(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "73 Magazine (May 1979)"



■ 




■ 




May 1979 $2.50 



30 CB to 10 

— part XVIII: several PLL rigs 



78 



K9PS 



34 PROM IDer for Longer Callsigns 

— don't be taught short . W4VGZ 

38 The W7GAQ Key Collection 

— 250 museum masterpieces 
IC7NZA 

44 Proper FM Transceiver 
Adjustment 

— good club project VE3AVY 

48 Dual-Band Smokey Detector 

— Super Scooper does it all. . . W1SNN 

64 The DXer's Secret Weapon 

— costs you nothing. . , W6BKY 

66 Foiling the Mad Kerchunker 

— frustrate him with this circuit 
KSMATfNSEE 

68 Trends in Surplus 

— if s not what it used to be 

WA2SUT/NNNIZVB 



i m- * 



72 [2 An 8080 Repeater Control 



86 



88 



92 



96 



100 



138 



lO RTTY Transceive for the 
KIM'1 

— ^requires video terminal and 

AFSK generator 

, . _ WB8VQD, WB3GCP 

n^ Keyboard Konvenience 
—simplify entry of BASIC 
programs. .-..,,,.,,-,, WA7NEV 



T| DXCC in One Sitting 

— know your prefixes 
_ WA4FYZ, N2CR 

A Low-Cost Circuit Board Holder 

— price tag: 45? Steele 

User Report: the IC-245 

— good things come in small 

packages . . , . W8YA 

The History of Ham Radio 

-part VIII W9CI 

Improving the Sabtronics 2000 

— make a good DMM even better 
, , . , N8AMRJ4 



— part tV: addenda N3IC 



142 Turn Signal Timeout 

—eliminates two-wheeled 
embarrassment .,,.,, K10TW 




Never Say Die- 4, Looking West- 6, DX-12, Letters— 18, Contests- 20, RTTY Loop -22, Ham 
Help — 22, 118, 152, New Products— 24, Microcomputer Interfacing— 28, Social Events— 119, Dealer 
Directory- 140, Corrections -150, 165, Review- 151, FCC- 151, 160, OSCAR Orbits-161, Propaga- 
tion- 193 



PORTABLE... MOBILE... BASE STATION 




the TEMPO 

SYNCOM S1 

DOES IT ALL 



AND GIVES YOU 



CHANNELS 



TEMPO PRESENTS THE WORLD'S FIRST 
SYNTHESIZED 800 CHANNEL HANJP HELD 
TRANSCEIVER • 

This amazing pocket sized radio represents the year's 
biggest breakthrough in 2*meter communications. 

Other unrts that are larger, heavier and are similarly 
priced can offer only 6 channels. The SYNCOM*S price 
includes the battery pack, charger, and a telescoping 
antenna. But, far more important is the 800 channels 
offered by the S1. 

The optional touch tone pad adds greatly to its 
convenience and the addition of a Tempo solid state 
amplifier adds tremendously to Its power. 



44f It* 



SPECIFICATIONS 

frequency Coverage: 
Channel Spacing. 



Power RK^uiremenls 
Current Drain: 



^hown wfih iKcessory touch ian« pad 



Tttp wtow 
•howing cofitrote 



Batteries: 



Antenna Impedance: 
Dimensions: 



RF Oufput 
Sensitivity: 

Price„, $349,00 Witn 



144 lo 148 MHz 

Receive every 5 kHz. 

iransmit Simplest or 

4600 kHz 

9 6 VDC 

!7 ma-standby 

500 ma-transfnit 

S pieces ni-cad 

battery incJuded 

50 ohms 

40 mm X 62 mm x 

165 mm 11.6" x 2.5" 

» 6.5" ) 

Better than T,S watts 

Better than 3 microvotts 



SUPPLIED ACCESSORtES 

Telescoping whjp antenna, nf-cad battery 
pack, ctiargef 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES 

Touch tone pad S55 • Tone burst 
generator: S29 95 ♦ CTCSS sub- 
audible tone control: $29 95 • Rubber 
fleji antenna $6 • Leather holster 
S16 • Cigarette tighter plug mobite 
charging unit 56 * Matching ^ v^att 
output 13-S VDC power amplifier (S30): 
$69 * Match eng dO watt output power 
amplifier (S60): $169 



touch tone pad,. $399 00 



TEMPO VHF & UHF SOLID STATE 
POWER AMPLIFIERS 



The Tempo line also features a fine line of extremely 
compact UHF and VHF pocket receivers. They're low priced, 
dependable, and available wJth CTCSS and 2-tone decoders 
The Tempo FMT-2 & FMT-42 (UHF) provides excellent 
mobile communtcations and features a remote control head 
for hide-away mounting. 

The Tempo FMH-2. FMH-5 & FMH'42 (UFH) hand held 
transceivers provide 6 channel capabilityi dependability and 
many worthwhile features al a low price, FCC type accepted 
models also available. 

Please call or write tor complete infoimation. Also available 
from Tempo dealers throughout the U.S. and abroad. 

11240 W. Olympic Blvd . Los 
931 N. Euclid. Anaheim, Calif 
Buller. Missouri 64730 



Boost your signal. . . give it 
a high powered base station 



Drive Power 

2W 
1QW 
30W 

2W 
10W 
30W 

2W 

2W 



Output 

130W 

130W 

t30W 

BOW 

aow 
aow 

sow 
sow 



the range and 
VHF (135 to 

Model No. 
130A02 
130A10 
130A30 

6CA02 

80AT0 

aOA30 

SOAOa 

30A02 



UHF (400 to 512 MHz} modefs, lower power and 
accepted rnod«lt »l%o available. 



clarity of 
175 MHz> 

Price 

^09 

$180 

S199 

$169 

$149 

$15& 

$129 

S 89 
FCC type 



Angeles, Calii. 90064 213/477-6701 
. 92601 714^772-9200 

816/679-3127 



KemM/t 



Prices subiocl to change wtrhoiii naiice 




See what just 

some of the many 

satisfied Hams 

say about 

the Wilson Antennas. 



Purchase a TT-45 snd a System Three at the same tirn© 

and Wilson will give you a factory 5% i 

price you paid for the package, Y8?reffll 

for the concrete to install it, or fciuy the XYL a little 

something to keep her^^pyf Or .. we will give you, 

at no charge, a IV1^27, the best 7 element, 2M beam 

available today! The choice is yours to make! 

Just send Wilson the receipt of your purchase from 
your dealer, showing your cost, and let us know what 
you want — 5% cash, or a IVI-27. But hurry! This offer 
expires midnight, May 31, 1979, and receipt must be 
mailed before July 1, 1979, 

Don't wait! See your nearest dealer to take advantage 
of this great Give-A-Wayl 

SPECIFICATIONS 

TT'45 TOWER 

• Maximum height, 45* 

• 8Q0 lbs. winch with padlock feature 

• 2S00 lb. raising cable 

• Totally freestanding with proper base 

• Tqtd weight. 189 lbs. 

Recommended accessories: 
RBRF-1 0, SBRF'IO, CBRF-IO. 

The TT-4S is a freestanding tow^r. Ideal for rnstallations 
winere guys cannot be used. If the tower is not being 
supported against the house, the proper base fixture acces- 
sory must be selected. 




Don't forget 

theWV-1 for 

the best in 

vertical needs. 

The WV-1 is 

the 10-40nn Antenna 

you should ^f* 
consider! 



SY-3 TRI-BAND ANTEWNA 



S«nd MHr 

M&Ktmum pdww input 

Cain [dBd) 

VSiWR *r rstonjina, . 

rnii»ed«nc« 

F/B Ratio 

Boom (O.D, X l«ngttil 
Hi>. Df alamflnti . , . , 
Longstt altmnnt. . , . 



.14-21-28 
.Legal limit 

.1,3:1 

.&0 ohms 

.20 dB 

.2" i£ 14' 4^' 

,3 

^7" 4" 



Turning rsdiui 15' 9" 

Maxifnum m*rt dJamfltAf , , ,2" O.D. 

Siprfftc^ ar^ .5.7 m. ft. 

Wind IOBdlri(| @ 80 mph ,,.114 lbs. 
Aneitibled weight {approxl ^7 lbs. 
Shippinfl weJifht (»pprox) . .42 lbs. 
Direct S2 ohm feed or balun 
P^ififniim wind survival . , .,100 mph 



M-27 - 7 ELEMENT 2M BEAM 

BamtKtHz 144-MSMH2 Sum wid th P 3 dB pt. 



27 degfeeE 



Gain 1 7 dB 

VSWft 1.2r1 

lmp>«lanc0 , , ^ , . &D ohms 

Boom fO.D. * l«nfiitf*l ... I" Kfi4" 
Number of •lffm«nti . . . ^ 7 
Li9ng«tt«l«m«nt. , ^ . i . . 40" 



TuFnJng radius 

M4$t <iiAm«tflr fO.D,} . . 

Surf a» am > ^ ^ 

Wind loading (9 SO mph . 
Shipping weight U|>prox| 
Aftemlilsd weight lappfox} 3.,5 Itis, 



37.13^' 
1"^ 1%" 
44 sq, ft. 
S'S lbs, 
&.S lbs. 




Consumer Products Divmon 



Wilson Electronics 

Incorporated 

A SubtJdUry at F)E:G£tMCY ELECTRONICS, INC. 

4288 So, Polaris • P. O. Boh 19000 • Las Vegas, Nevada 89119 
Phone (702) 739-1931 * Telex 684-522 




ACT NOW! 



Bi»yfh«WV-1 

1otfMFl«dMl KM 
...FRff 

of wMVyVi 



WV-1 SPECtFICATIOMS: 

• Input impedance; 50 ohms 

• Power handling capability: 

Legal limit 

• Two High-O traps 
with large diameter 

,v coils* Low angle radia- 

fe^ tion omnidirectional 

performance • Taper 

swaged aluminum 

tubing • Automatic 

bandswitching • Mast 

bracket furnished 

• SWR: T1:1 on all 
bands* VA^'O^D, 

heavy wall aluminum 

tubing • Does not 

require guying 

• Overall 

length: 19^8": 



subject to chftn^ifl Mai^out notice 



staff 



editor;publi5her 

Wayne Green W2NSDn 

EXECUrrVE V(C£ PfiESIDEWT 
Sherry Smyth© 

ASSISTANT PUBLISHER 
Jeff rev D. DeTray WBBBTHn 

AOMINISTFtATIVE ASSISTANT 
Dotty Gibson 

MANAGING EDITOR 
John C. Burnett 

ASSISTANT MANAGING 
EDITOR 

Susan G. PhNbflck 

NEWS EDITOR 

Gene Smarte WSeTOVM 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 
Elisabeth Blackmora 
Cynthia Smith 
Richard Phenix 

BOOK PUBLICATIONS 

J3nn PerFy 

PRODUCTION MANAGER 
Lynn Pander a- FraseF 

ART DEPARTMENT 

Craig Brown 

Gayle Cabana 

Judith Dalby 

Bob Drew 

Bruce Hecfin 

Dion Ov^ens 

Noel T\. Self WB1ARP 

Robin M. Sfoan 

John W. White 

PRINTING 
Gary Steinbach 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Bill HeydoJph 
Tedd Gluff 

TYPESETTING 
Barbara J. Lattl 
Mary KinzeJ 
Holly J, Walsh 
Sara Bedell 
David Dawe 

BOOKKEEPER 

Knud E. M. Keller KV4GG/1 

OtROULATION 
Barbara Block 
Laura BarnicEe 

DATA ENTRY 
Mary KinzeJ 
Denise Loranger 

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING 
Robert R. La Points 

SULK SALES MANAGER 
Judy Waterman 

SHIPPING 
Ethan Perry 
BItl Barry 

RECEPTIONIST 
Beth Smith 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Baker WB2GFE 
E. H. Barnetl WBBItlX 
Stihtey Cox WB9LHO 
Tom DiBiase WSBKZO 
Terry Fox WB4JR 
W. Sanger Green 
Dave Ingram K4TWJ 
Larry Kahaner WB2NEL 
Joe Kasser G3ZCZ 
Bill Pasternak WA6ITF 
JohnSchLrltzW4FA 
Waller Scott KSDIZ 
Peter Stark K2QAW 
Chuck Stuarl N5KC 
Bill Turner WA0ABI 

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 
Richard J. Dykema 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 
Florence Go Ed man 

Joyce Tarr 
Ellen BFanchard 

ADVERTISING 
Aline Coutu, Mat. 
Bill York 
Nandy Ciampa 
BfM Hoyle 
Gayie Halberg 
Lorl fylygford 
Rita Rivard 



W2NSD/I 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ec/itor/a/ by Wayne Green 




ATLANTA, JUNE 16-17 

While June is a very busy 
month in both the mlcroconn- 
puter and ham businesses, no 
year would be really connplete 
without a trek to Atlanta tor the 
Atlanta Hamfestival. First, V\\ 
be down to Dallas on June 2-3 
and be giving talks at the Dallas 
hannfest on both connputer pro- 
gramming and on the present 
state of affairs in amateur 
radio* 

My next stop will be New 
York and the National Com- 
puter Convention (IEEE), where 
I will talk about computer pro- 
gram development and sales. 
That's June 5-7, if you're in the 
vicinity, 

Atlanta's hamfest has been 
growing year by year and is 
starting to give Dayton some 
worrres. There are an awful lot 
of hams in the southeastern 
part of the country, and just 
about every one of them packs 
up his family and heads for 
Atlanta come June. Thousands 
come in from every southern 
state. It's a madhouse . . . and 
It's a ball. 

Chaz Gone, the chap who has 
been pulling this event off (not 
without a lot of able help), has 
come up with some incredible 
prizes . . . last year they gave 
away a car with a complete 
ham rig installed. There are so 
many prizes that it is difficult to 
escape getting something 
which is worth more than the 
registration fee, 

I'll be there and be giving a 
couple of talks . . . one on com- 
puting, with the emphasis on 
amateur radio . . . and not a lit- 
tle information on how to get in- 
to computing and take advan™ 
tage of the incredible growth 
which this fieid still has ahead 
of it. Never before have there 
been so many opportunities to 



make a fortune ... if you're 
willing to work for it. The money 
Is there, waiting for anyone 
who really wants it. 

The other talk will be ham- 
oriented and will try to put the 
past, present, and future into 
perspective. Does Wayne really 
hate the ARRL, or is this a fig- 
ment of the imagination foisted 
on a gullible public by New- 
ington? 

What is Wayne realty like? Is 
he the prophet of doom and 
gloom or is he a pragmatist, 
calling the shots the way they 
are? Is Wayne really as rich as 
some people from Connecticut 
say he is? And how in the devil 
did 73 Magazine get to be the 
largest in the ham field? Bring 
your questions, and Wayne will 
answer them. 

In addition to exhibits by 
most of the top ham equipment 
firms, youNi find dealers fight- 
ing tooth and nail for your busi- 
ness. Many are bringing trailer 
loads of ham gear to try to sell 
before the summer slump. 
There will also be some ex- 
citing displays of the latest in 
personal and small business 
computers. Maybe It's time for 
you to get more familiar with 
these little buggers and In- 
tegrate one into your ham sta- 
tion . . . and home? 

THOSE TOLL FREE NUMBERS 

A letter from Ed Leviton AB3B 
points out that the Federal Trade 
Commission has rather strong 
rules to protect mail-order 
buyers, but when you order over 
the telephone, you forego this 
protection. The entire text of 
the mail-order merchandise 
rules are lengthy and have 
some strong teeth. A copy can 
be obtained from the Govern- 
ment Printing Office, CCH 
booklet #4803, $1.50. 



If you are lazy, like me^ and 
prefer to use the phone, then it's 
caveat emptor (buyer beware). 

ON TOP OF OLD SMOKEY 

A recent court case {People v. 
Case — NY — 365NE2d 872, 
87ALR3d 77) involved a CBer 
who reported a radar checkpoint 
over his radio and was arrested 
for this. He was convicted in a 
justice court, and his conviction 
was upheld in the County Court. 
It was then reversed by the Court 
of Appeals. This court held that 
"under the statute making the 
obstruction of governmental ad- 
ministration a crime, obstruc- 
tion must be by means of in- 
timidation, physical force, or in- 
terference, or by means of any 
independently unlawful act and 
that the defendant's verbal 
message via his Citizens Band 
radio did not constitute a 
physical interference with 
governmental administration.'' 

Since people seem to worry 
about that aspect of CB and 
hamming, \ thought you'd like to 
know and have the reference. 

Another lawyer has promised 
to write and let me know more 
about a situation which has 
developed in his area In which 
hams are virtually exempt from 
radarnnspired speeding tickets 
by virtue of the unsettling ef- 
fects of a two meter rig in the 
car. 

My thanks to Attorney Dun- 
can Kreamer W1GAY for the 
above reference. 



THE ROVING CAMERA 

As if things aren't bad 
enough in New Hampshire in 
February (unless you happen to 
be a skier), the Interstate 
Repeater Society (I detest the 

Continued on page 1 16 



73 Magazine [ESSN Q09S'9010Hs publbhed monthly by 73, Inc., Pine Street, Peierboroygh NH 03453. Subscription rates in ttie U,S. and 
Canada are $16 for one year, and $45 for three years. Outside line U.S. and Canada, write for rales. Second class postage paid at Peter- 
borough NH 03456 and at additional mailirtg offices. Pubiication No. 700420, Plione; 603-924-3673 Microfilm edition— University 
Microfilm, Ann Arbor Ml 4Q106. Entire contents copyright 1979 by 73, inc. INCLUDE OLD ADDRESS AND ZIP CODE WITH ADDRESS 
CHANGE NOTIFICATION and send to 73, ino , Subscription Services Dept,, P.O. Box 931^ Farmingdaie NY 11737 




^^^ AAA 



Digital Frequency Coittror 
• • • a Kenwood innovation for maximum 

HF operating enjoyment! 



KenwcMKTs T5-180S witli DFC is an aU solid- 
fttate HF trancetver designed for the DXeT« 
the cont^t operator, and all oth^r Amateurs 
wfio enjoy tbe 160 through lO-meter bandsi. 
The follouing features pfove^ bevcind doubt, 
tliat the TS-180S U the classiest rig available! 

• Digital Frequency Control (DFC). including 
four memories and manual scanning. Memo- 
ries are usable in transmit and/or receive 
modes. Memory-shift paddle switches allow 
any of the memory frequencies to be tuned in 
20-Hz steps up or down, slow or fast, with 
recall of the original stored frequency. It's at^ 
most hke having four remote VFOst 

• All solid-state . - , Including the fjnaL No dipping 
or loading. Just dial up the frequency, peak 
the dnve. and openitel 

• High power. .200 W PEP 160 W DC inpui on 
160-15 meters, and 160 W PEP/140 W DC on 
10 meters (enure band provided). Also covers 
more than 50 kHz above and below each band 
(MARS. WARC, etc.), and receives WWV on 
10 MHz. 

• Improved dynamic range 

• Adaptable lo all three proposed (WARC) bands. 

• Single-conversion system with highly advanced 
PLL circuit, using only one crystal with im- 
proved stability and spurious characteristics. 



• Buih'in mtcn>proce$$or-contro1kd large ctigttal 
display. Shows actual VFO frequency and dil- 
ference between VFO and "Ml" memory 
frequency. Blinking decimal points indicate 
"out of hand-"* Monoscale diat too. 

• IF shift Kenwood's famous passband tuning 
that reduces QRM. 

• Selectable wide iind narrow CW bandwidth 
on receive (500-Hz CW filter is optional). 

• Automatic selection of upper and lower side- 
biind (SSB NORM/SSB REV switch). 

• Tuneible noist? blanker (adjustable noise- 
sampling frequency). 

• RF AGC {"RGC"). which activates automati- 
cally to prevent overload from strong, local 
signals. 

• AGC {selectable fast/slow/off). 

• Dual RIT (VFO and memory/fix). 

■ Three operating modes. ., SSB, CW, and FSK, 

• Improved RF speech processor 

• Dual SSB filter toptional}. with very steep 
shape factor to reduce out-of-passband noise 
on receive and Co improve operation of RF 
speech processor on transmit 

• 13.8 VDC operation. 

• Also available is the TSISOS without 
DFC, which still shows VFO frequency 
and difference between VFO and "hold' 
frequencies on the digital display. 



• pull line of matching accessories, including 
PS30 base- station power supply. SF-ISO ex- 
ternal speaker with selectable audio filters, 
VFO' 180 remote VFO, AT- 180 antenna tuner/ 
SWR and power meter, DF- ISO digital frequency 
control YK-S8 CW fitter, and YK-Sa SSB filter. 

All of these advanced features can be yours... 
and at an attractive price! Visit your local Autho^ 
rized Kenwood Dealer and inquire about the ex- 
citing TS-180S with DFC! 




Still availabls... 
ICsfnirood^s TS-S20S Hf transceiveri 

®KEIM\A/OOD 

■ ^ . . pttttittttT in amateur radio 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS INC. 

1111 WEST WALNUI/COMPTON, CA 90220 



Looking 14/est 



Bin P^ternak WASfTF 
24854*C N0wh3ii Am 
NewhattCA9t32J 

Having just celebrated my 
thirty-eighth birthday, and 
rememtjering back to my teens 
and the traumas I went through 
to obtain my amateur license, 1 
was l<ind of amazed the other 
evening wtien my friend Harvey 
Ross WB6YN0 recounted the 
story of how his now nine-year- 
old became General class 
licensee WD6FLP not long ago. 
It's an interesting story, and I'd 
like to share it with you. 

I've known Harvey and his 
wife Bonnie WA6SNB almost 
from the day we moved to Los 
Angeles. We first met on the air 
via the PARC WR5ABB repeat- 
er and were later formally in- 
troduced by Watt W6EJK, As 
Harvey tells it. one day close to 
two years ago he was busy oper- 
ating 20 CW when hts son David 
asked him to teach him Morse 
code. After some thought, 
Han/ey not only agreed to do so, 
but also made a game out of the 
project, David was fast to catch 
on, and it was not long before he 
had mastered the 5 wpm neces- 
sary to pass the Novice exam. 

To help David with the theory, 
Harvey enlisted the help of a 
friend named Bill Ellis. Bill, 
whose callsign is WA6USB, 
runs what is possibly the na- 
tion's most successful amateur 
training school: Murphy's Ama- 
teur Radio Class, which meets 
weekly In Culver City, Califor- 
nia, At Bill's suggestion, Harvey 
enrolled David in Murphy's 
Novice training program; the 
move was a very successful 



one. For his eighth birthday, 

David received quite a present: 
amateur calisJgn WD6FLP. 
Now, many youngsters would 
be content with attaining a goat 
such as this and move on to 
other things. However, in that 
regard, David is not your aver^ 
age youngster. He had devel- 
oped a love for amateur radio, 
and a Novice ticket would just 
not suffice. He continued work- 
ing toward his next major goal, 
a General class license. 

In July of 1978, David thought 
it was time to try. Though he 
literally breezed through the CW 
exam, the theory stumped him. 
He was kind of disappointed— 
but In no way beaten, Back to 
the books he went, so that next 
time the elusive General ticket 
would be his, Hfs tenacity paid 
off on December 14, 1978, when 
he walked out of the FCC office 
in Long Beach, California, with 
General class privileges and (he 
ability to sign WD6FLP— in- 
terim LB, His first QSO? it hap- 
pened to be on 450 MHz to in- 
form his very proud father that 
he had made it! 

What does a nine-yearold 
General do, you ask? The same 
as any other ham. He operates 
all bands, belongs to radio 
clubs, and is probably the 
youngest person to be found on 
a remote-base system any- 
where. Oh, yes, in his spare time 
David Is hard at work with his 
younger sister, teaching her 
code In hopes of making It an 
all-amateu^radio family. 

The case of Scott Lookholder 
WB6LHB is another matter en- 
tirely. We have been following 
this legal matter since it be- 



came public some months ago, 
and here is the final chapter. On 
February 6th, Judge Lawrence 
T. Lydig in Los Angeles Federal 
District Court passed sentence 
upon Mr, Lookholder, who had 
earlier, on January lOth^ plead- 
ed guilty to three counts of us- 
ing foul and abusive language 
on the air The sentence broke 
down as follows: count 1— $500 
fine; count 2 — $500 fine; count 
3 — one^year probation. In addi- 
tion, the court has forbidden Mr. 
Lookholder to use his ama- 
teur privileges for the term of 
the probation, and, while not 
making it a mandatory part of 
probation, the court did suggest 
that Mr. Lookholder seek psy- 
chiatric care. In his ciosing re- 
marks lust prior to the passing 
of sentence, the court described 
Mr. Lookholder as "being a 
disgrace to himself, his family, 
and the amateur service/' 

Lookholder's alleged opera- 
tions as ^'W6JAM" had raised 
havoc over a number of Los 
Angeles area 2 meter repeaters 
for several months. Particularly 
hard-hit had been WR6ABN, 
and it has been thought that 
many ABN users would be pres- 
ent for the sentencing. Alas, 
that was not the case. As is 
usual in amateur circles, apathy 
dominated the day, with but 
four area amateurs in atten- 
dance. Earlier, when the court 
was soliciting voluntary written 
statements from those who had 
been adversely affected by Mr. 
Lookholder's operations, only 
eight area amateurs took the 
time to write at all. Eight out of 
close to 20,000! The fact that 
not even 1% of the total ABN 
usership (which these days 
numbers close to 400) took the 
Initiative to express their views 
to the court when requested Is a 
rather sad commentary on the 



overall amateur society. Yet, 
during the *'W6JAM Reign Of 
Terror," hundreds of anti- 
W6JAM comments could be 
heard each day. Now, the aver- 
age on-the-air commentary is to 
the effect that the court was far 
too lenient in the case. To those 
who had their chance to alfect 
the case and were too lazy or 
apathetic to utilize it, I can only 
say, 'Vou blew it/* 

I do not wish to single out the 
overall ABN usership for ad- 
monishment in this matter. Let- 
ters from other parts of the na- 
tion tetl the same story. A 
jammer Is caught, and when it 
comes to the nitty-gritty of pros- 
ecution, everyone suddenly dis- 
appears. One or two are left to 
do the work for many. On-the-air 
rhetoric against the offender is 
loud and boisterous, but overall 
cooperation \s nil. Maybe this Is 
the reason for the development 
of a new kind of interference- 
tracing and -documentation 
method, the quiet clandestine 
operations which simply gather 
input and develop airtight legal 
cases. In many areas, it has 
become obvious that trying to 
get the assistance of the 
average "Joe Ham" has be- 
come impossible. Sure, he 
cares, but not enough to get out 
and T-hunt the offender or even 
write a letter of complaint. So, in 
many locations, the smalt num- 
ber of people who really are con- 
cerned are banding together. 
Probably you will never know 
who they are until the time ar- 
rives when a major offender is 
brought to justtce. Perhaps not 
even then. The Lookholder case 
has proven one thing to many: It 
has shown that our legal sys- 
tem can and will work it we are 
prepared to use it. Action taken 

Confiffuffd on psge t4B 





Da¥id RosB WD6FLP, 



TASMA 's 1979 ieadershfp: Chairman Bob Thomburg WB6JPi (left) 
and Vice-Chairman Dave Ferrone WASKOS. 



6 



OMNI HAS IT ALL. All the advantages and capabilities, all the new 
conveniences and new levels oi performance you need, whatever your 
HF operating spedaJiy. All built-in, ready to use, 

ALL SOLID-STATE. Ail the advantage of total solid-state from the 
pioneer of HF solid -slate technology. Reliable, cod. stable — from 
receiver front-end to transmitter final 

ALL HF BANDS. From 160 through 10 meters (and ail the ays^) plus 
convertible 10 MHz and "AUX^' band positions for possible future needs. 

ALL BROADBAND, Band changing without tuneup — without danger 
to the final amp. 

ALL READOUTS. Choose OMNI-A for analog dial (1 kHz markings) or 
OMNl-D for six 0.43" LED digits (100 Hz readability.) 

ALL VOX AND PTT FACILITIES built-in; 3 VOX controls plus PTT 
control at front and rear jacks for external PTT switch. 

ALL SQUELCH NEEDS for tuning and monitoring are buflt-fn. 

ALL FILTERS INCLUDED: ^position CW/SSB mm (150 Hz 
bandwidth with 3 selectable skirt contours) plus S-pcde Crystal fitter {2.4 
kHz bandvwdth, 1-8 shape factor.) 

ALL MODE SWITCH puts all filters to work In any mode. 

ALL BREAK-IN; Enstant or delayed receiver muting to fit any band 
condtion or mobile operation* 

ALL- VERSATILE OFFSET TUNING; dual ranges, ±5 kHz range for 
off-fiequency DX or :t0-5 kHz range for ijne tuning. 

ALL*SENSIT1VE RECEIVER; from 2 ^V on 160 m to 0.3 ^V on 10 m 
(10 dB S+N/N) for Ideal balance between dynamic range and sensitivity. 

ALL OVERLOADS HANDLED; dynamic range typically exceeds 90 
dB and PIN diode switched 18 dB attenuator also included for extra 
overload protection. 

ALL LINEAR/ANTENNA BANDSWITCHING FROM FRONT 

PANEL; auxiSary bandswitch terminals on back panel for external relays 
or drcuits are controlled simultaneously by the OMNI bandswitch, 

ALL INTERFACE JACKS FOR PHONE PATCH; access to speaker 
and microphone signals. 

ALL- LEVEL ADJUSTABLE ALC^ set output fa^om low power to full, 
i^e^toln low distortion at desired drive to power amp. 



ALL SIDETONE ADJUSTMENTS^ pitch and volume. 

ALL-POWERFUL ALL WARRANTED FINAL AMPUFIER 200 

watts Input to UnaL Proven design with ful warranty for first year and 
pro-rata warranty for additional 5 years, 

ALL 100% DUTY CYCLE. For RTTY, SSTV or sustained hard usage. 

ALL-MODE POWER: basic 12 VDC for easy mobUe use. externa] 
supplies for 1 17/220 VAC opieration, 

All. FRONT PANEL MICROPHONE AND PHONE JACKS, 

Convenient. 

PLUS ALL THE OTHER HANDY BUILT-INS: 'Timed" 25 kHz 
crystal calibrator in OMNI- A with automatic 5-10 sec. "on" time for easy 
2- hand dial skirt adjustment . . . Zero- Beat switch for placing your signal 
exactly on CW listening frequencies , . . SWR bridge switches "S*' meter 
to read SWR each time you transmit for continuous antenna monitor- 
tng . * . Separate receive antenna capability . * * Dual speakers for greater 
sound at lower distortion . , , Plug-in drcuit boards for fast, easy field 
service, 

ALL'FUNCTIONAL STYLING, **ClamsheB'' aluminum case clad in 
textured black viny! with complementarv nonreflective wann dark metal 
front panel and extruded aluminum bezel and baiL Convenient controls. 
Complete shielding. And easier- to-usc size; 5%"h x4^''w x 14"^ 

AND ALL THE OPTIONSi Model 645 Keyer. Model 243 Remote VFO, 
Model 248 Noise Blanker. Model 252MO AC Power Supply, 

ModeJ 545 OMNI-A $899 * Model 546 OMNI>D $1069 

Experience the G//-encompasstng HF world of OMNI, See your TEN-TEC 
dealer or write for at! the details. 







UPOTi 



TEN -TEC. INC. 

SEVIERVILLE. TENNESSEE 31862 
ftpcmj v\% LWCOLK Avc^ E»(iciioa ill 







IHO 



BESOmklt 



OSK 


vol 


<*K OT 




KaA 


Mm 


MMt^^fl 


«1TT 


K 






— M» 




©MNI'D 



HoT 



• «Nt> 






pnivr 
\ 







MLtaTlWlTr 



t*H CW 



«-. \ 



i*5r% 



ATT. tllf45fr 







'--*—" 





f 



The Field-Proven Rig the Whole World's Talking About 



235 Watt PEP 
and CW on 
ALL Bands 



Price? You won't 

believe it! Just ask 

yourdealer. 



All solid state quality American 
construction, with epoxy glass 

boards to withstand the 
rugged mobile environment. 





'^ ■' ELECTRONICS 



305 Afrport Road 
Oceanside, CA 920&4 
714^757-7525 



M tfWntftt Oi I^B 



Swan Astro 150 Exclusive 
Microprocessor Control 

w/memory gives you over 

100,000 fully synthesized 

frequencies, and more! 




VRS — Variable Rate 
Scanning, a dramatic new 
technique for unprecedented 
tuning ease and accuracy 
POWER — 235 watts PEP and CW 
on ail bands for that DX punch 
Advanced microcomputer 
technology developed and 
manufactured in the U.S.A. 
Price? See your authorized SWAN 
dealer for a pleasant surprise! 



f INE 



1 3.3 




ASTRO 150 SSB TRANSCEIVER 



KEY/MIC 



^ITAFGAIN 
^ IF GAIN 
I 



MIC GAIN 



FULL 


Mt* v\JA 


1 ■■ 






^^^^^^LJ ^^^^^^ 








mm 




m. «■ 







ST8Y 



SEMI OFF 

BREAK IN 



MODE 
USB CW 
LSBv \ ' ^<^^^ 



PIT OFF 




U.O 
\ 1 ^2Q.O 


^ 




FiAMU 












Dual Meter 

Reads PEP 
output in watts 

and receive 
"S" units. 



Full 
Break-in 

CW 

(or semi, 

switch 

selected) 



Mike Tuning 

For accurate 1D0 Hz 
steps or fixed rate scan. 



P$U5 -m 

Power Supply • 
wtth Speaker 



Wide Frequency 
Coverage 

10M — 28.0-30.0 MHz 

1 5M — 20.8^23.0 MHz 

20M — 13,8-16.0 MHz 

40M— aO-8.3MHz 

80M— 3-0-4,5 MHz 

160M — 1,8-2,4 MHz* 

*in lieu of 10M band 
on Model Astro 15T 



THE MOST ADVANCED HF SSB TRANSCEIVER AVAILABLE. 



FULLY 
SOLID-STATE 





ASTHO ISO 
Transceiver 



$T-3 Antenna Tuner 



ASTR0 1 50 




ELECTRONICS 



AfVftmtivF^A* Cu»«- 



flpmi^O'i 



305 Airport Road i Oceanside, GA 92054 / 714-757-752! 



FOR BEST PRICE AND 
FAST DELIVERY 

CALL 



TOLL FREE 

>>HA/VlRADICLCENi 



^HZ 



50 144~ REPEATERS ~220 450 Mhi 



BAStC AUTO PATCH 
'Access. ttDiaabfe and adiuslabl^ Timer. 
COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED— MIS^QO, 

EXTEHSIOH BOAfiD 



Ham ¥ntft soutttir 



dt e adu mtn Mutomatic jrewf. AnvlMtung 
Wftg dmtmctof. fev#fs# autu fiaihch capab*titY 
tm batw tulG patcff and two, two-watt audio 

CQMPLETEL Y ASS^MBLEQ—ff^QO 




AvaUftbi* Svpti^Btilv: 



COft liS^ntiiitr: Aft Ofi Off* board, proofammablt. Ftittf ad^ 
itittatit, tima out U^7 m(n.), fi^ng time (&-1 min.i idamifiat 
(1^10 min.)t tone, spaad, votuma, Lf.D. outputs, tow cirmaftl 
dratn CMOS togic, ptugs tor easy instaitattcrt ancf fvmovai pfus 
much more^ J7SPJ5 COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED 



V\» Pfo l^k X 



SbbIc ftcpealgr l<9g.95 COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED 

2M 130'17& MHi Bade Repeater lor 2 meters with all Ihe feftlured oi the HI 

Pro Mkl iflsa the power suply and ffont pane! controls unci accefisorles. 



REPEATERS 



5QMH2 S789.95 450 MHz 799.95 
144 i- 220 fAHi S699,9S 



PA R«. 4dd 6% lix 
PLUS SHIPPING 



Mnggfore EUt^ronlc laboTQlory 



s^M3€ 



ei4S WESTTOWm RO, 



pnoNi ais *30-ooo» 



TR7400lk 
KENWOOD" 



OWNERS: SCANNER KIT 

• Imlilli {ompklelr insiik rig, Ho oblruiivi cilvmai conneE- 

kiEii rile CQinpleit bidd or airli lli« portlwt tm ^t\ti\ m 
the HKt strfch «f TMtf rig (t.».. 141 m or 116 143 HHz). 
^ Urn If ifiMttf ti iinplif«d on ilii^if il ft »il«ii 
I Tvt ayilvi l«49lf ivrtditi mp^f^ nil IH t MJMM. w^ 
•H. ki^IkI bit bt BMB^ ulffi4iT V « it li« v 
IsflM uTtr il Ik rig. 

# li Ai luaaif «i1 aa4t it HTHU iiiiitii mthIt. li 

lippct. IW«) !» I miti liw II-IB (Rfdil «4iB 



■Nrt^ m Hiv if iiidi li it kd Mil ai iKiii b 
tt*^j Id liiEitnil 

• kini i\ Ihi rilt of 50 iifl4 iKr it<mi. 

• C(Hij}|ill virti deiailed nnlrDclioni (cf tn Im the be^innef), 

IMTROOUCTOfit OlFtK 
Kii: Si995 PreifuiPileit 159.95 Md 11.50 mm i kiiiling] 



FT-227 

«>l1EMORIZER" 

OWNERS; SCANNER KIT 

• SeJe [libit ivetp vidtit (up to Itill bind] . 
liSuii 'J^'i/v ^' poflHiH' of band t«i ifliEt 

• Sciif 4t iht ritt 4r 200 I Hi p«f ^iCQitd 
•Siikb ■eififJTion w n-iW ilk«i toe lo tun ptti 

«f licfc I*, iftf KCiiiti btipttCf , 
^CMfllli III wA Itfife^ flttifdHK 
•IbI#i JUMf/* fit M iiimirE iilir'' — 
•S| w u^t If rttoraci li «ii|iul € 

■Warw Ifiiffi ■ 
vjcw h pun MWi hi itMms • 

• IflamlK bwii •! Iiclci \nmm ■ $4 i«tiais 
■deii rm vtm laA-m ivilil 

• Tm c«i eiveidrap ilf orer i^t bind til^Hl IFfliiQ i 



Kit tUVSIaddUSOpQiugei handling] 
Pie «iiBnbltd and inied 1J4 



IC22S OWNERS: SCANNER KIT 

r Kwi 2« l«l Im llS^iaflS ■ IS Ult 

• LID Mutim Idh via rif n sc«ita|. 

• W{| Migcjlia H nit 4tn r«1iSCMfilltfkl«il««T «capiil Irtqtwr 

• llowf ditnl An tcMM ti lay lisl InpBEi Wud ■ ^«i li l«ift 2 l«tn ih« i^ 

• Om lilt Mfaii iMliii Ihtpi it litr 21 tuUt Iv mmati^ po^mm^ 

• CMi>J«te hit tHI MdM itilraciln, Ivllif PSiAl ri|. m ellmift tOand maai\um. atMKa%.m wM U jtmmi l» 
eiqiuj teaiti«t H dtMni 

KH IM.95 lidd 11,50 potligt & hendlliiJ 
Pre immblid 151 



DEAi.KiUNQVimES 
INVITED 



JKD 



VISA 



750 LUCERNE RD., SUITE 120 
MONTREAL, QUEBEC. CANADA HSR 2H6 

TEL. 514-737-7293 



>^A60 



CIRCUIT BOARDS 



REPEATER CONTflOL 

COMPUTER PROiECTS 

SENSITIZED BLANKS 

NEGATIVES/POSITIVES 

PROTOTYPE BOARDS 

PARTS KIT 

CUSTOM ETCH/DRILL 

RCA 1802 MP BOARDS 

CIRCUIT eOARO DESIGN 

PROGRAMMING PADS 

ART MASTER PREPARATtOKS 



We can twpply tfmrif of lit* llama ]rou n««d 
to mrnkm a p-c board. Saml SASE * 2i C«m« 
lor calAlOQ- 



QC Stafford 



t^SSQ 



Electrdnfc Service and DovQiopment 

427 S, Benbow Rd. 

Greonsboro, NC 274Q1 

919-274^9917 DAY/NITE 

Serving Ama|«ur» Ari;iun<t th« World 



NEW ELECTRONIC PARTS 



Brand nani«, Nrtt line componantm. Stoctttfd in 
depih. 24 tiouf deH^rery- Low prices arid mon«y 
back guarantee on all products we carry. 

STAMP BRIHGS CATALOG 

SPECIALS 

KEYBOARD ENCLOSURES 




y Q L| 

SIX SI^^S |J|t» fl !',» Tt*! 

IV' II. J" T 

ir tl.J" 3^* 



PA ICE 

15.15 
16.50 
iS.la 

20-75 



Blue base, specify while or black top. 



ItMCfVhiA M 

ONLY 




(WAlfHi 



* fiin|id lAciQviiciiil liifli^ 

■ iwtuitrin . IrtdiiiNHii 'hIU1i(4M< DrKtmm«fl 



RTTY 



UT4 SPEED CVTfl BOAftO 

KIT S109.?5 

BOARD ALONE $19.95 
AUTO CW 10 KIT S37,90 




SHtPPING 

INCLUDED 

FN PRICE 



Daytapro Electronics Jnc, 

Pc^rmorty NuOata Elect rofiics — i^ D3S^— 

3034 1^ WaSMIIt IN AtllNOTON HTS, 111,60004 
PHONE 312-B70 05&5 



FAST SCAN 



430-450 MHz 



on ATV FIRST • < - from APTRON 



our NEW - 

Model ISroB 

ATV REPEATER 



o COMMERCIAL QUAUTY syifem 
providing for COLOR operotion 
with AURAL SUBCARRIER sound 
plus many more feotures.p.*.* 
o complete^ single package unit 
ready to put on tho oir. * . olso 
complete antenna avoiloble , « , 
Call us at 1-811-336-4775, or 
write us for detoils and pricing. 



APTRON LABORATORIES 

PC Box 313 Bloomington IN 



47401 



10 



^ Reader Service— see page f95 



WHEN Obi 



Lr 



'f 



r^Ti 





w^ltfifKi^ 







MLl^ 



DS3100 ASR 






We've Been Taking Notes. 

Oombtnmg your ideas with some of our own. we ve come up with what has to be 
the mosi > >ced and convenient terminal available. These are some of the 
conveniences you can now enjoy by putting the DS3100 ASR in your RTTYand 
CW Stat ion 

ASR Operation (Compose your transmission IVH/LE receiving} 



• T^Wine Receive! Butter 
50-1 me Transmit Butter 
Split Screen to Show Buffers 

lint .11 Real-Time Ctock 
1 Programmable Messages 

• AijiOfTiatic Answer-Back WRU 



• Morse. Baudot, or ASCM Operation 
RTTY and CW Identification 

# Full 126-Character ASCII 
J 110-9600 baud ASCII 

I 60- 1 30 WPM Baudot 
I 1 -1 75 WPM Morse 



Write or call for the DS3 1 00 ASR specifications and see how YOU 
have helped design the new standard in amateur radio terminals. 







HAL COMMLMCATIONS CORR 

Box 365 

Urbana. Blinois 61S01 

2173677373 



Rjr ouf Eutopea^i Cusaimefs Contact 



DX 



Chuck Stuart N5KC 
57 75 M&nefee Drii^e 
Dallas TX 75227 

DX PROFILE 

This month*s DX Profile Is on 
one of the better-known DXers 
in the world, Dr. San Hutson 
K5YY/K5QHS, of Little Rock, 
Arkansas. 

San's ham career began fn 
the mid-1950s when he picked 
up an old S-38 receiver and 
started monitoring the ham 
bands. After receiving a few 
QSL cards, he decided to get In 
on the action side of the hobby 
and applied for his Novice ex- 
am. San received his Novice 
license in 1958, along with the 
call KN5QHS, and four months 
later he passed the General 
class exam. In 1977, San up* 
graded to Extra class and re- 
ceived his present call, K5YY, 

San has always been prlmari- 
iy a DXer, but because of col- 
lege he missed a few years. Dur- 
ing that time, he also missed 
several now-deleted countries 
that would have brought his 
DXCC total to nearly 350. As It 
Is, his total still stands at 333, 
and he needs only BY and VS9K 
to have them ait. 

Due to his medical practice, 
San has moved around quite a 
bit since receiving his medical 
degree from the UniversHy of 
Arkansas in 1969. However, all 
of his operating has taken place 
inside the state of Arkansas 
(with the exception of two years 
spent in Broken Bow OK), 

San's first DXpedilion was 
the only authorized DXpedition 
to Swan Island. In the eight 
years since, he has become one 
of the most traveled amateurs 
[n the country, operating from 
CE0Z, CE3, 2F1, KS4, VP2D, 
FM0, FG0, FL8, FH8, 06, ST2, 
STO, 3B8, and 5H1, along with 
F0, 10, and G, San was the first 
to operate from D6 and the first 



to activate two new DXCC coun- 
tries on a solo effort when he 
operated from D6A and FH8 in 
1976. 

His DXpedition experiences 
have made San much in de- 
mand as a featured speaker at 
DX gatherings across the coun- 
try. He has spoken to the Arkan- 
sas DX Association many 
times, the W9DXCC banquet 
twice, DXpo, SEDXA In Atlanta, 
and many others. 

A past president of the ADXA 
and presently head of the Exec- 
utive Committee, San was re- 
cently appointed to the ARRL 
OX Advisory Committee, He 
feels this DXAC appointment to 
be the crowning point in his 
twenty years of hamming, espe- 
cially in light of the serious 
aspects of WARC 79 and pres- 
ent DXCC disgruntlement fac- 
ing the committee. 

Still In his mid-30s, San Is the 
Senior Medical Consultant for 
Social Security in the state of 
Arkansas. He Is married and the 
father of three children {aged 
four, ten, and eleven). Other 
than amateur radio, his hobbies 
include sporadic coin collecting 
(mostly pennies from 1850 on) 
and Corvettes— he has owned 
13 Corvettes in the last 11 years. 
He enjoys hunting and tries to 
go deer hunting every year. He 
also enjoys all sports and, true 
to the medical profession, he is 
an avid golfer. 

Somewhat of an equipment 
collector, his present station in- 
cludes two Signal Ones and a 
home-brew 4-1000 linear, a 
Drake C-Line and Alpha linear, a 
Collms KWM2-Aand L4B linear, 
the Kenwood twins with a two 
meter hookup, and a 75A4 
receiver. Antennas include a 
Tetrex beam for 20, a duobander 
for 10/15, a sloper for 40, a 
d I pole for SO, and a loop and 
shunt-fed tower on 160. He says 
that his first real antenna was a 




San Hutson KSYYand his station in Little Rock. San says the sta- 
tion changes constantly, but this is it at the moment. 



five-element Telrex twenty 
meter beam at 130 feet, but 
since moving into larger cities, 
he has had to compromise 
somewhat. 

He hopes some day to have a 
super station with several 
operating positions for visiting 
hams and contests. San likes 
contest operation on the low 
bands and has over 60 countries 
confirmed on 160 meters. 

San Is planning another DX* 
pedition for later this year and 
says he will always be planning 
one of some sort. One of the 
most Interesting aspects of DX- 
peditions is meeting and get- 
ting to know other hams ail over 
the world. On his last trip alone, 
San met ST2SA, ST2HF, 3BSDA, 
3B8DA,3BSCJ, FH80M, FH8YU 
FH8CJ, D68AD, I0MGM, and 
many others in Italy, Great 
Britain, and along the way. 

Respected as a DXer around 
the world, San was the ADXA 
DXer of the Year i n 1 973. He also 
won the Virginia Century Club 
Award in 1976, the ADXA 
Achievement Award in 1977, 
and the Diplome du T.F.AJ. in 
1976, and holds certificates for 
A1 Operator, WAZ, WAC, 
WAS-160, DXCC Honor Roll- 
phone and CW— and many 
more. 

San claims that once he 
works BY and VS9K to have 
them all, he will just sit back 
and play with his sports cars. 
We find that hard to believe. The 
feeling here is that whenever 
and wherever there is a new one 
to be worked, K5YY will be on 
one end of the pileup or the 
other. 

HEARD ON THE BANDS 

With the recent mutual recog- 
nition between the U.S. and 
China, the feeling among many 
DXers is that BY stations will 
soon be blossoming every- 
where. Although the chances 
for a true-blue BY-type opera- 
tion from downtown Peking are 
better than they have been in 
many years, those with inside 
knowledge believe it may still 
be a bit premature to expect any 
immediate action, especially by 
any visiting U.S. operators. 

The operation, when it 
comes, will most likely develop 
along the lines of the Iraq activi- 
ty, where some YUs were able to 
help the locals develop their 
skills and form a national radio 
club. Already, several foreign- 
ers working inside China have 
been allowed to bring in their 
transceivers and install anten- 
nas for listening purposes. 

On January 17th, 0N4QX re- 
ported working a station sign- 
ing BY1AA at 1406Z on 14010, 
The operator gave his name as 
Pyngj was very fluent in English, 
and said to QSL via Box 68 in 
Peking. Many Europeans and 
some W/Ks heard the signal, 
but apparently 0N4QX was the 



only one to get through. 
Chances are this was Peking 
Slim, but Bob is watching the 
China mail nonetheless. 

Where-there-is-a-witl-there-is- 
a-way department . . . N5XX 
tired of trying to work through 
the large and unruly mob chas- 
ing 3Y1VC on Bouvet and decid- 
ed there must be a better way. 
He obtained the telephone 
number of LA5NM in Norway^ 
telephoned long distance, and 
persuaded LA5NM to ask 
3Y1VC to listen for him after 
their daily 10 meter CW sked. It 
worked, and Clark was able to 
add a rare new one to his DXCC 
total. Clark says the long* 
distance charges were only 
$3.75 for 3 minutes, but he didn't 
say how many 3 minuteses the 
persuasion took. 

The forthcoming trip in the 
Pacific by Peter Sutter calls for 
his vessel, Wild Spirit, to be at 
VR3/Christmas around June 
15th, VR3/Fanning around June 
20th, and KH5/Palmyra around 
June 24th. Exact times depend 
largely upon the trade winds 
and currents. 

The reciprocal iicensing 
agreement between Haiti and 
the U.S. has apparently hit a 
snag, with no further action be- 
ing taken. While on the subject 
of Haiti, we might mention that 
the HH authorities report no 
such license exists for HH2SL 
who has been showing recent^ 
ly. 

Slim joined the YASME DX- 
pedition of Lloyd and Iris Coivin 
while in the British Virgins and 
helped fill the log of VP2VDJ. So 
far, he hasn't forwarded copies 
of his logs. 

The ARRL is running some 
two months behind in process- 
ing DXCC applications. Enclose 
an BASE and you will at least 
know your cards arrived safely. 

Congratulations to the new 
officers of the Arkansas DX 
Association; AF5M/President, 
W5LQN/VP, K50VC/Secretary- 
Treasurer, and K5YY/Executive 
Committee. 

W3KVQ, the longtime QSL 
manager for 9N1MM, has 
changed calls and QTHs, He is 
now Edward Blaszczyk N7EB, 
12802 Sun Valley Drive, Sun City 
AZ 85361. 

Although 160 meter operation 
is not officially allowed in 
Guatemala, you will occasional- 
ly hear a station on. Apparently, 
as long as the operator is 
careful about avoiding inter- 
ference, the signal will not be 
noted. Guatemala also main- 
tains a ban on phone patches, 

A group of USSR types was 
supposed to head out to Franz 
Joseph Land last April. If you 
need FJL and you hear 
UK1PAA, UK1PAT, or possibly 
R1FJ, you will know they ar- 
rived. 

The station at YI1BGD now 
has both the FT-101E and 



12 



FTDX-500 on line and has asked 
permission to operate other 
bands and to establish more 
stations. Meanwhile, it con- 
tinues to be heard reguiariy on 
twenty. 

The Southeastern DX Cfub 
Shi pped a remote vf o to A51 PN, 
which has been malting the 
operation a bit easier for 
Pradhan. 

The first USSR amateur radio 
meeting took piace fast 
December in Moscow^ with over 
200 of the locals showing up. 
They are hoping for 160 permis- 
sion with a 10- Watt input. A 
special ''EU" prefix will be used 
during the summer Olympics to 
be held in Moscow next year. 

Later word has it that K1RH 
also worked that BY1AA station 
we mentioned a few items back. 
Raiph notes that Pyng gave his 
QTR as Pecinng and that a 
check with some language ex- 
perts at Yale indicated this to be 
an acceptable way of spelling 
Peking. Ralph caught the sta- 
tion on 28023 at 1455Z, K1RH, 
like 0N40X, awaits the China 
mail. 

N5KC recentfy received a 
direct QSL from VR6TC for a 
QSO in August, 1973. Never give 
up. 

K5MK resigned as QSL man- 
ager for8P6JD, cttrng an inabili- 
ty to get the station logs as the 
reason. 

C02FA is looking for 160 ac- 
tion. He has a ZS-meter antenna 
and can usually be found 
around 3800. Sometimes CW, 
sometimes SSB. 

Fernando says that If you 
sent a QSL for a C02FA contact 
and do not receive one in return 
within six months, you should 
try again. The mail sometimes 
takes three or four months get- 
ting to Havana and there ap- 
pears to be little way to speed 
things up. Fernando also men- 
tions that IRCs have little value 
in Cuba and that a green stamp 
works much better. 

There apparently will be a 
ftood of individuals and groups 
heading to the Isle of Man dur- 
ing June and July to operate 
during the celebration of the 
1000th anniversary of the Isle of 
Man parliament, 'Tynwald/* 
Look for the GT prefixes. 

Bill Rindone, who hasn't been 
heard from since he was the 
first to bring DXCC attention to 
the southern Sudan, STO, 
reports that he will be heading 
back out again this summer. He 
will be aiming for the East 
Africa and Indian Ocean area, 
and more (nformation should be 
forthcoming soon. You might 
remember Bill as the last per- 
son to activate Geyser Reef 
before it was deleted from the 
DXCC countries list. 

If you like six meter DX— and 
there Is quite a bit of F*layer 
stuff around these days— mon- 
itor 28885, where news is 




passed and schedufes are 
made. 

RF6f, heard in the CQ DX 
Contest last falL was the Radio 
Club of Voroshilovgrad there in 
Georgia. Their effort netted 7.8 
million points on SSB and 5,9 on 
CW, The club callsign is 
UK5MAF, and they are reported 
to be readying another multi- 
multl operation for the WPX 
contest, possibly signing R5M. 

VU2KB, often found on 14 
MHz CW, is an avid stamp col- 
lector and is interested In swap- 
ping with like-minded W/K DX- 
ers. 

John Kanode N4MM has re- 
signed his duties with the W4 
QSL Bureau after four years of 
volunteer labor. John handled 
the W4/K4/N4 section of the 
bureau. His duties have been 
taken over by John Boyd 
W4WG. with the address re- 
maining the same. 

3B8DA is considering anoth- 
er 3B6 effort this summer. 
Nothing definite at this time, 
but we will let you know as 
plans progress. 

Last month, we reported on 
the planned activity by Bruce 
Frahm K(&BJ from the Yankee 
Trader on Its ninth world cruise. 
We have obtained a copy of the 
ship's scheduled stops and will 
be reporting these each month. 
Stops in May include Samoa 
and Fiji. 

The Gilbert Islands will be- 
come Independent this July. 
Look for a new prefix to replace 
the present VR1. Meanwhile, 
VR1BD can usually be found 
around 28503 kHz from 2000Z. 

9M8HG passes along his sin- 
cere thanks to the many DXers 
worldwide who sent get-well 
cards during bis recent illness. 
Some W/K OXers donated a new 



Jun JA2BJW and his nice station, dun prefers CW because he is 
fascinated by the prospect of communicating his mind to others 
through intermittent tones rather than ordinary language. (Photo 
courtesy of N9YL) 



300*Watt rig and beam to 
replace Horace's little 
80-Watter and dipole. He fre- 
quents 21320 kHz at 2200Z and 
then dfops down to the 14225 
kHz net at 2300Z Horace, now 
82, was first licensed in 1924 as 
0B2SK, He won the world DX 
Contest in 1932, running 5 
Watts. 

0E6EEG is reported to have 
forwarded the necessary 
HZ1BS/8Z4 documentation to 
the DXCC desk. 

A team led by KH6CHL will 
activate rare Kalawao county 
on 10 through 80 meters from 



May 25th to the 27th. 

The E/W DX Net which meets 
each Thursday on 1424B kHz at 
0500Z continues to be a gather- 
ing spot for Pacific and African 
OX types. 

George Collins VE3F)Cr will 
be on hand September 6th to 
help Vendaland celebrate its in- 
dependence from SA. A tower is 
being erected (equipment was 
left on an earlier trip), 

Lloyd and Iris Colvin report 
making 6,000 contacts from 
W6KGm5 in Costa Rica, split 

Continued on page f62 




VU2VKK, in the center, visits with VU2G0 and VU2GX while the tat- 
ter wait in vain with the rest of the VU4ARC Laccadive DXpedition 
crew for operating permission that never came. 



13 



FOR BEST PRICE AND 
FAST DELIVERY 

CALL 




TOLL FREE 

^ >>HA/VUMDIQ£ENi 



^H2 




... at last . . . 
your shack organized! 

A beautiful piece of turnilure - your XYL will love it! 

S149.95 S-F RADIO DESK 

Deluxe -Ready to Assemble 

Designed with angled rear shelf for your 
viewing comfort and ease of operaliqn. 

FfNISHES; Wainu! or Teak Stain. 
Also available in Unfinished Birch. $1 34.9B 
Addn tonal information an Request. 

Checks. Money Orders. Ban kAmerj card 
and MssTsr Charge Accepted 

F.OB. Culver Cfty, (In Calif. Add 6% SalM Tax.| 

S-F AMATEUR RADIO SERVICES 
1384 KEYSTONE AVEMUE • CUtVER CiTf. CALIF 90230 — PHONE t213) 837-4870 



* 




O -» 



iQi^^ 



'i]L«. A.''-.-L."-: KJh^mcis>:^:^:*9 



electronic calculators 



4a.t« 

tmr 

•TSO.OO 
49Q.0Q 

1T1.QQ 
» 71-00 
32f.Q0 
1M.M 

•0,00 
«0,00 
4t»,00 

ito^oo 

Ti.OQ 



HAM MET 

112.49 

44.«A 
93. »S 

«z.»i 
HEWLETT' 

••ra.oo 

409.00 
M7.90 

197. so 

90 00 
72.00 

»4.O0 
449.90 

101.00 

97.90 



TEXAS INSTflUMEMTS ELtCTBQHW GALCULATOHB 

T.l.-n, etO IT IP PRCHlllAMilAVUt •ClENTIPIC 
T.L.i»^ 4i0 f TIP MOdRAMMAILi leiEHTIPIC 
T.I.-9T^ 110 ITIP PROailAWIIiAILt tCltNTrPIC 
T.L-99, ^i »TIP PROORAMIIAtLf iCIlHTIPIC 
T.L mOQRAUMIR, COMYfRTt PtCIMALOCTALIlIX 
TJ. MRA« tyPCR PROORAMMftQ f lltAMCtAL 

PACKARD MLECTmamc CALCULAromm 




nJr'm' 

H,P^ 

H.P. 
H.P. 

H.P. 

H.P. 
H.P. 



•T, 314 rrtP PROa tqiCHTinC PlltKT VIlUAL 

•T, 234 STEP PROa ftCJCITTIFIC 

f tC. M tTCP PflCM tCIIMTIFVC PfUMT VltyAL 

MC, M tTEP PROa tCIEMTIPlC 

10 RAftlC HAMD HEL& PfHlfTEm VlftUAL 

•I ^ PREPROORAIIUE& tCllMTIF»C PRINT VI tUAL 

331. 41 ttiP PRt>Q ftCtEMTIPIC 

32E. PRIPROaRAMMEP iCllirriFIC WITH STAT 

31 1, PRIPR&QPIAMMID ■CIlMTIf }C 

12. PfUPttOaRAUIIKD PlMAMCIALPRINTVmUAl, 

.3Se 9TeP PRDORAMMARLt tUPCR FlltAMCIAL 

37E. PnePnOQRAMMED f 1HAMCIAL 



Wt •TOCPt ALL HllttLtnr-PACKAnO CALCULATOR iOFWARfi AND ACCCHQRlRi 



S£ND ME THE CALCULATORtS} l(VfDlCA?irD Pi£LOW COMPLETE WITH HSJCLUDEO ACCESSOFHES 
INSTRUCTIONS AND MANUFACTURERS WAHHANTY I UNMRSTAND THAT IF I AM NOT COMPLETELY 
SATiSFJID. « WAV fiETuPfN IT W^rTMIN TO OAVS FOR A COMf LETE REFUNO (LESS SHIPPfh*G| 



:3EUSi 



.QUANtftY 



AMOUNT ENCtOSEO *. 



WElO^f* 



VjSa 



^lyiASTERCHAflGE 



COO 



AOO 12 00 FOR POSTAGE Ai^D -A%QLiM5 PLEASE ALiOfcM m DAV5 FfK)M DATE Qf RECEIPT OF 
ORDER FOR D€LtV£Rt f£KAS RESIDENTS ADO 5% SALES TAX i^ t w^ r,c«,ri wr 




CARD Number 

FUILNAME _ 



E>(P^RAT)ON PATE 
CALL 



lil 



STftEET, 



.crTv 



.STATE 



ZIP 



MORI UTEFIATURE MODELlSl 



"""""OCALER INQUIRIES iNvrTEO" 

Hartwdfs •^•''* 
Office W)r1d, Inc. 




MAIL TO: 6810 LARKWOOD 

HOUSTON. TEX 77074 

ATTN^ STEVe. WA50EN 

PHONE; A.C. (713) 777-2673 





THE 

CRITIC'S 
CHOICE 



^^: 




t^-. 




i '"r ■ 



DM-170 



X 



Active Filter 
Demodulator 







^ 



Cri!iCii tur*^ mm tfiiwn mt ou ifO PiTfY 
ltl*^K^lfWo(' lo ((■ft ifMn msii 
toiw covi Mniit Iv tBAcHimtiea Mid I 

D: S^crwr whtf Ihg CHiiCl lUrtL Dl.f S K If tft,li 



*^F5 



P.O. Box 976 
rop«kci, ICansfli 66601 

Cdl3) 234-0193 



ViSA 



masilef ciia^q^^ 



FLY YOUR RUBBER DUCKY f! 

Get qH the trunk ltd and into the best location 
on the car the center of the foof ' Tests have 
proven that the low profile quarter-wave whip, 
or the rubber-ducky from a Handy-Talky, out- 
perforrns A 5/B whip on the trunk Take advan- 
tage of the supflr ground plane by converting to 
the FLYING-DUCKY magnetic mount, Although 
designed specificaUy for use with a H-T, \l can 
be used with any mobile rig Ten second installa- 
tion 

F LYING •OUCKV magneHc mount consliM of: 

• Chrome-piated super magnet (holds 50 lb* ) 

• Compatible coax plugs furnished to match fig 
requiremenn Specify BNC. F type. PLZS^- 
S0239 For TNC Wtion type add Jl. 

• Coax cable 10S m long. 



FLYING DUCKY MOUNT ANDCABLE 
QUARTfR WAVE WHIP 

tspecjfy connector) .... , . 
RU8BER DUCKY to match 

tspecify connector) 



SI 195 
$ 5 95 
I 7 95 



^iiC« 



Ur^f 



^P1S 



Bov 234 
MiddlcbuFyCT 06762 




CONNECTOR ASSOttTMENT 

$25.00 $23.50 o^'h 

Pdsipaid lots of three 

Includes: 5-PL2S9, 5-S023f. S-UGf7S, 5UGI76. 
2 ^ PLZSa, I . DM, I ^ M3Se, 2 ^ M3S?, I - UG2&S, 
I - UG27J, 2 - PL2S9PO, I - i02U20. 1 - Lightning 
Arrestnr. 



COAKIT 



p'Cii 



P.O. &QI lOI-A Dumofit. N. J. 07621 

Circle C2I on Raader Service Card 



14 



Reader Service — see page 195 



EALCTATEDFTHEAFT 



TWO NFW AC-DC- BATTERY PORTABLE COUNTERS 

10Hz to 600MHz Frequency Counter 

• Precision TGXO Ume base 0,1 PPM Stability r7*40"C • Super Sens ittvfty with preamps 
ki boih HI*Z & SO Cmm mputs < 10 mV to 1 50 MHz <50 mV @ 600 MHz 

• Auto Dtcimal Poini • Alummum Case • Socketed iC"s • Three positton attenuator 
XK X10. X100 (avoids false counting) 

#0PT0-a000 1 A Factory Assembled - 2 Y»ar Guarantee . , . . $329.95 

#OPTO-B0O0.IAK Ki( fofm - 1 Y«af Parts Guarantee . . $279.^ 

*NI<CAO-ea NI-GAO Battery Pack (InslallB ir> case} . . . S 19.95 

10 Hz to GOO MHz Miniature Counter 

• XTAL (TCXO) Tlrne Base ±.oePPM/ C Standard • Aluminum Case • Hl-Za 50 Otim inputs 
e 1 Sec. A 1/10 Sec. Gat© times • AuioDec. Pt, • Built-in Prescaler and Preamps Standard 

#OPTO-7000 Factory Aasambled - 1 Year Guarantee ....,.,. $139.95 

#OPTO-7000K KU Form ... $99-95 #AC'70 AC Power Pak , $ 4.95 

#Nl-CA0'70 Nt-CAD Battery Pack and Charger Circuitry . . $ 19.95 

#TCXO'70 Opticifml Precision TCXO Time Base 0.1 PPM . 1 7-40 C $ 79.95 



Digital Capacttance Meter 

• Featured Sept 1976 f^adio EJectronics Magazine • Measures from 1 pf to 9999 utd 

.6" Digits e Alumrnum Case e Accuracy oil %les$^or 
#CM-1000 Factory Assembled $179 OCi tP-TOOO 

#CM-1000K Ki\ Form $12995 »P-1000K Probe K\\ 



4 Jumbo LED 



Sf 



Precisior> Thennofneter 

For Use wtth Digital Voltmeter • Output. 10 mvpet De^jree • Switchable. Fahmnhgit/Celsiys 

• Resolution lo .01 ' with 4Vi CHgil Meter • Requires two 9V Bjit»'"**= - not inciudea 

#T-1 00 Factory Assembled Si Calibrated $59.95 tT-100K Ku rufm sas.^s;^ 

#D'450, Antenna, Rubber Duck. RF Pickup, 450 MHi ^ j 

#D-1 46 Antenna f Rubber Duck, 146,MHz $12 50 

#RA-BNC Righl- Angle BNC Adapter for Abovu Aiittiriniis S 2-95 



#P-100 50 Ohm, IX Direct Connection RF Probe 
#P-101 LJ0-Pass^ Attenuates RF at audio frequencies 
#P-102 Hl-Z, 2X High impedance, qeneral purpose 



OQOOOOO 





TERMS: Oderg to US and Canada add 5% to 
maximum of $l 00 per order tor shipping, handling 
and Insurance. To all other countries, add 10% of 
total order Rorida residents add 4% stale tax 
COD Fee: SI 00 Personai checks must clear 
before merchandise is shipped. 



BahkAmericM 



i^ifAt^Mt 4? ^ 



H\^ 



ijtks 



(305) 771 -2050 • 771 -2051 




OPTOELECTRONICS, INC. 

5821 N.E. 14th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33334 







P€-2 





m^mmm 



The age of tone control has come to 
Amateur Radio. What better way to utilize 
our ever diminishing resource of fre- 
quency spectrum? Sub-audible tone 
control allows several repeaters to share 
the same channel with minimal geo- 
graphic separation. It allows protection 
from intermod and interference for 
repeaters, remote base stations, and 
autopatches. It even allows silent moni- 
toring of our crowded simplex channels. 



We make the most reliable and complete 
tine of tone products available. All are 
totally immune to RR use plug-in, field 
replaceable, frequency determining 
elements for low cost and the most 
accurate and stable frequency control 
|5ossible. Our impeccable 1 day delivery 
is unmatched in the industry and you are 
protected by a full 1 year warranty when 
our products are returned to the factory 
for repair Isn't it time for you to get into 
the New Age of tone control? 




flnC~3 




-B 





-12 



ST-1 






TS-1 SutS'Audible Encoder-Decodef • MiGrominiature in 
size, 1 25 X 2.0 ' X 65 • Encodes and decodes simultaneoysly • 
$59.95 complete with K-1 element 
TS-1JR Sub-Audible Encoder-Decoder • Microminiature 
version of the TS-1 measuring just 1.0 x 125 i 65 . for hand- 
held units • $79 J5 compieta with K-1 element. 
ME-3 Sub'Audilste Encoder * Microminiature in size, 
measures .45 t U x ,6 • Instant start-up • $29,95 complete 
with K-1 element 

TE-B EigW-Tone Sub- Audible Encoder • Measures 2,6' t 
2.0 X T • Frequency selection made by either a puti to ground 
Of to supply * S69 J5 v^tth 8 K-1 elements 
PE-2 Two-Tone Sequential Encoder Jor paging • Two call 
mil •Measures125 x20*K 65 • $43.95 with 2 K-2elements- 



SD'1 Two-Tone Sequential Decoder • Frequency range js 
268.5-2109.4 Hi • Measures 12' x 1.67 x m • Momentary 
output for horn relay, latched output for call light and receiver 
mutmg butlt*in • $59.85 with 2 K-2 elements i 

TE-12 Twelve-Tone Sub* Audible or Burst-Tone Encoder • 
Frequeocy range is 67 0-263 Hz sub-audihte or 1650-4200 Hz 
hurst-tone • Measures 4 25' x 2 5 x 15 • S79.95 with 
12 K-1 elements 

ST-1 Burst-Tone Encoder • Measures 95 x 5 x .5 plus 
K-l measurements < Frequency range is 1650-4200 Hz • 
$29.95 with K-1 element. 

' COMMUmCATtONS SPECIAUSTS 



V^A 



426 West Taf t Avenue. Orange. CA 92667 
(800) 854-0547. Catifornia residents use: (714) 998^3021 



;ju rroonH den' 




ci hP : . 




TARA SINGH XZ2KN 



! am sending a picture of my 
late father, Tara Singh XZ2KN. 
This is the latest picture 1 have 
of him, taken just last year. This 
was taken in Pegu, about 60 
miles out of Rangoon. The 
statue of the Reclining BucJdha 
is the background. 

My father was born in Kaiaw, 
Shan States, Burma, in 1918 
and was educated in Rangoon, 
He graduated wilh a OS in 
Mechanical Engineering from 
Rangoon University. He was a 
very active sportsman and 
became golf champion twice. 
He also represented Burma 
abroad many, many times. He 
got his amateur license in 1938 
and was very active. Soon after, 
due to WWII, he evacuated to 
India with his family. They 
watked to India, a trek which 
took over 3 months. He had tied 
his radio equipment to the 
rafters in the attic to prevent 
damage in his absence. He was 
a contractor and was instru- 



mental in building the Burma- 
China railway before evacuat- 
ing. On his return, he helped my 
grandfather with the machine* 
shop and foundry business. 
Known as the Empire Foundry, 
it was one of the largest in Bur- 
ma. He was an avid believer of 
the good antenna over high 
power theory and, having the 
resources, always was building 
new antennas. At one time, he 
built a 4-element wide-spaced 
beam for 20 meters with a 
44-foot boom, Ttie boom used 
V X 1" X V*** angle iron, and the 
beam assembly weighed about 
2000 pounds. He then got in- 
fatuated wilh cubical quads. 
The last antenna he built was a 
4-element quad, with which he 
had excellent results. He used 
an AR-88 receiver and, when he 
could get it working, an ET-4336 
transmittter. 

The last rig we used was a 
Johnson Viking Ranger running 
65 Watts— yes, 65 Watts into a 
4-etement quad. We made 
many, many stateside contacts 
and never had trouble or felt in- 




adequate. As no new licenses 
were being issued, i was the 
second operator for XZ2KN. 
Amateur radio was banned on 
10 January 1964, and no one 
has legally operated after that 
date. The licenses are renewed 
every year, but wilh specific in- 
struction not to use the equip- 
ment which has not been con- 
fiscated. I might mention that 
my father was the Secretary/ 
Treasurer of the Burma 
Amateur Radio Society for as 
long as I can remember. My 
father was hit by a car while 
crossing a street on 11 
February 1979 in Rangoon. He 
died in the hospital on the 12th 
and was cremated on the I3th, 
Gurbux Singh WB9TTN 
Rochester \L 

P,S. in his last letter, received a 
week before his death, he wrote 
that amateur radio was certain- 
ly out and that he saw no hope 
for it in the future- 

Tara Singh was most accom- 
modating when I visited Ran- 
goon, taking the time to show 
me atf around the cfty so that f 
coufd take pictures, introduc- 
ing me to the British Am- 
bassador (there was no U.S. 
embassy in Burma), and fitting 
me in on the history of this 
most interesting country. It 
was during this short visit that I 
met Gurbux, his son. White 
visiting Singapore a few days 
tater, f sent Gurbux some 
strings for his badminton rac- 
quet via a toe at ham, at so 
named Singh. Eventuatly, Gur- 
bux had to leave Burma, and 
the oniy address he had was 
9V1NR in Singapore, who had 
forwarded the strings for me. 
The next t heard, Gurbux was 
marrying BVINR's daughter 
and moving to the U.S. Quite a 
worid! t was saddened to hear 
that Tara had passed away 
without ever getting back on 
the air again, for t remember 
how his eyes lit up when he 
talked about amateur radio 
. _ a true love of his.— 
Wayne. 



month, i ditto your comments 
about Sam Harris in January 73. 
Sam was one of my first two 
meter *'DX" contac^p. back, 
when 250 miles was a long haul 
on that band, and Helen was my 
first Puerto Rican contact on six 
meters. He will be missed. 

Please keep up the good 
work, and pray with me that 
post-WARC 79 days will give 
you a reason to continue 
publishing an amateur radio 
magazinel 

Steve KaU WB2W1K 
Budd Lake NJ 



IMPRESSED 



Zl 



LOYALISTS 



Zl 



Tara Singh XZ2KN. 



Vm sorry I haven't written 
earlier to praise you and your 
staff for publishing the finest 
amateur magazine In America. 
You may not remember me, but 
my wife and I visited you at your 
station on Mt. Monadnock be- 
fore we were married ... I think 
it was in 1966 or so . . . back 
when W2NSD/1 was so strong 
down here in New Jersey on two 
meter AM that you could take 
out most of the locals on my old 
Gooney box. 

I've always been impressed 
by your sincere devotion to 
amateur radio, and I read your 
editorials with interest each 



From reading your editorials, 
which I tend to agree with as 
well as enjoy immensely, it 
seems to me that there is more 
than enough evidence to firmly 
establish the fact that the ARRt 
is detrimental to the future of 
amateur radio. When some- 
thing doesn't function properly, 
it should either be repaired or 
discarded; this is the case with 
the ARRL Since it is operated in 
such a manner as to make re- 
pair nearly impossible, then, in 
my opinion, it should be done 
away with. 

1 do not agree with the "but 
it's a\\ we've got" philosophy* 
As long as the ARRL exists, ft Is 
"all we 11 have'^— they'll see to 
that! You always make the point 
that you've been a member of 
the ARRL for most of your ham 
careen 1 fali to see the logic in 
spending $12 a year to support 
something 1 can't believe in. 
Were you to quit the ARRL, in 
protest, chances are that 50,0CX) 
hams would do likewise and the 
ARRL would fall In to that 
degree—or do you have 50,000 
loyal followers? Might be in- 
teresting to find out. 

More than half the hams I 
have queried about their 
reasons for joining the ARRL 
teil me that they "take the 
magazine;* "just joined to gel 
QST" eta That is why I would 
never subscribe to QST— I don't 
want to be "represented" h^ the ^ 
ARRU at WARC 79 or anywhere 
else. If we did have a truly 
representative amateur radio 
organ ization^ 1 would endeavor 
to join and support it. As Tve 
said before, why don*t you and 
some of the prestigious hams 
who are 73 loyalists resurrect 
the Institute of Amateur Radio? 
It's high time! 

BUI Harris K9F0V 
l^afayette IM 

BitI, as far as i know, i have no 
loyal followers . . , and I don't 
want any. If anyone agrees with 
what I write, I want it to be on 
the basis of tnteiiigence, not 
reaction and emotion, if I were 
to drop out of the ARRL, t doubt 



Qontinu&d on psgs f56 



18 



«wi^a 



*wp~« fi^ 



'*ir*< 



;x; 



■'ilf.lpl1iM 



PTflMi^ 



.^/T '.-(f-str/f itrif ^ 



(( >:■ 



RF-4900 






Tune in the Panasonic Command Series™ 

top-oMhe-line RF-4900. Everything you want in 

short wave at a surprisingly affordable price. 

Like fluorescent all-band readout with a five-digtt 

frequency display. It's so 

accurate (within 1 kHz, to ^ 

be exact), you can tune in --* 

a station even before it*s 

broadcasting. And with the 

RF-4900 s eight short wave 

bands, you can choose any 

broadcast between 1,6 and *- 

31 MHz. That's all short wave 

bands. That^s Panasonic. 

And what you see on the 
outside is just a small part of what Panasonic gives 
you inside. There's a double superheterodyne 
system for sharp reception stability and sefectivity 
as well as image rejection. An input-tuned RF 
amplifier with a3-ganged variable tuning capacitor 
for excellent sensitivity and frequency linearity. 
Ladder-type ceramic fillers to reduce frequency 
interference. And even an antenna trimmer that 
changes the front-end capacitance for reception 
of weak broadcast signals. 

To help you control ali that sophisticated 
circuitry Panasonic's RF-4900 gives you all these 
sophisticated controls. Like an all-gear-drive 



4S' 




RF-2900 



tuning control to prevent *'backlashr Separate 
wide /narrow bandwidth selectors for crisp reception 
even in crowded conditions. Adjustable calibration 
for easy tuning to exact frequencies. A BFO pitch 

control RF-gain control for 
^_ improved reception in strong 

signal areas. An ANL switch. 
Even separate bass and treble 
controls. 
J And if all that short wave isn't 

enough. There's more Like SSB 
(single sideband) amateur radio. 
All 40 CB channels. Ship to shore 
Even Morse communications. 
' AC /DC operation. And with 
nasonicB 4" full-range speaker, the big sound of 
AM and FM will really sound big. There's also the 
^nasonic RF-2900, It has most of the features of 
the RF-4900, but it costs a lot less. 

The Command Series from Panasonic. If you had 
short wave receivers as good. You wouldn't stilt ba 
reading. You'd be listening. 

•Short wave reception wifi vary wrttr antenna, weather condilions. 
operaror's geographic locatjon and other taclofe. An outside 
antenna may be required for maximum short wave reception. 

Panasonic. 

just slightly ahead of our time. 



ConJesfs 



Robert Baker W82GFE 
J 5 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 

NEW YORK STATE QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1700 GMT Saturday, 
Mays 

Ends: 2359 GMT Sunday, 
May 6 

(with a rest periad between 
0500 and 1200 QMT on May 8) 

Sponsored by the University 
Of Buffalo ARC, WA2NPQ. this 
contest Is open to all amateurs. 
Stations may be contacted 
once on phone and once on CW 
on each band. NY stations may 
work each other and mobHe/ 
portables changing counties 
may be reworked. 
EXCHANGE: 

QSO number, RS(T). and NY 
county or state/province. 
FREQUENCIES: 

SSB--3900, 7275, 14285. 
21375. 28550. 

CW— 1810, 60 kHz up from 
the bottom of each band. 

Novice— 3725, 7125, 21125, 
28125. 
SCORiNG: 

Score one point per QSO 
times the number of multipliers: 
states, provinces, countries, 
and NY counties for NY sta* 
tions, or the number of NY coun- 
ties for others (62 max.). Note 
that this is the first time NY sta- 
tions may include NY counties 



In the multiplier total. 
ENTRtBS & AWARDS: 

All entries must contain 
name, address, and county (if 
NY). Number the first contact 
for each new multipHer. A 
checksheet is required for sta- 
tions making more than 100 
QSOs, Awards to the number 1 
score from each county, state, 
or country, Entrants desiring 
results please send a #10 SASE, 
Logs must be received by June 
16 to qualify. Send all entries to: 
Michael Bergman WD2AJS, 45 
Swartson Ct.. Albany NY 12209. 

FLORIDA QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1500 GMT Saturday, 

May 5 

Ends: 2359 GMT Sunday, 

May 6 

This Is the 14th annual 
Florida QSO Party sponsored by 
Fiorida Skip and all amateurs 
worldwide are eligible and in- 
vited to participate. Each en- 
trant agrees to be txiur\d by the 
provisions of this announce- 
ment, the regulations of the ap- 
plicable licensing authority, 
and the decisions of the fiorida 
Skip Contest Committee, which 
are final. All amateur bands 
may be used and all stations 
will separate phone and CW 
log si A station may be worked 
once on each band on each 
mode. Neither crossband nor 



Calendar 



May 5^6 



May 12 

May 12 13 
May 19 

May 19-20 



May 2S<27 
June 2-3 
June 6-7 
June 9 
June 9-10 
June 10 
June 23-24 
June 30- July 1 
July 4 
July 14-15 
July 28 30 
Aug 4 5 
Sept d 
Sept a-9 
Sept 9 
Sept 15-16 
Sept 22-23 
Oct 13-14 
Oct 20-21 
Nov 3-4 
Nov 1 7-1 S 



NY State QSO Party 

Florida QSO Party 

LIARS lO^XQSO Party 

World Teleoommunlcattons Day Contest — 

Phone 

Luckenbach D)Cfradition 

World Telecommunications Day Contest— 

CW 

Annua! Armed Forces Day Communications 

Tests 

ARRL EME Contest (part 2) 

Michigan QSO Party 

Massachusetts QSO Party 

CO Worldwide WPX— CW 

Minnesota QSO Party 

SOWP CW QSO Party 

DAFG Short Contest— SW 

ARRL VHF QSO Parly 

DAFG Short Contest— VHF 

ARRL Field Day 

Seven-Land QSO Party 

ARRL Straight Key Night 

ARRL lARU Radiosport Competition 

CW County Hunters Contest 

ARRL UHF Contest 

DAFG Short Contest— VHF 

ARRL VHF QSO Party 

DAFG Short Contest— SW 

Scandinavian Activity— CW 

Scandinavian Activity— Phone 

ARRL CD Party— CW 

ARRL CD Party— Phone 

ARRL Sweepstakes— CW 

ARRL Sweepstakes— Phone 



crossmode contacts will count 
for contest credit. Florida sta- 
tions may work other Florida 
stations, but for QSO points on- 
ly. Out-of-state stations may not 
work each other for contest 
credit. Contacts made on re- 
peaters do not count! Florida 
stations will be divided into two 
classes: Class A stations are 
those operating portable or 
mobile on emergency power 
and running 200 Watts or less 
Inside Ftofida but outside of 
their home counties; Class B 
stations are all other stations 
operating inside Fiorida. 
EXCHANGE: 

RS(T) and Florida county or 
state, province, or country. Out- 
of-state mobife stations operat- 
ing not within the jurisdiction of 
any country send ITU region (1, 
2, or 3) in which operating. 
FREQUENCiBS: 

CW— 355, 7055, 14055, 21055, 
28055. 

Phone-3945, 7279, 14319, 
21379, 26579. 146.52. 
SCORfNG: 

Florida stations count 1 point 
per QSO with oyt<^f'State or 
other Florida stations and 
multiply by the sum of states (49 
max.), provinces (12 max.), DX 
countries (15 max.}, and regions 
(3 max.) actually worked. Max- 
imum multiplier is 79. Out-of- 
state stations count 2 points 
per QSO with each Florida sta- 
tion and multiply by the number 
of different Florida counties 
worked (67 max.). Class A Flor- 
ida stations only multiply score 
by 1.5 to obtain final total. 
AWARDS: 

Certificates for phone and 
CW top single-opefator score in 
each state, province, DX coun- 
try, and each Florida county. 
There are also five plaques to be 
awarded as follows: high single- 



operator Florida and out-of- 
state, CW and phone, and to the 
Florida ciub with the highest ag- 
gregate score, 
ENTRIES: 

At the direction of the contest 
committee, stations and/or op- 
erators may be disqualified for 
improper reporting, excessive 
dupes, errors in multiplier lists, 
unreadable logs, obvious cheat- 
ing, etc. Anyone disqualified In 
this yearns Florida QSO Party 
will be barred from the contest 
next year. Phone and CW en* 
Ides are to be separated. Along 
with legible logs in chronologi- 
cal order, a summary sheet is re- 
quired with each entry. The 
summary sheet must contain 
score, number of QSOs, multi- 
plier, station's callsign, entry 
class and county of Florida en- 
tries, power score for Class A 
entries, state/province/coun- 
try/region for out-of-state en- 
tries, callsigns of ail operators/ 
loggers if multi-op, name of 
club if part of a club aggregate 
score, name and address typed 
or printed in block letters, and a 
signed declaration that all rules 
and regulations have been ob- 
served- Include a 15€ stamp for 
contest results from a future 
Issue of Florida Skip, All entries 
must be received on or before 
May 31, but late DX entries will 
be accepted within reason. Mail 
entries to: Florida Skip Contest 
Committee. PO Box 660501, 
Miami Springs FL 33166. 

UARS 10-X QSO PARTY 

Starts: 0001 GMT Saturday, 

May 5 

Ends: 2359 QMT Sunday, 

May 6 
Sponsored by the Long Island 
Amateur Radio Service (LIARS) 
Chapter of the 10-X Internation- 
al Net /The object of the contest 



Resulls 



RESULTS OF THE 14TH ALEXANDER VOLTA 



1M3FUE 
2)SM6GVA 

3) I5MYL 

4) DJ2YA 

5) DLOTS 
6)W1MX 
7)I20LW 
8)G3UUP 
9)G3RED 

10)VE2QO 
11)K4YZV 
12) DKflOW 
13)OH6AA 
14)W3KV 
15) Y03J J 
16> I2ZGP 
17) EA4XW 
18] I2WEG 
19) HB9AVK 
20)18JRA 



QSOs 

224 

199 

162 

151 

152 

106 

135 

137 

140 

87 

67 

94 

104 

59 



RTTY DX CONTEST 



72 
71 
99 
64 

71 



Mult. 


Points 


96 


3750 


80 


2263 


76 


1977 


78 


1913 


70 


1868 


48 


3584 


68 


1931 


61 


1861 


52 


1306 


44 


2090 


36 


2208 


41 


1326 


48 


793 


3S 


2044 


36 


951 


32 


1287 


43 


926 


42 


638 


41 


984 


40 


813 




SWL 



Bonus 
41,000 

39,000 

44,000 
31,000 

41,000 

47,000 
14,000 

7,000 
34,000 
33,000 

7.000 
26,000 

13,000 

12,000 



Score 
80,640,000 

36,067,960 

24,340^24 

22,570,314 

19,919,520 

18,266,392 

17,726.580 

15,593,377 

9,554,680 

8,014,520 

5,332,696 

5,144,404 

3.991.656 

3.986,668 

3,073.004 

2,965,248 

2.840,078 

2,652.804 

2,594,016 

2,308,920 



t) Horst 
Ballenberger 155 



71 



1932 43,000 21,304,660 



20 



is to contact as many stations 
as possible on 10 meters, 28.3 
to 29.2 MHz- 
EXCHANGE: 

Station cafl, name, QTH, and 
10-X and LIARS membership 
numbers. 
SCORING: 

Score 1 point per contact; on- 
ly 2-way QSOs are valid. Add 1 
point for each 10-X number and 
1 point for each LIARS number 
With a maximum of 3 points per 
exchange. 
ENTRiES & AWARDS: 

Only 10-X members are eligi- 
ble for awards. A first- and 
second'place certificate to 
each state, province, or DX 
foreign country. A first-place 
trophy to highest scoring par- 
ticipant holding a LIARS num- 
ber. Any clear method of log- 
ging wrM be acceptable. Inctude 
your LIARS numtier, if any. Send 
a copy to: Bob Watson, 2 Suf- 
folk Court, Oceanside NY 
11572. Please include an SASE 
If a copy of the results ts 
desired. Logs must be received 
by June 15. 

LUCKENBACH DXPEDETION 

oaoo May 12 to 12O0 May n, 

1979 Central Standard Time 

Calksign: W5TEX 

The idea of a "Luckenbach 
Dxpedrtion" began as a joke be* 
tween several stations, includ- 
ing WB5VDU KB5DV, WB5R0Q, 
N5A0W, and AI5Q, in early 
December of 1978. During the 
course of operating around the 
bands, they found many ama- 
teurs had not only heard of 
Luckenbach, but also looked 
forward to working a station 
there. 

Luckenbach, located in the 
heart of the Texas hill country, 
was brought to national atten- 
tion by a country/western hit 
song by Willie Nelson. It is a 
town virtually untouched by 
modern civilization and is nes- 
tled between two small rivers. It 
boasts a general store, one 
house, and a barn. Their first 
pay telephone was just in- 
stalled late iast year. It Is not 
uncommon to drive the only 
street in town and have to stop 
for the cows to cross. 



To make this area available 
to those desiring a OSO, 
W5TEX will be operating during 
the dates/times shown above 
with a speciai QSL certificate 
to commemorate the event. To 
receive the certificate, stations 
should send a legal size (4" x 
9Vi'*) SASE to W5TEX, 2618 
Rigsby, San Antonio TX 78222. 
Only QSOs confirmed by W5TEX 
logs wili receive the certificates. 
The certificates will be SV?" x 
11", printed tricolor on trond 
paper, and should be a welcome 
addition to any shack. 

Operating frequencies are: 
CW-7110 and 21110 ±5 kHz; 
FM — 32.525, 29.600, and 
146.52; SSB — 3900, 7235, 
14285. 21360, 28625, 50,110, 
144.200, all ±5 kHz, 

Kennedy Associates, the 
South Texas Yaesu dealer, has 
kindly provided Yaesu radios 
and station equipment, while 
antennas will be furnished by 
Wilson Electronics for this spe- 
cial operating event. 

WOfllD 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS DAY 

CONTEST 

Phone 

0000 GMT to 2400 GMT 

May 12 

CW 

0000 GMT to 2400 GMT 

May 19 

This contest, sponsored by 
Liga de Amadores Brasileiros 
de Radio Emissao (LABRE), was 
instituted in order to com- 
memorate yearly "World Tele- 
communications Day*' (May 17). 
Each participating radio ama- 
teur will attempt to make the 
highest possible number of con- 
tacts with the different ITU 
zones of the world In order to 
enable his country to win the 
ITU Trophy. Use all bands 80 
through 10 meters on phone 
and GW. Categories include: 1) 
single operator — multiband; or 
2) radio clut>s and associations 
—considered as special muiti* 
operator/mult iband partici- 
pants. 

Points are computed sepa- 
rately, certificates being award- 
ed to the top winner in each 
country on each mode, phone 



Results 



RESULTS OF THE FLATLANO FARMER 10-X CHAPTER QSO 

PARTY, DECEMBER 3, 1978 
World Leader and Grand Champ/on—WBZUFO, 144 pointt 
AreB Leaders 

Ares 

DX 

First U,S, Call Area 

Second U.S, Call Area 

Third U.S. Call Area 

Fourth U.S. Call Area 

Fifth U.S. Call Area 

Sixth U.S. Call Area 

Seventh U.S. Call Area 

Eighth U.S. Call Area 

Ninth U.S. Call Area 



Cafl 


pQinis 


VE6BK0 


108 


WA1SQB 


06 


WB2MAN 


12 


No Entries 




WD40IR 


101 


No Entries 




W6ELR 


65 


WB7UFO 


144 


No Entries 




WB9YJF 


105 





and CW. To the world top win- 
ner on each mode, a silver plate. 
EXCHANGE: 

RSfT) and ITU 2one, 
SCORING: 

in the same country, any 
band = points (same country 
considered as same ITU zone); 
in another ITU zone/country: in 
the same ITU zone, but different 
country ^ 1 point <any band); in 
another ITU zone, on the same 
continent = 3 points (any 
band); in another ITU zone, on 
another continent = 5 points 
(any band). Final score is the 
sum of QSO points multiplied 
by the number of ITU zones 
worked. Repetition of contacts 
with the same station on differ- 
ent bands wHI be permitted 



though each ITU zone must be 
counted as a multiplter only 
once. 

For this contest, what constl* 
tutes a country will be deter- 
mined by the ARRLDXCC list. In 
order to obtain the number of 
points for a country, on each 
mode of operation, the sum of 
points earned by the top 5 con- 
testants of the country will be 
taken. In the case of less than 5 
entries from a given country, the 
sum of points of the submitted 
iogs will be taken. Points 
earned by participants con- 
sidered as clubs or multl- 
operators will not be valid for 
country points sum. 

Cont/nu^ on page 154 



Results 



NINTH WORLD TELECOMMUNICATIONS DAY CONTEST 

ITU TROPHY 1978 

OFFICIAL RESULTS 

ITU TROPHY 

First Place— BrazU, 1^649,954 points 

Phone Team 

PY3EE 249,622 

ZZ6AM 161.115 

PY40D 172;200 

ZV2CK 168,405 

PP5AZ iei,040 

CW Team 
PY40D 229.248 

ZX4ITU 175,456 

PSSiTU 160,360 

PY4MA 82,620 

PY2BW 69,8SS 

Second Place— France, 413,193 points 

Phone Team 



HW6ITU 


135,168 


F6EBN 


83.127 


HW5ITU 


43,530 


F6DLM 


6,258 


F6BVB 


2,924 



CW Team 

F6EBN 68,556 

HW5ITU 65,496 

F8TM 4,176 

F6BHX 3.960 

F6EPO 1,956 

MEDALS 

Gold^Top Scorer of the World 

Phone— Lithuania, UP2NK, 275,465 

CW— Brazil, PY40D, 229,248 

Silver— Znd Place In the World 

Phone— Brazil, PY3EE, 249,622 

CW— Brazil, ZX4iTU^ 175,456 

Bronze— 3rd Place In the World 

Phone— Brazil, Z26AM, 181,115 

CW- Brazil, PS2ITU, 160,360 

USA 

Phone 

W2LEJ— 11,014 

LU1BAR/W3— 3,504 

N4MM— 2,145 

WB90BX— 396 

WOiUB— 264 

K5DEC— 205 

CW 



W90 A— 31,995 
WB0GOB— 13,340 
WilUB- 11,186 
W7ULC— 10,296 
K6MR— 5,096 
W4YN— 4,403 
W5S00— 3,945 
W1CNU— 3,576 



N4MM ^3,536 
WB SOON— 2,223 
WB0UCP— 950 
N6GL— 846 
K4JEZ — 776 
W1 OP J— 760 
AA6EE— 624 
WA2PaU— 413 



2T 



RTTY Loop 



Mm: i Lmmy, MM. WA3AJH 
4006 Wifjfee ffoad 
Randatfstowfi MD 2f 133 

This montht we complete the 
second year of RTTY Loop. ! 
must say that it has been, and 
continues to be, a real thrill to 
be able to share so many facets 
of RTTY communication with 
you all. We have covered a lot of 
ground in these past two years* 
Early columns started with the 
basics of teletypeTM circuitSt 
and lately we have worked into 
digital logic systems, This 
month, we will dip into the bulg- 
ing mall sack, in no particular 
order, to answer, respond to, or 
pass along some of the 
thoughts that have been sent in 
to me. 

Starting out on a somewhat 
oddball vein (but that's routine 
(or this column), I have a letter 
from Jerry Keefe W0HAQ. Jerry 
has an SWTPC 6800 computer 
and a KSR33. The KSR-33 was 
apparently used in Sritain with 
a non-standard Interface. Jerry, 
the teletype should directly In- 
terface with the serial (MP*S) 
interface of the SWTPC 6800, 
You have sent along a circuit 
reproduced as Fig. 1, that was 
given to you as an **RS'232 inter- 
face," By my unskilled but logi- 
cal eye, there fs definitely 
something wrong here! Any 
readers wllfing to commit them* 
selves may write their opinion 
and I will pass it along to Jerry. 
In the meantime, it might be 
worth your while to try to get the 
"standard call control unit" that 
will turn your ugly duckling into 
a beautiful swan-etype. 

Speaking of computers 
(how's that for transition), Dave 
Ewing WB9PHQ sends along 
word that he Is up and running 
with a bare KIM-1 and home- 
brew 567 decoder. Sounds inter* 
esting. Dave, Send along some 
details and we will try to spread 



Miii4€ee 



■av^ 



OUTHJtO' 



r?VO 



t**PUT D. 




Fig. t wan AG's mystery cir* 
cuiL 



the word to other KIM and 6502 
owners. 

George Young K43DG is an- 
other SWTPC 6800 owner who is 
trying to get a system up and 
running on RTTY. George asks 
about ASCN-to^Baudot conver* 
sion in hardware. Well, I would 
rather do the conversion in soft- 
ware, as the receiving program 
of last year shows, but* If you 
are insistent, 73 has published 
several good hardware conver- 
sions in the past few years. One 
which comes to mind rather 
quickly was an ASCII-to-Baudot 
converter described by Cole 
Ellsworth W60XP on page 52 of 
the February, 1976, Issue of 73. 
This design converts all ASCII 
characters to the correspond- 
ing Baudot character, filling 
characters which have no 
match with a Baudot blank. 
While youVe looking at that arti- 
cle in the magazine, you might 
want to check out the cover 
story, too. It's out of this world. 

One of those things we all 
like to do is try to copy some of 
the commercjal and press RTTY 
transmissions for personal en- 
joyment. Bob Magil) WA6MUG 
is one of several readers inter- 
ested in such information. I 
would be wilting to compile 
some sort of list, If any data Is 
available. Readers with infor- 
mation on commercial, press^ 
etc, RTTY transmissions are 
asked to jot down times, fre- 
quencies, shift, speed, ASCII or 
Baudot, and send them to me at 
the above address. Til try to pre- 
sent some useful form In the 
future. 

Some more inquiries have 
come In on the Microlog RTTY 
system. To Lee Lust VVA2ETQ 
and the others who have asked 
my opinion by mail and via other 
media, all I can do is reiterate 
what I said a few months back. 
As of this writing (March, 1979>, 
data promised me in October, 
1978, has not arrived. Several 
hams have used the system, 
and, while it appears to perform 
as advertised, it is rf-sensittve. If 
you have any rf around the 
shack, as with a high swr, you 
may have trouble. Caveat emp- 
tor. 

A quick QSL to Clifford Er- 
back VE5QY up there in Moose 
Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. 
With a r^odel 15, Flesher 170, 
and FT-101 E, he has quite a nice 
RTTY station. The F1200B linear 
and TH6DX beam only help to 
get him into those "gray areas," 
right Cliff? Tom (no last name) 
WB8BDG is another member of 
the kilowatt club who feeds his 
TR4 into a MLA2500 linear. Tele- 
type Model 15 and 14 equipment 
provides the green key Inter- 
face, along with a HAL ST-5. The 



last member of this month's 
teletype group is Howard Olson 
WA9KEK, whose RTTY equip- 
ment consists of a Model 19 
feeding either an Icom 245 for 
two meter RTTY or an NCX3 for 
HF work. While the abundance 
of hams on RTTY are using 
equipment produced by the 
Teletype Corporation, and most 
of those are using Model 15/19 
setups, there is no clear con- 
sensus. 

The second most popular ma* 
chine is usually a product of the 
Kleinschmidt manufacturing 
concern. R. B. Gober, DOS 
W5ZNN writes of the Corsicana 
Teletype Society, It seems he 
and another member, N5ALA, 
are working on a few Klein- 
schmidt Model TT'10DB-FG ma- 
chines. Also laboring on one of 
these is Rob Lawson WB4BSZ, 
who is sweating over a TT-117- 
FG. Anyone having good wiring 
and application material is in- 
vited to send it along to this col- 
umn to help get these and other 
fraters out of a jam* 

Along the lines of the press 
transmissions mentioned earli- 
er, Rob raises the possibility of 
copying weather data from sta- 
tions located down south where 
he lives. Any data on these sta^ 



tions would also be handy. 

Some of you may question 
why I take the space to run 
down this or that ham*s gear, 
Teletype, computer, etc. When I 
was new to RTTY, or ham radio 
In general, I was frequently con- 
fused by the vast (at that time) 
proliferation of equipment and 
systems. Now, here we are in an 
age of sophistication. Model 
99s, 6880 computers, and 
LSMFT rush into the novice's 
vantage and mingle into an 
amorphous blob. What I hope to 
do is show, by example, what 
hams are using now on the air. 
Hopefully, the old and the new 
wilt integrate into a unified 
scheme and the newcomer will 
be a littie better informed when 
someone offers him a **slightly 
used Model 12." So much for 
philosophy. 

Next month, we will begin the 
third year of RTTY Loop as we 
began the second— exploring 
the computer in RTTY, I will pre- 
sent a transmuting program for 
the SWTPC 6800, using a paral- 
lel port for output. As with the 
receiving program of last year, 
flowcharts will be included to 
allow adaptation of this pro- 
gram to other systems. Until 
then, keep on loopin'l 



Ham Help 



We are presently setting up a 
School of Communication here 
atToccoa Falls College, Toccoa 
Fa*ls GA. Being a ham, I have 
presented the possibilities of 
amateur radio as a way of com- 
munication. We have been 
given a room and space for an- 
tennas. Some of the students 
have already started working on 
code and theory. We are now 
looking for good used equip- 
ment for the club station. Any 
donations of such equipment 
will be appreciated. Tax- 
deductible receipts will be given 
for the good equipmenL 

We also have a Nagra III 
Swiss-made tape recorder for 
which we need a manual. If any- 
one has one, we would like to 
copy it. We would buy one if an 
address can be given as to 
where to write. 

Any help given will be appre- 
ciated. 

Dale McMlndes KA4HBW 

Toccoa Falls College 

Toccoa Falls CA 30577 

I need plans for a 2m du- 
plexer that we can build for our 
club repeater. We would be In- 
terested In buying a used 
du plexer if someone has one. 

Gene Kirby W8BJN 
Union Co. Amateur Radio Club 

13613 U.S. 38 
Marysvilte OH 43040 

I need the schematic and/or 



owner's manual and alignment 
Information for the Courier 50 
FM. Any help will be much ap- 
preciated. 

Walt Persans WA2Z8E 

135 Roe St. 

Staten island NY 10310 

I am interested In getting in 
touch with anyone who would 
like to be involved with an 
organic gardening net- 

Carl Gorodet^^ky WD4DKP 
3526 Richland Ave. 

Nashville TN 37205 

I have an Eico 720 transmitter 
that I would like to buy an Eico 
722 vfo for. Anyone having such 
a unit for sale can get In touch 
with me and we'll work out the 
details. Thank you* 

Frank D, Paprzyckl KA8CKY 
1529 Henry Ave, S.W. 

Canton OH 44706 

I am in need of a Shure M-5D 
monaural phono cartridge for an 
experimental circuit. I called the 
warehouse in Evanston, Illinois, 
and Shure does not have this in 
stock anymore. Are there any 
special shops that might stock 
hard-to-get parts like this? 
Fellow amateurs seem to be the 
only source of help, t will gladly 
pay up to $20.00 for one from 
someone's junk box, 

Geoffrey W. Tilga WA2YIX 

196 South Main St. #3 

Brockport MY 14420 



22 








HIGH QUALITY & LOW COST! 




The DS2000 KSR FROM HAL 

HAL design experience now makes it possible to offer you an 
efficient, reliable, and cost effective termmal for ^our RTTY or 
CW station. Investigate the new DS2000 KSR from the 
people who KNOW HOW to build RTTY and CW equipment. 
See how you can get great performance and save money too! 

• Integrated keyboard and video generator 

• 72 character line 

• 24 line display 

• 2 pTogTammable 'Here Is" messages 

• Automatic carriage return and hne feed 

• QBF or\d RY test messages 

• Word mode operation, full screen buffering 

• Ail 5 standard Baudot speeds 

> 110 and 300 baud ASCII 

^ CW identification at the touch of a fcey 

• Morse code transmit 

• Morse code receive {opiiona}} 
I self tracking speeds from I 175 wpm on a 

separate plug-in circuit board 
(Available June. 1979) 

• All in a convenient, small Kobinet 
(14.rK9.25"x4.351 

Price: $449.00 

Optional Morse Receive Board $ 1 49 .00 
Optional 9" monitor: $150.00 



BIG PERFORMANCE 

SMALL SIZE, , SMALL PRICE 

i you're looking for an RTTY demodulator 
jyith great performance on both the HF 
and VHF bands, take a look at the ST-5000 
Tom HAL. The use of active fitters with no 
:3hase-lock loop or 'single-tone' short-cuts 
ensure the kind of performance you ex- 
pect. Full features in an attractive and con- 
jenientJy small package make this demod- 
alator a value thats hard to beat! 

• Hard limiting front end 

• Active discriminator 
m Active detector 

m Wide and Narrow shift 

(850hE and 170b^J 
m Normal and Reverse sense 
m Atitosfarf 

• Self-contained high uoltage loop suppi]; 
m RS232C voltage output (direct FSK) 

m Audio tone keyer (AFSK) 

• Provision for external tuning scope 
m Attractive, small cabinet 

(2,75''Hx8'D xl2'W} 

• Fully assembled and tested 

Price: $225.00 








For more information call or write us at: 

HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 

P.O. Box 365 
UrbanaJL 61801 
Phone: 217-367 7373 

In Europe contact: 

Richter & Co.; Hannover 
l.E.C. hiterelco; Bissone 



^m 



Nen^ Products 



SINCLAIR POM 35 DiGITAL 

MULTIMETER 
Although around for a few 
months, the Sinclair PDM 35 
digital multimeter Is a very 
versatile unit, considering rts 
compactness, and the price is 
right! rn fact, it may be the 
I owe St- priced commercial 
pocket digital multimeter on 
the market. 

The PDM 35 provides a very 
bright reddish-purple SVi-drgit 
display reading to ±1.999. 
Polarity of the display Is 
automatic and resolution is 
within 1 mV and 0.1 nA (0.0001 
uA). The decimal point is fixed, 
so it is necessary to mentally 
extrapolate readings depend- 
ing upon the range selected. 
For instance, when the display 
shows 0.967 and the multiplier 
switch is on X 1 00, the digits are 
read as 98,7. 

Dc input impedance is 10 
megohms for four ranges of dc 
voltage to a maximum of 1000 
volts. Accuracy in this mode is 
1.0% ±1 count. A single ac 
voltage position (40 Hz to 5 kHz) 
permits readings up to 500 
volts rms, accurate to t.5% ±2 
counts, with an input imped- 
ance of 450k Ohms, Six current 
positions switch from 1 nA to 
200 mA. Five resistance ranges 
permit accurate readings from 
one Ohm to 10 megohms, also 
with 1.5% accuracy. Five addi- 
tional lunctton-test ranges are 
also available. 

The instrument measures re- 
sistance by forcing a known 
constant current through the 
resistor and measuring the volt- 
age developed, it Is possible, 
using the resistance ranges on 
the meter, to measure the for- 
ward voitage drop of semi- 
conductor junctions and to 
match trie Vh^ of transistors. 
The current used corresponds 
to the current range scale, and 
the display reads the forward 
voltage drop in volts. 

Measuring only six inches by 
three inches by iVz Inches 



thick and operating on a single 
nine-volt battery, the POM 35 is 
ideal for use away from the 
bench. However, on the nega^ 
tlve side, I found that the test 
leads and, more especially, the 
test lead sockets detract from 
an otherwise outstanding unit. 
The leads are stiff and kinky, 
and inserting and removing the 
plugs in the sockets is extreme- 
ly difficult due to the mechan- 
ics of both the plug and socket. 
This Is distracting because 
mode switching is not em- 
ployed for DCV to AGV to 
mA/Ohms. and one test lead 
must be re-inserted lor each 
mode. 

With the exception of the 
xlOOO volts dc range and the ac 
position, all ranges can be used 
to a maximum displayed value 
of ±1999. Exceeding this will 
display =000, or =000, in- 
dicating that the next higher 
range should be selected. 

The operating instructions 
accompanying the multimeter 
are complete and adequate. A 
schematic in this booklet is 
barely fegibfe because of size, 
even with the use of a 10X mag* 
nifier. No parts values or type 
numbers are shown on the 
schematic — only component 
reference designators. Be- 
cause neither a parts list nor a 
theory section is provided, 
these designators serve no pur- 
pose. 

The RDM 35 comes complete 
with test leads, soft carrying 
case, and instruction book. An 
ac adapter, 30-kV probe, and 
padded case are extra-cost 
items. Guarantee period Is one 
year, 

Starshme Group, 924 Ana- 
capa Street, Santa BarHara CA 
B3WV (B0Q}-52BSQ50. ext. 1052. 
Reader service number SS9. 

A. A. Wicks W6SWZ 
Ag^iura CA 

TRAC DELUXE CMOS 
ELECTRONfC KEYER 

Trac Electronics, Inc., has in- 




troduced an addition to its line 
of state-of'the-art CMOS keyers. 
The Trac Deluxe CMOS Elec- 
tronic Keyer, Model TE 144, con- 
tains all CMOS Integrated cir- 
cuitry. The front panel contains 
controls for speed, weight, tone, 
and voiume. In addition, a rear- 
panel switch allows "bug '"-type 
operation (automatic dots, man- 
ual dashes) as well as straight- 
keying operation. The Deluxe 
CMOS Electronic Keyer pro- 
vides both dot and dash mem- 
ory, iambic keying, 5-50 wpm, 
sidetone^ and speaker, ail 
housed in an eggshell-white 
base and woodgrained top. It is 
compact in size. 6" x 4" x 2". 
The unit Is operated on a single 
9-volt battery and keys both 
positive- and negative-keyed 
rigs. Available direct from Trac 
Efectronics. inc., 710$ Rand 
Building. Buffalo NY f4203, or 
at most dealers throughout the 
US and Canada. Reader service 
number Tl 8. 

DAIWA RF-440 RF SPEECH 
PROCESSOR 

It was the acid test for my 
brand new Daiwa RF-440 rf 
speech processor: nighttime 
phone operation on 75 meters. 
Would the RF'440 really help 
my low-power signal punch 
through the bedlam? My CQ 
was answered by a station In 
Pennsylvania. After the usual 
exchange of pleasantries, I 
asked him to evaluate the per- 
formance of the RF-440 while I 
switched it in and out. The 
resutt of this mini-test? 
"Without the processor, you 
were down In the mud; I 
couldn't copy anything. With 
the processor, I copy 90%." 
That was enough for me. I was 
hooked. 

Since that first night. I have 
used the RF-440 in a variety of 
situations. While the results 
are not always as dramatic as 
the instance cited above, the 
processor has yet to disappoint 
me. 

Tl»e RF-440 is designed to In- 



crease "talk powef without In- 
troducing distortion and splat- 
ter. It's packaged in a very at- 
tractive an-melai enclosure that 
is several cuts above the cheap- 
looking boxes used by some ac- 
cessory manufacturers. The 
small size (6" x 2ya" x 6") of the 
unit cind the smooth feel of the 
controls give the RF-440 the 
aura of a precision watch. It's 
solid. 

The RF-440 simply installs 
between your microphone and 
transceiver. It comes pre-wired 
for Kenwood equipment, so I 
had to swap connectors to use 
It with my Heathkit gear. The 
processor has an internal ac 
power supply, but (t also 
operates from 12 V dc for 
mobile use. 

Using the RF'440 is a plea- 
sure. Simply set the gain control 
for a proper level using the built- 
in meter, then adjust the output 
control so as not to overdrive 
your rig, I adjusted the output 
control using an oscilloscope, 
then went on the air and was 
told that my sJgnal sounded 
fine, with no distortion. Alter- 
natively, you could start with 
the control set at its midpoint, 
then solicit on4he-air opinions 
for a final adjustment. 

One school of thought says 
that speech processor controls 
should be inside the case so 
you can set them and forget 
them. As a confirmed knob- 
twiddler, 1 was pleased to see 
the controls of the RF-440 right 
there on the front panel where 
they belong. This really simpli- 
fies matters if you intend to use 
the processor with more than 
one microphone or rig. Another 
convenience is an "OFF" posi- 
tion on the gain control which 
bypasses the processor for 
straight-through operation. 

The impressive Daiwa prod- 
uct line is being distributed in 
the USA by the J. W. Mitier DM- 
sion of Be ft industries, PO Box 
5825, Com p ton CA 90224, 
Reader service number B47. 

Jeff DeTray WB8BTH/1 
Assistant Putilisher 





Trac's Detuxe CMOS Eiec ironic Keyer. 



Daiwa's RF-440 speecii processor. 



24 



#f /#i/^##fj'fjrf rut ftfifitiiPii II II iiillitlliifcttiit%i«ti^^%^ 
iiSJttiiitli 




Yaesu's new FT-1012D. 



YAESU INTRODUCES THE 

FT-101ZD 

Yaesu Electronics Corpora- 
tion of Paramount, California, (S 
pleased to announce the intro- 
duction of the FT-101ZD trans- 
ceiver. 

The FT-101ZD is alt new In 
design and offers many of the 
features of the intematlonatly 
acclaimed FT-901DM. 

The FT-t01ZD is a no-corn- 
promise HF SSB/CW transceiv- 
er which offers variable i-f band- 
width for 2A kHz to 300 Hz, 
digital plus analog display, 
built-in rf speech processor, a 
built-in ac power supply, a new 
highly effective noise blanker, 
rugged 6146B final tubes, alt 
band coverage 160-10 meters, 
WWV, plus WARC band expand- 
ability and a true frequency 
counter (no more recafibrating 
when changing modes). 

Additionally, the FT^IOIZD is 
compatible with alt of the FT- 
901 DM accessories. 

The FT-101ZD is now avail* 
able from your local Yaesu deal- 
er, Yaesu Electronics Corpora* 
Hon, 15954 Downey Ave., PO 
Box 498, Paramount CA 90723; 
phone (213^633 4007. Reader 
service number Y1, 



HIGH-SPEED DIGITAL OPTO- 

COUPLERS FOR 5-VOLT 

LOGIC INTRODUCED BY 

MOTOROLA 

Motorola has introduced two 
fast, low-cost, digital op^ 
tocouplers for 5-volt logic ap- 
plications. Designated the 
MOC5005^6, they offer 7500-volt 
peak ac isolation and are UL- 
recognized. 

The new high-speed opto- 
couplers* turn-on time is 225 ns 
(typical) for the MOC5006 and 
420 ns (typical) for the 
MOC5005. The two devices are 
TTL compatible and are de* 
signed for applications requir* 
ing very high electrical Isola- 
tion, fast response time, and 



digital (ogle compatibfllty. 

Such applications include in- 
terfacing computer terminals 
to peripheral equipment, Inter- 
facing with microprocessors, 
digital control of power sup- 
plies, motors, and other servo- 
machine uses. 

Designed as a digital con- 
verter, the application of current 
to the LED Input results in a low 
voltage output; with the LED off, 
the output voltage is high. The 
circuits are current-, voltage-, 
and temperature-compensated 
and wit) sink an eight-gate fan- 
out {13mA) from DTL, TTL, or 
CMOS with an applied power 
supply voltage of 5 volts and 16 
mA applied to the input. The 
units offer buflt-in hysteresis 
and internal pulhup resistor and 
feature low power consumption 
of 4 mA (typical) @ Svottsinthe 
Olst state. 

Delivery Is from factory stock 
and authorized Motorola distrib- 
utors. Motorola Semiconductor 
Products Inc., PO Box 20912, 
Phoenix AZ 8^}36: phone (602^ 
244-6900. Reader service 
number M20. 



NEW LOW COST Syz-DIGfT 

DMM OFFERS TOUCH-HOLD 

FACILITY 

Sabtronics International of 
Dal! as f Texas, has introduced a 
new low-cost bench/portable 
aVa-diglt DMM that features 
touch-and'hoid capability with 



ANODE t o 




Sabtronics' model 2010A. 



an optional test probe. This per- 
mits retaining the display's 
reading even when the probe fs 
removed from the cjrcuit. The 
model 2010A DMM provides 
standard ac, dc, and hfgh/low- 
power resistance measure- 
ments in 31 ranges. 

The model 2010A DMM is de- 
signed for current measure- 
ments up to 10 Amps (ac or dc), 
with an ac frequency response 
from 40 Hi to 50 kHz, and with 
an input overload protection to 
1200 V dc or rms on voltage 
ranges. A unique feature of this 
DMM is a "times 10'' multiplier 
switch for convenient setting to 
the next higher decade range. 

Single-chip LSI circuitry is 
the basis of this compact unit; 
the display is made tip of large 
LEDs that read to ±1999 with 
automatic decimal point. The 
manufacturer has incorporated 
a stable bandgap reference for 
long-term accuracy and states 
that typical DCV accuracy is 
0J% ±1 digit. Other features 
of the unit are automatic zero- 
ing, fuse protection on Ohm 
and current ranges, automatic 
polarity, and overrange indica- 
tion. 

Optional accessories for the 

model 201 OA include a touch- 
and-hold probe for measure- 
ments in hard-to-reach piaces, 
a high-voltage probe, recharge- 
able nickel-cadmium batteries, 
and an ac adapter/charger. AN 
are available from Sabtronics. 
The model 2010A may be or- 
dered directly from the man- 



4 6 VCC 



cimiDDe 2» 



NC 3* 




« 9 G*m 



»4 OUTPUT 



ufacturer. Write Sabtronics In- 
ternational, 73426 Fioyd Circle, 
Datfas TX 75243; phone (214)- 
7B3-0994. Reader service num- 
ber S2T. 

10 NSEC LOGIC PROBE IS 
LOW COST 

The new PRB-1 digital togic 
probe costs less yet offers the 
full features of much more ex- 
pensive probes. It detects 
pulses as short as 10 nsec and 
has a frequency response to 50 
MHz or better. The unit provides 
automatic pulse stretching to 
50 nsec ( + and-) and is fully 
compatible with all RTL, DTL_^ 
HTL, TTU MOS, CMOS, and mi- 
croprocessor logic families. It 
also features 120k*Ohm imped- 
ance, power lead reversal pro- 
tection, and overvoltage protec* 
tion to +70 V dc. Constant 
brightness LEDs are provided 
over the full supply voltage 
range of 4*15 V, There is an op- 
tional PA-1 adapter for use with 
supply voltages of 15-25 V. In- 
cluded are a six-fool coited 
power cord and tip protector. 
The unit comes neatly packed in 



i 




MOC5005/6 digital optocoupier schematic. 



OK's PRB^I digital iogic 
probe. 



25 




CSC's 500-MHz prescater. 



a reusable case with complete 
troubleshooting instruction 
booklet, h is available at local 
electronics distributors and 
retailers or directly from O.K. 
Machine and Toot Corporatton, 
B455 Conner Street, Bronx NY 
10475; phone (2f2)-994-6600, 
Reader service number 05, 



CSC 500-MHz PRESCALER 
NOW AVAILABLE 

Continental Specialties Cor- 
poration Hrst previewed their 
new PS-500 500'MHz frequency 
prescater at spring's NEWCOM 
show, then officially introduced 
it at summer's WESGON show. 
Actual production began in tate 
summer, and quantities are now 
In stock for immediate delivery. 

The PS'500 prescaler has 
been designed to complement 
CSC's MAX-50 and MAX-100 fre- 
quency counters. 

For additional information, 
contact Continental Speciafties 
Corporation, 70 Fufton Terrace, 
New Haven CT 06509; (203)-624- 
3103, TWX (7W}465'1227. 
Reader service number G9. 



"BEARCAT" 220" SCANNER 

RECEIVES AM ArRCRAFT 

BAND PLUS FM PUBLIC 

SAFETY BANDS 

Electra Company has an- 
nounced a breakthrough de- 
velopment in scanner tech- 
nology that allows a single 
scanning monitor to receive 
not only public safety, marine, 
ham, and other FM trequen* 
cies, but also the AM aircfaft 
frequencies. The new Bearcat 
220 scanner is the first scan- 
ning monitor which combines 
AM and FM reception capabili- 
ty. Until now, two of the most 
popular monitoring activities- 
listening to aircraft and listen- 
ing to police cails— had to be 
received on separate monitor 
receivers. But now, six VH F and 
UHF FM public service bands 
plus the AM aircraft band are 
covered by this single radio. 

The new Bearcat 220 also 
features three search opera- 
tions for finding active local fre- 
Quencias. It has the normal 
search operation where fre- 
quency limits are set and the 
scanner searches between 





The Communicator a from Pace. 



New Bearcat 220 scanner. 



them. All active aircraft and 
marine frequencies are pre* 
programmed into the scanner's 
search memory so frequency 
limits aren't necessary. The 
user simply pushes the aircraft 
or the marine search button 
and the BC 220 seeks out the 
aircraft or marine frequencies 
being used locally, 

Crystal-less push-button fre- 
quency entry which was 
pioneered In the Bearcat 210 
scanner Is used In the Bearcat 
220. The actual frequencies be- 
ing monitored are shown on a 
bright digital display. Up to 20 
frequencies can be in any se- 
quence or mix of bands. A prior* 
ity function is also provided, in* 
stantly alerting the listener 
when a call rs made on the 
priority frequency programmed 
into the channel one position. 
Channels can also be activated 
In banks of 10, permitting the 
operator to **call up" a group of 
10 channels with one push- 
button. 

Other features Included in 
the Bearcat 220 are patented 
selective scan delay, scan 
speed selection, ac/dc opera- 
tion, automatic and manual 
squelch, individual channel 
locK*out, and direct access to 
any programmed channel with- 
out the need to manually step 
through channels, Electra 
Company's patented '*track 
tuning" is used to provide op- 
timum reception across entire 
frequency bands. Complete de- 
tails are availabfe from Bearcat 
suppliers or by writing to Elec- 
tra Company, PO Box 29243, 
Cumberland IN 46229. Reader 
service number E40* 



PAGERS COMMUNICATOR tl 

Pace Communications Divi- 
sion of Pathcom, Inc, has been 
known for its superb CB and 
commercial FM two-way radio 
products for many years, A few 
months ago, the Amateur Radio 
Products Group of Pace intro- 



duced its Communicator line. 
Top of the line Is a 4-MH2, 
600-channel, aU-synthesized 
two meter FM mobile, the Com- 
municator IL 

By using three knobs (MHz, 
100 kHz, and 10 kHz) and an in- 
out push-button for 5 kHz, the 
receive frequency is rapidly 
dialed into the unit and dis- 
played on the .375" 6-dlgit LED 
readout. Transmit Is selected by 
a 5*position rotary switch giving 
simplex, ±600-kHz, and ±1- 
MHz splits. When the PTT Is 
depressed, the digital readout 
automatically shifts from re- 
ceive frequency to transmit fre- 
quency, leaving no doubt as to 
where the unit is set. Also of 
note Is a push-on, push-off 
power switch that relieves the 
user of having to reset the 
volume control. The Communi- 
cator II weighs 6.6 pounds and 
Is 6,4" W X 2.8'^ H X 10.2" L Cur- 
rent draw is 1-1.5 A receive and 
1 .5 A (1 Wj-B.O A (25 W) transmf t. 

Using 52 diodes, 8 LED units, 
32 transistors, 6 FETs, and 18 
ICs, the Communicator II oper- 
ates in a 16F3 mode. Power out- 
put is 1 or 25 Watts push-button 
controlled (with the 25 Watts bB- 
ing adjustable for those who 
wish QRP). Frequency deviation 
is ±5 kHz majclmum. Spurious 
harmonics are 65 dB below car^ 
rier. Frequency stability is ±5 
ppm for - 30 ' to h- 60 * C, 

The receiver is a double 
superheterodyne using 16,9* 
MHz and 455-kH2 l-fs. Sensitivi- 
ty is less than .4 microvolts for 
20 dB quieting (.20 microvolts 
for 12 dB SI NAD). Image and re- 
ceiving spurious rejection is 65 
dB down; selectivity is 65 dB 
down at ± 12 kHz, The Internal 
8-Ohm speaker allows 1.2 Watts 
at 10% THD. One of the 8-mm 
plug jacks on the rear mutes the 
internal speaker when an exter* 
nal speaker is connected. The 
other 8-mm jack allows not only 
an external speaker to be used. 

Continued on page f63 



26 



ALL NEW 




HrGH-PERFORMANCE HF TRANSCEIVER 



Today's technology, backed by a proud tradition, is yours to enjoy in the 
all-new FT**1 01 ZD transceiver from Y AESU. A host of new features are teamed 
wfth the FT-1 01 heritage to bring you a top-dollar value. See your dealer today 
for a "hands on" demonstration of the performance-packed FT-1 01 ZD. 



^3$l front pan^l plus rieavy 
n-irv hj% dd|usi3b!«. VOX 



^ 



ft- in RF sp#«ch processor 
moTB ''talk power ' when you 




H'tn, threshold adjustable. 
se blanker — 

iipp«d for SS3 and CW 
ratkpfi, Choiee of wide or 
'm* l^^mJwtdth for CW (with 
Ofial CW finer in^talt^} 




Digital ply$ analog frequency 
readout Digital display resolt> 
tlon to 1 00 H2 

Rugged 614S8 final amplifier 
tubes with RF negative feed- 
back 



RFand AF gain controls loc 
on concentric ahafts for 
Ofierator convenience 



Full band coverage: 160 through 
10 meters, plus WWV/JJY 
< receive only) 



1 

I 





TX, RX, or Iran see Jve freqtiency 
offset frofn main dial frequency 



Continuously varlabb IF t^and* 
width: 300 Hz to 2.4 KHz 



TRANSMITTER 

PA Input Power: 

180 watts DC 

Carrier Suppression: 

Better ttian 40 dB 

Urrwartted Sideband Suppression: 

Better than 40 dB @ 1000 Hz, 14 MHz 

Spurious Radiation: 

Better than 40 dB below rated output 

Third Order Distortion Products: 

Better than -31 dB 

Transmirier Frequency Response: 

300-2700 Hz (-6 dS) 

Stability: 

Less than 300 Hz in first 30 minutes after 10 

min. war mup; less than 1 00 Hz after 30 minutes 

over any 30 min. penod 

Negative Feedback: 6 dB @ 14 MHz 

Antenna Output Impedance: 

50-75 ofims. unbalanced 



SPECIFICATIONS 

GENERAL 

Frequency Coverage: 

Amateur bands from 1 .8-29.9 MHz, plus 

WWV/JJY (receive onty) 

Operating Modes: 

LSB, USB. CW 

Power Requirements: 

100/110/1 17/200/220/234 volts AC, 

50/60 Hz; 13.5 vorts DC (with optional DC~DC 

converter) 

Power Consumption: 

AC 1 1 7V; 75 VA receive (65 VA HEATER OFF) 

285 VA transmit: DC 13-5V: 5.5 amps receive 

0-1 amps HEATER OFF), 21 amps transmit 

Size: 

345 (W)x 157 (H)x326 (D) mm 

Weight: 

Appfoximateiy 15 kg. 

COMPAnBLE WfTH 
FT-mWM ACCESSOmES 



Seteet switches for use witfi 
FV-901 DM synthe«li»d scan- 
ning VFO (option). FV 901OM 
provides scanners plus 40 fre- 
queiTcy memory bjsnk. 



RECEIVER 

Sensitivity: 

0-25 uV for S/N 10 dB 
Selectivity; 

2.4 KHz at 6 dB down. 4.0 KHz at 60 dB down 
(1 .66 shape factor); Continuously variable be- 
tween 300 and 2400 Hz (-6 dB); CW (with 
optional CW filter installed): 600 Hz at 6 dB 
down. 1 .2 KHz at 60 dB down (2:1 shape factor) 
Image Rejection: 

Better than 60 dB (160-1 5 meters); Better than 
50 dB (10 meters) 
IF Rejection: 

Better than 70 dB (160. 80. 20-10 m); Better 
than 60 dB (40 m) 
Audio Output Impedance; 
4-16 ohms 

Audio Output Power: 
3 watts (^10% THD (rnto 4 ohms) 






Pfioe Ard Speorficaiions Subfect To 
Change WUhoul Notice Or Obitgatton 





[U] 



radlo^ 



w 



VAtSU 



379X 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 1S954 Downey Ave., Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
YAESU ELECTRONICS Eastern Service Ctr., 9812 Princeton-Glendale Rd.,Cincinnati, OH 45246 



/Vlicrocomputer 
Interfacing 



Petef R Rony 
Jonathan A. Titus 
Christopher A. Titus 
David G. Larsen 

SUBROUTINES AND STACKS 

Subroutines are powerful 
software building blocks. Ttiey 
facilitate program develop- 
fTieni since they may be written 
and tested apart from the main 
body of software. In addition, 
they can be adapted for use 
with almost any type of pro- 
gram. In this month's column, 
we will focus upon their opera- 
tion as well as on the use of 
stack instructions. 

Both unconditionat and con- 
dttionat jump instructions 
transfer computer controi to 
another software task starting 
at the sixteen-bit address 
specified within the jump in- 
struction itself- The jump in- 
struction ss a one-way branch 
since it points to a single ad- 
dress, as Nlustrated in Fig, 1. \n 
many software tasks, however, 
there exist short subprograms 
which are used repeatedly. Ex- 
amples of such tasks inciude 
mathematical computation^ 
control, and teletypewriter in- 
put/output routines, it seems 
wasteful to duplicate these 
subprograms throughout the 
mam program, so an attempt is 
made to separate them at the 
end of the main program and, in 
some manner, branch to them 
when they are needed. 



® 






JMP 
























J HP 








® 








<D 








jMP 












atJi-woenfti 


M 


, ^ 








JWP 























The use of jump instructions 
to access these subprograms 
wifl not be successful since 
there will be no fink back to the 
main program once the sub- 
program's task is completed. 
The use of an additional jump 
Instruction at the end of the 
subprogram which points back 
to the main task is unsatisfac- 
tory, since jump instructions 
can point to a single address. 
This is also illustrated in Fig. 1. 
The jump instructions at 2 and 
3 point to the same subpro- 
gram, but upon completion of 
the subprogram's task, the 
jump instruction at 4 can only 
provide a link to one place. A 
new operation, the cati Instruc- 
tion, is required. This has the 
effect of inserting the sub- 
program's software steps in 
the main program flow at 
points 2 and 3, but without the 
problems associated with the 
use of a jump. 

The call Instruction^ like the 
jump instruction, transfers con- 
trol to another portion of the 
software. When that portion 
has completed its task, how- 
ever, control Is returned to the 
main program. This Is Il- 
lustrated In Fig, 2. In the figure, 
two subroutines are used by 
the main program, each being 



1 


HJUM PlWOfiAH 












CALL 








® ^ 






® 


(^ 




/Ss 


CMX. 






lJsL^, 




® 










CAU. 














SUenOUTINE HO 


( 


®© 










RET 


2 








SUBflOuTtME m 


® 






RET 






■ 





GLOSSARY 

Sutprogmm: A section ot a program whicli may perform a particular 

operation to be used with a larger program. Subprogfami are no I 

general-purpose and are generally used by one program. 

Subroiftine: A program which is general-purpose and which may be 

called or used by a main program or another subroutine. 

Main Program: A short notation to Indicate the software tasks which will 

occupy most of the computer's time. 

Link: A pointer address which witi point the computer to another section 

of a program or back to a program which It may nol be currently using 

N&stftrg: The operation of one subroutine within another, e.g., a one- 

mtnute delay subroutine may call a one-second delay subroutine 60 

times. 



accessed by a call instruction 
which specifies the starting ad- 
dress of the subroutine as a 
sixteen-bU, or two-byte, word. 
At the completion of the sub* 
routine, controi Is returned to 
the next instruction which 
follows the three byte caii in- 
struction. Through the use of 
call Instructions, the program 
shown in Fig. 2 has inserted the 
subroutine program steps In 
the flow of the main software 
task. Subroutine number 2 Is 
used only once, but subroutine 
number 1 has been used twice 
although it is present only once 
In the microcomputer's memo- 

ry^ 

Each subroutine is accessed 
via a call instruction and 
ends with a return instruction 
RET. The return Is a one-byte in* 
structlon which does not con- 
tain any address information, 
yet it acts to return control to 
the main program. The return of 
control takes place since the 
call instruction saves a Unking, 
or return, address which acts to 
branch the computer back to 
the address of the instruction 
immediately following the 
three-byte call. The return in* 
structlon causes the micro- 
computer to retrieve the ad- 
dress from storage and use it 
as the link back to the main 
task. 

The sixteen-bit return ad* 
dresses associated with call in- 
structions are stored in an area 
of read/write memory called the 
stacf(. The transfer of address 
information Is performed auto- 
matically by the 8080 micro* 
processor chip to and from the 
stack during call and return 
operations. Thus, the 8080 chip 
pushes the return address onto 
the stack during the execution 
of a call and pops it off the 



stack during a return. The ac- 
tual memory area set aside for 
the stack is determined by the 
programmer through the use of 
an LXISP instruction, which 
loads the sixteen-bit starting 
address of the stack into the 
stacf( pointer register located 
within the 8080 chip. It is the 
programmer's responsibility to 
set up a stack pointer before 
calls and returns are used; the 
programmer must also make 
certain that the stack area will 
not be used for other purposes 
during program execution, 

In the program example 
shown In Table 1, we decided 
that the stack should have 3 
starting address of 003377, The 
first step in the main program^ 
therefore, is to set the stack 
pointer to this address using 
the LXISP instruction. Later, 
when a call instruction fs ex* 
ecuted, the 8080 chip transfers 
the return address to the stack 
area of R/W memory. If the 
stack pointer is initially set at 
address X, the return address is 
stored with the low address 
byte in location X^2 and the 
high address byte in location 
X-1- ThuSt the stacli adds ad- 
dress data at addresses befo\^ 
the address value of the stack 
pointer. When the return ad- 
dress IS popped back into the 
80&0 chip, the stack pointer is 
automatically Incremented 
back to address X as the return 
is retrieved byte by byte. When 
the next subroutine is called, 
the stack locations are used for 
storage of the new return ad- 
dress, since the old return ad- 
dress has already been popped 
back into the 8080. 

Subroutines may be placed 
one within another, or nested. 

Cantfou&d on page t50 



Fig. T. Diagram iiiustrating the 
characteristics of the jump in- 
struction. 



2a 



Fig. E Diagram iiiustrating the 
characteristics of the cati and 
return instructions. 



•13 


• QO 


• 61 


START* 


LXI SP 


003 


• SI 


37 7 • 




377 


•03 


002 


00 




000 


••3 


• 03 


333 


LOOP* 


tM 


•03 


• 04 


005 




005 


• •3 


005 


37 6 




CPI 


1)03 


006 


026 




0^6 


003 


OOT 


312 




J£ 


003 


010 


015 




DETECT 


003 


on 


003 







003 


OlS 


303 




JHP 


• 03 


013 


003 




LOOP 


• 03 


• 14 


003 




• 


i03 


015 


171 


DETECT^ 


MOUAC 


• 03 


016 


323 




OUT 


••3 


• IT 


0»7ff 




007 


• 03 


OSO 


166 




MLT 



•003 000 

i^ SYMBOLIC ADDRESS OF 5TAAT 



/IMPUT DATA fHOM PORT 5 

/COHPAHE; it TO 026 

/ir IT MATCHES 60 TO 'DETECT' 



/ir IT DOESM'T HATCH^ GO TO 
/LOOP AND CHECK AHAlN 



Tabie h Software example showing a typicai assembler output. 





Imasinc All The Places Ybu Can Tuck 
ICOM^ Remotable iC-280. 





.) 



The lC-280 2 meter mobile comes as one radio 
to be mounted in the normal manner: but, as an 
option, the diminutive front one third of the radio 
detaches and mounts by its optional bracket, 
while the main body tucks neatly away out of 
sight Now you can mount your 2 meter radio in 
pint-sized places that seemed far too cramped 
before. 

Measuring only 2y4^'h x 7"w x 3%''d, the 
bantam-sized microprocessor control head fits 
easily into the dash, console or glove box of even 
the most compact vehicle. Or if those places are 
already taken by the rest of your "mobile shack," 
the IC-280 head squeezes into leftover nitches 
under the dash, overhead, under the seat or even 
on the steering column. 

But don*t be misled by the petite size of this 
subdivided radio; the IC-280 is jam packed with 
the latest state of the art engineering and conveni- 
ence features. No scaled down technology here! 



With the microprocessor In the detachable contra! 
head, your IC*280 can store three frequencies of 
your choice plus the dial, which allows you to 
select from four frequencies with the front panel 
switch without taking your eyes off the road 
These frequencies are retained in the IC-280 's 
memory for as long as power is applied tc the 
radio, even when power is turned off at the front 
panel switch. And if power is completely removed 
from the radio the ±600 KHz splits are still main- 
tained [ 

The IC-280 works frequencies in excess of the 2 
meter band with ICOM s outstanding single-knob 
tuning, so you can listen around the entire band 
without fooling with three tuning knobs. With 
steps of 15 KC or 5 KG, the IC-280 puts rapid and 
easy frequency chanqe at your single fingertip 
ana instantly displays bright, easy to read LED's. 

Available Opllona: • Touch Tone pad/microphone combination, 

which flte the mic plug on the radio face with 
dbsdyteJy mo modil^caHon 

(Ftts a£) ICOM ^^lin mk racfios.) 

15' uruosembled cabk kit for long dl^nce 
remote mound ng of the detachftlie 
control head 




IC-280 

2 meter FM, 4+ MHz 
Mobile Transceiver 




If you are a newly licensed novice, send lor lCOM*s ca^log and discount purchase coupon Mall your name, caD sign and date of license to your ICOM 
distributor (see the bottom of this ad). 



All ICOM radJa* itgntfifiiittlir 
FCC rcgulctkMu 



:witfaQ[iiiiigtli;«^. 



IC-MQ Spttftcitteni? aF^qtmrKyCgygiagB 143 90— I4i&ll MHiDOiSDralingConflinonL TompersluiT -lat to£(0^fl4T{o 140TK 
Duty FKtor conamxHs OFfwiiHiKy Slidiiiity ±1 S KHf O ModuJaiiar) T^^. FM 4F3) O Afiiaruu fanpedsncv SO ohm* unboluwtfd DPduw 
fi«|UMtp«f»t tX: IJ 8W ^V^% Efi#grt«^wiirf} DCuftwft Orait Is^tmimf^ 2 S*|* (lOWV 1 2A Lo flWl. R*i*ivii^ 630A at mu aiidlD 
fluiput.0 460«SQL0^i«#i«wri9niilO5liESa4^MK356iPii^ »p|init. Z^ Kd OP^mf Ov^puL lOW Hi tW Ld 

, ilw £7 S KHx «t -6 dB. las thm = tS »iz Of HW dB a Audk> Ovular Moi« iliM 



HF/VHF/UHF AMATEUR AMD MARINE COMMUNICATION EOUIPMENT 




ICOM 



ICOM WEST, INC. 
Sufte 3 

1 3256 hiorthrup Way 
Beitevue Wash 96005 
1206) 747-9020 



DiSTiRiaUTEDBY: 



ICOM EAST. INC. 

Suite 307 

3331 Towefwood Drive 
Dallas. Texas 75234 
(214) 620-2780 



ICOM CANADA 

7087 VictOfia Drive 

Vancouver S C VSP SYS 

Canada 

(604) 321-1 833 



Paui L Schmidi K9PS 
SJ&8 Brown Rood 
New Casiie IN 47362 



CB to 10 

part XVIII: several PLL rigs 



Who called it ''Ancient Mode?^' 



Recently, many hams 
have been converting 
CB radios to operation on 

the 10 meter ham band. 
With 40-channel CBs being 
sold now, there are many 
good used 23-channel units 
available at very reason* 
able prices. Some of these 
units will make very handy 
10 meter AM phone trans- 
ceivers, as they contain ex- 
cellent AM receiver sec- 
tions as well as efficient 



4-Watt output transmitter 
sections in a small package 
ideal for mobile use. One 
of these units which may 
be easily (a few hours of 
work at most) and cheaply 
(less than $10 for the con- 
version and perhaps $40 to 
$50 for the radio) put on 
ten meters is the Midland 
model 13-882 C, 

Although this article is 
concerned primarily with 
the 13'882C, the informa- 




Photo A, An overall shot of the rig with the case oft 



tion can be applied to the 

following radios which use 

the PLL-02A phase-locked 

loop IC in the same circuit 

configuration: 

General Motors — CBD-10; 

Hy^Cain-2680. 2681, 

2683; 
Kraco- KCB-2310B, 

-2320B, -2330B; 
Lafayette — HB'650, -750, 

-950, Micro-223A 
Lafayette — Com- phone 

23A, TelsatlOSO; 
Midland-13-830, '857B. 

'882C, '8888, -955; 
Pearce-Simpson— Tiger 23 

MK U, Tiger 40A (40 ch); 

Truetone~CYJ-4732A-77, 

MCC-4434B-67, 

There are probably more 

units containing the PLL- 

02A in the arrangement 

discussed here. They can 

be recognized by the 

numbers PLL-02A on the 

chip near the front of the 

rig, three crystals in the 

radio, and the numbers 

PTBM033AOX, PTBMO- 

36AOX, PTBM037AOX, or 

PTBMO39A0X on the cir- 



cuit board. There are some 
40-channel radios using the 
PLL-02A in a different ar- 
rangement (only two 
crystals) which cannot be 
put on 10 meters by the 
method described here, as 
the crystal that has been 
eliminated is the crystal to 
be changed in this mod if i* 
cation. Also, ft should be 
noted that earlier versions 
of the units listed above do 
not use the same circuitry. 
The Kraco KCB-2330, for 
example, uses a crystal syn- 
thesizer, and the KCB- 
2330A uses a PLL-01 A chip, 
which is not equivalent to 
the PLL'02A chip. 

Operation of the PLL-02A 

The voltage-controlled 
oscillator (vcol whose fre- 
quency is controlled by the 
PLL-02A chip and asso- 
ciated circuitry, provides 
injection to the first re- 
ceiver miKer and to a 
transmitter mixer stage. 
The oscillator operates at 
10.695 MHz above the 



30 



operating frequency, or 
37.660 to 37.950 MHz for 
operation on CB channels 1 
to 23. 

Output from the vco is 
also mixed with the third 
harmonic of the 11.80666 
MHz crystal oscillator 
(Q105) at 35.420 MHz, to 
produce a difference fre- 
quency of 2.24 to 2.53 
MHz, which is fed into pin 
2 of the PLL chip 10J40 
MHz energy from the 
10.240 MHz reference/sec- 
ond receiver mixer injec- 
tion oscilfator is fed into 
the IC at pin 3, 

Inside the IC, the 10.240 
MHz signal is divided by 
1024 to produce a 10.00 
kHz reference signal. The 
2.24 to 2.53 MHz signal is 
divided by n, where n is a 
number determined by the 
binary coding from the 
channel switch to pins 
7-15 of the IC, See Table 1. 

For channel 1, n is 224, 
dividing the difference fre- 
quency at pin 2 by 224. This 
frequency is compared to 
that of the 10.00 kHz 
reference signal. If the out- 
put of the n divider is less 
than 10.00 kHz, the voltage 
at pin 5 of the PLL chip (the 
control voltage for the vco) 
is raised, causing the fre- 
quency of the vco to in- 
crease, if, on the other 
hand, the frequency of the 
n divider output is higher 
than 1000 kHz, indicating 
that the vco is too high in 
frequency, the voltage at 
pin 5 drops, lowering the 
vco's frequency. This ac- 
tion, similar to that of a 
thermostat, regulates the 
frequency of the vco. By 
changing the value of n 
(the job of the channel 
switch) or the frequency of 
the 11 80666 MHz oscilla- 
tor and adjusting the slug 
in the vco oscillator coi! (to 
set its tuning range), the 
operating frequency of the 
vco, and thereby the 
operating frequency of the 
entire rig, can be changed, 



*5 WJLTS CCMKCT f© THE F»R 
LEFT tCfHttHAl OF CHAMNiL SiHfTCM 







^r % ^ 




Photo B, Close-up of the channel-switch area of the circuit board, s flowing the modifica- 
tion to provide 23 additional channels 320 kHz above the '"normal" 23 channels. 




while maintaining stability 
approaching that of a 
crystal oscillator. 

Conversion to 10 Meters 

To convert the radio to 
10 meters, the 11J0666 
MHz oscillator must be 
changed. The frequency re- 
quired to give channel 1 a 
frequency of "F" MHz is: 
crystal frequency 

[MHz) = (F + 8.455)/3 

or 12.405 MHz for channel 
1 at 28760 MHz, the chan- 
nel 1 for many converted 
CBs now in use, especially 
in the Los Angeles, Califor- 
nia, area. The crystal 
should be available from 
any of the major crystal 
manufacturers. When or- 
dering, specify the frequen- 
cy desired and the model 
of radio you are convert- 
ing. The crystal manufac- 
turers usually have infor- 
mation on holder type, 
toad capacity, and other 
specifications for CB units 
on file. If not, send a copy 
of the oscillator schematic 
along with the order. 
To get the rig up to ten 



"low" FREOS-f*0 CD«lfllECTK}li 



meters, the vco must be 
moved to near 39 MHz and 
the transmitter must be 
completely realigned. The 
easiest way I have found to 
do this is to use a dummy 
load, wattmeter, or other 
output indicator, frequen- 
cy counter, or receiver 
covering 27 to 29.5 MHz 
with some accuracy and a 
signal generator or steady 
on-the-air signal in the 
following procedure. 

With the unit off, isolate 
pins 5 and 6 of the PLL 
from the circuit board foil 
(use solder wick to remove 
the solder). Pin 6 is a pro- 
tection voltage which 
drops toO if the PLL fails to 
lock up (i.e., the PLL can't 
regulate the vco frequency 
for some reason) and dis- 
ables the transmitter. Pin 5 
IS the control voltage to 
the vco. Temporarily con- 
nect a jumper wire from 
pin 1 (5-volt supply to the 
IC) to the foil at pins 5 and 
6, without connecting to 
the pins themselves. It 
probably wouldn't hurt the 
IC if the pins did touch, 



but, at $1 2.00 or more for a 
replacement IC, I don't rec- 
ommend taking chances. 
This temporary modifica- 
tion runs the vco at max- 
imum frequency, unlocked 
from the PLL, and over- 
rides the transmitter 
disable line, allowing the 
transmitter to function. 
Connect the wattmeter and 
dummy load to the trans- 
mitter. Connect the fre- 
quency counter according 
to its instructions to 
monitor transmitted fre* 
quency. 

Turn the unit on and key 
the transmitter. The fre- 
quency counter should 
read somewhere above 
27.4 MHz, Tune the sfugs 
of Till, LI 03, LI 04, T102, 
T103, L106, L109, and LIIO 
for maximum output (the 
numbers are next to the 
coils on the circuit board}. 
Exercise extreme caution 
in tuning, as the slugs are 
very fragile. Tune the vco 
oscillator coil, T101. until 
the frequency is about 300 
kHz higher and retune the 
above coils for maximum 



♦5 VOLTS 



'ltO«lli4L^ FPIEOS-PJNS «, 9, JO 



Fig. 1. 



Fig. Z 



31 



n 


Ch. 


Freq. 


ptn: 7 8 9 


10 11 


12 


13 


14 


IS 


224 


01 


26.965 MHz 


1 1 


1 














225 


02 


26 975 MHz 


1 1 


1 











1 


226 


03 


26.985 MHz 


1 1 


1 








1 





228 


04 


27.005 MHz 


1 1 


1 





1 








229 


05 


27.015 MHz 


1 1 


1 





1 





1 


230 


06 


27.025 MHz 


1 1 


1 





1 


1 





231 


07 


27.035 MHz 


1 1 


1 





1 


1 


1 


233 


08 


27.055 MHz 


1 1 


1 










1 


234 


09 


27.065 MHz 


1 1 


1 







1 





235 


10 


27.075 MHz 


1 1 


1 







1 


1 


236 


11 


27.085 MHz 


1 1 


1 




1 








238 


12 


27.105 MHz 


1 1 


1 




1 


1 





239 


13 


27.1 1 5 MHz 


1 1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


240 


14 


27.125 MHz 


1 1 
















241 


15 


27.135 MHz 


1 1 













1 


243 


16 


27.155 MHz 


1 1 










1 


1 


244 


17 


27.165 MHZ 


1 1 







1 








245 


18 


27.175 MHz 


1 1 







1 





1 


246 


19 


27.185 MHz 


1 1 







1 


1 





248 


20 


27.205 MHz 


1 1 















249 


21 


27.215 MHz 


1 1 












1 


250 


22 


27.225 MHz 


1 1 









1 





253 


23 


27.255 MHz 


1 1 






1 





1 


255 


27 


(see text) 


1 1 






1 


1 


1 


Binary number; 






256 126 64 


32 16 


e 


4 


2 


1 


A 1 indicates 5 volts at pin; indicates 


no voltage. 


















Table 1. 













■I 



output Repeat the pro- 
cedure, "walking" the 
transmitter up to about 200 
kHz above your highest ten 
meter channel (about 2935 
MHz for channel 1 at 
28.760 MHz) Turn the unit 
off. 

Disconnect the 5-volt 
jumper wire which was 
temporarily installed from 
pins 5 and 6 to pin 1 and 
reconnect the pins to the 
foil. Turn the unit back on, 
and set the channel switch 
to channel 1, Adjust the 
trimnner capacitor next to 
the crystal for the proper 
output frequency. Turn the 
channel switch to channel 
18. Adjust all of the coils 
mentioned except T101, 
the vco coil, for maximum 
power output. (This is done 
at a higher-than-center fre- 
quency because the power 
output drops off faster 
above the peak frequency 
than below. This is normal 
even on 11 meters and 
should not be the cause of 
any worries about chang- 
ing capacitor values, trim- 
ming coils, etc., unless the 
coils just refuse to 
resonate. All three units I 
have converted have tuned 
beautifully with 4 to 5 
Watts output without jug- 



gling any component 
values) 

Connect the transceiver 
to the signal generator or 
other signal source. Set the 
channel switch to channel 
12 and adjust the generator 
for output on the same fre- 
quency. Adjust the rf 
stages in the receiver (T1 04 
and L112) for maximum re- 
ceived signal strength on 
the S-meter. Alignment of 
the other receiver tuning 
adjustments should not be 
necessary, as the i-f s are on 
the same frequency as 
when the unit worked a 
couple of MHz lower. 

Additional Channels 

Channel 27 may be 
available in the blank posi- 
tion between channel 23 
and channel 1 on the dial 
by installing an insulated 
jumper wire on the foil side 
of the circuit board be- 
tween the terminal on the 
far left of the channel 
switch and the terminal on 
the far right of the switch. 
This modification will sup- 
ply 5 volts to the vco and to 
ic pins 8 through 10 when 
the channel switch is in the 
blank position. Channel 27 
will be 20 kHz above chan- 
nel 23, or 29.070 MHz for 



channel 1 on 28.760 MHz. 
On some units, the blank 
will be another channel 1, 
but it's worth a try and, if it 
doesn't work on your rig, 
you can always take the 
jumper back out 

Each channel can be 
moved up or down 320 kHz 
by performing one of the 
following modifications. If 
one of these modifications 
is done, each channel will 
have two possible frequen- 
cies, one 320 kHz above 
the other. Thus, channel 1 
in the higher position will 
be 30 kHz above the lower 
channel 23 and 10 kHz 
above the lower channel 
27. In other words, the 320 
kHz offset switch is select- 
ing between two different 
bands of 23 channels (or 24 
channels) each. The only 
component required for 
the modification is an 
SPDT switch, which may be 
installed in the front panel, 
or, to preserve the stock 
appearance of the radio, 
the function of an existing 
switch may be changed. 

To be able to move the 
23-channel band down 320 
kHz, isolate pin 10 of the 
IC by cutting the foil on the 
circuit board around it 
Then wire the switch as 



shown in Ftg, 1 . 

To move up 320 kHz re- 
quires a little more work 
and is the modification I 
have shown in the photo- 
graphs. Cut the foil on both 
sides of the connection to 
pin 7 to isolate it from 
ground. Then cut the foil to 
isolate pins 8, 9, and 10 as a 
group from the switch con- 
tact and from the thin strip 
of foil going to one end of 
R103, the series resistor in 
the B-plus lead to the vco. 
Install a jumper from this 
end of R103 to the 5-volt 
line at the left-most ter- 
minal of the channel 
switch or to the point 
shown in the photograph, 
which is just on the other 
side of a jumper from the 
terminal, If this jumper is 
forgotten, the vco won't 
oscillate. Connect the 
switch as shown in Fig. 2. 

After the conversion has 
been completed, affix a 
label to it in an obvious 
place stating that the radio 
is not capable of operation 
on Citizens Band frequen- 
cies and that an amateur 
radio license is required to 
use it The label could save 
a lot of embarrassment or a 
pink ticket from the FCC in 
the event a passenger 
riding in your car says 
something like "You have a 
CB just tike mine!'', picks 
up the microphone, and 
yells "Breaker 4" all over 
the world on 29 050 MHz. 

My 13-8e2C on ten 
meters has provided quite 
a few contacts, mostly with 
stations on the west coast. 
My dad (Dale K9HIS) also 
has a 13-882C on ten, 
and my brother (Larry 
WB9BAQ) runs a 13^578 
(an 882C without the noise 
blanker or antenna warn- 
ing light) mobile with a 
trimmed-down CB magnet- 
mount antenna, working 
mostly stations on the west 
coast and southeastern 
U.S. What 4 or 5 Watts of 
AM phone will do on a 
clear frequency gave me 
quite a surprise. Who 
called it Ancient Mode, 
anyway? ■ 



32 



MFJ ENTERPRISea INC 1979 



NEW MFJ-962 1.5 KW Versa Tuner III 

For $159.95 you can run up to 1.5 KW PEP and match everything from 
1.8 thru 30 MHz: coax, balanced line, random wire. Buitnn balun. SWR, 
dual range forward and reflected power meter. Hexible six position an- 
tenna switch. Outstanding value. 

Tunmr with 9WR, dumi rmngm 
forwmrd mnd rmflmctmd powmr 







\ -«.! j^^ 



tllANS*«TTUI 
MATCMINO 



mBtrnff Bntmnnm mwltch mnd balun 
tow anljf . . • 



HHTWtiHH 



lHtHJCTO« 






^^J n.H-^i n \fH ui 



vc>N 



"riowAn %eREs 



HOD^i UF>«6? 






Ttii MEW MFJ-962 1,$ KW Vena Tuner ■ lets 
vou run up to 1.5 KW PEP and match any feed- 
l^ne contmuousfy from 1.8 to 30 MHz: coajs, 
balanced line or random wire. 

This lives you mtiC\mwm power transfer id 
your antenna for solid QSO s and attenuates fiar- 
monies to reduce TVI and cHjt-of band emtssion. 

An accurate meter gives SWR. forward, reftect- 
ed f>0wef in 2 ranges |2000 and 200 watts). 

A fleiHiie six posftion antenna surltcli lets you 
select 2 coax lines thm tuner or direcl. or ran 



dom wire and balanced line 

A mm ai metal, lew proftle cabtnel gives yoii 
RB protecdon. ngid cMStructiOfi, and sieeic slyfing. 
Black finish Black front panel tias reverse letter- 
ing. 5x14m14 inclies. k ffip down wire stand tilts 
tuner tor easy viewing. 

Efficjent^ encapsulated 4:t femtc balun. 500 
pi. 6000 vdt capacitors. 12 position inductor. 
Ceramic rotary switct*. 2% meter. 

Built-in quality. Every single unit is tested for 
performance and inspected for quality. Solid 



Amoncan construction. qualJIy components. One 
year iimiled wan^nty 

For your wircst MFJ dealer, call loilfree 
800 647iaOfl Stop by yoyr dealer Compare ft 
featyre lor feature with other tuners. Compare its 
valiie. its quality and its performance. 

Alter a Imty side by side companson^ you'if 
be convir>ced that tts value, quality and features 
make it a truly outstanding value. 

Why not itsit your dealer today? Ij no dealer 
IS available order direct from Mf J. 



MFJ-961 15 KW VERSA TUNER III has halyti . six position antenna switch. Matches coax, 
balanced line, random wire, from 1.8 to 30 MHz. 

ff nosMon antmnna switch latm 
you malmct 2 coax Unas thru tunar 
or diractg or random wira and 
ba lane ad Una. 




The IIFi-9G1 15 KW Vena Tuner ■ gives you 
a ftexible six position antenna switch. It lets you 
select 2 coax lines tinj tuner or direct, or ran- 
dom wire and tHianced line. 

Run 1.5 KW P9. Match any feedline from IJ 
to 30 MHz; coax, balanced line, random wire. 

Gives inaximuin power traniter. Harmonic at- 
tenualion reduces TVI, out of band emissions. 



B>lack all metal cabinet. Black front panel has 
reverse lettering, f hp down wire stand tilts fejner 
5xt4xt4 inches. 

BKapsulaled 4:1 fentte balun. 500 pf, &000 
voU capacitors. T2 position inductor, ceramic 
switches. SO-239S. ceramic feedthrus. One year 
limited warranty 

Every single ynil is tested for performance and 



inspected for quality, SoTid American construction, 
quality components. 

Fer your nearts! MFJ dealer, call toll free 
800 847 1800. Visit your dealei and compare. 
Youl find real value. 

Why ml nt the NEW MFJ-961 K5 KW Versa 
Tuner lit at your dealer's today? II no dealer is 
availatile order direct from MFJ. 



FOR YOUR NEAREST DEALER OR FOR ORDERS 



CALL TOLL-FREE 800 



§ 



Order any product froin MFJ and try it H not delighted, return within 30 days for a prompt refund (less shipping). 
Ordor today. Money back tf not delighted. One year limited warranty. Add $8>00 shipping/handling. 

For technical Information, order/repair statua. In Mtaaiaalppl. outslda continental USA, call 601-323>5S69. 

Order By Mail or Call TOLL FREE 800-647-1800 and Charge It On 

MB I BIJTBDDDieBe IM^ p. o. box 494 ^ms^ 

IVirv EN I EnfmOCdy iraw* Mississippi stati, Mississippi 39762 




P^ R—Of S*/vto«~i«f fitg* 1B5 



33 



PROM IDer for Longer Callsigns 



don't be caught short 



Take care of RPT. 



LONSfST M£SS*Gf:?-«l &E WJiJJ*i/RI*T 



«*T 



UME 




I 

9 

4 

ft 
7 
8 
9 

to 

M 
II 

rs 

14 

15 

IC 

17 

18 

19 

ZO 

21 

22 

21 

24 

29 

2» 

Zf 

s« 

29 

30 
31 



H 



'W 



— n 



^, £. Bi^/lngwn W4VGZ 
2736 Woodbury Drive 

Burlington NC 27215 



The Peter Stark K20AW 
CW identifier has seen 
good service for several 
years now. Since it was in- 
expensive and easy to pro- 
gram, I adapted it to a 



plug-in configuration. (See 
73 Magazine, )une, 1977.) 
Now it seems that a CW 
identifier with longer 
message capability is need* 
ed, due to the demise of 



Qty 

8 
2 

1 
1 
1 



STOP 



Ci 



Fig. 1, A ''not'So-typicaf" caltsign. 



Pans Ust 
Description 

10k Ohms, Vi-W composition 

270 Ohms, V^-W composition 

2.2 uF tantalum 

1.0 uF electrolytic 

100 uF tantalum 

10 uF electrolytic 

7474 flip*flop 

74151 parallel-to-serraf 

7493 hex divider 

82S23 memory (custom bit pattern) 

7420 gate 

7400 gate 

10k pot, Bourns 3389W 

curt boards and parts can be obtained from: 
O.C. Stafford 
427 S. Benbow Rd. 
Greensboro, NC 27401 



34 



WR repeater calls. Now we 
must identify the repeater 
with the trustee's callsign 
followed bv RPT, 

The longest of callsigns 
can be programmed by al- 
tering the bit pattern of the 
82S23 memory. Fig. 1 fists a 
not-so-typical caffsign to 
show how much room is 
available on the ROM. 

You can do it right the 
first time if you remember 
a few rules and definitions. 
First, a slot is the minimum 
length of time between 
data transmissions. Now 
then, a dit is 1 slot high 
followed by 1 slot low; a 
dah would be 3 slots high 
and 1 slot low. The space 
between characters is 2 
slots low. You should leave 
a few slots at the beginning 
to allow the transmitter to 
come fully on. A stop com- 
mand consists of bits 5, 6, 
7, and 8, all high. 

The leading edge of the 
start pulse causes the I CI 
flip-flop to change state, 
resulting in the hold corn^ 
mand going high. The Q 
output of the flip-flop 
enables the two 7493 four- 
bit ripple counters and the 



HOLU > 



ST*Plt >S-»^ 




J'OK 
; > \ AUDIO 



74151 parallel-to-serial 
converter. The 8 bits of 
each line of memory are 
thus pulsed out until bits 5, 
6, 7, and 8, being high, are 
detected as a stop com- 
mand. It should be pointed 
out that no other data 
should be on the stop line 
as it would never be pulsed 
out. A keyed CW oscillator 
that furnishes audio to the 



fig. 2. PROM CW identifier, 

transmitter completes the 
circuit 

This ID unit plugs into 
the same socket [with no 
wiring changes) as the one 
shown in my June article. A 
logic-high pulse starts it, 
and during the time that 
the ID unit is running the 
hold command is high to 
keep the transmitter on. 

A sample program is 



shown in Fig. 1 . As you can 
see, this 'longest call" uses 
only fines to 23. There 
may be room to have even 
your QTH included. 

Contest freaks can have 
several ROMS programmed 
for their various contests, 
and just plug them in when 
contest time rolls around I 
have one programmed: 
"DE W4VCZ Transmitter 




Fig. 3. Component layout 



35 




Fig. 4. PC board. 



Hunt Hi Ht " I use a VHF 
Engineering 2 meter trans- 
mitter and a 555 timer to 



cycle the ID unit. With bat- 
tery power, this unit can be 
hidden almost anywhere. 



f wilt gladly correspond 
if you have any questions 
concerning this or any of 



the other articles I have 
written. Please send an 
SASEIB 



ufKAR's Portable Erectable 



^^ Antenna Towers 



* Ideal for ground or roof mounfs 

* One man can assemble and erect 

* Lightweight 

■ High quality aluminum alloy 

TTiese unique anienna towers can be installed 
on the ground or root. Since they're eastty 
transpofied and site erected, they're a natural 
for tteld and portable operations. 

Constructed of sturdy aluminum alby, they're 
sturdy enough to handle large size HF beams 
and EME arrays as well, Also available with 
optional stainless steel hardware for harsh 
environments. 



High stability 
Modular and portable 
Extremely rugged 



Base is approximately 60" high and weighs 28 
pounds. Tower seciions are 72" high and 
wetgh 21 pounds 



Base plus 

? tower section 

with cad hardware. 
Suggested 
List Price . 



$179 



95 



CALL M & M FOR PACKAGE DEAL DISCOUNT! (714) 299-9741 




mw 

ANTENNAS 




AfGA ROTORS 
Wilson) 



ft 




Oil 




mi AM RF DISTRIBUTORS 

■WI^IHWI P.O. BOX 82183, SAN DIEGO, CA 92133 



t'MTB 





36 



t^ Reader Service — se^ p^ge f 95 



SCR 1000 
The Repeater of Your Dreams I 



2Mfr. & 220MHI 

i^SO HlHi Soon!) 



^wzi£sd(e 'WuA Ofitio*ud 



tea. 



"Dneeimed ^6cut f 









TTv' 



■a^: 



*^**% •*' 



'■|2*I 



^. 



a. 






SEMtQUQ 

VMF FM REPEATEfl 



^ ^-, . 



\ '/ 



CHmotvt 

NOW- 

FCC TYPE ACCEPTED 
For Coin me re la I Ser vices 



• FuU Autopatch. with or wrthout reverse patch, 
and "Landtine" or Radio Rdmote Control of the 
Repeater. 

• Radio and/or Landilne TouchTone* Remote 
Control of such repeater functions as HI/LO 
Power; Patch Inhibit/Reset; Switch ID Tracks; 
Repeater ON/OFF; PL ON/OFF. etc. 

• 65 Wt. Transmitter^ 

• *TL"-CTCSS; HI/LO Pwr; Multi-Freq. Up to 4 
different fDs; Automatic switching to 
"Emergency Power ID" when on battery pwr. 

The SCRIOOO — s/mp/y the fmeii repealer avAtfabhon ih& market —absolute- 
Iv TOP QUALITY throughout . and o^ten compared to fJesser featured) 
units sell irig fof 2-3 times the price! This is ^ 30 Wt unit with a very sensitive 
& selective receiver Included is a butlt-m AC Suppfv. NEW Expanded 
Memory CW IDef, full metering and I igh led status rndicators^'contro) push* 
buttons, crystals, local mic, etc 

totn the thousands of ver^ pleased Spec Comm customefs world-wide who 
are using ouf gear — knowledgeable Amateur Radio groups. Commercial 2X 
Radio users, Militarv & Government Agenctei, Red Cross, Universfttes, etc 
So, make irour dream a reality Call or write Spec Comm today! Give us all 
of yo^Jf repeater system requirements— whether modest . , , or ''Stiper 
Delune/' and tet us serKi you a Quote 

The Spec Comm Repeater System , a sound, long-term investment — for 
those who demand the finest^ Available only by direct factory order Get 
your order in ASA PI 

Mobile/Portable/Base 
Transceivers also avail- 
ablet 5'25Wt,;2,6.&12 
Chan.; 2M & 220 MHz 
Now in use in many Pro- 
fessionai Communica- 
tions Systems through- 
out the worid! Write or 
call for further info 

^Registefed Tfademark of AT. AT 




• Uitra^sharp. 10 Pole Xtal Filler; Xmtr. Xtal 
oven— for the ''ultimate'" in stabrlity. 

• Timeout— Timer Reset Tone Annunciator 

• And nrtany other ''custom-designed'' options 

per your re^uesf— such as custom logic, aux- 
iliary receivers, radio links, etc. Please Inquire. 

• Along witfi a complete line of Repeater 
System Accessorfes , , . such as: The Finest 
Duplexers, Cavities, Cabinets from 7" to 7\ 
Antennas, ''Hardline/* Cables, etc. 



^^ 



s^^tDWOO Muiomatic Base 



Station CW Mentiiier 



MitAtmftt 



ittwn 



^« (^ommmecai S /4m€^ewt /4p^dUat£oHA 



• Automat J^aFly lOt your Station 

(Base or Repeater) per FCC ra<3UFfe 
ments every 5-30 mtn {adjustable). 

• M#«ts aU FCC f«qulr«m«fiti for 
Parts 69. 91 . §3, &5, 97 & other appli- 
cations. 

• Conirenieril Front Pan«1 Con|rol» 
for AC Power: Trigger Mode; (Auto 
maiic/COR. Continuous, or Dia^ 
ablg^J; Manual ED; Local Monitor 
Spkr Volume, 

• Front Pane! Status Indicator Lights 
for AC Power; ID m progress; OG 



Powet operation. 
« Euilt-in AC Power Supply 

• 12VDC Battery Input vi^/auio< 
switchover to Emerg<sncy Poiv«r." 

• Op I [0 n a ! ' ' Emeroiincy Poww It) ^ 

m Acfjuslable CW Ton« Pitcn, Spe*(i I 
Letrel, 

• Provision for up to ♦ dtfftrent ID 
channels f 

• Plug-in IC Memory Ch-tp! 

• Two Inhibit Inputs. 

• Sid. 1 mack Mount^ 



fAdtf S375 shtp/handling. PA resider^ts add 6% tax j 

Send for Data Sheets! See uur April 73 Ad for more details 

EXPORT ORDERS -CONTACT OUR INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT 




SPECTRUM COMMUNICA TIONS 

1055 W. Germantown Pk., Dept. S5, Norristown, PA 19401 (215) 63M710 




f^ ReaOer S^rricm — S^e psge tB5 



37 



Martin W, Krey K7NZA 

7037 E. Chupurra! Road 
Sconsdale AZ SS2S3 



The W7GAQ Key Collection 

— 250 museum masterpieces 



Do you have one he doesn't? 



It could be the Smith- 
sonian Institute or it 
coutd be little Foothills 
Junior College in Califor- 
nia which houses the Lee 
De Forest collection- 
John El wood W7GAQ isn't 



sure which, but one of 
these museums, or perhaps 
some other one in the 
United States, will one day 
be privileged to display 
the finest collection of 
tefegraph keys in the 




}ohn liwood W7CAQ holds a small English spy key that 
he swapped for with an English ham. Three and one-ha!f 
inch screwdriver shows the relative size of the tiny key. 



world. John is devoting his 
retirement years to acquir- 
ing and restoring with 
almost unbelievable care 
as many different keys as 
he can possibly find. One 
day when he deems the 
time right he will donate 
the whole collection to the 
museum of his choice. 

At the moment, John's 
collection amounts to 250 
different types of keys, 
which he is quick to point 
out is not the largest col- 
lection in the world. But to 
this writer, who grew up in 
the atmosphere of the tool- 
ind die-making trade, 
it is obvious that there may 
be no one else on Earth 
willing and able to spend 
as much as fifty hours 
cleaning, restoring, and 
polishing a key the size of 
a J -38, and more on a com- 
plex key such as an orig- 
inal Martin Blue Racer 
)ohn Elwood's keys look 
more like a modern elabo- 
rate sales display than an 
antique collection. He has 
been that deliberate and 
final in his restoration and 
care of them. 

John was introduced to 
CW radio at the Army Air 
Force Radio School in 
Sioux Falls SD, in 1942, but 
it was several years before 
he got a chance to pound 
brass. He and his twin 
brother, Henry E, III, 



worked together running a 
control net system, VHF 
direction-finding station at 
Paine Field, Everett WA, in 
1943, Then John went over- 
seas with the 328th Fighter 
Control Squadron, 64th 
Fighter Wing, and for the 
duration of World War tl 
he ran direction-finding 
equipment helping to get 
triangular fixes on dis- 
oriented fighter aircraft 
and vectoring them in to 
safe landings in Italy, Cor- 
sica, France, and Germany. 

John finally got a 
chance to work CW as an 
operator in Panama, but 
he had to sign up for 
another hitch in the Air 
Force to do it, 

"We were sent out to a 
place called Rey Island to 
work in an administrative 
net handling CW traffic 
back to Panama," John 
said. ''It was great, and I 
knew I was hooked on CW 
for the rest of my life." 

John worked CW in 
Greenville SC, and then 
got his best shot at concen- 
trated CW operating in Op* 
eration Seminole, a joint 
Armed Forces field opera- 
tion in Florida in 1947-48. 
Then he was shipped to 
England to operate CW at 
Burtonwood in the Mid- 
lands. AH this time, the lit- 
tle contact machines that 
made CW communication 




^MMI 



Melehan Valiant made in the 1950s. This is a favorite key 
of }ohn% because you can set the vibrating arms for both 
dtts and dahs, the dahs being three times as !ong as the 
dits. Then both dits and dahs are made by spring action. 



possible were facilitators 
to John. The charm of the 
little devices hadn't yet 
struck him. 

The Berlin Airlift of 1949 
taxed all parts of an 
airplane to the breaking 
point, radio equipment in- 
cluded. John was flung in- 
to a maintenance gap and 
had to foresake CW for a 
while. 

"I worked my butt off 
repairing radio equipment 
on C-54s during part of the 
airlift/' John said, ''but as 
soon as 1 could, I switched 
back to operating CW and 
finished out the Berlin Air- 
lift doing ground-to-air 
communication with weath- 
er ships over the North 
Sea/' 



John wrapped up his Air 
Force career as ROTC ra- 
dio instructor at Ohio Uni- 
versity. Then he switched 
to the Federal Aviation 
Agency, from which he re- 
tired when he was Facility 
Coordinating Officer at 
the Los Angeles Air Route 
Traffic Control Center at 
Palmdate CA. 

It was at this final duty 
in California for Uncle 
Sam that lohn finally got 
swept away by the charm 
of telegraph keys — and it 
took a woman to gather 
him up. Louise Moreau, 
now W3WRE, was living in 
California in 1971 and 
working CW with her 
WB6BBO call. Since she 
was a prime collector of 





This is a 1912 Ftame Proof hand key manufactured by 
Machinery Division, Boston Navy Yard. The key is rated at 
1-2 kilowatts. It is cast iron with brass hardware. 



telegraph keys, she 
responded to a call from 
the Lancaster Radio Club 
to speak about them. John 
sat in the audience and 
listened and found 
himself captivated by the 
love and enthusiasm that 
Louise expressed for her 
keys- 

"She spoke with such ex- 
citement and interest/' 
John said, "that I couldn't 
help wanting to become a 
key collector. When t left 
the room that night, I was 
a collector/' 

A friend gave John a big 
Japanese key and, as a 
gesture of fellowship, John 
cleaned it up in one of his 
now-routine fifty-hour 
restoration projects, drove 
down to Altadena, and 
presented it to Louise 
Moreau. Louise showed 



him her key collection 
representing twenty years 
of effort and encouraged 
him to get on with his own 
collecting. This he did, and 
he and Louise have been 
friends and correspon- 
dents ever since. 

John's wife Edie bought 
him the first key for his 
own collection: a Boston 
Fire Alarm key which she 
got from J J, Glass Surplus 
Radio in Los Angeles. John 
went to work on the key, 
soaking and scrubbing and 
polishing until every speck 
of foreign material had 
been removed. That key 
amounted to free rein for 
John. He hit the highway at 
every chance, scouring the 
whole of the west coast for 
telegraph keys. Edie caught 
the travel bug, too, and 
went on nearly every trip 




lohn Elwood's well-used keying finger points to oil well on 
the Ducrete and Roger [Paris) oil break key. Oil dampened 
the spark of spark gap transmitters. The key was a gift from 
Ed Rasner W2Zh Trenton N). The gear in the background is 
John's R'391 Collins receiver. 



This is a Signal Electric semi-automatic key that can be 
used as a sides wiper by dropping a locking arm over the 
vibrating arm and closing the arms of the contact termi- 
nals, 

39 




This C*M. Phelps ''came/faacfc" leg key is from the 
1850-1860 era. The inventor, George M. Phelps, was the 
chief of Western Union at Utica NY. It was he who intrO' 
duced the spring adiustment for this type key. Brass "'legs"' 
were inserted through holes in top of desk and the key was 
tightened down with brass wing nuts. 



with him. 

"If you see any kind of 
antique store, junk shop, 
or radio store between 
Oceanside CA and Van- 
couver Island, Canada, 
that looks like it might 
have a telegraph key in it, 
we've been there/' John 
said. "And we've dug up a 
lot of keys worth saving/' 

It wasn't long before 
John's friends heard about 
his key collecting and, 
respecting his zeal and 
purpose, they kept their 
eyes open for keys. About 
twenty of them have had 
the satisfaction of con- 
tributing to his collection. 



Once, in Portland OR, 
John and Edie went into a 
little, out-of-the-way an- 
tique shop, and what they 
found made their trip a 
success. The proprietor 
told thenn he didn't know 
what he had, so they 
should go into the back 
room and take a look. 

'"We looked/' said John, 
"and found big boxes with 
an antique radio station in 
them, cat's whiskers and 
all. But since I don't col- 
lect radios, we picked out 
two cam el back keys and a 
Marconi wireless antenna 
knife switch built by Cross 
and Mines, and we bought 
them and left." 




This Electro-Bug, made by Electro Mfg. Co. of San Frarh 
Cisco, has a line magnet and works like a doorbell buzzer, 
attracting the vibrating arm and then breaking the contact 
"You can hold the paddle over and it will make dlts all 
day long,*' says W7CAQ, 




Here is a }.H. Bunnell & Co. "Sideswiper" double-speed 
key. It requires only half the movement of an ordinary key. 
Advertisements claimed it eliminated muscle cramping. 
John turned down $200 offered for this key when it was on 
display at the ARRL Convention in Hollywood, In the 
background is an RM18 US Signal Corps Type 5007 A 
British Air Ministry control unit, part of the SCR-57S 
VHF/Df unit of the type }ohn used in World War IL 



John wrote a friend in 
California about the old 
radio station^ and the 
friend went up to Portland 
and bought it, He got an 
extremely rare Marconi 
loose coupler, a Clapp- 
Eastham one-half-kW 
spark transmitter and 
receiver, a marble base 
detector, a Colby loose 
coupler, and some United 
Wireless gear. 

Once, at the Rose Bowl 
flea market in Pasadena, 
Edie, who John swears is 
clairvoyant regarding 
radio gear, had a strong 
feeling that this would be 
John's day. She was right 



John found a man with a 
wooden box of telegraph 
gear for sale for fifteen 
dollars. Among the con- 
tents were a Martin 
Vibroplex, a Boy Scout 
training key, three 
Menominee leg keys, a 
Bunnell straight key, and 
four Bunnell sounders. 
John paid the man the fif- 
teen dollars and picked up 
the box to leave. 

''Hey/' said the man, 
"don't take that box. It 
doesn't go with that other 
stuff/' 

As collecting became 
more difficult, |ohn began 
advertising in the maga- 





iam 



This Horace C. Martin Rotoplex key built for the US Army 
Signal Corps during World War U has a black crackle 
finish on a steel base and is mounted on a quarter-mch rub- 
ber mat 



40 




This chrome-steel teardrop base semiautomatic key 
was made by T.R. ''Ted'' McElroy in Boston. McElroy is 
credited with the Morse code receivtrig speed record of 
75^2 wpm set In a tournament at Asheville NC on July 2, 
1939. 



zines of England and Amer- 
ica, Half the worfd reads 
English and American mag- 
azines. John found that the 
foreign countries have col- 
lectors, too, and they were 
interested in swapping 
keys. Since John had dupli- 
cates of some types, he 
made mail-order agree- 
ments with several hams 
and, as a result, he got 
some interesting German, 
French, and English keys. 
Recently he has made con- 
tact with a doctor in 
Belgium who collects keys, 
and they have worked out a 
mutually worthwhile swap 
agreement One ham in 
Australia has traded nine 



keys to John. 

When John gets a key 
that is in rough condition, 
he applies penetrating oil 
to frozen or rusted screws, 
nuts, and moveable parts* 
Once the parts have loos- 
ened, he disassembles the 
key completely and sub- 
merges all metal parts in 
carburetor cleaner to re- 
move dirt and lacquer and 
get down to base metal 
Then he makes a cleaning 
potion of one-third cup 
each of baking soda, white 
vinegar, and ammonia, and 
one cup of very hot water 
He soaks all brass parts in 
this solution for twenty-five 
minutes, polishes them 




** 



Here is a German Bau muster 77 military key of the 1930s. 
''This is my favorite hand key because the adjustments are 
precise and the concave knob gives it a good feel/' says 
John Etwood, who purchased the key from Louise Moreau 
W3WRE. In the background is John's Hallicrafters SX- 
101 A receiver. Thafs John's precise fist in action. 




This is an Australian PMC vertical semi-automatic land- 
tine key made for the Postmaster General Department The 
PMC controls all communications in Australia. 



with Dupont chrome pol- 
ish, washes them with soap 
and water; and dries them. 
Then he finishes up the 
brass with Happich Simi- 
chrome polish [German) 
and washes it with hot soap 
and water. On the steel 
parts, he uses steel wool, 
working down to four- 
ought grade. He uses taps 
and dies to restore thread* 
ed holes and screw threads 
He has chrome- or copper- 
plated parts re-chromed or 
re-coppered. If a part is 
missing, he hunts for it un- 



til he finds it. Then he reas- 
sembles the key and puts it 
into his display case. 
Because of the time-con- 
suming job of keeping 
brass keys polished, John is 
now thinking of coating 
them with lacquer* 

John has an almost 
clinical attitude toward his 
keys — his patients. There 
they are in all their spar- 
kling beauty. He has taken 
them in, analyzed their dif- 
ficulties, repaired them, 
and stitched them back up 
again as good as when 




The thick-base key in the foreground is the famous 
"Boston" key made by Ctass-Eastham Co. This key is 
called a "Cadillac Class"' key of the spark era by Louise 
Moreau, The key was designed for luxury liners and the 
yacht trade, and every amateur wanted one. Behind it is a 
Boston Fire Alarm key, and to the left is a recent copy of 
the T.R. McElroy Professional Hand Model Key made by 
Daniel L. McElroy, grandson of the record holder, who is 
making them in honor of his grandfather. Out of focus in 
the foreground is a Mecograph semiautomatic key once 
headed for the Smithsonian until its owner, Howard 
Lorenzen W3BLC, heard of John El wood. 



41 



they were created. Now it's 
time to think of them as 
healed. They are well 
again, and that's a fact. 
Now he must get on with 
the business of locating 
and repairing others. He 
feels he must be suc- 
cessful before collectors 
with only a monetary in- 
terest in keys have col- 
lected them and taken 
them out of range of the 
ham fraternity. 

lohn wishes he could 



swap keys with more hams 
in this country and abroad. 
He'd especially like to get 
the miniature Bunnell key 
and sounder once used as 
watch charms. He'd also 
like to get a Vibroplex ver- 
tical bug. He never sells 
keys, though he has been 
offered as much as two 
hundred dollars for a small 
sideswiper key, but he will 
be happy to trade and will 
work out satisfactory trade 
agreements. 



Not once did John speak 
of ''my'' collection. He 
seems rather to consider 
the keys as the property of 
everyone. His responsibili- 
ty seems to him to be an 
almost sacred duty to get 
the keys and make them 
new again so that the 
world will be able to see 
them and know what 
pounded out man's joys, 
sorrows, successes, and 
failures during a century 
and a half of incredible 



progress in communica- 
tion. 

Also> John is preoc- 
cupied with that ultimate 
decision he will one day 
have to make: Which 
museum will display the 
keys to the best advantage 
and take the best care of 
them? 

Whichever one he picks, 
that museum will some 
day find itself the keeper 
of a remarkable and iiv 
teres ting col lection ■ 



AMECO 






HARD TO GET ITEMS 



$74 



t5 




7T 

pi * 









B>W 



Trin«e«tf«r prtimp 100-6 fnir. Wllh automttic 
Tnn»mlt/n«cilv« iwilehlng Htlpt |hjI1 In th« w««k 



SI 7230 



K 4 # V !" 



MT2000A mWTyner, .,.»*,,,*« 

MT3CX»A 2KW tuner with met&rs 

Big Diufimy Dummy IhnhI w/oi I . .^ . 

Supwr TtMwr PluiTu-nirr 



p^sei 



DLSOO 
MN7 



■>1 ORftKE 



Encoding mlcrop^^ane . 
300 W dry dummy load, 
matchbox w/meter 



¥ ^ ■ 1 « 



* p I- ■• » ■ - 



.f29.50 
113130 



MtJS 

SUO.fiS 



37Q 
370-10 



941 B 
901 

900 

&044tC 

MfJ 

CWFMX 

404 



4 POSCiMx switch... 

5 pos switcn w/ $rtd pos^ ^ 
Apartment artt, 40- 10 mtr 



immvrmwt 



MFJ 
Versa Tuner I ( matctwr 
Versa Tuner matcher . . 
Ectma Tuner marcher , 
Deluxe iambic key«r *....***. 
24 hour digital tl«ck .,,... ^ ., , 

Active cw filter ...,,. 

Grandmaster Mamorv Keyer 



* * « % ■■ - 



I19J5 

S19.75 
.t^.50 



M9.i5 

.S29.95 
129.95 

SI 39.95 



Wodat 43 Tnrui in€ warrmetaf . . , , 

Tilila 1 plug inelesuitix A-£,.,«..., 

Tabif 1 plug ill eie suffix H , . « i. « . . , . , 

CGI carryingcasefor mi>del -43 

2 MEIEf^ DUCKIES 

Hli4 fits IC2U. Wotofola.etc ..., 

HliS PL2Ktype connector* **,,, 

HM227 BNC cc^n fits Witson Marlts 



SI 25.00 
$31.00 

, f45 00 
$27.S0 



S7.00 
S7.00 
Sll,00 






W« fMMtntlly t!&eli tfi* «nllf« MFJ ffnr Don' I 9«1 
b»ckon|«r«d by tha r»ctO:ry. Glva ua • try. 



( 



StA3 
Marie n 

WC14 



Wilson 




Smair sp^Kf/mic for Mark H/1 V $30.95 

or Mark. tV..,..,,.>.,„.^.,,.calHor quote 
Battery pack for Mark t»/IV. ........ 924.95 

Wall charger for Mark I I/I V. . 1)5 J5 



Modar444 HHmp 
Modal 404C Hi imp 



SHURE 

desk mk., 
hand mic* . 



A ■ 4 i- d ik I 



■ * i- I b * 



934.95 

933.00 



m SPECTRONICS, 



Platsa add 51.50 p«r it am to covsr thlpplna *n^ 
hindltng. (ContmBntal US) PHONE & OVERSEAS 
ORDERS WELCOME 



^sai 1009 GARFIELD ST. 

INC. OAK PARK. ILL. 60304 



312-848-6777 



NEW MFJ DEL UXE Versa Tuner I 

$119.95 buys you one of the worid's finest 300 watt antenna tuners 
with features that only MFJ offers, ike . . . dummy load, SWR, forward, 
reflected power meter, antenna switch, balun. Matches everything from 
1.8 thru 30 MHz: coax, random wires, balanced lines. 

MFJ's Bemt Versa Tuner #1 . . . 
Solid American Quatltjf 





JH% H MFifi Itti Htm Tuner I. And Ofii of 
the world's finest 300 vwatt (RF outpyt) tumf^. 

Tte MFJ 949 Deluxe Ver$i Tuner I gtves 
you 3 combinatkon ol Quality, perlofmance, and 
features thai others can't totjcti at tftis price . . . 
or aity phce- 

pgflfOBMAWCE: Yoii cifl run your tul trsns- 
cetvef power output « up to 300 watts RF out- 
put — and match youf transmitter to any feedljne 
from U ttiot 30 MHi whett>er you have coax, 
li^ncetj line or random wire. 

FEATURES: A 200 tfitt SO tbffl dummy Itad 
lets you tune up for maximum peilormartee. 

A unsitJvt meter teti y9u rcid SWR with only 
5 watts and t>oth forward and reflected power in 
^rwo fangss {300 ami 30 watts). 



A ffexft)fe antenna iwittfi lets you select 2 
coax lines direct or thru tuner, raiidom wtre or 
balancei^ line aixl dummy load 

A large efficient airwound inductor 3 inches in 
diameter gives ymi plenty ol matching rang« and 
l^s losses for more watts out. 

1:4 t^lun. 1000 volt eapicNors. SO 239 coax 
connectors. OtndJng post tor balanced fine, random 
wire, ground, 10x3x7 irKihes. 

BtlAUTY: Every single unit h tisitd for per- 
fofmafKe and inspected for quality. Solid Amencan 
construction, quality componenls. 

Ttie ltFJ*949 carriei a fiiN ftiH year uncondi 
tional guarantee. 

Onter from MFJ ami try H » no obligition, 11 
not delighted, return it within 30 days tor a re- 



fund (less shipping). 

To erriw, simply call us toll free 600 647-tSOO 
and charge it on your VISA m Master Charge w 
mail us 3 check or money onier for $1t9.95 
plus $3 00 for slTippmg/handling, 

Doo'l wait any longer to tur>e out thai SWR 
and enioy solid QSO s. Mer your Deiuxe Versa 
Tuner II at no obligation, today. «^iisa 

MFJ ENTERPRISES. INC. 

P. O. BOX 494 

MISSISSIPPI STATE, MS 39762 

CALL TOLL FREE .... 800 647^1800 

For technical Informatfonp ofder/rep^ir ttilnp In 
His., MEtside cofittnenial USA, cal &0t-323-5ft69. 



42 



p^ Reader SefViC9^s«9 pegs ^95 



CALL TOLL FREE 



for Quality Hani Radio Products at Discount Prices 



YAESU 


DENTRON 


TAYLOR 


6.T.O. ALPHA 


KENWOOD 


HYGAIN 


SWAN 


VHF ENGINEERING 


DRAKE 


MOSLEY 


TEMPO 


BERK TEK CABLE 


ICOM 


CUSHCRAFT 


TEN TEC 


CONSOLIDATED TOWER 


STANDARD 


WILSON 


MIDLAND 


SAY 


EDGECOM 


HUSTLER 


CDE 


SHURE 


KDK 


LARSEN 


AUTEK 


TELEX 


PANASONIC 


BENCHER 


MIRAGE 


ROBOT SSTV 




ROBOT 


AEA 


BENCHER 



Our Mail Order Hours {CSTJ 

M-F 8 am to 12 Midnight 

Saturday 8 am to 6 pm 
Sunday 12 Noon to 8 am 



Call and Talk to 



Don 

Denny 

Bill 

Joe 
Jim 



WB0YEZ 

VV0QR 

WB0YHJ 

WA0WRI 

KA0CRK 



Ken 

Eli 

John 

Blaine 
Bob 



WD0EMR 

KA0CEJ 

WB0MTS 

WB0QLH 

WB0RQZ 




SANKAMEfltGAna 




Communications Center 

443 N. 48th, Lincoln, Nebraska 68504 jn Nebraska Call (402)466-8402 



master cnarge 



CALL TOLL FREE 



J 1 1 • 



FAnacocitQ 



era I Coverag' 
Receiver 



i^CSS 



'anosonic 
RF-4800 



- FM^AM/8 SW — 10 Bands Receiver with Digital SW Frequency 
Readout * AC' Battery Operation (8 0" Si^e Batteries included) 

• LED 5 Digits Frequency Readout For SW2-8 • Fuli coverage 
from 1.610 31 MHZ on SW* Covers SSB and CW* P remix Double | 
Super Helerodyne • Fast- Slow 2 Speed Tuncng * AFC Switch on 
FM. Narrow Wtde Selectivity Switch tor AM and SW - Antenna 
Trimmer • Caitbration Con If o^ • FET RF Circuit • Mode Switch for 
AM— C W SSB • BFO Pftch Control ■ ANL SwJtcti tor AM - RF 
Gam ConlfOl - Tunjn^ Battery Meter witti Meter Function Switdi 

• Separate Bass TreWe Torie Control • Dial Light Swft<^ • Digital 
Display On/Oft Switch • Separate power switch • Rack Type 
Handle * irxilucJes Antenna. Speaker, Earphooe. Aux In and 
Recording out jacks 12 V DC in Jac*« AC Lme Cofd. He3c^>hcf>e 
Converter PhiQ and FM Antenna - Umtied 2 yr. wairanty 



masrtr cfiatge 



Communications Center 

443 N. 48th, Lincoln, Nebraska 68504 In Nebraska Call (402)466 8402 



BiM)(iM(fiici(IO 



1 1 



1^ Reader Servfcesee page 1§S 



43 



Paui Cassel VESA VY 
91 Silver Aspen Crescent 
Kitchener, Ontario 

Canada 



Proper FM Transceiver Adjustment 



good club project 



In search of the crisp signal. 



Anyone who listens to 
the great number of 
rigs on two or six meter FM 
these days may wonder 
why there is such a great 
variation in the quality of 
signals they hear. One 
HW-2036 may sound clear 
and crisp, while the next 
may sound distorted, 
especially on audio peaks 
In almost 100% of the 
cases, the problem can be 
traced to either over- 
deviation or off*frequency 



operation, and sometimes 
a combination of both. Un- 
fortunately, most hams are 
quick to notice low audio, 
but few seem to point out 
excessive audio. 

If you have been active 
on SSB or AM, you may ask 
why these two items are so 
important to maximum 
range when using the FM 
mode. If you take a mo- 
ment and glance at Fig. 1, 
we will try to show you. 

Fig. 1 shows an FM 




3KHe 
IF 



14.9 KM} 



Fig J. 



transmitter on 146,520 
MHz with a 1000-Hz audio 
tone deviating the carrier 
frequency ±4,5 kHz, and 
being received by a re- 
ceiver with an i-f passband 
of ±5 kHz. (Please note 
that an i-f fitter selectivity 
curve is not as sharp as 
depicted) As one can see, 
the on-frequency signal. 
with its 4.5 kHz of devia- 
tion, fits perfectly through 
our i-f filter where it enters 
the FM detector and be- 
comes a good clean signal 
at the speaker. 

Now let's move the 
transmitter off frequency 
by 3 kHz and see what hap- 
pens. This may not seem 
like any amount of error to 
be concerned about, but 
look at Fig. 2. 

Since the receiver dis- 
criminator; or some form 
of FM detector, only con- 
verts to audio what passes 
through the i-f filter door- 
way, one can rapidly see 
why a good signal can 
sound distorted when it's 



only 3 kHz off frequency. 
As Fig. 2 shows, over 60% 
of the transmitted audio on 
the high side is being 
chopped by the filter and 
over 60% of the low-side 
audio is attempting to be 
detected on the high side 
of the carrier frequency. As 
a result, audio distortion 
occurs. 

You may ask why a weak 
off-frequency signal is 
more noticeable than a 
strong local signal The 
true selectivity curve of 
the i-f is such that strong 
signals brute-force their 
way through the filter, thus 
not affecting the audio 
quality as much. The selec- 
tivity of the receiver is 
directly proportional to the 
strength of the signal being 
received. This does not 
mean that if you are close 
to the repeater your fre- 
quency is not as critical. 
Remember, your off-fre- 
quency signal could be af- 
fecting the user of the next 
channel up or down. 



44 




1-F 

P4SSSUID 



Fig. 2. 



The only solution to the 
above is to adjust your 
transmitter back on fre- 
quency, or reduce your 
deviation 60% by backing 
away fronri the mike. The 
tatter is only a poor tem- 
porary cure 

Deviation 

Since the receiver i-f 
passband can accept only 
those signals that transmit 
within its 5-kHz limits, we 
must make sure the trans- 
mitter does not exceed this 
amount. 

If you look at Fig. 3, it is 
very apparent why over- 
deviation (±10 kHz) will 
produce highly distorted 
audio. 

At a recent tune-up ses- 
sion at the Kitchener- 
Waterloo Amateur Radio 
Club, some rigs were found 
to be deviating in excess of 
1 5 kHz. tf you visualize this 
amount of audio trying to 
find its way through a 
5-kHz fifter, it is no wonder 
why some signals were al- 
most unreadable prior to 
the tune-up clinic. 

With the number of 
repeater frequencies al- 
ready used in the Metro 
areas, the repeater coun- 
cils have adopted a plan to 
split the channels and 
create new ones every 15 
kHz, thus placing a new 
repeater pair between each 
existing one. Because of 
this split. It is rapidly 
becoming very important 
that our deviation be kept 
at 5 kHz maximum. 



Fig. 4 shows what hap- 
pens when an over*deviat- 
ing signal is placed on the 
air adjacent to one of the 
new channels. 

This same adjacent 
channel interference can 
occur if the transmitter is 
off frequencVi since it al- 
lows part of the signal to 
fall into the passband of 
the receiver using the next 
channel up or down. 

The new band plan 
adopted for use with these 
new split or 'tertiary' fre- 
quencies will minimize 
some operator error in the 
following way. All ne^N fre- 
quencies above 147.000 
will use low inputs and 
high outputs (reverse of the 
standard high in. low out). 
This will mean that off fre- 
quency and over deviation 
on a repeater input will not 
bother the adjacent input, 
only the output; so you will 
only get pins in your coax 
from your neighbors, not 
the complete repeater 
group. This will put all re- 
peater operators in a po- 
sition where they will be 
forced into keeping the 
peak deviation below 5 
kHz and off-frequency 
operation to less than 1 
kHz. If they wish to meet 
current DOC (Department 
of Communications, our 
FCC) commercial specs, 
they should keep within 5 
ppm or 735 Hz at 147 MHz. 

Don't feel you will have 
to run out and buy a new 
super-selective rig with 
these new splits. They will 




PABSfiAND 



»OKHr 
AUDIO 



f /g- -5. 



be issued about 50 miles 
away from adjacent chan- 
nel repeaters and should 
not cause a problem ex- 
cept on the older wideband 
rigs. Current DOC guide- 
lines are 35 miles between 
tertiary frequencies, with 
some as close as 5 miles 
with no interference prob- 
lems, so don't get upset 
about the new splits. 

Frequency Adjustment 

The best method for fre- 
quency adjustment is, of 
course, with a counter 
capable of 150 MHz. A 
counter capable of only 
10-15 MHz can also be 
used by reading the actual 
oscillator frequency and 
calculating the frequency 
by multiplying by the 
number of times the rig 
multiplies. For example, a 
CE Prog Line using a 6- 
MHz transmit crystal 
would have an oscillator 
frequency of 6.1050 MHz 
when producing a 146.520 

output. 

If no counter blesses 
your ham shack, have a lo- 



cal ham lend you his re- 
ceiver that is known to be 
on frequency and uses a 
discriminator for FM detec- 
tion. This type of detector, 
when properly aligned, 
produces a voltage relative 
to "0", either positively or 
negatively proportional to 
the amount of off-fre- 
quency operation. You sim- 
ply adjust your transmitter 
trimmer until the discrim- 
inator reads zero on the 
meter A lot of the new rigs 
use ratio detectors, or 
quadrature detectors, 
which cannot be used to 
determine receive frequen- 
cy unless It is beat against 
an accurate i-f frequency 
generator, e.g., 10J MHz. 
Another method to use if 
no counter and no receiv- 
ers with discriminators are 
available is to transmit a 
very weak signal to a 
known on -frequency re- 
ceiver. Simply adjust your 
trimmer while talking into 
the mike. The point where 
your audio has the least 
distortion should be very 
close to frequency. 



146 355 



t46 vm 



44«,38S 



ADJACENT 

CHANNEL 
rNTtftFEf^ENCE 




AOJACENt 

CHANNEL 
IhltCftFCaEftCf 



f\%, 4, 



45 



Deviation 

Deviation is normally set 
by the factory before ship- 
ping. Unfortunately, 90% 
of the rigs that get on the 

market appear to be set at 
73 kHz, Almost all users of 
these rigs sound much bet- 
ter when they back off from 
the microphone. As we all 
know, within a couple of 
transmissions, we tend to 
crawl back into our normal 
mike habits. The only solu- 
tion is, of course, to adjust 



the deviation as set out in 
the manufacturer's instruc- 
tions. 

To set this control prop- 
erly, one needs a cali- 
brated deviation monitor 
which very few hams, in- 
cluding myself, own. The 
next best way is with a 
weak signal into an on- 
frequency receiver, ad- 
justing the deviation for 
best audio. Have the per- 
son adjust his squelch at 
threshold with no signal. 



When you transmit, try whis- 
tling. If the squelch closes, 
you are exceeding the band- 
width of the receiver and 
should back off a bit until 
the squelch does not close 
on peaks It is very impor- 
tant when using this method 
that the signal be just full 
quieting, J-1 uV, 

The commercially ac- 
cepted level for adjusting 
FM deviation is 4.5 kHz of 
audio. This is measured 
with a TOOO-Hz tone driving 



the transmitter audio limit* 

er stage into limiting. 

So, as you can see, one 

does not have to mortgage 
the house to invest in test 
equipment in order to have 
a good-sounding signal on 
2 meters. Most of these ad- 
justments, if set once, re- 
quire very little attention. 
Because of this, there are 
many generous hams who 
have the equipment and 
don't mind helping out a 
ham in trouble. ■ 



Bird 






DON'T BE FOOLED! Buy your 
from the store with the largest stock! 

One well-known store in the south doesn't stock "E'' series elennents. Then 
there's the place in the midwest that orders only after you place your 
order! We stock heavy and we mean business. Call us when you get dis- 
couraged! 



OPEN ruts THRU SAT 



RADIO SUPPLY, SEATTLE 

6213 - 13th Ave. So. 98108 - (206) 767-3222 



•^^55 



MEW FROM UfMAR 



Modular 



• Ideal for ground or roof 
mounts 

• One man can assemble and 
erect 

• Llghtwelgtit 

• HIgli quality aluminum alloy 

• High stability 

• Modular and portable 

• Ejctremely rugged 



Electable Towers 



LUNAR'S NEW MODEL 

2M 10-150 LINEARIZED 

AMP 

Now ready and 
being shipped. 
We held off on 

announcing it until it was 

right,.. 

Ready now. Order today 
from your Lunar dealer, 




These unique antenna towers 
can be instailed on the ground 
or roof. Since they Ye easily 
transported and site erected, 
they're a natural lor field and 
portable operations. 

Constructed of sturdy aluminunn 
alloy, they're sturdy enough to 
handle large size HF beams and 



EME arrays as well. Also 
available with optional stainl^s 
steel hardware for harsh 
environments. 

Base is approximately 60" high 
and weighs 28 pounds. Tower 
sections are 72" high and weigh 
21 pounds. 




BRODfE ELECTRONICS COMPANY 



2537 EdgewQod Drivt 

Moore, Oklahoma 73160 

405-794-040 B 



i^B4a 



46 



p^ Reader Seftice—see page 195 





* J ■ I I [ « 



^ttf^XM 



MCOAifJ 



ftrPCFwcA 



ggB H» Ah Au MOPE nuMscxrvB 



Kjsii cm 



PHQh£S 



4 


use Lse „ 




*te 


AOC 


• -. t 


f 


o 





Q 


tJtJ£LC,H 


«,tl>JlL 




■- 1 J 




atV^rf 


o« 


fA»T 






ji^ "% 




^ 


RE0E4VE 


VOK 


DIM 



rvib 7iO 



,.\ '. 



if OLI^ 



. 



tlUMA«T CM 



2 meter Muiti-Mode 4 MHz Transceiver 

• Full 4 MHz * Operates new subband • Two VFO*$ built in • Single knob frequency 
selection * Variable offset * Remote programming with compatable RM2 micro- 
processor ' Two speed optical chopper dial • Computer input port • LSI circuitry * 
117v AC built in • Variable power output - 100 Hz & 5 KHz, 144-146 / 5 KHz, 146448 

• SSB & CW, 144448 /FM, 144448 • IF noise blanker • Front panel discriminator • 
SWR meter * VOX on SSB with adjustable gain level and delay • CW sideband 
monitor • Semibreak4n CW 



"The IC-2n is a very fine piece of electronic 
equipment. It is every bit what 1 expected, and 



more. 



John, K2Um 



" Vfery fine receiver, and easy to operate, even with 
so much on it. Nice!" 

AieK WD4DGF 



^'Fantastic rig! ICOM line recommended 
dealer, but rigs sold themselves! I!" 

Jerry, WB9QKV 



by 



"The 1C'211 outperforms anything Vve used ... 
Regal quality throughout, , . exceptional cosmetic 
design and compact ruggedness. Truly a master- 
piece of engineering inside and out/ 

Sfeue, WD9FRP 






I only buy the best 



Frank, WB4WUY 



"An excellent rig. Both my wife (WB9BFY) and 
myself are very pleased with it. " 

NeaK WB9ZCU 

''An excGptional piece of equipment. Very 
versatile." 

Bemie, WB2FBP 

*The one that probably best illustrates our point 
— that your Amateur Radio dollar buys a lot more 
these days^is the ICOM IC-21 1 . . . The key word 
in any description of the IC'21 1 is versQtilityL " 

QST MagaxiwiB, 
'Troduct Review", 
Dec. 1978 



AU iCOM radioi ilgfrihc «nt]v exceed 
FCC tpecificrBllAnt bmhing 
■patktttt rmii&HjRft. 



SprdftcatioRS arir « ub^rct to dlLBitge 



JC-2 1 J Sjwc ineattnnv: O FnquMicypCovfl^a^- <! n ny mad^i 14^1 I X) to 14S 00 MHi D Mod«t ^B (A^ i FM (F3 j . CW (Al k O Supp4^' Vi>hflg« 
DC: I J fiV - I SI,. ACllTV * tOTt O S« 1 HmrtiLh.^ *241mim«) « 2tAmmm D Weigl^ 6 8 Kg D TK Ouipui A3J. lOW (PEPJ: Al «r fl. lOW 
O 'StpuTKivt R«li«tiaa -60dBb«kwOrTwrr:A4icniph<»mlinp*daTi£« dOQ Phios D S«nwi»Mfy A3J&A1.0 SmtcAn^lOdaS *Hm, ¥3. 
6 nniiinivoil tm 2Q tp «|iiicftna C Sfwi»u5 RnfCjni* 60 (ffi ot b^tUrt ;. S^iriih«i^«t FwqMMKjf RBftgK 144 QD MKl to 143 CIO Wli 
HSymbcttserSicbfety - tKHl H Fi«i|un^- IUw^m 7 f&^LEDIQDKifieAJoiiiO AiUmiulinpHkfK^ 50 ohmt u Spttfiqu* iy*»ii i iw 

S«id>afidSupp««icmMi»tt«fi*OcBdPwi"S«kttivitirSSB.C^ - 24KHt«t - 604e.FM = ? 5KH*«! -&A2: 



HF7VHF/UHF AMATEUA ANO UAfllNE COM MUN (CATION EQUIPMENT 



DiSTmeUTESiYi 



ICOM 



(COM WEST. INC, 

Suire 3 

13256 Norlhrup Way 
Bellevu^. Wash 980D5 
<206^ 747-9020 



ICOM EAST. INC, 
Suite 307 

3331 ToiA^eiTivood Drjve 
Dallas Tenas 75234 
(2 I4j 620-2700 



ICOM CANADA 
7087 Vicroria Drjve 
Vancouver BC V5P SYS 
Canada 
<604| 321-1^3 



StiHmg M. Oiberg WISNN 
19 Loreita Road 
Waitham MA Q2154 



Dual-Band Smokey Detector 



Super Scooper does it all 



The battle goes on. 



The "Smokey Detector/' 
described in the 1976 
Holiday issue of 73, has 
been the subject of much 
mail received at WISNN. 
Many have asked if it 
could be used on the high- 
er frequencies found with 
newer types of radars 
which have been designed 
to Improve entrapment 
techniques and decrease 
confidence in Smokey De- 
tectors. 

The author has learned 
of new methods used to de- 
ploy obsolete pohce radar 
along highway ranges used 
for surveillance. Newer 
radar is used in conjunc* 
tion with this method, 
which is known in police 
circles as "seeding/' The 
older radar units are set up 
and left unattended so that 
they 'Illuminate" stretches 
of highway for many 
miles — depending on the 
number of "seeds" that are 
used. Most of those units 
operate on 10.525 GHz in 
X-band. 

The newer radars, usual- 
ly operated from a fixed 
position, are hand-held and 
triggered only when the 

48 



device is pointed at a par- 
ticular stream of traffic. 
The purpose of seeding is 
to keep the Smokey Detec* 
tors activated and, there- 
fore, cause drivers to slow 
down. Confidence is soon 
decreased in the Smokey 
Detector, however, and the 
unsuspecting driver is 
trapped by the hand-held 
device. Yes, it works on 
X'band, too, but too late 
for a detector warning be- 
cause the speeder has 
moved right into trigger 
range. 

But that isn't the only 
technique used. How 
about this one: As before, 
seeding is used. Radar 
which has been designed to 
be used in vehicles while 
moving is employed. 
These units have a device 
that arithmetically re- 
moves the vehicle speed, 
allowing the officer to pur* 
sue and record the speed 
of the car being chased- 
Here again, the police car 
can depend upon the seeds 
to keep Smokey Detectors 
operating, and even when 
the police come into range 
of vehicles using detectors, 



they can follow without de- 
tection. The new radar op- 
erates in the K-band region. 
Most of the older radar de- 
tectors will not receive at 
this frequency range; 
again, confidence is lost. 

These techniques are 
used by large municipali- 
ties and state agencies for 
the most part. They can af- 
ford to maintain the anti- 
quated equipment for 
seeds. Others will be 
adopting them, however, 
because of newer seed 
equipment that is being 
manufactured by several 
companies at prices which 
can fit smaller budgets. 
The newer units are simply 
a small oscillator and bat- 
tery supply. The oscillator 
will feed an antenna that 
floods an area with the 
oscillator's signal. They 
can be left unattended, 
fastened to street signs and 
stop-go signals. Other 
radar units that promise 
greater control for police 
agencies are in the works; 
the war is still on. 

What can we do with our 
radar detectors? WelL we 
can update them to detect 



the newer frequencies and 
learn how to use the older 
ones to be sure that we are 
detecting an active radar 
and not a seed. It is not too 
hard to manufacture de- 
tectors that are sensitive 
enough to detect a seeding 
and radar entrapment, and 
thus provide a warning that 
both are being used, or to 
warn that just a higher-fre- 
quency moving radar is ac- 
tivated. Look at the block 
diagram of a dual warning 
system which accompanies 
this article. 

A circularly-polarized 
horn coupled to a circular 
waveguide is coupled to a 
pair of crystal detectors. 
The detectors are mounted 
in cavities which support 
the frequencies of interest, 
The larger of the two cavi- 
ties is tuned for the X-band 
frequency, T0.525 GHz, 
while the smaller one has a 
step ridge mounted into its 
Emplane coordinate. The 
step ridge performs as a 
tuning device that allows 
the smaller of the two cavi- 
ties to work over the 
16.5- to 26.5-CHi range. 
There are several frequen- 



ties used in this range for 
hand-held and nr^oving-sur- 
veillance radar units. 

Coupling to the circular 
waveguide is accom- 
plished by careful place- 
ment of the two detectors 
which are mounted in rec- 
tangular waveguide to pro- 
vide coupling to the cir- 
cular mode. 

Two preamplifiers, one 
for each waveguide- 
mounted detector, amplify 
the signal — which is the dc 
component of the detected 
signal. The amplified signal 
is passed through a CMOS 
switch which serves as a 
signal modulator. 

Each of the switches has 

its own driving oscillator. 
An oscillator at 1 kHz 
modulates the X-band-de- 
tected signal, and another 
at 400 Hz serves as the 
K-band signal modulator 

The outputs of the two 
modulators are summed at 
the input of an audio am- 
plifier that drives a 
loudspeaker. 

The resulting warning 
signal will be two-toned 
when both X- and K-band 
radar units are detected. If 
just the X-band detector is 
activated, the higher- 
pitched tone of the 1-kHz 
oscillator will be heard. 
Likewise, the 400'Hz signal 
will be heard when a K~ 
band signal is detected. 
When both are on, it is very 
likely that you are in an en* 
trapment area which is 
well seeded. Beware when 
the higher-pitched tone 
stays on for long periods. If 
it is on for over 4,000 feet 
of driving, you are prob- 
ably in a seeded area. If the 
signal continues, slow 
down and watch for your 
friend in blue. 

The circuitry illustrated 
here is straightforward 
audio construction and 
can be built on a small 
board using flea clips or 
wire-wrap. No special at* 
tention is required. The 
completed board must be 



mounted so that the leads 
that connect to the detec- 
tor outputs are short — that 
Is, not over six inches long. 
Several adjustments to the 
electronics are required 
and will be described be- 
low. 

The hardest part of the 
construction of the Super 
Scooper is its antenna and 
circular waveguide. In the 
original Smokey Detector 
article, instructions were 
given on how to construct 
the horn antenna. This was 
the subject of many in- 
quiries both as to its beam- 
width and gain and rela- 
tive to variations from the 
given dimensions. First of 
all, the gain of the antenna 
is approximately 14 dB 
over a reference antenna 
that provided a 3-dB gain 
standard. The gain stan- 
dard was determined in a 
laboratory using a section 
of circular guide termi- 
nated in a matching impe- 
dance to a standard signal 
generator, A similar anten- 
na was used with a detec- 
tor and spaced one meter 
from the generator gain 
standard and three meters 
above the ground. Once a 
level was determined by 
setting the signal generator 
attenuator to produce a 
full-scale deflection on the 
detector indicator, the new 
antenna used on the Super 
Scooper was substituted 
for the transmitting horn, 
and then the attenuator 
was readjusted to produce 
the same full-scale reading 
as with the reference an- 
tenna. The attenuator dif- 
ference was 14 dB at 21 
GHz and 17 dB at the 
X-band frequency. 

Since most amateurs will 
not be able to duplicate 
these dimensions, a pattern 
shown in the drawings has 
been laid out so that it 
can be closely duplicated. 
Several antennas were con- 
structed and measured, 
and variations from the 
values given were not 
worth mentioning. The 
dimensions were deformed 



PRE AMP 



DCT£ET&H 
"^ 1 



HOFm «friTENN« 



400Hf 
OSClLLATOfl 



UOQiJLATOft 



1^ SAND 
DETECTOR 



PHEAMP 



AF 
AWP 



-*{f| SP€AfSR 




F/g, T- Block diagram. Super Scooper Smokey Detector. 



from true circular to a 
shape which occurs when 
the seam is soldered Not a 
true circle, the variation in 
gain wasn't worth the trou* 
ble to measure. It is ap- 
parent that that would take 
quite a departure from a 
true funnel shape. 

The beamwidth was 
measured, and it required a 
considerable amount of 
time to determine that it 
was a circular beam of 9 
degrees. Variation from a 
true funnel shape does 
distort the beam con- 
siderably, so care in 
achieving the cone shape 
should be exercised. The 
beamwidth was measured 
on an antenna range at the 
same laboratory, using a 
quality of range equipment 
probably not available to 
most amateurs. A nine- 
degree beamwidth is very 
similar to that of most cir- 
cular antennas used on 
police radars and should 
intercept most radiation 
from them. 

To construct the anten- 
na, it is necessary first to 
acquire a piece of copper 
flashing sold in most hard- 
ware stores. (Brass can be 
used but should be thin so 
that it is easily worked] 
The sheet should be at 
least 10" X 6", With a com- 
pass, lay out a 9-5/16" circle 
and, from the same center, 
scribe the second 14" cir- 
cle. (See the drawing.) Out- 
side of the circle leave 
enough metal so that the 
tooth-like section can be 
cut and bent. Cut the sheet 
with tin shears and flatten 



out all bends and dents ac- 
quired in the cutting pro- 
cedure. Make sure that the 
tooth-like cuts are bent at 
right angles to the sheet, 
and then lay it aside. 

Next acquire a piece of 
construction paper with 
the same dimensions as the 
flashing sheet. Lay out the 
same dimensions as be- 
fore, but forget the tooth- 
like part — just cut a 
smooth Vi" half-circle. Cut 
out the complete sheet 
so that it can be glued at 
the seam tab. Now you 
should have a cone that 
has a mouth 3Vi" in diam- 
eter and a length of 
4-1/16", The opening at the 
rear should be about Vi" in 
diameter. 

Make up about two cups 
of plaster of paris that is 
nearly dry but easily mold- 
ed, and fill the cone so that 
a substantial amount of it 
protrudes from the V4" 
hole. Shape the plaster so 
that the cone is as rounded 
as possible, and set it aside 
to completely harden. This 
form will serve as a man* 
drel for the metal horn 
when soldering its seam. 
Simply bend the metal 
around the form and hold 
it in place with rings placed 
at several points on the 
cone. Solder the seam. 
Shape the metal and set it 
aside until the circular 
guide is finished. 

The circular waveguide 
is made from a section of 
Vi" water pipe 3" long. 
Lay out the dimensions 
shown in the drawing. Mea- 
sure up along the outside 



49 



+ 13 DC 




■ ft 




Fig, 2, Schematic, Super Scooper Smokey Detector 



of the pipe and make two 
marks to ipdicate the width 
of the cuts. They will be 
.250" wide and will sup- 
port the K-band waveguide 
when soldered in place. 
Make this cut so that the 
.250'' X .500" guide sits in 
place in such a way that 
edges of the guide mate 
with the H-plane walls of 
the K-band waveguide Re- 
move all burrs. (The cuts 
are easily made with a 
hacksaw, but can be better 
if done by a friendly 
machinist and a milling 
machine.) 

No other cuts are need- 
ed in the circular wave- 
guide, but its length is very 
important. The ends should 
be square and free of burrs. 
It also would be to your 
best advantage to clean 
the pipe inside and out 
with steel wool so that 
solder will easily tin the 
metal Set the circular 
waveguide aside for now, 
and proceed to drill the 
holes in the E-plane dimen- 
sion of each waveguide 
section. 



Lay out the holes on the 
X-band guide as shown in 
the drawing. The crystal 
detector mounting for the 
40075 X-band detector 
should be a 3/16" drilled 
hole on the centerline of 
the E-plane. Mark a point 
11/16" from the smoothed 
end of the guide. Carefully 
centerpunch a point for the 
drill and drill through both 
walls of the guide. Open 
one hole to 5/16 of an inch. 
Place a section of 3/16" 
pipe or tube, 3/16" long, in- 
to the other hole, 

(This pipe is found in 
most model shops; it is 
brass tubing used in model 
construction. If you try to 
buy it at a metal dealer you 
will pay for a lot more than 
you need since there it will 
be a one-foot section you 
will have to purchase.) 

Solder this small piece in 
place so that it is just even 
with the inside wall of the 
X-band guide. This serves 
as a connection for the 
small end of the X-band 
diode. Now lay out the 



other two holes in line with 
the 5/16" diameter hole, 
drill them, and tap for +40 
threads. Next, drill holes lo- 
cated 3/4" from the B tun- 
ing hole through both 
walls. Use a #36 drill. On 
the same side of the guide 
wall as the detector holes, 
open the #36 hole to a 5/8" 
diameter. Tap the remain- 
ing #36 hole for 6-32 
threads. Deburr the hole in- 
side and out. This hole is 
used to couple the circular 
guide to the X-band detec* 
tor. Mount two 4-40x^2" 
brass screws in the holes 
marked B and C and use 
nuts as locks for these 
screws. A Vi" brass 6-32 
screw and nut is used for 
the same purpose at point 
A, 

Next, lay out the hole 
required on the K-band 
waveguide. This hole must 
be on the centerline of the 
E-pIane side of the wave* 
guide. Very carefully 
centerpunch a point 5/16" 
from a smoothed end of 
the guide, and at this point 
drill a .187"-diameter hole 



500^ F 

-Hf— 



;jC]S 



^EAKEFt 



through one wall of the 
guide, Deburr on each side 
of the hole, as on the 
X'band guide. Mount a 
%" long piece of copper 
tube ,250" in diameter. The 
ends should be deburred 
inside and out. This piece 
of copper serves as the 
outer part of a capacitor 
and choke for the K*band 
1N53 detector diode. The 
copper tube and the diode 
are coaxial ly mounted, so 
it is necessary for the tub- 
ing to be aligned so that 
the hole in the guide is ex- 
actly in the center. 

The next step Is to lay 
out the 1/8" thick piece of 
brass which will serve as 
the step ridge for the 
K-band waveguide. Lay out 
the steps, cut with a hack- 
saw, and smooth with a 
file. The steps are set so 
that the bandwidth of the 
K-band cavity is quite 
broad and will cover many 
of the frequencies used by 
K'band radar. Departure 
from the dimensions given 
will decrease the sensitivi- 
ty of the Super Scooper, so 



50 



try to stay as close as possi- 
ble. 

Next, in the middle of 
the second step from the 
top of the structure, drill a 
hole with a number 60 drill. 
This hole must be on the 
centerline of the step, and 
fall 5/16'' from the end of 
the structure so that it will 
align with the hole in the 
waveguide when the struc- 
ture is in place. Remove 
the center conductor from 
a BNC chassis jack 
(UC^1094/U). Cut off the 
solder section so that the 
pin is .250" long, and file It 
smooth. Insert the cut end 
into the number 60 hole 
and carefully solder into 
place. (Take care that 
solder does not fill the 
flutes on the opposite end.) 
This pin serves as the con- 
nection to the center core 
ductor of the 1N53 
diode — a coaxial diode 
that has a pin connection. 

Slide the step ridge sec- 
tion into the waveguide so 
that the pin is m the center 
of the .187"-diameter hole. 
This ridge section must lie 
on the center line of the in- 
side (E-plane) of the guide. 
(ft may be held in place by 
wood wedges while it is 
soldered on the bottom to 
the waveguide wallj 

Now solder the X-band 
and K-band detector 
mounts in place. The 2" cir- 
cular waveguide should be 
inserted into the 5/8" hole 
drilled into the X-band 
guide The pipe should be 
just through the waveguide 
so that it is parallel with 
the inside wall of the guide. 
Solder in place Also solder 
a W X 1" cover plate on 
the open end of the guide. 
Install the K-band detector 
mount and solder in place. 
Add a cover plate to the 
open end of this mount, 
also. 

Now slide the horn over 
the end of the pipe and 
press down the tooth-like 
flaps so that they lie flat on 
the pipe. Match up the end 
of the horn with the end of 
the pipe and solder the 
flaps to the pipe. Use 



solder sparingly on the in- 
side joint and make it 
smooth and clean, but 
build up the solder on the 
outside to strengthen the 
joint. Gussets may be add- 
ed to the outside of the 
horn and pipe, if desired. 

Install the X-band diode 
by first slipping over the 
diode a Vi" solder lug and 
a Vi" shoulder washer The 
shoulder should face the 
small end of the diode. In- 
stall a 1N53 diode in the 
K-band mount by first 
wrapping the diode outer 
sleeve with one wrap of 
Saran Wrap, which serves 
as the dielectric for the 
choke capacitor. [For the 
purist: Use a single wrap of 
1 mil mylarTM ) when this 
diode is installed, it should 
be pushed into the mount- 
ing hole carefully so that 
the insulation is not 
scored- The center pin of 
the diode should engage in 
the hole of the pin jack 
mounted on the ridge. A di- 
ode clip should be used to 
connect to the shank of 
this diode where it pro- 
trudes from the copper 
tube. Use a razor blade to 
cut away excess Saran 
Wrap or mylar^M so that the 
clip can make contact with 
the outer diode sleeve. 

The diodes may now be 
connected to the points in- 
dicated on the schematic 
diagram. Care must be 



fliB3 



COVER PL 4TE 

\ 
% 



.25P 



i 




SARAN WRAP 



.250 P\P^ 



used in making these con- 
nections. Be sure that there 
is no power in the circuitry. 
Do not solder to the di- 
odes; solder to the 
lug — and then only briefly 
for the X-band detector 
diode — and do not solder 
at all on the K band diode. 
Use a diode clip or make a 
small clamp that contacts 
the diode sleeve. 

Assuming that all of the 
electronics has bean con- 
structed as shown rn the 
schematic diagram, it is 
now time to test individual 
circuits. 

The input circuits to the 
LM380 audio amplifier can 
be used as an audio cir- 
cuit tracer by disconnect- 
ing the jumper marked AB 
at the input of the volume 
control Connect a .01 ca- 
pacitor to this point and 
use it as a probe to detect 
the VkHz tone at the out- 
put of IC3, pin 3, Be sure 
the audio volume control 
is half open, as the tone 
should be present at this 
point. Also, you should be 
able to detect a Am-Hz 
tone at pin 3 of IC4, If this 
test checks out OK, recon- 
nect the jumper at AB. 
Now, probably, you will 
hear both tones. If so, dis- 
connect pin 3 of IC4 and 
adjust balance pot RBI so 
that the tone nulls out. 
Reconnect pin 3 of IC4 and 
then adjust balance pot 



K SAKE) 



n PLAM£ VitW 




lUOC FROM ^EEl 
BflASS TO f>T Um 



CIRCULAR 
WAVElU«aE 




K gAHD ^ 
DETECtOPT 

1/2 1 I 4 t/l» 

CdVCR 
PLATE 



4-40 

TUHEHe 

SeUTEVS 

/\ 



DtOOE 



./ 



RB2 until the other tone 
disappears. This completes 
the electronic adjust- 
ments. 

The rf adjustments re- 
quire the use of two signal 
generators, or your friendly 
police car. Apply a signal 
to a ho/n, or other radiator, 
from an X-band signal gen- 
erator, point the Super 
Scooper antenna toward 
the generator, and use a 
fairly strong signal from 
the generator. Adjust tun- 
ing with screws B and C al- 
ternately for the strongest 
tone from the speaker. To 
use an indicator, connect 
an ac voltmeter across the 
speaker leads and adjust 
the screws for the greatest 
output Now turn off the 
X-band signal generator 
and radiate a signal from a 
K-band generator at 24.5 
GHz toward the Super 
Scooper. Adjust screw A 
for the strongest signal 

The adjustments are 
now complete, and so off 
to the highway! You may 
find that radar used at air- 
ports and military bases 
will be detectable. These 
units are putting out very 
strong signals and will sat- 
urate your Super Scooper. 
It will take only a very 
shorttime to learn how the 
Super Scooper works. 

No description of the 
packaging of this device is 
given here. It is sufficient 



9 A/IS 






^ 



1/2 »iti/» 

COVER 

PLATE 




etue tm soLDcn 

SCAM TAS 



3i/IE StAH 



DETECTOR 



1/2" COPPER 

WfltEPt PIPE 



DRILL AMD T4^ 
FOfl 4-40 



ALL OEMENSrONS 

m lift HE S 

MO SCALE 



E PLANE VIEW 



.250 EACH 



#»0 - 
ORlLi 



] 


1 H-t 




1/32 


"*^['J 


1/3Z 


a/is K 1 


t/32 


1/J2 



STEP NIO&E DETAIL 



fe-Sl BRAES 
SCREW 
1/2" L0N5 





e f»LANE 
VJEW 



1/4" SHOULDEA 
WASHER 



HOLE 
DETAIL 



/40ors _/T 



^y 



H PLANE 
VIEW 



fig. 3. Super Scooper SmokeY Detector, construction detaib. 



51 



to say that the whole de- 
vice can be enclosed in a 
plastic package — includ- 
ing the horn antenna. It is 
better to keep these de- 
vices out of sight, since 
confiscation of them does 
occur in several states. My 
unit lies on the dash, look- 
ing through the window. It 
is not a pretty device and 
does not took like much 
more than a batch of pipe 
and a funnel Eventually, I 
will enclose it in a fog light 



to be mounted on the front 
bumper. 

The diodes used are 
available from several 
microwave semiconductor 
manufacturers. Most of 
them cost too much for the 
average constructor, so the 
best bet is to get them 
through distributors. 
Names of manufacturers 
who supply either direct or 
through distributors ap- 
pear in the reference at the 
end of this article. 



The requirements for 
signal generators to tune 
up this unit must be left to 
your ingenuity. The possi- 
bility of tuning up on 
police vehicles is not too 
great, but it is a possibility. 
If generators are not avail- 
able, it always is possible 
simply to try out on the 
road in hopes that you will 
find a seed trap to tune up 
on. Or perhaps you could 
build a generator: In any 
case, lots of lucklH 



References 

"Mobile Smokey Detector," 
S. M. 01 berg W1SNN, 73 Mags- 
line. Holiday issue, 1976. 
'*A Complete X-Band Transmit- 
ted S, M. Olberg W1SNN, 73 
Maganne, August, 1978. 

Note: Microwave diodes used 
in this equipment are available 
from Alpha Industries, Sylvan 
Rd., Woburn MA 01B01, Para^ 
metric Industries, Inc., 742 
Main St., Winchester MA 01 890, 
and Microwave Associates, 
South Avenue, Burtington MA 
01803. 



TRICOIVl 



MK-lOl 
M^MOftY 
$ 79, 50 




so 







TRICOIVl 



MIC-201 

ELECTRONIC 
KEYER 

S64.50 



MK-101 Mtmory is designed fof uim with MK-201 or 

Heathkit HD-U1Q Eltclronic K«yer 
Instont conned ion to MIC*201 
EoiY connection to HDMIO 

LARGE 204d Brl Memory * oppro^c. 200 cHoractefi 
Four memory quodronli 
Easy insertion of *pauies* in messages for l^^mr 

imeriion of variable ilemi such as *R S T 
Connection provided fof optional remote control 



— 8 — 50 WPM Speed Ronge 

~-Dot & dosh memories 

— Self completing chorocters 

Oicinotor 



o C P O 



— Sidetone 
~ Ideal For use oi 
^Iambic operolion 
~ Solid stote output 

— Erase twitch clears MK-101 
-TRI-LEVEL Triggered clock 



' *^C18 



memory in 3 seconds 
during both sendir^g & 

loading operations 



Detailed set of fnitruction Manuals $2.00 [Crediled toword purcKoi*] 

FULLY ASSEMBLED & TESTED ^mr 

Order Direct -Add $3.00 for shipping C K COOK COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY 21i-A94-1982 

Texot retidenii odd 5% soles tax vHlh 3605 O'Henry Drive — Garland, Texos 75042 



RADIO EQUIPMENT DOESN'T GROW ON TREES 

But theC &A ELECTRONICS Warehouse Sale 

Win Make You Think It Does! 



AEA 

ALDA 

ANTENNA SPECIALISTS 

ARRL 

ATLAS 

ASTRON 

ASTATIC 

AMERICAN ELECTRONICS 

ALEXANDER MFG. 

BIRD ELECTRONICS 

BEARCAT 

BK PRODUCTS 

CRAIG 

CUSHCRAFT 



COMMUNICATION SPECIALISTS 

DVE 

DSI INSTRUMENTS 

DRAKE 

DYCOMM 

GOLDLINE 

HYGAIN 

HUSTLER 

ICOM 

INTERNATIONAL CRYSTALS 

KDK 

KLM ELECTRONICS 

KENWOOD 

KRIKET 



Call 800-421-2258 

FOR YOUR BEST VALUES ON THESE FtNE LINES 



i^CSS 



LUNAR 

LARS EN 

MAXRAO 

MIRAGE 

MIDLAND 

MOTOROLA 

NON-LINEAR SYSTEMS 

PACE 

PIPO 

POWER mc. 

ROYCE 

REGENCY 

RUSSELL 

REDCO COUNTERS 



STANDARD 

SANYO 

SHAKESPHERE 

TPL 

TRIEX 

TAYLOR 

TRtSTAO 

TRINETiCS 

VHF ENGINEERING 

WILSON 

WESTCOM 

YAESU 



Be Sure To Check Our 
SUPER SAVER 

Cash Sk Cany Specials 



C&A Electronic Enterprises 

DiiTribufOri erf CofTirnfoai O'vd Anvoiifiup Rodto Equipment 



22010 S. Wilmington Ave,, Sutte 105 

Carsorv CA 90745 

(213) 834*5968 (CalFforma residents) 



52 



K^ Resmr S6ryice—s&€ page 195 



© MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC 1979 



NEW MFJ-981 3KW Verea Tuner IV 

For $199.95 you can run up to 3 KW PEP and match everything from 
1.8 thru 30 MHz: coax, balanced lines, random wires. Built-in balun, 
SWR, dual-range forward and reflected power meter. 

Built' in baiun, 8WR, 
duai'Fange forward and 
reflected power meter. 





Ttii NEW MFi-981 3 KW Versa Tuner IV l€ts 
you run up to 3 KW PEP and match any feedfme 
continuoi^sl v from 1.8 to 30 MHz: coax, balanced 
line or random wire. 

This gives you maximum power transfier to 
ycur antenna tor solid OSO's and attenuates har- 
monics to reduce TV! and out ot-band emission. 

An accurate meter gives SWR, forward, reflect- 
ed power in 2 ranges (2000 and 200 watts). 

A new alt metal, low pronie cabirtet gives you 
RFI protection, rigid constructfon, and sleek styling. 



Biack tinist^. H\cU anodized alummunn front panei. 
5x14x14 inches, A flip down wire stand tilts 
tuner for easy viewing. 

Efffcient, encapsulated 4:1 fenrlte baiun. 500 
pi, 6000 voft capacitors, 18 position dial inductor. 
17 amp, 3000 volt ceramic rotary switcti. 2% 
meter. SO 239 coax connectors, ceramic feedtfiru 
for random wire and bafanced line. Binding post 
lor ground. 

Every single ur^K is tested for performance and 
inspected for quality. Solid American construction, 



quality components. Full one year limited warranty. 

For youf rtearest MFJ dealer* call toll-free 
800-647-1800. Stop by your dealer. Compare it 
teature for feature with other toners. Compare its 
value, its quality and its pertormance. 

After a truly side by side comparison, you'll 
be convinced that its value, qualfty and features 
make it a truiy outstanding vafue. 

Why not visit your dealer today and see the 
NEW MFJ 981 3 KW Versa Tuner IV? If no 
dealer is available order direct from MFJ. 



MFJ-982 3 KW VERSA TUNER IV has balun , 7 position antenna switch. Matches every- 
thing: coax, balanced lines, random wires continuously from 1.8 to 30 MHz. 



Fleicible 7 position antenna switch lets you 
select 1 coax tfrru tuner and 2 coax thru tuner 
or direct, or randoin wire and balanced line. 

Up to 3 KW PEP. Matcti any feediine from 1 .8 
to 30 MHz: coax, random wire, balanced iine. 

Gives maximum power trans ter. Harmonic at 
tenuation reduces TVI, out of band emissions. 

Black metal cabinet, anodized afuminum front 
panet. Flip down wire stand. 5x14x14 in. 

Encapsulated 4r1 ferrite balun. 500 pf, 60QO 
volt capacitors, 18 position dual inductor, 17 amp 




• 7 posifiOft 
antenna switch 

• 4:1 fe trite balun 
for balanced 
tines 

ceramic switches. SO 239 
ceramic feedtfiru for random 
binding post for ground. 

Made ir» USA, One year limited warranty. 

S«e it at your nearest dealer. If no dealer 
available order direct from MFJ. 



coax connectors, 
wire, baianced line, 



rs 




ft you already have a SIVfi/ wattmeter, the 

MFJ'982 is for you. 



MFJ-980 3 KW VERSA TUNER IV has built-in balun for balanced 
balanced lines, random wires, 1.8 to 30 MHz. 



Matches coax. 



up to 3 KW PEP, Malcfi any feediine from 1 .8 
to 30 MHz: coax, random wire, balanced Ime, 
Heavy duty encapsulated 4:1 fen^ite balun 

Stves maximum power transfer. Harmonic at- 
tenuation reduces TVI, out of band emissions. 

Black metal cabinet, anodized aluminum front 
panel. Flip down wire stand. 5x14x14 in. 

500 pf, 6000 volt cap^r Id position dual induc- 



• Bncapsutafed 4:1 

ferrite balun for 
balanced lines 



^69 



95 



tor. 17 amp ceramic switches. 

Made in USA. One year limited warranty. 

See It at your nearest deafer. It no dealer is 
available order direct 1rom MFJ. 




This is MFJ's fowest priced 3 KW Versa 
Tuner IV. 



FOR YOUR NEAREST DEALER OR FOR ORDERS 



• 



Order any product from MFJ anti try it. If not delighted, return witfiin 30 days for a prompt refund (less shipping). ^1^52 
Order today. Money back if not delighted. One year limited warranty. Add $8.00 shipplng/handlirtg. 

For technical Information, order/repair status, In Mississippi, outside continental USA, call 601-323^5669. 





Order By Mail or Call TOLL FREE 800-647-1800 and Cfiarge It On 

MFJ ENTERPRISESi INCb Mrssissippi state, Mississippi 39762 

(^ Reader Ssrvi'cs — see page 195 53 



The LEADER In the Northwest ! 




ATLAS • ICOM • KENWOOD • YAESU 



Come to ABC Communications today for the best solution to your 

particular communication requirements, whether they be Amateur, 

Two-way Business Band, VHF Marine or Police Scanner. 




Kenwood 7625 
2m FM Transceiver 




DENTRON MT-3000A 
Deluxe Tuner 



DENTRON 160-10 AT (not shown) 
Super Tuner 





KENWOOD Transceiver 
TS-820S 160 thru tOM 



KENWOOD Transceiver 
TS-520S16Dthru10M 




Kenwood 7600 
2m FM Transceiver 



NfiTIONWIDE TOLL FREE hUMBER 

1 ■800-426-6937 
Washington state: 1-800-562-7625 



'''ity is 



— . ^!*»T- 



V ^ 






KX>M Transceiver 2M FM 
SSBIC211 



(COM— iC280 




titfii'tfl" 





YAESU 901 DM 



Wft also handle Witson, Cuahcraft Hy-Galn, Ajilanna 

SpeclaHttIi, KLM, etc^ 

Attantlon WatlitPiQton ratldimt: Come on in for ex^ 

eel lent service In our complete Commynicatlona Repair 

Shop. 

Write or call for SPECIAL towar rotor< antenna package! 
Tri-Ex. Rohn, Wilson Towers. Shipping Info: F.Q.B. S^iatlla 
via UPS, truck, or parcel post, 

Washington rnjiidiants add sales tix. 



Yaesu FT101ZD 



COMMUNICATIONS 



f^M6 



ITSSa 1S1>« AVt. If .£. •5£ATTLC, WASH. ^155 • 12081 3a4a:iaa 





MS4 



Other iocatiorts: (Walk-in customers only) • Bellevue — 12001 U. E. 12th • Ev^ett — 4610 Evergreen Way • Open Mon. thru Sat. 



54 



1^ Reader Service— see pege f 95 



CALL TOLL FREE 



1-800-228-4097 

Com III unicat ions Center 

443 N 48th Street 
Lincoln, Nebraska 68504 
in Nebraska Call (402)466-8402 



i^C5B 



HY-GAIN 



TH6DXX 

TH3MK3 

TH3JR 

Hy-Quad 

205BA 

155BA 

10BBA 

204BA 

204MK5 

153BA 

103BA 

402 BA 

BN-86 

TH2fVIK3 



Super Thunderbird 

3eL 10-15"20M beam 

3 el. 10 t5-20M beam 

2 el. 1 0-1 5-20M Quad 

5 el. "Long John'' 20M beam 

5 el. "Long John" 15M beam 

5 elj'^'Long John" 10M beam 

4 e 1 . 2 OM be ann 

5 el. conversion kit 
3eL IBM beam 
3eL 10M beanrt 

2 el . 401V1 beam 

Balun for beam antennas 

2 el. 10-15-20M beam 



Classic 33 
Classic 3& 
TA33 
TA 36 
TA-33 Jr* 
TA 40KR 



Regular 

$299.95 

229.95 

149.95 

229.95 

289.95 

169.95 

119.95 

219.95 

99,95 

79.95 

54,95 

209.95 

15.95 

149.95 



Special 

$239.95 

T79.95 

129.95 

179,95 

229.95 

139.95 

99.95 

179.95 

79.95 

69.95 

44.95 

169.95 

15,95 

1 19.95 



18HT 

18AVT/WB 

14AVQ/WB 
12AVQ 

141^ MO 

5BDQ 

2BDQ 

66B 
203 
205 
208 
2T4 
LA 1 



Hy Tower 80-1 OM yerticaJ 

80-1 OM Trap vertical 

40-1 OM Trap vertical 

20-1 OM Trap Vertical 

Roof Mounting kit (verticals) 

80-1 OM Trap doublet 

80-40M Trap doublet 

6 el. 6M beam 

3 eL 2M beam 

5 el. 2M beam 

8 el. 2M beam 

14 eJ. 2M beam 

Deluxe lightning arrestor 



Regular 

299,95 
99.95 
69.95 
39,95 
33.95 
89.95 
49.95 

1 1 9.95 
15.95 
17.95 
25.95 
31.95 
59.95 



IVIOSLEY 

Gel. 10, 15, 20Mtr. beam 
Bel. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
3eL 10, 15,20Mtr. beam 
6eL 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
3eL 10, 15, 20 Mu. beam 
40 Mtr, Add On 



Regular 

304,75 
392.75 
264.00 
392.75 
197.00 
119.95 



Special 

209.95 
269,95 
189.95 
269.95 
149.95 
89.95 



CUSHCRAFT 



ATB 34 
ATV-4 
ATV-5 
ARX-2 
AR 6 
ARX22a 
AR X 450 
A144n 



4 ele. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 289.95 

10, 15, 20, 40 Mtr. Vertical 89.95 
10, 15, 20, 40, 80 Mtr. Vertical 109.95 

2 Mtr, Ringo Ranger 39.95 

6MTr.Ringo 36.95 

220 Mhz. Ringo Ranger 39.95 

435 Mh2. Ringo Ranger 39*95 

11 ele. 144-1 46 Mhz. beam 36,95 



219,95 
69.95 
89,95 
32.95 

32.95 
32.95 
30 S5 

HUSTLER 



A147'11 11 ele, 146-148 Mhz. beam 

A1 47-22 22 ele. Power Pack 

A144-10T 2 Mtr. "Twist" 10 ele. 

A144'20T 2 Mtr, 'Twist" 20 ele. 

A147-20T 2 Mtr. beam 

A430-1 1 432 Mha. 1 1 ele. beam 

A432-20T 430-436 Mhz. Beam 



3-TBA 

4-BTV 

5BTV 

RM'75 

RM-75S 

G6-144B 

G7-144 



3 ele; 10, 1 5, 20 Mtr. beam 

10-40 Mtr. Vertical 

10-80 Mtr. Vertical 

75 Meter Resonator 

75 Meter Super Resonator 

2 Mtr. Base Co 11 near 

2 Mtr, Base Colrnear 



WILSON 

System One 5 ele. 10, 15,20, Mtr. Beam 

System Two 4 ele. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. Beam 

System Three 3 ele, 10, 15, 20 Mtr. Beam 

WV-1 10-40 Mtr. Vertical 

ROTORS 

HamIN $125.00 T2X Tailtwister $199.95 
Call for prices on rotor cable. Coax, Towers, and Accessories. 



259,95 
99.95 

134.95 
16.95 
31,95 
79.95 

119.95 



274.95 

219.95 

179.95 

79.95 



189.95 
79.95 
99.95 
14.50 
27.50 
59.95 
89.95 



229.95 
179-9S 

149.95 

69.95 



AllianGe ND 73 $109.95 

All prices do not include shipping. 



18HT 



We carry all major brands oS ham radios 

AT DISCOUNT PRICES 



Special 

239.95 
79.95 
57.00 
32.95 
29.95 
69.95 
39.95 
99.95 



49.95 



36.95 


30.95 


109,95 


89.95 


42.95 


34.95 


62.95 


52.95 


62.95 


52.95 


34.95 


29.95 


59.95 


49.95 



Yaesu 
Ten -Tec — 



— Kenwood — Drake — ICOAA — Dentron — 
Swan — Tempo — Midland — EJ,0, — Wilson 



master charge 



y^ Reader SBrvice — see pagG' t95 



55 



M^^^Hiia 




8^ 




-roAM^ INFLATION FIGHTE 






FROM 



C.I.SJM.0 



AND . . . 



IIMNERSPACE AMPUFIER CORPORATION 



4 



r 



$100.00 

DISCOUNT 
IPS SOD 

30 ADC int©m>itfint 

20 ADC Contintjous 

Variable FrcMit Panel Voltage Comrof 

3-14 VOC with Digital VoUs 

and AMP Readout 



IPS 15D 

15 ADC Intermittent 

to ADC Continuous 

Variable Front Panel Voltage Control 

3 T4 VDC with Digital Voks 

and Arnf} Readout 

$ 1 00 .°° 

DISCOUNT 




$80.00 

DISCOUNT 
IPS 30M 



30 ADC Imermitteni 

20 ADC Continuous 

Variable Front Panel Voltage Control 

3-14 VDC with Illuminated Volt 

and Amp Meters 

IPS IBM 

1 5 ADC Interminent 

10 ADC Continuous 

Variable Front Panel Voltage Control 

3-14 VDC with Illuminated Volt 

and Amp Meters 



$80.00 

DISCOUNT 



$100.00 

DISCOUNT 
USER NET INFLATION 

FIGHTER 
PRICE 

$249.95 



30D 

$349.95 



IPS 15D 

$299.95 




$199.95 
$100.00 

DISCOUNT 




USER NET 
IPS 30M 

$289.95 



$80.00 

DISCOUNT 

INFLATION 

FIGHTER 

PRICE 

$209.95 



IPS 1 5M 

$239.95 



$159.95 

$80.00 

DISCOUNT 



$60.00 

DISCOUNT 
IPS 30 

30 ADC Intermittent 
20 ADC Continuous 
jntemaNy Voltage Adjustab le 

IPS -15 

IS Intermittent 

10 ADC Coniinuoys 

Internally Voltage Adjustable 

$60.00 

DISCOUNT 




www^ 



4^022 




1 




USER NET 

IPS 30 

95 




$60.00 

DISCOUNT 

INFLATION 
FIGHTER 

PRICE 
$169.95 



- 15 
$179.95 



■ ■>£■«* 



-8^-S]S£l 



$119.95 

$60.00 

DISCOUNT 



In SX. tall 1366-7157 
2305 Cherry Road, Rock Hill, S.C 
730 (Exit 66^8 off 1-771 



SAVE OVER $100! 



An Offer You Can't Refuse . . 



/'#^f^f#if#fj««ii«#rfiliiiiviiiitiiiiiiiilliiititttti4m\%i 



\ 



nftfrfttttt 



*K 




YAESy FT-tOlZD TRANSCEIVER 



YAESU SP-901P PHONE PATCH 



YAESU YD-148 

BASE STATION 

MICROPHONE 



. , . from Tower Etectronics. 

The all -new Yaesu FT-101ZD. proud 
successor to the wofid famous FT-101E! 

This unit is chock full of all the 
features you have ever wanted such as: 

• Full coverage 160-10 meters. 

• Digital plus analog readout. 

• Speech processor 

• Noise blanker par excellence. 

, . . plus interface with FT-901 series 
components! 




PLUS . . . 



The Yaesu SP-901 P Phone Patch . . 



PLUS . . . 



The Yaesu YD-148 Base Station 
Microphone. 




This is a $1000 package at usual 
amateur net pricing -yours for only . . . 



$895 



• II 



(Note; Send cashiers dieck or money ofder and we'll 
ship UPS Bfown Labe^ same day order is received AT 
NO CHARGE TO YOU!) 



24001 Alicia Parkway, Mission Viejo, CA 92675 • Ph: 714/768^900 ^m 

HOURS: Tlies,-Fri,: 10 a,m.-6p,m. Sat.: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun: Noon-4 p.m. YAESU service & repair speciallsta* 



I 
I 
I 



TOWER ELECTRONICS 24001 Alicls Parkway, Mission VI«jo, CA 926 7S « Ph: 714/768-0900 

mYMEMTB'^: MASTERCHARGE 4^ . EKPlRATiON DATE 

CHECK D CREDiT Q 
aO.O, D CARO 

(Gaiforrua Rgstdents add 6% Saies Tax) 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



MASTERCHARGE # 
•VtSA # 
OTHER 



CtTX STATE, ZIP 



PHONE 



OffflT GoQcf llru Miy, 1973 



SIGNATURE 



I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
i 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



p^ Reati^f Service — see p^ge 195 



57 



ToU 



Can iSS> 1-800-243 





"S m Retail Price Cetslos 

• MontMy Coniiiiterixed Used Egoipment List 

• Coturteons, Persoaalued Service 



WILSON 
MARK IV 




OVER 50 BRANDS IN STOCK 



KENWOOD • SWAN • KDK • DENTRON 
MOSLEY • WILSON • YAESU • DRAKE 
LARSEN • BENCHER • PIPO • BEARCAT 
B&W • DATONG • ICOM • PANASONIC 
ARRL PUBUCATIONS • ALLIANCE • MFJ 
CUSHCRAFT • TRAC • MICROLOG • CDE 
FINCO • DSI • DAYBURN INSULATORS 
BIRD • ASTATIC • HAM KEY • REGENCY 
HUSTLER • SAXTON • TEN TEC • AMECO 
AMCOMM • CALL BOOK • KLM • TEMPO 
ATLAS • ALDA • COVERCRAFT • HY-GAIN 
J.W.MILLER • MURCH • PFENTONE 
SHURE • TAB BOOKS • SAMS BOOKS 
ROHN • BUTTERNUT • Plus Many More! 




• NEW AND USED EQUIPMENT 

"Get on our used equipment maUing list" 

• TRADES WELCOME 
"The best allowances onyiohere" 

"We buy good used SSB gear" 

• FREE CATALOG 

"Prices of ail major manufacturers" 

• SAME DAY U.P.S. SHIPPING 

"Just a phone call away" 

• COMPLETE RADIO SERVICE SHOP 

"Mali Order Repair Service" 

• Fast Efficient Service • We Repair All Brands 

• AH Work Guaranteed • Amateur Extra/First Class 
Licenses • Send Us Your Defective Equipment U.P.S. 
Collect • Please Include Manual and Power Supply 

• Free Shipping Both Ways If Work Is Done 

• Most Repairs Done and Shipped Within 7 Days 



OVR FiNE REPUTATION SPEAKS FOR iTSELF 

'YOU SHtp rr 



WEFIXiT" 



COMMUNICATIONS 



or Write 

for your 

super quote 

today 




95 Khts Lane, Newington, Conn. 061 1 1 Connecticut Residents Call: 

'T^ear ARRL Headquarters" (203) 667-081 1 





Vl&l 




5B 



OPEN MON.-FRl. 10-6 • THURS. 10-8 P.M. • SAT. 10-4 

EASY DIRECTIONS: Rt. IS South - 2 blocks past McDonald's 

(Berlin Turnpike) 



A Look 






New Equipment — All new equipment on display is operating 
for actual '*on the air" QSO's. We really know our gear! 



Used Equipment ~ We recondition and guarantee all our used 
equipment. We make sure it satisfies you! 




Service Shop — You've probably heard of our fine service 
reputation — using Cushman CE4B signal generators, Hewlett 
Packard oscilloscopes » Bird wattmeters — we fix it right! 



Inventory Warehouse 

best prices^ 



— Our large volume assures you the 



And Our Service Is Even Better! 
Give Us a Call and See 
For Yourself! 




^T34 



1-800-243-7765 




f^ f^esoef Service^se^ page f9tS 



95 Kitts Lane, Ncwington, Conn. 06111 
(903) 667<«1 1 



59 



Now from 
J. W Miller 





RF Speech Processor 
Model RF-440 

Increases talk power 

With splatter Iree operation. 

RF clipping assures low distortion. 



CN-620 



""---•^Mt, 



DAWA 



DAIVWA 



CORPORATION 

Communications 
Essentials 



SWR & Power Meters 
Models CN-720 and CN-620 

Simultaneous direct reading SWR; 
Forward Power and Reflected Power 




Available from these authorized distributors.. 



AflFZOriA 

Kryd&f Electronics 
Phoenh {602) 249-3739 

ARKANSAS 

lavender DlstdbutorB 
Texarkana (501) 733^631 

CALIFORNIA 

Ham Radio Outlet 
Anaheim i7l4i 761 3033 

HerryFladloCo. 
Anaheim (714J 772-9200 

Electronic City 
Burbank (213)842*5275 

Ham Radio Outlet 
Burllngame^lS) 342-5757 

Sandy's Electronic Supply 
Canoga Pa^h (213) 346-8353 

Webster Hadto Inc. 
Fresno 1209)224^5111 

HonryRAdloCo. 

Los Angeles (213) 477-6701 

Tow9r Electron JC9 
Mission Vtero(714)76&^00 

ZacKJI Ccfp. 
Monterey 1408} 37S3144 

U-do Electronics 

Mouniain View (41^ 96^8894 

Gonwty Eltctronics 
Poway (714) 566-5000 

Zac KI1 i Sac ramen lo 
Sacramento (91 6| 446-3131 

Ham Radio Outlet 

San D^ego (714} 560 4900 

Weatern Radio 

San Otago (714)239^361 

Quament Electronics Inc. 
San Josa (406) 996-5900 

Ham Radio Outlet 
Van Nuya (213) 988-2212 

COLORADO 

CW Electronics 
De'^ver^SOl) 893-6525 

CONNECTICUT 

Thomas CornmunicatJons 
Newmgion (203)6e7-<)&1l 



DELAWARE 

Delaware Amateur Supply 
New Castie 1302)325-7728 

FLOniOA 

HIateah Communications 
Hiaie3h(305jaB7 5936 

GEOnGiA 

Ack Radio Supply 
Attania (404)35l434O 

ILLINOIS 

Tri Stake Elecironics Corp. 
Mount Prospect (312) 255-0600 

Spectronlcs, Inc, 
Oak Park (312) 848-6773 

INDIANA 

Graham E lee ironies 
Irvdianapolis {317) 634 -€202 

Rodeleld Co., inc- 
Rictimond (317) 96€^3S05 

IOWA 

Mid State Distributing 
Des Moines (515} 244-7231 

KANSAS 

i^uociated' Radio Communications 
Owwtand Park (913i 361 5900 

€l#clr0n>«cs, Inc. 
Sal ma Oi3) TA 7^7377 

Radio Supply 

Sail rva (913) B23-&353 

Afnategr Radio Supply 
Wic hit a {316) 264-9166 

MAINE 

Bad ic Supply 
Auburn {207) 7B4.5466 

MASSACHUSETTS 

You -do-it Electronics 
Needham (617)449-1005 

Tut Is Radio & Electronics 
MBdfordi617)395-82fl0 

MICHIGAN 

Purchase Radio Supply 
Ann Arbor (313) NO 6-6696 

Communications Unlimited^ Inc. 
Canton (313) 459-5050 

Radio Supply 3> Engineering 
Detroit (313) 435-5660 



Coaxial Switches 

2 position/Model CS-201 
4 positton/Modet CS-401 



MINNESOTA 

Northw^t Radio 
Dututh^^iaj 727-1565 

MlSSOURt 

Ham Radio Center 
SI. Loujs (3141 993-6060 

NEW JERSEY 

Route Electronics 46 
Totov^ra (201)256-8555 

NEW YORK 

Genesee Radio & Parts 
Buffalo (716) 873-9661 

Harrison Radio Corp. 
Farm ingd ale ^516)293-7990 

Barry Electronics 

New York (212) WA 5^7000 

Harvey Radio 

New York (212)575-5200 

T&M Electronic Supply 
Patchcgue (516) 269-2520 

Radio World 
Onskany (315) 337-2622 

Hani&on Radio C-orp 
Vattey Stream {516) 872 9665 

OHIO 

Universal Amateur R^io 
Reynofdsburg (614)866-1207 

Srepco Bectronlcs 
Dayton (513) 224^)S71 

OKLAHOMA 

Radio Inc. 

Tulsa (918) 587^9123 

Kryder Electronics 
Oklahoma C^ty (405) 789^t951 

OREGON 

Ron land Hidki Supply 
Portland ^503) 228-6647 

Portland Radio Supply 
Medtonf t»33} 773-5B1S 



PEJ4NSYLVANIA 

Tievo^e Hamtronica 
Tt«wose<2i5) 35M40D 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

lAffi^esaie EiecTronic* 
MHchell (6051 996-2233 

Burghardt Amateur Center 
Waterlown (605) 686-7314 

TENNESSEE 

Genmantowrt Amateur Supply 
Memphis (901M^^*276 

TEXAS 

Wholesale Electronic Supply 
Ausiln (512) 478-9568 

Douglas Electronics 
Corpus Christ I (512) 833-5103 

AGL Electronics 

Dallas (214) 241-6414 

Tracy Elect rortlcs 

Fort WorttHB17) 292-3371 

Angie Electronics Supply 
Houston (713) 659^8386 

Electrotex 

Houston (713) 526-3456 

Madison Electronic DislrlbutorB 
Houston {71;^ 568^268 

Space Radio Supply 
Houston i713)6SM5S4 

Appliance ^ Equipollent Co« 
San Antonio (512) 73^4)334 

UTAH 

Ballard Supply 

Salt Lake City (801) 972-3O0 

VIRGINIA 



Viefiiia(7O^93&33S0 

WASHINGTON 

Amateur Radio Sypply 
Seattle (206) 767 



>gppr) 
3222 




ExclusFve USA agent for these units; 
inquiries invited. 



J. W. Miller Division 



BELL INDUSTRIES 

19070 REYES AVE. ■ P.O. BOX 5825 
COMPTON. CALIFORNIA 90224 



p^B47 



60 



k^ Reaifet Seryrce— see f^age t95 



Full Features and 




ST- 6000 RTTY DEMODULATOR 



Select Rx & Tx Shitts 
Accurately Tuned Rx Filters 
Crystal Controlled Tx Tones 
True Transceive Operation 



Invert Both Rx Oemod, 
and Tx Tones 



Data Status Indicators 



Loop 1 Post-Autostart Pre-Autostart 



bHL 




PMIPT 



LllWItVf^ SENSE 





LOCAL 



KOB 


fMACTtC AUTO PISlltfSfl 




• 






«<cia 


pAL/TQ ■TA»T-^ iVdWEn 




C»# 


#!A9T DM On 


(«^ 




BBHBH 


i 







Hard - Limiting [FM J 

Non-Limiting [AM 
Reception 



Correct for 
Bias Distortion 



Tuning Oscilloscope 
Front Panel Controls 
Meter Indicator Option 
Also Available 



Correct For 
Multi-Patti Distortion 

Local Loop Operation 



Autostart witti: 
° Motor Control 
° Mark Hold 
° Antispace 

Automatic Tx/Rx Station 

Control with Keyboard 

Operated Switch [KOSI 






Why not have the best? 

The HAL ST'6000 Demodulator offers outstanding perfonmancc, versatility, and ease of 

operation. The Receive Demodulator features multiple-pole active filters available for "high"or "low" tones. 
These filters are frequency-matched to the transmit tone crystals (or true transceive operation. Input 
bandpass filters, discriminator filters, and post -detection filters are carefully designed and tested for optimum 
weak-signal recovery. The ST-6000 has an internal loop power supply, 2 loop keyers, RS-232, MIL-188C,and CMOS 
data I/O and rear panel connections to data and control circuits for connection to UART and computer devices. 
Use it with the HAL DS3000 KSR for the best in RTTY performance. $595.O0 

Write today for HAL s latest RTTY catalog. 




HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORR 

Box 365 

Urbana, Illinois 61801 

217-367-7373 



For our Overseas customers: 
see HAL equipment at: 
Richter & Co.; Hannover 
I. E.G. Interreko; Bissone 



3/4 KILOWATT DC INPUT 
ALL MODE VHP AMPLIFIER 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



Ff equancy Hange 
Foviref OuEptn. Mbk. 

M$a«fi of OiDefAtboo 

Difty CycEe 

Qftin, Typical: 
aWettalnpuf 
12 Wattfi Input 
1 5 Wetta Input 

T/R SwTTctungi 



Li^tiAd' 



Cooirpg 



AuxAwv Qulpiit 
D awp i Lsvout 

WetotTt 

Mounting 
Connectors 

USA Price 



i44.148MH2; No TuNtxi 
360 TO 400 Wans 
Fully TrSrtEjisrt onzed 
A M F W SSB -CW-RTTY 
Continuous Duty 

30O Walts Ouipui 
360 Wbub Output 
400 W^n^ Output 

Quilts AC Power Supply. fiWlSSOVAC 

Suit-in \KW CamxiBl Tm R»ily 

60de <h9wn. Qi Hormones 

1 W«n4 ftOVV) or 360 W«n (HIG^D 

f^iorn Parvi AH Moda Sert lnd«;stor 

Convflciksn SSa aric3 CW 
MocM F1 36 or F236 r«(|u»«d ftor 

duit-«i Tl wimo -Svwtch for F«n Comrcai 
4> 13Volist34Ajni£Mr*aonn«BrpBFi«i 




MODEL: V350 



FOR BASE STATION 

& 



Hmgmo Ampifie<r m%ti Hiwt-tink Tcfv 
AsMHiitjIy for easy AccrttAAJbdtfy arid S^tvits 

17 ir9 K 1 3^': 432 k 303 k ^0 mm 

Bonch Moijntin<B, Rubber BurnperB 

Rack Mounting. 19" Adaptor KJi (OPTIONAU 

SO-a3&UHF 

SaiS.OO FOB Factory 



RF POWER LABS, ma ^r^t 

PCM^;B^ lim 3^ t IWh nacw N.t • KirlUand Wa&hrnglcm 90(03 • Tstap«wne (2069 823 1 SS 1 * TEUBt No, 12- 1043 

LABS 





CONSOtETTE 



SPINET 




You can 
assemble any of these 



v-sra 



Schober Organs 

and save 50% off store prices. 



r 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



This coupon will bring you the 
fascinating Schober color cata- 
fog which describes the organs 
and shows you how easy it is to 
assemble them from Schober s 
complete kits. Include $1 if you 
want a 12-inch demo record. 



The uFtnore^ organ Corp., D^M. 01 6 
43 West 61st Strvet. N«w Yoffc, N.Y. 10023 

D Please send ntsUie Schot>er Organ Kit 

Catalog, 
O Enclosed IS my S I for the 12-irK:h demo 

reconl. 

Name 



Address. 
City 



State 



ap. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 




■^^^ 



^ 



xX>^r^^ • CB 

•C|V Ot" • CB standard 
^<J> -'jS ^ • 2 meter 

C}*>Y^ • Scanners 
^^ \^ • Amateur Bands 
v\J * General Communication 

r^X* industry 

v^' Marine VHF 

iviicro processor crystals 



Send 10' for our latest cataiog, write or 

phar\e for more aetails. 




master diarge 




t 



essv 

CO 



l-^M 



2400 Crystal Drive 

Ft Myers, Fiortda 33907 

all onones (813) 936-2397 



H}J YEARS WARRANTY! 

EXACT RBplacements for 

SYLYANIA 




UBIIIirTED 




ft 



TransiStor-Diodes-ICs 



ECQN 

101 

ton 

t(H 

im 

tZJ 

v;< 

■.ti 
i*t 
i» 
i» 

1^1 
i&« 

1IKI 
Ifit 
t«2 



44 

!» 
1 It 
1(» 
t^T 

m 

n 

m 

lis 

m 

n 

1&J 

iii 

4i« 
14r 
1» 
1»* 

1 aa 

1 01 
1 14 

1 4:3 

1,65 

1.65 
^.02 
1.413 

as 

91 



ECGtf 

163 
rE4 
165 
1M 
171* 

ira 

T7T 
t7» 

tw 

Itl 

lis 

lilC 

iw 
lasA 

UttA 
liB 

toe 

191" 
1SZ 

1B3 

igd 

195A 

1H7 
ISB 
t@9 

ati 

2t» 



5.75 

AM 

1.G2 
2.» 

-^ 

5jea 

4«6 

147 
1 70 
146 
1.4tt 
1S« 
1^ 

SOT 
M 
1.W 
IQ 
a.B7 
1.lfl 
I.B^ 

1 m 
59 

t.:5e 



ECQi 

«i 
Jan 

^» 
237 



Hi 

22f 



1^ 

24t 
247 

27« 

2d1 

sa2 

264 
265 

zer 



\» 
1 % 

vir 
i.« 
Id* 

TM 

£45 
SOT 

3^ 

t 71 

&r^ 

23« 

&«£ 

S.Ofi 

4 2-4 
fil2 
; 3^ 
?M 

69 
74 



E€G# 
2fig 

29D 
»t 
2SD 
293 
294 
29S 
29T 



3Q0 

302 

306 

3ce 



310 
Sit 
312 
313 
3,14 

ai& 
sie 

317 

3ia 

31S 

3211 
321 
332 

3m 

326 



m 
m 

1 14 

2 02 

to 

113 

zm 

290 

iiir 
7l« 

Tsa 

2lf 

1.0Q 
TBS 
2.01 
1.7* 

24 71] 

1.11 

2«.0(1 
7.R5 

tact 

3.i3 
2? 50 



« R-U S-H, All Ordffrs Stilppad Same Oaf Received 

• FREE Freight on s^H prapatd ord«n 

• EXCLUSrVE 3 Y^AR CONDfUONAL WARRANTY! 

• NO Min. Drfj«f^u9niUy Discounu Avillablc 

• Exicl IC» & Diodes In Stock 

9 Lerngm Hours Mon-S«t 9i-)0p. Sun 1-7p 

m C*n or wTtte today —to pAnot yOLg onfor{S1iMK^336T 

CommynicaHons & T.V. Unlimited 

Dapt 73, 17 Washington Si., ReR&ialaer.N.Y. 12144 

OISTHIBUTOR INQUIRIES INVITED 
T.V.*C,i.*AMATEUB BADlOSTEREOMONnORS- 
ELECTfiONlC PARTS v'ClOB 



62 



f^ Reader Service — seepage }95 




ANTENNA SYSTEMS 

Multi Band Beam Super DX Series 



NEW HIGH PERFORMANCE TRI-BAND BEAMS AS GOOD AS FULL-SIZE MONOBAND ANTENNAS 

TET Beams employ a hybrid system which combines separate full-size driven elements for each band with Hi-Q trap 
parasitic elements. The resulting antennas feature high radiation efficiency, 3 KW power rating, and an excellent VSWR 
across all three bands. 




JO 



3F35DX 



MODEL 



BAND 




^'^ 



3F37DX 



ELEMENTS 



ELEMENTS 
BAND 



PER 



ANTENNA GAIN 



20m 
1 5m 

iOm 
20m 

1 5m 

10m 



3F37DX 3F35DX 



14 21 28 14 21 28 



3 
5 



3 
3 
3 



FRONT BACK RATIO 



8. 5dB 
lOdB 
lOdB 
25dB 



8. OdB 

8. 5dB 

8. OdB 

20-25dB 



MAX. POWER INPUT 


3kw 


3kw 

1 .5 (bener) 

50ft 
10. 5m 


VSWR 


1 .5 (btttt«r) 


IMPEDANCE 


bOD. 


MAX. ELEMENT L. 


1 0. 5m 


BOOM LENGTH 


7. 5m 


5.0m 
50mm 


BOOM DIAMETER 


50mm 


TURNING RADIUS 


5. 3m 


5. 25m 
40 m /sec. 
50mm 
17kg 


WIND RAT NG 
SU TABLE MAST 


40m/sec, 
50mm 


WEIGHT 


23kg 






SQ-22 



II 



SWISS QUAD VHP 



If 



SQ-22 TWO METER DUAL QUAD 

The simple, lightweight SQ-22 consists of a pair of two- 
element quads on a single boom. Both elements of each 
quad are driven with a phase difference between ele- 
ments. The result is a two meter antenna with increased 
gain and an improved front-to-back ratio when compared 
to conventional designs. 



KEN PRO ROTATORS 



i 

•• 

i 


^^ KR-2000 



KR-600 




1 



# 



KR-400 




*>! 



KR-500 



«f i 




425 Highland Parkway, Norman, Oklahoma 73069 

Tel (405) 360-6410 



y^lSS 




U.S.A. 



p^ Reader Service— see pege 195 



63 



DickKeiiy W6BKY 
Box 1457 
CampbeU CA 95008 



The DXer's Secret Weapon 



costs you nothing 



Chart your way to DXCC, 



Having recently (final- 
ly) received QSLs 
from all fifty states and ap- 
plied for my WAS award, 1 
began thinking of other 
goals to pursue. DX came 
to mind. 

I have been a ham since 
1956, but, until a few 
months ago, 1 had never 
given much thought to 
working DX. From 1956 



through about mid-year 

last year, my total DX was 
probably less than a dozen 

contacts (including XEs 
and VEs) — not an impres- 
sive record for some twen- 
ty years of casual ham- 
ming. Which brings us to 
my first observation about 
DXing: 

Casual hamming does 
not produce DX contacts! 



"So/' I said to myself, 
"you gotta get serious if 
you are going to work DX/' 

Let's see — probably 
should get a linear so I can 
run a kW with the big guns. 
Gonna need a beam to 
replace my forty/fifteen 
meter vertical and that 
means a tower with a good 
base and heavy-duty guy 
wires. Oh yeah, some coax, 



HOURS 



HOW US 



wt£He:ND aic 



wetKCf/ir ox 



AFRICA 



ASIA 



SOUTH AMERICA 



EUROPE 



USA 



PACIFIC tlLANOS* 



(COMTiNClitALI 



•B 


~fi 


-4 


-I 


a 


*2 


** 


*t 


•■ 


*I0 


tii 


'10 


Ot M 


ot DO 


■0 OC 


■ £ 00 


i4 00 


ifiOO 


»iOO 


»00 






^^* 




or iM 




















""""'^ 




ft% 00 


1 L®** 


it 00 


14 00 


ii OO 


IB OQ 


20 OO 












01 QO 














to Qd 


12 0H3 


«4 00 


l« 00 ' 


l«00 


ZO DO 












otoo 


II fSO 


























14 00 


i(00 


tt 00 


zooo 












04 OQ 


lOOO 


ll&e 












^^^■^ 


I* ^ 


■ •OQ 


• OO 


10 0<l 






^^„^.^'''''^ 






<l«00 


lOOO 


rZDO 


19 ao 










^."-''''^1 














Ift oo 

if 00 
*■ 00 
«V 00 


10 00 


to 00 










Dt OO 


10 00 


itOO 


i« i>0 


1 to 00 




.--"' 






--■ 


ot OO 


10 DO 


12 00 


14 09 


ill 00 


20 Ofi 

ii 00 


; 


^^ 


.t>* 








lO 00 


tl 00 


■ A 00 


'«oe 


It 00 




l-^"""""^ 




















i% 04 


^^^^"'^^ 






















t4 tW 

0^ oo 


'""^ 


_ hmv na-f- i 


« 


















- mW QqT 1 


IWE - 
















ot oo 
























91 OO 






















0« OHD 
























04 9€ 

























fig. 1. Shaded areas show DX windows for my usual operating times. See text for details. 



some connectors, etc., etc.* 
etc. Good grief! Getting 
serious about DX is going 
to run me into serious 
financial problems! There 
has to be another way! 

After some head-scratch- 
ing and a little reading in 
back issues of ham 
magazines (mostly 73), I 
came up with a secret 
weapon for DX. With this 
secret weapon, my DX con- 
tacts went from a dozen or 
so in twenty years of ham- 
ming to seventy-four in a 
period of less than six 
months [not counting XEs 
and VEs)l If 1 had been 
making DX contacts at that 
rate during my previous 
twenty years on the air, I 
would have (can you 
believe it?) 3,040 DX QSOs 
to my credit by now, DXCC, 
here 1 cornel 

"What's the secret?" you 
ask, ''How can t get one?!" 
you continue. Well, you 
are in luck. I am going to 
share my "secret weapon" 
with you for exactly what it 
cost me — nothing. 

That's right, my weapon 
(shown in Fig, 1) cost not 
one red cent. 

"You gotta be kidding/' 1 
can hear you saying, 
"that's nothing but a chart 
showing times in various 



64 



places around the world/' 
You got it right! 

I am sure that my secret 
weapon is no secret at all 
to those guys who have 
DXCC certificates hanging 
on their walls, but, for 
those of us who are DX 
novices, it can be a real 
discovery- 

''Okay^ how does a time 
chart help with DX?" you 
ask (if you are one of those 
who do not already know). 
"Clad you asked that/' I 
answer. 

While trying to think of 
low-cost ways to improve 
my DX abilities, I reasoned 
that one requirement for 
working DX is that there 
have to be some DX sta- 
tions on the air for me to 
contact ''Elementary, and 
obvious to the most casual 
observer/' you say. 

'Tes/' I reply, ''but they 
must be on the air when 
band conditions allow con- 
tact between their part of 
the world and my part of 
the world/' 

''So/' you say, "when are 
DX stations likely to be on 
the air at the same time 
that the bands are open?" 
Your question can be 
answered easily, but first 
we have to make a couple 
of assumptions. 

First assumption: Hams 
everywhere in the world 
probably have to hold some 
sort of jobs in order to 
buy the groceries and pay 
the electricity bill. Further- 
more, they probably work 
about the same hours that 
you and I work: 0800 to 
1700 local time, Monday 
through Friday, This being 
the case, they probably get 
on the air during the eve- 
nings and on weekends„ 
(There are some DX hams 
who get on the air before 
going to work in the morn- 
ing, and I salute those 
hardy souls and thank 
them for being there.) 

Second assumption: The 
bands I work most— forty 
and fifteen meters — will 
probably be open from 
about 0800 to 2000 local 
time. I know that there are 



times when they stay alive 
ail night, but these times 
have been rare in my ex- 
perience, so 1 can't depend 
on that for DX. Besides 
that, I like a good solid 
eight hours of sleep every 
night 

Armed with these two 
assumptions (which have 
proven to be good enough 
to dramatically improve 
my DXrng), I constructed a 
chart that shows my "DX 
windows" to various parts 
of the worfd. Here are 
some examples of how I 
have^ used the chart. 

Let's suppose that I want 
to work England, Let's sup- 
pose, further, that my time 
zone is Pacific Standard, 
U.S.A. (which it is). Looking 
at the chart, we see that 
England falls on GMT (by 
definition). Based on my 
first assumption, the 
English chaps are going to 
be on the air from about 
1700 to 2000 during the 
week. This period of time 
falls between 0900 and 
1200 PST — right in the 
middle of my work day! 
This means that I must 
work Englishmen on week- 
ends, which is exactly what 
1 have done several times 
recently around 1 800 GMT. 

Here is another example. 
It has been very difficult 
for me to work Africa. 
Looking at the chart, it is 
easy to see why. Notice 
that there is only a two- 
hour window (1900 — 
2000) during my usual 
weekend operating hours 
and no window at all dur- 
ing my weekday operating 
hours. It is obvious that I 
must get on the air earlier 
on weekends or stay on the 
air later during the week if I 
am going to improve my 
chances for working 
Africans. This illustrates 
how the chart can be 
useful in pinpointing DX 
problem areas. 

Let's take a look at one 
more example. Suppose I 
want to work some DX on 

Wednesday starting at 
about 1800 PST. What DX 



will be available? The chart 
shows that Asia and the 
Pacific Islands will prob- 
ably be in my DX window. 
This includes Australia, 
Japan, New Zealand, and 
Russia. I have found that 
the Russians get up early to 
get on the air, and the 
Japanese are on the air all 
the time (maybe hams 
don't have to work for a liv- 
ing in Japan!?}. So, the 
chart says that I can work 
VKs, ZLs, JAs, and UAs 
after dinner during the 
week, which is exactly 
what I do. 

I am sure you get the pic- 
ture by now. DX is there to 
be had, and the secret is 
simple: 

Be on the air when DX 
stations are on the air! 

"Yes, but what kind of 
equipment does it take?" 
you ask. 

Well, my experience has 
been that the average DX 
ham is equipped with a rig 
similar to mine: about 150 



Watts input with a vertical 
antenna. Actually, most of 
the DX hams 1 work have 
better rigs than mine in 
that they usually have a 
beam of some kind. Which 
brings us to another obser- 
vation: 

For working DX, the next 
best thing to a time chart is 
a better antenna. 

That is where my next in* 
vestment is going. I figure 
that a better skyhook is the 
absolute best dollar invest- 
ment t can make. 

I don't know any bfg gun 
DXers personally, so I have 
not discussed my ideas 
about DXing with anybody 
who really knows how it's 
done. I do know that my 
DX count has gone up as a 
result of putting the chart 
together and using it. If 
you are a beginner at the 
DX game, it surely won't 
hinder you any. So why not 
put together a chart for 
your own time zone and 
give it a try?!B 




TERMINAL 
UNIT 



Connect to your receiver speaker, transmitter 
microphone Jack, and teletype machine and you're on 
the air. State of the art design features make the 
TU-170 Ideal for HF and VHF auto start operation. 



• Proved T70 Hz shift active 
filter demodulator 

• Lighted ttining meter for 
easy tuning 

• Currdnt regulated loop keyer 
& power supply 

• Autosta! with threshold 
control and solid state relay 

Prices good thrti June 30, 1979 



Ftesher products 



« Stable audio frequency shift 
oscitlator produces phase 
coherent sine wave tones 

• TTL compatible inputs and 
outputs for auxilljary 
equipfnent 

• High level output tor scope 
tuning 

TU-170 TU-170 

Kit 149.95 Wired 219.05 



f/ie critics choice/ 



*^F5 



masiei chSfgi* 



FlESIER CORP 



P.O. Box 976. Topeka. Kansas 66601 (913) 234-0198 



1^ Reader Service— see page 195 



65 



Foiling the Mad Kerchunker 

— frustrate him with this circuit 



How to give ulcers instead of get them. 



Bill Wageman K5MA T/N5EE 

35 San Juan 

Los Alamos NM 87 544 

Repeater operators! 
Arise! Figlit back! 
Sliovv the cads you're in 
cliarge! Stop getting ulcers 
because some refugee 
from the worid of little 
children is playing with his 
toy and kerchunking the 
repeater! 

How do you feel about 



l<;erchunkers? Does the 
very first one get you 
down? Or does it take a few 
to wear on your nerves? Or 
can you stand it for hours 
on end? If you're in one of 
the first two groups, read 
on, but If you're in the lat- 
ter group, take a ride on 
the Reading, and if you 
pass CO, co!!ect $200 — 
you deserve it for your pa- 
tience. This article holds 
little for you except educa- 
tion about how grouchy 
much of the rest of the 



world is about kerchunk- 
ing. 

So what's a kerchunk? 
Almost everybody who has 
operated on repeaters for 
any length of time has a 
pretty good idea, but there 
are some who may not yet 
have been exposed to the 
VHF-FM equivalent of tun- 
ing up the HF-band rig on 
the air without any iden- 
tification. It's a poor 
operating practice de- 
signed mostly to allow the 
kerchunker to see if the re- 



COR 




OPH 



fig. 1, Schematic diagram. 



peater is still alive. A more- 
or-less quantitative defini- 
tion (one that is necessary 
for this exposition) of a ker- 
chunk might be stated: ''A 
kerchunk is an unidentified 
key-up {or transmission) of 
short duration on a re- 
peater input frequency/' 
Most kerchunks are well 
under one second dura- 
tion. 

With a decent definition 
of a kerchunk, we may now 
think about how to design 
a kerchunk detector on the 
repeater. Once you have 
the ability to detect these 
strange creatures, it's feasi- 
ble to try to do something 
about them. What a guy 
cares to do depends heavi- 
ly on the situation, but let's 
look at a few of the possi- 
bilities. 

Yoti can ignore them al- 
together if you can stand rt 
There is a minor question 
about the legality of con- 
tinually repeating uniden- 
tified transmissions, but 
that's not the point. You 
can listen to the kerchunk- 
ing for a short time and 
then shut off the repeater 



66 



for awhile. This denies re- 
peater access to everyone, 
of course, but could result 
in a certain amount of 
''peer pressure'' on the guil- 
ty culprit(s). You could 
also, on the first kerchunk, 
measure the incoming fre- 
quency (assuming there's a 
discriminator on the re- 
peater), and then lock out 
only those incoming sig- 
nals near that frequency. 
This solution is still not 
ideal, but it is already quite 
difficult to implement un- 
less you have a micro- 
processor-controlled re- 
peater, so I have chosen 
the middle course. 

Let's suppose, for pur- 
poses of discussion, that 
the control logic in your re- 
peater is TTL-compatible* 
If not, you will have to use 
whatever level shifters that 
are necessary to make this 
true. Please note in the dis- 
cussion that I have as- 
sumed certain stated ac- 
tive signal levels— yours 
may have to be inverted. 

So, somewhere you have 
a squelch-operated control 
signal. I'm assuming that 
when the squelch is closed 
you have a TTL high, and 
when it opens you have a 
TTL low. Let me call this 
signal SOS, for NOT 
Squelch-Operated Signal. 
The overhead bar, or the 
word NOT, means the ac- 
tive signal is a low. If w e 
capacitively-couple SOS to 
the input of a 555 timer (or 
V2 of a 556), that timer will 
be triggered whenever the 
squelch opens, and its out- 
put will go high. If we 
NAND the output of the 
timer with the SOS itself, 
it's evident that if the 
squelch closes before the 
timer goes low, we'll get a 
TTL low out of the NAND 
gate. Thus we have a ker- 
chunk detector — if the 
key-up is shorter than the 
timer period, it's a ker- 
chunk. 

I have chosen to do two 
things with this signal. It in- 
crements a counter and 
starts another timer, which 
I'M call the limit timer. 



When the limit timer's 
period is up, it triggers a 
third timer which then 
issues a short reset pulse to 
the counter. We clearly 
don't want to shut off the 
repeater because it was 
kerchunked once on each 
of four consecutive days I 

However, the output of 
the limit timer is also 
NANDed with any one of 
the four outputs from a 
7490 decade counter. If the 
one output is chosen, only 
one kerchunk is needed to 
cause the output of the 
NAND to go low. If the 
two, four, or eight output is 
chosen, then it will take 
two, four, or eight ker- 
chunks during the limit 
timer's period to cause the 
output of the NAND gate 
to go low. 

This signal is capacitive- 
ly-coupled to still another 
timer, the off timer. This 
timer gets set when the 
NAND goes low, and its 
output stays high during its 
period, which may be 
anything you like. I have 
NANDed this timer's out- 
put with a TTL control 
signal I've called KCENBL 
(/Cerchunk Circuit £NaBi-e). 
This is a signal that must be 
provided by your control 
circuitry to enable (high) or 
disable (low] the anti-ker- 
chunk circuit. If you don't 
want to mess with this sort 
of thing, just tie that pin to 
Vcc through a Ik resistor 
so that the circuit is always 
on. 

The output of this gate 
might be called OPR, for 
OPe/?ate. When this out- 
put is high, the repeater is 
allowed to go on and off 
freely with the squelch, 
and when the output is 
low, the repeater is dis- 
abled. If you need the op- 
posite polarity to disable 
your repeater transmitter, 
it's easy enough to run this 
signal through an inverter. 
Note that the fourth NAND 
gate in the 7400 can be 
used as an inverter for 
either the input or the out- 
put signal, if necessary. 
There is a desirable 



fourth connection to your 
repeat er-con trol logic, 
called RESET (NOT RE- 
SET). A TTL low on this 
line will reset the off timer 
to zero, independent of 
how long it has been on 
(the repeater has been off). 
This allows a control 
operator to immediately 
defeat the anti-kerchunk 
circuit without disabling it. 
Some of you are un- 
doubtedly griping that I 
did not consider part of my 
definition of a kerchunk 
when I designed this cir- 
cuit. I said a kerchunk is an 
unidentified key-up. So, in 
reality, one should check 
to see whether or not audio 
is present on the signal 
before assuming it's a ker- 
chunk. I chose to ignore 
this aspect because 1 felt it 
was not all that important, 
it would be easy to defeat 
with a Bronx cheer, and the 
timing of the kerchunk de- 
tector 1 used is so short that 
it is unnecessary, if you 
have read this far you prob- 
ably have the knowledge 
to add audio detection if 
you want. That first gate 
could be made into a three- 
input NAND gate and ap- 
propriate audio detection 
circuitry added. 

The component values 
given in Fig. 1 are recom- 
mended as a first try and 
should be satisfactory if 
you are actually using TTL 
logic. R1 and CI may have 
to be increased to give 
more reliable triggering if 
COR is not a good square 
wave. R2 and C2 form the 
time constant for the ker- 
chunk detector, which may 
be anything you like within 
reason. Choose the Rs and 
Cs for the timers by the for- 
mula t = 1 .1 R C, where t is 
the desired time in sec- 
onds, R is the resistance in 
Ohms, and C is the capaci- 
tance in farads. My version 
defined a kerchunk as a 
key-up of less than about 
200 ms , so any audio pres- 
ent is essentially irrelevant. 
R3 and C3 define the 
iimittimer period. I chosea 
value of around 30 sec- 



onds, but almost any rea- 
sonable period that strikes 
your fancy is OK, The reset 
timer period is 10 microsec- 
onds and should be ade- 
quate for any TTL counter 

How long do you leave 
the repeater off? R4 and C4 
determine this length of 
time, and I chose five 
minutes as a reasonable off 
period. 

It is desirable to use 
good engineering practices 
when building any logic 
circuit, particularly when it 
will be used in what might 
be called a hostile environ- 
ment. Be sure to do proper 
bypassing and shielding, or 
glitches will be your com- 
panion-control operator! 
Mechanical relays some- 
where ahead of the circuit 
could easily have contact 
bounce problems that 
would make any transmis- 
sion appear to be a series 
of fast kerchunks. 

There are two problems I 
see associated with the use 
of this sort of thing. 1 1 is not 
desirable to deny everyone 
the use of the repeater just 
because someone is dis- 
courteous to his fellow 
amateurs. Some of the 
worst offenders are likely 
to get their kicks by using 
this device to shut off the 
repeater so others can't use 
it! It is also undesirable to 
have a repeater ''ker- 
chunked" off by a flutter- 
ing mobile signal. Neither 
of these problems is easily 
solved unless a micro- 
processor logic element is 
itvailable — but that's 
another story. 

I would like to thank 
Bob Cowan K5QIN, trustee 
of the Los Alamos Amateur 
Radio Club repeater 
(WR5ABU), who kindly per- 
mitted a shakedown cruise 
of this circuit, and the club 
members and repeater 
users who put up with the 
whims of a guy who want- 
ed to see if anything short 
of murder could effective- 
ly discourage kerchunking. 
Remember CRANK: Cour- 
teous Radio Amateurs 
Never Kerchunk. ■ 



67 



Alexander M. MacLeun 
WA2SUT/NNmZ VB 
IS Indian Spring Trail 
Denville NJ 078S4 



Trends in Surplus 

if s not what it used to be 



Don't give up hope. 



Radio amateurs reaped 
one of the first big 
benefits from surplus elec- 
tronics. This bonus first ap- 
peared after WWII, when 
there was lots of surplus 
military equipment on the 
market and lasted well in- 
to the fifties- Many of the 
rigs sold only needed sim- 
ple modification to get 
them on the ham bands. 
There were plenty of small 
parts available for the 
builder, too. 

To a large extent, this 
has changed. There is less 
of the wartime surplus 
available, and the prices 
are not all that great. Also, 
it is many years old now 
and behind the field in 
several cases. We were 
spoiled by its simplicity. 
There is no equivalent now- 
There just is not that much 
modern surplus military 
equipment for the ham. 
And the prices are higher 
for what there is. 

The situation looks 
bleak. Actually, it looks 
bleaker than it really is. 
There is plenty of surplus 



available, but the field has 
changed. While there may 
not be the dream rig just 
waiting to be picked up for 
a song, there are entire 
categories of worthwhile 
surplus that can be of great 
benefit to the amateur. 

It should also be pointed 
out that the amateur is no 
longer the main user of 
surplus. There are schools 
and industries, as well as 
electronics hobbyists, us- 
ing surplus now. It may 
help someone who would 
like to start taking advan- 
tage of this to outline the 
main categories of what is 
available and where it 
might fit into his plans. 

Many still think of sur- 
plus as being synonymous 
with military surplus. There 
is still military surplus 
available, and newer 
equipment being released, 
too, but probably the big- 
gest category of surplus is 
industrial surplus. 

Let's start with the 
military. There are still the 
older tube rigs available 
from the war and the fif- 



ties. It is mostly the receiv- 
ers that are eagerly sought, 
some of them perhaps 
more eagerly than they 
warrant. You can pick up a 
rugged, solidly-built receiv- 
er that will do workhorse 
service for you. You can 
also buy some that are ex- 
tremely hard to service. For 
example, the R-390 series is 
highly regarded but diffi- 
cult to maintain. Parts are 
a real problem. 

There are also a number 
of tube-type components 
still available. This goes for 
high-power projects and so 
forth. You may have prob- 
lems finding a reliable 
source for inexpensive 
small parts for a tube proj- 
ect, though. There is some 
newer solid-state military 
surplus coming through, 
but at a higher price than 
what makes surplus buying 
attractive. 

The next biggest cate- 
gory of military surplus 
would be test gear. You 
can pick up some military 
versions of civilian gear at 
a low price. However, this 



may not be what you need. 
Much of this is lab-grade 
gear, which sounds nice, 
but if It needs any sort of 
servicing to be put back in 
order, you may have prob- 
lems. You could wind up 
with something that you 
can't even use. Here you 
have to weigh your trouble- 
shooting experience and 
your test bench. 

It is schools and smaller 
industries that benefit the 
most from this if they can 
check out the gear them- 
selves. They may wind up 
with additional equipment 
at reasonable cost with the 
addition of just their own 
time and expertise. 

In the same way, there is 
industrial surplus of ready- 
built test gear, too. Unless 
it has been gone over for 
you by the seller, you have 
the same problems as with 
military surplus. If it! 
doesn't work right, can you 
fix it yourself? 

There are a few hidden 
pitfalls with much of this 
gear. A lot of the postwar 



68 



gear uses the early printed 
circuit boards. A lot of it 
received continuous-duty 
service. That and age have 
done things to those PC 
boards. 

When you go to work on 
them, you may find that 
the board itself has 
deteriorated to the point 
where it causes intermit- 
tent problems (the foil may 
be starting to peel], and 
that adds up to a service 
headache, 

A lot of equipment is of 
hybrid design — mixed 
tubes and transistors. Since 
it is precision gear, the 
tolerance is important. By 
this time it is long out of 
tolerance. The cost to start 
at the beginning and bring 
all the sections up to toler- 
ance may be so out of sight 
as to be impossible. If the 
cost doesn't get you, the 
lack of available replace- 
ment parts will. 

The use of mixed tubes 
and transistors, particular- 
ly circuits that mix both 
together, represents a care- 
ful blend of the worst 
features of both tubes and 
transistors. That means 
you will be trying to make 
an out-of-tolerance circuit 
function well. Hybrid cir- 
cuits are more difficult to 
service at best. Often these 
circuits were riding right on 
the edge of a usable state- 
of-the-art technology. They 
were apt to have very little 
tolerance for variation 
even when new. Trying to 
get them to function as 
out-of-tolerance circuits 
may not be practical. 

The used, unchecked 
price may look very attrac- 
tive, but can you fix it? The 
checked or good condition 
(working) price may not be 
that good when compared 
with a new, or kit, price for 
gear that may be simpler, 
but will do the actual job 
you need. A rule of thumb 
would be that you should 
have at least equal or bet- 
ter grade gear and exper- 
tise than you are trying to 
service. 

That's the part that looks 



so bleak. Where is the nice, 
easy, and cheap part? Well, 
it's all in how you look at it. 
There are areas which are 
electronic heaven for 
those who can use it. These 
are in the field of industrial 
surplus. First of all, how do 
you feel about solid state? 
This is where the action is. 
In fact the values here are 
often even better than the 
values that are fondly 
remembered from the late 
forties and fifties. 

Solid state is mostly low 
voltage. It also becomes 
obsolete almost instantly. 
Manufacturers dump it by 
the ton. Just two examples: 
A 1967 catalog listed the 
SN7400 for $6.50 each and 
the SN7490 for $23.20, 
Now you can get the 
SN7400 for about 16<f and 
the SN7490 for about 4S<P. 
That's a few cents on a 
dollar. And those 1967 
prices had come down 
quite a bit from the original 
prices. In that field, in- 
dividual solid-state devices 
of all sorts have been 
priced lower, and the small 
parts to go with them are 
available at comparable 
prices. This takes care of 
transistors and digital ICs, 
but there fs more. Even 
though they are newer, 
consumer-oriented ICs are 
also on the surplus market. 
You can not only buy some 
of the older consumer ICs, 
but also some that are still 
in use commercially. This 
gives you whole sections of 
equipment. 

You are familiar with the 
audio amps and preamps. 
There are also rf sections 
and specialized ICs avail- 
able, and are they ever 
cheap. 

For what is available, 
you can often build a tran- 
sistor Of IC circuit for much 
less than an experimental 
tube circuit of the same 
type. Power supplies are 
always a high-cost item 
with tube work. With tran- 
sistors and ICs, there is so 
much available in parts 
and built supplies that the 
cost is not a major factor. 



There are lots of rf tran- 
sistors and power types 
available for the exper- 
imenter, so in that area you 
can work with some reli- 
ability. 

While tube parts are 
hard to come by, this is 
really only in one area. 
Old-style tube thinking is 
expensive, but there is one 
way that you are ahead of 
the game. Take advantage 
of the state-of-the-art in 
tubes. What? You didn't 
know tubes had changed? 
Then you haven't had to 
work with TV sets much 
lately. 

There is a lot of tube 
technology designed for 
use in TV sets. This hinges 
on a line-operated supply 
(mostly without a trans- 
former) of about 10Q-200 
volts. The TV tubes are 
built to work well in this 
range. There are lots of 
modern compactron multi- 
section tubes that hams 
and experimenters have 
yet to touch. And the 
benefits from them are 
great. There are plenty of 
low voltage parts for 
receiver and TV replace- 
ment use around, even in 
surplus. There are also 
many power supply trans- 
formers and parts avail- 
able, too. This puts a tube 
circuit cost on a par with 
transistor work. The initial 
capital cost for bench sup- 
ply and some parts will be 
slightly higher, but once 
you have them, you have 
them, and the difference is 
only a few dollars. 

So you still have the op- 
tion of going tube or tran- 
sistor at a reasonable ex- 
perimenter's price. Keep- 
ing to receiver voltage 
levels is the key. Once you 
go above that voltage 
range, the price goes up 
fast. 

There is still more. There 
are a few areas of special- 
ized surplus to explore. 
The computer field did not 
just dump a few measly ICs 
on us. There is also 
ready- built computer 
equipment. To name a few 



items, there are power sup- 
plies, keyboards, video ter- 
minal units, and whole sec- 
tions of standard business 
equipment oriented to- 
wards computer interface. 
If you know what it is and 
what to do to get it going, 
there are bargains for the 
knowledgeable. 

There are some other 
areas of commercial sur- 
plus, too. These are more 
consumer-oriented. Many 
brands are really the same 
or similar equipment 
bought from other manu- 
facturers. There are lots of 
hi-fi-type components and 
semi-complete equipment 
that can be utilized with lit- 
tle work. These prices are 
often quite low. 

In short, there is another 
renaissance of surplus 
upon us, but the times and 
technologies have changed. 
With some work to update 
and upgrade your basic 
electronic knowledge, 
much is adaptable to ham 
or other experimental uses. 
There are a few gaps that 
make it a bit rough on 
some types of building. 
These make it seem as 
though there is not much 
available for building. 
Hams in particular are 
bothered by this, as certain 
key items are just not right 
at hand at surplus prices. A 
big headache is tuned cir- 
cuits. It is hard to get the 
coil stock which used to be 
a part of every project. The 
slug-tuned coils are hard to 
find, too. There are 
sources, but the price is at 
a premium. There are ways 
around this; however, there 
is another problem. 

The other half of the 
tuned circuit is a variable 
capacitor. The usual small 
variable with a shaft for a 
knob is not that common 
or available these days. 
This makes all sorts of 
tuned circuits for receivers 
and transmitters hard to 
build, particularly when an 
author uses a specific part 
in an article. There are 
ways this might be eased. 
There are easily-available 



69 



sources for toroid cores 
and information on using 
them in circuits. They are 
not that common in con- 
struction articles, though. 

Tuning can also be done 
with varactor diodes in 
many circuits, but this is 
also hot common in many 
articles, Other parts are 
also not common. The 
modern i-f strip parts, such 
as crystal or ceramic i-f 
filters, which are quite 
cheap for manufacturers, 
have not shown up on the 
surplus market. The stan- 
dard receiver i-fs^ in par- 
ticular, are hard to come 
by. Even the older-style 
transistor i-f transformers 
are not common items. 
Many construction articles 
use very expensive and 
hard-to-come-by filters for 
construction. There are 
few simple alternatives 
given. Power stages are 
always a problem. When 
the voltage or power goes 
up, the price goes up and 



the item becomes hard to 
come by. 

Some ham items have 
benefited from all of this 
technology. The frequency 
counter as a ham item is so 
new that it is still con- 
sidered exotic, and yet in 
the few years since it hit 
the ham market, the price 
has dropped steadily. At 
first, they had to be home- 
built to get any price 
break, and they were fairly 
expensive then. Now you 
can buy kits and ready- 
built units for less than you 
can build your own. 

A counter that would 
have cost industry thou- 
sands just a few years ago 
costs a ham a few hundred. 
A less-costly unit will still 
be more accurate than any 
frequency standard avail- 
able to hams up to now. 

However, we still have 
the problem that our basic 
purpose, communications 
equipment, is not so easily 
served by the surplus 



market. The nearest thing 
to it is the conversion of CB 
gear to ten meters. That 
may catch on in quantity, 
but in the meantime it's 
more symbolic than a ma- 
jor force. 

This apparent lack in 
modern surplus should not 
really be such a major 
problem. What it means is 
that we have not yet solved 
some of the technical prob- 
lems in utilizing what is 
available for our more 
common amateur uses. 

This is what is called a 
culture lag- The material is 
there, but we have just not 
fully adapted it to our pur- 
poses. 

It would seem likely that 
in the next few years there 
will be some breakthrough 
in the use of modern 
surplus that will bring a 
time of simple but effec- 
tive home-brew ham gear. 
This will probably have an 
effect not unlike that of 
the coming of the available 



frequency counter. In par- 
ticular, it will put equip- 
ment within reach of many 
who are not able to spend 
much to get started. There 
is very little simple rugged 
equipment at a beginner's 
price, particularly equip- 
ment that can compete in 
real performance with the 
$tore-bought 

That's the big problem. 
Even for the same money, 
there are few who could 
build a receiver that would 
actually work as well as a 
commercial kit or ready- 
made unit. 

Better utilization of the 
available surplus now, and 
what may become avail- 
able in the next few years, 
should produce projects 
where the cost, complex- 
ity, and availability vs. per- 
formance ratio should be 
favorable enough so that it 
will be a tangible induce- 
ment for many more hams 
to build some of their gear 
again. ■ 




ernaalo 
AMaiew 



ippiv 




^y-Gia 



MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 



NO MONKCV 0USINCSS! 

(A) Complete Service Facilities 

(B) Good Deals on most Brands 

(C) Shipping within 24 Hours 

(D) All inquiries handled by Active Hams with 
over 20 years experience in ham radio 

CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-238-6168 

tN TENNESSEE, CALL 90 f ■462-4276 

MONDA Y-SA TURD A Y 3:30-5:30 

FOR YOUR SPECIAL 



Write: 3202 Summer Ave,, Memphis, Tennessee 38112 



Call or Write for Delivery or Quote 



KENWOOD TS-120S 





MADISON 

ELECTRONICS SUPPLY, INC. 

1508 McKINNEY • HOUSTON, TEXAS 77002 

7ia/65e-02da 



LEAVE A MESSAGE & WE'LL CALL YOU BACK! 



70 



1^ Reader Serv/ce — see p6ge 195 



■^ 




fiia 9 5 



HoVM to 3"'W a 
WrocompoWf 



t^;-^ 



How to 

Biiild a 
Micro- 
computer 

. . . and Really 
CliKferstand It 



S9.95 



ir Complete circuit board layoff ts iit- 

€lfflf«ll 

^ Renily-iniiile hoards available 

^ Uses the popular 65 oz chip (same as 

the KIM, PET, APPLE) 
• Uses readil^'availahle parts 
irContpanent kits available 

While considerable information is available on the 
generalities of how a microcomputer works or how to 
program a microcomputer, you'll be hard pressed to 
find information concerning the construction of a sin- 
gle, specific system. 

Finally, electronic hobbyists are able to build their 
own microcomputer system with Sam Creason's 
book, "How To Build A Microcomputer and Realty Un- 
derstand It.** Greason's book is a combination 
technical manual and programming guide that takes 
the hobbyist step-by-step through the design con- 
struction, testing, and debugging of a complete 
microcomputing system. 

Once your computer has been properly programmed, 
it can be a powerful tool for use in the amateur radio 
station. Examples include a CW generator, a digital 
voltmeter, and a programmable signal generator. This 
book is must reading for anyone desiring a true 
understanding of small computer systems. 



To order, write 73 Magazine Mail-Order Oept. #S95 
Peterborough NH 03458. Include name and address 
and $10.95 ($9.95 plus $1.00 shipping and handling). 



^ ■^•^mmtm 



D Please rush my copy of "How To Build A Microcom- 
puter'' {BK7325} 

Name 



Address 
City 



Apt#_ 



State. 



Zip. 




D I enclose $10,95 ($9.95 plus $1.00 shipping and 

handling) 
D Bill my credit card 

O Visa D Master Charge 
Credit Card# Exp. date 

Signature 

73 Magazine Mail-Order Dept. #S95 
Peterborough NH 03458 



,J 



MY COMPETITION KNOWS 
ME, YOU SHOULD TOO. 




COMPLETE KITS: CONSISTING OF EVERY ESSENTIAL PART NEEDED TO 
MAKE YOUR COUNTER COMPLETE. HAL eOOA 7-DIGlT COUNTER WfTH FRE- 
QUENCY RANGE OF ZERO TO 600 MHz. FEATURES TWO INPUTS: ONE FOR 
LOW FREQUENCY AND ONE FOR HIGH FREQUENCY: AUTOMATIC ZERO 
SUPPRESSION. TIME BASE IS 1.0 SEC OR .1 SEC GATE WITH OPTIONAL 10 
SEC GATE AVAILABLE, ACCURACY ±001%. UTILIZES 10MHz CRYSTAL & 
PPM 
COMPLETE KIT , , ., $129 

HAL'SOOA 7D1QIT COUNTER WiTH FREQUENCY RANGE OF ZERO TO 300 
MHz FEATURES TWO INPUTS: ONE FOR LOW FREQUENCY AND ONE FOR 
HIGH FREQUENCY; AUTOMATIC ZERO SUPPRESSION. TIME BASE fS 10 SEC 
OR .1 SEC GATE WITH OPTIONAL 10 SEC GATE AVAILj^BLE. ACCURACY 

+ ,001 %, UTILIZES 10MHz CRYSTAL 5 PPM, 

COMPLETE KIT . . . - $109 

HAL'SOA 8D1QJT COUNTER WITH FREQUENCY RANGE OF ZERO TO 50 

MHz OR BETTER. AUTOMATIC DECIMAL POINT, ZERO SUPPRESSION UPON 
DEMAND. FEATURES TWO INPUTS; ONE FOR LOW FREQUENCY INPUT. AND 
ONE ON PANEL FOR USE WITH ANY INTERNALLY MOUNTED HALTRONIX 
PRESCALER FOR WHfCH PROVISIONS HAVE ALREADY BEEN MADE. 1.0 
SEC AND .1 SEC TIME GATES. ACCURACY ±001%. UTILIZES lOMHz 
CRYSTAL 5 PPM. 



PRESCALER KITS 

H Al 300 PRE . •.,..$! 9.95 

(Pre-dfilled GIO board and a!J componentsi 

HAL 300 A/PRE S24.95 

(Same as; above wtth preamp) 

n A JL V W I K h* *«* ***************** »« + «+ »« + « + *i »« t . + 4* *]p^4.7!J 

tPrfrdrilled GIO board and all coinponenls) 
(Same as abov^ but with preamp) 

TOUCH TONE DECODER KIT 

HIGHLY STABLE DECODER KIT. COMES WITH 2 SIDED, PLATED THRU AND 
SOLDER FLOWED G-IO PC BOARD, 7-567"s, 2-7402, AND ALL ELECTRONIC 
COMPONENTS. BOARD MEASURES 3V? x SVs INCHES. HAS 12 LINES OUT. 
ONLY 139.9S 

DELUXE t2 BUTTON TOUCHTONE ENCODER KIT utiNzIng the new ICM 7306 

chip. Provides both VISUAL AND AUDIO indications! Comes wfth fts own two- 
tone anodtzed aluminum cabinet, f^easuresonly 2 3/4 x 3 3/4". CnDrnplete miU 
Touch-Tone pad. board, crystal, chip and all necessary components to finish 
the kit. 
PRICED AT. $29.95 

For those who wiifish to mount the encoder in a hand heJd unit, the PC board 

measures only 9/16" x 1 3/4". This partial kit with PC board, crystal, chip and 

components. 

PRICED AT , . E14.95 

ACCUKIVEil-IHEMOItY OfTIDN KIT THIS ACCUKEYER MEMORY KIT PRO- 
VIDES A SIMPLE, LOW COST METHOD OF ADDiNG MEMORY CAPABILITY 
TO THE W64VVF ACCUKEYER WHILE DESIGNED FOR DIRECT ATTACH- 
MENT TO THE ABOVE ACCUKEYER, IT CAN ALSO BE ATTACHED TO ANY 
STANDARD ACCUKEYEfl BOARD WITH LITTLE DIFFICULTY. tl6.95 

ACCUKEYER {KITJ THIS ACCUKEYER IS A REVISED VERStON OF THE VERY 
POPULAR WB4VVF ACCUKEYER Of^lGINALLY DESCRIBED QY JAMES GAR- 
RETT, IN QST MAGAZINE AND THE 1975 RADIO AMATEURS HANDBOOK, 
»l«<95 

ACCUKEVER— MEMORY OPTIOIV KJT— TOGETHER ONLY S 32.00 

6-DlGIT CLOCK • 12/24 HOUR 

COMPLETE KIT CONSISTING OF 2 PC G10 PRE-DRILLEO PC BOARDS. 1 
CLOCK CHIP, 6 FND 359 READOUTS, 13 TRANSISTORS. 3 CAPS, 9 
RESISTORS. 5 DIODES, 3 PUSH-BUTTON SWITCHES, POWER 
TRANSFORMER AND INSTRUCTIONS, 

DON'T 8E FOOLED BY PARTIAL K^TS WHERE YOU HAVE TO BUY 
EVERYTHING EXTRA. 



CLOCK CASE Available and will Hi any one of the above clocks. Regular 

Price , , . S6.50 hit Only $4.50 when bought wlih flock 

SIX'PIGtT ALARM CLOCK KIT for home, camper, RV, or tield-day jse. Opefaies 

on 1£'VOlt AC or DC, and has its own OC^Hztirne base on the board. Complete 
with all electronic conDponents and two-pSece^ pre drilled PC boards. Board 
size 4" X 3", Complete with speaker artd switches. If operated on DC, there is 
nothing more to buy,* 

rH.E%_tU n I ■ iipvq.B^^>|Vf,(.| |.f*.»|-|fl-l»«l ■■■A*-! ■ l-l-iVI ll-li-ftE iiAAdqi ianra ■ ■■■■ afl W>,7P 3^ 



Twelve-volt AC line cord for those who wish lo operate the clock from 1 tO-volt 
AC. SI. 9 5 

SHIPPING JNFORMATIOM 

ORDERS OVER S15.00 WILL BE SHIPPED POSTPAID EXCEPT ON ITEMS 
WHERE ADDITIONAL CHARGES ARE REQUESTED. ON ORDERS LESS THAN 
S15.00 PLEASE INCLUDE ADDITIONAL Sl.OO FOR HANDLING AMD MAILING 
CHARGES. SEND SASE FOR FREE FLYER. 



m«riei -imw^ 



V "HAL 





HAL" HAROLD C. NOWIAND 

wezxH 



Hal-Tronix 

P.O. BOX 1101 

SOUTH GATE, MICH, 48195 

PHONE (313) 285-1782 



i^H24 



p^ Re^i^er Sefyice—see page 195 



71 



Roben Gtaser NBIC 
3922 Algiers Road 
Randallstown MD 21 133 



An 8080 Repeater Control System 



part IV: addenda 



Several additions have 
been made to the con- 
trol system, The LM309K 
regulator IC in the +5-volt 



power supply has been re- 
placed with an LM323K-5, 
which has a higher current 
rating. An "old code" com- 



2#1 Message 

You are hearing an amateur radio repeater. Very simply, a 
repeater consists of some electronics equipment which 
boosts radio communications range. A repeater has a re- 
cefver and a transmitter operating on different frequencies. 
They ultllze antennas located as high up as possible. 
Because of the high location and very good quaUty equip- 
ment, repeaters can receive transmissions from much fur- 
ther avi/ay than can be normally done and can be heard at a 
further distance than is commonplace, The repeater retrans* 
mits weai< signals, permitting walkie-tall^ies and mobile sta- 
tions to communicate with each other up to a hundred miles 
apart or more, when without a repeater, the range may be on^ 
ly several miles or several tens of miles. 

Repeater operation is but a small part of what is available 
to the radio amateur, or ham, as he is commonly called. 
Hams routinely talk to other hams around the world on the 
shortwave bands. Some operate the international Morse 
code and others use single sideband, a modern form of 
voice communication. Many hams operate radioteletype, 
and some even transmit pictures across continents. There 
are some amateurs with fast-scan television stations of 
their own. 

Ham radio Is a fascinating hobby. Some hams like to build 
equipment and some just like to talk, but most do a little of 
both. Hams keep up with the ever-growing technology of to- 
day. Amateurs built several satellites, had them placed into 
orbit» and can now easily communfcate through their very 
own satellites, called OSCAR (for orbital satellite carrying 
amateur radio). Some hams even have homemade comput- 
ers completely running their stations! 

Amateurs have a lot of freedom to operate on the air and 
build their own equipment. This is because each and every 
ham must demonstrate to the Federal Communications 
Commission before receiving a license that he has an under- 
standing of both radio law and electronics theory in addition 
to knowing the international f^orse code. 

Ham radio is both a fun and an educational hobby. If you 
think that you could develop an interest in ham radio, con* 
tact the Baltimore Amateur Radio Club at PO Box 5344, 
Baltimore MD 21209. Or dial H-A-M-T-A-L-K, HAMTALK, on 
your telephone for further information. 

This has been the two-pound-one message. Two-pound- 
two gives genera! information, two-pound-three supplies 
current club information, and two-pound-four explains more 
about the repeaters. 



mand has been added to 
the program, the Mohawk 
Message Repeater has 
been swapped for a stan- 
dard 8-track player, and a 
telephone switchover net- 
work has been added to 
share a single telephone 
line with two repeaters. 

The Old Code Command 

The Baltimore Amateur 
Radio Club changes its 
autopatch access code an- 
nually. I added the old 
code command to make it 
clear to users that their 
touchtonesTW were ac- 
cepted, but that the old ac- 
cess code was used and no 
longer activates the auto- 
patch. When the old code 
is used, after the carrier 
drop, the control system 
sends "OLD CODE" in CW. 



The programming is sim- 
ple, and Listing 1 shows 
this routine. The routine 
calls WCD, loads the HL 
registers with the message 
address, and CW is called. 
In the code table, the old 
access code now points to 
OLDCD. 

The Tape Loop 

The tape machine de- 
scribed in Part I developed 
a problem, and the oppor- 
tunity was taken to replace 
it with a common 8-track 
tape player. This is most 
suitable because a loop 
configuration is required. 
The primary drawback to 
the Mohawk Message Re- 
peater was that the record- 
ed message had to be ex- 
actly as long as the tape 
itself. The new system is 



OLDCD; 


CALL 


WCD 






LXI 


H p OLDMS 






CALL 


CW 




7 


JMP 


TTON2 




f 

• 

OLDMS : 


DB 


80H 


fSP 




DB 


OFOH 


;0 




DB 


4 en 


jh 




DB 


90H 


JD 




DB 


8 OH 


jSP 




DB 


0A8H 


JC 




DB 


OFOH 


?o 




DB 


9 OH 


|D 




DB 


4 OH 


jE 




DB 


8 OH 


jSP 




DB 







1 

• 

r 








* 

CODTB : 


DB 


9 






DB 


8 






DB 


12 


i# ! 




DW 


OLDCD 





Listing 1. The ''old code" command. 



M 



72 



2#2 Message 

Welcome to the Baltimore Amateur Radio Club's 07/67 
repeater, WR3AFM. The transmrtter is located at the old 
WBAL tower on Park Heights Ave, The repeater has receiv- 
ers north of the beltway on Old Harford Road, at the WRBS 
tower near 1§5 south and the beltway, downtown at 4000 
North Charles Street, at the QTH of K3VC and N3JC at the 
top of Ihe Jones FaUs expressway, and a fifth receiver in 
Randal istown, A voting selector feeds the best signal to the 
transmitter. 

At the transmit site, there fs also a duplexed 440-MHz 
repeater, 444.35 in and 449.35 out. 

You will note that a short click Is heard after releasing 
your carrier. This signifies that the repeater timer has been 
reset and leaves time for breakers. It is not necessary to let 
the repeater carrier drop. 07/67 has an autopatch limited to 
travelers and club members, though open to anyone for 
emergency traffic. 

The repeater is set up to block touchtone signals from 
repeating. There are several codes that anyone is welcome 
to use after proper identification. One-pound-one links the 
67 machine with the 440 repeater. To acknowledge that 
function^ the repeater 5end"s an **R" in Morse* The repeaters 
remain linked untiE a star is sent, again acknowledged with 
an '*W\ Two-pound-one plays a tape giving a brief introduc- 
tion to ham radio. Two-pound-two gives this recorded 
message. Two-pound-three supplies current club informa- 
tion. Two-pound-four gives more information about our 
repeaters. Tape messages can be activated at most once 
every ten minutes. Three-pound* three will disable the 
repeater's blocking function until the carrier is dropped, per- 
mitting the tones to be repealed. Any touchtone digits sent 
after four*pound-four will be verified in Morse after the car- 
rier drop. Five-pound-five will repeat what was sent during a 
four-pound-four operation, or the telephone number dialed 
during an autopatch, whichever was last. 

The control system for the repeaters is an 8080-based 
microprocessor which performs the various functions, in- 
cluding multiple Identifications as well as redialing 
telephone numbers for the autopatch. 

The Baltimore Amateur Radio Club has another two meter 
repeater, 34/94. which is a split-site repeater in the Northern 
Baltimore area. We hope you enjoy the use of our repeaters, 
and we would like to see you at our meetings the first and 
third Wednesdays of the month at the Ames IVIethodlst 
Church in Pikesvilie at 8 pm. Listen for Interesting bulletins 
weekdays on 67 at 7:30 am and rebroadcast on 94 at 6 pm. 
Code practice can be heard Mondays at 9 pm on 34/94. 
Should you desire to contact the club, write the Baltimore 
Amateur Radio Club, PO Box 5344, Baltimore MO 21209. 



more versatile and allows 
the message to be any 

length up to the length of 
the loop itself. Since the 
tape player is stereo, it is 
convenient to place the 
message audio on the right 
channel and a tone on the 
left channel to indicate 
when the message is fin- 
ished. Standard 40-minute 
tapes supply 10 minutes 
per track. The control cir- 
cuitry activates the drive 
mechanism upon request; 
and when the message is 
done and the tone is en- 



countered, the tape system 
disconnects itself from the 
repeater and continues 
running until the metal- 
lized strip signifying the 
beginning of the tape is 
reached, shutting off the 
machine. A bonus is that 
the tapes can only be ac- 
tivated once every ten 
minutes. A KILL command 
has been added to allow 
termination of the tape 
message when desired. 

The tape ptayer has four 
pairs of tracks, so this 
feature was exploited to 



2#3 A/tessage 
This is the two-pound^hree message. Two-poundone 

gives an introduction to amateur radio, two^pound^wo sup* 
plies a generalized message, and two-pound-four provides 
information about the repeater equipment. 

This repeater is sponsored by the Baltimore Amateur 
Radio Club, PO Box 5344, Baltimore MD 21209, 

Where Is the current DXpedition? What is the WWV propa- 
gation forecast for the upcoming week? When is the next 
local hamfest? To find the answers to these and other ques* 
tions, listen to the BARC bulletins weekdays at 7:30 am on 
07/07 and at 6:00 pm on 34/94. Keep up with your hobby, 

(In CW at 35 wpm: Hams constantly strive for proficiency 
with GW,) Code practice sessions are held on Monday eve- 
nings at 9:00 on 34/94. Call in your requests next Monday 
night and test or improve your code speed. 

Remember to dial H-A-M-T-A-L-K, HAMTALK, In the 
Baltimore area for current information. Spread the number 
around to your non-ham friends. 

Don't forget to write an article or two for the club 
magazine, the Modulator. If you can help out with amateur 
radio classes, contact W3HYY. 

Is there something that you can do or suggest for the 
club? Come to some meetings and volunteer— we'd love Eo 
have your participation. 

BARC meetings are held at the Ames Methodist Church in 
Pikesvilie at 8 pm. Business meetings are held the first 
Wednesday of the month. General meetings include a 
presentation and are held on the third Wednesday of the 
month. Everyone \s welcome at both meetings. 

The September meeting wHI be a discussion of spark-gap 
transmission and ham radio of years past. The October 
meeting will be a tour of the Emergency Medical Radio Ser- 
vice at Sinai Hospital. Novemt>er's meeting boasts a talk on 
radio-controlied models.The January meeting will be the an- 
nual BARC auction, the February meeting will have demon- 
strations of antennas and their patterns, and the March 
meeting will be all about our repeaters. Try to foin us at 
these meetingSp if possible. 



provide four different tape 
nnessages. The original sin- 
gle 2#2 tape request is ex- 
panded to four, accessible 
via the codes 2#1, 2#2, 2#3, 
and 2#4, The microproces- 
sor renn embers which track 
the tape player is on and 
advances the head assem- 
bly to the requested tape 
track. The 2#1 message is 
for non-hams. It briefly ex- 
plains what amateur radio 
is all about and is useful 
when someone asks what 
your handie-talkie is for. 
2#2 is a shortened version 
of what it was before. 2#3 
supplies current club infor- 
mation: net schedules, 
meeting programs, etc. The 
relative availability of 
8-track recorders permits 
monthly updates to be 
made. The 2#4 message ts a 
more detailed description 
of the repeaters. 



Fig, 1 shows the tape 
loop interface. This cir- 
cuitry is built into a mini- 
box and mounted to the 
tape player. The only con- 
nection betweeri the tape 
player and the control sys- 
tem is the 16'pin DIP plug 
as before. The tape player 
is a standard 8-track de- 
signed for automotive use 
and operates from a 
12-volt power source, Ac- 
operated players could be 
used with the addition of a 
relay to connect the unit to 
the ac line from a 12-volt 
coil The circuit is quite 
simple. Relays K1 and K2 
provide the switching 
logic. Normally, both re- 
lays are de-energized. 
When the start pulse from 
the processor grounds the 
floating half of the K1 coil 
the relay pulls in. The 
SENSE contacts on the 

73^ 



fINITIALIZATIOK PROCEDURE 



9 
I 

BERIN: 


XRA 


A 






STA 


LCKB 






INR 


A 


. 




STA 


TRACK 


f TRACK « 


RESET! 

• 

r 


LXI 


H,TIME-1 






ORR 


2000H 


; THIRD KOM 


TAPE 1 t 


MVI 


B,0 


jTAPEX PLAYS 


TAPE! 


LDA 


OUTOH 


fTHE TAPE ON 




ANI 


2 


I TRACK X 




JI^Z 


TT0S2 




TAPC ! 


LDA 


OUTOM 






ORA 


A 






JM 


TT0K2 






CALL 


SEEK 






CALL 


WCD 






LXI 


D,0UT3M 






MVI 


BrdOH 






CALL 


BITS 






OUT 


P0RT3 






CALL 


DELAY 






CALL 


BITC 


IPOLSB TAPE 




OUT 


P0HT3 




f 


JMP 


TTON2 




TAPE2 1 


MVI 


B,1 






JMP 


TAPE 




TAPE 3 t 


MVI 


B,2 






JMP 


TAPE 




TAPE 4 % 


MVI 


B,3 




I 


JMP 


TAPE 




I 

1 
TAPli 


MVI 


B,0 


yTAPX SAME AS 




JHP 


TAPC 


jTAPEX BUT FROM 


TAP2t 


MVI 


B,1 


f CONTROL CODE 




JMP 


TJ^C 




TAP3t 


MVI 


B,2 






JMP 


TAPC 





TAP 4! 

f 
} 

? 

SEEK: 



MVI 
JMP 



B,3 
TAPC 



SEEKl 
SEEK2 



LDA 

CPI 

JC 

SUI 

STA 

JMP 

MVI 

CMP 

RC 

LDA 

CKP 

RZ 

CALL 

INR 

JMP 



TRACK 

4 

SEEK 2 
4 

TRACK 
SEEK 
A, 3 

TRACK 
B 

STEP 
A 

SKEK1 



fSEEK ADVANCES 

J HEAD TO TRACK 
f SPECIFIED 
J IN REG B 



I 
I 

I 
STEP 



PUSH 

PUSH 

LXI 

MVI 

CALL 

OUT 

CALL 

CALL 

OUT 

CALL 

POP 

POP 

RET 



jT^F. I STEP ADVANCES 

B I HEAD ONE TRACK 

D,0UT4M 

B,40H 

BITS 

P0RT4 

LDELY 

BITC 

PORT 4 

LDELY 

B 

PSW 



I 
I 

LDELY 
LDLY1 



MVI 

CALL 
DCR 
JNZ 
RET 



A, 8 
DELAY 

K 

LDLYl 



I LONG DELAY 



I 
I 

I 



Listing Z Tape commands. 



player are normally open, normally low. This allows 
SO the sensing transistor is K1 to latch, supplying 



power to the tape player. only when K1 is activated 
The PTT line is grounded and K2 is not. Likewise, 



[ 



2#4 Message 

WR3AFM consists of two separate repeaters: a 440-MHz 
repeater and a two meter repeater The 444.35/449,35 
repeater ts a duplexed single-site repeater. The 07/67 
repeater consists of five repeaters spread around town with 
the common input frequency of 146.07 MHz. These satellite 
receivers transmit via 440-M Hz linl^ frequencies to the 146.67 
transmitter stte. Each linli has a Station Master antenna, a 
146.07-MHz receiver, a 440-MH2 transmitter, a control sheif, 
and a CW Identifier. The iDer is required to satisfy FCC re- 
quirements, and for our purposes they continuously identify 
with a low-level, low-pitch tone. This can be used to deter^ 
mine which receiver has been selected. 

At the transmit site, a voting selector chooses the best 
signal from the five links and sends it to the 146.67-MHz 
transmitter. The trarismitter drives a 250-Watt amplifier, 
though only a portion of that power reaches the Station 
Master antenna through about 500 feet of feedline. All ot 
this equipment is of the General Electric MASTR series. 

The repeater control is performed by a dedicated 8080 
microcomputer system. This consists of 57 Integrated cir- 
cuits and has 3K bytes of ROM, 256 bytes of RAM, seven 



eight-bit output ports, and three eight-bit input ports. The 
control program is over 1500 lines long. The 8080 accom- 
plishes the user codes, the autopatch, and permits elabo- 
rate control options to be accessed via touchtones re- 
motely. 

The 34/94 repeater is also a split-site repeater. The 
transmitter is in Towson and directly feeds a Station Master 
antenna. The receiver is co-located with the 07 receive link at 
the Charles Street site. The 07 and 34 receivers share the 
same antenna. Therefore, the coverage of 07^67 necessadiy 
engulfs that of 34/94. With the exception of the link transmit- 
ter, which Is a Progress Line, the 34/94 equipment is ail 
General Electric MASTR. It is necessary to wait for the beep 
to reset the three-minute time-out timer. Additionally, on 
34/94, it is required to let the entire repealer carrier drop 
once every twelve minutes. This Is because the drop delay is 
on the link transmitter, which causes it less wear and tear. 

This has been tape message two-pound-four; two-pound- 
one gives an introduction to amateur radio, two-pound-two 
supplies a generalized message, and two-pound-three pro- 
vides recent club information. 



M 



74 



KILL: 


LDA 


OOTOM 


IKILL TAPE 


0UT4W: 


DS 


1 






ORA 


A 




OUTSWt 


DS 


1 






JM 


TTON2 




0UT6M; 


DS 


1 






LXI 


D,0UT4M 




0UT7M! 


DS 


1 






MVI 


B,80H 




t 










CALL 


BITS 




1 










OUT 


P0RT4 




f 










CALL 


DELAY 


. 


CODTB : 


DB 


2 






CALL 


BITC 






DB 


12 


f» i 




OUT 


PORT 4 






DB 


1 






JMP 


TTDN2 






DW 


TAPE1 




1 










DB 


2 




t 










DB 


12 


;# 


1 










DB 


2 




STEPR: 


LDA 


OUTOM 


; MANUALLY 




DW 


TAPE 2 






ORA 


A 


;STEP HEAD 




DB 


2 






JM 


TT0N2 






DB 


12 


i9 H 





CALL 


STEP 




DB 


3 








CALL 


ROGER 




DW 


TAPE 3 








JMP 


TT0N2 




DB 


2 


- 




1 








DB 


12 


f# 




; 








DB 


4 






1 








DW 


TAPE4 








ORG 


3000H 


?RAM BOrrOM 


DB 


7 






* 








DB 


3 






TTDint 


EQU 


$ 




DB 


11 


1* 






DS 


25 


r SPACE FOR DIGITS 


DW 


KILL 






NUMBR t 


DS 


12 


rTEL #1 


DB 


2 






IDAD5S 


EQU 






DB 


11 


r 






DS 


196 


; SPACE FOR STACK, ID #5 


DB 


1 






STACK : 


EQU 






DW 


TAP1 






OUTRl : 


DS 






DB 


2 






0UTR2 s 


DS 






DB 


11 






0UTR3: 


DS 






DB 


2 


\ 




TIMER! 


DS 






DW 


TAP2 






NOTIMs 


DS 






DB 


2 






LCKRs 


DS 






DB 


11 


t 


i 


IDS: 


DS 






DB 


3 




1 


IDK: 


DS 






DW 


TAP 3 






TRACK: 


DS 






DB 


2 






TIME: 


DS 


1 




DB 


11 




• 


MASK: 


DS 






DB 


4 






LKROG: 


DS 






DW 


TAP 4 






OUTOM: 


DS 






DB 


B 






OUTlMi 


DS 






DB 





E 




0UT2Mt 


DS 






DB 


11 






0UT3M: 


DS 




• 


DW 


STEPR 







audio IS available only 
under the same conditions. 
At this point the tape is 
running, the repeater is 
keyed up, and the tape 
audio is feeding the trans- 
mitter. The right and left 
audio channels have a 
10'Ohm load resistor to 
protect the audio output 
stages. The left channel is 
stepped up in voltage, rec- 
tified, and fed to a tone- 
detect transistor. Most of 
the left channel is empty. 
At the end of the message, 
a tone of almost any fre- 
quency is placed on the 
left channel for five to thir- 
ty seconds. The tone-de- 
tect transistor detects the 
tone and activates K2. 
Immediately, the PTT and 
audio lines are released 
and the repeater is freed 
up. K2 latches through the 



grounding contact. Both 

relays remain latched, con- 
tinuing to power the tape 
player, until the metal foil 
on the tape reaches the 
SENSE contacts. This un- 
latches K1, which releases 
K2, and all returns to the 
rest mode. 

The track solenoid in the 
tape player usually re- 
quires several Amperes to 
drive it. Relay K3 drives the 
track solenoid and is 
driven by an open-col- 
lector output bit on the 
processor. This permits the 
processor to control the 
track-select mechanism. A 
ground on the KILL line 
simulates the beep tone, 
killing the tape message. A 
12-volt power supply is in- 
cluded to power the unit. 
The tape player must be 
modified by breaking the 



leads on the SENSE con- 
tacts and the stepping 
solenoid and bringing them 
out separately. 

A considerable amount 
of software is necessary to 
control the multiple-track 
tape system. The system 
works by dead reckoning; 
the processor maintains a 



memory of which track the 
machine was last on and 
advances the track until 
the desired one is reached. 
A better arrangement 
would utilize a tape ma- 
chine which has individual 
lamps to indicate the track. 
These signals could be sent 
to input ports of the pro- 



SWTCH? 


LXI 


D,DUT4M 


; SWITCH TO | 




MVI 


B,2 


|450 WT 




CALL 


BITS 


;0N PHONE 




OUT 


PORT 4 






CALL 


DELAY 






CALL 


BITC 






OUT 


PORT 4 




1 


JMP 


TTOH2 




1 

* 

CODTB : 


DB 


5 






DB 


9 






DB 


11 


r 




DW 


SWTCH 





Listing 3. Switch command. 



75 



M 



« + l2V 



3<> 



No^*^ I 



SENSE 

CONTACTS 



RIGHT 



I30 



»l2VCi" 




SEEK 



STAftT 



AUO LO 



30- 



7a- 



TRACK 
SOLCNOIP 



lOjJF 



/77 



I Si*- 



TfiAC* 




LM540T -la 
TOfi VIEW 



LM 3*31-12 




E 



Z 
5 



2000 



-^3+l2V 



JOpF 



7/7 



F/g. 7. J^pe loop interface. 



cesser, and it could ad- 
vance the assembly until 
the desired lamp was ac- 
tivated. I chose not to use 



this approach because the 
tape players with the add- 
ed track lamps are not as 
readily available as the 



TAPE I 



TAPE 2 



TAPE 3 



TAPE 4 



TTDN 2 ^ 







{1^0^ 



FAP 



TAP Z 



TAP 5 



TAP 4 



KItL 



STEPH 





TTON i 



TTON 2 



Fig. 2, Tape commands. 




GET 

CURRENT 

TRACK 



STOfiE AS 

CURRENT 

TRACK 




TES 



SEEK \ 



BUBTflACT 
4- 




r Pl&au£STEO 1 

' TRACK I 

OtfT OF 1 

i RASslGi j 



INCREMENT 

STEP 

OOUhtT 



c 



YES 



*■ 



YES 




CURfiENiT -I ! 



I REQUESTED ; 
' TRACK i 



STEP 

TRACK 



RETU 



'm) 



Fig, 3. The SEEK subroutine. 



ones which do not have 
them. There has been little 
problem with incorrect 
track selection. 

Listing 2 shows the tape- 
handling software. The 
four commands, TAPE1, 
TAPE2, TAPE3, and TAPE4, 
correspond to the 2#1, 2#2, 
2#3, and 2#4 codes. Com- 
mands TAP1 through TAP4 
correspond to the 2*1 
through 2*4 codes for use 
by control operators. 
TRACK is the variable 
which specifies the current 
track, Upon initialization, 
TRACK is set to 1, corre- 
sponding to track 2. This is 
because 2#2 is the most 
commonly used message, 
and, after a power failure, 
presetting the program to 
that track gives the highest 
probability that the pro- 
cessor and the machine are 
in synchronization. 

Fig. 2 shows the various 
tape commands. Register B 
specifies the desired track 
for the SEEK subroutine. 
The KILL command pulses 
the KILL line to the tape 
circuitry, stopping the mes- 
sage. The STEPR command 
steps the tape track and 
acknowledges with an ''R". 
This is used to resynchro- 
nize the machine and the 
processor. 

The SEEK subroutine is 
shown in Fig. 3. SEEK ad- 
vances the head assembly 



until the desired track, 
passed in register B, is 
reached. Validity checks 
are made to prevent possi- 
ble erroneous requests 
from pulsing the track line 
for long periods of time. 

The Switchover Board 

Our 449.35 repeater has 

separate autopatch circuit- 
ry, and we had been using a 
second telephone line for 
it. To economize, we decid- 
ed to utilize the main 
146,67 autopatch line for 
the other repeater, The 
telephone switchover 
board decides which re- 
peater is to have access to 
the telephone line. The 
phone line rests on the 
main control system, al- 
lowing control over the 
system via the telephone 
and permitting two meter 
autopatches. When an au- 
topatch is requested on 
444.35, if the line is not in 
use, the line is switched to 
that machine. The line re- 
mains there until the auto- 
patch is terminated. The 
telephone line will only be 
given to a repeater if the 
other one is not using it at 
that time. If the request is 
not granted, a simulated 
busy tone is generated and 
sent to the second request* 
ing repeater. To accom- 
plish the remote base func- 
tion on the 449.35 repeater, 



76 



after dialing into the con- 
trol system, the code 59* is 
sent. This switches the 
telephone line to the 
449,35 repeater for 10 sec- 
onds. During this period, 
signals present on 44435 
will be heard on the 
telephone. If the auto- 
patch code is sent before 
the ten seconds elapse, the 
autopatch will be activat- 
ed, the remote base func- 
tion is realized, and the 
line remains latched until 
killed 

The switchover board is 
shown in Fig. 4. The relay is 
normally relaxed and pass- 
es the phone line to the 
control system. Two 555s 
generate the busy signal. 
The 10k potentiometer sets 
the level of the busy tone 
to the repeaters. A single 
D-type flip-flop handles 
the switching logic. The 
flip-flop is CMOS and 



Tape*. 



P*iOME 



R1NHSO- 



^( 



lO^F 




^ 



■wv^ — 



^^ 



A — o- 



tOli 



/77 



drives a Darlington tran- 
sistor which drives the 
switchover relay. The num- 
bered connections go to 
the phone connector on 
the main control system. If 
the processor grounds the 
CRAB line, the telephone 
line will remain on the con- 
trol system no matter what 
When the processor pulses 
the 450 REQUEST low. the 
ten-second timer is ac- 
tuated, switching the 
phone line to 449.35. When 
an autopatch request is 
made on 44435, +12 volts 
is present on the 450 AP 
line. The AP + RB+PHC 
line coming from the pro- 
cessor board signifies that 
the phone line is in use. 

The software to imple- 
ment the 59* command is 
shown in Listing 3. The 450 
REQUEST line is pulsed 
low, and the command ex- 
its. 



-0 I 



-03 



(4&0J 





53k 



JT T. 



200 Hi 



I Hi/ 75% 



33k 



lOjjf 




450 



+ J2V 



450 tkP & 



+ P1HC 





A 10 


1 




1 '^ 


> 

TA0T4 


14 




n 


7 












"Y 


/■> 


h 



Fig. 4. Switchover board. 



Main Board Modifications 

A small amount of wir- 
ing must be added to the 
main board to permit the 
new circuitry to operate. 
The new connector wiring 
is shown in Fig. 5. Two 
diodes are used to create 
the AP+RB+PHC signal 
required. 

Software 

The software patches de- 
scribed may be included in 
full or in parts. It may be 
possible to fit the additions 
in the space remaining in 
the second ROM, depend- 
ing upon how much space 
is taken up by the four dif- 
ferent IDs and the single- 
digit telephone numbers. 
However, for us, it was 
necessary to expand to a 
third ROM. The last ROM 
is only about one-third 
utilized, so much more can 
be added before it be- 
comes necessary to wire in 
a socket for a fourth ROM. 



phcne: 

C0NW£CTOR 



TIP 



^RfNG 



SRM 



■*-pCsRT 4. fl[T:j 



.450 REQUEST 



-* PORT 4, SIT £ 



,Ap-*ftB+pHC 






1^ ^ IC7 - 3 



IG o- 



T^Pt 
COKHECTDR 



/77 



13 Ei- 



KILL 



■* POflT 4 . BIT H 



15 O" 



Tinres 



-i- PORT 4 . eiT T 



Fig. 5. Modifications to pro- 
cessor board. 

Acknowledgements 

Thanks go to Ed Mester 
WA3HQX for his help in 
wiring the tape unit and for 
taking over the responsi- 
bility of preparing the 
tapes. Appreciation is also 
given for the golden voices 
of Mattde Rouville K3MR, 
Denise Oliver, Deborah 
Yost ]im Harding K3DRJ, 
and Pat Biggs KB3CE, who 
have recorded tapes for 
us. ■ 



CUSTOM TRANSFORMERS 




HEAVY DUTY 
REPLACEMENT TRANSFOnMERS 



ALPHA A7 7D Power $ I 35 

BTI LK 2000 PJate $ I 35 

COLLINS30S-I Power ,,,.$215 

COLLINS KWS- 1 Plate $ I 35 

COLLINS 5 I 6F- 2 Power 5 95 

DENTRON I 60' I OL Power , $ I 25 

DRAKE L4a Plate $ I 65 

CONSETGSa- too Power .,,..,_$ 95 

GONSETGSB 201 Power 5 I 35 

H-CRAFTERSHT 32Power S 9S 

H CR AFTEHS HT-37 Power * 95 

HEATH DX- 1 OO LV Power S 95 



HEATH DX' I OOModf .,,.,.....$ 95 

HEATH HX- 10 Power. $ 95 

HEATH SB^ZZO Plate S ) 25 

HENRV 2K Plate S ] 50 

HENRVZK 2 Power S } 55 

HENRV ZK-4 Power , , $ t65 

HENHV 3K'A Plate . . ,„*.*- ...... S 1 65 

HENRY 3K-A OC Choke ; : : t 85 

EF} T-BOLT Plate , . , ..> ...... . * 1 25 

£F| 500 Modulation .... - i 95 

£F| 500 DC Choke ..,.% 75 

MATLNCL-20O0 Plate S 1 25 



OFF-THE-SHELF SPECIALS 



PLATE XFMR: 
PLATE XFMR: 
PLATE XFMRi 
PLATE Xf MR; 
PLATE XFMR; 
PLATE XFMRt 
FILMT XFMR: 
FILMT XFMR; 
FILMT XFMR: 
FILMT XFMR: 
FIL CHOKE: 
DC CHOKE; 
SWG CHOKE: 



2400 VAC @ 1 5A ICAS 220/240 PRI-41 LB $ I 50 

3000 VAC @ 1 ,5A CCS Z30 PRI-60LB $ I 95 

3000 VAC @ 0.7A ICAS I 1 5/Z30 PRI-27LB $115 

3500 VAC m 1 ,0A ICAS I t 5^230 PRf.4t LB $(50 

4000/4600 VAC @ 1 ,5A ICAS 230 PRI-60L& S I 95 

6000 VCT@ O.SACCS I 1 5/230 PRt-41 LB , JI50 

5.0VCT<^30A I ?7PRI-9.SLB .$ 30 

73 VCT @ 2 I A 117 PRI-9.5LB $ 30 

7.5 VCT @ 55A t ] 5/230 PRI- 14. 6LB ,...$ 65 

7.5 VCT@ 75A I 1 5/230 PRJ.20.2LB , , *..»*-. . $ 

30 AMP Bif liar Wound ori '/j 'x7" rod ,,..,». . $ 

S.OHenrEes @ 1 .5 AMf DC 4 ILB $ 1 50 

5-30 Henries ® I O AMP DC 2 3LB 1 I 00 



95 
9 



ALL TRANSfOBMEflS * CHOKES GUARANTEED FOR 24 MONTHS 
Aftny QthmTS bIso avaif&t>h. WriU for fne Ihi or quote on any c(fs(om 



transtornier, chok^t or saturabie rsactor. 



Peter W. Dahl Co. 



i^ 06 




4007 Fort Blvd, • El Paso, Taxas 79930 

Telephone (915) 566-5365 or (915) 751-4856 



iniivscei cnaifjK: 



^ R&3def S&fvice — see pag^ t9S 



77 



M 



Bili Schmidt W3SVQD 
734 K nth Street 
Miamisburg OH 45342 

Bob Shattuck WB3GCP 
Box 203A, Rt. J 
GiUeit PA 16925 



RTTY Transceive for the KIM-1 

— requires video terminal and AFSK generator 



No noise^ no oiK 



Several good articles 
have appeared here in 
the pages of 73 Magazine 
concerning the use of the 
KIM-1 microprocessor for 
RTTY work J. ^^ This article 
describes an easy-to-use 
program for RTTY trans- 
ceive when teamed with 
WASDXP's article.^ it re- 
quires no additional 
memory for the KIM. It is 
also designed as a "stand- 
alone'' program for RTTY 
transmission at afl stan- 



dard amateur RTTY 
speeds. 

Basically, what we de- 
sired was a connplete RTTY 
station without the need or 
bother of mechanical 
printers, TDs, or reper- 
forators. The resultant 
system sends and receives 
RTTY at 60, 66, 75, and 100 
wpm and has a built-in buf- 
fer for "auto-start" 
transmissions, auto-shift 
between Baudot letters 
and figures, and, finally, a 




Computer-generated RTTY station: Note use of ineapen- 
sive black and white portable TV, SWTPC CTS4 video ter- 
minal and home brew interfacing box. 



built-in ID for the end of 
transmission. The program 
does not need to be 
manually stopped to 
switch between transmit 
and receive and back 
again. The resultant system 
is straightforward to use 
and totally silent 

What will you need to 
make use of this program? 
Basically, you'll need a 
KtM-1 interfaced to a 
moderate-speed video ter- 
minal. We use 1200 baud, 
but find that the receive 
program has to be slightly 
modified to allow it to 
operate at this slow speed. 
Higher speed terminals will 
require no modifications to 
the receive program. Of 
course, to use this program 
for transmit, any terminal 
will work regardless of how 
slow. As long as you're in- 
terfaced through the stan- 
dard KIM-I TTY pins, the 
speed of input won't mat- 
ter. The program will sim- 
ply convert the input ASCII 
to Baudot and output it at 
any desired speed. We've 
found, though, that, on 
receive, the terminal 
doesn't have time to out- 



put the decoded character 
and get back in time for the 
next start bit. WA5DXP 
mentions running his ter- 
minal at 4800 baud; we 
simply don't have anything 
that fast! At 1200 baud, 
we've found that simply 
removing the last jSR 
DEHALF (change his fine 
0267 to EA EA EA) will 
allow his receive program 
to work on slower termi- 
nals. Comments would be 
welcomed if you have 
other ideas. 

You'll also need an AFSK 
to convert the output of 
the transmit program to 
the proper tones. The pro- 
gram defines a mark as pin 
PB7 high, a space as PB7 
low. This TTL level output 
can be used to drive an 
AFSK directly. We use a 
couple of sections of a 
7404 hex inverter as a buf- 
fer, !f you have a reason to 
interface directly to a stan- 
dard 60 mA loop, you 
might consider the op- 
to isolator approach used 
in an earlier article on this 
subject (see the references 
at the end of this article). 

The transmit program 




78 



Char. 



Baudot 



ZP Loc. 



A 


62 


41 


B 


4E 


42 


C 


3A 


43 


D 


4A 


44 


E 


42 


45 


F 


5A 


46 


G 


2E 


47 


H 


16 


48 


1 


32 


49 


J 


6A 


4A 


K 


7A 


4B 


L 


26 


4C 


M 


IE 


40 


N 


1A 


4E 


O 


OE 


4F 


P 


36 


50 


Q 


76 


51 


R 


2A 


52 



S 


52 


53 


S 


T 


06 


54 


& 


U 


72 


55 


1 


V 


3E 


56 


( 


w 


66 


57 


) 


X 


5E 


58 


f 


Y . 


56 


59 


ft 


z 


46 


5A 


1 


1 


76 


31 


m 


2 


66 


32 


i 


3 


42 


33 


? 


4 


2A 


34 


Cti 


5 


06 


35 


m 


6 


56 


36 


space 


7 


72 


37 


figs 


8 


32 


38 


Itrs 


9 


OE 


39 


- 


a 


36 


30 


stop 


! 


SA 


21 


bell 


>i 


46 


22 





4A 


24 


2E 


26 


1A 


27 


7A 


28 


26 


29 


3E 


3B 


3A 


M 


6A 


2C 


IE 


2e 


5E 


2F 


4E 


3F 


OA 


OD 


?? 


QA 


12 


20 


6E 


06 Note t 


7E 


OC Note 1 


62 


20 


16 


2B Note 2 


52 


2A Note 3 



Table 1. Code conversion. Note 1: 'Tigs'' and *'ltrs'' were included in this chart so that you can manually produce them 
with an ASCI! keyboard. The program produces them automatically whenever needed. They are included for testing 
only. Note 2: The ''stop'' or British pound symbol (depends on the receiving machine) can be sent by typing a " + " on 
your ASCII keyboard. Note 3: The "beircan be sent by typing a "*"o/i your ASCII keyboard. Other ASCII keys are "it- 
legal'' and will not produce a Baudot equivalent 



deserves some comment 
on the methods used. After 
initiaiizatron of the Itrs/figs 
flag, the computer awaits 
input from an ASCII key- 
board. Upon receiving 
that, it JSRs to a subroutine 
called STATUS where the 
incoming data is tested. If 
bit 6 is found to be a zero, 
the ASCII data was either a 
number or punctuation, fn 
either case, the computer 
must check whether the 
last character sent was also 
in uppercase Baudot. If 
not, then the computer wifl 
have to send the figures 
command before it sends 
the character just input. If 
it determines that the last 
character was indeed up- 
percase, then all it needs to 
do Is output the new char- 
acter. 

The same method holds 
true for lowercase, but in 
the reverse sense The com- 
puter is initialized in the 
"Itrs'' mode, since your 
first input will probably be 
a letter. Should you type a 
number or punctuation 
first, the computer will 
sense this and output a 
Baudot figures control and 
then your character. 

Since we have chosen 
PB7 as the output pin for 
the transmit program, a 
10k putt-up resistor will 



need to be added. PB7 on 
the KIM-1 has no internal 
pull-up (to permit cotlec- 
tor-ORing with other de- 
vices). Simply connect a 
10k y4 W resistor from PB7 
(A-15) and VCC(A-A). 

Even before the com- 
puter has checked the 
status of the incoming 
character, it first rules out 
three special characters: 
space, line feed, and car- 
riage return. A ''space" pro- 
duces the same effect as 
"unshift on space" in some 
mechanical printers. It's 
necessary as you're not go- 
ing to have any idea of the 
kind of printer the other 
station will be using. If you 
type a string of numbers 
and then space to another 
string of numbers, the com- 
puter will shift down on the 
space and back up on the 
second string of numbers. 
The result to the user of 
this program or the station 
copying on the other end is 
insignificant. In other 
words, type whatever you 
want and you can be sure 
the other guy will copy 
regardless of the setup of 
his printer! 

So why do we also dis- 
regard the line feed and 
carriage return as far as 
whether or not to send the 
figs/1 trs command? The 



main reason is that it sim- 
ply does not matter 
whether a Baudot printer is 
in upper- or lowercase 
when either of these com- 
mands are sent. So the 
computer leaves you in the 
mode you are in. 

After the status of the in- 
put character has been 
determined and figs/ltrs 
commands sent (if neces- 
sary), the character input is 
converted to Baudot, 
stored away, and then 
picked up by the XMT sub- 
routine. Transmission of 
the resultant Baudot is ac- 
complished in much the 
same manner as by a me- 
chanical printer. The 



character is sent out, bit by 
bit, with a start bit {a 
space), five data bits, and a 
stop bit (a mark). The 
lengths of both the start 
and data bits are deter- 
mined by the value loaded 
into the on-board KIM 
timer at location 03CD. 
Depending on the speed of 
transmission desired, toad 
the value contained in 
Table 2. Likewise, since the 
stop bit is longer than a 
start/data bit, location 
03E8 must have this delay 
constant loaded. The pro- 
gram is set for 60 wpm as 
written, since this is by far 
the most common speed 
for amateur RTTY trans- 




Chse-up of home brew interface box. Others might corh 
sider bringing all peripheral pins out to miniature phone 
jacks and all controls to outboard switches. 

9 79 



Baud rate 
Start data 

Slop 
(t = ms.) 
Normal totat 
cliar, time 
(t = ms,) 
KIM total 
char, time 
(t =^ msj 
Percent error 
(Allow ±57q) 

Hex to load at 

03CD 

Hex to Toad at 

0aE8 



60 wpm 

45.5 
22 

31 
163 



66 wpm 


75 Wpm 


100 wpm 


50.0 


56.9 


74.2 


20 


18 


13.33 


30 


25 


19 


150 


133 


99 



159.74 



153,60 



135.17 



99.33 



-2,0 

15 

IE 



+ 2.4 
14 

1E 



+ 1.6 

12 

18 



+ 0.3 

OD 

13 



Table 2. RTTY timing table and delay constants. This table supplies data used by the 
R TTY transmit progfam. The values supplied for locations 03CD and 03 18 must be loaded 
if you want to transmit at a speed other than 60 wpm {the program is preset for this speed]. 
Delay constants for receive are covered m WASDXP's article.^ 



missions. Change the desire another speed, 
above locations only if you Upon transmission of the 




Terminal unit provides both 60 mA loop for mechanical 
machine when we want hard copy and TTL level signals 
for the computer. 



2QC wQK 

SoC eSEft^ 9999 ISC € 2244 1B16 ISTUZH ft m 
WC 83B14 0(M)K 27/17 FU9C HZflOIC 

m mi^ OMK 2ai7 FDi flc 

«ln 23008 flK 2KD 10828 89C030 2/21 «S\\l I SE 
)<W aaeB/4 9999 lQfiCB38 5 15 1018 FDI9C KN ft 



Example of weather broadcasts you'll be able to receive 
with the KIM. They are usually highly coded as this one is, 
but decoding manuals are available and we've found the 
NWS most helpful. 



complete character, the 
program loops to the 
beginning where the next 
input is awaited. 

Note that, when you 
type a character requiring 
a shift, there is a quick two- 
step sound as first the com- 
mand for figs/I trs is sent 
and then the character, 
separated only by a stop 
bit, You'il probably get 
comments on this from 
people with mechanical 
printers, as they'll be used 
to "live" typing which 
won't usually produce this 
effect. Also, if you're a very 
fa*'t typist you may have 
to pjause slightly since the 
computer won't be ready 
for your next character un- 
til it's completed the above 
operation. Normal typists 
and pick-and-punchers can 
disregard this warning! 

The program does more 
than just allow real-time 
transmission of RTTY. It 
also tncorporates a buffer 
so you can type a short 
message into the computer 
and have it output the en- 
tire message at full speed 
This is accomplished in the 
BUFFR section of the pro- 
gram. Getting into this 
mode requires only that 
you type Control B" (that 
is, push the control key 
down and hold it down 
while you type a letter 
"B"). You'll notice that fur- 
ther typing is no longer out- 



put to your AFSK. Instead, 
anything you type is stored 
away in memory for "full 
speed ahead" transmis- 
sion. How do you know if 
the buffer becomes full? 
Every character you type 
will return with a bell 
sounding if you're using a 
mechanical ASCII printer 
or a tone if you're using an 
electronic terminal The 
program is set up to allow 
about a three-line (at 64 
characters per line) buffer. 
You can change this at 
location 0332. Whenever 
you're finished typing your 
message into the buffer, it 
can be sent by typing "Con- 
trol T/' Remember to turn 
on your AFSK and transmit- 
ter first, though! When 
your entire message has 
been sent the program 
again loops to the begin- 
ning and awaits your next 
input 

You can also load your 
ID into a special ID buffer 
which is always ready to be 
sent when you type "Con- 
trol r/' See Table 3 for ini- 
tial loading instructions. 
Since you'll certainly 
dump this program to 
audio tape, every time you 
load, your program and 
also your ID will be ready 
to go. You can use the ID as 
we do or make a slight 
change, Since we send the 
ID at the end of our 
transmissions, we have 
completion of the ID auto- 
matically jump us into the 
receive program. This is ac- 
complished at line 0321. If 
you want to use this pro- 
gram without WASDXP's 
receive program, then 
you'll need to change only 
this one line (see Table 4). 
This ID is in RTTY, so you'll 
need to either ID verbally 
or in Morse to satisfy FCC 
requirements. 

A few notes should be 
made about the actual 
ASCIl-to-Baudot code con- 
version table (see Table 1). 
This table takes into ac* 
count ail normal Baudot 
characters. Figs and Itrs 
commands are included 
for testing, but, since the 



M 



30 



step 1: 



Step 2: 



Decide what you want sent. 
Exampfe; '^DE WB8VQD c/r c/r l/f" 

Convert it to ASCM usirtg the chart betow: 



Change: 



A^l 


N-4E 


1-31 


B-42 


0-4 F 


2-32 


C-43 


P-50 


3-33 


CM4 


Q-51 


4-34 


E45 


R52 


5-35 


F-46 


S-53 


6^36 


G-47 


T-54 


7*37 


H-48 


U-55 


8-38 


1*49 


V-56 


9-39 


J-4A 


W-57 


0-30 


K-4B 


X'58 


space-20 


L-4C 


Y'59 


c/r-OD 


M-4D 


Z-5A 


l/f-OA 



Sfep 3: 



P(ace your ID into memory beginnrng at 0100. 
Example: 



0010 


D 


44 


0011 


E 


45 


0012 


space 


20 


0013 


W 


57 


0014 


B 


42 


0015 


6 


38 


0016 


V 


56 


0017 


Q 


51 


0018 


D 


44 


0019 


c/r 


OD 


001A 


c/r 


00 


001 B 


W 


OA 



Step 4: Tell the computer how long your ID is. This 

number, in hex, is loaded at 031 E, if you'ro not 

familiar with hex, take the last focation of 
your ID, add one, and use only the last digit. 
Example: My ID ends at 001 B, if I add one, 
that's 001C. Using only the last digit, [ gel 
'*0C" as the hex number to toad at 031E. 
Disregard the number already at 031 E 

Table 3, How to load the ID with your call. 



program supplies them 
automatically, you'll prob- 
ably never use them. A 
Baudot "figs" is produced 
by typing "Control F" and a 
"Itrs" command by "Con* 
trol L/' If you are in the 
"Itrs" mode and type a 
"figs" command, you'll 
really get two of them, as 
the STATUS subroutine 
will supply one of its own! 
The same applies to typing 
the "Itrs" command when 
in the ''figs" mode. Take 
this into account if you're 
inclined to experiment. 

Delay constants for the 
transmit program appear in 
Table 2. Since only four 
speeds are legal on 
amateur bands, only con- 
stants for those are 
published. Percents of er- 
ror are also included, as 



minor tinning errors have 
not been corrected by the 
program. There's simply no 
need to, as any printer, 
mechanical or electronic, 
can handle errors up to 
5%. Since we used the 
divide-by-1024 position of 
the KIM timer, even in- 
crements of milliseconds 
are not possible. Correc- 
tion factors can be pro- 
grammed in, but we found 
these constants plenty ac- 
curate for any use you'll 
probably ever encounter. 
One thing's for certain: A 
mechanical printer isn't go- 
ing to care either way. 

The receive program 
which we've referred to 
many times has performed 
well here for some time. 
We had considered writing 
one, but found this one to 



Table 4. Changes to WASDXP's program to adapt it to this 
transmit program to allow transceive. WASDXP's program 
appears in the October, 1977, issue of 73 Magazine The 
above changes at low switching back and forth from 
receive to transmit without manually resetting the com- 
puter each time [see the article for details). If you want this 
program for transmit only and do not want to incorporate 
WASDXP's receive program into it^ only one line needs to 
be changed: 

0321 FO El EA BEQ BEGIN 

(plus an NOP] 



^(L M33 FUIBOL-IMlinW* 
POSICIdC IE Lffi EQUIP05, AL TWINO BE W VlffSIUMMft 

^^'HsfriHWI FOEST 38 fWOG; KRKW Y a^OTOCL 34; ffiSEHfL 
33; WOCSTW CITY 2; CftBflW 30; ICT aamffl, IJEEB IWB 

y lOMW 2B; OWf Z); ffiW VMfl 24; IP3fnH Y NWCSe 
IMTED 23; 0£LSEfl Y fSKlISBWa 2; HDLfflWPTON Y 

mmm m mstol i9; aim ffw fnffRsn' i£st y* i7; 

IfUOflSTlf M Y LECESIER CITY 12. 



The computer won't mind foreign languages as this ap- 
parent sports broadcast proves. With the computer's abili- 
ty to copy any speed, you'll be able to print much — but 
not all — of what you hear. 



work so well we could see 
no sense in reinventing the 
wheel. We've copied 
everything from 60 to 100 
wpm with no difficulty. If 
you're so inclined, the WX 
transmissions at 14.395 
(LSB, 850 shift, 100 wpm) 
are a good deal of fun. 
Although the data is heavi- 
ly coded, you'll see some 
plain English. This frequen- 
cy is also one available 
quite near the top of a ham 
band and is accessible for 
those without a general- 
coverage receiver. You 
might also check out 7.405 
(USB, 850 shift, usually 66 
wpm) if you'd like to catch 
Spanish language tele- 



grams. Ifs interesting and 
unusual to see the KIM de- 
coding Spanish. 

If you're in a QSO and 
want to get from receive 
back into transmit, type a 
space. At high speeds, the 
computer may not pick it 
up the first time. Try again. 
This is the sole purpose of 
the modification to 
WASDXP's program ap- 
pearing in Table 4, We 
didn't want to have to reset 
every time we wanted, .to 
send or receive With this 
change, the computer is 
able to do all the work for 
you. 

These programs have 
been used on the air in 



0249 


4C 


DO 


02 


JMP 


024C 


EA 


EA 




NOP 


Add: 








• 


Q2DQ 


2C 


40 


17 


BIT SAD 


02D3 


30 


03 




BMI 


0205 


4C 


00 


03 


JMPTraosmft 


02D8 


A9 


80 




LDArmm 


02DA 


2C 


00 


17 


BIT PAD 


02DD 


4C 


4E 


02 


JMP Back to Rev. i 



M 



81 






0^ lOT at ™a^««^ cat CESM mwwa^^ 

A « fOfiO r 24 rUJDCS. 

U» WSSnOflCICN PRflaiOHW a LOS MQMES MJOfllfS SET WQ 
WZQUEn5)«lK)KELI06LE COGB^ IBB SOLilES P(K 
THW-O (WEELfl, DO 
ESPERfln EH(MR 



COROCL 3ff!*SQ0. 
liB tCTMDffi niRQN PIEST05 ft LJS (W^ 



News agencies, especiaily tfansmitting in Spanish, abound 
on the low bands. Copy is not perfect but then we use a 
PLL-based TU and no filtering. A better TU should pro- 
duce perfect copy! 

numerous QSOs and have station. Aside from the ad- 
been found to create a vantage of saving the out- 
quiet and efficient RTTY put from a mechanical 



printer, we're inclined to 
think this is the RTTY of the 
future — no noise, no oil. 
There's an obvious plus to 
being able to send and 
receive at any speed with* 
out changing gears. Chang- 
ing speeds is as easy as ty|> 
ing in a couple of sets of 
numbers* 

Comments are wel- 
comed and inquiries will 
be answered if you'll in- 
clude an SASE. Our thanks 
also to K6NLM who spent 
countless hours on the air 
helping with operational 
tests and to WB8ZVL 
whose suggestions led to 
many of the ideas incorpo- 
rated into the program, ■ 

References 

1. ^Try Your KlM-1 On RTTY," 



WA5DXP, 73 Magazine, Oct,, 
1977, 

2. '^RTTY With The KIM. ' 
K4GCM, 73 Magazine, Sept., 
1977, 

3, "KlM-1 Can Do ft;" W4CQI. 73 
Magazine, Feb.* 1978, 

KIM-1 SQUTce^/lnformatton 

1, KIM Customer Service* Com- 
modore tntefnational, 950 Rit- 
tenhouse Road, Morrlstown PA 
19401. 

2, Johnson Computer, P.O, Box 
523, Medina OH 44256. 

3, Computer Warehouse Store, 
584 Commonweatlh Ave,, 
Boston MA 02215. 

Books and Newsletters 

1, "The First Book of KIM," 
ORB, P.O, Box 311, Argonne IL 
60439, $9,00 postpaid, 176 pgs, 

2.6502 User Notes, PO 
Box 33093, N. Royalton OH 
44133. 



0100 

030Z 
0501* 

0307 
0309 

030C 

030P 

0311 
0313 
0315 



031A 

031c 

031I> 

o3ir 

0321 

03££ 
0329 
032s 
03^0 
0330 
033i 
0333 
0335 
0338 
033* 
033& 
03**0 
0342 

03^7 

0|"l» 

03i*S 
0350 
0351 
0353 
0355 
0356 
03 5 A 
03 5C 

035B 
03<S0 

03^2 
0361^ 

0366 
0368 
036a 
036c 
O36E 
0370 
0372 

0376 

037fl 

0379 
03?a 
037tJ 
03S0 

0381 
0383 
0385 

03B7 

0389 
038fi 

oieo 



A9 01 

65 04 

20 5 A IE 

65 00 

20 58 03 

%c 0^ 03 

A2 00 

B5 10 

&5 00 

8^ 01 

20 58 03 

A6 01 

EO OC 

EN3 FO 

hC 00 02 

A2 00 

20 5A IZ 

C9 1^ 

PO 13 

9D 00 Oi 

£8 

£0 BP 

SO 03 

hQ z^ 03 

A9 87 

20 AC IE 

4C 26 03 

86 03 

A2 00 

IID 00 Dl 

^ 02 

S5 00 

20 5« 01 

a6 02 

E8 

^ 03 

FO AF 

i^Q Mf 03 

A3 00 

C9 20 

FO 1*1 

C9 OA 

PO 1*^ 

C9 OD 

FO 10 

C9 09 

FO A5 

C9 02 

PO b6 

Zh QO 

SO 29 

A^ 04 

PO 06 

A5 00 

AA 

B5 00 

85 00 

20 91 01 

60 

A9 01 

B5 04 

AS 00 

85 05 

A9 72 

35 00 

?0 ES 01 



INIT 



Id 
lEH-l 



BUFFS 
GETB 



8UFUL 
XlflB 

XMTa+i 



STATUS 



LTRS 
IXIT 



LDAIeuo 


Irtltlftllze In 


3TATP 


"Ittm* mod*. 


JSR CETCHAB 


Get ASCII d*t» 


STAZp 


Store d»ta 


JSR STATUS 




JRP BECIM 




LDXlK 


a**!- X 


tHAxp.X 


St»r^ r««d «t 0010 


SfAzp 


Store charscter 


STSLrp 


S»n X 


JSH STATUS 




LDX.EP 


C«t X 


ISt 




CE'XlB 


Cone vitb ID7 


BN£ BH-l 




JMF BMCEIVE 




UXLXmm 


Clcur X 


j^ g%;tcua£ 


Input to buffer 


CMPlBID 


Control "r"1 


B£Q XWTB 




STA*b8,X 


Stort ch»r*ct#ir 


INX 




CPXimiD 


Buffer fulIT 


BCS BUF'trlri 




J«P GEfB 




LDAlnn 


ASCII -Bell" 


JSH OUTCHAa 


»rtd ring \X\ 


JItP GETS 




STXtp 


Stor* ^rfar liuLt 


l^£LXwm 


CleiO' X 


LDA«ba ,X 


H«*d buff«r 


STX2P 


Satv X 


STAXp 


St {are ciia.rmct«r 


JSfi STATUS 




USXxp 


Gsc X 


IKX 




Cjaip 


Buffer limit mchi 


mq BEGllf 




JiV XKT&-*^1 




LDAsp 


Ch«ck chAr«et9r 


CNPl«a 


•Spacft'T 


BEQ LTRS 




CMPlma 


■Line Feed*? 


EEQ EXH 




CflPlinin 


*'C*mags Return*? 


BEQ EXIT 




CHPlmia 


Control "I'l 


RRQ ID 




CHPlam 


Control "B"? 


BEQ EUfFR 




BlTzp 


Teat character 


BVC PIOS 


Bit 6 - wroT 


uyk%^ 


Teat 5t*ta8 Fl*fi 


BE4 SbTL 


if "flgs^, reeet* 


XJ^AXp 


Oat chATACter 


TAX 


fut in X regiflter 


LDAxp.H 


Lo^k-up Beydot 


STAxp 


Stor* coEiTer«ioa 


JSB xjrr 


and seiid It* 



&T3 

STA^p 
LDAzp 



STASp 

JSB xm 



Set fiig to "Itr** 

Betrl«ve character 
VftBp. Char* Stor* 
Baudot *ltra* coaiaand 
Store It 
aM seM it. 



0390 


A5 


05 






LDAzp 


Betrievfl charActer 


0392 


AA 








TAX 


Put In X reg^latar 


0393 


B3 


00 






LDAzp^X 


Look-up Baudot 


0395 


85 


00 






STAzp 


Store It 


0397 


20 


BE 


03 




JSB XMT 


aTtd aer^d It. 


039A 


60 








RT3 




039B 


A5 


on 




PIOS 


LDAsp 


Teat Stalua Plo^ 


0390 


FO 


14 






BEQ XJfOBJt*2 




039F 


A9 


00 






LDAlM 


If "Itr*'. r«aet* 


03 Al 


85 


0^ 






STAEp 




OlAl 


AS 


00 






UlAsp 


SetrlaT« character 


03A5 


B5 


05 






STAxp 


Teap. Char. Store 


03A7 


A9 


6E 






Lcuim 


Baudot "flga" coaAond 


03A9 


85 


00 






STAip 


Store it 


OflAB 


20 


BE 


03 




JSB xiir 




03A£ 


A5 


05 






LDAsp 


Batrle'^e ch*r*cter 


03BO 


AA 






XMOBH-l 


TAX 


Put In Jt regiatar 


03B1 


B5 


00 






LDAzpfX 


Look "Up Bttudot 


03B3 


85 


00 






STAJtp 


3tor« aonvaralon 


03B5 


20 


BE 


03 




JSB XMT 




0368 


60 








BTS 




03B9 


A5 


00 




X»0B»-a 


LDAxp 


BatriaTe oharaottr 


03BS 


4C 


BO 


03 




JMP XNORH-1 




03fl£ 


AO 


00 




XMT 


LDXimni 


Clear t 


03C0 


A9 


BO 






LUAUm 


Dafine PB7" output 


01C2 


8D 


03 


17 




STAAhn PBDD 




03C5 


AS 


00 




I£TR 


UlA^p 


Get stor«4 Baudot 


03c? 


29 


80 






ANDiUi 


Clear blta ^-'^ 


03C9 


8D 


02 


17 




STAaba PBD 




03CC 


A9 


15 




SETT 


LDAlBH 


Tia«s 22ees« 


03CE 


81? 


07 


17 




STAabe 




03DI 


2C 


07 


1? 


TCHK-1 


snkbB 


Time -out t 


01D4 


10 


Pfi 






BPL TCHE-1 


irol halt. 


0306 


C8 








UIT 


Set itp next bit 


03D7 


CO 


06 






CPlflBB 


Start /Data done? 


03W 


PO 


05 




nOMR 


gSQ STf FT 




03Da 


06 


00 






ASLep 


Get n«it bit 


C3D0 


*c 


C5 


01 




JHP LTB 




03SO 


06 


00 




srpET 


ASUp 


{iet atop bit 


OlEZ 


A5 


00 






LDAsp 




03E4 


BD 


02 


17 




STAaba PBD 


Stop bit # PB7 


03E7 


A9 


IE 






LUAlam 


TiAfl^ 3Laa. 


03E9 


8P 


07 


17 




3TAaba 


< 


03EC 


2C 


07 


17 


TCHK-Z 


BITmba 


Time-outT 


03EF 


10 


FB 






BPL TCHK-2 


r^oT Unit. 


03Pi 


60 








RTS 





EWD 



Be s erred Looatlonai 



0000 
0001 
0002 
0001 
OOOi 

rrc5 
0010-ootP- 



) 



Character Stora CPtIba 
San X f I 
Save X #2 

Buffer Limit Store 
Ltrs/Flgs Status Pl&f 
Character Store (Tewporarj) 

IP Storage Ar^a (Kaxlauv Ler^th* 1& charmctera) 
(S«c Table 3 for inetruotionc) 



mm* end fle« labia l for other reserved zero pas^ loc^ationv. 



M 



Fig. 1. Program listing. 



82 




Kilobaud Microcomputing Is the forerunner of small business and home computing with wide- 
spread educational application. To stay in touch with what's happening day to day in the world 
of computing, make a GOOD CONNECTION with Kilobaud Microcomputing. If you're just get- 
ting into computers or you're just getting interested, Kilobaud Microcomputing is for you. It's 
written to be understandable for beginners and interesting to experts. Subscribe to Kilobaud 
Mlcrocomputtng today and take advantage of this t/2 price offer. We*ll send you 1 2 issues for 
$15..* that's half the cost of the current newsstand price, and we'll guarantee your satisfac- 
tion. If you're not completely satisfied with Kilobaud Microcomputing, we'll refund your 
money on all remaining issues Send in the attached coupon today to establish a GOOD CON* 
NECTION with the world of Microcomputing. No need to send money now — we'll bill you later if 
you prefer. 



A GOOD CONNECTION AT HALf FSiCEl* 

n Please rush my subscription to Kilobaud MicfoccM imt l wg 

and establish a Good Connection between myself and the 
wortd of MkrocompuiingwU ha one year subscription for $ I 5. 

n Renewal C! New Subscription 

G Payment enclosed D 8iti me later 

n Master Charge D Visa 

Cardff^ Exp. date 



Signature. 
Name 



Address 
City 



Stase. 



Zip. 



•Offer good In U.S. &. Canada only. 



I95I 



ItttCClQLC) 



A GOOD CONNECTION AT HALF PRICEI* 

D PTease rush my subscription to Kilobaud Microcompytfng 
and establish a Good Connection between myself and the 
worldofMitrocomputing with a one year subscription for$ I 5. 

D Renewal D New Subscription 

n Payment enclosed D BilJ me later 

O Master Charge D Visa 

Card*^ Exp. date 

Signature , 

Name 



Address 
City 



.State. 



.Zip. 



•Offer good in U.S. &. Canada only. 



I95I 



MICROCOMPUTING 

P.O. hi m m fmm^ nt nm 



93 



Instant Software 

Has It All . . . 

Ask for Instant Software at your local computer store, use 
the handy order blank provided at right, or order your soft- 
ware by phone— call Toll Free 1-800-258-5473. 

Action Games 



SPACE TREK II Protect the quadranl IrofTi the Invading 
Klingon warstikps. The EnterpHge Is equipped with 
phasers, pholon torpedoes, impulse power, and w^rp 
drive. It's you a I on© and your TRS-90 levQ\ I 4K, Level 11 
ieK agaihst the^nejny. Order Nq. QO02R $7.95. 

SPACE TREK III Let yoursetf 90 10 iMfj tar ends di the 
SDiar system— and t>eyond. This package includes: 

• Si •liar Wars — Shoot down the Tte fightefs and 
«Sesiroy the Oeaih Star, 

• Piinitary Linder^ — Land your spacecraft and plant 
youi hag across trie solar system. 

IhmtB one playef games reqtiife a TRS-80' Level I iK 

SPACE Tf^ElC IV Tr3<le or wage war on a ptarieiary scale. 
Ihi^ pacMge includes: 

• Siallar Wan— Engage ajHttiestray Tie lighters myour 
attack on the Death Star For one player 

« Populalton Sirrvulation— A two player game where you 
control ine economy ot two ncighbofing pi artels. 
You decide, gyns or butter, with your IRS SO Ltvei II 16K 
Ordar No. 0034R %735. 

TREK-XCommand the Enterprise as you Scouf the quao- 
rani for enen>y warships- This package not only has 
superb graphics, but includes prDQrammtng for ophonal 
&Ound effects. A one player game lor Ihe PET 8K Order 
_No 0G32P S7.95; .^^^„__ 

CAR RACE/RAT TRAP^AIHTIAlRCfiAFT Enjoy these chal- 
lenging, tun rlhed programsi 

« Car Race— You and a friend can race on a choice of 
two iracks. 

• Rat Trap— Trap the rat in his maze with your two cats. 
For ode player 

• Anllalrcrall- Aim and shoot down Ihe enemy air- 
plane Requires Level UK TRS'30 Order No. DOUR $7 95, 

PENNY ARCADE Enjoy this fun tJj]ed package thals as 
much tun as a real (jenny arcade— at a I ruction of ttie 
cost^ 

• Poeiry— Compose free ^erse poetry on your com- 
purer 

• Trap— Control two movmg lines at ont^e and test your 
coofdiriatioti. 

• Poker — Play five card draw poker and let your PET 
deal and keep score. 

• So1iiair«— Don t ex)ther lo deaf, fet your RET harKlle 
the cards in thts old favorite" caid gam© 

• EafEm tips --Find out how many stars ygur Qg£it>ler 
can &«i| up t>e(ore the game is over. 

ThMt six programs require the PET with BK, Order Ho, 
(^44P 17 tS. 

RAM ROM PATROUTIE RGHTERmLINQON CAPTURE 
Buck Rogers never had (t so good. Er^gage m extrater- 
restrial warfare with: 

• Ramrom Patrol— Destroy the Ramrom ships tjelore 
they capture you 

• TIb Flghler— Destroy the enemy Tie fighters and 
become a hero of the rebeflioh 

• KUngon Capture — You must capture the Klingon ship 
Intact It's you and your TRS-SO Level M tSK battling 
acrosa the gaiaKy. Order No. 00280 %?M. ^^^ 

QUBlC"4fQ0'WOKU Play two ancfent games on your 
modern PET, The I wo programs included are: 

• Oublc-4— Play a muni-cJtmflnBloned gama of tlc-tac- 
toe. 

• Qo^Mo^u— Una up five of your men while blocking the 
PET S moves. 

These ohe player games require BK of memory Order f^o. 
OUMP 17.55. 



INSTANT SOFTWARE 



LEVEL I 
LEVEt it 



Space 
Trek II 




INSTOKT SOFTWUS 



TRS-8Q 



Business 
Package I 



riFf C 




J 



TANGLE/5UPERTRAP These two programs require last 
reflexes, and a ^ood eye lor angles: 

• Tangle — Make your opponent crash his line into an 
obstacle. 

• Suparlrap— This program is an advanced version of 
Tangle vi-ith many us^r control options. 

Enjoy these exciting and graphically beaut?fyl programs. 
For one or two players with an BK PET. Order No. 0029P 

17.95. ,„__ 

CAVE EXPLORINQ/VACHTfCONCENTTlATION These 
three programs are rH3t only fun. but stimulating as well: 

• Cave Exfilorlng — Search lor fabulous ti^asures as 
yoii exptore the niag:ic cave, For one player. 

• Yacht— One player can enjoy th^s game based 0*1 
Vahtzee 

• CDn««niration— TvK> players can pit their memones 
in this program based on ttie po|>ular television show. 
You'll need a TR&dO wHh Level I and 16K. Ordei No. 

OOIOR $7.fS. 

DESTROY ALL SUBSfQUtlSOATSfBOMBER This 
package of three programs is tun for the whole family tn- 
clode<J are: 

• Destroy Ail Subs—Munt dowrt enemy subs while 
avoitling mines and torpedoes A one player game, 

• Ounboals— One or two players can try to tHow each 
others shhps Out of the water 

• bomber — Garelully release your bomb to destroy the 
nioving submarine A one ptayer game. 

To enjoy these programs you'JI need a TRS-60 Level MK. 
Order No, 002t R 17 JS. ^^_^^_ 

KNIGHTS OUESTmOeOT CHASE/HORSE RACE This 
varied package ot one player games will give you hours 
of fun, 

• Knlghrs Quest — Battle demons to gain treasure and 
becoma a fuli fledged KnJght. 

m Robot Chase— Destroy the deadly robots without 
electrocuting yourself, 

• Hofse Race— Place your bet and cheer your hiorse to 
the finish line. 

These programs require a TRS*BO Level 1 16K Order No. 
0003R $7.95, 



DEMO I This package Fs Just the thkng to show your 
frJendi? what your TRS-90 can do. Included are: 
m Computer Composer — Gompose and play music us- 
tng only a standard AM radio. 

• Baftatwll— Play baseball with your computer while it 
does the scorekeeping. 

• Honm Raca— Place your bet and cheer your pony to 
tt\B Winner's ciTcle 

• ESP— Test your pet wens ot extrasensory perception, 
e Hi-Lo/Tic-laC'toe— Guess the secret number or giet 
three in a row 

• Petals Around ttie Rc^e— Can you figure out the 
eectet behinil (he itvt dice? 

• Slot M«chine— Turn your computef inio a gne^armed 
bandit The^e programs raquire a TnS-60 Level J 4K. 

OnHf No. 0g2DR ST.95. 

BASIC AND INTERWEtMATE LUNAR LANDER Brmg your 
lander m under manual controil The Basic version is tor 
beginners: 1t% Intermediate verston hi more difficult. 
With a choice of lamj^ng areas and rugged terrarn For 
one player with a TRS^ Levet I 4K. LeveJ 11 t6K, Onl«r 
No. 0001 R 17.91 

Business 

BUSINESS PACKAGE I Keep the books for a small 
business with your TRS-fiO Level I 4K. The six programs 
Included are: 

• Ganiril Information— The instructions for US tng the 
package. 

• Fixed Assel Control— This will give you a list of your 
iinGt assets and term depreciation. 

• Pilill Input— This program lets you create and record 
your general ledger on tape for fast access. 

• Month and Year to Data Merge— This program will 
take your monthly ledger data and give you a year to date 
ledger, 

• ProiH and Lo»s— With this program you can Quicltly 
get triai balance a^nd profit and Iosb statements. 

• Year End Balance— This program will combme all 
your data from the profit and loss statements into a year 
end balance sheet. 

WMh this package, you can make your TRS 60 a worf^ing 
partner Order No. 0C13R S29.M. 

BUSINESS PACKAGE 111 This package can change your 
TRS-dO into a full working partner tor any businessman: 

• Inventory — Maintain a computer-based inventory for 
a constant inventory system. 

• Cofnmlsfons and Ptfcentaga*- Let your computer 
figure out markup and disco^jnt calcuSalrons. sates tax 
and more. This is a. perfect timesavmg package tor any 
small business. 

For the TRS-SO Level j 4K Order No. 0081 R 17,95, 



DATA TAPES 

Top quality high density audio cas- 
settes for data storage. Each cassette 
runs 30 minutes, and is fitted with conve- 
niently marked labe)s that make controll- 
ing your ''data bank" a snap. Sold in lots of 
four. Order No. 0067. $7.95, 



Educational Games and Simulations 



BOWLING Lei your TRS-80 set up the pins and Keep 
score. One player can pFch up spares and get strikes. For 
the TRS-80 Level I 4K, Level II 16K, Ordar No. 0033FI $7.95. 

CHECKERS/BACARRAT Play two old favorites with your 
PET. 

• ChecltQrs — Let your PET be your ever ready opponent 
In this computer-based checkers program. 

• Bflcarrat— You tiave both Casino and eiachj^ck-style 
games in this fealistic program. 

Your PET with 8K wilt offer chal lenging play anytime you 
want. Order NOh 0Q22P $7JS. 

CASINO II This craps program is so good^ it's the next 
best thfng to being in Las Vegas or Atlantic City, ft will 
noi only play the game wtth you. but also will teach you 
how to play the odds and make the best bets. A one 
player game, it requires a PET flK. Ord&r No. 001 5P $735. 

AIR FLIGHT SIMULATION Turn your TRS SO Into an air- 
plane. You can practfce takeoff^ and landings with the 
benefit of futi instrumentaiton. This one-player simula- 
tion requires a TR&-80 Level \ 4K, Level II 16K. Order No* 
0OI7R S7.95. ^_ 

GOLF/CROSSOilT Have fun with these excitJng one- 
player games, included are: 

• Qotf— You won't need a mashle or putter— or a cad- 
die, for that matter, to enjoy aohallenglng 18 holes* 

• Cross out— Remove ail but the center peg in this puz- 
zle and your neighbors will call you a genius. 

You'll need a TRSSO Level I 4K, Level II 16K. Ordef No. 
jWQOfl sr.95. ^ 

GOLF Without leaving the comfort of your chair, you can 
enjoy a computerized 18 holes of golf with a complete 
choice of clubs and shooting angles. You need never 
cancel thfS game Ijecause ot rain. One or two players can 



enjoy this game on the Apple with Applesoft II and 2QK. 
Order No. OOISA S7.95, 

DOW JONES Up to six players can enjoy this exciting 
stock market game, You can buy and sell stock m 
response to changing market conditions. Get a taste of 
what playing the market Is all about. Requires a PET with 

BK. Order Nq. 0026P ^7,95. 

HEX PAWN/SHUTTLE CRAFT DOCKING/SPACE CHASB 
BATTLESHIP This four-game package is sure to provide 
hours of fun for the whole family. 

• Hex Pewfi— Turn your TRS-80 1 nto a model of artificiaJ 
intelligence by playing a simple game. 

• Shullle Crafr Docking— Land your shuttle craft on the 
©tars hip —even through varying gravity fields I 

• Space Chase — Seek out and destroy the enemy defta 
that's hidden in the star field. 

• Battleship— You must find and destroy the enemy 
fleet. 

This package requires a TRS-SO Level \ ISK. Order No, 
004lR$7-g5> 

SANTA PAR AVI A AND FIUMACCIO Become the ruler of 
a medieval city-state as you struggle to create a 
kingdom. Up to six players can compete to see who will 
become the King or Queen first. Thfs program requires a 
^RSeO Level I & II Ordef No. 0043R $735. 

CARDS This one-player package will let you play cards 
with your TRS-80— talk about a poker face I 

• Draw and Stud Poker — These two programs will keep 
your game sharp, 

• No-Trump Bridge— Play this popular game with your 
computer and develop your strategy. 

The package name says it ail. Requires a TRS-flO Level 
II t6K. Order No. 0063H 57.95. 



Home and Personal 



MIMIC Test your memory and reflexes with the five dif- 
ferent versions of this game. You must match the se- 
quence and location of signals displayed by your PET. 

This one-player progrann includes optional sound effects 
jtfith the PET 8K Order No. (HJ39P $7 .95. 

BOWLING/TRILOGY Enjoy two of Americas favorite 

games transformed into programs for your Apple: 

• Bowtlng- Up to four players can bowl while the Apple 
sets up the pins and keeps score. Requires Applesoft II. 

• Trilogy— This program can be anything from a simple 
game of t3c-tac-loe to an ejcercise in deductive logic. For 
one player. 

This fun filled package requires an Apple with 20K. Order 
No. Q04OA $7.95. 

B ACKGAMMON/KENO Why sit alone when you can play 
these fascinating games with your TRS-BO? 

• Backgammon- Play against the computer. Your 
TRSeo will give you a steady challenging game that's 
sure to sharpen your skills. 

• Keno — Enjoy this popular Las Vegas gambling game. 
Guess the right numbers and win big. 

You'll need a TRS-8Q Level I & II. Order No. 0004R $7.g5. 

OIL TYCOON Avoid oil spills, blowouts and dry wells as 
you battle to become the world's richest oil tycoon, Two 
players become the owners of competing oil companies 
as they search for oil and control their companies. Re- 
quires a TRS SO 4K Level I & II. Order No. WaSR t7M. 

CASINO I These two programs are so good, you can use 
them to check out and debug your own gambling sys- 
tem! 

• Roulette— Pick your number and place your bet with 
the computer version of this casino game. For one 
player. 

• Blackjack- Try out this version of the popular card 
game before you go out and risk your money on your own 
"surefire" system. For one player. 

This package requires a PET with SK. Order No. 001 4P 
$7.95. 



PERSONAL FINANCE I Let your TRS SO handle all the 
ledious details the nestl lime you figure your finances: 
m Personal Finance I— With this program you can con- 
trol your Incoming and outgoing expenses. 

• Ctieckboak- Your TRS-eo can balance your 
Checkbook and keep a detaiited list of expenses for tajt 
time. 

This handy financial control for the home requires only 

a TRS 30 Level I 4K- Order No. 0Q27R t7.95. 

MORTGAGE WITH PREPAYMENT OPTION/ 
FINANCIER These two programs will more than pay for 
themselves if you mortgage a home or make in- 
vestments: 

• Mortgage with Prepayment Option- Calculate mort- 
gage payment schedules and save money with pre- 
payments. 

• Financier— Calculate which investment will pay you 
(he most, figure annual depreciation, and compute the 
c OS I o f borrow mq, e a stiy and q uicki^f. 

All you need to become a financial wizard with an SK 
PET. Order No, OOOSP $7.95. 



• Status of Homes — This program will allow you to 
keep track of all ihe expenses involved in building one 
house or an entire subdivision. 

• Auto Ejipenses- Find out exacf/y what it costs you to 
drive your car or truck, 

These programs require a TRS-80 Level \ 4K. Order No. 

DPI gR $7.95. 

PERSONAL WEIGHT CONTROUBIORHYTHMS Let your 
PET help take care of your personal health and safety: 

• Personal Weight Con tro*— Your PET will not only 
calculate you your ideal weight, but also otter a detailed 
diet to help control your caloric Intake. 

• Bioitiyfhms— Find out where your critical days are for 
physical, emotional, and inteliectual cycles. 

You'll need only a PET with 8K memory. Oriier No. 0005P 
$7.96. 



BASEBALL MANAGER This pair of prograrns will let you 
keep statistics on each of your players. Obtain batting, 
on-base, and fielding averages at the touch of a finger. 
Data can be easily stored on cassette tape for later com- 
parison. All you need is a PET with 8K. Order No* 0062P 
Jt4.95. 

BOWLING LEAGUE STATISTICS SYSTEM Thi& package 
is the answer to the prayers of harried bowling league 
scorekeepers. The Bowling League Statistics System 
will keep a computerized list of league data, team data, 
and data for each bowler, it is extremely flexible and has 
a total of 16 different options to let you modify the pro- 
gram to suit your league's rules. The program is very 
easy to use and has extensive 'built-in'" aids to help you 
along. Requires TRS-SO Level II 16K. Order No. 0056R 
$24.95. 



STATUS OF HOMES^AUTO EXPENSES Two long awaited 
programs that have got to save you money at work or in 
the home: 

Electronics 

HAM PACKAGE I This versatile package lets you solve 
many of the commonly encountered problems in elec- 
tronics design. With your Level I 4K or Levef II 16K TRS- 
SO, you have a choice of: 

• Basic Electronics with Voltage Divfder— Solve prob- 
lems involving Ohm's Law. voltage dividers, and RC time 
constants. 

• Pipole and Yagi Antennas- Design antennas easily, 
without tedious calculations. 

This is the perfect package for any ham or technician. 

Order No. Q007R $7,95. 

ELECTRONICS I This package will not only calculate the 
component values for you, but will draw a schematic 
diagram loo You'll need a TRS-SO Level I 4K, Level II 1GK 
to usei 

• Tun^d Circuits and Coll Wlndinfl— Design tuned cir- 
cults without resorting to cumbersome tables and calcu- 
lations. 

• 555 Timer Circuits— Quickly design astable or 
monostable timing circuits using this popular IC. 

• LliA 331 Preamp Oesigr*— Design IC preamps with this 
low noise integrated circuit. 

This package wl II reduce your designing lime and let you 
build those circuits fast. Order No. OOO&R $7.95. 



o 



I 



"s I 

E 

1" 
II 

o 
A I 

*^ 

3 

" I 



Order your 

Instant Software 

today* 

To order by phone, call 
tol! free 1-800258-5473 
(MasterCharge, VISA 
and AMEX order accept- 
ed) or ask for Instant 
Software at your local 
computer store. 



D Check D Money Order Q VISA DAMEX 
D MasterCharge Esipiration date 

Card No 



Nafne_ 



Address. 
City 



State 



Zip. 



Stgn,ed 



Send me the following 
Instant Software: 











1 Quantity 1 Order No, 


Program name 1 tJnit Cost 1 Total cost 1 














































Shipping 


51,00 




Instant i 


Softwan 


8 Inc. oepi 734SA2 ' 


Total ordef 





Peterborough NH 03458 



Keyboard Konvenience 

— simplify entry of BASIC programs 



Throw in an LED for good measure. 



RodHaUen WA7NEV 
Road Runner Ranch 
PO Box 73 
Tombstone AZ 85638 



I recently replaced my 
uppercase-only key- 
board with one that 
generates both upper- and 
lowercase letters because 
word processing is one of 
my personal computing 
goals. However, this 
necessitates constantly 
shifting when entering 
BASIC and assembly lan- 
guage programs. The two 
circuits here (Figs. 1 and 2) 
allow either uppercase 
only or both upper- and 
lowercase operation at the 
flip of a switch. Numbers, 



punctuation, etc., are still 
under the control of the 
shift key. Both circuits are 
different methods of im- 
plementing the same func- 
tion depending on what 
type of IC gates you have 
available. 

The LED indicates 
upper- and lowercase 
operation, but it can be 
eliminated since the posi- 
tion of the switch or the 
operation of the keyboard 
will indicate which mode 
has been chosen. 1 just like 
lots of lights, ■ 



OS FROM 


irC vb 1^ A B:n hw. 








^ 


ICI 


?^' 




I^t To DARD 9~" 

I 




* * 


S 


^ rVC Tri ilLITT Brfcrvr 




J 

SWITCH 

- - — ' ' t 

t 
i 

f\ * 


™ 1/5 1 (J- <N ( tHrAtft 








JJfDT^ 








■ 

2 


« 


♦5V0C 






4 








■ 


nc^A 






■P 

be fMOfti 


rr^-^H 


1 

h 




^ 


-——. "DG TC INTERFftCE 



F/g. 7. /C7a = SN7408N AND gate. IC2a = SN7404N in- 
verter. Pin 14 is + 5Vdc on both tCs and pin 7 is ground. 



OS FRO^ KEIfeOARQ-.*- 




' i"^fl^^^ )°^- 



thfTERFACE 



□PDt SWiTCri 




llC^J 






PROU KETSOARO*- 




as TO 

INTERFACE 



Fig. 2. IC3a, b, and c = SN7400N. Pin 14is + 5Vdc and 
pin 7 is ground. 




There's a new, eighth OSCAR satellite in orbit, and the AMSAT team helped put rt there! 

Your help is needed for Future satellites. Join AMSAT and support the new, ad- 
vanced Phase IK series of OSCARs, engineered to provide communications over 
transcontinental distances for hours at a time- 
Send $10 membership dues to AMSAT, P.O, Box 27, Washington, D.C, 
Z0044. Life membership is available For a tax-deductible donation of $ 1 00 
or more, payable in quarterly installments If you wish. 

Phase 111 satellite solar cells may be sponsored for $10 each, and 
we'll send you a certificate specifying the cells you are sponsoring. 

For a tax-deductible contribution of $ 1 .000 or more, we'll 
even inscribe your name on a plaque to be placed in orbit 
aboard the Phase III spacecraft for posterity, and we'll send y^ ^ 



you a replica honoring your contribution. 

Dues and contributions may be charged to VISA or 
Master Charge. Phone us at (202) 488-8649. 




M 



S6 



THE COMMO 



III 



RE 



i^e^r 






(P)er$onaI (E)lectronic (T)ransactor 

The PET 2001 microcomputer is a complete turii- 
iiey computer witli a number of features especially 

applicable to ham radio* 

Heavy duty steel cabinet for RF shielding and 
njgged use. 
-6502 CPU 8K user RAM (expandable), 14K 

operating system with 10 digit BASIC, file control 
system, cassette operating system. This is one of 
the fastest interpreter BASICS available. 
12 Key Keyboard with all ASCII characters availa- 
ble without shift. Lower case and graphics available 
with shift. 

-9"CRT with clean, high resolution display. 
'Program editing uses movable cursor to INSERT & 
DELETE characters ANYWHERE on the screen! 
No need to retype lines. 
■Built in real-time clock and interval timer. 
RTTY and MORSE programs available which trans- 
forms the PET into a complete computerized 
RTTY /CW terminal. 

Memory expansion bus allows 65K RAM, ROM, 
and I/O expansion. 

Two I/O methods standard: 8Bit paralle! port 
w/handshake, and IEEE-488 bus for multiple 
peripherals. IEEE supports high speed 8 bit transfer 
to any of 15 different devices on line simultaneously 
■PET floppy and PET printer with advanced 
features available 



I. " 



Docamcntation now iiiclad«« "PET 

Commuaication with the Outside 

World" which outlines use of the 

otenory empansion bus* IEEE bus* 

puallel port, file control system, etc. 

PET Computer with Basic BASIC programming 

course (free) •795 
add on full sized keyboard for fast typing •125 
WRITE FOR A LIST OF THE LATEST IN 
ACCESSORIES FOR THE PET 



KIM-1 



A COMPUTER FOR HAM RADIO 

APPLICATIONS 



Fc«tture« include: 



i.Ai^a 



SPECIAL PACKAGE DEALflf 

KIH-I. poivcr «ippl^\ 2 eiceU^nt haakt: ^"Ttw Flnt B<h k of KIM'* 

wid Progrftinming a MiCTocomputpr. 6502". Thlc ta probabty the besr 

tutoriat package on micrococnpuiers avdiiatit*. inictvd«i liftHn^s of over 

50 udlity and ganw piogranis! Specuil P«kAg#-. KIM. with 3 maniials 

pmwff ntpplv. pJustwih books ilited abo^*. EVERYTHING NEEDED TO 

LEARN AND USE AN ADVANCED MICROCOMPUTER Usi Pric^ 

*239,(IO* Now save over 10%- *209,00f 



Compkidy »I1 contBJined urtiti cassette tape; }S\%m 
fsd^. 1 K RAM. 2K ROM monitor. 400 p^ge^ 
dooimenlAMoni 

Klcyijtwd i9)i4itit (M)anitor IKM) aEbw& en^ 
debug, and eiiecution o< p^o^^sr^ usoig dv 23 key 
Iwypod araj 6 dk#i LED ffepbsi, OR u» a sUfMlifd 
ASCII temirial with KM& 20 ma. offrent )aop x^& 
iKe Upeo9600baiid 
Podnerful 6502 i mnTjp i P cgsscy. mw seccmd 
soureed by 4 mvHitKturer^s (plus ConmodoFe/ 
Mas) 13«i(b«iiiil9n)Gd^w¥iaekitfiffidarchaec 
ticv rcsulr m atv irffjdiDt, last, and e^s^r to pro^arrt 

15 programmabl« tiO lines arid 2 poo^Bmmisble^ 
mtcTval iKTKs albu^ ibe KIM io€xeaii!e con^ikx 



Irvat ririK* progradns w(lh a mtniifnum of pro^'^ni 
miffg ovettuad. Raiio trietypc, and otha- ntiifiing 
icnsJilTve'^ afjpjeabons me ssuple. 
Estpand to 64K RAM, etc via the 22/44 pin «xpan 

SlOAbufi 

Ekpdi^ with a tuQ size dr ifstifloppy (i»k trom HDi. 
(iif«el Tht KIM bys is now a^iportfid by mmHrau^ 
nianiifKtuf«t$ fndbifing Radfutifl inti Syns^. 
RNB, hCC ttte Computen^ 

WefiproMfi des^^wer 40.000 tithrgefcl. KiM I 
*5th docum^taf »a> 179 .HO Pcwys supply, 5V 
and \7\l, S V al 4anifK. 16 Vat 1 anp MO.OO 
KJM4 rranheboafd*! 19.0O HIDE SK RAM 
*169.0O.3kir>465.00L HDE proto boaid 
H9.50. 



r~ 



mjitirr rN«r^ 



PLAINSMAN 
MICRO SYSTEMS 



(^P4Z 



M54' 



P.O. Box 1712 Auburn, Al. 36830 
Call toll free l-800-(633)-8724 



ALL ITEMS ASSEMBLED/TESTED 
WARRA7VTEED FOR AT LEAST 90 DAVS 



except Alabama 



(g&5t745'TTJ5. 



^ Reader Service— 100 p^g? f0S 



DXCC in One Sitting 



know your prefixes 



You don't even need a ticket. 



Gary H. Toncre WA4FYZ 
13764 SW 54th Lane 
Miami FL 33173 



Chris Wiener N2CR 
W Elm Sireel 
Tenafly NJ 07670 



Would you believe it's 
possible to work 
DXCC when the band isn't 



open? Well, you can work 
DXCC even if you don't 
have a ham license. If s not 



lit 

20 

£0 
fO 
80 

90 
100 
110 
IZO 

130 

150 

160 
170 
180 

190 
EGO 
210 
22C 

z:30 

250 
2£0 

£70 

290 
300 

310 
320 

33D 

>50 
360 
370 
380 
390 
400 
i||0 
420 
430 
440 
4J^5 
450 
460 
470 

475 
4«0 

490 
500 
510 
520 
530 

5£0 
S?0 
590 

590 
600 
&10 
62d 

# 

£50 
£60 
£70 
680 

70Q 
710 
720 

7*0 



PMIIT 
PMItT 
FUST 
IHPtlf 
FOU B 

PIOOT 
NEXT e 
FBI If T 'OK. 
PRIMT 
PRIWT 
PmilT 
PWIST 
PfllNT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PHINT 
PHI NT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
DIM S|(4) 
FOR I ■ 1 

READ 
PfEXT I 
DATA NOVICE 
PRINT 
PRINT 



■BXC(^ FItOGiULN * 
*REVISni lY CURI5 

81 

■I TO 30 



HI^KEIl nS^B EI - MA2AY1C.* 



I ^1 

'ABIMTT TO 



* . T«IS IS A GAMi DESIGIISP fO TBST ItWH* 
IDEHTIFY PREFIXES AND COWTRIES TMT^ 
'HAY BE IrfOHKED ALOlVG THE HAY TOWARD EiECEIVING THE* 
'AMERICAN MBIQ REU^y LEAGUES* 'S OX CEHTUBT CJ.U3* 
'ArtARO. iron «AY SELECT THE CLASS OF DXCC THAT: tOU' 
'WANT Td tut FOR ACCORDING TO tHE POLLOWIHG* 
'NITMBES NUHSSRS OF CDU^TMESi* 



TAB (a; 

TAB (a 
TAD (8 

xab(b! 



' MOnCE BXCC • , ♦ 1 S COUNTRIES' 
'OBMEHAL Dices '25 COUNTRIES* 



'AOVANCID CKCC\'35 
•IITRA CLASS 



DXCC, '50 



C0UNTRIS3' 
COUNTRIES' 



»THE mmBKI? CONFIflKED 
'D3CCG WILL m AWAKOED 



IS TKE mmm bight.* 

FOR 9(¥ CORRECT** 
TfOU itfILL GET TWO CHANCES TO ANaWEft COiERECTLT,* 



TO k- 



'WHICH 

'ENTER 



CLASS OF DXCC DO XW 
THE CLASS EXACTLY AS 



ADVANCED DXCC 
WANT TO THY 



EXTRA 
FOR? ♦ 



CLASS nxcQ 



INPVT 

If C$ 



tit 



LISTED ABOVE* J 



IF 

IP 



C* 



- s;i 



en 

C| 

dOTO H5 
M = 25 
GOTO 445 
« - 35 

SOTO 445 



SfU, 



THS^f 

tHBN 

THEM 
THEN 



■^80 
4D0 
i420 
^40 



ELSE 310 



FOfi I 

PRlJfT 
PRl(fT 
FOR I * 

mil: 



• 1 
IP 



tS AM 



ISLAND, THEK ME WORD *'ISLAKD" IS" ( 



IS A BAKD QPSnilCG. 
RATHER TR¥ FOR iCAS? 



TRY 

THE 



AOAIM.* 

CORRECT 



FOR 



?0 30 PRINT 
THE C0UN7HY 
t NOT IH HfB 

>ALL COtJItniY KAMBS AiiB fAJSK FROM THE A£RL**S Dja]C LIST.* 
i TO 4 PRIHT 
'MltOII&, LID. 
•SIJRE YOU liWJLON*'? 

D 

1 * I to » 
READ Q$, At 
T • 
PRIHT Qi 

INPUT c;* 

If A$ * Gt THESr 6^0 
IF r « BIBIl PAIlff iSiO) 
IF T • 1 TflEII PRiilf I4{lh 
t • f + 1 

IF T • 1 tlBW 
FlIKT A$ 

'tf « tl ^ 1 

Goto 6d0 

FRIItT *C&RBECT, mcg OVtS^," 

* = IT + 1 

1 w 1 * I 

PRUfT '¥W iOM HA¥l*i «t V 1 I J '«ORKeJ / CJOfCFiaED.* 

FOR IE * 1 TO 4 PRIST 

P » Dv9 • A 

IF X> » P T«8K 760 

Msrr 1 

PRlHf *LI1>. SSHSStSf VOD 11^ ilEI7 M!l^» CLAS^' 

pmKT *m TAKE UP COMPlrSSit FROGKAIKIIKI. EET2EI1 YET, &0 CB. 



AliSWER* • 



550 



7 SO GOTO 850 

7&0 PRIltT 'AFTER CAIEFUl* SCROTI WIZATIOW 0^ tmw APPLlCATIOli* THE rfftllER^ 
770 PEEMT •OF imS PRDCi]UUI SAKE GREAT (NOT ALL ^fUA? GREAT) PLEASURE' 
7d0 PRIMT 'IN Ai<AROIWG T3tl '» Ct, ',• 
7<J0 Y - X / lif • 100 

600 PfllWT 'YOU HAVH ACHIEVES} A 'i Yj *% WOHKED / COHFIJWED RECDf[D. FBI* 
810 PRINT *YOU RETIRE rflTH'i ill] '/'j Xf ' WORKED / CONFIRKED. ' 
820 PHITIT ^SIIICE YflU DID SO MELL, MKY HAVEM'^T YOG mm UmC* 
810 PHIJIT 'FOR REALT KO* YOC CAS"T 00 IT OM 2 ilBTEf^,' 
&4d print G0$UB 1020 
850 PRINT '73, '1 K$ 

860 PRINT 'UNI VAC 1100 IS CLEAR ASD QRT,* 
870 GOTO 9999 

830 DATA CUAN7ANAJK0 BAY, KG4, CANADA, m, lit COSTA RiCA , FRANCE, F 
890 DATA tCF^, PUERTO RICO, Wi UMTED STATES OF AMEJUCA, G, EI^QLANli, 

iEi^GIUM, ON 
900 DATA XE* MEXICO* DK, FEDERAL REPUBLIC D? QERJMAHY. YV » VENEZUELA , 

I TALY I 
910 DATA KZ5i CANAL ZONE , COLUMBIA, HK, PY, BRAZIL* SPAIN, £A 
920 MTIA OE* AU&TFCU, AU^ THALIA » VK, KB, SMITZERLANQ, JA, JAPAN 
930 DATA CE, CHILE, PINLAlCf, OH, KL7 , ALASKA. KETKERLaNDS ANtlLLIES* PJ 
W DATA HC, ECUADORi SULaAfllA, La* £S , SOUTH AFRICA, URUGUAY, CX 
950 DATA FC. CORSICA* hlAKE, KW6, GW, WALES, LIBERIA, EL 
960 DATA YO. RUMANIA* LIECHTENSTEIN, HSO, ZDS, ASCENSION, FORMOSA ^ BV2 
970 DATA JTi SiONOOLlA, BRITISH PHEONIX, VftJ , JY , JORDAN, NAVAS3A, KCh 
980 DATA ST, SUDAW, GREECE, SV, YPl, BELIKE. ANI3ORRA, G31 

INDIA, IVORY COAST » TU» KP6 , PALMYRA » mRKEY, TA 
PAKISTAN » CLIPPERTON, POfi 

iOlO GOTO 9*^99 

1020 PRINT 'AND NOW FOR YOUR CERTIFICATE: SUITABLE FOR FRAMING ,• 

1030 PACE 

1040 FOR I ■ I TO 66 

1050 PRINT '-'» 

lf)60 NEXT I 

1070 PRINT 

lOaO PRINT TABtllh 'CJAHY TONCRE WA^FYZ AND CHRIS rtEIMEft N2CR* 



990 DATA VU, 
1000 DATA AP, 



XX 



lO^^D PRINT TABin)} ' AnlARJ!] '1 K$t 

ILOO PRINT TAB(26){ C$ 

1110 PRINT 

1120 PRINT TAB(ia)t*I>Q^01^00D XX 

11 ?5 FEINT TASJlOJt'DDDDDDDDDO XX 

1130 PRlNf IARUO;i*0D tm XX 

1135 PRINT TABdOhrDP OD XX 

tl40 PRINT TAB(10)i*DD DO XX 

1145 PMNT TAadoJrDD DO XX 

1150 PRINT TABJiOJi'DD DD XX 

1155 PRINT TABClOh'IlQ DO IX 

1160 PRINT TABtloJt'DD DD XX 

1165 PRINT TABflOh'DD ED XX 

1170 PRINT TABhoirHD DO XX XX 

1175 PRINT TAfllloJt'OD OD XX XX 

IliQ PRIHT i^wj ? ft? t * wmiwi^ifimn u. 

11*5 PRIKT tiJ(l£lh*tlODD000ra3 IX 

1190 PRINT 

1200 FO^ 1 . I TO 66 

1210 PHIlIf *'*i 

1230 S21T 1 

1240 FOR I • 1 te 4 

1250 FRIW 

1260 HEXT I 
1Z70 IITtJni 

12B0 :c^ 99^ 

1290 FOR t - 1 to 30 
1300 PSllff 

1310 NEXT Y 
9*999 £J«D 



APf HDNORAHY GOKPUTER* 



XX 

XX 



cccccc 
cccccc 



XX 
XX 



cc 

GC 
QQ 
CQ 
CC 
CC 
GC 
CC 
GC 
CC 



CC 
CC 



CCCCCC ' 
CCCGCC 



CCCCCC 
CCCCCC 



CC 
CC 



CC 

CC 

CC* 

CC* 

CC' 

CC 

CC* 

CC' 

CC 

CC 



CC 
CC* 



CC* 
CC 



CCCCCC 
CCCCCC* 



FR?N 
DXCC 



11I49I37 



3 4PS 78 



IXECC PROGRAH - IffllTTEII BY GARY TOfCRE mhm 
HEV::iEO BY CKHS riEllIER ii2CR E2 - MA24YY. 
mn >iA2CII0 



M 



68 



Fig. 1. Program II 



Get a load of Instant Software 



and 




a whole new world off 



electronics design with your TRS-80 

Turn yourTRS-ao into the most versatile tool on your workbench. The Electronics I and Ham Package I series of programs will save you hours 
of tedious calculations. You can design circuits In a fraction of the time It toolt you previously. These programs will draw a complete schematic 
diagram of your desired circuit with all components labeled. You can even design a circuit around parts on hand! And you'H pet your designs off 
the drawing board and into production FAST. Save time, money, and energy as you get more fun out of electronics! 



Electronics I U*er 1 4K. Level II 16K 



f HONOSTftBLC KULTIVlBliltTG(» i 



Ham Package I 



Level t 4K. Lave) <l 16K 



ri« CELftV IS ££-K S£C. 

CI IS . I m 

R] IS 454545 OWiS 



mwst 



1 

IB 



ir NOT \m 



mi 9 m mmti vmis - tyfc s to keep sue v«.uk 



If you're still designing circuits the old fashioned 
way, let the Electronics I package introduce the latest 
way to go: 

Tuned Circuits and Coil Winding — Design tuned cir- 
cuits for audio and radio frequencies. This two part pro- 
gram will find the missing two values from any two of the 
following, frequency, capacitance, inductance, or reac- 
tance* The coil winding section will caiculate the number 
of turns and wire gauge required for a close wound, air or 
slug tuned coil from the inductance, diameter, length, 
and permeability of the coil. 

555 Timer Circuits— Timers, both monostable (one- 
shot) and astable(oscillator)«can be easily designed with 
this two part program. The program will also draw a com- 
plete schematic on the screen of your TRS'80. 

LM361 Preamp Design— You too can quickly design 
an 10 preamp. With this program all you need to do is 
enter the parameters of the performance you want, and 
the program does the rest— right down to drawing a 
detailed schematic of your circuit on the screen! 

To order by phone, call toll free 1-800-258-5473 or 




Ham Package I— We had to call it something, but this 
package Is not only for hams, it*s great for any ex* 
perimenler or technician in need of a dynamic reference 
of popular electronics formulae. The included programs 
will calculate: 

1. Ohms Law— Easily performs calculations involving 
voitage, current, resistancBp and power. 

Z Series and Parallel Calculations— Find the value for 
capacitors or resjstors in parallel or series circuits- 

3. Voltage Dropping and Voltage Dividing— This will 
give you the value of a dropping resistor and the effective 
resistance of the load. 

4. R/C Time Constants^This section will calculate 
the resistance, capacitance, or the time delay of an R/C 
circuit. 

5. Drpole and Yagi Antennas — These two programs 
will compute the dimensions of an antenna to your exact 
frequency and give you an on-screen display— complete 
with all measurements! 

ask for Instant Software at your local computer store. 



Send me the following Instant Software: 



[] Check 



Money Order 



VISA 



AM EX 



Quantity Catalog 



Program name 



0007R 



D067 



Ham Package I 



Beclronrcs I 



Blank c asset fes for data 
storage - in lots of four 



C YES! Please let me know how I can 
write programs for Instant Software, 
and send me your free software cata- 
log. 



Unit Cost 



S7.95 



$7,95 



$7,95 



Total cost 



Add Si 00 for shipping 



Totai order 



MasleiCharge Expiration date 



Card No. 



Name. 



Addresa 



City- 



state 



Zip, 



Instant Software Inc. Peterborough, nh 03458 

73-tSF1 



easy, but the award is com- 
mensurate with the effort 
put forth. So jump in with 
both feet and try your luck 
with Computer DXCC. If 
you don't want to use this 
program as is, read on. It is 
adaptable to many other 
uses. 

The original program 
was adapted from a quiz 
program in Basic Program- 
ming by Kemeny and 
Kurtz. Over a period of 
some six months, we have 
updated the program again 
and again. Somehow, 
every time we work a new 
country, it ends up being in 
the program! 

The Program 

The program as listed 
gives complete instruc- 
tions in the opening lines. 
Line 30 asks for your name 
or call, and it is stored as 



H$. 

The program allows you 
to select a "class" of 
DXCC, which is determined 
by the number of countries 
that you play. The max- 
imum is 50 countries for 
the Extra Class DXCC. The 
countries are arranged in 
the data statements in an 
increasing order of difficul- 
ty. 

You automatically win if 
you answer 90% correct. 
Thus, if you answer cor- 
rectly the first 45 out of the 
50 Extra Class countries, 
the program will go direct- 
ly to the certificate award- 
ed to the winners, 

If a country name is 
given, you must supply the 
prefix. If the prefix is given, 
then you must supply the 
name of the country as it 




<M% ImAZiMO. THIS IS A GAI^ DE5IGrffii:i TC TEST YOUR 
AfllU'IY TO iDRKTlPy FREFlXfiS AND COUNTI^IES THAT 
KkY BE 'rfiDKKED ALONG- THE rfAY I^OWARD RECElVlPfC THE 
AMERICA^' RADIO RgUX l^AOUS'S DX CENrHfiy GLUS 
AWARD. YOU MAY SELECT THE CLASS QF DXGG THAT YOU 
«ANT TO TRY FOR ACCORDING fO THE FOLLO'ftlKG- 
OF GOIiNfRISSs 



^ftJ&?.BEHS 



GENERAL tiJCCC 
ADVAl-JGED DXaC 
EXTRA CLASS BXCe 



15 COUNTRIES 
25 C0UNTK1E3 
35 COUNTRIES 
Sa ,:eOU,NTKIE5 



Tm WJHBER GOfiPIfiJlEU IS THE flUJlBETH SIGHT, 

DXCC WILL BE A'/TAfiDED FOR 90?^ CORRECT. ' 

YOU ^^ILI, GET TWC G HAWSES TU ANSWER .GORRECTLV. 

■^ICH dUiSS OF IJXCC DO YOU WANT TO TRY FDR'i' 

B]^5?IR ^HE CLASS EXACTLY AS USTJSIJ AJ^OVE? >rJOSrieS DXCC 



IF THE COUNTRY iSfi# ISLAND. THiSt THE (VtWQ 'ISLAND* 13 NOT IN TK£ mN.E 
ALL COUNTRY .MMES ARE TAKliltl FROK THE ARRL^3 WAdC Llis*, 



appears on the ARRL DXCC 
Country List. You are given 
two chances to answer 
each question without pen- 
alty. The number that you 
answered correctly is con- 
sidered worked and con- 
firmed. Wrong answers are 
considered as worked only. 
The program keeps track 
of your worked/confirmed 
record, as well as a 
percentage computed 
from them. A certificate is 
awarded to those who 
make the grade. 

Program Breakdown 

Lines 10 to 150 supply in- 
formation on how to play 
the game. Lines 160 to 440 
set up the computer for the 
number of countries that 
you want to work (variable 
N in lines 380 to 440). Lines 
500 and 510 set variables 
W (for your worked coun- 



tries tally) and X (for those 
confirmed) equal to zero. 

The main body of the 
program starts at line 520. 
The loop is completed at 
fine 720 and is executed N 
times. Line 530 reads the 
first two pieces of data 
from line 880— in this case, 
"Cuantanamo Bay" and 
"KG4/' Notice that the 
data is set up to alternate 
the country's prefix and the 
country's name as the 
question. 

Line 540 sets up variable 
T to keep track of whether 
your answer is the first or 
second try. Line 550 prints 
the country or prefix, and 
your answer is recorded in 
560 as C$. If your answer is 
right, the program iumps to 
650 and your worked and 
confirmed tallies are in- 
cremented by one each. 
The current record is 



GUANTAKAMO 3AY? JKG4 

•CDRRECTt NICE GUgS^. 

YOU m\-i HAVE' X / 1' WORKED /CONFIRWED. 



DK? >GERMA[iY 

•<mOm, LXD* THERE IS A BAND OPEWIIhGt, IRIC ACiAlM. 

DK? FEDERAL flSPU:3I.lC OF u^RC^LAMf 

CORRECT p NIOE GUESS. 

Tou m'ii mrE xa / m worked / cotffiRiiED, 



^V? >VE?E2UELA 

YOU NOW HAVE 11 / 11 /JOEKilD / COKFIRl^tED. 



ITAM? >I 

CORRECT, NICE GUESii. 
>SOU- KOW HAVE -t? /IE WORKED / GO^JFIKr.lED, 



K2:5?>FyERT0 niQO 

mOtiO, LID, THESE XS A BAND DPEHJflB.. TRX AQAIN, 

KSS"? ^WftVASSA 

SUEE ^dU rfOULDW'T RATHER TRY f^OR WAS^ ft{^- CQHftSCT ANS^^fER* CAKAL 

VOU now HAYS 15 / 12 WORKED / CONFIRMED. 



COLUMBIA? >}{K 

CORRECT, NICE (J0E53 . 

YOU h'OW HJ^VH 14 / 13 '^/ORKED / COKFIRKED. 



CAKADA7 >V*: 

CORRECT, RICE CUE33, 

YiPtJ NOi* HAVE 2 / S WORKED / CONFIRMED, 

HI7 >GaSTA RICA 

COI^RECT. NICE CUESS, 

1E0U NOW HAVE 1/3 WORKED / GONFlRl-lED. 



FRAb-CE? >F 

CORRECT, NICE GUESS, 

YCU NO^ HAVE h / i^ WORKED / CONFIRMED. 



KP^? »PUERTO RICO 
CORRECT, NICE GUES3 . 

.NOW HAVE 5/5 i^ORiffiD /CONFIRMED. 



W? *UNIT£D STATES OF AMERICA 

COHREOT, NICE GUE35. 

YOU NOW MVE 6/6 V*ORKED / CONPlA&ffii}- 



C7 >EKGLAND 

CORRECT. NICE GUESS. 

YOU HOW JiAVE 7/7 "^^ORKED / GOIiTFIRKKD. 



BELGIUM? >0N 
CORRECT* NICE CUES 3. 

YOU Kow ^VE a / e forked / CONFIRBIEQ. 



AFTER CAREFUL SCHUTINIAZnON OF YOUR APPLjCATIOHp THE WRITERS 

OF tULS PROGRAM TAKE GREAT (NOT ALL THAT CREAT} PLEASURE 

IN AWARDING YOU NOVICE DXCC. 

YDU MAVE ACHIEVED A 92.35714 % WORKED / CONFIRMED RECORD, FBI 

YOU RETIRE WITH 1^+ / 13^ WORKED / CONFIRMED. 

SINCE YOU DID 30 viKhh, WHY HAVEN* T YOU MADE MCC 

FOR REA1-? NO, YOU CAN'T DO IT ON Z METERS. 

AND NOW FOR YOUR CERTIFICATE SUITABLE FOR FRAMItfG 



GARY TONCRE i^Ati-FYZ AUD CHRIS rfEINER K2GR 
AWARD i^A2CK0 AK HONORARY CDMPlfTER 
NOVICE DXCC 



DDDDDDDDlJ 


XX !£X 


GCCCCC 


CCGGCC 


DDDDDDDDDD 


XX XX 


CCGCCC 


cccccc 


DD DD 


XX XX 


cc oc 


cc cc 


DD DD 


XX XX 


cc cc 


cc cc 


DD DD 


XX 


cc 


cc 


DD DD 


XX 


CO 


cc 


DD DD 


XX 


cc 


cc 


DD DD 


XX 


cc 


cc 


DD DD 


XX 


GG 


cc 


DD DD 


ya 


cc 


cc 


m DD 


XX XX 


cc cc 


GO cc 


DD DD 


XX XX 


cc cc 


cc cc 


DDDDDDDDDD 


XX XX 


GCCCCC 


CCCCGC 


DDDDDDDDD 


XX XX 


CGCCCC 


CGCCCC 



XE? >t*tEXlC0 

CORRECT, NICE GUESS. 

YOU NOW HAVE 9 / ^ WORKED / G0NET:JWi£D, 




90 



?:3, mzam 

UNIVAG llOO IS CLEAR AND gRT. 



fig. 2. Sample program rua 



printed and the confirmed 
figure is compared to the 
90% figure of the coun- 
tries worked of your class, 
tf they ^re equal, or if the 
confirmed figure is greater, 
a jump is made out of the 
loop at line 710 to line 760. 
Otherwise, the loop re- 
peats. 

Assuming that you an- 
swered wrong just once, 
line 580 sends you to line 
480, which is printed. T is 
incremented by one and 
you go back to fine 550. If 
you goof again, line 590 
sends you to line 490, 
which is printed; L = 2, so 
line 610 is skipped and the 
answer is printed via line 
620. Line 630 increments 
only your worked tally. A 
jump is made to the print 
of -your record in line 680, 
and the rest proceeds as 
noted above. 

If you haven't jumped 
out of the loop by the time 
you have gone through it N 
times, you haven't made 



90% correct In that case, 
the program goes to tine 
850 by way of 750 and ends 
at 9999. If you did win, the 
program goes through lines 
800 to 840 and into the cer- 
tificate subroutine. The 
program then returns to 
line 850 and ends at 9999. 

Modifications 

This program was writ- 
ten on a UnivacllOO at the 
University of Miami, tt 
should run as is on most 
large college and high 
school computers. If you 
want to run it on your 
micro, some changes might 
have to be made in the in- 
terests of conserving 
memory. You can elim- 
inate lines 10 to 260, but. If 
you eliminate H$ in line 40, 
it won't be there to print 
your name or call on the 
certificate in the sub- 
routine. You could also 
decide on just one class 
and eliminate everything 
up to line 450, except for 



giving N some value equal 
to the number of countries 

in your list. You could also 
eliminate the subroutine, 
but the certificate is nice, 
especially if you can get a 
hard copy of it. Of course, 
you can change the data to 
any countries or prefixes 
that you want, except 
those beginning with a 
number such as 5Z4 — 
variables like those won't 
be accepted by the com- 
puter. If you don't want to 
alternate country*prefix- 
country, you can set up the 
data to print either the 
country or the prefix alone 
as the question. You can 
also make the game easier 
to win by changing the win- 
ning percentage on line 
700 and also the print state- 
ment on line 230. 

One of the nicest 
features of the program is 
that, by changing the data 
statements, you can adapt 
DXCC into a quiz, such as 



naming the capitals of the 

states. Just rewrite the data 
lines to read state-capital- 
state-capital and so on The 
number of different quiz- 
zes that can be derived 
from this format is endless. 

Note that our Univac ac- 
cepts line 1030, the com- 
mand "page." This allows 
our printer to print the cer- 
tif icate on a separate page. 
You might have to make a 
loop of print statements if 
you want this feature but 
lack the page command. 

Conclusions 

We have spent many 
happy hours writing and 
playing DXCC. If you really 
want to get into it, try 
randomizing each class 
and making a large data 
list. We hope you enjoy 
DXCC, and, if you come up 
with any more modifica- 
tions, send us a list of your 
version. We would like to 
see what you're doing. ■ 



m wire wraiiping c:enier 



UJIR[UlRIIPPiniiKITUJK-S 

Br 

WSU-30 M 

DIP ICB 

DIP 10 416 

PC Can. - A P _ TRf^.? 

Mini-Shear V, „. ., Ct»p ?^r 

\4. 16, 24 and ^rs nip'^^ArScr 

TerminafsWWl . 

Tfi-Co(or Wire D^spens^r WO-30-TRI 

Hobby Board H-POB-l 



$74. 95 



Am 12,00 poti sHimna 

m. ¥. cm AHU SUTE Rf SIDENTS ADD TAX} 



OK MACHINE & TOOL CORPORATION 

ner St . Bronx. N t ju475 (212) 934-6600 Tfeiex 125091 



1^ f^eadw S^rviss — see page f95 



91 



M 



A Low-Cost Circuit Board Holder 

— price tag: 45<t 



The stingy solutioa 



Rmseli W, Steele 
SSB Gayle St. 
PapiHion NE 68046 

If you are still chasing PC 
cards across your work- 
bench, you may be inter* 
ested in a cheap card 
holder for PC boards. I was 
bitten by the computer bug 
this last winter and decid- 
ed to build a systein from 
scratch, using MSI and LSI 
chips and standard 44-pin 
prototyping boards. After 
evaluating a number of 



CPU chips and "one- 
board" systems, I decided 
to build a system based on 
the Popular Eteclronics 
ELF. 

My goals were: to learn 
as much as possible, to 
keep the project within my 
limited budget, and to end 
up with an expandable 
system. The ELF was less 
than $100. and I felt it 
would be easy to expand 
with other hand-wired 
boards. I didn't feel com- 
petent to make my own PC 
boards, so I chose the pro* 



totype board and wiring- 
pencil method. 

After collecting the 
necessary parts and design- 
ing a layout, my first prob- 
lem was holding the PC 
board so that 1 could use a 
wiring pencil in one hand 
and a soldering iron in the 
other. My first thought was 
to locate a professional 
card holder and vise (such 
as the PANA-VISE), but it 
came down to a choice be- 
tween using my limited 
cash for expensive equip- 
ment or buying computer 




A $A5 card bolder. 



hardware I chose the lat- 
ter, electing to solve the 
card-holding problem with 
my junk box and some left- 
over ingenuity. 

After making sketches of 
my idea (Fig. 1), the next 
task was to collect parts. 
Rummaging among my bits 
of this and that stored in 
the garage, I spotted a 
hardwood stave from a 
shipping crate {2" x Ya" x 
18") and a short length of 

threaded rod (Vi^'x 12"), In 
one coffee can I found five 
1 Vj" screws left over from 
a curtain-hanging project (I 
used molybolts after the 
curtain fell down), and in 
another coffee can were 
five washers and two wing 
nuts from a TV antenna 
that blew down long ago. It 
pays never to throw any- 
thing away! 

That left me with some 
T*nut5 to pick up at the 
local hardware (a package 
of five for 45?). With this 
collection of bits and 
pieces, I hoped to make a 
PC card holder for a stan- 
dard prototype board (4" x 
6" or 4" X 9"). The size of 
the holder can be selected 
to suit your own needs. The 
small Radio Shack boards 
will fit if they are slipped in 
sideways- 

To build the holder, I cut 
two pieces of hardwood 



92 



Dollar thoughts 
to consider about 



DRAKE UV-3 





UHF-VHF 
MULTIBAND 
FM SYSTEM 



Only $795 

for 

3-Band UVS 



(That's just $265 per band 
— and fully synthesized 

on all three!) 



How does the cost of the Drake system really compare to 
alternative methods of getting on 144-220-440 MHzfm? 



A 



B 



Rrst of all, there is no direct comparison possible^ 
because the Model 1346 Drake UV-3 is the only rig in 
the world offering 144-220-440 MHz fm in a single box 
— ^and it is fully synthesized on each band. 

The nearest comparison would be to add the suggested 
list prices of three ^parate units of competitive fm 
rigs presently available. It would work out 
approximately as follows (and you would end up with 
three separate units to power): 

2 Meters (Synthesized to 5 kHz) .... $ 449.00 

220 MHz (Synthesized to 5 kHz) , 449.95 

440 MHz (23 channels, crystal) , . . , 349.00 

Crystals (Assuming 20 per 440 MHz radio) 120.00 

Total competitive price ..... $1367,95 



But wait—even at those higher competitive 
prices you'd stUl be missing these features 

inciuded in the UV-3: 

1. Full synthesis on aU three bands 

2. Extra diode-programmable fixed 
channels on each band 

3- Priority scan feature on each band 
4, Everything in a single box! 



For your homework, then, ponder the following — at a 

suggested amateur net of $795,00. the Model 1346 
Drake UV-3 (144-220-440) is, to say the least, an 
incredible value. It gives you a real reason to trade UP! 



Di 1 NOW AVAILABLE: Complete UV^S Service/Schematic Book , . . $25,00 each. 



R. L. DRAKE COMPANY 




540 Richard St, Miami sburg, Ohio 45342 
Phone: (513) 866-2421 • Telex: 288-017 



Pnces and spedficaiiom subject to change uMhout notice or oMgatton. 



|p*^ Hesd^f Se/Vice—sse fisge fStS 



93 



CV:" X Va" X 8") and then 
put a 1/16" kerf down the 
length of each piece. This 
kerf was to hold the card 
once the wooden fingers 
were securely fastened to 
the buttbiock with the four 
lYz" screws, I cutthelVj'' 
X Va" X 4-3/8" buttbiock 
from the remaining hard- 
wood and beveled one 
end. The bevel allows ad- 
justable tension for one 
finger, permitting a snug fit 
on a variety of similar- 
sized cards, (I find small 
variations in different 
manufacturers' cards.) 

Before fastening the 
fingers, I drilled a 5/16" 
hole in the center of the 
block and two pilot holes 
for the screws at each end. 
Next, I turned the butt- 
block up so the narrow side 
faced me and drove a 
T-nut into the 5/16'' hole. 

! then selected a 2'' X Va" 
X T' section of the remain- 
ing hardwood, drilled a 
5/16" hole through the 



center, and drove a T-nut 
into the hole. 1 now had 
two blocks with T-nuts. 

Next, I fastened the 
fingers on the T x 4-3/8" 
block, one to each end. I 
found it advisable to pre- 
drill the screw holes in 
both the buttbiock and the 
fingers. 1 drilled the finger 
holes so they would just fit 
over the screws. This made 
the buttbiock holes snug 
enough to keep a good grip 
on the screws, 

I assembled the holder 
by threading a wing nut 
about three inches onto 
one end of the rod, with the 
wings toward the center. 
Then I put a washer on the 
rod and then threaded on 
the card holder. 1 then 
threaded the remaining 
block on the rod with the 
T-nut facing the wing nut 
Twisting it until the end 
protruded below the end of 
the block, I slipped on a 
washer and a wing nut. 

At this point I put the 




'f^ 




1... 


? 


^^ 


^db"^ 



f/g. 1- 



bottom block in the vise 
and bent the rod approxi- 
mately 70^. In this position 
I can swing the holder in an 
arc or set it in position by 
tightening the wing nut at 
the bottom of the 2" x T' 
block. I can position the 
holder at any 360° position 
on the end of the rod by 
tightening the wing nut 
behind the buttbiock. 

A coat of varnish fin- 
ished the job. A PC card 
holder for less than 45?1 
That is not counting the 
threaded rod (about $1.00) 



and the vise — which every 
hobbyist should have on 
hand. 

In using the "cheap card 
holder,'' I find it useful to 
place a small mirror on the 
workbench under the PC 
card so that it is easy to 
see if wires pushed through 
from the other side are 
positioned correctly. It is 
not difficult however, to 
flip the holder over to 
check wire position and 
flip it back again- I hope 
you find this as useful a 
tool as I do. ■ 



STACKED m Yi 




KLJIf's HEVi 4 

BANDERS, "THB ^'•BANGj;,,^.^, 
HAVE THE FEATURES YOUASKi 
FOR - AND THEY OOH'TCQSfAH 
ARM AND A LEO TO OWN 

'Simple speedy assembiy^ 

* One man instaUation 

* Low wind loading ^ perfect 
lightduty towers and rotators 

* Honest KLM 7.7 dbd (or bette 
less than 1.5:1 VSWR 

* Dual-driven elements and KL 
P.E.P. Balunfor_EUU=-PERFDR 
acr(^s4tieWH5LE BAND 
No tuning or matching 

* Ideal for stacking a4hiree^nd or 
monoband system 

* The same hi-quality materiats^as 
KLM's world-famous "Big Sticker 

KLM's ''4'BANGERS" - ready 

io help you make the most of ^^^ 

Amateur Radio K. 




AVOR. 



KLM 28-30-4 $99^6 



;S-4$i39« 



r dealer or contact 
17025 Laurel Rd. Morgan Hill. CA 9503 7 



94 



§^ Reader Service — see psge 195 




OOA 



SURPLUS 
WANTE[S> 



WE NEBD: AHCSIBK^ ARC 94, ARC 



W2, ARC109, ARC-1t5, ARC-116. 
ARC-13i, ARC-1M, ARCi64, ARN-82, 
ARN-eS, ARN'84. APN59, APN'153, 
APN-141, APN147, APN-171, APX72, 
6Tfln CUie6M, 4907'i, CUISSBA, 
Sty 4. 5tfl-a, SiRV%. FMS22. 807A, 
URC9, TOP DOLLAR PAID OR TRADE 



FOR NEW AMATEUR GEAR. WRiTE 



OR PHONE BILL SLEP(7Q4) S24 7S19 

SLEP ELECTRONtCB COMPANY 

P.O. BOX too, DEPT. ?3, 

OTTO. NORTH CAROLINA 28763. 




AUTOMATIC COUPLER 

CU-901 ANTENNA 

COUPLER ror 50-150 

watl transceivers in the 2* 

25 Mhz range; mil-Cothns 

1B0L-2,H3S7-970p13KV 

vacuum variable capacitor 

and variable silver rtbt>on 

inductof . iBth wim 28 VOC 

Ijrive Atso 14 uHV roller 

i^uctor and 5WR meter circiflt Requires 26 V[>C 3 

amps, 250 or 400 VOC 35 MA. and 1 1 5 VAC 400 Hz 20 

VA ioyt)c7V4nii '/j. 24 \m. sft- us*d $54.50 

C S0i^CU-9gi VACUUM VARIABLE 
CAPACITOR: 7-970 pf 3 KV: w/dnve operaoie 
Irom a VOC and uu, $34,95 

L401fCU-991 VARIABLE RIBBON 
tNDUCTOR: rtas 288" ot J25' wx .01 ' th, silver 
fibDon drawn oetween two 5 4" 1 x 3.4" dia coll 
forms; about 32 uHV. 2B VDC motor turns coiEs to vary 

Inductance $25.00 

R-390A RECEIVER: 5-32 Mhz. mech filters, 
S5 lbs. sh. Used, reparabta , , $295. 

Checked $450. Manual $12.00 

Use your Visa or Masterctiarge cards. 

All Prices FOB. Lima. Ohio. Please Allow for Shipping. 

Send for FREE Copy of NEW Catalog 79! 

Address DepI 73 - Pt>one 419/227-6573 



^ >I6 I lUVf XA 



»^Fi 

UOV IIMA OHIO 4^907 




Fult ASCII ProfMVionil 
Kaybomrd Kll, Modvl 7Se 



• Full 1 28 Character ASCII « Trt Mod« MOS En^ 
coding • MOS/DTI^TTL Compatible Output • 
TwO'K^y Rollover • Lryel and P^lsc Strobe * 
Shkk And Alpha Lock • Setectat^le Parity • 
foiltive or Negarivc Logk • All New. 0£M 
Grade Components 9 Qold Contact. Lpw 
Bounce Key SwtKhes # Rugge<! G 10 Prtnted 
Clfculf Boaid • Low Power Consumption , , . 
vid Niof e 

Model 756 K eyboard K It }64 .9 S 

Model 70 I riastk Ejiclotijr« . . $14.9S 

Modet 702 Steel Enclouire . $1$.$5 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

SmmI for cttalogiM t^ ottMr NEW mir^andt**, 
S«mlft, 5ci«k«tii, ICi, R*i., C«p«, «nd liORE 

N.Y.S. Resldanis Add 4% Sales Tax 



^nd to; K*y €f*cironlci 
P.O. Box 3506 
Sch0n«ctAdy, Ny 131303 



(^K14 



FOR BEST PRICE AND 
FAST DELIVERY 

CALL 





TOLL FREE 

^ N>HA/VlRADtQ£ENL 



a3«H *?Oiivi*0Hrf! f*o Bkip ?.S?T^ Si Uowt MOr,in? 



♦^H2 





With the RPT*1B Repeater* Backed by Standard Com- 
munications' years of experience In producing quality 
repeaters ior the commercial and amateur market, this 
superior 10 watt VHF repeater operates on a single pair of 
channels in the 143-149 MHz range. It contains separate 
transmitter and receiver assemblies for the re-transmis- 
sion of signals and a COR/TIMER for control of the 
swftching/limjng/monitoring functions of the syslem. Jn 
addition, an opiional private channel unit nnay be installed 
as an accessory ft may be operated in either a repeal of 
duplex nnode- Priced under $850 from your dealer. 

Write today for a FREE Catalog Sheet or see your 
nearest Standard Communications Dealer. p.o. Box 92 1 5 tLos Ange*©a. Cakfomia 90009 



ALL BAND TRAP ANTENNAS ! 



*^S18 




Standard 

Com mun teat ions 



—^Quamp^'^jf 






^^if^^iiliuij* — 




FOR ALL MAKES & MODELS OF AWATEUH 
TRANS RECEIVERS - TRANSMITTERS - 
GUARANTEED FOR 2000 WATTS S5B 
1000 WATTS CW. FOR NOVICE AND ALL 
CLASS AMATEURSI 



j»R£TUNED - COWPLETLY ASSEMBLED - 
ONLY ONE NEAT SMALL ANTENNA FOR 
UP TO 6 BANDSI EXCELLENT FOR CON- 
GESTED HOUSING AREAS - APARTMENTS 
LIGHT < STRONG - ALMOST INVISIBLE I 

COMPLETE AS SHOWN wTth 90 ft, RG50U-52 ithm fsedNna, and PL259 connector. Iniulatdft, 30 ft 
300 to. tett diicron ond muiiporU, centflr connflCtar wUh built In iithnlni; *"^*ttef and itatJc dlftpKai-'Sa - 
molded, jei^ed, wa^iherproM, retOinirrt irmpM. y*KG*'-faii Just twitch to ^and dub-ed fer aiiealiant worldwide 
Qparptlon - tranimHtino and raclevliiB} WT. LESS THAN 5 LBS., 

160*dO>40-2O-l6-10 bandi 2 tfao-14 9 ft wlih 90 ft. RGSBU - connaclor - MoifarTTTBU . . .Ssa95 
a0-40-20-t5-10 bandt 2 trap -« t02 ft. with 90 ft. RGSBU * ioftnmeHor - Modftl 99BBU . ..154.95 
40-20-15 '10 band! 2 trac^ — S4lt, wRJi 90 ft, RGSSU coait - eorin^ctef ^ Madsl tOOTBU , . .S^^.SS 
20»15-10 band* 2 u-ap ™ 26 n, with 90 ft, RGfiaU csmk - conjiactikr - Modsl lOOTBU . . , , SS2^5 

SiND FULL PRICE FOR POST PAID INSURED DEL. IN USA- (Canada la S5.00 axtra for paatage - 
dftrteal - cumtama - «tc.} or order utifm VISA Bank Amaricard * MASTER CHARGE - AMER. EX' 
PRESS, Give ftumbai^ and •!. dat*. Ph 1*306-23&-5333 9AM - ©PM waah days. We >hkp In 2-3 dayt. 
ALL PRICES WILL INCREASE S5,00 SEPT. t - SAVE - ORDER NOWi Al amennat guaj-vitanl 
tor t yaar. Man ay back tiiat I Made In USA . FREE INFO. AVAIL ABLE ONLY FROM. 

WESTERN ELECTRONICS ^Wi& Dapt, AT- 5 Kaarnay, N«brialta, 68847 



CENTRAL NEW YORK'S FASTEST GROWtNG HAM DEALER 



fee- 



|Tfl7-OR7 



lid t'M ''^JJ*"^ 






T&ESU 



Km* 






Featurirtg Vaesu, loom, Drake, Alias. Ten-Tec, Swan, Dent^or^, Pace» PaJomar, Alda. 
Midland. Wilson* KOK, MFJ, Microwave Module, Standard. Tempo. Astron, KLM, 
Hy-Gain, Mosle^, Larsen, Cushcrafr, Hustler, Mirti Products. Universal and Trisiao 
Towers. Weservtce evefything ive se/f/ Write or call for quote. You Wofi'i be Disipolnlftd. 

We are just a few minytes off The NYS Thruway (1-90) Exit 32 



CALL TOLL FREE ONEIDA COUNTY AIRPORT TERMINAL BUILOINQ g^t» Warran 

1-800-448 7914 ORISKANY, NEW YORK 13424 WA2MSH K2tXN 

NY STATE RESIDENTS CALL 315 337 2622 or 315-337 0203 



p^ f^eader Serv/ce— see p^ge 195 



95 



User Report: the IC-245 

--good things come in small packages 



Only two reservations. 



R. Stanley Dicks W8YA 
Box S31, RD2 
TriadeipHia WV 26059 



AS many amateurs now 
are doing, 1 recently 
decided to upgrade from a 
crystal-controlled two- 
meter rig to a synthesized 
transceiver. I wanted an 
alt-mode rig, but one which 
also was compact enough 
to use on FM from my 
small foreign car. After 
surveying the current 
market I decided to try the 
Icom IC-245 with sideband 



adapter, and I definitely 
have not been disappoint- 
ed! The compactness of 
the rig is truly amazing: It 
contains a fully-synthe- 
sized two-meter FM trans- 
ceiver, a digital display, 
and a sideband/CW adap- 
ter, all in a box not much 
bigger than most two-meter 
FM rigs alone. Crammed in- 
to this box are 47 tran- 
sistors, 8 FET5> 24 ICs, and 61 
diodes, and one heckuva 
two^meter rig! 

The 245 is fully syn- 
thesized from 144 to 148 
MHz. From 146 to 148 
MHz, it tunes in 5-kHz 



steps, and from 144 to 
146 MHz in 100-Hz steps. 
There is, however, a button 
which allows one to tune in 
5-kHz steps below 146 
MHz, making" sweeps of 
the band more rapid. Tun- 
ing is accomplished with a 
single large knob, eliminat- 
ing the two or three switch- 
es and knobs which often 
must be turned on other 
synthesized rigs. The knob 
has a solid feel and has a 
click-stop mechanism so 
that it clicks and holds firm 
at each increment. This 
prevents possible drift due 
to jostling in the mobile, 




96 




This is the Icom IG245. 



and also allows for tuning 
in heavy traffic without 
having to look at the rig. If 
one is on .76, for example, 
one can go to 79 simply by 
counting six clicks on the 
dial (at 5 kHz each). 

The rig comes with a 
quick-tuning adapter knob 
which easily can be slid 
onto the main knob, allow- 
ing rapid tuning across the 
band — especially on SSB. 
The digital display is large 
and easily readable, with 
four digits [146.52 reads 
out as 6,520), and an auto- 
matic dimmer so that the 
digits are dimmed in a dark 
environment (in the car at 
night) and bright in high 
ambient light. They shine 
brightly enough to read in 
all but very strong, direct 
sunlight. The meter in- 
dicates relative power on 
transmit and signal 
strength in receive. 

The unit has an inge- 
nious dual vfo system, also 
in use in Icom's 701 and 
711, which allows almost 
total versatility in setting 
up offset frequencies. Un- 
der normal circumstances, 
one lines up the vfos 600 
kHz apart, and they then 
track together for the rou- 
tine repeater split. How- 
ever, it is possible to pro- 
gram any spl it desired from 
5 kHz to 955 kHz. The in- 



/979 




Like the clasaic ^Tlukemeter'* differential voltmeter of the fifties (inset), the new 8020A DMM offers a superb combination of performance and 
vaJue for the seventjeB. Only $169* 



You know Fluke for innovation in 
precision test and measurement in- 
strumentation. For almost 30 years 
we've anticipated the measurement 
problems that come with fast-chang- 
ing technology. 

And weVe done it again. Introduc- 
ing the new 8020A digital multimeter. 

The 8020 A is built to the same high 
standards weVe designed into its pred- 
ecessors. The only difference is that 
the 8020A is smaller And, of course, 
it costs a lot less. 

You'll find the 8020A is the only 
DllM around with such impressive 



features for only $169* now and for 
some time to come. Features that mean 
value and versatility, Like 26 ranges 
and seven fiiBCtions, including oonduct- 
ance (which measures leakage to 
10**'Q). And three-way overload pro- 
tection. Hi-lo power ohms. And more. 
In factj the 8020A is 13 ozs. of pock- 
etable benchtop instrument perform- 
ance, in the Fluke tradition. Perform^ 
ance you can count on for up to 200 
hours of use with its inexpensive 9V 
battery, single custom CMOS LSI chip 
and ]ow-power» razor-sharp 3^*digit 
LCD display. 



Great performance, low cost: Tkctts 
Fluke tradition. Where else can you 
get a field reliable tool built to preci- 
sion lab standards? Oj"» factory cali- 
bration that's NBS traceable^ with 
0.25% dc accuracy? And, of course, the 
Fluke 8020 A has a full year warranty 
including all specifications, with world- 
wide service backup. 

The quickest way to get one is to 
call (800) 223 0474, toll free. Give us 
your chargecard number and we'll ship 
one immediately. Or come into our 
Midtown Manhattan showroom, 54 
West 45th Street, New York, NY 10036. 



TOLL FREE HOT UNE 800-223-0474 



Inside New York Stale call (212) 687-2224 




ADMNCi 
LECTRONIC 




A FLUKE AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTOR 



struction manual says that 
the unit has an automatic 
reverse circuit so that 
when tuning from 146 to 
147 MHz, the 600-kHz split 

will automatjcallv reverse, 
making it unnecessary to 
throw a switch to reverse 
transmit/receive frequen- 
cies above 147 MHz. A 
note accompanying the 
manual, however, states 
that, "due to customer re- 
quests/' this automatic 
reversal system has been 
defeated by the addition of 
a single shorting wire. The 
note says that the wire 
must not be removed while 
the rig is in warranty. As 
soon as my warranty ex- 
pires, i intend to remove 
the wire and see what hap- 
pens, if the reversal system 
functions, it would make 
repeater access possible 
anywhere from 146 to 148 
MHz without the necessity 
of throwing a single switch. 
Nifty? 

The 245 runs 10 Watts on 
FM (true FM) and CW and 
10 Watts PEP on upper 
sideband. Local stations 

report that the audio is 
crisp and clean on both FM 
and SSB. and that the CW 
note is excellent, with no 
chirping or clicking. They 
also report that carrier sup- 
pression is excellent; even 
when I am over S9, no one 
can hear any carrier at alL 

The receiver section of 
the rig h^s the quality for 
which Icom has become 
renowned. Even in the pres- 
ence of strong local sig- 
nals, I have never heard 
any cross modulation or 
front-end overload. The 
audio sounds sharp for a 
two-meter rig, and a rear 
panel jack allows plug-in 
of an external speaker. The 
receiver seems to be quite 
sensitive on both SSB and 
FM. An FM signal of SI will 
be full-quieting, and side- 
band signals are regularly 
copied which are out of 
range of the rig's 10-Watt 
transmitter, in fact, the 
receiver's sensitivity 
causes some frustration; I 




A bottom view of the 10245 shows the five connected cans containing the helical 
resonators which are responsible for the rig's excellent selectivity. The final transistor is in 
back. 



hear many stations I can't 
reach with only 10 Watts! 

On FM, the 245 has a 
conventional double*con- 
version system with i-f 
stages at 107 MHz and 455 
kHz, and on SSB/CW it has 
a single-conversion i-f at 
10,7 MHz. Sensitivity is 
rated at 03 uV for a 10-dB 
tS + N)/N ratio on SSB/CW, 
and 0.6 uV for 20 dB of 
quieting on FM. If any- 
thing, the rig appears to be 
more sensitive than its rat- 
ings. The noise blanker for 
SSB/CW reception is quite 
effective at cancelling the 
occasional hash-type 
noises I have tried it on, 
and the rig is considerably 
more impervious to auto 
ignition noise than was my 
previous rig. No matter 
what I did to try to sup- 
press ignition noise with 
the old rig, I had about S4 
QRN; with the 245, the 
ignition noise is barely 
discernible. The receiver 
has a switch to select a 
slow age rate for SSB re- 
ception, and the result is 
SSB which sounds as 
smooth as low-band SSB on 
my Drake receiver. 

One can cite features 
and specifications all day, 
but the proof, as they say, 



IS in the punch. The 245 is a 
delightful rig to own and 
operate. It is compact and 
therefore easily transferred 
from auto to house and 
back. Recently, I stuck it in 
my suitcase along with a 
small 12-voIt supply and a 
whip antenna and took it 
on a business trip, Try that 
with other multi-mode rigs I 
Two-meter SSB operation 
from the 14th floor of a 
hotel Is fun! 

At home, with an 11-ele- 
ment, vertically-polarized 
beam at 70 feet, I can hear 
literally hundreds of re- 
peaters on the synthesized 
rig and can regularly call 
into machines as far out as 
150 miles. This is one of the 
real joys in store for the 
crystal-controlled operator 
who changes to synthesiza- 
tion, the number of acces- 
sible repeaters is stagger- 
ing. The vertically-polar- 
ized beam doesn't do well 
on SSB and CW where 
most other stations are us- 
ing horizontal antennas, 
but even with cross-polar- 
ization, the Icom's 10 
Watts and sensitive re- 
ceiver provide regular con- 
tacts out to about 100 
miles. The 245 gives one 
full flexibility on two 



meters: FM work on any re* 
peater or simplex frequen- 
cy, satellite work, weak 
signal CW and SSB DXing, 
mobile and portable work« 
and so on, 

I can cite only two reser* 
vations about the 245. 
First, it operates only USB, 
and thus cannot be used 
for mode I OSCAR work on 
SSB; maybe Icom will 
come out with an LSB 
filter. Second, the photo- 
sensitive cell which con- 
trots the automatic LED 
readout dimmer is located 
right beside the tuning 
knob. This means that 
when the operator reaches 
up to tune the knob, often 
he blocks light from the 
cell, causing the readout to 
dim. It is only a minor 
nuisance, and one soon 
learns to move the hand 
slightly when tuning so 
that this doesn't happen. 

These reservations are 
negligible when compared 
to the flexibility and perfor- 
mance which such a small 
package provides, I can 
hardly wait to get a horizon- 
tal beam up and a small 
linear amp to tack on to the 
rig, and I am working on 
OSCAR antennas now. See 
you on 144.200[B 



98 



NEWFT-7B100W 
MOBILE/BASE HF TRANSCEIVER 

Enough power to drive those linears! The FT-7B is the high 
powered version of the popular 20 watt FT-7 that so many hams are 
running mobile in cars, boats, and pfanes around the world. Use 
the FT-7B as a top quality base station. New improvements include 
an audio peak filter (like our FT-901DM) to give you super CW 
selectivity, drive control, four 1 0M positions, full 80-1 OM coverage , 
28.5-29.0 MHz crystal supplied (other crystals available as op- 
tions), optional YC-7B Plug-in Remote Digital Readout, optional 
FP-12 Speaker/Power Supply Console. 



-AX ATT Om 






1 


^ KIC 


GAiM 


if 


1 ■ " f ■ '11 


Cf 


y-M^ 




1 






r- 


.91 


■r 






. 




EH ' 


4 


y^ 


'J 


"^Y- 


^ 

I 

' 


i 

OFF 






1' 





m 
/ 


-8 

10 ^^ 




CALI8 



.y^^^^^ 


20 


. V ■ KM 


( > 


ifi. 




0* <m 

TUNE •& OniVE 




BAND 



^^m 





RECErVER 

Sensitivity; O.SuV for S/N 20 dB 
Image reject ron: Better than 50 dB 
IF rejection: Better than 50 dB 
SetectiVity: -6 dB: 2.4 KHz, -60 dB; 4.0 KHz 
Cross-modolation: Better than 60 dB Im- 
munity at 20 KHz off a 20 dB input signal 
typical 
Audio output: 3 watts @ 10% THD 



TRANSMITTER 

Emission: LSB, USB (A3j), CW (A1), AM (A3) 
Input power: At, A3j; 100 watts DC 
Carrier suppression: Better than 50 dB be- 
low rated output 

Unwanted sideband suppression: Better 
than 50 dB @ 1 000 Hz 
Spurious emission: Better than -40 dB 
Distortion products: Better than -31 dB 



.^ 



Qffno 



w 



iMJ^a 



ISipmmfSim 



rAiHi 






Price And Specifications Subject To 
Change Without Notice Or Obligation 



radiOm 



579X 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP.. 15954 Downey Ave., Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
YAESU ELECTRONICS Eastern Service Ctr., 961 2 Princeton-Gtendale Rd.,Cincinnati, OH 45246 



1 1 



Eric Shalkhauser W9CI 
S27 Spring Road 
Washington II 61571 



The History of Ham Radio 



part VIII 



The early '20s. 



Reprinted from QCC Mews, a 
publlcatlan of the Chicage 
Area Chapter of the QCWA. 



The evolution of radio 
before, and to a great 
extent during, the 1918 war 
year was for the most part 
in the hands of radio ama- 
teurs and the experiment- 



ers. The development of 
the vacuum tube and its 
utilization required much 
time for laboratory re- 
search. The quenched-gap 
and crystal detector were 




still very much in use. Con- 
siderable effort was being 
put forth by commercial 
companies together with 
government engineers, 
notably the Navy, to devel- 
op reliable means of gener- 
ating undamped waves 
along semi- mechanical 
electrical lines. The 
cLilmination of these ef- 
forts was the Alexanderson 
alternator, providing high 
frequency energy with 
power up to 200 kilowatts 
to satisfy navigational and 
overseas communication 
demands, 

Following the evolution 
of radio art, twg major 
patent-issuing corpora- 
tions emerged in America, 
undertaking research 
toward larger and better 
vacuum tubes to replace 
the quenched-gap and the 
alternator. They were 
Radio Corporation of 
America, a group con- 
sisting of General Electric 
Company, Westinghouse 
Electric and Manufactur- 
ing Company, and Amer- 
ican Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, which 



100 



pooled patent licenses, 
and then Hazeltine Cor- 
poration, an independent 
licensing holder. This was a 
time when many patent ap- 
plications were flooding 
the patent office covering 
circuit designs, and many 
component parts were en- 
tering into the assembly of 
radio receivers and 
transmitters. The two com- 
panies acted initialiy as 
holders of patent rights 
and issued licenses. Many 
individuals and small or- 
ganizations, doing private 
research, were filing patent 
applications on hundreds 
of ideas pertaining to 
radio, thus leaving the bud- 
ding industry wide open to 
massive confusion. The 
license holders tried to 
meet this avalanche of new 
developments by issuing 
warnings to developers, in- 
ventors, and all those who 
were active in the field, in- 
cluding those who pur- 
chased radio parts from 
dealers and jobbers. The 
warnings read, "the assem- 
bly of a receiver is only for 
your own private, ex- 
perimental use, which in* 
eludes broadcast reception 
of music and entertain- 
ment, not for broadcast 
transmission and NOT FOR 
SALE." In other words, 
licenses had to be obtained 
first by dealers or jobbers, 
manufacturers, or assem- 
blers to go into business. 
With such regulations, 
back-door trading became 
commonplace, and many 
instruments found outlets 
designed to circumvent the 
restrictions. 

It was to be expected 
that to satisfy the demand 
of the listening public, 
there would be concerns 
engaged in building and as- 
sembling receivers. During 
this period, it was not 
possible to standardize any 
specific design because of 
the extremely high rate of 
turnovers and obsoles- 
cence. The radio amateur 
was busily building and 
assembling sets for his 
friends and neighbors, who 



reaped the benefits of his 
expertise in wireless. 

The market mushroomed 
with the proliferation of 
broadcast transmitters 
throughout the United 
States and the rapidly in- 
creasing availability of 
radio receivers. Improve- 
ments in quality and relia- 
bility also contributed to 
lowered costs. Vacuum 
tubes were produced by 
the thousands, gradually 
improving their function 
but remaining far from be- 
ing a uniform product The 
UV-200 detector and the 
UV-201 amplifier were the 
mainstays. All others were 
either experimental or left- 
overs from previous de- 
signs. 

The year 1921 saw a 
rapid growth of broadcast 
radio service. Electric 
manufacturing companies, 
universities, newspapers, 
and many individuals ob- 
tained permission from the , 
Department of Commerce 
to become broadcasters. 
Radio amateurs had per- 
mission to transmit news, 
music, and items of in- 
terest over their stations. 
Broadcasting received the 
attention and guidance of 
various government de- 
partments. Interest in radio 
was universal. 

This rapid expansion al- 
so had its reverse effects. 
Interest waned when dis- 
turbances occurred. The 
reason — general news and 
entertaining music was 

relegated to one wave- 
length, i.e., 360 meters. Of- 
ficial government stations 
broadcasting information, 
w^eather, and market news 
were on a wavelength of 
485 meters. Not all stations 
held to these wave assign- 
ments accurately. Devia- 
tions gave some stations 
advantages over others. 
There was not enough 
room for all to com- 
municate without ex- 
cessive crossovers. The 
1921-1922 receivers were 
not built to be selective or 
to avoid overlapping sig- 
nals. Unless stations 



RADIO HOOK-UPS 




A BOOK GP Tfl£ MOST ADVANCED CIRCUITS 
OF RECEIVERS, AMPLIFIERS AND TRANSMITTERS 
PQR BAMPED AND UJTPAMPED WAVE WORK? 

M.B, SLEEPER 




EVERYDAT ENGINEERING SERIES 

NORMAN W.HENLEY PUBLISHIKG Ca 
t WEST 45 TH. STREET. NEW YORK 

1922 EDITION 



geographic ally close to- 
gether decided by agree- 
ment to broadcast at dif- 
ferent times of the day or 
were located some dis- 
tances apart, the listener 
was denied satisfactory 
reception. 

This troublesome prob- 
lem of interference be- 
came so acute that in 
February, 1922. the Depart- 
ment of Commerce drew 
up plans which rearranged 
wavelengths to the broad- 
caster and to other services 
as follows: 

Public Broadcasting, sig* 
nifying broadcasting from 
universities, public in- 
stitutions, and stations 
licensed for the purpose of 
dissemination of informa- 
tion and for educational 
services, was assigned 485 
to 495 meters. 

Private Broadcasting, 



signifying broadcasting by 

a newspaper, private or 
public organization, or per- 
son licensed for that pur- 
pose, including amateurs, 
was assigned 100 to 150 
meters and 285 to 485 
meters. 

Other wavelengths were 
intended for commercial 
ship to shore and overseas 
communication. 

General broadcasting 
stations were on wave- 
lengths sufficiently dif- 
ferent so as not to be heard 
when a receiving set was 
tuned to another station. 
This was to be determined 
by the broadcaster himself, 
using his own equipment 
Amateurs were supposed 
to operate mostly late at 
night, using wavelengths 
below 275 meters. The ear- 
ly receivers had practically 
no selectivity. They were 



101 



r 



^ 



Tuned Radio Frequency With 

Neutraltzarion of Capacity Coupling 

tn ther 

FftEED*ElSEMANN 

NEUTRODYNE' 

BROADCAST RECEIVER 




Fk^ 



Freed^Eisemann Radio Corporation 



255 FOURTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK 



rH-^Trf" k4\HV rifn I » J *i riir 



very broad tuning, un- 
stable, and consumed a 
great deal of energy, oper- 
ating from dry cells and 
storage batteries. Radio 
receivers which could be 
operated from the stan- 
dard 115-volt circuit had 
not yet arrived. 

In 1914, Major Edwin H. 
Armstrong invented a radio 
receiver circuit known as 
the regenerative circuit. He 
obtained a patent from 
the government on Octo- 
ber 6, 1914. This circuit 
described the use of the 
vacuum tube in a detector- 
oscillator combination. 
Vacuum tubes were at 
that time only in the ex- 
perimental stage, crudely 
constructed, unreliable, 
and not readily available. 
Consequently, very little 
development took place 
before 1917 to test the 
unique application of the 
Armstrong circuit wireless 
signal reception. 

The regenerative princi* 
pie in the circuit is most 
simply described by stating 
that when energy is applied 
at the input terminals of a 
circuit connected to a 
vacuum tube in oscillation, 



the circuit presents either a 
more negative or a more 
positive reaction. The ob- 
jectionable feature of a re- 
generative circuit was self- 
oscillation, which was un- 
controllable in the hands 
of the average user. The 
whistles and howls coming 
from the loudspeaker or 
headphones were shock- 
ing and became unbear- 
able. 

Under such unstable 
conditions, the radio 
amateur came up with 
novel innovations, es- 
pecially when tuning to 
continuous wave signals. 
When using his audio tron 
tube or his Marconi, 
De Forest, Donle, or Con- 
necticut "vacuum bottle" 
for that critical adjustment 
to bring the reception 
under control, the pres- 
ence of a magnet in the 
proper vicinity of the tube, 
held at certain angles to 
the bulb, would Increase 
the intensity of the signal. 
Close adiusment of the 
magnet gave excellent 
results. 

Early in August, 1919, 
the De forest Company an- 
nounced one of the first 



receivers for the monitor- 
ing of phone and/or con- 
tinuous wave signals. It 
covered 160 to 450 meters 
and was designated the 
three-coil ultra-audion, It 
was designed as a short- 
wave regenerative instru* 
ment composed of a series 
of individually-wired sec- 
tions and was hooked up 
as a composite assembly- 
Hardly a receiver for use 
by the general public. 

Receivers could be as- 
sembled following the cir- 
cuits illustrated in hand- 
books like the one issued 
by M. B. Sleeper entitled 
k^dio Hook'Ups. The illus- 
trations basically used a 
coil or two, a tuning con- 
denser, and either a crystal 
or vacuum tube detector 
plus a pair of headphones. 
The tubes available were 
leftovers, designed during 
the war by French, Ger- 
man, English, and Amer- 
ican laboratories. 

They were not very re- 
liable and rarely gave uni* 
form results. It was not un- 
common to find a back- 
room laboratory coming 
up with some exotic tube 
design. The intent was to 
try to improve such unde- 
sirable characteristics as 
excessive filament current 
drain, objectionable inter- 
electrode capacitances, 
and short-lived filament 
emission. 

The radio literature of 
the 1920s carried instruc- 
tions on how to assemble 
receivers utilizing various 
types of coiis (these in- 
cluded universal, honey- 
comb, unilateral, duo- 
lateral, bi* and multi- 
lattice), tuning condensers 
(of the straight line wave- 
length, straight line fre- 
quency, book-type design), 
variometers, and variocou- 
pfers tied to a vacuum 
tube or two in cascade. 

In 1920, the radio ama- 
teur and the avid listener 
had available receivers 
manufactured under li- 
cense. They were known as 
Grebe CR instruments. 
These receivers were not 



the type to place into the 
hands of the uninitiated. 
They were meant for the 
radio amateur and ex- 
perimenter. 

For shortwave recep- 
tion, which included 
broadcast, the internal 
capacity of the tube 
proved a bar to any 
straightforward solution. 
Realizing that the vacuum 
tube was at the heart of the 
problem. Major Armstrong 
came up with a solution in 
the circuit principle named 
the heterodyne and super- 
heterodyne. It is based on 
the mixing together of two 
frequencies in order to pro- 
duce two frequencies 
which are equal to the sum 
and difference of the other 
two. In so doing, an in* 
termediate frequency was 
produced which could be 
more effective and respon- 
sive to the characteristics 
of the available tube. The 
resultant amplification 
was a comparison of the 
voltage applied to a sec- 
ond detector in the circuit 
to that of the incoming ter- 
minal voltage. 

A receiver built along 
these lines required a series 
of 6 to 8 tubes and gave ex- 
cellent amplification. It re- 
quired skilled manipula- 
tion of the controls, since 
adjustments had to be 
made at numerous posi- 
tions to track the frequen- 
cies of the incoming signal. 
Sensitiveness of the super- 
heterodyne receiver was 
proven by Paul Cod ley 
while at Androsen, Scot- 
land, in December, 1920, 
when he logged numerous 
American stations during 
the transatlantic initial DX 
contest, related in part V of 
''The History of Ham 
Radio/' 

In analyzing the various 
circuit combinations of the 
heterodyne, it was found 
that the operation of the 
system proved a little too 
critical, especially since, 
to avoid interaction, in- 
dividual tubes were re- 
quired for detection and 
for rectification. As a 



102 



result, tuning became 
more complicated. En- 
gineers remarked that if 
some way could be found 
for tuning adjustmeots to 
be set and sealed in the 
laboratory by skilled en- 
gineers leaving relatively 
simple adjustments to the 
operator, the receiver 
would be the ideal. 

The main difficulty 
which had to be overcome 
was the instability from the 
combination of high ampli- 
fications desired. The solu- 
tion hinged on overcoming 
the generated oscillations 
when the number of tubes 
of the 1921-1922 vintage 
were hooked to one an* 
other in cascade. Much ef- 
fort was expended in de- 
signing intertube trans- 
formers of air-core, special 
iron-core, special coup- 
lings, and windings, to bal- 
ance the impedances from 
stage to stage. Instability 
was the problem, again de- 
pending on the tubes avail- 



able. 

Well known, in 1922, was 
a receiver called the 
neutrodyne, It was de- 
signed around a non- 
regenerative and non-oscil- 
lating configuration. When 
properly constructed and 
assembled, the one thing 
this circuit did not do was 
emit objectionable whis- 
tles. The neutrodyne relied 
on straightforward cas- 
cade amplification of the 
incoming signal. It started 
with one or two stages of 
radio frequency am- 
plification, then detection 
and reinforcement with 
one, two, or even three 
stages of audio frequency 
amplification. It was a 
popular receiver in its day. 
The set suffered from an 
undue amount of internal 
noise, generated and 
amplified due to mis- 
matched component parts, 
internal tube disturbances, 
and lack of sufficient tun- 
ing controls to balance out 




:^-- 



Here is an 
Outfit With 

Eight Distinct 

Features 

You Will 

Appreciate 



MfttPl m tip F>riiurjMl CiMa. 
IHaIb' li ■■« t*a D¥ ^Oi|£S.T 

tW' v*r*t «M«f munt ^i*^ *mm 



Do You Want a Complete 

Compact Receiver at a 

Reasonably Low Price? 














M 



tw*M 4*m M«ih '' 



mtm -rmiaP* Ifllit* t»s Mn** IJrpiL i 

i — Ttigl •JhmiHiJiLi* naliilwinptm* t>iil*l<*>T <fl'HbIVIt t>** flUr 

' ^1 , ■■■ 

I^Ttift ♦who**,* W*n«l*T "itftittm *«r CD l> i| l ^*t i i f uauiIm* «>«•»«, tiiMt^B+ttrti lAM 

t '' t 

T^TIk*! i*timtH III w#piiBr# H fi*n^-t*t inphnHDL'^"^"""^^!!! *'>*■' Mlxlf If fVf prl**- 
I— Ti<4i taiBktc^R in* mr^i-n^n i4lrri>M«f« vt mlri' -lii*!: Th* T U1«^ IDVIIMft* 

' : Ih, 

TiO litnmiii' Ik II iifiniinij" rnr mil Tu li«if*?^T> ai ^hrmkHpumnli'P, ciujHhii-- 

iDltiii tilHHfM ■IgHlf'llllI Uil ytW D|i»«tlRjr+Ull'TiC wliCi'llWiUrlillilrhSj W»t(HhllBt|l«. ' 

Itttifiii- ' "i-iL n . •,! Mir .iilii'i jnli-.uiiiiL:-?!:' i<r !Nlii|i|iliii< Ii^IMj' ■[ <>< nii-L 

r<ii. 

Ui-j, .J .....'.. ' 



tS.' 
JMt", 









DE FOREST RADIO TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CO. 



[ :^Tat«n iui4 iUaabcl^rct «f H'lr^ Qtmit ta^A 



irsw TO* K cm 



i» TiHK HVIfLElLj^ES A&4 



the inherent design faults. 
About this time in the 
era of wireless evolution. 



the amateur's thoughts 
were directed toward mo- 
bile and portable gear,B 



The 1979 Atlanta HamFestival 



Georgia State ARRL Convention 

June I6-I7, 1979 

Downtown Atlanta Marriott Hotel 

GIANT covered Fleamarket/Swapshop! • 140 Major Exhibits! 

More than 25 Forums/Meetings! • Special MICROPROCESSOR iiectioni 

FCC Exams! • Programs for Ladies & Children! 

Parking for thousands of cars! • Activities Galore! 

Registration: $3 per person IN ADVANCE, $4 at the door 

CliHdren FREE! 

If you do not receive a Preregistration Packet by May 1st, write: 

Atlanta HamFestival 1979 

100 Woodlawn Drive 
Marietta, Georgia 30067 

■ 

Hotel Rates: $32 per day single OR doublel 
Write for Hotel Reservations to: 

Marriott Hotel • Courtland at International Blvd. « Atlanta, GA 30303 
or phone: Area 404/659-6500 and hurry, hurry, hurryf 

THE BEST HAMFE5T IN THE WORLD! 



'!i 



103 






INTRODUCING THE EXCITING NEW 
ATLAS 110 LINE 



ATLAS RX-110 



A high performance Ham Band Recehfff 
at a f anisette tow price, 

• nwpMncf e«varag*- 3SQ0-4DOa ^Hj 7000- 

kHi.^e 000-29.000 kttr 

■ AllSoUd SLkli. High P«rlormftnceDts)gn, Em- 
cedent SensilivMy. Selectivity, and Dyn^rtiic 
Range. Sup^ilor lo Most Receivers currenlly 
Dr> the markm, 

• ilcceiv«4 CW and norm ill SSB. Lower S(d«>- 
b^nn on. i ^ and / MHj bands Lipper Stde^ 
band on 14, 21 . arid SB MHj ban<±s. 

• Duitt-ln AC luiifilf and loud tpeadier. 

• EXCmWG MEW FiAfllWE: Th» RR-110 cori- 
■ eft^ lo a 1 10- 1. TrdntCAtw ty pMiging in mc 
TM-TtO TrwtnMm Module The tm ynrtt 
iTiay ^ a'Raci'ted w«Th Df^citetb. it desfrsd 




CALCULATOR 



This It ihe afnaleyr bnnd rfScfllvflr you've bsen 
WEiiEing fori U's perfecl for the rtt^wcaimer lo 
Urtipleur radio who wania ■ low cost receiver lo 
monhiDF ati rhe actictn on tha h^in i:han^d5. or for 
It^e o^d tinker who wanl^ ar\ flit Ira receiver with- 
out having to spend a foriuno, 

The RJf-1 lO's soUd afate design, wilti high Sensi- 

coffipanble la r«ceiv«rs c Piling savcfal binas. 
motfs Yet tiecwise ot iH »fnpUciTy 04 desgn 
and dur well kno«n yato* ftgi n tirn n^ ttie ccp^sI 
14 rttmartiably low 



TX—1W TRANSMIT MODULE 



Add The TX*tfO Module to the ^KtW 
and PRESTO f A Complete Ham BBnd 
Transceiver. 



A REAL BfiEAKtHfidUGH IN VERSATILE LOW 
COST AMATEUn EQyiPMENTJ 



RX 110— S229 
RX 11 OS -$269 
TX-110H---$249 
TX-110L— $159 




Mckctol EL-S131 

9 Oig< CiitLiua^fi irqf. Ufiiunr. 
Sauan Rui mtf Pferosn 

■ ^qtiiet ttm ktfr 

■ Cllfr illd tMll trUf !•¥«. 

■ Dvirnnw frrnr cinck dnici. 

■ I'lwvr E' "AA" liinirifi ind, 

■ 14flicllirQ9it|l9 Ml-t^id bflliriit ind 
iHaCFltr^civtrgtF «|tllanil 



SVs 



jj 



* % 



xS'i 



S'1295 





Model EL-500 






ti iMiniff . 

i Bipw , ffijDiim, fKdifif n 

ItigurtQmeiiic. mmii 

ErlgoiniinifllTic £ logjthliinlc cpl 
Squiri PHI, roQi anii pfc lur^ri 

AC titpm it^mmi. 



$1895 



" Pnytida* CW «MJ SS8 comtntmlcaUofr* 

• Ail solkl lUI* 

• Futt bmttA e a titm on 1 S th roug^ flQiiwieft, 2% td 
?9 MHz o^v 10 meifffi 

« Chokv of in milt inpot or 200 waits input, unth 



Witn this compteteliy n«w C(»ic«flt m rvcBtver 
trRAKfisver deSk^n we ve pfQdf««ll ft real break- 
Ittrough m kyw oist imaieuf equi|]inefd. A su- 
perb low cost i«Oiiw«r m ttwl wth, and lor ttm 
small ftMtta cosf o* ff»e TJt-iiO mcMluie^ a com- 
p»eie 5 hand CW'&S0 rrinsc«ive? 





Model EL-S806 

BiliWd lifm Ativw^M S&ienErric 

CJ5trijl3triF tm\\- 7 fimm ln\r. 

M fl dliU minnnii/^Z'digit inirvtlhc 

■ Pri-prDgridim^Hl lur H fllnElinHl. 

■ StillilJcil cilculilKtni. 

■ Eiiy ID rii44 Hl-Geitrrasi LCti 

■ Imtlcildri Idf mlnut, rnimary. 
biiiiry ind iCiiiitlEil nvdi. 

S Contlinl chiJiin (Miivar iciinlillic 
ini tiitiilitiJ cjlcvtitiattl 

■ t,Q(Ki tiaun in Z hiTeIi bJtTtnsi 

■ SoPt rinvl urrfln^ us» lrt«lv(l«d 



29 



95 










I 



Model EL-5001 

113 ^? Digill Sopti4S}isl«] ScienlilK 
CAltuldloi Fulunno Ltncdr Equa- 
It^nti Qpmpheii: Numt^r, rni^aaiton 

■ Mgn tliin ZS biiic funclKnii*. 

■ OBflrM/Wtmrif/Seconfl -*■■■* 
dielitiuij n Dill 1041 dagrse. 

■ Poilr Biiordinilii4=*'fiElin|ut|f 
ceardintiB 

■ Digrbi - fljidiin - Sffftltn iti«di 

■ PvHiir Ni-Ci^ liiniiriti and AC 
■dip4if ^chifgtr «nc4yidi#. 



$4095 




Model EL-1058 

ib-Otgn Deiii Tof) J-Cuxx ^inlHti 

CxICiJlllt&f with CanvKHBTFt Graml 
Tfltil M^mDry 

■ Itl^l rnvmnry ^, 

■ 7 CQliir pfinlir (rid A bllDliJH 
fl liiv f9 Qpirili "Huiiviii 

FnoHiBafsd" kivbtifd liyenC 

■ l<la.ridf hQn-^dd/iulhlDlal My 
II Add riDd'n. dBCJinil jEJJJI and 

DqniliniyilutiJiii dicirnt! liliclot 

■ Ptowtr IZQV 



74 



95 



AUTOPATCH — Ready to go 






Modtl MB II S2B5 
(wllh eiltjn)S315 



wa II provktot: 

*Cof*stani SWR monitormg * Precisfon tunin-g ol Urta^ amp * Harmonic suppcession. 
* Recenv^f mpul impedance-mate hi ng-* Wammum power tranafef to antenna ♦Con- 
tinyous frequency coverage 16 to 30 MHi * Precisiofi turimg of ainy wire W 
wavelength or longer, witti SWR of \\, 

MB II f«atut««: 
*Fine!s( 'quality, rrtad*-in*USAcofncNonenis *ijBtrg^ pfec"5^0fi. ©asy-fdi-read dials with 
j60 r^adoui *Qf)t»onat 30CX? watt Baiun lortwrn lead antennas 

The most conventent wav to order! Just call ourCrodit Card Order 
Department 9AM-9PM. Your order will be processed rmmBdiatelv— 
vou'lf be receiving it even more quickly than ff you'd sent it by 
mail. Any way you look at it, our samenday service plus our special 
telephone credit card service equal the fastest way to shop by maiH 
Helpful hint: To make your order as dear as possible, fill in aFI 
information on this order form, then read it when you catL 



A Complete Autopatch faciillt)^ thai requires only a repealer 
and 3 telephone hne. features include single-digit access/ 
disconnect, direct dialing from mobile or hand-held radios^, 
adjuitable ampJifiers for transmitter and telephone audio, and 
tone- burst transponder for acknowledeement of patch dls^ 
connect. RAP-2QQ P. C. C*rd |199,50 

IIAP'200R Rack Moynt 1249.50 




Lbrsefi Kulrocl 
nntefifios 



m HAfwIt* full 200 «Htb •tDw4ow V^.W.R. 

* Dvlivsf 3 dS ^in and ffiof cf 

• Pick the on* thai bei f lU vovr m 

MAGNETIC MOUNT 
sia>ysput even si 

1 00 m ph ' "^ — ^xL'-^ 

MM JM i50lon44MH2use^ *^^^^ 
MM jM^aO lor 220 MHz us(i $38.50 
J^jyM^44^oM4^HzLjge complete 





£ 



TRUNK LID MOUNT 

Notio^esand low 

5ilhou«iieioo' 

TLM J M 1 50 (Of 1 44 M Hz u se] ^ W 

TLM JM 220 lor 220 MHz us^ $:^ .SC 

TLM jM^*40ror440MH2use) complei 

And 1/4 wave aiiienna for trunk 
and ma(|netic moum - 518,50 

ROOF or FENOER MOUNT 1 

Goes on quick and easy 

in 3/r* or 3/4" with 

fewest parts. 

JM i&OKfor 144MHJUse 

iM 220-K tof 220 MHz use 

JM'440-K for440 MH; use f complete 

And 1/4 wa^/e antenna for roof and 
fender mounts $1 1 .50 



Only 
$31.50 




Name. 



Call 



V/SA 



Address. 
City 



.State 



Zip 




Order: 



Prices FOB Bedford MA. 
MA residents add 5% sales 

Minimum $3.00 for 
shipping & handling 
on ALL ORDERS, 



u Check enclosed f J Visa ^ Master Charge 

PRICES SUBJiCT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



Credit card #^ 

Signature 



Card expiration date 



«^T3 Radio Electronics 

209 Mystic Avenue 
Medford, MA 02155 
(617) 395-8280 
(800) 225-4428 

OPEN DAILY 9-1 
SATURDAY 9-G 



v^ 



^4iODUCT« C^ SOuf^D efe&fcJlflCi'^ 






Lightweight Headphones 



cDMui^twiCLA-r^oi^a, i««c 




^. 



HFC-91 

jntA-u^ni uridtrcHin iii^cccsuiiEic: delay of 
1 aiilliHconii (trifi4'ici9ft I iTEe 1 1 ig iCiiiH 1^ rt 

^f^dr «r C«Wl>f Ms 1II1S013 $9>90 



r 



/ 



/ 




HMC-2 

tjir -grapT for cantHti i 2 aunc«i 1O0 



HTC-Z 

Iht prp s *h(j m u hi 'A'^s ' I h^em far riou-ft 
1 e uurtCtH 100 • 3 0DO MJ tow impert- 
inqe iQ-SO o^hmi 



Hl-Q BALUIM 









0ndiw Hf CltMOQ No ttm-OO? Si D.DO Otitm bt CM*^ Hft ]7?5-0Cli? $24<50 



/7^ 



rtus 




PC- lOaH^dplidfie 

Fuii cuintQn co*ntor1 — 
0»io«e* ideailor nov*c» 

Oi0*f bf Caltfog 

No fSSiO-OlO 




H6«||>hofk« J««k Box 
H«ffi OuQA f hfilei «tsy contest 

figs fof fnuiiipie hewf- 
conti'ol^ 4 Idol eor«t with 



$16,954 

pnOFESSIONAL HEADPHONES 
& HEADSETS 

'III iMi uiriFtiiiii 41 Li|iTiin>u4iibriiit)ni' l u<i Mirtictii h iPta iMtcpirKy ■t'K I « ■kmni'' ifin Ibiidni Lanp littiri l4v|itiiw ^1 |h 
{DiiiiiiirHii«rt4Hit boarn pn<i: ^ri«||«Pi all^f'^' moM |iifiDr*il mdivililv v<^il* ibi^H-v^ ^f^k^i'ifl K^vnnii itrapatiit iia«MiiiFiifl tur tmi Wi'i 

- ■ - •■ ■mi*'iil>M ifl'I'Hi.i p-ib^vnl nskikPirii . ■ 1 . ■■ iinilliBitiifity |.«4* 



$14.30 



-•wan, U^lrt, w««ilMf *p«*«f 

»i:i Iin^d«it4* rvfto 

«B«pla««« c«iil*r litiiil«t«f 

-Httl»f«JliBiiMterVI 

"Pally OMirwntvad tfl fIC 

Van 

Go r den "••** 
Engineering 




t 



Model 210 



1 fK'Alh, 



■oott 


tElO 


SWlilD 1 C l?1D 


t 1311) 1 CKEID 


CM 1310 


CH 1 37t CM 1 12«S 


»f , • ^ ■ f . i ■ 1 " . 
3t*<|,iipri (till 


^Ml 


*4KrB 


■; 




^3« 




EOSdBSII 


"^SSr* 


J2 


TQOQa^ 


71 




J *■ 
»#^ 


37 


13 


3 J 
mmm. 












SO 
8000 tH 


ion HI 
















*i,^ 


MN^§4 


in^R 


t^m 


5fl•l^Tl¥^lt 
j! Ik HI 










51 dB 

"5dfl 








Pticm. 


$tCl.45 


$12 25 


$29.70 


$41.80 


S47.20 


$62.75 $75,25 $59 95 






/ 



• D 






QQQ 
BQQ 



Model 
300 





Model 221 



Model 
220 



*MDd*i30Q - AC^Liiiiiit c{Ki|Hi<ri9 f49.?S 

* MadfiH STd lor mduihiipiitpoin PtaHh.iM <iT ficTTci tiiHdi. $30. 9l^ 
*M{»iS«4 5?d CfeS £airi new olti* yO" ■ touch TOftj^^ hj^i '- 
5l«rid*r«t C^iniTiu nii;iT< an« ^f«nc| *<v^d ria«0i Thil il Il»« Cl^rnr' ' 

^ Waa l Zt S 1 iTFintaiEjf » >ii*nJOn ol 3 1 0) - £39 9S 





i 



iQ 



\ 

7 



f 



Model C610 ^ 

(SWL 610) Model C 1320 Model CM 610 Model CM 1210 







t 




ModefC 1210 



Model CM 1320 Modef CM 1320S 




^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ Novice Crystals (Specpfy Sand Only) 




TWO METERS Motorola HT 220 Crystals 

CRYSTALS IN STOCK In StOCk! 

landard • (com • Heathkit • Ken •Clegg • Regencv •Wilson • VMF 
Eng # Drake •And Othefsf 

LIFETIME GUARANTEE! 
MOW OMLY S9.00 A PAIR I 



Make/Mode) 


Xmrt Freq.. ' 


Rec. Freq. 

































1 



* V4CMI Z^l :UNvi - tSd 9% 



( 



Ht72e 



:l| «r^ Pw6 M«4*ittf 



THE HAM-KEY 

NOW 5 MODELS 




Model HK-2 

• Sam« as 
HK-1, less 
base for 
those who 
wish to imcor- 
p o r a t e j n 
their- own 
K ©y er. 




Model HK-5A 

Electronic Keyer - $69.95 

• New Cabinet colOr^ keyed to 
match nnost modern radio equip- 
ment • Iambic circuit for squeeze 
keying • Se*f- completing dots & 
daslies • Dot moinory • Battery 
operated witti provision for ex- 
ternal power • 8uiti-in side-tor>e 
monitor • Grid block or direct 
keying • Speed, volume, tone & 
weight controls all mounted on 
front panel. • For use with exter- 
nat paddle, such as H K- 1 or HK-4 

• Cen be us:ed as Code practice 
oseitlator with straighvkeVp such 
as HK-3 



^i^j^r , B 




Model HK-3 $16,95 

♦ Deliijxestralgihl key. 

• Heavy lM%«^ riQ n««d to attach to 4t%k 
» Velvet «m<»th action, 




Model HK-1 S29.95 

« Dual levef s^^ueeze pad<fle, 

• Use with HK 5 or any electronic k«y«r 
« Heavy base wtfhnon slip rubbijr t^eet 

• Padd l«5 re vers i bi e 1 o*- w i de or c lose 
t P nger s pa-c I no 




Model HK-4S44.95 

« Cornbination on HK 1 & 
HK 3ofisamebase. 








4 ELEMENT BEAM 



10-15-20 METERS 



1 



Cy«llcraf1 #rNg>neer& have incorpofaied more than 30 
yeari oi ^es^gn eMpenence inio th« best 3 band 
KF beam avaitjbte today ATii*34 Has superb 
peHoTTnanct «iitt three active eiemtfits €m e^ch 
barrd ttie ci^rivenience of easy aasembiy and 
modest difnensions Value tfwougih rMPAvy duly alt 
aluminum cQnstruciKvi and 3 iKice cofflbtele wilh 

ENJOY A NEW WORLD OF DX 



FQRiAri^RD GAIN ■ 


EJtC£LLE«T 


FfB flATiO - 


30 m 


VSVVA ' 


14* 


POWfA 




tlAMDLNG ^ JOOe WTArrS PEP 


aOOM L£P«GTH/ DU 


" le ■ ? t^» 



SIȣCtFlCATlO#4S 

LONGCST CiiHEl4T 32 6 

tuAMNG nAdms - i« » 

^INO Sf C ' 5 4 Sq Fi 

WIND S«J(IV«VIIL - 90 MPfi 



World Radio T 
Handbook 197 







«^ul'i^ 'p J. h TC.,1* ■HBI.fe kAtlO^ 



I1E.00 



$259.59 
UPS SHIPPABLE complete 

COMMUNrCATIONS WITH AT8-34 



VHF-UHF DX-ARRAYS 

144^ 220^ 430 Mhx 




20 ILIMINT DX- ARRAYS 

20 ELEMENT SPECmCATIDNS 



Fonifard Gelin »-■■ 


"- I4i2 db 


impftdinta 


52 ohmi 


>yB RaUo ---". 


.**.. 24dta 


VS(^tl«l Pr«qutnty ---- i ~ 1 


Fwd, Lnb* »l Ij'* 


P^r* Point 


B»iH»«fidlh w vnwfi 


hoFlzailul ■ 


.- . 4r 


Lcf « lh>n 2 - 


1 — - 4 mhi 


vvrlirA3 --.-—. 


— Z6* 


Pew«r Hmidliitt 


- - 1 KW PEP 




Hi Mht 


U9 Mitt 


4J£Hli« 


Hetftif 


ill* 


Tr" 


41" 


WMh 1 Di^pth 


t5"*W" ia"m»l" 


t9"n W 


Tumtnc ^ilttft 


«" 


«" 


tl" 


Hscimuim Mtii na. 1 t/I" 


I iva-' 


! lA" 


Srt Uvi^i Ubft. 


» 


1 


• 


%>Ttical rappart m 


Lilt not vtp^i^ 






1 Meier DX 130 


l%'4 Mtfcf 


DX 120 »-. Mrtef DX^20 


Am Nrt |J?..95 


142.9! 


S16.95 



40 EiiMEMT DX- ARRAYS 



Fcni^rd CaIa •**—*-- IT db 

F B RJi4d --***"»"» to db 

i^d. Ldb« 11 I /i Pur. Pnuit 

hariiontil »——«-• 32' 

HfLgM 



WIdih i( Dppih 
TurnluK Porilui 
MEximuin Mxt DMi- 
Net W^i|thl l,bi. 
Wind Rallni 
suck Kfl Nn, 
Amalmr N«l 



IlM" 

lor 

2 1/2 ■ 

90 rnpli 
DICK- 140 
S A5 95 



\'^%lt ■[ Fr«i4k«HUlr — 1 - I 

Lcflfe ttufi ? - I " — - i mlu 
PoM^r liindlini -- 2 KU' PEP 

71" 

133 ' It W 



H 1/2" 
22 

DKK-24Q 



432 Mhx 

4a ■ 

72"* 11" 

36" 

2 1/2" 

12 

9*> mph 

DXK-44Q 

145^5 



to tLIMINT DX- ARRAYS 



*ot LL I M t ST BV EC I rWA TKJNJt 



r B rbiio - — ^■ 

r^d. Lobr at I '' 
hnrizflAal: -< 

Width % Depth 
Tumum Kidiut 
MHimum 1M«I 
U ind Itfttinc 

Stack Kkl Sn. 



[HI. 



M 




HF MONOBEAMS 

10 15 20 MEfERS 




10 MITIRS 

3 tLtUtnt SEAM Y'ou oJi Irivr ia niUUiidmi BLpuE ulni 
t^it ^oBifiiirl thr«« el^ftiHit b<>«ni. It tt fftaily rncmnt«d on ■ 
liftilwriKht TDlnLor and lakcfl only ■ |lmilf*d imAimt of iipftce< 

4 ELtMFNT »E^M A rM( OX>r» Iwum for th* aetiv* ham 
who want! a top ak|^l on 10 mrtpra* Mount, on * good ham ro- 
taiar, Mgdd No. A28-4~SB9,9J 



HF Verticals 10-80 (Vlet#r$ 
•efficient top ring • fiberglass 
trap forms • enamel od wire coiH 
•solid alyminum capacitors •no 
tuning required • full compres- 
sion ciamps • omnidirectionai 
cover^e • reinforced base • mast 
or ground rnountif^ •pre-marked 
sections • easy assembly • supe- 
rJoT oualitv 

3 BAND 20-15 meterVModel 

4 BAND 4" 20* IS* 10 meters/ 
Mode! ATV-4 ,.,,,,*,». S89.95 

5 BAND S0'4O*20*iBM0 meters 
Model ATV 5 $109.95 



aPECtFlCATlONS 

BOOM 

LONGEST EL£Ml:^^^ 

ELIMEJIT OiA METER 

TURNING RADlliS 

ft)|4^AFl[)fjAlf« 

FRONT TO BACK 

^R t» FNEQUENCY 

WEICHT 



It* «■' 
T/i" - I /ft" 



A 28-4 

I S/H" x U" 

7/»"'3/4^ 
14' 3" 
10 (»» 

tU) 1 

21 Ibt. 



11 Ite. 

IS MITiRS 

3 ELEVCNT BEAM A fak^ qtullty Iwftm vbLch cu bci 
on a m^Ml wall 04b«r ^ntcmwa, A Itesv; duly TV ratotor «-kU 
twRdlr li- 

Modd No. A2t-J-SW.**5 

4 ELEMENT BEAM For ihv 15inft4«r*ntKu«L>«l *hi4N«lB *ill 
gtrc r«i3 DX peHomunc^- Vilicn momfitrd on a food faam rO' 
Utor It ikilli i*llhatjuid the moat advvrae »«feUi#r condiUena. 
Mchdd No, A2 1-4-1129.95 



SPECIFICATIONS 

LONCEiiT ELEMENT 
ELEMENT DIAMETER 
TlfRNINO BAOItS 
FlIRWARPCAIN 
FRONT TO BACK 
SWR Ii FBEQL ENCY 
WEIGHT 



AZI-3 

I S/B"it 12* 

22 db 

1 to 1 
tC lb#. 



A;E1-4 

1 3/4 "a 21" 6 

22* 10" 

7/S"-l/4" 

tfi* - B" 

LO db 

35 db 

1 ID I 

22 IbA. 



30 MITIRS 



1 ELEMENT BEAU FtulEalie beam pfrformanev for tfaeactlv# 

10 Biaur tttm »ilb limited »p(ire ami ^^ttdgi-l* 

Modd No A 1 4^3-1 119.95 

3 ELEMENT SEAW A r*»l DX-*r'a b**n^ »itti Ml .15 mrr- 

ImgUi flwwat cpftcinc. Thr li^ry ottfjr mfutfuctian ttti'S 

>eaf ^ of I rmibk- free wr^itt. M Add Nil , A 1 4- J 1 1 59.95 



spEcirrrAT»oNS 

BOOM 

LOtcCESt ELEMENT 

ELEMEfTT DIAMETER 

Tt RȣI1^G RAIXt S 

FORliARO CAIN 

F/B KATH) 

SUH (ft UlEiQl ENCY 

WEICHT 



At 4-3 

I 5/«"a 10' 

I I'i"- J/4' 

:tiii 
13 <i> 

I to I 



A 14 -3 
1 to 1 




Speak upu 

wft know all atwui up in fec^. we're 

numbief one Irofn Th* ground 

up ..when il come* to amateui com- 

muoicfltloni tOw*f4 M'e'vt t5e«n 

bonding iticm for HAMSTcw more than 

two If rartti 

wneth*J voiuYt thinking crflf*;-i#p. 

pcndabk 

•ban "* M? nymbCf one friom 
mc yoMim ^ , ^f^ 'c taiivsg about 

tOwtfl Mtt Irr.tJt new ^^ V 

fhi^wn r«Y tn a N«e^$t]antir^ 

low COM iOeilfOrtcnOiHH^MS 

Modet W5I 

(51' S«tf supporting) 

S8SO,00 







SST T-1 RANDOM WIRE 
ANTENNA TUNER 

All bajfxd operattun (160-10 meters) wit 
any rutdom length of wire. ^30 watt outpi 
power capabiUiy — will work witii virtual] 
any transceiver. Ideal for portable or hotn 
operation. Gremt tcv apartments and hov 
rooms — sEinply run a wire inside, out 
Window, or anyplace available* Tor old ii 
ductor for anaO sUe: 4-1/4'* x 2^3 ^8" % 3' 
Buth'in neon lunch^up indicator. S0^23 
connector^ Attractive bronze finished et 
closure. Only $29,9& 

SST T-2 ULTRA TUNER 

Tunes out SWR on any coax fed antenna i 
well as random wires^ Works great on a 
bands (160-10 meters) with any transceivi 
running up to 200 watts power output. 
Increases usabli;! bandwidlh of any antenni 
Tunes out SWR on mobile whips froi 
inside youf car. 

Uses toroid Indue tor and speciallv maci 
capacitors for small si/e; 5^*** x 2^**^x 2i'i, 
Rugged, yet compact* Attractive brona 
finished enclosure, SO 239 coax connectoi 
are used for transmitter input and coax fe 
antennas. Convenient bmduig posts are pr( 
vided for random wire and ground coi 
nections. Only S49.95 

SST T-3 IMPEDANCE TRANSFORMER 

Malches 52 ohm coax to the lower impe^ 
ance of a mobile whip or vertical. 1 
position switch with taps spread between 
and 52 ohms. Broadband from 1-30 MH 
Will work with virtually any transceiver 
300 watt output power capability. S023 
connectors, Toroid inductor for small sizi 
2-3/4" % 2" % 2^1/4," Attractive^ bron;^ 
finish. Only $10*95 



■ t 




6 METER BEAMS 




*i.6.IO ELEMiNIS 

CACB perfcrm«K« front ra|ce4, hill •!«** * eneter b*uii*. 
,•« test ivlifTv, hl^ forwnl f>lll« food (nnt to taciL rvllo 

.OSS lAlt i«t *teiii«ia» »rv J/4" - &/!'* .<H1 ««U 
cbitMBC flatiill **i«i»i— B^UiS, Tbr 3 and 5 fJeinrnt 

TT ] 5/f" - 1 1/^" bwnu. All br«cfctt» ir« hrawr ^^ 
rmed Mbimtmufi. Brigla flaiak^d p1«mlutwUaiitT)idJ«*^.bir 

siBCxit bcviiu. At! loiHltto EBAjr to —mwl for torlioHti] or 
atiei] pclAf Izatioa. 

^*r iemxoTcm lEiciaide Kt]wt*:W* Icti^b trlrmefiti, kllcm^utt RctjJt 
SLtcb ami tnilt-in CQU tittlflC for «llf«et &2 ohrn frcd. Tto>v 
»Dk> MTV factory inark«d cod iqnsimi ^Itli u»truci4ciBia for 



DiM^iMtPE^n 


JttVttmwH 




G«iMncnt 


ll^ltffliim 


■■ * - J - > 111, 


A»3 


A^S 


Afia« 


A5010 


Bovo (^■fvf- 


ir 


13- 


3a 


2*' 


LomgnEi 


Mr 


117-' 


iir 


nr 


Turn fl:*^i» 


F 


rr* 


M 


%T 


F'wd Gnn 


7^d8 


fSxiS 


n 5dB 


13d& 


^ '^ ftftifi 


20 da 


34 dB 


SWiJS 


36 da 


Wek^t 


7lb& 


n ibt 


iaitt» 


?&lb|. 



COAXIAL DUAL STA[:i]J<iC «.ni 
&Mllli« rew effect l¥« r«dui1td p«wfT bjr 

■tukuif i.tU provtdr i ulfit>k ind r^iui!-nl 
mi^bad foir cvjluinf. > db iddlUnHal |iin 
o^Ut miinlutiini tht luptriQr diiu«.^ 

l^nitKi cf am Bnijlr tiraHiL Tht tlMLkjnf 
fciti ire cciifip3«lF wiLh R(:,-59^U title IlFiU 
pnsiHnnblBrd fihillfs for djfwl S2 vhm 

>del No. For stack ms- Amalcur Ncl 
3h\-SK A50-6wr A50^IO Slt.95 




RINGO 
RANGER 

L tor FWI 



4.5 dB* -BdB** 
OmmdirecticKial 

CAIN 

BASE STATJON 

ANTENNAS 

roR 

MAXIMUM 

PERFORMAI^CE 

AND 

VALUE 

Zmh Craft hu created mother fimt by RiAkinjr the 
jwrkl's moflt poiHilar 3 meter ofiUno* twle* u gwd- 
Die n#w Rin^ Ranger is ck^^elop*d irtan the tmaic 
^a-a *iih three hatf wmvea m pli«ie uid b mh* eighth 
^ve matchiii? -itub, Eifkgo Ranger gift* *n #Ktrtmely 
ow anifle of radJAtioci for better nifit*! coreraire Tt b 
;iniabk over a broad frequency rmo^ And petfr^tly 
ngtclud to 53 ohm cthuc. 

ARX-2. 11MS0 MHi. 4 tos.. 1ir* 
ARX-220. 220-225 MHi. 3 lb*.. TJ* 
ARX-4S0, 435^450 UNx. 3 «»., 3^' 



■■ F.efiprESC* ^ wnv* whip lufd *M fmln ULMKUrd b]r mui> 

XTork fiill quiet miE into nrore f*pMt#f» *nd extent! the 
-wliiis of yoor direct eoatac-tA with the new Einpi 

ifou can up 4»t£' your present AR-2 Rmfo with tlte 
lunpie addtikHi of thti eKtemk. kit The kit incluck^ 
Jte piusinff netwfMit and iMceiisary eteii>«iit esEttn^ions. 
fhe ooly modificatioiis required art e**y to make saw 
Jits in the top section of yoor antenna. 



ARX-tK 



CONVERSiON KtT 



2 METER 

ANTENNAS 



A'fU flmOO 1-^ AB Qdud I rcf ereikH \ w>*« wlii^ i Hmlf wan laicth klr- 
Inms with tfuHt ^ pvui^ ^ ohm fwrt tM^^* Pl-aa, Imp »Mglm at 
IMA wiUt l-l IWilt FutPfT prcK^enWAi uid hb^ IA IHtia. # 
pmJf pnuwnUdedL >ll kut iM |iB> lafca 1 Ik' ««4*1^ Hhan an nion RMCvi 

!■ HI HUM. MU MJUr ni SBlHBH i tUlllU l l I fl 

M^IM IfiimtMi AR'I Alt^tS AJl-« AA-fH AM-44# 

r^^uvfso MHi iK^-tTS 139-171 W-M t»-n3 *«-*« 

wauj ue d« »» M> »A 

ii. it* Ji" JT jr .w 



MT KHf — zr zm iiMz — IS'. 4» kOfx — r. p«i]«ni Mv* - I 

tn}' - # dB laia. U ofan r««4 tikts FL >m nfiiirfcT. Pteliat* 

■ad lO 
VvUfsl Hpport i^ot Bit w^t/taA. 

AfHt^iJ IH - ISA MBm. I«H *«tUL *«4 ^^ tM m t^ 
Ant £*E> ]» '^^ MHjt »W «tbL m^ ana I •» iq R 
AFll-t«I> 43S--ft9B ICHx. !«» mUL wind ■««* t U «^ tL 

IBB A|fT-l| rmiki Via m. 



Alft-n lU - IIA UBe. mo Wmaif. wtiid m* t^« t^ tt 



■tfiarti^ for Ck? ^iwikall^ faAu-^fd jafu 
ihfl MBfta mrudli 




e-«-#-ti ff* Firt TiT riUilS The itaadard, vf n^iipiTiwgn mt VTCP-UHF n^»- 
nA fw FH B^d TtTti^iJi peliri^Ljoii Ttt* frttir baA hs *!•- 
b* t0«r«r Dda aiwntvd All an niUd al ICOO w«lu ■»«» 

BDin/l^ienl dc 141" tD" 44" 'W 
mgM-/Tvm rtdiw* « lb*.. 73" 1 lit. «' 
OaJ^/r^'B raUD dB I^Ll-IS l/^D 

Wmi am iq, CI iTt .U 

F^T4^u':n■^y MB* Hfl-JIQ 140-1431 

F^M TWIST 13-* im GikiD: TEH ttemests hortconlal f^iirtHtMSi for |0w 
iiVl twverag^c and Ieh elem-eoti TrUral p^Brizatl4in for flW r^vermf*^ FDih- 

■S«n)ei»t *0-\ ^ oKiti EUKJkil MAtrh driven flmnHH^U iUtli« PI^SSV fofmtoftfrm. 
HMO, two a^aratc Fe«l iLeica, 

A14T-iOT 145 - 147 MHi low *»ltsi, urtod art* J |J M| fl. 



A441^]l 


Ai4a4 


At>3-ll 


w ir 


la".*" 


itr* vat- 


4 Iba, M~ 


lite, ir 


A lb 31 


11^1/a 


ii/'la 


1U » 


4H' 


w 


«' 


» 


-H 


ja 


44IMU 


4t»-i» 


X^tSA 



HIOH PERFORMANCE 
VHP YAOIS 



3/4 , 1-1/4, 3 MFTilt MAMS 

Tisc RlAivlBnt or comparison In atnflttiir VMFArKF (romnmnlc*- 
(ifVia Ciuib Crdb TlglB cotnliMW all cnt p* rfo mwhcr and r*li*- 
bill IV Hilb apUmum stt« for ak»e oi asBAmbCt aiid nKNMinft ai 

Ll^w<igjhi yet ruined, the jwtFwimi tove n/14" <J. D. aglid 
atviniiBixn f Wmrtiia Titb ^/ir cept«r^itf|ida irriiNifrtied4n ItedTji^ 
(hity fomsed brackets, fiocioi* are T mnA T/S" O- D. sliuQlnum 
tubing. Mast EfiQania nf l/S" fann«ii almnimim hare BdjuMablF 
u-faditA tor yp ta t-l/Z" 0*0. maata. The? can b* ftiouftf*TJ 
(or horiuBital or vertical potariiatjon. Complelc if»uvelwAa 
inpliaie dtaia ^ 2 SHter I'M repeater op^raLraA. 

New festurK laetiade a kUirvdtt iteddi Katcfl Ht direct SI dkm 
c(U]iiflrf««d«m»stHH»an£ En.-Z5t nniBf. Ail 

at ,£ mvcfea^k dad lapered (or jnfFnwed fa«tfvMtfe, 



OodiHWo 


A144 7 


AIM It 


A23D11 


Dvtc^pPOft 


^ 


a» 


\%m 


Eiemenn 


7 


11 


II 


&»mLn^ 


98" 


1«- 


HW 


We^T 


4 


C 


4 


F^if &IK1 


tidi 


11 de 


\%m 


F 9 H«« 


2SdB 


28 dB 


•mm 


F^ UriwP 








^pwir lA 


^ 


43 


42 


^n#Ff«)| 


Itol 


1 10 1 


lial 









Tempo 




channels 

\n the palm 

of your 

hand 

Tempo presents the 

SI SYNCOM-., the world's 

first synthesized 800 

channel hand held 

transceiver 



This amazing pocket sized radio represents the 
year's biggest breakthrough in 2*meter communications- 
Other units that are larger, heavier and are similarly 
priced can offer only 6 channels. The SYNCOM'S price 
includes the battery pack, charger, and a telescoping 
antenna. But, far more important is the 800 channels 
offered by the SI. The optional touch tone pad shown 
in the illustration adds greatly to its convenience and we 
have available a 30 watt solid state power amplifier 
designed to give the 5YNC0M S4 the flexibility of 
operating as a mobile and base station as well. 

iM^ClFlCATfONS 



Friqiivncv CrlvBrAgi- 


l4«-b9 14BMMr 




C|i<»n-n(^ Sji-ariip 


Emdtt S sCH, 




Pimtft Fl«<|uii«i1i»|rt 


ae ¥QC 




C'jimnl Crai>^ 


1 7 mn ' f tind^v 400 int - iirn^nwt 




5*i^«iisa 


l^i.E;*t] t^mnatt jncli inclii4l4d 




Ant*nnH IrnjndnrKB' 


60 oKth 




DiATijinpKani 


40 pimiflZ JTim P, 155 mm H B" j 2 5" 


16 fi-| 


H+ <4Mi[inf 


B«M*i khtn l.a MifiLt 




^ini'Hl^ll'ir 


UaHqir^K'Bn G miCfCrviO^* 





SUPPLIED ACCESSOnrES 

TBinficDfiirrg ifk+iip BnlimnB nicad liatlDrY pKh i;htfqmt 

OPTIONAL *CqESSOR[Fg 

fuLi^li ui\'* pud. H]na iiur^i {jitnyrf [[k . C'CiS nhipt. 'At^fbtr 4Iki pnunru 

PflEH O49.0D i[^ N>Th Khicn <nn» pM im.iXH 



DELUXE RECEIVER PREAMPLIFIERS 



Ideal for Recetvars — Converter! 
High Gain — Low Notie 

FEATURES^ 

• Small size 

• ) Heresies sensttivity of most receivers 

• Gold-plated copper shielding 

• Sjngfe or double stage models 

• D^ode protected, duaf-gated FETs 



'ADDON 
POWER! 



H n. 



■AiJiTTg 

11 S£4lt 



Highest quaitlY, American-macte ttf^nd" 
iransislcri^ are fiilJy protected for VSWR, 

short and oveHo-a'd, rev@r$e polarity. 
Highly effective fveat sinking assumes long 
kfe. reltdtjie peffonmanct Black anodi^ed 
cofiiainers ..ekdusive KUM eKirusions, 
have Hven, full lengih rina tin 
both si(>es{ 



ti-viU* iU^k.-'HF 



KLM EF PD>ver Amplifiers 



SPECIFICATIONS: 
Power: 6 VOC to 18 VDC {12 VOC 
recommended) 

Size: a. Single sia^e: 1' x 1^" x Yj" 

b, Double stage; 2" x 1 %" x %" 
IVfOSFET: FT 060 T, 500 MHi, dual-gate 
diode protected MOSFET 



• A simple, add on-immectiately 
RF amptifier. 

• Merely coax-cqnnect ampHfier 
between antenna and transceiver. 

• No tuning! Etfictent strip-line 
broad band design. 

• Automatic! Internal RF-sensor- 
controNed fe!ay connects ampiifier 
wlienever transmitter is switched on. 



Manual, remote -position switching 

is cpt tonal. 

• Models tor 6.2.1^/4 meters. 70CM 
amateur bands plus MARS coverage 

• Two types: Ctass C for FM/CW. 
Linear for SSB.' AM /FM/CW, 

• Negligible insertion loss on receive. 

• American made by KLM. 



New Model 

PA 2-2 5B 

PA4-70BL 

PA 15-40SL 

PA15~80BL 

PA15-160BL 

PA45-140BL 



List Price 

$74.95 
189.95 
109.95 
179,95 
259.95 
219.95 



PA 4-70BC 
PA 15^60BC 
PA45-120BG 
PA 4-40C 
PA 1 5-35CL 
PAt5-nOCL 



189.95 
164.95 
209.95 
1 69.95 
154.95 
279.95 



yaiicoM 



IC-21 5— $239.00 
2 Meter FM PortabEe 

* An extremely rugged, high quality, radio 

with 15 channel capacity. 
- The ^C size cells may be fSptaced with 
rechargeable cells of the same size and very 
simple modiJic^Eion made Eo provide FULL 
CHARGE from either Ihe auto electrical sys- 
tem or the tC-3PS power supply whtSe (he 
lC-215 IS in operation, This feature is po&si- 
h)e due to Ihe BC'20 battery pack and 
charger. 




SIGN*'- THe(3)[L,[5^PEUABLE 




UNADILUA 
'W2AU" BALUN 






L'l HtMlWAAi 



$1495 



Vt-Ji 




HEYCO 
"M2VS" ANTENMA COiLS 



$21S5 






lft|.4tH<IIIIID 




/ 



KW' 40 



IS". 
iO 



iU.CniM.AIKW#EO 

KK¥- E4JIL fomn 



Whefi DreJ^ring tje 'lurc to ip«ciifv 

2. (ingte c double t^nd itagp 
3 kll n* jitvfpblMi w#fiifin 






iUliiJJE 

1*^ 




ir *^ 


ISnw 





FBEQ. 
(MHz) 


USE 


STAGCS 


DELUXE PREAMPLJFIER 
^AIN dB MP ifB WIfiED 


50 10 54 


6 METER 


SINGLE 
DQUBLE 


25 
48 


2 
2 


*15.G0 
$23.50 


lOe 10 144 


VHF 
1 AIRCRAFT 


SINGLE 
DOUBLE 


20 
40 


2.5 
23 


t14,50' 
$26.50 


135 10 139 


SATELLtTE 


SINGLE 
DOUBLE 


20 
40 


2.5 
2.5 


tl4.S0 
£26.50 


144 t& 14S 


2 METER 


SIJ^GLE 
DOUBLE 


20 ! 
40 


25 
2.5 


$14.50 
$26. 50 


14« to 174 


HIGH 8AN0 


SINGLE 
DOUBLE 


20 
40 


2.5 
25 


$14.50 
$26.50 


320 to Z25 


IH METER 


SmCLE 
DOUBLE 


18 
35 


2,5 
2,5 


il4,50^ 
$26.50 


2ZS 10 3Q0 


UHF 
AIRCRAFT 


S1N{^LE 
DOUBLE 


15 

30 


25 
25 


$14.50 
$26.5C 



DATA SIGNAL, INC. 



UHADIUIiOftiaiNATEDi 



-FDEQUilCV-UATCHeQ PAlAtI 



• E schg ALUM ?«1^ PEP 

• Liotilriing Aii«»i#i 

• Wir Pull MttlniuWai 



• Only '!'oi and ft i Mi- 

■ BeOi»rEt T v'l 

■ Imnn^vtir B>aliuis 

■ WfMI'irjirLiul 

■ Cui'nui('lv<>i4lrucM[Mia 



r ii*^rn VouJ f-nrnnni IpIq A 
MifMi Band' PrDlfliCI-nil* 

■ P<rCiaiOl*i Mi[:«i*liKl 

■ Only H ij? tnt^^' : I I'kk 



"^ufl9*fl - 0-«r a»« (hill 
H«MI^ l«»i' IQ IB » ^ 

Cpmpif It :'n.Vrt#EFiO'k!. 

Vuiv El^anilLtnglihi 
Tuning Qi hi 



lAlUN MIS 
UGHTIiINC 

JlllESTCR 



^-^occco^ 







I I'^^f I 



W2AU/W2VS • 5 BAMD 

10/80 METER ANTENMA KIT 

by UNADILLA/REYCO 

GIVES YOU OPERATION ON 
10 • 15 • 20 ♦ 40 •80 METERS 

fDESlGNED CLOSELY TO 5 
BAMD TRAP DIPOLE PARAM- 
ETERS PER A.Ft.R.L. HAND- 
BOOK. HP AMTENNA CHAP^ 
TER 21 'A MULTIBAMD TRAP 
ANTENNA^} 

Everv Component of This Kit Is a 
'Highly Crafted, old Line UN 
ADILL A/REV CO Product Time 
Tested bv HAMS, COMMERCIAL 



a ARMED FORCES PACIL 
ITIES - AROUND THE WORL[ 
- FOR OVER TO YEARS! 

COIVIPLETE KIT (Nothini els 
needed) 

• 2 ea. W2VS REYCO KW-4 
TRAPS 

• 1 ©a. W2AU 
BALUN \\\ 

• 120 Ft RUGGED 
Strand Copper Wire 

• 2 ea. W2AU SHATTERPROO 
END'Sulators 

• instructions 

•$4a25 



'BIG SIGNAL 



#14- 



EIf 



ICROWAVE 

artft 

C OMPANY. 



|^fc 




ibrujilrx 



HE IMPROVED "ORIGINAL" 
HBROPLEX. Suitable f^r All 
;ia5$e« of Transmirtlng Work 
rfhere Speed &nd Perfect Morse 
wfe Prime Eis«ntials, This great 
BVi Vibroplex \% a smooth and 
s%Y working BUG, It has moh 
ame on lund and sea for its 
laritv, fireciiioh and ease o1 
'kanipulaTion. Can be stov^ed 
own to 10 words per mintite or 
255 or geared TO as ht^h rate of 
3eed as destr«d. Mamtams the 
3fne tiigh quality signal at whaf- 
ver Kpeed, insuring easy recep- 
ron under all condl lions. Weight 

lbs. 8 oz. Standard $49. 9& 
^eLuxe — Chrornium base and 
>p parts, with jeweled move- 
leni. $65.00 





HE ** LIGHTNING BUG'' 
MBROPLEX High QuaJity Sig- 
sFs at All Speedi. Plat pendulum 
-lOdel. Weight 3 lbs. 8 oz. Stan- 
ard — Polished Chromium top 
arts, grev base. $65-00 
tandard $49.95 . 




"HE •* CHAMPION" VIBRO- 

LEX 

/eight 3 lb$, B 02, Witfiout circuit 

loser. Standard finish only. Chro- 

lium finished top parts, with 

rey crystal base, $46.50 



NYE VIKING SQUEEZE KEY 

Extra4one, finger- fitting molded paddles with 
adjustable spring lert^ion^ adjustable contact 
spacing. Knife-tdgc bearings and esctra large* 
gold plated silver con Lac ts! Nickel plated brass 
hardware and betvy^ die cift base with 
non-'Skid feet. Base and duist cover black 
crackle finished. SSK-1 — *23.45, 
SSK'ICP has heavily chrome-plated base and 
dust cover. Price — $32,^5 

Vou gel ft sure, smooth, Speed-X model 
310-001 transmitting key, linear circuit osciUalor and amplifier, with a 
built-in 2" speaker, all mounted on a heayy duty aluminum base" with 
non-skid feet. Operates on standard 9V transistor type battery (not 
included). Price— $20-75 

PHONE PATCH Model No, 250-46-1 measured 6-1^2" wide. 2-1/4" 
high and 2-7/8" deep. List price. $36.50. Model 250-46-3, designed for 
u&e with transceivers having a built-in speaker, has its own buUt-in 2** x 
6" 2 watt speaker. Measures 6-1/2** wide, 2-1/4'* high and 2-7/8" deep. 
Prtce — S46.50 






CODE PRACTICE SET 



^« 









• 1] fO 



Na. llfl liDQUi - t^.tfi 



fcia lb 



fta: ]l4'j]E]'Daji - t9.B& 



tlCJl 




NYE VIKJNG SPEED-X KEYS 
NYE VIKING Standard Speed-X keys feature smooth, adjustable 
bearings, heavy-duty silver eontactB, and are mounted on a heavy 
oval die cast base with black wrinkle finish. Available with 
standard^ or Navy knob, with, or without switch, and with nickel 
or brass plated key arm and hardware. 

Pamper youzaell with a Gold-Plated NYE VIKING KEY! 
Model No. 114-31C-004GP has aU the smooth action features cf 
NYE Speed'X keys in a special "presentation'' model. All 
hardwart* is heavily gold plated and it is mounted on onyic-likc ]et 

black plastic sub-base. Price $60.00 



WDson ElflctTonlcs 6off . 




IBRO-KEYEH 
(ver the years, we have had many 
jquests for VSbroplax parts to be 
sed for construction of a keying 
techar^ism for an , electronic 
'ansmittifig unit. This beautiful 
nd most efficient "Vibro Keyer" 
-. ideal for this job. 

EATURES OF THE ^^VIBRO- 

EYER*' 

'8eaut(ful baige colored base, 
ze 3y/' K 4K*% weight 254 
ounds 

'Same large size cortiacts as fur- 
jshed on OelUKe Vibropfex. 
'Sarne rriam fra^rie and super 
nished parts as OeJu^e Vibro- 
lex 

'Colorful red fin||«e and thumb 
iece*. 

Has the same srnooih and easy 
perating Vibroplex trunion level 

A real "Gerri" adju stable to suit 




our owr> ** taste" 



tandard — $49.50 ; OelUMe Finish 
65.00 



There's ■ 
nothing | 
like it ■ 

1979 




ADIO AMATEUR CALLBOOK 
- There's nothing like It! Foreign 
adio Amateur Callbook OX List- 
igs — United States Callbook — 
II K&w Listings, 
$14,95 -DX $1S.95-U.S. 



cstHHM rui 

* |[^iFic]ii4l I nnmif r't iX' rfll 

• All Jll4ll phl| \pi 

* tliritbKl I hi I 4[t|#niii liHiilthMi 

• LitiJlTf«is|i1 *l» I m 1*1 h*(i AMI*; 

I liult llN I ll^lJ Mi 

*0«i«ii tmi rwTui^^ -^ift MOi tttte iwium I 

I MUM i4tivu aiam ttM.mm 

MEW 2 METER MARK 11 AND 
MARK IV 

As the srr»atteft size h and- h elds 
ever marketod^ the radios feature 
SKcellent adjacent channel selec- 
tivity, ar^ innermod /image rejec- 
tion. The attractive blue-gray 
Lexan(g) outer case is rugged and 
durable, Mark II {2.5 watt) 
S229.9a Mark IV (4 watt) 
S259.9S 

Riding the crest of the new v/ave 
of multi channel ivs^-meter rigs is 
ihe Wilson WE 800. Designed a$ 
an ail-purposfl mobile or portable 
unit, tha WE 800 is loaded with 
enough features to satiify even 
the most disc riminati rig aFinateur. 
The *'e00" is for channels, from 
144 to 148 MHr in 5 KHz steps, 
up or down 500 KHz for vour 
local repeater* There are even 
provisions for pre- prog ramming 
five of your favorite frequencies 
or changing to Two optional off- 
sets, in case your area repeater [s 
nonstandard. Add to these fea- 
tures; internal rechargeable power 
pack optional (uses 10 AA NiCad 
cells^ not includad), detachable 
rubber flen antenna, built-in 
S-meter/outpu t indicator, built-in 



high-lowr power option sv/itch (T 
or 12 watti, when used mobite or 
base}, butlt-in connectors for ex- 
ternat antenna, speaker and 
power. Whether you're just get- 
ting your feet wet on two-meters, 
or a seasoned amateur, you'li find 
the WE' 800 to be the most light- 
weight, versatile base/mobile/ 
portable rig on the market today^ 
The WE-flOO comes complete with 
plug- in spe a ker -microphone, 
mobMe mounting bracket/h«indle, 
rubber flax antenna, 12V DC 
Charger Cord, instruction booklet 
and 90 dav limited warranty. 
Rechargeable internal battery 
pack optional. 




1(«-144l UHf 



mmm^WU0^mtp^ 



' ii 



■- %r^ wt iiM'i**^Mji 







< fVhfi QHi*^ 



i^w ^ « III 1i » I T h «n 

i MU^ iXt^ h>.iit kt Mrl 



LEATHER CARRYING CASE 

• LC 1 for 1402 SM - $18.95 

• LC-3 for Mark H, IV -^ $16.95 

• LC'2 — all others — $18.95 
IIOV'AC DESK BATTERY 
CHARGER 

For new units Mark II, IV — use 
the Model 8C-2; for Models 1402, 
1405, 1407, 2202 and 4502, use 
Model eC 1. S40.95 



ML^A 




a Ktad«l TA^S 



• Model TA-33, 3 elements, 10,1 
dB forward gair^ (over isotropic 
source) - S264.0O 

• Model TA-33 Jr., 3 elements, 
10.1 dB forward gain (over iso^ 
iropic source) — S197»00 

• Model MPK 3, 7500 Watts AM/ 
CW and 2000 Watts P.E.P* SSB - 
$67,75 

• Model TA-36, 6 elements ^ 
$392.75 

• AK'6D mast plate adapter — 
$14,50 

• Model CL-33, 3 elements - 
$304.7 5 

• Model CL 36, 6 elements — 
$39 2; 7 5 

• Model CL-203, 3 dements - 
|29D.00 

•Model TA-40 KR - 40 meter 
conversion kit — $119.50 




WATT BATTERY CHARGER 

110 VAC Charger .i- use WC 12 

(Si 9/951 for 1402, 1405, 1407, 

2202, 4S02; use WC'14 ($15.95} 

for Mark I!, IV. 

ACCESSORIES 

BC-12 - $14.95 

CIGARETTE LIGHTER MOBI LE 

POWER PLUG 

SPEAKER MtC 

SMI - for Models 1402, 1405, 

1407, 2202, 4502. 

SM3 - (Mark H. Mark tV) 

SM2 for Models 1402, 1406, 

1407, 2202, 4502. ($30.95). 

R ECHARGEABLE BATTERY 

PACKS 

Use the following Ni-Cad Packs 

for the unit you select: 

BP 1 - 10 loose ceHs - 500 mA 

(1402, 1405) - $18,95 

gp. 2 — strapped cells — 600 mA 

(1405. 2202, 4502) - $24.95 

BP-4 - Mark If, Mark IV pack - 

S20.9S 

eP? - 1407 SM high power pack 

- S24.95 

Other options include: Touch 
Tonfl@ Pad (installed only), TE-1 
Tone Encoder, TE-2 Encoder/ 
Decoder, BNC Rubber Duck 
Antenna, TNG Rubber Duck 
Antenna^ 



SAVE YOUR RAD 10 f 

& 





Thf TUrft SAVE VQUH RADIO Urfc>ii un »• t^H ■ 

Ilt«i^lt . ■ ifid • lai of linil* WHv w«riv Hkimi -rtf uv^lf Tit* 
TUFTl tVH Ivilalral •nauTi'tl -qu^cklv t<i4 #M>lv i" f*»t cr *t«i 
(ri»hai It pqn4llf l<» Pup i^4nir M4 cHiE «' HI br*<li*f ifthfn yp^ park 
•Mi 0111 n UiH 4jF l>#il. 

T hv conrwcrDr tyiECttn tt» * iP9«ii' «g«^J# of^li LDnplHJlw 
w*\ic*> iMlH p\nm6m ydu wI11» i tfHslMi cnnn»ciinn \^i up tu ^4)00 
MHjI Nli LiTiil lit kMiIIWI IQ> i^ i\ux.i CDiH zannK.nw Itiirl t0* 
■I14 Fntji ^D-wiri ind K^flngrv CDnnactiDfii Wtiiich I't fWM 
piiliHtHEKaM-r M^^ti itw t^ ■!» llicl wrTD \it iwmctMi juvl nAtI w4i( 

rwd Ifu 1«a4inf p p# Mi Wkd ICHJCl«icAlker connvinMm tii ttm rtt- 

THn i| I ri^ttfrij tvaclui Bid CEHinrciDi lyilMnl , iI'M Il4ti 1 
tlMl mp 1 rm* It • hoi* Dn sBrti iidt d1 the I & v^m ii W P^iirt lar * 
liH)h.H;k iH M;Mm ru^ «»n1 Id *mwwi i*w ■■■ 'or li^^l Qlf lOM^ 1 lA 
tm^Ltei Tt)«> 11 tiaw rn r V wit t^ ^nh Ifl m •( #4 it vA'f ■ '19* 

tm IMUB «•!« ^m II m ■emkh Out fim rtm ofi- wkpt <■ AC 1 
ta \*m r^ mm iamU m r^m •Dlit i .ju » h ^ <t7i tS 










/HOBIL-MR 




$69.95 

lmo-wmf-fmdi9 llMltf»«t with ujfMfior lid»Nty 

pAlifVlMld ItJ^ twitch. 

FOR aROAIK AST qU ALITT TRASS- 
MiSSIOV AND MEryPTlON FOR BOTH 
MOBILE UKITS ASU BASE STATJOV'S 

• Boom num.- '^-^ '^rftrft^tipvcitor micro- 

wotr^ reptiMJuciiofi V«mbl* ftin control 
r#tft y-QH ndiuft Tor optimism modulntkon 

• Cuihkoiwd rurtap Jrt» S'*™ mnnttnr in 

'Tt BlcMrkm qu( #nfirDnmrfitjl noiiv*, 
too Midr af unbrrtkiblr ABS plut«c 

■ Hpadbandl w^f «dlj|ii^t* for #4nifo^*l>l^ 
'mra,T orrr long tlcHtn Bpnngflit^ hlnfr 
MvtA yov tJip hvAdwl an and uff -mth 
hfit <ftnr lund ft*i^tmibl# Ten nf ht or l«ft 
«r 

« tft^tdH^I c«n b# hititf &a tundATd mfCro- 

• Corrip*ci fkitm-hftdi talk twitrh L«u you 
kw^^i *t,ir,hi hiitdki an thr wh#¥l for lafrr 
(lii^ knit Msdf of itnbtrakablr ABS plsfttie. 

« Buili m FKT IranHitoi ■mpiifipr adapti 
miifruphnn^ uutpul to arty tranaceivrr 

^CompiuMf with RiMl t WO' was- ndkM in- 
rludinti: •JQ^hanncI CB unil* 

*8iitHiitfr V«lrri) p*d for «a^y m»unii.nt oT 
thf talk switch 

■ |Vt;irE^4n VSA 

Sf^CmCATtOHS 

,inil iy|>f 4 ohim, djfniiiiic 

MirrDph«n» typp: ElrcrTFt caparitor 

Mic r^iptirrrie ■ fri?g Uf ncy C . ' 

1 jrv#TH3flt«| 'iOO-6000 Hz 

' Amplffitr ty|if ,*PET Lninalst.i)r, 

AmpUfif'r holtiiry 7-voli MjilLury 
, pimi'f; TK-Jl,?,'! 

IDEAL FOR .EVKkV T\A^d-WA¥ HADlO 
C?OM M If N rc ATI O m K^ KU 

(.'0 oprimUir* • Amiltuf^tidji^ ciperatoin • 
Policp and firp vphiclr"* * Amtiulanc«'i dnd 
*m*!r|i5*nfv vfhiclt*! • Tmtyi frnd trutfk^ra • 
Marina pk*nii.urr Mnd wdrh bnnUt • Con- 
MTLicilon und dprnolJUunrrp^i • Indujtrii' 
al ^qmrnunirfltlonii • SfCuHtv puLroJt • 
Airport loWiT and g^round erf wi * R*^- 
iTifit^ hroadcuil and TV ramfVA crewi * 
ForciLi'f* and firpwiitch uniLt * 



J, W, MiHer Pmsents^, 







nf-*m 





mitm^ 



N^a IP- jgo6>.» 

— ~~mis^ 



Ip 1 ,0 ^ * 3 D 







4pq« 




The Bencher Ultimat© Paddle . „ . 
a dual lever, iannbic keyer paddle 
that wjH increase your speed, 
accuracy Si operating c:oinr*foft* 

• ADJUSTABLE CONTACT 
POINT SPACING — Precision 
scitew adjustments on each set of 
contacts make e^act settings easy. 
Contact posts are split and locked 
by set screws, eliminating the 
need for locknuts. 

•wide range of tension 

ADJUSTMENT - Tension on fin- 
ger knobs is main ta tned by a Ion0 
e^cpansion spring. Dual screw wd- 
iustmenti adjust spring tension to 
match your "fist/' 
•self ADJUSTING NEEDLE 
BEARINGS— Keying shafts pivot 
in nylon bearings that * 'float" on 
machined brass fittingSr Spring 
tension prevents free psay and 
slop; elimina^^ contahCt bounce 
and backlash. 

•SOLJD SILVER CONTACT 
POif4TS — The contact points are 
solid silver for e Itfetiime of flaw- 
less keyirig. 

• PRECISiON-MACHmED COM 
PONENTS — Main frame, contact 
posts, spring post and bearing ring 
are ail machined from solid brass 
. » . polished and chrome plated 
for durability and rich appear- 
ance. The Bencher Paddle looks as 
good as it works! 

• heavy STEEL BASE; NON- 
SKID FEET — Finished in an 
attractive black wrinkle finish 
(chrome pleating Optional), the 
base measures 9.5cm x 1 0.2cm x 
1.3cm thick. It weighs I kilogram, 
and with its non-skid rubber feet 
is as solid as a rock^ 

Model BV-1 Standard Black Base 
. .. $39.95, Model BY-2 Polished 
Chrome Base . . . $49.95. 

BencHeRjnc. 





PP-1 



PP2 

M series is for mounting to sur 
faces inaccessible from the rear 
(walls, mobiles, systems interface, 
panels, test equipment!. K series 
is self-cQf tamed with a relay 
inside the encoder. When keys are 
pressed contact closer occurs with 
a 2 sec. delay (adjustable), Con 
tects are rated at 110 m A (i^ 28 
woNs switched, 500 mA carry. 
PP-2K contains delay exclusion 
for the fourth coJuirm, However, 
by^ jumping D-5, 4th column >5 
restored. Unit ts operable from, 
4,5-60 volts at temperaitires from 
0"'-l40 F. Output level wiH drive 
any transmitter or system. Adjust- 
ah e output In^el is controMed 
with an extremely stable nnulti 
turn trim pot, w/access frorn the 
front of the encoder (not behtnd), 
saving time for level setting, 
which amiQunts to hours when 
involved w/a system. 
PP 1 SS5 n2 keys), PP 1m S55 
(lettering optional add SI J PP T K 
S66, PP-2 SS8; PP 2m $58 (let 
cermg optional add $1), PP 2K 
369 PP1A S68 (for standard 
cornm hand-held). 



^ipo ^Sonimunkations 



■■ 



MICROWAVE MODULES 
TEXAS RF 



M II t^MM 



l.f , 0WW1 ff*qw*'icv Ja JO hMv 
¥ n^ifl tmmtit iiiici4*i as, ap 

It it, ia-i«. it^a, 2a»WHt 



144 Wti'l wOMtT CDM 

^imt <tam mttm «fi ^K*««n«i Hi 




144 ^M*^S ooy>*Lt GCiHVtM 

'kMi mm I ^ilipiipiii 

t ^ i Ki l^fr^f^ tmtim vvr^cm^AB* 

'T— -■*—!■ r—T 144 I44HKI 

0«4l9f«« fTM4up*c« Tt t|*H| t7* UiMM 1^1. 

Mtawfiiim fi'aaiuaw y vtw «• t44 IfM* 3 iLHt 



1«4 tltuX OUAl. OwTptlT VOS^ 

p i f fiiii 4yf*i »f liii ■ 

MMA144 

ritr DUfl Fh« — ft- ri" iiMH«^4f «irt 

• 1 irnpi^ 

TinHC«| ptM ti dB 

Oii mni Mi mialinii n i niu^ *»§!«•■ S.ftdlf 

■tfM*Mdl*i S Ut4f •! J da, a '-■ ID tlfl 

43t MM? MCt^lT COH 
vtPfTin ^ «(«ic;4a?j'i44 

T'n^ R* Ampiil>lipi. until t Mfl^tn 
Mpaw (0<^lHn« timH HfWTNUV 
aftii] U,iiA< tu^ilat n~ciilLi4q|kigin ^K^gr 

tP'I'l.l'KI 

ln[hHi lrw;Mi««CV 433 ^*54 MM/ 

14 1A. tl-», 7tl3[i. 1^iM 
M»fJ 

Tw^it §ttn 50 da 

(fWICf tsaniralladli tfOi MHl MM t*n VHt iP-] 

PQn*r pAt'iuliBpnariti 17 wblu PC ''?DX«t 49 mA 

I?a6 M>hl£ CONVtHTEH 
IVIMC 1»a/3a . MMC^I 90(1/1 44 

A KiytHlri flKq mum •mUh M 

ilhiiiiBi, htriviriti a duni 1^1* pptuifn 
k, F'. 4rr>inlih«r, ■, 

l<ipwl ir#qiJaft«v I^C 1 3QH MHi 

LF, Ourpul Iriqurntliii wm r i Idbl a : 3ft. JO, T44. T4e MHt 

Tynkitl ]^^'n^ Qli dB 

□uirininni MtRjuniipr't rmiu IIliui'*. H.& dD 

ervitiil i]llli4lt«T0i rr«ih^priLy. lOt.tiOCI MMl ij^p-^ID h^Hf IF I 

jjTBitpr ^;a4iifD||*i|b ;ki MHi]' I144 14ri MHz tfi 
M^Mvuujfri Uit^uhhf.Y nrtar rI 1 J9A MMj' 3D HHj 
P^flji^ir r*t4N.ip*iniiari|i 1J val(i DC 'S^*^ wi: btt niA, 



TRANSVERTERS: 

MMT 144/28 

MMT 144/50 , . , , . 
MMT 432/285, , , . . 
MMT 432/SOS, .... 
MMT 432/144S. . . , 
RECEIVING CONVER 

MMC 144/28 

MIVIG 144/2BLO. . . . 
MMC 432/265. , . . . 

MMC 432/144 

MMC J296/28 

MMC 1296/144 , , . . 
VAR ACTOR TiPLER: 
MMV 1296. .,.,.. 
ATTENUATORS I 



, . 259.95 

, , 259,95 

. . 329,95 

. . 329,95 

. . 389.95 
TERS: 

. . 65.95 

, . 70.95 

. . 95.95 

. . 95.95 

. . 65.95 

. . 110.95 

. - 57.95 




ASTATIC 
MICROPHONES 



t iJP»Dir«4i 




AMPHENOL 






SE£lIES 31 — BNC CO^JNECTOlta 

wtAthtrtpiboi rAnnv^\ftr* with luvon#l WtlOtl lot 

Aj^ciii^Wt miiiilliiipd Clvi¥i brui. S^nfi, ■IP tn4d#<ir 
brryU^usn Cttppmt^ All vattu ia lion »n A^THO 
plalrd® tty tiv# ypu I!1l^i^frll^w^ ilul ran Imk* 
iMsiFlam hsTiiflfnt. tu|h t ^tti i^n tu r^i, Mid eiH'k\ 



TA€LE 31 2Z13U UC-lO&t 
l^lALeJi with A^T aUC If Luc 
Eircrplajclr ema bv mowntMl 
ifiiu pMftr^ up tu ICI4'^ Clliirh. 
£1.2a 

BNC IMI TO tmr tn ADAV- 
TEH UQ-XWHI-IAS Ut; lU 
Adis(t» jtBi ^NC lack lit Mi-r 

DOUBLE MATH ADJtPTr^R 

nn^ are fret ^law^fm Cua- 

nrrfU 1 friEulr riTRiponrDli- 

ta72 

^ACX AOPATES tt .9A 

STS'I 07-3«.S A davit 

fqi^ raitcniu ^arh at plii kv^. 
FANEL MEC^rTACte 
K$'ie-3A& SOZt9 McuBic 
trilig 4 Ikct^cu^ts is tliXl^ 
flHAvrtc-r boJr 11 IT 
PANEL RECEPTACI^F 



BHIUrt TO UHF mi ADAF 

AdipU mat bsi pl^^i ik« tn'* 

PUSH-tiV" 

AA-^SP-'3A3^ I'«-Jitufn ,■■ iot- 
LhF«A4«4. mnnty fJurfli ut i^ioli 
fit on fvmsJf ci 

12.37 



LICBTNIMG AftRfSTOa 
i'T9-l(l5~J4A Elumiuxfi itAii£ 
huiM-up tfow JMilFitnji PriT 
LcctE TiHu fsbuhie rtiuii^nwcif 

■ l«[Qili liahlnuia dum44i* 
(4^BD 

BB CoBwaDlir EOird (i>f T^rm- 
m ilniCiilioiia ABtApna 1*^ 

&B/U GKliJifa. f 1.B9 

BNC STaAlGHr ADAFTEn 

M-ZL3-34& UG-91-1 I ^>^t" 

idtil, )tlJ»v3. Wnith nf fabln. la 

hr iouie^d. KLi.le4 wilh aNC 

PiIuOlCI.12 

miC FAVEL ftCCEFTACLE 

dliTnrtcr bull . d.74 



fl3.BTB-3it^ soasasn MnQHa 

in iiTi«lr 21 All" (LL4niifl«v 

buLc, ULnUrbcEl hicji T<Ui4 pr*- 

vent tuiTfine- -fl L^ 

BNC ANGLE AfiAFTKR 

31-0(r9'3B5 UG^30fi A<4kp1i 

«nv U^€ pivt Tc^r Tight Anilr 

us*. t4.2B 

S^fC TEK AOAPTI^R 

31-00B^aB& UG 274 ^Hl4titA t 

BNC flMii L'l ^1 QD3-30F) ur 

Othtf f*I«*lt BNC type tii^ep' 

lalil«. «4.aB 



Ufi4»»4 










»-? 



iTG^aiit 




i-^S-JaVJAS 






tFCJIt 




UG-XBO 

sosatsii 

UCi-S74i 



slinky 

SLINKVf $43,95 Kit A LOT ntant.finii 
m a LITTLE space N«w Sttnkv®dlpolt" 
with helical laadlng radirat#i a g^oC 
signet aT 1/10 wavelength ldiiiii< 



'fmtmt M« kMVJtO 




ic f ktf »•■ 



This electricaJIv smaH 90/75^ 4C 
6i 20 meter antenna opersta^ ai 
any length frqm 24 td 70 ft- • nc 
exL^ra balun or transfnatch needee 
• portable — e-ects 8r siores if 
minutes • small enougli to Ni *r 
attic or ^t- • full legal power * 
low SWR over connplece 80/75. 
40 Bt 20 meter bands • muc^ 
lower atmospheric nisi^e pick-ui: 
than a vertical & needs no radialt 
^ kit incl. a pr. of speciallv-medi 
4" dia^ toy 4'* long coils, con 
tainlng 335 ft. of radiating con 
ductor, baKjn, 50 ft, RG5S/L 
coax, PL259 connector^ r\y\Qr 
rope & manual. 



i^^W 




OATDIMQ ELECTROrMICS UMITEO 



PREGUJEIMCY-AGILE AUDIO RLTER 
Model FL^ 




fheindi 









ftClfliCiKV ■iM* (M+fH 




I- 

m 




1DD- 


U0 


»«i 








^ ^Jlll 


_ 


•iA 


■*t 


■iO 


^f 


t0w4l1!> 


— 


\0A 


<0C 


lOD 


T« 


i^ Willi 


_ 


^A 


J^C 


."iO 


25( 


VOwrdlll 


M*H 


WA 


■ioc 


■>oo 


Wl 


leMntr^Eii 


100H 


lonA 


inx 


lOOfl 


100( 


^^O^dtl^ 


2'}0M 


J'itlJ^ 


iSiK 


JVDO 


/5£t 


VOJ_lwil!> 


SOON 


■WOA 


yfjOi 


■iOO? 


^OCH 


1000*«JTH 


tOOUM 


IWXJA 


lOOlif 


lUODD 


IDUX 


J'^DOv^jHCi 


ZWOht 










'wirKVv»aih 


snruhi 











THRUUNE 
WATTMETER 

MODEL 43 $125.00 

Elements {Tabte 1) 2-30 MH? 45.00 

Elements {Tabte ^) 25-1000 MHz 38.00 

Carrying case for Model 43 St 6 elements 27^50 

Carryirifl case for 1 2 elements 17.00 

READ RF WATTS DIRECTLY! ^Specifv Type N or S0239 con- 
nectors) 0,45 — 2300 MHz, 1-10,000 Watts ±5%, low Insertion VSWR 
— 1.05, Unequalled economy and UexihUity. Buy only the eJementis) 
co^erfng your present frequency and power needs^ add extra ranges 
later if your requirements expand. 



EtectfiHik Corporation 






rifNCTION. 

The Dotarvu FrequincvAgilM AiMjifi f lUf ■■ IfUfit^ded tJrlHWrilr 'or pasl-Omcccar signpl filtgring; en HP *nd LF Lommuniattoni 
nUtfrFi !ur SSS ar>d CW- *: ciHInrf an ujiiijmbIIv "W Will* (JOnriJiflfl Iran □ I berMftti tu tht ui^f irteln^finj: 

FAt (Nt SSB {3|wrBlor. 

fall HuEuffiHlic lupiMgrnna o4 inTeJi'Sfinrf hwerodVfle whUllW iri I ha ruisge ?S0 - 3000 Hr Uy 4 itrnqM* Sfl#i<:h-lM-k- 
4r>d-V"jaiA nctc'h riltM Th« tracking notph om Ej* FeU in cirtufcc w<rri no dudftjle cfFnct until 3 ywtiiitl* jpfiaflrs in 
liliieh iaiB tfi« whlst(« w.ll *di^pp*ji' ^iTtiifi lymcffliv 4J»ie to£nnd. T>iJt caiiHiHity fvavi^ii 3 htghJY ffFeciiv* 
CflUrtttrTTiiasLir* I'd/ 1h« gr^jl mqjorJCy 0' (he hvuracfvnei wKiC^^ -IrEquentIv a3>fMDr pn-Eh^nrig! ttn n^-d^f t Cf CnMhid 
LF amU HF bf^rtd^ 

A canlino'jslv jnji^[|j±il«^iicti|} wtilbiiOm' in a va^ijtbla-iMBdth notoh ta> jr^ipr^iut ncspilDn t[> 1<i4 prHGrw* d'f dthn 
at l-[kjii« 5*B, RTT V gr SST V ti9T«la. 






F«iT lilt CW iHMvlHHIr. 

CCrtllnuciuslv ^afifllrf? cifilrB ffsqusnCY I2fl0'3000 Hil and b*MmidS*i IZB- 1000 Hr| f^jr pflrfKT mfliching of 
fccEivBr paut;ii)4 ra cha-riigins; l>diK! COTKiiliont Idtsdin^ >Pc^i, and p«r)«r!Hl pr*fiHBf»X, 

\ 

F^lin'N>pdiid, ltHi»''fUniid.'f|||ti«[lil« rtta|3r Far DFllimuni «n*<?t.1uii^c«j^iHd Wtth ^XUll^Afll noiH rcta£tidn. 

LiUNr tuning iiiwviith tdndiWldth lnd4p«rdNI a^' 1rail(U«r^v lihd ^in irldnWikhnt nf bzr>t^id1^ for PWtur?! 'fegl' 



$179.95 





FT-301 orFT^JOlD 



coM^etiTiON CiitAct Hf Kcvn 



FTOOlDM 


i^.iOMxciviq 


inw 


FI-^WIU 


iM-Hi**?!CVfl 


12&9 


FT-WlDt 


560- 1^« J^CVfl 


135fl 


INTEANiLTiOPlAI. <Jfl*DE HF XCVR 




FT-1C1F 


IQO-tOM KCVH 


799 


FT-IIUFE 


IBC^iaU XCVFI 


?sg 


FT 101 FX 


iS&EQM^ACDnly] 


eaa 


SOLID STTATEHFXCVH 




FT-MHJ 


vSJ-iOM J-+15W tHQUpi 


^35 


FT.30> 


l*d.H?H3<0W Ajnjioc 


7W 


rr.j 


JJOi-0¥ tCIW KiiVR 


iia 


VKF TRAMSCEIVfltS 




<3Fli-25<H] 


FW Moblia 


TBA 


Ft-2MH 


ZM JCCVft 


aw 


Ft-2SSBD 


3** XCVfl WfOitflal 


W& 


FI-E27H 


FM ■M-OtMIe !M 


?C9 


Pi^arft* 


^ulCi5«an4Mflm 3M 


TflA 


FI^aSRD 


All M^« 6M 


39s 


F7.625R 


All MadDeM 


B4Q 


SOlIB STATE H£CE1VEHS 




FP*e 7 


CHnmunjcmimn; nri^^-R 


3t5 


KHC^WO 


Ajji 6jui^ HPfiCvft 


^29 


fR.1(JlS 


led.JM ROVH 


S» 


FFl-lCll^d 


IM iClMJiiWOlflilPt 


ThI9 


MTEFLMATrONJU. OnADC TflANSMITTEII 




Fl-tOI 


1BO-10M)^MTTFI 


MB 


UhEJdH AMPilFlffl 




FL-2HI30B 


BO'lDMLinHi 


*s 


TEST EQUlPMEm 




vc-waj 


50Qnih4z 14^ PPM 


is» 


vc&i»& 


MO 171+IJ S P^fH 


M9 


i^CMoe 


5(W mW; 0.0! PFM 


M? 


yj'.tM. 


&ttnin*V l.Md 


« 


A^ccssoniis, FOR Ai.1 mohels 




VM-54 


Hsatfeei 


TBl 


yo-i^a 


■HI-LQ-2 D»Th M4h« 


^3 


¥0*4+4, 


HI LCI DtiJih IWl'kc 


30 


VP-WS 


HlZ H4nd Milte 


Jft 



V**;i, 


LOZ hand mKa 


1« 


fF«!!U 


52S! Lo Pftda FUlea 


3* 


— 


CiSd*,'nTrY DecDdor 


T8A 


<lJR-2i 


Wnrid&Dtk 


S 


ACCfSSOfllES FOA FH-tQl HCVR 




FC-2 


?W C^invmv 


zs 


ffr* 


BM Coftn-fl-'lB' 


2J 


FM-1 


Fni Adapier 


Zt) 


KFXB 


FM F\n& 


JIO 


— 


hUK^W Cnr«ldlS 


s 


Accessomis foh soii eeriis 




FA-S 


Fan 


30 


FM«H 


FM Ad?pr?ir 


*i 


KVffO? 


Kfl^fl-T ynll 


^& 


MlU»T 


Memofy Un>f 


124 


CiCf*>1 


UC-OC l^ll 


do 


sp-mi 


Sp^BAer 


35 


SP-flOIP 


Si[>BAi(«i7PAl£:ii 


74 


rrvacii 


liSITOctV. K^TFj 


l^A 


YO.90TI 


Mcirtilar AnalyzipE 


TBA 


FV«1 


S-yntnajiir^a WO 


Jii 


FC»T 


Antenngi f uoflr 


l-BS 


KFfl.9 HC 


Ffllw 


45 


KF^BJ D 


Flllflr 


45 


ftCCESSOAlES FOn 301 i€AlES 




FC-Mi 


Ar>h9n,np Tgn^r 


170 


FV301 


vPO 


I24i 


F^^l 


i^oww 94J wdjf 


15T 


FP-301D 


PJS Uertri«i« 


Z39 


vo-sai 


Monil-!ii-&2(H* 


ZBJ 


SP-T2D 


EKlarndi- &pnik4T 


Sfi 


XF90B 


AM f ihfif 


*0 


XF»C 


CVSf FJI1m 


40 


HFSJA 


S^firPror; PHEtr 


45 


EA.e. 


itttarnal ffi\tY Qim 


\7 


LUBI 


pti^r^ PMCh 


40 


MUB-< 


Mohn^ Mpuni 


23 


ACCKISOntES FCn 1Q1 SERIES 




FtV6M& 


BM T'a*ni.^6rtei 


Z^ 


FTV£50 


2M T'ans-veHe* 


Z7^ 


FV-101B 


tfFO 


131 


SP-taiB 


Speaker 


» 


SP-tOIPH 


Spaa4er.iFaLc4t 


«? 


FA-e 


Ffljl 


w 


XF3DB 


AM Fin«r 


40 


MFMC 


CW FiKor 


^ 


DC1 


DCi'DC Ckjn¥i?rler 


M 


flFPlM 


P*-*cflair]r ^P5rlfl 


iS 


RFP.l&i 


Pracflijcgr ^ijalef 


FTTQl 


^«irM./Maifil HarkUBl 


ZA 


If 0-1^1 


MDn.f-of Sflj&pfl 


329 


VC-M'fi 


Digital ^adcHJCf 






FrsqusfKy Counmr 


233 


MMB^I 


Uf7bl4« M^Hirrl 


J3 


ACeg&SOfllES FOR VMF EQUIPIIEHT 




PB1424 


Mj]rhBrUn.r(FT&30ei 


» 


MMS.S 


FT^A Mpbi IR M>i>iLnt 


23 


MMQ-4 


MOIi'?;!i Mflb.«oiiini 


33 


FT^Hl 


S«rMJMfir| UanUBl 


15 


irtzji 


Dlg'lftl Dliplif 

Ftzzm wubiitMavm 


1111 


MMd'S 


« 


F^-* 


J amp Pdw^ SupiUv 


aa 


FHa-7 


Caittmiip-icntipns. Flgc-invs!' 


gii 


FflG.TQOtt 


AM Bi^rtsf HF nK9l^«r 


ezi 


OTfl.a* 


yytrndCioch 


H 




VHF model 43ee 
HF model 4360 

The 4360, 4362HAM'MATE DirLttirjnal Watt- 
mt,'lcF5 Hire inierlifjn lypc irisiruments for measyrmg 
iorward or feflecifd pow<;r In 50-Qhin coixiil 
transmissfor \\r\tt. They are direcl de^cnddnts of 
.the mydef 43 THKULIWE* Wattmeter - ihe 
pri3fc55ionaf standard <jf the industry- • and >i^iii 
apcuraiefy raie^surt- R F power flow u^dtrany Joad 
cijFidiiicin. fiach wattmeter is. made up of a precisely 
rnachmed settioii tif 5G-rjlim fine, a rotatabk Knvng 
eiemet\tinci meter ca libra ted in walls, aJ I mojnted 
ih a hi.gh-impaci pU^tic htjusing. It is this lyjie L>f 
scilid cor^slJ-uctlonand the dirfictjortjil THRU LINE 
coupaing eircuit, wfthout toroids^ that accourjt for 
ihesuperirtrKy oT Lhe HAM-MATE W*it meters. 



THRULINE® "^ 

I^Dnectional 

VC^ttmeter 



PD»*f RfMr^. 5000 Mil} - J TO M AlHi 

1<K)0 Willi -iD to 1CtOOMf4£' 
56 ohms' numirul 
I ;a7 [0 I .a nttK ' 



IflMJtMw VSWR 

(witlh N C«i;fi«(tVflil 

lra*fTl*n t.iM4 



FtF Coupllnf 

RF Coi^llt C(HVT«[(Ft. 

Frinury Line CofinccuM' 



Q.ldfl WiJ(.t2-*-13*IHi| 
i^.2dB MjiK. (132 1000 UMil* 

— « 1 S la 70 [f a 

^ 1 5% (i« 1^ 5. 

fcrnjitaHt; 

Femj If N 



model 4431 



/Ht*' 



[Other QC Corarsectflri Cifl tHUujjpl^tff 




VModQl 43 Power Measuremgat Versatility 
^Variable RF Signal Sampter (built-in) 

Model 4431 provides an RF signal sample for us^ with counters, 

oscilloscopes^ spectrum analyzers, etc, at the same time a power 

rneasurement is made* 

Amplitude of the RF sample is adjustable by depth-of- insert ion 

control knob on the front of the wattmeter. 

Model 4431 uses the same Plug-in Elements as the Model 43 {within 

its frequency and power limitations). 



Mow you can receive the weak sigrials with the Ameco PT-2 pre-amplifieri 

Model PT-2 is a continuous tuning 6-160 
rneter Pre-Amp specifically designed for use 
with a transceiver. The PT-2 combines the 
features of the weli-known PT with new 
sophisticated control circuitry that permits 
it to be added to virtually &r»y transceiver 
with no modification. Mo serious ham can 
be without one. Price: $74,95, 

im proves HcnBitiiiit'y and 8i;^iil-to-noise ratiQ- 

Booete si^al» up lo 26 db. 

For AM or SSB. ^mrrt 

Byp^Ks itielf autotnittirall) wh*n the Iransceiver ifi traiufnitting. ???Vr^ 

PET ampiifief give« niperior cross imiduktion protection. 

Simple to irtitoli. * Adv»nc«d KiJiditate firciutry. 

Improves immuniity tu transc^eiver front -end overload by use of JLe bujll-in attenuator. 

Provides ma«t«F power control for sttation equipment. 




ALL BAND PREAMPLIFIERS 




AMECO 



6 THRU 1GQ METERS 

TWO MODELS AVAILABLE 

RECOMMENDED FOR 
RECEIVER USE ONLY 

INCLUDES POWER SUPPLY 



MODEL PLF employs a dual 
gate PET providing noise fig- 
ures of 1.5 to 3.4 db., de- 
pending upon the band. The 
weak signal performance of 
most receivers as well as image 
and spurious rejection are 
greatly improved. Overall gain 
^s in excess of 20 dfa. Panel 
contains switching that trans- 
fers the antenna directly to 
the receiver or to the Preamp. 
Model PLF 117V AC, 60 Hz. 
Wired a Tested $49.95 






£S;;i-:: 



f engineering 



THE WORLD'S MOST COMPLETE LINE OF VHF-FM KITS AND EQUIPMENT 



RX2lit . . . . . 

RX28CW/T. . 
RXSOC Kit . . 

KXSO(*W/T . . 
RX144C Kil. , 

RXJ44C W/T . 
KX220C Kit. . 

KX220C W/T . 
RX43 2C Kit. . 

RX4.J2CW/T . 



28-,* 5 MH7. KM receiver with 2 

pole 10.7 MHz crystal filler . . , S 64.95 

same as ibove -wired & tested. . 12^,95 
30-60 MHi rcvr w/2 pole 10,7 

MHi crystal filter 64.95 

same as above -wired & tested . 129.95 
140-170 i<AUz rcvr w/2 pole 

iO.7 MHi crystal filler . . , . . 74.95 

same as above -wiredi & ieiLted . 13K9S 
210 240 M Hi rcvr w/2 pole 

10.7 MHz crystal filler 74*95 

jsame as above -wired & tested . 111.95 
432 MHz rcvr w/2 pole 10.7 

MHz crystal filtcf , . ..,.,,. S4.95 

same as above— wired & tested . 142.95 



RECEIVERS 




Rxn- . . . 

RI-2& Kit. . 
Rl 50 Kit. . 
RFI44D Kit 
RF220D Kit 

RF4i2 Kit. 

IF 10.71" Kit 

FM45f5 Kit. 
AS2 Kit . . 



accessory filter for abovf rtteiver 

kits pve£ 7 dB adjai^enl 

chfinnel rejection ,.,..,... 9,95 

10 mtr Rl-' front end J 0.7 MHt out 13.50 

6 mtr Kt- frtml end l*>.7 MH7 out 13.50 

2 mtr RK fronl end 10.7 MHz out 18.50 

220 MHz RF front end 10.7 MHz 

out 18*S0 

4 32 MHz Rl' ffoiil end 10-7 MH/. 

out .... - i ^ * . , 29.50 

10.7 MHi W module includes 2 

pole crystal filt€:r ......... 29.50 

4 55 KHz IF &tage plus l-'M detector 14.50 
audio and squelch board . . . , . 16.00 



TXSOKit . . 
TX50 W/T . . 
TXH4B Kit 
TX1441J W/T 
TX22 0B Kit . 



trmismitter exciter^ 1 walt^ 6 mir. 44.95 

same as ahi>ve -wired & testttJ . . 71*95 

trans.mitter exeiter- 1 wjitt-2 mtrs 34*95 

same as above -wired & tested- . . 65-95 
traniimitltr exciter- I wait- 220 

MHz . - - - - 34. 9S 



TRANSMITTERS 




TX220B W/T 
TX432B Kit. 
TX432B W/T 
TXISO Kit. . 
TX ISO W/T . 



same as above -wired & tested . . 65.95 

transmitter ex toiler 4 32 MHz - - - 49,95 

*3mE as above -wired & lesttd ^ - 87,95 

300 miiltwatt, 2 mtr tranfimitler . 24,95 

$ame as^ above -wired & tested . . 43.95 



POWER AMPLIFIERS 



1*A2S01H Kit 

l'A40J0H Kit 
FASO/as Kit, 
HA 144/ 1 5 Kit 



PA I 44/25 Kil 
VA220/IS Kit 
KA432/J0 Kit 




2 mtr power amp -kit Iwin— 2Sw 
out with si>ltd state switching, 

casti, Connector^' , ,^, * . 69.95 

2 mtr power amp- 1 Ow in— 40w 

out— relay switt:b in E . . 69.95 

6 mtr power amp, I w in, 25w out, 

less case, connectors & switching £9.95 

2 mtr power amp-lw in- J Sw 

out— less case, connectors and 

suitcbiiig ..*.... 49.95 

same a& PA 144/1 5 kit but 25w . 59.95 

similar to PA 144/1 s for 220 MHi 49.95 
power amp— similar to t*Al44yt5 
except EOwand432 MHz . . . , 59.95 




Blue Lirt£ ^ 



Model 

BLC 10/70 
BLC2/70 
BLC 10/150 
BLC 30/150 
BLD 2/60 
BLD 10/eo 
BLD 10/120 
BLE 10/40 
BLE 2/40 
BLE 1 0/ao 



RF power amp, wired & tested, emission— 
CW-FM^SSB/AM 

Power 



Band 
144 MHz 



144 
144 
144 
220 
220 
220 
420 
420 
420 



MHz 
MHz 
MH* 

MHz 
MH£ 
MHz 
MHz 
MHz 
MHz 



Input 

lOW 
2W 

low 

30W 
2W 

low 

lOW 

low 

2W 

low 



Power 
Output 

70W 

70W 

ISOW 

(SOW 

60W 

60W 

now 

40W 
40W 

gow 



149.95 

174.95 
269.95 
249,95 
164,95 
169.95 
169.95 
1 5 9.9 S 
1 89,95 
289.95 



POWER SUPPLIES 




PS ISC Kil . 

PSlSC W/T, 
PS2SCKit 



PS2SC W/T 
PS25M Kit ' 
PS25M W/T 



RPTSO Kit. ' 
RPT50W/T . 
RPT144 Kit . 

RPT220 Kit . 

RPT432 Kit - 

RPTI44 W/T 
RPT2 20W/T 
RPT4 32 W/T 



1 5 amp- 12 voU regulated power sup- 
ply w/case^ w/f old- back current limit 
ing and overvolta^e protection. . . 99.95 
Jiame as sbove— wired & tested. . . 134.95 

25 amp- I 2 volt regulated power- 
supply w/casc, w/fotd-back currenl 

limiting and over voltage protection 139,95 

same as above-wired and testie^d . 169.95 

same as PS2SC with meters . - ■ ■ 159.95 

same as sbove— wired and tested - 189.95 




O.V.P. . . . 
PS3A Kit . 
i^S3Ul2 W/1 



adds over voltage protection to your 
power supplies, IS VDC max. -. 14.9S 
1 2 volt -power supply regulator card 
with fold-back current limiting . . 11.95 
new commercial duty 30 amp 12 Vl> 
regulated power supply w/case, 
w/folil-back current limiting and 
overvoltJige protecticm 274.95 



re pea ter -6 meter (fess crystals) . . 
ri;peiit.ir— 6 meteri wired & tested 
repeater- 2 mtr— 1 5w— complete 
(less crystal) - ^ ......... . 

repeater -2 20 MHz— 1 5w— com pie 

{le^s crystals) . . , . ^ * 

repeater- 10 watt -43 2 MHz 

Oess crystals) . , < . . 

repeater - IS watt— 2 mtr . , , . . . 
repeater- 1 5 watt-220 MHz, . . . 
repeater- 1 Owatt"432 MHz. . . . 



te 



599.95 
S99.9S 

599.95 

5 99.95 

649,95 
899,95 
a99.9S 
949.95 



REPEATERS 




1>IM.A50. , . 
I>PLA144 . . 

11PLA:20 . . 

r>PLA432 , . 
DSC-U . . . . 

1>SC-N 



6 mtr close fipsjCi^d duplexer . . , 
2 mtr^ 600 KH? spaced duplexern 
wired and tuned to frei^uenL^y , , 
220 MHz duplester^ wired and 

tuned to frequency . , 

rack mount duplexer - + ..... 
diiuble shielded duplexer cables 
wi lb PL 2 59 connectors (pr^) . . 
jiame as above with type N 
connectors (pr*) 



680.00 

409,95 

409,95 
J79.95 

29.95 

34.95 



TRANSCEIVERS 



TRXSO Kit 



Complete 6 mtr FM transceiver kit» 
20w out, I channel scan with case 

(liiss mike and crystals) 

same as above^ but 2 mtr St 1 5w out 
same as above except for 210 MHz 
same as above except 1 watt and 

A I'? MH-y 

TRC-l transceiver case only ..,,,... 

TRC-2 ..... transceiver case and accessories . . 



TRX144 Kit 
TRX220 Kit 
TRX432 Kit 



259.95 
25 9.95 
259,95 

2S4.9S 
34.95 
54.95 




SYNTHESIZERS 



SYN il Kit , . 



SYPJ II W/T . 

SYN 220 Kit 

SYN 220 W/T 



2 mtr synthesiier» transmit offsets 
programmable from 100 KHz— IOMHj:^ 
(Mars offsets with optiortal 

adapters). , . , 169.95 

S^me as above— wired & tested. , . 239,95 
same as SYN II Kit except 220- 

225 MHi, 169.95 

same as above— wired & tested , , 239.95 




OTHER PRODUCTS BY VHP ENGrNEERING 



CD I Kit . 

CD2 Kit , 

CD 3 Kit . 

COR 2 Kit 
SC3 Kit . 

Crystals . 

CWSD Kit 



cwm 

CWSD 
MIC I 



F ■ fr 



TSI W/T. . 
TSl W/T. . 

TD3 Kit . . 
TD3W/T , 
HLJ44 W/T 

HL220 W/T 
HL43 2 W/T 



10 channel receive ^tal deck 

w/diode switching, . , 5 s,95 

10 channel Kmil deck w/switcb 

and trimmers . 16,95 

UHK Version of CD I deck> needed 

for 432 m u It i- channel operation. 14.95 

carrier operjited relay. ...... 23,95 

10 channel auto-scan adapttir 

for KX wjtb priority 21.95 

we stock most amateur grade pairs 
from 146,0-147.0 (each) .... 5»00 

159 bitn. field pro flammable, code iden- 
tifier with buiU-tn squelch tail: and 

ID timers . . . , 42,'9S 

wired and tested, not programmed^ S9,95 
wired and tested, programmed . 64.95 
2,000 ohm dynamic mike with 
P.T.T. and Coil cord ....... 13*95 

tone squelch decoder. ..,.., 59,95 

iqstalled in repealer^ including 

interface accessories i , 94.9 5 

3 tone decoder . , . , , 39,9 S 

same as above— wired St tested . 64,95 

4 pole helical resonatof, wired & tested^ 
swept tuned to 144 MHz ban . . 34.95 
Same as above tuiied to 22 MHz ban 34,95 
same as above tuned ta432 MH?: ban 34,95 



::OAXIAL SWITCHES AND 
ACCESSORIES for antenna seiec- 
lion and RF switching, Tiiese 
^igh-qualitv switches have set the 
^tar^dard for the industry for 
f^art. Carannic switches with sil- 
t&f alloy contacts and silver- 
>lated conductors give unmatched 
>arformance and reltability from 
ludio frequencies to 150 MHz. 
i&W coaxial switches are de- 



signed for use with 52 to 75-ohm 
non- reactive load^, and are power 
rated at 1 0OO watts AM, 2000 
watts SSB Connectors are UHF 
type. Insertion loss is negligible, 
and VSWR is less than 1-2:t up to 
1 50 MHz, Crosstatk (measured at 
30 MHz) is 45 dB between ad la- 
cent outlets and -60 dB between 
alternate outlets* 




HbMSiZ 



IHDdtl »0A 



HncMSVO 



COAXIAL SWITCHES AND ACCESSORIES 

for intflnnt telACTion and RF switching 



Modal 


PRICE 


Ouipun 


Rffrmn-ks 


375 


TS.9B 


S 


PROTAX s^wttch Gfi^u-nds *li txi^tjpi selected 
Quipul circuit. 


376 


18.95 


5 


P ROT AX ^wPTch. Ground! jIt e!NC«pg «ieeT«) 
output Circuit. SiJ<fh iwUCh tMjstt^on giound^ 

Mff QutpUtK. 


&50A 


14.00 


5 




&50Aa 


12.50 


2 




5S1A 


17.50 


2 


St*icia< 2■po^e, 2-j>Oittn>n fw^tch used to 
swircti any HF device tri or out oi sen*? 

timnetinjrt lo dcodxtji line See ligure- (o-ver). 


556 


.95 


— 


Brachei oniv. for wall moynirng of f^\ai 
connector switches 


B90 


17.95 


5 




S90G 


17.95 


5 


Grounds all *«cepi selected out pui c-ifcujt. 


&92 


1 6.SP 


2 




595 


13.50 


fi 


G'Oui^i all excepi s^H^cred output circuity 



B^W 




\flodel 333 dummy ioao watt- 
Tieter — Favorite Lightweight 
^oriable-250 WATT RATING - 
Mr Cooled. Ideal field service unit 
or mobile 2- way radio — CB^ 
narine, business band. Best for 
ZIRP amateur use, CB, with zero 
:o 5 watts full scale low power 
ange, 

Ff*qiiflTi«V' Ranga-. DC ti^^CH NdHf 
VSWfl: LeM thA'T. 1.3:1 15 33DMHr 

PoimiF Rnnja- 3 fifl ^j Ht "nT«TiTntlB-n I 

WaiUmBtBr flana**! 0-5-, 0-&O, 0.125, 0.2BO 

Co-nntet**; 30- S3& 

SnipfijngWfighT 2 ibt. 
Prlc*: SgS. SiO 




High Power -^ 1000 WATT 
=1ATING - Oil Cooled - model 
334A dummy load wattmeter. 
:>ur most popular combir^ation 
jnit. Handles full arnateur power* 
Weter ranges mdividuaMy caM- 
irated. Can be panel mounted. 




Model 374 dummy toad watt- 
meter — Top of the Line — 1500 
WATT RATING - Oil Cooled. 
Our highest power combination 
unit. Rated to 1 BOO watts input 
(intermittent). Meter ranges are 
tndividually calibrated for highest 
accuracy. 

Fi'aiii^ntv BanffB txt lo 300 Mk2 

V$WI=|: Uni, ihin 1,3:1 to 230 ^He 

Po^V RjingB' IfiOD watt^ DC \ntWPfiitttnt. 

WariMnq li^itnt^ i»0ridl4 

mjj(irnurw4 h4at llnliE 
WaEE^ei^ n^ngoi : 1 B^ Q BE), O-dlDO. 1 BOO 
InjJul CQnnmctifr: SO -233 IheriTivtlcallv sbjiIqeIJ 

SJiiPPlng MBQNt, 1 2 llw. 




VSWH 
Fcw«r.,RflFi^: 



Wdttrmlttf Rdf^Q*! 
Input COnnticlcr: 

S)j:b. 

Frier 



OC tt|3«i MH2 

Ltii Ft^ »ri I 3 1 to 23tl Mhi 

lOOO i^JTCl CW iht*f ftiittsflt 

i^l^dmum hcBl Jirriill-. 
OHO. 0-100^ & 3O0, 01000 
^<]'33S iharmslirjllv i*ak*!Jl 

t2jljj. 

$174.DD 



Wide range attenuator — Model 
371-1. Seven rocker switches pro- 
vide attenuation from 1 dB to 61 
dB m 1-dB steps. Switches are 
marked in dB, 1 -2-3-5-1 0-2a 20. 
Sum of actuated switches ON 
position} gives attenuation. With 
all switches in OUT position, 
there is NO insertion loss. Atten- 
uator installs in coaxial line using 
UHF connectors. 



PgwH Cap^z 


iiv: 


% WDit 


VStArR: 




I.Jn mtnimum, DC I* J2& MH^ 


(Fnp*diinc* ■ 




fiD atim'S; 


Acxuiracy : 




1 dBj'de,.DC taSO MHi 

0.1 dB/di i4.e dS, aC to i«0 mh^ 

0.1 ds/ae ii.Odfi.Dc i&^a-s mhi 


&z»: 




ej-b-' K 2!.'," K 354" 


SKiep4'^B *t* 


fltii 


1 ^] rfaa. 


PriC*- 




H9.6D 




BARKER & 

WILLIAMSON. INC. 



INTFODUCES 



PI-DUX« CQtl» 

High-pfeciS'!Cjn, afr-wourhCf coils 
lof band-&wjtctiina, pi-netwoik 
Imai arnpniisra. 




Mpdel 195-1 jated id t KW PEP 
Model tflS-? ^aifid to 2 KW PEP- 



195 

1»5 



1 $48.50 

2 $56.50 



AJSO.., 

AIH-DUX» Afr Woiiiid Coil« 

Uniform- pilch coi's itom !4 incf> 
to 6 ancfies dsfljnet«f . ? »rKH&s to 
10 ifichM lofig, 4 lo 3S luifJis tier 
incri. no S to no. £4 AWG 




#P^ 



w-:,** 



Typical aif-idux cojI. 



^i-' 



2 Kiw CouFil 5wltch«f 
for wall or detk mounting 

Mudel 5&3 — ijiiig:t! pLilt', 
S'^Dgiliprt 




$16.7S 

Grounds unused fKisitltHis 



Model 59^— DPDT 

tniBfctianflfls iwo ouTp-uls 
balvvfer) two Inpitis. 




$T7.50 



r^cuwfrf faietr ? KW P£P □ Ctif r^nr 
raisrig 5 A □ V^WR @ 5fl [>hmg — 
1.3n man. to 150 MNi □ Ervsenlon 
loss and c^oBstaEk naghgible. 




Model 331 A trar>sistor dip meter 
— Portable RF single generator, 
signal monitor, or absorption 
wavemeter. Lightweight (1 
pound^ 6 ounces with all coil^), 
battery-powered unit is ideal for 
field use in testing transceivers^ 
tuning antennas, etc. Can also be 
used to measure capacity, induc- 
tance, circuit Q, and other fac- 
tors. Indispensable for experi- 
menters, it is easily the most 
versatile instrument in the shop, 
Contint.iOUS coverage from 2 MHz 
to 230 MNz in seven ranges, 

FfQ^-tjept.y i^vflrnifa: -;} MHz ^d 230 MH^'ifi 7 civ4r4a[>|^ln# 

B MM2- te MHjr, le Mrij-aa mmj, 

3a M HI--64 W Hr, 50 mH?- l TO M Hr, 

no Mti*-zao MH? 

±3% 

low Hi, S5% w4Cl"(t 
S-'VaJt trmif-iatur bAltDrV^ 
eufgaii 2U€ Or 4qwJvai«n1 
7" jt 2\i" K 2'A" 
1 lij., 6 at 




Model 372 CLIPREAMP. Get 
maximum legal modulation with- 
out danger of splatter. 



[np>ui ImptiMntii': 
Inpu) Lfivli: 
VnltaQK Gain: 
(Output E-etMfl: 



lOQ DOOoPinTt 

& m |M| MoJt* to UO- mU I Ivoltf 

CD mililvoEti 



Output Impvdarvca: 50,D0D dh-nlE 



¥avt*r, 



1)«1t*tV, BvfSfiti 



Sim: 

Shipping UVaighi: "f iii, 
■Conn«et(M'*' Twtrninmi rtrlf] 



M 



AccurDcr: 
MnduEatLcn; 
Portflf : 

$IJ!»: 

PreifB: 




Coaxial antenna changeover relay. 
Model 377. 

^■a-fV Rating: tOOCI' watts C?N 4^004 wbtT^^^-l 

Vi^WH: Lb-i* [hart 1.1 5il., OC w IHOMH? 

Pawnr P«fltJHr BTPW nt* S.01 5 Amp*rp^ 4!J ;p iSOii^ln AC 

Cortuflc lura : UHP TypP S0.339 

DimBrrtiQi^?: 3>>'- n 1 V 

54ii|api«^tf Wd-iB^I! 1 Ib- 




Model 359. Increase your trans- 
mitter's effective speech power up 
to four times. This two stage, 
transistorized Audio Preamplifier/ 
Li miter can be used with all tvpes 
of transmitters. 



^'Tipul H mfiada.n-cfl 
Iripui l-Rual 
VQtT^pB Dafn 
Output LsveI 
Output I tti|7flsj anr^t 

Shipping WBi<g>it 
l^pin nectar I 
Pric*: 



lOO.WJOahiTH 

^ i^illivdht la 30 mlill¥Bl« 

lOtue 

^0 Jwltlivolrf. 

aO.OOD Qhmi 

9.W9U rriHii'i'ttair b^EtBrV, 

Sur^is 2U&4r ^Ouivahni 

2fi" n 3" K ^>i" 

& ^r at . 

T*»iiiinaf Hf Ip 

$:W.aO 




PHONE 
PATCH 



Uriiversal hybrid coupler II phone 
patch, iVIodel 3002W and model 
30O1W. The hybrid circuit pro- 
vides for effortless VOX opera- 
tion of the phone patch. A built- 
in Compreamp speech preampli- 
fier/hmiter {tr\ Model 3002W) 
increases the level of weak phone 
signals and also prevents overmod- 
ulation when the local telephone 
fs used as the station microphone. 
(The Compreamp also functions 
as a preamplif ier/lrmiter with the 
station microphone, if desired. ) 

Model 300 2W with Compreamp 
$125.00 

Model 300 IW without Com- 
preamp $85.00 



bnpuhs. frDn:>: 
Line 

f^tcBiytn- 
Micibp^iOTH 



T#p« fi#t-OfCl"r 
DuipiJtE tn: 
Tunirnillvi M.OOO ll*|.^t 

T'ipa HACDrdBr Q, $ mc^hm 

5hipf>ini}VU«ight 
P&*rtt 



&Oa ohmft 

Hiflh irflMflane* I SO.OOfl anmil 

tiryitSl flf dynamic 
4 ahm^ 



L.C>nni:CTQI £ 



6K" K TW 

D-von l>ttt*tv, &urupi-M a Lis 

O'' »C(ii|iiVfll*nT 




2-meter mobrle AT-200 An- 
tenna Matcher. Use your cars 
AM/FM antenna for your 2- meter 
mobile rig. Tunes from the front 
panel for max. output, min^ 
VSWR (1.2:1 or less for most car 
antennas), $24,95 






COAXPROBE® 



ONLY 




COAXIAL RF PROBE FOR 

FREQUENCY COUNTERS 

AND OSCILLOSCOPES 



^MONITOR VQUn SIGNAL DIRECTLY 

FROM THE COAX LINE 
*5-200Q WATTS PEP 
*aUTPUT: .31v-1.av RMS «>80Q WATTS 
*rNS€RTIQN LOSS LESS THAN 

.2db (3-30 Mhz.) 
"^USEFUL RANGE: .5 to 150 Mhz. 

Eliminate jerrv-rigging when you need to 
monitor your signal. The CoaxProbe" 
will work on both frequency counters and 
oscilloscopes (of proper tjandwidlh). 
Just connect the probe into your coax line 
and hook up your test equipment. 
Because of its low loss, you can leave 
ft in while you operate! 



LYTL-LOAD® 



ONLY 

$8.95 



NEW! 




30 WATT DUMMY LOAD 
FOR QRP AND 2- METERS 



Now! A dummy load that's just the 
right size for low power work. Rated 
at 30 watts for 30 seconds, the Lytl* 
load* is perfect for Qrp work, 
2-meters or any application where 
low power and small size are re- 
quired. The LythLoad® has a range 
to 1 50 Mhz with SWR of 1 .4:1 at 1 50 
Mhzand 1.1:1 at 30 Mhz. 



All Eagle proitucis carrv a 10 day. 
money back (minus shipping) guar- 
antes. Please add Si per order for ship- 
ping. 



ORDER TODAV FROM: 

EAGLE ELECTRONICS 

Box 426 D 
Portage, Ml 49081 

LOCATEO AT 4475 W. MILHAM ROAD 



MAY SPECIALS 

BONUS : Extra 3% Discount on 
merchandise when order is ac- 
companied by Cashier's Check 
or Money Order. 

Trf-Dond Beams Ltst Spl 



Mosler Ikli, i elemtnts 
Mosin Cl-33, 3 elenenti 
Hf-Ciin THBJfi. low Power 
HrGiin TH3HIC3. 3 tkatati 
HT'Gain TH6DXXX. i efemenb 
OTHER SPECIALS 
Cushcraft Mil 
Cudictift At47-t1 
Cmkrall M 47-22 
Alliance HD 73 Rotor 
Hitstler-see March Issue of 73 



304.75 
1«95 
229.J5 

299.50 

39.95 

36.95 

t09.95 

159.95 



169 00 
I94.IX) 
109.50 
169.0Q 
205,M 

29.75 
27.50 
81.50 
99.00 



MC& VISA WELCOME 



Send stomp for price sheet ond 
descriptive infomnotion* PRICES 
DO NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING. We 
ship only to 50 States. Prices ore 
good OS long os monufoctufer 
holds above Ust prices. 

COMMUNICA i IONS SERVICES 

I »aA VVnl UilB Slrt*i ^^Qfifi 

I Ptdtidflptii«. MIsitHtppi 39350 

L Phone: 601-656-5145 Hours: 7-5 Mon-Fri« 




COAX 
SWITCHES 

froin Barker & Williamson 




Model 593 

• Single PqI% 3 
Posiiioo wilh 
grourrdrng o/ all 
unu&ed positions 

• Cfossta/lr (mea- 

sured at 30 MHzJ is ■4Sdb between ad- 
jacent outlets and 60 db between alter- 
nate outlets 



Mode) 594 

• 2 Po/e 2 Poa/f/on 

• Crossta/lr 4Sdb 

(measured at 30 
MHz) 



Specifications for both switches 

• Power 1 KW-2KWPEP 

• imperfenc© 50-75 ohms 

• VSWB 1.2:1 up to 150 MHz 

• O/morta/ons ^W htgh, 5" wide. 3" deep 

• Weight 1 lb. 

• Mount Wall or desk 

y^ B23 Available at your B&W dealer 




BW 



Barter A Williamson. Inc. 

10 Canat St firjsjal. Pa. 19007 



SSTT-4 

t-LTHA Tl-TFS DELIMK 



r-jnuTO^ai 



ITLTfiA TT'^'ER DELrXE Male^h^^i uny uniirniiii^ 
crhix ted irr lundfim wire i»n uti luiiirU (NK^IO 
imitrHj Tunc ciiLi the SWR nn yimr unrciimi Fur 
rtiiirc crruiirnl crperulliin of nity rtj{, Hume, nitthilf , 
p(»rmtilc««riW 9"!c2i^"s5* * 300 wtnt KF 
uuJ|iiil L-u|»iiU|tliy • SWH, wamimw \\\\\y 'i-^ttUw 

t^'ltk' • AulctlUJI fiwllErk >M,'k<.'(!H tji^tW^'CIl IVL'a 

ffHts Ti**,! urucnnus, miuli^m wire, tir timer tiTfiuHH • 
Rrruiiirt Ali-wrjuntl Ei««lfic?lur * '^i\H pt tOOOV. 
C^ii|HiL-lturH« Aitri.iciivc brdii^c HiHf^hvrl L'EifitiHUJ'c. 



oiilyj$64.95 



SST T'Z ULTRA TrKER 



Ttiiik'4( mi I SVYH 4 in 
unt' untcniiii — c(iili 
fcil iir riiiMl*iin witk: 
(160* I (J meet n* J. 
.Iny rtjtf-^iiii iiig(Hl 
vrarts RF nutpul. 



oiilf'S37.99 



SSTT-S MOBILE 
IMPEDiWCE 

TRA.VSFOKMER 



ciiQix ill (he Iriwcr 
impcrdinrc of a 
miidlk' uhl|j. lu|i><% 
tHr(w€i:n S unri 1^0 
ohmw :HIO MHk. 
'V)i% u'utrH otitpitt. 



oiily019.9S 



SSTT-l RAa 



AH biitirh (I5U-IU 
111.} lA'lih any \K'\tc > 

Any lTiiiiN<-t.'hcr * 



WIRE 



only S29.95 






c»tiIy^l7.9S 



%%T 4 1^1 £4 MH. iXCII K. (iliint i^-it LIJi 
liitlT!lcrul*t. Mnntli and ifity uIhii u% \%n*^ nt biiltnit 
Ik-Mutlfflirnrnmrtltsk. I lOVAt' 



aiilF#£2.9S 



SST ■'I nALt'M fiirbolanc^d llnc-^. dfMJW, 



onljrSS.OO 



€■11 It I m nim-^Hni to nrdcr tMf .11.. TlK.l, 
or .Ha^Ciii^ IkHE-i^K, 



T*» 4lr<lsn 

f^Cltd u chirck r»r iniincy UTi\^. r — <>r lit**? y<Kir M.Cj (IT 
VISA AtitI M^ Khliipiiiq unci hapidlhi^, C Lilif. p^^\* 
ilcnis, itdil >>uk"!^ iu:f . 



4M«itrHnilcei All SST jiiTtifhuLih xirc imeutMlM Ion- 
ully ^luiriiiiUkTci iVir 1 yciir, In ndilLlltJii, ijuy tiiiiv 
he rLlnt-iii-d wllhhv 10 rk^ys IVif h In]! li-lnnd llt"Hh 
KliJ|i|Hnfi;; Ifvon tire iktI siilisfk'd Tipr n\\\ rtuNi^n 




i^SlO 



PQ-BOX 1 LAwrsiOALE. CALIF. 

soeso (S13) 37B-5eoy 



114 



P^ fteader Service — see psge 19S 



^ a s 



■ i iilt J MI WIiiMMW IIIi -^ 



£M-. 



»» 'tti 



■^ Ki 



»44 



ur-'-im^ 



m 



fm 



,^&a 



MMt 






T|£ O^R^T 



• i'Ml"'il'ri1'N|-^''^ "' 



25 VUWTTS 

144-148 MHz 

FULLY SYNTHESIZED 

5 KHz STEPS 

PROVISIONS FOR NONSTANDARD OFFSETS 

AND ONLY $295.00 



Last year we promoted the Flvi-28 at 
$329.95 in an attempt to acquaint the 2 
Meter FM gang with this superb trans- 
ceiver. We never experienced such an 
enthusiastic response. 
As a result of the great popularity of this 
radio we've been able to increase pro- 



duction, reduce our cost, improve re- 
liability and tighten specifications. 
So now in 1979 when you purchase a 
new FM-28 you become a real winner 
We have reduced our price still further 
And our warranty on the 1979 produc- 
tion Is now a full 12 months. 



ORDER YOURS TODAY DIRECTLY FROM CLEGGi 



Send your check or money order for 
$295 and we will pay domestic UPS. Or 
order yours on your VISA or Master 
Charge card and we'll add the few dol- 
lars for shipping to your credit card 
charges. 



191 1 Olde Homestead Lane 

Greenljeld Industrial Park Easi 

Lancaster. PA 1 760i 

(717)299-7221 



t^QZ 



l^ ReBder Service — see page 796 



115 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

e eft" tor/a/ by Wsiyne Green 



from page 4 

initials of that club) mounted 
their second annual auction in 
Manchester just before Lin- 
coln's birthday. Chancy time of 
year for something like this, as 
they found out last year when 
Mother Nature dumped a 
bunch of snow on New England 
the day before the auction, ef- 
fectively Keeping most every- 
one home. 

The crowd was excellent this 
year, and the Roving Camera 
was there to catch all the ac- 
tion. The auction brought out 
Ions of vintage ham gear for a 
yearly change of ownership, t 



haven't seen so many Gonset 
Communicators all in one 
place in years ... I wonder 
what the new owners do with 
them? 

Manchester is only 35 miles 
from Peterborough, but then, 
Hew Hampshire is a very small 
state and most towns are not 
very far apart. Sherry and I 
often drive up to Manchester 
for a busir>ess lunch or dinner. 
The shopping is good there, 
too, particularly since there is 
no sales tax in Islew Hampshire. 
After visiting other states, it 
feels funny to buy things and 
pay only the price marked. 

There is a particularly good 




The auction is hetd in an armory in downtown Manchester^ a 

cavernous place. 




Jeff DeTray, the assistant editor and publisher of 73 and Kilobaud 
MICROCOMPUTING, managed to oontain himseif through some 
of the more frantic bidding, returning with naught but pleasant 
memories of underbidding on equipment for which he would have 
no earthly use. 




An excited mass of bidders, vying for every piece of gear, no mat- 
ter how useiess, is here letting its enthusiasm run away with itseif 
over a particularly exotic rig. ' 




Much of the crowd wandered off to visit the fables of ham gear 
brought in by dealers such as Tufts Eiectronics, a carpetbagger 
from Massachusetts — a state known to most New Hampshire peo- 
ple for the tons of beer cans brought up by thousands of world- 
famous Massachusetts drivers and dumped alongside New Hamp- 
shire roads on weekends. Here Is aging, paunchy WaynQ in the 
center, listening to John Seeney of Cushcraft tell why his new 
magnetic-mount two meter antenna is selling so well. John had a 
display set up In one corner of the Tufts booth and kept a lot of 
hams enthralled with his hyperbole. 




Here's Chuck Martin WA JKPS trying to beat off the frantic buyers 
of ham gear. Actually, Vm not kidding about the auction doing welt 
for some of the commercial exhibits. Tufts did their best day of the 
entire month in sales as a result of the sates made this day , . . lots 
of 520s found happy homes. Chuck, who would much rather be ski- 
ing, gave In to commercial pressures and brought a truckload of 
stuff to New Hampshire, thus ensuring more healthy signals from 
this retatlvefy rare state. 



tie 



CALL AJiaON. NO W ! 

615 868-4956 
for the Best DEALS 



Amateur Radio Supply of Nashville, Inc 



615 South GalloHn Road, Madison. Tenri$$«ee 37115 ^a40 



best prices -best service -best trades 




YAESU FT 901 DM 

Call for yours today 1 





DENTRON GLA 1000 

1 KW DC Inpjt! • ^200 W PEP!! 

DENTRON 

CMppetion L • MLA 2B00 B • DTR 20(K)L 

We have the New Oentron AF-IA Audio Processar 

Oentron Antenna Tuners. Antennas antf SWR Meters, 

CHECK OyP PRICES 



/ffT. nil H\A 1 1 1 ! J I 11 h4 i Ml f l"*++i|-1 ril ! ■ "-*'• ■ ■ 




THE NEW FT101ZD 
n IN STOCK I! 



DigJiai T60M-10M 
Cheok me othcn . 



Delui<e Features 

than g«t our pr|c9l 



Fast UPS delivery Place your order then 
stardback!! ! We ship your order the same day 
we get it 8e$t prices and qutck handling of 
your order. 

Used Equipment? our stock turns fast 

- write or call your speciHc r>6i?ds 

CLOSEOUT SPECIALS! 

Send S.A.S.E. for our pink sheet specials. 



STORE HOURS 

Mon. - Fri, 9 AM - 5 PM 
Sun. 1 PM - 6 py 



TS-820S ^ KENWOOD 

Deluxe 1 .8 - 30 MHZ Transceiver 
CalJ or write for special prJceiJJ 



•y-: ■ ■; ■ ■->-^ry;.?ic;i™?'?.TTi''^?r?y;^ :■;,. 




KENWOOD TR7600 
KENWOOD TR7625 

10 or 25 Watt FM 2 meter xcvr synthesized 
with memory. Qet our beit pHcel 

IN STOCKH Atso ask about the RM 76 
MICRO processor for the 7600/7^25 

PUT YOURSELF IN THE PICTURE!! 
Get m on the late&t in Ham Radio. 

SSTV — ROBOT 



IN STOCK 

Call or write for prices. 



ICOM 701,211,215. 280, 30A 
ALL IN STOCKM 
Compare Our Pricesll! 





I 




"!dur-w>^=^' 



CDE ROTOR SPECIALS 

The NEW HAM IV Rotor 

Shipping JncFuded 
HAM IV Rotor $147** 
Ham IV Rotor with 100 ft rotor cable $162*° 
Ham IV Rotor plus 100 ft. each - rotor cable 
and first grade RG SU StSS^^ 
Send castifers chectt or M.O. 




KENWOOD'S NEW TS 120S 

ALL SOLID STATE HP TRANSCEIVER 
PLUS A FULL LINE OF ACCESSORIES 

Before You Buy, Get Our Prices! 



W^ stock the FULL Kenwood and 
Yaesu line. CALL USfl 

MIRAGE 

B10&2M AllffP • MPI Hf SWn MTU 

MP2 VHF SWR MTR 

We've got 'em in stock! CaiJ or write for prices. 

2M HANDI TALKIES?? 
WILSON, YAESU, TEMPO 

DATONG 

We stock the amazing Datong FL-T agiie, 
active audio filter - absofutefy a faritastic 
addition to your stitlon, 




TEN-TEG 
OMNI D & A 

UNBEATABLE PRICESf! 
Full TEN-TEC Line In Stock 

Get On Frequency! 

DSI Counter Semi-kit 




Write or call for special price. 



sura, we tahe traiies on new 
equlpmenti Call or write, 
were Burning to mahe "Hot" 
Deals!! 



1 




Over visiting, looking for 
microwave gear bargains, was 
Jadson Snyder K2CBA, v\fhom 
I've known for over 30 years. As 
a matter of fact, fie used to 
booUeg witf} my ham rig before 
he got his own oaff Jud is a big 
gun on UHF from the Troy area 
of New York, 

supermarket in Manchester, 
too--Ferretti's— so I stopped 
by and found they had some 
fresh Chinese noodles! Now^ 
how otten do you see those in a 
supermarket? A few days later I 
got busy and made up a batch 
of spareribs with black bean 
sauce on soft noodles. This is a 
dish which 1 always get when I 
visit Hong Fat restaurant in 
Chinatown in New York (63 
Mott Street). It's so good, you 
can become addicted to it. 
Imagine my surprise when I 
found that 1 could make it even 
better then Hong Fat! It's easy, 
once you figure out how to do 

it. 

Not to turn 73 into a 
cookbook ^ but there are a few 
dishes which I've learned to 
make which are first rale^ if you 
are adventurous in your eating. 
Oh, you're not? Okay . . . forget 
it. 

SOFTWARE SURPRISE 

One of the more pleasant sur- 
prises in the new software 
publishing business has been 
the sales of Instant Software's 
Ham Package I. This is a group 
of eight different programs for 
the Radio Shack TRS-80 micro- 
computer. These programs per- 
mit you to make most of the or- 
dinary ham slide rule calcula- 




This is Steve 1^ array K1KEC, 
who apparently lost his razor 
and scissors a few years ago. 
Steve is another skier, though 
he missed the yeariy pilgrim- 
age to Aspen this January. 
Steve has been deeply involved 
with repeater frequency coor- 
dination for about ten years. 

tions quickly and easily — 
calculations such as Ohm's 
Law, frequency vs, reactance, 
series capacitances, parallel 
resistances, voltage dividers, 
etc. There are also programs 
which give you the dimensions 
for dlpole and yagi antennas. 

One of the more useful as- 
pects of computerized calcula- 
tions is the ability of the TRS-80 
to draw the schematics of the 
circuits and antennas, complete 
with the dimensions. 

With approximately 30% of 
the computer hobbyists also 
being radio amateurs, the sales 
of the Ham Package I programs 
were not expected to be low, 
tjut sales reports from tnstant 
Software marketing show that 
this package of programs has 
consistently been one of the 
very best sellers. Only the 
Space Trek II and the Air Flight 
Simulator program packages 
have consistently been outsell- 
ing the Ham Package! Space 
Trek II has been running about 
40% ahead of the Ham Pack- 
age, and Air Flight Simulator 
has been running about 15% 
ahead. 

At $7.95 for the eight pro- 
grams, the Ham Package has to 
be one of the better program 
values— and perhaps a harbin- 



Ham Help 



I need a schematic and/or 
manual for a Sideband Engi- 
neers model SBE33. I will pay 
for photocopying and shipping, 

Jeff Taylor W0NLU 

R #1 , Box 40A 
St James MO 65559 

I need help with the digital 



multimeter article authored by 
WA4AIH in the April, 1978, issue 
of 73. I need the source for the 
General Instruments AY-3-3550 
10 and the Intersil ICL 8052 
ACPD. 

Ed McKenzie WA3PHL 

Mlllersville State College 

Mlllersvilta PA 17551 




A computer store from Boston had a display at the auction, attract- 
ing computerist Hal Chamberlin . . . one of the earliest publishers 
in the field, tie I put out The Computer Hobbyist from North 
Carolina before wising up and moving to New Hampshire. His 
worii with cassette systems fives on in many of the commercial 
systems today. Hal, by the way, was one of the first people I con- 
tacted when I thought up the idea for starting Byte magazine. He 
didn't seem to think that a magazine would do well for microcom- 
puters, so i next tried Hal Singer, another editor of an excellent 
hobbyist newsletter. He didn't think much of the Idea either, so I 
tried Bob Albrecht, etc., finally getting down to the chap t eventual- 
ly picked, Helmers. I understand that Helmers has been sort of 
''retired'* by Byte^ so perhaps those who turned down the job made 
a better decision for the long run. 



ger of things to come as far as 
the publishing of programs in 
bulk is concerned. These are 
available from many of the 
computer stores, a few Radio 
Shack stores, and from Instant 
Software, Inc. A few ham stores 
are starting to set up computer 
program sales centers. Tufts 
Electronics is carrying the full 



line of Instant Software pro- 
gram packages, 

JANUARY WINNER 

John Murray W1BNN was the 
overwhelming winner in our 
January Most Popular Article 
contest. He will be receiving a 
$100 bonus check for his arti- 
cle, "SOSl Ship in Trouble!" 



WE COOK, TOO! 




On the feft ts Lynn Panciera-Fraser, the production manager for 
both 73 and MICROCOMPUTING magazines. She's working with 
Sherry Smythe, our Executive Vice President, in making some 
Chinese steamed dumplings. I was not too busy making my 
spareribs with black bean sauce on soft Chinese noodles to snap 
this picture. 



lie 



Social E/ents 



Usttrtgs in this column are 
provided free of charge on a 
space-avsilabie basis. The 
foftowing information shouid be 
included in every announce- 
ment: sponsor, event, date, 
time, place, city, state, admis- 
sion charge (if any), features, 
taik-ln frequencies, and the 
name of whom to contact for 
further information. Announce- 
ments must be received two 
months prior to the month in 
which the event takes place. 

SHREVEPORT LA 
MAY 4-5 

The Shreveport Amateur 
Had»o Association wlH hold Ks 
annual hamfest on May 4-5, 
1979, at the Louisiana State 
Fairgrounds. Pre-registration is 
$3.00; $4.00 at Ihe door. This Is 
an ARRL sanctioned hamfest. 

NEENAH Wl 
MAYS 

The 3^F Amateur Radio Club 
will hold its annual swapfest on 
Saturday. May 6, 1979, from 
8:00 am to 3:00 pm. at the 
Neenah Labor Temple, 157 S. 
Green Bay Road. Neenah, 
Wisconsin, just off Highway 41 
at the Highway 114 or 150 exit. 
Factitties include a large park- 
ing area and a large indoor 
swap area with a free auction at 
the end ot the day. Food and 
beverage will be available. Ad- 
vance admission for tickets 
and tables is $1.50; $2.00 at the 
door. Talk-In on 52/52, For 
reservations, write to Mark 
Michel W90P. 339 Naymut 
Street, Menasha Wl 54952. 

BIN6HAMT0N NY 
MAY 5 

The Southern Tier NY 
Amateur Radio Clubs will hold 
their 2Dth annual hamfest and 
dinner on May 5, 1979, at the 
Lutheran Feflowship Recrea- 
tion Cenler, 3.7 miles north of 
NY Rte. 17, Exit 71 N., on Stella 
Ireland Road, Binghamlon, 
New York. There will be tech- 
nical talks, prizes, displays, ex- 
hibits, refreshments, and free 
flea-market parking. Tickets 
are $2.00 for general admission 
and $7.00 for the banquet (In- 
eluding general admission). In- 
side tables are $5.00 each, by 
reservation only. For tickets 
and information, write to 
STARC, PO Box 11, Endicott NY 
13760. 

DULUTH MN 
MAYS 

The Arrowhead Radio Ama- 
teur Club will hold its annual 
swapfest on May 5, 1979, from 
11:00 am to 3:00 pm at the First 
United Methodist Church, 230 E. 



Skyline Parkway, Duluth, Min^ 
nesota. Admission is $1.50 and 
tables are $1.50. Refreshments 
are available on the grounds. An 
auction will be held at 2:00 pm. 
Talk-in on .34/.94. For more 
information, write Harold Sim- 
merman N9AMA, Swapfest 
Chairman, Route 1, Box 7, Lake 
Nebagamon Wl 54849, or call 
(71 5)-3 74^3231. 

DEKALB IL 
MAY 6 

The Kishwaukee Radio C(ub 
and the DeKalb County Ama- 
tear Repeater Club will hold 
their 21st annual indoor/out- 
door hamfest on Sunday, May 6, 
1979. from 8:00 am to 3OT pm at 
the Notre Dame School, 3 m^les 
south of DeKalb between High* 
way 23 and South 1st St. on 
Gurler Rd., DeKalb, Illinois. 
Tickets are $1.50 in advance; 
$2.00 at the door. Indoor tables 
are avaifabte or you may bring 
your own, The outdoor setup is 
free. Talk-in on 146.13/, 73 and 
94, For tickets ar\6 directions, 
send an SASE to Howard New- 
quist WA9TXW, PO Box 349, 
Sycamore IL 60178. 

LOGANSPORT tN 
MAY 6 

The Cass County Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its second 
annual hamfest on Sunday, 
May 6, 1979. from 7:00 am to 
4:00 pm at the 4-H fairgrounds, 
Logansport, Indiana. Go north 
of Logansport on Highway 25, 
turn right at Road 100, and 
follow the QSY signs. Admis- 
sion is $1.50 in advance and 
$2.00 at the gate. Outstde set- 
up is free and undercover set- 
up is $1.00. Bring your own 
tables. There will be overnight 
camping, refreshments, ladies' 
bingo, and door prizes. Talk-in 
on 146.52 and Logansport re- 
peater 147. 78/. 18. For informa* 
tion, write Dave Rothermel 
K9DVL, RFD 4, Box 146Q. 
Logansport IN 46947. 

WARMINSTER PA 

MAY 6 

The Warminster Amateur 
Radio Ctub will hold its fifth an- 
nual *"Ham'Mart" flea market 
and auction on Sunday, May 6, 
1979, from 9:00 am until 4:00 
pm, at the William Tennent In* 
termediate High School, Street 
Road {Route 132), two miles 
east of York Road (Route 263K 
Warminster, Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania. A registration 
fee of $1.00 per car includes 
one trcket for door prizes, 
Tailgating is $2.00 add it ion aL 
Indoor tables are available for 
$3.00 each. Talk-in on 146.16/76 
and 146.52. For further informa' 



tlon, please write Horace 
Carter K3KT. 38 Hickory Lane, 
Doylestown PA 18901, or phone 
(215)-345-6816. 

SACRAMENTO CA 
MAYS 

The North HMIs Radio Club, 
Inc., of the greater Sacramento 
area, is having their 7th annual 
Ham Swap on Sunday, May 6, 
1979, from 9:00 am until 3:00 pm 
at the Machinists Hail, 3081 
Sunrise Blvd.. Rancho Cordova, 
Calffornia. Take Hwy. 50 to 
Sunrise, turn left, and go to the 
signs. For Information, write 
Cecilia Pringle WB6PBS, Pub- 
licity Chairman, North Hills 
Radio Club, PO Box 701, Fair 
Oaks CA 95628, 

ELLICOTT CITY MD 
MAY6 

The Potomac Area VHF 
Society will hold its eighth an- 
nual hamfest on Sunday, May 6, 
1979, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm at 
the Howard County Fair- 
grounds, approximately 15 
miles west of Baltimore, at the 
intersection of 1*70 and Rte, 32, 
Ellicott City. Maryland. A reg- 
istration fee of $3.00 Includes 
flea market or tailgate sales. 
Professional food and beverage 
catering and unlimited parking 
will be available. Tatk-in on .52. 
For further information, contact 
Paul H, Rose WA3NZL 25116 
Oak Dr., Damascus MD 20750. 

IRVINGTON NJ 

MAY 6 

The Irvington Radio Amateur 
Club will hold its annual ham- 
fest on May 6, 1979, from 9:00 
am to 4:00 pm at the PAL 
Building, 285 Union Ave., Irv- 
ington, New Jersey. Take the 
Garden State Parkway to Exit 
143 north or 143A south. There 
will be refreshments and 
prizes. Tables are $3.00. Talk-in 
on .34/.94 and .52. For informa* 
tion. contact Ed Surmaitis 
WA2MYZ at {201)'6e7-3240 eve- 
nings, or write to Irvington 
Radio Amateur Club. 285 Union 
Ave.t Irvington NJ 07111. 

FRESNO CA 

MAY 11-13 

The 37th annual Fresno 
Hamfest will be held on May 
11-13, 1979, at the Sheraton Inn, 
Clinton and Highway 99, Fres- 
no, California. The program in- 
cludes technical talks, swap 
tables and flea market, trans- 
mitter hunt on 2 meters (146.52). 
QLF contest. ARRL CD ap- 
pointees meeting, ARRL-FCC 
forum, commercial exhibits, 
prizes, eyeball QSOs, prime rib 
banquet, and more. For full 
registration and eligibility for 
pre*registration prize, send in 
$17 before April 27. 1979; it ^s $19 
and no pre-registration prize 
after that date. Talk-in on 146.34 
/146.94. For more information, 
contact the Fresno Amateur 



Radio Club, Inc., PO Box 783, 
Dept. HF, Fresno CA 93712. 

DEERFIELD NH 
MAY 12 

The Hosstraders Net will hold 
its 6th annual tailgate swapfest 
on Saturday, May 12, 1979. at 
the Deerfield Fairgrounds, Deer- 
field, New Hampshire. There 
will be covered buildings^ in 
case of rain. Admission Is $1 .00, 
with no commission or percent- 
age. Commercial dealers are 
welcome at the same rate. Ex- 
cess revenues will benefit the 
Boston Burns Unit of the 
Shriners' Hospital for Crippled 
Children. Last year we donated 
over $1 100.00. Talk-in on .52 and 
146.40-147.00. For more infor* 
mation, send an SASE to Joe 
DeMaso K1RQG. Star Route, 
Box 56, Bucksport ME 04416. or 
Norm Blake WAIIVB. PO Box 
32, Cornish ME 04020, or check 
the Hosstraders Net on Sun- 
days at 4:00 pm on 3940 kHz. 

VANCOUVER WA 
MAY 1213 

The Fort Vancouver Hamfair 
will be held on Saturday and 
Sunday, May 12-13, 1979, at 
Clark County Fairgrounds. Van- 
couver, Washington. Registra- 
tion is $4.00 per person, which 
includes a drawing ticket. 
Tickets are also available at the 
door. Activities will include con* 
tests, seminars, commerciai and 
amateur displays, family events 
and a large ham radio flea mar- 
ket. Many prizes will be award- 
ed, with the grand prize be- 
ing an loom lC-701 HF trans- 
ceiver and power supply. The 
fairground facilities include 
trailer parking and ample car 
parking. A catered buffet dinner 
is scheduled for Saturday night, 
with musical entertainment in- 
cluded. Price of the dinner ticket 
is $5,00 for adults. For registra- 
tion, contact Ken Weslby 
W70YX, Registfatlon Chairman, 
606 Miami Court, Vancouver WA 
98664. 

DAYTON A BEACH Fi 
MAY 1M3 
The Daytona Beach Amateur 
Radio Association, Inc., will 
hold its first hamfest on May 
1M3, 1979, at the Holiday Inn 
Surfside, Daytona Beach, 
Florida. For Mom and the kids, 
there is the "drrveon'' ocean 
beach, and shopping in the 
oceanside plaza. Advance 
registration is $3.00 per family 
and S3.50 at the door. For more 
details, contact Funfest chair- 
man David Busier WA4ZR, 1725 
Hope Drive, Ormond Beach FL 
32074. 

SALINE Ml 

MAY 13 
The ARROW Repeater Asso- 
ciation will hold its annual 
Swap and Shop on Sunday, 
May 13, 1979, at the Saline, 



119 



Michigan, fairgrounds. Admis- 
sion, including parking on tlie 
fairgrounds, is St.SO in ad- 
vance and $2.00 at the door 
There will be food, prizes, and a 
covered area for trunk saies, as 
well as indoor tables. Because 
of Mother's Day, wives will be 
given free admission. Talk-in 
on 146.37/97, 223.18/224.78. and 
448.5/443.5 MHz. For addi- 
tional details, write ARROW. 
PO Box 1572, Ann Arbor Ml 
48106, Of call George Raub 
AD8X at {313)-485-3562. 

WAUKESHA Wl 
MAY 13 

The Milwaukee UHF Society, 
InCt will hold its second annual 
Spring SwapfesI on Sunday, 
May 13, 1979. start mg at 7:00 am 
on the grounds of the Wau- 
kesha County Exposition 
Center, Waukesha, Wisconsin. 
There will be prizes and refresh- 
ments. Admission is $1.50 in ad- 
vance and $2.00 at the gate. 
Some Indoor space is availabie. 
Dealers and exhibitors are 
welcome. For information, write 
Swapfest, Box 49, North Prairie 
Wl 53153. Please include an 
SASE- 

CADILLAC Ml 

MAY 19 

The Wexaukee ARA will hold 
Us 19th annual swap and shop 
on Saturday, May 19, 1979, from 
9:00 am until 4:00 pm at the 
National Guard Armory, 415 
Haynes Street, Cadillac, Mich- 
igan, Tickets are $ZO0. There 
will be free parking and lunches 
available. Talk4n on 14e.37/.97. 
For more information, contact 
Robert Bednarick WDBRZL, 
Publicity Director, Wexaukee 
ARA, Cadillac Ml 49601. 

BENSENVILLEIL 
MAY 19 
The Radio Amateur Megacy* 
cie Society will hold its third 
Antenna Measuring Contest on 
Saturday. May 19, 1979. starting 
at 10:00 am on the grounds of 
the Flick- Reedy Corporation, 
comer of Thorndaie and York 
Roads, BensenvMle, Illinois, 
Equipment will be available to 
measure the gain and swr of 2 
meter, \Va meter, and 70 cm 
antennas. Equipment for higher 
frequencies will be brought if ad- 
vance request is made. Prizes 
will be awarded for the highest- 
gain antenna in each category. 
Refreshments will also be sold. 
For further details, including 
directions, write Joe LeKostaj 
WB9G0J, 2558 N. McVicker 
Ave., Chicago IL 60639. Please 
enclose an SASE 

BIRMINGHAM AL 
MAY 19-20 

The Birmingham Amateur 
Radio Club. Inc., will hold its 
Birminghamfest 79 and Ala- 
bama State Convention on May 



19-20, 1979, at the Birmingham* 
Jefferson Civic Center Exhibi- 
tion Hall, Interstate 20/59 at 
22nd Street north (downtown 
Birmingham, 3 minutes from the 
airport), There will be air-condi- 
tioned exhibit space and an in- 
door air-conditioned flea mar- 
ket. Tentative forums are 
planned on a wide range of 
topics, from ARRL to micro- 
processors. Meetings will in- 
clude MARS, ARRL, Alabama 
section nets/ARPSC, and oth- 
ers. On-site FCC exams will be 
administered on Saturday 
morning. Prizes include a Drake 
TR/DR-7 solid-state transceiver, 
a Kenwood TS^20, and a Drake 
UV-3 (complete). There will be a 
banquet on Saturday night at 
the Exhibition Hall, with special 
guest entertainer Jerry Clower, 
Family activities Include 
games, movies, and bus tours 
of area sights. For information, 
contact Birminghamfest '79, PO 
Box 603, Birmingham AL 3520T 

DURHAM NC 
MAY 19-20 

The Durham F,M. Association 
will hold Its annual Durhamfest 
on Saturday and Sunday, May 
19-20, 1979, at the South Square 
Mall. Durham, North Carolina. 
Plenty of prizes, exhibits, and 
programs will be offered, and 
the XYLs can enjoy shopping. 
Ladies' bingo will be held on 
Sunday. Free tailgating spaces, 
under a covered, drive-in-and- 
sell flea market, come with a 
one-time $3.00 general registra- 
tion ticket, with vendors and 
dealers included. Electrical 
power will be available. Har- 
monics and unlicensed KYLs 
are admitted free. Talk-In on 
t47J25-.225, 146,34-94, 222.34- 
3.94. For more information, 
write DFMA, Box 8661, Durham 
NC 27707, 

BURLINGTON KY 
MAY 20 

The Kentucky HamO-Rama 
will be held on May 20, 1979, at 
the Boone County Fairgrounds, 
Burlington, Kentucky, For easy 
access, take the Burlington exit 
off 1-75 south. There will be a 
chance for prizes included with 
the $3.00 gate ticket. There will 
also be hourly drawings, ex- 
hlbits, a flea market, and re- 
freshments. Talk-in on 146.19/ 
79 and 52/52. For more informa^ 
tion, contact NKARC. Box 31, 
Ft. Mitchell KY 41017. 



Spahl K1SYI at (617V943-4420 
after 8:00 pm. 

EASTON MO 
MAY 20 

The fifth annual Easton 
Amateur Radio Society Ham- 
fest will be held on May 20, 
1979, from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm, 
at the Easton Senior High 
School cafetofium on Rt. 50, 
just south of Easton at mile 
marker 66. From the Battimore 
or DC areas, go across the 
Chesapeake Bay bridge; the 
mile marker Is about 27 mJles 
from the bridge. There will be 
hamfest signs on Rt. 50, north 
and south. Refreshments will 
be available. There will be a 
donation of S2.00 with an addi- 
tional $2.00 for tables or tall- 
gaters. Talk-in on 52 and 146.445 
/1 47^045. For more information, 
write Charles C, Walgren 
WA3ZWX. Box 7, Trappe MD 
21673, or the Easton Amateur 
Radio Society, Inc., Box 781, 
Easton MD 21601. 

TRENTON TN 
MAY 20 

The Humboldt ARC will hold 
its annual hamfest on Sunday, 
May 20, 1979. at Shady Acres 
City Park, Trenton, Tennessee* 
There will be a flea market, 
prizes, ladies' activities, and 
food. For further information, 
contact Ed Holmes W41GW. 
501 N. 18th Ave.. Humboldt TN 
38343. 

EVANSVILLE IN 
MAY 20 

The TrhState Amateur Badio 
Society will hold its annual 
hamfest on May 20, 1979, at the 
Vanderbugh 4-H Rural Center, 
Evansville, Indiana, Grounds for 
the hamfest will be open at 8:00 
am CST Sunday morning. There 
will be no admission charge. 
Tickets will be on sale for door 
prizes, which are a Kenwood 
520S and a Yaesu 227R. In ad- 
dition, there will be many other 
lesser prizes awarded for ham- 
fest attendance. Exhibit tables 
inside the hall will be $2.50 
each, and a 4-by-6'foot space in 
a covered area adjacent to the 
hamfest will be available for 
$1.00 per space. Food and 
beverage will be available. 
Saturday overnight camping 
space is available for those so 
equipped. Talk-in on .75/, 15 
through the Evansville repeater. 



WEBSTER MA 
MAY 20 

The Eastern Connecticut 
Amateur Radio Club will spon- 
sor an electronics flea market 
from 9:00 am until 6:00 pm, with 
an auction at 1:00 pm, on May 
20, 1979, at Point Breeze 
Restaurant, Webster, Massa- 
chusetts. It will be held rain or 
shine. For more information 
and flyers, contact Richard 



STIRLING NJ 
MAY 20 

The Tri-County Radio Asso- 
ciation will hold Its annual In- 
door hamfest/flea market on 
May 20, 1979. at the Passaic 
Township Youth Center. Valley 
Roadt Stirling, New Jersey, 
from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. Ad- 
mission is $2.00 and tables are 
$5.00. Among the many door 
prizes will be a Tempo S1 and a 
fully-synthesized 2 meter trans- 



ceiver. Talk-in on 147.855/.255 
or 146.52. For information, 
write Tri-CoTjnty Radio Associ- 
ation. Box 412, Scotch Plains 
NJ 07076, or call Herb Klawunn 
at {201)h647-3461. 

CROWNSVILLE MD 
MAY 20 

The Maryland Mobileers 
Amateur Radio Club, Inc., will 
hold Us annual hamfest on May 
20, 1979, at Camp Barrett, 
Crownsville, Maryland, Just 
west of Annapolis. The gates 
will open at 10:30 am. Tickets 
are $3,00, Prizes will be award- 
ed. Talk'in on 146.52 and 
146.10/ JO. For information, con- 
tact MMARC, Inc. PO Box 784, 
Severna Park MD 21146. 

ROCHESTER f^Y 
MAY 25 27 
The 46th annual Rochester 
Hamfest and the New York 
State ARRL Convention will be 
held on May 25-27, 1979, at the 
Monroe County Fairgrounds, 
Route 15A, Rochester, New 
York. Advance registration is 
$3.75; registration at the gate Is 
$4.00. The Saturday evening an- 
nual awards banquet tickets are 
$9.50 each. Unlimited outdoor 
flea market space is available at 
$1.00 per parking space. It will 
open at noon on Friday and op- 
erate until closing on Sunday. 
The indoor flea market space is 
$5.00 per table per day and is 
open Saturday and Sunday on- 
ly. A limited numtDer of camper 
hookups are available free on a 
first-come, first-sen/ed basis. 
Commercial exhibits and most 
programming is located at the 
Dome Center and will open at 
8:30 am Saturday. FCC tests for 
Technician and higher classes 
will also begin at 8:30 am on 
Saturday at the fairgrounds. 
The ladies' shopping tour and 
program are free, but all must 
have a registration ticket. Chil- 
dren under 12 are also admitted 
free. For information, write 
Rochester Hamfest, PO Box 
1388, Rochester NY 14603, or 
phone (716H24*1100. For tick^ 
ets, write Rochester Hamfest 
—Tickets, 737 Utta Rd., Roch- 
ester NY 14612, 

PORTLAND ME 
MAY 26 

The Portland Amateur Wire- 
less Association and the Univer- 
sity of Southern Maine Radio 
Club will hold a tailgate flea 
market on May 26, 1979. from 
9:00 am to 5:00 pm on the cam- 
pus of the University of South* 
ern Maine, Portland, Maine. Ad- 
mission is one dollar. Food will 
t>e available. Talk-in on 146.73 
and 146.52, For further details, 
contact John Taylor N1SD, 44 
Mitton St.. Portland ME 04102. 
or phone {207)^773-2651 . 

HAMBURG PA 
MAY 27 

The Reading Radio Club will 



120 



hold Its annual hamfest on Sun- 
day, May 27, 1979, beginning at 
9idO am, at the Hamburg Field 
House in Hamburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. There will be door prizes, 
food, tailgate sales, and dealer 
space available. The hamfest 
will be held rain or shine. Talk- 
in on .31 /.91 and 146.62. For 
more Information, write The 
Reading Radio Club, Hamfest 
Committee, PO Box 124, Read- 
ing PA 19603. 

SALEM VA 
MAY 27 

The Roanoke Valley Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
hamfest on Sunday. May 27, 
1979, at the American Legion 
Building, Apperson Drjve, Va 
mile west of the intersection of 
South 11 and 419. Salem, Vir 
ginia. There will be fine prizes. 
Including a first prize of a Ten- 
Tec 540 transceiver. Inside flea 
market tables are $3.00 and tail- 
gaters are $2.00. Tickets are 
$2.00 each or 3 for $5.00 in ad- 
vance. All tickets are $2.50 at 
the door. Talk-in on 146,88, 
146.985, and 146.52. For ad- 
vance tickets, send an SASE to 
George Moore WA4GFX, 701 
Apperson Drive, Salem VA 
24153. 

LOUISVILLE KY 
JUN 29'JUL 1 

The Louisville Area Comput- 
er Club will hold its 4th annual 
ComputerfestTM 1979 from 

June 29 through July 1* 1979, at 

the B^uegrass Convention 
Center. Louisville, Kentucky, 
Activities include a flea market, 
seminars, and exposition, as 
well as activities for the entire 
famtly. Seminar and exposition 
admission is $4.00, Pre^reg- 
istered Ramada Inn guests 
i$29.00, single; $34.00, double) 
receive free admission. For ad- 
vance mail information, write 
Computerfest '79, Louisville 
Area Computer Club, PO Box 
70355, Louisville KY 40270, or 
phone Tom Eubank, Chairman, 
at (502)^895-1230. 

UPPER HUTT N2 
JUN 1-4 
The 1979 Annual Conference 
of the New Zealand Associa- 
tion of Radio Transmitters will 
be held on June 1-4, 1979, at 
Upper Hutt, New Zealand. 
Visitors are welcome to attend 
this conference. For registra- 
tion forms, contact the 
Secretary. 1979 Conference 
Committee, PO Box 40-212. Up- 
per Hutt NZ 

ST. PAUL MN 
JUN 2 

The North Area Repeater As* 
sociation, inc, will hold its 
Amateur Fair T9 on Saturday, 
June 2, 1979, at the Minnesota 
State Fairgrounds, St. Paul, 
Mfnnesota, This is a swapfest 
and exposition for amateur 



radio operators and computer 
hobbyists. There will be free 
overnight parking for self- 
contained campers on June 1st 
only. You may sell from your 
car in the giant flea market or 
from the available inside 
space. There will be AMSAT 
and microprocessor exhibits, 
FCC, ARRU Minnesota Repeat* 
er Council booths, and many 
prizes. Admission is $Z00. For 
information or reservations for 
commercial space, write Ama- 
teur Fair, PO Box 30054, St. 
Paul MN 55175. 

WENATCHEEWA 
JUN 2 3 

The Apple City Amateur 
Radio club will hold its Ham 
Fest on June 2*3, 1979, at Rocky 
Reach Dam. 7 miles north of the 
city on Highway 97, Wenatch- 
ee, Washington. Regrstra- 
tion fee for amateurs is $3.00 
(which Includes one ticket for 
the prize drawing), $1,00 for 
non-amateurs, and children 
under 12 are free. A banquet 
dinner will be held on Saturday 
night at $5.00 per person. Free 
camp/trailer space will be pro* 
vided at the park. Featured will 
be equipment displays, a VHP 
tune-up clinic, an arts and 
crafts show/sale, a swap shop, 
a photography display, ex- 
hibits, a tour of the Power 
House, a film on the Life of 
Thomas Edison, and a potluck 
dinner on Sunday at 1:00 pm. 
For information and reserva- 
tions, contact the Apple City 
Amateur Radio Club, 713 
Grandview Avenue, Wenatchee 
WA 98801, 

MANASSAS VA 
JUN 3 

The Ole Virginia Hams 
Amateur Radio Club, Inc.. will 
hold its annual hamfest on June 
3, 1979, at the Prince William 
County Fairgrounds, located V^ 
mile south of Manassas, Virgin- 
ia, on Rte. 234, Gates will open 
at 8:00 am but tail gaters may 
enter at 7:00 am. General admis- 
sion is $3.00 per person, with 
children under 12 admitted free, 
Tailgatmg is $2.00 per vehicle, 
with over 300 spaces available. 
Prizes include a 5-band SSB 
transceiver, a synthesized 2 
meter transceiver, and a Bird 43 
wattmeter, plus many more. 
Breakfast and lunch are avail- 
able on the premises. Featured 
Will be an FM clinic, a YL pro* 
gram, a children's program, CW 
proficiency, and QSL bureau 
programs. Indoor exhibit space 
for dealers and manufacturers 
is available. For information, 
write to Sam Lebowlch 
WB4HAV, OVHARC, PO Box 
1255, Manassas VA 221 10. 

WEST HUNTINGTON WV 
JUN 3 

TheTri-StateARAwMI hold its 
17th annual hamfest and family 



picnic on June 3, 1979, starting 
at 10:00 am. at the Camden 
Amusement Park, West Hunt- 
ington. West Virginia. There will 
be a planned program for the 
XYL and kids, or you can enjoy 
the amusement park if you pre* 
fer. There is a possibility the 
FCC will administer amateur ex- 
ams. There witl be major prizes. 
a large flea market, exhibitors, 
and displays. Dealers are al- 
ways welcome to space In the 
covered pavilion. Talk-in on 
34/94 or 16/76. For more infor- 
mation, write TARA» PO Box 
1295, Huntington WV 25715. 

ISLIP LI NY 
JUN 3 
The Long Island Mobile Ama* 
teur Radio Club, Inc., will hold 
its Long Island Hamfair T9 on 
June 3, 1979, from 9:00 am to 
4:00 pm at the I slip Speedway, 
on islip Avenue (Rte. 111), just 
one block south of the South- 
ern State Parkway, Exit 43, or 
south on 1 1 1 from Exit 56 of the 
Long Istand Expressway. Islip. 
Long Island, New York. There 
will be over 250 exhibitors. 
General admission is $1.50 and 
exhibitors' admission is $3.00 
per space. Wives, sweethearts. 
and children under 12 are ad- 
mitted free. There will be many 
door prizes available for all 
ticket holders. Talk-in on 
146.25/.85 and .52. The rain date 
will be June 10, 1979. For infor- 
mation, contact Henry Wener 
WB2ALW, 53 Sherrard St., East 
Hills NY 11577, or phone (516)- 
829-5880 days or (516)-484-4323 
nights. 

STEVENS POINT Wl 
JUN 3 

The Centraf Wisconsin Radio 
Amateurs, Ltd., will hold its 
swapfest picnic on Sunday, 
June 3, 1979, starting at 10:00 
am at Bukolt Park, Stevens 
Point, Wisconsin. There will be 
a picnic area, refreshments, 
equipment sales, and prizes. 
For information, write to Frank 
L Guth W9BCC, Secretary- 
Treasurer, Central Wisconsin 
Radio Amateurs, Ltd., 1632 
Ellis Street. Stevens Point Wl 
54481. 

PRINCETON IL 
JUN 3 

The Starved Rock Radio Club 
will hold its annual hamfest on 
Sunday, June 3, 1979, at the 
Bureau County Fairgrounds, 
Princeton, Illinois. The fair- 
grounds are centrally located 
and easily reached via routes 
80-6-34-89-26. Watch for the 
large yellow "Hamfest" signs. 
There will be lots of room for the 
free swappers' area and park- 
ing. New equipment dealers, 
manufacturers, and their repre- 
sentatives are invited to request 
details on reserving space in 
our inside display area. There 
witl be food and refreshments 



available during the day. 
Camper, van, and trailer spaces 
are available for a nominal fee 
and should be reserved in ad- 
vance. Please include an SASE 
for map, motel information, and 
advance reservations at $1.50, if 
postmarked before May 20 
($2.00 at the gate). For more in- 
formation, write W9MKS/ 
WR9AFG, Starved Rock Radio 
Club, RFD #1, Box 171, Oglesby 
IL 61348, or phone {815)^7- 
4614. 

CHELSEA Ml 
JUN 3 

The Chelsea Swap 'n Shop 
will be held on Sunday^ June 3, 
1979, at the Chelsea Fair- 
grounds^ Chelsea, Michigan. 
Gates will open for sellers at 
5:00 am and for the public from 
8:00 am until 3:00 pm. Admis- 
sion is $1 .50 in advance or S2.00 
at the gate. Children under 
twelve and non*ham spouses 
are admitted free. Talk4n on 
146.52 and 146.37/.97. Proceeds 
will benefit the Dexter High 
School Radio Club and the 
Chelsea Communications 
Club. 

ALLENWOOD PA 
JUN 3 

The 8th annual Milton 
Amateur Radio Club Hamfest 
will be held on June 3, 1979, 
rain or shine, at the Altenwood 
Firemen's Fairgrounds, lo- 
cated on US Rte. 15. 4 miles 
north of Interstate 80, Allen- 
wood, Pennsylvania. Hours are 
from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. Regis- 
tration for sellers is $2.50 ad- 
vance or $3.00 at the gate. XYLs 
and children are free. Featured 
will be a flea market, an auc- 
tion, a contest, cash door 
prizes, a free portable and 
mobile FM clinic, and super- 
vised children's activities. 
There will be an indoor area 
available, plus food and 
beverages. Talk-in on .37/.97, 
,34/.S4, and ,52. For further 
details, call or write Kenneth 
Hering WA3i JU, RD #1, Box 381, 
Allenwood PA 17810, or phone 
(717)'538^9168. 

BEMIDJI MN 

JUN 9 
A hamfest will be held on 
June 9^10, 1979, at Bemldii Fair- 
grounds, on the west side of 
town on Highway 2, Bemldji, 
Minnesota. There will be a com- 
plete program for hams, non- 
hams, and kids. Camping will be 
available on Saturday night. 
Tables are available at no 
charge. Tickets are $1,50. Talk- 
in on 145.34/.94 and 3935. For 
more information, write Jerry 
Pottratz WBOMSH, Rte. 2, Box 
2398, Bemidji MN 56601. 

MEADVILLE PA 
JUN 9 

The Crawford Amateur Radio 
Society will hold its fifth annual 
hamfest on Saturday, June 9; 



121 



1979. at Crawford County Fair- 
grounds, Meadville, Penn- 
sylvania. Admisston is $2.00. 
Gates wilt open at 8:00 am. 
Bring your own tables. The cost 
to display is $2.00 for an inside 
area and S1.00 for an outside 
area. There will be door prizes, 
refreshments, and commerciaJ 
displays, Talk-m on .04/.64, 
.8T/.21, .63/.03. For details, 
write CARS, Hamfest Commit- 
tee, PO Box 653, Meadville PA 
16335. 

GUELPH ONT CAN 
JUN9 

The Central Ontario Amateur 
Radio Flea Market will be heJd 
on Saturday, June 9, 1979, from 
8:00 am until 4:00 pm at Centen- 
nial Arena, College Ave. W., 
Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Com- 
mercial displays will open at 
10:00 am. Admission is 75e per 
person with children 12 years 
and under admitted free. Ad- 
mission for vendors is an addl- 
tlonal $2.00. There will be a 
large indoor and outdoor flea 
markets commercial exhibits, 
free balloons, free handouts, 
and operating ham stations. 
Talk-in on ,52/. 52, .37/. 97 
VE3KSR, and .96/,36 VE3ZMG, 

SENATOeiA MS 
JUN 9>10 

The fourth annual Tri-State 
l-lamfest will be hetd on June 
9-10, 1979, in the coliseum of 
Northwest Junior College, 
Senatobra, Mississippi. Indoor 
air-conditioned space will be 
available for manufacturers, 
dealers, and distributors. For 
information, contact Joel P. 
Walker, 1979 Hamfest Chair- 
man, PO Box 276, Hernando MS 
38632; (601)-388^5277. 

AKRON OH 
JUN 10 

The Goodyear Amateur Ra- 
dio Club will hold its 12th an- 
nual hamfest picnic and flea 
market on Sunday. June 10, 
1979. from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm 
at Goodyear Wingfoot Lake 
Park, near Rtes. 224 and 43, 
east of Akron, Ohio. There will 
be five main prizes, including a 
Yaesu f^-101ZD, a Midland 
13^510, a Wilson Mark II, a 
Drake MN-4C, and a Bird watt- 
meter, Featured will be a large 
flea market, auction, and picnic 
area. Tickets are $3.00 each or 
two for $5.00. Talk-in on 
146:04^64, For more informa- 
tion, contact D, W, Rogers 
WA8SXJ, 161 South Hawkins 
Ave.. Akron OH 44313* 

MONROE Ml 

JUN 10 

Ttie Monroe County Radio 
Communication Association 
will hoid Its annual hamfest 
Swap and Shop on June 10, 
1979, from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm at 
the Monroe County Community 



College on Ralslnville Rd. off 
M-50, Monroe, Michigan. Dona- 
tion is $1^00 at the gate. There 
will be plenty of free parking, 
free trunk sales and indoor 
table space. Features will in- 
clude a contest an auction, 
commercial displays, and UHF, 
VHFp and HF technical ses- 
sions and demonstrations. 
Talk'in on 146.13/.73 or .52. For 
reservations and information, 
contact Fred Lux WD8iTZ, PO 
Box 982, Monroe Ml 48161. 

OAK RIDGE TN 
JUN 14 15 

The Oak Ridge Amateur 
Radio Club will hold the Oak 
Ridge Amateur Radio Conven- 
tion and Hamfest '79 on July 
14^15, 1979. at the Oak Ridge 
Civic Center, Oak Ridge, Ten- 
nessee Admission is $1.00, 
There will be commercial and 
flea market exhibitors. FCC ex- 
ams will be given on Saturday at 
8:00 am. Features for the ladies 
and kids Include movies, a tour 
of the Museum of Science and 
Energy, or the pooL picnic, and 
playgrounds at the Civic Center* 
Camping facilities, motets, and 
restaurants are conveniently 
located. The week of July 9-16 
will be proclaimed Amateur 
Radio Week in Oak Ridge by the 
Mayor. Talk'in on 146.88, 147,72, 
and 146.82. Local tatk^ln on 
146.52, Anyone interested 
should contact Charles Byrge 
WB40BE, PO Box ^1, Oak 
Ridge TN 37830. 

DUNELLEN NJ 
JUN 16 
The Rarltan Valley Radio 
Club will hold its eighth annual 
hamfest on Saturday, June 16, 
1979, from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm at 
Columbia Park, Dunellen, New 
Jersey. For details, write 
Rarltan Valley Radio Club, RD 
3» Box 317, Somerset NJ 08873, 
or phone WB2MNE at (201)- 
356^8435. 

MIDLAND Ml 
JUN 16 

The Central Michigan Ama- 
teur Repeater Association will 
hold Its fifth annual Swap Sl 
Shop on June 16, 1979, at the 
Midland County Fairgrounds, 
Midland, Michigan. There will 
be computer demonstrations 
and door prizes. Donation is 
$2,50 at the door. Talk-in on 
146.73 WR8ARB and 146.62, 
For tickets and information, 
send an SASE to R. L. Wert 
W8Q0I. 309 E. Gordon vi lie 
Road, R #12, Midland Ml 48640. 

CROWN POINT IN 

JUN 17 

The Lake County Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 16th an- 
nual Dad's Day Hamfest on 
June 17, 1979, from 8:00 am un- 
til 5:00 pm at the Lake County 
Fairgrounds, Crown Point, In- 



diana. The event Is all indoors. 
Donation is $1.50 in advance 
and $2.00 at the door. Table 
space is available on a first* 
come, first-served basis. There 
will be refreshments, a picnic 
area, ample parking, and a zoo 
and playground area for the 
children. Talk-in on 147.84/.24. 
For Information and advanced 
tickets, write LCARC, PO Box 
1909. Gary IN 46409. 

8ARNESV1LLE PA 

JUN 17 

The Schuylkill Amateur Re- 
peater Association will hold its 
2nd annual hamfest on Sunday, 
June 17, 1979, at Lake wood 
Park, Bamesville, Pennsylvanta, 
along Rte. 54, 3 miles east of 
Exit 37E on Interstate 81. Gates 
open at 9:00 am, rain or shine. 
Registration is S2.00. with XYL 
and children free and tailgaters 
$1.00 additional. Indoor tables 
are available at $2.00 per table. 
There will be large indoor and 
outdoor display areas, prizes, 
plenty of parking space, amuse* 
ment rides, picnic tables, and 
refreshments. Talk-in on 147.78/ 
.18 and 146.52. For more infor- 
mation, write SARA Hamfest. 
PO Box 901, Pottsville PA 17901. 

TORRINGTON CT 
JUN 17 

The CO Radio Club will hold 
its first flea market, rain or 
shine, on June 17, 1979, at the 
Torrington Fish and Game, Tor- 
rlngton, Connecticut, Under^ 
shelter tables, tailgate space, 
light lunches, a raffle, and a YL 
bake sale will be featured^ Talk- 
in on 147.84/.24 and 146.52. For 
Information, contact Bob 
W1FHP at (203)-266^7232, Ed 
W1JSU at (203)-482-1837. 
Everett K1AQE at (203)-482- 
0523, or write Dave Johnstone 
WB1C0B, 19 Margerie St., Tor* 
rrngton CT 06790, or phone 
{203h482-734a. 

BELLEFONTAINE OH 
JULI 

The Champaign Logan Ama- 
teur Radio Club, Inc., will hold 
its annual hamfest on Sunday^ 
July 1, 1979, at the Logan Coun- 
ty Fairgrounds, South Main 
Street and Lake Avenue, 
Bellefontaine, Ohio. There will 
be free admission and door 
prizes. Trunk and table sales 
are $1,00, and there will also be 
a bid table. Talk-in on 146,52. 
For more information, contact 
John L Wentz W8HFK, Box 
102, West Liberty OH 43357, or 
Frank Knull W8JS, 402 Lafay- 
ette Ave., Urbana OH 43078. 

DUNKmK NY 

JULI 

The Northwestern New York 
Repeater Association and the 
Northern Chautauqua Amateur 
Radio Club will hold their Lake 
Erie International Hamfest on 



Sunday, July 1, 1979, at the 
fairgrounds in Dunkirk, New 
York. A large flea market area 
and plenty of free parking will 
be provided- Tickets are S4.00 
at the gate or S3.00 in advance, 
RV hookups are available. For 
Information on advance sales 
or for a map showing easy 
directions from 1-90, write to 
Dick Brinkerhoff WB2HEF, 123 
5th St., Dunkirk NY 14048. 

INDIANAPOLIS IN 

JUL a 

The Indianapolis Amateur 
Radio Association will sponsor 
the Indianapolis Hamfest on 
Sunday, July 8, 1979, at the 
Marion County Fairgrounds, on 
the southeast corner of Indh 
anapoiis at the intersection of 
Interstates 74 and 465, Indian- 
apolis, Indlana^ There will be 
commercial exhibitors and 
dealer displays for a fee of 
$30.00 per booth. The commer- 
cial building will be open from 
12:00 noon until 9:00 pm on 
Saturday and will reopen at 7i00 
am on Sunday. Camper hookup 
facilities are available on the 
fairgrounds for overnight park- 
ing if you arrive on Saturday, A 
food and drink vendor will have 
a setup outside, while a profes* 
Sional caterer will have facil- 
ities inside. For more informa- 
tion, write to the Indianapolis 
Hamfest, PO Box 1002, Indian- 
apolis IN 46206. 

CANTON OH 
JUL 15 

The fifth annual Hall of Fame 
Hamfest will be held on Sunday, 
July 15, 1979, at Stark County 
Fairgrounds, Canton, Ohio. 
Tickets are $2.50 in advance i 
and $3.00 at the gate. Mobile 
check-in on .19/.79or .52/.52. For 
information, contact Max 
Lebold WA8SHP. 10877 Hazel- 
view Ave., Alliance OH 44601. 

PITTSFIELD MA 
JUL 21-22 

Ttie NoBARC Hamfest will be 
held on July 21-22, 1979. at Cum- 
mington Fairgrounds, Pittsfield, 
Massachusetts. There will be 
tech taiks, demonstrations, and 
dealers. Flea market admission 
is $1.00. Advance registration is 
$3.00 single and $5.00 with 
spouse, and $4.00/$6,00 at the 
gate. Gates open at 5:00 pm on 
Friday for free camping. Talk-in 
on 146.31/91. For resen/ations, 
contact Tom Hamilton WA1 VPX, 
206 California Ave., Pittsfield 
MA 01201 

ESSEX MT 
JUL 21-22 

The International Glacier- 
Waterton Hamfest witi be held 
on July 21-22, 1979, at the Three 
Forks Campground, ten miles 
east of Essex, Montana, on US 
Highway 2. Registration is at 
9:00 am. Talk-in on .52 and 



122 



,34/.94, For more information, 
wNte Giacier-Waterton Ham- 
fest, PO Box 2225, Missoula MT 
59806. 

EUGENE OR 
JUL 21-22 

The 4th annual Lane County 
Ham Fair will be held on July 
21-22, 1979, at the Oregon Na- 
tional Guard Armory, 2515 Cen- 
tennial Blvd., Eugene, Oregon. 
Registration is $3.00, and an ex- 
tra drawing ticket is given witli 
advance registration. There will 
be dispfays, tectureSj contests, 
swapshop, transmitter hunt, 
and entertainment. The facili- 
ties provide plenty of free park- 
ing for motor homes and trail* 
ers. 

For information and advance 
reservations, phone or write 
Wanda or Earl Hemenway, 2366 
Madison, Eugene OR 97405 at 
{503)-485-5575. 

MARSHALL MO 
JUL 22 

The Indian Foothitis Amateur 
Radio Club will hofd its 4th an- 
nual hamfest on July 22, 1979, 
at the Saline County Fair- 
grounds, Marshall, Missouri. 
Tickets are $2.00 each or 3 for 
$5.00 in advance; $2.60 at the 
door. Registration is at 8:00 am. 
with lunch at 11:30 pm (all you 
can eat) and the drawing at 2:30 
pm. Prizes include a Tempo SI, 
a Dentron Jr. MonitorTM tuner, 
and many more. There will be 
fiea markets for the OM and 
XYL There is no charge for flea 
market tables this year, but 
reservations are requested. 
There will also be old and new 
equipment displays, a tO-X 
booth, and other activities for 
the XYLs. Talk^in on .52, .28/.86, 
and 147.84/,24. For information 
and tickets, write Norman Gib- 
bins WB0S2I, 692 North Ted, 
Marshall MO 65340. 

MOOSE JAW 

SASKATCHEWAN CAN 

JUL 27-29 

The Moose Jaw Amateur 
Radio Club will hold Its 1979 
Hamfest (Particifest 79) on July 
27-29, 1979, at the Saskatche- 
wan Technical Institute, 600 
Saskatchewan St. W., Moose 
Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. 
Registration will be held on Fd- 
day evening with a full day of 
activities on Saturday culmi- 
nating in a banquet and dance. 
Most of the meetings and work* 
shops will be held on Sunday. 
There will also be a busy 
schedule for the XYLs, 

OLIVER BC CAN 
JUL 2a 2d 

The Okanagao International 
Hamfest will be held on July 
28-29, 1979, at Gallagher Lake 
KOA Kampsite, 8 miles north of 
Otiver, B.C., Canada. Registra- 



tion starts at 9:00 am Saturday, 
Activities start at 1:00 pm 
Saturday and continue until 
2:00 pm Sunday. Ladies may 
bring their hobbies and items 
for a white-elephant sale. 
Featured will be prizes, a flea 
market, bunny hunts, entertain- 
ment, a home-brew contest, 
and more, A potluck lunch will 
be served Sunday at noon. Call- 
in on 3800, .34/.94, and .76 
simplex. For information, write 
John Juul-Andersen VE7DTX, 
8802 Lakevlew Dr., Vernon, 
B.C., Canada VI B 1W3, or Lota 
Harvey VE7DKL, 684 Heather 
Rd., Penticton, B.C., Canada 
V2A 1W8. 



BOWLING GREEN OH 
JUL29 

The Wood County Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 15th an- 
nual Wood County Ham-a-Rama 
on July 29, 1979, at the Bowling 
Green Fairgrounds, Bowling 
Green, Ohio, Gates will open at 
10;00 am, with free admission 
and parking. Dealer tables and 
space are available. Trunk sale 
space and food will also be 
available. Tickets are $1.50 in 
advance and $2.00 at the door. 
Prizes will be awarded. Talk-in 
on .52 K8TIH, For information, 
write Wood County ARC, c/o 
Eric Wlllman, 14118 Bishop 
Road, Bowling Green OH 43402. 



JACKSONVILLE FL 
AUG 4-5 

The Jacksonville Hamfest 
Association is pleased to an- 
nounce the 1979 Jacksonville 
Hamfest and ARRL North Flor* 
ida Section Convention to be 
held on August 4-6, 1979, at the 
Jacksonville Beach Municipal 
Auditorium, Jacksonville, Flor- 
ida, The location is just one 
block from the beach, where 
U.S. 90 meets the sea. 

Advanced registrations are 
available at $3,00 per person 
from R. J. Cutting W2KGI/4, 303 
10th St., Atlantic Beach, Florida 

Continued on page J6S 



PASS FCC EXAMS 



The Driginat FCC Tests- Answers Exam 
manual t^at prepares vo<J ^^ ha me 
for FCC First & Second class Radio- 
telephone II censes, You get the com- 
plete s^t of IBnewty revised mul- 
tiiple-choice {examinations- cover- 
ing all area:s tested an the actual 
FCC eKam. AlsciincLud^— help. 
ful study tips, thon cuts, and 
"Sell Study AtaMity Te«." 
These updated FCC Tests- 
Answers take the mystery 
out of preparing fpr current 
FCC exams. Practical proven 
Material. S9,95 postpaid 
Uncanditionak iVtoneyb^ck Guarantee 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

L 



commdiiD productions 

RADIO E^fGINEERIPJG DiVtStON i^ C10& 
P.O. BOX 26343 F SAN FRANCISCO. CA 94126 
Please rush me Teats- Answers for FCC First and 
Second Class Commercial License. My £9.95 is 

endosed. 



l^ame. 






StPte 7ifj_ 



i 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
1 
I 
I 
I 

J 



• •••••••^^••••••••••* 




Bearcat® 250 



Only $269.00 plus $5.00 UP.S. shipping. 
Quantity discounts available! 

Order toll free (800) 521-4414 

or (313) 994-4444. Circle C5 on reader's 
service card for a free catalog or write us 
at Box 1002p Ann Arbor, Michigan 481 06 




TJM 



COMMUNICATIONS 

ELECTRONICS" ■^'^ 
••****••••••*••*•*■*■• 



DIPOLE HEADQUARTERS 



Fmmous ''W2AU" Bmlun 




MODEL t:l 
ir 

MODEL 4:1 



M4 



9S 



Plus 
$1.00 

Shippino 



riiiims FVLi t Kw nr akd mm ^m Sfo^ei ftarHit4i i to t^ ^ 

HELP? TV! fMllEmS 3f fif^lLtme Coax Lint R*!lnii6?tin 

N4W AIL StJ|3HL($; STE[L MAIDWJMi ^Q^yi Dt^^ble S^lwr FiaHi 

lll^»<HrES r;i BATIiQ 8- Rrfyi^'n^ Coax Lm? FkK Up 

lEftimES tiJtttH LHillLATftll, l/*i1h3lanjj Artltfiru PUll ai 0«f 600 U». 

•UltT'tN UCMIHIKH IIRESUI. ttelE^^TraEecE Baiui — Coirld Also Sh4 

V^ur Vjli?iblt Qiii 

BVILHIH H*MUP HWK. mn H* Ifweitid t*es «ul1i Bift* Pmitenrui. 




MINIMUM ORDER 

(F^l«aetf add 



»10M 




CABLE 

iU FOAMt ^i density t^raid $0'. 

1U FOAM, hi dentitv braid. 100', - . . 

ll<aMA/U, «Trand»d center Am'.. 

RQU, 2 It. inffL259 on each end, 

3 It. w/PLZ&d on aach and, 

S Pt. wyPL?&ft en aach and, ........ 

12 ft W/PL359 &rj each ernj, ........ 

SO ft W/PL35& -oni eac^ end. , , , . 

4*0 OHI* L*DM« LIME I r Space) 100 .:.;/... 
dUY WRi, »]«H4/E}laatic. Xtid U., ,,^,, ^.^ . 

COPPER WIRE 

#14 9T1IANDED 100' apoal 

#14 SOLID. Bnamai«d. lOO' spools , 



ROW, 
ROM, 
ROM, 



itI.BB 

3.31 

4.40 

TM 

t2.9S 

. 4.1ft 



.*B.n 



INSULATORS 

AIRPLANE style. porc^Fatr \m., wl. 2 i&. , 2/$ ,M 

DOG BON£ «tvle Dorce^am ins., wt .2 lb 1/ US 

HY GAIN # 15& canT«f msulatoF. w1. 1 .5 4b. i.iS 

HY QAIN Cycalac end vns. pajr, wt. 1 tb. ... , . 3.<9 

MOVLEV dipol« centef insulator, wt. 1 lb 4.2i 



CONNECTORS and ADAPTORS 



PUSi, UHF maifl court 
torn, UHF lemaj:*, chas, mtgi. 



£for ft«lt 

■ ■ 4W 



U01T5» Adapts RG&6 ta PL25S 2 for 






UG17«, Adapts R05& 4 a PL2S& 

PL2H. UHF <laul>l« lfimal« , M 

OM-SP, UHF double mala Conn. ........ I.fl 

ll$Sf^ 90 d«g. UHF aEbow conn.. ,»..., .^.., . .. a.io 

UOMU, BMC mafe ior nG56 ......:;... i.4« 

IOB4« BhfC lompiQ chasiie mlO- . . .ii 

■lUp UHF "T ' connactOr 2,49 

||(UH, Adaplft UHF famaFa I0 GHC mai« . . , , ^ %j^ 

M<m%, AaaplB a^C fwrnald lo UKF malv , |jt 

AMPHENOL UaHTNINQ AftHEStdRS . j^.QQ 

HALF-SIZE FULL PERFORMANCE 
iltl-Band HF Communications Ant«nfia$ 



CIMO^'BINI) H„ 




Tl.l(]. k,Q 



VMA U St^fM] 



MOR GAIN HD DiPOLES . , • One half the length of 

canvcntional h^ilf wav« ^\ptA^% * MuJti-b^nd, Multi- 
trmuertcy. • Maximuoi effjcttncy — no t^aps. ^oadtng ceils, 
or itubi. • Fullv asiembltd and pr^-tunaj — no 'Yica^LrmriB. 
no cutting. • An wtathtr iat«j - ^ KW AM, 2.5 KW CW or 
PE? 5SS. * Pribv«n pfirfomri'ante — riiore than t&,000 h»ye 
baen dehvvrad. 



MODEL 


a AMDS 




PRICE 


WEIGHT 


LENGTH 




fMttflfi) 






IO*/K8l 


|FT/M,Fl^ 


4t>;0HD 


40.'2O 




S53.25 


36/ n 


35/ 10 9 


Sl>40 HO 


flO/40 - t & 




61.25 


41/1 IB 


69/? 1 


75-40 HD 


75/40 




5fl.75 


40^1 1J 


6e/?o.i 


7Sk30 ho 


75/40/30 




70.25 


44/1. Z3 


66/20 1 


75-10 HD 


75.'40.'?0/T5 


10 


76.35 


^8/1 34 


66/20 1 


'BfrlO HO 


80/40/20/ i^/ 10 


80.25 


ftfl/l 40 


69/Zl 




^ S81 li^AQIO PUBLJCA"n&NS, iNC 



*h«il#dki ArAAlMfT 



H ridiq ikmLlBUfii 



1 -I^T^hrtl' *! 4AQ«I FT"* 
ir-M. bWTI. llF^'3. b4'b?*1^ 



Ml P4«wl 4.s4i-cail rTFiH^bifi-? 
LiWfifvji^ inaipfni^d biKni 
iHrixiiA ■nunr.feb ^1 h|iTm 



SPECTRONICS, 




(312)848-6777 



1009 GARFIELD Sr^ 
OAK PARK, ILL 60304 



p^ Reader Service — see p^ge 195 



123 




t 






LOVG 
HAM 





Prices in this catalog subject to change 

withouf notice. Prices good only 
whiJe supply lasts. 




GUIDE 





ORDER 
YOURS! 




Order your 

TEN-TEC Omni D transceiver today 

Totalty solid state, covers 160 to 10 meters, digital readouts 
VOX and PIT. built-in squtlch. buitt-in 4-pos. CW 'SSB fitter, 2 
speed break-in, power input 200 watts wiih 50 ohm load. t00% 
duty cycle, basic 12VDC operation power supply required for 
T17 VAC operation, and more' Optional power supply 
2?52M/0 avaitabte 



1069.00 




List Call for quote. 



VtSA 




GLA toaa 



LA 



BUY 

NOW! 



WW 



U UJ 

DENTRON GLA-1000 
linear amplifier 

Frectuentv' cov&rage'au lol6 mftt<»ri covers mosf WARS rfeqi>enci4f4 RF drivi? ptui» 

1?5 powef con-aumpSion. 1 17 VAC50'60H; 12 S Amps Factory ! used ttt 1 ^ ' "'4 

VAC5C 60 Hz 7 Amps, DC iripul " KWCWiintj ISOJVV PEPSSS FmalTMr A 

lubes leLQS) 



379.50 



List Call for quote 



•TiTi 



V 




Ttie new 
KENWOOD 

TR-7625 25 watt 2m transceiver 



Featuriing' memory ch.T---'-' moffeswilch far^irrrpli^?' - 
af down, lyll4MH/criv.- ., iODchannels SkHzatfL^ 
LEO unlock mdJcnlor 



■ ^ ■ k ^' t~i - K^ p-n la 



1 if> '■ ■ f f tf iTi 



j-i » 1 r~i 



425.00 



i^all tor quolR 



muTi 




MAIL ORDERS P O BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM. AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 35233 






^k 



SAVE 
NOW! 




Q?»^ 



*^ft'S'i*t 



YAESU FT-901DE 
HF transceiver 

ccNefsge Qt 160 trim 10 m«f«rt. 2O0W P£P RF 
£(M«eli pfC3CS$$ci'' butH^n VFd refCCt lunmg 
varfSbie IF C»nd wK^rn tuning L£D1t«Q tJi»p4ay 
iaui4t-fn Curtif ke|r«f. '6146P tma) ti^xtt audio 
p^pk Ireq Tuning 



1259.00 



fnf Can fc* ntJtjie 



NEW 
ITEM! 



ORDER 

YOURS! 



YAESU 

FT-901DM 

HF transceiver TJ 

Air^ att modeHf lc]|«tcoiT»muf>M:Air(>ris sviKcvit' Fl«qi- ttn*i*S)t 
leortiry l0meier5.3O(WP£P RFspMcliproosstOf bullion 
VFO reject timunig vif^bi« IF t»nd «Mtiti tunin{ji L£D !in»o 

AC DC IPOwer BU&fJ*V butft-rfl 3urdK> Df^ tf**0 UinrfHl 





1459.00 



l»$t Can to* iTuc*e 



YAESU 

FT-101ZD transceiver ■ 

MSB CW. tnpul power leOW DC. aiftplal A analog fi&q 
f(«Adoul. 614^ rtriats RF lp«cch proces&Of var^hfe IF 
bandwidth 300 H^ lo 2 4 KHi ^eaisr SWitcH VOK an^jrHoi^o 
bidnk£r buifl'tn powc*i supply 




895.00 




YAESU SP901P 
Speaker/patch 



floun ' ur i^tahon *irh ihff SP-901P 

ipeaiN , pale h li matches the FT -90 1 anct 

FT-tOtZD iri* SP-901P fea^lures buitr-in 
ip(»^er and has S oH^ms impedance 



List Call lor quo 8 E 



74.00 



Call! tor yaurs locEay 



DONT 
WAIT! 




<s^;^ 






YAESU FT-901D HF transceiver 

Coverage 160 ihru lO meiers iOOW PEP HF 
spe&ch processor. bu"lt-in VFO re|ecl tuWng. 
vait^ble IF hand widih lumrig. LED Pripq diiplay 
6 1 468 f mai tii1>6&, AC /PC pCMer syppiy FM u na 
audio peak freq itimng 



1259.00 



l(si C*ll iaf miolp 



1 




YAESU FT 227R 2m 
FM transceiver 

Wtlti I mwnorv etuwrntl. Itiit »l$o »*» Iteq ctw- 
eraiie 144 to t48 MHj.aOOctiC««n«i!i f»owar re- 
quiT»m£^ts 1 3 B VDC # 2 S ampS co<il«)ueus 
f*F outpul rw ?*i Wf lo lone IhutSI ' SOQ *tMi 



385.00 




YAESU CPU-2500RK 
2m FM transceiver 

flOO PLL ctianneis. aulo ^c^n over entire Zm 
band, 4 merTTarie-s, tone tmnrst 3^5 wall^. ti')c4KJ ' 
600 KH? programmable offsets. t3.B VDC ai n 
amps conlinijays Comes wilh keyboard ri^ic Iqr 
remole input, scanning control, ^lik ippgaior 
spill, jnd 2 lon^ inpul for ai'to p^aicH or conf^ol 
link 



585.00 



Call Jof ouot4? 



It^ CiM tof Quole 



Accessories 

YAESU HC't NiCad tbangef 
:^ the bstfenesTor 
__^R. Char gkrt^ Cur- 
rent 45 mitlt-amp^ .forB- 
Mj nr^ tfO VAC opefPtKjfi 



YAESU ¥M-a4 speakef fnic 
'c' (he FT-202H Connlkteiw 
A I m cowled cord and eOAnec^ 
toe 39JI0 



YB-I AA fBcnargeabieN^Cad 
baltery 1 ZV fFT-202R 
requires € banenesj 2-^ fl*. 






YAESU FT-301AD solid state 



digital transceiver 

All solid slalt ISOlhiii ID meters plus WWVJ J V 
&nd Auk Modes. SSt3. CW. AM, and FSK. digiSal 
r«SdOul 200W PEP SSB & CW & 50W AM'FSK 
PF leodbac^ noi&e bkankqf, ^Rf speech 
processor V03<, auto sefnj'break-m wjlh 
lidotone. FP-3010 PS w speaker clock Sl auio 
i[l«niifier avsitiibJi^ IN 23436 215 10 



935.00 



iisl C^ll lor quple 



CALL 
TODAY! 



YAESU FT-202R^ 
2m handheld 
FM trdnscerver 

1 lArall 4tllpvi rmfiimiLtm, 6 
cttsnmH ca|Hto»Tity lie^itiie 
fielie«l whip «nterina 
eqiirtpfi«d wi/Vh i^netitJf^t 
cofnp«cl lUc and lM|tn 
«re«Qlii &-m««&t mvi baiiery 
con^ton mdtoitcH . Operates 
on » AA NiCmI or 7 AA dry 
iretl bdtlrriM 3pr Xtft^stncl 



199.00 





list CaH (Qif quote 



VtSA 




I 




MAfL ORDERS: PO BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM, AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 35233 



r 

c 



• 










^mt^m* 



ARRL Publicattohs 

lUlltL Radio Aiiwlnir^l^p«*»Dk N&w«yfieVTHd 
H lampacked tttth cwerythifK} from basics t£> 

AftRL Rwfto AmttkuKt Umi»a MwMdl Tm 
moit up to Oaii; ccmpiist^n q! m^^^ & 
FegylitKjni Covf^t It^m N<]wice to Extra Ctsss 
I N 1D012 3 00 




ARRL Aiil*nfM Hwidtwok Compme (rtstruc- 
hona Idr buildifvg antennas oF eii type$ I N 
t0O26 5.TO 

AnflL World Map I N 10099 3>.50 

iCF C«lcul«lor SNdfi ruieiyjM catculfllor to 09m- 
puM r«torwrit h^wncy. He A great aid* I N 
10063 3.00 

Elvclronlc Dull Sooli an ycu need to know pt^i;^! 
Fll1«r dcwtgn. RF circuit data antenrvas and 

fMdUno mfo * more FN \QG27 ...... 4,00 

iMmlng lo Worti With Inltgriltd Clreulta Build 
a diQi'tiil voltm«t@7/lreq ci?ur>t(!r while learning 

about iCa IN rpoao 2.oa 

Slngl4 ^Idtband for Ih* Radio AmalBur Cav«r9 

iheory and piactiUBJ how-tcf-bunU »dsas IN. 

10017 .. a.oo 

FM and R9p««1«rv lor lh« Radh? Aniftt«ur L&am 
B I i ati OM t F M a n d rep^atera from t his handy boo k. 

]N lOOM .4,00 

BoM Statt D«ikffn for tht Riadlo Amalaiir. 
PicMd With InformalKsn for pracucal use of sol(d 
atat9 devices I.N 10Q61 . . i , 7.00 

Bond Slil9 Hailci PurB solid stale inlormalion 

ind piattiual rsiislcs for today's ham. (.N 10037 

5,00 
Spvclallztd Communication Tactinlouai For th* 
ftadlo Amalffur Covers ATV. SSTV, FAX RTTY, 
lalsliile cammiintcaliong end more I N IDOZe 

a.00 

10007 
J»*a. 

ARRL SpKtel Optratlnp KI1 Consists of ARRL 
Ham Radio Guidfl. lull coiot US. area cs!i map, 
ARRL logbooK. 70ARRLr«d40gr3m$ IN 10063 

i.50 
ARRL Ham Itadio Op«fallng QuJda Brush upoii 
good oparatir^ praciice^ with this ready 
rM^efice i<9utce IN 10025 , COP 

Gallkig lo iCfio* Oscar front ttia around Up. 
EM{>lair»» an at}OuT the use of amaleur sat&liiles. 
l>ow to usa therm and n&tmrm lo f imj them 

IN 100^ SjOO 

•0 malar DXIhq HafidlMKilL ComTams 4 sections 
on propapadton, aniwioas, station equipmenl 
and opafftitng pta^^^ticaK It's 14H«><1 wilt* sotid 
prai^tical «jioeT4«nc« I N ?Ek3d7 , . 430 

Ilia Ainaiauf Ratfwo vaiitoai Antpfma Handbooli- 
Tr« tirsi tX30k lor amaitu^n ^icv abottl wticaM 
aniaftntt. it Nt HiU of mlofmai^ofi i u 2!B3t^ 

Tha C h a img a af liO Th« unic^e operalir^ 
chafaettf itttes are e^piaifted and ifwre are it^ 
on iNjilCling stmple aqi^pmem I H 26312 



ARRL Radiogram Menage Pade 1 N 



WIRE 
ANTENNAS 




HIrit* afid KInkt New idtta& wniie'n by hams 

tliemSiii^lv^S Thts is- Eull of practical ideaf And tips 
thaTlheyhavaus&dsLiccossirijIilv I N 10C29 4.00 

Radio Fr«qu«rtcy lntttrl«ren>ca A now book to 
help everyone understand RFI II covers bM Irom 

good neightjor rolalrons fo simple tcjchnilcHi 
cijfes tor RFl Hefps idenlily and solvs problems 
I N 10083 3.00 




ARRL Code KH Upgrade your Ni»vice or Tech 
L>t#nsa with th^e 2 60 mm cassaties wim 
spaedi oi$. Th. 10, A 13 wpm trtil^uciion tm^ 
in&ua^ IN 10046 ijg 

ARRL L09 fioofcs spiral (MHind t>oolis 

La^ge in lOOIS 1,75 

Small IN 10020 jm 

Tunc In tii* WorM with Ham Radiio Laam all 
atwut ainataur radio «iitn a r«jis ano « mone cod« 
CMSetle For Iha CAgmfier iJudy^^ng tor tha 
Novce esam 1 N 10031 T.OO 

Undersiandbri^ Amataur Radio A must guide for 
ttte newcomer. ii eMpLakns m simple language 
e^tt^niMry principles 0I eiaclrQCiics & t«11i hew 
to bu^ low cost equipmenl (N 1OO1& 5.00 



Radio Publications, Inc. 

Beam Antennai Handboolt ty Wm Ort, MI65A1 

IN 26200 „, *.S5 

Wire Antonfua by Wm Ofr W&SAI i N 100^ 

All AJwut Cu^cal Quad t>y Wm Orr W6SAI 
IN 26201 4.71 

The Tmlti Aibout CB Antenna* bv Wm Qtt 
WeSAI I N W20!2 S.tfi 

ElMAC'i Care and Faadlr^ ol Power GrM Tiibaa 
1 14 26205 4 li 

TTw Antenna Han^boot I N 26207 US 

VWF Handbook Oy Wm Orr WgSAI I H 26203 

Bsne* Srion W^vef^ecepiH^nbvWmi Qt^r wfiSAi 
tH 26204 4.t$ 




Ameco Books 



CMnmunicala wtOi itw^ Wojid with Ham ftadio 
NP 1 I N 24825 «.|$ 

OunlkMi A An«w*t Guida tor Novice aitd 
General Ciasa Eitam, t ** 24401 1 U 

Question i Antwer tof Advanc»d Claat Eiant 

ie-* IN 24609 1M 

Queslloo A Answer tor Ealra CIbh Eiam 17-1 
IN 24A01 tSO 

Radio Amalawr Theory Courae 102-fl-l I *4 24B ^^ 

496 

Radio Etvctro^ilcs Mad* Simple l N ^4800 350 
Logbook I N 24807 1.50 

Commercial Radio Operator Theory Course 19^ 
01 I fM Z4&m e.«5 

Commercial QAA Lteenae Gylde Efe. 4 1001 
IN ?4S05 1.95 

Commercial O&A Licefli* Guide El«. 1 ft~Ol. 
IN 24604 2.95 

Commercial QtA Licenee Guide Eie 1 , 2. A 0. a- 
01. !Nl 24a03 ., 1.50 



|K3CHPs' 

I OX QSi ami 




Other Great Books 



W2Ag Second OP DX Akl q N 

ColHni Radk> Co. SSB Afnaleur SIrigl* 
Sideband 1 N ^00^2 



IM 



CIS 



73 Ma-oaiki* VHF Anianna Handi«ok ■ N 
26303 *M 

73 Magazine Novice Cites Study GiJtde. I N 

26300 4,f5 
73 Maga^Kw QtntrM Cl«Q £ludf Gulda 1 N 

26301 a.tS 

The Be^reragc Antenna Handboek. 1 N DOOD 

5,90 
KSCHP Dit OSt Gittde I N 263T3 xm 

Amateur TV ki a Nutiiiel} 1 N 263^ %.m 

Now 10 Make Better OSL S. I H 29304 CtS 

The Complete Handbook ol $tov Scan TV- 1 N 
»5i9 ».«s 



Remember, you can Call Toll Free: 1-800-633-3410 in the U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 

Alabama for our low price quote. Store hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM. Monday thru Friday. 



V/SA 



I 



I 



• 




MAIL ORDERS P O BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM. AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 35233 



». 




• 



I 




Tab Books 




Htfwicf Cl«*« ShHfr Gtikd* I N 30S1T 5.H 

Cl»» 5iM4y Oui<*» < N 3051& - 7.** 
Cliu Sludy Quid* ■ N 3052£ 
Eitm Cisu Study Gukt* I N 26302 ... 
A B«ginr>frn Quid* lo MIsoproaHOim I H 

f TPtrognmi and Garnet m Oa*ic i H 30601 7 d5 

Th« C&^-p.v-' Boo> ( N 30609 7J8 

HiiPiR»iitotnjjnti¥»iJc>n«4iiB0yMilN 30603 

4JS 

Pro{|rAmiTiirig lillcropfoc*«*oifi I N 305^ 6. IS 



Tiling Clna FCC Lic«nM SliMly Giikto IN X^ 14 
Flnt Ouft FCC LJcvrtH Study €uld« I N 30542 



EJ«etrDf>k^ D«l« H4ndlKmfe I N 30^3 S.M 

linp«dinc« ) IM 310520 S.tS 

B«k DPflltil £l«ctronl«« I H 3C»527 4Ji 

Bilk Elvctranlc Prolsl«fnt Solwd l N 30545 

4.S9 

Towff'ft lnl«m«ttOfiil F£T S«(Ktor k N :M3500 

t.95 

Second Clut FCC EfM;yciop»ai* » N 30S3& T.BS 
Haw lo U«« AF ind RF Slgnvl G«n*ritori I N 
30513 5.9S 

£l«ctroiilc« IJnr«v«l«d I N 30531 5.95 

Mnlof TrinilM'/lO S^ibttltyllofi Handbook 
IN 30510 F,95 

RF and DlgUarTMt Equlpm««i! You Can Build 
I N 30521 S.95 

Cdmmercliii FCC L(c«fit« HiifidbocH( 11^ 30$42 

T.B& 

IC Projacli lor lh# Amaltur and Expf-fimanlar 
IN 20543 BM 

How lo Rvad Eiaclfonk Clrtuh Dkagramt I.N 
30&46 6JS 



MMlar Handboofc of 1001 Pncllcal El«clfonl€ 
C^ri^na I N 30523 9.95 

Maitaf Handbook of Ham Rwffo Circuits 1 N 
30506 0.95 

Complelfl Sharl Wava Liitanari handboolt i n 
30S32 6 95 

Matter OP- AMP Applications Handt>ooM I N 
30505 9 95 

C.f.T. tlTO«fita Handbook ^ N 305^3 1.95 

Erf*ctlv« Trouble Slioollng wllh EVM ind Scom 

I N 30S2& i.g 

Handbooh ot Efectronic Tabtn I N 30546 4.95 

H0m«brew HF/VHF Anlanna HandlWdk J H 
30504 . 5.99 

How to Ba a Ham I N 30533 3.&5 




Qvlting th« Moat Qur Of Yotir Eltctroftk CateH' 
Wot^Fj 3052S 4.95 

How to tnitall Ewry thing £l«i«lrpfil« I H 30$S2 

Tikt 3 MtiitFM R«p««l«rCkrcul1 HandboM t N 

30537 ........ «.9S 

Modem A^lcauwu of LJiwar ICi 1 N 30530 




llDbllf fta<»o Hantftook r N 30S34 4.19 

Baik; EJactrielty aiMl R a qtnntna El*ctrafiica 
IN 3053fi $.9$ 

Pr»c4cat Solid Stala DC Pow#r SupfMbta tN 
3Cei5 t.9£ 

ElaclrvnlcConwrvkina^ Symbola., and ^onnula* 
IN 30S24 5.95 

T&mmfm Irttamatiofwl Tf anahor 5#l«cior t H 
30S07 ft.iS 

Baefeonli; Yaal Equlp****^* and How ta Mac It 

IM 30^ft 4 95 



Radio Amateur 
Callbook 

Map Littrmrf Aconrpl^eset of maps jK«ftx worm 
map, great circle chart map of N Amm*ca. and 
worUi atlas IN 10005 3 75 



14J9 

10004 t-S 

10022 !.as 



us GHILboDh red I N 10(^4 
DX caDbook blif IN \OD^b 
OX CaJltlKMika I M 10001 
US. Caill»oki I N 10000 . . 
PnflK m*iJ of Norlli A— ffJM I N 
Zon« prafii map of 9W Wwfd I N 



RSGB Books 



picar - Amalatir Radio Satv^lhtti Ttie 
compr fih^ftnivt EwQ^ on amateur ^iei^iles 
ii^ufttrated w^ih picTures and cttarls 1 N1D069 

8.50 

VI^-UHF Uanual If you itaw« any intef».t ats^^ve 
30 MH; tncn ge* Ihk^ book It covsn &verythin<g 
m Ih^s t^a I N ^2(St 11.95 



Amaitur Radio Awatda I N 3?0O4 



4Jft5 




TRAINING PACKAGES 
TAPES 



Crack tti« eod«' ftnd ace /ciur exapi by studying 
iHa naw way witti our s&leclion ot cas^ette!^ Just 
dtOfj tlxtm into B cs&s«llc^ piayef and study 
■nywfiara vaaiiy and qutckiy Yqm ii tiave great 
rtnulLi 

73 eaaf«ltM 

Nov»£« Thaory Taprs prepare you tor ihe FCC 
novhCe t^Hifrt Citfarly presented n^ater^al can be 
reviewed many I tmes |N 2G3m 15 95 



Coda Taptt 

5 word pflir mm 

6 word per mm 



81 lU Tape I N 
Bini Tape I N 



13 word per mm BiiU Tape i N 
20 wo^d per mm Biitf Tape I N 



2630a 

26310 
26311 



4.99 

4,95 

4.95 
4.95 



r]3 Tf CO lUCt^aMic* 

- m ^* • ■ 




T* CO 
lit*. 



Ce»da Pracllce Tape »r* guatanlaad tar 



(SMrice tape IN 31461 
S Wptfi tape 1 N 314S0 
7"li wpm ^Ape 1= N 31451' 



1 wpm tape 
1 3 wpm tape 
15 lArpm tape \ 
17 #pm tape 1 
20 wprn qape i 
12 wpm lapa I 
?5 30 wpm I ape IN 
3540 wpm lapd I N 



N 

rN 

N 
N 
N 
N 



3t452 
31460 

31454 

31455 

31456 

31457 
3145B 
3145$ 



3.W 
3.95 
399 
3.95 
3.99 
3.95 
395 
3,95 
3.95 
3.95 
3«5 



Cnm circle chAl oj Itta Wo^ld i N 10003 1.35 



Amaeo Coda Tapet 

Jtmlot Cod* Courac vfOO-T Covers start la S 
wpm I N 24919 4.95 

Advanced Code Cour» N103'T Ffdm a to te 
wprr. I t4 'c*6?i 4.9S 

Senior Cod* Couraa *101-T Double tengtn 
i&CWotfrig ttie Jun^of artd Advanced Courses start 
to ia wpm I N ^46^ i,95 

iatrtCt««Co<f«Cotin* a itM-T Covets Trom 13 
wpm 10 22 *p"i includes FCC type eiam I H 
3*922 4.9S 

0*n«fai Claaa OSQ Lapva ai^^-OT 12 i3 i4 & 
1^ *pm I N ?4*^7 4.95 

Ejitf* Clvaa QSO tapa aiOOQT 19 20 2t & 22 
mpm i N 24a^& 



Kairofitca 

OSOCodetapaa Covers/'. 10 
6« f eady ro« Itierww FCC eitams' I 








113. & 15 wpm 
H 28goe 4.95 



Remember, you can Call Toll Free: 1-800-633-3410 in the U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 
Alabama for our low price quote. Store hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday. 



VfSA 




% 




MAIL ORDERS PO BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM, A L 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2800 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 35233 








Q £ I ±: g 

™ i ^ 5? S 




I & ^ 



rl5 




«i>- 



9t 



D E 5 & 



CC _. 



d^2 ^ 

s rg a 



aoBQ h 



?a«B.L 



^ JX fc 5 

*fl IT; U " 

?* Hi' s a 

. £ " c 

3&- U 



tjE 



9- 






^j 



c a 



11 






^ 
u 



o 



CD 






^ * — t: tn 



* = (!»' M 

fli O >> ^ 

^ C (J rq 

>- Q a « « 

a u ^ c ^ 

r > I- ° 

g,Ei 6 o 5 

5*3 m ^ — 



13 
D 

5 
o 

>• 

S 



in 



Q 





< 

o 



UJ 

o 

UJ 

o 
o 

< 

LU 

< 
GC 
Q 

CC 

O 



i SSI 

9 < 



M 

s 

IT 



S8$88 

c^ rK CM (vrf 
■O *A lO tiTi to 






e: 







e; 



P 5r t a; 7 1 



K - - «■ ji: ^ W 

O ' ^ ::. - 1 

rr u- 1 m " - a 

S *. *i S- 



^.jf!;£» 



5 5 









S 9 S o 

in tA w1 in 



IT 

- p 

St B»^ tj 



i:r*a 



5?ll 






p;8 



4 



ft 
o 



".:: c 






It - a; -1 
















F 



2 2 

2^ 



^4 






.V 









MFJ-404 Grandmaster 
memory keyer 

Featurifig spe«<! conlio4 4 LEOS lo iltcnr 
fn«mory <" use record and piaYDaOi iambic 
oper^ion dor-di»$h rntmories repeat messages 
lArilh pauses thj(il'«n rneniory saver w^^gJit can- 
Irol torieiConlroJ lune functi<[xi soliid stdtfMi^ying 
uses 110 VAC 0^ 12-^5 VDC Auromaficaifv 
$wilch«s to ekTfrrruil Oalleries *neni AC fMjwef is 



139.95 




MFJ-721 CW/SSB filter 



Featurmig «^4«cia£iie &an<fMi{]th H poiit acliv« 
Icltef sivitctiabte auldmatic n<}ti« lamrTef piugis 
mfo ptiofie faci^. ? walls for sp«aher £imuial«d 
SlCHTW] r^cepfxofi inpuH for 2 r^g^ spealter An0 

irtdwrdm, requuBsB^ISVOC 900 rriA mAn. 



list. CaN lor quolP 



59.95 




wi. 



MFJ-MIB Versa Tuner II 

Featufei SWR and duai ^An^ wattmefer 
antefirra sMriTch bu'^t^in b^un. 3dbw RF o^puL 
M atcries #« eryl ri rrsg from 1 S lti» u 30 MKz. uses I 
anienna ihcreases rhe iisaoie baridwidlh Has 
SO- 239 connectors 



CalS today 



79.95 



C<iM iQdiay 




eeeec 



iV««MB^> 



MFJ-8044 IC deluxe keyer 

S&nds iambic, flutomatic. senru-auTQmauc! of 
ma^lJa^ Dot ana dash memgnes. iQtaUy RF 
proof, solid state keying, -frortl panel controls, 
woight conlrQi lofti? cantrot lunction switch 3 
LO<^idLJt;iar / phone pack lor key pho-rio jact<s 
lor keying outputs Soueeze key opitoni^ 



69.95 




CUSHCRAFT A MS- 147 
FM mobile 2m mag 
mount antenna 

A IV wav^3 length anlenno with 3 dSi 
gam, low SWfl operation o^fer 146-1 4fl 
MHe FM t>and. "Movecanlerfreq ' 1-6 
MHz Milched tn 50 otima Campjete 
wrlh CDtK & con nee lor 



Calf today 



34.95 





CUSHCRAFT 
ARX-2 2m 
antenna 

Thnin 1/t Wcives in phasff and a wave 
matcl-iingi slub Exlfemely low anglfj ot 
radinlion lor bcttf^f signal c:ov4*fage 
Turntable over a t>ro3d tft*q range 
Maichsfl lo &? ohm coax 



CaJI lor yotits today 



39.95 



Call locuy 



B&W 595 coax swilch 




Features b jjutptjl^ A powet 




Ffltng Of ? KV^" PEP VSWR 0^ 




irrta than 1 2 1 up to 150 hfiHt. 




grounds all ynusad antennas. 




1 N 2730S. Add 1 10 Shipping 


M 


I, hfindling 




->-^ '^ 


19.75 


* * 


r' r' r' .f' r' \ 


B4W 376 






5 position coajc svvitch 


Jl^ 


' ' Huiei 3 ^^:t-=s pQ«er 


^^rbflofZKW PEP VSW« 
j«Kthani 2 1tiplol50MHj 


l»*-^^-*t 


KW^^^^k. 


with mMi wnouM and d:ia9 


yS^m 


plate groanas all uiiytftti - 


anlenrtas i H 2T3oa Atfd 


1 10 shippmg a handling 


iHStF 


19.75 


^IT 



B«W S93 

3 position coax switch 
thii. 9t«itcri features 3 oul 
puts ^ power rarmg o* 2 KW 
P£P VSWR ot less Ihan 1 7 i 
up lo 1^ MHz & grounds all 
ufii, J SDd antennas IM 3r5lS 
Add 1 lOshipping A handiino 



16.75 



B&W 375 coax switch 
Faaturir^g power ratino 
1000M AM and ?000f^ 5S6 
connHBctors are UHF i^pc 
dial plate supplied nm '^ 
OiiTpnuts Gri»iirHl$all u^ng&ed 
■niennas & nad VSWR ot leii 
tnwn T 2 1 Ltplo t 50 MHz i N 
^7390 Aod 1 1Q srtippirtg 4 
fUlfrdNng 



19.75 




i§ Ms^^ 




B&W 550 A 

5 posjlton C03I switch 

Feafynng power raiing of 
lOOQW AM 200OW 5Se UHI 
lype connflctors 5 outputs 
VSWe li Fess tnan 1 2 i up to 
1Q0 MHf w^lh very tililCr 
in?i(?ftion loss IN 27301 
Add T 1 shipping & tiandling 



16.95 




B&W SSOA'Z 

2 position coax switch 

Triri, i^pii f^'^tures 2 Outputs 
a power lattng olS KW PEP 
VSWR iHS trian 1 2 I up ^to 
100 MHt BAW wall mount 
and 0^-2 dial plate awatiaiii^e 
I M 273(B Add T lOshtpp^rtg 
S Haindl'nfl 



13.75 





ORDER 
NOW! 



KENWOOD 
MC-355 
dynamic mic 

Trv MC-35S i« a 50 K oturs impedance, dynamic 
h«r>d held mK A 2rposttion swttph teis you 
operate m a quiet moboe dr f med station or leiflci 
noiBHQ cancelling for u^e ^n high anrbtent no>3e 
enwrronmenls MC-30S iameasMC-3SSE>ulSaO 
ohrriis. tow impedance lor TR-74ClO.'7SDO 



29.00 



Cflit tor yours loday 



COVER CRAFT 
dusi covers 

Keep youf eq^iipmefil dean 
and protected with dull 
covT&rt made of toug^ clear 

virry^l plaiiTM: Mnth a 'peidrlij^ed 
liekiured f+ntsh All seami sit 
machine sfttched lor 
maMimum strength We carry 
coveir$ tor Kenwood. Vat^tu 
I com. DraKe. Ten-Tec_ COE 
and DflniroTT 



CDVin CHIIFT 



4,95 



Call today 







^ 



BENCHER BY-1 
Iambic paddle 
Thd Ullimate i am ore padd^o 
Fealurei tohd sjiver ccx^tacl 
points lull range adjustrpenl 
non-skid leel an^ heavy 51 eHuJ 
btatk1#]ituredtiJS€ ttemMo 
3T700 ^dd 1 35 shipping & 
nandiir^^ 




39,95 



BiNCHER BY-2 
Iambic puddle 

The By -2 has all the fealur«« 

of the BV'1 bLPt com#s wilh 
chrome base Add 1 35 

shippmg S handling Item 
No 31701 




*¥*#•%? V 



VISA 






I 



r - 1 

|m«5l#i ch«r9«|l 



MAIL ORDERS PO BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM, AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2806 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 3S233 



ASCII MORSE RTTY 



HONITOR «139. 

(12 BftW) 



CXIMPUTER 



COMPLETE 
KETBOAMO 
TERAONAL 

^350. Kit 195 

(L«ii MonitDT) 





ASCII & BAUDOT 
Auto Sync. 1-150 WFM 
Microcomputer Interface 



TRAlffSCEIVER 



RS232 

UfkfOUU 



^ 



SERIAL 

LOOP 




TERMINAL UNIT 



8CT-100 STAND 
ALOITO VIDEO BOARD 

• Partial Kit ♦SS- 

• FuU Kit •15T, 

• Assembled & Tested ilST. 



»XIT€X CORR 

V.mU^ Ni-ytnin P. O. Box 402110 
lhilhi>. Ti»x;is T524f) «2I4i 3^i6*:J^^9 



lie /VISA 



OKDtlR BY PHONE 




RTTY 
(TX/RX) 



MORSE 

(TX.T?X) 




K£YER OPTIONAL 



• Partial Kit •BS* 

• FuU Kit *328. 

• Assembled & Tested ^SSS* 



NEW MFJ DELUXE 3JCW Versa Tuner IV 

The MFJ*984 Deluxe 3 KW Versa Tuner IV gives you a combination of features that 
only MFJ offers, like . . . exclusive RF ammeter , dummy load, SWR, forward, reflected 
power meter, antenna switch, balun. Matches everything from 1.8 thru 30 MHz: coax, 
balanced lines, random wires. —w^^. «■«»«■,«!' »«. «»■««*»«« 

EXCLUSIVE RF AMMETER 

Snsurem maximum power to 
mntmnna at minimum SWR, 





m% [% mjr% best 3 KW Vcfsi Tuner IV. The 
MFj 984 Deluxe 3 KW Versa Timer IV giv^ you 
a coinbinaiion of quality^ perfcirniaAoe. and fea- 
tures that others car*'t touch at this price. 

FEftFOflMAHCE: You can run up to 3 KW PEP 
and contjnuOList v match any feedlme from 1 .8 to 
30 MHz: coax, balanced line or random wire. 

FEJTURES: A 10 am p RF ammeter insures 
maximum power to antenna at minimym SWR. 

A leparale meter gives SWR. torward, reflected 
pow^r in 2 ranges (2000 and 200 watts). 
I A fleiibic antenna switch lets you select 2 
I coax lines thru tuner and 1 thru or direct, or 
I random wire, balanced line or dummy load. 
I A ZQD WBtt 50 ohm dymmy load lets you tune 
I yoirr exciter off atr for peak perlormance 



A If metaf, fow pro!lfe cabinet gives RR protec- 
tion, rigid construction. Black. Anodized aluminum 
front panel. 5x14x14 m. 20 pounds. 

A Up stand lilts tuner lor easy viewtfig. 

Ftfictenl, oncapsulited fenlto 4:1 Jialun, 500 pt, 
6000 volt capacitors. \B position dual inductor, 
17 amp ceramic rotary switch. 2% meters. 
SO-239 coax connectors. Ceramic feedthru for 
random wire, batanced line. Binding post for ground. 

miALITY: Every stngit unit is tested for por 
formance and inspected for quality. Solid Ameri- 
can construction, quality components. 

The MFj*d&4 carries i full one year limited 
warranty 

For your netreit MFJ deiler, call toll-free 
000'647'ieoo Stop by your dealer. Compare il 



feature tor feature witti other tuners, Compam its 
value, its Quality and Its performance. 

After a truly side by side cDmparisan, you1f 
be convinced that its value, quality and features 
make it a truly outstanding value, 

Why not vlift your dealer today? If no deafer 
is available call tolMree 800-647 1800 and order 
direct from MFJ. SS.OO shipping. 

MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC. 

P. O, BOX 494 ^MB2 
MISSISSIPPI STATE, MS 39762 

CALL TOLL FREE .... 800-647-1800 

For technlcif Information, order/repilr stitui, \n 
liu,. outikfe continental USA. cal 601-3Z3-Sfl6fl. 



130 



p^ Reader Service-- se* page T§5 




mrumon 

franffB 



AMATEUR RADIO'S NGGEST 



10 ywi^ 



MA6AZINE AT HALF PMCE/ 

only 11^ pm copy. 79 MogasiM Mil lor I2J0 on tho 

iiviViiiMi V UMi 1 99§ pvf jvon T w oon n^K rMnp qori ujf 

WW^fV nORIflO Mli WCtfOOfOMQfJf WMf Ofl tlW WOfiv t MpfMi 
MBpiSra OT mi KmO lO piPW fO irOli iilDi #9 WOT |WI ffnoiv 
MH MlO yVllf IIOODy IIIHI Qfl)flMft0 MW yOU flHI buy iBf WflBM 



tfiof 79 li wofth for. for mero tiion 1 1 ^ on 



yW lOf hM^ VMBHM flO filBIMf WtlOt MpMt fli MflOMW IQflte yWF ff# v^ 

rw #wMspv^n9 wfvii II moiw M w iiw^wy vw mopwi r fmn iwi aion 

WMIiPM OQQI MSMM Mi yWI M CK IMI MMMI MQMlmilM CMM C^pf|pfllMlt • ■ ■ Ml^flflO yOW Mt^ 

. wilfte ¥BU Into iiMtf OMn thtttHI moiw ojimhim iiuko oi McdtiM to whj oft tho dov wou hMMd 

yW MM tlMMIlilllOiW 

SUMOUNNOVI 

94»*«iipvf BMiv on Qw fVwiKQnv yw «m low mm wuuy py woKnooig lo f v lor ofio yoof iw 91 w iwo 
voofi fat SAO* iJiMOO voofi fat Mft* Wiiri In tho oidot faim Cwo'l oov tho ooitoool ond wou^ mcaIvo vour 

ffftt tot Inuo In fauf to ilx wooIil 



« ■ 



1DT9PM 



IMIMTiHI 



til) 



Ml 



fMtfTCft 




citr. 



^Hk 



YOiftauAiuimE 



(Ml vltor tMtf hi *• WA> 



SQ^magozino 



^j0.9oKf9i 

NY 11797 



FOR BEST PRICE AND 
FAST DELIVERY 

CALL 




TOLL FREE 

N^HAMUVVOIOJCENt 

m^ 8340.42 OhveBlv^l PO Spif-.?e371 St Lduw MO Bits? 



.yH2 



Iron Powder and Ferrite 

TOROIDAL CORES 

Shielding Beads, Shielded Coil Forms 
Ferrite Rods, Pot Cores, Baluns, Etc 

Small Orders Welcome 
Free 'Tech- Da ta^ Flyer 



AIVIID0N^ 



i^A2G 



Since 
T963 




12033 OTSEGO STREET, NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 91607 

in Germany EleKitonnOaden. Wriheim — Meilies Str 88, 4930 Oeimald 18. Wes! Germany 

In Japan Tjyomufa Electronics Comoany, Lid-. 7-9. Z-C^ome Sota-Kanda. Cfiiyoda-Ku. Tokyo, Japan 




still 
Only 

$14S5 



THE 

UNflDILLfl 

WZnU Baluns 



HEIIJtHPED BV 
PROFESSIDHHS 
ffPRLD WIDE 
AVER l£YEAflS 



«ThtOri|iNiilightni«| Arrest 
*S50^Streineth 
^Sltinles^Hairdwife 
• Sialtd ASSISTIN€E? 

#CUIRANTEtO Cal1:IIUCHOUHNI$QW,WA2£0T 

Tail Free eoo-44 8 I66e 

[HYS Collect 315-437-3953 




PEP 



FULL-POWER^QUnilTY 
HON flNTENNR PflRTS 



AT YOUR^DEflLER 

* eALUNS-TRAFS IHSULATOnS 

* f|0AD PARTS- ANTEMNA KITS 

* BODM/lHAn iOUNTS-IVIfiE 

* CAILE'CONNECTDRS 



WRITE FVR FULL CATALflG 



UNAOlLLfl/REVCO DIVrSiON [&ept._I3_] 

er^JHrNNt STREET EAST5TRACUSE HE'Hv fOflU IMW? 



ICPOW^VE 

FILTER 
( 



Scans any or all 
800 Channels of 
the 2 Meter Band - 




CES Model 800 programs in 
just seconds and any 
number o1 channels can be 
scanned or you can scan 
entire band without losing 
memory. PTT switch stops 
scanning and is put into 
hold mode, internal battery 
holds memory when dis- 
connected. 

Available for Yeasu 227R, KDK 
FM 144, Midland 13-510, Ken- 
wood 7400, ^0115 



At your Ham Radio Dealer 
or Call or Write 



CES 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS 
SPECIALTIES, inc. 



3» W. Fairbanks Avo., Winter ParK, ria. 327a§ 

305/^45^0474 



AUXILIARY POWER 

for Emergency or Portable Operation 




1 



DEALERS WIINTED-OVER 300 WORLDWIDE 




■ta 



TR$-80 OWNERS 

Send-Receive RTTY & CW 

m Auto, send & receive: RTTY & CW; 

■ Complete hardware & software. 

■ Connects to TBSaO User Port & key/tieadptiofie jacks. 

■ 10 message memories - 255 char ea< 
fl Keyboanj buffer-allows tvpmg ahead. 

■ Uses built-in PLL or external TU, 

■ Morse trainer random 5 tetter words, 

■ Includes tiardware , casselle & manual. 

■ Requires Level II Basic & 1GK DAM. 

Wired 

■ PET version available, 69.95 m i 99.95 wfred 
Write or cat! for detailed brochure 



$99. 

kit 

$129. 



'AMCfXyiRONICS. inc.. 

FORMERLY irUCROTHQEiilCS ^M4a 

P.O. Box 747 (S) KeyeS, CA 95328 (209) 634-0008 / 067-2888 CaEifomia resiElents add 6% lax 





Light wt Portable Alternator Stand-by power for Ham 
Equipment, household needs durmg power outages or 
operatioTi in remote areas Operates hgt\ting, 
refrigerators^ heating systems or other appliances in- 

eluding freq. sensitive loads such as TV sets, induc- 
tion motors and fluorescent lights. Sol id -State 
voltage regulation 3750W rating; 25% surge 
capacity. 120/240V at 31 3/15.6A. 8 HP/3600 RPIVI 
B&S engine. Alternator draws just ennugh engine out- 
put to meet bad resulting in up to 25% fuel savings. 
Low interference. Advanced design. Drip-proof con- 
struction protects windings from rain and dirt assur- 
ing long life. One year warranty hy marrufacturer. 
301x 18"Wxl9"H. 128 lbs Shipped via Truck 



PREPAID INo extra charges) 

Electric Start .,..,, . 

Battery Charging, 

Spark Arrest Muffler , 

Models available wilh 1350 to 7000 watt ratings 
Write for our quote and additional information, 

Master charge or VISA accepted 



. . I659J5 

$110,00 
ILOO 
21.00 



OUTDOOR OUTFITTERS 

705 Elm Ct. Waukesha. Wt 53186 

Ph. 1-414'542"7772 • Ken, N9KS - Mgr. 



132 



tf^ Reader Servtoe — se& p^g& 195 



Transistor Tester 



Dioufc Protected • Fused • Gold Plated Selector Switch 



SPECfFJCATtONS 



MftMurem«i| 


lif#»yrem«fit Rongt* 


Accuracy 


DCV 


10V- 50V- 250V- 1000V 


± 3% f s 


ACV 


0- lOV^ 50V- 250V- 
1000V 30Hz to 30kHz 


± 4% f s 


DCA 


* 50M - 2, Sena - 25ma 
- .25 A 


t 3%fs 


fi 


.2 10 20m Ji 

Range X ijtIOx Ikst 10k 


± 3% arc , 


dB 


* 10db-^22dbroriOVAC 


±4%fs 


ICEO 


0' 150M X Ik 0- 15ma 
xlO 0- 150m J( 1 


z 3% arc 


HFE 


0- 1000@x 10-!^ 


± 3% arc 




DC VOLTAGE 

OC CURRENT 

AC VOLTAGE 

n RESISTANCE 

AF OUTPUT — DB 

20kn PER VOLT 

HFE DC AMP FACTOR 

ICEO LEAKAGE 




MODEL 



YF-370 
COMPARATIVE VALUE 49'i 



Shipping, Handling and Ins. . , *3.00 



Every YF-370 rs factory assembled, tested, and 
includes diode protected meter movement with 
a fused input and an extra fuse. The switch assem- 
bly has double wiping gold plated contacts to 
assure years of trouble-free service. At this low 
price buy two.. .one for the car and one for the shop. 




WS4' 



master durge 



CALL TODAY TOLL FREE: (800—854-2049) Calif. Rw. 
CALL (800—542-6253) TO ORDER OR RECEIVE MORE 
rNFORMATrON ON DSI's FULL PRODUCT LINE OF 
FREQUENCY COUNTERS RANGING FROM 10HZ 
TO 1.3GHZ 

TERMS: MC — VISA — AE — Chech — M.O. — COD m U.S. Funds. 
Orders outside of USA & Canada, please add $5.00 additionaJ to cover 
air stiipmcf^t. Catifomia restdenls add 6% Sales Tax. 

DSI INSTRUMENTS, INC. 

7924 Ronson Road. Dept. G. San Diego, CA 92111 



^ WM ftdf tt I 



a 



ill 



w 1 



k iL 



v^ 




1 a 



iQomnx 




/ L/ J U, U U L' L,' 



lllilllll a-^* 



I 




MODEL CI 000 10Hz to 1GHz 



$499 



95 



INCLUDES BATTERY PACK 
AUTO ZERO BLANKING 
AUTO DECIMAL POINT 
10MHz TIME BASE 



MODEL C700 50Hz to 700MHz 



$369^ 



INCLUDES BATTERY PACK 
AUTO ZERO BLANKING 
AUTO DECIMAL POINT 
tOMHzTIME BASE 



Accuracy . . . that's the operational key to this rugged ad- 
vanced design Model ClOOO 1GHz frequency counter ... a 
significant achievement from DSI. That's because you get 
, . . A PPM 0'' to 40^ C proportional oven time base ... Built 
in 25DB preamplifier with a 60DB adjustable attenuator . . . 
k10 & xlOO audio scaler which yields .01 Hz resolution from 
lOHz to lOKHz equivalent to 10 sec. & 100 secGate Time . . . 
Selectable .1 & 1 sec- time base and 50 ohms or 1 meg ohm 

Input impedance Built-in battery charging circuit with a 

Rapid or Trickle Charge Selector . , . Color keyed high quality 
push button operation . , . All combined in a rugged black 
anodized (,125" thick) aJuminum cabinet. The model C-1000 
reflects DSCs on going dedication to excellence in 
instrumentation for the professional service technician, 
engineer, or the communication industry. 



ALL NEW! All UNPARALLELED DSI QUALITY! The model 
C 700 700 MHz frequency counter features ... .2 PPM 
O'^ to 40"* C proportional oven time base . . . 25db preamplifier 
with a 60db adjustable attenuator. Built in battery charger 
with a rapid or trickle charge selector . . . Combined in a 
rugged {.125" thick) aluminum cabinet makes the C700 
ideal for the communication industry and professional serv- 
ice technician. 

3600A OWNERS: Up date your 3600A frequency counter to 
a C 700 includes, new back board, .2PPM proportional oven, 
2S6b preamplifier, rugged .125" thick aluminum cabinet, 
order 3600 A- 700. Unit must be returned to DSI factory for 
modification. 



DSI — GUARANTEED SPECIFICATIONS — FACTORY ASSEMBLED — MADE IN USA 



Model 


1 

Frequency | 
Range 


Proportlona! Oven 

Accuracy Over 

Temperature 


50 Hz 

To 
75MH2 


7SMHi 
To 

500MH2 


SOOMH? 

To 

1GHz 


Number 
Of 

Digits 


Size 
Of 

Digits 


Power 
Requirements 


Size 


C700 


50Hz to 700MH2 


.2PPM0° to40^C 

i 


50MV 


10MV 


NA 


8 


.5 Inch 


115 VAC-BATT 
8 to 15VDC 


3'*H X a"W X 6"D 


cioqo 


10Hz to IGHZ 


JPPM0° to40^C 


20MV 


1MV 

.....J 


>5QMV 


g 


.5 Inch 


115VAC-BATT 
8 to 15VDC 


4"H X 10"W X TWO 



— AH Units Am Factory AssomblBti, Tested And Carry A Fult 5 Year Limited Warranty — 

Model C 700 $369.95 



FREE 



^ > * ^ t * * * t 



* * ■ * 



Strongest warranty in the counter field, i 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. * 



FOR MORE INFORMATION 

Call Toll Ffee: (800) 854-2049 
OSI INSTRUMENTS, INC. 

California Residents, Call Collect: (714) 565-8402 

VISA ■ MC • AMERICAN EXPRESS • CHECK * MONEY ORDER • COD 

7914 RONSON ROAD, #G, SAN DtEGO, CA 92111 



3600A-700 Factory Update (3600A only) 
Includes Labor & Re-Calibration $199.95 



Model C 1000 

Opt. 01 UGHz (CI 000 only) 



$499.95 



opt. 02 .05 PPM 10MHz Double Oven 
0** to 50*C Time Base (CI 000 only) $129.95 

Ant. 210 Telescopic Ant./BNCAsiapter $11.95 




YOU ON FREQUENCY? 








ODEL 3600A .5PPM 1 T'' - 37°C 

• AUTO ZERO BLANKING 
■ AUTO DECIMAL POINT 

• INCLUDES ANTENNA 



ngg 



95 



SAVE SHOP COSTS WHEN ADJUSTING XTALS 
MEET YOUR QSO ON FREQUENCY EVERY TIME 

The 3600A and 3550W Frequency Counters represent a 
significant new advancement, utiffzing the latest LSI Design 
, . . which reflects DSrs ongoing dedication to excellence 
in instrumentation, for the professional service technician 
and amateur radio operator. Before you buy a DSi instru- 
ment you know v\/hat the specifications are. We pubtish 
complete and meaningful specifications which state accu- 
racy over temperature and sensitivity at frequencies you 
need. And we guarantee those specifications in writing. 

MODEL 3550W TCXO 



H4g 



95 



• rNCLUDES INTERNAL BATTERY HOLDER 
. SAME AS 3600A LESS OVEN 

• SEE SPECIFICATIONS 8EL0W 



MODEL 3700 

$9RQg5 




.2PPM C^ - 40''C 

• AUTO ZERO BLANKING 
> AUTO DECIMAL POINT 

• INCLUDES ANTENNA 

PORTABLEI TAKE IT TO THE MOUNTAINS OR 
USE IT MOBILE — TAKE IT WITH YOU ON FIELD DAY 

ALL NEW! ALL UNPARALLELED DSI QUALITY! The model 
3700 700MHz frequency counter features ... .2 PPM 0' to 
4p°C proportional oven time base . . . Buitt in battery trickle 
charger less batteries . . , Combined in a rugged (.125" thick) 
aluminum cabinet makes the 3700 ideal for the communi- 
cations industry, professional service technicians, and 
sophisticated amateur radio operators. 



3600A OWNERS: Update your 3600A frequency counter to 
a 3700 includes ... .2 PPM proportional oven, rugged .125" 
thick aluminum cabinet, order 3600-A - 3700. Unit must be 
returned to DSI factory for modification. 



DSI — GUARANTEED SPECIFtCATIONS — MADE IN USA 



Moifer 


Frequency 
Flange 


Accuracy 

Ov&r 

Temperatyre 


@ 
146MHz 


220MHz 


@ 
4&0MHZ 


Number 

of 
l^«adouts 


Si2« 
of 

Readouts 


Pow*r 
{Require mcnts 


Size 


3700 


50Hz - 700MHz 


Proportional Oven 
.2 PPM 0° ' 40°C 


ioyv 


10MV 


50MV 


8 


.5 Ifidh 


115 VAC or 
8.2- 14.5VDC 


3"H X 8"W X 6"D 


3600A 


SDHz - 600MHz 


Oven 
.5 PPM 17= - 37-^0 


TOMV 


10MV 


50MV 


6 


.5 Inch 


nSVACof 
8.2-14.5VDC 


2W'H X 8"W X 5"D 


35S0W 


50Hz - 550MHz 


1 PPM 65^ - 85^ F 


25MV 


25MV 1 


75MV 


3 


.6 Inch 


1t5VAC or 
8.2- 14-5VDC 


2W*HkB''Wx 5"D 



— ALL UNITS ARE FACTORY ASSEMBLED, 
. NO EXTRA COSTS • 

FREE Shipping anywhere in U.S,A. and Canada. 
All other countries, add 10%. 

Strongest warranty in the counter fieid^ : 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. ' 



See Your Dealer or 

Call Toll Free: (800) 854-2049 
DSI INSTRUMENTS, INC. 

California Residents, Call Collect: (714) 565«8402 

VISA • MC • AMERICAN EXPRESS * CHECK * MONEY ORDER * COD 

7914 RONSON ROAD, #G, SAN DIEGO, CA 92111 



TESTED AND CARRY A FULL 1 YEAR WARRANTY — 



Model 3700 $269.95 

3600A - 3700 Factory Update (3600A Only) 
Includes Labor & Re-Calibration , , $ 99.95 

Model 3600A $199.95 

Mode! 3550W. $149-95 



Option 03 20-Hr. Rechargeable 
Battery Pack 



*■*■** 



$ 29.95 



w>^. 



fi^ 




i 




A 



50 HZ TO 550 MHZ COUN 




ASSEMBLED 100^ ^r ■> 

Pertormance You Can Count On 



FHEQUENCY COUNTER APPLICATION: 

j^^ qadio — Two Way Radio — CB 
' P o Ampiifier & Receiver Repair 

^^mputer Maintenance & Construction 
- A Must for TV & PLL Repair 




MODEL 3550K 



inciuoes buiii-in 
Pre-Amp & Prescaler 






I n 



i|«i /ill 



D £f b □ 



iUi 



DSt OFFERS THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS 

An unprecedented DSI VALUE ighq ty, LSI Desian. 

cft tj^ *^ ff5Q ^1^2 frequency counter kit. And, because ii o a 
DSI innovation, you know it obsoletes all competitiv ikes. 
both iu j-nioe & performafice 

With 95% of the as ^ npleted bv DSL you are onl j e 

away ^'^^•^ solving all of those wiw*wuti aench problems. 
n adjusting 60 HZclock-time bases to setting the frequency 
01 u 468 MHZ Mobile Radio, 

Every 3550 QUIK-KIT" • ■ board is factory assembled 

^pH to^f orj h^f nrrfs cHinrrjjsrif THc* prObter"*^ ^^ bad LED'S 

IC dnd Capacitors are a thing ot the past. No manu- 

facturer except DSI offers a 550MHZ frequency countervk^ith 
8 digits, .5 In. LED's, TCXO, 1HZ resotution and a one year 
warranty on parts for under $100.00 ' We do not know 

how long we can hold this tow. tow price. GO WITH THE 



JKMk 



u 



DSI — GUARANTEED 

Time Base TCXO IPPM 65 SS'^F 

Freq. Range S0H2 to 550MHZ in^i two S0239 ini 

Resolution IHZ to 55MHZ, 10HZ lo 550MHZ _ 

Gate Time t sec & 1/10 sec with Auto Decimal Point 
Display 8 d ^ ,ED with Leading Zero Blanking 

Sensitivity 25MV .HZ. 150MHZ. 250Mh^, . 

^^MV^ .^OMHZ I 

Power Bail,, i2VDC (® 300Ma, nuvAC in AC- 



S99.95 
3.95 
7.95 

moo 



3550K Ktt 

T-101 Ar 

AC-9 AC 

Shipping, Handling, tn^ 

3550W Wired , 
T-101 (incL) 
AC-9 (incl) 
Shipping (inci.) . 



149.9S 

. NC 

. NC 

NC 




VfSA 






TO! L p«^^E' mnn— R^4-^n4m 






1 IJL 

LINE OF FREQUENCy COUNTERS RANGii* ^O^ 



DSt iNSTRUMeNTS, tNC: 

^on Road, Dept G, San Diego, Ca y 



r^oJ'ijti: 



>a,^ttii 



FOR BEST PRICE AND 
FAST DELIVERY 

CALL 



TOLL FREE 

^ ^>HA/Vl8AQiaCENi 



PO 6o*aS??lSl Loin* MOMMt 



^m 



D O V E T R Q 






MPC-IOOOC 

Muftipath Correction 
In Band Diversity & 
AFSK Tone Keyer 

Amateur Net: $545,00 



Stdndard features fnctude CONTINUOUSLY tuneable Mark and Space channels (1000 
Hz to 3200 Hz), Dual Mode (MARK or FSK) Autostart and Internal high level neutral 
loop keyer (20 to 60 ml). Both El A and MIL FSK outputs are provided for direct 
interfact to microprocessor and video terminal peripherals. 



MPC-IOOOCR 

Sipal Regeneration & 
Speed Conversion 

Amateur Net; $645.00 



A front panel switch permrts internal TSR'200 Signaf Regenerator-Speed convert- 
er assembly to electronically "gearshift" between 60, 67, 75 and 100 WPM, Alt 
incoming and outgoing signals are regenerated to less than 0.5% bias distortion. 
Also dvailabJe with DIGITAL Autostart (TSR 200D): Amateur Net: (695.00 

MPCIOOOR/- 
TSR-500 

Doal UART Regeneration, 
Speed Conversion, 200 
Char. Memory, Word Cor- 
rectfoo & DIGITAL 
Autostart 

Amateur Net; $895,00* 

The MPC-lOOOR/TSR-500 provides Preloading and Recircuiation of the 200 character 
FIFO Memory, a keyboard -control led Word Correction circuit, Vanable Character 
Rate. Tee Dee Inhibit, Blank/LTRS Diddle, a Triple Tone- Pair AFSK Tone Keyer and a 
Character Recognition/Speed Determination DIGITAL (DAS* 100) Autostart mode. 

♦The MPC-IOOOR is also available without a TSR assembly and functions as a MFC- 
lOOCX; with a Triple Tone-Pair AFSK Tone Keyer. This "Basic^R" permits future ex- 
pansion with a TSRIOO, TSR-200p TSR-200D or TSR-500 by simply lifting the lid 
and plugging in the appropriate TSR assembly: Amateur Net (Basic-R): $595.00 

Your QSL will bring complete specifications, or call: 213-682'3705. 




►^023 




627 FREMONT AVENUE 

(R O. BOX 267) 

SOUTH PASADENA, CA. 91030 



Write for CATALOG 

CRAMMED WITH GOVT SURPLUS 
ELECTRONIC G EAR S€no 5* fo« mawoling 



ARC 5 TftANSMlTTEH— wltti all tut»ft and 

CfystJMs-NEW 116.95 

AC POWtR SUPf'LY— fctf atKjve tTan^tmiHer 

(S04npfeteiy wire<! S tested. KEW %3B.50 

ARC 3 RECEIVER- 10M56 MC crysiml 

cofilrotied. excel letil oomlEtion wit^ *ube$ $24 50 
ARC 3 TRANSMITTER— 100-156 MC CfV«ai 

controllis^, «xcet!^en1 condition witli Iutw5 S29 50 

r&34A CODE PRACTICE KEYEH-\*^!lh 

take-up TOBi and AC line cord. n.ev^ cofid $24.50 
2000 ohm headset, NEW $3.95 

600 ohtn rieat5s«t with chamois cushions 

e^tcellehl cprto. $3.95 

An types ot {ran emitting, receiving A special purpose 

t jbes available We invite youf InquiTi'- 



Terms: FOB NVC, 25% deposit with order, bafa 
COO or remtiance m lull Subject to prior sale 
price change. 



^\ 



M^G30 



GI^G fl«dlo Elt?ctronlc» CO, 
4S 47 WARREN ST. (2nd floor) 
NEW YORK. NY f0007 Ph. Z 1 2-267-4605 
OPEN 9am to 5 pm 



A^P41 



FAST SCAN ATV 



ALL YOU NEED IN ONE BOX 




ShtrM Ifw ftuck hotnt mo vies, compulcr lanHf* rtc. 
Cl^niwci: to the jjiL 1erTntrLi.U of Jiny TV leC add a good 
4%tt jntrfifu^ J c Ameri, and you an* timv » . ^ 

• t(J Watts peak RF ouiput. Specify 4 34.0 or -119.25 MHi 

• Su^KJ^r^^e^ sound with plenty of mic gain for difbince 
pick-up. 

• B MHi tandw\d\h, high resolutiort r>e<cessdry for com- 

• tun&ahli* roriveiier covers 420 to 4S0. (Covers CH 2, 3J 

• Cuntdin^ AC lu 1 2VDC regulated 3 AMP power iupply^r 

• Only S3^9.00 direa mail, Check, Money Order. VISA. 
Send S.A.S-E. for catalog of ATV Modules and K" BrkirH*. 



P.C. ELECTRONICS 

Maryanr 2522 PAXSON Tom 

waevss arcadia. ca 91006 vweOHG 



Introducing 

The lO-sccnnd PL Tune-tp 




A iCr^»01**i and m trmqu mnc f cdpnlttt •■« flA fow 

Ut bMi« Oat n*w Pi, tneod^t ut>M^ at** Vha tmttw tm 

1 1HMB-9llh*»rt #i«laii hu ^o^^^vd: •" inc'vdt&if 

»M ElA pttH,tmtlK* t^wciHcalionm llcHl«h $11| 
404f •!*» *l Mi^ vsHcff* frniit T»^1S V dc tndi t<t*hmt 
wtph i T«»r m«na/t«cii#mii » ImvlMl varTtmiv 

COMPARE THESE FEATUftJS 

Sja Mlf4l1 ATUflE Silt. %" L « tm {> i t«7 l# 

CO*iHliuOW«.y TU<^*BLE Aa^ lret|ue#^C7 t»li»*n ST Ht Md 

EASY TO IN&TALt S«^f ilM:libac4^ lof «asv rniXinlinQ Juil 3l«c(}i 
EKCEiDE ALL ElA SF£CiFCATtON£ SlAfail'ly l^r^ OH^raiit^ 
l«nipir«l^t ritrgw - 30 Iq * CO C 

LOW COST Puc* 4M 95tfctu5 JV50 poiSlage and tian-dfifig 
ArriMTlON CONTHOi 0PS-*flO(J*l 510* mimutul* |1 3r< I » 
1-3^1$ P I U? j fncpd^D' decoder B&me 4i 4tKf*t iptit F|«<d 
tuna^lii iui-lil'in Ht-PusFUiftreiiniinitBiRXlDriB. Fnc«tABQ&plu» 
ST SO [Miiaigfl and ritfidiino 



intfo^uctart 5ftr-c\9i QlV£ US VOUfi FfttQUENCf 



CHorce AP4C> wf wfLL SEr UP UNH m Oitit i*o 



API ndustries 



^ASI 
po eota^o 

Gr^HnvMW f4«w YOfR 1il5t4C 



y^ fl^3d&r Sefyice^—M00 p^ge JSS 



137 



Improving the Sabtronics 2000 

— make a good DMM even better 



Easier maintenance is a bonus. 



James D, Paweli U N8AMR/4 
6400 J Terrace View 
Biacksburg VA 24060 



Shortly after the ad for 
the Sabtronics Model 
2000 digital multimeter ap- 
peared in 73 Magazine, I 
sent in my check for one. I 
suspect that quite a large 
number of other people 



did the same, since my 
order was delayed several 
weeks. When the DMM fi- 
nally arrived, I assembled 
the kit and, to my surprise, 
it worked the first time I 
turned it on. After calibra- 
tion, using the supplied 
resistors as references, the 
meter's performance com- 
pared quite favorably to 
that of a more expensive 
DMM. 

I was pleased with the 
meter for its performance, 
and pleased with myself 



for taking advantage of a 
good deal, until I noticed 
the meter would not zero 
on the ac scales- With the 
input leads shorted, the 
display would eventually 
settle down at about 0.5 
volts on the 1 0.0-volt scale. 
A quick check showed that 
all of the ac voltage and 
current scales were af- 
fected. 

At first I assumed that I 
had made some mistake in 
construction, but checking 
with two other owners of 




Photo 1 This is the displa y board of the Model 2000 DMM, showing the added transistors 
that drive the decimal points. 



the Model 2000, I found 
that they noticed the same 
problem, 

Fortunately, the design 
error is easy to correct t 
will describe the necessary 
modification, plus a relo- 
cation of the fuse holder 
and installation of nicad 
batteries and a charger for 
convenience. 

After I studied the board 
layout and schematic for 
the DMM, I tried a few 
things that looked as if 
they might correct the 
trouble, t found that if I 
unhooked the +6 volts 
that powered the decimal 
points, the meter would 
zero properly. Apparently, 
the high level dc line that 
feeds the decimal points is 
located too near the low 
level ac lines on the main 
PC board. You can see 
there is quite a mess of 
traces carrying the various 
signals to the range and 
function switches if you 
check the layout diagrams 
in the manual. 

Before I describe the 
modifications 1 made to 
the circuitry, I want to say 
that I have had no contact 
with Sabtronics on this 
matter. I hope they cor- 
rected the problem in later 
model runs, but I do not 
know. Obviously, you can 
check to see if your meter 
has the problem by simply 



138 



*6V 

t 


B49 




















SELECT SWITCHES 
(IMIN ClftCUIt BOARbl 

tm »i DPI 











Dn D*t [dpi 






-IBB'B 



L 



I 
I 
I 

_J 



DI&PLAT CIRCUIT BOARD 



Fig. 7fa| Block diagram of decimal point driver circuitry of 
the Model 2000 DMM before modificatior). 



shorting the input leads 
and punching up the 
lO.O-volt ac range. 

If you refer to Fig. 1(a) 
and compare the simpli- 
fied diagram with the 
schematic in your manual, 
you will see that the range 
and function switches 
drive the decimal points 
directly off the +6,0-volt 
line through R49 (150 
Ohms) Fig. 1(b) shows a 
block diagram of the cir- 
cuit after modification. 
The modification requires 
only three garden-variety 
PNP transistors and three 
Vi- or ^4 -Watt resistors. 
You do not have to cut or 



modify any of the traces on 

the PC boards. 

Fig. 2 shows the actual 
schematic of the added cir- 
cuitry. The transistors drive 
the decimal points; the 
switching arrangement on 
the DMM main PC board is 
now near ground potential 
and carries only the small 
base current needed to 
drive the transistors. 
Although a small PC board 
would have allowed a neat 
installation, I did not think 
it was necessary for so few 
parts- In the following 
steps, refer to the diagrams 
of the PC boards in your 
Sabtronics manual as well 






Pt49 




ORICIMAL CtRCUIT 
BFJOKEN HEnt 



DECtWAi POINT 
SELECT SWITCHES 
tMAJN CIRCUIT aOAUD) 









flUC 



DPI 

— o— 



6IIC£« 



VEJOJIV 



ADDEE> DCeiHAL POlHT 
PRIVER TRAN^lSTdflS 



ppi 



9i»e 



BB 



□PI 



L„ 



DISPLAY CIRCUIT eOAffD 



Fig. 1(bl Block diagram of the decimal point driver cir- 
cuitry of the Model 2000 DMM after modification. 




Photo 2. This pictures the rear of the DMM, showing the 
added fuse holder on the right and the charging jack and 
components on the left. 



as to the diagrams and 
photographs [ have sup- 
plied. 

Photo 1 shows how the 
transistors are mounted on 
the display board. First, un- 
solder the end of R49 that is 
nearest the edge of the main 
PC board. Bend this resistor 
straight up so that it 
is perpendicular to the 
board. Solder a short 
length of hookup wire from 
the hole where you just 
removed R49 to the ground 
lug on the input terminals 
of the front panel. Now 
remove the three wires on 
the display board marked 
DPI. DP2, and DP3. You 
can do this without remov- 
ing the board if you are 



careful. Prepare the three 
driver transistors by bend- 
ing the base lead of each 
one back over the case so 
that it is parallel to the 
other leads but pointing in 
the opposite direction. 
Solder one of the resistors 
to each base lead, I used 
lOkOhm resistors with the 
junk box transistors I had, 
but you may need to use 
smaller values (on the 
order of 2k) with some tran- 
sistors. 

Working on the back 
(side of the board with 
traces) of the display 
board, solder the collector 
lead of one of the prepared 
transistors in the hole 
marked DPI where you re- 



*6V 



"l 



I 



H49 



/7? 



OeCIMAU POINT 
SELECT SWITCHES 







DISPLAY CJHCUIT BQARQ 



fig. 2. Schematic of decimal point driver circuitry. R49 is 
part of the original DMM circuit The transistors are added 
to the back of the display PC board. R1, R2, R3: 2.2-1 OkQ 
(see textl V4 to Vi Watt Q], Q2, Q3: any silicon PNP 
general purpose transistor, such as Radio Shack 276-1604, 



139 



moved the wire previously. 
Install the other two tran- 
sistors in the holes marked 
DP2 and DP3. Solder the 
emitter leads of all three 
transistors together and at- 
tach a wire from the emit- 
ter leads to the free end of 
R49 on the main PC board, 
Finalty, solder the free 
ends of the wires you 
removed from the display 
board to the corresponding 
resistor on the driver tran- 
sistors you installed. This 
completes the decimal 
point modification and the 
meter should zero properly 
on all the ac scales after a 
few seconds. After you are 
sure everything is working 



n&OlO SHACK 



properly, you may want to 
insulate the transistors 
with some silicone rubber 
or tape. 

The second modifica- 
tion to the Model 2000 was 
simply the moving of the 
fuse holder. I manage to 
blow the fuse in my DMM 
about once a month by 
punching the current but- 
ton with the leads con- 
nected to a battery. Since 
the fuse is mounted inside 
the Sabtronics meter, 
changing it requires that 
the case be disassembled. 
Unfortunately, I could not 
train myself not to blow 
the fuse, so I did the next 
best thing — 1 mounted a 



2?4-21t 



StUCOM RECTIFIED 
N400) OR eouivALEirr 

M 




fWrNIATUflC 
PHOHS. JACK 
itADID SHACK 
274 -2a« 



±^4 c-ce:ll 

NICAOS 



I 



Fig. 3. Charging circuit for nicad batteries instalied in the 
Model 2000 DMM. Adjust R4 for WO-mA charging car rent 



panel-type fuse holder on 
the right rear of the meter 
[Photo 2), I chose a Radio 
Shack [270-365) fuse holder 
since it extends only 05 cm 
on the back of the panel. If 
you install a fuse holder, 
short out the old one on 
the PC board. A short piece 
of a potentiometer shaft 
works very nicely for this- 
You must use shielded 
cable running to the fuse 
holder since the power sup- 
ply of the meter generates 
considerable noise and the 
longer input lead will pick 
this up. 

The last thing I did to 
the DMM was install re- 
chargeable batteries. If 
you use your meter very 
much, you will find that 
replacing batteries is not 
only a nuisance but also ex- 
pensive, 1 used some sur- 
plus ntcad C cells that I 
ordered for SI. 50 each. In 
order to charge the bat- 
teries without opening the 
case, I installed a 
miniature phone jack in 



the other panel on the rear 
of the meter (see Photo 2). 
For charging, I used one of 
the little transformers with 
which the phone company 
powers the dial lamps in 
some phones. The simple 
charging circuit is shown in 
Fig. 3. If you have one of 
these transformers [who 
doesn't?), a 12-Ohm, 
V2-Watt resistor for R4 will 
give the proper charge cur- 
rent for 1-Ah cells, ff you 
don't have a transformer, a 
Radio Shack 12 6-volt trans- 
former [273-1385) will give 
the proper 100-mA current 
with a 33-Ohm, Vj-Watt 
resistor. Do not try to 
measure the charge cur- 
rent with the batteries in- 
stalled in the meter unless 
you use another meter. 

If you make these modifi- 
cations to your DMM, you 
will have improved perfor- 
mance on the ac scales and 
the unit will be easier 
to maintain. I will be glad 
to answer any questions ac- 
companied by an SASE.B 




<DEflLER q)IRECTORY 




Fonlanft CA 

We carry thf rollowiiig: ICOM, Mkltandf Am^ 
com, DcnTroii. Kl.M, Swan. Drake . Ten-T«» 
Wilsqn, SSI. Ml'J* Hy-Cpajh, Luttir, Nye- 
Viking. a&W, Red i-Mlo wail, CuihCmft, 
M OS ley, Big Signal, f ipii, etc. Full Service 
Sec re Fantani Kli>clr€<iiic^, ftfijUl SAvm Av«., 
f aatMii CA 92335, fill 77] U. 

Saau Clin CA 

Eay ^Tca^is newest Amaieiir ftudio uort. Nevr' 6l 
iwed Amalcyr Radio mlcs & Mrrvice. We fea- 
ture Kenwood. ICOM, Wilunn, Yac^u, Allas^ 
Ten-Tec &. many marr Shft^tr RhUo, SSSfi 
Lochinvir A^e^nue, St»u Cljin CA 9505K 
147^120. ^^_^^ 

Denver CO 

Exp<rfid]etilef's pif&diie!' ElecirDiiic and 
mcchSLnical compancnti fm eompuier pcciple^ 
itfdki f^toi^lc, hAm% t&hcm buitderi, enj^eri 
moitcn. Open sU dayi a week- Giitf*K| Ekc- 
IfiiflFi C«rfi.^ 2119 ^. Uth Att., Draw CO 

New Cftslk DE 

Pmul WA3QPX, Rot* 1*'A3QL5— Smiftf 
coMteyn in soul hem New Jency» DcLiware, 
■Dd Mjaryl^iTK^ with ibc ISTiCM HOCk cif fttnaieur 
equipitieni and iccf«oriet in Delaware. 
DctawVY AmKlfur ^up^l>, 71 Mtadiow Road, 
New Cmiie Oil 1^20. ^^^TfU. 

CoIbbiImis GA 

KE^WOOD^VAESU— l>ltAKE 

TIk vofldS mo^ fincalie Amateur shqw- 
rDom! You fotlA lee tt to bdkve it! Ratfki 
Wbola^^ 2)011 Aiibuj-H AvrSDe, ColTinibEit 
GA 3tfM« S41-7««0. 



Tell ihtm you saw 
their name in 73 



Boise ID 

Alliance, Amcom. CIR^ Cushcraft, Dentron, 
Bdgecoffi, tCOM, HusUer, KDK, M¥S, NPC. 
NYE, SET, Tefj-Tet, witsdn. Vii^tum Bee* 
iTpnlci, 1109 Brvidway. Boi» ID »370fr. Bob 
W7SC 344-50M. 



Preston ID 

Ross WB7BYZ, has the Largest Slock of Amft- 
leur Gear iji ihe [nierTttdUdtaln We&l and the 
Btti Pfk'cs CaU me For all your ham ntctl*. 
Rdq DelribaliDg, 7% So, Slate, Pr^lofi 10 
«J^1. «52-M3t, 



Terre Haate IN 

Your him headquaJter^ iia&i^ in ihtr htari of 
the midwest Hoosler Ekctrnmics^ Inc^, 43B 
McmIowi ^hoppLiiK Caller ,^ P.O. Boi ^00], 
Tcm Hsnte IN 41W2, 23i-14M. 



LittielOD MA 

The hxm nore of N.E. you can rdy on. Ken- 
wood. ICQM* WOscKD, Vasii. DcoTrDn, KLM 
axnpt, BbftW fwitches & wattmetent Wtmtkr 
mcUr detcicUw?, Bcarcai. RegeACj^ antoinais bf 
LMnm, WiUon, HuFtler. GAM. TEL-COM 
Ivr. CtifKKBiiintknH & Ekctroaka.,. 675 Gml 
RH., R(. 119. Utiklon htA 01469^ 4S6-3CU0. 



Laarel MD 

We stock DnJic, Icom^ Ten-Tec* Swaa* 
TempOf Dcfilion, DSI, KPIC, l^'ilvm. Mi^Stand 
tnd OftlMT^^ CMl ton free S00H6}ga4S6. Tlht 
€omm Center, Lk.« Lanrd PiazH, Rte. Itl. 
LbkrI MD 20110^ 



St Louis MO 

Hxpcrimcnter'fi paradise! Elecironic and 
meditakal componenii for cottipuicr people, 
audici pcnplf, haim, fobol buitders, c'lperi- 
Titt!n|rrK. Op(!'in Kix day^^a wtck. Vt*itvf%y EClnr- 
irc^nlcn Corp., S12J-25 PaiLe RKd,, SU Lnuk 
M0«JIM. 42ir-«ll6. 

Camden NJ 

X-B^nd (A other frequcncJcfJ Microwave 
Componrni^ ^ Ecjuipmeni. Lahoralory Grade 
Test tn^irumemi, Power Suiiplin^ 1000\ In 
stock at all timet. BUY & SELL all popular 
makc^— HP* GR, FXR* ESL Sorcnteii, Singct, 
ac 1 ecfmnlr RKfan-li IjiIji. 1423 FtfT? Awe.* 
Camden Ni miU, 54i-4im^ 

Syracu^ NY 

m-c Deal. We Trade, Wc Diicoujii, We Fle«»! 
Yac^u. Kenwood* Dr«ke, ICOM, Ten-Tec, 
Swin, DenTron. Midtaod, CushCrmn. KLM, 
Hy-Cl*in* «t. Complete Z-wav iervici? ?hop! 
linB*lHHie Radio iMr, Iktntt Rejnir Shop} 
3106 Crkil^, Emi, SrtaettM NV 13114* 44«- 



Syrartise-Romr*Utiai NY 

Feaiurifi|: Yftnu. JC riM. Dr^ke, Alias, Deo- 
Tron, ToI'Tk. Swan* Tonpo, KLM» Hy- 
Gaiii. Motley, W»lion, Lariea,. Midlajid 
Soulhwesj TechmcaJ Productf^ You wort'i he 
disApjKiinted «iih i5qmpirtei!i/teTvif;«. Radio 
WftfitJ, Oneida foe 11(1 AkpO'it-'TtriflliiaJ 
IkiildiriK. OHiLiay NY li414. 117-2622. 



CkveUnd OH 

Need fCTii'ice on yout lite model or oid time 
equipfiMTU? We lervin oU makes and models. 
Rttei li*t.^ br. Call or ttrrte. CaniniiinkB- 
tmfl4 UnrldK In^.. 47tS *iCBle Ki!., CJr>diiid 
UH 441<r9, J^aH-6J63. 



Scran ton PA 

ICOM, Bird. CushCraft, VHF En|incer1li|, 
Anteiuia Speci agists . Barker &. Willi am son, 
CDE Rotaiprs, Ham Keys, Bcldcn, W2AU/ 
W2VS, Shure, Regency, CES Touch-Tone 
padSf Radio AmaLeur Collbookt. LmRue ^ee* 
ironies » nil Grand view St.* Scrmnii>n PA 
18509,343-2121, 

Souderton FA 

Tired of lookLtig at ads ??? Come and try our 
new and ustfd tqnipavum youj^f — ptrr^naJ 
advice from our 5tH PTf 60 yeain cocnbi itcd bam 
expcrii^nce. CIc^roHlr Ex<:haiiKe, 136 N . Mala 
St>>Soader«op PA l«%4. T23-12IW. ^ 

Houston TX 

Bxpemoestea'^ paradi^t Elcaronlc and trie- 
chanical components Tor computer people, 
audio peopEe, hnta^t robot builderik* at* 
perirwenlOT. Open -ii^ dayi a week. Cpatriray 
EkctTDi^a Eae.» B9J2 ClatlcEr^t, HoiudHi J% 
77063.^71-6575. 

Port Angeles W A 

Mobile RFl dudduif fov dtmirmion of i|EJtUh 
tion and ahrmator noisc$< Bandtnf itrapi, 
CoBipaoenti for '^do-it-youndr* projects^ 
Plenty of hvK advice. Ei4ti EBuEnmlit^,. f 39 
Maflae Dri«e, Pwt A^|||Ib tt A 98J62. 457- 

H^ 



DEALERS 

Your C omp aq mame aftd rmess^r csm contatfi 
up to 2S HWifr f&t m tiak m $150 j-rorfjc 
fprepaidh or fl5 ptr motith fprtpnid 
qu^tttfty}^ So matrkm of maU-oft^ biaiittss 
or ipva code permit Jed- Dfrwctaty uxi and pay- 
msfst rmtsf raadi us 43 dajfs in mtNmct cf 
pubikslion. For example, advitrtauit /or f Ae 
Atuptsj tssiig must bf in our tvutdi bj jam' 
iStft. Maii to 73 Ma^o^ne, Ptferb^rmi^ NH 
03458, AITS: Aline CotttM. 



140 




ALL THE MOST WANTED FEATURES 
AT A MOST WANTED PRICE 



BIG Vt' HrGH LCD DISPLAY 

USE INDOORS OB OUT 

200 HOUR 0V BATTERY LIFE 

AUTO ZERO, POLARITY, 
OVERRANGE INDICATION 

100 mV DC RS. SENSITIVITJ 

19 RANGES AND FUNCTIONS 





Removable cover 5t€ 
set fyrnishecJ as part or 




Ava liable ai ■ ct ■ b b t < i m - s i no I ud ^ 
adBpter, padded vinyl carry in 
40K V DC probe. lO Amp OC b. lu - 






HICKOK 



I 



lor prote 



Here is the handfutl of 
accuracy you Ve been 
waiting for. Hand- 
somely encased *a 
Compact, Efficient. 

^O^Iy 8 ounces. ^ 
Hickol<^s exciting. 
^ new LX 303. 3]^ 
" digit Mini-Multime- 
ter with high quality 
components, one 
year guarantee 
and rugged Cyco- 
iac- case offers 
features previously 
^ found only in ex- 
^>ensive units, . at a 
price under $75.00! 
So why wait any 
longer? The 
amazing LX 303 
is here, NOW! 
Another American 
made test equip- 
ment breakthroug _ 
from Hickok. The Value 
Innovator Order today! 




SPECiFICATJONS! 

DC VOLTS (5 RANGESJ: ImV tc 

^0-5%rdg*0 :ped 

input IkVexct.- ,Y>rr\M 

AC VOLTS ^^^''^ ^n-f^v > 

± 1 .0% rds 

input: 600V, 

RESISTANCE (6 LOW 

20Mil; Accurac'. 

on 20Mn rang' 

ranges 

DC CURRENT f6 RANGE 

Accurac;, 
DIMCNSIONw 

hswKOK MO auap 



atjteju) or 



sec. 



nc 



Jk c fbutor or order below 




TO ORDER CALL TOLL FREE 
800-223-0474 



36 Z1Z-687-2224 

tmetars — 




ADC 

7 KV ^w 

Bift my: 
Account 



^ni Shun! „.. 
Mastar verge 



WP^^^"^""^ 



@ 74.95 ta 
% 7.50 ea 
@ 7,50 ea 
i® 14.95 ea 
# 14.05 ea 
^ 35.00 e« 



\/lSA G 



Exp. Date. 



I 



Address 



Slii# 



Zia 



Add S3,00 PoaiBge a^iiJ Handling. NY residefils add ssies tsk 



DEPT 73 



Turn Signal Timeout 

eliminates two-wheeled embarrassment 



Thirty seconds is the limit 



Howard R, Worthinglon KIOTW 
17 Fremont Si. 
Ojtford MA 01540 



s there a motorcyclist 
who has not felt dumb 



and hazardous after dis- 
covering that he has had 
his turn signals on for five 
minutes after making a 
turn? Here's a simple cir- 
cuit to time them out in 
thirty seconds, if you 
forget, A few new bikes 
have a similar device; some 



riders install an audible in- 
dfcator— but this is not 
dignified, honking away. 

The 555 is used as a stan- 
dard monostable timer 
from the Motorola Linear 
iC Data Book, Refer to the 
schematic. When the turn 
signal switch is turned on. 




Photo of the turn signal timeout 



pins 2 and 4 go high, which 
starts the timer and begins 
to charge C2. Pin 3 is 
high, keeping the relay off. 
When C2 is charged to 2/3 
Vcc — thirty seconds in this 
case — pin 3 goes low and 
sinks the relay coil which 
opens the turn signal cir- 
cuit. When the turn signal 
switch is turned off, pins 2 
and 4 go low^ which resets 
the 555; at this time Q1 
turns off and prevents C2 
from being charged, so you 
will have a full 30 seconds 
of flashing time at the next 
intersection. 

C3 is needed to prevent 
false resetting while flash^ 
ing. My theory is that Cl's 
delay keeps pins 2 and 4 
high enough to prevent 
resetting during the time 
when the flasher opens the 
circuit Somehow, CI has 
to be electrolytic; a 
tantalum-type does not do 
the job. Too large a CI 
causes a long reset delay. 

Due to variations in for- 
ward voltage drop among 
silicon and germanium di- 
odes, and due to variations 
in flasher rates, I suggest 
that the Ql base resistor be 
a 250k trimpot. I found that 
it should be set at 80k us- 



142 




Hustler amateur fixed station antennas. 



When you're transmitting and receiving around the 
globe, only the finest wfll do. Long distance com- 
munication demands the high quality you find in 
every Hustler antenna. 

Hustler fixed station antennas have gained a world 
wide reputation of superior performance through 




advanced design, precision constructionp all- 
weather durability plus quality components such 
as all stainless steel hardware and heat treated 
seamless aluminum tubing. 

When a Hustler amateur fixed station antenna 
goes up, you can be sure the very height of quality 
is reached. 



Clearly the choice of those who know quality. 

neuu-tfonics corporation 

15800 Commerce Park Dr • Brookpark, Ohio 44142 



>^H3e 



ing 1 N91 4s, and 1 80k using 
1 N34s, in order to keep Q1 
on, and thus charge C2. The 
exact resistance required is 
quite critical, but provides 
reliable operation, once 
determined. 

Time-out is determined 
by the formula: T($ec.) = 
1.1 X R1 X C2. R1 Is in meg- 
ohms, C2 is in farads, and 
tolerances of components 
require experimentation, 
which explains my six-sec* 
ond dtscrepancy from the 
formula. 

Any DPDT relay with 
5-Amp, or so, contacts, and 
12-volt coil should do, 
keeping in mind the 
20OmA sinking capability 
of a 555. I used a Potter & 
Brumfietd R10-E1 X2-V185. 

I epoxied the relay to 
vectorboard, on which all 
components were mount- 
ed; this was stuck into a 
1-5/8" x 24/8" X 2-3/4' mini- 
box from the junk box. The 
six leads were brought out 
to a barrier terminal strip 
on the box. The box was in- 



stalled under the left side 
cover of a Kawasaki 900 
where, conveniently, there 
were two unused welded 
nuts on the battery box. 
After installation, my hind- 
sight saw that there was 
space for the entire kludge 
under the tank. The circuit 
could be made much 
smaller for other machines, 
if called for. 

Wiring to this bike re- 
quired cutting the left and 
right turn signal wires after 
the switch; these were 
found in a harness under 
the fuel tank. These four 
points are then connected 
to the NC relay contacts, 
keeping in mind which is 
"in" and "out" for sensing 
purposes. 

For fully solid state, I 
don't see why 2N3055-type 
transistors could not be 
used instead of a relay, if 
you want to tolerate their 
voltage drop. Knowing 
555s, possibly the timer 
should be set longer for 
cold weather riders 




Schematic for the turn signal timeout 



It works! It's imperfect, 
and requires resetting in 
traffic jams, tt even seems 

to make itself unnecessary 
by making one more con- 



scious of its purposel 

Credit is due to K11CU 
for his idea, and for the use 
of his Kaw as a guinea 

pig ■ 




THE FIRST CHOICE IN 

REPEATER CONTROL 

The Power ond Flexibility of Microprocessor Technology 

AUTOPATCH, REVERSE PATCH, SMART ID, ACCESS CODE 
MUTING, MORSE CODE ANNOUNCEMENTS, FLEXIBLE 

FUNCTION TIMEOUT, COURTESY TONE, UNKING, 
CONTROL OP. FUNCTIONS, TWELVE USER FUNCTIONS, 
... AND MUCH MORE. 

Call or write for specificalions; 

MICRO CONTROL SPECIALTIES (617) 372-3442 

^m» 23 ELM PARK GROVELAND, MA. 01834 



QUASAR VIDEO 
TAPE RECORDER SALEI 




FOR BEST PRICE AND 
FAST DELIVERY 

CALL 





toll free 
^ VHAMLRAQIOjCENl 



-^Records to two hours, color or bloch & 
whlcfr 

* Records off the of r— record one pro- 
grom while watching onother 

• Comero Input to n^oke your own 
topes 

# Con be used with optionof cirrrer while 
you ore out 

* Pouse contfof for editing 

• Limited supply — ihese SI. 000 VTRs 
were demonstrators Cr come with new 
warrantee , . , S499 
HOO worth of new blonk tope will 
be Included ot no extra chorge! 

13 ShJipp4rDg chQjrgn p»r OFd*f • ho C0.D^ 

Bill: n MC D Visa D Ame^t 

I Credit card # 

■ Exp. dale 

_ Signature 

Name 



I 



k, , ^ I- ' r '..' 



*^H2 



Address 
■ City 



TUFTS 



state 



Zip 



a^i^j. LikiLttiamLi 



209 S, Mystk Av# 

1(600)225-4428 
(61?) ^5-^260 



.1 
I 
I 

I 

J 



.^13 



144 



tf>^ R&at^ Senf/ce— seff p6ge 795 



• « • ^ • • 



B-3 
niuu 



Bl- 



acf d a new dimension to your present gear 



Drake WH-7 
Directional 

RF 
Wattmeter 



Model 1514 Drake WH-7 

• 1.8-30 MHz ctjverage • Through- 
line, versatile, lab accuracy, low 
cost • Removable coupler for 
remote metering • Includes four 
calibrated scales: three for rf 
power from QRP to high power 
(0-20. 0-200 and 0-2000 W full 
scale) and one for direct reading 
VSWR • Line impedance: 50 ohm 
resistive • Power: 2000 W 
continuous • Accuracy: ± (5% of 
reading + 1% of full scale) • Size: 

5.3 "H X 6.9"W X 7.5"D (13.S x 17.S x 
19 cm) 'Wt: 3 lbs (1.4 kg) 

$89.00 



Drake 7077 

Dynamic 

Desk 

Microphone 



Drake "Dry" Dummy Loads 



•^ J i I < 



> # > i ' 



-V.V.'A".*r 



i **'■' 



*■** 



n#' 



Drake 
DL-1000 



no oil 
required 



Drake 
DL-300 




Drake 7077 

•Audio and level charattedstics 
custom designed to match the 
transmit audio requirements 
of the Drake TR-7 • Features 
both VOX and PTT operation 
without modification • High 
Impedance • Includes coll cord 
and plug wired for direct 
installation to the Drake TR-7 
• Style and color provide a 
beautiful match to the Drake 
7-Une» Size 4.3"Wx 5.8' D x 
9.3 "H {10.9 X 14.7 X 23,6 cm). 
m.tlb.7oz.(650g). 

$45.00 



arrtf Bpeciftcatmns sutjeci to chsnge wftftoutmttce orotngstfm. 



Model 1551 
Drake DL-1000 

• 1000 watts for 30 seconds, 
with derating curve to S 
minutes. Designed to accept 
Drake FA- 7 cooling fan for 
extended high power 
operation • VSWR of 1 -Sd 
max- 0-30 MHz* Provided 
with SO-239 coax connec- 
tor, and rubber feet for 
desk or bench use* Size 14 x 
3.6" (35.6 X 9,1 cm). Wt. 2 lbs 
(910 g) 



Model 1550 Drake DL-300 

• 300 watts for 30 seconds, 
with derating curve to 5 
minutes* Built-in PL- 259 
coax connector for direct con- 
nection to rear of transcefver or 
transmitter-no jumper coax 
necessary* VSWR of 1.1:1 
max. 0-30 MHz 1.5 max, 30-160 
MHz * Ideal as bench test 
device for amateur or commer- 
cial hf and vhf gear. • Small size 
fits conveniently in any field ser- 
vice tool box. 6.7 X 2,08" (17.0 x 
53cm).Wt.11oz(310g) 

$19.95 




Df1 



For a FR£E Drake Full Line Catalog contact your favorite Drake Dealer. 



R. L. DRAKE COMPANY 




DRAKE 



I® 



540 Richard St, Miafntsburg. Ohio 453^ 
Phone: (513) 866-2421 • Telex- 288-017 



p^ Reader Service — see page t95 



145 




MESSAGE MEMORY KEYER 






Tha World's Greatest 
Sending 




Adjustable to 
Any Destred Speed 

Now avaHabte from Patomar Engineers 
— \hB new Electronic IC KEYER. 
HtQhEy prized by profesaional oparelors 
because it Ib EASIER, QUICKER, and 
MORE ACCURATE. 



It tfan8fnlt» with amazing ease CLEAR, 
GLEAN-CUT ftlQfiaJft at any dedlrad 
speed. Saves the arm. Prevents cra/np, 
ml enables anyorve to avid with lh# 
skill of an expart. 



^ SPECIAL ^ 
^^ RADIO MODEL ^ 



Equipped with large apeclafly Gon* 
atructed contaci points. Keys any 
amaieuc transmitter with ease. Send! 
Manual, Semi -Automatic, Fully Aulo- 
matlc, Dot Memory ^ Dash Memory, 
Squeeze, and iambic — MORE FEA^ 
TUHES than any other keyer, Haa bulft- 
In didetone, speaks, speed and volume 
oantrols, BATTERY OPERATED, heavy 
fielded die-cast metal case. Futly 
ADJUSTABLE COKTACT SPACINQ 
AND PADDLE TENSION. The perfact 
paddle ti^uch will AMAZE yoy. 

Every amateur and Ikonsed c^idrator 
should know how to send with th^ K 
KEYER. EASY TO LEARN. Sent any- 
wtwre on receipt of price. Free t)ro- 
chure sent on request . 

Send check or money order. IC KEYER 
SB7.50 In U.S. and Canada, Add $3.00 
shipping /hand ling. Add sates lax \f% 
Caiifomla. 

Fully guaranteed by the world s oldest 
manufaclurer of electronic keys. 

ORDER YOURS NOW! 



Palomar 



Box 455. Escondido. CA. 92025 
Phone: [7141 747-3343 




Model # TE20I 



$69.95 



Featureo: 

m Advanced CMOS message memory 

• fwo (50 char, each) message 
storage 

• Repeat fa net ton 

• Records at any speed — pfBys back 
at any speed 

• Longer message capactty 
Exampte: send CQ CQ CQ DX de 
WB2YJM WB2YJM K—then play 
second message on contact — de 
WB2YJM QSL NY NY 579 579 Paul 

Pavf K 

• Use tor da/ty QSOs or contests 



PLUS; 

• Stateofthe-artCMOS keyer 

• Se/f compietlng dots and dashes 

• Both dot and dash memory 

^ Iambic keying with any squeeze 
paddle 

• 5 50 wpm 

^ Speed, volume, tone, tun^ and 
weight con fro is 

• Stdetone and speaker 

^iow currertt dram CMOS battery 

Qperafton—poftabie 
Deluxe quarter-mch jacks tor key- 

iftg and output 

• Keys and block and sohd state rtgs 
mWiRED AND TESTED FULLY 

QnARANTEED - LESS BATTERY 



t*<S 



9^ 



Jif> 



^ 







Speetfp weight, fofte. ¥ofvme tune conttots & sitfelone and] 

speaker 

Semisutomartc *'6yg'* opera f ton S stratght kefing—rear 

fianet swttcti 

Lqw curmnt tf/ain CWOS ftaffery opera f ion —portafife 



Features: Deluxe CMOS 

Electronic Keyer 

I SiAt9-i}t'theart CMOS ctfcui try 
I S6tf e^mf^f Bring dots attd d4sti9S 

|| Both dor anti dasti memory # DetuKe Quartitf tncti iacks for Heytng and Qutpuf 

► lAMBtC h9fing wm any si^ueeie pMddfeB f^^Y^ gnd fi/oc* and sohd sram rigs 
5-50 wpm # Wired and tested— tuUy guarameed^te$$ bvitery 




Model # TEi21 



$36.50 



Features cmos euctronic keyer 

• Stateot the art-CMOS circuitry 
^Setf compieting dots and dashes 
^Dot and dash memory 

miambtc keymg with any squeeze 

paddle 
mS'SO WPM 

• Speed, volume, tone controls, side 
tone and speaker 



Low cunent drain CMOS battery 
operation 

Deluxe quarter inch tacks for key- 
mg and output 

l-landsome eggshell white 
base — woodgrain top 
Compact and portable t7iB% 4-li4 
X ^U4 

Grid block keying 
Wired and tested— tufty 
guaranteed --less battery 



FEATURES; 

• Twtn paddle squeeze key 

• Extra heavy base— non-skid feet 

• Adjustable contact spacing 

• Touch tension — comfort keymg 

• Smooth friction free paddle move- 
ment 

• Handsome crinkle firtish base and 
rich red paddies 

• Ffve way bmding posts 

• Use With Trac CMOS keyer or any 
keyer 




$25.95 



RAC 



47 rOVR DEALER OR SEtiD CHECK OR MONfr ORDER. 





ELECTRONICS, INC 
1106 RAND BLDG. 
BUFFALO NY 14203 "' ' 



146 



(^ Reader Service — see page 195 



Call or Write for Delivery or Quote 



YAESU FT101ZD 



ft*ifttffttittttitHi*t-: 'I I lir I (liliiiii 1 1 1 liililt ll1\1%V\li 



iffii/iiiift 
iiiiiitjjti* 




MADISON 

ELECTRONICS SUPPLY, INC. 

150e McKfNNEY • HOUSTON, TEXAS 77002 

713A65«026a 



^M3S 



LEAVE A MESSAGE & WE'LL CALL YOU BACK! 



TR-128 

*RTTY Regenerative 
Speed Converter 



TIL compatible connections for direct hook-up to tlie 
Ftesher TU-170, also adaptable to other terinlnal 
units. 



• 60. 67. 75, 100 WPM and 
110 BAUD ASCir 

• Stable cfysial-cofitrofled 
oscillator 

• 128 Character storage ca- 
pacity wWh stomge status 
meter to show buffer fill 

« Pre-loads and repeats up to 
128 characters 

Prices good thry June 30. 1979 



• Has conlNitJoyslv variable 
ciiardcter rale 

• Low powfif CMOS circuitry 

• One- board ^ total circuitry J 
conslructlon 

• Power requirement: 115V 
60Hz, 5W 

TR-128 TR-t28 

KM $169.95 Wfred $239,95 



fTWBtf cnar^e 



FhshBr products . . , thB critics choice! 

Fleshes cor p. 



K^FS 



VISA 



Code Made Ecisyb 

To really master code, get Pickering Code Master instruction 
tapes. They're easy to use, easy to iearn. compleTe and reliable 
But don't jus! take our wofd for it, ask any ham. Or order a set 
and see for yourself. 

CM-1 Novfce. A complete course with 5. 7 and 9 WPM code 

group practice 

CM*1^^ Generaf. No roslruction. just practce. y? hr at 11 WPM, 
1 hr at 1 4 WPM and v? hr. at 1 7 WPM Tape includes coded groups 
and straight text. 

CM^2 Extra Class. Mostly straight text, some groups. 1 hr. at 
20 WPM, '/? hr. at 25 and 30 WPM, 

A)l courses are two hours long and come with key sheets for 
checking problem areas. 

To order, send your check, money order. Master Charge or Visa 
number (along with card expiration date) to Codemaster, Specify 
number and quantity of tapes desired. Tapes are $7.95 each, 
two for $14, and three for $1 9. Also specify T reei or cassette. 
Well send your tapes post paid by fourth class mail First class, 
Canada and Mexico orders, add $1 per reel, 50C per casse tte. 
To order by phone, call {401 ) 683'0575. 
Rl residents, add 6% 
sales tax 

Pickering 

Codemaster Co., 

P O Box 396 D. 

Portsmouth, R,L j^ . ^^^^♦'Srfi^ 

02871 J^ y^i*^ 

Pickering Codemaster. Your key to code. 





TUNE in with DAVIS 

FREgUENCY COUNTERS 



NOW , , . for the FmST TIME 
RECEIVE FREQUENCY ADAPTER 



7208 10 Hz lo 600 MHz MINI COUNTER 

All Meiai Cabinei • ti Dig»i 4 lED neadouT 

115VOI 1?V operation •lit Sec Gate Ttmes 
' AuTumatic DP m SiaDiti- Crystal Ttrrwbase + l ppm^C 

720BKit l^i^^g*'^' 720eA Ass#mbl«d S199 9S 

Ophons: PfOQ Crystal Oven (OCXOl* i 1 ppm 1D= to 50" C S39 95 

Mi'Cad Battery 8uitl-m with t.t>^ge« S3S 95 

Handle 5500 

VHF-UHF Pf<*amp SIO.OO 

^4QV S10.00 

R#c@«v«> Ffj?mi^ncv Ada pre* S49.9$ 



OCXO - achfeve Superior Trequencv stabiMty through rfie use 
oi proportional control oven which maintams the crystal at a 
stable temperature. 



CALL FACTORY DIRECT 
1-716-874 5848 



TERMS Add 33,.a0 shippmp !0 U.S A Canada. Other coun 
I r 195. add 1 0°u to tgral prlcQ. N,Y. Stm^a residents add 7% %Bia^ 
tAin. C.Q.D. Fee $1,00. P O, acc^pttird from rated compam^t. 



loflmmsi 



I minp. ■''^flil 



P.O, Box 976, Topeka. Kansas 66601 (91 3> 234-0198 



DAVIS ELECTRONICS 

636 Sheridan Drtve 
Tonawanda. New York 141 50 
(716)074-5848 ^^^^ 



no* CQUNTFi 



WQIUHBB 



• a 



t^ R&sO^ Service— see page f95 



147 



Looking M/est 



from page 6 

along these lines is a far t3etter 
alternative than brule-force 
vigitanifsm, which lowers those 
involved to the level of the of- 
fender himself. 

Finally, to those who still feel 
Scott Lookholder got off easy, 
let's look at the overall picture. 
Lawyers I have spoken with tell 
me that a viable estimate of his 
legal costs would be between 4 
and 6 thousand dollars. Add to 
this another thousand to satisfy 
the fine, and financially it may 
have cost him close to $7,000, 
Only he and his attorney know 
for sure. Then, loo, he has lost 
the use of something many of 
us hold dear: the ability to com- 
municate via his amateur sta- 
tion. Remember, the court made 
it a provision of his probation 
that he not utilize his amateur 
privileges for at least a year. 
There is also the possibility that 
the FCC will begin proceedings 
to revoke his license, thereby 
making his QRT period perma- 
nent. Nobody knows if this will 
happen, but it is a distinct pos- 
sibility. Ho, Scott Lookhoider 
did not get off easy by a iong 
shot, H cost him dearly, and 
hopefully it will be a lesson to 
others who have thoughts of en- 
gaging in similar illegal activi- 
ties. 

While we are on the subject 
of malicious Interference, I 
would like to discuss another 
new type with you for a moment. 
One might almost call it "legal 
Interference/' but it Is morally 
wrong nevertheless. It usually 
shows up when a group of two 
or three who want to see just 
how much they can get away 
with takeover and monopolize a 
given repeater. They carefully 



structure their remarks so as to 
not violate any rules and regula- 
tions as set forth by the Com- 
mission, but nonetheless their 
statements are constructed in 
such a way as to ''get the goat" 
of all others who may be listen- 
ing. Usually, they wiH not recog- 
nize breakers, and those who do 
make it in find themselves ha- 
rassed In one way or another. 
These bothersome people play 
It strictly by the rulebook, In^ 
eluding proper station identifi- 
cation at the prescribed inter- 
vals. They always "stand on 
their constitutional right of free- 
dom of speech" and in doing so 
take away yours and mine. If 
this sounds all too familiar, then 
you have such a faction in your 
home town. 

What can be done about 
them? First, aU of us have to re- 
member thai our amateur li- 
censes are not a guarantee of 
freedom of speech. Rather, It is 
a privilege to communicate 
granted by our government, and 
it can be revoked any time the 
government sees fit. There are 
no rights stated or implied. 
Herein lies at least part of the 
solution. Since a repeater Is not 
a public utility, the licensee is 
under no obligation to provide 
this service to those he deems 
are abusing it. The repeater 
owner-operator has one very ef- 
fective weapon at hand: the 
ability to take away the toy from 
those who do not appreciate it. 
Many owners hesitate to take 
such action, fearing that a time 
will come when some user will 
want to make an emergency call 
and the system will be off. True, 
this can happen, but if the same 
amateur wants to make this call 
and the repeater is being 
abused by those who do not re- 



spect it, he will have no better 
chance then anyway* It Is up to 
the technical minds who pro- 
duced the myriad of FM relay 
devices which now stretch the 
length and breadth of this na- 
tion to fulfill their obligation to 
the amateur community by ini- 
tiating a cleanup of the bad on- 
Ihe-air operation. If they do not^ 
and if abuses continue to grow, 
they will only have themselves 
to blame when the ax falls — 
when the FCC and other govern- 
ment agencies start to do It for 
them. Repeater owner-oper- 
ators have more than just a 
technical responsibility to erect 
and maintain a system. There is 
also a moral obligation to en- 
sure the proper utilization of a 
given system. If they fail in this, 
they should not be permitted 
the privilege of continued sys- 
tem ownership. The day in 
which a repealer owner-opera* 
tor can isolate himself from the 
rest of the amateur community 
is long gone. His responsi- 
bilities are ciear-cut and he 
must discharge them for the 
good of the community, 

THE SOME'PEOPLE-NEVER- 
LEARN DEPARTMENT 
Maybe it would be better to 
call this **Once Involved, Always 
Involved/' This might be 
the motto of Bob Thornburg 
WB61JPI. After two years of po- 
litical hiatus, Bob was elected 
earlier this month to the chair- 
manship of TASMA, the organi- 
zation which replaced the old 
SCRA in the middle of 197a. Bob 
sees his job as one of uniting 
the vafious special Interests 
which abound on two meters. 
Frankly, It looks as If he has hts 
work cut out for him. While 
Association membership by 
those involved m other aspects 
of two meter operation has 
been steadily on the rise, re- 
peater owners seem to tm stay* 
ing away as if to protect the or- 



ganizational structure change. 
Late last year, just around the 
time of the change, a rather vile 
letter was circulated to many or 
all area repeater owners calling 
for the destruction of the SCRA 
and its new open-door policy 
and "a return of political power 
to those competent to adminis- 
ter it:" The letter went on to give 
steps which should be taken by 
repeater owner-operators to en- 
sure that the above would in- 
deed happen. However — and 
this Is very Important— the let- 
ter was basically unsigned, a 
condition which thus destroyed 
Its overal! credibility. Whether 
this letter has had anything to 
do with the lack of organiza- 
tional interest on the part of 
repeater owneroperators can* 
not be determined. One thing is 
clear They are staying away, 
and Bob will have quite a job 
during the next twelve months 
trying to bring them back into 
the fold. It won't be the first llm© 
that Bob has pulled off a mira- 
cle. He is very adept in that re* 
gard. Can he do it? If he can't, 
nobody can. 

Already, Bob has support 
from virtually every other seg^ 
ment of southern California's 
two meter society ^ including the 
weak-signal people and repeat- 
er-user groups. Indeed, he is a 
very popular and well-respected 
individual in this area who hon- 
estly cares about his fellow 
man. He has taken on a very big 
responsibility, and we wish him 
welL 

It's hard to find a reason for 
this lack of initiative on the part 
of this area's two meter repeat- 
er owners. No one reason 
seems to predominate. Some 
speculate that many of the old- 
liners who helped start volun- 
tary coordination are just tired 
of the political arena and want 
out. As with any organization, 
attrition aiong these lines Is to 
be expected. No one group of in- 




In attendance at the TASMA meeting were Jim Rieger WA8EZL 
and ED Tippler WABKYZ. Jim is probably the nation 's best authori- 
fy on iinear translators. 




Marlene Thornburg WDSFBl sips soda as Herb Gordon WBKBDex^ 
plains her new duties as TASMA treasurer. 



148 



dividuals can be expected to 
stand in front of the firing line 
forever. In other cases, it's ob- 
viously apathy. They have their 
systems operational and noth- 
ing else concerns them. Why 
should they get involved? They 
need involvement like they need 
a headache. More predominant, 
however, is an unspoken senti- 
ment which seems to say that 
the organization no longer rep* 
resents those whom It was es- 
tabJished to protect— the south* 
em California repeater owner- 
operator— and that opening vot- 
ing membership to all interest* 
ed amateurs has weakened the 
political position of the repealer 
owner. Therefore, why should 
an owner-operator bother to 
keep membership in an orga- 
nization in which he is no longer 
in the majority position. This 
was the view stated in the letter 
discussed earlier. 

It's interesting to note that 
the 220*SM A, which was formed 
at the same meeting, suffers 
none of these ills. T?ie 220 peo- 
ple of thfs area, system owner 
and spectrum user alike, seem 
very together in their goals and 
viewpoints. Structurally, the 
two organizations are almost 
identical, yet 220 keeps its re- 
peater owners as members 
while two meters can't Why the 
unity on 220 not found on two 
meters? Is ft because all 220 
spectrum users see the US 
WARC proposal as a common 
enemy? Is It that they have 
watched the development of 
two meters and have sworn that 
the same pitfalls will never oc- 
cur on 220? No one can rightly 
say. However, at this time, the 
220 people ot this area are far 
more together than any other 
group. Perhaps it's time for 
everyone to step back and take 
a good look at what has put 
them in such a position. The 
220'SMA is going strong, and 
we can all learn from them. 

All the above might lead you 
to believe that two meters in 
this area is in a disastrous 
state. Far from it. TASMA's 2 
meter band plan has been ac- 
c^ted without complaint, and 
While fepeater owner support is 
dwindling, support from all 
other sectors of the two meter 
society is strong and growing. 
However, making overall spec- 
trum management work takes 
the ongoing cooperation of all 
users. Those who own and op- 
erate repeaters are a key part of 
two meters, and it's to soliciting 
their active support that Bob 
and his staff will be dedicated. 

DX ON A REPEATER 
DEPARTMENT 

Southern California is known 
as an area of "'repeaters with a 
purpose/' Over the past few 
years, we have seen systems 
developed for just about every 
reason under the sun, including 



one for the exclusive use of 
school chiidren. Now, thanks to 
the Southern California DX 
Club, even HF DXers have a 
meeting ground of their own. 
According to club president 
Dave Bell W6AQ, while not the 
first system of its type in the na- 
tion, the AD6P/R system will 
serve as more than just a local 
gab channel for DXers. The club 
has great plans forth© newly es- 
tablished system, and the fu* 
ture seems bright with promise. 
Already, it is used to alert mem- 
bers as to where the rare ones 
can be found. In the future, one 
might even hear actual on-the- 
air seminars on the art of DX^ 
chasing. 

While Its prime usership )s 
made up of DXers, AD6P (144.88 
in/145,48 out) is an open repeat- 
er which invites all area ama- 
teurs as well as visitors to Los 
Angeles to utilize its facilities. If 
you happen through LA and 
want to meet some of its top DX 
enthusiasts, then drop in on the 
system or, if time permits, at- 
tend one of their club meetings, 
You will find either one a re- 
warding experience, 

ONTHE-MOVE DEPARTMENT 

Jim Hendershot WA6VQP, 
network director for Westlink, 
asks that I pass along the news 
that the new Westlink studio 
facrfitres are fully operational at 
their new location in Canoga 
Park, California. The new studio 
features such amenities as car* 
tridge tape units used to gather 
and pre-edit items for the news- 
cast and additional post 'pro- 
duction duplicating equipment 
to cut down the reproduction 
time of finished cassettes. He 
still hopes to expand the repro- 
duction facilities further when 
funds permit the acquisition of 
more cassette recorders. 

What started a year and a half 
ago as a small undertaking to 
produce a weekly amateur radio 
news program has grown to an 
enterprise which serves the 
news needs of thousands of 
amateurs nationwide. Now in 
its seventy-second week of con- 
secutive operation, the West- 
link Amateur Radio News Ser- 
vice has become a vital link in 
keeping us all informed of 
events which affect our day-to- 
day operation. It is still free to 
any group or individual who 
supplies blank cassette tapes 
in SASE mailers. For more infof- 
mation about this service, con- 
tact Jim at West I ink's new ad- 
dress: 8331 Joan Lane, Canoga 
Park CA 91 304 

HF INTERNATIONAL! 
AN OUTSIDER LOOKS IN 

II was not until after I 3f» 
ranged the interview with Norm 
and Jeanne Meuller that 1 first 
bothered to listen to the spec- 
trum HFl calls its home. CB 
channels 32 through 40, 1 ex- 



pected to hear the same type of 
"104 Good Buddy" operation 
as is found on what CBers call 
the **lower 23," but was quite 
taken aback by what I actually 
heard, Frankly, it sounded a lot 
closer to 20 or 40 than to what i 
expected. Operation seemed 
very structured and in no way 
haphazard. Other than the 
strange-sounding dual callsign 
bit (HFl members utilize both 
their assigned FCC callsign 
and their HFl call or "HF 
number"), the operation 
seemed as if it could be taking 
place on any of the amateur 
bands. 1 was shocked, per- 
plexed, and maybe a bit mad. 
After all, here I proudly sal with 
an amateur license displayed 
on the wall. Who were these 
people to play ham without 
bothering to be hams! 

The following Sunday 1 mat 
with Norm and Jeanne. Upon 
entering Norm's office, I noted 
two things immediately: an ab- 
solutely marvelous amateur 
station in one corner, and a 
large poster of Jerry Lewis 
touting HFl in relation to the 
annual MDA campaign. Inquir* 
ing, I learned two things right 
off the bat. It was indeed an 
amateur station, and Norm was 
licensed to use it. *'My god." I 
thought to myself. "An amateur 
runs HFl?" The ft4DA poster 
was also explained. HFl and its 
close to 50,000 active members 
would be participating in the 
1978 Labor Day Jerry Lewis 
telethon. I thought again to 
myselfr 'These are the bad 
guys who are out to destroy 
ham radio? The bad guys every- 
one had told me about? Some* 
thing doesn't jive. Bad guys 
don't do nice things like thisT' 

The questions I asked ranged 
from simply what was HFl and 
its goafs to what their official 
stand was on specific matters. 
Basically, here is what I learned: 
HFl is an organization of hobby- 
type SSB users operating in the 
upper portion of the 27 MHz per- 
sonal radio band. It was found- 
ed to promote the use of SSB 
communication in that particu- 
lar spectrum and to give the 
SSB CB hobbyist an organiza- 
tional structure of his own. At 
its peak, HFl boasted more than 
90,000 members, but this was 
prior to the reorganization. 
Though it is still quite large— 
probably still better than 50,000 
at the latest estimate— no ex- 
act figure was available at the 
time of the interview. 

Norm asked that I make it 
clear that H Fl does not condone 
the use of excessive and illegal 
power levels or out-of-band 
operation. In his remarks, he 
made it clear that an HF number 
does not always mean that the 
holder is a current HFl member. 
Therefore, those operating ille* 
gaily between the 11 and tO 
meter bands are not necessarily 



HFl members, though some 
may still use their HFl numbers 
issued many years ago. All of_ 
the foregoing has been reiterat-' 
ed to the members of HFl in re- 
cent membership mailings, in 
which Norm stressed the need 
lor legality in day-to-day on-the- 
air operation. Another point I 
was asked to emphasize was 
that HFl, under the current 
direction of Norm and Jeanne 
Mueller, never backed or con- 
doned in any way the actions of 
Mr Richard B. Cooper or his 
Communications Attorney Ser* 
vice. Norm's basic commentary 
was that Cooper/CAS was detri- 
mental to both the amateur and 
CB services and would even- 
tually cause both harm. Con- 
trary to popular belief in ama- 
teur circles, HFl was not one of 
Cooper's ardent supporters. 

Norm sees today's HFl as an 
intermediate ground between 
AM CB radio and the amateur 
service. He would like to see 
HFl take an active role in help- 
ing the CBer make the change, 
with as minimal an environ- 
mental impact on the amateur 
service as possible. He believes 
that the education of the transi- 
tioning CBer is the key. How- 
ever^ such education can only 
come about if the FCC acts to 
create "SSB only" channels 
wherein the AM CBer can gel 
away from the "10-4 Good Bud- 
dy" attitudes of AM and learn 
proper operation from his SSB- 
minded peers. HFl feels that if 
such were the case, actual on- 
the-air amateur-oriented train- 
ing could be accomplished (es- 
pecially if CW were permitted). 

As an amateur himself, Norm 
sees one of amateur radio's 
greatest problems today to be 
the uninitiated AM CBer who 
has the technical experlise to 
obtain an amateur license but 
has never been educated in the 
moral and operational vaiues 
which amateurs associate with 
their hobby. He specifically 
cites many of the problems 
prevalent on FM repeaters as an 
example of this lack of proper 
indoctrination. Again, in rela- 
tion to the amateur service, he 
sees this as an avenue for ac- 
tive HFl involvement. 

While HFl would like more 
SSB-oniy spectrum for its mem- 
bers, Norm does not feel that it 
should come from the amateur 
bands. Rather, HFl endorses 
proposals which would place 
such spectrum directly next to 
the current 40-channel Class D 
allocation and above it In an 
area below 10 meters (with a 
buffer zone between the two). 
HFl feels, however, that such 
can only come to pass if all HF 
members obey the current regu- 
lations as written— especially 
those regarding proper station 
identification at prescribed In* 
tervals and respect for band- 
edge and power limitations. The 



149 



■1^ 



organization knows that only a 
mass show of good faith to the 
FCC will have any meaning. To 
that end, HFI's literature con- 
stantly feminds its members of 
these precepts. 

Above all. HFl wants to be- 
come a respected member of 
the hobby radio community. 
They want amateurs especial ty 
to know that they are not the 
enemy. They want to be consid* 
ered as friends and working 
partners. It has taken me a year 
to sh down to write this, a year 
of wailing to see if I was being 
handed something substantial 
or just hot air. I have followed 
HFI's progress these past 12 
months, and what I was told a 
year ago is substantially true to- 
day. Norm and Jeanne Mueller 



are two people who are sin- 
cerely devoted to their beliefs 
and who are very positive-think- 
ing people. Under their leader- 
ship. HFi has taken many giant 
leaps toward its prime goal. 

Whether you Irke or dislike 
organizations such as HFI is 
unimportant. What does courtt 
Is that today's non-amateur 
hobby radio enthusiasts are 
responsible for a good percent 
of alt personal radio operation 
and cannot be ignored. There 
are many myths these days in 
amateur circles about how any- 
one who owns a CB radio is a 
bad guy. Myths they are. and as 
such they should be dispelled, 
There are good guys and bad 
guys in every walk of life. We 
have both In amateur radio, and 



I'm sure that Norm has both in 
HFI. What is important is learn- 
ing that we are all human be- 
ings with a common Interest, 
even though we may express 
this interest in different ways. 
HFI has said to us, *'We want to 
be your friend and work with 
you/' What will our answer be? 
You can let me know, or you can 
write directly to Norm c/o HF in- 
ternational PO Box 7576, River- 
side CA 92513. 



THE WHATEVER-HAPPENED- 

TO r?? DEPARTMENT, 

REVISITED 

Without warning recently, the 
FM and Repeater column 
seems to have disappeared 
from QST! It's well known that 
its editor, Lou McCoy W1ICP. 



has retired from active League 
duties and now lives in one of 
my favorite places, New Mex- 
ico, i sincerely wish Lou many 
prosperous years of retirement, 
as well as many more happy 
years of hamming. 

However, Lou's departure 
seems to have tett a rather big 
gap in Newington, one that 
shouid be tilted quickly. In this 
day and age, when FM ts on the 
lips of virtually every amateur, 
QST cannot afford to be without 
such a service to the ARRL 
membership. The column is 
necessary, and L speaking as 
one ARRL member, would tike 
to see it reinstated. Perhaps one 
of you reading this Is wIMing to 
offer your services to the ARRL. 
Lou did a fine job with it, and his 
act will be hard to follow. 



/Vlicrocomputer 

Interfacing 



from page 28 

This means that one subrou- 
tine may call another, in this 
way, a control subroutine may, 
in turn, call a timer subroutine. 
When the timer subroutine has 
completed its task, it causes a 
return to the control subrou- 
tine- This situation requires two 
levels on the stack, or four R/W 
memory locations, since two 
full 16^bit return addresses 
must be maintained on the 
stack while the timer subrou- 
tine is In operation: (1) the 
return address for the timer-to- 
control link, and (2} the return 



address forthecontrol-to-mafn- 
task link. The stack operations 
take place automattcatty 
whenever a cali or a returh is ex- 
ecuted. The call and return in- 
structions may be either condi* 
tional or unconditional, but 
each subroutine must contain 
at least one return instruction. 
Recall that the 8080 chip con- 
tains seven 8-bit general pur- 
pose registers, the accumuia- 
tor (A), B, C, D, E, H, and L. In 
programs where subroutmes 
are used, there may be register 
conflicts since the subroutine 
and the main task may both re- 
quire the use of a specific 



register. Sometimes this prob- 
lem may be solved by choosing 
another register, but this is not 
always possible, particularly 
when the A register and the 
flags are involved. To avoid 
register conflicts, it is possible 
to use the stack for temporary 
data storage. All of the internal 
8080 registers may be pushed 
onto the stack and popped 
back into the 8080 as needed. 
Data is stored and retrieved as 
register pairs, with register A 
and the flags forming a two- 
byte word which is treated as a 
register pair. 

The subroutine in Table 1 Is a 
time delay routine in which 
registers D. E, A, and the flags 
are stored on the stack. At the 
completion of the subroutine, 
the data stored on the stack is 
retrieved and placed back In 
the internal registers. The com- 
plementary operations of stack 



storage and retrieval are called 
push and pop, respectively. 
Notice that the stack pointer is 
initialized at the start of the 
program, before any other in- 
structions are executed. 

The use of subroutines in a 
program allows many complex 
tasks to be subdivided into 
small segments which are easy 
to link together and which 
relieve the problem of con- 
tinuously rewriting frequently 
used program steps and rou* 
tines. You will find that a per- 
sonal library of frequently used 
subroutines Is indispensible 
when you are programming. 




Corrections 



I have recently been advised 8902-8 i-f units which 1 used in 
that J.W. Miller Company no my circuit on pp. 4&4S of the 
longer has the 890TB and January, 1979, issue of 73 

fig, 1, Revised 14 circuitry, *'Buifdfng an Economy Receiver." 
Resistors are V?-W, 10%, Milter 455-kHi transformer ^2041— in- 
put 25K 600^ impedance; ^2042^output 25K ^*fQ impedance. 
Transformers are avaitabfe from J. W. Miiier Company, PO Box 
5825, Compton CA 90224. 




-REVISCO 
DACjUIT 



MILLEB 204J 



ci»eu*T 



i 



/77 



10 



210 ^Ot ^^'iSf 0* 



ZZQO 




MlLL£fi 204J 



/77 /7? 



I 



■?7i 



T2av > 



/77 



K04 

10TURM 
THIU 
POT 



1 



/TT 



" 



("Building an Economy Receiv- 
er"), 

I have enclosed a copy of a 
revised i-f circuit which does 
use currently-available compo- 
nents. 

Tom McLaughlin WB4NEX 
St. Petersburg FL 



There are two errors in my ar- 
ticle, ''A Single IC Time Ma- 
chined' which appears on page 
148 of the February issue- 



Both errors are In Fig. 15. in 
Fig, 15ta), the error is caused by 
a possible "smear." At the top 
of the figure, near the middle, 
there is a pad for the -5-V 
regulator. This pad is shown 
connected to the adjacent cir- 
cuitry by a fine line. This fine 
line (S possibly a "smear" from 
the original silk screen and 
should be removed. 

The second error will raise a 
lot of eyebrows. Basically, it is 
an inversion. The grey area of 



cmcufT 







470pr^ 
EACH 



/77 
0,1 



/7? //? 



_L ILiepF [A 



I /77 



m 



m 



2011 
KJTUPIN 

POT 



Ih 



_L ooi __ 




EJOSTWO 



*9SVIJC 



IF 6iiN 9&¥0C 



ff Saiii 93VDC 



150 



the PCB of Fig. t5(a) should be 
rotated 180" on the darker 
overlay. 

H. M. Knickerbocker K6SK 

La Mesa CA 



In response to a letter from 
one of our readers, Lee Reed 
W5VRC (ex-W4RBL), author of 
"Build An Economy Zener 
Checker" (February, 1979, page 
137), would like to comment on 
his ^ener checkmg circuit. 

The problem is the inherent 
danger of a transformerless 
line-operated power supply. 

Should the "hot'' side of the 
ac line be inadvertently con- 
nected to the '^common" side of 
the unit, as it would if the ac 



plug were inserted backwards 
into a receptacle or if the ac 
socket is miswired, it is possi- 
ble to get line voltage between 
the common side (which the 
user may be holding) and an ex- 
ternal ground. 

As a remedy for this, the use 
of a small isolation transformer 
is recommended or, at the very 
feast, a Ik 2-Watt resistor 
should be added in series with 
the fuse. 

A few dollars spent on a 
transformer is certainly worth 
the safety which it affords. 

Gene Smarte WB6T0V/1 
News Editor 



In my article in the 



September, 1978, issue 

("Nuclear Attack!"), I left out a 

very important " = " at step 193. 

Here is a procedure to fix the 

program: 

1)Load the bad program into 

memory; 

2) Press: 

GTO 1 93 

LRN 

2nd Ins 

LRN 

This will insert the " = " be^ 
tween the "B" and the "X'\ I 
apologize to alL 

I have been receiving re- 
quests for a version of the game 
to run on the Tl 58/59. I will be 
glad to send anyone a program 
fisting for this machine, provid- 



ed the request is accompanied 
by an BASE. 

Dan Everhart WA7WKA 

293 Lander Halt 

University of Washington 

Seattle WA 981 05 



In 'Impedance and Other 
Ogres" (February, 1979, page 
47, column 1), the fourth and 
fifth lines from the bottom read, 
in part: ". . . Pav - Erms x 
Cos 8/' Since we do indeed 
believe in Ohm's Law, the for- 
mula should read: PaV = Erms 
X iRMS X Cos B. To our read- 
ers and Georg Simon Ohm, we 
apologize. 

Gene Smaite WB6T0V 
News Editor 



Rev iew 



When the 7979 Radio 
Amateur's Handbook made its 
appearance last November, I 
was probably the first on the 
block to pay $9.75 and take a 
paperback copy home. The 
ARRL has put a lot of effort into 
promoting the 1979 Handbook 
as being new and different. My 
1974 edition is worn from heavy 
use and 1 moved it aside, mak- 
ing room for the newcomer, with 
a bit of reluctance. 

The most obvious change in 
the new Handbook is the size, 
Like QST, the License Manual, 
and other League publications, 
the Handbook has gone to the 
bigger BVz" x ir' format. The 
new size makes older Hand- 
books look small and unimpor- 
tant, but a quick weighing re- 
vealed that it was a scant ZVz 
ounces heavier than the 2- 
pound 1974 edition. 

Old-timers will be glad to 
know that Ohm's Law is still 
V = iR in the elementary theory 
section. The baste principles 
haven*t changed, but the theory 



chapters have been either com- 
pietely or partially rewritten. 
Both beginning and experi- 
enced hams will find the ''Radio 
Design Technique and Lan- 
guage" chapter useful. In addi- 
tion to a comprehensive discus- 
sion on tuned circuits, a glos- 
sary of radio terms is included. 

A chapter on vacuum-tube 
principles will not be found In 
the 1979 Handbook; in its place 
there is a greatly expanded 
chapter on solid-state funda- 
mentals. The Handbook editors 
have limited the coverage of 
this vast topic to those devices 
and applications that are most 
applicable to genemi amateur 
use. 

The chapter on HF transmit- 
ting contains a number of 
charts and graphs that elimi- 
nate someot the drudgery of de- 
sign calculations. The Hand- 
book's new size seems to lend 
itself well to this kind of pre- 
sentation. Throughout the edi- 
tion, graphs and charts are In- 
cluded. One conspicuous area 



is missing, however. Gone is the 
index of tube specifications and 
base diagrams. The token cov- 
erage of solid-state device 
specs has also been deleted. 

One of the most repeatedly 
mentioned attributes of the 
1979 Handbook is the "Narrow 
Band Voice Modulation'' chap- 
ter. The Handbook's coverage 
of NBVM is largely a rehash of 
the QST articles and, in some 
cases, is a word-for-word repro- 
duction. Experimenters iooking 
for parts suppliers and discrete 
filter design information will be 
very disappointed. 

In the enthusiasm for NBVM, 
such modes as RTTY, slow 
scan, and facsimile seem to 
have been forgotten. It is 
ironical that a book devoted to 
state of the art neglects even a 
short reference to these "spe- 
cialized communications tech- 
niques" that many ham/ex- 
perimenters are involved in. 
ARRL publications are sorely 
lacking in this area. 

In keeping with the state-of- 
the-art theme, the FM and re- 
peater chapter includes infor- 
mation on tone-decoding cir- 
cuitry as weil as a "practical 
synthesizer." However, there is 



no complete schematic for an 
FM transmlrter or receiver. In 
this chapter as well as in most 
of the others, the editors have 
chosen to include many subcir- 
cuits dealing with a specific 
part of a rig. 

The chapters on propagation, 
transmission lines, and anten- 
nas have been partially rewrit- 
ten. Theory sections tend to be 
more mathematically oriented 
than earlier editions, while 
specific construction details 
are fewer. 

if you are an "appliance 
operator" who doesn't care how 
your station works, then you 
may find the Handbook to be a 
waste of money. Highly knowl- 
edgeable hams looking for the 
latest In microprocessor control 
will probably be disappointed 
with the 1979 Handbook. Begin- 
ners searching for a wire-by- 
wire description on building 
their first rig may be frustrated 
with the Handbook's contents. 
Like its predecessors, the 1979 
Radio Amateur's Handbook is 
not a rigorous text on electronic 
theory; instead, it is a reference 
and idea book for hams willing 
to think. 

Tim Daniel NdRK 
Oxford OH 



FCC 



.Reprinted from the Federal Register. 



AMATiUR EXTRA CLASS UCENSi 

Eliniincitlng Granting of &*dit Toward tha Ta- 
lagrapfiy Psrtiofi vt %iiawAtiat\&n la tatmst 
Koldan of tK« AmntAur fxtra fini Clou Li- 

AGENCTT: Federal Commimlcations 
Commission- 

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemak- 
ing. 

SUMMARY: The Commission is pro- 
posing to delete §9T,25(d3 from its 
Rules. This provides credit toward tlie 
telegraphy portion of the Amateur 
Extra Class license examination t& 
holders of the former Amateur Extra 
First Class license and lis suc^iessor li- 
censes^ 

DATES: Comments shall be filed by 
April 30* 197§, and Reply comments 



shal] he filed by May 30, 1979. 

ADDRESSES: Comments shall be 
filed with: Secretary, TCC, 1919 M 
Street, N.W,, Washineion, D.C. 20554. 

FOR FURTHEH INPORMATIOl^ 
CONTACTl 

Mr PhiHp W. Savitz, Personal Radio 
Divi&ion^ C202) 632-7X75, 

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Adopted! February 14, 1979. 

Eeleased: February 27, 1979. 

By the Commission: Commissiotier 
Quello absent. 

L In accordance with the Adminis- 
trative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. 553^ 
^nd g 1.412 ol the Commission's Rules, 
the Commission hereby gives Notice of 
proposed Rule Making in the above 
captioned matter. 



2. During the period from June 1923 
to June 1933 the Federal Radio Com- 
mission Issued Amateur Extra First 
Class operator licenses. Subsequently, 
the equivalent license Issued by the 
Federal Communications Commu?sIon 
was designated '* Class A," and then 
^'Advanced." 

3. In 1952 the Commission created 
the Amateur Exti^ Class license. Ob- 
taining this license requires suecessfiil 
completion of written examinations in 
nine areas of basic, general^ intermedi- 
ate and advanced amateur practice. 
These written examination require- 
metits are much more stringent than 
those associated with the Amateur 
Extra First Class license, However, the 
telegraphy proficiency requirement 
for the Extra First license was 20 
words per minute, which is the same 
as the current requirement for the 
Amateur Extra Class license. 

4. Recognising this identical telegra- 
phy requirement^ the Commission, In 
its Report and Order in Doctet No, 
19163. released on September 13, 1972, 
amended § 97.25 fd> of its Buleg to pro- 
vide that credit for the telegraphy 
portion of the Amateur Extra Class 



exaininatlon be granted to applicants 
who present proof of having continu- 
ously held the Amateur Extra First 
ClajSS license and its successor licenses. 

5. Seetion 97.25(d) has now been in 
effect for more than six years. Recent* 
ly, the number of persons seeding ex- 
amination credit pursuant t^ this pro- 
vision has declined to the point where 
such an application is now a rarity. As 
it appears that §97. 25(d) has become 
obsolete, the Commission Is proposing 
its deletion from the Rules, effective 
six months from the adoption of such 
an order. This delay will give any 
former holder of the Amateur Extra 
First Class license who may remain a 
final apporiunlty to receive telegraphy 
credit toward the Amateur Extra Class 
examtnation. 

6. The specific rule amendments we 
are proposing are set forth below. Au- 
thority for these proposals b con- 
tained in Sections 4(i), 5<e), and 303 of 
the Communications Act of 193 4 ^ as 
amended^ We invite Interested parties 
to submit comments concerning our 
proposals on or before April 30, 1979, 
and reply comments on or before May 
30. 1979, An original and five copies of 



151 



alt comments and reply commcnlfi 
shBJl be furnished the ConimisBioa. 
pursuant to 5 1.419 of ihc Rules. Re- 
Apondests wistiiiig tach Commissioner 
to have a personal «jpy of the com- 
ments may submit sii addJtionaJ six 
eopl«C- Uembers of the public wishing 
to txprtss Int^re^ Ln ouf proposals 
but unable to proiide the required 
oopia may participate tnfonriaily by 
submit tins one copy of their cant- 
merits, wtihoui regard to form, pro- 
vided the correct Docket number is 
ipecHied Lti the headin* of the com- 
ments. Ail eommenta and reply cotn- 
tnents filed In this proceeding should 
be Bent to the Secretary ^ Federal Com- 
munications Commkslon, Wa^hln^lon, 
D,C. 20554. 

T. Individuals wlahlnfi to inspect the 
comments and replj^ comments filed in 
this proceedins may do so durlne regu- 
tar business hours, 8:00 A.M. to 5:30 
P.M., Monday through Friday, in the 
Commission 'a Pubiic Reference Room, 
19 lA *"M" Street, N.W,. Washington, 
D.C 20554, 

i. For further information contact 
Mr, Philip W. Savit^ Personal Hadio 
Divtaion, FCC. 1910 "M" Street. NW, 
Wmahtngton. D.C. 305S4* C302> 632- 
7 ITS. 

FtDE3lAL COMMUVlCATlOnS 

ConmiBstatt, 
WnxiAM J. TRicaftico. 

The Federal Communications Com- 
mliaion proposes to amend Part 97 of 
Chapter 1 of Title 47 of the Code of 
Federal Regulations as followsi 

f 67,2(1 1 Amended] 

1, In §97.25 paragraph fd) is deleted 
and para^aph ie\ Is redesignated as 
paragraph id). 



PAMl 2— FREQUENCY AUOCATIONS 
AND tADIO TREATS MATTERS: 
aENERAL RULES AND REGULA- 
TION£ 

PART 97— AMATf UR RADtO SERVICE 

AmandrnfrflH of Rul*f Concamtng tha 
Nftrthvm Morians (ttondft 

AQIINCY: Federal Communications 
Commit on» 

ACTION: Orcfer < Rulemaking i. 

SUMMARY: The Northom Mariana 
tHlands ha^ recently be«n added to the 
CommlasLlon's jurisdiction. Certain 
thari^ and tablei; In the amateur rules 
are being amended to re fleet thid 
change in the Conun lesion's jurlsdic- 
tlon. 

EFFECTTVE DATE: March 13, t»TO- 

ADDRESSES: Pederal Communkft^ 
tlof» Cora mission, 1»19 "M" St. NW^ 
WaAhinirton, D.C. 30914. 

FOR FURTHER IKPORMATTON 
CONTACT; 

Mr. Robert Ca&iler, Prtrmie Radio 
Bureau (2<^2-€34-««20), 

SUPFLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

In the matter of amendments of 
Parts 2 and *7 of the Dommisslon's 
rulea concemLng the Northern MarU 
ana Islands. 

Adopted: February 22, 197B. 

Released: March 3, 197^. 

By the Commission: 

U On January 9, £976. 9^ a step 
toward eventual political union with 
the United States as a Common- 
wealtii« the Northern Mariana Islands 
came imder the iurtsdiictJon of those 
laws of the United Staus wtiieh have 
generaJ applicabUity to the several 
Glat^ Previously^ these Islands were 
admhiEstered by the United States for 
the United Nations ai part of the 
Trust Territory of the Pacific lalands, 
and those persons seeking authorisa- 
tion to operate a radio station «ere re^ 
quired to apply lo the High Commis- 
sooner of the Trurt Tterrliory of the 
Pacific Islands. As of January 9* I97a» 
tiw ConununieailotiA Act of 1934, 
being a law ol general applicahilUy to 
the several States, t>ecame applicable 
to the Northern Mariana Luiands, and 



Jurtsdictian over radio stations on the 
Northern Mftriana Islands passed from 
the High Commissioner to the Federal 
Communications CommlssiOiL 

2- Certain amendroents to the rules 
gin'emlng the Amateur Radki Service 
in Partj 2 and 97 of the Commission's 
Rules are necesary to reflect the 
change of status of the Northern Mar< 
iazui Islands. Two minor amendments 
to Pills 2 and 91 concern the frequen- 
cy bands available to amat4!'ur radio 
operatom on the Northern Mariana Is- 
iandSw The Northern Mariana Islands 
lie in Region 3. Most of the rest of the 
tJnlled Slates lies in Region 2. Inter- 
national allocations for the Amateur 
Radio Service are different for Region 
3 than for Region 2. Footnote NG62 to 
S 2.106 and |97>ei(bK4) ftr^ being 



amended to reflect this. 

3. The other two amendments con- 
cern the use of the 1800-2fMM} 1eH2 
amateur band. Because this hand U 
shared vith the radlonarlgatlon 
CLORAH-A) Berhice, input power is 
limited according to geographic area. 
The charts in footnote NGI5 to f 2.106 
and §97.§l(bK3» are being amended to 
add the Horthem Mariana Islands to 
the list. 

4. Authority for these rule changes 
1^ contained in Sections 4Ci? and 303 of 
the Communications Act of 1934. Be- 
cause these amendments are bFLsic&Dy 
minor changes in the rule^ to reflect 
the addition of the Northern Mariana 
Islands to the Commission's Jurisdic- 
tion , the Com mission finds that, for 
good cause t the notice and public pro- 

Appewhex 



cedures provisions of the Administra- 
tive procedure Act are unnecessary (5 
OjS.C, 553(bn. For more Information 
about these rule changes, contact Mr. 
Robert Cksslcr, Personal Radio Divi- 
sion, FCC. 1919 "M ' Street, NW,, 
Washington. D.C. 20554 (202-^34- 
6020 J, 

5, Accordingly, it is ordered that, ef- 
fective Marth 13. 1979, Part 2 Mi4 
Part 97 of the Commission's Rules arc 
amended as set out in the Appendix. 

iSecSv 4, 303. II Stau. «s aoicnded, I0$fi. 
IOT2; 47 tl-S.C 154,303,1 



FedEHAL COMMUSICATiOIfa 

Commission, 

WtLLIAM J, TaiCARICO, 



Part 2 of Chapter 1 of Title 47 of the Code of Federal Regulations [A amended as follows: 
L In Section 2.106, footnote NGIS. and footnote NC 62 are amended to read as follows: 



f 2 J CMp TsMe of rr«|ucfKr nl t<K-al Iom. 

• * 

NG15* • • 

C4J* ' ■ 



Muctutm DC Putt Ihfut Powd m Watts 



An« 



11 
D«r/|ftsht 



US5- IISO 

n«4r/Niim 



iid« tsn 

CHjr/Nlslil 



1C75-19W 
fcHx 



klBE 

DoUryNUhi 



Dmjj'ritihl 



DiUr.<'t«lfht 






Ouarni, JoliruitDii. Mldwuy, NnrlliFMi 

nnmi tftnlL 9ll.llBIIII1B<IBBBBBBMJIt.Bj;iaaBJBaBaBailBai1BI!B|ipPr II 














D 



roo/as 





a 







100/ 2i 

100/ 3» 
3C0/bD 



NOfl2 Consistent with R**solution 10, Radio Regulations, Geneva, 1959, interregional amateur contacts hi this band 
should be Umited to that portion between 7000 and 7100 kH2. In the band 7 LOO to 73(J0 kHz, the provtsionja of No. 117 of 
the Radio Regulations^ Geneva, 1959, are appUcable. In addition, 7100 to 7300 ItHz is not available in the fallowing U^, 
possesalons: Baiter, Canton, Ehderbiiry, Guam. Uowland, Jarvts. Northern Mariana Islands, Palmyra, American Samoa 
and Wake Islands. 



Part 97 of Chapter I of Title 47 of the Code Of Federal Regulations is amended as follows: 
3. In Sect^n 97 Jl. paragraphs (bM3) and (bM4) gre amended to read as followa: 

Q 9TM AltlKoriied fr«iu*nri« pud eini*«iorti. 



rb> 

C2) 



• • 



Maximum DC FtJ^fE Itirur Pow«» in Watts 



AP?4 






mW 1875 


tB7&-igoo 


19019 i«afl 


1»3I» iH^O 


ta^ 107B 


1^75 lOtlO 


kUn 


fcRi 


kit/ 


k1l7. 


kll?. 


kit?. 


Dfc}i/Nliaiiii 


J>ai7NlBJit 


D«)f/NLKliL 


nay/NlRhL 


UiLV/NlffliL 


Dfty/Nlghl 



Quiim. iatuitftAD, Midway, Monhi!<ro 



' H ^ UPP^W ^* 



Anuvicui flanuM. 



fcMiaiMW 



iflo/jfi 

9 



i 



9 
9 



tW/Jfi 



ioo/m 



140/99 

tdo/ss 

»0/30 



a 

9 



a 





100. » 



(41 3900-4000 kH£ and 7100-7300 kHz are not available In the following VB- possessions: Baker, Canton, Enderbury, 
Guam. How land, Janls, I he Northero Mariana Islands, Palmyra, American Samoa and Wake lalaiKfei, 



Ham Help. 



An obviously demented 73 
author Is looking for 455-kHz i-f 
components. These may be any- 
thing from standard i^f Irans- 
lormers to moderately-pdced 
crystal and ceramic 11 iters. 

They must be easily applied 
and usable with a wide range of 
soiid*state devices^ from junk- 
box transistors to IC devtces^ — 
also, With tubes if possible. 
Tbey must give good results in 
an i-f strip used for CW and/or 
SSB receiver use. 

Manufacturers, distributors, 
or surplus dealers foolish 
enough to provide me with 
technical \T\iD, appHcation 
notes, and an easy way for 73 
readers to get their hands on 



the goodies may find them* 
selves pestered unmercifully by 
73 readers wanting to purchase 
parts to see If the circuit really 
works. 

Alexander MacLean 

WA2SUT/NNN«ZVB 

IS Indian Spiing Trail 

Danville NJ 07834 

I need help in converting a 
Drake TR-S to semi breakno 
CW. I feel that there must be 
some circuits for this obvious 
improvement of the TR-3 which 
possibly appeared in ham mag- 
azines In the &Ds. 

At present, my 15-year<jld 
TR-3 must be manually 
switched between transmit and 
receive, The successor to the 



TR-3 , the TR^, infects a tone in^ 
to the grid of the VOX amplifier 
circuit. Possibly, the same may 

be accomplished with the TR-3, 

Ron Yokubaltis WB5TKQ 

PO Box 3S54 

Austin TX 78764 

I need the RCA manual sec- 
tions for the high-band CMC-60 
FM 60-Watt ^^boat anchor" rig 
(transmitter and dynamotor 
power supply only). I will 
duplicate and return within one 
week. 

Jack Myers W3RU 

5740 Auberger Dr, 

FaiHieid OH 45014 

(513hS29-0511 

I need help with an SR-C802 
— ^the schematic diagram or 
owner's manual, preferably. 

Walt Parsans WA2ZBE 

135 Roe St. 

Staten Island NY 10310 



152 




The Sangre d© Cnsto Mounrams - ETO 'S backyard 



WHY WISH YOUH 




AIPHA? 



P^^tMiin 



«KJ»>tfM 




Q 



Ml^KM 374M 



IS SOMETHING ELSE ^ JUST AS GOOD? 

New ALPHA owners often teil us. *7 wtsh I'd saved my ttme and money and bought an ALPHA in the first ptace** 
Why not benefit from their experiences? Compare first! 

TRY TO GET ANY OTHER MANUFACTURER TO TELL YOU * IN WRITING - THAT IT'S SAFE TO OPERATE HIS 
DESK TOP LINEAR AT A FULL DC KILOWATT . . . SAY FOR 24 HOURS KEY-DOWN. OR, ASK HIM FOR A FULL 
YEAR WRITTEN WARRANTY, LOTS OF LUCK! 

YOUR NEW ALPHA WILL HAPPILY AND COOLY RUN THAT KILOWATT KEY-DOWN . . , FOR 24 DAYS IF YOU 
WISH. AND YOU'LL BE PROTECTED BY ETO'S UNMATCHED WARRANTY FOR TWO YEARS. WE PUT IT IN 
WRITING ALL THE TIME. IT'S THE WAY WE BUILD AND WARRANT EVERY ALPHAl 



The new ALPHA'S are the best we've ever built. 
Nothing else even approaches an ALPHA*m combina- 
tion of power, convenience, quality, and owner protec- 
tion. The ETO^ALPHA two year limited warranty offers 
you eight limes as much protection as the industry- 
standard 90 day warranty. 

The new ALPHA 374A adds NO-TUNE-UP operation 
to ail the other traditional ALPHA qualities and capa- 
bilities. You can hop instantly from one HF band to 
another, with full maximum legal power and with little 
or no amplifier lune-up at all! (If new amateur bands 
are added, you can manually adjust your ALPHA to 
work them, too.) 



In 1974 the original ALPHA 374 set a standard of high 
power convenience that has remained unmatched 
since. Despite its small size, not even one '374 owner 
ever burned out a power transformer. Impressive? The 
new '374 A has an even huskref power supply And it 
has ETO's ducted-air system with acoustically -isolated 
centrifugal blower to insure cooL whisperquiet 
operation. 

Before you get serious about any other brand of linear. 
compare its convenience and quality, its transformer 
hefL Its cooling system efficiency and noise level - and 
its warranty - with the ALPHA 's. Be sure to ask around 
about its reputation 

Call or write for detailed literature and thoroughly 
check out all the great new ALPHA'S . , . so you don t 
make a mistake. 



EHRHORN TECHNOLOGICAL OPERATIONS, INC 
BOX 708, CANON CITY, CO 81212 (303) 275-1613 



Conteste 



FrfiqiiencidS (kHi) 
4006,7380, 14400 



L 



from page 2t 

AWARDS: 

The ITU Trophy will be award- 
ed to the country which earns 
the highest number of points 
computed as described above. 
The country which wins for 3 
consecutive years or 5 inter- 
laced years will remain in 
possession of the trophy. The 
trophy wiil be awarded to the 
representative national asso* 
elation of radio amateurs of the 
winning country. Gold, silver, 
and bronze medals will be 
awarded to the 3 htghest- 
scorlng radio amateurs in the 
world on each mode. Certifi- 
cates will be awarded to the 
highest-sconng radio stations 
in each country on each mode. 
Depending on the number of 
contestants in each country, 



the contest committee will con- 
sider more certificates, 
ENTBIES: 

Logs Will be filled out sepa- 
rately for each mode. Logs will 
follow the standard form and 
must be mailed before 30 June 
1979. Address entries to: 
LABRE, UIT Contest Coordlna^ 
tion, PO Box 07-0004, 70.000— 
Brasilia, DF, Brazil, Logs re- 
ceived after August 30 will not 
be computed for awards. In- 
elude a QSL, a self-addressed 
label, and IRCs for personal 
contest results. Note: Look for 
specfal ITU calls worldwide! 

ARMED FORCES DAY 
May 19, 1979 

This year's observance of 
Armed Forces Day marks three 
decades of communications 
tests between the amateur 



Transmitting Station 

NAM 

U.S. Navy Communicatiorts Araa 

Master Station, Norlolk VA 

GXH 

U,S. Navy Communication Station 7394, 14520 
THUBSO, Scotland, United Kingdom 

HPG 

U.S. Navy CommynicatJon Station 4010, 7S<7.5, 13922.5 

Stockton CA 

NDT 

U.S. Navy Gommttnicatlon Station 7430, T550O 

Yokosuka, JA 



WAR 

Hiadquarters, U.S. Army 

Washington, D.C. 

A(R 

2045m Com mu meat ton 8 Group 
Andrews Air Force Sa3« 
Washington, O.C. 

Table 2. 



4030, 6997.5. 14405 



40Z5, 7315, 13997,5 



radio fraternity and military 

communications systems. 
Since 1950, this event has been 
scheduled during the month of 
May and has emphasized a con* 





Military 




Appropriate 


Station 


Frequancy (kHz) 


Emission 


Amateur Band (MHz) 


NAV 


7365 


RTTY 


7>00^7.050 


Headquarters, Navy- 








Marine Corps MARS 


14455 


BTTY 


14.25-14.35 


Wash ngtDn, D.C. 










t3876.5 (13973) 


SSTV 


14,2?5-1 4.250' 


NNNONCG 


4005 


CW 


3.5*3-65 


US Coast Guard 








MARS Radio Station 


6970 (6971.5) 


LS8 


TisSD-rioo 


Alexandria VA 










14385 


CW 


14.&14J 




20968.5 {209fl7) 


USB 


21-25-21,45 


NNNiNHZ 


7380(7381.5) 


LSB 


72'7.3 


CiNCLANTFLTMARS 








Radio Station 


14440(14398.5* 


USB 


14,M4.25 


Norfolk VA 








WAR 


4001,5 


CW 


3.5-3.75 


Headquarters, US 








Army MARS 


4020 (4021.5) 


LSB 


3775-4.0 


Washington. D.C. 










4030 


RTTY 


3.^5^3.775 




6997.5 


CW 


7.0-7,15 




14405 


CW 


14.0-14.2 




20994 (20992.5) 


USB 


21.25-21.45 


AIR 


4D25 (4026.5) 


LSB 


3.940 


U.S. Atr Force MARS/ 








SITFA Radio Station 


7305 £7306^) 


LSB 


7.25-7 JS] 


Wastiington, DC- 










7315 


CW 


7.025-7.20 




13977^ 


CW 


14.025-14.20 




14397 t1ii3m5> 


USB 


14,275-14.350 


KPG 


4001.5(4003) 


LSB 


3,7754.0 


Navy Communication 








Station 


4005 


CW 


3.S'3.B5 


Stockton CA 










4010 


CW 


3.65a75 




6989 


CW 


7.O0-7.025 




7301.5(7303) 


LSB 


7.0257,050 




7365 


CW 


7.050-7.075 




14375 


CW 


14.00-14.025 




20983 


CW 


21,0*21.2 




20998,5 (20997) 


USB 


21.27-2140 


NNNdMET 


7347.5 


RllY 


7,075-7.1 


USMC Air Statior^ MARS 








Radio Station 


13922.5 


RTTY 


14.075^14.1 


El Toro CA 








NPL 


14^0,5(14389) 


SSTV 


14.225-1 4.250* 


Navy Communication 








Station 








San Dl^go CA 









•SSTV from NAV will run from 1300-2100 UCT 19 May 1979 
**SSTV from NPL will run from 1600-2400 UCT 19 May 1979 

Table 1. 



tinuing climate of mutual assis- 
tance and warm esteem. Satur- 
day, May 19, 1979, has been 
designated as the 30th Annual 
Armed Forces Day. 

A featured highlight of the na- 
tionwide celebration will be the 
traditional milltary^o-amateur 
crossband communications 
tests. These tests give amateur 
operators an opportunity to 
demonstrate their individual 
technical skills and to receive 
recognition from the Secretary 
of Defense or the appropriate 
military radio station for their 
proven expertise. 

The proceedings will include 
operations in continuous wave 
(CW), single sideband voice 
(SSB), radioteletype (RTTY), and 
slow-scan television (SSTV), 

Special commemorative QSL 
cards will be awarded to 
amateurs achieving a verified 
two-way radio contact with any 
of the participating military 
radio stations. Those who 
receive and accurately copy the 
Armed Forces Day CW and/or 
RTTY message from the Secre- 
tary of Defense wiil receive a 
special commemorative cer* 
tificate from the Secretary. In* 
terception by shortwave listen- 
ers (SWLs) is not acknowledged 
by QSL cards; however, anyone 
can qualify for a certificate by 
copying the Secretary's mes- 
sage. 

Crossband Radio Contacts 

The milllary-to-amateur 
crossband operations will be 
conducted from 19/1300 UCT 
(tJniversal Coordinated Time) to 
20/0245 UCT May 1979. MiJttafy 
stations will transmit on select- 
ed military frequencies and 
listen for amateur stations on 
those portions of the amateur 
bands indicated in Table 1. The 
military operator will specify the 
particular frequency in the ama- 
teur band to which he/she is 
listening. Duration of the con* 
tact should be limited to three 
minutes. 



154 



CW Receiving Test 

The CW Receiving Test wilf 
be conducted at 25 words per 
minute. The broadcast will be a 
special Armed Forces Day mes- 
sage from the Secretary of 
Defense to any amateur oper- 
ator desiring to participate. A 
ten-minute CQ call for tuning 
purposes will begin at 20/0300 
UCT. The Secretary of Defense 
message will be transmitted at 
20/0310 UCT from the stations 
on the listed frequencies in 
Table 2. 

RTTY Receiving Test 

The Radioteletype (RTTY) 
Receiving Test will be trans- 
mitted at 60 words per minute. 
Radio station "AIR" will trans- 
mit using 850 Hertz (wide) shift. 
All other stations will transmit 
using 170 Hertz (narrow) shift. A 
ten-minute CQ call for tuning 
purposes will begin at 20/0335 
UCT. The special Armed Forces 
Day message from the Secre- 
tary of Defense will be trans- 
mitted at 20/0345 UCT. This test 
is to exercise the technical skill 
of the amateur operator in align- 
ing and adjusting equipment. 
Transmission will be from the 
same stations and on the same 
frequencies as listed for the CW 
Receiving Test. 

Submission of Test Entries 

Transcriptions should be 
submitted "as received," No at- 
tempt should be made to cor- 
rect possible transmission er- 
rors. 

Time, frequency, and call- 
sign of the station copied as 
well as the name, callsign, and 
address (including ztp code) of 
the individual submitting the 
entry must be indicated on the 
page containing the message 
text. Each year, a large number 
of acceptable copies are 
received with insufficient iden- 
tification information, or the 
necessary information was at- 
tached to the transcript and 
became separated, thereby 
precluding the Issuance of a 
certificate. 

Entries should be submitted 
to the appropriate military com- 
mand and postmarked no later 
than 25 May 1979. 

Stations copying NAM, GXH, 
NPG, or NDT submit entries to: 
Armed Forces Day Test, Chief, 
Navy-Marine Corps MARS, 
Btdg 13, NAVCOMMU WASH- 
INGTON, Washington, D.C, 
20390. 

Stations copying WAR sub- 
mit entries to: Armed Forces 
Day Test, Commander, United 
Stales Army Communication 
Command, ATTN: CC-OPS- 
MARS, Fort Huachuca AZ 
85613. 

Stations copying AIR submit 
entries to; Armed Forces Day 
Test, 2045th COMM GP/DONV, 
Andrews Air Force Base, Wash- 
ington, D.C. 20331. 



MASSAC HUSETTSQSO PARTY 

Starts: 1200 GMT May 19 

Ertds; 2200 GMT May 20 

This year's contest is spon- 
sored by the Greater New Bed- 
ford Contesters, A station may 
be worked once per band, with 
phone and CW being separate 
bands for the purposes of this 
contest. No crossband or re- 
peater contacts are permitted. 
Mobiles and portables may be 
counted as new contacts each 
time a county change takes 
place. DX stations count for 
QSO points only when worked 
by MA stations. 
EXCHANGE: 

RSfT) and MA county or state/ 

VE province, 

SCORING: 

All stations count 2 points for 
each completed SSB exchange, 
4 points for each CW exchange. 
MA stations multiply QSO 
points by total MA counties 
worked plus states and prov- 
inces worked. Out-of-state sta- 
tions multiply QSO points by 
total number of MA counties 
worked. As an added bonus, 
add 5 points to your total score 
for each sponsor station 
worked (WIFJI, N1AS, K1KJT); 
sponsors can only be worked 
once for bonus points. 
AWARDS: 

Certificates will be awarded 
to 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place win- 
ners in each MA county as well 
as each state. Two special 
awards will be given — one to 
the ARC with the highest aggre- 
gate score in MA (min. of 3 logs), 
and a second award to the sta- 
tion rn MA who submits the atl- 
time highest number of QSOs 
(now held by N1YY at 664 QSOs 
in 1978}. In addition, a certif- 
icate will be given to stations 
working all 3 sponsors. 
SUGGESTED FRBQUENCIES: 

CW only— 1810, 3560, 3720. 
7060.7120, 14060,21060,21120, 
28060,28120. 

Phone onty — 1820, 3960, 
7260, 14290, 21390, 28590, 
50.110, 

Use of FM simplex is en- 
couraged; CW must be in CW 
bands only! 
LOGS & ENTRIES: 

Logging must conform to 
FCC rules— date, time, band, 
mode, caMsign, state and prov- 
ince worked, exchange RST, 
Submit separate summary 
sheet along with logs. Summary 
sheet information: name, call, 
mailing address, cJub affiliation 
for aggregate score, total QSO 
points, multipliers, and total 
score. Deadline for mailing is 
June 30. For awards and re- 
sults, send an SASE to Arthur 
Marshall W1FJI, 60 Meadow 
Rd„ Westport MA 02790. 

MICHIGAN QSO PARTY 

Contest Periods 

1800 GMT Saturday, May 19 

to 0300 QMT Sunday, May 20 

1100 GMT Sunday, May 20 to 

0200 GMT Monday, May 21 



Sponsored by the Oak Park 
ARC with phone and CW com- 
bined into one contest. Mich- 
igan stations can work Ml coun- 
ties for multipliers. A station 
may be worked once on each 
band/mode. Portable/mobiles 
may be counted as new con- 
tacts each time county 
changes. 

EXCHANGE: 

RS{T), QSO number, QTH = 
Ml county or state/country. 
SCORING: 

MuftJpiiers are counted only 
once- Ml stations score 1 point 
per QSO times sum of states, 
countries, and Ml counties on 
phone. Each CW contact is 2 
points per QSO. KL7 and KH6 
count as states. VE counts as a 
country. Max. multiplier is 85. 
Non-MI stations score QSO 
points times number of Ml 
counties. QSO points are as 
follows: 1 pt. for each Ml phone 
QSO, 2 points each CW QSO, 5 
points each club station con- 
tact W8MB. Max. multiplier Is 
83. VHF-only entries same as 
above except multipliers per 
VHP band are added together 
fortotal multipliers. No repeater 
contacts allowed, but 5 points 
for each OSCAR QSO. 
FREQUENCIES: 

CW— 1810, 3540, 3725, 7035, 
7125, 14035, 21035, 21125, 
28035, 28125. 

Phone— 1815, 3905, 7280, 
14280.21380, 28580. 

VHF— 50.125, 145.025. 
AWARDS: 

Only singlen^perator stations 
qualify. Ml trophies to high Ml 
score, high Ml (upper peninsula) 
score, high aggregate club 
score. Plaque to high VHF-onfy 
entry and high mobile. Certifi- 
cates to high score in each 
county with minimum of 30 
QSOs. Out of state— high out- 
of-state trophy and certificates 
for high score In each state and 
country. 

ENTRIES: 

A summary sheet is re- 
quested showing the scoring 
and other pertinent information, 
name and address in block tet- 
ters, and a signed declaration 
that afl rules and regulations 
have been observed. Ml sta- 
tions include club name for 
combined club score. Party con- 
tacts do not count toward the 
Mi Achievement Award unless 
one fact about Ml is com- 
municated. Members of the Ml 
Week QSO Party Committee are 
not eligible for individual 
awards. Decisions of the con- 
test committee are final. Re- 
sults will be final on July 31 and 
will be mailed to all entries- 
Mailing deadline is June 30, 
1979, to: Mark Shaw K8ED, 3810 
Woodman, Troy Ml 46084. 

ACHIEVEMENT CERTIFICATES 

1979 will be the 21 st year that 
hams have had their own pro- 
gram to publicize Michigan and 
its products. Just as for the past 



20 years, the Governor will 
award Achievement Certifi- 
cates to hams who take an ac- 
tive part in telling the world of 
Michigan's unlimited re- 
sources, opportunities, and ad- 
vantages. 

Certificates are awarded on 
the following basis: 

1} A Ml ham submits log infdr- 
matlon and names and address- 
es <if possible) of 15 or more 
contacts made to out-of-state or 
DX hams with information 
regarding ML 

2) An out-of-state ham, in- 
cluding Canada, submits log In- 
formation and names and ad- 
dresses (if possible) of at least 5 
Ml hams who relate facts to him 
about Ml. 

3) A foreign ham, excluding 
any resident of Canada, sub- 
mits the call letters and name/ 
address plus log Inforination for 
at least 1 Ml ham who has told 
him about Ml. 

4) Only QSOs made during Ml 
Week, May 19-26, will be 
considered valid! 

All applications for certif- 
icates must be postmarked by 
July 1 and mailed to Governor 
William Milliken, Lansing Ml 
48902. 

For your Information, the 
state bird == robm,ffsh = trout, 
flower = apple blossom^ state 
tree = white pine, stone = 
Petoskey Stone. 

PERSONAL 

COMMUNICATIONS ESSAY 

COMPETmOfsl 

The Personal Communica* 
tlons Foundation is pleased to 
announce its 1979 law student 
essay competition. 

Any person who is a student 
in good standing at an ABA- 
accredited law school on Febru- 
ary 15, 1979, Is eligible to par- 
ticipate. Prizes of $500, $250, 
and $100 are being offered. In 
addition, the Foundation will 
endeavor to have the winning 
essays published in a national 
bar journal. 

The genera! subject matter of 
the essay must deal with one or 
more of the legal aspects of per- 
sonal communications by use 
of amateur radio, Citizens Band 
radio, monitors, and/or radar 
detectors, Within this area, sug- 
gested topics include, but are 
not limited to, constitutional 
issues, federal v. state and local 
regulation, effects upon proper- 
ty use and values, zoning and 
land-use considerations, and 
civil and/or criminal liabilities in 
connection with equipment op- 
eration (exclusive of FCC pro- 
ceedings). 

Essays may be of any length. 
They must be typed, doubte- 
spaced. Footnotes must appear 
at the end of the essay and con- 
form to the current edition of A 
Uniform System ofCltBtfon pub* 
lished by Harvard Law Review 
Association. 

All essays must be received 



155 



■■ 



at the offices of the Personal 
Communications Foundation 
on or before October 1, 1979. 
Contestants must inciude, in 
addition to their name, maillog 
address, and telephone num- 
ber, the name and address of 
their law school Essays wilt be 
returned only if they are accom- 
panied by a sett-addressed, 
stamped envelope. 

All entries will be judged by a 
committee of the Board of 
Trustees of the Foundation- The 
decision of the judges is finalt 
and all entries wttt become the 
property of the Foundation, 
Winners will be announced no 
tater than November 30, 1979, 

The Personal Communica* 
tlons Foundation is a nonprofit 
California corporation dedicat- 
ed to the collection and dissem^ 
i nation of legal research and In- 
formation concerning personal 
communications. Its Board of 
Trustees is composed of law- 
yers, judges, and law-school 
professors who are licensed 
amateur radio and/or Citizens 
Band operators, inquiries and 
essays should t>e addressed to 
Kenneth S. Widetitz, President, 
Persona t Communications 
Foundation, 10960 Wiishire 
Boulevard, Suite 1504, Los 
Angeles. California 90024, 
Telephone (213)^79-1749. 

THE SASQUATCH AWARD 
Sponsored by the Chilliwack 
Amateur Radio Club, the re- 
quirements are as follows: Eye- 
bait contact with one Sas- 
quatch, radio contact with two 
Sasquatch. Canadian and Con- 
tinental US work six amateurs 
In the Chilliwack District, of 
whom three shaH be club mem* 
bef s. DX stations work five con- 
tacts, of which two shall be club 
members. Use all bands and all 



modes with all contacts made 
after March 1, 1979. The cost is 
$1.00 for VEM, 3 IPCs for DX. 
Send log data only. QSLs not re- 
quired. Apply to: Chilliwack 
Amateur Radio Ctub, do 317 
Marshall Avenue, Chiiliwack, 
BC, Canada V2P 3J5, 

ChilUwack ARC Members: 
VE7s— AFA, ANN. AlO, AKD, 
AND. BEN, BHG. BYU, BZY, 
EWO, EX, FK, NHF, PU, QN. RS, 
TL, ZL Local Area Calls (VE7s)— 
AQ2, AYZ, BBV. BDH, BIF, BLB, 
BPW, GBQ. CIO, CIW, CIX, CQO» 
GM. 

JEFFERSON DAVIS 
MONUMENT AWARD 

The Pennyroyal Amateur 
Radio Society of Hopkinsvllle 
KY will be operating portable 
from the Jefferson Davis Mem- 
orial Park on June 3, 1979. from 
0001 to 2359 GMT. This certified 
sequential award will be Issued 
to any station presenting writ- 
ten confirmation of contact 
with a PARS member during the 
QSO pefiod, or any ten Ken* 
tucRy amateurs during the year. 
Awards may be obtained by 
sending $2.00 and the QSL 
cards to: PARS* PO Box 1077, 
Hopkinsville KY 42240, The QSL 
cards wilt be returned with the 
award. Frequencies to be moni- 
tored are as follows: Novice— 
3740, 21140, 28140; General — 
3970, 7270, 14310, 21370. 28610. 

NORTHERN LIGHTS AWARD 

The Northern Lights Award is 
offered by the Northern Lights 
Chapter of the QCWA and is 
available only to members who 
are located outside the state of 
Alaska, Make contacts with 
three (3) members of the North- 
ern Lights Chapter on any 
mode, any band, and any time 
after November 11, 1975. This is 




a one-time free award! Send a 
list of the three confirmed con- 
tacts, giving the date and time 
of the contacts to the secretary: 
J. W. ^'Mac" McQueen KL7AVX, 
1928 East Dimond Blvd.. An- 
chorage AK 99507. 

NOVICE WAS NET FORMING! 

For anyone interested, a 
Novice WAS net is forming at 
1400 GMT on Saturday morn- 
ings on 21.125 MHz. Net control 
stations are KA8AKL and 
WOeRUH. Check in with QTH 
and staters) needed. Listen for 
QST WASN or NWASN to locate 
the net. For more information, 
contact Rick Todd KA8AKL, 
14470 Basslake Rd., Newbury 
OH 44065. 

FAR SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Foundation for Amateur 
Radio, Inc, a nonprofit orga- 
nization with its headquarters In 
Washington DC, announces its 
Intent to award six scholarships 



for the academic year 1979-80- 
All amateurs holding a license 
of at least the FCC General 
Class or equivalent can com- 
pete for one or more of the 
awards if they plan to pursue a 
full-time course of studies 
beyond high school and are en- 
rolled in or have been accepted 
for enrollment In an accredited 
university, college, or technical 
school. The scholarship awards 
range from $250 to $^, with 
preference given in some of 
them to residents of various 
areas. 

Additional Information and 
an application form can be re- 
quested by tetter or postcard, 
postmarked prior to June 1, 
1979, from: FAR Scholarships, 
8101 Hampden Lane, Bethesda 
MD 20014. 

The Foundation is devoted 
exclusively to promoting the in- 
terest of amateur radio and 
scientific, literary, and educa- 
tional pursuits which advance 
the purposes of amateur radio. 



o u rr o r i o (ii.n* t v v e r i r o j i r 










frofnpsgB 18 

if soothers would follow suit . , . 
for what? People who subscribe 
to QST get their money's worth 
in the magazine. If they are 
sending in the money to buy 
fepresentafion, then I think they 
are getting cheated Sure, QST 
could be better. . . but it's cer- 
tBtnly worth the subscription 
price, even at the new rate of 
$18 per year , . . which is about 
time. 

If there are any 73 loyalists 
reBding this, go soak your head. 
if there are any ARRL ioya fists, 
go soak your head and leave it 
under —Wayne. 



THE HP3422 



JohnM, MunrayWIBNN 
4 Kenwood Circle 
Bloomfield CT 06002 

Dear Mr. Murray, 

I enjoyed your article In the 
January, 1979, edition of 73 
Magazine concerning the ship 
that sank off Haiti. 

I have spent the last 3 years 
with the United States Coast 
Guard in San Juan, Puerto 
RicOj where I worked In com- 
munications and the Rescue 
Coordination Center (RCC), We 



handle approximately five hun- 
dred separate search and res- 
cue cases each year under the 
direct control of the San Juan 
RCC. I do, however, remember 
the case of the HP3422, 
because of the part amateur 
radio played In saving these 
people's lives, and because I 
was on duty at the time of the 
Incident and recall some of the 
procedures used. 

The initial call for assistance 
was copied by an amateur radio 
operator in the States, who in 
turn notified the Coast Guard* 
Because time is usuatly a very 
Important factor In rescue 
cases, the Coast Guard at- 
tempts to talk directly to the 
unit for locating, assisting, and 
other Instructions, rather than 
using the longer and not-so- 
efficient relay method. Al- 
though we do have a number of 
club and personal amateur 
radio stations, in an emergency 
situation the FCC has aHowed 
us to use any frequency with 
the distress unit providing it 



does not cause a problem with 
the defense of our country: In 
this particular case, the Coast 
Guard Communications Sta- 
tion, Portsmouth VA, was our 
initial radio unit in contact with 
the vessel. The Coast Guard 
has several teletype and tele- 
phone networks set up be- 
tween the Navy, Air fierce, 
other Coast Guard units, and 
civliian organizations in order 
to help perform our missions. 

During this case* many dif- 
ferent military organizations 
were used in the attempt to get 
assistance to this vessel. The 
Navy assisted with the direc- 
lion*finding work, which they 
supplied to the rescue aircraft 
(to get It within 1 mile of vessel), 
the Air Force helped with air- 
craft, and the Coast Guard pro- 
vided the major coordination 
and communications effort. So 
you see, even though it seemed 
that only one or two people 
were trying to get assistance 
and rescue these people, 
several different groups, in- 



isa 



eluding amateur radio 
operators, played an important 
part in the case. 

I will not go into any more 
details concerning this inci- 
dent, because my memory and 
the facts might tend to differ 
with each other. However, for 
your information, the people 
were picked up by a passing 
merchant vessei diverted to the 
scene to assfSt, 

James C. Norton WD8EAI 
Cleveland OH 



NOTHING PERSONAL 



I like your magazine very 
much. It is probably the best 
ham publication on the market 
today! BUT . . . it's not worth 
$15 a year to me. The last time I 
subscribed, J got a three-year 
subscription for that amount. 

f know what you are going to 
say. You're going to telf me how 
inflation has made the price go 
up and all that lazz. Well, that 
may be, I can't, however, keep 
paying what I believe to be an 
outrageous price. I'm sorry, DM, 
nothing personal. 

Clay Welsh W1PI 
Springfield MA 



VLF RECEPTION 



I very much appreciated your 
fine editorial on Sam Harris. I 
had the W8FKC call from about 
1948 to 1968 and knew Sam 
when he was at Brush Develop- 
ment in Cfeveland and lived in 
Burton, Ohio. I used to work 
him on 144 and 220 from my 
former homes In Hudson and 
Chagrin Falls, Ohio, when the 
bands were dull. I built several 
paramps based on hrs designs 
and used them for moont rack- 
ing the very first series of 
Ranger moon probes with a 28' 
dish. In fact, the paramp 
designs were the basis for my 
being interviewed for a position 
at Arecibo by Dr. Drake and 
others up at GorneJI back in 
about 1964-65. I didn't get the 
job, which is just as welt, 
because i did not really have 
enough expertise at the time. 
However, 1 was also on a year*s 
leave of absence from OU here 
in 19S6-67 with a position as 
station manager of the mm- 
wave dish supported by NRAO 
out at Kitt Peak AZ. I also spent 
a summer at Greenbank WV. Alf 
this was due in part to my in- 
terest and ability in VHF 
microwaves as a result of Sam 
Harris' work on low*noise am- 
plifiers, etc so [ feel Sam had 
some influence over my career. 
I have graduated to the dc-to- 
500*kH2 range now, teaching 
audio methods, supervising EE 
senior Eabs, and doing contract 
research on various NASA-, 
Signal Corps% USCG-, and FAA* 



supported grants and con- 
tracts. 

1 enjoy reading 73 very much, 
although sometimes the quali- 
ty of the technical work is not 
too good. A case in point was a 
recent article regarding VLF 
signal reception. In his article 
about a simple VLF converter 
(73 Magazine, January, 1979), 
W30VZ mentioned the use of a 
1000-toot (300'metef) longwire 
for VWVVB, and only obtaining 
an estimated 20 uV at the input 
terminal. In theory, the la-kW 
erp from WWVB at 60 kHz will 
develop a field intensity of 
about 100 u V/meter at W3QVZ's 
QTH in Woodbine, Maryland 
(see NBS Special Publication 
#432). Now, does this tell us 
that a 300*meter longwire 
strung out over the landscape 
only has an effective height of 
about 20/100 meters or only 20 
cm? This, in fact, might be ap- 
proximately true considering 
the input attenuation involved 
and the inherent difficulty of 
making accurate signal- 
strength estimates with a long- 
wire antenna at VLF. 

A longwire antenna system 
is just not the way to go at VLF, 
The antenna looks more like an 
extended groundwire, with 
much more capacitance to the 
variable noisy ground currents 
flowing in the earth than effec- 
tive capacitance to the electric 
field above. Thus, the wire is 
picking up orders-of -magnitude 
more ground noise than signal, 
W3QVZ's comment that the an- 
tenna leaves much to be de- 
sired, even when used with a 
tuned circuit, is very true. 

There is a much better ap- 
proach to this problem of VLF 
signal reception, A 3-meter-or- 
so vertical whip antenna 
mounted up as high as possible 
and reasonably in the clear, 
with low capacitance to ground 
(but with a very good ground 
system at the receiver and 
underneath the antenna), can 
provide an effective height of 
20 to 60 cm. In Ohio, I can 
receive WWVB 60 kHz with an 
estimated 160 uV/meter field in- 
tensity as developed on a 2^^- 
meter standard C8-type verti- 
cal whip, in order to operate a 
vertical, it is usually necessary 
to have a unity-voitage-gaint 
high-input-impedance circuit at 
the antenna base. 

In my case, a preamplifier re- 
lated to that presented In 73 
Magazine (May, 1978, pp. 
146-153), has a measured Input 
capacitance of 85 pF with no 
antenna connected. The 2V*- 
meter vertical has a capaci- 
tance of atjout 100 pF. The ef- 
fective height is very roughly 
100/(85 + 100) meters, or about 
60 cm. I actually estimate 
about 90 uV for WWVB at the 
antenna terminaL If 90 uV is 
developed on an antenna with 
an effective height of 60 cm, 



then 100 cm (or a 1-meter 

theoretically perfect antenna) 
would develop about 150 uV, 
This approximately checks out 
with what WWVB says their 
60'kHz signal level should be at 
my location in Ohio. The point 
to make here is that 3 meters up 
and vertfcai in the dear is bet- 
ter than 300 rneters long over 
the tush. 

There are a multitude ot 
other problems connected with 
operating vertical whip anten- 
nas, but they can be solved. In 
fact, these types of vertical 
antennas are now being used In 
military and marine VLF 
monitor systems for radio 
navigation throughout the 
world. The biggest single prob- 
lem with all VLF E-field anten- 
nas is providing a really good 
ground system and relatively 
low capacitance to ground at 
the antenna terminal, in VLF 
reception, we are trying to 
measure the potential dif- 
ference between what we think 
is our local ground system and 
an ideal probe sticking out into 
free space. A long horizontal 
wire does not solve the prob* 
lem. 

Another way of measuring 
antenna performance is to 
compare the actual height (or 
length) with the effective 
height. Thus the 2¥4-meter ver- 
tical has an efficiency of [60 
cm/{2.75x100cm)](100) = 22%, 
and the 300-meler longwire has 
an efficiency of [20 cm/(300 x 
lOOcm)l(IOO) = 0.07%, assum- 
ing all our measurements are 
correct. Even if we are off by a 
factor of ten, the short vertical 
antenna is still better! 

Still another way of looking 
at the problem of a 300-meter 
longwire is to consider the 
height above ground. In the 
W3QVZ case, it was 60 feet, or 
about 20 meters, off the 
ground. The lead-in from this 
longwire may be a more effec- 
tive antenna than the 300 
meters of longwire. The hori- 



zontal wire adds so much 
capacitance directly to a noisy 
ground plane that it is degrad- 
ing the performance of the 
height above ground. A good 
rule to follow in designing a 
*'tlattop" horizontal wire is to 
make the length about equal to 
the height and to place a 
buried counterpoise of radial 
wires in the ground underneath 
the whole antenna to provide a 
good earth ground. This is 
typically the type of antenna 
used for transmitting radio 
navigation beacons in the 
ISO^kHz to 400-kHz range with a 
height and width of 15 to 20 
meters. While the radiation effi- 
ciency is low for transmitting at 
these frequencies because of 
the very long wavelength, the 
receiving efficiency can be 
quite high in terms of effective 
height when used with a low- 
noise, high-input-impedance 
antenna coupler circuit. 

An attempt at Illustrating the 
problem of a longwire antenna 
with a low height-to-length 
ratio <as compared with a short 
vertical whip) is shown in Fig. 1. 
The downward point lines In- 
dicate the predominant cou- 
pling to the ground plane, and 
the dotted lines pointing up- 
ward show the coupling to the 
free-space electric field. In real- 
world antennas at low frequen- 
cies, it is often necessary to 
make a series of two-dimen- 
sional electrolytic tank ex- 
periments and plot the field 
contours by applying dc poten- 
tial between an upper eleclrode 
and the bottom ground plane 
electrode containing the model 
antenna. The results are dif- 
ficult to illustrate in two dimen- 
sions. Fig. 1 is a rough pic- 
torial representation of the 
situation, not to any scale, to Il- 
lustrate the idea of effective 
height (which is a purely math- 
ematical concept). The main 
point we are trying to illustrate 
with ail this is Ihat it is impor- 
tant to have the probe (antenna) 



CAPACITANCE TO 
E- FIELD > 20% 






C 



EFFECTIVE HEtSHT 



QflQUHD i 80% 




fcTTEmjATtOH 



m 



SHORT ES*4J VERirCAL WWP ANtEhlMA 



CAPACITANCE 



EFFECTIVE 

HEIGHT 



% TOE- FICLO i \% i i * 







CAPACITANCE TD 



(VARIABLE 6R0UN0 CURRENTS) 
LONG (30aM^ H0RIZ0f4TAL WRE AUTENNA 



ANTiMNA COUPLER 

WITH ATTENUATIOM 




Fig, 1. E-fieid pictoriai representation of VLF antennas. 



t57 



oul in the electric field as high 
as possible to minimize paral lei 
capacitance and coupling to 
the local ground plane. In ama- 
teur work with VLF antennas, 
we should stop thinking about 
the way antennas work at 80 
meters and up. Virtually all VLF 
E-field antennas are much 
shorter than a quarter wave- 
length. We should consider the 
antenna as more like placing a 
high impedance probe at the 
end of a cable connected to an 
oscilloscope^ with the high-Z 
circuitry at the antenna de- 
signed to minimize undesired 
noise pickup. (H-field loop 
antennas are a whole different 
story at VLF, suitable for some 
other author to present.) 

Another aspect of W3QVZ's 
article on the VLF converter is 
the trouble experienced with 
cross-modulation. The use of 
an LM318 bipolar IC as a wide- 
band input stage amplifier is 
prone to this problem. The in- 
put circuit, low-pass filter, and 
the input 10k summing resistor 



used with the LM318 operate as 
an attenuator for low-level 
signals. This decreases the 
signal even before it is 
amplified, tt is not common 
practice to use operational 
amplifier methods at the very 
first input stage of a com* 
munications receiver. The sig- 
nal'to-noise ratio is always 
decreased whenever an at- 
tenuation network is inserted 
between the source and the 
amplifier. A better input stage 
amplifier is a JFET MPF102 or 
2N5457, each of which is much 
less susceptible to cross-mod- 
ulation problems. 
Good DX-hunting on VLFl 

R. W. Burhans 
Athens OH 



227 MOD 

As a member of Army MARS, 
I am grateful to KH6JMU for his 
work on expanding the frequen- 
cy range of the Yaesu FT-227R 



Memorizer to include some 
MARS coverage (73, March, 
1979). 

Following his instructions^ 1 
removed the red wire from pin 3 
and the blue wire from pin 7 on 
Q712 (MC14028B), located on 
the PLL control board (PB- 
1773A), and soldered them to a 
nearby ground. 1 found that the 
display became functional 
from 142.000 MHz to 149.995 
MHz, as he indicated It would. 
The unit would transmit out-of- 
band below 144.000 MHz, but 
not above 147.995 MHz— which 
is required to work our local 
Army MARS repeater {148.01 in, 
143.99 out). 

After studying the diagram 
on page 19 of the owner's 
manual, I noted that although 
Q712 controls the low-end 
cutoff, Q711 (MCI 4081 B) con- 
trols the high-end cutoff which 
must be overridden in order to 
transmit above 147.995 MHz. 

The '*fix" is very simple. All 
that is required Is to cut a 
1/16-inch gap in the foii leading 




+s 



+5 



FREQUENCY SELECTOR 
+ 5 +5 



+5 




X20 



74Q0 % ^^ 



r^-^COMTROL 

DlO OUT 



fig. 2. Added circuitry for *The Italian Freq Generator. 



Tt 



from pin 10 on Q711 to D701, 
allowing Q713 to function prop- 
erly above 148.000 MHz. This 
quick fix allows full transmit 
and receive functions from 
142.000 to 149,995 MHz, in- 
cluding memory. (Would you 
believe 1600 channels?!) 

Perhaps this 15-minute 
modification will make the FT- 
227R attractive to MARS 
members who were consider- 
ing other alternatives. 

Mike Zoruba N8AVF 
North Rtdgevine OH 

GENERATOR IMPROVEMENT 

First off, thanks to Louis Hut- 
ton K7YZZ for the translation 
and St. Mario Scarpelli I6TH8 
for his design, *The Italian Freq 
Generator" (January, 1979). I 
would like to suggest an im- 
provement to prevent a "race" 
condition. Separate pin 13 of IC 
X5 and add an R-S flip-flop as 
shown in Fig. 2. This modifica- 
tmn forces the "load'* pulse to 
be equal to one half of the 
period of the generated signal, 
at least 60 ns at 10 MHz. Ten dif- 
ferent 74192s were tried In the 
original circuit, with poor re- 
suits above 5 MHz. With the 
modified circuit, the output 
signal is not '*off 1 or 2 Hz at 
audio" and "several hundred 
Hz at MHz range," but is exactly 
"thumbwheel switch settings" 
plus "one" times the "multi- 
plier switch" pius Of minus the 
"reference oscillator error." 

I had to add an additional 5 
pF to the 33-pF and 100-pF ca- 
pacitors to tune down to 3.40O 
MHz and 1.OO0 MHz respective- 
ly. Again, thanks for a good 
design, as I now have a signal 
generator which tunes from 
0.993 Hzto 10.000 MHz with ±1 
ppm accuracy. 

Clancy Arnold W9AFV 

Lawrence IN 

P.S. If you change IC X20 from a 
7400 to 74S00 and use 2 unused 
gates of it for this modification, 
you add nothing to the parts 
count and gain an increase in 
drive power from 15 pF at 4O0 
Ohms to 150 pF at 93 Ohms. 



MEXfCAN OPERATION 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

First, I thought I'd let you 
know how much I enjoy your 
magazine and how much I ap- 
preciate the fact that I can buy a 
subscription to it In Mexico for 
the same price as paid by state- 
side subscribers. 

I thought some of your read- 
ers might be interested in know- 
ing that there is now a possibili- 
ty that licenses may be issued 
to visitors to Mexico. Until 
recently, only Mexican citizens 
were permitted to hold amateur 
licenses, and Mexico has no 



158 



recrprocai agreements in force; 
however, due to a change in the 
reguiations covering amateur 
operation in Mexico, permits 
may be issued up to a term of 6 
months to persons visiting Mex- 
ico. 

i wouid suggest that anyone 
interested in obtaining such a 
permit submit a request to: 
Secretarla de Comunicaciones 
Y Transportes, Subdtreccion 
General de Permisos Y Asuntos 
Internacionales, Depto. de Fre- 
quencias Radroelectricas, Ofi- 
cina de Licenclas, Torre Centrai 
de Telecomunicaciones, Ave. 
Nino Perdido Y Cumbres de 
Aculzingo, Mexico 12, D.F., 
Mexico. 

I suggest that a photocopy of 
the current license be included, 
as welJ as a copy of the Mexican 
tourist card (obtainable at the 
airline or travel agency offices) 
and a statement that "in accor- 
dance wfth Article 19, subsec- 
tion b, of title 3, Regulations to 
install and Operate Amateur 
Radio Stations as published in 
the Diario Oficiai of July 4, 
1977," you are requesting con- 
sideration of your request to be 
granted a temporary permit to 
operate. I would also suggest 
that a list of places to be visited, 
the approximate dates, and the 
equipment to be brought into 
the country be sent at the same 
time. 

I cannot guarantee that this 
will get the applicant a permit, 
but at least such a possibility 
exists, for the first time, 

Kenneth M. Price XE1TIS 
Irapuato, Mexico 



PURE BODIES 

In your editorial in the 
November, 1978, Issue of 73, 
you express concern about the 
effects of radar radiation ab- 
sorbed as one drives down the 
highways of New Hampshire. 

I submit that your concern is 
extremely parochial. You get 
zapped once every twenty miles 
or SO- Consider the pUght of 
those of us living on the heights 
just across the Hudson from the 
Big Apple— as one looks at the 
Empire State Building, one sees 
not only the TV antennas with 
their tremendous erp, but also 
alj manner of dishes, yagis, cor- 
ner reflectors, and horns aimed 
In our direction. And that is just 
a start— many other buildings 
from the Baltery to uptown are 
also squirting a potpourri of rf 
our way. Of course, not all of 
this radiation is in the micro- 
wave region, but a good deal of 
it is — and many of those UHF 
TV channels are getting mighty 
close— and running lots of 
Watts. 

I have no Idea how much 
microwave energy I'm being 
subjected to, but if, as you 
claim, the highway dosage is 



500D tfmes the amount of leak- 
age allowed from microwave 
ovens, I'm sure I'm being sub- 
jected to a helluva lot more 
than that! 

When you start your Church 
of the Pure Body, I think I'd be 
ready to become a convert. I'd 
then be able to protest the viola- 
tion of my religious principles 
by all those rf sources across 
the river. Do you think we could 
get them to install a copper- 
screen rf fence along the top of 
our Palisades? As you say, if 
enough people protest, they 
can raise hell with the system. I 
don't want to move— I've lived 
here longer than the system has 
been imposing its rf on me. And 
the saddest part of all is that so 
much of the rf is being used to 
carry the pure unadutterated 
garbage that is the rule rather 
than the exception on the TV 
channels these days. 

Allen L. Bamett WB2QPM 
Jersey City NJ 



WRIST-CO M 



Our January, 1979, issue con- 
tamed a brief mention of a proj- 
ect to develop a ''wrist radio'' 
communications system. Since 
tiien, we've received an es- 
peciaily informative fetter on 
the recent iiistory of this con- 
cept. An excerpt from tfie tetter 
appears beiow. 

The conclusion one draws 
from your comments is that 
NASA was the first to concep- 
tualize and develop a function- 
mg two-way wrist radio. I feel 
that it would be more to your 
advantage to provide full 
coverage regarding the actual 
facts in the development of a 
two-way wrist radio communi- 
cation system beyond the rep- 
resentations provided by 
Chester Gould. 

In late 1972 and into 1973, I 
developed a concept and then a 
breadboard working model of a 
sophisticated two-way wrist- 
worn communications system 
for deaf-blind persons which in- 
cluded digftai on-board control, 
outputting of a number of dif* 
ferent types of messages, and 
Morse code capability. It also 
provided for signaling back to a 
base station in cases of an emer- 
gency. We call it the '*Wrist- 
Com." For one version of the 
Wrist-Corn wireless signaling 
system, the ^'institutional 
Wrist-Corn," we required assis- 
tance in mjcrominiaturization, 
and, because of their reputa- 
tion and willingness to assist, 
we entered into an agreement 
with the Technology Utilization 
Office of NASA which would re- 
sult in their producing for us a 
system which was based upon 
our design specifications and 
breadboard^ and which would 
be usable at the Helen Keller 



National Center for Deaf-Blind 
Youths and Adults by our staff 
and clients, and elsewhere. 
More than four years have gone 
by since the original commit- 
ment was made, and NASA is 
still working on the project, 
(Since the original agreement, I 
have served as a technical con- 
sultant to NASA.) 

I am quite disappointed that 
reports such as those occur- 
ring in M/crowave Systems 
News and 73 should give so 
much publicity to a device 
which is merely an artist's con« 
ceptualization, when an actual 
system specifically designed 
to make use of a sophisticated 
two-way wrist radio and capa- 
ble of satisfying many of the 
survival and signaling needs of 
severely handicapped people is 
presently being prototyped. 
Moreover, the prototype work Is 
based on my designs devel- 
oped here at the Helen Keller 
National Center, In light of the 
above, credit for the initial 
development of a practical two- 
way wrist communication sys- 
tem should be given to the 
Helen Keller National Center 
for Deaf-Blind Youths and 
Adults. 

Frederick M. Kruger, Ph.D, 

K2LDC 

Director of Research 

Helen Keller National Center 

Sands Point NY 

Thanks for providing us with 
the proper background on the 
Wrist'Com idea. Best of iuck 
with the project, Fred, and be 
sure to keep us up to date on 
your progress,~Jeff Defray 
WB8BTH/1, Assistant Publisher. 



HAD IT 

1 enlisted in the Navy in 1956, 
and ended up as a Radtoman. In 
1962j while on my one and only 
tour ot shore duty, f was sta- 
tioned with several amateurs, 
and a friend of mine had quite a 
collection of back issues of CQ 
and QST. I spent a lot of time 
reading and enjoying these old 
magazines, especially '^Never 
Say Die" and "ScratchL" So, I 
went and got a General class 
license. 

I spent many enjoyable hours 
working 20 CW from the small 
ham shack where I had the mis- 
fortune to be stationed. I ended 
up with a big bunch of QSL 
cards (all of which were ac- 
knowledged), and then went to a 
ship home-ported in a country 
without reciprocal privileges. 

About thjs time, the subscrip- 
tion to CQ I had ordered finally 
caught up to me. Right away I 
opened It to W2NSD, only to 
find out it wasn't there; no 
Scratchi, either. Then I saw an 
editorial by the new editor, and 
the part that sticks in my mem- 
ory after 15 years was some- 



thing he wrote to the effect that 
there is no place in a ham 
magazine for levity. And that 
was why Wayne Green was no 
longer the editor- The next ten 
issues were passed on to my 
ham shipmates without being 
opened. Naturally, I never re- 
newed that subscription. 

At the same time, I let my 
membership in the ARRL lapse^ 
mainly because of incentive 
licensing. I didn't mind working 
harder for something more, but 
It really ticked me off to lose 
what I already had. 

In 1966, I became a subma- 
rine sailor. No chance for ama- 
teur radio there, but each time 
my license expired, I renewed It, 
thinking that one day I would be 
on the air again. In the mean- 
time, I had tours on four sub- 
marines, in Viet Nam, and in 
Taiwan. Finally, in 1976, 1 retired 
from the Navy. During my ca- 
reer, I had been the leading Ra- 
dioman in five different radio 
shacks, and only a Navy Radio- 
man can tell you what that 
means to a Radioman. I had 
also managed to acquire a First 
Class Radiotelegraph license, 
and shortly after retiring, I re- 
ceived my Merchant Marine 
Radio Cfficer*s license and 
Z-card. I did not, however, at- 
tempt to upgrade my amateur 
license, mostly because of a 
lack of Interest, 

Shortly after I retired, I re- 
ceived your offer of a three-year 
subscription at a special price, 
and I went for It. The first couple 
of issues got me thinking again, 
and over the past couple of 
years I have been doing quite a 
bit of soul-searching and dis- 
cussing amateur communica- 
tions with some of the amateurs 
I know. 

I have now reached the con- 
clusion that after twenty years 
as a professional radio com- 
municator, IVe had it. Amateurs 
today are the same as they were 
when I started. If you manage to 
get in contact with one of them, 
either they are looking for as 
many contacts as possible or, if 
they are Interested in com- 
municating (rag chewing), 
which is my bag, ft seems like 
all they can talk about is what 
gear they are using. The fact 
that I can receive them at all 
tells me that they have an 
antenna, a transmitter, and 
some sort of electricity hooked 
up to it. If I ask about the 
weather, they don't know be- 
cause they haven 1 been out- 
side of the ham shack for the 
past week. If I ask about the 
liberty where they are, such as 
the night spots, local attrac- 
tions, etc., the contact either 
fades, or the other guy comes 
on like the caretaker at the local 
monastery. 

Well, now I have a job as a 
locomotive engineer. (That^sthe 
guy who runs the train.) i have a 
radio on my engine but I 



159 



couldn't tell you what frequency 
it's on. 1 suspect it's around 160 
JVIHz, on FIVl, but if it IsnX I'm 
not concerned* As a matter of 
fact, I'm not really all that con- 
cerned about whether it works 
or not. And that's the limit of my 
two-way communications. 

If, as you fear, WARC takes 
away the amateur frBquencies, 
I'm not going to mourn them. If I 
haven't made it clear why not, 
I'll spell it out here: incentive 
licensing. Once it went in, I went 
out and have stayed out. 

Well, Wayne, I know this is 
the type of letter you don't like 
to receive, but it is how I fee!. If 
you want to cancel my subscrip- 
tion now, that's okay. If not, Til 
keep reading the magazines as 
they come until it runs out^ but I 
won't be renewing it. 

Jack McCord KA4EXD 
Arlington VA 



OUT OF SIGHT 



I have just returned from an 



ARRL convention/hamfest, 
where I attended an ARMA 
(Amateur Radio Manufacturer's 
Association) meeting at which 
most of the ARRL board o1 
directors also sat in. Since 
ARMA allows manufacturers, 
dealers, reps^ and publishers to 
be members, the ARRL was 
classified as a publisher and 
allowed to participate in the 
meeting. The meeting started 
with just a handful of manufac- 
turers and dealers and the 
group of ARRL directors. The 
first words that came from the 
ARMA meeting moderator were, 
"tt has been said that ARMA is 
antl-ARRL— this is not so." 
With that, you could hear a sigh 
of relief in the form of a wheeze 
from the elderly ARRL board 
members. The main topic of the 
meeting was the 220 band and 
what to do with it. They also 
talked about the 10 meter ampli- 
fier ban. 

As some of you know, the 
ARRL has asked the FCC to 
allow the use of 220 for the 



Novice for phone, hoping to 
bring more users to the band. 
ARMA wants to start an all-new 
entry level exam for 220, with a 
code recognition test (3 to 5 
wpm) and a Novice-type techni- 
cal exam. The testing for the 
new class would be much like 
the Novice test, only the old 
term "Novice'' would not be 
used. After all, who wants to be 
a novtce at anything? The term 
"Communicator" will not be 
used either. They said that 
"communicator*' sounds too 
much like CB and that the high 
emotional feeling of hams 
about that word would spell 
doom for the ARMA plan. So 
they have to come up with a 
name that all will go for. 

ARMA then disclosed its plan 
of attack. It called for $30,000 to 
go for a lobbyist to push a $1 .5 
million FCC grant/funding pool 
for the "new class" license, 
ARMA said that the FCC had 
told them that if the money were 
appropriated, the new class 
could be on the air by midsum- 
mer of 79. With that came the 



big question— Will the ARRL 
back ARMA and their plan? 
Silence fell over the room. 
ARMA members were on the 
edge of their chairs, and all you 
could hear were the tapping of 
toes, the counting of fingers, 
and the scratching of heads 
coming from the ARRL leaders. 
Then came the big answer: 
Well, maybe, but off the 
record— we don*t want to make 
anyone in the ''fraternity" mad 
at us and lose members. 

It seemed to me that the 
ARRL directors were looking 
after themselves as board 
members, but as elected repre- 
sentatives they were not doing 
their job in any way. Even the 
next day, at the ARRL member- 
ship meeting, the ARMA plan 
was not brought to light to the 
membership. If a phrase could 
be used to express the ARRL 
feelings on any issue that might 
have an impact on membership, 
it's ''out of sight, out of mind." 
James W. Menefee, Jr WA4KKY 

Jacksonville FL 



FCC 



Reprinted from the Federal Register. 



PAIT 97— AWATEUR RADIO SStVICE 

Edit^rifll Amendment C«f>c«rt>Jitg 
Appti£«itlon f«f Station y««nse 

AGENCY: Federal CoramunicatiiSns 
QajnEoisskOTL, 

ACTION; Correction o! fin at rule, 

SUMMARY: FCC amends rule lo cor- 
rect error in paragraph seciuence. 

EFFECTIVE DATE: March 13, 197&. 

ADDRESSES: Federal Cotnmiinlca- 
tiOTis CoimnifiSlon, Washington, DC, 
30554. 

FOH FURTHER INFORMATION 
CONTACT: 

Upton Guthery. Office af General 
Coun&el, 202-632-6444. 

In ihe mailer of editorial funen^- 
ment of §97.41 Rules of Practice and 
Procedure; Order, 

Adopted: February 26. 1979. 

Released: Marcn 2, 1979, 

1. Ts correct Irw^onsistenciss between 
th« amendatory Eartg^a^g^e and the par- 
agraphing of the rule chanses in two 
orders amending 5 97.41 of Iht^ Rules, 
we are Issuitig this order specifying 
th? correct text of that section. The 
orders in question are FCC 78-76. 43 
FR 7323. February 22, 1978. and FCC 
7B-210, 43 FR 1&3.TI. April 12, 1978. 

2. Authority for this action Is con- 
tained \n Sectlonit 4(i> and 303(ri of 
the Communications Act of 1934, a-s 
Amended, 47 USC 154U) and 303(r), 
and 5a.261fd) of the Rules* 47 CFR 
0.26^! (d>. Pecause the correclion Is edi- 
torial in nature, compliance with the 
prit>r notice and effective date provi- 
sions of 5 U.S. C. 555 Is unnecessary. 

3^ According fy, it is ordered, effec- 
tive March 13, 1979. That §97.41 is 
corrected to read as set forth below. 

(Sees, 4, 901, 4ft Stat , as amended. 1066. 
10a2;47 U.aC. l&l 303. 3 

R, D* LlCHTWAHt>T, 

Executive Director. 

In part 97 of Chapter I of Title 41 of 
the Code of Federal Reg.iilations, 
§97.41 is corrected to read as rol]ou;s: 

|?7.4l AppUcaUon TprstalHin tlrtns*-. 

(a) Each application for a club or 
military recreation .station license tn 



the Amateur Radio Service shall he 
made on the FCC Form filO^B. Each 
application for any other amateur 
radio license shall be made on the 
FCC Form 610, 

(t>) One application and all papers 
incorporated therein and made a part 
thereof shall be submitted for each 
amateur station license. If the applies 
Uon is only for a station license, it 
shall toe filed directly with the. Coin- 
mission's Gettysburg. Pennsylvania 
office. If the application also contains 
an application for any claSiS of ama- 
teur operator llcetise. it shall be filed 
in accordance with the provisions of 
§97.11. 

fcl Each applicant In the Safety and 
Special Radio Services (1> for modifi- 
cation of a station license involving a 
site change or a substantial increase in 
tower height or (2) for a license for a 
new station must, before commencing 
construction, supply the environmen- 
tal Information, where reqiiired, and 
must follow the procedure prescribed 
by Subpart 1 O'f Part I of this chapter 
C§§ 14301 throu&h 1.1319) unless Com- 
mission action authorising such con- 
struction wovild be a minor action with 
the meaning of Subpart I of Part I* 



PART 97— AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE 

Extending Grac« Period for R»newal 
of on E)cp1red Am«»t9ur Rddio Serv- 
ice OpArQt^r Li»n»a 

AGENCY: Federal Conununlcatlona 
Commission. 

ACTION; Order (Rulemaking:)^ 

SUMMARY: The Amateur Radio 
Services rules are being amended to 
extend the grace period for renewal of 
an expired amateur radio license from 
one year to five years. At present, per- 
sons who do not renew within one year 
of the expiration of their llcenjse must 
be retested in telegraphy and radio 
theory. Extension of Ih^ grace period 
will reduce the number of re-ex amlna- 
tlons and/or requests for waiver of the 
re'examination requirement. 

EFFECTIVE DATE: March 16. 1979. 

ADDEBSSES: Pederal Communica- 
tions Commission, Washington. D.C. 
20554. 



FOE FQRTHER INFORMATION 
CONTACT: 

Mr, Stephen J. Francis, Private 
Radio Bureau, (203-632-7175). 

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Adopted: Febrtiary 2B, 1&79. 
Released; March S. 1979. 

Order. In the Matter of Amendment 
of Part 97 to extend grace period for 
renewal of an expired Amateur Radio 
Service operator license. 

1. The purpose of thi» Order is to 
amend Part 97 of the Commission's 
rules to lengthen tl^e "grace" period 
for renewal of an expired amateur 
radio operator license. Section 97.13(d) 
of the Commission's rules now states 
thatt "If a license Is allowed to expire, 
application for renewal may be made 
during a period of grace of one year 
after the expiration date. During this 
0!ie year period of grace, an expired li- 
cense Is not valid." 

2. Applicants who allow the one year 
period of grace to expire must normal- 
ly be reexamined tx> demonstrate again 
their quali flea lions to be amateur 
radfo operators. The Commission, 
however, receives many requests for 
waivers of §97,t3<dJ from applicants^ 
who, for various reasons, have unk- 
nowingly permitted their licenses to 
lapse beyond the one year period of 
grace. 

3. In con^dering whether or not to 
grant waivers of 597.13(d), the Com- 
mission evaluates the ctrciunstances 
surrounding the non-renewal of the&e 
licenses. The rule is waived In coses 
when <1> circumstances beyond the li- 
censee's control, such as a physical dis- 
ability or a death of a close family 
member prevent the licensee from 
filing a timely application and (2) the 
pedod since expiration of the "grace 
period" has been of brief duration. 
When a waiver is granted, the Com- 
mission presumes the applicant is still 
fully qualified to operate an amateur 
station, 

4. It is evident from experience 
gained in processing several hundred 
requests for waivers in recent years 
that the overwhelming majority of re- 
quests result In waivers. For this 
reason, the Commission Is amending 
3 97.13(d) to change the period of 
grace from one to five years. The Com- 
mission concludes that the five-year 
period Is one In which It Is reasonable 
to presume that the licensee will 
remain fully qualified. WhUe there Is 
no clear demarcation, we believe that 



an extension of this period beyond the 
e<iuivalent of one additional lleense 
term is unwarranted. 

5. The rule amendment will reduce 
Commission workload In two ways: CD 
The Commission will receive fewer re- 
qtuests for waivers, each of which now 
require Individual attention and han- 
dling; and (3) the Commission will ad- 
minister fewer second examinations to 
ex^llcensees who failed to renew their 
licenses Within the "grace period". 

6. Authority for these amendments 
Is contained in Sections 4<i) ajxd 303 of 
the Communications Act of 1934, as 
amended. The Commission finds, that 
for good cause the prior notice and 
public procedure provisions of the Ad- 
ministrative Procedure Act <S U-S.C. 
5B3) are unnecessary because the Com- 
mission believes that there would be 
no objeetion to the relief from previ- 
ously Imposed restrictions. Early adop- 
tion would simplify application filing 
re^inlrements, accelerate the speed for 
processhkg appJlcatlone, and reduce 
delay In eliminating restrictions. 

7. II is ordered. That effective March 
la, 1979, Fart 97 of the Commission's 
rules and regulations Is amended &b 
set forth below, 

(Sees. 4p 3D3. 49 Stat, lus amencteil. 1066, 

PEDEiaAL Communications 
Commission. 

WlLLIA,M TRICARICO, 

SeareMry. 

Part 97 of Chapter I of Title 47 of 
the Code of Federal Regulations Is 
amended as follows: 

i. In §97.13 paragraph (d) is revised 
to read as follows: 

§ 97,13 Renewal or iEiDdiricQ.iion of ap«ra- 
tor Uccnse, 



(d) If a license Is allowed to expire, 
application for renewal may be made 
during a period of grace of five years 
after the expiration date. During this 
five year period of grace, an expired li- 
cense Is not valid. A license renewed 
during the grace period will be dated 
currently and will not be backdated to 
the date of its expiration. Application 
for renewal shall be submitted on FCC 
Form fl 1 and shall be accompanied by 
the applicant's expired license. 

AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE 
Ttfmintri'lnf Pn»«»^ti0 Cdncemfrig Opervlvr 

AGENCY: Federal Communications 



160 



Coiomisaion, 

AcmON: Termination of ml** rankfripr 
proceeding. 

SUMMARY; The CommlBslon elpctdps 
to defer action on th** "Communicfttor 
Class" and ''duii] ladder" amMt^ur lU 
censing. A petition for 'i I retime" fssu- 
BJice of the Amateur EKtra Cla&s U- 
cetme \s di^nli'd: and actimi \s dt^ferred 
on changing the prDcedure for meaA* 
uring amateur tnutBmltUr power. 

EPFECTTVE DATE: Not applkmble. 

ADDRESSES: Federal CommunrcA^ 
tlans Commission, WiAtilngton^ D.C 

205M. 



FOR PtTRTHER 
CONTACT: 



mPORBAATtON 



James E. hflcNall^% Jr. F^nonaJ 
Uaji\o Division. Private Radio 
eureau^ (202) 332-7175. 

THtRD R£POaT Ami OascR^ 
(Pnodzniifo TtaHiif ATEt») 

Adopted: March 6, 1979. 

R«le«s«d: March 14. t&7fr. 

In the matter of amendmc'til of Fart 
97 of the Comjniaslon'K rules concern- 
ing operator classes, prhllegcs. and t*- 
quinements in the Amateur Radio 
Senlce, Docket No. 302S2, RM-lOie. 
1363. 1454, 14&6. ISlS. 1571. 1S2$, 1535. 
1588. 157?. ISQ2. tSlti* 1029, 1633^ 1656. 
1724. 1793. 1305. 1S4I. 1920. 1947. 197S. 
1991, 2030. 2043. 2053. 2149. 21 SO, 31S2. 
2166. 2216. 2219. 32S8. 2284. 2449. 

1. Oo December 10, 1974, the Com- 
mission fesued a Nolice of Propofled 
HuIe Making in ihe above-en tilled 
matter which was published In the 
Federal Rm^TER on December 20. 
1974 (39 PR 44042). The major pro- 
posed rule changes contained In the 
Notice wer& the following: 

<a) Creation of a 'dual ladder' ilcens- 
tng structure; 

ib> Creation of a "Communleator 
Class" license ha^LnjE no telegraph f 
privileges or examination r«inirement: 

(e> Establishment of new power 
Zlmjls based on trajLftmilter peak enve- 
lope power output: 

(d* New restTlct(on.s on liecniies ob* 
tained by meRnii of vol unt.<&er- admin is* 
terpd msLil oxaminatiDnB; 

Ce) Issuance of tifettme Amateur 
Extra Class operator license^' and* 



(f) ModlTicat.lon of Ehe frequencies 
and modes availsible to certain license 
classes. 

2. Because of severe manpower and 
t»me resiriciions brought about by the 
huge surge in Citizens Band Radio 
fii*rvice applications alrtce 1974. *'e 
were tmable to undertake the prt^para- 
iton of a ifMTKreh endive Rt-port and 
Order aaH(*'S„"-ini? ali of the i.ssups 
raJsL-d hi the ^f&tic'^:^ We did, however, 
rt^leiise a Firsi Hepon and Order on 
Juntf 15. 197« (41 FR 25013) which 
amended the rules to reflect the fol- 
lowing changes 

(a^ Eiccepi in cases where the appti- 
CAnt was physically disabled (and 
where the Commission would select 
the volunteer examiner)^ votunteer'ad^ 
minLstered examinations could only be 
aiven to applicanis for the Novice 
Class Ilcens: 

Cb> The ConditionaJ Class license 
and th<^ "eondltiozt&t'^ CO limitation 
on the Technician Cla^ license were 
to be etlniifiated upon renewal Licens- 
ees holding the Ooftditionai Class li- 
cense were to be issued a regular Gen* 
eral Class itoense, and holders^ of the 
Technician iC) Cla^ license were to be 
tesiied regular Technictaii Class II- 



CcJ The 1T& mile distance eli^bilit^f 
criteria for the General (formerlir 
Conditional) Class iicen&e was elimi- 
nated: 

(d) Applicants for any class of anta- 
teur license must take Element Two: 

4e) Holders of tlie Technician Clas 
license wer« giv^i all Noiice prJd- 
leges; and. 

rf ) The maximum permissible input 
pow^fT for Novices was increAsed to 250 
waits. 

3. Subfie<iuen(ly. on April 0. 1973. we 
released a Second Report and Order 
C43 FB 153241 which gare holders of 
the Technician Class license full oper- 
ating privileges above 50 MHzl. and 
which chsnged the term of the Nov See 
Cla£S license from 2 years, non-rei^w- 
able to S yeaLTSi renewable. 

4* The purpose of this Third Report 
and Order is to dispose of the remain ^ 
ing unresolved martyrs. 

5. First, we have decided to take no 
a<:tlon at this tinie on the dual ladder' 
ticenfling structure proposed in the 
Notice^ or on the creation of a ■■Com- 



municator Class'* license havlnp: no l^- 
li'ktraphy privileges or regulrt'^ments. 
We fhrnly believe In the principle, ar- 
ticuLated In the Notice, that in any 11- 
censitig Aj^sLem there should be a lotcl- 
cal relationship bi-tween the qiiallfica- 
Uon requirements and the operator 
prhvUetes authori^s^^d at eacit lict'Uije 
class level. We feel that the *Cammu- 
nicator ClASS". «a prcH>4)^«d, wa« tn 
kef^pknf with this principle: and we do 
not agree with liie maiority fuing 
comments who asserted that the pri'ii- 
leges to be conveyed by the •^Comtnu- 
nicator Class'' were "out of propor- 
tion" io the Qualification require- 
ments. Nevertheless, since much time 
has elapsed since the tssimnce of the 
Notice 14 years », sjid since Ibe Ama- 
teur Radio Sif^rvlee ha.s grown about 
50^ bi that time period (wiih m&n>^ of 
the new llcenseea com ins from the 
Citi^ns Band Radio SrrvlcpK It b our 
beli^t that the eommi»nta» and perhaps 
^ven our orlgLnaJ proposal, have 
tK'come some'Altat outiJated. Then, 
too, tremendous growth has taken 
place in llie dUiena Band Radio Sen-- 
ice tHO<l% in 4 y«atsi: and v« would 
like to f el the vlewi of these newer 11- 
cejiset« on the need or desirability of a 
'^cndeleai" clan of amateur licemie. Ac- 
cordingly, we hope to reiislt this 
matter later this year in a new rule 
making proceeding. 

e. At this time, however, we will ad- 
dress the matter of lifetime Issuance 
of the amateur Extra Class license 
(RM-2030K In the Notice, we proposed 
to adopt this request since our records 
Indicated thai very few pmateura drop 
out of amateur radio alter they have 
attained the amateur Extra Class. We 
pointed out, however, thai while sec* 
lion S034LKU of the Communications 
Act of 1934» as ameodedi allows us to 
Issue operator licenses for life, section 
307<d> limits the term of the ooncomi- 
tantly Issued station license to not 
more than 5 years. At best then, we 
would only be able to eliminate the 
need to retake the examination should 
the amateur neglect to renew hlti (or 
her J license. 

7- in the years Since ihe isstmnre of 
the Notice, however, we have become 
wry simdliivf* to the adverse cffecta 
sucii "spcMiriiiJ case'' consideration can 
have on our various personal (and 



atna-teurU radio service data proce?islng 
sjiiLems, While we gentr^ly retain 
files coniajnlng inlormation about ex- 
pired licenses for periods In excess of 5 
years after the expiration date, to 
maintain these files indcfinately 
would be a new and burdensome re* 
quirement. particularly in view of the 
fact that very few people would be ex- 
pected to take advantage of the 11 fe^ 
time non -examination renewai privi- 
lege. In a separate action, we have 
amended 5&7.13 to extend the ■grace 
period" for all classes of license (rom 
one to five years. This extension will 
accommodate a great variety of per- 
sonal circum.i3tances which has been 
the basis of requests for waiver of the 
'grace period";, and it is, in our opin- 
ion, an equitable altemaUve to a life- 
time, non-exajninatioci renewal privl^ 
le!ge. Accordiii^ly. we have decided to 
take no additional action on this 
matter. 

a. Lastly, the comments filed in re- 
sponse to our suggestion of estabtish^ 
log new power limits based on tran^^ 
mittcr peak envelope power output 
were, in the main, negative. There 
were* however, several respond enls 
who did suggest Innoi^ative alterna- 
tives to our proposal. While we have 
decided to take no furthEr afitlon on 
this matter at this time, we are still of 
the opinion that the state of present* 
day amaieur communications war- 
rants the use of better procedurei to 
determine trarjsroiUer power ihan the 
■plate voltage tim^ current" method. 
We intend to revisit this matter at. a 
later time, and we encourage ama- 
teurs, in the Interim, to develop and 
disseminate data which oould be used 
as a basis for a workable and state-of- 
the-art measurement technique. 

9, Accordingfly. pursuant to the au- 
thority contained En Sections 4U) and 
303 of the ComLmunications Act of 
1934, as amended: £t U OTdered, That 
Ihi? proceeding is terminated. Further 
Information about this action by the 
CoiTuni^ion may be obtained by con- 
tacting Mr. James E. McNally. Person* 
al Radio Division. FCC, 1919 M Bt., 
NW.. Washington. DC. 20554 (202- 
032-7175). 

FedEHAL CowWDTinCATTOIfS 

Commission^ 

WlLUAM J. TAtCAUCO, 

Secretarjf. 



OSCAR Orbits 



J 



Counesy of AMSAT 



The listed data tells you the time and place that OSCAR 7 and 
OSCAR 8 cross ttie equator in an ascending orbit for ttie first time 
each day. To calculate successive OSCAR 7 orbits, mal<:e a list of 
the first orbit number and the next twelve orbits for that day. List 
the time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 115 minutes 
later (two hours less five minutes). The chart gives the longitude of 
the day's first ascending (northbound) equatorial crossing. Add 
29° for each succeeding orbit. When OSCAR is ascending on the 
other side of the world from you, it will descend over you. To find 
the equatorial descending longitude, subtract 166° from the 
ascending longitude. To find the time OSCAR 7 passes the North 
Pole, add 29 minutes to the time it passes the equator. You should 
be able to hear OSCAR 7 when it is within 45 degrees of you. The 
easiest way to determine if OSCAR is above the horizon (and thus 
within range) at your location is to take a globe and draw a circle 
with a radius of 2450 miles (4000 kilometers) from your QTH. If 
OSCAR passes above that circle, you should be able to hear it. If it 
passes right overhead, you should hear it for about 24 minutes 
total. OSCAR 7 will pass an imaginary line drawn from San Fran- 
cisco to Norfolk about 12 mfnutes alter passing the equator. Add 
about a minute for each 200 miles that you live north of this line. If 
OSCAR passes 1 5 * east or west of you, add another minute; at 30 ", 
three minutes; at 45 ', ten minutes. Mode A: 145.85-95 MHz uplink, 
29.4-29.5 MHz downlink, beacon at 29.502 MHz. Mode B: 
432.t25-.175 MHz uplink, 145.975^.925 MHz downlink, beacon at 
145.972 MHz. 

OSCAR 8 calculations are similar to those for OSCAR 1, with 
some important exceptions. Instead of making 13 orbits each day, 
OSCAR 8 makes 14 orbits during each 24 hour period. The orbital 
period of OSCAR 8 is therefore somewhat shorter: 103 minutes. 



To calculate successive OSCAR 8 orbits, make a list of the first 
orbit number (from the OSCAR 8 chart) and the next thirteen orbits 
for that day. List the time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 
then 103 minutes later. The chart gives the longitude of the day's 
first ascending equatorial crossing. Add 26" for each succeeding 
orbit. To find the time OSCAR 8 passes the North Pole, add 26 
minutes to the time it crosses the equator. OSCAR 8 will cross the 
imaginary San Francisco-to-Norlolk line about 11 minutes after 
crossing the equator. Mode A: l45.85-.95 MHz uplink, 29.4-29.50 
MHz downlink, beacon at 29.40 MHz- Mode J: 145,90-146.00 MHz 
uplink, 435.20-435 JO MHz downlink, beacon on 435.090 MHz. 



Oicar 7 Orbital Information 



Ofcar 8 Orbi^tPl Inlomiallon 



Orbit 


date 


Tlm» 


Longltadc 


OrWt 


Odis 


Time 


Longilud* 




mm 


tQMn 


orEq, 




(May) 


^ (GMT} 


of Eq. 
Cmssing '\ 


20387 


1 


O043:4B 


73.a 


5S/VAbn 


1 


0039:21 


53.a 


2O400X 


2 


0138:05 


07.4 


5Sdtx 


2 


0044:32 


f^A 


20412 


Z 


00372S 


72^ 


SdQ&Abfi 


3 


0049^43 


56.4 


2042SX 


4 


0131:42 


iVSA 


S9tQAtHi 


4 


0054:54 


S7.7 


20437 


S 


003102 


70,6 


SXHUtnl 


5 


OlOOvOS 


5^.0 


20450 





01^:19 


S4.2 


9947Jlin 


6 


oioa:ie 


60,3 


204^rp 


7 


0024:40 


m.\ 


S96lAl>fi 


7 


Ot 10:27 


61.7 


50475 


a 


01 ISlST 


82.T 


S^75Ai»n 


S 


0115:38 


S3.0 


20487X 





0018:17 


67 5 


5O60X 


9 


0120:49 


643 


20500 


10 


0112:34 


BU 


fimsAtNi 


10 


0126:00 


65.6 


7m\l 


11 


0011:54 


BSD 


6017Abn 


11 


0131-T1 


66.9 


20^5 


12 


0106:11 


79,6 


6031 Jbfi 


12 


013622 


68^ 


20K37 


T3 


0OO5t31 


64 4 


e045Jbo 


13 


0141:33 


m^ 


2065Oqfp 


14 


oos»^^4a 


71B.0 


SDUAlm 


14 


0003:31 


45,0 


7GS63 


15 


0154:05 


91.6 


e072Abn 


15 


0006:42 


46J 


20575X 


1« 


0053:2fl 


7S4 


Gcwex 


16 


0013:53 


47J 


20508 


17 


0147:43 


ioo 


filOOMo 


17 


0019:04 


49.0 


20600 


1B 


0047:03 


749 


Bt14M»n 


ia 


0084:14 


SOJ 


20613 


19 


014120 


fle-5 


6l2aji3«t 


19 




5!. 6 


20ft25 


20 


0040140 


73:3 


ei42Jt»i 


20 


0034:36 


52.9 


20@39gfp 


21 


0134:57 


ae.9 


6156A&I1 


21 


0039:47 


54.2 


?^m& 


22 


003417 


71 J9 


6l70iAim 


?7 


0044-^ 


55.5 


2nfie3x 


23 


0128:34 


854 


6ia4:i; 


ZJ 


0CS0:O9 


56J 


ajers 


24 


0027S 


TOJ 


6l9aAl>n 


24 


0055:20 


sai 


20f»W 


25 


0*32:12 


A3J 


e212Ahn 


as 


0100:31 


59.4 


20700 


26 


0CS1:32 


eae 


fi226Jbfi 


26 


0tO5:4l 


mA 


20713 


27 


01 15:49 


S2.2 


6240Jtm 


27 


01 10:52 


62J 


2a725Qr(i 


2S 


GDl5t»9 


07 1 


6^4Atirt 


28 


0116:03 


634 


20738 


2g 


0105-26 


ao.7 


62GaAt>n 


29 


0121:14 


647 


20750X 


30 


Q0C^!4e 


65.5 


fv282X 


30 


0126:25 


66.0 


20703 


3T 


0103^ 


mi 


6206Abfi 


31 


0131;3& 


67^ 



161 



DX 



fmmpagB 13 

about evenly between CW and 
SSS. They were active for three 
weeks and operated during the 
CQ'WW 160 Meter Contest. 

Annateur radio operators in 
Sweden ar^d the U.S, wid at- 
tempt direct contact between 
Bishop Hilt, Illinois, and Biskop- 
skuila. Up pi and, Sweden, dur- 
ing the weekend of May 26th 
and 27th. Bishop Hill was a 
communal settlement estab- 
lished in the 1840s by Swedish 
immigrants, and is now a 
historical site maintained by 
the state of Illinois. Led by 
W9FKC and SMQFY, the two 
groups will contact as many 
stations as possible during the 
time period. Special QSLs will 
be issued, and SASEs are re* 
quested. QSL to WA9AQN. 

The Wiesbaden Amateur Ra* 
dio Club will be going on a DX- 
pedition to Lichtenstein from 26 
May to 3 June. They will be us- 
ing the callsign HB0XAA. The 
frequencies they will be using 
are: 3.780, 7.090, 14.280, 21350, 
28.650 SSB, and 25 Hz up from 
the bottom for CW. For the 
Novices, some of them will iry 
to get on at other times, but 
nothing Is scheduled so far The 
QSL manager will be Hugo 
Jakobljevich DJ0LC, Am Wein- 
berg 10, 6201 Auringen. 

8EATA ISLAND 

The fol lowing letter from Tim 
H18MFP wraps up the recent 
H11RCD operation from Beata 
Island: 

*The Beata expedition was a 
success, with more than three 
thousand contacts in 52 hours 
of operation. Fifty-three coun- 
tries were contacted. The first 
contact took place at 2045 GMT 
on the 25th, and the last was 
made at 1234 GMT on the 28th, 

"The trip on the boat to the 
island was excellent. We left the 
island six hours before the set 
time, on the recommendations 
of Navy authorities who said 
they were expecting changes in 
the water currents which would 
make the trip back dangerous. 

"QSL information should be 
sent to: Beata Operation, PO 
Box 2191, Santo Domingo, 
Dominican Republic, West In- 
dies (or via bureau: PO Box 
1157, Santo Domingo, Domin- 
ican Repubiic). The cards are 
already being printed and we 
hope to start mailing them 
soon. We would like to remind 
all those who contacted us on 
the 27th to send an SAE and 3 
IRCs in order to receive the first 
day cover. 

"The prefix HI1 was activated 
for the first time, and now we 
are compiling all the infomna- 



tlon to be sent to the ARRL in 
order to try to qualify Beata as a 
new country. If this goal is 
achieved* the group would be 
wiHing to repeat the operation 
next year for a week, 

"Thank you for your coopera- 
tion, and we hope you appre- 
ciate our effort." 

DX NOTEBOOK 

Bangladesh S2 

S2BTF shows regularly on 
Saturdays near 14275 MHz 
after 1700Z. 

Qatar AT 

A7XAH has been showing 
around 14225 kHz between 
1300Z and 1500Z on Fridays. 
This is a list operation. 

Senegal 6W8 

eWSHL has N1ACW as MC 
on 14260 kHz from 2100Z daily. 
At 2245Z they shift to 21275 
kHz. 

South Georgia VP0 

VP8SU has GaKTJ and QSL 
manager G3RCA running the 
list Sundays from 1900Z to 
2100Z on 14280 kHz, He atso 
hangs around this area during 
the week. 

Minami Torishlma KA1 

KA1NC regularly offers this 
rare one to 58DXCC hunters at 
1100Zon3798kHz. 

Christmas Island VK9X1 

This is a club station and 
usually is activated on meeting 
nights. Look for it Wednesdays 
around 14225 kHz after 1530Z, 

Aves Island YVilAA 

If you receive this magazine 
early, you may still be able to 
catch this one. The operation 
opens April 28th and will 
secure on May 1st at around 
O0OOZ. The frequencies to 
watch are: 3796. 7086, 14196, 
21245, 21295, and 28495 on 
SSB, and 25 kHz up from the 
bottom edge on CW. They will 
announce listening frequen- 
cies* 

Peter Island 

Willy got to Peter Island just 
about on schedule, but after an 
on-site survey, any landing at- 
tempt had to be scrubbed. WiHy 
decided to head east through 
the Drake Passage and into the 
Atlantic. He should have 
passed through ZD9 in April, 
and present plans call for stops 
at PYO/Trinidad In May, 
possibly PYO/St, Peter-St. Paul 
In June, and then on to the 
Azores by the end of July. 

46,100 QSOs IN 1978 

With a last-minute spurt on 
December 30th and 31st which 
netted 640 QSOs. Dick Spence- 




Dick KV4AA and his SSB operating posttion, where many of the 
more than 48,000 QSOs in 1978 were made. 



ley KV4AA wound up 1978 with 
a total of 48,100 contacts. This 
was an average of 131 per day, 
or one QSO every 11 minutes of 
1978. 

About 55 percent of the con- 
tacts were on CW. with the bal- 
ance on SSB. A total of 199 
countries were worked, with on- 
ly a couple of them being 
"chased." Assorted equipment 
held up nicety, as did Dtck's 
73-year-old health. 

Continuous calling by Euro- 
pean stations on CW (even dur- 
ing QSOs) and the cooperation 
of U.S.A, SSB ops. plus contest 
operations, made large totals 
easy. KV4AA took part in just 
about every contest that turned 
up. Otherwise. QSOs, though 
short, were not of the "contest** 
or "DXpedltion" variety. This 
makes a difference of three 
QSOs per minute versus one 
every three minutes. 

All this started in 1976, when 
Dick's AJ3AA bicentennial call 
resulted in 36.335 QSOs, or an 
average of 96 per day. A goal of 
36,500 contacts was set for 
1978—100 per day. When this 
was passed on October i9th, a 
new goal of 45,000 was set. This 
was met on December 14th. and 
another 3,100 were worked. 

It ts realized that certain fac* 
tors are a **must" for such 
totals, such as a fairly *'dxotic" 
call and pJenty of time. This will 
limit most. KV4AA was not on 
continuously, as he works daily 
until 1:00 pm. Until the latter 
part of the year, he was seldom 
on after 7:00 pm. Stations con- 
tacted twice or more often dur- 
ing the same day were only 
counted one time, unless the 
mode and band were different. 

Invaluable aid was given the 
project by YASME (WA6AHF> 
and other West Coast hams 
who handled the KV4AA QSUng 
chores. 

KV4AA*s three-year total now 
stands at 115,280 contacts. 
Dick says, "This year, we 
rest — but *t ain*t easy getting 
used to," 



THE RUSSIAN WOODPECKER 

The following report Is from 
the West Coast DX Buffetm and 
was compiled by a W3. 

**\f you have not heard this 
one, you have not been on the 
air in the last year or two. Like a 
lot of other things, you try to 
live with it and wish it woutd go 
away — but it seldom does* 
Maybe if you know a bit more 
about it» it might help to 
tolerate the burden. 

*Th8 'woodpecker' is a long- 
range radar; the range can be 
estimated by noticing thai the 
repetition corresponds to 
25-wpm CW dots. At this speed, 
the time from dot to dot is 96 
milliseconds. This means that 
the radar range is roughly 47 
miliion feet, or 8950 miles. This 
on-the-air estimate was done 
without instruments, so it is 
probably a bit in error. If the ac- 
tual design range was 15,000 
km, or 9320 miles, the error 
would be only 4%. 

^'Presuming a ten-million- 
Watt source, and 18 dBi of 
antenna gain, the effective 
radiated power, erp, is SB dBW, 
However, if you figure twenty 
meters at 1000 miles, this im- 
mense signal is reduced by 
path loss to a mere ,0006 of a 
Watt. 

"This might make some think 
that a one Watt jammer would 
have an advantage over the 
woodpecker of 1000:1 » but this 
is not correct. Not all of a jam- 
ming signal will be effective un- 
less it is able to pass through 
the i-f and video filters of the 
radar A constant carrier Is not 
effective at all, because it is re- 
jected as a dc signal by the ac- 
Goupled video circuitry of the 
radar. 

"However, CW dots will get 
through. Assuming a rise time 
of one millisecond for amateur 
CW, an additional 20-dB advan- 
tage is given back to the racfar 
because of the mismatch in rise 
time, video bandwidth, and cor- 
ner frequency. Notice that the 
CW dot jammer, even if only us- 
ing one Watt, still has a 10:1 ad-^ 



162 



vantage. A lOO-^Watt or a 1000- 
Watt signal would be even bet- 
ter, 

"Tliere is some reason to 
believe that much of the above 
IS true. For one thing, the 
woodpecker is only heard on 
the phone bands, where voice 
envelopes can be rejected by 
the radar video circuitry. Also. 
If someone Is sending CW dots 
at 25 wpm, the woodpecker 
usually shifts frequency within 
five minutes. 

*'Some have noted that con- 
tinuous 25-wpm CW dots on the 
woodpecker^s frequency have 
caused them to stop transmit- 
ting—one time, for a period of 
three weeks. The woodpecker 
then returned with 3 new gim- 
mick. When problems devel- 
opedt the woodpecker wouid 



switch to another frequency on 
the amateur band." 

This seems very interesting, 
and while we sure aren't ad- 
vocating intentional jamming, it 
would be interesting to experi* 
ment around with. The problem 
is. we aren't sure which would 
be worse, the woodpecker or a 
bunch of endless CW dots at 25 
wpm. 

OX RIDDLE 

Which three DXCC countries 
ail share the same prefix, in- 
cluding numericai designator, 
yet are located within separate 
continentai boundaries? 

QSL INFORMATION 

3X1IX to Box 477. Conakry 
4X4CW to WB0YHe 



5R8EAto026MI 

601 FG to IISDUD 

6W8HL to Box 5012, Dakar 

8Q7AF/AG to WB4ZNH 

9J2BO to W60RD 

9M8HG to Box 2242, Kuchtng, 

Sarawak. Borneo 
9N1MM to W3KVQ/N7EB 
A7XAH to DJ9ZB 
FM7W0 to JH3XCU 
FR7ZL/T to N4NX 
IY7EX to i7DP0 
JDIYAto JH1RNZ 
K1CO/PJ7toK3RYA 
KA1IWtoK8DYZ 
KAINCto K4JEX 
KH3AA to Box 69. APO SF 

96305 
KP4AM/D to Box 717, Oakland 

CA 
LU32Y to LU2CN 
S2BTFt0 I0JN 
ST0HFtoG4GFI 



T2T to W5SBO 
TF3CWto K1RH 
VOeONTtoVOIHP 
VP2DXA/B/C/D to W8UVZ 
VP2LGK/LGL J6LGL/LGK to 

WB4SXX 
VP2MBHtoW0SH 
VPSHXto WA1SQB 
VP8SU to G3RCA 
VQ9MR to N5GU 
VRIBDto W5RB0 
VR3AK to Box 30323, Honolulu 

H\ 96820 
VB6TC to W6HS 
VS5CW to Box 398, BSB, Brunei 
WA7JRUSU to W8I.ZV 
WH4AAA to W5RU 
YV0AA to Box 2285. Caracas OF 
2D9GH to ZS1Z 

Many thanks to the West 
Coast Dx Bulietln, Long Island 
DX Association Bulletin, and 
WoridRadio Magazine. 



New Products 



from page 2B 

but also allows the internal 
speaker to remain unmuted. 

The Communicator II has in- 
corporated a novel mounting 
bracket which allows forward 
and backward slide adjustment 
to accommodate virtually any 
mobile mounting position. The 
transceiver mount mates with 
the mounting bracket slides 
and the unit is secured In place 
with two quick-turn knobs. Also 
included with the Communi- 
cator il is a desk-top bracket 
which snaps in place to elevate 
the front of the unit for indoor 
use. 

A 24-pin accessory connector 
is mounted on the rear of the 
transceiver. Five connections 
are factory wired: PTT, ground, 
af input, af output, and 13.8 V, 
These will allow easy installa- 
tion of TT, phone patch, or 
subaudible tones. The nineteen 
unconnected pins allow indlvid* 
ualistic modification without 
case damage. 

The Communicator II, priced 
at $399.00, carries a dealer- 
backed, factory warranty of one 
full year. Pathcom, fnc.^ 
Amateur Radio Products Group, 
24105 South frampton Ave., 
Harbor City CA 90710, 

A. G. Vaughan K5FQY 
Los Alamos UM 



A GREAT NEW HAND HELD 
FROM HEATH 

The amateur market is crowd* 
ed wHh two meter rigs, yet I had 
tjeen having problems fir^ding 
one that would fit the budget of 
a high-school student. Then one 
day a new Heathkit catalog ap- 
peared in my mailbox. GJancing 
through the catalog, I found just 
what i had t>een seeking: Heath 
had coma out with a new hand- 



held called the VF'2031. I was 
not only impressed with it, but 
also I could afford it. 

Before I was to purchase ft, 
however, there were two prob- 
lems that had to be resolved. 
First of all J I had heard com- 
plaints from owners of Heath's 
previous hand-held, the HW- 
2021, which was recently dis- 
continued, ft seems that the 
2021 had many design prob- 
lems. Was the VF-2031 going to 
have gremlins also? After some 
reflection, I rationalized that 
Heath most likely had received 
much feedback on the previous 
rig's problems, and planned to 
eliminate similar problems from 
the VF-2031. The second thing 
that had me concerned was a 
notice in the catalog at the bot- 
tom of the rig's description. 
This little b?urb stated that the 
kit was not recommended for 
beginning kit-builders. Al- 
though I had previously built 
several Neathkits, I was certain* 
)y not in the running for the "Kit- 
Builder's Hall of Fame." I finally 
decided that if 1 was to become 
experienced in electronics, this 
would be a good test of my abili- 
ty. Besides, in the back of mind. 
I knew that I could do it. Subse- 
quently, I decided to buy the kit. 

Two weeks after ordering, my 
kit arrived. After opening the 
carton, the first thing that had 
to be done was to make several 
changes in the assembly man- 
ual as directed by a correction 
sheet. After this was complet- 
ed, 1 glanced through the man- 
ual to become familiar with the 
construction of my hand-held. 
Heathkit manuals are a plea- 
sure to read; every step is laid 
out in a clear, precise manner. 
There is even a separate book of 
diagrams so that one need not 
constantly flip between pages 
in the manual. Heath also pro- 



vides various goodies to aid In 
kit construction: solder^ desol- 
dering braid, nut drivers, and 
alignment tools. The only tool 
that I did not have for construc- 
tion of the kit was a pair of wire 
strippers. Although they are not 
necessary, past experience told 
me that these devices are very 
useful; I also feared that if I con- 
tfnuad to strip wires with my 
teeth, f would become a Leon 
Spinks look*alJke. A quick trip to 
the house of a friend (Mike 
WB7ECW) netted me a pair of 
wire strippers. 

Construction 

After putting aside the drop- 
in charger that was built in 
almost no time at all, I was 
ready to start the construction 
of the hand-held. Glancing at 
the printed circuit board, I 
realized that I would have to be 
careful while installing parts; 
the board Is very crowded and 
things could become a bit rough 
If I had to remove a component 
that was tightly surrounded by 
others. 

Since the board was com- 
pact, most components were 
mounted vertically. There was 
no room for Heath to put com* 
ponent values or numbers on 
the board, but what they did do, 
however, was put different sym- 
bols on the board for the com- 
ponents. A darkened4n circle, 
for example, was the symbol for 
a resistor. In this way, one could 
tell the relative positions of the 
components on the board. 

Be careful of component 
placement with this method, as 
it can easily lead to confusion. 
At the time, however, i felt that I 
couldn't possibly install a com- 
ponent incorrectly. It was be- 
cause of this attitude that a 
replacement choke had to be 
ordered. I was trying to remove 
a choke that was installed in the 
wrong spot {it seemed as good 
a spot as any after several 
hours of work) and, much to my 
dismay, I removed a lead from 
the choke at the same time. This 



wasn't enough for me, however, 

as I ended up breaking the gtass 
body of a diode while making 
room for a capacitor that was to 
be installed. Moral of the story: 
Take frequent breaks and do not 
rush through the construction 
of any electronic kit. 

Another thing that 1 had to be 
careful about was component 
values. Poor lighting can raise 
havoc with one's eyes, so I 
made sure that there was 
enough light so as to not strain 

PliDtos by Scc^tt RumlMugh 




The VF-2037 as 
charger. 



it sits in its 



163 





Circuit board close-up. Note that the PC board is doubie-sided. 



my eyes, ft is very difficult to 
read the color code of a resistor 

H the only source Of Illumina- 
tion in the room is a desk lamp 
in the corner of the workbench- 
Also, a 22 pF capacitor looked 
very much like one of the 22 pF 
capacitors, as the decimal point 
was very faint, A similar prob- 
lem arises with the small glass- 
tK>died diodes; the bands are 
hard to see. If In doubt, one 
should use the magnifying 
glass that Heath encloses. 

The printed circuit board is di- 
vided into six sections, After 
one section is completed. It is 
then time to move on to the next 
section. Heath provides some 
hints that might eliminate much 
misery. They suggest that one 
should take breaks and inspect 
each section after completion. 
These warnings make the kit 
sound as if it is very difficult to 
build, however, which it Is not. I 
found the PC board construc- 
tion to be fairly simple; it wasn't 
nearly as hard as 1 had expect- 
ed* The hardest part of the kit 
was wiring, I had to be careful 
that my soldering iron didn't 
burn any insulation from adja- 
cent wires while I was solder- 
ing. This was especially true 
with the switch wiring, which 
was fairly tight and constituted 
the hardest part of construe* 
tion. 

Allgnmeiit 

After a week of hibernation in 
my workshop (i.e., bedroom), 
the construction of the hand- 
held was complete. At this 
point, I brought out my trusty ol' 
VOM to make the resistance 
measurements. Everything 
checked out fine; at least my rig 
wasn't going to go up In smoke 
when power was applied, 1 was 
now ready to proceed and align 
the rig. 

Alignment procedures have 
always been the worst part of 
kit construction for ma. It is 
always frustrating to adjust one 
coil and then have to go back 
and readjust another coil, 
repeating this process over and 



over. I was afraid that the six 
pages of alignment steps were 
going to take longer to com- 
plete than the actual construc- 
tion of the rig. As it turned out, 
these steps were completed in a 
couple hours and were not very 
difficuit. 

The only piece of test equip- 
ment needed for alignment is a 
VOM, an Instrument that almost 
every ham owns or at least has 
access to, Rf signal generators, 
deviation meters, frequency 
counters, and wattmeters are 
other instruments that are 
helpful, but they are not re- 
quired for alignment. 

Several test points on the cir- 
cult board simplify the align- 
ment procedure. All I had to do 
was hook my voltmeter to these 
test points and use the align- 
ment tool to adjust the circuit 
colls for a peak or dip reading 
on the meter. The only rough 
spot in alignment that I encoun- 
tered was with the receiver front 
end. The voltmeter readings 
hardly varied at all as 1 tried to 
peak the coils. If I had had an rf 
generator, things would have 
been a lot easier. I then remem- 
bered that 1 had a portable VHF 
receiver. I tuned this receiver 
10 J MHz below the hand-heid's 
receive frequency. The VHF re- 
ceiver's circuits put out a hefty 
signal that could be picked up 
on my hand-held. Voilal I now 
have an rf signal generator. 

[ then adjusted the transmit- 
ter section, getting a little more 
than two Watts output power. 
The deviation potentiometer 
was set to mid range because I 
didn't have a deviation meter, 
l^ter, 1 fine-tuned this control 
while on the air. 

The final alignment step was 
to gel the hand-hetd exactly on 
frequency, I borrowed a fre- 
quency counter from my elec- 
tronics teacher, since the align* 
ment without a counter involved 
more work than with one. In 
other words, Tm lazy! I quickly 
adjusted the trimmer inductors 
for each installed crystal. Now 
that the con struct ion ol my 



hand-held was complete, I was 
on the air. 

Operation 

As soon as i put the trans- 
ceiver on the air. 1 began to get 
excellent signal reports. The 
audio was good and I was get* 
ting into the repeater fine. 
Needless to say, it was good for 
my ego to have the rig work well. 
A day or two later, however, i ran 
into a problem. WB7NML had 
given me a call on the local 
repeater; when I answered, he 
didn't respond. I called him 
again, but he again did not re- 
ply. He then cleared and I no- 
ticed that the receiver was 
"motorboaling." I then realized 
the problem: Nicads don't stay 
charged forever The nicads in 
the VF-2031 last about ten 
hours on a charge, and on the 
previous night 1 had forgotten to 
place the transceiver in its 
charger. 

Conclusion 

The VF'2031 has many 
features that have made it 
worth more than the $190 that 
Heath asks for it, including: 

• eight channel capability 

• 146.94 f^ Hz crystal 

• only one crystal per channel 
Is used; one crystal renders 
one receive and three (-600 
kHz, simplex, +600 kHz) 
transmit frequencies 

• separate microphone and 
speaker built in 

• BNC antenna Jack 

• battery-saving squelch cir- 
cuit 

• earphone 

• many available accessories 
(external microphone, contin- 
uous tone encoder, auto- 
patch encoder, amplifier, and 
holster-type carrying case) 
As demonstrated by the 

above features and the quality 
of the rig, It Is obvious Heath 
has come out with a winner--- 
the VF-2031, 

Mark Rumbaugh WB7NMM 

Corvallis OR 

THE MIDLAND 13-51 0— 
A USER REVIEW 

For quite some lime, i have 
been wanting and trying to get 
active on two meter Ffvf. it 
wasn't until just recently that 1 
found myself in a position to 
make the big jump and pur* 
chase that two meter rig. Want- 
ing to get the most rig for the 
amount of money spent, 1 did a 
lot of studying in past issues of 
73 Magazine to see if anyone 
had ever reviewed the various 
pieces of two meter mobile rigs 
and, if so, what they had to say 
about them. At first, as many 
articles were published on add- 
ing channels to the loom IG* 
22S, I thought that this would 
be an easy rig to work with. 
Then the many various ham 
outlet stores started to have 
theif year -end sales. The prices 



looked better with each issue 
of 73. Finally, I made the big 
jump and called one of the 
leading stores. They were all 
out of the IC-22S, as well as 
most of the crystal -contra I led 
rigs. I also noticed in their 
advertisement that the Midland 
synthesized model 13-510 was 
being listed at $100.00 betow 
suggested retail. Luck of the 
poor be with me, they had one. 
So I made the choice, and I 
believe that i made a very wise 
choice. 1 anxiously awaited the 
UPS truck: after five days* I 
received the Midland. As I 
opened the box and pulled out 
the transceiver, 1 noticed how 
everything was carefully 
packed. 1 started reading the in- 
struction book and found it to 
be very straightforward. In no 
time whatever. I had the rig in- 
stalled and operating. 

A check of the local repeater 
frequency showed no activity, 
so I switched down to the 
Louisville repeater frequency. 
The Louisville repeater is about 
forty miles or more from my 
home, but there was activity on 
the channel. I waited and lis- 
tened for a clear period of time 
to make a try at keying the re* 
peater I pushed the mike but- 
ton and gave my call to see if 
anything would happen. What a 
thrill to have a Loyisville sta- 
tion come back to me and ask 
for my location. Since then, I 
have met many new hams on 
both the local and the Louis- 
ville repeaters. Believe me, this 
is the mode to use, as there is 
no noise, lots of consideration 
and assistance to the new- 
comer on the band, and many 
good interference-free QSOs, 

After getting used to the 
Midland, I decided to see what 
all was in the book and learn a 
little more about the rig. What a 
treasure*trove of information I 
found. Let's see what we have. 

First off, the Midland Is an 
all-synthesized unit covering 
the range of 146.00 to 147.995 
MHz. it has a one-Watt low- 
power position and a 25-Watt 
high-power position. The 
modulation is direct F*3 and re* 
quires a 600-Ohm microphone, 
which IS furnished. The primary 
power requirement is 13.B vofts 
positive dc plus or minus 15%, 
Duplex shift for plus 600 and 
minus 600 kHz is furnished. 
Two provisions are provided for 
other offset frequencies. 

In the receiver, the following 
information is furnished, it is a 
double superhet, with a first i-f 
of 16.9 MHz and a second i-f of 
455 kHz. The sensitivity is 
claimed to be .5 microvolts with 
20 dB of quieting at a signal-to- 
noise ratio of .3 microvolts at 12 
dB or more. The audio output is 
1.5 Watts into an eight-Ohm 
load. Frequency control is the 
popular PLL covering the range 
of 127.1 to 131.1 MHz with no 



164 



doubling in the PLL There are 
39 transistors. 10 FETs, 14 m- 
tegrated circuits^ and 23 diodes 
in the set. The fotlowing ac- 
cessories are included: mobile 
mount* dynamic micmphone, 
mike hanger, a spare ?-Amp 
fuse, external speaker plug, 
and an accessory plug for the 
accessory socKet on the rear 
paneL The mount is a snap*in 
unit, which makes it very easy 
to remove the rig If you don*t 
want to leave It in the car. The 
power cable has a three-pin 
socket that makes for easy re- 
moval and is so arranged that 
only the proper polarity can be 



obtained when plugging the rrg 
in. 

The really amazing thing 
about the entire unft is the 
amount of information that is 
furnished in the operator's 
manoaL Midland really had the 
do-it-yourself amateur in mind 
when ihey printed the manual. 
The manual includes, in addi* 
tion to basic hookup and oper- 
ating instructions^ the follow- 
ing: block diagram, schematic 
diagram, wiring diagram, volt- 
age chart, frequency tabie with 
a frequency breakdown dia- 
gram, top and bottom chassis 
photos, detailed printed circuit 



board diagrams, FET, transis- 
tor, and IC terminal guide, coax 
cable plug assembly diagram, 
and, the most valuable of all, 
complete alignment instruc- 
tions. As you can see, it is one 
of the most complete manuals 
that I have seen on amateur 
equipment in some time, 

t do not have the facilities to 
run any real technical signal-to- 
noise tests or to check the man- 
ufacturer's specifications for 
what is claimed, but 1 can tell 
you that all of the on-the-air 
checks have been very satisfy- 
ing. The audio Is very ciear and 



plenty adequate for norma! 
use. Very little squelch control 
rotation is needed to have full 
quieting. All in all, I would rate 
the Midland 13-510 as one of 
the best units on the market for 
under three hundred dollars. I 
hope you enjoy your rig as 
much as I do mine, and maybe 
someday I will hear you on one 
of the repeaters across the 
country. See you on two FM. 

Mfdiand internattonaf, PO 
Box 1903, Kansas City MO 
64141. Reader service number 
M41, 

Billy L. Nielsen WB4APC 

Radcliff KY 



Social E/ents 



fromp&ge 723 

32233. Price at the door will be 
$3,50. 

A large indoor swap area will 
be featured, with advance table 
reservations available for $6.00 
per table per day from Robbie 
Roberts KH6FMOAA^4. 10557 At- 
lantic Blvd., #31. Jacksonville. 
Florida 32211. Information on 
exhibitors* booths and space 
are available from the same ad- 
dress- 
Other features and programs 
include statewide organization 
meetings on such topics as traf- 
fic nets and MARS, a micropro- 
cessor seminar, a solar power 
demonstration, a DX "pileup" 
contest, a hidden transmitter 
hunt, an OSCAR forum, ARRL 
forums* emergency prepared- 
ness programs, DX and contest 
presentations, antenna and 
technical seminars, and much 
more. 

More general information 
may be obtained from J HA, 911 



Rio St. Johns Dr., Jacksonville 
FL 32211. 

LITTLE ROCK AR 
AUG 4-5 

The Central Arkansas Radio 
Emergency Net (CAREN) Ama- 
teur Radio Club will hold its 
second annual Ham-a-Rama on 
Saturday and Sunday, August 
4-5, 1979. at the Arkansas State 
Fairgrounds, Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas. There will be two main 
prizes given, as well as door 
prizes. Featured will be forums, 
dealers' exhibits, a Saturday 
night party, and a large flea 
market. Talk-in on 146.34/ .94. 
For details, send an SASE to 
Morris Middleton AD5M, 19 Elm- 
hersl Drive, Little Rock AR 
72209. 

ANGOLA IN 
AUG 5 

The Steuben County Radio 
Amateurs will hold their annual 
F.M, Picnic and Ham f est on 
Sunday, August 5, 1979, at 



Corrections 



1 received some comments 
on my article. "Build a Hybrid 
Capacity Meter" (March, 1979, 
page 40), and would like to 
respond. 

Through my error, I did not 
catch the missing value of the 
bypass capacitor on pin 5 of the 
555 {IC 1 ). This component is op- 
tional, but if it is desired, a 
value of .01 to .1 uF will do. 

I also received a letter con- 
cerning inaccuracy on ranges 
other than the one which is 
calibrated. I double-checked 
mine and the accuracy Is more 
than adequate. For those re- 
quiring the ultimate m ac- 
curacy, the following may be 
performed: Select a 1%, or 
smaller, tolerance capacitor 
that will be a midrange value 



for the selected range (e.g., =:50 
pF for the 1-to-100-pF range) 
and adjust the calibration con- 
trol for exactly 50 pF, The scale 
will than be as accurate as your 
capacitor, less any nonlinearity 
of the meter. Naturally, the 
range switch should be on the 
desired range. 

I also received a call 
concerning an inability to get a 
full-scale reading when testing 
a capacitor that would normal- 
ly read at, or near, full scale. 
This can be caused by several 
things: leaky rectifier diodes, 
leaky filter capacitor, meter 
resistance is too high, or the 
clock frequency is too low. The 
clock should be operating be- 
tween 200 and 300 kHz, 

Glen A. Oeibert WA4HUU 
Fayetteville KC 



Crooked Lake, Angola, Indiana. 
There will be prizes, picnic- 
styie barbecued chicken, in- 
side tables for exhibitors and 
vendors, and overnight camp- 
ing (fee charged by county 
park). Tatk'in on 146.52 and 
147.81^.21, Admission is $2.00. 

CEDARTOWf^ GA 
AUG 12 

The Cedar Valley Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
Cedar Valley Hamfest on Au- 
gust 12, 1979, from 8:00 am to 
4:00 pm at the Polk County 
Fairgrounds, on US 278* two 
miles east of Cedartown, 
Georgia. There will be food, 
drinks, and prizes. Talk-in on 
147.72/.12 (WR4AZU), For more 
information, please contact 
Jim T. Schliestett W4IMQ, 
Secretary, Cedar Valley ARC. 
PO Box 93, Cedartown GA 
30125. or phone (404)-748'596e. 

LEXINGTON KY 
AUG 12 

The Bluegrass Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
Central Kentucky Hamfest on 
August 12, 1979, at the Fasig- 
Tipton Sales Paddock, Newton 
Pike, Lexington, Kentucky. The 
program will Include grand 
prizes, hourly door prizes, 
manufacturers' exhibits, an in- 
door/outdoor flea market, guest 
speakers, and forums. For infor- 
mation, contact the Bluegrass 
Amateur Radio Club, Inc, PO 
Bom 4411, Lexington KY 40504, 

PETOSKEY Ml 
AUG 18-19 

The Straits Area Radio Club 
will hold its Swap "n Shop and 
hamfest on August 18-19, 1979, 
at Petoskey Middle School, 
State and Howard Streets, 
across from the Catholic 
church and post office, Petos- 
key, Michigan. There will be a 
donation of $2.00 at the door. 
Table space is also $2.00. 
Refreshments will be available. 
There will be a swap and shop 
on Saturday from 9:00 am to 
4:00 pm and on Sunday from 
9:00 am to 12:00 pm. Prizes, a 
ladies' program, and seminars 
at 1 1 :00 am and 2:00 pm on Sat- 



urday will be featured. A ban- 
quet at the Holiday Inn on Sat- 
urday at 7:00 pm will have 
Mellish Reef DXpedltioner Bob 
Walsh WA8M0A as guest 
speaker. Banquet tickets are 
$7.50 and are limited to 200, 
sold in advance only. For full In- 
formation and lodging, send an 
SASE to Bill Moss WA8AXFp 
715 Harvey Street, Petoskey Ml 
49770, or phone (6ie)-347-4734. 

ROSEMOm' IL 
SEP 7-9 
Tfre Quarter Century Wireless 
Association will hold its 1979 

Chicago Convention on Sep- 
tember 7-9, 1979, at the 
O'Hare/Kennedy HoHday Inn, 
Rosemont, Illinois. The com- 
plete package for the three days 
is $35.00. Special room rates will 
also be available. There will be 
the annual banquet, special 
ladies* program, various tours, 
and prizes. For reservations and 
information, write Phil Haller 
W9HPG, 6000 S. Tripp. Chicago 
IL 60629. 

PECATONICA IL 
SEP 9 

The Rockford Amateur Radio 
Association will hold its second 
annual Rockford Hamfest and 
Illinois State ARRL Convention 
on Sunday, September 9, 1979, 
at the exhibition hall at the Win- 
nebago County Fairgrounds at 
Pecatonica, Illinois, just west of 
Rockford on US Rte, 20. Tickets 
are $2.00 in advance or $2-50 at 
the gate. Tickets are available 
by mail by writing RARA, PO 
Box 1744, Rockford, Illinois 
61110. Please include an SASE 
for tickets by malL Prizes in- 
clude a Kenwood TS-520S trans- 
ceiver and an Atlas receiver. 
Campsites are available on site, 
with electric and sanitary 
hookup available. There are 300 
flea-market tables available at a 
nominal charge. Plenty of free 
parking is available. Featured 
will be speakers, forums, dem- 
onstrations, and discussions. A 
hamfest menu, including hot 
dogs, BBQ, and soft drinks will 
be available at reasonable 
prices. Talk-in on 146,01/,61 or 
146.52. 



16S 



COMPLETELY 

FREE-STANDING, 

TELESCOPING TOWERS. 



Ball AdlramlaGk for 

New & Used Gear l Friendly Advice 

Tothfree Order Number 

1 -800-833-8680"^ 

'For technical information order/repair status 
or within N.Y. State, cail (518) 642-8350 

TfTTrnr^ w^rr Radio 
ill J 3J Supply 

185-191 West Mam Street • P.O Box 88 
Amsterdam, N Y 12010 Tel (518] 842-8350 
Jysl 5 minutes from N-Y. Ttiruway— EjeiI: 27 



"J40f> series 



740O 


.10 


7454 


.1^' 7^55 


.40 


740J 


.10 


7460 


.10 74137 


.40 


7402 


.10 


747^^ 


.15 74161 


.60 


740S 


.10 


7473 


.IS 7^1fi2 


.60 


7406 


.20 


7474 


.15 741fi3 


.60 


7^10 


.10 


7475 


.30 741^4 


.60 


7413 


.20 


7476 


,20 74170 


1.50 


741? 


,20 


7483 


.50 74173 


1.00 


7420 


ao 


7489 


1.50 74174 


.70 


7425 


-IS 


7491 


.40 74175 


,70 


7426 


.15 


7492 


.40 74177 


.50 


7430 


.10 


7496 


.40 7*1130 


.5" 


7437 


.15 


74100 l.On 741S1 


1.50 


7433 


.15 


74107 


.20 741S2 


,50 


7440 


.10 74122 


.30 74185 1.75 


7441 


.40 74123 


.50 74189 


2.50 


7442 


,40 


74132 


,50 74150 


.70 


7445 


,40 


74X41 


.60 74191 


.70 


744a 


.50 74145 


.50 741^2. 


.70 


7450 


.10 


74151 


.40 74193 


.70 



74195 
74200 



.70 
2,50 



74H00 


,15 


74H04 


,15 


74H11 


.15 


74H40 


.15 


74H50 


.15 


74H51 


.15 


74H54 


.15 


74H55 


.20 


7^H60 


.20 


74Hf;i 


,25 


74HG2 


.25 


74B72 


.25 


74H74 


.25 



74L05 . 15 

74L10 .15 

74t20 .15 

74L30 . 15 

74L42 .50 

74L51 . 15 
74L54 

74L55 
74L71 
74L72 
74L73 



741.1 ?3 X.OO 



15 
15 

15 
25 

30 



74L0O 
74Ij02 
74im 

74L04 



,15 
.15 
.15 

.15 



74L74 .45 
74LB9 1.^5 
74L&0 .70 
74L91 *70 
74L53 .70 
74L95 .70 
74L9a 1.35 
74L157 .90 
74L164 .90 



74E00 


.30 


74,^03 


.10 


74S05 


.30 


74510 


.30 


74S15 


.30 


74320 


.30 


74522 


.30 


74S40 


.30 


74564 


,40 


74S65 


.40 


74S74 


.75 


74SI36 


1.10 


74S112 


1.20 


74SU1 


1.20 


74S151 


.75 


74S157 


1.00 


74S200 


4.00 



301fi .15 

.ia4£{ .45 

305H .45 

3nfiH 2,00 

307H ,20 

307N .20 

30eH .55 

mm ,55 

311H .45 
312H . 95 
31?H ,95 
320K 1.00 
(5,12,151 
322N 1.15 
340K 1.10 
(6 ^8 f 12 f 
15, IB, 24) 
371H 1,15 
373H .50 
373H 1.35. 



fVSS 



*iCIDSB3UT SfltE 
*TVee Substitution 
*$10 miniimin oiider 



^All parts guaranteed 
*S&rid all ofdisrs to; 

•OOti c>P(3^)re phone {7 14) 
S64-1550 Stmdav only 



WEIR 



6746 Palm Ave. Highland, CA 92346 




3 7 EN 


.30 


llOlRf 


377K 


2.00 


1103N 


3a0M- 


B .90 


1403^ 


secH 


,90 


1403N 


3 BIN 


1.00 


1404W 


S55N 


.45 


250JIJ 


55 5H 


.45 


2524CN 


56 =M 


1,10 


252aM 


56fiK 


1.25 


2602N 


703H 


,20 


5013N 


70 3N 


,20 


501&J 


709H 


.15 


S017M 


711M 


.15 


505OH 


72311 


.30 


5n54N 


733H 


1.00 


5056N 


741H 


.15 


505714 


74 IM 


.15 


sosew 


7J6H 


.40 


50601^ 


74 7H 


.35 573eN 


748M 


.30 573 BH 


!■ 




5739(N 


m 




574 lij 



lao 

2,00 
2,50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.25 
2.50 
4.00 
2.50 
.75 
1.50 



1. 
1, 
2, 
1. 
1. 
2. 



50 

50 
50 
60 
60 
75 



2.75 
2. SO 
2.10 
2.40 
2.70 

Self -SOdring- IQ 
Test.. $3 2/$5 




R30 




WHERE THE HAM IS KING iSck FOR OVER 30 YEARS 

Let Us Fill Your ^■fj Specific Needs From 

OUR $2,000,000.00 AMATEUR GEAR INVENTORY 



ALL THE FAMOUS NAMES— TRANSCEIVERS— AMPLIFIERS— ANTENNAS—TOWERS 

Give us a try before you buy • Call Jim Titus 

la Division of TBEVOSE ELECTRONICS, INC/ 4033 Brownsville Boad. Trevose. PA I9047i 



FREE UPS SHIPPING 
ON PREPAID ORDERS 



, ^1^l^<l I'hHncji' 



215-357-1400 




PUT IT RIGHT WHERE YOU WANT IT. 
With one hand, raise the tower from 2V to 
as high as bb'. Find s^tactly the right re- 
ceiving level ffom C6, Ham or TV, When 
yoy want to adjust your antenna, install a 
new one, or pull maintenance^ crank [\ 
down again. No more climbing up tn the 
sky to repair or replace antennas. With [\\q 
exception of cur breakover models, tlii^ is 
the most convenient tovy^er yoLj can buy. 

BREAKOVERS-THE ULTIMATE IN CON- 
VENIENCE— Ouf breakovefS not o^^y 
telescope, they He down for you. Orte man 
can crank it down, then lay it dow^n, so 
your feet n«ver have to leave the gound, 
even on our tallest towers. 

TOTALLY FREE-STANOiNG. No guy 
wires, no brackets. Our towers are de- 
signed to withstand 60 mile winds, with 50 
pounds rotor and antenna with a vertical 
area of 6 square feet. 

TOWER CONSTRUCTION. We make it out 
of the finest materials available. Our steel 
is thicker and heavier, our cables are 
thicker and stronger— our towers them- 
selves are two or three times heavier than 
comparable towers on the market. Welgtit 
runs about 165 pounds for our 40' towers 
350 pounds for 55'. Several design innova- 
ttong are used to make TeleTowV the 
strong est j most reliable tower. 

ONE-PIECE PRICE. When you buy one of 
these towers you get the wtiole tower 
ready to Install. No accessory charges, no 
eKtra costs f or guy wire, base plates, etc. 
And even our complete one-piece price Is 
considerably lower ttian any comparable 
tower on the market. 

Concrete sleeves available for Model 40s 
and Model 55s. By using sleeves you can 
move tower to another location and all 
you teave is the sleeve In coricrete. 



40' MODELS 

Model 40 (extends 2r to 40*) 

Breahovftr Mq4e1 40 

(extends from 23' to 40' with breakover at gound 

level) 

55' MODELS 

Model S5 (extends from 21' to 55') 

Breakover Model 55 

^Extends from 23' to &5' with breakover at ground 

level) 



TELE-TOW'R MFG. CO., INC. 



P,0. Box 3412 •Enid, Oklahoma 73701 

405-233-441 2 

i^T52 



166 



(^ Reader Service — sbg page 195 




RO. Bqi 4430M Santa Clara, CA d&(KE4 

wiir call only: (W8) 988-1640 

2a22 Walsh Ave. 



RCA Cosmac Super Elf Compute 

Compare features be-fore you decide to buy any 
other com pu Ten Thsre is no other conputef on 
rhfl market today \\)a\ has all the dfi^Srable bene- 
fits of the Super EH br so Ifttie rnoney. The Super 
£lt is a small smgle board compurer that does 
fnany big (Mr gs. It fs an excellent comput&r for 
training and for f earning pFogramrning with its 
machine language and yet it is ea^rly expantfed 
v^'ith additEDiial rn^morV' Tiny Aas^c, ASCII 
Keyboards, vjijeo cbaracler gereratjon, etc. 

The Super 0f mclydes a ROlil monitor for pro- 
!?ram loading, editing and executior with SINGLE 
STEP far program debug gEng which i^ not in- 
L■;^lJtfed ir olhers at the same prica. With SINGLE 
STEP you can seethe miicrDpraQ&ssQr chip opefa- 
ting with rtis unique QuesI address and data bus 
displays h&fors, during and after executing fn- 
structions. Also, CPU modE and instniction cyde 
are decoded and displayed on eight LED indicator 
lamps. 

An RCA ia6t videu graphics cfrip allows you to 
connect to your own TV with an mexpensl v& video 
modulator to do graphics and games. There is a 
^pesiter system included for writing your own 
music or using many music programs already 
written. The speaker amplsfter may aJso be used 
:to drive relays tor control purposes, 

A 24 key HEX keyboartf includes 16 HEX keys 
plus loadr reset, run, wait, input, mernory pro- 



r $106.95 

lect, monitor select and single step. Large, on 

board displays provide output and optional high 
and low address. There is a 44 pi r^ stand arcs 
connector for PC cards and a 50 pin connector for 
th e Qu est S u per £xpa ns ion Board Pq wer so p ply 
and sockets for all iC's are incfuded in the price 
pFus- a detailed 1S7 pg. instructlDn manual which 
now tnoiudes over 40 pgs of software info, in- 
cluding a series of less^^ns to help get you started 
and a music program and graph>ics target game. 

Many schools and universities are using the 
Super EJI as a course of study. OEM's use it for 
training and research and development. 

Remember, other computers only ofler Super Elf 
features at additionai cost or not fit all Compare 
bufore ynu buy. Super Elf Kit $1 06.95. Hlgt> 
address Dption $8.95, Low address option 
$9.95. Custom Cabinet with drilled and labeled 
piexigiass front panel $24.95. NICad Ballery 
Memory Saver Kit $6,95, All kits and options 
also conne compSetely assembled and tested. 
Que^ldala, a 12 page monthly software publi ca- 
tion for 1802 computer users is available by sub- 
scription for $12.00 per year. 

Tiny Basic for ANY 1802 System 

Cassette $1D,00, On ROM $3^.00. Super Elf 
owners, 30% off. Objed E^ade listing with nian- 
ual S5.D0. Objei^t list, manual and paper lape 
$10.00. Original ELF Kit Board $14.95. 



Super Expartsion Board with 

This is truly an astounding vaiuef This board -has 
bean desi^gned to allow ynu to decide how you 
want it optioned. The Super Ezpansfon Board 
conies wllh 4K of low power RAM full/ address- 
able anywhere in 64 K wifh huilt^n memory pro- 
tect and 3 tas^ette inteHace. Provisions have 
been made for all other optinns nn the same 
board and it fits neatiy into the hardwood cabinet 
along side the Super Elf. Thetioardinciudessiots 
tor up to 6K of EPROM [2703, 2758, 2716 orTl 
2 7 1 B ) an d i s f ul ly 3 u^keted . E PRO M can be used 
for tPe monitor and Tiny Basic or other purposes. 

A IK Super ROM Monitor S19.S5 fs avallabEe as 
an on board option in 270S EPROftfl which has 
been preprogrammed with a program loader,' 
•ectitor and error checking multl file cassette 
read /write software, (relocatibie cassette file) 
anotter exclusive from QtreSt. it includes reoister 
save and readout, bioci^ move capability and 
video graphics driver witb blinking cursor. Break 
points can be used with the register save feature 
to isofaie program bugs quickFy, then toilpw with 
single step. The Super Monitor is written with 
subroutines allowing users to taka advantage of 
m^-nitcf functions simply by calling them up. 



Cassette Interfat^o $89.35 

Improvements and revisions a re easily done with 
the mortitor. it you have ttte Super Expansion 
Board and Super Mnnitor the monitor is op and 
running at the pusb of a button. 

Other on board options include Parallel tnpul 
and Oulput Poi1$ with tub handshake. They 
all ow easy con ne ctto n of a n AS Cll keyboard to th e 
input port. RS 232 and 20 ma Current Loop For 
teletype or other device are on board and if you 
need more memory tJiera are two S-10fl slat? for 
static RAM or video boards. A God bout 8K RAM 
board is availaDte tor $1 35.00, Also a IK Super 
Mor^tor version 2 with video driver fnr full capa- 
biifcty display with Tiny Basic and a video interface 
board Psraf lei I/O Pods $9.85, RS Z32 $4,50, 
TTY 20 ma i/F $1.S5. S-100 $4.50. A 50 pin 
cannedor set wrtfi ribbon cable is available at 
$12.50 for easy connection between the Super 
Elf and the Super Eirpansion Board. 

The Power Supply Kll for the Super Expansion 
Board is a 5 amp supply with multiple positive 
and negative voltages $29.95. Add SAM for 
shipping. Prepunci^ed Irame 55.00. Case 
StO.OO, Add SI. 50 for shipping. 



Auto Clock Kit $15.95 

DC cloc^ wfth 4-. 50" displays. Uses Nationaf 
MA-1012 module with alarm option, fn dudes 
Sflht dim mar. crystal fimebase PC boands. Fully 
regulated, comp, instructs. Add $3, 95 for beau- 
tiful dark gray case. Best value anywfiere. 

flCA Qosmac VIP Kit $229.00 

Video computer with games and grapiiics. 
Fully assem. and test. $249.00 

Nol a Cheap Clock Kit $14.95 

includes ever^hing except case. 2- PC boards. 
6-. 50" LED Displays. 53 T 4 clock chip, trans- 
former, all components and full instructions. 
Orange displays also avail. Same kit vtlM" 
displays. Red only. $21.95 Case $11.75 

GO Hz Ci^stai Tint e Base Kit $4.40 

Converts digital clocks from AC line frequency 
to crystaltime Ijase. Outstanding accuracy. Kit 
Includes: PC board. IC. ciystal, resistors, ca- 
pacitors and trimmer. 



Digital Temperature Meter Kit 

Indoor and outdoor. Switches hack and forth. 
Beautiful. 50" LEO readouts. Nothing like it 
availabfe. Needs no additionai parts for com- 
piete, full operation. Will measure -10D-'"to 
-i-2G0'F. tenths of a degree, air or liquid. 
Very ac corate . $39.95 

Beautiful woodgram case w/beief $11,75 



NiCad Battfiry Fixer/Ctiarger Kit 

Qpehs siiorted c^lEs that won^t hold a charge 
and Iben charges them up, all in or^e kit w^lull 
parts and instructions. $7.25 



PRDIW Eraser Will erase 25 PROMs in 

15 minutes. Ultraviolet, assembled $34.50 



Rockwell AIIV1 65 Computer 

&5Q2 bas ed s i n gle bo ard with f u II AS C 1 1 keyboa rd 
and 20 column thermgi printer. 2D char, al- 
pha numeric dfspfay. ROM monitor, fully expand- 
able. $375.00. 4K version S4SQ.00. 4K Assem- 
bler Se5-00. &K Basic Interpreter Si 00.00. 
Power supply assembled incase $60.00. 



, 



7aofifm. 

741 (IN 

TiHJy 

7Ai?H 

7J7JIN 
JiTliW 

743?*! 

?qi(MN 
74;l(??N 
7i|?lN 
7-i1S3N 
74;I35M 
7^i-1iM 

7il5!tJ 

Ti154N 
■■Vim 
'^liilPf 
■•ii62H- 

?4174N 
rJI75N 
7419qN 

T4??ftN 
T4.3l>7hl 

.•■aSLiiN 

?CSOfllf 
7sLSrON 

7^LSl'^N 
.^>]L:f33Kl 

7i|.ST5N 

^-L595N 
.■-LS:Ci?H 

?44.5:ii3M 

7'lt5l36M 

?JL3i57W 
74L3ie:!U 

r^LSl-7flN- 
74L519!JN 
74LS22IN 

744S367N 

LMEAH 

CAaoa2 

Lltf3aiA*i'AKt 

uvtateH 

LMSJfH 
LMSaSM 

LMn?r,'R 

LM31E 

LU3£3K'IJ 

LW333K-1S 

LM3?aT-5 

LM3MfT4 

1H33DT-1=. 

I M34i)K-8 

LM140K12 

LMa4dK-15 

LM34[]K-?4 

LM34(lT-5 

LM3-iiir-a 

Lh'-34C'T-5J 

LM3.1DT-15 

'■.MaitT.IS 

LM3fl&T.2.1 

LHJ7D 
LK1J77 



1.3,9 
.■20 

M 

m 

M 

.^/ 

.79 

+? 

iM 
.43 
-M 
A3 
M 
.^ 

1.00 

fl7 

.H? 
M 
.M 
1,15 
67 

m 

1 55 
I 66 

Be 



2S 

a 

25 
25 

ih 

2b 
4iQ 

2s 
21 

41 

35 
39 
3D 
7Qi 
41 
.51 
91 
\&i 

35 
72 
34 

.«r 

.fl7 
M 

I," 

35 
1.0S 
fM 

97 
t Jo 



M 

.117 

\m 

\.m 

?;«& 

.3S. 

.»7 

35 

.sg 

1 15 

^M 

.M 

2.H 

! 35 

1 20 

fi.BS 

1.^ 

L3& 

1 60 

I.WJ 

1.50 

vm 

1 15 
1.55 
1.35 
1.3^ 
T2S 
l.ia 
IK 
1 2? 
1 25 
1.26 
1.2^ 
1.^5 
1.25 
4iO 
fM 
I 15 



uniadK 

LM3«1 
iM^^ 

lM7fl9H 

LM753:H'H 

LM733N 

|.MJi47N.'l4 

LM74BN 

I.Ml303tt 

LMI3G4 

LV1305 

lf/:130? 

LMirMlH 

LW146II 

|.M1flKI 

LII1B12 

LMEJB4 

LMflM 

LMHSDON 
LM39I1& 
LM3KIS*; 
MC145BV 

NEHSV 

N£5B^V 
ME&g7U 
NES70B 

Htsns, 

78LM 

7IIWIH 
.'5!Dig 

75492CN 



ELECTRONICS 



t.n 
1 eo 

40 

.£& 

5ft 

.67 

Q 

?5 

&£ 

% 

M 

T.tp 

1 = ^7 

2M 

2.75 

,4r 

7.50 

S.M 

3.75 

1.W 

M 

r.7? 

.«1 

.60. 

« 

.i9 
i:fiO 

1.58 
I..3DI 

im 

.H) 
M 
..■a 
M 

].n 

.50 
M 



A (D D £MlrEAr^R 



S7(J1GN 

S7S0tl 

LDtM 

91flOCJV;F 

iCLhcn 

ICL^fDJ 

mm 

CE)4aoi 
CD«oe' 

CD4007 

CIH01'2 
($4(J15 
ClI4014 

CD«ii; 

C0*D1fi- 

CDdOFa 

CD101» 
CS4dSD 
DCi4C2> 

CO4023 
Cl?4ff24 

ci>c(i2a 

CtMDEfl 
CD4ll?7 
CD402:« 
Ca4<lS9 

CP4ID36 

0341^3 
CD 4044 
C04(MG- 
i:tMiHg 
iOifm 

CEM051 

cp4ci&g 

CD40l>9 
?;iM)70 
GD40?1 
CD40?J 
CO 4073 

C0407B 
CD 4091 

CD4bl>.' 
CD45(}fl 
CP45T0 
CD4S1 1 
CD451& 
CD4j;e 
CD4S14 
CD4520 
M4&J.t 
C04&2A 
CD4Sb3 
c:D4556 



■4. SO 
14.J5 



■ 50 
16 
21 

,£t 
Lid 

.2T 

31 
.39 
.39 
.a- 
:2-t 
3« 
B« 
M 

si 

.94 

.i\ 

I K 
66 

?1 
7i 
tt 

1.51 

.3& 

fS 

1,02 
21 

1.02 

1.02 

n 

63 
« 

36 
3$ 

1.13. 

iAZ 
71 
« 

Ai 

21 

.21 
-21 
\Z1 

?1 
AT 

5.50 

I.OU 

1.03 

.04 

2.i2 

i.m 

1.05 
1.Di2 
1.51 



cnjsas 


1,10 


cwinss 


^.00 


74C00 


29 


?4M4 


33 


74C10 


•2fl 


t4fi14 


f.lO 


74C30 


?S 


74C3a 


?fl 


740^* 


1.05 


74i;;7Ji.- 


J5 


74^76 


IM 


74C90 


LtS 


741:93 


t.40 


74Gt54 


3.00 


74CT6D 


1.44 


74tl7fi 


1.35 


74C1*S 


1.65 


74C221 


2.(10 


74C905 


3.[» 


74CSK1Q 


-76 


?4Cgi4 


1.95 


74GSC? 


5.50 


74C923 


5 50 


74C92^ 


«.96 


7JCg2E 


g.^S 


740957 


e.S5 


IHTEAFABE 




B(»5 


.55 


•fl&*B 


.6-^ 


5037 


M 


Btm 


-is 


ffTOS. 


]li 


BtlO 


4.50 


ST13 


aoo 


iT2G 


i.m 


.m^ 


■ 3.10 


ars4 


3.50 


BTg5 


3^ 


ERfi 


16^ 


ms 


s.rs 


vm 


iM 


aT&9 


1.«5 


HBsmmom fuiM 


21D1-1 


3 St 


2lK-f 


.95. 


2l«2Ai-4 


l.flO 


ZILffi-i 


l.li 


?1T0? 


\:n 


2^tHfir4 


4.95 


fiera 


4.95 


211f-1 


3,7S 


2Tl2-f 


3.S6 


2l1dL-3 


790 


4116 


10.S^ 


?5i10 


6.30 


MMiWi 


.40 


Mmt&Q 


3.00 


MM5%^ 


995 


Mmi^a 


534 


PP411P^3 


4.W 


P13411IJ-4 


!i.0^ 


P5101L 


n.BS 


4ZIXW 


9.15 


12325 


2.90 


SlLd^ 


1.50 


II 001*5-3 


6.9& 


MM5riQo 


4.5(1 


ClAY'SSSDP-l 


■9,95 


MCMS571.(\ 


^.:^5 


935S 


i.iO 


410D 


WM 


416 


1000 


CLOCKS 




MM&sira 


3 DO 


MML^^n 


3.H 


Pj*Mf)31f 


4.8(1 


MMb3E? 


3.00 


MiVI53F4 


•^M 


MW53I5 


i.m 


iUMb3lS 


a.oo 


^M5510 


36& 


MW5S6& 


2.1tt 


MrJ5&41 


14,45 


MMf^aes 


795 


CTTW' 


E.M 


CJrogj 


5.95 


crioifl 


MS 


P7035 


7 25 


WM53T5M-U 


3-90 


HM:j37L^AB,-N 


4.90 


7J05 


'6 50 


?aJ- 


75a 


73fle 


li.i)! 


72!]5 


4.95 


DSDfl^eCM 


3.75 


PSM56CN 


3.J5 


MM53H14 


2.50 



CDlPiBOSD 




25.00 


CPP10&1 




12.95 


e«2i> 






9.SS 


3^50 






t?.95 


6M£ 






li.5il 




C SDCKflS 


SridH TIrt Ldh ftalllfl 


fHH 


1UP 


m 


ItfP 


U 


1& 


22 


.30 


r4 


IS 


2:< 


s> 


te 


JO 


23 


4a 


16 


a/ 


3e 


:SI 


2& 


29 


40 


.5?. 


;l level 


MllE ■ 


rap p« 


1f Hn 


s: 






2 ltw< K nn 


w*. . 


SG 


Wlfi£ mX^ LEVa 3 


PHI 




m 




14 


f5 


it 


as 


Mi 


33 


IM 


1.00 


18 


57 


40 


1.^3 



AVS-i!)i3 
AV5^10i4 
334.1 

png-M 

Ne2S23 

Na2$i23 

N&SSI^g 
N92S129 
NK5131 
Nfl^Sl36 
N9^137 

6£:£3 
27IEf1 
271 E tnLal 

fliriITiU.S 

1 mt 

2UHI 
4MHr 

10 MHz 
1#HHe 
fOMH^ 
SMH? 

I.S43:^ MH2 
5.5795 MMi 
2gi;)DM<(f 
J.usntj Mm 

2.4!;7e MHr 
3.27^S MHi 

i.lfl: M.-iiJ 
5.7143 WHr 
Q.552« MH,I 
".3lfii3 Mit 
1B432MHX 
J? 1 184 MHi 



s:.so 

7r50 
6^i&5 



3.95 
2.M 
a.50 
3-75 
3.?i 
3 75 
fl.75 

e.-76 

t0.50 

?.» 

S.SO 

29 50 

*fl.DO 



4.50 
4:5fl 
4 25 
4 25 
4,S5 
3.^0 
H^ 
3.911 
4.00 
4.50 

1 ao 

T.95 
4. 50 
4. SO 
4.50 
4.50 
i.5P 
4.50 
4.50 
4.25 
4.iD 
4.50 



CPHNrproRS 

44 'j<n C.iHii' 2.75 

roa pir. Edga 4.^ 
I Da [iir! -doe WW 5 25 

KETBPiiHD {NCOOFflS 
firb-2%!i 312.50 

AY5-.38O0 F3.S(S 

t*tS2jt • 5.50 

74C923 S.Sft 

Hltef^*! 6,95 



IC Ttfl Cirpi 
alack 



lUfflt M43 14.M1 



1 


10 


.55 


.47 


55 


47 



ttlCROPDOCE^SOJl 



J50 
2.25 
4 5P 



«S02 

mop. wAh J3t3 

BI)«i5 

8212 
8274 

esiG 

8324 
0220 
B251 
0353 
Ba5 

B259 

1B02CP plas 
IHWDPiKtts 
IBftiP 
i;D=PlH?2dD 



17 50 
24 9S 

ass 
27.M 
f9.75 

IMi 

v.po 

?.30 

f.^ 

i.35 

6.50 

10 00 

9 25 

ig.5a 

19 50 

'3.9l> 

I7S5 

n.so 

19.-96 



Tfywasnofis 




2rfiH&3 


40 


21ft 2222^^ 


9S 


SK23g4 


:» 


SNJfflKJ^ 


20 


2»2gD7A 


• 35 


2H3fl53 


.40 


£N3@36 


K 


2^3943 


,2^ 


2h3^{^ 


t« 


2N3906 


.19 


2N3a55 


.59 


IMAK) 


.25 


2KA4<i) 


.?£ 


5N44B? 


,S0 


T1P31 


.BO 


T1P3aA 


I.m 



D 'CfHinctUm n£^Z 
2.S ^In Submnii^iLrg^ 
0K5P Z95 

DB(25^ J.gi5 

Covsr 1.S0 

RSE32 compets se e 50 

Dtfli* 1 513 

Dt3S 1.9i 

da;5N! 1 10 

IM15S 5 10 



2.25 

11.'90 

2.J5 



2.96 



OJdCK HDPULU CcinplsEa Bt^r^ decks 

swhchi:! VBiy eompdi;! wiin 5{]' gn^ 

.B'^'dlgira. 

MlloaSA, C «rf .SO' 

t82R3 Ti»nif nrawr 

mil DIM. CprE.ft*" 

Spa«i.al trsn-slDrmBr aefl e\s 

br,'mDd4jU 
HA^Cng «r JnoeiHH .3- 
Hr««n liluw. dlapliy iiS9 

nESisr^ns '.i wnt i% 

lOttrr trpi ^3 iOC10i»ri!/pa .Of£ 

1(10 (wrlype .015 5pflr|:y|piS75 
tCETQO^FIpS 

Full^ as-wmWed 77.50 

hi kfty ^>in!i i(«ryhi?ifd tt eo.M 

Fw^y 3EJ«mt]l?d 70.00 Eii;lDQun>4.D5 
L£Q£ 

fed njiB .15 

Gfsan. fBllpM T0l3 M 

JUi^bg Rnd .20 

Cjeen . ClTJfi[je ytaow JnlfftB .25 
Gll-jiiri« Hit Msunllivp Clitt BZ". 25 
(.jKelly r^c. jmher. ^.-seh yellaw, cleirl 

CONBNEHTAt SPECIALTIES In ttocL 
■vft^dlHi; tiin P- hnjijdb^ard tMttquip 
MU-IDO B dfDll Fra«. Qr. tliil.BS, 

OK W»FIE WRAP TOO-iS In lUck 
Rstmlil* HwlUrtiSkr I1B.M 

DlQrTAL IHEAMDIirTf H i4>.S{l 

Btrt. p^j Gentiai !^u.'p'jSF iv midicjil 
SS''230-F PicpE>sibl« ffTDbE [Hiver 
= ? jpcuficj Certifl Assy, in 
compact caEf Swdcnes rrnni F= to C' 

CDMPUTtn BOARD KITS 

BK R^^ Btur^l Kh $l3&.(Kl 

4K EPHOM Kir 114 95 

L'O doird Kn 44.^ 

^fif.nttf Boa ■(! w.coPincripr 1 &.5d 
IfiK iP«/JM to3^n k^ ii.-rt mm^^ 7i 50 

Knnii Slar FI>Dppii DIA Mi $&^5.0a 

Aflai... lii Crivs Kil 415.00 

SPtClAL PADDUCTS 
Mtt5B65 SltipurailGh Tfmar i^.dO 
K EKSfif 7.&!J 

Sir.ttEhfli ^fo[^> l^sfibLitl^n .£7 

3 poE. slicte J$ 

EncHlfi^ ^iW^65■5 4.K 

3 Qlf It UniHnil 
iCiHinCi!F BoMd Hit 
Dps'aiiB S-1,g ^ DC Id i WKi' 
ff-p i2i' LEOdRplJj' 10.50 
Vpju ^((u3(«if tuNEh BO 

PinErpn-ici i[iSA tpgic 
AnHrJti *t\ $224 .OB 

U{)i|$l ^QTmq^j 

EifiB-Tfla.- Kil £229 00 

hTodBl 1^3 Bu9 

GrabE>r Dil £^36^.00 

BHnisttl^ 31'^ DIfIt 

MwlUnnctflr jsi.'fl& 

apck C&lfendlr HII U3 ^5 

TtUNSPONHEItS 
£V3Q0ma 3.% 

12 Vpli nmo ma IraR^rmar I.SS; 
12 HV CT 630 niji 3.75. 

'Zf 2L0 ma wall pliigi 2.35: 

12V CT 350 rm wall pruo a.sft- 

24V Cf 4DD ,Tia 3.95 

lOV 1 7 |[^p wsii rluD' 4.95 

i^ ^ anrj] T^ 95 

OlSPUT LEPS 

MArHI CA .273 

MAN3 CC tM 

MAn72.'74 CA-W ,300 

DiL704 CC .3110 

PI.707..XJi707Fl C4 .300 

DL72^75fl CA^tt .500 

OL747.75fl CA^&C .SDfi 

01.750 DC .sao 

FND351J CC .357 

FH[>iOQ'£07 CC-M ..500 
FMP?4J3,'51<I CC-CJi JOO 

FMDg^o.'av; cca .sou 

3 dijS^ ButkblE 

4 dicrt t](.'!>ble 
OFifi ''iiMjrrsi.'e'ii 
£)Qlo hliiarescant 
5diDiC Uixn diep^y 
NSNE9 9 di^ dispN:^ 
/520 4:jjf'gi< phnbottict 
TILSii+ltji 



COHFUTfR 

rgjio 

5600 
5S0{] 

sido 

ftlOQ 

?7O0 

BIKN 

94013 
lOMHJ- 
12000 
350O{l 
550O& 
a^Offil 
GOOOO 



shape: CJfFS 



mid 



*5V 
50V 
^5V 
«iV 
4DV 
SUV 
SOV 
5i5V 
$5V 
iOV 
ffilV 
S5V 
23V 
ISV 

10V 



3.W 

.33 

1.00 

1.25 

J. on 

1.90 
l.^'J 
1.95 

.70 
1.35 

M 
?.2fl 

.^ 

.BO 
ITS- 

tn 

I.DO 

.eo 

t.M 

4,50 
2.5^ 
2.50 
2.M 
3.00 
3,» 
[J.OO 
2.M 
?M 
3.KI 
ISO 
3 50 
^.00 
ISO 
B.dO 
6.W 



Multj-volt Computer Power Supply 

8v & amp, =l8v ,5 amp. 5v 1.5 amp, 5v 
.5 arnp, 12v.5aimp, -ISaption. ±5v, t12v 
are regulated. KitS29.95. Kit with puiched frame 
$34.95. Woodgrali case ^lO.DO. 



Video Modurator Kit S8.95 

Convert yojr TV set jnta e high quelity monitar 
Without affecting normal usage. Complete ^W 
with full instructions. 



2.S MHr Freffuency Counter Kit 

Complete kit less case $3>.50 

30 MHz FrequeiTcy Counter Kit 

Complete kit less case ¥47.75 

Prescaier kit tn 350 WHz S19,9S 



Stopwatch Kit $26.95 

Full six digit battery operated. 2-5 voEts. 

3.2768 MHi crystal accuracy, Times to 59 
min., 59 sec, 99 1/100 sec. Times std.. split 
and Taylor. 7205 ctiip, all componerits rniniis 
case. Full fnstiructfDns. 



Hickok 3y2 Djgjt LCD Muliimeter 

Batt/AC Qper. O.lmv-IOOOv. 5 ranges. 0.5% 
accur. Resistance 6 low power ranges 0.1 
ohm-ZOM ohm. DG mr. .Q1 to lODma. Hand 
held. W LCD displays, auto lero, polarity, over- 
range. S74.95. 



79 IC Update Master Manual $3500 

Complete IC data selector, 2500 pg, master ref- 
frrenceflpidfl. Over 50,000 cross references. Free 
update service through 1979. Domestie postage 
S3. 50. for&ign S5.00. 1978 IC Master cfoseout 
$19.50, 



S-1QQ Computer Boards 

m static RAM Kit Godbojl $^35.00 

I6K static RAM Kit 265.00 

24K Stat it RAM Kit 423.00 

32K Dynamic RAW! Kit 310.00 

64K Oyaamic RAM Kit 470.0Q 

BKyiOK Eprom Kit (less PROMS) Sfl9.00 

Video Interface Kit J13S.00 
Mottierboard $29. Extender Board $8,99 



TEHliS: SS.OQmin.arderU.S. Funds, Califfe5identsadd6%taK. 
SankAmer^card and Master Ctiarge aocepted. 
Shipping charges will be added on cbarge cards. 



FREE: SeF^e! far your copy of our NEW 1979 
QUEST CATALOG. Include 28 c stamp. 



$^ A0«tf«f S«rviC«— ttt p«0# 1^ 



167 



Uncompromising performance. 
Incredible price. 

A professional SVi digit DMM Kit for less than $70. 




Incredfble? True! Professionafs and hobbyists alike are 
believers in this Sabtronics 2000. the only portable /bench 
DMM which offers such uncompronnising performance 
at the astonishingly low price ot $69.95. 

Uncompromising performance you'd expect only from 
a specialist in digital technology such as Sabtronics: 
Basic DCV accuracy of 0,1 % ± 1 digit; 5 functions giving 
28 ranges: readings to ±1999 with 100% overrange; 
overrange indication; input overload protection; 
automatic polarity; and automatic zeroing. 

The low price of $69.95? Simple: The Model 2000 is all 
solid-state, incorporating a single LSI circuit and high- 
quality components. You assemble it yourseif. using our 
clear, easy-to-follow, step-by-step assembly manual 
Kit is complete, Including a high-impact case, 

Now you too can have it! A professional-quality, SVa digit 
Sabtronics Model 2000 DMM kit for only $69.95. If you 
ddn1 have one in your lab. use the coupon below to 
order NOW. 

BRIEF SPECIFICATIONS: 

DC volts in 5 ranges: 1 00 ^iV to 1 kV • AG volts in 5 ranges: 
100 ^V to 1 kV ' DC current in 6 ranges: 100 nA to 2 A 
' AC current in 6 ranges: 100 nA to 2 A • Resistance: 
0.1 fi to 20 Ma in 6 ranges ■ AC frequency response: 40 
Hz to 50 kHz ' Display: 0.36" (9,1 mm) 7-segment LED 
* Input impedance: 10 MQ • Size: 8" W x 6.5^' D x 3'^ H 
(203 X 1 65 X 76 mm) ^ Power requirement: 4 "C** ceils 
(not included). 

GUARANTEE: 

Examine the 2000 DMM kit for 10 days. If not completely 
satisfied, return unassembled for full refund of purchase 
price. {Less shipping and handling) 

Use your Master Charge or Visa. 

To order by phone calJ: (214) 783-0994 



*^SZ7 




INTERNATIONAL ING 
1342B Floyd Circle •Dallas. Texas 7B 

168 





Mactd inUS A. 



To: Sabtronics Internattonal, Inc, 
13426 Floyd Circle, Pallad, TX 75243 



Pfease send me. 



-w n « 



at ^o'^.^t? eacn». <*.» 

Shipping and handffng, $5.00 per unit* 
Texas Residents Add Sales Tax 

TOTAL enclosed 

Name^ 



Sabtronics Model 2000 DMM kFt(s) 

S 

S 



S- 

$ 



street 



City. 



Stata 



Zip. 



*USA Qfitf. Canada $6,50. Atl ottwf couritries. S10.OO (surface mmtl 



I 
I 

J 



North 32nil Street/Untt -1 PhoaniXf Arizona 85008 [602] 956-9423 

Wa accapt chack8| MaaterCharge, and Viaa 

Prices subject to change without notice 



R.F. CONNECTORS 

UG-1095A/U $3.99 

UG-58/U 3.29 

UG'30C/U 3.00 

UG-27C/U 3.50 

Pb259 -50 

SO-239 .43 

Uai75 .36 

PU258 2.99 

UG-106 .69 

UG-177 .69 

UG-274/U 3.27 

UG-447/U 1.50 

UG-492 3.69 

UG-306/U 3.00 

UG'646/U 3.29 

UG-260B/U 159 

UG-1094/U .90 

UG-701/U 3.00 

UG-212C/U 3,00 

TUBES 

3-500Z $90.00 

572Sm60L 34.00 

6146 5.09 

6146A 5.99 

6146W 7.95 

811A 12.95 

811 9.95 

4CX250B 29.95 

4CX250R 32.95 

6KD6 4.99 

6LF6 4.99 

6LQ6/6JE6 6.25 

8950 6.65 

2E26 6.00 

3B28 5.00 

4X150A 15.00 

6360/A 7.95 

6939 5.95 

7289/2G39 4.95 

8072 46.00 

FERRITE BEADS 

12/S.e9or 
100/S4.00 

TORIDAL CORES 



T-37-6 

25/4.00, 

100/10,00 

1N914/1N4148 

30/tl.OO or 
120/$3.00 



6^1.00 
50/6.00 



R.F. TRANSISTORS 



2N2857 

2N2857JAN 

2 N 2947 

2N3375 

2N3553 

2N3818 

2N3866 

2N 3866 J AN 

2N2866JANTX 

2N3925 

2N3948 

2 N 3950 

2N3960 

2N4072 

2N4427 

2N4877 

2N4957 

2N5108 

2N5109 

2N5179 

2N5589 

2N5583 

2 N 5590 

2N5591 

2 N 6060 

2N6081 

2 N 6082 

2 N 6083 

2N6084 

2N6095 

2N6097 

MRF502 

.VeRF8004 

SS2548 

40280 

40281 

40282 



$1,80 
2.45 

17.00 
7.00 
1.80 
6.00 
1.09 
2.70 
4,43 
6.00 
2.00 

26.25 
4.70 
1,70 
1.09 
2,57 

3.50 
3.90 
1.55 

.59 

4,60 

5,00 

6.30 

10.35 

5.45 

8.60 

10.75 

12.00 

13.20 

10.35 

19.35 

.69 

J5 

.75 

3.50 

10.90 

11.90 



TRIMMERS 5-80pf 

45c each or 10/3.50 
or 100/25.00 

CHOKE [U252] 2 5mh 

150ma 30MH2 

2/$i .00 

TRIMMER CAPS 

small enough to 
fit in your watch 
3.5-1 Ipt 75« each 
or 10/$6.00 

PISTON CAPS t 2 lOpf 

75«eachor 10/$5.50 



F.E-T-*s 

MPF4391 

MPF112 

MPF102 

40673 

3N128 

2N5248 

MPF131 

2N4303 

2N3958 

MFE2000 

MFE2001 

MFE2008 

MFE2009 

MFE3002 

MMF'5 

MFE120 

2N3436 

2N4416 

MFE131 



$ .75 Of 10/ 6.50 
.69 or 10/ 5.50 
.43 or 10/ 3.50 

1.39 or 10/10.00 

1.35 or 10/10,00 
.60 or 10/ 4.50 
.60 or 10/ 5.00 
.45 or 10/ 3,50 

2.95 each 
.90 or 10/ 8.00 
.99 or 10/ 8.00 

4.20 or 10/36 00 

4,80 or 10/39.00 

3,35 each 

5.00 each 

1.00 or 10/ 8.50 

2.25 each 

1 .00 each 

1,05 each 



MICROWAVE 

1N21D 

1N21C 

1N21WE 

1N23B 

1N23C 

1N23GR 

1N23E 

1N23F 

1N23We 

1N25 

1N121WE 

1N2e6 

1N416E 

1N446 

1N3655A 

1N5153 

1N5711 



OIOOES 

$ 1,40 
1.05 
2.00 
1.05 
1-05 
2.00 
2.00 
4,10 
Z10 
3.03 
4.00 
5.00 
5,00 
8.00 
4.00 
15.00 
1.20 



ADDITIONAL R.F. 
TRANSISTORS 

40894 $ 2.50 

M R F454/568BLYCF 1 7. 1 

LM566V VCO/FUNC- 
TION GENERATOR 

$.99 each 

LM34aT-5 K LM340T 

-12 75(teach 



SEMTECH MINISTIC 

high voltage rectifiers SFMS 

20 K 20,000PiV 

20ma $1.99 each 

1S00PIV 1.5 AMPS 
RECTIFIERS io/$i50 



MC4024P & 
MC4044P 



S3.25 each 



HEP 170 2.5 Amps 

1000PlV1Q/$2.00or100/S14.50 

POTTER & BRUM- 
FIELD 12VDC RELAYS 

4PDT 3 Amps $2.95 

SPDT 25 Amps 55.95 

2PDT 3 Amps $1,99 

4PDT 25 Amps 16,99 

BRIDGES 24 AMPS 
500PIV $2.99 each 

4CX25QB/R SOCKETS 
AND CHIMNEYS NEW 

$14.95 per set (1 socket, 1 
chimney) 



BfiW COILS 

1206T 
2006T 



$3.99 
$7,99 



FAIRCHILD REGULA- 
TOR 78H05KC $6.99 each 



TUBES 

6148B 



$6.50 



MINIMUM ORDER $5.00 
Minimum Shipping $1, In^ 
surance 35e per $100. COO 
charges S5c to street address 
only! We prefer street ad^ 
dress as we ship UPS and P.O* 
Box #*s take up to 50% longer 
to deliver. We accept VISA or 
Mastercharge. Please list 
complete card number and 
expiration date. Allow 10% 
extra for shipping of heavy 
items. We reserve the right to 
change prices without notice. 
All Items listed are subject to 
prior sale. Some items listed 
are in smaii quantities. 



P^ Reads/ SefViC€—see page 195 



169 



CRYSTALS iCon-lJ 












54 95MC 




Alfred Moder 632D 




55 4S 




Sweep signal generator 




57,45 




2-4 GHz $399,00 






58.4S 












59 45 












6045 












61 95 












66 65667 
72 ass 
75.165 
73.66607 






Polorad Model 1206 








1-95 to 4.20 GHz 








signal source 




82 75 






$400,00 




B3, 






Model 1107 3.8 to 8.20 




84. 






GHz signal 

$550 


generator 
,00 




85.833330 








90.633 












93.1346 












93.535 












93.9353 

94,3 

95. 






TUNNEL OlODES 






TYPE 




PRICE 




95 35 




TD261A 




S10.00 




106-850 




TD266A 




10.00 




123-5 




1N2930 




7,65 




14B.S4 




1N2939 




7.65 




147 09 




1N4395 




5,40 




166.5 












RF TRANSISTORS 












TYPE 


PRICE 


2H51S4 


2.00 


MM2605 


3-00 


2Nt5ei 


S15,iXI 


2N5216 


47.50 


MM2606 


5.00 


2Nt56a 


15.00 


2N5583 


4,43 


MM8002 


aos 


2N16gZ 


15.00 


2N55ee 


4.60 


MMB006 


2-15 


2Kie93 


15.00 


2N5590 


630 


MRF304 


«,45 


2M26S7JAN 


2.45 


2N5591 


1035 


MRFS02 


49 


2NZe76 


12-35 


2N5637 


20.70 


MRF504 


6.95 


2N23&0 


25.00 


2N5641 


490 


MRF509 


4.90 


2N2927 


7.00 


2N5643 


14.3B 


MflF511 


8.60 


2N2947 


17.25 


2N5645 


11.00 


MftF901 


3.00 


2N2946 


15.50 


2N57e4 


27.00 


MRF5177 


20.70 


2 N 2949 


3-90 




P^F^ ri ^^ ^" 


MRF8004 


1.44 


2N2950 


5,00 


TYPE 


PRICE 


HEP76/S3014 


4.95 


2N3267 


4,30 


2N5842 


$ B.65 


HEPS30Q2 


\ 1 .30 


2N3294 


1,15 


2N5B62 


50.00 


HEPS3003 


29.86 


2N3303 


1.05 


2N5913 


3.25 


HEPS3005 


9.95 


2N3307 


10.50 


2N5922 


10.0C 


HEPS300e 


19.90 


2N3309 


3.90 


2N&942 


46.00 


HEPS3007 


24,95 


2N337S/MM3375 


7,00 


2N5943 


1J5 


HEPS3010 


11.34 


2 N 3553 


145 


2N5944 


7.50 


HEPS5026 


2.56 


2N3at6 


6.00 


2N5945 


10.90 


MMCM^ta 


1-00 


2N3666 


1,09 


2N594e 


13.20 


MMr72 


61 


2N3e€ejAN 


2.70 


2N6060 


5.45 


MM 1/4 


,94 


2N3866JANTX 


4.43 


2N60ei 


6,60 


MMT2a57 


1.43 


2N3924 


3.20 


2N60e2 


9,90 


TYPE 


PRICE 


2n:^5 


B.0O 


2NHJ83 


11J0 


MMT3960A 


S6^ 


2N3927 


11J0 


2NeOS4 


13-20 


PT3S39& 


zm 


2N3950 


26.25 


2N6094 


S-7S 


PT4186B 


xoo 


2N^61 


6.60 


2N@095 


103S 


PT4571A 


1.50 


2N4072 


L70 


2N609e 


19.35 


PT4612 


5.00 


2N4135 


2J30 


2N6097 


2S-Q0 


PT4e28 


5.00 


2N4427 


t.09 


2N6135 


18.70 


PT4640 


600 


2N4430 


20.00 


2N6166 


36 80 


PT8659 


10,72 


2N4440 


8.60 


2N64a9 


43.45 


pr9/B4 


24.30 


2N4957 


3,50 


MM1S00 


32.20 


PT9790 


4170 


2N495a 


2.^ 


MM 1550 


10.00 


PT9S47 


26.40 


2N49S9 


zn 


MM1552 


50.D0 


SD1043 


5.00 


2M4976 


19.00 


MM1553 


56.50 


SD1116 


3.00 


2N5090 


6.90 


MM1601 


5-50 


SD111& 


5.00 


2N5108 


3.90 


MMl602/2N5e42 7 50 


801119 


3.00 


2N5109 


1.55 


MM1607 


aJ5 


40281 


10.90 


2N5160 


3.34 


MM1661 


15.00 


40282 


11.90 


2N5177 


20.00 


MM1669 


17,50 


40290 


2.48 


aN5179 


.49 


MM 1943 


3.00 


T A 7994 


50.00 






MHZ ELECTRONIC KITS: 

kit t1 

Motorola MC1441CICPCMOS Ton« Gvncnior 

CMOS Tone Generaior usas IMHZ Ciystal to produce standard dual frequency dial- 
ing skgnai. Directly Qomp^tibie w(tti 13 key Chomefic: TcHicfi Tone P^s Kit tncludBS 
the loUo^Jng: 

1 Motorola MC14410CP Ctitp 

1 1 MHZ Crystal 

1 PC Board 

And all other parts for assembly. NOW ONLY IISJO 



Kit #2 

Falrchlld 95H9D0C Praacaftr 3S0MHZ. 

95H90OC Prescaier divides by 10 to 350 MHZ. This kit will take any 35MHZ Counter 

to 350 MHZ. Kit Includes ihe foifowInQ; 

1 Fairchild 95H90DC Chip 

1 2N5179Trari5lstor 

2 UG'Ba/U BNC Connectors 
1 PC Board 

And all Oth« r part S f r assem bj y . N O W N L Y S 1 9 . 95 



FAIRCHIIO 

95H90DC 

95H91DC 

11C90DC 

11C91DC 

1lCd3DC 

11C70OC 

iicseoc 

11C44DC 
11C240C 
11C060C 
11C0SQC 
11C01FC 



VKF AND UHF PRESCALER CHIPS 
:^OMHZ PrescalerOMcte by fO/11 
:J50MHZ PrMCAlftr 01 wide by 5/S 
&50MHZ Prescdler Divide by lOni 
B50MHZ Prescaler Divide by S/6 
1 GHZ Divide by 24af2S€ Prescaler 
600MHZ Fitp/Fiop «ith res«| 
ECL VCM 

Pfiaae Ff6<|uency Detector [MC4D44P^D 
Dual TTL VCM fMC4024P/U 
UHF Pr^scator 7 50M HZ D Typ€ Flip/Fiop 
1 GHZ Counter Divide by 4 
High Speed Dual S4 Input NO/NOR Gate 



$ B95 

B-95 
1595 
1595 
29 90 
12.30 
453 
3.62 

3.aa 

1^30 
74 35 
15,40 



CRYSTAL FILTERS! Tyco 00M9M0 wm* »» 2194F 

10- 7 MHZ Narrow Band Crystal FMtdr 

3 db bandwidth 15khz minimum 20 db bandvwidth SOkhz minfmum 40 db band^A^idth 

I50khz minimum. Ultimate 50 db: Insertion foss I.Odb Max. Ripple 1.0db Maji.Ct. + 

- 6pf. R1, 3600 Oh ma. 

NOW ONLY SB J5 



TUBES 



2E2e 


$ 5.00 


4CX350A 1 32.25 


3*500Z 


74.50 


4CX1S0QB 250.00 


3-1000Z 


165,00 


5728 


33.60 


3B2e 


5,00 


SUA 


12.95 


4e5A 


^.50 


5094 


3900 


4 125A 


68-75 


61 46 A 


5-25 


4-250A 


80.00 


61468 


6.25 


4-400A 


B1.50 


6360 


795 


4'!0O0A 


255.00 


6907 


35,00 


4CX250B 


24.95 


6939 


9.95 


4CX250F 


15.00 


7360 


io.eo 


4CX250G 


15.00 


KJ72 


45.00 


4CX250K 


35 00 


a295A/PL172 15000 


4CX250R 


29.00 


8950 


5.95 


SONALERT Model SL628P 


1 MHz TCXO Crystal Oscilfator 


6-28 volts DC 






TTL output 


3-14 ma 






3.3 volts DC 


SS.95 


■ 1 




$19,95 

T11BI 

HJ. DtHtE iSIIlT f iRtl a*$% 'QH UK 

All rAHIE nUME/CiUAIIAMULO 



i^MB 



(602) 242-30371 

* 

Camelback I 



2111 W, 

* ^ 

Phoenix, Arizona 85015: ^o^^^a^-^^ 



BANK AMERICARD/VISA/MASTEHCMARGE 

Vout Wumb^r 
(Dr equ>vai8ntS 

Exp. Dal» 



170 



MURATA CERAMIC FILTERS 
Model SF0'4S5D 


TYCO 
10.7 MHz Monolithic 


ALL CRYSTALS S4.95 










4S5 l<Hr $3.00 




Crystal Filter 


3?.35kc 


2. 222125 MG 2 7735MC 


3.255 MC 


6-537MC 


133045MC 


Modal SrB-4S50 




$5.95 


49.710 


3 22325 


2 776625 


3.256125 


6.567 


133145 


455 kHz $2.00 




/^m m f~WW 


70 


2 22675 


2 78 


3.25B6^ 


6-5a2 


13 3245 






(fVI^z 


8T 9 


2 2?875 


2.814 


3.261 


6.512 


13 3345 






96 


2 23725 


2.817 


3.261125 


6.6645 


13.3445 






»1^»#-.^}^«^ 


100 


2.2395 


2.8225 


3.268625 


6.673 


13.3545 


BEACON TRANSMITTER 




electroiyc*^ 


225 


224075 


2-835 


3 271125 


6.693 


14 315 


MlcTOwav« AAAOCdil*! ModaT MASSClB 


250 


2.241 


2,85 


3.273625 


6.723 


15 016 


An all solid statfi high powm Um 


Bd tuned C band RF Generator. Ttiis unit is crystal 


285,714 


2246 


2854 


3.2761 ?5 


6.7305 


15.036 


controlled, and provides frequency siabi 


lity in extfeme environments. Destoned for 


576 


2 2475 


2 854285 


3.3 


6.738 


16.80417 


use m tijgh |>erfOfmance aircraft and ground based beacon applications, ihis device 


720 


2 2925 


2.865 


3.3345 


6.75125 


t7.2800 


can also b9 uied a* an up»conv«rtef pymp tor micfowave commumcatioris relay. 


T.2338MC 


2.2975 


2B68 


3-4045 


6.753 


17.8?tO 


Frequency Range 




6.0 to 6.3 GHZ 


1.3047 


2.3 


2,8725 


3.4115 


6.7562 


17.9065 


Power Oulpyt 




1 Wan Mm. 3 Watts NtBOL 


1,4 


2-320 


2.B76S75 


3 4325 


6.7605 


17.9165 


Frequency Stability 




+r- inio« 


1 455 


2 326 


2.887 


3.4&35 


6.7712 


17 92K 


SfMiriouS Harmonics 




-30de 


1-5 


23262S 


2889 


3.4675 


6 77625 


17.936S 


tnpyt Voltage 




24 to 32 Volts DC 


1,6d9600 


232886 


2.894 


3.4815 


6-8aiX)00 


17.9465 






ONLY $69.95 


1.7 


2.352S 


2.910 


3.5 


6.910 


17 9665 








1 76375 


2 35356 


2.920 


3.57954S 


6.940 


17-975 








1.77125 


2,36& 


2925450 


3,64 


7.15 


17.9735 


TEKTRONIX 




HEWLkl I PACKARD 


1.773125 


2.374 


2,92545 


3./b 


7.26 


19.100 


Modal SIS Oscilloscope OC to 1Gh 


Iz Model 140 A OscJIEosoope 


1. 786 75 


2,375 


2.931 


3.7/35 


7-35 


I9.*x5416 




$69^.00 W/1402A. 1423A $550.00 


1-80??4 


2 38725 


294375 


3.^ 


7.390 


20 1 








1.81675 


2,395 


2.945 


3.805 


7.423 


21.99965 


TEKTRONIX 






1.6275 


2396875 


294675 


3.803 


7,443 


22 


IL30 Spectrum Analyzer pfug-fn 


, 


1 S4512S 


242 


2,952 


3.901 


7.473 


23.25 


g25MH2 10 25GHz 


U9BM 


1 84375 


2.4375 


2.966 


3-908 


7.5 


23.575 








1 -845625 


2 44275 


2 973 


3.916B 


7.S1 


2547667 


HEWLETT PACKAGED UHF, 


VHP. AND MICROWAVE SIGNAL 


1 .64575 


2,4495 


2.900 


4.0Q00 


8.00764 


25.9 


GENERATORS AND SWEEPERS 




1.S46 


2,45 


2.981 


4.011 


8.00824 


25 99961 


MODEL S06A 


MODEL 6830 MODEL 61 2A 


1.6425 


2.4585 


2 98325 


4.126666 


8 075 


26.66667 


50 kHz to 65 MHz 
JmV to 3V into 50 ohms 

SI. 000.00 


■^ -^r -™p -^m- m r r .■_■■ m^ ^i^ ^^ Wf^ q Bta-r 9 

2 to 4 GHZ 4S0 to 1230 MHz 
ONLY 529^00 -lyv to .5uw into 50 ohms 

ONLY $499.99 


1.^975 
1 .8575 
1 908125 
1,925 


2.46125 
2.482 
2,486 
2.5 


2.987 
2.9989 
3.001 
3.0235 


4.26 
4.3 

4.6895 
4.6965 


8,12 
8.15571 
8.364 
8,64 


26.8965 
26.9 
26.958 
27.77778 








1.927 


2,51375 


3.045 


4.7 


8.820 


27.9 




MODEL 616B MODEL 618B 


1.932 


2.56 


3.049 


4.7175 


88285 


28.720 




1.ato4.2GHZ 3.8 to 7.6 GHZ 


1,982 


2,581 


3,053 


4.7245 


8.837 


28.88889 




ONLY S399,00 ONLY S499.99 


1.9SS 


2.604 


3.062 


4.7315 


8.a455 


28.9 








1>9942 


2.6245 


3.067 


4.765 


8.854 


28.93888 








t. 995975 


2610 


3-074 


4.89 


8.8625 


29. 


WJSPEH FANS 






1,964750 


2.62825 


3.1125 


5.0000 


8.871 


29 896 


This fan is super quiei, efficient cooling where low acoustical disturbance is a must. 


2.0000 


2,633125 


3.126 


5.13125 


8.879500 


29.9 


Size 4.68" X 4.68" ic 1,50". Impedance protected, 50/60 Hz 120 volts AC 


2.0285 


2.639 


3.137 


5.139585 


e.688 


30.0000 






ONLY S9.95 or 2/I1S.D0 


2.05975 


2.63575 


3.13975 


5.147917 


8.905 


30.9 








2.126175 


2.64325 


3.1435 


5.. 164583 


8.9305 


31.0000 








2.12795 


2,646 


3.144 


5.348400 


8.939 


3T,ni11 


TRW BROADBAND AMPUFIER MODEL CA615B 


2/1315 


2,647 


3.145 


5,426636 


8.956 


31,66667 


Frequency rasponse 40 to 300 MH2 




2.133275 


2.650750 


3.151 


5 436636 


9.0265 


31.9 


Gain 




300 MHZ iSdB MIN. 


2.13505 


2 6545 


3,1545 


5 456 


9.65 


32.0000 






l7.5dB MAX. 


2.136825 


2.65625 


3.158 


5.4675 


g,55 


32,22222 






50 MHZ to - IdB from 300 MHZ 


2.1425 


2.660 


3.1 B85 


5.4990 


9,7 


32.9 


Voltage 




24 voHs DC at 220m a MAX 


2,144625 


2.662 


3.1615 


5.5055 


9.75 


33 0000 






ONLY 114 J5 


2.14675 


2.66575 


31626 


5.515 


9.8 


33.33333 








2.148875 


2.6695 


3 166 


5.5215 


9-B5 


339 








2.151 


2.677 


3.16975 


5,544 


9-9 


34.0000 


Slow scan CRTs 






2.153125 


2,68075 


3.177 


5.5515 


9,35 


34.4 


Used but good 

Some may have small 

burn spots 

JAN-3CAP7A 




^■h ^B^. #^ rfVk. iM .^4^ ^B^ M ^Bh ^4 ,^P^h. H ^4. J^ ^Nl ■ Jh 


2.15375 


2.681 


3.181 


5.559 


9.9^ 


34.4444 




2C39A, 2C42, 2C43, 2C46 


2,155 


2.6845 


3,1825 


5.5665 


10.0000 


34.44444 




All JAN tubes 


2,15525 


2.68825 


3 18475 


5,574 


10.021 


35.0000 




Used but guaranteed 


2.157375 


269575 


3,1885 


5.5815 


1020633 


35 25D0O 


$24.95 




$9,957 each 


2 t595 
2J6375 


2 7 
2.702 


3.2 
3 2035 


5.589 
5.604 


10K>375 
11. 


35,55555 
36.0000 








2.165875 


2,704 


3.20725 


5,619 


11 1B05 


3621750 








2 170135 


271075 


3.2105 


5,6115 


11.228 


36.6666 


MARCONI Model TF791C Carrier Deviation Meter 


2, 17225 


2715 


32165 


5.6266 


11.2375 


36 66666 


4.0 MHz 


to 270 Mhz 


2.174375 


2 716 


3 2175 


5.6415 


11.2995 


36.6fi#i67 




$29^9^ 


2.1765 


2 723 


32315 


5.6715 


1 1 -3565 


37 000CX3 




^^m « 




2.17925 


2,730 


3.23275 


5.675 


11.535 


37.77777 


WTCaRATED CIRCUITS 


2.1B475 


2.7315 


3.2365 


5-680 


11 69626 


38.00000 


MC1303L S 200 


MCt460R S 5.40 


2.18575 


2.73225 


3.23775 


5.695 


12.29 


38 33333 


MC1461R 


6.90 


MC1463R 5.15 


2.194125 


2.732625 


3 23775 


5.7 


12-39 


rw 77777 


htCl469G 


2.05 


MCT469R 335 


2.207063 


2 733 


3.23R5 


5,7105 


12.49 


38.77778 


MC15S0G 


1.50 


MC1560G 10.20 


2.208313 


2,737 


3.238875 


5.733333 


12.69 


38.88888 


MC1560R 


12.40 


MC!563R 10.00 


2-209563 


2.73975 


3.23925 


6 110 


1279 


38.88889 


MCl56dG 


5.31 


MCtSeSL 5.00 


2,210812 


2.742125 


3-24 


6.210 


12-89 


39,00000 


MC156§R 


a. 15 


MC1590G 8l50 


Z2lDdl3 


2-7425 


3.24025 


6258333 


12.99 


39.160 


MC4024P 


3412 


MC8600P 9U9S 


2.212063 


2.744 


3.2405 


6 321458 


13.09 


40.00000 


MCfla20P 


«JS 


Mceeezip iloo 


2.214562 


2-7445 


3241 


6 424583 


13.102 


41.11111 


2513 


6.95 


4116 200NS 10 37 


2.214563 


274475 


3.242S 


5-425 


13,2155 


43 33333 


aosoA 


395 


TMS4060 &95 


2.215625 


2.746875 


3 244 


6 4270B3 


13.2455 


48 972?? 


270eTI 


a.95 


TMS4024 13,90 


2,217938 


2.751 


3.246875 


6.45 


132745 


49 95 


2716TI 


^.95 


t702A 4.95 


2.21975 


2754 


3.24975 


6-47 


13,^45 


50.14T6e 










2.75525 


3,4975 


6.4711 


13.2945 


53-45 










2.762375 


3.^15 


6.510 







$^ Pe^dBf SefVicesee page ?S5 



171 



FREQUENCY COUNTER KIT 



CT-ijU ^"i^nit^wcY eoyftjTgft 




4^ |h 9 



Outstanding Performance 



CT-50 



isdisa^ ataairo^toj. 



Incredible Price 



The CT-50 IS a uersatite and precision (reQtiency counter which will measure Accurac act a* 

frequencies to 60 mHz and up to 600 mHz with the CT-600 optJon. Large Scale statiility^2Ci pc 

Integration, CMOS orcuitry and solid stale display technology have enabEed this counter to compensat&t 

match performance found m units seUmg for over three tsmes as much Low power input ewe in 

consumption (typically 300-400 ma) makes the CT50 ideal for portable battery operation QveNoad &ov^ 

Features or the GT-50 Include large 8 digit LED display F«F shielded all metal case, easy ^rnHz""^ '^^^ 

pushbutton operation automatic decimal poinl. fully socketed (C chfps and input protection p^v^er hcva( 

to 50 volts to insure against acctdental burnout or overload And, the best feature of all fS the s^ie e- « 4 % 

easy assembly Clear, step by step mstructions guide you to a fisnished unit you can rely on tcs nuniis a 
Order your today! 

CT'50, 60 rnHz counler tea Sfi9.9S CB 1 Color TV cslibrator^^labiliier 

CT'SOWT 60 mHz countef wired and tested 1 S9.95 pp.i pC probe general purpose pTObe 

QT'60D 60Q mKf scaler option add Z9.95 hP-1 High impedance probe, rion-loadir 



SPECIFICATIONS: 

Ffequ&ncy range. 6 Hz lo 6*t mHz. BOO mhe wilh CT-BM 
Resolution lOHzv-^ Oi sec gate i Hzuj 1 sec $ale 
Rtsadout 8 dign 4" fi^qh LED. direcl madoul in mHi 
Accuracy adiustabfe lo OS ppm 
SlaCility 2 ppm over 10 lo 40 ' C, lemperalure 

compensated 
input Sr^C I megofim '20 pi tftret!. SO ohm wilti CMOC 
PveNoad SO VAC majdmum, a if raodss 
SensiUvily less than 25 mv ta 65 mH2 50- 1 50 mv lt> 600 

mHz 

Pov^er 1 TO VAC h Watts or i ?. VDCi^^ 4&0 m^ 

S^ie 6" St 4" X 2^' high quality aluminum case 2 lbs 

(CS \'\ unils a4l sqcketed 



514.§5 
ta.95 



CAR 
CLOCK 



OP-AMP SPECIAL 



^Q^ 



7A^ mini dip 

Bl-FET rnim dip. 741 lype 






The UN-Kit only 
S solder connections 

Here's a super looking rugged and accurate aiit6 
clock. which IS a sr>ap (a build and install Clock 
moverrer>t 6S completely assembled— you only solder 
3 wrres and 2 switches, lakes about 15 minutest 
Display is bright green wilh aulomalic hrtghtness 
Cpntrot pholOC^It— a$Surg$ you Of a highly fg^d^ble 
display. Cfay Or nighj Comes m a i>atin fimsh :an- 
odized aluminu-m case which car be attached 5 
difterent ways using 2 sided tape Choice of silver 
black or gold case [specify) 

DC-3 kit. 1 2 hour formal S3^.9S 

DC-3 >vi re4 Sin d teste d S 25. 95 

110V AC adapter S5.95 




Under dash 
car clock 

}t'2^ hour cJock in a beau- 
tiful plastic case features 6 
lumbo RED LEOS. high accuracy (1 mm ■ mo >, easy 3 

wire hookup, display blanks with igniiion, and ^uper 
instfucnons Oplional dimmer automatically adjusts 
display to ambient lighl ievel. 

DC' 11 clo c k w I th ml g bra ckel %%l.%h 

DM-i dimmer adapter 2.50 



VIDEO 

A completely self-contained, stand alone video ter- 
minal card . Requires only an ASCII keyboard and TV 
set to become a cornplete terminal unit. Two units 
avaitatile, common loatures are: single 5V supply, 
XTAL controlled Sync and baud rates (to 9600), 
complete computer and keyboard controli of cursor. 
Panty error control and display Accepts and gener- 
ates sertal ASCII plus parallel keyboard input. The 
3£l6 is 32 char by 16 fiir>es, 2 pages with memory 
dump feature. The 6416 is 64 char by 16 lines, with 
scrolling, upper and lower case {optional) and has 
RS'232 and 20mfl loop interfaces on boards Kits 
include sockets and complete documentation 
RE 3216, refminal card $14S.§S 

RE 6416, terminal card lBft.$5 

LPwer Case o pti o n . 64 1 6 on ly 1 3.&S 

Power Suppfy Kit 14.ftS 

Video. RF Modulator. VD-t 6.95 

Asserribled, tested umts. add BO.OQ 



^"nif^lK*—^-- 



PRESCALER 




Extend the range ot yoor 

counter to 600 rtiHz Works 

with any counter Includes 2 

transistor pre -amp to give super sens, typicalty 20 

mv at 150 mHz Specify -i- 10 or -i^ lOO ratio 

PS 1 B 6O0 mH z pre scaler S&9.^S 

PS' 1 BK, 600 mH? urescaler kit 49.95 



CALENDAR ALARM CLOCK 

The clock that s got it all. 6- 5" LEDs, \2 24 hour, 
snooze, 24 hojjf alarm, 4 year calendar, baltery 
backup, and lois more The super 7001 chip is used 
Size Sx.4h2 inches 
Complete kit, less ciri&e (not avaifabfe) 

DC-9 t34,S5 

30 Watt 2 mtr PWR AM P 

Simple Class C power amp features a limes power 

gain. 1 W inforaout.^mtor 15ouL4 Winfor30out 
Max . u iput o f 3 6 W i n cred Ibie val ue , compiete wi 1 h 
aU parts, less case and T-R relay. 
PA't . 30 W pwr amp kit $22.45 

TR-t, RF sensed T-R relay kit 6.SS 



Ramsey's famous MINI-KITS 




FM WmELESS MIKE K 

Transmits up tq 300' 
lo any FW broiadcasi 
radio, uses ^ny typq ol 
mikfi Runs On a lo 9V. 
Type FM-2 h<j3. added Ren- 
stfive m>ke preamp sSage 
FM-1 kUS2SS FVI-2kitS4 



COLOR ORGAN/MUSIC UGliTS 

See music come alive' 3 different 
Uglify f Milker wi|h music. One lighf 
(or 10*6, one lor the mid-fan^e and 
one for me Ngtis Each channel 
individually adjustatHe. and drives 
up Id 30DW. GreaT for parlies, band 
music, nite clubs and more 
CompSeTe Kit. ML-1 S7-95 



LED BLINKY KIT 

Agreaf aMenliongeller.Ahtch alter- 
namely tLashi^s 2 |umba LEDs. Use 
\oi name t>adges, hutlons. warning 
panel lights, a-nything' Runs on 3 to 
15 volts 
Complete kit. BL-l S2-9S 



VIDEO MODULATOR KIT 

Converts any TV lo video mDnitor 
Super stable. I unable over ch. 4-6 
Runs on 5-1 5V, accepts std video 
Signal Best unit on ihe marker 
Compietekil. VO-1 fS.95 




TONE DECODER 

A complete 

tone decoder on 

a single PC l!?oard 

Features; 400-5000 

Hz adjusts tjle range via 

20 turn pol, votfa-g^ re-gttlation, S67 

IC Uselul forlWJCh-tone decoding, 

lone bur^s! deteclon. FSK. etc Can 

also be i^sed as a slsh^e lone ^n- 

codei- Runs on 5 to 13 voUs. 

Comptele kit. TD-1 f5.95 



WHISPER LIGHT KIT 

An mterestrng kit, small mike picks 
up sounds and converts them to 
Ihght The louder (he sound Ibe 
tifightar lh# light Completely selt- 
cantatned, includes mike, rurrs an 
ilDVAC controls up (o 300 watls 
Complete kil. WL.T S6.95 





rsfnss^ sIssiiDiiss 

BOX 4072, ROCHESTER, N.Y. 14610 



SUPER SLEUTH 

A^uper sensitive am- 
pltfrer ^hich will peck 
up a pm Orop at T5 leeU 
G rear to r mon itorrng t>aby s roorf> or 
as general purpose ainpljfier Full 2 
W rms Output, runs on 6lo 15 volts, 
uses S-45 ohm speaker 
Complfits kit. BM-9 $5^.95 

POWER SUPPLY KIT 

Complete fri-ple regu- 
lated power supply pro- 
vides variable ' -G lo 18 
voJisataoQmaand +-5Val ^ 
Amp Eiccelleni load regulation, 
good tillering and small size Less 
I rana formers, requires 6.3V (m 1 a 
and 24 VCT 
C omp I ete Kit, PS -^LT $6.95 



SIREN KIT 

produces upward and downward 
wail char BClerislrc ota police siren 
5 W peak audio output, runs. on 3-1 5 
volts, uses 3' 4 5 ohm speaker 
Complete kit SM'3 $?.95 



PHONE ORDERS CALL 
(716)271-6487 



FM MINI MIKE KIT 

A super high psflormance FM 
wiretess mike ktt! Transmits a stable 
signal up to 300 yards wiith excep- 
tional audio qtiality by mean^ of its 
built in eJecfrei mik^ Kit includes 
case, mike, on-off switch, antenna, 
battery and super instructions This 
i$ Ihe finest unit available 
FM'3kit S^2.95 

FM-3 wpred and le^ed 16.95 





CLOCK KITS 

our Best Seller 
your Best Deal 



Try youf hand at buildmg Ihe finest looking 
clock on Ihe market. Us satin tinish a nodi zed 
aluminum cas^ kooks great anywhere, white Six 4" 
LEO digits provide a highty readablediSpla-y This i&a 
CQETipieie kit no exuas needed, and it only takes 1 -2 
hours to as.se mble. rour choice of case colors: 
Sliver, gold, bronie. black, blue (specify). 
Clock kit, 12 24 hour DC-S $22,9S 

CEock with 10 min. ID timer, 12.'24 hour, 

DC-10 2T.t5 

Alarm Clock 12 hour only DC-fl 24,95 

1 2 V DC ca r c Soc k . DC- 7 27.95 

For *ired and tested clocks add $1 00 to ktt once 



Hard to find PARTS 



LINEAR ICt 






REGULATOFtS 




301 


S 35 


78 MG 


?r25 


324 




1 50 


723 


^^ES 


360 




1 25 


309K 


85 


S80B 




75 


7flO& 


m 


555 




45 


7aL05 


25 


555 




85 


7905 


125 


566 




1 15 


7H1? 


65 


567 




1 25 


79 12 


1 25 


1459 




50 


7&1S 


85 


39DO 




50 


TTL JCa 




CMOS ICt 






74^0 


35 


401 i 




20 


7447 


65 


4013 




35 


7475 


50 


4046 




105 


7490 


50 


4049 




40 


7419611 


1 3d 


45ie 




t.25 


SPtCIAL ICft 




53€9 




175 


11C90 


13 50 


TRANSISTORS 






10116 


1 25 


2N390fl lype 


10 


1 00 


4&n 


2 DO 


2N3906tvpe. 


10 


1.D0 


53 T 4 


2 95 


hJpN 3DW Pm 


3 


1 00 


&375AB 


295 


PUP 30 W Pwr 


3 


1 00 


7001 


6 50 


2NS055 




60 


4059 - N 


9 00 


UJT 2N264&!ype 


3 


2 00 


720a 


17 95 


FETMPFtOElype 


3 


2 00 


LEDt 




UHF2N5t79tifpe 


3 


■^00 


Jumpo red 


fl'l 00 


MFTF-JSe RF 




IT 95 


Jumbo green 


e 1 00 


SOCKETS 






Jumbo yellow 


S/1 00 


Spin 


to 


'2 0O 


Mini red 


e.'-l GO 


14 pun 


10 


200 


Micro red 


6' 1 m 


16 pm 


10 


2 00 


BiPciiar 


75 


?4pin 


A 


5 00 


FEnniTE BEA1>S 




2t pm 


4 


2 00 


With info, specs 


15 1 00 


40 pm 


3 


2.0O 


€ hole baiun 


5-1 00 



tujuimun 



TERMS: Sattst^clinn guaranteed or mgney 
rerunded COD add It 50 Minimum o/der. 
S6 00 Orders under SIO 00, aduS 75 Add 
5"-V fof pQ^ign^ insurance handM^g Over- 
seas add 1 5\ NY residenls. add 7^ ta?f 



172 



1^ nS 



ihhi 



romcs, inc. 



OSCAR 

HEADQUARTERS 



^H16 



W Quality VHF^UHF Kits 
^^ At Affordable Prices 



SSB TRANSMITTING 
CONVERTERS 




FEATURES: 

• Linear Converter fbr SSB, CW^ FM, eJc* 

• A fracHon of The price of of her unlH 
#2W p.e>p. output with 1 MW of drive 

• Use low power tap on exciter or a^^enuatclr pod 

• Easy tooflgri wJth built'-ln test points 



Frequency Schemes Available: 

MODEL IN PUT (MHz) OUT PUT ^^^ 

2 8-30 



XV2-1 
XV2-2 
XV2-3 
XV2-4 
XV2-5 



20-30 
28-30 
23-30 
23-29 
2 6-28 



50-52 

220-222 

222-224 

144-146 

145-146 

1 44- 1 46 



{MHri 



ONLY $59*95; 



VHF Linear PA's 



• Use as Linear or Clast C PA's • For XV-2 Xmtg 
Converters, T50 Exciters r of ony 2W Exciter 




LPA 2-15 Kit" $59.95 
• 15W out (linear) or 20W (class C) • Solid State 
T/R Sv^iJ^chmg • Models for 6M, 2M, or 220 MHz 




LPA 2-45 Kir S109.95 

• 45W out (linear) or 50W [class C) 

• Models for 6M or 2M 

LPA 3-45 Kit $89.95 
For 2M, 8-lOW In, 45W out 



ISO UHF POWER AMP 



^ Broad band PA 




No Tuning Required •Class C PA 

•430-470 MHz 

•13-15WGut 
•200 mW Drive 

Model T3Ch450 

S79.95 
Wired & Te$ted 



f^fyfrrfrrrrrffff 



VHF RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 



LET VOU RECEIVE OSCAR AND OTHER 
EXCITING SIGNALS ON YOUR PRES- 
ENT HF RECEIVERI 



UHF RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 




MODEL 
C432-2 
C432-4 
C432-5 
C432-7 
C432-9 
Special 



RF RANGE \-f RANGE 



432-434 

432-436 
435-437 
427.25 
439.25 



2 8-30MHz 
144-146 
28-30 
61 ,25 
61.25 



fnquire Abou^ Other Ranges 

ONLY $34.95 



A9 Extruded Alum Case with BNC's for 
obpve Converters (Optionaf) ,,, $12*95 



VHF&UHF FM RECEIVERS 



* NEW GENERATION RECEIVERS 

*MORE SENSITIVE i*rMORE SELECTIVE (70 or 100 dB) 

* COMMERCIAL GRADE DESIGN 

♦EASY TO ALJGN WITH BUILT-IN TEST CKTS 

* LOWER OVERALL COST THAN EVER BEFORE 



m 


^-^^^^^^^^^^K^^^^sS^ ^ 


J^' 




■■:— IMS _ • 




MODEL 

C28 
C50 


RF RANGE 

26-32MH2 
50-52 


1-F RANGE 

t44- 148MHi 
2e-3 


CI 44 


144-146 


2&-30 


C145 


145-147 


28-30 


C!46 


146-148 


2B-30 


CI 10 


A 1 r c r o f 1- 


26-30 


C220 


220-222 


23-30 


C222 


222-224 


28-30 


Special 


jnqujre About Other Ranges 

ONLY $34.95 




^"^ ■•Mv:--ib»-Ki;. 



R70 6-channel VHF Recefver Kit for 2M^ 6M, lOM, 

220 MHs, or com' I bands*,** $69.95 

Optional xtat filter for 100 dB adj chon 10,00 




R 90 UHF Receiver Kit for any 2 MHz se^ent of 
380-520 MHa: band , $39,95 



FAMOUS HAAATRONiCS PREAMPS 
let you hear the weak ones! 



Greot for OSCAR, SSB, FM^ ATV. Over 10,000 In 
use throy^hduJ the world ort alf types of recei^vers. 




P9 Kit $T2-95 

PT4 Wired $24.95 

specify Bond When Ordering 



• Deluxe vhf model for applications where space 
pefmits • I" 1/2 X 3^' •Models avail to cover any 
4 MHz band in the 26-230 MHz range #12 Vdc 

• 2 stages •Ideal for OSCAR ^20 db gain 

• Diode transient protection •Easify tunable 




*|^^ P8 Kit $10-95 

F16 Wired $21.95 

Specify Band 

• Miniature vhf model for tight spaces - size only 
1/2x2-3/8 •Models avalf to cover any 4 MHz 
band in the range 20^230 MHz #20 db gain •IZV 




P15 Kit $18.95 
P35 Wired $34,95 

• Covers an/ 6 MHz band in 
UHF range of 380-520 MHz 

• 20 dB gain *2 itag&s •Low noise 



NEW FM/CW EXCITER KITS 



BUILD UP YOUR OWN GEAR FOR MODULAR 
STATIONS, REPEATERS, & CONTROL LINKS 
• Rated for Continuous Duty • Professional 
Sounding Aixiio • BuHll— in Testing Aids 




T50 Six Channel, 2W Exciter for ^M, 6i>A, or 220 
MHz (Specify band) , $49,95 

T50U Six Channel, IW Exciter for 430-450 MHz 
uhf operation , „ , ,,,,.,.. ^^ $49 » 95 



►Ask For Free Catalog < 



IT'S^SYTOORDERr 

GALL OR WRIT! fMOW FOR iFHiE 
CATALOG OR TO PLACE ORDER! 

PHONE 716-392-9430, (EI^&ctronTc' 
onswering service eves ^ wai^lcendi) 

Ufe ere el it cordj, c,o*d,, ch^ck, Bi»o 
Ad d. 12,00 shipping & ^fe'^<J^i^M' : 




IN CANADA, order from CoiT3munlcati<ms Rvs, 3680 
Cffte Vepty; St^Loures^t, Quebec or pKone Si 4-^337^ , 
7255. M^m^ te^^ov^r dut«,.tg^ g^d .^chong., ' 



Noie New Address and Phone No. 



pontes, mc 



65 A MOUL RD • HILTON, NY 14468 

— Dealer Inquiries tnvited — 



P^ Reader Service— see psge 195 



173 



.•••V 












* * 



• « * 



• •••- 



ELECTRONIC 

GENERAL INSTRUMENT 

FULL WAVE BRIDGE 
4 AMP 600 PIV 

3/4 IN. SQUARE - WITH LUGS 






■ # V -+ 



* + ***■> 



PARTS BARGAINS! 



*■• 




750 



3 FOR $2 



-1 



OP AMP SPECIAL 

LM 358, MINI DIP. HOUSE #. 
WORKS ON SINGLE SUPPLY. 
A SUPER GEN, PURPOSE 
DEVICE. SAME AS 1/2 LM 324. 

59$ 



HEAT SINK 

4 X 2% X 1 

BLACK ♦ FINNED 

DRILLED FOR TWO 

TO-220 CASES. 

$1.29 



• •••■• 



MOTOROLA POWER TRANSISTOR 

HIGH VOLTAGE 

MJE 3439 - PLASTIC POWER CASE 
VCEO-350V. 15 WATTS 



DC PANEL METER 



2 FOR $1 




TOP QUALITY 
SMALL SIZE 
500 MA F S 



99 



t\' 



each 



TRIM POTS 

MINIATURE SIZE' 
100 K OHMS 

6 
^^^ $1 







• •■ 



SUB-MINI PHOTO CELL 

ONLY 1/8 IN. DIA. VERY SENSITIVE. 
50K OHM-DARK IK OHM-LIGHT 

LIMITED STOCK! 

5 FOR $1 



556 DUAL TIMER IC 

DUAL 555 TIMER IN ONE DIP 

750 EACH 3 FOR $2 

SONY 30 WATT AUDIO AMP MODULE 

#STK-056. 30 WATTS SUPER CLEAN AUDIO. 20 HZ to 100 
KHZ i 2 DB. HYBRID. SILICON, SELF-CONTAINED 
MODULE ONLY 1% x 2% tNCHES. WITH DATA, COMPARE 
AT UP TO TWICE OUR PRICE! $Q99 p*ri. 



LIMITED 
STOCK 



HAM & GOVERNMENT BAND 
nCA CONVERTER KIT 

Coverts 134 to ISO MHZ FM to lisien on regular AM Band. Complete ktl 
originally designed to sell for about twice our price. Includes PC Board, all 
parts and pre^punctied aluminum enclosure! Prectsion tuning capacitor has 
coarse and fine control, close out speciau *5.'' KIT 



_^^ FILTER CAP 

f .^-Sw^r^jT" 2200 MFD 16WVDC 

\y/— ^ X — BY PANASONIC SMALL SIZE 

FRESH! 3 FOR $1.25 



FOUR CHANNEL SCANNER 

PC Board only. A sensitive two band 
RECEIVER on a board measuring only 
3x2^/i in. Units were puchased when 
HYGAIN closed its Puerto Rico plant. 
Will scan four crystals on the VHF 
{high) band or the UHF band Works 
off 6VDC. Some units may require 
slight tuning. We provide basic hook 
ups, but have no schematic at this time. 

LIMITED QTY. 

$5.99 each 






INTERSIL 7107 DVM CHIP 

40 PIN IC. MAKES Z'^ DIGIT LED 
VOLTMETER. CAN ALSO BE 
USED FOR THERMOMETERS, 
AMP METERS. ETC. WITH DATA. 



$9 



95 



EACH 



GE NICAD! 




GE Nl-Cad Battery Pack 

3 Cell pack, gives 4 volts 
at 900MAH. Brand new, 
factory fresh. Each cell is 
2/3 "C" size, $2.95. 
Buy 3 packs (12 volts) 
for $6.95. Limited slock! 



COMPLEMENTARY POWER TRANSISTORS 

SILICON NPN AND PNP. TO-220 CASE. 
VCEO - 40V PD - 30 WATTS 

FOR AUDIO POWER AMPS. ETC, 




TIP29 - NPN 
TtP30 - PNP 



YOUH 
CHOICE 



3 FOR $1 



"THE COLOSSUS 
FAIRCHILD SUPER JUMBO LED READOUT 

A full .80 inch character, The biggest readout 
we have ever sold! Super efficient. Compare at 
up to $2.95 each from others! 
FND 847 Common Anode '"'OUR CHOICE 
FND 850 Common Cathode Si 49 

(6 tor S6:95) 



FAIRCHILD RED LED LAMPS 

#FLV5057 Medium Size. Clear Case. RED EMITTING. These are not 
retesled ott-spec units as sold by some ot our competition. These are 
factory prime, first quatUy. new units. 

10 FOR *V^ 



T 



«C4 



kff 



FAIRCHILD PNP 
SUPER TRANSISTOR' 

2N4402, TO-92 Plastic. Silicon PNP 
Driver. High Current VCEO-40 HFE-50 
to 150 at 150 MA. FT-150 MHZ. A super 
■'BEEFED— UP" Version of the 2N3906. 



8 FOR $1 




50 FOR W^ 

"WE BOUGHT 250,000 PCS." 



MINI PROJECT CASE 

Black Molded Plastic 2'^ x l% x 2 IN. Has open front, with mounting 
ears so unit can be easily attached to auto dash, etc^ Case has 
molded card guides for mounting PC Board inside. Pefect lor digital 
clocks, car burglar alarms, or almost any e^ectronic project. Can also 
be used for encapsulating circuits or modules. 

Super Special Purchase! 

75*t EACH 



Digital Research Corporation 

(OF TEXAS) 



••;•*; P*0, BOX 401247 GARLAND, TEXAS 75040 (214) 271^2461 






TERMS: Add 30C postage, we pay balance Ofdeis under S^S add 75* 
handling No C O D We accepl Visa Masief Charge and American Express 
cards Te*. Res add 5% Tax Foreign orders (except Canada) add 20% P & H 
90 Day Money Back Guarantee on alt items 



# tt 



« « 



* • * 



* • * • 






• «•*«•#* 



• • « • 



« • • 



* # 



• * # 



■■ -1. fl -A « « 



> • 4 



m • • • 



■•• «•»■»■ •••■«■**■*» 



• « • * • 



* * • 



« * • 

•' • • 



* * « 






* * 



•««•«* 



V 



•• •••••••••••••••••••••'•*::: jjtsttttjrttrtttrtsrJSJtssJss!?* 



'#.:>'-^ — - — ^ ^ — . ^ ^ .J,— ^ — , _ — ^ ■,.*••• 



««j 



4 ■< 



»+» 






i*f 



I •■ 



!■*♦ 

^B4 
*m* 

Wm* 
»•> 

■ •* 
»•* 

■ •■ 
>*i 
»•* 
tit 
!■■ 
»•* 
>•■ 
1*4 

!•■ 

I«t 

■ «> 

»*i 
1*1 
»*i 
!•« 

■ *« 

■ •> 
»•« 
1*1 
»•< 
»i< 
!•' 

r*> 

!•■ 
I«- 
I** 
I** 
t** 
t** 
^•^ 
Ml 
l*» 
M* 
I*' 
i ^'< 
»*■ 
l*> 
k** 

lit 
I** 
*•' 
l^ii 
I** 
!«■ 
»■• 
!■■ 
I*« 
»it 
Mi] 

► *• 
l*> 

»•■ 

»•■ 

I** 

■ ** 
!•■ 

■ «« 

• •■ 

■ *i 

■ ■« 

■ •■ 
t»* 

■ •■ 
!«■ 
»•■ 
P*» 
»•> 

► •* 

!•* 
^•* 
!■> 
I** 
M- 
!•■ 
*** 
M- 
!>' 

■ ■1 

!•■ 
*•■ 



16K EPROM CARD-S 100 BUSS 



Y 





OUR 



SELLING 
KIT! 



USES 270e'sr 

Thousands of personal and business systems around 
the world use this board with complete satisfaction. 
Puts 16K of software on line at ALL TIMES! Kit features 
a top quality soldermasked and silk-screened PC board 
and first run parts and sockets. All parts (except 2708's) 
are included. Any number of EPROM locations may be 
disabled to avoid any memory conflicts. Fully buffered 
and has WAIT STATE capabilities. 



OUR 450NS 2708 S 
ARE $8 95 EA. WITH 
PURCHASE OF KIT 



ASSEMBLED 

AND FULLY TESTED 

ADD $25 



8K LOW POWER RAM KIT-S 100 BUSS 

250 NS SALE! 







... •:■ . ..^ 




ADD $5 

FOR 
250NS! 





\mk' 



(450 NS RAM SI) 

Thousands of computer systems rely on this rugged, work 
horse, RAM board. Designed for error-free, NO HASSLE, 
systems use. 

KIT FEATURES: 



1. Doubled sided PC Board with sofder 
mask and silk screen Fayout.Gold 
plated contact fmgers. 

2. All sockets included. 

3. Fully buffered on all address and data 
lines, 

4. Phantom is jumper selectable to pin 
67. 

5. FOUR 7805 regulators are provided 
^\ _ on card. 



Blank PC Board w/Documentation 

$23,95 

Low Profile Socket Set... 13. SO 

Support IC s (TTL & Regulators) 

$9J5 
Bypass CAP's (Disc & Tantalunns) 

$4.50 

ASSEMBLED AND FULLY 

BURNED IN ADD $30 



16K STATIC RAM KIT-S 100 BUSS 




FULLY 

STATIC, AT 

DYNAMIC PRfCES 



WHY THE 21 14 RAM CHIP? 

W^ feM the 2t1 4 '«4li be (he nexi industry standard 
RAM chip (like the 210? waa^ This means price, 
avaUabiJIty, and QuaJity will all be good* Next the 
2114 is FULLY STATIC! W^ feel th<i& is the ONLY 
way to go on the S-1 00 Bussi We've &i\ heard the 
HORROR stones aboul some Dynamic Ram 
eoards having troubJe with DMA and FLOPPY 
DISC DRIVES. Who needs these ki*ndls of 
probtems'' And fina3^y. tven among other 4K 
Static RAM's the 2 1 1 4 stands out^ Not all 4K siatic 
Rams are created equall Some of the other 4K's 
have clocked chip enable lines artO varfous timlnQ 
win dows just as critical a 5 D y na m i c R AM ' s. Some 
of ouf cofnpctitcr'5 16K boar-ds use I hese "tricky" 
devices. Biit not us! The 21 14 Is the ONLY logical 
choice for a trouble-fj'ee. straightforward desig>n 




KIT FEATURES: 

1. Addressable as fouf separate 4K Blocks. 

2. ON BOARD SANK SELECT cirCyilry. 
(Crofnemco Standard!) AlilDws up to S12K on 
linef 

3. Uses 21 14 {450NS) AK StatJc Rams. 

4. ON BOAflD SELECTABLE WAIT STATES 

5. Doubie sided PC Boafd, with solder mas!< an-d 
sitk screened layout. Gold plated contaot fingers 
6- All address, and cfata lines tuiiy buffered. 

7 Kit includes ALL pans and socl^ets. 
B. PHANTO^« Isjumpered lo PlN 57. 

9. LOW POWER- L>nder2amp$TYPlCALfrgmlhe 
*e Vgll Suss. 

10. Blank PC Boa ret can be populated a$ any 
multiple of 4K. 



BLANK PC BOARD W/DATA— $53 
LOW PROFiLE SOCKET SET— $12 ASSEMBLED & TESTED—ADD $30 
SUPPORT IC'S & CAPS— $19.95 2114 RAM'S— 8 FOR S69.9S 



COMPLEMENTARY POWER TRANSISTORS 



SILICON NPN AND PNP. 70-220 CASE 
VCEO - 40V PD - 30 WATTS 

FOR AUDIO POWER AMPS. ETC 



TIP29 - NPN 
TIP30 - PNP 



YOUR CHOICE 

3 FOR $1 




NOT ASSOCIATED 

WITH 
DIGITAL RESEARCH 

OF CALIFOflKIA, 

THE SUPPLIERS OF 

CPM SOFTWARE. 



"X 



16K DYNAMIC RAM CHIP 

16K X 1 Bils.. 16 Pin Package. Same asMosteit 4116-4. 250 NS access 41 D 
NS cycte time. Our best price yet for this state of the art RAM. 3£K and 64K 
BAM boards using this chip are readily avaiJabie-. These are new, lully 
guaranteed devices by a rriajor mig VERY LIMITED STOCK J 

8 FOR $89.9 5 

450 NS! 2708 EPROMS 

Now full speed! Prime new units from a major U.S. 
Mfg. 450 N.S. Access tima 1 K x 8. Equiv. to 4-1702 
A's in one package. 

$ 16.75 oa . *9^^ 

PRICE CUT 



"*f — p-tfW <|^01J 



00 



NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR NEW! 

CAR CLOCK MODULE - #MA6008 

Originally used by HYGAIN to indicate time and 
channel on an expensrve C,B. Mmi size, seff 
contained module. Not a Kit. Four digits dIus 
flashing indicator for seconds, includes MM5369 
and 3. &8 MHZ crystal for super accurate time base. 
With hookup data. 

MFGR's CLOSEOUT 

LIMITED QTY. 



$699 



each 



INCLUDES CRYSTAL TIMEBASE1 
WORKS ON 12 VDCI 



Z-80 PROGRAMMING MANUAL 

By MOSTEK, orZlLOG. The most detailed explanation 
ever on the working of the Z-&0 CPU CHIPS. At least 
one tull page on each of the 158 Z-80 instructions, A 
MUST reference manual for any user of the Z~80. 300 
pages. Just off the press, $12.95 



LAB-BENCH VARIABLE 
POWER SUPPLY KIT 

5 to 20 VDC at 1 . AI\4P. Short circuit protected by 
current limit. Uses IC regulator and 10 AMP 
Power Darlmgton. Very good regu lation and low 
ripple. Kit includes PC Board, all parts, large 
heatsink and shielded transformer. 50 MV. TYP. 
Regulation, $15.99 KIT 



MALLORY COMPUTER 
GRADE CAPACITOR 

30,000 MFD 15WVDC 

Small: 3x2 Inches 

$1.99 #a. 3 For $4.99 



GENERAL INSTRUMENT 
FULL WAVE BRIDGE 
4 AMP 600 PIV 

3/4 IN. SQUARE - WITH LUGS 




ea. 



3 FOR $2 



fltM-1 



N«wi REAL TIME 
Compytvr Clock Chip 

NS. MM531 3. Features 
BOTH 7 segment and 
8CD outputs. 28 Pin 
DIP. $4.95 wllh Dila 



"THE COLOSSUS" 

FAIRCHILD SUPER JUMBO LED READOUT 

A full .60 inch character. The biggest readout we have 

ever soldi Super efficient- Compare at up to S2 95 each 

from others* YOUR CHOICE 

FND 843 Common Anode ^ - .« 

FND 850 Common Cathode '1^' ea {^ for $6>95) 



f^D20 



Digital Research Corporation 

*• (OF TEXAS) 

P.O. BOX 401247 • GARLAND, TEXAS 75040 • (214) 271-2461 



TERMS: Add 30* i^cisla^e, we pay balance Orders under $15 add 75* hartdUng No 
C.O.D We accept Vtsa. MasterCharge, and American Express cards. T^x. Re$. add 
5'^ Tax. Foreign orders (except Canada add 20% P 6 H, go Day Money Back 
Guarantee on alt hiems. 



«**«•! 

■••••I 
**•••! 

**•••! 
-'•••4 

-•*«#4 

..*««! 



85 TON SURPLUS DEAL!!! 

170.000 pounds of new surplus electronics was too much for either Digital Research Corporation 
or Bullet Electronics to handle ALONE! So we pooled our resources and rolled a convoy of four 
eighteen wheelers into our new Texas warehouse. You may order any of the below items from 
either company along with any other items from our respective ads elsewhere in 73. However, 
please DO NOT order Bullet Kits from Digital Research, or vice-versa. 



TEMPERATURE CONTROLLED HEATING PLATE 







IpZ.ua 




S^feX lO^flln. 120 VAC. 1 20 WATTS. Made of 1/4 In. tempered plate glass with Ni-Chrome heating element laminated to 
back. Element size is 4% x 9% inches Double protected by Tl KLIXON Thermostat and two thermal fuses Each also 
has neon ready light. 

Besides the obvious use as a bun warmer, food warmer, coffee warmer, glue warmer, etc., ourtests show this plate to 
be an excellent warmer for ferric chtoride solution used in etching PC Boards by hobbyists, Typicalty increases 
etching efficiency by 300% over room temperature. Non-Submersibie. 



CMOS PARTS BONANZA 




990 



EACH 



^W^i'''' 






Complete Module: 2 x W^ In. 

Contains: MC14553 3 DIGIT BCD COUNTER. MCI 451 1 BCD to 7 
segment decoder latch. CD4060 OSCILLATOR and RIPPLE 
COUNTER, CD4011 Nand gate. Also was square N.O. push 
button. 9V battery clip, SPOT Sub-Mini slide switch. Plus mlsc 
resistor, caps, transistor- All parts easily removed, Reg. Disl. List 
on MC14553 alone is over S4 eachl 



FIBER POINT PENS 

Writes on almost anything. Water Soluble ink 

Designed to wriie on plastic etc. Black. Fine Tip. 49e 

Value 

SPECIAL: 6/$1 100/$14 



PUSH BUTTON SWITCH 

NO. SPst. P.C. Mount. Same as used on CMOS 
Parts Bonanza at left. 



5 FOR $1 



4 BIT MICROPROCESSOR MODULE 



• "■ I 




75<tJ 



iMODULE ONLY> 



3 FOR $2 



Origmally custom designed for a large US Consumer Mfg These were used as part 
of a weight loss program Unit counts up to 25 bites with 24 flashes between bites to 
indicate chewing rate. Has 2 Digit LED readouts, adjustable on board oscillator. 4 
Bit Microprocessor with PROM. Our experimentation shows this module has many 
applications for timing, pacing, etc. Also there are on board signals that can 
produce various beeping, warble and exotic tones. Some appiicatron data included 
Complete units in case, as above: $2.49 each. 



74C903 CMOS: 



National Semiconductor. New CMOS Part. Hex 
Inverting Buffer, Use for interface from PMOS to TTL 
or CMOS, Can Drive LED'S. 



6/$1 



ORDER FROM EITHER COMPANY: SEE TERMS OF SALE ON OUR RESPECTIVE ADS 



Digital Research Corpration 

(OF TEXAS) 
P.O. BOX 401247 • GARLAND, TEXAS 75040 • (214)271-2461 



BULLET ELECTRONICS 

P,0, BOX 401244E • GARLAND. TEXAS 7S040 

(214)278 3553 



176 



Busmmmsmm 



fiVLLET ELi€¥B«MCS PaBax40i244E (214)278-3553 

BARLAIMD TEXAS 75040 



ta^ iifliiji *ai9t cum ^m^aMmnt 

FKuusE Cwfrnon CUtart^ ni^dp^ .4* ( 

I^NOri Cprtimcri C«ri(xM r i CNwKltr 

r|iP-30 ftiP- saw Vem^tm C- tA lata mouiK 
fCJ-220 4^1,00 



^\ UNIVERSAL SOUMD EFFECTS BOARD 

Nft¥E TCU B?EB tfI3J€D 1DU CQULO OUPLIClATt rrfi: oCWFiD OF A STtAM 
IIIAIM Dfl A FliASOR <jUN? HCU AfiOVT GUBDI^, UKIHTLES, SimtS, 

mtam dogs fm oivier souwd ^fetr:? etou tm can with flofi 
pfoawwaLE Boum sfects kit. it uses itc icw as pin t.i. scxjmd 

^wTHEanei tuxp^ mt^frr Mi} suptobt ciRcuiiHif, 5 to is-ra; is 

SECWIHED TTl GIVE APPBOX. t/^l rfATT (JF AUDIO IVTPliT. WE PnaVTDE THF 
P.C. BOARD. PARTS AND IPtSTBUCn^JNS ALJOf« Wml /V CHART 10 PROGRA.M 
L^OHE COTTON SOUNDS, USE YOUFt tMA^^IKATEON TO CREATC GfilGINAL 
^aJND EFFECTS. ffitEH: SE-OI IG.SSLUsf Sfiir J 3/39.55 



¥OUVE SEEN IT OK CHIALmr 

■ LACNWtlPt 



CHAOHE 



fit" i»o»i 
ID^ hall 



□ PDT TfrAglEi 
.1A I U&V 



5:iBi**«''n«5««iafwse 



iici«««4 (^sinve vottAai 

qCGULAT13« 
1^^ ■.*.-.*n ft*i&» Mrti 






Og FAIR CHILD 



DUAL LOW HOfSt 
JUJlHOniE' 



«i40n»1ZL 



*!?f J.* L .ti-_Cw*ww£[-, 



■ > d'^r- - 1. 









^^c^e^^^m. 



C44IF 



liNVIiOPf C:nhT?aCd w> 



1.10'. 



EMfTTUI 

HARGTOFVO) 
VALLEY' 

1 dtv^(^^ 






OyAO 

ttAMGAiiH iiniCE That 



4.-1 orro iHKATQAs 
tot 

mtttit TurrLMMTf 



WiftE^nTRAP Win 
KYMAD Iniutal. 



4J0> 



Sfei 






ILHW 



*lJtoW\T* sd^ftLU'Tie *D4UiLD* 

AiEift*a Asp B-iTf^ (HA-* Oa»t 



53.00( 



iy^-Ki 



^TT- ^.T- 



l;«:£^sx»: 






S DIGIT ZULU CLOCK KIT 

>iuu ipT lap tp^Mif jufti ma pliM ^CBotMOh Ttn ipiiqu* dBwpi 4l Iw 

^ -iCfOHlWKXVn DCM *<|tT HH in* 9Cf *M ^VK cNl OX TO 4 
&P1CVL mn01i3£ WE HAVE A UHrTED OMMftTTY. 



.^ P^omUeeCf 



ALL COWPONENrS 10*'^ 
nUARANTECO 

r.A31lt I W.I]f£EiA«ib <e MW ■ HWU 
?if 9FMIP«rHl9*» 

73! 0> mam I Qw * O l l KlUWI ■ 



L JilT 



COMftJEn 



»«M»» 





Z^WSfd 




1M«X)3 


ZDOV (A 


1*/1« 


IhUOOfi 


flOOV 1A 


4S/1J0 


iHSTa 


GunuriMin DtoM 


1#1 w 


1M3BA 


0«imiBiu*n Deo* 


1CU160 


IHfl*! 


OMlBirtior 






PC^KHMMdUH 


MOnJi 


UHMARltED POWEA Q^OPti Mm 


'-^fW^tM 


k^it Gl^i^^^m to :b* tf |g^^ 


«oww@ 


1A, 140% Gbq^ » 


r«i EsOiv 



39nj 



CVV 



i-mn 






W|)«BLE ALAaM Kh 

ft fun EA5 r n in ear 

niancing 10 v, . irfiAmbln 

iiirmafliin -uren aQund urtidi Pqr phjrmi or iDvi- 

I^Vf'DC'B $ri«n ip«ak;«r]l. Q^er f|i.iif rrn^uuml 
K.ivrt twerv aulJ All pjJMi mr-ludlnj J'C beNI'd-, 

2.50 









J3?^Sir 






HCfUfiP 



AiiP 



Dli-eHlKINATOA 



IfTfjMk 



ivGu-M 



"^1* t*f VI 



!>0c 



iOC 



POWER SUPPLY K)T 
PS* 14 

' SeriEf tKaa 200MV kq4tf#ndllfi«ni^r<V4n 

* Fplrtbatk CurrfflT l-imiimii __^^ 

' Shori Circuit PrctmEtid < j*^**^!** ^ 

* fhermal ShuttWawn ^i^^*!' irf^***^ 
' Adiu^table Cwriarn LImMIng ^i*^ ciPfeS^^hO^ 

» L«n ih*n t^s; r\piM ^^ p N^^ 

* tG imps 11.6 lo HBV 

* A4l parti. BjpplJBd' infllgdirKp hiflvy dtity trdnv 

* Qualiky tilaied fibiHgl^u PC tKMrJ 

REVIEWED tN 7/7S 72 MfiJS. 

ISA coNT. 20^ 1^^ 42.95 



r 



>-^^ 



HV1434 Vkncsp DkMB TQpH Norn ^ i 

JHSiU High Frvq fmp 1 ^Ml f^ IS 
Q<HZ1 TO-5 CBii« KVlP. HOUH # iOf 

HIIDI'Oa 100V lA ECn Ulttl tttiiHlv^ 

HKI^S 3t>V i^A Thac: Bwnlilvii QliM 
tl>5 4« 



'/* Wat<| Abidlo JM^ 4 din fllii- 
B0E 






!is^ 



2 



m 



L?>fjS 






OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION KFT 



TfiOi 



; a Z&A SCfi «rtii ihgrH fh* «wVMff 10 ^«a«Ct 
1^lh0«lFS1J Jf«P%14 AJlllKfWt 



NEVER A SWeETEfT 
METER! 

BiflUlilMl AmtNon nudt p^nnJ 
imtlflre ere a ^nap Id IrMirHll Hug# 
iTji wnilBfilaitAtflewylDraict Vdu 
MOiHl e^psd Id pay iH^cn fpf tilCt^ 
Huti «•«• ^ lor im paifl MATCHED 



MK-03A CLOCK/TIMER KfT 

iFealuiE^ 24 hour JEulu Iipm *m\ un 1u 24 liDun of didciwfl 
11:113^ en the sam« nl dP iIx rllyil L^D ir&BfiDuts. Tatall^ 
iMdependenr ztpwtWtfn t^^ \^\h luni^lJi^nt Cluck h^ pre 
Mttablff alarm ^iTf» 1Q mjnuiii tih^i'if, Tinwr \\a% latBfi. 
hvlct, «nij count ^unclionti Pull n^jit iticj oticivoltPfle 

Off i+i»v e»ii be ujjrtfd tilT wihiMJi rthihjrtsmq niir ciac* or 

Igmp Tim«tWH< iticluillKJ it^^\ WSSMtK^\ ^CKS* 0t lti« 
mofiV cvf>^^ a*^ nnmJiiii^if C»rndf»ral«a>ni t^e cafi a^d 
<iv.—--tt n n«rt ■'^v<tKl S4Mit;*m. ara u^^ddil IVTw* 
iV ■ ^t inndp I3»idarii Mtcralt NtttnuwnT tsm. 



t-i«vOC 



28,95 



"Tiew^ ^iUmi 



^0^ 



CA^ACITOIQ 



"N 



723D1 



General PurpodA dp Amp i Load Qqhi 3/1.00 
VoK. Rflg. IC iTauu ln«lnurr>«r«i) to Lead Can .BB 
FET IrvgitTil Op AiTTp Hep i* Mirn Dip 3/1.10 






IJmrcI 
33m Kd 



vipe#iaw( 
nevcic H'Hiw 

4IWVCC Mf tat 



20V dip Tani 



•■■1 W 
4|.<'t DO 
aa DQ 



l.-ii^^ 



(Sip tint ^\.QoyM*.\ 
-^^J-f. 



'TnWhiHWU14na»t«Pll^n,4li^ 



'@'9il PFP GerBmiE: trimmor Cop SmaJl !■ Sl£it>le 

rS\M& Cornx(lva«d«Cv3Vk'h«irHl 2.10 1^11.50 
3.3niHI C.3VDC Dtp T^raiAW (iilWD HwisI Laad» 

1V1JB 

SuYouinOAYTONi 



r 



\^t 



-^«Sto 



■-:f\^^ - V^J----^^ 



*N0 COD S ^ADD 5% FOR SHIPPING -ORDERS UNDER SIO- 

-SEND CHECK OR MONEY -TEX RESIDENTS ADD 5% TAX ADO .75fof HANDLING 

ORDER OR CHARGE CARD NO- FOREIGN ORDERS ADD 10%, 

PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED ON VISAS MC 



COPYHI&HT 



ZENEft GRAB SAC 

A r«Tr nice a&sortmafii pi * ' 
A iVW zeners Vonagii ringjus 
*f« fwtfm 3.T 14 M VOC. 1Mo«l 
h]Q« heuSe • JblA m POHMM ■ 
cross over Jot lo ttMftdm^ 
^idfhitmiL A gnm tuf lot any 






1*^ Reader Service— see pag& f 95 



177 



.. . and we also have . . . 



HEIITH H8 
BliRE BOfiRD 

MEMORY 
SPECIfIL — $35! 

Don't need the full 12K of our standard HB 
memory? We now offer the board, mounting 
bracket, edge connector, an<j schematic for only 
$35. Populate it with a few support chips and 
readily available, low cost 2102s to build your 
memory up to a full 12K whenevef your budget 
permits. 



MEMORY 

CHIP 
SPECIfiL 

2102 LI (low 
power, better than 
450 ns speed) 1 K 
static RAMs are now 
only 99c while they 
last. Only good or^ 
orders of 10 Of more, 



$200 



12K OF MEMORY 
FOR THE 

HEffTH H8: 

24K: $399 

Heath H6 ownefs are recognising that Ecor^oram VI** 
offers a truly superior vaiue; where else can you find a 
12K board at this low price that is fully static, draws a 
minimal amount of current, and is expressly engineered 
for full electrical and mechanical compatibility with the 
H8? This memory comes as an easy-to-assemtiie ''unkil' 
(socKtts, bypass caps are pre-soldered In place) and 
includes simple, clear Instructions. 



PET ROCKS 



(some people call them crystals) 



XT500K 

XT1M 

XT1 .84320 

XT2M 

XT3.5dM 

XT4iyi 

XT4,S315M 

XT5M 

XTSM 

XTdM 

XT10M 

XT12M 

XT15M 

XT18M 

XT20M 



500 KHz, series mode, furvdamental, wire leads, HC6/U 

package . . . $4.95 

Same as above« but 1 MHz . . , S5.95 

Same as above, but t. 64320 MHz . . . $5.95 

Same as above, but 2 MHz . . . $5.95 

Same as above, but colorburst (3.58 MHz) , . . $2.25 

4 MHz, series mode, fundamental. HC19 pkg. . . . $4.95 

Same as above, but 4.5315 MHz . , . $4,95 

Same as above, but 5 MHz . . . $4,95 

Same as above, but 6 MHz . , . $4,95 

Same as atx^ve, but 9 MHz . . . $4.95 

Same as above, but 10 MHz . , , $4^ 

Same as above, but 12 MH2 . . . $4.95 

Same as above, but 15 MHz , . . $4.95 

Same as above, but 18 MHz , . . S4.9S 

Same as above, but 20 MHz . . . $4.95 



RF POWER TRANSISTORS 

2NRF-t 2 GHz RF power transistor, Pd max (@ 25 degrees C) 

3.5W, Pout min # 2 GHz LOW, Pin 310 mW. efficiency 
@ 2 GHz 30%, round Shape» similar to RCA 2N5470, 

2NRF-2 2 GHz RF power transistor. Pd B.TW, Poyt 2.5W, Pm 

300 mW. efficiency 33%, cross shape, similar to RGA 

TAB407. $5 J5 
2)4RF-3 2 GHz RF power transistor. Pd 21W, Pout 5.5W, Rn 

r25W. efficiency 33%, CfX^sS Shai>e. Simitar to RCA 

2N^69. SS.95 
2NRF4 2 GHz RF powQf transistor. Pd 29W, Pout 7.5W, Pin 

15W, efficiency 33%, cross shape. Factory selected, 

prime 2N6269, $7,95 



12V 86 POWER SUPPLY KIT $44.50 

12A @) 50% duty cycle, foldback current 
limiting, crowbar overvoltage protection, many 
more features. For tfarrsceivers^ portable 
taperrv equipment, disk drives, etc. Easy to 
assemble — except for transformer^ diodes, 
and filter caps, all parts mount on heavy-duty 
circuit board. Does not include case. 



Mfi1003 CLOCK AND CfiSE SPECIfIL: 

$ 19.95 1 

Easy to buMd — just add 12V 
DC and tiime setting switches. 
Includes crystal Hmebase, ideal 
Tor automohveiportable use. 4 
bfue-green fluorescent readouts. 
Case includes filter and mount- 
ing hardware, and is available 
separately for $5J5. MA1003 
module avaiJable separately for 
S16.50. 



I A ±: «'-«r'« b.'m mr* 



•Mm * k! 



Tl SN76477 COMPLEX SOUND GENERflTOR CHIP 

We break the price barrier on this amazing IC. includes oscillators, white noise 
source, noise filter, digital mlxer^ one shot, amplitude envelope control, and more. 
An audio experimenter's delight f NOWnNIV C7 T^ 



TERMS: Add Si handling to orders ur>der $15. A I tow up to 5% shipping (rnore (of power 
supply)^ excess refunded. Give street address for UPS delivery, Prices good through cover 
month of magazine VISA^ /Master charge^ call our 24 hour order desk at (415) 562-0636* 
COOa OK wilh street address. CaL res. add sales tait. Thanks for your business! 

send for our new flyer 



WE EVEN STOCK 
KNOWLEDGE . . 

The Actam Osborne & Associates books orf 
microcomputers are recognized as the tops in their 
field . . , lucid and complete, they cover virtually all 
aspects of microcomputing. Prices have gone up on 
the new editions, but we still have some of last 
year's books available at a good price. 

An introduction to Mfcrocomput^rs, 

Vol. 1. * - > - -....,. $7.50 

An Introduction to 

Microcomputers, VoL 2 (1st ed } S10.00 

(Mention 73 Magazine and take off 10%!!) 

■■«■■■■•»■«•■■«■■■■■■■■»■■■■■•■«■■«■•■ 

Craig Anderton's books have shown thousands of 
peopie that building electronic music machines can 
be enjoyable . , - and even profitable! "ELECTBONIC 
PROJECTS FOR MUStCtANS" ($7S^ g^ves the 
basics of electronic construction, and goes on to 
describe a variety of projects usefiil to the 

audio^muslc enthusiast. **HOME RECORDING FOR 
hflUSICIANS" {$^M% his latest book, let Is you how 
to make professional sounding recordings *~ 
whether you're a multi-track rock musician, or just 
taping a church choir or^ a portable cassette 
machine. Includes a projects chapter that describes 
how to build a versatile mixing console with 
preamps. noise gates, tone controls, etc, It you're 
into musical electronics, these are two books you 
can't be Vh/lthout« 



^G4 



ecK 



BILL GOOBOUT ElfCTRONlCS 
2355. CW^KLAND AitPORI CA Si4^l4 



178 



i^B 



7400 TTL 



SN74C]1f4 

SrJ74Mhr 

SN74Q6I^ 

S^7^13N 
&N7115N 
SN'/4UN 
StJ7J1fiN 
SM74im 

SN7J23ff 
£N7i]?3N 
3J^74?SN 

5f^7427N 

SU7^3Q^! 

SU7J37N 

SM7439M 
SiyT44aH 

3N7.t4;i| 
SN:?143N 
5N74J4U 
SN74d5N 
3N744eN 
!)NJ44rN 
S«74+H*J 

3^7^51 Ni 
Sy7453N 
S;IV'4aJ4 

SN745nN 



IS 

ia 
^a 

.2D 

?» 

29 

.20 
?0 

^5 
3S 
4fl 
7« 
25 
35 
2)0 
.59 

.25 
59 
.2ft 
25 
.3ii 
,25 

.2(1 
$9 
49 
.?5 
J5 
.73 
.fi9 
.59 
7* 
.20 
?0 
.20 

.2D 



$*l7il7DtJ 
3*17^7541 
&N74?3N 
SN?474N 
SM7475M 
SN747fijy 
$N7479N 

, sti7^eM 

SN74a6N 
&NT4gSN 
Srj7490N 
SN7491U 
5117*421* 
^II7493N' 
SN/491fJ 

SN743rN 

5l«74fMN 

SN74ECl7n 

$N7410SIN 

■5l'J741l€l»J 

EN74121N 

s*i7<ii2ahe 

SN7J125M 

5*J7413JN 
£hl?fli:l6P| 
SN74141N 
SW7*f4l2N 
3$J7'414^^ 
&H7J144Ni 
Sf*MU5« 
3N74M7rj 
Siil7'?14eN 
i>IJ74IMftl 
BW741$TN 
SN74152-.M 

S^7*154N 
S'J74155I^ 
5N741&6N 
SN7Jr?i7N 



.29 
29 
:15 
.35 
49 
35 

.50 

94 

.iiS 

.79 

35 

1.7S 

45 

.sa 

.43 
.43 
.G5 
«5 
.65 
3.-K) 

35 

.S9 

1.95 

.<g 

.43 
.7& 
.75 
.?9 
2.i5 

.7fl 
1 35 
1 £9 




.5S 
.59 
.99 

,7« 
55 
20^ DJicniiiit 10d fici etunlitiied «nler 25% -IQN pei combiniHl flnlBr 



3W7J1MM 


.■B9 


5N74ieih| 


m 


Sfg74l6SN 


1.^5 


SN74163H 


.m 


3fi74l64*l 


m 


SN741S5H 


.«9 


SN7IISQN 


1.25 


£H74f67W 


1.95 


SH74irON 


159 


BM7417?N 


G.OO 


SII74T73ig 


1.75 


Sh74E74^ 


89 


EIV74 175*1 


.73 


Shl^41?6N 


.7? 


SW74T7™ 


.79 


SN7417'9*J 


1.85 


SN741ft{m 


.79 


3N^41F(1N 


1.05 


SN7418aN 


.73 


SN74lA4Pt 


1.^ 


SN7J1&SW 


1&5 


SN741B€N 


9.%i 


5N7<l«3rJ 


a.35 


SJ>J7^1&0N 


1.25 


SiN7J1!HPii 


1 25 


SM74iy3N 


.79 


SW7<193H 


.73 


rniAmn 


.•99 


SN7'[19SN 


.69 


SH7<l«f* 


.fiS 


■SHr-tlSTN 


.39 


SPf?4l96N 


1 4f 


SN74IMN 


T.49 


EPf?*s2aa 


4.95 


$rf7425IN 


17* 


SM74?79N 


.73 


EM74283N 


2.25 


$N74Se4N 


3.95 


£H742a^ 


3.95 


SN74365^ 


m 


3'h74je«N 


m 


SN74.367*J 


64 


$N74:iS£lN 


M 


S«7439(1N 


1.95 


SN74:i^SN 


1 95 



C[MD(U 
CU40ei 
CD40K 
CD4aK 
C04(I07 
CD4aM 

cei4t]io 

CD4011 
€0^01? 

cri4[ji$ 

CD4Q14 
{:iJ4(J15 
CU4016 
CM()17 
CD4{]i15 
CtMOig 

cwoeo 

CO4023 
00402-5 

CD4QZ6 
CLJ4K7 



1 



23 

;3 

t9 

?5 

49 

43 

.S3 

.25 

39 

\M 

T 11 

49 

1.19 

99 

49 

1.19 

1.39 

I 19 

.23 

73 

.33 

2.25 

6!* 



7*CQ|} 
74^2 
74CM 
74DDft 
74C10 
74CK 
74G20 
74C3i3 
74M£ 
74C4e 
74Cr3 
74074 



-39 
23 
39 
49 

!.9I} 

39 

39 

1.95 

3 44 

.39 



7aMi:i 

L^IIDfiH 

Ltt.30flH 

LU30lCitJ.'H 

LW302M 

LM3IMH 

L.M3Q5H 

LMM7CN/H 

LM3iJ9K 
LW3I0CW 
LM311N,-H 
LH312H 

lm31B<:»;h 

IMS19M 

l,M32[K-Si 

LM320K:..2 

iM3^0K-li 

J.M320K-15 

LM3KIK-1S 

LM3fflK-24 

J.H32DT'5 

LM330r-5.5 

LM32Cn"'B 

LM32QT-15 

LMaOT-tB 

t.M32Dl-54 

LH323K-5 

iM:)34N 

LM339N 

L.M/I4GK-6 
LMJ4DK-e 
LMS4(!3(-F3 
LM340K.15 



99 
.90 

34 
.75 

1 m 

.SO 

1 00 

1 aa 

1,25 

1 15 

M 

i.es 

I.SQ 
1.3fl 
1.3£ 
1.35 
1 55 
1.1-5 
1 35 
1.35 
1,2S 
1.S5 
1.25 
1,« 
1.25 
1.25 
1.35 
5.95 

1 m 

1.35 
1.3S 
1.S5 
1..36 
1.35 



741SK1 
7^1301 
T415Q? 
74L303 
74LS04 

741SDS 
74L5fl9 
74lLSTa 
TdlSTI 

7iL514 

74LS1S 

T4LS2fl 

74LSai 

;4',.S22 

74LS25 

74L327 

74tS!§ 

74LS3a 

?4LS33 

TiL337 

f4l.S4ft 

74LS4i2 



n 

.23 
.23 
,2» 
.23 

.n 

29 

.J3 
.^ 
49 

M 

3». 

.59 
» 

.2t 
?4 

.29 
£3 

n 

35 
219 
.69 



C/MOS 



C[j4Q;?a 
CD4Ci2g 

CD4Q35 

CD4S41 
C04*9? 
OD4{M3 
CD4044 
CW045 
CW047 

ci>4oie 
cwcwg 

CD'5D5D 
G?4tl5l 
CIHD(S5 
CCI445G 
CO4059 
C04€6a 

C£i44)$a 

CEMDeg 



1 ts 

49 

1 19 

I.Si 

99 

m 

1.79 
2.54 
(■.3S 
49 
.49 
L.19 
1.19 
2.95 
9.95 
I 49 

n 

39 
Ah 



ra4D(7C! 
C0i1t71 
C04fl7? 
Ci]4ff?fi 
11104^1 
GD40B2 

WCT44a9 
JliK;i441D 
MCI 4411 
Wt;T4419 
MCI 4433 

MC145D7 

HC5 45E2 

Wt45^ 

C[>45(]e 

CW510 

004:511 

C0451& 

CD4i516 

CD4520 

CD4iSa6 



^ 

:4& 

1.39 

.n 

.23 

.93 

3 49 

14.9(5 

14.95 

4S 

S9.9S 

75 

.99 

3*3 
3 95 
1.99 

\.n 

3.« 
1.29 



74C00 



74CS5 
74C90 
74C93 
T40S5 

74C151 
7^154 
74Ct57 
74Ct60 
74C161 



2.49 
I 9S 
1.95 
1,95 

1.2S. 
2M 
3.M 
2.15 
2.49 
2.^9 



74C1K3 
74C1 &4 
74C173 
74G1K 
74C193 
74C19S 

74Ci23; 
74C9a5 
74Cg26 

e[}C37 



2.49 
2.49 
2 6* 
2.49 
3.4& 
2.49 
5.45 
a2S 
^95 
8.95 
1 5IJ 
1,50 



LINEAR 



74 



LM34K-1S 


1.3S 


|,M340K-24 


).35 


LM34Cn-"5 


ISS 


LM^IOTT-a 


1.25 


LM34BT^a 


1.25 


LM^UT-TE 


1.25 


LJyt34aT-15 


1.2S 


LM34[JT-19 


1.25 


LM340T-24 


1-35 


LMSEiaN 


1.00 


LM370N 


1.95 


LM3(73tJ 


3.Z5 


LM377(J 


4.M1 


HA3$0N 


1 n 


LU3flOCN 


M 


LH39fN 


179 


i)mn 


1.79 


NE5(11N 


9.K] 


NE51DA 


6.1KI 


NE52SIA 


49S 


NE53lH,'y 


J.^ 


hlE^T 


■B-.Ofl 


NES40L 


6.09 


hlE544N 


4.S« 


NESHM 


1.3D 


l'JE5S5V 


.39 


NtSSfiN 


,99 


NES&JB 


5.00 


ff£&615 


%M 


JJE.5629 


5.00 


NESRSM.'H 


1.25 


MEB^GEN 


1.75 


NE557V,'H 


94 


NE57flN 


4.95 


LM733CMj>1 


.69 


-■U^7CWJ^H 


.29 


74LS00TTL 



LM71DN 

LW7HN 

IM723^,-H 

(.M733N 

LM739N 

iM741CK/H 

LW741 -UN 

LM!'4?'N,«H 

|Jil74flN^Hi 

LM131W 

LMI^SSCN^M 

MC343&*! 

MC14^9N 

LW155«V 

MC1741SCP 

LMSlltN 

LU2991N 

LM3B5$N 

LM39aON?340il 43 
iM3M&N Ba 

LM390I9N: 
MG555flV 

LM75^gaN 
'5451CN 



1.00 

1.19 

.35 

39 

79 

.39 

2.95 

.59 

\M 

1.39 

95 

1 75 

3.00 

1 95 

2.95 

1.50 

1.49 



7545SCIt 
754;53CH 

7fi49-1CN 

75492CN 

75i(93k 

75494CN 

m:4i3e 

R&*151 

R«144 

RC4195 



1.25 
59 

4.95 
41 
39 
39 
39 

79 

99 

39 

119 

1.25 

2.a£ 

S9f^ 



74LS47 
7(ltB?i1 
74L354 
74L&55 
r4LS73 
74LS74 
74I.&75 
T4US7B 
74LS7a 
T4L^3 
74LSI5 

74LJS90 

74L59? 

741333 

744595 

741S96 

741.3107 

74L3ta9 

74LS112 

74iLS123 

74kS:|25 

7415133 

74'.S-r3E 



.64 

,23 
,S3 
.23 
.35 
.35 
.49 
3S 

m 

.7S 

m 

35 
.49 

sa 

.79 

,^ 

3S 
,3S 

.99 

m 
im 
n 



74L3iaS 
74LST39 
74t3l51 
?4t5t55 
741^157 
74LS160 
74L$161 
74LS162 
74lSld3 
r4LSt64 
741.S175 
7*LSiai 
7415190 
74L&191 
7^LS192 
74LS193 
74LS194 
741S195 
74LS253 
74LS^S7 
74LS2Sfl 
7415^0 
74LS279 
T4kS3&7 
741.3363 
74LS&70 



.59 
.69 
.69 

M 
69 

.99 

.79 

2.49 



.n 

.79 

.m 

1.39 
.53 

195 



EXCITING NEW KITS! 

Regulated Power Suppiy 

5 to 1 6 VDC 



Thermometer Kit 




*Fitll 1.& amp at 5-1 QV 
vutput — Up to .5 amp 
at 1BV output 

*H«aVV dutV^ tran^qriflHr 

*3 ternf>inal 4.C Vn^lt. Rag. 

^Hedt sink provkfed for 
coQling effjci*Tiey 

*PC Qaard cdTl&trUt]:tiqn 

*120 VAC input 



JE21Q 5ta15VDC $19.95 

ALSO AVAtLABLE: 

JE90D Di^rtal Stopwatch Kit , $33.95 

JE301 6 digit Crock Ktt .... $19.^5 




■ Dual fentofs-ewltchirifl eontrOE for in- 
door/Qutdoor or dual rvionitorlng 

■ Cantinuoyfl LED .&" ht. diiplav 
-Rangffl: -iO^F to 199T= ,/ -40^ to 100^ 
* Accuracy-. ±1' noftiinal 

'Set for FshrenNBit or Celiioiic reading 
•Shm. ivBlrut casB - AC wall adapter mcl. 
- Si f fl ; 3-1 /4 ■ ' H a S-S/e " W X 1 -3/8' ' D 

JE300 $39,95 

JE73D 4di!?itClock Kit , . . £14.95 
JE2206B Func. Genaralor Kit . Si 9.95 
JE747 Jmnbo6rigt.cldckltit £29.95 



DISCRETE LEDS 



KC556H 
KCS56& 

KC556C 

KC22R 

MV&G 



.20(3" itta. 
red 

yelhow 

.200" dla. 
retf 

Ted 
.MS" dii. 
red 




INFRA-RED 1-£D 

t/'4->;ly'i''x1/l6"tlat 

5^ST 



5,''S1 




1^r^Jlt. 




m\ 


xcaogn 


rod 


5/S1 


Am 


xczogG 


gf«(^ 


^;$1 


i;%\ 


M7mi 


yilPGfw 


4/$i 


4/11 


XCS2Bft 


115' dlt. 


5/11 


XC52&G 


Or«fin 


4/51 


XC526V 


yiflllmw 


4^1 




XC526C 


deaf 


4^1 


4/$1 




.190' tfli. 




m\ 


XCtltR 


red 


€/S1 


XCItIG 


flfBW 


4$1 




KC111Y 


yvllcM' 


4^1 


t 


.JtClllC 


c^ar 


4/S1 



TIMEXT1001 

LIQUID CRYSTAL DiSPLAV 

r IE LD E F recT 




DtGIT - .5" CHifiiRACTERS 

J.OO" K T.20" PACKAGE 
INCLUDES CQWNECTOR 

T1Qai-Tfani;mi$¥iii'fl S7.0i 

TIDBIA-ReflBEtnre B^5 



DISPLAY LEDS 



Ttff. PQUmTT 

MAW 1 Coniiii4JP ano(jl6-red 

MAN ? 5 K 7 Qnt Uat/^x-rad 

^AH 3 Cw'niTOn Cattici[Se-r«l 

MAiN i C^mman CjiltiilHle-raiJ 

y.4M /I' Coflinsiifi An&dE-yBllBW 

MAJ^ 72 CcirnmDn A-nE^dit^red 

IMN 74 CcKTi^iMJn CaUiQi^-red 

MAl4 3^ C^mman AiKiA-^kiw 

WAN 34 Canimon C»lni5tl?'l'elftHi* 

MA^ 3420 ComrnQRi AnorH-orjrr^B 

WAN 3630 Camman Arwdd-oranfli t 1 

MA^ 36^9 Qommcin CHltii?dE-o[3ii[{fl 

MAJU4gl4 CodnriDn ArfiDril^tjrjnga 

WAN 4S4fl Cwninni CMtiOdf-flnnBe 

MPiN4:''l9 Cornmon AnQrie-md 

MA^ 47M CommDn Aciodt-rfliS * 1 

MAN 4749 Gbininon GJirnKlfl-retf 

MAN 4^14! CofnTTiui AnHJe-'yallciw 

MAN 4E40 Common CsllwKlflyello* 

MAN &6;i Q OoHicmrn AnoE^e-orfjnoe-P p . 

MAN 6E30 Cammari .ArMd^-orangB =: 1 

^AN ^40 Curi-'Tjjn CacJioW'OraiMiff-D !:> 

^AN ^h.a ClHranon CattiQCie-Qmi^t ::: 1 

WANfi6H Cflmiinan AniKlH^i»a.nir« 

MAN 6661? Compiod CiinwIi-iKsnoe 

MASIS71D nommon Ancirfe<-fBd-D.[>. 



.370 

.M)0 
12S 
1*7 
300 
309 
300 
3CK] 
3W] 
3i» 

.230 
SW 

.300 

.400 
400 
400 
.4Qfl 
409 
400 
5«l 
580 
560 
.560' 
5l&d 
S«0 

5eo 



^fliCt 

2 95 

4.95 

.25 

1 91& 

T.25 

.99 

M 

T.25 

99 

.99 

99 

.99 

99 

9S 

.99 

.99 

,49 

.49 

M 

M 

.» 

.99 

99 

.99 

.99 

.49 

.49 



TTfPE PflUfflmr WT 

UAN 67:!0 Oontm^n .^rMiaB^rad ^ 1 550 

WAN S740 Cdmrftan CaPtOtft'rftl'O.D 5*0 

MAN 57^ ComniQn CdlltQidB-jied 3 1 .560 

M*N 6760 CixTKrtWi MUdfr-hfld SSft 

lirAN 6:i^0 Common: CBtiioEff-md 560 

DL701 Cammniv ArttuSe-nfd ±1 SCO 

DL704 Common CUhn^lH-rBdi 30Q 

Ol.7fli7 Cflrnmon AnDde-rad 500 

D-L72S Common CaituKie-rflii 500 

Dl,74l fromman Ancite-rBd EOO 

DL746 GDinmDN Aflmle'red t 1 ■530 

0174? Common Angda-red EOO 

0-1749 CumnDh Csiltfldfl-Wfl: = \ 630 

D>L750 Common CamndB-md! BOO 

Dl J3B ComnlKi CaJHOde'rtia 1 14 

FND7a common Cstnode 250 

FND35i Common CattiCidB ±1 357 

fKD359 C[Mn,'TliQ<i C^^hdde 357 

FNDS03 common ejdtHmdetFNDSDO) 500 

Fry[>507 Oommai) An^de iFNOSlia) .590 

Si(ffl3'-77S9 CommDn Anod^iti^rtd 390 

HDSP-WOO CommD-fi AjioOa-rR(S flOQ 

K|lSP'-^03 Common C^ltindB red BOO 

5082.7500 4 i7sgl Oiflil-RKD-P 6» 

5092 7302 4*7Sgl DIjHd-l-ri&P WO 

SQf!^V73M l^ierTailgB diaraaar (±1] 600 

5042-7340 4.(7S-:il Oift.!H,=:-<.:-1fl<iT^I 600 



PRICf 

OS? 

99 

.99 

.99 

.99 

.93 

.99 

.99 

1.49 

1 25 

1.49 

1.49 

1.49 

1.43 

.35 

.69 

99 

.75 

.90 

.99 

1..30 

2.10 

?.IQ 

I If-iPul 

14.95 
1S,<I0 
22.50 



RCA LINEAR 



CA2E23T 

G'\:ii;.ii5i 

CA303aT 

Cfl;i;(>46ft| 

OA3059M 
CA306(^ 
CA3D90T 
CflSOSTN 



2.15 Cft305£N 

2.^ CA30a3N 

2.*ft C*30a6N 

1 .35 CA30fl9N 

1.30 CA.3130r 

3.25 CA3140T 

J,26 Qdiarr 

.B5 USIOIN 

2 04 CASBOah 



1[R 

\m 

.35 
3.75 
t,39 
t.25 
1.25 
4i 
3.50 



CALCULATOH 
(^MIPS/DRIVERS 



MMS.7JJ 


52.96 


WM573fl 


2.95 


C:iM3Bfi4 


2.QQ 


0M3&G5 


1.90 


;jMafla7 


.7^ 


DME.S39 


75 


9^74 7 uq 




t.A LEO drive- 





CLO€K CH4PS 

MMS309 

MMl^^ll 

MM53:12 

MM&^'U 

MM531d 

MM5Sie 

MMS369 

MM5,lB7.'199aA 

MM5ai] 



MDTOROU 

$4.B5iMC140lHr S4.9S 

4.t5 MC)40flLB; 5.75 

•*:9S HG14.-I9L 2.95 

4,93 i MC3D!22P tM 

8.45 WaO&lP 3.59 

g,45 MC4016f74416f 7.$a 

S.flfi M{;4i!)24P 3.95 

4.95 WC4D4QP 6.93 

9.95 MC4944? 4.50 



*pin LP 

14 pin 1^ 

15 pin LP 
1« ^n LP 

20 pin LP 

r4 pin ^ 
1*1iin ST 
18 pilT ST 
^4 pin £T 

J pm SS 
14 pin SG 
1-$ {lir SG 
ia pin SO 

a put WW 
14 pin WW 
14 pin WW 
l£ pin WW 

tS pin. WW_ 



1-24 

.*1T 
.20 
.22 
.f4 

.34 

1.27 
.30 
.35 
49^ 

t.3i9 

.35 

.39 
52 

5.3^ 
.45 

.43 
75 



iC SDLDEHTAIl — LOW PftOFlLE (TIN} SOCKETS 



2S"(4 

ie 

.19 

-21 

.21 

32 

.27 
.S2 
,4S 

.37 
.32 
3^ 

47 

.38 

41 
3« 
42 



50-10t^ 

.15 

.1* 

27 
.30 

.1^ 
.25 
.30 
.42 

.m 
n 

.32 
43 

.31 
.37 

37 

41 




1-24 
22 pin LP * -37 
24plrtUP .S* 

29 jWti LP ,45 

30 pin LP .eo 

SOLDERTA(LSTAWDAftO (TIN) ^ap"'^^^ ^ 

:^S pin ST S .49 
36 pm £T 1 89 
4*plRST 1.5S 

SOLDOtTAIL STANDARD im\3\ 

24 fiiil Sa 

29 pirt SC 

30 pHi SG 
40 pin SC 





\ .70 

1.10 
1.65 
1.75 



WIRE WRAP SOCKETS 
(GOLD) LEVEL #3 




22pHnWWs 95 
j4pinWW 1. 05 
28 pin WW 1.40 
3€ Pll^ WW 1 ,59 
40< pin WW 1 75 



2&-48 

.36 

37 

44 

.i9 

m 

.90 
T.26 
1.4* 

I 00 
1.4(3 

1.59 

.SS 

1.25 
1.46 
1.55 



SO'IDO 
.3* 
,30 
.43 

.B1 

1 J5 

1.30 

57 

90 
1 26 
t.45 

75 

.as 

1 10 
T.3D 
1 *0 



1/4 WATT RESISTOR ASSORTMENTS - 5% 

sDPcs $1.75 



ASST. 1 



ASST. 2 



ASST. 3 



ASST. J 



ASST. 5 



ASST. 6 



ASST. 7 



S lB3> 



f B* 



S B» I 



S^BBi 



5 ta 



Sb 



5H 



(0 UMIU 

?7 giiM 

^6 t.)JHM 
T80 0*IM 

470 UHM 

J.3K 
*.2K 



?2K 
Mh 

39DK 

IM 
2:7M 



12 C?HM 
j:.i IfHM 

62 mM 
2?BC*IM 

5M(IHM 
\,% 

IDK 
?7li 

laOK 
47DK 

urn 

'AM 



15 WM 
39 Ohm 

109 OHM 
279 OHM 

esaoNM 

AM 

izk 

J3K 
B.2K 

220h 
560K 

I.5M 
ISM 



16 IIHM 
4 7 NHM 



1?0<.IHM 
330' OHM 

320. OHM 
?,2K 

3DK 
19QK 

270H 
630K 

I, aw 

4,7M 



?;*nHM 

^ Ohm 
11^1 OHM 

:4nnnhiM 

Ik 
?.,>> 

IHh 
;47K 
12DK 

33W 
a2W 

2r2M 



SDPCS 



sapf^ 



sopca 



MFCS 



so PCS 



SAPCS 



1J5 
US 
1J5 
1.75 

1.75 
1.75 



ASST. BR Incluries Resistor Assortments 1-7 £350 PCS ) $9J5 ea. 



$10. na Mlf^lMUM OilOER— il.S. Funds On^y Sptc She^u -2U 

California Residents — Add %% Sales Tax "^a Catalog A¥aHa&l«^San[f 4K jtamp 






a9 



rt% 



c* 



v'JI 




ameco 



ELECTRONICS 



i,ii,n J jAtii-Ji KCJ-r ihiiMi .. 4 iiir..Tii>i 



PHONE 

ORDERS 

WELCOME 

(415) 59ZBD97 



I^AiL ORDER FLFCTRONICS - WORLDWIDE 
tfl21 HOWARD AVENUE, SAN CARLOS. CA 94070 

ADVERTISED PRICES GOOD THRU MAY 



TELEPHONE/KEYBOAnD CHIPS 

AY-5-910D Push Buttari Te^e9ht^^e DiaitEF Si 4, 95 

Ay-S-aaOO Rflwrtory Gialler f4.95 

AY-5-9500 CH&S Clock tieneiildr 4.9S 

AV- 5-2371 Ksyboafd Enco<ser (^ %9/&) 14.95 

HD01 &5 KeytsMrfl EncDdei i 1 6 keyis) 7,95 

TAC^ii l%bMrd|ncfider jiii Keys) 5.^ 



iCM7045 
ICM7205 
ICM7?f|.7 
JC1M72(IB 



ICM CRIPS 

CMO.S Precisi^on Timer 
CMOS LED SsapwatdljTimer 
Osciilatoi' Contr<i>ll4r 
&»en D«C3ds Counter 
CkJi* Seneraior 



£4S5 

19.95 
7.SD 



NMOS HEAD ONLY MEMORIES 

MCM6571 128 X & K 7 ASCII SsliiftBd with Greek 13.^ 

MCW657J* ^2SXB^(? Main Svm&ol & PJctures E3.5fl 

MCM:6S75 123 X & X 7 Alphanumeric Contnj] 13 50 
Cttararttr Generalor 

MISCELLANEOUS ' 

JLdlAQH Quad Low Noise bt-fd Q^ y^mp ZA^ 

TL494C^ Swtchini} Regulpftflr -4.49 

TL496CP SingluSwitctiing Regulattjr 1J5 

1 1 C90 DlvfeJe 1 C'i 1 PmscaJ&i 1 9.9S 

95H90 HJ'Spe«d Wvm 1 0.^1 1 Prescalsr 11 , 95 

4N33 Photo-OiDlrMfton Oplo-isoiatoi' 3.95 

MKSOS'^C Top Oetave F rcQ. Genfifator t7>SC 

DSDD26CH BMhi ^-pftase MOS dtKclii dnm 3.7B 

TFLJ09 .37^ ned nym. (tisspiay w^inrteg. togic chip lO.Sfl 

MM532CI TV Camera SpiC. Genera Jor H.95 

MFi^533Q 4^ Dioit DPM Logic Block (Sp«cjal] 3:^5- 

LD 1 1 D/11 1 3 ^'z Digit A/D Coovarter Set 25.00/set 



LITiDNIX ISO LIT 1 

Photo rraris<slor Cfpto-lsolartor 
^Same as mi 2 or ^NZS) 



2/99<i 



SN7G477 

SOUND GENERATOR 
Generates Complex Sounds 
Low Power - Profirammgible 

3.95 each 



TV GAME CHIP AN!} 

AY-S^esm-l in J 2.01 
indudea soite dii&p^y, 



CRYSTAL 

6 gafflfrs and s&lgd anaies, etc / .aa/Spl 



XR205 


?3.J0 


CVI^ 


KR21D 


4.40 


KXf 


XR215 


4,40 


k#\r 


}(ft3?fl 


t.&5 


JE^206KA 


XR'L&SS 


1,50 


JE22WK9 


.)(R&S5 


.39 


XH1B0D 


XflS56 


99 


!(^3?06 


XftMJCP 


.99 


JfR22Q7 


KR^GTCT 


1.25 


x«ao8 


XRtSlOP 


1,30 


XI t2^ 


Xfl14«aCN 


3. as 


)(ft3?11 


JCRH8S 


1.39 


>fF^^212 


XH143g 


1.3^ 


l(fl224a 



14,9* 

19.95 
S.2a 
4.40 
3.65 

S.20 
1.7S 
5.25 
4.35 
3 45 



XRJ242CP 

xHsser 

)(R34£» 
XR413C 

XR41S1 
XR41»4 
Xft42tt2 
XR42t2 
XR455S 
)(R4739 
XR4741 



1.50 

4.25 
3.20 

t,2& 

4.95 
3 60 

tm 

.75 
1 15 

1.47 



DIODES 



TYPE 

IN746 

IN?^; 

1N75? 

1N753 

1N754 

1V757 

IN7i9 

1M959 

1H965 

1N523J 
l«JS235 

1M5242 

1MS245 

1NJ55 

IISI4SB 

1N465A 

INiCfli 



VDilS W 



3,3 
5,1 
5.6 
6.? 
5.9 
90 
!2.0 
8.2 
15 
&.6 
6,? 
6.6 
7.0 
12 
15 
25 
150 



4D0rii 
4]^!n 
4C0m 
400im 
40*11 
400in 
4l)0m 
400fn 
4flO{n 

SfiOrri 

iSOflm 

50am 

SCKKn 

SOOm 

40m 

Tfi 

S9ni 



5J1P1V1 i^MP 



fAICf 

4/1.90 
4,^1.00 
ifl.OO 
4/1, W 
4/LDO 

4/t.ao 

J{J! 00 

i:im 

4.n.04 
3« 

2B 
33 

28 

fiyi.oo 

3i'l.A0 
5,'1.«0 



rrPE 

INdOti.? 

;rj4DQ3 

1H40(H 
1U4405 

ifwooe 

1N4a[17 

iNSeo4 

11^140 
1HH1S4 
1N43l)5 
ir41734 
1U4735 
1N47^ 
1N47^ 

1tt4744 
1 H1 1^-3 
INT1S4 
1141 1B5 

iNnee 

INMBa 



VDITS W 
100 PIV 1 AWP 
2DQ PIV 1 AMP 
4«) P(V 1 AMP 
&I10 PIV ) AMP 
309 f EV 1 AMP 

1000 PtV 1 AMR 



sa 

7S. 
35 
75 

• 6.? 

e.2 

1? 

T5 



10^ 

10m 

25m 

1w 

Iw 

tw 

1w 

1w 



59 nV 35 AMP 
K10 PIV 35 ftWP 
ISO PIV 35 AMP 
200PIV.KAJMP 
4flfl PIV 3li AWI* 



PHtCE 
i2,'1.D0 
lfi'1 09 
1 Jill .00 
10/1.09 
10,11.00 

loyi.oft 

4j'1.GQ 

i5;i m 
%2!'i.m 

15/1.00 

ae 

33 
29 

£? 

.eo 

70 
70 
.BO 



SCR AND FW SRJOGE RECTIFIERS 

C3eQ tsk^i^am scfii^Ni^^) SI 9 J 

C3$M 3SA#600V ,SICq 1.95 

2N232B t.6A Si 3O0V SCB' ,50 

WaA9B0-T f2Af^50V fW tHIQiSE RFC. 1.B5 

tAC«\WJ-i 12ftiVj?MV FW RflinriF PEC 1.BS 



CH360I 

MPSAOS 

MPSMie 

TJS9f 

T1S9S 

4040» 

40410 

4D67J 

?N9l3 

2M2219A 

2N22?1A 

fHmt ftoshfc 

2K23&3 

2JIJ23G4A 

MP.^J3l>& 

2N24^4 

2N2996 

Prf29&7 PUSllC 
2-N2925 
MJF545& 
2N30!>3 



.50 

.30 

6/1.90 

6,'l.dO 

mm 

1-75 
1.75 
1 7& 
4/1. iU 
2,^1. M 
4V1.0I) 
$ri.04 
7,'1.00 
VI -DO 

4n,oo 

4/1.00 
4/1 .0(1 
4/1. DO 
5.M.0B 
7;t.0Q 

6/4.43 

1.25 

2/1.04 



tRANSISTORS 



2N3iKi5 

MJIMS5 

?«3392 

3*13395 

PN356? 

PN35&fl 

Pri3569 

MCS363SA 

MP^TOZ 

2N37M 

lfp£3704 

2H37K 

MPS370S 

MPsoroo 

2N3707 

5W3711 

2N3724A 

2H37SA 

3ftl3772 

2N3323 

^N3903 



1.90 

5/1 .flO 

6/f.OO 

3/1.90 

4/f,90 

4/1.00 

5/1.90 

5/1,90 

5/1 .90 

5,11.09 

5/1, Kf 

S/I.OO 

S/1,W 

5/1.00 

5/1,09 

5/100 

.65 

ilA 

^.25 

1 04 

jj^Ul^ 



2N3904 
2M-39fl5 

m^m 

2N441S 
2M41?3 
PfJ424? 
PJJ4^0 
2W.«490 
2N44D1 
?lii4Q? 
2ttl4g3 
3f»4449 
SNiOg6 
2N50S/ 

?liS9S9 
Zf+5129 
PN5t34 
Prf5^3S 
9M^139 
2N5210 
2N5449 
^5K1 



4/1.00 

m.m 
An KJ 

3/1 .09 

e/i,oo 

4/1 .00 

4/i.'ao 

4,1 s.M 
4,'1.D0 

4n ,D& 

.■4/1 .00 
.5/1.00 
■4/T.OO 
4/1.00 
4,''1.0D 
4/1 .00 
5/1.00 
5/1,^0 
5/1. 9<3 
S.'l IM 
5,11.90 
3,f1.90 



CAPACITOR 



10 pi 

22 pi 

47 p4 

100 pi 

£J#pf 

mtA 

.OOlmt 
.0022 
,904/1^1 
OlmF 

1/*5V 
15/35V 
.2M5V 
33f35y 
47/35V 
6fl/35V 

t o^asv 



4P,'50V 
1 Oi^SOV 
3 3 /50 V 
4.7/S5V 
10/2SV 

io./5av 

,2S/!rt^ 

22/50V 

47./25V 

47/IOV 

10a/25V 

1M)/K!V 

7?4/?$V'- 

?£0,!5aV 

470/2SV 

IDOD./ieV 



.(}5 
.05 
,05 

,05 

M 



1£J 
-04 
.04 
.04 
04 
.04 



54 van ceramic: 

DISC GAFAClTDflS 
liVl ■ 

m 

03 
(3(3 

<a 

03 



CORNER 



.04 .055 



001 ;<f 

.Kl47^F 

91mF 

0?2^f 

4l7**r 

UF 



.(£ .04 



.95 
.06 
.96 
1? 



lODVOLTWYUlll FILM CAFACJTQRS 
12 .10 0? .922!nr .13 

.12 .10 07 D47(nr Jl 

.12 .10 .0? .tnri .77 

.12 .to .0? .22mF .33 

^24% EHPfiD TAHTftLUMS t^Qim CApAClTORS 



.25 
.,38 



.23 
.23 
.£3 

.;3 

.23 



15 
17 
,17 
17 
17 
17 
17 



1 5.g5y 

2.2/25V 
3.^:25V 
4.7.'?5V 
iS,S/25V 
I0/25V 
1S,'HV 



.30 
.31 

,31 

M 
,49 

.a 



04 
05 
05 
04 

11 
.17 

.2? 

.36 
..27 

.is 

.31 

.35 
S4 



03& 

.035 

035 

04 

154 

075 

M 
13 

,17 
.22 

.21 

.22 
.22 
£3 

.40 



MIHIATIME AL4JMINyH ELEOTn.QLfni; EAPACITORS 



AiJtl Lsid 
15 
1* 
14 

1& 
15 

le 

!? 

.^4 
19 

.?3 
.24 
35 

.32 
.45 
.33 
^5 
.TO 



.13 
.14 

.^^ 

.13 
.13 
.14 
.IS 
.20 
17 
.21 
.20 
.3B 

.2a 

.41 
.29 
^0 



10 

il 
.09 

ID 
.10 

IS 

If 
.13 

IS 
J4 

13 
.29 
.55 
.3a 
.27 
.45 



.47/2SV 
4?,'-50V 

1 o/iev 

1 Q/HV 
T.a/S9V 

4 r/f6v 

4.7^&V 

4.7/sav 

1D/16V 

1IV25V 

ID/BDV 

47i-50V 

IKJ/lfiV 

lDfl^S5V 

1KI/5flV 

220/tev 

4JO/S5V 



j^rilal Lud 
1,5 13 



.Ifi 

.15 

.19 

19 

IS 

:ia 

.14 

.t6; 
.16 
,f4 
19 
.2* 
.35 
.23 

.at 



.14 
.13 
14 
14 
.13 
.13 
14 

n 

.13 

AA 

a 

IS 
.20 

,3ff 
17 
.5a 



10 

11 

11 
II 

,10 
.19 
.11 
,09 
.19 
.12 
14 
14 

:1B, 

2i 



211 J 



p^ Fleader Service—see page 1Q5 



179 



ASSOCIATED RADIO 

8012 CONSER BOX 4327 
OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS 66204 



913-381-5900 



*^A54) 



CALL US WITH YOUR REQUIREMENTS 

AMERICA'S NO. 1 Real Amateur Radio Store 



C^::;:^^^! 




Associated Wants to Trade 

Call US 

913-381-5900 

TRADE BUY SELL 

NEW AND RECONDITIONED EQUIPMENT. 

NOTE: SEND $1.00 FOR OUR CURRENT CATALOG 

OF NEW AND RECONDITIONED EQUIPMENT. 

■3f ALSO WE PERIODICALLY PUBLISH A LIST OF 

UNSERVICED EQUIPMENT AT GREAT SAVINGS. 

A BONANZA FOR THE EXPERIENCED OPERATOR. 

TO OBTAIN THE NEXT UNSERVICED BARGAIN LIST, 

SEND A SELF ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE. 



180 



Customers the world over are clamoring for our giant 



SALE 




PENNY ARCADE 



SUCCESSFUL? 



YOU BET IT ISI 






44 



THE FAT" MALLORY AA 
MERCURY BATTERY 



13, SasMt hnchL iM • AA but &■ 
S~ DIA . ifJ^ihC pAcalbui AA 




3 for tl.M 



tt 



BEEM -O- LIGHr* LASER DIODES 



2 tor $6 




Dvakfunt rn Hricnr-jmicXMiB 
Cttmi alruftim. for PtrLSK 
rmmI* opaFfltbDii. EtBlnd H fi-9 
Wbiiu. Wanhnflii: M4 kk 
(itppf«aJ Tip FoFward V 
(pMk). IJIV. Hu. Wia. Cvx: 40 

A. SIZE a:r L 7.B*. 



It 



GIANT 
INCHER'* 



READOUT 




To to «KKi t^^ i«r cji ukA. 

CdMHOII CATHODE, ^ncl 
trnfiammm^t for Lurantdf 74?, 
1^1 ■kciBaJ S\ H ft lula pn 



Ontj 



$2.99 



3 tor 13 



FANTASTIC? YOU BET IT IS! LOOK WHAT YOU GET FOR IC MORE! 



I -k i I i i I 



■^^^4'tl-PiPI!I^^T¥1!>i1-l-ll|i 



I 1 4 -I ■ Wt 



PVlld'lV«->fl-feig«««aEl«+»»->» • 



-■«4f*l«-al 



I f-f * b Kid rii ri 



t-tfrVVVVVVIP 



P ■ P V 41 « « I *« * R ■ If P 4 1 « tV-* 4 



F P P W' V P B 



■ ■ ■ d -I ■■ ««■ P 1 K q 



1^1- H ■ « P i 



m Bri *44 ■> f % P i l»^«.#4 « P ■ ■ i ****«*« » « V^ * 



I «-#-''P# WW 9 % 



r #if^w»i « I 



iPPPIP'+^^WP-P* 



P 4- « « #1--l- I 



I a ■■'•vv-'V-p p a- 1 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ p r ■ 



111 «•■■ b 



1 00 ■ to ILOC H PI »C C J^ P S, < ■« nrlvil V4l i»i« . AOt mil ■i-LiI I if 1U1| 

iO llHKllLET DtODII, fli«f papulir iwltcHLnr 4kmia, N«l)liii A untvtlid jf LOIlAt ^ 

• OPTO' CCMIPLER, 1 ftOOV ■■olatiBti, h«bbi m litrUIn U' C«it [ir 36 JMJ , . . . 

4 CHHIIT HICIIO iWirCH, US VAC, lAA, N.C. lypa Ell, lera* tirmJwil* (iiftUE) 

i VST PUIHIUTTOH MOAIfHT AIIIXI, rt. anil*, pc mC wi-m' l* U>l^ 

11 m>. vKHi TMiyH, U lail, dll*« li>341U3 

Ml RADIO AMD fv HItaif , tial fcl»l*in ilz** '>liT) „,,,,. 

*9iri,JiLHJlll£A]*ACITaRl, ABtl. v«lti ■ad t.lit% i>l|t|l«, „«.»»,»,,. 

»» L«W i«>i« iMUlT &■» ^. HW. mlfl, ate i:=aio| . .-^ . 

SO PO Ufflll W EUlTOiti. i. 9^ T v,<il»l.pBpi4«» J^U*] 

^11 UiHiraiU, «ll h4j|4H »1 pirf i In II ««b (v.lt4f . . ,^*^m*Mt*t*********-***'~^*'' 

I2f AHfl IWITCItLl, rvtarrptFlidfl, t«nl4,«tc |'l*t| .^^.,,,,i.^^t,t,«4«„«,*^*, 

AO COIL! AH&CIWllEA. rt. ipAr&i<RJe^ If , ctE >ltT]l. 

Ac TtHMIHAL f tH ri^l, B|» t* 4 frdd«rlitfK 4«1^].,, 

iQ PIECIiJDN lEiJlTOIIl. KW, J 1. JLXill I'Uaj^.. 

K iHCA CAFACtTC«». «•«< t*Im« ^ 173 i . 

J»lCTftK:APUHllAll&JAaU.^li«H ^««a} „«,., 

mmaC CAPACfTOttL »■« nivn twrLiLii^i :p4IT1 

jHTtAilUirAMflXCniO'S, *•*!•* HPrf tr ''4fJ^ » *• *•■* 

79^ HALT »AniPfi.n*i«tM^c»tf Eidiri.JHt >4M} .^.i.^,..^....^..^. 

U tJLVCJt HKAf. r4ri k*ck«, ulM. mam. i^4Ut. . 

#.M»H •tTTflm. iPit. PAIfEL. iUC 1S5» t *. = !*» ■ 
l«»BEI«UMmMi HHHI^ mxW l*i*t, • tMl ^#»tX ----- 
l*ft-tTABtlf 0«», ■— tator^ 1 mbI umJ i. iMwitl 1 ■ A*M. — ^ ||Wi UlJ4# 

|JTWAlrti*TP*i!0C*C1^airtm^««Jp«ptfPMi'i*itl|*#***i**it«>## .. — . 

M-lMlVtMJCiMMCtinCSA. .ij^,uat Vl«HS| ..,„„„„ »»»,...«-....... 

HHlLTtt rMMt tmP%. piartlK EB^arf^ p#4c. *ia41|:„,,.„ 

IB piimiTY mia awfTom u lui , ^^^**^^, 

AHPtlliHf TO-llT«AIUSTgi»4«M24.i. >> 

»4tHHJ3 CMMICTOAIh trihM- Hrt- bIws i'SH^ . . . 

*^^*' ^ft ***■ "• "■* ■^*** ^" ••***-'*'ni ^^**m^m^ a ■■ >■ I ■ .1 . J«*mi*^ 

M0MUirimCIIBI0M3,n*L«t«l.*t^l -iPM4 

»-iPA.]«l mail WATT PC ■OAn». 9m •**• ,«»lJi --'. 

AHtWHOTOirA. I^TOC^f Th i fcfc lP* « MU iTlMlJ .<«>, 

M-Al t W l itCTgiW*. uil ta HWV. a t«M i-39««. . . 

M.OPmOHT ILICTIIOL aiit't «pIiim< A ciMciU-ca • UHJU 

• mAHAP.tVPCSAT'^lip.inMMblAchlaaJ^ 1-3*14. ^,.,,,,,,tt + «*>«#>^** 

• 1 400 VOL! "ItlD lALL" mCTinCftS. aiiti 1 A Jl# : 9 »•# >, ^.. ». i « i *«**,, » 
Mi tHAlAAl IWfTCHWQ BHWEl. 4 naac. ■i:i«>l' i'SWOl' 

• 10 AMf QUADItACl. wi^t/liiw 41 td* up KtMV I' »«l 

lllKITOIWItCHtf.au-h.BmatliMi I" Milt 

44AQUAi|E0IACiTYLICl+0HEr ciiL«Ki;r«d«ir#tM3ji,»^,.,, i,„,«..#^^ 

JBTtAMllirOflft 1012 aii444n a«rfit, h I4«t (t'lMl] ........... .»»,,......... 

t rn AN UiTOa t TK AHirattlliElll, audio, In1*r , 9H m^ [M iMit 

J I r MlHTtO CM? TWHMiM KTA, aaat valuta, ate {ir ]M« ,.,»,,. . 

7-IM»1f H«tBVNI^rirAilWiTa«S.TD 3 1 U3rTJI.i^*».H,<.»«V 

Ifl-rMr M W AtT TO 1 TR AN »ll TQUft, Mhbt I « :! ? 7 2l 
W TURE iOCHETB, 4, A, «. T pin fubai, aP»t l#UiB^ - . 
M« AMP POWER TAi «UAIMtAC, 300 PRV, T03ZQ, 3/lrlEEi' <*1IB49**« t ,^..** 

ill-t1|IU,iT RECTiniRIn l.lainp, 2D0Vk axial ^^Hf ,** .*, . m 

t^-IKAMUTti HAH-1. cmi men cath, LED,l!hi Elaw, RID (»>IM^ ,.,,^*,,.*...^w, 
l-ltl^l, attlh PlJiai aM ahapaa, rad, jraaii, yallaw, am|i«r iVHH] 
MMTO PLAtM itKCTRO. CAP, UO IMF « 3«0V il^rSltTI 

l-ClRCIIlTRRtAllCill, (Uil a*alad+a]ilal, rrladi <ii, I anp |i*J>OE}>»> *«<»« 

MICRO MNPI TMIOUL, KP$ t . ? paa , aii -oH, 1 21V pl 1 ampt (' » JlJ . . 
1 tUDE VOUJME COHma Li. aaa L »! papular val uaa . I ar Hif 1 . > H | U 
I i CO A H LCDa. p h> il a I a^rf, pin h*a d att t* r Calor ; Rad i ^ t TU| r,idi^*«<<<<«.,.»i...<«««^ 

HTERMIHAl iTR^PS. tarm Iwd luffc bp, toldaf lypa. i* llAllAK^ >>*»t**^ **^**, 

UCEHAJnCCAPl.lBctHPV a, naf^ eaal.NTIiraasBt, TiltaaJalMMi ««**#* »ii.«i<# 
jaTV/m VUCEJtt, Iv MOalu* ahtalAadtw^i l*Bd. RaAatll*. l'U4f]i 
JB-ltVXEHERLAAan*. Biial.|:l*aai:*>*i-S<4a4t ***>««..<,*.. 



iJS 



p«v«V'p««rid**i-#«««««i#«#**«#p ■ 

b.B«^4 -i-4 4 ppp«WCsn#.4i.4i*i*4*«#-B'' I 



I !«**■■«''■ 



I ■ ■ fl ■ mm-* I 



« 4 »■■■■■ -fr P ■■>• ■ ■■■4P-I-4-P 



■ 4 +'P «««■«« Pfrti*i<fe4#pi 



a^4iiidl#> l-KA^^a «'ril «'-*i1>< » I 



iiflP-Pii-PfrVV-fl-PP 



I I- i I P Hi P V il « R 



■ «« « d ■ I 



B ft * * A h 



IPP!^i>V«-i-kl1l+!^«t«f+'l>-l>>lt »»>*"■ 

■ i I i + + + + « |i I 4 I i *** « 



I f I 4 i i i ■' « H 



■!llft«<P44-llllll 



hVil a T'l PP#i|-H«P P 



|[44I-IIII4-*«I>4«> 



I i **m*m i 



100 far 
13 far 
ifar 
10 far 
Utai- 
•Ofar 

100 lar 
a tar 



1.30 



14 wuF 



lAtarl.M 



i-riJiaahll*fe«-4 



IR^PIi-Pifi 



I ri it ***««««« -f i P I 



I I P P* P * P P »« « t P P ■ 



■ -VVP i ■ P T ♦ ¥ ■ 



h n ■ p p p-n i 



h fr fe P^ « !| 4 ■ 



b P ■■ 1 -P -P ■ 



mA m-A ^mAh 



11- I.IV LAMP APiD lOCHET AEY. IdOma, tl al!t>ia U IPMJ 

tO'RCAPHOHO JACHl, chiallii mtutit. Iv'^eA baap IfVBIlW **<<i*4'^»««>>*>'«*:>>,f>!('» 

it-THERMIlTOfll, avatrtjrpaa, at^laa, A ivaluaa >aiMi.) ti,,4i,i.,wwf,,w,*M,**, 

A^ l-lHaiT T-lEOMEHTREADtfVTA, In flat pah Cal« If lili]w*.*«..^>.^^^. *.««.. n.^^ 

4.U" SLIICIl TRIM POTIn SH (''»3<) ...,,.„... ^ « ** 

1 "rOTD-riT' N GHAHMEU Crratalmlca, M*al«di Etiart Tranalitora (« llfil 

l-V01TAaEREOIllJIT<»R,T0203cB», taV «00« A {« 1 MOj h^ ^.^..*«« . .h.^.^^ 

l-lDHIlTAOHAIHP,LE]>^r*d, DLUlalHTl .......,^ ,, 

»mHAa4iaHDVNAMiCRAH,tp*<llrtvpai;'r}4»J ,. 

Ift-SMTl ] HlUt t^nH IWITCHIHQ TRAHUITORI. TO 11, m^ i*tH4i 

til W Hi WQWSM r* AMECATORS. 130V. npft. TDU (• ITOTK .,,*«.. ^ 

I'M PIN IC f0£|CETf IrtlAAl ,«.,, 

1 MRIIIS DIGITAL CLOCK CHIP, laOl |<|tt||i,.„„ 

t MM 173^4 FUNCTION CALCULATOR PttP. lMt la^M^.., 

I'MMllOlCJIAlAALEntOM. 100% kSAHf ri^>.i,i.«>**».f...> 

». Iff AMP HV HttD«£ RECT, caiBh wtiPto tpHATJ . . ,......*,.^^...*....„.«.. 

ttk39f]flMNFTRAttltntMl,T01Slls 2HtllJ ['1373)... ,.,... 

t^UHCAJI tWFTCHIHE rHAHlllTORl, 3H3AOL p«p. TOf l«UTI|' * * 

•*^aAHPCTLIllOR»CJU.JtECT.iipta lH. > latl •«»«> ,,,.«„.. 

tOPRM^ACC READMITS, IXD. rW. ■>*> >•«> mlaaiai MMtlt^Hlto l*M*a|" 

i«^2«2XZ3lw««HlT.KTQ-UB«taJf«a« ^fmj **»,.^^^^,,,., 

lfltlATAEHT*iriWrTCIK&,IPST. lavp.pa'vapM laV >113ijf.>.^^<,.... 
A-nUNAtETOR RAWgEA MP II O W E m, 1 aA«a ia p ij l*3!«A«) 
|l>Fl.UD*UeEJrT OlCERfLaVI JEEADOUT TUOCA. w/la«da L 

tAiUHFHUiM NEAt EIIM[I.fvrT^Z3e 'UH(i «* .»,... ^..^^*_.... ,p 

J ■ a iggijOT TRANHyK M jm» :-3H«j .™^^^^.****....„ *.*. 

■ CtOCR/CALCWJ^™ Qtm^ am. MM ■ 1 Tl. T% WIT la. («R«MAJ .,..,.,..111*1 

IMVTLt/UttCHHAtCM.^Xm* padtlllpHapatBlp, IBK lamMl > ^..,*«« 

I 34VOLT»MILTItAJISrQHm. lltViApi.1^a#a*fraB«.l-*i t" x Vr \tmaii . . 

IOi^aHlTaAT1tAJIllSTO«.ii|f«PB. ro ■jcBiB,hf*'M*ia«t iaHJS; 

|t'aiiST«AT«AJIitIT0«l.iJillcaHTTl^l3eaa«. hi* IftO. l«n »S*1^ ^„„^.^,^„.. 

19^94*31 TaAllAttTtHUvl««pw*vr^altUMi,btih««. 70 «3 xi^^j ,„,,, 

I AUtM MAOLCTPOT. IdlL, 1-1 €manm.tr^-X JT m •*" aPwPt la'IT**^*^^.^*.**... 
iO AUT. RES LOHw 291 at MaCtac. vanawa at]H*a and li-paa I'1A2A|.. ,«**•<<.•**••■>> 

>«LCPe«aTAtTRAN«l«tORA,D4BHl,N^a«aHLTII2»^B«3M 

Jl'^"" RLDCXi TWnH POTL 200* ' U W ^t*t** -.^ ii.--* -. 

t- 1 3V1K IMIL REED RUAT. aptl. N,«. mon rtPIl^ f/tT B l/tr* « VIC t«V] 4 

•0 TtmP. COEFFICIENT VOLTA«C RET- IHOOfA, a Btl.itlt. ^Vn 'i*4f\ , 

I J t1iHHiVTR|HPOTAtPCE£ll'ON, aaat. aliHia»H TaJri>aa te/%tiwi4 -i^Hpi} .^**« 

Mp<-ntECUT, PRrmOftS WUtL ^aflaiia laacaa and wlara ^•I17|j ^^<...*>. 

•QiiMIHI RE ■llTORB.fH PC appi.Tar1.i;iW.i:«larc«i<a4Uaa]ti*««.*.^. -*■■■■ >. 

l»HHTiWi aCAftt^lrqttaJ btr, aa at, tiaaa I « W44I .,..<.. ^ *,, 4 .,,,,# , 
10-HIP*eTt. Budlatipa^, plaatu anap-lnmatifltjap lalia4F ■ 
10-IR2HEe DUAL POTS, aud^o tapir, -^anap-ln" mnl i>*'1ill 
iO- 1 AMP IIMERS, vide aial, ti vaJuaa, unUalad > tt«4|. . . 
1 3- IC R't A TRIAC S, 1 AMP, «af I - v bIubb. u ral.ai ad i:'30ATr 
tr-QUADRACA, 10 AMPhIOOK prima. » I W) 390 V. TO- UQ T Ji f«4f|i 
to- MINI R EC TiriERl, t^ AMPl, 33V , apa kv , ■ tlal {^ tit*) ...... ^*. 

JO lH4<10t )(X>DW MiNJ RECTIFIER, apeH/Gata.avlal laada l^lMlf ,««4,,.,, ........ 

7 1 HIOLEX CON N CC rOR Tjrpa M l*lA-4, maliaB I A to 40 ptn a« k«la ja ItOt] , ^ „ , , , « „ 

lOirTRANSrf^NMCftS, a«atiLiaa kS^lAlK. »^,<. 

10-rV. CHEATER CDRQ JACMl l# KBIB) 

10-1 AMP 30DV MINI RECTlFIM. lN4O0^ •P»r< mI«I (^UTO) . . ^.....^ **^.**. 

4- I.AV IILVER DKIOE WATCH RATTERIEl. ipactlri HW 1 A, lA, J3 dt 10L120 i>tS003F 

l-LCD WATCH READOUTS, 3^^' dltH*. t f •g^ dim IV, ■ |" <« »««J. „.r . . 

14-1^ DICE CtllP,Gampl:alachrtu»lrrr">'f,^l'*a j'iOAM 

tO^IHSTIfUMENT HNDRS, aiat- alyiap »tnii^*tm. S*." pfaatt (aliai] 

4MIIKC HOLDERS, rar CS'i and otlD^r mabiltrifla i AftJi' ., 

i TJlHTAmMELCCTROK, tCAltDRoParylah l-Svl ^i UV l«UOtJ 
3 INLINE FVlEIWLOCRS, cDnmlata to/Samp l^iia I* Alls' 

Mh4'CARUT1ES,BiBa-iLlip*ti]LaNaattt nsn?! .... ^, ««,..., ,.^, 

KpiliEAT IHRWW.aBpl. aJx^a, Un >hrLnhaii '^ IS^tl. < »« . , p ^.^.^ 

3-S,]V. IX. low. fT1ID£tKeA!.&0-4cau |*Sat7| ........».,.*,*, 



i.2R 



i.2R 



B^«*Adi^A*A«-4Kpfrii ' 



b ^ A >« 4 4- 1 



I * *« rii4 ft *-#' ft i 



'^<II*1"P""P-PP'P' 



IPI'dlPpqpq 



■ ■l»«9AR|ili«ft a fa ■ 



, ■■ « P-ft feRdl«-IV-P-l*'V-Pft 



I P P V « P ' 



i H 1-PPBiVPPVa.piq pa 



1.3* 



14 lar 1.10 

39 Ur !.» 
Ktpf l^M 

tl*tl.lO 
Sipr 110 
afPrl.lO 
3lvf l.H 
3lPr l.» 

f IllFlJO 

30 (or I.JO 

4 far 1,10 
Ofa^rl.H 
3lBf 1.10 
4f«Fl.U 
)iaf 1.10 

aOlar l.H 

11 lar I.JO 

iMfH l.H 

lllaf l.H 

10 Iw l.H 

11 lar !.»■ 
lD«ar 1-10 

«f«a Ji.)« 

i«*rt,ii 

Star UlS 
lttarl-1* 

tOIW t.»t 

liar I. JO 

aOMtLlO 

IfaaLM 

30fwl,S* 

4f«r t.SO 

Ifar 1x10 

100 lat 1.10 

34r*ri.iO 

t70f«r l.M 
110 fw 1.10 

401*' um 

10 tar I. M 

^tar J.U 

IQOfaf t,IO 

34r«r l-» 

• far I.JO 

40 tar f. 14 
10 far I.IO 

liOfar l.M 
IWiarl.W 

tor^ri.io 

10 tar 1.10 
ildt 1.10 

30 far l.M 
Ofsf 1 M 

lOfkf I.M 
4l«r l.H 

OOfar l.H 

OOfaf 1.10 
4 f*r 1.10 



•*CRIMP-ON" 

PL259 2 for $1.29 
COAX PLUG 

Qwci. E*rr jH^af mspnif So 
SaUariai^'^ &ltip iBauialiDB- 
Elabaa la SO^O- Fv 




«Mpr^CBi.ai 
VWMCMHCCAtarfl. 



iftAu 



13 



tl. 



* 11 






rn^^Q TQTHAT lUI 

4IICIKI imAiiPHino 

lUWIO 4,„bp. 

iiMiK) na 
HHtoo aiviEif 

WCROHS 
JtlMRO RED CtE4B 




CAPEHART 
AM/FM/PHONO 
STEREO RECEIVER 




2for S4a 



F-Hturvi 

f4ri>k*ar'OMXirr. mm 

RPHi Alaaincl 

II- 

CaL Nai. tlCul*«U 









PLUS SPEAKERS 



aima' aaaJMrtTB bttl tntfl-4(yil matchi^^nc ipanisr snciaurM Kad^f 
Cat Ma. iteUlOM 



2 for 160.00 



1 AMP 

1000 VOLT 

MINI RECTIFIERS 



20 for 

$2.49 



llflBTI 

IQQl. t^HL Will ftXlKl 

1 blM'i. aT iMiife^ arts 



-is. 



CdCi 



•ICUIHI 



25 AMP =» 



» 



C 14 



BRIDCE ^«« 

D OOO 



u Aoe 



RECTIFIERS 



tf '1 A te#tlC« 



J 




li 




40 CHANNEL 
CB BOARD 



t'Pa 



POLY PARS® 



Rotfld I Net 30 



Only 



.^^> 



2 lar iiO 



Torms: Add Poa^tage 

Phono: ibL7) 245-3H;^H 

Rot! LI: 16-18 D&] Carmine St. Wakefield, 

, P.O. BOX 942* AB ^^ 

WnImum 



LED 

WATCH 

GUTS 



yV? /> 1. 



^Ladlaa'J 
Cal. »a. 03CU1IJJC 




(4Mt frtin J1y-«*"^ 






lORDER: SS 



SO. LVNNFIELD, RIA 
01940 



COlJ'aMAY 

[JF; PHONED' 



Buy S20 worth of merchanditi 
Qhoote any two $1.29 itoint FRE£- 






^1 



■*n"i) 

•acLiiiiip 




3tei^$|.50 



i^ R&^dBf Servtcm~S0^ page f 95 



18t 



■■ 



7294 N,W. 54 STREET 
MIAMI. FLORIDA 3316S 




URPLUS 
LECTRONICS 



PHONE: (305) 887-8228 
TWX: 810 848-6085 

WHOLESALE RETAIL 



PL259's/SO 239's 

Quality American Made 
10/$5.00 100/$35.00 

50i$20.00 1000/S300.00 



E. F. Johnson Desk Top Microphone 

Ceramic ElementfHtgh Imp 

W35 S3§!€CC now $1 5.00 

While They Last 



E. F. Johnson NICAD 

12,0 V, 1.2 AH (?i 10 hr rate 
4 1/2'^ X 1 7/8" X 1 3/4" SU95ea. 



RCA POWER MODULE 

450-470 MHz 10W 

UHF Hybrid 

$20.00 ea. 



E F Johnson External Battery Charger 

Modet 239^3206001 

Output 14.5 V dc c?^ 50 mA 

S3 50ea 



«14.g6ea 
W/4Q eh SW 

lO(HjpS8.50ea 



E, F. Johnson S Meter 

Edflfi Meier 250 UA Fds in S/S x i i^" hole 
MfQ, holes on each enii t 1/4" behind parvel 
Black scale Q^S bottom 1 20 lop 
Sl.aSea 5^.00 



NEW Hy^Gain Remote 40€h CB L^sCasA.spe3ii;6r& Control mc 

(asta) 

New40CHCB Boards 

1-9Sia.50ea 
tO-4§ 19.50 ea 

NEW E-F. Johnson Power MiC'Less Cofd 
Desk Top Style f ^9 95 ea 

Serviceman Special 

New Hy-Gain 40ch CB Less Case. Speaker t Knobs tss is) 

S14 95 ea 



IC SOCKETS 

Cambion 

Gold Plated Wire Wrap 

14 pin ,35 ea 10/$3.00 

16 pin .386a 10/$3.30 



Eoge meier same -i; 

and reads SWR MO 
$1 ,25ea 



inov© with silver scaio 



5^S5.00 



E. F. Johnson Signal Strength 

Meter 200 UA 2Vj x2"j"Sq. mounisin 
1 >4 ' hote 1 ' behind panel. Sca^et 1-30 dtj top 
0-5 bottom. 
U 95ea 5rS20 00 



MINI TOGGLE SW 
CStH 

SPOT 

S1,00ea 6/S5.00 



£. F. Johnson 

40Gh Selector 
Switch 
$3.50ea 



2 SIDED 
,062 Ctippar CI id Board 

Sa.OOea 3/S6,00 



Sony flKfi4A 

2 Conductor mini phoctn 

plug wiipstch cord 3'6'" 

long &3 0E>9Q 



POLYFOAIVI COAX— 50 OHM 

Equal to RG174 

$4.95/100^ 

Low Loss 

Potyfoam 

Coax Cable 



MODEM CABLE 

50" cable contains 
13 # 22 ga. wire DB-25p with 
DB-5t22fi-1 cover on one end 
$6,50 ea 10/$50.00 



EFJ CRYSTAL OVENS 

6V/12V 75" 
$5 00 ea. 



MOTOROLA SRF 574 

house marked 

9W 175 MHz Amp- 

$5.00 ea. 



PANEL METERS 

$4.G0ea 2 for $7.0C 

10-0-IOdc Amps \ ^,,,, ^„ 
25-0-25 dc Volts f 



0-25 dc Volts 
0-50 ac Volts 

-Shunt Required 



} 



2'/4"x2%" 



CB SPECIAL 

Brand new printed circuit board assembfy. Used in all 
HyGain 40 channel CB transceivers. Fits many other 
manufacturers' units also. Squelch pot/voJume control/ 
channel selector switch not included. 

V 9— 7.50ea. Board 

1 0-49—6-50 ea . Dimensitjns 

50-99—6.00 ea. 
100-up— 5 50 ea 



MUFFIN FANS 

3 Biades. no Vac, 4V*'^ sq. 

Removed from equipment— 

Excellent condition— $4.95 



5'*)cevi' 



RECEIVER FRONT ENDS 

Made by EFJ 

132-174 MHz 

$12.00 ea. 



CMOS 

RCA CD 4012 AE 

Dual 4 in Nand Gate 

6/$1,00 100/$ 10.00 

50/$6.00 loooisao.oo 



12 Vdc RELAY 

SPST Open Frame 

5 Amp Contacts 

Mfg-Magnecraft 

Sl.SOea 4/$6.00 



12 Vdc RELAY 
SPST 35 Amp Contacts 

Open Frame 
Rugged* great for mobile use 



S4.60ea 



5/S20.00 



TRIMMER CAPS 

Small enough to fit 

in your watch— 

3.5 to 20 pF 

5 to 30 pF 

$J5e3, 2 for SI ^5 

5 lor $3.00 



D Cell Nicad 

mfg. by G. E. 2.50 ea 

1.2 volts 3-5 amp hrs- 

cat No,41B004 AD08G5 



Computer Grades 

23,200 uf @50 Vdc 3.00 ea 
3" diamx4Vi"* high G. E. 



Coax Connectors 

UG-273/U BNC FUHF-M 2.50 

UG-255/U BNC'M/UHF F 3.00 

UG'146A;U N^M/UHF*F 4.50 

UG'83B/UN-F/UHF^M4,50 

UG-175RG-58 Adapt, .20 

UG 176 RG'59 Adapt. ,20 



CRYSTAL FILTERS 

10 J 3/ Lead 
Can Type 
S3.00 ea. 



CERAMIC IF FILTERS 

EFC L455K 

$3.50 ea. 



CAPS 

2200 UF ra 16V 

Radial Leads 

.25 ea. 10/$2.00 



NEW BOXER FANS 

6 blades 110 VAC 
4Vt" sq.— $11.95 



GOLD PLATED CARD EDGE CONNECTORS 



Double Row/Wire Wrap .100 

25 pins S3.49ea 10/130.00 

30pins $3.96 ea 10«32.00 

50 pins $5.43 ea 1Q/$45.00 



Double Row/Sofder Eyelet .1S6 

6pms $1,10 ea 10/$9.00 

15 pins $1.55ea 10/S12.50 

22 pins $2.08 ea 10/$17.00 

43 pins $3,66 ea 10/S30-00 



22 pins/Double Row/Dipped Solder 
156 $Z08ea 10/$17.00 



22 pins/Double Row/Wire Wrap 
.156 $2.44 ea 10/$ia00 



______ -*'' maWftai gu9rant»0C • if for artf mason yotf anftot BSit^fted, puf proiiiucn f^'¥ ^e re fumed withm 10 days for a fut! FetynaftaMS aiitppmgi Pitase sdd$3 

TERM Si 'Of ittipptng and handtmg on alt ofde-rs. Additionmt S% chsfge for shipping any ttam over 5 (bs COO's accaptad for i?rdar^ tQtaiing iSOOOof mtyra. Ali or^afs 
Atiipftvd UPS unless olharwtsa spacified. fionda taaidant^ pteass ^dd 4^ silitt tai. Mimmum order 175,00. 



EQUIPMENT / COMPONENTS / WIRE & CABLE / ACCESSORIES 



182 



GET YOUR 



h€^ 



Published December 1st, 1978 




Specialize in DX? Then you're 
looking for the Foreign Callbook 
with over 280.000 calls, names and 
addresses of radio amateurs out- 
side the USA plus many valuable, 
additional features of interest to 
the DX'r. 

FOREIGN CALLBOOK 
PLUS SHIPf^INQ 




RADIO AMATEUR 



CALLBOOKS 



The U.S. Callbook has over 
350,000 W & K listings. It lists 
calls, license classes, names 
and addresses plus the many 
valuable back-up charts and 
references you come to expect 
from the Callbook. 

UNITID STATES CALLBOOK 



Respected worldwide as 
the only complete authority 
for radio amateur 
QSL and QTH information. 



$15.95 

PLUS SHIPPtNQ 



See your favorite electronics dealer 

for the latest issue or order direct 
from the piiblisfier using handy order 
form. 



Payment in U*S. funds must 
he sent directly to publisher 
not through a baJik, 



1^^ ^^^'fc^^k'^^ 



i 
I 



OKDER Form" 



Ir^in 



Radio 
A in o t e u r 



IDJL 



S CALLBOOK 



i^RI 



i rn FOREIGN CALLBOOK 



^' 1 r I t E JC ^^ 



$15.95 



$14.95 



Shipping 



$1.75 



$1J5 



Tiiwt Pncf 



$17.70 



$16.70 



lit 



Ic 



linois residents onfy odd 5% s<ile^ tax 



Nama. 



, INC 



925 SHERWOOD DRIVE 
LMCE BLUFF, lUlNOlS 60044 



Address. 



TOTAL 



City- 



I 

1 
* 
I 
I 
I 
f 
I 
I 
I 
I Dept. B 



Stat«H 



Zip. 



CHarge my; d Visa Card D Master Charge 
Card No = 



_ Expiration Date 



Signature. 



p^ Render Service— see page r95 



183 



ALDELCO ELECTRONW CENTER 



OVERVOLT 12 

Crow Bar circuit protects 
Transceivers 6l Tape Decks from 
runaway power supply voltage that 
can zap expensive components. OV 
12 causes fuse in Power Supply to 
blow if voltage exceeds preset level 
(approx. 16 to le volts). Rated at 25 
Amperes, $ 7.95 

Model 0V5. Protects 5 Volt ckcuits. 
Triggersat 7.5 Volts $8.95 

Ot her units available at 3.a to 100 Trig- 
ger Voltages Sl0.95ea 



A EC 1074 50 Watt 
30 MHz $21.15 



AEC 1076 75 Watt 
@ 50 MHz $2400 

boih cases 500 4LFL 



AldelcD can supply 3 PC boards. Sill< 
screened front panel and complete instruc- 
tions for only $12.50 & shipping. 



SOME PARTS USED IN COUNTER 

11C90 Pre scaler 14,50 

74C925 Multiplex 995 

F9363 Driver {2) 7.90 

1 MH2 XTAL 7.95 

10,60 pF trim cap ,60 

See six page construction article In 

Dec. 197&73 Magazine 




BUILD A 6 DIGIT 500 MHz 
FREQUENCY COUNTER 



Look 

for u« 

at Dayton 



COMPLETE LUNCH COUNTER KIT S99.35 
Includes a reprint or six page cofistruction article from 
Dec 1978 73 Magazir^e 



For reprint only send 50 cents lor handling 



y 

f IS" 



Hard to find replacement for 
VHF Mobile S. Marine use. 
Successfully used In Stan- 
dard and otfier VHF Rigs. 
Rated 12 Watts at 200 MHi 
125 Volts witn 5.3 DB Galm 
Heat Sink St J d (8/32) isolated 
Irom eeads. Only $12.30 




010 Tvr 



AEC 1 1 58 



RF DEVICES 



2N2&76 
2N3375 
2N3553 
2N336G 
2N3926 
2N4427 
2N55e9 
2N5590 
2N5591 
2N5913 
2N60aO 
2N&a81 
2N&082 
2N60a3 
2N6064 
2N6094 
2N6095 
2N6096 
2N6097 



1&W 
3.0W 
2,5W 
TOW 

7aw 

LOW 

3,0W 

10W 

25W 

1 75W 

4.0W 

15W 

25W 

30W 

40W 

4.0W 

15W 

SOW 

40W 



200 MHz 

400 MHj 
175 MHz 
400 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MH£ 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHj 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHl 
175 MHz 



T060 

T060 

TO 39 

TO 39 

TO 60 

T039 

MT71 

MT72 

MT72 

T039 

MT72 

MT72 

MT72 

MT72 

MT72 

X106 PNP 

X106PNP 

X10e PNP 

XlOe PNP 



$12.35 
5,60 
1,40 



25 
30 
35 

75 

ao 



10.25 

1.70 

5.40 

8.45 

10.95 

12.30 

16.30 

6.60 

aso 

10.35 

20.00 



ALDELCO KITS 

DUAL DIGITAL 12/24 HOUR CLOCK KIT 
NOW WITH A NEW WALNUT GRAIN WOOD 
CABINET 




NEW! NEW! NEW 



FM2016A 



BlKDK 



144 to 149 MHz 1000 CHANNELS 



All the features of the 2015R and now with adjustable sine wave PL 60 Hz to 
203 Hz. Adjustable low power position 1 Watt to 16 Watts, 

Buy your KDK 2016A from Atdeico and we'll pay shipping and insurance in 

the 48 states- 



Out of staters save: 

New Yorkers must pay sales tax 

Sorry no charge cards 
accepted on 201 6 A 

Low, Low Price 



FMMC 1 



$359 



Regulated AC/PS 

Mod&l FMPS 4e . S39:95 




SHOWN WITH OPTIONAL mP-SOO fvtlCRO PROGRAMMER 






Dynamic 
Touch 

Tone Mic 

$39-95 



Features: 

12 or 24 Hour Operation on either clock 

Each Cicck separately conlroJIed 

Freeze feature tor time set 

Easy assembly for clock and cabinet 



BIG 
0.5 LEDS 



MODEL ALDS'W OI\|LY S49ii95 



ALARM CLOCK KIT 

6 Big 0.5 LED Displays " On Board AC Transformer ' 12 
Hour Format with 24 Houi Alarm * Snooze Feature ' Elaps- 
ed Timer. Timer feature makes this Popular in Broadcasi 
Stations, lis a naiurat for cars, boats and campers when 
used with optional crystal time base. Fits our standard 
cabinet. $21.95 

Crystal time base when purchased with clock. $3:95 

12 or 24 HOUR DIGITAL CLOCK KIT 

Uses 0.5 Display LED 5314 Clock Chip Freeze feature foi 
accuratesei, fMs our standard cabinet. ONLYS19.95 

CLOCK CABINETS ea$4 95 

Woodgrairi or black leather 

CRYSTAL TIME BASE KIT 

fncludes PC Board, CrystaL aJI parts and instruc- 
tions $4.95 



CLOCK FILTERS 

Bl u e , Red , G re e n , A m ber o r Smoke 



$.eo 



BUnky Flasher Kit $2.95 

PC board, 535 & all parts works on 9 volts. Mouse button — 

Sl.OO 



DIGITAL 

MULTIMETER & 
THERMOMETER 

3V^ Digit— 5 ranges on each 
function AC/DC 2 Volts to 
2000 Volts Current 2 
Microamps to 2 Amps 
Resistance 2CJ00 Ohms to 2 
Megohms. Includes PC 
Board, ICL7107 Chip and all 
parts. Only $49.95 



RF TRANSISTOR SPECIALS 
2N55B9 3 Watts 

175 MHz S3.75 



2N5590 

175 MHz 

AEC 1272 
220 MHz 

AEC 1451 
50 MHz 



10 Watts 

$5.50 

30 Watts 
$12.30 

SOWatIs 
$1B.10 



CRYSTAL SOCKETS 

HOLDS 8 HC25U S 53 

Single HC25U 29 



NATIONAL AnaSA 
9 digit calculator 
readout .89 




NEW! 



Tunable 420 MHz 
Fast Scan TV 
Converter 



Recetve Fast Scan Amateur TV in the 420 to 450 MHz Band 
with any TV set. Low noise. hiQh gain rf Amp with Varactof 
tuned input and outputs. 8uJ9t in AC supply Comes m two lone 
walnut h beige cabinci measuring 1 7/5" x 4 1^4" x 4iyQ". 
Factory wi^red i^ith 2 year guarantee $59.95 



ADJUSTABLE POWER SUPPLY KITS 

5-l5Volls500MA $6.95 

12-28 Volts 500 MA 6,95 




Salt Completing Dots & Dashes 
Iambic Operation 

'^ingiie I>ot ^ Dash Memories 



THE VERY 

POPULAR 

TOPE 

ACCUKEYER 

KIT 



Provision for attachment ol 256 or 512 
Bit Memory tor DX or Contest work 



Revised version of the Accukeyei* featured m the ARRL Handbook. Has 
more logical IC Layout and ON Board sidelone Oscillator Includes PC 
Board. TTL ICs, 555 Timer, IC Sockets, Switch. Speaker Transistors, 
capacitors and resistors. Requare&5 VDC 0NLY$19 95 

ACCUKEYER MEMORY KIT 

Simple iow<;o5t Memory Kit, Uses 2 programmable 1 101 Memory chips Pro 
vides 2 canned messages of 30 Ctiaraclers each. Adaptable to Handbook 
and other Accukeyers, includes PC board (same size as accukeyer board) 
and all pans. Requires 5 VDC, 9 VDC. $19.95 



ALDELCO 



•^A2 



2789A MILBURN AVE, BALDWIN, N.Y. 11510 

516 378 4555 



Add 6% shipping. Add $1,00 for orders under $10,00, Out of U,S.A, add 15% shipping and rrertified check or money order in t/,S, funds, 
184 











DIODES/ZENERS 

t 

1N914 lOOv 10mA 


.05 


1N4005 


600v 


lA 


.08 


1N4007 


lOOOv 


1A 


,15 


tN4148 


75v 


10mA 


OS 


1N4733 


5Jv 


t W Zener 


.25 


1N753A 


62v 


500 mW Zener 


.25 


1N758A 


IDv 


rf 


.25 


1N759A 


I2v 


rt 


.25 


IN 5243 


13v 


ff 


.25 


1N5244B 


14v 


ti 


.25 


1 N5245B 


15v 


rt 


.25 



SOCKETS/BRIDGES 

f 

S^pm pcb .20 WW 


.35 


14-pin 


pcb 


.20 WW 


.40 


16-pm 


pcb 


.20 WW 


.40 


1 B-pin 


pcb 


.25 WW 


SB 


20"pin 


pcb 


.35 WW 


.95 


22-pin 


pcb 


,35 WW 


,95 , 


24-pin 


pcb 


.35 WW 


.96 


28-pifi 


pcb 


.45 WW 


1.25 


40-pifi 


pcb 


,50 WW 


1.26 


Mqlex pins 


.01 


To -3 Sockets 


.25 


2 Amp Bridge 


lODprv 


.95 


25 Amp Bricl9e 


200'prv 


1.50 , 




TRANSISTORS, LEDS, etc. 

2N2222 (2N2222 Plastic J 01 


.15 


2N2222A 






J9 


2N2907A 


PNP 




.19 


2N^0S 


PNP 


[plastic Unmarked P 


.10 


2N3904 


NPN (Plastic Unmarked} 


.10 


2N30S4 


NPN 




.45 


2N305S 


NPN 


ISA BOv 


.60 


TIP125 


PNP 


Oarfington 


1.95 


LED Grtwi 


fieci, Clear, Vellovs 


J5 


D.L,747 


7feg 


S/8 ■ ' H igh coiTj-a node 1 .95 I 


Pk^N72 


7»g 


com-ariode (Red) 


1.25 


MAN36T0 


7 seg 


corTvair>ode (Orange) 


1.2S 


MANd2A 


7se9 


cofTHsnode ^Yeflow) 


K25 


MAN74 


7seg 


com-ssthode (Red) 


1,50 


FND3B9 


7«9 


convcathode IRed) 


1.25 



9000 SERIES 

QTY. 



9301 



.65 



9309 



.35 



9316 



1J0 



9322 



»d5 



9601 



.20 



9602 



.46 



MICRO'S, RAMS, CPU'S, E-PROMS 

^, QTV, 



8TI3 



1.50 



8T23 



1.50 



3T24 



ZOO 



8T97 



T.OO 



74S188 



aoo 



1488 



1.25 



1489 



1.25 



17D2A 



4.50 



AM 9055 



4.00 



MM 531 4 aOO 

MM 5316 3.50 



2107B-4 



4.96 



2114 



9.50 



2513 



a25 



2700 



10,50 



2716 D.S. 34.00 



271 6 ibv) 59.00 



27Ba t5yi 23,95 



3242 



10.50 



4116 



11,50 



6SO0 



13.95 



6850 



7.96 



8080 



7.50 



MM 5:^7 



3.50 



MM 5369 



2.95 



TR 1 6026 



3.95 



UPD414 



4.95 



2S0A 



2Z50 



230 



17.50 



Z80PI0 



10.50 



2102 



1.45 



2T02L 



1.75 



8212 



2.75 



8214 



4.95 



B216 



3.50 



8224 



3.25 



922S 



aoo 



8251 



8253 




8255 



8.50 



TMS 4044 9.95 



STOMER NAME 



CMOS 

QTY. 

4000 


.15 




4001 


.15 




4002 


.20 




4004 


3.95 




4006 


.95 




4007 


20 




4008 


.75 




4009 


.35 




4010 


.35 




4011 


.20 




4012 


,20 




4013 


.40 




4014 


.75 




4015 


.75 




4016 


.35 




4017 


J5 




4018 


,75 




4019 


.35 




4020 


.85 




4021 


.75 




4022 


,75 




4023 


.20 




4024 


.75 




4025 


.20 




4026 


1,95 




4027 


.35 




4028 


,75 




4029 


1.15 




4030 


.30 




4033 


1.50 




4034 


2.45 




4035 


.75 




4037 


1.80 




4040 


.75 




4041 


.69 




4042 


.65 




4043 


.50 




4044 


.65 




4046 


1.25 




4048 


.95 




4049 


.45 




4050 


.45 




4052 


.75 




4053 


.75 




4066 


.55 




4069/74C04 .35 1 




4071 


.25 




4081 


.30 




4082 


.30 




4507 


.95 




4511 


95 




4512 


1.10 




4515 


2.95 




4519 


.85 




4522 


1.10 




4526 


.95 




4528 


1.10 




4529 


.95 




MCI 4409 


14.50 i 




MC144ld 


4.85 




74C1B1 


1.50 





QTV, 

MCT2 


LINEARS, REGULATORS, etc. 

QTY. QTY. 

,95 1 LM323K 6.95 LM380 (8 T4 PinM.19 


8038 


3.95 


LM324 


1.25 


LM709 (S 14 Pin) .35 1 


LM201 


.75 


LM339 


.75 


LM711 


.45 


LM301 


.45 


7805t340T5] 


.95 


LM723 


.40 


LM308 


.65 


LM340T12 


S5 


LM725 


2.50 


LM^i^H 


.65 


LW340T15 


.95 


LM739 


1.50 


LM309K(340K~5) 1.50 


LM340T18 


.35 


LM741 (S'14J 


.35 


LM310 


.85 


LM340T24 


.95 


LM747 


1.10 


Ufl311D 


.75 


LM340K12 


1.25 


LM1307 


1.25 


tM3l8 


1.75 


LM340Kt5 


1.2S 


LM145a 


,65 


LM320H6 


.79 


LM340K18 


1.25 


LM3900 


.50 


LM320H1 5 


.79 


LM340K24 


1 .25 


LM75451 


.65 


LM320H24 


J9 


LM373 


2,95 


NE555 


.45 


79O5«LM320K5) 


1.65 


LM377 


3.95 


NE556 


35 


LM320K1 2 


K65 


78U05 


.75 


NE&65 


BB 


LM320iC24 


1.65 


78L12 


.75 


NE5B6 


1.25 


LM320T5 


1.65 


78L15 


.75 


ME 567 


.95 


LM320T1 2 


1.65 


78M06 


.75 






LM320T1 5 


1.6S 


1 



















^ T 



QTV, 



74 DO 



10 



7401 



15 



7402 



.15 



7403 



15 



7404 



.10 



74QS 



.25 



7406 



.25 



7407 



,55 



740a 



.T5 



7409 



15 



7410 



.15 



7411 



Ji 



7412 



M 



7413 



.25 



7414 



75 



741S 



.25 



7417 



.40 



7420 



IS 



niB 



.25 



7427 



.25 



7430 



.15 



7432 



.20 



7437 



.20 



7438 



,20 



7440 



.20 



7441 



1.15 



mz 



,45 



7443 



.45 



7444 



,45 



7445 



.65 



arv. 



T L - 

* ClTV. 



7482 



.75 



74B3 



.75 



7485 






7486 



,2S 



7489 1.05 



7490 



45 



7491 



.70 



74S7 



45 



7483 



.35 



74S4 



JS 



7415 



M 



7446 



M 



74100 1.15 



74107 



.15 



74121 JS 



74123 



.59 



74123 



.35 



74121 



M 



74 120 .35 



74132 .75 



74141 



M 



74150 M 



74151 



.55 



741S3 J5 



74154 J5 



74T56 



.70 



74157 M 



74161 .55 



74103 M 



7446 



.70 



7447 



.7Q 



7448 



JQ 



7450 



.25 



7451 



.25 



7453 



.20 



7454 



25 



7460 



40 



7470 



.45 



7472 



.40 



7473 



.25 



7474 



.30 



7475 



.3S 



7476 



AQ 



74«0 



.55 



74«1 



.75 



74184 



M 



74271 1.00 



74357 



751 08A 



75491 



75492 



74H00 



74H01 



95 



35 



50 



SO 



15 



20 



74H04 .10 



74H05 JO 



74HQ8 



,35 



74W10 



.35 



74H11 J5 



74H15 .45 



74K20 .25 



74H21 .25 



74H22 



.40 



T4H30 .20 



74H40 



.25 



74H50 



.25 



74H5I 



.25 



74H52 



.IS 



74HS3 



.25 



74H55 



.20 



74H72 



.35 



74H74 



.35 



74H101 .75 



74HI03 55 



74H106 ,95 



QTV. 



74LS0Z 



74LS04 



74LS05 



74LS08 



74L509 



74LS10 



74L511 



74LS20 



74U21 



741S22 



74LS32 



74LS37 



74lS3t 



741840 



74LS42 



74i^t 



74LS74 



74LS7e 



74lSa6 



74LS80 



74LS33 



74LS107 



74 LSI 51 



74 LSI 53 



74 LSI 57 



74 IS 160 



74LOO 



,25 



74L02 



,20 



74165 t.10 



74165 1,25 



74175 



60 



74176 



.85 



741ftll .55 



741B1 ZL25 



74162 



75 



74190 1.^5 



74191 1.?| 



74192 



.75 



74193 



•5 



74194 



Jt 



741S5 M 



74196 J5 



74T97 



J5 



74196 T.4i 



74L03 



,25 



74L04 



.30 



74L15 



,20 



74L2I] 



.35 



74130 



.45 



74L47 1J5 



74L51 



45 



74L55 



.fi5 



74L72 



.45 



74L73 



.40 



74LJ4 



4S 



74175 JS 



74L93 



,55 



74 LI 23 .85 



74L&00 20 



74Lsai ja 



»^HI 



INTEGRATED CIRCUITS UNLIMITED 



7889 Clairemont Mesa Blvd,, San Dfego, California 92111 
24 Hour Toll Free Phone 1-800-854-2211 
(714) 278-4394 California Residents 1-800-542-6239 

CABLE ADDRESS iCUSD 



^EET ADDRESS 



74 LSI 95 



74LS368 



74$00 



74S0I 



74S03 



74Sa4 



74505 



74S08 



74S10 



74&1t 



74S20 



74S44 



74SHI 



74S51 



74S64 



74S74 



74S112 



745114 



74S133 



74SI40 



74Sr5l 



74SIS3 



74SI57 



.30 



.30 



.35 



.35 



,35 



,35 



.35 



.10 



.35 



.35 



.35 



.35 



45 



,40 



.75 



45 



45 



SO 



,45 



ES 



.£5 



,5a 



74 LSI 23 1.20 



85 



.85 



.85 



.95 



74LSlfi4 T.20 



74LS193 iOB 



M 



74LS244 1.70 



74LS367 J 5 



95 



..jri 



.35 



.25 



.25 



.35 



,35 



.35 



,35 



J5 



JO 



20 



-25 



.15 



.35 



M 



.65 



40 



.55 



,30 



.35 



JS 



74S15t . 30 

JMS1S4 1JJ5 

74S25mm}lJ5 



8131 



2.75 



STATE 



ZIP 



^ ■._ 



SPECIAL DISCOUNTS 



OtSlE. 



A£ Vlu 
CHARGE CAfiO BA tAC . 



EXP. DATE 



SJD. 



WILL CALL _ 



UPS 



POST, 



NET 10th OF THE MONTH. 



PO *^ 



a ORDERS SHIPPED PREPAID - NO MINIMUM - COD ORDERS ACCEPTED - ALL ORDERS SHIPPED SAME DAY 

■EN ACCOUNTS INVITED - California Residents add 6% Sales Tax. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 

We ao^pt American Expr^s / Vis / BankAmericafd / Master Charge 



Tota[ Ord«r 


Deduct 


$35899 


10% 


S100-S3fl0 


15% 


$301-$1000 


20% 



VARiABLEPOWER^OPPLTKiT^IIss 



Continuously Variabie from 2V to over 15V 

Short Circuit Proof 

Typical Regubtionof 0*1% 

Electronic Current Limiting at 300mA 

Very Low Output Ripple 

Fiberglass PC Board Mounts AH Components 

Assemble in about One Hour 

Makes a Great Bench or Lab Power Supply 

Inclucles All Components except Case and Meters 




FREE 



ICor FEr» WITH 
S5I$I$10 ORDERS.! 
DATA SHEETS 
WITH MANY ITEWS, 



nEmiitRi 

1 

1 



nuUditniRI TflAJtiHTBW |TII*ilWWI UilJAlCl 



ADD S1.2S FOR PC^TAGE/KAr^DLtiiG 



SPECIALS- THIS MONTH ONLY 



jMTm 
wtta 

ZH3IH 

^lilllt 

En2 

T15?* 



am 



nn DhI tmnVPUv 3MV Hiaitk ,431 

HP* Arap^Wtlch .rIDft 4llv lOhnA 

N-Ch*ii4iil AHri4i I'll tH««r LvwIlQiii 

IWf Vnlf f HP Tfi«iviflflf i«t ^mfi 
N'CtuiiHiil FE1 VHF Ml fimv 
N-tluivnil FiT HJih-SpnO !iy<iLch ^fiji 



Gil 

11 -W 
li^fl 






LlDt?« 



LJHHT 

moDE 

CAlflllA 



IJIV 

>P 
hiAiu- v*ln|» ^iflihttv DIP' 

lIQt in £uw UAH [1 1>4 ■ U D V 
(ET-lvMl DtAmt Ikk* <t imr,iAMI 
4-Tnaiifl»f Afrav^irfliigUil 

FH I F Afltpyi imitii /DiAKtir II » 

DwilHifii CJi.n ipfrlimpi fPPI^ 

F^iEhlfli! Fivt w f^^m nO iP 

Dmllfi CwngpAmp. GJPmp, mtiW 



-H 



SEMO FOH APVA'S N 
NEAHLY IDOO 5EMlCE>MDVJGTonB. KITS. 



LDQir PRO IE hll-TTL.aUiai,flE. 

MiciiJtHd iiH iiidutlii ->■ hi. lUiinUf 

EW 1979 CATALOG 
CAPACITPflS, EtC.-SENO JW STAMP 



a«1 

tm 

tlJE 

Ji 

1.4^ 

US 
mi 

1A1 



$1M 



maiH 



WW 



II 



iHtltto 
IMIR 



OTHER ADVA KfTB: 



LCHUC PfiOM Bir-UH *Mt CHCS. tTl.. CFf U HtL HTL, HiML ini >wi WH ICY 
- .<f Dkf^ lE{i F^tatf. QpivpiA kit Nz^Bki CH Mrf. d» h^ dM.W.B 
■ art npim tm^mms «e turn 




MiMLiniim (WTA 

f rr-^ ■* pvk P4^ ^ tm V 

■nm pov p«H C&TJU.DC ^t% 









w BP«r li^. ** •* Fim em 




tIJS 
■dJS 

ttJi 



fLJ£ 



i» LLS.. 



tit. 



GOD 



ItllBl 



MORE SPECIALS: ifll 

nC41950lSI rtSV # SOlnA VOLTAGE REGULATOR tC. V«rv MfV w 
um. MlKtt I rail tftoh^ R«pjU|H| '1!^ Suipphf F(» OP AMfi. «lc 
R4i^ir«l only unrtguNLAf QC t19-3tJVj wl 2 byp«ai 
mUh Dad Shaft wwl SctmnMtct- Sow mOtP 

FlC413f Chwd 741 Low^NoW Dp Afnp inDkP 

LMiaOt FM Widtifhft SlAn DsiiDdulKiw DIP 

LMZITf FU ^^ Sulkffnm IIF Anv. Dk., Luw^rt DtP 

1H62G3 H<ri Cmi« Oi^ 0.4V « ImA Q 1m fX3-^ 

ZEHEKS-^SpKiifvVMMpJ^. J9. 4J. 6-1 fiJI R^ «» 

a.1, 10, 12. 15, 19. It. 20 aZ 24. 27. op 33W lilOiy 1 VNQ 3^11 Ol 

• MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

• AU TESTED AND GUARANTEED 

ADVA 

^^Lm^ Wm m electronics 

BOX 4181 GB, WOODSIDE, CA 94062 
Td, (415) ^1500 






VAN ACTORS 

INtlMi 
D» I44UHJ 

MVI JB In 

MVIII 

MVtU4 

WVIMIn 

■villi 

HtflM 




ftA 
IJI 



Ull 

Jl 

IM 

tJi 



Eft 



ISIEIU 

T 

inui 

ZM3M1 

jJiMil i» 

;ioBii 

ZM]»D]ii» 

2113121 
311)141 






.401 



lit 

1 H 



2NE311B 

Zll»ti» 
IHHH 



mail 



lUH 

)/ll 

7m 

IDJI 

1/11 

1,H 



fvn 

MGITAK iri 

un 

tan 

t«M1N 

IKI4I9N 
IHT4I1I 
tH14T3W 

LlfllARIC'l 

LMIiQSH ir.-IO 



iiiMica' 

LWHiCfetl 

iMttttn 



HI 



it 
II 

.11 
.11 

.41 



IMlfltAW 

L«i:iDlN 
LMlfDtK 
IMJUN 
IWItlll 



lLiDlLH3»K Ift 



.11 
11 
•I 

u 
ta 

iJf 
tJi 
ijft 



IW1H« 


Ml 


Ui^HH* 


a* 


LMnnn 


tlU 


lAmicr 


i«i 


tHitii 


i.p 


CATBIIA 


(» 


CA1D44 


M 


iMJDHiRI 


UE 


t«Dfl* 


n 


iWlllHltt 


JG 


hqitiiD 


ViO 


PM1«TIC 


]:,EB 


nC4l1SDN' 


I.U 


HMI4&rK- 


I.fi 


HHflfQCN 


I.BO 


nDHHQN 


I& 


NIIMV 


H 


NlWir 


,11 


iiAfWItlC 


141 


IBIDIP* 


XII 


Miiiit 


II 



*SUPER SPECIALS; ^ 



INM Qmmmmim Diedl lOi'Sl 

imi4 IDOVrtOmA Dwxte SC/SI 

1N4I001 QOV/IA flKHte^ ^&41 

1IW41&4 JOS^ INtM ^S-SI 

Bn 1 SCV mi BrUv ftac 4<<«1 

2»f2222 mn iTwmtmi v$i 

XN290T np TwMMr ti^S? 

lOA $0,75 

FET^Amp SS 




F£A3^1M Dtodft Arrvir 
KPF1<^ ZDVlHi nf Amp 
40&73 MOSFrr R F Ajupi 
LM324 OuMt 741 Op Am* 
LM37Q Pot Vo«i R«t mOir 
»f£5S6 TM«f tfClIP 
LMT^ 2 37V R«f EH^ 
LM741 ClP^ Op Anup i^M^ 
LMT«i Ovrf 741 nDtf 
CjAJOtS & TrBH Arttr Pi^ 
RCAJES Pw l^nar tA 



nntt RF 

FIC41»4TK OMri 
flC419^TK thm T 



Trmrnnat laJSW » 3-JOMilt TIM 

mnvl frofn SGH EwAdin]' 
niBilrtot -0,7 w 30V • 20aniA TI}«t 
tTiipiWMiii TifiV 9 lOOmA |Tt>4i» 
-h-n/MHtvi Witfi Ckmfb Ift Dm 



.TO 

saoo 

SUE 



1 



NEW SPECIALS 



LM313CN 
LM313D 
LI\/I339N 
LM3B0N'8 

fyE567V 
XRS67CP 

LM723Cfl 
LM747CI\t 

SA0 1024 

XR2206CP 
XR2242CP 



High Speed Op Amp 50V/^&fnDIP 
High Speed Op Amp SOV/ms DIP 
Quad Compirator Single or Dual Supply 
Vm Audio Power Amplifiar 8-22 V 

Tone Decoder (PLL) 0.01 Hz to 500kHz 
Tone Decoder (PLL) 0.01Hz to 500 kHz 
Precision Voltage Regulator 2^37 V DIP 
Dual 741 Comptnseted Op Amp 

Dual 512 Stage (1024) Audio Delay lirie 
''Bucket Brigade" AppL Dati included 
Function Generator with applic. data 
long Range Pr ecfsion Timtf ^s to days 



t YEAR TIMER Kit 2 XR2242 land Applic Nate 



Ui290iri 
CA3Q18A 
CA3D2SA 
RC45SB 



Quad Comparator +iV or 2 to 36VOC 
4-TransJstDr Arriv/Dirlmgton 
RF/IF Ampfifitr OC to l20MHx 
Dual High Gain Op Amp mOIP 



$0.94 
00 
.70 
M 

M 
M 

3«1 
2/$1 

$18.95 
4.40 
1.&0 
3.00 

$1J0 

.99 

1.25 

3/S1 

SLOD 



SPACER Kit - 4 ea af 5 assorted size spacits 

•IS VOLT Regulated Power Supply KK-Easy assembly, 
BmV regulation, lOQmA, fully protected. 
Includes aM comportents and hardware, 
no FCB orctsi-Add S1J0 for shippiny SI 3.95 



1N27Q 
1NS23 

1M914 

1N3044 
1N3045 
1N3D71 

2ISI2915 

2N3819W 

2N4020 

2fV4445 

2IU5394E 

2N5912 

2N6028 

2N644S 

CF640 

E304 

MPSAI2 
TiSSa 

RESISTOR 



PC BOARD 



Germanium Diode 80V 200mA 

Temp Camp Reference 

6.2V±5%±.005%rc 

Sflkon Diode 100V 10mA 

100V Zener 1W-BBtt«r than an DB3 

110V Zener M-Better th^n an DB2/OC3 

200V 100mA Switching Diode 40ns 

NPN Dual Transistor 3m V Match ^100 
N Channel RF FET IOOMH2 Amp 
PNP Dual Transistor 5mV Match .^250 
N Channel FET 5M Switch 

Ultra-Low Norse J FET Audio Amp 
Dual J FET RF Dif Amp to 800MHir 

PrOframmifale Unijunction Transistor 
300 Volt K Channel JFET Amp/Sw 

Broadband FET RF Amp 14MB 

Dyn Range 

N Channel RF FET 3,8ii6 NF @ 40aMH2 

NPM Oartjngton Transistor ^20,000 
N Channel FET 400MHz RF Amp 

K'Et-150 pes *^W, 20 most common values, 
individuaMy packaged, 5 to 20 pes each , 

Mounting Kit-B ea spacer, screw, nut 
and washer'32 pes total , 



4/Sl 

SOJO 

25/S1 

J5 

.75 

.30 

S1.95 

.35 

SM 

3.50 

SI .25 
2.90 

.45 
2^00 

$4.50 
.50 
J5 

,60 

S4.95 

$1.00 



SEND FOR ADVA'S NEW 1979 CATALOG 
NEARLY 1000 SEMICONDUCTORS, KITS, CAPACITORS, ETC -SEND 25^ STAMP. 




^A34 



ELECTRONICS 



BOX 4181 GB 
WOODSIDE, CA 94062 
TeL(415) 328-1500 



186 



MOTOHOU 4 MHZ XTAL OSCIL- 

LATOH 14 pin dip pkg.. 5 VDC in, 4 
MHz oui. TIL compatlbte. %SM «i. 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR - 6 
DIGIT CLOCK MODULE a tmit. 

clock featuring alarm and anooz© alarm 
function, Gomas complete wHh every- 
tfting. All you add is a power cord and 
switches Each nxadulft utilizes tilscr&ei 
components and Is ready for you to mount 
In your enclosure. Display is€ each seven 
aegmenis, .33 Inches higti ciddkchip Is 
MM5375. C&n easily be mourttad In arther 
0t our instmcnefit ck)ck case kits. tl4*8£. 





CALCULATOR GUTS 

Expeilmenters dehght. Eicti ksytsoard 
inckjdes a morx>ttltik: calcutator crilp and 
disp^y The^ are rejecls. It miohS be 
aomething simpto to repair or It c^ould be 
very nasty. At this prk^e. wtio canaa! 
volt St.iO««. 3/13.00. 




INSTRUMENT CLOCK CASE KIT 

A real jewel for those small pfolecla. 
Hinged top door aikJsw you to hkte your 
contro* area. O.D. 4W x 4'' x 1*4". 
SI. 99 aach. 

DB-25 FEMALE CONNECTOR 

A unique assembiy originally adapting ihe 
l=E5232 Type Connector to flat cable. $1 .50 
•«chor2/S2.50. 




INSTRUMENT/CLOCK CASE KIT 

Perfect for your opto projects. Solid 
aluminum construction with real walnut 
sides. O.D. 5-3/ff' by 5-3/8" by 2", 
$6.95 ea. 






EDGE CARD CONNECTOR 

Qnch Jones 10/30 PIf* .156 Spacing 
PC Mount .85 Bumdy 22/44 Pim, .150 
apttcmg PC Mowi, Si .40 mch. 




DEFECTIVE CALCULATORS 

Well, some are and some are not. We 
can*t afford the time !o tesi tf»m. f2.50 
m. Batteries fw< included, 2/14.00. 




Electronic 




r'UB 



'i^'^'o-oi ueiifGd ppoducfs 



C9rp«rfit.i[cin 



Ccrp. Hd^tB^p g3a9 1st Avm., S«aiti«. W««h. 981^1 • (10«] fttS^SOta 




LINE PRINTER HAMMER DRIVER 

BOA RD Each boani contains approx 
IX each fMJEBOO (SiHcorv Darlington 
Mm hfe 750, T.5A). About S13O.O0 
worth, ever tOO tMIOOl diodes, pkm 
support cNps. TTte whole paclege is yours 
ltyontyt14.te, 

HURRY. WE DOfTT EXPECT IH^E TO 
UhST VERY LONQt 




TRANSFORMER pn. 110 vac Sec. 

1 1 .2 and 5 VCT ^ .1 amp. S.ftS 



MINIATURE D.P,D,L [PUSH BUT 
TON] momentaiv, rated 6A/125 VAC, 
mtefoswilct) part I^H2021. Ortfy $1.64. 

CLOCK DISPLAY 

National Semi. 6 Digit Multip^eieed Dis- 
play; .33" Characters (Common Cath- 
ode). A REAL BUY AT JUST SI. 00. 

EDGE METER 100-0-100 ua 1 /2" tiy 

11/16"'. Compare witii ottier meters 
costing $6,00. Only $2,00 M. W^y pay 
more? 

DIODE SALE 1N414B 



100/11.95 
1000/$14.S6 



TAPE/ REEL 



DIQDES 

TYPE 

1N4001 

1N4002 

ir>l4003 

t N4O04 

IMOOS 

1N400e 

1M40O7 

11^400 

1 N5401 

1N5402 

1N54D3 

1h^404 

1 f^405 

1N5406 

1hJ5407 

1N540e 

1N4148 



VOLTS 

50 

100 

200 

400 

OOO 

800 

1000 

50 

too 

£00 

300 
400 
500 

600 

8O0 
1000 
75 



WATTS 

1A 

1A 

1A 

1A 

1A 

1A 

1A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 

3A 
10M 



00 
00 
00 
00 



PRICE 

15/$1.Q0 

15/$1 

12/$1 

12/ri 

10/$1 

to/$i.oo 

6/$1.00 

5/$1 

5/$1 

5/$1 

4 /SI 

4/$1 



.00 
.00 
.25 
.25 
.25 



4/$1 
4^S1 
3iSl 
2/$ 
20/$1 



4S 
49 
49 
99 
00 



1% 



SOLID 


DIPPED TANTALUM CA- 


PACITORS 


1-99 


100 PLUS 


.1X35 VOLT 


.23 


J 9 


.15 


35 


.23 


.19 


.22 


35 


.23 


,19 


.33 


36 


.23 


,19 


.47 


m 


.23 


,19 


,66 


m 


.23 


,19 


1.0 


m 


.25 


.20 


1.5 


35 


.29 


^ 


2^ 


35 


-31 


.25 


3.3 


35 


.36 


.29 


4,7 


3S 


.38 


.30 


5.8 


35 


.50 


.40 


10.0 


3$ 


.60 


.48 


15.0 


36 


.79 


,63 


22.0 


36 


1.39 


1.12 


33.0 


36 


2M 


1.66 


47.0 


35 


7 m 


2.12 


VALUES AND CXJAm-. MAY BE 


ASSORTED TO ATTAIN QUANT. PRiaNG 


NYLON 


TIE WRAPS 






3^* 


65000 




10/* .30 


4" 


65002 




10/ .50 


5.3" 


esooa 




10/ .59 


6.9" 


65004 




10/ .69 


10.8" 


65005 




10/ 1.59 


13.0" 


66006 




10/ 2.69 


14.4" 


650S6 




10/ 2,96 


SCREVtf 


MOUNT 






13.6^^ 


65054 




10/ 4,29 


7.4" 


65052 




10/ .08 


5.6" 


65051 




10/ .89 


4.4" 


S5050 




10/ ;75 


a 









QALLIUM PHOSPHIDE L.EJ/s 

Provide greater light out- put, t3rtghter 

colors, greater uniformity and l^ss current 

drain than regular L. E.D/s 

.110 DIAMETER 

P/N 724H Red Diffused 4/Sl.OO 

724G Green Diffused 4/ 1.19 

724Y Yellow Diffused 4/ 1.49 

7240 Orange Diffused 4/ 1.49 

,220 DIAMETER 

71 4H Red Diffused 5/$1.19 

71 4G Green Diffused 4/ 1.49 

71 4Y Yeilow Diffused 4/ 1.69 

7140 Orange Diffused 4/ 1.59 

,220 DiAMETifl (low dome) 

70411 H9d CHfu^d 4/$1.59 

704G Green Diffused 4/1.65 

704Y Yellow Diffused 4/ 1.84 

7040 Orange Diffused 4i 1.84 
1 01 F^o Duaf {Red and Green) 

$2.65 2/5.00 

MOUNTING HARDWARE 

, 220 Diameter iTaMH 12/$1.44 



% WATT SKDEPOSITEO CARBON FILM RESISTOR ASSORTMENTS 

A 10^1 OHM 1 .5 OHM 2 OHM 2.7 OHM 3 OHM 3.6 OHM 

4.7 OHM S.6OHM6,8 0HM e.aOHM 100 pCS $2.40 

B 10 aa 10 OHM 12 OHM 15 OHM 18 OHM 22 OHM 27 OHM 

33 OHM ^OHM 47 OHM 56 OHM 
C lOea^OHM 62 OHM 100 OHM 120 OHM 150 OHM 
180 OHM 220 OHM 270 OHM 330 OHM 390 OHM 
l0ea470OHM 560 OHM 660 OHM 820 OHM IK LlK 

1.5K 1.8K 1.2K 2.7K 
10ea3.3K 3.9K 4.7K 5,6K 6.8K 8.2K lOK 12K 

15K1BK 
lOeaaaK 27K 33K 39K 47K 5eK 66K 82K 100K 
120K 
G lOealSOK tfiOK 220K 270K 330K 390K 470K 
560K 680K 820K 
ASST. H lOealM 1^2M 1.5M 1 .&M 2.2M Z,7M 3.3M 3.9M 

4.7M 5,6M 
ASST, A-H INCLUDES ALL RESSTOR ASSOfTTMENTS (600 pca) 



Assr. 



ASST. 



ASST. D 

ASST, E 
ASST. F 



ASST. 



100 pes S2 40 

100 pc$ $2.40 
100 pes $2.40 

100 pes $2,40 
TOO pet 12 40 

100 pes $2.40 

I00pcs$2.40 
$14.95 aa 



-nrrrrrr 



r1 



.1 1 1 1 
«.i 1 1 



I 






PARTS BOARDS a groat way ID ixiy 
parts on a budget We guarantee ytxir 
nftoney's worth. OW_Y $1.00 ••. 

ROTRON WHISPER FAN fWRZHI 

3 Blade 4" Dbnwiar 7SCFM 115VAC. 
NET $17.00 YOUR PRICE W.t5 Wart 
now, tf^se are not pull-oyts or sorrKthing 
Ilka that, ttiese are newl 

CUIREX PHOTO CELLS 

These have a real USEFUL range to rhem. 
Any project involving control from ambient 
fight levels will util^e tms pholo call. U^ 
resi^^ncelK. Fast rBsponae. .156 Diam- 
eter. $.75 isch or 2/n.OO. 

NOVUS CALCULATOR i824H 

Rect^rgaabte N^C^ calculator WITH 
f^EMOfW, EJCCS AND % KEY. $4.95 Si. 

(Qv^ners manual and ctiarger aire not 
ir^iudad^ 

PLASTIC PARTS BOX A nic« littie 

Nnged-top tiox for storing all your small 
pam^ O.d. 6%" \ff ZW b^ 2". $.75 M. 
10/$£.00. 




REPEAT OF A SELL-OUT a conv 

plate 12 hour digital clock, Sonne are man- 
ufacture line rejects, sorne are retiirns, 
and some are just acratched. Features: 
lx>urs, minutes, alarm, snooze alarm, 
Parts vaJuB atone would equal $20, 00, j^ou 
pa/only se.OOea. -, 

HOT DEALS 

75493N (quad seg, driver) ,,,.", 55 

SN7428N .....„25 

lOOOuf 25VDCP^C. ./ 25 

2000uf 25VOC AXIAL. .50 

18 ga. LINEOORDe^ ..25 

2N2222A 4/t .00 

2N3054 i . * 75 

2N3055 fTO-3) .*.... .99 

MEMOHDi 1" VIDEO TAPE ^ HOUR 

^ wiin Casej TTTi^i Hii.»*»4i ^# tfo 

SIEMENS MAGNETIC SENSOR .... .1.99 
43/43 GOLD EDGE CONN. .156 , . . ,4.96 
Pi 8 MIN. 1 2VDC RRAY D. P. D.T. . . 1 .99 

FREE BY POPULAR DEMAND 

With min. purchase of $50.00, you will 
receive free, a 5 function Natkxiat 
Seniteonductor LCD. mens watch. Wltlt 
rnin. purchase of $100.00 you will neeeive 
free, our LCD. oar clock, {watch and 
clock advertised in Dec, issue of 73 Mag J 

For Master ChargeAliss 

Orders Usfl Our 

TOLL FREE HOT LINE; 

1-80O-42S-O634 

for arttsa outside Washington 

[incL AiaatcB & Hawaii) 



O.E.M/b WILCOIVIS 








MbCOII 



StOf» HoufV M-F 9^5 • SAT 9-5 



k^ Reatfer Service— &^e ^ge f95 



187 



UcENSE sTudy quides & TApes 




* ■*'-' &^ A,*' 












■mm 



• NOVICE STUDY GUIDE— SG7357— Here Is a completely new study 
guide and relerence book for the potential ham. This is not a ques- 
tion/answer memorization course. Electronic and radio fundamentals are 
presented and explained in an easy-to-understand fashion, preparing the 
beginner for the Novice exam. Includea the latest FCC amateur regola- 
tions, as well as application forms. Easily the best path into the exciting 
world of ham radio! $4.95.* 

• GENERAL CLASS STUDY GUIDE— SG7358— A complete theory course 
, for the prospective General or Technician. This reference explains tran- 
sistor, amplifier, and general radio theory, while preparing the Novice for 
the "big"' ticket. After getting your ticket, you'll use this guide agam and 
again as an electronic reference source. Not a question/answer guide that 
becomes dated when the FCC updates the amateur exams. $5,95.* 

• ADVANCED CLASS STUDY GUIDE— SG1 081— Ready to upgrade your license? To prevent retaking the FCC theory exam, you 
need the 73 Advanced theory guide. SSB, antenna theory, transmitters, and electronics measuring techniques are covered In 
detail in this easy-to-follow study guide. Special modes and techniques, such as RTTY, are also treated. An engineering degree is 
not necessary to master Advanced theory — try this book before visiting the examiner's officel $5.95.* 

• EXTRA CLASS LICENSE STUDY GUIDE— SGI 080— Before going for your 1 x 2 call, it pays to be a master of the Extra class 
electronic theory. This study guide Is the logical extension of the 73 theory course. All the theory necessary to pass the exam Is 
presented. Antennas, transmission lines, swr are discussed, as weM as noise, propagation, and specialized communication 
techniques. This book is not a classroom lecture or memorization guide, but rather a logical presentation of the material that must 
t>e understood before attempting the Extra exam. Save yourself a return trip to the FCC and try the 73 method first! $5.95.* 




Dl 




» NavK=E ,,„ NOVICE THEORY TAPES 

Startling Learning Breaktlirough 

• NOVICETHEORYTAPES—CT7300— startling Learning Breakthrough. YouMI be astounded at how 
really simple the theory is when you hear it explained on these tapes. Three tapes of theory and one of 
questions and answers from the latest Movice exams give you the edge you need to breeze through 
your exam. 73 is interested in helping get moreamateurs,sowe7e giving you the complete set of our 
tapes for the incredibly low price of ONLY $15,95-* 

Scientists have proven that you learn faster by listening than by reading because you can play a 
cassette tape over and over in your spare time — even while you're driving 1 You get more and more info 
each time you hear it. 

You can't progress without solid fundamentals. These four hour-long tapes give you all the basics 
you'll need to pass the Novice exam easily. YouMI have an understanding of the basics which will be 
invaluable to you for the rest of your I ife! Can you afford to take your Novice exam without first listen- 
ing to these tapes? Set of 4— $15,95.* 




IS nqvigeTjI 




SSTV 



• SLOW SCAN TELEVISION 

TAPE— CT7350— Pri^e-winning 
programs from the 73 SSTV 
contest. Excellent for Demo! 
$5.95.' 





73 CODE SYSTEM TAPES 



Any Four Tapos For Si 5.95 1 * 
•4.05 Each I * 



tt 



GENESIS 



II 



S WPM— GT7305— This ts th* beginning 
tap^ for people who <^o not Knowthecode 
at all. It takes them thorough the 2& letters, 
10 numbers and necessary punctuation, 
complete with practice every step of the 
way using the newest blit? teaotiing tech- 
niques. Ft is almost iniraculous! Fn one 
hour many people— Inciudlng Kids of ten 
^a re a b le to master t h e code . The e ase of 
learning gives confidence to tioQlnners 
who might otherwise drop out. 

"THE STICKLER" 

&+ WPM— CT7306— This is the practice 
tape for the Novice and Technician li- 
censes. It is made up of one solid hour oi 



code, sent at the official FCC standard (no 
other tape we've heard uses these start- 
dafds, so many people fkunk the code 
when they are suddenly— under p reassure 
—faced v^fith characters sent at 13 wpm 
and spaced for 5 v^pm). This tape Is not 
memorlzable, unliKe the zany 5 wpm tape, 
3 1 n c e t he cod e g rou p s are ent kely ran dom 
chafacters sent in groups of five. 



"THE CANADIAN" 

tO+ WPM—CT7310— 73 hasnM forgotten 
the Canadian hams—our 10 wPWf tape 
prep are s you to fa reeze t hro u g h y o u r cou n- 
try '3 licensing exams. LiKe the other code 
groups, the tape is not memorlzabie and, 
once mastered, provides a margin of safe- 
ty in the actual text situation. 



"BACK BREAKER" 

13+ WPM— CT7313— Code groups 
again, at a brisk 1S per so you will be at 
ease when you sit down in front of the 
steely-eyed government Inspector and he 
starts sending you plain language at only 
13 per. You need this e)(tra n^afgfn to over- 
come the panic which is universal in the 
test situations. When you've spent your 
money and tim^e to take the test, youMi 
thank heavens you had this bach-breaking 
tape^ 



Iff 



COURAGEOUS 



ij 



20-1- WPM -CT7320— Code is what gets 
you when you go for the Extra class li- 
cense. It ts so embarrassing to panic out 
Just because you didn't prepare yourself 
with this tape. Though this is only one 
word faster, the code groups are so diffi- 
cult that you'll almost Tail asleep copying 
t hie FCC St u f f by CO m pari so n . U se r s repo rt 
that they can't believe how easy 20 per 
really is with this fantastic one hour tape. 



•f 



II 



OUTRAGEOUS 

25+ WPM— CT7325— This Is the tape for 
that small group of overachieving hams 
who woutdn t be content to simply satisfy 
the code requirements of the Extra Class 
license. It's the toughest tape we've got 
and we keep a permanent file of hams who 
have mastered it. Let us know when you're 
up to speed and we'll inscribe your name 
tn73 3CW "Hall of Fame." 



ajcooTcouBst 



9cODf COUftSf 



Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03453. Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. 

*Add $1.00 handling charge. Note: Prices sutiject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine, 



FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL [603] 924-7298 



9 TEChNicAL libRARy 



• BEHIND THE DIAL— BK7307— By Bob Grove. Get more fun out 
of shortwave listening with this interesting guide to receivers, 
antennas, frequencies and interference. $4.95/ 

• THE CHALLENGE OF 160— BK7309— is the newest book in the 
73 technical library, dedicated to 160 meter operating. Si Dunn pro^ 
vides all necessary information to get started on this unique band. 
The all-important antenna and ground systems are described in 
detail. The introduction contains interesting photos of Stew 
Perry's (the King of 160) shack. This reference is a must for new 
and experienced "Top Band" operators. Price: $4,95.* 

• IC OP-AMP COOKBOOK— BK1028— by Walter G. Jung. Covers 
not only the basic theory of the \C op amp in great detail; but also 
includes over 250 practical circuit appJications, liberally il- 
lustrated. 592 pages, SVa X aVa, softbound. $12.95.* 





• INTFIGDUCTION TO RTTY^8K7380-A beginners guide to 
radioteletype including teletypewriter fundamentals, signals, 
distortion and RTTY art. You can be a RTTY artist! A 73 publica- 
tion. $2,00/ 

• THE NEW RTTY HANDBOOK— BK7347— is a new edition and 
the only up-to-date RTTY t>ook available. The state of the art has 
been changing radically and has made alt previous RTTY books ob- 
sofete. It has the latest circuits, great for the newcomer and expert 
alike. $5.95/ 

• PROPAGATION WIZARD'S HANDBOOK— BK7302-by J. H. 

Nelson- When sunspots riddled the worldwide communications 
networks of the 1940's, John Henry Nelson looked to the planets 
for an answer. The result was a theory of propagation forecasting 
based upon interplanetary alignment that made the author the 
most reliable forecaster in America today. The book provides an 
enlightened look at communications past, present, and future, as 
well as teaching the art of propagation forecasting. $6.95/ 



• SSB . , .THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE— BK7351— by James B. 
Wilson, Single Sideband Transmission . . . thousands of us use It 
every day. yet It remains one of the least understood facets of 
amateur radio. J. B. Wilson presents several methods of sideband 
generation, amply illustrated with charts and schematics, which 
will enable the ambitious reader to construct his own sideband 
generator: A must for the technically-serious ham, $5,50/ 

• SSTV HANDBOOK"'BK7354(hardcover), BK7355(softcover)— 
This excellent book tells all at>out it, from its history and basics to 
the present state-of-the-art techniques. Contains chapters on cir- 
cuits, monitors^ cameras, color SSTV, test equipment and much 
more. Hardbound $7.CX), softbound $5.00.* 

• WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK— BK7370 — Simple equip* 

ment and methods for getting good pictures from the weather 
satellite. Antennas, receivers, monitors, facsimile you can build, 
tracking, automatic control (you don't even have to be home). Or 
Taggart WB8DQT$4.95/ 




SLOW 
SC*N 
TOiVlSIOK I '^*^'»' 

HANDBOOK 






ANTENNAS 



• 73 DIPOLE AND LONG-WIRE ANTENNAS— BK1016— by Ed- 
ward M, Noll W3FQJ. This is the first coHection of virtually every 
type of wire antenna used by amateurs. Includes dimensions, con- 
figurations, and detailed construction data for 73 different anten- 
na types. Appendices describe the construction of noise bridges, 
line tuners, and data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity 
factor, and swr. $5.50. * 

• 73 VERTICAL, BEAM AND TRIANGLE ANTENNAS— BK1069— 

by Edward M, Noll W3FQJ. Describes 73 different antennas for 
amateurs. Each design is the result of the author's own ex- 
periments covering the construction of noise bridges and antenna 
line tuners, as well as methods for measuring resonant frequency, 
velocity factor, and standing-wave ratios. 160 pages. $5,50/ 

• VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK- BK7368— The NEW VHF Anten- 
na Handbook details the theory, design and construction of hun- 
dreds of different VHF and UHF antennas , . - A practical book 
written for the average amateur who takes joy in building, not full 
of complex formulas for the design engineer. Packed with 
fabulous antenna projects you can build. $4.95.* 



Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458, Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. 

•Add $1.00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine. 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



TEST EQUIPMENT 



• RF AND DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN 

BUILD— BK1044—Rf burst, function, square wave generators, 
variable lerigth pulse generators— 100 kHz marker, i-f and rf sweep 
generators, audio osc, af/rf signal injector, 146 MHz synthesizer, 
digital readouts for counters, several counters, prescater, 
microwave meter, etc, 252 pages. S5.95.* 

• VOL. I COMPONENT TEST E RS- LB7359— ... how to build 
transistor testers (8), diode testers (3), IC testers (3), voltmeters 
and VTVMs (9), ohmmeters (8 different kinds), inductance (3), 
capacity (9). Q measurement, crystal checking (6K temperature (2), 
aural meters for the blind (3) and all sorts of mtscellaneous data on 
meters < . . using them, making them more versatile, making stan- 
dards. Invaluable book. S4.95/ 

• VOL. II AUDIO FREQUENCY TESTERS-LB7360— . . Jam 
packed with all kinds of audio frequency test equipment. If you're 

Into SSB, RTTY, SSTV, etc, this book Is a must for you , . , a good 
book for hi-fi addicts and experimenters, too! $4,95/ 

• VOL. Ill RADIO FREQUENCY TESTERS— LB7361— Radio frequency waves, the commofi denominator of Amateur Radio. 
Such Items as SWR, antenna impedance, line impedance, rf output and field strength; detailed instructions on testing these 
Items includes sections on signal generators, crystal calibrators, grid dip oscillators, noise generators, dummy loads and 
much more. $4,95.' 

• VOL tV IC TEST EQUIPMENT— LB7362— Become a troubleshooting wizard! In this fourth volume of the 73 TEST EQUIP- 
MENT LIBRARY are 42 home construction projects for building test equipment to work with your ham station and in servicing 
digital equipment. Plus a cumulative index for all four volumes of the 73 TEST EQUIPMENT LIBRARY. $4.95/ 




ThE WElL'EQuippEd llAM shAcli 



• 73 MAGAZiNE BINDERS— Preserve and 
protect your collection for your lifetime! 
There's no excuse for lost issues when you 
have these handsome red binders with 
gold lettering. Order 1—BN 1001— for 
$6.50*; 2 or more— BN 1002— for $6,00 
each.* (specify 1978 or 1979 binders) 

• QSL CARDS— 73 turns out a fantastic 
series of OSL cards at about half the cost 
of having them done elsewhere because 
they are run as a fill-in between printing 
books and other items in the 73 Print Shop. 
250 Style W— QW0250— for $8:95'; 500 
Style W— QW0500-"for $13 J5*; 250 Style 
X— QX0250— for $8.95'; 500 Style X— 
QX0500-for $13.95*; 250 Style Y-QY0250 
-for $8.95* i 500 Style Y— QY0500-for 
$13,95,* 





Style X 



Style Y 




W2HSD/1 



• HOW TO eUlLD A MICROCOMPUTER- 
AND REALLY UNDERSTAND IT— BK7325 
—by Sam Creason. The electronics hobby- 
ist who wants to build his own microcom- 
puter system now has a practical "How- 
To" guidebook. Sam Creason 's book is a 
combination technical manual and pro- 
gramming guide that takes the hobbyist 
step-by-step through the design, construc- 
tion, testing and debugging of a complete 
microcomputer system. This book is must 
reading for anyone desiring a true under* 
standing of computer systems $9.95/ 

• NEW REPEATER ATLAS OF THE EN- 
TIRE WORLD'^BK7345— 150% as big as 
any list ever available— nearly 900 more 
repeaters listed. New Improved maps 
show the locations by frequency of every 
repeater in the States. Only $1.95/' 

• BACK ISSUES— Complete your collec- 
tion; many are prime collectables now, 
classics m the field! A full collection is an 
invaluable compendium of radio and elec- 
tronics knowledge! 

Single back issue— STOOOO— $3.00* : 
25 our choice— ST2500— $10.00': 
25 your choice— ST2501— $20.00*: 
5 your choice— ST0500— $7.00*; 
10 your choice— ST1 000— S12.00V 



style W 



• OWNER REPAIR OF AMATEUR RADfO EQUIPMENT- BK7310'-Frank Glass shares over 40 years of operating, servicing, 
and design experience in this book. There are several books and numerous articles available on the subject of repairs to elec- 
tronic equipment. The informaiion within these books ranges from the elementary to the highly technical written for the top 
engmeers in the field. But this book stands out from the rest in that it is written in narrative style aimed at conveying the con- 
cepi of electronic servicing. A written discussion of how components work and how they are combined to provide communica- 
tion equipment is used to help the reader understand the concepts required to service station equipment, $7,95.* 

• A QUJOE TO HAM RADIO— BK7321— by Larry Kahaner WB2NEL. What's Amateur Rad^o all about? You can learn the basics 
of this fascinating hobby with this excellent begin ner's guide, ft answers the most frequently asked questions in an easy-going 
manner, and it shows the best way to go about getting an FCC I icense. A Guide to Ham Radio is an ideal introduction to a hobby 
enjoyed by people around the world. $4.95.* 

• LIBRARY SHELF BOXES— These sturdy white, corrugated, dirt-resistant boxes each hold a full year of 73 or KiJobaud Micro- 
computing. With your order, request setf-sticking labels for any of the following: 73, Kilobaud Microcomputing, CQ, QST, Ham 
Radio, Persorjat Computing, Radio Bhctronics. interface Age, and Byfe, Order 1—BX1000— for $2.00*; order 2-7— BX2002— for 
$1,50 each*; order 8 or more— BX 1002— for $1.25 each*. 

Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03459. Be sure to include check or delailed credit card information. 

*Add SI. 00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine, 



FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL [603] 924-7298 



Make check payable to 

U.S. Ofympic Committee. 

RO. Box 1980'R Cathedral Station, 

Boston. MA 021 18 



A contribution of $_ 



jsenciosed. 

Please send me the 
symbol of support 
checked below. 

O Stickpin ($10} 
Q Pendant ($25), 
n Tote Bag ($25) 
D Visor Cap ($25) 
a Desk Spinner ($50) 




¥nthout your help, we can't afford to win. 




-> J9y9 





That's the size of the Dvorld's 
most comprehensive guide to 
the subject of ham radio: 

18 years of 73 Magazine. 



The back issues of 73 are a gold mine of interesting articles. Unlike 
the other magazines, which fill their pages with activity reports, 
there's little to go stale in 73. You'll find pioneering articles on SSTV, 
FM, repeaters, ICs, and computers. Even the editorials are fun as 
Wayne Green's dire predictions, like the debacle of incentive licens- 
ing, have come to pass. 

Clip the coupon below and send for 73's new back issue catalogue. 
Treat yourself (or a friendly ham) to some fun, and a fantastic bargain 
to boot. 



D YES! Rush me 73's FREE Back Issue Catalogue! 
N 



Address 
City _ 



State 




magazine 

PETERBOROUGH NH 0345S 



Zip 



192 



IS 

HfiRD COPY STORAGE 

Q nrnhloin? 




U, as thick as It Is, Js more flke a 
floppy when it comes to standing on 
the bookshelf. Try the 73 Ubrary 
Shelf Boxes . , . sturdy corrugated 
white dirt-resistant cardboard 
boxes which wNI keep them from 
flopping around. We have self- 
sticking labels for the boxes, too* 
not only for 73, but also for 
Klfobjiiid Microcomputing . . . and 

for CQ« QST» Mmm ladto, Pcrsotijil Computing, R^dfo Eicc- 
tronJcs. interface Agc^ and Bjrtc. Ask for whatever stickers 
you want with your box order. They hold a full year of 
71 ... or Kilobaud Mlcrocomputtng. Your magazine 
library Is your prime reference* keep it handy and keep it 
neat with these strong tibrary shelf boxes . . . One box Is 
$2.00. 2 boxes are 53.00 and eight boxes are $10.00. Be 
sure to specify which labels we should send. Have your 
credit card handy and call our toll-free order number 
800-258-547 3. or use the order card in the back of the 
magazine and mall to: 




azine 



peiertKiroij|tli nliO.^-lfUI 




MOVING? 

Let us know 8 weeks in advance so thai you won't 
miss a single issue of 73 Magazine. 
Attach old label where indicated and print new ad- 
dress in space provided. Also include your mailing 
label whenever you write concerning your subscrip- 
tion. It helps us serve you promptly. Write to: 




magazine 



Subscription Department 

P.O. Box 931 

Farmingdale NY 11737 



Q Address change only 
D Extend subscription 
n Enter new subscription 
D 1 year $18,00 



D Bill me later 



1i^Name_ 

I . Address 

I I City 

r 

I 

I 

I Address. 

I 



State 



Zip 



print NEW address here: 



oi Name 



Call 




I 

I 
I 

I , 

I tfyou have no label handy ^ print OLD address here, . 

I 



D Payment enclosed J 

(7 extra BONUS issue) I 

I 

r 



I 

I 
\ 
I 




State. 



Zip 



I 



Tj 



propagation 



by 

i. H. Nelson 

































EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 




GMT: at 02 04 ofl oi 10 13 14 TB It » n 




ALASKA 


h< 


14 


14 


7 


? 




? 


7A 


14 


14 


14 


14 




A»taiNTINA 


21 


Zl 


14 


11 


T 




u 


21 


7tA 


31A 


21 A 


21 




AUSSTNALIA 


21 


14^ 


14 


Tp 






7 


7 


7 


7A 


14 


:'i 




CANAL ZONf 


^1 




14 


J 


J 




14 


14 


?1 


?! 


?1A 


31A 




fiPiOtANO 


H 




r 


r 


T 


14 


14 


21 


7\A 


21 


21 


14 




HAWVAfI 


71 




14 


ji\ 


79 




7 


14 


14 


U 


V 


?l 




\m>iik 


H 




^B 


'fl 


7ft 


78 


14 


14A 


14 


1 A 


14 


14 




ISiPAH 


11 




14 


7t 


fB 


?e 


7B 


7A 


14 


H 


H 


14A 




UfXICO 


Zl_ 




Ji^ 


_Z_ 


7 


7 


T* 


14 


»4 


21 


21, 


Jl 




PfflLMVllVES 


t4A 




14 


7fr 


ra 


71 


7^ 


f4 


14 


14 


14 


14 




pufPtTonicQ 


71 




1 


' 


» 


1 


t4 


14 


"*^ 


2} 


11 


JI 




iOUtH AFfUCA 


TA 




T 


n 


ri 


14 


?7 




,TA 


llh 


y*^ 


14 [ 




u, 1. 1. n. 


m 


\* 


T 


} 




y^ 


ti 


14 i ?1 


71 


14 


14 




IfWST COAST 


31 


14A 


\L 


7 


7 


r 


7a| 14 1 14 


I4A 


I4A 


27 




CENTRAL UNITED 




- 




STATES TO: 




ALASKA 


14 


14 


14 


r* 


t 




7 


7a 


14 


tJ 


14 


14 




AIIOeifTIAIA 


P 


_2J_J 


14* 


14 


? 




14 


2f 


3S 


2U 


1\A 


31A 




AiMTnALIA 


?1A 


31 


14 


H 


7A 




7 


7 


I 


7 


14 


31 




CANAL ZONE 


2IA 


31 


14 


t4 


T 




14 


14 


21 


ai 


21A 


31A 




ENGLAND 


14 


14 


7 


7 


7 




14 


14 


21 


31 


14 


14 




HAWAII 


7\ 


21 


14 


14 


7 




7 


14 


14 


14 


■ji 


/I 




INDIA 


14 


14A 


14 


111 


VD 


ro 


7B 


14 


14 


14 


94 


14 




MPAM 


14A 


21 


14 


^U 


;ei 


78 


7 


7A 


14 


94 


14 


14 




MEKCCO 


Ji 


M 


? 


F 


1 




7 


14 


14 


14 


14 


71 




PHILIPPINES 


14A 


31 


14 


7i 


IB 


7» 


76 


7A 


14 


14 


14 


[4 




PUERTO nico 


31A 


14 


\4 


7 


J 




i4 


94 


14A 


71 


21 


21A 




SCXmiAFflICA 


7A 


7 


7 


, -71 


7% 


Tfi 


i* 


2J 


2t 


J}±. 


94A 


14 




y,Lt.K. 


14 


14 


1 


j 


t 


7 




14 


t4A| 


i* 14 


14 




WESTERN UNITED ST 








ATES TO: 1 




AtASKA 


U 


14 


14 


?A 


7 




1 


7A 


t« 


14 


14 


14 




AHCS£*mNA 


2\ 


If 


14 


14 


7 




14 


14 


71 


J1 


JiA 


JIA 




AUfiTftALIA 


31 A 


31A 


31A 


21 


1« 


14 


14 


14 


7 


7 


14 


31 




CANAL 2CWiE 


3tA 


21 


14 


7A 


7 




14 


14 


14 


11 


31 


atA 




EMJLAMq 


14 


14 


7 


7 


7 




7 


14 


HA 


HA 


14 


14 




HAWAII 


^1A 


21 A 


31 


31 


14 


14 


7 


T 


14 


21 


31 


21A 




INDIA 


14 


T4A 


14A 


14 


m 


JB 


7B 


7A 


14 


14 


M 






i4 




JAPAN 


14A 


21 


21 


14 


14 




7 


7 


14 


14 


94 


14 




MEXICO 


21 


14 


14 


7 


T 




3 


14 


14 


H 


31 


21 




(^MlLIPflNES 


14 


21 


Qi 


14 


14 


TBi 


7B 


7A 


14 


14 


14 


14 




PUERTO RICO 


71A 


21 


14 


u 


1 




3 


14 


14 


Jl 


Jl 


21 A 




SOUTH APniCA 


I4g 


7B 


? 


1 


7p 


7fl 


7B 


14 


14 


14^ 


2! 


14 




U. &. L N. 


1* 


H 


J_ 


7 


/ 




7 


JA 


14 


J4 


i« 


14 




EAAtCOAfl- 


7. 






—3— 






-JA 










„2L_ 



A = NqxI higher frequency may also be useful 

B = Difficult circuit this period 

F = Fair 

Q = Good 

P = Poor 

SF - Chance of sofar flares 



may 



1 Bun 


moin 


tue 


vir«icl 


ittti 


Irl 


QUI 






1 

G 


2 

G 


3 

G 


4 

G 


5 

G 


6 

F 


7 

F/SF 


8 

G 


9 

6 


10 

G 


11 

G 


12 

G 


13 

G 


ia 

F 


15 

F/SF 


16 

G 


17 

6 


18 

G 


13 

G 


20 

G 


21 

P/SF 


22 

F 


23 

G 


24 

G 


25 

G 


^26 

P/SF 


27 

F 


28 

G 


23 

G 


30 

F 


31 

F 





193 




SSSd 



Peterborough, n.h. 03458 




A4€ 
A1 

A34 

# 

A60 

A2 

A55 
A40 

A26 
ABl 

Ae 



023 
842 

Be 

CM 

C3 

C2t 

C106 

G58 

C5 

ens 



C0 

C105 

09 

C119 

D6 

O10 

035 

D20 

D23 
D1T 
02S 



ABC CommiinlDattons ... 54 

Adirondack Radio Supply. . . . 16G 

Adva Elecifonics. , . . , 186 

AdvapceElactromcs ...§7,141 E40 

A£0 ElectrcKiics 10 F1 

AmsBt.-... ...-* 86 612 

Amateur Hadio SupiHy. ...... 46 62fi 

Airateur Radl<o Sgpply ol Kaslv G22 

vitle. Ir>c 117 G4 

A midork Assoc hates. . ..*..-. 132 

AP Induslne^ 137 

Aptron Laboratories , . 10 H24 

Associated Radio ....... 180 H2 

Atlanta HarnFestival 103 

BarKerWIIIIamson 114 H16 

Brodle EJectronlcS Comp&t\y. 46 Hfl 

Bullel EI«*ctronlcs, 176, 177 H2e 

C & A Elacironic Ejiterpdses. , . 52 H5 

CliQ^9* * " •-■*" -*' * US "^^ 

CoakH ........... 1 :.,.. 14 H36 

Command Pvoducltons 123 J1 

Co mfnurr I cations C«nler. 132 

MB *.., 43. K 19 

CommLinicat^ons Hectrofiics. 123 J1 

Communications £J«ctronics Spe- J2 

ciames 132 

Communications Servicfrs. . . 114 K14 

Gdmmunlcations Special- * 

mi* It, 17 K4 

Communications & TV Unit d. . 62 L9 

Gontinentai Specialties Corp. ,26 M48 

Cook Communications Corp, .52 M35 

Peter W.Dahl Company ,,.7? M36 

Davia Electronics. .......... 147 M52 

Oaytapro Electronics, Inc 10 MS 

Digital ^eaearcli Corpora^ M69 

lion tT4, 175 M41 

Oovstron 137 1*92 

Dfake Corr^pany 93. U^ M716 

DSl Instrufnents 133^136 MW 



Eagle Eiectronics. 114 

Ehfhom Technological Opera- 

lions* Inc. ^53 

Eiecira ..... 26 

Fair Radio Sales. ..... ..... 96 

FIflfthftf Corporation - 1 4. 6S, 1 47 
GefinBfito<iMn Amateur Supply . 70 
G & G Radk> Electron k:4 Qo. 137 

G.IS.M.0 -56 

Go<lt>oui Electronics, 17g 
HAL Communications Corpora- 
tion. . . * ^ . * ^ * w i 11. 23. 61 

HalTrontit , 71 

Ham Radio Center 10^ 14,95, 

132, 137, 144 

HamtronlcSn NY 173 

Hamtronics, PA. . . , . „ . 166 

Hartwall's Office World. 14 

Heath...... 163 

Henry Radio.*-.,. *..,. XII 



Hustler 143 

ICOM 29, 47 

Instant Software 84, 65, 89 

Inlegrated Qrcuits. tlnitd 185 
Jameco Electronics 179 

Jan Cfystals 63 

Kenwood .... QV, 5 

Key Bectrofiics. .95 

Kilobaud..**,*.. 83 

KLM Electfonlcs 94 

Long's Electronics. ...... 124-129 

Macroironics, Inc. . * . , , 132 

Madison Electronics Sup. . 70, 147 

Maggiore Efectronic Lab, 10 

MFJ Enterprises. . 33. 42, 53, 130 

MHZ Elactfonics » » . , 170, 171 

Micro Control Special lies — 144 
Midland international 164 

J.W. Millar Div. (Bell Indus.^ 24. 60 

M & M RF Di£trit>utors 36 

Motorola. 25 



05 OK Mactilne & Tool 25, 91 

03 Oploeleclronlcs. Inc. IS 

Ot2 Outdoor Oulti Iters. 132 

PIS PaceTraps 14 

Patomar Ef^lnMrft 146 

P3i Panaaonic. ....19 

P5i Patticom . ,..26 

P41 PC Eiectronics ,..137 

P44 Picltefing Goctemafttef Co- . . . 147 

P42 Plainsman Mlcfo Systems 67 

P2 Poly Paks....... .......... ..18t 

Q3 Quest Electronics . . , . 167 

B1 Radio Amateyr Callbook. Inc. 183 

Radio World. , ^ ,,,...,. 95 

H8 Ramsey Eiectfonics. .172 

R27 HF PowBf Labs, Inc. , 62 

S27 Sablronlcs 25, 168 

S79 Tt\e Schober Organ Cofp. ..... 62 

^3 Semiconduclor? Surplus 169 

S33 S F Amateur Radio Services. . . 14 

S4 Slep EJecUonics Go. .96 

SSI Spectfonics. tnc 42, 123 

S8 Spectrum Communic&tkms. , . 37 

S10 SST Eiectfonics ... 114 

S50 O C. Stafford Elect r on ica 10 

SIB Standard Communications 9:5 

589 Starshine Group .. .24 

&43 Surplus Elecironica. . . . 182 

S44 S«an Eleotronii^ 8t 9 

T52 Telft^Tow'r Mfg. CO. InC 166 

1 en ' I ec .....*«,..... f 

T34 Thomas Communicallona. . 58, 69 

T4fi Tower Electronics Corf>. ...... 57 

T18 Trac Etectronica, Inc. ..... 24, 146 

T3 TuTls Radio Eiec 104-113, 144 

U9 Unadilla^Reyco Division 1^ 

Ue United Products . , . 187 

W26 Weirnu........ 166 

WIS Western Bectfontcs 95 

W2 Wiiaon Electfonicd ^..3 



Y1 Vaesu Elec. Corp. . . CHI, 25, 27. 99 
From 73. . . Pages t3t, 186-194 



'Reader Service inquiries not hortorMk 
Pisaae contact adwrtiGa-f direclfy. 



eK1016 
STOTOO 
ST2500 

STosao 

ST1000 

ST2S01 

BK7307 

BN1001 

BN1002 

BK7309 

CT7305 

CT7306 

CT7310 

CT7313 

CT7320 

CT7325 

CT7394 

BK7321 

BK7310 

BK1026 
BK738Q 

CT7300 
BK7302 
OW0250 
OWOSOO 





73 DIPOLE & LONG WIRE AISITEMNAS. . . . S 5,50 
73 BACK ISSUE. .••^•«#i^^.4..i*«.*. .*«•«»,$ 3.00 

73 BACK ISSUES-25 OUR CHOICE S10.00 

73 BACK ISSUES— 5 YOUR CHOICE..,,., S 7.00 
73 BACK ISSUES— to YOUR CHOICE,. •., S1 2.00 
73 BACK ISSUES-25 YOUR CHOICE. .... $20,00 

BEHIND THE DIAL .*..$ 4.95 

BIN DER— 73— 1 . ..,.,.-. ........$ 6.50 

BINDER— 73— 2&UP - . . $ 6,00 

CHALLENGE OF 160 , S 4,95 

CODE TAPE— 5 WPM, ,,,.,„ , . S 4.95 

CODE TAPE— 6 + WPM S 4.95 

CODE TAPE— 10 + WPM $ 4.95 

CODE TAPE— 13 + WPM , . S 4.95 

CODE TAPE— 20 + WPM S 4.95 

CODETAPE— 25+ WPM- ..$ 4,95 

CODE TAPES (ANY FOUR ABOVE). .,-..,. S15.95 

GUIDE TO HAM RADIO,,... ,,-,$ 4,95 

OWNER REPAIR OF AMATEUR RADIO 

EQUIPMENT . , . * i ..««...,« S 7.95 

IC OP AMP COOKBOOK. . S12.95 

INTRO TO RTTY. » • . • . • .,..-..$ 2.00 

NOVICE THEORY TAPES...... ...S15.95 

PROPAGATION WIZARD'S HANDBOOK, ,S 6.95 

QSL CARDS-STYLE W-250 .„,.,$ 6.95 

QSL CARDS— STYLE W— 500 $1 3.95 



^ 



QX0250 

QXO5G0 

QY0250 

QY0500 

0K7345 

6K1044 

BK7347 

BX1000 

BX1001 

BX1002 

BK7351 

BK7354 

BK7355 

CT7350 

SG1Q61 

SG1060 

SG7358 

SG7357 

LB 7359 

LB7360 

LB7361 

LB7362 

BK1069 

BK7368 

BK7370 



«'*#'*•«* 



* '. « '» 



««•«.«•« 



QSL CARDS— STYLE X— 250, 
QSL CARDS— STYLE X— 500. 
QSL CARDS— STYLE Y— 250, 
QSL CARDS-STYLE Y-500, 

REPEATER ATLAS... 

RF DIGITAL TEST EQUrPMENT. 
RTTY HANDBOOK. 
SHELF BOX— 1... 
SHELF BOX— 2.,. 

on t L r DiJ A""" O LP". *. i.i,«.4» I. 411. «#■..■. 

SSB THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE. . , . 
SSTV H AN DBOOK (HARDCOVER). . . . . . 

SSTV HANDBOOK (SOFTCOVER). 

SSTV TAPE 

STUDY GUIDE— ADVANCED CLASS. . .. 

STUDY GUIDE— EXTRA CLASS. 

STUDY GUIDE— GENERAL CLASS...-. 

STUDY GUIDE— NOVICE CLASS 

TEST EQUIP LIB V1 — COMP TESTERS. . 
TEST EQUIP LIB V2— AUDJO TESTERS. . 

TEST EQUIP LIB V3— RADIO EQUIP 

TEST EQUIP LIB V4— IC TEST EQUIP. . . , 
VERTICAL BEAM & TRIANGLE ANTNS-. 

VHP ANTENNA HANDBOOK. . „ 

WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK.,.. 



$ 8.95 


$13.95 


S 8.9S 


$13.95 


$ 1.95 


S 5.95 


$ 5.9S 


S 2.00 


S 1.50 


S 1.25 


S 5.50 


S 7.00 


S 5.00 


$ 5.95 


$ 5.95 


$ 5.95 


S 5.95 


S 4.95 


$ 4.95 


S 4.95 


S 4.95 


$ 4.95 


$ 5.50 


S 4.95 


$ 4.95 



194 




Display On /Off 



Kgyboa 



5 KHz Up 



The Yaesu FT'207R Synttiesaed Handle 
has ail the features fou could want in a very compact package 

• Keyboard Encoded Frequency Entry 



• 144-148 MHz Range 

• 10 KHz Steps 

• 3 Watts Output 

• 4 Memories plus Programmable Offset 

• Priority Channel 

• Memory and Band Auto Scan 

• Optional Equipment: 



2 Tone (Touchtone® ) Input from Keyboard 
Keyboard Lock guards against accidental 
frequency change 

Odd Splits Can Be Programmed from Keyboard 
Automatic Battery Saver Feature for LED Display 
Rubber Flex Antenna 



Tone Squelch, Speaker /Mike, Nicads, Battery Charger 



S 



^. 



armo 



tgu^ tift ittJh &iiMWhtilluMf'i -MinieiaikHi 



Price And Specrlications Subject To 
Change Without Notice Or Obligation 




YAiSU 



679X 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 15954 Downey Ave.. Paramount. CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
YAESU ELECTRONICS Eastern Service Ctr., 9812 Princeton-Glendale Rd., Cincinnati. OH 45246 



r 



ri € 






3 



>^H O 



^ 4J 



^ = 



**- M 



d ^ 



J - E m 



. - « 



5 -0 



*3 ff T3 
£ 2 C ^ 



^ JD O 



^ O » 



" 03 m c 



& O aj 










/ 



lU 



W M s 


H £ c s 


!r* O 9 

tsoa 


N !g Oi < ^ 


(* W a? - 
« 3 T 1 

o 5 ft* .= 


%;^ 


■ ^ C 5 


W *e^ 


B i s V 


a i^ 


H < i C 



\\ 






s 




go 

* SO 
> o - 



H — 



Cs C 



H a. 



H ^'.* '1 



• - «