
ford, Leonardo, Middletown, Keyport, Keansburs, 
Holmdel, Freehold, Hatawan, Little Silver, Shrews- 
bury, Eatontown, Long Branch, Monmouth Beach, 
Ellieron, AUenhuret, Deal, Asbury Park, Ocean 
Grove, Bradley Beach, Spring Lake, Sea Girt, Manas- 
quan. Point Pleasant and Lakewood. 

Day Phone, 686; Night Phone, 689 and 1066. 

41 Broad Street 



MEMBERS 
F.TD. 



Abundantly Prepared 
AT All Times 

Edwards Floral 
Hall Company 

1716 Pacific Avenue 
Atlantic City, Newjersey 

Nurseries : Mediterranean 
and South Carolina Aves. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assn. 




ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. 

CRANE & HILL. Inc. 

Formerly Egg Harbor Flower Shop 
1311 Pacific Ave. Members F, T. D. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. 

Atlantic City Flower Shop 

1519 Pacific Avenue 

Always a big stock on hand of all kinds of flowen 
and plants. Personal attention. '<'. T. D. Member 



PATERSON \T^,,, T^v^^,, 

PASSAIC INew Jersey 

EDWARD SCEERY 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



All Middle State and Seashore 

NEW JERSEY POINTS 

and Northeastern Pennsylvania towns 
are best reached from 

TRENTON 

MARTIN C. RIBSAM, Florist 
Member F. T. D. Broad and Front Sts. 



Summit "A^^Y 0. MAY 

•^Ulllliilty PROPRIETOR 

New Jersey The Rose Shop 



MONTCLAIR, N. J. 

MASSMANN 

Member Florista' Telegraph Delivery 



HOBOKEN, N. J. 

J. GRULICH & SONS 
Members F. T. D. 616 Washington Street 



DOVER, NEW JERSEY 

148 East Blackwell Street Phone 470 

SUNNYSIDE GREENHOUSES 

We deliver to the followlnK towns: Wharton, Kenvil, 
Succasunna. Lake Hopatcong, Stanhope, Netcong, 
Rockaway, Denville, Mt. Hope, Mt. Tabor, Chester. 

ESTABLISHED TWENTY-TWO YEARS 
Member F. T. D. Have oar own glasi 



NEWARK, N. J. 

PHILIPS BROS. 

938 BROAD STREET 

Members P. T. D. 



McALESTER 

OKLAHOMA 

WM.. WEAVER 



MEMBER F. T. D. 



TULSA, OKLAHOMA 

Boston's Flower Store. 0. 0. Boston 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 



OKMULGEE, OKLA. 



GEO. W. MARSHALL 

210 W. Main St. 



MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



CHICKASHA, OKLA. 

Mrs. Stella Johnston Member F. T. D. 



a snug, model greenhouse range, the 
result of enthusiasm and plodding. 
Leaders in fine shape at Easter and for 
Mothers' day are: Carnation Matchless, 
Sweet Peas Yarrawa, Christmas Pink 
and Blue Bird, and snapdragons. 

• • • • 

The Derrick Flower Store, Oneonta, 
N. Y., reports good business, with fine 
cuts from the greenhouses at Coopers- 
town. The store is being remodeled to 
meet increasing trade. 

• • * • 

"The third generation of Frost," 
commented Adolph Frost, Cortland, N. 
Y., when his son, Dan, was admitted to 
the business recently. Time was when 
the original Frost found it hard to work 
single-handed. Now it is expansion and, 
with the infusion of younger blood, the 
possibilities are unlimited. 

• • * • 

W. E. John, Schenectady, N. Y., said 
that the entire season is a revelation. 
He looks for Mothers' day to be another 
Easter. A nice stock of blooming plants 
was noted here. W. M. 



WORCESTER, MASS. 

With the general improvement in 
business, florists in this city continue to 
look forward to a busy time Mothers' 
day and Memorial day. 

The growers have lots of stock for all 
occasions, both potted plants and other 
flowers, in variety. The cold nights pre- 
vailing are retarding outdoor growth 
somewliat. 

Herbert A. Cook & Son, Shrewsbury, 



Oklahoma City 

OKLAHOMA 

Furrow & Company 

Hembar Florists' Telesrapb Delivery. 

205 W. MAIN STREET 



ENID, OKLA. 

The Huh of the Middle Southwest 

10 Railroads for quick delivery 

ENID FLORAL CO.. Leading Florists 

Authorized Member F. T. D. for Enid 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

JAMES WEIR, Inc. 

324 Fulton St., cor. Pierrepont 

Telegraph orders receive our usual (food care 
and prompt attention. Pbones, 270-271 Main 



JOSEPH TREPEL 

Member F. T. D. 

BROOKLYN'S LARGEST FXORIST 

FIFTEEN STORES 

MAIN STORE. 334 Lewis Avenue 

Phone llEO Bedford. BROOKLYN, N. T. 

Teleeraph orders delivered to any part of New 

York City, Brooklyn and Long Island. 



Trepel & Bershaa ^'^'^It^Je^^^^ 

Bedford and Gates Avenues 

Livingston St., comer Bond Street 

Florist Dept. care of Frederick Loeser & Co. 

• BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Doing Business a Quarter of a Century. 



WETTLIN FLORAL CO. 

HORNELL, N. Y. 

For quick service to Avoca, Addison, Andover, Ark- 
port, Almond, Angelica, Bath, Coming, Cuba, Canis- 
teo, Castile, Cansarga, Cohocton, Friendship, Wells- 
ville, Wayland, Warsaw, Dansville, Alfred (Alfred 
University), Nunda and other Western N. Y. towns. 



YONKERS, N. Y. I^TS^ 

'e^AIII r. t. broderick 

14T \rC\ U 1 A UM 710 Nostrand Avs 
ilUUU n. JAnlN, BROOKLYN. N.T. 

Tel. 1962 Bedford. Will deliver to Steamahlpa. Theatera, 
uiywhere within 20 miles of New York. Arttstic work 
Personal attentfan. Spedal eat* of telegraph orden 

ELMIRA, NEW YORK 

SHEELY BROS. 

F. T. D. HUDSQN and WALNUT 



OLEAN, N. Y. 

DANA R. HERRON 



MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



OLEAN, N. Y. 

Manuel Oppenheim 



Member Florists' 
Telegraph Delivery 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



111 




The flortoto whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
~"*~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. .-— — 





WE CARRY THE HIGHEST GRADE OF CUT FLOWERS 

SEND US YOUR NEW YORK ORDERS 

ADJACENT TO THEATRICAL AND HOTEL DISTRICTS 




. . . FLORIST . . . 

426 Madison Ave. — and 49th StreCfc 

Also Vanderbilt and MCVY/ YORI^ 

Ritz-Carlton Hotels l^C-W I ^>^I\^W 

Talephone Morray Hfll 783 

Higrhett award at the International Flower Show. 

April 11, Grand Central Palace. 

f^eatioo Central. Penonal AttaDtla8c 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



C. F. BAKER & SON 

UTICA, N. Y. 

We Cover Central New York 



Members 
P. T. D. 



UTICA, N. Y. 

Utica Floral Co. 



Larfi«st and most modem floral establish- 
ment in Central New York. Send us your 
orders for Utica and vicinity. 



ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



88E.MAiN.5r 



We reach 

all 
Western 

N. Y. 

Points 



JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 

LAKEVIEW 
ROSE GARDENS 

Capable Retail Serrlca 
Fredonia, N. T 
Chaataaqaa, N. T. 
Lakewood. N. T. 



1,600,000 ft. of glass 
Mayville, N. T. -» 
Broeton, N. Y. ! 

Randolph, N. T. f 
Point, N. Y. } 



iUndolph, 
Bemai Po 



INSTANT 
SERVICE 



--T0-- 



Cauadaca, N. Y, 



Other Principal Weetem N. Y. towns. 



The Rosendale Flower Shop 
126 Jay Street 

Schenectady, N. Y. 

No order too large for us to fill, none 

too small for consideration. 

Member F. T. D. 



J. B. KELLER SONS, 
Florists 



Rochester, N. Y. 

25 CLINTON AVENUE. N. 
Member s Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

HORNELL, New York 

C G. JAMES & SON 

iPrompt Deliveries to Elmlra.Cornlnif and WellsvlUe 



BUNYARD 



413 Madison 
Avenue 



NEW YORK CITY 



Member F. T. D. 



SUMMER SEASON, Bellevue Ave., 
NEWPORT, R. I. 



David Clarke's Sons 

2139-2141 BROADWAY 

Tel. 1562, 1553 Columbus 

NEW YORK CITY 

Out-of-town orders for delivery in NewYorl' 
caref uHt and promptly filled at reasonable ratss 



NEW YORK CITY 

THE PARK FLORIST 

S. H, CALAMARAS 115 East S4th Street 

AT YOUR SERVICE 

FLORIST FOR 25 YEARS 



Mass., are building another large, mod- 
ern carnation house. 

Lange Bros., Main street, had real, 
live alligators displayed in their win- 
dow last week. Two policemen were on 
duty to keep the crowd moving, which 
was attracted by this unusual sight in a 
florist's shop. 

At present strawberry plants are 
much in demand and few are in the local 
market. E. A. 



EASTER AT PORT ALI.EGANY, PA. 

The Port Allegany Greenhouses, ac- 
cording to E. G. Ventres, the proprietor, 
had the largest Easter business ever. 
Easter week sales amounted to more 
than those in any one of ten previous 
months. There were many duplicate or- 
ders and stock to fill them at both 
wholesale and retail. The company is 
now getting ready for future business. 



ST. LOUIS. 



The Market. 

The wholesale market was strong all 
last week, with plenty of seasonable 
stock in all grades. Despite the fact 
that part of the week was cloudy, the 
demands of the retailers were heavy on 
some days, since there were plenty of 
weddings and social functions. 

In last week's consignments there was 
an abundance of roses in all varieties; 
these cleared fairly well, as usual. 
Premier, Columbia and White Killarney 
have been favorites in demand. Carna- 
tions continue of good quality, with 
the supply not so large as usual; prices 
remain stationary for choice En- 
chantress varieties. Betty Jane and 
Edna are the favorites in demand. 

Sweet peas have been plentiful and 
are of fine quality, but toward the latter 




DARDS 

341 Madison Ave. 
Opp. Hotel Biltmore 

New York 



Fifty Years' Exacting 
Fulfillment 



RAMM'S "-^^^'^ 



SHOP 



In the XT 
Heart of INCW 



V^ J, 412 Madison 

lork Av 



Prompt and Elfficient Service 



Avenue 

Member F. T. D. 



THE BOSTON FLORIST 

Personal scloction. Satisfaction euaraiitcccl. 

In the lioart of New York City. 

Close to Theaters anil Steamships 

Kstabllshed liWi 

135 E. 34th St., NEW YORK 



NEW YORK 



Order* 

Sent to 



H.H.BURNS 



609 
Madison Av. 



will receive prompt and carefal attention. 
LONG ISLAND JERSEY CITY 

BROOKLYN NEWARK 



BRONX,NewYorkGty 
FORDHAM FLORIST 

421 E. FORDHAM ROAD 




The Florists^ Review 



Max 4, 1922 






The flori«t« whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
" "~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. -^ 




•^ 




uffalo 

NEW YORK 

F.T.D. MEMBERS 



>»m^l^li»iJlV?^liSillVS^OLV»v 



Wm. H. Grever 

77 and 79 Allen Street 

Kramer the Florist 

1291 Jefferson Street 

Lehde & Galley 

2 1 65 Seneca Street 

W. J. Palmer & Son 

304 Main Street 

Scott the Rorist 

Main euid Balcom Streets 

Charles Sandiford 

2692 Main Street 

Felton's Flower Shop 

1388 Main Street 

W. H. Slevers 

330 Genesee Street 

S. A. Anderson 

440 Main Street 

Colonial Flower Shop 

230 Delaware Avenue 




Albany, New York 




23 STEUBEN 
STREET 

Best Service. 



^*^*5**™15 orders to ua. 



Members Florlata' Telegrapb Delivery Ass'n. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

JOHNSTON'S 

SYRACUSE'S FINEST FLOWER SHOP 

IMMEDIATE MESSENGER SERVICE 
Syracuse and Vicinity 

WASHINGTON and WARREN STREETS 



For SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Onondaga Hotel Bids. 
F. T. D. 



W. E. Day Co., 



THE CAPITAL DISTRICT 
and all Eastern New York 



ALBANY, N. Y 

WM. GLOECKNER 

WE GUARANTEE ABSOLUTE SATISFACTION 
Member of Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 



MEDINA, N.Y., White Bros. 



Members 
F. T. B. 



Orders for Western New York 
handled with promptness. 



TROY. N. Y. 



MEMBER 
F. T. D. 
33 Fourth St. H. LOUIS MENAND 



Hannibal, Mo., jtv^L 

Cut Flowers, Decorative and Bedding Planu 
FLORAL WORK A SPEO^^LTr 



Louisiana, Mo. L M. SEIBERT 

Motor Delivery, 



Pike Co., Mo. 
Pike Co., III. 



mm 



COLUMBIA, MO, 

COLUMBIA FLORAL CO. 
Halfway between St, Louis and Kansas City. 

l^^l* IV^^ AMERICAN 
JOplm, Mo. FLORAL SHOP 

J. £. MEINHART, Prop.. 216 W. 4th St. 

part of last week they became scarce 
and inferior in quality. 

Some fine early gladioli and peonies 
were among the consignments; these 
liad an excellent demand, with good 
l^rices. 

Dutch bulbous flowers from indoors 
are practically over, but outdoor bulb- 
ous stock has been heavy. The demand 
has not been large enough to consume 
the daily consignments. Yellow mar- 
guerites are in heavy supply, with lit- 
tle value. 

The supply of callas and Easter lilies 
is in keeping with the demand, while 
daily the market is full of miscellaneous 



KANSAS 
CITY 



F.T.D. 



MISSOURI 






! 



J. E. Murray 
and Co. 

217 East 10th St 

A Newell 

11th and McGee 

William L Rock 
Flower Co. 

1 1 06 Grand Ave. 

Alpha Floral Co. 

1105 Walnut St. 

Joseph Austin 

3111 Troost Ave. 

W. J. Barnes 

38th and Euclid 

Chandler's 
Flowers 

4700 Ward Parkway 

Muehlebach 
I Flower Shop 

I 1208 Baltimore 

I Samuel Murray 

i 1017 Grand Ave. 



a 






i 



7/ V}-- 



MAT 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



\ 



113 







The fl ortets whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
"* from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. — — — 




Send your F. T. D. orders for 
Mo., Kan., and Okla. to Alpha 

THEY WILL BE 
WELL TAKEN CARE OF 

(EmA 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



KANSAS 



KANSAS 
CITY . 

MRS.T. A. MOSELEY 

"Service Above Self 724 Minnesota Ave. 
MEMBER F. T. D. 



SEDALIA, MO. 

and all orders (or center o{ state given 
personal attention. Members F. T. O. 



ARCHIAS FLORAL CO. 



SEDALIA, MISSOURI 

C. . "You will not I 

State Fair PI 



Florists 
Telegraph Delivery 



ITou will not stammer 

if yo u say it with our 
flowers" 



STUPPY FLORAL CQ 

Orders Executed 
Missouri, Iowa, Kaosas and Nebraska 

St. Joseph, Mo. 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Aldn's Floral Co. 1 203 Baltimore 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

O'CONNELL FLOWER SHOP 

FOR SERVICE 
M. W. COR. INDEPENDENCE AVE. AND OAK. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Midland Rower Shop, ElevTntfltreet 

Springfield Seed Co. 

SPRINGFIELD, MO. 

FLORAL DEPARTMENT OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

Member Florists' Teleirraph Delivery Association 

WEBB CITY, MO. 

J. E. Meinhart, 416 S. Pennsylvania Ave. 

CHILLICOTHE, MO. 

ISHERWOOD GREENHOUSES 

WE STRIVE TO PLEASE 



Make 



JULIUS E. SCHAEFFER 

350 North Boyle 



Your representative in 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

AND VICINITY 

We are very wonderfully located for making deliveries 
to all St. Louis, especially the very exclusive West End. 




For Flowers Worth While 


And Service with a Smile, 


Wire your orders to 


PAUL T. HEIL 


R ""d' 556 Skinker, ST. LOUIS, MO. 





ST. LOUIS, MO 

FLOWERS DELIVERED IN CITY OR STATE 
ON SHORT NOTICE 

F. H. WEBER 

Taylor Avenue and Olive Street 

Both Long Distance Phones 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assodstlao 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

GRIMM & GORLY 
Leading Downtown Florid 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 




■SEND YOUR ORDER TO 

ANDER 

623 Clara Avenue 

T. LOUI 

MEMBER F. T. D 




ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Hemb#r 

Florists' 

Telesraph 

Delivery 

Association 



4732 McPherson Avenue 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

J. M. WALTHER & SONS 

FLORISTS 3645 Iowa Avenue 

Established 1900 

We cater to those who require the best. 

Prices reasonable. Members F. T. D. 



Let OPPERMANN OT I fjl TIC 
serve you in O 1 . l-iV/UlO 

KINGSHIGHWAY. AT SHAW 



Excelsior Springs, Mo. 

EXCELSIOR GREENHOUSES 



stock, such as snapdragons, calendulas, 
daisies, irises, tulips, lilacs and pansies. 
Cape jasmines from Texas are expected 
soon. 

A good call exists for asparagus, 
smilax and fancy ferns. Blooming 
plants had a good demand all last week. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Wire your orders to 

MULLANPHY FLORISTS, Inc. 

N. W. Cor. 8th and St. Charles StreeU 

Both Long Distance Phones 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



Choice 

Seasonable 

Flowers 



ST. LOUIS 

George Waldbart Floral Co. 

Members F. T. D. 
Efficient Service-Most Centrally Located 

Carefully Executed 3 I 6 N. Qtand AvC. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 
BENTZEN 

FLORAL COMPANY 

8118 North Grand Avenue 
FACILITIES SECOND TO NONE 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

llZZr:'^. OSTERTAG BROS. 

The Largest Retail Supply House In the West, 

JEFFERSON AND WASHINGTON AVES 

Members F. T. D. 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1922 




.^^^e^florlsts whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
""*"" from other florists for local deUvery on the usual basis. "" " 




MILWAUKEE 



Member F. T. D. 



750-752 Third Street 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

HARRY PERSTEIN 

"SOME FLORIST" 
471 TWELFTH STREET 



Milwaukee, Wis. 

A. CURRIE & CO., 

130-132 Wisconsin Street 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



La Crosse, Wis. 

La Crosse Floral Co. 

Oldest F. T. D. Member 
We arrow all our flowers Gaaranteed aervlee 



La Crosse, Wis. 

Send your order for flowers for deUvery in 
this city and vicinity to 

SALZER'S FLORAL GARDENS 

QUAUTY AND SERVICE ASSURED 



SUPERIOR, WIS. 

Superior Floral Company 

1410 Tower Ave. 

FLORISTS 

TELEGRAPH ORDERS SOLICITED. 



RACINE AND KENOSHA 



OperatlDB large ereenhoase 
in both these Wisconsin cities 



P. N. OBERTIN 

Member F. T. D. 



MANITOWOC, WIS. 
THE M. G. MADSON SEED CO., 

North 8th and Commercial Streets. 

Watertown, Wis. 

404MdnSt STUEBE FLORAL CO. 

Appleton,Wis. ^'"^^Ji^; 

Junction Greenhouses 



Orders for Northern 
and Central Wisconsin 



GREEN BAY. WIS. 

M-:»> C^k.^oJo.- r^ Orders for Cnt Flowers and 
eierOCnrOeder LO. Designs delivered anywhere 
In Wisconsin and Northern Michigan at right prices. 

MADISON, WIS. 

RENTSCHLER RORAL CO. Smf 



LOOK AT YOUR MAP 

With excellent facilities at 

CHARLESTON, W. VA. 

we can give prompt delivery in many surrounding towns. 

WINTER FLORAL CO. 



MILWAUKEE 

F. T. D. 

SEMLER-LEIDIGER CO. 

419 Milwaukee Street 



MILWAUKEE 

EXCLUSIVE FLORAL 
ARRANGEMENTS 

BAUMGARTEN, Inc. 

Member F. T. D. 93 WISCONSIN ST. 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



FOX'S 



lacosroRiTED 

07-89-41 MILWAUKEE STREET 

[ember FloriaU' Telegraph DeUyery Aas'n. 



MILWAUKEE 

1-3-5 GRAND AVENUE 

GIMBELS 

A. H. MacDonald, Mgr. 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 



APPLETON,WIS: 

Growers Established 40 Yean 

Riverside Greenhouses 



It is expected that the planting season 
will open up during the present week, 
weather permitting. 

Bowlers Meet. 

The florist bowlers, who make up the 
"Say It with Flowers" bowling league, 
held a meeting April 21 at Henry Bern- 
ing's wholesale house, to distribute the 
prizes and to elect officers. President 
Ruff called the meeting to order at 8:30 
p. m. All officers and thirty other 
bowlers were present. 

The secretary announced that $188.25 
in cash prizes was ready for the win- 
ners. The Sweet Pea team was awarded 
the championship. This team won fifty- 
eight games out of ninety played. 



WEST VIRGINIA 
WESTERN MARYLAND 

The H. Weber & Sons Co. 

Fairmont, W. Va. Clarksburg, W. Va. Oakland, Md. 

Commissions Promptly Executed 

QUALITY EXCELLENCE ABILITY 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association. 



J. W. Dudley Sons Co. 

PARKERSBURG, W. VA. 
CLARKSBURG. W. VA. 
MARIETTA, OHIO 
Orders Carefully Executed 



CLARKSBURG, W. VA 

Order your flowers on any occaston 
for delivery in this section from the 
leading Florists in the State. 

HAYMAN GREENHOUSE CO. 

CLARKSBURG. W. VA. 

Bluefield, West Virginia 

THE FLOWER SHOP 

Soceesaor to Alexander Cot Flower & Plant C*. 
Member F. T. D. 

CHARLESTON, W. VA. 

Capital City Floral Co., ^"''"^"^^^"ANDER'a 

FOR ALL SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA 

^^"lo^l CHARLESTON, W.Va 

areglTen prompt and careful attention by tbe 

Charleston Cut Flower and Plant Co 



BLUEFIELD, W. VA. 

FALLON, Florid 



HUNTINGTON, W.VA. 

ARCHER'S FLOWER SHOP 
Everything in Flowers. Member F. T. D 

Huntington, W. Va. r?.1.'. 

McClure-Coffman ^"rv^TudVey sons Co 

WHEELINCW.Va. 

Also for Bellaire and U C <>PTRPRT 
Martins Ferry ^ . V^. OEalDILIX 1 

MILWAUKEE 

LUBLINER. Florist ^„,413 

UBHBER F. T. D. GRAND AVE. 



ir»^;jF'--v"r ' 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



115 







lie florists whose cards appear on the pages carrying tliis liead, are prepared to fill o rders 
**""" from otlier florists for local delivery on the usual basis. " 




Lexington, Ky. 

JOHN A. KELLER CO. 

INCORPORATED 

Main Street, Opposite Phoenix Hotel 

Service for all 

Central and Eastern Kentucky 

Member Florists' Telegraph Deliveiy Association 



RICHMOND. VIRGINIA 




115 E. Maki St. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 



Richmond, Va. 

The Hammond Company, Inc. 

LEADING FLORISTS 
109 EAST BROAD STREET 



ROANOKE, VA 

FALLON, Florid 

Uember Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 



CLIFTON FORGE, VA. 

ALLEGHANY FLORAL CO. 

Charlottesville, Va. 



W. A. Lankford's, Rorist ??^r'g.yJ"^S' 

Portsmouth, Va, 

Cotton The Florist, 333 High St 

PETERSBURG, VAo 

MRS. ROBT. B. STILES. Florid 

Phone 910 1202 W. Washington St 

LYNCHBURG, Va. 

J. J. FALLON CO. ''i°ag,ggXr 

LYNCHBURG,Va. 

MISS McCARRON lefe'^ph Eteliveo 



STAUNTON, VA. 

'"'^^Alt'^ JOHN FALLON 



NORFOLK, . VIRGINIA 

GEORGE, Inc. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Dellverr Association. 



In ISlEiJN 1 Ud\. 1 where pre^ige counts for much, 
let your cu^omers be represented by a concern whose pro- 
gressiveness is combined with the dignity of forty- six years 
of di^inguished service. 

C/sSO FOURTH AVENUE - LOUISVIOE^ 

Members F. T. D. Association 



LEXINGTON, KY. 

HONAKERJhe Florist 

Largest Cut Flower Grower in the State 

160 West Main Street 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 



Member 
F. T, D. 



Covington, Ky. 

ROBERT D. RUTTLE 
THE MADISON AVENUE FLORIST 

Prizes were as follows: Sweet Peas, 
$29; Violets, second, $23; Carnations, 
$22.50; Orchids, $21.50; Roses, $21, and 
Daisies, $18. "The Sweet Peas, Carna- 
tions and Roses divided $6 for three 
high season games. The Sweet Peas, 
Roses and Carnations divided $6 for the 
three high single games. 

The ten high average men divided 
$13.75. They were E. Niebling, O. Ruff, 
J. J. Beneke, A. Hofifmannj Jr., F. Plotz, 
F. Alves, G. Kuehner, J. J. Bentzen, 
George Berner and George Schrieffer. 

The ten liigh for single games divided 
$13.75. They were J. J. Beneke, E. 
Niebling, O. Ruff, F. Plotz, A. Hoff- 
mann, Jr., F. Alvcs, Joseph Kraycr, 
(ieorge Kuehner, J. J. Bentzen and A. J. 
Bentzen. 

The ten high for the highest three 
games divided $13.75. They were E. 
Niebling, O. Ruff, George Kuehner, .7. 
McAna, J. J. Beneke, C. A. Kuchn, F. 
Alves, A. Hoffmann, Jr., Joseph Krayer 
and F. Plotz. 

Then came the election of officers. As 
the rules read that no officer can hold 
the same oflSce the second year, the old 
officers went out of office and the fol- 
lowing were elected to serve the coming 
year: President, J. J. Bentzen; vice- 
president, Andrew Hoffmann, Sr. ; secre- 
tary, George Kuehner, and treasurer, 
A. Hoffmann, Jr. 

A motion prevailed that the tourna- 
ment for the members take place May 
1, at the Tower Grove Turner hall al- 
leys. This was to be followed by a ban- 
quet. Thirty-five cash prizes were 
offered and the same number of special 
prizes offered by members in the trade. 
The donors of special prizes were the 
guests of the bowlers at the banquet, 
with Andrew Meyer, Jr., as toastmaster. 
The committee on arrangements was 
composed of O. Ruff, J. J. Windier and 
J. J. Beneke. 

Various Notes. 

The St. Louis Florists' Club will hold 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

E. G. REIMERS & SON CO., 
800 Baxter Avenue. 



Established 1880 



Incorporated 1912 



Louisville, Ky. 

HENRY FUCHS 
670 SOUTH FOURTH STREET 

Member F. T. D. 



Louisville, Ky. 

MARKET & MILLER 

Est. 1878. Members F. T. D. 

814-822 Cherokee Road 



PADUCAH, KY. 

SCHMAUS BROS. 

100,000 feet of Glass Produces Our Supply 

F. T. D. Member 

4 2 8 BROADWAY 



Fulton, Kentucky 

Prompt^lnd Efficient Cholce FloWCrS 
Wire or Phone your orders to 

RIT^l^FR'<^ FLOWER SHOP 
IXUV^IVLilV iJ 452 LAKE STREET 



FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY 
THE POWER FLOWER SHOP 



Owensboro, Ky. 

NANZ FLORAL CO. 



Members 
r. T. D. 



AUGUSTA, KY. 



Victor H. Thomas 



Deliveries to Geor^towc 
and Ripley, Ohio 



Paducah, Ky. ilS^ 

JOHN VAN aIrT 
Oreenhouses and Retail Store Member F. T. D. 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 




3T«e florUte whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders, 
"'"*" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. " 




MICHIGAN 

ORDERS WILL BE CAREFULLY CARED 
FOR BY 

HENRY SMITH 

FLORAL CO. 



ISOOBPOBATED 



GRAND RAPIDS 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FLORIST 

Member F.T. D. 

200.000 FEET OF GLASS DEVOTED TO 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 



CHICAGO 



DETROIT 



Central Floral Co, 

"FLOWERS THAT LAST LONGER" 

35-37 Broadway, Detroit, Mich. 
132 N. State St., Chicago, 111. 

CENTRALLY LOCATED 
OPEN EVENINGS AND SUNDAYS 

Members F. T. D. 



DETROIT 

J. BREITMEYERS SONS 

1314 BROADWAY 

"Always a pleasure to keep an eye, personally, 
on any order for a brother florist." 

Philip Breltmeyer 



DETROIT 

SCRIBNER FLORAL CO., 

2740 EAST FORT STREET, 

Always at your service. 



VAN AKEN BROS. & SONS 

LEADING FLORISTS 
COLDWATER. MICH. 

ELKHART. IND. 

COVER MICHIGAN and INDIANA POINTS 

Orders promptly and carefully taken care of 

Members F. T. D. 



STURGIS, 
Mich. 

Member F.T. D. 




Coldwater 
All Mich. 

So. Mich, point 



THREE RIVERS, MICH. 
City Floral Co., Reed & Wallace 



J. B. gop:tz sons 
SAGINAW, MICH 

OR ANY CITY IN MICHIGAN 



PORT HURON, MICH. 

ASMAN. LEADING FLORIST 
Prompt Delivery 



Ann Arbor, Mich. tTi. 
BluMaize Blossom Shop 



MEMBER F. T. D. 

622 Aisquith Street 
Downtown 



GRAHAM 

BALTIMORE 

MARYLAND 

GREENHOUSES WAVERLY 



Established 40 Years 



854 W. North Ave. 



Uptown 



BALTIMORE Samuel Feast & Sons 

XATXV^X XJ_-l MEMBERS F. T. D. :: :: ESTABLISHED 1832 
AND ALL MARYLAND Charles and Pleasant Streets 




JACKSON, MICH. 

1101-1105 W. Ganson St. 

A. W. FURNIVAL & SON 

Your orders will receive our prompt and 
careful attention, upon abort notice. 



JACKSON, MICH. 

rhe oldest and only F. T. D. T D DT PCCIMP 
(tore in the heart of the city. J. O. OlJLifOOViWi 



Member 
F. T. D. 



Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Cut Flowers, Floral De- U W AT I FR^MA 
signs and PotU!d Planta **• '' • rtl^l.J-<l\w>l»lrt 

its monthly meeting May 11. The 
officers met May 4 at the home of Presi- 
dent Rowc, at Kirkwood, to arrange a 
l)rogram of unusual interest that should 
attract a large attendance. Special no- 
tices are being prepared by the secre- 
tary for this meeting. 

The Grimm-Lambach Flower Co., 
manufacturers and importers of artifi- 
cial decorative flowers, have leased new 
quarters at the northwest corner of 
Ninth street and Washington avenue. 
The present quarters, at 1110 Washing- 
ton, became too small. Eugene Grimm, 
head of the company, is a relative of 
Vincent and Frank Gorly, of Grimm & 
Gorly. 

The St. Louis County Growers' Asso- 
ciation, which has held no meeting for 
the last several months, owing to the 
bad roads leading to the Eleven Mile 
House, the club's regular meeting place, 
planned to hold a regular meeting May 
;;. At this meeting the election of 
officers was to take place. 

Last week A. Hoffmann, Sr., of the 
Waldbart Floral Co., celebrated his 
twcnty-si.xth wedding anniversary; Ed- 
ward Ciszkowski, of the Cass Avenue 
Florist, celebrated his fourth wedding 
anniversary, and Walter Young, of the 
firm of Young the Florist, celebrated 
his fifth wedding anniversary. 

Oscar May, state vice-president of 
the S. A. F. for eastern Missouri, says 
that from what he hears in his rounds 
of the trade, St. Louis will have one of 



Baltimore, Maryland 

WILLIAM J. HALUDAY 

Member F. T. D. 321 Charles St., North 



HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

HENRY A. BESTER & SONS > 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 

MARY JOHNSTON, Florist 

Nee Paterson 
221-223 W. Madison Street 
Member Florists' Tel. Delivery 



Baltimore, Md. 



OWOSSO, MICH. 

OWOSSO FLORAL CO. 

C. Marcus Anderson, Prop. Member F. T. D. 

MT. PLEASANT, MICH. 
V:^^^. Walter W. Caple 

Battle Creek, Michigan 

S. W. COGGAN. Florist. 26 B. Main St. 
Member of Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



HILLSDALE, MICH. 

Soothem r\ A CTHI I *"• T. D. 
Michigan Points \J' t\. iJlULJ^ Member 



Kalamazoo, Michigan 

G. VAN BOCHOVE & BRO. 
F. T. D. Orders Satisfactorily Filled. 



YPSILANTI. MICH. 

.•>AVIS & KISHLER, 
At your service. 102 Michigan Ave. 



LANSING, MICHIGAN 

J. A. BISSINGER fP^.^S!' 

"INCE 1894. LANSING'S LEADING FLORIST. 

MEMBERS 
F. T. D. 

Service to BUCHANAN and BERRIEN SPRINGS, MICH. 
Largest Floral Establishment in Niles. 

HANSEN NURSERY A FLORAL CO. 



NILES. MICHIGAN 



NILES, MICHIGAN 

Also service to Buchanan, Mich. 

THE REDUNE CO. ""flikE*^™ 

BATTLE CREEK, MICH. 

CARUS &. GREENS MITH 
Greenhouses: North Union and Emmet Streets 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 





The fl ori«U whoae cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
""^ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. ' — ' 




DECATUR, 

ILLINOIS 

DAUT BROS. 



P. T. D. 



120 E. Prairie St. 



JOUET FLORAL CO. 



507 ^^sr JOUET, ILL. 

All points in Will G)unty and Vicinity 



CENTRALIA, ILL. 

J\U 'DOQIQ We serve the following 
• VV. I\.V-»00 Illinois towns, direct 
train service: Mt. Vernon. Wayne City. Fair- 
field. Sesser, Christopher, Herrin. Ashley, Car- 
bondale. Nashville, Oakdale, Coulterville. 
Sparta, Salem, Odin. Sandoval, Carlyle, Patoka. 
Kinmundy, Farina. 

F, T. D. Member. 



QUINCY, ILL. 

H. A. GENTEMAN 

Uember Flerista' Telegrraph Delivery Association 

For Northeastern Missouri and 
Central-western Illinois. 



Oiiinrv 111 HECKENKAMP, m! 

KlUUU^y^ ill. Quincy's Leading Florist 
Western Illinois, Northeastern Missouri and 
Southeastern Iowa. 40.000 feet of glass. 

CENTRALIA s^o^^thern ILL. 

The Webster Greenhouses 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

GALESBURG, ILL. 

I. L. PILLSBURY-For Central 111. 
Memb er Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 

GALESBURG, ILL. 

H. F. DRURY 



Member F. T. D. 
All orders filled well 



nr l^ A T D TT I Northern Illinois 
l^I-j K/lLD, ILL. Southern Wisconsin 

J. L. JOHNSON 

Yoor o rder will receive our prompt and carefal attention 

JIXON, ILL., and NORTHERN ILL 

'•can and wUl be -^ . <rn 1 /^ 

^£^¥¥^ Dixon Floral Co, 

BRINKERHOFF GREENHOUSES 

SPRINGFIELD and CENTRAL ILLINOIS 

Member Florists' Telesraph Deliven Association 
Best and Prompt S«r»i«<> Always 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Hembreiker & Cole, ^^HiHSris'u '"*"* 

VIeratiers FlorlstB' Telegraph Deliver? Association 



SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 



217 South 
Fifth Street 



Good Service 

Backed by Large 

Greenhouses 



MEMBER F, T. D. •'^ 



FREEPORT, ILL. 

Bauscber Bros. Floral Market 

Established 1868. Incorporated 1920. 

We are the larsest growers in the northwest. 

1,000,000 square feet of glass. All orders receive 

careful attention and prompt delivery. 



FREEPORT, ILLINOIS 

THE FREEPORT FLORAL COMPANY 

Staflan & Balles, Inc. 

Tha hooaa of Quality and scrvlee. 



PRINCETON, ILL. 



W. E. TRIMBLE 
GREENHOUSE CO. 



For Central and 

Northern Illinois. 

Members F.T.D 



PEKIN- 



-PEORIA 



All Orders Receive Personal Attention 

GEO. A. KUHL, PEKIN. ILUNGIS 

Ci_ 1. Ill THORNTONS 

otreator, lu. flower shop 

^' FLORIST Quality is Our Hobby 

STERUNG and ROCK FALLS, ILL 

and VICINITY ^o\u satisfaction is our aim. 
J. A. SWARTLEY & SONS, STERUNG, ILL 

MISSISSIPPI T^T 

J. B. Adams & Sons Pass Christian 

Dekalb. Illinois 

and Vicinity dekalb flower shop 

the largest parties that ever attended 
an S. A. l'\ conveution, when the event 
occurs in Kansas City this year. Two 
strong bowling teams from the "Say It 
with Flowers" bowling league will be 
part of the party. 

J. F. Ammann, secretary of the Na- 
tional Flower Growers' Association, 
spent May 1 in Detroit, Mich., attend- 
ing to matters of the F. T. D. and S. A. 
F. publicity. 

Mrs. A. E. Eeton, member of the state 
flower committee of the Missouri 
Daughters of the American Revolution, 
called a meeting of the committee April 
17 to assemble at the Missouri Botanical 
Garden, to view the hawthorn, now in 
bloom. The hawthorn has been en- 
dorsed by them as the state flower. 

George Waldbart is still confined to 
bed at his home on West Pine boule- 
vard. The nurse forbids all visitors to 
enter the sickroom. Reports are that 
he is resting easily. 

Werner Bros., of Clayton, Mo., have 
had a successful season with roses and 
carnations. George Schmidt is their 
rose grower and Charles Roper their 



JACKSON,MISS. 

THE CAPITOL FLORAL CO. 

THIRTY YEAHS OF FLORAL PROGRESS 

Greenhouse and Retail Store 

PROMPT ATTENTION, OUR MOTTO 

Member F. T. D. Texas Bldg., E. Capitol St. 



Yankton and Mitchell, S. D. 

We grow Roses, Carnations and all seasonable 
flowers. Floral emblems that are right. Give 
us your northwest orders. 160-page catalogue. 

Gumey Greenhouse Company 

MitcheU,S.D. "-S"' 

Choice flowers and prompt service 
731 SOUTH MONTANA ST. Member F. T. D. 

Fargo, North Dakota 

SMEDLEY FLORAL CO., Inc. 
We ship to all points in the Northwest 

EstabUshad orer a quarter of a century 

Devils Lake, N. D. Minot, N. D 

VALKERS FLORAL CO. 

Largest Greenhoases in the State 

GRAND FORKS, N.D. f^^'T 

§ a^SS!^ GRAND FORKS FLORAL CO. 

Orders for North Dakota and Northern Minnesota 

GRAND FORKS, N. D. 

McELROrS FLOWER SHOP 

Order* for North Dc kota and Northern Minnesota 



CLARKSDALE, MISS. 

PAYNE'S FLOWER SHOP 



TUPELO, MISS. 

l?tTo^/le.^cg TUPELO FLORAL CO. 

MISSISSIPPI 



STEMME & SONS 



HATTIESBURQ 



GREENVILLE, MISS. 

IDLE HOUR FLORAL CO. 

L. A. WAAS. Manager Main St Extended 



PONTIAC, ILLINOIS "^^^R 



Flowers of all kinda 
in their Beason. 



W.J. MILLER & SON 



118 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 




e^e^ft=^ clivcry Sepaopla^ 



T^e^florUts whose cards appear on the pages carrylntf this head, are prepared to fill orders 
™'"~ from other florists for local deUvery on the usual basis. 




CHICAGO 

75 E. ADAMS ST. 




Branch Store 

Evanston, HI. 



Cu I r* \ r* r\ send your 
ri 1 V« A VJ V^ ORDBBS TO 







OR 1 ST 



Phone Graceland 16Z1 8336 Lincoln Avenue 



OTTAWA, ILL. 

LOHR'S GREENHOUSES 

Fancy Cut Flowers and Blooming 
Plants. 

Good R. R. Service. Orders filled promptly. 



FOR MONTANA 

STATE NURSERY & SEED CO. 

HELENA, MONT. 

200.000 SQUARE FEET OF GLASS 

At Your Service. Telegraph Orders Solicited . 



CASPER, WYOMING 
CASPER FLORAL CO- 

I We deliver to all of 

Central and Northern Wyoming 
Western Nebraska and South Dakota. 

Members F. T. D. 



BASIN, WYO. ^^ 



CUT FLOWERS 



BLOOMING PLANTS 



SHERIDAN, WYO. 

SHERIDAN GREENHOUSE CO. r 
Plants and Flowrs 

BILLINGS, MONTANA 

HOPPER'S GREENHOUSE & NURSERY 

Omsmentml Shraba and Bedding Planti, 

Cat Flowers and Desigiu. 

BILLINGS, 

MONTANA The Leading Florist 

EASTERN MONTANA •-- NORTHERN WYOMINQ 
Qnality and Sarvlea 



Billings Floral Co. 



2816 l8t Avenue N. 



^erJ'fo? Eastern and Southern Montana 
to M. LANGOHR, F. T. D. Floriit 

BOZEMAN. MONTANA. 

MISSOULA, MONT. 

GARDEN CITY FLORAL CO. 

Lakoest Growers in Western Montana 



For Quality, Service and Supreme Efficiency 



USE 



JACKSON FLORAL SHOP 

748 E. 63rd Street ISK'I''^t.T] CHICAGO 

We have the stock and want your business. We handle a large and 
complete line of choice Cut Flowers and Blooming Plants, and are 
located so that deliveries can be made in the shortest possible 
time. City and suburban auto delivery. We will reciprocate. 

Notice to out-of-town florists: Each and every order will be filled and delivered at once by 

special messenger &ame as last year. 



CHICAGO 

iuick deliveries anywhere on the South 
side or in the City's Southern Suburbs. 



STORE AND CONSERVATORIES 

7045 STONY ISLAND AVE. t( 




CARBONDALE, ILL. 



E. W. PLATER 



Southern Illinois 



Just west of 
CHICAGO. 



WHEATON, ILL., 

OTTO F. MAU 

KANKAKEE, ILL. 

Schafer Floral Company 
KANKAKEE, ILL. 

GEORGE FABER, Leading Retail Florist 
Member F. T. D. 162 S. Washington Ave. 

CAIRO, ILL. VICINITY 

^^^X Cade The Florist 

KRUG FLORAL CO. 

ALTON, 

ILLINOIS 



Branch Store 
Granite City, ILL. 



MOLINE, ILL. Mote 

n"?."- WM. H. KNEES & SONS 



U6 



carnation grower, both splendid growers 
in their classes. 

The new floral establishment known 
iis the Milbourne Floral Co., in the new 
Milhourne hotel, opened for business 
last week. A large Brecht refrigerator 
of the finest make has been installed. 

The Mullanphy Florists report an ex- 
cellent run of trade since Easter, both 
ill the store at Ninth and Grand avenue 
and in that downtown. This firm is pre- 
jiaring to handle a large Mothers' day 
business. 

Edward Harvey, official show decora- 
tor at the Washington avenue store of 
Grimm & Gorly, says that while Easter 
was the largest ever, it is a case of 
"Look out for Mothers' day." 

It is understood by the writer that all 
St. Louis members of the F. T. D. meet 
once a month and talk over matters for 
the good of the association and for the 



Flowers 

for all 

Occa0ioni 




Tel. 

Lake View 

1121 



39 1 2 North Qark St, CHICAGO 



OAK PARK 

and all western suburbs of Chicago 

A. H. SCHNEIDER 

Member 1048 Lake Street 

F. T. D. OAK PARK. ILL. 



OAK PARK, ILL. 

Madison Street Florists 

OAK PARK'S LEADING FLORISTS 

813 to 821 Madison St. 
Oak Park, Austin, River Forest and Majrwood 



op 



Oak Park, 111. nowersh 

Flowers and Plants. Gkxxl Quality Prices 

Phone 849. 8U Lake Street Reasonable 

ROCKFORD, ILL., and Vicinity 

ROCKFORD FLORAL CO. 

103 West State Street 

Prompt deliveries to ROCKFORD COLLEQK 

ROCKFORD, ILL., and Vicinity 

SWAN PETERSON & SON fi^ 

Comer E. State and Longwood Streets 

AURORA GREENHOUSE CO.. 

AURORA, ILL. 

Our Service is the Beat. 

Aurora, 111., and Vicinity 

JOS. M. SMELY PHONES 



ELGIN, ILL. 

GEORGE SOUSTER 



MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



1S8 DU PAGE 
STREET 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



119 






_The flori«t« whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
*■■"■ from other florists lor local delivery on the usual basis. — -— — 




CHICAGO— 77-79 Ea^ Madison St. 

A. LANGE, Florist Phone central 3777 




THE UNEXCELLED FACILITIES OF THE 

E. WIENHOEBER CO. 



22 B. ELM ST., 



CHICAGO 



Are BTailable to the trade la flllln^ all orders. 

UEMBEB F. T. D. 



CHICAGO 



THREE 
STORES 



PALMER HOUSE 

DRAKE HOTEL BLACKSTONE HOTEL 

Uember F. T. D. 





1924 E. 71st Sl 



Chicago 

Mnreiia made to 
any put o( the d<y 
aBo^mboiM. Dfl^ 



CHICAGO 

O'LEARY— Florist 

369 East 47th Street 
Member F. T. D. 



Send Your CHICAGO Orders to 

H. N. BRUNS 

Best Equipped Retail Store on the 
West Side 

3040 W. Madison St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



GEORGE 

FISHER & BRO. 

183 N. WABASH AVE. 

CHICAGO 



PEORIA II I 423 Main St. 

* ■L'V-'lVliij iJ-il^. Member F. T. D. 

oreI^ToIses chas. loveridgf 



CHICAGO 



2132-2134 
Michigan Avenue 

Member F. T. D. 




Orders 
^ . J Carefully 
t-xecuted 



EVANSTON, ILL., 



AND ALL THE NORTH SHORE 
SUBURBS OP CHICAGO 
HENRY WITTBOLD & SON. 75 East Adams Street. Chicago. Branch Store. Evanston. 111. 



EVANSTON, ILL. WILMETTE, ILL, 

1614 Sherman Ave. JOHN WEILAND 11«1 Wilmette Ave. 
TWO STORES Catarioc *• the bMt trade in Chle«c*'a Bieh North SbM« Saborb*. MEMBER F. T. Q 



CHICAGO 



BOH 
FLORi^ 



ANNO 



N 



FLORAL COMPANY 
Member F. T. D. 75 E. Monroe St. 



ESTABLISHED 1894 



MEMBER F. T. D. 



R. C LANGE & SON 

3339 No. Whipple St. CHICAGO, ILL. 

purpose of inducing other local retailers 
to join. J. J. B. 



The St. Louis Rose Co. has filed in- 
corporation papers with the secretary of 
.state. The incorporators arc Louis A. 
Hoerr, with 748 shares; D. S. Geddis, 
with 200 shares; Paul Hranicka, with 
fifty shares; Roland Hoerr and S. H. 
Campbell, with one share each. The 
capital stock is $100,000 and is fully 
])aid in. This firm has placed an order 
for Lord & Burnhani greenhouses, 
which, when completed, will make up 
the largest range of glass devoted en- 
tirely to roses in the state. The range 
will be located on the Burlington rail- 
road, at Larimore station. Louis A. 
Hoerr will be president of the new com- 
pany. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Tlie Market. 

There was much work accomplished 
last week among the nurserymen and 
landscape gardeners. The weather has 
been ideal and quantities of stock have 
been moved. Easter business is now 
comfortably out of the way, with Moth- 
ers' day near at hand. According to re- 
ports, stock for that day will be fairly 
plentiful. There is a good crop of 
carnations just now and some growers 
are a little bit doubtful as to whether 



FLOMUST 



GEO. WITTBOLD CO. 

Established 1867 

745 Buckingham Place n\A\Ct^CC\ 

LD.Pb«MB«ckiafkaB 1000 v-.riiv-./-vvavy 

NO BRANCH STORES 



CHICAGO 

SWANSON, The Florist 

GREENHOUSES: STOBE: 

7302 N. Western Ave. 6973 N. Clark St. 

Well located to handle North Shore orders. 

Member F. T. O. 




We cater 
to those 

who 

require 

the best. 



CHICASO 

tSTABLISHeD 
1865 

4W7 GRAND BLVD. 



Pricea 
reasonable 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

CONGRESS FLOWER SHOP 

T. C. FOGARTY. M«i. 
520 S. Michigan Ave. Congress Hotel 



Highland Park, 111. 

„ HIGHLAND PARK GREENHOUSES 
Established 1894. Members F. T, D 



The Florists^ Review 



UjiX 4. 1022 





^ ^m i **?*^** whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orden 
~*' from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




FT. WAYNE, IND. 

W. J. & M. S. Vesey 

2602 THOMPSON AVE. 

1 50,000 feet of glass devoted to fine 
Roses, Orchids cmd Carnations 

Prompt and Careful Service 

MEMBER F. T. D. 



SOUTH BEND, IND. Mianst 

WILUAMS THE FLORIST 

South Bend's Leading Florist 

Daily deliveries to St. Hary'a Academy and Notra 
Dame University. Orders filled for Northam 
Indiana and Southern Michisan. 



BEYER FLORAL SHOP 

136 N. UichlKan Street 

SOUTH BEND, INDIANA 

Daily deliveries to Notre Dame University and St. 

Mary's Academy. Also close connections with 

Miles, Berrien Sprin^^s, St. Joseph, Micli., 

New Carlisle, ilichigan City, La Porte, 

EUkhart, Goehen, Warsaw, Ind. 



TIPTON & HURST 

FLORISTS 

Litde Rock, Arkansas 

Gipital and Central Shipping Point (or Arkansas 
Members F. T. D. 



Quality Flower Store 

Large Greenhouses of our own; centrally located 

We guarantee satisfaction in service, 
Quality of flovrers, and price 

FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS 



HOT SPRINGS. ARK 

The Flower Shop 



$66 Central 
Avenue 



Nearest Florist in 
State 150 miles 



Helena, Ark. 

BALL FLORAL COMPANY 

PINE BLUFF, ARK. 

DAVIS FLORAL CO ''^^sg.^ 



GEORGE RYE, Some Horist 
THE PLAZA 
K. T. D. 



Ft. Smith, Ark. 



EL DORADO, ARK. 

ALL OCCASIONS LEACH FloWCr Shop 

Eureka Springs, Arkansas 

Northwestern Arkansas C 1. lOOR, rloHSt 

ATTICA, IND. 

**''"!™S» " Attica Floral Co. 



TUCSON—' 



AU SOUTHERN 
AIU20NA, 
NEW MEXICO and SONORA. MEXICO. 

Langers Seed & Floral Co., 

Tucson, Arizona 



Formerly 
Tucson Seed & Floral Co, 



Phoenix. ARIZONA 

Donof rio Floral Co. 

CHAS. E. MORTON, Mgr. 

Wire your orders to us for delivery in 
Arizona and New Mexico. 



DOUGLAS,AREONA 

GATUFF FLOWER SHOP 

AND NEWS AGENCY 

Flowers for all parts of Arizona 

Navajo Rugs and Mexican Zarapes (blankets) 



PREISCOTT, ARIZ. 

^L^r ACKER'S FLOWER SHOP 



TUCSON, ARIZ. CkjnCTessStreet 
BURNS' FLOWER SHOP 



Lillian C. Tom 

MGR. 



Colonial Flower Shop 

GOSHEN, IND 



802 S. MAIN 
STREET 



this will continue. These at the present 
time move well. 

Jonquils are reaching us and at this 
late season they are considered good. 
Other bulbous stock includes tulips, 
poeticus narcissi, and outside-grown 
daffodils. These at present are not in 
big supply. Roses are in good supply 
and include Columbia, Premier, Ophelia, 
Butterfly, Ward, Killarney, Maryland, 
Crusader and Scott Key. A fair supply 
of Cccile Brunner is seen and they move 
well. Orchids move well and there has 
been a fair demand for valley. Gar- 
denias do not move rapidly. Snapdrag- 
ons arc plentiful. Sweet peas are of 
good quality and sell well. Easter lilies 
are in good supply and are of splendid 
quality. They move well. There is a 
big quantity of forget-me-nots reaching 
us, the demand for which is not large. 
Yellow and white daisies, mignonette, 
stocks, calendulas and pansies are in- 
cluded in the daily shipments. Green 
goods of all kinds are plentiful and of 
good quality. 

Various Notes. 

Max Pawlizek, of Lyell avenue, has 
just purchased a new Dodge delivery 
car, which has attractive lettering on 
the body. He had a splendid Easter 
business and is gratified with the way 
trade has been keeping up since. 

F. E. McCoy, of the A. L. Randall 
Co., Chicago, called on trade last week 
and appeared quite optimistic regard- 
ing future business. 

The style show held last week at the 
New York state armory called for a 



Member F. T. D. 



Pksae: Canal { ]^^ 



.1938 



H. W. SHEPPARD 

FORMERLY HILL FLORAL CO. 

FLOWERS OF QUALITY 

Arranged in a Highly Artistic Manner 

Service Unexcelled 
Your Patronage Solicited 

532-534 Race Street 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Indianapolis, Ind. 

241 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 

Bertermann Bros Co. 

LEADING FLORISTS 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assn. 

EstabUshed 1869 

A. WIEGAND'S SONS CO. 

1610 to 1620 North Illinois Street 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Indiana's Oldest, lar^eat and most complete 

retail establishment. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Dellrerr Awoclatlon. 

TERRE HAUTE. IND. 

129 SOUTH SEVENTH STREET 
JOHN G. HEINL & SON 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

COWAN BROS. & CO., Florists 

Established 1894 Twenty-first and Spruce Sta. 

KOKOM O, IND, 

COLES' FLOWER SHOP 

MEMBKB P. T. D. 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 

FRED H. LEMON & CO. 
Florists and Decorators Send us your orders 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 

AND VICINITY 
Member F. T. D. G. R. GAUS}^ 

LOGANSPORT, IND. 

PERSHING-Florist Lrber^T^ 

BLOOMINGTON, IND. 

ELUS FLORAL CO. 

Members F. T. D. 



Marion, Ind. floral co. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



VALPARAISO. INDIANA 

AND SURROUNDING TERRITORY 

REINHART & ADAMS 

FLORISTS MEMBERS F. T. D. 



Evansville, Ind. 

ktui^plSI'nt JUUUS NIEDNAGEL 



and Southern Indiana 

and Illinois and 

Western Kentaclty 



100.000 Feet Glass 
Modem 



Mat 4, 1»2S 



The Florists^ Review 



121 





The florists whose cards appear on the pages carrying this bead, are prepared to fill o rders 
**" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. " 




MEMBER F. T. D. 



YOUNGSTOWN, 0. 



HARRY C WALTHER 

29 WEST WOOD STREET 



WELL EQUIPPED TO HANDLE YOUR ORDERS 



Toronto, Canada 

J. J. HIGGINS, Ltd. 

273 Yonge Street and 1450 Qyeen Street 
Member P. T. D. 



CANADA'S FLORIST 
^ri< 8-10 w. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assodatioa 



HAMILTON 

ONTARIO CANADA 

JOHN CONNON CO., Ltd. 

F. T. D. FLORISTS 



Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

AND THE BORDER CITIES 

J. GAMMAGE & SONS, LTD. 



Members F. T. D. 



VANCOUVER, B.C. 

BROWN BROS. & CO., Ltd. 

48 HASTINGS STREET. E. 

^jI BRITISH COLUMBIA orders 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assn. 



VICTORIA, B. C. 

Brown's Victoria Nurseries, Ltd. 

618 VIEW STREET 

Victoria's Leading Florist 



VICTORIA, British Columbia 

Last Port of Call for All Oriental Liners 
EsUblished 1892 WOODWARD, Florists 

PORT ARTHUR, ONT. 

HERBERT H. WILLSON 
Member F. T. D. 267 Arthur Street 

Saskatoon, Sask., Can. 

Victoria Nursery ^i^'^lP^'^' 

REGINA, SASK., CANADA 

REGINA FLORIST CO.. Ltd. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO F. T. D. ORDERS 



MONTREAL 

CANADA 

LEY & McALLAN 

658 ST. CATHERINES STREET. WEST 
RELIABLE FLORISTS F. T. D. 




Largest 
Retailers 
in 
Canada 



Cor.St.Catherlneand Guy Sts- 

Montreal 



e St. John St.,QTTEBEC, CAN. 

Member Florists' Tel. Delivery 



Edmonton, Alberta 

WALTER RAMSAY, Ltd. 

Member F. T. D. 

We have the largest greenhouses in the district 



London, Ont., Can. 

J. GAMMAGE & SONS. Ltd. 

"The House ofFloivers" 
All Orders Carefully Executed 

Members Florlgta' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



Winnipeg, Man., Can. 

THE "KING" FLORIST 
270 Hargrave St. 



■Member 
P. T. D. 



SCRIM'S, FLORIST 

OTTAWA, CANADA 



TRURO, '^°^nS2.™ 

y.Tg: SUCKUNG & CHASE. Ltd. 

Montreal, Que., SobPnson 

825 St. Catherine St., W. "f^'^T 

FOR ALL "NT17"Dr> A QIT A ORDERS 
CENTRAL INriJoKAoxvA USE 

ED. WILLIAMS, Grand Island 

Competent Florist Railroad Center 

large number of palms, ferns and flow- 
ers. 

Alberts the Florist moved several 
thousand first-class jonquils by adver- 
tising a special of 50 cents per dozen 
Saturday, April 29. Another offer was 
that of a dozen daffodils arranged in 



LINCOLN, NEB. 

1338 Street 

FREY & FREY 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

120.000 square feet of glass at your 
service 

Trad J Discount 

Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



C. H. FREY 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FLORIST 

1133 O Street, - LINCOLN, NEB. 

MEMBER F. T. D. 

Will Fill Orders for the West on Short Notice 

TRADE DISCOUNTS FIRST-CLASS STOCK 



LINCOLN, NEB. 

EICHE FLORAL CO. 
1333 O STREET 

1 36,000 ft. of glass 36,000 roses to cut (rom 



NORFOLK, NEB. 



Norfolk Floral Co. 



Member 
F. T. D. 



For all Northern Nebraska, Southeastern 
South Dakota and Northwestern Iowa. 



Flowers for All 
Occasions, from 
Cradle to Grave 



Lincoln, Neb. 

CIHAPIN BROS., Retail Florists 

OMAHA, NEB. 



Member 
F. T. D. 



JOHN H. BATH. The Careful Florist 

1804 FARNAM STREET 



OMAHA, NEBRASKA 
Lee L. Larmon wi^'douglas^s't. 



Hess & Swoboda, Florists 

Telephones 1501 and L. 1583 

1415 Farnam Street OMAHA. NEB. 

OMAHA, NEB. ¥'?"§. 

Louis M. Rogers, 319 So. 16th St 



OMAHA, NEB. 



FLATIRON 

FLOWER 

SHOP 
1728 ST. HARY8 AVENtJE 

FOR OMAHA AND VICINITY 



122 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1922 





The florirts whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
** from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. "- ■ 




EARL W. 



CLYDE J. 



TOLEDO, OHIO .^ETz jr^ 

F. T. D. MEMBER 221 Superior Street 

WE ARE LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE CITY. NEAR HOTEL SECOR 



EGGERT N. ZETLITZ 

THE LEADING FLORIST 
209 We^ Market Street 

UMA, OHIO 

Member of Florists' Telegraph Delivery 




Hutchi 



inson. 



Kansas 



Member Florists' 
Telegraph Delivery 



Leavenworth, Kan. 

606 Delaware St. Leavenwofth Flotal Co. 



Leading Florist 
825 KANSAS AVENUE 

TOPEKA, KANSAS 

Member F. T. D. 



MRS. LORD'S FLOWER ROOM 
112 W. 8th Ave., TOPEKA. KAN. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 

MANHAHAN, KAN. 

irl THE MARTINS 




Ueznbei F, T. D. 



T. S. UABTIN, PniD. 



WICHITA, KANSAS «"^S"oV^'olS-« 

W. H. GULP & COMPANY 

Quality Flowers Members 

Personal Service F. T. D. A 

A l-^UiorN'r« 1^«« The Atchison 
AtCniSOn, Kan. Flower store 

Leading Florists 
Established 1874. 



424 (Commercial St 

MEMBEB F. T. D. 



Atchison, Kan. fl^raEco. 



Established 1865. 



Member of F. T. D. 



SALINA, KANSAS 

LEIGHTON FLORAL CO. 

Memt)er8 Florists' Telexrapb Delivery Ass'n 

Hiawatha, Kansas 

Susan Margrave, Florist f.^t.^ d! 

DODGE CITY, KANSAS 

DODGE CITY FLORAL CO. 



Zanesville, 0. 

C. L. HUMPHREY 

Has the best facilities tor filling your orders. 
Memba: Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



COLUMBUS, OHIO %'$ 
s. Hijh St Mission Flower Shoppe 



with 
lower, by 
Telegram 



Columbus, Ohio fS^^'o. 

THE FRANKLIN PARK FLORAL CO. 
Cut Flowers for Central Ohio 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Neil Flower Shop 



Flowers 
for all 
occasion. 



Member 
F. T. D, 
Ass'n. 



a basket for $1. This also meant the 
sale of a good number of baskets. 

Salvatore Bartollato, of Fairport, 
N. Y., practically cleared out every- 
thing he had for Easter, with the ex- 
ception of bedding stock. He was busy 
and the demand was much heavier than 
that of last year. 

Salter Bros., at the East Main street 
store, have been busy lately with much 
funeral work, which has been consid- 
erably heavier than usual. This year 
they have put in a considerable quan- 
tity of garden and flower seeds, of 
which they are selling a good amount. 

Painters have been busy painting 
botli tlio interior and exterior of George 
B. Hart's wholesale house; this also in- 
cludes the front of the seed store of 
Hart & Vick, Inc. 

Louis Collatos says that business has 
kojit up wonderfully well since the holi- 
d;iy. Funeral work has been quite 
heavy. He is making big preparations 
for Mothers' dav business. H. J. H. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 



The Market. 

Owing to unfavorable weather from 
Monday, April 24, till Friday, April 28, 
last week was not up to the rest of the 
month. It was not exactly dull, but 
somewhat slow. Cut flower stock did 
not move well until Saturday, April 29, 
which was a beautiful day. That day 
business took a sudden spurt and left 
the market fairly clean at the close. 

Prospects are extremely liright for 
Mothers' day. Orders are piled up in 
the wholesale houses. There may be 
difficulty in getting enough stock to 
take care of them all. No trouble is an- 



WE LEAD 

Whether for funeral, party or 
home, your order will be artisti- 
cally prepared and delivered by 
that Zip-Zip Service for which 
our beautiful store is famous in 

Columbus, O. 

The Wilson Seed & Floral Co. 

Members of F. T. D. 



MARION, OHIO 

S railroads with good connections to all parts of state 

A GOOD SELECTION OF FLOWERS 

ON BAND AT ALL TIMES. 

BLAKE'S, HOW. Center 



SUDER'S 

TheToledo,Ohio, Florins 

A. A. SUDER. Proprietor 

2941-3003 CHERRY STREET 



TOLEDO, OHIO 

—AVERY, PLORIST- 
2601 Collingwood Ave. Member F. T. D. 

VAN METER FLOWER SHOP 
fn^d^'i^g SPRINGFIELD.OHIO 

BEST FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION 



WARREN, OHIO 

ADGATE & SON 

OUR FLOWERS 



THE F. T. D. 
FLORISTS 

WE GROW 



FREMONT, OHIO 

912 CROGHAN ST. I-I^,^ Fl^^^l n^ 
Member F. T. D. rlom T loral ^O. 



ALLIANCE, O. 



MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



Woodman's Flower Shoppe 

WE DELIVER IN SEBRING. 



ALLIANCE. O. 

522 S. Freedom Ave. H. T. MILLER 



Member 
F. T. D. 



LORAIN, OHIO 



Member 

*lfe^(5^'^ F. G. CAREK, Leading Horisi 

Our Motto: "Anywhere; Any Time." 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



123 





Jhe florirta whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
"*" """ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




NO ORDER TOO LARGE 



NO ORDER TOO SMALL 



CLEVELAND w a. mTimBtt ©n. 

1006 EUCUD AVENUE 
WE ARE THE LARGEST GROWERS OF CUT FLOWERS IN OHIO 



CLEVELAND, O. 

6923 EUCLID AVENUE 

WESTMAN & GETZ 

FLOWERS and SERVICE 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Wm. H. Temblett 

FLOWERS 
Member F. T. D. 10313 Euclid Avenue 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 

A. GRAHAM & SON 

5523 EUCLID AVENUE 

Members Florists' Teleexaph Delivery Ass'n 



CLEVELAND, 0. 

Megchelsen Flower Shop 
ROSES 

1976 E. 105th St 



Quality 

Art 

Service 



CHILLICOTHE, OHIO 

BREHMER GREENHOUSE 



Member F. T. D. 



Frank J, Tomastik, Prop. 



NEWARK, OHIO 

Perry's Flower Shoppe, Cor. 2nd and Church Sts. 



BUCYRUS, OHIO 

H'ff'* ^t'*'*"" The Posie Shoppe 

Nelle Bnnkman on the square 

Upper Sandusky, Ohio 

B. E. CONSTIEN, ^^Vv^i^g 

Elyria, Ohio Tnli'^ 

THE L. C. HECOCK FLORAL CO. 

Member FlorirU' Talegrapb Delivery AuociatJa^ 



MARIETTA, OHIO 

Have our own XT VJCVD Member 
Greenhouses. ^^' ^-IValLlX p. x. D. 



ASHTABULA, 0. 

„ ASHTABULA FLORAL CO. 

Ernest E. long, Mgr. 137 MAIN STREET 



SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 

SCHNEIDER, FLORIST 

PLANTS AND CUT FLOWERS 







Youngstown, Ohio vi^iSy 

SCHMIDT & MEINE 

TWO STORES 

Greenhouses: 3121 Market Street 
Send all Telegrams to Store. 20 W. F( deral St. 


DAYTON, OHIO 

AND VICINITY 


AKRON. OHIO 

THE HEEPE CO. 

EXCLUSIVE FLORIST 


DAYTON, OHIO 

ABBY AVE. r,RFF.NHOUSES 
E. E. Schaefer, Prop. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Largest Greenhouses in West Dayton 


CANTON, OHIO 

Quality Flowers RAFRFT Ri ^CiN 
Courtland Hotel Bldg. KRLDtLL <X OUIN 


DAYTON, OHIO 

J. W. RODGERS 
Member F.T.D., Elks' Bldg.. 3d and Jefferson St». 


ticipated in disposing of any stock. 
There will be a good variety. Eoses, 
sweet peas, snapdragons, Easter lilies, 
peonies and carnations will be the main 


PORTSMOUTH. OHIO 

0. B. OAKES 
South Central Ohio 0pp. Post OflSce 




flowers. Carnations, of course, will be 
scarce. They will probably be from $12 
to $15 per hundred. 


XENIA. OHIO 

Engle Floral Company 


Charles Heite, Jr., has returned from 
Columbia, Mo., where he took a course 
in floriculture and agriculture at the 
state university. He has charge of the 


NEWARK AND GRANVILLE 

OHIO 
CHAS. A. DUERR 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 


salesyards of the W. L. Rock Flower 
Co., at the greenhouses, Meyer boule- 
vard and Troost avenue. This depart- 
ment was recently opened. Tlants, 
shrubs, urns, garden pottery and garden 
furniture are sold there. 

The Chandler Landscape & Floral 
Co. is busy in both lines. One of the 
favorites in cut flowers is the lavender 
Darwin, which has been good this sea- 
son. 

August Luther had an unusually good 
supply of hyacinths for Easter. They 
were of fine quality. 

John Furrow, of Oklahoma City and 
Guthrie, Okla.; Dr. B. W. Murphy, St. 
Joseph, Mo., and Clifford Pruner, Chi- 


Kent Brothers r^r^ 

^rmt^U"^!°T^r*« Newark, Ohio. 

Youngstown, 0. ''s^re""^' 

"''"F^iD. RYAN & CULVER 

YOUNGSTOm^OHIO 

Central Flower Shop 107 market streeF' 
T^^«|.^« nU:^ RELIANCE SEED CO. 

ironton, Unio tristate florists 

MEMBERS F. T. D. 
Southern Ohio Kentucky West Virginia 


cago, called upon a number of the Kan- 
sas City florists April 24. 

The Alpha Floral Co. has completed 
its annual distribution of roses to cus- 


AMHERST, OHIO 

SANDSTONE CENTER OF WORLD 

LOUIS J. HENES. Leading Florist 



124 



The Florists^ Review 



Max 4. 1922 





- S^ **ori**» whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orden 
from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




DENVER, COLORADO 



MEMBER FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH 
DELIVERY ASSOCIATION 



PARK FLORAL COMPANY 



nFNVFR ««da« COLORADO 
ULAy V 1LI\ and WYOMING 

The Mauff Floral Co., 

1223 Logan Street 
Member F. T. D. 



DENVER, COLO., and WYO. 

CENTRAL FLORAL CO. 

936 Fifteenth St. 



MEMBER OF 
F. T. D. 



Open Sundays 
and Evenings. 



DENVER, COLO. 

The Rockmont, Inc. 

FOR FLOWERS 

MemberF. T. D. 821 1 7th Street 



Colorado Springs,CoIo. 

ORDERS CAREFULLY EXECUTED 

PIKES PEAK FLORAL CO. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 



Colorado Springs, Coloo 
Frank F. Crump, '^'"'""^t>^,i ^^ 

HembeT Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 

DPnVPV Bright Spot Greenhouse* 
t^IlVCl Cor. 5th Ave. & Josephine St. 
DOWNING & KASH. Proprietors 

THE PUEBLO FLORAL CO. 

Paeblo Member F. T. D. 623 North Main Street 

Colorado, New Mexico and Western Kansas 

PUEBLO, COLORADO 

ALPHA FLORAL CO. 

PROMPT DELIVERY FINE STOCK 

Trinidad, Colo. "^A^-SSSir* 

THE PARK FLORAL CX). 

Members F. T. D. 

FORT COLLINS, COLO. 

ESPELIN FLORAL COMPANY 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'*' 

TRINIDAD, COLO. 

JD 13 A D IT" CD Trinidad Floral Store 

. tX. r>/\.C\.lVEit\. Masonic BuildinB 

DENVER, COLORADO 

COLUMBINE FLOWER SHOP 
IDA E. DU PONT 607 15th Street 




S^^S^^ 



^dst" IVlinneapoIis 

IViinnesota 



Minneapolis, Minn. 
ADAMS 

^^ FLORIST 

ELEVEN SOUTH EIGHTH STREET 



ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Rochester Greenhouse Co., 

EMIL RIEPLE, Manager. 

Rochester's only store having its own 
greenhouses. 

Member P. T. D. 



Mankato,Minn. 



Mankato Floral Co. 
428 South Front St. 
Mankato's Leading Florist. Twenty-four hour serv- 
ice, Ineludin); Sundays. Centrally located. 



tomers. This year 50,000 roses were 
given away. The delivery plan and 
routes were worked out in the oflSce a 
month before Easter and the distribu- 
tion was easily made in ten days. A 
woman whose husband is a good cus- 
tomer of the store, being the head of a 
large business that places many orders 
in the course of a year, called up to ex- 
press her thanks for the roses. She 
said this was the only time she ever 
received any flowers and she enjoyed 
them so much that she was going to tell 
her husband to send her a box occasion- 
ally. Koy Millice, store manager, says 
his couipany has found this annual dis- 
tribution of flowers a profitable invest- 
ment. 

Anthony Kusik and A. L. McKeown 
arc planning a motor trip to Milwaukee 
a little later in the season. 

Mr. Malone, of the Stilwell Green- 
houses, Stilwell, Okla., was in the city 
April 12G. He is building a greenhouse 
in Gushing, Okla., iind wanted to see 
some of the new houses here. He vis- 
ited a number of the local growers and 
was cordially received. 

Mrs. E. H. Hedges is working up a 
splendid business in the .Tones Store. 
Her flower shop is on a better basis 
than this department has ever been. 
She has made up some Legion orders 
for Mothers' day. One is a large Amer- 
ican flag for outside shipment. 

Henry Kuisk & Co. will have a big 
cut of roses from John Klaus for Moth- 
ers' day. 

Frank X. Stu])py, St. Joseph, Mo., is 
in the Peter Bent Brigham hospital, 



ST. PAUL, MINN. 

THE LARGEST STORE IN AMERICi\ 

MEMBER F. T. D. ASS'N 

The finest and largest stock west of Chicago 

Awake night and day looking for orders 

20-22-2+ 
W. 5th St 



HOLM & OLSON, Inc., 







rORMUUT LLMAY COS STOIU 



SAINT PAUL 
MINNESOTA 



ANDREWS florist) 

HOTEL ANDREWS 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

All orders executed with ntmost care. 
Member F. T. D. 



#«rattantt*a 

Incorporated 

912 Nicollet Avenue, oflfers the trade ita 
unexcelled facilities for filling orders in 

MINNEAPOLIS 



Mankato. Minn. 

THE WINDMILLER CO. 

Flowers to all points on short notice. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



MANKATO, MINN. 

NEIL NEILSEN, Inc. 

Member F. T. D. EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Southern Minnesota, Northern Iowa, 
South Dakota 



DULUTH FLORAL CO. 

2<>o MILES in any direction. nulntV. Minn 
We are the center of the great l.'UlUin, minil. 
Northwest. Daily deUveries to SUPERIOR.WIS. 



100.000 FEET 
OF GLASS. 



AUSTIN, MINN. 

A. N. KINSMAN. Inc. 



MAT 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



125 




le^e^>ft= lJclivci y=gepeHffeaae 



The flortot« whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill ordera 
^"■•— from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 



SIEBRECHTS HOUSE OF FLOWERS 



HENRY A. SIEBRECHT. Jr. 



jest assortment of choice and rare flowers in California 

Inquire from your customers who have visited California about The House of Flowers, 



Larg( 



F. 
T. 

D. 



CITIES 



Arcadia 

Alhambra 

Altadena 

Glendale 

Eagle Rock 

Monrovia 



Duarte 
Glendora 
Lamanda Park 
Flint Ridge 
La Canada 



COUNTRY CLUBS 

Altadena Country Club 
Annadale Country Club 
Midwick Country Club 
Overland Club. 



SANATORIUMS 

Potter's, at Monrovia 
Southern California 
Los Encinas 
Lamanda Park 



ROSS FIELD. UNITED STATES BALLOON CAMP. ARCADIA 



F. 
T. 
D. 



Henry A. Siebrecht, Jr., District Representative of California 
for the Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association. 

''SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" from 
SIEBRECHT'S HOUSE OF FLOWERS, 383 E. Colorado St., Pasadena, California 



PORTLAND, ORE. 






>jSm^' 



OAKLAND. GAL. 



SPOKANE, WASH. 

ALBERT BURTS 



Pals 



>f Flc 



907 West Sprague Avenue 



Established 25 years. 



Send us your order. 



Yakima, Washington 

STATE FLORAL CO. 

We Grow Our Own Rowers 

Telesraph Orders filled Promptly and CarefnUy 
Uembers F. T. D. Asaociation 



YAKIMA. WASHINGTON 
Annavee Flower Shop, 'bS™?)* 

QUALITY FLOWERS Artistic ArranKemcDl 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 



PORTLAND A4«i,rJ'"'" 

OREGON R^,^i^„ ^^Orb&s 
354 Washington Street and Growers ^^ 






YOUNG & LESTER 

WaUaWalla,Wash. 

Established 1903 

60.000 SQUARE FEET OP GLASS 

MEMBERS F. T. D. 


PASADENA, CAK 

342 East Colorado Street 


W. T. D, W 

FLORIST 


California Florist 

TACOMA, WASH. 

Orders for Cut Flowers and Designs delivered 
anywhere in the United States and Canada. 


PASADENA, CALIF. 

WHITFORD'S. Florista 

UemberF. T. D. 

343 East Colorado Street 
We are the Largest Growers in this city. 


Boston, Mass., for an operation. His 
wife and his mother, Mrs. A. Stuppy, 
accompanied him to Boston. 

W. L. Rock has gone to Detroit for 


PASADENA. CAL 

ELDRED FLOWER SHOP 

Member Florists' Telegraph DeUvery. 


F. T. D. 

John Rice, with J. C. Steinhauser, 
Pittsburg, Kan., was here recently to 
fill out his bonus papers. 

The Kansas City Wholesale Cut 
Flower Co. will have cornflowers in dif- 
ferent colors for Mothers' day. Peo- 
nies, to be shipped direct from the 


SPOKANE,WASH. 

N 3 Lincoln St CITY FLORAL CO. 
EUGENE University Rorist 

OR F ^ '^"'^ ^^ Southwestern 
V^IXlli. Orfgon points quickly reached 



126 



The Florists^ Review 



Mav 4, 1022 




The lloristo whose cards appear on the patfes canyintf this head, are ptepared to fill o rders,. 
~**~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




S; 



F 



Where F. T. D. Members will 

get the Greatest Satisfaction 



an r ranClSCO Brown & Kennedy 



AND VICINITY 



Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 



3091 Sixteenth Street 



SFATTI F Hollywood Gardens 

^^ *^ *• * * *^ *i^ SEATTLE'S LEADING FLORIST 



Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



SEATTLE'S LEADING FLORIST 

1622 Second Avenue 



Los Angeles, Calif. 

O. C SAAKE. Florist 

WE SOLICIT TELEGRAPH ORDERS 

REGULAR TRADE DISCOUNT 

216 WEST FOURTH STREET 
Member F. T. D. 



Darling's Shop 

"FLOWERS FOR HER" 

208 West Sixth Street. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Cut flowers or good design work by best artists 
»nd designers delivered anywheie in the west 
an receipt of mail or telegraph orders. 

Hambers Floristi' Telegrraph Delivery Aasociation. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

HOWARD & SMITH 

NINTH AND OUVE STREETS 

You can depend on us for all orders for 
delivery in this section. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

ATHLETIC CLUB FLORIST 

Formerly California Cut Flower Co, 
433 West 7th Street 

Takes care of telephone and telegraph order* 

over the whole of Southern CaUfornla. 

Usaal trade discount. 



LOS ANGELES 

HERBERT BATEMAN, Inc. 
FLORAL ART 

647 South Grand Avenue 



LONG BEACH, CAL. 




RoTARiAi^ ^3)'\j^'yUuL> ^\.Aj) Member 

Fl-Of^ HOUSE SL FLOWERS F. T. D. 



Long Beach, CaL 

R t.'d': art FLORIST '"j^r 
LONG BEACH, CAL. 

Lowe's Flower Shop, '^'"' """""^'i^^Ja^^ norw 

Member Florlsta' Telegraph Dell""— 



SEATTLE 

1001-1003 Third Avenue 



Finest Floral Studio 
in the Northwest 



^j| V^ Membm 

•\V^ F. T. D. 



LOS ANGELES 

SEND YOUR ORDERS TO 

Broadway Florist 



Member F. T. D. 



414 SO. BROADWAY 



LICHTENBERG'S 

913 West Seventh Street 

LOS ANGELES 



Say It with Flowers 



Member F. T. D. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL 

REDONDO FLORAL CO. 

218 West Seventh Street 

Members of Florlsta' Telegraph Delivery 
A. KNOPF A. F. BORDEN 



field, will be a welcome addition to a 
variety of other cut flowers. 

The T. J. Noll Floral Co. will shortly 
open a wire factory in the building oa 
Oak street opposite the shipping room. 
A bridge has been built across the al- 
ley, connecting the two buildings. A 
stock room, 4;jxl00 feet, is now nearly 
filled. Boxes and other lines are being 
bought in carload lots and supplies are 
stored in the new building. This will 
leave the space formerly occupied by 
these goods for the display of samples. 

John II.Tnimond, formerly of Kansas 
City, was liere last week. lie bought a 
big stock of baskets and supplies from 
the Kansas City Wholesale Cut Flower 
Co. for his store at San Antonio, Tex. 

The Apollo Flower Shop had a nice 
display of roses and sweet peas Satur- 
d.-iy, April 2!). 

John Callas will feature plants and 
artificial liaskets for Mothers' day. He 
sfivs he will not handle carnations. He 



SEATTLE, WASH. 

Pinehurst Floral Shop 

325 Pine Street 
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS 



SEATTLE 

CITY FLOWER SHOP 

601 Third Avenue 

Nearest Shop to Docks and Depots 



SANTA ANA, CALIF. 

Personal attention given your orders 

MORRIS, the Florist 

Member F.T.D. 630 N. MAIN STREET 



Monrovia, Gil. 
C. A. BRUNGER 



Tou can depend on ua 
for all orders for de- 
livery in this section. 



239 Grand Aveoue 



BERKELEY FLORIST 

(Oldest Established Flower Store in Berkeley) 

23 1 5 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley, Cal. 

R. T. MacDOUGALL. Prop. 

ROTARIAN FLORIST 



Hollywood Flower Shop 

HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 

ARTISTIC WORE. MEMBER F. T. D. 

Telegraph Orders Delivered to 

LOS ANGELES OCEAN PARK 

SANTA MONICA VENICE 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



127 







The ilortoto whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orden 
'■ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




SAN FRANCISCO F. C. JAEGER & SON, Florins 



AND VICINnY 



—MASTER FLORISTS- 
MEMBERS F. T. D. 141 Powell Sheet, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



s 



F 



an rrancisco 

OAKLAND. BERKELEY and Vicinity 



CHAS. C NAVLET CO. 



THREE STORES: 



423 and 427 Market Street SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

917 Washington Street OAKLAND. CALIF. 

20 and 22 East San Fernando Street SAN JOSE. CALIF. 



San Francisco, Gilifomia 

ALBERT O. STEIN 
Flower Shop 

1160 SUTTER STREET 



San Francisco, Gilifomia 

SHELLGRAIN & RITTER 

148 KEARNY STREET 

Prompt attention given to all 

telegraphic orders 



San Francisco 

DARBEE'S 

1036 Hyde Street 

LABGEST STOCK OF CHOICEST FLOWEBS 
Memben Floriiti' Talegraph Delivery 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

ART FLORAL CO. 

255 Powell Street 

Best attention given your orders 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



SAN FRANCISCO 

JOSEPH'S 

Member F. T. D. 

233-35 Grant Ave. 
Ste imer and train packages our specialty. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Podesta & Baldocchi 
224-226 Grant Avenue 

Prompt and careful atteDtioD to order* from 
oat-ot-towD flOrl8t8. 

Uember F. T. D. 



Santa Barbara, CcJ. 

912 STATE STREET 

GLEAVE'S FLOWER SHOP • 

ARTHUR GLEAVE, Prop. 

Choicest Out Flowers and Floral Designs 

on short notice. 

- Both Phones 1013 



OGDEN 

UTAH 



DATIDrtAH rrXTTUD FOR INTERMOUNTAIN SHIPPING 
I\/\1LI\ \J/\U LEill ICilX Ogden's Largest and Finest Store 

ONLY GROWERS UNDER GLASS WITH DOWNTOWN STORE. 

iLOWERS DUMKE 

RESH Memb«F.T.D. FLORAL 

ROM THE GREENHOUSES. CO.. Inc. 



FI 
1 



Q A T T T A W riTV ^^^p ^^^^^ °^ ^'''^^' ^^^^^^^ p^^ 

•^"tlLil Li/lJXCi V^ll 1 of NEVADA and IDAHO 

MILLER FLORAL CO., 10 East Broadway 

MEMBER F. T. D. 
250.000 sa. tt. of modern glass. Unexcelled facilities. Prompt and courteous service always. 






Salt Lake City, Utah 

ERNEST LAMBOURNE, Florist 

MEMBER F. T. D. 

67 South Main Street 


Oakland, Calif. 


Thorsted Floral Co., 1438 Broadway 

Member FlorlsU' Telettraph Delivery Association 


SAN FRANCISCO 

Mason street Suzannc Floral Company 


OAKLAND, CAL. 

HOGAN & EVERS 
1439 Broadway 

THE BEST SERVICE 


believes the price should be such that 
they could retail for $2.50 per dozen. 
Higher than this, he says, the general 


public cannot afford to pay. 




Samuel Murray has three houses of 
fine stock for Mothers' day — one 
house of gloxinias, one of calceolarias 
and one of hydrangeas. J. E. K. 


SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

BOYLE & DARNAUD 

F. T. D. Florists. We grow our own flowers. 

Telegraph orders carefully executed. 

Usual discount. 

Members Floristo* Telegraph Delivery. 


PITTSBURGH, PA. 


The Market. 


Business has dropped off since Easter, 
with the exception of the usual daily 
demand for funeral and wedding work. 
The supply of cut flowers is limited, es- 
pecially the carnations. Eoses are ar- 
riving in fairly large quantities, and 
these move well, with the exception of 
White Killarney. Tlierc is no demand 




POMONA, CALIF. 

POMONA FLORAL CO. 

283 North Gary Street 

Aato deliveries daily to Claremont Inn, Mission Inn 

at Riverside and all iurroundint; towns. 

GOOD WORK AT RliASONABLK PRICKS. 






on the market. In some instances they 
sold as low as $10 per hundred. The 
supply of calla lilies is small, but the 
demand just about takes care of the 
supply. Plenty of sweet peas are in 
the market, but are being moved at low 
prices. Some long-stemmed yellow dai- 
sies are arriving and are moving out 
rapidly. Gladioli are still in the mar- 


POMONA, CALIFORNIA 
POOLEY'S FLOWER SHOP 

Member Florists' Telegrraph DeUvery 




ARTISTIC FLORAL CO. ^'^^^esl" 
"^A^^uJ^^" OGDEN, UTAH 

L. B. Westholder. Ugr. Geo. T. O'Kecfe. Asst. 



128 



The Florists^ Review 



Uat 4, 1822 






The florists whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill or ders 
'"" '"~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. ^ 




PITTSBURGH 

AND VICINITY 



P. T. D. 
Service 



A. W. Smith Co. 

Flower Stores 



Keenan Building, PITTSBURGH, PA. 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 




6022 

PENN 
AVE. 



Design* 
an<] Decoradona 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 

DAVE HILL & CO. 

Fifth Ave. and Wood St. 

OPEN SUNDAY QUICK SERVICE 



PITTSBURGH 



J^ 



E. C LUDWIG 
FLORAL CO. 

710 L Diamond Street 
Hemben F. T. D. 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

RANDOLPH & McCLEMENTS 

FLORAL EXPERTS 

5936 PENN AVENUE 

Members of the Florists' Telesraph Delivery 



p 


itts 


bi 


ur 


gh, 


Pa. 




MRS. 


E. 


A. 


WILLIAMS 


621 PENN AVENUE 


Member F. T. D. 




EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 



FREDERICK 
FLOWER SHOP 



Braddock and all Turtle 
Creek Valley Point* 



e8tat>- 
in town 



THE ALPHA FLORIST "^^^l 

Special attention to all orders, largre or small 

p.R.R.Station. UNIONTOWN. PA. 



Corry, Pennsylvania 

GOULD & COMPANV; Florists 

Prenpt and Carefnl Service 



TARENTUM, PA. 

qUAUTY AND SERVICE 11 TARENTUM 
Vo matter how small the order || FLORAL CO 



THTNK ' Everything in Flowers 

Xllll^JlV, GRAKELOW'S 



Member Florista' Telegrapti 
Delivery Association 



Broad Street at Cumberland, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



PHILADELPHIA 

Colonial Florist Company 

WE ARE SO CENTRALLY SITUATED TO 
FILL ALL TELEGRAPH ORDERS PROMPTLY 

N. L Cor. 1 3th and Market Sts., Subway Station 



PHILADELPHIA 

OUR BETTER SERVICE 
MAKES BETTER CUSTOMERS 

HILL'S FLOWER SHOP 

4348 Frankford Avenue 



PHILADELPHIA 

VICTOR I. RIDENOUR 

(Florist of the Better Kind) 
Ridge Ave. and Dauphin St 



ket, but the demand for these is lim- 
ited. American Beauty roses are seen 
in the market in small quantities, but 
the demand does not equal the supply. 
Inquiries from all directions are being 
received on carnations for Mothers' 
day. 

Various Notes. 

The Pittsburgh Florists' and Garden- 
ers' Club held its regular monthly meet- 
ing in the lecture room of the Carnegie 
library May 2, at 8 p. m. Miss Bombard 
was the lecturer of the evening. A spe- 
cial feature was ladies' night and all 
the ladies of the members were invited. 

The monthly meeting of the Retail 
Florists' Association was held in the 
Hotel Chatham at 6:30 p. m., Thursday 
evening, May 4. 

L. J. Reuter, representing C. U, 
Liggit, of Philadelphia, Pa., was in town 
last week. 

An attractive window display was 
made by the E. A. Williams Co., show- 
ing sonic fine varieties of azaleas. 

There were a number of visitors in 
the city .last week. Among them were: 
Mr. and Mrs. John Keil, of the John 
Kcil Co., East Liverpool, Pa.; Paul Bar- 
ber, of the Liberty Flower Store, Steu- 
benville, O.; Mr. Sahle, of Sahle & Co., 
Butler, Pa.; Mr. and Mrs. Krut, of the 
Krut Flor.ll Co., Butler, Pa.; Mrs. E. H. 
Carey, of the E. H. Carey Co., New 



PHILADELPHIA] 

Germantown and Chestnut Hill 

Orders carefully filled in first-class style 
and on time. 

WILLIAM BERGER'S SONS 

5522 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



ORDERS FOB 

PHILADELPHIA 

AND SUBURBS CAREFULLY FILLED ■ 
We are in close teach with all the labarbs by 
railroad service and can make quick delivery. 

CHARLES F. KRUEGER CO. 

Beadln? Terminal Flower Shop, Philadelphia 



Germantown ami Chestnut Hill 

OR r^F R ^ Carefully exactited with 
\jr\.LJI-,l\J taste ana promptneu. 

FRANK R. HASTINGS 

8 West Chelten Ave.. GERMANTOWN 

PHILADELPHIA PA. 



ORDERS FOR 

PHILADELPHIA 

Carefully and Promptly Executed 
with Good Flowers and Good Taste by 

M. J. Callahan, phil^/^elph^a 



PHILADELPHIA 

Cheirles Henry Fox 

I will never send yon an order less than $6.00. 
Member F. T. D. 



J. J. Habermehl's Sons 

i floral arrangements, ( 
umished on telesraphi 

Philadelphia 



The finest floral arrangements, flowers and 
plants furnished on telesrapkic orders. 



The 

Bellevue- 

Stratford 



Broad and 

Walnut 

Streets 



SCHULTHEIS, Florist 

S17 Chorch Street C12 Linden StraM 

DUNMORE, PA. SCHANTON.PA. 

Members of the Florists' Telegrayh Delivery Asa'n. 

Wilkes-Barre,^. 

Member |_„ /^ 1V4„«.^^ 23 So. FrankUnl 

F. T. D. Ira Va. Marvin, «no Majnst 



Max 4. 102K 



The Rorists' Review 



129 





T he florUU whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
"" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

AVENUE C AT 8TH STREET 

LARGEST RETAIL FLOWER SHOP IN THE SOUTHWEST 

TELEGRAPH ORDERS A SPECIALTY 




MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



UNIONTOWN, PA. 

STENSON & McGRAIL, "■KS£i!" 

11 Msrgantown Street 

FRESH HOME-GROWN CUT FLOWERS 

AND PLANTS at all times 



I 



Williamsport, Pa. 

W. J. EVENDENTS SONS 
THE LEADING FLORISTS 

Members Telegraph Delivery Association 



J. V. LAYER 

ERIE, PA. 

Write, Phone or WireS^phKfr; 



Erie, Pa. 



Charles G. Offerle 

2408 Poplar Street 



Members 
F. T. D. 



LEBANON, PA. 

J. p. VAVEOUS SONS 

Orders for '•entral Penna. handled with promptneso 

NEW KENSINGTON, PA. 

GEORGE BROS. & CO. 

813 FIFTH AVENUE 

TITUSVILLE, PA. 

WM. A. MURDOCH ^.^^f"g 

New Kensington, Pa. 

McRAE-JENKINSON CO. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Deliyery. 
Hembers FloristB* Telecrraph Delivery Aieociatioii. 

EVENDEN BROS. 

WilUamsport, Pa. 



Luvest Grown, in 
Cratral Psnniylvuiia 



WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 

DERRS FLOWER SHOP P. A. Den, Prop. 

Established 10 years Guaranteed Service 

WARREN, PA. 

r* 1. O I r* J SHERU OFFERLB, 

Lrescent rioral laarden, proprietor 

WARREN, PA. 

Wood's newer Shop ^.^"^^^g 



LANCASTER, PA. 

B. F. BAER & CO., Leading Florists 



AUSTIN, TEXAS 

AUSTIN FLORAL CO., Inc. 

Flowerland, 722 Congress Ave. 

9000 feet glass. 7 acres of flowers 

AUSTIN'S LARGEST PLACE 



SCRANTON, PA. 

A. L. BESANCON & CO. 

Florists and Decorators 

Adams Ave. and Spruce St. I^febldq. 

BOTH PHONES 
You can depend on us. Order your flowers on any 
occasion for delivery in Scranton and vicinity 



SCRANTON, PA. 

Wire your r* D fl ADIf 124 Washington 
orders to VI. I\» V*l*rVl\IVj Avenue 
^ EBt. 42 years. Everytliing in Flower, and Seeds. 
Seven railroads give quick connection, to all parts in 
aaatem Pennsylvuiia, aoathem New York, western 
New Jersey. Telephone connection, everywhere; 
throagh delivery cars, no disappointments. 



SAYRE, PA. 



SAYRE 
FLORAL CO. 

We handle a full line. Prompt deliverie. t. Waverly, N. 
Y.; Atlien.. T.wanda, Pa., and ottier sarroanding towns. 

SCRANTON, PA. 

BEAGLE, The Florist 

925 Capousc Avenue 



MEXIA, TEXAS 

Mexia Floral Co. ^'^^A^r^PSr^'E'''^ 



North and East Texas 

WISE ADKISSON. GREENVILLE. TEXAS 
9 Railroad Ontlets Honber F. T. D. 



Brighton, Pa. All of these florists re- 
ported a large Easter business. 

Postal cards have been received from 
W. A. Clarke, treasurer of the Pitts- 
burgh Cut Flower Co., from New Or- 
leans, La. H. J. H. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



The Market. 

Trade was quiet last week. The de- 
mand was small and the supply abun- 
dant. A good quantity of roses, carna- 
tions and sweet peas is coming into the 
market daily. Prices have declined in 
practically all lines. Eoses were being 
sold from $4 to $15 per hundred, car- 
nations at $4 to $6 per hundred and 
sweet peas at $1 per hundred. There 
was also a good stock of snapdragons, 
lilies, gladioli and pansies in the market. 

There is a good supply of spring 
bedding stock in this market. With 
a large demand for blooming plants for 
Mothers' day and bedding stock for 
Memorial day, sales for the remainder 




H0UJTON.TIXAS. 



Austin, Texas 
HILLYER'S 

MEMBER F. T. D. 



FOR WEST AND CENTRAL TEXAS 
AND THE OIL FIELDS 

^'"SJ'^te Brownwood Floral Co. 

BROWNWOOD, TEXAS 

We are prepared to fill your orders 

Uembers F. T. D. 



FLAGG FLORAL COMPANY 

Special attention to all Cut Flowers, Plants, Floral 

orders, large or small Designs and Casket Sprays 

Stores and Greenhoases, r\ A 1 I AC Tt? V A O 

826 West 10th Street, LlALLAj, 1 LAA J 

HILLSBORO, TEX. 

""f!T. d. Wood Seed & Roral Co. 

SHERMAN, TEXAS 

H. 0. HANNAH & SON 

Service ap-to-dat«. Northern Tezaa-Sontliem Oklabei^ 

WACO i.°Juf Texas 

Member F. T. D. WOLFE THE FLORISl 



AMARILLO, TEXAS 



1 



West Texas 
Western Oklahoma 
Eastern New Mexico 



CUNNINGHAM 
FLOWER SHOP | 



DALLAS {3S} TEXAS 

gt-^^'oiLss Lang Floral & Nursery (x 

TEXARKANA, ^11: 

MA.IESTIC FLORAL COMPANY 



El Paso, Texas floral co.| 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



FT. WORTH. TEXAS 



Baker Floral Co. 



Members Florists' 
Telegraph Delivery 



WILKINSBURG, PA. 

WM. M. TURNER, FloHst 
809 PENN AVENUE 



130 



The Florists' Review 



Max 4. 1022 





_The fl ortote whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
"" '~~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. ■" " 





SEND 
YOUR ORDERS 

FOR 

Dixie Land 

TO 

IDLE HOUR 
NURSERIES 

MACON. GA. 

100,000 sq. ft. of Qass. 



Savannah, Ga. 
JOHN WOLF 

The Largest Grower 
of Cut Flowers in the South 



SAVANNAH 




and for all South Georgia 

■tMBiRS rLomarr timoiaph dbuvut A«80ci«Twa 




Member 
F. T. D. 



MOBILE, ALA. 

'"Membg^F.iy Goodbiad Floral Co. 

Mobile, Alabama 

f^T^: The Minge Floral Co. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

PARKER^S FLOWER STORE 

A .1 . /^ • WEST END 

Atlanta, L»eorgia gardens 

Stor«, S3 E. Hantor St.; GrMnhoasea, 446 Lawton St. 

WHO LESALE AND RETAIL 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Un 1 r* Sapply Flowers for all 

WrenCe Moral LO. Ocea«ionj m Ceorgj. 

ROME, GEORGIA 

The Flower Shop, Puryear & Co., 338 Broad St. 

No eharses for deliveries to Shorter CollCKe^ 

ALBANY, GA. 

JACK SMITH GREENHOUSE CO., Florifl 



ATlyANIA.GA. 





FLOWER^ 
SHOP 

41 Feachtree Street 



BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 
Harris Seed & Floral Co. 

2018 Fir« Avenue 



MONTGOMERY. ALA. 

Alabama's Leading Horists 

Rosemont Gardens 

Member Correspondence 

F. T. D. Solicited 




New Orleans, La. ^"^^to 

The Flower Shop 

108 Baronne Street 
HENRY SCHEUERMANN. Prop. 



BATON ROUGE, LA. 

THE ROSELAND FLORIST 

MEMBER F. T. D. 

of the month are expected to be heavy. 
Various Notes. 

A meeting of the publicity commit- 
tee was held April 27 and appropria- 
tions for the Mothers' day advertising 
were made. This advertising campaign 
is being carried on in the local news- 
papers and in street cars. 

From present indications and advance 
orders, the Mothers' day demand will be 
large. The trade is pushing plants and 
all lines of flowers, in order to keep 
the price of carnations at a reasonable 
figure. There are many fine geraniums 
in bloom, and, if used in boxes or pans, 
these make cfifective Mothers' day offer- 
ings at reasonable prices. Other boxes, 
such as yellow daisies, ageratums and 
pink geraniums, can be arranged effec- 
tively. There will also be a consider- 



ATLANTA, GA. 

Wire Your Orders 

Tq 




MKMBKK 

P. T. D. 



BIRMINGHAM, MA. 

WIRE YOUR ORDERS 

TO 

THE BLOSSOM SHOP 

"AN UP-TO-DATE FLORIST" 
Molton Hotel Bldg. 5 1 5 No. 20th Street 



NEW ORLEANS 



MEMBER 
OP THE 
F. T. D. 



^c&muK 




We Cater 
to the 
,^^,^/ Best Trade 

2600 ST. CHARLES AVENUE 



QytJity and 
Promptness 




MembeM 
F. T. D 



The 

Avenue Floral Co. 

8M2 ST. CHARLES AVENUE 



New Orleans, La. ^^^S*'" 

Flowers of Superior Quality 

Frank J. Reyes & Co. 

525 CANAL STREET Prompt Delireiy 




liOUISIANA - TEXAS - ARKANSAS 
SHREVEPORT. LA. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

CHAS. EBLE 

OLDEST FLORIST SOUTH 
121 BARONNE STREET 

Member Florists' Telecraph Delivsrr. 



U. J. VIRGIN 

838 Canal St., NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



131 





The flortof whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
*"" "^~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. "- • ■ " 




WINSTON-SALEM,N.C. 



AT YOUR SERVICE 



Member F. T. D. 




HINSHAW R\ BUILDING 



Asheville, N. C 

MIDDLEMOUNT GARDENS 

MEMBER F. T. D. 




Charlotte, N. C. ^^ity 



Scholtz, 



THE FLORIST 
INC. 



Member Florists' Telesiaph Delivery Ass'n. 



CHARLOHE, N. C. 

AND VICTNITY 

THE FLOWER SHOP 

203 N. TRYON STREET 

Member F. T. D. 



"AU Over North Carolina" 
PIEDMONT FLOWER SHOP. Inc. 

"Everything in Flowers" 
Mrs. N. W. G>bb, Prop. Durham. N. C. 



Fayetteville, N. C. 

J. J. FALLON CO. 



LEADING 
FLORISTS 



DURHAM, N. C. 

J.J. FALLON CO. ^^iPeL^^,|:^j.T^« 

DURHAM, N. Cc 

Durham Floral Co. f^^S: 

WILSON, N. C 

^7!^h. STARR. The norist 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

McCarron Floral Co., HsrL?t"street 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

I. J. FALLON CO. ^^ASr^n'^' 



GREENSBORO 

IN THE CENTER OF 

North Carolina 
Van Lindley Co., II 5 S. Elm St. 



GOLDSBORO, N. C 

Ga<« City to Eastern North Carolina 

GOLDSBORO RORAL CO. 

Modem Greenhouses — Retail Store 

20 years* experience 



CHARLESTON, S. C 

Carolina Floral Store 



King and George Sts. 



Greenhouses, 
Saxon, S. C. 



Member 
F. T. D. 



Charleston, S. C. 

Art Floral Co. 

219 King Street, near Market 



SPARTANBURG 

AND ALL SOUTH CAROLINA 

CHARLES A. MOSS 

Member Florists' Telesraph Delivery Ass'n 



SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

We will give you service 
FRED'S FLOWER GARDEN 

JACKSON, TENN. 

JACKSON CUT FLOWER CO. 

Fresh Cut Flowers S. C. BRENDBL. Manager 

GREENVILLE, N. C. 

GREENVILLE FLORAL CO. 

Oateway to Eastern Nortli Carolina. 
Flowers for all oceaiions. Phone 143-443 W 

able iiuiiibc'i- of liydrangeas, gloxinias 
and calceolarias in the market. 

The trade is getting a considerable 
amount of publicity for Mothers' day 
this week from one of the large motion 
picture theaters. George Beban is put- 
ting on his play, "The Sign of the 
Rose," in person. The stage setting 
consists of the interior view of a flower 
shop. The trade is to supply the plants 
and flowers for this occasion. In return 
for this service, the florists will be al- 
lowed by the manager of the theater to 



Ncishville, stSwIs 

Chattanooga 
and Atlcinta 



Member 
Florists' 
Telegraph 
Delivery 




Two Stores 



Members 
F. T. D. 



(M 



Haeger Moral Co. 

Central Market House 700 Uarket St. 



XVai^ 



Geny Bros. ''™As 

Members Florists' Telegraph Deliver; 
212 Fifth Avenue North. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



"WE NEVER SLEEP' 



Idlewild 11 1 L* T 

Greenhouses IVlempnlS, 1 Cnil. 

89 South Main Street 

"Up-to-the-minute" Service and Execution 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



Send all MEMPHIS Orders to 

THE FLOWER SHOP 

81 Union Avenue 
MEMPHIS. TENNESSEE 



Memphis, Tenn. 

JOHNSON'S GREENHOUSES 
161 MADISON AVE. 

Established 1888 

Memfcer Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 



Knoxville, Tenn. 

CROUCH. Florist 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

LAKGKST AMOITNT OF GLASS DKVOTKD TO 
CUT FLOWERS IN THK SOUTH 



132 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 





Th« flgrtoto whoM canU appear oa the pages canyiog tlil* bead, are pveparad to fln 
*"■ "~ from other florists for local delivery oa the nsoal ' 




Kirkwood Floral Co. 
DES MOINES 



Yimr orderB will receive Mr. Ray UoW a Personal Attention 



■/' " • 



F. T. D. 



IOWA 

STORE AND GREENHOUSES 



DAVENPORT 

IOWA 

BILLS FLORAL CO. 

H. A. TIERNET, Owner Member F. T. D. 



Council Bluffs, Isu 

FRED R.SHAW 
flower Shop 

Member F. T. D. and KiwaniB Flarist 



OTTUMWA, IOWA 



PHONE 182 




107 North Maiket Street 



SIOUX CITY, 
IOWA 



SappUes western Iowa, 
■ootbern Uiimaaota, all of 
Sooth Dmkota and nartb- 
•aatem Nebraska. 

J. C. RBNNISON CO. 



SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

"Tt^.'^ ROCKLIN & LEHMAN 



Council Bluffs, Iowa 

GARDINER FLORAL CO. 
Leadinc Retail Florist 546 W. BROADWAY 

FAIRrltiLU, lA. pl«weomtrad« 

Montgomery Greenhouses 

pUBUQUE,^ipWA 

S . E. MUPiTZ Best (^aer^ at all ttmea 

DES MOINES, lA. 

GUTHRIE-LORENZ CO. 

r^Jo^PolL To BANCROFT'S 

\^6Qar rdllS, la. Beautiful Flowers 

SnTF.^'" Joseph Bancroft & Son 

CEDAR RAPIDS, lA. 

KEMBLE FLORAL CO.. Inc. 

Member Florlgta' Telegraph DellTery. 

NEW HAMPTON, I A. 

S. L. DEAL 

Wholaiala and Ratall Florist. 

SPENCER, IOWA 

WOODCOCK FLORAL CO. 
KTholcsale and Retail Florists. Member F. T. D. 



v/LIUlNv^iLi OLiUrFiJy IrV. 750.000 feet of glass 

Orders shipped to any part of Iowa or Nebraska on a moment's notice. 

Daily DeliTery to Omaha. 
MEMBERS FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY ASSOCIATION 




For 



{ 



Eastern Iowa 
Western Wis. 
N.W. Illinoii 



Fim^NUR^ERX Dubuque, Iowa 




DAVENPORT, IOWA 

EASTERN IOWA AND WESTERN ILLINOIS 

GEO. F. FORBER, 3 1 3 Brady Street 

wmataUtfanssservayoabsst. Anothar asset of our owit at roar sarriea— 

Hambsr Florista' Tdegraph DellTery Asaoeiatioii. ORIGINAUTT. 



AUSTIN, TEXAS 

AUSTIN FLORAL CO., Inc. 

Flowerland, 722 Congress Ave. 

9000 feet glass. 7 acres of flowers 

AUSTIN'S LARGEST PLACE 



put np Mothers' day posters, and the 
slogan will be thrown on the screen at 
each performance. 

The Milwaukee Florists' Club held its 
regular meeting May 4. Arrangements 
were to be completed for the annual 
May ball at this meeting. P. 



STEAMER SAZUNGS. 

The following sailing list, displayed 
in a conspicuous place in the window or 
store, or used in advertising matter 
with the information that you have fa- 
cilities for filling bon voyage orders on 
short notice, will help you to develop 
steamer trade: 

steamer — From — 
Persia Mara.. San Tr'sco 

lyo Maru Seattle 

Montcalm Montreal 

Metacama Montreal 

Lafayette New York 

Panh'dle State.New Tork 

Noordam New Tork 

Albania Montreal 

Cameronla . . .New Tork 

Homeric New Tork 

Kroonland New Tork 

La Touraine . . Ne w York 
Dante AUcbleri... N. T. 

Torek New Tork 

Samaria New Tork 

Talyo Mani..San Fr'aco 
Minnedoaa .... Montreal 

Algeria New Tork 

Orbita New Tork 

Reglna Montreal 

Paris New Tork 

Scotian Montreal 

Tanlsian Montreal 

Wenatcbee Seattle 

Caronla New Tork 



To— 


Sails 


HonckonK . . 


...May 6 


Japan 


...May 5 


LiTerpool . . . 


...May 8 


OlasKOw 


...May e 


Harre 


...May e 


London 


...May 6 


Rotterdam . . 


...May e 


Liverpool . . . 


...May 6 


Glasgow . . . . 


...May 6 


Sou'mpton . . 


...May • 


Antwerp . . . 


...May 6 


Harre 


...May e 


Genoa 


...May 10 


Bremen 


...May 10 


LiTerpool ... 


. . .May 10 


Hongkong . . 


...May 11 


Liverpool . . . 


. . .May 12 


Glasgow . . . . 


...May 12 


Hamburg . . . 


...May 12 


Liverpool ... 


. . .May IS 


Havre 


. . .May IS 


Glasgow .... 


. . .May IS 


Glasgow . . . . 


...May IS 


Manila 


...May 18 


HambuiK . . . 


...Maris 



SIOUX CITY, lA. 

ART FLOWER SHOP 

512 FIFTH STREET 

Bverything in Cot Floweis. Flaati, 

Fnneral Designs, Etc. 

Member F. T. D. 



A Card This Size 

Costs only $1.85 per Week 
^ on Yearly Order 

It would keep your name aod your specialty 
before the whole trade. 

A half-Inch card costs only esVic per week on 
yearly order. 



MILLS THE FLORIST, Inc. 

36 West Forsyth Street 

Jacksonville, Fla, 

Wereaehall 
FLOBIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA POINTS 



ORLANDO, FLA. 

Violet Dell Florist 

LAKEUSiND. FLORIDA 

Service in all directions 
WESTMORELAND FLORAL GARDENS 

CHARLES CITY, IOWA 

RIVERSIDE FLOWER SHOP 

GRINNELL,IOWA 

'SSSnS? Dittmer the Florist 



Mat 4t 1922 



The Florists' Review 



133 



JOHNKRUCHTEN 



HENRY KRUCHTEN 



JOHN KRUCHTEN CO. 



^NOT INCORPORATKO) 



Wholesale Florwte ^OEaj^^doiphSte^et CHICAGO. ILL 



L. D. Phcme. Central 8016-4017-8018 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 



Chicago, 



May 2, 1922. 
Per 100 



Ooluinbla % fOO 

Mrs. Ruisell 4.00 

Premier 4.00 

MUady 4.00 

Crusader 4.00 

Butterfly 4.00 <a 

Montrose 4.00 & 

Sunburst 4.00 @ 

Ophelia 4.00 ® 

Double White KlUarney 4.00 @ 

Nesblt 

CecUe Brunner 

Valley 5.00 @ 

furnatlons 2.00 @ 

rarnatlons, Mrs. Ward 4.00 @ 

Carnations, Laddie 8.00 @ 

Jonquils 4.00 @ 

Tulips, Darwin 8.00 @ 

Sweet Peas 50 @ 

Calendulas 3.00 ® 

Easter Lilies, doz.. . .$2.00@$2.60 

Callas, doz 2.00® 2.60 

Snapdrasons, doz. . . . 1.00@ 2.00 

Lupines, doz 1.00® 1.60 

Cattleyai, each 76® 1.2S 



$20.00 

80.00 

80.00 

2S.00 

26.00 

20.00 

18.00 

18.00 

18.00 

18.00 

8.00 

3.00 

6.00 

5.00 

6.00 

10.00 

6.00 

10.00 

2.00 

6.00 



St. Louis, May 2, 1922. 
Per doz. 

Beauty, SpecUU » 6.00 @ $ 8.00 

Beauty. Extra 3.00 ® 4.00 

Per 100 

Premier $ C.OO @ $20.00 

Columbia 6.00 ® 15.00 

White Killarney 6.00 @ 12.00 

Killamey 8-00 ® 10.00 

Ward 6 00 @ 8.00 

Milady and Ophelia 5.00 @ 10.00 

Russell 6.00 @ 20.00 

Butterfly 8.00 ® 12.00 

Carnations 3.00 @ 4.00 

Easter Lilies 15.00 ® 20.00 

BnaDdraKona 4.00 ® 8.00 

Dill.1^. 1.00 I 2.00 

VaUey 4.00 ® «.00 

Tloleta 26 ® .76 

Paper Whites 8.00 ® 4.00 

Sweet Peat 76 ® 1.00 

Tulips 3.00 Q 4.00 

Innqnils 1.00 & 2.00 

Peonies C.OO @ 8.00 

Gladioli 10.00 @ 15.00 

Orchids, per doi..$18.00®$24.00 



Beauty, 

Russell, 

lussell. 

Premier, 

Premier, 



Philadelphia, May 2, 1922. 
Per 100 

long $50.00 

Hadley, long $20.00 @ 

Hadley, abort 8.00 & 

Columbia, long 10.00 @ 

Columbia, short 4.00® 

Double White Killamey 4.00 @ 

Butterfly, Ophelia, long 10.00 ® 

Butterfly, Ophelia, abort 4.00 @ 

Pilgrim 4.00 ® 

Easter Uliea 12.50 @ 

Valley 6.00 @ 

Valley, outdoor 1.60 ® 

Carnations, Laddie 8.00 @ 

Carnations, select 4.00 @ 

Carnations, ordinary 2.00 @ 

Delphinium 15.00 @ 

Gladioli 5.00 ® 

Daisies 1.00 ® 

Cattleyas 100.00 ® 

Callas 10.00 @ 

Sweet Peas, select 1.60® 

Sweet Peas, ordinary 50 @ 

Snapdragons, ordinary 4.00 @ 

Gardenias 15.00 ® 

Darwin Tulips 4.00 @ 

Lilac, bunch $0.80®$0.60 



25.00 
10.00 
15.00 

8.00 
10.00 
12.00 

6.00 
12.00 
20.00 

8.00 

2.00 
lO.OO 

6.00 

3.00 
35.00 
10.00 

1.60 

125.00 

20.00 

2.00 

1.00 
12.00 
25.00 

6.00 



Waxalxachle, Tex. — The opening of 
the Flower Shop has been announced. 
The manager of this concern is C. Cantu 
and the assistant manager is Mrs. H. 
Mcintosh. 

CentraJia,, IlL — Webster oil well No. 
1, which was drilled on the land of the 
proprietor of the Webster Greenhouses, 
directly offsetting the Eureka No. 1 
well, which is pronounced the best well 
in the field, was brought in April 24 and 
made a good showing. It is estimated 
to be on the order of the Eureka well. 
The well was drilled 774 feet, with 
twenty-four feet of pay sand. 



ECOME A 





Dignified, Exclusive 
Profession not overrun 
with competitors. 
Crowded with opportun- 
ity for money-making and 
big fees. $5,000 to $10,000 in- 
comes attained by experts. Easy 
to master under our correspondence methods. 
Diploma awarded. We assist students and grad- 
uates in getting started and developing their 
businesses. Established 1916. Write for infor- 
mation; it win open your eyes. Do it today. 
Ansricaa LaaJtrape Schaoi, 17 K. Newark. N«w Tark 



UentioD Tbe BeTlew when yoo write. 



HRONOUNCING 
DICTIONARY 

A list of PLANT NAMES and the Botanical 
Terms most frequently met with in articles 
on trade topics, with the correct pronun- 
ciation of each. 

Sent postpaid on receipt of 25c 

FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 
606 So. Dearborn St., Chicag>o 



NOTICE 

We have moved to our new place at 
108 New St., Newark. N. J. 

and will furnish florists' supplies under the name ef 

CHRISTY S. PULOS 

Formerly P. S. PULOS St BRO. 



WIETOR BROS. 

WHOLESALE GROWERS OF 

Roses and Carnations 

30 East Randolph St, CHICAGO 



PERC Y JO NES 

WHOUSAU ^^^5 nOMSIS 

SO Bast Baadolph Street, 
CHICAGO 



GEO. REINBERG 

SlirS Cut Flowers 

MllJMly,CohuiibU,Saiibar«t, Ophelia, Whit* 
KUlamey aad RiumII 

30 E. Randolph St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



PENCILS AT WHOLESALE 

Bast Graphite, Gilt Tip, Rubber Eraser Lead Pencils 
at tS.SS a noes. Imprinting, one to three lines, in 
loU of TWO GROSS and over, $1.60 per gross extra. 
15c brings you samples worth double the money. 

The. Osborne Co. 

Lock Drawer D., Camden, New York 



BE AN EXPERT IN 



F 



LORISTS' ADVERTISING 

and Sales Promotion 

Our Correspondence Course in Advertis- 
ing and Selling is something new for the 
Florist Trade. Offered in a comprehen- 
sive and practical form by practical ad- 
vertising men and florists. No stereo- 
typed ideas — but up-to-date advertising and 
merchandising methods applied to the Florist 
Business. This Course is meeting an enthusi- 
astic welcome among florists. 



FINE OPPORTUNITIES 
FOR YOUNG MEN 



Young florists or 
young men and 
women seeking 
business opportunities will And this 
Course in Florists' Advertising and Sales 
Promotion a stepping stone to success. Splen- 
did future. Good jobs open. Write today for 
Free Literature. Dept 1-A. 

American Horticulture Co. 

202-206 E. Graad Are. DES MOINES, IOWA 

Mention The ReTlew when yoo write. 

t GLOEKLER FLOWER I 
I REFRIGERATORS I 

Jt. Send at once for catalosae F. illustrating X 
,*. and describing flower homes. ^ 

i BERNARD (iLOEKLEKCO.,rittikugk,P«. | 

YOU WILL GET 100% 

BETTER SHOWING 

BY EXHIBITING WITH 

Randall Displayers 

They are neat, durable, practical and economical. 

Randall Displayen Ct., Attleban, Mas. 



^ 






REFRIGERATORS for aU pnrpoMS 

Send for Catalogue 

McCrar RcfriKratar Ce.. 22SS UkeSt, KeaUKiik, Ui. I 



GET OUR BSTDIATBS ON 

REFRIGERATORS 

AND STORE FIXTURES 

A. L. RANDALL CO. 

ISO N. Wabaeh Ave,, CHICAGO, i^'- 



lleatloa The Brlew w>m roe write. 



HARRISON 1848-1849-1850 

REFRIGERATORS 

and Complete Fixtures 

Uiion Insvlatmg & CtutractMn Ci. 

Suri i h ii C tmtrm t tim fa K«ferii»T«lit h fcrt ri w 
GREAT NORTHERN BUILDING. CHICAGO 



A HALF-INCH ADYQtTISEMENT 

here will keep your name and specialty 

(before the whole trade, at a cost of 
only 62>»c per week on a yearly order. 



132 



The Florists^ Review 



'■S Mat 4, 1922 





^^e^florists whose carda appear on the page* canyliiK thla head, are prepared to fill o rders, 
** from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. ■ " 




Kirkwood FlorcJ Co. 
DES MOINES 



F. T. D. 



Your orders will receive Mr. Ray Ilolt'a Perional Attention 

I O W A 

STORE AND GREENHOUSES 



DAVENPORT 

IOWA 

BILLS FLORAL CO. 

M. A. TIERNEY, Owner Member P. T. D. 



Council Bluffs, la. 

FRED R. SHAW 
Blower Shop 

Member F. T. D. and Eiwanis Flcrist 



OTTUMWA, IOWA 



PHONE 




SIOUX CITY, 
IOWA 



Sapplies western Iowa, 
Boatbern Hinneeota, all oi 
Sooth Dakota and Dortb- 
eastem Nebraska. 

J. C. RENNISON CO. 



SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

"rx'D.'" ROCKLIN & LEHMAN 



Council Bluffs, Iowa 

GARDINER FLORAL CO. 

Leading Retail Florist 545 W. BROADWAY 

FAIRrlhLU, lA. pleaLo^ trade 

Montgomery Greenhouses 

pUBUQUE,JpWA 

S. E. MUNTZ Beat (S'ser^ce at all times 

DES MOINES, lA. 

GUTHRIE-LORENZ CO. 

r^rlarFnlU U BANCROFT'S 

V^eQal laild, Id. Beautiful Flowers 

!iai.t I'T Joseph Bancroft & Son 

CEDAR RAPIDS, lA. 

KEMBLE FLORAL CO.. Inc. 

Member Florists' Tele(?raph Delivery. 

NEW HAMPTON, lA. 

S. L. DEAL 

Wholesale and Retail Florist. 

SPENCER, IOWA 

WOODCOCK FLORAL CO. 
A^holesale and Retail Florists. Member F. T. D. 



Council Bluffs Ia J- ^- ^^^^ * ^^^ 

\^\J\Jiy\^LLt ULtKJL I %Jy XxT.. 750.080 FEET OF GLASS 

Orders shipped to any part of Iowa or Nebraska on a moment's notice. 

Daily Delivery to Omaha. -^ 

MEMBERS FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY ASSOCIATION 



C/ y^FWR^NUP^RX Dubuque, Iowa 



Eastern Iowa 
Western Wis. 
N.W. Illinois 



^UALin 

PLUS 

.SERYIOL 



DAVENPORT, IOWA 

EASTERN IOWA AND WESTERN ILLINOIS 

GEO. F. FORBER, 3 1 3 Brady Street 

Will at all times serre yoo best. Another asset of oar own at your serriea — 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association. ORIGINALITT. 



AUSTIN, TEXAS 

AUSTIN FLORAL CO., Inc. 

Flowerland, 722 Congress Ave. 

9000 feet glass. 7 acres of flowers 
AUSTIN'S LARGEST PLACE 



pat up Mothers' day posters, and the 
slogan v?ill be thrown on the screen at 
each performance. 

The Milwaukee Florists' Club held its 
regular meeting May 4. Arrangements 
were to be completed for the annual 
May ball at this meeting. P. 



STEAMER SAILINGS. 

The following sailing list, displayed 
in a conspicuous place in the window or 
store, or used in advertising matter 
with the information that you have fa- 
cilities for filling bon voyage orders on 
short notice, will help you to develop 
steamer trade: 



steamer — From — 
Persia Maru. .San Fr'sco 

lyo Maru Seattle 

Montcalm Montreal 

Metagama Montreal 

I>afayette .... New York 
Tanh'dle State. New York 

Noordam New York 

Albania Montreal 

Cameronla . . . New York 

Homeric New York 

Kroonland New York 

\a Toiiraine. .New York 
Dante Allehlerl... N. Y. 

Yorck New York 

Samaria New York 

Talyo Maru. .San Fr'sco 
Minnedosa ....Montreal 

Algeria New York 

Orbita New York 

Regina Montreal 

Paris New York 

Scotian Montreal 

Tunisian Montreal 

Wenatchee Seattle 

Caronia New York 



To— Sails 

Hongkong May 5 

Japan May 5 

Lirerpool May B 

Glasgow May 6 

Havre May 8 

T.«ndon May 6 

Rotterdam May 6 

Liverpool May 6 

Glasgow May 6 

Sou'mpton May 

Antwerp May 6 

Havre May fl 

Genoa May 10 

Bremen May 10 

Liverpool May 10 

Hongkong Hay 11 

Liverpool May 12 

Glasgow May 12 

Hamburg May 12 

Liverpool May 13 

Havre May 13 

Glasgow May 13 

Glasgow May 13 

Manila May 13 

Hamburg May 13 



SIOUX CITY, IA. 

ART Fl6wER SHOP 

512 FIFTH STREET 

Everythinar in Cot Flowers. Plants, 

Funeral DesigTU, Etc. 

Member F. T. D. 



A Card This Size 

Costs only $1.85 per Week 
on Yearly Order , 

It would keep your name and your specialty 
before the whole trade, 

A half-inch card co^ts only 62>ac per week on 
yearly order. 



MILLS THE FLORIST, Inc. 

36 West Forsyth Street 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

We reach all 
FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEOEGL& POIMTS 



ORLANDO, FLA. 

Violet Dell Florist 

LAKELAND, FLORIDA 

Service in all directions 
WESTMORELAND FLORAL GARDENS 

CHARLES CITY.IOWA 

RIVERSIDE FLOWER SHOP 

GRINNELL,IOWA 

^^^^i Dittmer the Florist 



w^ 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



133 



JOHN KRUCHTEN 



Hl^RY KRUCHTEN 



JOHN KRUCHTEN CO. 



Wholesale 



^NOT INCORPORATED) 



30 East Randolph Street CHICAGO, ILL, 

L. D. Phone. Central 80ia«017-8018 -w^--^ ^** -^^ 9 * 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

Chicago, May 2, 1922. 
Per 100 

Polumbia $ 4.00 @ $20.00 

Mrs. Russell 4.00 @ 30.00 

iTemler 4.00 @ 80.00 

Milady 4.00 ® 25.00 

frusader 4.00 @ 25.00 

Hutterfly 4.00 @ 20.00 

.Montrose 4.00 O 18.00 

Sunburst 4.00 (g) 18,00 

Ophelia 4.00 @ 18.00 

Double White KUlaruey 4.00® 18.00 

Nesblt 300 

'"ecile Brunner 3.00 

Valley 5-00 @ 6.00 

Carnations 2.00 f<? r>.00 

.arnatlons, Mrs. Ward 4.00 @ 6.00 

I arnations, Laddie 8.00® 10.00 

Jonquils 4.00 @ COO 

lullps, Darwin 8.00 @ 10.00 

Kweet Peas 50 ® 2.00 

Calendulas 3.00 @ 6.00 

Easter Lilies, doz.. . .$2.00®$2.50 

Oallas, doz 2.00® 2.50 

.'Snapdragons, doz. . . . 1.00® 2.00 

Lupines, doz 1.00® l.BO 

rattleyas, each 75® 1.26 

St. Louis, May 2, 1U22. 
Per doz. 

Beauty, Special! $ 6.00 @ $ 8.00 

Beauty, Bxtra 3.00 @ 4.00 

Per 100 

Premier $ 6.00 @ $20.00 

Columbia 6.00 ® 15.00 

Wliite Killarney 6.00 @ 12.00 

Killarney 6 00 @ 10.00 

Ward 6.00 @ 8.00 

Milady and Ophelia 5.00 @ 10.00 

Russell 6.00 @ 20.00 

Butterfly 8.00 @ 12.00 

Carnations 3.00 @ 4.00 

Easter Lilies 15.00® 20.00 

Bnapdragona 4.00 @ 8.00 

Daisiei 1.00 ® 2.00 

Valley 4.00 @ 6.00 

Violet! 26 a .7B 

Paper Whites 8.00 @ 4.00 

Sweet Peaa 76 @ 1.00 

Tulips 3.00 ® 4.00 

Jonquils 1.00 ® 2.00 

Peonies (i.OO @ 8.00 

Gladioli lO.OO @ 15.00 

Orchids, per doz. .|18.00®$24.00 

Philadelphia, May 2, 1922. 
Per 100 

Beauty, long $50.00 

Russell, Hadley, long $20.00 ® 25.00 

Hussell. Hadley, abort 6.00 10.00 

Premier, Columbia, long 10.00 @ 15.00 

Premier. Columbia, short 4.00® 8.00 

Double White Killarney 4.00 @ 10.00 

Butterfly, Ophelia, long 10.00 @ 12.00 

Butterfly, Ophelia, abort 4.00 ® 6.00 

Pilgrim 4.00 & 12.00 

Easter Lilies 12.50 @ 20.00 

Valley 6.00 ® 8.00 

Valley, outdoor 1.50® 2.00 

Carnations, Laddie 8.0O @ 10.00 

Carnations, select 4.00 ® 6.00 

Carnations, ordinary ij^2.00 ® 3.00 

Delphinium fTTTlrMQ ® 35.00 

Ciladloli /... 6.00® 10.00 

Daisies 1.00® 1.50 

Cattleyas 100.00 @ 125,00 

Callas 10.00 ® 20.00 

Sweet Peas, select 1.50® 2.00 

Sweet Peas, ordinary 50 ® 1.00 

Snapdragons, ordinary 4.0O ® 12.00 

Gardenias 15.00 ® 25.00 

Darwin Tulips 4.00® 6,00 

Lilac, bunch $0.3S@$0.60 

Waxahacliie, Tex. — The opening of 
the Flower Shop has been announced. 
The manager of this concern is C. Cantu 
and the assistant manager is Mrs. H. 
Mcintosh. 

Centralia, 111. — Webster oil well No. 
1, which was drilled on the land of the 
proprietor of the Webster Greenhouses, 
directly offsetting the Eureka No. 1 
well, which is pronounced the best well 
in the field, was brought in April 24 and 
made a good showing. It is estimated 
to be on the order of the Eureka well. 
The well was drilled 774 feet, with 
twenty-four feet of pay sand. 





Dignified, Exclusive 
Profession not overrun 
..-''with competitors. 
Crowded with opportun- 
ity for money-making and 
big fees. $5,000 to $10,000 in- 
comes attained by experts. Easy 
to master under our correspondence methods. 
Diploma awarded. Wc assist students and grad- 
uates In getting started and developing their 
businesses. Established 1916. Write for infor- 
mation; It will open your eyeo. Do It today. 

Americaa Landscape Sckeol, 17 K. Newark, New York 



Uentlon The Review when you write. 



HRONOUNCING 
DICTIONARY 

A list of PLANT NAMES and the Botanical 
Terms most frequently met with in articles 
on trade topics, with the correct pronun- 
ciation of each. 

Sent postpaid on receipt of 25c 

FLORISTS* PUBLISHING CO. 
608 So. Dearborn St., Chicag^o 



NOTICE 

We have moved to our new place at 
108 New St., Newark. N. J. 

and will furnish florlBts' supplies under the name •!' 

CHRISTY S. PULOS 

Formerly P. S. PULOS & BRO. 



WIETOR BROS. 

WHOLESALE GROWERS OF 

Roses and Carnations 

30 East Rudolph St., CHICAGO 



PERCY JONES 

WHOIESAU coMMiMOT nORISTS 

SO Bact Randolph Street. 
CHICAGO 



GEO. REINBERG 

Sl"i; Cut Flowers 

Milady, Colombia, Sunbur at, Ophelia, White 
Killarney and RuMell 

30 E. Randolph St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



PENCILS AT WHOLESALE 

Beat Graphite, Gilt Tip, Rubber Eraser Lead Pencils 
at t3.2E a gross. Imprinting, one to three lines, in 
lota of TWO GROSS and over. $1.60 per groea extra. 
15c brings you samples worth double the money. 

The. Osborne Co. 

Lock Drawer D., Camden, New York 



BE AN EXPERT IN 



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FOR YOUNG NEN 



LORISTS' ADVERTISING 

and Sales Promotion 

Our Correspondence Course in Advertis- 
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Business. This Course is meeting an enthusi- 
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Young florists or 
young men and 
women seeking 
business opportunities will find this 
Course in Florists' Advertising and Sales 
Promotion a stepping .'tone to success. Splen- 
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American Horticulture Co. 

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Mention' The Review when yon write. 

t GLOEKLER FLOWER ? 

% REFRIGERATORS % 

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i BERNARD GLOEKLERCO.,Pittsbiirgk,ra. | 

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They are neat, durable, practical and economical. 

Randall Displayers C«., Attlebiro, Nass. 




REFRIGERATORS for aU purpoacs 
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GET OUR BSTDIATE8 ON 

REFRIGERATORS 

ANP STORE FIXTURES 

A. L. RANDALL CO. 

I8O N. Wabash Ave., CHICACO, ILL. 



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HARRISON 1848-1849-1850 

REFRIGERATORS 

and Complete Fixtures 

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here will keep your name and scecialty 
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134 



The Flonsts^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



Holton & Hunkel Co. 

471 Milivaukee Street Mil^vaukee, Wis. 



Growers and Shippers of 

CUT FLOWERS 

GREENS and 

PLANTS 



s 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

Milwaukee, Mar 2, 1922. 

Columbia $ 4.00 @ $20.00 

Premier 4.00 @ 25.00 

Butterdy 4.00 @ 20.00 

Wliite Killarney 4.00 ® 18.00 

Opiielia 4.00 @ 20.00 

Mrs. Ward 4.00 @ 12.00 

Curnatiuus, fancy Block 5.00 a 6.00 

Carnations, common 3.00 @ 4.00 

V«lley 8.00 

Calendulas 3.00® 6.00 

Sweet Peas 1.00 ® 2.00 

Lilies 2.00 @ 2.50 

Tuliiw 4.00 O 6.00 

Tulips. Uarwin 8.00 

Jonquils 4.00® 6.00 

Cattleyas 100.00 @ 150.00 

Daisies, white 1.00® 1.60 

Daisies, yellow 3.00® 4.00 

Callas, per doz $2.50@$3.0O 

Snapdragons, per doz. .7SQ 2,00 

Gladioli, per doz 2.00 

Forget-me-nots, bcli.. .35® .50 

Pittsburgli, May 2, 1922, 
Per 100 

Beauties $12.00 ® $60.00 

Buisell, long 20.00 @ 20.00 

Bussell, abort 8.00 @ 15.00 

Columbia, Premier, long 15.00 @ 2B.00 

Columbia, Premier, sbort 8.00 @ 10.00 

OphelU, long 16.00 ® 25.00 

Opbella, short 8.00® 10.00 

Doable White Klllamey 6.00 @ 26.00 

Richmond 6.00® 25.00. 

Crusader 10.00 ® 30.00 

Carnations $ 6.00 @ $ 8.00 

Haster Ulles 28.00 

Valley 6.00 ® 8.00 

Orchids 76.00 ® 100.00 

Trumpet Narcissi 4.00 ® 6.00 

Violets 76 a 1.00 

Tulips 4.00 @ 8.00 

Paper Whites 4.00 ® 6.00 

Calendulas, bunch $0.75 

Oallai. dos 2.00 

Boston, May 2, 1922. 
Per 100 

Premier $ 3.00 ® $16.00 

Columbia 3.00 ® 16.00 

Pilgrim 3.00 @ 12.00 

Double White Killarney 2.00® 8.00 

Francis Scott Key, Radiance... 3.00® 16.00 

Mme. Butterfly 2.00 @ 10.00 

Milady, Mock 2.00 @ 8.00 

Killarney 2.00 @ 8.00 

White Killarney 2.00 ® 8.00 

Killarney Brilliant 2.00 @ 8.00 

Mrs. Aaron Ward 2.00® 12.00 

Hadley 4.00® 20.00 

Ophelia 2.00 @ 8.00 

Cattleyas 50.00 @ 76.00 

Sweet Peas 50 @ 2.00 

Gardenias 20.00 3 25.00 

Easter Lilies 6.00 @ 8.00 

Pansies 50® 1.00 

Carnations 2.00 @ 5.00 

Snapdragons 4.00 @ 8.00 

Callas 4.00® 8.00 

Marguerites 1.00 @ 8.00 

Daffodils 2.00 @ 3.00 

Tulips 2.00 @ 3.00 

Calendulas 1.00® 2.00 

Spanish Iris, doz $1.00O$2.00 

Buffalo, May 2, 1922. 
Per 100 

Columbia $ 8.00 @ $25.00 

Premier 6.00 ® 15.00 

Double White Klllamey 6.00 ® 12.00 

UlUdy 6.00 ® 18.00 

Crusader 10.00 ® 20.00 

Maryland 3.00® 10.00 

Russell 6.00 & 10.00 

Ophelia 4.00 ® 12.00 

Bunbant 6.00 @ 12.00 

Cecile Brunner 4.00 ® 8.00 

Callas 10.00 @ 20.00 

Rubrum Lilies 6.00 & 10.00 

Snapdragons 6.00 & 15.00 

Calendulas 4.00 6.00 

Hlgnonette 8.00 9 S.OO 

Easter Lilies 10.00 ® 20.00 

Carnations 4.00 ® 6.00 

Sweet Peas 1.00® 2.50 

Daisies 2.00 @ 8.00 

Ylolets 100 ® 1.25 

Golden Spur 4.00® 8.00 

West Downington, Pa.— A. \V. Hill, 
124 Lancaster avenue, is conducting a 
retail store. He deals in cut flowers and 
potted stock. 



GUST. RUSCH & doJ 

Wholesale Cut Flowers and Supplies 

Headquarters of the Cudahy Roses 
and Other Seasonable Novelties 

p. O. BOX 676 

444-446 Milwaukee St. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



r 



Mention The HeTlew when yoo wrif . 



Cut Flowers Greens 


Supplies 


Everything a Florist Needs 




CINCINNATI CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 


Wholesale Commlssioii Florists 14 E. Third St., Cinciimatl, Ohio 



DYES 



for FRESH, ARTIFICIAL and DRIED HA 
FLOWERS, Mosses, Ferns, Roping, nllr 



Baslcets, etc., all shades, in packages at 
Special Prices in 'quantities, or in 1 to 5-Ib. tins. 



PREPAID 



AUO NANUrACTURING CO., 101 Beekman Street, NEW YORK CITY 



"Smiling Smrvicm' 



WINDLER 

Wholesale Floral Co. 

1310 Pin* St. ST. LOUIS, MO. 



A. W. GUMZ 

WHOLESALE FLORAL CO. 

Cut Flowmra a Spacitdty 

1314 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Both Ions dlatance TelaphonM 



Cut Flowers 

OUR SPECIALTY 

H. G. BERNING 

1402-4 Pine St, St. Louis, Mo. 



Wm. C. Smith Wholesale Horil Co. 

IVHOLBSALE 

FLORISTS 

1316 Pine Street ST. LOUIS 

(Both L. D. Phones) 
Sapplies aad ETerythmg m Scasoa Always m HssI 



The Regan Printing House 

Larg* Runs of 

CATALOGUE3 

Our Specialty— Oet Our Figures 
531.537 Plyaumtk PI., CHICAGO 



Three Good Colors 



We now hare a Blue and Deep Fink dye that 
are fit companions to our famous Yellow. The 
blue Is as blue by artificial light as by day. Peas, 
Roses, Carnations, Tulips, Paper Whites, Free- 
slas. Larkspurs, Shasta Daisies, and almost any 
flowers take these dyes freely. 

any color, *(- <||% 

or assorted ^O.l/W 

1 pkg $1.00 

Western customers may order from the Colo- 
rado Seed Co., of Denver. 

McClenahan Greenhouses 

40tk ami Pkillipt Sti.. OkUhoM City, Okla. 



Six pkgs., 



ST. LOUIS SEED CO. 

Tke Hme if "Tire ud Sue** Sce^ 

411-413 WASHINGTON AVENUE 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



BECKERT'S 

SEEDS, BULBS 
SUPPLIES :: 

Quality and Servica 

Boekert's Saod Store, Pittsburgh. Pa. 



RICE BROTHERS 

Wholesile Florists ud Supplies 

MINNBAPOUS, MINN. 

SEND LIST FOR QUOTATIONS 



Mat 4, 1922 



u 

The Florists^ Review 



135 



FRANK H. TRAENDLY 



CHARLES SCHENCK 



Traendly & Schenck 

Wholesale Florists and Cut Flower Exchange 

436 6th Arenne, between 26th and 27th Street*, NEW YORK 



Phones 797. 798 and 799 Farra«ut 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 



N. Y. Florists* Supply Co., Inc. 

103 West 28th Street, NEW YORK CITY 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in all kinds of 

EVERGREENS ^^s'"^. FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

Telephones 2144-2145-2146 Farratfut 



1922-E«tabUshed-18S7 



J. K. Allen, New York 

Commlcsion Dealer in Cut Flowers 

At the main entrance of the Great Wholesale Da*a* PamafiAna 
Flower Market. 43 West 18th St., solicits "VOSCS, VamauOnSy 
Vallpv Orrhifls ^^^ facilities for handling. Highest prices. 
vniicjr, vriuuus. Quick returns, mronipt payments. 

Telephone, Watkins 0167 and 3058 



$1.25 



Seventh Edition 



$1.25 



Album of Designs 



$1.25 



Better Than Ever 



$1.2S 



Something Needed By 
Every Florist 

APRONS 

LARGE SIZE 

Aprons made of Black Rubber, medinm 
weight. 
Let us send you one for a triaL 

Price, f 2.00 each. 

Avoid Getting Wet. 

Pittsburgh Cut Flower Co. 

lit Seraatk StttU PITTSBUEGH, PA. 



Burlington Willow Wire Shops 

Makers of 

Wtrth Whfle W01-0.WaK 

Baskets for particular Florists 
BURLINGTON, IOWA 



PATRICIAN CANDLES 

-AND 

CANDLESTICKS 

WILLIAM T. U8INOER 
Century BItf g., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



CHARLES N.COTTER CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 

Floricaltural and Agrieoltnrai 

Products and Snpplios 

JAMESTOWN. NEW YORK 



J. E. KOPPELMAN 

fi^ol««a/« tmd ConuniMtion 

FLORIST 

26 Custom House Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. L 



MOTHERS' DAY 

CARDS, ENVELOPES, TAGS, 
LABELS, BLOTTERS, STICKERS 

Write for SamjAta 

THE JOHN HENRY CO., 
LANSING, MICH. 



Alwairs Msntion Tbs 

FLORISIS' REVIEW 

WhsB Writiar to Advertisers 



CHAS. FUTTERMAN 

WhoUaaU Florist 

1 10 W. 28th St. NEW YORK 

Phone: Watldna4675 

Consignments Solicited 

RETURNS DAILY CHECKS WEEKLY 

HO ommxcTioM with ASY OTHKB riBM 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

New York, May 1, 1922. 

Per 100 

Beauty. Specials $15.00 @ $30.00 

Beauty, Fancy 10.00 @ 15.00 

Beauty, Extra 8.00 ® 10.00 

Beauty, No. 1 5.00 @ 8.00 

Beauty, No. 2 3.00 (a 5.00 

Hadley 5.00 @ 20.00 

Russell 5.00 @ 20.00 

Francis Scott Key 10.00® 50.00 

Premier 3.00 @ 15.00 

American Legion 3.00 @ 12.00 

Prima Donna 2.00 @ 12.00 

White Killarney 2.00® 12.00 

Mrs. Aaron Ward 2.00 @ 12.00 

Ophelia 2.00 @ 12.00 

Columbia 2.00 & 12.00 

Sunburst 2.0O ® 12.00 

Orchids— Cattleyas 50.00 @ 75.00 

IdUes of the Valley 3.00 ® 6.00 

Lilies 5.00 @ 12.00 

Carnations 3.00 ® 6.00 

Cleveland, May 3, 1922. 

PerlOO 

American Beauty $ 6.00 @ $75.00 

Columbia, short 4.00 @ 15.00 

Columbia, long 20.00 

Premier, short 4.00 ® 15.00 

Premier, long 20.00 

Ophelia, short 4.00 @ 12.00 

Ophelia, long 15.00 

Butterfly, short 6.00 12.00 

Butterfly, long 16.00 & 20.00 

Sunburst 4.00 @ 15.00 

American Legion 8.00 Q 16.00 

White Killarney 3.00 @ 15.00 

Ward 3.00 @ 8.00 

Pilgrim 8.00 ta 16.00 

White Ophelia 8.00 Q 26.00 

Miniature Roses 2.00 @ 3.00 

Carnations 2.00 @ 8.00 

Valley 6.00 

Violets .76 

Calendulas 3.00 @ 6.00 

Sweet Peas 75 @ 2.00 

Tulips 3.00 @ 4.00 

Daffodils 2.00 O 4.00 

Snapdragons 8.00 ® 12.00 

Mignonette 4.00 @ 6.00 

Easter Lilies, doz $1.60@$2.60 

Pussy Willows, bch 2.00 

Callas. doz 1.60@ 2.00 

Daisies 2.00 



Warrensburg, Mo. — Mrs. Carrie Col- 
lins is entering the trade again and she 
will grow porch box material in a small 
way. She says that there is a dearth 
of this material here at the present time. 
Mrs. Collins formerly operated green- 
houses on Manhattan island, but she 
closed them during the war. 



Chelsea 8071. 

Harry Charles 

WHOLESALE FLOtlST 
VIOLETS UUES ROSES 
104 W. 28th St„ NEW YORK CITY 



Are You Wise? 

Wise ones ship their flow- 
ers to the New York market. 

You will be wise if you do 
likewise — wiser still if you 
ship to us. 

We have years of experi- 
ence backed by ample cap- 
ital and every facility for 
handling your shipments. 

Special opportunity for a couple of 
good Rose Growers who are lookinir 
for best returns. Our present demand 
is gre&ter than our supply. 

United Cut Flower Co., Inc. 

1 1 1 WEST 28tl STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

IfentloB Th. B.T1.W wh.B 7«« mrlta. 



M.C.FORD 
Wholesale Florist 

Amcriaui Bcautlea umI Canuthms 

3lt»4SW. IStkSt, NEW YORK CITT 

Tdephone 3870 WatUiu 



I. GOLDSTEIN 

Wholmaat* Floritt 

31 to 43 W. 18th St, NEW YORK Cnr 

Telephone CheUea 6925 

h dw euct center of the Wholesale Cut HoinC 

Sediao. PkomptandcareKilattentioatojnMiiiiiteietli. 

CONSIGNMENTS SOUOTED 



Florists' Supplies, Baskets, 
Willow Ware and Sundries 

rear. t»r S a » » bm 

S. HANFLING CO. 

131-133 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 



UNITED STATES 
CUT FLOWER CO. 

Wholesale Growers 
ELMIRA, NEW YORK 



ORCHIDS, GARDENIAS, £tc. 

PAUL NBCONI, WMwal* FImM. NEW YORK 
Tihifcim W.. 3««i y-^ «M UU. U. STW.MtkSt 



' / 



136 



The Florists^ Review 



Max 4, 1922 



The Florists' Supply House of America 




Mothers' Day Specials 

MOTHERS' DAY will soon be upon us. 
You will want some nice, fine 

Pure White Muslin Carnations 

Look as good as the natural ones 

Only $2.50 per 100 

Cycas Sprays with White Carnations, 75c each 

Mothers' Day Flower Receptacles 

With cup retainer for holdinsf flowers 

$3.00 per doz. 

H. Bayersdorf er & Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF METALLIC DESIGNS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

1 129-1 133 Arch Street PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Branch Factory: 709 First Ave., New York City, Telephone Vanderbilt 4976 






lO Inches high 



Mpntlon The Review when you write. 



SAN FJLANCISCO NOTES. 

(Continued from page 92.) 
nic at Fairfax park, June 25. Active 
preparations are already in progress to 
make the affair a success. Frank 
Thatcher, of Pelicano, Rossi & Co., and 
Jack Kilroy, at Eighteenth and Castro 
streets, have been appointed a commit- 
tee on arrangements. 

The Growers' Floral Co. has been 
growing carnations with an eye to hav- 
ing good crops Mothers' day. 

Enomoto & Co. are almost flooded 
with eucalyptus pods and buds, for 
which there is a good demand. 

Domoto Bros, are showing beautiful 
potted azaleas and rhododendrons, 
grown in lath houses. 

The United Flower & Supply Co. is 
doing a large business in Boston ferns 
and in potted plants, which sell well 
locally, in spite of the glut of cut 
flowers. 

"I do not think that there will be a 
shortage of carnations Mothers' day; I 
know it," stated J. A. Axell. "There 
are not enough carnations being grown 
to meet the abnormal demand," con- 
tinued he. "So many of the growers 
gave up carnations and substituted 
roses, that now we are having quanti- 
ties of roses on the market. If we could 
salt away all the stock we now have, 
we could do well on Mothers' day." 

F. C. Jaeger has taken up golf on his 
weekly Monday off and is becoming an 
enthusiast for the game. F. C. Jaeger, 
Jr., says that the firm is doing well with 
baskets and is already booking orders 
for Mothers' day. 

The Suzanne Floral Co. had all the 
decorations for the International Ge- 
neva Association, at California House. 



Here Are Some Real Prices On 

FLORISTS' BOXES 



Our Prices on the Popular 
MIST GRAY 

Will Save You Money. 

The following Discounts apply: 

100 to 300 Boxes 10 per cent 

300 to 500 Boxes 15 per cent 

500 to 800 Boxes 20 per cent 

800 to 1,000 Boxes 25 per cent 

1,000 and over Boxes 3t per cent 

Printing in one color, $4.00 per thousand or 
less. Bronze, Gold or two colors double the 
above charge. The above discounts also apply 
to the printing charge. 

1( you use Pink, White or Violet Enamel, 
Covert Gray or Fern Green, ask us for prices. 



PROMPT DELIVERY 



ORDER NOW 



Send 



NO. 

1 

2 

3 

A 

S 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
IS 
16 



Us Your 
SIZE 

18x5x3 
21x5x3^^ 
24x5x354 
30x5x3"^ 

21x8x4 

24x8x4 

28x8x5 

36x8x5 
36x5x3;.^ 

30x10x5 

36x10x5 

42x10x5 

20x20x10 

24x24x10 

8x5x4J4 
I2x8x5j4 



Order 



PER 100 

$ S.7S 

*M 

4.50 

5.50 

5.75 

CM 

7.50 

11.50 

8.00 

13.00 

15.00 

1840 

30.00 

36.00 

3.50 

4.75 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO. 

471 Milwaukee Street MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 



Florists' Stationery 



Priess qpstad are tar WhlU 
prlatad In Mack er craaa Ink oalr. 

ItOt Lattarliaada, UM lOOt Billkaadi. I8.M 
l«OOBB*akv«s, 4.M 1000~ ~~ 



Writ* for saaplas 



NOkr rriit Sktp. 



p. O. Bm 



niUilrku.ra. 



The hall and many tables were deco- 
rated with spring flowers. 



E & D. DESIGN BOXES 

Am made of Ucht, •trong Oomwatcd Vlber- 
board and can be tomistaed witb K. D. lock- 
eomar eorers, safe and conrenient. 
Write for fall parttcolara. 

THE HINDE k DAUCH PAPER CO. 

SAMDUSKT, OHIO 



A handsome, new delivery wagon has 
been put into service by the CharlcB C^ 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



137 







Specisd Discounts 

L*ss than 280, assertad. . , 20% BOO and ovar. aaaertad 20 and 109I 

280 and ovar, aaaortad 28% lOOO and ovar, aaaortad 80?t 

Prices ff. o. b. Marion* Ind.; 3<j() extra discount if casii witli ordsr. 

PriatBf Mack ar coloraJ iak. $3.50 t*t tkawuU aztra ar laH qauttty. 



Milt Gray "S" Grade 

Undley standard-weight, 
well moisture - proofed, 
green tinted inside, special 
reinforced, easy folding, 
hinge crease. 

For Out Flowen, ato. 
Shallow Full 
Lid Tele- 
Size Per 100 Bcope 

16x4x8 $ 8.60 

t0x4x8 4.80 

18x6x8 8.06 I 4.20 

Slx6x8 4.20 4.60 

Mx6x8H ... 6.00 6.80 

80x6x8V| ... 6.10 6.90 

S6x6Vix8V4 . 8.66 0.80 

Slx7x8H ••• •■30 

84x8x4 8.00 8.76 

88x8x4 8.76 10.80 

84x8x6 8.40 10.86 

88x8x6 8.60 18.80 

86x8x6 18.16 16.86 

48x8x6 18.40 

Nut Gray "AA" 

PoaltiTely the highest 
quality, atiffest, beat 
flower box obtainable. la 
molature-proofed, green 
tinted inside, easy folding, 
hinge crease. We recom- 
mend full telescope AA 
lllat Gray for ahlpplng. 

Shallow Full 
Ud Tele- 
Size Per 100 acope 

18x6x8 1 4.86 $ 4.80 

81x6x8 4.70 6.86 

84x6x3% ... 6.66 6.60 

80x6xS</i ... 6.80 8.10 

S6x6%xSVi . 8.80 10.10 

81x7x8Vi ... 6.60 

84x8x4 8.86 10.00 

84x8x6 8.66 11.30 

88x8x4 8.00 11.10 

88x8x6 9.80 18.60 

86x8x6 16.80 

48x8x6 19.96 

For other sizes see Regu- 
lar Standard "B" Grade. 



Hist Gray Canage 

High - grade, moisture- 
proofed, green tinted in- 
side, special reinforced, 
easy folding, hinge crease. 



Size 


Lid 


Per 100 


8x 6x6 


2-lnch. 


..% 8.76 


lOx 6x6>4 


2-inch. 


.. 4.60 


18x 8x6V; 


2-lnch. 


.. 6.60 


16x Sxei^ 


2-lnch. 


.. 7.60 


14x10x8 


2-inch. 


.. 10.60 



Hist Gray OUang Deiigi 

Heayy weight, well 
moisture-proofed. All full 
telescope. Special hinge 
creased. 

Size Per 100 

80x10x6 ...: $16.40 

36x10x6 18.60 

86x10x6 81.40 

48x10x6 88.76 

48x10x6 87.60 

80x18x6 18.88 

86x12x6 86.90 

30x18x7 88.60 

86x18x8 ..., 81.66 

86x14x6 86.76 

80x14x8 88.70 

86x14x8 83.60 

40x14x8 86.40 

48x17x8 48.76 



Nift Gray Sfiare Desi(i 

H e a T y weight, well 
moisture-proofed. All full 
telescope. Special hinge 
creased. 

Size Per 100 

14x14x8 117.60 

16x16x7 17.60 

16x16x8 81.70 

18x18x7 81.90 

80x20x6 81.80 

80x80x8 88.70 

80x80x10 86.00 

24x84x8 84.70 

24x84x10 4&.86 

88x88x8 46.30 

32x32x8 64.80 



Greei Boxes 

A Beautiful Appropriate 
Color 
Made from high-grade, 
medium weight, moisture- 
proofed stock. Special 
binge creased. 

Shallow Full 
Ud Tele- 
Size Per 100 scope 

7x4x4 1 2.90 

16x7x6V4 ... 6.70 

18x6x8 4.10 $ 4.36 

21x6x3 4.60 4.76 

24x6xSVi 6.86 

30x6x3% ... 6.60 7.80 

36x6%x3H 8.86 

84x8x4 7.76 8.80 

88x8x6 9.90 18.80 

36x8x6 ..... 18.00 16.00 
80x10x6 14.90 

Marble Greei Bezei 

Made from same liigh 
grade atocic aa our regular 
green and in same sizes. 
Special hinge creased. 

Shallow Full 
Lid Tele- 
Size Per 100 scope 

7x4x4 $8.00 

16x7x6% ... 6.86 

18x6x3 4.86 $ 4,60 

21x6x3 4.66 4.90 

84x6x8% 6.40 

30x6x8% ... 6.70 7.40 

S6x6%x8% 9.60 

84x8x4 7.66 9.46 

88x8x6 10.16 18.19 

36x8x6 18.30 16.40 

30x10x6 16.80 

Naiila Bazet 

Made of high - grade, 
water-proofed, Manila lined 
atoclc. Absolutely the best 
medium priced box on the 
marltet. Special binge 
creased. 

Size Lid Per 100 

18x6x3 2-inch... $ 3.76 

81x6x3 2-lnch... 8.96 

24x6x3% 2-inch... 4.76 
30x6x3% 2-inch . . . 6.80 
21x7x3% 2-inch . . . 6.96 
24x8x4 2-inch... 7.70 

28x8x6 2-inch... 9.10 

36x8x6 2%-lnch. 11.70 

86x8x6 6-inch... 14.76 



White Enaneled 

"AA" Grade 

For Cut Flowers 

The most beautiful box 
made. The bardeat, atiff- 
est, and best water-proofed 
genuine Enameled Clay 
Coated stock obtainable 
and Tery tough and dur- 
able. Is specially flnlshed 
to prevent aolling. Printa 
beautifully. Special water- 
proofed lining inside. 



Size 
18x 6x8 
80x 6x8 
81x 6x8 
24x 6x8% 
80x 6x3% 
86x6%x8% 
21x 7x9% 
84x 8x4 
84x 8x6 
88x 8x6 
36x 8x6 
80x10x6 
86x10x6 



Lid 
2-inch. 
2-lncb. 
2-lnch. 
2-incb. 
2-inch. 
2-lncb. 
2-inch. 
2-inch. 
2-inch. 
2-inch. 
6-iDCh . 
6-inch . 
6-inch. 



Per 100 
..$ 6.10 

.. 6.60 

. . 6.86 

.. 8.46 

.. 9.80 

.. 18.40 

.. 9.40 

.. 18.80 

.. 18.70 

.. 16.00 

.. 80.80 

.. 80.60 

.. 88.66 



Wkite Eiameled Carute 

"AA" Grada 

Same high quality; stlflt, 
extra tough board aa used 
in White Bnamel. "AA" 
cut flower. Special hinge 
creased. 

Size Lid Per 100 

7x 4x4 2-lnch... $ 4.10 

8x 6x( '--inch... 6.86 

lOx 6x6% 2-incb... 6.80 

12x8x6% 2-iDch... 8.80 

14x10x8 2-lnch... 16.60 

White Pitted Baiei 

Patent White plated 
stock. A beautiful box, 
but not as nice aa oar 
White Enameled. Special 
hinge creased. 

Shallow Full 
Lid Tel»- 

Slze Per 100 acopa 

18x6x8 $ 4.76 $ 6.00 

81x6x8 6.00 6.60 

84x6x8% ... 6.00 6.80 
80x6x3% ... 7.80 8.80 
36x6x8% ... 9.90 11.00 

84x8x4 8.60 

88x8x6 11.60 18,60 

86x8x6 14.80 17.00 



BARGAINS 



Odd lota and discontinued, high-grade bargain mill 
ends. SPBOIAIr— Extra Discount of 10 Per Cent. 

7x 4x4 2-lnch lid Violet color % 8.80 

7x 4x4 2-lnch lid Green color 8.80 

16x 7x6% 2-inch lid Green color 6.70 

14x10x8 2-inch Ud Tlolet color 8.76 



ECONOMY CARTONS 

Ono-Pieoe Style 
Made of mlat gray light-weight stock. Just the box 
for small local delivery packagea. Far superior to 
wrapping paper and almost as cheap. Try them. 



Size 


Per 100 


80x4%x3 


...$8.40 


84x4% x3 


... 8.66 


84x6 x8% 


... 8.16 


30x6 x3% 


.... 8.60 




LlNDLEY FLORIST BOX CO. 

Quality Box Makers MARION, IND. 

Oar inspactora bava aortaMMflNHB oar regular ftock aoma good aeconda 



! Intereatcd 



CITY SAISS AOENCIB8 

Chicago — Phone Franklin 64S0 — A. V. Z. Jenninga. 
New Yorl< — Phone Academy 2663 — <}eo. ll Hoopla 
St. IvoniH — Phone Olive 1340 — H. F. Seigneur. 
Louisville — Phone 2669 — J. Raymond Clarlt 
Detroit — Phone Cadillac 4178 — A. A. Fordon. 
Buffalo — Phone Seneca 8336 — J. Anthony. 
Richmoitd, Va. — Phone Boulevard 673— -J. 8. Scott, 
.lacksonville, Fla. — Phone 5966 — Southern Brokerage. 
Cleveland — 316 National Bldg. — P. B. Toung 



136 



The Florists' Review 



Mat 4. 1922 



The Florists* Supply House of America 



Mothers' Day Specials 

MOTHERS' DAY will soon be upon us. 
You will want some nice, fine 

Pure White Muslin Carnations 

Look as good as the natural ones 

Only $2.50 per 100 

Cycas Sprays with White Carnations, 75c each 

Mothers' Day Flower Receptacles 

With cup retainer for holding^ flowers 

$3.00 per doz. 

H. Bayersdorf er & Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF METALLIC DESIGNS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

1 129-1 133 Arch Street PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Branch Factory: 709 First Ave.. New York City, Telephone Vanderbilt 4976 




lO Inches high 



Mpntion Thf Rfvl»w when you write. 



SAN FSANCISCO NOTES. 

(Continued from page 92.) 
nic at Fairfax park, June 25. Active 
preparations are already in progress to 
make the affair a success. Frank 
Thatcher, of Pelicano, Eossi & Co., and 
Jack Kilroy, at Eighteenth and Castro 
streets, have been appointed a commit- 
tee on arrangements. 

The Growers' Floral Co. has been 
growing carnations with an eye to hav- 
ing good crops Mothers' day. 

Enomoto & Co. are almost flooded 
with eucalyptus pods and buds, for 
which there is a good demand. 

Domoto Bros, are showing beautiful 
potted azaleas and rhododendrons, 
grown in lath houses. 

The United Flower & Supply Co. is 
doing a large business in Boston ferns 
and in potted plants, which sell well 
locally, in spite of the glut of cut 
flowers. 

"I do not think that there will be a 
shortage of carnations Mothers' day; I 
know it," stated J. A. Axell. "There 
are not enough carnations being grown 
to meet the abnormal demand," con- 
tinued he. "So many of the growers 
gave up carnations and substituted 
roses, that now we are having quanti- 
ties of roses on the market. If we could 
salt away all the stock we now have, 
we could do well on Mothers' day." 

F. C. Jaeger has taken up golf on his 
weekly Monday off and is becoming an 
enthusiast for the game. F. C. Jaeger, 
Jr., says that the firm is doing well with 
baskets and is already booking orders 
for Mothers' day. 

The Suzanne Floral Co. had all the 
decorations for the International Ge- 
neva Association, at California House. 



Here Are Some Real Prices On 

FLORISTS' 




Our Prices on the Popular 
MIST GRAY 

Will Save You Money. 

The following Discounts apply: 

100 to 3M Boxes 10 per cent 

300 to 500 Boxes 15 per cent 

500 to 800 Boxes 20 per cent 

800 to IJMO Boxes 25 per cent 

1,000 andfover Boxes 30 per cent 

PrintinW in one color, $4.00 per thousand or 
less. BrAnze, Gold or two colors double the 
above cha?Ke. The above discounts also apply 
to the priiTtingr charge. 

H yOtr^se Pink, White or Violet Enamel, 
Covert Gray or Fern Green, ask us for prices. 

PROMPT DELIVERY ORDER NOW 



NO. 

1 

2 

3 

■) 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
IS 
16 



Send Us Your Order 

SIZE PER 100 

18x5x3 $ 3.75 

21xSx3J/^ AM 

24x5x.^J^ 4.50 

30xSxi'/2 5.50 

21x8x4 5.75 

24x8x4 0.00 

28x8x5 7.50 

36x8x5 11.50 

36x5x3.'-^ S.00 

30x10x5 13.00 

36x10x5 15.H 

42x10x5 1S.00 

20x20x10 30.00 

24x24x10 30.00 

ixSxA'A 3.50 

12x8x5>^ 4.75 



HOLTON & HUNKEL CO. 



471 Milwaukee Street 



MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 



Florists' Stationery 



MS qostad art tar White Haissaanalll Bead, 
triatad la Mack or gt u m iak oaly. 



lOOO Latterhaada, tl.M 1000 BOlkaadi, tl.M 

lOIOCaTalopas, 4.M lOOOLabala. Ml 

Writs for saaplas 



Naiar rriit Skip, 



P.O.Box 



ra. 



The hall and many tables were deco- 
rated with spring flowers. 



H. & D. DESIGN BOXES 

▲re made of Ugbi, strong Oomwated Wibet- 
board and can be fomiahed witb K. D. lock- 
corner corera, safe and conrenlent. 
Write for fall parUcolaia. 

THE HINDE k DAUCH PAPER CO. 

SAKDCSKT, OHIO 



A handsome, new delivery wagon has 
been put into service by the Charles C 



fWWiTiyf' 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



137 




Special Discounts 

Lass than 280, assertad..,. 20% BOO and evar, assertad 20 and 10% 

280 and evar, assertad 28% lOOO and evar, asserted..., 30% 

Prices f. o. b. Marion, Ind.; 3<jt extra discount if casli witli ordsr. 

PrialBC U>ck ar calarad iak, $3.St p«r IhMnad •zira ar Uu qautily. 



Hilt Gray "S" Grade 

Lindlej Btandard-weiBbt, 
well moisture - proofed, 
green tinted inside, special 
reinforced, easy folding, 
hinge crease. 

For Out Flowers, ete. 
Shallow Full 
Ud Tele- 
Size Per 100 scope 

16x4x8 9 8.60 

>0x4x8 4.90 

18x6x3 8.06 8 4,80 

81x6x8 4.20 4.60 

S4x6x8Vi ... 6.00 6,80 

80x6x8H ••• 6,10 6.90 

86x6Vix8Vi . 8.66 9.80 
aix7x8H ... 6.80 

84x8x4 8.00 9.76 

88x8x4 8.76 10.80 

84x8x6 8.40 10.96 

88x8x6 9,60 18.80 

86x8x6 18.16 16.86 

48x8x6 19.40 

Flist Gray "AA" 

PosltiTel7 the highest 
quality, stiffest, best 
flower box obtainable. Is 
moisture-proofed, green 
tinted inside, easy folding, 
hinge crease. We recom- 
mend full telescope AA 
Mist Gray for shipping. 

Shallow Full 

Ud Tele- 

Slse Per 100 scope 

18x6x8 8 4.86 8 4.80 

81x6x8 4.70 6.86 

84x6x3% ... 6.66 6.60 

80x6x3% ... 6.90 8.10 

86x6V4x8>4 . 8.80 10.10 
81x7^Vi ■■. fl.60 

84x8x4 8.86 10.00 

84x8x6 8.66 11.80 

88x8x4 9.00 11.10 

88x8x6 9.80 18.60 

86x8x6 16.80 

48x8x6 19.96 

For other sizes see Regu- 
lar Standard "8" Grade. 



Hilt Gray Canafe 

High - grade, moisture- 
proofed, green tinted in- 
side, special reinforced, 
easy folding, hinge crease. 

Size Lid Per 100 

8z 6x6 2-lnch...8 8.76 

lOx 6x6% 2-inch... 4.60 

18x 8x6% 2-lncb... 6.60 

16x8x6% 2-inch... 7.60 

14x10x8 2-inch... 10.60 



Nist Gray OklaHg Detigi 

Heary weight, well 
moisture-proofed. AH fall 
telescope. Special hinge 
creased. 

Size Per 100 

80x10x6 ...: 816.40 

36x10x6 18.60 

86x10x6 81.40 

48x10x6 88.76 

48x10x6 87.60 

80x18x6 19.86 

86x18x6 86.90 

30x18x7 88.60 

36x18x8 81.66 

36x14x6 86.76 

80x14x8 88.70 

36x14x8 83.60 

40x14x8 36.40 

48x17x8 48.76 



Nist Gray Sfiare Denci 

H e a T y weight, well 
moisture-proofed. All full 
telescope. Special hinge 
creased. 

Size Per 100 

14x14x8 817.60 

16x16x7 17.60 

16x16x8 81.70 

18x18x7 81,80 

80x20x6 81.80 

80x80x8 88.70 

80x80x10 86.00 

24x24x8 84.70 

84x24x10 46.28 

88x28x8 46.30 

32x32x8 64.30 



Greei Boxes 

A Beautiful Appropriate 
Color 
Made from high-grade, 
medium weight, moisture- 
proofed stock. Special 
binge creased. 

Shallow Full 
Ud Tele- 
Size Per 100 scope 

7x4x4 8 2.90 

16x7x6% ... 6,70 

18x6x3 4.10 8 4.86 

81x6x3 4.60 4.76 

84x6x8% 6.26 

30x6x3% ... 6,60 7.80 

36x6%x3% 9,36 

84x8x4 7.76 9.80 

88x8x6 9.90 12.80 

86x8x6 ..... 18.00 16.00 
30x10x6 14.90 

Marble Greei Bexes 

Made from same high 
grade stock as our regular 
green and in same sices. 
Special hinge creased. 

Shallow Full 
Ud Tele- 
Size Per 100 scope 

7x4x4 8 8.00 

16x7x6% ... 6.86 

18x6x3 4.86 8 4.60 

21x6x8 4.66 4.90 

24x6x3% 6.40 

30x6x3% ... 6.70 7.40 

3ex6%x8% 9.60 

84x8x4 7,06 9.46 

88x8x6 10.16 18.18 

36x8x6 18.30 16.40 

30x10x6 16.80 

Manila Bexes 

Made of high - grade, 
water-proofed, Manila lined 
stock. Absolutely the best 
medium priced box on the 
market. Special binge 
creased. 

Size Lid Per 100 

18x6x3 2-lnch...8 8.76 

81x6x3 2-lnch... 8,96 

24x6x3% 2-Inch... 4.76 
30x6x3% 2-Inch . . . 6.80 
21x7x3% 2-Inch... 6.96 
24x8x4 2-lnch... 7.70 

28x8x6 2-lnch... 8.10 

36x8x6 2%-lnch. 11,70 

36x8x6 6-Inch... 14.76 



White Enameled 

"AA" Grade 

For Cut Flowers 

The most beautiful box 
made. The hardest, stlS- 
est, and best water-proofed 
genuine Enameled Clay 
Coated stock obtainable 
and Tery tough and dur- 
able. Is specially finished 
to prerent soiling. Prints 
beautifully. Special water- 
proofed lining inside. 



Size 


Ud 


Per 100 


18x 6x8 


2-lnch. 


..$ 6.10 


80x 6x8 


2-inch. 


.. e.60 


81x 6x8 


2-lnch. 


. . 6.86 


24x 6x8% 
80x 6x3% 


2-lnch. 


.. 8.46 


2-inch. 


.. 9.90 


36x6% x8% 
21x 7x8% 


2-lnch. 


.. 18.40 


2-inch. 


.. 9.40 


S4x 8x4 


2-inch. 


.. 18.80 


S4x 8x6 


2-lnch. 


.. 18.70 


88x 8x6 


2-lnch. 


.. 16.00 


36x 8x6 


6-inch. 


.. 80.80 


80x10x6 


6-lnch . 


.. 80.60 


86x10x6 


B-lnch. 


.. 83.60 



White Enameled Cersage 

"AA" Grade 

Same high quality; stiff, 
extra tough board as used 
In White Bnamel. "AA" 
cut flower. Special binge 
creased. 

Size Ud Per 100 

7x 4x4 2-inch... a 4.10 

8x 6xt '--inch... 6.86 

lOx 6x6% 2-lnch... 6.80 

18x 8x6% 2-inch... 8.80 

14x10x8 2-inch... 16.60 

White Plated Boxes 

Patent white plated 
stock. A beantifnl box, 
but not as nice as oar 
White Enameled. Special 
binge creased. 

Shallow Fall 
Ud Tele- 
Size Per 100 scop« 

18x6x8 a 4.76 a 6.00 

81x6x3 8.00 6.60 

84x6x8% ... 6.00 6.90 
30x6x3% ... 7.80 8.10 
86x6x8% ... 9.90 11.00 

84x8x4 9.60 

28x8x6 11,60 18.60 

86x8x6 14.90 17.00 



BARGAINS 

Odd lots and discontinued, high-grade bargain mill 
ends. SPECIAL— Extra Discount of 10 Per Cent. 

7x 4x4 2-lnch Ud Violet color | 8,08 

7x 4x4 2-lnch lid Oreen color 8.00 

16x 7x6% 2-lnch Ud Green color 6.70 

14x10x8 2-lnck lid Violet celor 0.76 



ECONOMY CARTONS 

Ona-Pleo* Style 

Made of mist gray light-weight stock. Just the box 
for small local delivery packages. Far superior to 
wrapping paper and almost as cheap. Try them. 



Size 


Per 100 J^T : 


20x4%x3 


....».40 £SC---— 


84x4% x3 


• ••«•" cr^ — - 


84x6 x3% 


• • SIS nk. 


30x6 x3% 


.... 8.60 ^iaBi.;^ 



Udley FLOitisr Box Co. 

Quality Box Makers MARION, IND. 

Oar iiupectora have tortaAMBCMMi our regular «tock some good secoiuU 

Wntc us if interested 



CITT SAI.E8 AOKNCIB8 

Chicago — Phone Franklin 5450 — A. V. Z. Jennings. 
New York — Phone Academy 2663— ^eo. I>. Hoopla. 
St. I>oniH — Phone Olive 1340 — H. F. Seigneur. 
LoulsvUlP — Phone 2669 — J. Raymond Ciark. 
Detroit — Phone Cadillac 4178 — A. A. Fordon. 
Bulfalo — Phone Seneca 8336 — J. Anthony. 
Richmond, Va. — Phone Boulevard 673 — J. S. Scott. 
.larkHonville, Fla. — Phone 5966 — Southern Brokerage. 
Cleveland — 315 National Bldg. — P. B. Young 



138 



The Rorists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



Raedlein's Mothers' Day Specials 




ASSORTMENT M-l— 

50 Tumbler Baskets, with liner, 4 to 
5-in. diameter, 13 to 17 ins. over 
all, 4 to 7 ins. deep 

ASSORTMENT M-2— 

30 Medium Cut Flower Baskets, 
with liner, 7 to 8-in. diameter, 27 to 
32 ins. over all, 10 to 12 ins. deep. . 

ASSORTMENT M-3— 

12 LarseCut Flower Baskets, with 
liner, 10 to ll-in. diameter, 30 to 40 
ins. over all, 13 to 18 ins. deep 

ASSORTMENT M-4— 

25 Plant or Table Baskets, with 
liner, 10 to 13 ins. wide; 15 to 23 
ins. over all, 5 to 6J4 ins. deep 



$19.S0 
$25.40 
$20.2S 
$26.00 



Satisfaction guaranteed or money cheerfnlly refunded. 

All Baskets come In Assorted White two-tone aiui B'jnze 
two-tone colors, or In Snow White Enamel, with metal liners. 



Raedlein— Al^vays at your Service 

Raedlein Basket Company 

713-717 MILWAUKEE AVENUE CHICAGO 




Navlet Co. B. Lcviton, the driver, al- 
though quite young, was one of the first 
to tackle a florists' delivery "gas 
wagon" in San Francisco. Until eight 
years ago, most local florists had boys to 
make deliveries. 

Podesta & Baldocchi aro contributing 
two musical numbers to the Fairmont 
radio broadcasting station, with William 
Paganinni, the whistler, and Edward 
Kleinhans, the pianist. On the opening 
night, N. A. Baldocchi invited all his 
stafif to his home to listen in at his re- 
ceiving station. 

Joseph's finds social business good. 
Some of the first gladioli of the season 
were shown in Joseph's windows. 

Pelicano, Kossi & Co. had the decora- 
tions for a large society wedding. Frank 
Thatcher was in charge of this work. 
This firm came to the fore with some of 
the earliest and best gladioli. 

Brown & Kennedy report that wed- 
ding and funeral work is keoi)ing up 
well iu the Mission district. M. M. 



Umatilla, Fla. — Charles II. Post is es- 
tablishing a i)usiness for the growing 
of greens for florists. 

Athens, Ga.— The name of T. W. Pen- 
nock lias been added to the roster of 
members of tlio firm of Crucedals Green- 
houses. 

St. Petersburg, Fla.— Cade B. Allen 
is iu tlie trade with a stock of flowers, 
plants, shrubs, etc. He has an acre of 
roses, in aiMitioii to gladioli, sweet 
peas, lilies and others. 

Alvin, Tex.— The Xytex Floral Co. re- 
ports tiiat the outlook for cape jasmines 
is most favoralile in respect of both line 
bulls and foliage, but they will be a lit- 
tle later than usual. Unless ideal 
weather forwards tlie crop, most of it 
will probably come after May 20. Sev- 
eral thousaiul gladioli and a good many 
thousand daisies will l)e cut for Moth- 
ers' day. Sweet peas have been shijiped 
daily since Febriiai-y 
large quantities. 



DISCOUNT 
y-w whca Boaey is Mat 
^ witk tk« order. 



FLORISTS' BOXES 5% 

The AuU Bros. Co., Dayton, O. 

ESTABLISHED 1890 

Made of heayy, high-grade material and first-class workmanship, 
strive for duplicate orders and get them. Write for samples. 

Mist Oray Mist Onj 

or Manila or Manila 
Shallow Full 

Corer Telescope 
Price Price 

SIZES Per 100 Per 100 

3 x20x4 $ 2.50 

3 xlSxS 2.60 

3^x24x5 $3.25 4.20 

3^x30x5 4.25 5.00 

5 x24x8 5.80 6.80 

5 x28x8 6.50 8.20 

5 x36x6 7.70 10.90 

5 x38x8 9.25 11.30 



We 



Mist aray Mist Oray 

or Manila or Manila 
Shallow Full 

Cover Telescope 
Price Price 

SIZES per 100 per 100 

5x30x10 $10.10 $11.50 

6x28x12 10.80 12.60 

5x35x10 11.40 13.00 

6x36x12 14.40 16.50 

8x20x20 15.20 19.00 

8x24x24 22.50 25.60 

7x42x12 25.70 

8x48x14 31.50 



Gray Corsage and Violet 

With Shallow Fluted Edge Lid 

5%x9x 6 $3.40 I 6x9x13 $4.60 

6 x7xl4 4.30 I 7x9x 9 4.60 

ONE PIECE BOX, heavy weight, mist »ray, 3x4^x24 $2.50 

Printing in black ink, $2.00 per 1000, or less quantity; printing in colored ink, $3.00 per 
1000 or less quantity, in assorted sizes. All f. o. b. Dayton, Ohio. 
No order printed less than SO of large sizes or 100 of small sizes. 



though not in 



Save Freight on 
Your Boxes 

If you are located west of the Missis- 
sippi river, be sure and write for prices 




St. Joseph Paper Box Company 

St. Joseph, Missouri 




Wm. J. Boas & Co. 

1427 Vine Street, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Write for 
Prtoea. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



139 



ecial Announcement 

For the benefit of Chicago and mid-western customers, we have established a Chicago Sales 
Office, managed by Charles L. Manning, Box 133, Maywood, 111. We can supply from 
stock at Chicago, unprinted boxes for immediate delivery. 



CL AOWCCMCHTS ARt HAOC CONTinaCNT UPON BTWi .. n. ACC1OC.NT, OD CAUSC* aCYOMO Ou« CSMtroi. 
P«>Ct» Swa^CCT TO CHAM6I wiTnOuT NOTiCC 






(Jilt 



^i 



^t 



4^s 



CSTA*LISHCD lao* 



•■AMCvt erricES 
•OSTON 

•MiL»Dei.i»Mi* 

(WASHINGTON 



FOLDING PAPER BOXES 

riBRE DRUMS 



April 17, 1933 



Florists' Publishing Company, 
508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 

Gentlemen:- 



111. 



Making reference to your recent letter 
In which you suggest the possibility of our using 
a larger or page ad In your publication, listing 
prices similar to some of our competitors, we would 
state that as a general thing we do not believe 
in this kind of advertising. 

Our plant has been operating to full 
capacity and over time during. all the past months when 
most box shops have been running to about half 
capacity. "Quality"- is the reason— and on a 
Quality basis our prices are no higher than our com- 
petitors, and in a great many cases they are lower. 

We have for years been catering to a very 
large majority of the largest and most desirable 
Florists in the country, and a great many of our old 
customers, as well as new ones, send in their orders 
without price question, knowing that Climax will give 
them the lowest prices and discounts possible and 
stand back of its product in every way — Thus we 
have made "Quality" the thought of our endeavor and 
the results have been highly gratifying. We make six 
grades of Florist Boxes- two more than our nearest 
competitor- and carry in our warehouses at all times 
approximately a thousand tons of box board to take 
care cf our good Florist Friends. 

It may be that later on we will take up 
with you the matter of running a series of unsolicited 
testimonial letters, such as we have carried in the 
F, T. D. News. In the meantime, we desire to thank 
you for your favors. 

Very truly yours. 
Climax Mfg. Co. 



UCH/ LRF 



President • 



Manufacturers of the largest line of Florists" Boxes. All popular sizes in six grades, in- 
cluding our new "White Glazed," positively the highest class box on the market today. 
Our prices are no higher than for an inferior (luality box. Write for list, discounts and samples. 

CLIMAX MANUFACTURING CO., Castorland, N.Y. 

BRANCH OFFICES ; Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington and Chicago 



' .fyvrr^ ■"'^'^'^'■■^ ' '^T^rTf 5 



'.^^''^v^f ^rt Try^;5^;»-TjfT..-^' T**- , "^/TVr ^V ■' 



140 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1922 



Seed Trad e News 

AMXaiOAX SEED TKADB ASSOCIATION. 
President, L. L. Oldi. Madlaon. Wis.; aecre- 
tUT-treaturer, 0. B. Kendel, OleTeUnd, O. 

CONSiDEi;iN(i the many minions of bulbs 
grown last season, it may be said gladioli 
are well eleaiied iiji. 

Thk annual spring meeting of the 
Western Seedsmen's Assoeiation was 
held at Omaha. Neb., Saturday, April 
29, at the Hotel Fontenelle. The meet- 
ing was given o\'er entirely to a discus- 
sion of garden seeds. 

The Michigan Cannors' Association 
held a two days" session at Grand Rapids 
last week, with eighty members in at- 
tendance. Prof. (J. H. Koons, pathologist 
jit the University of Michigan, advised 
that experiments to determine a standard 
tomato for the Michigan canneries be 
based upon existing varieties rather than 
upon an attempt to evolve a new strain. 

Mis.s KiLEEN Low, representing Stuart 
Low & Co., Bush Hill Park, Middlesex, 
Enghmd, is visiting the seed trade on her 
wav from Vancouver to New York. She 
was at Chicago this week. This is Miss 
Low's tliird trip to America since the 
firm's old representative, the late Harry 
Barnard, stopped coming. This time she 
is on her way around the world, having 
first visited 'France, Italy, Imlia and 
.Japan. 

A GIFT of 47,0U0 bulbs, including nar- 
cissi, jonquils, hyacinths, daffodils and 
tulips, was recently made to the city of 
New York bv the National Association of 
Bulb C; rowers of Holland. The bulbs 
were ]>lanted in Central jiark, near Fifth 
avenue and Fifty ninth street, and any- 
one who has enjoyed the privilege of visit- 
ing this delightful spot in the park can 
readily visualize the wonderful transform- 
ing effect these 8U,000 blooms will have on 
the territory in the immediate vicinity of 
the Sherman statue. 

The severe winter in Holland is re- 
ported to have affected the bulb crops 
in some cases. J. J. Grullemans & Sons, 
of Lisse, say that hyacinths have suffered 
heavily and' that in some parts of the dis- 
trict early tulips have been frozen. Dar- 
win tulips have been lost by some growers 
in important quantities, especially in 
fields where planting took place after 
November. Crocuses are said to have 
suffered considerably in some places, while 
Dutch and Spanish irises, especially the 
white varieties, have been killed outright. 
Some other sorts of bulbs have been sim- 
ilarily damaged, it is said. As yet the 
efifect of the severe winter is only esti- 
mated. Later reports will give more exact 
information. 



CANNERS FACE BAD SEASON. 

This is the one season when pea can- 
ners hoped that weather conditions 
would be favorable for an early pack 
so that the present shortage of stocks 
might be relieved, but so far the out- 
look in all packing sections has been 
unfavorable. In Wisconsin the cold, 
wet weather has delayed planting. 
There has been no seeding so far, and 
it is now about a week later than the 
average planting of other years. The 
outlook is discouraging, because the 
backward start will prove a handicap 
all season and is in itself a sufficient 
cause for concern on the part of the 
packer. Canncrs have been compelled 
to revise completely their plans for 



The albert DICKINSON COMPANY 

35th St. and California Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

LAWN SEED TO THE TRADE 



€X C MORSE & CO. 
WHOLESALE SEED GROWERS 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



CARROT-CELERY-ENDIVE-LEEK-LETTUCB-ONION-RADISH-PARSNIP-PABSLET-BALSirT 
SWEET PEAS-ALL VARIETIES PEAS-KENTUCKY WONDER BEANS 



Braslan 



Growen for tba Wholesale Trade Only. Onloo, Ijettnce, Carrot, 
Pamlp, Panlar, Oelerr. Endlre, Salsify and Mixed Sweet Pea*. 



Seed Growers 



SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Company 





Garden LtONARD SEED CO. Onion 

^AAli« WHOLESALE GROWERS O . 

*^^^^ 226-230 WEST KINZIE STREET. CHICAGO ^^^^ 




1 






Wholesale Seed Grower 

Pepper, Eggplant Tomato, Okra. Asparagus, 
Rhubwb, Crlery, Spinach, Beet Onion, Beans, 
Cabbage. Cauliflower, Sweet Com, Vine Seeds. 

Correspondence Solicited 
GEORGE R. PEDRICK & SON 

PEDRICKTOWN, N. J. 


Waldo Rohnert 

GILROY, CAL. 
Wholesale Seed Grower 

Specialties: Beet, Carrot, Endive. Lettuce. 

Onion and Radish. 

Correspondence Solicited. 


m KINBERI.IN SEED CO. 

sJST'S!;^^ San Jose, Cal. 

GROWERS OP 
ONION, LETTUCE, RADISH, ETC 

Correspondence SoKcitet) 


JAMES VICK'S SONS 

GROWERS OP 
FLOWER and VEGETABLE SEEDS 

Get the benefit of our 73 years' experience 
AU Seasonable Varieties 

Our Stocks Are Very Complete 

Rochester, N. Y. The Flower City 


THE 

J. C. Robinson Seed Co. 

WATERLOO, NEB. 
ROCKY FORD, COLO. 

Contract growers of Cucumber. Cantaloupe, 
Watermelon, Sauash and Pumpkin Seed, Sugar, 
Flint and Field Seed Corn. 


TOMATO SEED 

Grown for the 
Wholesale Seed Trade 

HAVEN SEED CO. 

SANTA ANA. CALIFORNIA 






The C. Herbert Coy Seed Co. 

VALLEY, g;^ NEB. 

Wholesale Growers of Hifk-rade Seeds 

Cucumber, Muskmelon, Squash and Pump- 
kin; Sweet- Flint and Dent Seed Corn 


The J. Bolgiano Seed Co. 

Garden, Field and Flower Seeds 
Poultry Supplies 

Founded 1818 Incorporated 1921 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



-flM-^M^'f-* 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



141 



Not Prico^ 



I.I <^f-^-ll"W«-. 




Bui Quality ^ 



FLOWER SEEDS 

Write at Once for Price 
Bamboo Stakes 

TREE SEEDS 
T. SAKATA & CO. 

SAKAICHO, Yok^eSS^^f .rk JAPAN 

Office : No. 1 KITANAKADORI 
ITCHOMB :-: YOKOHAMA 



We are Headquarters for the 

BEST OF EVERYTHING 
in 

Peas, Beans, Corn and Vegetable Seeds 



Olkd to auote for preaent delivery or on 
Browing conti»ct for future delivery 



Jerome B. Rice Seed Co., Cambridgre, N. Y. 



MentloB The Review when yn write. 




Try WATKINS & SIMPSON, Ltd. 
^ for HARDY PERENNIAL 
and CHOICE FLORISTS' 

FLOWER SEEDS 

Write for illustrated A>r nn n ■ * ,r^B.i><k4^m.r 

catalogue to 27-29 Druy Lane, LONDON, England 



BuRPEES Seeds Grow 

W. Atlee Burpee Co* 

Seed Growers Philadelphia 

The Everett B. Clark Seed Co., Milford, Conn. 

Branch Hoosce In Wisconsin, Colorado, Montana, Idaho and Washington. 

BeanSf Peas. Sweet Com, Onion, Beet, Turnip, Tomato, Spinach. 



SEEDS 




30-32 BarcUy Street, NEW YORK CITT 



Tomato Seed and 

Seed Sweet Potatoes 

Pleated to quote yon prlcei on qaantltlee and 
varletlee wanted for preeent or fatare dellrery. 

H.AUSTIN Felton, Del. 



An Experience of Hall a Century 

IN PBODUCINQ BIGB-GRADE 

GARDEN SEEDS 



at yoar dlipoeal. Contract prowm for tha 
Ana ti " ■ "" "■ 

' both SPOT and VUTUBB raqairamrata. 



JobUn 



: tradeofa fall Una. Mail oi yoar fiat • 



Job6in« traife of a faU Una. Calu 
for both SPOT and VUTUBB raq 

te'' S. b. WnIioB & Suu X"" 



TOMATO SEED 

Pepper, Eggplant, Squash, Pumpkin, 
Cucumber, Cantaloupe and Watermelon 
Seed and Field Com, on contract. 

EDGAR F. HURFF 

Correspondence Solicited. Swedesboro, N. J. 



Th 



Seed 



L. D. Waller 
Company 

WHOLESALE GROWERS 

Select Stock of Flower Seeds 
Sweet Pea and Nasturtium in variety 

Guadalupe, California 



A New Florists' Aster 

EARLY AMERICAN BEAUTY 

Blooms ^ith the Royals 

SEND FOR FLORISTS' CATALOGUE 

HART & VICK 

55 Stono St., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



NcHutchison 

& CO. Offers 
Immediate Shipment 



Lay Bulbs ^ 12. 

OKanteam. 6 to 8 In 400 MT.60 

Gisanteam. 7 to • In 800 SO.OO 

MaanlBcnm. 8 to 9 In 200 S4.00 

Babram. 8 to 9 In 200 24.00 

Repacked and regraded. 

Valley Pips 

Per 1000 

German Type, forcing pips $22.60 

Berlin, early forcing pips 28.00 

2S00 pips per case, case lots only. 

Gladioli 

Per 1000 

l»4to IMjto 

All Northern grown. IVi-ln. 2-1d. 

Amerira, pale pink $22.00 

Mrs. Francis King $18.00 

Cblcaso White 30.00 

Halley, orange-pink 25.00 30.00 

Lily Lehman, blusii 50.00 

Willy Wigman, blush 45.00 

Ang'usta, pure white 32.00 

Nlagrnra, pale pink 30.00 35.00 

Prlm-e of Wales, pink 60.00 

Yellow Bud (Kunderd's) . . . 18.00 .... 

White Kiner, creamy 20.00 

Late White, waxy 24.00 

PrImuUnns Queen Victoria -lO.OO 

Mixed, all colors, ael 2000 25.00 

Bamboo Cane Stakes 

Bale Bale 
Domestic, natural, 6 to 6 ft. .1000 $10.00 

Domestic, natural. 6 to 9 ft.. 800 12.50 

Domestic, natural, 9 to 13 ft- 200 7.60 

Japanese, natural, 6 ft 2000 18.50 

Japanese, dyed green, 1V& ft. 2000 5.00 

Japanese, dyed green. 2 ft... 2000 7.S0 

Japanese, dyed green, 2^ ft. 2000 9.25 

Japanese, dyed green, 3 ft... 2000 11.00 

Japanese, dyed green. 3Vi ft. 2000 13.00 

Japanese, dyed green, 4 ft. . .2000 15.00 
F. O. B. New York. Can also quote 
F. O. B. Chicago or San Francisco. 

Raffia 

Per lb. 

Red Star Brand, 25 Xbu, op 90. IS 

Bed Star Rrand, 50 lbs. np 11% 

Bed Star Brand, 100 lbs. up 10 

Red Star Brand, bale (225 Iba).. .08% 
Also dyed in 20 colors and shades. 

Advance orders booked for the followlas 

Items at firm prices: 

Dra««ena Canes, best commercial varle* 

ties, fall shipment. 

Palm Seeds, Kentla Belmoreana and 

Forsterlana, F. O. B. Saa Francisco or 

New York. 

Cocos WeddelUana, Areea I^otescens, fall 

shipment. 

Ferns in Flats, all commercial rarletlea. 

July-Augrust shipment. 

FlcDS Elastiea, rooted mossed cuttlnfs, 

fall shipment. 

Domestle Bulbs, Freeslas, Cailaa, Iris Tln- 

gitana and Spanish. 

Fall Shipment 

Advance orders being booked for the fol- 
lowing Items, the prices when made be- 
Ing subject to buyer's acceptance. 
French Bulbs. Paper Whites, White Ro- 
mans, Lllium Candidum, Solell d'Or, etc. 
Dntch Bulbs. Hyacinths, Narcissi, Tu- 
lips, etc., XXX forcing grade only. 
Lily Bulbs, Formosum, Giganteum, Aura- 
tum, Rubrum, Magrniflcum, Album, etc. 
T. R. Begonia and Gloxinin Bulbs. 
Manetti Stocks, Engli.sh, for greenhouse 
graftins?. 

Chinese Sacred Lilies, Valley Pips, etc. 
Use business stationery. We sell only to 
the trade. Enclose remittance if you 
have not established credit with us. All 
quotations are P. O. B. New York. 

NcHUTCmSON & CO. 

95 Cliainbors St., NEW YORK 



■••• u—f: ^*':_> :-; 



142 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 




SNAPDRAGON 

Begin to sow seed for •pring blooms and 

for oarly spring sales of plants. Use the 

best seed and be snre of results. 

SEED of ovir famous Silver Pink. Sl.OO per pkt.; 

S for $2.60: 7 for SS.OO. 

SEED of Hybrid Pink and of our new Gk)lden 

Pink Queen, same price. 

SEED of Keystone, Nelrose. Gamet.Whi ' e, Tel- 

k>w. Scarlet. Light Pink. Buxton and Fancy 

Mixed, sec per pkt.; 8 for tl.OO. 

Free cultural directions. All orders cash. 

G. S. RANSBURG, SONERSWORTH. N. H. 



IVHCHELL'S 

FLOWER SEEDS 

V, Tr. Tr. 

CINERARIA Pkt. Pkt. 

Grandiflora Prize, dwarf $0.60 $1.00 

Grandiflora Prize, med. tall 60 1.00 

PRIMULA CHINENSIS 

Alba magnifica 60 1.00 

Chiswick Red 60 1.00 

Duchess 60 1.00 

Holborn Blue 60 1.00 

Kertnesina splendens 60 1.00 

Rosy Mom 60 1.00 

Prize Mixture 60 1.00 

PRIMULA OBCONICA GIGANTEA 

Tr. Pkt. ^ Oz. 

Lilacina, white $0.50 $2.00 

Kermesina, crimson 50 2.00 

Rosea, pink 50 2.00 

Alba, white 50 2.00 

Hybrida Mixed 50 1.50 

PRIMULA OBCONICA GIGANTEA 
Monster Strain 

Extra large flowering Tr. Pkt. 

Apple Blossom, soft pink $1.00 

Kermesina, deep crimson 1.00 

Plathii, deep rose 1.00 

Rosea, pink 1.00 

NICHELL'S SEED HOUSE 

S18SI6 Hnket St., FHIU. 



BULBS 



PIONEER GROWERS 
AND EXPORTERS of 

N. Veldhayzen van Zanten & Sons 

LISSE. HOLLAND 

Kstabllshcd IHTO-Still f,'oln(,' stroiip 
Csbl« AJdreM - VELDZANTEN, LISSE, HOLLAND. 



ALKEMADE & SON 

Wholetde Bulb Growers 

Send as your list of wants for aootatlons 

Noordwyk, Holland 



packing, as they will not have early 
offerings. If the weather in May and 
June is ideal, canners fear that they 
will be up against it at packing time, 
as there will be a rush of raw stock all 
at once, and the capacity of the facto- 
ries will not be sufficient to absorb it. 
One canner fears that only a normal 
pack will occur, with the average qual- 
ity lower than last year. Indiana grow- 
ers have no seeds planted, and the crop 
up-state is equally late. It was thought 
that southern sections would profit at 
the expense of less favored competing 
points by producing an early pack 
which would relieve the shortage of old 
goods, but the weather in the south has 
been unfavorable also. 



"POLITIC All PETTY LARCENY." 

"Political petty larceny" is the way 
a headline in the Chicago Tribune de- 
scribed the action of Congress in voting 
for free seeds. The headline appeared 
over the following editorial: 

Tlie United States Senate's approval of an ap- 
propriation of $350,000 to buy free seeds for con- 
gressmen to send to their constituents recalls 
the fact that the measure has already been 
adopted by tlie house, where It originated. Such 
an appropriation obviously is for political pur- 
I«)8ps. We do not know who gets the seeds or 
what the recipient does with them. Certainly a 
farmer has little use for a small packet of gar- 
den seeds. Perhaps it is the human trait of ac- 
(piisitiveness — especially of getting something 
or anything for nothing — to which the congress- 
men are catering. Perhaps the back-yard gar- 
dener gets most of the seeds, and the congress- 
man who sends them gets most of the votes. No 
doubt it is a good thing to encourage gardening, 
but to encourage it with public funds for private 
proflt is not good. Politically, it Is petty lar- 
ceu'. It is a «mU Item For sacta recipient of 
seeds, but it is $.350,000 out of the federal treas 
ury. Members of the T'nitod States Congress 
sliould be above such action. 



TWO SEED BILLS IN CONGRESS. 



Subjects Seeds to Police Powers. 

Two important seed bills were intro- 
duced in Congress last week. One is de- 
signed "to promote the sale of pure 
seeds" and the other is "to prohibit 
the transportation and sale of field seeds 
in ])ackages not properly branded." 

The first of these provides that all 
seeds transported in interstate and for- 
eign commerce shall be subject to the 
laws of the state, territory or the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, wherein they may re- 
main for seeding purposes. In other 
words, under the terms of this measure, 
such seeds become divested of their in- 
terstate commerce character and become 
subject to the police powers of the in- 
dividual jurisdiction into which they 
may enter. 

Any person, firm, corporation or 
(Ic.'iler in seeds who knowingly violated 
the ))r()pose(l law by carrying, trans- 
]>ortiiig or m;iiliiig into any state, terri- 
tory or the District of Columbia, seed 
for use therein for seeding purposes 
which was not in conformity witli the 
seed laws of such state, territory or the 
District of Columbia, would be liable to 
a fine of not to exceed .$.')Ofl, to be re- 
covered at the suit of the United States 
in any court of the United States having 
jurisdiction. 

Regulates Branding of Field Seeds. 

The other bill, requiring the branding 
of field seeds, does not cover garden 
seeds or grain not shipped or sold as 
seed, but otlierwise covers all grass and 
field seeds. It is provided that a pack- 
age or other container of such seeds 
shall be deemed to be misbranded (1) 
unless it be plainly and conspicuously 



Spring 

Flowering 

Bulbs 

READY FOR PROMPT SHIPMENT 
CANNAS — 2 to 3 eye roots 

Austria, 100 1000 

yellow $2.50 $20.00 

Florence Vaughan, 

yellow 2.75 25.00 

King Humbert 4.50 40.00 

Wintzer's Colossal, 

scarlet 5.00 40.00 

Yellow Humbert, 

bronze leaf 3.50 30.00 

HARDY ULIES 

Album, 8 to 9-in. Case Doz. 100 

Case of 200 

bulbs $27.00 $2.00 $15.00 

Auratum, 8 to 9- 

in. Case of 180 

bulbs 26.00 2.15 16.00 

Magniiicum, 8 to 

Q_ii'i Cssp or 

200 bulbs 25.00 1.85 14.00 

9 to 11-in. Case 

of 150 bulbs. .. 25.00 2.40 18.00 
Rubrum, 8 to 9-in. 

Case of 200 

bulbs 25.00 1.85 14.00 

9 to 11-in. Case 

of 150 bulbs... 25.00 2.40 18.00 

GLADIOLUS BULBS 

100 1000 
America, V/i, to li/S-in..$1.80 $16.00 
Chicago White, 1^ to 

2-in 3.75 35.00 

VA to VA-m 2.85 26.00 

Francis King, V/j. to 2-in. 2.50 22.00 

Halley, 1 Yz to 2-in 3.75 35.00 

1J4 to V/i-m 2.00 18.00 

Pendleton, 1^ to 2-in.. 5.00 45.00 

1J4 to IJ^-in 3.75 35.00 

Primulinus Hybrids, 1^ 

to 2-in 2.75 25.00 

TUBEROSES 

Doz. 100 1000 
Excelsior Dwarf 

Pearl (First 

Size), 4 to 6-in. 

circumference ..$0.50 $3.50 $30.00 
E'.celsior Dwarf 

Pearl (Jumbo 

Size). These are 

the finest bulbs 

that are pro- 
duced 75 5.50 50.00 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS SEED 

Greenhouse grown. . .$4.00 per 1000 
5000 for $18.00. 

Outdoor grown 2.50 per 1000 

5000 for $10.00. 

A. HENDERSON & CO 

166 N. Wabash Avenae, CHICAGO 



-:; r'- -, -,■■ r-«;?5»T^KT-'~'" : 



•*■ . T' ■> 



MAY 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



143 




Aug. Lagardc 



LIVE WIRE 

Again-Buy Your 
French Bulbs-Now 

FROM 

Lagarde & Vandervoort 

OLLIOULES, FRANCE 

Permanent American Address: 
P. O. Hamilton Grange Station 
Box 38 NEW YORK CITY 

Our rmpreaentative wiU be calling on you 




J. A. Vandervoort 



SEED 
RACK^ETS 



SEED 



UTHOttRAPHCO 

IHCOLOHS 
TSUB TO NATURC 
AND VARJCTV 

sccoMOtrrt 




AVe also make 
M Specialty of 

iScvd Cataloff Covtrt, 
Hi^cn, Bca LabeU, 
-NunoTmca't PUtci, 
J.IWB Craw and Bird 
Stti Curton uid Sc«<l 
Cirtoiu of evcr^r ciet- 
^riptioa. Wt lAvwp 
ckTTf ■ larg« atodc of 
•U iiems for unnwdiaM 
shipment, and givi 
prtMnpl attention to 
orders for individual 
requtrnwnti 



STECHER UTHCXUIAPHIC COMPAr^fV 

ROCHUTKK. N. Y. 



ilentlon The BcTiew when yoo wrtU. 

Celosia Chrysantheflora 

NOW 18 THE TIME TO SOW 

The most talked of flower of theday; per (C Mi 
trade packet of more than 20CJ0 seeds ♦«•«« 

S. BRYSON AYRES, Independence, Ne. 

"Over lOO Acres in Flowers" 
Mention Th« BctIcw when yon write. 



Chas. Schwake & Co., Inc. 

LILY OF THE VALLEY 

Japanese Lilies, French and Dntdi Bulbs 
90-92 West Bnadwiy NEW YORK 



Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



VAN ZONNEVELD BROS. & PHILIPPO 



KSTABLISHKD 1879 



SASSENHEIM, - HOLLAND 

Lily of the Valley— Bulbs 

Order Now Your Plrst-ClaM 
Gcmuui Grofvn 

Lily of the Valley 



Rltfht From Cold Storage 
at Pre-war Prices 



Let Us Quote Yoa Oar 
Reasonable Prices 



The Best Grade 

Dutch and French Bolhs 

Branch Office: 18 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 

AGE AND REPUTATION ARE TWO 
FACTORS WORTH CONSIDERATION 



Bulbs — HOLLAND — Bulbs 

R. A. Van Der Schoot 

Wholesalm Bulb Growmr 

Hillegom, Holland 

R. A. Van Der Schoot 't bulba will increase your friendt and your profits 



Bulbs 



Address all correspondence care of 

J. W. HAMPTON, JR, CO. 

17 Battery Place NEW YORK 



Bulbs 



Buy all your aeefU at the louroe 
G«br. ^^IPPEyA. CQaedlinbary, Gemuuiy 

Flower and Vegetable Seeda. 
72 year* old, now the largeatseed growing organiza- 
tion in Europe. Why? 

Allow aix week* after ordering to receive freah aeeda 
by dependable direct mail from Qnedlinburg. 

Haadqaartara U. S. and Canada 
DETROIT INTERNATIONAL SALES CO. 

Free Prea* Bulldlnc, Detroit, Mich. 
rataloame with deaerintiana. Dollar prleea. 



Mention The ReTtew when you write. 

DANISH SEED IMPORT 

Import of all klnda of Seeds direct from seed 
»rowerB In Denmark. Please send for price list. 

CHR. MOSB.IERG. 2U 7th St N.. Miaaespolis, Miaa. 




TrNV EIJ> 
ONS 




61VESEYST.. NY CITY 



Holland. 



Ollioules, 
France. 



All Florists who seek a source of dependable and reliable Ferdag Balki please commun cate wit'i 

CRESCENT BULB COMPANY 

Wholesale Bulb Growers 

kmtricu Address: 84 Bread St.. New ToA HILLEGOM, HOLLAND 

QUALITY 18 OUR MOTTO 



■ . ;.-*, " vrr- ';it»T"v-f--' ^ f. ■f^-'^sL" ''rnr7'n|Sf7B7'«';ir3»,.7!FTpWTf ^TTT'^' —^ v- — ;- ■ 7y 



-T» r.7A-""*f ■•-* r /;#*'T7^" 



144 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1922 



marked, labeled, or branded in English 
upon the exterior thereof with a written 
or printed label, stamped or marked, 
showing (a) the common or trade name 
of the particular variety of field seed 
contained therein, (b) the foreign coun- 
(Conclnded oil page 162. > 



PEACOCK DESCRIBES BISE. 

In his appearance before Eeferee in 
Bankruptcy Eastment, last week, Ever- 
ette E. Peacock described the means by 
which the rapid growth of his seed com- 
pany was promoted since its organiza- 
tion in October, 1917, with an initial 
capital stock of $100,000. 

"I received $60,000 for merchandise 
received from me from another store in 
which I was interested," he testified. 
"In 1919 the capital stock was in- 
creased to $200,000 and a new issue of 
stock was made. In May, 1921, the 
capital stock was increased again, this 
time to $300,000, but at this time only 
$25,000 was sold, making the total 
capital of the company $215,000." 

Peacock testified that he had an open 
credit with the Second Security bank 
of Chicago, 1951 Milwaukee avenue, for 
$20,000. The loan was secured by a 
mortgage on farm property owned by 
the corporation. In 1921 the indebted- 
ness of the company was nearly $60,000, 
secured by warehouse receipts and dis- 
counted paper. "I went to the Mil- 
waukee-Irving State bank and had 
them take a $100,000 first mortgage on 
the farm and property of the company, 
so that I could take up the indebted- 
ness with the Second Security State 
bank. 

"During tJiat time I borrowed more 
than $5,000 from the Second Citizens' 
State bank, 4801 Lincoln avenue, and 
the First National bank of Oak Park 
had a note of mine for $11,500." 

The call of the receiver for bids on 
the assets of the Everette E. Peacock 
Co. is reported under the heading, 
"Business Embarrassments," on an- 
other page of this issue. 



DUTCH AND FRENCH BULBS 

C. J. Speehiaii & S«u La|arde & Specku 

SUSOMIIM. NOUMD gixiouus. vu. nUMCE 

New York Office: 470 GREENWICH ST. 

Pacific Coaat Rep., W. B. Clarke, 
Box MS, San Joae, Oallf . 



Retnm Envelopes 

Catalogue Envelope* 

Seed PackeU 

Brawn Bag miiag Machine Co. 

Fitekbart. Mm*., U. S. A. 



Dreyon-Tegelaar & Co. 

Wholesale French Bulb Growers 

1133 Broadway, New York 

(Corner SStli Street) 

Norseries at OUionles, Var, France 



Hogewoning & Sons, Inc. 

WHOLESALE 

Bulb Growers and Importers 

299 Broadway, New York City 



VALLEY 

FOR MEMORIAL DAY 

AND SPRING WEDDINGS 

Choice Cold Storage Valley Pips 

1000 $30.00 

500 16 00 

250 8.00 

H. N. BRUNS 

3032-42 W. Madison St. CHICAGO, ILL. 



GULDEMOND & SON 

LISSE, HOLLAND 

Df Tf DC best possible 
DL^l^DO that's all! 



Special Pricet and 
Tenns on Demand 



OVER 300 ACRES UNDER CULTIVATION 

116 Broad St., Room 40, NEW YORK 



C. KEUR & SONS, HILLEGOlli HOLLAND 

5625 Mosholu Ave., NEW YORK CITY 

Uly of the Valley -Gladioli 

Now on hand In this country for immediate delivery. 

Orders and mquiries invited. 

The trade will be visited in due time for Spring and FaD orders 1922. 



Darwin Tulip Specialists 

Let OS have your list; we will give you the right varieties to catalogue at the 
right price. We are growers of the finest and largest collection in the world. 
Also originators of some extremely fine Darwin and Breeder Tulips. Large 
growers of Hyacinths, Early Tulips, Crocuses and Narcissi. Originators of 
the finest and earliest Gladiolus Primulinus. 

J. J. Grullemans & Sons, '*7i.'%;::^ f J^"* New York, N. Y. 




"N. B. A." 

The above is the trade-mark of the 
Naicini Bilbgrowen' Asssciation if CanpieirMne, Var, Franca 

Do not fall to specify N. B. A. brand when ordering 

Paper White Narcissus 

of your American dealpr next season. You will avoid disaDPOintment 
and be sure to receive stock Kiving best results. Wholesale only. 



Prices Now Ready for RELIABLE HOLLAND BULBS 

COMMUNICATE WITH 

TEGELAAR BROS^ Inc. 

1133 BROADWAY, NEW "YORK, N. Y. 

Extensive Nurseries at LISSE, HOLLAND. 



•tB'^'Tf^ r-JJ,-.>w, '.■;.■• tw-^^TH^ • 



-/ ■..-^-■' ▼'-- .« -■-T^-^— -T-r ■■ 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



145 



\ 


- *- 


■' l^vv,.«, 


1 









For Prices, Quality 
and Service 



TRADE WITH 



SEGERS BROS.,Ltd. 

Bulb Growers 
and Exporters 

1165 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY LISSE, HOLLAND 



Hyacintlis Scored and Scooped. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Tke Uutd Bulb Growers, lie. 

SaMcnheim, Holland 
Ntw TMfc Office 15 WiOkm StiMl 

Wlkotesal* Grown of 

HYACINTHS, 

TULIPS. 

DARWIN TULIPS 

GOLDEN SPUE 

BIC. VICTORIA 

VON SION 
and eth*r Balba 

Cable Addrcts: United Bolb, SaMenkeim. 



KENILWORTH 

GIANT PANSY SEED 

KwHwarth Mixtara, 1000 Beeda, 

86c; ^ oz. 90c; 3^ oz. 

1 oz.. S6.00. 
An ceUn, separate or mixed, : 
seeds, 80c; any 4 pkts. $1.00 
H. oz.. Sl.80: 1 oz.. S6.0« 





The General Bulb Co. 

Established 1883 

Vogelenzangt Holland 

BRANCH OFFICE: 
25 Beaver St., New York City 

1922 Catalogue now ready; copy upon request 



GLADIOLI 

If you are looking for Gladiolus bulbs of 
Al Quality see my ad under the Classified 
column of this issue. 

JEULE ROOS 

^a^StS^l Box A, CONCORD, MASS. 



GLADIOLUS ANNA EBERIUS 

A wondprful variety; l)cautlful lirynnd (U'soiip- 
tlon. Healthy, yoiiiiK bulhs. Sure to please. 

Ist size bnlbH. IHi-iii. ap, $i8.00 i>er lOO 
Kulblets. $14.00 per lOOO 

Order gulck. 

Alfred Oesterlint °" sSlJ'ISS!*"'* BiUer. P«. 





S<N for Catalorw. 

HEUER & CO. 

Montpdier. Ohio 


HELLERS 

M I C t 
P R O E 

SEED 
CASES. } 




LIVE WIRE 

J. A. Vandervoort & Co. 

Wholesale Bulb Growers 
NOORDWYK, - HOLLAND 

Also NurserieH at Sassenheim 



Absolutely the largest growers in Holland of 

Bic. Victoria, Golden Spur and Von Sion 

Also lari^e growers of 

HYACINTHS, TULIPS, ETC. 



Permanent American Address: 

P. O. Hamilton Grangre Station 
Box 38, New York City 



Our representatives will be 
J. A. VAXDEBVOOBT Calling on you. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



BULBS 



BULBS 



For Holland grown Bulbs of every 
description, ask prices from 

Bader & Co., aia cl^lr. Sassenheim, Holland 

Lars^e s^rowers of Hyacinths, Tulips and Narcissi 

PLEASE COMMUNICATE WITH 

Bader & Co., care of R. F. Laag, 82 Broad Street, New York City 



Mention The Review when you write. 



|-^f Jl niril I ^^^ FORCING OR 
Ul-A%lrIl-rI-l OUTSIDE PLANTING 

UNITED BULB CO., Mt. Qemens, Mich. 

LEADING GROWERS OF GLADIOLI 



When you think of GLADIOLI 

think of P. VOS & SON 



The Home of 
Fine Gladioli 



WE HAVE THEM-HEALTHY AND TRUE, TRY US, 

P. VOS & SON 
P. O. Box 555, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



■ .;tv^.'I 1 .', r 






146 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1922 




The death of Max Paul Haendler, pro- 
prietor of the Old Town Nurseries, 
South Natick, Mass., is reported in the 
obituary column of this issue. 

J. A. Young, of Aurora, 111., will repre- 
sent the Illiiu)is State Nurserymen's As- 
sociation, of wliich he is secretary, at the 
conference on ((uarantine 37, at Wash- 
ington, D. C, May 15. 

The Central Alabama Pecan Growers' 
Association has been incorporated at 
Sclma, Ala., with Clifton Cabrara, of 
Kirkpatrick, president; G. E. Beers, of 
Tyler, as vice-president, and T. H. Miller, 
of Selnia, as secretary and treasurer. 

William A. Peterson, the well known 
Chicago nurseryman, celebrated his fifty- 
fifth anniversary April 29. He was born 
at the nursery his father had established 
in 1856 and which the son has made 
known around the world for its peonies 
and irises. 

Much damage was done to fruit in the 
upper Ohio valley and central and north- 
ern Appalachian mountain localities by 
the recent severe frost and freezing tem- 
peratures, according to last week's report 
of the weather bureau. Full and exact 
reports are not yet given, but it appears 
that damage was greatest in the moun- 
tain sections of Virginia, West Virginia, 
Maryland and Pennsylvania. The de- 
struction, hoAvever, was not nearly so 
comjjlete or so extensive as that caused 
by the freeze the latter part of April a 
year ago. 

An effort, although it may or may 
not be an unconscious one, to interest 
people in reforestation is being made 
by Norman Taylor, of the Brooklyn 
Botanic Gardens, who is writing a book 
on "The Vegetation of Long Island." 
Mr. Taylor is offering prizes for the most 
complete list of names of the largest na- 
tive trees on the island. The primary ob- 
ject of Mr. Taylor's quest is, of course, 
to ol)tain material for his book, but tlie 
fact that he is hereby creating an interest 
among children and grown-ups which will 
be of value to the nurseryman in a refor- 
estation campaign cannot be denied. 



HELP PLANTING CAMPAIGN. 

The success of the "Plan to Plant 
Another Tree" campaign, inaugurated 
by tlie Illinois State Nurserymen's As- 
sociation less than three months ago, 
has been so marked that it is believed 
many nurserymen, outside as well as in 
Illinois, will readily and hcjirtily re- 
spond to the projiosal to extend the 
work by means of subscrijitions from 
nurs(>rymen in all parts of the country. 
The details of the ])laii are given in the 
following letter sent to meniliers of the 
Illinois State Nurserymen's Association 
by A. H. Hill, of Dundee, who is cliair- 
man of the finance committee, under 
which the campaign is being o])erat('d: 

"Plan to riant AnotliiT Troc" was burn Fcli 

riiary 10 at ;ni oxenitivi niniittcr inectini.' i-( 

the lUinois State Nurscrvnii-n's Asscicintion: 
$200 was ai>|iriiiiri.itiMl In tinancp tlic jilan ami 
to pot cililorial inalfrial ready fur llio iiews- 
pnpfrs, anil iSlSO was iipiiroprialod to run sliile< 
In tlio motion picture tlH'aters in Illinois, 1,H(MI 
of lliom. 

Tliis lias started tlio movement in Illinois. 



generous as possible, write ft check at once, and 
send it to Miles Urjant, Princeton, 111. 
Give every dollar you feel you can afford. 



Clubs such as Lions, Rotary and Kivranis, cham. 
bers of commerce, women's clubs, etc., as well 
ns farm bureaus, have come forward and joined 
in an effort to drive home the slogan, "Plan to 
Plant Another Tree." 

It has not stopped at the boundary line of Illi- 
nois. More than 100 nurseries and seed houses 
outside of Illinois have purchased the rubber 
stamp, "Plan to Plant Another Tree," and are 
using it on their mall. Newspapers and clubs 
in Iowa, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin and Michigan 
have taken up our movement and want to push 
our plan in their states. Even Pennsylvania 
and South Carolina are heard from, wishing to 
push a program of such merit. 

The executive committee realizes that "Plan 
to Plant Another Tree" is not for March and 
April, but for all the year. The newspapers and 
clubs are doing their part and, with the finan- 
cial help of the nurserymen, "Plan to Plant An- 
other Tree" will go forward in a nation-wide 
movement to make America a better place in 
which to live, and all nurserymen will benefit. 

All of the material thus far has passed through 
the hands of your secretary, J. A. Young, of 
Aurora. He is giving his time free toward the 
best interests of all nurserymen. You, gentlemen, 
all realize that an undertaking of this character 
demands much time and careful thought. It 
Mr. Young will give his time, surely we nursery- 
men, who will benefit from his efforts, should be 
generous in our support of this campaign with 
the necessary money to carry on the work. 

A careful estimate worked out by the executive 
ooniraittee indicates that it will require $2,000 
to keep up the good work for the year. This 
means a small sum for each one of us, if ever>- 
member of the association and other interested 
ntirserymen will give either $10, $25, $50 or 
$100 to Insure that there is plenty of money in 
the treasury to carry on tliis Important piece of 
work for the nurserymen. The following nurs- 
erymen have given $100 each: Peterson Nursery, 
Chicago; Klebm's Nursery, Arlington Heights, 
111.; Swain Nelson & Sons Co., Chicago; D. Hill 
Nursery Co., Dundee, 111., and Aurora Nursery, 
Aurora, III. 

We ask that you sit down right now and make 
out a check to Miles Hryant, Princeton, 111., for 
the amount you feel you can afford to appropriate 
as your share of the necessary expense. 

The nursery interests have already received 
many thousands of dollars' worth of advertising 
space in the papers. This advertising has been 
of the very l)est of its kind for the nursery in- 
terests. Splendid editorials have been written 
commending the work of the Illinois State Nurs- 
erymen's Association. We, us nurserymen, can- 
not afford at this time to discontinue our efforts 
or lessen the good work for lack of funds. He as 

Important Items in Choice Donnant Nursery Stock 

In our new and modern rtotmn we h»ve one of the best iisortments of tree*, imill frolU. hedges, thrube and 
roses In the country and shall be able to fill large or BmaJl orders untU the end of the ahlpplnB ieaaon. If ySo 
tI*.„".°l°.".^r'H;!l'i'i"!ii"'"' **"** '°' °'" ^""** "" »* """• Wire for any of these items and shipment Will 



CALIFORNIA NURSERY EXPANDS. 

The California Nursery, at Niles, 
Cal., has spent many thousands of dol- 
lars in the last few months for new 
buildings, new equipment and new prop- 
agation, until the oldest nursery in the 
state maintains its position of the larg- 
est in size with the greatest variety 
of nursery products in the state. Those 
who knew the California Nursery 
of last season would hardly recog- 
nize the place today, with its increased 
equipment and new buildings, upon 
which probably $25,000 have been 
spent. 

Probably the most visible and im- 
portant improvement has been the con- 
struction of a new building for the 
display and sale of plants and trees. 
This is a lath house. An entirely 
new building of this character has been 
built at the entrance to the property 
of tlie company, just north of the un- 
derpass at Niles. This building is in- 
tended for a salesroom, where custom- 
ers can see the plants that they are 
buying just as they will stand in the 
gardens when planted. 

This system of selling is an innova- 
tion and follows closely the line of re- 
tailing any ordinary line of goods. The 
management of the California Nursery 
decided thjit purchasers of ornamental 
plants must be able to see what their 
purchases look like and be able to pick 
out just what they want. So the great 
display lath house was built as a sales- 
room, and customers now drive up to 



be made same da; In all cases. 

Per 100 

Amoor Privet North, 12 to 18 Ins 

Amoor Privet North, 18 to 24 Ins 

AlthsBHS, 2 to 3 ft $18.00 



Per 1000 

$50.00 

60.00 



Deutilai, 2 to 3 ft.. Pride Re 

Golden Elder, 2 to 3 ft 

Cornut, 'J to 3 ft 

Spirsa Blllardli, 2 to 3 ft. .. 
Splraa, golden, 2 to 3 ft. . , 
Spiraea callosa and alba, 18 

llicjies 

Splraa Vanhouttel, 2 to 3 ft. 
Calif. Privet. H to 12 Ins. . 
Calif. Privet, 12 to 18 Ina... 
Calif. Privet. 2 to 3 ft 



lleste 



to 24 



18.00 
20.00 
18. DO 
18.00 
20.00 

25.00 
15.00 



1. 



1. 



Moore's Early Grape. 1 jr., No. 1 
Campbell Early Grape, 1 yr.. .No. 
Cherry Currants, 2 yr.. .\o. 1.,.. 
Wilder Curranti, 2 yr.. No. 1... 
White Grape Curranti, 2 yr., No. 

Gooseberries, 2 vr.. No. 1 

Clematis Paniculata, 3 yr 

Boston Ivy, 2 yr 

Honeysuckles, iu>ri|!lit. 2 to 3 ft.. 
Hcneysuckles, IIair.i, 2 to 3 ft.. 

12.50 Snowberry. 2 to 3 ft., red 

22.80 Syringa cor., 2 to 3 ft 20.00 

60.00 Norway Maple, 10 to 12 Ins ladi. $1.40 

Above stock Is strong, often running nearer 3 to 4 ft than 2 to 3 ft, but no larger. 

Per 100 

Dorothy Perkins, white, 8 to 4 ft tIS.OO 

Dorothy Perkins, pink, 3 ft 16.00 

Tausendschoen, 3 ft 20.00 

These are limply samples from our trade list. 

GUARANTY NURSERY CO., 449 Cuti.r Bidg., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Per 100 
. $ 9.00 
. . 14.00 
. . 10.00 
. . 10.00 
.. 10.00 
. . 12.00 
. . lO.OO 
. . 12.00 
. . 20.00 
. . 12.00 
18.00 



It Is sure to please you. 



Still Shipping Evergreens 

Hill's Evergreens can still be safely handled for several weeks. Plenty of 
line lining out stock left— also choice specimens for landscape work. Telegraph 
orders given immediate altenfcicn. 

Evergreen Specialists THE D. HILL NURSERY CO., Inc. 



Largest Growers in America 



Box 43, DUNDEE, ILL. 



T- 



^'■»>.^'l^"l' •'. ' ■• 



Mav 4, 1922 



The Rorists^ Review 



147 



Dreer^s Pot Grown Hardy Perennials 

The Stock here offered, all of the beat plantingp:InKe, ia pot grown unless otherwise noted. '.It is superior at all 
times to field grown stock, and particularly so late in^j^e .season, there being no risk of loss evenunder unfavorable 
weather conditions. Extensive planters, among theKMk-^thkac.lJBading Landscape Architects, have for many years 
shown their appreciation of the Dreer Pot Grown PtftJ AnTtej ig -;' 

5*;;5fep|tIS— Conld. • v^^inchPots Doz. 



Inch Pots Doi. 



ACHILLEA, Boule de Neiffe 

Millefolium roseum 

The Pearl 

AGROSTEMMA coronaria 

coronaria alba 

Flos Jovis 

AJUGA reptans rubra 3 

Senevensis 3 

ANCHUSA, Dropmore 3'A 

Opal 

ANEMONE japonica alba 

Queen Charlotte 

rubra 

Whirlwind 

AQUILEGIA canadensis, chrysantha, cerulea, 

flabellata nana alba, Helene, nivea grandi- 



3 

3yi 

3 
3 
3 
3 



3'A 
2Va, 

2J4 



flora, vulgaris. Long Spurred Hybrids. 

ARABIS alpina 

ARMERIA formosa rosea 

Laucheana rosea 



ARTEMISIA lactiflora 3'/^ 

Abrotanum 3 

pedemontana 3 

Stelleriana 3 

ASCLEPIAS tuberosa, 2-yr., field roots 

ASTERS, 12 choice varieties 3 

Dwarf Alpine 3 

BAPTISIA australis 3'/4 

BELLIS perennis, pink and white 3'/^ 

BOCCONIA cordata 3'/, 

BOLTONIA asteroides 3 

latisquama 3 

CAMPANULA Medium 4 

CARNATIONS. Hardy border 3'/i 

CENTAUREA montana 3'/4 

dealbata 3'/4 

macrocephala 3 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, Hardy Pompon, 25 

varieties 254 

Alaska, Shasta Daisy 3 

Glory of Wayside 3 

CERASTIUM tomentosum 3 

CHELONE glabra alba 3 

Lyonii 3 

CLEMATIS integrifolia cerulea 3^ 

recta 3'/^ 

CIMICIFUGA racemosa 3"/^ 

COREOPSIS Delphinifolia 3 

lanceolata grandiflora 354 

rosea 3 

DIANTHUS deltoides alba 3'A 

deltoides rosea 3'/i 

DELPHINIUM Belladonna 3-/i 

Bellamosa 3'A 

chinensis. Blue and White 3 

formosum 3'A 

Gold Medal Hybrids 3'A 

DIELYTRA formosa 3 

DIGITALIS gloxinieflora 4 

lanata 3'A 

ECHINOPS spherocephalus 3 

ERYNGIUM planum 4 

EUPATORIUM ageratoides 3'A 

coelestinum 3 

HARDY FERNS, choice varieties 3 

GEUM atrococcincum 3 

Heldreichii 3 

Mrs. Bradshaw 3 

GERANIUM sanguineum 3 

GAILLARDIA grandiflora 4 

GYPSOPHILA cerastioides 3 

paniculata 4 

repens 3 

repens rosea 3 

HELENIUM autumnale rubrum 3 

autumnale superbum 3 

Hoopesii 3 

Riverton Beauty 3 

Riverton Gem 3 

HELIANTHUS giganteus 3'A 

mollis grandiflorus 3'A 

multiflorus fl. pi 3'A 

Maximilliana 3'A 

orgyalis 3'A 

rigidus japonicus 3'A 

Wolley Dod 3'A 

HELIOPSIS Pitcheriana 3'/2 

scabra excelsa 3 

HEMEROCALLIS tlava 3'A 

HIBISCUS (Giant Marshmallow), Red. White, 

and Pink, 2-yr. old roots 

Crimson Eye, 2-yr.-oI(l roots 

Marvel Mallows, 2yr.-oId roots 

HOLLYHOCKS, Double, all colors, strong 

roots 

Single, Choice Mixed, strong roots 

Allegheny, Choice Mixed, strong roots 

IRIS Germanica, 12 choice varieties, strong 
divisions 



$1.50 
1.50 
l.SO 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.75 
1.7S 
2.09 
2.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 



1.75 
l.SO 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
1.25 
1.75 
1.50 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

.85 
1.50 
2.00 
l.SO 
1.75 
1.75 
2.50 
2.50 
1.75 
l.SO 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
1.75 
2.00 
1.75 
1.75 
2.00 
2.00 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
l.SO 

2.00 
1.50 
1.50 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.00 




10.00 

10.00 

lO.OO 

10.00 

lO.OO 

12.00 

12.00 

15.00 

15.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 



12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 
8.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 

6.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
20.00 
20.00 
12.00 
lO.OO 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
lO.OO 
10.00 
15.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
15.00 
12.00 
12.00 
15.00 
15.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 

15.00 
10.00 
10.00 

12.00 
12.00 
12.00 

7.00 



'K'i J^'fj'^ierinantca, ch.oice mixture, strong dKtstotis 
Japanese, 12 choice varieties, stro»# divi- 

■ sions 

Japanese, choice mixture, strong divisions.. 

LOBELIA cardinalis 3 

syphilitica 3 

LYCHNIS chalcedonica. Red and White 3 

Haageana 3 

Viscaria splendensi 3 

LYSIMACHIA ciliata 4 

dethroides 3 

Fortunei 4 

Nummularia 3 

LYTHRUM roseum superbum 3'/2 

MERTENSIA virginica 3 

MONARDA didyma rosea 4 

didyma, Cambridge Scarlet 4 

didyma violacea 4 

fistulosa alba 4 



MYOSOTIS palustris semperflorens. 

NIEREMBERGIA rivularis 

OENOTHERA Pilgrimii 

speciosa 

PACHYSANDRA terminalis, 1,000, $90.00. 



PAP AVER nudicaule. Choice Mixed 3 

PAP AVER orientale, Gerald Perry 3 

orientale. Goliath 3 

orientale. Mrs. Perry 3 

orientale. Oriflamme 3 

orientale. Perry's White 3 

orientale. Choice Mixed 3 

PHLOX, HARDY, 12 good varieties 3 

Miss Lingard, early white 3 

subulata, white, lilac and rose 3'/2 

PHYSALIS Franchetii 3'A 

PHYSOSTEGIA, Pink and White 3V4 

PINKS, HARDY, 6 choice varieties 3 

PLATYCODON grandiflorum. blue and white, 

strong roots 

japonica fl. pi., blue, strong roots 

PLUMBAGO Larpentie 3 

POTENTILLA, in variety 3 

PRIMULA veris 3 

PYRETHRUM hybridum, choice mixed seed- 
lings 3 

uliginosum 3 

RANUNCULUS acris fl. pi 3 

repens fl. pi 3 

ROSEMARY 3 

RUDBECKIA, Golden Glow 4 

maxima 354 

Newmanii 354 

nitida. Autumn Sun 354 

purpurea 354 

subtomentosa 3 

SALVIA azurea 3 

Greggii, pink and white 3 



Pitcherii 
SANTOLINA incana 
SCABIOSA japonica 



3 

254 
3 



SEDUM acre, album and sexangulare 354 

■purium and coccineum 3'/2 

spectabile and spectabile Brilliant 354 

SILENE Schafta 3 

SILPHIUM perfoliatum 4 

SISYRINCHIUM bermudianum 3 

SOLIDAGO, Dwarf and Tall varieties 4 



SPIR.XA filipendula 

palmata elegans 

ulmaria fl. pi 

STACHYS Betonica grandiflora 

STOKESIA cyanea, blue and white 

SWEET WILLIAM, white, scarlet and pink 
THALICTRUM dipterocarpum (New) 3 

aquilegifolium purpureum 3 

glaucum 

intermedium 

THERMOPSIS caroliniana 

TRADESCANTIA virginica, blue and white.. 
THYMUS Serpyllum, coccineus and splendens 
TUNICA saxifraga 



3'A 

3'A 

3'A 

3 

3 

4 



3 

3 

354 

354 

3 

3 

TRITOMA Pfitzeri 254 

VALERIANA coccinea 35^ 

coccinea alba 354 

officinalis 354 

VERONICA amethystina 354 

incana 3 

longifolia subsessilis 3 

maritima 3 

pectinata 3 

repens 3 

rupestris, blue and white 3 

spicata, blue, white and pink 3 

virginica 3 

VINCA minor per 1,000, $70.00 3 

VIOLAS (Tufted Pansies), blue, white, yellow 

an<l purple 3 

VIOLETS, Double Russian 254 



$0.60 

2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.50 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1..S0 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.25 
1.75 
3.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.25 
1.50 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 
.85 

l.SO 
2.50 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 

1.75 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

l.SO 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.7S 

1.75 

1.75 

1.2S 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

1.75 

l.SO 

1.75 

l.SO 

1.50 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

3.50 

2.00 

1.50 

1.50 

1.75 

1.50 

1.75 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

1.25 

.85 
.85 



The above prices are intended for the trade only. 



100 
$ I'JO 

15.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
IQ.OO 
12.00 
12.00 

i2.no 

10.00 
12.00 
25.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
10.00 

8.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 

6.00 

10.00 
18.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 

12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
8.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
25.00 
15.C0 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.<jO 
10.00 
8.00 

6.00 
6.00 



HENRY A. DREER, 714 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



148 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



the entrance and pick out what they 
want, with the aid of the catalogue and 
their own powers of observation. 

This metliod of buying garden shrubs 
and trees has become so popular since 
it has been instituted that the grounds 
of the nursery company are thronged 
on Saturday and Sunday, and even dur- 
ing the week, by those who motor down 
to Niles. 

The grounds of the company have 
been thoroughly cleared and laid out, 
and a new section devoted to fruit 
trees has been installed. Here is carried 
a quarter of a million fruit trees at all 
times, and selection of any quantity 
can be made right on the grounds. This 
is an entirely new feature, for in the 
past the California Nursery has not 
dealt in fruit trees in such large quan- 
tities. This nursery has always been 
noted for its ornamental plants, of which 
it is said to liave the largest stock in 
the state, but it is now able to deal in 
fruit trees to any extent necessary. 

The nursery grounds have been laid 
out anew, and many new sections have 
been laid off for the propagation of 
shrubs and ])lants. There have been 
large demands upon the stock of this 
company this season and it has been 
found necessary to go into the work of 
replenishing and keeping up this stock, 
wliich means more i)ropagation. Ex- 
tensive plans liave been made for new 
propagation this season. 

Tlu' California >;urs('ry is becoming 
one of the yreat sliow places of Ala- 
meda coviTity, ami visitors from all over 
the world ,iii' iidw being sliown just 
what can lie ddiic in tlie glorious cli- 
mate of Alameda couiitv. 



SCALE ON FRUIT TREES. 

1 am scinlin;: you a sani|il(' ))rancli of 
an infcstcil fruit tree. Please let me 
know wliat till' troiil)le is ;ind what 
causes it. A. ]'. — Mich. 



Tlie liraiicli t'(>r\vaided was heavily 
crusted with San .lose scale. If all 
parts of your t lec or trees are covered 
in ]iroi)<>iti(in, T am afraid their tenure 
of life will lie brief, unless you can 
treat tlieni sjii'cdily. A liiiie-sul]iliur 
sjiray, a]>}plied wliile the tr<'es are dor- 
mant, will kill this scale, as will any 
of the soluble oils dissolved in water at 
an average ratio of one j)art of oil to 
twenty jiarts of water. T'se a spray 
nozzle which will make a fine, misty 
spray and be sure to wet every portion 
of bark. It is getting a little late now 
for a dormant sjtray, but, if your plants 
are badly affected, better spray now, 
even at the risk of scorching some ad- 
vanced buds, rather than let the scale 
kill your trees entirely. Dormant 
sprays can be ajiplieil safely from No- 
venilier until April 1 in your latitude. 
December and March are gooil months 
to apjily it. C. W. 



HARDY ROSES FROM CUTTINGS. 

I do not lia\ f a greenhouse and sliould 
like to grow :i few slirubs and hardy 
plants. How can I start r.anibler roses, 
liybrid perpetuals and hybrid tea roses 
witliiput a jji'eeiiliouse? I i>ut down 300 
rambler roses last fall and set them out 
this s]iviiiL;. Will tlle^■ root.' 

.r. A. C— Pa. 



If Vdii lia\i> carried some rose shoots 
over winter in ilamp soil, you can line 
them out now. Burv most of their 



SPECIAL 



Per 1000 

$350.00 

250.00 

tco.oo 

45.00 
30.00 

$180.00 
70.00 



BERBERIS THUNBERGII Per 100 

2 to 3 ft $36.00 

12 to 18 ius 26.00 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET 

2 to 3 ft $7.00 

18 to 24 ins S.OO 

12 to 18 ins 4.00 

AMOOR RIVER PRIVET (Hardy) 

3 to 4 ft $20.00 

12 to 18 ins 8.00 

SPIRAEA VANHOUTTEI 

3 to 4 ft $20.00 

2to3ft 16.00 

18to24in8 10.00 

12tol8ins 7.00 

Send for our BULLETIN NO. 8, just off the pre«s and offering 
an excellent assortment of general nuisery stock. 

■VUse printed stationery. Private trade not solicited. 

JACKSON & PERKINS COMPANY 

NEWARK, NEW YORK 



NURSERY STOCK 

for 

FLORISTS' TRADE 

Field Grown Rotes our Specialty 
Budded and Own Root 

Write for our WkolesaU Trad* Litt 

W. & T. SMITH CO. 

Geneva, N. Y. 



UeatloB Tha Rerlvw when roa writ*. 



WELLER'S PERENNIALS 

With that wonderfat Root Syatom 
READY NOW 

WELLER NURSERIES CO., Inc. 

HOLLAND, MICH. 



YES 
WE STILL HAVE SOME 

Berberis Thonbergii 

Hydrangea P. G. 

Pmnos Pissardii 

Pmniu Triloba 

Bechters Double Flowering Crab 

Boston Ivy 

Clematis 

Write for trade list on trees, ahrubs. roses 
and perennials. 

Onarga Nursery Company 

CULTRA BROS.. Mjuaaonra 



ONARGA, 



BROS., Mjuaagnra 

ILLINOIS 



UcBtloB Tka Bavlaw whan Tovwrtto 



ROSE SPECIALISTS 

Budded fleld-(f rown Teas. Perpetuals, 
Climber! (own root) and Standards. 

SEND LIST WANTED 

NEW BRUNSWICK NURSERIES 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



Hardy Perennials 

Send for our Spring 1922 Wholesale Price 
List of strong field -grown hardy perennials. 

WILLIAM TOOLE & SON 

HARDY PLANT & PANSY FARM 
BARABOO, WIS. 



Mention Th» ReTlew when yon writa. 

Magnolia Grandif lora 

Evergreen variety, hardy in cold sections if 
planted to northern exposure. 2 to 3 ft., 
$60.00: 3 to 4 ft., $75.00; 4 to S ft., $125.00 per 100. 
Other sizes iiuoted on reauest. 

ABELIA GRANDIFLORA 

1 to 2 ft., $25.00: 2 to 3 ft.. $35.00 per 100. 

Valdesian Nurseries, Bostic, N. C. 



NURSERY STOCK 

AT WHOLESALE 
A complete attortmeat of seneiml avrsenr 
stock— shrubs, roses. Tines, shade trees, trm 
trees, etc., well rrowa and well srmded. s«ek 
as will satisfy your cnstomers mad biil4 n* 
your trade. 

We solicit a trial order, belieTing that ear 
stock, service and reasonable prices will mak( 
you our regular customer. 

Onr Wholesale Trade List free ape* 



SHENANDOAH NURSERIES 

D. S. LAKE, Pre*. 
SHENANDOAH. IOWA 



PEONIES 

Saad far onr Special Price LUt skowiac 
best sorts, with each color ia tha 
- order of bloominc. 

PETERSON NURSERY 

S« N. La San* StrMt, CHICAGO, ILL. 



STAR BRAND ROSES 

"American Pillar" and nearly every 
other good hardy climber. 

Send for our list. 

imST GROVE, 
Tf PENNA.,U.S.A. 

Ant. Wint»er,V.-P. 



n. r*ONARD 

C JONES 

Robert Pyl 



>NESCO.I.X.| 

«,Pre«. 1^1 



May 4, 1922 



The Rorists^ Review 



149 



THE NEW GERAHKM, MRS. RICHARD F. GLOEDE 





A WONDERFUL CREATION 


OF LOVELINESS 




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Interior View of the Gloedc Conaervatorlec, ahowintf the Superb Geranium, Mrs. Richard F. Gloede, In bloom. 

To introduce this fine Geranium, we are going to offer a fine lot of beautiful stock out of 2)^-inch iwts for a short time only. 

$15.00 per 100, $140.00 per 1000. 

, No order for less than 100 accepted. 250 at 1000 rate. 

GLOEDE CONSERVATORIES, EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 



SATISFACTION 





TREES 

SHRUBS 

PERENNIALS 



I GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

Whatever you buy of us. It* 
satisfaction we sell 





fuliuy t^eKrr Ca 



AtlUSt^ofll^T.. 



Bobbink & Atkins 

NURSERYBIBN 
FLORISTS and PLANTERS 

RUTHERFORD, NEW JERSEY 



The Wayside Gardens Co. 

GROWERS OF HARDY PLANTS 

Skmbs, Bulbs and Seeds 

MENTOR, OHIO 



length and leave only one eye showing 
above ground. Firm the soil thoroughly. 
A fair proportion of these will root and 
make nice plants before fall. 

Cuttings can be taken of medium 
wood or half-ripened wood, as it is 
sometimes called, in early summer. 
These will root in a coldframe. 
It will, however, assist rooting mate- 
rially if you can get some fresh stable 
manure and tamp it firmly to a depth 
of nine to twelve inches. Less will do, 
if it is difficult to procure. Some leaves 
mixed with the manure will help to re- 
tain the heat longer and prevent over- 
heating. If you place your sand, which 



OUR SPECIALTY — Ferns of Finest Quality 

Boston N Boston .. 

Boosevelt ) 2}^-inch RooseTelt 1 „ • .v 

Whitmanii >per 100 $ 6.50 Whitmanii \^ , m «i k nn 

Teddy, Jr. (perlOOO 60.00 Teddy. Jr. ^PerlOO 515.00 

Whitmanii Comp./ Whitmanii Comp.j 

100 1000 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2)^-inch $ 5.00 $50.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri. 2H-inch 5.00 60.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, 3-inch 12.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-inch 12.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 4-inch 20.00 

We are bookin? orders for Immediate and future deUvery.oQuaUty stock guaranteed. Cash with order. 

THE SPRINGTIELD FLORAL & FERN CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



PANSY PLANTS '2aSS ?i; ,iS? 

See Classified ads. Send far list. W^M. P. YEAGLE, Bristol, Pa. 







BOXWOODS 

Choice American grown Pyramids. Balls 
and Standards. Good color, well formed 
specimens that will please your customers. 
This stock is supplied balled and burlapped, 
carefully packed. 

BOXWOOD Each 

Ball Shaped. 14x14 inches. B&B $3.50 

Ball Shaped. 16x16 inches, B&B 4.2i 

Ball Shaped, 18x18 inches, B&B 6.50 

Pyramid Shaped, 2i« feet. B&B 4.50 

Pyramid Shaped, 3 feet. B&B 6.50 

Standards— Stem. 14-inch; Crown, 16- 

iTioK RA.R 6.50 


FERNS 

POT-GROWN STOCK 

2)<-iiich. 

_, Per loe Per looe 
Boston S6.00 S56.00 


Roocevelt 6.00 55.00 

Whitmanii 6.00 ^5 00 


Teddy Jr 6.00 55.00 


B&B signifies balled and burlapped. 

The D.Hill Nursery Ce., lac, ^Si Dundee, lU. 

EverBreen SpecialisU — Largest Grower* in America 


Vexona 6.00 55.00 


MacawU 6.00 55.00 

Transplanted Bench-grown Stock $5.00 
less per 1000 than the Pot-grown. 


WM. K. HARRIS 

Wb«le*«le Grower oi M kima* «i 

Flowering ind Decoritive.PIants 

55th and Springfield Avenue 
W. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


Fern Runners, 

$16.00 per 1000 

HENRY H. BARROWS 

Fern Specialist 
264 High Street, WUtman, Maw. 



150 



The Rorists^ Review 



Mav 4, 1922 



should be sharp, on this manure, you 
shouhl get a good percentage of your 
cuttings to root. 

As roots form, gradually admit more 
air and light, and when the plants are 
well rooted, remove the sashes and ex- 
pose the plants to the weather. As 
severe weather comes along, pack dry 
leaves over the jdants. When they are 
firmly frozen, put on sashes, lay match- 
board shutters over these and do not 
remove until the middle of March. The 
plants can be lined outside in nursery 
rows early in April, when the weather 
has become settled. Frequent cultiva- 
tion will be necessary right through the 
flowering season. 

"While the various types of hardy 
roses can all be propagated from cut- 
tings, it is well to remember that, al- 
though some of the ramblers, rugosas 
and hybrid perpetuals prove fairly sat- 
isfactory from cuttings in our colder 
northern states, budded or grafted 
roses have proved vastly superior, and 
hybrid teas from cuttings are abso- 
lutely valueless outdoors. In the 
warmer states roses from cuttings suc- 
ceed better. C. W. 



CATALOGUES RECEIVED. 

D. Hill Nursery Co., Inc., Dundee, 111. — An 
Illustrated, well printed circular, containing a 
wholesnle list. One of its two large panes Is 
headed, "Hill's Decorative Evergreens; Choice 
Boxwood; Tubbing and Window Box Ever- 
greens." The other page bears the title. "Ulll's 
Evergreens and Other Choice Stock for Lining 
Out: also Evergreens and Shrubs for Immediate 
Sale." 

Jackson & Perkins Co,, Newark, N. Y. — 
"Bulletin No. 9," u wholesale list of surplus rose 
plants, perennials and general nursery stock. 
On the title page is a humorous, somewhat 
startling picture which illustrates the fact that 
the company has "Just caught up with shipping," 
and the picture is followed by the statement: 
"Here's our cellar count of stock In storage, 
dormant, in perfect condition." 



Willo'W Springs, 111. — Eesurrection 
cemetery will erect a greenhouse and 
conservatory, 56x160 feet, on Archer 
road. 

Akron, 0. — F. A. Chittenden has 
about completed the construction of a 
greenhouse, in which he plans to grow 
stock for the trade. 

Rensselaer, Ind. — J. H. Holden has 
bought his partner's interest in the 
greenhouses of Holden & Eobinson and 
now conducts them individually. 

Goshen, Ind. — Miss Dora Brown, who 
has been out of the business for a cou- 
ple of years, has returned to it. Dora 
Brown's Flower Shop has opened at 219 
South Third street. 

Pontiac, 111. — Max Rasmussen has 
sold the Riverview Greenhouses to W. 
11. Francis, formerly of Attica, Ind., 
who has taken possession. Mr. Francis 
has had many j-ears of experience in the 
business. 



Standard 
and Novelty 

Write for prices and description. 
THE JOSEPH H. HILL CO., Richmoad, hd. 



Roses 



ROSES, Own Root 

Quality Stock 

At Prices You Know Are Right 

AMERICAN ROSE & PLANT CO. 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



Seasonable Stock 

READY NOW 

PETUNIAS, Double named varieties. Gertrude, light pink; Snowball, 
pure white; 6 other distinct varieties; 2J4-inch pots, $6.00 per 100, 
$50.00 per 1000. 

PETUNIAS, Single, Giant Ruffled and Rosy Morn, 2-inch, $5.00 per 100, 
$40.00 per 1000. 

HELIOTROPE, Jersey Beauty and Florence Nightingale, good purples, 
2K-inch, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 2H-inch, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 2j4-inch, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

BEGONIAS, Gracilis Luminosa, Prima Donna, Erfordii, Superba and 
Mignon, 2^-inch, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000; Metallica, Argenteo- 
Guttata, Sandersonii and Albo-Picta, 2J4-inch, $8.00 per 100. 

BUDDLEIA ASIATICA, 2j4-inch, $5.00 per 100. 

COLEUS, standard varieties, 2j-^-inch, $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 
Brilliancy, 2«4-inch, $7.00 per 100. 

FUCHSIAS, Black Prince, Avalanche, Mrs. E. G. Hill, Speciosa, 2^-inch, 
$5.00 per 100: 3-inch. $10.00 per 100; 4-inch, $20.00 per 100. 

FERNS, Boston and Teddy Jr., 2j4-inch, $6.50 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

GERANIUMS, Mme. Salleroi, 2^^-inch, $5.00 per 100. 

PLUMBAGO, Capensis and Capensis Alba, 3-inch, $15.00 per 100; 4-inch, 
$25.00 per 100. 

SNAPDRAGONS, giant flowered, separate colors, 2-inch, $5.00 per 100, 
$45.00 per 1000. 

SANTOLINA INCANA, grand for carpet bedding, 2-inch, $5.00 per 100, 
$45.00 per 1000. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO. 

PAINESVILLE. OHIO 



Winter-Flowering Roses 

We ofTer the followingr strong plants, own-root stock, out of 3^-lnch 
pots, ready for immediate delivery: 
Francis Scott Key, Crusader, Mme. Butterfly, Columbia, "NLlgnon and Premier. 

The following varieties, own-root stock, extra strong plants out of 3^ -inch 
pots: 

Francis Scott Key, Crusader, Mme. Butterfly, Columbia and Premier. 

Prices on application, 

FERNS 

We wish to call particular attention to our fine stock of ferns 
which we are offering at this time. 

XTeplirolepls Victoria (The Victory Fern). A beautiful, new, crested form of 
Teddy, Jr., nice plants, 3%-ln. pots, $25.00 to $35.00 per 100; 6-in., 75c to 
$1.00 each; 8-in., $2.00 to $3.00 each. 

Hepbrolepls Elegantlssima. Large specimens, 8-ln., $2.00 to $3.00 each; 10-ln. 
$4.00 to $5.00 each. 

Hepbrolepls BlegantlBslma Cosnpacta. 3%-ln., 35c to 50c each; 6-in., $1.00 each; 

large specimens, 8-inch, $2.00 to $3.00 each; 10-inch, $4.00 to $5.00 each. 
Vepbrolepls Muscosa. Nice plants, 2%-lnch pots, $12.00 per 100; SVi-inch, 35c 

to 50c each; 5-lnch, 75c each; 6-inch, $1.00 each. 

XTepbrolepls Harrisll, 10-in., $5.00 to $7.50 each. 

Kepbrolepls Dwarf Boston, 3V6-in. pots, $25.00 per 100; 6-in., $1.00 each; 8-in,. 
$2.00 each. 

English Ivy, nice plants. 3%-inch pots, 12 to 18-in., $16.00 per hundred. 

Packing added extra at cost. 

F. R. PIERSON, Tarrytown, N. Y. 



ORCHIDS 

We (frow and sell Orchids only. Can fur- 
nish you with anythlnK In this line. 

If you intend Investing In Orchids, do so now 
while prices are low. 

Special lists on application. 

LAGER & HURRELL. SiHut, New Jerser 



My Specicdty 

POTTED PLANTS 

TO THE TRADE ONLY 

A. L MILLER, Jamaica, N. Y. 



Mav 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



151 



SPRING STOCK 

Ready by the Thousands 

Per Per 

Size of Pots 100 1000 

2^-Id. AKeratumg, Frazeri 

or light or dark blue $ S.OO $ 27.50 

2V4-in. AlternantheraB, red 
and yellow 2.7B 26.00 

2%-in. Asparagrug, Plumo- 
Bus or Sprengeri S.25 60.00 

8-in. Cannas, 100,000 red 

and yellow Humbert 7.60 70.00 

Cannas, Mrs. Alfred Co- 

nard. Firebird 10.50 100.00 

2^-in. Centaureas, Dusty 
Miller 8.00 27.60 

2%-ln. Chrysanthemmns, 28 

varieties 4.76 45.00 

ZMi-ln. Coleua, red or yellow 3.25 SO.OO 
60,000 Dracaena IndlTlaa. 
4, 5, 8-ln. pots, $20.00, 
$40.00, $75.00 per 100. 

2%-in. Fuchsias, 12 good 
varieties 8.26 80.00 

4-in. Fuchsias, 12 good va- 
rieties 12.60 

8V4-ln. Geraniums, all stand- 
ard varieties 6.26 60.00 

4-ln. Geraniums, fine plants 12.60 120.00 

2%-ln. Heliotropes, ligtit or 

darli blue 4.50 40.00 

4-in. Heliotropes, line plants 12.60 .... 

2V^-ln. Marguerites, white or 

yellow 6.00 45.00 

4^-in. Margueritea, stoclcy 

plants 12.00 

2^-ln. Stocks, Princess 

Alice or Beauty of Nice.. 8.60 30.00 

2V&-in. Verbenas, fancy as- 
sorted 3.25 80.00 

2^-in. Tradescantias, Wan- 
dering Jew 3.76 85.00 

t^-ln. Vinca Variegata 5.00 45.00 

S%-ln. Vinca Variegata 13.00 126.00 

Also abundance of other stock. 
Send for list. 

VEGETABLE PLANTS IN ABUNDANCE 

Per Per 

100 1000 
Cabbage plants, standard 

varieties $0.76 $6.00 

Tomats plants, standard 

varieties 90 7.B0 

Lettuce plants, 4 varieties. .50 4.00 

For special prices, correspondence so- 
licited. 

ALONZO J. BRYAN 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 

WASHINGTON. NEW JERSEY 

Mention The Itcview when you write. 



ASCHMANN BROS. 

WHOLESALE GROWERS OF 

Pot Plants 

Second and Bristol Sts., Pkiladelphis, Pa. 



R. S. MCMURRAY 

Wholesale Grower of Plants 

BELLEFONTAINE, OHIO 



J.W.DAVIS COMPANY 

Wholesale Growers of 
Christmas and Easter Plants 

TERRE HAUTE. IND. 



YOU 



Will find a9l the best 
offers all the time in The 
Review's Classified Advs. 



ROSES 



2)^ -inch 



Cerise Red Seedling, 
per 100; $150.00 per 1000. 



AMERICAN LEGION 

Grafted, $30.00 per 100; $250.00 per 1000; Rooted Cuttings, $20.00 
0*n Roots, $25.00 per 100; $200.00 per 1000. 



ANGELUS. New White. 



Seedling Columbia x Ophelia 100 

Own Root $35.00 

Grafted 42.50 

Own Root 



250 1000 
$82.50 $300.00 
101.25 375.00 

Grafted 



100 



1000 

$140.00 

140.00 

130.00 



Pilgrim $15.00 

Crusader 15.00 

Mme. Butterfly 14.00 

Premier \ 

Columbia i 

Ophelia, Double White Killarney, Sunburst, Radl- \ Prices on 
ance, Maryland, Mrs. Aaron Ward, Milady, / Application \ 
Francis Scott Key \ f 



100 
$30.00 



1000 
$240.00 



Kaiaerin 



1 



30.00 
30.00 
30.00 



30.00 
30.00 



240.00 
240.00 
220.00 



220.00 
220.00 



100 



1000 



Tausendachoen, 2}4-in $12.00 $100.00 

Dorothy Perkins, 2J4-in 10.00 90.00 

Excelsa, 2i4-in 10.00 90.00 

Baby Ramblers, asstd., 2^-in. 12.00 100.00 

Baby Tausendschoen, 2H-in... 12.00 90.00 

3000 American Legion, l-yr.-old, for forcing. 

Write for prices. 



LILIES 

Cold Storage Giganteums 

7 to 9-in., 300 to case, $55.00. 

LILY OF THE VALLEY PIPS 

Exhiiiition size. It doesn't 
come any better. 

2500 to case, $30.00 per 1000. 



CARNATIONS 

2Ji-incli. 100 1000 

Mrs. C. W. Ward $6.50 $55.00 

Matchless 6.50 55.00 

White Enchantress 7.00 60.00 

Enchantress Supreme 8.00 70.00 

Pink Enchantress 6.50 55.00 

Benora 7.00 60.00 

Belle Washburn 7.00 60.00 

Aviator 6.50 55.00 

Beacon 6.50 55.00 

White Perfection 6.50 55.00 

Laddie 15.00 135.00 

Thos. Joy 15.00 120.00 

Maine Sunshine 16 00 135.00 

Lassie 14.00 120.00 

Red Matchless 15.00 120.00 

STEVIA 

Double and Single 100 1000 

Rooted Cuttings $2.50 $20.00 

2^-inch 6.00 50.00 



CYCLAMEN 

German Strain 

Best Red, very fine. 
aory of Wandsbek 
Perle of Zehlendorf 
Roa* of Zehlendorf 
Wonder of Wandsbek 
Bright Pink 
White with Ey« 
Bright Red 

1000 Seedlings 


TRANS 

Wandsbe 
Salmon 4 
Rose of 1 
Pride of 
Bright R 
Wine Re 
Defiance 
Dark Sal 

lOOO 
$50.00 


PLANTED 

Ame 

k Salmon 

:eris« 

blarienthal 

Cincinnati 

ed 

d 

mon 

2}4-in. .. 
iyi-in., e 
3.in 


SEEDLINGS 

to 7 leaves, as good as pot plants 

rican Strain 

Dark Blood Red 
Christmas Cheer 
LiUc 

Pure Rosa 

Giganteum Lavender 
Daybreak 
White, Pink Eye 
Pure White 

100 1000 
$12 00 Sim no 


5000 Seedlines 


.... 46.00 


Ktra 


select 14.00 120.00 

18.00 


10000 SeedlinKs 


.... 43.00 


Gi 


aaranteed free from mite. 





CYCLAMEN SEEDS 
German Strain 
Best Red. Very fine. 
Glory of Wandsbek. 
Perle of Zehlendorf, pink. 
Rose of Zehlendorf, rose-pink. 
Wonder of Wandsbek. 
Bright Pink, White with Eye, Rose- 
Pink, Bright Red, Pure White. 
$12.00 per 1000, all varieties. 
Red Salmon. The finest variety oflfered. 
$30.00 per 1000. 

The above varieties are grown for us 
near Windsbek, Germany. No better 
seeds can be produced. 

Peterson's Strain. All ^varieties, $12.00 
per 1000. 



SNAPDRAGON SEED Pkt. 

Nelrose $0.60 

Phelps' White 60 

Phelps' Yellow 60 

Keystone 60 

Ramsburg's Silver Pink 75 

Golden Pink Queen 1.00 

Philadelphia Pink 1.00 

Orlando, orange-bronze 1.00 

Golden Delight, pure yellow 1.00 



PRIMULA OBCONICA GIGANTEA 

Very strong grower with extra large flow- 
ers in large clusters. 

7Sc per '/i tr. pkt., $1.25 per tr. pkt., 1200 

seeds: 
Apple Blossom. Light pink. 
Kermesina. Deep carmine. 
Lilacina. Deep lilac, large. 
Purpurea. Deep purple, medium. 
Rosea. Bright rose, very large. 



Boston Office: 1 5 Cedar St., Watertown P. O. 

C. Uo LIGGIT, 505 Bulletin Bidg. PhHa., Pa. 



A. N. PIERSON 

INCORPORATED 

Growers o! Pltnts, Cut Flowers 
Pilms tnd Ferns 

CROMWELL, CONNECTICUT 



GODFREY ASCHNANN 

Wholesale Grower of 

POT PLANTS 

Write for prices. 
10 ID W. Ontario St., Philadelphia, Pa 



152 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



CLEVELAND CLUB DOINQS. 

The meeting of the Cleveland Flo- 
rists' Club was held at the clubrooms, 
in the Hollenden hotel, May 1. The 
speaker of the evening was Mrs. An- 
tonio Di Nardo, of the Cleveland School 
of Art. Her subject was "Art in Flo- 
ral Arrangement." 

Let us bear in mind that Cleveland 
is due for a real flower show this year. 
Everything is on the boom now and we 
must keep in time. One really good 
show would net a nice sum for the build- 
ing fund. 

We are having a building boom in 
Cleveland which is a "hummer." It 
would be really patriotic to start a 
Florists' Club home. 

The following members were elected 
during the month of April: John Du- 
dak, of the Brookline Floral Co.; Frank 
Vierek, 2611 Prospect avenue; F. H. 
Zieckman, 2950 Center road, Warrens- 
ville, O.; H. G. Frey, 8419 Decker ave- 
nue; F. E. Stover, 9322 Wade avenue, 
and Joseph Cannon, 1836 West Twenty- 
fifth street. 

The club is on the boom and the mem- 
bership mark of this year, for 100 mem- 
bers, will be passed at the next meeting. 
Do not let up, though, for, with an extra 
fifty, we can begin to think and do big 
things. 

One of the pleasant surprises last 
week was the amount of business done 
at the building show, given as the open- 
ing attraction in Cleveland's new 
$6,000,000 hall. It really was a flower 
show, for each exhibitor tried to outdo 
his neighbor. The garden of Knoble 
Bros., in front of the model home, was 
tasteful. The Independence Nurseries 
had the real attraction of the show — 
more than seventy varieties of lilies, in- 
cluding water lilies. This was added to 
by a great collection of aquarium fish. 
Flowers and baskets were in every 
booth. Over 250,000 passed through the 
gates. Corsages were "the thing." 
This speaks well for Cleveland florists, 
who are always on hand for business. 

The next "get together" dance of 
the club will be held Tuesday, May 9. 
The committee is all set to make it the 
best yet. Come and bring a friend. 

A. T. F. 



Newark, O. — P. "W. Tivener has en- 
tered the trade and is operating at 188 
North Gay street. 



CROTONS 

From 2Ht-iBeIi to Spoeimons 

2M-in. pots, 935UH) per 100. 

PHOENIX RECLINATA 

2H-in.. eztr» luge. $8.00 per 100. 

HUGH N. NATHESON 

418 S. W. Second ATemie 
MIAMI :: FLORIDA 



CHAS. D. BALL 

GROWER OF 

PALMS, ETC. 

Holmesburg. Philadelphia, Pa. 



NATALIE 

A new medium pink seedling carnation 
that will take the place of Ward 

NATALIE was awarded the Silver Medal in New York 
Won First Prize and was awarded a Report of Merit in Boston 

Place your order at once to insure early delivery 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 
$12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000; $450.00 per 5000 

250 at 1000 rate 

Deliveries beginnlDg December, 1922, and filled in the order received. 

JOY FLORAL CO. 

Nashville, Tennessee 



BETTY JANE 

Awarded the Silver Medal at the National Flower 
Show at Indianapolia, Indiana, 

Our new Ward pink seedling has a beautiful 
formed flower on long, stiff stems; of an even 
shade of Ward pink. It is a good grower in 
the field and under glass and a free and con- 
tinuous bloomer, good keeper and shipper. 

Awarded the Special S, A. F, & O. H. Silver Medal 

by the American Carnation Society at Hartford, 

Connecticut, January, 1922. 

Place your order now for early delivery next 
winter. $12.50 per 100; $110.00 per 1000. 

Order* will hm fiU»d in rotation aa received 

A. JABLONSKY, Carnation Specialist, 

OLIVETTE. CLAYTON P. O., MISSOURI 




BIDDEFORD, MAINE 

CARNATION PLANTS 

ROSALIND, rooted cuttinKS $120.00 per 1000 

IMPROVED WARD, rooted cuttings 100.00 per 1000 

December. 1922 delivery. 

MAINE SUNSHINE, rooted cuttings 120.00 per lOOO 

WHITE DELIGHT, rooted cuttings lOO.OO per 1000 

April, 1922 delivery. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



153 



YOUNG CARNATIONS 

We have to offer a few thousands of fine young plants of each of 
the following varieties of carnations. Order these now and plant in 
the field upon arrival: 

Harvester, the freest and steadiest blooming 

white $10.00 per 100; $80.00 per 1000 

White Wonder 6.00 per 100; 50.00 per 1000 

Matchless 6.00 per 100; 50.00 per 1000 

Enchantress Supreme 7.00 per 100; 65.00 per 1000 

Send in your order now for Super-Supreme, the better colored 
Supreme, to insure delivery early next winter. $12.00 per 100; 
$100.00 per 1000. 

How about young Poinsettia plants? We have our usual large 
stock and will be glad to book your order for delivery any time you 
want them. $8.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. 

BAUR & STEINKAMP 

3800 ROOKWOOD AVENUE INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



DENVER GIANT 

Pansy Plants 

In Bloom 

Are now ready for shipping. 

They are famed for immense 
size and colors. 

$3.00 per 100 plants 

Each plant is neatly wrapped 
with sufficient soil to carry 
nicely by express. 

Give us your standing order. 

COLORADO SEED CO. 

1515 CHAMPA ST^ DENVER, COLO. 



Surprise (No. i3s-i6) 
And Laddie 

We are now booking orders for our new 
pink Carnation, Surprise, for 1923. 
Also Laddie, for December, 1922, and 
later delivery. 

Description and price lUt 
mailed on request 

F. Dorner & Sons Co. 

Lafayette, Indiana 




Why show your customers 
an old, soiled 

ALBUM of 

DESIGNS 

when you can get a 
bright, clean copy of a 

New Edition 

PoBtpaid for 

$1.25 

Send $1.25 now for one copy, or $12.00 for a dozen copies 

-r;.l...... FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 

Tilt Aibttmtf Detiins 508 S. Dearbom St., Cazton BIdf., CHICAGO, ILL. 



For Bedding Plants 

See Review of April 27, 

page 132. 

GEO. A. KUHL 

Wholesale Grower PEKIN, ILL. 



Mention The Reriew when 70a write. 



Ferns, Pandanus Veitchii, 
Cyclamen;* Dracaenat 

are our quantity stocks. Writs ui about 
aay plants you need. 

MACAW BROS. 
Dalawar* County, NORWOOD, PA. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Fi*;.;- -, ■'■-.'•■xr- 



154 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



EXPANSION AT DOVER, N. H. 

Located on the southern slope of Gar- 
rison hill at Dover, N. H., a flourishing 
florist's business of approximately 60,000 
square feet of glass is found. This es- 
tablishment, now operating under the 
corporate name of the Garrison Hill 
Greenhouses, Inc., was formerly owned 
by C. L. Howe. Mr. Howe retired a 
few years ago, and the business was 
taken over by J. T. Massingham and 
later by James Whiting. The present 
proprietors of the company took con- 
trol in April, 1921, and in July of the 
same year it was incorporated with the 
following men as its ofticers: President, 
Charles E. Cartland; vice-president and 
manager, James "Whiting; treasurer, El- 
well S. Shortridge. In Mr. Whiting the 
concern has a man of wide experience as 
a manager. He was the head of the de- 
partment of horticulture at the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College at Amherst 
for seven years; he was also a lecturer. 

Recognizing the infinite possibilities 
for expansion, the new owners set them- 
selves immediately about altering and 
improving the buildings, putting in new 
concrete walls and a new heating sys- 
tem. They are making arrangements for 
the erection of additional houses in the 
near future. 

The land occupied by the firm consists 
of seven acres on Garrison hill. And in 
addition to this plot, upon which the 
greenhouses stand, the company pur- 
chased the Henderson field of ten acres 
back of the Wentworth hospital last 
spring. The soil in this plot is particu- 
larly well adapted to floriculture. 

The present stock of the concern con- 
sists of 2,200 violet plants, 6,000 rose 
plants, between 5,000 and 6,000 chrysan- 
themum plants, 50,000 carnation cut- 
tings, nearly 7,000 geraniums and many 
other well known plants. 



Greenville, N. C— The Greenville 
Floral Co., under the management of 
E. P. Spence, has just started in busi- 
ness. 



BLUCK BULL 




"BUILD STRONG' 
PURE ASPHALTUM 

Greenhouse Cenent 



ACID 

HEAT 

WEATHER 



PROOF 



Barrels, 50-60 gallons $1.20 per gal. 

v» Barrels, '.V) 40 galloDS 1.25 per gal. 

Kegs, '20 eallons 1.30 per gal. 

Pails, 5-10 gallons 1.35 per gal. 

F. O.B.CHICAGO, ILL. 
10% discount, Cash wiih order. 
Re -■. Terms— 2%, 10 days. Net, 30 days. 

BUY DIRECT FROM MANUFACTURER 

ROBERT M. LUCAS CO. 

1950 W. 31st Street, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Garlanite 

GARLANITE, the New Putty-Colored Glazing Com- 
pound, is the result of years of experience and untiring 
effort to produce a PERFECT Glazing Cement. 

GARLANITE, made in putty consistency for bedding 
and semi-liquid consistency for bulbing over the top, 
assures you of the utmost in Glazing Service. The beau- 
tiful Putty color, its elasticity and the ease with which it 
can be applied or removed when necessary to replace 
broken glass makes GARLANITE the most desirable 
of all glazing materials for both new and old work. 

PERMANITE, of course, still leads the field of black 
materials. 

THE GARLAND COMPANY 

Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



To All Orchid-lovers, "Attention!" 

On May 15th next the Federal Horticultural Board has called 
a Conference at Washington, D. C, to discuss Quarantine No. 37. 

At a previous Conference in 1920, at which were present over 
twenty orchid men (besides, we had two hundred signed protests 
from prominent orchid growers against the embargo on orchids), 
two men only spoke in favor of the quarantine. 

In spite of the prevailing sentiment that the quarantine should 
be modified, the Board decided that, inasmuch as Orchids could 
be raised from seed, no change in the regulations were necessary. 
Since that time, however, the effects of this embargo have been 
disastrous to the orchid interests, and if you are in favor of 
modified restrictions that will provide reasonable protection 
against pests without destroying our orchid industry by prohiljit- 
ing importations, send protest and, if possible, reasons for same to 

—DO IT NOW JOHN E. LAGER, 

We need your Chairman Orchid Committee, 

reply before May 15th Summit, N. J. 



Mentiiin The Ucviow wlieii you write. 



Carnation Thomas C. Joy 

strong, from 2-inch pots 

$12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000 
250 at 1000 rate 

JOY FLORAL CO., Nashville, Tenn. 



'/■r •'■^■TJ -■■ ■• 



■- ■*'. \i J . 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



155 



No Shortage Of 
Palms With Us 

KSHTZA POBBTBBZAHA OOVBIVA- 
TZOV8: 

e-inch ^ .11.60 

6-inch S.OO 

Wooden tubs, $6.00, 17.60. 110.00, 

$12.00, 114.00. $18.00. $20.00 and $26.00 

All in flrst-claas condition 

ABXOA £VTSBOEirS OOHBIVA. 
TZOWSi 
8-lnch $10.00 

PAVBAHV8: 

8-lnch $S.00 

0XBOTITTM8: 

10-inch tubs $10.00 

BirBBEBSi 

4-inch 40c 

5-inch 60c and 76c 

6-inch $1.00 

FBBHS — ^All kinds, pot-errown: 

6-lnch $0.60 

6-inch 76 

7-inch 1.00 

8-inch 1.60 

ASFABAOUS F&UXOBVSi 

2%-inch 6c 

3 -inch 16o 

ABFABAaVS SBBBVOEBXt 

2%-inch 6c 

3 -inch 16c 

DBAOABBA. MABBABaBABAl 

6-lnch $1.26 

6-inch 1.60 

FOR EASTER LIST 
SEE ISSUE OF MARCH 23. 

JOHN BADER CO. 

Mt. Tro7. N. S., PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Mfptlon Tlw H>Tl>w wfaea jmt write. 



Joseph Heacock Company 

Wyncote, Pa. 

Palms and Cibotiums 

S«« Clataifiad adTartisamanta 



Mantlon Tha Bariew when yon wrlta. 



Chrysantliemiims and Roses 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Write jxa about anjrthinc you want 
in thia line. 

CllAo* ll« TOTT I CO., ifKnr jbbsbt 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Chrysanthemums 

FOR EVERY NEED 

ELMER D. SMITH & CO. 

Chryianthemum Speclaliats 
ADRIAN, MICH. 

The Birthplace of Modern Chrysanthemums 



Mention Tlip Ucview wlicn you write. 



Painting and Glazing 

Putty Bulbing and Permaniting 

S. E. AUSTIN 

Eait Haven Ave. and Main St. , Ricbmond, Ind. 



Rain When ^u W^nt It 




A lifehne dry weather insurance 



A lifetime insurance against dry 
weather crop losses, that's ex- 
actly what the Skinner System 
of watering is. 

When your crop is cut short, 
because of dry weather, it costs 
you money. 

Costs you real money. The 
Skinner System of watering not 
only insures crops like asters, 
carnations, cannas, gladioli and 
dahlias, but it greatly improves 
their quality and surprisingly 
multiplies the quantity. 

Don't think you have to buy 



a big, expensive equipment. 
You can have a Portable sec- 
tional line 50 feet long, that 
waters 2500 square feet, for 
even so little as $19.75. Or a 
200-foot Portable line that 
waters 10,000, for $79.75. Four 
moves of it waters a whole acre. 
Two men can set it up in 20 
minutes, hook on the hose and 
the watering starts. Just as 
easy to take down and move. 

Can ship at once. 

Lower price equipment gladly 
quoted. 



The Skinnor Irrigation Co. 



223 Water Street 



TROY, OHIO 




LATE MUMS PAY BEST 



White and Pink Seidewitz are the two best late varieties and 
we have a large stock of rooted cuttings ready. We oflFer you 

WHITE SEIDEWITZ— WhiU tpact of £***** 

popular Scld6Wlti, ntembllna tt ia avny 
rwpect exoapt color, wtilcb la a pan white; 
tbli rartety ibould rank aa doea Ita parmt, 
aa one of ttaa beat TarleUaa for Chtlatmaa 
Moomina $4i Jt 



Per 1000 

flOLDEN QUEEN— The beat jeUow for early 
October, maturlna (bout the lOtb. Same 
color aa Oolden Olow line Incurred form 
and double from any bud $3S.O0 

OCTOBER QUEEN— Pure white. Urge ain. 
maturing Ooctober II to 20; exoeptloaally 
fine stem and follaae 44.00 

WH. H. CHADWICK— Large. incurred, white 
nmetlmea (haded pink U.OO 

HARVARD— Japaneae reflexed: very dark 
erlmaon; la perfection Norember 15 or 
later; the heat red yet Introduced; double 
from any bud 35.00 



•EIDEWn 



beautiful late. Isearvad, 



bright pink, maturing from ThaakaglTliM to 
early Deoembar; aurpaaaea all late pinka 

we hava grown 

EARLY FROST— A Tciy good early white to 
foUow Smltb'a AdTanca: para white, la- 
otured 



These Good Pompons Ready in Quantity 



Per 1000 

MRS. FRANK BEU— The nry beat Thanka- 
glrlng bronze, (hading to fine red: erery 
florlat winta (ome of thla grand late Ta- 

rlety 130.00 

MRS. MAZEY— Bronae aport of Godfrey.... 40.00 
ANNABELL— wine colored (pott of Oodfray. 40.00 



SUNSHINE— Deep yellow In eoior. Snn aad 

freah for Tbank(clTlnc without any holdinc 
back and remalna In perfect coadlttaaTif 
dealred, for two weeka longar; riKNdd ka 
partially dUbudded, otherwlaa the parfaally 
foimad flowera wlU be too oiu w i lad 



rlOOO 



HANS JEPSEN, Chrysanthemum Specialist, MAYWOOD, ILL. 



156 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



Greenhouse Heating 

Subscribers are invited to write the 
editor of this department with regard to 
any details of greenhouse heating that are 
not understood. When information is de- 
sired regarding the capacity of boilers, or 
the amount of radiation required for a 
greenhouse, the needed temperatures 
should be stated in the inquiry, as well 
as the amount of glass in the side walls, 
and the dimensions and general arrange- 
ment of the greenhouses. It is often help- 
ful, also, to have a sketch showing the 
location of the houses. 



USINO OLD BOILER. 

A few years ago we picked up a boiler, 
thinking that it might be serviceable in 
a greenhouse we were then thinking of 
erecting. We are now building that 
greenhouse, which is 30x100 feet. The 
boiler is eight feet in length and has a 
diameter of three feet. There are 
twenty-eight 3-inch flues, together with 
a 4-inch outlet and a 2y2-inch return 
connection. Is it possible to heat the 
above-mentioned greenhouse with this 
boiler if hot water is used, or would it 
be more advisable to use steam? 

T. H. G.— Colo. 



No reference is made to the amount of 
glass in the side walls, or to the temper- 
ature desired in the greenhouse, but if 
there are not more than thirty inches of 
glass in each of the side walls of the 
greenhouse, and if the temperature dj 
sired does not exceed 60 degrees when 
the outside temperature is 10 degrees 
below zero, the boiler will meet the re- 
quirements. The boiler must have a 
grate thirty inches square, however. 

For heating a house 30x100 feet, it is 
advisable to use hot water. The only 
objection to the boiler now on hand is, 
that the inlet and outlet on it are too 
small. An additional 3-inch outlet 
should be provided. You should either 
provide the boiler with two 3-inch inlets, 
or one i-inch in addition to the 2%-inch 
inlet which the boiler now contains. 

The piping arrangement in the green- 
house should include five 2%-inch flow 
pipes; one of these should be located on 
each side wall plate, one under the ridge 
and the fourth and fifth at the purlins. 
Fifteen 2-inch return pipes will be re- 
quired, if there are two feet of glass in 
the side walls of the greenhouse. If 
there is no glass in the side walls, how- 
ever, thirteen returns will suflSce. Ar- 
range the returns in five coils, and sup- 
ply each coil from one of the flow pipes. 



HOLDING TWO TEMPERATURES. 

I have a greenhouse under construc- 
tion, which is 20x40 feet, with forty-five 
inches of glass in the side walls. The 
ridge is twelve feet high. I intend to 
pipe this greenhouse with one 3%-inch 
flow and one 3%-inch return. The main 
flow is to be a 2%-inch pipe. I intended 
to use sixteen runs of 2-inch pipe under 
the benches, three runs under each side 
bench and five runs under each center 
bench. I intend eventually to use this 
house for growing plants at a higher 
temperature, and I also intend to add a 
second greenhouse for use at a lower 
temperature than the above house. 
Therefore there would be a 2i/^-ineh 
flow in the greenhouse with the higher 
temperature and a 2%-ineh flow in the 



To the Man 
Who Needs a Boiler 

THE CUSTOMERS' INTEREST FIRST— Is the 

basis of the Kroeschell standard, and this princi- 
ple makes the Kroeschell policy the most liberal 
of all in the greenhouse boiler business. 

The great variety of boilers we make places us in 
a commanding position. We make every type of 
boiler that is used, from the smallest house heater 
to the largest water tube steam boiler (600 horse- 
power). For the above reason we can furnish the 
most efficient boiler unit in every case. 

It is the Kroeschell policy to supply only that type 
of boiler which is best suited to the conditions, 
and under no circumstances do we take any 
other stand. 

ORDER NOW 

Orders may be placed now for delivery during 
summer or fall of 1922. You can save from 5 to 
10 per cent if you purchase a boiler during this 
month. It will pay you to take advantage of this 
offer. 



Th« superiority 


M K'rO*' GJ^EEN H0U5t 
W ^ BOILER 


V 


KROESCHELL 


of vur boilers has 


^ 


. BOILERS have 


rosuitodinthe re- 




1 

^ 


k no bulky soet- 


moval and abol- 




m accumulatinssur- 


ishment of hun- 




1 


M faces — yeu avoid 


dreds of cast iron 




L 


■ the disacreeable 


sectionalboilers— 




■ 


I work and trouble 


in every Instance 




P 


■ indispensable to 


KROESCHELL 




F 


* cleanins boilers 


BOILERS Bive 


V^ ^^^^^r 


n 


r with complicated 


more heat with 


V> ^^^^^F^ 


' and tortuous back 


the same pipins 


^^ r^^^ 4^^ 


and forth fire 


With less fueL 


X^^jHOTVjg^ 


r 


passases. 


WHEN YOl 


J BUY- 




IT SAVES 


GET A KROI 


ESCHELL 


COAL and LABOR 



EnsineerinK Advice and Quota- 
tions cheerfully submitted— 
Let us know your requirements 



KROESCHELL BROS. CO., 



444 W. Eri« Straat 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



157 



MONEY-SAYING 
SUNDRIES 

OUR PRICES ARE 
ALWAYS BELOW THE MARKET 

GULF CYPRESS 

Greenhouse Naterials 

Pecky Cypiess Bench Lumber 

GLASS 

HOTBED SASH 

All Kinds and Sizes 

At low ir than tbe prevailing mar- 
ket prices. 

PECKY CYPRESS 

In random 'widths and lentrthK. 

Carload lots shipped from mill, f iclKlit 
palil New York rate. 

$/i8,00 per thousand sq. ft. 

NON-KINK 

WOVEN HOSE 

Bemnants, 12 ft. and up, coupled, 12c per 
ft. This hose is cheap at twice the pnce. 


















Hose Valve 

^^(^^ All brass except the hand 
wheel. Has a removable leather 
disk, which is easily replaced to keep water- 
tight. Stuffing box prevents leaks at stem. 



Metropolitan 
PatcBted 





BOILERS 

Will do more work than any 
other boiler of the same size; 
made in all sizes to heat every 
size greenhouse. 

PIPE 
VALVES FITTINGS 



1299-1323 FlushinK Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



house witli tlie lower temperature. The 
returns will be of 2%-inch pipe also. 
Will this arrangement work out all 
right with a boiler of the proper size? 
Would you i>ut the same size of pipe in 
the greenhouse with the lower tempera- 
ture? The house with the lower tem- 
perature will he of the same width, but 
sixty feet longer than the other house. 
How close to the ridge pole should the 
2Va-ineh main flow be placed? How 
high and how large should the stack be 
made? The greenhouses are situated on 
the side of a hill, about 200 feet below 
the summit. The hill protects the west 
and the soutli sides of the houses. The 
walls are made of cement and e.xtend iip 
to the sills of the glass in the sides. The 
outside temperature goes as low as 10 
degrees below zero. The heater is a Her- 
cules, made in Chicago, and I intend to 
add another when the second house is 
completed. Each of the heaters will 
have five sections. I should like to use 
3%-inch pipe, because with the present 
arrangeiiioiit I can disconnect either 
heater in mild weather or for repairs. 

F. K.— O. 



The principal objection to the pro- 
posed jilan for piping the greenhouses 
is that only one 2i/i-incli supply pipe 
is to be used for sixteen 2-inch returns. 
It is true that there will be but about 



Used in More 
Than 9,000 Plants 

Better join up with this 
satisfied army of friends who 
know what a profitable move 
it is to eliminate poor combus- 
tion conditions, escaping heat 
and needless repairs with a 
permanent, modern setting of 



m mi ! i> ^ii i iii 




Settings of "Steel Mixture" reduce the joints more than two-thirds. Because 
they are smooth and with few joints they last more than twice the life of 
ordinary fire brick. These tested facts are worth considering. 

Write us at once for "Book of Dimensions" and information about Boiler 
Door Arches, Fire Box Lining Blocks, Back Combustion Chamber Arches, 
Blow-off Pipe Protectors, Ignition Arches or Dutch Ovens. We ship from 
stock immediately; settings fitted to your exact requirements. 

McLEOD & HENRY CO., TROY, N. Y. 



NEW YORK 



BOSTON 



DETROIT 




IMICO 

Hot Water BoUers 

Made by 

Illinois Malleable Iron Co. 

1801.1825 Diversey Boulevard 

CHICAGO 

Are noted for COAL ECONOMY and 
good results generally 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



It Lets the Florist Sleep 



Let na tell you what one 
will cost delivered at 
yoqr Railroad Station. 

WRITE NOW 



You don't have to sit up and watch a 

GIBLIN GREENHOUSE BOILER 

GIBLIN &. CO. UTICA, N.Y. 




To stop that 

pipe leak per- 
manently — 
cheaply — use 
Emergency 
Pipe Clamps. 

M. B. Skinner Co. 

558-562 WasUiiftoa 
Boal.. CUcaffo. 



> 



PIPE and FLUES 

A LL SIZES of second-hand pipe, with 
" new threads and couplings, in ran- 
dom lengths or cut lengths. Also 
malce a specialty of handling boUer 
flues for retubing boilers or for green- 
house piping. All flues are trimmed 
and thoroughly cleaned by machine. 

JOHN GROH 

1885 Clyboum Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



COAL COSTS 
MONEY 

Are yoD bnining more than yon thoold ? 

FREE ENGINEERING 

We maintain a staff of Combustion 
Engineers who will come into your 
plant, look it over and if we can cut 
your coal bill we will tell you how 
we can do it. There is no obliga- 
tion to buy COKAL HAND STOKERS. 
We will guarantee to save coal in 
your plant if it is possible to do it. 

Call us up or write — 

Cokal Stoker Corporation 

335 East Ohio Street 
Tel. Saperior 7701 CHICAQO 



HentlOD The RctIcw when yon writ*. 



/r^< 



-.yr'-y vr— v^'TJTTj.^.'Y- 



M(^.;pwFJ*?»^^ 



158 



The Rorists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 



430 squ:ne foot of radiation in the 
houses, which would not be much out of 
the way if there were only six 2-inch 
returns to be supplied in a house 100 
feet long. "With sixteen returns, the cir- 
culation will be sluggish in some of the 
returns, and far better results may be 
secured if three 214-inch flow pipes and 
twelve to fourteen 2-inch returns are 
used. 

One of the flows should be on each of 
the side wall plates and the other three 
feet below the ridge. Four returns 
should be placed under the side benches 
and the others distributed under the 
middle benches. The number of the re- 
turns in the house with the lower tem- 
perature may be reduced at least one- 
third, varying with the temperature de- 
sired, but it will be advisable to use at 
least two flow pipes. 

The stack should be about thirty feet 
high and from ten to twelve inches in 
diameter, depending on the size of the 
heater. The area of the cross section 
of the chimney should be about one- 
seventh of the grate area. 



NEWARK, N. J. 



Now that Easter is past, the growers 
are preparing for the next great event. 
They are forcing into shape geranium 
plants and other stock for release Just 
before the occasion. In the meantime 
part of the earliest of the stock will be 
sold for early cemetery decorations. 
Large quantities of pan.sy plants are be- 
ing sold now for cemetery use and these 
will be replaced later with plants that 
will last for the season. 

Florists whose stores are near the 
cemeteries are busy now putting graves 
in condition. 

McLaughlin & Murphy report that 
there has been a little lull in business 
since Easter. There is a considerable 
amount of funeral work, however, and 
some wedding work. R. B. M. 



Boiler Flues 

Cleaned by Special Process 

Cut to order for retubing 
Random lengths for piping 

Guaranteed Rebuilt Boilers 

STEAM and WATER 
Prompt Delivery 

C. B. ISETT & SON 

BOILER WORKS 
1701.7 Winnebago Ave., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when Tou writ* 



Union Grate 

A Rocking Grate that Saves Coal 

Write for catalogue and prices 

MARTIN GRATE CO., '^li^.^'SS'^ 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



ESTABUSHED 1867 

S. WILKS MFG. COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

¥/ILKS HOT WATER BOILERS 

FOR GREENHOUSE HEATING 
3517-3539 Shields Ave., CHICAGO, ILL 



Mention The Review when 70a write. 




The Book for Every 
Greenhouse 

This book glvee full liiforniiitlon regarding 




FURNACE LINING 



PLIBRICO is saving liiindredM of dollars annuallT In 
greenhouses all over the country. Its JointlesH air-tigbt 
walls make poSKlble the utmost production of heat with the 
least expenditure of fuel. 

But read our book D-60, on "Modern Furnace BulUUng," 
and learn what PlilBKICO will do for you. Our neari-st 
representative will show you how to put in quick temporary 
repairs or complete holler settings. 

Our Service is Free 



PUBRICO U de- 
liTeredomly ia iteel 
coatuaera of dii- 
tiactiTeappcaraBC* 
ai ihovra at tlic 
rifht. 

Warehouse 
stocks in all 
principal cit- 
ies. 






1134 CLAY ST. CHICAGO. 



Mention The Review when yon wrlta. 



Mfiehead 




Points the 
Way to 
Economy of Fuel 



BEGIN NOW to find out about the "Morehead" System. Send right away 
for the "Morehead" book for florists. In it you will find an easily understood 
discussion of the boiler and condensation question from the practical 
Btsuidpoint of the grower of flowers. Write for this help TODAY. 

MOREHEAD MFG. CO. Dept. "M" 299 DETROIT, MICH. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 







aic 



y 



BOILER FLUES 

We make a specialty of handling 
carefally selected boiler flues, 4 
inches in diameter and other sizes 
for Retabing Boilers. Also 
Fines for greenhouse piping, etc. 

All fines are thoroughly cleaned 
Inside and out, trimmed and are 
ready for ase. Oeneral sales agent 
for Stuttle's Patent Clamp and El- 
bow for Joining flues— DO packing, 
no leaks. New Standard Pipe and 
all kinds of Qreenbonae Fittings. 
Right prices and prompt shipment. 

THE H. MUNSON CO., 
Est. 1898. Inc. isZI. 

Phone State SMS, 6464 
038 W. North Ave. Ctaloago J 



% 



alt 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



■PIPE- 



Wrought Iron of sound second-hand quality 
with new threads and couplings. 16-ft. lengths 
and up. Also pipe cut to sketch. We guarantee 
entire satisfaction or return money. 

ALSO NEW PIPE AND FITTEVGS 

Pf aff & KendaU, f^"^ Newark, N. J. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

PIPE — Second-Hand 

All sizes Fittings and Boiler Tubes 

f*ipe cut We guarantee entire satisfac- 

to sketch tion or money refunded 

Philadelphia Second Hand Pipe Supply Ca 

1003 N. 7th Street. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The never-failinsr 

Non-Poisonous Insecticide 
INSECTONOS 

In form of spray 

KILLS 

not only many of the 

INSECTS 

In the greenhouse but 
aUo DESTROYS their 

EGGS 

"A great success," "Gives perfect satisfac- 
tion," so say leading florists. 

j$ 2.00 per can 
tpaid\ 14.00 per case 

8 cans to the case, K case .\t case rate, 
1 can sufficient to make 32 gals, of solution 
for Epraying. 



\rice 

OS 



WM. BRANSON, 

OP. Inaectonos' Laboratc 
BLOOMINGTON. ILL. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



TO AVOID TROUBLE- Use 

FISHER STEAM SPECIALTIES 

LOOK for our ad in May 11 issue 
FISHER GOVERNOR CO. 

Home Office -MARSHALLTOWN, LA. 

Branches in Principal Cities. 



Mention The Review when jron write. 



^t-— rr7r" 



-I. ■ i^"<^-r 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



159 




^ 





Sincle (combination Shelf Bracket. 
Carry one 12-in. board, or two pipes. 




T Bracket unassembled 



■ ■ 





Tie Bracket 



Side Board 
Bench Bracket 



Fig. 24 

Double Pipe Carrier 





Split Tee unassembled In ordering pipe carriers specify size of 
post as well as size of pipe to carry. 



Fig. 28 

Multiple Pipe 
Carrier 



Challenge Ventilating Apparatus and Greenhoose Fittings 

It will be to your interest to secure our prices and 
catalogue before making a selection. 



Improved Ciialleiige 



John A. Evans Co., Richmond, Ind. 

Comer North ISth and Penna. R. R. 



it- ramyMairMialiJilfc,.:"-;; 



EVANS 



;alt sprayer 



HOSE->HH 

Price, $7.50 




THE RECOGNIZED STMDAM INSECTICIDE 

A spray remedy for green, black, 
white fly, thrips and soft scale, 

FUNGINE 

For mildew, rust and other blights 
affecting flowers, fruits and vegetables. 

VERMINE 

For eelworms, angleworms and other 
worms working in the soil. 
Quart, $1.00 Gallon, $3.00 

Sold by Dealers 

Aphine Mfg. Co., "«"-•;.•"' 



Our CUSTOMERS guarantee 

Gets-There Insecticide Soap 

the best thing for 

White riy, Aphis, Red Spider 

"Gets-Tbere clears them out in a 
short time." 
"Best thing to clear our Rose Bushes 

'^'^ Mildew." 

Send $1.00 for good sized sample can. 

Ask your dealer for it. 
Gets-There Soap Co., Conthokocken, Penna. 




DREER'S 

Florist Specialties 

New Brand New Style 

**RIVERTON" HOSE 

Furnished in lengths 
up to 600 feet without 
seam or joint. 

The HOSE for the FLORIST 

'4-lnch per ft., 18c 

Reelof«)Oft.,per ft, 17c 

Couplings famished free 

with lengtbg of 25 feet. 

HENRY A. DRCER 

714-716 Chestnut St. 

PHII.ADILFHLA, Pa. 



: 



IGREENHOUSESI 



You CEin build now at big savings 



MMEMM 




o 



UR PRICES are down to rock bottom. We offer 
helpful assistance to those who want to build. 

Put Your Greenhouse Problems Up to Us. 



We go anywhere in the United Statea to eubmit plana and prices, 

MctropoIitai)MatcrialC5 



1299.1323 FLUSHING AVE. 



BROOKLYN, N, Y. 



Ill i I I I I I I I I rmnr 



TOBACCO PRODUCTS 

Pnlverlzert Tobacco Powder 

Flue as flour 1(X) lbs. , H.OO 

Fuiiiientinijr Tobacco Ilust 

Strong; and fresh-... 100 lbs., 3.00 
Fine Tobacco Uu8t 

Cip.an, uniform 100 lbs., 2.00 

Cut Tobacco Stems 

Clean, fresh, in bags, .'WO lbs., .'j.OO 

Special prices in ton and carload lota 

F. & I. Tobacco Products Ce. 

FuccesBora to 
Lancaater Tobacco Products Co. 

300-310 Plum St., LANCASTER, PA. 




BUYYOUR OWN RAIN! 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

OUT OF DOOR AND GREENHOUSE 

FACTORY BUILT— ANY SIZE 

ROCK RIVER IRRIGATION COMPANT 
FAaORT AND MAIN OFFICE: ROCKFORD. ILL 



HENRY G. MILLER 

20 Years' Kxperienco 

Greenhouse Designer and Builder 

Construction Materials 

Ventilatin]{ Apparatus 

HeatlnK Systems 

Irrigation and Refrigeration 

Box 181 Irvington Sta., 
Phone IR. 1761 Indianapolis, Ind. 




RED RINO BRAND 

NIKOTEEN 

FOR SPRAYING 

Aphis Punk 

FOR FCMIOATINO 

NICOTINE MFG. CO. 

SLLouie. Mo.. U.S.A. 






160 



The Florists' Review 



Max 4. 1922 



ruLvemzEb Sheep- Pulverized Catom 

SHREbbEb C/ITTLE 

n/l N U RE 

THE PULVERIZED MANURE CO., 33 Union Stock Yards, CHICAGO 



Highly Concentrated 

Convenient Dependable 

Direct heat dried and sterilized bone dry — no 
weeds. The ideal manure for bench soil, potting 
soil or field dressing— for every crop under glass 
or out of doors. 

Insist on WIZARD BRAND through your 
supply house or write us direct. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



The Market. 

Business in Washington was slow last 
week. Even the call for funeral work 
slackened materially, and outside of a 
few of the larger stores having fairly 
big decorations in hand, there was lit- 
tle doing in the cut flower line. 

Prices on roses have dropped ma- 
terially since Easter, and they now 
range from $4 to $20 per hundred. Co- 
lumbia, Butterfly and Premier are the 
favorites in the day's sales. American 
Beauty roses are quite good and range 
in price from $6 to $9 per dozen at 
wholesale. 

Carnations are l)cginning to show the 
effects of warm weather and are small 
in size. Tlie top price has been $6, with 
inferior stock selling in large quanti- 
ties at as low ns $10 per thousand. 
Sweet peas are exceedingly plentiful, 
and there is n surplus each day except 
in the purple and lavender shades. The 
average price, regardless of color, is $10 
per thousand. 

Darwin tulips List week came into the 
market in heavy supply and moved at 
an average of $8 per hundred. Some 
few specials brought as high as $10 per 
hundred. A few single violets entered 
the m.arket and they sold well, for there 
are always stores that find use for them. 
This is late for the appearance of vio- 
lets. They were priced at $7.50 per 
thousand. Many delphiniums of extra 
fine quality were sold at from $2 and 
$2. .50 per bunch up. 

Potted plants have been selling well 
since Easter. Despite the fact that 
practically all of the available stock 
was used up for Easter, enough has 
since been found to meet this continued 
demand. The plants as a whole are 
quite good. 

Various Notes. 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Gude, accom- 
panied by their daughter, Wilhelmina, 
left Washington Saturday. April 29, for 
Detroit, Mich., where Mr. Gude attended 
the meeting of the executive committee 
of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery As- 
sociation. 

Gude Bros. Co. achieved a great deal 
of publicity recently when it furnished 
a huge basket containing 100 American 
Beauty roses, of the firm's prize-win- 
ning type, and orchids, as an Easter 
offering; to Presiilent Harding by one of 
his admirers. 

Local police rcgvilntions governing 
the sale of flowers and other merchan- 
dise on the streets have been materially 
clianged. Now it will not be possible 
for the flower venders to sell from 
baskets at given street corners. They 
will have to keep moving or suffer ar- 




Pure Ground Steamed 
Bone Fertiuzer 

Available for three years — 
fertilizer with filler avail- 
able for only one year. 

Nourishes and enriches soils; replaces 
in soil used continuously, those el- 
ements necessary for healthy, steady 
growth of plant life. 

An ideal plant food — delivered in 
any quantity desired. 

Samples furnished on request. Sold direct to individual 

florists and growers in 5, 10, 25, SO and 100 lb. bags. 
Special price* onlcarload lots. Write Dept. F. R 

JACOB DoLD Packing Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 



Mention TIn> RptIbw wh<iB Ton wr1t» 



Feed Your Plants Now 

Use PREMIER BRAND POULTRY MANURE 

The best feed for Mums, thoroughly heat dried and pulverized. 

Does not bum and will produce better flowers and more luxuriant 

foliage than is possible with any other fertilizer. Use as a top dressing 

at rate of 75 lbs. to 500 square feet of bench space. 

Shipped from either Kankakee, Illinois, or Buffalo, New York. 

$3.00 per 100 lbs., $13.75 per 500 lbs., $25.00 per 1000 lbs., $48.00 per tea. 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 166 N. Wabuh Ave., CHICAGO, ILL 



MentloD Th8 BeTlew when yon write. 



PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY 

A list of PLANT NAMES and the Botanical Terms most frequently met with 
in Articles on tradei (opics, with the CORREQ PRONUNCIATION of each. 

"The Pronouncing Dictionary is just what I have wanted." 
"The Pronouncing Dictionary fills along-felt want." 

"The Pronouncing Dictionary alone was much more value than the sub- 
scription price of The Eeview." 



A Booklet iust the size to fit > desk pigeonhole and be 
always available. Sent postpaid on receipt of 25c. 

Caxton Building, 
508 Soutli Dearborn Street, 



FLORISTS^ PUBLISHING CO. 



CHICAGO 



May 4. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



161 



Down Come Our Prices 

Giazi;;r^finri;jFaints! 

Again Reliable Brands scores a home run ! Last fall our prices were from 40 to 50% lower 
than others — this spring we have been able to purchase our raw materials at still lower 
figures — and you get the benefit through another cut in price ! 

Asbestos Coatinsr for Roofs and Gutters $0.92 per sfallon 

Brush free with every barrel and half barrel 

Reliable Brands Glazing Putty, Black 98 per grallon 

Reliable Brands Glazinsf Putty, Gray 1.33 per gaXXon 

Gun free with every barrel and half barrel 

Greenhouse White, First Grade 2.22 per gallon 

Packed in 58-galloD steel drums and 40-Kallon steel half drums, plus 
5 cents per gallon for 20-gallon steel kegs. 

You are cordially invited to place a trial order with us for any of the above products at our 
risk and expense ; we absolutely guarantee the same Reliable Quality that has made strong 
friends in every part of the country — and we will gladly refund your money if not entirely 
satisfied with the results. 

A Suggestion : Don't Delay — Order Today ! 

RELIABLE BRANDS COMPANY 

EAST NINTH AND CENTRAL AVE. CLEVELAND. OHIO 

Note: 5^ cash discount allowed on all ordors accompanied by Check, Draft or Money Order. 



CALLAHAN GREENHOUSES 



■ 




ECONOMY 

u tdway* found 
in CaUahan Quality 

Prices are now down. Let us fig^ure 
with you on Greenhouses and Ventilat- 
ing Equipment. Everything for the 
Greenhouse Complete. 

T. J. CALLAHAN CO. 
970 S. Perry Street DAYTON, OHIO 

Cleveland Rep. IndiaTiapolis Rep. 

ten Protpect Ave. i6 N. Ritter St., IrvingUm 
Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



u 



HUMUS 

D. V. Brand 

Makes Everything Grow 



it 



Put up in specially prepared water and dust 
pioof bags, containing 2!^ cu. feet or about 
100 pounds. Shipped anywhere from our 
storehouse at Streetsborough, Ohio. $1.00 
per batf, f . o. b. Write fur prices on car lots. 

THE CLEVELAND SOIL CO. 

1353 Park Row, Lakewood, Ohio 



Mention The Rcrlew when yon write. 

SPLIT CARNATIONS 

Easily Mended with 
Pillsbnry's CaraatiM Sl<>oles 
"Best device on the 

market."— Joseph Traudt. 

Gould not get along with- 
out them."— S. W. Pike. 
laOO. 3Sc: aoaOhf $1.00. 9nt$»M 

I. L Pillsbury, Galesburf , III 

Mention The Rerlew when you write. 




MECHANICAL 

Sash Operating Devices 

The ADVANCE Machine has many supe- 
rior merits which are universally en- 
dorsed. All users are very enthusiastic 
over the type and design, and it is with- 
out a doubt the one best purchase in 
Ventilating Equipment. 

GREENHOUSE FITTINGS OF ALL KINDS. 

Strongest, neatest and most reason- 
ably priced fittings on the market. 

One of our circulars will be of interest to you. Write today. 

Advance Co.^ Richmond, Ind. 




I- J PAT. 



il 



Wire Tie" 



Will tie any plant to a 
wire or Hyacinth 
stake. Yoar Chrya- 
M ■_- mn OA anthemams will aoon 

^ _ Hfr» b I "fcy need tying to a stake. 

^^^^^^^ # Why not send for 

^k M samples? From yoar 

^^ ,^ r dealer or direct, 

^^m^^ »2.00 per 1000 

WM. F. BU.StHARI>T. 
6 E. Woodland Ave. ArlinKtOD, Md. 



No loss if you 
mend your split 
carnations with 

SUPERIOR 

CARNATION 

STAPLES 

35c per 1000; 3000 
fo» $1.00, postpaid. 

|Wa.ScUatter&Sw 

12 TjmAm St. 
BETOBK SpriwficU, Mm*. 





AFTEB 



*j ivT'^r T\ ■ 



162 



The Florists' Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



rest. To overcome the effect of the 
modified regulations, it will be neces- 
sary for them to rent space in buildings 
or provide themselves with carts which 
can be kept moving. T. N. S. 

(Concluded from page U4.) 

TWO SEED BILLS IN CONGRESS. 

try or jjlace, or the state, territory, or 
possession of the United 8tatcs, or the 
District of Columbia, in which such field 
seed was grown, and (c) the year such 
field seed was grown; and also (2) if it 
is labeled or branded so as to deceive or 
mislead the purchaser, or if the con- 
tents of the package as originally put 
up liave been removed in whole or in 
part and other contents inserted. 

Fines and imprisonment are provided 
for violations of the proposed law and 
examinations to determine misbrand- 
ing are to be made by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. In tlie event 
that an examination determines mis- 
branding, the Secretary of Agriculture 
is directed to give notice thereof to the 
person from whom the package or other 
container was obtained. Such person 
would ])e given an opportunity to be 
heard, under rules and regulations to 
be prescribed by the secretary. In the 
event that it appears that there has 
been a violation of the j)roposed law, 
the facts would be certified to the 
proper district attorney, who would 
commence approi)riate court proceed- 
ings. 

It is provided that no person shall be 
jirosecuted under tlie proposed law when 
he can establish a guaranty, signed by 
the wholesaler or jobber, or person re- 
siding in the United States from whom 
he purchased field seed in such package 
or other container, to the effect that tne 
package or other container is not mis- 
branded within the meaning of the law. 
Such guaranty, to afford protection, 
would have to contain the name and ad- 
dress of tlie wholesaler, jobber, or other 
person making the sale to such person, 
and in such case this seller, named in 
the guaranty, would be amenable to the 
prosecutions, fines and other penalties 
which would attach in due course to 
such persons. 

If adopted, the law would become ef- 
fective six months after its passage by 
Congress. An effort will be made to 
have the Senate agricultural committee 
consider this legislation at an early 
date. T. X. S. 



/isbesC^lf 




M»ke your greenhouse weather-tight with 
▲sbcstfaJt, the elastic cement that never gets 
hjurd, cracks or peels in cold weather or runs in 
hot weather. 

$1.00 per gallon 



,11. - 

Utf -1323 Flmkkc Atmb*. BROOKLYN. NEW YORK 



GLASS 

for 

GREENHOUSES 

Get Our Prices 
JOSEPH ELIAS & CO., he 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



Greenhouse Glass 

BENJAMIN H. SHOEMAKER 



DISTRIBUTOR OF 



LIBBEY- OWENS' flat drawn Sheet Glass, 
AMERICAN WINDOW GLASS CO/S ma- 
chine made Glass, and other leading brands 
produced by high-grade factories. 

Quotations gladly furnished on any quantity 

205-211 N. Fourth St. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



LOW PRICES 

PROMPT SHIPMENTS 



GREENHOUSE GLASS 

QOOD QUAUTY UNIFORM STANDARD THICKNKSS WELL FLATTENED 

Our Service and Prices Will Save You Time and IMoney 
We Solicit Florists' Inquiries 

THE THROOP-MARTIN CO., COLUMBUS. OHIO 



GREENHOUSE GLASS 

In all sizes, uniform in thickness, prompt shipments 

Ohio Plate & Window Glass Co., M^isiiix.^ Toledo, Ohio 



SOMETHING NEW IN 

Greenhouse Glass 

"FLAT CRYSTAL GLASS" 

Even thickness. The cost to you is oo more. 
Why not have the best? Get our prices. 

CADILLAC GLASS COMPANY 
2556-2586 Hart Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 



GLASS CLOTH 

A 'ransparent waterproof fabric as efficient 
as glass for hotbeds cold frames, etc., per sa. 
yd.. 35c; 25 yds at 32c; 50 yds at 31c, 100 yds. 
at20c. Lei uafiffureonyour l&rgerordera. Foi 
parcel post add Sc per yd. to above prices. 
Try It out now and be convinced. 



Turner Bros., 



Bladen, Neb. 






!*■ , '• •' ■^'•"^'?7. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



163 



GREENHOUSE CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 

Durable, Efficient, Light, Convenient, Inexpensive 

It wiU be to your interest to let us quote you on your requirements. No charge for estimates. 
OUR CATALOGUE WILL BE OF INTEREST TO EVERY GROWER. 

Louisiana Red Gulf Cypress or Washington Red Cedar 




CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 



FITTINGS 



HARDWARE 



HOTBED SASH 



A. DIETSCH CO- "^ 



SHEFFIELD AVE. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The RctIbw when yon write. 



GREENHOUSE BUILDERS 




W« build all kinds of areenhonMS. 0«t onr 
eaUnuite on your next honie. 

Weeber & Race 

ins Ukmm StR. L. ■nOOAPOUS. Hiini. 



Glazing Points 

Drive easy and trae, beeaoie 
heth bevels are on the same 
side. Can't twist and break 
the glass in driving. Galvan- 
ized and will not nist No 
rights or lefts. 
The Peerless Olazing Point 
is patented. No other* lilij 
it. Order from year dealj 
er or direct from as. 
Write for samples 
end price. 

kTA.BBIIB,I 
fl« Ok*st>«t Itreeek 

.fUlMelyMa. 7 



GREENHOUSE 

GLASS 



ALL SIZES 



BKST BRANDS 



Sharp, Partridge & Co. 

2263 Lumber Street 
CHICAGO 



Mention The Berlew when yon write. 



We Await Your Commands 
THE 

Foley Greenhouse Nfge COe 

3248 W. Thirty-firct St, CHICAGO, ILL 



Greenhouse Glass 



WE ABE TIE NOILII LU8EST PROMCEBS 

Ask the dealer for prices, or write us direct if the dealer doesn't 
handle our product. We sruarantee uniform Gradin^f, Flattening, 
AnnealinjT and Careful Packinar. 

"fiET ACQIJURTED" WITI 0» SPEOIALTIES 

29-34-39-ounce Glass 

AMERICAN WINDOW GLASS CO. 

General Offices: Fanners' Bank Building, PITTSB0R6H, PA. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



BEST QUALITY 



EXTRA HEAVY 



PROMPT SHIPMENT 



Greenhouse Glass 

SINGLE AND DOUBLE STRENGTH 

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

Write U» for Price* 

BAUR WINDOW GLASS CO., Eaton, Indiana 



Mention The Review when yoo write. 



Florists' Hail Association 

Did you ever stop to reflect that insurance is a guaran- 
tee of value, and that now is the time to be sure that your 
glass is protected? 

IT IS WORTHLESS WHEN BROKEN BY HAIL. 

Banks loan money when your glass is insured in the Flo- 
rists' Hail Association. 

For particulars write JOHN G. ESLER, Saddle River, N. J. 



164 



The Florists^ Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



EVERTITE 

GLAZING CEMENT 



Applied with an 

"OH BOY" 

Automatic Gun 



Evmrtite Glazing Cement applied with the new "Oh Boy" Gun makes 
an ideal cambination. This gun, which is the last word in glazing guns, 
allows Evertite Glazing Cement to flow in a uniform consistency all the 
time. Note the ease with which this gun can be handled. Think of 
what you have used and draw your own conclusions. 



Write for circulars and prices. 

THE EXCELLO MANUFACTURING CO. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Patented 
S. A. HOST. Inventor 




INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



The Market. 

Stock is abundant. Everything in 
season is coining in freely. Business has 
been fair, considering the season. 
• Carnations are plentiful at from $4 to 
$6 per hundred. Laddie brings $10 to 
$12 per hundred. Roses range from $4 
up to $25 per hundred. Various varie- 
ties of roses are available and the de- 
mand has been good. Lilies are in large 
supply. Easter varieties sell from $15 
to $20 per hundred. Callas bring $1.50 
per dozen. 

Snapdragons are greatly in evidence 
at from $6 to $10 per hundred. Short- 
stemmed sweet peas are plentiful, al- 
though longer-stemmed stock is not so 
heavy. Calendulas are offered at $3 
and $4 per hundred. 

Outdoor stock is pouring in, including 
lilacs, valley, bulbous stock, pansies, 
etc. 

Various Notes. 

A new flower store, known as the 
Joseph E. Little Flower Shop, has been 
opened at South Meridian and Kelly 
streets. This shop advertises fancy cut 
flowers, floral designs and potted plants. 

Edwin E. Morner, of Shelbyville, and 
Mr. Werner, of Smithland, Ind., were 
in the city last week. 

The florists will miss the May meeting 
of the Indiana State Florists' Associa- 
tion, which was suspended. 

Baur & Steinkamp are cutting good 
snapdragons of their own origination. 
This firm has a good crop of carnations 
coming on for Mothers' day. E. E. T. 



TORONTO, ONT. 

Business last week was comparatively 
quiet. There has been an abundance of 
flowers, including roses, tulips, roses in 
pots, etc. 

It is evident that the cut rate drug 
stores, groceries, etc., are able to secure 
flowers at a low rate, judging by the 
retail prices th;it arc being quoted. The 
regular florists are not at all pleased. 
They were willing to spend money on 
advertising, but found that the drug 
stores and butcher shops were able to 
buy flowers at such a price as to quote 
still lower retail prices. The result was 
not satisfactory. 

Plans are hcin^^ made for Mothers' 
day, May 14, and it is hof>ed that the 
growers will unite in maintaining the 
present prices. After Easter a great 
many letters appeared in the local 
papers, referring; to the hitiU price of 



PECKY CYPRESS 



WE ARE SPECIALISTS 

We wen prftctically the first to sell to this trade, and guarantee perfect satis- 
faction and rock-bottom prices. Get the value of ottr long experience. 
PECKY CYPRESS, because of its durability, is the only wood now being 
used for greenhouse oenches. Will sliip in any auautity. carload or less. 

Dnp Siding, Ship Lap, Flatring, White Cedar Peiti, ETerythin^ in Lmhei 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

Klagsbary and Weed Stt. 
CHICAGO 

L. D. Phones Uncolm 410 and 411 



ADAH SCHILLO LUMBER CO., 



Hentloii The BeTlew when yoa write. 




COMPETITION PROVES OUR QUALITY 



•^OSS AZTEC" 
Ware 

Aralea Poto 
Hanging Baafceta 
Lawn Vases 
3lrd Baths, Etc. 



RED POTS 

Best Materials— Skilled Labor— Uniformly 
Burned- Carefully Packed. 

THE ZANE POTTERY CO., i?A?£i?. .°n^\o^: So. Zanesville, Ohia 

Meatloa Tfce Berlew when jtm write. 

IONIA POTS ARE STRONG 

Always burned to the same degree of hardness. Our kilns are equipped with iiM^ 
measuring pyrometers and other up-to-the-minute improTements. Every detail of man- 
ufacture, from the clay bank to the strong crates in which Ionia pots are carried ti 
you, marks an advancement over old-time methods. Let us have your order now. 
WE WILL SHIP WHEN YOU ARE READY. 

■is^;.ssir,:::7;;r ink PonEiT eo., iohu, micl 

Mention The HeTlew when yon write. 



.^^^ 



THE HARRIS 

READY-TO-USE 

LOCKED 

PLANT BAND 

SaapUrap oa rc<|BCi 
«.« THE A. W. HARRIS MFG. CO., 
lOl E. PINE ST., SLEEPY EYE, MINN. 




If you have not seen our wonderful 

JIM'S ELASTIC 

write ue today for free sample 

The Quality Brands Company 

25 Spru St., New York, N. Y. 



BIRD'S 



NeponseT 

' WATERPROOF PAPER ^ 

FLOWER POTS 

•WMTI YOUR OIAUR rOR SAMPLES AND PMCU ■< 



L OinSVlLL Ej POTTERY CO. 

ine. 

Louisville^Ky. 

Mmnafaetoren sine* 1876 af 

Red FlorisU' Pots 
Azalea and Bulb Pans 

ASK ANY SOUTHERN GROWER 




Mention Th« R«t1«w wh>n joo wrif . 

GEORGE KELLER POTTERY CO. 

Successors to 
GEO. KELLER & SON 

Manufacturers ot 

RED POTS 

Before buying write for price* 

2614-2622 Hemdon Street 

Near Wrightwood Avenofl 

CHICAGO, ILL. 




Mat 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



1&5 



OUR PATENT LEAK-PROOF GUTTER 

has proven to be superior to any other gutter in the 
market and we substantiate this assertion with the 
testimonies of many growers. Let us send you an 
estimate on your next houses. All our material, same 
as the gutter, is strictly best grade in its line. 




Fat. Oct. 80. 1917. 

ICKES-BRAUN MILL CO. 

2330 Wabansia Avenue, Near Wertem ud North Ares. CHICAGO, ILL. 

Greenliouse Material, Greenhouse Hardware, Permanite, Paint, etc 



Mentioii Tba BeTlew when T*n writ* 



Nr. Greenhouse Owner 

Do your greenhouses need paint- 
ing, puttying or repairing this 
summer? 

Now u the time to get an 
estimate on your work. 

MIKE WINANDY, Jr. 

Greenhouse Builder 

6054 Ridge Are., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Rerlew when you write. 
MAKB TOUB OWN IRRIGATOR "WITH 

MARCH PATENT HEXDILE NOZZLE 



PATENTED 
JUNE 7, 1921 



Saapla Nenia with 
Ml iastnictMU aulad 
M racaipt «< ten ctntt. 



Nvch Aitomadc Irrigator Co., Nukegon, Nick. 

Wtmanafaetaraaeompleta Una of Irriirator aqalpment. 

Aak aa. 

Mention The ReTlew when yoo writo. 







SOS Rlohdale Ave., 
( Cambridge, Mass. 



ESTAB. 17CS 



8171 Flasklns Ave., 
Maspeth, L. I., N. Y. 



INCORP. 1904 




W«rld'( Oldest ud Lwfctt Manniactorert of 

FLOWER POTS 

A. H. HEWS & CO., Inc. 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS 

Ventlon The Rerlew when yon write. 




The Pfaltzgrafl 
Pottery Co. 

Flori^s'Pots 

YORK. PA. 



MeatloB Th« Berlew wkea yon writ«. 




NINETY YEARS' EXPE. 
RIENCE IN MAKING 



FLORISTS' POTS 

The YORK, Pa., PLANT has for more than one whole generation 
shown the way in making the best RED POTS that can be product. 
STRONG, POROUS, UNIFORM, absolutely the best and cost no more. 

THE PROGRESSIVE CLAY COMPANY 

Executive Office: Ninth Floor, Marbrtd^e Building, N£W YORK CITT 
Branch Office: Bulletin Bids., Pbiladelpliia. Pa. 

Mention The Bariew whea y«a writ*. 

THE ELVERSON POT 

It is a dollars and cents saving proposition — plus satis- 
faction — to use the pot that proves its merit in the test 
of actual service. Write for free samples of that pot. 

W. H. Elverson Pottery Co., New Brififhton, Pa. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 





KAHLER REAL RED POTS JlSff^aiiSr^ 

Your orders always receive prompt and careful attention. Made 
of high-grade material by skilled workmen in a modem plant. 

Write for prices and samples. 
KAHLER POTTERY CO. - LOUISVILLE, NEB. 




ORDER NOW 

St Louis 
Standard Red Pots 

All Regular Sixee 

They are the best. All orders 

receive prompt attention. 

Prices on application. 

ST. LOUIS POTTERY & MFG. CO. 

5240 Northmp Ave ST. LOUI& MO. 



WHY WAIT 

TO ORDER YOUR 

Flower Pots? 

Have them when you need them. 
It's like money in the bank. 

ORDER TODAY DO NOT DELAY 

GET THE BEST, FROM 

Missouri Pottery & Supply Go. 

4219 Iowa Ave., ST. LOUIS. MO. 



Red Pots 

No. in 

Size Crate Per 1000 

2 -in 2000 $11.25 

2)i-in 1700 12.75 

2H-in 1200 15.00 

3 -in 900 19.50 

3H-in 560 24.00 

4 -in. Geranium 400 27.00 

4 -in 360 30.00 

4H-in 272 40.50 

6 -in 200 54.00 

Three-quarter size pots, same price as stand- 
ard size. 26% discount on Clay Pots and 6% 
additional cash with order. 

Well Made, Properly Packed. 

Prompt Service. 

C. C. Pollworth Co., 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Extra Quality Pots 

Florists who want superior (luallty RKI) POTS, 
pl.ico their orders with us. Wire or telephone 
your rush orders at our expense. 

Missouri Pottery 

Kansas City, Mo. Kansas City, Mo. 

Established 37 Years 



166 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 



Retail Florists — Attention! 



. i«r wiAlii U kM* kMM fiaal* kaaUy mJ mtka Ani grew. 



Ivwy Irtdi FUtM it aik*^ «mm tifc fc— t 

The Public Wants It — We Have It — Here It Is 

ZENKE*S 

"NEW PLANT UFE" 

A Uqold Plant Food, Tonic and Fortlllsor. OdorioM, Econoadcal, Hamdaaa. 

la Chicaco alone over 800 Retail Florists are sellins it and sending repeat orders everj month. 

SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER— Cat coapen balew and erdar today 

IZCELL LABORATORIES, 453S RaveaswaaJ Ave., CHICAGO, ILL 

Inclosed please find check for $10.00. for which kindlr ship at once, the foUowins: 

5 Doa. NEW PLANT LIFE, K-pint siaa, Q 92.00 910.00 

1 Doa. NEW PLANT LIFE, M-pint siaa FREE 

Also a good supply of leaflets, without charge. Retailing at 26c per can, brings 118.00, or 18.00 net profit. 




Hams 

■trset City and State. 



Retailibr.. 



25c 



flowers. It is hoped that the public will 
not be given an opportunity for writing 
such letters after Mothers' day. An- 
other reason for maintaining the exist- 
ing prices at Mothers' day is that the 
jewelers, book stores and post card 
houses are making a strong bid for 
Mothers' day trade. Boosting the prices 
of flowers in the face of such competi- 
tion will be fatal to the florists' trade. 
The Toronto Hetail Florists' Club 
held a social evening April 24. 

J. J. H. 



S. W. Parsons, 620 St. Clarens avenue, 
is planning to go into business in the 
near future. He was twelve years in 
the florists' trade in England. 



FORT WAYNE, IND. 



The Market. 

General business following Easter has 
been good. There are many Easter 
lilies coming in now that did not arrive 
in time for Easter. The price is reason- 
able. Call as are in good demand and 
are of good quality. Roses are in good 
supply, but a scarcity of carnations 
prevails. There is a good demand for 
orchids and the quality is fine. Snap- 
dragons are a general favorite and are 
being used extensively. I'lants are sell- 
ing well for hospital orders. The pros- 
pects are good for a record business for 
Mothers' day. There will be a scarcity 
of carnations in the local market. 

Various Notes. 

Kalph Tinkliam has a new Dodge de- 
livery car. This firm furnished tlic 
(lecor.atioiis for several tiaiujucts. At 
the Rotary Club ban(|U('t the decora- 
tions were mounds of spring flowers 
and an individual miniature rose tree 
for each guest. Rusinoss, in general, 
is on the increase. 

The Wenninyluiff Florists have had a 
good week ami rejiort liusiiu'ss as good. 

W. .1. & M. S. Vesey furnished sev- 
eral thousand roses for the anniversary 
and opening of the Indiana Furniture 
Co. 

The ever-increasing demand for roses 
has been felt by the Flick Floral Co., 
and the firm has decided to convert sev- 
eral of the houses in whidi jilants have 
been grown to the growing of roses. 
Some fine Faster lilies find snapdragons 
arc seen here. S. N. 



ORDER QUICK FOR DECORATION DAY 

TWO BIG SELLERS AT LOW PRICES 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 




No. 17 

Hclcrht, 36 in. 

Base, IS^a In. sq. 

Width, 35 In. 

Weight, 166 lbs. 

Capacity of 
Keservolr, 3 sral. 



No. SO 




Height (with bottom base) 

32 >4 in. 

Height (without bottom 

base), 25 In. 

Bottom Base, leHj in. sq. 

Sub Base, 13 Hj in. sq. 

Width, .SO In. Weight, 140 lbs. 

Capacity of Reservoir, 

1*^ gallons. 

With hand'es.... $15.50 net With handles $14.00 net 

Without handles, 14.00 net Without bandies. 12.50 net 

If bottom va>e omitted 
deduct $2.75 
511 digcount for cash with order. 

Catalogue of other designs upon request. 

THE STEWART IRON WORKS COMPANY, Inc. 

230 STEWART BLOCK CINCINNATI, OHIO 







Does Fonr Times tke Work 
with One-half the Effort 






77ie BOLENS POWER HOE 

and Lawn Mower Tractor 

is a motorized wheel hoe. It will work 
in 12-inch rows and wider. (The pict- 
ure shows cultivation of asters planted 
30 inches apart.) Where rows are not 
more than 18 inches apart, it will 
handle three at a time. It also pulls 
three seeders. 

All attachments for seedine, culti- 
vating or lawn mowing have snap 
hitches and can be changed instantly 
^vithout the use of a wrench. 

The BOLENS multiplies your man 
power when you are most crowded 
with work. It pays for itself in a hurry. 

Write for further partieulari. 

GILSON MFG. CO., 121 Park St., 


- di^ -,' *'-/ :: .'■.iij^s^ 




%-*! >^ 




.-.^:.^ : \ 




PORT WASHINGTON, WIS. 






May 4, 1922 



The Rorists* Review 



167 



&<Jng 

G REENHOU SE S 




60-Foot steel frame flat rafter Rose house. King Patent "L" eave carries drip to wall — 

no spatter — no black spot. 




50-Foot semi-iron Rose house. Rigidly tied together across the house from eave to 

eave with strong threaded joint malleable iron fittings. No cast 

iron clamp friction joints in King Houses. 

When you think of good greenhouses, think of KING. 
Ktng Construction Company 

GENERAL OFFICES. NORTH TOXAWANDA. N. Y. 
NEW YORK CITY PHILADELPHIA BOSTON. MASS. SCRANTON, PA, 



1 WEST 47th ST., 
TELEPHONE 
BRYANT 809 



HAKRISON BLIXi., 
TKLEPHONK 
8PRICE 6521 



HOARD OF TRADE ISl.DQ. 
TELEPHONE 

MAIN 4:!99 



307 N. IRVING AVE. 

TELEPHONE 

4136 



168 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



^ Classifie 



ABELIAS 



ABELIA GRANDIFLORA. 
Strong 2% -in., $4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 
Not lesB than of any variety of plants sup- 
plied in our wholesale department; under 2B of 
a variety are billed at dozen rate; 25 and over 
at hundred rate. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO.. 

The largest Rose growers In the World, 

Department A, Springfield, 0. 

ABELIA QRANDIFLORA; POT-GROWN, 

$4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 

JOS. W. VESTAL & SON, 

Little Rock. Ark. 



ACALYPHAS 



ACALYPHA SANDERI, 
2V4-ln. pots, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 
Not less than 6 of any variety of plants sup- 
plied In our wholesale department; under 25 of a 
variety are billed at dozen rate; 25 and over 
at hundred rate. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO., 

The largest Rose growers in the World. 

Department A, Springfield, 0. 

Acaiypha Trlumpbans, 2V6-ln., $0.00 per 100. 
Oak Orove Oreenbouae, Tuskegee, Ala. 



Acalypba Tricolor, 16c per dos^ $5.00 per 100. 
The Schmidt A Botley Co., Sprlngfleld, O. 

ACMILLEAS 

AchlUeas, Boule de Niege and The Pearl, 
atrong plants from 2V^-in. pots, $7.50 per 100. 
J. T. Lavett, Little Silver, N. J. 

ACHYRANTMES 

Achyrantbes, Brilliantlssima, Lindenii. Bailey 
(green and yellow), rooted cuttings, $1.75 per 
100, $15.00 per 1000; 2V4-in. pots, $6.00 per 100, 
$50.00 per 1000. 

Roman J. Irwin, 43 W. 18th St., New York. 

ACHY EANTHKS, RED ; 214-lN., 4 CENTS. 
GULIJiITT & SONS, LINCOLN. ILL. 

ADIANTUMS 

Adiantuni Cuneatuni, strong plants, 2%-in., 
$12.50 per 100: 4-in.. $30.00 per 100; 5-ln., $50.00 
per 100; strong, large clumps of Croweanum, 
$50.00 per 100. Can be sub-divided. 

Adiantum California variety, strong B-ln., 
$75.00 per 100. Special price while they last. 

Adiantum Hvbridum, strong clumps suitable 
for 8-in. potsi $50.00 per 100. 5 per cent 
for packing. S. S. Skidelsky & Co., Dodge Bldg., 
63 Park Place, New York^ 

Adiantum O'Brienii, easy grower, 8-ln. pots, 
15c; 4-ln., 20c; B-ln., 50c; 6-ln., 76c. Adiantum 
Farleyenae Oloriosum, 4-in., 35c; 6-in., 60c. All 
full and pot-l)ound. Cash with order. H. 0. 
Doescher, 2048 Gentllly Ave.. New Orlea n s, L a. 

Adiantum Cuneatum. 2%-ln. at $12.60, fine 
plants; Hybridum, 4-in. at $25.00. 
Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

■ AQERATUMS 



BLUB STAR AND STELLA GURNBY. 
Stella Gumey, Blue Star, rooted cuttings, $1.00 
per 100, $8.00 per 1000; 2%-ln., $3.60 per 100, 
$30.00 per 1000. 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

Ageratums, clean, well rooted cuttings, $1.00 
per 100, $9.00 per 1000; strong 2%-in. plants 
in flower, $3.50 per 100, $30.00 per lOOO. S. S. 
Skidelsky & Co., Dodge Bldg., 63 Park Place, 

New York. 

Ageratums, extra fine stock, 2%-ln. pota, $6.00. 
Cash. Packing free. 

La Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse. Wis. 

Ageratum Blue Perfection, 2%-ln., $3.60 per 
100. Packing free. Cash. 

Truitt's Greenhouses. Chnnufe, Kan. 

Ageratum Blue Star, in bloom now and when- 
ever you want it, 2V4-ln-. $4.00 per 100. 

Freeport Floral Co., Froeport, 111. 

Ageratum Stella Gumey, blue; 2%-ln., $3.00 
per 100. 

Oak Grove Gree nhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Ageratum Blue Perfection, 2>4-ln. at $4.00 per 
100; seedlings, 76c per 100. 
Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Ageratums, well-rooted, $1.00 per 100; 2%-ln., 
$3.00 per 100. 
Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green. Ky. 

Ageratums. rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100, 
$9.00 per 1000, prepaid, 

S. D. Brant, Clay Center, Kan. 



Ageratum Little Blue Star, 2%-ln., $4.00 per 
100, $35.00 per 1000. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co., Paines vl Ue, . 

Ageratum Imperial, seedlings, 40c per 100, 
$3.60 ppr 1.000. L. J. Rowe, Titnsvllle, Pa. 

Ageratum Bine Star, 214-ln., $4.00 per 100. 
The McGregor Bros. Co., Springfield, 0. 




Department % 



Rates for adrertiauig in thi* department 
18 cents a line net per bsertion 
Minimom advertisement, 2 lines 



Ageratums, Ourney and Blue Star, rooted ent- 
tlnga, $1.00 per 100, $8.00 per 1000; 2-lm., |S.W 
per 100. Cash. Byer Broa., Chamberaburg, Pa. 

Ageratum Little Blue Star, 2^-1b., $4.00 pet 
100. Cash, please. 
Kelly's Greenhouse, Ko k omo, Ind. 

Ageratum Bine Utar, rooted cuttings, $1.00 pei 
100; 2^-in., $8.00 per 100. Cash or e. o. d. 
W. B. Trimble Oreenhoase Co., Princeton, HI. 

Ageratum True Dwarf Blue, alwaya In bloom 
when you want It, rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100. 
J. A. Keeney Co., Monongahela, Pa. 

Ageratum Stella Gurney, 2-in., $2,60 per 100. 
Cash. Harglerode Bros., Shippensburg, Fa. 



Ageratum Blue Star, strong plants, 2^-in., 4c. 
Cash. Joseph Turskl, Gross Point. 111. 

Ageratums, blue and white, rooted cuttings, 
$1.00 per 100. Wm. J. Beck. New Oaatle, Pa. 

ALTEWNANTMEWAS 

ALTEBNANTHBRAS, RED AND YBLLOW. 

August stock, fine, strong plants 

from 2^-in., ready for 8-in. 

$4.00 per 100, $37.50 per 1000. 

Cash. Prompt Shipment. 

H. W. BUCKBBB. 

Forest City Greenhouses, Bockford, 111. 

ALfERNANTHBRAS^BOM FLATS. 
Good as 2%-lD. pot plants. 

760 Brilliantlssima $4.00 per 100 

350 Aurea 8.00 per 100 

Cash. No packing charge. 
THB IMLAY CO., ZANE3VILLB, O. 

Altemantberas: Pink and yellow varieties, 
strong 2-in., $4.00 per 100, $37.60 per 1000. Bril- 
liantlssima, 2-lB., $6.00 per 100, $46.00 per 1000. 
Special prices in lots of 5000 and more; write for 
them. Wlnfield S. Kircher, Cyclamen Specialist, 
Defiance, O. 

Altemantberas: Twice aa good at Juat a trifle 
higher price tiian rooted cuttings; dwarf red and 
yellow, bench-grown, equal to 2^-ln. pot plants, 
$2.00 per 100, $16.00 per 1000. A few Bril- 
liantlssima at aame price. 
F. W. Fletcher. Orlando. Fla. 

"""" ALTERNANTHERAS. 

Aurea Nana, Brilliantissima and others, 

2V4-in. pots, $5.. "50 per 100, $46.00 per 1000. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 

43 W. 18th St., New York, N. Y. 

Altemantberas, Brilliantlssima and Aurea 
Nana, well colored, busby 2%-ln., $4.00 per 100, 
$35.00 per 1000. Cash. 

Joseph Bancroft & Son, Cedar Falls, la. 

Alteruantheras, red and yellow; 2-in., $4.00 
li<>r 100; Brilliantissima, $5.00 per 100, $46.00 per 
1000. Cash with order. 
G. A. Weberg, Chi cago Heights, 111. 

Altemantberas, red and yellow; 2-in., (4.00 
per 100, $35.00 per 1000. Big plants, nice stock. 
Cash, please. 
H. E. Youngqulst, 3142 Foster Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Altemantberas, red and yellow; atrong 2-ln., 
$4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000; Brilliantissima, 
$5.00 per 100, $45,00 per lOOO. 
Kemble-Smith Co., Inc., Boone, la. 

ALTERNANTHERAS, RBD AND YBLLOW. 

Good, strong plants, 2^-ln., $4.00 per 100. 

THB REBSER PLANT CO.. 8PRINGFIBLD, O. 



ALTERNANTHERAS, 3 KINDS, 2%-IN., 4c. 
GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 



Altemanttaeras, rooted enttlngs fall stmek from 
soil, BrilUantissima. $15.00 per 1000; pink and 
yellow, $10.00 per 1000. These are good planta. 
Cash, please. H. B. Handolph, DelaTan, 111. 

Altemantheras, red and yellow, $1.25 oer 100, 
$10.00 per 1000. Strong fall enttlngs. Write (or 
prices on 10,000 or more. 
Kingman Floral Co., Kingman, Kan. 

AUeraanthera Brilliantissima, extra heavy, 
fall struck, from soil, $16.00 per 1000. Small 
leaved, red and yellow, same ouality, $10.00 
per 1000. N. 0. Caswell. Delavan, 111. 

Altemantheras, red and yellow, 2-la., 8g; Bril- 
liantissima, 4c. Ship May 1. 
John Nelson Co., Oshkoah. Wis. 

Alternanthera Brillintisslma, red and yellow; 
fall soil, branched cuttings, l^c prepaid. Root- 
ed cuttings, Ic. C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

Altemantheras, red and yellow; 2^-ln., fall 
cuttings, $5.00 per 100. Packing free. Cash. 
Truitt's Greenhouses, Chanute, Kan. 

Altemantheras, Rosea, P. Major and Yellow 
rooted cuttings, $8.00) per 1000. Cash. 
^^ Byer Bros.. Cham bemburg, Pa. 

Altemantheras, red and yellow; rooted oat- 
Ungs, $1.00 per 100; 2i^-in., $8.00. 
0. D. OUs, Lake Ohariea. Ul. 

Altemantheras. red and yellow; good stock 
from 2^ -in. pots, $4.00 per 100, $85.00 per 1000. 
B. B. Morgan Floral Co., Paxton, 111. 

Altemantheras, red; extra atrong stock. 3)4- 
In., $S.OO_per 100. $26.00 per 1000. 
H. Weber A Sons Co.. Oakland. Md. 

Altemantheras, Aurea Nana, Paronycblokles 
Major, 60c per doz., $3.60 per 100, $80.00 per 
1000. The Schmi dt & Botley Co., Springfiel d, O. 

Altemantheras, 2%-ln., $4.00 per 100, $37.00 
per 1000. Lewis G. Plelss, New Albany, Ind. 

ALYSSUM 

DOUBLE GIANT 8WBBT ALYSSUM. 

Strong 2-in., $4.00 per 100, $36.00 per 1000. 

WINFIBLD S. KIRCHBR, 

Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance, O. 

SINGLE ALYSSUM LITTLE OEM. 

Little Gem, 2%-ln., $3.00 per 100. 

GULLETT A SONS. LINCOLN. ILL. 

Alyssum Little Gem seedlings, 40e per 100, 
$3.50 per 1000; 214-in., 2%c. 
L. J. Rowe, Tlt uavlUe, Pa. 

Sweet Alyssum, single or double, 2^-in. plants, 
$4.00 per 100; seedlings, single, dwarf, 76c per 
100. Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Alyssum Double Sweet, rooted cuttings, $1.M 
per 100; 2K-ln., $8.00 per 100. Cash or c. o. d. 
W. B. T rimble Gr een hous e Co., Princeton, 111. 

Sweet Alyssum, 2-ln., $8.00 per 100. Gash, 
please. J. O. Witt & Son. 10428 Wallace St., 
Chicago, HI. 

Alyssum Little Oem, plants from seed bed 
ready to pot, 40c per 100; 800 (or $1.00, post- 
paid^ A. B. Campbell, Cochranvllle, Pa. 

Alyssum. tme double, well rooted cuttings, 
$1.60 per 100; 2U-in., $8.00 per 100. 

Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

Alyssum Double Otant, strong 2^-ln., 4c. 
J. 0. Bteinhanser, Pittabnrg, Kan. 

Alyssnm. double white, OOe per dos.. $4.00 per 
100. The Schmidt ft Botley Co., Springfield. O. 

AMARYLLIS 

Amaryllis Bquestris, growing plants from B-in. 
pots, 40c each; 4-ln., $3.00 per doz.; young bulbs 
from 2H-in. pots, $8.00 per 100; Jobnsonil, 6-ln., 
60e]^4-ln,,_86c each. N. 0. Caswell, Delavan. 111. 

Amaryllis Johnsonii, monster bulbs, red, $25.00 
per 100; monster bulbs, $35.00 per 100. Cash 
with order. H. C. Doescher, 2048 Gentllly Ave., 
New Orleans, La. 

AMPELOPSIS 

AMPBLOPSIS VBITOHII. 

Boston Ivy. 

Two and three-year, transplanted, well rooted. 

8-year XX, 8 to 4 ft., $16.00 per 100, $126.00 
per 1000. 2 year XX, 2 to 8 ft., $10.00 
per 100, $80.00 per 1000. 2-ycar, strong, 18 to 
24 inches, $6.00 per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 2-year, 
good, 18 to 24 inches, $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 
1000. 2-year, strong roots, tops l>elow 18 inches, 
$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 2-year, light, for 
lining out, $16.00 per 1000. 1-year, 20 to 80 
Inches, $16.00 per 1000. 1-year, Ught, 10 to 20 
inches, $8.00 per 1000; 6000 and over, $6.00 per 
1000. 

All above by express, packed free. 

8-year, U. $8.00 per doc.; 2-year, XX, $2.00 
per dos.;- ^year, 18 to 24 Inches, $6.00 per 
100; 2-year, short tops, $0.00 per 100, by parcel 
post. Special prices for larger quantities. 

CHARLBS BLACK, HIGHTSTOWN, N. J. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



169 



AmpelupBig Eugelmannii and Quinquefolla, im- 
proved types, 4-ln, pot-grown, $12.00 per 100. 
All extra strong. Cash with order. H. C. 
Doescher, 2048 Gentilly Ave., New Orleans, La. 

Ampelopsis Veltchli, strong 2-yearold pot- 
grown; to close out quick, $6.00 per 100. Packed 
free. Arcbias Floral Co., Sedalia, Mo. 

Ampelopsis Veltchii, 2>^-ln., $4T00^1)er 100, 
$35.00 per 1000. 
The McGregor Bros. Co., Springfleld, O. 

ANTHERICUMS 

Anthericums, variegated 21n., $6.00 per 100. 
George Bros. & Co., New Kensington, Pa. 

ANTIQONONS 

Antigonon Leptopus (Rosa de Montana), 
Queen's Wreath, 2-year-old, 3-in. pots, 15c; 4-ln., 
20c. All extra strong roots. Cash with order. 
H. C. Doescher, 2048 Gentilly Ave., New Or- 
leans. L a. 

AQUATICS ^^ 

. WATER HYACINTHS. 
Miigniflcent bloomers, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 
1000. 
GULP FARMS. 
. Lalie Charles, La. 

Water Hyacinths: Send for a supply; great 
for fish ponds end fountain pools, $5.00 per 
100, $25.00 per 1000. 
C. D. Otis, Lake Charles. La. 

HEALTH PLANTS 
Water Hyacinths, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

GEORGE DUFLOT, 
Box 808, Lake Charles, La. 

AOUILEOIAS 

Aquilegla, Columbine, yellow, white and blue, 
00c per doz.. $4.00 per 100. 

The Schmidt A Botley Co., Springfleld, O. 

ARTEMISIAS 

ARTEMISIA LACTIFLORA. 
Ttali Introduction from China la, no doubt, tha 
Oneat perennial plant of all recent Introdactiona; 
frowB four feet high and ia covered with many 
branched paniclea of fragrant, white flowera from 
AuKuat to October; fine for cutting; atrong, fleld- 
KTown clumps, $10.00 per 100, $85.00 per 1000. 
Ask for oar Ilat of atrong field planta. 

JOSEPH r. UARTIN NURSBBIBS, 
P. O. Box Na. 97. PalneaTllle. O. 

ARTILLERY PLANTS 

AtlUery plants. Novelty, rooted cuttinga, $2.00; 
2H-in., $5.00; 8-in., $8.00 per 100. Cash or 
c. o. d. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton. HI. 

Pllea Serpyllifolia, Artillery plant, 8Sc per 
doz.. $6.00 per 100. 

The Schmidt A Botley Co., Springfleld, O. 

ASPARAGUS 

ASPARAGUS. 
Asparagus Plumosus Nanus — New Crop. 

1,000 seeds $ 2.25 

10,000 seeds 20.00 

100,000 seeds 190.00 

Asparagus Sprengerl — New Crop. 

1,000 seeds $ 1.50 

10,000 seeds 14.00 

F. RYXVELD & SONS, 
61 Vesey St., Sew York. N. Y. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2-in $ 3. ,10 per 100 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2M!-in 5.00 per 100 

Asparagus Plumosus, 3-ln 8.00 per 100 

Asparagus Plumosus, 4-in 15.00 per 100 

Good, strong plunt.s. Ciisli witli order. 

E. R. POUND. 

Cedar and Indiana Sts., Newark, 0. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Plumosus. 2-in. atrong plants $3.50 $30.00 

Sprengerl. 2-in. strong plants 8.00 27.50 

Sprengerl aeedllnga, from flats... 1.00 8.00 

Caah. Prompt ablpment. 

H. W. BUOKBEB, 

Forest City Oreenhonsea, Rockford, 111. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS SEEDS. 
New crop, just picked, good quality; $2.50 vei 
1000; 6000 for $11.25; 10,000 for $20.00; per 
pound, $17.00. 

Cash with order. 

P. P. WILSON, 

2012 S. Olive St., West Palm Beach. Fla. 

SEASONABLE STOCK READY NOW. 
Asparagus Sprengerl, 2^-ln., $5.00 per 100, 
$4S.«0 per 1000. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2>4-ln., $5.00 per 100, 
$45.00 per 1000. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., 
^__ PalnesvUle, 0. ^_^ 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERL 

8%-ln., heavy $ 9.00 per 100 

4-ln., heavy 11.00 per 100 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS. 

8-ln 7.00 per 100 

Cash, please. 
BEZDBK GREENHOUSES, CEDAR RAPIDS, IA. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERL 

2H-ln $ 0.60 per doz. 

2%-ln 4.00 per 100 

THE SCHMIDT A. BOTLEY CO.. 
Springfleld. 0. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI^ 

From 2U-ln. pots $3.00 per 100 

From 3-ln. pots 6.00 per 100 

Cash. No rharee for naokine. 

W. ft T. CASS, GENBVA. W. T. 



PLUMOSUS AND SPRENGERL 
Plumosus and Sprengerl, 2^-ln., extra strong, 
$6.00 per 100, $50.00 per 1000; 3-in.. $12.00 per 
100; 4 in., $16.00 per 100; seedlings, $1.50 per 
100, $12.00 per 1000. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 
48 West 18th St., New York. N. Y. 

Aiparagua Sprengerl. aeedllnga, $8.00 per 1000; 
2'ii-ia., $4.00 per 100, $87.60 per 1000; strong 
SVi-ln., $10.00 per 100. $90.00 per 1000. Aspara- 
gua Plumoaua. 2-in., $3.60 per 100. $30.00 per 
1000; 2V6-in., $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000; 
8H-in., $10.00 per 100, $90.00 per 1000. 

The McGregor Bros. Co.. Springfleld, 0. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERL 

2W-ln., $3.00; 2M!-in., $3.50 per 100; 

3-in., 8c and 10c; 4-in., 15c each. 

All ready for shift. Casli with order. 

ELLIS & CO.. FLORISTS, 

Okmulgee, Okla. 

Asparagus, Sprengerl and Plumosus seedlings, 
$1.25 per 100, $10.00 per 1000. 

Sprengerl and Plumosus, tine 2i/4-In., $5.50 per 
100, $50.00 per 1000; 3-ln., $10.00 per 100. S. S. 
Skidelsky & Co., Dodge Bldg., 53 Park Place, 
New York. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERL 

With healthy growth. 

3-ln., $7.00 per 100. 

4-ln., $12.00 per 100. 

BAUSCHEB BROS., 

20 S. Chicago Ave., Freeport, 111. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI AND PLUMOSUS. 

Good, strong plants, ready to shift, 

out of 2%-in. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

Cash with order. 

No charge for packing. 

R. S. McMURRAY, BELLEFONTAINE, 0. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERL 

2%-in $4.00 per 100 

8-in. S.OOperlOO 

Strong plants. 

SCHMIDT ft MEINE. 

8121 Market St., Youngstown, 0. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERL 

Strong 2V4-in., $6.()0 per 100, $50.00 i>er 1000; 

3-In., $8.00 per 100, $75.00 per 1000. 

WINFIELD S. KIRCHER. 

Cyclamen Specialist, Deflance. 0. 

extra" fInE^ plumosus, SPRENGERI. ~ 
Plumosus, 3-in., 10c; strong 4-ln., 20c; 5-ln., 
35c; Sprengerl, strong 214-ln., 5c; 3-in., 8c; very 
strong 4-ln., 15c. None finer. 

GULLETT ft SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

ALL EXTRA HEAVY. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, 8-ln $6.00 per 100 

Packing at cost. 

WALTER ARMACOST ft CO.. 

821 Bast 4th St.. L og Angeles, Ga l . 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 

3-in., $7.00 per 100. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 

2%-ln., $5.50; 3-ln., $7.50 per 100. 

CHARLES SHERWOOD. WATERLOO, IA. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI. 

Good strong 3-in $ 8.00 per 100 

Good strong 4-in 12.60 per 100 

WESTWOOD FLOWER ft PLANT CO., 
Lynnm St. near Hoover Ave,. Dayton. O. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI. 

3-in., $8.00 and .$10.00 per 100. 

4-ln.. $15.00 per 100. 

H. S. WIECKING, BLUFFTON. IND. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, transplanted second time, 
will average for 2>>^-ln., 8-ln. and 4-in., $4.00 per 
100, $36.00 per 1000. 

J. S. Jones. Sablna. 0. 

Asparagus, Plumosus and Sprengerl. 2%-in. 
at $5.00 per 100; 8-in. at $10.00 ; 4-in. at $15.00; 
Sprengerl seedlings. $1.00 per 100, $8.00 per 1000. 

Henry Smith Floral Co.. Grand Raplda, Mich. 

GOOD. STRONG PIxANTS. CASH. 
Asparagus Sprengerl, 41n.. $12.00 per 100; 
Asparagus Plumosus. 3-in.. $7.00 per 100. 
GEO. MON CUR. WOODSTOCK, ILL. 

Asparagua Sprengerl, 8-in., $8.00 per 100; 4-in., 
$12.00; Aaparagus Plumosus, 8-ln.. $7.00 per 
100; 4-in., $12.00. Cash, please. 

Kelly's Greenhouse, Kokomo, Ind. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, 2%-tn., $4.00 per 100; 
Aaparagus Plumosus, 3-in., $10.00 per 100; 2\i- 
In., 6c each. Cash or c. o. d. 

W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co.. Pri nceton. 11 1. 

Asparagua Sprengerl, transplanted plants from 
flats, e to 8 shoots. $12.00 per 1000. 8 to 4 
shoots, $10.00 per 1000: seedlings. $6.00 per 
1000. Samuel Whitton, Utlca, N. T. 

Asparagus Sprengcri, strong seedlings almost 
ns heavy as 2-ln., $7.00 per 1000. Cash, please. 
Ozark Pansy Gardens. Wost Plains, Mo. 

Asparagus Plumosus, ver>- strong, extra fine 
pl.ints. very hest 3 in.. IOp; 4in.. 15c. Cash. 
Hrinkorhoff Grcenhouaes, Springfleld. 111. 

.\spnragus Sprengorl. extra strong 2-in.. 4c; 
3 in., 7'<.c to 10c each. Cash. 

G. E. Berthold, Nebraska City, Neb. 



G. E. Berthold, Nebraska City, Neb 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI SEEDLINGS. 

$1.00 per 100. $8.00 per lOOO. 

H. P. S MITH. BOX 721, PIQUA. 0. 

Asparagus Plumosus. strong 2-in., 4c. $4.00 
per 100. F. H. Reese, 406 N. Belmont Ave., 
Springfleld, 0. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 20O at $8.00 per 100. 
Strong plants. 

H. H. Windhorst. Florist, Seymour, Ind. 



Asparagus, 4-in., Sprengerl, $12.00 per 100; 
Plumosus, $16.00 per 100. Cash. 

Truitt's Greenhouses, Chanute, Kan. 

Asi)arugus Sprengcri, 3-in., $8.00 per 100; 4-ln., 
$15.00 per 100. (Jood strong stock. Cash. The 
North Madison Floral Co., North Madison, Ind. 

Asparagus, I'luniosus and Sprcugeri, 3-in., 9c; 
4-in., 14c; ready for shift. 
W. B^Shumway Floral Co., Tiffin, O. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, large transplanted plants, 
ready for 3-in., $2.00 per 100, $15.00 per 1000. 
Edward Whitton, Utlca, N. Y. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, strong seedlings, $1.00 
per 100, postpaid; $0.00 per 1000. 
Chas. Whitton, York and Gray Ave., Utlca. N. Y. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, extra heavy 3%-ln., 
$12.00 per 100; 21/3-in., $4.00 per 100. Cash. 

Daut Bros., Decatur, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, extra long fronds, good 
4 in., $15.00 per 100. Cash, please. Warren 
Huckleberry, 422 Chestnut St., North Yemon, Ind. 

Asparagus, Sprengerl, 214-ln., very good, $3.50 
per 100; Plumosus, 2>4-ln., very fine, $5.00 per 
100. Theo. D. Kuebler. R. 6, Evansvllle. Ind. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 1-year plants, $5.00 per 
100. $45.50 per 1000. 
Peter Mack. Box No. 172. Orlando. Fla. 

Asparagus Sprengerl and Plumosus, strong 
3-ln., $8.00 per 100. 
E. B. Morga n Floral Co., Paxton, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, 3-in. ready to shift, $8.00 
per 100. 

The Sycamore Greenhouses, Sycamore, 111. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 6000 2>4-ln., also 6000 
Sprengerl, 2U-ln.. $4.00 per 100. 

Greenville Floral Co.. Greenville, Mich. 

Asparagus Plumosua, 3-ln.. $10.00 per 100. 
Cash with order. 
France ft Yandegrift. Monroe, Mich. 

Asparagus, Plumosus, strong 8-in. eady for 
4-ln.. $8.00 per 100. Sprengerl. 8-in., $7.00 per 
100. The Bast Lawn Gardens, Urbana, O. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, atrong 2-in., $4.00 per 
100. Cash. 

Myers-Watson Floral Co., St. Joseph. Mo. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, extra atrong 8-ln., 8c; 
Plumosus, 21^ -In., 6c each. This ia fine stock. 
Cash. Groves Floral Co., Atchison, Kan. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, 2^-ln., $4.00 per 100; 
8-in., $8.00 per 100. 

F. 0. Freeman ft Sona. Portland. Ind. 

Asparagus, Plumosua and Sprengerl. 8-ln.. 
$8.00 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse. Tnskegee. Ala. 

Aaparagus Sprengerl. atrong 3-ln.. $7.00 per 
lOO; 2-ln.. $3.50 per 100. Cash. 
Jacoba Bros., Peoria, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, strong 2'4-ln.. 5c. 
C. Humfeld, Clay Center. Kan. 

Asparagus Plumosua and Sprengerl, 5-ln., 7c. 
Urlce Bro s.. Vinton. Ia. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, strong 4-in., 10c. 

A. C. Anderson, Columbus. Neb. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2^4-ln., $4.00 per 100. 
Haase Bros.. Pekin. HI. 

Asparagus Sprengerl seedlings, $7.00 per 1000. 
Cash. Sunkist Gardens. R. 2. El Cajon. Cal. 

Asparagua, Plumosus and Sprengerl. 3-ln., 10c 
each. Goshen Floral Co.. Goshen. Ind. 

Asparagua Sprengerl, 2^-ln., 2^c; 8-ln.. 4Vic; 
4-in.. 10c each. L. J. Rowe. Tituavllle, Pa. 

Asparagua Sprengerl, 4-in., $12.00 per 100. 
Cash. 0. Oehlenscblager ft Son. Oconomowoc. Wis. 

Asparagua Sprengerl. strong 2H-tn., 5c each. 
Odor Greenhouses. lola, Kan. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, flne 214-in.. $4.00 per 100. 
Burden Floral Co.. Bowling Green. Ky. 



Asparagus Plumosus. strong 2^-ln. plants, 
$4.00 per 100. 8. A. Plnkstone. Utlca. N. T. 

Asparagua Plumosus. 2-ln., $3.60 per 100. 
J. H. Dann ft Son. Westfleld. N. Y. 

ASPARAQUS ROOTS 

Asparagus roots, licavv year-old. 75c per 100, 
$6.00 per 1000. 
Kemble Flora l Co., Cedar Rapids, la. 

ASPIDISTRAS 

Aspidistras, 4. 5 and 6-in. ix>ts, 10c per leaf. 
Ciish with order. M. Cook's Son. 129 Carondelet 
St., New Orleans. I^a. 

ASTERS '^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
HARDY ASTERS. 
Robert Parker, soft lavender blue... $8. 00 per 100 
Beauty of Colwell, bright blue, yel- 
low center 8.00 per 100 

White Queen, large pure white.... 9.00 per 100 

H. Egroln. soft pink 8.00 per 100 

Choice undivided fleld-grown clumps. 
THE WAYSIDE GARDENS CO.. MENTOR. O. 

Aster Quopn of tlic Market, white, soft pink, 
light blue and rose, healthy seedlings, 40o ix-r 
100. Anlen Floral Giirdens, Arden. Del. 

Asters, Ball's White Royal, mixed, seedlings, 
50c per 100, $4.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 
Edward Tatr o. Sa lin a, Kan. 

Asters, Queen of the Market and Semple'a, In 
colors, 40c per 100. $.'1.60 per 1000. 

L. J. Bowe, TittuvlUe, Pa. 






170 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. l'J22 



ASTERS— Continued 



100,000 ASTBH SEEDLINGS. 

High priced quality seeds were germinated 
in flats tliut were previously sterilized with the 
soil under high pressure of steam. It's a lot of 
extra hard work and expense, but this is the 
only way to get healthy plants, and 1 want you 
to have plants, to start with, that have a healthy 
and clean root system. My flats are placed 
on raised beds of sterilized soil, no weeds or 
bacteria come in touch with them. 

The seedlings are not leggy, sappy nor 
stunted, Just in condition to stand the trans- 
planting or potting and keep right on growing. 
My list of varieties is complete, if you fail in 
the early market you may win In the next one. 
I have no guarantee of success to ofter you, but 
try and find out for yourself the best way to 
succeed under your own conditions. 

Queen of Market, earliest of all, white, pink, 
lavender. 

Carlson's and Invincible, next early, bearing 
Peony formed flowers, white, pink, lavender. 

Lavender Gem, very early and best in ex- 
istence, lavender. 

Pink Enchantress, flowers very double of large 
size, making it a grand Aster. 

Peerless, large flowers on long stems, pink and 
white. 

Daybreak, excellent for cutting, flowers large 
and double, shell-pink and salmon. 

Purity, similar to Daybreak, pure white color. 

Ball's White, originator's seeds, the sensation 
of Chicago market In 1921, very full and well 
centered, ideal for long distance shipping. 

Crego's Giant, best late in existence, large 
flowers borne on good stems, white, pink and 
lavender. 

All labeled and true to name. 
75c per 100, not less than 2.5 of a kind or color; 
$5.00 per 1000, not less than 50 of a kind or color; 
10,000 for $45.00, see Pansy, Salvia, Vegetable 

ads. 
H. J. POTOMKIX, MUXCIE, IND. 

ASTERS. ASTERS. 
Free from disease; in separate colors; only 
early Asters pay; get my cool, solid bench- 
grown Aster plants now. 

Never cheeked, they will bloom during June 
and July, if set out after danger of frost. Will 
ship out at once. "Success" culture directions 
with order. 

EARLY WONDER. 
Colors: 100 1,000 10,000 100.000 

White, pink, lavender. .$0.75 $7.00 $65.00 $650.00 
EARLY QUEEN OF THE MARKET. 
Colors: 100 1,000 10.000 100,000 

White, pink, lavender. .$0.75 $7.00 $65.00 $650.00 
EARLY ROYAL. 
Colors: 100 1,000 10,000 100.000 

Rose, shell-pink, white, 

lavender, purple $0.75 $7.00 $65.00 $650.00 

HEART OP FRANCE. 
Colors: 100 1,000 10,000 100,000 

Best early red $0.75 $7.00 $65.00 $650.00 

ADOLPH FISCHER, FLORIST, EASTO N. PA. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

Seventh Edition. 

Y'ou cannot afford to be without It. 

$1.25 per copy, postpaid. 

$12.00 per doz., postpaid. 

Florists' Pub. Co., Caxton Bldg., Chicago. 



Asters, Quci'ii of llic Markol, Scniple's Branoli- 
iiifc', Iiiviiiiililc, slriiiiK iihiiils. :it ."i0<' licr ](>0, 
.$H..jO per lOUO, ,Oii(M» for .SI.". 00. 
J, C. .Scliniiill, ISrislol. P.K 

Asters, pink, white and lavender; strong geed- 
linBS, 75c per 100; transplanted, $1.25 per 100. 
Cash or c. o. d. 

W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, m. 



AstiTs, Early Ro.val and I,iite, all colors, trooil 
stronp plants, $l,(Xt per lOn, $8.00 imt 1000. 
(ash with order, please. 

Jos. Sohoos , 14;i.3_\Varren St., Evanst on. 111. 

Roval Asters, white, shell-pink and light blue; 
fine early variety, 50c per 100, $4.00 per 1000. 
J. L. Johnson. DcKalb, III. 

Asters, Semple's Giant I^'ite brandling, mixed, 
$1.00 per 2.50, $1.75 per 500, $3..50 per 1000, pre- 
paid^ F. Danley, M acom b, 111. 

■EPPINQ^LAIMTS I 

WHOLESALE PRICE LIST, BEDDING STOCK. 

Per 100 



Aceratiim $ .TOO $. , 



•1.00 



, .tin. 4 
$ 5.00 $. .. 



20.00 
8.00 



Sweet Allysiiiii 

Aeliyraiillies 3.00 

Asparat'iis PInmosus 

Asparapns Sprenperi 

Asters 40 

P.eKonins 8.00 

Cannas 12.00 

Carnatiniis 90.00 

Colons Trailini.' Queen. 4.00 

Dracaen.is 4.00 

Salleroi 4.00 

Parlor Ivy 

Enclish Ivy 

I>olielia 

Petunias, frin^'eil .... 5.00 

Salvia 

Snapdragons 2.00 

3.00 

4.00 



0.00 

t;.oo 



4.00 

4.66 



15.00 



30.00 



20.00 



Tradescantias 
Verben.'is. nil colors.. 

Vinoa Vinos 

Wandering Jew, 



4.00 8.00 l."i.00 



see Tradescantias. 



623 N. Main St., 



C. o. d. or cash with order. 
THE PUEBLO FLORAL CO. 



Pueblo, Colo. 



BEDDING PLANTS, ROSES, PBRBNNIALS. 

Send for trade price list. 

WESTOTKB NCR8ERIK8. 

8t. Loall Oo., OlajtOB, Ifo. 



BEDDING PLANTS. PER 100. 

2'4-in. 3 In. 4-in. 

Alyssum, 2-In., $3.00 $ | $ 

Asparagus .Spreiigeri 7..'>0 

Asparagus Pluniosus ."i.OO 

Baby's Breatli (aiuuiall... 2.(K) 

Campanulas 8.00 

Coleus Trailing Queen 2.50 5.00 

Coreopsis tl.OO 

German Iv.v 4.00 

Ijiirkspur, douljle, all colors ;10(I 

I'elurgoniums 9. (Hi .... 

.Salvias, America and Ziiiicli ."i.tX) 

Tradescantias, 3 kinds 3.00 

GEUANII MS. 

Nutt 4.00 7.00 15.00 

Miclieli 7.00 10.00 20.00 

Iticard 7.00 10.00 20.00 

SUNSET HILL GREENHOUSES, 
Box 73, Leavenworth, Kan. 

ACHYRANTHES. 

Biemuelleri, Brilliantissimu, Panaclie de Bai- 
ley, Lindenii and Formosa. 

Rooted cuttings, $1.50 per 100, $12.00 per 1000; 
2V4-in., 75c per doz., $5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 
1000. 

ALTERNANTHERAS. 
For April and later delivery. 

Aurea Nana, Brilliantissima, Paronvchioides, 
2%-in., 75c per doz., $5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 
1000. 

A. N. PIERSON. INC., 
_• Cromwell, Conn. 

BEQONIAS 

BEGONIA CORAU.INA DE LUCERNE, 

2V4-in., $10.00 per 100. 
Picta Rosea, Argonteo-Guttatii Rubra, Thurs- 
tonii, Albo-Picta, Pres. Carnot, Sandersonii, Alba 
I'erfccta, 

All 2>4-in., ,$0.00 per 100. 
Not less tli.in of an.v variet.v of plants 
supplied in our wliolesale depart uieut; under 25 
of a variety are billed at dozen rate; 25 and 
over at hundred rate. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO., 

The largest Rose growers iu the World, 

Department A, Springfield, 0. 

BEGONIAS. 

S'/i-ln. iK)ts, except where noted. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Chatelaine $7.00 $65.00 

Mrs. Patten 8.00 75.00 

I'riile of Newcastle 8.00 75.00 

Luniinosa and Prima Donna, 2-in. pots, $5.00 
|ier 100. 

ROMAN J. I it WIN, 
4.'! W. 18th St. New York, N. Y. 

Rex Begonias, our well-known fine assort- 
ment including Mme. Cache and Speculata, 2-in., 
$15.00 per 100. 

Begonias, assorted, blooming varieties, $5.00 
per 100; Coralllna de Lucerne, 2M!-in., $10.00 
per 100; 3-ln., $15.00 per 100. Otto Hacker, 
Tliurstonil, Argenteo-Guttata and Lucerne, 2-in., 
$8.(K> per 100. Sandersonii. Marguerite and Mac- 
Bethii, rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100; 2-in., 
$6.00 per 100. N. 0. Caswell, Delavan. 111. 

BEGONIAS. GOOD STOCK. 
.\lt)0-Picta. rooted cuttings, 2">c; 2yi-in., 5c: 
.■?in., 8c; 4-in., 12'.jc. Chatelaine. 2'4in., Oc; 
3 in., 10c. .Mrs. M. A. Palten, 2U-in., 6c; 3-in., 
IL'c. I'ride of .Newcastle, 2ii-in., 8c; 3 in., 12c 
each. Iiiiiiiinosa. 2', in., 6c; 3 in., .8c. Cor- 
allina de Lucerne, 2',1-iii-, 12p; 3-ln., l.lc; 4 in., 
25 c. 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN. ILL. 

BEGONIAS. 
PRIDE OF NEWCASTLE, 
MRS. M. A. PATTEN, 
OUT OF 4INCH POTS, 
BOTH VARIETIES, 20c EACH, 
PLUS 10 PER CENT TO COVER COST OF 
FIRST-CLASS PACKING. 
FINE PLANTS. MOSTLY IN BUD. 
G. R. NOBLE. PADUCAH, KY. 
SEASONABLE STOCK READY NOW. 
Begonias, Gracilli Lumlnosa, Prima Donna, 
Erfordii, Superba and Mignon, 2'A-ln,, $5.00 
per 100; $45.00 per 1000. 

Metallica, Argenteo-Guttata, Sandersonii and 
Albo-Picta, 2H-ln., $8.00 per 100. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., 
Palnesvlllo, O. 

Begonia Chatelaln^^ 2%-ln., $7.00 per 100, 
$05.00 per 1000; Mrs. Patten and Pride of New- 
castle, our new red sport of Chatelaine, 2V4-ln., 
$8.00 per 100, $75.00 per 1000. Rex Begonias in 
nssoitment, strong 2',i-in., $12.50 per 100. S. S 
Skidplsky & Co., Dodge Bldg., 53 Park Place, 
New York. 

BEGONIAS. 

Mrs. Patten, 2-ln $ 4.00 per 100 

Metallica, rooted cuttings 2.50 per 100 

Metallica, 2V6-ln 7.00 per 100 

Metallica, 4-ln 20.00 per 100 

Cash, but no packing charges. 
THE IMLAY CO., ZA NE8YILLB, O. 

BEGONIA PRIMA DONNA. 

Exceptional stock. 

3 inch $15.00 per 100 

4in-incli 30.00 per 100 

AMERICAN BULB CO.. 
172 No. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

BEGONIA CHATELAINE 
Strong 3-In., ready for shift, $10.00 per 100. 
Cash. 

J. SYLVESTER, OCONTO, WIS. 



Begonias, Chatelaine, well rooted cuttings, 
$2.60 per 100, $20.00 per 1000; Chatelaine, 2V4-in.. 
extra strong, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000; 
Mrs. Patten, 2'/4-ln., extra strong, $0.50 per 100, 
$60.00 per 1000. No charge for packing. 

Otto Becker, Cambridge City, Ind. 

CORALLINA DE LUCERNE. 
Begonias, 2H-in., $10.00 per 100; 4-in., $18.00 
per 100. Can ship at once. 

WEST WOOD FLOWER & PLANT CO., 
Lynam St. near Hoove r Ave., Dayton, 0. 

Begonias, Chatelaine, 2i/4-ln., $7.00 i>er 100. 
$65.00 per 1000; Mrs. Patten and Pride of New- 
castle, 214-in., $8.00 per 100. $75.00 per 1000. 
A. J. Schmutz, 23 Arnold Place, North Adams, 
Mass. 

Begonias, Erfordii and Vernon, fine, bushy, 
rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100; 2Vi-ln., $6.00 per 
100; Erfordii, fine, bushy 3-in., $10.00 per 100, 
4-ln., $15.00 per 100. Cash or c. o. d. 

W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co.. Princeton. Ill, 

Begonia Chatelaine, rooted cuttings, fine stock, 
all bottom cuttings, will make flue bushy plants, 
$2.50 per 100 by mall, $20.00 per 1000 by ex- 
press. Cash with order. 
Swaby Greenhouses, St. Charles, HI. 

Begonias, Lumlnosa, Prima Donna and Rosea, 
strong transplanted plants rcaiiv for S'.i-in. pots. 
$2.50 per 100, 300 lor $0.75. 500 for $10.00, 
prepaid. Cash. 

Brill Celery Gardens, Kalamazoo. Mich. 

BEGONIA CHATELAINE. 

21n., $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

W. C. SMITH WHOLESALE FLORAL CO., 

1316 Pine St., St. Lo uis, Mo. 

Begonias, fine transplanted seedlings of Vernon 
and mixed varieties, ready for 3-in., $3.00 per 
100. Will make fine bedding stock. 

L ewis G. Fleiss, New Albany, Ind. 

BEGONIAS, CHATELAINE, LTTMINOSA, 

strong 3-in., $10.00 per 100. 

AVINPIELD S. KIRCHER. 

Cyclnnien Specialist, Defiance, 0. 

Begonia Coralllna de Lucerne, strong, healthy 
2-in., ready for 3-ln., $8.00 per 100; 3 in., $15.00 
per 100. Cash. 

Meyera-Watson Floral Co., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Begonias, strong rooted cuttings of Chate- 
laine, $2.50 per 100, $20.00 per 1000; Mrs. Patten, 
$3.50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. Ready now. 

S. A. Pinkstone, Utica, N. Y. 

Begonias, best flowering and foliage varieties, 
2»4-ln. at $5.00 per 100; 4-in. at $25.00; large 
plants, 50c each. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Begonias, Argenteo-Guttata Rubra, De Lesseps, 
Tliurstonil and MarKuerile, .'tin., .$12.00 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greonlioiise. Tuskegee. Ala. 

Begonias, Lumlnosa ami Prima Donna, strong 
plants, 4-in., 15c each; 2 in., ,")0 each. Cash. 
Carl Erickson, Princeton. 111. 

Begonias, best varieties for bedding and vases, 
mixed 2%-in. extra strong and larte, 7c, Casli. 
Brinkerhoft Greenhouses, Springfield, 111. 



Begoni.i Prima Donna, lood sfiMug plants, 
3-in. ready for 5-in., 12c. Casli. 

Joseph Tuiski, liros^ Point, 111. 

Begonia Prima Donna, extra fine stock, 2i41n. 
pots, $6.00; 3-in., $10.00. 

I>a Crosse Floral Co., I^a Crosse, Wis. 

Begonia Chatelaine. 2-in.. 3'.c; Mrs. Patten, 
2in., 4c; Pride of New Castle, 2-ln., 5c. 

Loyd C. Buncli, Fredouia, Kan. 



Begonia Chatelaine, pink and red; 300 214-in., 
5c each. 

H. H. Windhorst, Florist, Sevmour, Ind. 

Begonia Rex, fine varieties; strong plants from 
2-ln. pots, 10c each. Casli with order. 

George M. Eininaiis. Newton, N. J. 

Begonias, Lumlnosa and Prima Donna, strong 
8-ln.. $10.00 per 100. Grown from seed. 

Hendra & Son, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Begonia Argenteo-Guttata, special otter, flne 
2%-ln., $6.00 per 100. 

Burdell Floral Co., Rowling Green, Ky. 

Begonias, Graollis and Chatelaine seedlinga, 
60c per 100, $4.60 per 1000, prepaid. 
L. J. Row e, TltusTllle, Pa. 

Begonia Pride of Newcastle, strong plants out 
of 2V4-ln. pots, $8.00 per 100. Cash with order. 
Chas. E. Smith ft Son, York, Pa. 

Begonia Liiininosa, from 4-iii, pots. 25c each. 
Nixon H. Gano. Martinsville, Ind. 

Begonia Pride of Newcastle. 2'i-in., $8.00 per 
100. Charles Sherwood, Waterloo, la. 

Begonia Lumlnosa from seed, 2>4-ln., 6c. Cash. 
Hnmmerschmldt 4 Clark. Medina. 0. 

«egonia Chatelaine, 2V4-in.. $50.00 per lOOO. 
Cash. J. C. Re nnison Co., Siou x City, la. 

Begonia Prima Donna, strong 4-in., $15.00 per 
100. Cash. Jacobs Bros.. Peoria, III 

Begonlo Argenteo-Guttata, strong 2Mi-in., $7.00 
per 100. The East Lawn Gardens. Urbana. 0. 

BERBERIS 

BERBERIS. JAPANESE B.VRBERRY. 

12 to 18 ins., liranclied $10.00 per 100 

2 to 3 ft., heavy 40.00 per 100 

Cash with order. Packing free. 

NEW BRIJNSWICK NURSERIES, 

New Brunswick. N. J. 

The BEST WAY to get rid of your surplus 
stock Is to use the REVIEW'S Classified advs. 



May 4, 1'.V22 



The Florists' Review 



171 



BERRIED PLANTS 



TWO NEW CIIEUUIES. 

Improved (ilaiit Clcveliiiul, yellow ; 

Improved (Jiiiiit Oraiitte (Jueeii, 

ri'i iu. i)ots, $0.50 per KXt, $r>0.(XI per 1000. 

UOMAN J. lUWl.N. 

43_W. 18tli_St., New York. N. Y. 

HoUyberry Cherry, the Improved Dwarf Cleve- 
land Cherry, strung 2-in. stock, $5.00 per 100, 
$45.00 per 1000. Cash with order. Jos. I. 
Schaeffer, Mad River Gardens, K. II. No. 3, 
Dayton, 0. 

Cleveland Cherries, 3 to 5 large plants in a 
pot, 2%-ln., $6.00 per 100; seedlings, 75c per 
100. Geo. MaoArthur, 3009 4th Avenue South, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Cleveland ("berry, large berried, per pkt., 50c; 
seedlings, 75l" iH;r 100. 
Otto 1'. Krueger, 4127 Kiist Kroadway, Toledo, 0. 

Jerusalem Cherries, trans|)lanted seedlings, 
ready for 3-iu. pots, .$"1,00 per 100. 

Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

Cherries, Cleveland and Orange, tinv, stock 
seedlings, 75c per 100,' $U.OO piT 1000. Cash. 
Uyer Bros., Chanibcrsburg, Pa. 

Cleveland Cherry seedlings, 75c per 100; 2Vi-in. 
at $4.00 per 100; strong 4-in. at $25.00. 

Henry Smi th Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

HoUyberry Cherry seedlings, ready now, $2.00 
per 100. Abby Avenue Greenhouses, Dayton, O. 

BLACKBERRY PLANTS 

Eldorado Blackberries, nothing better, $2.60 
per 100; $10.00 per 60O; 26 by mail, 7&c. 
Sterner's Nursery, Monmouth. 111. 

BOUOAINVILLEAS ~~ 
BougainvlUea Sanderiana, 4-ln., 25c; 5-in., 
40c; 3-year-old, globe shape, 6-in., $1.00; 7-in.. 
$1.25; 8-in., $1.50, height 2 to 3 feet and spread 
at top 18 to 24 ins. All well shaped. Cash with 
order. H. C. Doescher, 2048 Geutilly Ave., New 
Orleans, La. 

BOUGAXNVILLEA GLABRA SANDERIANA. 

2%-in., $10.00 per 100; 

3-in., $20.00 per 100. 

THE STORRS & HARBISON 00.. 

P alnegyllle, O. 

BOUVARDIAS 



BouTardias, strong pot plants, 2^-ln.. mixed, 
pink, white and red. $8.00 per 100. 
Henry Sm i th Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

BUDOLEIAS ' 



BUDDLEIA PARQUHARII. 
Good greenhouse variety, a companion to Asi- 
atica; blooming during December and January; 
color pale pink; on long stem and flowers almost 
as large as Lilac it properly grown. This plant 
should be grown by ever.v florist, commercial or 
private; can he grown in iwts outdoors during 
summer and planted inside on bench after early 
Chrysanthemums, or can be grown on in pots 
until in flower. 

2-in. pots $10.00 per 100 

Rooted cuttings COO per 100 

BUDDLEIA OFFICINALIS, ROSE-PINK. 

2-in. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

BUDDLEIA ASIATICA. 

2-in. pots, $3.50 per 100. 

JACOB F. GERLINGER, 

Chestnut Hill, Box 4 304, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BUDDLEIA VARIABILIS MAGNIFICa! 
Rank grower, hardy, beautiful Lilac; 

blooms all suniincr. 

2V4-ln., $3.50 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 

ASIATICA, WHITE. 

To grow on for winter blooming; 

a great money maker, 

2Vi-ln., .f3,50 per 100. $:!5.00 per 1000. 

Rooted cuttings of nlv)ve varieties, 

$1.50 per 100, prei)aid. 

Cash with order. Free packing. 

C. L. irU.MPIIREY, 

Zanesvllle, O. 

BUDDLEIA MAONIFICA. 

$4.50 per 100. $40.00 )Mr 1000. 
Not less than fi of any varii'ty of plants 
supplied in our wholesale (ii'partinent ; under 2.^ 
of a variety are lulled at ilnzen ratr; l',") and 
over at hundred rale. 

THE (JOOI) & UEESE CO., 

The largest Kose growers iu the World, 

Department A, Springfield, O. 

lUDDLEIA VARIABILIS MAGNIFICA, 

Butterfly Bush. 
Plants that will commence to bloom about 
June .ind liloom all summer. 

Strong 3 in. pot plants r(a<ly fur shift. $8.00 
l>er KXI; extra line 2':.-in. pot plants ready for 
shift, .|4.."iO per 100. .?l(t.(M> pr.i- 1000. 

II. G. WALKER. 
312 W. Che stnut St., I»uisville. Ky. 

BUDDLEIA VARIABILIS MAGNIFICA. 

Summer Lilac, or Butterfly Bush, 

a hardy slirub, 

blooms from July until frost; 

elegant for cut flowers; 

2%-ln. for lining out, 

$5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000; 

Cash. 

THE IMLAY CO., ZANESVILLE. O. 

Buddleia Asiatica, or White Btitterflv Bush, 
2%-ln., $fi.00 per 100; 3in., $1.50 per doz., 
$10.00 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, A la. 

Buddleia Asiatica, 2%-in.. $5.00 per 100. 
The Storrs & Harrison Co.. Painesville, 0. 



Buddleia, or Butterfly Bush, $4.60 per 100, 
$40.00 per 1000. 

The McGregor Bros. Co., Springfleld, 0. 

Buddlelas, white, pink and lilac, 2»4-ln., $6.00 
per 100. Eli Cross, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

BULBS 

MANY GROWBRS MADE) MONET 
On our prepared Hyacinths for Cbristmai 
blooming. The preparation of these bulbs for 
early forcing is the work of specialists, and w* 
■re leaders in this line. Now l>ooklng the mew 
crop for early summer delivery. Send for com- 
plete lilt of all fall bulbs. Remember we are 
growers. 

r. BYNVBLD & SONS. 
61 Ve««y St.. New York. N. Y. 

Purity Freesia and White Calla bulbs at 
growers' prices. Crop seriously injured by recent 
cold weather. Order now for June, July, August 
delivery. State your requirements, and we will 
quote prices by return mail. 
Lilydale B ulb Co., Santa C r u». Cal. 

Stammes & Co., Wholesale Bulb Growers and 
Exporters, Hillegom, Holland. We sell at grow- 
ers' prices. Ask for special quotations and cata- 
logue or mail your list of wants care R. F. 
Lang, 82- 84 Br oad St., New Yo rk City. 

Bulbs of all descriptions; Lily of the Valley. 
Write for prices. The trade will be Tlsited by 
us in due time, as usual, for 19^ spring and 
fall orders. C. Keur A Sons. Hillegom, Holland, 
Or address 5625 Mosholu Ave., New York. 

Bulbs of all (lescriptions, high grade Japan 
Lilies. Please mail list of wants to Papendrecht 
Bros., Sassenheim, Holland. 

Lilium Giganteum, bulbs, 7 to 9 Ins.. 300 to a 
case, $50.00. 

Holton & Hunkei Co.. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Tigridlas, fine, sound, blooming bulbs, $2.00 
per 100, $18.00 per 1000. 
Jos. A. Elbel, Box 268, Lancaster. Pa. 

" BUXUS 

HILL'S BOXWOODS. 
Choice American grown pyramids, balls and 
standards, good color; well formed specimens 
that will please your customers. Tree furnished 
balled and burlapped, carefully packed. 
BOXWOOD. 
Balled and burlapped. 

Each 

Bnll shaped, 14x14 inches $3.50 

Ball shaped. 16x16 Inches 4.25 

Ball shaped, 18x18 inches 6.50 

Ball shaped, 24x24 Inches 6.50 

Pyramid shaped, 2V^ feet 4.50 

Pyramid shaped. 3 feet 6.60 

Standards, stem 14 Inches; crown 16 Inches 6.50 

THE D. HILL NURSERY CO., INC., 
Box 403. ^^^^ Dundee. 111. 

r.uxus SUFFRUTICO.SA. ' 

Per 100 Per 1000 
Bo.\ Edging, Buxiis Sulfrutlcosa, 

2<4-in $5.00 .'?40.00 

Box Edging. Itiixus Suffrutieo.sa. 

;i-iii 8.00 70.00 

THE CONAUI) & JONES CO., 

Robert Pyle. I'res.. Antoine Wintzer. Vice-Pres., 

West (Irove, Pa. 

boxwood! 

Just as good as we used to get, onlv acclim- 
atized. Pyramids, 2l^ ft. high, $3.50 each; 
Pyramids, 3 ft. high, $4.75 each. 

GULDEMOND & CO., SPRINGFIELD. 0. 

Boxwood Sufl'ruticosa, for lining out, 6 to 
6 ins. and 7 to 8 Ins. Write for prices. 
Robert H. Bende r, Boxly, Chestnut Hill. Pa. 

CACTI 

Cacti, my choice, 25 vars., $4.00; .50 vnrs.. 

$10.00; siKTuIentH. 25 vars., $2.00; 50 vars., 

$5.00. Cash with order. A. G. Greiner. 4202 

W. Natu ral Bridge Av e. , St. Louis, Mo 

CALAD IUMS 

FANCY LEAF CALADIUMS. 

•MIOO bullis in 10 named varieties, finest stock 
In America. 

Medium sized bulbs $20.00 per 100 

Monster bulbs 26.00 per 100 

All bulbs extra large and strong; order quick, 
as they will not last long; sold out of small size. 
Cash with orders. 

H. C. DOESCHER. 
2048 Gentilly Ave., N ew Orleans. La. 

Caladlums, 5 to 7 ins., clioice bulbs, $5.50 per 
100. $50.00 per 1000. 
Ways ide Gard ens, Mentor. 0. 

CALCEOLARIAS 



CALENDULAS 



Oconto. 



J. SYLVESTER. 



Wisconsin. 



CALCEOLARIAS. 

Fine stock ready for shift, 

S^i-ln., 15c each. 

Cash, please. 



Calceolarias, finest hybrids. Grandiflora, spot- 
ted and blotched, large-flowering. 3-in.. $16.00 
per 100; 4-in., $26.00 per 100. 
Toledo Greenhouse, 2829 Chestnut St.. Toledo. O. 

Calceolarias, large-flowering, in bud and bloom, 
4-in., 25c each. 

Vogt's Greenhouse. Ooldwater. Mich. 

Calceolarias, best hybrids, also Rugosa. mixed 
colors. 2%-in., $10.00 per 100; 4-in.. $26.00. 
Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Bapids, Mich. 



Calendula Orange King, seedlings, 40c per lOO. 
$3.60 per 1000, prepaid. 
L. J. Howe, TitusTiUe. Pa. 

Calendula Orange King ready to bloom. 2H-iD.. 
$4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. Alonzo J. Bryan. 
Wholesale Florist, Washington, N. J. 

Calendulas, Bull's seeds, 2Vj-in., $4.00 per 100. 
Packing free. Cash. 
_ Truitt's Greenhouses, t^hanute, Kan^ 

Calendula Orange King, fine plants, 2%-in., 
$4.00 per 100. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

CALLAS 

YELLOW OALLAS. 

Spotted foliage, golden-yellow flowers; 

Well cured Calla Elllottiana. 

WHITE OALLAS. 

Spotted foliage, ivory-white flower: 

the well known Maculntn. 

LOS ROBLBS CO., SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 

(iodfi-cy ('alias. 2'/'..-in. jmts full of roots. 

rcailv for 4-iii., $.'j.00 per 100: strong 4-iii.. 

»M>.W per 1(10. Palm Beach Floral Co.. 020' 

Fern St., West Palm lieacli. Fia, 

" Calla LlMes.^sTrong 2-ln., $0.00 per 100; 3-in. 

blooming, $8.00 per 100. 

Klrchgraber's Greenhouse. Mattoon. HI. 

Godfrey" Calla, 2%-ln., $4.50 per lOO! $40.00 
per 1000. Geo. F. Deutschmann. R. No. 6, Web- 
ster Groves, Mo . 

Calla Godfrey, strong stock, 3-in., $7.50 per 
100. A. N. Kinsman, Inc., Austin, Minn. 

Callas, extra strong 2-in., 5c; 2%-ln.. 7c. 

C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 



Calla Godfrey, 2Vj-ln., $5.00 per 100, $45.00 
per 1000. The McGregor Bros. Co., Springfleld, O. 



CAMELLIAS 



CAMELLIA JAPONICA, 

Strong, thrifty stock from a strain of extra 
good bloomers. 

Each Per 10 Per 100 

t! to 8 ins $0..-)0 .$4.,j0 $40.00 

THE D. HILL NURSERY CO., INC., 

Box 403, Dundee, 111. 



CAMPANULAS 

CAMPANULAS. 
Medium, blue, white and pink....$ 9.00 per 100 
Medium, double, blue, white and 

pink 10.00 per 100 

Calycantliema, blue, white and 

pink 9.00 per 100 

Persicifolia, blue and white 12.00 per 100 

Blegans, lavender 10.00 per 100 

Choice, undivided field-grown stock. 
THE WAYSID E GARDENS CO., MENTOR. 0. 

Canterliurv Bells, single and d(mlile. fall trans- 
planted plants, $4.tH» per 100. Cash, please. 
Edward Escliri( li, II. R. No. 1, North .Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

CANNAS 

GOOD LUCK CANNAS. 
Variety. Per 100 Per 1000 

American Beauty, 5 ft., carmine. $50. 00 $ 

Candelabra, 5 ft., orange scarlet, 

3 for $2.50; 10 for $7.50 50.00 

Susquehanna, 3 ft., rose-pink, 3 

for $2.50; 10 for $7.50 50.00 

Coronet, 3 ft., yellow 4.00 35.00 

E. M. Bvrnes, scarlet 7.00 60.00 

Statue of Liberty. 6 to 7 ft., 

flame red; 10 for $3.00 25.00 

Flag of Truce, near white 15.00 125.00 

Gladiator, 5 ft., yellow 5.00 40.00 

Golden Gate, 4 ft., orange-crim- 
son 6,00 ."iO.OO 

Indiana. 6 ft., orange 5.00 40.00 

King Humbert, 4 ft., orange-scar- 
let 6.00 60.00 

Duke of Marlborough, 4 ft., crim- 
son 5.00 40.00 

I.afayette, 4 ft., scarlet 7.00 00.00 

Nokomis, 5 ft., crimson 7.00 60.00 

The President, 4 ft., scarlet 8.00 76.00 

(Jueen of Holland, 3 ft., orange.. 7.00 60.00 

Uncle Sam, 7 ft., orange-scarlet 5.00 40.00 

Wawa, 3 ft., soft pink 6.00 60.00 

Wm. Saunders. 4 ft., scarlet... 7.00 60.00 

Wyoming, 7 ft., orange 4.00 .10.00 

Burbaiik 4.iiO liO.OO 

California 5.00 40.00 

Chautnu<iua 5.00 40.00 

("loth of (iold 7.00 

("onowiiigo 0.00 .... 

OirecKir Holtze 5,00 40.00 

Duke of Marllmrougli 5,00 40.00 

Eastern lliautv n.0(» 40.00 

Egandale 5.00 40.00 

Fiery Cross H.(K) 75.00 

Hallev's Comet 5.00 40.00 

Ix.veliiiess 7.00 60.00 

Morning Glow 7.00 60.00 

New York 6.00 60.00 

Philadelphia 5.00 40.00 

Pillar of Fire 4.00 30.00 

Queen Charlotte 5.00 40.00 

Richard Wallace 6.00 ."iO.OO 

Soiiv. 1). A. ("rozv 4.00 30.00 

Splendor 5.0O 40.00 

Wintz<Ts ("olossal 7. .10 60.00 

THE CONARD A JONES CO.. 
Robert Pyle, Pres., Antoine Wintzer, Vlce-pres. 

West Grov e, Pa . 

CANNAS. 2 TO 3 EYES. 
David Harum. $15.00 per 1000: Wyoming, 
$18.00 per 1000: Louisiana, $18.00 per 1000; 
Fire Flame. $15.00 per 1000. 
THE MCGREGOR BROS. CO., SPRINGFIELD. O. 



. Awjtm 7K» ""w v"** J. ii*^.jj^i^:fl(pp*wr'i*Fw;."«:«^'v,vi';\w*in>' ,'^*»?r'' *iJPB.J?S!'?'".l'W#!-A- 



172 



The Florists' Review 



May 4, 1922 



CANNAS-Continued 



0ANNA8, 

a TO 8 BTB8. rBBSH OUT FOR TOUB OBSBB. 

Ooat • little more tban loutlieni Oaniute, bat 

worth more. 

TBLLOW OANNAS. OBBBN-LBAYBD. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

QiutaT Oampper $4.60 $40.00 

Queen Helen (Yellow Klnc Hum- 
bert) 8.00 70.00 

Blcbard Wallace 4.60 40.00 

RED OANNAS, TALL. OBBBN-LBAVBD. 

Louialana 4.B0 40.00 

Mrs. Karl KeUer 4.60 40.00 

Mrs. Kate Qrar 4.60 40.00 

BBD OANNAS. OOLD-BDQBD. OBBBN-LBAVBD. 

Ume. Crexy 4.60 40.00 

Queea Charlotte 4.60 40.00 

SouT. de Antolne Crozy 4.60 40.00 

BBD OANNAS, DWARF, QRBBN-LBAYBD. 

Beaote PoiteTlne 4.60 40.00 

OrimiOB Redder 4.60 40.00 

SPECIAL OANNAS. 
Oheerfulneaa, bright orange 0.00 60.00 

Orance Redder, wonderful Oanna, 

tango tinta, orange luSused 

Bcarlet 6.00 60.00 

BTORRS & HARRISON CO., 
PaineaTille, 0. 

CANNAS. 3 IN. POT PLANTS. 
READY NOW. 
The following. $5.50 per 100, $45.00 per 1000: 
Alphonse ISouvier, Gladiator, J. D. li^isele, Jean 
Tissot, Florence Vaiighan, I>ouisiana, Marcs, 
Mme. Crozy, Kiibln, Pres. Myers, Queen Char- 
lotte, Kicliard Wallace, Uncle Sam, Souv. d' An- 
tolne Crozy, Venus, Wyoming. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

King Humbert $ 0.00 $ 50.00 

Rosea Gigantea 8.00 70.00 

The President 9.00 80.00 

City of Portland 14.00 120.00 

Mrs. A. Conard 12.00 100.00 

Crimson Redder 7.00 65.00 

Yellow King Huml)ert 8.00 

Firebird 12.00 100.00 

CANNA ROOTS SEE PREVIOUS ISSUES. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 

43 W. 18th St., New York. N. Y. 

OANNAS, STRONG 2 TQ 8-BYB ROOTS. 

Clean, bright, healthy stock. 

A few thousand surplus. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Alemannla $2.60 $22.60 

Crimson Redder 2.76 26.00 

Florence Yaughan 3.B0 22.60 

Kate Deemer 2.B0 22.60 

King Humbert 8.76 85.00 

Yellow King Humbert 8.76 85.00 

Louisiana 2.50 22.60 

Mme. Crozy 2.60 22.60 

Wintzer's Colossal 4.00 86.00 

No order accepted for leas than 60 of a kind. 

Cash or bank reference. 

THE TBMPLIN-OROCKETT-BRADLBT CO.. 

6700 Detroit Aye., Olereland. O. 

CANNAS. CANNAS. CANNAS. 
Strong established 3-inch. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

King Humbert $7.00 $ 

Yellow King Humbert 7.00 

Florence Yaughan 6.00 

Firebird 8.00 

Mme. Crozy 6.00 

Charles Henderson 6.00 

Richard Wallace 6.00 

2 AND 3-BYE ROOTS. 

Nokomis 8.00 75.00 

The President 10.00 90.00 

Wyoming 4.00 86.00 

OULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

CANNAS. SELECT 2 AND 3 BYE ROOTS. 
True to name, clean stock. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Austria $2..'50 $20.00 

.Memanniii 3.00 25.00 

Wiiil/.cr's Colossal 3. .50 25.00 

ralifornia 3,00 25.00 

Yellow King Iliinibert 4.00 35.00 

Howell 2.50 20.00 

('has. Hi'ndorson 2.50 20.00 

Indiana 3.00 25.00 

Richard Wallace 2..50 20.00 

Wyoming 3.00 25.00 

NORTH STAR NURSERY. 
H. R. Schroeder. Mgr., Onarga, 111. 

(ANNA ROOT SURPLUS. 

For (|iiick sale rush order. 

I.IOO Queen Helen $20.00 per 1000 

17.'0 Indiana 15.00 per 1000 

1S75 Alpinannia 15.00 per 1000 

1225 Austria 15.00 per 1000 

lOOO Farquhar 15.00 per 1000 

1000 I'ennsylvania 15.00 per 1000 

ll.")0 Henderson 16.00 per 1000 

Total 9500 for $140.00. 
DRAIME imOTHERS, CITRONELLE, ALA. 

OANNAS TRUE TO NAME. 2 TO 8-BYH ROOTS. 
Per 100 Per 100 

King Humbert ..$4.60 Mile. Herat $8.00 

Austria 8.00 Louisiana 8.B0 

The President . . . 8.00 Pennsylvania .... 8.00 

Ohaa Henderson . 8.00 Indiana 8.60 

60c per 100 off on 1000 lots. 
LOYD O. RDNCH. FRBDONIA^KAN 

Cannes, King Humbert and Yellow King Hum- 
bert, strong, heavily rooted 3-in. pots, $5.00 per 
100. This is fine stock. 

O. B. Majors, Denison, Tex. 



CANNAS. 
Fine roots, 2 to 3 eyes. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Austria, yellow $2.75 $25.00 

Florence Yaughan, yellow 2.75 25.00 

King Humbert 4.50 40.00 

Yellow King Humbert, bronze leaf 3.60 30.00 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 
10(1^ N. Wabash Ave., Chi cago, 111. 

OANNAS. 2 TO 3 EYES. 

Brilliancy, $3.00 per 100; Souv. de Antolne 
Crozy, $3.50 per 100; Brandy wine, David Harum, 
President Meyer, Burbank, Beaute Poltevlne, 
$2.60 per 100; mixed of the above, $2.00 per 
100. 

HENRY O. NORTON. ROX 6, PERRY, 0. 

CANNAS, 2 TO 8 BYB DIVISIONS. 
Burbank, Henderson, 

Florence Yaughan, Kate Gray, 

Pennsylvania, Jean Tissot, 

Louisiana, 

$8.00 per 100. 
CHARLES SHERWOOD, WATERLOO, lA. 

CANNAS, 
J. D. Eisele, Florence Yaughan, President Mc- 
Kinley, Queen Charlotte, from 3-in. pots, $6.00 
per 100; King Humbert, $7.00 per 100. Ready to 
shift into 4-in. 

WETTLIN FLORAL CO., HORNELL, N. Y. 

Cannas: Started plants from soil, good tops, 
ready for 3-in. pots. The President, $6.00 per 
100; King Humbert, $4.00 per 100; Mrs. Alfred 
Conard, $8.00 i>er 100. True stock. A. B. Camp- 
bell, The Canna Man, Cochranville, Pa. 

Canna King Humbert, 5 to 12 inches above 
pots, will make elegant 4-in. in a few weeks; 
3-ln. potted, 6c, $55.00 per 1000, 250 at 1000 
rate. 4 per cent discount for your cash. 
B. C. Blake, Sprlngfleld, 0. 

Cannes, Cbas. Henderson, Florence Yaughan, 
Burbank, flue selected roots, $2.50 per 100, $20.00 
per 1(X)0. In assortment if wanted. 
8. W. Pike. St. Charles. Hi. 

Cannas, well started, Wyoming, $3.00 per 
100; J. D. Eisele, Indiana, Austria, Alemannla 
and Pennsylvania, $2.60 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Cannas, Kate Gray, red; Indiana, orange; 
Alemannla, red and yellow; Wyoming, orange; 
$2.50 per 100. A. C. Sperry. Neodesha, Kan. 

Cannas started, Alemannla, orange and yel- 
low; George Washington, red, $2.00 per 100. 

A. C. Anderson, Columbus Neb. 

Cannas, Wyoming, King Humbert and Colossal, 
started in sand, $5.00 per 100. 

B. R. Morgan Floral Co., Pazton, 111. 

Cannas, Alemannla and Pennsylvania, strong 
2 to 8-eye roots, $2.00 per 100, $16.00 per 1000. 
Kingman Floral Co., Kingman, Kan. 

Caiinas, strong 2 to 3 eves. King Humbert. 
yellow, $4.00 per 100, $37.60 per 1000. Cask. 
Q. B. Berthold, Nebraska City. Neb. 

Canna King Humbert, 3-in., $8.00 per lOO. 
The McGregor Bros. Co., Sprlngfleld, O. 

CARNATIONS ~ 

HERE'S A BARGAIN. 

Fine plants out of soil, 
ready for planting. 

MATCHLESS. 
$4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

MRS. r. W. WAKD, 
$4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

NEBRASKA. 

$4.."0 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

WHITE ENCHANTRESS. 
$4.50 per 100. $40.00 per 1000. 

PINK ENCHANTRESS. 
$4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

ROSETTE. 
$4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

I.dddle $12.00 $110.00 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward 3.50 30.00 

Rosette 3.50 30.00 

Matchless 8.60 80.00 

White Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Pink Enchantress 8.00 26.00 

WIETOR BROS.. 

Wholesale Growers of Cut Flowers. 

30 B. Randolph St., Chicago. Ill 

CARNATIONS. 214 IN., READY NOW. 
Must have room. 

Knclianlress $ 4.,'>0 per 100 

White Enchantress 5.00 i)er 100 

Matchless 5.00 per 100 

Miss Theo 5.00 per 100 

Mrs. Ward 5.00 per 100 

Enchantress Supreme 5.50perl(X) 

Beacon 5.50 per 100 

Nebraska 5.50 per 100 

Multlflora 9.00 per 100 

Ruth Baur 9.00 per 100 

I-addie 13.00 |)er 100 

Our stock has had State inspection and is of 
highest quality. We invite inspection before 
buying. Don't be misled on stock. 

.T. C. STEINHAUSER, PITTSBURG, KAN 



CARNATIONS 2%-INCH POT PLANTS. 
PINK. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Enchantress $6.00 $56.00 

Enchantress Supreme 8.50 76.00 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward 7.60 65.00 

RED. 

Beacon 7.50 65.00 

Belle Washburn 7.60 65.00 

WHITE. 

Matchless 6.00 65.00 

White Enchantress 7.50 65.00 

White Wonder 7.50 66.00 

White Perfection 7.60 66.00 

White Benora 8.60 75.00 

VARIEGATED. 

Benora 7.50 65.00 

NEW VARIETIES. 

Per 100 

Thos. C. Joy $17.60 

Lassie 17.50 

Redhead 17.60 

Red Matchless 17.60 

Maine Sunshine 20.00 

The Lark 20.00 

Hope Henshaw 15.00 

Harvester 16.00 

CARNATION CUTTINGS, NEW VARIETIES. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Thos. 0. Joy $12.00 $100.00 

The Lark, variegated 15.00 120.00 

White Delight 12.00 100.00 

Maine Sunshine 15.00 120.00 

For other varieties of cuttings, see previous 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St.. New York, N. Y. 

Well-rooted 
CARNATION CUTTINGS 
from sand 
NOW BEADY. 

These cuttings are of the same clean, healthy 
quality we have been sending out for many 
years past. 

Variety. Per 100 Per 1000 

Matchless, white $4.00 $36.00 

Nebraska, best red 6.00 40.00 

Enchantress, flesh 4.00 86.00 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward, dark pink 6.00 40.00 

White Wonder 4.00 86.00 

White EnchantreH 4.00 86.00 

Bemice 4.00 86.00 

Aviator 4.00 86.00 

Harvester 8.00 70.00 

PBTBB BBINBBRO, INO., 
80 B. Ban dolph St., C hica g o, HI. 

CARNATION PLANT'S, 2%-INCH: SPEAK UP. 

Maine Sunshine $17.50 per 100 

Tlie Lark 17.50 per 100 

Enchantress Supreme 8.00 per 100 

Belle Washburn 8.00 per 100 

Mrs. C. W. Ward 7.00 per 100 

Enchantress 7.00 per 100 

White Enchantress 7.00 per 100 

Matchless 7.00 per 100 

Ethel Fisher 7.00 per 100 

Mrs. Akehurst 7.00 per 100 

White Wonder 6.00 per 100 

Mrs. A. Roper 6.00 per 100 

Packing 5 per cent of the Invoice. 

OULLETT & S ONS, L INCOLN, ILL. 

CARNATIONS, BOOTHD CUTTINGS. 
Nice, healthy, weU rooted, A-1 stock: 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Sappy Day $8.00 $70.00 

White Ekichantress Supreme 7.00 60.00 

Harvester 8.00 70.00 

White Wonder 3.00 26.00 

White Enchantress 3.00 26.00 

Matchless 3.00 26.00 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward 8.00 26.00 

ivlator 8.00 26.00 

Bemice 4.00 85.00 

Nebraska 4.00 86.00 

MILLBB BBOS., 
8668 N Lincoln St.. Chicago, HI. 

CARNATION OUTTINQB. 

Matchless $4.00 per 100, $36.00 per 1000 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward... 6.00 per 100, 60.00 per 1000 
Bdna 8.00 per 100, 75.00 per 1000 

CARNATIONS. 2-IN. STOCK. 

Matchless $6.00 per 100, $60.00 per 1000 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward... 7.00 per 100, 60.00 per 1000 
Enchantress Supreme 8.00 per 100, 70.00 i>«r 1000 

0. 0. POLLWOBTH CO., MILWACKBB. WIS. 

CARNATIONS. 
Well established, clean, healthy stock. 

Oittlngs 2-in. 

Per 100 Per 1000 PerlOO 

Harvester $8.00 $70.00 $10.00 

Bdna 8.00 70.00 10.00 

White Bnchantress .... 6.00 46.00 0.00 

Matchless 6.00 45.00 8.00 

White Wonder 6.00 46.00 6.00 

Beacon 8.00 26.00 6.00 

Harlowarden 8.00 26.00 6.00 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward 6.00 46.00 

Oasb. Immediate shipment. 
H. W. BUOKBBB, 

Forest City Oreenhonses. Rockford. 111. 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

Laddie $10.00 per 100, $90.00 per 1000 

Lassie 8.00 per 100, 76.00 per 1000 

White Delight 8.00 per 100, 75.00 per 1000 

Enchantress 3.00 per 100, 25.00 per 1000 

Matchless 3.00 per 100. 25.00 per 1000 

N. KIOER. MARIETTA, 0. 



May 4, 1022 



The Florists' Rcvkw 



173 



OABNATION PliANTS, NIOB, GLEAN, 
HBALTHY 8T00K FBOM 2-INOH POTS. 

Nebraska I e.OO p«r 100, 9SO.0O per 1000 

Ifn. 0. W. Ward.. 6.00 per 100, BO. 00 per 1000 

BoMlla 7.00 per 100, 60.00 per 1000 

Bnth Baar 7.00 per 100, 60.00 per 1000 

Happ7 Day 12.00 per 100, 90.00 per 1000 

■dna 12.00 per 100, 00.00 per 1000 

Please make money orders payable at Clayton 

Postofflce. 

A. JABL0N8KY. 

Olivette, Clayton P. P.. Mo. 

Carnations: Strong 2-iD. plants while tbey last, 
White Wonder, White Enchantress, Beacon, En- 
chantress Supreme, $7.00 per 100, $60.00 per 
1000; rooted cuttings of these and all other 
standard varieties at a low price now. Write 
for list. It is still time to get Thos. 0. Joy, a 
new white, and one of the best, strong, clean, 
rooted cuttings, $12.00 per 100, $100 per 1000. 
S. S. Skidelsky & Co., Dodge Bldg., 53 Park 
Place, New York. 

BOOTED CUTTINGS 

Ready now. 

Glean, healthy, vigorous, well rooted. 

Mrs. C. W. Ward.. $4.00 pet 100, $30.00 per 1000 

Matchless 3.00 per 100, 25.00 per 1000 

White Enchantress 3.00 per 100, 26.00 per 1000 

Aviator 3.00 per 100, 25.00 per 1000 

Cash with order, please. 

GHABLES N. MILLER A, BBO., 

Morton Grove. 111. 

' CARNATIONS. 

Extra fine 2'/i-lu. plants of the following va- 
rieties : 
Matchless. 

Mrs. C. W. Ward, 
Nebraska, 

Cottnfre Maid, 
At $6.00 per 100, $55.00 per 1000. 
ELITCH GARDENS CO., DENVER, COLO. 

CARNATIONS, BOOTED CUTTINGS. 
Prices per 1000. From sand From Mil 

Pink Enchantress $25.00 $80.00 

Laddie 100.00 120.00 

Nebraska 85.00 

Gash with order, please. 

PBTBB J. SCHUMBB. 

748 Wesley Ave., Branston, Bl. 

HERB IS A BARGAIN. 
Very strong 2-ln. cut back and branched stock 
and at the same price a great many are asking 
for rooted cuttings. 
Mrs. C. W. Ward. .$6.00 per 100, $60.00 per 1000 

Matchless 5.00 per 100, 60.00 per 1000 

O. L. HUMPHREY. ZANE8VILLE, O. 

CARNATIONS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Topsy $15.00 $126.00 

Enchantress 6.00 50.00 

RICHMOND GREENHOUSE CO., 
Maywood, 111. 

CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Pink Enchantress . . .$2.00 per 100, $15.00 per 1000 

Matchless 2.00 per 100, 16.00 per 1000 

Cash. 

BESTLAND FLOBAL CO.. MENDOTA, ILL. 

CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Enchantress Supreme $50.00 per lOOO 

Matchless 45.00 per 1000 

Mrs. O. W. Ward 50.00 per 1000 

HOLDEN FLORAL CO.. PORTLAND. OR^ . 

WHITE CARNATION THOMAS C. .TOY. 
Strong 2-ln. plants, $12.00 per 100, $100.00 ptr 
1000. 
J OY FLORAL CO., NASHVILLE , TENN. 

MATCHLESS^ 
Choice plants from 2-ln. pots, $40.00 per 1000. 

BASSETT & WASHBURN, 
178 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, III. 

CARNATIONS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Matchless, Rose-pink Enchantress and Light- 
pink Enchantress. $4.00 per 100. 

CHARLES SHERWOOD, WATERLOO, lA. 

Carnation plants, 30,000 2^-in., Matchless. 
Ward and White and Pink Enchantress, $45.00 
per 1000. Cash with order. 
West End Fl oral Co., East Liverpool, 0. 

CARNATI0NS7~2 j^ -Tn~] 

Hope Henshaw $8.00 per 100 

Mrs. C. W. Ward 6.00 per 100 

W. C. EHMA NN, CORFU, N. Y. 

Carnations, 1000 Mrs. 0. W. Ward from soil, 
strong plants, $4.00 per lOO. 
R. D. Kimball. Waban, Mas s. 

Carnation White Enchantress, rooted cnttings, 
$25.00 per 1000. 
T. G. Owen & Son, Cohimbug, Miss. 

Carnations, Mrs. G. W. Ward and MatcUeaa, 
extra line plants. 2-ln., $5.00 per 100. 
L. Q. Barbler.^unklrk. I»<. 

Carnations, Matchless, fine 2-ln., $5.00 per 100; 
Pink Enchantress. 2-in., $4.00 per 100. 
Wagner's Greenhouses, Tiffin, 0. 

Carnation White Enchantress. 2-in., $4.00 per 
100. L. Llnnemann, Jr., 1313 Ashland Ave., 
Pes Plalnes, 111. 

Carnations, White Enchantress. Enchantress 
and Rose-pink Enchantress, 2-in., $4.00 per 100. 
A. C. Anderson, Columbus. Neb. 

Carnations. Matchless and Miss Theo. rooted 
cuttings, $20.00 per lOOO. St. Mary's Training 
School, Greenhouse Department. Des Plai nes. 111. 

Carnation Pink Enchantress, rooted cuttings 
from soil, $5.00 per lOO, $45.00 per lOOO. Cash 
with order. W. L. Miller, Napervil l e, 111. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS, $1.25 postpaid. Flo- 
rists' Publishing Co., Chicago. 



CENTAUREAS 



CENTAUREA GYMNOCABPA, DUSTY 

MILLER. 

Strong plants, ready to shift, 

out of 2U-ln. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

Cash with order. 

No charge for packing. 

R. S. McMUBBAY, BELLEFONTAINE, O. 



CENTAUBBAS, DUSTY MILLER. 
Seed plants, strong and well rooted, ready for 
2%-in. pots, $1.26 per 100, $10.00 per 1000, $45.00 
per 5000, prepaid. See Pansy, Salvia and Yegft- 
table ads. 
H. J. POTOMKIN, MUNCIE, IND. 

Centaurea Gymnocarpa, Dusty Miller, extra 
strong, bench-grown, transplanted, ready for 
3-ln., $1.50 per 100, $14.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Harry M. Buckley, R. R. No. 6, Spr i ngfield, 111. 

Centaurea Gymnocarpa, or Dusty Miller, 2-ln., 
$3.00 per 100. Cash. 
Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Centaureas, Dusty Miller, strong transplanted 
plants, $1.76 per 100, by mall, $15.00 per 1000, 

express. S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 

OBNTAUBBAS, DUSTY MILLEB. 

2;4-ln., $3.00 per 100. 

QULLETT A SONS, LINOOLN, ILL. 



Centaurea Gymnocarpa •eedlings, 60c per 100, 
94.60 per 1000, prepaid. 
L. J. Bowe, Tltnsvlllc, Pa. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

LARGE FLOWERING, ROOTED CUTTINGS 
Maturing in the order given. 

WHITE: Smith's Advance, Oconto. Smith's 
Imperial, Josephine Foley, White Chieftain, 
Betsy Ross, White Helen Frick, Victory, Chad- 
wick Improved, White Seidewitz, Mistletoe. 

YELLOW: Golden Glow, Sun Glow, Chryso- 
lora. Golden Queen, Tiger, Midnight Sun, Golden 
Chadwick, Sunbeam, Loyalty, Major BonnatFon, 
Golden Mistletoe. 

PINK: Smith's Sublime, Unaka, Pacific Su- 
preme, Chieftain, Rose Perfection. Dr. Bngue- 
hard, Helen Frick, Patty, Edwin Seidewitz, De- 
cember Beauty, Pink Mistletoe. 

$4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000, except Pink 
Mistletoe, $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000. 

Chadwick Improved and Golden Chadwick, 
$5.50 per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 

POMPONS. 
WHITE: Uvalda, LaPurite, Nordi. 
YELLOW: Zora, Klondike, Quinola. 
PINK: Edina, Fairy Queen, Western Beauty. 
BRONZE: Adironda, Clorinda, Frank Wilcox. 
RED: Fire Bird. 

BABY POMPONS. 
For pot plants or cutting: Babv Doll, Buena. 
Button Rose, Little Tot, Mary Plckford, White 
Midget, Marguerite Clark, Hilda Canning, Blllie 
Burke, Vivian Martin, Christmas Gold. 
LARGE FLOWERING POMPONS 
for disbudding. 
Angclo, Juliana, Lillian Doty, Miramar, White 
Doty. 

ANEMONES. 
Godfrey's Perfection, Golden Lida Thomas, 
Izola, Sunshine. 

Above pompons and anemones, $4.00 per 100, 
$35.00 per 1000. 

EXHIBITION VARIETIES. 

Here are twelve of the very best for florists 
who desire show blooms: Calumet, Cheyenne, 
Elberon, Mrs. J. Ijeslie Davis (Pink Turner), 
Nakota. Odessa, Purple King, Rosanda, Wells' 
Late Pink, William Turner, Yellow Turner. 

$5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000, except Mrs. 
Davis and Rosanda, which are $10.00 per 100, 
$90.00 per 1000. Those deslrihg plants from 2%- 
In. pots of any variety offered, add $1.00 per 
100, $10.00 per 1000. The prices are for May, 
June and July delivery. Clean stock; best qual- 
ity. I^et us ijook your order to be delivered when 
desired. 

Not less than 25 of a variety at 100 rate and 
2.50 at 1000 rate. Many other varieties in stock. 
Send list of wants. 

ELMER D. SMITH & CO., 
Adrian, Mich. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS. ROOTED CUTTINQS. 

Ready now, also for future delivery. 
A. No. 1 stock. 
Richmond, Mistletoe, 

Unaka Pink Chieftain, 

McNlece, White Chieftain, 

Charles Bager, Marigold, 

Early Frost, Chrysolora, 

Oconto, Harvard, 

Pink Seidewiti, 

$3.60 per 100. $30.00 per 1000. 
San Glow, Chadwick Supreme, 

Golden Chadwick, Hamburg Late Plak, 

Victory, Hamburg Late Whit*, 

Whlta Chadwick, 

$4.00 per 100, $35.00 p«r 1000. 
White Seidewitz and Golden Easton, 

$5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 
POMPONS. 
Nisa. Clarinda, 

Bita, Golden Harvest, 

BIdlna. Western Beanty, 

Leta, White Mensa, 

Delphlne Dodge, Donald, 

Mariana, Julia De Witt, 

Bomalne Warren, Christmas Gold. 

Sunshine, Godfrey, 

$3.60 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 

WILLIAM F. KASTINO CO., INC., 

668 Washington St., BntTalo, N. T. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

LARGE SUPPLY. QUALITY QUABANTBED. 

DELIVERY FREE. 



A 1 stock of the best commercial varieties. 
No drawn up hard cuttings. No midge. Circu- 
lar "How We Keep Our Plants Clean of Midge" 
for the asking. Descriptive price-list on request. 



OUR GUARANTEE. 
We deliver Mum rooted cuttings parcel post 
free of charge up to the 6th zone, or 1400 miles 
from Geneva, and guarantee safe delivery. Stock 
not satisfactory when received may be returned 
at once and money refunded, or slight difBcultles 
will be adjusted and you keep the stock. Out- 
side this territory stock travels at buyer's risk 
and expense. 



25 per cent oft on all varieties marked • for 
two weeks or until surplus is sold. 



$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

•Unaka, 

•Tiger, 

Pacific Supreme, 

•Oconto, 

•Early Frost, 

Harvard, 



$3.50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 

Golden Queen, 

Chieftain, 

White Chieftain, 

Roman Gold, 

•Dr. Enguehard, 

Pink and White Patty, 

•Pink Seidewitz, 

White Seidewitz, 

Chrysolora, 

Charles Rager, 

•Josephine Foley, 

Yellow Foley, 

Marigold, 

•Jeanne Nonin. 

•Mistletoe, 

Golden Mistletoe. 

•Yanoma. 



$4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 
White Turner, 
Yellow Turner, 

Betsy Ross, 
I.,ady Hopetoun. 



POMPONS AND SINGLES. 

$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

•Clorinda, bronze; 

Diana, white; 

Golden Mensa, 

White Mensa. 

Godfrey, pink; 

Fairy Queen, pink; 

•Christmas Gold. 



OBNBVA FLORAL CO., GENEVA, N. Y. 



CIIUYSANTIIEMTIMS. 

Start your fall business 

with the 

big money-makers In chrysanthemums. 

This stock 

guaranteed free from midge 

and 

exceptionally fine. 

ALL 2-IN. POTS. 

The following nt $4.00 per 100: 

Smith's Advance, Marigold, 

Oconto, Lynnwood Hall, 

Pacific Supreme, Seidewitz, 

Lena Baum, Harvard, 

Yellow Rager, Richmond, 

Odessa, White Chieftain, 

Buckbee, Whittler. 

The following at $5.00 per 100: 
Sun Glow, Victory, 

Betsy Ross, Louisa Pockett. 

No charge for packing and 
rash with order. 

C. L. HUMPHREY, ZANESVILLE, 0. 



2Vi-IN. SUNSHINE 
CIIRYSANTIIEMnMS, 

.1S3.50 per 100, $32.50 per 1000. 

rUOVISO FLOR.\L CO.. 
Maywood, 111, 



Chrysanthemums, stand.nrd varieties, $2.50 per 
100, prepaid. 0. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 



174 



The Rorists' Review 



Mav 4, 1!»22 



CHRYSANTHBMUMS— Continued 



Charles Rager, 
Early Frost, 
Oconto. 
I'olly Koge, 



MUM CUTTINOS RBADT NOW: BEST VARIB- 

TIBS, CLEAN, FREE FROM MIDGE 

AND WBIjL rooted. 

STANDARD COMMEROIAIi VARIETIES 

(LARGE FLOWERING MUMS). 

Rooted cuttings, $3.50 per 100, $30. UO per 1000. 

WHITE. 

White Chieftain, 
Early Snow, 
3. Nonin. 
And otliers. 
YELI^OW. 
Golden Giow, Richmond. 

I'lirysolora, Tints of Gold. 

Coi. Appleton, Rol)t. Ilalliday. 

Golden Queen. Roman Goid. 

Maj. Bonnaffon, Whittler, 

Marigold, 

PINK. 
Chieftain. Mrs. W. T. McNlece. 

Dr. Enguelinrd, Unaka, 

Rd. Seldewitz. Patty, 

Glory of Pacific, Pacific Supreme, 

RED. 
Harvard. 
CHOICE COMMERCIAL VARIETIES. 
Rooted cuttings, $,').00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 



Mistletoe White. 
Mistletoe Golden, 
Sunglow, 

Wells' Late Pink. 
White Seldewitz, 
White Turner, 
Yellow Turner, 
Yellow Rager. 



Wliite Chadwiek. 
Yellow Chudwlck, 
Pink Chadwiek. 
Bronze Clindwick. 
Barbara Davis. 
December Gem. 
Glenview, bronze, 
Hamburg Ijite Wliite, 
Hamburg Late Pink, 

Pink Turner, $10.00 per 100. 

BEST NEWER VARIETIES OF POMPONS. 

The following four new varieties fiower in suc- 
cession and are well recommended: 
Rooted cuttings. $15.00 per 100, $140.00 per 1000. 



light 



New York 

lironze; 
Sarah Townsend 

bronze: 

POMPONS 
Rooted <'Utting8 



I.>onise Davenport. 

reddish bronze; 
November Gold, 
bright gold. 
STANDARD VARIETIES. 
$3. .50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 
Acto, Baby. Becky McLane, Christmas Gold, 
•Cometo, Connie Dick, Delphine Dodge, •Diana, 
•Donald. 'Doris, Edna, •Excelsior, *Falry Queen, 
Prank Wilcox, •Golden West, 'Golden Climax, 
Hilda Cauriiii;.'. ".liilcs Lagraverc, 'Lillian Doty, 
Mariana, Maid of Kent, .Mar.v. Mimico, 'Niza, 
Xovcnibcr I'cjirl. Qiiiiiolii, Roniaine Warren, 
"Skilio. rvalilii, "Vase c). Wanda, AVcstern Beauty, 
•White L. ll.ptv. White Gem. 

HARDY EARLY FLOWERING MUMS. 
Tho.se above marked with • are most suitable 
for outdoor planting. 

SINCJLK MCMS, ASK FOR COMPLETE LIST. 
Rooted cuttings, $3. .50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 

ANEMONES. 

Rooted cuttings, best varieties, $3.50 per 100, 

$30.00 per 1000. 

Anemone Sunshine, the best yellow Anemone 

worth while growing. You should trv some. 

Rooted cuftin!.'s. .$5.00 per 100. $45.00 per 1000. 

ASK FOR LIST OF NEW VARIETIES AND 

COMPLETE CHRYSANTHEMUM LIST. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 

43 W. 18th St.. New York, N. Y. 

OUR SPECIALTY— CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

OF FINEST QUALITY. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS READY NOW. 

PINK. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Edwin Seldewitz $2.50 $20.00 

Helen Frick 2.50 20.00 

Dr. Enguehard 2.50 20.00 

Mrs. Patty 2.50 20.00 

WHITE. 

Chadwiek 3.50 30.00 

Helen Frick 2.60 20.00 

Chieftain 2.50 20.00 

Chns. Rager 2.50 20.00 

Florence Pullman 2.."iO 20.00 

White .Mistletoe 2.50 20.00 



YELI.OW. 

Chrysolora 2. .50 

Golden Wedding 2.50 

Golden Queen 2.50 

Golden Mistletoe .'^..'iO 

Riehniuiid 3.00 

POMPONS. 

Diana 2.50 

Golden Wedding 2.!50 



Satisfaction guaranteed. 



20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
30.00 
23.00 



20.00 
20.00 



T. O. OWEN & SON, 
Wholesale Florists, Columbus, Miss. 



CHADWICK CHRYSANTHEMUM, 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

IMMEDIATE AND LATER DELIVERY. 

GOLDEN CHADWICK AND 

CHADWICK IMPROVED, WHITE: STRONG. 

WELT, ROOTED CI'TTINGS, 

FREE FROM MIDGK. 

$.-..00 PER 100. .$4,-|.0n PER 1000. TERMS: CASH. 

P. R. DEMIITH & SONS, 

CONNELUSVILLE, PA. 



LARGE FLOWERING, ROOTED CUTTINGS 
Maturing in the order given. 

WHITE: Smith's Advance, Oconto, Smith's 
Imperial. Josephine Foley, White Chieftain, 
Betsy Ross, White Helen Frick, Victory, Chad- 
wiek Improved, White Seldewitz, Mistletoe. 

YELLOW: Golden Glow. Sun Glow, Chryso- 
lora, Golden Queen, Tiger, Midnlglit Sun, Golden 
Chadwiek, Sunbeam, Ijoyalty, Major Bonnaffon, 
Golden Mistletoe. 

PINK: Smith's Sublime. Unaka, Pacific Su- 
preme, Chieftain, Rose Perfection, Dr. Engue- 
hard, Helen Frick, Patty, Edwin Seldewitz, De- 
cember Beauty, I'ink Mistletoe, 

$4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000, except Pink 
Mistletoe, $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000. 

POMPONS. 

WHITE: Uvalda, LaPurite, Nordi. 
YELrX)W: Zora, Klondike, Quinola. 
PINK: Edina, Fairy Queen, Western Beauty. 
BRONZE: Adironda, Clorlnda, Frank Wilcox. 
RED: Fire Bird. 

BABY POMPONS. 
For pot plants or cutting: Baby Doll. Buena. 
Button Rose, Little Tot. Mary Pickford. White 
Midget, Marguerite Clark, Hilda Canning, Billie 
Burke, Vivian Martin. Christmas (ioid. 

LARGE FLOWERING POMPONS 
for disbudding. 
Angelo, Juliana, Lillian Doty, Mlramar, White 
Doty. 

ANEMONES. 
Godfrey's Perfection, Golden Lida Tliomas, 
Izola, Sunshine. 

Above pompons and anemones, $4.00 i)er 100, 
$35.00 per 1000. 

EXHIBITION VARIETIES. 

Here are twelve of the very best for fiorists 
who desire show blooms: Calumet. Cheyenne, 
Elberon, Mrs. J. Leslie Davis (Pink Turner). 
Nakota, Odessa. Purple King, Rosanda, Wells' 
I>ate Pink, William Turner, Yellow Turner. 

$5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000, except Mrs. 
Davis and Rosanda, which are $10.00 per 100, 
$90.00 per 1000. Those desiring plants from 2%- 
in. pots of any variety offered, add $1.00 per 
100, $10.00 per 1000. The prices are for May, 
June and July delivery. Clean stock; best qual- 
ity. Let us book your order to be delivered wlien 
desired. 

Not less than 25 of a variety at 100 rate and 
2.50 at 1000 rate. Many other varieties in stock. 
Send list of wants. 

ELMER D. SMITH & CO., 
Adrian. Mich. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

We offer immediate deiiver.v on the following 
list of varieties, which includes all the va- 
rieties most in demand: 

WHITE— Smith's Advance, Polly Rose, Oconto. 
Chas. Rager, White Chieftain, Betsy Ross. White 
Chadwiek, December Gem, Mistletoe, Victory, 
White Seldewitz, Early Frost, October Queen. 

YELLOW— Yellow Advance. Golden Glow. 
Golden Queen, Chrysolora, Sun Glow, Marigold, 
Richmond, Major Bonnaffon, Mrs. Morgan, (Cele- 
bration, Golden Chadwiek, Yellow Mistletoe, 
Whittler. 

PINK— T'naka. Pink Polly Rose, Pacific Su- 
preme, Pink Chieftain, Dr. Enguehard, Mrs. 
B. A. Seldewitz. Maud Dean, Ncrissa, Wells' 
Late Pink, Thanksgiving Pink. 

RED — llarviird. dark crlinson, the best red yet 
introduced, donble from aii.v bud. 

All of the above rooted cuttings at $3.50 per 
100, $30.00 per 1000, except Golden and White 
Cliadwick, wliicli are $5.(10 per 100, $45.00 per 
1000, and Thanksgiving Pink, wliicli is $6.00 per 
100, $50.00 per 1000. 

POMPONS. 

WHITE— Nizn, Mariana, Diana. 

Y^ELLOW — Quinola Improved, Zenohla, Golden 
Climax, Peter Pan, Baby, Klondike, Golden 
Wedding, Christmas Gold, Source D'Or. also 
known as Golden Heather, a wonderful variety 
when grown in sprays. 

PINK — Minta, Fairy Queen, Lillian Doty, 
Nelia, Western Beauty. 

BRONZE— Iva, Hilda Canning, Frank Ben, 
Wilcox. 

WINE COLOR— Annabelle, sport of Godfrey. 

FAWN— Mrs. Mazey. 

SINGLES— Mensa, Single Salmon. Simplicity, 
Felicity, Mrs. E. D. Godfrey, Mrs. Buckingham, 
Bronze Buckingham. 

ANEMONES— Blanche, Elizabeth, Emma, Graf 
Von Oriola, Sunshine. 

All the above pompons, singles and anemones, 
rooted cuttings, at $3.50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 

Add 5 per cent to cover cost of packing. 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 

172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, III. 

STANDARD, 

POMPONS AND SINOLB 

Earliest to the latest. 

A good range of colors 

and productive growers. 

Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Free of disease. 

Write what you need or would 

like. Information Is yours for the 

asking. T.<?t me send vou list. 

W. C. EHMANN, CORFU. N. T. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS READY NOW! 
Ciirysanthemiims. Smith's Advance. Unaka, 
Chieftain, Wliite Chieftain. Pacific Supreme. 

Pompons. Lady Buckingham, White Mensa, 
Donald, Lillian Doty. White Dotv and Izola. 
-Ml at the rate of $25.00 per 1000. 
CALLA CI T FLOWER CO., CALLA, 0. 



0HBY8ANTHBMUHS. 
Buckbee'a prize winning exhibition and com- 
mercial varieties, well establiahed, clean, bealtby 
Mock. 

Rooted cutting! 2-ineh 
Per Per Per 
100 1000 100 
O>rporal Piper, best exhibi- 
tion yellow 9.... $ IIO.M 

Dr. Enguehard, pink 8.60 26.00 

Early Frost, white 8.00 25.00 

B. A. Seldewitz, pink 8.00 26.00 

Qolden Wedding, one of the 

best yellows B.OO 

Harvard, deep crimson 8.00 26.00 B.OO 

James Fraaer, exhibition yel- 
low «.00 

Joan of Arc, exhibition white 10.00 

Louisa Pockett, white 10.00 

Major Bonnaffon, yellow 3.00 25.00 

Marigold, yellow 8.00 26.00 6.00 

Mrs. Chas. W. Johnson, ex- 
hibition white; scarce 16.00 

Mrs. O. O. Mason, best red, 

commercial and exhibition 10.00 

Mrs. H. W. Buckbee, white. 8.00 25.00 

Nagirroc or Golden Champ- 
ion 6.00 

Patty, pink 4.00 

Pink Chieftain 8.00 26.00 4.00 

Pockett's Crimson, fine va- 
riety 8.00 

Richmond, yellow 3.00 26.00 6.00 

Sgt. Wm. B. Young, best 
bronze, commercial and ex- 
hibition 10.00 

Smith's Advance, white... 3.00 26.00 

Unaka, pink 3.00 2S.0O 

White Chieftain 3.00 25.00 4.00 

Wm. H. Walte, fine bronze 8.00 

Whittler, yellow 3.00 26.00 6.00 

POMPONS. 

Christmas Gold, late yellow 3.00 26.00 6.00 

Diana, white 6.00 

Glory of Seven Oaks, best 
yellow for out-door Aut- 
umn-flowering 6.00 8.00 

Golden Climax, yellow 3.00 26.00 6.00 

Golden Wedding, yellow... 3.00 26.00 

Hilda Canning, bronze 8.00 26.00 6.00 

Lillian Doty, pink 3.00 25.00 6.00 

Lucille Knoble, yellow 3.00 25.00 6.00 

Mary, white 3.00 25.00 6.00 

Western Beauty, pink 3.00 26.00 

White Doty, white 3.00 25.00 6.00 

C)a8h. Immediate shipment. 

H. W. BUCKBEE. 

fi •est City Qreenhouses, Rockford. Ill 

CLEAN. HEALTHY CUTTINGS. 
CREAM OF BREAD WINNING VARIETIES. 



WHITE: Smith's Advance.* Early Fiost, 
Oconto.' Chas, Rager, Wliite Chieftain. White 
Chadwiek.* White Jones.* Wliite Mistletoe. 

YELLOW: Golden Glow. Siinray,' Gobleii 
(Jueen.' Richmond,* BiuinafFon,* Yellow Cliad- 
wick.* Yellow Jones. 

PINK: Pacific Supreme. I'liaka* Chieftain,* 
Patty, Dr. EiiBiiehard,* Seldewitz.* Frick. 

POMPONS: Chicago Wliite. Elva. Golden Cli- 
max. Riickingliain.' Mariana.* Fairy Queen, Siin- 
sliine, Kenneth,* Western Beauty,* Romaine 
Warren,* Gidden AVeddiiij;.' Christinas Gold,* 
Mrs. Frank Beu.' 




Those marked * ('{in also lie siipiilied in 2''i - 
ill.. $().(K» iier too. .$.->.'.. 00 jier 1000. except Cliad- 
wick, Siinr.iv and Richnioiid, \yliiili are $7..-0 
per imi, $711.00 per 1000. 

GILLKIT & SONS. 
Plant Specialists, Lin<'oln, ill. 

MANY OF YOUR OLD FAVORITES. 

Clirysantliemums. strong "Jin. stock. 

ready f..r iM^iii'liinc', $4..-.0 per loO, $10.00 per 1000, 

r.hiek Hawk, dark red. 

Clias. Rager, wliite. 

Diana, white, for designs. 

Excelsior, hard.v, deep yellow. 

Glory of Pacific, pink, early, 

T,'.\fri(ane, rich puriile, 

Mrs. i;. A. Seidewilz, pink. 

Miss Florence Pullman, wliite, 

I'aeitic Supreme, pink, 

I'.itfy. [link. 
Silver Wedding, white. 

I'luik.'i. pink. 

P.ronze Beauty, bronze. 

Canary, h.'irdv, light .yellow. 

Early Snow, white. 

Estelie. white, early, 

Ilarvani, best red, 

Ijiuis Boelimer (Oslridi Plume), 

Oconto, white. 

Miss Minnie Bailey, pink, 

Roman Gold, yellow. 

Tints of Gold, pink and bronze. 

White Bonnafron, 

Not less than C of any variety of pl.mts 

siiliplied in our wholesale department; under 25 

of u variety are bill<'d at doeen rate; 25 and 

oyer at hundred r.ite. 

THE (!(>()1) & REESE CO.. 

The largest Rose growers in the World. 

Department \, Springfield, 0. 



^Z-' 



May 4, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 



175 



READY, READY. RBADT. 
ROOTED CDTTINGS. 
Can 8blp at once. 
To ttaoae who have planted our jormg atook 
In other years nothing need be lald, but thoM 
who have not yet ordered cutting* from am we 
would like to let know we never tend oat any- 
thing that la not clean, healthy and well rooted, 
variety. Per 100 Per 1000 

Ohas. Bager, white $3.00 $26.00 

Richmond, yellow 8.00 25.00 

Roman Gold, yellow 8.00 20.00 

Ohleftaln, pink 3.00 20.00 

Intensity, maroon 8.00 20.00 

Oconto, white 8.00 26.00 

Early Frost, white 3.00 20.00 

Mrs. E. A. Seldewltz, pink 8.00 20.00 

Rose Perfection, pink 8.00 20.00 

Smith's Ideal, white 8.00 20.00 

Golden Queen, yellow 8.00 20.00 

AVhlte Chieftain, white 3.00 20.00 

Thanksgiving Pink, the best late 

pink 6.00 00.00 

POMPONS READY NOW. 

Lillian- Doty, light pink 3.00 20.00 

Mrs. Buckingham, pink, single.. 8.00 20.00 

Mrs. Godfrey, late pink 3.00 26.00 

Hilda Canning, bronze 3.00 20.00 

Volunteer, yellow 3.00 26.00 

White Gem, white 8.00 26.00 

WIETOR BROS. 

Wholesnle Growers of Cut Flowers, 

30 E. Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

READY NOW, 
THE CREAM OF THE COMMERCIALS. 

Clfiin. well i(.iit<Ml ciittiiiifs of the following 
Vii pieties : 

Per TOO Per 1000 

Clirysdlnia $3.50 $30.00 

Celebriiti(]n. iniirli hetliT tli.iii 

Yellow Km toil n.OO 45.00 

riiadwick Iiiuinviil (j.OO 50 00 

Golden CIuhIw:, k 0.00 50.00 

Golden Clow 3.,-,0 HO.OO 

J. W. riiiif>'. Iiiipioveil Chief- 
tain .S.50 30.00 

Mrs. E. A. S.i.leHitz :}.5() 30.00 

Mrs. I^'slie D:,vis, tlie Pink 

Turner 10.00 

I{i'''i"i""'l ^..-iO 30.00 

Tinioth.v ICiitun 4.00 35 00 

Thankscivinv I'ink 12.00 100.00 

White ChienMiii -.i'M 30 00 

Yellow liiiner .500 45.00 

Mr-N. I'.n. kint'L^TM. lovely, big, 

single iiink. iixiiue like leiitlier 3..")0 .30 00 

Golden Kenth.r. colden hronze, 

fiine.v, indi>|iens;ilile 3..'i0 30 00 

( OM.MKHCI.M, I'O.MI'ONS. 
Clara JiHiieson. hronze and scar- 
let .'-..OO 

Lillinn Iiot.v, pink 3..-)0 .30 00 

White llot.v 3. .10 30.00 

TIIK i:. G. HILL CO., 
Uielimo iid, Ind. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 
We offer iniinedinte delivery on tlie following, 
being the varieties most in demand: 
Smith's Advance, 
Golden Glow, 

Chrysolora, 

f^olden Queen, 

Charles Uager, 

Whittier, 

Oconto, 

Bonnnffon. 

Yellow Chadwick, 

White Friok, 

Pink Frlck. 

Golilen Wedding, 

$3 .',0 per 100, $.30.00 per 1000, 

POMPONS READY NOW. 

Pink Dotv. 

White Doty, 

Mariana. 

JlensM. 

Yellow Mens.i. 

Diana, 

Godfrey, 

ilolden Clima'C. 

I'.arretfs Earlv White. 

y^i.-id per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 

STlPPY FLORAL CO., ST. JOSEPH. MO. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 

Smith's Advance, white; Smith's Advance, vel- 
low; Roserle, October Frost, Sunrav, Rose Perifec- 
tlon. Marigold. Sun Glow, Titanic, Pink and 
White Chieftain, Smith's Sublime, Unaka, Mid- 
night Sun, Loyalty, Oconto, Chrysolora. Mrs 
Foley, Sunbeam, White Turner, Richmond. 
Smith's Imperial, White and Golden Mistletoe, 
Mrs. C. W. Johnson, Pink and White Seldewlti, 
Charles Rager, Celebration, Major Bonnaflfon, 
Mrs. Totty, Betsy Ross, Glenvlew, White and 
Golden Chadwick, $35.00 per 1000. 

December Beauty $46,00 per 1000 

Sunshine, Little Bronze, Early Pink NIza, Mrs, 
Buckingham, Mrs, Frank Beu, Golden West, Tel- 
low Anemone. Late Bronze, Red Pompon, Xmas 
Gold and White Pompon, $36.00 per 1000. 

ELI CROSS, 
180 Monroe Are.. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Chryganthemum rooted cuttings from stock that 
Is absolutely clean from midge. 

Yellow: Golden Queen, Marigold, Richmond, 
Turner, Bonnaffon, White: Betsy Ross, Tur- 
ner, Oconto, Chieftain. Pink: Unaka, Selde- 
wltz and Patty, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 
White and Yellow Chadwlcks, $5.00 per 100, 
$40,00 per 1000. 
Sllvleus Greenhouses, E, F. D. 4, Ashtabula, 0. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

READY NOW, 
ROOTED CUTTINGS, 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Golden Glory $20,00 $160,00 

Thanksgiving Pink 1'2.00 100.00 

Glorious, Victory, Pink Turner, December 
Beauty, Rose Perfection, Sunbeam, Willium 
Turner, Yellow Turner, White Chadwick, Yel- 
low Chadwick, Pink Chadwick. 
The above at $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

Sun Glow, Whittier, Sun Ray, 
$5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

Golden Glow, Charles Rager, Richmond, Bon- 
naffon, Seidewltz, White Seidewitz, Chieftain, 
Pacific Supreme, Early Rose, Early Frost, 
Oconto, Robert Halllday, Mistletoe, Golden Mis- 
tletoe. 

The above $3.50 per 100, $30,00 per 1000. 
And many others, Including all varieties of 
pompons. 

Send for our complete list. 

C. U. LIGGIT, 

Wholesale Plantsman, 

505 Bulletin Bldg.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, WELL ROOTED 

CUTTINGS, 

$3,50 per 100, $30,00 per 1000, 

WHITE. 

R. 0. Berthler, 

Smith's Advance. 

White Chadwick, 

Ivory, 

William Turner, 

Clementine Touset, 

Charles Rager, 

YELLOW. 

Polyphlne, 

Bonnaffon, 

Yellow Jones, 

Golden Glow, 

Chrysolora, 

PINK, 

Chieftain, 

Maud Denn, 

POMPONS. 

Nlnta, King Henry, Helen Newberry, Diana, 

Martha, Mensa, Clorlnda, 

also French Caprice all colors mixed, 

STATE FLORAL CO,, YAKIMA, WASH, 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. STRONG 2-IN. 
$4,00 per 100. ».S5 00 per 1000. 
Monrovia, Ivory, 

Oconto. Polly Rose, 

Chrysolora, Smith's Advance. 

E. A. Seldewltz, Tints of Gold. 

Enfant Des Mondes. Chas. Rager, 

Harvard, Perle L.vonnalse, 

White Chieftain, Pink Chieftain, 

Dr, Enguebard. Wlilte Bonnaffon, 

Roman Gold, T>oiiis Boehmer, 

Early Frost, Wm, Falconer. 

Clementine Touset, Golden Glow, 

October Frost, Red Seidewitz, 

Rob't. Halllday, Col, D, Appleton, 

Yellow Bonnaffon, Lynnwood Hall, 

Pacific Supreme.' 
HARDY GARDEN CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 
Prince of Wales, Excelsa, 

Flora. Homestead, 

Victory. 

THE McGregor bros. co., 

Springfield, 0^ 

C HR YSA NTIIEM t ' MS , M II ,K 11 icriT~Ql ' AI.I r Y . 

Pompons and singles, i'l-in., .$r>.00 per 100. 
EARLY V.VUIETIKS: L.\TE VARIETIKS: 
Zenobla, yellow double; Hilda C.inning, bronze 
Lillian Doty, pink double: 

double; P.eiky McLean, bronze 

Diana, wliite doiiMe; donhle: 

Ch.irles Fohn. pink Wilcox, bronze double; 

single; .Tiiles I,ai.'ravere. red 

Fine Hronze, bronze double; 

single: Western lieaiity, pink 

Early bronze, bronze doiibl«»: 

single: Donnlii, pink double: 

Acto, white double. Colden Wedding, yellow 

double. 
Snnsliinc. late yi'liow, $X.(K) per 100, 
Caprice varieties: Yellow, white, bronze, lav- 
ender and purple, 2'i in.. ST.OO \ht 100. 

I'AHK FLORAL CO.. 
1043 Broadway, Denver. Colo. 

C I rRYSANTHF:MrM S^ 

Good, strong rooted cnttinijs. 

Per 100 Per IHOil 

Pink Tnnier $3.7.". $3.".. 0(1 

Golden Chadwick 3.7." .^■i.00 

I'ink Chadwick 3.7."> .3.">.0(| 

Wm. H. Chailwick 3.25 30.00 

October Qneen 2.75 25.00 

Charles Kager 2.75 25.00 

Chrvsolora 2.75 2."i,00 

Yellow Kager 2.75 25.00 

Ma lor Bonnaffon 2.75 25.00 

I'lia ka 2.75 25 no 

Chieftain : 2.75 25.00 

E. A. Seidewitz 2.75 25.00 

Pink Frick 2.75 25.00 

Harvard, red 2.75 25.00 

250 assorted at KKKI rate. 

D. H. G REEN. HOONSHOU O. Ml). 

CHRYS.VNTIiKMT'MS. 
Strong, clean, well rooteil cuttings. 
T'n.'ika. I'ink Cliic>ft:iin. 

Oconto. While Chieftain. 

Chrysolora. Col. .Appleton, 

Gloria. Kngiiehard. 

Wliite Rager Ifiiliinond, 

Yellow Rager, E. A. Seidewitz, 

Marigold. Harvard. 

«2 75 |)er lOO, $25.00 jx-r 1000. 

HKNKY A. HESTER & .SONS, 

Hagerstown. Md. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS, 
PREPAID. 

Polly Rose, Unaku, I'aeitlc Supreme, Cometo, 
Diana, (iolden Climax. Golden Wedding Pom- 
IKjn, Mrs, lUickingliani, Elizabeth, 2'^c; White 
and Yellow Touset, Josephine Foley, Smith's 
Ideal, Chrysolora. Amorila, Ijivender Queen, 
.Mariana. Mimico, Miramar, Wandu, Vasco, Bul>y 
Marguerite. lA'ilah. Little (!eni, Mrs, Frank 
lieu, Cvalda, Western Beauty, Christmas Gold, 
the best pompon; Kenobia, (lodfrey's Perfection. 
l>ouis I'ihlein, Izola, 3c; May Foster, White and 
Pink Frick. C. C. Pollworth, (Jolden Gleam, 
Tokio, Harvard, White Thri-ad, 3'/ac; Lynnwood 
Hall, Kichmon<l, I,ena Haiiui, Helen Lee, Dr, 
Engiieliard, K, A, Seidewitz, 4c; Sun Ray, Wbit- 
ti(?r, Calumet, November Glow, Smith's Cameo, 
Silver King. 5c. Cash. 
JHEO. D. KIBBLER, R. 0, EVANSVILLE, IND. 

Chrysanthemums: Order now, delivery as 
wanted. We have a complete list of the best 
varieties, a few of whicli are in white, October 
Queen, Oconto, Chieftnin, Chas. Rager, .Seldewltz; 
in yellow. Golden Glow, Golden Queen, Richmond, 
Y'ellow Rager, Bonnaffon; in pink. Pink Chieftain, 
.Maud Dean, Seidewitz, AH of the above are 
.«!3.."iO per 100, $;i0.00 per 1000. We also have a 
fine list of choice varieties, such as the Turners, 
Mhite. Yellow, Pink, (Mrs. J. Leslie Davis), 
White and Yellow Mistletoe, Sun Glow, Rose Per- 
fection, anil as always, the Chadwlcks, White and 
(;ol<len. the same unsurpassable quality as in 
|)revioiis years. These are $5.00 per 100. $45.00 
per 1000. Likewise a very full list of pompons, 
singles, etc. Write for copy, S. S. Skldelsky & 
Co., Dodge Bldg,, 5.'$ Park Place, New York. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 
ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Free from disease. 

Per Per 

100 1000 

20,000 McNlece, reflexed, deep pink. $3.00 $25.00 

30,000 Oconto, Incurved, white 8,00 25.00 

60,000 Chieftain, Incurved, pink... 3.00 25.00 

10.000 Chrysolora, Incurved, yellow. 8.00 25.00 
30,000 Golden Chadwick, Incurved, 

yellow 4.00 85.00 

40,000 Harvard, reflexed, dark crim- 
son 8.00 26.00 

65,000 Charles Rager, incurved, 

pure white 8.00 28.00 

A DOLPH FISCHER, FLORIST, EASTON, PA, 

CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 

Order now, don't lose out by ordering late as 
others did last year. 

White: Crystal Gem, Oconto, Charles Rager, 
Diana, Sliver Wedding. 

Yellow: Chrysolora, Robert Halllday, Roman 
Gold, Richmond, Whittier, Major Bonnaffon. 

Pink: Unaka, Pacific Supreme, E. A. Selde- 
wltz, Dr. Enguehard. 

Red: Harvard, at least 12 other varieties, 
$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

White Mistletoe and Yellow Turner, Golden 
Wedding, Silver Wedding. White and Yellow 
Chadwick, $4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

Eight standard pompons, $26.00 per 1000. Add 
$1.00 per 100 for 2V4-ln. 

J. C. STEINHAUSBR. PITTSBURG. KAN. 

CHRY'SANTHEMUMS. 

Strong roofed cuttings, guaranteed free froiu 

disease. 
Golden Glow. Dr. Enguelianl. 

Y'ellow Rager. Pink .Seidewitz. 

Mrs. C. C. Pollworth, I'naka. 

Chrvsoloni, Pink Chieftain. 

White Chieftain. Wells' Late Pink. 

Oconto, Pink Frick, 

Virgini.i I'oehlmann, Pacific Supreme, 

Yellow anil While Turner. 
'llic aliove $2,511 pi>r KHi. .T'Jd.OO pc>r liXMl. 
White Cbailwick. S3. ,50 i)er 100. 
SCHLUND FLORAL CO., 

10 N. Centre S t., Ciii nber lnnil . Md. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 
PINK. YELLOW. 

Pacific Supreme, Golden Queen, 

TTnaka. Chrysolora, 

Seidewitz, Richmond, 

Chieftain, Robert Halllday, 

WHITE. 
Chieftain. Mistletoe. 

Early Frost, Seldewltz, 

Early Sno'w, 

Rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; 

2V4-ln., .$4.00 per 100. $35.00 per 1000. 

L. H. DORNBUSCH, 

Hills & Dales Greenhouses, Dayton, 0. 

CHHYSA Sri7rr:>ri ^>IST~F1NE CLEAN sTock". 
I!o<ite<l cuttings. . .$3.00 jier 100. $25.00 per 1000 
2'j-in. |Kits 5.00 per Kill. 45.0f> per lOOil 

Golden Clow, Early Frost. Smith's Ide.il. Coni- 
oleta, Chrysolor.i, Pink and White Chieftain, 
Ulchinond, Harv;ir(l, Dr, Enguehard, Cliarles Ra- 
L'cr and Honnaffoii. 

POMPONS. 

I'ink and White Doty. Climax. Mrs. J'r.ink 
I'.eii. Ilild.'i Canning. Diana. Marg.irel Waite. 
Mrs. K. 1>. iJodfrev. Miramar and Mariana. 

ItOIilNSUN KI.OU.VL CO.. 
nio I-;a<i liitli St . Portland. Ore. 

CHRYS.ANTHEMUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS'!" 

$3,00 per 100, $25,00 per 1000, 
Charles Rager. Oconto. White Chieftain, De- 
cember Gem, 'Yellow Rager. Midnight Sun, 
Golden Gleam. Richmond. Calumet. Harvard. 

Pompons: Golden Climax. Klondike, Godfrey's 
Perfection. Golden Wedding. Lydia Thomas. 
Diana. Elva, Western Beauty, Illona, Frank 
Wilcox, Bronze Beauty. 

J3..50 per 100. $30 00 per 1000. 

William Turner and White Chadwick. 

KINYON BROTHERS, 

804 Duvall Ave.. South Bend, Ind. 



176 



The Florists' Review 



Mat 4, 1922 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS-Continued 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Golden Glow, Golden Queen, Chieftain, White 
Chieftain, Oconto, Bonnaffon, Enguebard, Selde- 
witz, Enchantress, Mistletoe, Rager. Pompons: 
Lillian Doty, White Doty, Wilcox, Quinola, 
Mariana, Christmas Gold, Golden Climax, God- 
frey, Buckingham, Sunshine, rooted cuttings, 
$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

Golden Chadwick, rooted cuttings, $S.00 per 
100, $45.00 per 1000. 

Good stork, absolutely free from midge. All 
orders acknowledged same day as receWed. 
W. B. SPAFFOHD, BARKER, N. T. 



PINK. 

Pacific Supreme 

tinaka, 

Seidewitz. 

Early Frost, 
Early Snow, 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 



YELLOW. 

Golden Queen, 
Clirysolora, 
Uichmond. 
WHITE. 

Mistletoe, 

Seidewitz. 

Rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

2% -in., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 

HENRY DORNBUSCH. 

4 28 Cincinn ati St., Da yton, 0. 

ON E~H ALF~M ILLION 
CHRYSANTHEMUM ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Yellow Bonnaffon, Seidewitz, yellow, white and 
bronze pompons, $20.00 per 1000; 2V4-ln., $26.00. 
Chieftain, Golden Glow, Baby Yellow, William 
and Yellow Turner, $25.00 per 1000; 2%-in., 
$30.00. White Chadwick, $35.00 per 1000; 2%-ln., 
$40.00. Cash only. 

M. HILPERT. 
Sta. O, 313 Belalr Road. Baltimore, Md. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Pacific Supreme, Chrysolora, Oconto, Touset, 
White and Yellow Rager, White and Yellow 
Turner, Edwin Seidewitz. 

Pompons: Niza, Zora, Diana, Lillian Doty, 
Donald, Mary, Volunteer, Christmas Gold, $2.50 
per 100. $22.00 per 1000. 

HENRY KRUEGER, 
602 Clark St., Toledo, O. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 
Good, clean stock. 
Yellow Chadwick, Golden Glow, Chrysolora. 
Golden Wedding, Golden Queen, Marigold, Yel- 
low BonnafTon, White Chadwick, Smith's Ad- 
Tance, Crystal Gem, Early Frost. Chas. Rager, 
Unaka, Seidewitz, $3.60 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 
Cash. 
J. 0. RBNNISON CO., SIOUX CITY, lA. 

Chrysanthemums, Yellow Bonnaffon, Pink Sei- 
dewitz and Golden Wedding, pompon; rooted cut- 
tings, 20,000, $2.60 per 100, $20.00 per 1000, pre- 
paid. 

This stock is first class, absolutely clean. 
Tour money will be returned at once, also any 
other charges you may bare paid. If for any 
reason you are not satisfied. 

Henry Dumke, Marseilles, 111. 

NEW TRICKBR POMPON. 
A real profit maker. It is the earliest golden 
yellow; 8 to 6 flowers to a stem and 20 to 80 
■t«ma to the plant. Will be widely grown ■■ 
■oon •■ it becomes better known. We offer 
■troDg rooted cutting*. 

$10.00 per 100, $90.00 per 1000. 

AMERICAN BULB CO.. 

172 N. Wabash Aye.. Ohloio, HI. 

Chrysantliemiuns, rooted cnttlngs; rnaranteod 
clean, sturdy stock: Golden Oloiw, Golden Qneen, 
Early Snow, October Queen, best early white; 
Paclflo Supreme, McNlece, Boman Gold, Turner. 
Chas. Rager, Pink and White Frlck, Seldewlts, 
Dr. Engnetaard, Roy. Mistletoe. Single: Mar- 
raret Walte, White Mens*. Pompons: Christ- 
mas Gold, Golden Climax, $2.60 per 100. 

Tarentum Greenhouses, Torentnm, Pa. 

MAJOR BONNAFFON. 

200.000 rooted cuttings, ready now and later. 

We have a national reputation for quality on 

this variety. If your stock is weak, get fresh 

vitality by renewing with our cuttings. 

$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

EDWARD J. TAYLOR, 

Bonnaffon Specialist, Greens Farms, Conn. 

' CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

CAPRICE. 

One of the best pot varieties. 

Colors, pink, white, yellow, bronze and rt4. 

Now ready In 21^-1°. pots, 

$6.00 per 100. $50.00 per 1000. 

BT. LOUIS WHOLESALE CTJT FLOWER 00. 

14«e-08 Pine St.. St. Lonls, Mo. 

CnRYSANTHEMrMR. 
Clirysolora. White and Yellow Turner. Unaka, 
Ocontn and Paoiflr Supreme. 

Pompons. Cliristmas Gold, Hilda CinnlnR and 
Ben, nioted cuttings, 3c: well established 2V4-ln., 
4%c. 

EDEN'S GREEMIOTSES. SEBRINO. O. 



NOTICE! 



CHRYSANTHEMTM CTTTINCS: CLEAN STOCK 
Pink: Seidewitz. Dr. Engnelianl. I'naliii, P.itty. 
Yellow: Golden Clow. Yellow I'.onn.iffon, C. C. 
Pollworth. MariRold. White: Smith's Advance. 
Oconto. Diana. Red: Harvard, $3.00 per 100, 
$25.00 per 1000. Cash. 
G. E. BKKTIIOLD. NEBRASKA CITY, NEB. 

AtrrUMN GOLD. ~ 

Blooms October 12th. 
The new single Chri-santliemum of rich golden 
yellow; rooted cuttings, $15.00 per 100, $140.00 
per 1000. 

0. A. KUBHN, FLORIST, 

1312 Pine St., St. Lonls, Mo. 

Chrysanthemums, Golden Glow, Nagoya, cut- 
tings, $2.00 per 100, postpaid. Cash. 

W. O. Thomas & Sons, Sheffield, III. 



"A few llnea In The Review 
will polish your mall box." 

J. Dobbertln & Son, 
April 9. Rochester, N.T. 



To be sure of atten- 
tion for the issue dated 
Thursday, instruc- 
tions for 

Classified Ads 

must reach The 
Review on or before 
the preceding 

MONDAY 



Chrysanthemums, Yellow Bonnaffon, Lillian 
Doty, Climax, Enguehard, Charles Rager, White 
and Pink Chadwick, Unaka and C. C. Pollworth, 
clean stock, 2%-in., $3.00 per 100; rooted cut- 
tings above varieties, $2.50 per 100. Cash, 
please. E. A. Llewellyn, Olean, N. Y. 

' EXTRA EARLY WHITE POMPON. 

Our well known variety, which will come Into 
bloom by September 1 if wanted that early; 
2-ln. pot plants now ready, $5.00 per 100. 

BASSETT & WASHBURN. 
178 North Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Chrysanthemums, Oconto, Unaka, Golden Glow, 
Patty and Buckingham, $2.50 per 100; $80.00 for 
the lot of 4000, containing the above varieties, 
and small lots of 6 more good varieties. Also new 
large pink seedling at $1.00 per dozen. Carl S. 
Lindey, 1207 S. 17th St., New Castle, Ind. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Smith's Advance, Early Snow, Unaka, Golden 
Queen. Chrysolora, Kalb, Early Frost, Pink Sei- 
dewitz, Mariana and Golden Wedding pompon, 
$3.50 per 100. 

CHARLES SHERWOOD, WATERLOO, lA. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 

CHRYSOLORA AND CHARLES RAGER. 

10,000 strong 2^-in. stock, $40.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. 

0. W. BBU FLORAL CO., 

4446 N. Crawford Ave., Chicago, HI. 

FINE ROOTED CUTTINGS, 
$2.60 per 100 for early orders. 
Oconto, Rager and Seidewitz, also good assort- 
ment of pompons. 

RUTLEDGE NURSERIES, 
Delaware Co., Rutledge, Pa. 

Chrysanthemums: Best collection of large- 
flowering Mums for pot culture; also collection 
of Caprice varieties in 2M!-in. pots, $8,00 per 
100, $75.00 per 1000; 500 at the 1000 rate. 
Frank Oechslin, 4911 W. Q\iincy St.. Chicago, 1 11. 

Chrysanthemums. Chrj'solorn. C. C. Pollworth, 
Oconto and Seidewitz: Pompons. Christmas Gold, 
Ben .'inrt Golden Climax, clean, stronp rooted 
outtincs. $2.. 10 per 100; 2>4in.. $4.00 per 100. 
Otto P. Knieger, 427 East Broadway, Toledo, O. 

Chrysanthemums, pompon plants, 6 best va- 
rieties: clean and healthy rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100, $18.00 per 1000; 2i4-ln., $3.00 per 100, 
$25.00 per 1000. 

Lakewood Greenhouse. Walbrldge, 0. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Major Bonnaffon, Marigold, Roman Gold and 
Chrysolora, $25.00 per 1000. 

GEORGE BAYER & SON, 
205 Islington St., Toledo, O. 

riivrsantheniunis. 000 2-ln. White Chadwick, 
100 2 in. rink Chadwick, 300 2-in. Golden Chad- 
wick. .<.'">. 00 per 100. Large enough to top for 
another cutting. 
Neil N eilsen, Inc., Mankato. Minn. 

IlENCn MUMS. EXTRA GOOD PLANTS, 
Clomenfine Tonsct. Rnlit. ITallid.iy. Lillian 
Doty. Godfrey's Perfection, Diana, 2-in., $5.00 
per 100. 
QIIENTIN FIX)RAL CO., ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

Chrysanthemums, Polly Rose and Glory of Pa- 
cific, sand rooted, clean cuttings, $2.25 per 100; 
transplanted once, $2.50 per 100. 
Obercreck Greenhouses, New Hamburgh, N. Y. 



Chrysanthemums, Unaka, Oconto, Chrysolora, 
Pink and White Chieftain, Enguehard and Mistle- 
toe, rooted cuttings, $8.00 per 100, $27.00 per 
1000. Write for our weekly list. 

Abby Avenue Greenhouses, Dayton. 0. 

Chrysanthemums, White Chadwick, Seidewitz, 
Oconto, Pink and White Chieftain, Single Pink, 
early and late; Yellow and White BcHinaffon, 
Diana and others, cuttings 2c each. 

L. J. Rowe, TitusviUe, Pa. 

Chrysanthemums, Marigold, Patty, White 
Chieftain, Harvard, Bonnaffon, rooted cuttings, 
$20.00 per 1000. Also pompons, Illona, Diana, 
Clorlnda, Godfrey. Niza. 0. A. Stoll, Hillsdale. 
Mich. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings, good, clean 
stock; now ready: McNlece, Charles Rager, 
Patty. Marigold, Yellow Bonnaffon, Touset, 
White and Yellow Turner, $3.00 per 100, $26.00 
per 1000. Page's Greenhouses, Staunton. 111. 

Chrysanthemums, best standard yarieties. In 
early, medium and late. Also single and pom- 
pons, rooted cuttings and pot plants. Write 
for varieties and prices. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Chrysanthemums, good, clean stock. Golden 
Glow, Yellow Bonnaffon, Charles Rager, Golden 
Climax and Christmas Gold, rooted cuttings, 
$2.60 per 100; 2H-in., $6.00 per 100. Cash. 
Charles A. Gardner, East Aurora, N. Y. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

aOOO Wm. H. Chadwick, 

$8.60 per 100. $80.00 per 1000. 

For immediate delivery. 

J. 8. WILSON FLORAL CO., DBS MOINES. lA. 

Chrysanthemums, Golden Glow, Early Snow. 
Chrysolora, Oconto and Harvard, strong 2-ln., 
$3.00 per 100; rooted cuttings. $2,00 per 100. 
Cash, Valley View Gardens, Tiffin, 0. 

Chrysanthemums, Yellow Mistletoe, Bonnaffon. 
Wm. Turner, Patty, rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 
100; 2% and 3-in., $4.00 per 100. 
C. D. Otis, Lake Charles, La. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings and plants 
from 2% -in. pots our specialty. Ask for trade 
list of nearly 200 Tarleties. 
Stafford Conservatories, Stafford Springs, Conn. 

Rooted cuttings of new Pompon (Arysanthe- 
miun Golden Sunshine, flowers at Christmas 
time, $4.00 per 100. Cash. John Walsh, Frank- 
lin St., Melrose Highlands, Mass. 

Chrysanthemum Eugene Langaulet, clean and 
strong rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100, postpaid; 
$26.00 per 1000 by express. 

Wm. F. Krueger. 616 Potter St., Toledo. 0. 

Ohryaanthemnms, Chrysolora. Richmond. Pink 
Chieftain. White Chieftain aad Naomi. 2^-1b. 
pots, $4.00 per 100. 
Bolton ft Hnnkel Co.. Milwsnkec. Wis. 

Chrysanthemum Bonnaffon, rooted cuttings, 
choice stock, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 
O. B. Stevens. Shenandoah, la. 

Chrysanthemum Oconto, 700 2-in., $3.50 per 
100. L. Linnemann, Jr., 1313 Ashland Ave.. 
DCS Plalnes, 111. 

Chrysanthemums. White and Yellow Mistletoe. 
2-ln., $3.60 per 100. 
Anderson Floral Co., Lebanon, Tenn. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings. Send for 
list of leading market varieties. William 
Swayne, P. O. Box T, Kennett Square, Pa. 

Chrysanthemum Whlttler, good, late Incurved 
yellow, rooted cuttings, 3c; pots, 4c. 

B. G. Miller, R. R. No. 1, Camphlll, Pa. 

Chrysanthemum Mrs. C. 0. Pollworth, the best 
early, large yellow; strong, out 1%-in. pots. $2.00 
per 100. John F. Rupp, Shiremanstown, Pa. 

Chrysanthemum Mistletoe, cuttings. $3.00 per 
100. Haentze Floral Co., Fond du Lac, Wis. 

CINgRAW^AS 

CINBRARIAS. 
Vaugban's Columbian and Price Dwarf. 

8%-ln $16.00 per 100 

6-ln 40.00 per 100 

CHARLES SHERWOOD, WATERLOO, lA. 

Cineraria seedlings, 40c per 100, $3.50 per 1000; 
2V4-in., l%e; 3-in., 5c; 4-ln., 10c. 
L. J. Rowe, TitUBvllle. Pa. 

Cinerarias, 4-ln. pot plants, $16.00; 6- in., in 
bloom, 60c. 
Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

CLEMATIS 

CLEMATIS PANICULATA. 

Japanese Virgin's Rower, 
One of the most beautiful of our hardy-flower- 
ing vines, 2'4-in, pots, 7!>c per doz,, $4.00 per 
100: fleldgrown, $S,00 per 100, $75,00 per 1000. 
Not less than of any variet.v of plants 
supplied in our wholesale department; under 25 
of a variety are billed at dozen rate; 25 and 
over at hundred rate, 

THE GOOD & REESE CO,, 

The largest Rose growers In the World. 

Department A , Springfield, 0. 

CLEMATIS PANICULATA, ' 

1-year $ 8.00 per 100, $ 60.00 per 1000 

2 year 12.00 per 100, 100.00 per 1000 

8 year 15.00 per 100. 126.00 per 1000 

THE WAYSIDE GARDENS CO., 
Mentor, O. 

Clematis Panieulata, extra strong seedlings, 
$5.00 per 1000. Samuel V. Smith, 3323 Goodman 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



177 



Clematis Paniculata, 1-year from coldframe; 
hardened, stocky, for lining out, $5.50 per 1000, 
prepaid; Virginiuna, 2-yeur from seedbed, $10.00 
per 1000. Cash from unknown parties. 

J. Dvora k , Nur seryman, Hempstead, N. Y. 

Clematis Paniculata, 2-year, pot-grown, aur« 
to live, $18.00 per 100. Burdell Floral Co., 
Bowling Green, Ky. 

Glematla Paniculata, 1-year fleld-grown, $8.00 
per 100. The McQretor Bro». Co., Bprlngfleld, O. 

CLERODEWPROWS 

Clerodendron Balfourl, 8-in., $1.60 per dos., 
$10.00 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhonae, Tnahegeg, Ala. 

~ coBAEAs TTTrmir 

COBAEA S0ANDEN8. 
Strong 214-ln. plants ready to shift, $4.00 per 
100. Cash with order. 

No charge for packing. 
R. S. McMURRAY, BELLEFONTAINE. 0. 

COLEUS 



NEW HARDING COLEUS 

IS A SEEDLING FOUND BY US, 

SHOWN AT WASHINGTON, D. C. 

8. A. F. CONVENTION, 

Where an award of high merit was recommended 

by Judge* A. L. Miller, J. A. Peterson and 

Joseph Kohout. 
Harding Coleus, most lieautlful, bright red 
leaves with brown, green-yellow edging. Send 
for sample leaves. 
Strong rooted cuttings, $10.00 per 100. 
Defiance, strong rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 
100, $20.00 per 1000. 

LOUIS HAHN & SON, 

R. F. D. No. 4, Box 75. 

HiUvale Branch, N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



COLEUS ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Golden Redder, Verschaffeltii, Queen Victoria, 
Firebrand, Defiance, Gettysburg and other t>est 
bedding varieties, $1.50 per 100, $13.00 per 1000; 
2%-ln. pot plants, $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 

Brilliancy and American Beauty, rooted cut- 
tings, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; 2^-in. 
pots, $7.00 per 100. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St., New York. N. T. 

COLEUS 
ASSORTED COLORS. 

2V2-in. and 3-ln., 
$5.00 per 100. 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 
172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

CHOICE COLEUS FROM 2-IN. POTS. 
Dunelra, Sabonii, 

Khaki, Prince Edward, 

Beckwlth's Gem, Queen Victoria, 

Pink and Yellow Trniling Queen, 
$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; 
rooted cuttings, $1.25 per 100, $10.00 per 1000. 

Cash, no packing charges. 
THE IM LAY CO., ZA NE8Y ILLE, 0. 

Coleus cuttings, 12 varieties. Including Golden 
Redder and Verschaffeltii, also some of our new 
variety. Rainbow, a real acquisition in fancy 
leaved Coleus, $1.25 per 100, $10.00 per 1000. 
Rnlnl)ow alone, $2.00 per 100; also Brilliancy or 
Christmas Gem. 2%-in., $5.00 per 100. All stock 
good, clean and healthy; absolutely free from in- 
sects and disease. We guarantee this stock. 
Cash. J. A. Famworth A Son. Gallon. 0. 

Coleus. VerschafTeltli, Golden Redder and 12 
other varieties, rooted cuttings, $1.25 per 100, 
prepaid, $10.00 per 1000 bv express, not pre- 
paid; 2-ln., $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; Bril- 
liancy, rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100; 2-ln.. $4.00 
per 100. All of these in 2-in. have been cut 
back and will make good, bushy plants. Cash, 
please. B. B. Randolph, Delavan. III. 

Coleus, Defiance and Brilliancy, rooted cut- 
tings. $2.00 per 100, postpaid; strong 2-ln.. $6.00 
per 100. 

Golden Redder and 6 other leading varieties, 
rooted cuttings, $1.25 per 100, postpaid; strong 
2-in., $4.00 per 100, Winfield S. Kircher, OycU- 
men Specinlia t. Peflnnrp, O. 

SEASONABLE STOCK. ~ 

Colons, sttiuflunl v.irictios. 2'4-in.. .$4.00 per 
100, $3.').00 per 1000; Brilli.ancy, 2'/4-in., $7.00 
per 100. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., 
Painesville, 0. 

Coleus, strong, well rooted cuttings of the 
standard varii'tios. Ifi.M per 100, $12.00 per 1000. 
Fancy varieties. $2.00 per 100, .Sl.^.OO per 1000: 
e.^rept I!rilliancy. whirh Is $2.50 per 100. $20.00 
per 1000. S. S. Skidelsky & Co., Dodge BIdg., 63 
Park Plare, Xew York. 

COLEUS PRESIDENT HARDING. 

Rooted cuttings. 

Fine stock, well rooted. 

$5,00 per 100. postpaid. 

J. N. SPANABEL & SONS, 

Columbiana, 0. 

Coleus, strong rooted cuttings in fine assort- 
ment of best bedders, $1.50 per 100, by mail; 
$10.00 per 1000, by express; heavy 2^4-in. stock. 
So. Trniling Queen separate if wanted, 
S, W. Pike, a t . Cha rl es. I II . 

Coleus, 6 good varieties, including Golden Red- 
der. 2i4-ln., $4.00 per 100, $36.00 per 1000. Cash. 
J. 0. Rennlson Co., Sioux City. la. 



Coleus. 8 leading varieties, rooted cuttings, 
$1.60 per 100. $10.00 per 1000; 214-in., $3.60 per 
100; Trailing Queen, rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 
100; 2%-ln.. $4.00 per 100; 8 in., $8.00 per 100. 
Cash or c. o. d. 

W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

20 best" BEDDING VARIETIES. 
Coleas, including such as Golden Redder, 
Dunelra, Verschaffeltii, May Laverin and Fire- 
brand, good, strong 2^-in.. $3.50 per 100, $30.00 
per 1000. 
THE RBESER PLANT CO., SPRINGFIELD. O. 

TRAILING QUEEN COLEUS. 

Rooted cuttings, postpaid $1.00 per 100 

2'A-in., well branched 2.50 per 100 

Cash, please. 

RIVIERA GARDENS, 

Box 208. Gulfport. Miss. 

Coleus, Trailing, red, yellow and mixed, stand- 
ard varieties including Yellow Redder and Ver- 
schaffeltii, very large, extra strong, clean and 
healthy, $3.60 per 100. Cash. 
BrinkerhofC Greenho uses, Springfield, 111. 

STAITOARD MARKET SORTS. 
Colen*. 2ii4-in., 60c per doz., $4.00 per 100, 
$30.00 per 1000. 

THE SCHMIDT & BOTLEY CO., 
Springfield, O. 

Coleus. standard varieties, including Pink and 
Yellow Trailing Queen, rooted cuttings, $1.60 
per 100. $12.00 per 1000; 2 and 2^-ln. strong 
plants, $4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. Cash. 

G. A. Weberg, Chicago Heights, III. 

COLEUS ROOTED CUTTINGS^ 

10 best varieties, clean stock. 

$1.00 per 100. 

RICHARD A. IRVINE, 

Bay City, Mich. 

TRAILING QUEEN. 

Coleus, bushy 2%-inch. $3.00 per 100. 

AMERICAN BULB CO.. 

172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Coleus, Christmas Gem. 2%in., $fi.00 per 100; 
Trailing Queen, red and yellow, bushy 2\4-in.. 
$3.00 per 100; rooted cuttings, $1.25 per 100. 
Otto P. Krueger, 427 East Broadway, Toledo, 0. 

BIG COLLECTION, GOOD COLORS. 
Coleus, 15 kinds, heavy rooted cuttings, $1.50 
per 100. $12.50 per 1000; 2V4-ln.. $4.00 per 100. 
GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

Coleus, 8 best bedding varieties, well rooted 
2-ln., $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; rooted cut- 
tings, $1.50 per 100, $12.00 per 1000. 
Chas. E. Smith & Son, York. Pa. 

Coleus, Christmas Gem, 2V4-in., $5.00 per 100; 
Trailing Queen, rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100. 
Cash. 

O. A. Anderson Greenhouse Co., Tlonesta, Pa. 

Coleus, best varieties, except Trailing Queen, 
clean stock that will please vou, 2in.. $4.00 per 
100: rooted cuttings, $1.50 per 100, $10.00 per 
1000. Cash. C. L. Hu mphrey, Zanesvllle. O. 

COLEUS, TEN BEST BEDDERS, 

2-ln., $3.00 per 100. 

WHITSON'S, 618 N. 8TH ST., 

Vincennes, Ind. 

Coleus, best standard varieties, rooted cuttings, 
$1.60 per 100, $12.00 per 1000; 2% and 8-in.; 
strong stock plants, branched, at $5.00 per 100. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Coleoa, good, choice varieties including Trail- 
ing Queen, 2^-in.. $3.00 per 100. Fine varieties 
for stock. 

Oak Orove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

VERY~STRONG ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Coleus, 12 best varieties, including Trailing 
Queen, $1.25 per 100. Cash. 

RUTTON BROS., LAKE GENEVA. WIS. 

Coleus cuttings in 10 leading varieties, strong, 
well-rooted, for prompt shipment, $10.00 per 
1000 cash. Danish Seed Import, 206 N. 7th St., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Coleus. good, choice varieties, including Trail- 
ing Queen and Golden Redder, mixed rooted cut- 
tings, $1.26 per 100; 3-in., $8.00 per 100. 

Montgomery Gardens, Snc City, la. 

Coleus, fine stock, best bedding kinds, $2.50 
per 100. Cash. 

Joseph Bancroft & Son, Cellar Falls, la. 

Coleus. 10 best bedding varieties, strong and 
well rooted, $1.25 per 100, $10,00 per 1000, C.ish, 
please. J, J. Limpert, Xenia, 0. 

Coleus, rooted cuttings, $12.00 per 1000, pre- 
paid; Christmas Gem, 4-in., 15c and 20c. 
C. Humfeld, Clay Center. Kan. 

Coleus, 8 leading varieties, 2-in., $3,50 per 
100. B. R. Pound, Cedar and Indiana Sts., New- 
ark, O. 

Coleus, 10 varieties, extra fine stock, 2V4-ln. 
pots. $5.00. Cash. Packing free. 

La Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse. Wis. 



Coleus, 10 varieties, 2V2in., $3. ,10 per 100. 
Packing free. Cash. 

Trultt's Oreenliouses. Chaniite. Kan. 

Coleus puttings, lea<ling varieties, AVrite for 
prices. Joseph Austin, ,35th and Park Ave.. 
Kansas City. Mo. 

Coleus, Improved Mrs. Hunt, Defiance and 
Brilliancy, extra strong, clean 3-ln., 7c. 

Burton B, Crane, Kansas City. Kan. 

Coleus, 12 good varieties, roofed cuttings. $1.00 
per 100. Vogt's Oreenliouse, Coldwatcr, Mich. 

Coleus, 7 varieties, rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 
100. Cash. Valley View Gardens, Tiffin. 0, 



Coleus Trailing Queen, extra fine stock, 2^4- 
In., $3.00 per 100. Cash. 
Wheat & Shelnutt. Inc., Columbus, Ga. 

Coleus, rooted cuttings, 12 bright colors, also 
Trailing Queen, $1.25, postpaid. 
Quaker Hill Greenhouses, Sebring, 0. 

Coleui, 8 varieties, rooted cuttings, $1.60 per 
100; 214-ln., $3.00 per 100. 

Charles Sherwood, Waterloo, la. 

Coleus, good mixed variety, strong plants, 
21^-in., $2.76 per 100. Cash. 
W. A. Ballou. Wheaton, 111. 

Coleus. 10 varieties, standard and fancy mixed, 
2% -In., $3.00 per 100; rooted cuttings, $1.26 per 
100. B. G . Go ltz , Bell evu e, 0. 

Coleus, in 10 varieties, good assortment, rooted 
cuttings, $1.25 per 100, $10.00 per 1000. 

Grohma n the Florist, Saginaw. Mich. 

Coleus, good mixture, 2^-in., 4c. Cash. 

Joseph Tnrskl. Gross Point. Til. 

Coleus, 10 named varieties, all clean stock, 
rooted cuttings., $1.25 per 100; 2%-ln.. $4.00 per 
100. Cash wi t h order. H. A. Cook, Oberlin, O. 

Coleus, mixed. 2%-in.. $3.00 per 100; rooted 
cuttings, $1.00 per 100. Trailing Queen, both 
colors. Wm. J. Beck, New Castle. Pa. 

Coleus, good, strong rooted cuttings, $10.00 
per 1000. Cash with order. 
White's Greenhou ses, North Manchester, Ind. 

Coleus. 10 Tarietles, rooted cuttings, $1.25 
per 100, $11.00 per 1000, postpaid; 2-ln.. 2Hc. 
Cash. Harglerode Bros.. Shlppensbnrg, Pa. 

Coleus. bright colors; 3-in.. 5c each. 

De Meester, Florist. Humboldt. la. 

Large Leaf Coleus, seedlings, 50c per 100, $4.60 
per 1000; 2Vt-ln., 3V2C. L. J. Rowe. TitusviUe, Pa. 

Coleus, rooted cuttings, $1.60 per 100, $12.00 
per 1000, prepaid. S. D. Brant, Clay Center, Kan. 

Oolens, 10 kinds, rooted cuttings, $1.26 per 
100. Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersbnrg. Pa. 

'_ _ COREOPSIS _ 

Coreopsis Lanceolata, large bushy plants. 2%- 
in. pots, $7.00 per 100 Geo. MacArthur. 3009 
4th Avenue Sout h. Minneapolis. Minn. 

Coreopsis Lanceolata, strong field-grown stock 
at $6.00 per 100. 

Jose ph F. Martin Nurseries, PalneBviUe, 0. 

COREOPSIS LANCEOLATA GRANDIFLORA. 

Choice field-grown plants, $6.00 per 100. 

T HE WAYSIDE GARDENS CO., MENTOR, . 

Coreopsis Lanceolata Grandlfiora, strong, will 
bloom this summer, $4.00 per 100, 
Lakewood Greenhouse, Walbrldge. 0. 

Coreopsis Lancelata Grandlfiora, 60c per doz., 
$4.00 per 100. 

The Schmidt Sc Botley Co.. Springfield. O. 

Coreopsis Lanceolata, strong field-grown, $6.00 
per 100. Thomas Murphy, I'ainesville, O. 

Coreopsis Lanceolata, field-grown plants, $5.00 
per 100. Highland Park Nursery, Sterling, III. 

^^~ CUPHEAS " 

STRONG ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Cupbeas, $1.00 per 100. 

Cksh. 

BUTTON BROS., LAKE GENEVA. WIS. 

CUPHEAS. 
2>4-ln., $3.50 per 100. 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

Cuphea Plat.vcentra (Cigar plant), 60c per 
doz., $4.00 per 100. 
The Schmidt & Rotley Co., Springfield. O. 

Cupheas, rooted cuttings. $1.00 per 100; 2-ln., 
$3.00 per 100. Cash. 
Byer Bros., Ohamberabnrg. Pa. 

EXTRA STRONG PLANTS. 

Cupbeas, 2%-ln., $4.00 per 100. 

THE REESER PLANT CO., SPRINGFIBIJ). O, 



Cupbeas, rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100. iMst- 
paid; 2-ln., 2V6c each. Cash. 
Harglerode Bros., ShippenBbnrg. Pa. 

Cupheas, 2-in.. $2.00 per 100. Gash, please. 
He nry G . Norton, Perry, 0. 

Cupheas, 2^ -In., $4.00 per 100. ' 

Charles Sherwood, Waterloo. la, 

CYCl-AMEN 



CYCLAMEN, TRANSPI^ANTED SEEDLINGS 



In the best commercial shades, 

consisting of white, white with pink eye. 

Hose of Marlenthal, lavender. 

Cherry red, Christmas red. 

dark salmon, light salmon 

and Daybreak. 

Last year we shipped 25,000 plants 

and never had a complaint. 

This year our stock 

being exceptionally fine, 

vou must expect 

to get tile best on the market, 

?.').50 per 100, $.')0.00 per 1000. 

Cash. 

No charge for packing. 



C. L HUMPHREY, ZANESVILLB. 0, 



Cvclamen plants, Fischer's strain, leading va 
rieties, strong 2V4 In,. 12c. Cash. 

Joseph Tiirski. Gross Point, 111. 



178 



The Rorists' Review 



Mav 4, 1922 



CYOLAMKN-Continued 



OYOLAHBN SBEDLINOS. 

In offeiing our block of 800,000 

TRANSPLANTED OYCLl&MBN SBEDLINOS 

to the trade, we 

can empbaticallj recommend them as 

a superior grade of plants, in as much 

■8 we hETe specialized on OYCLAMBN 

for years, and are constantly ImproT- 
Ing our atraln and methods of growing. 

Through the use of a specially 

prepared compost, we hare produced wonderful 

root action and a fine foliage. In 

fact we have never bad a finer lot of 

seedlings of the very best known Tarleties. 

We established a new record with our 

OTCLAMEN plants last fall when we 

shipped them in full carload lota to 

the East. 

Remember — Our plants have no trace 
or sign of the mite or any other 
diseases CYCLAMEN are subject to. 



Orders booked in rotation, 
guaranteed. 



Satisfaction 



$6. BO per 100, <50.00 per 1000. 

CYCLAMEN PLANTS. 

SUPERIOR STOCK NOW READY. 

2%-ln. plants... $12.00 per 100. $100.00 per 1000 

8-ln. plants $15.00 per 100, $125.00 per 1000 

Packing at cost, 250 at the 1000 rate. 

ZETLITZ FLORAL PRODUCTS CO.. 
Cyclamen Specialists, Dayton, O. 



CYCLAMEN PLANTS GROWN FROM L. & W. 
and other best strains of American-grown seed 

In the following colors: 
Dark Christmas Red, Salmon Glory of Wanda- 
Bright Red, hek. 
Rose Dark Eye, American Reauty, 
Rose Mnrienthal. pink, IMire White. 
White with carmine 
eye. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

211-in. pals $l'.'.On $110.00 

l"..-in. iMits l.'i.tH) MO.Of* 

3-in. rots 18.00 

.Sin. {.ots. selected 122.00 

.S'i-iii. puts, selected .'t.'i.OO 

4-in. pots, ready June 1 40.00 

4-in. pots, extra select, ready 

June 1 BO.OO 

Add 5 per cent for packing. If Salmon alone 
is ordered add 10 per cent to the above prices. 
CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS, STRONG, 
TRANSPf..ANTBD. 

5 to 8 leaves $8.50 per 100. $75.00 per 1000 

In best varieties; best strain. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 

43 W. 18th St.. New York. N. Y. 

CYCLAMEN SEED. 

New crop for July and later delivery. 

A No. 1 seed from the best German specialist 

One who grows for quality instead of quantity. 

This is A No. 1, or largest size seed; not 

mixed sizes as it comes from tlie plant; tliere 

fore gives practically 100 per cent germination} 

also gives quicker and stronger seedlings and 

THE KIND I RTTY TO GROW MYSELF. 
Dark blond red, bright red, bright rose (Ma- 
rlenthal). $12.00 per 1000. Light and dark 
salmon and Snow Queen, at $15.00 per 1000. 

Ijet's liavc your order now for next season's re- 
quirements. 

WINFIELD S. KIRCIIER. 
Cyclamen Specialist. Defiance. O. 

CYCLAMEN. 

We are now l>o<i);in(; orders for M:iv or Inter 
delivery out of 2'4-ln.. $12.00 per 100. $100.00 
per 1000; out of 3 in., $17.50 per 100. $160.00 per 
1000. 

Strong transplanted seedlings for immediate 
delivery, $6.00 per lOO, $50.00 per 1000. 

Our Cyclamen are grown from tiie best German 
seed obtainable. 

Rose von Zehlendorf, Perle von Zehlendorf. 
Rose of Marienthal, Wonder of Wandsl)ek. Glow- 
ing Red and Rlood Red. 

If you want plants shipped in paper pots add 
$4.50 per 1000 on 2K-ln. and $7.00 per 1000 on 
3-ln. 

SCHMIDT & MEINE. YOUNQSTOWN. 0. 

CYCLAMEN! ^YCLAMENil " 



Wandsbek Salmon, 
Salmon Cerise. 
Rose }f Marienthal, 
Pride of Cincinnati. 
Bright Red. 
Wine Red, 
Defiance, 



Dark Salmon, 
Dark Blood Red, 
Christmas Cheer. 
Giganteum Ijavcnder. 
Da V break. 
White. Pink Eye, 
Pure White, 



Seedlings, $5.50 per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 

2'4-in $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000 

8-in 15.00 per 100. 125.00 per 1000 

A. L. RANDALL CO.. 
180 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, HI. 

Cyclamen, good, strong, healthy plants. 2V4-in., 
$12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000. 

Cyclamen seedlings, 2 to 4 leaves, $6.00 per 
100, $.50.00 per 1000. J. F. Wilcox A Sons. 
Wholesale Dept., 1132 E. Pierce St.. Council 
Bltiffa, la. 



CYCLAMEN, SEPARATE COLORS. 
200 Pink and White, 240 Dark Salmon, 
20(J Bright Bed Pink, U'M Bright Blood Red. 
250 Pure White, 200 Erecta, 

200 Wliite with Car- 450 Defiance. Ciirlstmas 
mine Eye, Red. 

.\bout one-luiif of these are good 2M!-in., the 
remainder strung seedlings, and extra fine. $4.00 
IKT 100 as tlicy run; $75.00 for the entire lot. 

Good mixture, August-sown; worth the money; 
expressed well packed. Cash with order. 
OZARK PA NSY GARDENS, WEST PLAINS, MO. 

CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS. 

Transplanted from best German and Peterson 
strains, from 3 to 5 leaves in Cherry Red, Wands- 
bek, Roseum, White with Eye. Loreley. Perle of 
Zehlendorf. Salmoneum and Pure White, $5.Q0 
per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 

Stock is strong, clean and packed right. Cash, 
please. 

BOUND BROOK GREENHOUSES, 
Bound Brook. N. J. 

CYCLAMEN. 
Ferd. Fischer's strains for immediate delivery 
In assorted colors. 

Strong, twice transplanted seedlings ready for 
.■?-iM.. $7.00 per 100. 

Strong 3-ln.. $15.00 per 100. 
No charge for packing. Cash, please. 
CHAS. WARNCKE GREENHOUSE. 
9171 W. Fort St., Detroit, Mich. 

30.000 CYCLAMEN, 
in the following varietiea: 
Wandsbek, Pink Pearl, Glowing Red. Puro 
White. Rose of Marienthal, Perle von Zehlen- 
dorf, Rose von Zehlendorf, etc., fine bushy plants 
in ;^ in. pots, ready for delivery, ail varieties, 
.■t:l.">.00 per 100. 

WALTER ARMACOST & CO., 
321 East 4th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

' CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS. 

Orders booked now for early shipment of 
extra strong, bushy, transplanted Cyclamen seed- 
lings. These are A No. 1 stock; should be seen 
to be appreciated; from Peterson's and Fischer'a 
celebrated strains. Best money can buy. Orders 
filled In rotation. $7.00 per 100, $60.00 per 1000; 
250 at 100 rate. 

J. W. DAVIS CO., TERRE HAUTE. IND. 

OYCIxAMEN CARMINE SALMONEUM 
Was the best Christmas seller. Now booking 
the new crop seed for August delivery at $15. OO 
per 1000. Our Cyclamen won first honors at 
the big European shows. We sell many of the 
leading growers in the country. Send for com- 
plete list of many varieties. 

F. RYNVELD & SONS, 
61 Vesey St., New York, N. T. 

CYCLAMEN PLANTS. 

Genuine Fischer strain. 

Best colors. 

Stronp 2''i-in $1.j.00 per lOn 

Slron;; ;{ in 22.50 per 100 

Unusually fine plants. 

Prompt shipment. 

AMERICAN BULB CO.. 

172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago. III. 

QUALITY CYCLAME N . 
We offer now for immediate shipment, 75,000 
of the finest Cycmmen plants ever seen, out of 
2'/4-in. pots, $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000, 
Best commercial colors. If Salmon alone is 
ordered add 10 per cent to above prices. Shipped 
in paper pots. 

AURORA GREENHOUSE CO., 
Aurora, III. 
CYCLAMEN , 2 V4-INCH. 
Strong, extra heavy 214-ln. Cyclamen ready foi 
8-ln., in all the best shades: 100 per cent salmon 
shades If desired; this stock is selected and all 
of uniform size; free from disease; $10.00 per 
100. Packing free. Cash with order. 
B. L. GIBBS A SON CO., CUMB ERLAND. MP. 
CYrL.XMEX. 
Strong 2'', -in. reaiiv for shift, .$12.00 per 100. 
Kiselier's stniin: Light red, dark red. light 
salmon, dark salmon, mse :ind reii eye. It pays 
to buv early. 

GILLETT & SONS. LINCOLN. ILL. 



ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

Seventh Edition. 

You cannot afford to be without it. 

$1.25 per copy, postpaid. 

$12.00 per doz., postpaid. 

Florists' Pub. Co.. Caxton BIdg.. Chicago. 

' CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS. ' 

Extra strong, healthy plants, 3 to 8 leaves: 

of the best German and American strains; 6 

separate colors, twice transplanted, $4.25 per 

100, $40.00 per 1000. 

N. KIGER. MARIETTA, O. 
Cyclamen, separate colors or mixed, strong 

transplanted seedlings, .$7.00 per 100, $60.00 per 

1000; 2'i-in., $11.00 per 100. $100.00 per 1000; 

2."n or more at 1000 rate. S. S. Skideiskv & Co.. 

Dodge Hldg., .5.3 Par k Place. New York. N. Y. 

CYCLAMEN, SALMON AND ROSE. 

Strong transplanted seedlings $ 4.00 per 100 

2V'-ln., well rooted, fine stock 10.00 per 100 

PETER SCHILT. 

1200 Wesley Ave., Evanston, 111 . 

Cyclamen plants, ready by the end of April 
and May 1; very finest strain of salmon; best 
deep pink anl red; no white or poor pink in this 
lot, 2^-ln., $12,00 per 100. $100.00 per 1000. 

Cash. Dixon Floral Co.. Dixon, 111. 

CHOICE CYCLAMEN SEEDSl 

Holland grown, best German strain. 

Write for prices to 

BADER ft CO., SASSBNHEIM, HOLLAND, 

or care of R. F. Lang. 82 Broad St., New York. 



CYCLAMEN. 
A grand lot of 2^-ln. plants ready for shift, 
$10.00 per 100, $90.00 per 1000. 

Ferd Fischer's seed. 
CARL HAQENBUR GER. WE ST MEN TO R, O. 
Cyclamen. Fischer's separate colors; 2Vi-in. 
ready for 8-ln., $10.00 per 100, $90.00 per 1000. 
Sunset Hill Greenhouses, Box 7.j, Leavenworth, 
Kan. 

Cyclamen, good, strong, fine 2V4-ln. plants 
ready to repot, pinks, reds and salmons, $10.00 
per 100; no white. Cash with order, please. 
The Winchester Greenhouses, Winchester. Ky. 

Cyclamen, twice transplanted, extra strong, 
7c, Cash, Hammerscbmldt & Clark, Medina, 0. 

CYPBRUS 

Cyperus Alternifollua, 7Bc per doz., $5.00 per 
too. The Schmidt A Botley Co.. Springfield, 0. 

DAHLIAS 

DAHLIAS, DESIRABLE KINDS. 

For fiorlsts' use we recommend the following 
guaranteed, good cut flower sorts in our locality: 

Each Per doz. 
Lavender Queen, new. Decorative 

Peony, light lavender $0.50 $ S.OO 

Fireworks, Hybrid Cactus, novelty 

yellow, carmine. large 30 3.B0 

Qroenekan, Decorative, extra large. 

dark wine color, long stems 50 B.OO 

Vesuvius, Hybrid Cactus, dark red, 

long stem 25 2.60 

Doz. Per 100 
Vesuvius, Hybrid Cactus, dark red, 

long atem $2.50 $20.00 

H. J. Lovlnk, Peony, lilac and 

white, large fiowers 2.50 20.00 

DIemant Van Bystein. Peony, light 

lavender 1.75 14.00 

Golden Gate, Colossal, Cactus, large 

yellow and bronze 2.00 17.00 

Yellow Le Colosse, Colossal Decora- 
tive, large yellow 2.00 17.00 

Flora, Hybrid Cactus, large white. 

Chrysanthemum shaped 2.50 20.00 

Princess Juliana, Peony Decorative, 

white 1.50 10.00 

Le Grand Manltou. Decorative, violet 

purple and white 1.50 10.00 

Caleb Powers, Massive Ball, day- 
break pink 1.50 10.00 

American Beauty, Decorative, cerise 

pink 1.50 10.00 

Alice Roosevelt, Decorative, white 

and lavender 1.50 10.00 

Manhatten Beauty, Novelty Ball, 

yellow, splashed red 1.00 8.00 

Progress, Decorative, lavender and 

carmine rose 1.25 10.00 

Bird of Passage, Fancy Ball, white, 

carmine shading 1.00 8.00 

Fire King. Decorative, cardinal red. l.OO 7. BO 
LIbelle, Cactus, lavender, very good 1.00 6. BO 

Something special, all named varieties In dif- 
ferent types and colors In 100 lots: 

5 different colors $ 4.00 per 100 

10 different colors 5.00 per 100 

15 different colors 6.00 per 100 

20 different colors 10.00 per 100 

Cash. 
BRBCKSVILLB DAHLIA FARM, 

Brecksvllle. O. . 

DAHLIAS TRUE TO NAMi:. 
Countess of I>insdale, Cactus. pink.*1i! 00 per 100 
(lolden (Jnte. ('.'lelus, golden yel!,.\v; 

large M 00 i)or lOO 

Cr.iiid Dulie .\lexis, Slii>\v, white; 

l;irKe 1-J.oo |.er lOO 

I'erle lie I.von llyliriil. ltcinnitivi>. 

wliite 10. oO per 100 

Kl(l..ni(lo. I)e<'onilive. yel|..w: l.ir-'.- !t,iH> |.er 100 
Drr'cr's White, Show, white: v.mv 

liirye iL'.iHt pi'r 100 

Clirrnnl liruton. Decorative, yelinw: 

1,-irge 7.110 per 1011 

M.iiicle .\iliinis. Sliow. while tiii 

|iini<. new •-'.'. 00 per 100 

I'rineess Victoria. Slmw. yi-How; 

tine 0.00 per 100 

.\. I). I.ivoni. Show, pink T.Oii jier lOO 

Win. .Vt'new. Decorative, searlel.. T.iH» per 11K» 
Itonny Itlne, Slmw. liMie: new.... 1 l.iHi iier lOo 
City of I'ainesville. IieciM i ive. 

\vhile laviMider: rare Ilnoi-ach 

l':itric k llenrv. Decdrative. white: 

liirge 7,00 per 100 

J.ick liose. Di'icinilive. criin-iiii; 

huge .".OO per KXl 

liiwiiie. CMitns, wliite; iiirg^' I'J.Oii per IIMI 

Sylviii, l)e^l^r.•ltive, pink, wliit.^ .,,, .'iiOperlOO 
(;iistave Dii.-izon, llecoralive, siMrl>'t NOO per 1("l 

Klor.i, Ciielus. wliite: larg" 11,00 per 100 

Storm King. Sliow. while >i 00 per 100 

Queen \iitoria. Show, yellow TOO per 100 

King of .\iitiiniii. 1) r.-itive. pint;, 

overl.-iiil old gold; verv large, v.tv 

free .S.-.0() per 100 

W. W. U:iws(in, Sliow. wliite tip 

l.lue 12. .'0 |>or 100 

KIciradorii. t'aeliis. wine crimson., s "ii per Iflo 
Yellow Duke, Decora tivi'. yellow: 

large •< 00 per 100 

Mrs. Cordon. Penny, wliiir; r.ire. 20 110 per lOO 
Laura liiirnes, I'ecjny, orange red: 

nire 2." i1<> per 100 

Little Bessie. Pompon, white S 00 per UNI 

Little Jennie. Ponipon. yellow * ito per 100 

.Snow (lad. I'oinpon. while >< OO per 100 

We liave the liest cut tlower varieties. i'l 
of one kind at 100 rates. Cisli. please. 
PERRY (;.\KDENS. R.WKXNA. O. 

Dahlias, strong ilivisions. . leii.-e named va- 
rieties, mixed, $2. .'JO per 100. f.-yi OO tier 1000, 
rash, H, E, Cliriswell. "(;iad:ifres" Flower 
Farm. Wanakah, Hamburg P. . N. Y. 



1 ^•■.■" 



May 4, litl'l' 



The Rorists' Review 



179 



HAHMAS— FIB;LI) GROWN DIVIDED BOOTS. 
Qimiitlty Varlctv Per 10 Per 100 

260 Prof. Mansfleld, Decorative, 

yellow, white tips $1.25 $7.00 

.'lOO Red HuKSur, Show, pure car- 
dinal red 1.00 6.00 

300 Rose-pink Century, single, 

rose-pink flowers ] .00 6.00 

300 Sylvia or Dolly, Decorative, 

lavender 1 .00 0.00 

225 Yellow Duke, Decorative. 

primrose-yellow 1.00 0.00 

1000 A. D. Livonl, Show, soft 

pink 1. 00 0.00 

l.'iO Klack Diamond, Show, al- 
most black 1 .00 O.on 

150 Emily, Show, ver.v large, 

Solferino, white markings... 1.00 0.00 

200 I^a Riante, Peony-flowered, 

deep lavender-pink 1.00 6.00 

THE CONARD & JONES (^O., 

Robert Pyle, I'res., Antoine Wintzer, Vice-Pros., 

West (Jrove, Pa. 

COLOItADO (iUOW.N DAlTl.IAS. 

Attraction, IjP (i. Lilas, Uutli McIidIms anil 
Xaiad, $40.00 per 100. 

Mrs. JelTries, Isa and Hortnlanus Wilte, $22. .">0 
per 100. 

Queen Mnry, Mina Rurgle, Golden Hedder, 
W. W. Rawson, H, V. HeemesliMle, Thi' Rose, 
('has. riavton. Ilcrtha Hernstein, Dec Ijigliled, 
Queen Wilhclniiiui and Mrs. il. Wirth, $12.00 
per 100. 

Robt. Rroomfleld, A. D. I<ivoni, l'nrpl(> (Jem, 
Jack Rose, Mary I'ickford, .Mrs. ll.irt(jng. Syl- 
via, Hon Ton, Maid of Kent ami .Mrs. J'ui-ner. 
ifS.OO per 100. Sec Hollyhock ad. 
("ash, please. 

R. T. DAVIS, JR., WIlEATKllXiE, COl.O. 

Dahlias, money makers for florists; STRONG 
DIVISIONS: Daybreak, Uvndhurst. I-izzie Mc- 
Cullough, scarlet-gold; Sylvia, Jack Rose, Perl- 
huhn, Yellow Duke, $4.00 per 100. Cuban Giant, 
Crimson I^e Colosse, Countess of Lonsdale, (»us- 
tave de Doazon, Harry Patrick, Hampton Court, 
pink; Livoni, Kriemhilde, $7.00 per 100. Dream. 
Dorothy Peacock, Jack's Discovery, white and 
violet; Princess Juliana, Paul Bonyon, salmon- 
pink; Progress, Lavender, Mina Rurgle, Rhein- 
konlg, Golden Gate, Le Grand Mauitou, $10.00 
per 100. All colors mixed, $3.50 per 100. Cash. 
Imperial Seed & Plant Co., Colgate, Baltimore, 
Md. 

KIEIJ)-G R7)W>n>IVISI0Nsl 

All there is to it. Send thcni back, if vou 
iliin't like tlieni. Per 100 Per I'OOO 

Mixed, all colors $4.00 $35.00 

Jack Rose 6.00 55.00 

.NtniMg for counter trade, no giants. Liglit for 
niiill oriler trade. 

State wliich yon want 
and speak tjuick at these prices. 

GTtKKN HILL GARDENS, 
(11(1") Crccn Hill Parkway, Worcester, ^Mass. 

T).ihli:is: Very special: wliilc ll'.cv last: 800 
dark velvet red; long, stiff stems, line for cut- 
ting. l',{.c; assorted, labeled as to color, but not 
named, 2''l>c. 

A limited sujiply of the following well known 
kinds: J.-n-k Rose. l\r: Princess X'ictnria, Ainer- 
ii-.in Heauly, (!c; Drccr's White. Vivi.in. Dciice, 
liornthy I'cMcock. .lane ()lcsl:i;iei* an<l Princess 
Juli.'ina. .Sc. Evi'ry lubcr sine to grow. Satis- 
faction gu.ir.'intced or vour nioncv back. Mrs. 
E. W. Stillev, M(H» .IctTerson .\vi., Johnston 
City, 111. 

DAHLIAS. 

White Century, Souvenir de 

Gustave Doazon, Edith, $2.50; 

Arabella, $2.00: Countess of 

Lonsdale, Stability, $3.50; 

America, $5.00 per doz. clumps. 

HARRY FRANKLIN RAKER. 
1118 W. Lake St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

DAHT,IAS. FIELD-GROWN 

DIVISION IN BEST CONDITION. 

Choice cut-flower varieties, $3.00 per 100 and 

up; Dellce, $11.00; Baron O. De Grancy, $11.00; 

Mina Burgle, $9.00; Springfield, the Improved 

Lonsdale, $15.00 per 100, 25 at 100 rate. 

If Interested in something beyond the ordinary 
for cutting, send for catalogue listing 81 varletlei. 

MISSOURI DAHLIA FARM, 
Wellston Statio n, Route 29, St. Louis, Mo. 

DAHLIA SVI,VI~V 
White, edged with jtink. 
A splendid variety for the Horist. blooms more 
in a week th.in some kinds do .'ill soninier, 
good divisions, $,"i.Oii per loO. 
Can send an assortment of other good va- 
rieties at same jirii'e. 

II. <;. WAI-KER. 
312 W. Cliestnut St. . I^iuisville. Ky. 

MONEY-BACK DAHLIAS!! 

Send us $10.00 and we will send you 

200 pink and white Dahlia tubers. 

You grow these, use the bloom and 

If not satisfied, we will return your 

money for them next fall. Many 

other sorts at lowest prices. 

INDIANA DAHLIA FARM, 

New Albany, Ind. 



Dahlias: We are strong on commercial cut- 
flower varieties; fancy and common kinds at rea- 
sonable prices. 

If Interested, please send for wholesale de- 
scriptive list. Mannetto Hill Nurseries, Inc., 
Hlcksville, L. I., N. Y. 



DAHLIAS, BEST CUT FLOWER VARIETIES. 

Sylvia, J. H. Jackson, 

A. D. LlToni. Jack Rose, 

Golden Gate, Lyndhurst, 

Yellow Duke, Storm King, 

Blue Oban, Perle de Lyon. 

StroDtr divisions, $5.00 per 100. 

W. 0. WEISS, 

R. F. D. 2. Box 42, Portsmouth. Y«. 

DAHLIAS, GOOD DIVISIONS. 
Doazon, $4.00; Sylvia, $4.50; Jamaica, Cather- 
ine Duer, $5.00; Autumn Queen, Morroco, D., 
$0.0(1; Emily, $7.00; Little Koerner, P., $6.00; 
Koerner's White. $6.00. 

WM. STABELFELDT & CO., 
P. 0. Station C, Route No. 6, Milwaukee, Wis. 

DAHLIAS FOR CUT FLOWERS. 

Jack Rose, Sylvia, Mrs. J. G. Cassatt, Red 

Hussar, Miss Minnie McCullough and Nymphae, 

In strong divisions from field clumps, $4.00 per 

100. Also a few thousand undivided field clumps. 

MARK W. SIMON & SON. 
Box 11. Berl in, N. J. 

Dahlias, surplus stock, $4.00 per 100; $3.50 
per 100 for 300 or more, of 25 to 100, of the fol- 
lowing varieties: Earl of Pembroke, Zulu, Mrs. 
Charles Turner, Lady Edith Thornhill, Stradella, 
Easton, Puritan, C. W. Bruton. Maid of Athens 
and others. Mrs. Howard Holsinger, Dahlia Spe- 
cialist, Denton, Md. 

CUT FLOWER GROWERS ATTENTION. 

Write us for special price on 

MRS. CARL SALBACK, 

In 25 and 100 lots. 

KEY ROUTE HEIGHTS NURSERY CO.. 

3852 Loma Vista Ave., Oakland. Cal. 

" i)AlTl7lA GOLDEN GATE. 

200 large undivided clumps. $25,00 iicr KM). 
Each clnmp will make from 5 to 10 divisions. 

Packing free. 
WVCKOFK FLORAL CO.. CHAGRIN FALLS. O. 

DAHLIAS, CLEAN, WELL CUT STOCK. 
Send your list of Dahlia wants and I will 
quote special prices. I have a large stock of 
select sorts and I want your business. 
JOHN MERRITT, FARMINGDALE, L. I.. N. Y. 

Dahlia roots, strong divisions. Millionaire, 
$1.00: La Favorite, Breeze Lawn, 50c; Maud 
Adams, 35e; Marathon, 30c. (^ash. .John Del- 
nay, care Soldiers' Home. Grand Rapid.s. Mich. 

Dahlias: Write for our list, you will find It 
worth while. S. S. Skidelsky & Co., Dodge Bldg., 
.".;! Park Place, New York. 

Dahlias, mixed, $4.00 per 100. 

H. H. Windhorst, Flori st, Seymour, Ind. 

DAISIES 

DAISIES! DAISIES!! 

Per 100 Per lOnO 

Boston Yellow, 2'4-in. pots $7.00 $60.00 

Single White, 214 in. pots G.OO 50.00 

Single White, Mrs. Sander, rooted 

cuttings 3.00 25.00 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
4 3 W. 18th St., New York, N. Y. 

Boston Yellow Daisy, rooted 



SIIAS'IA D.VISY. 

strong, field-grown plants that will Mooni soon. 

.$,'1,011 per IIM). 

H. (J. WALKER, 
312 W. Chestnut St., I>onisville, Ky. 

Daisy Marguerite, extra fine stock, white, 
2V2-ln. pots, $5.00; 3-in. pots, $8.00; yellow, 
2%-ln. pots, $8.00; 3-ln. pots, $10.00. I'acking 
free with cash. 

La Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wis. 

' margTi^rites, Y^ELLOW 

Extra heavy 3-in $0.00 per 100 

Packing at cost. 

WALTER ARMACOST & CO 

321 East 4th St.. L)S Angeles, Cal. 

Bellis Daisies, I»ngfellow and Snowball, 
strong, stocky plants, $3.00 per 1000, 500 at 
1000 rate; fine, bushy plants, fall transplanted. 
In bud and bloom. $2.00 per 100. 

Oustav PItzonka, Pansy Farm, Bristol. Pa. 

DAISIES. SANDF^l AN D PARI S^ 



-in.. $.->.(lO iK>r 100. Paris, 



:<i 



blooni. 20c: .5 in., in bhumi. 40c and 5(tc. 

GILLETT & SONS, LINCOLN. ILL. 

Sli.ista Daisy .\laska. extra strong seedlings. 
4 to .-, ins. high, $1.00 per 100: field clnnips, Sc 
each. Cash. 

G. E. Berlliold, Nebraska City. Neb. 

Bellls Daisies, fall transplanted, large plants 
in bud, mixed colors, $5.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
Edward Esobrich, R. R. No. 1, North Milwaukee, 
Wla. 

Boston Yellow, strong 2V4-ln.. $7.00 per 100: 
Giant White, 2<4-ln.. $<>."0 per 100. 5 per cent 
for packing. S. S. Skidelsky & Co., Dodge Bldg.. 
5.'^ Park Plnoe, New York. 

HUNT'S IMPROVED WHITE DAISY. 

2H-ln $4.50 per 100 

Good plants. Cash, please. 
BEZDEK GREENHOUSE. CEDAR RAPIDS. lA. 

Daisy Marguerite, white with yellow center, 
strong, rooted cuttings, $1.50 per 100, 2H-in., 
$4.00 per 100. Cash or c. o. d. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co.. Princeton. 111. 

Daisy Single White, strong 2>4-in.. 4c; 4-ln.. 
20c. Cash. Joseph Turskl. Grosi Point, 111. 



DAISY MARGUERITE. 

Double, 2^-ln., $5.00 per 100; 

Single, 2y4-ln.. $4.00 per 100. 

CHARLES SHERWOOD, WATERLOO. lA^ 

Daisy .Marguerite. 3 in. lim-, linshv slock, $6.00 
per l(J(l: 4-in.. $l(i.(M) |>er 1(H). Cash. 

Joseph Bancroft & Son, Ci'dar Falls, la^ 

While Daisy, r<H)ted cuttings, $1..")() per 100: 
2-in., 3c: .Mrs. Sander, rooted cuttings. $2.(K) per 
IIK). Cash. Ityer Bros., Chaml)ersbnrg, Pa. 

Shasta Daisy, 2'4-ln. pots, $7.00 per 100. Geo. 
MacArthur, 3009 4th Avenue South. Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Daisies, Marguerite, 4-in.. 20<': strong plants 
In bloom, .■) in., 3.")C. Yellow, ."lin.. 3.'ic each. 
Geo. Vntter, Marinette, Wis. 

Daisies, Hardy Marguerite. 5c; Shasta Daisy, 
good, strong, .'ic. 

.\tlantic Greenhouses, Atlantic, la. 

Daisies, in bud and bloom, 3-in., $9.00 per 
100; bushy 5i/j-in., 50c each. 

Lakewood Greenhouse. Walbridge, O. 

I'.cllis llaisv Snowl)all. g<j<)(l, liealtliy stock, 
trajisplantcd seedlings, $:!,00 per UM)0. 

Freeport Floral Co.. Freeport, HI. 

Bellis Daisies, in bud and blooni, strong plants 
must liave a shift, 2'4-in., $3.00 jier 100. Joseph 
-Vustiii. ;i,"jlli and Park Ave., Kansas City , Mo. 
I ).VTS nrs\ SANDEIl~AND~PAR 1 S. 
2i/.i-in., $5,00 per 100: .l-in.. 2.5c and 3r>c. 

(ilLLETT & S ONS. L INCO LN, I LL. 

Daisii's. Jlrs. Sander and Paris, rooted c nl 
tings, $2,0(1 per 100. prepaid. 

S. 1). Brant, Clay Center, K an. 

Shasta Daisy Alaska, strong, undivided, field- 
grown clumps, $5.00 per 100. 

_ II. P. Smith, Box 721, Piqua, 0. _ 

Bellis Daisies, Longfellow, Snowball, strong 
transplanted plants, $3.00 per 100, $18.50 per 
1000. Wm. P. Yeagle, Bristol. Pa. 

Daisy Marguerite, 214-in., $3.50 per 100: 3-in., 
$0.00 per 100. Cash. Anderson Floral Co., 515 
John St,, Anderson, Ind. 

Daisy Marguerite, tiest single white, 2 '/4-in., 
$5.00 per 100; 4-in., $15.00. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids. Mich. 

Daisies, Paris, white; Mrs. Sander and Giant 
White, strong rooted cuttings, $1,75 per 100. by 
mail. S. W. Pike. St. Charles. 111. 

Shasta D.iisv, GOc per doz,, $4.50 per lOU, 
$40.00 per 1000. 
_ The_SchmldJ & Botley Co.^ Springfield. 0^_ 

Daisy I)<iiible .'Zander, 4-iii.. $12. .")0 pc-r loO. 
llaase Bros.. I'ekln. HI. 

Daisy Mrs. Sander, rcKited cuttings. 1 ',Ac pre- 
paid. ('. lliiinfeld. Clay Center, Kan. 

Sliaata Daisies, nice plants, outdoor grown, 
$2.00 per 100. Gray Floral Co., Chick asha , Okla . 

' delp hinFums 

DTLnilNIITMS, 2', -IN, 

licllailonna and I'"oriiio.iinii, 

From roIdfr;inies. in prime roiiditioii. 

$.-..(10 per 10(1, $4."i.00 Tier IIMHI. 

Noi less than (> of any varii'ty of plants 

siipplii'd in our wholesale (lepartnient : under 2."> 

of a varii'ty arc billed at dozen rale: '-'."i and 

over at liunilicil r.-ite. 

I11I-: G(MII» & REESE CO . 

Tlie larj-'cst Rose growers In the World. 

DcpartinenI .\, Springheld, O. 

D'ETrpIIINIUMS; ^ 

Belladonna, light bine; 
111 ll.iniosiini, ilaik liliuv 

Per 100 Per lOOO 

1 vear-old plants $10,00 $80.00 

2-vear-old plants 12,00 100.00 

21,, in. iMiis of I'.ili.iilonna (J.'iO .■.-,. 00 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St.. New York, N. Y. 

DELPHINIUMS. 

Belladonna. 2-yearold $10 00 per 100 

lli'llainiisiini. L'.v.arolil IIP.IMI |,|.|- Kill 

Koniio^iiMi. 1 .M'.ii- old !l. 00 per lull 

Cliinensls, bine, 1-yearold 7.00 per 100 

Chinensis, white. 1-year-old 7.00 per 100 

Choice, field-grown transplanted stock. 
TIIE WAYSIDE (MRDENS CO.. MENTOR. 0. 
Dclphiniiiins. lust Hybrids, mixiil, stioii;.' last 
July seedlings, 'A to ."1 leaves, out in the held 
all viniiT. (iOc per 100, $.'),00 per loOO. Cash 
with order, 

Iio«e Mill Nurseries, New Roclielle, N, Y, 

THE BEST WAY 

to get rid of your surplus stock 

is to use the 

REVIEW'S 

Cla sslfied Advs. 

STRONG PLANTS FROM 2'2 IN. POTS. 

Delphinium Belladonna $10,00 per 100 

Delphinium Gold Medal Hybrids,.. 8.00 per 100 

Delphinium Kelwav's Hybrids 8.00 per 100 

J. T. LOVETT, LITTLE SILVER, N. J. 

Delphinium Belladonna, very strong 2<4-ln. 
stock that will please you and that you will 
cut blooms from this summer, $4,(X) per 100 or 
$35,00 per 1000. Cash with order, 

C. L. Humphrey, ZanesviUe, 0. 

Delpliinimn Belladonna. 2 vear old. $12,00 per 
IIMi. $1iHI,0(l per 1000; 2',4-in,, $11. 00 per 100. 
$."iO,0(» pir 1(K)0. S. .><. Skiilelskv & Co., Dodge 

Hlilg . rr.i I^irk 2'lacc, New_Yi)rk._N._Y; 

25;000~DELPniNHIM BELLADONNA. 

2V4-in., $6,00 per 100, $50,00 per 1000. 

WILLIAM 8WAYNE, 

P. 0. Box T, Kennett Square, Pa. 



\ 



180 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4, 1922 



DELPHINIUMS— Continued 



Delphiniums, Belladonna, Hellamosa and Oold 
Medal Hybrids, strong transplanted plants, $2.2S 
per 100, prepaid. 
a. W. Pllie, at. Charles, 111. 

Delpblniums, Oold Medal Hybrids and Uella- 
donna, $1.00 per 100, $9.00 per 1000. 

Lakewood Greenhouse. Walbrldge, O. 

Delphinium Belladonna seed thoroughly cleaned, 
$2.00 per oz . Th omas J. Murphy, Painesville, 0. 

^^^] DIANTHUS 

IIAUDY SCOTCH PINKS. 

.'> nuuied sorts, 

2%-in. pots, $4.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

Not less than (! of any vuriety of plants 

supplied in our wliolesale department; under 

25 of 11 variety are billed ut dozen rate; 25 and 

over at hundred rate. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO., 

The largest Rose growers in tlie World, 

Department A, Springfield, 0. 

HARDY PINKS, 

Strong plants from 2V4-in. pots. 

Abbotsford, carmine pink, 

Arthur, white, with dark maroon center. 

Her Majesty, large, pure white. 

Plumarlus Nanus Flore Pleno, early-flowering, 

mixed colors. 

All the above, $8.00 per 100. 

J. T. LOYETT, LITTLE SILVER , N. J. 

DIANTHUS CARYOPHTLLUal 

Hardy Carnation Pinks; in sand; 
Remontant, Grenartin, 

Malmaisun, Cliabaiid 

and other varieties separate or mixed, 4-month- 
old scedlinps only. $2.00 per 100, $15.00 per 1000. 
THE WINDMILLER CO., 
Mankato, Minn. 

SWEET WILLIAM8. 
Newport Pink, White Beauty, Scarlet Beauty 
and Dianthus Plumarlus, sweet scented pinks at 
$6.00 per 100; also a good list of other hardy 
plants. Ask for list. 

JOSEPH F. MARTIN NURSERIES, 
P. O. Box No. 97, PalnesTllle. 0. 

Hardy Scotch, or Sweet May Pinks; Abbotts- 
ford, Gertrude, Her Majesty, Laura Wllmer, 76c 
per doz., $S.0O per 100. 

The Schmidt ft Botley Oo., Springfield, O. 

CHOICE FIELD-GROWN PLANTS. 

Sweet Williams, mixed colors. $7.00 per 100. 

THE WAYSIDE QARDEN8 CO., MENTOR. 0. 

Hardy Pinks, Essex Witch, 2%-in., $4.60 per 
100; Her Majesty, 2% -In., $5.00 per 100. 
The McGregor Bros. Co., Springfield, O. 

Sweet William, good strong plants, $2.00 per 
100. Gray Floral Co., Chickasha. Okla. 

DIQITALIS ~ 

Digitalis, 90c per doz., $6.00 per 100. 

The Schmidt & Botley Co., Springfield, 0. 



DRACAENAS 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. 

Per 100 
3-in. 10 to 15 leaves, 15 to 20 Ins. high. . .$10.00 
21^-iD. 6 to 10 leaves, 12 to 15 ins. high.... 5.00 

2^-in. 4 to 6 leaves, 8 to 10 ins. high 4.00 

All the above are ready for a shift. 

Cash, please. 

FROST & SPENCE, 

Dark Co., QreenTille, 0. 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. 

4-in.. 15 to 20 loaves $ 15.00 per 100 

4%-In.. 20 to 30 loaves 35.00 per 100 

6-in.. 20 to 30 loaves 75.00 per 100 

C in., 30 to 40 loaves 100.00 per 100 

All pot bound; fine condition. 
FRANK B. SMITH'S .SONS, 
Danville, III. 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. 

Extra fine plants at these prices 
while they last. 

Per 100 Por 1000 

3-in $6.00 $50.00 

4-in 15.00 140.00 

BAUSCHER BROS., 
20 S. Chicag o Ave., Freeport, III. 

DRACAENA INDIvTsX " 

Strong, healthy plants, must be shifted at 
once. They will make fine plants for spring 
use. Tou never lx)ught better plants. 
3-in., $7.50 por 100. 
Cash with order. 
The above prices Include careful packing. 
R. S. McMURRAY, BELLEFONTAINE. O. 

EXTRA FINE DRACAENA INDIVISA. 

Sample on request. 

2600 4-ln., 20c each. 

Strong, healthy seedlings, $1.00 per 100. 

No extra charge for packing. 

Cash with order. 

SAYRB FIvORAL CO., SAYRE. PA. 



DRACAENA AUSTRALIS. 
Strong 6-in. stock, $100.00 per 100; 5-in., $60.00 
per 100. Fine plants. 

Indivlsa, 3-in., $10.00 por 100; strong 2M!-in., 
$o.(Mi per 1(K) 

WINFIELD S. KIRCHER. 
Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance. 0. 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. " 

Strong 3-ln. plants $10.00 per 100 

Strong 4-in. plants 18.00 i)er 100 

Cash, ploase. 
THE ASHTABULA FLORAL CO . 
137 Main St., Ashtabula, 0. 

800 Dracaena Indivisa, 6-in., 35c each. 

F. Dornor & Sons Co., Lafayette. Ind. 



DRAOABNAS. STRONG. NEED SHIFTING. 
4-in., 18 to 24 ins. high, 15 to 24 leaves, $17.60 
per 100; 4-in., 24 to 28 ins. high, 25 to 28 leaves, 
$26.00 per 100. 

Cash. No packing charge. 
THE IMLAY CO., ZANESVILLE, 0. 

DBAOABNA INDIVISA. 

4-ln.. height 24 ins $17.60 per 100 

2% -In $4.00 per 100, $86.00 per 1000 

Seedlings 2.00 per 100, 16.00 per 1000 

UNITED STATES CUT FLOWBB CO.. 
Blmlra. N. T. 

Dracaena Indivisa. transplanted seedlings, 
$2.00 per 100; strong 2M-in., $4.00 por 100; 3-ln., 
$10.00 i>er lOO; 4-in., $L'().00 per 100: 5 in., $50.00 
por 100. S. S. Skidelsky & Co., Dodge Bldg., 
53 Park Place, New York, N. Y. 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. 

2Vj in. ready for a shift to 4-in $ 6.00 per 100 

3-in 10.00 per 100 

4-in 18.00 per 100 

H. S. WIECKING, BLUFFTON. IND. 

Dracaena Indivisa, 2i/l-in. pots, $0.00 per 100, 
$.55.00 per 1000; :^-in. pots, $12.00 per 100; 3%- 
in. pots, $17.50 per 100; 4-in. pots, $25.00 per 
100: 5-in. pots, $50.00 per 100. Roman J. 
I rwin, 43 W. 18th St., New York. N. Y . 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. 

As good or better than we had Inst vear. 

Fine 4-in.. 2.'')c; 5-in., 50c; 6-in., COc each. 

F. C. FREEMAN & .SONS, PORTLAND, IND. 

Dracaena Indivisa, fine, healthy plants ready to 
shift, 15 to 20 inches high, 14 to 18 leaves, 
4-in., 20c. Cash. 

Brinkerhoff Greenhouses, Springfield, 111. 

" DRACAENA INDIVISa" 

Strong plants from 2-in. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

E. RAWLINGS, 

Wholesale Grower, Allegany, N. Y. 

Dracaena Indivlsa, 3-in., $10.00; 3%-in., 
$17.60; 4-ln., $25.00; 5-in., $40.00 and $50.00; 
6-in., $60.00 and $75.00 per 100. 
C. H. Jacobs. Westfield. Mass. 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. 

Strong 3-in.. per 100, $12.00. 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 

172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Dracaena Indivisa, strong, healthy stock need- 
ing shift, 2% -inch. $4.00 per 100; 3-inch, $8.00 
per 100; 4-inch, $22.60 per 100. 
Free port Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

Dracaena Indivisa, 4-in., $25.00 per 100; 6-in., 
$6.00 per doz., $45.00 per 100; extra strong, 
transplanted in September. Cash. 
B. Scheller. Warren. Pa. 

Dracaenas, strong 3-in. ready for 4 in., $10.00 
per 100. Cash. 

Riverside Greenhouses, Appleton. Wis. 

Dracaena Indivisa. strong 3-in., $8.00 per 100. 
S37.50 for ."lOO. J. E. Kallenbach & Sons. R. F. 
D. No. 2 , Erie, Pa. 

" dITaCAENAS, HEAVY STOCK^ ' 

2'4-in.. .5c; 3-in., 10c; 4-in., 20c. 
GULLETT & SONS. LINCOLN, ILL. 

Dracaena Indivisa, 16 to 18 ins. high, 10 leaves, 
strong, out of 2J4-in. pots, $3.50 per 100. 

H^B. Rogers & Son. Spencerport, N. T. 

Dracaena Indivisa. fine seedlings, 75c per 100, 
$0.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Byer Bros., Chambersburg. Pa. 

Dracaena Indivisa, good, strong plants, ready 
to shift. 3-in.. $10.00 per 100. Cash. E. R. 
Pound. Cedar and Indiana Sts., Newark, O. 

Dracaena Indivisa, fine stock, $f8.00 per 100. 
Packing free. Cash. 
Trultt's Ore en hou ses. Chanute. Kan. 

Dracaena Indivisa, 3-in., i5c; 4-ln., 20c; 5-in., 
40c; 6-in., 00c. Strong. 
^1_I^- Shuniw ay Floral Co., Tiffin, O. 

Dracaena Indivisa, strong 4-in. pots, $20.00 
per 100. Cash with order. 
.\ttica Floral Co.. Attlcn. Tnd 

Dracaenas, strong 3-in.. $8.00 per 1007^-in., 
$3.60 per 100. Cash. 
__ Jacobs Bros., Peoria. III. 

Dracaena Indivisa. fine stock, 2'i4-in., $5.00 
per 100. 

Henry Sm ith Floral Co., Grand Rapids. Mich. 

DRACAENA INDIVTSA: 

Good, strong plants. 4-in.. $20.00 por 100. Oash. 

C. L WRTCKSON. PBTNCRTON TT .T. 

Dracaena Indivisa, ready for 4-ln. and 6-ln. 
pots, $8.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
Ustler Bros.. Apopka. Fla . 

Dracaena Indivlsa, 2U-ln., $4.00 per 100: iVi 
in., $10.00 per 100. 
_ The McGregor Brofi. Co.. Springfield. O 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. 

Strong 8-in $8.00 per 100 

KBTXiY 'S j?RBENHOUSBa. KOKOMO. IND 

Dracaena Indivisa. strong plants, 8-ln., SH-ia^ 
and 4-ln.. lOe, 16c and 20c each. 
3. 0. Steinhanser. Pittsbnrf, Kan. 

Dracaena seedlings, 60c per 100.^14^60^ per 
1000. prepaid: 2H-ln., S^c: 8-1n.. TU,e. 
L. J Ro we. TIt nirrllle. Pn 

Dracaena Indivisa. good 3-in.. JR. 00 por l6o. 
Casli. Green's Greonliouses, Inc.. Fremont. Nob. 

Dracaena Indivisa. 5-in.. $45.00 per 100. 

Charles Sherwood, Waterloo. la. 

Dracaena Indivisa, good, strong 4-ln.. $25.00 
per 100. Atlantic Greenhouses. Atlantic. la. 

Dracaena Indivisa. 2-in.. $5.00 per 100. 
Walnut Hill Oreenhoniea, Independence, Mo. 



ECH EV ERI AS 

Bcheverias. 8-in., 6c; 2-in., 8c. Well eatal>- 
lished. Cash, please. 
Fischer's Greenhouse, Vinton, la. 

~ ERICAS _ _ ~^ZZ. 

ERICA MELANTHERA. 
We offer this popular winter flowing Heather 
from 2-iu. pots at tlie following prices: 

I'er 100 $ 8.00 

Per 1000 70.00 

Per 10,000 600.00 

Quotations on larger quantities on application. 

Tliese will be ready about May 16. 

Prices F. O. B. Pasadena. 

Packing at cost. 

Cash or satisfactory references. 

JANNOCH NURSERIES, 

Pasadena Avenue and Waverly Drive. 

Pasadena, California. 

Erica Melanthera, 15,000, strong 2-ln. pot stock, 
$9.00 per 100, $80.00 per 1000; 10,000 Erica 
Persoluta Rosea, $10.00 per 100, $90.00 per 1000. 
Coolldge Rare Plant Gardens, Box 628 Sta. B., 
Pasadena. Cal. 

Heather Melantheru, choice stock out of 3-in. 
pots, ready for 6 and 6-ln., $35.00 per 100. 
A. L. Miller, Jamaica. N. Y. 

EUPHORBIAS 

EUPHORBIA JACQUINIAEFLOBA. 
2-in. pots, 15c. July delivery. 
THE THOMAS FLORAL CO., 

Thomas, Wash^ 

Euphorbia, or Crown of Thorns, 3-ln., 15c; 
4-ln., 20c; 5-ln., 30c. Extra strong plants. Cash 
with order. H. C. Doeseher, 2048 GentiUy Ave.. 
New Orleans, La^ 

Eupliorbia Splendens, or Crown of Thorns, 
3-in., $1.50 per doz., $10.00 per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuske gee, Ala. 

EVERGREENS 

JDverKreen understocks for grafting conifers, 
complete assortment. Write for prices. The D. 
Hill Nnraery Co.. Box 408, Dundee. III. 

EVERLASTil^^G^~FLO^A/ERS 

Bverlastings, mixed, transplanted, $3.00 per 
100. J. G. Witt & Son, 10428 Wallace St.. 
Chicago. 111. 

' EVONYMUS '^^^Z^ 

20,000 EVONYMUS JAPONICA. 
Field-grown plants, fine for window boxes, 
hedges nnd landscape plantings. 

18 to 24 inches, well branched $50.00 per 100 

12 to 18 inches, well branched 35.00 per 100 

SARVER FLORAL CO., 
3 806 Oakland Ave., Dallas. Tex. 

^^ZZZI^ FERNS 

FERNS! FERNS!! 

Per Per Per 
Quantity Size Each 10 100 1000 

1500 Boston 2V4-in $4.50 $40.00 

25 Boston 5 -in. $0..'iO $4.50 

220 Boston -in. .73 7.00 05.00 

400 Elegantis- 

sima 2'i in 4,50 40.00 

35 Elegantis- 

sima 5 -in. ..50 4.,")0 

10 KooBovelt ...5 -in. ..">(> 4. .^)0 40.00 

100 Roosevelt ...6 -in. .75 7.00 05.00 

400 Scliolzolii ...2V4iu 4.50 40.00 

90 Sciiolzolii ...ft -in. .75 7.00 63 00 

250 Scot til 2V4-in 4.50 40.00 

23 Soottii 5 in. .."lO 4.50 

120 Soottii (i -in. .75 7.00 03.00 

23 Smitliii 3 -in. .30 4.30 

23 Sniithii (J -in. .73 7.00 

100 Smitliii 3 -in. ... 1.00 7. .30 

400 Teddv Jr 2l4-in 8.00 40.00 

CO Teddv Jr 5 -in. .50 4. .50 40.00 

90 Toddy Jr V, in. .73 7.00 63. (H) 

.300 Whitmaiiii ..L"l ill 430 40.00 

100 Whitmanii ..5 -in. .,30 4.30 40.00 

CO Whitmanii ..(•« -in. .73 7.0O fhj.OO 

THE CONAUD & JO.NES CO., 
Rol)ert Pyle, Pros.; Antoine Wintzer. Vice-pres. ; 

We st Grove, Pa . 

FER.NS MY SPECIALTY. 
Ferns for fern dishes: Strong, bushy, 2<4-ln. 
stock, in largest and best assortment, $6.00 per 
100, $60.00 per 1000. 

Kentla Belmoreana, clean, thrifty 2Vi-in. stock, 
right size for center plants, $2.00 per doz.. $15.00 
per 100. 

Fern Seedlings, excellent stock, ready for pot 
ting, in assortment of 8 best fern dish varieties. 
$1.75 per 100, $15.00 per 1000. 

Alsophila Australls (Australian Tree Fern) 
Splendid 3-ln. stock, $2.50 per doz., $20.00 per 
100; 4 in., $6.00 per doz., $40.00 per 100. 

Cibotium Schiedei, the King of Ferns. Strong, 
thrifty 3-in., $8.00 per doz., $65.00 per 100; 4-ln., 
$12.00 per doz.. $95.00 per 100; 5-in.. $24.00 per 
doz.; 6-ln., $3.00; 7-ln., $4.00. Special quotation 
on 100 lots. 

Adiantums, Cuneatum and Graclllimum, strong 
2H-ln. stock, $6.00 per 100. $50.00 per 1000. 

Polypodium Mandaianum, well established 2%- 
in. stock, $1.50 per doz., $10.00 per 100. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong seedlings, $1.00 
per 100, $9.00 per 1000; 2hi-in., $5.00 per 100. 
$45.00 per 1000. 

See Smilax seedling classified ad. 
Illustrated price list mailed upon request. 
J. F. ANDERSON, 
Fern Specialist. Short Hills. N. J 

Boston Ferns, well-grown stock, to make room, 
0-in.. (iOo and 75c; 7-in., 75c and $1.00; 8-in., 
$1.'23 anil $1 .30 No charge for packing. 

A. 0. Oelscblg & Sons, Savanah, Ga. 



If 



JlAV 4, 1S)1'2 



The Florists^ Review 



181 



FERNS, BEADY NOW. 
Boston, Roosevelt, Teddy Jr., Verona and 
Whitmanii. 2'4-in. pots, $6.50 per 100, $55.00 
per 1000; Dwarf Boston, $8.00 per 100, $75.00 
per 1000; Elegantissiinu. $8.00 per 100; New 
Macawil, $7.00 per 100, $66.00 per 1000; Bird's 
Nest Ferns, 2% in. ixjts, $25.00 per 100. 
LARGE FERNS. 
Boston, Teddy Jr., 4-in. pots, $40.00 per 100. 
Also larger sizes for nil varieties. Ask for 
prices. 

TABLE FERN SEEDLINGS. 

Ready June and later. 

$3.00 for one Hat; 5 flats at $2.75 each; 

10 flats at $2.50 each. 

In all the best varieties as follows: 

rteris Wilsonii, I'teris Victorlji, Pterls Mayii, 

rteris Serrulata, Pteris Wimsettii, I'teris Trera- 

ula, Pteris Argyraea, Aspidiura Tsus-sinense, 

Crytomium Falcatuni, Cyrtomium Rochford- 

ianiim, I'teris ("retica Albo Lineata. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St., Ne w York. N. Y. 

Table Ferns from flats, shipped In or out of 
flats, best varieties, $2.75 per flat, 10 flats or 
more at $2.60 per flat. 

Table Ferns for dishes, strong 2%-in., $6.00 
per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 

Strong 2V4-ln. pot plants, Boston, Teddy Jr., 
Verona, Roosevelt, Dwarf Boston, $6.00 per 100, 
$55.00 per 1000; Scottil and Whitmanii, $6.60 per 
100, $00.00 per 1000. Fern runners of the above, 
except Dwarf Boston, Teddy Jr. and Scottli, $2.00 
per 100, $15.00 per 1000. 

Transplanted bench-grown stock of the above, 
except Scottli; better than pot plants; cheaper 
and lighter, $50.00 per 1000; Macawil, 2i4-ln. 
pot plants, $7.00 per lOO, $65.00 per 1000. Trans- 
planted bench plants, $60.00 per 1000. Write for 
prices on larger sizes. 

S. S. Skldelsky & Co., Dodge Bldg., 53 Park 
Place, New York. 



BOSTON FERNS. 

6-lnch $0.40 each 

6-lnch 75 each 

7-lnch 1.15 each 

8-lnch 1.50 each 

10-lnch 2.00 each 

We pack all orders on the same day they are 
received. All will be packed to arrive in flrst- 
clnss condition. No charges for packing out of 
day pots; in clay pots, add 5 per cent. 

DAVIS FLORAL CO. 

Fern Specialists, Davenport, Iowa. 

FERNS, BENCH-GROWN. " 

PER PER 
100 1000 
BOSTON, READY FOR 4-IN. POT8.|8.00 $70.00 
WHITMANII, READY FOB 4-IN. 

POTS 8.00 70.00 

SPRINGFIBLDII, BEADY FOR 

4-IN. POTS 8.00 70.00 

BOOSBVBLT, READY FOB 4-IN. 

POTS 8.00 70.00 

PIBBSONII. READY FOB 4-IN. 

POTS 8.00 

8C0TTII, READY FOB 4-IN. POTS 8.00 

CASH. PLEASE. 

USTLBB BROS.. 

WHOLBSALB QBOWERS, APOPKA, FLA. 

Hardy Ferns, wholesale price. Per 100 Per 10 

Evergreen and Marshfleld $8.00 $1.00 

Maidenhair and Wood Fern 9.00 1.00 

Ooldleana and Ostrich Fern 10.00 1.20 

Cinnamomea and Interrupta 12.00 1.30 

And 11 other varieties. Illustrated descriptive 
list mailed free. 100 or more, your selection, 
billed at the 100 rate. I offer for trial a collec- 
tion of 15 Goldleana, 15 Ostrich, 10 Cinnamomea, 
5 Maidenhair and 6 Evergreen for $5.00 cash. 
Packing free. ' 

Ludvlg Mosbaek, Ferndale. Aabov, Minn. 

FERNS. 

Boston. Teddy Jr., Roospvolt. Whitmanii. 
All 2>4-in., .«r...')0 per 100, .$60.00 per lOOO. 
N'lit loss than 6 of any variety of plants sup- 
plied in our wholesale department: under S.'i of 
a variety are hilled at dozen rate; l-'.'i and over 
at hundred rate. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO.. 

The largest Rose growers in tlie World. 

Department A, Sprinpfleld. 0. 

BOSTON FERNS. 

214 -Inch stock. Per 100 Per 1000 

Boston $.1.50 J.'iO.OO 

Roosevelt 5. ,50 .")0.00 

Wliitmanii .I. .TO ."lO.OO 

Teddv Jr «.00 .'iS.OO 

Ven>n!i 0.00 ."iSOO 

Macawil 6.00 .IS.OO 

AMERICAN BILB CO., 
172 N. Wabash .\vp., Chicago, 111. 

dTsH FERNS. 
Holly, Wimsettii and .\spidinm. .$4.00 per 100. 
Not less than 6 of any variety of plants 
supplied in our wholesale dopartnient: under 2."> 
iif a variety are, billed at dozen rale: 25 and 
over at hundred rate. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO.. 

The largest Rose growers in tlie World, 

Department A, Springfield. 0. 

FERNS. 3 AND 4-IN. ~~~ 

Boston, 3 in $15. 00 per 100 

Teddv Jr., .3-in 15.00 per 100 

Roosevelt, 3-ln l.'i.OO per 100 

Boston, 4-ln 25.00 per 100 

Roosevelt, 4-in 25.00 per 100 

Whitmanii, 4 in 30.00 per 100 

Cash please. I>e»s 4 per cent discount. 
B. C. BLAK5. SPRINGIflELD, O. 



FERNS 1 

Boston, 4-in., 26c; D-ln., 60c; 6 in., $1.00 each. 

Whitmanii, 4-ln., 26c; 6-tn., 60c each. 

Macawil, 4-ln., 2ec each. 

Bird's Nest Ferns, S-ln., 26c; 4-in., eOc; etn., 

$1.00 each. 

This Is excellent stock and will make you 

money. 

J. W. DAVIS CO., TERRB HAUTE, IND. 

FERNS. FEBNS. 

SEE OUB DISPLAY AD THIS ISSUE. 
STOCK OF SPLENDID VALUE. 

THE SPRINGFIELD FLORAL & FERN CO., 
SPRINGFIELD. 0. 

FERNS OUR SPECIALTY. 

100.000 2%-ln. Ferns. 

Scottil, Teddy Jr., Roosevelt, Boston 

and Verona, $6.00 per 100, $66.00 per 1000. 

20.000 Macawil, $7.00 per 100, $66.00 

per 1000. Cash with order. 

BRDMAN & ULBIOH, 

Belair Boad and Brdman's Hill. 

Baltimore, Md. 

FERNS. FERNS. 
Our 2i.l>-in. stock is equal to any 3-ln. stock 
we ever bought. 

Boston, Wann maker, Norwood, Smithli, Whit- 
manii, 2V.-in., $6.00 per 100; strong 3-in., $10.00 
per 100. 

JOS. W. VESTAL & SON, 
Little Rock, Ark. 

Ferns. Boston, Sword. Smithli, Whitmanii, 
Superblsslma, Asparagus Sprengeri and Aspara- 
gus Pliimosus, out of 2^-ln. pots, 6c; 4-in., 
17%c; 6-in., 35c; 6-ln.. 60c; 7-ln.. 75c; 8-ln., 
$1.00. Australian Tree Fern, 6-in., 60c; 8-ln., 
80c; 7-ln., $1.25. Above all full and pot-bound 
stock. Cash with order. H. C. Doescher, 2048 
GentlUy Ave., New Orleans, La. 

BOSTON FERNS. 

Strong runners, ready for immediate delivery, 

$10.00 per 1000, $88.00 per 10,000. 

3-ln. pot size, $5.50 per 100; 

4-ln. pot size, $7.00 per 100. 

20 per cent discount for cash. 

F. M. SOAR, LITTLE RIVER, FLA. 

BOSTON FERNS. 
Strong plants from 6-ln. pots at 50c each. 
Cash. No charge for packing. 

BOSTON FERNS. 
Strong plants from bench for 6-In. and 6-in. 
pots, at 40c each. Cash. No charge for packing. 
W. & T. CASS, GENEVA. N. Y. 

BOSTON FERNS. 
STRONG, BUSHY, CLEAN STOCK. 

6 In $ .70 

7-ln 90 

Packing charges free. 

DAVIS & STEINER CO., 

Morrison, 111. 

POT-GROWN BOSTON FERNS. 

SVi-ln $5.00 per 100 

5 in $0..35 and $0.50 each 

6-in 75 and 1.00 each 

7-ln. and 8 in. at 1.00 and 1.50 each 

WISE ADKISSON, GREENVILLE, TEX. 

BO.STON FERNS. ~~ 

2i'.-ln $ 5. .TO per 100 

3 in 10.00 per 100 

5-in. and 6-ln 50c and 75c each 

H. S. WIECKING, BLUFFTON, IND. 

Fern Nephrolepis Ruffescenos, Ostrich Plume, 
a strong grower, good for window boxes and 
borders, stands wind and s>m. $3.00 per 100, 
200 for $5.00. Palm Beach Floral Co., 020 Fern 
St., West P al m Bea ch, Fla. 

FERNS T0~1>LANT NOW. 
Boston, Roosevelt. Whitmanii. Verona, Teddy 
Jr., Scottil and Whitmanii Compacta. 2^-ln.. 
$6.00 per 100, $55.00 per 1000. 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

FERNS. 

Boston ready for Bin. pots $10.00 per 100 

Boston ready for 4-ln. pots 8.00 per 100 

Sprengeri ready for 4-ln. pots.... 8.00 per 100 
W. P. NEWELL CO.. APOPKA. FLA. 

SEASONABLE STOCK READY NOW. 
Ferns, Boston and Teddy Jr.. 2%-ln.. $6.50 
per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., 
PalnesvIUe. O. 

FERNS, 2U-IN. A-NO. 1 STOCK. 
Boston, Roosevelt, Teddy Jr.. Whitmanii Com- 
pacta. $6.50 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

WILLIAM F. KASTING CO., 
568 Washington St., Buffalo. N. Y. 

BOSTON FERNS. 

Boston, 4-ln $20.00 and $25.00 per 100 

Boston, 6-ln 75c each 

Macawil, 5-in $65.00 per 100 

CHARLES SHERWOOD, WATERLOO, lA. 

BOSTON FERNS. 

Strong and well rooted 2%-ln., 

$6.00 per 100. 

ST. LOUIS WHOLESALE CUT FLOWER 00., 

1406-08 Pine St., St. Lotila. Mo. 

SBLBOT rBBNB. 
Boston Ferns, 6-in. ready for 7-ln. pota, SBc 
•acb. No charge for packing. Cash with order. 

THOMAS 8ALVE80N, 
Hin N. Main St., Petersborn, III. 

Boston Ferns, 2>4-in., $5.90 per 100; 3-ln., 
*12.,50 per 100; also a few Whitmanii, 3 In., 
$12.50 per 100. Cash, please. 

Warren Huckleberry, North Vernon, Ind. 



FERNS, 4-IN. 

Boston $25.00 per 100 

Cash with order. 
IIARTLINE & HUFF, NEWCOMERSTOWN. . 

Ferns, Boston, Compacta, Roosevelt and 
Verona, 2 ',4 in., $5.00 per 100, .$45.00 per 1000. 
Maidenhair Fern, strong 2i^-in., $5.00 per 100. 
The McGregor Bros. Co., Springfield , O. 

Fern runners: Good, strong Whitmanii rim- 
ners, $20.00 per 1000. Cash. 0. L. Schmaltz. 
2211 Ashland Ave .. St. J oseph, Mo. 

^lioSTON FBRNS. 

4-in., $25c 

THE CKLINA (iUEKNHOUSE CO.. CELIN'.\, 0, 



Kerns, lioston and Whitmanii, 5-ln., 40c; 6-in., 
75c each. Sunset Hill Greenliouses, Box 75, 
Ijcavenworth, Kan. 

Ferns, Boston, Whitmanii and Scottil, fine 
plants ready to shift, 214-ln., $5.00 per 100, 
«45.00 per 1000. Samuel Whitton, Utlca. N. Y. 

Boston Ferns, 4-in., $25.00 per 100; 5-ln., 
$40.00 per 100. K. R. Pound, Cedar and In- 
diana Sts., Newark, O. 

Ferns, Boston, Roosevelt and Whitmanii, 
strong 214-ln., $4.00 per 100. 

A. C. Anderson, Columbus, Neb. 

Boston Ferns, 2^-in., 4-in., 6-ln. and 8-ln., $6.00 
$25.00, $60.00 and $100.00. Packing free. Cash. 
Truitt's Greenhouses, Chanute, Kan. 

Boston Ferns, clean, healthy, bushy stock, pot- 
grown, 2^-in., $5.50 per 100. 

Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, HI. 



Ferns, Boston and Teddy Jr., extra strong 2%- 
ln.,'$5.50 per 100. Cash, please. 

The Sycamore Greenhouses, Sycamore, 111. 

Ferns, Boston and Verona, 4-ln., 22c each. 
These are good plants ready for 5 and 6-In. 
pots. Edgar Easterday, Nokomls, III. 

Ferns, Boston and Whitmanii, 2^-in., $6.00 
per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

Henry Krueger, 602 Clark St., Toledo, 0. 

Ferns, Boston and Whitmanii, flne, clean, bushy 
stock, 8-ln., $1.25 each; Boston 6-ln., 40c. 

Koopmann Bros., Davenport, la. 

Ferns, Boston, Dwarf Sword, Wanamaker and 
Teddy Jr., 8-ln., $10.00 per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Boston Ferns, good 4-ln. stock, $30.00 per 100. 
Wlnfleld S. KIrcher, Cyclamen Specialist, De- 
fiance, 0. 

Fern seedlings, $2.00 per 100; assorted 2-ln.. 
ta.OO per 100. Roscoe S. Baldwin, 460 Atlanta 
St.. Pasadena. Cal. 

Ferns. Boston, Booserelt and Dwarf Sword, 
4-ln., 18c each. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse, Toskegea, Ala. 

Ferns, Boston and Whitmanii, extra choice, 
bench-grown, $20.00 per 100. 
B. B. Morgan Floral Co., Paxton. 111. 

Boston Ferns, out of 214-in. pots. $6.00 per 100. 
Quick shipment. 3. C. BIgelow A Son. 1642 Sun- 
set Ave., Utlca, N. Y. 

Boston Ferns, pot-grown, 4-ln., ready for 6-in., 
26c each. Cash, please. 
Chas. 0. Walker, 1227 Logan Ave., DanTllle. III. 

Table Ferns, leading varieties, strong 2^-ln., 
$6.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 
Evenden Bros. Co., WUllamsport, Pa. 

Boston Ferns, strong 2V2-ln., $5.00 per 100. 
Haase Bros., Pekln, 111. 

Fern Norwood, fine, stocky plants, 2^-in., 
$6.00 per 100. C. E. Majors, Denison. Tex. 

Boston Ferns, 4-In. ready for 6-in., 80c each. 
De Meester, Florist, Humboldt, la. 

Table Ferns, best varieties, 214-ln., $5.00 per 
100. Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FEVERFEW/ 

DOUBLE FEVERFEW. 

From cuttings, 2-ln., $5.00 per 100. 

$45.00 per 1000. 

JOSEPH MICHAL. 

6701 3. Kostner Ave., Chicago, 111. 

TRUE LITTLE GEM. 
Feverfew, strong rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 
100 by mall, $18.00 per 1000 by express; heavy 
2-ln. stock, $4.00 per 100. 

S. W. PIKE. ST. CHARLES, ILL. 
Feverfew I.ittlo Gem. the only good one, rooted 
• ultings, $1.50 per 100: 2-in., $.'?.00 per 100, 
Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Feverfew Double Giant, 2-ln., $4.00 per 100. 
$88.00 per 1000. 
Edward W. Schnster. Or ookstnn, Minn. 

Feverfew Little Gem, 2-In., $4.00 per 100, 
$36.00 per 1000. F. Llnnemann, Jr., 1S18 Ash- 
land Ave., Des Plalnes, 111. 

FEVERFEW LITTLH OEM. 

2% -In 4c each 

GULLETT ft SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

Feverfew, 3-ln., $4.00; 4-In., $8.00 per 100. 
Cash. Joseph Bancroft & Son, Cedar Falls, la. 

Double Feverfew, 214-ln., $5.00 per 100. 

Charles Sherwood, Waterloo, la. 
Feverfew, 2-In., $3.00 per 100. J. OT Witt Ik 
Sons, 10423 Wallace St., Chicago. 111. 

Feverfew, 2%-ln., 5c; 3% In., 8c each. 

De Meester. Florist, Humboldt, la. 
Feverfew Little Gem, 2%-ln.,^.60 per iOO^~ 
The McGregor Bros. Co., Sprinffleld, O. 



^f^^l^l^T'.VW^iJw^T-r^r::-^ 



! 5''-H'»'T-T. V7' 



182 



The Florists' Review 



May 4. 1!»1*2 



FEVERFEW— Continued 

Veverfew, rooted cuttlnga, IHc, preiMild. 
O. Humfe l d, Clay Center. K»n. 

Fererfew Double Olant, strong stock, 2^-ln., 
18.00 per 100. J. O. Schmidt. Bristol. Pa. 

FICUS 

Jt'lciis Elastitii, 4 In., 15 to 18 Ins. high 35c 

FIciis Elustica, 4-iu., 18 to 24 ins. high 40c 

Flcus Klastku, 5 in., 1!4 to 36 ins. high BOc 

Flcus Elustica. (i-in., 30 to 48 ins. high 70c 

Good foliii),"* iiinl well-grown. Cash with order. 
H. C. Docsdier, 2048 Gentilly Ave., New Or- 
leuQS, 1m. 

Ficus Eastira, 12 to 14 Inches higli, 25c each. 
Cash with order. M. Coolc's Son, 129 Curondelet 
St., New Orleans, La. 

FICUS ELASTICA. 
Fine stoclj, 4-in., 60c; 5-ln., 75c; 6-in., $1.00. 
QULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN. ILL. 

Flcus Blastlca, Rubber plant, IB Ins. hlgk, 
4-ln., 40c each, $4.60 per dos. Nice stock. 

Oak OroTe Oreenhouse, Tuakegee, AU. 

Uubbers, 4-in., $40.00 per 100. 
Holton &, Hunkel Co., Milwaukee. Wig. 

FOROET-ME-NOTS 

Korccl nic iiots, stronK, young plants, from 
<(p|(lfruMi<'. lianly (iiitdiKir grown, .$4.00 inT 100. 
Highland I'ark Nursery, Sterling, Hi. 

For;;('l-nu'-not Alpestris Victoria, bine; strong 
Ueidgrown plants in Imd, $3.00 per lUO. Cash. 
Urill Celery Gardens, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Forget-me-nots, strong, busby plants, ready to 
shift, 2V2-inch, $4.00 per 100. 
Freeport Floral Co.. Freeport. 111. 

FUCH SI AS 

FUCHSIAS. 

The two great leaders. 

Gas fiiinigated and free from white fly. 

ULACK PRINCE. 

Strong 2-in., $4.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000; 

extra strong 3-in., lots of branches, many in bud, 

$10.00 per 100, $80.00 per 1000. 

TRAILING QUEEN. 

Make the most attractive banging baskets and 

great for vase work, strong 2-in., $4.00 per 100, 

$45.00 per 1000; 3-in., lots of briTuches, $10.00 

per 100, $80.00 per lOOO. 

Free packing. Cash with order. 
0. L. HUMPHREY, ZANESVILLE. O. 

FUCHSIAS. 

Strong, well established plants 

from 2-ln. ready to shift. 

Urs. B. O. Hill, double white; Phenomenal, 

double purple; Beauty of Exmouth. double rlolet- 

blue, $6.00 per 100; Black Prince. Speclosa, 

$4.60 per 100, $42.60 per 1000. 

Cash. Prompt shipment. 

H. W. BUOKBBB. 

Forest Olty Greenhouges. Rockford. 111. 

FUCHSIAS, ASSORTED. ' 

2", -in, pots $5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000 

l.riTI.K r.KAl TV AM) liL-VCK IMllNCK. 

2' I -ill. pots .«H. 00 per 100 

ROMAN J. IRAVIX, 
4.-! \V ISth .-^t.. New York. N. Y. 

FUCHSIAS. 

Hest assortment 

2'/4-in. ready to shift, $4.00. 

Cash, please. 

HEZDEK GR EENHOUSES. CEDAR RAPIDS. lA. 

Fuchsias. 3 different varieties; clean, strong, 
iMisliy plants out of 2'{..-in. pots, $0.00 per 100. 
Prompt shipment. Cash. 

F. A. Schelsky. New Castle, Ind. 

Fuchsias, Avalanche, Black Prince, Mrs. B. G. 
Hill and Speclosa, 2^1n., $5.00 per 100; 8-Id., 
$10.00 per 100; 4-in., $20.00 per 100. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co., PalnesTille, O. 

Fuchsias. 6 different colors Including Little 
Beauty and Black Prince, well branched, S-ln., 
$6.00 per 100; 2^-in., $4.00 per 100. Edward 
Whltton, York and Walnut Sts., Utlca. N. Y. 

Fuchsias. Black Prince, Mme. Vander Btrmoss, 
White Olant and Speclosa, 214-ln. pots, 60c per 
dos., $B.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

The Schmi dt A Botley Co., Bprlngfleld. O. 

Fuchsias, strong rooted cuttings, best named 
rarletlea, single and double, labeled, $2.00 per 
100, prepaid. Black Prince separate, if wanted. 
8. W. Pike. St. Charles. 111. 

Fuchsias, 6 best Tarletles Including Black 
Prince, 214-in. ready for S-in., $4.00 per 100, 
800 for $11.00. Cbas. Whltton, York 8t. and 
Gr ay Are., Utlca, N. Y. 

Fuchsias, Little Beauty and Phenomenal from 
2in. pots ready for 3-in., fine plants, $3.00 per 
100 . Cash. G. Raymond Smith, Latrobe. Pa. 

EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT. 

Fuchsias, 2Vi-ln 6c each 

GULLBTT A SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 
Fuchsias, nice plants, 6 varieties, 3^ and 
4-in. pots, $10.00 per 100. Cash. 

Victor H. Thomas, Augusta, Ky. 

Fuchsias, best varieties, strong 2^-ln. plants 
•t $5.00 per 100. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids. Hlch. 

Fuchsias, fancy assorted, rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100; 2>A-in., $6.00. Oasb or c. 0. d. 
W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton. 111. 

Fuchsias, 3 best Tarletles. 2^-in.. $5.00 per 
too. Charles Sherwood, Waterloo. la. 

Fuchsias. 6 kinds, rooted cuttings, $1.60 per 
100. Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 



FUNKIAS 

Funkla Varlegata. strong lleld-grown divisions, 
$7.60 per 100. Carl B. Bcheller. Warren, P a. 

QAILLARDIAS 

Gaillardlas, new English Hybrids, choice field- 
grown stock, $7.00 per 100. 

The^Wayside Gardens Co., Mentor, O. 

Qaiiiardla Grandlflora, strong, will bloom this 
summer, $4.00 per 100. 

Lakewood Greenhouse. Walbridge, 0. 

Oaillardta Grandlflora, 00c per dos., $4.00 per 
100. The Schmidt A Botley Co., Bpringfleld, 0. 

QENISTAS 

Genistas, rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100; 2%- 
In., $6.00 per 100. Gash or c. o. d. 
W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co.. Princeton. 111. 

Genistas, 5-in., 45c; 6-in., 75c. 

W. B. Shumway Floral Co., Tlflin, O. 

QERANIUMS 1^ 

NEW GERANIUMS. 

Red Barney, brilliant red; 2>4-in. pots. $3.00 

per fioz., $15.00 per 100, $125.00 per 1000. 

Mrs. Geo. E. Huxton, double, rose-pink, 

2 '4 -in. iX)ts. 

$15.00 per 300, $125.00 per 1000. 

GKUANIIMS KBAUY NOW. 

2'4-iu. pots. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

I'oitevine, Ricanl and Viand $7.00 $65.00 

S. A. Nutt, lUichner 6.00 .')0.00 

Helen Micliell 8.00 70.00 

ItOSE-SCKNTEl), IVY LEAVED. 

3-in. pots, $7.(K) per 100, $00.00 per 1000. 

For other varieties ask for list. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

S. A. Nutt $3.00 per 100, $27.50 per 1000 

Poitevine 4.50 per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

Ricard 5.00 per 100, 45.00 per 1000 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St., New York, N. Y. 



J. SYLVESTER, 



Oconto, 



Wisconsin 



GERANIUMS. 

Our selection of S. A. Nutt, Poitevine, Mlchell, 
Ricard, Barney, Oberle, Viaud, Buchner, Regalia, 
Jatilin and Maryland. 

Strong stock ready for shift. 

4-in 15c 

5-in 25c 

2'/u-in. Mnie. Salleroi Uc 

I'Hcked to jilease. Cash. 

" GERANIUMS. " 

Poitevine. L-iOO 2-in $55.00 per 1000 

Ricard, 1000 2 in :.. 55.00 per 1000 

Mlchell, 500 2-in 6.00 per 100 

Michell, 500 2'/o in 8.00 per 100 

Ivy Geraniums, 2 in 5.00 per 100 

Sallerol, 2-in 4.00 per 100 

This stock is all extra strong and must be 

moved up. 
ROOTED CUTTINGS, READY ABOUT MAY 10. 

.WOO Ricard $3.00 per 100, $27.50 per 1000 

,5000 Poitevine 3.00 per 100, 27.50 per 1000 

1500 Michell 3.00 per 100, 30.00 per 1000 

Cash with order. 

r. L. HUMPH KEY, ZANESVILLE. 0. 

GERANIUMS. 

Niitt $4.00 per 100, $30.00 per 1000 

Uucliner 5.00 per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

Viuud 5.00 per 100. 40.00 per 1000 

Regii lia 5.00 per 1(K), 40.(K) iier 1000 

liirjini ,''..00 iH-r 100. 4(MH> jicr 1000 

Poitevine ti .".O per lll(>. HO.dO PIT 1(MH> 

Rooted cuttings of Nutt, ready May 15, $18.00 
per 1000. 

All are extra strong 2-in. stock, except last 
item; as gcHul .is J'j in. anil llie express is niucli 
less. Packed right and free by experts. Cash, 
please. 
J. A. SWARTLEY & SONS, STERLING, ILL. 



THE NEW GERANIUM 

MRS. RICHARD F. GLOBDB. 

See display ad In this Issue. 

OIX)EDE CONSERVATORIES, 
Evanston, Illinois. 



GBRANIUMS. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 

RBADY NOW. 

8. A. NUTT AND BUCHNER. 

$25.00 per lOOO; 

RICARD, VIAUD. 

CASTELLANS. ANNA BROWN. 

POITEVINB. SCARLET REDDER. 

$30.00 per 1000. 

CASH WITH ORDBR. 

^ FRED W. RITCHY. LAN CASTER. PA. 
NOW READY TO SHIFT. 

S. A. Nutt. 4-ln $15.00 per 100 

Ricard. 4-in 20.00 per 100 

8. A. Nutt, 2-in 60.00 per 1000 

Ricard, 2-ln 60.00 per 1000 

Cash with order. 
CHAS. T. MAY. R. R. NO. 14, DAYTON, 0. 



NEW GERANIUMS. 

By all means get some of our new Mrs. 
George B. Buxton, the beautiful rose-pink with 
enormous trusses, $16.00 per lOO, $126.00 per 
1000; not less than 60 plants on an order. Red 
Karney, the name describes It, $3.00 per doz., 
$15.00 per 100, $126.00 per 1000. 

S. A. Nutt, strong 2% -in. plants, $5,00 per 
100, $4,"). 00 per 1000. Poitevine, Ricard and 
I.4iwrence, strong 2i4-in. plants, $6.50 per 100, 
$55.00 per 1000. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY A CO., 
Dodge Bldg., 53 Park Place, New Yor k, N. Y . 

GERANIUMS, CASH WITH ORDBR. 
Charles Turner, Ivy, 2-in.. .4c each, $4.00 per 100 

Casteliane, 2-in 4c each, 4.00 per 100 

Poitevine, 2-in 5c each, 6.00 per 100 

Montmort, 2-in 5c each, 6.00 per 100 

Ricard, 2-ln 5c each, B.OO per 100 

Oberle, 2-in 4c each, 4.00 per 100 

Barney, 2-ln 6c each, B.OO per 100 

Strawberry Geraniums, 2-ln. 4c each, 4.00 per 100 

F. H. REESE, 
406 N. Belmont Ave., Springfleld, 0. 

GERANIUMS, EXTRA STRONG, THRIFTY. 

Well-grown stock. 

For Immediate delivery. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Ricard, 2%-in $7.00 $65.00 

Ricard, 3-ln 12.00 110.00 

Poltivine, 2%-in 8.00 75.00 

Poltlvine, 3 in 15.00 135.00 

S. A. Nutt, 21^-in 6.00 60.00 

Cash with order. 
QUAKER HILL NURSERY CO., MONROE, N. Y. 

THE NEW GERANIUM. 

Per doz. Per MO 

Mrs. Richard Gloede, 4-ln $ 6.00 $ 40.00 

Mrs. Richard Gloede, 2V4-in... 3.00 20.00 

Mrs. Richard Gloede, 2H-in., $180.00 per 1000; 
S. A. Nutt, 4-in., $15.00 per 100, $136.00 per 
1000; Helen Mlchell, 4-in., $16.00 per 100, $136.00 
per 1000; Poitevine, 4-ln., $16.00 per 100, $140.00 
per 1000. 

UNITED STATES CUT FLOWER CO.. 
Elmlra. N. Y. 

Geraniums, in bud and bloom, assorted. In- 
cluding Ricard, Jean Oberle. Dagata, Ruby and 
Abble Schnetfer, strong 4-ln., $15.00 per 100. 
Mixed, same varieties as above, 3-in., $7.00 per 
100. Ricard, 2-ln., $4.00 per 100, $40.00 per 
1000. Mixed 2-in. Geraniums, $3.50 per 100. 
Ivy Geranium Rycroft's Surprise, $3.50 per 100; 
3-ln., $7.00 per 100; 4-ln. in bud, $15.00 per 
100, fine for vases. Cash. 

Jacobs Bros., Peoria, 111. 

GERANIUMS, 2-IN. 
8. A. Nutt and Buchner, $35.00 per 1000. 
Scarlet Bedder, $40.00 per 1000. Jean Oberle, 
Presiily, Ricard, Viaud and Poitevine, $60.00 
per 1000. Rose-scented Geraniums, 2^-in., 
$4.00 per 100. Same rate by the 100 for all 
Geraniums. These are strong, well rooted plants 
equal to 2V4-lnch. 

Cash with order. 
CHERRY PARK GARDENS, FREDONIA, W. Y. 

GERANIUMS. 

S, A. Nutt, Buchner, 

Viaud and Montmort, 

from 2-in. pots, $3,50 per 100, 

$35.00 per 1000. 

Ricard and Poitevine ready soon 

at the same price. 

ELMER RAWLINGS, 

Wholesale Grower, Allegany, N. Y. 

GERANIUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
IMMEDI.\TE DELIVERY. 
Grant, S. A. Nutt, Scarlet Bedder, Buchner, 
Oberle, Jacquerie, Doyle, Saileroi and Ivies in 
iloulile pink, red and lavender, $2.50 per 100, 
$20.00 per 1000. Cash. We are booking now 
for all other commercial varieties, June de- 
livery. 

THKHESK.VX PL ANT CO.. GARD KNA. CAL. 
GERANIUMS. 

S. A. Nutt, 3 in $8.00 per 100 

Mme. Iliichncr, 3-in 8.00 per 100 

Jean Viaud, 3-ln 8.00 per 100 

Beuute Poitevine, 3-in 8.00 per 100 

American Beauty, 3-in 8.00 per 100 

4-in., same varieties as above 15.00 per lOO 

WESTWOOD FIX)WER & PLANT CO., 

Lynam St. near Hoover Ave ., Dayton, 0. 

GERANIUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

American Beauty, 

Oberle, Jacquerie, Mme. Sallerol, 

$2.75 per 100, $26.00 per 1000. 

Fiat, Poitevine. Ivy. pink. $3.00 per 100. 

$27.50 per 1000. Other varieties ready soon. 

LOS ANGELES GERANIUM CO.. 

Sawtelle P. 0.. Log Angeles. Cal. 

geraniums; EXCELLENT 2%-IN. 

S. A. Nutt, Double Grant. 2V4-ln., 5c; Ricard, 

Poitevine and Jean Viaud, 2>4-in., $7.00 per 100; 

Ivy Leaf, strong 3-in., 8c. 

S. A. Nutt and Double Grant, about 50 per 
rent in bud or bloom, strong 4-ln., $15.00 per 
100. 

GULLETT A SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

ALL A NO. 1 PLANTS. PACKING FREB. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, General Grant, Poi- 
tevine, Jean Viaud and Buchner: 

4-ln $15.00 per 100 

8-in 10.00 per 100 

Above In 3-ln., mixed 8.00 per 100 

Cash, please. 
LAKE STREET FLORAL CO., KBWANEB. ILL. 

10,000 S. A. NUTT, 4-IN. 

Fine stock in bud and bloom. 

$16.00 per 100, $150.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. 

LINESVILLE GREENHOUSE CO.. 

LtaesTlUa, Fit. 1 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists* Review 



183 



GBliAMlMS, AI^L GOOD BLOOMEItS. 

Mixed colors, 

3'/.-in. us jT'iixi lis any 4-iu., $11.00 per 100; 

3-in., $7.00 per 100. 

No charge for packiiiK. 

H. r. KKIKDEUICUSEN, FL,OUIST, 

Murengo, la. 

HOOTED (JEKANIUM CUTTINiiS. 
MAY AND JUNE DELIVEKY'. 

S. A. NUTT $20.00 PER 1000 

ALPHONSE KICAKD HO. 00 PER 1000 

HHAUTE I'OITEVINE 30.00 PER 1000 

CASH. 
THE V>\ T. FICKLEY CX)., S PRIXGEIELD, ILL. 

^GERANIUMS^ 

Rooted cuttings ready for shipment. 

S. A. Nutt, $25.00 per 1000. 

Ricard, Poitevlne, Scarlet Bedder and Anna 

Brown, $30.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. 

PETER BROWN, LANCASTER, PA. 

. GERANIUMS. 

S. A. Nutt, 2'.'. in $ 4.00 per 100 

I'oitevine. 2ij-in .^.00 per 100 

S. A. Nutt and Poiteviiie. 4-iu 18.00 per 100 

Casli with order. 
HARTL INE & HU1'^\ NEWCOMERSTOWN. O^ 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, Appleblnssom, Mme. 
Buchner and Improved I'oitevine, strong rooted 
cuttings. .*2..''i0 JUT 100: 2Vi-in. ready to shift, 
$4.00 per 100; Mme. Salleroi, rooted cuttings, 
?;2.00 per 100. 
Otto 1". KiiK-ger, 427 East Broadway, Toledo, O. 

(JEPvANlU.M, ~~ 

QUALITY STOCK. 

S. A. Nutt and .Jean Vlauil, 

4-iM.. 14c. 

Hill. 4-in.. loc. 

MARSH I'.UOS., .MORRIS, ILL. 

GERANIUMS. S. A. NUTT. ~ 

Strong 4 in.. .fl.^i.OO per 100, $125.00 per 1000. 

Our new Gerunium Defiance, salmon pink; 

strong 4-in., $25.00 per 100. 

WINFIELD S. KIRCIIER. 

Cyclamen Siieiialist. Defiance, 0. 

Geraniums, strong, bushy plants, in bud and 
bloom, I'oitevine. 4-in.. $20.00 per 100; Helen 
Mlchell. 4-in.. .$20.00 jier 100; mixed, 21/2-ln., 
readv for shift, .$5.00 per 100; Mme. Salleroi, 2>4- 
in., HOO per 100. Cash with order. 

G. .\. Weberg, Chicago Heights, 111. 

GERANIUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Summer prices. 

S. A. Nutt and Buchner $20.00 per 1000 

Poitevlne and Ricard 30.00 per 1000 

ALBERT M. HERR, 
R. No. 8, Lancaster, Pa. 

Geraniums, 1000 strong 2V4-ln. S. A. Nutt, 
trould make good 3-in. stock at once, $4.00 per 
100; rooted cuttings, $15.00 per 1000, ready now; 
also gome good 2i4-in. Grant and Ricard, mixed, 
and a few Salleroi, same price. 

B. B. Morgan Floral Co., P axton, 111. 

' (TekanI u m s. fin e stock! ' 

All coliirs out of ;i'o and 4-in. pots, selected, 
20c: as they run from bench, 15c. Packed in 
paper pots. Nti charge for packing. 
MARYSVILLE FLORAL CO., MARYSVILLE, 0. 

(ieraniunis. S. A. .Nuit, Ricard, Huchncr and 
Poitevini'. in bud and tiloom, SVj-in. and 4-in. 
ready for .'-in.. .$17.00 jier 100. Wliile they 
last. These are well spread strong plants. Chas. 
Whitton, Yr.rk St. and Gray Ave., Utica, N. Y. 

Geraniums. S A. Nutt. Double Pink and Poite- 
viiie, all ill bud anil bloom, fine stock, 4-in., 
.«l."i.00 per 1(H»: 20(1 I'oitevine, 2i..-in.. .$4.00 per 
KMt: .MHI S. A. .Nutt. Double Pink, 2-in.. $.'i.50 
per 100. Violet Greenhouses, I'ickerlngton, O. 

(ieraniiiiiK. .■ii.(MHl l!i<ard, I'oitevine and Nutt, 
fine. larg»' pliiiits will Ipiiiinheil, 4-in.. $15. (K) per 
100. $140. (HI per liMKl. .Ml .\-l stmk in bud and 
IdiMini. Edward 'Whitton, Y"ork and Walnut Sts., 
Utiia. N. Y. 

1(MK( GERANIU.M JE.\N VIAUD. 

Striuig 2'i-in . $4.(Ki per HHI, or $,%").0<> for the lot. 

Cash, please. 

S( III.UND FI^)RAL CO.. 

40 N. Centre St.. Cumberland, Md. 

gerTnii'ms, extra"value! 

S. A. Nutt, 21.4 -in $ 4.S0 per 100 

S. A. Nutt, 3 in 7.00 per 100 

S. A. Nutt. 4-in 15.00 iK-r 100 

CHARLES SHERWOOD. WATERIX)0, lA. 

Geraniums, Gloire de France, Single Giant, 
S. A. Nutt and Buchner, good, strong plants, 
2-ln., $3..''.0 per 100. $32.50 per 1000; Mme. Sal- 
leroi, $3.00 per 100. 
J. H. Dann & Son, Weatflel d, N. Y . 

Geraniums. 500 strong 214-ln., want a shift 
nt once, about one-half S. A. Nutt, balance 
Poitevlne, Ricard, Presllly, Barney and White, 
$20.00 cash for the lot. 
Richard A. Irvine, Bay City, Mich. 

Geraniums. S. A. Nutt, Castellane, Barney 
and Lemon, in good assortment spread on bench, 
4 in.. 121...C, liic and 20c; 3-in., 7c, 8c and 10c; 
according to size, 214-in. and 2%-in., 4%c. 
L. J. Rowe, TltnaTille, Pa. 

GERANIUMS. COOL GROWN NORTHERN 
STOCK YOU WANT. 

Grant, strong plants $3.50 per 100 

RIVER FALLS FLORAL CO., 

River Falls. Wis^ 

Geranium's, 3000 Helen Mlchell, 2H-ln., $8.00 

per 100, $50.00 per 1000; 2500 Beaute Poitevlne, 

2>4-ln., $R.00 per 100, $50.00 per 1000; 1000 S. 

A. Nutt. 2V4-in.. $4.00 per 100. $36.00 per 1000. 

Evenden Brot. Co., Wllllamsport, Pa. 



Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, 4-ln,, ISc; Ricard, 
4-in., 20c; Buchner, 4 in., 20c; Poitevlne, 4-ln., 
20c. Uoae Oeraniuma in bud and bloom, 4-iD., 
$15.00 per 100. J. Q. Witt & Sons, 10423 Wal- 
l ace St.. Chicago. III. ^___ 

Geraniums. 25.000 8. A. Nutt. Buchner and 
Scarlet Bedder. large, strong plants out of 
2-in. pots, equal to 2V4 and 2V^-in. plants, $30.00 
per 1000; need the room. Cash with order. 

Cherry Park Gardens. Fredonia, N. Y. 

80.000 OERANIUM8, 214-IN. 
Ricard. Hill. Poitevlne, Barney, Oberle, Buch- 
ner, Grant and Rose Geraniums, $5.00 per 100. 
BURDBLL FLORAL CO., 
Bowling Green, Ky. 

Qeraniums, S. A. Nutt and Poitevlne, strong, 
healthy plants, most of them in bud and bloom; 
8^-in. pots as good as any 4-in. and less express 
costs; S. A. Nutt, $12.50; Poitevlne, $15.00 per 
100. L. R. Frlederichsen, Wilton Junction, la. 

Geraniums, Snow Queen and La Favorite, rooted 
cattlngs, $2.50 per 100; 2^-in., $5,00 per 100; 
8-in., $8.00 per 100; any variety, 4-in., $15.00 per 
100. Oasii or c. o. d. 

W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

'aeraniums, S. A. Nutt. 2^-in. and 2V6-ln.. 
Be; 4-in., 10c; rooted cuttings. 2Vic; Poitevlne. 
2^-lii. and 2H-in., 6c; 4-in., 12c; rooted cuttings. 
8^c. Cash, please! Packing free. 
Derr's Flower Shop. Wllllamsport. Pa. 

SEASONABLE STOCK. 
Geranium Mme. Salleroi. 214-ln., $5.00 per 100. 
THE STORRS & HARRISON CO.. 
Painesville, O. 



(JERAXIU.MS, NUTT AND GRANT. 

2'.j-iii.. ready for shift .$ 0.00 per KKl 

4-in., assorted colors 15.00 per 100 

H. S. WIECKlXt:, liLUFlTON, IND. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, good, strong stalk, cut 
back, in bud and bloom, well branched, 4-in., 
$15.00 per 100. Cash. E. R. Pound. Cedar and 
Indiana Sts.. Newark, O. 

S. A. NUTT AND API'LE BLOSSOM. 

2U-inch. $4.00 per 100. 

AMER1C.\N BULB CO.. 

172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Geraniums. S. A. Nutt, Ricard, Poitevlne, 
Buchner and Presilly. good, clean 4-in, plants, 
in bud and Bloom, $15.00 per 100. 

S. A. Pinkstone, Utica, N. Y. 



Geraniums, Ricard. Buchner, Perkins, S. A. 
Nutt, etc., 4-in. In bloom. $12.00 per 100. I'ack- 
ing free. Cash. 

Truitt's Greenhouses. Chanute. Kan. 

(ieraniunis, red: in bud and bloom, strong 
plants, 4-in., $15.00 per 100, $125.00 per 1000. 
No charge for packing. Cash with all orders. 
New London Greenhouse. Ne w London. O. 

GERANIUM S. A. NUTT. 

Fine 4-in. stock in bud and bloom, 

$15.00 per 100. Cash. 

BEL AIR GREENHOUSES, BEL AIR, MD. 

Geraniums. S. A. Nutt, Pfitzer. Vlaud, Double 
Grant, Single Red, Nutt shade and some Mlchell, 
4-in., 15c. Packing free. Cash, please. 

Goshen Floral Co., Goshen, Ind. 

Geranium Mme. Salleroi, strong 3-iu.. $8.00 
per 100. Cash. 

Riverside Greenhouses, Appleton. Wis. 

(ieraiiiiim S. A. Nutt. 2'A-in., 5c; 3-iu., 8c; 
4-in., 12e. Good stock. Cash. 

Harglerode I'.riis., Sliippensburg. Pa. 

Geraniums, Scarlet Bedder and Mme. Buchner. 
stocky plants, strong 4 in., $15.00 per 100. 
Cash, please. Kelly's Greenliouses. Kokomo, Ind. 

Geraniums, good bedding varieties, clean stock. 
2'4-in.. $;^..">0 per loo' to clean up. Cash. 

Warren Huckiefierry. North Vernon. Ind. 

(ieraiiiiim Mine. Salleroi, good stock, ready to 
shift, 2 in.. $5.00 per 100. Cash. 

Carl Erickson, I'rinceton. III. 

Geranium Helen Mlchell, .SOOO 2i.4-in., $0.00 
I>er 100, $50.00 per 1000, Ready now. Cash. 

New'iKirt Greenhouses, Newport, Pa. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt. 2 in.. $3.00 per 100, 
$•-■5.00 per 1000. 

The Riverside Gardens Co., Emporia, Kan. 

Geraniums. S. A. Nutt or mixed. 4-in.. $16. (K) 
per 100, $150.00 per 1000. Cash. 

M. IC. ifiisse, Como Station, St. Paul, Minn. 

(ieraniiiiii Mine. Barney, strong plants in bud 
ami bloom, 4-in. pots, $2(1.00 per 1(X>. Cash, 
t'ostoria Floral Co . Kostoria, O. 

(ieranhims. nii.\eil. mostly S. A. Nutt. 4-iii.. 
$12. fM) per 100. Anderson Floral Co., 515 John 
St.. Anderson. Ind. 

Geraniuni .s. ,\. Nutt. tine stink, in bud and 
bloom. 4-iii.. $15.00 per 100. Cash. 

Hill City Greenhouses, Forest Cit>', la. 

(ieraniums, Nutt, Barney, Lawrenie, White. 
Seiirlet. clioico plants, full of bloom, 4-in., $15.00 
Iper 100. Cash. Butz Bnis., Newcastle, Pa. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt in bud and bloom, fine 
4-ln., $15.00 per 100. 

Geo. Vatter, Marinette, Wis. 



Geranium Mme. Salleroi, 2-Id., $4.00 per 100. 
$38.00 per 1000. 

Edward W. Schuster, Crookston. Minn. 

Geraniums In bud and bloom, red, white, pink 
and salmon; 8i4-ln., $12.00 per 100. Cash. 

Daut Bros.. Decatur. 111. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, 2-in., $4.00 per 100, 
' $35.00 per 1000. J. L. Johnson. De Kalb, 111. 



Geraniums, Beaute Poitevlne, Marquis de 
Castellane, Alice Lemon, single, strong 2^-in. 
pots, $5.00 per 100. 
H arold W. McGregor, Springfleld, 0. 

Geraniums, Jean Viaud, Poitevlne and Kicard, 
8-ln., $9.00 per 100. S. A. Nutt, 2^-ln., |4.00 
per 100; 8-in., $0.60 per 100. 
The Bast Lawn Gardens, Drbana. O. 

Geraniums, Poitevlne, Ricard, H. Mlchell, 2V4- 
in., $6.00 per 100; Marvel, 2^-ln., $5.00 per 100. 
Cash. 
North Madison Floral Co., North Madison, Ind. 

NUTT GERANIUMS, 2>4-IN. 
$35.00 per lOQO. 
LIBERTYVIXJLE FLOWER & VEG. CO.. 
Llbertyvllle. Ill, 

Geraniums, Ricard and Viaud out of 2Mi-ln. 
pets. $6.00 per 100. Buchner out of 2^-ln. pots. 
$5.00 per 100. Cash with order. 
Chas. B. Smith ft Son. York, Pa. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, excellent plants, 2-ln., 
3c; 3-in., 6e; 4-in.. 15c. 

A. C. Anderson. Columbus, Neb. 

Rose Geranium, skeleton leaved, 4-in., ready 
for sliift, IHc. 
AV. B. Shiimway Floral Co., Tlffln, O. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, rooted cuttings, l%c; 
2'i-iii., ready to shift, 314c each. 
Clary Bros., Coshocton, O. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt. excellent healthy stock, 
none better, In bloom. 4-ln., $20.00 per 100. 
Freeport Floral Co.. Freeport. 111. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, 2V4-ln.. $45.00 per 1000. 
Emil Rieple, care Rochester Greenhouse Co.. 
Rochester. Minn. 

Geraniums, assorted varieties, 2%-in.. $5.00 
per 100; 4-ln., $12.50 per 100. Cash. 
C. A. Anderson Greenhouse Co.. Tlonesta. Pa. 

Geraniums. Ricard, S. A. Nutt and Frances 
Perkins. 2^-in., $5.00 per 100. This stock will 
please you. Wagner's Greenhouses, Tiffin, 0. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt and Grant, 3-ln., 7c; 
4-in., 15c. (Jood plants. The Theodore J. 
Steffes Co., Taylorville, 111. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt and Double Scarlet, 
4-in., 15c. Cash with order. No c. o. d. 
Harry A. Cook, Oberlin, 0. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, 4-in., 15c; Mme. 
Salleroi, bushy plants, 4-in., 15c each. 
D e Meester, Florist, Humboldt, la. 

Geraniums, rooted cuttings, S. A. Nutt, $2.00 
per 100; Alliance Ivy, $3.00 per 100. 
Quake r Hill Greenhouses, Sebring. 0. 

Geraniums, Poitevlne and Ricard, rooted cut- 
tings. $3.75 per 100. prepaid. Cash. Royston A 
Fenton, R. A., Box 583. Evansville, Ind. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, rooted cuttings, $2.50 per 
100. $20.00 per 1000; 3-ln.. $8.00 per 100, $75.00 
per 1000. O. B. Stevens, Shenandoah, la. 

Geranium Sallend, 2-in., $.'t.00 per 100. Cash. 
Hill City (ireeiihoiises. Forest City. la. 

(Jeranium Beaute Poitevlne, 214-in., $.55.00 
pe r 1000. Calla Cut Flower Co., Calla, O . 

Geranium I'oitevine. 2V<j-ln.. $5.00 per 100. 
Haase Bros.. I'ekin. III. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt. rooted cuttings. $2.00 
per 100, prepaid. Sefton's, Chlllicothe. Mo. 

500 Geranium Countess Harcourt, 2^-ln.. $4.00 
p er 100. F. Dorner A Sons Co.. Lafayette, Ind. 

QLADIOLI 



SPECIAL OFFER 

OF 

THE BEST IN COMMERCIAL GLADIOLI. 

No use waiting any longer 

with that order; the supply of 

A-1 stock has almost melted away. 

Prices per 1000. IH-ln. lV4-in. 

America, lavender $22.00 $19.00 

Augusta, white 36.00 30.00 

Brenchleyensls, scarlet 30.00 

Glory of Holland, late white 45.00 

HALLEY, earliest salmon pink.. 30.00 27.00 

Ida Van, orange-scarlet 25.00 20.00 

La Grandesse, large rosy-white.. ."iS.OO 45.00 

Mrs. Francis King, scarlet 30.00 25.00 

Mrs. Frank Pendleton, pink, red 

blotch 40.0« 

Mrs. Watt, wine red 50.00 

Niagara, cream 50.00 .... 

Panama, large pink 45.00 40.00 

Peace, large white 45.00 40.00 

Pride of Hlllegom, giant scarlet. 60.00 .... 

Prlmulinus Hybrids 25.00 22.00 

Prince of Wales, early orange... 80.00 70.00 

Schwaben, large yellow 50.00 46.00 

WILBRINK. earliest Uvender. . 60.00 61.00 
Yellow Hammer, pure yellow, 

large 60.00 45.00 

Florists' Mixed 22.00 20.00 

America, 1-in. up. $10.00; Mrs. fYancls King, 
■■•i-in., $7.00 per 1000. 

BULBLETS. 
We are willing to sell n limited quantity of 
our bulhlets of Le Marechal Foch and a few 
other "headlights." Write us. 

WBLLBR NURSERIES CO.. INC., 

Gladiolus Specialists, Perennial Specialists. 

Holland. Mich. 

~G ladlohisTAugusta . 1 % -inT~up7 $12.00 per~1000'. 
Cash. Lacher Bros., R. D. No. 1, Liverpool. N. T. 



184 



The Florists*" Review 



May 4. 1922 



QLAPIOLI C ontinued 

GLADIOLI TKUE TO NAME. 

AiiitTlca, No. 1 ijilU.SO per 1000 

America, No. 2 13.00 per 1000 

Mrs. Francis King, No. 1 21.00 per 1000 

Mrs. Francis Kind, No. 1' 15.00 per 1000 

Mrs. Francis King, No. 3 12.00 per 1000 

Mrs. Francis King, No. 4 U.OO per 1000 

Burou llulot, No. 2 55.00 per 1000 

Barou Hulot, No. 3 45.00 per 1000 

Uaron Hulot, No. 4 38.00 per 1000 

Prince oi: Wales, No. 1 GO.OO per 1000 

Prince of AVales, No. 2 50.00 per 1000 

Prince of AValcs, No. 3 40.00 per 1000 

Bertrex, No. 1 80.00 per 1000 

Bertrex, No. 2 70.00 per 1000 

Bertrex, No. 4 50.00 i>er 1000 

Bertrex, No. 5 38.00 per lOOO 

Mrs. Frank Pendleton, No. 2 35.00 per 1000 

Wllbrink, No. 1 60.00 per 1000 

Pink Perfection, No. 2 50.00 per 1000 

Gretchen Zang, No. 2 40.00 per 1000 

Gretchen Zung, No. 3 30.00 j)cr 1000 

Gretchen Zang, No. 4 32.00 ixiv 1000 

Gretchen Zang, No. 5 27,00 per 1000 

Gretchen Zung, No. 22.00 per 1000 

Halley, No. 1 25.00 per 1000 

Halley, No. 2 20.00 per 1000 

Halley, No. 3 14.00 per 1000 

Schwaben, No. 1 40.00 per 1000 

Yellow llanuner, No. 1 40.00 per 1000 

Niagara, No. 1 35.00 per 1000 

Niagara, No. 2 30.00 per lOOO 

Niagara, No. 3 24.00 per 1000 

Panama, No. 1 35.00 per 1000 

Panama, No. 2 30.00 per 1000 

War, No. 4 20.00 per 1000 

Peace, No. 1 35.00 per 1000 

Peace, No. 2 30.00 per 1000 

Pink Beauty, No. 1 40.00 per 1000 

Mrs. "Watt, No. 1 40.00 per 1000 

Mrs. Watt, No. 2 30.00 per 1000 

Flora, No. 1 25.00 per 100 

Crimson Glow, No. 1 28.00 per 100 

Le Marechal Foch, No. 1 32.00 per 100 

Empress of India, No. 1 40.00 per 1000 

Goliath, No. 2 40.00 per 1000 

Herada, No. 1 70.00 per 1000 

Herada, No. 2 (iO.OO per 1000 

Ix)uiw, No. 1 38.00 per 100 

Lilvwhite, No. 1 100.00 per 1000 

Marv Fennell, No. 1 75.00 per 1000 

Marv Fennell, No. 3 05.00 per 1000 

.Sulphur King, No. 2 8.00 per 100 

Helen Franklin, No. 1 15.00 per 100 

Mrs. Dr. Norton, No. 1 38.00 per 100 

Mrs. Dr. Norton, No. 5 83.00 per 1000 

Mrs. Dr. Norton, No. 6 48.00 per 1000 

Alice Tipladv, No. 1 15.00 per 100 

The Pearl, No. 1, new pink, tine.. 50.00 per 1000 

The I'eari, No. 2 40.00 per 1000 

The I'eari, No. 3 .30.00 per 1000 

The Pearl, No. 4 20.00 per 1000 

The I'eari, No. 5 14.00 per 1000 

The I'eari. No. 6 7.00 per 1000 

Golden Measure, No. 1 2.25 each 

M vrtle. No. 2 50.00 per 1000 

Wlllv Wigmnu, No. 2 30.00 per 1000 

Velvet King, No. 2 30.00 per 1000 

Faust, No. 1, large red 4,00 per 100 

Exhibition Mixed, No. 1, best 22.00 per 1000 

Exhibition Mixed, No. 2 17.00 per 1000 

Choice Mixed, No. 1 12.00 per 1000 

War, bulblets 1.00 per 1000 

Flora, bulblots 10.00 per 1000 

Empress of India, bulblets 1.00 per lOOO 

illory of Holland, hulbb'ts 1.00 per 1000 

Glorv of Holland, bulblets 2.75 per qt. 

Crystal White, bulblets 1.00 per 1000 

Crystal AVhite, bulblets 2. .50 per qt. 

Herada, bulblets 3.00 per 1000 

Lilvwhite, bulblets 3.50 per lOOO 

Marv Fennell. bulblets 4.50 per 1000 

Helen Franklin, bullilets : 10.00 per lOOO 

Alice Tipladv. bulblets 8.00 per lOOO 

The Pearl, bulblets 75 per 1000 

The I'eari, bulblets 2..'')0 per qt. 

1'riniulinus Ilvbrids. bulblets 75 per lOOO 

niauii. bulblits. new reil ; large,.. 20,00 per lOOO 

:Mvrtle, bulblets 4.00 per 1000 

I'ananui. bullilets 1.00 per 1000 

Panama, bulblets 34.00 per bu. 

Mrs, Francis King, bulblets 75 per qt. 

Mrs. Frauds Kittg. bulblets 15.00 per bu. 

Mrs. Frank Pendleton, bulblets... 1,25 per lOOO 

F.velvn Kirtland. bulblets 3.00 per 1000 

Gretchen Z.ing, bulblets 2.00 per 1000 

Hallcv. bullilets 1.00 per qt. 

Halley. bullilets 5.00 i)er pk, 

Schwaben, bullilets 1.00 per 1000 

Yellow Hnniuier. bulblets 1,00 per 1000 

Yelliiw Haiiinier. bulblets 2.75 per qt, 

Cliicago White, bulblets 1,25 i)er 100 

Chicago AVhite, bulblets 2,25 per qt. 

.\merica, bulblets 50 per qt. 

.Vnu'rica. bulblets 10,00 per bu, 

Rnuce Torch, bulblets 1.25 per 1000 

Marv Pickford. 4jolWefs 12,00 per 1000 

2,"0 bulbs at 1000 rates: less lots, 15c per 100 
liiglur. Good stuck. Cash, please, 

PERRY GARDEN.^, H.WENNA. 0. 

GLADIOLI IN ALL BEST VARIETIES. 

1V4 to 
Prices per 1000. H4-ln, up 1%-ln. 

America $22.00 $19.00 

Auguata 35.00 29.00 

Cbirago White 4.'S.00 36.00 

Halley ^n.OO 20.00 

Mrs. Frands King 30.00 25.00 

Peace 40.00 84.00 

Panama 45.00 85.00 

Schwaben 50.00 46.00 

Aak for a complete list of all ▼arietlei; all 
sUea; alao bulbleta. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 
48 W. 18th St., New York. N. T. 



4.00 
3.50 
2.50 
2.00 



GLADIOLI. 

Per 
100 
Empress of India, 1>4 to 

1%-iu $ 3.0O 

Empress of India, 1 to 

lV4-ln 2.50 

Lilywhite, IVi to 2 in 8.00 

Lilywhite, 1% to IVj-iu... 0.00 

Lilywhite, 1 to 114-in 5.00 

Prince of Wales, 1% to 

IMi-ln 5.00 

Prince of Wales, 1 to IVi- 

in 

Schwaben, 1^ to 2^. 

some 3-in 

Schwaben, 1^4 to l'/4-in. . 
Schwaben, 1 to 114-ln... 

Schwaben, % to 1-in 

Peace, 1V4 to 2Mi-in 3.50 

Peace, 1% to 1%-ln 3.00 

Peace, 1 to 1%-in 2.25 

Peace, % to 1-in 1.50 

Mrs. Pendleton, 1 to 1%- 

in 3.00 

Gretchen Zang, I14 to 

1%-ln 5.00 

Gretchen Zang, 1 to 1%- 

in : 4.00 

Mary Fennell, 1% to 1%- 

In 5.50 

Niagara, 1% to 1%-in 3.00 

1 to 1%-in 2.50 

% to 1-in 1.80 

1 to 114-in 2.50 

% to 1-in 1.80 

Smith, 1^ to 

2-ln 40.00 

Byron L. Smith, 1V4 to 

1%-in 35.00 

Golden Measure, each, 

$,X.25 90.00 

Crimson Glow,'ii/4 to'2-Vn'. 2o!o0 
Purple Glory, each, $1.00. 90.00 
Early Sunrise, IVi to 3in. 15.00 
Mrs. Dr. Norton, 1% to 

2-ln 16.00 

Europa, 1% to IVj-in 8.50 

Europa, 1 to H4-ln 5.50 

America, 1 to H4-in 1.50 



Per 

1000 

$24.00 

18.00 
00.00 
50.00 
40.00 

40.00 



4.00 30.00 



Per 
5000 



40.00 
30.00 
25.00 
15.00 
30.00 
25.00 
20.00 
12.00 



$175.00 

150.00 

150.00 

125.00 

90.00 

60.00 

140.00 

100.00 

75.00 

60.00 



25.00 100.00 



Niagara, 
Niagara, 
Panama, 
Panama, 
Byron L. 



40.00 

30.00 

50.00 
25.00 
20.00 
15.00 
20.00 
15.00 



90.00 
60.00 
90.00 
60.00 



60.00 
60.00 
12.00 



W. E. KIKCHHOFF, JR., ALBION, N. 



50.00 
Y. 



BUY LONG'S GLADIOLI AND BE GLAD. 

IH to 
Per 1000. 1%-ln. min. up 

America, lavender-pink $16.00 $20.00 

Autumn Queen, cream yellow.... 24.00 80.00 

Empress of India, maroon 82.00 40.00 

Halley, salmon pink 24.00 80.00 

Mrs. F. King, salmon red 18.00 24.00 

Niagara, delicate cream 82.00 

Panama, fine pale pink 28.00 86.00 

Prince of Wales, early salmon... 48.00 60.00 

Princepg, scarlet white blotch... 36.00 

Schwaben, best yellow 86.00 45.00 

All good mixed, 1 to l^,^\n., $12.00; 1^ to 

1%-ln., $16.00 per 1000. 

Send for special prices on 6000 or more America. 

100 or 250 bulbs at 1000 rate. Cash or c. o. d. 

26 per cent will hold bulbs until wanted. 

P. o. b. West Grore, Pa. 

BULBLETS PREPAID. 

1,000 6,000 10,000 

America $0.60 $2.00 $8.60 

Autumn Queen 1.00 4.00 7.00 

Empress of India 60 2.00 8.60 

Halley 60 2.00 8.60 

Mrs. F. King 60 2.00 8.60 

NUgara 1.60 6.00 10.00 

Panama 60 2.00 3.60 

Prince of Wales 8.00 16.00 28.00 

Schwaben 1.00 4.00 7.00 

War 1.00 4.00 7.00 

Willy Wlgman 76 8.00 6.00 

Yellow Hammer 1.60 6.00 10.00 

All good mixed 50 2.00 8.60 

Cultural directions with each order. 

Cash or c. o. d. 25 per cent will hold bulblets 

until wanted. 

W. P. LONG, BOX F., WEST GROVB, PA. 

Wholesale grower of Gladioli. 

IN ORDER TO MOVE MY LARGE STOCK OF 

HALLEY QUICKLY, I AM MAKING THE 

FOLLOWING SPECIAL OFFER: 

HALLEY. 
1% to 1%-in., $16.00 per 1000. 

HALLEY. 
1 to 1% In., $12.00 per 1000. 

HALLEY, 
% to 1-ln., $8.00 per 1000. 

HALLEY, 
% to %-in., $4.00 per 1000. 

HALT EY 
Under %-ln., $2.50'per 1000. 

Terms: 6 per cent for cash with order. An 
additional 6 per cent will be allowed on orders 
for 10,000 bulbs. 

If interested in other Tarieties, I shall be 
glad to quote my lowest prices on same. 



Box A. 



JELLE ROOS, 
Gladiolus Specialist, 



Concord. Mass. 



GLADIOLI. 

Prophetess, fine white with red throat, rery 
early, flrst-slze, $18.00 per 1000. 

Standard Florists' Mixture, a large variety of 
standard sorts, flrst-size, $18.00 per 1000: second- 
size. $16.00 per 1000. Cash. 

MRS. J. W. UOORB. 
168 OUntOB At*,. Ttfftn, 



GLADIOLUS BULBS. 

1st tlse 2nd size Srd sIm 

IH-ln. 1^ to 1 to 

ap IVi-in. 1^-in. 

Per Per Per 

1000 1000 1000 

America $20.00 $10.00 $12.00 

Augusta 26.00 20.00 lA.OO 

Bertrex 76.00 70.00 

Brenchleyensla 20.00 16.00 12.00 

Crackerjack 20.00 16.00 12.00 

Dawn (Tracy's) 76.00 70.00 

Empress of India 40.00 86.00 

Evelyn KirUand 76.00 70.00 

Gretchen Zang 66.00 60.00 

Halley 20.00 20.00 10.00 

Mrs. Francis King 26.00 20.00 10.00 

Mrs. Frank Pendleton 40.00 80.00 

Panama 80.00 26.00 20.00 

Peace 40.00 80.00 

Pink Perfection 60.00 60.00 

Princeplne 26.00 20.00 

Schwaben 40.00 40.00 

Taconic 40.00 

War 46.00 40.00 

Willy Wlgman 40.00 40.00 

William Falconer 76.00 70.00 

Yellow Hammer 40.00 40.00 

White and Ught, mixed. 20.00 18.00 10.00 

Primnllnus Hybrids 20.00 18.00 10.00 

General Mlxtur* 18.00 10.00 12.00 

200 or more of one kind at 1000 rate. 

ThsM bulbs are first class, in every way. 

Dependable stock. 

N. LBON WINTZBR, 

Qladlolna Grower, ^??* Grove. Pa. 

"A. B. C." QUALITY, TRUE TO NAME. 
NOTE REDUCED PRICES: 

1st size 2nd size 
1%-in. up 1^-ln. up 
100 1000 100 1000 

America $2.15 $19.00 $2.00 $16.00 

Arizona 4.25 40.00 8.76 85.00 

Autumn Queen 3.50 30.00 

Chicago White 3.50 30.00 

Louise 30.00 26.00 

Goliath 4.00 35.00 3.60 80.00 

Independence 3.00 25.00 2.60 20.00 

Lily Lehman 3.60 30.00 8.00 26.00 

Flora 7.00 

Mrs. Frank Pendletoo.. 4.50 42.00 4.00 37.00 

Mrs. G. W. Moulton.... 10.25 100.00 

Mrs. 0. W. Halliday.... 6.75 65.00 6.25 60.00 

Negerfurst 13.00 125.00 

Manama 4,00 35.00 3.50 32.00 

Peace 4.00 35.00 3.76 82.00 

Pink Beauty 4.00 35.00 3.60 80.00 

Prim. Hybrids, mixed... 3.00 25.00 2.60 20.00 

Prince of Orange 6.75 66.00 

Prince of Wales 5.50 60.00 6.00 45.00 

Schwaben 6.00 45.00 4.26 40.00 

Wllbrink 4.60 40.00 

Willy Wlgman 4.50 40.00 4.00 86.00 

Mixed 2.00 17.60 1.76 10.00 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 
172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

GLADIOLUS PRIMULINUS. 

NOTHING IS MORE BEAUTIFUL THAN MY 

GIxADIOLUS PRIMULINUS WITH THEIR AB 

TISTICALLY ARRANGED FLOWERS AND 

THEIR PASTEL AND ORIENTAL COLORS. 

THEY BLOSSOM EARLIER AND LATER THAN 

ANY OTHER GLADIOLUS, AND THE SMALL 

EST BULBS PRODUCE FLOWERS. TRY THEM. 

1 to 114-in $10.00 per 1000 

% to 1-in 8.00 per 1000 

% to %-ln 6.00 per 1000 

%-ln. and below 8.00 per 1000 

Bulblets 2.00 per qt. 

Halley, the earliest salmon-pink; Ist size, 
$20.00 per 1000. Panama, the best pink; 1st 
size, $30.00 per 1000. 

CHAUTAUQUA FLOWBRFIELD CO., 
0, Zeestraten, Prop., Bemus Point, N. Y. 



TBBY SPECIAL! 

For $12.00 I will send 6000 selected bulblets of 
the new pure white Gladiolus Lilywhite and In- 
clude 10 blooming size gratis. Lilywhite is the 
long desired pure white Gladiolus of vlgoroas, 
healthy growth; great multiplying power; 
straight spikes opening six to eight blooms at a 
time; an Ideal forcer, early as Halley and the 
best commercial pure white to date. 

Awarded first prize by New York, Massacbn- 
setts and St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada, Horticul- 
tural Societies and American Gladiolus Society. 

This variety will be grown eventually by the 
million and practical florists will get stock at 
once. 

Send for our descriptive list of cut-fiower vs- 
rieties suitable for retail florists; also testimo- 
nials from leading growers. 

H. B. MEADER. 
OlsdiolDS Specialist. Dover. N. H, 

NEW JERSEY GROWN GLADIOLITS BULBS. 
Special offer for cash with order. 

Panama, .'iOOO li/4-in $20,00 per 1000 

Panama. 40.000 lV4-in 16,00 per 1000 

Halley. .'lOOO ]i4-in 14.00 per 1000 

Sold out of Gladiolus except the aljove. 

WM. BECKER, SR.. 

P. O. Box 138, I.flkehurst, N. J. 



May 4, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



185 



LE MARBCHAL FOCH. 
Come quick if you want them. 

I have 5000 Le Marecbal Foch bulblets to 
spare, $8.00 per 1000, the 5000 for $37.60. 
PINK BEAUTY, EARLIEST, 

$1.60 per 1000; quart, $3.00; peck, $12.00. 
PER QUART. 

America, $2.00. Annie Wigman, yellow; Can- 
didum, white tinted; Chicago White, Halley, 
Meadowvale, white; Primulinus Hybrids, Kun- 
derd's strain and Queenly, $2.26. 
PER 1000. 

Norton. $4.00; Herada, $1.60; Baltimore and 
Peace, $1.00; Prlnceps, 76c; Burrell, Early Pink, 
Crackerjack, Golden Wedding, Halley, Inde- 
pendence, Minnesota and Prlncepine, 50c. 

I have about a bushel of Mrs. King mixed 
about 20 per cent with Crackerjack, Blue Hy- 
brids, etc., 50c per quart. You can well afford 
to rogue and select them. Planting stock of the 
same lot, % to 1-in., $3.00 per 1000, $5.00 per 
peck. 

Small lots of Peerless Pink, Mr. Mark, Queen 
Wllhelmina, Mrs. Velthuys, Crystal White, 
Golden West, Hiawatha, Mrs. H. R. Whitney 
(Primulinus), Diener's Hybrids and Dawn 
(Tracy's) in regular sizes at low prices, as I 
don't list them. Cash with order. 
GEO. S. WOODRUFF, INDEPENDENCE. lA. 

HOYT'S NORTHWESTERN GROWN. 
Prices cut to the quick to close out. 

1^-in. X\i to 1 to 
up IH-in. 1%-ln. 

Halley Amount 3000 10,000 10,000 

Price $1B.00 $12.50 $10.00 

Myrtle Amount 400 300 

Price 45.00 38.00 

Niagara Amount 1000 

Price 16.00 

Prince of Wales.. Amount 1000 2000 2000 

Price 40.00 85.00 30.00 

% to %-in. 

% to 1-in. %-in. under 

Halley Amount 10,000 10,000 

Price $ 3.50 $ 2.00 

3 pecks Halley, 1/6 to %-in., $3.00 per peck. 
All above stock, young bulbs, plump and vig- 
orous. No better stock anywhere, 

HOYT BROS. CO., 
N. 11 Post St. Spokane, Wash. 

NICE, CLEAN, PLUMP BULBS. 

1%-ln. to 1-in. to 
Price per lOOO. 1%-in. up 1%-in. 1%-ln. 

Mrs. Francis King $20.00 $15.00 $10.00 

Niagara 36.00 28.00 23.00 

Panama 26.00 22.00 16.00 

9i-ln. to %-ln. to Below Bulb- 
1-in. %-ln. y,-ia. lets 

America $ 6.00 $2.76 $0.60 

Chicago White 1.00 

Mrs. F. King S.OO 3.00 .60 

Ida Van $10.00 6.00 3.00 .60 

Niagara 16.00 12.00 7.00 1.00 

Panama 12.00 8.00 6.00 .76 

Mixed XXX 4.00 2.00 

No charge for packing; 250 at lOOO rate. Above 
offers made subject to prior sale. 

FRANKLIN NURSERIES. 

200 W. 68th St., Minneapoli s, Minn . 

GLADIOLUS BULBS. 
THE FAMOUS PETOSKEY GROWN BRAND. 

No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 

America $18.00 $14.00 $10.00 

Autumn Queen 25.00 20.00 16.00 

Arizona 40.00 35.00 

Ida Van 2."i.00 20.00 16.00 

Mrs. W. E. Fryer 40.00 .32.00 

Independence 25.00 20.00 1(!.00 

Florists' Extra Mixture... 15.00 12.00 9.00 

Louise, extra fine, per 100 20.00 

Evelyn Kirtland, per 100.. 8.00 6.00 

Gaiety, very fine, per 100 4.00 3.20 

Cnsh witli order, pk'iisp. 
Write for bargain price on larjfe lots. Can 
furnish biilblets by the bushel of the following: 
America and Autumn Queen. 

C. M. GROSSMAN, 
Evergreen Farm, I'etuskey, Mich. 



WE WANT TO MOVE QUICKLY. 

Per 1000 

20,000 America, No. 2, IH to l^^-in $13.00 

10,000 Wllbrink, No. 2, 1V4 to IVjin 33.00 

Further, we have about 100.000 bulbs in No. 
1 and No. 2 in several other trade kinds, which 
must be sold. 

Ask for surplus list. 

P. VOS & SON, 
The Home of True Gladioli, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



GLADIOLI, SPECIAL CASH PREPAID PRICE. 

1000 Schwahen. No. 6 $5.0l> 

1000 Master Welbertus, H to %-in 6.00 

100 Evelyn Kirtland, No. 6 1.50 

TOO Herada. % to %-ln 1.00 

1000 Panama. Vi to %-ln 4.00 

1000 Prince of Wales, No. 6 9.00 

inoo Crackerjack, No. 6 2.50 

lOOO Arizona, No. 6 6.00 

TOO Alice Tiplady, >A to 1-in 6.00 

100 Angola, % to 1-in 5.00 

100 Mrs. Dr. Norton. No. 6 5.00 

10 Myra, No. 4 1.50 

6 Golden Measure, % to %-in 3.50 

All sound, true stock. Cash prices. 
F. C. HORNBERGER, HAMBURG. N. Y. 
Oladiolua America, % to 1-in., $8.00 per 1000; 
1 to l^-in., $10.00 per 1000. 

3. De Oroot, Orower, Catonirllle, Hd. 



GLADIOLUS AUTUMN QUEEN. 
Creamy-yellow suffused with a very delicate 
rose-pink, lower petals blotched maroon; large 
well opened flowers on a long straight spike. 
A late bloomer and stands the early autumn 
frosts in northern Michigan the best of any 
Gladiolus that has been grown here. 

I am discontinuing the growing of Gladioli 
and, in order to dispose of the remainder of my 
stock, I am making the following offer: 

5000 1%-in. and up $22.00 per 1000 

4000 1% to 1%-in 17.60 per 1000 

3000 1 to H4-in 12.00 per 1000 

20 per cent discount on lots of 5000 bulbs. 
40 per cent discount on entire stock. 

Cash with order. 
FRANK WINANS, PETOSKEY, MICH. 

GLADIOLUS BULBS. 

Pricei per 1000. 2nd size Srd size 4tb size 

Halley $16.00 $12.00 $ 8.00 

Mrs. F. King 16.00 12.00 9.00 

Peace 30.00 26.00 20.00 

Scbwaben ... 20.00 

6th size eth size 

Halley $ 6.00 $ 2.60 

Mrs. F. King 7.00 5.00 

Peace 18.00 16.00 

Schwaben 16.00 12.00 

Bulblets of above varieties at lowest market 
rates. 6 per cent cash with order. 

JOHN C. DAVIS, GROWER, 
77 South Ave., Rochester, N. T. 

HALLEY, 
the best earliest Gladiolus. 

SPECIAL OFFER, 
Ist size per 1000, $30.00; 
2nd size, per 1000, $27.00. 

Always profitable for wholesale 
as well as retail cutflower growers. 

WELLBR NURSERIES CO., INC.. 

Gladiolus Specialists, Perennial Specialists. 

Holland, Mich. 



WB STILL CAN SUPPLY OUR "BIO FOUR. 

Evelyn Kirtland, Bertrex, 

Oretchen Zang and Herada 

in various sizes 

at attractive prices. 

Our surplus list for the asking. 

A. H. AUSTIN CO.. WAYLAND. O. 



BARGAINS IN PLANTING STOCK. 
Per 1000 
4th size 5th size 6th size 

America $7.50 $4.50 $2.50 

Ida Van 9.00 7.00 4.00 

Mrs. Watt 14,00 10.00 7.00 

Niagara 16.00 10.00 7.00 

Peace 15.00 10.00 7.00 

Primulinus Hybrids 6.00 4.00 2.00 

Lilywhite, under %-in $1.50 per 100 

America and Primulinus Hybrids, bulblets, 
$8.00 per bu.: Mrs. Watt. $3.00 per qt. 

RALPH BENJAMIN. CALVERTON. N. Y. 

BARGAIN PRICE. 
To move quickly; for cash. 

Halley, 1^ to l^-ln $16.00 per 1000 

Halley, 1 to 1%-in 12.00 per 1000 

Halley, % to 1-in 8.00 per 1000 

10 per cent discount for 10,000 lots. 

WOBURN BULB FARMS. 
Arthur Hans, Prop., Wobum, Mass. 

LAST CALL FOR GLADWOOD GLADS. 

Price per 1000. No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 

America $18.00 $ $ 

Peace 32.50 27.50 20.00 

Prlncepine 20.00 16.00 

We still have the following varieties in smal- 
ler quantities: Empress of India, Ixivellness, 
Orange Brilliant. Prince of Wales. Willy Wig- 
man. Write for closing-out prices. Bulblets 
of most of the standard varieties. 
GLADWOOD GARDENS. COPEMIHH. MICH. 

THE BEST FLORISTS' VARIETY ON THE 

MARKET. 

MISS HELEN FRANKLIN. 

% to %-ln., $5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000; 

under %-in., $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; 

bulblets, $6.00 per 1000, $20.00 per qt. 

Cash with order or satisfactory references. 

THOMAS COGGER, MELROSE, MASS. 



GLADIOLI: SPECIAL OFFER. 

Mary Piokford, bulblets $5.00 per 1000 

Mary Fennell. %-in. and less 7. (X) per 1000 

Lilywhite, 1-in. and up 7.00 per 1000 

Lilywhite, % to %-in 7.00 per 1000 

Lilywhite. bulblets 5.00 per 1000 

Purple Glory, 60 2-ln $1.00 each 

T. Kent, 2-in 25 each 

Write for moderate prices on other sorts. 
J. Q . BURROWS. ONSET, MASS. 

VERT SPECIAL PRICES ON SURPLUS^ 
Small quantities of Gladiolus bulbs in all sizes 
of the following varieties: 

America, Augusta, Mrs. Francis King, Halley, 
Panama, Niagara. Prlnceps and Pink Beauty. 
If interested, write for prices. 
PERRY FEAGLBR, AUBURN, IND. 



GLADIOLUS BULBS. 
Fine, clean, healthy stock. 

1% to 2-in. IHtolH-ln. 
100 1000 100 1000 

America $.... $ $1.80 $10.00 

Chicago White 3.75 36.00 2.86 26.00 

Halley 3.75 35.00 2.00 18.00 

Mrs. Watt 4.25 38.00 

Panama 4.00 35.00 

Pendleton 5.00 45.00 3.75 35.00 

Primulinus Hybrids.. 2.75 25.00 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 
166 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

GLADIOLUS BULBLETS, POSTPAID. 

Fine, clean stock, free from dirt and absolutely 
true to name. 

America, Augusta, Brenchleyensis, Crackerjack, 
Halley, Independence, Mrs. Francis King, Pan- 
ama, Princepine, Scarsdale and Wlntzer's Gen- 
eral Mixture, 50c per 1000, $2.00 per 6000 of a 
kind; $3.50 per 10,000 of a kind. 

Niagara, Peace, Schwaben, War, $1.00 per 
1000, $4.76 for 5000 of a kind; $9.00 for 10,000 
of a kind. 

N. LEON WINTZER, 
Gladiolus Grower, West Grove, Pa. 

~10,000 REAL BULBS, SPECIAL TO MOVE. 

;.'000 Halley; 2000 Kmpress .if India; 1500 
mixed, ','4 to 1-in. <pr over. .1>10.00; 2000 America, 
1 to I'l.-in.. $10.00; 2000 Sumiuer (mauve), % to 
1-in., $15.00 per 1000. 

750 Primulinus Hybrids, finest mixed, $15.00. 
$100.00 talies them. 

Bullilets: 20,000; 7000 Primulinus Ilvbrids, 
7000 Summer, 3000 Empress of India. 2000 Fair- 
fax, 1000 Halley, 7Dc per 1000. $12.00 takes 
them. 
THOMPSON, FLORIST. BEAVKK FALLS. FA. 

AMERICA, CHEAP ONLY IN PRICE. 

26,000 1%-in. and up $18.00 per 1000 

16,000 IVi to 1%-ln 14.00 per 1000 

20,000% to %-in 5.00 per 1000 

60,000% to %-in 3.00 per 1000 

FAIRY (MRS. JAMES LANCASHIRE). 
Exquisite cream color shading to salmon-pink; 
two weeks earlier than America, 1% to 2%-Id., 
$26.00; 114 to 1%-in., $20.00 per 1000. 250 of 
either kind at 1000 rate. 10 per cent for caah 
with order. 

E. H. STEWART, BROOKLYN. MICH. 

SMALL LOTS, CLEAN STOCK, SMAIJL, PRICE. 

300 War, No. 2 $2.75 per 100 

200 Velvet King, No. 2 3.00 per 100 

300 Liebesteuer, No. 1 (i.75 per 100 

200 Schwaben, No. 1 4.40 per 100 

3000 Schwaben, No. 5 1 .00 per 100 

300 Augusta, No. 2 1.80 per 100 

300 America, No. 2 1.10 per 100 

C HAS. B. HAFFAUF, l.NDEPENDE.VCE, lA. 

GLADIOLI'S BILBS. " ~ 

I'j in. up l',4 to 1%-in. 

America .fl.S.OO $14.50 

Mrs. Francis King 22.00 19.00 

Peace ;}.-). 00 30.00 

The above is flrst-dass stock. 

No charse for packing. 

HANSEN NURSERY & FLORAL CO., 

Xiles, Mich. 

SPECIAL OFFER, PLANTING STOCK. 
Exhibition Mixture of 3,000,000; $2.00 per 
1000, 10,000 for $17.50; pk. of bulblets, $8.00; 
bushel, $10.00. Halley and America, planting 
stock, $2.60 per 1000. Cash with order or aatis- 
faetory references. 

THOMAS COGGER, MELROSE, MASS. 

AMERICA, CLEAN STOCK. 

1%-ln. and up .$!(>. 00 per 1000 

1% to 1%-in 11.00 per 1000 

Cash, ple.ise. 
R. E. SHARPLESS. WEST GROVE. PA. 

GLADIOLI'S PINK PERFECTION. 

1400 No. 2 $18.00 per 1000 

1100 No. 3 15.00 per 1000 

Bulblets, 8 quarts, $1.50 per quart. 
THE WESTI.,^VKE MA RKET, SPOKANE, WASH. 

GLADIOLI, SPEciAlTOF^Eir 
America and Crackerjack, fine dark red; first 
size, $12.00 per lOOO; second size, 1-in. bulbs, 
$9.00 per 1000. 

WAGNER'S GREENHOUSES, TIFFIN, 0. 

REMEMBER 

Massachusetts grown are the best. 

Two million planting stock. 

WOBURN BULB FARMS, 

Arthur Hans, Prop.. Wobum. Mass. 

Gladioli: Choice No. 3 bulbs, per 1000; Amer- 
ica, $9.00; Mrs. Francis King, $10.00; Mrs. 
Frank Pendleton, $23.00. Cash or c. o. d. 

Valley View Gardens. Garrettsvllle, O. 

7000 America, 1%-in, $11.00 per 1000; 13,000 
America, 1-ln., $8.00 per 1000. 

Also planting stock of several kinds. 
Humphrey's Flower Gardens, Patask ala. 0. 

Gladioli: See my list in Review, April 27 
issue, fine bulbs at richt prices. 
Fred W. Baumgras, 423 Pearl St., Lansing, Mich. 

Gladioli: Let us quote you on all the best 
varieties; good sound bulbs. S. S. Skidelsky It 
Co., Dodge Bldg., 53 Park Place, New York. 

Oladiolus America, 2nd size, $16.00; Srd size, 
$12.00 per 1000. Planting sizes quoted on ap 
Plication. J. L Johnson. DeK alb. ni 

GLOXINIAS 

Gloxinia plants, will make nice blooming stock 
this iummer; nice, thrifty 2-tn. ready to shift, 
$1.00 per doz., $10.00 per 100. 

N. 0. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 



> 



186 



The Florists^ Review 



May 4. 1922 



QREVILLEAS __^ 

OreviUea Kobusta, good, strong 4-1d. plants 
ready for S-ln., 20c. 

Wagner's Qreenbouses, Tiffin, 0. 

Orerlllea Kobusta, 2%-in., $4-50 per 100. 
Th e McGregor Bros. Co., Springfleld, O. 

QU A VAS. 

Stniwberry Guavii, out of 4-ln. pots, 2 feet 
lilgh, 35c; 3 feet, 50c. Casli with order. H. C. 
Doescher, 2048 GeutlUy Ave., New Orleana. La. 

QYPSOPMILAS 

Gypsopliila Paniculata, exceptionally fine plants 
at $6.00 per 100. 

Joseph F. Martin Nurseries, PalnesvlUe, 0. 

(Jvpsojiliilii raniruliitii, BtronB fleld-grown, 
^6.00 p e r 100. Tliumus Murphy, PainesvlUe, 0. 

HAWPY PLANTS 

HAKDY I'LAXTS, FIKLI) GROWN, STRONG, 
STOCKY. 

Will tildoni this seiisdii. Give us n trial order 
and let us- prove to vou the (juality of our stock. 

Per doz. Per 100 

Agrosteimii.i, Mullein Pink $0.00 $3.00 

Alyssuni Sa.\atile. (iold Dust «0 3.00 

Auchusa Ancnstifiila GO 3.00 

Anthemis, Yellow .Mar>;uerite (JO 3.00 

Aqnilettia Canadensis. Colunil)ine. . .00 3.00 

Aiiuilejiia linnu spurred, mixed 00 3.00 

Aquile«ia. all sorts mixed, 2-yeur. .(iO 3.00 

Artemisia Stelleriana OO 3.0O 

Hoooonia, Plume Poppy (iO 3.00 

Holtonia .\steroides. white 00 3.00 

Cantertiury liells. very larye 00 3,00 

Carnation Red Gri'nadin 00 3.00 

Carnaiiiin White Grenadin tM) 3.00 

Hardy Border Carnation, mixed... .00 3.00 
Hardv liorder Carnation, yellow 

ground CO 3.00 

Centaurea Mairoicphala, i;-year- 

okl CO 3.00 

Coreopsis 00 3.00 

llelphiniiuii (;old Medal 00 3.00 

Dianlhus PI ariiis. Grass Pink.. .00 3.00 

Diantlnis I>juif<plius. double scarlet .00 3.00 

Kiantluis .Midnijiht (iO 3.00 

Diantlius Snowball 00 3.00 

Dianthus Fireball 00 3.00 

Itianthns Kasier Queen 00 3.00 

Diaiithus Salmon Qiii'tii till 3.00 

Dianthus, all sorts mixed 00 3.00 

Digitalis. Foxglove. v.Ty large 00 3.00 

Glaueium i llorneil I'oppy), Bur- 
bank's CO 3.00 

Echinops. Globe Thistle 60 3.00 

Ervngiuni, Sea Holly 00 3.00 

Kupatorinm Fraseri GO 3.00 

Feverfew, white 60 3.00 

Gaillardia 00 3.00 

Gvpsophila Paniivilata, Bal)y's 

Breath CO 3.00 

(Jviwophila Hepens, dwarf 60 3.00 

Galcga, (loafs Hue (!(> 3.00 

Hollvhoek. doulile inixeil 60 3.00 

Hollvhock. single mixed 00 3.00 

Hibiscus. .Mallow Marvels CO 3.00 

Iberis Gibraltariea 60 3.00 

Isatis (;iauca 00 3.00 

laniim Blue. Howerint Flax, L'-year- 

old CO 3.00 

Myosotis. Foruet nienot 00 3.00 

Jlonarda Didvma Rosea, Horse 

Mint CO 3.00 

Physoste;.'ia. pink and white CO 3.00 

Pvrethruni .\ureiim (iolden Gem... .(JO 3.00 

inidbeckia Purpnna (JO 3.00 

Sweet Rocket. L'year old CO 3.00 

Stachvs Ijtnata. tine foliage (iO 3.00 

Shasta Daisy 60 3.00 

Salvia ArL'entea. hue foliage 60 3.00 

Sweet William Scarlet Beauty 60 3.00 

Sweet William Pink Beauty 60 3.00 

Sweet William, while CO 3.00 

Sweet AVilliani. velvet blaok 00 3.00 

Sweet William Hidl)orn Glory, 

mixed 60 .TOO 

Tunica Saxifraca 60 3.00 

Valeriana Rul)ra CO 3.00 

Valeriana Coccinea 00 3.00 

Valeriana Alba GO 3.00 

Phlox Suiiulata, white, pink and 

lil.ic 60 3.00 

Bv exiiress not jirepaid. .'iO at 100 rate. 
.TOH.X F HATSER, BAYFIELD, WIS. 

HARDY PERENNIAI.a. 

Per 100 

Oalega Officinalis $10.00 

Oalllardla Grandiflora 10.00 

Helenlum Rubrum 10.00 

Hibiscus, assorted 7.00 

Aciuilegla Hybrids 10.00 

Lythrum Roseum 7.60 

Nepefa Musslnl 7.00 

PhTSostegIa Virginlca 7.00 

Rudbeckla Golden Glow 7.00 

Rudbeckia Newmanll 7.00 

Sweet Williams In variety 10.00 

Chrysanthemum Maxima 10.00 

CHARLES H. TOTTY CO., MADISON, N. J. 

ATJOUST SEEDLINGS. 
Delphinium Belladonna, Shasta Daisy, Coreop- 
sis Lnnceolafa, $6.00 per 1000. 

Platycodon, blue or white; Aqullegla Long 
Spurrrd Hvbrids, $1.00 per 100. Arhlllea Perry's 
White, Phvsostogia. pink: divisions. $2.50 per 100. 

H. HILLS. BRISTOL, IND. 

Sweet William, strong, fleld-grown plants, 
choice mixed. $7.00 per 100. 

Arden Floral Gardens, Arden, Del. 



WBLLER'S PERENNIALS 
"With that wonderful Soot system." 

ASIDE FROM OUR COMPLETE COLLECTION 

WB OFFER: 

STRONG FIELD-GROWN PLANTS OF: 

Per 100 

Achillea Millefolium Roseum $0.00 

Anthemis Kelwayi 7.00 

Arabia Alpina, (Rock Cress) 10.00 

Armerla Formosa 12.00 

Asters, mixed 10.00 

Asters in var., our sel 12.00 

Boltonia Asteroldes 8.00 

Boltonla Latisquama 8.00 

Baddlela, Butterfly Bush 20.00 

Campanula Medium Caiycanthema, In sep- 
arate colors 10.00 

ConTaliaria Majaiis . . . : 6.00 

Coreopsii Lanceolata Grandiflora 7.00 

Delphinium Bellamosum . . . ; 12.00 

Delphinium Gold Medal Hybrids 12.00 

Dlantbus Barbatus, mixed 7.00 

Dianthus Holborn Glory 8.00 

Dlantbus Scarlet Beauty 8.00 

Dianthus Velvety Black 8.00 

Dianthus LatlfoUus 10.00 

Dianthus Plumarlus, mixed 8.00 

Dianthus Plumarlus Semperflorens 10.00 

Gaillardia Grandiflora 8.00 

Geum Mrs. Bradsliaw 15.00 

Grasses Pennlsetum Japonlcum 10.00 

Grasses, Kulalia Zebrlna 15.00 

Hellanthus Miss Melllsh 8.00 

Hellantbus Multlflorus Flore Pleno 12.00 

Ileliopsis Pitcherlana 10.00 

Heliopsis Scabra Zinnlaeflora 10.00 

Hemerocallis Thunbergli 10.00 

Hibiscus Crimson Eye 10.00 

Hibiscus Giants, pink, red and white 15.00 

Iris Germanlca, in variety 6.00 

Iris Germanlca, mixed 2.60 

Iris Kaempferi, (Japanese Iris), in separate 

colors 15.00 

Mixed colors 10.00 

Linium I'erenne 10.00 

Lobelia Cardinalls 15.00 

Myosotis Palustris Semperflorens 7.00 

Phlox, in separate varieties 12.00 

Phlox Miss Lingard 15.00 

Physostegla 7.00 

Pyrethrum Hybridum Grandiflorum, double 

mixed 15.00 

Ranunculus 7.00 

Rudbeckia Laciniata (Golden Glow) 8.00 

Rudbeckla Newmannli 8.00 

Sedum Spectabile Brilliant 12.00 

Sedum Sexangulare 10.00 

.Statice Latifolia 15.00 

Tritoma Pfltzerll 16.00 

Veronica Splcata 12.00 

Vinca Minor 7.00 

ASK FOR GENERAL CATALOGUE. 

WEIJ.,ER NURSERIES CO.. INC.. 

Gladiolus Specialists, Perennial Specialists. 

Holland, Mich. 

BIG SALE PERENNIAL PLANTS. 

Extra robust plants that will bloom this season 

and make you money. 

Hurry your orders in for the famous Bryson Ayres 

perennials. 

Our expert packing assures safe arrival 

in fine condition. 

Per 100 

.\nthemis Kelwayii $12.00 

Aquilegia, Colimil>ine. extra fine strain.... 12.00 

Carnation Hardv White Puritv 12.00 

Carnation Hardy Red Fireflame 12.00 

Coreopsis Ijance<data 5.00 

Chrysanthemum, extra early white iK)in- 

pon. very hardy 9.00 

Dianthns Barbatus, Sweet William, most 

beautiful colors imaginable 12.00 

Dianthus Chinensis. earlv and continuous 

bloomer 12.00 

Daisies, Hardy Marguerite, everblooming. . 6.00 

Delphinium Cambridge Blue 8.00 

Gnillanlia Grandiflora 8.00 

(!ypsoi)hila Paniculata 8.00 

Gyjisoiihil.i Paniculata FlorePleno, dotible 

white; 2 year fleld-grown plants 28.00 

Iris Sibiricn, blue, resembles Japane