(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the Department of Agriculture of the State of Florida for the years 1917 and 1918."


■■•vtf'i' 




• 

* 


:1 ' P l-r .:i 




111 J L 



STATE CAPITOL BUILDING 



'. 



' 



Fifteenth Biennial Report 

OF THE 

Department of Agriculture 

OP THE 

State of Florida 



Divisions of Agriculture and Immigration 



PART 1 



FOR THE YEAR 
1917-18 



W. A. McRAE 
Commissioner 

Tallahassee, Florida 




T. 3. APPiiitAHD, Printer, 

T.M.I.A1|ASSKK, FLA. 



FLORfDA STmTE LIBRARY 



r 



BAD3DCN 



J ft* 



tLTON I n 



J»*rW 



kSSjS-V 



(-MADI50N 

> 1 %", ■*" 

liOCRTY\ J/JYtAVLOR 



WNMLI*L 



H.*H 



b / i v. < >»•. 

RADFOSDCLAY 



< 

" Ulachu* 






Si* 



1*» 



COUNTY MAP 

FLORIDA 

SHOWING SUBDIVISIONS 



y-i. C VV j 

[MAP.ION 

r ST % \ . 



OR AN O £ 




LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



Department op Agriculture, State op Florida, 
Commissioner's Office. 

To His Excellency, 
Sidney J. Catts, 

Governor of the State of Florida: 
Sir: 

As provided by law, I herewith submit the Bi-ennial 
Report of the Department of Agriculture for the years 
1917-18. The dates upon which the agricultural, hor- 
ticultural live stock and industrial statistics are based 
cover the period from July 1, 1917, to June 30, 1918, in- 
clusive. The Industrial Reports are for the year 1917. 
All other Divisions are for the two years 1917 and 1918. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. McRAE, 
Commissioner of Agriculture. 



PREFACE. 

In the publication of a report like this, to get the best 
results, we find it necessary to present each branch or di- 
vision of the Department separately, treating each sub- 
ject or division separate and distinct from the other. We 
therefore publish the report of each division under sep- 
arate cover, except in the case of this volume. 

In order that the public may realize the magnitude 
and importance of the work of the Department of Agri- 
culture, we give below an outline of the duties of the 
Commissioner of Agriculture. 

1. Division of Agriculture. 

2. The Division of Immigration. 

3. The Prison Division. 

4. The Pure Food and Drugs, Stock Feed and Fer- 
tilizer Division. 

5. The Land Division. 

6. The Field Note Division.' 

7. Shell Fish Commission. 

In addition to the above the Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture is a member of the following Boards: 

1. The Board of Commissioners of State Institu- 
tions. 

2. The Board of Pardons. • 

3. The Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund. 

4. The Board of Drainage Commissioners. 



VOLUME I 

DIVISION 

OF 

AGRICULTURE 



V . 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 
By H. 8. Elliot, Chief Clerk, Department of Agriculture. 

Article 4, Section 26, of the Constitution, provides that 
"The Commissioner of Agriculture shall perform such 
duties in relation to Agriculture as may be prescribed by 
law, shall have supervision of all matters pertaining to 
the public lands under regulations prescribed by law, and 
shall keep the Bureau of Immigration. He shall also 
have supervision of the State Prison and shall perform 
such other duties as may be prescribed by law. 

Change in Form of Printing Report. 

This, Volume No. 1, contains the report of 
the Divisions of Agriculture, and Immigration 
only. The Manufacturing Schedule also is in 
one Volume — No. 2, the ofher four divisions being 
also contained in separate publications. This is made 
necessary by the greatly increased amount of work of 
the Department and to facilitate handling through the 
mails. If the work of all divisions of the Department 
were published in one book, it would be so unwieldy as 
to make it too heavy for mailing, as well as wasteful, be- 
cause necessarily a lot of matter would have to be sent 
to enquirers that ie not requested. A considerable sav- 
ing in expense is gained by publishing the report in 
separate form. Copies of the reports of any one of the 
Divisions may be had on application. 

The financial statement of the Department is also pub- 
lished in a separate form. 

The following statements will serve to convey some 
idea of the work performed by this Department in con- 
nection with the discussion of the subjects that follow 
throughout this work. 



14 

It must be remembered that the period covered by this 
report was the most intensely interesting, of any in the 
liistory of America, and that conditions were rapidly and 
continually changing, and increases and decreases were 
many and varied. 

Number of letters written on Agricultural, In- 
dustrial, Immigration and numerous sub- 
jects, incidental to the work of the Depart- 
ment, approximately 30,000 

Number of maps distributed to applicants by 

*" mail for the two years 1917 and 1918 20,000 

Number of pieces of mail matter containing 
printed information sent in reply to inquir- 
ies concerning the State, over 254,000 

Number of Quarterly Bulletins used in Immi- 
gration work and mailed to applicants on 

request beyond the State, over 41,000 

Number of Quarterly Bulletins mailed t .oreg- 

ular subscribers (no subscription fee) 58,500 

Number of express packages handled by this 

division 1,000 

Number of packages by registered mail, over . . . 2,000 
Number of telegraph messages received and 

answered, approximately 750 

Just reading over the bare statements and figures 
above made, conveys no conception of the vast amount 
of work required to properly direct and perform the du- 
ties entailed upon the office by the varied character of the 
demands for information. 

This does not include the work of gathering and com- 
piling the Agricultural. Industrial and other Statistics 
of the State, nor the preparation of the vast quantity of 
matter for publication in various forms with which to 
meet the ever increasing demand for information in a 
more or less detailed form, which will be found on the 
pages that follow. Applications on these subjects have 
greatly multiplied since the war closed. 



K 



* 15 

GENEBAL AGRICULTURAL MATTERS. 

Discussion of Numerous Subjects. 

By H. 8. Elliot, Chief Cleric Department of Agriculture. 

The progress and advancement made by our State in 
the lines of agricultural and industrial development dur- 
ing- the two years just passed has surpassed in many 
respects all previous years. There have been decreases, 
but the increases have far outweighed the losses, and 
when we take into consideration the fact that within the 
short period covered by this report the greatest war in 
the world's history has been fought to a successful issue 
we have just cause for pride and wonderment. But we 
have still greater cause for wonder and admiration at 
the momentous results in agricultural achievement 
wrought by the farms of America. 

In all of this great work our State did its part. In 
Borne branches of agriculture, farmers surprised them- 
selves at the result attained. Men for the first time took 
seriously to the better methods of farming and found 
that better farm practice meant higher production. Such 
crops as wheat, rye, rice were grown as never before 
and all other grain crops were doubled and trebled. So 
with sugar cane, sweet potatoes, peanuts, etc. 

The war necessities as well as inducements brought 
home to the farmer as never before, the realization of 
the value of the use of scientific methods in agriculture, 
and this in turn taught him that with the right kind or 
management, there was and is practically no limit to the 
yielding capacity of our soils ; and so we say again, that 
as agriculture is the oldest industry, so is farming the 
greatest science in the world. Yet too often have the 
tillers of the soil lost sight of the scientific features of 
farming, thereby depleting their lands through continued 



T 



10 

practice of worn-out methods that should have been long 
since discarded from consideration. 

A diversity of soil crops and an increase in the live 
stock industry to the extent that the farms are made self 
sustaining, will work wonders in the restoration of de- 
pleted soil conditions. It will do more — it will demon- 
strate beyond doubt that the only road to profitable 
farming lies in the diversification of crop production 
and the raising of live stock, and it is morally certain 
to create a more modern system of farm management 
along the lines suggested. Certain it is that, cattle and 
hogs or other marketable live stock are just as visible 
and tangible an asset as goods in the warehouses or on 
the trains. Credit based on cattle and hogs is fully equal 
to credit based on bills of lading. Also to grow live 
stock means success on the farm, regardless of the boll 
weevil, unfavorable weather or other crop failure. 

Live stock means the building up of the soil and an 
increase in farm profits. Live stock growing will keep 
people on the farms, it will do more, it will enable men 
to become farm owners and good contented citizens, who 
of necessity become the implacable foe of Bolshivism, 
Anarchism, Socialism, I. W. W., etc., for no man with 
property and a family can affiliate with fanatics. Their 
object in life is diametrically opposite and impossible of 
copartnership. The one means civilization and progress, 
the other hell-born destruction, misery and woe. 

The growing of live stock means to live on the farm, 
make a good home, have good schools, good roads, and 
productive soil. It also means raising what you feed 
and feeding only what you raise. It means diversified, 
farming, the profitable kind, which brings plenty, happi- 
ness and contentment. Reverse this proposition, and we 
have scarce money at high interest, a struggling people 
with shabby homes, farms without necessary animals or 
proper implements, mean roads, second rate teachers, and 
fanatical tramps to sow the seed of Bolshevism. 



• 



17 

Undoubtedly land ownership is the greatest safeguard 
of our country. The comparatively near future will al- 
most certainly prove it. It is the best assurance of happi- 
ness and content in mankind. It ia said "That Nation 
which best loves the soil and which lives closest to the 
soil is the happiest. It was so in the beginning — it is 
true today." The strong time in the life of every nation 
has been marked by the excellence of its agriculture and 
the great number of men and women owning and engaged 
in the cultivation of the soil. This ownership- question 
has been so clearly allied with our daily life and still 
bears such close relation to our very existence, that in 
our familiarity with the subject we have overlooked its 
national and political importance and have given it little 
serious thought. The time for this carelessness has 
passed. To continue this policy is to invite disaster. 

The closer we are to the soil, the longer will be the 
generation of our people, and the strength of our insri 
tutions become unassailable. Thus the future hope of 
our State may safely be measured by the number of its 
land owners. Therefore become a soil owner. Millions 
of acres of cutover lands suitable for all purposes are 
awaiting occupancy and development. There is no better 
field for agricultural development than is here presented 
or can be found in any country. No other surpasses 
Florida, more than that, no other State equals it in oppor- 
tunities for profitable investment, the comforts of life, 
health and happiness. 

Therefore, let us place people on our present unoccu- 
pied lands as a guard against future evil and turn 
threatening conditions into a bulwark of Liberty. 

Reverting to live stock, we suggest that draft horses, 
including mules, be not overlooked. For years this class 
of stock has been of immeasurable importance to the 
farmer and in spite of tractors will hold their own — they 
are a necessitv and always will he. 



■oui.Aer. 



18 



The day is at hand when European Nations will be de 
manding them in large numbers. We therefore suggest 
thai in growing of live stock for farm purposes, the draft 
animals be included — Perckerou horses and mules will 
All the bill. Their sale in foreign countries will in the 
near future demand all that America can produce for 
many years to come. 

I M MIGRATION. 

A synopsis of the detailed work of this Department 
appears on previous pages, and indicates clearly the 
volume of work transacted through this Department in 
the work of Immigration. There is no separately estab- 
lished Bureau of Immigration charged with the duty of 
caring for the business. The Constitution requires the 
Commissioner of Agriculture to keep the Bureau of Im- 
migration, but in the absence of specific clerical help, this 
work must be and is performed by the clerical force of 
the Department of Agriculture. Additional help should 
be provided, and a Bureau of Immigration properly 
equipped and with the proper safeguards, would, we be- 
lieve, be of great advantage to the State in the near 
future, but we want no Huns, Bolshevists, Anar- 
chists, Socialists, I. W. W., or any of this class of peo- 
ple from any foreign country nor from the other states 
of this Union. We have one_race iroblem on our hands, 
we do not want another. 

A Wobd of Caution to Investors. 



To those persons who are contemplating a removal to 
Florida we suggest a few words of caution, and advise 
them that, before they make any purchase of lands, or 
even enter into any contract to purchase, that they first 
pay a visit to Florida" and make personal investigation 
of the lands offered them. No matter who it is that 



10 

makes the tempting offer, make them wait until either 
yon can investigate personally or through some undoubt- 
edly reliable source. There is no scarcity of land in 
Florida. Millions of acres of good lands are still here 
to choose from. Unless this course is pursued there can 
be no certainty that the interested homeseeker or investor 
will get what he wants. But see what is offered firm', is 
our advice, then you will know what yon are getting and 
your choice is likely to be satisfactory. Besides, it is due 
to both buyer and seller that common sense methods and 
proper business precautions are observed. 

Meteorological Report. 

This report is one of great value as well as interest to 
the people of our State, and particularly useful to the 
thousands of persons who are contemplating a change <>f 
residence to Florida or of making investments in the 
State. 

The weather service is, at all seasons of the year, a 
great protection to the farmers, vegetable and fruit grow- 
ers of the State through its system of storm and tem- 
perature warnings, as well as to those engaged in ocean 
commerce. It is also specially worthy of publication for 
the history it makes relative to the meteorology of the 
State. It supplies information of a character that is con- 
stantly increasing in demand and which cannot well be 
obtained by or distributed to those wanting such informa- 
tion as when given publication in our official reports. 
The report for 1915 follows the Agricultural Statistical 
Report for 1917-1918 further on. in this work. 



^ 




Orange Grove. 



i 



FLORIDA— A LAND OF OPPORTUNITIES. 

It is said that opportunity knocks at the door of every 
man once, but if not seized upon immediately passes on 
and is known no more. 

An old adage also says that there are exceptions in all 
cases, therefore I shall briefly attempt to poyit the ex- 
ception in the case, as it relates to Florida. 

Geographical Position 

From its geographical position being in the same latitude 
as the Northern half of Mexico and Southern China, it is 
natural to suppose that the climate is hot, but its com- 
parative degree of heat is not accurately indicated by its 
latitude, because the temperatures that might be expected 
from its geographical position are controlled in great 
measure by its peculiar shape, bringing the whole sur- 
face in close proximity to the ocean currents, which in- 
fluence to a great degree, its entire climatic conditions. 
The narrowness of the State and its consequent exposure 
to the fructifying influence of the balmy ocean winds, 
produces a pleasantness and salubrity of climate, and 
a power of vegetable production, truly wonderful. 

Throughout the history of the world, experience has 
invariably shown those countries blessed with water 
facilities for travel, transportation and commerce, to be 
the ones which accumulated the greatest wealth; were 
prosperous and progressive. Florida has these facilities 
to a greater extent than any other State, for practically 
all her territory is in close touch with the commerce of 
the ocean, through her harbors, where her products may 
be transported to other climes or exchanged for wares 
from other parts of the world. 



\ 



22 

Climate 

Climate, taken in its general sense, indicates all the 
changes in the atmosphere that sensibly affect our organs, 
as temperature, humidity, fluctuation of barometer, pres- 
sure, quietness of the atmosphere, winds, direction, forces 
and action, purity of the atmosphere and its admixture 
with vapor, or noxions exhalations of gaseons matter, 
transparency and clearness of sky in its relations to 
radiation of heat, to the organic development of plants, 
etc., also with reference to its influence on the feelings 
aud mental condition of mankind. 

In relation to these manifold elements of climate, Flor- 
ida occupies a most favorable position, for the modify- 
ing influences in operation have produced a climate, that 
for equability has few if any equals, and no superior. As 
regards temperature, continued observations in various 
parts of the State show tbat it is not excessive in either 
extreme during the entire year, the range between winter 
and summer temperature being only about 20 degrees. 
The annual mean is about 70 degrees; that of spring 
about 71 degrees; summer, 80 degrees; autumn, 71 
degrees; winter, 60 degrees. 

The main portion of the area of the State is peninsula 
in character and stretches away south to the borders of 
the Torrid Zone. If we divide the peninsula at the 28th 
degree of latitude, in two parts, by a line across the State, 
east and west, we fiud that the difference between the 
summer and winter temperature is less south, than north 
of that line. This is owing to the snn imparting to 
southern latitudes less beat in summer and more in 
winter than to those further north. 

Also, since the temperature falls as distance from the 
Equator increases, one degree of depression to every 
added degree of latitude, and since moreover, the ther- 
mometer falls one degree for every 300 feet in altitude, 
and Florida being so near the Equator, and so little 



21 

above sea level, is likely to be thought a very hot coun- 
try. Other causes also conspire to give Florida a climate 
remarkable for its equability — so far as temperature is 
concerned. There are many rivers and smaller streams 
which course the surface; also innumerable lakes, many 
of which are large, and of great depth. 

The evaporation from these streams and lakes, and 
from the Gulf of Mexico on one side, and the Atlantic 
Ocean on the oilier, rapidly absorbs and dispels the heat 
of the sun, just as rain upon the hot ground absorbs the 
heat and cools the atmosphere ; this process is quite rapid, 
because as the vapor rises, absorbing all the heat it can pos- 
sibly contain, the oceanic breezes waft it away and supply 
other atmosphere to absorb more vapor in its turn, thus 
performing the same office in the cooling process. Thus, 
the truth is demonstrated that the thermometer rises 
higher in the latitudes of New York, and Boston, or St. 
Paul, lhan in Florida; this holds good in any compari- 
son made between Florida and any State lying north of 
it. 

Another point to be considered when looking for the 
causes of higher temperature in states north of this, is 
the fact that the days in summer are longer as we go 
northward, and the nights are shorter; consequently 
there is less time for throwing off or radiating the heat 
from that the sun that accumulates during the day. 

Soils. 

The soils of Florida may be said to belong to the 
Coastal Plain'and therefore are more or less alluvial in 
their nature, and are of the sandy and clay loams in 
classification 

They 'are locally classified as first, second, and third 
rate pine lands, and high hammock, low hammock, swamp, 
and prairie lands. These designations are given them 
because of the character of the timber and other plant 



24 



growth ; a« also soil conditions. Some require drainage of 
course; others do not; but it is their alluvial nature that 
adds to their fertility and productivity. The soils of the 
Coastal Plain are the most fertile and productive in the 
eastern U. 8., with few exceptions, and it is here that 
Nature steps in and with lavish hand, makes posgible 
with unlimited opportunities the enjoyment, occupation, 
and welfare of the human race. 

The bestowal of these gifts upou man was as a bless- 
ing from high Heaven, sent by an all-wise Providence for 
the purpose of ameliorating the worldly condition of man- 
kind. There is but one Florida. 

Know ye the land of the cedar and vine, 

Where the owers ever blossom and the' beams ever shine? 

Where the light wings of Zephyr, oppressed with perfume, 
Wax faint o'er the groves of the citrus in bloom? 

Where the orange and citron are fairest of fruit, 
And the voice of tbe mocking-bird never is mute? 

Tib the clime of the East — 'tis the land of the sun! 
'Tis Florida, the fabled land of song and story, the 
"Eden" of Atlantis, the gem of America, the flower of the 
Southland ! 

Her climate offers health and happiness to all classes 
of humanity, the rich and the poor alike, and with it the 
opportunity for personal and industrial independence. 
In no other clime in all the world has Nature bestowed 
upon her people with such lavish hand her choicest gifts. 
Nowhere else in the world are the fructifying rays of the 
sunshine and the rain so evenly distributed throughout 
the seasons of the year. 

Florida's climate must be recognized as one of the 
Almighty's greatest gifts to the State of greatest oppor- 
tunities; its sunshine is more valuable in the laboratory 






25 

of nature than all the gold ever dreamed of by the 
'alchemists of old. It is the magician of the fields, the 
orchards, the groves, the forests, and the -maintenance 
of all life. 

In winter it ripens the golden fruits; in spring it 
makes possible the condition that transforms Florida 
into a veritable cornucopia overflowing with all the deli- 
cacies of a fertile, productive soil. Nor are we confined 
aloue to the native products, for on every hand are seen 
exotics of the far East; fruits and plants of the temper- 
ate zone; of the tropics and semi-tropics of both hemis- 
pheres. 

Geographical Position — Commercial 

In its geographical position with regard to her future 
possibilities for ocean commerce, no state in the South 
can equal, and no state in the Union surpass her, in these 
facilities. 

There are not less than nine spacious harbors of the 
first class; as many more of the second class; and innum- 
erable smaller harbors — all capable of caring for thou- 
sands of vessels aggregating millions' of tonnage through 
all seasons of the year. These facilities offer Opportuni- 
ties without limit to ocean traffic with all countries of 
the world. 

Our harbors are accessible at all seasons of tlie year: 
no "Titanic" disasters are possible, and our routes of 
sailings are as direct as from the ports of any state, or 
states, on the Atlantic or the Gulf, whether to the coun- 
tries of the East, West, or South, as the case may be. 

With shipbuilding industry, as it is, being fostered at 
numerous points in the State, every harbor offers hun- 
dreds of opportunities for either foreign or coastwise 
trade. Florida should control vast amounts of trade 
with the countries to the South. Our harbors and in- 
terior-facilities make this entirely possible. These won 



V 




Dixie Highway. 



derful Opportunities are within our grasp today. Shall 
we seize them? Or shall we let them pass to others while 
we look on passively? 

Let us not forget that the records of the world's his- 
tory shows that the countries which have dominated the 
peoples of the earth and their destinies have been, and 
are today, the maritime nations. The people who put all 
their faith and works in the land alone can never lead; 
they can only follow. Therefore they play a minor part 
in the affairs of the world. Let us wake up to our oppor- 
tunities, for they are endless. 

Othek Opportunities 

In this connection some comparisons of the present 
with the past may be of interest — going no further back 
than 1880. about the time when Florida began to attract 
attention, though in a small way and chiefly because of 
her climate. 

In 1880 the United States census gave Florida a popu- 
lation of 269,493; in 1915 the State census, which is the 
latest one, gave her 921,618, or an increase of practically 
400%. 

ISDUSTBIAL 

(All quotations from census in this article are for the 
year 1880, U. S., and 1915, State.) 

In 1880 there were but 426- manufacturing establish- 
ments of all kinds in Florida; in 1915 these were in- 
creased to 5,175. In 1880 capital invested was f3,725,000 ; 
in 1915, 167,611.774. In 1880 wage earners employed 
numbered 5.504 ; 1915, 64,235.' In 1880 amount of wages 
paid these people was f 1,270,875; in 1915, |29,653,734. 
In 1880 value of products of these establishments was 
95,546,448: in 1915, $68,668,656. Note that the values 
here given are exclusive of the cost of production. 



I ' 









28 



Here are opportunities without limit for any man or 
number of men, for there can be no limit to the wealth 
of a manufacturing community when it can and does 
produce the commodities in demand by the. public. That 
this State can supply all demands is but a question of 
effort; she has the timber resources surpassing .any other 
state; she leads in all classes of timber, having over 247 
distinct varieties of timber adapted to commercial pur- 
poses and ilie number of varieties would reach near 300 
if all were included. 

Ifor is this all industrially; it is well known that Flor- 
ida is rich in fiber plants exclusive of cotton. There are 
over 20 distinct fiber plants of real commercial merit 
that thrive in the several sections of the State to which 
each is best adapted. In these products there are oppor- 
tunities at least equal to those offered in Mexico and 
Central America. 

The growing of fiber plants and their manufacture into 
cordage should be done in Florida ; the time is near when 
the demand will far exceed the supply; our binder twine 
for harvesting purposes; rope for marine purposes; fiber 
for the various qualities of bagging, and other coarse 
cloths are in growing demand, but unavailable in neces- 
sary quantities. Truly, industrial art is the handmaid 
of agriculture. 



. ' 









Agriculture 

Agriculture in its several branches probably offers to 
the average man the greatest opportunities. This is indi- 
cated by a comparison of its more recent development 
with the past. 

It is not generally realised even by our own people 
that Florida leads all other states in the number each 
of the three classes of soil products considered essential 
to the welfare, happiness, and prosperity of each man, 
but it is nevertheless true ; these classes are, First : what 



29 

is known and designated by the trades as standard crops 
of which there are 30 distinct kinds used as food for man 
and feed for live stock. 

Second: There are twenty-five varieties of vegetables- 
used by man and domestic animals as food, and as staple 
commercial products, and always in demand. 

Third : There are more than twenty varieties of fruits 
each in demand in its season in the markets of the world. 
Here then we have nearly one hundred soil products, 
which cover the whole range of food for man and beast. 
For every item that goes to make up each of these sev- 
eral classes of products, there are many opportunities; 
for every product will be better for higher development 
in the utilization of opportunity. 

But here is the widence: note the contrast. Iu 1880 
there were 23,438 farms in the State of all sizes, valued 
at $20,291,835; in 1915 the 55,000 farms were valued at 
1188,300,000. 

The value of standard crops in 1880 was $5,430,3!):!, 
and in 1915 their value was $21,613,300. 

In 1880 there were no vegetable crops grown for com- 
merce, but in 1915 the vegetable crops were valued at 
$10,724,519. 

In 1880, the fruit crops were valued at only $285,350, 
and in 1915 they were valued at $13,511,950. 

In 1880, the live stock on these farms and the ranges, 
was valued at $5,358,980, and in 1915 it was valued at 
$29,869,842. In 1880, the total dairy produ -ts of the 
Slate were valued at $99,137, while in 1915 they were 
valued at $3,881,462. And so the contrast grows; and 
with it grow the opportunities in every case. 

Divide these items into separate units and in every 
one a multitude of opportunities present themselves. Tin- 
ability to choose and the will to direct the effort, will 
bring success as a reward. 

But this is not all that knocks at the door of oppor- 



30 

I unity in Florida and that waits on clear heads and will- 
ing hands for profitable development. 

There were no phosphate*, Fuller's earth, kaolin, etc., 
known to exist in Florida in 1880; but since 1890 the 
discovery of these minerals has yielded approximately 
$217,843,143, and opportunities for further discovery 
are by no means exhausted 

Through her phosphate deposits, the greatest in the 
world, Florida has and is today supplying the world with 
a fertilizing material that is essential to successful agri- 
cultural development in every land. 

Fisheries 

There is perhaps no single industry in Florida of such 
vast economic importance and one that offers greater 
opportunities, for profitable investment than fisheries. 
With approximately 1,200 miles of sea coast, and in- 
numerable bays, lagoons and other water courses filled 
with fish of almost every kind, Florida possesses natural 
advantages to a greater degree than is enjoyed by any 
other State. 

The varieties so far enumerated show 34 distinct kinds 
of food fish in Atlantic waters, and 54 in the Golf of 
Mexico. In addition there are 14 kinds of shell fish fit 
for human consumption. These lists do not include a 
number of large, deep sea fish only recently declared to 
be edible by the U. S. Government, and while I can say 
little for the eating qualities of these fish, they can and 
should fill a place in commerce as important and val- 
uable material in the manufacture of oil and fertilizer 
products. In this industry then there are also opportu- 
nities for most profitable employment of both capital and 
labor — opportunities as yet neglected and unappreciated 
except in a limited way. 



31 
Conclusion 

"There is a tide in the affairs of men, 
Which taken at the flood, 
Leads on to Fortune." 

In conclusion, we have no hesitation in claiming that 
there is no section of this country with resources so 
varied, none presenting such a field for new and promis- 
ing enterprises, none that offers to the rich and poor 
alike the gifts of nature in such lavish form, as Florida ; 
because we base that assertion upon firmly established 
facts. 

We claim that Florida is the healthiest State within the 
U. S. and we have the proof that it is so ; we have asserted 
that the climate of Florida is unsurpassed by that of 
any country on this globe, and we have given the scien- 
tific reasons for saying it. We have described the char- 
acter of our soils, and given the reason of their fertility, 
and their peculiar features, which make them lasting 
and valuable over all others; we have offered a list of 
the products of these soils and shown their adaptability 
to conditions, and their value from a pecuniary stand- 
point based on results; in the timber resources of the 
State we have shown that our State stands without a 
peer on this continent in the value and varieties of tim- 
ber for economic purpose. We have shown the almost 
unlimited possibilities of Florida in an agricultural, hor- 
ticultural, and industrial sense, and the open road to 
wealth that lies before the industrious farmer and live 
stock grower, and we have submitted the proofs. We 
have shown in a manner that leaves no room for doubt 
the wonderful future that lies before our State in a com- 
mercial respect; and with a railway already stretching 
away to the southermost end of the State and Continent 
overseas, connecting with the "Gem of the Antilles ;" and 
when the waterways of the State now in construction, 



32 

are completed; when a system of commercial intercourse 
and trade is established with our Sister Republics to the 
south of us; then, will the great stream of traffic flowing 
down from the almost limitless interior, seeking an out- 
let to these new-world markets in other lands, tax our« 
harbors to the utmost. Then will our claim of boundless 
opportunities be substantiated. 

Further we will have shown in connection with this 
possible commerce system, the unequaled inducements 
and opportunities for the establishment and successful 
operation of countless manufacturing industries. 

Florida is in very truth a Land of Opportunities, where 
all who are honest and energetic can make life a success. 

Particularly is this applicable to the younger genera- 
tion of men, also "That in the bright lexicon of youth 
there is no such word as fail." Opportunity is inviting 
your acceptance; but he who hesitates will lose. 

Again we say to such people the fertile soils of Flor- 
ida offer unparalleled opportunity. These are the people 
to succeed; accustomed to the problems of soil work, they 
are the men who can utilize the forces of nature and make 
them yield obedience to their will. Men possessed of will- 
ing hands, resolute hearts, and level heads, were never 
presented with a finer field for occupancy than Florida. 
It is a field boundless with the best elements of wealth 
and substantial enjoyment. It has an endless quantity 
of raw material of every sort, and rich productive soil, 
upon which all the fruits, all the crops, and all the ani- 
mals necessary for man's subsistence, comfort, and con- 
venience can be cultivated and propagated ; and withal a 
climate that brings back to the pallid cheek the glow of 
health ; to the listless eye the sparkle of new life; trans- 
forms the careworn frame to one of reanimated nature; 
brings rest to the wearied mind; and takes from the 
memory of adversity the sting of distress. 



33 
THE HOME UAKDEN AND ITS ADVANTAGES 

(By W. A. McRae, Commissioner of Agriculture.) 

In 1916 I gave to the press of the State an article en- 
titled, "Why Not the State Beautiful? - ' 

In this article I stated, among other things : 

"Florida is rich in its variety of trees, shrubs, vines, 
ferns, herbs, sedges, grasses and mosses. No State in the 
Union equals it in floral wealth. 

"Many of our trees, shrubs and plants bear flowers, 
glorious in color and fragrance, each month and season 
having its share, making a constant procession of floral 
beauties along the path of the year. 

"In the winter season when the rivers and lakes of the 
North are covered with thick ice and the ground blanket- 
ed with snow, the Wistaria vine in Florida clambers over 
our porches and trees and freights them with masses of 
pennants bewildering in number and beauty. And roses, 
too, of infinite number, sizes and color, are in bloom at 
Christmas time — if they are given a chance to grow. And 
it's in the winter, too, that the orange tree is in height of 
bloom and fills the air with indescribable fragrance. 

"Then, in turn, comes the oleander and then the mag- 
nolia, with a blossom having no rival for splendor among 
the trees of America, accompanied by its prototype — 
smaller but no less beautiful — the cape jasmine, and just 
at this time the crepe myrtle shrub is a vision — each a 
massive bouquet. 

"Florida has over two hundred kinds of deciduous green 
trees of commercial utility — many more than any other 
State — and countless shrubs and vines, with herbs con- 
spicuous when in bloom, but very inconspicuous or prac- 
tically invisible at other times. 

"There are trees growing in Florida not known to bot- 
anists anywhere else in the world, and found native only 

8 — Com.Azr. 



34 

on the east Bide of the Apalachicola river. These are the 
Torryea taxifolium, or stinking cedar— and Taxus Flor- 
idania, both very attractive evergreens. A fine specimen 
of the first named is to be seen on the grounds of the 
State Capitol at Tallahassee and in several of the parks 
of Jacksonville. 

"Besides the native flora of the State, ranging from 
lichens to palms and mammoth cypress and oak trees, 
there will be found great areas greatly modified by civil- 
zation, such as new and old fields, roadsides, dooryards 
and railroad rights of way. Some of these minute but 
charming creatures of natnre in their struggle to reach 
out to the skies for 'a place in the sun' for their share 
in the air, not only that they may thrive and silently 
teach the lesson of the beautiful but to tempt man to 
utilize them, are native varieties which and other 
branches of tree and plant life. Let us make Florida 
the 'State Beautiful.' 

"Where the birds sing sweetly." 
— (even at night) ; 

"And the flowers ever bloom." 
— (and in plenty) ; 

"Where the roses and the orange" 
— (none fiiner) ; 

"Send out rarest of perfume." 
"Everybody can help. The federation of women's clubs 
is doing a notable work, setting an example for the men 
folks, in promoting the science of forestry, and beauty. 
Among its achievements is the creation of what is known 
as the Royal Palms State Park, an estate of some 2,000 
acres in Dade County, southwest of Florida City, con- 
taining perhaps the finest collection of royal palms, some 
of them a hundred feet high — to be found in this coun- 
try, besides fifty or more varieties of other semi-tropical 
trees, in all a veritable wonderland. It is planned to 
make it a game reserve and a bird sanctuary, and many 
kinds of birds are already under protection. 



' .■ 



35 

"Not only has this federation established a wonderful 
park, but it has been active in every direction in the mat- 
ter of beautifying the State, a work which has founda- 
tion in doing the small duties about us. Let me quote 
from a circular sent out at the beginning of the year by 
the civics department to all members in which the follow- 
ing duties were sugested j 

"1. Observe Statewide clean-up week — April 10-15, 
and October 9-14. (Why not clean up every day a little 
of the time) ? , 
. "2. Destroy breeding places for Hies and mosquitoes. 

"3. Give special attention to colored districts. 

"4. Inspect markets, fruit and grocery stores. 

'•5. Beautify school and railroad station grounds. 

"6. Fight unsightly billboards and street scattering of 
advertising matter. 

• "7. If you have no junior civic league, organize one 
and have the members plant seed. Mrs. J. W. Sample, of 
Bartow, Fla., is chairman; write her for information. 

"8. Post the enclosed card in every school house. 

"9. Progress calls for community civics taught as a 
text in the public schools. Have your civics chairman in- 
terest school authorities in this very important work. 
Along with this introduction comes humane work, both 
for the protection of children and animals. 

"10. Take pictures of unsightly places that may be 
beautified or improved, and at the end of the federation 
year take another one showing improvement. 

"11. Let everybody in Florida co-operate and work to 
make Florida worthy of the name, 'Land of Flowers,' liy 
planting and beautifying. 

•"As your community, so your State. 

"Getting down to brass tacks, as Kipling says: 
"It isn't the guns nor armament nor funds that they 

can pay, 
But the close co-operation that made them win the day. 



m 


k. jH 


m ■ - 




g 










^ 


s 






M 


k 




. 


m 


1 


*1 


" 




• 
• 













Multiplying Sunflower. 



37 

It isn't the individual, nor the army as a whole, 

"But the everlasting team work of every bloomin' soul." 

The article above referred to was very generously pub- 
lished by the press of the State, and many favorable com- 
ments were made, end the Department of Agriculture 
was signally honored by its appearance as the leading 
article in the publication of the Federation of Women's 
Clnbs. • 

When the Great World War brought strikingly home 
to us the fact that we should all do onr parf in every 
way we could, and that the "home garden" was a neces- 
sity, I did all that I could by writing and speaking to 
urge our people to greater activity along this line, and I 
fairly believe the number of home gardens increased a 
thousand fold in. this State during the four years of the 
World War. 

The year 1918 was not, on the whole, a good garden 
year, but I made a large quantity of vegetables from the 
small space I could use for the garden, and in every nook 
and corner of the yard I had something growing, either 
vegetables for the table or flowers, to add beauty, where 
weeds and grass might otherwise grow. 

Following up the idea of the home garden, I have writ- 
ten the following article, illustrated, and this will be- 
come a feature of future reports: 

The Garden and Its Advantages 

When God made man he was placed in a garden to 
cultivate and keep it. The garden was well filled with 
trees bearing frnit, and intermingled were many hum- 
bler planis. each playing its part in supplying the occu- 
pants with things for their sustenance and comfort. 

The first man neglected his opportunities and all along 
the centuries to the present hour men have ignored the 
early command of the creator to make a garden and keep 
it. 







FrulU of the Garden. 



J 



39 
- 

If there is a State in the Union where the garden can 
be made to yield something for the nse of man in every 
month of the twelve it is in Florida. The absence of the 
garden in town and country in our State or the poorly 
cared for ones, is evidence that a good many people are 
disobeying one of the original and fundamental require- 
ments placed upon man by the Maker of the Earth. 

The garden was the starting point in the history of 
man, not a saw mill, nor factory, nor store, nor office. 
These were after thoughts or adjuncts, and now neces- 
sary, but they could not exist without the products of the 
garden, field and grove. The land is the original source 
of wealth. The possibilities of a plat of fertile land are 
suprising when it is properly cultivated. Tons of food 
can be produced on a single acre. To show what can be 
grown it is known that 43,000 plants set 1 foot by 1 f<>o1 
can be accomodated with room for full developmeut. 

2 feet by 2 feet will grow 18,800 plants. 

3 feet by 3 feet will grow 4,800 plants. 

3 feet by 4 feet will grow 3,600 plants. 

4 feet by 4 feet will grow 2,700 plants. 

5 feet by 5 feet will grow 1,700 plants. 

6 feet by 6 feet will grow 1,200 plants. 

Gardening was given a great impetus during the try- 
ing period of the war as a patriotic measure, but the 
world is not at ease and it will be a long time before 
normal conditions can be realized. There is still need of 
gardening, the world is still hungry. The ability to 
make gardens successfully means efficient food produc- 
tion, and on efficient food production, naturally and in- 
evitably depends the natural comfort and welfare. 

Good seed is just as essential in the garden for vege- 
tables as in the field for cereals and cotton. Some folks 
disregard this fact, and the result is poor or indifferent 
crops. They act as if nothing was to be gained in seed se- 
lection. If that is so, then all cattle are cattle regard- 
less of breeding and feeding The Shorthorn, Jersey, 



Okra Garden. 



41 

Hereford and tue Scrub are all the same. This is also true 
of the hog. The Duroc, Berkshire, Poland China and the 
razorback would be the same. No one believes this, and 
yet in the matter of seed many persons are indifferent. 
The same law of nature holds true in plant life as in ani- 
mal life. Like produces lik.e. 

Our children should be taught the beauties and attrac- 
tions of the plant creation. No State in the Union equals 
Florida iu its variety of trees, shrubs, vines, ferns, herbs, 
hedges, .grasses and mosses. If we hope to keep our chil- 
dren at home on the farm the home place must be made 
charming with flower beds and gardens to supply ample 
and proper food. It has been said that "in the homes of 
America are born the children of America, and from them 
go out into American life, American men and women. 
They go out with the stamp of these homes upon them; 
and only as their homes are what they should be will our 
children be what they should be." 

The farm and garden can be made to supply food. The 
meat, milk, eggs and corn of the farm acres and garden 
vegetables provide every form of nourishment and min- 
eral needed for a perfect body and continued health and 
vigor. 

Startling information came in 1917, when it was shown 
that more than one-third of the country's young man- 
hood, examined under the selective draft, was rejecte.4 
for physical unsoundness. Could this have happened if 
the children had entered manhood in proper condition? 
If the foundation is not made at home the structure is 
weak and fails. Good nourishing food and sane regula- 
tions in bringing up children in outdoor living and activi- 
ties would not have shown so many stunted, slouching, 
stooping, crooked and awkward men. One young man 
unfit in every three in this the greatest nation on earth 
cannot be other than a matter of concern. 

No one with a plot of ground in a town should think 



/ 



-— r~ 




Kentucky Wonder Beans. 



that the time and labor given to it in growing vegetables 
is lost. The same is true of the farm, where the garden 
can be made the most profitable acre. Vegetables are 
cheaper and better than fat pork and canned stuff as a 
regular diet for both children and adults. 

Florida, as is known, is one State in which vegetables 
and fruits of one kind or the other can be had all along 
the processes of the months. It is only a question of 
foresight and judgment. No one should depend on one 
planting of snap beans, radishes, lettuce, sweet corn, etc., 
but continue at intervals of several weeks apart, so that 
vegetables can be had fresh, crisp and tender through- 
out the entire growing, season. 

Every garden, too, should have a few berries, but it is 
an exception to find strawberries or blackberries grow- 
ing on Florida gardens. This form of fruit is not only 
a most healthful addition to the table when picked ripe 
from the bushes, but it can be preserved in many appe- 
tizing ways. And no garden should be without a fig tree, 
a fruit as delicious and seviceable now as it was in an- 
cient times, and no other fruit is more frequently men- 
tioned in the Bible. 

©Nursery and seed catalogues are available to every 
one, and nearly all of them supply practical information, 
which applied with good judgment cannot help but serve 
a good purpose. 

One kind of garden not as general as it should be and 
most desirable, is the school garden, to which the £00 
often neglected and unsightly "yard' might be devoted. 
Agriculture is always to be the chief industry of Florida. 
The children should be early taught the importance of 
plant life and its wonders. Gardening has been advocat- 
ed in all ages as being of the highest economic and nat- 
ural importance. Working in the garden gives needed 
physical exercise to aduts of the home, as well as the 
children. With a reasonable supply of tools the labor 
need not be irksome. Killing weeds should begin just 







Squash Garden. 



45 

as soon as it is possible to tell plants and weeds apart, 
and be continued until the vegetables are strong enough 
to assert their individuality and crowd out the weeds. 
The work will not be hard if done regularly. 

The growing of flowers should be encouraged, but not 
at the expense of vegetables. In regard to both flowers 
and vegetables those promising best returns at least risk 
should be selected. A bouquet on the table from the gar- 
den in connection with the vegetables appetizingly and 
properly prepared adds to the attractiveness of the dis- 
play of tempting and savory foods. 

The school garden could be made of inestimable value 
to children when managed and conducted in a Bpirit to 
encourage competitive interest wherein each participant 
can have part in a garden fair, to be followed by a sale. 
Talks can be made on soils, seed selection, planting, cul- 
tivation, weeds, insects, birds and the many related fea- 
tures of the work, all necessary facts in the beginning of 
the business career of the young people of an agricul- 
tural State. 

To encourage persistent and uniform effort garden pho- 
tographs may be taken and records kept of the progress 
made, all of which is part and parcel of any systematic 
«ffort. 

Accompanying this article will be fonnd a series of pho- 
tographs made of various features of the garden culti- 
vated mornings and evenings by the Commissioner of 
Agriculture at his home in Tallahassee. Most of the prod- 
ucts in this garden were transplanted from little seed 
boxes, miniature substitutes for hot houses. These gar- 
den plots, which otherwise would have remained vacant 
and served no purpose, were made really profitable 
sources of a most excellent food supply — tomatoes, beans, 
lettuce, okra and many other vegetables, the cost of which 
bought in the market would have run into a considerable 
sum of money. There was with it all, besides healthy 



■ 




9t*te Farm, Ralford. 



47 

exercise, the pleasure of planting the seeds, noticing the 
struggles of the tiny plants to break through the soil for 
a place in the sunlight and finally towering high into the 
air gave freely of fruitage ^or family use. t 

Feeding p.* iky Cows 

(A Compilation of Information on this Topic by H. S. 
Elliott, Chief Clerk Department of Agriculture.) 

Successful feeding of dairy cows from an economic 
standpoint involves the providing of an abundant supply 
of palatable, nutritious feed, at the minimum cost per 
unit of feed, and supplying it to the cow in such way as 
to secure the largest production for feed consumed. This 
bulletin suggests some factors involved in the economical 
selection of feeds to guide the producer in supplying them 
to the cows. 

Liberal Feeding Necessary foe Profit 

The dairy cow has been likened by many writers to a 
machine or a manufacturing plant. This comparison 
can be applied literally, with certain reservations. A cer- 
tain proportion of the power furnished any machine is 
used for running the machine itseff and is not in any 
sense productive. In a steam engine this is represented 
in the exhaust steam, in heat which escapes without pro- 
ducing steam, and in the friction of the working parts 
of the engine. In the manufacturing plant it is repre- 
sented by the managerial, the clerical, and sales forces. 
These forces, while necessary for the successful operation 
of the business, are, in a sense, unproductive. 

In the feeding of the dairy cow this overhead expense, 
this unproductive force, is termed the "'maintenance ra- 
tion." and is that portion of the feed given the cow which 
is used by her to perform her own functions, such as 
heating the body, pumping the blood, digesting the teed. 






^^■mm 


if ' ■ 


top-^w 









Sorghum Waiting at 81 lo to be Cut — Anthony Farm*. 



49 



and moving the body from place to place. This feed, 
from a productive standpoint, is entirely lost to the far 
mer. The cow can prodnce without loss of body weight 
only after she has exacted this toll of maintenance. Hav- 
ing received feed enough to maintain her. practically all 
the feed she consumes above this can be used for milk 
production. This maintenance ration is a fixed charge, 
and the more feed a cow can consume above that required 
for maintenance the greater the amount available for 
production. 

Feeding for profit can, therefore, be denned as liberal 
feeding, to the full capacity of the cow. This point is 
illustrated by Table 1. (These figures are only approx 
iniiilc but will serve to illustrate the point.) 

Table 1. Approximate proportions of cows' feed requir- 
ed for maintenance and available for milk production. 





i"nst of 


tout of 


mainte- 


ration. 


nance 


Cent*. 


re»t: 


10 


10 


15 


10 


20 


10 


25 


10 



Available 

for milk 

production. 



Cents. 



5 
10 
15 



Troportlon 
of ration 
available 

for produc- 
tion. 



One-third. 

One-half. 

Thrce-IUths. 



It will be noted in Table 1 that when the cow is fed 
only a maintenance ration no feed is available for milk 
production; when she is fed twice this quantity, half the 
feed can be used for milk produttion ; when she is fed 
two and a half times the maintenance, three-fifths of the 
feed can be so used. One of the most common mistakes 
in the feeding of dairy cattle on our farms is that the 
good cows are not fed a sufficient quantity of feed above 
that required for maintenance. This is especially true 
of the highly specialized dairy cow; that is, the cow 
which when fed all she will take makes it all into milk 

4 — t'om.Ajir. 



•I 



except what is needed for maintenance. It i8, however, 
unfortunately true that all cows in the dairies of the 
country are not this kind. Some cows when fresh make 
all the feed above maintenance into milk for a period of 
several months before they begin to lay on flesh ; otherif, 
if fed heavily, begin to gain in weight soon after fresh- 
ening From the standpoint of economical milk produc- 
tion one can not generally afford to give a dairy cow 
more than she will consume without gaining in weight. 
There are times, however, when it is desirable to make 
exceptions to this rule; for example, practically all highly 
specialized milk producers in the early part of the lacta- 
tion period lose in weight ; that is, they produce milk at 
the expense of their own body flesh. When such cows ap- 
proach the end of their milking period they normally re- 
gain the flesh they have lost in the early part of this pe- 
riod. The feeder can, therefore, well afford to feed such 
cows liberally, being assured that the feed will be re- 
turned to him in the form of milk when the cows again 
freshen. 

Simmer Feeding 

The problems involved in winter and summer feeding 
are so different as to make a natural division between the 
two. Summer feeding ordinarily consists in the use of 
pastures or soiling crops. These may be supplemented 
when necessary by silage or other roughage or by grain. 
When dry feeds alone are fed in the summer, the problems 
are not materially different from winter feeding. 

Pasture 

Pasture is the natural feed for dairy cows, and in many 
respects the best. With abundance of good grasses in 
fresh, succulent condition, we have one of the rations 
most conducive to heavy production. Even with the very 
best of pasture, however, a cow can not be forced to max- 



51 



imam production on it alone. This is owing to the fact 
that for the greatest production she must be induced to 
take a large amount of nutrients. ' The bulky nature of 
pasture grass places a positive limit upon the capacity of 
the cow to take feed. In other words, the cow's stomach 
can not contain grass enough to supply the required nut- 
rients for maximum milk production ; therefore a part of 
' the ration should be of a more concentrated nature. Good 
pasture contains an abundant supply of succulent, palat- 
able, and nutritious grasses. On such pasture it should 
be possible for a cow to satisfy her appetite with a few 
hours' grazing. Pasture of this kind will supply all the 
food material needed for medium production and a large 
part of that necessary for large production. For aver- 
age conditions, with ample pasture of good grasses or 
legumes in good, succulent condition, good production 
can be secured. The economy of the use of pasture de- 
pends chiefly upon several factors, such as the price of 
land, the price of labor, and the lay of the land. 



V 



■ 


m 


■m 




*" ft |p '■!' 


;\/1 











Holstein-Jersey Steers, Three Years Old. 
Weight Average. 1.360 Pounds. Raised on 8klm Milk. 



Price op Land 

The price of land has a direct bearing upon the cost of 
pasture and is an important factor where land values are 
high. If pasture is to be depended upon entirely for from 
four to six months in the year, and production is to be 
kept up to a profitable standard, anywhere from 1 to 4 
acres or more must be provided for each cow. This is 
assuming that in permanent pacture there is a good, clean 
turf, with little or no waste places, and that for tempo- 
rary pasture there is a good stand of grass or legumes 
throughout. Land which will give these conditions fre- 
quently sells at from f50 to $300 an acre, and the inter- 
est on the investment must necessarily also vary widely, 
as is shown in Tables 2 and 3: 

Table Xo. 2— Interest on cost of pasture per cow for the 
season; interest at 6 per cent on the value 
of the land, allotting pom 1 to 4 acres per 
coir. 



Acres 
per 
cow. 


Value of lnnd per acre. 


$25 


$50 


$100 


UN I $200 

r 


1 

1% 

2 

3% 

3 

3% 

4 


11.50 

2.25 
3.00 
3.75 
4.50 
5.25 
8.00 


$3.00 
4.50 
6.00 
7.50 
9.00 
10.50 
12.00 


$6.00 
0.00 
12.00 
15.00 
18.00 
21.00 
24.00 


$0.00 

13. .VI 
18.00 
•-'•.'..- ii 
27.00 
31.50 
30.00 


$12.00 
18.00 
24.00 
30.00 
36.00 
42.00 
■IS. 00 



84 

Table No. 3 — Cost of pasture per cote per day on basis 
of Table No. 2, with a pasture season of 
150 days. 



Acre* 

per 

tow. 


Vnlue of land pt-r acre. 


$25 


»50 


»10U 


$150 


$200 


1 

Mi 

2*4 
3 

::', 

4 


Cm**, 

l 

2* 
2% 
8 

4 


Cent*. 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
T 
8 


Crnl*. 

4 



8 
10 
12 
14 
16 


Cent*. 
6 


12 
15 
18 
21 ■ 
24 


Cent*. 
8 
12 
18 
20 
24 
28 
32 



It will be seen that the price of land may readily be- 
come so high that it would be unprofitable to graze it. 
In many sections of the country a cow can be fed for aver- 
age production for about 20 cents a day. Therefore, 
when the daily rental or interest on the value of pas- 
ture approaches that sum the fanner should carefully con- 
sider other methods of summer feeding. 

The cost of caring for permanent pastures must also 
be taken into consideration. This will consist in the ex- 
pense of cutting weeds, building and repairing fences, etc. 

Price of Labor 

» The pasture system of summer feeding reduces to the 
mi inimum the amount of labor required to handle a given 
number of cows, and, therefore, it is especially adapted 
to conditions where labor is high. 



Lav ok Land and Roughness ok Surface 

* 
In mountainous or hilly sections of the country there is 

often a part of the farm which, on account of steepness, 
tendency to wash, or the presence of rock formation near 
the surface, can not or should not be plowed frequently. 



66 



On such farms it Is often best to plow only the bottoms, 
keeping the uplands in permanent pastures. The dairy- 
man will find ready application of the pasture system for 
summer feeding on such farms. 




Stock-Feeding Shed, State Farm, Raiford. 
Pasture with Supplements 



geain. 
As has been said, the supplementing of pastures with 
grain is sometimes advisable, even when the pastures are 
of the best. In many sections, however, pastures are 
never of the best kind, and in iio sections are they always 
in the best condition. It is Evident, therefore, that the 
commercial dairyman will e dom depend upon pasture 
alone. Grain should be fed' i heavy-producing cows un 
der all pasture conditions. 



ST. 

Prof. C. H. Eckles, of the University of Missouri, sug- 
gests the following-named quantities if grain with aLun 
dant pasture for varying production : 
Jersey cow producing — 

20 pounds of milk daily 3 pounds of gr^in. 

25 pounds of milk daily 4 pounds of grain. 

30 pounds of milk daily C pounds of grain. 

35 pounds of milk daily 8 pounds of grain. 

40 pounds of milk daily 10 pounds of grain. 

Holstein-Friesian or Ayrshire cow producing — 

25 pounds of milk daily 3 pounds of grain. 

30 pounds of milk daily 5 pounds of giain. 

35 pounds of milk daily 7 pounds of grata. 

40 pounds of milk daily — 9 pounds of grain. 

50 pounds of milk daily 10 pounds of grain. 

While this is, of course, an arbitrary rule and varia 
tions should be made to suit different conditions and in 

dividual cows, it is in accord willi good feeding practice 
and probably is as good a rule of its kind as has been 
formulated. 

For cows of medium production it is usually more 
economical to feed silage or some green crop rather than 
grain for supplementing short pasturage. In supplement- 
ing pasture with grain it should be remembered that the 
percentage of protein in the grain ration need not be the 
same as for winter feeding. Good pasture is an approx- 
imately balanced ration. The grain ration to be fed with 
pasture grass should, therefore, have approximately the 
same pro]iortion of protein to other nutrients. In the 
case of extra-heavy producers the percentage of protein in 
the grain mixture should be somewhat greater. 



^'Xke followiiig-uanied mixtures are suggested for sup- 
plemeuting pasture without other roughage: 

Mixture No. 1 : 

Grounds oats 100 pounds I 

Wheat bran 100 pounds r^ cr cen t digestible prolcln, 10.S. 

Corn meal SO pounds I 

Mixture No. 2 : 

Wheat bran 100 pounds 

Corn meal 100 pounds S-Per cent digestible prolcln. 12. i. 

Cottonseed meal 25 pounds 

Mixture No. 8: 

Corn-nnd-cob meal ... 2i"0 pounds I • ' M _ ... 

Cottonseed meal 100 pounds f Per cent digestible prolcln, 10.0. 

Mixture No. 4 : 

Wheat bran 100 pounds I 

Gluten feed 30 pounds fp er CVBt digestible protein. l.l.D. 

Corn meal 50 pennds 







Field of Millet. 



5a 

Soiling Crops 

Pastures, except where irrigation is practiced, are so 
dependent upon rainfall that there is practically sure to 
be some period each season when they are short. It is a 
well-known fact among dairymen that if a cow, for lack 
of proper feed, falls off in her flow of milk for any period 
of time it is diflicult or impossible to bring her back to a 
full flow until she again freshens. To carry the cows 
over this period on grain alone is expensive; conse- 
quently, the supplementing of pasture with soiling crops 
is becoming much more common and is growing in favor. 
In fact, in many sections it is extremely difficult to keep 
a herd in maximum production throughout the summer 
without furnishing some supplemental feed. Unless an 
abundance of pasture is available, there is practically 
sure to be a shortage toward the end of the season. 
Special crops can be grown for these shortages, but they 
usually involve added expense and inconvenience com- 
pared with standard farm crops. Second-growth red 
clover, oats, peas, or alfalfa are excellent. Corn is avail- 
able in August and September. These crops are usually 
a part of the regular cropping system of a well-conducted 
dairy farm. 

The advantages of soiling crops as a supplement to 
pasture are that large quantities of forage can be grown 
on a relatively small area, because it is frequently possi- 
ble to harvest more than one crop in a season on land 
used for soiling. Another advantage is the palatability 
and succulence possessed by such crops. With their use 
pasture need not be cropped so elosely and less feed is 
wasted through tramping by the cattle. By judicious 
application of the soiling system it is often possible to 
reduce the acreage of land used for pasture, which in 
addition to the saving in land required for pasture has 
the added saving in the cost of fencing. Soiling crops 



usually are fed in the stable where the manure can be 
saved for application on cultivated fields. 

An objection which' can be urged against the use of soil- 
ing crops is the greater amount of labor required and 1jie 
difficulty in using this labor to the best advantage. An- 
other difficulty is to plan a succession of special crops 
which will at all times during the season supply an 
abundant supplementary feed. Even with the best ar- 
ranged plan, its 'success depends very largely upon 
weather conditions. 




Stock Feeding, State Farm, Raiford. 
The Sim \n;it S11.O. 



Silage^-has found a wide use in this couni*ry as palat- 
able, succulent, and economical roughage for use during 
the winter. Many of the advantages of its use in winter 



apply equally well in summer, and there are additional 
ones that apply alone to the latter season. 

The use of a summer silo is particularly applicable 
ou high-priced land. If the land is pastured it will re- 
quire from 1 to t 3 or more acres a season for each cow, 
while 1 acre of corn pui' in the silo will supply succulent 
roughage for several cows for a like period. It is true 
that grain will be necessary in addition to silage, but 
the great problem on high:priced. land is to raise a suf- 
ficient quantity of roughage. 

As has previously been said, soiling crops have been 
used to a great extent either in place of or in addition 
to pasture. The greatest disadvantage in their use is that 
much labor is required. In order to use these crops they 
must be cut and hauled from day to day. This work is 
expensive because only small areas are cut at one time. 
tliHS making it impracticable to use the harvesting ma- 
chinery of the farm to advantage and entailing consider- 
able loss of lime in harnessing and unhitching the team. 
Considerable inconvenience also is occasioned by the fact 
that the field work is pressing at that season of the year, 
and both man and horsepower are badly needed in the 
fields. Silage, on the other hand, is cut at one operation 
when the work in the field is not pressing. The crop or- 
dinarily grown for silage is corn, which is a part of the 
regular farm rotation and consequently fits in well with 
the regular routine of work. 

With a silo for summer feeding, the dairyman always 
has an abundant supply of feed that is easily handled. 
By using silage the necessity of cutting and hauling the 
supplementary roughage during rainy weather is elim- 
inated. Another advantage as compared with the soiling 
system lies in the fact tha-i' with the latter it is often 
necessary to feed a portion of each crop after it has 
matured too much to be palatable, and probably to start 
on the succeeding one while it is still a little too green. 
It is difficult to plan exactly so as to prevent these con- 



«2 

ditions. With silage, however, the crop can be cut at the 
best stage for feeding and preserved at that point. 

One of the most important uses of silage in the sum- 
mer is as a supplement for short or poor pasture. This 
condition frequently occurs as a result of long-continued 
dry weather. Under such circumstances even the mosa 
carefully planned soiling system may fail. It is then 
that the greatest value of the summer silo is. realized, 
for with the silo full of well-matured silage grown in 
the previous season, an abundant supply of succulent feed 
for the cows is/ available, regardless of weather condi- 
tions. * 

When it is not necessary to use the silo during the 
summer, it can be sealed up and ine silage preserved 
for winter use. This prevents any waste in feed. 

One point, however, must be kept in mind in plan- 
ning the summer silo.. This is the diameter of the silo 
in relation to the number of cows to be fed and the 
quantity to be fed to each cow. Silage enough must be 
fed daily i'o prevent excessive surface fermentation. As 
a general rule, a cow under summer conditions will con 
sume about 20 pounds a day. On this basis the diam- 
eter of the silo in reference to the number of cows to 
be fed in summer will be as follows: 

20 cows 8 feet in diameter 

30 cows 10 feet in diameter 

40 cows 12 feet in diameter 

Inasmuch as 8 feet is about the minimum diameter of 
a silo in best practice, tf will be seen that the summer 
silo for supplementing pasture has its best application 
in herds of 20 cows or more. 

Winter Feeding. 

The problems involved in winter feeding are usually 
distinctly different from those of summer feeding. Pas- 
ture (or green feed), usually the basis of summer feed- 



63 

ing, is not available. Broadly speaking, there are two 
factors involved in this problem, first, to satisfy the 
needs of the cow, and, second, to suit the pocketbook. 
The cow mnst have an ample supply of feed of a palat 
able nature, and this feed must be supplied at a price 
which will permit a profit on the feeding operation. 

Viewed from an economic standpoint, tfiere are some 
fundamental considerations which should first receive 
attention. In general farm practice it is advisable, so 
far as is economical, to use the feeds produced on the 
farm. Often the freight rates and the middleman's 
charges, if saved, will constitute a good profit' for the 
feeder. This is especially true of roughage. Such feeds 
are bulky and in most cases must be baled at a consid- 
erable cost; the freight rates also are much greater in 
proportion to the nutrients contained than on the grains. 

When land is high in price and the market's for dairy 
products are good, it is often impracticable to grow all 
the feeds on the farm. In snch cases arrangements first 
should be made to grow the roughage, on account of the 
high cost of transporting these feeds. In most cases the 
prime object of tlie farm under such conditions will be 
to supply the greatest possible quantity of roughage. 

It is a difficult jiroblem to provide a system of. winter 
feeding of roughage- which will make the best use of 
home-grown roughage and at the same time insure full 
production. Only a general discussion of the problem 

can be attempted. 

• i 

Silage. 

» 

In addition to containing the proper nutrients in the 
right proportion, part of the ration should be of a suc- 
culent nature. K is extremely difficult, if not impossible, 
to keep cows in full production throughout the winter 
without some succulent feed. There are two chief sources 
of succulent feed for winter feeding — silage and roots. 



Of these, silage is iu almost universal use by commercial 
dairymen. While almost any green crop may be used 
for silage, the heavy yields of corn, as compared with 
other crops, and is comparative ease of handling, to- 
gether with its keeping qualities, make it the leading 
silage crop. Where the cost of land and the prices of 
dairy products are high, and the system of farming of 
necessity is intensive, it is questionable whether the dairy 
man should consider any other silage crop. 

Roots. 

The chief function of roots in cattle feeding is to sup- 
lily a succulent feed. Under general farm conditions the 
quantity of nutrienls grown per acre in root crops is 
small in comparison to the cost of production. These 
root crops, however, can be preserved during the win- 
ter equally well whether large or small quantities are 
fed each day, and therefore have special application when 
only a few cows are t'o be fed. Of the different root crops, 
mangel-wurzels furnish the greatest yield per acre. Other 
kinds of beets and turnips and carrots may be used. 
Turnips, however, should be fed after milking rather than 
before,, as they cause a bad flavor in the products if fed 
immediately before milking. Carrots impart a desirable 
color to the milk. 

Dry ROCOHAGK. 

The best kinds of dry roughage to be fed to i"he dairy 
cow. in connection with corn silage or roots, are legumin- 
ous hays, such as alfalfa, red. crimson, or alsike clover 
and soy-bean or cowpea hay. While corn silage is an ex- 
cellent feed, it is not a balanced one. as it does not con 
tain sufficient protein and mineral matter to meet fully 
the requirements of the cow. The leguminous hays, in 
addii'ion to being very palatable, have a tendency to cor- 
reot this deficiencv. Thev are also one of the best and 



i 



G5 

cheapest sources of protein. One or more of these hays 
can be grown on any farm, and in addition to their value 
for feeding purposes, they improce the soil in which they 
are grown. Hay from Canada field peas, sown with oats 
to prevent the peas from lodging, also makes an excel- 
lent roughage. 

Corn stover, coarse hay, etc., also find a good market 
through the dairy cow. This class of roughage is low 
in protein, however, and when it is used the grain ra- 
tion must be richer in protein. 

No positive rule can be laid down as to the quantity 
of dry roughage that should be fed, but about 6 to 12 
pounds a day for each cow, in addition 10 silage, will 
be found to be satisfactory in most cases. When the dry 
roughage is of poor quality, such as coarse, weedy hay 
or a poor grade of cornstalks, a large portion can often 
be given to advantage, allowing the cow to pick out 
the best and using the rejected part for bedding. With 
Vhis quantity of dry roughage the cow will take, accord- 
ing to her size, from 25 to 50 pounds of silage. This 
may be consideerd as a guide for feeding to apply when 
the roughage is grown on the farm. When everything 
has to be purchased, it is often more economical to limit 
the quantity of roughage fed and increase the grain ra- 
tion. 

Roughage Alonb Too Bulky a Ration. . 

While a cow's stomach is large and her whole diges- 
tive system is especially designed to utilize coarse feeds, 
there is a limit to iThe bulk that she can take. This limit 
is below the quantity of roughage that it would require 
to furnish the nutrients she must have for maximum pro- 
duction; that is, a ration may contain the proper propor- 
tions of prm'ein and carbohydrates and still be so bulky 
that she can not handle it. She. therefore, should have 
some grain, even though the roughage in itself is a bal- 
anced ration. 

om.Agr. 




Herd of Dairy Cattle. 



67 
Importance or a Balanced Ration. 

It is probably well at this point to refer briefly to the 
composition of feedstuffs as it relates i'o economical feed- 
ing of the dairy cow. The cow takes into her digestive 
system feeds which she utilizes for the production of 
body tissues, heating the body, performing bodily func- 
tions, such as digesting feed, moving from place to place, 
iind for milk production. For the purposes of the present' 
discussion, it is sufficient to say that the constituents or 
compounds and the relative quantities necessary for these 
operations have been determined; that is, we know tfhat 

milk contains protein and energy or heat-producing con- 
stituents, the protein being represented by the casein 
and albumiu and the energy and heat-producing constit- 
uents by the fat and sugar. In addition to the constituents 
or compounds necessary for the production of milk, she 
also must have the constituents necessary for perform- 
ing the other functions mentioned. These for conven- 
ience, have been classified into proteins, carbohydrates, 
and fats. Fats perform much the Bame functions as car- 
bohydrates and are worth for production practically two 
and one-fourth times as much per pound as carbohy- 
drates, and in the balancing of a ration are usually 
classed with them. This brings us to a deflntion of a 
"balanced ration," which is a ration containing these 
various nutrients in the proportion the cow needs them. 
The economical importance of a balanced ration, is 
evident'. The cow can use only certain elements or com- 
pounds in certain proportions; consequently, if the ra- 
tion supplies an excessive amount of any one, the ex- 
cess is liable to be waste. Not only is this true, but as 
the cow has to assimilate it, even though she can not 
use it. her capacity for production is reduced. 



68 
Cost. 

In making a ration, cost is one of the important fac- 
tors. The best practice is to compound a grain mixture 
so that it will balance with the home-grown roughage. 
With this in mind, the separate grains should be selected 
to supply the necessary nutrients at the lowest possible 
cost. For this, not only the price per hundred pounds, 
but also the relative cost of each constituent', especially 
protein, must be considered. For example, to determine 
the cost of a pound of digestible protein in a given feed 
divide the price of 100 pounds by the per cent of digesti- 
ble protein in the feed. If this calculation is made for 
several feeds, the relative cost of protein in each will be 
apparent. Then the feeds that furnish protein at the 
least cost can be selected. The same can be done to de- 
termine the cost of tie carbohydrates and fat, which are 
the, heat-making or energy-producing part of the feed. 

Bulk. 



A certain bulk is necessary in the grain mixture to ob- 
tain the best results. When heavy feeds are used, some 
bulky ones should be included to lighten the mixture, 
since it is probable that' a certain degree of bulkiness aids 
digestion. Some of the common feeds are classified as 
to bulk in Table 4 : 

Table 4. — Classification, of common feeds as to bulkiness. 



Bulky. 


Medium. 


Heayy or compact 




Alfalfa meal, 
orn-and-rob meal. 
Bran (wheat). 
Drien brewera' gain*. 
Dried distillers - grains. 
Oats, ground. 
Malt sprouts. 
Pried beet pulp. 


Corn meal or feed. 

Hominy. 

Gluten feed. 

Rye 

Barley. 

Buckwheat middlings. 


Cottonseed meal. 
Linseed meal. 
Cocoanut meal. 
Peanut meal. 
Gluten meal. 
Wheat middlings. 





■ 




1'aiatability is of great importance in successful feed- 
ing. The best results can. not be obtained with any feed 
which is not well relished by the cow; consequently any 
unpalatable feed to be used should be mixed with those 
that are appetizing. 

I'hysiouxjical, Effect. 

In making the grain mixture care should be exercised 
that too large a quantity of either constipating or laxa- 
tive feed is not included. Cottonseed meal, for' example, 
is decidedly constipating and should be fed with laxa- 
tive grains or succulence, soch as silage or roots. For 
ordinary feeding in moat parts of the United States 
not more than one-third of the grain should be cotton- 
seed meal. In some sections larger quantities have been 
fed, but this practice is not to be recommended. On the 
other hand, linseed-oil meal, because of its distinctly lax- 
afive action, should not be fed ordinarily in greater qnah 
titiea than 1 1-2 pounds a day. 



A 







Dairy Herd in Everglades. 



71 

Nutritive Value of the Grains and Concentrates. 

As a general rule, the energy or heat-producing ma- 
terial is found chiefly in the stem and leaves of the plant 
and the protein is largely in the seeds. The great excep- 
tion is in the case of legumes, which have larger per 
centages of protein throughout the plam' and particular- 
ly in the leaves. It should be noted, therefore, that in 
supplying grain we are chiefly concerned with the pro 
tein it contains. 

Two classes of feeds are uesd for making up the grain 
ration, namely, grains and by-products of the manufac- 
turing industries. The grain produced on the farm and 
commonly used for cattle feeding are corn, oats, barley 
and rye. In many cases the demand for these grains for 
other purposes has become so great that the dairyman 
can not afford to use them ; consequently, it has usually 
been found more economical to use the by-products of the 
manufacturing industries. The following are among the 
most common of these feeds: Wheat bran, wheat mid- 
dlings, linseed meal, cottonseed meal, gluten meal, gluten 
feed, hominy feed, brewers' grains, malt sprouts, distil- 
ler's' grains, beet pulp, molasses, buckwheat middlings, 
cocoanut meal, peanut meal. 

The following analyses represent digestible nntrients 
in 100 pounds. The fat is multiplied by 2.25 and added • 
to the carbohydrates. This represents the energy or heat- / 

making part of the feed. 

Wheat Bran. 

Digestible nutrients. — Protein, 12.5 per cent; carbohy- 
drates and fat, 48.4 per cent. 

Bran is the outside coating of grains, and is the resi- 
due or by-product from the manufacture of flour. Wheat 
bran may be derived from winter or spring wheat, and 
there is little difference in its composition from either 
source. 



From a physiological standpoint wheat bran is one of 
the very best feeds for cows. It is slightly laxative in 
nature, and generally tends to keep the cow's digestive 
system in good condition. The price based upon its pro- 
tein content is usually so high that most commercial 
dairymen combine it with other feeds in which protein 
costs less per pound. Aside from the value of the 
nutrients which it contains, it has a special value in a 
feeding mixture, as it gives bulk and addis to the palata- 
bility. Wheat bran may be used when the rest of the 
grain ration is lacking in palatabiliry or is of a consti- 
pating nature. It is especially good when the roughage 
is all dry. The best grades of wheat bran are of light 
weight, with large flakes. Some of the large mills put 
the sweepingB from the mill into the bran ; therefore, it is 
usually best to buy the highest grade of bran, provided 
the mills grading it are reliable. The output of small 
country mills is usually of excellent quality. Bran con- 
tains a high proportion of phosphorus and potash in itb 
ash content. 

Wheat Middlings. 

Digestible nutrient*. — Protein, 13.4 per cent; carbohy- 
drates and fat, 55.9 per cent. 

Standard wheat middlings or shorts are composed of 
the finer portions of the bran together with tne coarser 
portion of the flour. They are not so flaky as bran, are a 
little less laxative, and contain a somewhat smaller quan- 
tity of ash. In other respects they may be said to re- 
semble bran closely. This feed is somewhat' pasty when 
moist, and consequently lacks bulk. 

Linseed Meal. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Old process: Protein, 30.2 per 
cent; carbohydrates and fat, 47.7 per cent. New process: 
Protein, 31.7 per cent; carbohydrates and fat, 44.2 per 
cent. 



78 

i 

Linseed meal is a by-product of the manufacture of 
linseed oil from flaxseed, and is produced under two pro- 
cesses, known as the old and t!he new. Linseed meal or oil 
meal from a physiological standpoint is one of the very 
best feeds. It is laxative, palatable, and a very good 
"conditioner," but, like wheat bran, its price is usually 
excessive for its nutritive value. | It has, however, a" dis- 
tinct place in a mixture in supplying protein i'o increase 
the palatability and improve tie physiological effect. 
It is very heavy, so that it is well to feed it in connec- 
tion with a bulky feed. It is especially applicable in a 
mixture to be fed wh!h dry ronghage. 

Cottonseed Meal- (choice). 

Digestible Nutrients.— Protect, 37 per cent; carbo- 
hydrates and fat, 415 per cent^ 

Cottonseed meal is the rich^ft in protein of all the 
common cow feeds on the m* %et. It is usually the 
cheapest' source of protein avail tble, but it does not have 
the best physiological effect upi n the cow, often causing 
digestive troubles if fed in larjj? quantities for long pe- 
riods. At first it is advisable ti f start with 1 to 2 pounds 
a day, gradually increasing the Quantity if no bad result's 
are observed. In some herds i i the North as high as 5 
to 6 pounds a day are fed without bad results. In the 
South there seems to be no limit in this direction. 

Cottonseed meal is a highly concentrated feed and 
should, if possible, be fed in a mixture with some bulky 
feed like bran. It can be fed tp better advantage when 
the roughage contains an ample quantity of succulent 
feed. While its physiological effect in the North at least 
is not good as compared with most other cow feeds, 
it's cheapness end the fact that in time the cows seem 
to overcome this tendency to digestive trouble from it 
are rapidly giving it great prominence as a cheap source 
of protein for dairy cows. 



• • 



74 

Gluten Meal and Gluten Feed. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Gluten meal: Protein, 30.2. per 
cent ; carbohydrates and fat, 53.8 per cent. Gluten feed : 
Proi'ein, 21.6 per cent; carbohydrates and fat, 59 J. per 
cent. 

Gluten meal is a by-product of the manufacture of 
starch from corn. The basis of the meal is the germ 
part of the corn kernel. Gluten feed is composed of the 
gluten meal plus a certain quantity of corn bran, which 
makes it lighter than the meal. Boin feeds are fairly 
palatable and are usually among the cheapest sources 
of protein. 

Dried Brewers' Grains. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Protein, 21.5 per cent; carbo- 
hydrates and fat, 44.2 per cent. 

Dried brewers' grains rank wiin wheat bran as a flaky, 
bulky feed. The physiological effect is nearly if not quite 
as good as bran. They differ in that they earry a some- 
what larger percentage of protein than bran. Cows 
sometimes do not eat these grains readily at first, but 
soon overcome this aversion. 

Malt Sprouts. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Protein, 20.3 per cent; car- 
bohydrates and fat, 50.3 per cent. 

Malt sprouts are loose and bulky and cows usually do 
not take them readily at first. The chief place of this 
feed is with other feeds in a mix-tare. Both brewers' 
grains and malt sprouts come from barley and are by- 
products from the manufacture of beer. 

The proprietary feed companies control at the present 
time a large percentage of the output of dried grains 
aud malt sprouts from the larger breweries, and these ex- 
cellent feeds do not appear unmixed on the market to so 
great an extent as they did a few years ago. 



75 

Hominy Meal, Feed ok Chop. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Protein, 7 per cent; carbo- 
hydrates and fat, 77.6 per cent. 

This by-produci' of the manufacture of hominy consists 
of part of the starchy portion of the corn and part of the 
germ. It is variously known, as the heading suggests, an 
hominy meal, feed, or chop. In many respects it re- 
sembles corn and is a good substitute for it. This feed 
is used chiefly to furnish the energy or heat-making part 
of the ration, but because of its low percentage of pro- 
tein it is not an economical source of the latter. 

Dried Distillers' Grains. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Corn grains: Protein, 22.4 per 
cent ; carbohydrates and fat, 66.5 per cent. Rye grains : 
Protein, 13.6 per cent; carbohydrates and fat, 52.8 per 
cent. 

These grains are the by-produei' of the manufacture of 
alcohol and distilled liquors from corn and rye. Both 
kinds are rather bulky and usually the corn grains are 
among the cheapest sources of protein. These grains are 
not particularly palatable, consequently they should be 
used with other feeds in the grain ration. 

I : Dried Beet Pulp. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Protein, 4.6 per cent; carbo- 
hydrates and fat, 67 per cent. 

Dried beet pulp is a by-product from the manufacture 
of' sugar from the beet. As a source of protein it is not 
of high value, and the farmer should recognize this fact 
when he buys it. It is bulky, however, and has an ex- 
cellent' physiological effect upon the cow, as it aids in 
keeping her digestive organs in good condition. When 
for any reason neither silage nor roots are available, the 
pulp can be soaked for about 12 hours in abont four 
times its weight of water; it then constitutes a good sub- 



76 

stitute for a succulent roughage. Beet pulp should be 
classed as a carbohydrates rather than as a protein feed. 

Molasses. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Protein, 1 per cent; carbo- 
hydrates and fat, 58.2 per cent. 

Molasses, from both the beet and cane sugar factories, 
is valuable as a source of energy or heai'-making material, 
the main difference between the two kinds being that the 
former is more laxative when fed in large quantities 
When fed in small quantities, molasses adds materially 
to the palatability of the ration, but unless it' is very low 
in price it is not usually an economical feed for dairy 
cows. 

Buckwheat Middlings. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Protein, 24.6 per cent; carbo- 
hydrates and fat, 52 per cent. 

This floury feed is composed largely of that part of Ae 
buckwheat kernel under the hull together with some of 
the coarsest of the flour. It is rather heavy and tends to 
produce a tallowy butter if fed in large quantities. In 
certain sections it is one of the cheap sources of protein. 
Frequently bran and chaff are added to the middlings, 
thus greatly reducing their feeding valne. 

OocoANrrr Meal. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Protein, 18.8 per cent; carbo- 
hydrates and fat, 60.2 per cent. 

This meal is the ground cake resulting from the manu- 
facture of cocoanut oil. It is a ratner heavy feed which, 
on account of its high oil content, tends to become rancid 
if kept for long periods in the summer. If it is possible 
to obtain cocoanut meal at a reasonable price it will be 
found to be a valuable addition to the ration. 




Herd of Jersey Dairy Cattle 



78 

Peanut Meal. 

Digestible Nutrients. — Hulled nuts: Protein, 42.8 per 
tent; carbohydrates and fat, 36.6 per cent. With hulls: 
l'rotein, 20.2 per cent; carbohydrates and fat, 38.5 per 
cent. 

This meal is the by-product of t"he manufacture of pea- 
nut oil and varies greatly in composition, depending upon 
the percentage of hulls it contains. It is an excellent 
dairy feed an&in some sections is a cheap source of pro- 
tein. 

Farm Grains. 

Some of the more common grains that are grown upon 
ihe farm will be described briefly below. 

COHN. 

Digestible nutrients. — Corn meal: Protein, 6.9. per cent; 
• arbohydrates and fat. 76.9 per cent. Corn-and-cob: Pro-- 
tcin. 6.1 per cent: carbohydrates and fat, 72 per cent. 

Corn is probably the most common grain grown upon 
the farm and is well adapted to be part of the ration of a 
dairy cow. Corn is palatable, heavy, and one of the best 
and cheapest sources of the energy or heat-making part of 
the ration, but, on account of its low protein content, it 
should riot form the entire grain ration. In order to 
listen up this grain, the cob is often ground with the 
kernel, the resulting meal being called corn-and-cob meal. 
This feed is more bulky and better adapted for mixing 
with heavy grains. 

OATS (GRdlNIH. 

Digestible nutrient*. — Protein, 9.4 per cent; carbohy- 
drates and fat. 60.6 per cent. 

This very palatable cereal is slightly laxative and very 
well adapted for feeding dairy cattle. Owing to the Wgh 
market price of oats, it is usually more economical to sell 
them and purchase other feeds which furnish nutrient* 
at a cheaper price. 



79 

BARLEY. (GROUND). 

Digestible nutrients.— Protein, 9 per cent; carbohy- 
drates and fat, 70.4 per cent. 

This is a palatable feed and one that can be used to 
good advantage as a source of carbohydrates or energy 
material for dairy cows where its price is moderate. Like 
corn, it should not be the only grain in the ration. 

rye (ground) 

Digestible nutrients. — Protein, 9.2 per cent; carbohy 
drntes and fat, TO.'o per cent. 

This grain is not especially palatable and should not 
be used in large quantities, as it tends to produce a hard, 
tallowy butter. Mixed with other feeds, it is often a 
valuable addition to the ration. 

ROL'GHAGK. 

All roughage may be divided for convenience into two 
general classes with reference to its content of protein. 
In the first, or low-protein, class are placed corn silage, 
corn stover, timothy hay, millet hay, prairie hay, hays 
from the common grasses, straws of the various cereals, 
and cottonseed hulls. The second, or high-protein, class 
includes the various legume hays, such as alfalfa, the 
clovers, cowpea, soy bean, and oat and pea. Economy 
in feeding demands that grain should supplement the 
roughage, consequently the grain mixtures will be com- 
pounded to fit the class to which the roughage belongs. 

CoMrouNniNc; a Grain Mixti hk. 

A few simple rules for making np a grain mixture are 
given briefly below: 

1. Make up the mixture to fit the roughage available. 
With roughage entirely of the low-protein class the grain 
should contain approximately from 18 to 22 per cent of 
protein, while with exclusively high-protein roughage the 
grain ration need contain only about 13 to 16 per cent. 




c Cow Peat and Sorghum. 



81 



1. Select "rains that will furnish the various con- 
stituents, especially protein, at the least cost, using 
home-grown grains if possible. 

3. Be sure that the mixture is light and bulky. 

4. Tbe mixture should be palatable. 

5. See that the grain has the proper physiological 
effect upon the cow. 

All these suggestions should be kept in niind in order 
to obtain the best possible combination of grains. For 
the convenience of the feeder Table 5, showing the digesti- 
ble protein content of the more common grains and by- 
products feeds, is given. The per cent columns are ar- 
ranged in 5 per cent divisions. 



Table 5.— Approximate digestible protein of various 
ijrains and by-products. 



AYITllgC 


Average 


Average 


Average 


5 per cent 


10 per cent 


li> per cent 


20 per cent 


(2.5 to 7.4 


(7.5 to 12.4 


(12.5 to 17.4 


( 17.5 to 22.4 


per cent). 


per cent). 


per cent). 


per cent). 


Corn meal. 


Wheat, ground. 


Wheat bran. 


• iluten feed. 


< "urn-und-cob 


Oats, .ground. 


Wheat mid- 


Malt sprouts. 


meal. 


Barley, ground. 


dlings. 


Dried brewers' 


Ilnminy feed. 


Buckwheat, 


Dried distillers" 


grains. 


Pried beet pulp. 


ground. 


grains (rjrei. 


Dried distillers- 




Sorghum grain**, 




grains (corn). 




ground. 




I'oeoanut meal. 
I'eanut meal 
with bulls. 
Cowpeas. 


Average 


Average 


Average 


Average 


26 per sent 


30 per cent. 


35 per cent 


40 per cent. 


(22.5 to 27.4 


(27.5 to 32.4 


(32.5 to S7.4 


(37.5 to 42.4 


per cent). 


per cent). 


per cent). 


per cent). 


Buckwest 


Gluten meal. 


Cottonseed meal. 


Peanut meal 


middlings. 


Linseed meal 
(both pro 
ceases) . 




Ihnlled nutsi. 




Soy beans. 







The per cent of protein in a grain mixture may be 
found as follows: Take any number of parts of any num- 
0— Com.Agr 



82 

ber of feeds in the table, and for each part put down the 
per cent of the column in which it is found. Add these 
numbers and divide the sum by the number of parts. 
Examples : 

1 part wheat bran 15 

1 part cottonseed meal 35 

1 part gluten feed 20 

3 3) 70 



\ 23.3 per cent protein. 




3 parts wheat bran (3x15) 45 

2 parts cottonseed meal (2x35).. 70 
1 part glutten feed (1x20) 20 



6) 135 



22.5 per cent protein. 

The approximate price of a ration per pound of pro- 
tein may be ascertained as follows: Divide the total 
pTice of the mixture by the average protein content as 
derived above. The mixture costing the smallest price 
per pound of protein, other things being equal, is the 
most economical. Unfortunately, other things are never 
exactly equal, for the physiological effect of the grain, 
bulk, and palatability must also be taken into considera- 
tion. Practically all the grain feeds low in protein are 
rich in carbohydrates, but, as already stated, grains are 
purchased primarily for their protein content, as almost 
invariably the carbohydrates can be produced more 
cheaply in the form of corn silage, cornstalks, etc. While 
the above- mentioned method of testing the economy of a 
grain ration is not entirely accurate, it is usually a safe 
method to follow. 



83 

SAMPLES OP GRAIN MIXTURES TO BE FED WITH 
VARIOUS ROUGHAGES. 

WITH LOW-PROTKIN EOUGHAGBS. 

The following grain mixtures are adapted to be fed 
with roughages of the low-protein class, such as corn 
silage, corn stover, timothy, prairie, rowen. or millet hays, 
cottonseed hulls, etc.: 

Mixture 1.— Per cent of digestible protein. 18.4: 

500 pounds com meal. 

400 pounds dried distillers' grains (conn. 

200 pounds gluten feed. 

300 {rounds linseed meal (old process). 
Mixture 2. — Per cent of digestible protein. 19.8: 

100 pounds corn meal. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 pounds linseed meal (old process). 

200 pounds wheat bran. 
Mixture 3.— Per cent of digestible protein. 19.8: 

300 pounds corn meal. 

200 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 pounds dried distillers' grains (corn). 

100 pounds gluten feed. 
Mixture 4. — Per cent of digestible protein, 19.8: 

200 pounds corn-and-cob meal. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 pounds linseed meal (old process). 
Mixture 5. — Per cent of digestible protein. 18.8: 

200 pounds corn meal. 

150 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 pounds gluten feed. 

100 pounds wheat bran. 
Mixture 6.— Per cent of digestible protein, 18.1 : 

200 pounds corn meal. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 



84 

100 pounds oats, ground. 

100 pounds linseed meal (old process). 
Mixture 7.— Per cent of digestible protein, 19.4 : 

400 pounds corn meal. 

200 pounds cottonseed meal. 

300 pounds gluten feed. 

400 pounds dried brewers' grains. 
Mixture 8.— Per cent of digestible protein, 18.3 : 

200 pounds coin meal. 

100 pounds linseed meal (old process). 

150 pounds gluten feed. 

200 pounds dried. brewers' grains. 
Mixture 9.— Per cent of digestible protein, 18.4: 

300 pounds corn-and-cob meal. 

200 pounds cottonseed meal. 
Mixture 10.— Per cent of digestible protein, 19.1: 

200 pounds corn-and-cob meal. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 pounds gluten feed. 

100 pounds buckwheat middlings. 

Mixture 11.— Per cent of digestible protein, 19.1 : 
280 pounds barley. 

200 pounds cottonseed meal. 
100 pounds alfalfa meal. 
100 pounds wheat bran. 

With High-Protein Roi hhaoes. 

With roughage of the high -protein class, such as clover, 
alfalfa, soy beans, i-owpeas. and vetch or other legume 
hay, the following grain mixtures may be used: 

Mixture 12. — Per cent of digestible protein. 14.1: 
400 | m mud com meal. 
100 pounds cottonseed meal. 
100 pounds gluten feed. 
100 pounds wheat bran. 



S3 

Mixture 13.— Per cent of digestible protein, 15.6: 
400 pounds corn meal. 
200 pounds gluteu feed. 
200 pounds linseed meal (old process). 
100 pounds oats, ground. 

Mixture 14. — Per cent of digestible protein. 14.9: 
. 200 pounds corn meal. 

200 pounds gluten feed. 

100 pounds malt sprouts. 

100 pounds wheal' bran. 

Mixture 15. — Per cent of digestible protein, 16.7: 

300 pounds barley. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 pounds alfalfa meal. 

100 pounds wheat bran. 
Mixture 16— Per cent of digestible protein, 13.7 : 

100 pounds barley. 

200 pounds cocoa nut meal. 

100 (>ounds oats, ground. 

100 pounds wheat bran. 
Mixture 17. — Per cent of digestible protein, 15.8: 

300 pounds corn-and-cob meal. 

200 i>on mis gluten feed. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 | Kin 1 1 (Is wheat bran. 
Mixture 18. — Per cent of digestible protein, 15.5: 

100 pounds corn meal. 

100 pounds linseed meal (old process) 

100 pounds oats, ground. 

i 

With Combination of L,o\v ani> Hioh Protein 
Roughages. 

The following grain mixtures are adapted for feeding 
with a combination of the low and high protein classes of 
roughage, such as silage and clover, or other legume bay : 



86 

com stover aud clover, or other legume bay; mixed hay, 
or oat-and-pea hay, etc. : 

Mixture 19. — Per cent of digestible protein, 16.3: 

urn pounds corn meal. 

300 pounds dried distillers' grains' (corn). 

100 pounds gluten feed. 

100 pounds linseed meal (old process). 
Mixture 20. — Per cent of digestible protein, 16.1 : 

300 pounds corn meal. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 pounds linseed meal (old process). 

200 pounds wheat bran. 
Mixture 21. — Per cent of digestible protein, 16.4: 

400 pounds corn meal. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

200 pounds dried distillers' grains (corn). 

100 pounds gluten feed. 

Mixture 22. — Per cent' of digestible protein. 16.7 : 

400 pounds corn meal. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

200 pounds gluten feed. 

200 pounds dried brewers' grains. 

Mixture 23. — Per cent of digestible protein, 16.4 : 

200 pounds corn-and-cob meal. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 
Mixture 24. — Per cent of digestible protein, 16.7 : 

200 pounds corn meal. 

100 pounds peanut meal (with hulls). 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 pounds wheat bran. 
Mixture 25. — Per cem' of digestible protein, 16.4 : 

100 pounds- corn meal. 

100 pounds oats, ground. 

100 pounds cottonseed meal. 

100 pounds wheat bran. 

The above-named mixtures which contain linseed meal 



87 

are particularly adapted for use when no succulence is 
in the ration. 

Rations Suitable for Florida Where Cottonseed Meal la 

of Moderate Price and Cow-pea and Other Hays 

Are Raised on the Farm. 

Pounds. 

(1) Corn silage 35 

, Cowpea hay '. . 8 

Cottonseed meal or oil meal 7 

(2) Corn Silage 30 

( 'ot"tonseed hulls 12 

Cottonseed meal 7 

BALANCED RATIONS FOR DAIRY COW8. 
Bv John M. Scott. 

In the lists of rations given below, home-grown feeds 
are separate from purchased feeds. The amount given in 
each ration is sufficient for one day's feed for a cow 
weighing 1,000 pounds and giving about three gallons of 
milk per day. (Dairy cows in Florida usually weigh 
from 600 to 800 pounds.) For cows giving a heavier flow 
of milk, it will be necessary to increase the amounts of 
feed accordingly. No attempt has been made to estimate 
the cost of these rations, or to say which will be the 
cheapest, as the prices of feeds vary in different places. 
The amounts of each feed being given, it will be an easy 
matter for the dairyman to calculate ilie local cost of the 
different rations and in this way find out which will be 
the cheaptest for him to use. 



88 
Rations of Homk-Cuow w Fi:i:i>s. 

1 1) Velvet beans in the pud 10 pounds 

Japanese cane, cured in shock 1U pounds 

Cowpea hay 8 pound? 

(2) Velvet beans in the pud 10 pounds 

Cottonseed meal 2 pounds 

Japanese cane 12 pounds 

(3) Velvet beans in tlie pod. 8 pounds 

Cowpea hay 10 pounds 

Japanese cane 10 pounds 

(4) Corn 3 pounds 

Velvet beans in the pod 7 pounds 

Cowpea hay 9 pounds 

Japanese cane silage 20 pounds 

(5) Velvet beans in the pod 8 pounds 

Cowpea hay 10 pounds 

Sorghum, green 20 pounds 

(6) Velvet beans in the pod 8 pound*. 

Cowpea hay 8 pounds 

Crabgrass hay 8 pounds 

Sweet potatoes (or cassava) 25 pounds 

The above are well-known home-grown feeds, or feeds 
that can be grown at home. Feeds can be grown more 
cheaply than they can be bought on the market. Tn these 
rations, cowpea hay can be replaced by an equal weight' 
of beggarweed hay, velvet bean hay, or any other good 
legume ha.v. Which of these hays should be used will 
depend largely on the cost of the hay on the market, or 
rather on what it will cost to produce it. One may be so 
situated as to be able to grow beggarweed hay, or velvet 



bean hay. 10 better advantage tban cowpea hay. All of 
the hays in these rations are considered to be of good 
quality, cut at the proper stage of maturity, and properly 
cured. 



Rations of- Pint haskk Fkkps. 

(1) Alfalfa hay 1° Po unds 

Wheat bran , 4 i P onndR 

Shorts H P° mid8 

(2) Alfalfa hay 10 PO«n<'» 

Wtfeat bran 9 pounds 

Crabgrass hay 13 pounds 

(3) Alfalfa hay 10 P° nnd8 

Shorts • P "'" 18 

Crabgrass hay «« V™*** 

(4) Alfalfa hay 1° P° nud8 

Wheat bran « P°" nds 

Beet palp 10 P° nnds 

(5) Wheat bran ft P°» nd8 

Cottonseed meal 3 pounds 

Cottopseed hulls 20 pounds 

- 

(6) Shorts 8 P° nndB 

Cottonseed meal 2$ pounds 

Hay (any non-legume) 15 pounds 

(T) Wheat bran 6 I*»«" ds 

Cottonseed meal , • • • • 2i pounds 

Beet pulp 10 Vmnda 

Timothy hay 7 pounds 

(8) Wheat bran 9 pounds 

Cottonseed meal 3 pounds 

Japanese cane » pounds 



90 

(9) Corn 5 pounds 

Cottonseed meal 2£ pounds 

Cowpea hay 12 pounds 

Silage 30 pounds 

It sbould be understood that the above rations are not 
necessarily to be fed in the exact quantities given above, 
but sbould be modified to suit local conditions or the 
actual conditions on each farm. They are given to show 
approximately the average amounts and character of feed 
that would be consumed daily by a 1, 000-pound steer dur- 
ing the feeding period. 

It is well to feed as near a balanced ration as possible 
without materially increasing its cost. Sometimes the 
prices of available feeds are such that a farmer is justified 
in deviating from the standard. Such conditions are 
illustrated by the use of some of the rations given above. 
The second ration shown for the South is an example, as 
that ration is very narrow, but in certain localities it is 
more profitable than one which is balanced by the use of 
high-priced carbohydrate feeds. 

HriTI.K.M ENTARY FEEDS. 

While silage is au excellent feed, it is - not a complete 
one for dairy stock. It is too bulky and watery and con- 
tains insufficient protein and mineral matter to fully meet 
the requirements of the dairy cow. It shonld be combined 
with some leguminous hay, such as clover, cowpeas, or 
alfalfa. These will tend to correct the deficiencies of the 
silage in dry mati'er, protein, and mineral constituents. 
A ration of silage and. say, alfalfa hay alone is satisfac- 
tory, however, only for cows which are dry or giving only 
a small amount of milk and for heifers and bulls. Cows 
in full milk require some more concentrated feed than 
hay or silage, else they can not consume enough feed to 



IE { 

meet the demands of the bodji The result will be that 
the cows lose in flesh and in m- Ik flow. 

: 

Amount h I Feed. 

i i 

The amount of silage to f etj \ a cow will depend upon 
Vne capacity of the animal to j Ike feed. She should be fed 
as much as she will clean ui.Jwithout waste when con- 
sumed along with her hay anf 'grain. Raise or lower the 
amount until the projter qnari Jry is ascertained. Gener- 
ally speaking, a good cow shoi Jd be fed just short of the 
limh' of her appetite. If she^fcfuses any of her feed it 
should be reduced at once. 1fce small breeds will take 
25 or 30 pounds per day; the! large breeds about 40; and 
the medium-sized ones amounts varying between. 

Rations. 

Ironclad directions for feeding cows can not be given. 
In general, however, they should be supplied with all the 
roughage they will clean up with grain in proportion to 
bntterfat produced. The hay will ordinarily range be- 
tween 5 and 12 pounds per cow per day when fed in con- 
nection with silage. For Holsteins 1 pound of concen- 
trates for each 4 pounds of milk produced will prove 
about right. For Jerseys 1 pound for each 3 pounds of 
milk or less will come nearer meeting the requirements. 
The grain for other breeds will vary between these two 
according to the quality of milk produced. A good rule 
is to feed seven times as much grain as there is bntterfat 
produced. 
The following rations will be found god: 
For a 1,300-poond cow yielding 40 pounds of milk test- 
ing 3.5 per cent : 

Pounds. 

Silage 40 

Clover, Cowpea, or Alfalfa Hay 10 

Grain mixture 10 



92 

For the same cow yielding 20 pounds of 3.5 per cent 
milk: 

Silage 40 

Clover, Cowpea, or Alfalfa Ha v 5 

Grain mixture 5 

For a 900-pound cow yielding 30 pounds of 5 per cent 
milk: 

Silage 30 

Clover, Cowpea, or Alfalfa Hay 10 

Grain mixture 11 



For the same cow yielding 15 pounds of 5 per cent 
milk: 

Silage 30 

Clover, Cowpea, or Alfalfa Hay 8 

Grain mixture 5 

A good grain mixture to be used in a ration which in- 
cludes silage and some sort of leguminous hay is com- 
posed of: 

Parts. 

Corn Chop 4 

Wheat Bran 2 

Linseed-oil Meal or Cottonseed Meal 1 

In case the hay used is not of this kind some of the 
corn chop may be replaced by linseed or cottonseed meal. 
In many instances dried brewers' grains or crushed oats 
may be profitably substituted for the bran. 

Time to Feed. 

The time to feed silage is directly after milling o.- at 
least several hours before milking. If fed im media ttty 
before milking the silage odors may pass- through the 



m 

cow's body into the milk. Besides, the milk may receive 
some taints directly from the stable air. On Hie other 
hand, if feeding is done subsequent to milking the vola- 
tile silage odors will have been thrown off before the next 
milking hour. Silage is usually fed twice a day. 

Many objections have been made to the feeding of sil- 
age; some condenseries even refusing to let their patrons 
use it. These objections are becoming less common, since 
milk from cows fed silage in a proper manner is in no 
way impaired ; besides which there is nothing about sil- 
age that will injure in any way the health of the animals. 

Silauk kob Calves, Bulls, and Dby Cows. 

Calves may be fed silage with safety when they are 
about 3 or 4 months old. It is perhaps of greater im 
portance that the silage be free from mould or decay 
when given to calves than when given to mature stock. 
After the calves are weaned they may be given all the 
silage they will eat up clean. Yearling calves will con- 
sume about one-half as much as mature stock, that is, 
from 15 to 20 pounds a day. When supplemented with 
some good leguminous hay little, if any grain will be re 
quired to keep the calves in a thrifty, growiug condition. 

There is a decided opinion among some breeders of 
dairy stock that a large allowance of silage is detrimen- 
tal to the breeding qualities of the bull. Whether there 
is any scientific foundation for this opinion remains to 
be determined. Pending further investigations, however, 
it is advisable to limit the allowance to about 15 pounds 
of silage a day for each 1.000 pounds of live weight- 
When fed in this amount silage is though 1 to be a good, 
cheap, and safe feed for bulls. It should of course be 
supplemented with hay. and with a small allowance of 
grain also in the case of bulls doing active service or 
growing rapidly. 

Cows when dry will consume almost as much roughage 



94 

as when milking. Milage may well form the principal 
ingredient of Ihe ration, in fact, with 25 to 40 pounds of 
silage and a small supplementary feed of clover, cowpea, 
or alfalfa hay, say 5 or 6 pounds a day, the cows will 
keep in good flesh and even make some gain. Cows in thin 
flesh should receive in addition a small amount of grain. 
Silage will tend to keep the whole system in a state of 
healthy activity and in this way lessen the troubles inci- 
dent to parturition. 

Silage fob Summer Feeding 

One of the most trying seasons of the year for the dairy 
cow is the latter part of the summer and early fall. At 
this season the pastures are often short or dried up, and 
in such cases it is a common mistake of dairymen to let 
their cows drop off in flow of milk through lack of feed. 
Later they find it impossible to restore the milk flow no 
matter how the cows are fed. Good dairy practice de- 
mands ahat the milk flow be maintained at a high point 
all the time from parturition to drying off. It becomes 
necessary, therefore, to supply some feed to take the place 
of the grass. The easiest way to do this is by means of 
silage. Silage is cheaper and decidedly more convenient 
to use than soiling crops. 

The amounts to feed will depend upon the condition of 
ihe pastures, varying all the way from 10 ponnds to a full 
winter feed of 40 pounds. It should be remembered ii> 
this connection that silage contains a low percentage of 
protein, so that the greater the amount of silage fed the 
greater must be the amount of prot'ein in the supplemen- 
tary feeds to properly balance the ration. 

Individual Feeding. 

Different cows have different capacities for converting 
feed into milk. For this reason the above-mentioned rules 



i>5 % 

can serve only as indicators for the inexperienced feeders. 
No man who has not a full appreciation of the wide 
variation in individual cows- will be fully successful as a 
feeder. Some cows may have natural capacity for pro- 
ducing large quantities of milk, and may not receive feed 
enough for maximum production. By increasing the feed 
of the highest-producing cows and carefully consulting 
the milk sheets on which each cow's daily production is 
recorded, the skillful feeder will soon find that some cows 
in the herd will respond to the increased allowance and 
return a good profit on the additional feed given. On the 
other hand, there aie cows that have a limited capacity 
for milk production and are very liable to be overfed. By 
carefuly studying each individual cow the feeder will soon 
ascertain the point beyond which any addition to the 
grain ration becomes unprofitable. 

Watbr fob Cows. 

All animals require plenty of good, pure water. This 
is especially true of the milking cow, as water consti- 
tutes more than three-fourths of the t'otal volume of milk. 
The water supply, therefore, demands the dairyman V 
most careful attention. Stale or impure water is dis- 
tasteful to the cow and she will not drink enough for 
maximum milk prductlon. Such water may also carry 
disease germs which might make the milk unsafe for 
human consumption or be dangerous to the cow herself.. 
During the winter, when cows' are stabled the greater 
part of the time, they should be watered two or three 
times a day unless arrangements have been made fo keep 
water before them at all times. The water should, if pos- 
sible, be 15° or 20° above the freezing point, and should 
be supplied at practically the same temperature every 
day. When water well above freezing temperature is 
stored in tanks and piped directly to the cow, there is 
probably little occasion for facilities to warm it. When 



ii stand* iu ji tank on which ice often forms, it usually 
pays weti to warm it slightly. This can be done by a 
tank beater, by live steam, or by hot wai'er from a boiler, 
ff a boiler is used for running a separator or for heat- 
ing water to wash and sterilize utensils, steam from 
it can readily and cheaply he used to warm the water. 

Salt. 

Salt is required by all animals. The dairy cow requires 
an ounce or more a day, and while she should be given 
all she needs, she should not be forced to take more flian 
she wants. It is best, therefore, to give only a small 
quantity on the feed, and to place rock salt in boxes in 
the yard where she can lick it at will. 

- 
SOU. EROSION. AN IMPORTANT MATTER 

In this connection we wish to bring to the farmer's at- 
tention a condition that is growing serious in the more 
rolling lands of the State, and is wasting at a high rate 
the fertility of these lands. We mean soil erosion. 

Soil washing by heavy rains is a cause of the loss of 
soil fertility on rolling upland farms. The amount of 
tli is loss is difficult to determine accurately. But it is 
reasonably certain that as much as four to five ]ier cent, 
of the real fertile soil may be lost during one year on 
even a gently sloping field if the surface is left bare of 
vegetation. This means that the continuous cultivation 
for a long period of time may result in the loss of prac- 
tically all the fertile soil on even gently rolling land, 
unless some methods are adopted to prevent it. On hill 
lands the loss is necessarily much more rapid. 

The element lost in this way is one of the most valu- 
able that exists — nitrogen. This element in the soil is 
contained in the organic or vegetable matter. Nitrogen 
is made available for the use of plants by the decay of 



97 

organic matter. It is considered that about two per cent, 
of the total amount present becomes available each year. 
It is this two per cent, which may be removed by the 
crops, by leaching, and in the form of gas, by evapora- 
tion. As the availability of the other elements of plant 
food in the soil is closely associated with the decay of 
organic matter, it is certain that the washing away of 
that part of the soil richest in organic matter results in 
a lack of all the really valuable plant food. In addition 
to the loss of plant food, the poorer physical condition 
of the soil resulting from the removal of organic matter 
and the inconvenience caused by the necessity for ditches 
in the fields are to be considered. 

The sort of farm work that causes excessive erosion is 
continuous cultivation without crop rotation, shallow 
plowing, running furrows down the hills, leaving the 
laud bare Of vegetation in winter, neglect of control of 
the gullies, and the exhaustion of organic matter. 

The best way to control erosion is by systematic ro- 
tation of crops, containing fewer cultivated crops and 
more hay and pasture crops, by the gradual deepening of 
the soil, by occasional deep plowing, the use of barn 
yard and green manures, winter cover crops such as rye. 
oats and wheat, and prompt control of gullies and 
ditches. 

Cultivate the level lands and plant the hillsides to 
pasture grasses for |>ermauent pastures, and thus re- 
claim the worn-out hill lands. 

As lauds increase in value, reclamation becomes profit 
able. Steep, badly washed hillsides may. be also set i'o 
forest trees. Small ditches may be filled with litter and 
soil and seeded down to grass. Large ditches may be 
filled by obstructing wllh brush and coarse litter staked 
and weighted down, by planting willows, or placing some 
form of obstruction in I'he gullies, which will in time aid 
in filling them and gradually restore these soils to use- 
ful fields. Our people mnst realize that neglect in this 

7 — Com. Apr. 



1 



98 

matter means positive i-uin to the laud itself. They must 
also realize that the soil is the one most valuable natural 
resources of any country. From this source, directly or 
indirectly, we derive all that we have, use or subsist upon. 
In fact, the soil may justly be considered tbe bedrock of 
civilization itself. Thus considered it becomes as neces- 
sary to existence as the air we breathe or Vhe water we 
drink. Then the case of the soil and the prevention of 
its destruction is one of the most important features 
connected with farm management. It is a vn'al subject 
to continued prosperity and the maintenance of farm 
land values. No owner of lands can afford to ignore its 
importance. 

WHEAT) IN FLORIDA. 

By H. S. Elliot, Chief Clerk Department of Agriculture. 

That wheat can be successfully grown in Florida, there 
is no doubt. The early settlers in Florida grew their 
own wheat and made their own flour. True, the mills 
used in those days were of vastly different type from the 
present, but the qnality of the flour was equally as nutri- 
tions and wholesome, if not more so, than the new process 
flours of today. We consider that the growing of wheat 
in Florida, owing to the condition of the times and the 
demand for breadsfnffs by the allied powers, is prac- 
tically a necessity, and that Florida in common with 
other States should live within herself as nearly as pos- 
sible. In fact, it is a patriotic duty, which the people of 
our State owe to our country and the cause we are en- 
gaged in defending, fo grow every kind of food products 
that are necessary not only to maintain the people at 
home, but to supply our quota of foodstuffs to the armies 
in the field. Wheat can be grown in Florida from the north 
central portion of the Sfate, northeast and west to the 
Perdido River. Most of the land in the region named 
will produce one or more of the varieties of wheat adapted 







The Biggest H09 Ever Raised In Florida. Weight 1,326 Pounde 



100 

to southern conditions. Wheat is the world's choicest 
bread crop and the source of one of the principal foods 
of the most progressive and intelligent peoples and na- 
tions- of the world. The only other crop that approaches 
it in food value, and that is grown to any extent, is rice. 
With these conditions before us we feel justified in sug- 
gesting that all farmers who can, and whose lands are 
adapi'ed, in whole or in part, to wheat growing, plant at 
least enough for home consumption. A few acres planted 
by each farmer will give him all of the flour that he needs 
throughout the year. If each farmer in Florida, of the 
ordinary size farm, should plant from three to five acres 
to wheat, he would find it the most profitable crop that* 
he could plant. In doing this, if he does no more, it 
would set free many hundred thousands of bushels of 
wheat for war consumption. We suggest the following 
varieties as being adapted to Florida soils : Blue Stem. 
Red May, Georgia Bed and Leap's Prolific. Of tliese, the 
Blue Stem, a smooth-headed wheat, is well adapted to 
the better quality of sandy loam soils of Florida;- like 
wise, the Red May wheat. The Georgia Bed and Leap's 
Prolific do best on the clay loam soils. Any of the 
varieties mentioned will do well on the better gradations 
of fhe soils mentioned above. 

SOILS. — Light fertile clay and medium fertile sandy 
loams of good depth, and well drained, are the best lands 
for wheat culture. Heavy clays are too close in texture 
and liable to bake under certain conditions. But light 
clay loam and good sandy loams have about the proper 
consistency or degree of compactness necessary fo retain 
moisture, and are better adapted to wheat cultivation 
than the. heavier clays or lighter loams. Good drainage 
is necessary to the proper development of the wheal 
plant, and a medium porous, permeable sub-soil is also 
important" during most of the growing period of wheat. 
A great deal depends on the soil as regards the yield as 
well as the quality of the grain. Deep plowing is not 



101 

necessary to the successful growing of wheat. In break- 
ing land that has not been in cultivation the year pre- 
vious, six to ten inches, depending upon conditions of 
ilie soil, will be about correct. If it is stnbble land that is 
to be planted in wheat, it need not be broken with a turn 
plow. If in the first instance the land is well broken, then 
harrowed cross-wise with a disk, and later with a straight- 
toothed smoothing harrow, a good seed bed will be 
obi'ained. If it is stubble land, such as corn laud, cow 
peas or velvet beans, where the crop has been cut off for 
hay, the soil will need no turning, but the planting can 
be equally as well done by preparing the land with a 
heavy disk; then if the wheat is to be sown broadcast 
it can be sown on the disked soil and harrowed in with 
a straight-t'oothed harrow. The best way of planting 
wheat, however, is with a drill, which opens the furrows, 
drops the seed, covers and rolls it with one operation. 
In preparing the land, however, the surface should be 
left clean without sticks or weeds left lying on the 
ground, which would interfere with the handling of tfhe 
harvest machinery. In the case of fallow lands, it should 
be well broken early in the fall, or in Florida in the late 
summer, from three weeks to a month, at least, before the 
wheat is to be planted. One thing to remember is that 
it will be a waste of both time and seed to neglect a 
proper preparation of the soil. A good seed bed is half 
the battle. 

The time for sowing wheat in Florida of course de- 
pends upon the section of the State where it is to be 
grown. In Northern and Western Florida the best time 
would be from about the middle of October to the middle 
of November. In Southern Florida the best time would 
be about the first of November to December. There can 
be no fixing of positive dates in this matter, and the 
grower will have to use his discretion as to the time best 
suited for planting. 

FERTILIZING. — The best form of manuring for 



14*2 

wheat, and in general the best kind of manure adapted 
to wheat growing, is farm lot or stable manure, but if 
this kind of manure ia applied it should be under the 
crop preceding the sowing of the wheat. If commercial 
fertilizers are to be relied on, then it is best to apply that 
broadcast, and later, if there is barn yard manure to 
spare, that can be applied as to a top dressing. Manures 
containing too much nitrogen should not be used. A good 
formula for this purpose is, and one that is generally 
recommended by most growers, on the character of soils 
we have in Florida, a mixture analyzing about three and 
one-half per cent nitrogen, len to twelve per cent of 
available phosphoric acid, and about four per cent potash. 
to be followed in the spring, when the wheat indicates 
a swelling of the upper portion of the plants prior to 
heading, with nitrate of soda. This will be about four 
weeks before the plant heads. The application of about 
100 to 150 pounds of nitrate of soda per acre will add 
greatly to the yield of grain. If the laud has been well 
cultivated and kept in a reasonably fertile condition, es- 
pecially manures, like stable manure, that contain a con- 
siderable amount of humus, then the following formula 
would be an excellent one in producing a good yield : Acid 
phosphate, 350 pounds sulphate of ammonia, 130 pounds; 
muriate of potash, 90 pounds ; mixed and used on one acre. 
This also should be followed in the spring as above sug- 
gested with about 100 pounds of nitrate of soda broadcast. 
This is rather on tbe intensive system of manuring, but it 
will pay well. Some soils under certain conditions will be 
much benefited by the application of well slacked lime. 
From 25 to 40 bushels per acre on poor land, and es- 
pecially the thin clay land, will have a good effect. Its 
benefit consists in loosening up the clay .lands, making 
them more friable, of easier cultivation, and sets free the 
potash in the clay for the use of the plants. 

These brief descriptions and instructions are intended 
more for those who have not planted w,heat on their 




50 Hogs Slaughtered at One Time on 8tate Farm at Raiford, December 6, 1918. Average Net Weight, 202 Pounda Each. 



104 

farms. The average, older and expert farmer will easily 
understand the best methods of growing grain crops. 
There is much similarity in the methods used in growing 
wheat, oats and rye. The same fundemental principles 
underlie the characteristics of each of these crops and 
the methods 'of their cultivation. In closing this, the 
Department of Agriculture urges the people whose lands 
are adapted to wheat raising in Florida to plant the 
acreage that they can handle best. 



GROWING RYE IN FLORIDA. 
By H. S. Elliot, Chief Clerk Department of Agriculture. 

Soils Beat Adapted to Rye: 

Rye is one of the most important cover crops grown in 
the State, although planted in a small way. Its real value 
as a grazing crop, as well as a cover crop, does not seem 
to have been appreciated as it deserves. Rye can be grown 
on almost all of the well-drained soils of the State, 
especially those in the North-Central, Northeastern and 
Middle and Western sections of Florida. It is best 
adapted to the lighter loam or sandy soils than to the 
heavy clay lands, and it yields best and produces the best 
quality of grain on well-drained sandy loam soils that 
contain a fair supply of lime. It is not limited, however, 
to such conditions, and it does about as well on acid soils 
of neutral soils, and is possibly the best grain for planting 
on sandy lands, which aTe rough and to a considerable 
extent exposed to the cold of winter. It is alBo better 
adapted to sandy and poorer classes of lands than wheat 
and will stand a much greater amount of acidity in the 
soil than either wheat, oats or barley. It is also 
especially good for drained marsh lands and also for cut- 
over lands, which are being brought under cultivation for 



105 

the first time. Rye should be generally the first crop 
grown on this character of lands, and it may be grown 
witb equal success on other sandy soils where most cereals 
fail to succeed, but the growing of rye should not be 
attempted on lands that are subject to overflow or where 
water may come or stand for any length of time. If too 
rich in nitrogen or too much on the order of muck lands, 
it is likely to cause the rye when grown to fall down, or 
in other words, to lodge. Neither does rye grow so well 
on wet lands, but in dryer soils it is much more resistent 
to cold tban wheat or oats. If the land is made too rich, 
however, this condition is reversed. 
Rye in Rotation: 

Rye, like all other farm crops, does best when planted 
in rotation, although it can be grown year after year on 
the same land with as great degree of success, if not 
more so, than most small grain crops. This is because few 
diseases that affect this plant are found in the soil. In 
many cases rye is grown in place of wheat, and there are 
many people in the world who prefer rye flour anil liread 
to wheat flour or wheat bread. Rye also takes less from 
the soil than most of the small grain, unless it be rice, 
though the difference is slight in any case. One of the 
best rotations is to follow other crops with rye. For 
instance, rye can be sown in the corn field after the corn 
has been gathered, and in this case where the soil ha! been 
baked it is best to plow the rye in. The better plan is to 
use a disk plow and not a turn plow, and follow this by 
a straight tooth harrow slanted carefully and properly. 
In this way labor is saved by harrowing in the grain, 
which is a quicker and more practical way than by plow- 
ing in under the ordinary conditions. In disking, the 
grain in the standing corn utalks will be leveled by the 
time the grain is ready for harvest ; if it is to be harvested, 
the corn stalks will have decayed to such an extent, at 
least, that they will not be in the way of the harvest 
machinery. If it is only intended for grazing, and in 



10G 

the early Spring and turning under as a green manure 
crop, should some of the stalks be left standing under 
these conditions, they will not be in the way. 
Varieties: 

For Florida, in the sections previously mentioned, there 
are really only two varieties that can be depended on. 
These varieties are the Ebruzzes and the South Georgia. 
I'nder some circumstances the Ebruzzes seems to be the 
best, and under other circumstances the South Georgia 
appears to give best, results, but like most grains these 
also are subject to fluctuations in growth, depending on 
more favorable location in the one case or in the other. 
The South Georgia rye, in soils best adapted to its growth, 
grows perhaps a little taller than the Ebruzzes, but both 
are excellent ryes and can be depended on. One advan- 
tage of the rye crop is that it can be, and is often used 
to fill gaps between other crops. It can be sown at most 
any time, early or late fall, on lauds that are either rough 
or well placed, and it will nearly always take care of 
itself, and make a good growth, which cannot be said of 
any other grain under like conditions. It is also a good 
crop to grow on hillsides or on lands that are threatened 
with washing, and to this extent it is one of the best crops 
that can be planted. It is an excellent preventer of soil 
erosion, as it prevents the washing of the soil and the 
debris down into the valleys, thus holding the soil in 
place. After the rye has grown to practical maturity, 
and especially while in the milk stage, it makes an ex- 
cellent hay if cut at that time and properly cured. It 
can also be made a good pasture for hogs, and after the 
hogs have eaten down the grain then the crop can be 
turned under for manurial purposes. For these purposes 
it is one of the best winter crops that can lie grown. Hogs 
will harvest the crop and benefit the soil by the dropping 
of manure in so doing. Rye is also considered a better 
crop for Fall, Winter and Spring pasture than either 



T 



107 

wheat or oats. It does not affect cattle to the extent that 
oats and wheat does, and it makes a better crop to turn 
under for green mannrial purposes. 
Preparing Seed Bed: 

While in most eases rye does better than any of the 
other cereals on poorly prepared soil, it is not a good 
reason for neglecting the proper preparation of the soil. 
As the expenses of preparing the soil is very slight and 
will not be noticed to any appreciable extent, this will be 
greatly repaid by a much larger yield of grain. The land 
should be plowed, as a rule, from five to seven inches 
deep, and it should be done from three to four weeks 
before planting the seed, if possible. After the land is 
plowed, it should be well harrowed and made level and 
as smooth as possible, then allow it to stand for a few 
days. When rye is to follow a cultivated crop it is best 
to plow the land three or four inches deep and harrow it 
well so as to eliminate as much of the grass and weeds 
as possible. This of course puts the land in better con- 
dition. This process can be carried out best by the use 
of the disk and- a straight-toothed harrow. As before 
stated, cowpea land or corn-stubble land can usually be 
planted to rye by simply disking and harrowing. It then 
can be covered, if so desired, by a wide shovel plow run- 
ning bei'ween the rows of the cowpeas or the corn stubble 
as the case may be. On land that has been properly 
broken other than corn or stubble land rye may be sown 
broadcast, but the better way to plant all grain, whether 
it be rye, wheat, oats or barley, is by drilling with the 
machine. This machine opens the furrow, sows ilie seed 
and covers it with one operation. If sown broadcast it 
should be disked in and the land well harrowed, which 
will give a smooth seed bed. 
Fertilizers : 

Although rye will grow well on very poor soil, com- 
paratively speaking, large yields of the forage or the 
grain cannot be expected on these soils, neither will rye 



108 

succeed well on very rich soils. If grown for green pro- 
duction the land should only be moderately fertilized, 
nor should these fertilizers contain a too large quantity 
of nitrogen. This would make the crop top-heavy and 
liable to fall when the winds blow. . Stable manure is 
the best fertilizer for rye. but acid phosphate should gen- 
erally be applied witli it. It is best to mix forty to fifty 
I umiids of acid phosphate to each ton of stable manure, 
into a form of compost. In this way each of the ingre- 
dients is better and more evenly distributed. There 
should be a mixture of this kind of two to four tons 
applied to the acre. If commercial fertilizer only is avail- 
able, it would be well to apply acid phosphate at the rate 
of about two to three hundred pounds per acre at the 
time the crop is sown, and this can be harrowed in with 
the seed. Cotton seed meal may also be used, but with 
that there is a liability of getting too ranch nitrogen, but 
this should be applied from two to three weeks before the 
grain is sown. If the rye is grown for pasturage or soil 
purposes, or for tlie straw that is in it, then a greater 
quantity of nitrogen-bearing compound could be applied 
in the fertilizer, but not otherwise, as it would cause the 
grain to fall or lodge. To obtain the best stand it is- best 
to re-clean the seed before it is sown. Rye otten loses its 
germinating power, and when this is the case the grain 
becomes light and can be separated by putting through a 
wind mill. Even then the seed should be tested for germi- 
nation. The best thing for sowing of rye depends on the 
use t'o be made, of the crop. When intended for green pro 
duction, it is best to' sow it about October 1st in Florida 
in the Norhtern part and November in the North-Central 
portion of the State. It is intended as a pasrtire cover 
or green manure crop, or for combination purposes, it is 
best to sow it from two to three weeks earlier, because 
this gives it a longer season of growth for these several 
purposes. The rule for the sowing of rye in Florida 
would be to sow h' early enough in each section of the 



109 

Slate so that the roots may become well established be- 
fore frost or cool weather sets in. After the roots are 
established rye will stand almost any degree of cold 
known in Florida. When rye is harvested, if the grain 
is to be saved, it' can be bound in bundles and shocks, the 
same as wheat, and can be threshed in the same threshing 
machine that is used for threshing wheat. The usual 
quantity to sow per acre is about six pecks; or in other 
words, one bushel and a half. On the sandy loam soils 
best adapted to rye, from three to six pecks will meet' the 
requirements. When sown |jjr forage or soil purposes, 
then more seed can be sownj" because of the purpose for 
which the rye is to be used ; in other words, it makes more 
grazing to the acre. As has.^een indicated in the begin- 
ning, rye is one of the best^cover and soil crops, as well 
as for pasturage, thai the Florida farmer can plant. It 
is possibly the best corp of the kind for winter, even 
better than rape, because of Ks root system and its ability 
to prevent soil erosion,' as well as supplying a large quan- 
tity for pasturage, at a season when green food is scarce 
for live stock. Every farmer that is interested in the 
growing of live stock should make it a point to grow 
a certain acreage of rye for winter pasturage. Let the 
acreage be in proportion to the number of head of live 
stock to be pastured; in this way he will protect his soil 
in the winter and benefit' it as well. 

Oats ix Fi.oriha. 

By H. 8. Elliot. Chief Clerk Department Agriculture. 

No farmer should fail to plant this, the most valuable 
of all feed crops; he can hardly plant too largely, as oats 
are among the best and safest of all feeds for farm work- 
ing animals, even better than corn as a single feed 
ration, as they never produce sickness as corn does. Of 
course, oats and corn in proper portion are a safer and 







Herd of Pig», Raiford 8tate Farm. 



Ill 

far better feed in combination than singly, and every 
farmer should always strive to make enough to carry his 
stock through from season to season. It saves making 
large quantities of other forage not near its equal in feed- 
ing value and much more expensive to produce. 

Feed your oats mostly in the sheaf, and your stock 
will eat the greatest part of the straw, but you should 
arrange to feed your oats and corn in combination the 
year round ; but plant oats. 

In this way you can make more feed to the acre of land 
than you possibly can on the same acre, no matter what 
crop you plant on it. You can make it at smaller cost 
aud less work with greater certainty of a good yield than 
any other. It grows in the winter season when nothing 
else will, and it requires no cultivation. In this respect 
il excels corn, and no budworm and weeds are waiting 
ever ready to destroy it. Oats are easy to plant and 
easy to grow. Oats and vetch go well together in Florida. 
Together they will give you a splendid forage crop in the 
Spring. - •CowpeaB and velvet beans both will do well after 
oats, or you can follow with corn, or potatoes. But plant 
oats, and get the recleaned. Fnlghum, Appier, Burt. Ban- 
croft, Hundred Bushel, or some other rust-proof variety. 
Oats is a crop that every progressive up-to-date, real 
farmer should grow, specially the farmer who does most 
of his own work. It is equally as good for the farmer 
who can grow a thousand or more acres, it is a crop that 
"can be planted and harvested by hand or with machinery. 
Grow oats and live stock, for between •fhe two they 
will build up your lands, put money in your pocket and 
contentment and happiness in your homes. Therefore 
do not forget that oats is one of the two greatest food 
and feed-producing crops in the world, therefore one of 
the mosf profitable. 

There is no special method necessary in planting oats, 
except that the better the preparation of the seed bed. the 
better will be the crop. If your lands have been recentlv 



11-2 

ml t hated — say in potatoes or some such crop — or where 
cowpeas or velvet beans or other legumes have beeu 
growu and there has been a thorough cleaning up of 
sticks aud brush of all kinds, a disking of the land one 
way will be sufficient. 

The oats theu can be sown on good land at the rate 
of a bushel and a peck an acre; or, if the land is rather 
thin, a bushel, and a half to three-quarters per acre. Then 
luin under with a disk harrow across the previous way 
of the harrowing, and finally smooth the surface all down 
with a slanting, straight -tooth harrow. This will make 
the surface of your seed-bed smooth and you will have no 
difficulty in harvesting your crop. 

If the lands have not been previously cultivated then 
the first tiling is to plow them up well with the turn 
plow. After this the disk harrow and other methods 
as prescribed above. 

Should you have to fertilize the soil, a good manure 
under the circumstances would be about 400 pounds of 
acid phosphate — high grade — to the acre, with about 50 
pounds of nitrate of soda -thoroughly mixed with the acid 
phosphate 

Next Spring when the oats are growing up well and 
are beginning to show signs of swelling then sow broad- 
cast 100 pounds of nitrate of soda per acre — this will 
add at least one-third to your crop. 

While you are growing grain of this kind, when yon re- 
move the oats, why not follow wiili a rice crop? This is 
one of the best and most profitable grain crops that can 
be grown in Florida, and is well adapted to the lands in 
all sections of the State. Grow some. 

Other Vai.i able Winter Crops 

There are numbers of valuable grazing erope that 
should be planted by every farmer for pasture purposes 
in wim'er time; among these are barley, rape and vetch. 
They should be planted singly for the pasturing of hogs. 



113 

pigs and calves, or they can be combined into a mix- 
ture sown all together — either way is good. 

The combination is especially good, as it gives the ani- 
mals that graze on it a variety of plants to choose which- 
ever they most desire. The past'ure mixture comprising 
barley, rye, rape, vetch, wheat, or oats in equal parts 
makes a most valuable mixture for pasture purposes. But 
if not convenient to the farmer any one of these can 




Herd of Pigs, State Farm, Raiford. 



be planted in the sized patches, or areas to suit Che re 
quirements. All are good and every farmer should, util 
ize these plants to a greater or less extent 

It will help materially to grow the foliage snpplie 
through the winter, and h' will be of great benefit tc 
the live stock. In addition to this it is well not to for 
get to plant root crops as largely as can be provided 
for; turnips, rutabagas, beets, collards are all good for 
poultry, calves and milk stock — likewise pigs. 

In addition for the farm table or market, we suggest 
that you grow cabbage, onions, lettuce and in the proper 

8— Com.Afcr. 



114 

seasons Irish potatoes; all of these will cut down store 
bills and go a long way to supplying the family need 
with nutritious and palatable and healthful food. It is 
surprising to what extent grocery bills can be reduced 
by giving good attention to the gardening end of the 
farm in the Spring and early Summer. 

Irish potatoes this Fall in the North and West have 
been a poor crop and the chances are that this crop 
will be in great demand before Florida can get' her crop 
on the market next Spring. We, therefore, believe it 
would pay to plant a moderate acreage of Irish pota- 
toes. 

Do not forget to plant a good acreage of sugar cane 
or sorghum or both; but be sure to plant one or the 
oiler. 



GROWING ONIONS IN FLORIDA. 

By H. S. Elliot, Chief Clerk Department Agriculture. 

This is one of the best crops to plant in Florida for 
foreign markets as well as home markets, although it is 
also considered by many writers on agricultural subjects 
to be one of the most difficult crops to grow. But this is 
questionable. Of course it has its drawbacks, the prin- 
cipal one of which is having to weed it carefully several 
times, but if the plants are first grown in seed beds and 
then transplanted after attaining the height of five to six 
inches, using good, well-rotted lot manure, as also com- 
mercial fertilizers, when yon transplant them, weeding 
and cultivating will not be needed so often, and in that 
way much labor will be saved. A good many growers 
complain of the cost and trouble of transplanting them, 
but we believe that the bulk of experience shows that it 
does not cost any more to transplant the plants than it 
does to thin them out and weed them. Anothr-r fact in 



116 

connection with this is, that with most root plants the 
yield is better from being transplanted than by growing 
from seed direct. There is one great advantage that the 
onion has and why it is suited to Florida soil in general 
being adapted to the successful growth in all sections of 
the State, cold weather does not often damage them. The 
principal variety of onions grown in Florida is the Ber- 
muda. These are raised from seed grown in Teneriffe. 
The Bermuda onion is considered the best adapted of any 
other variety to Florida, and is one that we advise all 
those who wish to grow onions to plant. Bermuda onion 
growing in Florida is no new industry. They have been 
grown in this State and shipped to northern markets 
since in the early eighties, but the demand for them has 
never been so great until in quite recent years, and is 
greater today by far than ever. 

PLANTING. — Seed may be planted at any time from 
the middle of August to about the first of January, de- 
pending of course, upon the section of the State in which 
the grower lives or farms, and you can either plant the 
seed in the field where you wish the plant to grow, or you 
can plant them in seed beds. Planted in beds, the amount 
of seed required will be less than where planted in the 
drill to be thinned out. In the bed it will require from 
four to five pounds to the acre. In the drill in the field 
it will require from one-half to one pound additional. 

8EED BEDS. — In order to raise the best crops it is 
necessary, of course, to have good thrifty plants. That 
means that the seed beds shall be properly prepared, and 
to obtain this condition it is well to bestow extra care 
on its preparation. The land best adopted in making the 
seed beds is that which has not been under cultivation 
for from two to three years, and on which a crop of 
leguminous plants, either cow peas or velvet beans, were 
grown the previous year. Construct your beds in a con- 
venient and protected location, where they can receive 
prompt attention if necessary. It is also good to scatter 



117 

thickly over the beds, some ten days or two weeks before 
arranging to plant the seed, a heavy dressing of hard- 
wood ashes, and Take them into the soils of the beds. Make 
the beds jnst about wide enough to reach across con- 
veniently from either side when sowing the seed or weed- 
ing the bed. Make the drills in which you sow the seeds 
cross-wise of the bed and about six inches apart. Four 
feet is a good width for the beds, because you can reach 
at least half way across from either side of the bed. You 
will find it also a good plan, when first making up the 
beds to apply a moderate quantity of a good commercial 
fertilizer in the soil, so that it will thoroughly mix in 
the soil during future preparation. When you have sown 
the seed, planting them about three-quarters to an inch 
iu depth, press down the dirt over the seed. One of the 
best tools for this purpose is a light roller. We make 
this suggestion because, when the seeds begin to germi- 
nate the plant is very tender, and should the Tays of the 
sun be hot or the season dry, the germ or young plant 
would be killed by the heat. Another suggestion we have 
found to be good as a great protection against either the 
sun or the rain, is to stretch cheese cloth lengthwise over 
the beds. This will protect them against both sun and 
excessive rains. It also conserves moisture, which will 
have to be applied in dry seasons. The cheese cloth can 
be supported by small stakes to which the cloth can be 
tied anywhere from 8 to 12 inches above the seed bed. 
When the plants have attained about six inches in height 
they are ready for transplanting to the field, or if the 
seed was sown in the field they are ready for thinning 
and for their first cultivation. 

TRANSPLANTING AND CULTIVATION.— The land 
where the plants are to be planted should be broken and 
thoroughly prepared, from four to six weeks prior to 
transplanting. In about three weeks before the trans- 
planting to the field the fertilizers for the field should 
be applied. If chemical manures are to be used, if should 



118 

be sown broadcast, and harrowed in with a light disk 
harrow, and -then re-harrowed with a slanting toothed 
harrow. If possible, about one ton of good commercial 
fertilizers should be applied to the field as suggested 
above. The formula should be about as follows: Am- 
monia, six per cent; available phosphoric acid, five per 
cent; and muriate of potash or sulphate, from eight' to 
ten per cent — all broadcasted and harrowed in, in the 
manner above suggested. In planting the field the rows 
should be about from fifteen to twenty inches apart, and 
the plants should be set in itie row from six to eight 
inches apart. Be careful in cultivating the onions, as 
their roots are shallow or near the surface, and deep cul- 
tivation would destroy the root system and retard the 
growth of the plants. During t'he period of their growth 
onions to do their best should have at least two applica- 
tions of nitrate of soda. The last one should be applied 
about the time the bulbs are getting into good shape. This 
will carry them tlirough until they are matured. The 
varieties that we suggest as the most profitable to Florida 
growers' are about as follows: The Crystal Wax, which 
is pure white, and the ordinary white, which is to some 
extent a straw color: it is called white, but i( is not en- 
tirely so. The Red Bermuda also is a very hardy and 
thrifty and fine onion, and except for the color is the 
equal of either of the others. Three other varieties that 
succeed remarkably well in Florida are the Creole, ilie 
Yellow Globe, and Prize Taker. 

MATURITY — As soon as the onion tops begin to turn 
yellow and dry up, the corp can be considered matured. 
This is usually from the middle of April to the middle of 
May. depending upon the section of the State in which 
they are grown. In the far South they have been placed 
on the market as early as ihe first of April, but generally 
the marketing period is within the date first above men- 
tioned. Bermuda onions, or all of those considered here- 
in, are tender and should be handled carefully in the prep- 



. i 




Tobacco Field in Gadaden County. 



120 

aration for market. They should only be pulled when 
the weather is good, if it can be so arranged. When they 
are pulled, which is the only proper way to gather t'hem, 
they should be left long enough, if the weather permits, 
to dry out. If left in piles for a day or so, they will be 
in good shape for trimming preparatory to packing and 
shipping. In trimming them the tops can be best re- 
moved by clipping with a pair of scissors or shears, not? 
too close to the bulb. Our advice at the present time to 
truckers and others to grow onions is based upon the 
demand, not only arising in this country, owing to war 
necessities, but for shipment abroad as a part of tue sup- 
plies which are needed by the United States Government. 
The indications are that the good prices now existing will 
be maintained. 

GROWING BROOM CORN IN FLORIDA. 

(Andropogan Sorghum Yuigore.) 

By H. 8. Elliot, Chief Clerk Department Agriculture. 

Broom corn, as is well known, resembles Borghum in 
appearance, both plants being varieties of lie same spe- 
cies. The culture of the two plants has much in common. 
Broom corn usually grows 8 to 12 feet high, though the 
dwarf variety attains only half that height. The chief 
economic difference between broom corn and other varie- 
ties of sorghum consists in the greater length, strength 
and straightness of the fine stems composing the head, or 
panicle, and supporting the seeds. T\e longer, straighter 
and tougher these stems or straws and the greener their 
color after curing, the higher the price the produci' com- 
mands. The variety, the character of the soil and sea- 
son, and thickness of planting, influence these quali- 
ties. 



121 

Vabieties. 

The different varieties of broom corn afford dissimilar 
products. The dwarf variety produces the short brush 
used in the manufacture of small brooms and whisks. It? 
is somewhat difficult to harvest and is cultivated only to 
a limited extent. Of the large variety, the Evergreen, 
known as the Missouri or Tennessee Evergreen, has given 
general satisfaction. The Mohawk is regarded as the 
earliest, but as affording a smaller yield. There is some 
advantage in planting more than one variety and at sev- 
eral different dates so as to extend through a long sea- 
son the time of harvesting. At a number of the Experi- 
ment Stations the Evergreen proved the best of several 
varieties tested, and was much improved by the selec- 
tion of seed ihrough several years, the brush becoming 
longer, stronger, straighter and brighter. In the field 
from which seed was selected the inferior heads were cut 
away before shedding their pollen, and thus kept from 
crossing with the more valuable heads. 

Climate, Soil and Mancbino. 

A climate suitable for Indian corn is also adapted to 
the growth of the broom corn plant'. Dry weather at 
harvesting time is a favorable climatic condition. A 
well-drained, rich, sandy or gravelly loam soil such as 
will produce a heavy yield of Indian corn, and is as free 
as possible from weeds, is best for broom corn. If the 
soil is not fertile it should be liberally manured. Pine, 
thoroughly rotted barn-yard manure, and other nitro- 
genous fertilizers may be used with advantage, prefera- 
bly in the rows or drills, in order to hasten the growth 
of the young plants which are usually small and delicate. 
In general it may be said that the system of manuring 
followed should be practically the same as that found best 
adapted to corn in the same locality, and will depend 
largely upon the character of the soil. 



122 
Manner or Planting. 

There are two methods of planting which may be fol- 
lowed, namely: surface planting and listing. Either of 
these methods, if carefully followed, will give good re- 
sults. In sections where listing is practiced the soil 
should receive some previous preparation, and the listed 
tows need not be more than three or four inches deep. 
This is plenty deep enough to secure all of the advantage 
of this system, and there will be little danger in covering 
the young plants at the time of the first cultivation. The 
broom corn seed can be planted with an ordinary corn 
planter which is provided with Kaffir corn plates, or it 
may be put in with an ordinary grain drill by blocking 
the proper number of feed holes so that the rows may be 
given the correct spacing. The seed of the dwarf varieties 
are usually planted in rows 36 inches apart, and enough 
material is used to secure a stand of one plant to every 
four to eight inches in the tow. The standard sorts are 
given greater spacing, the rows being placed at least 42 
inches apart, and twelve to fifteen inches in the row. It 
will require three to five pounds of seed to give the pro- 
per stand. Where the seed is first class in quality, and 
will give a germination test of 90 to 95 per cent, the min- 
imum quantity may be planted ; however, if the seeds con- 
tain a large amount of trash and have been damaged to 
a slight extent so that the vitality has been impaired, 
much more seed should be sown. 

Cultivating the Crop. 

The cultivation of broom corn is similar to that given 
to corn or sorghum. The early growth of the plant is 
slow, hence the need of prompt and shallow cultivation to 
keep the weeds in subjection and to maintain a thin layer 
of loose soil on the surface. 

In the culture of broom corn the value of rotation of 
crops is not thoroughly appreciated, and it is sometimes 



123 

grown for many years in succession on the same land. If 
the stalks are plowed under and the seeds returned to 
the soil either in their green state or are fed to animals 
and the manure obtained applied to the soil, the draft on 
the soil is not very heavy. However, continuous culture, 
even of crops removing but small quantities of fertilizer 
ingredients, will eventually impoverish the soil, especially 
when, as is sometimes the case with broom corn, the stalks 
are burned on the land. Better crops will generally be 
secured when broom corn enters into the regular farm ro 
tation, or when an occasional crop of clover, cow pears, or 
other leguminous plants are grown on the land usually 
devoted to it. 

As soon as the young plants are two or three inches 
high cultivation should be commenced. If a good stand 
has been secured, some thinning may be done with the 
smoothing harrow or weeder by giving cross cultivation. 
Where the stand is ideal, these implements can be run 
lengthwise of the row, and they will assist in stirring the 
soil at a time when the regular cultivator cannot be 
manipulated. Such treatment will not only stir the sur- 
face and aid in holding the moisture for the crop, but it 
will destroy many small weeds which make their appear- 
ance early in the season. The broom corn will probably 
be large enough to permit the use of the regular corn 
cultivator fifteen days or three weeks after planting. A 
machine which is provided with five or more narrow 
shovels per section adjusted to run at a shallow depth 
will give better results than an implement which carries 
two or three shovels per section. Cultivation should be 
continued through the growing season at intervals of ten 
days or two weeks. This will keep the surface in proper 
condition, will afford ample protection against weeds, and 
will assist in conserving the stores of moisture. Later in 
the season the soil may be stirred with a one-horse five- 
tooth cultivator. This practice is not common in broom 
corn sections, but is a practice which has been adopted 



124 

by many in cultivating common corn, and it. ought to give 
equally good results in broom corn culture. 

Quality op Bedsh. 

The market demands a brush of fresh green color ; hence 
ine heads should be free from red stains or other color. 
In order to secure brush of the desired color it is neces- 
sary to harvest just as the plants are coming into full 
bloom. If the crop is allowed to remain on the stalks for 
a longer period than this and moist weather occurs, then 
the heads that remain enclosed within the leaf sheath 
will have a tendency to turn red, plant lice also work on 
such heads and may bring about a reduction in the qual- 
ity of brush. Over-ripeness and exposure to the hot sun 
will discolor the straw; thus it is absolutely necessary 
that i!he crop be harvested at a time when the heads are 
prime in quality. 

Harvesting and Cubing. 

The chief difficulty encountered by the novice in broom 
corn culture is in determining when to harvest the brush. 
Even experienced growers are not unanimous on this 
point, some cutting the heads while in blossom, and oth- 
ers harvesting later so as to obtfain better developed seeds 
possessing considerable nutritive value. The time gen- 
erally preferred is just after the fall of the so-called "blos- 
soms" (anthers). When the saving of more matured seed 
is a consideration the head may be bent down by sharply 
bending the stalk at a point 12 to 18 inches below tfie 
base of the head. Thus the seeds while filling hang down 
and tend to keep the brush straight. This "lopping," if 
practiced at all, is done after the head has attained its 
full length, but before flie seeds acquire much weight. It 
is not practiced by large growers. A common custom 
with tall varieties at time of harvesting is to bend down 



123 

the stalks of two rows diagonally toward each other in 
such a manner that the bent parts support each other 
in a nearly horizontal position. The stalks of one row 
cross diagonally those of the other and form a platform, 
or "table." The break, or rather the sharp bend, in the 
stalk is made about 2y 2 or 3 feet above the ground. The 
brush borne on one row projects over and beyond the 
other row in a position convenient for the cutter who 
follows immediately. The heads with five inches of stalks 
are laid on the table, or platform, umll they can be re- 
moved to a drying shed. 

Cutting while the plants are wet with dew or rain 
should be avoided. The brush of the dwarf variety is 
pulled, not cut. If the season is dry and the corn ap- 
proaches maturity the brush remains straight, but! if 
the weather is hot and damp at this period the straws are 
likely to bend and to form crooked brush. In harvesting 
and in curing great pains are t.iken to keep the brush 
straight. Crooked or tangled brush is carefully sorted 
out. 

From the field the brush is taken to the scrapers, which 
removes the seed. Large growers of broom corn employ 
special scraping machines, consisting of one or two cylin- 
ders provided with iron teeth and usually, driven by 
horsepower. The most complete scrapers are provided 
with an automatic feeding arrangements. With cheaper 
machines the operator holds the seed end of a handful 
of brush against the cylinder until the seed are removed. 
It is statfed that the ordinary threshing machine, with 
concave removed, has been used in a similar manner. For 
small quantities of brush a long-toothed currycomb, or 
a wooden comb made by sawing teeth in a plant has been 
used. The brush should be cnred in the shade, as expos- 
ure to sun injures the color and strength. Free circula- 
tion of air is necessary in this process. Hence when large 
quantities are to be cured special curing houses thorough- 
ly ventilated and provided with racks made of narrow 



120 

planks and lathe are constructed. On these racks layers 
of bniBh 3 inches thick are laid. Curing is continued until 
the brush will not heat when bulked, or baled. 

When cured the brush is pressed into bales, usually 
46x30x24 inches and weighs about 300 pounds. The buts 
are placed evenly at the ends of the bale and the pieces 
of "brush" lap in the middle. The labor of harvesting and 
curing makes n' considerably more expensive to grow an 
acre of broom corn than a similar area of Indian corn. 
Greater skill is also required in handling the former 
crop. As regards feeding value the broom corn plant is 
inferior to Indian corn and to the non-saccharine 
sorghums such as Kaffir corn, dura, milo maize, etc., br- 
ing poorer in the valuable nutritive constituents (fat and 
protein) and richer in the indigestible fiber. The chemi- 
cal composition of the ripe seed, however, indicates that 
it is but slightly inferior to corn kernels as food. 

The following table shows how broom corn compares- 
with Indian corn in this respect: 



FOOD CONSTITUENTS OF BROOM CORN AND INDIAN CORN. 



Water 



Per Cent 



Water-Free Material. 



a 






Per Cent Per Cent Per Cent 



I! 



Per Cent Per Cent 



Broom corn plnat[ 9.4 

Corn plant I 42.2 

Broom corn seed! 14.1 

Corn kernels ... 10.9 



5.6 
2.3 
1.7 



4.3 

8.8 

11.2 

11.7 



46.6 

24.1 

8.3 

2.4 



40.8 
58.9 
74.1 
78.1 



2.a 

2.6 
4.1 
6.1 



Little use as a food is generally made of the broom corn 
fodder beyond letting the cattle run in the field after the 
harvest. As the above table shows, the seed, when allowed 
to ripen, has considerable nutritive value, but since it iff- 



I2» 

necessary in securing the best grade of brushes to har- 
vest the heads green it has been found difficult to cure the 
seed obtained from them. Success in preserving the green 
seed in air-tight silos has been reported, so that by this 
process a cattle food of considerable value may be econom- 
ically obtained. The yield of seed varies greatly, and on 
the average probably approximates the quantity afforded 
by sorghum grown for syrup. 

Marketing the Crop. 

The growe* ought to acquaint himself with the market 
requirements 1 in the case of this crop, and the heads which 
come up to the standard should be selected for planting 
the seed patch next year. Since broom corn should be 
pulled before the seeds mature, every grower should set 
aside a small plat for the production of his seed. After 
the first season, choice heads can be selected for planting 
the plat next year, and the remaining portion of the seed 
from this plat can be used for the commercial field. By 
adopting this method the quality of the brush can be im- 
proved from year to year. Inasmuch as broom corn crosses 
readily with other plants which belong to the same class, 
the seed plat should be well protected. A good grade of 
lirush comes or may be had only through careful selection. 
The seed plat may also afford an opportunity for testing 
the productive capacity of the various types, and will en- 
able the grower to single out those strains which have 
outstanding features. Better cultivation will undoubted- 
ly add to the output of brush ; a systematic plan of seed 
selection will surely improve the quality of the broom 
corn. 



128 v i: 

ANALYSES OF FLORIDA MUCK SOILS. 

SOIL ANALYSIS. 

COMPILED 
I 

By B. E. Bosh State Chemist. 

Frequently samples of soil are sent to the Chemical 
Division for analysis, with a request to advise as to the 
best methods of fertilizing. There is but little informa- 
tion to be derived from a soil analysis that would be of 
benefit to farmers. So much depends on tilth, drainage, 
culture and other physical conditions, that chemical ana- 
lysis made under laboratory conditions is of little value. 

A chemical analysis of soil may indicate a very fertile 
soil, rich in plant food, while the facts are the soils are 
not productive. This is instanced by the rich Sawgrass 
muck lands and river bottoms of the State, that are fertile 
chemically, but not productive until properly drained; 
also, by the arid lands of the West, rich in the elements 
of plant food, but not productive until irrigated. Other 
soils, with less plant food, but on account of proper 
physical conditions, culture and tilth, are exceedingly 
pToductive. 

B. E. Bose, Florida State Chemist 1908. 

The average of thousands of analyses of Florida soils 
made by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station 
and the State Laboratory is as follows: 

Nitrogen (per cent.) 0.0413 

Potash (per cent.) 0.0091 

Phosphoric Acid (per cent.) 0.1635 

This is a fair average of all the Norfolk and Ports- 
mouth soil series of the State, which comprise by far the 
greater portion of the State. 



129 

The following conclusions as to the value of chemical 
anal yses of soils, alone, without considering other factors 
— drainage, culture, physical and biological conditions of 
the soil under consideration, as to its productiveness, are 
those now generally accepted by experiment station, prac- 
tical and scientific agriculturists, chemists and biologists : 
u • • • Hence, for a chemist to have stated 
that a given soil was necessarily productive be- 
cause he had found present in it all of the ele- 
ments that plantB required in growth, would 
have been a great mistake, for a practical test 
would have often proved his statement false." 

"There ito probably no one subject in connec- 
tion with their profession, that is so little under- 
stood by farmers generally, as that of the real 
value to be attached to a chemical analysis of a 
soil. Indeed, I may say, that there is scarcely 
a question that is the Bubject of so much discus- 
sion and disagreement, even among the agricul- 
tural chemists of the country, as that of the real 
importance to be attached to such an analysis." 
"It will be seen that the weak point in an 
analysis is that, while it reveals what a soil 
actually contains and in what proportions the 
several constituents are present, it does not state 
with absolute accuracy just bow much .of that 
plant-food is in an available form, i. e., in a form 
suited for plant assimilation." 

"While a chemical analysis cannot definitely 
answer everything in connection with the above 
queries, still it can aid very much in solving all 
such problems, and, together with a physical 
anaylsis, can contribute much valuable informa- 
tion along such lines." 

(A. A. Persons, Florida Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, 1897.) 

"It is generally admitted that the productive- 

9 — GMbtffc 

\ 



130 

ness of a soil cannot be determined by a mere 
chemical analysis alone. True, the analysis will 
show what elements are present and in what 
quantities, but it does not show what is abso- 
lutely available for the immediate use of the 
plant. Of two soils showing great similarity in 
chemical composition, the one may be highly pro- 
ductive and the other very unproductive. The 
reasons for this may possibly be found in different 
moisture conditions, or a difference in physical 
texture, or in the difference in the amount of 
available plant food, or in a combination of all 
these differences. The chemical analysis may, 
however, be of value in showing what the possi- 
bilities of the soil are under the proper treat- 
ment." 

"This subject has been studied by the agricul- 
tural chemist, the soil physicist, and ihe prac- 
tical farmer, and all have contributed to the fund 
of knowledge." 

(A. W. Blair, Florida Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1906.) 

"The Experiment Station does not analyze 
samples of soil to determine the fertilizer require 
ments. There is no chemical method known that 
will show reliably the availability of plant food 
elements present in the soil, as this is a variable 
factor, influenced by the kind of crop, the type of 
soil, the climate and biological conditions; hence , 
we do not recommend this method of testing soil." 
(Agricultural Experiment Station, Purdue Uni- 
versity, 1908.) 

The foregoing facts and opinions are drawn from prac- 
tical experience, and scientific deduction, after careful 
investigation by competent scientific observers, establishes 
the fact that a chemical analysis of soil is of little value 
to the practical farmer, and that correct deduction can 



131 

not be drawn without a personal knowledge of all itie 
physical and biological conditions — drainage, tilth, cul- 
ture, season, and other local factors, necessary to be con- 
sidered in passing upon the fertility or productiveness 
of a soil. 
Tallahassee, Fla., June, 1915. 



MUCK SOIL ANALYSES. 

Numerous inquiries for the analyses of muck soils, par- 
ticularly of Everglade and other saw grass mucks, having 
exhausted the reports of the State Chemist for 1912 and 
1914, while Bulletin No. 43 of the Florida Agricultural 
Experiment Station, A Chemical Study of Some Typical 
Soils of the Florida Peninsular, by Prof. A. A. Persons, 
is also out of print, I have compiled a number of analyses 
of Florida muck soils as reported in these publications. 

It will be noted that fliere is little difference in the 
Nitrogen (Ammonia) content in pare mucks, that is, 
mucks not mixed with sand. Where the Insoluble Matter 
(sand) is considerable, the Nitrogan (Ammonia) is pro- 
portionately less. Sand is therefore the principal adul- 
terant found in Florida mnck soils. Sandy subsoils con- 
tain notably less Nitrogen than the pure mncks found in 
deep beds — three to ten feet. Shallow muck beds — one 
to two feet — necessarily contain more sand and less 
Nitrogen. 

Beds of muck deposited in still water, not affected by 
drains or runs of sandy water during freshet's, sand bars, 
or ridges, have a uniform high Nitrogen content. The 
uniformity of the Nitrogen content is notable and is 
naturally greatest in those specimens having but a small 
percentage of sand. 

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. 

Tallahassee, Fla., September, 1917. 



132 

ANAYSES OF FLORIDA MUCK SOILS. 
By R. E. Rose, State Chemist. 

Hundreds of analyses of mock soils from all pan's of 
the State have been made — saw grass muck, pond muck, 
bay head muck, etc. The physical characteristics vary 
considerably, depending entirely on the state of decay or 
decomposition. 

Muck constantly covered with water does not decay 
or rot. 

Muck occasionally exposed to the air (partial drain- 
age) decomposes and becomes a fine-grained soil. 

Perfect drainage will cause any muck bed to decay, rot, 
or decompose and become a fine-grained garden mould. 
Imperfect drainage will not. 

The average of all muck soil analyses shows as follows : 

Nitrogen (as ammonia) : . 3.10% 

Phosphoric Acid 0.18% 

Potash 0.08% 

It will be noted that there is sixty times as much 
Nitrogen (Ammonia), with practically the same percent- 
age of Phosphoric Acid, and nearly nine times as much 
Potash as found in the average sandy soils of the Si'ate. 

This great excess of nitrogen, when made available by 
proper drainage, deep plowing and proper culture, as- 
sisted by phosphoric acid and potash, thus providing the 
necessary media for the growth of the nitrogenous fer- 
ments (nitrogen-forming bacteria), insures large crops 
on properly drained and cultivated muck soils, wherein 
the nitrifying agencies of the air, together with properly 
encouraged bacteria, have made the enormous supply of 
nitrogen available to plant growth. 

Nitrogen induces foliage development, hence is largely 
necessary for such crops as cabbage, lettuce and celery, 
while potash and phosphate tend to produce starch, sugar 
and seed, and to make firm, heavy fruit, that will bear 
shipment, with less danger of decay. Hence the economy 



133 

of adding phosphate and potash to muck soils, which 
require — 

First. Perfect drainage, to get rid of stagnant, acid 
water, and allow the air to enter the soil to oxidize, or 
rot it. 

Second. An addition of phosphoric acid and potash to 
form a media to aid in developing the nitrogenous bac- 
teria, necessary to make the nitrogen available, and to 
aid in forming starch, sngar and seeds. While properly 
drained, deeply plowed muck soil will produce large crops 
without adding phosphate or potash, the great excess of 
nitrogen and, comparatively, small amount of potash and 
phosphate, necessarily makes the addition of these two 
elements economical and prqljtable, D y the increase in 
yield and better shipping quality of the vegetables and 
fruits. Hence the application of 500 to 1000 pounds of 
16% acid phosphate and 100 to 200 pounds of 50% 
<j& Sulfate (or Muriate) of Potash, or 1000 to 2000 pounds 

of unleached ashes, carrying 6% of potash and 40% Car- 
bonate of Lime, is an economical addition. 

Muck as a Fehtilizrh. 

The application of sour, freshly-dug, undecomposed 
muck, or peat, to sandy soils as a fertilizer or amend- 
ment, or to add humus to a sandy soil, is of little or no 
value. As said by a noted' Florida grower, "It is a harm- 
less though costly amusement." Buch raw, undecom- 
posed, acid muck, applied to sandy soil, simply dries out 
(carbonizes), its nitrogen dissipates, leaving nothing bat 
carbon (charcoal) in the soil. Hence, the application of 
raw, sour, undecomposed muck to ordinary sandy soils 
is not advisable, as it is not economical. 

Muck Composts — Manure. 

If newly-dug, raw, acid, undecomposed muck be com- 
posted, using 500 pounds of 16% acid phosphate and 100 
pounds of 50% sulfate (or muriate) of potash to each 



134 

cord of wet muck (128 cubic feet), well distributed 
throughout the heap, the heap kept moist (not wet), 
broken down and turned several times, in two months a 
cord (some three tons) of excellent manure, will be ob- 
tained. Where practical, a few barrow loads of fresh 
stable manure added to this heap, will hasten decomposi- 
tion,, add nitrifying bacteria, and aid largely in making 
available the inert nitrogen in the raw muck. 
I, The heap should be kept moist at all times (not wet). 
Never allow it to overheat or "fire fang." nor to dry out. 
If necessary, turn the heap, dampen it (to cool it off), 
and again heap it up. 

The "compost heap" is the "Bank'' from which the 
French, German, Belgian,* Dutch and Swedish farmers — 
the best farmers in the world — draw their supplies of 
plant food. On the size and quality of the compost heap, 
the credit of these farmers is based. 

When the dairy cow, the pig, the silo, and the compost 
heap, which can be greatly enhanced in size by the muck 
pond, become more in evidence in the South, and particu- 
larly in Florida, the problem of rural credits, commercial 
fertilizer, and crop mortgages, will naturally be settled 
by the farmer becoming the lender, and not the borrower ; 
the financial master, not the slave. 

Muck in Stables and Barn Lots. 

An economical method of utilizing muck is to employ 
it as a bedding in horse and cow stalls, to absorb the 
liquids, the most valuable portion of the manure. 

Place six to twelve inches of raw muck (fairly dry) in 
each stall, in which mix acid phosphate and potash in the 
proportions given for the compost heap. By this means 
ten tons of first-class stable manure may be obtained, 
where one would be, under ordinary conditions. 

The secret of a good compost heap (or manure heap), 
particularly in Florida, is to keep the heap moist (not 
wet), and avoid over-heating — "fire fang." 



135 

This can readily be accomplished by breaking down the 
heap, dampening, and again heaping up. The Sulfate of 
Lime (Gypsum) which composes some sixty per cent of 
acid phosphate (which, by the way, is not acid) will pre- 
vent the escape of nitrogen as ammonia, but will absorb 
it as Sulfate of Ammonia ; soluble, but not volatile. 

The contrary effect is had by ine use of Lime Carbonate, 
or Oxide (burnt lime), or wood ashes, which have a ten- 
dency to decompose the nitrogenous matter and allow it 
to escape as ammonia. Hence the application of lime car- 
bonate, or oxide, or wood ashes, to a manure pile is a 
blunder, while the application of acid phosphate — Gyp- 
sum (Lime Sulfate), and phosphate — is advisable. 

Imperfectly Drained muck Soils. 

There are many instances, particularly in Florida, of 
imperfectly drained muck soils — tracts adjacent to canals 
or drains, in which insufficient lateral or field ditches 
have been cut. The surface water has been to a greater 
or less degree removed by the canals or drains, while the 
sour, acid water in the soil still remains. 

Frequently this land becomes dry from evaporation, 
though the acids are not removed. On the contrary, the 
acids are concentrated by this evaporation. Such soils 
naturally fail to produce cultivated' crops. 

Often an attempt to correct this acid condition by the 
application of lime is made. Such an application to such 
soils, noi' provided with the necessary field ditches, is but 
an expedient, and of no permanent benefit. The acids 
naturally continue to form, and in a comparatively short 
time neutralize the lime. 

There is but one reliable method of removing acid from 
muck soils i slowly decomposing vegetable matter), and 
that is by thorough drainage, allowing the rains to fall 
upon. pass down and through the soil, into the drains, 
which must be kept open (even in the dryest weather). 



13G 

by this means washing out (draining away) the con- 
stantly accumulating acids. 

There are a large number of such imperfectly drained 
tracts of muck soil in the State, unproductive and dis- 
appointing, partially drained, and generally dried by 
evaporation to a considerable extent, still for the want 
of drainage, sour, undecomposed, and unfit for cultivated 
crops. These same soils, properly drained by the neces- 
sary field ditches, at intervals of say 105 feet (one-half 
acre) at least three feei' deep, with fall or slope sufficient 
to drain the soils not less than three feet below the sur- 
face, will in a short time (after one or more rainy 
seasons), be freed of their superabundance of acid and 
become prodoctive. 

The application of phosphate and potash, after thor- 
ough drainage, together with an application of ground 
lime stone, will materially hasten the process of decom- 
posing the vegetable matter r forming a rich, productive 
mould, or soil, a condition impossible on partly (shallow) 
drained muck, in which there are no field drains to re- 
move the sour, acid waters from the zone which should 
be occupied by living bacteria, and the roots' of healthy 
plant's. 

Such thoroughly drained soils, deeply plowed and thor- 
oughly decomposed (rotted), changed from a peat or 
muck into soil, will not suffer for moisture, even in the 
dryeat seasons in Florida, though crops on imperfectly 
drained land do suffer by the concentration of acid in 
the soil, by evaporation, during dry weather, thus bring- 
ing the acids of tlie lower soils to the surface (acids 
which should be removed by drainage). 

This problem now confronts the farmer on much of 
the irrigated soils of the West, where drainage has been 
neglected — in this case the alkali, dissolved by the irriga- 
tion waters, not being provided with drainage, is brought 
to the surface by evaporation, where the alkali remains, 
soon changing t"he fields into alkaline bogs, of no agricul 



137 

tural value. When provided with drains, this condition 
is corrected, and the irrigated land becomes wonderfully 
productive. 

The same thing occurs in Florida, except that acid — 
not alkali — is the substance that must be gotten rid of. 
Fortunately, with our hnmid climate, with some 60 inches 
of rainfall, the acids of our muck soils can be rapidly 
gotten rid of by washing them out, through properly con- 
structed drains, with sufficient fall or slope. 

Tallahassee, Fla., June 18, 1915. 



EXTRACT FROM STATE CHEMIST'S REPORT. 1912. 
Analyses of Everglades Soils. 

The following analyses of Everglades soils, 34 samples 
taken at various points in the Everglades, from Lake 
Okeechobee to the Miami River, near the banks of the 
State Canals, are located on the accompanying map. 

The samples were taken in duplicate by representatives 
of the' United States Agricultural Department, and the 
Drainage Commissioners of the State of Florida. 

The surface soils samples are taken from the surface to 
12 inches deep, the subsoils from 12 inches to 36 inches 
deep. 

The average of the series shows: 

Ammonia (NH 3 ) 3.10% 

Phosphoric Acid (P,O s ) 0.18% 

Potash K 2 0) 0.08% 

All samples are on an air dry basis. 

The Ammonia (Nitrogen) determinations are made by 
the official modified Qnnning Method for fertilizer. The 
Potash and Phosphoric Acid determinations by the offi- 
cial method for fertilizers. 



138 

M. 1784 — Maximum Ammonia •. 4.41 % 

Soil Sample No. 29. 

M. 1793 — Minimum Ammonia 0.44 % 

Sandy Sub-soil No. 38. 

M. 1792— Maximum Thosphoric Acid •• 0.53 % 

(Evidently added phosphates on culti- 
vated soil.) 
Soil No. 37. 

M. 1793 — Minimum Phosphoric Acid 0.04 % 

Sub-soil No. 42. 

II 1770— Maximum Potash 0.175% 

Sub-soil No. 14. 

M. 1790— Minimum Potash 0.03 *% 

Soil No. 36. 

M. 1793 — Mintuum Potash 0.03 % 

Sub-soil No. 37. 

EVERGLADE SOILS. 

Samples taken from Lake Okeechobee to Miami, near 
Banks of State Canals. 

M. 1765— Everglades Soil No. 9. 

Surface soil, S. New River Canal, NE. y± Sec. 
4, T. 46, R. 35. 

Moisture 12.06 % 

Ammonia 3.35 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.26 % 

Potash 0.115% 

M. 1766— Everglades Soil No. 10. 
Sub-soil No. 9. 
Moisture 12.22 % 



139 

Ammonia WB % 

Phosphoric Acid 01 ° % 

Potash 0085 % 

M. 1767— Everglades Soil No. 11. 
Surface soil, shores of Lake Okeechobee. 

Demonstration Farm, West of S. New River 
Canal. Cnltivated field. 

Moistnre 13 - 81 % 

. • . 3.72 % 

Ammonia ' 

Phosphoric Add ;;;.; i 3 05 % 

Potash ' 

M. 1708— Everglades Soil No. 12. 

Sub-soil No. 11. ta 

. — ■-::::™l 

Ammonia noser 

«»t»* Acid ::r.::555 

Potash 

M 1769— Everglades Soil No. 13. 

West side of S. New River Canal, near Lake 

Okeechobee. 
Virgin soil. 

Moistnre --^J 

Ammonia 2.86% 

Phosphoric Acid °- 8 '° 

Potash 0165 % 



jj 1770— Everglades Soil No. 14. 
Sub soil of No. 13. 

Moisture 

Ammonia 



.1038 % 
. 2.36 % 



Phosphoric Acid I' ?L5 

Potash (Maximum) 0.175% 



I 



HO 

M. 1771— Everglades Soil No. 15. 

South New River Canal, near Lake Okeecho- 
bee. Cultivated land. 

Moisture 13.04 % 

• Ammonia 3.37 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.30 % 

Potash 0.105% 

M. 1772— Everglades Soil No. 16. 
Sub-soil of No. 15. 

Moisture 11.06 % 

Ammonia 2.56 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.21 % 

Potash 0.115% 

M. 1773— Everglades Soil No. 17. 

Sec. 11, T. 45, R. 38, East of Hillsboro Canal. 

Moisture 13.43 % 

Ammonia 4.37 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.20 % 

Potash 0.07 % 

M. 1774— Everglades Soil No. 18. 
Sub-soil of No. 17. 

Moisture 13.17 % 

Ammonia 3.64 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.05 % 

Potash 0.06 % 

M. 1775— Everglades Soil No. 19. 

Sec. 14, T. 46, R. 39, 25 miles from Lake Okee 
chobee. East of Hillsboro Canal. 

Moisture 12.09 % 

Ammonia 4.05 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.11 % 

Potash 0.095% 



141 

M. 1776— Everglades Soil No. 20. 
Sub-soil of No. 19. 

Moisture 12 - 82 % 

A m tin >n i;l 2.82 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.05 % 

Potash °07 % 

M. 1777— Everglades Soil No. 21. 

Sec. 9, T. 47, B. 32 miles from Lake Okee- 
chobee, North of Canal. 

Moisture 1212 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.15 % 

Potash . 0.04 % 

M. 1778— Everglades Soil No. 22. 
^-> Sub-soii of No. 21. 

Moisture ll-!6 % 

Ammonia 3.71 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.06 % 

Potash 0.04 % 

M. 1779— Everglades Soil No. 23. 

Sec. 29, T. 47, R. 41, North of Canal. 

Moisture H-83 % 

Ammonia 3.06 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.09 % 

Potash 0.07 % 

M. 1780— Everglades Soil No. 24. 
Sub-soil of No. 23. 

Moisture 12.74 % 

Ammonia • 3.00 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.06 % 

Potash 0.06 % 

M. 1781— Everglades Soil No. 25. 

Cleared land on border of Lake Okeechobee, 

West of N. New River Canal. Virgin soil. 

Moisture -....10.84 % 



112 

Ammonia 2.89 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.32 % 

Potash 0.105% 

M 1782— Everglades Soil No. 27. 

1^4 mile S. of Lake Okeechobee, on West side 
of N. New River Canal. 

Moisture 10.19 % 

Ammonia 2.97 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.46 % 

Potash 0.085% 

M. 1783— Everglades Soil No. 28. 
Sub-soil of No. 27. 

Moisture 11.65 % 

Ammonia 3.32 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.20 % 

Potash 0.115% 

M. 1784— Everglades Soil No. 29. 

East side of N. New River Canal, 10 miles S. 
of Lake Okeechobee. 

Moisture 12.54 % 

Ammonia (Maximum) 4.41 j 

Phosphoric Acid 0.29 % 

Potash 0.05 % 

M 1785— Everglades Soil No. 30. 
Sub-soil of No. 29. 

Moisture 14.06 % 

Ammonia 4.30 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.20 % 

I,ota 8h ,0.05 % 

M. 1786— Everglades Soil No. 31. 

Center of Sec. 29, T. 48, R. 39, West of N. 
New River Canal. 

Moisture 14.09 % 

Ammonia 3.72 jj. 



143 







Phosphoric Acid 014 % 

Potash 007 % 

M. 1787 — Everglades Soil No. 32. 
Sub-soil of No. 31. 

Moisture n - 08 % 

Ammonia 312 % 

Phosphoric Acid 006 % 

Potash »•<»% 

M 1788— Everglades Soil No. 33. 

SE 14 Sec. 34, T. 49, K. 39, South of Canal. 

Moisture l341 % 

Ammonia 351 % 



v 



Phosphoric Acid Ifc ° -18 % 

Potash * 0.08% 

M. 1789 — Everglades Soil No. 34. 
Sab-soil of No. 33. 

Moisture 13 - 28 % 

Ammonia 2 - 98 % 

Phosphoric Acid °- 06 % 

Potash • 0.06 % 

M. 1790 — Everglades Soil No. 35. 

Center of Sec. 3, T. 50, R. 40, North of Canal. 

Moisture 1304 % 

Ammonia 3>12 % 

Phosphoric Acid W? % 

Potash (Minimum) 0.03 % 



x 



51. 1791 — Everglades Soil No. 36. 
Subsoil of No. 35. 

Moisture 1104 % 

Ammonia 3.42 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.11 % 

Potash 0- 07 % 



I 



114 

M 1792— Everglades Soil No. 37. 

'•Musa Isle" Grove, South of Miami Canal. 
Cultivated soil —evidently added Phosphate. 

Moisftire 9.02 % 

Ammonia 2.33 % 

Phosphoric Acid (Maximum) 0.53 % 

Potash 0.05 % 

M 1793 — Everglades Soil No. 38. 

Sub-soil of No. 37. Sandy sub-soil. 

Moisture 1.52 % 

Ammonia (Minimum) 0.44 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.24 % 

Potash (Minimum) 0.03 % 

M. 1794— Everglades Soil No. 41. 

Center of Sec, 11, T. 53, R. 40. 

Moisture 14.86 % 

Ammonia 3.47 % 

Phosphoric Aeid 0.11 % 

Potash 0.085% 

M. 1795 — Everglades Soil No.. 42. 
Sub-soil No. 41. 

Moisture 13.14 — 

Ammonia 3.60 % 

Phosphoric Acid (Minimum) 0.04 % 

Potash 0.06 i% 

M. 1796 — Everglades Soil No. 43. 

NE. % Sec. 31, T. 52, R. 40. 

Moisture 11.63 % 

Ammonia 3.44 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.15 % 

Potash 0.06 % 

M. 1798— Everglades Soil No. 45. 
E. y 2 Sec. 9, T. 52, R. 39. 
Moisture 12.32 % 



145 

A liiiiuni i;i 4.07 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.13 % 

Potash 0.07 % 

M. 1709— Everglades Soil No. 4G. 
Sub-soil No. 45. 

Moisture 12.38 % 

A in muii in 3.67 % 

Phosphoric Acid 0.25 % 

Potash 0.07 % 

Note,— Numbers 1792 and 1793— soil No. 37 aud sub 
&oil No. 38 — taken from "Musa Isle Grove'' — a cultivated 
orange grove, have evidently been fertilized with com- 
mercial fertilizers, particularly phosphates. 

2— Soil. 

EXTRACT FROM STATE CHEMISTS REPORT. 1914. 



ANALYSES OF MUCK SOILS FROM THE UPPER 
ST. JOHNS VALLEY. 

M. 2005 — Muck Soil No. 1 (12-inch surface. Sec. 1. 
Fellsmere, Fla. 
Air Dry Sample. 

Moisture = 17.87 % 

A Nitrogen — 2.35 •}{ 

Volatile matter — MJM ' I 

Involatile matter I ash i = 8.24 % 

Insoluble matter (sand^ «- 4.4<> ' ; 

Phosphoric acid = 8.824% 

Potash = 0.041% 

Lime — 0.83 % 

Iron and alumnia = 1.92 % 

10 — Com.Anr. 



146 

if. 2006— Subsoil No. 1 (12 to 36 in.) Bees. 2 aud 3, 
Fellsmere, Fla. 
Air Dry Sample. 

Moisture =- 14.70 % 

Nitrogen = 1.76 % 

Volatile matter = 72.01 % 

In volatile matter (ash) = 27.09 % 

Insoluble matter (salnd) = 21.81 % 

Phosphoric acid = 0.050% 

Potash i = 0.058% 

Lime = 1.C2 % 

Iron and alumnia = 2.80 % 

*£. 2007— Muck Soil No. 2 (12-inch surface), Myrtle 
hammock on ditch N, 12, near lateral canal 
N, Fellsmere. Fla. 
Air Dry Sample. 

Moisture — 18.04 % 

Nitrogen = 2.38 % 

Volatile matter = 87.88 % 

Involatile matter (ash) = 12.12 % 

Insoluable matter (sand) = 7.35 % 

Phosphoric acid = 0.148% 

Potash = 0.073% 

Lime = 2.55% 

Iron and alumina = 1.38 % 

M. 2008— Muck Soil No. 3 (18-inch surface). Sec. I, 
corner of lateral canal Q and railroad ditch, 
Fellsmere, Fla. 
Air Dry Sample. 

Moisture = 16.35 % 

Nitrogen = 3.39 % 

Volatile matter — 95.70 % 

Involatile matter (ash) = 4.30 % 

Insoluble matter (sand) = 1.72 % 

Phosphoric acid '■ = 0.100% 



147 

PoteBh — 0.052% 

Lime = 1-29 % 

Iron and alumina = 0.52 % 

M. 2009— Subsoil No. 3 (18 to 36 inches). Sec. 2, corner 
of lateral canal Q and railroad ditch. Fells- 
mere, Fla. 
Air Dry Sample. 

Moisture = 16.75 % 

Nitrogen = 2.76 % 

Volatile matter = 95.32 % 

Inrolatile matter (ash) = 4.68 % 

insoluble matter (sand) = 0.71 % 

Phosphoric acid = 0.058% 

Potash = 0.028% 

Lime - = 1.52 % 

Iron and alumina = 1-78 % 

M. 2010 — Soil No. 4 (18-inch surface). Sec. 1, coiner of 
lateral M and railroad ditch, Fellsmere. Fla. 
Air Dry Sample. 

Moisture = 17.18 % 

Nitrogen = 2.99 % 

Volatile matter = 95.74 < ; 

Involatile matter (ash) = 4.26% 

Insoluble matter (sand) = 1.55 % 

Phosphoric acid — 0.180% 

Potash = 0.043% 

Lime = 1.68 % 

Iron and alumina = 0.71 % 

M. 2011— Subsoil No. 4 (18 to 39 inches). See. 2 and 
3, corner of lateral M and railroad ditch, 
Fellsmere. Fla. 
Air Dry Sample. 

Moisture — 16.55 % 

Nitrogen = 2.52 % 

Volatile matter = 92.84 % 

Involatile matter (ash) = 7.16 % 



148 

Insoluble matter (sand) :..= 1.55 % 

Phosphoric aci«l •= 0.072% 

Potasli ' = 0.030% 

Lime = 2.95 % 

Iron and alumina .•..= 1.71 % 



EXTRACT FROM BULLETIN NO. 4:5 OF THE A OR I- 
(TI/rrRAI. EXPERIMENT STATION— 1897. 



BY A. A. PERRONS. 

No. 16 — Dade County Saw Crass Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 3.9300% 

Nitrogen 1.2300% 

Insoluble matter Csand) 59.8035% 

Phosphoric acid (PA) 0.1472% 

Potash (K.O) 0.0260% 

Lime (CaO) 3.9850% 

Iron and alumina 2.5803% 

No. S3 — Dade County Reclaimed Bay Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 7.2350% 

Nitrogen 1.4560% 

Insoluble matter i rand) 43.0630% 

Phosphoric a<id ( P,0,) , 0.1120% 

Potasli (K ; 0) Trace 

T.ime (CaO) 0.1500% 

Iron and alumina 3.3470% 

No. 54 — Dade County Reclaimed Bay Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 7.1750% 

Nitrogen 1.3300% 

Insoluble mati'er (sandi 48.7350% 

Phosphoric acid < P t O.) 0.0480% 



140 

Potash (K 3 0) Q.awa% 

lime (CaO) 6M0096 

Iron and alumina 3.3470% 



c 



No. 90 — Osceola County Government Station Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 0.0000% 

Nitrogen 2.4400% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 7.9700% 

Phosphoric acid (PA) 0.1600% 

Potash (K,0) 0.0800% 

Lime (CaO) Trace 

Iron and alumina 0.8000% 

No. 91 — Osceola County Government Station Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 0.0000% 

Nitrogen ." 1.7000% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 33.3900%, 

Phosphoric acid ( PA) • • • T""* 

Potash (K.O) 0.0600% 

Lime (CaO) Trace 

Iron and alumina 2.4210% 

No. 92 — Osceola County Government Station Muck, sub- 
soil. 

Moisture ai' 100° C 0.0000% 

Nitrogen 0.3100% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 84.9100% 

Phosphoric acid ( PA) Trace 

Potash (K.O) '. 0.0700% 

Lime (CaO) Trace 

Iron and alumina 2.2890% 

No. 93 — Osceola County Government Station Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 0.0000%, 

Nitrogen 2.7400% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 7.3900% 

Phosphoric acid (PA) Trace 



150 

Potash (K 2 0) 0.0900% 

Lime (CaO) Trace 

Iron and alumina 1.7600% 

No. \)i — Osceola County Government Station Muck. 

- Moisture «i 100° C 0.0000% 

Nitrogen 3.0000% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 2.2500% 

Phosphoric acid (P,0.) Trace 

Potash (K z O) 0.0400% 

Lime (CaO) Trace 

Iron and alumina 1.2600% 

Nil !)5 — Osceola County Government Station Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 0.0000% 

Nitrogen 2.7600% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 2.1300%. 

Phosphoric acid (P 2 0- 1 Trace 

Potash (K„0) 0.1000% 

Lime (CaO) Trace 

Iron and alumina 1.3900% 

Xo. 96— Osceola County Government Station Muck, sub- 
soil. 

Moisture at' 100° C 0.0000% 

Nitrogen 1.0100% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 65.8600% 

Phosphoric acid (F 2 0.) Trace 

Potash (K 2 0) 0.0300% 

Lime (CaO) Trace 

Iron and alumina 1.3000% 



< 



r 



No. 97— Osceola County St. Cloud Orchard Mnck, sandy 
ridge. 

Moisture ai' 100° C 0.0000% 

Nitrogen 1.5000% 

Insoluble matter ( sand) 53.5900% 

Phosphoric acid (P,0.) Trace 



«r 



151 

Potash (K.O) "1500% 

Lime (CaO) Trace 

Iron and alumina 10.0100% 

So. 98— Osceola County Sugar Cane Muck Land, sandy 
ridge. 

Moisture at' 100° C 0.0000% 

Nitrogen 1.3900% 

Insoluble matter (sandt 50.3800% 

Phosphoric acid (FA) Trace . 

Potash (K.O) 0.5100% 

Lime (CaO) Trace 

Iron and alumina 12.6900% 

No. 35— Polk County Bay Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 14.7050% 

Nitrogen 2.4500% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 3.2750% 

Phosphoric acid (P.O.) 0.0544% 

Potash (K a O) 0.0482% 

Lime (CaO) 3.4600% 

Iron and alumina 0.5106% 



R_Orange County Reclaimed Apopka Saw Grass 
Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 

Nitrogen 2.8000% 

Insoluble matter (sand ) 4.2000% 

Phosphoric acid (P 2 O s ) 0.2100% 

Potash (K.O) 0.0780% 

Lime (CaO) 2.0920% 

Iron and alumina 1.6500% 



g Orange County Reclaimed Apopka Saw Grass 

Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 

Nitrogen 2.8500% 

Insoluble matter (sand ) 4.5500% 



152 

Phosphoric acid (P 2 O s ) 0.1810% 

Potash (KjO) 0.0700% 

Lime (CaO) 1.9670% 

Iron and alumina 3.0200% 

T — Orange County Average Saw Grass Mock. 

Moisture at 100° C 

Nitrogen 2.2800% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 10.1500% 

Phosphoric acid (P,0 5 ) 0.2800% 

Potash (EsO) .. 0.0600% 

Lime (CaO) 1.8300% 

Iron and alumina 5.7000% 

No. 23— Lake County Bay Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 13.9500% 

Nitrogen 1.3832% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 5.0480% 

Phosphoric acid (P,O ) 0.4032% 

Potash (K',0) 0.0386% 

Lime (CaO) 3.1950% 

Iron and alumina 0.6768% 

No. 24 — Lake County Saw Grass Muck. 

Moisture at 100° C 12.2200% 

Nitrogen 2.6460% 

Insoluble matter (sand) 4.2770% 

Phosphoric acid (P g O„) 0.1152% 

Potash (K 2 0) 0.0116% 

Lime (CaO) 1.7500% 

Iron and alumina 0.5748% 



153 

A MOST PROMISING GRASS FOR SOUTHERN 
FLORIDA. 

University ok Florida 
agricultural experiment station. 



Elephant Grass, Xapicr Crass. Carter Grass. 
By J. B. Thompson. 

Napier grass, Pennisetwn purpureum, is a native of 
Tropical Africa and was first introduced into the United 
States in 1913 by the Federal Department of Agriculture. 
It is a rank growing perennial grass, with non-saccharine 
juice, and ranges from 6 feet to 15 feet or more in height. 
It is quck growing and btinchy, each plant bearing many 
coarse stalks or canes with numerous broad succulent 
leaves. At the Experiment Station h' lias shown a habit 
of sending out a branch from each of the upper joints 
during the late summer months; and in October each of 
these bears a long millet-like seed spike varying from 
3 to 10 or more inches in length. 

Propagation and Planting. 

Napier grass may be propagated by either one of three 
methods. It may be grown from joint's of the canes, 
from divisions of the root bunch, or from the seed. The 
mature canes may be cut before frost in the fall and 
banked over winter by the method commonly practiced 
in the handling of Japanese cane or sugar cane. In the 
Spring these seed canes' may be planted horizontally in 
open furrows made 6 feet apart and the canes dropped 
from 3 t'o 4 feet apart in the row. Where the number of 
seed canes is limited and it ,is desired to adopt a system 



154 

that will insure the maximum number of plants from 
the i nut-* available, single eye cuttings may be success- 
fully used. These are prepared by severing the, canes 
with a sharp slanting cut about an inch below each joint. 
In planting these the lower end of ane cutting is simply 
thrust obliquely into the plowed ground to a depth of 4 
or 5 inches. In preparation for planting the soil should 
be thoroughly harrowed to eliminate air spaces and pre- 
vent the cuttings from drying out too rapidly. If, how- 
ever, the canes are sufficiently mature, and the soil is 
in good condition both roots and sprouts will be sent 
out from the same joint and a good vigorous plant will 
soon be established. The root clump may also be divided 
into several parts, each of which is capable of producing 
an independent plant'. Napier grass seeds freely in the 
latitude of Gainesville and has produced mature seed as 
early as the last week in October. Many of these seeds 
are found to germinate; and the practice of propagating 
plants by this method would seem entirely practicable, 
at least while seed canes are not available in quantities 
adequate to entirely supply the demand for them. The 
seed should be sown in seed flats or boxes and the seed 
lings may be planted to the field when abont 6 inches 
high. Plantings should be made in rows 6 feet apart with 
spaces of from 3 to 4 feet between plant's in the row. On 
highly fertile soil these distances should be increased. 

Soil and Cultural Requirements. 

With respect to soil requirements this grass does not 
seem as exacting as are many of our more familiar for- 
age plants. It thrives remarkably well on good muck or 
other rich moist soil. It also does comparatively well on 
the lighter drier soils having average fertility. There is 
an impression rife among interested parties that this 
grass will produce large crops on any type of soil and 
that it requires little or no care. This belief is unfounded. 



155 

Plantings made in many parts of Florida during the past 
year indicate that results will vary according to the fer- 
tility of the soil, and that at least as much care and cul- 
tivation will be required as is necessary to produce a 
good crop of Japanese cane. It is a drouth resistant 
grass, but will thrive best where soil moisture is not lack- 
ing. It seems especially able to appropriate plant food 
from comparatively poor soil, but it can not continue in- 
definitely to produce heavy crops on a light soil without 
some provision for returning the plant food removed. 

Yields. Use and Feeding Value. 

There are, as yet, little data on the yields of this graxs 
in Florida, but there seems little doubt that where con- 
ditions are favorable, there is no other forage crop that 
will excel it in the production of green feed. One test 
made at the Experiment Station yielded at the rate of 
19.5 tons to the acre, while another planted at a different 
time and under different conditions gave a crop weigh- 
ing at the rate of 39.1 tons of green feed to an acre of 
land. These results were obtained from new pinewood 
land of rather better than average fertility but with no 
fertilizer. Two tests made under government auspices in 
New South Wales resulted in yields of 16 and 25 tons 
of green fodder respectively after a period of four months 
from time of planting. Napier grass is a splendid crop 
for soiling purposes, as it ratoons freely, is palatable as 
a green fodder, and very nutritious. Fats, 2.15% ; protein. 
11.36% ; sugar and starch, 46.02%. 

An official analysis made by the Government Chemist 
of New South Wales and reported in the Agricultural 
Gazette of New South Wales, for July 1917, shows this 
grass to be unusually high in food nutrients, containing 
in the green form 3.59 i>ereent protein, and constituting 



J 



'. 



15G 

ii good balanced ration for a cow when yielding a good 
How of milk. Like other green roughage, a full ration 
would not, of course, contain enough dry matter as a com- 
plete feed for fattening or forcing milk production, and 
some concentrates would lie required to produce best 
results. 



157 
CITRUS CANKER ERADICATION IN FLORIDA. 

By Wilmon Newell, Pi-ant Commissioner. 
Gainesville, Fla. 

The work of eradicating citrus canker in Florida, which 
has been carried on intensively by the State Plant Board 
aud the Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, for the past three years and eight months, 
has been an undertaking unique in many way6. The dis- 
ease, first noticed in 1913 and assuming an alarming 
aspect in 1914. had hitherto been unknown, and for a dis- 
ease so deadly and destructive to appear like lightning 
from a clear sky was undreamed of. In 1914 its de- 
structive nature became so apparent in Dade County that 
even - possible means of checking h' by sprays or other 
treatments were tried, but withont effect, and it was soon 
learned that the spread of the disease could be checked 
only by the complete and prompt destruction of all in- 
fected trees, as well as the adoption of antiseptic meas- 
ures more severe than those practiced by surgeons in 
their operating rooms! 

The fight against citrus canker in Dade County dur 
ing 1914 was waged by the growers themselves and by 
the Florida Growers' and Shippers' League, no State or 
Federal assistance being available, except a thousand dol- 
lars from the Governor's contingent fund and about the 
same amount from the State Nursery Inspector's Office. 
In spite of all that conld be done by these agencies, the 
plague continued to spread, and efforts to secure State 
aid resulted in the passage of the Florida Plant Act' in 
the Spring of 1915, and the appropriation by the State 
Legislature of a fund of $125,000 with which to conduct 
the fight against the disease. Just prior to this ijme the 
Department of Agricnltnre. through Dr. K. F. Keller 
man. Associate Chief of the Burean of Plant Indnstrv. 



158 

took a hand, mainly with a view to finding out whether 
measures of eradication appeared i'o be feasible. 

To make a long story short, the Plant Board took up 
an intensive campaign against the disease, assisted both 
financially and technically by the Department of Agricul- 
ture, and the campaign has been continued unremitting- 
ly up to the present time. 

Never before was eradication of a plant disease under- 
taken upon so tremendous a scale, and never before were 
such large amounts of money expended for such a pur- 
pose. However, the results have more than justified the 
expenditure and the effort, for it is a certainty that the 
round orange and grapefruit industries of the State 
would have, within a few years, been ruined entirely 
by the disease if allowed to have' its own way. 

Up_ to June 30, 1918, a total of 11.002,944.65 had been 
expended on the canker eradication work iu Florida. Of 
this amount |247,030.27 was money appropriated by the 
State Legislature, f648,009.57 was out of Federal appro- 
priations expended through tlie Department of Agricul- 
ture, and |107,904.81 was expended by the Florida Grow- 
ers' and Shippers' League, by County Commissioners, by 
growers and by Plant Board employees. 

Staggering as the expenditure appears, its justification 
is found in the fact that this expenditure has saved from 
practical destruction ilie State's principle industry, repre- 
senting an investment of 1140,000.000 and bringing into 
the State each year approximately f22.000.000 in cash. 

However, the expenditure of money alone could never 
have accomplished the task. The utmost care and 
thoroughness on the part of every employee of the Plant 
Board was also necessary. This, fortunately, was secured 
and the success thus far attained would not have been 
possible had not the Board from the beginning eliminated 
all political considerations. No person has ever held 
employment under the Board on account of political in- 
fluence or personal favoritism. On the contrary, effi- 



15!. 

ciency has been the sole basis upon which an employee 
could hold his position and the policy of the Board V 
promote men in strict accord with their ability and atten- 
tion to duty has resulted in an organization loyal to the 
public of Florida and wonderfully efficient. Many evi- 
dences of this loyalty have come to light. On two occa- 
sions, when funds were totally exhausted, all employees 
continued their work without compensation, even defray- 
ing their own expenses, in order that there might be no 
set-back to the work. Inspectors have worked day after 
day knee-deep in water, inspecting trees suspicioned of 
being infected. In case of newly discovered outbreaks the 
men traveled all night and on Sundays to reach the in- 
fection and wipe it out in the quickest possible time and 
in other cases men have worked in infected groves uutil 
prostrated by heat or fatigue. The battle against canker 
has been a wonderful one, even if not spectacular, and 
it ha8 by no means been without patriotic sacrifices on 
the part of those engaged in it. 

Co-operation of the citrus growers themselves was also 
vital and this co-operation the Plant Board has enjoyed 
to an unusual degree. Of course, in the beginning of 
the work there were many who did not credit the state- 
ments as to the destructiveness of the disease and it was 
perhaps only natural that they should object to the 
drastic measures taken. However, with a fuller realiza- 
tion of what failure in this undertaking would mean to 
the citrus industry, and, in a broader sense, to the entire 
State, opposition gradually died away and it may be said 
that co-operation of the growers with the Board is at 
the present time "100 per cent, perfect." 

Statistics are usually uninteresting, but in the present 
case they show as nothing else can, the magnitude of tbu 
work and the progress that has been made. 

Citrus canker has been found, at one time or another 
during the past four years, in 480 citrus properties in 
Florida. These properties contained approximately 2 per- 






160 

rent of tbe citrus grove acreage in the State. Today there 
are but five of these properties which are still classed a* 
•■infested. " This does not mean that the work of canker 
eradication is completed, for every vestige of the disease, 
in fact every individual citrus canker bacterium in the 
entire State, must be wiped out of existence. Like a fire, 
tbe disease can again break forth and spread devastation 
from a very tiny beginning. Unless the work be carried 
to its logical conclusion and be made complete, the enor- 
mous expenditures of the past will be wasted. Proper- 
ties now infected, and those which have been infected, 
must he kept under close inspection for from three to 
four years longer as a safeguard. Much of the citrus 
area still remains to be inspected for the first time, and 
until all of it has been inspected at least once we cannot 
l .c sure but what there is a center of infection in some 
remote locality. 

The total number of grove trees which have been found 
infected to date amount to 13,723, and the number of 
nursery trees infeci'ed amounted to 342,254. The extent 
to whidi the owners of citrus trees co-operated with the 
board in efforts to wipe out the disease is shown by the 
fact that owners have given their consent for destruc- 
tion, without" any compensation whatever, of 234,544 grove 
trees and 2,611,514 nursery trees, which had been ex- 
posed to the infection. 

One must not draw the conclusion that with the com- 
pletion of the eradication work in all infected Florida 
properties now known the task will be over wh"h. There 
is, potentially, almost as much danger now of citrus 
canker being introduced into Florida as there was in 1913 
and 1914. There is a considerable amount of the dis- 
ease in other Gulf States, and practically every citrus- 
producing country of importance on the face of the eanTi 
now has the disease to contend with. Only the quaran 
tine work of the Plant Board stands between the Florida 
citrus grower and additional introductions of citrns can- 



161 

ker. This quarantine work is made jusi' as thorough as 
scientific skill, hard work and available funds permit, but 
from the nature of the case it is not infallible. Future 
protection of Florida against this scourge must, there- 
fore, depend not only upon quarantine measures, but on 
inspection work within tbe State, which will detect in- 
fecti«js in their incipiency and at the same time make 
it impossible for the disease to be distributed from any 
nursery. Insi>ection of the Florida nurseries, containing 
as they do upwards of 13,000,000 citrus trees at all times, 
is no small task in n'self. All of these trees are inspected. 
practically a tree at a time, by the Nursery Inspection 
Department of the Plant Board, not once, bat many times 
between the planting of the seeds and the time when the 
Yree is ready to leave the nursery. Incidentally, the Plant 
Board feels a justifiable pride in the fact that since it 
commenced its work not a single instance has come to 
light of citrus canker being distributed on nursery stock. 

In other words, while the board bas, through one de- 
partment, been eradicating the citrus canker that was in 
Florida when the board commenced its work, its Quaran- 
tine Department has been keeping out more of the dis- 
ease, and its Nursery Inspection Department has been 
holding the second line of defense to see that nurseries 
did not become infected, either from extra or intrastate 
sources, and spread the disease. This combination must 
continue perpetually, and (is the price of the future safe- 
ty of Florida's citrus industry, even though the expense 
of future protection will doubtless be much smaller than 
iTie cost of the war on canker through which we have 
been passing, and which, it is confidently hoped, will soon 
be ended, not by an "armistice," but by complete annihila- 
tion of the enemy within our borders. 

Gainesville, Fla., Dec. 14, 1918. 



11 — Com.Agr. 






. tea 

THE CITRUS FRUIT INDUSTRY. 

A Review of Citrus Activities in Florida During the Two 
Years Ending December 31, 1918. 

By Dr. J. H. Ross, President Florida Citrus Exchange, 
the Second Largest Farmers' Co-operative Organization 
in the United States. 

The stability of the citrus fruit industry of Florida 
has perhaps been best shown within the last two years. 
Its ability to withstand seriously adverse circumstances 
. and to recuperate has been well demonstrated. 

With the beginning of the 19161917 season citrus 
growers had an excellent outlook in point of both crops 
and prices. Early fmit went forward, and was readily 
absorbed by the markets at good prices. After Ihe open- 
ing of the year 1917 conditions during the month of Jan- 
uary were generally very satisfactory to growers. 

Then unheralded there came on February 3, 1917. the 
coldest weather for twenty-five years. Snow was seen in 
certain portions of the north central part of the Ptate 
for the first time within the memory of many inhabi- 
tant's there, and a killing freeze caught practically all 
of the fruit then hanging upon the trees, while untold 
damage was done to thousands upon thousands of acres 
of valuable grove properties. 

It was largely a repetition of the big freeze of the sea- 
son of 1894-95; but the results was signally different inso- 
far as to iTie effect upon the growers themselves. While 
in 1894-95 hundreds of growers abandoned their proper- 
ties, there was apparently no disposition to do this in 
1917. Instead practically all those whose groves were 
affected forthwith applied themselves strongly to the task 
of bringing their properties back info condition. 

Horticultural experts of the State gave sound advice 
as to the best methods to be followed in rehabilitating 



163 

stricken trees. The information they gave was given wid- 
est circulation by ihe newspapers and periodicals of the 
State. This information undoubtedly was of the greatest 
value to grove owners. 

Everywhere there wa» a disposition to "stick to the 
ship ;" and the results of this determination and a proper 
application of the efforts of the growers is now strongly 
manifest. 

Volusia County provides an excellent example of this. 
In this county the damage to trees was most severe. As 
a result the crop available for marketing from there dur- 
ing the 1917-1918 season was very small; but we now 
have the example of Volusia County having for shipment 
during the 1918-1919 season considerably more than six 
rimes the volume of fruit shipped during previous sea- 
son. Moreover, prospects are reported excellent for a 
considerable increase over these figures next season. 

As a result of the previous winter's freeze the crop of 
the 1917-1918 season was considerably below normal 
amounting only to approximately 5,000,000 boxes, not all 
of which was of the most desirable quality. Prices gen- 
erally are good during a short-crop season and this was 
tme during the 1917-18 season, but the unprecedentedly 
severe weather prevailing throughout the North while 
most of the fruit was moving, the transportation tie-ups 
and other handicaps due to war conditions all combined 
to present considerable difficulties in the matter of 
marketing. 

However, to those growers who had any considerable 
volume of fruit for handling, the season was most success- 
ful in point of prices realized. The Florida Citrus Ex- 
change was able to secure for its members the highest 
average of prices on both oranges and grapefruit in the 
history of the citrus fruit industry in Florida. 

The opening of the 1918-1919 shipping season was uota- 
ble for the very early maturity of both oranges and grape- 
fruit. Due to rather unusual weather conditions fruit 



164 

generally was from three to four weeks earlier in matur- 
ing than is normally expected. The epidemic of sickness 
throughout the North proved a strong stimulus to the 
markets as a result of which both oranges and grapefruit 
vent forward in unprecedented volume right on up to 
the close of the year 1918, at which time this is written. 

Notwithstanding a certain amount of trouble due to 
decay, caused by some softness in fruit and delays in 
transportation, most excellent prices were realized for 
growers. This is particularly true when the tremendous 
volume of fruit moving out of the State during Novem- 
ber and December, 1918, is taken into consideration. 

Before the opening of the season the best available esti- 
mates placed the 1918-1919 total crop in the neighborhood 
of 8,000,000 boxes. The severe storm which ravaged 
Pinellas County caused the loss of something like 300,000 
boxes of fruit in that section. This combined with the 
effects of a certain amount of droppage generally over the 
citrus section of the State has reduced the total crop 
quite considerably. Careful estimates from well posted 
persons at the close of 1918, placed the total crop for 
the 1918-19 season at from 7,2000,000 to 7,400,000 boxes. 
According to government figures, 10,620 carloads of citrus 
fruit moved out of the State up to and including Decem- 
ber 27, 1918. Figured upon a bisis of 360 boxes to the 
car this would mean a total of 3,823,200 boxes which had 
gone forward to that date. At the rate fruit was then 
moving it is safe to figure an additional 350,000 boxes 
for the remaining days of that month ; which would mean 
that approximately 60% of the estimated crop of the 
State had been shipped before the close of the year 1918. 
The government figures earlier mentioned gave a total of 
7,887 carloads of oranges as against 4,153 for the cor- 
responding period of the year previous. Shipments of 
grapefruit were given at 2,733 cars, as against 1,318 cars 
of the season before at the same time. 



1G5 

Under the stimulus of careful advertising and the sell- 
ing efforts of the more than one hundred northern repre- 
sentatives of the Florida Citrus Exchange the Sealdsweet 
brand of this great growers, cooperative, non-profit mar- 
keting organization has become a very strong factor in 
the, successful marketing of the members of this organiza- 
tion. Purposeful following out of carefully laid adver- 
tising and sales plans have resulted in Sealdsweet oranges 
and grapefruit obtaining a place very high in the regard 
of both wholesale and retail fruit dealers in the North, 
while millions of northern housewives have been taught 
to demand Sealdsweet fruit through the newspaper and 
magazine advertising of the Florida Citrus Exchange. 
This in very large part accounts for fruit shipped under 
the Sealdsweet brand generally obtaining higher prices 
in the northern markets than is realized for other fruit 
not so distinguished. 

This advertising and concerted selling effort is made 
possible only through the standardized methods of pick- 
ing, packing and handling fruit in the packing houses 
of the various associations of the Florida Citrus Ex- 
change throughout the chVus section of Florida. Unified 
control of the methods followed by these packing houses 
makes it generally possible to deliver on the markets 
fruit of uniform grade and pack. 

The close following of uniform packing methods is one 
of the big advantages had through the operation of the 
centralized and thoroughly equipped packing houses of 
the Florida Citrus Exchange. Aside from the economics 
affected, this has proven one of the greatest advantages 
to those growers who are members of this organization. 

One of the .significant developments in connection with 
the citrus fruit industry of Florida within the iaai two 
years has been the entry of a new factor into the situa- 
tion in the form of the Exchange Supply Company, which 
is affiliated with the Florida Citrus Exchange. The Ex- 
change Supply Company is closely patterned after the 



lGli 

Fruit Growers' Supply Company of California, which is 
an affiliation of the California Fruit Growers' Exchange. 

It has for its purpose the purchase of necessary ma- 
terial and supplies for growers in large quantities and 
the sale of them at cost to iter stockholders. 

The various associations of the Florida Cii'rus Ex- 
change are stockholders of the Exchange Supply Com- 1 
pany. The grower members of these associations place 
their orders for materials with their local organization. 
The Exchange Supply Company bills all materials di- 
rectly to the associations, which in turn collect from 
the growers for the materials furnished i'o them. Ma- 
terials furnished to the packing houses are paid for from 
association funds. 

The Exchange Supply Company charges supplies to its 
members at prevailing retail prices. In this way it does 
not disturb the normal retail markets, but, due to the 
company being owned byiliose who make their purchases 
through it, all the profits from its sales are returned to 
purchasers in the form of rebates and dividends. 

One of the surest ways to make money is to save money, 
and the citrus growers who are enabled to obtain their 
various supplies at lowest possible cost tlirough the med- 
ium of the Exchange Supply Company, and who, in turn, 
are able to obtain for their fruit its full value in the 
Northern markets by having it handled through the co- 
operative, non-profit selling organization of the Florida 
Citrus Exchange, very nai'urally must obtain a larger 
compensation for their activities and efforts than can 
any growers who have not the benefit of affiliation with 
these organizations. 

The beneficial effects of co-operative marketing of their 
products by growers have been thoroughly established in 
Florida through the greatly higher average prices ob- 
tained for Florida citrus fruits in the Northern markets 
since the Florida Citrus Exchange became an established 
factor in the marketing activities* of this StaVe. These 



167 



marketing activities have been realized in the face of con- 
stantly increasing production, which makes them all the 
more notable. 

The commercial value of co-operative marketing is firm- 
ly established in Florida. The developments of the lasr' 
two seasons have only served to emphasize that value. 
In view of this, and in view of the stability of th« cit- 
rus fruit industry as shown in the face of most adverse 
conditions, it is Bafe to say that* the outlook for the cit- 
rus industry in Florida seemingly never was brighter than 
at the close of the year .1918 when this review is written. 



168 

MILCH GOATS. 

Br H. S. Elliot, Chief Clerk, Department of Agriculture. 

For several months this Department has received many 
inquiries relative to this Bubject and the probable success 
of sflch an industry in Florida. 

On investigation by this Department we find this is a 
very limited industry, the territory covered in its opera- 
tion probably not exceeding half a dozen States in num- 
ber, excepting Florida, Where the number of goats used 
for supplying milk to human beings does not exceed fifty 
at this time. 

The industry is operated to some extent in New York, 
Virginia, New Mexico, Arizona, and in California, to a 
considerable extent in the latter, and where it probably 
meet with more success than in any other section of the 
United States. We believe there can be no reasonable 
grounds, for doubting its adaptability to and entire suc- 
cess in Florida, and especially when confined to the hilly 
and rolling lands of the State without regard to section. 

With the present ecoonmic condition and the extraordi- 
nary high cost of living, the use of the inilch goat is one 
sure means of reducing living expenses on the part of 
small families and at the same time placing one of the 
most nutritious and wholesome foods within their daily 
control at the minimum of coBt. It is our deliberate opin- 
ion that it is an -industry both capable and worthy of the 
highest development. 

General Information Concerning Milch Goats. 

Milch goats are kept for milk production in many for- 
eign countries, especially in Continental Europe, Great 
Britain, Scandinavia, and in the countries bordering the 
Mediterranean. They are found in limited numbers in 
different States in the Union, and aTe doubtless more nu- 
merous in California than elsewhere in the United States. 



109 

They are generally kept in very small herds that supply 
the milk used by the family. A relatively small number 
of large herds is found in California, gome in Alabama, 
and some in Virginia. 

The comparatively dry climate of the Southwest agrees 
well with milch goats, and they are kept on land differing 
greatly in topography and feed conditions. If sufficient 
feed is available, hilly and even rocky land can be used for 
keeping goats. Goats do not thrive well on low, damp, or 
swampy land as the conditions on such land are conducive 
to foot rot and other troubles. Provided they are properly 
cared for, goats will do well on well-drained valley land. 

Alfalfa in the Southwest furnishes an abundant teed 
supply in the interior valleys, which could be utilized in 
goat keeping as at the present time for dairy cattle and 
other classes of live stock. In most places, where alfalfa 
cannot be grown successfully, other pasture crops well 
adapted for feeding goats can be raised to advantage, 
such as clover, vetch, rape, and peas, cow peas, velvet 
beans, etc., such as is found growing in waste places, on 
vacant city lots, along roadways and fences, on hill lands 
where there is not sufficient available feed for keeping a 
■cow. Goats thus largely derive their living from feed that 
would otherwise go to waste, which accounts for their 
I>opularity among people in urban communities and for 
the fact that they are generally considered most economi- 
cal milk producers. The present conditions, care and 
possible extension of the milch goat industry in this State 
will be discussed further on in this bulletin. 

Breeds op Milch Goats. 

There are many different breeds of milch goats, but 
comparatively few of these are represented in California, 
or other States, those present in largest numbers being 
the ToggenbuTg, Saanen, and Anglo-Nubian. A great 
variety of crosses and numerous goats of no particualr 
breeding are also fonnd. 



170 

Toggenburg. — This breed has its native home in Tog- 
genburg Valley, Switzerland, where it has been bred for 
centuries. The prevailing color is brown, both light and 
dark, with white markings. A white brindle mark is al- 
ways present on each side of the face. White is also pres- 
ent on the under line and on the legs below the knees anj 
hocks. White is also now and then found on the sides of 
the animals. As a rule, they are hornless, but horns are 
some times developed. The head is rather long, facial 
lines straight or slightly concave, ears of a medium size, 
more or less erect, although sometimes held almost' hori- 
zontally. The neck is somewhat longer and slender and 
there may or may not be wattles at the base of the lower 
jaw. Toggenburgs usually have a beard, which on the 
male is long and heavy ; the better specimens of the breed 
are always lean and of medium size, females weighing 
about 100 to 140 pounds, while bucks as a rule weigh from 
110 to 140 pounds. Both long-haired and shon'-haired ani- 
mals are often seen in the same herd. It has been our ex- 
perience that the Toggenburgs are very hardy and make 
splendid mothers. 

Saanen — This is another Swiss breed wnich is quite 
similar to the Toggenburg in general conformation. They 
are a little heavier in weight, mature bucks weighiug from 
175 to 200 pounds and does from 110 to 140 pounds. They 
are of a white or cream color, and usually shon'-haired. 
The Saanen is considered a hornless breed, but horns often 
occur as in the case of the Toggenburg. The Saanen may 
be used to great advantage in grading up herds, as many 
of the common goats are white in color. 

Nubians or Anglo-Nubians. — This goat is probably the 
result of a cross between the common short-haired goat of 
England and the Nubian, Egyptian, Abyssinian, Chitral, 
or some other Oriental breed of goats. They have a short 
coat of no fixed color, all colors and combinations being 
found. The ears are long, wide and pendant or semi- 
pendant. The facial lines arc arched with a slight taper 



171 

toward the muzzle. The eyes are large and full, and the 
forehead wide. The kids are relatively large and grow 
rapidly. 

The Milk op the Goat. 

One of the first questions usually asked about milch 
goats is in regard i'o the quantity and quality of milk pro- 
duced. Milch goats are similar to dairy cows in that some 
do not yield a sufficient quantity to pay for their keep, 
while others are profitable dairy animals. A good goat 
should give 800 to 1,000 pounds (approximately 400-500 
quarts) during a lactation period. Many breeders speak 
of the production of i!heir animals in rather uncertain 
terms, such as a four-quart doe, a three-quart doe, etc. 
This refers to the production for a single day during the 
maximum flow of milk. The individuality of the animal 
is the greatest factor influencing milk production. Breed 
is also an important factor. The Toggenburg and Saanen 
are, as a rule, heavy milkers. While but' little is definitely 
known in regard to the production of the other breeds at 
the present time, Pelger states that the Anglo-Nubian is 
a good milker of rich milk, containing more butter-fat 
than that of Swiss goads, although the yield is, not as a 
rule, as large. 

Composition of Goats' Milk. 

The composition of goats' milk varies as that of cows' 
milk, with the breed, period of lactation, and the individ- 
uality of the animal. But little information is at band 
concerning the composition of the milk of goats of differ- 
ent breeds. So far as known, the milk of the breeds of 
Swiss origin does not contain asr high a per cent of butter- 
fat as that from the Anglo-Nubian or even from some of 
the common goats. As the doe advances in her period of 
lactation the fat content of the milk increases. This also 



172 

varies with other conditions, like intervals between milk- 
ings, completeness of milking, etc., so that the text of a 
single sample of milk will not give a reliable index to the 
average quantity of i!he milk. This can only be obtained 
bj- the regular testing of the milk for one or more full 
days at intervals during the lactation period, in the 
same way as for dairy cows. A few analyses of goats' milk 
taken from different sources are given below : 

COMPOSITION OP GOATS' MILK (GENEVA, N. Y., 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.) 

Analyses were made of twenty-three samples of milk 
from. eleven animals: 





Average 


Variations 




per cent. 


Per ceat. 


Pat 


3.82 






12.12 


40- .80 


Total Proteins . 


3.21 


9.22-17.63 




2.40 


2.24- 5.21 


Ash 


55 




Specific gravity, 


1,0294. 





COMPOSITION OP GOATS' MILK (CALIFORNIA 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.) 

Analyses of the milk from the does in the University 
herd are made weekly. The averages given below are the 
results of the analyses made weekly during the entire lac- 
tation periods. With one exception these does are Tog- 
genburgs : 





Average 
per cent. 


Variations 
per cent. 


Total solids 


.... 88.05 

11.95 


9.5-14.8 


Fat 


3.40 


1.7- 5.6 




8.55 


7.8- 9.2 









173 



OTHER SOURCES GIVE THE COMPOSITION OF 
GOATS' MILK AS FOLLOWS : 



Authority. 


Water 

per 

cent. 


Fat 

per 

cent. 


Casein and 1 Sugar 
albumen ] per 
per cent. 1 cent. 


Ash 

per 

cent. 


Landweinth . . . 
Hoffman 

Koenig 


85.50 
85.60 
86.91 

86.88 


4.80 

4.60 

4.73 

•4.70 


5.00 
4.80 
3.68 
3.76 


4.00 
4.30 
4.50 
4.64 


.70 

.90 
.85 



•Variations, 2.29-7.55 per cent (Compiled from about 
100 analyses). 

Flavob and Odob of Goats' Milk. 

Many people bejieve that all goats milk has a peculiar 
"goaty" odor or taste. This is not, however, necessarily 
the case. A disagreeable flavor is often times due to the 
presence of a buck in the milking herd ; it may also come 
from the feeding of improper feed. Provided good feed 
and care are given the doe, and the milk is produced un- 
der sanitary conditions, no disagreeable odor or flavor is 
found in goats milk, although it has a distinct flavor, dif- 
ferent from that of cows milk. 

Length of Lactation Period. — Some of the common goats 
milk for only four or five months ; on the other hand it is 
not easy to "dry-up" many well-bred does even after they 
have been milking for ten months. The common goat herd 
may be improved, however, by the use of pure bred bucks 
of known milking strains. A good milch goat should give 
milk for at least eight months. 

Use of Goats' Milk. 

Direct Consumption. — Goats' milk is a common article 
of diet throughout Europe. Foreign writers agree in at- 
testing to the value of goats milk for invalids and child- 
ren. Physiciaps give testimony as to the beneficial use of 
goats' milk for infant feeding. 



174 

The following quotation from the annual report of the 
Geneva, N. Y., Agricultural Experiment Station for 1915 
it of interest in this connection : 

"During the past few years the station has maintained 
a herd of milch goats for the purpose of studying, uo\ 
<>ii 1 v the cost of maintenance, but also the adaptability of 
the milk to certain uses. The most striking results so far 
secured relate to feeding goats milk to infants. The sta- 
tion has had the opportunity to supply this milk to a 
fairly large number of very young children who were in 
serious physical condition, due to their inability to prop- 
erly digest and assimilate modified cows' milk or 
any of the commercial infants' foods that were tried. In 
nearly all cases of this kind, the physical condition of the 
children has been built up, and satisfactory growth has 
been brought about by the use of goats' milk. It is not 
entirely clear why this milk has proven to be so efficient 
a food in the instances under observation. 2 

2 Xew York (Geneva) Agri. Exp. Sta., Bull. 413, p. 639." 

Care of Milch Goats. 

The quantity and quality of milk which a goat will give 
depends very largely on the animal herself. 

A good scrub, or common garden goat may give as 
much as l'/a or 2 quarts a day for two months, but if her 
milking qualities are not developed, she soon goes dry. 

A grade — i. c, the product of a pure bred or cross bred 
sire and a scrub dam will produce more milk than her 
dam and the quality will depend largely on her sire. 

A cross — i. e., the product of two specimens of different 
pure breeds will give a fine quantity of milk and it will 
vary in quality according to the herds of sire and dam. 

The Swiss goats are the Holsteins of the goat family, 
giving an enormous quantity of rather poor milk, the 
amount of milk being as much as 6$ quarts in exception- 
ally good animals. The butter fat would not.' be higher 



175 . 

than 3.5 per cent. Of course individuals vary — some more, 
some lees. 

The Nubian goat and the Indian goat are the Jerseys 
of the goat family. The Nubian will produce 4^ quarts of 
milk which will test 8 per cent or 9 per cent butter fat. 
Note carefully the distinction that is made all through 
this article between grades and crosses. 

The young does should be kept growing all the time, and 
should never be bred until fifteen months of age at least. 
The period of gestation is from 147 to 152 days and the 
dams stand a great deal of rough usage without accident'. 
Two kids are generally born at a time, but we have 
known goats to have three, four, and sometimes five young 
at a birth. The kids should be allowed to take the cole- 
strum, or first secretion of the glands, which is yellowish 
and thick, and of a mucilagenous nai"ure. It seems to act 
as a laxatfre and tones up the systems of the young. 

The udder should be very carefully watched, and if It 
becomes inflamed and over-distended it should be very 
carefully washed with warm water with a few drops of 
turpentine in it, and then carefully massaged with olive 
oil. Then a part of the contends of the ndder should be 
drawn — sometimes even before the kids are born. 

If the kids are pure bred or cross bred they may all be 
kept for stock, as there is a great demand for young ani- 
mals. If they are grades, the males may be killed at birth 
or else emasculated, and at from six months to a year they 
make most excellent meat, resembling mutton, if fed on 
pasture, and venison, if fed in the woods. 

The females should be bred to pure or cross bred bucks. 
It is good to breed back one generation to its own sire to 
fix the type. A grade should never be allowed to be the 
sire of any kids. Never keep one. 

There is a general impression that goats are omniverous, 
eating any and everything to which they may gain ac- 
cess. This is a greaf mistake. Under proper conditions, 
the goat is the most fastidious of all our domestic ani- 



17G 

inals, aud refuses to driuk any but pure, fresh water, and 
xc'orns sloppy, sour or greasy food. Indeed the greatest 
trouble in goat feeding is to prevent waste in stall feed- 
iug, for if once any of the food is dropped under foot, it 
in never t'onched. 

When it is available the best results are obtained from 
free grazing on land which has been deforested, but not 
yet reduced to good pasture, as the animals are browsers 
rather than grazers, and relish a very diversified diet. 

It is best to have the land well fenced, and a good fence 
consists of woven wire twenty-six inches high, with a 
strand of barbed wire three inches above it, and another 
strand six or eight inches above that. The tendency of a 
goat is rather to squeeze through or crawl under than 
jump over an obstacle. 

The goat should be exceedingly valuable to persons 
dwelling in an arid or semi-arid country, for «he will not 
only make a living, but* thrive, and supply a generous 
quantity of delicious milk and wholesome, palatable meat, 
where the cow would perish from starvation. Of course, 
on such land a goat should have free range. 

Easily handled, readily finding her own food, and trans- 
ported with but little trouble, the goat makes a fine foster 
mother for infants, and has been used to raise lambs, 
calves, and by the irony of fate, one was foster mother to 
a lion cub in the Zoological Gardens in Paris. 

It is surprising how small a quantity of water will suf- 
fice for a goat, and she must be freqently encouraged to 
drink. 

The Angora produces mohair, and is largely used as a 
means of destroying brush and shrubbery on newly- 
cleaned land, but is not a milch goat. 

The garden refuse, clean and fresh, with scraps from 
the kitchen, supplemented with some sweet hay and a 
little grain, will be ample t'o feed these animals. Their 
kids, if pure bred or cross bred, will bring enough to pay 
for all the bought feed for a year. 



177 

A tirst -class milch goat, pure bred or cross bred, giving 
a gallon of milk a day when fresh, will readily bring 
150.00 to flOO.OO or more. But even at that apparently 
hfgh price they are exceedingly scarce, and for every doe 
kid a breeder has sold, he has had not less than fifty 
chances to sell the same kid. Following are the names 
and addressee of a number of milch goat breeders in il«e 
several States: 

D. R. Schmidt, Hannibal, Mo. — Anglo-Nubians, Toggen 
burgs, and grades. 

Esther Tnfts, Meredith, N. H. — Saanen and Toggen- 
burgs. 

Edwin W. Pritchett, Rt. 1, Long Beach, California — 
Swiss Toggenburgs. 

Will L. Tewalt, Richey. Miss. — Pnre Toggenburgs. 

Victor D. Hondt, Spankle, Washington. 

Fred C. Lounsbury, Plainfleld. N. J. — Anglo-Nubian 
and Toggenburg grades. 

G. T. Etzel, 293 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Miss H. A. Wood. Swiss Goat Dairy, Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia — Purebred Swiss Toggenburgs. 

Florida Breeders. 

Eppie L. Barber, Lake Worth. 

William B. McCain, Clement. 

Capt. Hngh L. Willoughby, Port Sewell. 

Bennet't Land, Jr., Plant City. 

Oakland Hill Goat Ranch. Lake Geneva. 

The Walkill Stock Farm Co.. Green Cove Springs, Fla. 



12— Com.Agr. 



178 

ANGORA GOATS AND SHEEP IN FLORID \ 
WHY NOT BOTH? 

By H. S. Elliot, Chief Clerk Department of Agriculture. 

Iu the interest of sheep meat of the highest quality 
we suggest the growing of Angora Goats in Florida, a> 
well as sheep. We offer some suggestions to thoes inter- 
(sucl, which we hope will induce the growing of An- 
goras on a much larger scale in Florida than heretofore. 
But before deciding upon which is the more profitable 
for the farmer it will be necessary to look into the hab- 
its of both. The habits of sheep are so well known that 
it would seem to mention them is a waste of ink, but in 
order to make a comparison h' is necessary to do so. 
Goats and sheep belong to two different classes of ani- 
mals. The sheep are grazera, eat grass; the goats are 
browsers, eat the twigs and shrubs. Sheep love to nip 
the short and tender grass close to the ground. Goats 
prefer the leaves and twigs of shrubs and want t'o feed 
with head up and hate to lower the head to get a bite. 
The goat prefers to eat the top off everything he comes 
across, weeds brush, briars, etc. How often do we see 
spuis in the sheep pasture where tbe sheep have eaten 
the grass to the roots and left other places where the 
grass had grown up and covered the ground with fine 
grass, because they had gotten this one spot eaten down 
until it is very short and Vender they kept it there (be- 
cause it is tender) until it is so poor it will hardly pro- 
duce grass at all. Goats eat the coarser foliage in their 
pasture such as brush, briers and weeds, and leave the 
grass for the other stock until the former is all consumed. 
No other st'ock will feed after sheep, but they do not ob- 
ject to. eating after goats. Turn a flock of sheep into a 
wheat Btubble sown to grass badly grown up with weeds, 
etc., and the sheep will make paths through the weeds 
and eat up the young grass and probably kill It. Turn 



179 

goats into tie same field and they will eat off the weeds 
and leave the grass to grow. Wild carrots, daisies, cock 
leburs, thistle, and snch weeds have no terror for the 
man who keeps goats, as they make good grazing in Sum 
mer, and if cat before they bloom good hay for Win 
ter. 

Fencing : 

Goats are not hard to fence if they have never been 
in any inclosure except a corral, and hence do not know 
how to jump. Any good fence will ihirn them; they are 
more apt to crawl under than jump over. But when they 
do learn to jump they are good at the job. A woven 
wire fence three feet high is an ideal goat fence; one 
with square meshes is preferable, with stay wires not 
closer than twelve inches apart. Angora goats breed but' 
once a year, and usually bring forth their young in late 
Winter or Spring, usually one, but sometimes twins. The 
kids are delicate when first born, but when once filled 
with mother's milk they stand lots of exposure. The 
Fall is the best season to bny goats, and then you can 
see the mohair, and it has not added much to the price. 
If von buy in the Spring you must buy the fleece as 
well as the goat. Shorn goats all look alike, and no one 
can tell a good-haired goat after it is clipped. Does are 
more apt to disown their kids if moved close to kidding 
time. 

Thb Flesh. 

The flesh of the Angora goat is considered superior to 
mutton by everyone who has eaten it It has a wild 
gamey flavor, and is called Angora venison by a great 
many in the Western markets, because it has the same 
flavor as venison. This is because both are browsers 
are not grazers, and as they bofh live on the same kind 



180 

of food, it is natural their flesh should have the same 
flavor. The flesh of goats raised on grass alone resem- 
bles mutton more than venison. All animals that are 
shorn for their fleeve should be kept out of the rain as 
mncli as possible, and some breeders of fine sheep bring 
in their sheep whenever it looks like rain because sheep 
having such a thick coat of wool over their backs do not 
care for the rain and will not go to shelter. But the 
goat whose hair parts on the back and leaves his back 
to take the rain will rush pell-mell to shelter from the 
slightest shower and stay there until it ceases, or he is 
compelled to go out on account of hunger. 

But about the returns from keeping these two kinds 
of animals. We all know that good sheep shear from 5 to 
8 pounds of wool worth from 25 to 40 cents per pound 
at this time, and the heavier the fleece (other things be- 
ing equal) the less the price, so much so that ram's 
fleeces that weigh as much as 15 pounds and over bring 
but half price. With the heavier fleece bringing the low- 
est price it is not much inducement for the sheepman to 
breed for the heavier fleeces. With the Angora goat it 
is just the opposite. Mohair, the fleece of the Angora 
goat is worth one year's growth from 75 cents to $1.00 
per pound at this time, while good long hair (12 inches 
and up) is worth from $ 1.00 to $6.00 per pound, accord- 
ing to condition. It has been grown 22 inches long in 
one year and to weigh 21 ]H>unds to the fleece. Two buck 
fleece grown in Montana weighed 42 pounds, and brought 
$6.50 per pound, and a doe's fleece in New Mexico weighed 
14 | ion mis and sold for $43.00. A buck's fleece in New 
Mexico weighed 19 Vi pounds and sold for $84.00. So 
you see that the longer ind heavier hair that you can 
grow the better price you can get. There is a market in 
Sew York and Boston fo • mohair 12 inches and over in 
length at $1.00 to $6.00 i pound. And evidence that it 
can be grown 12 inches aud over in length is shown in the 
fact that no buck can be registered in South Africa that 



181 

does not show a growth of 12-inch hair in 12 mouths. 
Goat raising in the United States is in its infancy, and 
yet we" are producing some of the finest mohair in the 
world. The man that will feed and hreed his goats with 
the same care as his sheep will soon be producing a 
quality of hair that will top the market and he will have 
no hriars, brush or noxious weeds on his farm. The 
I'nited States Department of Animal industry is au- 
thority for the statement that 40 goat swill clear as much 
land as a man with a mattock and do it much better, and 
that there are millions of acres of land in almost every 
state that could be doubled in value by keeping goats on 
it. for a few years. 

Climate: 

Goats have been successfully raised from Maine to 
Texas, and in Asia Minor, where they originated, the 
climate is similar to the United States, with hot sum- 
mers and cold winters, with snow and rain. 

Goat Industry. 

The raising of Angora goats has more to woik up to 
than any other animal industry. aB by careful breeding 
and feeding one can increase the clip of his goats fully 
300 per cent. And increases the price of the hair at about 
the same rate, and at the same time free the land of 
brush and weeds, so the pasture will look like a lawn. 

Adaptability. 

The Angora goat is as adaptable to Florida conditions, 
climate, etc., as our common goat, and far more profit- 
able as the foregoing article shows. We advise our peo- 
ple to grow them. Their mohair is the most valuable wool 
in the world, their flesh is in every respect equal to mut- 



182 

ton, and the cost of their keep is lees than any other food 
animal in the world. 

The following bulletin by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture will be interesting: 

The Angora Goat. 

U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Farmers' Bulletin No. 573. 
Contribution from the Bureau of Animal Industry, A. 
D. Melvin, Chief, April 27, 1914. 

Origin and Distribution. 

The Angora originated in the vilayet of Angora in 
Asia Minor. This location and South Africa are to- 
day the two large foreign centers of mohair production. 

The Sultan of Turkey passed an edict in 1881 prohibit- 
ing the exportation of Angoras, expecting thereby to 
confine the industry to Asia Minor and have a monopoly 
ii 1 >on the mohair trade 

In 1901 South Africa also passed a law for the same 
purpose, which is usually referred to as the Angora ex- 
port-duty act. This act provided for an export duty of 
£100 (J486.65) on each Angora goat exported. Since 
that time importations have been entirely prohibited. 

It was feared for a time that prohibiting the importa- 
tion of breeding stock would have a bad effect upon the 
industry in America, but later evidence has indicated 
that some of the best blood had already been brought to 
the United States and that deterioration apparently does 
not take place here, as experts say that the best' Ameri- 
can product is equal to the best grown in Turkey or 
South Africa. 

Faith in the excellence of American Angoras has been 
demonstrated by other nations, as quite a number of ex- 
portations have been made from the UnhVd States. Tn 



183 

1894 six Angoras were exported to Sooth Africa from 
California, and the next year 20 bocks followed for $1,000 
cash. Canada, Alaska, and some of the Pacific Islands 
also have flocks that came originally from California 
Recently exportations have been made to Brazil and Ar- 
gentine Republic. 

The Angora was evidently bred pure in Asia Minor 
for many years previous to the last half century. About 
50 years ago they were largely crossed upon the common 
Kurd goats of the district. Borne authorities give their 
opinion to the effect that not a flock escaped the inflox 
of Kurd blood. This has generally been considered a 
very harmful proceeding, and many hold that' kemp in 
the Angora's fleece is stil an outward sign of the pres- 
ence of this foreign blood. 

The Angora, as brought from Turkey, was considered 
loo small for American purposes and was largely crossed 
upon i'he common goat. One eminent Angora author- 
ity has said that he doubted whether there was a pnre- 
bred Angora in America. This statement is probably 
a little overdrawn, as other well-known Angora breed- 
ers claim that some flocks have been kept entirely pure, 
but undoubtedly crossing was at one time a very common 
practice. The purposes were i'o obtain a larger, hardier 
animal, and to increase the breeding stock. This has 
largely been accomplished, and it is the general opinion 
that the American Angora is better suited to local con- 
ditions and gives wider satisfaction than the original 
conld ever have done. 

Description of the American Angora. 

The Angora, as bred in the United StaVes, is almosi 
pure white, bnt occasionally a black one appears. Some 
profess to see in this the cropping out of impure strains 
of blood. Both sexes are usually horned, but polled in- 
dividuals occur. The ears are either partially erect or 



184 

pendulous. The body should be built upon lines denoting 
a good constitution and should be symmetrical. The 
fleece should cover all partfe of the body except the in- 
side of the upper part of the legs; should be of fine qual- 
ity, closely carled, of a high luster, and as nearly as pos- 
sible free from kemp. 

Impobtance of the Angora. 

New uses are constantly being found for the Angora. 
Their value in clearing up brush lands has been men- 
tioned in the introduction, but it is worthy of more ex- 
tended discussion. It is estimated that there are 3,000,- 
000 acres of logged-off lands in the Northwest that could 
be profitably converted into homesteads. Already many 
fields in this section have been enabled to smile under 
bountiful harvests made possible by the repeat'ed brows- 
ing off of the brush by the Angora. Many settlers who 
have developed farms in this section are loud in their 
praise of the Angoras and attribute their rapid progress 
to the use of this animal. 

The following indicates a new use to which the An- 
gora has been placed in the West: 

Angora Goats to Prevent Forest Fires. — In order to 
keep the fire breaks on the southern California forest 
reserves clear of weeds, an ingenious plan has been pnt 
into operation which will save the Government thousands 
of dollars and incidentally provide forage for large herds 
of Angora goats. The plan was originated by Forest 
Supervisor B. H. Charlton, of Los Angeles, and provides 
for free grazing for a herd of 600 goats on the reserve. 
They were shipped into the State from Arizona and al- 
lowed to roam at will over the pan's of the range where 
their services are required. Their help to the forest 
rangers is in keeping down the growth of weeds, grass 
and small shrubs on the strips of cleared land, known as 
fire breaks, which follow the ridges through the forest 



185 

and serve to check the spreading of forest fires. These 
fire breaks are of little value unless such growth is kept' 
down, as the weeds and grass dry up in California Sum- 
mers and would carry the flames across the clearings. 
The goats feed close, keeping the fire breaks bare of vege- 
tation, and thus do the work of gangs of laborers. In 
this way the Government's pay roll is kept down, while 
the owners of the goats are provided with free grazing 
for their herds. 

The im'erurban Railway Company between Seattle 
and Tacoma recently purchased a band of Angoras to 
keep their right of way clean and attractive. The above 
two are simply examples of a general type that may 
suggest local uses to which the Angora might be suit- 
able. 

It should not be inought that the West is the only 
part of the country where the Angora will fit in. In 
the Central West, many pasture fields that have "grown 
np" while other stock was being pastured upon them 
could be reclaimed and made to carry more a\bck by 
their use. In the South there are also many abandoned 
fields that might profitably pasture a band of Angoras, 
and gradually be made ready for cultivation. 

While the Angora will get along upon grass and weeds 
it is more satisfactory to have a browse in connection 
with these. Browsing is Vhe natural way for them to feed 
and they do not generally give the best results unless 
they have access to a certain amount of brush, etc. How- 
ever, it should be stated that rough brash land is not 
suitable for growing extra long mohair, especially after 
•die fleece is about 6 inches long. 

The question as to whether goats can be pastured with 
other live stock can be answered in the affirmative. Their 
presence is in no way objectionable to cattle and sheep. 
In the case of the latter, a few goats are often allowed 
to run wrtli the flock for the purpose of keeping the 
dogs away. It is doubtful whether this purpose is ac- 



186 

coniplished, as there are instances where the gouts them- 
selves have been killed, but it illustrates the point that 
the sheep and goats feed together satisfactorily. 

Allowing goats to run with horses is not objection- 
able to the latter, but there is danger of the goats being 
kicked. Accordingly, this plan does not give very great 
satisfaction. This is even more true with jacks and 
yonng mules. Pasturing with hogs is generally imprac- 
tical because of the danger of the hogs devouring the 
young kids. 

'Regarding the number of goats that can be pastured 
per acre, only general figures can be given. The soil 
length of pasture season, the climate and whether the 
pasture is to be permanent or the goats turned in merely 
to clean up the brush are some of the factors deciding 
this. There are sections unsuitable for cultivating pur- 
poses where it might be desirable to pasture the goats 
year after year. Eating off the browse too closely would 
kill it, hence it is desirable under these conditions to 
have several fields that are pastured for short periods in 
rotation. Even then the goats will often peel the brush 
and gradually destroy it. 

For cleaning up brush land for oilier agricultural pur- 
poses from two to five goats per acre from two to four 
years will usually do the work. It has been asserted that 
the Angora can eat all kinds of poisonous plauts with- 
out ill effects. They naturally feed upon a wide variety 
of vegetation, browsing a leaf here and another i*here. 
and the amount of the poisonous plants consumed at any 
one time is usually small. No bad results would be like- 
ly under these conditions. There are other records of 
where hungry goat's have been turned in upon fields con- 
taining little else than poisonous plants and of large num- 
bers dying because of having eaten heavily of them. Tliit* 
has been found true of the laurel plant especially. Green 
brier has also beeu found objectionable, but from an- 
other standpoint. This applies especially to goats with 



187 

considerable length of fleece. They become entangled 
among the vines and frequently die, being nnable to free . 
themselves. 

Value and Use ok Mohaib. 

It has often been said that the Angora works and pays 
for its board at the same time. The value of the fleece or 
mohair is considerable and is increasing. The ideal fleece 
should possess length, quality or fineness, luster, strength 
of fiber, freedom from kemp, and it should be closely 
curled but not kinky. Mohair is made into plush for rail- 
road cars and unholstering furniture. It is also used for 
automobile tops, coat linings, dress goods, men's sum- 
mer suits, braids, rugs, carriage robes, imitation furs, 
couch and table covers, sofa pillows, portieres, and curled 
false human hair. For a number of years the price of mo 
hair varied between wide imitations, depending upon the 
decree of fashion, but during the past few years there 
has been a steady increase in price, undoubtedly caused 
by the more extended use of the article, and fashion no 
longer plays an important role in determining its value. 

The weight of fleece for American Angoras ranges from 
2 to 12 pounds. The average weight of fleece has been 
placed at 2J pounds for one year's growth. Shearing 
once a year is practiced, except in the Southwest. Here 
climatic conditions are such that the Angoras often shed 
their fleece if not clipped twice, hence they are usually 
sheared both in the Spring and Fall. Where the fleece 
is allowed to grow for 12 months the average length is 
about 10 inches. The total production of mohair in the 
United States for 1913 will probably approach 5,000,000 
pounds. The best of it comes from the Northwest. In 
Oregon, Polk County leads and the product of this county 
has sold for from 42 to 55 cents per pound for the past 
few years. The Northwest Angora Goat Association re- 
ports an average cash production of about 91.75 per head. 



188 

with many flocks averaging as much as |2.25. From su- 
perior flocks of California and Oregon it is not unusual 
to get 15 to 20-inch stple in one year's growth. In Texas 
and New Mexico much mohair falls under the 6-inch 
standard (because of shearing twice a year), which is 
the shortest length generally desired. The short product 
is largely responsible for the lower average quality of 
American mohair. The Southwestern product shrinks 
heavier than that from other sections. This is especially 
true of the Arizona and New Mexico product, but some 
Teaxs hair shrinks as" light as 5 per cent. California 
mohair often has a characteristic reddish cast. 

Notwithstanding the large domestic production about 
2.000,000 pound of mohair are annually imported into 
the United States. The imported mohair is of better 
quality than the average American product. If the prac- 
tice of clipping twice a year could be abolished, the dif- 
ference in quality would probably largely disappear, as 
these short fleeces reduce the average quality to_ a consid- 
erable extent. The shrinkage of American hair is said 
to average more than that imported, but some American 
authorities dispute this statement. The shrinkage is es"- 
timated at from 12 to 15 per cent. The shrinkage of 
Arizona and New Mexico mohair is largely due to dirt, 
etc., while that of the Oregon hair is caused by natural 
grease. In most cases the foreign mohair is blended with 
the American product and spun in this manner. The aim 
for future advancement in this industy should be toward 
increasing the average quality rather than the quantity 
of mohair produced. There need be no discouragement 
in this, as it has already been said that the best mohair 
of this county is equal to any produced. Another word 
of encouragement is spoken by competent authorities 
praises the marked improvement that has already taken 
place in American mohair, both in the matter of quality 
and freedom from kemp. 

The best mohair comes from the kids, the young 



189 

wethers, aud does. As the goat grows older the hair be- 
comes coarser and gradually loses its luster and curliug 
qualities. The production of extra long mohair, from 1- 
to 24 inches, has been the subject for considerable dis- 
cussion of late. This quality of goods is used for making 
false hair, etc., and sells for a much higher price than 
the ordinary grades. A notable instance is the one of 
the fleece of Romeo, sweepstakes buck at the El Paso 
show in 1910. It weighed 18 pounds, measured 20% 
inches in length, and sold for |115. This quality of hair 
could not be grown, however, under average conditions. 
It could not be produced upon rough brush land nor un- 
der any conditions where feed and care were not the 
best. In the Southwest it would be difficult to produce 
it, on account of climatic conditions, yet some breeders 
have succeeded in producing an excellent quality of 
fiber in this section. 

As a rule, the extra long fleeces must be allowed to 
grow for a longer time than 12 months. Some authori- 
ties claim that certain non-shedding goats are essential 
for the production of the extra long fleeces; others dis- 
pute this, maintaining that care, food and climatic con- 
ditions are the deciding factors. 

Care of Fleece. 

Mohair fleeces should not be tied, but should be rolled 
up. cut side in, and in suitable bags. Bags that have 
previously been used for wool should never be used, as 
the wool fiber that adheres to tne sides becomes mixed 
with the mohair. It will not take the dye used for mo- 
hair, and is the source of considerable troubel in the 
manufactured goods. 

A great deal of American mohair is sold direct to the 
mills by the producer. Quite often it' is pooled, and the 
growers of the Northwest have realized considerably bet- 
ter prices by this method of sale. Commission men also 



190 

handle this product. Some of the principal mills in this 
country are the Sanford Mills, Banford, Me.; the Massa- 
chusetts Mohair Plush Co., Lowell, Mass.; the Queens- 
bury Mills, Worcester, Mass., and 'the Multnomah Mills, 
Portland, Oregon. 

The skin of Angoras with the hair attached are some- 
times tanned for rugs and carriage robes. This material 
"is also used for making muffs, trimming coats, etc. It 
makes a very attractive "fur." With the hair removed, 
the skins are also tanned and made into leather. This 
is not suitable for the production of kid gloves ov shoes, 
but i8 sometimes made into morocco and similar grades, 
the poorer product being used for the manufacture of 
workmen's gloves. 

Angora Mutton. 

The flesh of the young Angora is delicious, although 
there has been a prejudice against its use. Kansas City 
is the leading goat' market in America. Two classes of 
goats are offered for sale, designated at "fat" and "brush 
ere." The fat class are those in condition for slaughtering, 
and the "brushers," as their name would indicate, are 
stockers of the caprine family. The average weight of 
goats at Kansas City is 68 pounds. 

Because of the prejudice against Angora mutton h' has 
been almost invariably passed over the counter as lamb. 
In Oregon a law has been passed making it necessary to 
properly label the carcass. That the Angora will not 
suffer from this is evinced by the fact that the carcasses 
have previously sold as lamb and that the consumer has 
been unable to detect any difference. As soon as the ex- 
cellence of Angora mutton is more commonly appreciated, 
it will undoubtedly be in greater demand and ita value 
will he enhanced accordingly. , 



191 
Adaptability- of Angoras. 

So far as temperature* are concerned, the Angora 
flourish in any part of the United States. In Turkey and 
Soirfh Africa the ranges in temperature are almost if not 
quite as great as those of the United States. It is 
claimed that the coldest weather will not affect them, 
provided it is dry. In Montana the goats are undaunted 
by the heavy snowfalls so long as they have a dry place 
for the night. • 

In Texas. New Mexico and Arizona the high tempera- 
tures make it necessary to shear the goats twice a year, 
but the heat has apparently no ill effects upon the health 
of the flocks. 

Wet and swamp land, wherever it may be, is unsuit- 
able for Angoras. The native home of all goats is upon 
the high hills and mountains and their preference for 
altitudes is still manifested by their ascending to the 
highest available point, if it is only the feed trough. 
Well-drained land and pure water are very essential for 
the health of the flock. The fact -rtiat these conditions 
are common to considerable portions of this country, and 
that flocks of Angoras are to be found in almost every 
State, would indicate that the country as a whole is fair- 
ly well adapted to -the Angora industry. However, a 
closer scrutiny of the conditions will show that seme sec- 
tions are especially favored, and that the industry will 
probably always be largely confined to these. The large 
areas of new lands, the comparative low values of these, 
and the almost ideal climate have combined to create and 
maintin the industry in the Willamette Valley and the 
surrounding country, and the great amount of cheap 
range lands in Texas, Arizona and New Mexico has fos- 
tered it in the Southwest. 



192 

Building ¥p a Flock. 

As mentioned before in this bulletin, when Angoras 
were first brought to America, considerable crossing was 
practiced with the common goat. At that time breeding 
stock was scarce", and it was necessarj- to increase the 
supply by and practical means. It was found that the 
first and second crosses upon the common goat produced 
little mohair and a large amount of kemp, and that it 
was necessary to cross with a pure Angora five or nix 
times before a really superior animal could be produced. 
In the past the fifth cross has been considered to produce 
a purebred. Beginning with common does and crossing 
with Angora bucks was necessary at the beginning of 
the industry, but it would no longer be profitable to stari 
a Hock in this way. It would be far better to buy a few- 
purebred Angoras outright and develop a flock from 
these by the natural increase. 

Management of the Flock. 

Contrary to a former common opinion Angoras need 
considerable care and personal attention. The kids are 
especially in need of this, and if it is denied them a 
large mortality among them often results. For this rea- 
son it has been found inadvisable to turn them out with 
the does before they are fi weeks or 2 months old. 

Sheds or other shelters must be furnished both in tho 
adults and the young, and if the country is infested with 
dogs or wild animals a dog and wolf proof fence should 
be built about the pasture. The expense of this will bf 
repaid in a few years. 

The management of a flock of Angoras does not differ 
radically from that of a flock of sheep. It is not considered 
necessary to have a herder constauly present with the 
flock. A dog is often sent out to herd and guard them, the 
herder riding out two or three times during the day to 



193 

note the direction of the flock aud see that they do not 
roam too widely. 

Breeding. 

The age at which the does shouldg be bred has an im- 
portant bearing on the welfare of the flock. The general 
opinion prevails that if they are forced to bear the bur- 
den of reproduction before thew are 18 months old their 
growth will be stunted. Neither is it regarded advisable 
to use the bucks for breeding purposes before they attain 
this age. 

The goats are supposed to be in their prime when from 
2 to 6 years of age, but they have been known to repro- 
duce regularly up to the age of 15 years. It does not 
generally pay to keep them too long, as the mohair be- 
comes continually coarser with advancing age. 

The does come in heat during August and September. 
The bucks also have a period of heat, but it usually stgrts 
sooner and lasts longer than that of the does. The time 
the does should be bred depends upon the climate. The 
kids are not so heartj' or able to take care of themselves 
as lambs. If they come early and have not proper shelter 
and care a great many of them will die if the weather 
is cold and wet. A single bad night has caused the loss 
of 50 per cent of the kid crop in flocks- of the Southwest 
where the shelter was insufficient. 

The number of does a buck will cover satisfactorily 
depends upon the vigor and fertility of the individnal 
and the care and food received. From 40 to 50 is a com- 
mon average. The gestation period is from 147 to 155 
days, or 5 months, as it is more commonly expressed. 

Number of Kids. 

The does usually drop single kids, twins being rather 
uncommon. The Tariff Board found that the kid crop 

IS — Com.Air. 



1!)4 

in the flocks investigated was about 65 per cent. Some 
authorities hold this figure too low. It is certain that in 
some well-managed flocks the average is from 100 to 120 
per cent. A record of extraordinary fecundity is the -one 
of a doe that produced twins, quadruplets, and triplets 
in three successive seasons. 

Feeding. 

It is a good plan to feed a little heavier previous t'o 
kidding to start the milk flow. A small amount of grain 
is often desirable. It is not meant by this that the goats 
should be underfed at other seasons of the year. Some 
people have been of the opinion that all that is neces- 
sary for the Angora is to turn them out in the Winter, 
regardless of the depth of snow. They cannot be expected 
to browse under these conditions if they cannot reach the 
twigs. Some breeders cut down the high trees, and i!his 
makes very satisfactory browsing, but other feed, both 
hay* and grain, is necessary, especially in the Northern 
climates, if good results are to be expected. Flocks have 
been wintered out, however, without artificial feeding as 
far north as Nevada. 

Angoras are very particular about the cleanliness of 
their feed, and if it be pulled out of the manger and 
trampled under foot they refuse to touch it. For this 
reason it is considered the better plan to have an open- 
ing in the manger large enough to permit the entrance 
of the goat's head rather than to make it small, thus 
necessitating the pulling ont of the hay in bunches with 
a large part of it falling upon the ground. 

Shearing. . 

In the Southwest shearing is done during February and 
March in the Spring and the Fall clip id removed in Sep- 
tember or October. In other sections shearing usually 



193 

takes places during March and April. It should be done 
before shedding begins, but it? should not take place too 
early or the goats may suffer severely from the cold. Both 
li ;t ii. I shears and machines are used, but shearing by the 
latter means has increased rapidly during the last few 
years. 

<joats are not so gentle in the hands of the shearers 
as sheep, and many men, especially beginners in the in- 
dustry, are anxious to know how best i'o handle them 
during the operation of shearing. 

The late F. W. Ludlow, of Lake Valley, N. Mex., de- 
vised a shearing table, which has proved to be of great 
service. It is a collapsible trough, or combination table 
and trough. 

Mr. Ludlow's description of this table is given here- 
with : 

The table is simple in construction. It is about 22 
inches high, 2 feet 10 inches long, and 21 inches wide. 
The top is composed of two 9-inch sides, which are hinged 
to the 3-inch centerpiece. On the lower side of these mov- 
able flaps is a narrow piece 8 inches long, which catches 
on the framework of the table when the sides are lifted 1 
and holds them stationary. When the sides are ele- 
vated the top of the table forms a trough 3 inches wide 
at the bottom and possibly a foot wide at the top. Into 
this trough the goat to be shorn is thrown, feet up. A 
small strap, which hangs from the end of one of the sides, 
is run over the goat's neck and fastened to the other 
side. The goat's head is hanging over the end of the table 
and the strap prevents it getting free. The belly and legs 
are then shorn. The legs of the goat are then tied to 
gether, the strap removed from the neck, and the sides of 
the table dropped, so that one has a plane surface on 
which to shear the rest of the animal. An untrained man 
can shear 100 goats a day with a shearing machine and 
such a table. 



190 
The Kidding Season. 

The kidding season is an important one upon the Au- 
rora farm, and problems are presented that' are often puz- 
zling, especially to the beginner. The following two meth- 
ods of handling the flock as described by a Western breed- 
er have given general satisfaction. 

The Corral Method. — This method may be used with 
any number of goats. With various modifications and 
adaptations which best suit the size of the flock, the cli- 
matic conditions, the facilities for feeding, etc., it may 
be used by the beginner with success. We have prac- 
ticed this method in Nevada for more than 25 years. If 
the herd is a large one, say 1.000 head, three men are 
required to handle the goats at kidding time. The serv- 
ice of the bucks is so managed that the kids will be 
dropped gradually several weeks. At the height of the 
season we expect from 75 to 100 kids a day. The sea- 
son lasts about 30 or 40 days. Fortunately, most of 
the kids are dropped in the daytime. 

We have four or five small corrals fenced whh 30-inch 
woven wire and large enough to hold 50 does and their 
kids. The doe should be allowed plenty of room, because 
If ton close to her neighbor she may adopt the other doe's 
kid. iResides these small corrals, two large ones are 
needed, each large enough to hold 1.000 does. Along the 
fence of one of these corrals are a dor.cn small pens just 
large enough to hold a doe and kid. At the gate of this 
large corral a jump hoard is placed. This jump board 
is intended to keep back those kids which are not large 
and strong enough to jump over it. A 2-inch board about 
IS inches high will aaswer Hie purpose. Another device 
sometimes used is a platform open at the end. so that 
the kids may run under it, and thus avoid being trampled 
upon when the goats are going out over the platform. 

The small corrals may be made of panel fence and 
located in a meadow where some feed is afforded. The 



11*7. 

noes should always have some kind of feed at kidding 
time. 

In the morning the flock is carefully examined, and all 
does which show signs of kidding during the day should 
he separated and placed in one of the small corrals. The 
large flock is now turned out, and one of the men is sent 
with them with instructions to take the herd at once 
as far as he intends to go for feed that day, and then to 
let them feed over a limited area and gradually work 
their way home. A few does will drop their kids 
on the range, and the herder should carefully note the 
number and their location. He should see that the herd 
does not feed around one of these does, as she is apt 
to leave her kid and join the band, thus necessitating 
much extra work in finding the kid and in giving it to 
its mother. Early in the afternoon the band is placed 
in one of the large corrals. Now, the herder and another 
man go out with a wagon or on foot and carry the kids 
home, gently driving the mothers. The kids should not 
be handled or rubbed against one auotlier more than is 
necessary, as the doe knows her kid by the scent. These 
does and kidB are placed in the small corral which con- 
tains the does held back in the morning with the ex- 
|.<-«-t;i i i«.n that they would kid during the day. We now 
have one day's kidding in one of the small corrals. The 
does and kids should be watched to see that they are 
properly arranged- Do not bother them more than is ab- 
solutely necessary. Do not be in a hurry to make « 
doe own a kid. Do not drive the goats around one of 
the small pens. 

The does should remain with their kids in the corrals 
for a day or two at least, or until the kids are properly 
mothered. Any does which have not kidded should be 
taken out. The next morning any kids which may have 
been born during the night are put in another small cor- 
ral with their mothers, as well as the does which are ex- 
pected to kid during the day. The procedure of the pre- 



1!>S 

vious day is related. In about three days, if one has 
limited quarters, the first day's mothers and kids may 
be put in the second large corral — that is, the one with 
the jump board at the gate. Now this "wet" band is 
placed in charge of one of the men and sent ont to feed. 
The gate is ojMMied, the mothers passing out over the 
jump board, and the kids remain in the corral. The 
herder must not range his goats near the does that are 
kidding upon the range, and he should be cautioned to 
come in later than the "dry" band, so as to avoid any 
possibility of their mixing. When his band arrives at 
the corral, the gate is opened and each mother hunts for 
her kid. Some of the kids may not find their mothers, 
and if after a day or two there are a few nnnourished 
kids and some does not over-distended udders they should 
be placed together in the small pens along the side of the 
corral. The doe will own the kid in a day or two whether 
she is its mother or not. The kids should not be allowed 
to become too weak before this is done. If one does not 
have enongh small pens a doe may be held while two or 
three kids suckle her, and thus tide th^fn over until some 
of the small pens are vacant. 

The next day the second day's kidding is added to the 
wet band. The wet band thus gradually grows, while the 
dry band decreases. During the day two men will be em- 
ployed at herding the dry and wet bands, respectively, 
and the third man will be kept busy inspecting the kids, 
feeding the does in confinement, etc. If the weather is 
stormy, some of the kids will have to be sheltered. The 
advisability of having kids dropped gradually through a 
period of 30 or 40 days will readily be seen. If help is 
inexperienced, that may be gradually trained, or if the 
weather is stormy there will be time to get all things ar- 
ranged properly. 

The kids shonld not be allowed to go with their moth- 
ers until they are about 6 or 8 weeks old. If they go 
before this, they will probably become tired very soon 



199 

and go to sleep. When they awake, the band will have 
gone and they are liable to be loert. During the.day, while 
the moiliers are feeding, the kids would eat a little grass 
if thej' could be herded near the corral. 

As stated before, there ma; be many modifications of 
this method which will suggest themselves, but the above 
is a general outline of a method commonly in use. 

The Staking Method. — This method is largely employed, 
even with large flocks, in New Mexico, but is possibly 
besn' suited to small flocks. It is without doubt the best 
method for certain surroundings. About the same amount 
of help will be required as with the corral method. There 
should be a good supply of stakes similar to tent stakes. 
There should also be a supply of swivel blocks which are 
about 4 inches long and having. a hole b< red near each 
end. A piece of rope about 6 inches long is fastened to 
the stake and the other end is passed through one of 
Vhe holes in the swivel block and a knot tied in the end. 
Another piece of rope of equal length is likewise knotted 
and passed through the other hole of the swivel block, 
the loose end being tied to the kid's leg. Any swivel will 
take the place of this primitive method. The herder or 
owner can busy himself daring the winter months by 
making stakes and swivels an'd by cutting and attaching 
the ropes. 

When a kid is born it is taken to a convenient "place 
to stake, and the mother is gently coaxed to follow. The 
stake is securely driven into the ground, and the kid 
fastened l'o it by the hind leg. The mother is left with 
the kid in order that she may know where to find it upon 
return from feeding. The kid should be staked where he 
can get plenty of sunshine, shade and shelter. A small 
bush, a post, or a box will answer the purpose admirably. 
If there are twins, they must be so staked that fhey can 
suckle at the same time. The rope should be changed 
from one hind leg to the other occasionally to prevent 



unequal development. Sometimes a vigorous kid gets 
thoroughly tangled and requires help. 

The kid' may thus be left staked until he is old enough 
to go with the flock, which is after six or eight weeks 
or lie may be put in a corral after a few days, as is done 
in the corral method. 

There are many successful breeders who use this 
method entirely. One may expect to get good results if 
lie follows either the corral or staking method care- 
fully. 

There is very small loss among kids cared for as set 
forth above. Many of the breeders on a large scale re- 
port the percentage of increase as 100. This does not 
mean that every kid lives, but that so few die that the 
loss is offset by the number of twins that are dropped. 

The most practicable fencing to be used at kidding 
time is made of portable panels. By the use of these 
panels a pen may be made larger or small, and be moved 
from one place to another without' difficulty and with 
very little work. 

Does will occasionally refuse to own their kids. In 
such cases they should be tied up and compelled to al- 
low the kid to suck. Small claiming pens are handy 
for these motherlike creatures. Tying a dog near them 
lias had the effect of inducing them to mother their off- 
spring sooner than they would have otherwise done. 

Castration. 

All buck kids not intended for breeding purposes 
should be castrated when from 2 to 4 weeks old. This 
is best accomplished by cutting off the lower third of the 
scrotum with a sharp knife, forcing down the testicles 
one at a time with the thumb and forefinger of one hand 
and pulling them out with the spermatic cord attached 
with the other hand. A good firm grip should be taken 
so that one's fingers do not slip off. A 3 t'o 5 per cent 



201 

solution of creolin or carbolic acid will keep out Infec- 
tion and repel the flies. 

Weaning. 

Kids should be weaned when from 4 to 5 months of age. 
Bock kids older than 5 months should never be allowed 
to run with the does, as they will often breed, beside 
causing endless annoyance to the does. 

Associations. 

The American Angora Goat Breeders' Association was 
organized in 1900. This association up to the present 
time has recorded about 50,000 animals. Mr. K. C. John- 
ston, Lawrence, Kansas, is the present secretary. There 
can be no doubt bat that the association has done the 
industry a great deal of good. There has been consider- 
able agitation in favor of an advanced registry, based 
upon superiority of the animals entered, but it is not 
possible to say the exact form this movement will take. 

Other associations for the promotion of the Angora 
goat and the mohair industries are the National Mohair 
Growers' Association, founded September 23, 1909, and 
the Northwest Angora Goat Association, which came into 
existence January 8, 1910. ; ^ 

Score Card for Angora Goats. 

There is no official American score card, but the fol- 
lowing has been suggested by prominent breeders. 
Physical animal 25 per cent, snbdivided as follows: 

Per Cent. 

Size and constitution 15 

Shape of body, head, horns, ears, etc.. deducting 
for black spots on skin, colored hair, black 
(freaks in hoofs, horns, etc., up to 10 points. . 10 



202 

Fleece 75 per cent, subdivided as follows: 

Must be soft, silken, velvety, with small compact 

ringlets 30 

Must be of evenness in length, density and growth 
1 inch or more per month, which gives weight 20 

Freedom from kemp 15 

Luster - 10 

Total 100 



203 

PROGRESS IN THE WORK OF TICK ERADICATION 
FOR THE PERIOD JAN. 1, 1918 TO JAN. 1, 1910. 



PRELIMINARY WORK. 

Number of Vats 

cattle dipped, constructed. 

Jauuary 12,591 ~~ 25 

February 4,608 23 

March 7,532 38 

April 12,706 4l 

May 59,943 31 

June 68,194 29 

July 90,168 26 

August 125,846 23 

September 122,423 39 

October 80,628 16 

November 126,863 8 

December 85,555 25 

Total 324 

Vats previously constructed 516 

Total dipped 804,657 

Total vats 840 

The number of cattle dipped shown in this list was 
done voluntarily upon the part of the owner. 



204 

•SYSTEMATIC WORK. 





a 

if 


7 

9 

.a ■ 

sr 

= - 

2 3 


t 

if 


u 

fa 

IS 

Ss 5 


it 

li 


ti 

Us 


E 

11 

c - 

»« 
> — 


J: 




2,500 42 


872 
1,714 
3,153 
4,075 
3,762 
4,129 
32 


5.048 
26,237 
48.451 
57,848 
55,737 
00,437 
371 


2.194 

2,984 

2,108 

1,307 

497 

437 

10 


37,667 

88,350 

20,030 

15.081 

5,003 

1,879 

57 


.... 


lib 


July 

Aumut 

October 


4,220 
5,281 
5.472 
4.268 
4,509 
42 


64,587 
74,481 

73,529 
00,740 
61.802 

428 


lie 

116 
117 
117 
117 
117 



•ThU work was conducted In Orange and Lake Counlles and that 
part of Pnlm Beach County north and east of the Hlllsboro dralnaue 
ciinal. 



I 



205 



COUNTY DEMONSTRATION AGENTS. 
FLORIDA. 



rorxTr. 



AGENT. 



ADDRESS. 



Alachua . . . 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . . 
Brevard 
ltroward . . ■ 
Calhoun . • ■ 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia 

Hade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia . 
Flagler . . . • 
lrnnklill . . . 
Gadsden 
llHmllton 
Hernando 
Hlllsboro . . 
Holmes 
Jackson 
Jefferson 
Ijifayette . . 

Ijiko 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison . . . 

Manatee . . . 

Marlon 

Nassau 

Okaloosa 

Okeechobee 

Orange 

Osceola 

1'alm Beoch 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 
Kant Rosa 
Seminole . . 
Sumter 
Suwannee . . 
St. Jobcs . . 
St. Lucie . 
Taylor 
Volusia 
Wakulla . . . 
Walton 
Washington 



C. D. Ounn 

J. S. Johns 

J. D. DeJI 



O. D. Klme. 



J. H. Yob 

.(. E. King 

XV. T. Nettles . 
\V. T. Henry . . 
J. 9. Ralney . . . 
W. A. Sessoms. 
W. I,. Watson., 
c. W. Burnett. 
W, II. Deen 



M. N Smith. . . 

S. B. Smith 

Jas. Mountain , . 

R. T. Kelly 

J. J. Sechrest . . . 
I.. J. Thompson. 

1. L. Poore 



J. M. Boring.. 

R. I. Mathews. 



H. G. McDonald. 
C E. Mathews.. 
O. W. Caswell. . . 
ii. Blacklmrn . . . 

W. W. Ward 

R. J. Hart 

I.. B. Ha vis 

E. P. DeBusk... 
M. M. J ii vi- ns. . . 
R. A. Conkllng.. 
R. T. Wearer... 
•J. H. Jefferies. . 



I,. Cantrell 

It. T. Oglesby . . . 

c. M. Berry 

M. 8. mil 

4 l>. A. Armstrong. 

K. W. Lord 

- Alfred Warren . . . 

L. R. Muoro 

R. B. Lou f est 

. W. T. Green 

. J. W. Mathtfon . 

Geo. E. Mead 



Guineavllle. 

Macclenny. 

I'anama City. 

Starke. 

Tltusvllle. 

Ft Lauderdale. 

Itlountstown. 

Lecanto. 

ilreen Cove Springs. 

r*ke City. 

MIsbL 

Arcadia. 

Jacksonville, 

I 'ensacola. 

Itnanell. 

Apalachlcola. 

Itlver Junci ion. 
.lennlngs. 

BrookSTllli-. 

I'lant City. 

Honlfay. 

Marianna. 

Montlcello. 

Maya 
Tsvares. 

Ft. Myers. 
Tallahassee. 

Branson. 

Bristol. 

Madison. 

Bradentown. 
Oca la. 

Laurel Hill. 

' ikeechobee. " 

i trlando. 

Klsslmmee. 

West Palm Beach. 

Hade City. 

' 'learwater. 

Kathleen. 

I'alatkn. 

Milton. 

Sanford. 

Coleman. 

Live Oak. 

St. Augustine. 

Ft. Pierce. 

Perry. 

DeLand. 

Arran. 

DeFunlak Springs. 

Chlplcy. 



20T, 
COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS OF FLORIDA. 

(List Compiled in 1919) 

Chamber of Commerce, Apalachicola, Franklin County. 
Board of Trade, Apopka, Orange County. 
Board of Trade, Arcadia, DeSoto County. 
Board of Trade, Archer, Alachua County. 
Commercial Club, Auburndale, Polk County. 
Board of Trade, Avon Park, DeSoto County. 
Board of Trade, Bartow, Polk County. 
Board of Trade, Bonifay, Holmes County. 
Board of Trade, Bradentown, Manatee County. 
Board of Trade. Brooksville, Hernando County. 
Chamber of Commerce, Callahan, Nassau County. 
Board of Trade, Carra belle, Franklin County. 
Board of Trade, Cedar Keys, Levy County. 
Chamber of Commerce, Chipley, Washington County. 
Chamber of Commerce, Clearwater, Pinellas County. 
Board of Trade, Dade City, Pasco County. 
Board of Trade, Davenport, Polk County. 
The Commercial Club, Daytona, Volusia County. 
DeLand Commercial Club, DeLand, Volusia County. 
Board of Trade, Eustis, Lake County. 
Board of Trade, Fernandina, Nassau County. 
Board of Trade, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County. 
Board of Trade, Fort Myers, Lee County. 
Ft. Pierce Chamber of Commerce, Fort Pierce, St. Lucie 
County. 

East Coast Chamber of Commerce, Fort Pierce, St. 
Lucie County. 

Board of Trade, Gainesville, Alachua County. 
Boosters' Club, Grand Ridge, Jackson County. 
Board of Trade, Green Cove Springs, Clay County. 
Boosters' Club, Greensboro, Gadsden County. 
Board of Trade, Haines City, Polk County. 
Board of Trade, Havana, Gadsden County. 



207 

Board of Trade, Hilliard, Nassau County. 
Chamber of Commerce, Jacksonville, Duval County. 
Board of Trade, Jasper, Hamilton County. 
Board of Trade, Kathleen, Polk County. 
Board of Trade, Key West, Monroe County. 
Kissimmee Board of Trade, Kissimmee, Osceola Coun- 
ty- 

Chamber of Commerce, Lake City, Columbia County. 
Chamber of Commerce, Lakeland, Polk County. 
Board of Trade, Leesburg, Lake County. 
Chamber of Commerce, Live Oak, Suwannee County. 
Baker County Board of Trade, Macclenny, Baker 
County. 

Chamber of Commerce, Miami, Dade County. 
Chamber of Commerce, MiUville, Bay County. 
Commercial Association, Molino, Escamiba County. 
Board of Trade, Moore Haven, DeSoto County. 
Board of Trade, Mulberry, Polk County. 
Board of Trade, Mt. Dora, Lake County. 
Board of Trade, New Port Richie, Pasco County. 
Marion County Board of Trade, Ocala, Marion Conn 

ty- 

Board of Trade, Okeechobee, St. Lucie County. 
Board of Trade, Orlando, Orange County. 
Board of Trade, Palatka, Putnam County. 
Board of Trade, Panama City, Bay County. 
Chamber of Commerce, Pensacola, Escambia County. 
Taylor County Board of Trade, Perry, Taylor County. 
Chamber of Commerce, Plant City, Hillsborough Coun- 
ty- 
Board of Trade, Punta Gorda, DeSoto County. 
Boostets' Club, Quincy, Gadsden County. 
Board of Trade, Quincy, Gadsden County. 
Board of Trade, Sanford, Seminole County. 
Commercial Clob, Sarasota, Manatee County. 
Board of Trade, Seffner, Hillsborough County. 
Board of Trade, Starke, Bradford County. 



2t>S 

Chamber of Commerce, St. Augustine, St. Johus Coun- 
ty- 

Board of Trade, St. Cloud, Osceola County. 

Board of Trade, Sebring, DeSoto County. 

St. Petersburg Board of Trade, Pinellas .County. 

Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce, Tallahassee. Leon 
County. 

•North Florida chamber of Commerce, twenty coun- 
ties; headquarters, Tallahassee, Leon County. 

•Noa'e: The North Florida Chamber of Commerce wilt 
give information about towns of North Florida that have 
no commercial organizations, from Hamilton, Suwannee 
and Lafayette counties westward to Escambia County. 

Board of Trade. Tampa, Hillsborough County. 

Board of Trade, Tarpon Springs, Pinellas County. 
Pinellas County Board of Trade, Tarpon Springs, Pinel- 
las County. 

Board of Trade, Titusville, Brevard County. 
Brevard County Board of Trade. Titusville, Brevard 
County. 

Board of Trade, Trilby, Pasco County. 

Board of Trade. Umatilla, Lake County. 

Soutli Florida Cliaml>er of Commerce, Valrico, Hills- 
borough County. 

Board of Trade. Yero, Ht. Lucie County. 

Board of Trade, Waldo. Alachua Counl.v. 

Board of Trade. Y\ 'niiclniln, DeSoto County. 

Chamber of Commerce, Webster, Sumter County. 

Association of Commerce, West Palm Beach, Palm 
Beach County. 

Board of Trade, Winter Haven, Polk County. 

Board of Trade, Winter Park, Orange County. 

Board of Trade, Zephyrhills, Hillsborough County. 

All special detailed information relating to localities 
covered by the organizations above named, will be 
promptly supplied on application. 



209 
POPULATION TABLES OF INTEREST. 

FROM TABLE NO. 14.— POPULATION OF STATE BY KACES AND 

SEX IN CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS, BY COUNTIES : 

CENSUS 1915. 



COUNTIES. 


Total Popula- 
tion of Stii to 
1915. 


Vol Inn Ages, 1915. 


White 


Negro 


White 
ma let: 


Whitu 
femnlca 


Negro 

males 


Negro 

femnl'-s 


Total for First Con- 
gressional District 


108.155 


58,275 


50.112 


42.220 


19,787 


14,601 




iv.i.io 
18.823 

3,104 
05.754 

7,933 

7.105 
II.0C9 

7.187 
14,144 
25,962 

4,334 


2.276 
3.204 
3.097 

17.880 
4.488 
1.487 
4.61 
2.447 
4,644 

11.409 

2,588 


82S 
5,499 

989 
10.120 
2.448 
2.264 
8,201 
2,242 
4.62B 
7.551 
1.208 


704 
4,418 
786 
10.1. "A 
2.243 
1.720 
2.720 
1,833 
4.212 
6.283 
1.003 


080 
1,177 
1,169 
6,062 
1,546 

613 
1.645 

946 
1,445 
3,802 

702 


407 


DoSoto 


680 




639 


Hillsborough 

Laid* 


5.400 
1,004 




394 




1,124 
527 






1,331 


I'olk 


2,499 
500 


Total for Second Con- 
gressional District 


105.!)18 


102.779 


27.306 


24.302 


26,644 


22.765 


Alachua 


1.-..019 

4,263 

11.065 

7,710 

6.856 

3,910 

6,437 

0,192 

7,913 

11.865 

5.270 

11.815 

0.007 


10.413 

878 

4,537 

8,313 

5.628 

12.287 
1.428 
5.800 
9,919 

16.746 
4,726 
8.471 
4.043 


4.238 
915 
2.770 
1.074 
1.733 
1.041 
1.640 
I.r.TI 
1.871 
3.505 
1.411 
2.868 
1.750 


4.062 
833 
2,529 
1,787 
1 .564 
030 
1,208 
1,365 
1.815 
3,114 
1.228 
2.560 
1.217 


4.919 
• 259 
1,109 
1,978 
1 ,33(1 
2,479 
539 
1.903 
2.111 
4,618 
1.343 
1.884 
2.060 


4,373 
164 




953 




1,803 




1,203 




2.736 




278 




1.240 
2,061 




3.919 


Xmsnii 


1,108 
1.881 




«.-.« 



14 — Coni.Ajcr. 



210 



POPULATION TABLES OF INTEREST— Continued. 



Total ftjr Third Con- 
gressional District 



Bay 

i alt. "ii ii . 
Escambia 
Kranklln . 
ttadsden 
Uolmes 
Jackson . . 
I -eon . ... 
Liberty . . 
Okaloosa* 
Santa Ro°a 
Wakulla . 
Walton . . 
Washington 



127.234 



0.340 

3.135 

25.883 

2,790 

7,323 

12.577 

18,501 

5.003 

2.591 



14.634 
3.208 

12.031 
8.128 



113,72!) 



4,178 

2,333 

15.229 

2,643 

l.-..«KG 

1,520 

10,848 

15,038 

2,329 



6,111 
4,398 
4,442 
2.995 



31.897 



2.720 
1.178 
7,150 

752 
1.905 
2.805 
4.153 
1.394 

601 



:t.c»4 

746 

3.008 

1.881 



28,794 



2,238 

1.021 

«.5i>!> 

760 

i,7ea 

2.580 
3.927 

lJra 

515 



23,309 



3.141 

617 

2,800 

1,548 



1.469 

678 
4, in:: 

7811 
:i.:)34 

490 
:;.5.T.i: 
8,810 

702 



1.917 
963 

1,226 
728 



22.714 



930 

461 
4.457 

745 
.'1915 

303 
3,728 
I! 055 

480 



l .:i85 
tOl 

! (IS 

5M1 



J_ 



•This county was 
but did not become a 
census was is ken. 



created out of Santa lto-.ii and Walton Counties. 
county under the law creating It until after the 



Total for Fourth Con- 
gressional District 


157.491 


105.611 


50.702 


43.917 


34,604 


28,681 


Brevard 


5.142 

3.110 

4.805 

16.241 

47,727 

14.698 

10.052 

9,305 

6.499 

8.026 

8,149 

6.331 

4.958 

r.i.ti.'-o 


2,072 
1.652 

2,952 
8.220 
47.067 
4.909 
5.345 
1,032 
3.062 
7.K36 
5.283 
2,258 
4,940 
8.888 


1,641 
1.074 
1.165 
5.653 
15.351 
4,624 
3.134 
8,124 
2,212 
2.484 
2,54:1 
2,029 
1,602 
4.066 


1,332 

811 

986 

4.568 

13.849 

3.648 

2.987 

2,761 

1.849 

2.250 

2.314 

1.455 

1.366 

3.741 


721 

tit; 1 

1.071 
3.003 
14.917 
1,28' 
1.B39 

577 
1.060 
2.008 
1,806 

909 
1,401 
2.911 


408 




4.18 


Clay 


685 


Dade 


2,134 




13.947 




1.833 




1.408 


Osceola 

Palm Beach 

Putnam 

St. Johns 


372 

848 

1 .838 

1 .423 

472 

1.127 


Volusia 


2.158 



211 
CROP STATISTICS FOB 1913-14, 1915-16 AND 1917-18. 

The attention of the reader is invited to the contents of 
the pages that follow, and the figures that give expression 
to the details of the tables giving the statistics of the ag- 
ricultural, fruit and vegetable production, and also of live 
stock of all kinds. 

The figures for the back years are used for the pur- 
pose of comparison. These are interesting as an indica- 
tion of the substantial and wonderful growth of the 8tai'e 
in the production of her soil and animal products. True 
there was a large increase in the acreages planted, and 
much of this was due to the patriotic spirit manifested 
by t"he farmers and others in winning the war for hu- 
manity, but this remarkable production was all the more 
creditable, as well as wonderful, considering the labor 
conditions and other disadvantages necessary to be over- 
come. 

Acreages. 

For the period included for 1913-14 the acreage planted 
to field crops was 1,081,434, an increase over that of 
1911-12, of 144,170 acres actually cultivated. The acreage 
planted to vegetables and garden products for the same 
period was 93,413, or an increase of 30,172 acres in actual 
cultivation, over that of 1911-12, being over 30% 

In 1915-16 the acreage planted to field crops was 
1,478.428, showing an increase of 396,994 acres in the area 
planted to these crops in 1913-14. The acreage planted to 
vegetable and garden products, however, was only 68,955 
or 24,458 acres less than the previous period. An exami 
nation of the causes for this discrepancy shows that it is 
attributed to two causes: first, the scarcity of potash and 
in many cases the absence of it which disarranged the 
usual formulas, that growers had been for years accus- 
tomed to using; and, second, the extremely high price of 



212 

these commercial fertilizers as fixed by the manufacturers. 
Whether these prices were necessary or warranted is ques- 
tionable. 

In 1917-18 the acreage planted to field crops exceed 
that planted to the same crops in 1915-16 by 52,910 
and also exceeded the acreage planted in vegetable crop 
36,690, making a total acreage under cultivation of 
1 .630,983. 

These figures do not of course include the acreage of 
lands planted to fruit trees. They are listed under a 
different plan. 

Elsewhere is published for the first time tables show- 
ing land and farm areas, in addition to acres actually 
cultivated, read it, it is interesting, it is part of table 
No. 1. See the footings of tables No. 1 and No. 2 for 
results in crop values, etc. 

Value of Field Cbops. 

The value of the standard crops for 1913-14 amounted 
to |18,861,389, showing an increase of f 2,809,659 in value 
over 1911-12, and in favor of 1913-14. 

The value of these crops for 1915-16 shows a rather 
remarkable increase, the figures being $21,613,300 as com- 
pared to 118,861,389, the difference in favor of 1915 16 
over that of 1913-14. being $2,751,911. 

The value of field products for 1917-18 indicates clearlv 
what Florida soils can do when put to the test. The 
results show a remarkable situation in the shape of an 
increase of practical! v 50 per cent. 

In 1915-16, the value of all field products was #21. 
613,300, but in 1917-18. these figures were exceeded by 
$9,532,604, or a total of $31,145,904. 

Value of Vegetable and Warden Products. 

The yield in value of these for 1913-14 was $13,185,904. 



213 

showing an increase of $5,129,219 or more than 60% 
over 1911-12. The value of these products, however, for 
1915-16 are short of the previous period by 92,461.385. 
The cause of this reduction is explained in the preceding 
paragraphs. 

In this schedule the increase over 1915-16 is even more 
marked than in the field products, being 98,113,630. or 
practically 75 per cent over and above the valne of the 
same products in 1915-16. 

Fruit Products. 

The value of the fruit crops of the State for 1913-14 
was 913,447,435, an increase of 93,422,272 over that of 
1911-12. The value of these products for 1915-16 is 
913,511,950, or an increase of only 964,515 over 1913-14. 
The cause for ibis is that both the output of the crops 
and the prices obtained for them differed comparatively 
little in either year period. 

In this branch the same proportionate values hold 
good. The increase in value of fruit products for 1917-18 
over those of 1915-16 is 92,869,868. 

When we take into consideration the effects of the 
cold snap in February of 1917, we consider ibe above 
results remarkably fine. 

Value of Live Stock. 

In 1913-14 the value of live stock on hand July 1. 1914, 
was 929.541,931. In the period of 1915-16, on July 1. 
1916, the value of live stock was $29,869,842, showing an 
increase in valne over 1913-14 of 9327,911. Undoubtedly 
this increase in value was held down by the decrease in 
number of live stock, large numbers being shipped out of 
the State to the West for beef, thereby keeping the supply 
depleted. 

It' is on this branch of farm industry that attention 
has been fixed for the past year or more, and we do 



214 

not think, there will be much disappointment if figures 
convey the truth. In 1915-16 the total value on live 
stock in the State was placed at $29,869,842. The fig 
ures for 1917-18 show the tofal value of live stock to 
have been $62,573,373. This table is subdivided showing 
each class of stock and its increase on its own merits. 
We direct special attention to the details as appear in 
the table of total values. The figures as to cattle and 
hogs particularly should be convincing as to Florida's 
ability to grow live stock. 

Value of Poultry and Products. 

The value of poultry and products for 1913-14 was 
$4,665,001, and for the period embraced in the year 1915- 
16 the value is shown as $4,559,876. Thus there appears 
a decrease of $105,125. The only significance to be at- 
tached to this occurrence is that the demand has been 
greater than the supply, a fact that should iuduce a 
greater extension of the industry ; it will stand doubling 
and then fall short 50% of the demand. 

In this industry both output and values have kept 
pace with the more pretentious rivals, as it shows an in- 
crease of $1,433,367 for 1917-18 over the census of 1915- 
16. Certainly a fine showing. Thus even the feathered 
tribe proves its work in helping to defeat the "Hun." 

Value of Dairy Products. 

The value of these products for 1913-14 was $4', 130,925, 
and the value of these same products for the period of 
1915-16 is $3,881,452 thus showing a loss of $249,473. 
This apparent falling may be ascribed to the selling off of 
many of the cows as beef cattle, one of the very Important 
matters in connection with the sale of cattle, that this 
Department has repeatedly warned live stock growers not 



215 

to do. If persisted in, growers cannot and need not ex- 
pect to meet the demands. 

Apparently the warning above made has had its effect 
if the wonderful increase in these products may be ac- 
cepted as evidence; for in the entire history of the State, 
there has never been such a demand for dairy products, 
nor has the supply been so rapidly increased, and yet 
it falls far short of the demand. It is no exaggeration to 
say that were the supply twice as great, the demand 
would not be nearly supplied. There were in the period 
covered by this report 13,292,040 gallons of milk alone 
sold to the markets, for $5,282,355. 

The value of dairy products in 1915-16 was $3,881,452, . 
and in 1917-18 they were $6,017,296. showing an increase 
of $2,135,844. 

Value of Misceiaaneous Products. 

The value of products included in this schedule being 
made up of numerous odds and ends, so to speak, varies 
to a considerable extent. This period covered by 1915-16 
the aggregate value of these products amount to $174,225. 

There is an increase in these products also caused by 
the addition of new articles to the census. In this 
schedule the total shows $312,933 of product*. PH in- 
crease over 1915-16 of $138,708. The articles making Op 
this list are yet unclassed. 

YEAR 1913-14. 

Table No. 8— Total Acreage of Crops. 

Field Crops, acres 1,081,434 

Vegetable and Garden Products, acres 93,413 

Total Acreage in Cultivation 1.174.847 



21fl 

Table No. 9— Total Value of All Farm Product*. 

Table No. I— Field Crops f 18,861,389 

Table No. 2— Vegetable and Garden Product's 13,185,904 

Table No. 3— Fruit Products 13,447. 1 33 

Table No. 4— Live Stock on Hand 29,541,931 

Table No. 5— Poultry and Products 4,665,001 

Table No. 6— Dairy Products 4,130.925 

Table No. 7 — Apiary Products 104.55(1 



Total 183,937.135 

YEAS 1015-16. 

Tabic \i>. 8 — Total Acreage* of Crop*. 

Field Crops, acres 1 .478,428 

Vegetable and Garden Products, acres 68,955 



Total Acreage iu Cultivation 1,647,883 

Tabic No. 9— Total Value of All Farm Product*. 

Table No. 1— Field Crops $21,013,300 

Table No. 2— Vegetable and Garden l'ioilucls*10.72l.:.l'.i 
Table No 3— Fruit Product* 13.511,950 



Table No. 4— Live Stock on Hand 

Table No. 5 — Poultry and Products 

Table No. 6 — Dairy Products 

Table No. 7 — Miscellaneous Products . . . 



29,869.842 

4.559.876 

3,881,452 

174.225 



Total Values 184,335.164 

YEAR 1917-18. 
Table No. 8— Total Acreage* of Crop*. 

Field .Crops, Acres 1,531,338 

Vegetable and Garden Products 105,645 



Total Acreage in Cultivation 1.636.983 



r 



217 
Table No. ii— Total Value of All Farm Protect* 

Table No. 1— Field Crops , $31,145,904 

Table No. 2— Vegetables and Garden Products 18.838,149 
Table No. 3— Frnit Products 16,381.818 

Table No. i—IAve Stork on Hand July 1. 1918, V/'r.: 

Horses f 5,7U4,451\ 

Holes 7,782,483] 

Milch Cows 2,542,446/ 

* All Offcer Cattle 2:?.670.239( 

Other Cattle Shipped .... 2.075.552/$62,573,373 

* Hogs on Hand 8.707.3531 

Other Hogs 11,478,002] 

Sheep and Coals 192,847/ 

Table No. 5— Poultry and Products $ 5,993,243 

Table No. 6— Dairy and Products 6,017,296 

Table No. 7 — Miscellaneous Products .. 3124*93 

Ownfl Total #141,262.776 

•The total number of hogs for the twelve ^12) months 
would have been 2,164,722, if we could have included 
the 477,590 butcherel and the 591,651 that were shipped 
oui' of the counties and the State for market by packers 
and others. The value of hogs butchered and shipped 
was for the butchered $6,069,841, and those shipped $5,- 
408,161, or a total of $20,245,355 for hogs alone, includ- 
ing those on hand July 1, 1918. 

•There were 85,689 cattle exported from the counties 
and State by packers and feeders in and out of the State 
valued at $2,075,552. 

i 



218 



The following is a list of the County Enumerators, and 
their postoffice addresses, who performed the field work 
in gathering the Agricultural Horticultural, Live Stock 
aud Industrial Statistics of the several counties. The re- 
sult of this work is found in the tallies that follow : 



COUNTY 



NAME 



POSTOFFICE 



1. Alachua 

2. Baker 

3. Bay 

4. Bradford 

. 5. Brevard 

6. Broward 

7. Calhoun 

8. Citrus 

9. Clay 

10. Columbia ... 

11. Dade 

12. DeSoto 

13. Duval 

14. Escambia . . . 
16. Flagler 

16. Franklin 

17. Gadsden 

18- Hamilton 

19. Hernando . . 

20. Hillsborough . 

21. Holmes 

22. Jackson 

23. Jefferson 

24. Lafayette . . 

25. Lake '. 

26. I.ee 

27. Leon 

28. Levy 

29. Liberty 

30. Madison . . . 

31. Manatee '. . . 

32. Marion 

33. Monroe .... 

34. Nassau .... 
36. Okeechobee . 

36. Orange 

37. Osceola 

38. Okaloosa . . . 

39. Palm Beach. 

40. Pasco 

41. Pinellas . . . 
42. Polk 



E. G. Spencer 

J. W. Dowllng 

C. C. Mathls 

R. A. Green 

Chas. H. Nelson, Jr. 

Robert J. Reed 

John R. Richards . . . 

J. W. Knight 

J. M. Williams 

Donald TomkinB.... 

M. W. Goode 

J. Edgar Albritton.. 
Chas. R. Thebaut. .. 
Wm. J. Scott 

F. A. Rich 

W. J. Lovett 

D. J. Mears 

L. R. Taylor 

Leroy McKeown 

Ben L. Blackburn . . . 

D. J. Grice 

J. M. Blount 

W. B. Bishop 

J. P. Abbott 

Walter H. Bell 

John M. Boring 

W. J. Johnson 

M. D. Graham 

Wm. A. Deason 

H. R. Fox 

W. M. Baxter 

M. L. Payne 

Chas. W. Chase 

W. W. Ward 

L. E. Davis 

J. C. Merrill 

Milton Pledger 

W. W. Hurston 

W. C. C. Branning, Sr 

J. H. Pike 

A. C. Turner 

J. E. Bryant 



Alachua, Fla. 
Macclenny Fla. 
Panama City, Fla. 
Starke, Fla. 
Titusville. Fla. 
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 
Blountstown, Fla. 
Inverness, Fla. 
Green Cove Springs, Fla. 
Lake City, Fla., R. F. D. 
Lemon City, Fla. 
Arcadia, Fla. 
Jacksonville, Fia. 
R. F. D. "A," Atmore, Ala, 
Bunnell, Fla. 
Apalachicola, Fla. 
Hardaway. Fla. 
Jasper, Fla. 
BrookBVille, Fla.' ' 
Tampa. Fla. 
Bonifay. Fla. 
Grand Ridge, Fla. 
Lloyds, Fla. 
Mayo. Fla. 
Tavares, Fla. 
Fort Myers, Fla. 
Chaires, Fla. 
Bronson, Fla. 
Bristol. Fla. 
Madison. Fla. 
Bradentown. Fla. 
Reddick, Fla. 
Key West, Fla. 
Boulogne, Fla. 
Okeechobee, Fla 
Plymouth. Fla. 
Kis8immee. Fla. 
Laurel Hill, Fla. 
West Palm Beach, Fla. 
San Antonio, Fla. 
Clearwater. Fla. 
Kathleen. Fla. 



219 
COCJSTY ENUMERATORS— (Continued) . 



COUNTY 



NAME 



POSTOFFICE 



43. Putnam . . . 

44. Santa Rosa 

45. Seminole 

46. St. Johns 

47. St. Lucie 

48. Sumter* 

49. Suwannee 

50. Taylor . . 

51. Volusia . 

52. Wakulla 

53. Walton 

54. Washington 



J u lien de Nazarie... 
Putnam Jernigan . . . 

A. R. Chappell 

John W. Davis 

F. Scott Waters 

J. R, Wilkerson 

H. E. Carter 

W. E. Vann 

Otto R- Klrchofl 

John McKenzie 

D. L. Colvln 

F. M. Russ 



Palatka. Fla. 
Milton, Fla. 
Sanford, Fla. 
St. Augustine, Fla. 
Walton, Fla. 
Wildwood. Fla. 
Live Oak, Fla. 
Shady Grove, Fla. 
DeLeon Springs. Fla. 
Sanborn, Fla. 
DeFuniak Springs. Fla. 
Vernon. Fla. 



• Did not report — refused. 



220 



I'AHM LAND AKEAS IN FLOKIDA BY COUNTIES. 



COUNTIES. 




ll 


ill 

> v^ 




3,314 

1,075 

1,853 

4.142 

042 

1,171 

1,365 

224 

525 

3.256 

4,126 

.-,..-,!!.-, 

10,800 
5,837 

225 
1.064 
1,510 
iVJ.-o 

325 


95.7 




42.1 




2.6 
3S.47 
75.7 




16.0 




58.4 




129.9 


< May 


138.4 




45.0 




6.7 




311.0 




9.53 




14.2 




69.7 




8.3 




158.3 
81.74 
34.45 




13 
1 
5 

■» 


692 
925 
385 
700 


6.7 




.-,.-..0 




41.3 




61.3 




1.455 
1,110 
1,252 
3.570 


59.4 


Lake 


53.9 




71.6 




71.54 








705 

3.375 

1,575 

4,870 

52 

433 
1.401 

218 
2,300 
2,031 
2,205 
2,565 

840 
5,813 
3,720 
1,675 

993 
2,742 
1,796 


77.9 




25.0 




33.9 




43.64 




137.0 




384 3 




69.3 




48.1 




47. 




16. 




47.2 




24.53 




40.8 




17.58 




8.5 




43.52 




20.35 




25.86 




60.0 








2,955 
1,415 
4,210 
780 
1,745 
1.R.17 


54.1 




11.48 




12.9 




129.0 

44..". 




48.1 











Totals 1 133,347 \. 



•Not reported. 



221 



FARM I. ANIi AREAS IN FLORIDA BY COUNTIES. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Alachua 

B.iker 

Bay 

Bradford . . 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

clay 

Columbia . 

Dade 

DeSolo . 

Duval 

Escambia 

Flagler . . . 
Franklin , .... 

Gadsden 

Hamilton . .. . 
Hernando . . . . 
Hillsborough . 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson . .. . 
Lafayette 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty . 

Madison 

Manatee . 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . , . 
Okeechobee . . 
Orange . ...*.. 

Osceola 

l'alm Beach . . 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

s.i '.i!. i Rosa . . 
Seminole . 
St. Johns 

St. I .tide . 

•Sumler . . . 
Suwannee . . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington . 



1 



zs 



;ii '.'.204 

45.277 
5.802 
159,357 
71,406 
10,809 
72,850 

? 3,889 
2,714 
120,400 
29.061 
200,059 
102,876 
82,786 i 
15,704 
8.512 
240 502 
18.1.U1U 
28.489 
01.721 
105,912 
222.496 
165,491 
80.428 
55,035 

»JSM 

256.067 

88,001 
54.970 
83.300 
53,397 

212,547 
7,106 

144,730 
97.081 
10,503 

108,560 
32.496 

104.222 
62.928 
34,333 

102,246 
31.613| 
68.5811 
20.211 
69,428 

107.416 



159,870 
16.236 
54.272 

100,690 
77,360 
89.308 



175.738 
26.286 

3,185 
62.387 

9,443 
16,482 
20,742 
10.531 
21,380 
83,570 
14,348 
52,368 
10,650 
24,245 

4,623 

1,762 
00,995 
68,701 
18.574 
45,071| 
44,230 
143.792 
86,401 
36,785 
17,358 
17.745 
106,168 
22.500 

8,330 

50.400 

17,598 

107,747 

1.079 

7,184 
27.588 

8.518 
28,901 

0.159 
26,108 
25,626 

0.987 
51.206 
20.338 
11.476 

6.334 
16.423 
15.280 



106.928 
8.144 
25,839 
24.599 
31.821 
37.655 



£S 
Sd 
<- 

27,89"l' 

8,500 

89 

17,019 

40,734 

2,817 

2,54 1 

9,191 

27.305 

39,470 

15,313 

100.773 

8,850 

26,180 

5,402 

3.200 

81,241 

46,534 

9,810 

iH.im:', 

25,055 

7,238 

42,716 

4,595 

17,875 

38,977 

45.367 

21,250 

28.320 

8.800 

2,447 

31,173 

4.0661 

106,046 

69,499 

5,090 

16,262 

13,526 

43,909 

23,240 

13,531 

17.272 

6,333 

28,597 

12,974 

53,000 

55,799 



3 

< 3 

7,955 

1,628 

79,351 

21,429 

503 

49.567 

0,167 
24,029 

6.360 



40,908 

83,376 

32,301 

5.679 

3,550 

08,266 

68.381 

B.OO0 

29,747 
36,027 
71.486 
38.374 
45.048 
18.702 
32,874 
104.532 
44.251 
28,32<> 
15,100 
33,347 
73,627 
1,962 
31,507 



20.417 
4,568 
2.890 
38.159 
45.548 
51.6531 



1,900 
66,391 > 

9,811 
34,205 
14.053 
10.815 
88.768 

4,932 

28,513 

903 



36,32s 



32,531 

3.524 
25.543 
37.941 



4.S78.344|1.880,277|1.88».01911,597,736 



Totals 



•Not reported. 



222 



FARM LAND AREAS IN FLORIDA BY COUNTIES. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



Alachua .... 

Baker 

Bay . 

Bradford . . . 
Brerard .... 
Broward . . 
Calhoun . . 

Cltrua 

Clay 

Columbia . .. 
Dade . ... 

l*Soto 

Dural 

Esctmbln . . • 

Flagler 

Franklin 
Qadaden . . . . 
Hamilton . . . 
Hernando . .. 
HlllBborougli 

Holmes 

Jurkson . . . . 
Jefferson . . . 
Lafayette . .. 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Lery 

Liberty 

Madison . ... 
Manatee . .. . 
Marlon . 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . 
Okeechobei* 
Orange .. . 

Osceola 

Palm Beach 

Paaco 

Pinellas . 

Polk 

Putnam . 
nta Rosa . 



St. Johns . 
St. Lnde .. 
•8umter . 
Suwannee 
Taylor . .. . 
Volusia . 
Wakulla . . 
Walton . 
Washington 



3 S 

I i 

g-H£ 

ill 

<<r. 



is 

y 



..i 



585 
602 
522 
1,156 
720 

I.IMII) 

612 
622 
T92 

3.75.". 

822 

668 

484 

731 

500 

508 

475 

1.075 

435 

063 

593 

1.202 

1.128 

4.641 

730 

1.133 

720 

003 

1.275, 

1.640 

1.125 

646 

040 

720 

055 

1,431 

2,688 

750 

234 

1.967 

772 

1.026 

:teo 

636 
1.024 

599 

680 
1.100 
1.119 

601 
1.058 

652 



807,680 
370.680 
442,880 
344,960 
11511.000 
490.800 
762.880 
3110,800 
394.880 
506,880 

1,450,720 

2,402,5601 
503,0401 
420,480 1 
309,7601 
346,240 
345.600 
3:47,920 
318,080 
688,000 
293,120 
617,600 
374,400 
796,160 
670,080 

2.579.840 
457,600 
731.520 
026,720 
460,160 
856,680 

1.054,080 
704 .000 
403,200 
607.360 
460.800 
599,600 
915,840 

1,720,520 
400.880 
149,760 

1,220,480 
481,280 
656.640 
230,400 
407,040 
741,760 
373.120 
442,880 
680,960 
700,160 
385,280 
677,1201 
469,320| 






16.090 

2,542 

43.880 

576 



11M* RRTSBs 



13.775 
7,926 
4,211 

58.2491 
13.081 
9,7781 
9,046 

16.143 



1.E09 

47.7-6 
37,917 

3,175 
10,352 
38,468 
287,367' 
57,061 
23,299 
12.335 

1,809 
61,173 
21,294 

5,61 
66,771 

5,675 

30,807 

892 

6,414 



3,454 
1,684 
3,614 
8,300 
747 
6.878 

11,092 

33.813 
3.096 

32,611 
1,622 

28,039 



10.048 
7.619 

13,065 
31,448 

28.620 



633 
51,001 
61,100 

6,924 
17,245 
38.468 
234,458 
68,149 
30,147 

8,377 

1,140 
87.081! 
22.760 

6,849 
71,914 

7,7741 
75.622 



7.207 

2.626 

7.587 

11,076 

2.209 

6,770 

19,772 

26,590 

2.960 

28.556 

997 

25,973 

103.210 

17,741 

11.370 

14.833 

33.543 

31.874 



- c 
3 =X 



~EB2S1 

10.790 

3.909 
59.413 

1.572 
13,300 
31.662 

8,045 

S.S75 
83,960 

0,751 
31.468 

6.740 
20,778 

5,518 

462 

40,572 

63.597 

8,825 
28,617 
59,890 
155,041! 
70,086 
58,818 

6,136 

2,904 
92,653 
39.381 

7,952 

73,334 

11,918 

02.199 

185 

5,980 
40,712 
30,085 
11,206 

2,034 
27,213 
15.345 

1.652 
14.730 
17.008 
22.761 

8.255 
36,115 

4.239 



88.753 
15.275 
12.301 
18,235 
30.562 
30.769 



Totals. 



54.240135. 111.0401 1.174.8471 1.547.383' 1.636.983 



•Not reported. 



223 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CROPS. 1017-18. 



COUNTIES 


COTTON. UPLAND 

• 


Acre* 


Bales 




Value 




749 


237 


* 25.490 






48 


19 


2,00 
























317 


78 


r.,77r. 






93 
1,041 


42 
515 


4.320 




08,011 
















40 

2,258 

8 


15 

706 

3 


83.520 




Flagler 


280 




202 

20 

726 


57 
6 

230 


0.040 




800 




24.800 








3.908 

7,100 

11.717 

152 


1.327 

1,575 

1.838 

15 


277.772 




isMis 




2M»M3 




1.565 
















16,526 
307 


3.847 
117 


422,510 




3355 




21 8 


815 




893 


184 


It 20" 








tS» 


SO 


60,184) 






iw 

1,582 
45 


54 

526 

32 


7,010 




65.134 




3.500 
















2 
33 

5 
10 


i 

19 
o 
2 


400 




3,740 




MB 




520 








1,745 
90 


615 
72 


73,760 




12,050 
























173 

21 

284 


87 

3 

52 


6,394 




750 




6.055 








998 
890 


s4i 

126 


30.644 
15.655 








i 


52,721 


12,707 


1,675,265 



•Not reported. 



224 



TABLE No. 1— KIEI.D CHOI'S, 1!>17-18. 

C'liitittuttt. 



A. 



COl'NTIES 1 


COTTON, SEA ISLAND 


Acres 


Bali's 


Vnlue 




31.356 
5.029 


5,883 
2,558 


1,558,790 
403,560 








18,061 


4,698 


141,082 
















30 

2,267 

485 

24.352 


9 

630 
.. 123 

5.140 


2,500 




183,740 
31,124 




Columbia 


459,502 


DeSoto . 


160 

12 

4 

39 


(10 
1 
2 

15 


14,005 

25l i 




300 




3,121 














20.788 
806 


3,292 
213 


715 250 




77,150 
















10 

86 

17.704 

222 

4 

IS 

4.3H8 


3 
IS 

780 


400 




l.'i in in 




181.83(1 




521 ' 8,591 

2, 300 










787 


221,748 






6,203 
118 

13.5115 


602 

5 

2.917 


141.100 




■iii.i 




722,807 








260 

14 


186 

4 


11,703 




1.10.1 












40 


10 


050 








3.247 


1.287 


270,410 






181 
782 


43 
102 


12,611 

11,0(15 








3 


2 


271 
























IS. 117 

•-'•j:i 

» 


4.214 
30 


985,240 
R 4 on 




1 ' 8.-. 










179.1131 


1 




33,679 tim: mi 









•Not report pd. 



225 



TABLE No. 1 — FIELD CROPS, 1917-18., 
Continued. 



C'ORX 



COUNTIES 



Acres 



Bushels 



Value 



Alachua . 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . 
Brevard . — 
Broward . . . 
Calhoun . ... 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia . .. 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Dn»al 4 

Escambia . .. 

Flagler 

Franklin . . . 
Gadsden . ... 
Hamilton . .. 
Hernando . .. 
Hillsborough . 
Holmes . ... 
Jackson . . . . 
Jefferson . . . 
Lafayette . .. 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

t*tj 

Liberty 

Madison . ... 
Manatee •*.... 
Marlon . . . > ■ 
Monroe . 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 
Okeechobee . 

Orange 

Osceola . ... 
Palm Beach . 

Paaco 

Pinellas . ... 

Polk 

Putnam . ... 
Santa Ro8a . 
Seminole . . . 
St. Johns . . . 
St. Lucie . . . 
•Sumtej- . . 
Suwannee . . 

Taylor 

Volusia . ... 
Wakulla . . . 

Walton 

Washington . 



58,022 

8,739 

1,984 

24,001 

213 

1,412 
15.829 

2,758 

4.598 

32.966 

87 

12.815 

8,047 
11.614 

1,916 

149 

28.337 

30,564 

4.294 
13,172 
28.!"' 16 
78,540 
53.427 
18.243 

1,911 

762 

54.818 

13.909 

4.864 
56.748 

3.847 
42.690 



617.296 
118,614 

18.783 

271.330 

983 

25.952 
164.892 

35.000 

52.316 

335.261 

1,205 

209.163 

73.510 
145.113 

31.064 

5.980 

375.858 

281.083 

77,780 
272,474 
285.087 
958,188 
450.543 
168,203 

22.503 

9.261 

524.458 

366.703 

57.804 
554,478 

70.121 
605.840 



3.351 

18.209 
1.128 
6.075 
2.581 

10.688 

6.585 

377 

8.961 

8,326 

11.804 
1.629 

13.823 
319 



53,702 

172.085 

15,031 

88.946 

50,530 

70.925 

90,417 

4,989 

106,585 

194,290 

135,385 

49,111 

345.790! 

3.7611 



42.615 
9.665 
6,028 
12.818 
18,182 
20,348 



436.801 
69,691 1 
67,4051 
101,1421 
184,374 
241,695 



721.405 

.£47.121 

•>i 174 

398.714 

1.745 

44.946 

329,784 

70.018 

92.171 

406,632 

2.045 

274,087 

146,886 

268.721 

50.000 

11.960 

475.«58 

381.083 

108,330 

549.660 

496.819 

1.802.597 

450.543 

140.484 

44.528 

18.330 

781.604 

172.677 

86,540 

554.478 

107.785 

907.201 



77.260 
286.784 

30.037 
176,199 

95.850 
135.816 
146.202 

10.187 
1 70.981 
273,440 
249.087 
104.751 
691.586 
9,006 



450,634 
64,771 
134,610 
150.027 
218.620 
241,695 



Totals. 



814.217 



9,464.731 



I 



3.390.436 



•Not reported. 

15 — Com.Agr. 



226 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CROPS, 1017-18. 
Continued, 



COUNTIES 



OATS 



1 

Acre* | Bushels 
I 



Vulue 



Alachua . . . 

Bsker 

Bay 

Bradford . . 
Brevard . . . 
Broward . .. 
..alhoun . . . 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia . . 

Oade 

UeSoto . . . . 

OutsJ 

Escambia . . 
Flagler . .. . 
Gadsden . . . 
Hamilton . . 
Hernando . 
Hillsborough 
Holmes . .. . 
Jackson . . . 
Jefferson . . 
Lafayette . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Lery 

Liberty . . . . 
Madison . .. 
Manatee . .. 
Manatee . . . 
Marlon . 
Monroe . . . . 
Nassau . 
Okaloosa . . 
Okeechobee . 
Orange . . . . 
Osceola . . . . 
Palmer . .. . 

Pasco 

Pinellas . . . 

Polk 

Putnam . . 
Santa Rosa 
Seminole . .. 
St. Johns . 
St. Lucie .. 
•Sumter . 
Suwannee . 
Taylor . 
Volusia . . . 
Wakulla . . 
Walton . .. 
Washington 





.... 



2.704 

260 

56 

677 



7 

419 

74 

54 

2,021 



89 

51 

371 

8 

1,074 

40 

12 

65 

584 

1.267 

1,672 

121 

32 

10 

1,357 

1,430 

118 

1,504 

1,504 

25 

1,448 



108 
437 

4 
7 



.-,11 



13 

54 

475 



336 
120 
242 
"23 
801 
648 



45.870 

3,912 

915 

6,160 



60 

6,013 

1,165 

965 

26,563 



1.14* 

5,489 

200 

18,276 

350 

110 

1,408| 

3,897 

13,515 

24,781 

1,210 

460 

21U 

18.130 

27,003 

1,380 

14.030 

14,030 

230 

20,456 



2,678 

5.271 

65 

90 



497 



225 

566 

5,554 



275 



2,01)5 
1,005 
2,100 
515 
2.633 
6.925 



5,840 

915 

12,320 



150 
6,013 

745 

2,022 

26,063 



4,036 

2,285 

5,489 

250 

18,276 

335 

220 

3.826 

9]9»5 

24.781 

2,220 

570 

320 

18,130 

*7,023 

1.233 

19.700 

19,760 

380 

29.084 



3,059 

4.190 

130 

150 



1.340 



380 
614 

6.379 



550 
391 



5.164 
1.059 
4,200 
440 
2,790 
6.92.1 



Totals. 



20.378 



276.383 



312,838 



I 



•Not reported^. 



227 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CHOPS. 1917-18. 
Continued. 



WHEAT 



COUNTIES 



Acres 



Bushels 



Value 



Alat'hua 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . . . . 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

Cltrua 

Clay 

Columbia . 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Dura I 

Escambia . 

Flagler 

Franklin . ... 

Uadsden 

Hamilton . 
Hernando . . . . 
Hillsborough . 

Holmes 

Jackson .. 
Jefferson . 
Lafayette . .. . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Lery 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee . .. . 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . 
Okeechobee . 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach . 

Paaco 

Pinellas . . . . 

Polk 

Pntnam . ... 
Santa Rosa . 
Seminole . . . 
si . Johns . . . 
8t Lucie . . 
•Sumter 
Snwannee . . 

Taylor 

Volusia . ... 
Wakulla . ... 

Walton 

Washington . 



470 
20 



870 
40 



r.l 



110 



330 



100 
150 



137 
800 



36 



60 



90 



180 



20 
250 



80 
75\) 



285 



570 



240 



480 
155 



IS 



35 
'230 



70 

iio 



u 



287 



404 



11 



790 



790 



Totals. 



164 



3.132 



4,706 



•Not reported. 



l!T 



■J2S 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CHOI'S. 1017-18. 
Continued. 



SWEET TOTATOES 



COI'XTIES 






Alactauu 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford - 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

citrus 

Clay . 

Columbia 

Dade 

DeSoto 

DutbI 

Escambia 

Flagler 

Franklin 

Gadaden 

Hamilton 

C Hernando 

Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

' Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee v 



Mnrlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 
Okeechobee . . 

Orange 

Osceola . ... 
Palm Beach . 

Pasco 

Pinellas .... 

Polk 

Putnam . ... 
Santa Rosa . 
Seminole . . . 
St. Johns . . . 
St. Lucie . . . 
•Sumter . 
Suwannee . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla . ... 

Walton 

Washington . 



Acres 



Bushels 



I 



Value 



1..11B 

433 

234 

1.455 

85 

108 

550 

S4 

648 

870 

127 

2.320 

1.178 

844 

247 

100 

1,116| 

1,005 

220 

962 

668 

2,299 

1.636 

416 

108 

247 

2.261 

1,966 

226 

1.305 

93 

2.385 

50 

554 

633 

145 

364 

113 

393 

450 

63 

715 

613 

711 

122 

731 

200 



671 
1.331 
767 
191 
728 
774 



Totals... J. 



3S.353 



201.109 

37.451 

17,027 

101,407 

1,205 

4,429 

44.207 

9,968 

49,948 

81.838 

10,970 

282,029 

165.904 

40.2ns 

22.415 
20,000 
88.424 
55,972 
15.538 

107,035 
34,936 

211.230 

147,368 

41,844 

4,817 

24,050 

203,160 

201,871 
22.360 

143.090 
12,666 

200.930 
820 
76,096 
56,103 
11,589 
26,2171 
6,665 1 
36.3321 
34.9761 
3,383 
48,462 
88,611 
64.663 
9.887 

123,888 
5.496 



31.386 
17.338 
71.205 
12,730 
46.492 
45.594 



3,423,544] 



201.109 
52,400 
17.027 
79,541 
1,822 
12,987 
44,207 
9,968 
62,857 
81.838 
36,065 

406.771 

330,765 
62.911 
27.185 
40,000 
88.424 
53,387 
21.230 

214,071 
34,9311 

162.960 

147,568 

41,844 

6.305 

47.748 

190.280 

201.766 
20.865 

143.090 
17.095 

200.504 
123 
80.730 
44.073 
20.698 
48.754 
10.163 
62.002 
67,114 
7,119 
56.243 

125.914 
66.987 
14.430 

145.646 
7.696 



61.459 
17,745 
142.410 
19.730 
46.492 
45,549 



4,150.785 



•Sot reported. 



V 



229 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CROPS, 1917-18. 
Continued. 



KICK 



COUNTIES | 




Acres 




Bushels 


Value 




10 



68 

54 


100 

227 

1,931 

1,300 


100 
675 




3.782 




3,180 
























115 

1 

10 

14 


2,186 

5 

395 

413 


4,372 




10 




843 




1,066 








i.66i 

10 
68 
45 


33,200 

780 

1,367 

525 


132.090 




2.923 




2.633 




1,145 








12 

26 

88 

875 

201 


193 
1,192 
1.230 
8,103 
4,165 


323 




1.260 




3.150 




23.918 




4,166 






Jefferson , 


42 
43 
4 
32 
14 
14 
— 18 


449 
400 
43 
1.336 
208 
298 
426 


1,308 
810 




112 




2.992 




596 




596 




714 








726 

100 

2 

51 

38 

6 

6 


9.902 

2.507 

40 

950 

1,274 

120 

206 


19.804 
4,640 






96 

.VJL'.-, 

2,362 




260 




628 








2 
45 
74 
54 
2". 
71 
1 
6 
12 


52 

1.197 

1.863 

1.099 

365 

2,113 

40 

375 

/ 54 


204 




4.050 




4.959 




3.321 




OM 




3.319 




120 


Rt. Johns 


975 
200 








2 
17 
18 

8 

66 

324 


41 

357 

310 

85 

1.073 

B.B86 


180 




841 
430 




70 




1.073 




6.9SB 



Totals. 



3.941 



ni.ss..-, 



252,93.-. 



•Not reported. 



hi 



230 



TABLE No. 1- 



-FIELD CROPS. 1917-18. 
Continued. 



CODNTIES 


SUGARCANE 


j 1 

Syrup. 


Sugar. 




Acres 


Barrels 


Value 


Pounds 


Value 




539 
208 
120 
548 
5 


3.662 

1.830 

289 

8.879 

2 


132.470 

62.745 

8.670 

!>0.!>7.-. 

s 


220 


22 





















887 
107 
107 

r.iis 

24 

1.185 

291 

182 

18 

49 
999 
276 
185 
838 
375 
2.413 
327 
328 

26 
108 
589 
370 
113 
414 
208 
653 


3.286 

548 

548 

1,878 

10 

5.281 

1.350 

787 
76 

792 
9.784 
1,957 

850 

5,621 

1.110 

21.988 

1,891 

334 
58 

623 
3.006 
2,230 
1.004 
2.616 

819 
3,561 


65.600 
15.312 
15.312 
55.761 
500 








ioo 

100 
2.290 






10 




115 










370.246 

41.455 

23.328 

3,655 


400 


40 












Flagler 


200 


20 


Franklin ....... 


23,760 

208,655 

57.215 

32.070 

163.712 

55.500 

247,332 
37,820 
41,190 
3.250 
19,746 
77.220 
66.888 
21.430 
65.595 
















































Lake 




Lee 
































27.830 
105.881 








IOO 


8 










139 

192 

38 

24 

12 
556 
273 

57 

506 

N 100 

276 

4 

118 

74 


1,021 

978 

406 

68 

91 

1.823 

2.426 

255 

2,156 

781 

926 

12 

378 

215 


30.407 

29.142 

16.453 

2.173 

9.650 
































54.066 
32,586 














11.154 
74,747 
38.530 
31,846 






polk 




















484 
9.260 
6.795 








12,250 


1.225 












30.1 
103 
165 
106 
308 
410 


1.559 

619 

886 

985 

1,322 

2,013 








35.430 
31.655 
38.702 
36.680 




































16.318 


101.663 


2.681 ,664 


15.810 1.46IC 


N 









•Not reported. 



231 



TABLE No. 1 — FIELD CROPS. 1917 
Continued. 



18. 



COUNTIES 



FIELD PEAS 





Acres 


Bushel* 


V.I-.S 




100 1 
75 
89 

428 

811 

8 

107 

nn 

423 
300 

58 

2.201 

410 

175 

32 

44 
1.272 

44 

2,881 

302 

027 

89 
738 

11 
827 
B86 
783 

75 


836 

672 

1.302 

4.054 

190 

3.10 

740 

942 

2.832 

6,543 

100 

23,876 

7.356 

1,007 

762 

877 

10.397 

* 390 

37.612 

1.822 

5.449 

750 

3.524 

200 

1,007 

8.210 

12.528 

672 


'3.230 




3.380 




2.604 




12.162 




511 




950 




2.103 




2.710 


Clay 


8.154 




19.430 




300 




55,522 




20.636 




2.728 




2.286 




1.087 




10.82."> 




1.185 




114,009 




8.849 




9.055 




1,920 




7.284 


Lake 


340 
8.750 




9,571 




24.724 




1.957 








342 

1.088 

5 

119 

819 

31 

BOO 

5 

30 

804 

7 

90 

762 

318 

10 

33 

164 


622 

12.523 

9 

1.175 

6,279 

489 

4,675 

33 

845 

7.185 

80 

2.711 

11,035 

2,467 

127 

2,235 

147 


2.083 




24.51! 




60 




3.232 
8.815 




1.015 




11,079 




90 




2,500 


1'lneliHS 


10.349 

175 

5,090 




33.343 




5.305 




872 




4.470 




1.073 








30 

67 

BIO 

122 

87 

490 


179 

634 

3.735 

1.225 

462 

3.544 

i 


27.". 




2.367 




14.7--.0 




2.4.-.0 




son 




4.232 






Totals 


18,241 


193.04C 


470.68.1 



•Not reported. 






232 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CUOrS. 1917-1S. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES | 


■ 


SOY BEANS 

t 




Acres 


Bushels 
I 


Value 












































22 
3 


865 
20 


1,915 
70 








2 
12 


29 
30 


57 




60 










4 
16 


75 
150 
200 


165 




450 




300 








































n 

2 


577 
10 


1,723 




20 
























i 


50 


100 
























. 9 


25 


73 








3 
214 


20 
2.106 


170 




6.538 








































tat 

56 


8.905 
644 


26.565 




1.328 








1 


11 


64 








6 


42 


96 








2 
25 


r* 


600 




237 
























114 


728 


2.915 








7 


35 


90 














Totals 


696 


'14,95:: 


43,570 



•Not reported. 



233 



TABLE No. 1 — FIELD CHOPS, 1917-18. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 



FIELD PEA HAY 



Acres 



! 



Tons 



Val 



DC 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . . . .' 

Brevard 

■Broward 

Calhoun 

citrus 

Clay 

Colombia .... 

Hade 

Degoto . ..... 

I 111 VII I 

Escambln . ... 

Flagler 

Franklin .... 

Gadsden 

Hamilton . ... 
Hernando . . . 
Hillsborough . 

Holmes 

.1. irks. in 

Jefferson 

Lafayette .... 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Munatee 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . — 
Okeechobee . . 

Orange 

Osceoln 

Palm Beach . 

PaBCO 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa . . 
Seminole . 

St. Johns 

St. Lnde 

•Sumter . . . 
Suwannee . . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington . . 



1.012 

121 

16 

144 



5 
150 

18 

389 

1.160 

50 
421 
916 
176 
150 

32 
722 
208 
218 
360 

37 
433 
444 

85 
112 

2.J70 

71 

80 

002 

43 

1,305 



158 
23 
25 

244 

55 

9 

395 
11 

346 

110 

269 
77 

158 
11 



330 
13 

746 
99 
94 
18 



1,713 

131 

15 

137 



20 
127 

17 
344 
401 
!<K>! 
704| 
0621 
127| 
164 

63 
807 
228 
195 
684 

37 
2511 
239 

54 

45 

123 

2,026 

82 

55 
515 

241 
872| 
• I- 



196 

181 

22| 
264| 

72 1 

T4| 
524| 

26 
335 
286 
200 

07 
166 

14 



231 

87 

605 

169 

86 

14 



I 



31.430 

3.800 

465 

3.425 



350 

3.305 

330 

9.6011 

12.028 

600 

LAMO 

12.566 
2,743 
2.915 
1.905 

22.012 
5.940 
4.880 

21,650 
730 
3,735 
6.935 
1,620 
810 
1.270 

58,100 
1,720 
1.354 

12,765 
460 

19.724 



3.950 
375 
515 

9.245 
1.800 

508 
8.685 

515 
9.925 
8.020 
4.912 
2.157 
3.320 

360 



8.2S7 

745 

18.150 

3.110 

1.740 

290 



Totals. 



15.J31I 



14.C07; 342.786 



•Not reported. 



FT 



■ 



234 



TABLE No. 1— FIBLD CROPS, 1917-18. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 



HAY, NATIVE GRASSES 



r 



-I- 





Acres 


Tons 


Vuliie 




4.741 

06 

100 

1.819 
86 
150 
940 
201 
298 
590 
155 

2,002 
S66 

1.898 
177 


4,646 
163 
107 
974 
24 
427 
018 
182 
205 
222 
190 

1,955 
265 
868 
198 


OS.O-'S 
3.800 
8,035 




19,480 




460 




7.919 




11,060 




3,507 




5,670 




5,740 


Dade 


2,400 




53,180 
5,220 






17.607 
3,900 










418 


448 


* 7,765 








178 
1,449 
1.039 
3.173 

400 


114 
1,389 

738 
2,132 

117 


8,815 
55,044 
14.760 
22.066 

2,675 










829 

102 

608 

1,051 

80 


432 
195 
096 
996 
50 


8,120 
4,244 




8,090 




24,435 


Liberty 


1.132 




372 
2.830 


397 
2,268 


7,210 
. 48,739 






166 

1,161 

36 

1.614 

814 

797 

161 

801 

915 

1,084 

185 

1,933 

6,619 

:oo 


298 

716 

31 

1,793 

1,112 
755 

165 

871 

964 

2,069 

209 

1,121 

6,038 

187 


5,150 




14,315 
750 






50.38.) 




30.190 




28 229 




3.27.1 




17,430 
27,781 






57.800 
3,045 






21,562 




137.87.". 
4.735 












, 






4 

758 

33 

512 

• 709 


6 

617 

28 

398 

024 


180 
1 6.42.1 




500 




7.730 




11,290 








•13. ..JO 


39,333 


980 738 







, / 



\ 



•Not reported. 



235 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CROPS. 1917-18. 
Continued. 



NATAL GRASS HAY 



COUNTIES 



A I .-i.li un 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . 

Brevard 

Broward . 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia . ... 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Dnval 

Escambia . . . . 

riagler 

Franklin . ... 

Gadsden 

Hamilton . 
Hernando . . . 
Hillsborough . 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson . . . . 
Lafayette . . . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee . 

Marion 

Monroe 

Nassau . 

Okaloosa . 
Okeechobee . . 
Orange . ./.., 

Osceola 

Palm Beach . 

Tasco 

Pinellas . ... 

Polk 

Putnam . . . . 
Santa Rosa . 
Seminole . 
St. Johns 
St Lode . - • 
•Sumter 
Suwannee . . 

Taylor 

Volusia . 

Wakulla . ... 
Walton . 
Washington . 




3 
26 
16 
16 
E» 
55 

2 
78 



_'S 



489 

400 

8 



1.075 

40 

225 



3 

355 



11 



3 
IB 



96 
3 
331| 
11 
13 
18 



■J-J 



102 



1 
41 

7 

32 

12 

I 
6<i 



27 



114 
325 

4 



635 

90 

190 



20 

355 



7 
15 



86 
11 
261 
22 
14 
19 



i.-; 



73 



25 
826 
160 
755 

660 

250 

48 

1 ,685 



160 



*W 



4.SG7 

12,993 

80 



13.615 
1,200 
2,310 



413 

7.150 



140 



200 
450 



2,020 
235 

5,710 
670 
280 
525 



251 



2.190 



Totnls. 



3.481 1 



I 
2.487. 



fi0.8»2 



•Nnt reported. 



/ 



236 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CROPS, 1017-1S. 
Continued. 



KAFFIR CORN 



COUNTIES 




Acres 


Tons 


Value 








































::.::::::>'.: 




8 

• 4 

1 


30 
10 

s 


500 




260 




75 








































1 


1 


"20 






































11 

1 


11 

2 


330 




40 
































8 


8 


170 




>..::. 




























16 
S 


16 
S 


110 




100 




















* 




i 

10 


9 
22 


180 




960 








l 

i 


2 
1 


60 




10 
















































5 


6 


151 
























1 


1 


30 
















1 


I 


40 








Totals 1 19 


143 


a.oor. 



•Not reported. 



< 



237 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CROPS. 1017-18. 
Continued. 



RHODES GRASS HAY 



COUNTIES 




•Not reported. 



A 



238 



TABLE No. 1 — FIELD CHOPS. 1917-18. 
Continued. . 



\ 
COUNTIES 


PARA GRASS H. 


Vi 


Acre* 


Tons 


Value 




































1000 
50 


| 400 
IOC 


I 4,666 
1,565 








1 


1 


10 














119 


235 


1,980 






















3 


8 


• 60 






























































B 


S 


150 








11 
1 


20 
1 


400 
10 


































20 


40 


80 












































51 


151 


3.042 






















































sa 


83 


975 
































































454 


995 


* 12.272 



•Not reported. 



239 



TABLE NO. 1— FIELD CROPS, 191718. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 



SORGHUM 



Acrea 



Tom 



Value 



Alachua . . 
Baker . ... 

Bay 

Bradford . 
Brevard . . 
Broward 
Calhoun . . 
Cirrus . ... 

Clay 

Columbia . 

Dade 

De8oto . .. 

Duval 

Escambia . 
Flagler . . . 
Franklin . 
adsden . . . 
Hamilton 
Hernando . 
Hillsborough 
Holmes . . . 
Jackson . . 
Jefferson . . 
Mfajrette . 

Lake 

Lee 

Loon 

Levy 

Liberty . .. 

Madison 

Manatee . • 
Marlon . . . 
Monroe . . . 
Nassau . . . 
Okaloosa 
Okeehobee . 
Orange . • ■ 
Osceola . . . 
Palm Beach 
Pasco . — 
Plnellaa . . 

Polk 

Putnam . . 
Santa Rosa 
Seminole- . 
St. Johns . . 
St. Lucie ■ ■ 
•Sumter . 
Suwannee . 
Taylor . . . 
Volusia . .. 
Wakulla . . 

Walton . 
Washington . 



12 



8 

IS 

82 

40 

8 

88 

21 

6 

IS 

49 

S 

4 

1 



•JO 



6 
« 



29 

5 

38 

238 
2 

4 



33 
315 



1 
20 



4(1 
44 



13 



41 

4 



no 



31 



22 



10 
40 
78 
90 
38 
44 
28 
12 

an 

88 

15 

86 

5 



30 



27 
88 
32 



29 

7 

198 

865 

7 

5 



48 
911 



8 
100 



155 
46 



67 



160 
8 



203 



44 



220 



270 

\W* 

1.642 
715 
895 

2.880 
240 
710 

2.610 
150 
190 
100 



585 



330 

3.450 

650 



2.R3R 

120 

UN 

6.815 

170 

105 



9f0 

9,812 



180 



120 

2.370 



8.973 
885 



1.285 



1,745 
148 



4,055 



200 
75, 



760 



Totals 



1,323! 



3.7041 



63.239 



•Not reported. 



vT 



240 



TABLE NO. 1— FIELD CROPS, 1917-18. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 




Kt'DZU HAY 




Acres 


Tons 


Vnluo 












































1 


2 


40 








1 


1 


40 
















































1 


1 


2"> 
























































































77 


47 


1 210 
































































































i 


1 


20 
























i 


3 


40 




































































s 


2 


40 






85 


se 


* 1.415 





•Not reported. 



241 



TABLE NO. 1 — FIELD CHOPS, 1017-18. 

Continual. 



MILLET 



COUNTIES 



Acres 



Tons 



Value 



Aluchuu . . 

Baker . 

Bay 

Bradford 
Brevard . . 
Broward . 
Calhoun . . 
Citrus . ... 

Clay 

Columbia . 
Dnde . ... 
DeSoto . . . 
Plival . ... 
Escambia . 
Flagler . . . 
Franklin . . 
Gadsden . . 
Hamilton . 
Hernando . . 
Hillsborough 
Holmes . . . 
Jaekson . . . 
Jefferson 
Lafayette . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty . . . 
Madison . . 
Manatee . . 
Marlon _ . . , 
Monroe ' . 
Nassau . . . 
Okaloosa 
Okeechobee 
Orange . . . 
Osceola . . 
Palm Eeach 
Pasco . 
Plnellaa . . 

Polk 

Putnam . . 
Pant a Rosa 
Seminole 
St. Johns . 
St. Lucie .. 
•Sumter . . 
Suwannee . 
Taylor . . . 
Volusia . . . 
Wakulla . . 
Walton . . . 
Washington 



I 
28 



u 



11 



1 

15 

1 



1 

34 



:;:: 



15 



11 



2 

18 

1 



15 



12 



10 



25 
838 



770 



as 

80 
60 
50 



300 



320 



50 

1,100 

20 



•I.-, 

170 

50 



750 



20 



20 

25 



60 



300 



50 



Totals . 



in 



i 

1691$ 



5.078 



•Not reported. 

IB — Com.Agr. 
/ 



^ 



242 



TABLE NO. 1— FIELD CROPS, 1917-18. 
Continued. 



XII LO MAISE 



COUNTIES 



Acres 



Tons 



Alachua , . 
Baker . 

Bo v 

Bradford . 
Brevard . . 
Broward . 
Calhoun . . 
Citrus . . . 

Cloy 

Columbia . . 

I iad- 

I H-Poto . . . 
Duval . ... 
Escambia . 

Flagler . . . 

Franklin 
Oadsdcn . . 
Hamilton 
Hernando . 
Hlllsliorougli 
Holmes . . . 
-Tackson 

.lefferwn . . 

Lafayette . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty . .. 
Xloritson 
Manatee . . 
Marlon . . . 
Xfonroe . . . 
Nasanu . . . 
Oknlootut . 
rr.-eechobcc . 
Oran«re . . . 
Osceola . . 
I'a'm Beach 
Pasco . 
Pinellas . . 



Polk 
Putnam 
San In Rosa 
Seminole 
si . Johns . . 
St. Lucie . • 
•Snmter . . 
Suwannee 
Tavlor . . . 
Volusia . . . 
Wakulla . . 
Walton . . . 
Washington 



:iii 



21 



033 



Value 



700 



10 



500 



168 



4 

BO 



1.130 



00 
520 



..I. 
61 



51 



120 



101 
101 



25 



50 

01 



1.000 
270 



Totals 



1091 



1.2581 



4.415 



•Not reported. 



243 



TABLE NO. 1 — FIELD CHOI'S, 1017 18. 
Continued. 



PEANPTS 



COUNTIES 



Alachua . . . 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . 
Brevard * 
Broward . . 
Calhoun 

Cltrua 

Clay 

Columbia . . 

Dade 

HeSoto . . . . 
Pnval . . . . 
Eacambia . 
Klajjlar . . . 
Franklin . . 
Gadsden . . 
Hamilton 
Hernando 
IlillghorouK'' 
Holmea . 
Jackson . . 
Jefferson 
Lafayette 
Lake . 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty . . . 
Madison . ■ 
Manntee . . 
Marlon 
Monroe . . . 
Naseau . . . 
Okaloosa . 
Okeechobee 
Oi-anite . . . 
Osceola . . . 
Palm Beach 
Pasco . — 
Pinellas . . 

Polk 

Putnam . . 
Santu It"-* 1 
Srmlnole 
Sr. Johns . 
St. Lucie . . 
•Sumter . . 
Suwannee 
Taylor 
Volusia . 
Wakulla . 
Walton . . . 
Washington 



Totals 



Acres 



10.012! 

3.7. r ,w 

2841 

o.746i 



Bus'-els 

I 

1.161.5661$ 
41 .CM I 

105.5301 



5.680 ' 

1.4451 

11SI 

16.0751 

I. 



sr,e«0 ; 
*r..i54i 

1.472 
289.6101 



1.2751 
.171 



24. '.-.31 
8301 

18,725 1 

225! 




25 : 
.".26.0051 
■I- 



7.3 'I! 

20.041! ' 

2.6151 

320 

100 

36.286 

11.595 



1 .254 

7.505 

24.8*1 

150 
25.1 
■ OS 



274.331 
10.4K2 
0,0 '0 
50.130 
36.600 
83.702 



217.129) 



4.188,411 



Va!ii.. 

_ f.lRl.r.c.i; 

e,.|.'.|-..-! 

12.444 

205.2O5 



171.770 

7" 300 

3.973 

542,448 



40.328 

".000 

22 807 

428 



8.671 


172.877] 


'0-.877 


0.734 


135.R*3I 


135 0O3 


83.. 


10.5871 


a san 


1.452 


31 938 1 


i'J.770 


11.6311 


171 3701 


°1'' W 


45.035 


251.6»4I 


513 403 


4.806 


99.703! 


99.703 


8.339 


237.8001 


35« 8">4 


172 


5 3671 


T.«*1 


71 


!\797l 


n mi 


5.774 


103.809! 


II 8,831 


0.784 


205.641 1 


■.•!•«•. |38 


1.044 


24..-:..- 


38.403 



50 

3 -'.580 



11014 
21.448 

:..-:!.'! 

CIW 

100 

1 in. 205 

2". H:2 



14.258 
80,764 

1 20O 

5i li i 
342 



::ii 1. 077 
4::.714 
211.480 
75.475 
36,800 
83,702 



5.04.1.020 



•Not reported. 



■^ 



244 



TABLE NO. 1 —FIELD CROPS. 1917-J8. 

Continual. 



0OT7NTIES 


• TOBACCO — Open Field Culture 




Acres 


Pounds 


Value 












15 


r 150 


800 
























































































1 


U0O 


60 
















925 


913,005 


189.020 










Hillsborough 


3 
31 


2.000 
842 


620 




631 












1 


20 


10 






I«ee 










63 

1 


54.845 
200 


25.345 
















^ 












si 


2.420 


630 
























































































6 

1 


400 
75 


1?3 


Seminole 


10 








1 


82 


34 












































• 




4 


299 


149 








. 



Totals 



1.0831 974.3381* 217,907 



•Not reported. 



245 



TABLE NO. 1— FIELD CROPS. 1917-18. 

Continued. 



_ . 

COUNTIES 


TOBACCO — Grown Under Shade 


Acre8 


1 
Pounds | Vnlan 













































1 


75 


50 


















** 










































On dad en -,... 


1.747 


1.890,440 


1.025.497 




















1 


12 


g 






































74 


69.4001 02.310 










| 




38 


43,500! 10.71« 


















































































• 
























































































_ 






















1 



Totals . 



1.9811 2.123.4271* 1.224.582 



•Not reported. 



^ 



2Ui 



TABLE SO. 1— FIELD CHOPS. 1017-18. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 


WOOL— Spring Clip 

i t 


1 1 

No. Fleeces | Pounds Value 

! ' 




- 












500 

•-'7.-. 


l.noo 

431 


000 




300 














2.201 




6.580 


'■'■ :i:; i 








4.-0 


1.310 


743 
















2TB R7K 


600 




2.1O0 
2.047 
8,800 


5.R00 

6.801 

11.200 


1.040 




3.088 




4.7SO 










findHden , 1 152 


370 


380 




1.15 

1.000 

2SO 

2SO 

71 


740 

2.500 


700 




1 .450 




6.195 4 nnr. 


Jackson 


8.-.0 
400 


en 

400 






. Lake .."... . A/ 






Lw _ 1 „ 







Leon . 

Levy 

Liberty . . . 
Mndlson . . 
Manatee . . 
Marlon . . . 
Monroe . . . 
Nassau . . . 
Okaloosa 
Okeehobee . 
Oraneo . . . 
Oseeola . . . 
Palm Beacb 
Pasco . 
Pinellas . . 

Polk 

Putnam . . 
Santa Rosa 
Seminole. - 
St. Johns . . 
St. Lucie . 
•Sumter . . 
Suwannee . 
Taylor 



3871 
61 
.1.398! 
J. 



1.5401 
331 

4.409! 



.1. 



2.660 



■ I. 



1.9301 
10.3161 



8.6201 
.1. 



5.601 1 
36 1641 






2.3110 1 

I. 

4101 
.1. 



• I. 



7 0001 

I. 

2.2851 



500 1 «t 

I... 

18,1351 



2.0001 

I. 



.1. 



40.261 1 



.1. 



835 
10 

3033 



5.379 



23600 



« ::s.| 



2400 



21.P30 





3.1 ?0 
12 

8.881 
6.250 


10.0001 
MR 
27.2201 
16.3551 . 

1 


5.1«n 




IS 




17 994 




9.555 






Totals 


64.530 


1 
207.0761 


1 29.360 



•Not reported. 



247 



T.VBI E NO. 1— FIELD CROPS, 1917-18. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 


VELVET BEANS 

i - 


Acres 




Bushels 


Value 




1,111 

851 

2,004 

91 

9 

6.936 

684 

773 

2.745 

83 

662 

I 

30 


110.880 

13,019 

9.527 

24,503 

1,820 

27 

74.5R.-i 

10.123 

6.762 

35.547 

66 

13,636 

l.n.-.n 

7,358 
537 


* 119.707 
30.729 


Bay -. 


27.527 




34.503 
4.000 




540 




74.585 




18.985 




14,923 




72.480 
532 




23.990 
2.544) 




10.052 




1.210 








2.231 


24.646 


24.927 








214 

1,467 

11.788 

13.915 

1,110 

4.435 

66 


1.175 

29.307 

104.964 

51.609 

6.420 

21,058 

680 


3.385 




176.406 




314.892 




14.334 




6,420 




81.704 




680 








5.878 
2.220 
1.297 
160 
r 104 
5,775 


59.149 
43,004 
11.269 
980 
15 
60.390 


69.289 




84,991 




21.056 

1 .'.(io 






30 




62.710 








426 
16.599 


5.329 
117,149 


7.908 


Okaloosa 


93.692 




257 

27 

6 

681 

1 

42 

405 

4.649 

-1 


2,395 

390 

240 

6.906 

25 

808 

5.372 

32.739 

35 


4,800 




630 




1.000 




13,994 




50 




1.889 




15.915 


Santa Boaa 


59.556 




• 50 




307 


1.028 


1 .028 








3R3 
1.102 

305 
2.295 
6.524 
6.544 


2.545 

5.112 

3.546 

22.980 

50.4A8 

77.852 


3.867 




10.129 




10.638 




22.0RO 




50.468 




77.852 








117.263 


1.059.776 


$ 1.675.493 






•Net reported. 









248 



TABLE NO. 1 — FIELD CROPS. 1017-18. 
CimUnued. 



COUNTIES 


VELVET BEAN HAY 




Acres 

1 


Tons 

1 


V.'llll.' 








Baker 


271 
5 
8 


330 
21 
5 


6.01V! 
60 




Bradford 


110 








2 
86 


50 
53 


250 




1 .305 






Clay 


152 

4 


234 
2 


2 043 




40 






DeSoto 


17 
88 

2.400 
11 


10 

63 

2.170 

11 


340 

1.100 

34,642 

225 








5 


5 


100 








4 

85 

121 

47 

43 


1 3 

155 

35 

66 

30 


70 




2.500 
700 




400 




870 






Ijike 


40 


22 


440 


Lee 






53 
33 


49 
54 


800 


Levy .' 


000 
























70 


67 


790 






Nassau 


74 


50 


1.000 








5. 

r,2 


82 
76 


150 




1.710 




21 
100 


130 
1.638 


3.814 




4.030 




1 
123 
310 


2 

332 

488 


40 




6.120 
0,020 














16 


5 


166 








6 
30 


6 
35 


150 




1,006 
























1 5 


4 


SO 




1 




Totals 


4.382 


■•..IIP.- 


* 85,1 10 



•Not reported. 



240 



TAIILB NO. 1— FIELD CROPS, 1917-1 & 

C'UlUnucd. 



. t 

• 

COUNTIES 

• 1 
1 
1 


1 


ICVK 

] 




1 
Acres 


1 
Run" el* 


rain/ 














































14 




7.1 


300 








4 





24 


72 








i 









20 




40 






















1 








2 




20 


80 


















127 
« 
8 


1,000 

M 
inn 


8,309 

12n 




lake 


mo 






Leon 


14 
5 





isn 

18 




' 4"0 




20 









on 

1 

11 


BOO 
RO 

108 


800 
200 




MS 








12 


200 


r.so 




































in 

3 





100 


•_1.11 




12 














S«wann.H» 


J.- 
M 


1 
1 


va 

30 

30 


too 

00 




on 



























! 1 1 




KM 


1 


3.3M 


$ 7.004 




1 



•Not reported. 



> 






250 



TABLE NO. 1 — FIELD CROPS, 1017-18. 
Continual. 



BROOM CORN 



COU.NT1E8 

V 

\ 


i 

Acres 


_ 

, Tons 


Vulue 
























4 


. 1 


200 




















* 














80 


8 


no 




1 


• i 


40 
























































• ■> 


- 


90 




































* 












4 


2 


150 




























1 




S 


8 


120 
































i 
,?, 


5 


76 








/ 








8 


12 


1.10O 
























. 


















































































• 












Tolals 


*A 


37 


MOS 



•Not rcportwl. 






V 



251 



TABLE NO. 1— FIELD CROPS, 1917-18. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 


CASSAVA 
r ' 


1 

Acres 


Tona | Value 

1 




















i 


1 


25 








































M 








2 


1 


20 


Dade . .» . . 






4 
1 


6 
2 


650 




60 
















































75 


120 


4,028 






























Lake ; 

Lee ) 


13 
5 


00 
25 


7.-.-I 
480 
































7 
22 


12 
26 


220 




550 












■4 


















Orange 


1» 

9 


77 
18 


1,120 
900 
















6 

2 

10 


39 
20 
68 


780 




400 




468 
















2 

I 1 


8 

1 •• 


400 




7.". 








• 
















10 


43 


305 
































189 


' 497 


11,235 







•Not reported. 



252 



TABLE No. 1— FIELD CHOI'S. 1017-18. 
Continued. 



ALFALFA (LUCERNE i 



Tntlll*. 



COUNTIES 




Acres 


I Tons 


\ Value 




















































































r* 


18 


800 








43 


170 


740 
















































1 


1 


HO 












































































































s 




































































1 


/ 


is 










2 


a 


75 






















































" 














i 


* 





-,?, 



1112 



1,180 



"Not reported. 



> 






253 



TABLE NO. 1— FIELD CHOPS, 1917-18. 
ContiAued. 



CASTOR BEANS 



" 



COUNTIES | 


Acres 


Bushels 


Value 




1,729 


8,224 


44.572 








14 


150 


450 
























iee 

133 


905 


4,394 




2,743 






205 
253 








5,746 


13,840 






5 


50 


225 
































4 

815 

16 


96 

240 


285 




720 














ii« 


1,610 


4,845 












466 


7,795 


23,385 
































273 


1,689 


6,409 




















24 


107 


680 




. . . a ... . .?!: 




5 

719 
771 


30 

85 
5.409 


200 




355 




15,327 








i 


40 


120 








* 


25 


75 
















752 


335 


1,018 












1 19 


340 


970 
































* 








6,488 


84,777 


120,550 







•Not reported. 



rr 



w 






254 

TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES aVd GARDEN PRODUCTS, 1917-1S. 



COUNTIES 


• 


ONIONS 




Acres 


Oaten 


Value 




















9 

1 

4 

16 


SH 

50 
315 

2.4-45 


337 




100 




502 
1.020 






a 

2 

1 

-5 

14 
12 

1 

1 

11 

1 


206 

91 

25 

000 

1.240 

1125 

79 

20 

2.1 50 

15 


367 




144 

50 

1.695 

1.300 

1 645 








170 


KIllRllT . 


°0 




0.450 
30 




1 

66 

1 


.-,ci 

0.088 

50 


200 




0.534 

100 
















Lake 


1 
1 
4 

2 
20 


22 
164 
39S 
190 
600 


44 
190 
664 




310 

l.-OO 
















ib 
n 

7 
1 
1 
28 
7 


74(1 

1,600 

.163 

4 

60 

4.243 

565 


760 




1 ..-..'!.-. 




564 

41 




65 
3.517 




910 








804 

13 

2 

12 

iS 

4 


62.694 
250 
251 
986 
28 
120 
568 


130.123 






(.044 
75 






1.096 




807 








:ii 


1.851 


2.000 




















29 


4.11.-..- 


5.8IHI 










1 


.6 


15 






Totals 


1.155 


94.489 


$ 17SJSS9 



•Not Reported. 



IL 



r. 



255 



TABLE/ NO. 2 — VEGETABLES AND GARDEN PRODUCTS, 1017-18. 
— Coninuei. 



/ 

COUNTIES 


LETTUCE 

_ — 1 — — . > 




Acres 


Crate* 1 Value 




152 


24,36.1 


* 2«,870 












* 














jg 


150 


::imi 















































2 


BSD 


!l5n 












2 


80 


IflO 




















\i& 


21.056 >■> 
































i^ik/. ...::;:;:;::;;;:::: 


n 


1.072 


•MR 








i 
ii 


.10 


■m 




1,2001 :::«*> 














003 

18A 



:::::::::::: 


2fi7.'.i.V. ll-'.-I.V. 


wonroe 

Nnttraa 


2».2."..- 1 ::\. •■:■.» 








332 


04.207 


04*16 



Oaceola 
Palm Beach 

Paaen . 

Plnellns . . 

Polk 

Putnam . . . 
San'a Roan 
Seminole 
St. .ToIidii . 
St. Lucie . . 
•Sumter . . 
Suwannee . 
Taylor . . . 
Voltmln . 
Wakulla . . 
Walton . 
Washington . 



40| 



0.000 1 



I8.8SH 



71 
001 



1.110' 
88.1421 



- , .... 

_r. :■!>.". 



ni 

7711 

• ,! 



2KOI 
204 07.-. I 



uT.ra 



70' 
...I. 
...I. 



WW 



. 1 



201 



4.700' 

I. 

I. 

I . 



-.son 



Totals 



•Not reported. 



2.08.-I 



747.3461* 



.-.IK. 871 



T^ 



25G 



T.USU-; NO. J— VEGETABLES AND UAUDEN PRODUCTS, 1917-18. 
Continued. 



CELEKY 



COUNTIES 

- ' 1 


Acres 


Crates 


Value 
























- 3 
2 


l.uoo 
370 


2.000 

otto 
































ie 

8 


i.r.10 
373 


3.000. 
1.020 
















































121 


82,372 


.217.280 














. . .'. .\ 
















1 


,150 


150 




















- 




















009 


297.1 1.". 
2,150 


■188.550 
2,15o 




























s 


1.200 


1.200 








2 


- 470 


800 








1 
22 


175 
3,588 


330 




3.478 








2 

802 

1 
1 


185 

463.088 

a 

•6 


180 


Seminole 


379.3115 
18 




6 
























2 


540 


840 




















1 






Totals — 


1 

1.601 


85 4. 298 


If 798.161 



•Nm reported. 



L 



I 



267 



TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND OABDEN PBODUCT8, 1917-18. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 


PEPPEB 


Acre* 


Crates 


Value 




14 


1.010 


$ 1.300 






4 J 


12 


4 








2 
959 


160 

183,212 


250 




320,115 














1 


10 


30 






Dade 


181 

3.081 

6 

1 


13,068 

44.800 

765 

25 


29,785 

48.560 

1,104 

76 




Escambia 
































1 
1 3t 


25J 
1 4.45( 


59 




| 9.652 






















1 

2 

215 


2 

100 

60.741 


4 




250 




138.592 








1 


50 


150 








. 








409 
22 
36 


69.988 

1,890 

275 


98,885 




1.835 




350 
















8 
41 


500 
9,585 


500 
12.708 








2.946 
3 


337.747 
441 


547,924 
652 










1 • u 


1 . 2,131 


1 2.281 








1 
323 

1 

n 


35 50 




121,156) 139,646 




5 20 




:U8!I 


8,142 
























2 


291) 


44l> 
































1 
8,039 


S 1.363.264 











•Not reported. 
17 — Com.ARr. 



258 



TABLE NO. 2 — VEGETABLES AND GARDEN PRODCCT8, 1917-18. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 


IRISH POTATOES 


/ 


Acret 


Bushels 


Value 




134 

64 

16 

32 

904 

490 

12 

T 

532 

22 

303 

3,941 

181 

287 

2,522 

28 

2 


8,201 

3.925 

680 

3,270 

240.328 

42,220 

718 

980 

55,493 

445 

11,780 

290.715 

18,127 

13,992 

182,191 

5.700 

114 


t 6,120 

6,200 

1,006 

5,520 

47.326 

48 320 














1.436 

1,469 

15,894 

775 

17.575 

317,485 






Colombia 






24,563 




25,299 




127,457 

17.100 

228 












59 

1,671 

44 


4.830 

171,149 

2,130 


3 775 




176,855 
2,693 
















15 

91 

118 

25 

85 

1 

1 

371 

779 


1..242 

7.283 

11,267 

1,957 

4.377 

■ 40 

50 

27,384 

78,800 


1 2,281 
8.254 
9,505 
3.741 
8.557 
80 














200 




13,317 
138.820 








10 


916 


1.448 






1,042 

477 

884 

2,726 

47 

103 

737 

3,966 

57 

301 

14,574 

277 


106,076 

29.975 

55.520 

334,825 

3,280 

9,706 

54,503 

419,175 

2,002 

42.590 

2,183.874 

41.236 


30.349 
33,020 
05 350 






Palm Beach 


545.245 

6,525 

12.964 

41,405 

489.830 








3.868 

39,128 

1,987.029 

27.690 








2 


300 


450 








801 

1 


78,840 
60 


"■m 










4 


•150 


245 








38.596 


4,552,465 


$ 4.403.361 





•Not reported. 



TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND GABDEN PBODUCT8. 1017-18. 
Continued. 



COI'NTIES 


DASHEEN.S 




Acres 


Biuthelg | 


Cwrtea 




































10 


200 
1.170 


1.240 
1.505 






Citrus 


1 


10 


20 
















2 

84 

1 
1 
10 


100 

2,200 

75 

60 

835 


150 




2.870 
150 






60 
835 




















24 


100 
2,592 


ioo 

3.822 












* 




















« 


1,225 


1,220 






























id 


1.100 


300 
















is 


3,117 


3,754 






l 


10 


15 








* 








15 

36 

1 

4 

3 

1 


20.075 

3.752 

45 

220 

100 

10 


4,160 
4440 






135 




316 




150 




15 
















10 


527 


031 
























ii 

l 


060 
50 


2.880 
50 


















1 


• 




217 38..138 


$ ■" 28.323 








^1 



•Not reported. 



TABLE NO. 2- 



260 



-VEGETABLES AND GARDEN PRODUCTS, 1917-18. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 




CABBAGE 




Acres 


Crates 


Value 




485 


62,080 


t 61,90.1 








23 
8 

33 

778 

3 

2 

1 5 

4 

38 
552 

24 
8 

80 

24 
1 


iliio 

625 

840 

78,640 

87 

285 

391 

119 

1,926 

61.500 

2.768 

761 

2.391 

4.900 

15 


1,590 




1,050 




880 
75,200 




310 




360 




817 




258 




8,400 




65,300 




4,937 




1,640 




4,818 




14,700 




75 








16 

958 


315 
102,912 


450 




150.766 
























50 

577 

159 

1 

74 

2 


195 

22,322 
17,478 

95 
14.450 

70 


400 




24,565 




7,527 




115 




28,600 




176 








2.179 

417 

39 


272,300 

36,770 

300 


182,441 

27,097 

430 


















218 

145 

23 

1,481 

2 

68 

1,018 

4 

24 

209 

8 

495 


31,775 

37.372 

5.360 

22,635 

214 

8,834 

160.819 

295 

188 

26.01J 

168 

48.126 


27.037 




25,520 




8.780, 




532>«r 




/*220 




S 3 > 92 " 




y' 80.434 




/ 540 




' 2.146 

30,590 
438 






26.813 
























69 

1 


9.025 
200 


14.20C 
400 






8 


54 


123 






10.253 


1,082,379 


8 1.358,633 





•Not reported. 



. 



\ 



V 



261 



TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND GARDEN PRODUCTS. 1917-18. 



COUNTIES 


TOMATOES 




Acres 


Crates 


Value 




10 


1.580 


1.520 




7 

22 

17 

6.925 

1 

4 

2 

8 

7.093 

383 

21 

1 

1 

3* 


300 

2.830 

815 

1,135.556 

5 

377 

210 

155 

860.090 

34.224 

1,880 

82 

25 

1.550 

300 


300 




2.991 




1.035 




1.932,703 




10 




035 


Clay 


895 




295 




1.323.175 




35.294 




3,380 




95 




SO 




4.650 




300 








14 

K 102 
1 


600 

29,522 

53 


1.090 


Hillsborough . ....--. 


54.961 
175 












16 

22 

267 

3 

1.218 
1 


1,648 

2.411 

3».486 

288 

1.510 

25 


2,500 




3.220 




47.365 




505 




3.510 




13 








1.036 
348 
149 


157.706 

29.450 

5,606 


291. 440 




33.767 




7.766 
















204 

204 

8 

1,852 

13 

3 

111 

• 8 

20 

114 

2 

323 


17.177 
28.206 

800 

430.842 

1.011 

265 
10.926 

545 

248 
24.999 

120 
31.883 


18.277 




65.8.17 




6.10 


Palm Beacb 


2.314.018 
1.604 




600 

14.486 




895 




1.865 




47.209 




250 




60.819 








2 

1 
37 


105 

10 

4.745 


68 




18 




6.010 
















10 


811 


360 








21.186 


2.852.426 


S 0.287.557 







•Not reported. 



TT 



262 



TABLE NO. S— VEGETABLES AND GABDEN PBODCCT8, 1917-18. 

Continued. 




COUNTIES 




SQUASHES 




Acres 


1 

Crates 


Value 












- 
















3 


200 


400 




lis 


15,255 


25,865 
































5 
74 

1 
1 


iio 

* 10.570 

280 

5 


620 




9.505 




460 




i 








3 


- 220 


440 
























39 


4,300 


5,816 
























io 

28 
5 
1 

61 


540 
3.475 

815 

83 

6,015 


817 




4.5O0 




1,647 




33 




6.015 
















13 
18 


2,360 

860 

1,000 






680 




1.500 
























4 


250 


325 




138 

8 

1 

• 8 


27,198 

195 

25 

.352 


53.882 




270 




2i> 




507 








1 

42 

1 

7 


90 

7.237 

86 

488 


85 




8,030 




168 




669 
























1 


220 


295 






























Totals 


596 


82,543 


t 124.716' 







•Not reported. 



263 



TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND UARDEN PRODUCTS. 1017-18. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 


EGG PLANTS 


Acres 

I 


Cratea 


Value 







1,450 


* 010 




















1 
120 


75 
20.405 


75 




::m.oo5 








4 


205 


490 
















46 

200 
3 

1 


6,340 

22.575 

125 

15 


0,»75 




20,650 




325 




10 








1 


40 


80 




















53 
1 


6.507 

•jr. 


15,701 




26 
























i 

60 

1 

61 


ioo 

11.108 

40 

6.110 


200 




23.354 




40 




11,300 
















n 


50.472 
740 


57,062 




1.150 
























14 

8 

' 2 

831 

2 


2.208 

1,850 

500 

208.833 
350 


2,940 




3,600 




750 




386.541 




670 




13 


1.028 


3.158 
















56 
1 

7 


16.156 

3 

226 


17.735 




9 




531 




..... 




















4 


560 






















1,616 


358,737 


$ 590.33.1 







•Not reported. 



\W 



' 



264 



TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND GABDEN PBODUCTS, 1917-18. 

Continued. 












COUNTIES 






CUCDMBEB8 




Acres 


Cratei 


Value 




307 


38.260 


* 78.700 




Bay 










1 

1 

89 


35 

27 
9.880 


70 




54 




15,820 








3 


875 


1,150 














4 

• 75 

8 

3 


780 

03.870 

4.735 

270 


875 


DeSoto 





103.925 

4,9:11 

197 
















1 


80 


160 






















7 

118 

5 


310 

17,579 
70 


075 






29,745 
110 






















1 

13 

174 

1 
1.129 


. 80 

2.719 

1,410 

5 

85.687 


117 


Lake 


5.185 


Lee 


2.263 




10 




38,508 














97 

84 


15.889 
12.927 


- 26,694 






16.812 




































264 


97.818 


146,085 












65 
2 
1 

11 


11.845 

159 

125 

1.280 


21.244 






318 






275 






1.722 










2 

23 

1 
2 


60 

4,133 

10 

141 


110 




5.803 




30 




293 








1 


40 


40 






Volusia 


4 


500 


630 


































2.497 


350.516 


$ 497.615 







•Not reported. 



V 



265 



TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND UAKDEN PRODUCTS. 1917-18. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 


UOMAINE 


Acres 


1 

Crates | Value 

1 












































2 


iob 


100 
































































. 








































8 


238 


37U 
















































































2 


330 


200 




















_ _ 












' 




• 


2.532 


3,074 




























1 


40 


48 
















ie 


10.700 


0.860 
















































































30 


13.940 


J 7.633 


." 


i 







•Not reported. 



prf 



266 



TABLE NO. a— VEGETABLES AND GARDEN PRODUCTS, 1017-18. 
Continued. 



•Not reported. 



1 

COUNTIES 


WATERMELONS 


1 
Acres Carload 

1 


Value 




841 


103 


% IM.'.'-M' 








5 

28 
18 


5 

14 

1 


280 




1.065 




123 








57 
30 
25 
377 
13 

30 
• 12 

ir. 


SO 
14 

22 

157 

1 

415 

22 

24 

3 

30 

\ 


3,000 




4,760 




1,785 




5,100 




700 




08.035 




3,285 






2,525 






500 






1.200 


















200 
267 
160 
287 
191t 
1 
040 
212 
430 
520 


28 
211 

80 
102 

"2 

::is.-. 

60 
146 

80 


8,525 


HtllRhorougU . . 




71,803 




2.5!i:; 




8.250 




2,850 




200 




•10.284 




15.905 




8.920 




16,403 








16 
72 

■■■so 
20 

4 


7 

20 

231 

:t 

3 


800 




5,455 




54.075 




270 




712 






Okeechobee . . . 


5 

448 

12 

i 

165 
44 

.-7 

8 
11 
76 


1 
137 

6 

4 
14 
34 
47 
27 
22 

4 
23 
27 


400 
21.640 




490 




1.273 
1.980 
3,485 




16.560 




'4.415 




3.305 




1,280 




1,870 




2.664 








340 
145 
267 

12 


iio 

20 

72 
7 


14,830 




3,000 




18.820 




080 








50 


. 17 


925 








7,558 


2.77.1 


* 494.636 







• 



267 



TABLE XO. 2— VEGETABLES AND GARDEN PRODrCT8. 1917-18. 
ConUnved. 



■ 



COUNTIES 


CANTALOUPES 


I 
Acres 


Crates ' 


Value 




















] 


45 


00 






































Clay 


1 


50 


100 








2 
3 

4 
1 
1 
4 


250 
200 
204 
30 
55 
750 


300 




200 




420 




7r. 




65 




•J. :r.<> 
























18 


2.808 


8.441 








































3 

1 


87 
57 


70 
68 




















i 

407 
20 


30 

18,292 

905 


50 




26.854 




800 
























1 


50 


100 
























1 
4 


55 

100 


100 
200 








S 


210 


255 
















13 


296 


472 
























2 


470 


630 
































1 B02 


24.054 


* 41,520 



•Not Reported. 



268 

' TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND GARDEN PRODUCTS, 1817-18. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 


ENGLISH PEAS 


Acres 


Crates 


Value 




4 


100 


* 270 








1 


36 


41 
















40 


6,000 


10,150 






















3 
119 


110 
12.5S4 


, no 

19.267 




1 


8 


6 








1 


100 


300 
























10 


903 


2.709 






























4 


113 


183 








1 
10 


20 
500 


20 




.'■00 
















i 

20 


22 
550 


66 




1 .290 
























• 

4 


352 
110 


800 




280 








87 


24,869 


32.670 








1 


85 
205 


165 




710 








e 

i 


105 
7 


190 




14 








6 


464 


1.322 
























7 


470 


1.020 
































341 1 47-KKft 


$ 72.083 











•Not reported. 



. 



TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND GABDEN PBODUCT8, 1917-18. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 




BEETS 


Acres 


Crates 


Value 




































1 


1,850 


1,000 




































Dade 


i 

15 

8 

1 

1 

x 1 


30 
2,180 
645 
100 
126 
150 


60 




1.380 
760 
100 






125 




450 
























io 


915 


1.718 










- 




















24 
1 
1 

15 


1,825 

9 

30 

750 


3.250 




22 




40 




750 
















28 

19 

5 

1 


5,619 

2,710 

40 

30 


7,432 




2.810 




60 




30 








2 


. 848 


330 








i 








209 

e 

1 


45.483 

840 

60 


72.606 




580 




60 
















i 

23 

1 


28 

8.950 

10 

204 


20 




10.200 




20 






253 
























8 


l.i45 


1.335 




























380 


73.571 


$ 105.301 



•Not reported. 



-f 



270 



TABLE NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND GARDEN PRODUCTS, 1917-18. 
Con Mount. 



COUNTIES 



Alachua . . 
Baker . ... 

Bay 

Bradford 
Brevard . . 
Broward 
Calhotra . 
citrus . . . 

Clay 

Columbia . 

Dade 

DeSoto . . . 
Duval . ... 
Escambia . 
Flagler . . . 
Franklin 
Gadsden . . 
Hamilton . 
Hernando . 
Hillsborough 

- H. 'I II:. - . . . 

Jackson . . 
Jefferson . 
Lafayette . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty . . . 
Madlaon . . 
Manatee . 
Marlon . .. 
Monroe . . . 
Nassau . . . 
Okaloosa 
Okeechobee 
Orange . . . 
Osceola . . . 
Palm Beach 

Pasco . 

Pinellas . . 

" Polk 

Putnam . . 
Santa Rosa 
Seminole 
St. Johns . . 
St Lucie 



BEANS (String) 



Acres 



117 



9 

19 

74 

1,811 

1 

1 

15 



227 
2S7 

18 

1 



a 

370 



10 

78 

11 

1 

50 



47 
1.580 



152 
22 



1.828 

78 

8 

242 

185 

2 

74 

1 

672 



Crates 



4.761 * 



518 

1,065 

1.181 

317,220 

5 

94 

427 



34,354 

172.485 

1*528 

50 



300 
500 



200 
36,778 



1,927 

.-..(Mifl 

840 

23 

5,000 



5,781 
112.920 



911 



is.«2 
1,842 



M048! 

1,317 

235 

21.842 

0,580 

50 

l *.::<n> 

28 

49.286 



Vulue 



21.776 



429 

1 .348 

2,166 

527.655 

10 

136 

867 



54.360 

isn..->oo 

1,886 
50 



900 
500 



25n 
95.584 



2.988 
8.T00 
1.558 
25 
4.000 



8.177 
114.141 



190 



l«.mt:s 
2,559 



717,435 

1,081 

420 

30.448 

14.930 

150 

17.25:1 

56 

91.482 













1 


5 




10 








25 


2.430 




3,565 
























- 




8,006 


1.860,136 * 


1.933,578 









•Not reported. 






271 



TABU! NO. 2— VEGETABLES AND GARDEN PRODUCTS, 1017-18. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 



LIMA BEANS 



Acres 



Crates 



Value 



Alachua . , . 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . . 
Brevard . . . 
Broward . . 
Calhoun . . . 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia . . 

Dade 

DeSoto . ... 

1 HI va 1 

Escambia . . 
Flagler . ... 
Franklin . . . 
Gadsden . . . 
Hamilton . . 
Hernando . . 
Hillsborough 
Holmes . ... 
Jackson . ... 
Jeerson . . . 
Lafayette . ■ 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty . ... 
Madison . . . 
Manatee . - . 
Marlon . ... 
Monroe . ... 
Nassau . . . 
Okaloosa . . 
Okeechobee . 
Orange . ... 
Osceola > . ... 
Palm Beach . 

Pasco 

Plnellaa . . . 
Polk 

Putnam . . . 
Santa Rosa . 
Seminole . . 
8t. Johns . . 
St. Lucie . . . 
•Sumter . . . 
Suwannee 
Taylor . ... 
Volusia . . . 
Wakulla . .. 
Walton . ... 
Washington . 
Totala . . . 



X: 



i 

10* 
44 



2 
313 

7.O80 



5 



100 

1.41X1 
120 



HS 



US 

1 



20 

u 



329 



3,010 



191 



1IMI 



10 



797 
20 



4,650 
347 



110 



1,574 

"Li 



220 



20,079 



10 

608 

9,510 



00 



300 

1,900 

371 



4.578 



381 



150 



20 



1,300 
60 



7,450 
706 



16» 



3.01O 
31 



270 



30,009 



Totals . 



329 



20,079 S 30,909 



•Not reported. 



272 



TABLE NO. 3— FRUIT PRODUCTS. 









1 
CO I' NT I ES 


ORANGES 




Bear- 

Jl ng 

Trees 

1 


Non- 
Bearing 
Trees 


Trees In 

Nursery 

Form 




25.388 












Bay 


106 

203 

290,643 

7,562 

1.678 

7,610 

1.056 

202 

13,720 

442.740 

13,914 

718 

1,172 

1,285 


720 

482 

123.915 

5,758 

995 

1,552 

1,353 

62 

16,133 

290.145 

1,450 

2.597 

128 

1.283 










169.625 

40.000 

100 

1,690 

27 












60 


Dade 


5.800 

173,482 

243 








2,706 


Flagler 




















18.040 

268,009 
20 


3,285 

272,963 

79 


11,800 
121,429 






















mi 

194,179 
156.695 

27 
1,395 

79 


1,072 

114,649 

79.411 

31 

337 

495 


82 

232,190 
43,284 












I^VJ 




Liberty 












170,729 

91,597 

565 

6 

24 

4.9211 

430.528 

4.-..r,77 

49.925 

53.036 

141.276 

309.5 19 

-'24.376 

2.204 

89.930 

0.979 

Bl,638 


76.450 

45.121 

205 

45 

146 

1.11)7 

310.403 

13.627 

50.443 

.17. IS.", 

73,910 

583.401 

21.805 

till] 

21.630 

1.312 

1I7.1I!>» 


115,790 

61,40* 

G.*» 


























1 280 




111 00(1 




4,377 

10 58ti 


Palm Beach . 




:;.-,. in 7 

31,30(1 

228,387 

86 510 










3.IRHI 




21 l.'ln 




1 1 8 




17° " > 4fi 








■.NM. 

28 
329.850 








44 

1481760 
19 






53,800 




8 








8 


22 










3,567.0721 


2.452.426 


1,719.063 




•Not reported. 











273 



TABLE NO. 3 — FRUIT PRODUCTS. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 


ORANGES— Continued 


Value 
of All 
Trees 


Crates 


Value 






33,468 


« 70.426 






104 

148 

349,025 

15.050 

1,923 

9,750 

896 

214 

19,346 

969.238 

9.861 

524 

1.790 

3.855 


243 




1,185 

292.033 

171,628 

5.755 

4,956 

2.172 

723 

75,430 

2.707.032 

4.580 

552 

4,082 


290 




711.96S 

31.888 

3,846 








17,006 

2,188 

535 








33,98!) 




1,783.389 
44.837 






1.214 


Flagler 


3,800 




28,130 


















53,255 

724,957 

105 


23,787 

632.483 

2 


29.298 




1,241,865 




3 












1.260 

60,715 

268.793 

31 

6.267 

1.708 


468 

142,273 

75,002 

23 

5.750 

69 


020 




267.22-1 




131.431 




44 




11.641 




168 








165.480 

120,239 

.-,50 

156 

193 

51,660 

68.500 

1,446,580 

158,620 

182,398 

14.375 

4,897.295 


169.132 

151,576 

95 

11 

8 

8.524 

670.303 

159,136 

58.291 

103,281 

288,040 

799,457 

44.579 

144 

156,262 

12.570 

85,697 


268,712 




232.661 




310 




32 




13 




16,919 
1,186,366 






:i30.399 




117.223 




192,403 




485,262 




1.188|ft66 

281,582 






2,794 
820,281 

1.680 
450.056 


634 




97,523 




25.140 




209.105 








ioi 

98 

125,500 
83 








'46 

124,815 

14 


239.340 






41 








98 


4 


14 




2,893,859 


5,177,081 


9.899.144 






•Not reported. 

18 — Com.Acr. 




I 





274 



TABLE NO. 8— FRUIT PRODUCTS. 
ComUnuei. 



COUNTIES 
I 



LEMONS 



Bear- 

£S 

Trees 



Non- 
Bearing 
Trees 



Tree* In 

Nursery 

Form 



Alachua . .... 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . .. 
Brevard . ... 
Broward . . . 
I'alhoun . ... 

Cltrns 

Clay 

Columbia . .. 

Dade 

DeSoto . ... 

Duval 

KscamMn . . 

Flagler 

Franklin . . . 
Gadsden .... 
Hamilton . .. 
Hernando . . 
Hillsborough . 

II.llllli-H 

Jackson . ... 
Jefferson . . . 
Lafayette . . . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty . 

Madison .... 
Manatee . ... 

Marlon 

Monroe . ... 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 
Okeechobee* . 

Orajigc 

Osceola . ... 
Palm Beach . 

Pasco 

Pinellas . ... 
Pinellas . ... 

Port 

Putnam . ... 
Santa Roea . 
Seminole . . . 
St. Johns . .. 
St. Lucie . •■ 
Jackson . ... 
Suwannee . . 

Taylor 

Volusia . ... 
Wakulla .... 
Walton . ... 
Washington . 



28 
2,138 



70 
441 

137 



219 



11.277 



4 
M 



103 
'615 



1.143 
15 
25 
32 
12 



824 



20 



430 
771 



654 

5.010 

157 



8.200 
28 



107 



676 



59.187 



15 
1.014 

41 



400 
471 



1,016 
"l27 



9,510 



1.234 

2.115 

2.115 

5 

312 



2.800 

187 

187 

10.000 

836.550 



2 
1,500 



15.683 



■ I. 



Total. 



17,098 



15.220 



942,521 



•Not reported. 



/ 



275 



table no. 8— fruit products. 
OhmmkA 



LEMONS— Continued 



COUNTIES 




Valoe 

•CAI1 
Trees 




Cratea 




Value 




































1,030 
27.235 


4 
2.386 


4 




7,032 






























333 

12,710 

731 


49 

570 

90 


152 




870 




448 


















557 


4.599 


























19.1.38 


1.440 


5.683 
























10 
200 
490 


5 


8 




109 


291 








3 






















3.692 


91 


248 










120 


225 


















75 


2 


10 
















7,470 

3.745 

1.000 

84.916 


2.451 


7.325 








59 
18 


152 




32 
















4 














3,913 


1,207 


2.163 












































167,495 fl.MK 


29.244 











"Not reported. 



/ 



f 



276 



TABLE NO. 3— FRUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 






LIMES 



COUNTIES 

• 




Trees 




Crates 


— 

Value 




































2i7 

877 


32 
454 


174 




1,914 
































1.582 

511 

32 


2,155 

519 

30 


5,542 




529 




108 
















































994 


1.111 


4,159 














T<*ke 


5 
1,868 








1,535 


6.172 
































14,237 


448 


1,300 








41,120 


3,653 


14,824 






































Palm Beacb . . 




3,118 


4,491 

2 

53 

5 


15,634 




2 

31 

2,322 


4 




104 




40 
































9.025 


1,091 


2.447 


























































Washington . . 




















75,950 


15,582 


*53.100 





•Not reported. 



277 



TABLE NO. 3— FRUIT PRODUCTS. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES. 



GRAPEFRUIT 



Alachua . . . 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . . 
Brevard . .. 
Broward . . 
Calhoun . . . 
Citrus . ... 

Clay 

Columbia . . 

Dade 

DeSoto .... 

Duval 

Escambia . 
Flatter 

Franklin . . 
Gadsden . . . 
Hamilton . . 
Hernando . , 
Hillsborough 
Holmes . . . 
Jackson . . . 
Jefferson . . 

Lafayette . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon . 



Levy 

Liberty . ... 
Madison .... 
Manatee .... 

Marlon 

Monroe . 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 
Okeechobee . 

Orange 

Osceola . 
Palm Beach . 

Pasco 

Pinellas . ... 

Polk 

Putnam . ... 
Santa Rosa . 
Seminole . . . 
St. Johns . .. 
St. Lucie . .. 
•Sumter . .. . 
Suwannee . . 

Taylor 

Volusia . 

Waknlla . ... 

Walton . 

Washington . 



Total. 



Bear- 

'1 res 



830 
50 



32.052 

13.519 

20 

SB 

10 



881.837 

68,028 

822 



65 
298 



2,201 
23.371 



6 

35.941 

132.835 



185,125 
3,971 
1,143 



. 3,408 

53,698 

7,451 

46.862 

12.565 

I r,..-.'.n 

214.423 

7.180 

1 

3.448 

147 

117,161 



Non- 
Bearing 

Trees 



50 



16.096 
15,329 

6 
15 

2 



..6.394 

64,297 

68 



14 
103 



It'.M 



9 

B.-..S-J3 
82.826 



74.299 
56« 
286 



1 
31,895 



666 

71.183 

4,416 

42,780 

52,818 

80.917 

678.362 

1.260 



357 

30 

156.544 



2 

9.650 



1,893,0861 



1,493,193 



Trees In 

Nursery 

Form 



2,725 
4..->0!> 



2,610 

14.200 

46 



600 
55,768 



1 

119.000 

22,957 



58,160 
20 



175 
. 2,400 
3.200 
14.975 
17,977 
37.400 
245.765 



1.050 

47,585 



16,500 



667.620 



•Not reported. 



N 



27S 



TABLE NO. 3 — FBDIT I'llODUtTS. 
Continued. 



■ i 



J 



COUNTIB8 \| 


ORAPBFBr IT — Continued 


Value 
of All 
Trees 




Crates 


Valne 






2.125 
50 


4.300 






150 


















47,688 

248.539 

80 

40 

11 


39.998 

36,158 

20 

120 


73.560 




65.05U 




40 




87 














209,199 

172.401 

1.778 


448,423 

4 '3.676 

1,«*W 


721.584 




5U3.SS1 




5,952 








155 


•>4 
8114 


293 




5.364 


















8.185 
47,168 


2,264 
56,627 


2,849 
113.315 


























IS 

45,500 

235,407 


7 
18.346 
97,553 


29 




32.982 




257,402 








25 


1 


2 








189.981 

844 

1,200 


279.883 
8.948 
1,445 


094.820 




14.34)! 




4,390 












30.105 

60.000 

159.119 

169.720 

161.377 

18.150 

5.957.625 


8.652 
51.794 
16.268 
82,819 
84,427 
284.184 
434.127 
10.802 


14.169 




66.424 




35.289 




195.622 


Pasco 


92.638 




428,293 
928,088 






34.709 


Santa Hosa 


5 

35.337 






4.182 

274 

102.(100 


5.498 




548 




2,971.507 


356.737 














Taylor 


6 
7,650 


2 
8,185 


4 
21.120 
































$10,778,740 


2.566.608 


$4,770,164 





X 



•Not reported. 



279 



TABLE NO. 3 — FHCIT PRODUCTS. 
Continued. 



I PINEAPPLES 



lulNTlES 



Bun. 



Value 



Alachua . .. . 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . . . 
Brevard .... 
Broward . . . 
Calhoun . . . . 

Citrus 

Clay . 

Columbia . .. 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Eftcambla . . . 
Flagler . 
Franklin . . . 
Gadsden . .. . 
Hamilton . .. 
Hernando . . 
Hillsborough 
Holmes . 

Jackson . .. . 

Jefferson . . . 
Lafayette . . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty . 
Madison . .. . 
Manatee . . . 
Marion . 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 
Okeechobee . 

Orange 

Osceola . . . . 
Palm Beach . 

1'asco 

Pinellas . ... 

Polk 

Putnam . . . . 
Santa Rosa . 
Seminole . . . 
Ct. Johns . .. 
St. Lucie . .. 
•Sumter . . . 
Suwannee . . 

Taylor 

VolusU . ... 
Wakulla . .. 

Walton 

Washington . 



200 



2.485 
4,750 

1 



71 



GO 



401. 



4.08U 

8.500 

5 



201 



130 



Total . 



320 

1.000 

.-.9.000 



10 



1,000 

2.500 

92,975 

23 



3.4081 



5.504 



71.595 116.17." 



•Not reported. 



/ 



280 



TABLE NO. 3 — FRUIT PRODUCTS. 
Continued. 



• 
COUNTIES 


BANANAS 


Crate* 


Value 




























121 
4.343 


148 




3,905 


















5 

1.822 
25 


J 


Dad« 


2,157 




125 














5 

174 


15 




174 














107 
2.697 


175 




2,726 
































387 


560 


























2.677 
104 
291 


1,290 




624 




155 
























17 
7.233 


35 




9.676 








84 


175 




2 




















SB 

4.263 


52 




3,208 








































, 






24.447 


26,428 







■N»t reported. 



281 



TABLE NO. 3 — FRUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 



MANGOES 



Alachua . . . . 

Baker 

Buy 

Bradford . . . 
Brevard .... 
Broward . . . . 
Calhoun . 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia . . . 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia . .. 

Flagler 

Franklin .... 
<:*dsden . .. . 
Hamilton . . . 
Hernando . .. 
Hillsborough . 

Uolmea 

Holmes 

Jackson . . . . 
Jpffprgon . . . 
Lafayette . .. 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon . ...... 

Lake 

t«vy 

Liberty 

Madison . 
Manatee . .. . 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 
Okeechobee . 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach . 

Pasco 

Pinellas . . . . 

Polk 

Putnam . 
Santa Rosa . 
Seminole . . . 
St. Jojhns . . 
St. Lucie . . . 
•Sumter . ... 
Suwannee . .. 

Taylor 

Volusia . 
Wakulla . . . . 
Washington . 



Total. 



Trees 



Crates 



8 
1.680 



11.863 

746 

16 



740 



1.379 



760 
224 



14.056 



28 



1.878 



344 



2,446 

2.256 

19 



641 



2.324 



983 
6 



4.344 



79 
5 



502 



Value 



1.387 



17,002 

4,183 

49 



1.947 



392 



1.270 

io 



12,325 



165 
115 



1.018 



33,4281 
1 



18.9801 



43.391 



•Not reported. 



282 



V 



TABLE NO. 3 — FBUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 



pnTTNTIP* 


JAPAN PERSIMMONS 


* 




Trees 


Cmtea 


* 

Value 
































407 

156 

16 

1 

54 

207 

5 

60 

191 

874 

3.1 

7 

129 


309 
55 


624 




80 




10 




2 
27 
71 

5 


4 




82 




135 




25 




200 




377 

1,080 

6 


760 




5,036 




18 




50 




645 


2,580 




















is 

1,134 


25 
1.065 


65 






3,181 






























8 
193 
67 
5 
9 
3 


18 
111 
109 

10 

15 

1 


31 






135 




301 




4 




32 

3 












79 


29 


78 












































56 
'5 
195 
120 


56 

10 

116 

57 


160 




25 




B§0 




lflii 








104 
140 
3 
28.". 
647 
862 


41 

158 
3 

& 

247 


207 




246 




3 




31° 




1.496 




~ii~ 
















4 

607 


4 
1,253 


3 




3.8S0 




























• 








7.702 


7,033 


21.418 





•Not reported. 



2S3 



TABLE NO. 3 — FUCIX PRODUCTS. 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 



8UOAR APPLES 



Crates 



Value 



Alacil nil .... 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . . . 

Brevard .... 

Broward . . . 

Calhoun . . . 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia . . 

Dade 

DcSoto 

Duval 

Escambia . .. 

Flagler 

(iudsden . .. . 

Hamilton . .. 

Hernando . . 
Hillsborough 
Holmes . — 
Jackson . ... 
I,afnyette . . 
Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty .... 

Madison . .. . 

Manatee . .. . 

Marlon . . 

Monroe 

Nassau . 

Okaloosa . .. 

Okeechobee . 

Orange 

Orange 

Osceola . ... 

Palm Beach . 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam . — 

Santa Rosa . 

Seminole . . . 

St. Johns . . 

St. Lucie . . . 

•Sumter . .. . 

Suwannee . . 

Taylor 

Volnsla . ... 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington . 



30 

39 



30 
97 



in 



•-'54 

"ioo 



n 



79 



141 



510 



866 



Total. 



547 



1.743 



•Not reported. 



284 



TABLE NO. 


3— FRUIT PRODUCTS. 
Continued. 




COUNTIES 


AVOCADO PEARS 


Trees 


Cr&tea 


Value 












































11.788 


1,278 


4.597 
























17 

5.400 

123 


17 

12,786 

162 


34 


Dado 


50,298 




439 






















































960 


1,197 


3,519 
































5 

903 






Lee 


985 


317 
































1.131 


isi 


701 








764 


17 


47 








































18,221 


2,669 


15.712 








207 
100 


152 


328 


Polk . 


350 


























8 
4.317 


10 

94 


22 




544 
































































38,894 


1 
19,531 79768 




1 





•Not reported. 



L'8o 



TABLE NO. 3 — FBUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 



SAPODII.LAS 



Crates 



Valu- 



AlHchua 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun- 

Citrus 

Clay :. 

Colombia 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia 

Klngler 

Franklin 

Franklin >. 

Oadsden 

Hamilton 

Hernando 

Hillsborough 

Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Uberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Manatee 

Marion 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa 

Okeechobee 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Kosa 

Seminole 

St. Johns 

Sl. 1 .1 : • ' i •• 

St. Lode 

■Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla. 

Walton 

Washington 

Total 



U 



120 



447 



242 



194 



582 



53 

785 



M 



758 



18 
289 



268 
20 



87 
1,255 



1,248 



157 
1,401 



240 



773 



30 
897 



881 
60 



158 
1.737 



2,530 



2S6 



TABLE SO. 3— FRUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 

< 


GUAVA8 


Cratea 


Value 




























95 

1,796 


170 




2,822 
























2.276 


2.514 






82 


238 




























































6,395 


10.823 
























30 


89 












276 


1.414 












6.489 

14 

148 

6 

76 


10.072 

26 

"93 








15 
162 












St Anfans 


7 


15 


"ta2kgtr 














































19,739 


32.671 





287 



TABLE NO. 3— FRUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 



COCOANUTS 



| Treea 



Nuts 



Value 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 

Ilradtord 

Broward 

Broward . y _. 

Calhoun 

Citrua 

Clay 

Columbia 

Dade 

DeSoto 

DutbI 

Escambia 

Flagler 

Franklin 

Franklin 

Gadsden 

Hamilton 

Hernando 

Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jackson -. 

Jefferson .- — 

Lafayette . ..- !** . . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nasaau 

Okaloosa 

Okeechobee 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa 

Seminole 

St. Johns 

St. Lncle 

•Sumter 

i Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volnala 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington 



11,896 
3 



88 



1.218 



11,482 



1,093 



10,500 
SO 



1.800 



9,270 



48.720 



1.388 



318 
3 



805 



282 



MH 



217 

. ;. . 



Total. 



25,7l',n 



71.C88 



4,847 



•Not reported 



288 



TABLE NO. 3 — FRUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 



\ 



COUNTIES 


STRAWBERRIES 


i 

Acres | Quarts 
| 


Vslne 




















1 

107 

1 

4 


100 

366.707 

300 

28.600 


50 




37.363 




76 




7,100 
















3 


2.220 


438 








7 

8 

10 

\ 1 

3 


16.000 

7.560 

1.150 

400 

1.100 


6.760 

1.898 
3,150 




50 




273 
































310 
1 


872.906 
5 


852.326 
5 


























2 

1 


350 
600 
200 


90 




150 




60 


























12 


15.000 


3,280 


















300 


30 


















12 
3 
4 

B 

8 

215 

2 

i 

2 
8 

7 


34.470 
7.400 
1.575 

11.775 

8.760 

358.951 

2.950 

100 

2.022 

17.000 
3,218 


4.200 




1.800 




1 167 




1,235 




2,710 




87.398 
son 






60 




429 




2 568 




2.129 






2 


600 


120 








80 


43.150 


14,895 






























874. 


1,805,369 


5S"> 289 







•Not reported 



289 



tabu: no. :i— friit frowcts. 

I ontinunl. 



COtNTIES 

1 


I 


■ 


PECANS 

j 






i 

Rearing 

1 


Non- 
Bear- 
ing 


Value 
of All ! 
Trees 


Bn-.ll- 

els 


Value 




1 
9.107 


1.465 

344 

5.691 

23 

11 

1,122 

427 

834 

4,378 

28 

9,200 

27,766 

400 

288 

106 

1,586 

1,134 

7,077 

763 

- 29.297 


2.400 


3,158 


20.560 








4.347) 

338 

5 

188 

271 

497 

2.607 

4 

98 

7.245 

3,204 

118 

151 

346 

982 

235 

1.466 

170 

10.335 


19,4821 

1,574» 

175 

4,915 

2,558 

1,470 

11.717 

10 

40 

24,425 

20,889 

520 

itt 

2,224 

215 

536 

1,134 

104,270 


1,914 

7 


21,333 




50 








259 

32 

200 

1,800 


1,036 
296 




2,068 




15,246 








106 

4,201 

963 

302 

835 

132 

48 

3,376 
154 

2,202 


210 




40,205 




9.525 




1,010 




1,510 




3,(86 




0.137 




560 




10.585 




1,005 
22,020 










922 

151 

-v. 

5.789 

3,542 

2851 

100 

48 

205 


958 

340 

84 

84,123 

1.535 

460 

21 

288 

2.415 


1,896 

978 

40 

196.633 

20,259 

2,185 

250 

565 

5.324 


351 

70 

70 

4,820 

2,358 

329 

75 

5 

685 


1.503 




350 




548 




23,925 




9,880 


Liberty 


965 




900 




4 




4,828 








2.492 
2.501 


3.202 

5.246 

16 

1,411 


11.643 
8.277 
2,000 
1.500 


2,099 
27J 


10.452 




1,223 








931 


332 


3,047 


















Pasco - 


169 

115 

179 

4.334 

2.911 

91 

* 656 

32 


1,675 

118 

314 

2,774 

2,551 

80 

77 

434 


2,486 

500 

2,251 

9.305 

1,345 

87 

1.018 


57 

15 

48 

273 

1.070 
26 

1.385 
43 


1.103 
135 
575 




2.809 




5.467 




267 




24,603 




276 








806 

50 

3.230 

128 

57 

1.328 


690 
117 
2,478 
1,140 
3,058 
3,862 


7.460 
189 
2,200 
3.200 
5.680 
4.701 


222 
97 
940 
183 
6 
021 


1,418 




329 




4,700 
580 






30 


Wasblngoa 


4,815 






Totals 


98.745 


212,848 


*492,588 


38,038 


(295,534 



•.Not Reported. 
19 — Com.Attr. 



290 



TABLE NO. 3— FRUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 



1 

COCNTIES 


PEARS 

• 


I 

Bear- 
ing 
TreeB 


Non- 
Ben ring 
Trees 


. Barrels 


Value 




530 
40 
66 

187 
27 




515 
45 
22 

217 
33 


535 






80 




£30 

91 

111 


66 




651 




IIS 




33 

271 

907 

• 182 




"76 

514 

591 

1,332 


168 




. 47 
494 
412 


1,954 




1,415 




8.447 










6 
2.551 
2,48* 

:« 
706 




18 

2.437 
744 


65 




1.319 

1,671 


12.418 




'.'.560 




10 




330 


1,592 


6.358 








35 
176 
788 

55 


47 

59 

4,278 

140 


67 
268 
657 
104 


174 




1.025 




2,249 




5b 


















757 
751 


22 
23,545 


433 
478 


635 




1,437 








4.265 

2.805 

29 


295 
70 
49 


2,269 

3,146 

52 


4.622 




3,593 




169 








4 
2,864 


3 

647 


4 

3.694 


18 




6,436 








1,001 

214 

18 

47 


452 
179 


970 
55 
30 
27 


2,908 

287 

40 


Okaloosa T 




65 


9« 


















1.166 
69 
70 
690 
294 
137 
199 


519 

13 

16 

417 

184 

• 54 

12 

55 


1,035 
53 
38 
565 
125 
125 
178 


2,875 


Pinellas 


153 




-OS 




987 




769 




261 




538 
















13 


7 


11 


94 








1.118 
727 


449 
24 


660 
771 


1.890 




2.313 




Wnehlngton | 104 


119 


97 


201 




1 
26,523 MUM 


24,044 


63.967 











•Not reported. 



291 



TABLE NO. 3— FHUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 


rBA< 


"HES 




Bear- 

JS* 

Trees 


Non- 
Bearing 
Trees 


Basnets 


Value 




222 

323 

35 

1.307 

333 

JO 

1.373 

1.433 

_«.034 

3.480 

60 

320 

3.840 

7.078 

170 

1.085 

206 

448 

698 

8.081 

921 

31 


154 
182 
368 
3,983 
102 
18 

oil 

1,640 
724 


210 

490 

85 

946 

86 

10 

1,482 

4.132 

4,888 

2,445 


314 
3,370 




85 




1,801 




•»->o 




30 




2.864 




2.690 


Clay 


7,956 




6,062 


Dade 


100 




40 

1,692 

704.006 

98 

991 

54 

173 

62 

2,312 

500 

4 


346 

4.678 

3,080 

80 

3.370 

211 

583 
1,316 
6.978 
1,303 

152 


076 




18.488 




6,288 




460 




13,480 




340 




1.139 




2,474 




10.354 




1,648 




518 








2,089 
15,106 
12 
5.739 
4,406 
1,548 


1,370 
45,501 


5.863 
10,354 
9 
5.634 
2,720 
1.752 


2.267 




10,575 




26 




742 

/ 1.643 

579 


10.887 
5.354 




2.068 








517 
2,174 


31.-. 
29.636 


91 

2.664 


220 




5.463 








2,436 
5.503 


1,234 
4,542 


3.668 
2,771 


7.257 




3,000 








1,873 

205 

21 

4,140 
595 

2.851 

7.922 
941 
390 

4,542 
167 


2,260 


1,034 

215 

3 

3,706 
280 

2.623 

3,928 
458 
292 

4.6.KI 
45 


1,746 




324 




3 

3,966 

96 

896 

240 

664 

04 

1,075 

385 


16 




7,897 


I'in.'.liis 


904 
10.429 




7,029 




2.227 




587 




0.200 




129 




61 

205 

13,706 

2,066 

34 

2.781 




77 

200 

3,066 

3.06IS 

17 

2.848 


13i> 




262 
507 

507 


734 




3.066 




3.068 




25 




1.406 


. 2.851 




120,347 


820,099 


106,263 


202,508 







•Not reported. 



292 



TABLE NO. 8 — KRL'IT I'RODfl'TS. _ 
Continued. 



COUNTIES 


PH 


MS 

i 


Beat- 
ing 
Trees 


Non- 
Bearing 

Trees 


11" -lli-ls 


Value 












34 

12 

288 

35 

2 

165 

542 

388 

- 1,542 


10 

112 

• 85 

16 

2 


24 

2 

264 

22 

1 

77 

630 

166 

1.180 


162 


Bar 


4 




528 




26 




4 




154 




62 

65 

285 

•2 

30 

1.242 

646 

10 
2,100 


1,107 




875 
2,059 








72 

8, i :«. 

832 

32 

2,418 


147 

4,054 

386 


294 




13,803 




938 




65 




7,254 


7,254 








128 

134 

4,428 

66 

4 


47 

1.021 

51,352 

38 

20 


195 

152 

4,048 

70 

55 


255 




296 




10,931 




91 ». 




55 ^ 








876 

62 

2 

1.922 

1.456 

108 


564 

88 

6 

55 

310 
14 


457 

29 

2 

1,126 

894 

25 


081 




34 




6 




1,260 




1,771 




44 








276 

77 


2 

22 


688 
124 


490 




183 








584 
429 


247 
213 


913 
879 


956 




264 








10 


50 


4 


8 








7 

2.7-25 

18 

204 

130 

118 

42 

1.320 

10 


6 

402 

9 

42 

2 .-.ci 

U05 

5 

204 

85 


24 

2.015 

11 

152 

53 

172 

92 

1,133 

8 


86 




4,030 




23 




424 




114 




330 




168 




2,266 




29 
















79 
MB 

152 


58 
1TB 


55 

307 

51 


76 
910 
103 










261 


65 


188 


253 




1 
2.-.,45.", 


60.172 


28.544 


52.860 







— •Not reported. 



2f)3 



TABLE NO. 3— FRUIT PRODUCTS. 

Continued. 



COUNTIES 



ORAPES 



Pounds 



Value 



WINES 



Gallons 



Value 



Alachua .... 

Baker 

Bradford . . . 
Brevard . — 
Broward . . . 
Calhoun .... 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia . .. 

Dade 

DeSoto 

1 Ml 1.1 I 

Escn mbla . 

Flagler 

Franklin . . . 
Gadsden .... 
Hamilton . . 
"Hernando . .. 
nillsborough 
Holmes . . . . 
Jackson .... 
Jefferson . . . 
Lafayette . .. 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty .... 
Madison .... 
Mnnatee . .. . 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 
Okeechobee . 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach . 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 
Santa Rosa 
Seminole . . . 
St. Johns . . 
St. Lncie .. 
•Sumter — 
Suwannee . . 

Taylor 

Volusia . 

Wakulla . . . 

Walton 

Washington 



Totals 



2.40O 

2.^37 

69.49.1 

1,046 

760 

12,280 

13,1108 

24,1*20 

104,900 



112,218 

9,411 

1,500 

78.900 

30O 

10,300 

185 

84.602 

6,940 



7,780 
1.670 
1.876 

18.550 
18.420 
15,210 



17.675 

1,502 

44.920 

31.280 

100 

900 

410 

1.178 

6.336 

430 

5.677 

37,200 

1,917 

6,353 

175 .625 

6,689 



J 30 
57.830 
15,700 



12,510 



1 047,830 



119 

234 

1.194 

93 

61 

987 

941 

2.002 

4.825 



23.454 

1,334 

45 

6,312 

15 

286 

35 

15.415 

1,032 



1.155 
178 
379 
371 

2.066 
571 



46 

938 

150 

2.238 

1,731 

3 

45 

114 

228 

813 

40 

758 

1,488 

872 

426 

17,563 

890 



36 

2.907 

668 



1,253 



TM1.SS1 



Ml 



130 
245 



13 



20 



105 



ta 



132 



257 

342 



20 



20 



410 



34' 



■•». 



10 



610 



1.223 



•Not reported. 



294 



TABLE NO. 3.— FBUIT PBODUCT8. ) Continued. i 







FIG8 




COUNTIES 


Bearing 
Trees 


Non- 
Ben ring 
Trees 


Crates 


Value 




10 
9 
28 
17 
15 




50 
88 

21 

s 


50 






200 




492 


11 


Bradford 


a 






RIJ 












m 

Bl 
20 
96 


10 


111 

Ufl 

:>7 

172 


323 




298 






t"i7 




15 


2»8 
















3.417 

1,096 

4 

720 



42 


114 

35,717 


5.0M 

nou 


20. 150 




2,451 




40 




470 


2,910 

12 

84 


11.664 




24 




21 


115 








1.669 
1 
9 


220 
3 


1.436 

5 

93 


4,253 




23 


Holmes 


107 








fin 

10 

IS 

2.509 

42 

45 


73 
53 


63 

12 

8 

2.043 

89 

204 


154 


Lake 

Lee : 


31 
11 


Leon 

Libert* 




2,943 


2 


166 
225 








10 

23 

6 

78 

112 


1 


S 

18 

1 

247 

-22 


40 




71 






2 




85 


236 




139 






























60 
SO 




37 
200 


111 




"00 










29 

1 105 

10 

14 

1,207 

18 


7 
2 
2 


IS 

264 

8 



1,765 

40 


52 


Putnam 


773 
58 




27 




436 
622 


3,530 
115 




















B 

1,850 

1 




6 

2,510 

2 


5 




10 


7,530 













31 




a 


53 










13,549 


^ 38,305 


19,754 


58,791 

l 



•Not reported. 



295 



TABLE NO. 5.— POULTRY AND PRODUCTS. 



COUNTIES 



POULTRY — All Ages. 



Common Barny'd 



No. 



Value 
Dollara 



AUOthcn 



No. 



Vain* 

Dollars 



EGGS 



Sold and Used 



Dozen 



Value 

Dollars 



85.288 
84.372 

4.002 
77.813 v 
30.367 
91.510 
17,287 

1,114 
11.530 
94 360 

723M 
42,862 

209.861 

44.448 

224 

848 

30.470 

21.332 

22.560 

851 135 

122.014 

23.495 

9.162 

25.318 

53.856 

00.794 

22,573 

8.866 

31,184 

25.(146 

42,08* 



Alachua .... 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford ... 
Brevard 
Broward . . . 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia . . . 

Dade ' 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia 

Flagler 

Franklin . . . 
Gadsden ... 
Hamilton . . 
Hernando ... 
Hlllsboroaugh 
Jackson .... 
Jefferson — 
LaKayette . . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison .... 

Manatee 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 
Okeechobee 

Orange 

Olceola .... 
Palm Beach 

Pasco 

Plnellaa .... 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa . 
Seminole — 
St. Johns . . 
Bt. Lucie 
•Sumter . . . . 
Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington 



188,881 

38.866 
11.722 
87.126 
11.205 
22,861 
34,842 

7,495 
17.330 
94.952 
87.017 
79.552 
157.718 
85.724 

6.542 
22.012 
40,061 
62.441 
22,854 
185,827 
201.902 
52.155 
3!r.5»7 
17.451 
27.809 
65,845 
38.6971 
17.1301 
39,5291 
34,7571 
75.7111 
720| 
10,7741 
40.2&5I 

4.968 
56 364 
36,218 
60,416 
46.107 
26.946 
124.719 
55,435 
20,933 
18.547 
86.125 
29.738 



67.523 
15.961 
86.510 
23.332 

38.11 1 2 

,-,ii 888 



55.749 
33.852 

4,368 
43,542 

9.999 
22.861 
17,318 

5,471 
15.724 
31,650 
89.042 
81,161 
218 117 
66,558 

6.815 
16,509 
21.586 
30.310 
19.306 
1 85.. -.3 2 
01.922 
37.078 
20.670 
12.423 
24.946 
34,731 
15,880| 

6.153 

19,930 

25,554 

41 272 

65 

5.617 
20.868 

4,827 
48.280 
23,750 
58.621 
46.107 
26 008 
103,075 
42.340 
17.901 
17 142 
43.883 
30.806 



11,610 
882 
705 
651 
300 



28.881| 
800| 
567 
625 
400 



3..5I 
47 



8551 
48] 



1,304 



634 

18,704 

1,503 



1,304 ( 

•I 



3.866 

16,428 

4.277 



762 

5 

137 

210 

S5.34T 



762 

5 

79 

465 

45.887 



35,885 
8 453 
62.445 
11.166 
22.042 
23,300 



160 

1,232 
3.002 

743 
2,193 
1 078 

101 



75 
1,266 

20 
7,950 



50 

509 

00 

2.272 
640 
451 
926 
754 
213 

4,705 
465 
660 



150 

11.073 

237 



-!- 



100 



Totals '|2.K25.298| 1.076.6381 164.895 



48l 
1,500 
1 764 
850 
2.280 
1,809 
1091 

I 

501 

1.41-41 

126| 

8.1941 



277,034 

191,163 

10,733 

259.378 

69.203 

180,731 

68 931 

27,922 

49,189 

281,470 

132,839 

81,800 

042.325 

129.172 

1,010 

1,607 

111 795 

90.273 

08.804 

187.2191 

•109..-V8., 

74.589 

35,239 

ai,698 

118,551 

187,116 

99.076 

33.1821 

75,177 

57,373 

139.806 



250 
1.035 

305 

3,4.15 

*640 

085 

807 
2.100 

240 
7,981 

393 
1,306 



33,800 
159.979 

10.731 
397.756 
299.492 

58.039 
239.:I02 
193.332. 
■142.588 
054,350 

53.610 

44.637 
523.060 
107.369 



10.933 

49.583 

4,306 

155.260 

181.328 

33.822 

60.843 

81,731 

166.758 

221,740 

20.818 

46,909 

26.530 

69.200 



00 

13.862 

237 



M 



151.570 



70,155 
10.798 

401.335 

116,325 

35,381 

136,221 



8.290.726 



22.622 
3,176 
83.300 
34,342 
20.343 
82,750 



3.865.03.1 



•Not reported. 



r 



296 



TABLE NO. 6.— DAIRY PRODUCTS. 



£„ 





MILK 


II! ITER 


CHEESE 


COUNTIES 


Sold nnd Used 


Sold and Used 


Sold and Used 


» 


Gallons 


Value 
Dollars 


Pounds' 


Value 

Dollar* 


rounds 


Vnlm- 

I f< 1 lit IK 



Alachua . . 
Maker .... 

Bay 

Bradford 
Brevard 
Broward 
Calhoun . . 

Citrof 

Clay 

Columbia . 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Enrambla . . . 

Flagler 

Franklin 

Gadsden 

Hamilton . . . 
Hernando . .. 
Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jackton .... 
Jefferson . . . 
I-a Fayette . . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee .... 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa 
Okeechobee . . 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach . 

I'aseo 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa . 
Seminole . . . 
St. Johns . . . 
St. Lucie . . . 

•Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor 

Voiusla 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington 

Total 



1. 111. ISO 

8,485 

30.600 

Kti..-,NII 

iMi'.iinu 
97.000 
47,9321 

61,573| 

12.084 < 

160.640T 

06.8111 

7.590| 

1,067 .739 1 

419.0041 

1.650' 

3681 

125.0801 

177.-99 

1 4..-IOI 

2.251.178 

183,553 

2.-7,0171 

18,7101 

1»,380| 

92.01(1 

207.6071 

395.1 ss 1 

20.880 

27.765 

0,000 

258,200 
193.775 



291.330 

0,800 

6.093; 

34.032 

71.017 

43.196 

18.9781 

41,281 

4.024 

46.992 

28 392 

1.890 

763.366 

139.074 

395 

184 

43.841 

67.118 

12,080 

,030,588 

45.921 

82.807 

5.00s: 

6.813 

41,428 

90.076 

114 099 

9.825 

0.877 

2.600 

85.370 

57,000 



163.160 

500 

5 936 

20.090 

400 

7.450 

17,964 

13.219 

1.027 

63.240 



72.949 

320 

2.173 

10.045 

200 

3.165 

7 181 

6,751 

515 

31.620 



695 

1,646 

7.991 

200 

184 

33,740 

31.175 

i.oooi 

293.6181 

51.1051 

149.245 

1 564 

10.887 

'."J. 334 

20.260 

166.810 

6.995 

7.840 

4.600 

15 111 

41.731 



67.525 
295.1501 

17.9101 
504.9451 
791,2401 
206,700 

297.4841 
197.950 1 
450.3601 
233.300; 
70.070| 
110.2071 
674.165| 
146,9081 



27,278 

00.204 

10 006 

255.890 

101. S72 

77.822 

99 907 

101,980 

238.874 

116.6501 

27 110| 

57.9541 

222.4711 

79.311 



15.4181 
8R8I 

8S5.85H 

36.5501 
130.077! 
170.091 1 



8.679 

221 

442 025 

14.070 

50.515 

38.233 



6.464 

118.375 

910 

55.830 

48.690 

7.190 

27.300 

11.465 

39.554 

54.660 

23.685 

111.754 

43 

21.046' 



307 

823 

3.241 

100 

92 

13 042 

9.724 

640 

141 748 

12.628| 

56.2151 

644| 

5.148! 

10.7631 

13.2191 

77,83:t 

2.0731 

3.532 1 

1.880 

7.539 

14.622 



265 
62 



120 
31 



(',.5(101 
31,3341 
30.0561 



2,640 
10.509 
11.9531 . 

-It 



■•■T 

700' 

14 



210 

4 



3.247 

37,606 

557 

27.845 

25,623 

2.695 
22.376 

5.745 
22.4721 
21.8641 

9.900 

0.500 
23 

9.000 



i 13.292 040 '5. 282. 355 1 1.661. 3631 734.658 1 



1.217 



69 



283 



•Not repaorted. 



297 



TABLE NO. 7. — MISCELLAXEOIS PRODIXTS. 



• (UNTIES 





HONEY 




BEESWAX - 


Stands 
Of Bees 


Pounds 


Value 
Hollars 


Villi'.- 
Poends Dollars 
i 



Alaobua 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

(Columbia 

Dade 

I ...Sold 

Duval 

Escnmbla 

Flagler 

Franklin 

Oadsdcn 

liamlllon 

Hernando 

Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

LaFnyette 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Martoir 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa 

Okeechobee 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Bench 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa 

Seminole 

St. Johns 

St. Lucie 

•Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington 

Totals 




177,7411! 



•Not report e-* 



298 



TABLE NO. 4-IJVK STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18. 



• 

COUNTIES. 


HORSES 
urn Hand July 1. 1918.) 


■ 


Number 


Value 


Baker 

Bay 


3,463 

395 

177 

1,828 

187 

79 

459 

181 

306 

1.102 

249 

2.507 

1.700 

1,320 

134 

81 

1,156 

676 

558 

2.921 

413 

2,340 

600 

637 

415 

448 

1.638 

1.094 

255 

1.332 

1.187 

3,010 


% 435,739 

57.785 

28.030 

182,700 




21.46" 
13.070 




58,430 




18.355 

29.005 

161.315 


Dade 


40.325 

201.960 




224,725 




131,233 
18.495 




16.200 

140.600 

80.640 




85,085 


Hillsborough 


329.165 
41,880 




268.963 
09.095 
98,700 


Lake 


30,750 
65.900 




223.860 

107,195 

29.140 




175.505 


Marlon 


105.355 
324,925 




274 

335 

247 

939 
1,053 

320 
1,142 ' 

302 
1.675 
1,073 

567 

323 
1.102 

241 


38.390 
35.808 




23.170 
109,040 
208.735 

53.960 
162.687 


Plneltn- 

Polk 


37,850 
198,215 
138,794 




57,565 




32.585 


St. Lucie 


134,440 
28.170 




1.391 
279 

1.239 
360 
482 
625 


172 545 




31,356 
116 94" 




44.595 




49,444 
66,030 




Totals 


46.923 


. * 5.601.524 



•Not reported. 



TABLE NO. 4.— LJVK STOCK ON HAND. 1917 18 — (Continued, i 



COUNTIES. 



COLTS 
(On Hand July 1, 1918.) 



' 


Number 


Value 




276 
14 

2 
87 
11 

1 
30 
37 
11 
03 


* 24,360 
1.560 




Bay 


100 

6,125 




1.135 




150 




2.335 


Citrus 


2,165 

735 

5.695 






IJeSoto 


iii 

33 

46 

2 

2 

86 

32 

47 

73 

17 

192 

18 

4 

8 

35 

199 

127 

21 

7 

79 

358 


5.055 
2.740 




2.600 
200 




200 




4,840 
1.650 


Holmes 


2,085 
4.050 
1,365 

15,753 




1.650 
295 


Lake 


350 
2,810 




13.060 
6.345 




1,480 




600 




3.375 




20.860 


Nassau 


2 
23 

2 
31 
22 

63 
— 5 
47 
4 
32 
14 
22 
15 


200 

1.555 

65 

1,890 

1.345 




5.464 




475 




2.985 




800 




1.475 




635 




1,275 
1,180 








38 
8 
18 
23 
17 
34 


2,885 




715 
1,155 




1.165 




1.125 




1.855 




2,442 


t 162.927 







•Not reported. 



3iM) 



TABLE NO. 4. — LIVE STOCK OK HAND. 11)17-18 — (Coniiniicil.i 



COUNTIES 



MULES 
(Oil Hiind July 1, 1818.1 



XiiiuIht 



Value 







2.864 
751 
::::•_> 

1.451 
150 
410 
802 
120 

. 217 

2.027' 
457 

1 .500 

1132 

857 

241 

75 

1.256 

HB 

1.183 

1.172 

21.848 

1.787 

889 

201 

370 

1 ,504 

257 

204 

l.r.'.n 

503 
1.037 


S 585.721 




• 123.637 






40.195 






206.020 

27,100 






7H.575 






143.100 






22.320 


fUjy 

Dade 


34.275 
321,401 

04.700 
320.263 




117,465 




1 64. 7 811 




111,300 




18.750 




203385 

221.388 
47.r.25 




265.760 

161 ,800 




684.740 




286.234 




210.861 




. 51 .065 

68,525 




204.560 

27.5511 


Liberty 


43.080 
203.325 




88.770 




181.750 








206 
818 
r,l 
053 
163 
320 
243 
200 
754 
603 

era 

432 

903 

188 


34.710 




122,620 




10,300 

1 33.030 
38.32" 
70.755 
50.010 




36, 1 25 




177,780 




162.545 




67.270 




02,158 




235.475 




."••1.177 






1 ..".37 
415 

1.220 
424 
005 

1.040 


260. 1:31 




70,725 


VoIuHla 

Wn kill In 


174.315 

75.2011 

120,890 




144 235 






Totals 


60.125 


$ 7.653.128 



•Not reported. 



301 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued, i 



COUNTIES. 



MILE COLTS 
(On Hand July 1, 1918.) 



Number 



Value 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia 

Dade 

I leSoto 

Duval 

Esi :tllll< ■■ 

Flagler 

Franklin 

i iiuUil. n 

Hamilton 

Hernando 

'lllls.borough 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

La Fay*tte 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa 

Okeechobee 

Orange 

Osceola 

l'nlm Be.ich. . . . 

l'nico 

Pinellas 

Tolk 

l'utnam 

Santa Roan. - • ■ 

Seminole 

St. Johns 

Si. Lucie ■ . 

•Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylcr 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington. 



118 
w 6 



30 
2 

1 
6 



38 



8 
24 
27 



25 
26 
1 
30 
32 
123 
22 

"5 

i 

14 
2 
2 

4 

• 1 

3 

74 



2 
10 



34 



38 



30 
3 
3 

1 



HI 
14 

4 

4 

9 

11 



| 14,075 

l.lOO 

" 3.666 

350 
100 
415 

4.6fi6 

2,666 

2.235 
2.200 

2.280 

1.720 

*S 

V..04U 

2 -&o 

SB 

1.620 
125 

f 

12". 

7.J71. 

: " " iMi> 

325 

500 

1..1O0 

' i.ieo 

425 

225 

90 

8,785 
1.050 
370 
MO 
MB 
655 



Totals. 



851 



109.415 



•Not reported. 



lf- 



302 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18— (Continued.) 



COUNTIES. 


ASSES AND JENNETS 
(On Hand Jul; 1, 1918.) 




Number 


Value 




5 

4 


* 




1.350 




300 




3 
9 






S50 




290 




2 
4 
.7 
'1 

27 

18 
6 
1 
5 
1 

10 
3 
4 
1 
7 
1 
8 
4 
1 
4 
2 
8 

76 

i 

2 






400 




240 


Clay , 

Duval \ 


545 

123 








360 
2.360 




350 




300 




25 

100 
300 




740 
210 




330 
410 
700 


Lake 


10 
628 




600 




125 
175 




700 
37.". 


Monroe 


3,480 






25 




550 








•> 
1 






120 
25 






























4 
9 
5 
3 

4 




175 


St. Lucie 


200 

125 
400 
195 




2 

2 
.-. 
6 






300 




450 
340 




375 




















275 


* 




19.483 





•Not reported. 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STQCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued.) 


' COUNTIES. 


WORK OXEN 
(No. Yoke on Hand .inly 


1. 1918.) 




Number 


Value 


7 


44 

68 

364 

43 




S 


3,800 


Baker 


4.506 
10.490 




1,730 




460 






Calhoun 


236 

1 

32 

35 




23.980 
50 




4.070 




1.570 








70 
515 
421 




3.935 




23.865 




39.150 








116 

157 

44 

11 
119 
110 
430 
302 

10 




4.640 

7,054 

277 85 

810 






4.845 
7.840 




18,010 

12.907 




850 






Lee 


89 
4.17 
6 
75 
60 
39 
23 




4,160 
28,180 




600 
7.140 




4.190 




1.810 
1,000 








495 

185 

2 

4 

6 

13 

177 

1 

7 

21 

347 




21.312 




15.520 




100 




200 

435 

1.150 

5.975 




100 




025 




2.525 




18.003 




9 

8 


880 
370 




9 

34 

57 

103 

150 

259 




320 




2.040 




4.950 




5,135 
15.055 




15.360 








5.793 


* 


330,234 







•Not reported. 



\tr 



304 



TABLE NO. 4— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued. 1 






COUNTIES. 



Alnchua 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford .... 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia. . . . 

Dade 

UeSoto 

Duval 

Ks. :imU.a 

Flagler 

Franklin 

CadKden 

Hamilton. . . . 
Hernando. . . . 
Hillsborough. 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

La Fayette. 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa .... 
Okeechobee . . 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach . 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

l'ntnnui 

Santa Rosa . . 
Seminole .... 
St. Johns . . . 

St. Lucie 

•Sumter 

Suwannee . . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington . 



Totals. 



8TOCK CATTLE 
Native Breeds — All Ages. 
(On Hnnd July 1. 1018.-I 



N urn be:- 



Value 



76.494 
29.049 

3.010 

23.350 

4,017 

164 

19.829 

■■'...'is:, 
S.XXO 

17,404 
IB 

94.917 
19.3(10 
7,997 
1,004 
1.872 
r..i.v: 
i-.it:; 

8.878 
■J.-..r. lei 

8.816 
22.1 no 

9,129 
17.441 

4.171 
30.05.". 

7,713 
23.239 

5.899 
10.185 
37.522 
211,485 



9.763 
7.234 
10,555 
14.897 
91.843 
19,758 

I 1.IIS4-, 

2.752 
00.038 
17.394 
9.991 
7.947 
17.085 
17,005 



7.827 

8,490 
47.349 

6,755 
11.653 

S.920 



952.026 



2.000.024 
769,750 

37.847 
467.000 

84,785 

15.740 
204,920 

63,730 
108,001 
280.300 
1 .-,.-. 
1.963.445 
305.760 
189.161 

24.390 

84.240 
126.384 
237,078 
136.540 
734,029 
141.832 
462,221 
202,700 
325.990 

80.334 
052.828 

80.093 
442.927 

89.933 
231,045 
836.664 
503,952 



223,386 

. 138.763 

217,330 

296.895 

3.IWI..303 

426,036 

166.509 

01.15-. 

1,465,948 
520,140 
199,104 
185,090 
602.730 
546.302 



132.799 
105.349 
1146,950 
132,560 
195.220 
160.1M 



21.848.435 



•Not reported. 



f 



305 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued. > 



COUNTIES. 


THOBOD6HBRED CATTLE 
Including Three-Quarter Grades and Op- 
ward — all ages. (On hand July 1, 1918. i 
Hereford and Grades. 


. 


Number 


Value 




3.14 

166 

1 

8 

30 


* 


^» 


33.4O0 

10.670 




Bay 


50 

215 




3.000 








24 






2,520 














87 






1.715 








10 
1 
1 






1.000 




50 




70 








15 

1 

IS 

13 
33 
16 
"'7 
"4 

O 

3 

9 

137 

2 

65 






750 




100 
645 




.-.in 




3.010 
6.335 




1.040 




375 
175 




30 




2.28ft 




3.820 




125 




2.190 








8 

96 




150 
6.689 
















7 




800 








11 
12 




1.100 








200 




420 












340 




127 

1 




6.010 




100 








56 

5 

8 
4 

21 
112 




4.835 








1.370 
250 
186 
340 




1.290 




5,415 




1.487 


* 




110.560 






•Not reported. 
2ft — fom-Agr. 


, 


■ 







\ 



» 306 

TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 191718 — (Continued. I 



COUNTIES. 



THOROUGHBRED CATTLE 
Including Three-Quarter Grades and Dp- 
ward — all ages. (On band July 1, 1918.) 
Shorthorn and Grades. 



Number 



Alnchua 

Biker 

Bay 

Bradford .... 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia. . . . 

Dade 

HeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia. . . . 

Flagler* 

Franklin 

l.'llllSlll-Il 

Hamilton 
Hernando. . . . 
Hillsborough. 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson .... 
La Payette. . . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa. . . . 
Okeechobee. . 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach. 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa. . 
Seminole. . . . 
St. Johns. . . 

St. Lncle 

•Sumter 

Suwannee. . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington . . 



Totals. 



189 

26 

1 

4 

206 

1 

1 

1 

19 

5 

71 

52 



8 
5 

e 

4 

3 

82 

3 

1 



465 



14 
1 
2 



551 



24 
1 

27 
2 

16 
3 



17 



11 
64 



11 



2.009 



Value 



12,200 
950 

lt§ 

4 -?S8 

80 

50 

950 

275 

7,100 

1.200 



150 
300 
420 
200 
230 
1.250 
140 
• 200 



75 
44 

3.025 



125 



45.500 



1.890 

50 

300 



7.600 



1 .275 
100 
740 
100 
830 
. 300 



1.745 



1.500 

610 

3.150 



675 



100.429 



•Not reported. 



307 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued. I 



COUNTIES. 



THOROUGHBRED CATTLE 
Including Tbree-Quarter Grades and Up- 
ward — all ages. (On band July 1, 1918.) 
Devon an4 Oradet. 



Number 



Value 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 

Ilradford 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

Citrus '. 

Clay 

Columblu 

Dade 

DcSoto 

Duval 

Escambia 

Flagler 

Franklin 

Gndsden 

Hamilton 

Hernando 

Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jack9on 

Jefferson 

La Fayette 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marlon ' 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa 

Okeechobee 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa I ■ 

Seminole 

St. Johns 

St. Lucie 

•Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington ~< — 



75 

276 



240 

ioo 



775 
550 



817 

a 



32.050 
25 



10 



00 

aio 

575 



850 





....• 



Totals. 



867 



36.2R0 



•Not reported. 



.308 



TABLE NO. 4— LIVE STOCK ON BAND. 1917-18— (Continued. i 



COUNTIES. 



Alnchua .... 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford 
Brevard .... 
Broward 
Calhoun. . . . 

films 

Clay 

Columbia. . . 

Dado 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia . . . 

Flagler 

Franklin . . . ■ 
( iadsden .... 
Hamilton. . . 
Hernando. . . 
Hlllsboroucb 

Holmes 

Jackson. . . . 
Jefferson 
La Fayette. 

Lake , 

Lee 

Leon 

I-evy 

Liberty 

Madison .... 
Manatee. . . . 

Marlon 

Monroe. ... 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . 
Okeechobee . 

Oranae 

Osceola. . . . 
Palm Beach 

Pasco 

Pinellas. . . . 

Polk 

Putnam. . . . 
Sanla Rosa. 
Seminole. . . 
St. Johns. . 
St. Lucie . . 

•Snmter 

Suwannee . . 
Taylor 

Volusia . 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington . 



Totals. 



TUOROUGHBBED CATTLE % 

Including Three-Quarter Grades and Dp- 
ward— all ages. (On hand July 1. 1018.) 
Aberdeen Angut Polled and Grade! . 



/ 



Number 



143 



1 
80 
38 



.8 

5 

13 

24 



30 



1 

38 



21 



326 

"e 



4 

108 



2 

31 

1 

69 



52 



Value 



1.112 



14.250 



100 
4.000 
4.900 



60O 

T.600 

375 

1.095 

2.400 



60 

50 

100 



1.500 



140 

2.750 



275 
2V.366 



900 
212 



1.000 
9.150 



200 

3.250 

50 



1,210 

6,206 



150 



87.792 



•Not reported. 



s 



309 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued.. 



COUNTIES. 


THOROUGHBRED CATTLE 
Including Three-Qnarter Grades and Up- 
ward—all ages. (On hand July 1. 1918. > 
Guernsey ami Qradei. 




Number 


Value 




22 




1.1MK1 






Bay 


5 
21 

::::;:: ... i 


270 

1.875 


Broward 




Calhoun 




Columbia 

Dade 


27 
56 
98 
14 

1 

• 20 

1 

6 


2.700 
3.210 
8,118 

1.075 

511 

1.000 

17, 

325 








I'ranklln 






41 
44 
20 


4.680 
4.836 
1.466 

1 . 1 -jo 






Lake 


6 
12 

78 

3 
8 

24 




425 

426 

2.110 








300 

.-.i}0 
1.785 




Nassau ^ 




75 






360 


Palm Beard 


1 
8 

' 6 

214 

2 

4 




100 

2.000 

375 

280 




17.905 




200 




325 




26 
12 


1.595 


St. Lucie 


1.835 




140 
58 


7.280 




2.825 








5 

2 
6 


315 




75 




475 




1.089 


1 


71.098 







•Not reported. 



310 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Contlnacd.i 



COUNTIES. 



THOROUGHBRED CATTLE 
Including Three-Qnarter Grades and Up- 
ward — all ages. (On hand July 1, 1918.) 
Jersey and Orade*. 



N'umber 



Value 





8.957 

•jr. 

59 
794 . 
135 

41- 

76 

24 

38 

94 
668 
177 
889 
920 

18 

31 
141 

70 
273 
716 

18 
109 

69 

28 
262 
222 
3,422 
100 
155 
215 
499 
460 


t 154.900 




1.975 


Bay 


3.030 
35.465 
9.360 
4.850 
3.465 
1.625 




2.480 




5.355 




63.51 1 




11.854 




35.250 




20,078 

695 




1,150 
5.885 




4.990 




17.820 




37.385 




865 




4.355 




3,825 
2.240 


Lake 


14.530 
13.004 




60.380 




4,950 






4,315 






15,800 






37.137 






27.565 












86 

63 

66 

659 

284 

272 

464 

479 

009 

148 

122 

28 

927 

688 


6.640 






3.215 






7.715 




22.045 




26,575 




13..' 29 


Pasco 


jr. -inn 
36.S50 




33,290 




12.7S3 




5,238 




1.700 




:.t MlM 




4T, 4.'!5 








403 

6 

465 

53 
214 

30 


i*is» 

450 

24.395 

3,' 175 






12,400 
» RP5 








25,369 


$ 973.S37 







•Net reported. 



311 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18— (Continued. i 


COUNTIES. 


THOROUGHBRED CATTLE 

Including Throe-Quarter Grades and Up- 

ward^aTl ages. (On band July 1. 1018. i 

Jiolttein and Grade*. 




Number 




Value 






13 


* 




1.325 


Baker 














1.315 








13 
1 
8 

13 

212 . 

3 * 

26 

37 

... ... 




i 


1.075 




805 




75 




680 
360 




.-.hi ii ii. 


Duval 


220 
1.200 


Flagler 


1.699 


Franklin 




50 




1 

70 

4 

44 

o 

1 

55 

3 

5 






2.105 

100 




4.770 
SOB 




,1.080 


Lake 

Lee 


100 
50 

4.265 
210 
100 


Uberty 




2 

40 
21 
70 






135 
2.000 

740 
4.800 








47 

4 
o 






2.830 




315 




300 


2 

61 

9 

10 

129 

15 

10 

1 

367 

20 






75 

6.535 

320 




1.005 




7.615 




1.700 
685 




250 

24.405 




1.480 








4 
4 
62 
6 
2 
1 




565 
100 




3.100 
375 




165 




50 


Total* 


l.*464 


* 




111.574 



\ 



•Not reported. 



312 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1017-18 — (Continued.) 



I 



COUNTIES.- 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford .... 

Brevard 

Brnward 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia. . . . 

Dado 

DcSoto 

Duval 

Escnmbla . . . . 

KlnplpF 

Frs-.nklln. . . . 

'Jmlsden 

Hamilton. . . . 
Hernando. . . . 
Hillsborough. 

Holmes 

.Ih. ks'in 

Jefferson .... 
La Payette. . . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marlon 

/"Monroe 

Nnssan 

Okaloosa. . . . 
Okeechobee . . 

Orange 

Osceola 

I'alm Beach. 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa . . 
Seminole. . . . 
St. Johns. . . 

St. Lnclo 

•Sumter. 
Suwannee. . . 

Tavlor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington. 



Xotais. 



COWS 

Kept for-'nillk only. 

(On Hand July 1. 1U1S.I 



Number 



1.824 

41 

156 

28S 

149 

100 

186 

286 

76 

5.643 

349 

162 

3.015 

1.020 

144 

184 

766 

1.831 

o 

4.797 
1 ,288 

20.791 

68 

I.MS 

39.1 
374 

31962 
228 
16* 
1 67 
496 

1.270 



202 
2.057 



1.36" 

.-,<>.-! 

384 
660 
.166 

1 .003 
429 
433 
352 

1.052 
369 



79 

4 

1.208 

34 
1.091 
1.788 



64.041 



Value 



202..-.8,- 

3.770 

"1.490 

1 7.865 

31.933 

10.750 

19.650 

10.415 

3.950 

i'.S.V.Vi 

35,125 

10.659 

260.3S5 

54.780 

9.825 
1 s 2(10 
26.600 
67. '120 
160 
435.145 
42.310 
02.074 

3,405 

31.758 

20.700 

30.223 

113.490 

0.875 

6.640 
1 3. 835 
36.794 
04.120 



13.035 

77.:,.-,:', 



lOS.l'M) 

•-'S.22II 

33.060 
31.060 
43.060 
87,567 
20,010 
20.605 
21.584 
77.935 
28.115 



3.855 

160 

88.585 

1.510 
34.974 
51.345 



2,542.446 



•Not reported. 



313 



TABLE NO. 4. — LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 191T-18 — (Continued. I 



COUNTIES. 



C* VTTI F 

Movement Thin Year. All Ages— 1917-18. 

Purchased. 



Number 



Value 



... 



Alachua. 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

Citrus. 

Clay 

Columbia 

Hade 

ripSoto 

Iluvnl 

fRcambia 
lagler 
ranklin 

(Jadsden 

IlamlltoD 

Hernando 

Hillsborough. . . . 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

La Fayette 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Ijevy 

Uberly 

Madison 

Manatee 

Ma rion 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa 

Okeechobee 

Orange 

Osceola 

I'nlm Beach 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Pntnam 

Santa Kosa 

■•eminole , . 

St. Johns... y... 

St. Lucie 

•Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor. . r 

Volus'.a 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington 



Totals. 



2.428 

2.672 
141 

1.870 
100 



1.804 
227 
469 
024 

s 
I.:::; I 

I Hi 
278 



1.834 
1.12 
138 
34 
965 
871 
144 



2.209 

328 

1.302 

166 

760 

40 



727 



72 
380 



139 
8,615 

230 

178 

401 

2.026 

1 .667 

861 

438 

2.20(1 

5 298 



151 

63 



113 
437 



:>ri.(i(i:t 



43.H63 
24.550 

2.306 
51.007 

2,500 



35.669 
4.497 
H.336 

25.560 
870 

27.280 
2.790 
6.414 



7.1.360 

3.437 

2.780 

680 

10.186 

1(1.590 

10.820 

324 



44.700 
83.875 
19.643 

3.442 
13.280 

1.600 

230 

22.909 



1.330 
0.461 



3.460 
106.585 

2.400 

4.519 

12.740 

17.519 

30.706 

30.015 

9.295 

68.000 

131.853 



3.064 

130 



2.235 
'...'.•35 



1,020.755 



•Not reported. 



314 



TABLE NO. 4— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued.) 



COUNTIES. 



CATTLE 

Movement Thin Tear. All Ages — 1917-18. 

Died of Disease. 



Number 



Value 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 


77 
1 

■n 

■277 
ISO 

15 
184 

i;.'; 
34 
20 

4 
213 

2 
31 


* 


4,430 

50 

170 

6.574 


Citrus 

Dade 

DcBoto 


2,500 

1,450 

2.994 

1.535 

20E 

400 

400 

4.180 

155 




765 


Kranklln 

Hamilton J. 


104 

230 

52 

95 

80 

208 

8 

199 

139 

72 

125 

126 

61 

14 

18 

252 


( 


760 
2.106 
4.615 
1.040 
2.965 
2.566 
3.810 




200 
2,080 




2,710 


Lee 

Levy 


550 
3.721 
1.895 




1.099 
840 




360 
4.230 




50 




035 
1.UO0 










101 
50 

308 
2 

401 
25 
90 
26 
2S 
4T 




3.065 
500 

6,135 
120 

6,995 
625 




1,672 
700 






545 


St. Laele 


905 




141 
259 


1.582 
5.155 




• 8 
6 

125 




35 




97 




2,544 




4,552 


> 


98,760 







•Not reported. 



315 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued.) 


CODNTIE8. 


CATTLE 

Movement This Year. All Age» — 1817-18. 

Slaughtered — (For Some Cae). 




Number 


Value 


Aliichua 

Baker 

Bay 


4.518 

39 

93 

296 

525 


* 


133.088 
3.636 
1,995 
8,604 




16,150 




506 
158 
227 
208 
3 
543 
121 
116 

25 
1.810 

.-.s 
33B 

20 

46.979 

114 

2.-.L' 




12,888 




3.938 




B,MT 

5.975 


I>aclo 


90 
12.770 


I Duval 


2.975 

3.217 

750 


Franklin 


73.600 
1.4S7 


Hamilton 


0.880 
605 




618.985 
1,692 




5.126 




229 

604 

1.034 

5 

295 






6.035 


Lee 

Liberty 


20.6M 

36.321 

125 

0.605 




24 

289 

12 

24 

10 

182 

161 

2.845 

» 581 

202 

42 

846 

412 

107 

2.138 

4,815 




805 
11.365 




390 




646 




300 




5.980 
4,835 




18,150 




14.181 




6.740 




1,042 




35.760 


Santa Rom 


11.542 
3.340 




74.925 
129,502 








' 1 

4 




20 




92 








18 




266 


Walton 




17 


S9S 




71.872 


* 


1,311.684 







•Not reported. 



316 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued. I 



! 



COUNTIES. 



.V lllchlia 

Bilker 

Bay 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

citrus 

Clay 

Columbia .... 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Puval 

Escambia 

Flagler 

Frank! I n 

Cadsden 

Hamilton. . . . 
Hernando. . . . 
Hillsborough. 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson. . . . 
Ln Fayette. . . 

I-ake 

Lee 

Loon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau. . . ., . 
Okaloosa. . . . 
Okeechobee . . 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beacb . 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa. . 
Seminole. . . . 
St. Johns . . 

St. Lucie 

•Sumter 

Suwannee. . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington . . 



Totals. 



CATTLE 

Movement This Vear. All Ages — 1917-18. 

Exported Living. 



Number 



864 



27 
1.480 



2,382 
33 



12.759 

"""i 



5 



113 



11.313 

e 

18 
200 



22 



197 



13 
793 
i«3 

iio 



15 
445 



25,836 



Value 



33,525 



530 
13,125 



37.0* 1 
1.147 



172.580 
230 



1.135 

100 



too 



1 050 

l.viu 



llni.262 

ISO 

:M2 

4.730 



GOO 



4.100 



260 
47.366 



6.065 
V.650 



400 
10,175 



551.S47 



•Not reported. 



317 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued.) 


COUNTIES. 


CATTLE 

Movement This Year, All AgeB— 1917-18. 

Sold I.I vine— (Local UK). 


* 


Number 


Value 




2.912 

3,745 

60 

2,680 

1.232 


S 


125,708 




88,480 


Bay 


1.188 
70.240 




27.580 




. .". . 




317 

565 

1,032 

10 
3.959 

78 
381 

34 

64 
750 
192 
162 
958 
852 
1,360 
628 

12 
235 
584 
723 
940 
x 650 

40 

315 

3.063 




22.443 
7.902 




13.357 

23,89.1 

510 

88,310 


Duval 


3,29.1 
0,806 

873 
2.560 




14,803 




4,250 

4,545 

34.2.10 




21.47.1 

20.199 

3.303 

240 


Lake 

Lee 


8.557 
19,126 
19.620 
24,075 
16,64.1 




2,100 




8,6.10 
74,740 




42 

1.437 

585 

1,356 

6.854 

1,549 

15 

7.148 

1.026 

919 

248 

5.888 

1.302 




1,055 




36,512 




1.1.670 




30.37,1 




170.720 




12,992 

79.1 




169.88.1 




27.260 




26.22(1 




7.400 




166.17.1 


St. Lucie 


39.033 




569 
730 




12,192 




1 1 .36.1 








270 

226 
713 




7,297 




3,(.:sr. 




18.103 


Total! 


59.863 


* 


1. B28.705 



•Not reported. 



318 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND, 1917-18— (Continued.) 



COUNTIES. 


CATTLE 

Movement This Year. All 

I>ed of Exposure to 


Ages— 1917-18. 
Weather. 




. Number 


Value 




21 


* 


630 












Bradford 


576 
20 


7.20O 
200 




280 
135 
142 
251 




4.705 




3,445 




2,924 


Columbia 


5.193 


IteSot.} 

Duvnl 


56 

2 

24 

3 

50 

41 

156 

34 

105 

115 

42 

20 

5 

28 

22 

85 

■III.'! 

178 




1.100 

40 

495 

70 




2,000 

050 
2,580 

080 

3,235 




- 1,524 




890 




400 
100 


Lake 


405 
220 




664 


Liberty 


7,625 
2.085 


Manatee 


6 

866 




120 
14.730 














88 


1,760 










AO 


300 




185 




2,687 








1,127 
226 
171 
162 
374 
843 


-• 


25,430 




6,640 




3.429 




3.152 


St. .loll lis 


17.515 
15.754 








3 

443 


24 




7,160 








222 




3.390 








2 




35 








8.514 


$ 


152.386 



•Not reported. 



319 



TABLE NO. 4. — LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1017-18 — (Continued.) 



COUNTIES. 



HOGS 

Movement This Year. All Ages. 
(On Hand July 1, 1018. i 



Number 



Bay 


58.540 

18,667 

4.148 

33.572 

2,142 

956 

31,959 

4.775 

7.204 

54,552 

722 

421,147 

14,074 

14,396 

2.581 

3.557 

40,939 

42.269 

MM 

41.840 

46.702 

89,879 

44,870 

34.666 

5.792 

4.667 

46,267 

28,786 

11,680 

43,894 

11,015 

49.497 


t 370,030 
149,287 

40,148 
280,380 

' 15,881 




21.335 
329,888 




23.625 




30.328 




t 162.208 


Dade 


11,512 
239.147 
151.048 




73.560 




12,063 




28.456 
197,912 


Hamilton 


232.696 

40.855 

299.065 

357,242 




858.790 




3.TO.282 

237),39l 

36,055 






39.470 




341.267 




282,570 
45.978 




283,587 




58,069 
383.504 








6.853 
10.157 

5,11« 

7,069 

8,170 
14,615 
22.210 

1.732 
29,312 
20.089 
24,445 

2.533 
21.623 

2.842 


46.517 




81,524 




18,450 




72,078 

48.717 

117,467 




.v.i. 20o 




18.TM 




204,420 




199,208 




175,445 




18.556 


8t. Johns 


108.433 
32.271 








55,195 
11.624 
• 30.302 
12,891 
29,070 
32.754 


366,468 




80,156 


Wakulla 


146,270 
180,672 

161,500 




179.661 
1 




1.195,481 


$ 8,767.353 







•Not reported. 



TABLE NO. *.— laVB STOCK ON HAND. 1017-18 — (Continued.) 






COUNTIES. 



HOGS 

.Movement This Year. All Ages. 

Slaughtered for Pork. 



Number 



Value 





0.767 

.-..!>.-,<> 

-•70 

3.491 

224 

42 

. 1.112 

842 

> 818 

1.473 

4 

7.1!) 

482 

670 

13 

1,452 

233 

1.041 

92 

20.480 

180 

66.281 

770, 

2.08* 

311 

1.314 

8X2 
-.070 
680 
104 
2: 18 
2.259 


t 87,022 

94.64U 

2.744 

48,288 






3,413 

1.665 




10.615 




.",.!)'.).-. 




<i.r.:s 
12,232- 




80 




2:;,o.-.o 




7.136 




8.537 




00 




11.015 




2.041 




12,356 

1.190 

281,876 




2,057 




104.700 




10,169 




27,67.-. 
5,570 
14.188 
10.860 
33.260 




7.802 


MadUon 


890 
2,534 




' 211.43.-. 




1.183 


19.438 




1,548 

752 

2,000 

. 568 

\ 517 

7i:: 

2.831 

4,148 

1.043 

• 374 

6.301 

742 


7,499 
9.810 

L'.-i.K.V, 

7.072 

o,:,:;:; 




10,855 




26.848 




88,806 


S:i n 1 : t ROSB 


31.525 
6.176 




96.35U 
10,026 








831 

. 280 

8,288 

491 

IDS 


4,433 

5.570 

42.918 




11.955 




1.400 














158.715 


$ 1,826.195 







/ 



•Not reported. 



\ 



321 



TABLE XO. 4.— MVK STOCK OX HAND. 1017-18 — (Continued.! 



rofXTIES. 



HOOB 
Movement This Year, All Ages. 
Slaughtered for Bacon — (Loral I 



Xnmber 



Value 





17.032 
8.743 

SOS 

13.360 
1 


J 34*> 47.t 


Raker 

Bay 


86,891 

0.2.-14 
200.760 

■■:: 




4.000 
1.700 

1,800 

25.703 


121.505 




21.152 




22.048 




314.48:: 








402 
305 

2.812 ' 
121 

r> 

ll.02.-i 

18.275 

282 

UN 

7.707 

14.746 

0.400 

7.694 

471 

7 

10.215 

4,200 

2.717 

11.238 


8.030 




.-..ONII 




48.010 
1,870 




40 




1 02.508 




169.975 




7,300 




27.051 
110.487 




23ft,«51 




235,836 




117,506 




13.043 




140 




204.350 




58,482 
43.837 




192.405 








12.351 


198.601 








7.934 
15 


10.082 
97.911 






90 








318 

776 

2 

785 

2 

1.456 

108 

1.150 

13 

12.832- 

2.014 

r;.s»2 

350 

0.547 

10.983 


7.880 








53,652 




36 




52. 120 




0.'. 




34.772 




2.700 




20.820 




151 


•Sumter 


*" ' "144.375 




50.170 




40.855 




57.725 




98.277 




146,541 







Totals. 



231.068 



3.817.0-7 



•Not reported. 
21 — Com Apr 



( 



322 



TABLE NO. 4. — LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1017-18 — (Continued.) 


COUNTIES. 


HOGS 

Movement Tola Year. All Ages. 

Sold Living. 




Number 


Value 


Baker 

Bay 


4.802 

1.S66 

320 

2,112 

88 

28 

4.1150 

481 

5S4 

2.107 

o 

729 
225 
406 


* 50.611 

13,745 

1.901 

18,804 




222 
655 

46.865 


Cltrns 


4.302 
2.415 




28.202 




20 




7,290 


Dnvnl .' 


3,228 
8.079 






Krnnklln 


43 
1.737 
1382 

33r» 

2.383 

1.462 

7.233 

2.884 

285 

157 

283 

2.787 

5.663 

1.634 

2.872 

101 

6,966 


344 

25.812 
16,623 




4,387 




23,378 
23,184 




59.1 68 


Jefferson 


44,988 
2,445 




1,442 




2,445 




35.431 




86.252 
12.678 




52,858 
960 




114,665 




123 

1.262 

250 

766 

1.858 

200 

804 

159 

641 

80 

968 

204 

634 

510 


1,621 




10.583 

2.542 

11.086 

12.980 

2,000 

5,505 




1,103 
4,225 




1,880 


Santn Rosa 


13,178 
1.578 


St. Jobw 


0.865 
5.788 








7.313 

267 

10.096 

495 

354 

3.296 


14,884 




1.582 




86.740 


Wnkulla 


2,240 
4.224 




40.445 








86,907 


$ 825.858 







•Not reported. 

\ 



323 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued.) 



COUNTIES. 



HOGS 

Movement This Year. All Ages. 

Died of Disease. 



Numlwr 



A lac iiuii 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford. ... 

Brevard 

Broward. . . .. 

I'alhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia. . . . 

Dade 

KeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia 

Flagler 

Franklin 

Gadsden 

Hamilton. . . . 
Hernando. . . 
Hillsborough . 

Holmes. 

Jackson 

Jefferson .... 
Ln Fayette. . 

Lake f. 

Lee 

Leon 

I>-vy 

Liberty 

Mndlson 

Manatee 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa. . ■ ■ 
Okeechobee . . 

Orange 

» tsceola 

Palm Benrta . 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosn. 
Seminole . . . 
St. Jobns. . . 
St. Lucie. . . 
•Sumter. . . 
Suwannee . . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla. . . - 

Walton 

Washington . 



2.385 

942 

14 

4,685 

41 

1 

3,045 

1.352 

482 

3.98(1 



Value 



130 
90 

755 

115 

40 

4.326 

2.324 

131 

2.284 

3,903 

14.224 

473 
3.520 

552 
2,047 
3.041 
3.448 
2,876 
2.890 

476 
7.356 



258 

5,324 

865 

61 

600 

12 

1.288 

34 

2.294 

514 

628 

364 

1.052 

647 

'3.961 
745 



1.417 
3.21.6 



Trvlals. 



95.174 



11,160 

1.195 

74 

18,759 

460 

25 

10,418 

4.955 

2,197 

15,944 



569 

860 

3,578 

1.570 

J20 

17*90 

11,023 

705 

16.705 

15.700 

40,933 

3.238 

10.200 

8,002 

-2.o05 

13.34"! 

H.863 

9.279 

17.74S 

2,645 

37,223 



2.110 
^0.434 
2.534 
1,060 
3.444 
120 

5,3p 
§33 

20.50S 
3,275 
3.294 
2,141 

15,685 
3,450 



16.766 
2.907 



3.7S2 
'U.053 



424.000 



•Not reported 



324 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE 


STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18— (Continued.) 


COUNTIES. 




SHEEP 

Movement This Year — Sheep and Lambs. 

(All Ages, on Hund July 1. 1018.) 




Number 


Value 






1.410 
.130 
817 

368 


? 7.56o 
2.100 




2.451 
1.740 












14.450 










16 

8 

A49 

1 .842 

3424 

4j55 


2.605 
80 


Dade 


3.145 




0.188 
16.234 




24.375 










82 
722 

l.rsnii 

2.077 

1.014 

140 


316 




71 

3.765 

4.208 

15,464 




2.070 




755 










170 


920 




555 

31 
1.160 


1.425 


Levy 


74 
3.100 






745 
4.415 


1.295 
15.240 








1.068 
11.935 


9.145 
50.150 






150 

1.400 

BOO 

400 


1,200 
3.OO0 
2,500 
1.010 












1.201 

80 

16.285 


3 005 




400 






44,811 






300 


1.500 












79 

so.-. 

3.40.-. 

05 1 
0.770 
7.865 


878 




1 .445 




2.1.8.-..-. 




3.804 




44.88.-, 




38.08-S 








84.213 


* 401. 16G 







•Not reported. 



325 



TABLE MO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1817-18 — (Continued.) 



COUNTIES. 



SHEEP 

Movement THIs Year — Sheep and Lambs. 

Purchased. 



Number 



Value 



Alachuu 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

CitruR 

Clay 

Columbia 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Huval 

Escambia 

Klagler 

l-ranklln 

■ jadsd- -n 

Hamilton 

Hernando 

Hillsborough 

Holmes. 

.iHCkHOD 

Jefferson 

Iji Fayette 

Ijike 

Fx-c 

Leon 

I>ry 

Uberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau j 

Okaloosa 

Okeechobee 

Orange 

Osceoia 

Palm Beach 

Pasco 

Plnellaa 

Polk 

Putnam 

Santa Rosa 

Seminole .- 

St. Johns 

St. Lucie 

•Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

WnshiiiKii.n 



32 
144 



1.217 

"iio 



20 
60 



313 

802 



100 

1 



20 
17 



157 



20S 



23 



25 



:: -3S 



* 





98 

5ei 

; 4,613 

080 

"its 

"406 
610 





1.280 
2 

i«6 

' i35 

625 

.*..-- 

> 

V 440. 

::::::::::::::::: 

ido 

128 



Total*. 



2.877 



10.440 



•Not reported. 



326 



TABLE SO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18— (Continued.) 



■ '< 



COUNTIES. 


SHEEP 
MoTement This Year — Sheep and 
Sold LI vine. 


Lambs. 




Number 


Value 






» 




linker 


100 


300 


























2,256 








48 




180 












1'eSoto 








375 
1.818 




1,479 




12,208 










6 

160 

3B 

310 

500 




12 




S«o 




250 




700 
3.500 
































Levy 


is 


30 


Madison 








96 
224 




288 




1.132 








2 

840 


12 

4,200 
















20 






125 


Polk 


140 


560 




1.048 


5.839 




80 




400 






































225 
87 




67.1 




118 




6.512 


* 


35.064 






•Not reported. 









327 



TABLE NO. 4. — MtTB 


STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18— l Continued.) 


COUNTIE8. 




8HEEP 
Movement Thla Year — Sheep 

Slaughtered. 


and 


Lambs. 




Number 


Value 






».... 












Bay 

Bradford 


id 

12 


§3 












130 


Cltrua 




e 


24 














DUVH1 ; 




3 


148 
15 










8 






7 














12 
13 

7 






88 

51 




SO 








Luke 


7 


49 




1 
9 






2 




90 
















51 


350 
































Palm Beach 


200 
25 






1,500 
125 




















281 






701 








St. Johns 


75 


375 








































14 






54 






TotaU 


1 781 


t 




S.767 



. 



•Not reported. 



I 



32S 



TAIU.E NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18— (Continued.) 



COUNTIES. 


SHEEP 

Morcment This Year — Sheep and I^ambs. 

Died of Disease. 




Number 


Vnhie 




3 


* 21 




, 




Hrevard. . 


7 


n 










28 


140 




B 


20 




























870 


4,011) 




21 


82 




















110 


223 




21 






















10 



35 


41 




. 6 
70 




2.1 
37 


M 














152 


717 
















■ : s :::.:...:: : 


































342 


4«5 








































' 










i 


TotalR 


1.058 


? 7,001 


•Not reported. 







/ 



329 

TABLE -NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued.) 



COUNTIK8. 


SHEEP 
Movement Thin Year — Sheep and 
Killed by Dogs. 


Lambs. 

.1 


1 


Number 


Value 








Baker 


50 
11 
11 


S 


920 
38 




55 








845 


4,400 




20 
2 




70 




e 








20 

90 

635 

35 

50 

12 
175 

75 
490 

25 


• 


100 




250 


Plagl«r 


2.535 
140 

111) 




600 

450 

1.524 




50 


























300 


800 


IJberty 


100 


307 




ioo 

344 




300 


Marion 


894 




35 • 
1.281 




175 




3,130 












280 






1,320 


















283 




1.286 












































toe 


1 


400 




500 

• 


2,750 








5.990 S 


24,289 











•Not reported. 



\ 



330 



TABLE NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18— (Continued. ) 



COUNTIEg. 



SHEEP 

Movement This Year — Sheep and Lambs. 
Died of Exposure to Weather. 

/ 



Number 



Value 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford .... 

Brevard 

Broward. . . . 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia. . . . 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia. . . . 

Flagler 

Franklin 

(ifldsden 
Hamilton 
Hernando. . . 
Hillsborough . 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

La Fayette. . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee. .... 

Marlon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa. . . . 
Okeechobee. . 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach. 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam. . . . . 
Santa Roaa . . 
Seminole 
St. Johns . . . 

St. Lucie 

•Sumter. . . . 
Suwannee. . . 

Taylor 

Toiusla 

Wnkulla. . . . 

Walton 

Washington. 



170 



860 



1 
10 



3 
70 



5 
i30 
8S2 



20 



881 
2.67i 



■100 



800 



093 

"io 



2.588 
'SO 



Totals. 



2.071 



7.443 



•Not reported. 



331 



TABLE NO. 4. — LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-18 — (Continued.) 


COUNTIE8. 


COMMON GOATS 

All Agea. 

(On Hand July I, 1918.) 




Number 


Value 




3.719 

2.180 

249 

4.85S 


t 




7,693 
7.267 


B.y 

Bradford 










722 
593 
607 






8,9*8 




l.fCl 




1.187 
1,247 






rieSoto 


95 

2.276 

3,127 

224 

465 

862 

794 

376 

1.888 

1,352 

8,931 

603 

711 

47 

180 

1.155 

958 

389 

258 

461 

1,862 






" - 386 




799 

1,417 




4,139 
1.659 




m 




711 
224 




MO 




m 

447 




3,452 








1,413 
1,342 

63 

100 

44 

1,034 

1 

919 

784 

943 

17 

878 

14 






2.920 




1,842 






x 




63 
210 
290 




2,148 




4 




m 






SM 

85 




987 




74 








525 
421 
97 
958 
896 
2,122 






$4*2 






4P5 






2.145 








53,998 


$ 




88.087 







•Not reported. 






332 

TABUS NO. 4.— LIVE STOCK ON HAND. 1917-1S — (Continued.) 



COUNTIES. 



ANUOKA GOATS 

All Ages. 
(On Hand July 1, 1918.) 



Number 



I 



Value 





8 § 


» 

150 


Bjij 


24 



















150 


Hay 


5T 
OS 


188 
247 


Dade 










12 
13 


133 




71 




















126 

17 
87 


130 




125 




468 




115 
30 


35 




45 










28 
171 


280 




431 














23 

1 

51 


130 
8 




202 








01 


304 










« 


40 








5 } 






234 




13 


32 








38 


35 




























_ 
























30 


ioo 


Totals 


1.000 


.t • 3.304 



•Not reported. 



333 



YEAR 1!H7 iy. 



Tabic Xo. 8 — Tola! Acreages of Crops. 

Field Oops, Acres l,531,::'.s 

Vegetable and Garden Products 108,645 



Total Acreage in Cultivation 1,636,98.! 

Table Xo. 0— Total Value of All Farm Products. 

Table Xo. 1— Field Crops 931,145.004 

Table Xo. 2— Vegetables and Gardeu Products 18,838,149 
Table Xo. .-{—Fruit Products 16.381.81S 

Tattle Xo. 4— Live i^tock on Hand July 1. 1018, Vie.' 

Horses 9 5,764,451 \ 

Mules 7,782,483 

Milch ( KWW 2,542.446/ 

• All Cnuer Cattle ._ 23.670.239( 

Other Cattle Shipped •" 2.075.552/$62,573,373 

• Hogs on Hand 8,787,3631 

Other Hogs 11,478.002] 

Sheep and Goats 402.847 / 

Table Xo. 5 — Poultry and Products 9 5,993.243 

Table No. 6— Dairy and Products ". . 6,017.296 

Table Xo. 7 — Miscellaneous Products 312.00:'. 



Grand Total 9141.262.776 

•The total number of hogs for the twelve (12) months 
would have been 2,164,722, if we conld have included 
the 477,590 butcherel and the 591,651 that were shipped 
out' of the counties and the State for market by packers 
and others. The value of hogs butchered and shipped 
was for the butchered 96,069.841, and those shipped 95.- 
408.161, or a total of 920,245,355 for hogs alone, includ- 
ing those on hand July 1, 1918. 

•There were 85.689 cattle exported from the counties 
and State by packers and feeders in and out of the State 
I valued at 92.075,552. 



- 



t 

U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
CLIMATOLOGICiYL SERVICE 

of the 

WEATHER BUREAU 

Central Office: Washington, D. C. 



FLORIDA SECTION, 

Prof.vA- J. Mitchell, Meteorologist, 
Year 1918. 



ANNUAL SUMMARY, CLIMATOLOQICAL SERVICE, 
FLORIDA SECTION. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The cold weather of December, 1917, persisted during 
January, 1918, the deficiency of 5.2° and the minimum of 
11° during the month marking the abnormal thermal con- 
dition of the year. These negative conditions were fol- 
lowed by temperature inversions of 6° and 4° during 
February and March, respectively. The rest of the year 
conformed more nearly to the normal from a temperature 
viewpoint, except that July and September were excep- 
tionally cool, October unusually warm, and December 
quite mild as compared with the normal. The mean 
annual temperature, 71.3°, was the highest since 1892, 
except 72.3^ in 1911 and 71.5° in 1907. The year averaged 
not so dry as 1917, the deficiency being 2.10 inches com- 
pared with 12.72 inches for the previous year. February 
was nearly 3 inches drier than usual and April was 3.59 



336 v 

inches too wet. The excess for April was the more marked, 
as that month is normally one of the driest of the year. 

The progress of crop development, as influenced by the 
several weather elements, was reflected in the somewhat 
backward growth in January, owing to the low tempera- 
ture and local drought. The warmth of February and 
Mach was favorable, but dry weather continued to be an 
unfavorable factor. The draught was relieved, however, 
by quite general and heavy rains in April, although cool 
nights during April and May retarded the growth of some 
cotton and corn. The boll weevil appeared during May, 
but the absence of frequent showers during much of the 
growing season tended to reduce the damage to cotton 
from that source. The last quarter of the year was un- 
usually wet, delaying harvesting to some extent. But the 
absence of the usual frost in November, and occasionally 
in October, prolonged the growing season to the advan- 
tage of cane, sweet potatoes and truck. Citrus fruits 
matured earlier than usual. The excessive rains during 
November and December were somewhat unfavorable for 
the crop as a whole. Some fall seeding was done, and at 
the close of the year oats were promising in northern and 
central divisions. 

THE WEATHER BY MONTHS. 

January. — The cold weather of December continued 
into January, makjng it exceptionally cold during the 
first and second decades. The minimum temperature, 11°, 
was the record. for January. The rainfall averaged about 
the normal, although droughty conditions continued on 
the southeast coast at the close of the month. Truck, such 
as cabbage, lettuce, celery and beans, recovered slowly 
from the cold of December. XJitrus growth was somewhat 
backward. Plowing began for general crops. And a large 
acreage was planted to Irish potatoes. 

February. — The month gave excessive temperature, and 



/ 



337 

it averaged the warmest February of record. It was, 
also, unusually dry, breaking previous records, except 
1911, when the average was 0.19 inch. The warm weather 
favored rapid growth of truck, although it was retarded 
in some districts by droughty conditions. Much corn was 
planted and some cotton. Citrus bloom was irregular, 
being profuse in some groves and much below the average 
in other groves — due to insufficient rain. 

March. — The warm weather of February continued, 
practically, throughout the month, as did, also, the more 
or less widespread drought of February. No frost was 
reported from any station, the lowest temperature being 
38°. Farm work was well advanced, the rains during the 
last week having improved tn> condition of the soil. The 
bulk of the cotton, corn, cane and peanut crops was 
planted and some early corn was worked. Citrus bloom 
was not up to the average. Truck shipments were in- 
creased during the last part of the month. 

April. — There was a reaction from the warm weather 
of the previous several months to colde*r, especially from 
the 11th to 13th, with freezing in interior of north portion 
and frost locally in the central division. In contrast to a 
normal April, which is generally dry, the month was one 
of the wettest of record. Germination was delayed and 
early cotton and corn were retarded by low temperature, 
and much cotton was plowed up and planted to corn. 
Some early corn and cotton were worked. The rain bene- 
fited citrus fruits. There was some damage from local 
hail storms. 

May. — May averaged cooler and drier than the normal. 
Rains were insufficient, except during much of the second 
and third decades, when showers were frequent in all 
divisions, except the western. The boll weevil increased 
with the "showers and much cotton was plowed up and 
land planted to corn and peanuts. Large shipments of 
tomatoes and Irish potatoes were made and a few peaches 

22 — Cora Agr 



"V- 



) 



338 



and melons went forward. The setting of sweet potato 
slips was backward. 

June. — Like May, the month was drier than the normal, 
although showers occurred almost daily in most counties 
after the first few days. The insufficiency of rain was 
most pronounced in the western division, where corn was 
unfavorably affected, but cane, tobacco and peanuts did 
well on low lands. Cotton, also, was benefited, as the dry 
weather retarded the weevil activity. A local storm on 
the 17th in Gadsden County damaged corn, cane, tobacco 
and timber to the extent of about $34,000. Pvt. Heriry C. 
Rich, U. S. A., was killed by lightning at Camp Johnston 
on the 14th. « 

July. — The monthly) mean temperature was 1.2° below 
the normal, and the rainfall averaged 1.71 inches less than 
usual. Corn, especially in the western division, was un- 
favorably affected by the dry weather. Some early planted 
cotton began to open and picking began ; in fact, several 
bales were ginned during the last week of the month. The 
dry weather retarded boll weevil activity. Cane, pea- 
nuts, castor beans, citrus fruits and sweet potatoes were 
promising. Most crops were "laid by." Robert Single- 
ton, Titusville, was killed by lightning on the 2nd. 

August. — Nearly normal temperatures, except high mid- 
day temperatures during the forepart of the month, and 
drier than usual, especially in the Miami section, charac- 
terized the weather during August. Cotton picking was 
generally active and much of the corn crop had matured. 
Citrus fruits, sweet potatoes, peanuts and castor beans 
were fair to good, although more rain was needed locally 
for cane, sweet potatoes and seed beds. Some Irish pota- 
toes were planted. One death resulted from lightning 
during the month. 

September. — The month was cooler than the normal, 
and it continued relatively dry, as were the several imme- 
diately preceding, although showers were frequent in 
much of the section. Rains were least frequent in the 



/ 



339 

western division. The chief incidence of the month was 
the disturbance that passed eastward from the west Gulf 
«oast during the night of the 27th. It approached the 
coast over Pinellas County, where damage approximating 
$250,000 was done and 8 or 10 lives were lost. Much of 
the cotton, corn and peanut crops were harvested. Citrus 
fruits did well. v 

October. — The month was unusually warm and wet, the 
rainfall exceeding the normal by more than 1 inch and 
the temperature by about 4 degrees. The average number 
of rainy days, 12, compares wit ha normal of about 9. The 
weather was favorable for sweet potatoes, cane and some 
truck, but cotton picking was at a disadvantage, and con- 
siderable hay was lost as a result of frequent rains. Much 
corn, velvet beans, peanuts and practically the last of the 
cotton crop were harvested. Citrus fruits were well ad- 
vanced toward maturity. The minimum temperature, 
50°, was the highest minimum, since 1891, and it compares 
with 25° in October, 1917. 

November. — The month was moderately cool on an 
average, but the lowest temperature, 29°, was the highest 
for the month during the last ten or fifteen years. The 
month averaged unusually wet, due to the rain of the last 
week. The first two decades were draughty to the extent 
of retarding the growth of truck, and in some instances 
delaying the seeding oats. The peanut and sweet potato 
crops were harvested. Cane grinding continued and the 
shipment of citrus fruits increased. 

- December. — December averaged 1.5° warmer than usual 
with an excess of almost an inch of rain, the bulk of which 
occurred during the last half of the month, although the 
first two days were featured by general and particularly 
heavy rains over most of the State. The lowest tempera- 
ture occurred on the 29th, which was the date of the first 
killing frost of the season. Otherwise the temperature 
was mostly mild. Owing to the absence of the usual frosts, 
truck was generally plentiful over all divisions. 



340 



COMPARATIVE ANNUAL DATA FOR FLORIDA. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Year. 


d 

03 

a 


p 


« 
■ 

a 


1 

i 

5 


& 

S 

■ 

< 


■£■" = 

c£ c 

~-y. 


1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1908" 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

19 IE 

1916 

1917 

1918 


70.4 
71.0 
71.2 
69.9 
71.0 
71.2 
70.5 
71.0 
70.7 
68.8 
70.8 
69.8 
69.9 
70.5 
70.9 
71.5 
71.2 
71.1 
69.2 
72.3 
71.1 
71.2 
70.3 
70.4 
71.1 
70.3 
71.3 


—0.2 

+0.4 

+0.6 

—0.7 

+0.4 

+0.6 

— 0.1 

+0.4 

+0.1 

—1.8 

+0.2 

—0.8 

—0.7 

—0.1 

+0.3 

+0.9 " 

+0.6 

+0.5 

—1.4 

+1.7,. 

+0.6 

+0.7 

—0.1 

—0.1 

+0.3 

—0.7 

+0.5 


101 
104 
101 
100 
103 
104 
102 
104 
104 
107 
105 
105 
102 
103 
101 
102 
103 
103 
102 
104 
104 
104 
107 
105 
102 
102 
106 


£2 
19 
12 
11 
20 
17 
17 
— 2 
13 
12 
16 
17 
20 
10 
14 
21 
20 
16 
19 
15 
21 
23 
19 
23 
21 
13 
11 


47.99 
63.01 
52.51 
45.50 
49.62 
56.69 
48.36 
53.93 
61.19 
58.47 
51.24 
55.79 
48.15 
61.43 
53.76 
49.15 
48.54 
49.52 
50.88 
47.40 
64.88 
48.02 
49.08 
56.30 
47.10 
41.36 
50.09 


— 4.42 
+ 0.60 
+ 0.10 

— 6.91 

— 2.79 
+ 4.28 

— 4.05 
+ 1.52 
+ 8.78 
+ 6.06 

— 1.17 
+ 3.38 

— 4.26 
+ 9.02 
+ 1.35 

— 3.26 

— 3.87 

— 2.89 

— 1.53 
, — 5.01 

+11.61 

— 6.20 

— 4.62 
+ 1.23 

— 6.26 
—12.72 

— 2.10 



\ 



\ 



341 



MONTHLY SUMMARY, 1918. 



Month. 
/ 



Temperature. 



Precipita- 
tion. 



Average Num- 
ber of Days. 



I! 



s = 

— - 



o 



5- 



ti 



January 

February 
March . . . 
April .... 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 
October . . 
November. 
December 

Year... 



53.9 
65.9 
69.8 
69.1 
75.0 
80.4 
80.2 
81.5 
77.6 
76.6 
64.8 
60.9 

71.3 



—5.2 1 
+6.3 
+4.2 
—0.9 
—0.8 
+0.1, 
—1.2 
+0.2 
—1.8 
+3.9 
—0.4 
+1.5 

+0.5 



89 

92 

92 

96 

97 

106 

101 

104 

98 

96 

90 

90 

106 



11 
25 
58 
28 
40 
58 
57 
58 
44 
53 
29 
23 

11 



3.11 
0.81 
2.53 
6.55 
2.43 
5.12 
5.50 
5.73 
6.42 
5.84 
3.45 
3.60 

50.09 



+0.27 
—2.80 
—0.62 
+3.59 
— l.o9 
—1.60 
—1.71 
—1.08 
—0.70 
+1.42 
+I.b2 
+0.90 

—2.10 



71 

4 

7 

91 

6 

11 

12 

12 

11 

12 

6 

8 

105 



16 
15 
16 
13 
18 
12 
13 
13 
12 
11 
17 
12 

168 



9 
9 

10 
10 
10 
13 
13 
14 
12 
11 
6 
7 

124 



i 



nw. 

BW. 

BW. 

se. 

e. 

sw. 

sw. 

se. 

ne. 

e. 

ne. 

ne. 

BW. 



jj 



342 
KILLING FROSTS 


. 1918. 




8TATION8. 


Last in 
Spring. 


First in 
Autumn. 


Northern Division. 


• 

April 12 

• 

• 
Jan. 23 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
April 12 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 5 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
April 12 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
April 12 

• 

April 12 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 23 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 5 

• 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Feb. 5 

• 

Jan. 13 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 2 
• 

• 
Jan. 4 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 5 
Feb. 5 


Nov. 14 


Bristol 


Nov. 13 




Dec. 29 




Dec. 29 




Dec. 29 




Dec. 29 


Federal Point 


None 




Nov. 13 




None 




Dec 29 


Hilliard 


• 




Dec. 29 




Dec 29 




Dec. 29 




Dec" 29 




Dec 29 




• 




Dee 29 




Dec 29 




• 




Dec 29 




Nov. 13 




Nov. 14 




Nov. 13 




Dec. 29 




Dec. 29 




Dec. 29 




Dec. 26 


Central Division. 


None 




• 




Dec. 29 




• 




None 




Dec. 29 

None 




None 




None 




None 




None 




None 




None 




' None 




None 




None 



343 



KILLING FROSTS. 1918— Continued. 



STATIONS. 



Merritts Island . 

New Smyrna '. 

Ocala 

i Okeechobee 

Orange City 

Orlando 

Pinellas Park 

Plant City :. 

Rockwell 

St. Cloud 

St. Leo 

St. Petersburg .' 

Sanford 

Tampa 

Tarpon Springs 

Titusville 



Southern Division. 



Arcadia 

Avon Park 

Boca Grande 

Bradentown 

Davie 

Port Lauderdale. 

Fort Myers 

Griffin 

Homestead 

Hypoluxo 

Key West 

Long Kej 

Miami (1) 

Miami (2) 

Moore Haven 
Punta Gorda 

Ritta 

Sand Key 



,-Western Division. 



Apalachicola 

Bonlfay 

DeFuniak Springs. 
Garniers (near)... 

Marianna 

Molino 

Pensac ola 

St. Andrews 

Wausau 



Last in 
Spring. 



Jan. 5 

Jan. 24 

Feb. 6 

* 

Feb. 6 

Jan. 24 

Jan. 24 

Jan. 24 

» 

Jan. 24 

Jan. 24 

Jan. 4 

Jan. 24 

Jan. 4 

Jan. 24 

Jan. 24 



tJan. 19 
Jan. 4 

• 

Jan. 24 
Feb. 5 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 5 
Jan. 25 
Jan. 4 
Jan. 5 
None 
None 
Jan. 4 
Jan. 4 
» 

None 
Jan. 24 
None 



Feb. 5 
April 12 
April 13 
April 12 

• 

Jan. 23 
April 11 
April 13 



First in 
Autumn. 

None 
None 
Dec. 29 
None 
Nov. 21 
None 
None 
None 



Dec. 29 

None 

Dec. 29 

None 

None 

None 



None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
Dec. 29 
None 
None 
None 
None 
tNone 
• 

None 



Dec. 3 

Dec. 26 

• 

Dec. 2 

Dec. 26 

• 

Dec. 26 

Dec. 29 

Nov. 14 



. * Record incomplete. 
t Data incomplete, but this date probably correct. 



CLIMATOLOOICAL DATA FOR THE YEAR 1918. 



STATIONS. 



COUNTIES 



Northern Division. 

Archer 

BriBtol 

Camp Johnston 

Carrabelle 

Cedar Keys 

Crescent City 

Federal Point 

Fenholloway 

Fernandina 

Gainesville 

Hilliard 

Jacksonville 

Jasper . ■• 

Johnstown 

Lake City 

Live Oak 



Alachua . 
Liberty . . 
Duval ... 
Franklin 
Levy 

Putnam . 
Putnam . 
Taylor . . 
Nassau . . 
Alachua . 
Nassau . . 
Duval . . . 
Hamilton 
Bradford 
Columbia 
Suwannee 



a 
o 

«-> 

I 



92 



10 

10 

45 

10 

75 

15 

176 

69 

222 

152 

125 

210 

109 



TEMPERATURE IN DEGREES FAHRENHEIT 



o h 

xi -a 

as 

a ii 



33 
9 
1 
20 
30 
20 
27 
12 
26 
23 
10 
48 
17 
20 
35 
IS 



v 

s 

1 



71.0 
71.2 
69.1 
69.0 
69.8 
69.1 
69.2 

68.8 
69.1 



- 

x 



103 

99 

101 

101 

97 

103 

104 

103 

100 

100 

102 

96 

99 
106 



a 

Q 



June 2 
Aug. 16 
Aug. 15 
Aug. 16 
July 23t 
Aug. 15 
Aug. 15 
June 3 
Aug. 14 
June 3f 
Aug. 15 
Aug. 16 



Aug. 15 
June 3 






23 
22 
22 
15 
23 
18 
16 
21 

17 
16 






Jan. 1 



*- 



Jan. 1 

Jan. It 

Jan. 13 

Jan. 1 

Jan. 1 

Jan. 1 

Jan. 1 

Jan. 1 



Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 



' 



Macclenny 

Madison 

Melrose 

Mlddleburg 

Montlcello 

Morton's Farm 

Mount Pleasant. . . . 

Old Town 

Qulncy 

St. Augustine 

Satsuma Heights. .. 
Switzerland ....... 

Tallahassee 

Central Division. 

Bartow 

Brooksvllle (1) .... 

Brooksvllle (2) 

Bushnell 

Clermont 

DeLand 

Eustls 

FellBmere >.. 

Fort Meade 

Fort Pierce 

Inverness 

Isleworth 

Kissimmee 

Lakeland 

Lucerne Park 



Baker ... 
MadiBon 
Alachua . 
Clay .... 
Jefferson 
Duval' . . . 
Gadsden 
Lafayette 
Gadsden 
St. Johns 
Putnam . 
St. Johns 
Leon 

Polk .... 
Hernando 
Hernando 
Sumter 
Lake .... 
Volusia . 

Lake 

St. Lucie 
Polk .... 
St. Lucie 
Citrus . . . 
Orange . • 
Osceola . 
Polk .... 
Polk .... 



125 


23 


143 


19 


163 




14 


18 


207 


15 


15 


3 


306 


13 




1 




4 


10 


67 


98 


11 


14 


26 


192 


32 


115 


32 


126 


27 




7 


80 


1 


105 


26 / 


27 


22 


56 


28 


25 


5 


125 


30 


10 


18 


43 


20 


6C 


27 


227 


4 


... 


7 



69.0 
69!l 



67.7 
69.7 
71.8 

68l3 



72.3 
76!4 



•71.9 
72.1 

. . .N 

74.3 



73.5 



103 

ioo 



103 
102 
102 
98 
99 
100 
101 



• 97 
100 



102 
102 

95 
100 

98 
100 

99 
96 
99 





16 


Aug. 15 


17 


June 3t 


18 - 




16 




19 


June 3 


11 . 


June 3t 




June 3t 


12 


Aug. 15 


22 


Aug. 15 


21 


Aug. 15 




June 3t 


18 


July &t 


25 


A 


23 


Aug. 15* 


22 


-::::.] 


28 


Aug. IS 


20 


June St 


23 


Aug. 15\ 


25 


Aug. 15 > 


23 


June 23 \ 


81 


Aug. 15 


^ " 


June 3t 


1 26 


Julv 8 y 
Aug- 1BCJ 


' 30 


A 29 



Jan. 1 
Jan. It 



Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 13 



Jan. 13 
Jan. 1 

Jan. 1 

Jan. 13t 



Jan. 2 
Jan. 4 
Jan. 4 



Jan. 2 

Jan. 4 

"Jan. 2t 

Jan. 2 

Jan. 2 

Jan. 2 



CO 



Jan. 5 
Jan. 4 
Jan. 2 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR THE YEAR 1916 





COUNTIES 


i 

£ 

a 

o 

8 
> 

H 

H 


TEMPERATURE IN DEGREES FAHRENHEIT 


STATIONS. 


i 

ft 

si 

fi 


a 

1 

S 

s 

1 


CO 

■ 
.£3 

to 

£ 




CO 

■ 
I 


9 






28 

175 
20 
14 
98 

39 
111 

20 
121 

54 

190 

25 

104 

20 

16 


27 
22 
36 
34 
27 

1 
25 
27 

7 
26 
17 

5 
24 

4 
11 
29 
34 
23 

4 


73!9 
71.8 
72.7 
70.0 

68.8 

72.6 
72.4 

7l!o 
73.9 
_.71.5 
73.1 
72.3 
71.9 


ioi 

100 

* 94 

96 

99 

103 

101 

97 

98 

103 

98 
96 
100 
98 
96 
99 




June 23 
Aug. 16 
Aug. 15 
July 8 
June 3 

Aug. 15 
Aug. 16 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 14 
June 3 

Aug. 15 
Aug. 15 
June 2 
June 3 
Aug. 27 
June 3 


28 
23 
31 
23 
22 

18 
26 
27 
26 
20 
27 
27 
34 
24 
31 
26 
24 


Jan. 2 




Jan. 2 


Merritts Island 


Volusia 


Jan. 2 
Jan. 2 
Jan. 1 




Okeechobee 

Volusia 


Jan. 2 
Jan. 2f 


Plant Clty^. 


Hillsboro 


Jan. 4 
Jan. 2 
Jan. 1 


St Cloud 




Jan. 2t 




Jan. 2t 






Jan. i 
Jan. 2t 




Jan. 4 


Tarpon Springs 


Jan. 4 
Jan. 2 


Southern Division. 








Arcadia 

Avon Park...-. 

Boca Grande 

Bradentown 

Davie 

Fort Lauderdale . . . 

Fort Myers 

Griffin 

Homestead 

Hypoluxo 

Key West 

Lock No. 1 

Long Key 

Miami (1) 

Miami (2) 

Moore Haven 

Punta Gorda 

Ritta 

Sand Key...,.,.... 



Western Division. 

Apalachicola 

Bonifay 

DeFunlak Springs.. 

Garniers (near) 

Marianna 

Mollnp 

Pensacola 

St. Andrews 

Wausau 



DeSoto 

DeSot<> 

Lee 

Manatee 

Broward 

Broward 

Lee 

Broward 

Dade 

Palm Beach . , 

Monroe 

Broward . . , 

Monroe 

Dade 

Dade 

DeSoto 

DeSoto 

Palm Beach . . 
Monroe 



Franklin . . 
Holmes . . . 

Walton 

Okaloosa . . 
Jackson ■ ■ ■ 
' Escambia 
Escambia 

Bay 

Washington 



1 81 


1 w 


150 


20 


11 


3 


22 


35 


10 


6 


10 


C 


12 


47 


12 


6 


13 


9 


9 


24 


15 


48 


"9 


3 


83 


'» 17 


10 


-8 




1 


7 


4 


18 


6 


42 


13 


24 


15 


111 


IS 


193 


21 


22 


6 


120 


17 


49 


16 


151 


39 


14 


22 


250 


20 



72.9 



73.0 
74.7 
73.4 

74.5 
74.8 

77.4 

74.6 
75.7 



68.2 

ei'.k 
»7*fl 

67!9 



96 
98 
96 
97 
95 

96 
97 
92 

94 
92 
96 



98 
89 



101 
101 
102 
101 
103 
101 
99 
102 
104 





1 27 


June 3t 


31 


Aug. 4 




July 21 


28 


Aug. 15 


23 


Aug. 15 


32 


July 22 


32 




26 


July 9 


27 


June 23 


29 


Aug. 19 


46 


June 15t 


42 


Aug. 16 


32 


Aug. 16 


31 


Aug. 15 






34 


Aug. 15f 




July 19t 


60 


Aug. 15 


\ 
20 


June 16 


16 


June 16t 


15 


Aug. 15t 


13 


Aug. 16 


15 


Aug. 15 


18 


Aug. 16 


18 


Aug. 16 


16 _ 


June 16 


15 



Jan. 13 
Jan. 4 



\ 



Jan. 2t 
Jan. 4t 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



Jan. 4 
Jan. 1 4 
Jan. 4 



Jan. 1 



Jan. 4 



Jan. 1 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 12 
Jan. It 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 1 
Jan. It 






t On other- dates also. 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR THE YEAR 1918. 





COUNTIES. 




PRECIPITATION, IN 


INCHES. 


CO 

■- — 

is 


SKY. 




STATIONS. 

• 


if 

JOS 1 


$1 

■ 
I 
t~ 
%t 

s 

s 

o 


El 


1 

S 

s 


! 11 


a 

o 
S 


8 °) 

= .2 

Zo 


•- 
t 

£ b 

•2"° 

3.2 

ZU 


to 

Is 

Zu 


1 
If 


Northern Division. 




















/ 








Alachua 


38 




• • < < 








, 


... 






• ■ • • 


Bristol 


Liberty 


9 




















sw. 


Camp Johnston 


Duval 


1 




v.. . 


.... 


. . . • 




. . . 






• * > 


.... 




Franklin 


20 


49.34 


6.13 


June 


0.38 


Feb. 


77 






• t • 


.... 




Levy 


32 


39.12 


6.07 


July 


0.30 


Oct. 


66 


242 


67 


56 


w. 




Putnam 


20 


51.72 


10.82 


Oct. 


0.22 


Feb. 


109 


198 


131 


36 


ne. 




Putnam 


27 


46.61 


8.82 


Oct. 


0.03 


Feb. 


126 


109 


153 


103 


se. 




Taylor 


12 


49.02 


10.20 


July 


0.56 


Feb. 


140 


172 


148 


46 


ne. 


Fernandina 


Nassau 


26 


41.69 


7.19 


April 


0.17 


Feb. 


101 


61 


233 


71 


sw. 




Alachua 


30 


48.26 


10.21 


Aug. 


0.25 


Feb. 


100 




. . . 


. . . 


se. 




Nassau 

Duval 


10 
48 


47.54 
39.55 


6.88 
6.17 


Sept. 
Sept. 


0.63 
0.21 


Feb. 
Feb. 


122 
101 


153 
.203 


138 
126 


74 
36 


sw. 








Hamilton . . . 
Bradford 


17 
21 


60.54 


11.72 


Aug. 


0.21 
0.25 


Feb. 


124 


141 


124 


100 


BW. 








Columbia . . . 


35 


53.22 


7.92 


April 


0.39 


Feb. 


89 








.... 




Suwanee 


22 




.... 




.... 


Feb. 


100 


125 


103 


137 


ne. 



se 

GO 



Macclenny 

Madison 

Melrose 

Middleburg 

Monticello 

Morton's Farm 

Mount Pleasant. . . . 

Old Town 

Quincy 

St. Augustine 

Sat8uma Heights. . . 

Switzerland 

Tallahassee 



Central Division. 

Bartow \ 

Brooksville (1) j 

Brooksville (2) .. 

1 1 null in ■ 1 1 

Clermont 

DeLand 

EuBtia 

Fellsmere 

Fort Meade 

Fort Pierce 

Inverness 

Isleworth 

Klsslmmee 

Lakeland 

Lucerne Park 



Baker . . 
Madison 
Alachua 
Clay .... 
Jefferson 
Duval 
Gadsden 
Lafayette 
Gadsden 
St. Johns 
Putnam . 
St. Johns 
Leon . . . 



Polk .... 
Hernando 
Hernando 
Sumter .. 
Lake .... 
Volusia . . 
Lake 
St. Lucie . 

Polk 

St. Lucie . 
Citrus ... 
Orange . . 
Osceola . . 

Polk 

Polk 



23 


...'. 


* • • f t 















. . . 


19 


54.35 


7.45 


April 


1.67 












5 


45.01 


6.85 


, Oct. 


0.10 


Jan. 


132 








18 


47.71 


10.65 


April 


0.20 


Feb. 


111 


226 


96 


43 


15* 










Feb. 


78 








' 3 


















• • • 


13 










.... 










1 




















4 


60.23 


8.11 


April 


0.99 












50 


38.46 


5.71 


April 


0.60 


Feb. 


117 


192 


78 


96 


11 


53.95 


10.06 


Oct. 


0.06 


Feb. 


80 








27 


49.29 


8.21 


June 


0.60 


Feb. 


126 








34 


47.01 


8.16 


Dec. 


1.18 


Feb. 


95 








32 


53.05 


10.19 


June 


0.74 


Feb. 


124 


117 


209 


39 


27 














. . . 


. . . 


• • . 


7 

1 

26 


59.89 


8.11 


Aug. 


1.62 


Feb. 


135 


157 


129 


79 




















16 


51.66 


7.71 


July 


0.21 


Feb. 


119 




• • i 




28 


62.06 


13.28 


Oct. 


0.06 


Feb. 


110 


234 


65 


66 


7 


45.98 


9.56 


Sept. 


1.49 


Nov. 


134 


172 


136 


57 


36 


47.69 


9.12 


Sept. 


1.43 


May 


120 








24 


56.36 


14.22 


Sept. 


0.69 


Feb. 


143 


114 


177 


74 


20 


52.27 


9.08 


June 


0.00 


Feb. 


92 








3 


47.48 


7.57 


April 


0.00 


Feb. 


70 








27 


1 




> > > • 


, , , 






. . . 






4 


50.40 


10.40 


Sept. 


t 


Feb. 


83 


209 


ioi 


65 


7 




.... 


.... 
















se. 



sw. 



sw. 
ne. 



se. 

ne. 



sw. 
ne. 
ne. 
sw. 
se. 
sw. 

e. 

ne. 
ne. 



S2 

to 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR THE YEAR 1918— Continued. 



STATIONS. 



COUNTIES. 



PRECIPITATION, IN INCHES. 



M) O 
JOS 



I 

3 

o 



as 



a 

o 

S 



-5 
v S 



a 
o 

S 







SKY. 






>> 






I 






CU a 


•J 


°& 


** 




sS 


»* 


i. 


2 >• 


£ >• 


*k i, 


•2-0 


■2 •= 


|g 


as 


a 3 
I- 2 


zo 


fco 


Zo 



00 . 

go 



Lynne (near) 

Malabar 

McDonald 

Merritts Island 

New Smyrna 

Ocala 

Okeechobee 

Orange City 

Orlando 

Pinellas Park 

Plant City 

Rockwell 

St. Cloud 

St. Leo 

St. Petersburg 

Sanford 

Tampa 

Tarpon SDrings 

Tltusvllle 

Southern Division. 



Marlon 
Brevard 
Orange 
Brevard 
Volusia 
Marlon 
Okeechobee 
Volusia .. 
Orange . . 
Pinellas . 
Hillsboro 
Marlon . . 
Osceola . .. 
Pasco . . . 
Pinellas . 
Seminole 
Hillsboro 
Pinellas . 
Brevard . 



5 

27 
16 
40 
35 
27 

1 
28 
27 

7 
26 
19 

5 
24 
-4 
11 
29 
27 
23 



48.24 
44.73 
55.59 
55.36 
44.65 
65.09 

47.50 
56.32 
40.07 
49.10 



54.37 
45.46 
45.03 
35.81 
44.41 
45.70 



7.87 

9.57 

10.32 

13.. & 

7.52 

11.76 

8.81 
12.30 

7.50 
10.12 



10.27 
8.55 
7.48 
8.11 

10.35 
8.05 



June 

Sept. 

June 

Qct. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Sept. 
July 
Sept. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Oct. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 



0.06 
0.10 
0.10 
0.37 
0.40 
2.26 

0.48 
0.14 
0.10 



1.12 
0.12 
0.11 
0.08 
0.26 
0.25 



Feb. 
May 
Feb. 
May 
May 
Feb. 

Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



114 
103 
119 
108 
110 
98 

113 

139 

124 

83 



123 
125 
112 
106 
89 
121 



231 
138 



120 
172 

194 



197 
162 
175 
82 
204 



... 


... 


. 




90 


44 


188 


39 


194 


51 


177 


16 


115 


66 


113 


55 


123 


80 


77 


110 


174 


109 


70 


91 



sw. 
se. 
ne. 
ae, 
ne. 



se. 
n. 
w. 
ne. 



e. 

ne. 

ne. 

ne. 

w. 

se. 








Manatee .... 
Broward .... 
Broward .... 

Broward 

Dade 

Palm Beach.. 


17 

20 
3 

35 
6 
6 

52 
6 
9 

24 

48 
6 
3 

28 
8 
1 
4 
6 

13 

15 
13 
21 
6 
17 
16 
39 
22 
20 


46.18 

48.07 
58.65 
68.00 
40.06 

54.96 
64.06 
29.77 
62.96 
42.56 
' 43.33 
60.39 

35.02 

69.58 

"60.36 
59.69 

68.34 
59.39 
65.04 


9.50 

11.61 
9.93 

10.49 
8.28 

9.98 
9.41 
7.94 
10.60 
10.01 
10.0 
10.00 

7.06 

10.87 

9.65 
11.43 

14.79 

11.76 

9.13 


Aug. 

Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Aug. 

June 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

April 
Nov. 

Aug. 
April 
Nov. 


0.23 

0.20 
0.61 
0.48 
0.61 

0.40 
0.27 
0.12 
0.90 
0.26 
0.60 
0.72 

0.20 

0.99 

0.60 
1.10 

0.32 
0.96 
1.41 


Feb. 

Feb. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Nov. 

Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Nov. 
Nov. 

Nov. 

Mar. 

Mar. 
Mar, 

Mar. 
Mar. 
June 


108 

102 
120 
142 

121 

93 
120 

96 
129 

97 
134 
156 

130 

98 

82* 
101 

ill 
96 
80 


154 
200 
183 

197 
223 
191 

263 
120 

99 

in 

127 
191 


m 

96 

iii 

84 

94 

118 

80 
159 

202 
167 

ioe 

122 


66 
*6ff 

H 

84 
48 
61 

22 
86 

64 

'si 

132 

52 


• t * • 




e. 




sw. 
e. 


Fort Lauderdale . . . 
Fort Myers 


e. 
e. 
e. 




se. 
Be. 




e. 




Broward 

DeSoto 

DeSoto 

Palm Beach.. 

Franklin .... 

Walton 

Okaloosa . . . 
Jackson 
Escambia . . . 
Escambia ... 

Washington . 


e. 




e. 




e. 




ne. 


Moore Haven 

Piint.ii Qorda 


ne. 




e. 


Western Division. 


n. 
nw. 


DeFunlak Springs . . 
Garnlers (near) .... 


sw. 
n. 




.... 




ne. 


St. Andrews 


8. 

B. 



g 



t Amount too small to measure. 



352 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918, with De- 
partures from the Normal. 



Stations. 



January. 



c 
o 

- 



- 






February. 



I 



V 
D 



March. 



a 
o 

I 



2 
1 

B 
e 
D 



Northern Division. 



Archer 

Bristol 

Camp Johnston '. 

Carrabelle 

Cedar Keys 

prescent City 

Federal Point 

Fenholloway 

Fernandina 

Gainesville 

Hilliard 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Johnstown 

Lake City 

Live Oak 

Macclenny 

Madison 

Melrose 

Mlddleburg 

Monticello 

Morton's Farm 

Mount Pleasant 

Old Town 

Qulncy 

St. Augustine 

Satsuraa Heights 

Switzerland 

Tallahassee 



4.01 



1.77 



+ 



+ 



0.98 
0.15 
0.29 
0.33 



+ 



0.58 
0.46 



— 0.34 



1.24 
0.21 
0.58 
2.31 
2.09 



+ 



0.95 
2.35 



+ 0.63 



0.38 
0.69 
0.22 
0.03 
0.56 
0.17 
0.25 
0.63 
0.21 
1.80 
.0.25 
.39 
.30 
0.41 
2. "40 
0.10 
0.20 
0.80 
0.45 
1.09 



4.05 
2.03 
3.42 
3.29 



3.87 
2.76 



i 



— 1.70 

+ 0.84 

— 0.71 



0.99 
0.60 
0.06 
0.60 
1.18 



3.22 
2.38 
3.62 
3.78 
4.18 
3.64 
2.20 



1.09 



1.23 
1.74 
2.54 
2.25 
1.28 
3.65 
1.98 
2.12 
2.31 
1.65 
1.89 
3.18 



3.44| 
3.64| 

— l.W 



2.61 
2.41 
2.60 
3.18 
2.58 
2.24 
1.49 



— 2.76 

— 1.18 

— 0.29 

— 0.86 



+ 0.37 
— 1.26 



— 1.21 

— 2.35 

— 1.16 

— 1.02 



1.09 
1.27 



0.73 
0.49 

— L82 



— 2.39 

^2!73 

— 3.75 



Central Division 



Bartow 

Brooksvllle (1) 
Brooksville (2) 



3.42 
3.99 
4.21 



+ 



0.89 0.74 
0.781 2.15 
1.62 



3.96 
3.41 
2.84 
1.95 
1.51 



— 2.14| 2.48 

— 1.271 3.79 
I 4.86 



+ 0.43 

— 1.47 

— 3.37 



+ 0.06 
+ 1.47 



.353 



CLJMATOLOGICAL, DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for The year 1918, with De- 
partures from the Normal. 



Stations. 



Bushnell 

Clermont 

I leLand 

Eustis 

Fellsmere 

Port Meade . . . / 

Fort Pierce 

Inverness 

Isleworth 

Klssimmee 

Lakeland 

Lucerne Park 

Lynne (near) 

Malabar 

McDonald 

Merritts Island 

New Smyrna 

. Ocala 

Okeechobee 

Orange City 

Orlando' 

Pinellas Park 

Plant City 

Rockwell 

St. Cloud 

St. Leo 

St. Petersburg 

Sanford 

Tampa 

Tarpon Springs 

Titusville 



January'. 



a 
o 

a. 



9 

E 

- 



a 



0.12 
0.70 
0.19 



0.31 
0.12 
0.18 



+ 1.36 



— 0.18 



Southern Division. 



Arcadia 

Avon Park . . . 
Boca Grande. 
Bradentown . 



4.00 
4.09 



3.64 



.0.79 
1.41 
0.56 
0.40 
2.42 



February. 



a. 



a 



March. 



£ 



a. 



£ 

3 

— 

Q 



0.4b 
1.00 



+ 0.55 



+ 0.20 
+ 1.90 
+ 0.30 



0.24 
0.21 
0.06 
1.64 
1.68 
0.69 
0.00 
0.00 
0.68 

t 

t 

0.06 
0.44 
0.10 
0.94 
0.49 
2.26 
0.53 
0.48 
0.14 
0.10 

t 

0.51 
0.25 
1.12 
0.12 
0.11 
0.08 
0.26 
0.25| 



2.99 
3.16 
2.98 



0.96 
2.17 
3.29 



— 2.92 



1.91 
2.89 
1.69 
2.51 
1.01 



2.20 
2.60 

a.ii 

2.88 



— 2.48 



3.19 
2.89 
3.06 



1.58 
3.04 
1.48 
2.04 
4.33 
4.38 
3.69 
2.34 
4.16 
4.88 
5.27 
2.67 
5.19 
1.49 
3.69 
4. 00 
2.77 
2.74 
1.74 
1.72 
0.76 
3.33 
2.40 
3.45 
3.32 
0.50 
1.51 
0.19 
1.31 
1.71 



+ 



0.48 
0.61 
l.U 



1.58 
1.54 
0.88 



+ 1.86 



3.06 
0.50 
1.21 
1.09 
0.06 



+ 



1.61| 
1.72| 
• I. 



0.051— 2.28! 3.25 



0.23 



0.721 0.20 



— 2.631 



2.29 

I l-« 

— 2.9ll 0.66 



0.95 
0.62 

6!90 
0.62 



+ 0.76 



1.90 
1.09 
0.89 



+ 9.26 
+ 0.12 



— 1.94 






23 — Com Acr 



854 



CLIMATOLpGICAL DATA— ConUnued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918, with De- 
partures from tBe Normal. 



January. 



Stations. 



'E. 



- 



Davie 

Fort Lauderdale 

Fort Myers 

Griffin 

Homestead 

Hypoluxo 

Key West 

Lock No. 1 

Long Key 

Miami (1) 

Miami (2) 

Moore Haven 

Punta Gorda 

Ritta 

Sand Key 



Western Division. 

Apalachicola 

Bonifay 

DeFunlak Springs 

Garnlers (near) 

Marianna 

Moli n 

Pensacola 

St. Andrews 

Waiisau 



3.68 
5.21 
2.42 
4.98 
3.90 
5.30 
5.53 
4.69 
4.03 



p. 

o 
a 



+ 1.14 



— 2.36 
0.93 



— 2.60 



+ 



0.50 
0.80 
1.47 

0.44 
0.65 
1.49 
1.26 
0.15 



February. 



March. 



c 
o 

s 



2.11 
1.18 
1.53 
0.92 
0.40 
0.27 
0.12 
1.67 
0.26 
2.61 
2.21 



0.25 
2.28 
0.07 



3.55 
1.20 
2.47 
1.95 
2.60 
2.02 
1.05 
3.0 



* 



a 

! 
I 



= 

i 

- 



0.70 



3.11 
1.52 



— 0.19 



5.06 
3.79 
1.06 
2.89 
2.78 
6.43 
2.65 
4.39 
3.59 
1.48 
2.13 



1.02 
2.75 
4.03 



1.75 
5.54 

3.56 
4.08 
2.47 
3.65 
1.90 



3. 

0.99 
0.41 
0.50 
1.16 



0.32 
0.96 
1.48 



0.99 



+ 3.99 
+ 1.17 



— 1.24 



\ 



02-+ 



0.17 
3.04 
4.80 



— 4.13 



5.04 
2.85 
3.88 



t Amount too small to measure. 



< 



;;^5 



OLIMATOLOQICAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918. with De- 
partures from the Normal. 



Stations. 



Northern Division. 



Archer 

Bristol 

Camp Johnston 

Carrabelle 

Cedar Keys 

Cresfeent City 

Federal Point 

Fenholloway 

Pemandlna 

Gainesville 

Hilliard 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Johnstown 

Lake City 

Live Oak 

Macclenny 

Madison 

Melrose 

Middleburg 

M on t icel 1 o 

Morton's Farm 

Mount Pleasant 

Old Town 

Quincy 

St. Augustine 

Sat sum a Heights 

Switzerland 

Tallahassee 



April. 



4. 
10. 



& 



+ 2.69 



2.58 
2.49 
3.45 
5.26 

i'.ii) 

3.20 

3.24 
2.53 
6.37 
5.31 



Central Division. 



I 



+ 



8.43 + 
7 

5 

10 

5 
7 
9 



.45 
.99 
.65 
.53 
.71 
.54 



5.69 
4.58 



7.86 
2.31 



May. 



June. 



c 
o 

I 

Q, 
u 

a. 





s 




o 






ri 




g 


<B 




M 


«3 








s 


9 




9 


£ 


&■ 


fl 


£ 



£ 
5 

a 

Q 



0.95 
4.20 
3.19 
4.12 
2.56 
2.65 
2.12 
2.71 
0.77 
2.72 
1.93 
2.50 
3.47 
2.69 
1.94 



— 2.74 



+ 4.86 



+ 3.07 



2.85 
2.97 



1.65 
3.09 
0.97 
1.66 
3?64 
0.83 
1.81 



2.51 
1.98 
1.39 
2.76 
5.28 



10. 
6. 
4. 
6. 
4. 
6. 
2. 
3. 
4. 

4. 
4. 

- 1.75 3. 
— 0.54 10. 



1.40 
0.77 
1.22 
1.62 

i'.kk 

0.38 



0.85 
1.17 



— 2.49 

— 1.04 



— 3.67 

— 0.28 

— i]28! 



— 1.42| 

1 

— 6.54) 

1+ 1.55| 



7.06 
4.68 
2.64 
4.32 
3.67 
6.59 
9.11 
5.80 
2.99 
7.09 
8.21 
5.68 



+ 2.28 



1.26 
1.29 
0.85 
3.29 

6!<)6 
2.09 



+ 



2.21 
3.73 
2.55 
0.00 



1 



+ 1.21 



— 4.23 

— 2.37 



— 2.18 

+ 'z!83 

— 0.78 



s 



Bartow . . . 
Brooksville 
Brooksvllle 



(1) 

(2) 



3.21 


+ 1.35 


6.39 


+ 4.30 


5.49 






. I I 

3.561— 0.11|10.19|+ 2.18 
2.65|— 0.87,1 3.63|— 3.73 
8.59 | 4.691 



s 



386 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918. with De- 
partures from the Normal. 





April. 


May. 


June. 


Stations. 


B 
O 

ts 

& 


a 

s 

i 

5 

a 


§ 

o 

1 


9 

t- 
B 
& 

M 

a 

a. 

a 


d 

o 

as 

8 

fa 

£ 


• 

P 
S 

I" 


/ 

Bushnell 


2.19 
6.09 
4.71 
4.55 
2.48 
3.16 
6.74 
5.70 
7.57 
6.99 
3.87 
3.93 
7.29 
3.95 
7.46 
3.43 
4.91 
6.84 
2.25 
4.89 
8.24 
1.58 
3.62 
5.51 
5.90 
3.80 
1.69 
6.95 
1.89 
2.34 
4.59 


+ 4.09 
+ 2.62 
+ 2.35 

+ "i!i7 

-f 4.25 
+ 3.63 

+ 4.98 

+ i!94 
+ 5.63 
4- 0.74 
+ 2.86 
4- 4.87 


0.21 
2.69 
1.47 
1.02 
2.08 
1.43 
1.35 
1.64 
2.89 
1.59 
4.08 
3.41 
1.57 
0.10 
3.96 
0.37 
0.40 
2.81 


— 0^89 

— 2.21 

— 2.48 

— 3.02 

— 2.80 

— 2.51 

— 2.22 

— 3.96 
4- 0.43 

— 3.38 

— 2.90 

— 0.82 


3.90 






5.92 
5.55 
6.35 
5.41 
6.30 
9.08 
6.00 


— 1.41 




— 0.60 


Fellsntere 


— 3!97 




— 1.00 




— 2.98 










Lakeland 

Lucerne Park 

Lynne (near) 


3.47 
5.71 
7. 87 
2.49 
10.32 
4.78 
4.29 
5.52 


— 2.93 




4- 5.07 


Merritts Island 


— 1.67 

— 1.21 

— 1.94 








4- 3.2« 
4- 6.22 

+ 't'M 

4- 3.76 

4- l'-81 

4- 0.04 
4- 0.62 
4- 2.75 


0.77 
2.11 
2.15 
3.42 


— 2.68 

— 1.70 

— 6!80 


5.02 
5.37 
2.54 
4.73 
6.60 
8.33 
6.81 
4.02 
2.81 
1.26 
1.92 
4.58 


— 1.76 




— 1.89 


Pinellas Park ; . 

Plant City 


— 3.42 




— 0.46 




0.66 
1.74 
2.75 
0.90 
2.15 
1.65 
3.41 


— 2.09 

— 0.77 

— 0.85 

— 1.37 






— 2.01 


St. Petersburg 






— 7.08 




— 5.01 

— 2.72 






Southern Division. 
















2.64 
8.39 


4- 0.69 


0.61 


— 4>.26 


5.95 


— 3.39 

















357 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918. with De- 
partures from the Normal. 



Stations. 



April. 



a 
o 

I 

s 

I 



£ 

3 

— 

1 



May. 



a. 



2 

■a 

- 



June. 



o 
p 



a 



Bradentown . 

Davie 

Fort Lauderdale 
Fort Myers . . . 

Griffin 

Homestead . . . 

Hypoluxo 

Key West 

Lock No. 1 

Long ivey 

Miami (1) 

Miami (2) 

Moore Haven . . 
Punt a Gorda. .. 

Ritta 

Sand Key 



2.02 
6.90 
7.5r 
1.36 
3.28 
5.61 
9.30 
2.80 
3.22 
2.12 
4.49 
3.82 
2.05 



— 



2.97 
1.93 



14 



94 



N 



5.181+2 

3.79 

7.23 



4.23 

2.48 

3.81 

1.23 

5.19 

4.61 

2.87 

2.80 

2.50 

0.35 

1.84! 

0.9o 

2.62 



— 1 



+ 



— 3 



ir, 
• • 

40 



57 



1.28 
7.58 
6.18 
6.68 
5.88 
9.98 
4.63 
0.43 
7.05 
3.81 
6.17 
7.65 
2.55 



— 6.91 



— 2 



3.60 
0.74 



in 



19 



72 



Western Division. 

Apalachlcola I 2.93 

Bonifay J |ll.34 

DeFuniak Springs | 8.98 

Garniers (near) I 9.55 



Marianna . . 
Molino .... 
Pensacola 
St. Andrews 
Wausau . . . 



7.37 



+ 0A5 
+ 7.42 
-1-5.85 

I 

+ 4-26 



1.97— 1.46 
1.36— 2.76 
2.56— 1.51 

2.141 

2.951— 0.71 



o.75 
1.75 
2.38 
4.57 
2.40 



+ 0.83 

— 3.52 

— 3.29 

— '^45 



.'. 



13.90 

11.76 

8.11 



-4-10.741 1.15|— 1.53! 2.89 
4- 9.401 2.28|— 0.99| 2.49 
+ 4.971 8.321+ 3.871 1.41 



2.48 

— 2.64 

— 4.33 



358 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918, with De- 
partures from the Normal. 



• 


July. 


August 


September. 




c 




c 




a 






o 




o 




c 




Stations. 


S3 

S 


9 

s 

& 


S3 

a 


2 


1 


01 
fa 

i 






s 


u 


■ 


■g 


1 




a 

a. 


■ 
Q 




c 
s 
a 


,*t 


i 

a 



Northern Division. 

Archer 

Bristol 

Camp Johnston 

Carrabelle 

Cedar Keys 

Crescent City 

Federal Point 

Fenholloway 

Fernandina 

Gainesville 

Hilllacd 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Johnstown -. 

Lake City 

Live Oak ~ 

Macclenny 

Madison . . . .' 

Melrose 

Middleburg 

Monticello 

Morton's Farm 

Mount Pleasant 

Old Town 

Quincy 

St. Augustine 

Sat s unia Heights 

Switzerland 

Tallahassee 



5.39 
6.80 
6.33 
4.89 
6.07 
3.88 
3.11 
10.20 
1.70 
4.36 
4.44 
3.35 
6.12 
1.98 
5.29 



3.151 7 



1.18 
1.96 
2.71 
3.79 

4i30 

2.86 



6.10 
5.09 
5.31 
4.07 



3.14 
6.82 
4.43 
2.60 
7.17 
5.56 
1.28 



2.85 
0.21 
5.96 
2.48 



1.13 
2.36 



— 3.19' 



— 4.80 



— 2.65 
6.24 



Central Division 



Bartow 

Brooksville (1) 
Brooksville (21 



.£.63 
8.05 



— 1.78 



— 0.13 



+ 



+ 



4.09 
5.11 
1.15 
0.99 

2.88 
3.34 



— 3.09 



5.52 
6.11 
6.97 
3.27 
5.26 
5.55 
3.98 



7.11 



8.11 



+ 



+ 



3.72 
0.34 
2.82 
1.32 
1.41 



2.22 



+ 0.60 



— 2.78 

— 0.87 

— 3.06 



7.41 
5.89 
5.11 
5.54 
5.20 
3.55 
4.59 
5.89 
6.18 
5.46 
6.88 
6.17 



5.77 
4.80 
5.26 
6.91 
3.66 
5.01 



+ 1.20 



— 1.76 

— 0.64 

— 3.29 

— 3.21 

— ZM 

— 0.26 



— 1.86 



5.05— 0,21 



0.39 
0»09 
t- 0.16 
+ 1.39 



+ 



— 1.91 



3.85 
7.36 
5.48 
5.24 
5.26 
4.95 
3.85 



— 2.40 



— 1.25 

— 3!ii 

— 1.24 



— 0.78 






9.21 



5.69 



+ 1.20 



338 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918, with De- 
partures from the Normal. 



Stations. 



July. 



a. 



s 



August. 



September. 



Buahnell 

Clermont 

DeLand 

Eustis 

FellBmere 

Fort Meade 

Fort Pierce 

Inverness 

Isleworth 

Kissimmee 

Lakeland 

Lucerne Park 

Lynne (near) 

Malabar 

McDonald 5 

Merritts Island 7 

New Smyrna 

Ocala 

Okeechobee 

Orange City 3 

Orlando 12 

Pinellas Park 8. 

Plant City 5 

Rockwell 8 

St. .Cloud 

St. Leo 7 

St. Petersburg^ 2. 

Sanford 6. 

Tampa 4. 

Tarpon Springs 6. 

Titusville 5. 

( 



7 
3 
4 

6 

8 
8 
6 
9 
4 
10 

15: 



+ 



.71 
M 
:<s 
.26 
.21 

Ml 

:;:-, 

.!!!< 

71 

3" 
.97 

64 

11 - 
.65 



0.18 
3.13 



2.79 
2.78 
1.94 



+ 3.10 



IS 
44 

DI- 
SS 

M 

4 5 



+ 



2.92 
2.39| 

-.21 
0.051 



9 

E 






56 — 
30 — 
95|.. 

76|— 
.741— 
85!- 
25 
05 
75 
01 ... 
78 .. 
10 — 
43 — 
01 — 
27 — 



2.88 
0.14 



— 0.82111.76 



2.47| 3.51— 3.51 

5.05 3.34— 3.81 

6.81! 



- 



4.38 
3.38 
3.59 

i!oi 



3.86 
3.52 
3.52 
2.63 
4.27 



2.13 
0.16 



— 1.67 



3.55 
1.86 
1.02 



10.12 + 
5.10 — 



10.27 
8.55 
2.88 
8.11 

10.35 
2.80 



0.89 
3.66 



+ 0.94 



— 0.48 
+ 0.56 

— 2.59 



20 . . 
70 — 

.831 + 
04 — 
56 ■... 

.121 + 



0.89 
0.52 
1.31 



22 
:>7 
73 
M 
i" 
H 
si 
57 
04 

37 

u 

10 



0.89 
7.13 
0.59 



— H.49 



2.14 
2.14 
1.76 
1.29 
2.31 



8.81 


+ 2.69 


6.60 


— 0.79 


7.50 




5.55 — 1.29 


5.05 


— 0.48 



5.29 
6.58 
7.39 
5.39 
3.56 
8.05 



— 1.18 



— 2.02 

— 3.49 
+ 0.49 



Southern Division. 



Arcadia 

Avon Park 

Boca Grande 



5.77 
1.32 



— 2.08 



9.50 
4.01 



+ 2.02 



8.11 
6.23 



+ 2.30 



3G0 



CLIMATOLOGIGAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918, with De- 
partures from the Normal. 





July. 


August. 


September. 


Stations. 


£ 

s 

a, 
"3 

» 

c 


i 

3 

3 

a 

3 


a" 

o 

« 

S 

°3 

B 


a 

u 

3 

3 

a. 

i 

a 


a 

o 

1 
"3 
1 


i 

f. 
§ 

a 




5.19 
7.56 
6.00 
3.93 


— 5.23 

— 4.07 


11.61 
3.27 
1.33 
8.28 


+ 2.42 
— 0.05 


3.721-^3.88 




9.98! 




9.53 

6.99 

8.27 

8.28 

8.57 

3.53 

10.50 

7.06 

10.06 

10.00 

10.83 

8.13 

4.54 

3.67 




— 0.68 








6.43 
6.04 
1.72 
6.74 
5.42 
4.01 
6.60 
2.87 


+ 6169 
— 1.87 

— "»1» 


5.65 
4.36 
1.85 
2.55 
3.50 
1.43 
2.10 
6.94 


— 6.56 

— 2.84 

— 6.17 






+ 0.04 




— 3.26 


Lock No. 1 




Long Key 


-f 0.45 


Miami (2) 









Rltta 


3.13 
1.20 

5.25 
6.92 
4.86 
8.03 
4.89 





7.06 
2.48 

6.28 
10.87 
8.57 
5.84 
7.28 
6.59 
14.79 
4.86 
8.39 







Sand Key 





Western Division. 


— 1.79 
+ 1.28 

— 2.59 

— 1.73 


— 1.67 
+ 6.19 

— 0.67 

+ 'i!82 

— 0.57 
+ 7.63 

— 3.64 
+ 1.12 


9.94 
1.85 


1 
+ 0.25 




— 3.08 


DeFuniak Springs 

Garniers (near) 

Marianna . 




2.76 
2.53 
2.85 
3.30 
3.44 
3.66 


— 8.44 

— 4.96 




6.02 
5.01 
6.70 


— 1.25 

— 1.90 

— 0.47 


— 1.93 




— 3.71 




— 3.08 







361 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1018, with De- 
partures from the Normal. 





October. 


November. December. 


Stations. 


a 

o 

*■> 
a 

| 


G 

3 . 

1 

& 


d 

o 

a 

P. 

"3 

■ 

5.60 
7.54 
3.99 
4.24 
2.21 
2.10 
2.96 
3.10 
3.62 
"3.39 
4.12 
3.26 
3.85 
3.27 
3.82 
3.75 


i 

s 

3 


d 

o 

i 

3 

i 


2 


Northern Division. 
Archer 


5.64 
4.06 
8.74 
5.04 

0:30 

10.82 
8.32 
0.91 
3.79 
3.81 
3.98 
3.97 


+ 2.80 

-+- 1.92 

— 2.82 
+ 7.06 
-f 3.37 

— 1.31 
+ 1.13 

— 1.09 


+ 3.41 




• 


RrlRtnl 






Camp Johnston. ........ 


— 0.11 
+ 0.57 


2.86 
5.50 
6 . 19 
3.05 


+ 6.21 




+ 2.61 




+ 0.45 




+ 0.92 3.32 


+ 0.47 


Fenholloway 


+ 1.02 
+ 1.50 

+ 1.07 
+ 2.10 
+ 1.62 
+ 1.28 
+ 1.55 


4.48 
3.05 
3.46 
4.13 
2.60 
3.84 
1.95 
4.92 
4.50 


— 'o.'ai 




+ 0.41 








— 0.39 




+ 0.03 




5.66 
3.42 
2.29 
4.29 
2.55 
6.85 
6.37 


-I- 2.51 
+ 0.39 

— 0.60 
'+ 1.26 

— 0.35 

+ 2.05 


— 1.46 




4- 1.30 




+ 1.63 


MRt'rlpnnv 






5.01 
3.40 
2.63 


+ 2.87 
4- 1.17 


4.85 
3.37 
3.06 


+ 1.07 






Mlddlebure 


— 0.01 


























0.43 
3.22 
6.73 
3.50 
2.25 
1.63 
4.44 


4- 4.47 
4- 1-22 
4- 1.78 


7.99 
4.76 
8.04 
2.95 
4.62 
2.73 
8.16 


4- 3.37 




6.98 
2.21 
5.29 
10.06 
6.44 
2.30 


+ 0.31 

+ 2.06 
— 0.85 










+ 0.27 


Satsuma Heights 


— 6!is 




+ 3.56 






Central Division. 


2.13 


— 1.56 


2.52 


4- 0.74 


2.85 


+ 0.46 






Brooksvllle (2) '. 


6.30 




3.92 





3.36 





862 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly ami Annual Precipitation for the year 1918, with, De- 
partures from the Normal. 





October. 


November. 


December. 


Stations. 


c 
o 

a 

a 

■ 


H 

s 

03 

a 


c 
o 
s 

5 

9 

£ 


o 

u 
3 

s 


c 
o 

1 

w ■ 
1 


o 
E 

s 








i 




• 




1.20 

7.45 

13.28 

5.96 

3.7B 
6.02 
2.74 
4.29 
5.04 
5.. 17 
2.64 


— 2.34 
+ 2.56 
+ 9.89 

— 0.29 

— 0.14 

— 0.03 

+ 0.56 


4.17 
3.38 
4.73 
1.49 
1.98 
0.89 
4.99 
3.38 
5.35 
::.:>?; 

4.10 
2.45 
1.91 
3.33 
3.88 
1.98 
3.18 


+ 2.67 
+ 1.69 
+ 3.16 


1.78 
5.02 


— 0.53 




+ 2.88 




2.85+ 0.53 




2.07 




+ 0.48J 2.96I+ 0.63 
— 2.25| 1.311— 0.96 






+ 3.27 3.251+ 0.47 




+ 3.41 


2.59! 




1.33 — 1.11 


Lakeland 


1.32 





Lynne (near) 


5.04 

6.59 — 0-52 


— 6.46 
+ 1.14 
+ 1.59 

— 0.81 

+ 1.42 


3.33 
2.10 


— 6.70 




5.42 

13.78 

7.52 

4.20 


+ 0.97 
+ 7.97 
+ 1.53 
+ 1.41 


2.60|+ 0.46 


Merritts Island 


1.81— 0.64 
a.95|+ 0.44 
4.53 + 2.05 
0.801 




Orange City 


8.48 
7.25 
5.13 
2.12 


+ 4.07 

+ 2.10 

— i .08 


3.07 
2.30 
4.51 
5.90 


+ 1.91 
+ 0.71 

+ 4^39 


3.21 + 1.26 




3.231+ 1.08 


Pinellas Park 


3.021 

2.1 1 — 






















St. Leo 


2.75 
8.14 
7.48 
2.88 
4.97 
7.71! 


— 0.58 

— 0.09 
+ 2.20 
+ 2.26 


5.61 
4.40 
2.30 
3.07 


+ 3.64 
+ 1.35 


2.39 

'3.66 

3.00 


— 0.30 


St Petersburg 






2. 1H + 0.17 


Titusvllle 


3.22|+ 1.29 
2.37;— 0.08 


3.821-4- 1.38 
2.281 — ft. SO 








Southern Division. 








i 




3.82 


— 0.57 


2.01 


+ 0.36 


1.16|— 1.06 
0.701 "- 



















:;*;:; 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA — Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918. with De- 
partures from the Normal. 



Stations. 



October. 


November. 


Dec« 


a 




a 




a 


c 




o 




o 


** 


• 


s 


e 


*2 


a 


B 


■ 


E 


M 




9 








c 


fi 

B 


3. 


EZ 


™ 


CI 

s 

b 

fE 


B 


8 

1 


i 

s 

• 

o 


1 



Bradentown .... 

Davie 

Fort Lauderdale 

Fort Mvers 

Griffin 

Homestead 

Hypoluxo •. 

Kev West 

Lock No. 1 

Long Key 

Miami (1) 

Miami (2) 

Moore Haven . . . 
Punta Gorda. . . . 

Ritta 

Sand Key 



5.39 



+ 4.29 



— 0.84 



7.31 

7.88 
10.49 

2.63 

8.74 

7.77 

9.41 

7.94 

7.56 
lrt.01 

4.82* — 5.72 

6.88 

2<72 



— 0.80 
+ 2.56 



4.94 
0.61 
0.93 

0.61 

1.04 
0.88 
1.24 
0.38 
1.05 .. 
0.S1 .. 

0.60 
0.72 
0.98 



+ 3.23 



0.69 



0.20 



2.18 
1.98 



— 1.95 



2.43 
3.15 
3.35 
1.17 
2.58 
1.77 
1.57 
2.11 
2.72 
2.29 
4.11 
4.72 
0.73 



0.16 



— 0.16 



— 0.55 



— 0.86 
+ 0.27 



+ 1.87 



Western Division. 

Apalachicola 

Bonifay 

DeFuniak Springs . . . 

Garniers (near) 

Marianna 

Molino 

Pensacola 

St. And !-•=■ \yr- . , 

Wausau 



I 4.73 
7.18 



k+1.19 
+ ,.40 



6.83 
7.77 



+ 4.14 
+ 5.03 



7.85 
6.05 
8.11 
8.09 
9.34 
5.70 



3.04 
4.80 
4.01 
5.12 
2.87 



5.23 
11.43!+ 8.85 



15.88 
10.79 



+ 10.95 
+ 6.36 



6.44 
7.78 



+ 3.47 



4.58 
5.50 
9.13 



+ 0.84 
+ 2.47 
+ 5.48 



6.25 
7.41 
4.99 



+ 2.08 
+ 2.26 
— 0.27 



\y 



3fi4 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 191S, with De- 
partures from the Normal. 



Stations. 



Northern Division. 



Archer 

Bristol 

Camp Johnston . 

Carrabelle 

Cedar Keys 

Crescent City 

Federal Point . . . 

Fenholloway 

Fernandina 

Gainesville 

Hilliard 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Johnstown 

Lake City 

Live Oak 

Macclenny 

Madison 

Melrose 

Middleburg 

Monticello 

Morton's Farm . . 
Mount Pleasant . 

Old Town 

Qulncy 

St. Augustine . . . 
SatBuma Heights 

Switzerland 

Tallahassee 



Annual. 


c 




o 








w 


» 


a 


N 


"Z. 


3 

E 


5 


£ 


(Lr- 


1 



49.34 
39.12 
51.72 

46.61 
49.02 
41.69 
48.26 
47.51 
39.55 



— 3.43 

— 9.41 
+ 2.31 

— 6.70 



—10.76 
— 0.49 



-13.70 



50.51 
53.22 



54.35 
45.01 
47.71 



60.65 
38.46 
S3. 95 
49.29 
47.01 



— 0.35 

— 0.33 



+ 0.40 



— 7.37 



— 9.16 



- 2.73 
-10.13 



Central Division. 



Bartow 

Brooksville (1) 
Brooksville (2) 



53.05 



+ 0.51 



59.89 



305 



CLIMATOLOGICAL, DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918. with De- 
partures from the Normal. 



Stations. 



Annual. 



a 
o 

a 
a 

- 
0* 



3 
t 
X 
2. 



Bushnell ...."... 

Clermont 

De Land 

Eustls ......... 

Fellsmere 

Fort Meade 

Fort Pierce 

Inverness 

Isleworth 

Kissimmee 

Lakeland 

Lucerne Park . . . 
Lynne (near) . . 

Malabar 

McDonald ...... 

Merrltts Island . 
New Smyrna . . . 

Ocala 

Okeechobee 

Orange City . . . 

Orlando . : 

Pinellas Park . . 

Plant City 

Rockwell 

St. Cloud 

St. Leo 

St. Petersburg . 

Sanf oni 

Tampa 

Tarpon Springs 
TltUSTllle 



"A"V 



Southern Division. 



Arcadia 

Avon Park . . 
Boca Grande 



51.66 
52.06 
45.98 
47.69 
56.36 
52.27 
47.48 



oil. 40 



48.24 
44.73 
55.59 
55.36 
44.65 
65.09 



47.50 
56.32 
40.07 
49.10 



54.37 
45.46 
45.03 
35.81 

44.41 

45.70 



40.18 



+ 0.34 
+ 4.34 



—10.40 
+ 3.12 
+ 0.61 



... 



— J. 48 
+ 7.86 
+ 5.14 

— 5.78 
+ 14.10 



+ 0.06 
+ 4.76 



— 4.55 



+ 2.61 



+ 17.32 

— 7.24 

— 6.43 



— 6.77 



3B6 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— ConUnued. 
Monthly and Annual Precipitation for the year 1918, with De- 
partures tj-oin the Normal. 



Stations. 



Bradentown 

Davie 

Fort Lauderdale. 

Port Myers 

Griffin 

Homestead 

Hypoluxo 

Key West 

Lock No. 1 

Long Key 

Miami (1) 

Miami (2) 

Moore Haven. . . . 
Punta Gorda 

Ritta 

Sand Key 



Western Division. 



Apalachicola 

Bonif ay 

DeFunlak Springs . 
Ganders (near) . . 

Marianna 

Molino 

PenBacola 

St. Andrews 

Wausau 




54.96 
54.06 
29.77 
52.96 
42.55 
43.33 
50.39 



35.02 



69. 58 



60.36 
59.69 



68.34 
59.39 
65.04 



—22.17 



+ 17.33 



+ 5.86 



+12.09 
+ 1.13 
+ 4.53 



r 



367 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures for the Year 1918, with 

Departures from the Normal— Continued. 



January. 



Stations. 



— 

S 
s 



Northern Division. 



Archer 

Bristol ,.. 

Camp Johnston 

Carrabelle 

Cedar Keys 

Crescent City 

Federal Point 

Fernandina 

Gainesville 

Hilliard 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Johnstown 

Lake City 

Live Oak 

Macclenny ...'. 

.Madison 

Middleburg 

Monticello 

Morton's Farm -. . 

Mount Pleasant 

Old Town 

Quincy 

St. Augustine 

Satsuma Heights 

Switzerland 

Tallahassee 



47.4 



52.7 
52.2 
48.8' 
50.2 
49.6 
50.0 



49. 3 ! 
47.5 



49. 8 1 
46.6* 
48. 6« 
47.2 
48.6 
47.7 



47.8 
50.2 
53.8 



45.8 



Central Division. 






Bartow 

BrooksviUe (1) . 
Brooksville (2) . 
Bushnell (near). 

Clermont 

DeLand 



55.8 
55.4 
53.6 



55.3 
52.7 



3 


u 


C 


9 

a. 


I 


S 


» 


e 


Q 


t- 



— 3.8 

— 4.4 

— 5.1 

— 5.9 

— 3.9 



5.9 
7.9 



— 5.0 

— 7.7 

— 6.0 

— 6.9 

"+ 7.5 



— 6.1 



— 6.6 



4.9 
3.1 



5.1 
5.5 



February. 



t 

9 
t. 

a 

a 



61.2 



63.7 

66.6 

65.5 

59.7" 

64'. 6 

62.4 

62.8, 

63.4 

64.2' 
62.6' 
63.3' 
63.6" 
61.9" 
63. C 
58. 8« 
62.4 
61.8 



61.5 
62.0 
66.3 
63.0 
61.8 



67.9 
68.4 
66.0 



68.6 
66.4 



+ 4.7 
+ 8.3 
+ 7.7 
+ 4.4 
+ 8.0 



+ 5.9 

+ 9.3 

+ 7.7 

+ 5.4 

+ 7.4 

+ 7.8 

+ 6.6 

+ 7.6 

+ 4.5 



+ 8.5 



+ 3.4 



+ 6.7 
+ 7.4 



+ 4.9 

+ 8.5 



+ 6.6 
+ 7.3 



March. 



i 

r- 



a 



65.4 



69.4 

69.8 

69.6 

66.8 

68.4 

67.0 

67.6 | -|- 5.7 

66.6 

66. P 

67.4 



+ 6.2 

+ 4.2 

+ 5.2 

+ 4.5 

+ 3.5 



68.2 
66.4 
68.7- 
65.2 
67.0 
65.5 
i 



65.4 
68.4 
70.2 
68.3' 
66.4 



71.4 
72.6 
68.8 



74.2* 
70.8 



+ 3.9 

+ 2.8 
+ 4.0 



+ 4.5 

+ 4.1 

+ 5.4 

+ 2.3 

+ 3.9 



+ 5.5 



+ 4.9 
+ 5.3 



.+ 4.2 
+ 6.8 



+ 5.7 
+ 5. J 



:;<;s 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures for the Year 1918, with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 



Stations. 



January. 


Feb 


9 




9> 


M 




%» 


a 




9 


44 


l 


a 


B 


3 


u 


B 


*J 


i 


a 


t 


a 


a 




| 


£ 


| 


» 
H 



March. 



4) 

a 

£ 



s 
St 

s 

I 



Eustis 

- Pellsmere 

Fort Meade 

Fort Pierce 

Inverness ( 

Klsslmmee 

Lakeland ...... 

Lucerne Park 

Malabar 

McDonald 

Merritts Island . 
New Smyrna. . . . 

Ocala 

Okeechobee 
Orange City 

Orlando 

Pinellas Park . . . 

. Plant City 

Rockwell 

St. Cloud 

St. Leo 

St. Petersburg . 

Sanford ., 

Tampa 

Tarpon Springs. 
Titusvllle 



Southern Division. 



Arcadia 

Avon Park ...... 

Boca Grande.... 

Bradentown .... 

Davie 

Port Lauderdale 

Fort Myers 

Griffin ... 

Homestead 



55.2 
58.5 



57.0 
61.2 
62.2 

59.6 

61.0 

62.4 



— 5.4 



3.7 
4.6 



— 6.9 



4.6 
3.9 
6.0 
G.8 
7.0 



5.3 

4.4 



3.6 

4.9 



3.9 
3.6 
5.8 



— 7.3 

— 3.5 



— 3.6 



3.7 



67.4 
66.9 
68.8 
69.2 



70.4 
68.9 
67.6 
67.6 
67.8 
64.6 
64.0' 
68.6 
66.0 
68.6 
67.2 

69.4 

66.7- 

68.3 
67.4 
68.8 
68.8 
68.4 
67.3 
66.6 



+ 6.6 



I 



+ 7.6 
+ 5.3 



+ 4.4 

+ 7.3 
+ 4.0 
+ 6.6 
+ 4.7 



+ 6.0 

+ 7.3 



+ 7.7 

+ 8.8 



+ 6.5 



68.7 



67.5 
68.6 
70.5 
69.3 

68.3 

69.4 



+ 6.1 
+ 6.2 
+ 4.9 



+ 5.0 



+ 4>3 

+ 3.7 
+ 4.3 



+ 5.-0 
+ 4.8- 
+ 4.4 
+ 4.7 
+ 2.4 



I 



+ 3.9 

+ 5.3 


+ 2.3. 

+ 6.1 


+ 2.5 


+ 5.5 
+ 4.6 

4- 6.6 



5.6 



+ 5.3 



+ 4-4 



71.3 
72.9* 
70.0 
70.4 

72.1* 

71.0 

71.4 

71.8 



+ 3.3 



+ 3.8 
-i- 2.3 



,!69 

CLIMATOLOGICAL. DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures tor the Year 1918. with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 



Stations. 



. January. 


February- 


Ml 


£ 


£ 




ft 


3 








s 


I 


£ 

s 


8 


w 

3 


g 


« 


tt 


■ 

o. 


t 




l 


1 


g 


■ 

a 


a 


a 


E~ 


1 


i- 



£ 
S 

IS 

a 

s. 



1 1 y poluxo . . . 

Key We«. . . . 
Long Key .... 
Miami (1>... 
Miami (2)... 
Moore Haven 
Punta Gorda. 

ftitta 

Sand Key .... 



V\ estern Division. 



Apalachicola 

Bonitgf 

DePuniak Springs. 

Garniers (near). .. 

Marianna 

Molino 

Pensacola 

St. Andrews 

Wausau - 



61.9 

66.4 

65.7 
62.8 
63.3 



68.6 
61.6' 
67.0 



48.8 

47. e 

45.4 
46.8 
45.4 
49.5' 
47.4 
44.8 
47.4 



— 4.1 

— 2.4 



— 4.5 



6.2 

5.3 

6.3 

6.5 
2.6 
4.9 
7i4 
4.1 



70.9 

73.1 
73.7 
70.4 
71.8 



70.7 



72.2 



61.6 

60.1 
60.0' 
60.3 
62. 2 ! 
69.8 



61.3 



+ 4.2 

+ 2.3 



+ 1-6 



+ 7.7 

+ 7.4 

+ 8.2 

+ 8.9 

+ 4.3 



+ 8.2 



72.6 

75.6 
75.9 
72.4 
72.7 



71.7 
71.0 
75.0 



67.8 
65.6 

65.2 
64.4 
65.6 



65.0 



63.7" 



+ 2.3 
+ 2.7 



+ 0.4 



+ 5.S 

+ 1.6 

+ 8.8 

+ 4.5 



4- 3.9 
+' 1.8 



Small figures indicate number of days missing from report. 



24--< - om Ajr 



/' 



370 



CLIMATOLOGJCAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures for the Year 1918, with 

Departures from the -Normal — Continued. 



Stations. 



April. 



a 

a 



t 

a 

& 



May. 



a 

a. 

a 



— 
& 



June. 



£ 

3 

a 
I 

a 

o 



c 



Northern Division. 



Archer 

Bristol 

Camp Johnson . . 

Carrabelle 

Cedar Keys ...... 

Crescent City 

Federal Point 

Fenholloway .... 

Fernandina 

Gainesville 

Hilliard 

Jacksonville .... 

Jasper 

Johnstown 

Lake City 

Live Oak 

Macclenny 

Madison 

Middleburg 

Monticello 

Morton's Farm. . . 
Mount Pleasant.. 

Old Town 

Quincy | 64 

St. Augustine [ 66 

Satsuma Heights | 69 

Switzerland | 67 

Tallahassee 64 



— 2.0 



— 2.7 

— 1.9 
+- 0.3 



Tf 1.1 

— 2.2 



0.6 
0.1 
1.1 
— 2.0 



+ 



74.8 
73.4 
76.0' 
73.2 

75.2 
73.8 
74.4 
74.2 
74.0' 
74.6 
73.6' 
74.2 
74.2 
73.0 
75.0 



— 0.8 



2.0 
0.7 
2.6 
0.3 



0.1 
2.0 
0.5 
3.4 



•I- 



— 2.0 



73.8' 
75.6 
74.0* 
72.9 
72.5 
74.0 



0.0 
X. 8 



0.0 
0.7 
1.8 
0.6 



80.2 

79.7 

81.1 

79.4 

80.4 

80.0 

81.0 

81.4 

80. 

80 ." 

77.2 

79.8 

80.9 

79.6 

81.4 



— 1.1 

— 0.2 
+ 0.2 

— 2.4 



— 0.9 



73.2 

- 1.5 | 72.6 ' — 1.4 

. 176.61 

- 0.7|73<-3'| — 1.4 

- 2.3 j 74.6 | 0.0 



79. 2' 
81.0 



0.0 



-0.9 

— 0.2 

— 0.4 
+ 1.8 



+ 0.7 
— 0.3 



>+ 0.8 
+ 1.8 
— 0.4 
+ 1.5 



81.8 


+ 1-4 


80.6" 


+ 1.3 


78.6 


— 1.5 


79.4 




80.6 


+ 1-7 


81.4" 


. . . K . . 


80.9 




79.0 


+ 0.0 


82.1 





+ 0.4 
+ 1.9 



Central Division. 



! I I 

I I I 



Bartow . . . 
Brooksville 
Brook8ville 



(1) 
(2) 



Bushnell (near) ! I I 75.7 



71.4| 4- 0.1 I 75.0 I— 1.9 |80.2 |— 0.2 
69.0 | — 1.1 | 77.8 I +. 1.1 ' 79.0'] — 1.1 
68.21 |73.6|.......|79.4| 



81.6'|. 



371 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures fo r the Year 1918. with 

Departures from the Normal— Continued. 



i 



Stations. 



April. 



3 



& 



Clermont 

DeLand 

Eustis ....... j 

Fellsmere 

Port Meade 

Fort Pierce '. ... 

Inverness 

KisBimmee . . . ^ 

Lakeland ,, . . 

Lucerne Park 

Malabar 

McDonald 

Merritts Island 

New Smyrna 

Ocala 

Okeechobee 

Orange City 

Orlando 

Pinellas Park 

Plant 6ity 

Rockwell 

St. Cloud 

St. Leo 

St. Petersburg 

Banford 

Tampa 

Tarpon Springs 

Titusville 



72.8 
70.6 
70.5 
68.8 



73.0 

68.6 

71.6 

72.4 

71.8 

71. 4 J 

70.0 

70.7 

67.8 

66.6 

90.9' 

69.0 

71.4 

70.6 

68.9 

69.0' 

71.2 

69.2 

72.2 

69.2 

71.2 

70.2 

70.2 



Southern Division. 



+ 0.4 
+ 2.1 
— 0.5 



+ 1-5 
— 1.0 

+ 0.0 



0.0 

— 0.4 

— 0.9 

— 0.7 

— 3.1 



— 1.0. 

+ 0.4 



— 2.1 

— 0.6 



— 1.6 



+ 0.2 
— 0.1 
+ 0.5 



Arcadia 

Avon Park 

Boca Grande 

Bradentown 

Davie 

Fort Lauderdale 

Fort Myers 



71.4 
74.2 
71.2 
71.8 
72.6 
71.2 



— 0.7 



+ 0.7 
— 1.2 



May. 



5 

i 



2 

= 

a. 

a 



June. 



E 



o 

E 



5 

I 

c 



I 



75.2 

75.9 

71.7 

75.9 

77.1 

75.6 

76.4 

76.4 

76.3 

78.0' 

74.9 

76.8 

72.8 

73.4 

83.2" 



75.5 
75.6 
74.8' 



76.1 
74.1 
77.5 
75.2 
76.4 
76.1 
75.0 



75.8 



75.9 
74 .-6 
76.0 
75.4 



— 0.1 81 

— 1.5 82, 
76, 

— 0.7 | 80, 
+ 1.3 | 80 



— 0.5 

— 1.1 



+ 1.6 

— 1.7 
+ 0.5 

— 1.1 

— 2.7 



+ 2.4 
+ L.1 



+ 1.3 

+ 1.4 

+ 0.6 

+ 1.6 



— 1.4 



79.8 
81.0 
80.4 

- 1.9 | 81.4 

| 82.6* 

.80.6 

- 3.1 79.4 
81.6- 
80.8 
81.6 
81.3 
79.8 



+ 1.7 
— 0.2 

+ 0.1 
+ 0.1 



0.0 
+ 0.5 
— 0.2 



— 1.5 



0.2 
1.7 



— 0.7 
+ 0.6 

'+' 1 -V 
+'2.8 

— 1.0 



79.9 



+ 1.6 
+ 1.6 
+ 0.8 



0.0 



80.2 
77.8 
79.4 
79.3 



+ 0.4 



— 0.7 



372 



CLJMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures fo r the Year 1918, with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 



April. 



Stations. 



Griffin 

Homestead . . . 

Hypoluxo 

Key West 

Long ' Key 

Miami (1) 

Miami (2).... 
Moore* Haven. 
Punta Gorda. . 

Ritta 

Sand Key 



:z: 



- 



74.0 
73.0 
76.7 
77.2 
73.6 
74.4 



72.2 
75.6 



3 

as 

a. 

& 



May. 



June. 



a. 

B 
a 



s 

t 

a 



3 



a 

a 

£ 



3 
t 

a 
& 



0.0 
1.2 



— 0.6 



74.6 
76.7 
76.8 
77.8 
78.6 
76.2 
78.0 
76.4' 
76.8 
75.6 
76.6 



I 



0.4 
1.2 



2.4 



80.6 
79.2 
82.0 
83.1 
79.4 
80.6 
80.1 



78.7 
81.2 



0.2 
0.2 



— 1.0 



Western Division. 



Apalachlcola 

Bonifay 

DePunlak Springs.. 
Garnlers (near) .'. . . 

Marianna , 

Molino 

Pefnacola | 68.6 

St-. Andrews 

Wausau 64 . 8 



65.8 
64.4 
63.9 
62.6 
64.2 



2.0 
2.5 
2.0 



— 1.9 



74.8 
74.2 
74.6 
70. S 
75.0 



— 1.0 

0.0 

+ 0.4 



+ 0.6 



81.0 
81.4 
82.2 
77.6 
81.0 



+ 0.6 
+ 2.0 
+ 2.5 



+ 1.3 



4.1 

1.5 



73.2 
73.4 
74.8 



1.6 
1.7 

0.7 



80.1 
80.2 
82.2 



— 0.7 
+ 1.7 



373 



CL.IMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures f*r the Year 1918. with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 



x 



Stations. 



July. 


AUgU8t. 


Sept 


IS 




» 




■ 


fi 




l- 




kt 


B 


ai 


- 


■ 


W 


?. 


9 


g 


ha 


* 


a. 


i 


3 


t 


s 


g 


03 
Q. 


a 


3 


s 


9 


a 




1 


B 



£ 

s 



Northern Division. 


78.7 

79.0 

80.4 

80.3 

80.8 

80.7 

81.4 

79.2 

80.0 

79.2 

78.2 

79.0 

79.1 

77. 7» 

79.3 


1 

— 3.0 

— 1.6 

— 1.5 

— 1.4 
+> 0.2 

— 1.3 

— 2.5 

— 1.9 

— 2.2 

— 3.9 

— 1.6 


80.1 
78.2 
83.0 
80.5 
82.4 
82.0 
82.8 
80.4 
82.0 

81.0 
81.2 
81.2 


1 

— 1.1 176.2 

I 72.8 

| 78.1 

— 0.9 75.8 


— 2.8 






Camp Johnson 


— 2.7 




+ 0.6 
+ 0.1 
+ 1.6 

+ 1.0 
— 0.7 

+ 1-1 


T9.4 
78.0 
78.2 
76.3 
76.8 
76.9 
75.4 
75.8 


— 0.1 




— 1.4 




- P 3 






— 14 

— 1.8 


Hilliard 






— 1.5 








80.2' 
81.4 
82.4 
81.6 
81.7 
81.4' 


— 1.2 
+ 0.5 
+ 0.8 
0.0 
+ 0.2 
+ 0.3 


76.2' 
76.4 
78.2-' 
76.5 
76. t 
76.2* 


— 2.7 


Lake City 


— 2.0 




— 0.3 




79.0' 
80.2 
79.6' 


— 2.7 

— 1.2 

— 2.0 


— 2.1 




— 2.1 


Middleburg 


— 2.2 




















Mount Pleasant 

Old Town 


78.8 
78.9 
79.4 
78.8 
80.6 
78.8 
SO. 9 


— 1.4 

— 2.1 

— 1.6 
+ 0.6 


79.2 
81.0 
80.0 
80.4 
82.8 
81.4' 
81.6 


— 1.0 

— 0.3 

+ 0.9 
+ 1.8 


73.3 

76.7 

73.4 

77.6 

77.8 

76. 2 ! 

75.3 


- 4.2 


St. Augustine 

Satsunia Heights 

Switzerland 

Tallahassee 


— 1.0 

— 1.6 

— ! . 3 


Central Division. 


80.3 


— 1.2 


81.0 


— 0.4 


78.0 


— 1.7 






Brooksville (2) ....... 


78.8 
81.0 




80.2 


' 


76.8 
79.0 
















:\~\- 



CLIMATOLOGICAL, DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures fo r the Year 1918, with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 





July. • 


August. 


September. 


Stations. 


i 

*•> 

a 

o 

— 

i 


fa 

3 

■c 

a 

o. 

0> 

Q 


d 

K 
3 

« 

M 

O) 

Pi 

B 

5 

r- 


oi 

u 

g 

a 
a. 

a 


5 

■ 
A 
E 
s 


ai 

3 

l 

a 




81.0 

81.2 

77.8 

80.2 

81.6 

79.7 

81.0 

80.8 

80.8 

81.6' 

79.8 

80.0 

79.0 

77.6' 


+ 0.4 

— 1.2 

— 0.6 
+ 1.0 

— 1.0 

— 1.1 

• * V ■ 

+ 0.0 

— 2.0 

— 1.3 

— 0.9 

— 3.8 


83.0 
83.0 
78.4 
81.9 
82.5 
81.6 
82.4 
81.7 
82.4 
82.8 
82.2 


+ 2.4 
+ 0.7 

+ 0.6 
4- 1.5 
4- 0.7 
4- 0.2 

4- 0.9 
+ "0.7 


79.2 

78.4 

76.4 

78.8 

80.2 

77.3 

79.4 

79.1 

79.4 

80. I 1 

77.6 

78.6 

77.0 

74.8 

\ 


4- 0.5 




— 1.4 








— 0.9 




4- 0.3 




— 1.7 




— 0.9 












■*■ 0.3 
— 1.6 


Merritts Island 


81.2 | — 0.3 
79.6 — 0-4 


— 1.5 

— 1.7 




78.9 


— 2.4 


— 4.0 








79.6 
80.1 
80.9 
81.8 
81.1 J 


— 2.6 

— 2.0 

+ 0.6 

— 0.9 


81.5 
82.2 
81.6 
82.9 
83.6" 


— 0.3 
4- 0.1 

+ 1.6 
4- 1.9 


77.2 
78.8 
78.5 
78.0 
79.4= 


— 2.4 




— 0.7 


Pinellas Park , . 

Plant Ci*y 


— 1.5 




— 0.8 








78.8 
82.4 
79.6 
81.5 
81.3 
80.1 


— 2.6 

+ 0.3 

4- 0.3 

— 0.9 


80.3 
83.0 
81.4 
82.5 
81.6 
81.2 


— 1.1 

4- J.l 

4- 0.4 

0.0 


77.1 
80.4 
77.6 
79.4 
78.8 
78.5 


— 2.5 








— 0.3 


Tarjon Springs 

Titusville 


— 0.8 

— 1.0 






Southern Division. 
















80.0 
83.4 
81.2 
79.5 
80.6 
80.8 


— 1.6 

+ 0.3 


80.9 
83.5 
81.7 


— 0.8 

4- 0.5 

— 1 


78.6 
81.2 


— 1.6 








I 79.9 

j*|82. 4 

— 0/1 1 81.0 


77.9 
79.8 
79.2 




Port Lauderdale 


-•- 0.7 


Griffin 











375 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures fo r the Year 19 IX, with 

Departures from the. Normal— Continued. 



Stations. 



July 



4> 

— 

B 
a 

E- 



Homestead 

Hypoluxo 

Key West 

Long Key.*. 

Miami (1) 

Miami (2) 

Moore Haven 

Punta Gorda 

Ritta 

Sand Key 

li 

Western Division. 



.80.2 
.180.4 
. 83.5 
.(83.8 
. | 80.4 
,| 80.8 
.1 80.6 



2 



August. 



I 

§ 



3 
t. 



September 



a 

a. 

a 

01 



3 

r 

3. 



1.1 

0.2 



— 1.5 



Apalacnlcola 

Bonifay 

DeFuniak Springs. 
Garniers (near)... 

Marianna 

Molino 

Pensacola 

St. Andrews 

Wausau 



.! 80.5 
.182.4 



80.4 1 
80.8 ; 
81. 1 ! 
78.7'! 
80.3 I 



81.0 
82.4 
84.4 
84.0 
81.5 
83.2 
81.0' 



+ 0.8 
+ 0.6 



— 0.5 



.1 80.3 
79.9 
82.6 
82.8 
79.5 
81.0 
78.0 



I 



84.4 
82.0 



— 1.5 I 81.0 



79.4 
81.7 



— 0.9 
+ 0.1 



— 2.0 



— 0.7 I 76.6 



I 



79.4 

78.8 
80.9 



— 0.1 81.0|— 0.8 | 75.2 

+ 0.4 I 80.4 — 0.4| 

'| 80.6V 

— 0.7 I 80.5 |— 0.7 
| 81.4 | + 0.9 

— 2.0! 79.9' — l.l 

— 3.5 | 79.6| — 2.2 

— 1.0 | 80.8 |— 0.9 



73.5' 
73.7 
73.8' 
74.3 
73.6 
74.0 



— 2.8 

— 3.2 



— 4.3 

— 3.6 

— 3.6 

— 6.5 

— 4.0 



\ 



370 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures for the Year 1918„ with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 



Stations. 



October. 



v 

a. 

E 
s> 
H 



<3 



November. 



December.- 



■s 

v 



a 



-. 
£ 



a 

a 



Northern Division. 



Archer 

Bristol 

Camp Johnson 

Carrabelle 

Cedar Keys 

Crescent City 

Federal Point 

Fenholloway 

Feruandlna 

Gainesville 

Hilliard 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Johnstown 

Lake City 

Live Oak 

Macclenny 

Madison 

Middleburg 

Montirello 

Morton's Farm 

Mount Pleasant. . . . 

Old Town 

Quincy 

St. Augustine 

Satsuma Heights | 76.9 

Switzerland 75. 2 

Tallahassee 74.2 



76.2 
72.4 
75. T 
75.6 
78.9 
76.5 
76.3 
7C.0 
75.2 
76.2 
79.5 
74.5 



74. 4' 

74. ft 
76.5 



74.6 
74.5* 



76.6 
73.8 
75.8 



Central Division. 



+ 4.6 



+ 4.8 

4- 6.3 

+ 4.3 

+ 4.4 



+ 3.8 
+ 4.8 



+ 4.9 



+ 3.6 
+ 5.1 
+ 6.1 



+ 4.5 

+ 4.2 



+ 3.4 



Bartow 

Brooksville (1) . 
Brooksville (2) . 
Bnshnell (near). 
Clermont 



77.4 



76.0 
78.2 



+ 4.7 
+ 5.8 



+ 3.4 



61.8 
59.6 
64.7 
64.8 
64.3 
59.0 
61.3 
61.7 
59.0 
60.4 



60.2 
59.4 
60.6 



59.1 
58.6 



4- 3.3 



57.2 
60. 9 ! 
57.4 
65.0 
63.6 
61.2 
58.3 



67.0 



63.4 
67.6 



— 2.1 

•4- 1.0 
+ 0.1 
+ 0.3 



— 0.9 

— 1.3 



— 0.9 



1.3 
2.2 
2.2 



1.7 
2.3 



— 2.1 



4- 0.8 



— 1.2 

— 1.2 



/ 



58.4 
56.1 
58.9 
60.2 
60.7 
56.9 
57.4' 
57.8 

5JU0' 
58.2 



57.2' 
56.8 
57.4 



56.4 

57.2° 



&7.3 
55.4 
60.0 
62.1' 
57.2= 
55.1 



4- 1.9 
4- 0.5 
4- 2.0 
4-3.3 



+ 1.4, 
4- 1.4' 

4- 3.0 



4- 2.5 
4- 0.8 
4- 2.6 



4- 2.1 
4- 3.0 



4- 1-0 



4- 2.4 



+ 1.4 

4- 2.2 



I 



4- 0.5 



4- 0.1 



62.0 



59.6 
62.8 



4- 0.6 



4- 1.7 



377 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continue.!. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures for the Year 1918. with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 



Stations. 



October. 


9 

■ 


rture. 


3 
a 

H 


& 



November. December. 



= 

a 

r- 



DeLand I 77.0 

Bustis J 76.7 

Fellstfiere j 75.3 

77.6 
79.0 
76.8 
77.6 
77.9 



Fort Meade 

Fort Pierce 

Inverness 

Kissimmee 

Lakeland 

Lucerne Park j 78.0 

Malabar 79.6 

McDonald 76.8 

Merritts Island 177.8 



75.8 
74.0 



New Smyrna 

Ocala 

Okeechobee 

Orange City 75.3 

Orlando ] 77.0 

Pinellas Park 77.6 

Plant City 78.4 

Rockwell 

St Cloud 

St. L?o 76.0 

St. Petersburg .' 78.8 

Sanford .. 76.4 

Tampa 77.9 

Tarpon Springs | 77.9 

Titusvllle 77.6 



+ 5.0 
+ 3.4 



4- 3.5 

+ 2.7 

+ 4.2 

+ 2.7 



+ 4.1 

+ 3.9 

+ 2.3 

+ 2.7 

+ 2.0 



64.6 
65.0 
66.8 
67.0 
71.2 
62.9 
67.1 
67.0 



+ 2.0 

4- 3.3 



+ 4>6 



+ 2.6 



70.2 
65.0 
68.5 
65.0 
61.3 



63.8 
66.8 
67.2 



+ 4.1 

+ 4.6 
+ 3.9 



64.6 
68.4 
65.6 
67.2 
66.0 
66.6 



i 



s 

m 

— 

s 

a 



£ 

i 

* 



+ 0.2 | 60. 
— 0.6 | 60 



+ 0.1 
+ 1.8 

— 0.2 

— 0.3 



+ 1.6 

— 0.6 
+ 0.1 

— 0.2 

— 2.5 



— 0.9 

+ 0.3 



— 1.5 



+ 0.4 
+ 0.3 
+ 0.2 



.Southarn Division. 



Arcadia 

Avon Park 

Boca Qrande 

Bradentown 

Davie ^, . , . 

Fort Lauderdale 

Fort Myers 

Griffin 



77.1 



78.0 
77.2 
79.6 
78*2 



+ 2.2 68.8 



+ 3.9 



67.5 
70.8 
72.9 
+ 2.9 I 70.3 
i 71.8 



+ 0.9 



+ 0.4 

+ 0.7 



60.4 
64.1 
60.3 
62.6 
62.0 
61.4 



+ ;-7 

+ 0.3 



+ 3.0 

+ 1.4 

+ 2.3 

+ 1.3 



+ 1.2 
+ 1.6 
+ 0.8 
+ 1.0 
0.0 



+ 0.7 
+ 1.5 



+ 0.1 



+ 0.5 



I 





+ 


1 


4 


+ 


2 


1 


— 


<> 


2 



63.6 
66.0 
63.6 
65.8 
68.4 
65.4 
66.5 



+ 0-8 



+ 2.0 

'+' i'.i 



:}78 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures to r the Year 1918, with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 



Stations. 



80.3 
78.7 
80.0 
Long Key 80.2 



Homestead 
Hypoluxo • 
Key West 



October. 



« 

£ 
o 



November. 



£ 

n 
a. 

a 



a 

s 



D^cembtr. 



a 

M 

3 



B 
B 

r- 



3, 

a 

a 



Miami (1). 

Miami (2) 

Moore Haven . 
Punta Gorda. . 

Ritta 

Sand Key 



Western Division. 



Apalachicola 

Bonifay 

DeFuniak Springs . . 

Garniers (near) 

Marianna 

Molino |>T4.7 

Pensacola j 73 . 5 

St. Andrews | 72.6 

Wausau 173.8 



78.9 
80.3 



78.4 



+ 1-2 
+ 1.3 



+ 1.1 



76.0 
73.5 



74. : 
72.9 



+ 4.9 
+ 5.3 



71.8 
73.2 
75.4 
74.6 
72.2 
73.6 



I 



0.8 
1.1 



70.5' 



+ 0.2 



66.4 
68.0 
71.7 
70.6 
67.8 
68.8 



66.8 



I" I 

80.fi — 1.6 



— 0.3 
-f- 1.6 



— 0.2 



58.7 



— 0.7 



157.7' 
67.0 — 1.4 



+ 4.9 

+ 7.5! | 

+ 4.1 |59.4 '— 0.2 
+ 2.6 58.6 | + 1.2 
+ 5.4 j 57.2 I — 1.4 



55.5 
55.2 



55.4 



55.4 
54. : 
54.4 



+ 0.2 
+ 3.2 



+ 2.2 



+ 1.5 

+ 0.8 
+ 2.0 



379 



. CLIMATOLOG1CAL DATA— Continued. 
Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures fo r the Year 1918, with 
Departures (rom the Normal — Continued. 



Stations. 



Northern Division. 



Archer 

Bristol 

Camp Johnson ■ ■ . 

Carrabelle 

Cedar Keys 

Crescent City 

Federal Point 

Fenholloway 

Pernandina 

Gainesville 

Hilliard 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Johnstown 

Lake City 

Live Oak 

Macclenny 

'Madison 

Middleburg 

Monticello 

Morton's Farm . . . 
Mount Pleasant . 

Old Town 

Qulncy 

St. Augustine 

Satsuma Heights 

Switzerland 

Tallahassee 




Annual. 



o 

a 

B 



71.0 
71.2 
69.1 
69.0 
69.8 
69.1 
69.2 



68.8 
69.1 



69.0 
69.1 



67.7 
69.7 
71.8 



68.3 



s 



+ 0.7 
+ 1.6 



+ 0.5 
+ 0.1 



— o.i 

+ 0.1 



+ 0.3 
+ 0.8 



+ 0.3 



Central Division. 



Bartow 

Brook8ville (1) . 
Brooksvllle (2) . 
Bushnell (near) 



72.3 



70.4 



+ 0.3 



• 



f 



380 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Continued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures fo r the Year 1918. with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 



Stations. 



t 



Clermont 

DeLand 

Eustis 

Fellsmere 

Fort Meade 

Fort Pierce 

Inverness 

Kissimmee 
i Lakeland 

Lucerne Park . . 

Malaba r •••»••• 
- McDonald 

Merritts Island 

New Smyrna . . . 

Ocala 

Okeechobee . . . 

Orange City . . . 

Orlando 

Pinellas Park . . 

Plant City 

Rockwell 

St. Cloud 

St. Leo 

St. Petersburg . 

Sanfsrd 

Tampa 

Tarpon Springs 

Titusville 



Annual. 



a 



71.9 

72.1 



74.3 



73. B 



73.9 
71.8 
72.7 
70.0 
68.8 



72.6 
72.4 



71.0 
73.9 
71.5 
73.1 
72.3 
71.9 



C 



+ 1.8 
+ 0.5 



+ 1.5 



+ 1.3 
+ 0.7 
+ 0.2 
+ 0.2 
— 1.4 



+ (1.9 



0.5 



■+ 1.4 

+ 1.3 

+ n.v 



Southern Division. 







"... 




72.9 


I + 0.3 






i 




73.0 
74.7 
73.4 










i + 0.3 





:wi 



CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA— Contiaued. 

Monthly and Annual Mean Temperatures fo r the Year 1918, with 

Departures from the Normal — Continued. 



Stations. 



Annual. 



- 



o 
A 

I 



Griffin 

Homestead ■ ■ 

Hypoluxo 

Key West ... 

Long Key 

Miami (1) ... 
Miami (2) ... 
Moore Haven 
Punta Gorrla . 

Ritta 

Sand Key . . . 



Western Division. 



Apalachicoia 

Bonifay 

DeFuniak Springs 
Oarniers (near) . . 

Marianna 

Molino 

Pensacola 

St. Andrews 

Wausau 



74.5 
74.8 
77.4 
77.5 
74.6 
75.7 



68.2 
62.2 



67.6 
'67i6' 
67 '.9" 



® 

D 



+ 0.2 
4- 0.6 

-6: 8 ' 



+ 0.6 
+ 0.6 



+ 0.5 

— 'Hi' 

+ 0:4 



\ 

I 



INDEX TO CONTENTS 



Letter of Transmittal 9 

Preface 11 

Division of Agriculture 13 to 14 

General Agricultural Matter 15 to 19 

Florida — A Land of Opportunities 20 to 32 

The Home Garden 33 to 47 

Feeding Dairy Cows 47 to 96 

Soil Erosion 96 to 98" 

Wheat in Florida 98 to 104 

Growing Rye in Florida 104 to 109 

Oats in Florida . 109 to 114 

Growing Onions 114 to 120 

Growing Broom Corn 120 to 127 

Analysis of Muck Soils 128 to 152 

Napier, Elephant or Carter Grass 153 to 156 

Citrus Canker Eradication 157 to 161 

The Citrus Fruit Industry 162 to 167 

Milch Goats ' 168 to 177 

Angora Goats and Sheep 178 to 202 

Progress of Tick Eradication 203 to 204 

County Demonstration Agents 205 

Commercial Organizations 206 to 208. 

Voting Population, Male and' Female, by Dis- 
tricts (Suffragists) 209 to 210 

Crop Statistical Information — Tables, etc.... 211 to 333 

Weather Statistics 335 to 381 



\ 







Fifteenth Biennial Report 



of tht 



Department of Agriculture 



of the 

State of Florida 



Division of Agriculture and Immigration 



Part 2 — Census of Manufactures 

and Industries 



FOR THE YEAR 
1917 



W. A. McRAE 

Commissioner of Agriculture 

Tallahassee, Florida 



T. J. Appleynrd, Printer. Tallahassee, Flu. 



d 



. 







L 



1 




I 



.. 



* 



> 



.'* 



i 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



■IJLI 



To His Excellency, 
S. J. CATTS, 

Governor of the State of Florida. 

Sir: 

As provided by law, I herewith submit the Biennial 
Report of the Department of Agriculture for the years 
1917-18. The dates upon which the manufacturing and 
industrial statistics are based cover the period from Jan- 
uary 1, 1917, to December 31, 1917, inclusive. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. McRAE, 
Commissioner of Agriculture. 



i 



■•' 



MANUFACTURES 



For the Calendar Year Beginning January 1, 1917, and Ending December 31, 1917 



cemt 



The information usually most sought for in connection 
with manufacturing and industrial work is contained in 
the following tables, the heads of which clearly express 
the meaning of each. 

No better advertisement of a State or county can be 
made than the publication of its, industrial progress and 
development, and to those interested in such matters and 
who wish information relative to the possibilities of in- 
vestments in such lines of activity in this State, the Bta 
tistics contained herein are wel| worth careful perusal. 

We beg to direct attention to] the classified tables by 
counties. The results- there disclosed are of unusual in 



TABLE No. 3 — Shows the industries by counties, 
giving the number in each county, the aggregate amount 
of capital invested in each class, the average number of 
wage earners and their total wages; the average number 
of persons engaged in these industries of specified ages, 
and wages paid them ; the largest and smallest number 
engaged in each industry; the cost of manufacture, and 
the value o fthe products of each of the industries by 
counties. 

The following is a list of the County Enumerators, and 
their postoffice addresses, who performed the field work 
in gathering the agricultural, horticultural, live stock, 



terest and show plainly the results of the past two years. manu facturing and industrial statistics of the several 



All of the counties are noticeable for their progress and 
development in industrial work. 

TABLE No. 1 — Shows a general classification of all 
industries reported in the State. The selections of the 
several classes of industries were arranged according to 
their value as principal products. Also products for a 
given industry may, on the one hand, include one or 
more minor products very different from those covered by 
the class designated, and also may not include the total 
product covered by this designation, for the reason that 
some portion of this product may be made in other classes 
or establishments in which it is not the product of princi- 
pal value. Thus it would be noted that the portions of one 
<:lass of products are combined in the class of some other 
product. This is unavoidable, because in many establish- 
ments several products belonging to widely different 
classes are manufactured in the same establishment by 
the same power and working force. Oftener than other- 
wise under such conditions no separate accounts are kept. 
This explains the difficulty and impossibility of a strict 
classification. 

TABLE No. 2 — Shows the number of establishments 
reporting, capital invested, average number of wage earn- 
ers and the total wages paid by the counties, the average 
number of wage earners of specified ages, the amount of 
wages paid each, and the greatest and smallest number of 
each class employed during the year, cost of material 
and value of all of the products of industry of the sev- 
eral counties. The quantities and value of manufactured 
tobaccos and kinds of products manufactured, the out- 
put and value of naval stores (Turpentine and Resin) for 
the year 1915; the products of ginneries of the State, 
pounds of cotton of both staple. The number of gins is 
found in the classified list by counties. 



counties. The results of this work is found in the tables 
that follow. 



CODNTV 


NAME 


PO.STOFFICE 


1. 


Alncbua 


E. G. Spencer 

J. W. Dowllng 

C. C. Ma this 


Alacbua, Fin. 
Macelcnny, Fix. 


1 




Pnnnma City, Flu. 
Starke. Fla. 


4. 


Bradford 

Brevnrd 




Chns. 11. Nelson. Jr 

Uoberl .r. Heed 

John It. Itlchurds 

J. W. Knight 


Titusville. Fla. 


0. 




Ft. Lauderdale. Fin. 
Blouuslown, Fla. 


8. 

0. 

10 


Citrus 


Inverness. I'la. 


Donald Tompkics 


Green ( ove Spgs.. Fla. 
Lake Citv. Fla,, It.F.K. 


11. 

13. 

14 


Dade 

DeSolo 

Duval 

Escambia. . 


Lemon City. Fla. 
Arcadia, Fla. 
Jacksonville. Flu. 
I(.F.I(."A".Atmore. Flu. 


r. Edgar Alhrllton 

Chns. H. Thcbaul 


in 




F. A. Rich 


Bunnell. Fin. 


16. 
17 


Franklin 




Apalnehirola. Fla. 
Ilardawav. Fla. 






18 


Hamilton 




Jasper, Fla. 
Urooksvllle, Fla. 


10 




'-•0. 




Tampa. Fla. 
llonifuy. Fla. 
(.'rand Rldgc. Fin. 


•>v 




J. M. Blount 


». 

24. 

■>i> 


Lafayette 

Lake 




Lloyds. Fin. 
Mayo, Fin. 
Tavtires. Flu. 


J. P. Abbott 

Walter n. Bell 


?B 


Lee 


Fort Myers. Fla. 
Chalres, Fla. 


?7 




">8 






Bronsou, Flu. 


"A 


Liberty 




Bristol. Fla. 


no 




Mudlson. Fla. 


rti 




W. M. Baxter 

Chns. \V. Chase 

W. W. Ward 


Bradentown. Fin. 


82. 

33 




Roddick, Fin. 
Key Wesl. Fla. 
Boulogne. Fin. 
( Ikeecbobee. Flu. 


14 




15 






1(1 


.1. ('.Merrill 

MiltonPledger 

W. W. HurHlon 

W. C. C. Brnnnlng. Jr. . . 


Plymouth, Flu. 
KlsslmunT. Fin, 
I jun-i-l Hill. Flu. 


37. 

38 




39. 
40. 
41 


Palm Beach 

Pasco 


Weal Palm Beach, Fla. 


A. C. Turner 

I. E. Bryant 

Jullen de Nazarle 

Putnam Jcrnlunn 

A. It. (Tanpell 

.1 . > ■ ■ 11 \V. 1 '.■!!- 


Clearwater. Fin. 


4° 




Knllileeu. Flu. 


■n 




Pnlutka, Fin. 


44. 

45. 
■Ill 


Seminole 


Milton. Fin. 

Ranford. Fla. 

St. Augustine. Fla. 


47 




.1. It. Wllkeraon 

II. K. Carter 

W. E. Vann 


Walton. I'la. 


48. 
40. 
RO 


•Sumter 

Suwannee 


Wlldwood. Fla. 
Live Oak. Fla. 
Shady Grove. Fin, 
Ilel^on Spr;Lgs, Fla. 
Sanborn. Fla 


n. 


Wakulla 


OttoR. Klrchoff 


13 




DeFunlnk Sprint--. I In 
Vernon. Fin. 


M 


WftKhbairrnn 











•Not reported. 



PREFACE. 

In the publication of a report that will give the best 
results, we find it necessary to present each branch or 
division of the Department separately, treating each sub- 
ject or division separate and distinct from the other. We 
therefore publish the report of each division under sep- 
arate cover. 

In order that the public may realize the magnitude 
and importance of the work of the Department of Agri- 
culture, we give below an outline of the duties of the 
Commissioner of Agriculture. 

1. Divisions of Agriculture and Immigration. 

2. The Prison Division. 

3. The Pure Food and Drugs, Stock Feed and Fer- 
tilizer Division. 

4. The Land Division. 

5. The Field Note Division. 

6. Shell Fish Commission. 

In addition t othe above, the Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture is a member of the following Boards: 

1. The Board of Commissioners of State Institutions. 

2. The Board of Pardons. 

3. The Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund. 

4. The Board of Drainage Commissioners. 



■' 






-f-8 



Feed Crushers 

Corn Millers 

»ry K i iii i 

Canning Factories 

Ice Cream Manufacturers 

-Crate and Baskset Factories ■ 

Fucking Houses ( Fruit) 

Orange Picking Bags 

.Sprayers and Repair Work 

Bice Cleaner 

Meat Packing Plant 

Broom Factories 

Fisheries and Packing Houses 

Clam Packers 

Gasoline and Oil Supplies 

P'ow Factory 

Logging 

Wood Yards 

:arrel Factories 

altera Earth Companie* 

Syrup Manufacturing 

Upholsterin" 

Manufacturing Jellies and Preserves . . 

Dome Cannery 

Concrete Works 

Cement Blocks Manufacturing 

Marble WorkB and Monuments 

Box Factories 

Manufacturies Doors, Sash and Blinds 



llarness Makers and Repairs 

Candy Manufacturers 

Manufacturers and Repairers Turpentine Stills 

Manufacturers Lens and Repairing 

Manufacturers Butter and Milk Sterilizing . . . 

Peanut Butter Factory 

Bat Cleaners and Repairers 

Manufacturer Soft Drinks 

; 'aiming Shops 

Painters atd Trimmers 

Painting and Papering 

Mattress Manufacturing 

Coal Burners 

CO OH Mills 

Ladder Factories 

Well Drilling 

Veneering Companies 

Manufacturers Grapefruit Juice 

Manufacturing Palmetto Brushes 

— Lumber Mills and Manufacturing 

Hay Drying 

Paper Hanging .•. 

Contractors and Builders 

Soap Manufacturers 

Photographers 

Construction Companies 

Insecticide Companies 

Bllos 

Piling 

Electrical Shops and Repairs 

Cypress Tanks 

Dry Dock 

Manufacturinc Buckets and Tubs 

Window Frames and Screens Manufacturing . . 

Macaroni Factories 

Markets.— Mfg. Dept ". . . 

CofTee and Tea Blenders 

Bag Factory 

Cracker Works 

Ostrich Plumes 

Distillation Pine Products 

Tent and Awning Maaufactnrers 

Mooting Company 

Show Case Manufacturing 

Bed Spring Manufacturing 

In Igntlon Plants 

Kaolin Mining 

Fibre Company 

Lime Kiln Companies 

Quarry 

Dredging ••••„••,••;•, 

Mls«e''aneous Industries 



3 

1 

2 

244 

49 

9 
80 

1 

1 

1 

«i 

38 

1 

2 

1 

6 

48 

10 

2 

423 

11 

7 

1 

10 

10 

6 

4 

2 

11 

17 

1 

5 

1 

1 

9 

1 

9 

7 

3 

3 

00 

2 

4 

6 

2 

2 

1 

19 

4 

6 

2 

3^ 
501 

2 

5 I 
II 

121 



in 



106 



2,850 

11,500 

20,000 

115,523 

37.070 

300.060 

735,179 

2,000 

20.000 

500 

100.000 

30,175 

810.115 

25.000 

20.000 

4.000 

165.000 

37.425 

98.700 

375.000 

59,552 

0,800 

17.950 

150 

81,250 

28,600 

33,300 

351,500 

20,000 

12.600 

38,325 

4,000 

21,800 

5.000 

1.500 

24.950 

7.000 

38.500 

13.000 

25.500 

1.325 

11,465 

375.000 

700 

11,400 

.-.o.ooo 

11,000 

3,000 

1,130.000 

22.000 

4.000 

17.000 

150 

.12,0201 

381,850' 

12.0001 

7001 

1.000 

83,300 1 

40.000 1 

250.000 

40,000 

600 

14.500 

19.055 

103.050| 

30,000 

130.000 

5.000 
150.000 

2.500 

10,000 

25.000 

25.000 

2OK.040 

50.000 

35.000 

IS.-,. 000 

211,442 

500,0001 

r..r,:'.:!.-,.io 



9 

20 

20 

684 

93 

810 

1,763 

1 

4 

1 

35 

41 

1,505 

30 

10 

2 

549 

136 

111 

300 

1,778 

17 

29 

5 

113 

97 

29 

585 

45 

18 

88 

3 

13 

7 

6 

34 

6 

24 

27 

34 

T 

107 

140 

4 

22 

100 

16 

9 

1,402 

48 

8 

41 

1 

0- 

1,022 

5 

30 

6 

89 

18 

58 

70 

3 

20 

89 

T5 

381 

60] 

5 1 

100 

12 

4 

10 

30 

230 

60 

T 

120 

100 

300 

1.483 



1,600 

15,000 

9,500 

79,880 

55,344 

132,860 

439.960 

600 

4,940 

300 

40,000 

29,500 

608,166 

17.000 

30.000 

1,600 

64,800 

64,228 

45.S86 

160.000 

200.148 

15,350 

7,810 

80 

128.920 

58,920 

24,360 

427.484 

28,800 

16.693 

47.302 

3.200 

11,760 

7,500 

1,200 

18.190 

3.370 

31.300 

18,300 

37,000 

3.700 

25.644 

60.000 

400 

17,500 

110.000 

11,939 

2,000 

735.5601 

49.500 

2.850 

41,360 

1,300 

.-■0.002 

870.404 

3.900 

1,000 

2.000 

87.6801 

10.0001 

72.000 

34.000 

2.000 

16,588 

44.328 

66,456 

9.500 

56.000 

4,000 

90,000 

12.000 

6.000 

8,000 

32.000 

00.950 

r.o.ooo 

1.500 

50.100 

132.222 

220.000 

1 .057.487 



91 

20 1 

20 

245 

87 

245 

1.653 

1 

4 

1 

35 

31 

1,397 

22 

10 

2 

549 

130 

111 

300 

1.117 

15 

11 

5 

113 

971 

29! 

290| 

451 

18 

49 

3 

10 

5 



21 

8 

22 

27 

34 

4 

107 

140 

4 

22 

100| 

16 

6 

1,3981 

48 

8 

41 

1 

51 

1,016 

4 

30 

6 

85 

13 

57 

70 

3 

20 

88 

73 

12 

25 

4 

100 

9 

4 

10 

30 

280 

60' 

71 

120! 

85 1 

300| 

1.2791 



1,600 

15,000 

9.500 

49.750 

51 406 

127.510 

423.522 

.600 

4,940 

300 

40.000 

21,500 

eoo.iee 

15.000 

30,000 

1,600 

64.800 



429 
6 
65i 
110 



20.630 
3,938 
5.350 

16,438 



10 

105 
8 



M 

2 

18 



280 



30 



13 



8.000 
7.400 
2.000 



62.302 

45.386 

160,000 

197,817 

14.500 

4,460 

80 

128,920 

5E.920 

24.360 

272.004 

28,800 

16.69S 

26,731 

3,200 

9,520 

6.700 

1,200 
12,832 

2,500 
16,300 
18.300 
37,000 

2,800 
25,644 
50.000 
400 
17.500 
110.000 
11,939 

1,500 

732,960 

49.500 

2,850 
41.360 

1.300 

47.010 

856,308 

3,000 

1.000 

2.000 
83.480 
10.000 
71.000 
34.000 

2.000 
16,588 
43.704 
75,468 

4.300 
23.500 

3.200 
90.000 

8,500 

6,000 

8,000 
32.000 
no. too 

(in. nun 
1.400 

50,100 
180.0631 15 

220.0001 

956.0331 165 



1.144 



10 
6 

1, 



358 

850 

3,350 



155.480 



10 



500 



572 



000 



882 



1,973 



20.571 



2.240 
800 



5.258 



1.500 



1.400 



S00| 
2,6001 



870 



8.992 

r..(Hlf, 

1MI0 



4,200 



1.000 



624 

780 

5,200 

32.500 

800 



2,500 



2,159 



100.184 



208 



391 



1,220 



II 


9 


22l 


6 


81 


8 


585 


354 


102 


87 


379 


206 


2.169 

4 
9 


1,199 

4 


1 


1 


50 


18 


60 


24 


1,901 


699 


50 
10 


10 


5 


1 


684 


895 


154 


124 


132 


99 


1,620 


200 


1,890 


1,214 


23 


14 


34 


16 


5 


5 


158 


95 


151 


49 


86 


21 


587 


583 


63 


40 


20 


18 


91 


75 


5 


1 


15 


11 


9 


6 


6 


4 


46 


28 


7 


4 


39 


23. 


38 


21 


52 


26 


8 


6 


107 
160 


3 


4 


4 


28 


12 


120 


SO 


22 


4 


7 


2 


1.631 


ws 


58 


29 


11 


7 


56 


41 


1 


1 


65 


53 


1,052 


»8» 


7 


4 


30 


30 


10 


6 


96 


75 


18 


10 


66 


50 


80 


60 


5 


1 


20 20 


89 


80 


75 


75 


45 


30 


90 


50 


6 


4 


110 


90 


18 


8 


12 


4 


ir, 


S 


40 


20 


28S 


170 


9(1 


45 


10 


7 


120 


80 


100 


70 


475 


250 


1.528 


1.424 



TABLE NO. 1 — MANUFACTURES — CLASSIFICATION OF ALL INDUSTRIES. 



NAME OF BUSINESS. MANUFACTURE 
OB PBODUCT. 



Cotton Gins 

Cotton Gin and Grist Mill . 

Naval Stores 

Mills 

Blacksmith Repair Shone . . . 

Bottling Works 

Grist Mills 

Garages and Repair Shops . 

Cigar Manufacturing 

Cigar Box Factory 

Tobacco Companies 

I'inmblng and Repair Shops 
, — Ice Manufacturing 



— Ice and Cold Storage Plants 

i — let. Water and Light Plants ....'.Ill' 

— Ice and Light Plants 

Electric Light Plants .......'... 

— (»as Plants 

.^Electricity and Sewerage '.'.'. 

OO^Water. Gas and EIrctric Light Plants ... 

JJJ e " rlcl .9'- '<*• Gae """l Water Plants 

—Water Works 

Iron Foundries 

Boll- r Makers and Repairs ..".." ." ." .' .' .' 

Machine Shops 

Bakeries _ 

laundries ' ' 'i 

Bicycle and Repair Shops 
Motorcycle Repair Shops 

Cabinet Shops 

Coffin Manufacturers 



A 

*. OB 

§5 
2H 



Millinery and Dressmaking Shops 
Shoe Shops and Repairs 



^s; 



General Repair Shcps . 

-Wagon and Carriage Shops and Repairs 

Vulcanizing and Repairing 

Tailoring and Pressing Shops 

Dying and Cleaning Works 

Tin Shops 

Jewelry Shops ] 

Furniture Repair Shops 

Fertilizer Plants 

Newspapers and Printing Plants 

Gunamlth Shops 

Locksmith Shops 

^ooper Shops 

ihlngle Mills 

•ianing Mills 

Jrick Manufacturing 

-Novelty Works 



Cross Tie Mnnufscturlng 

«- Aoto Painting Shops 

Into Shipping Blocks 

Sheet Metal Works 

Marine Ways 

Marine Ways and Machine Shops 

Marine Ways and Shipbuilding . . . 

__ _Shlpbulldlng and Repairs 

Feed Mills 

Bice MUIs 

Knitting Mills 

Bean and Peannt Hullera 



5H 

aa 

3* 



si 



m u. 
a a. 
SB 



CCS i 



82 

4 

:iot 

354 
370 
S4 
255 
330 
206 

n 

2 
fi3 
43 

7 

5 

, 14 

29 

6 

1 

1 

6 
14 
11 

4 
68 
73 
90| 
74 

1 
14 

1 

235 

188 

85 

18 

34 

239 

4 
11 
69 
33 

9 
101 

3 

« 
T0L 
334 
26 

8 
26 
74 

6 

1 
14 

8 

3 

»g 
7 
6 
1 

4 



f 565.170 

8,500 

7,891,910 

14,686,180 

343,093 

452,750 

310,444 

1,185,125 

6,671,219 

49,000 

106,500 

180,500 

1,718.100 

130.000 

159,487 

1,723,240 

1,277,285 

1,257.000 

40,000 

230,000 

749.500 

2,093,076 

298.100 

53,000 

986,790 

370.150 

564.015 

100.525 

7.500 

25,200 

1.000 

155.245 

103,655 

1 09.650 

111.850 

38,300 

132.510 

22.700 

22,600 

94.950 

7.780 

2,773.000 

1,372.726 

1.600 

3.350 

82.150 

882,525 

341,500 

133.100 

289,700 

51.795 

7.800 

6.000 

37.800 

55.300 

34,000 

2.011.500 

3.103.095 

13,915 

1.450 

45,000 

10,925 



I 



790 

16 

7,258 

12,535 

606 

287 

386 

1,121 

14,051 

115 

340 

273 

637 

58 

29 

208 

281 

128 

4 

20 

100 

126 

179 

25 

689 

467 

1,085 1 

113 

4 

40 

2 

498 

306 

146 

103 

72 

522 

45 

28 

122 

48 

815 

831 

3 

9 

274 

694 

351 

86 

153 

752 

9 

10 

101 

49 

22 

3,011 

4.316 

12 

8 

70 

10 



03 



o . 

|S 

© 

o a 



| 88,888 

4,250 

2,733.225 

6,498,980 

350.861 

188.082 

78,065 

1,050,198 

11,172,817 

6.300 

89.400 

288.895 

481.405 

82.908 

23,484 

152,312 

161,838 

90.406 

2,200 

12,000 

57.588 

102.477 

157,775 

21.000 

658.740 

333,080 

520.917 

81.009 

2,800 

33.050 

2,0(10 

278.130 

205.550 

95.124 

89,150 

53,720 

334,672 

27.500 

29.650 

146.092 

29,310 

303,190 

764.124 

2.200 

6.200 

185.412 

113,930 

232,008 

32,900 

134.902 

295.102 

6,320 

4,000 

57,600 

20,800 

5.200 

570.180 

8,544,940 

6,560 

1,770 

28,100 

1,950 



Men 16 Years and 
Over. 



i 






735 

18 

6.944 

12,298 

599 

232 

363 

1,101 

10.008 

40 

180 

260 

635 

58 

20 

200 

279 

125 

4 

20 

100 

124 

179 

2d 

676 

411 

509 

111 

4 

40 

2 

111 

284 

137 

103 

68 

450 

45 

28 

121 

41 

815 

688 

3 

9 

245 

688 

341 

86 

151 

752 

9 

10 

101 

49 

22 

2,991 

4.168 

12 

8 

8 

10 



i* 

23 

O 83 
HCU 



75,168 

4,250 

2.614,133 

6,44L',464 

374.341 

lKii.nss 

75,570 

1.036.242 

8.774,200 

3,600 

73,800 

286.645 

480,645 

62.908 

23.464 

147,037 

i; :.». 4.-.K 

95.806 

2,200 

12.000 

57,588 

100.605 

157.775 

21.000 

649.575 

312,172 

321.984 

79.957 

2.800 

33,050 

2,000 

65.848 

199,490 

84,724 

89,150 

50.444 

308,713 

27.500 

29.650 

145.260 

29.310 

303,190 

665.927 

2,200 

6,200 

182,412 

110,980 

218.508 

32,900 

133,202 

295.102 

0.820 

4.000 

57.600 

20.800 

5.200 

549.120 

3.467.205 

6.560 

1,770 

6.200 

1.050 



Women 16 Years and 
Over. 



64 

"i58 

71 

2 

22 

10 

18 

4.020 

60 

105 

4 

1 





4> 


u 


~ " 


1 

a 




a 


- & 


2 


11 


& 


■ 

B 
B 


ffi'C 




o = 


< 


r-C 



Children Under 
16 Years. 



13 

41 

575 

2 



362 
5 
9 



4 
55 



142 



88 



10 



20 
152 



83 



8.620 

74.672 

36,966 

880 

18.302 

2.325 

12.956 

2,392,909 

1.800 

11,500 

2.250 

520 



5,200 
2,380 
3,600 



1,872 



9.165 

17.736 

198,783 

1,052 



212.282 

1,068 

10.400 



2.996 
21,526 



832 



98,215 
' 3,666 



18,500 

' 1,700! 



21,060 
77,455 



22,000 



156 

166 

5 

13 

13 

2 

25 

15 

55 



- - 
^a 



as 



32 

o 03 



15 
1 



17 



100 

21,992 

18.550 

2,640 

3.722 

750 

936 

5,708 

900 

4,100 



240 



75 



°,a 



Is 
Is 
sS 

if. 

-St 

SB* 



m 



3,172 
ISO 



1,850 
7.992 



4,433 



200 



3,000 



280 



464 

20 

9,656 

10.347 

750 

288 

427 

1,392 

14.579 

250 

340 

323 

685 

60 

30 

247 

318 

156 

6 

20 

113 

101 

204 

32 

965 

544 

1,219 

129 

4 

56 

4 

583 

344 

246 

125 

74 

663 

52 

38 

135 

50 

1.141 

963 

4 

12 

368 

953 

466 

128 



976 
13 
12 

143 

77 

35 

3.011 

5.307 

14 

9 

70 

10 



31 



%} 



15 

p 

II 

ill 



335 

8 

5.291 

9,121 

513 

199 

322 

946 

13.791 

105 

175 

192 

536 

52 

24 

174 

232 

116 



77 
114 

18 
602 
392 
823 
101 
1 



2 

386 

269 

118 

85 

68 

406 

S3 

24 

113 

41 

S74 

845 

8 

9 

164 

640 

247 

74 



468 

6 

8 

64 

32 

.14 

3,011 

314 

10 

7 



Dry Kline 

Canning Factories 

Ice Cream Manufacture™ 
Crate ft Basket Factories 
Packing Houses (Fruit) . 

Orange Picking Bugs 

Sprayers ft Repair Work . 

Rice Cleaner 

Heat Packing Plant 

Broom Factories 

Fisheries * Pack'g Uouses 

Clam Packers 

Gasoline ft Oil Supplies - . 

Plow Factory 

Logging 

Wood Yards 

Barrel Factories 

Fullers Earth Companies . 
Syrap Manufacturing .... 

Upholstering I 

Mfg Jellies 4 Preserves . 

Home Cannery 

Concrete Work 

Cement Blocks Mfe 

Marble Worka ft Monum'ts 

Box Factories 

Mfg Doors. Saab ft Blinds 
Harness Makers & Reps. 

Candy Mfga 

Mfgs ft Reps Turp'e Stills 
Mfg Lens ft Repairing . . 
Mfg Butter ft Milk Stcrlz 
Peanut Butter Factory . . 
Hat Cleaners ft Repa. . . . 

Mfg Soft Drinks 

Painting Shops 

Painters ft Trlmmera — 
Painting ft Papering . . 

Mattress Mfg 

Coal Burners 

OH Mills 

Ladder Factories 

Well Drilling ; . . 

Veneering Companies . . . 
Mfg Grapefruit Juice . . . 
Mfg Palmetto Brushes . . 
Lumber Mills ft Mfg. . . . 

Hay Drying 

Paper Hanging 

Contractors ft Builders . . 

Soap Manuf acturero 

Photographers 

Construction Companies 
Insecticide Companies 
Silos 



Reps 



Piling 

Electrical Shops ft 

Cypress Tanks 

Dry Docks 

Mfg Buckets ft Tubs 

Window Frm ft 8crn Mfg 

Macaroni Factories • 

Markets— Mfg Dept 

Coffee and Tea Blendera . 

Bag Factory 

Cracker Works 

Ostrich Plumes 

Distillation Pine Products 

Tent ft Awning Mfg 

Roofing Company 

Show Case Mfg 

Bed Spring Mfg 

Irrigation Planta 

Kaolin Mining 

Fibre Company 

Lime Kiln Companies ... 

Quarry 

Dredging . . ■ •••, ■ ■ ■ 

Miscellaneous Industries 



■0,000 

141.720 

180.772 

239,148 

1.673.250 

2,100 

25,817 

700| 

.10.000 1 

.13.230 

742.728 ' 

105.0001 

30.0001 

1.5001 

511.000! 

170,0801 

145.7301 

100.0001 

70.761 ! 

31,0501 

0.595! 

400 

234.000 ! 

78.020! 

40.300! 

564,000 

128,058' 

44,3601 

141,020! 

4,5001 

18,500' 

8,000| 

2,2001 

40,450! 

5,000' 

43,700 

15,700 

48.000 

7,140 

34,936 

1,110,400 

400 

18,500 

65,000 

28,000 

4,000 

1.433,900 

34,0001 

4,5001 

75,0001 

1.500 

, 82.870! 

1,755,890 

1.1.250 

1,500 

4,000 

166,500 

65,000 

350.000 

80.000 

3,400 

47.960 

00,846 

193,714 

180.000 

154.500 

8.000 

285.000 

21,000 

12,000 

30,000 

98,600 



1 29,000 



2.167.868 



S9.000 

244,114 

3.12,01.1 

301,650 

1,100,670 

2.200 

26.817 

900 

80.000 

96,600 

1.598,71-1 

1 40,000 

36,000 ■ 

3.5(10 

77,000 

357,274 

360,600 

110,000 

156,317 

56,575 

27,420 

500 

297.800 

146.250 

77.000 

970,2501 

150.054! 

74,»20! 

245.700' 

5,0001 

31.900 

11.000 

3.000 

90.850 

7.250 

60.300 

23.800 

67,000 

11,800 

67,354 

1 ,540.000 

1.950 

52,000 

27,500 

40.200 

7.000 

2,507.262 

119.000 

12.400 

ito.ooo 

3,000 

143.760 

4.274.810 

25,250 

2,400 

6,000 

264,000 

85,000 

500,000 

120.W 

6,801 

11 4,992 1 

237.46* ' 

-504.990 

210,000 

1-85.000 

18,000 

304.000 

30,000 

24,000 

40.000 

118,400 



153.000 



4.353.459 










;;:;:;d 



■! 



TABLE NO. 1— MANUFACTURES — CLASSIFICATION OF ALL INDUSTRIES.— (Continued.! 



NAME OF BUSINESS 

MANUFACTURE OR 

PRODUCT 



TOBACCO MANUFACTORIES. 



Chnrncler of Product. 



O 

s 



s 



Cost of Material and 
Value of Product*. 



These columns must 
not he used in valu- 
ing Munufncl ured To- 
bacco 01 Naval Stores. 



EM 
Sltj! 

OS-Si 



Cution <ilns 

Cotton Gin and Grist Mill 

Naval Stores 

Haw Mills 

U>acksmlth Repair Shops 

Bottling Works 

Grist Mills 

Garages and Repair Shops 

Cigar Manufacturing 

Cigar Box Factory 

Tobacco Companies 

Plumbing and R?p. Shops 

Ice Manufacturing 

Ice and Cold Stor. Plants 
Ice, Water and Lt. Plants 
Ice and Light Plant* 

Electric Light Plants 

Gas Plants 

E'ectricity and Sewerage 
Water, Gas * Elee. Lt. PI 
F.lec. Ice, Gas ft Wtr. PI. 

Water Works 

Iron Foundries 

Boiler Makers ft Reps. . . . 

Machine Shops 

Bakeries 

Laundries 

Bicycle * Rep. Shops 
Motorcycle Rep. Shops . . . 
Coffin Manufacturers ... 
Millinery & Dresmk. Shops 
Shoe Shops aud Repairs . 

General Rep. Shops 

Wagon ft Carriage Shops 
Vulcanizing and Itepalriug 
Tailoring & Press Shops . 
Dying ft Cleaning Wka .. 

Tin Shops 

Jewelry Shops 

Furniture Rep. Shops 

Fertiliser Plants 

Newspaper ft Ptg. E'lnnts , 

Gunsmith Shops 

Locksmith Shops 

Cooper Shops 

Shingle Mills 

Planing Mills 

Brick Manufacturing 

Novelty Works 

cross Tie Mfg 

Autos Painting Shops 
Autos Shipping Blocks . 

Sheet M< tal Works 

Marine Ways 

Marine Ways ft Mrh Shops 
Marine Ways ft Shlpbldg. 
Shipbuilding and Repairs 

Feed Mills 

Rice Mills 

KnUtlng Mills 

Bean ft Peanut Hullera . . 

Feed Crusher 

Cera Millers 



469.301.042 



30,127.941 



7.800,000 



154,000 



4.800 



14.821,945 

498,488 

327.008 

263.207 

1.915,945 



pEU 

s s 

■ 



*. 



8.330 
.« 



187.000 

157.375 

475,400 

1,050,650 

104.346 

52.777 

378,785 

157.070 

150,000 

5.200 

52,000 

131.096 

116.420 

313,500 

63.000 

1.222.154 

940.736 

696,555 

171.618 

113,300 

3,000 

375,618 

305.320 

141,514 

160,100 

144,120 

547.240 

34.300 

59,250 

227.275 

50,030 

3,990.253 

1.166,953 

2,500 

6,200 

779,885 

539,550 

47.600 



32,282.62* 

1.017.011 

690,069 

459.419 

3,449.584 



220,000 

210,000 

812.900 

3,534.265 

167,500 

86.848 

-19,020 

266,275 

198,000 

6,400 

73,000 

199,598 

340,200 

415,600 

101,000 

1.864,461 

1,586,352 

1.139.340 

323.130 

165,400 

4,000 

794,197 

547,772 

236.590 

230.050 

311,325 

1.018.175 

54.300 

88,200 

416,558 

100.8311 

4,797,262 

1 .935.295 

3,700 

10,600 

334.867 

i.i mvi. .too 

793,700 
89,150 



NAVAL STORES. 



Turpentine. 



Rosin. 



Si 



GINNERIES AND PRODUCTS. 



II 



*fr 



- a . 
sf.s 



|j.S24.295l 13.018,447; 414.2261 3,260.107 



463,81)6 

9,840 

8,500! 

220,950 i 

39.500 

r.o.niii. 

1,613,300 

643,0251 

1 5,225 ' 

2.900! 

85,0001 

13.0001 

4,500: 

18,5001 



1,002.8471 
23.0401 
1 6.500 ! 
305.400 
62,8001" 
90,(KHil 
3.687.200 , 
1.181.250|. 
20.1001. 
12.070;. 
110.500' 
16,7501. 

w.ooo . 

25,S0O|. 



8,494 
104 



863,026 

15,600 



c-2 

S3 

a g 



ha 



26.897 
1.007 



t 5,636,094 
241.880 



TABLE XO. 



2— MANKF.U TIKES— TOTAL FOR STATIC BY COUNTIES.— (Continued, i 



TOBACCO MANUFACTORIES. 



COUNTIES. 



Character of Product. 



B 

9 

z 



■ 



5 

I 



S 

= 



, Alachna . — 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford 

BreTard 

Broward 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

•Clay 

Colombia . . . 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Dnval 

Escambia . . . 

Flagler 

Franklin 

Gadsden 
Hamilton — 
Hernando . ■ . 
£J HlllBboroujrb 

M Holmea 

Jgekson 

Jefferson — 
Lafayette — 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

•Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee — 

Marlon .... 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 

Okeechobee 

Orange . . . • 

Osceola .... 

Palm Beach 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Putnam . . • 

Santa Rosa 

Seminole 

St. Johns . . 

St. Lucie . . 

•Sumter . . . 

Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volusia . - • 

Wakulla . . ■ 
Walton 

Washington 



40.000 



.1(1,00(1 



2,000 



1,400 



Cost of Mnterlal and 
Value of Products. 



These columnB most 
not be used In valu- 
ing Manufactured To- 
bacco or Naval Stores. 



I 

a 



300.000 
72.0001 
317.0601 



10.000 
21 .BOO 
692,707 



.1... 



at fc"^ 

laSj 

Effg 



iBi 

COS 

o a 

sila 



415,154.000 27.609.055 



225,0001 
| 42,293.802 



10,000 
1.460 



7.800,000 



154,000 



2,638,200 



114,849 



51,500 

24,000 

475.000 

45,600 

6,500 

' 500,666 

3,806.880 

3.960 



25.750 
22.000 
16.680 
17.160 
13.000 

' 18,666 

110.287 

4.560 



8031. 



888,800 
114,100 

1,246,225 
260,130 
584.114 
259.700 
375.506 
76,058 

'14,805 

'i,W&976 

11,370,654 
2.306,576 
165.100 
923,000 
187,095 
119.100 
548,000 

11,762.937 
347.738 
27.051 
158.662 
423,200 
263,049 
180.300 
741.882 

'718.450 
163.971 
229.100 

1,207,320 

311.583 

60.936 

106.757 

440.280 

1,903.587 
281,975 
589.975 

3,342,175 
457.000 
483.260 

2,324,180 

531,351 

40,007 

675.021 

205.214 

36,266 

80,250 

1,500,440 

28.834 

444,112 

420.170 



1,327,600 

62,950 

1.500,750 

399,464 

658.915 

2.-.0.650 

465.662 

98,800 

30442 

'3.94l',620 

14,420.624 

2.588,877 
213,800 

1,399,400 

200,400 

178,850 

740.500 

30,127.549 

9,269,510 
80.800 
273.385 
114,200 
381,954 
285,750 

1,379,824 

924.866 
322.833 
723,100 
1,420,115 
365.737 
104.0001 
140,2411 
744,500 

2,109.301 
410,700 
744,830 

4.518.850 
618.535 
714.375 

3.913.600 

610,302 

r.T.nsji 

1,243.720 
329,012 

58.250 

131,750 

3.519.820 

42,767 

1,001.725! 

616.800 



NAVAL STORES. 



Turpentine. 



Rosin. 



GINNERIES AND PRODUCTS. 



■oa 

S3 



3 a 



203.00O|$ 

197.000 

412.300 

188,790 

20,450 

326.356 



75,500 

16.666 
98.700 

H2.666 

259.315 

20,500 

137.500 

62,466 
14,950 

3,802.625 
48.900 1 
23.900 



144,200' 

303,666 

65,850 
135.000 
134.01)0 



122,400 

140,560 

84.320 

73.198 

8.180 

116.996 



8,489 
16,750 
15,520 
11,889 

1,150 

19,952 






C3«n 
■«- B . 



ir 

S5UH 



63.800 

47,750 
44.850 

41,666 

9,076,025 

7.640 

54,000 

86,666 

8,897 

448,754 

26,300 

12,000 



147.868 

335,996 

498.380 

45.000 

79.000 



38,80i«| 
237,000 
106.8601 

89.951] 
6,900 1 

'162.828 



904 



108.000 

56,000 

633 

68,000 



310,000 
8,945 

162,566 

133.750 

58.036 

101,600 



12.745 

101.000 

60,500 

02,000 

504.450 



60.000 
22.230 
19,000 
29.060 



27,850 

' 6^025 
5,807 

' 4,550 

15,080 

1,230 

20,310 

* 3,550 
1,552 

81.025 

3.251 

850 



9,534 

"19.562 
4,050 
5.400 
6,700 



44,425 

178.666 
59.570 

' 27.s66 

196.040 

9,300 

52,150 

45.666 
10,905 

544.025 

33.160 
S.400 



225 



120 



28 









in 

2 "C 



80.400! 



33.750 



16,700 



9,165 

1,650 



4,290 



428 
2.6i6 
"266 



2.711,450 
16,500 



1,141.120 



2?.666 " 4,266 



94,482 

158,954 
34,410 
22.500 
41.200 



4.100 
3.525 
1.900 
4.396 



24,600 
28.075 
38,000 
28.487 



178.000 
6,000 

' 81,250 
47,620 
22,508 
57,720 



7.920 

505,000 

34.450 

33.322 

186,628 

1979" 



16.800 
670 

10,366 
6.270 
3,759 
1,750 



1,569 
6,850 
3.310 
5.942 
33.259 
19.815 



2,800 200,000 

. , - 322 i... 166, . (>00 .r 



1,771 



77 



205 



20.1100 
5.300 

92,766 
56.230 
30.072 
35.000 



8.614 

08.5OO 

62.500 

61.013 

323.280 

liMi linr. 



550 



176,000 



8.42:. 



26.750 



107.000 

280.666 
' 50,666 



378.000 



1.860 



103.000 



430,800 



57,500 



20 

75 



104 



400 



8,000 

13.000 



15,600 



60.000 



1,500 



1.533 



330,000 



365,920 



Grand Total 



1460.301.0421*30.127.941 1 7.800.0001* 154,0001151.058,6111*95.758.0171 8.824.295 1*13.01 8.447 1 414,226|* 3,260,1071 



8.5981* 808,6251 



28,1041* 



.-,.004.300 



•Not reported. 



table no. 2— v.vxri-Ai-ri-HKs— total for state, by COUNl'IHB. 



E 



COUNTIES. 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 

Bradford . . 
Brevard 
Broward . . . 
Calhoun . . . 

Citrus 

•Clay 

Columbia 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia 

Flagler 

Franklin . . . 

< iadsden 

Hamilton 

Hernando 

Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson . . . 

Lafayette 

Lake 

Lee ....... 

Leon 

•Levy 

Liberty 

Madison . ■ . 
Manatee . . . 
Marlon .... 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Okaloosa . . . 
Okeechobee . 



A 

a 

oi 

— 

fa CO 

■5- 

5 ■> 
ZfcJ 



Osceola 
Palm Beach 

Faaco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Pntnam 
Santa Bosa 
Seminole . . . 
flt. Johns . . 
St. Lncle . . 
•Sumter . . . 
Suwannee . . 
Taylor .... 

Volusia 

Wakulla . - • 

Walton 

Washington 



Grand Total 



i-s 
- s 

Ms 

s a 
If 

— '> 

•a £ 

5 — 

Hi 
W 

cm r 



140 

50 

123 

147 

11 

:il 

41 

7 

234 

28 

381 

514 

103 

15 

07 

30 

68 

14 

1,082 

21 

48 

316 

48 

50 

• 28 

169 

"'24 
53 
46 

137 
10 
35 
24 
13 
79 
45 

115 

218 
42 
18 

230 
54 
11 
85 
26 



23 
38 
285 
24 
52 
37 



1,050.000 

L'.-.s.ir.o 
1.098.850 
154.050 
4or,,319 
1 15.875 
713,640 
128.500 

32,794 

2.990.918 
2.098,225 
9.275075 
4,849,353 
112,000 
l.so5.90o 

536.850 
186,700 
686.100 
14,030,965 
549.709 
403.N5O 
320.590 
1,108.825 
559,163 
490,700 
895,565 

'302,692 

71,705 

345.450 

1,188,150 

1.024.012 

130.950 

134.610 

213.440 

1,880,553 

209.275 

407.079 

1,712,870 

649,350 

520.300 

1,854.800 

1.359,752 

287,750 

885.835 

130,215 



38,275 
1,445.800 
2.811,740 

208.020 
1.524,722 

501.275 



I 

a 



<$ 



663 
433 
1.050 
624 
438 
111 
803 
130 

' '348 
830 

2.491 

5.876 

5,027 
446 

1.632 
403 
453 
484 
21.243 
436 
250 
086 

1,170 
486 
148 

1.603 

"608 

328 

353 

1,652 

1,361 

182 

184 

264 

1,016 

144 

820 

2,198 

273 

520 

1,095 

1,243 

142 

57 

102 



462 
1.660 
2,157 

264 
1,481 
1.112 



358.547 
181.580 
350.075 
192,429 
105,409 

74,850 
320,760 

58,06* 

52,662 

709,469 

1.565,875 

3.978.894 

4,007,841 

L'«4.10n 

278,850 

224.108 

120,200 

321 ,598 

15,143,478 

125,530 

88.915 

115.0(17 

827,147 

202,531 

21,580 

401,046 

368,407 

104,862 
226.080 
007,997 
909.414 

83,05* 

52.919 
288.960 
540.871 
133.850 
539,171 
1158,010 

18,795 

282,135 

1,066,380 

739,098 

65,476 
482,507 

94,523 



Men 16 Years and 
Over. 



of 



el 

•I" 



Women 10 Years and 
Over. 



1 

a 



s 

at 



I- 



pi 

f-ft- 



29.450 

232,500 

1,205.11)5 

76.121 
040.505 
449.930 



618 
239 
1,037 
595 
428 
100 
761 
110 

' i«7 
817 

2.401 

5,262 

4.686 
446 

1,532 
475 
437 
484 
16.522 
436 
230 
666 

1,170 
395 
137 

1,216 

"595 

328 

350 

1,388 

1.004 

182 

184 

264 

016 

142 

702 

1,826 

260 

515 

1.949 

1,242 

141 

506 

96 



343,947 

114,280 

352.725 

191.099 

83,452 

72,250 

313,010 

53,414 

'32,662 

099.813 

1,565.875 

8,671.308 

1,420,715 

284.100 

274.350 

77,808 

114,600 

321.598 

12,302.364 

125.530 

79.615 

98.793 

827.147 

197.511 

19.511 

391,304 

zwi.'iiii 

104,862 
226.480 
573,589 
791,837 

83,050 

52.910 
288,900 
.-.14,1108 
132.350 
496.191 
654,510 

12.910 

279,355 

1,038,380 

738.498 

65.210 
453.475 

88.071 



50 
194 



20 



181 
22 



614 
341 



100 
18 



4,660 



14 



88 

8 

131 



3 

264 
245 



14,000 

07.30O 



1.830 

21,357 

2.600 



4,650 

' '20.366 
9.596 

302,706 

128.155 



4,500 
2.800 



2.825,058 



9,300 



4.150 
2,000 

0.593 



Children Under 
Hi Years. 



462, 

1 .000 
1.940 
241 
1,480 
1.10S 



20,450 

232,500 

1,100,515 

73.029 
040,405 
449.455 



96 
2 

33 
220 

12 
5 

46 

1 

1 

"68 

6 



135 
1 
1 
4 



500 

34,410 
74.956 



24.813 
1.500 

17.800 
4,000 
5.650 
2.780 

28,090 
600 
260 

20,736 
5.200 



43.900 

72 

100 

475 



= n 
■"2 

c — 
o° 

ca-a 
o"3 



13 



4 2 



20 



16 



61 



320 

'"3 
3 

370 

i03 



20 



4 
■17 



3,350 



000 



7,750 



3,552 



5,600 



15,456 



17,204 

870 

75 

2,077 

10,700. 



2,052 



1,450 



3,620 
235 



02 

22 



1.436 
312 



700 
2,402 



u 

P 



If 

Sgi 

SSI 



728 



3,400 
770 
182 
1561 
985 
187 

"531 

987 

5,183 

7,204 

6,003 

450 

2.128 

1,875 

505 

605 

21,243 

531 

281 

911 

1,350 

527 

224 

1,030 

748 

441 

594 

1.717 

1,705 

234 

228 

330 

1,333 

152 

1,010 

2,411 

423 

608 

2,420 

1.7211 

217 

663 

141 



135 

1,883 
2,804 
355 
1,553 
1.167 



5.4931*65.061.7461 



60.9551*40,075.0371 



61 .108 1 $33,508,283 1 



7.63JI* 3,694.5271 



1.1141* 80,4311 



83.3791 






p 



V 

3 m . 
so 3 

in 



563 

•jii 
483 
852 

73 
640 

95 



163 

580 

1.9H4 

4.860 

780 

406 

1.016 

311 

336 

391 

21,243 

374 

136 

1,097 

1,018 

285 

93 

58S 



484 
261 
240 

1.206 

1,042 
147 
115 
167 
620 
119 
686 

1.500 
172 
395 

1,598 

744 

101 

542 

80 



51 
827 

1,187 
185 

1,409 
989 



52.878 



•Not reported. 



lev I renin Manufacturing 
Laundry 

Machine Shop* 

Marine Ways 

Millinery Sbopn 



NoTelty Works 

Naval Stores 

Plumbing and Repairs 
I'lunlng Mills 

Rice Cleaner 

Shingle Mills 

Ship Building ' 

Saw Mills 

Repair Shops 

Tailor Shops, 

Tinner . . . ■ . ■ ■ 



1 


III ici 


1 


1,300 


.1 


4.500 


•1 


1,800 


8 


2,600 


l 


1,200 


-•" 


435 .000 


1 


1.100 


a 


48,000 


l 


500 


i 


5.000 


■.; 


00.000 


K. 


392.100 


13 


6.250 


1 


400 


1 


300 



1 


200 


•> 


1.000 


10 


4,000 


5 


1,600 


h 


1.200 


2 


1,000 


341 


114.550 


B 


2.200 


37 


14,000 


1 


300 


5 


1.650 


M 


10.000 


442 


152,000 


20 


6.400 


1 


300 


1 


150 



1 
1 

10 
5 



320 

5 

37 

1 

I 

00 

442 

20 

1 

1 



200 














400 














4.000 














1,600 














1,200 














1.000 














112,550 






12 


2,666 


1.57T 


98 


2,200 






14.000 










ST 


15 


300 
1,650 




















7 

T5 

1,641 


2 


10.00O 










10 


152,000 










86 


6,400 










300 














150 






:::::::::: 









BRADFORD COUNTY. 



en 



BREVARD COUNTY. 



BROWARD COUNTY. 



CITRUS COUNTY. 



~7T* I2s.ooo 



"TSi'S 



"2oTS 4.6501 . 





147 It 154.050 

18 17.«00 

13 670 

1 800 

11 21.600 

1 275 

1 2.000 

3 1.500 
19, 13.250 

1 4,000 

8 11,500 
SO 6,150 

31 265 
1 100 

1 125 
5 m.ooci 
3| 8.000 

4 2,500 

2 16.000 
1 2,000 

27 5,015 

9 32.200 


62411; 192.429 
271 95,974 

13 3,910 
3 180 

60 28,160 

1 200 

2 1,300 
8 1.650 

26 13.050 

2 1,600 
11 8,450 
34 8,185 

3 160 
1 150 
1 100 

SO 8,300 

29 9.800 
17 5.700 

7 2.520 
1 1,000 

30 8.210 
59 7.480 


.V.I.-, 

271 
13 

8 

60 
1 
2 
8 

" ■ 26 

■> 

11 

34 

3 

1 

1 

33 

29 

17 

1 
18 
59 


x liti.oitii 

90,1174 

3.910 

MO 

26.100 


■j'.HS l .:-..:. ■ 






770 
349 

12 
4 

86 
1 
2 
.1 

27 
B 

12 

38 
8 
1 
1 

63 

34 

2 9 

1 
30 
70 


486 

199 

12 










::.:::::::l:::::::::: 














40 




200 

1,300 

1.600 

13.000 








40 












£ 

i 

10 
88 

S 

1 

1 

82 

i 

i 

80 
49 
























1.600 












11,450 

3.135 

160 

150 










































urn 












7.900 
9.800 
5,700 

2.020 

i.ooo 


IT 


600 






























" ' 














2,480 

7.480 


12 


780 

















¥ 506.31 11' 


4SS|# 


mo.. loin 


428 1* 83.402 7 


f 21 .357 1 


3|* 


6o0 


182 


302 


Saw Mills 


1 3 

1 2 

i ! 

i i. 


500| 

17.5001 

402,0001 

17.361 1 

68,0001 

3.0001 


11 

631 

3401 

111 

211 

21 


1.0921 
42.4301 
40,805 1 
9.240 1 
8.837 
3.0001 














501 40.03OI 1 

337| 23.0601 3 

8| 0.03:1' 3 


'.Kill 

16.845 


3 


600 


78 

380 

48 

25 

3 


46 

280 

7 
18 

1 

























31 |* 110.870 


111|* 74.800 


100{* 


72.2501 11 


* 2.600! [*T7 VT "156 


73 




4 
6 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 
5 
X. 

1 

o 
T 


5.900 
2.250 
3.500 
100 
32.100 
s.ono 

1,250 

7a 

28,000 

9.000 

200 

23,506 
8.000 


3 

4 

( 


1,1530 
1 .300 
4,000 


31 
41 
41 


1 .550 
1 .000 
4.500 




1 




6 
10 

10 
1 

29 
2 
2 
1 

63 
3 
1 

24 

4 


8 
S 
2 

1 
IS 

1 

1 

1 

41 

1 
1 


































20 

1 
1 


22.600 

000 

1.200 


201 

11 
ll 


22.600 

000 

1.200 






































58 
2 


32,750 
i.eoo 


581 
1 


32.750 
1,000 


1 
























2 i 


4,600 

4.000 


iol 

21 


2.000 2.600 






4.000 










1 



(Irnnd Total 



Repair Shops •■•••■•• 

C,arnge» and Repair Shops 

Crate Factory 

Cotton Oln 

Pnrklng House 

Ire and T.lghi Plant 



II 

2 
ll 

1 
11 



1 .000 

6.000 

100.OOO 

8.500 

4.000 

13.000 



58,064 



11 

100 1 

41 

10' 

61 



600 

3.100 

49.240 

1,000 

600 
3.524 



1101* 03.4141 



1 


600 


X 


3.100 


Sll 


44,590 


4 


1.000 


10 


000 


~) 


3.524 



20 



•'• 



4.650 



CADHOUN COUNTY. 



i.i-Hiid Total 



tttt 



Brick Kilns 

Blacksmith Shop 
Cotton "Ins . . . . 

C.H.I \Mll« 



ti 3.640 

3,500 

500 

3.500 

3.700 



803|* 320.7001 
1.800 

300 

.1.000 

i.ioo 



761 



HI 
1 
8 

4 



10 

1 
8 

4 



313.010| |*. 



"CTj 7.7501 



1.80OI 

3001 

3,6001 

1.1001 



JSTT 
1 

8 

150 

8 

15 

5 



smr 



11 

3 1 

41 



1 

4 
70 

2 
15 

3 



640 



18 
t 
3 

4 







TABLE NO. 


8, (FIR8T 


HALF.)— MANUFACTURES— BY COUNTIES. 
















F ' '• ' " 


.2S 






Men 16 Years and 


Women 16 Years and 


Children Under 




33 




' 




1 

a 


•< 


Over. 


Over. 


« 16 Years. 


■a 


•w a 
















c — 








»■-• 


b 


M 














II 


ii 








a . 


id 


e 














fr>(D 




- 




=5.2 
= g 
- a 


a - 


§ 




m 


• 


00 

B 
a 




i. 




*>• 

o 

111 


NAME OF 




p 






• 


^s p 




oB 


u 


*-H 


t = 


a 




OR PRODUCT. 


a 


■oi. 


9 

s ' 

a 
v. 


o 

a 
a 

- «* 


I 
§ 


li 


I 

a 


° 

if 


a 

2 


,2 

BS 


II 


H 
SB i r' 






It ■ 
P 


lis 


N 

2 

< 


5 v 

It 


§ 

■ 
> 

< 


§1 


0) 
M 

f 




■ 

E 
V 

> 


12 


5c£ 


(.ITS 



ALACHUA COUNTY. 



Grand Total 


140 

17 

16 

5 

2 

1 

1 



16 

1 

IS 

s 
1 

."* 

3 
3 

4 
6 
1 
3 

i 

2 
1 
3 
3 

2 


* l.tir.n.oiMi 

321 ,000 
12,000 

72.500 

23.000 

20.000 

1.000 

83.200 

53.100 

| 276.000 

1.000 

10.800 

1.500 

2.000 

3.000 

6.400 

17.000 

11. son 

3.600 

.-,(!. II1MI 

27.000 

15.000 

500 

4,000 

15.000 

12.000 

4.000 

3.000 


8551 

107 

28 

21 

31 

R 

1 

78 

36 

| i 93 

2 

38 

4 

o 

5 

7 

10 

7 

I) 

4 

25 

18 

1 

3 

12 

7 

6 

a 


$ 358,547 

13.970 

14.200 

10,807 

24.200 

6.000 

1,200 

69.000 

34,400 

I 86.250 

2,500 

3,420 

4.100 

2,000 

3.500 

5,000 

"■ 7.500 

8.200 

4.600 

3.000 

15.500 

6.500 

1.000 

2.700 

12.000 

6.500 

7.300 

2.800 


613 

83 

28 

21 

31 

5 

1 

78 

85 

103 

2 

38 

4 

2 

5 


$ 848,947 

11,770 

14,200 

10,307 

24,000 

6.000 

1,200 

69,900 

33,600 

86.250 

2,500 

3,420 

4,100 

2,000 

3.B00 


SO 

24 


1 ITBW 

2,200 






T28" 

112 

28 

23 

39 

8 

1 

102 

41 

208 

2 

38 

4 

2 

5 

10 
7 
3 
4 

25 

18 
1 
3 

15 
7 
6 
3 


563 

112 
28 
19 












15 
3 
1 


Gas riant 










Paint and Repair Shop 










58 


Saw Mills 


i 


800 






35 


Garages and Repair Sbops 

Naval Stores 

Tailor and Repair Shops 

Grist Mills 






131 

2 

?8 

4 


Tin Shops 

numbing and - Repair Shops 

Bicycle and Repntr Shops 

Millinery Sbops 


7 

1 


5.000 
800 







! 

7 

x 2 


Bakeries 

Jewelry Shops 

Shoe Shop and Repairs 


V Oil w 

7 $.200 
ftl 4,000 
A ' 3,001) 






7 
9 
4 


Fertiliser Plant 


61 3.0CO 
11 2.800 






25 


Printing Plants 


XV 

7 
1 
8 
12 
7 
6 

a 


3,700 
1.000 
2.700 

I2.O00 
6.500 
7.300 
2.800 






18 
1 


ilunsnilth 






3 


Furniture Repair Shops 








10 


Cabinet Shop 








7 


Bottling Works 

Waeon Manufacturers and Repairs 








6 
3 



BAKER COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Saw Mills 

Naval Stores 

Cotton Gins .... 
Cooper Shops . . . 

Corn Mills 

Blacksmith Shops 
Shingle Mills ... 

Garages 

Tailors 

Millinery Shops . . 
Planlne Mill" . , 



~wj—' 2rrs;nfo: 



1ST* 181.S80I 



"257 



s 

r. 

5 

51 
13 
11 

3 

3 

1 

1 

1 



ni. ooo 

1 1 3.000 

17,500 

1.100 

14.000 

11.250 

5.000 

3.500 

1QO 

200 

1.500 



113 

201 

27 

44 

131 

161 

7 

6 

1 

2 

3 



43.100 

99.180 

9.300 

2.600 

2.900 

1 3,900 

3.000 

5.500 

600 

1.000 

500 



113 

76 

9 

21 

5 

10 

7 

6 

l 



| 105.3801 



THST* 7R.2O0' 



43,100 

36.680 

5,000 

1.400 

1.000 

n.6oo 

3,000 

5.500 

600 

"soo 



125 

18 

23 

8 

e 



62.500 
4.300 
1,200 
1,900 
4.300 

Y,666 



T. I 



BAY COUNTY. 



Grand Totn' I 1241*1.093.850 


1.0521* 356.0751 


Bottling Works 


2' 25.000 


12 


s.-'oni 


Blacksmiths 




111 3.500 


* •> 


3.3251 


Bakeries 




2 


1.200 


4 


1.5001 


Boat Rppalrlng 

Brick Kiln 




7 


2,251 


12 


1.900' 




1 


4.000 


3 


600 




Cooperage Shops 

Canneries 




10 
1 


3.900 
500 


20 

3 


1.750 
450 




Dry Kilns 

Cross Ties. 




2 


20,000 


20 


9.500 






1 


8.000 


R 


3.60O 




Electric Planta 




2 


38.000 


18 


7.000 




Grist Mills 




8 


1.500 


3 


750 




Teed Mill 




1 


400 


1 


200 




Ice Factories 




2 


30.000 


9 


3.400 





1.037!* 352.7251. 




13 

4 

12 

8 

20 

3 

20 

8 

18 

3 

1' 
01 



4,400 
3,325 
1,500 
1.9O0 

600 
7,150 

450 
9.500 
3.600 
2.000 

750 

200 
3.400 



fl 2300T 



3.4601 



800 



81 

12 



• 



"221 



5 



Ladder Factories 

Laundries 

Millinery 

Naval Stores 

Pressing Clubs 

I'lumblng 

Planing Mills 

Packing Houses 

I'rlmlng Works 

rt'acksmlth and Repair* 

Veneering 

Saw Mills 

Cross Ties 

Vulcanizing 

Well Drilling 

Hice Mills 

Teed Mills 

Syrup Manufacturing 



3 



lirand Total 



Automobile Repairs 

Bicycle Repairs 

Bakeries 

Bottling Works 

Blacksmiths 

Broom Factories 

Bag Factory 

Clothes Repairers 

Concrete Works 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Candy Manufacturers 

Crackers Manufacturer 

Contractors 

Cotton Oil Products 

Cabinet Makers 

Coffin Manufacturers 

Carriage Manufacturers 

Dressmaking 

Distillation Pine Products 

Dying and "'leaning Works 

Electrical Construction 

Engineering aud Construction 

Fertilizer Manufacturers 

Horse Shoeing 

Harness Manufaclurlng and Repairing 

Hat Manufacturing 

t«« Manufacturing 

Jewelry Repairing 

■.sundries 

Locksmiths 

Millinery 

Machine Shops 

Mattress Manufacturing 

Machine Repair Shops 

Metal Product* 

Manument Manufacturers 

Musical Repair Shops 

Mirror riatlng 

Novelty Works 

Picture Frame Manufacturers 

Papering and Painting 

Photographers 

Newspaper Publishers . ., 

Plumbers '. 

Prlsters 

Ostrich Tlumes and Farm 

Painters 

Tinners 

Tailors ..." 

Naval Stores 

Tent and Awning Manufacturers .... 

Trunk Manufacturing 

Routing Company 

Shu Mills 

Ship Builders 

Sjrup Manufacturers 

Shoe Repairing 

Show Case Manufacturing 

Bed Spring Manufacturing 

Umbrella Manufacturers 

Well Drillers 

Upholsterers 

Planlna Mills 

Shingle Mill 

Pressing. Repairing nml ("leaning .... 
Riga Painters 




6 

11 
4 

3 
5 

.■in 
8 

II 

28 

8 

ia 

5 
1 
1 
3 



7001 

71.0251 

4.400, 

410,0001 

1,025! 

-,. ;u . 
IS.O'llli 

r* 1 1 .-.oo I 

IS.IO'I 

• 9.525 

:,'< •, M| 
t ! 7 

2,450 

2,750 

1.4(111 

600 

250 
500 



4, 

317! 

* 

r.4 

525 

'.:•) 

!>4 

1110 

037 

62 

13 

16 

1 

1 

4 



400 

» 8,300 

2,000 

I -*>...■ .. ■ 

1,800 

2. 2' "I 
32,0091 

IS 1.460' 

2(1.420 

24,7001 

IKl.OOO 

Hill. '.Kill 

20.1011 
1,600 

1 1 ,500 
500 
200 
400| 



4 
23 
10 

317 

7 

4 

54 

525 
39 
04 

100 

657 
62 
IS 
10 

1 
1 

4 



400 

18,300 

2,900 

189.5(1" 

1,30" 

2.200 

32,000 

184,400 

26,420 

24,700 

110,000 

CO 1.900 

20,100 

1,600 

11,500 

500 

200 

400 



DUVAL COUNTY. 



.-i 14 * 9,275,0751 



5,876|S 3.978.8941 



30 

27 

11 

4 

18 
2 
1 

44 
2 

. 2 
1 
l 
1 
7 
1 
7 

18 
1 
4 
1 
1 
6 

10 
•> 
8 
5 

19 

22 
3 

11 

19 
1 

6 
1 
3 
I 
1 
1 

o 

3 
11 

3 


24 

1 

o 

5 
19 

n 
8 

i 
i 



i 
i 
s 
i 
« 
r. 
l 

12 
6 



45.000 

50,770 
131 .600 

85.000 
9.400 

28.000 

30.000 
9.500 

70.000 
258.800 

15.500 

180,000 

10.000 

:ioo.ooo 

2.800 
1 .000 

no. mo 

ti.tloo 

150.000 

22.700 

25,000 

30,000 

2,650,000 

BJBJO 

3.000 

24,900 

•jr,-.. 000 

25.250 

100,100 

3.000 

88.400 
■06.700 

l. 

2.300 

130.000 

81,000 

1 .000 

1,000 

2,000 
12.11"" 
25.500 

14. '.mil 

500.000 

54,500 
230,700 

5,000 

3.000 
20.100 
24.0"" 
1 40.000 

2,500 

I. nun 
10,006 
2.558.600 
75.""" 
14.000 
25.700 
25.01 Hi 
25.000 

1.5(11 1 
10.011(1 

4. •..'"" 

126.000 

10. "O" 

22.700 

8.000 



131 
47 

142 
50 
26 
35 
38 
70 
00 

389 
24 
00 
20 

10(r| 

13 

•> 

73 

52 

100 

45 

20 

85 

795 

18 

6 

35 

210 

51 

436 

() 

61 

290 

5 

14 

60 

23 

1 

1 

1 

8 

34 

21 

2 Id 

80 

1761 

..II 

21 

145 

121 

l| 

I 

1,007 

57 

18 

M 

in 

2" 

5 



1" 

12 1 

45 

45 

12 



134,540 
30.500 

117,100 

:;7.""" 

23.5(1" 

24.500 

9,500 

43.000: 

109.5001 

282,558 

7.000 

.-,11.011" 

8.000 

45.000 
12,200 
2,000 ' 
64.50(1 
20.00" 
90,000 
27.5001 
16,5001 
88.000 

289.490 

13.200 

6.000 

17.1"" 

162.450 
68.100' 

170.825! 

5,300 

42.000 1 

321.100! 

3.000' 

12,320 

26,500 

20.750 

l.ooo 

1.800 

1.000 1 

6.800' 

87,000 

18,.-, 00 

-220.000 

68.540 

158.000 

4,000' 

13.8001 

24.(1(10 

43.800 

r l.i id"; 

12.000 

I.1O0' 

0..HMV 

576.820 

42.00" 

10.000 

74.750 

S.llll" 

32.000 
3.400 
0.000 

12.200 

85 

24.50-1 
27.50(1 
13.300 



5.2021$ 5,071,3081 



131 
47 

135 
46 

20 

25 
12 
68 
B0 

330 
12 
25 
20 

100 
13 

73 

10" 
15 
20 
85 

795 

18 

B 
20 

21" 
51 

230 
6 
1 

294 

14 

611 

23 

1 

1 

1 

8 

34 

21 

205 

(ill 

133 

4 

12 

&! 

145 


1 

4 

957 

57 
18 

08 
10 

SO 

6 

10 

114 

45 

45 
12 



134.540 

36,400 

114.200 

35,050 

23,500 

10,500 

4.300 

43.100 

109.500 

. 251.4i.il 

4.550 

23.500 

8.0O0 

45,01,0 

12,: on 

2.1100 

64.500 

MOO 

90.000 
27,500 
16.500 
38.000 

280. HI ■ 

12.2110 

6,000 

11.892 

102.450 

88,100 

1113,950 

5,800 

500 
819,100 

1.600 
12.320 
20.500 
20.750 

1.(10(1 
1.800 

I. 

6.800 
37.000 

18..-"" 

209,000 

US. 54" 

128.400 

3.2"li 

18,300 

24.000 

12. son 

51.0(10 

9.500 

laoo 

6,000 

552.826 

12.000 

10,000 

74.750 

,8.11(1" 
32.(10" 
2.500 
6,000 
12.200 
71.- I" 
24.5.0 
27.50, 
13.3001 



14|$ SO2.790I 



7 
4 

io 

2(; 

2 

59 
12 
35 



206 

"60 
2 
8 



l.'l 



50 



1" 



2.900 
1.950 

' 8.666 

5.211" 
800 

21.153 

2.4501 

32.500 



25.200 



5.458 



72.875 

1 2. ii'i" 

2.000 
1.400 



13.000 

28.50" 
800 



1.(1(1(1 
' 2.50(1 

24.666 



900 

12.51111 



4 
27 
10 

405 



M' 

721 1 

■ i4 

135 

1 -il 

1,811 

95 

IS 

18 

1 

1 

4 



i 

1" 

s< 2 



7.2041 



342 



28 

81 

8<l 

545 

53 

IS 

10 

1 

1 

4 



4,860 





TABLE NO. 3. (FIRST HALF.)— MANUFACTUBES — BY COUNTIES. — (Continued.) 














4i 






Men 16 Years and 


Women 10 Years and 


Children Under 


S3 • 


*!3 






9 


a 




Over. 


Over. 


16 Years. 


<&- 


<g 








s 


< 








S3 


















K — 


NAME OF BUSINESS. MANUFACTURE 




M 

e . 

= a 

If 


i 
§ 


9 

(0 

3 




■ 
OS 




i 




fid 

&=£ 

°? 

° « 


■ SIS' 

u 


I* 


OB PBODUCT. 


A 

a 

oS 

a 

II 


3 

■ a 
.2.2 

-S3 


u 

B 
X3 

B 
a 
% 



B 

p 


o 




I 8 ' 


1 

a 
i 
a 

at 


11 


■3 
I 

a 

B 
2. 

V 


3 

*=a 
Is 

M 


u 

at 

a 

i 

• 

fij 

m 
a 

V 

> 
< 


£1 

B £ 


e 

IS 

p 

n & . 

za & 

in 





So 
H 


fit 

- - r 


9 

> 


It 


E 
B 


S3 
ft* 


■ 
> 

■M 


5*g 

Eh a. 


S3 
o « 





Ice Factories 
Repair Shops 
8aw Mills .. 
Naval Stores 



II 2(1.(100 

3 350 

101 2.267,050 

17| 414.140 



2 
3 

374 
406 



1,5001 

1.200 

177,9o0l 

141.1)301 



3 

337 
401 



1.500 

1,200 

171,230 

140.li.-10 



83 
fi 



6.750 
1.000 



3 

4 
434 
522 



2 

3 
292 

317 



COLUMBIA COUNTY. 



(irand Total 



Blacksmith Shops 

Shoe Shops 

Naval Stores 

Cotton Gins 

Saw MUls 

GrlRt Mills 

Wood Mills 

Machine Shop 

Miscellaneous 

Canning Manufacturing 



234 1* 32.7941 



34S [$ 52.90'-' I 



5 


320 


4 


1,050 


!> 


46,000 


5 


11,000 


4 


4,300 


2 


900 


1 


350 


1 


8,000 


2 


2,410 


205 


1,864 



91 

4 

82 

28 

26 

4 

1 

10 

4 

181 



2.220 

2,300 

13,575 

2.810 

6,022 

725 

150 

6,000 

800 

20.300 



167 1* 32.6021 



9 

4 

82 

28 

28 

4 

1 

lo 

4 



2.200 

2,300 

13.575 

2.810 

6.022 

725 

150 

5,000 

800 



lftllt 20,3001. 



181 



2II.3Q0 



33TT 



9" 

4 

134 

29 

41 

2 

1 

16 

5 

190 



"133 

5 

4 

33 

18 

8 

1 

1 

« 

2 

85 



DADE COUNTY. 





28 
1 
3 

4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
«• 2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


t 2.996.918 

526,686 

32.800 

182.800 

211,442 

3,000 

500,000 

30,000 

700,000 

234.415 

11,000 

40,000 

20.000 

32,700 

2,700 

10,000 

7.500 

1,000 

496.076 


839 

71 

28 

36 

100 

5 
300 

7 
71 
60 

5 
18 
40 
12 

4 
15 

4 

2 
48 
13 


* 709.469 

49,406 

23.980 

31.267 

132.222 

4,600 

220,000 

6,500 

51,006 

32,036 

4,000 

22.360 

62.400 

16.645 

3,000 

5,000 

2.800 

1,960 

30.997 

9,300 


817 
70 
24 
35 
85 

5 
300 

7 
70 
60 

5 
18 
40 
12 

4 
16 

4 

2 
48 
1.1 


S 099.813 
49 406 


22 
1 


t 9.656 

1.600 

3,796 

500 

2.160 


1* 


987 
71 
28 
48 

100 
3 

476 
10 
71 


I 558 

71 




20.184 

30.768 

130.063 

4,600 

220,000 

6.500 

49.406 

32,036 

4,000 

22.360 

62,400 

16.645 

3,000 

5,000 

2.800 

1,950 

30,997 

9.: son 


4 

1 

15 






18 
















70 








9 












250 












A 




1 


1,600 






Fisheries 


















20 
12 
75 
16 
8 

' 1 

10 
15 


2 












6 












20 










9 












1 












10 












o 












\ 












3 


5.800 


1 1 1 


10 



DiSOTO COUNTY. 



Grand Tni-il 



Asphalt Plants . . 
Boat Building . . . 

Bakeries . . . : 

Bicycle Repairs . . 
Bottling Works . . 

Cooperage 

Cigar Factories . . 
Canning Factories 
Electric Plants . . 

Fisheries 

Garages 

Grist Mills 

Cotton Gins 

Irrigation Plants 

Ice Plants 

Jewelry Repairs . 



381 It 2.o9S.22.-| 



2.4011$ 1.565.8751 



2.491 1$ 1.565.8751 |S I If. 



1 


7.000 


H 


5.700 


a 


3.000 


2 


1.100 


8 


8.000 


H 


3,000 


8 


900 


2 


20.000 


11 


100.600 


5 


162.000' 


20 


185.000 


U 


1,900 


2 


5.0001 


N 
5 


38.140 
68.0001 


3 


10.300 



(1 


6.000 


19 


5.100 


4 


4.0OO 


2 


1.400 


111 


6.000 


a 


8,900 


8 


4,200 


20 


20.00.1 


80 


26.460 


12V 


12.5001 


70 


59.185 


10 


1.600 


6 


5.0H0I 


'61 


21,530 


20 1 


20.0001 


•» 


3.500 



6 


8,000 


19 


5,100 


4 


4,000 


2 


1,400 


10 


5,000 


II 


8.900 


8 


4.200 


20 


20.000 


86 


26.460 


126 


125.000 


70 


59.185 


10 


1.600 


6 


5.000 


161 


21,5501 


20 


20.000 


4 


3,500 



8.1*3, 



1.904 



10 


5 


43 


17 


7 


4 


4 


8 


1« 


7 


» 


a 


H 


6 


40 


10 


130 


64 


230 


48 


98 
10 


3 


12 


i 


213 


128 


28 


16 


4 


4 



Nuvul .Si oris 



Shingle and LumlH'r Mill* 
Pinning 



Mill 



12 1 542,3001 

-II 7-5.000 
1 10.0001 



282 

475 

10 



84.000 

24.7.10 

3.000 



282 

475 
10 



M,ooo 

24,750 

3.000 






3871 

675 

10 



GADSDEN COUNTY. 



(■l-auii I'ii I il I 



Garages 

Saw Mills 

Fullers Earth Companies 

Grl»t Mills 

Ice Factory 

Blacksmiths 

Naval Stores 

Brick. Yards 



...... J.. 



S!l|* 



030.850 
5.500 



493 1 * 



111 


15.91)0 


2 


375,000 


IS 


11,200 


1 


20,800 


•■. 


3,480 


:: 


25.000 


2 


Ml.OOO 



IT 
51 
300 
10 
10 
8 
59 
35 



224,108 

73>O0" 

14.35(1 

100,000 

5.820 

5,038 

3,100 

14,800 

14.HII" 



4)5|* 



IT 
51 
300 
10 
10 
8 
41 
35 



( 1,3 081 
7,000 1 . 

14,350| . 

KM). . 

5,820' 
5,038 
3,100 

12,000 

14.000 



is;* 



2,800| I*. 



1,857 | 



IK 



2,800 



171 

OH 

1,0201 

211 

10 

8 
65 
55 



HAMILTON col NTY. 



(irand Toeal 



Naval Stores . . 
Cotton Gins . . . 
Repair Shops 

Grist Mills 

Millinery 

Electric Plants 
Bottling Works 
Shingle Mills . . 
Saw Mills 



0*1* (K0.70OI 



4531* 12O.2O0; 



114.1500 



13 

8 

15 

18 

6 
1 



71.000 
It. 220 

0.000 

4,850 

5.) 5o 
6.000 
1.450 
1,800 
08.700 



218 


43,300 


45 


3,800 


25 


9,050 


20 


4.050 





2.650 


2 


3,000 





3.000 


8 


3.300 


123 


48.050 



218 
45 

J 5 

20 

6 

6 

8 
107 



43,300 
3.SO0 
0,050 
4,050 
2,650 
3,000 
3.000 
3.300 

42.450 



l«l» 



5,000 



10 



-50V- 



5.0001 



243 
43 
21 
20 



« 

9 

155 



HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



1.0821*14.036,11051 



21.243|*15.143.47K 



Bakeries 

Bicycles and Motorcycles 

Blacksmiths 

Bottling Works 

Box Factories 

Candy Manufacturers 

Cement Contractors 

Cigar Factories 

Coal Burners 

Coffee Grinders. — Coffee and Tea Blenders 

Cross Tie Manufacturers 

Dressmakers 

Electricians 

Furniture Repairs 

Garage Repairs 

General Contractors 

Grist Mills 

Harness Makers 

Ie Cream Manufacturers 

Ice Factories 

Jewelers and Watr hRepalrers 

Job Printers and Book Binders 

Laundries .... — 

Macaroni Factories 

Machine and Iron Works 

Markets— Manufacturing Department 

Milliners 

Miscellaneous Manufacturers 

Naval Stores 

Novelty Works 

Opticians 

Poto Print Works 

Plumbers 

Rubber Tire Works 

Saw Mills ■■ 

Ship Building and Marine Ways 

Shoe Makers and Repairers 

Tailoring. Cleaning and Repairing 

Water Works 

Wood Yards 



27 

16 

30 

7 

3 

10 

10 

140 

25 

31 

11 

92 

8 

20 

62 

36 

7 

8 

37 

10 

29 

22 

28 

4 

13 

81 

13 

56 

4 

4 

4 

18 

17 

« 

25 

10 

51 

75 

5 

23 



05.350 

10.350 

21.450 

127.000 

350.000 

12.600 

38,150 

5.508,425 

4.375 

103.050 

9.700 

8.390 

22,500 

2,330 

87.200 

282.700 

9,550 

1.400 

24.370 

472.500 

34.200 

133,900 

135.925 

14.500 

197,500 

19.055 

34.425 

5,595.050 

23.000 

S9.0O0 

20.800 

7.870 

51,100 

18,800 

367,900 

2.011,500 

14,015 

22.445 

1,027,000 

28.725 



1671 
27 1 
59 
45 

581 
501 

122 

12,318 

38 

75 

76 

119 
38 
26 

267 

788 

13 

4 

69 

186 
48 

121 

306 
20 

146 
89 
45 
1,340 
75 
15 
9 
32 
65 
36 

434 

8,011 

82 

160 

44 

93 



9 



112,504 
20,930 
51.524 
32.088 

425.984 
'JO. 052 
96.814 
,890.830 
21.944 
60.456 
45.858 
67.382 
42,796 
17.160 

277.204 

721,590 

8,042 

4.160 

41,112 

146.484 
53.092 

1011,184 

201.470 
16.588 

109.832 
44,328 
36,980 

.001,084 
47,320 
13.780 
9.360 
31.252 
78.780 
31,720 

344,188 

570.180 
58,152 
12.676 
3«.440 
46.248 



18.522 *1 2.302.384 1 



4.6(10|J 2.825.0581 



Oil* 15.45(1 



21.2431 



140 
27 
39 
35 

292 
27 

122 
8.543 
38 
78 
76 
1 
38 
26 

267 

782 

13 

4 

66 

186 
42 
92 

144 
20 

145 
88 



1.188 

75 

15 

8 

24 

65 

33 

425 

2.991 

74 

143 

42 

87 



105.4321 
20.936 
51.524 

27. .-.04 

270,504 
15.756 
96,814 
7.602.134 
21,944 
65,468 
45,858 
780 
42.796 
17.160 

277.204 

716,494 

8,042 

4,160 

38,720 

146.484 
52.260 
82.316 

128,176 
16.588 

168.584 
43,704 



81 



"..ono 



902.350 
47.320 
13,780 
8,320 
23,660 
78.780 
29.224 

337,272 

549,120 
51,072 

1 12,220 
37.572 
44.272 



2891 
231 



15 



3.759 



1 
118 



1 

29 

162 



1 
1 

45 
1501 



2.964 

155,4801 

14,196 



2.284.900 



780 
86.002 



5.096 



2.392 



832 

23.868 
73.294 



8 
9 

20 



17 
2 
2 



1.248 

624 

36,980 

98,214 



1,040 
7.592 



10 



8,172 



1,560 



3.798 



208 



2.496 

6.016 

21.060 



12.188 
1.872 
1.144 



5201 



2.080 
3.288 



832 



167 
27 
59 
4*1 

5811 
50| 

122' 

12.318' 

38 

75 

76 

1191 
38 
26 

26T 

788 

13 

4 

69 

186j 
431 

1211 

306| 
201 

140 

89 

45 1 

1.8401 

75 

15 



32 

* 65 

38 

434 

3,011 

82 

169 

44 

93 



282 
450 

4 



311 



7 

17 

200 

11 

5 

5 

42 

24 



836 



142 
81 
19 

20 
6 

2 
6 

7 
103 





14 S 6X8.1 OO 


HEHNANDC 

484|* 321.598 


COUNTY. 








605 


391 




fc 4 

3 

1 
1 
1 
•» 


5 10.21111 
03.000 

30,000 

.-..OOO 

7.000 

, 1 000 


403 

60 
5 
5 
8 

4 

4 


239.000 
30.600 
30,998 
5.000 
3,000 
3,000 
4.000 


408 

60 

5 










490 
95 
5 
5 
3 
3. 


323 

48 

5 

5 

3 




5 
3 

4 
4 
















3 




s~ 2— J 3.000 






4 


4 




7^ — 























21.243 



167 
27 
59 
45 

581 
50 

122 

12.318 

38 

7i 

78 

119 
38 
26 

267 

788 

13 

4 

69 

186 
43 

121 

306 
20 

146 
89 
45 
1.340 
75 
15 
B 
82 
65 
36 

434 

3,011 

82 

169 
44 
93 



TABLE NO. 3. (FIRST HALF.)— MANUFACTURES — BY COUNTIES.— (Continued I 



NAME OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURE 
OR PRODUCT. 



a 

I 1 
13 

s 1 



II- 



fl . 

> a 
If 

|| 

> ■ 

= *•= 

fit 



1 

a 

s 
Z 



a 
= 

Is 

*!• 

s £ 

o - 

r-&5 



Men 16 Yemra and 
Orer. 



S 
K 



Is 



Women 16 Years and 
Over. 






$4 



s - 



<e 



o a 

E-6- 



Chlldren Under 
16 Years. 



I 

8 
a 

i 



Si 



££ 






Is 

£* 

£■- 

Hi 
W 

I* 

ill 






'I 
§£ 

a 
£ifr 



2c2 



ESCAMBIA COUNTY. 



5,0271$ 4.067.8411 



(.rand Total 

Shoe Repairing 

Tailors and Repairing 

Bui tliiiK Works 

Grist Mills 

Manufacturers and Repairers Turpentine SI II Is 

Candy Manufacturers 

Millinery 

Shipbuilding and Repairing 

Box Factory 

Manufacturers Lens and Repairing 

General Repair Shops 

Bakeries 

Laundries • 

Saw Mills 

S Fertilizer Manufacturers 
Manufacturers of (las 
Manufacturers Poors. Sash and Blinds 

Cabinet Shop 

Plumbing and Klectrlcal Works 

Manufacturer Butter and Milk Sterilizing — 

Harness Maker and Repairer 

Cooper Shops 

Marble Works 

Printing Shops 

Machine Shops 

Planing Mill 

Auto Repairing 

Grand Total 

Blacksmith Shop 

Saw Mills 

Naval Stores 

Bottling .Works 

Barrel Factory 

Light and Ice Plant 

Grand Total 

Fisheries and Packing Establishments 

Blacksmith and Repair Shops 

Ways • 

Bottling Works 

Gasoline and Oil Supply Shops 

Plumber and Repair Shops 

Auto Repair Shop 

Bakeries 

Cabinet Shop 

Machine Shop 

Ice Manufacturing ; 

Ship Yard 

Ijmndry 

Saw Mills 



103J* 4.849.3o3T 



4,8601* 1.420.7151 



3411* 123,1551 



201* 



"TT55JT 



"5353" 



78 

17 

2 

S 



2 

1 

66 

2 

2 

4 

27 

57 

360 

8 

25 

30 

3 

3 

« 

1 

90 

4 

1« 

0» 

10 

34 



13 


13.050 


12 


10.850 


3 


07.500 


•£ 


1,800 


1 


4,000 


2 


4,000 


1 


3,500 


■1 


2.340.500 


1 


1,600 


1 


l.ooo 


13 


38.300 


4 


20.000 


« 


59,200 


1 


1,560.153 


1 


30.000 


1 


400.000 


1 


10.000 


1 


5110 


3 


11.000 


1 


.-..iiimi 


1 


2,500 


2 


70.0(10 


1 


1.5(10 


n 


49.000 


5 


33.000 


1 


50,000 


13 


45.600 



30 

35 

29 

2 

3 

6 

4 

3.790 

4 

4 

35 

34 

91 

463 

10 

80 

30 

5 

34 

7 

1 

165 

4 

32 

114 

20 

45 



17,448 

15,850 

26,344 

948 

3.200 

7.500 

3.000 

3,207.000 

1.500 

2,200 

32,374 

19,086 

44,800 

300,101 

7,600 

25,000 

20,800 

2,500 

38,700 

7,500 

1,000 

159.600 

2,160 

26,700 

40.795 

12,000 

43,135 



16 

11 

21 

2 

3 

2 

4 

3.592 

4 

2 

26 

29 

30 

458 

10 

28 

30 

5 

81 

u 

1 

159 

4 

20 

108 
20 
45 



10.468 

600 

10,344 

948 

3,200 

3.800 

3,000 

654,545 

1 .500 

1.200 

21,974 

20,301 

30.100 

298,201 

7.500 
23.000 
2O.S0O 

2.5..0 
27.050 

(1.700 

1,000 
157.800 

2,160 
21 .oco 
28,989 
12,000 
43.135 



5 

18 

8 



ioi 



12 
6 



1.068 

3.000 

800 



1,200 
77.455 



1.200 
10.400 

1,786 

14.700 

900 



2.000 



1,650 
800 



1,800 



5,100 

1.MI6 



1,612 
51QJ 



280 



150 
1,000 



34 
6 

8 
2 

5 
4 
3 

4.470 

6 

6 

15 

62 

121 

523 

12 

50 

48 

8 

19 

9 

1 

255 

4 

25 

268 

80 

30 



151* 112.000" 



II 

4 

71 
II 

i 



2,800 

56.500 

43.0110 

3.000 

2,000 

5.CI00 



FLAGLER COUNTY. 
446 1 1 284.100! 



440 S 284.100 |*. 



1 

251 

186 

2 

4 



1,500 

1 33,000 

146,500 

1,200 

1,200 

700 



1 

251 
186 



1.500 

13.-..0IM) 
14C.500 

1,200 

1,200 

too; 



TSof 



l 

255 

186 
2 

4 

z 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



~571* 1.865.0001 
25 i .;••" > 



1.6321* 278.850 



10 
5 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 

II 
°l 
1 
ll 
II 



(i.40l)i 
38,0001 

io.oooi 

20.000' 
2.3001 

io oooi 

1,800 1 
5,000 1 
5,0001 

54.000' 
70.0001 

l.ooo 

1(1(1.(1(10 



624 

13 

30 

10 

10 

6 

4 

4 

4 

10| 

23' 

251 

21 

100| 



■ •,7.20(1 
3,900 
9.000 
3.000 

30.000 
1.800 
1.200 
1.20O 
1 .200 
3.000 
fl.900 
7,500 
600 

30.000 



1.532IS 27J 3" (I 



1(101* 



4.50OI' 



524 

13 

30 

10 

10 

6 

4 

4 

4 

10 

23 

25 

o 

100 



l|->.-,IM> 

3,000' 

ii.oooi 

3.000 

30.000 ' 

1,800! 

1.200' 

1.2001 

1.2001 

3.000 

6,900 

7,500 

600 

30.000 



100 



1.5 



HE 



~2TT2S~ 



748 

17 

47 

10 

10 

T 

4 

4 

4 

15 

28 

35 

2 

125 



"406 



1 
247 
150 
2 
4 
2 



1.016 

78 

9 



10 

10 

4 

4 

3 

4 

4 

18 

25 

2 

100 





sir 


» — S,"(i 1 its 


4*0 


LAKE 
$ 202,581 


COUNTY. 
395 


* 107,511 


88 It 4.150 


S|t 870; 


527 


280 


Laundry and Repairs 


1 

•1 

10 

1 
1 

10 

8 

1 

t 1 
5 
1 
5 
2 
3 

I 


BOO 

1,1 

12,500 

500 

500 

134,000 

r. ..-.«.« . 

2.000 

7.000 

159,487 

2.000 

84476 

30.0011 
20.000 

loi.ooo 

50.000 


3 

10 

24 

2 

2 

144 



3 

6 

20 

17 
20 
40 
115 
60 


600 

3.500 

15,000 

1,050 

600 


■• 
24 

1 

2 
70 

3 
3 
20 
•> 

15 

2(1 

40 

115 

60 


1,200 

l.-..!l(l(l 
500 
600 

1,266 
1,600 
2.500 

23,464 
700 

18,847 
8,500 

12,000 

56,000 

ISO.OOO 


3 

8 

i 

74 


H00 
2.300 

550 




i. 


3 

10 

24 

2 

2 

144 


2 
5 

15 
1 
1 

02 


Wnirli Itopulrs 

Shoe Kcpn Irlng 


racking Houses ( fruit i 

Bakery Products 


1,200 

1,600 

3.370 

28,464 

700 
14,047 

K5O0 
12.000 
50.000 

mi. iiiiu 


9 

81 2 


Novelty \\ orks 






3 


870 


71 4 

20 24 
2 1 

21 12 
25 17 
40 28 

115 60 

00 1 45 


Publishing and Printing 

Brick Manufacturers 

Naval Stores 

Saw Mills and Shingle* 


2 


700 




• • •" • 



LEE COUNTY. 



(iranil Tola! 



Marine Ways and Machine Shops 

Storage Battery Planl 

Clgnr Manufacturing 

Blacksmith Repair Shops 

Electric Shoe Shop ••- 

Shoe. Homes* and Saddlery Manufacturer 

Bicycle Shops 

Saw Mill 

Tailor Shop 

Candy and ('nam Manufacturer 

Lumber ord and Novelty Works 

Unragea 

Ice and Eleeerlc Plants 

Wagon Works 

Fibre Compnny 

Clam Packers 




400.7001 



148|* 73.858J 



137 S 71,783! 



34.1)110 
1.000 
I.700 
8,500 

1.500 

BOO 

1.500 
2.000 

1.500 

500 

20,000 

70,000 

2S7.O00 

K.OOO 

35,000 

25.000 



22 
1 
6 



2 
6 

is 
36 

O 

1 
30 



1 1 ,440 
10 
600 
520 
600 
300 
S40 
9oo 
400 
300 

660 

1 1.448 

27.500 

BOO 

980 

17.000 



8|$ 



2.000 



31$ 75 



!IS 

1 

6 

|l 

1 

3 

5 
2 
2 

6 

18 

:::'. 

o 

7 
22 



11,440 

10 

600 

520 

600 

800 

340 

900 

inn 

360 

660 

11,448 

26.750 

•.un 

'..Ml 
15.000 



2.000 



75 



LEON COUNTY. 



Auto Repair Shops 
*f Basket Factories . 
^ Blacksmith Repair Shops 

Bakeries 

Broom Factory 

Bee Keepers Supplies 

Cbero-Oola Plant . . . 

Candy Factories 

Collar Factories 

Cotton 'Jins ■ ■ ■ 

Cane Mills 

Cross Tics 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Cooper Shops 

Foundry 

Grist Mill! < 

Ice Plant , 

Laundries 

Lumber Companies 

Monument Company 

Mattress Making . . 

Metal Works 

Naval Stores 

Oil Mill .-• 

Pressing Clubs 

Tobacco Packer 

Paint Sbop . . 

Photographers 

Printing Shops 

1' Inning Mills 

Saw Mills ... 

8boe Repairing 

Upholstering . . . 

Wagon Factories 

Wood Yards ... 

Wa tnr Has and Meeirleity 



Blacksmith and Repair Shop* 

Naval Stores 
Saw MOls . . 
firlst Mills ■ 



2241 



86 

1 
9 
8 
8 

"3 

10 
3 
2 

10 
27 
61 
2 
10 

5(1 



93- 

14 

1 

4 
4 
1 



1 
2 
5 
14 
SO 
2 
7 




TABLE NO. 8. (FIRST HALF.) — MANUFACTURES — BY COUNTIES. — (Continued.) 









™" — 


* 




Men 18 Years and 
Over. 


Wc.nicn 10 Years nnd 
Over. 


<"i:fli|j-..n ''mler 
Ifl Y-a:*. 


KB 
0/2 

35 


Si 








— ^ 


8 

3 


-- 
































■M 










fa 


















a — 








=: • 


3 


3 




CO 




w 
fi 

te 

8 

*i 






11 

K« 


fj 


NAME OF BUSINESS. MANUFACTURE 




p a 

SI 


83 


1 




i 






I. 








OB PRODUCT. 


CO 

a 


7 s 


3 


a 


1 

a 


of ' 

53 


u 

c 
-a 

s 


1 


■a 


If 




if 






•Si 

S 


gl5 




a •/« 

s - 

< >. 

c 




I! 


5 


a v 
•E- 


2". 

s 


a a. 


— 5 >'. 

■,5 h 








■2 ~ 


*;*a 


















-E- » 






s = 
sea 




i* 




•g 




G 

•< 


5hg 

e 3 
r-C- 


> 


3«g 

-— — '• 


8 ■-- 
III 


111 



HOLMES COUNTY. 







549.709 1 


tm\ s 


125,530 


-l.-.i; s 


1 2.1.580 1 | $ 


i* 


.i:si 


374 


(JrlBI Mills 


1 2 

I I 

7 




.-...-mi 

2.1(10 

18,069 
18,800 




4 

7 

16 

37 

372 


2.100 

3.1 no 
8,078 

111. ."(Ml 

10.1.803 


4 

7 

16 

37 

372 


2.1O0 

3,150 

3.976 

10.500 

105,808 


:::::::::: 




= 


£::::::: 


8 

13 

26 
SB 

429 


4 

.1 

14 

18 


Saw Mills 


1 8 


510.298 




338 



JACKSON COUNTY. 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 





48 


* Hi-. T,m 


25111* 88,915 


23(1 1 $ 711.615 


14M 


9.3001 |S 


2X1 


1 ::c, 




10 

o 

1 
.1 
3 
3 
11 
8 
4 
.1 


149.000 

40(1 

1.10 

800 

2,850 

1 ,325 

250.500 

18,000 

34.000 

sir. 


13 

T 

3 
9 
8 

IliO 

21 
8 


5,885 

120 

150 

750 

1.000 

1.70(1 

49.MO0 

1.1.800 

6,080 

1.7.10 


13 
2 
1 

.1 

!1 

8 

140 

27 

21 

(1 


5,365 

120 

150 

750 

1.600 

1.700 

(0,500 

15.800 

1.280 


' , . . 




2 

.1 

6 

9 

10, 

190 

83 

21 

5 













2 










1 










a 




| 






9 










5 
81 




14' 


9.300 












16 




1 






14 










5 





316 


* 326.590 


9SRIS 115.997 


1916 




320 


* 17.204 


911 


1.097 




10 

3 

1 

2 

247 

20 
4 
7 

16 


20.500 
20.000 
12,000 
11.000 
18.000 
121,600 
16.300 
83.000 
1 4.500 


24 

13 
4 

11 
.132 
214 

35 
122 

31 


11.700 
2.400 
2. 5i Hi 
3.500 
2.707 

50.100 
9.90(1 

29.800 
3.300 


20 
12 
4 
11 

;••>•> 

173 
29 

18 


9.10O 
2,800 
2,500 
3.500 
2.043 

47.500 
6.000 

22,500 
2.4.10 






4 
1 


2,600 
100 


24 

13 

4 

10 

581 

184 

23 

90 

31 


24 








13 








4 












10 








210 


754 
2.600 
3.000 
7.300 


532 






41 
6 

45 
13 


°62 








51 
170 










1 


31 







\ 


LAFALETTE COUNTY. 


















48 
3 
8 
6 

1 
4 
6 

I 7 
1 

1 
9 
1 


* 1.108.8251 

9.0001 

2.025: 

7001 

4.101 

14.0001 

.1.1501 

578.0001 

1 ii.OOOI 

400| 

1,0001 

483.400 1 
3.000 1 


1.1791$ 827.147! 1,11918 827.1471 


1.018 




81 4.704 

10 1 6.474 

«l 1,300 

21 1.200 

181 1.404 

101 820 

25.11 188.645 

50! 62.400 

2 100 

0' 3.800 

801 1 602.200 

51 4.200 


8 

10 

6 

2 

18 

16 

255 

50 

o 

6 

801 


4.704 
6.474 
1.300 
1.200 
1.404 
820 










8 


8 










10 
6 
o 

18 
16 

■295 

55 

*> 

9 

924 

.1 


10 










:::::::..: 


6 












2 












18 




, 








16 














210 


Plnnim* Mill 


62.400 

100 

3.800 

602.200 




40 


RlpA Mill 










•> 














r> 


Rnw Mills * 










696 




4.200 





1 




5 



Mattress Manuactuiing Company 

\ ulcanlzlng and Repairing 

Millinery Shops 

Vegetable Canning Factory 

Gunsmith Shop 

Fish Fucking House 



tc 



Grand Total 



Cigar ■ Manufacturers 
(.lgar Box Factory . 
Ice Factory 



Canning Factory (Turtle 8oup> 
Fount" ' 



Iron 



undry 



(.rand Total 



Auto Repairs 

Brick ana Tile Manufacturer 

Bottling Works 

Blacksmith Shop 

Canning Company 

Grist Mills 

Saw Mills 

Naval Stores 



Grand Total 



Naval Stores . . . 

Crist Mill. 

Saw Mills 

cotton Gins 

Blacksmith Shoo 



i ; rand Totnl 



Anto Pnlmtlng 

Bakeries 

Blacksmith Shops 

Broom Factory 

Carriage and Wagon Manufacturers 

Candy Factory 

Canning Factory 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Electricity, Ice. Gas and Water Plnnts 

Foundry and Metal Works 

Fertilizer Company 

Garage and Repair Shops 

Grist Mill 

Harness Shop 

Insecticide Companies 

Laundries - :'ii\i: 

Marble and Cement Works 

Orange Packing nouses 

Orange Picking Bags 

Bicycle and Repairing 

Printing Shops 

Plumbing and Repairing 

Photographer 

as wins 

Shoe Repairing ••••••••• 

Spravers aad Repair W ork 

Bottling Works 

Tallsrs and Pressing 

Naval Stores ■••••••:•• 

Vulcanising a»d Repairs 

Waod Sn—ly Company 



Grand Total 



Naval Stores 

BlickMsith Shop 

Bottling Werka 

. FlBh Packers 

Fruit Packing House . ••-••• - 
lee and Electric Light House 

Saw Mills ■ • ■ • • • ■,:•■• ■ 

Poat Building and Repairing . 
Wagoo Works and Uifmlrs . . . 



200 1 
6.250 
3,200 

8,( 

1.000 
2.000 



10|* 1.024.012; 



722.012 
49.000 

211,000 
30,000 
12.000 



~35T 



1MJBB0I 



2 


1.000 


1 


15,000 


1 


1.000 


2 


400 


1 


10.000 


5 


1,050 


14 


80.500 


n 


28.1 M Ml 



_7!> *_ 
1 

8 

4 
1 
2 
1 

1 
3 

e 

3 

1 

8 

II 

1 

2| 

2! 

21 



1 

1 

3 

2 

1 

4 

S 

1 

2 

8 

5 

1 

1 



1.880.553I 

3001 
41.0001 

2.. -.00 1 
4001 

16,500 1 

5,500 : 

9.3441 

28.807 1 

749.5001 

100.4001 

43,000 

34,1100 

300 

1.200 

12.000 

58,000 

sun 

70.0711 

2.000 

2,808 

ss.noo 

10.000 

2.500 
93,500 

5,250 

20.000 

22,500 

15,350 

440.723 

2,500 

2.000 



TS 



5 213.4401 



SO.OnO 

200 

2,700 

39.000 

12.000 

53.140 

11,000 

45.000 

4*0 



M 

81 

100 

1 
10 



ooo 

5.520 

4.400 

4.000 

900 

O.tMMI 



1 


ooo 

5,520 

4,400 

1,000 

Ooo 








i! i 


5 








5 4 










7 


15 


85 3,666 






1001 90 

11 1 


1 






10 


9.000 








10] 8 



MONROE COUNTY. 



1.3611* 009,414 



1,189 

115 

40 

6 

12 



806.475 

49,675 

32,814 

4,800 

15.650 



1.0941* i91.tttii 



2451* 



74.9561 



201* 



2.0521 



999 

40 

38 

5 

12i 



735,733 
3,600 

32.U54 
4,800 

15.650 



184 
60 

1 



72.6361 

1.8001 

5201 



4| 
15! 

II 



912 
900 
240 



.1. 



NASSAU COUNTY. 



1 72 J 



4 

10 

o 

2 
10 

4 

106 

44 



83.0501 



H3.050I | » ' I * . 



4.200 

4.000 

1.500 

900 

4,000 

1.650 

49,200 

17.600 



41 

*| 
2 

10 

4 

loii 

44 



4,200 

4.000 

1,500 

000 

4.000 

1.630 

49.200 

17.600 



OKALOOSA COUNTY. 




1X41* 

801 
01 

881 
6 1 
II 



'.2.9111 I*. 



25.0181. 
1.563 1. 

25.8801. 
1561. 
300 1 . 



ORANGE COUNTY. 



1.016]* 540,8711 



91tl|* 514.008! 



061* 24.81 :t | 



"4TT 



1.4.'." I 



221 
61 
21 

i 

41 
451 

ion 

54 
6 

48 
1 
1 
5 

45 

2 

370 

1 

2 

24 

IS 

1 

109 

4 
4 

a 

10 
105 



1,820 

14.900 

3,784 

780 

12.075 

2.000 

8.90O 

56.803 

57.588 

36.280 

3.200 

41.300 

400 

OOO 

3.900 

17.000 

1.450 

102.0501 

600! 

1,7201 

27.229 

14.000 

750 

68.162 

4.800 

4.940 

6.180 

4,700 

44.500 

1.600 

1.806 



2 

19 

6 

2 

12 
4 
4 

45 
10(1 

54 


48 
1 
1 
4 

14 

310 
1 

2( 

23 

13 

1 

109 
4 
4 
6 
9 

105 

2 
3 



1.8201 

13.4001 

3.7«4I 

7801 

12.11751 

2.0001 

3,9601 

50.8031 

57.5881 

36.2801 

3.200 1 

41.300 

4001 

600 

3.000 

8.600 

1.450 

88.412 

nun 

1,720 

26.S54 

14,000 

750 

08. use 

4,800 
4.940 
5.130 
4.300 
44.500 
1,600 
1.860 



"il" "1.566 






60 



800 
8.400 



13.638 



375 



1.050 
400 



1,793; 



OKBECHOBBK COUNTY. 

"26411 288.960 



.1,499 

250 

40 



2341 



4 

14 

2 

3 

14 

4 

134 

56 



~228 



100 


111 

6 
2 



i.::33 ! 



30 
1 

Q 

165 

20 

8 

30 

7 

1 



18.000 
1,200 
1.000 

115.000 
1.800 
0,760 

135,600 
8.460 
1.266 



264 * 288.9601 ■■!/ I If 



30 
1 

2 

16B 

20 

8 

30 

7 

1 



lS.CMIO 
1,200 

1,000 

115,000 
1.800 
6.700 

145.000 
8.460 
1.260 



30 

S 

i 

17 

6 

n 

59 

113 

75 

10 

67 

1 

1 

7 

55 

3 

475 

4 

S 

31 

27 

1 

166 

5 

9 

10 

121 

1241 

3! 

•I 



903 

106 

34 



^iTiTT 



35 

8 

21 

205 

26 

8 
47 

IS 



3 
10 
2 
2 

10 

4 

82 
34 



•7T5 

60 



40 

5 

1 



1 

16 

6 

2 

8 

4 

1 

34 

33 

36 

2 

32 

1 

1 

4 

25 

2 

195 
1 
2 

21 

9 

1 
72 

4 
4 
7 
7 
IS 
2 
1 



T?7 

25 

1 

1 

90 

20 

6 

19 

4 

1 



TABLE NO. 8. (FIRST HALF.)— MANUFACTURBS— BY COUNTIES.— (Continued.) 







■S3 






Men 16 team and 


Women 10 


Years and 


children Und«r 


&l 


^ 






m 

s 

i 
a e 

if 


S 

■ 

g 


3 


Ov 


er. 


Over. 


16 Years. 


"h 
















SI 


NAME OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURE 




■ 

8 

or 

it 


O 

I 
M 
1 




§ 

a 




1 

a 

h 

— — 




i. 
Ij 

MS 
OS 

|Q 

si 

= 1= 

BE 


ce- 
fcS 

if 

i a 

2 • 

III 
111 


ll 


OR PH6BBCT. 

i 


a 
§ 

«i 

■fl 

ll 

IS 


- — 

si 
> • 

-"'■5 
-g- 
§§« 

-05 e. 


§ 

z; 

& 
g 

> 
< 


O 

fl 



o . 

<>. 

c 

S£ 
o E 
HE 


■2 

S 

1 

* 

8 


*8 

II 

S3 

o c 
Hi- 


i 

i 

D 

• 
Eg 
c 
8 

< 


« 

1 

1 

> 
< 


a 

P 

= » . 

III 



MADISON COUNTY. 





53 
4 
4 

14 
5 

14 
6 
6 


S 71.705 

175 

3,500 

41,800 

14.000 

11.375 

770 

85 


3281* 104.862 

1 100 

23 14,700 

180 70.400 

or: 10,800 

23 1,961 

3 351 

5 550 


:;2S 

l 

28 

180 

03 

23 

3 

5 


* 104,862 

ioo 




J61 




14.700 

70,400 

16.800 

1.061 










521 
250| 

loii 

311 

21 

51 


24 

137 

72 

21 

2 


































351 
550 





















5 



MANATEE COUNTY. 



Brand Total 



Auto Repnlr Shops 

Blacksmith and Repairs 

Planing Mill 

^ Light nnd Power Plants 

g Saw Mills 

Naval Stores ,,.....' 

Rice Mill 

Irrigation Plant 

Concrete Manufacturer 

Sheet Metal Shops and Plumbing 

Electrical and Rubber Works . . 

Graefrult Juice Manufacturer . . . 

Manufacturer Palmetto Brushes . 

Ship Building 

Canning Factorv 




4811 345.450 



13.000 

10.500 

2.000 

145.000 

2!i.il5ii 

oo.ooo 

300 

26.000 

1,000 

3.100 

500 

10,000 

3.000 

2.000 

1.000 



35315 226.9W) 



8 

23 
4 

17 

74 

190 

2 

11 
2 

7 
2 
1 
9 
1 
2 



9,100 

23.680 

2.400 

19.000 

46.000 

106.1100 

1,200 

7.000 

1.500 

5.500 

600 

1.500 

2.000 

600 

300 



350 



8 
23 

4 

17 

74 

100 

2 
11 

Q 

7 
2 
1 
6 

1 
2 



* 226,4801 



9.100 

23.680 

2.400 

19,000 

46.600 

106.000 

1.200 

7,000 

1.500 

5,500 

600 

1,500 

1.500 

600 

300 



.-,00; 



500 



504 



11 
53 

6 

2B 

134 

300 

3 
15 

4 
25 

4 

2! 

7 

2 



MARION COUNTY. 



Grand Tota' 



Saw Mills 

Naval Stores 

Crates and Basket Factories 

Grist Mills 

Cotton Gins 

Bean and Peanut Hullers 

Foundry and Machine Shops 

Blacksmith and Repairs 

Lime Kiln Companies 

Garages. Sole nnd Repairs 

Ice Plant and Co lid Storage 

lias Plant 

Knitting Mill 

Packing Houses (fruit) 

Peanut Butter Factory 

Plamblng and Electric Shops 

Cigar Factories 

Printing Shops 

Tailoring and Pressing Shops 

Laundry Companies 

Jewelry and Repairing 

Shoe Shop and Repairing 

Bottling Works 

Barrel Factory 

Sash. Door and Lumber Factory 

Metal Works and Repairing 



I 37 | * 



6 
9 
3 

11 
5 
3 
2 

is 

4 

13 

3 

1 

1 

18 

1 
o 

3 

4 
6 
g 

4 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 



1.188.1501 

108.300 

191.000 

200.000 

1 1 .750 

39.000 

10.R00 

no.ooo 

1.1. ISO 

135.000 

57.600 

75.000 

30.000 

45.000 

60.600 

1.300 

9.500 

8.500 

12.000 

1.375 

10.200 

5.400 

1.625 

6.200 

15.0001 

10.0001 

1.000 1 



1,6521* 



144 

274 

205 

22 

41 

9 

60 

29 

120 

51 

30 

12 

70 

352 

6 

10 

9 

8 

9 

22 

6 

7 

10 

S 

151 

21 



607,9 9 

66.800 

80.650 

83.577 

7.750 

11.180 

1.850 

56.000 

17.660 

50.100 

43,740 

15.000 

7.200 

28.000 

50.020 

1.200 

9.800 

4.200 

5.700 

4.800 

8.800 

5,200 

3.400 

7.250 

3.000 

8.000 

2,000 



1.8881* 573.5801 



264!* 34.4101 |*. 



1,7171 



144 


66.800 


274 


80.650 


160 


82.877 


21 


1.150 


35 


9.070 


It 


1.R50 


60 


56.000 


29 


17.660 


120 


50,100 


■ •I 


43.740 


30 


15.000 


12 


7,200 


8 


0.200 


303 


48.920 


6 


1.200 


1) 


9,200 


9 


4.200 


8 


5.700 


11 


4.800 


i 


5.200 


6 


5.200 


7 


3.400 


10 


7,250 


5 


3.000 


15 


8.000 


2 


2,000 



45 
1 
6 



700 

400 

2.110 



62 

•10 



15 



22.000 
2.000 



600 



3.600 



1681 

285 

224 

22 

56 

9 

62 

29 

120 

51 

30 

14 

70 

355 

6 

10 



8 

7 
oo 



in 

5 

15 

21 



246 

4 

18 

3 

15 

40 

140 

1 

8 

1 

4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



1.206 



101 

188 

131 

14 

24 

8 
48 
26 
80 
36 
26 

8 

40 

200 

4 
10 



5 
« 

17 
6 
6 
8 
4 

10 
1 



PINELLAS COUNTY. 



Grand Tolal . . 

Qarafe and Auto Repairing . . . 
Cement Block Manufacturera . 

Bicycle Shop and Repairs . 

Blacksmith Shop and Repairs . 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Cleaning and Pressing Shops . 

Fruit Packing House 

Novelty Mills 

Ice Manufacturing 

Naval Stores 

Saw Mllli 

Shoe Shop and Repairs 

Grand Total ~ 

Cigar Manufacturer^ 

B«*tllag Works 

Repair Shop 

Oarage and Repair Shops 

la* Manufacturing 

Grape fruit Juice Manufacturing 

Shingle Manufacturing 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Ice and Lights 



42|* B4U.330 



161 ,350 

11.000 

5.500 

3.750 

3,500 

7,000 

30,000 

90.000 

291,300 

8.000 

28,000 

3j950 



-273 



n 

3 
3 

7 
M 

20 

SB 

so 

12 
28 
11 



18,795 



60,100 

15,200 

2,250 

3.000 

5.900 

9.860 

20,000 

46,200 

23.950 

n.ooo 

22,000 
5,835 



260|> 121910 



r.s 

31 
2 
3 

5 

10 

19 

34 

go 

12 

28 
11 



58,500 

15,200 

1,800 

3,000 

4,800 

8.225 

19,200 

45,400 

23,960 

5,000 

22,000 

5.835 



im 5^50 



1.600 
"450 

"1,166 

900 
800 
800 



1 8 



"555" 



235 



"S57 



Tf5 



941 

51 
4 
6 

IS 

20 

45 

74 

33 

20 

41 

22- 



35 

18 

3 

3 

8 

7 

10 

29 

24 

10 

22 

8 



POLK COUNTY. 



T3 



» 520.3661 



TZG 



t 282.188 



515 



( 279,3551 



"51*^ 2,7801. 



608', 



"555 



6,500 

5,000 

800 

20,700 

36,000 

1,000 

75,000 

295.000 

80.000 





4 

1 

19 

11 

10 

20 

432 

12 



4.880 
2.450 

eoo 

15.360 

7,986 

10.439 

10,000 

214,760 

9.000 



Bi 

4 

1 

19 

11 

IS 

20 

428 

12 



4,200 

2.450 

000 

16,800 

7.986 
10.439 
10,600 
21,160 

9.560 



180 



2.600 



a 
4 
i 

19 
11 

8 

20 

5321 

1H 



20 

20 

807 

12 



PUTNAM COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Crow Tie Manufacturers 

Cleaning and Pressing 

Bakeries 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Wood Yards 

Steam Laundries 

Lumber Manufacturers .'. . 

Bottling Works 

Photographers 

Novelty Works 

B»eyele Repair Shops 

Locksmiths 

Auto Repair Bhops 

Marine Ways 

Shoe Repair Shops 

Anto Shipping Blocks 

Millinery Establishments 

Furniture Repairs 

Garages 

Dressmaking 

Plumbing and Tin Shops 

Concrete Block Manufacturera 

Blacksmith Shops ,.. 

Shingle Mills ?.., 

Barrel and Staves Manufacturer! 

Packing Houses 

Cypress Tanks 

Backets and Tub Manufacturing 

Job Printing 

Ice Cream Manufacturers 

Machine Shops 

Naval 8toree 

Window. Frames and Screens Manufacturers 

Sewing Machine Repairs 

Cabinet Makers 

Boiler Makers and Repairs 

Harness Shop and Repairs 

Electrical Work 

Grist Mills 

Dry, Docks 

Gas Plant 

Electric Light Plant 

Ice Plant 

Watar Worts 



■ I 



280 » 1.854.8001 



l.»05|* 1.066380 



1.9491* 1.088.8801 



■*tm 28,000! 



2.4261 



1358 



I 



27 

'I 

3 
10 

2 
11 

3 

2 

1 

3 

3 
10 

3 

8 

1 

8 

8 

8 
26 

8 

4 
2 

4 

8 

1 
1 
4 
3 
6 
7 
2 
3 
2 
4 
1 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 

8 



10,800 

1,050 

4.200 

800 

2,500 

5,500 

702.000 

14,500 

5,000 

1.500 

1,500 

350 

18.100 

15.500 

2,750 

6.000 

9.860 

800 

4.700 

1.800 

4.700 

1.700 

6.500 

8,000 

18,000 

38.000 

40.000 

40.000 

10,000 

1.000 

27.500 

82,000 

600 

100 

400 

53.000 

200 

3,000 

800 

250,000 

75.000 

75,000 

80.000 

260.000 



261 

15 

6 

♦ 

11 

14 

779 

18 

3 

4 

3 

8 

23 

14 

11 

10 

12 

8 

11 

27 

6 

S 

19 

14 

SB 

222 

13 

70 

B 

5 

33 

190 

3 

3 

3 

25 

1 

8 

4! 

68 

4 

8 

10 

12 



96,900 

8,650 

5.500 

3.700 

9.000 

7.800 

398.BOO 

9.500 

4,100 

4.000 

3,500 

900 

28.800 

10.200 

9,900 

4.000 

9.600 

5.600 

7.000 

13.500 

8.200 

3.000 

18.400 

8.000 

13,000 

70,180 

10.000 

34.000 

8.000 

3.800 

43.500 

68,000 

2.000 

1.500 

1.400 

21,000 

800 

4,000 

1.000 

72.000 

3,000 

6,000 

ie.000 

10,000 



261 

15 

6 

4 

11 

9 

770 

18 

2 

4 

i 

1 

25 
14 
11 
10 

'"a 
11 



96,900 

8,650 

5.500 

3.700 

9,000 

5.100 

398.600 

9.500 

2.900 

4.000 

3.500 

900 

28.800 

10.200 

9,900 

4,000 

5',e66 
7,000 



6 

8 

19 

14 

35 

222 

13 

70 

6 

5 

831 

1901 

3 

3 

3 

25 

1 

3 

4 

57 

4 

8 

19 

12 



8.200 

3,000 

18,400 

8,000 

13,000 

70,130 

10,000 

34.000 

8.000 

3,800 

•i.'i.r.on 

68,000 

2,000 

1,500 

1.400 

21.0OO 

800 

4.000 

1.000 

71.000 

3,000 

6.000 

16,000 

10.000 



2.700 
i',266 



9,000 
18,566 



1.000 



328! 

1 

IT] 

1L 

8*Tt 

IT 

5 

6 
B 

37 
20 
19 
III 
20! 
16 
19 
52 
9 
8 
80 
IB 
44 
261 
16 
80 
10 

i 

40 

225 

8 

2' 

si 

32 

2 

5 

4 

06 

8 

23 

18 

IB 



197 
3 



B 

10 

701 



1 

« 

3 

I 

13 

*. 
8 

4 

8 

8 

1 

8 

. 2 

8 

12 

26 

188 

10 

60 

.2 

2 

26 

185 

1 

8 

1 

18 

1 

1 

4 

80 

3 

18 

9 

B 









SANTA ROSA COUNTY. 


















64 1* 1,859.752 


1,243|» 


600 




* 1 


744 




101 384,100 

2 3.800 
2 900 
31 875 
91 458.000 


620 
6 
2 
8 

245 


431,880 

4.100 

2.000 

2,960 

72.076 


620 
8 
2 
3 

245 


481.580 

3,500 

2,000 

2.960 

72.075 


1 


000 






832 
7 
2 
8 

331 


441 

4 








I 












3 












159 



TABLE NO. 3. (FIRST HALF. I— MANUFACTURES — BY COUNTIES.— (Continued.) 



NAME OF BU8INE8S. MANUFACTURE 
OR PKOLUCT. 




Urnnd Tom I 

Bincksmlin Shops . 
Concrete FactorW 
Wbeclrlght „n<t Repairs 

Millinery .Shops 

J Igar Manua. -ti.r.T 

ice Mnnu.nct iin-rs 

Electrie Plant 

Boat Repairing 

Saw Mills 

Repair Simp* 

Painting Shops 



Grand Total 



''I. an. is and Pri-asem ... . 
Illarksinlth and Kepairors . . 
NhoemnkiTs nun Repairs . . 
Auto nud HI. vrle Repairs 

Boat Build, is 

Saw Mills 

Fish Packers ' 

Gas Plant 

Upholstery Plant 

Ice Cream Manufacturers . . 

Novelty Works 

Dressmaking Establishments 

Concrete Works 

Lanndrles 

Bakeries 

Bottling Works 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Machine Shon 

Plumbing and Kennlra 

Sheet Metal Work- 



•JrandTvTaT 



Blacksmith Shops 

Cotton Stan 

Irrigation Works 

Cane Mills 

Grist Mills 

Newspapers and Printing 

Packing Bouses 

Piling 

Photographer* 

Naval Stores 

Tobacco Company 

Saw Mills 

Canning Fnetory 

Construction Company . . . 

Concrete Works . . ." 

Slloa 

, Cigar Factor; 

Coal Burners 

, General Rennlr Shoos . . . 



H 



P 

H 
tj 
is 

m 

BO a 



OSCEOLA COUNTY. 



4.1 | .< 209.271! 



144 



3 
2 
2 

4 

4 

20 

2 



21.(rn| 
I .»-..» 

200 

K' 

30,000 
30.000 
145 
53,250 
38,528 
38.000 



2 

4- 

:; 

IB 

12 

4 

52 

34 

ii 



!m;i,v><> 



2,000 
1,500 

2....''. 

I ..-.on 

3,000 

15.000 

1.200 

4.000 

5.1,500 

26,050 

17.500 



142|$ 132..-..->i) 



2 
S 
2 

4 

3 
15 
12 

4 
52 
34 

fl 



2,000 

4,500 

2,ll(Hl 

1,500 

3.000 

15.00(1 

1,200 

4,000 

58,500 

26,680 

10,000 



21$ i.-ioni. 



PALM BEACH COUNTY. 



115 S 4>i7.(i7!i" 



13 

6 
8 

25 
8 
7 

Ki 
1 
1. 



825|$ 539.171 



5.250 

8,400 

2.700 

.17.27.1 

14,200 

10,500 

100.300 

50.000 

500 

2.500 

1 15.000 

1,700 

4.000 

8.225 

20.000 

4.000 

1.600 

43.620 

6.200 

5.200 



2." 

fl 

8 

81 

19 

36 

458 

6 

2 

4 

36 

17 

8 

27 

26' 

8' 

18 

17 

SO' 





10.800 
9.950 
8.010 

■W.SOO 

21.100 

20.040 

217.500 

7,200 

1.800 

3,500 

28.900 

11.600 

7.200 

8.750 

21.900 

6.900 

15,500 

17.641 

34.200 

9.800 



702 1 $ 496. 1 1H J 



9 

i 
r.« 

19 

36 

•154 

6 

2 

4 

35 

10 

8 

17 

22 

8 

16 

17 

30 

9 



-16.0041 

21. lOO 

28. 040 

21.1.500 

7.200 

1,800 

."..5(10 

28.000 

6.800 

7.200 

4.070 

20,300 

(•-.'. 

14.700 

17,641 

34,200 

9.800 



PASCO COUNTY. 



218 i$ 1.71 2.87QI 
10 



2' 
T 
113 
7 
8 
o 

1 
1 
8 
1 

11 
1 

1 
1 
5 
1 
85 
8| 



10.050 

14.000 

114,600 

5,005 

5.600 

io.ooo 

33.000 

1,000 

.500 
373.000 
100.000| 

007 550- 

6.00OI 

10.0O0' 

1,000 

700 

io.ooo 

7,080 
0.375 



2.19KIJ 0.18.010 



12 


7.100 


10 


0.600 


51 


25,900 


350 


18.010 


11 


3.100 


6 


8.000 


05 


10,000 


e 


2.000 


l 


500 


195 


78,800 


150 


70,000 


834 


230.000 


300 


8,500 


2 


2.000 


2 


1.600 


80 


1.000 


60 


30.000 


89 


3,700 


14 


8.300 



1.8261$ 654.5101 



121 

10! 

511 

348 

11 

6 

95 

8 

1 

105 

150 

614 

150 

21 

2 

30 
60 
69 

14 



i 
9 

25 

181 

3 

3 

10 



,1001 
.Onol 
.000 



78 

70 

230 



1, 
1 

SO 
3. 

8 



500 
,800 
000 
000 
000 
,000 

600 
(100 
000 
700 
30() 



Eiif-:- 



1.500 



21 

B 

2 

4 

3 
ir, 

■ 

4 
52 
84 
22 



10.NU0I . 

0,830 

8.010 

5 



_33J.< 17.XOO, . 



I*. 






Id 
4 



3.000 



2.000 



1100 
4.800 



3.800 
1.800 



'800 



1.0 101 



aril 
17 
111 
291 
291 
481 
555 
8 

3 
40 
14 
12 
21 
25 
12 
21 
23 
30 
11 



22(1 1 



4.00(11 



47|$ 



.010 

1O0 

noil 
000 
000 



3.020! 



2.4111 



801 10.0001 

-.-.1 1 

1401 3.000 



7 

80 



ISO 

3,000 



10' 



5..II 



221 

17' 

50] 
4881 

171 

91 

1301 

•J 

2801 
200- 
783| 
1W>! 

2i 
2' 

ioo! 



119 



2 
3 
2 

a 

3 

8 
8 

4 
52 

?? 



_6J6 

24 



9 

49 

14 

30 

389 

6 

2 

4 

30 

8 

8 

15 

19 

8 

13 

hi 




130' 



1.5 nn 

12 

10 

30 

237 

9 

. .1 

40 

6 

4 

125 

628 

100 

2 

2 



40 











ST. LUCIE COUNTY. 


















2.1 


* 136.215 


102 


$ 94.523 


MjC 88,971 


«l$ ' 


i 141 


80 


Broom Factorlets ".. 


2 
\ 
1 
2 
7 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
o 
1 
2 


5,700 

1.000 

300 

5.6B0 

35.000 

150 

5.000 

45,000 

500 

7.000 

17.000 

10.015 

3.000 

900 


4 

2 

1 
8 

27 
5 
4 

12 
1 
1 

27 
2 
5 
3 


4,900 

3.720 

960 

6,920 

31,334 

80 

2,192 

12,076 

250 

540 

22,725 

3,170 

2,600 

2.996 


4 
2 

1 

a 

23 
j 

a 

12 
1 
1 

27 
2 
3 
4 


4,960 

3,720 

96'l 

6.920 

27.578 

80 

1,646 

12.076 

250 

54(1 

22.725 

3.170 

1,300 

3.II4I - . 










6 

4 
1 

29 

34 
5 
7 

12 
1 
2 

29 
2 

5 

4 


2 
2 












1 












i 


Garages and Machine Shops 


4 


3.756 






21 








5 




1 


sii 






4 








12 












1 












2 












15 




2 




1 


988 


1 


212 


5 




8 



Grand Total 



23|* 38,2751 



SUWANNEE COUNTY. 
4621* 29.4501 



4621* 



•-".1.4511 [ 



T35T 



81 
9 

8 
14 

8 

4 



Blacksmith Shops and Repair* 

Cotton Gins 

Nayal Stores 

Gin and Grist Mill-. 

Saw and Grist Mills 

Grjsl Mills ..... '. 

Corn Millers 



81 
21 
2| 
4l 
41 
21 
11 



2,125 
2,550 
3.400 
8.500 
0.500 
700 
11.500 



13 
360 
81 
16 
17 
5 
20 



3,200 
1,000 
1,400 
4.250 
3.700 
. 900 
15.000 



13 
360 
31 
16 
17 
5 
*>0 



3.200 
1,000 
1,400 
4.250 
3.700 
900 
1.500 












TATLOB COUNTY. 


















38|S 1,445.800 






827 




13 i 1R4 Ron 


927 

152 

520 

19 

11 

8 

14 

9 


145.7001 !>27 
12,700 1.13 
55.000 520 
5,0001 19 
7.8001 11 
3.0001 8 
l.OOOl 14 

1,4001 n 


145.700 
1 2.70(1 
55.000 
5,000 
7,800 
3.000 
1.900 
1.400 








9i-,r, 

179 

6.10 

22 

13 

16 


807 




8 
3 
3 

1 
3 
5 


48,000 

157.000 

18,000 

30.000 

.-.linn 
1,100 
2.200 








93 












375 












12 












8 


Bottltne Works 










14 












10 












16 


8 













VOLUSIA 


COUNTY. 


















285 


* 2.811,740 


2.157 * 


1.205.195 


1,9401* 1.180.515 


13.1 


* 43.900 1 621* 7001 2.804 


1.187 




11 
10 

i 

6 

4 

27 

5 

9 

9 

16 

7 

24 

12 

4 

6 

8 

10 

4 

5 

. 15 

8 

4 
4 
4 
4 
6 

4 
3 

8 

82 


.108.400 

422.500 

8.945 

2.500 

1.2.14.000 

220.000 

63.2.10 

7,500 

11.1.700 

7.000 

9.775 

17,000 

3.140 

20.200 

8.850 

4.30ft 

18.340 

7.400 

3,400 

14,000 

4,430 

12.600 

22.000 

.10.000 

i .»,.(»», 

35,800 

4.000 

14.400 
1.000 

2.050 

115.860 


902 

110 

247 

6 

140 

14 

64 

7 

72 

12 

17 

20 

31 

24 

26 

6 

51 




475.000 

73.000 

93.400 

2.250 

1 25,880 

16.280 

8.1.500 

4,500 

61,380 

7.350 

3.050 

28.650 

7.900 

24.200 

14.800 

4.000 

7.350 

1,325 

4.460 

11,800 

1,850 

6.050 
49,500 
11.170 

6.H.10 
19.000 

2.8S0 

35.OO0 

750 

1.250 

38.750 


898 

110 

247 

6 

135 

14 

62 

7 

61 

12 

17 

20 

22 

24 

1.1 

6 

e 

10 

6 

21 


471 .500 
73.000 
93.400 

2,250 

120.680 

16.280 

6.3.900 

4,500 
5T.800 

7.3.10 

28.6.10 
6.450 

24.200 

10,800 
4.000 
3.000 
1.325 
3,464 

11,800 


4 


3,500 






1.015 

172 

34.1 

6 

164 

24 
115 

11 
120 

13 

19 

g 

37 
25 
7 
80 
12 
10 
32 

53 

24 

58 

80 

46 

11 

86 

3 

4 

150 


534 









52 












75 












S 




5 


5,200 






116 








11 




2 


1.600 






40 








S 




11 


9,500 






1 


















16 




11 




9 


1,450 






24 








14 




n 
25 


4,000 
4.350 






13 








Q 




M 




10 






1A 




7 
21 
43 

16 
48 




2 


1,000 






5 








8 




18 

15 


1,860 

6,050 


25 




24 








a 




48 
15 

7 
20 

8 
56 

8 

2 

65 


49,500 

10.770 

3,eoo 

19,000 

2.850 

an.ooo 

750 

400 

37.250 






29 




17 


2 

18 


400 
3.3.10 






7 




2B 

29 

8 

56 

3 

4 

113 








12 








12 












7 












24 












3 


Upholstering 


2 

li 


850 

800 






3 


87 


760 


60 











WAKULLA. COUNTY. 
















Grand Total 


241* 208 


2641* 76.1211 73.62*1 


■Jt 


% 2.4921 


355 


18* 




6 
3 
4 
5 
1 
4 
l 


189.750 

15.000 

270 

1.650 

100 

950 

300 


176 

57 

4 

9 

1 

7 

10 


54,248 
15.950 
200 
3.840 
300 
788 
800 


1ST 
58 

• 4 
9 
1 

7 

10 


52 256 


18 

4 


1,9921 

500i 

j 


282 
74 

6 
16 

2 
10 
15 


124 
39 




15.450 
200 
3.840 
300 
78S 
800 












4 























. . 1 


1 












8 










::::::::::! 


5 



TABLE NO. 3. (FIRST HALF..)— MANUFACTURES — BY COUNTIES. — (Continued.) 



NAME OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURE 
OR PRODUCT. 



■SB 

~ 

ft] 

-:= 
■2-° 

= 3 
£ « 



< 

& 
5 



o 
c B 



Men 18 Years and 
OTer. 



a 

ea 
E 



8| 



o ■ 



Women 18 Years and 
Over. 



1 

s 



> 












Children Under 
• 16 Years. 



1 

a 



■5 9 






r-t. 



2 s 



li 

|« 

*-. 
ill 



Jewelry and Repairing • . 

Shipbuilding 

Electricity and Sewerage 
Bellllni! Works 

Shingle Mills 

Grist Mills 

Cane Mills 

Cotton Oln 

Feed Mill 



2 
1 

1 

1 
4 
2 
12 
1 
1 



1,500 

441.000 

40.000 

4,000 

16.500 

600 

1.477 

l.r.oo 

B.0O0I 



2 

295 

4 
2 

20 
2 

36 
2 
4 



3,000 

207.600 
2.200 
1,500 
4,300 
1,600 
1,683 
1,500 
3.000 



2 I 
295 

4 
21 

20 
2 

86 



3,000 




207,600 




2.200 




1,500 




4,300 




1,600 




1,683 




1,500 


3.000. 



ST. JOHNS COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Bicycle Repair Shops 

Bottling Works 

Bakeries 

Blacksmith Shops 

Boat Builders and Repairers 

Barrel Factories 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Cabinet Manufacturers 

Manufacturers Cement Blocks and Fences 

Contractors and Builders 

Coopering 

Croas Tie Contractor 

Dressmaking 

Auto Garages and Repairs 

Furniture Makers and Repairers 

GrlBt Mills 

Harness Makers and Repairers 

Hat Cleaner and Repairer 

Ice Factories and Cold Storage 

Printing Plants 

Jelly Manufacturers 

Lighting Plants and Power House 

Laundries 

Millinery Shops 

Novelty Mill 

Plumbing Shop and Repairing 

Planing Mill 

Shoe Makers and Repairers 

Soap Manufnctur 

Sewing Machine Repair Shops 

Tailoring and Repair Shops 

Tin Shop S 

Naval Stores 

Vulcanising Plant 

Vegetable Canning Plant 

Water Works 



"56H 885,835 



5 ! 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
7 
2 
2 
2 
2 

5 
3 
8 
2 
2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
2 
I 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
4 
1 

8 

l 
l 
X 



11,000 
14.500 
17.250 

1,700 

2,000 

58,000 

60,000 

1.5oo_ 

1.500 

17,000 

450 

300 

5.130 

06.250 

650 

400 

::.soo 

50 

30,000 

102,550 

1.550 

327 .000 

7,000 

7.880 

4.000 

700 

4.000 

3.1011 

150 

750 

2.375 

500 

33.0001 

5001 

300 1 

100.0001 



5771* 482.507 



506 i* 453.475 



8 


8.394 


li 


9.500 





10.090 


7 


7,532 


4 


6,180 


H8 


23.226 


M 


47.670 


3 


3,750 


• i 


5.720 


41 


41.860 


4 


5.000 


« 


3.744 


SB 


23.184 


28 


32.120 


4 


3.850 


2 


2,080 


4 


4.108 


1 


1,040 


21 


45.388 


M 


61.162 


8 


610 


M\ 


41.972 


44 


14,472 


14 


13.884 


4 


3.372 


3 


&57S 


8 


2.808 


7 


8.980 


X 


1.3O0 


2 


2.500 


18 


14,726 


1 


1,250 


40 


18,720 


2 


1.500 


1 


2,000 


8 


5.760 



68 |S 



'l 


7.7BT 


« 


7.500 


8 


8.840 


7 


7,532 


4 


6.180 


US 


2.1. ■_•■_'« 


55 


44.770 


3 


3.750 


*> 


5.720 


41 


41,360 


4 


5.000 


6 


3.744 


8© 


23.184 


26 


30.884 


4 


3,850 


2 


2,080 


4 


4.108 


1 


1.040 


21 


45.388 


w 


30.230 


3 


610 


55 


41.192 


11 


6,108 


M 


13.884 


•i 


Mn 


» 


8,830 


8 


2,808 


V 


8.900 


1 


1,300 


2 


2.500 


17 


14,258 


1 


1 ,250 


4o 


18.720 


1 


1.000 


1 


2.000 


8 


5.760 



is 



1 

33 



26.736! 

BOUT 

2,0001. 
1.250' . 



3 $ 



240 



1,300 



11,232 



780 
8.364 



408 



500 



l.436| 



500 



936 



—t- 
2 

485 

6 
2 

281 
2 

14 
8 
6 



663 

ff 



'I 

4 

73 

16 

3 

6 

56 

4 

6 

37 

30 

5 

2 

5 

1 

21 

51 

3 

59 

24 

17 

4 

4 

8 

8 

1 

8 

20 

2 

65 

2 

1 

8 



>>3 
2 s 



It 

§s 

a 
P 

ill 



2 

roi 

2 
2 
14 
2 
S 
1 
2 











SEMINOLE 


COUNTY. 


















11 


* 287.750 


1421$ 




101 




1 

1 
o 

4 
1 
1 

1 


5.000 
3.000 
8.000 
265.000 
3.. -00 
250 
3.000 


6 

4 

20 

93 

2 

2 

15 


6,240 

48 

12.000 

37,570 

2,400 

468 

6.750 


6 

4 

20 

08 

2 

1 

15 


6.240 

48 

12.000 

37.570 

2.400 

208 

6.750 




. | 




11 

4 

87 

128 

3 

2 

32 


5 
4 

15 
72 

1 
1 
3 


Cotton Oln 








































1 


260 









"545 

— 8 
6 
» 

7 

4 

63 

64 

8 

41 

4 
6 

n 



4 
1 

21 

46 

3 

56 

24 

12 

4 

8 

3 

7 

1 

2 

18 

1 

40 

2 

1 

8 



to 

to 



Grist Mills 

Tin Shop* 

Plumbing and Repair Shcp 

Bicycle and Repair Shops 

Millinery Shop* 



Bakeries 

Jewelry Shop 

Shoe Shop and Repairs 

Fertiliser Plants 

Printing Plants 

Laundries 

Gunsmith 

Furniture Repair Shop 

Cabinet Shop 

Hottllng Works 

Vulcanising and Repairing 
Wagon Mfg and Repairs 



56.025 
3,850 
5,«00 
7,100 
22,800 
58,500 
7,100 
5,800 
B.000 

n«.r.oo 

8,350 

1,000 

8,800 

75,000 

15.000 
20.000 
10.000 



56.025 

7,000 

7,280 

0,800 

47,850 

81,500 

14,400 

8,325 

9,000 

83,200 

10.850 

1,500 

10,250 

100,000 

30.500 

36.000 

18,000 



BAKER COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Saw Mills 

Naval 8tores 

Cotton Gins 

Cooper Shops 

Com Mills 

Blacksmith Shop 

Shingle Mills 

Ganges 

Tailor* 

Millinery Shops 

Planing Mills 



■ II- 



114.100 



69.000 



2,000 
17,100 
10,000 

2.000 

n.ooo 

1,000 
3,000 

l.OOo 



62.030, 



197.0001* 140.560 



87.200 



6.050 

13.700 

18,700 

4,000 

11.500 

1,000 

4,000 

4.000 



197,000 



140,560 



16.73 



16.750 



* 237.000 



237,000 



16500 



1,650 



16,500 



BAY COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Bottling Works 

Blacksmiths 

Bakery 

Boat Repairing 

Brick Klla 

Cooperage Shops 

Canneries 

Dry Kilns 

Cross Ties 

Electric Plants 

Grist Mills 

Feed Mills 

ice Factories 

Ice CreBm Mfg 

Laundry 

Machine Shops 

Marine Ways 

Millinery Shoos 

Novelty Works 

Naval Stores 

Plumbing and Repairs 

Planing Mills 

Rice Cleaner 

Shingle Mills 

Ship Bolldlng 

Saw Mills 

Repair Shops 

Tailor Shops 

Tinner 



*■ 



1 ■246.325' It 1.5007501 412.300 t 94,3201 10,520 



6.900 

8,600 

5.600 

4,300 

2,600 

13.375 

1.500 

30.000 

24.200 

16,200 

2,350 

600 

6,400 

1,400 

2.600 

10.200 

3.800 

9,400 

3.000 

3,866 

74,800 

700 

24.650 

100.000 

867.550 

14.500 

1,500 

1.200 



11. .OHO 

10,660 
7.500 
5.650 
5,650 

12,025 
2,300 

39,000 

34,400 

20.575 
2.800 
800 
9,000 
2.200 
3.300 

12,200 
5,200 

11.150 
4,100 

4,200 

91.200 

900 

32.800 

125,000 

1.020.100 

24.550 

2,000 

1.500 



412,300 



$ 106.860 



IT. 



94.320 15,520 



1 06.880 



Grand Total 



40.0001* 20.0001 I*. 



BRADFORD COUNTY 
260.1361* 399.464 



185.7901$ 73.1961 



11.8801? 89.9511 



Naval Stores . . - 

Cooperage 

Shingle Mills . . 

Baw Mills 

Broom Factory 
Cigar Factory . . 
Shoe Repair 
Blacksmith Shop 
Plow Factory . . 

Garages 

Grist Mills 

Feed Mills 

Rice Mills 

Bean Hupllcni 
Cross Tit Mfgs 
lagging 



I 



40,000' 



20.000 



. I. 



9.2111 

1.5001 

68.0001 

4501 



12.470 

2.300 

107.600 

GOO 



.1 



,85,7901 73,10R| 11.889 



2.6001 

28,200! 

1.5001 

13.6001 

5,610 

925 1 

300] 

1501 

43.9701 

35.0001 



3.400! 
46.7501 

3.5001 
19,500! 
10.695 

1.300 

450 

200 

63.500 

50.000 



89,951 



4.26o|«- 



1.141.120 




TABLE NO. 3. (FIRST HALF.)— MANUFACTURES— BY COUNTIES.— (Continued.) 







•5 = 






Men 16 Years and 


Women 16 


Yeans and 


Children Under 


■ 5 


*£ • 






la 

g 


= 
5 

B 
& 

■ 
ft* 

a 

a 
K 

& 

ft 


? 


Over. 


Over. 


16 Yearn. 


5g 
















«s 


NAME OF BU8INB88, MANUFACTURE 
08 PRODUCT. 

• 


S 

*- % 

o £ 

-1 


|| 

9 a 
11 

tl 

IS 

► • 

-as 
tig 


1 
& 

B 
•i 
a 
p 
© ■ 

y 

11 

61 


I 

a 

a 
X 

B 
S 

> 


a n 

ss 

II 

-- 

r-fr" 

n 


1 

a 

s 

is 

S 

I 

R 

•4 


i 
= i 

e 


| 

a 

a 

m 

& 

■ 
« 

i 

< 


$ 
I| 

flu 

il 


!i 

I"" 

* . 
IPS 

II! 


&* 
M 

H 
Sw 

a i . 

as 3 

all 



WALTON COUNTY. 



Grand Total 

Griat MUla 

Naval Stores 

Blackamltb Repair Shops 
Saw Mills 

Grand Total . . .TTT 

Naval Stores 

Blacksmith Shops 

Srtat Mills 
iw Mills 

Brick Manufacturing . . . 

Bottling Work* 

Packing Plant 

Ginning and Milling 

Saw an d Grist MllT 



52 » 1, 524,722* 



14 

15 

9 

14 



9,060 
,',46,200 

1.768 
067.704 



1.481 



3 

687 

11 

766 



I 640.666 



8^80 
262,068 
8.174 

371,603 



1,480 



18 

687 

10 

765 



* 640,468 



"3J30 

262.068 

3,074 

371.608 



100 



100 



T5W 



IS 

722 

11 

802 



~M0t> 



"T5 

652 

11 

728 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 



"» 



I 

7 
6 
11 
l 
1 
1 
1 
1 



W~ 56X276" 



386,600 

2,275 

1,950 

110,250 

600 

2,600 

100,000 

7,500 

700 



TTT2 



375 
17 

9 

657 
8 
2 

35 

S 

4! 



J 449.930 



87,066 

5,960 

1,426 

306,200 

4,000 

2,000 

40.000 

2,000 

400 



1,108 



375 

17 

8 

656 

8 

2 

85 

& 

2 



I 449,465 



87,966 

5,960 

1,400 

305,900 

4,000 

2,000 

40,000 

2,000 

260 



-ffi 



25 

300 



150 



T*"ST 



-410 

12 

11 

660 

»1 

4 

50 

8 

4 



i 
• 

64S 

S 
3 
18 
2 
8 



TABLE NO. 3 (SECOND HALF)— MANUFACTURES — BY COUNTIES.— (Continued). 



NAMB OF BU8INB8S, 

MANTJFACTURE OB 

PBODUCT 



TOBACCO MANUFACTORIES. 



Character of Product. 



8 

9 

a 



1 
I 

I 

fcs 

il 

a 



Cost of Material and 
Value of Products. 



These columns must 
not be used In valu- 
ing Manufactured To- 
bacco or Naval Stores. 



!1 S ' 
a = x 

f?Sj 
£||| 

a$3u 



lit 

V 

fill 



NAVAL STORES. 



Turpentine. 



I 

8 



Bosln. 



a; 

t 



i 



GINNERIES AND PRODUCTS. 



■a a 
S3 

h 



g 

a od 
KOf< 



I 

5 



5 
^ 



ALACHUA COUNTY. 



grand TouT 



Cotton Gins 

Blacksmith Rep Shops . . 

Ice Manufacturing 

Iron Foundry 

Gas Plant 

Paint and Repair Shop . . 

Saw Mills 

Garages and Repair Shops 

Naval 8torea 

Tailor and Repair Shop . . 



-J 



It 888.300 



17,826 

16.950 

50,000 

15.000 

2,000 

282,600 

121,000 

6,666 



I 1.327.600 



25.200 

33,950 

100,000 

25.000 

5,000 

3112.000 

198,600 

' Yi',666 



203.0001* 122,400 



203.000 



122.400 



8.489 



8.4811 



904 



904 



38.869 



89,406 



89,400 



9.165IJ 2.TTMK0 



9.1651 



2,711.450 




COLUMBIA UIDNTV. 



ee 



Grand Total 



Blacksmith Shops 

Shoe Shops 

Naval Stores 

Cotton Gins 

Saw Mills 

GriBt Mills 

Wood Mills 

Machine Shop 

Miscellaneous 

Canning Manufacturer 



.••!•■ 



14,80.-. f 



mo. 142 



1,040 
1,100 



3,600 

85 

00 

'1.000 

800 

1,180 



2,420 
3,100 



4,800 
200 
200 
0,000 
1,500 
8.022 



75,.>00.» 



08,800 1 



75,000 



03 



BM 



S|,85Q|» 44 



27 



850 



4-1 



12U|| 10.7110 



425 



120 



utfoo 



2,Sl0|* 280,000 



2,510 



280.000 



BADE COUNTS'. 



Grand Total 



•I 



Light and Power Co 

Eleclrloal Repair 

Machine Shops 

Quarry 

Stone Works 

Dredging 

Irrigation and Installation 

Gas Manufacturing 

Fisheries 

Building Contractor 

Blacksmiths 

Boad Building 

Foundry and Mch Wks . . . 

Cigar Manufacture 

1'alnters and Trimmers . . 

Motorcycle Bepalr 

Vulcanizing 

Water Works Co 

Garages ■ 



aw.ouu.t ~To".iiooi |$ |$ it. 



300.01 up 



10.000 



» 



Grand Total 



Asphalt Plants 
Goat Building 

Bakeries 

Bicycle Repair 
Bottling Works 

Cooperage 

Cigar Factory 720.000 

Canning Factory 

Electric Plants I , 

Fisheries 

Garages 

Grist Mills 

Cotton Gins 

Irrigation Plant* 

Ice Plants 

Jewelry Repairs 

Ladder Factories 

Laundries 

Millinery 

Naval Stores 

Pressing Clubs 

Plumbing 

Planing Mills 

Packing Houses 

Frlntlng Works 

Blacksmith and Repairs . . 

Veneering 

Saw Mills 

Cross Tlea 

Vulcanizing 

Well Drilling 

klcp Mills 

Feed Mills 

Syrup Manufacturing 



720.oii0|* 21. Gi Ml | TW- 



21,600 






Df.Soto COUNTY. 
It 1.CW3.0T5HI 3,941.0201 



16.0'Hij$ 



2.000 
7,300 
7,000 
550 
2,5tO 
1.900 

20.000 
29.800 

•;:;. oi.o 

36.0O0 ! 
1.275; 



28,000 

1,700 

400 

4,700 

1.000 

"400 
1,400 

10.000 

386.500 

35.700 

21,700 

65.000 

300.800 

6,700 

1.400 

11.300 

250 

200 

300 



10,000 
54,500 
18.000 
2.000 
25.000 
10.400 

' 40.000 

208.000 

573,000 

03.0011 

7.800 



84.500 

10,000 

1 .050 

28.580 

5.200 

Y.300 

0.600 

56,500 

1.633.570 

66.700 

164.000 

275,000 

306,100 

20,700 

5.050 

43,000 

3,000 

1,008 

1,600 



10 



000 






DTJVAL COUNTY. 


5.8071$ 


vsjm 


1 




11 


Bakeries 1 1 

Botlllne Works I 

Blacksmith 

Broom Factories 1 


' 56,500 101 .000 

1 27.400* 45.70O 

| 46.0001 70.000 


..'.'.'.'.'.'. 




















L 




NAME OF BUSINESS. 

MANUFACTURE OR 

PRODUCT 



TORACCO MANUFACTORIES. 



TABLE NO. 8 (SECOND HALF)— MANUFACTURES— BY COUNTIES.— (Continued). 



Character of Product. 



Cost of Material and 
Value of Products. 



a 

r. 



These columns must 
not be used In valu- 
ing Manufactured To- 
bacco or Naval Stores. 



NAVAL STOKES. 



Turpentine. 



"V. b-o 

m 
cjfi ■ 

*«■; 

fell) 

w « — --. ft 



3.1 



f 



Kosln. 



Cord Wood 

Ice and Cold Storage' '.','.'.' 
Jeweler and Repair .. 

Canning Factories 

Cotton Gins . . , 



BRADFORD COUNTY— Cont. 



GINNERIES AND PRODUCTS. 



&3 



e 

If* 

= ;.= 



II. 

a: ? 

=£« 
Ill 



!>.3»0 
4,660 

15,000 
4,880 

15,270 



13.950 
6.500 

25,000 
9.B80 

20.269 



4.290 



114.120 



$ 













BREVARD COUNTY. 
* 584,H4|t 658,9151 20.4501* 8 180 


1,150 


* 6.900 




$. 




t 


Machine Sbopg 

Naval Stores 

Automobile Repairs ' 




.::::::::: 




.......::: 


6.000 

79,553 

408,457 

75,104 

15.666 


8,000 

88.185 

466.219 

79,511 

17,000 


20.456 


8,180 


i'.ioo 


6,900 


;;;;;:;;;: 




lili 





Grand Tot al 
Bicycle Repairs . . 
Blacksmith Shop . . . 

Boat Bulldlns 

Cigar Factory 

Oarages 

Machine Shops . . 

Millinery . . " 

Picture FramB Works 

Saw Hill* 

Bottling Works 

Tin Sh. .... 

Canning Factory , . . 
Novelty Works ' 



~ I 



40.000 pT 



BROWARD COUNTY. 



40,000 



1.400 



1,400 



It 



.-IS 2,-i9.70«lt 259.650 



8.300 

7.900 

12.500 

s&ieo 

3.000 

1.700 

100 

63.000 

7,800 

1,600 
45.000 

9.000 



13.40*1 
10.500 
16.000 

40,366 
5,500 
3,000 

ir»o 

70.500 

9.000 

2,800 

67.000 

12.500 



■■■It I----- It 



wrr. 



Grand Tola! 



Repair 8hop 

Garages and Repair Shop 

Crate Factory „ 

Cotton 8In 

Packing House 

Ice and Light Plant 



CITRUS COUNTY. 



TTJ77 



■ it 7g.059Tt" 98.8001 



9.101 

4,0001 

00.088 

"5.520!' 
6.5001 



1,500 

6,300 

66,500 

8.500 
16.000 



• It. 



42*1$ lOTOOO 



428 



107.666 



Grand Total . . . 
Blacksmith Shops .7.'.' 








t 375.506" 
3.000 


t 405.662 
4.000 


Cotton Olns 


.... ... 







320 


600 


Grist Mills 











660 


800 


Ice Factories 










1,625 


3.412 


Repair Shops 











3,200 


4,400 


Saw Mills 






• • ■ 




820 


2.000 


Navfll Stored 






:::::::::: :;:;:::::: 


365.881 


450.450 



CALHOUN COUNTY. 



326.350 It 116.990! 



s->« 3.10 



19.9521$ 162.828 



116.99«! 



19.952 



162.828 



2261$ 



8,750 



225 



33,750 



■'t 






ESCAMBIA COUNTY. 



Grand Tom | . . . |*. 



g; Shoe Repairing 

~ Tailors and Repairing .... 
* Bottling Worka 

Grist Mills 

Mfgra It Heps Turpt'n Still 

Candy Manufacturers . 

Millinery 

Shipbldg and Repairing . . 

Box Factory 

Mfgra Lena and Kepng . . . 

General Kepalr Shops 

Bakeries 

Laundries 

8aw Mills 

Fertiliser Manuacturera . . 

Manufacturers of Gas . . . 

Mfga Doors, Sash & Blinds 

Cabinet Shop 

Plumbing * Electrical Wks 

Mfg Butter & Milk Sterlig 

Harness Makers & Rep'rs 

Cooper Shops 

Marble Works 

Printing Shops 

Machine Shops 

Planing Mill 

Anto Repairing 



• r». 



. I* 2.306,A76i* 2,588,877 



24,250 

6,000 

30,000 

350 

4,500 

17,500 

6.500 

555,000 

2.000 

3,200 

40,034 

95,000 

34,500 

402,541 

14.843 

80.OUH 

95,958 

2,000 

70.000 

8,000 

5.000 

219,600 

5,000 

48,200 

240.200 

100,000 

07. 400 



51.250 

32,200 

94,000 

1,382 

5,000 

29,000 

8,500 

271.000 

4,000 

4,800 

76.740 

106,000 

63,100 

594.877 

13.624 

90,000 

106,154 

4,500 

120,750 

11,000 

7,000 

259,000 

6,000 

60.6IMI 

294.200 

150,000 

124,200 



.1$. 



FLAGLER COUNTY. 




Blacksmith 

Saw Mills . 
Naval Stores 
Bottling Works 
Barrel Factory . . . 
Light and Ice Plant 



4.550 It 27,300 



4,550 



27,300 






8 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Fisheries * Pack'g Estab 
Blacksmith & Rep Shop . 

Ways 

Bottling Works 

Gxsollne & Oil Sup Shops 

plumber & Rep Shop 

Auto Ifenalr Shop 

Bakeries 

Cabinet Shop 

Marchlne Shops 

Ice Manufacturing 

Ship Yard 

Laundry 

Saw Mills 

Naval Stores 

Shingle and Lumber Mill 
Planing Mill 



IT. 






IS 928.500!? 1.899.4001 259.3151* 9,076.0251 



175.0,1(1 

10.800 

1.1.700 

3.000 

30.000 

5.000 

12.W)') 

5.000 

x.rtOO 

«,>HlO 

21.000 

8,000 

3.000 

75,000 

542,666 
4.000 



379, 
22, 
19, 
9, 
30, 
15 
17, 
13 
12 
12, 
30, 
12, 
6, 

125, 

682 

8 



900 
900 
600 
1 100 
(100 
000 
,000 
.000 
000 
,•'00 
000 
000 
000 
000 

666 

000 



269.315 



0.076.025 



15.0801* 196.0401 



15.0801 196,040 



Gran d Total 



■ I*. 



GADSDEN COUNTY. 



Saw Mills 
Fullers Earth Co 

Grist Mills 

Ice Factory .... 

Blacksmiths 

Naval Stores 

Brick Yards ■ ■ ■ ■ 



$ 187.095 $ 20cl.4"o: 



20.5001* 7.640 



20.200 

20.500 

100.000 

8,425 
12.670 

3.800 



22.000 



12.500 
25,400 
110,000 
12,400 
15,400 
6.200 



18.500 



.1. 



20.500 



7.640 



1.23H S 



1.230 



9.3001 . 



9.300:. 



nr 



Grand Total I IS. 



HAMILTON COUNTY. 



Naval Stores 
Cotton Gins . . . 
Repair Shops . . 

Grist Mills 

Millinery 

Electric Plants 
Bottling Works 
Shingle Mills . 
Saw Mills 



IS 119.1001* 178.8501 137.5001* 54.0001 



2O.310|* 53.1501 



25 IS 



2.5001 



6,700 
3,050 
3.100 
3,000 
3, COO 
7.500 
•2.750 



14.300 
7,100 
7,600 
5.000 
5,500 

11.000 
128.350 



137.5001 



4.200IS 378.00* 



54,0001 



20,3101 



52.150 



25 



2.500! 



4.300 



S78.00* 



-__^- 



TABLE NO. 3 (SECOND HALF)— MANUFACTURES — BY COUNTIES.— (Continued). 



NAME OF BUSINESS. 

MANUFACTURE OR 

PRODUCT. 



TOBACCO MANUFACTORIES. 



Character of Product. 



?ost of Material and 
Value of ProductB. 



u 

u 

2 
s 



Clothes Repairers 

Concrete works 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Candy Manufacturer .... 

Cracker Manufacturers . . 

Contractors 

Cotton Oil Products .... 

Cabinet Makers 

Coffin Manufacturers 

Carriage Manufacturers . 

Dressmaking 

Distillation Pine Products 

Dying and Cleaning Wks 

Electrical Construction . 

Engineering & Congtrucfn 

Fertiliser Manufacturers 

W Horse Shoeing 

bS Harness Mfg * Repairing 

Hat Manufacturer? 

Ice Manufacturers "..... t 

Jewelry Repairing 

Laundries 

Locksmith .» 

Millinery 

Machine Shops 

Mattress Manufacturing . 

Machine Reonir Shops . . 

Metal Produris 

Monument Mfgrs 

Musical Repair Shops . . 

Mirror Plating 

Novelty Works 

Picture Frnnis Mfgrs 

Papering and Painting . . 

Photographers 

Newspaper Publishers . . . 

1'luml.ers 

Printers 

Ostrich Plumes and Farm 

Painters 

Tinners 

Tailors 

Naval Stores 

Tent and Awning Mfgrs . 

Trunk Manufacturers . . . 

Roofing Company 

Saw Mills 

Ship Builders 

Syrup Manufactners .... 

Shoe Repairing 

Show Case Mfgrs 

Bed Spring Mfgrs 

Umbrella Manufacturer 

Well Drillers 

Uoholsterers 

Planing Mills 

Shingle Mills 

Pressing, ReDair'g. Clean'g 

Sign Painters 



3.170.600 



These columns must 
not be used In valu- 
ing Manufactured To- 
bacco or Naval Stores. 



= ■ 
2 ■ 

a 
f] 



m 

a. 



MB 



*** 
Sec 

"5 =.° S 
>-■£ = 



NAVAL STORES. 



Turpentine. 



Rosin. 



GINNERIES AND PRODUCTS. 



3 





B ^ 




K - 









• = • 




°5S 


V 




9 


as-s 




m 


3 OJ3 


> 


Z^H 



m 



ifi 

is 5 

Z5- 



DUVAL COUNTY— Cont. 



49,800 
205.000 

24,666 
1154,500 

16,000 
900,400 

21,800 

3.000 

110,700 

31,900 

285.000 

34.300 

90,000 

80,000 

3,927.410 

21,900 

11,500 

38.050 

229.700 

76.040 

274.100 

5,600 

66,700 

446,300 

6.800 

13.600 

175.000 

41,600 

1.200 

2.500 

1,800 

10,000 

48.000 

22.000 

388.500 

85.400 

244.800 

8,000 

15.700 

48.600 

93.100 

21,666 

2.000 
12,000 
1.389.504 
70,000 
35.000 
94,900 
30.000 
08.600 
38.000 

7,000 
26.400 
229.400 
32.500 
34.S0O 
15.700 



84.400 
250,000 

'28,500 

1 85,600 

26,000 

1.340,000 

36,100 

4.000 

166,1)00 

54,100 

304,000 

54.300 

130,000 

100.000 

4.729.638 

32.200 

15,000 

67,850 

306.000 

105.260 

362.650 

9.500 

108,400 

600.500 

11.000 

14,350 

220.000 

67,000 

2,500 

4,500 

3.000 

19.000 

67.000 

34,200 

556.000 

138.500 

386,100 

18.000 

23.800 

73,000 

129.300 

'30,666 
3.000 

24.000 

1,783,976 

118,000 

45.000 
153.400 

40,000 
118,400 

69.000 
9,000 

46,000 
323.400 

30.400 

54,000 

23.800 



08 



700 



44,850 



807 



59 



570 



\ 















JACKSON 


COUNT*. 












• 
















11.400 


16.400 






8,102 


5,0 4 4, 02*5 




















120 

381 

450 

4,300 

3.800 

V,508 


ieo 

706 

1,000 

19,000 

5,000 

'34,108 
























































































































Naval Stores 











3.802,625|$ 1,521,900 


8,1021* 


| 2,80C!* 

VyOO 


2«0,*9) | 


t 


Saw Mills 










200.000 
















1,800 


4.500 










::::::::::: :::::::::: 



JElTbRSON COUNTY. 









1* 


* 168,0021* 

21. IOUI 


278.383 

:io,075 


*8,B09|| 


2li.:-i0O 


3.261|* 


33.160 


1.322 
1,823 


* 100.090 
106,00* 





* 










5,00'. | 

7.000L 

4.3;0 

95,800 

18.00(i| 


31,310 

144.400 

30,100 




























































































48.900 


26.300 


3,251| 


33.160 
















o'.ioo.l 


13.100 




".""•.•.•.•.v.v.'."'.::::^ 





en 













LAFAYETTE COUNTY. 
















"irand Total | |f , ...| If If 423.2001* 114.2110 


23/.NHJ|f 12.000 


850 


* 3,400| >f 


r«a«f 












4,500 

9.800 

1.000 

500 


9.000 
9,700 
3.200 

8iii> 






























'.'.['.' 








Chair Shop 














































7*8 


163.60* 












1 ..-,oo 


3.400 
























23,900 


12,000 


850 


3.400 




















.-,11.11(111 

3011 

5.0(1(1 

346.000 

4.000 


10,000 

500 

10,900 

62.300 

5.300 






























































Saw Mills 


























\\ a&»n & Buirirv Repairs . 



























LAKE COUNTY. 








* 




* 


$ 263.(140 


* 881 ,904 
















» 












24. -Kid 

800 

800 


33,600 
I ..".no 

2.000 






































































Facking Houses (fruit) .. 




































0.000 


15.000 


















































































52.777 
3.000 

27,512 

17.000 

13, J 

112.000 


86.848 
3.0(1(1 
31.100 
45.000 
22.000 
136.000 












































Publishing and Printing . 







































































































































LEE COUNTY. 









Marine Ways A Men Shops 










50.000 
'650 
600 

r,..](iii 
1 ..-.i.n 

500 

1.000 

5.O00 

75* 

400 

2,500 

11,448 

27.500 

27.500 

1,000 

105.000 


90,000 
1.500 
3,400 
9.500 
8,00* 
1.000 
S.5O0 

1 2,*00 






































































Blacksmith Repair Shop . . 




















































Shoe Harness & Sad. Mfg. 
























































































1.KO0 


















tandv & Ice Cteam Mfg .. 










750 
5,000 

18.000 
53,*00 


















I.umUr Yd A Novelty Wks 




















































Ice and Electric P'Mts . . 




































9.800 

140.0BM 














































L 



TABLE NO. (SECOND HALF I— MANUFACTURES — BT COUNTIES.— (Continued). 



NAME OF BUSINESS. 

MANUFACTURE OB 

PRODUCT. 



TOBACCO MANUFACTORIES. 



Character of Product. 



I 
B 



i 



Coat of Material and 
Value of Products. 



These columns must 
not be used In valu- 
ing Manufactured To- 
bacco or Naval Stores. 



IV 



30- - 
!« a I 

i- ™ „, e 

_ - -i — 

— C = 

IlIJl 



cHi 



III 

°« = 

IHL 

mi 



NAVAL STORES. 



Turpentine. 



Rosin. 



SI 

1 

> 



GINNERIES AND PRODUCTS. 



h 



? t 



«1 

v. B . 

c; 1. 

If 

£ =■= 



fe 



51 



re 











« 




S ... 


HERNANDO COUNTY. 












1 


* 


Saw Mills 

Naval Stores 

Electric Light & Ice Mfg. 

Garages 

Feed and Grist Mills 

Blacksmiths 

Repair Shops 






, , , . 


* 


493,00" 
Se.OOO 


i-.TS.non 
62,500 





















HILLSBOROUGH UH'.VTV. 



Grand Total 



Bakeries 

Bicycles and Motorcycles 

Blacksmiths 

Bottling Works 

. Box Factories 

S Candy Manufacturers . 

Cement Contractors . . 

Cigar Factories 

Coal Burners 

Coffee Grinders 

Cross Tie Mfgrs 

Dressmakers 

Electricians 

Furnltare Repairs .... 

Garage Repairs 

General Contractors 

Grist Mills 

Harness Makers 

Ice Cream Mfgrs 

Ice Factories 

Jewelers & Wat en Reprs 

Job Print & Book B'nd'rs 

Laundries 

Macaroni Factories 

Machine & Iron Works 

Markets — Mfg Don! . 

Milliners 

Miscellaneous Mfg 

Naval Stores 

Novelty Works 

Opticians 

Fhoto Print Works . . 

Plumbers 

Rubber Tire Works . . 

8«w Mills 

Ship Bldg k Marine Ways 

8hoo Makers & Reprs . . 

Taller'g. Clean's & Repr' 

Water Works 

Wood Yards 



415,154,000 



$27 



,134,000 



60n,055| 7.800 



ilii'.i 



*» 



0001$ ir>4 



■ Mill 



154 



<I00| 81 1.782.937 IS8ft.127.54B I 



1 >i i» 



273.830 
54,874 
93,911? 
80.770 

582,000 
91,020 

204.000 



30, 

193 
96 
24, 

68. 

31 

701, 

1,450, 

17, 

12 

02 

418 

110 

163 

253 

47 

305 

90 

60 

2,085 



936 
714 
176 

.938 
500 
1:10 
(185 
890 
400 
300 
172 
0*5 
,490 
329 
400 
SCO 
,200 
,846 
,250 
601 



47 

15 

47 

138 

98 

1,61! 

1,813 

87 

267 

82 

135 



000 
,300 
,720 
.590 
,120 
,240 
,300 
.180 
.43" 
,100| 
.090' 



670,052 

118,880 
190,900 
168.200 
906,250 
178.800 
560,400 



504, 
300. 
121 
117 
69 

1.58-1, 

3.568. 

51 

24, 

273 

2.591 
238 
289 
478 
114 
676 
237 
122 

4,145 



354 
90S 
097 
382 
000 
111 11 1 
SS4 
410 
200 
9 L'" 
,315 
272 
,548 
327 
640 
,992 
.70" 
,468 
,870 
,994 



109 

27 

87 

256 

229 

0,066 



800 
I "(I 
.360 
,400 
875 
s*" 



179.515 
532.1 10 
242.500 
281.784 



62,4001 * 36.0001 



3.550|* 45.000! ■ 



.1*. 



02.400 



36.000 



-I. 



5.5501 



45.000 



HOLMES COUNTY. 



Grand Total I I» I*- 



.1$ 347.738!$ 0.239.5101 



1-1.95" 



Auto Repair Shops 
Blacksmith Shops 

Grist Mills 

Naval Stores 

Saw Mills 



fl.050 ' 

2.050 

18.821! 



3,5"" . 

8,860 ; . 
42.812!, 



321 .617 1 9.187.339' 



14.950 



8.897 1 



1.552 



8.897 



1 .552 



10.90i| . 



' I" 



10.9051 






MANATEE COUNTY. 



Grand Total I- 



I*- 



nr 



J| — gjgjWHl 723,100 



Auto Repair 8pobs .... 
Blacksmith and Repairs 

PlanlHg Mill 

Light A Power Plaits . 

Saw Mills 

Naval Stores 

Rice Mill 

Irrigation Plant 

Concrete Manufacturers 
Sheet Metal A Plumb Shop 

Blectrtcnl & Rnbber W»« - 
Grapefruit Juice Mfg .... 

Mfgrs Palmetto Brashes . 

Ship Building 

Canning Factory 



S3 



u.ooo 

60400 

5,000 
30.000 
71.000 

' 2.666 
1.-1,000 
2,500 
11.000 
1.200 
3,000 
4,000 
1,200 

TOO I 



:i7.000 

07,300 

10.000 

40,000 

440.000 

' 10,666 

40,000 
9,800 

18,000 
3.000 
n.000 
7.000 
3.000 
2.0110 



135,000 



135.000 



45.000! 



TS^oo 



j — 22,5001 .: It- 



45.000 



5,400 






rtr 



22.500 



1 

1 






1 



MARION COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Saw Mills 

Naval Btores 

Crates 4 Backet Factories 

Grist Mills 

Cotton Gins 

Bean A Peanut Holler . . . 
Foundry A Mach Shop . . . 
Blacksmith and Repairs . . 
Lime. Kiln Companies . . . 
Garages, Sale and Repairs 
Ice Plant A Cold Storage 

GM Plant 

Knitting Mills I . 

racking Houses (fruit) . . 
Peannt Butter Factory . . 
Plumb's A Electric Shops 

Cigar Factories 

Printing Shops 

Tailoring & Pressing Shops 

Laundry Companies 

Jewelry and Repairing 

Shoe Shoot Repairing . . 
Bottling Works 



225,0001* 10.0001- 



■•If--- 



* 1,207.3201* 1,420.115 



Barrel Factory 

Sash. Door 4 Mir Factory 
Metal Works A Repairing 

Mattress Mfg Co 

Vulcanizing & -Repairing 

Millinery Shops 

Vegetable Canning Factory 
Gunsmith Shop . . . 

FIkIi Packing nous. 



'225.000 



10.000 



176.0001 215,700 



180.000 
50,100 

' 12,850 

108.000 
26.100 

120.000 
74.O00 
43.500 
2.1.000 
85.000 
82.200 
2,200 
22,800 

" Ya.ooo 

5,000 
17,300 

7,170 

5,100 
26,000 
12.000 
33.000 

2,500 
100 

8.100 

7.000 
32.000 

1.000 
11.000 



235.000 
07,725 

' 16,556 

137,000 

34,640 

153,000 

113,200 

56,000 

35.000 

lio.soe 

108.200 

3,000 

26,900 

io',766 

5,600 

20,350 

0.4.-.0 

8,350 

32.490 

17.000 

43,900 

3.000 

200 

11,200 

10.260 

36.000 

. 1.500 

12.000 



134.000I* 79.000! 



6.700|$ 41,2001 



771* 8,4251 



1,8601* 480,800 



134,000 



79,000 



6,700| 41,200 



:J- 



77 



8,425 



1,860 



430,806 






MONROE .COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



. [ 42.293,802 |t 1.450,803' . 



Cigar Manufacturers 

cigar Box Factory 

Ice Factory ■ 

Cnn'g FacOy (turtle soup) 
Iron Foundry 



42.293.N02I 17-I50.SO3 



I*. 



* 311.5831? 365.737!. 



187.000 

98.083 

S.000 

18.500 



220.000 

108.737 

14.000 

23.000 



.It- 



NASSAU COUNTY. 



Grand Total I ■ 



JJL^ 



Auto Repair . . . . . 

Brick and Tile Mfgrs. 

Bottling Works 

Blacksmith Shop 

Cannery Company 

Grist Mills 

Saw Mills 

Naval Btores 



60.93611 104,9001 108.0001* 60.900 1 



4.1001* 24,600!. 



•I*. 



*■■ 



1.000 
1.500 
1.200 
1.100 
1,500 
1.000 

53,636 



B.200! . 

4,5001. 
3.500 
2,000 
6.000 
2,200 
83,500 



108.000 



60.900 



4.1001 



24,6001 ■ . 



OKEECHOBEE COUNTY. 



Grand Total 

Naval Stores 

Blacksmith Shop 

Bottling Works 

Fish Packers 

Fruit Packing House . , 
Ice A Electric Light House 

Haw Mills •■ 

Boat Bldg and Repairing 
Waasn Works and Repairs 




449.280* 744.50OJ 



63! 



1.180 

2.000 

14.400 

101.000 

14.iK)0 

24.500 

27,000 

1.600 



2.600' 

4,<0OI 

23.800 

126,000 

201,000 

40.200 

50.000 

2.100 



19.000 



10.OOO 



1.9001* 38.000 

"1,9001 • 38.0W 



* » 



, 



TABLE NO. 3 (SECOND HALF)— MANUFACTURES— BX COUNTIES.— (ConlUned). 



-£ 



NAME OF BUSINESS, 

MANUFACTURE OR 

PRODUCT. 



TOBACCO MANUFACTORIES. 



Character of Product. 



8 






tc 



s 

1 



Cost of Material and 
Value of Products. 



Thew columns mast 
not be . used In valu- 
lng Manufactured To- 
lwcco or Naval f-iores. 



I-a" 
83 - 



— — -- 

=°I 

It 01 

_ n 



NAVAL STORES. 



Turpentine. 



Rutin. 



GINNERIES AND PRODUCTS. 



h 

«-E-> 
o 

|- 

n. 

ox ** 

- I 

E~JS 
= c = 



s 

> 



3 

JSl. 

ifs 



LEON COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



H | It I* ?44.W 



1 1,370,8241 144.200j« 147,86*1 



Auto Repair Shops 

Basket Factories 

Blacksmith Repair Shops . 

Bakeries 

Broom Factory 

Bee Keepers' Supplies . . . 

Chero-Cola Plant 

Candy Factories 

Collar Factories 

Cotton Gins 

Cane Mills 

Cross Ties 

Cigar ManUHcturcra 

Cooper Shops 

Foundry 

Gris tMllls 

Ice Flam 

Laundry 

Lumber Companies 

Monument Company 

Mattress Making 

Metal Works 

Naval Stores 

OH Mill 

Pressing C ltibs 

Tobacco Packar 

Paint Shop 

Photographers 

Printing- Shops 

Planing Mill* 

Saw Mills 

Shoe Repairing 

Upholstering 

W agon Factories 

Wood Tarda 

Water, fias k Electricity 



81.550 

60 

7,772 

4.800 

400 

400 

10.000 

1.500 

45 

3,176 

28,080 

26,100 



785 

10,000 

15,715 

60,000 

10.200 

185,200 

800| 

240 

4,500 



1.10.OII0 



46,000 

150 

13.615 

S.I II II I 

500 

600 

15,000 

2.900 

125 

6,201 

4:1.911 

56.050 



11,534 1 f 94,4821 



1.771 |S 176,0001 



rrnr 



1,400 

11.500 

80.99.". 

100,000 

11.500 

360,402 

1,500| 

600 

10.000 



144,200 



147.868 



9,534 



94,482 



1.771 



176,000 



4.000 

7.37.-. 

1.000 

2,150 

52,300 

48,800 

03.900 

4,300 

150 

4.625 

2.760 

52.001) 



6.500 

10.000 

1.500 

3.700 

liS, .'.Oil 

1 15.000 

112.000 

•V*>0 

225 

9.150 

3.840 

73.000 



Grand Total 



Blacksmith & Ren Shops. 

Na v al Store* 

Saw Mills 

Grist Mills 



It It 718.4501* 924.800 



LIBERTY COUNTY. 

303.0501* 385.flll«T 






718.1001 

BBnl 



923.000 
OOtt 



308.050 



335,996 



19,5021$ 158.0541 



19.502| 158,954 
I 



MADISON COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Shoe Shops 

Shingle Mills 

Saw Mills 

Naval Stores 

Grist Mills 

Blacksmith Shops 
Cooper 8hops . . . 



Tit 163.9711* 322.838 1 65.85(1 * 498.3801 



4.04518 34.4161 



to: 



TO" 



..!-. 



5101 

18.840| 

137.100' 



1.0201. 

77,1001. 

226,800 , 



2 921 1 
'.020 1 
.'! 400 1 



7.878 1. 
3.48SI. 
6 600I. 



62.850! 498,380 



..I. . , 
,.l... 



4.045 



34.410 



.1. 



..!.. 



PALM BEACH COUNTY. 



G rand Total 

Cleaners and Pressors . . 
Blacksmith and Repairs . 
Shoemakers and Repairs 
Auto and Bicycle Repairs 

Boat Builders 

Saw Mills 

Fish Packers 

Gas Plant 

Upholstery Plant 

Ice Cream Mfgrs 

Novelty Works 

Dressmaking Kstubilshm't 

Concrete Works 

Laundries 

Bakeries 

Bottling Works 

Cigar Mannf actnrers 

Machine Shops 

Plumbing and Ropalrs . . 
Sheet Metal Works ..... 



r>1.500|» 25,7501 -|$. 



51,500 



25,750 



5811.9751? 744.830 



22.050 

18,500 

0,000 
70,050 

•J4.ir.ii 

82,000 
280, 1 7--. 

IS. (Mill 

2.000 

4.500 

211,000 

13.000 

7.000 

8,880 

28,100 

8.150 

' 10.550 
30.700 

io.s.-.o 



::2.5.-m 
22.350 
1 3,450 

sy.i 

33,500 

40.200 

265,080 

20.000 
2.850 
7.500 
45.000 
18,000 
10,800 
12.80(1 
US. SO" 
11,880 

'23.500 
48,700 
10.500 



• I*. 



• I* 



PASCO COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Blacksmith Shops 

Cotton Gins 

Irrigation Works 

Cane Mills 

Grist Mills 

Newspapers and, Printing 

Packing Houses 

Piling 

Photographers 

Naval Stores 

Tobacco Company 

Saw Mills 

Canning Factory 

Construction company ...i 

Concrete Works I 

Silos »•) 

Cigar Factory I 

,. Coal Burners . 

g General Repair Shops 1 



24.000 



ITTOOO 2,2001 ~|* . ..j* 3,342.1 73 1* 4.518.850 



2,200 



16.200 

'154,000 
20.875 
10,800 
13.000 
15,000 
4.080 
1.000 

150.666 

2.920.008 
12.000 

5.60O 
•j. iKiii 
1,500 

4.666 

13.300 



310.0001* 1 78.0001 ~ 111.80(l|* 29.8081 



550!* 57,5001 



1.5801 * 350.800 



20.000 

'345'. 666 

13,850 
17,000 
20,000 
80.000 

e.ooo 

2.080 

200.666 

3,733.00(1 

20.000 

20.000 

4.000 

2.408 



10.666 '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 
23.800 



550 



810,100 



178.000 



P I N KI.I.A8 COUNTY. 



16.800 



29,600 



v. 



57.500 



1.500 



350.000 



Grand Tata I 



475.000 



$ 16.680! ■■ 



Garage and Auto Repairing 
Cement Block Mfg ....... 

Blcvele Shop and Repairs 
Blacksmith Shop and Reprs 
Cigar Manufacturing .... 

Cleaning A Pressing Shops 

Fruit Packing House 

Novell Mills 

Ice Manufacturing 

Naval Stores 

Saw Mills 

Shoe Shop and Repairs . . 



475.000 



10.680 



$ 457.00011 618.5351 



8.0451* 8.000 j 



0701* 5.3001 



42.01" 

22,000 

li.'JOW 

2.500 

' '13.440 
40.000 

227.588 
50.000 

41.666 

I.4S0 



93 .56(1 

30.000 

8,400 

6.000 

19.635 
50,««0 

288,000 

75.080 

70.666 
12,000 



8.9451 



ti.oeo 






870 



5.308 



POI.K COUNTY. 



'Grand Total 



• I 



45.6001* 17.1601 



.1*. 



483.2681* 714.3751 !» I Tf* 



Cigar Manufacturing 

Buttling Works 

Repair Shop ........... 

Garage and Repair Shops 

Ice Manufacturing 

Grapefruit Juice Mfg 

Shingles Manufacturing . 
Lumber Manufacturing . . 
Ire and Light* 



46.000 17.160 




8.588- 

1.2*0 

48.975 

22.000 

34.200! I 

115.5001 1 

459.0881 I 

30.0001 . I 






...I.. 



■ ■'» 



PUTNAM COUNTY.. 



rrnn , To „„ 65.0001* 13.008 I* I* 2. 324.1.8,* 3.013.800 1 '*" r-nw* si -wai 1 0. 3 001* O^TW 

''■""" - • '- i ' ** i 1M.4MII 2R!\3O0! ! 



r'ross Tie Mfg 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Bakeries 

Cigar Manufacturing . . 

Wood Yards 

Slenm Laundries • • - • - 
Lumber Manufacturing 

Itnttllng Works 

Photographers 

Novelty Works 

Bicycle Repair Shops . 



,;.-.. ftixi 



13.000 



I 

I.. 



188 
o 

11 



.4*0! 
0001 
2001 



280.3081 

•■4 noo 1 I 

22.«06l 



.1.. 



' l«.7»«l 

18.5801 

•78.0O0I 

24.088] 

7.0O«l 

4.0001 

4.508! 



r.l.H... . . 
21.888I.. . 
1.644.0001. . 

51.888' 

1 2.5081 

10.0001 

s.too 

oot . . . 






.I. 






1.HM 



*c 









TABLH 


NO. 3 (SECwNI* HALF)— MANUFACTURES— BY COUNTIES.— <ContiB»e<L). 










• 


TOBACCO MANUFACTORIES. 


Cost of Material and 
Value of Products. 


NAVAL 8TORE8. 


OINNKMIBS ANB PR©»TJCTt. 




Character »f rrodnct. 


Turpentine. 


K*Htn. 


e 

§- 

w a 

v-a . 

°5S 
*a* 

111 




*J9 

— x 

|| 

s 

*- ED 

w 






These columns raufit 
not be lined In »nlu- 
Ing Manufactured To- 
bacco or Naval Store**. 




NAME OF BUSINES8, 

MANUFACTURE OR 

PBODTJCT. 


1 

a 

u 

V 

s 

3 
Z 


4) 

3 


| 
u 

5 
E 

S5 


a 


1 

_o 

"a 


J 

> 


■a 
"3 

of 


a 
"3 




Ms 9 

fisi 

!!flp»* 

1MB 


c E >1 

3 OB 

- ? "- 

._ w = 


a 
> 



OKAI/OOSA COUNTY. 



.'■"mil To i hi 



Naral Stores 

Grist Mills 

Saw Mills 

Cotton Gins 

Blacksmith Shop ..'.'.'.'..'. 






HMI .757H 

44,500 

1.745 

09.708 

204 

600| 



M1UM1 

.io,»3"o 

3.295 

84.820 

396 

800 



r.H.IHKllS 22.2.101 



56.0001 



22.230 



.'{..VJ.1I* 28.073! 

~s,sm jitottt ' : 



2Q.1 f ggTBOi 



205 



26.75«j 



ORANGE COUNTY. 



Uranrt Total i -J.B.SK.L'OO' » 94.H49' |j. 



Anto Palntlnir 

Bakeries 

Blacksmith Shops 

Broom Factory 

Carriage and Wagon Mfg. 

H Candy Factory 

ao Canning Factory 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Elec, Ice (!as & Water Pita 

Foundry & Metal Wks . . . 

Fertilizer Companies '. . . . 

Garage and Rep Shops . . . 

Grist Mil! „ 

UarnesB Shop 

Insecticide Companies . . . 

Laundries 

Marble 4 Cement Wks . . . 

Orange Packing House . . . 

Orange Picking Baga 

Bicycle and Repairing . . 

Printing Shoos 

Plumbing and Repairing 

Photographer ... 

Saw Mills 

Shoe Repairing 

Sprayers and Rep Work 

Bottling Works 

Tailors and Pressing . . . 

Naval Stores 

Vulcanizing and Repairs 

Wood Supply Co I 



.IS l.!m:i.5S7l.s LMliO.-iiil 



2.B38.200 



94.84* 



. . 






3.B40 

70.000 

r.,800 

2.780 

17.775 

7.000 

7,980 

' 131.090 

100.000 

42.000 

70.900 

800 

l ,M0 

1.1.2.10 
40.000 

2.700 
967.900 

2,100 

9.100 
.12,394 
4.1.000 

3.000 
206.2111 

9.600 
2.1.817 
20,764 
10.8001 

"l'»,266l " 

3.8801 



3,640 
78,000 
7.650 
4.000 
2G.O00 
8.500 
8,312 

199.508 

122.000 

4.1.000 

93.625 

800 

3.500 

25,250 

48.000 

4,000 

994.400 

2.200 

ie.8o« 

61.097 
46,900 
4.000| 
222.521 
11.810 
26.817 
21.681 
12,700 

12,000 
4.500 







08.900 



2». 



4.8H6IH -JS.4.S7 



060 



4,396 



28,487 



BE 



OSCHOLA COUNTY. 



Grand Total 



Blacksmith Shops I 

Concrete Factories 
Wheelrlght and Repairs 

Millinery Shops 

Cigar Manufacturers 

Ice Manufacturers 

Electric Plant 

Boat Repairing 

Saw Mills 

Repair Shops 

Painting Shops 




S 281. 'I?.'. In 41.1.700 



3.0001 

.1.0001 

2.400! 

3.200| 

6,0001 

30.0001 

18.800' 

6.07.1 1 

132.000! 

48.5001 

27.0001 



4.000 

7.000| 

3.5001 

3.2fl0| 

7.50O,- 

70.008' 

37.000. 

8.9001 

160,500' 

75.3001 

3.1.0001 



rr^i 




i 




~v 



ST. JOHNS COUNTY. 
Grand Total | 3,tfO6,B80|$ ll0.287| I* I» *75,021|$ 1.243.720| HU.WHfl* 57,7201 



l,75o* 86.UU0I |». 



Bicycle Repair Shops 
Bottling Works 



Bakeries 

Blacksmith Shops 

Boat BIdrs and Repairers 

Barrel Factories 

Cigar Manufacturers .... 
Cabinet Manufacturers . . . 
Mfg Cement BUc A Fences 
Contractors & Builders . . 

Coopering 

Cross Tie Contractor 

Dressmaking 

Auto Garages and Repairs 
Furniture Mkrs A Keprs . 

Grist Mills 

Harness Mkrs A Reprs . . . 
Hat Cleaner & Repairer . 
Ice Factories & Cold Strge 
I'rlatlng 1'lants . . . 
Jelly .Manufacturers. 
Light Plains * I*wr House 
laundries .... 
Millinery Shops 
Novelty Mill . 
Plumbing Shop and Heprg 

Planing Mill 

Shoe Mkrs and Keprs ... 
Soap Manufacturers .... 
Sawing Mch Hep Shop . . 
Tnllerlng and Repr Shop 

Tin Shop 

Naval Stores 

V ulcanlzlng Plant 

Vegetable -Canning Plant 
Wat*r Works 



8,600,880 



110.287 



12.394 

11,150 

18.000 

7,982 

6,800 

4!t,200 



4,500 

9,020 

75,000 

10,400 

5,000 

25,100 

100.000 

4,500 

2,235 

13.000 

1,500 

56,380 

85.000 

060 

48,772 

20,000 

18,500 

5,000 

4.500 

35,500 

20,050 

1,500 

2, Si "J 

24,800 

2.O00 



19,470 
25,670 
64,000 

28.01"! 

16,500 

180,500 



9, 

18, 

90. 

If 

8, 

31 

129, 

11 

6 

22 

3 

105 

114. 

1 

108 

35 

43 

.,., 

11 
15 

28 

a 

7 

3ti 

3 



800 
,250 
,000 
500 

IIIHl 

,250 

,l|(>0 

,000 
,950 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,200 
,5511 
.000 
,500 
,050 

.ooo. 

.00o 
,000 
,500 
.00.1 
.500 
fi!U) 
,000 



l.-U'l 

2,100' 
7,020 1 



,500 
,000 
,000 



101.600 



57,720 



1,750 



35,000 



IT 













ST. LUCIE COUNTY. 

T .W Jii « '}->o ft 1 •> 


-; 






|$ 




;S 





•V 




Grand Total 

Barrel Factorlas 

Broom Factories 

Cigar Factory 

Concrete Werks 


8,966 

3.1)60 


* 4.500 
4,566 






23.280 

8,600 

Ys.ioo 

SN.IOO 

400 
11.800 
29,571 

135 
22.000 

kMo 

2.4HII 

15.024 

424 


32,000 
21.600 

17,666 
9 9,000 
500 
12.000 
33,796 
170 

25. 1 

03.S70 

4,052 

17,528 

1 .596 


i. . .. 

















<•.■■>■■■ 


Home Cannery 

Ice Cream Products 

Ice Factory 

Mfg Jellies A Preserves . . 

Mat-tilae Shop 

Saw Mills 

Shoe Shops 

Bottling Wrks 

Blacksmith Shop 





























SI'WANNEF 


rotrNTY. 






















i 




36.200 


$ 58.2501 12.745 


s 7.920 


1.569'$ 


8.614 


104|$ 


15,600 


1,333|$ 


365.920 


TTIackHmlth Shop A Reprs 
Cotton Uin 










4.050 

Y.soo 

6,000 
1,650 


8,850 
11360 

3.500 


12,745 


7.920 


1,569 


8,6i4 


' 104 


15,666 


1,667 

200 




76,240 


Naval Stores 


241,680 
48.000 














1B.OOO 


25. .'500 
TAYLOR 


COUNTY. 























(irand Total 



Saw Mills :... 

Naval Stores 

Log Camps ...... 

Garages and Repairs . 

Electric Plants 

Bottling Works 

Cross Tic Mfg ■■•■■■• 
Milling and Repairing 



..I.. 



80.2501$ 131.750 



41,700 

21,666 

1.200 

15,000 
600 
800 
450 



82.500 

87,666 

1.400 

19.000 
800 
450 
000 



101.0001$ 505. 0001 



t;.S50|* 68.500! 



101,0001 



50.-,.0lHI 



6.850| 05.500 



^ 



1 











TABLE 


NO. 3 (SECOND HALF)— MANUFACTURES— BY COUNTIES.— (Continued). 




















TOBACCO MANUFACTORIES. 


Cost of Material and 
Value of Products. 


NAVAL STORES. 


G 


INNEB1ES AND PRODUCTS. 




Character of Product. 


These columns must 


Turpentine. 


Roela. 


11 


P 


diJS 














not be used in valu- 
ing Manufactured To- 










5« 




i e 














bacco or Naval Stores. 






4 


•' 


V 




=7 




NAME OF BUSINESS, 




a Si 




MANUFACTURE OB 




£ 




O 4>G- 








= •0 




-t = 




PRODUCT. 


£ 


£ 




S — M 










* 




t a 


. 




S 


§ 




ff*| 


fc * 






| 




= § 




C ■ 


I 


• 


5 

ji 

s 

s 


a 

1 * 


E 

fa 


Of 

■ 
> 


4H 

iiill 




■ 
a 





6 

3 

>• 


i 

es 
M 


a 

V 

s 


IfiJ 

= c= 


i 

G." ™* 

.= 5 


Ji 

■aZ-c 


t 

« 

s 

> 


PUTNAM COUNTY — Cont. 






Auto Repair Shops 

Marine ways 













.ill, HIM 1 
•J-.IIIMI 


tz.uuui 

flS.000; 



















Shoe Repair Shops 

Auto Shipping Blocks . . . 
Millinery Establishments . 












la.rioo 


29,TO0| 




































s.rrno 


16.5"!i. 




































22,400 


47.80«> 


























Furniture Repairs 












0.000 


16.000 




























Parages 












10.IKK1 ?5.000 




























Dressmaking 

Plumbing & Tin Shops . 


, 










20,2.>n r .4.C00 






































19..'iii0! 30.000 




























Concrete Block Mfg 












8,U0o; 22.000 




























Blacksmith Shims 












21.000 r.s.noo 




























Shingle Mills 













30,000 


75.0001 


























Barrel & Staves Mfg .... 












84,000 


125.000 


















...... 










Packing Houses 












75.130 


1 00.000 




























Cypress Tanks 












65,000 


85.000 




























Buckets and Tubs Mfg . . . 












80,000 


120.000 




























Job Printing 

Ice Cream Mfg 













8,800 
7,500 


10,000 
17.000 




























Machine Shops 














73,000 


112.000 




























Naval Stores 

Window, Frames & Screens 













3,400 


0,806 


162 


5(1(1 


81,250 


10,300 


02.700 


















Sewing Machine Repra 












1JSO0 


1.000 




























Cnblnet Makers 












2.000 


3.000 




























Boilermakers & Repairs . . 





> . • 








63,000 


101,000 




























Harness Shop & Repairs 













400 


1,200 




























Electrical Work 


.......... 










8,000 


17.000 




























(irlst Mills 












1.200 


1.000 




























Dry Docks 












850,000 


500,000 




















• 








c,aa Plant 













12,000 


22,000 


























Electric Light Plant 












10.000 


25.1100 




























Ice Plant 













20,000 


32,000 




























\\ n'er Works 












15.000 


26.000 






.......... 










• • ■ * 












S*NTA ROSA COUNTY. 
Urnnd Total |--- '* rvi AlH . •?!/, ••,.-» 10 <**..!. r=-TT^t „ . =^rr^-. ^~ 




Xuw M1IU 


1 1 








4ir.,4c,o 


453.360 


i^.uu|* 1 1 ,n.» 


O.Z/UI* 00.23UI 20 


* 3.0001 






* 


Printing Shops 


.....(.. 








8.150 


10.260 














. . . . 












Shoe Renalrlng Slums . . . 


• • 1 . . 








2,800 


2,900 


























Blacksmith Shops 







• ■ ■ 






2,700 


3,300 


























Naval Stores 

Jewelry and Repairing ... 
Ship Building 


.".'.:::: : : 











1,666 


2.666 


138.750 


47,620 


6.270 


56.230 




























75,000 


109,000 














' * * ' 












Electricity and Sewerage 












5,200 


5,400 














* ■ * ' 












Bottling Works 

Shingle Mills 












. 2,000 
5,400 


2.100 
6.200 












'.'.'.'.'.'. 














Grist Mills 














2,400 


2,600 


























Cane Mills 

Cotton Gin 

Feed Mill . . .■ 








:::::: 




1.241 

' Yo',666 


2,182 
' 11.666 










' 20 




3.000 












(Jrand Total 


SEMINOLE COUNTY. 

500,000* 18.5001 IS * .inonTI* m rtBA nantmi on *.r>a i -l**.!,. ■,„„■»,,, wm .* ...i . 


Cigar Manufacturing .... 

Cotton Gin 

Lumber Mfg 


soo.ooo 


18.500 








27.266 


38,866 




:::::::::: 




■P OW,Ul*i( 


I'M* IJ.UUt 

751 13,666 






* 




Naval Stores 

Novelty Works 















5.666 


' b',666 

780 


58.036 


22,508 


3,759 


30,072 
















Mfg of H«Cct (medicinal 1 





- • • • • 








312 
























Shingle Mills 













7.485 


11.600 







•••• 





















TABLE NO. 3 (8ECOND HALF)— MANUFACTURES — BY COUNTIES.— (Continued). 



NAME OF BUSINESS. 

MANUFACTURE OR 

PRODUCT. 



TOBACCO MANUFACTORIES. 



Character of Product. 



| 

2 

I 



ta 



I 
■?. 



Cost of Material and 
Value of Product*. 



These columns mast 
not be used In valu- 
bacco or Naral Stores, 
bacco or Naval Stores. 



o I = a 

8 sSie 



=2 i 

Si*-; 

= =.-% 



NAVAL STORES. 



Turpentine. 



Rosin. 



GINNERIES AND PRODUCTS. 



SC5 






Hi . 

If! 



■"J3 

I, 

••2 






ft 



VOLUSIA COUNTY. 









* ■ 










717.000 


1.638.000 




























110.5(1(1 


84.450 


3.310 


62.500 










Tire Repairers 

Light. Ice ft Pwr Heu*o . 


, » 









2.500 
204,23ft 

12,31)0 
00.500 

o,"oo 

45.010 

5.25.-. 

11,400 

35.05(1 

.1,370 

37.6110 

37.100 

2.275 

8,105 

9.550 

111,000 

IT. in.) 

5.680 

26.250 

34.000 

13,800 

s.r.iio 
29,700 

4.500 

39.000 

790 

2.500 
24.470 


8,900 

262.320 
41.700 

1 95, 7(10 
19.400 

139.505 
17.O00 
26,600 
93.700 
31,150 
91.T00 
117,500 
10,400 
42.SOO 
25.T00 
39,250 
37,900 
15.485 
45.700 

119,000 
31,800 
25,700 
65.200 
12.400 
76,000 
1,100 
7,500 

101.(111) 


















































Auto Repair Shops 

Auto Painting Shops .... 









































































































































Cleaning & Pressing Shops 




































































































































I 
















































.. 




















Dressmaking Eslaulishmts 







































































































Mfgrs Preserves ft .11 lies . 












































• 







































































































Miscellaneous Industries . 












1 











WAKULLA COUNTY. 





* *•••• 


28,5341* 42,767 


!>2.0OO|X 


«3.»23| 


5.9421* 
















92.0001 


.13,3221 


5,942 


61,613 
















21 232 
277 

4.450 
500 
»7ft 

1.100 


32.80O 

522 

5.786 

TOO 

1,560 

1.400 
























































"1 




















i 


















.:::::::::»:::. ::::.:! ::::: 











WALTON COUNTY. 



4, rand Totnl 


1 1* I !* 


* 


444:rv- 


* 1.001.7251 


504.450 


% 180,(128 


33.259 1» 


.123.28(1 1 


1* 1 


1* 








6.350 
433.13S 


103001 




1. 












.104.450 


1 86.628 1 


33.259 




323.286' 


••••••• 













WASHINGTON COUNTY. 







S 420.170 s i:)6 800l 275.956 


* 197.927! 19.8151* 189,696 1 400 


* 60.0001 •% 












i 


27.-..05K 


197.927 


19.815 


160.695 




















6.556 

1.150 

352.545 


7,aoo 

2.800 

5»8.ftOi> 

H.400 

80,000 
4.000 




































































.LOCO 


























2.000 

50.000 

2 50P 












































400 


60.000 








1 


::::::::::i:::::::::: 


425 


1.2O0