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Full text of "The New York times"

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VOL. XXVI JfO. 7829. 



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NEW- YORK, TUESDAY, OCTOJBER 17, 187G.--WITH SUPPLEMENT. 



PUIOE FOUE CENTS. 



MR. BUINE IN NEW-YOM. 



COJStVICTJNG ABBAIGNMEKT OF THE 
i DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 

CrUCNDID riCTUSK OF THB DOINGS OF THE 
BOHSB or BKPKK8EWTATIVB8 — EX- 
yKTirTiff TAKINO THE LOAVKB AND GIV- 
raO THE CRUMBS TO URIAH HEAP DEMO- 
CRATS OF THE NORTH — DE8PEBATE EF- 
rORTS OF THE CONFErBKATES TO RULE 
THE COUNTRT AND TTRANNIZK OVER 
THE BLACKS. 

^e reception of Mf. Blaine at the hall 
if tbe Cooper Union last oTenine was one of 
tAe grandest of demonstrations \7hi0b even tbis 
City of demonstrations has ever witoessed. In 
every respect the audience was one -which re- 
fl««t«id credit npon the intelligence and 
patriotism of the Bepublicans of the 
Metropolis. Among thote on the plat- 
form -were Thurlow Weed, Elliot C. Cow- 
Un, Luther B. Harsh, Gen. Daniel £. 
Sickle^ Gen. Q. B. Sberidai), William 
Blakeman, Jude* P. J. Fithian, Henry High- 
land Gamctt. Hon. William L. Estabrook, Wil- 
Kam X. Darling. Charies S. Spencer, ex-Judge 
4. J. Dittenhoefei, Hon. A. W. Tenney. and 
maoy others. At 7:20 Hon. A. B. Cornell called 
tbe meeting to order and nominated Clarence 
A. Seward as Chairman. Mr. Seward accepted 
tbe honor in a neat speech, and, after the com- 

plf^on of the organization by the appointment 
of Vice Presidents and Secretaries, introduced 
to the audience tbe speaker of tbe evening, Hon. 
James G. Biaine. Tbe appearanee of tbe ex- 
gpeaker was tbe signal tor a most en thus 
. iasrio and tnmaltaons reception. Men cheered 
nytii they were boarse, 'women waved their* 
haadkerehieft, and for full five mioutes the 
'^' air itsoonded with the continnous applanse. 
When the noise of his welcome had sufficiently 
sahaided. Mr. Biaine advanced to the front of 
ib* platform and spoke for an hour and a 
half. His exposure of the meanness, dupli- 
aity. and false pretenses of the Democratio 
C««f«dwate House -was telling and was re- 
eaired with tbonders of applause ft«m tbe en- 
tin assenblagew His tribute to tbe courage of 
tbe Bepublioan Senate in resisting the arro- 
gant demaxtds of the ex-Bebel Representatives 
called forth a renewed tempest of oheerinf, 
while his description of the servile submission of 
the Northern Democratio mt^oritj^o tde South- 
ern Demooratio minority was a masterpiece of 
saressm and indignation. The peroration in 

wbibh he pomted tbe artniment for protection to 
tba fiUmthem blacks by quoting Ed mnnd Burke's 
appeal A the impeaobmeat of Warren Hast- 
mis, in which justice was demanded for the 
eaiforinK Hindoo, was spoken with the utmost 
sffsct, and was reoeired Moordingly. Tbe 
aoene when Mr. Blaine lett tbe rostrum was a 
repetition of bis welcome. It was generally 
eonoeded that the meeting was one of the most 
memorable in tbe annals of New-York poUtioe. 
After Mr. Blaine came Hon. A.W. Tenney, of 
' Brooklyn, who spoke effectively for nearly an 
!M>ar. anl was succeeded by 8. B. Dutoher. of 
Brooklyn, and Henry Highland Gamett. Loud 
salla were made for Gen. Sickles, bat be did not 
re^Hmd. The meeting broke up at a late boor 
unid hearty cheers for the national and State 
iieketa. 

ItB. CLARENCE A. SBWABD'S BEMAEK8. 

Hon. A. B. Cornell opened the proceedings 
by BonloatiDg Hun. Clarence A.. Seward as Presi- 
SSBt of the mestinc. 

Mr. Seward, who was leeeived with enthusiastic 

pplaase, spoke a« follows : 

TSLLOW-Crnzaas : I hsvs tbo. honor to thank 
fW for tbe position which you hsve given me to- 
.If bt, and if yon eon Id stand hers ss I do and see 
this iDacnifloMit array &om onr Citr yon ooald an- 
davtsnd tbe feeling ot grstltade which I have. It hss 
Isoc been tbe custom of onr people, when qaesdons 
of xxav* a stjonal import were to be considered, to 
lather tbamsetrss together and gain that wisdom 
sad streagth which results from oonsnltatien and 
dtseostloa. Oa a ootable ooesaion, 100 years aco, 
Umss who then watobsd over the welfare- ot our 
Bepablio asserted, st a meeting which they had, 
Ibst tbey held certain truths to be self-erident;. 
flues that declaratioa tboee troths have 
feraed a portion of the political creed of ever3- 
tnw American. In accordance with that oostom, 
tbos loog connnoed, we bave come togetber to- 
Digbt tagoodiv numbers to snpplement tbe work 
ef onr fore^bers. by adding to their tmtbs tbls 



tarttarone: 



Ibst tbe Tight to govern tbe Union 



betoBgs to those who detended, protected, and pre- 
terrad it. flAiad obaers.| Saob ia tbe creed 
of the Sepu'oUesn Party to-dsy. | Cheers.] 
The inquiry now is. Shall this further tmtb. with 
an the qoeations of flnancew of oivil reform, and of 
Soothem leoopstmetton, which it involves, b* now 
seeei.tsd by tbs American people t° And shall 
Bsyes sad Wlieeler, who reprssest those who ac* 
tmfH that fenitb, be eleeteu to snstain and enforce 
ftf [Great eheezing.J 

Tbs old ory, ""Watchman, wbat of tbe night 1" 
finds here new atteraoce. The slgis are pro- 

pt'.iosa. Vermont and Maine lead oif with aaperb 
victories. Conneetieot baa already siveo snob signifl- 
eant BepubUean faint, ss Insores her futbfalnesa. 
Ohio [cheers] expieases the gratitude which she 
fasls for having been given the Bepnblican nom- 
^a^ by givioz him aad us a victory. And farther 
oward the settmg sun, ttie Sta>e of Indiana ha* 
ibown her atrengtb In the present, and gives happy 
fi^miae for tbe fatnre by largely inoreanag tbe 
Fanmher of her Beonbhcaa CoDgressmen. Sbe 
Will do agaia in 1&7S what she did in 1872. 
Sbe then elected Hendricks ss her Governor, 
bnt^ave her electoral vote to Grant and Wilson. 
Tbs gallant Harrison ana those who sprang to bis 
■opport are seitber dismayed nor discouraged. 
They^ propose to demonstrate that wbat Indiana 
has dooe sbe will do yet agaio. by giving ber elec- 
teral vote to ihs Bepuobcaa nominee. [Cheers.] 
Tins being tbe outlook Ease and West, it is obvious 
that the real contest is nearer home ; that it 
is, in fact. tbe electoral vote of tbe 
£mpire Sute wbicb is to determine the 
present oootest. We ate told thai we baveaaolid 
goulb. A " solid South" in favor of " :^«o^lbern 
men with Soaibsrn princlplea" tor Preaideiit and 
Vice Presiaeot msv make Kew-Tork, as she was in 
1S24, tbe arbicer of (be question. Ber dutr in such 
a contest is plain : To vote for Ibose whose first 
and ooty eonslderatioo will bj tbe ioteznTy of the 
Government and the prosperity of tbe people. 
[Cheers.] Graut that our opponene commenced 
tbis oaovass with a solid South, and tbe 
foot la not half ao dark aa it would havu 
heeo bad sot slsrerv been abolished. Admit the 
!aet of tbe unity of tbe South, and it foils to afford 
a reason why we of tbe North ahould l>e diacoar- 
aged. Tbete was a " aolid South" In tbe rebellion, 
aad at its coinroencement there was a divided 
K'Ttb. But barilly bad tbe rchoea of tbe first gun 
flrrd by treason died away when tbe division wtn 
•laaled'tbe issue ceased to be doubtful, for a united 
Kortb t>I<rtted out tbe slavery and crushed oat tiie 
rsbeilioo of a "solid South." Since tbes, with un- 
parallel^ magnanimity tbe Government btta for- 
given those wbo were its foes, and ^as oermitted 
*.oosw who were leaders in tbe rebellion to hold seats 
as llepreseotitives In Conjftesa. 

ITotwithatandlng ail this, we bave to-day the 
epeciacle of South Caroliaa. tbe mother of noUifloa- 
don and secession, actually engaged in armea re- 
Ustanca to that portion ot the Constitntion known 
as tbe fourteenth amendment. Are we of the North 
esain to be divideti, and ahaU we a^«spt Sontb 
Carolina's new invtistton t Stiall ws nnieam tbe 
lasson ortne oast 1 Or shall wa sasecl 0(i9a mora 






in a neacefni way the power of a united Xorth I 
[Great cheering.] 

OFFICERS OF THE EVE.PfING. ■"^r 
Judge Fithian here submitted the iollowing 
list of Vice Presidents and Secretaries, which was 
adopted by the meering : 

VICE PRESIDENTS. 



John A. Dix, ■ ■ -. 
Georee Ooovke, 
Cbauncev M. Depew, 
Joseph Seligman, 
Levi P. Mortoo, 
Thomas L. James, 
M. K. jKsup, 
Ertwiu EiDstein, 
Christopher. Pullman, 



Edwin W. Stonghton, 
Lntber R. Marsh, 
John D. Lawson, 
Charles P. Eirtlsnd. 
SVan Bonsselaer Cruger, 
Biastos C. Benedict, 
William H. G^dney, 
Sinclair Tonsey, 
FletoDerlT. ilarcer. 



Abraham J.Bltteuboefer, Lloyd Aspiawall, 



George B. Law ton, 
George B. Deane, 
J. Schuyler Crosby, 
William Orton, 
Joho Cochrane, 
Bichard M. Hunt, 
Albert Bterstadr, 
TbomAB Nsst, 
Jacob L. Dodge, 
Jacob Uens. 
John J. Townsend^ 
Henrv G. Pearson, 
Thomaa L. Tbomell, 
Henry L. Burnett, 
R. R. Caro!»nier, 
F. S. Wilmerdinfi, 
Rntherford Stnyvesant, 
Thomas E. Stewart, 
Bobert C Brown, 



Geor,ie Starr, 
EJronnd Stepbenson, 
George E. Eaamire, 
John Ho«'y, 
Edgar Ketcbam, 
John McClave, 
James C. Carter, 
Andrew J. Campbell, 
Cbarle.^ L. Tiftanv. 
E. Delafield Smith, 
George W, Palmer, 
Mattbnw Kane, 
Frederick 1). Tappan, 
M. Thalmessinrer, 
WMliaiii B. Asten, 
Herman Cantor, 
Lawsoo N. Foliar, 
Charles Post, 
David B. Milhken, 



SECBETARIES. 



Frederick Richardson, 
J. W. Howe, 
Booert O'Noil Ford, 
E. F. Bruce, 

Webster Siepheinon, 

Charles C. Murphy, 
Stephen H. Oiin, 
Frunk Fiereon, 
Cbaries Sherman, 
Frank Ball, 

John B. 



Jobu R. Pope, 
D. Webster llee, 
Janips R. Adams, 
Bobert E. B;»teman, 
William H. Baker, 
Josepli C. Bielin, 
Uenrv Garrison, 
J. W. Wilson, 
W. H. Lockwood, 
William H. Gary, 
Lawrence. 



MR. BLAINE'S SPEECH. 

Tbe President then said : I have now to 
present to you him whom yon all came to hear, and 
who, after rendenng loyal sorvioe in the West, 
comes to aid us with his voice and presence. I 
have tbs pleasure of introducing to you Hon. James 
G. Blaine. Tbe meation of Mr. Blaine's name was 
received with the most enthusiastic cheering, again 
and agaiu renewed. Tbe ex-Speaker then addressed 
the meeting as follows: 

It was my fortane, either good or ill — at least it 
was my fate— to bave catered Congress some four- 
teen years ago, and the first Winter that I took my 
seat in the House we bad under discussion a bill to 
prescribe a test oath fur persons who should there- 
after bold office under the Government of the 
TJnited States. That oath has since become his- 
loric. and is popularly known aa the iron-clad oath. 
Its desien was to prevent men in rebellion against 
the Government of the ITaited States holding office 
nnder . that Crovemment afterward. Aod I 

well remember one day beiae in the Sen- 
ate when the hill was nader diacns- 
sion, and a pleasant-faced, agreeable gentle- 
man, then a Senator from Indiana, Mr. Thomas A. 
Hendricks, fhisses.] of whom I always speak kind- 
ly in a personal eense, [laaghter.J was occupying 
the floor, and I well remember, also, that be said to 

the Senate, " This oath you are now about to pre- 
scribe is useless ; nay, it is mischievous. It is use- 
less because, let me assure yon," said he, with a 
certain spirit of propheov which no one but a mod- 
em Democrat could ever put on, "let me assure 
yon, when this rebellion is ended Lee and Beaure- 
gard. Slidoll and Mason, and all their associates will 
be buay iu seeking their personal safety by flight, 
and they will not bother you in seeking 
or holding ofSoe under the Government 
of tbe United Stares." Well, I thought 
for once tbat Mr- Hendrioka was right ; I thouKbt. 
indeed, that it ivould be a presnmptaoas piece of 
arrogance and impudence, that I should not live to 
see, that men then engaged in rebellion should ever 
come back and claim to aid in the admUustration of 
this Government; and I certainly should bave 
esteemed myself a dreamer of very wild dreams 
if I could then bave thought that I ehonid myself 
remain in thsHouse of Representatives long eaongh 
to see, as I did see on the first Monday of Deoem* 
ber Isat, seventy of the associates of Lee and Slideil 
and Mason — Captains. Colonels, and Brigadiers of 
tbe Confederate Army — seventy of them, stand up 
at the bur of tbe House of Bdpresentatives 
and be sworn In as Democratio members — sworn 
IQ nnder tbe modified oath, for we Bepublicans, who 
are accused of such hard-hearted and cruel policy 
toward the Sontb, h:ive always modified ihct oath 
to adapt it to the tender consciences of rebels. And 
whereas I and every other ioyal roan that takes bis 
seat from the Kortb is compelled to swear that he 
never did rebel and never wished to rebel, and never 
intended to rebel, and tbat he takes the oath with- 
oiit any mental roKervatian or evasion nnder the 
pains and penalties of perjurv in this world and 
future damnation in the next — while we 
are compelled to take this oath these 
seventy Southern scamps, (cheers,] they took 
tbeir seats on tbe. simple promise that tbey 
would try to behave well hereafter, flanghter,] and 
they came in under that oath and took tbeir seats, 
and took off their hats, and hung up tbeir coats, 
and sat down, and made themselves at bouae, and 
took command of the House. [Applause.] And 
the 110 Kortbem Demoorats who were their asso- 
ciates were content to sit at tbeir toet anc take the 
policy of the Democratic Panv of the Union from 
,the seventv Southern rebels that were sworn in un- 
der this modified oath; sod I say here that never in 
the days of the most arrogant pro-slavery r^^ime 
that flourished under Pierce or Buchanan was 
Soathero domination in the Honse of Bepreseata- 

tives SO abiolnte and nncontradicted as it has been 
in the Forty-fourth Cotiaress. 

SOUTREBN DOMINATION IN THB HOUSE. 

Why. look at tbe facts, gentlemen ; they are all 
familiar to you I know, but yet they will bear re- 
cital. Tun knowp as every independent aan knows, 
you know in tbe organization of a Parliamentary 
body its power is expressed tbrough its commit- 
tees- The greatest man wbo ever sat in tbe 

Speaker's choir, Mr. Clay, of Kentncky, said tbat 

the very essence of legislative power was in tbe 
oommitteos ot the House ; that is where legislation 
is shaped, and formed, and fashioned, and com- 
pleted, and whMi tbey came to appoint the oommlt- 
tees of the House wbat did we see ! These seventy 
Southern meo, with a population of thirteen mil- 
lions behind them, were associated with one 
bondred and ten Iforthem Democrats, witb a popu- 
lation of thirty-two millions behind them. Kow, it 
would bave been tbe last point of generosity and 
liberality tt'iward tbe South to bave appointed tbe 
committees of the House on the basis of population. 
[Here the increasing audience rendered it somewhat 
dit&culi 'O bear the speaker.] 

Mr. Blaint- — 11 you only keep qaiet I will make 
every man in tbe bouse bear me. It wonid, I say, 
I have been tbe most liberal basis imaginable 10 have 
p given the Soutnern men control of the commit- 
; tues in the proportion of popnlation. lor on 
I no other basis, whether ot llnauce or of commerce 
. or ot manutHCinrea or ot any great interest of tbe 
I country, du tbey approach the Nortti in anvtbing 

I liice the ratio of' popalRtion ; aud tneretore I s^ it 
I would be treating them wiib tbe utmost liberaaty 
, to have given them between a third and a ruunh 
i part of tbe cummitteus of the House. Aud yet 
I they coolly, they very coolly take possession of 
i twenty-one of the thirtT-one (!ommitte-!S of the 

House, and allow the DeraocraiS of the North to 
I nave tea. [Lauehter. | And these hinb-spirited 
I and proud Domocrats u{ tbe North obedieativ took 
I wbat was given them, «ud sat down nuder it 
\ content; and Mr. Samuel S. Cox, who 
j represents a pirtion of this Citv, or miirepreseuts 
) it, as tbe case may be flaughtei,] Mr. 6amuel 
' Cox, whon twitted uu that fact on tiie flour of tbe 
\ House, said be was glad of it. "Thank Uod." said 

Uriah iicp, 'Master David, I am 'umble." 
, [Laughter.] 

! THS DEMOCKATS KNOCK DOWN ANCIENT KULE8 
I FOB PAKTY PDKPOBES. 

I Well, as soon as tbey had appointed these com- 
I inittees, taking two-Uiirds of the commiltee power 
, of the House on lesa than one-third ot the popnla- 
1 tion of tbe country, tbey got ready for legislation. 
I And the first thing then tbey loond in their way 
: was a great body of mles in this Honse — a body 
I of rules tbat contained the aggregated parliament- 
ary wisdom of ninety years' experi«n.cs - in 
this ooantry, and which . for two centuries before 
had received tbe sanction of the British Honse of 
Commons. And among those rulea the meat im* 



portant of all, the rule which goes more to the very 
pith and marrow of tbe purity of leg^lslalion, was 
tbat wbicb says that upon your appropriation biils 
you shall not engraft acy independent le$:islation- 
Uoderstand me, gentlemen, I say the most im. 
portant rule of the whole body of rules of the Iluuae 
is that which forbids the engrafting of independent 
legislation upon an aporopriation bill. For example 
here comes up your Post Office Appropriation bill, 
appropriating $33,u00.000 or $34,000,000 for the ex- 
penses of the Post Office Department. Up gets a 
Democrat, under instruction of the party caucus, 
and moves to put on to that a piece of legislation 
wholly nneonnected with the Post Oftiue Depart- 
ment — rothiog whatever to do with it — some piece 
of legislation wbicb could not be got tbrough the 
Honse on its own merits, but can be put on tbe 
Committee of the Whole where the yeas aud nays 
cannot be called, and where no man is put on bis 
own responsibility. Then when it gets back to the 
House every man is put on the House 
in what is fnmiiiarly called the "Duvil's Cross-, 
roads," a bad ■n;ay whichever direction you take, 
for vou have eat either to vote for the infaiaons 
legislation which is engrafted on the bill, or in vot- 
ing against it yon bave got to vote agalnal giving 
a single dollar to carry on tbe Post 
Office Department ot the United States. 

Therefore, the rule of the Hou^e, which has been on 
toe statute-books of tbe House tor nearly ninety 
rears, ban forbidden that kiud of legislation. It is 
S'ld that shall not be done. Weil, the first thing 
this House did, tbe very first step they took, was 
to entiiel.v change that rule, and to say that cuma'- 
ter wbat piece of leei^latiun was desiroa, it might 
be DUt on the Appropriation bill pnividet? it was a 
measure of retrencbment. If it was a mtasure ot 
retrenchment it might be put on the 
Appropriation, bill and go tbrongb. That w!<3 
a sort ot silver lining or sugar- 
coating of a bi'ter pili, and they changed the rule 

of tbe House, every Be<pubiicAU votiiie against the 
chance and every ^Democrat vorlae for it. And 
that change, tbe first to"^ninety years that came to 
us. is known as the Sundry Civil Appropriation 

Now tbat bill contains all charities of the United 
States Government. It contains nil tbat Is benefi- 
cent, all tbat is klndlr, and ail tbat is benevolent in 
our Government. It coutaiua the appropriation for 
the Insane Asylum -lor the Army and"'Navv. 
It contains tbe apprnpriatinn for the 
Marine HospitaL It contains the appropriation for 
tbe coast and lakes aud rivers and gulf and^cean. 
It contains tbe appropriation for bringing ibome 
shipwrecked mariners and distressed Americans 
from distant aud possibly bai baron.i coasts. /It con- 
tains tbe appropriation for your great light-bouse 
system, w2iich tnrnishes eyes to the ocean, and by 
Bight warns the manner of danger. And while, I 
sav, this bill of cbaritiea, this bill of beneficence 
was under consideration iu tbe House, np rose a 
Democrat, under instruction ot a secret party caucus, 
and moved co amend it by patting on a clauae re- 
pealing the Snpervisorfi law ot 1869. 

THE SUPERVISORS LAAV AN OFFENSE. 

"Well, what had the Suporvisors law of 1869 to 
do with the chiiitiea of the United States Govern- 
ment f And immediately a fiepnblican rose and 
said, why, under your amended rule, this is not in 
order, becaose your rule says you wsu't put any 
general legislation on the Appropriation bill, unless 
It be a measure of retrenchment. And then arises 
a man who sat in the chair of the Cosmiltee of tbb 
Whole, and whose name I don't now remember, 
and never wish to find ont, und over- 
ruled the point of order, and said 
this was a measure of retrencbment, because he 
said, if you repeal the Supervisors law — and I want 
yon to get that fine point -if you repeal the Super- 
visors law you won't tiave to pay the Supervisors. 
I Applanse and laughter.] Tnat is where the re- 
trenchment came in. Now, gentlemen, I need not 
tell a New-Tork audience what the Super visor.-* 
law is ; you all know it, because it was by reason of 
the frands committed in your (Jity, and the scan- 
dals connected with the Democratic victories, tbat 
created tbatlaw. You know, gentlemen, fori believe 
you cail it an open secret in tbis City of New- York, 
that John T- Hofi'man was seated as Governor on a 
fraudulent vote, and tbat the electoral vote given 
In 1668 was withheld from Grant and given to Say- 
mour^ and that that fraudulent vote was manceuvred 
and manipulated and originated, I don't say by 
whom, for I don't know the intricacies of New-Tork 
Democratic politics, and God forbid that I ever 
should, but I do say, on tbe testimony of tbe last 
candidate for *the Presidency of the Democratic 
Partv, Horace Greolt-y, that the present candidate 
of the Democratic Party, Samuel J- Tilden, was 
the author and the finisher of that fraud, and Mr. 
Greeley arraigned him for it. And that letter, 
which you probably have all got by heart, and 
which I feel as if I was carrying coals to -New- 
castle, when I refer to it before a New- York audi- 
ence but which cannot be referred to too often, lor 
I think it is a good thing in a political contest to 
show np political rasoaUty in order to avoid it. 
and you have got* it in tbis letter uf 
of Mr. Tilden — this letter, which was addressed 
by Mr. Tilden on tbe litst week of O I'obar to every 
one of the rural oonntfes > of New-york. You ail 
remember it. Mr. Tilden 'Mid: 

My Dear SIR: Please to communicate at once 
with some suitable person in threeor four principal 
towns Rnd in each city of your county and request 
him [expenses duly arranged for at this end ; 
laughter,] to telegraph William M. Tweed at Tam- 
many Hall at the very minute of closing the polls 
tbe state of the vote' In jour county. There is." 
continues Mr. Tilden, for I omit a portion 
of the details of the letter, "an important 
object to be attained by a simultaneous transmission 
at tbe very boar of tbe cloainir of the poila witbont 
longer waiting. The opportunity can be taken by 
the usual half hour's lull in tbe telegraphic oom- 
munication over the lines before the actual risults 
begin to be transmitted by the Associated Press. 
Tours very reapectfully, 

SAMUEL J. TILDE>{," 

fLauahter.J 

Now, I take it there is not a man who is not able 
and was not able to read tbat letter, aud to under- 
stand, what Tilden understood, tbat tbe men in the 
country who got it would understand, wbat be in- 
tended sbonld «e understood by it. That was juHt 
as though Mr. Tilden bad said "My dear Sir : The 
rural counties of New- York are nearly all Kepub- 
lican bv laree majorities, and we erearly fear ttiat 

those luaJoTitiss tbis year will be a little worse 
than usual; but It at tbe very moment of 
closing tbe polls, without waiting for tho 
count, you ■will telegraph to New- York 
what those majorities are, and you send 
word to my friend William M. Tweed, at 
Tammany Hall, and give blip half au hour's start, 
be baa got a voting macbinC here that will outrun 

all the rural counties." [Applanse.] That is wbat 
was done. That is wbat was notoriously done, and 
tliey got them in, and tbey ground our. I tbink, 40,- 
000, (yon know more about this tban I do.) and de- 
clared tbe Demuoraiic ticket carried by 10.000, 
which is a confession tbat tbe Republicans 
carried the State by 30,000. I am quite 
aware, risht here (and I put icrather in an interloc- 
utory way)— I am quite aware that Tilden says be 
never wrote that letter. I believe ho says William 
M. Tweed forged it. I dod't have the honor of the 
acquaintance of Tilden, nor dirt I ever see Tweed, 
but 1 thinic it is fair tbat Tweed should be beard 
from on tbat question. Tweed is coming home ; 
and right here, iu the City of his great achieve- 
ments and tnatnphs, I respectfully ask for a sus- 
pension of public opinion ou behalf of Tweeil. 
[Laughter.] 

No matter about that, this traud was committed, 
and naa ann'f into the hearts of the honest men ot 
this cuniitry, and it was taken up by Mr. Horace 
Greeley, then editing the New-York Tr'ibunt, aud 
the first thing he did was to arrai'jrn Tildeu in an 
open letter. He took him by tbe tbioat and took 
him before tbe bar of public opinion uf a continent, 
aud he went on to give details showing where tbis 
kudactous fraud '^s committttd, and tbe result of 
,Mi'. Greeley's exposure, and the agitation in the 
'I'ribune, and the correspondence in Congress was 
the paHSiige ot tbe Supervisois' law, which, I 
understand, was simpy that jn every city of 
20,000 and upward in which "any respectable 
number of electors say they cannot bave a tair 
count when a nalionnl officer is to be chosen, cither 
as au Elector for President or a Rspreaentative in 
Congxeus, that the United States may appoint a 
supervisor to be preiO'Ut, and to see to an honest 
count, and a fair declaration of tbat count, [ap- 
plause,] and I say, on the very outskin, thai the 
mau oljiecting to tbat law uoafesses bis willingness 
und bis desire to commit some fraud ot political 
acoundreiism. [Applauae.] Aud I wish to aay here, 
on behalf ot New-Eoulaiid. wnere I belong, that iu 
New-Eugland we have from twelve to fourteen 
cities ot over twenty thousand, and they 
are all Kenubtican, and there nevt-r has 
been found a Democrat rash enough or reckles 
enough tu come forward and sweat that he dido't 
beliave a fair count and honest declaration could be 
had. [Applause.] I believe tberd is not an honest 
Bepublicau In tbi.t City who is not willing 'o swear 
every day that unless you bave a supervisioa of 
tbis count an bofiest and fair count is impossible 
under tbe Tammany regime. 

I very well remember tbis being on the statute- 
book when this bill ot charities, tbis Sundry Civil 
Appropnatiou bill, was under consideration, 
up jumped, as I told you, a Domo- 
crat, and moved to repeal the Supervisors 
law, and, the point of order being overruled 
it was repealed as far asConaress could do It. They 
carried it by a party vote, and. witb some llttln ob- 
servation and experience in legislation, Doth State 
and nstional, 1 do undeitake to say serionsly tbat I 
never ksew a ptoposition in a legislative body so 
absolutolv and Irreiaemsblv iufauoos as that Law. 



What was it. eentlemon ? 'VVhy, it was taking the 
chariries of the United States by the throat, 
in the spirit of the corsair and the pirate, 
find saving: Yon shall not have one dollar 
for the helpless brave soldiers and seamen 
ot the Army aud Navy for tht^ir asylum ; 
you shall not have one dollar to spread a cot in a ma- 
rine hospital on coast or lake, or gulf, or river, or 
ocean ; you shall not bave one dollar to bring a 
Riarving American home I'rotn a foreign city where 
be may bo located ;£ytm Bhall not have a pint of oil 
to light the beacons along your coast, those eyes of 
tbe ocean which would warn the mariner of ship- 
wreck and ruin before himj you shall have none of 
all these cbaiitlea nnleas you a'^ree to re- 
peal the iiuperviaors law ' of 1869 in or- 
der that we may cheat onoagh in the State 
of New-York to give its vote to Samuel J. Tilaon. 
That is wbat thfc House said and did — said it iu so 
many words — and they held on to the bill tor sixty- 
four days; thev attempted for siity-tour days r.o 
weary and worry and bully tha Senile of tbe 
Uujted States Into conceding it, but. thank God, 
the Senate of tbe United States stood firm, [crios of 
" Good,"] and tbey said, in effect if not in words, 
to the House of ReoresentatlTea, "Your proposi. 
tioD. is entirely and absolately infamous, and we 
will never consent to it. The Senate of 
the United States has a pleasant Cham- 
ber, J and each Senator has a good arm- 
chair, and tbey kindly intimated to tbe House of 
Representatives that they proposed to sit there 
until tbe second centennial of American Indepen- 
deuL-e, [applause,] and they were compelled to back 
down aud back oiit, and the Supervisors law re- 
m.ains ou the statute book, [oriea uf "Good I'M and 
you ought to have a cbance tor a fair count. And I 
onght to have said that tbe law enacted in 1869 and 
.1870 wont into operation with a reasonably tair 
count in this City and Stale in 1873. and the 
man whose orisinal asitation produced it, 
Horace Greeley, was the one wbn. was defeated 
by it, and bavin'; done all m my power to assist in 
his defeat. 1 desire to say, ana I say it wllh re-/er- 
enre for hit me'mory, that I Knew him well enough 
lor twenty yuars 10 know tbat Mr. Greeley would a 
thonsand times rather be defeated by an honest 
vote ttian be counted In by a fraiid. [Applause.] 

THE ARMY A BUGBEAR TO THE DEMOCKATS. 

Well, this new mode of legislation on appropria- 
tion bills came along to tbe Army Appropriation 
bin. We reached tbe Army Appropriation bill, 
and those of you who attended Democratic meet- 
ines this year, or read Domncratic newspapers, 
(neither of which I can commend as very profita- 
ble occupation.) mnat have seen how alarmingly 
we are m danger of being overrun in this country 
by military despotism. [Laughter.] Your liberties 
are in peril in New-York by reason of an •enormous 
standing Army that is kept up. Think of it 1 We 
have got thirty-eight States and nine Territories, 
and Alaska unorganized. We have got 15,000 miles 
of ocean coast. Wo have got a tenltory laraur 
than tbe coniincnt of Earope. We have 
got 45,000,000 of people, and increasing 
every year, and wo are absolutely tbreat- 
eaed, and all our liberties imperiled, 
by a standing Army of 30,000 men. TLaugbtor.] 
Tbat is what is threatening your liberties — 35,000 
men. 'Vydi, I know that iu addressing tbe citizens 
of Now- York I bave to sneak of fucts more public 
to yon than to me, but as I understand it there are 
3,000 Dainocratic policemen in thi.i City alone — ;ine- 

etghth of the whole Army of the United States— 

and they with great difficulty prevent the Demo- 
cratic pickpockets from stealing your pot^et-book 
and mine between tbe hotels and th^ depot. 
One-eighth of the Army of the United' 
.States on the Police force of Npw-York, 
and we are in danger of our llbprtiesl Well, 

when the Army bill was under conaideration 
wo had another specimen of this legislation, and I 
want to detail it tu you briefly. When the war was 
rver we had more than a million of men on the 
rolls. They were mustered out. Many ot these, I 
doubt not, are here to-ni^ht, better men for having 
aided in saving a great country ; they were lons- 
terod out, ana the cfuestinn camonp, "Wbat shall be 
the peace footing of the Unit'ed States?" and it was 
fixed by tbe act of 18C6 at 585,000 men. When we 
came to discuss that question wo found a great 
change established in' this country. Four millions 
of peoplu who bad been slaves had been made free, 
and then had been made citizens, and 200, OOO'of these 
people bad served in the ranks of the Union Army, 
and had served faithtull.v. I know It is somewhat 
tbe mode in cartaln circles to snoer at the colored 
soldiers, but I say, on the authority of vhe leadmg 
Journals of the United States Army, that thev were 
good soldiers : that they did their duty like loyal 
men ; that they fought and bled, and many of ibem 
died, ofl'eiing tbe last sacrifice which humanity can 
for any cause. I Applause.] I beard Ben Harrison, 
a gallant son of Indiana, say the other day, jap- 
plauae,] that one uf the, hanifsomest loot 
races that he ever saw in his life was 
at the battle of Franklin, below Nashville, 
where Hood's Army was charged by a colore 1 
brigade, but the rebels broke, and he said be never 
saw men rim as fast in his life as that colored brig- 
ade did, hut they didn't overtake the rebels. I say 
these men had earned the right to 'Wear the nni- 
torm of the United States, and when tbe peace es- 
tablisbtnent was fixed certain regimen's of infantry 

and certain regiments of cavalry were or- 
dered to be composed of colored soldiers, 
and tbey now are composed of them, 
and thev are good regiments, and tbey did 
their duty faithfully ; and yet this Congre.sn put in 
a clause in the Appropriation bill disbanding these 
colored regiments and driving them out of the ser- 
vice. Now, another clause in the Array bill of 1866 
forbids that any man wbo bad served in the Coufed- 
erate Ariav and borne arms against his country 
s'loulo ever be commissioned iu the Army of the 
United Stacen, and a bill is now pending on tbe cal- 
endar ot tbe House of Representatives tbe spirit 
and purpose of which is to drive out the colored 
man from the Armv ot the United States, where he 
had faithfully served, and to bring back 
to it tbe Confederate soldier, who nad done his best 
to destroy it, and that leeislation was also defeated 
by the United States Senate. I might go on, 
(■entlemen. and give you details ot almost all tbe 
appropriation btila in which the spirit seemed to be 
to legislate against tbe nationality of the country. 

HOW THE DEMOCRATS HAULED DOWN THE A.MERI- 
CVN FLAO ABROAD. 

Let me give yon one more before I leave. We 
came to the Consularand Diplomatic Appropriation 
bill, which providea the money for all your foreign 
intercourse and for your commercial agents. 
The Consular and Diplomatie Appropriation bill 
contains an appropriation ot aoout one million thres 

hundred thousand dollars. It provides pay for all 
your foreign Ministers and all your Consuls, and the 
pay of tho Consuls of the United States is more tban 
reimbnrsed by the fte« collected by them. 
The fees of tbe Consuls ot the United 
States are tuore thau two hundred 
thousand dollars in excess of their salaries, 
and yet" when thev came to legislate on this little 
bill, which involved a very small outlay for the 
whole of the consular and diplomatic intercourse, 
they struck off forty-two places where we have had 
heretofore Consuls, and ordered that no Consul 
should thereafter be found, and they did it on the 
ground that, although the Consular system as a 

whole had largely more than paid its expenses, yet 
at these particular points tbe fees didn't quite 
amount to the'salaries ; and yet at these points you 
will find tbe^^Snglish, the Spanish, the German, the 
French, tbe Austrian, the Russian, and even tbe 
little flags of Belgium and Holland, but no Ameri- 
can flaft, and the American flag was hauled down by 
their order, and fortv-two places on the globe whore 
it bad hitherto been flying it was hauled down on the 
ground that it oost a few thousand dollars to keop 
it going. Now, gentlemen, the Republican Party, 
who touzbt lor the protection of our flug over toe 
whole terriiorv, and overall the territory of tbe 
globe, take tbe ground thatrwhen the American 
HfH has once bern raised it snail never be hauled 
down, [Applause,] and I undertake to say that if 
tbe next Congress is Reonblican. as I hope It will 
be, [Applause, 1 and certainly wll be it New-Yoik 
does i!.8 full duty, one of tbe first acts will be to 
restore tho American flag to the places where thoy 
have ordered it to be pulled down. 

° THE SOUTHERN WAR CLAIMS. 
But the one subject which 1 find is irritating 
above all others to the average Democratic miod, 
aud wbicb is ever apt to create a lit' la profanity, is 
to mention to him Southern Democratio war claims, 
and then hoar bim apply adjectives and oaths, the 
mildest of which is "liar," with a prefix before it. 
He will tell you tho Republican Party Is coing 
around falsifying and lying ou the questinn 
of these claims, and they will open the Con- 
stitution of tbe United States and say to 
you: "Look there; the Constitutiou of 
tbe United States actually forbids the payment of 
those claims. These Republicans are lying through- 
out the length and breadth of the land." The Con- 
stitution, tbey tell yoiL repudiates it ; tbe Demo- 
crats forbid it. . WelL the third clause of tha fonr^ 



teenth amendment to the Constitntion does forbid 
tbe payment of the rebel debt. That is the debt of 
the rebel government or the rebel debtol any State, 
and it also fortlds the payment for any slave that 
was emancipated under tbe thirteenth amend- 
ment. Now I think I can argue, and I think 
I can show that both (hose inhibitions 
can he got around and evaded, but I don't choose to 
do that. For the saXe of the argument I admit in 
its broadest sense, as far as any Democrat will 
claim it, that these classes of claims are barred 
and cannot be paid. 

Grant, now, tbat all that is in tbe Constitution. 
Those classes of claims are barred, and when I 
have made that admisiioo I have pecked the egg- 
shell, because the class of claims about which we 
are legislating has nothing whatever to do 
with the debt 01 the rebel Government; 
has nothing whatever to do with the negroes eman- 
cipated under the thi/'tennth amendment. Tbe 
class of claims which are now pending and impend- 
ing relate to the oestruction of every form of 
property that followed in the wake of the war- 
wheat, corn, flour, fences, houses, barns, 
horses, mules, cattle, hedges, railroads, 
culverts — every imaf^nable thing that was 
destroyed In the progress of our armies 
IS now the thing wh:oh forms the 

basis of the united claims against the United States. 
And on the basis of tboae claims there are now 
pending in tho Honse of Repro-ientativoa 143 bills, 
beside, a general law, of which I hold in my hand a 
precise fac simile, and from which I will read one 
paragraph, and tbat paragraph to any intelligent 
tiiind will show that undertbeoporationof chat law, 
should itever be enacted, tbe Treasury of the United 
States could be bankrupted in six m.onvbs. Now 
the bill pendine to-day in thn House of Repre- 
sentatives before the Judiciary Committee, townich 
it was referred last February and whence it baa not 
been leported back, reads thus : " That, the Secre- 
tary ot« War is hereby authorized to allow 
reasonable ' compensation to all citizen" of the 

United States"— mark yoii, " all citizens"— not all 
loyal citizens." Heretofore, and generally, we have 
been paymz all tho claims that loyal men have 
asalns the Government of the United States. Now 
the proposition is to jump that aistinction — to leap 
clear over it. Ii authorizes the GoverDioent to pay 
" all citizens ot the Uailed States— to allow reason- 
able compensntioo to all citizens of the United 
plates lor tbe use and occupation of their property 
by the United States Array, or any part thereof, 
d/ring tho late civil war.*' Mark you, wherever 
the Aimy encamped or marched on foot, on 
railroad or tumpiKe, or crossed bridges, 
losses aud rents may be demanded and 
damages collected. Apd I want the lawyers 

hf-ro present to Iiston to ihe rale of evidence; 
'' provided thai afiidavit uf tbe claimant, supported 
by tbe competent testimony of any reputable citi- 
zen, shall bo sufficient piouf Ui establish the fact of 
the use and occupatioii of such property by said 
Array!" jLaughter.l A man puts in a claim, 
aud be has au associate swear tbat he knows it is a 
good claim, and that coucludea tbe case. Petro- 
leum V. Nasby puts in a claim lor losses at Con- 
tederate X RoaUa, and Bascom, who keens the 
liquor-Store, awt^ars he knows it is just; and tbo 
Claim IS made out. Nothing iiiore is to be heard if 
a claimant swears that the Irovernmenl owns him, 
and a reputable citizens iudorses his statement. 
And I tell yon that when you come to the con- 
struction tliat a Democratio House pnl^ on a re- 
pntable citizen you open a wi le tloor. fL mehter. j 
Xow, the tact that I want to ira.nress upon your 
minds aura is that this is "absolutely tiampllnB un- 
der toot tbe distinction tbat baa neretoiore pre- 
vailed. The Democrats say, " You ^have been pay- 
ing war claims yourself ;" and they thus present to 



me the ar;7Mm«»iCMm ad hominem. They sav "you 
.iiavo voursflt referred war claims." I answer, 
"certainly I have done it, but ii was always tne 
Claims of loyal men ;" and so entirely do we recog- 
nize the risiht of loyal men who bave lost by the 
war to compensation, tuat in 1871 we established 
what is known as tne Southern Claims Com- 
mission, to hear and determine every case 
of loBS that was made by loyal meu in and for and 
by aud in behalf of the Armies of the United 
biates, of loyal men in New- York, who furnished 
mules or forage, or bacon. Iu the Constitution of 
tbe United States he read that clause which says : 
" private property shall not be taken for public use 
without .inst coiiipensation, and it he has a just 
claim it is rsi-ognized. And so the loyal niau in 
Virginia and Louiaiaua, he has Just as strong a 
claim, naj, he has a stronger claim thau 
tbe loyal man of tbe North, because he 
was ioval uuder difficulties. Therefore he 
established the Siutheru Claims Commission, and 
uo to Ibis lime f 2. 700,000 ' have been allowed ; and 
we intend that the Gjvemment of the United 
States, strong in its fluanclal ability, powerful in 
its credit, abundant in its resources, snail reward 
and pay to the uttermost farthing every aaan who 
did and dured be loyal. [Applause and cheers.] 
But when you come to pay the public enemy, wheu 
you come to pay the men who were at that very 
moment using their resources to destroy your Gov- 
ernment, you enter upon an entirely difterent 

question. , ,, , ^rr 

Some gentlemen may naturally ask, '• Why, 
when you were passing the fourteenth amendment, 
and you were prohibiting the payment of claims tor 
slaves and the rebel aebf, did you not prohibit these 
ulaims from passing CongreasI" My answer to 
tliat IS this, that when the fourteenth amendment 
was p'aBsed in 1866, it never entered into the brain 
of man to conceive of a height and length and 
breadth and depth of Democratio and rebel impu- 
dence and insolence that could tbink of asking tbe 
United States to pav their side of the expenses 
of this war. [Applanse.] Tbat is the 
result of ten years of progress, to bring 
them up to that. [Laughter.] I> had neyer 
been dreamed of at ttat time — never once. 
Now gentlemen will say, " This is all nonsense— 
this is a great bugbear; yon are getting this up for 
the campaign, to afliet people who are green ; it is a 
campaign ruse." My answer to that, or rataer my 
question— tor, as I am a Yanaee, I claim the privi- 
lege of answering one question by asking another — 
I ask, "Why do Souiuern men put these claims 
in if it is mere nonsense f If this means nothing 
—if to use a phrase of the day, this does not 
■mean business'— why do they put the biils 
in?" Just answer that, my D=mocratic friends. 
They know, just as well as you know 
to-day. or as well as any man knows, 
that the putting forward of claims of this character 
would be a stumbling-block, an oflense to the loyal 

men of tbe North. They know it would be lost. 
Tbey know perfectly well that tbey would bave to 
meet the fact on every stump, and that it probably 
would be lbs hardest campaign nut to crack they 
would meet. With all that, such is the unanimity 
of opinion ot the South in tavor or these claims 

that there is nut a Southern Representative on the 
floor elected by Democratio votes who dares to re- 
luse to put iu these bills. There is not one. 

A DEMOCRATIC ADMINISTRATION TVOULD NOT 

RESIST THESE DEMANDS. 

I say the sentiment of tbe House on this question 

amounts to a positive unanimity ; aad you give 

them a Democratic administration elected by a 

"solid South." deriving its entire poliiioal strength 

and prestige from ita S mtheru vote, controlled, aa 
It would be, by tho Southern vote — controlled in all 
its measures as tbe present House of Representa- 
tives is controlled by an inferior number of Sonth- 
ern men wbo represent it on the floor — and 
I ask what powor is there In an admin- 
istration with Samuel J. Tilden at the 
bead, if it should come to that, to 
resist such demands as these ) It is absolately ab- 
surd to trust them. Give them the entire control 
of the Treasury of the Uoited States, and say they 
would not help themselves laat f Gentlemen, I am 
only aceuslag tbem, when I say this, ot having 
haman nature. You may take any class of men 
and beat them in war, as we beat the reoels, 
and let them bo hoisted into power, and tbey 
will help themselves ont of the Treasury. Northern 

men would do it; anybody would do it who had the 
opportunity, for buman nature is human nature. 
The passion of the rebellion lies smoldering and 
ready to ue kindled into a flame. Give them power 
and thev will put the foot on you in the North. 
[Applause.] Any Northern man who votes the 
Democratic ticket with the idea that they are to be 
governed by some namby pamby sentiment about 
civil sirvicn reform or some talk of civil service 
preached in tbat remarkable letter put forth 
by tbe St. Louie Convention ; anybody 
who believes tbat kind of sentiment is to 
be the warp and woof ot Tilden's admiuiatratiou 
If he shall be elociod, does not understand human 
nature. They will seize the Treasury of th9 United 
States ; they will do it boldly. I will say for these 
Southern fellows tbat tbey are bold.' They put 
thiii- fo;>t down square on tbe necks of Northern 
Democrats; they taHe command of the sloop at 
both ends. [Laughter.] They take the anchor'at 
tbo front and tho rudoer at the rear; the Demo- 
ciats of the North are only passengers;, they do not 
set compass or square ►ails or holo the heltn — the 
Southern men do that. If the North takes them on 
trust thoy will wake up to a teiriolo delusion, and 
they will wake up to a terrible delusion wheu it is 
too late. 

WHT TUB SOUTH DON'T WANT SPECI^ RESUMP- 
TION. 
Then, gentlemen, this connects itself most pal- 
pably with another question. You know very well, 
as soon as Congress had passed the Specie Resump- 
tion act of 1875, proposing to resume specie onyment 
on behalf of the Government on the 1st ef January, 
1679, Mr. Tilden made haste to induce tbe Demo- 
cratic Legislature of New-York to conform the 
legislation of your great State to that of the nation. 
They did it. An act on your statute booka to-day 
nrovides for tbe collection and navasant of voor i ■■ 



taxes in eolo and silver, and the enforcement of 
your contracts in gold and silver. It was done witb 
aooMa, ostentation and was proolalmeu aloud 
by tllat eminent proclamation writer, Manton 
Marble. When that was done, Mr. Tilden discov- 
ered that they could not have Southern support of 
that basis. I state here to-night this well-known 
fact, that Southern men are deeply and deadly bos. 
tile to specie payment. Why, they know perfectly 
well tbat when gold dollars and silver dollars are 
thi) currency of this country, and you are paying 
and receiving them, and yoar taxes are collected in 
them, and .vourGevemment disburses them— they 
know very well, I say, and no one knows better, that 
never will a dollar be collected in this country lor 
the payment ot the rebel debt or tho payment ef any 
rebel claim whatever. [Applause.] And tbey also 
know that if they can keep the greenback bag 
open at both ends they can get rebel claims in at 
one end and manufactuie paper money of some kind 
at tbe other, and that yon and I and tho country 
will bavo to take care ot the paper money here- 
after. That is the whole of it ; -that accounts for the 
step backward, though they promised there should 
not be one ; that accounts for toe recalcitration ; 
that accounts for the fact ot tbe backing down and 
going for the repeal of the Resumption act that Til- 
den bad lauded in his special Message to the New- 
York Legislature, and induced the Legislature to 
pass an act in conformity with it. The next thing 
we will bear from these same managers Is the re- 
peal of that act connecting itself indlssolubly with 
tbe payment of the Southern war claims. 

ONE THING WHICH THE PEOPLE WILL NEVER 
FOEGET. 
Well, there is another thing I have against Mr. 
Tilden. that we talk about a gieat deal in the conn- 
try, and I wonld like to talk about here, though 
you know more about It. I allnde to the arraign- 
ment by Gov. Dix of Mr. Tilden for his refusal to 
give even the weight of his name to the meeting in 
tnis great City, held in theSpringof 1861, topledseita 
loyalty to the cause of the Union. You in New- 
York generally do not know and cannot measare 
the extent of the influence of that meeting. I be- 
long to tbe country. When that great crisis came 
upon us of a war iu the South, every village and 
hamlet held its mebting of loyalty. The very next 
moment after the expression had gone forth, with 
the patriotic gush of enthusiasm, the first thought 
of every thoughtful man in this country was 
"How does the Citv of Now- York stand?" 
New-York was the Guancial centre, as it 
still is, of the continent. Its prestige was far 
greater than any other. Its press was more widely 
disseminated, aud as a radiating ceutre its influ- 
ence far transcended any other force in this coun- 
try. More tnan that. New- York was the point from 
which European public opinien was formed of af- 
fairs in America. Those who travel In Earope 
know that you never see any other paper there thau 
a New- York paper, and European public opinion 
is formed as much on the state of sentimeut 
and feelinu in New- York aa we derlva a 
a knowledge of RingliahKoplnion from London, or ot 

French opinion ^^icom Paris, and German opinion 
from Berlin. Therefore, it became of the last fcig- 
uiflcance tbat New-York sbonld speak in no nneer- 
tain voice. That grsat meeting on tbe26th of April 
became historic, and will remain so — tbe most im- 
portant meeting on this continent, except that of a 
hnnnred years ago In the streets of Phil- 
adelphia to ratify the Declaratioo of Inde- 
pendence. [Applause. J To that, meetinK, as I 
understand, an array of testimony is preseutea 

wnicb is absolately undeniable, Mr. 'Iilden re- 
fused to give tbe influence of hia name. I under- 
stand that be has now got a esHlflcate going around 
that he attended that meeting. I understand that 
Manton M.irble and John Bigelow are ont with a 
certiflcate thai be did atteoa. I don't think that 
is any great merit. , You can't tell what a 
man's ' motive may be in attending a meeting. 
I have no doubt that many who attended the 
meeting were roughs looking around for a chance 
to break it up. I don't say that Mr. Tilden at- 
tended for tbat purpose. [Laughter.] But be baa 
given great aigniflcauce to the fact. All of you 
cb'urcb-goers, in looking over tbe societies yon 
worship witb, can point ont old, bald-headed sin- 
ners from whose pates the truth has been glancing 
for forty years. [Laughter. | That will never 
save them iu the world. I do not 
know but some tou<th Tammany Democrat 
may bo la this large crowd now. It will never lie 
counted to him for righteousoess, [laughter,] nor 
will it ever be the slightest consolation on his 
deathbed, [renewed laughter,] if after all I have 
told him Ibis erening he blindly persists in voting 
for Tilden and Hendricks in November. [Prolonged 
laughter.] Atteodinz a meeting is tbe very least 
merit you can possibly claim fur a man. 

A BECOBD NOT TO BE PEOUD Oy. 
Bnttneieis one great peculiarity about Samuel 
J. Tilden's record ; the things in which you have 
him regularly docketed and indorsed, where you 
have bim on record, wheqe be has signed hln name, 
as I said about the Tweed letter— and he denies 
that, although his signatqre is to it — although he 
was a member of the Committee on Resolutions at 
Chicago, and, I believe, was on the aubcommittee 
that framed the platform, and was popularly and 
generally and for years understood to be in hearty 
accord with it, he says now he never sgrsed 
to it at all. [Laughter.] More than that, be says 
as soon as he got to New- York he went down to the 
back door o. McClellan's' house at night and tola 
him not to pay the least attention to that clause of 
the platform when he wrote hla letter of accept- 
ance. [Laughter.] So that when you have Mr. 
Tilden on the record there is an extraordinary at- 
tempt at evasion for getting him off the record ; 
and then, as a counterpart to that, we bave the 
promise and parade of what Mr. Tilden would have 
been glad to say at certain times if the opportunity 

had arisen for him to say it [Langhter.] 

I understand, now, Mr. Bigelow aays, and Mr. 
Marble says, and thej' both say that Mr. Tilden 
says, that he would have been glad to have said 

something that would havs been very fit to aay, 
[laughter,] but that aa a matter of fact the oppor- 
tunity did not occur to say it, and he never did say 
It. [Laughter.] Now, I prefer, gentlemen, to take 
a mii|!i'-"''Upon the exact record that he 
has liade himself. We don't want to impute 
anything to Mr. Tilden for which he 
Is not on the record. We don't want to 
slander bim. We don't want to even speak disre- 
spectfully of him : but we simply ask Mr. Tilden to 
be judged asevury other public mau in tbis country 
has to he judged, by the record he bas made as 

a pnblic man, and uoon tbat record, if the American 
people chooie to elect him, why, of «onr8ej__the re- 
sponsibility must be taken, and the future conie- 
quenoes mast be abided bv. And on that retxird, 
familiar as you all are witb it, just let me eall your 
attention to one single thing. Tbe children for ten 
years were familiar with the remarkable message 
which Mr. Buchanan sent to»Congres8 af;er the re- 
bellion had broken out, or after tne States had be- 
gun to secede, and the rebellion was imminent and 
war was upon us almost. You remember that mes- 
sage was based on the idea tbat this was a oonfed- 
eraof of independent and sovoreiga States, and that 
there did not reside any power in tho general gov- 
ernment to coerce a State ; and the oldtgentleman 
said it was impossible to cement this Union by 
blood, in civil war. I am glad to say he lived long 
enough to flnd oat his mistake. Just at that mo- 
ment, or six weeks, I think, before, Mr. Tilden had 
Klven expression co a sentiment which was evident- 
ly the foreranner ef what Mr. Boobanan incorpo- 
rated in hu mesaage. I will read the two ^marks 
together and you will see snob an absolute Identity 
that you cannot possibly help thinking t that 
Mr. Buchanan at least had made jt, very 
attentive stuuy of Mr. Tilden's letter. Allow me 
to read one paras^aph from Mr. Tilden and then 
one paragraph from Mr. Bachanan, and then I will 
ask vou ta contrast it witb a paragraph frem a man 
who went before them both. 

Mr. Tilden says tbat "the States are held to- 
gether only by a compact of cenfederation ;" tbe 
sioEle, alender, and conventional tie which binds 
the States in confederation. "The fathers," be 
says, "left revolution organized; whenever it should 
be' aemandod by the public opinion of the Sutea, It 
left them with the power to snap the tie of oonted- 
eratlon. as a nation might break a treaty." 

Mr. Buchanan, taking up tno thread of the argu- 
ment six weeks later, in his Message to Congress, 
a Message which paralyzed the power of tbe Gen- 
eral Governroeot for tbe time, said: "Has tbe 
CoDstitution delegated to Congress tbe power to 
coerce a State into submiasion wbich is attemptiag 
to withdraw, or has actually withdrawn, from the 
confederacy! I have arrived at the coucluelsB- 
that no sucn power has be*n delegated to Coagress 
nor to any other department of the General Gov- 
ernment. The tact is," says Mr. Buchanan, almost 
quoting Mr. Tilden's words, " sur Union rests 
. ** • ■ 



DANGERS OF A SOLID/SOUrU 

— ♦ — 

JJOiV. E. W. STOUGHTON AT ALBANY, 
TWKDDLK HALL PACKED TO OVEHFXOWISO 
—THE ISSUES OF THK CANVASS ABLT 
REVIEWED— THB DEMOCRATS COWARD- 
LY AND DOUBLE-FACBD — TILDBN's COB- 
RCPT RBCOBD — THE DANGER^ IN THB 
60UTH. , i: 

HvecM Ditpatelt to tlu Neu>- York Tlmn. 

Albany, Oct. IG.— Tweddle Hall wa 
packed to-night by an audience of cbaractei 
and intelligence, gathered to listen to a discna- 
sion of the political issues of the day by Hon. 
E. W. Stoughton, of New-Yorlt. Ex- Mayor Ed- 
mund L. Judaon presided, and on the staj^ 
were a number of our most prominent citizena 
Mr. Stoughton was received with much en- 
thusiasm, and his eloquent address was listened 
to with the greatest- attention. The 8i>eakec 
was very much in eameet with hia subject, and 
bis impaasi jned, telling words, hia fervent elo- 
quence, and venerable, yet nobls«r«|iiMaa»ace. 
created a feeling of the liveliest enthusiaam 
among tils hearers, the applause being both 
frequent and hearty. Mr. Stoughton spoke for 
about an hour, and daring that- time the gallo' 
ries, aisles, and vestibules of tbe .ball hecaaoe ■« 
choked with eager listeners tbat it was estj- 
mated 2,500 persons were present in tb« build' 
isg. Following is the address -delivered by Xr. 
Stoughton : b 

MR. STODGHTON'S SPEECH. J, 

Again, after the lapse of four years, the tw* 
great political parties of tbe Union confront each 
other for the purpose of asserting through the bai> 
lot-box their respective claims to national power. 
We find the attitude and leaders and the developed 
purposes of the Democratic Party somewhat dif- 
ferent from what they were in 1872. Then it waa 
led by Horace Greeley, long one of its most dla- 
tinguisbed opponents — to whose bands its iater-^ 
eats were for the time intrusted. Misfor- 
tune attended this choice, for not only did 
nine ot the sixteen Southern States east 
their electoral votes for &su. Grant, bat fhm 
popular maiority in his favor Vas more fhaa three- 
fourths of a million. It was doubtless apparent ta 
tbe Southern as well as Northern Democratio lead- ' 
era in tbat canvass that from Mr. Greeley Uttla if 
anything oould be hoped to favor tbeir views for 
the unconstitutional an^ unjust advanoement of 
Southern interests, aad hence tbe Southern State* 

did not consolidate. 

Now, however, all is changed, and tbe formeralava 
States, now sixteen in number, ar* aaid to be ready 

to vote in solid colnma for the Democratic nom- 
inees; and if tbat be ao Mr. Tilden will reoeiva- 
from LUe South alone 135 electoral votes — soActeot, 
witb the addition of furty-^ven moie, to insore Bis 
election. Why these States have eombined for 
such purpose can be readily nnderatood when tlt« 
past history of those wbo control them shall be dis- . 
closed. I do not propose, in wbat I have to say. to 
assail or even allude to the personal character of 
either of the candidates. Their public hutorv. 
their pelitical acts and opinions only will l>e re- 
ferred to ; - and to this there certainly can be no ob- 
jection. And especially shall I refer ts the relatioa 
which Mr. Tildan has held toward our coantry, ax 
discloaed by his conduct and opinions doriug aoiaa 
of the darkest days of the rebellion. His eiainaa. 
as a patriot, lover of hia conntry. and reformer will 
be scanned, not at length, but briefly and justly. 
And after a right estimate ahall have been formed 
concerning him on bis pab'do relations, it will ba 
fotmd that he stands much in need of all the aiA 
wbiob can be afforded by his private character. 

We may, I think, at this time consrratnlate tho 
whole country that the City of New- York is not t« 
be, at the coming election, in tbe exclusive power 
of the man who in 1868 controleo it, and fraudu- 
lently increased its Democratic majonty ; tcr it la 
possible the electoral vote of tbe iState of New-Tark^. 
ma; determine who, for the next four years, shall, 
occupy the highest positions which onr peonle ca& 
give. And, inasmuch as from the City of New- 
York issues a malonty so large tliat it is aot al-> 
ways easy for the rural district* of the State t* 
overcome it, it la of the last importance tbat anchi 
maiority should not t>e swollen by ballot-box' 
stuffing or manufactured votes. 
tilden's RESPONsrBu.rrv fob the 1868 fbxtjds. 

It was thought in 1S68, when Gov. Seymour waa 
nominated for the Preaidenoy in Tammany Hall. 
the State of New-York might possibly by ita vote. ! 
determine whether he or Geu. Grant should occupy 
the Presidential chair. At that period Mr. Tiioes 
waa the Chairman ox the Democratic State Com- 
mittee, and aa such had general supervision and 
control of the political campaign ot tliat year, ao^ 
nnder him were his subordinates Tweed, Sweeay, 
and others, whose duty it was to see that the City 
of New- York should give such a Democratic ma- 
larity as would effectually secure the vote uf tbe 
State in favor of the Democratic nominees, i'jt tbe 
five years precsdiug 1871 that City tiad given 
au average Democratic migority of 54.130; although 
prior to 1868 the highest Democmcic vote eist 
thereio was 3J,6T7. It became apparent, as ttaa^ 
canva&a progressea in that year, that a very larga 
vote wonld be caat throughout tbe State for G«a.< 
Gram ; and, as bis miyoriiy outside of the City waa 
sure to be large, it became indispensable, if tb« 
electoral vote of the State was to t>e eecureo toe 
Gov. Seymour, that the Democratic majority m 
tnat City should be immensely increased over tliat 
of former years- 

Xbe mean* by w^hicb thia was aco»inplished are 

well known. Just prior to tbe da.r of election a ur- 
cular signed with the name of Tildea, as Chairman 
of the Democratic State Committee, was oironlated 
tbroughonc the towns aud eleccion disi riots of the 

State, calling apon trusty persons within them, jist 
before tbe closing of tbe polls on elecuon day, to 
transmit such information to Tweed, in tha Ciiy of 
New-YorK, as would enable him to indge uf thO: 
majority outside of that City, wbich would probably' 
be secured tor Gen. Graiit He would thus be eo- 
bbled to determine how many, in addition to the 
usual Democratic maiority in the Cit.v, it would be 
necessary to add to lis vote to overcome the Re- 
publican majority outside of it. He ascertained 
this from answers to this circolar, and loond it de- 
sirable, in order to give an apparent majority toe 
Seymour of 10,000, to increase tbe Democratic vote - 
of the City, which in 18t)7 had been buc SJ,764, to 
112523. In eatimatine the exMni of ibis trauO. it 
abouid l>« borne in mind that the average Demo- 
cratic majority for the Ave years preoeQing IsTl, 
which bad been 54.120, was, by a reorgauizatiuu uC 
the Republican P<irty there, for tbe five years com-' 
menoing in tnat year, reduced to 31,400 — 22.7;W votes 
beine thus taken from the majority tu b« overcome. 
When, thtrefure, we oonsiaer that the aveiage. 
Democratic miOoriiy during these Ave yeais waS; 
undoubtedly aU that the piu-ty waa eatitled to, and' 
learn that the vote returned for tbe City id 1868. 
was 112,523, an addition to this average ot 37.750 
votes, we can form some estimate of the magnitude 
of the frauds tbus perpetrated. If such means 
could now t>e resorted to through snch instrumants, 
and this State should happen to be the pivot UD«a 
wbich tbe coming election shall torn, we can readily 
see that all hope ot final success. by the Repuhlioau 
Party should be abandoned. 

THB TEBBOKI8M 0i THB SOCTH. 
We may also, I think, congratulate the people ot 
the country and State that it is not under ctmtrot of' 
the violent and lawless meu who new domiuate in 
South Carolina and iu other Southern States. We 
bave Joat learned that in G-aorgia the result of the 
•lection shows about eighty thousand Democratio , 
minority ; and, in this, no intelligent man can fail 

to see tbe hlcnd~of violence and tbe voice of intimi- 
dation. We Know tbat vast numbers ot colurud 
voters have by theav^meaus been there kept iroiu 
tbe polls, and from this we may learn the persisteut 
detfrdiinAtion, at any cost and by any means, 
of ' Soutbom man , to control or prevent 
the. votes of > the ~ oolored race throughout 
the: Southern States. Atteuiion has been 
especially called to these eflbrU by the proclam- 
ation ot the Crovernor of South Carolina, woo, uooa 
grounds tbe most serious, and by force uf the dui.y 
he owes to the Constitution and lawa, has called 
upon the organised nfle clubs, formed for the pur^._ 
poses of intimidaUoB and violenoo, to disband. A~t- 
tompts have been made to show that the causes as- 
serted for this proclamation do not exist, but in- 
formation of the most oonolnsive character has 
reached tbe North, aotwitfaataoding the effjrta of 
Southern men to prevent it, tbat not merely lo 
^uth Caroltoa, but thronghoat tbeSouthern States, 
tha same lawless efforts are resorted to for 
the purpose of ultimately casting thnlr aolid 
vote for Tilden and Hendricks. Aud not 
only are iatimidatiou and viulenoe off.*red 
to tbe blacks, but methods are pursu'-d 
toward Republioans of our own raoe — men of tha 
most respectable cbaraoter residing there— well eal- 
calated to make thom elthw taftain altogsthor ttoss 
voting, or voce the Democratic tloket. Indeed, tha , 
tights of those .wbaJwJt^ftJiOMtitattonal »m»ni~ 



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nenls are deolared to b« oltiaons and entitled to 
privilezea as sucb. and aUo tho riffhu of white Re- 
publlcaiia are sabstsntlslly aisregarded and law- 
lesslr viulatnd. Ic has been.aaid, aud .{astir, that 
-^he naiiou which fails to protoot ita citizeua abroad 
do4erve<) tbo contempt ot all other nations ; but 
what ahall we »av of a Governmont which not only 
refrains fpom nrotocting rho rlgnta or persons of its 
citizens nt home, hut pormits tbo clecrire franchike 
— so dear to us all — to bo taken away by foroe and 
violence, or reudered asolesa by coutrivanoo and 
fraad i 

MB.. AUAHS' FALACIOCS REABOMNQ. 
Let U8, however, tnrninji from these sabjcots, 
couiiiier briefly npon what eronnda the Democratic 
Pai'tj (irse that there should be at this time a 
change of administeatlon of the General Guvern- 
laeot. Grave national reasons shoald oertainly ba 
g;von for thla by those who insist upon withdraw- 
ing control from the party whlob preserved the na- 
tion troni (lestruoiion by treason, and has, np to the 

'■ breaent time 8u administered its aff^rs as to make 
it respected abroad, besides giving; it a financial 
ei-mlit-ttaroushoul the world second to that ot no 
couotrv upon ilie face of the earth. We find 

_ this chsuje inr,i8fed noon ftom many sources 
and especially by Mr. Charles Francis Adams, a 
late convert, and by G>>v. Soyoionr and others. Mr. 
Adains. in a letter written to the Kew-Tork State 
liemocratio Commlctee, Oated Sept. So, 1876, de- , 
elares : ''The time has now come for a radical 

otaansn ana the sntiscitution of a wholly nevr infla- 
enoe. tied up by no restriction other than the Ken- 
nine wishes of honest men of all parties." And ho 
ftdds: 'Verily, verily, if tho people are wise they 
will lav duwu party and seize the present 
upportunltv to make a cbance." And 
Gov. Seymour urges ' ohange m view of 
What be calls two aspocta of our couotrv which de- 
mand onr attention — ita moral disorders, and its 
material distress. But he proceeds lo say : " I ad- 
mit that the same spiriCr of extravauanoe which 
marks the expeuditaro uf the GuveruiueDt Adniin- 
Mtrallon br the Kepablican Party has been shown 
by every State aud Maoioioal Government, wit boat 
regard to the p.irty which controlled them, since 
thedo^e of the war." And be auugests that with 
a Democratic President and House of Reuresenta- 
iives, cud a Kfpublican SeuJte, we have the check 
opun arbitrary power designoi by onr Fathers. 

J^ow, one would suppose from readinif the letter 
of Mr. Adams that ae designed to convey the im- 
preaaion that the time had oome for the peoole to 
anlLeln the election of klr. Tilaen and in the eleva- 
tion of the Deuiocrarlo Party to power, because, in 
sach event, ibey wuuld " lay down party aud seize 
the present opportunity to make a cbanire, and, by 
OTvatlDi: a new iufluence, uo ovher restriction would 
" be imposed upon such partf than tne Konuine 
wishes of the honest men of all parties." Is it 
rsally the belief of Mr. Adams that, 
if 2Ar. Tilden should be elected, he would 
be tiel np in his Executive action by " no restcic- 

tlun. «avu that impused bv the> genuine wishes of 
th«r honest men o: all parties}" Does he believe 
that Mr. lilden would fail to act in barmony with 
the purposes ut bis own t And, does he believe that 
those purposes would be in any manner oliauKed or 
miMlldeil by the wishes of snoh Republicans as 

migbt, under bs advice, nnite with the Democratic 
Party i Do«ahcinut, indeed, know from the history 
ot that par'.y that it haa tollowed with intensity, 
•od carried out at any sacrifice its own party 
Bohemea, and that ita leaders have never failed to 
obey the wishes of tho party ) 

•>£MOCBATIC SlXXUItJH OF PSETEN8E ASTD MIKI-i 
MtJM OF TKUTH. 

We muit I think, resort to some better reason . 
than this for making the proposed ohange. Mr. 
Seymonr admi^ that the extravagance of the Ke- 
pabiioan Party in oonductinz the General Govem- 
jntnt haa been eqnaled by tnat of the Democratic 
Party m every State and city in which it has ruled, 

and we are not likely, therefore, to gain in that re- 
spect by the chance prooosed. Other considerations, 
bowever. are ar;{ed in the plactorm adopted bv the 
Democratic Party at bt. Louis. It ia there 
aaaerted tiiat " the result of Kepabli- 
caa rale has . been to lock fast the 
prosperity of an mdustnoua people in the paralysis 
vf bird times." No reasons are stated for this as- 
aeruon, and when we consider that depression in 
tnuiness prevails throagboat the civilized world, 
aud that thia paralysis is totind not oulv in Eng- 
land, but in i< ranee and Germany, and in most of 
the Coatioental nations, we are led to suppose that 
to attribute iv to the influence of the Republican 
Party is a iiule nnrcasonable. It is, however, tur- 
Vber asserted in that plaUorm that "change is indls- 
peoaable, because reform in the Government is ne- 
cessary to rcouild aud establish in tne hearts of the 
whole people the y^iion eleven years ago happily 
resoaad trom the danger of secession of States." 
Such an Bsseriiou is the more extraordinary when 
we consider its source. It proceeds from tlie very 
men. ur (heir represeutatives, who attempted to de- 
stroy the Union by a wicked rebellion oontrived 
aud brobKht on in lij6I. And it sounds Strang, in- 
deed, tu hear tcom BUeh niea the suggeatioD tbar, 
is order to establish a love ot the TTnion 
in tne hearts of the people, it is neces- 
sary to take its Government from the Bepublican 
P^ircy, by whicn aioue it was sostuined and pre- 
served In tht p.!ril to which 1 have referred. £l.ui1 
It is eqnaily extraordinary that it should b* pro- 
poaed i>e».auii3h this love of Union in the hearts 
of the people by placing at the head ot the nation 
Mr. Xilvieo, whose recurl fsera 1860 down to the 
Close of the war disclosed — if not hostility to the 
cause ot tuc Union — certajoly an utter indifference 
to ikS predervation. and sKoug sympathy with the 
traitors who were attemotiug to destroy it. It is, 
bOAerer, found at xljbis lime indupaD8at>le 
to asaert tho conuiMy. because it is well- 
known that, were it admitted that he had 
thoa failed in his duty to the Constitution and laws 
oi nis oouDtry every Northern State would oppose 
ttu alec-ttoD. Aud so well satiatied are his friends 
and the leaders ot his party that to establish belief 
in bia patriuiisin is iudispensable, that repeated 
and public tH'orta have beeu made by them for that 
purpose; aud more especially by Mr. Hewitt, in 
tbe iloiue of Eepres'eBtativus, where he made state- 

meuia — ^1 of which were eniixely unt'oundea 

concemius; ,the oplaioos and the action of 
*'Mr. 'illdetl at the commencement ot the 
Tobelhon aud durini! its couiiDuance. Thus, we 
have it asserted , by him that Mr. Tilden united in 
the ca.l tor the meuster meeting at Uulua square ; 
that he couiributed largely to the fltimg out of the 
'Xammsny He^iinqfit, and that he declared trum the 
time the Aral State seceded that war was the only 
remedy for the purpose of restoring the Union. 
That these aiatementa were nttkiiy anfuonded is 
manifest from testimony, uocumeuts, and records 
which cannoi be filsided. Tbusit appears that this 
regiment and three others were the only font regi- 
ments raised lu the City of New-York the 
euure expense of which was paid by in& Uaion De- 
fense Committee, and afterward by the Govern- 
inent And, iu direct hosillitv to the declaration of 
Mr. Hewitt, that Iroin the Ume the tirst Stite 

•aceueci. Mr. 'X'ildeu insiHted that war was the rem- 
edy, wo learn from a speech made by him on the lat 
«ay of rebroiirY, Ibfll, belore a convenilda wuicH 
met in this hull fur the porpose. as wonia 
appear from its pr^eediuns, of sym- 
pathiziag with the retiellion, (six Staiea 
then haviug seceded irom lue Union,) 
that " he ai'gusd atrongiy against coercion, showing 
the slreufth ana resources ot" the Southern States, 

and re.isoiuiJ2 that belt-interest, if no higher motiye, 
sDoaid deter na trom plunging into a civil war, 
which c«.uid nut tail to prove disastrous to tu as a 
liatiuu, aud to bnn;£ poverty aud suffering on our 
«wn citiwck, aud t.iat ho lor one would resist, 
nniierany aud all circimstancea, the use of force to 
coerce the South into the Uiiion." And that con- 
vention also resolved, (Mr. 'liiden being one of the 
cumuilitee which drew the resolutions,) " That in 
the opinion of the convention the worst and the 
most luetteetivo urgument that -can be addressed by 
the Couiederacy or its adheiing members to the 
lecediai; States is civil war. Civil war will not re- 
arure the Union, but wili defeat forever its rcoon- 
\mctiOn," 

A DOUBLE-PACED AND COWARDLY PARTY, 
xf we add to the views thus expressed by Mr. 
TUden, his letter to Judge Kent, just pravioas to 
the election of Mr. Lincoln, in which be aeclareo, 
la substance, that the success of the Northern 
States wooJd place the Southern States Bndec the 
beet of a foreign Government, which they might 
{tutly resist; aud also hi^< actiunin oonneotii<o with 
the Society fur tho Diffusion of Useful Political 
KoowleUgL — con^isii.ig principally in asstirting the 
biessiags of slavery and the UDounsiitutionality of 
every war measure— .ind also his participation in 
the Chicago Cuuvuution of 1864, ana in framing the 
resolution whiuh declared the war a failure, we 
shall be able to ioim a very corieot estimate ot the 
propiifty of seieciiug hiro as a person caloulated to 
I'eawakeu a love ut the Uuion in the hearts of our 
people, 

I;, is fnrtber insisted iu the St. Lsnis platform 
that change of Administraiton is necessary to 
"establish a sound (juirency." I suppose we all 
know What IS oidiaaril.y meant by a "sound cur- 
rauey." It c insists of gold aud silver, ur their 
equivalent, and tti^tt equivalent, it' paper, can 
eujy answer tliis meaning by being oou- 
'xertible into the preoioas metals at will. 
2^'uw this w*a8 piovided tor by a Bepnblican 
l.loogree.i in 1B75{ w'lich enacted that on or before 
the 1st day of January, la79, the puper money of 
the United Status shouid be redeemab u iu coin. It 
1.1 not pretuuded that by any means our Govern- 
tneut could well havs suticipaiea that date fur the 
Aiurposo ot resumption ; aud yot we find it assorted 
"^h this plaUorm ihitt tuu act requtriUK resumption 
at that time is a nindra;ice tu it, ,and, therefore, 
should be repealed ; auu in harmony with this pur- 
pose the House ot itepresuaiaiives passed an act 
utterly repealing it, and pruvidiug no means what- 
ever tor resumption. 

When we Iouk at the platform for the purpose ot 
aacertainiug by what muaus resumption is to be ac- 
complished under Demoeraliu rule, we are there 
told that it 18 to bo by "a jadiciuus system of prep- 
aration, by public- economies, by othuial retreuca- 
lueuls, and uy wise tlaauue." These certainly are 
aufiiciently mdetiuite to satisfy the most devoted 
adherent of the soft-money party i and when we 
consider that what shall bn that "Judicious system 
of preparation'' is uowaere stated, except in the 
general language which toilows, we can derive but 
very little, if any, iutoruiation as to tbe time 
when resouiption la t<^take place. Proceeding still 
further, ic is duciarea iu the platform that such a 
sysieu ((/bat is. tbe "judicious system of prepara- 
' tioii" suggested) '- well deviiied, and. above all, iu- 
trusted to competent hands for execution," (by 
which, I suppose, is meant the Democratic Party,) 
" would, trutu the day ut its adoption, bring healiug 
on its wiugs to all our harassed industries, aec m 
Biotiou the vTbeels of oommeroe, mauufaoturoa, and 
tbe ueehauical arts, restore employment to labor, 
aud leuew iu all us natural sources the prosperity 
p( the people." Where can anything be found more 
tuigid, more usnafislactory, more meaningless than 
this ) And yet all this is put forth in the platform 
of a great party, framed fur the pnrpose of oom- 
giannlng the resseot and oonfldeDce ot oar oeoolo. 



and intended to show that by placing the Govern- 
ment in the hands ef its. loaders, snoh a sysiem of 
preparation by publio economies, official rotreuch- 
meors and wise fiuauce would ue adopted as wonld 
bring forth tbe promised result. 

DESriCABLB NONSENSE OF THE DEMOCUATIO PLAT- 
FORM, 

"We are further told, however, that change is 
necessary to "restore the public credit." I* not 
that alreadv sutBcienlly established ? And what, 
let me ask, is meant by its "restoration"! To what 
standard is it to be elevated or depressed ? Is it to 
be brousrht to that standard which existed at the 
close — and for some time previous to the close — of 
the administration of Mr. BiichanaD, when the pub- 
lio debt had been increased to $70, 000, 000, bonds lor 
which, at six per cent, interest, were at some seven- 
teen per cent, disouuot) Is this the restoratiou of 
national credit which the platform proposes to .at- 
tain by change of administration f Already our 
credit throughout tbe world is so assured that 
bonds paying but four and a half per cent, interest 
are above par. Certainly, in view of these facts, 
and especially of its oast history, we can hardly 
trust the Democratic Party to restore or maiutaiu 
the public credit. 

But it is further Insisted that change is nocess.-^ry 
to enable that party to "maintain the national 
honor." Where is this to be maiuiained ! abroad or 
at borne ! Abroad, throughout all the natiuui 
of the earth our flag, onr name, our 
credit are honored as never before. We do 
not, then, need the aid ot Dsinocratlo 
lead|t's to maiutaln the natioual power abroad. 
And, if we may Judge how they would maintain It 
iu the iuiure by tho maaner in which it was uphold 
by Buchanan and his advisers in the past, we 
should shudder at the thought of transferring tbe 
national power and ounfiding tbe mainteuance of 
lis honor to such hands. And it is quite certain 
that the opinions of those men as to Slate rigiits 
and their supremacy ate substantially those of tho 
men who coutiol that party. 

If it be meant by maintaining the national honor 
that It should be more eft'ectuallv sustained at 

home by tbe protection ot our own ciiizeus, I agree 
that there the Republicans have been delinquent. 
But, from what caused Our citizeus have been 
massacred at Kew-Oneans, and generally tbmugh- 
out Louisiana, and mere reuenciy at Hamburg 
and in other porticos of South Carolina, 
where — as elsewhere threughout the South 
— by the orgauiziHttJiE — olr- -ritle — and other 
clubs, oar Bepublicaus, white aud black, 
are threatened, not only with deprivation of their 
rights, but with the destruoi Ain of life itself, if they 
attempt the independent exjioise of the elective 
IranoLiae. A uation which tj^.is to protect its citi- 
zens at home wh6n thus thieatened, is dishonored. 

And yet when the attempt is made by our Govern- 
nienti thronzn ita Attoruey General, to give such 
advice and direction to the United States Mursbala 
as m some degree to protect the citizen at the polls, 
the leaders of the Demociatio Party. South aud 
North, denounce the etfjrt as nuconstitotional, in- 
sisUus that colored oltizeus are to be left to the 
mercy of armed men daeuly interested in preventing 
tbem from attendms the polls. 

That our Government ia bound to protect its eiti- 
zeus in tbe right t« vote tor members of Con(;ress, 
no lawyer will venture t« deuv ; and any pefsou 
who has doubts upon that subject, can easily quiet 
them by referring to the fifty-eighth article ot the 
Federaliit, written by Alexander Hamilton, 
urging the adoption, by the States, of 
that portion of the Constitution which provided 
for this protection — he asserting that without it 
tbe General Government would be left wkhout the 
power of self-preseivation. 

It is insisted, however, that if a change should 
not be made upon the 0'i)uuds mentioned, tne ex- 
travagance and public expenditure of which tbe 
Bepublicaa Party has beeu guilty require that the 
Government should bo placed lu other uauds. Upon 
this subject it is well to look at the protif 
which was officially disclosed in June last, 
from which it appears that during the admin- 
istration of Gen. JacKson tlO 55 ware lost upon 
(1,000 disbursed ; $21 15 during tne adminisira.ion 
of Van Buren ; |1U 37 during that of Harrison ; 
$8 34 during that of Polk; i7 t>4 duriifg that et Tav- 
lor and PiUmore ; |5 86 during that of Pierce ; $0 1>8 
during that of Buchaunan ; (1 41 only ouriug 
that of Lincoln; 48 cents ou |l,OUl) uuiiing that of 
Jubnsou, and for the first four years of Pres- 
ident Grant's administration, but 43 cents ; and for 
the seeond term thus far, but 26 oenis, while iu the 
Post Office Depattmeut, nut included in toe present 
statement, the loss ou each fl.UOO during Jackson's 
administration was $11 Id , $'i6 19 iu Van Bureu's ; 
but 11 59 during tbe first term of President Grant, 
and (1 Hi. for the secona. 

Tbe past instructs accurately— prantice being 
much more satisfactory than promises ; aud by ref- 
erence to that we find that the loss by fraudulent 
ibisappropriation bv otUcials has beeu ooastantlvS 
dimial»bing, and Mas never so tntiing as dunug the 
last four years of Gen. Giaut's administra- 
tion. And -^ when we consider that during 
the entire'^ Bepublican administration, from 
1861 to the present time, vast expenditures — exceed- 
iue many times that of any previous like number 
of years — have been made, (a part of them during 
a prolonged aud wastefai war,) it Is surprising than 
BO little has been wi-oogfaiiy taken irom the na- 
tional Treasury. If it bo urged that the expenses 
of tbe Government have beeu greater ouder Ke- 
pablican rule, tbe answer is that the cost to each 
person for such expenses in 18K0 was f 1 91, while lu 
1875 — assuming forty miiiioos to have beeu the pop- 
ulation — the cost .was but $1 70 ; and, if wo asaame 
that 43,000,000 was our popalauon, tne cost was but 
11 60 to each person. We, therefore, fail to see any 
probability that a change of admiuistration will in- 
crease in the hearts of our peeple a love of the 
Union — or tend to establish a sound currency — or a 
better public credit, or, better, msintain our 
national honor ; and we also fail to percuive that 
such a change would yield greater ecouomy in tihe 
administration of the Governmeat, or, better, pre 
vent fraudalent appropriations ut its reveuaes by 
officials. 

THB WBETCEtSED LEQACT LEFT BT THE DEMO- 
CEATS. 
Bnt we are told, in addition to all these reasons 
for a change, that better men — statesmen better 
calculated to conduct the affairs of tbe Govern- 
ment — will be placed in charge of its interests if 
the Democratic Party eufcceeds to power in the com- 
ing election- Again the past instructs us, and 
we cannot but recur, under its teaching, to 
the intamy of that Democratic Administration 
which permitted our Government to ba con- 
trolled by traitora, whose purpose was to de- 
stroy our nationality and degrade oar flag. 
That was the last effort ot Democrats to administer 
this Government, and what legacy did they leave 
te the Kepablican Party t An empty Treasury, un- 
armed regiments to resist treason, treasonable 
leaders in the Senate and lu the House of Repre- 
seutatives, a North divided, tbioughsympattiy with 
the rebels, as illustrated by the course of Mr. Til- 
den, then an influential member of the Uemocratio 
Party, and now proposed fur the Presideucy of the 
United States. 

Wnatthis legacy wa«, is disclosed when we re- 
member that to restore the Union, to subject, rebelliou 
duo reduce traitors to the discipline of the Con- 
stitution and lawa, 2.S0(J,401 men were called into 
the field, 95,085 of these were killed and 190,319 
more died in the service. To these should be added 
one-thtid more as the number who died from dis- 
eases contracted in oar armies — making in all a lost 
of some 433,000 men. In 1361 tbe eutire sums paid 
lor pensions was but $1,089,218 75. In 1874 thia 
amount had swollen to over tweniv-nine millions 
annually, while the national debt entailed upon as 
was some two haudied aud five thousand millions— 
aunnally costing about one haodred and fifty mil- 
lions of dollars. 

If we are to estimate the men who, by the pro- 
posed change, are to become itilers by those who' 
coniroUed tbe Demoeratlc Party when it was last 
in power, we pray to be delivered from a course so 
intolerable. The labors and lesponsibilities which 
devolved lipen the liepnblican Party when, under 
the leadership of Mr. Lincoln, it attempt^sa tu re- 
deem tbe country from the terrible condition iu wliich 
the Democratic Party had placed it are well known 
to onr people,: Thuusauds and tens of thousands uf 
brave Democrats, abandoning and disregarding the 
doctrines, sympathies, and purposes of leaders of 
their party, joined the Union Armies j and, when, 
under the leaaership of Gen. Grant, we were hearing 
the great end fuugnt to be attained, these leaders, 
of whom Mr. Xiluen was one, again appeared iu a 
convention held at Chicago in 1864, to nominate one 
of tbelr number tor the Presidency. Their 
purpose was again to resume control of 
the nadon, and to attain this they resolved 
that the experiment of war had proved a failure ; 
that the rule of the Republican Party had been a 
suoceasiou of consuiutioual ouiragos upon the 
oouutry, and they attempted by their lufliieace to 
suspend the draft designed to reinturoa our armies, 
and thus to paralyze the nation in its final struggle. 
They failed iu this purpose^ The war was con- 
tinued, and flaal.ly ended by tho surreuder of Gou.- 
Lee and his siibordmato officers aud tbe armies 
under them, 'then commeuced in Congress a 
further struggle to prevent the country trom se- 
curing by constitutional guarantees the fruits of 
the war. The most determined reiistauce was 
made by leaders of the Democratic Party against 
the submission to the conutry ot such amendments 
to the Constitution us were necessary to secure cit- 
izenship to tbe blacks, prevent repuuiatiou of the 
national debt, tne pavmeut of tue Coufedeiaie 
debt, or compensation to .Sonihern mso tor tne 
value of their slaves. And thia upDositiun was 
continued in the halls ot Congress, iu the 
Legislatures of suuh of the States as 
were controlled by the Doiuocritic Party, 
and, ultimately, in an attempt by the States ot Ohio, 
New-Jersey, JSew-York, aud Indiana, so soon as 
they camu under Demoeratical coutrol, to with 
draw their assent to the tourteenlb and fifteenth- 
amendments, for the purpose of defeating the great 
purposes for which the war had beeu coutiaued. 
Iu this, however, they failed; and, tinally, after all 
these eiforts, came tne nomiuatioa uf Gov. Seymour 
In 1368. I have relerred to the frauds praoticed lu 
the City ot New-Yora in the attempt 
The^ failed of their purpose 



to elect him. The^ tailed of their purpose. But 
tbe enormity ot these traads was so great 
that to pieveot their repetition, and to secure to cit- 
izens entilled to vote for members of the House of 
Representatives protection in no doinu, acts ot Con- 
gress were paaseiLiu gnard agaiust fraud:! at sub- 
sequent elections. , 

UNDER THE OUIgE OF ItEFOR M. 
In 1872 another effort tor supremacy was made by 
the Democratic Party, under the leadership of Mr. 
Greeley. This, also failed, and now, in 
1876, we have the attempt repeated — not 
liBder a leader of patriotic antecedents — 
but under one associated from the begin- 
ning with seceasionists sympathizing with treason, 
•addoing what he dared to aid the rebellion. And, 
atraneelv enough, we flAd thia effort masked under. 



the gnlse of "reform," superadded to which tho 
garb of tbe patriot is also ansnmed : for the leaders 
of that party well know that without this disguise 
snccossatthe North would bo impossible. AVe 
are, however, signiflcanily warned of their senti- 
ments, of their hyp icrisv, and ot their purposes 
when we scrutinizu with care how, under tho mask 
of patriotism, by phrases dpainned to convoy a dou- 
ble meaning, they attempt to imitate, bv their pl.it- 
form tifterances, those of the Republican plattoim 
adopted at CmcinBati. Take, tor instance, that 
portion of tho latter which declares that "the 
pledges which tho nation has given to our soldiers 
and sailors must be fulflUe 1 ; aud a grateful people 
will always hold those who imperiled their lives tor 
the country's nreservation iu the kindest remem- 
brance." That is a plain and simple tribute paid to 
the soldiers and sailorn who subdued tho lebelliim, 
and a promise that a gratetui people would always 
hold thera in kindest remembrance tor having thus 
imperiled their lives forthoir country. An attempt 
IS made in the Democratic platfonn to convey the 
impression of a similar tribute and promise; but, 
when we remember that this was framed by, or in 
the intprest of, the very men who fought us in the 
field, and who attempted, with arms in their hands, 
to overcome and destroy tho armies of the Union, 
it would be absurd to suppose they would really 
nnite in any such tribute or in any .siu'h 
promise. Tliey did, howover. resolve "ihattha 
soldiers and sailors ot the Kepubltc " — be- 
ing caretul not to diitinguisu between 
tho«e Nuitli and those (South, "aud the widows and 

orphans of thoso who have falleu in battle," uom;; 
careful not to difcriminnte between those slain 
When flgtitiog for the Uuion aud those who fell in 
thoConiederate cause, " have a jd.st claim upon the 
care and protection of tnelr fellow-eitlzens." This 
deceptive phrase well illiistratea inaoy others in 
the platform which might bo relerreJ to. I have 
not, iioweve'r, time to do this, and I proceed, there- 
fore, to consider briefly what is the real luirpose of 
tho Southern leaders who now control the Demo- 
cratic Party. 

We are told by their public Fpaakora and by their 
press that lu this canvass the Hapublicau Party in 
Ui.sinterrinc dead issues — waving. tbo "Dloodyshirt," 
and thus seeking to divert our people from the real 
qiiesiions buloie the country — :uiil that m so doinii 
hate and disc >rd are being awakened and promoted 
between Xorth and South. What issues thus des- 
ignated are referred to, and what is meant by this 
charge of waving the "bloody shirt" ? Di) Itopub- 
licans present dead issues when they In^tist that it is 
the purpose ot leaders of the Democratic Partv, so 
Boon as they shall acquire legislative and executive 
control of the Government, to pass acts now 
before the House of Representatives, authoriz- 
insc payiueBts to Southern men who were 
rebels during the war, for all property used, oc- 
cupied, taken, appropriated, ot injured by the 
Uuion Armies? Is this a dead issue, or one forced 
upon the Xorth by the most solemn method in 
which an issue can be presented to the country. 
Bills have been introduced into Congress by South- 
ern members, expressly providing for such pav. 
ment to an amouut nearly if not quite equal to the 

national deot. Have we heard it BuegesCed from 
any Democratic source — North .or South — 
that it is not the purpose of that party 
thus to appropriate the revenues of the 
nation ? and it snt;h snggestion were made sbonid 
it be credited by reflecting men. who know that tbe 
representatives of iluise whose claims are pressed 
onstitute a large majority of the Democratic Party 
in tho House, aud control its action now, as they 
did betore the war? This, theielore, is nor a dead 
Is.sue, uncovered by tho RepuOlican Party, but ons 
raised and distinctly presented by the action of 
Democratic leaders which must' be met now, for 
after tbe election it may be too late. 

LOTALTY TUB PRICE OF CONCORD. 
"What other issue is said to have been invoked 
from tbe dead to confront them ? They insist that 
the past should for the sake of natioual union and 
harmony be forgotten — or at least never referred 
to ; and that the North should ba content, and even 
rejoiced to see the halls of Congress swarming with 
the men who not only forced the South into rebel- 
lion, bnt led its armies in the field. If, in connec- 
tion with such a spectacle, we could discern in the 
sentimeats, speech, and conduct of these men, an 
abandonment of the doctrines which led to the re- 
bellion — a hearty snbuaisston to the Constitution — 
a subjection, earnest and sincere to such of its 
amendments as were aesiTne'l to secure 

rights of citizenship to the blacks, eu- 
toree prompt payment of onr national 
debt, aud prevent payment of the Conled- 
erate debt, and all legislation intended to obtaiu 
compensation for manumitted slaves — if this cou d 
be seen, I should feel that at length the Nortli and 
South could traternallv unite iu luo government ot 
the couuiry, each acoept.ng with cboBrfulQess the 
conditions impoeei at the close of the war. Bnt are 
we not warned in many ways, and with terrible 
earneitness, that the time fur this is not yeti Are 
we not told in terms uhmistaliaisle, that to these 
amendments there is, aud is to be, uo such submis- 
siou I Is not tlus to be found recorded in the most 
solemn doings of tnuse wao now hold sway iu 
tbeDemocraac Party? Bitterly and persistently 
did they struggle acalnst the submission to, aud 
adoptioii by, too States, of these aineutlments ; aud 
alter their adoption by Eepublican Legislatuies iu 
three-fourths of them aitempts by four States, 
wbeu they came under Democratic rale, were made 
to withdraw their assent, aud thus to render the 
amendmeuts a dead letter. And after all this op- 
position to, and defiance of, the will of the people, 
we find tbe Democratic Party declaring 'by i-ts plat- 
form adopted In 1863 that the Reuuustructijn 
acts — uuder which only was the requisite 
assent uf three-fourths of the Slates ob- 
tained — were usurpations, nnconstitutiohal, .and 
void — thereby in the mo4t deliberate man- 
ner asserting that the amendments procured 
by meaas of sach acts were equally so. And be- 
yond and after all this, when iu the House uf Rep- 
resentatives, in March, 1870, a resolutiou was of- 
fered declaring the amendments valid and blinding 
upon the President, the States, and all citizens, 
seventy-eight Democratic members voted in the 
uef;ativeaud but four in the affirmative; and when, 

nearly a year thereafter, a resolutiou was intro- 
duced declaring that the legislation for the enforce- 
ment of the amendments was constitutional and 
binding, the Democrats voted solid against it, and 
only the Republicans in its lavor. Iii Aew of all 
this, can it bo truthtullv said that all questions as 
to the repudiation of tbe national debt, 
the paymeut of the Coufederata debt, 
and qf claima for manauitted slaves, ate 
forever settled by constitutional amondnieuis, aud 
that these have ueeu RO universally accepted and 
acquiesced in by the Democratic Party that no 
jjbues can possibly arise thereunder, antl that they 
have been invoked by Republicans only to mislead 
the people in the present canvass. On the contrary, 
I assert that every issue presented has been forced 
npon them by the solemn acts and votes to which 
I liave briefly let erred, and that tho Demociatio 

Part.y alone is responsible tor the necessity of pre- 
senting to the country tbe inquiry, whether the 

leaoers of tbo party are lit to be traaled with sach 

legislative and ezecotive power as will enable them 
at will to utterly disrugard the rights and interests 
which the amendments were intended to secure, 

THE COKSTITCTIONAL AMENDMENTS SHOULD BB 

ESFOItCED. 

' I have a few words more to say apon this snbjsct. 
The fonrteenth amendment confers citizousbip npon 
tbe blaalts, and the fifteenth was framed to protect 
them against degisiatiou which might deny or 
abridge their right to vote. If these amendments 
are not to be enforced, as they surely will not be by 
tbose who believe tbem invalid, tbe colored race 

throughout the South will be left to the mercy ox 
their former masters. Who, then, has raised the 
issue as to whether their constitutional rights will 
be endangered b.y the success of the Domocratio 
Party? IJas it not been raised and presented by 
those who have refused to accept these amendmeuts 
as valid, and especially by those who already 
throughout the Southern States aie, by their lawless 
and violanc ooaduct, diiclosing a purpose wide- 
spread, if not uuiTorsal, to ureveuc tne exercise 
by the blacks of the elective fraucbisa ? Who, 
then, I aalc. flaunts the " bloody shut," and who 

presents the issues which Democratic orators and 
lis press are pleased to c^ll dead ? Are the Repuo- 
licans respon-ible for this, or are they but meetiug 
grave questions, thrust upon them, uud which tlie 
people should consider during, the present canvass, 
and setiie at the coming elociiuu. It would doubt- 
less be far more agreeable to the Democratic Party 
to have It assumed that its purposes are patriotic 
and loyal to the Coustitutioj and its amend- 
meute, thau to be compelled to de- 
fend itself against the charges suggested ; 
but it should beirin mind that out of the mouths 
and by the official votes uf its leaders, liave these 
charges been established, and it may also bo sug 
gested that but for the faithlesauess to coautiy aud 
CohKtitution thus exhibited, the couhdence and un- 
divided support of the South would not have beeu 
secured, ^y such aid it is believed the Guvorn- 
metit may bo grasped, and then, while the Southern 
Slates have upou the basis uf negro citizenship and 
representation, 106 Representatives lu the llouse, 
a* ouiup.iied with 74 beroie tbe war, tbi.t lucroused 
uumbei will euable them, with tuu aid uf a tew 
dough-taced Democrats of the !North, to control 
its legislation; and with knowledge that the four- 
teenth aud llfieeuih amendments are cousidtred in- 
valid, Wf> can readily imagine what bucli legislation 
will be. Is it to be pieveu ed, or shall »e, as ad- 
vised by the Democratic Party, ignore the issues 
which involve it and its cousL-queuces 1 

So soou as success shall renuer disguise unneces- 
sary. It will be cast aside, and then the leaders of 
that party will openly avow the doctrine to which I 
have reierru'^, and assert their right to disregard 
these amendments. It ihey succeed, Mr. Tuden 
aud the Goveiumeut will be coutro^laule at their 
will. It wuuld bu absurd to suppyse otherwise. 
They cast 138 votes iu the Electoral Co lege — 
oujugh within 47 to elect the President and Vice 
President. Is it to be for a moment supposed that 
the nieu who coutrol this numbur wili yiuld 
any considerable portion of authority over the 
Guvernmeni, lo those who control but 47 
ot the eKoturnl votes iieeJtul tor success 1 Does tho 
past history of Southern ieaiiHi's permit us tu sup- 
pose that thev will surreuder their will to that of 
their Northern allies/ And, does the character of 
these allies warrant us iu supposiug that they will 
venture lo coutest suprt-macy with tlieir more 
numerous Southern brethren of the party? Will 
tliey not oe content to accept saub aduautages as a 
uomiuaut party may seouie for its mem- 
bers, and leave the priucipal control iu 
the bauds of Southern men— as was done 
prior to the Rebellion ? And if this shall be so, 
what will inevitably follow as a cousequanoe > Does 
any reasonable mun suppose, iu view of the vast 
Claims already made bv southern meu for property 
occupied, uesiroyed, used, aud injured by union 
Armies, that one jot or tittle ot these or other 
claims will be abated when the control of the Legis- 
jttive asd Executive departu»encs ot tiie Govern* 



ment shall be attained by the Damocratic Party f 
Does any intelligent person believe that assuming, 
as its leaders do, tbe invalidity ot the 
ionrleouth amendment, which prohibits 

comneosation for their manumitted slaves, they 
will hesitate to attempt this by legislation tbe mo- 
ment thev have the power? And, in view of these 
vast claims, can it be supposed that they will desire 
an early resumption ot specie payiuentu ? i3o uotall 
reflecting men know that with resumption will 
come prudence, economv, restriction upon exirava- 
cance? And these iniu'ht prevent the asspnieven 
of Northern Democrats to legislation authorizing 
payment m gold of the claims which will 
swarm from the South, in the halls ot Congress. 
Uxtravasrauoa is rite when promises without pay- 
meut are accepted as sufficient lor the purpose of 
conduitiug the ufffirs either of cations or of indi- 
viduals I And can we doubt that Southern leaders 
are ignorant of the need of maintaining a. paper 
cinrency, it they would attain the great ends which 
tliey desire ? When the nation adopts a curreni'.v 
ol which it can make millions at. will, with no defi- 
nite period of redemption fixed, is not the 
process a very jiimpie— a very e.4sy one of 
luauufacturing these mi. lions fob the purpose of 
payiug claims which would not be tolerated if they 
were payable in uold f Ami, ajiain, is it to bo 
dontited that with the L;>gisla(ivo aud Executive' 
power ot tho Goveruiueut in Southern hauas there 
will be hes'iiation iu so delerrine the pavmeut of 
our national debt that coiupensatiou lor slaves 
manunii.ted may bu piovided lor? Indeed, is it not 
highly probable that when tbe payment of our 

national debt and r4*siiiiiptien of apecie jiaymenis 
shall be pressed by Northern men, tho.so of 
tho South will say, " We, too, fought 
lor a cause as holy as that for which you fought j 
and in that incurred a debt as sacred as that which 
.you incurred, and if tho one is paid, tbe oher 
should be | aid also ?"' Is it improbable that such 
arguments will be used ? And is it very doubttul 
that if employed they will be successful, if Sonihern 
men acquire the control I have suugesfd. I decline 
to accepi, pledges of the Democratic Party ou tbe 
eveof an election of Whit it will or will not do if 
power bo attained. Tbe nation is tilled with evi- 
dence ot its uromises unredeemed, its duties violat- 
ed. Thoae have carried mourning into almost eveiy 
bouseuold at the North, aud have doited its hills 
and valleys with cemeteries crovvdod with the bod- 
ies of men who died that the uatiou niiiriit live. 
These are some of tho fruity of Democratic rule, 
aud I am unable to seo in the purposes of those who 
uow oontr.il that party any subatautial departure 
Irom the fatal doctrines which produced these bit- 
tec fruits. Wo know that even now the State of 
South Carolina Is but a great oanip fllled with 
armed men, lesolved to contest tlie coming election 
— not by bail.jts, but by force and vio- 
lence, and, if necessary, by murder. Such 
a spectacle is a disgrace, not merely 
to tha< State, bnt to tbe nation, aud those who have 
produced it mast not complain, if they find iue 
laws uf tbe Uuiuu proclaimed there by the sharp 
shrill voice ot musketry, and executed ai the point 
of tbe bayonet. Xuey uiust be taught obedience, as 
is the savage, through fear, and le.i7n that the msg- 

esty of a mighty naciun, will nut long tolerate tne 
perpetration ot cruelty and outrage upon even the 
meanest of its people. 

POLITICAL CHEATS SETTING THEMSELVES UP AS 

JUDGES. 

I hear much from orators and from tbe press of 
the need of civil service reform, and much have I 
beard^lrsnfe-tAStimjny secured through Democriitio 
Committees iu Congress, of the frauds and pecula- 
tions of men who nave held office under the present 
administration. Donunciations the most riulent, 
have been uttbred against them by members of Con- 
gress who served in the rebel armies, aud ibsreby 
justly forteiied their lives for this greatest ot all 
offenses against their country. To the supreme mercy 
of our government they are inaebted for their 
existence, and especially for the privi.e^eof sitting 
in the halls of Congress. It wad their purpose to 
destroy all that a nation holds most dear — its Gov- 
ernment, its property, its loyal people; and when 
I hear such men — covered with these gcave crimes—^ 
charge others, aud especially those who defended 
the nation in lU peril, with filching a triiie from 
the revenues, they seem to me like incendiaries, 
who, after having Area a ware-house filled with 
valuable merchandise, charge tbose who have ex- 
tinguished the flames and s ived the proi>erty with 
having wroDgiuiiy abstraoted from it a few yards 
of ribbon or a lew loaves of bread. Let such ac- 
cuseds stand far back, uncovered, with uowed 
neck!<, aud let others who are without sin cast the 
first stone. 

Nor am I willing to conflile the duty of reforming 

the civil sei-vico tu the lineal descendants in politics 
of those who established the maxim and adopted 
tbe praciice tbat to tue viui.ora oeluug the spoils. 
Their promises upon ibis subject do not repose 

upon cnnvictloa. Tue leaders of the Democratic 

Party and 'flieir followers are hungry aud gaunt 
with long fasting, and, should the Govurument pass 
into their hands, reform wili wait long and ho^ie- 
lessly for a vioiatiun of this time-honored maxim or 
for a departuie from this venerable practice. 
Promises to tbe cuntrary are but the bieach ut their 
nostrils, to be disregarued when they shall have 
achieved the purpose tor whicn they were made. 

I decliue to notice the aouse ot the illastrious 
man now at the head ot our Government, wiio, as 
chief of our armies, finally crushed a rebellion 
which at oue time threatened destruciiou to our 
natioual life. Ue cau stand erect aud alone, now 
and hereafter, unaided, save by a record which has 
reudered him famous, and will make him immortal. 
A. Democratic press may denounce him as it did 
Gen. Washiugtoii, concerning whom, at the close of 
his administration, we find iu tbe A.urora, a paper 
printed in Philadelphia, on the 4th ui March, 1797, 
the following: 

" • Lord now lettest Thou thy servant depart In peace, 
for mine eyes have seen Thy salvation,' was thj pious 
ejaculation of a man who behold a flood ot happiness 
riuhiug uoon mankind, it ever mere was a tima that 
would liceiise the reiteration of the cxelam^tiuD, that 
time haa now arrived: for the man wao is the source 
of all the misfoftuuus of our ouacry Is this day re- 
duced to a level with his fellow-ciiizans, and is no 
loni;er possessed of power to multiply evils upou the 
United States. If ever there was a pe.iod for rtjoiciug, 
this IS the moment, hvety heait in uuisou withiieeoom 

ana happiueiiii of the pi^oiile ougat to beat high nitn 
exultation that the name uf v> ashlugiou from this 
day ceases to give a currency to poiitfcal iu.quity 
and to legalize curruotieu. A new era it now opeui ug 
up in us — an era which promises much to thep(.Oj>e: 
for public measures mudt now stand upuu toeic own 
merits aud nefarious projects can uo longer be sup- 
ported br a name, when a retrospect is tageii ot tue 

V\ asUiugt^u Aoministratien for eight years, it is a sub- 
ject of nn? gre^itesti astoutolimont that a single! di- 
vidual should have cau ^ered the principles oi repuo- 
licautsm in ail enlightened oeople Just emerged trom 
the gul' of despoti.-m, and should have corned his de- 
signs against tne public liberty so far as to have put 
lu joepardv ita verv existence. Such, however, are 
the lacis, and with these staiiuK ui iu the face this 
day ougut to he a luuilee iu the United States." 

Assaults like this are harmless, and soon find the 
obscurity aud con tempt which their scumlitv aud 
falsehood deserve. Their authors also quickly 

descend lo their proper plane of infamy, while 

the reputations they intendel to destroy grow 
brighter an.i grander as tbe years loU on. Nor 
ebail I take the unnecessary trouble to answer such 
feeble charges as have beeu made against the men 
put forth by tbe Republican Party as its nominees 
upon the State and national tickets. Xhey 
have planted tbemi>eives so firmlv iu 
the affjctiou' and confidence of the Ameri- 
ean people as to require no deteuse 
from tue lips or pen of any man. It is true, a 
" warning voice," as the paper through which it 
was uttered was pleased to call it, emanatiug from 
a distiaguisbef^tlawyer, has appealed to tne Kopub- 
hcan voters uf tbi«>Siate, to detest their candidate 
for Judge of the Court uf Appeals npon tbe sole 
ground, that he, npon some occasion, exprtssed the 
opinion that its members weie able aud upright; 
men, and had rightly decided the case of Tweed 
when it was before them on habeas corpus. I trust; 
this appeal will be uosuccesstui, for should it pre- 
vail, the ground npou which It is made will, I am 
inclined to think, disqualify tor tbat position 
every member of ihe Bar tf ithin the State whose 
character, ability, aud learning fit him tor a seat 
upon that Bench. 

SPKftCH OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY PHELPS. 

District Attorney Phelps followed Mr. Stough- 
ton, being mtroduoed by Mayor Judsonas ''the 
gentleman who in the State Convention nomi- 
nated for Governor Edwin D. Morgan." Mr. 
Pheips' adiiresa was a candid review of the 
claims of both parties to a control of the Gov- 
ernment. He said that parties should be judged 
by their records in the past, and not on 
their rose-colored promises treely made on the 
eve of a popular election. Ho then reviewed 
both platlorms aad candidates, aud showed 
wbat luigbt bo expected as tbe results of a 
Democratic victory in contrast with the con- 
sequences of a liepublican success. Wbile Mr, 
Phelps did not deal in invective or abuse, he 
impressed his hetirera with the dangers to tbe 
couatry that would follow Democratio su- 
premacy at the present time. 

Both speeches were admirable expositions of 
Republican principles. The moeting was one 
ot the most successful ever lield here. Hun- 
Hieds of persons who had arrived too late to 
gain admission to the hall gathered in front of 
the building, but there was no outdoor meeting. 



A MODEL DJlMOUJiAriO OONOBESSMAX. 

About a year ago Archibald M. Bliss was im- 
pieatled with William A. Powler. William C. 
Kintraley, Abner. C. Keeuey, and E. B. Lowber by 
tbo Tax-Payers' Association of Brooklyn, in suits 
for conspiracv to defraud and rob tbe city. Mr. 
Bliss was. in Washington ^isiinoutshiug himself as 
a Democratic investigator at tbe time the papers in 
the salt were served upon tbe oti ers. Siuce his 
return he has constantly tried to evade service, and 
it was only late on Saturday night tbat uu a.'eat uf 
the Tax-Payers' Association suocoeded iu placing 
the summons in Mr. Biiss' hands. The person in- 
trusted with the duty ot serving the papers in- 
quaed tor Bliss at the lalter's bouse, bnt was told 
mat be was not a( home. Not believing tbe state- 
meut he lingered in the vicinity, and in a short time 
Bliss came oat ot the bou^^e aud was served. Tbe 
reason oi Mr. Bliss' alleged aoxieiy to avoid the 
service of the summons is to be foiind in tbe fact 
tbat us is the Democratic candidate for Congress in 
jtk« Vourttt Congressional District 



LOCAL MIS€.EL LAiNY. 

COMMODORE VA^DEBBILT. 
ANOTHER FALSE REPORT OF HIS DEATH 
CIRCtTLATED IN THE STRKET — HOW THE 
ASSOCIATED PRESS WAS IMPOSED UPON. 
There was great excitement created in Wall 
street yesterday by another report of the death of 
Commodore Vanderbilt. It had really no serious 
eflfect on the stocks ot what are known as the 
" Vanderbilt roads," but the commotion which en- 
sued was exceedingly violent notwithstanding. As 
a mere rumor circulated by the bear element In the 
ordinary way, the matter would have passed off 
with the guffaw that usually characterizes tbe 
close of business in such cases; but the fact 
that the story was made reputable by its reprodu 
tion from Kiernan's Financial News Bureau was 
eminently calculated to have it considered in any 
light but tbat of a practical joke. It was received 
at Mr. Kiernan's office from a source that has long 
since come to be recognized as reliable, namely, the 
New-York Associated Press, and, after an effort on 
the part of niernan's staff of assistants to ascertain 

its truth had failed to justify a suspicion of it, waa 
sent out npon the street. It had simul- 
taneously reached all tbe* newspaper offices 
of the City thrnugh what is implicitly 
regarded as the proiWr channel, and was posted on 
the bulletin boards of the "Western Uuion Tele- 
graph Company, whose wires bad been used to 
convey the " Intel. igence." Even after Mr. Kier- 
naii had promulgated the report, in an eflort to 
farnish the earliest information on matters of that 
nature, he still persisted in inqul-ies which soon 

resulted in his ajcertaining that' tbe whole sffiry 

was untrue, and in less than half an hour after the 

false report had reached the Stock Exchange its 

contradictii/Q was out on the street. The 

origin of the rumor was a dispa.ch broucht 

byadistiiot telegraph messenger to the Western 

Union office at the New- York Ilotol. addresseil to 
the A.ssocialel Presi?, to tuo effict that Mr. Van- 
derbilt had died at 10:30 o'clock. It was sisned 

"Rev. Dr. Deems,' who is the Commodore's ^pIr- 
itual at eudaiit and was, as might have beeu eaiily 
se.n from the form of the signature, a tull-biown 
forgery. Mr. Kiernan prompi ly sent a communica- 
tion to the President of the Slock Exchange ex- 
plaining the manner in which tbe cunaid had 
reachea and been uttered from bis < fficje, requHjt- 
ing ai' investigation by the Governing Comiuitfee, 

and offTing all ihe resourcea at his command to 
aid in the detection and punishment of the party 
or parties from whom the falsehood emanated. Tne 
following note from Mr. Simontou explains itself : 

Nrw-Tork, Oct. It, 1376. 
To tht Jatoeialed Press : 

'the dispatc, auuouncins Commodore Vanderbllt's 
death came to us toaay, by telegr ipli, over t.ie nigaa- 
ture ot " ev. ijharles K. Deems." Oar diy manager 
of the uews department, recogaizinij the name of br. 
lieems. oia not ques lou :ue (zoiu faita of the mesiatte 
and st-nt it out ai once, taKl.ig tne p eoantiou how- 
ever, to call for further infoiiDati.iu and p rticula s. 
ihis l«d to the discovery of the fraud wilnia half an 
hour. 

While we greatly reerei this mishap, I am happy to 
remind von that the present is thefli'st lost ince duriuft 
my eounectioQ with your buainess m which wo have 
beeu betrayed, evt-n bj torgeiy, ilioUih it haa fre- 
quently been attempted. Wuula it not be sretl'^ offer 
a reward lor the discoiery ot the cnlprit, ;iad his ex- 
posure and punishment I Verv respectfully, 

J. W. Sl:iIUNTO.., Ueueial Agent. 

Messrs. Davli & Frremao, Mr. Vanderbllt's 
brokers, received the following dispatch from him 
in reply to an iuquiry made by them : 

I am alive and do.Bg well, better than I have been in 
many months. C. VAMO.-.KBILl'. 



THE WORK OA THE GREAT BRIDGE. 

STRETCHING OP ONE OF THE CBADLE CA- 

"3LES BEGUN YKSTERDAY — SUCCESSFUL 

PROSKCUTION OF THE ENTERPRISE. 

I'he operation of placing iu position one of 

tcie larger wire cables intended tu support the 

cradles or platforas upon which tbe workmen will 

stand while engaged in the constructions uf the 

great cables from which the Ei.^t River Bridge will 

be suspended waj began yesterday morning. This 

cable is made of Wire of chrome steel, and is 23g 

inches in diameter. It is eomp.isad of 7 strands 

composed of 19 wires each, is 3,700 feet 

long, and weighs abont 33,000 pounds. Tbe 

large drum upon which it was colled was 

placed on the New-York side ot the river near the 

foot ot the tower, and this morning, the end having 
been already hoisted to the summit, the operation 
of carrying it across the river was begun. It was 
not attached to the carrier cables placed in position 
some time ago, but was made fast toan independent 
wire rope sent across for the purpose. This rope 
was attached to a windlass or drum, worked by a 
sicam-ensine on tbe Brooklyn side, and the larger 
cable being m;ide fast to it, was slowly drawn 
across. As it was paid out it was sus- 
pended to onB of the carrier cables at 
intervals of fifty feet by means of small iron 
pulleys or blocks fitted with iron hoops, especially 
prepared for the purpose. At 5:30 o'clock yesterday 
afternoon, when the men quit worjf, the end of the 
cable had reached the Brooklyn tower. To-day it 
will be carried to the ancburage on the Brooklyn 
side, and may Dossibly be taken to the New- York 
anchorage. When secured on this sido of the river. 
It will be drawn taut, aud the pulleys by which it 
IS suspended to the carrier will be removed. Two 
mure cables of this size will be placed in position as 

soon OS received, and the preuararions for hunting 

the great cables will be completed by the buspeiisioii 
of two more cradle or platform cables of S^ inches 
in diameter, making five in all. Tne operations 
yesterday were earned on under the direction of 
Mr. Martin, Assistant Engineer in charge, assisted 
by Mr. Fairingion, tbe master mechanic, and Mr. 
Xouug, the master nager. 



4 CO¥BTESY AI KyOWLEDOED. 
It will be remembered by tlie readers of 

Thb Times that :he excursion steam-boat 
Plymonth B ick made an effort to pull the In man 
steamer City of Cheater from tbe rocks near Fort 

Hamilton, upon which she ran wbile entering the 
harbor in August last. The Plymouth Rock was 
crowded with pasa^u^ere at the time, but there 
was unanimons consent from tbem to spend th.eir 
time in tbe effort to release the Bntiah vesiiel. The 
following correspondence 1^ the sequel to the inci- 
dent. The check referred to was for £500 : 

Ln'han Stbau-ship Compakt 
KBw-ioEK, lOtu uctober, laTti. 
Mftrs. Jarrett tt Palmar : 

DsAu Sias : I am epeciallv instructed hy tbe Inmau 
Steaiu-ihip Company to express to ynu their thanks 
lor the very prompt and kind assi-itance reudcretl 
without ohiirge by your steamer flymouth Eock to 
tbe steam-ship City of Chester when aground iu tbe 
harbor ou oUnday, 13th of Au<;ust, and at tbe same 
time 10 place in your bauds tbe incosed check, tij 
m.ike such diapusitiou of as you may see ht. Truly 
yours, JOli.S U. DaLK, Agent. 

Booth's Thkatrk, NBW-YoBK,Oct. 12, 187t). 
Mr. John O. Vale. Agenl laman bteam-jihip Oompanu : 

Dkau Sin: VVe bets fo ucknowledttu tlie receipt of 
your favor of the lutk fust., woioh has Just reacoed 
US upon our return to the > ity, oonveyijtf an expres- 
sion uf the graCltddQ ol your principals for what .you 
are comp.iuieut.iry enough to term the prompt and 
kind assistauce reiidore<l tj.v our steamei- I'lymouth 
Keck when the steam-ship City of chebter, of the lu- 
man'Line, was ashore Aug. i3. and Inclosini; us a 
checit, payable to our order, for the service. We are 

sorry that the efforts we made toward releasing your 
ship were not entirely oucoeaoful, LUC they were given 

with a pertcct sense of the requir. meats of the situa- 
tion, as an act of dut) from one vussd to another iu 
distress, and we are amply paid with the knowledge 
ih^t what we did has appreciation. You will, there- 
fore be plea>ed to look upon the return of tbe check to 
th^ compauy you represent as an act of Justice to 
ourseiviswe could nut withhold performing, aud be- 
lieve us to bo the company's uud yoax olidgud aud 
obedient servants, J.-illKKir & fALjJhU. 



IROVBLE IS AN EPIUVOFALIAN OHUBOB. 
There is liliolv to Da a dissension in the 
Church of the Holy Trinity, (Episcopalian,) on St. 
Paul's avenue, Jersey City Heights, over a disa- 
greement between the Rector, Key. V7iiiiam Hoyt, 
and the congrcisation. Mi. Hoyt has presided at 
the services in the church for about a year, but re- 
cently he introduced what is known as " High 
Church" form of worship. The members of the 
chui oh requested him to discontinue toe new form, 
aud he remsed. Last week the teachers ooonecied 
with the church met and resoived to absent them- 
selves irom church until tne reverend genilemsn 
acceded to their views. In consequence of this 
there were many vacant seats in tue church last 
Sunday, but Mr. Hoyt has not yet consented to 
forego his inclinations. 




availed himself of that opportunity when the Cap. 
tain was on tbe stand durtng the nrevions snesion of 
the trial he was debarred from that privilece. bnt 
b« did not wish to be understood that his client per- 
emptorily ret used to testify, as the Captain would 
take the stand if ordered to do so. The Board, 
however, sustained tbe objecttbn of the counsel and 
the case was closed. 

PARADE OF THE VETERANS. 

THE VETEBANS OF THE SEVENTH REGI- 
MENT CELEBRATE THEIIl FIFTY-SECOND 
ANXIVKRSABY — THE BANQUET IN THE 
EVENING. 
The annnal parade and banquet of the Veter- 
ans of thfe National Guard, Seventh Regiment, took 
place yesterday, and was in all respects a thoroagh- 
ly suc^sfaJ^iffair. Shortly before 3 o'clock the 
of tbe corps began to assemble at their 
ew armory, in Delmonico's. They were all uni- 
formed In the sombre but handsome dress of tbe 
corps, and althoneh tbev have not yet arrived, to 

the mellow age attained by the older veterans of 
1812, there were many whose years have reached 
nearly t^ree score, out whose step was elastio as 

that of their younger comradea. At 3:30 o'clock the 

"Adjutant's call" was beaten by the Seventh 
Regiment drum corps, which had been engaged 
lor the occaiion, and line was foroied 
with eight companies of eight files (rout. 
The band of the Third Reelment United States 



Cavalry, of Fort Hamilton, had been engaged to 
lead the regiment, under tbe direction of Prof. 
Wolf, an old member of the organizttion. Dress 
parade was executed on Twenty-sixth ttreet, and 
during us progress the members demonstrated con- 
clusively that they had not forgotten the tactics. 

Line of march was then taken up. Co . 
Cyras H. Loutiel assumed command for the 
first time on parade since receivlue his 

commission as Colonel. His field and staff com- 
prised Lieut. Col. W. A. Pond Maj >r Liebenau, 
Adjt. C. H. Bosrwick, Rev. J. Xuttle Smith, Assist 
ant Chapla-n; Paymaster, Henry H. Holly; ijum- 
missary, Gilbert J. Arrowsmith ; Col. Abram 
Denik>?, Col. Jackson S. Schultz, Col. El ward A. 
Lamiiert, Capt. J. D. Judson, and Cspt. Thotp. 
Tue first company was uuoer command "of Col. 
Shumway; second, Coi. Riblet; third, Msjir 
Nevers; fourth, Capt. Speight; Hfth, Lieut. 
B.iker ; sixth, Col. Price; seventh, Capr. 
Kotpp ; Eig.iih, Capt. Burtis. Tne total num- 
ber wiio parad d In uuiiorm was 173. After 
pas<iing through varions streets aud avenues, tb 
leeimcn I returned to Delmonico's about 5:30 P. M. 

Doriug the absence of the omuiaod tue teiupursty 
armory had beeu irHusformed into a dining-Mom, 

and covers were laid tor 200 guests. Col. Lontrel 
nreeided at the dinner. Ou bis left hana was seated 
Col. Emmons ClarK. Ou his right, ex-Col. Morgnu 
L. Smith, Gen. John McNeill. Centennial 
Cummisaioaer from Misseuri, snd Gen. Wil- 
liam Guiney, Centennial Commissioner from 
booth Carolina. After the (tinner bad been 
discusStd Col. L mttel rose and cflf^red a 
toast to the meoiory of the late Gcn. 
Marshall Lefterts, which'was drank in silence. Col. 
Emmons Clark, com.nauder of the ac/ivo regiment. 
Who desired tu leave, was toeo called upon to speak, 
lie said he was glad to see so large a representation 
of- the veterans of the ola "Seveuub; " ne was giad 
to see the associatiuu fljurlKb, and this yvas not el- 
to^etli'er an uuso.fisb motive, as he knew tbe V t- 
erau Assnciaiion siood as a kind of Alma Mater to 
bis cummann, and whatever evii, if auy, shouid be- 
taJ the Jjeveuih, tbe Veteran Assuciaiion, he lelt 
C'inflJeni> would step forward and r.iBturd cuufi- 
aeace and harmony. 

Coi. Morgan L,. Smiih was the next speaker. He 
had come to tbe euierlainment, be said, because oi 
tbe opportunity it gave of meeting old friends. 
There were very few living now who bati 
uaraded with the Tweoiy-seventb Regitnent 
toriv-tlve years ago, bnt those who were 
Still living, wore for.una.e in their as^ociatuns. 
Among the many organizations in existence there 
were few of sued elevating tendencies as ibis 
veieran organiz.ition. Ha had noticed that those 
members of the regiment who had performed their 
duty well and faithtuliy, were tbe best citizens. 

Mr. Jackson >S. bchuliz maae a hum tous ad- 
dress in wuicb be said, that although thev all felt 
their importance, thai, as it had ueen remarked, 
"they were all Generals, or Colonels, or Captains," 
j'et a large pri;poriion of tbe people who 
witnessed tneir parace tbat day, were ooiiged to 
a^k-^' » bat legiment that was?" One persou even 
had m resjiouse lo that qoestios dbDomioated tbem 

"a set of pufi-i." Bjt as long, continued tbe 
spedker, as the Veterans enjoyed their t-araoe, it waa 
perfectly proper fur tbem t^ do so, and it their ser- 
vices were ever required in ibe field, they could 
step to tbe iront as quickly a» inev had done in the 
J) a St. 

Gen. McNeill was next toasted. He was, be said, 
an old member of the eighth comnany of the old 

Tweniy-sevetith Regiaieiit. He recalled with 
pleasure the old ussociaiions which a meeting 
uf the Veterans inspired, an J it seemed like a dr^am 
to him as ne viewed in memory tbe wide ezpatse 
between the past and the present Dnriag the late 
war. when he had been in command ot a divisiou, 
be bad never known a man who ciame tu bim as a 
graduate of tab Seventh to he found wanting. 
Speeches were also made by Gen. Guroey, Lieut 
Col. Pond, Coi. Deuike, Col. Piico, AJjutanc Boat- 
wick. Paymaster Uolly, ani Col, Loctrel. The 
band played appropriate selections between every 
toast, and the entertainment was prolunged until 
late in the eveuing^ 

THE CONTROLLER AilD IHE MATO BAJJ F. 
Controller Green was ealled upon yesterday 
by tbe conimittee appointed at a recent meeting of 
the citizens o( Tremont to tender him the resolu- 
tions adopted in favor of hij nominaaon for Mayor. 
Tlie cotumittee consisted of Messrs. B. L. Aoder- 
ton, B. H. Shannon, John Eerby, P. B. Danbam, 

V. V. Kiting, and Henry E. Droz, all of whom are 
old residents and represeut large prop'erty-owners 
in the Twenty-lonrth Ward. Mr. Anderton pre- 
sented the resolutions and Mr. Shannoo addressed 
tbo Controller, stating tbat the gentlemen who 
compoiiel tbe Aieetlog deemed it incumbenr npon 

them to aid, to t.ie bestuf their ability, iu securing 
the election to the Mayoralty of a man who will 
give the people an economical administratioo of 
publio affairs, and who will discbarge tbe duties of 
the ofiice m the interest of ihe tax-payers. The 
Controller, in response, thanked the oommitt«9 for 
their comniimeniaiy resolutions and said Utitt be 
was happy to meet theiu as cUizens ot the territory 
recently annexed tu tbe City, as he was one uf tbe 

original advocaies of the project. He hoped to sea 
the improvements necessar.y to bring tbem in close 

cuDneciion wicti ttie benrt of tbe City ac- 

compiiRhed, at the.y must be sooner or' later. 
It bad been charged tbat be was opposed to these 
impruvenents, out this was not so, as tbe plans 
tor sapplyiugtu the rosideuisof the annexed dis- 
trict Croton water, the construction of a tunnel 
under ihe Harlem River, the improvement ot tbat 
Stream, and the laying out ef their streets, vera 
prepared under bis tarigdiution some six or eight 
years ago. Tbe Controller oouoluded by assttring 
the committee that in the event of bis election be 
would endeavor tu discharge the daties of the office 
to their entire satisfaction. 

The Martin Tyrrell Independent Campaign Clnlj 
of the Seventh Ward met last evening at No. RO 
Henry streei, and indorsed the uomiuaUun of Mr. 
Andrew H. Green for Mayor. 



SUDD EX DEATHS. 

Dr. F. Berthbets, the Principal of an educa- 
tional institute at No. 908 Sixth avenue, died sud- 
detily yesterday morning at his rusidence. 

Lester H. Hall, a plate-printer in the employ 
of the Natl inal Bank Note Company, died suddt nly 
vesterday at the oljice of the comuany, in tbe 
Couj^er Institute, from hemorrhage of the longs. 

CAP2. lRVI.\a ON TRIAL. 
The trial of Capt. James Irving, of the Har- 
bor Police, who 18 charged with neglect of duty and 
violation of the rules, was resumed vesterday be- 
fore the full board. Several witnesnes were called 
lor the defense, and they testitied that the accused 
was ou board the boat at ceriaiu times when it was 
alleged by the witnesses lor the prosecution that ho 
was usbore. Superintendent Wulling was called as 
a witness to testilv to the character of Capt. Irving. 
The Superint ndent stated tbat he had known Ir- 
ving since 1860. The Captain hid always promptly 
obeyed all orders given him. Mr. MacLeao. Coun- 
sel for the prosecution, desired the accused to take 
the stand fur tho purpeseot cios's-examlnatloi), but 
Mr. Buck, frving's ooupsel, raised the objection 
tiiati as t)>9 coonssl for the proaeisalioa tiftd (io( 1 tlie otiier^ 



A PROBABLE MURDER. 
A jirobable murder has been discovered in 
the vicinity of New-Bruuswick, N. J. Ou Sunday 
J. V. D. Christopher, Overseer of the Roads lo 
North New-Brunswick received information that 
a dead mole was lying In the road to Gr]g;:8lown, 
near Hines' Tavern. On investigatiog a nagou 
was found near the mule, aud about tbree miles 

further along the dead body of a coloreu man was 
found lyiua near a fenco bv the roaaside. The 
body was reeognizea as that of Banjamin Staats, a 
lesideniof Griggstown. On inquiry it was learned 
that Staats aud auotber colursd man named Nelson 
Wyokoff came from Griggstown to New-BrunswicK 
Saiuiday iu two wugous. Wyckotf being accom- 
panied uy bis family. They started back again 
about dusk and nothing more is posi.ively known 
of their movements as yet. Staau bad 
eviilentiy been murdered. His skull was cmsbed 
in as if by a blow from a club, and 
there were other marks of violence upon 
the body. Wyckoff was hunted up and questioned, 
but oeclared lilmsell unable to throw any light upon 
the case. He said he ami Staats left New-Bruns- 
wick Httho same time Saturday night, but a short 
distance along the road ho passed Staats, whose 
mule was a very slow traveler. That was the-iast. 
he saw or heard of him, uiuil he saw his dead body. 
Tbe authoriiiss of Somerset County will investigaia 

the case. 

♦ 

THE BROOKLYN BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 
The Brooklyn Board of Aldermen met yes- 
terday. Alderman Prench in tne chair. Alderman 
Murtha handed in a protest signed by the residents 

ou Fifteenth street against the New Coney Island 
and Eist River Railroad. Alderman Griswold, o 
the Eleventh Ward, moved that the Fire Commls- 
slonem-be required to inform the. Board how many 
firemen slept iu tho engine-houses on the 
-25ih of SeptemtMjr last, and how many 
'are now sleefi^g nightly in the engine- 
houses to which they are attached. 
The 25th of September was the flrst«;gi8tration 
day. and the ooject of the resolution is to ascertain 
bow t.tr the Commissioners have aided the Ring 
Democrats in ooloniziug the odd wards. It is well 
known that Frederick Maasey, the President of the 
Pire Department, is eueaged in the colonization 
scheme. A resolutiou oflered by Alderman Mu^ 
tha. directing that the ooutracts for portions of the 
wurk on the proposed new municipal builtUug be 
not awarded until bids tor all tho work have been 
received aud accepted, was voted down. 



THE CRIMINAL HECOm 



s-;^/':-jf- 



•ic- 



TEE PASSAIO ROhLlNli MILL TROUBLES. 
The troubles at the Passaic rolling mill, in 
Paterson, N. J., whioh weie sappused to have been 
adjusted last week, broke out anew yesterday, and 
350 men were thrown out of em jloi ment, 340 of 
them against their will. It appears that ten 
•'heaters" aad "rollers" refuse to accept the pro- 
posed reduction of wages, and witlm|it them tbe 
work canno. go on. As iheir work requires great 
skill Slid experience, it is next to impossible tu re. 
place them. The remaining workmen are wiiliiig 
to acorjit the reAaoiiuu, but cannot work withoal 



TRIAL OF MBS. BOUSE, 

SHE IS CHABOED WITH MAWSLAUORTSB Q| 
THE KILLINO OF BER HUSBAND— BKB 
DEFENSE A PLEA OP JUSTIKABLB BOKX^ 
CIDE— THE TESTIMONY TK8TERDAT. 

Tbe trial of Mr*. Irene A. V. Hooie for maan 
slaughter In kililna^er iiiubaod, OrKm jJeuo 
House, opened yesterday In tha Coanty Gonrt. 
house at Trenton, N. J. The case wu Mlle4 M U 
o'clock in the forenoon, before Chief JasMoe YUma ' 
ley «d4 Associate Justices Tyler and Steberly' 
The coort-room was densclv crowded with m«a aad 
women, who awaited with evident anxletr the ap. 
pearance of the accused. Mr. Edward T. OtmoT 
counsel for tbe defense, announced tbat he bad •«■« 
for Mrs. Rouao, and that she would bs in tha roan 
in a short time. A momeot later lis turned his 
eyes toward the court-room door, which suddenly 
swung open, a« if by a nreoostserted 
nal, and disclosed tbe •ceased, dressed 

mourning, leaning upon her father's utm. 

She had eoma from ber father's bonaa, vh»r«-'s| 
haa heen stopping under bail. The pair paoaad « 
second npon the threshold and then caioa'ap tha 
aisle to take their position inside tbe failing that 
separates the lawyers from tba {rraeral aadiAaee. 
her appearance created intense interest amoag tha 
spvctatori. She is a native of TrestoB aai tfea 
daughter of Mr. Vansant, one of the oldeM S 
wealthiest residents of the plaosi There were 
scores of people in the room who had known ber 
from her infancy. They knew Her accomplish- 

mehto, ber disposition, and ber ebaracrer. Ib#^ 
too, the storv of tbe sbootlog waa familiar to avary 
one. They all knew tliat sbe bad killed ber bae> 
band, at whose hand* the bad repeatedly exptd- 
enced personal violence. They looked apon imt 
handsome faoe and golden hair, and tboagtat ef the 
scores of times that sbe bad suffered vloleooeat the 
hands of the deceased, and of tbe &ot tbat he fc«^ 
Just before the cbooting canirbt ber br ber crttfsa 
tresses and dragged ber about tbe floor. Tneee ««ca 
facts that nobody could deny. Bven Proeaeutiac 
Attorney Beasley admitted tbem is bis openii^ 
address. 

Having taken her eeat, "iirt. fiAose, wao is ttlc^ 
two years of age, threw baok ber heavy rati n« 

discovered ber handsome face to those who wnaia 

positron to see it. Her forehead is broad SDd of 
graceful shape, ber rose ia as perfect as if «*«^ ^ 

by ao artist, and ber eyes— «hameleon-like~are af aj 
changing hae. At one minate tfaey ere sImius 
liitbt-blue. the next a dark faaaet, cbanzing iatOA' 
fierce gray color. There is oothiDg bmtai $baat 
her looks. Ko ona wonid eniertaia tbe idea tbet 
sbe could be eniltv of a cold-blooded bateberr. 

The Jury was drawn immediately upon the fVJt- 
inguf Mrs. Hnose, a proceeding which ooeatned lasa 
than twenty minutes. There was no di«po«itiaa «» 
the part of tbe defense to pick'CUt men who ki— 
nothing of the case. Cjuoselor Greene ngbttf 
Judged that the testimony apon wliicb be relied t* 
make out hiscase of Justifiibie manslaughter ironU 
be boat appreciated by intelligent men. Ctmutj 
Attorney Beasley then made bis opeaiogeddteee 
to tbe lary^ He aaia tbat it would be proved ha> 
yond doubt that Mr. House was shot bv the a*- 
cueed. Tbe only question that oooid be raised wa» 
whether or not the sboodog was doae lo aatt^ 
defesefr He would acmit that Mr. fiooaa baA 
abated hta wife shamefaliy. bat it would not ba 
enough to i>bow thi* tu tbe jarv. It most ba 
farther 8bo,wn that Mrs. House was at the tiae 
when Bhe shot ber bnsbaod ia danirer of 
personal vial^'ncn. He sbonia attempt to show tba 
contrary. This was tbe substance of bis sdiimie,; 
though be bad a few words to say abest tbe oes*' 
duct of certaiu newspapers in criuctsiag-iOecooueei, 
tor I be prosecntiun and in aiiegiug Uutitwoidd 
stop abort of an ^ouest effjri to ooftriei tbeae- 
cused. 

Tb« first witness called i^as Dr. AI •■zander Ma- 
£c:uzie. He gave a dimcriiitiun of the woood tu 
I be head of the deceased, and expre«*ed his iMisf 
tbat the wound catised death. Mrs. Wubam Hsa 
mill, sister of the decea£ed, was then oailed to tha 
stand. She waa living with Mr and Mis. House as' 
the time uf tbe mnrder. ijbe taia she eaw 
Mr. House enter tbe yard ihe night of Jjatm 

13, npon bis retaro from Ik-w-Yort. He su (towa 
with bis wite on a pile of Inmoer, and talked with 
her. He oontinoed his talk at tbe cardan gate. Sas 
told bim she was tired ot living with tuin aad 
wanted to go away. He told ber she might go to 
New.York or any other place whenever tbe uked. 
^rs. House ~went into tbe house and Ut. 
House stopped on ibe pjrob to talk with, 
his father, an old iiiao. In a short time a boy came 
into tbe house, and aaid tbat old lli. House was 
crying. Mrs. House and tiie other mem tiers uf the 
family immediately went oat apou tbe porch. Mc. 
House had gone away from tbe perch a 
short distance. Mrs. House called to 
bim saving, "Orsuu, fcome here: I want you." 
When be came up sue aaid: ' Ii's a saame to make 
tatber Htjiiso feel tais way." He replied with «a 
oath, and threatened to whip bit wife to daath. Ai 
this speech old Mr. House was so affjciea tiiat he 
fell down in a swoon. Mrs. Hoase g stured witk 
her baud preparatory to making a repiy to ber bus* 
band, but lieiore she coaid speak be siruca ber m 
the lace, knucjting her dowa. He kicked ber aa aha 
fell. •■Qj. Orson," she a.id. "you have 
killed me." He oaught ber by ber bMi; 
threw ber back against a trunk in the baUway,. 

and told ber to bold bef tonsae ; abe was •cieau-' 
ing, and attracted by her cries her son ay a previ- 
ous maiTiage. sixteen years old, who came up and 
said. *'Djn't hii her, Mr. House; sheirm^ Buibari'* 
this iuterferesce -maddeuea ~ Mrr-fioase. ainl b« 
traosf erred his fury to tbe boy. .mj-s. Hammill^ 
huebauU called ber away jtut at this lime, auil ahe 
kuew notniug more ot wuat went <io uutil ane waa 
summoueu fco tne poroh by tbe cry iha; Mr. Hooaa 
was shot. Mrs. Hammiii, apoo cross-exam i n ettiA, 
Slated that Mr. House w<u a mnn ol s.rodg, anoav. 
eroahle temper, teiribiy proiaue, aud ibat aba tad. 
heard him threaten to lage b.s wife's lite iievenl 
timea. 

William Hammill, husband of the preTions wit' 
ness, saia that he saw tbe deceased till ija lall 

fitoe tu tne ground, and did uot luove after '"^"fjr 
Mrs. House was just outside tarn door as uc m^ 
proMCoed the prostrate oooy. Sbe had a tuor- 
barrcled revolver in ber haod, which abe fave to 
her Sou. Tbe son gave it te witness, and wi t nase 
gave it to tne Coroner. Jost prior to Uie aboeriaa 

Witness heara Housd say to hu witts, "I'd ■gm 
you a good licking." Mr. House bad a revotr.er 
in bis iK>ckei when he fell- Witness beard bim 
sdV several weeks belure tbat be would anoot aay: 
body who sbou'd interfere be wean bim aud bu 
wite. Patrick Coffee, a laborer empiofed ig tbe 

Uoaae farm, ana tjeorge Sljver. a farm boy, aaoa 
saw someioiDg of tbo iragedv. Tbof were the 
next wiinessea. The latter said toat he beard 
House say that he would -lick " nis wife to death. 
Miss liucetta House, sister of tbe deceased, aad 
daughter of old Mr. House, was at the hoose 
at toe time of tbe mnrder. iSbe oeard the wutda . 
that were exchanged between Mr. aud Mrs. Hooae 
piior to tbe sbuoUnc, aud was an eye-wi&uaai 
she said, of tbe shouting itself. Sbe saw lira. 
Hou.se raise tbo pistol aud deliberately aim at ber 
busoand's bead, bhe said that ber bro«ber piuhed 
Mrs. House down, putiuiic bis hand upon liar 
shoulder. The other witnesses say tbat he kooofcad 
her doftu with a biow between the evefe^ Her-ex- 
amination lasted till S o'clock, at wbioT tinu tba 
court aujooroed. 

The cross-examination of Miss House will take 
place this m<.ruing. The opeuiug tor tbe defense 
will begm sometime during ibe uay. and it te ex- 
pecied that tbe whole case will be oonoluded bvi 
Wednesday night. Counselor Green say*, ia ^a.^ 
gard to the denial of Bradley W. House, brother of' 
the deceased, toat be had made a proposal of mar<t 
riage to Mrs. House since the murdtfr, that be baa a 
letter written by Bradley House lu wnich tbe otter 
of mairiage is formally broached. Ii. is thought 
that Mr. Bradley H.>ase'e purpose in making tbe 
proposal was to getposaessiuu ut bit bto(ber'a,prop> 
ertv in case Mia. House ahuald be convicted aa^ 
sent to prison. _ 

'~TS1E~WAB£EN SlHEEI^OMIOipB. 
Cbsxies Meiler, a porter in tbe eo^ploj ft 
William Hultiert St Son, commission mercbaouf at 
No. 80 Warren street, was arrested yesterday by 
Detective Hagan, on suspicicm ot being the maa 
who caused tue death of William Simmons, the 
colored man who died at tbe Chambers Street Hos> 
pital on Sunday. The accused, who residee at Uo. 
464 Degraw street. Brookivn. denies tbat li|e had 
anything to do with the killing of Simmons. His 
emoioyers give hiui an excellent character, and s^iy 
tbat he is a quiet, inoffensive roan. Coroner Wolt- 
man committed biw to the Tombs to await furUist 
developments. 

THE FORSYTH STREET TSAOBDT. 
Tbe condition of Mr. Oustava Ballion, tbe 

French gunsmith, of No. 16 Spring street, wbe was 
stabbed on Sunday morning by Joba Sulliva% a 
sneak tbiet, whom he waa endeavoring to arrest foe 
larceny iu Porsyth street^ was not improved yea- 
terday. He is considered to be la.* very oriucal 
condition, and tue attending surgeon is unsb:e to 
give an opinion in relallou to the result. Suiiivaib 
the assailant of Mr, Balliou is still iu tbe TumM. 



CAPTURE OF EHOAPED OOSTIOrS. 
About three yean ago Eflward Lyona, • 
noted bank burglar, and iiopbia L«fy'. a prufee- 
slonai pickpocket, botb of whom weia semag 
terms of imprisonmeat in Sing Sing Pnson, suc- 
ceeded In effecting their escape from tbat inetitu- 
lion. Their wheieabonis were unkbi-wn to lUa 
authorities un.il ihe early pari of ibi« month, when 
it was ascertained that parties answering thrtr 
description had been arrested at RiverUead, i^ong 
l*laud, for picking uockoU. Doteoiive J^aokson, of 
bing Sing Prison, who is noted for his saocesa la 
ibo reoaptureof escaped convicts, on being intoraed 
of tbe arrest repaired to Riverboad and immedi- 
ately idontifted the piisoners. After serving their 
terms oa. at Kiverhead the prUoaeia wW be trw*. 
>tred to 8»b« $W». ; ,. 



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mi BLAINE IN NEW-YORK. 

JCSriCTiya ASIiAJGNAIENT OF TEE 

DEMOCRAllC I'AJiTT. 

' ■ ConU7iued from Fir§t Page, 

fern onbho ooiniuu, and u«Ter can ba o«mented by 
cirJI w«r." 

>iow, ueiitiameii, both thene ideaa proceed npon 
lh» |)i»ilncAt tlu'ury that tlie auVfruaieut we live 
buiiur !• koouieJeracy. Fur.T-cUreo Tuara an" n 
gi-OMsr uiau ibau Mc^ Tilden, and a ereater man 
tti«a Mr. Buctiiioau— :k uian named Webator, truin 
MaanntteuaoHa, (di>pUu»«,J bad a xreai Uubat'O wUb 
tku a»ee«»i*nlac.t and ntilUUera of thai dar; and'Mr. 
AVebtlur Uid it duwu aa ihe curuer-auiuo uf tbe ar- 
cniu<>i>i lu tlieaa worda : "Tbat tbe Coustitutiou ot 
ui« Uuiud State* i« uot a luaicue or conledoracy or 
eoiniiaot'beCweeu the people uf the- teTeral biatea 
a Itietr aovercieu eapacitr, bat i» a euvaronient 
prwpwr. loonaed on the ati'optiun of the people, aud 
nMUUK dtr«ot reiaiioue between itsolC and in- 
Mvidua!*." And bi* eminent biotrrapber. Mr. 
3«MVtt Yickner Curtia, of wbom 1 will ouiy speak 
Willi tei<pe«(, l>ut wliu t4uow la tbe iuoousistent At- 
Uiade ut auppuriiuii Mr. 'I'ildeu, In detailiuu tbis 
jtnat apeecii ot Mr. Wpustor'n— ::rrater than hU re- 
pir tu Mitvua, bia apveoli ot 1833, a apaecb wliluh In 
tuD WurK* may bo found uuder tbe title of '"X'be 
Coaititntiuu but aCum}act"— Mr. Gm>rjjo Ticknor 
Ourtia, who, lor hli political oon-tinte.cy 1 ijreatly 
l:<'gr«t to aay, U now auDportiiiK Mi-. Xildeu, says 
lu uia biOkn°apbr of llr. Webster : 'PorliaBS there 
ta uo ■pee«d uTflr made bv Mr. Webster that is to 
^loiie lu iti loaKoaiaf, A^houver w.iuld antieraiand 
tbat tbeory ot tiie Couatiiuiiou wbicb regardu it aa 
tbo euitctnient ot a fucilaoieutal law. aju«t go to 
Ihla spacuii to find Us oeat and oleareat exposiuou. 
Wbu«v«r woBid toow tiie duetriue tbat euabteJ tbe 
BruvcrnniaiiC uf the United Stalea years later to call 
:or>ht(ieener;:ies or u (treat popaiaiiuu,stronceoou(!li 
le eaooanter, and to prevent tbe diamenibtrmeqt of 
this Uulon by tbe aecetsion attempieil lu lti6\. and 
lUDpreaded la 1S65 oiiist find it in thepobiciou muiu- 
Miuad bT Mr. Webatar iu his ereat apeecb in 1833." 
^d I liero MT tnat tnera m uut a hue, or a aeu.l- 
ueiii, or aposltiou, or an argumetit lu tbut ({reat 
ipa— ■ «f Mr. Web«ter'a tbat is not to-day tbe cor- 
i«vatuoe ot tn» tiiunuatiao or theReuubtioan Party 
B tbU Union. [Applanse] And tbere is uot a seu- 
:laut ta tbat tii^t is not ausolutely at war witb all 
:b« doO'rinaa laid down by Mr. Tiiuen on tbia ques- 
tiw uf 8t»t« nghta — aot une. [Applause. | 

A KATION OR A CO»F£J}£ItACT I 
Some caotiemen. I know, will say, and it le reiy 
Mtaral. tbey sluuld, it tbey \io not sire tbe subject 
aU.'IMmora ttian a soporfloial examiorfiiou, tbat 
f»a ara merely qiarrniing about terms. Suppose 
yam party does o.^il this a coni'ederacy and th» o:ber 
a lutton. A rose andar auotber name smalls aa 
iweet, and (he eo-.:ntry is Jaat as i;reat nuder thn 
oD« njiiua aa nader the ottiar. Ah I senclemen, 
that la a terribla mistttlca. It was Mirabeaa 
vte t«Id OS that word* are things ; knd 
tbay are rary tombla tbinzs aomotlmen, 
aad titis la not a play npon words 
nor a man diCeraneo as to terms. Ton show me a 
maa that aalls this eonntry a eonfederaoy, and I 
wtU ahew yoa a taaa wbo acknowled^^es his alleei- 
as«a «• IM dae ta his State before It is dne to tbe 
fadaral Oovernment. [Applaoae.J Show me a 
jBtti that heliaves this is a confederacy and I trill 
abaw yoa a man wfto taaa fally imbibed that fatal 
liaraay tbat drora Tirjcloia into the rebellion aicainst 
iMTlatereata and axainat her wishes, and that made 
Babart fi. Lee a rebel leader instead of a loyal sol- 
Oiw to the union of tbe States, f Applause. J Sbuw 
ma a man that calla tbis Qovernmeot a nation, and 
t will abow yoa one wbo believes that dearly and 
taadarly aa ha loves bis Stats, maoh as you love 
Saw-Te^k or as I love Maine, be pats his allesiance 
to bta Stale secovd, and to tbe General Govfrnment 
flrst. lApplaustf.] We don't want any Srate flies 
in thia eonniry. I don't know whether yoa have 
got one ia 27ew-Tark ; I sboald not know it if I 
ahoBid see it. and I am rery acre yon wonld not 
know the State fljs of Maine, bat We all know tbe 
Xiacef tbe XTaiun. fAoplaose.} And yoa may to-day 
taka the aaonxeat Democratic State in this Union, 
vkiah, IB the boastful dispatches of the last three 
waeka, apoeara to he Georsia, where, with 40,000 
mora Sapabliaaaa~ihat tliere are Democrats in tbat 
State, thay caa cive a Demoeratie majoriry of 
80,000 — take Georjcia aa tbe strongest Democratin 
Bute in thia Unian, and I make bold to declare bore 
tkat oQCslde of tba Castom-huaiea and forts of tbe 
ITailad State.*, yoa cannot find tbe Na- 
loaal fl,tii fljauae in Georgia anywhere. 1 

aaka bold to say that; and I make bold 
farther to say that yon cannot hold a Republican 
meetiBK in any conaiderabie town in Geareia, and 
attpmpt to march the streets flyiDg th^t flag o^ (be 
Uaired Sratea, to the mnaio of any naTiooa' air, 
wttkooc crc^atitis a riot an J bIaodsb»uia tbat State. 
[Applaoae.1 And tbat ia what tbey v«ll a Djmo- 

eratiO nctory, a Democratic victory based upon 
ixaMipline nnier loot the nstionali y ut tbe coun- 
try, ma I>eiDocrtattc riccoriea ac i be Suiltb to-U.<y are, 

iBdiiact boatUuy to the natiuoal fcpiric ut this Oov- 
•nmeut, 

Bow. I ibis ^amm»r took occasion, during a pe- 
riod ol aome leisare, to examiua for myself aome- 
thlac atwut tbia qaoation of confederacy ani na- 
'Heo, and at some paio» I read everv me.-saze of 
ev^TT .Presitieut Jroiu Washintton down to Grant. 
I waated lo Sod oat bow tbe old patrlarcbs aud pa- 
Izlata, the fauiiJera of tbe Guverament, treated this 
4acatiiia. aud I took, say tbe first tweniy years ot 
Ul« Oovemment — Waabtnictou, Adams, Jeifciraaa — 
laaaarara f ederalial, extreme Federalist, K'>pabli- 
cau, Drmocxat, repreeeiitiug ail the phases aid 
ti«ms uf the puhacal opinion of tbat day, and 
X toond ibat tbtwe tbrea great old worthier, 
tiM toaaders of tlie Govemmest, alloded to tbia 
bl osasti eoontry of otua iu tbt>ir mea^iagaa 115 times 
MB "Baiiiiu," and not once aa a ''confederacy." 
fAtrpIaUae.] And ao witb Madison. Mjuioe, John 
Qalttey Ad«as, and •T^ckson, and Van Barea ; and 
1 e aiaa clear aowo, down, down, awav to tbe melan- 
ehaly aoyaa where lie tbe remains of. tbe aduiiais- 
trailaoa ofTierce and fiucbauau, fLaajrhttr] tietore 
is a BBtioDal doenment eniauatUiK trum tbe £xeca- 
tlTe Department ot this GuTemiuent I funud tbl» 
MBBiry reierred to aa a cuntederacy. Buchanan 
aod Ploree beean in their mesaaaes to call it a oon- 
f adec ao y, and then began the Uylng of (he egg 
whieh hatched ont tae treason Wuioo bruuebt un 
the reuelliuu, and It is loreyec connected with tbat 
Idea. [Appiause.J 

X object, tberriure, to the word oonfederaoy. I 
omeot to lis being applied to this ooautry. I ob- 
ject to the pbraae oonlederate. I dou't intend to 
l a»ca ilad one. It is a bad word. It U aasociated 
lararer witb a diabonored and a lost eaate, aeekinz 
BOW revtral ihruugu ttie inanaoientality of the 
Democratic Pirty. Ii ia a bad wora in tne diction- 
BTT, Tott never si>ea!c uf ooufederate* in goodness ; 
1( M aiwaya oeaiederates ia ertaae. (Laagnter.J 
Meat asaociate £»r viri,ue and eoiii:«d«r»t« lur vii- 
teiay. 



aaVVBUCAXS XUItDEBED THAS FEU. IN 

:|'. •■•■ THBJBK OBXAT BATTLEA. 

V«v, gaBtiemen, I bare nut been indulging in 
«kat ia popalarly known aa sbaiiing the bloody 
ahirk X have preterrad to dwell upon the Demo- 
K»Xu Party aa It now is, prcsentinij; to |ou as nearly 
»m Z may the spirit abown by them, tbe jburp jsea m- 
t^Uea by them, tbe meaaarea ooveredi by tbem In 
;1i«ir preaest power in the Hoose ol/Eepresenit- 
ttre^ and I hare dealrid In that preaentation to ask 
yon, aa thinking men and reaponaible voters, if 
»lth Um small laodicam of power with 
wbieb they have l>eea mtrasted la the 
HMiaa of Eepresentatlyes, and intrusted 
Bt a tiaie irben they bad every temptation and 
rverv impulse to be prudent and wary and cau- 
tiotia— if, with all these influences making tbem 
tasd to prudence, the;^ have acted as I bave shown 
Toatbay have, what do yon suppoie will bo their 
coarse with a President of their choice in the chair 
and with the Senate of the United SUtea acting In 
hwrmony with tbe Houaef Af It be thus in tiie green 
tree, what, m God's name, might it not prove in 
tbadfyl fAppiaaie.J Bat as to the bloody shirt. 
Tbeabakm< of the bloody shirt, ot course, as has 
been well aaid. Is not tbe crime; It is the making It 
blMdyt and It will be snaken in this coantry Just 
to )eo( aa it ia rendered bioody. [Applause. J Now, 
they tell yoti tbat they bad a peaceful eiection in 
Miaaifestppi laat year, ana they recovered that State 
B»m tha IiepabUoaas. Mississippi, upon anv reg- 
istry of votere, is Sepublican by an overwhelming 
OUIoritT. It is aa strungly Republican nearly as 
Vermont, in the ratio, and they last year 
eatried It for a Dsmooracio Governor, they 
•eiaad the Legiatatore, they hare aO the power, 
and they tell you vary defiantly and with a great 
fl^anah of prideia tha matter, tbat it was a peaceful 
election. Well, I wish to put it on reoord here and 
Uka the Whole responstbiUty for the statement in 
lU szaotnase, that at what they call a peaceful elec- 
tion there were mere men murdered— that in the cam- 
paigB, 1 mean, leading to and connected with the 
Daaocntio triumph in Misalsaippl— there were 
moTB man murttsted than ever loat their lives at 
all the aleotlona, Municipal, S.ate, and national, that 
bare ever bean held in alt tHe free SUtea fiom Maine 
to CAUfomia, la all the time of the Federal Guvem- 
aient l^oai Qforga Washington down to Giant. 
(Applaosr.] Take all tbe election rows and riota 
and acrimnugef and disturbances which in times of 
high ozciument yoa are liable to have at the polls, 
and eapeclally in large eitiea. where tha population 
la dense and the elementa disorderly at times, 
and pat thea all together, ■ at ail the elections 
ia all the free Stataa, 'from the formation 
of the Tederal QuvemsienS . to thia hour, tbey will 
sot aggtegate oae-half, no, not one-foartb, the nunx 
bet that loat their \i9vt ia that paaceiut aleotloa in 
Mlaaiaaippx laat year. I tfaat to pat oa record an. 
<nb«r tlilac. that slaaa tb* •orraadar o/ (hra. !«•>-. 
XMeiatitfa gaom oOatit itAm^tm 



loose or random assertion — I am stating 
it from evidence tbat wonld be accepted 
in any court, a litti*) stricter evidence 
than that with wiiich it is proposed to ass^iil the 
Treasury of the Uuited Statea for war claims— 1 
am patting it on evidence, and pvidenoe that 
.would have been Accumnlati''e a hundred lold 
ilr tbe man who could have testiiled freely 
bad dared to testit'v — 1 desire to put 
another fucr, on equnlly reliable data, on 
record, and that .ia this : rtrat sir.ce iho war closed 
lu le65 there have been more men murdered in the 
Eoutb lor nolltlcui opiniou.-' — ami that is, murdered 
tor beiug Itopiibiican.t — tbitre luive been more men 
lu those oleveti yeai 8 murdered ia tlie South tor be- 
ing £epuulican« thau fell on the Union side iu tbe 
three bloodie.tt battle^« of the war. 

1 make tbut statement on tbe official data, and 
yot uothing 18 more coraraon t'lati tu gpoer a. tbe 
•"bloody sbirtj" and a man wuj pretends to discus.'* 

the validity aud the iatejjrity of the thirteanth, 
fourteenth, and litteeDtli amcudmeuts, aud to 
insist that, they term tue great groundwork of this 
Contest iu wbieii we are eutiaged, is ralbei 
laujihed down in DnmocratiC auait-ucea and in 
Dumooratio newspapers) tbat it ia a qufvarion which 
We are forcing upou the people tbat noes nut belong 
heie i tout the South wants p<moe, and we who talk 
about outraged tbat are inflicted upon tbe poor 
negroes dowu there are shaking; the bloody abirt 
aud merely trying Co get up an excitement to hide 
some wore formidable issue which tbey think we 
wish to avoid. 

THE CON8TITCTIONAI. FRANCHISE CANNOT BE 
TEAMPLED DOWN. 
Wei], gentlemen, all I have to say about this is 
simply tbiit tbe Governmeni if it intends to be 
honest, and I hope it does no intend, is boaad either 
to repeal and annul the fourteenth and flfioeuth 
amendments ur to enforce them. fApplauscJ For 
there is one thing sovl cannot stand, aud that 
is to allow : these amendments to retuain in 
your Constitution and quietly permit the n to be 
trampled under foot aud tnade of non-effect. 
lApplause.J That tbis Gsvernment can't stand. 
Let me' tell you, gentlemen, that can never be 
endured in this country, and tbe man 
wbo tbinks be can do that with 
safety in New-York has either never read 
history or read it in vain. The man who tbinks 
that any constitutional franchise wherewith he is 
clothed enables or empowers him to trample upon 
tbe constitutional franchise of another man makes 
a great and grievous mistake. f^PPl^ase.J The 
Government of tbe United States is powerful ; 
none more so on tbe globe, [cheers,] but 
it is uot powerful enough tu do wrong. 
[Cheers] And one of tne moat magnifloenl 
passages containing an instraction tbat should 
never be lorgntteo, bearint: with powerful parallei- 
|gm upon oar Goostitation. is toaod in the declara- 
tion of Mr. Burke before the proud tribunal of the 
British House of Commons wben in the impeach- 
ment of Warren Hastings be pleaded for tbe rights 
of the down-trodden Hindoo in Indi i, and stand- 
ing there representing more of talent and 
statesmanship than any man of England for a cen- 
tury; be said to that body which represented all 
tbere was of Briti»h griamess that Brinsh 
power was not strong ennush or mighty enough tu 
trample on tbe rights of the hamblest Hindoo on 
tbe banks of tbe G^ingea, and yet preserve the rights 
ot the proudest peer of the realm on 
the banks of the Xbames. [Uneers.] And 
I say to you, genuemeo, that contains 
the lesson of this hour, because i he United Statea 
is not strong euoujfh to disregard the Couatllutioual 
righ's of tbe most ignorant oegru in Alabama and 
Louisiana, and guarantee that of the wealthiest 
man lu New-Yjrk or Pennsy.vauia. [Applaust-.J 
"Peace be within thy walls, oh, Jerusalem 1 ana 
prosperity witbin thy palaceH. But rememijer that 
the L.jra God Omnipotent reigneih, the friend ut 
the trieudiess, tbe always helper of the helpless." 
Mr. Blame concluded amid load cheers. 



OTHER ADDRESSES. 
Hon. A. W. Tenney was next introduced. As 
a New-Yorker, he said, he congratulated the meeting 
on the reception which it bad given to tbe mau 
trom Maine. The speaker proceeded to state at 
length his o'ljeotions to Mr. Tilden as a candidate 
for the Presidency. He was opposed to him, hu 
saidr because he was a Democrat, and because he 
possessed all tbe particular characteristics wbicb 
that name implied; because during the terrible 
decade of blood he wji£,jup friend ot tbe nation 
and of tbe bova in bine; becaase bis 
Furroundings were bad, and becunse he was a po- 
litical sham. The grounds of his opposlcion to Mr. 
Tiiden rested in the first instance on Democratic 

authoriiv, and in support of his pr.iposition he 
quoted from tbe Cincinnati Enquirer ot Jaoe 5 and 

6 tbe Qtterances of Aairast £eluioDt^ tbe Brnokljn 
ArguM, and the Chicago Timei. fie snpplementerl 

tbt-i»n proot'a witb qaoittnoua truai Mr. Tildeu'n 
celebrated letter to Mi. Kent. Toe maii wbom the 
Democrats pranerited as uandntare for the Presi- 
deucv of .ihe United States did not see fit to give 
his name tbat tbe natiou might live. 

Hun. Siiad B. Dutcuer was ibe next speaker. Hp 
alw, in the first instancj, paiil a cnniplirueut to Mr. 
liiaine. Whom be desoritred as the "Harry Clav ot 
(he Uepublioan Parcy." He bimsnlt w.is uot, he 
eaiu, one ot (hose who bad any apologv tu luake 
for tbe RepuDlican Party ; he was nut tbere to de- 
fend If, tor it nueded no daiense. Its Tvc'Td wu.s 
the record of the country dating tilteen yea.s which 
were the most iuipoitaiit uf the cuuutry's bi story. 
Mr. Dutcber exuosud Mr, Til Jen's nreteuso uf hav- 
ing saved tne Mtate of New-Xork over seven miliiim 
dollars and in couclusiun impressed upou tbe Re- 
publican Party the impoi'iance Ot the Work wbicD 
lay before i,- 

At the Conclusion cf Mr. Dutcher's remarks there 
were loud erles lor Hou. D. £. Sickles, out be bad 
pr.;viou8iy lelt the ba;l. 

Bjv. Henry Highland Garuett was then present- 
ed, but, deuliuing eracetu ly to make a eueeub, aim- 
ply anvised bia.heaiers to 8e.>arate, aud ponder over 
aud well digusc what they bad heard. 

The President then lorually declared the pro- 
oeedinga leiminatevV 

THE OUTSIDE MEETING. 

IMME3|fE CROWDS — A GKAKO DISPLAY— 
SPEECHES BX SILAS B. IXJTCHKK, 
VA^lEl, 9. RIDDLE, AND .MR, BLAZXIC. 

The spaciotis square in front ot Cooper Insti- 
tute was filled by tbuusdndsot enthusiastic listeners 
to the speeches made iu favor of the EBpublican 
national and State tickets. A mammoth ntand, 
three times as large as those ordinarily erected for 
outside meetings, extended along the spaee un tbe 
souih side of the square, and was hand- 
somely decorated with flags, streamers, and 
Chinese lauterna. Tbe square was brilliantly, 
illuminated by calcium lights, msking it as bright 
as mid-dav, and a grand display of fireworks added 
tu the immense demonstration. 

The stand was occupied by prominent representa- 
tives of Bapnblioan diitriot associations. Boys in 
Blue, and kindred orgaoizationa. Hon. Jacob M. 
Patterson, Chairman of the Bepublican Central 
Committee, called the meeting to order and pre- 
sided. 

MB. DUTCHER'S SPEECH. 

Bon. Silas B. Dutouer. uf Brooklyn, was received 
with entbusiastiacbeers for tbe ''ledemptionof old 

£.inga County." 

Daring Mr. Dutcher's speech a Democrat called 
out for three cbt-ers for the Democracy. "Yen" 
responded Mr. Dutcber, "do you want to know 
what Democracy la f You have it pure and unadul- 
terated here in New- York City. Urant has paid off 
1425,000.000 of the public debt, while your City debt 
has grown from t38. 000,000 to over 1125,000,000 under 
the control of Tilden and his friends." ( Appkase.J 
Every man who fought Under the "Stars and 
Bars" was a Democrat, and it was a Demjciat who 
hauled down tbe American flag. If Democrata did 
not waut these crimes remembered against them, 
they should not eibil it the -8pirlt_ they always be- 
tra.yed when they fancied tbey were about to resume 
their loDg.lost power. [Applaase.] There had been 
good men iu tbe Demooratlo Party, and 400,- 
000 of them voted for Grant when 
he -was first nominated, 500,000 when 
he was again nominated, and 600,000 of the honest 
men now in the Democratic Party would vote for 
Rutherford B. Hayea, whose "bloody shirt" was 
riddled by rebel bullets on tbe field of battle, when 
Samuel J. Tilden, who could nut find time to sigu 
a call lor a Union meeting, w.jb wntiug a long let- 
ter to induoo iSucreiaiy Cameron to invest in " my 
brother's essence of cvttee." [Cbeers aud laughtei.J 
Hendricks voted agaiust men aud mouey to pni, 
down tbe rebellion, and aga:nst the cuusiitutionul 
amendmeoU made necessiurv by the war, and was 
of the saoie opinion r"W as he was then. Dorshel- 
mer, Tildeu'a cand'.uate for Governor of the Si^te 
of New-York, was a man who had been dis- 
missed trom bis district attoruevship by 
tbe President tor making fraudulent mileage 
eoarges, and be immediately turned a 
"Ketormer"' Joined the Democratic Party, and 
was miide Lieuttuant Governor of tbe Bmptre 
State. [Applause and laugbter.J Mr. Dutcber 
closed by pieaioting tbat tne State ol New Tork, 
,wlucb had always, since 1860, voted for a Bepubl 
dican President, wbeo its vute was honestly oast, 
would, on thuTihof November, cast, its thirty-five 
electoral votes lor J^yea and Wheeler, and true 
reform. [Appiause.J 

DANIEL 6. bundle's BEUARK8. 

The Chairman next introduced Mr. Daniel g. 
Riddle, of tbis City, who addressed the assembly at 
length. He aaid that the great issae iu tbe present 
camjMiign waa whether or not tbis United States 
Government should be handed over to its most 
bittar aBOBilaa. The rebel elements and the copper* 
, )te«4_«lffM»f«.ir'Meii.M«M4..«a4 aBatalaad tbt 



wa' were at the present day in the Dem- 
ecsrlo Party, and these elements were etrlving 
hard for the possession of tho Government. Every 
one ol those who chuckled over rebel victories, and 
who dropped their lip when thoy heard of Union 
victories dnnng tbat totrible war. were to-day 
shrieking for 'Tilden and Beform." Samuel J. 
Tilden was even worse than any of these men, lor 
he had cheated the Government out of bis incomo 
tax. 

MR. BLAINE OUT OF DOORS. 

Soon after Mr. Riddle concluded, the announce- 
ment was made that Mr. Blaine would in a few mo- 
ments be ready to address the immense crowd of 
people that had by tbia time assembled, and as that 
gentleman appeared on the platform, he was greeted 
with cheer after obeer. The greatest enthusiasm 
Was manifested, and tbe chairman's voice could 
scarcely be heard as he introduoed the orator of the 
evening. 

Mr. Blaine, aa soon as the applanse had subsided, 
said tbat his strength was hardly equal to tbe taste 
of making two speeches in one evening. He 
wished, however, to say to tbem as voters of New- 
York that the contest in this Centennial year was 
Whether or not every man wbo had a right to vote 
should do so. The next question was whether the 
men wbo had preserved - tbis government should 
Control it, or whether it should be given into tbe 
hands of that party tbat had attempted 
to destroy it. Tbe Bepablican Party had 
taken tbe ground that men of all classes, 
be thev black, white, of American or 
foreign birth. Catholic or Protestant, should have 
the right to vote, and do it freely. They wanted 
no man intimidated because of his nationality or 
color. If. in the coming election, every man that 
Was entitled to do ap should vote, did any one 
among his bearers thilk tor a moment that there 
was a single Democrat in the coimtry who had 
any doubt as t'l the result. No, there was not ; 
for on the night of Nov. 7 tbe Republican Party 
would have gained a victory. Mr. BUine expressed 
his regret at being unable to address them tit 
greater length, and bid tbem a cordial good night, 
after which be retired from the platform amid vo- 
clferoas appltuse. As be took his departure 
the crowd, while dispersing, cheered him lastily. 
^ 

THE PENNSYLVANIA REPUBLICANS. 



KINGING ADDRESS FKOM THE STATE COM- 
MITTKE. 

Head-quarters Republican state Committee, 

Philadelphia Oec. 14, 1876. 
To the People of Vennsylvania: 

Eleven years after the overthrow of the re- 
bellion we find the men who forced it upon tbe 
country again preparing to seize tne Government. 
It is tbe old Confederate Army united upon tbe old 
Coufeaerate heres.v. They have never abandoued 
their cherished idea^tbey still think with Mr. Til- 
den tbat ours is a confederacy, and not a nation. 
Tbey have made bim their candidate because he 
never abandoned bis declared conviction that " tbo 
Constitution of tbe United States is only organized 
revolution," and that " any State has the right to 
snap the tie at ita plessare.' ^ .^ 

This was the heresy that flrpd the rebel gun from 
Charleston against Sumter in 1861; and this is the' 
heresy tbey are remarsbaled in 1876 to re-establish. 

To tbis end they bave crushed out Republican 
opinion lu every Southern State. To this end they 
have made the ivhite Republican an outcast and> 
tbe black B.^ publican a vassal. To tbis end coer- 
cion of Reptfolioans is tbeir stern discipline. By 
force, their Confederate heresy is again tbe cement 
to make a solid South. 

Tbe Confederate Army is fat more united to-day 
in the new effort to seiae the Government than it 
was Qfteen years ago in tbe mad effort to destroy it. 
To-day treason is aided bv their sympathizers in 
the North. Tbey have concentrated the 8tr-«f;;;Ia 
upon a ningie issu — the levolutiun of tbe Guveru- 
ment. 'Thev sink eve y other quesilou out of 
:)ieht, aod tbcreiu they toitcii aa our duty. 

tjball tbey recover by the ballot, conierred upon 
tbem by Roiiublioan majcnantmity, what the.y lost 
on tbe battle-held in coiiflici witti the people they 
ueirayed ) 

We bavo met and vanquished their a'^saulting 
columns five times since lue tirst Tuosilay of Sep- 
tembei, 1816 — in Vfrmunt, Malue, Culorad •, Ohio, 
and luditfuu — ^luining ten nietuuers of Congress, 
eleciiuK Qve Lieviislalures, including that of luui- 
ana, wuioii even the lobel raiders fruni Kentucky 
Were not able lo capture. 

Demueiatio victories in tbe South are only evi- 
dences of Democratic terrorism over Kepuolicann. 
Sixty-five thousand Democratic majority in Geor- 
gia meaua 65,000 rebel shoi-guus at the polls'. 

Three wobks ojjI.v are leti to us to meet tiie new 
cilsis torced npoii ua by tbeae men. Wbar will 

Peunsyivauia do) Our euijmies, ountidouc of auu- 
cesslui coercii D ail over cue South, nave re.olved to 

make auotber acfaok upon this ereat State. Tliey 
lebVu the boucti in tbe sale custody of ibe reorgan- 
ized Couiodeiaie Army, aud tbey are now, us i;i 
186'J, marcuibg uijou Peunsylvauia in determined 
aria.y, and tbeir rebel .\ ell a.ready is heard wituin 
our limits. 

Let us be prepared for tbem. Oar j^-eat Comipon- 
Wealth has always beeu the stroughoid of riatioual- 
ity. Duriug tbe wur she gave bei: treasures of men 
aud luiiuey to tbe cause ol her country. Staadug 
uctwbeu lue iwu seciioua, she has always biioii the 
too ot seciioualisiii. Si-o stood by Lincoln, tiraut, 
Sbermau, and Mijade, Uuiiug ail the struggles of tlio 
war. Tne people believed thut When Vicksbaig 
aud Gijrtysburg tell un tbe 4;h of July. IStfci, tne 
sreat worn ot leatoj-atlon wan accomotisbeu, aiid tbe 
rebellion was) aead, but tbey are now brjugbt face 

CO face With a revuiaiion as daugeious as the rebel- 
liju itself. i 

When fit'teen States can be more unified by the 
sbot-guii ana tbe biudgeun tuau tbe.y tveie by armed 
secfSiiou itaeli. anu wueu tbis cumuiuallsu is eu> 
torceu by tbe suppre^islon oi free speecu, a free bai- 
lot, an-d free ecuoois, its buceess must end our lie- 
(jublican experiment. Xuase meu tried to tisht 
their wa.y out ot the Uuiou ut an bicalcuiaole sac- 
rifice of human life, aud now tbey are trytug witbin 
the Uuiou. by ueiv forms uf viuleuce add fraud, cu 
re-esiabhsb the do..;iuas supposed to oe desoroyed 
ou the baiiie-deid. All cuey ask is a aufiicieut cuu- 
tingeiit trom the free States tu couiplece their pro- 
gramme. 

It is in tbia Centennial year, wben Pennsylvania 
ia luviiiUii all tho n<itious to her 0Li80ita:iii»!<, aud 
prcffeiing eucouragemeiit and kindness tu her 
isouiueru sisters, thau the Couiederatea advance 
upon net borders lo make ui>otber tlfort for tbe 
heresy wbicb urigina.ed abd prulungud tbe rebel- 
lion. 

Ptiuosylvauia demands "peace and unity," but 
sheoemaudi (hem a^ tbe rdsuit of caeerlul obe- 
dience to ]ust law, and uot as tue sulleu suomissiuu 
compelled by tbe ufllcera ef the law. 

Peunsylvania dewauds indadiii.il and commercial 
proaperiiyj but stus ku.)W3 tiiat tuese are itio iiuits 
ot peaceiul ana orderly society, based upon honesty 
and rigut, and caucut gro>v uut ot ibe auarcuy aud 
chaos threatened lu a solid South. Peausyivania 
will first have Justice, then prosperify. lias the 
country no rodd to prosperity but tUal wlucb oib- 
graces the scars of ihe living soldiers and disbunors 
too graves uf tbe dead ? 

Peuns.vivania will have purity iu public adminis- 
tration, but she wanta none ot tne illusive promises 
Ot "reform" made by Tilden and illus rated by 
Tweed and the disciples of Tammany Hall. 

Men of Peuosyivauia, upou you rests the reapon- 
eibiilty — yours is the absorbing obligation. Will 
you " hold tbe fnrt !" 

By order of the committee. 

HENRY M. HOYT, Chairman. 

A. Wilson Nokius, Secretary. 



SOUTH CAMULINA. 



THE LOYAL CAUSK— LKITER FROM GEN. 
BUFUS 6AXTON. 
Port Leaveswoetu, Kan., Sept. 19, 18t3. 
To the Editor of the Columbia (H. C.) Union-Herald: 
Dear Sib : The recent action of tbe Repub- 
lican Convention at Columbia in giving en almost 
niiaulmuus ludorsemont to the wise and faitblul 
administration of Gov. Caamberlain is worthy of 
all commendation. Since my service during the 
war as military Governor of South Carolina I bave 
been an iulerested observer of her political career. 
'Tbe steadfast allegiance her people have niyeu to 
tbe party ot ireedoin is a good omen lor tho luiore 
of the State ; and now when tbat party has in- 
scribed reform and honest admiuistration on its 
banners i:. ought to triumph, if ihe fieedmen 
come forward in November and re-elect Gov. Cbam- 
buriaiu oy an overwhelming majority, so uractioal 
an illustraliou of their caoaclty tor self-goveru- 
meut would gUddennbe beans of all the friends of 
ireedom and good goyernment, and would furnish 
tbe best answer tbey could posii'tly make to those 
who assert that tbey are not Ut to be tiusted with 
tho ballot. The comlbg election iu South Carolina 
will be oue ot l\i-> most iiuportunt to its future woll- 
bbing ever held in the Palmetto State. A Repub- 
lican defeat would be duastious to tbe best inter- 
ests of ail tbe people, white as well as black. A 
Republican irlutuph — another grand step forward 
iu tbe pathway ut ber progre;i8. 

Yours respeettully, RUFCS SAXION. 



A BIRD l^VASloy. 
The Charleaton (8. C.) Journal of Thursday 
last says: "The city was swarmed last night with 
several species of birds, some resembling very much 
the dove, but considerably smaller than tbat 
bird, and other small birds, about tbe size 
of the sparruw, resembling nonpareils. Tnese 
little vibIlots maue their appearance about 
9 o'clock in tbe evening lu large numbers all 
over the city. 'Tbeyctuld be seen skimmiug the 
pavements and dodging into tbe comers ol tbe 
doors and windows. Oue gentleman in JUarket 
street canght twenty-six lu his store in a snort time 
aud caged them in his show-case. The Journal of 
Commerce oftice was attacked by them, and the 
winduws of ihe composing-room had to be shut 
dowu to keep them out Sea Captains sa.y tbat they 
Inaicate tiiat there has beeu a fearlul storm in soma 
locality aud that these birds bave been driven from 
their abode by the storm. They are evidently a 
species of bird from afar o£f and net accustomed to 
euX otlmate^ aa tbey appear to be vatr aaeii at a 
loss h«te»'* 



A WRESTLING MATCH. 

A FINE CONTEST A T CENTRAL PARK 
GARDEN. 

THE MATCH BEI WEEN COL, JAMES II. 
M'LAUOnLIN AND JACOB H. MARTIN— 
A FINK EXHIBITION OF COLtAR AND 
„ BtBOW ^WRESTUNO — M'tAUGHLIN THE 
WINNER. 
Tho wrestling contest last evening at Central 
Park Garden was witnessed by at least eight hun- 
dred persons. The contestants were L^- James U. 
McLaughlin, champion, and Jacob R. Martin, both 
of Michigan. Doubts were expressed by Bone 
present as to tbe gonninonesa of the match, but 
that it was a bona fide affair is unqneatinn- 
able, tbe stakes being |500 a side and tbe 
championship. Twicebefore tbemenhad met ; each 
time tbey struggled in vain efforts to Win, and both 
matches were pronennoed a draw. There was, ou 
both occasions., considerable partisan feeling ntani- 
fested by tbe friends of either man, and it was to 
escape their annoying manifestations tbat tbe 
wrestlers came from Detroit to this City, to decide 
who was tbe better man. Some half hour after the 
promised time both men made their appearance on 
a platform where other and far more pleasing strug- 
gles have taken nlace. In personal appearance tbe 
two men are grand specimens of the human form. 
It would be difficult to determine which one 
presented tbe more perfect physical frame. 
Equal in height — six feet one Inch in their 
stocking feet — of the same weight, 224 pounds 
— they were to all except the closest 
observer the exact physical counterparts of each 
other. But to tbe student of anotomioal structure, 
a difference was perceptible. There was a greater 
depth of chest in Martin ; his torso was the more su- 
perb of tbe two ; but McLaughlin's arms and legs 
were a trifle the largest, and his lower limbs were 
more firmly placed. In tbis respect he seemed su- 
perior, though both were far better developed phys- 
ically and in better proportions than perhaps any 
other two men in ten thousand. Tbeir dress was 
neat and certainly cool enough for all purposes. 
They wore fiesb-colpred tights, rubber slippers, 
knit vests, and breech-clouts, the one chocolate, the 
other of a crimson color. Additional to tbis scanty 
costume each bad on a short Jacket, with loose 
sleeves, which was worn unbuttoned. It was tio the 
cellar of this shortened garment tbat the right hand 
of either man was c'.inobed, while tbe left grasped 
the sleeve at the elbow. 

The conditions of the match being announced, 
and with Mr. Harry Hill as referee, the struggle 
commenced. Instantly every mnscle of their bodies 
was brought into active exercise. Tbe hardened 
muscles of the arms and ot the tegs were straioed 
afmust to tbeir utmost tension. To one not famil- 
iar with tbe sport their proceedings were at first 
rather uninteresting, but after a few minutes their 
determined efforts were rooognizod by every 
one present. McLaughlin pushed the strug- 
gle from tbe start. Maitln was caretul 
and cautious, but, despite his every effort, the 
champion succeeded iu securing an inside crook 
with his right leg firmly locked on Martin's left, 
and, although the latter pnt forth all of bis great 
strength to prevent a fall, McLaughlin, with 
an excellent application of the deltoid muscles, 
iurced his opponent backward until he was past his 
equilib.ium and was compelled lu succumb. 'The 
Cuionel won the fall in just nine minutes. 

Tnere were eleven minutPs.of rest, ami then the 
giauts reaopeared upou the si age. Quick work fol- 
lowed, and lock followed lock iu rapid succession, 
only to be broken by wondrous ."till and strength. 
Presently Martin assumed the offensive, and wiih 
rapid Biiokes S'>usht to confuse fats skilled and more 
practiced uppoiiCnt. McLaughlin's deleiisive tactics 
ware'excelleui, but sudaenly Martiu took advan- 
tage of f.n opening, aud almost beforu any onecould 
realize tbe tact the champion wa.s lying flit 
upon the carpet. Martin had thrown his 
left foot to tbe out!>ide of the" Colonel's right leg, 
and tben, with a sudden useot fleX'irsHud exiennors, 
aided uf course by the massive biceps and triceps of 
his upper arm, had cluickly fl'.ing McLauchiiu to 
the fiour. it was well acaumpiiobed, aud withal su 
suddenly that everybody Was ustouiaued when tbey 
Saw the champion upou his back. The ruuud lasted 
14niiDutes, 22 seconds.^ 

Twenty luiuutes, less two, were spent in tbe 
reat, and then tbey clingbed agaiu. McLaugiiiiu 
at once began to force tbe work, and the Euowiu<r 
ones whispered, " They're ai it now j you'iUeeeonie 

flue work pxeaently." Time uud ai;jia be forced 
faiEU.-jelf eloeet.y to JUartiu'd loria and wtia the aid ol 

tbe pecturalis major muscles sua j:ht to bear biiu back- 
ward. It was ut such iitues as < heso that the ex- 

lerual uiascles of Mirtiu's abdonteu aulTcred .the 
uiuai. He exerted uil his tfreat slrongiu — aud be is 
said to be able te lift l.SUU pouuds with either baud 
— to tree bimaelt', but uut wituout a terrific .s:ruggle 
did be succeed, 'llieii McLaugbliu got fin uuiside 
kick and was near placing Martin upon 
tliefljur; but the latter bruku the lock aud, amid 
great applauie, ouce more iace<l his friendly oppo- 

uiiir. x'ueu came tbe final sirugiile. Toe Colonel, 
i<touping almost io the fioor, crent cio.ser ana closer 
iu upon his oomnetitur. in vain the latter put 
tortb his immruse uireogtb to prevent an appruacb. 
McLauiibliu was doieruiined to win, and as be bud 
a good auvtiniuge he contiuiied bis tff>rts with all 
his skill. Presently be was laiily uuder Matiiu 
aud with strong arms was attempting to litt him 
upward ana bacaward to tbe fijor. Tbe two meu 
were in such a posicion mat the slightest mistake 
would lose the match, for the first time a luok of 
ooaut was uoiiced upou the face of Martiu ; he re- 
alized his position aud alread.y was defeated. Tbe 
auuieuce stood up to witness the closing struggle ; 
ihey saw the cbampiuu secure an inside heel luck, 
aud theu tbe strong man Went dowu. Col. Mc- 
*Laughliu bad won the fall, tue money, aud ail tbe 
atteudaut honors. 

CHIVALRY AT THE CENTENNIAL. 



prkpaeations fob maryland, delaware, 
vihqixia, and the disxricf of colu.m- 
bia — a tournament, with a quekn 
ok love and beauiy to crown the 
victors. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 16. — The preparations 
for the Slate day celebrations of Maryland, Dela- 
w.ire, Virginia, and tho D strict of Columbia are in 
course of completion, and iuolude Ihe following 
oeremoties : At 10:30 o clock Gov. Cochrane, of 
Delaware, will enter the grounds witb a military 
escort, and accompanied by the Mayor and City 
(youncil of Wilmington, members of the State 
Let>islatnre, members of Congress, and other dis- 
tinguished cit zens of the State. The visitors 
will proceed to tbe Delaware State building, 
where they will be welcomed by the 
Centennial management. At 11 o'clock. Gov. Car- 
roll, of Maryland, with bis stafi^ and escorted by 
the Pittb aud Sixth Maryland Regiments, will 
arrive at thegrounds, and at 12 o'clock the author- 
ities of tbat State, and all visiting Marylanders 
will assemble in the Judges' Hall, wben tbe Orator 
for the State, Hou. J. V. L. Ptndlay, will speak. 
At 1 o'clock the Centennial tournament will com- 
mence on the camp grounds S.t the foot of George's 
Hill. Virginia, notwithsianding tbe disinclination 
of tho State authorities to officiate in an official 
capacity, will doobtless be represeated by thou- 
sands 1 1 her people. 

The prizis to be awarded the successful competi- 
tors in tbo tournament were to-da.y placed on exbl- 
bitiun iu a largo glass case near the mu^'O stand iu 
the Main Building. Thoy comprise a pair of pearl- 
iiandled, Bilyor-plaied Remiugtim revolvers ; bronze 
statuette of a knight; an elaborately ornamtnted 
centre piece, the bowl being of crystal, aud the 
Tiedestal of silver, inlaid witb gold, the salver 
ornamented to match, and tbe goblet.s of chaseil 
silver with gold medallions; a double-barrelled 
shot-gun. with ajimuuitlon aud case complete; a 
silver-plated, gilt aud enamelled fruit dish, aud a 
tea sot (twelve pieco!i.) lu tbo eveniua the success- 
ful kn'ght will be croWiied in tbe Jud;.'es' Hall by 
the Queen ef Love and Beauty, the name ol' this 
lady otiug kept a secret until after ibe eeremony. 

Au aildress on Arkansas, ber resources, indus- 
tries, aud progress, was delivered by Hon. Daniel 
Walker, ot that State, this morniug, lu the Judges' 
Hull. 

The preparations for tho brilliant pyrotechuic 
display on Wednesday evening, are beiua prose- 
cuted by the wurkmeu ot Brock & Co., of Loudon, 
ou the eite of tlie former display, ou lieorge'a Hill. 
The Illumination of tbe grounds will be on a more 
extensive scale thau upou the evenlug ot Pennsyl- 
vania day, 4ii0 colored lights being used througnput 
the illuminatea area. 

The AdiuiHsiou Bureau report the attendance at 
tho Mam Exhibition Building to-day, at fifty cents. 
73.903. at twenty. five cents, lUO, and at the live 
stock exhibition, 666. 



STRIKB OF LABORERS AVERTED. 

Nashua, Oct. Hi. — The apprehended trouble 

with the discharged laborers un the Keene and 

Nashau Railruad has been averted. The towns aloug 

the route bave cashed their due bills at a dis- 
count often per cent., and most ot the men left this 
evening. 

EXPLOSION OP A OASOHNB TANK. 
Worcester, Oct. 16. — To-night at the High- 
land MiUtary Academy the vapor from a gasoline 
tank, used for making gas for the Academy build- 
ings, ignited, aud an explosion followed. C. B. 
Metcalf, proprietor and principal of tbe academy ; 
£dwia Morse, a earpenrer, aad John Morse, a la- 
borer, were standing over tbe task at tbe time, and 
all of thedi were thrown into tha air and qutt-t sari- 
oualy bornad, Mr. Uatoolf belnc tbe moat teverely 
tsjiued. Xb< Mrtb ttaoad tii« hoik vaa utcowa 



np, but none of the bnildinsrs were inlnred, and 
ouiy tho three versions named were affected by the 
e.tiilosion. Mi. MotcaU'aod bis assistants were ex- 
aniliiio. the tank for a leak, and tne vapor was 
ii'ulted by their lantetu. 



WASHINGTON NOTES. 



TSE CABINET— THE CENTENNIAL ADDRESS 
OF THE IRISH MEMBERS OF THE BRITISH 
PARLIAMENT— NAVY MATTERS— THE MC- 
PHERSON MONUMKXT THE 6AFE 

BURGLARY CASE. 

Washington. Oct. 16.— There was a special 
Cabinet mee'lng t(j-day of two hours' duration, at 
which all departments except the WarlSepartinent 
were represented. The Interior and State Depart- 
ments were represented by Assistant Secretaries 
Gorham and Cadwallader respectively. The meet- 
ing was for tbe purpose of attending to a mass of 
miscellaneous bnsiness that had accumulated dur- 
ing the Summer. The suhject of Gov. Chamber- 
lain's request for the araiatanoe -of tbe General 
Government m preserving the public peace in South 
Carolini was not considered, but will be at the 
regular session to-morrow, at which Secretary 
Cameron will bo in attendance. 

The President will receive the Centennial addresi 
of congratulation from the people of Ireland to- 
morrow. The address will be nresented by Mr. 
O'Connor Power and Mr. Parnell, Irish members of 
Parliament, and will be read in the President's 
office in the White Honso at about 2 o'clock in tho 
afternoon. 

'The following balances were in tbo United States 
Treasury at tba closing hour to-day : Currency, 
$13,322,971 ; special deposit of legal tenders for the 
redemption of certificates of deposit, #33.390,000; 
coin, (including $30,745,000 in coin certificates.) 
tG8,530,504; outstanding legal tenders, 1363,494,740. 

Tho President has recognizad Simael £. Spring 
as Vice Consul of Urnguay, at Portland, Me., and 
Arthur Carroll, Vice Consul for Uruguay for Bos- 
ton and Silem. 

Paymaster Francis J. Swan is ordered to the 
Buston Navy-yard, relieving Paymaster W. W". 
Woodhull. detached aud ordered to settle his ac- 
counts. Ensign Nathan Sargent is ordered to ex- 
aminatioa lor promotion. 

The Navy Department is advised of tbe arrival 
at Valparaiso, Chill, ou ths 4th of September, of 
the United States flag-ship Richmond. The Rich- 
mood expected to be at Montevideo about the 15th 
of Qjtdber. 

The receipts from internal revenue to-day were 
$724,816 -28. and from Customs $371,603 89. 

Theodore B.Potter was to-d,iy appointed Internal 
Revenue Storekeeper for the Pirst District of Con- 
necticut. 

Quartermaster General Tyner will leave Wasb- 
Ingron to-night for New-York City on olficlal busl- 
nesx, and will stop in Philadelohia lor two days on 
his return trip. Second Assistant Postmaster Gen- 
eral Grady returned today from Indiana and re- 
Rurood his official duties. 

Tne President to-day appointed Walde Burns 
Postmaster at Sheiman, Texas, vice Frederick' W. 
Sumner deceased. 

The programme of exercises for the Society of 
the Army of the Tennessee and the unveiling of 
Gen. McPhetson's statue is complete. There will 
be a civic and military display here on th'elSib 
Inst., and the departments will" be closed after 12 
o'clock in order to allow their employes to join in 
the exercises. The District Militia and Marine 
Corps will serve as a military escort, and the band 
from Fort McHenry, Baltimore Harbor, is urdered 
here for the occasion. Gen. David Hunter, of the 
Uuited Slates Army, will act as Grand Marshal. 
It is expected that tho display will auipass any- 
thing of a like character wbicb has been witnessed 
bert) siace President Grant's inauguration. 

The bond given at Wilmington, Del., bv Richard 
Harriogtou, lor his appearance at the nresent term 
of the Criminal Court of the District of Columbia, 
to answer the chaiges of coospirac.y against him in 
connection with the safe burglary case, has beeu re- 
ceived by the Clerk of tbat court. The amount of 
the bond is flO.OUO, and the sureties are S. M. Har- 
rington, of WUmlugton, aud H.eury Ridgely, of 
Dover. 



TROTTING AT MYSTIC PARK. 



S.MUGGLER DISTANCED BY GREAT EASTERN— 
TUE FREE TO ALL WO.N BY CO.MEE. 

Boston, Oct. IG— Three thousand people 
visited Mystie Park this afternoon to witness the 
first of tha three races which have been arranged 
for between Smoygler and Great Eastern, the win- 
ner to receive the gate inouey. The pools sold at 
$40 to t'22 ou Smuggler, who behaved badly, bow- 
ever, and was disiaoced m the second beat. Tbe 
following IS a summary: 

Great Eastern 

Siuujfsler.. ..." 

_ Time— 2:2;-t, 2:24 'a- 
Following this a free to all race took place for a 
purse of $500 ; |2J0 to the first horse, f 125 to tbe sec- 
ond, $75 to tbe third, and foU to the fourth, of which 
the roUoniug is a summary: 

Comee v'. 1 

Bella 2 

Auuie collias 3 

ijonner .-. i . . . .- ^ I'^Jn 4 

Maybird 

Uauuuh i) 5 

Time — \::Zij. iiJilia 2:233*. 

BY MAIL AND TELEGRAPH. 



....... 1 dia. 



'2 


•S 


4 


4 


3 


5 


ti 


•^ 


5 


e 



TliePaciflo Mail steamer Granada sailed from 
San Fruucisco, for Panatna, yesterday. 

B. F. Nourse, of Buaton,- has declined to #erve 
on the Silver Commidsiou, owing to budine:is eu- 
gagemeut--. 

The total number of interments at Savannah 
on Suuany was fifteen, ot wbicb ci,;ut were .yol.ow 
lever viciims. 

The Democrats of the First District of Orarite 

Couuty have uuminated Nathaniel B. W'ooiinuli rjr 
the Assembly. 

The Ro3s-Brayloy scull race at St. John, N. 
B , WLis p.istpoued yesterday on aecuuut of uuta- 
viirabe weather. 

Edward Wiggleworth, a prominent merchant 
of Bositoti, Uied at his re&iaence. No. 81 Beacon 
street, on Sunday night. 

The Republicans of the Twenty-fourth Dis- 
trict of PcLiUHyivauia have nominated Dr. W. S. 
Shailenberger, of Beaver, for Congress. 

John Jeffersou, night watchman, of Hamil- 
ton, Ontario, wbo was shot some Uays ago by an 
AiAericau named Aiden, died last night. Alden 
has been arrested. 

Four more illicit distillers have been taken to 
St. Louis from Suutb-eastern Missouri by United 
Sates Marshal Wheeler, aud, in default of bail, 
committed to jail. 

Frank Landers, who was arrested on sus- 
piciuu of being the murderer of the Trim family at 
Bucksport, Me., has been discharged. 'Tne eviaeuce 
is very strong agaiust £. M. Smith, who is now in 
cu.study. 

The b0(3y of Miss Harriet D. Williams, who 
was formerly a tciicher iu BuSIod, was lound iu 
Charles River near Cambridge Bridge, Boston, yes- 
teiday afternoon with a flat-iron lied to the neck. 
It is un undoubted case ot suicide. 

Robert Biydges, a brakeman on tho Grand 
Truuk tieight tralu bound westward, fell trom the 
engine-tender, at Ailsa Craig, Ontario, while trying 
to reach the top of a lreii{ht oar uu Sunday moriiliig, 
and had bis head severed from bis body. 

Tbe report of tho Boaki of Health of the 
District uf Columbia shows that dnriug the month 
of September there were 349 deaths — 7 less than 
iu September of last year. A.H usual, consumption 
leads ibo list ot causes of death, 37 iiorsoss baviug 
died ot that disease; diarrhcei aud cholera intan- 
tum each caused 19 deaths ; 1::4 deaths were trom 
zyujocio disea.ies, wbiciiure caused by decomposing 
wood pavements, bad sewerage, imporiecc draiuauc, 

^^mm 

LOSSES Jjy FlIiK. 



Last evening at 8 o'clock a fire was tJiscov- 

eruu iu a baru adjuiuiug the house of .Samuel 
Forbes, iu East ilaveu, Cunn.. just across Tomim- 
sou's bridge, which destroyed two dwelling houses 
occupied by Samuel Forbes, Millett, Johnson, aud 
Charles Ahdie. three large barns, catle sheds, and 
outbuildings, seventy tons ut bay, 400 bushels of 
corn iu the ear, a flue bull and a cal.', several cords 
of wuod, and several tons of coal. All the-se were 
owned by Samuel Forbes, whose loss Is (15,U00; in- 
sured fur $9,(iOO. The next house, known as the 
••Old Stone House," built in 17C7, was saved with 
great difUculty. The fire was uuduubtedly the 
work ot au luceudiary. 

A lire on Sunday at Mendota, 111., destroyed 
a number of builaiaga, causing a loss cf uuout 
$'2*2,000, which is uearly covered by insurance. 1). 
F.HLk, a drj' goods and clothing dealer, is tbe 
heaviest loser. 

A block of tbrce-atoiy buildings on Front 
street, Everett, Mass., wa^ burned ou Sunday. Mr. 
Woous, a inauulacturer of einerv-i;ioi.h. loat consid- 
erable. Tbe total loss is (B,OUU; i>i'.rtiuliy insured. 

Tho house, barn, shed, fad other outbuildings 
of E. T. Nichols were buined yesterday at Coriutu, 
Me., toi;efher wilh furnituie, hay, and farm iiap.e- 
ments. 'Tue loss is unkuowu aud not insuied. 



FAILVBE IN SAN FRANCISCO. 
San Francisco, Oct. 16, — The failure of 
Muecke, Victor & Co. 'a shipping and commission 
houae was announced to-day. The assets are prob- 
ably in excels ut the liabilitioa, and it is hoped that 
the suspeBsiun will be temporary. 



SENTENCE OF MOLLY 2IA6UIRES. 

FOTTSVILLK, Oct. 16, — The court passed the 

following sentence this morning on the Molly 

Maguires convicted at tbe laat term of the court : 

JohnSehoe, fourteen years' imprisonmeiiLt; Dennis 
F. Catiuiog, fourteen yeara : Coristupber Douaelly, 
fourieeD years i Michael O'BrieB, fourteen years ; 
VikUtL O'Jff«aL««aaBd0Be*ltA)tjrMni J9ha Gih- I 



boas and John Morris, seven years each ; Patricls 
Dolan, Sr,, one year j Thomas Donobne, two years ; 
Edward Monaghan. seven .years. Sentence was 
also passed on a number of the witnesses whe had 
committed perjury at the trial. 

i^m 

ROWING AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY. 



FALL REGATTA OF 
CAYUGA LAKE- 



THB CORNELL NAVY OX 
-TWO FRESHMEN CBKW8 



IN 8IX-0ARKD GIGS, WITH COXSWAINS— 
THE CLUCK CUP WON BY THE VICTO- 
RIOUS FRE8HUKN CREW OF JU^,Y— 

OTHER EVENTS. 

Prom an OeccuUmal Corretpondeni. 

ITHACA, Saturday, Oct. 14, 1671, 

The annual Fall regatta of tho Cornell navy 
took pl«oo to-day. This event has been looked for- 
ward to with great interest by the students and 
citiaens of Ithaca since the opening of the present 
term. But tbe threatening cleuds and slight dashes 
of rain at frequent intervals dnriug the mornlDg 
put a "damper" ou tbe gaoeral enthusiasm, and 
caused many to stay at home in the belief that 
wearisome delays would^only be followed by post- 
ponement Notwithstanding this, a goodly num- 
ber of students, including a fair sprinkling 
of "co-eda," (by which eelfexplaining title 
tbe lady-students are designated,; assembled 
at tbe depot at the hoar appointed. As Is quite 
generally known the facilities for obseryiog a 
regatta on Caynga Lake are nns ntpaaa ed. A rail- 
road ruDB along the east shore of the lake elose to 
the water's edge ; the elevation of the track above 
the water, and the nearness of tbe rowing coarse to 
tbe shore, enable each oarsman of the several crews 
to be recognized, and afford ample opportunity for 
studying and comparing tbe difi'arent styles of row- 
ing, and as thn train keeps pace with the boats 
over the entire oonise, the merits and demerits 
of any particular style, or of any partionlar oars- 
man, are sure to oe brought out before tbe end of 
the race. The very play of the muscles can be 
clearly seen. To these fijoilitlee for observation 
Cornell owes not a little of her success in boating 
in times past. The keen critical eye* of Mr. 
Gardiner, the coach for the last two Saratoga crews, 
observed many defects in our oanmeu at the 
Spring regatta, from his position on the train, and 
settled definitely wbo were to represent as at the 
inter-colleeiate contest. 

To-day at 11 o'clock, after the usual long delays, 
the train, with five or six handrod aboard, got un- 
der headway, and soon reached the corner of the 
lake where tbe races are started. 'The first race 
was between two Freshmen six-oared gigs, with 
coxswains. Unnsnal interea't centred upon this 
race, as it was the first one ever rowed at Cornell 
Iritb coxswains, and also beoanss it is the first time 
a Freshman class have ever been able te fit out two 
crews so early in the terra. The first crew was 
composed of the following meu : Mills, 6; Barto, 
5; Farquhar, 4; Pomeroy, 3; Mealok, 2; Sinolaire, 
1, with White, son of President A. D. White, lor 
coxswain. The following m*a constituted tbe sec- 
ond crew : Eggleston, 6; Dutton, 5; Hawkins, 4; 
Bacon, 3; Haves, 2; Sheldon, 1, with Vance for cox- 
swain. No. 2 is the son of Rutherford B. Hayes, 
the Republican nominee for President The race 

was an exciting one till toward the finish, when 
tbe second crew showed exhaustion, and were 
pulled away from by tbe first, who crossed the two- 
mile point in 13m. 308., followed by tbe other crew 
iu 13m. 47s. These two crews comprise material for 
as good a Freshman crew as Comstl ever sent to 
Saratoga. 

The next race was for the Cluck Cup, and be- 
tween last July's victorious Freshman crew and a 
"scrub" crew picked from the classes of '78 and 
'79. On tbe latter wera Smith, Lswis, Waterman, 
aud King, (substitute,) of the University crew, to- 
gether with 'Tremau and Howard, whose fame is 
confiued to home contests. The '79 crew was com- 
posed of Mason, Warner, Greepry, Baker, Doonce, 
aud Wilson, ruwing in about tbe same order as at 
Saratoga. From start to finish the excitement was 
iuteuse, each class seeking to encourage its own 
men by loud cries of "73." '"79," &c., and -with a 
vieor only known to college lungs ; '79 won, making 
the two miles in 12m. 48s., followed by the other 
crew in 12m. r>3s. 

Tne next event was a siDgle-scuU race1>etween 
Osirom, of inter-collegiate boating fame, and Fran- 
cis, Who won the single scull laurels at Saratoga 
last July. Ostrom's proper position is stroke oar in 
a four or six.oared shell. There he has lew superi- 
ors, but iu a Bin|;le-8call, although a strong and 
Clean puller^ be caii never gain many laurels. Fran- 
cis played with him ever the whole course, inci^eas- 
lux or QeoreaslnK his lead at will, and pleasantly 
chattins witb his frleuda aboard tbe train in the 

meanwhile. The final rice of the day was between 
a '79 crew aud one selected from the difierent 

claaitea, and was of bat little interest. 

The interest in boating is not likely soon to die 
out at Cornell, Never has the enlb'aiiasm been 
greater than during the present term, aud particular- 
ly since at a leccnt meutiut; of all the classes it was 
decided to seud a ehallenge to the victors iu tbe 
Oxturd-Caaihridga race, to row them ou English 
Waters. In the event uf the race beihg a four-oared 
oue tue lollowin£ men are pretty certain te be se- 
leced: Mason, stroke of the Saratoga Freshman 
crew i Lewis, Oatrum, and Kmg, of the University 

craw. Tbe tnree first named may be reicarded as 
certain, " barring accidents." 



EIGHTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT. 






-••'-I-tl-'iv^'' 



"-.^d. 



ir^i. 



:c«A» 



«..». «..'; 



.•ti. — .fjHp^k , 



'PSM:^;,MtMSm>^i 



.v<t 



..cr-« 



£^" 



THK NOMINATION OF CHARLES P. SHAW— 
AN " INDKPEXDE:!}T" VEBilON OF THK 
CO.NVEN^riON. 
io the Editor or the New-Tork Tiinet; 

The ladepaudent KepubUoan Convention of 
the Eighth Congre»sioual District assembled on 
Saturday evening, pursuant to adjoammeot, at 
Science Hall. No. 141 Eighth street. All the dele- 
gations, consisting of thirty-eight delegates, repre- 
senting the Ninth, Fifteentli, Sixteenth, and part 
of the Eighteenth Wards, were present. The deep 
interest excited by the convention was manifested 
by the large number of spectators wbo crowded 
tho ball. At 8 o'clocic, CoL £. Gebhardt, 
wno bad been sntwtituted at the previous 
meeting of tho convention iu the place of an absent 
delegate from the Eighteenth Ward, and elected 
Chairman at the Instance of Ellwsod E. Thome, 
called tbe convention to order. Mr. Thorne then 
moved tbat the oonvention adjourn after the ap- 
pointment of a conference committee to confer witb 
other R'jpublioan organ issations as to the selection 
ot a suitable caudidate. An exciting debate en- 
sued, iu which several delegates participated, re- 
sulting in a nearly unanimous vote agaioat Mr. 
Theme's motion to adjuarn and in favar of proceed- 
ing immediately to the nominatioa of a candidate. 
Some acrimony was disclosed on the part of Mr. 
Thurife toward his opponents in the disciusiou that 
followed, and at an unfortunate moment he stated 
tbat be would bave prevented the convention from 
being called at all if he could have foreseea 
tbe purpose to nominate then ; be further 
aggravated his assumptions b.y insinuating that 
Judge Richardson, a regular delegate and an old 
and prominent resident of tbe district, was not a 
delegate. These mistakes on the part ot Mr. 
Thorne, who was a prominent candidate before tbe 
couveution, were not snlfered to pasa unimproved 

bv a half-dozen speakers, among whom were Oen. 
Fuster, Judge Richardson. H. T. Cleaveland, Simon 
Stevens, ano Mr. George Mitchell, Principal of the 
Si-xteeuth Ward School. It became apparent dur- 
ing the discuasiou that Mr. 'Thuroe had lost the 
coufidence of the couventioa and destroyed all his 
chances of preferment before it. Col. Gebhardt 
niauitested a aispofiition to side with Mi'. Tnorua 
in some subsequeut filibustering motions made 
by that gentleman, in one of which tbe 
original roll of oelegates was called, and it 
transpired, as tbe resalt of the ruling of Col. Geb- 
hardt, that he himself had bean improperly substi- 
tuted by Air. Tharue, aud waa not entitled to a seat 
iu tne cunveutiou, aud was not even a resident of 
the Congressional district. Under tbis accumula- 
tion ot misfortunes Col. Gebhardt witudrew trom 
the couventiun, followed by Mr. 'Thorne and aiX 
otber deleijates, two of when! were substitutes — 
seven iu all. The cvnvention then eleated Judge 
Richardson Chairman, aud, after filliug the vacan- 
cies iu the delogatuns caused by the withdrawal of 
Mr. 'Thorne uud his friends, proceeded to ballot 
for a candidate, which resulted in the unanimous 
nomination of Hon. Charles P. Shaw, be receiving 
the yoto of every delegate on tba first ballot The 
annoan'iibmont of this result waa received with 
great euthubiasm by Ibe convention and tbe speo- 
taturs, and a coiumutee was appuinted to proceed 
immediately and nollly Mr. Shaw of the action ef 
the couveution. During the absence of tbe 
committee Major Forbes offiered a preamble 
and resolutious extolling Controller Green and 
iudorsiug his nomination for the Mayoralty. Tbe 
iuuurseaient uf Cimtroiler Green was given with- 
utit a dissenting voice, followed by tniea hearty 
cheers for our next Mayor, Andrew H. Green. , 

'Tuo couia'itteo to notify Mr. Shaw soou returned 
and repoited tbat they were unable to find him. 
'I'hey were instructed to notify him in writing of bis 
nomination, aud tu request his acceptance. Tbe 
same committee were aiso instructed to wait upon 
Controller Green and inform him of his indorae- 
meut by the convention, aed tu present him with 
au engrossed copy of the preamble and resolutions. 
An Executive Committee was then appointed to 
take charge of the campaigu In behalf of the Con- 
grensional candidate, aud the convention adjourned, 
subject tu the call of the Chair. A. B. 

MARINE DISASTERS ON LAKE ONTARIO. 
ToHONTO, Oct. 16.— ihe galea of the past few 
days have proved disastrous to tlie •talppiaic *& the 
lake, ^he schooner, Wood Daek, Capt. Xbaatas, 
whiob leXt 0«we^ • ««•« «i.« tyt Zerwato. la r«*J 



ported missing. Several other vessels are overdoT 
here. The schooner Briliah Queen is riding at an* 
chor six miles oast of Cobourg, sails acd yawl gotm, 
and the crew unable to reach shore. Several ve* 
eels put back to Port Colborae this evening in bad 
condition, and a number arrived tbere tu-ilay t» 
porting losses of anchors and sails. 



THE GEORGIA ELECTION. 



WHY THE REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE rO» 
GOVERNOR RKCEIVKD NO MOUB VOTI8. 

From the Atlanta Rtpxtbliean, Oct. 10. 

As Bome of our frieucis abroad, as well aa 
home, may wish to 'know why it was, aod how il 
was, that Mr. Norcross, our candidate for GaveraoTj^ 
did not receive any more votes, we give the follow- 
ing a'mone many other reasons i 

la the first place, the Democracy, on coming Intc 
power flye years ago. changed the day and time foi 
State elections from the day and time of cleetina 
toembers of Congress as fixed by the Republicans, 
lor the purpose of enabling the former to have full 
•wini; to practice " fraad, intimidation, and Tio- 
lenoe," as they acknowledged they have been doing 
in the Lord resolutions passed by iheia on tbe Ulla 
of Aneust last 

In the next place the Republicans "have been 
shamefully demoralized ever since tbo abdloatioa 
of Bullock, and split and rent bv teuds about the 
Federal offices, over which they have oeeu quarrel- 
ing nearly as savagely as so man v hunjcry Demo- 
crats! aud these scramblers have' given a coldness 
and IsdifTerence to the various principles and ob- 
Jects of tbe patty. 

In the third place, from the time the nominatioa 
was made on the 16th of August to the oiwciiuo oa 
the 4tti of October, it was Impossible lor any maa 
or set ot men. with almost the entire ptea« of tbe 
State aeainst them, ^na with ibe Kuxlux epiril 
everywhere threatening to eifcct. in hi shorn 
tide, in so aiauy counties and over so large a terri 
tory as our State contains, anything Use a complet« 
and harmonious organiz^itiuu. Aud all th»t cunlll 
be expected under the eircamstancea was for thi 
candidate to visit the cbiet points of tbe State, aiU 
expose tbe rottenne<<8 and corruption ot the part] 
in power, which he has done must efi'sctualiy an* 
acceplabl.v to large crowds, except that of Augusta 
Where Kulduxiam was too ramnant tu allow ot trei 
discussion. 

In tho fourth place the election laws of tbe States 
always loose and oefeotlTe, and made worse by re- 
cent Democratic •naotmenie and the ahehsbment ol 
voting places, for the purpose of brmeing together 
large crowds to facliiiate frand, intimidation and 
violence, have altogether cheated the Repnbllcaaa 
tmt of tuonsands npon tbousaada of votes. Tlie 
Tammany Ring was never mure base in thisieipect 
than is the Democracy of Georgia^ and wnicb, U not 
speedily reformed or turned out ot olfica. moat saaa 
land the State in a vile and aa bearable despoium. 

Mr. Norcross has made ab«ut a dczen •peer.hes la 
the principal towns, mainly ttiuchiug eur Siat« 
financial condition, the chief parts uf which hava 
been given to tbe public by tbe most tMpectabla 
Demucratio papers uf ths State, to the great oia> 
cust ef tae riug-masters whu iare now rnnuiag, or 
trying to run. tbe machiaery of the patty. Tbia 
Was about all a candidate eoald do ia so short a tiae 
and tinder such adverse circumstances; but aven 
finder tnese difficulties several large coanties have 
given him handsoiue majoritiefi, and it is to be 
hoped that many have been enligftrened by the ex- 
po£6 he has made, and that some food will result 
tberefrem. 

Our chief hopes are centred in the trpod aeose and 
patriotism of tbe people of the wboie country, who^ ' 
we trust, will never be so blind as to give the Na. 
tional (xovernment into the bauds of the men and 
the very party which moved Hearea and earth to 
destroy it and doom the mass of the people to th» 
ourae of slavery forever. 



UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT. 



Wa8Hikgtoj», Oct. 16.— In the Supreme Court 
to-day two opinions were delivered as follows : 

No. e^i.—Soge, Controller QtnertxL rfe., of Svuth 
Carolina, v*. Ihe Richmond and VanvilU HaUroad 
Company, — Appealed from the Circuit Court of 
South Carolina — Tbe motion to advance tLe cauaa 
on ttie docket for hearing was denied, the coart 
having decided to give no preference to causes la 
which the execution of the revenue laws oi a btata 
is eujolned, anieas it suffleiently ap&ears that the 
operations of the Government of the Siate will be 
embarTMsed by delay. In the present crowdetf 
condition of the docket it is thongat that any otb«r 
course might work loiustice to private parties, or 
to parties concerned in cases not invul'viBg publlo 
interests. The Chiel Justiee delivered tbe opinion. 

No. 3 — Gainet Belding et al. t$. Hale and R-cctor.— la 
error lo the istiureme Court of Araansas. — luis u a 
case appertaining to the Hut Sprinss tiac- and the 
court says that tbe principal ojntrovcrsy netweca 
the parties to it was disposed of by tbe ueciinoa ia 
tbe Hot Springs cases last Winter uy d^ciaring that 
none of them were entitled to the land. As the Su. 
preme Court ot the State has not contravooe«l thsc 
decision, but has refused to aid either uf tbe par- 
tiei, and by its action saved tbe rights of tbe (Juitod 
States, no error is found, and the oeciid'in 'oeiow ta 
affirmed. Mr. Joailce Bradley delivered ta« opiW 



COLLISION BETWEEN SCHOONERS. 

WASHiNaxoK, Oct. 16. — ^The eignai eervics 

Observer at Atlbntio City, 2f. J., reporta to -the 

Chief Signal Officer as follows: The •cbooaer 

Breeze, from Port Jefferson, N. X.. for Georgetowa, 

D. C, witb a cargo of bone-dast onacijfned te Hart* 

ley Bros., was run into this luorniag bv tbe sch.>oD- 
er Lizzie younir, and cut to the water's edge. She 
put back to New-York this afternoon in a dancer- 
ona •onoition. 

LIIILB FALLS BUTTER AND CBESSB MAE- 

EST. 

ALBAjrr, Oet. 16.— Ibe Little Falls Cheese market 
was dliBdaatll a late bour, wben sales ol abon: 4,600 
bxs. factory Cheese were made at 12\c.'al4c. the 
latter price being paid but tor one or two lots on pti* 
rate terms.. The average market price 'wns from 13e;. 
'd'13^0., a few lots doiue a fraction t>etter. Fana 
Cheese lirooaht tiom liic®13o., bat one lot bringias 
the latter flsure. In Butter abont the aame ataonv 
ef traffic prsvaiis j prices, '27o.'S'SOo. 






W! 



■ .%: 



't>vi 



HAVANA MARKETS. 

HiVANA, Oct 16.— Spanish Gold, SS59S351*. Ej 
change qmet and weak ; on the United States 60 dava, 
currency, 134'a'2'4 discount ; short sight do. ia81 ^a- 
count: 60 days, gold, b^3>6i9 inremliun: short sight 
do., 7k'^734 oremium ; ou Lon4pn. 1S919 pttmiMHn 
ou Pans, ^'a'ad premium. 

' ' II I 1 11 I l a 

BUSINESS OHAJ^^OEa 

CAPITALISTS, AND ~ ^ 

BC5INE5S MBN^ 

The extensive printing establishment known as tht 
"NATION FBK8S," situated at Mo. *.>7 Boae St.. prop^ 
erty of tbe late John Boas, is now offered for sale at ^ 
great sacrifice. 

The office contains six large Adsmi presses, one Pe^ 
ter press, one Whartdale press, one doe saper-royaL 
press, oue balf-mediimi Globe press, two qa.irter^ne^ 
oiom Gordon presses, one hydraulic press pomp and 
pressing boards, oue Sanborn paper cutter, :2t$ loeb. 
There is abundance ot type and all other nece«s*ty ' 
material to run the presses tn their full capacity. 

Tbe office now emplo/s eighty-five h»Dds.andIuia 
Btead.v work to kee ptuemconstan tlj- empto yed. One- 
half tbe purohtue mone.y can remain «n mortgage, ■•• 
cured on the presses and material, for two years. 

This is a rare opportuult.v for printers or»ctira bn^ 
ness men •wishing to ensace In a aafe, permameut, aad 
verir lucrative business.— ^BftiFWO or three praottoal 
printers having some meansTwid 'Wishing to oomblnf 
their skill and capital, this budiiiess oSisrs aa ladvor 
meut r»rel.T, if ever, afforded. 

Fox further particulars apply to oraddxess 

juaa J. HUBPHT. Administrator, 

Ko. 47 John st, New-Tor^ 

•> Kt\f\ WHjL BVY FiNB SHOP ANl 

^JsCjVf Ulot, with tools, stock, a n tt 'g e od wUlef ^ 
furniture business in a Iffrge aud growisg village li 
middle New-York: no other in tbe piace; undertaki>a 
can be added. Part of tbe purchase money can Tvaait 
on bond and mortfcaee : saUsfactory reasons for seU 
ing. Address WBKD BBOTBKB^, hew-Haven, Conn. , 
■ " 

PttOPOSATsTpoa^waaK^A^^ 

MIUCTAKY C£MBT£KI£S. 

Offick National Cekktbrix*. } 
WABHi.\aro.t, 1). C, Oct 10, 1876. S 

Sealed proposals, in triplicate, with a o. py ef thia 
advertisement attached, will be re.^iveil at this offlo* 
until WKONKSDAY. Nov. 16. 1876, tor the constrao- 
tlon ot inclosing walls of brick or stone around the 
Katioual Cemeteries at Yorktown, Va., and BeaoAtrt 
and Florence, S. C 

The Torktown wall will not be' commenced before 
the Ist of April next. The Beaufort end Florenoe 
walls to be bmit as soon after the award of oooti act aa 
practicable. 'Iha work durinf( its pro^re^ -will b« 
frequently inspected by competent Ln^iueers, and a 
6trict compliance with the terms of the coutraot wiA 
be rcquirCii. 

Tbe richt is reserved to r^<>ct an,y or all blda nol 
deemed ot interest to the Oovernmeut. 

Copies of plans and Fpeciflcaiious may bn eeea, and 
blank forms ol prooosola pn>curea at this offioe and al 
the Qtmrtermasters' offices In New-York i ity, (comer 
cf bouaton and Green sts..) at Furt Monroe, Ya.. 
ChHrlestou, B. C. I/ouisrille, Ky., Baltimore, ttd., and 
at the Cemeteries above named. 

Proposals sboul-l bo indorsed : •• Proposals lor Walls 
fbr National Cemeteries." and addressed to the tmder- 
fcigned. They wiil be opened at noon on tbe date speot> 
fled, 'When biadera are invited to be present 

A. y. KOCKVVEL L. Captain and A 0- M« _ 

PUOPO!iAt.!<> FOR DREUGIMJ. 

0inTBo Statsi Enoinkbe Ofpici, TbiksStost) 
Cicios tiASK BDiu>tKO, Fatsttb, rkar Chahlbs it., > 
Baltimobe, .Md.. Oct. 9, 1876. * 
Propossls (or dredging in Patnpsco aiver will be re> 
ceived until noon of Nov. 1, 1870, and opened iiume. 
diately thereafter. The right to I'ejeot any bid u re- 
served. Blank forms, specifications, and any desired 
information can be bad on anplioation to tliis office. 
WAL P. <..:ttA10 mi.L, Major of Kngiueers. 

PKOFOSALJ3 FOR STONE. 

Sealed proposals wilt no received by tho Trustees ol 
tbe New- York and Brooklyn Bridge, at tbeir office. Now 
21 Water st, Brootl.yn. uutll Nov. 6, lor about llrf 
cubic yjirde granite cut stone, specifications 'WlU be- 
fiirnisbed upon anpiication at the office, where plans 
can be seen. W. A. ROEBLIXU, Chief Kagineer. 

MISCELLAN EOUS. 
pFwcatiojTfor^Iomission to thb 

• OiiOGBSTL^^MKN'S UW^BCTARIAN HOMS," So. 
b'Jl Kast 12otb St., for aaed inaigent men residing In 
Kew-York. Brooklyn, or viduity, sbeold be made at 
the Home. 

US TO Lib tiiATK.— PaUK VlCTUBM iflUSi-^ 
aa Ingeuloas MOt &tf o\AmU to flad. . Addresa, 
Witbawaa. it Cl aiiBsiX. SalMft Ji.)^ 






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jfi^ Ifete gjofrfi STtims 



VV I X H S IX P P L E IVI E N T . 



! NEW- YORK. TUESDAY, OCT. 17. 187a 

I bl REPMCAN JIOMINATIOE 







TOR PRESIDENT, 

fiEN.'RUTHEKFORD B. HAYES 



OF OHIO. 



'' .. FOR iTJCB PBHSIDENT, 

miJAM A. WHEELEB. 

^V NEW-YORK. 






Al^USBMSNIS THIS ETENIKO. 



ITALLACK'S THKATRE.-FoRBi»D«» FRtiT-Mr. J. 
Mantariie, Mr. Barrr Beosett, Mlsa Ada Dtm, Miss 
^#., KAe G«ri)EUM>. 

lUTH AVBNUS TH«ATBK.-LiFR-Mr. C. P. Coahlnn, 
-*!.aif. Janici Lewis, Mr. Cbarlea Kaher. Miss Amy 
J«wtitt, Ura. a. U. Gilbert. 



IIIBLO'S O&BOBK.— Baba— Mr. W. A. Crane. Mr. V. 
Bowart. Mlu Bhaa Weath«rsby,MiM Minselli. 



BOOTH'S THEATRE.— Sakdaxapahts— Mr. F. C. Bamcs, 
Mrk. Agnes Buoth, graud ballet and ohoroa. 



VSaOS SQUABK THUATBK— Thk Two OKPHAirg — Mr. 
C Thome, Jr., Mr. J. O'Neill, Miss Kato Claiton. 



FARK THKATRE.— ri.oi70»— Mr. W. J. CosBwell. Mr. J. 
KPolk. Mias Eioae Wood. Mtss Ida Jeftiers. 



^W-TORK AQL'ARIUM — Ra»i asd Ctjrioot Fiih asd 
Maxxaua, Statvart. tia. 

BIUiOBK'S GAROBN.— P. T. BAR^rrx'a MvtVTnf, Cibctts. 
an MiNASiRiK. 

iiTCBCM THBATRK.— Row»o and Jitlikt— MIbs Louise 
M. Pomeroy, Itr. J. P. Roberta, Mr. M. 7. Liugbam. 



IKOOXyS MD9KTJM.— Dramatic Pbr»orjia.vc«'— CURioaJ- 
vm Attemoou aud evratait 



IMIKBICAS INSTITDTB HAliG— A»!nrAL Eihibitios 
07 Art, Scisncb, ako Mkcbaxics. 






^GLB THEATRE — Mixstrclst, CoVedt, BiTiii.KS«irB — 
, Meaara. Sherulaa and Mack, Mlas Kate Caatleton. 



taSAIYD OPBIlA-HOCSK.2-Usct.B ToM't Cabin— Mrs. G. 
C. Ueward and 0«orsia Minatreia. 



. ^TWPIC THBATRK.— Qraxd Motbltt ato Tarirtt 
KaxaaTAiaBKHT. 

ITATIOSAIj ACADRMT of DKStQS.— KxBlBmoi o» 
PAnmxoa. Day and evening. 



)rHSA?RR rOMigCE — TARiaTT KaTxmTAUiMum — 
Meaita. UarrUcan and Bart. 



pAa FRANCISCO MINSTRELS— MlxaTBBI,ST, PAXOsa, 

'Ain> Hr«xo Comicautibs. 



OESLLT k. LEON'S HALL.— Mutitsbut a»o CoKiOAfc. 



^ICKBBIXa HALL— Matinee at 1:30.— Prbstioisi- 
TATiuB by Commandear Caaaneave. 

CP'AdTaitlaementB for Tiis 'Weekly Tdou 
%uaat be banded in before 6 o'clock tbia eTeniits. 



ThiM morning Thb Daily Tuuss consists oj 
^tEH Paossl Hvoff nevsa-deaUr is hound to 
'^e h rer /he paper in its compiete form, and any 

finhare to da to shmdi be reported at the publir 

tatiot^ office. 




Seaator Blaine addressed a rery large 
0ndience last eveniajj; with excellent effect. 
vEBs speech was chiefly devoted to an ex- 
plaoation and exposure of the doings of the 
Bouse of Eepresentatives at its last 
■ession, showinj; the overwhelming inflaence 
exerted by the ex-Confederates in that 
l>ody, and the strenaoas efforts made to se- 
ieitre the repeal of the Federtd law for the 
iprotectioD of the suffrage. He was accorded 
^most enthosiaatic reception, and spoke 
^with all his accnatomed vigor. 



-rhat the system of terrorism which the 
4Koathern Democrats are employing to build 
IHjg a ** solid South" is not confined to. one 
St^te, or applied only to one race, private 
jfetters received by mercantile houses from 
their agents . and correspondents clearly 
prove. Politiciana are often led uncon- 
Bciously into exaggeration ; newspaper cor- 
respondents may be accused of partisan bias ; 
}>nt the 'testimony of resident merchants, 
wid of business men traveling through 
;khe South, with none but business objects in 
jTietw, IS surely trustworthy so far as it deals 
iirith positive knowledge. We have recently 
•eeu with what fury testimony of this nature 
b resented by the Charleston Democrats, 
(Who threaten to drive from the city any 
merchant or mechanic who transmits to the 
Korth evidence of the proscription which 
prevails. Extracts from private letters 
•re sent to us continually, all telling of the 
ing.Uance with which Northern business 
Men are watched, and of the ruin and 
'abu^^r that would atieud the authorship of 

Ithese exposures if discovered. The travel- 

fhijc representative of a Cincinnati firm re- 

|ve«U a similar condition of affairs in Missis- 
sippi, where the Northern man who dares to 
mvow himself a Republican is exposed to 
perilg scarcely less than those which pre- 
(vailed when the slave-power was supreme. 
p?he proscriptive spirit is also quite as 
^i>ad in Texas and other parts of the 
South. The battle to be fought out in the 
Bon th is, therefore, not simply a battle be- 
tween white and black, or, as the Democrats 
cbooee to state the case, between intelli- 
*;ence and ignorance. It is a ooDflict be- 
tween a brutal despotism and the common 
rights of American citizenship, and it ex- 
tends to the social and buaiaess relations of 

»very-day life as well as to the exercise of 
political privileges. 



The speech delivered by Mr. SrouoHTON 

lat Albany last night is, like his recent lat- 

jker, full of hard hits at the record of Mr. 
TrLDEic and |iis party, at the dishonesty of 
itheir canvass, aud at the policy which their 
elevation to power would inaugurate. Mr. 

TiLDElf's connection with the election 

frauds in this City in 1868 is presented 

truly, and as part of the evidence which 

Identifies him with the Tammany Ring in 

;^^the hey-day of its power. His double- 

&cad and cowardly Bondact in reference to 
the rebellion is exposed as a natural prelim- 
inary to the disingenuous tactics he is em- 
ploying in this campaign, and to the ulte- 
rior purpMes of the Southern section of 
his party, with which he is in close fellow- 
ship, and whose disturbing plans would 
have in him an abettor and a friend. The 
duty of the Gc»vemment to protect South- 
ern citizens of either race in the exercise of 

their rights and privileges is placed by Mr. 

SlOUGHTON on impregnable ground, and 
the Democratic outcry which the prospect 
of a performance of this duty has called 
forth is used adroitly, but with perfect fair- 
ness, to indioate the ill-ooncealed hostility 
of the SotKthem leaders to Federal author- 
ity, and "the troubles which might be ex- 
ipeoted tq( follow their success. 



man should be "defamed" the moment he 

became a candidate for office ; but 

the underlying quMtiou— whether a 

party of "relbmi" sboiild nominate for 

high office a man who needs to be reformed 

— he entirely ignored. If Mr. TiLDEV can 
be satisfied with this sort of apology we 

Lave no leaaon to complaia. In a criminal 

court, character is an element which jorora 

take into account when evidence conflictf^, 
or of which the Judfje takes cognizance iu 
passing sentence. It is valueless as against 
conclusive proofs of guilt. Wo beg to re- 
mind Mr. Kkrnak, therefore, that instead 
of shedding crocodile's tears over his dead 
friend Tilden, and bewailing the " demor- 
alization of the press" because it ar- 
raigns that functionary at the bar of 
public opinioib, he should declare plainly 
whether a perjurer and cheat is fit to be 
even a Democratic President. Professions 
of sympathy and confidence are, in a case 

like this, of no avail. We want to know 

what Mr. Kerxan thinks of Mr. Tildkn's 
false oaths, of his withholding taxes due the 
Government, of his abuse of trust in railroad 
matters, of the Brady's Bend swindle, and 
of the various other transactions which 
should enter into every candid man's mind 
in judging of Mr. Tildex's pretensions as a 
reformer. When Mr. Kernan declares him- 
self on these points we shall be ready to 

discuss with him the functions and the 
moral responsibility of the press. 



A nice regard for public financial obliga- 
tions is not a characteristic of the Southern 
States or municipalities. They have no 

objection to the maintenance of credit wheu 
the burdens entailed are not inconvenient ; 
but they have a chronic habit of leaving 
public creditors in the lurch when repudia- 
tion carries with it some temporjiry advan- 
tage. In severaFbf the States, the Demo- 
crats signalized their restoration to power 
by allowing State indebtedness to rnn into 
default and then compelling the holders of 
securities to submit to a scaling process, 
with total repudiation as the alternative. 
We have seen this iu Alabanla, where the 
total wiping out of a portion of the 
outstanding indebtedness, and a par- 
tial confiscation of the remainder, 
is hailed as a measure of relief; 
in Georgia, wheje ono' Legislature 
summarily repudiated obligations incurred 

under the authority of a previous Legisla- 
ture ; in Tennessee, where default was 
made long ago, and where the demagogues 
bid against each other in favor of the re- 
duction of taxation to a point that would 
render the payment of interest or principal 
impossible ; in Virginia, where holders of 

bonds were fleeced under the guise of fund- 
ing",- where contributions to the sinking 
fund have been suspended, and the debt 
generally is in the worst possible condition 
this side of repudiation. Now comes that 
zealous Tildeuite sheet, the Mobile Begiater, 
with a proposal to apply to local improve- 
ments money set aside for the city's credit- 
ors, and a bold declaration of the principle 
that in the disposal of the proceeds of 
taxes the taX'^ayer alone is entitled to con- 
sideration, aiid the creditors most patiently 
await his pleasure. These are suggestive 
illustrations of the way in which the na- 
tion's faith would be protected if the Demo- 
crats were once more absolute in Wash- 
ington. ^^_^_^^^_^.^___ 

We are requested to call the attention of 
our New-Jersey readers to the fact that the 
Election law of that State requires a regisss. 
tration of voters in every city having a pop- 
ulation of ten thousand or moro. To-day is 
the first day for registry. We trust that 
there will be no neglect in this important 
matter by Republicans. A registration law, 
properly enforced, is a decided protection to 
honest suffrage, and it should be seen to that 
all our voters comply with it, and that the 
opportunity it presents for preventing ille- 
gal voting is fully and fairly used. 



The Tilden " Bureau " is engaged in 
proving how just is the ancient adage, " a 
guilty conscience needs no accuser." It has 
sent editorials as far west as Indiana, and 
as far south as New-Orleans, warning the 
faithful to look out for disgraceful revela- 
tions by Tweed concerning Tilden. It 
18 to make these that Tweed haf been 
obtained from Spain. " The great crimi- 
nal," declares one of these editorials, " was 
amenable only to the State of New-York. 

But it was the United States which, only 

since the St. Louis Convention, undertook 
the enterprise of his recapture." '' The 
Administration was in a situation, 
hy condoning [,»io'\ outrages on American 
citizens, to bargain with Spain, behind 
Tilpen's back for the surrender of Tweed 
without treaty." The Bureau editorial then 
goes on to say that the arrangement is for 
Tweed to " squeal" on Tildes, and receive 
a pardon from G«v. Morgan in case the 
latter is elected. "For this," adds the 
Bureau, " an old man in Tweed's situation, 
moral and material, cannot be supposed to 
hesitate out of scruples of conscience, any 
more than a hound hesitates when he sees a 

rabbit." Mr. Tilden, we suppose, is the rab- 
bit ; the comparison is not bad. The Bureau 
concludes in this mysterious manner: " He 
may have gotten religion, but if not, most 
men would say ho would be a great fool not 
to do it, as it would not blacken him much 
to speak of." Which of the two great 
Democrats this refers to we do not know, 

but it is true of either. Meanwhile we 
accept the Bureau's warninjt : " Be not sur- 
prised, therefore, at what you may hear." 
We shall not be, nor, apparently, will the 
Bureau, however bad the news may bo. 



S«nalK>r Kkrn AN, addressing a Democratic 
aneetlng at Rochester, adopted the canting 
•train which is in vogue among Democratic 
•pea>^erB when allusion is made to Mr. Til- 
. S>U( and th* aoousations prefsTred against 
ihbft. 11 WM tezxiUe. he thonoht. that • 



A VERT SIMPLE QUESTION. 
If there be one issue in the pending cam- 
paign as to which the good faith of the two 
parties is more important than as to any 
Other, it is the financial issae. In this 
matter good faith is the absolute e8.3ential 
for successful treatment. Unfortunately, 
the Republican Party is not entirely blame- 
less with reference to it. Its record is not 
perfectly clean. It furnished a certain num- 
ber of advocates to the wildaheme for " pay- 
ing" the bonds in legal-tender notes, which 
Was simply a form of repudiation, because 
an ieterest-bearing bond cannot be " paid" 
with a non-interest-bearing note. The Re- 
publicam Party has also contributed a cer- 
tain numbtr of votes to the various inflation 
measures proposed since the close of the 
war, and these measures also have beea 
from first to last, only badly-concealed de- 
vices for repudiation. It was a Republicaa 
Administration, moreover, which tolerated 
the Derniflloua notion that legal tenders 



once paid Were still a "reserve" and capa- 
ble of being legally reissued, and it was a 

Republican Congress which formally rati- 
fied a.ud condoned the aj>pllcatioii of this 

fatal error in the crisis of 1873. 

But a party must be judged by what a 
majority of its members think and do, and 

not by what a minority may sustain, and 

by this perfectly simple and just ^test the 

Republican Party is shown to be trust- 
worthy, and the Democratic P.irty utterly 
unreliable, on the financial issue. If a 
minority of the Republican Party was led 
away by the delusion of paying the bonds 
in legal tenders, a majority so strong as to 
control the party heartily condemned that 
mischievous idea, and stamped it out 

iu the elections of 1868— the most 

important in some regards «that the 
United States have ever held. If, again, 
a minority of Reuublican Representatives 
has been found from time to time supporting 

the various inflation projects, a majority has 

almost invai'iably been on the other side, 
while the President of their choice has 
stood like a rock against all the assaults of 
the inflationists and repudiators. Gen. 
Grant, whom it is fashionable just now to 
decry, has won many laurels of which his 
country will be proud long after he has 

passed away, but none of them were earned 
by more honorable service than that which 

he rendered the country when he inter- 
posed his veto to save it from the disaster 

and disgrace of inflation. That act, too, 

let it be remembered, awoke a hearty and 
general response in the Republican Party, 
and revealed to its own leaders the sub- 
stantial strength of sound financial j)rinci- 
ples in the ranks of their followers. Since 
its performance there has been no doubt pf 
the position of the party and there can bte 
none henceforward. 

What, on the other hand, is the history 
of the Democratic Party on this question? 
It is the exact reverse of that of the Repub- 
lican Party. It is the history of a minor- 
ity strong in desire, but weak in numbers 
and purpose, to force sound doctrines upon a 

majority which /ejected aud despised them. 
In the momentous struggle of 1868, to which 
we have referred, the Democratic Party was 
squarely arrayed on the side of repudiation, 
and had it noj; been for the firmness of the 
mass of Republicans, would have plunged 
the country Into an abyss of discredit from 
which only long years of suffering could 
have rescued it. The measures ot inflation, 
to which, also, we have made reference, and 
which received the support of a Republican 
minority only, in nearly every instance, 
were sustained almost uniformly by the 
majority of Democrats, and it is particularly 

noteworthy that while the Republican or- 
ganization has steadily passed more and 

more into the hands of friends of sound 
money, the Democratic organization has 
gone more and more completely into the 
hands of the extremest and most fanatical 
advocates of irredeemable paper currency. 
As we have frainkly conceded tiie errors of 
a portion of the Republicans, and the dan- 
gers with which these have threatened the 
party in the past, so we as frankly recog- 
nize the sincere devotion of a portion of the 
Democrats to sound financial principles. 
But the fact, which no one can ignore, is 
that the sound-money Democrats have for 
a long time been losiag their hold on their 
party, and their position is incalculably 
weaker to-day than it ever was before. They 
have lacked both the courage and the sup- 
port in their own party to enable them to 
carry out their views. When Senator 
Fessenden greeted the proposition to pay 
the bonds in legal tenders with the ringing 
cry, " Repudiate the repudiators," his party 
rallied to the summons and carried out the 
policy so bravely announced. Bat if the 
hard-money men in the Democratic Party 
had undertaken to really repudiate the re- 
pudiators, they would have been driven out 
of the camp. All that they could do was to 
temporize with the opponents of their ideas, 
aud seek to make the party professions ap- 
pear to be what the party convictions would 
not justify. 

It is this policy, never so conspicuous as 
to-day, that stamps the Democratic atti- 
tude toward the finances with bad faith. 
The declarations of fidelity to sound money 
to be found in their platforms are ambig- 
uous, insincere, and inconsistent with the 
actual course and purpose of the party. If 
they were not unmeaning,they could not be 
in the platforms. The party would not tol- 
erate explicit and reliable declarations, be- 
cause it has no intention of carrying them 
out. The choice of the hard-money 
men lay between a dubious and worthless 
financial plank and one that should reflect 
the undoubted inflation views of the party. 
They preferred the former, and even then 
were obhged to place on their national 
ticket one of the most offensive and irra- 
tional inflationists, and to allow Mr. Tilden 
to concede the repudiation of the Redemp- 
tion act. What could be more complete 
proof of the absence of good faith in the 
party, and of its entire incapacity to 
maintain the national honor, or bring 
the country to the resumption of specie 

payments? The financial question lies in a 

nutshell. It is as simple as the question of 
the maintenauoe^'o*- business credit by a 
merchant. The point at isspe is, will the 
Government redeem its promises. There is 
no doubt of its ability to do so by processes 
that involve no shock to business and no 
undue strain on the resources of the eoun- 
tary. But it can no more be done by the 

Democratic Party, whose masses are reck- 
lessly bent on the opposite course, than the 
business obligations of a house could be met 
by a firm, the majority of whose members 
were determined to cheat their creditors. 



-% 



*^ V." '^ 



NEW-YORK AND THE RAILWAY WAR. 

There has long been a tendency among 

New-York merchants to regard th^ contests 

between the trunk lines from the sea-buard 

to the grain-growiugi^West as something iu 

w^hich they have no local interest. The 

word " local " seems to most New-Yorkers a 

small word, which they do not like to use in 
connection with a city so great as ours. 
They are inclined to look with amused 
inditfereuce upon the attachment of the 

citizens of Boston, Philadelphia, and Balti- 
more to the places of their residence and 
business, aud to consider as "provincial" 
the schomoi which the people of these cities 
enter into so heartily to draw huainess from 
this port. This feeling ifj natural, and, to a 
certain extent, proper ; but it may be carried 
too for. There is no fact pet'tar established 
in our recent commercial {history than that 
the three oriucipal porits on the Atluu- 



"■rX^-r 'SSf 



tic coast other than New-York have made 
greater relative progress in trade than 

New- York has made, and that this progress 

has been, to a very considerable extent, at 

the expense of New-York. It is equally 

well established that this fact is due to a 
spirit of co-operation between the business 

men of those ports and the railways which 

bring them the products of the West — a 

spirit which has had practical expression in 

many ways, and especially in the energetic 
moral support given to these railway com- 
panies in their struggle with the trunk line 

which ends ih this City. This is particular- 
ly true of Philadelphia and Baltimore. 

In a reccBt address of President Garrett, 
of the Baltimore and Ohio line — a gentle- 
man who combines the plausibility of a pol- 
itician with the astuteness of a railway 
manager — particular stress was laid on the 
golden fruit which his city and Philadel- 
phia were drawing, and would continue to 

draw, from a vigorous opposition to the 

schedule of rates propoaed by the New- 
York Central Railroad Company. These 
rates, as we understand, are simply 
those that are charged by the 
other lines. In other words, the Central 
managers decline to make concessions to 
Baltimore and Philadelphia because they 

are nearer the West, or to Boston because 
it is more distant. They insist that New- 
York is entitled to all the advantage which 
can ■Jte derived from the superior facilities — 

the four track road, the excellent equip- 
ment, the complete system, and the com- 
mand of capital — supplied by the Central. 
In doing so we do not for a moment suppose 
that these managers are actuated Solply by 
public spirit. On the contrary, they 
are msplred by a conviction of 
their own interests; but their con- 
ception of those interests is an inteHi- 
eent one. They believe that they can serve 
both themselves and New- York by the pol- 
icy which they are pursuing. Wherein are 
they incorrect? If they have brought 
their road to such a-stage of efficiency that 
it is no longer a mere question of distance ; 
if they are able to carry freight over longer 
distances for less money than other roads, 
why is it not for the interest of New- York 
City that they should do so ? On the other 
hand, it would be absurd for the New- York 
Central Compahy to claim that the mer- 
chants of New- York should approve their 
course out of a feeling at affection or grati- 
tude toward it. Sentimentalism has no 
place in business. AH that the Central 
Company can fairly ask is that the mer- 
chants of New-York i^aU consider its 
policy candidly, and give it support so far as 
it clearly serves the best interests of the 
City. To such support^ it seeiijs to us, the 
company is fairly entitled. 

Mr. Garrrti is of the opinion that the 
contest now goin^ on«Will help Baltimore 
the more the longer it lasts, and that his 
own line can maintain it indefinitely and 
continue its ten pdr cent, dividends to the 
last. If that be the oase> ll*e cannot see that 
he need to berate the New-York Central 
for its course. Indeed, the policy of the 
Central appears to be to the Baltimore 
and Ohio a blessiUg in very thin disguise. 
If the trade of Baltimore steadily increases, 
and the dividends of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Road are sate, then Mr. Garrett is 
guilty ot gross inconsistency in blaming the 
Central for refusing his demands. The 
duty of all the roads involved is clear 
enough. No one of them has a right in a 
fight «f this kiad to inflict serious and 
lasting injury on its stockholders ; but 
within that limit each road has a 
right to get all ther traffic it can, and 
the more it gets the better for the city 
it feeds. Mr. Vice President Vander- 
BiLT has recently declared officially that 
the dividends of his road are being paid, 
and will conticue to be paid, out of its net 
earnings. That being the case — and the 
shareholders, who are the chief parties in 
interest, show no disposition to doubt it — 
it is clearly for the interest of New-York 
City that the Central shall control all the 
business it can. 

Whether the policy of the Central is- one 
that can be maintained indefinitely is a 
question which we . canaot undertake to 
determine. If it can carry freight at a rate 
which leaves no margin of working profit 
for its competitors, it will win. That mar- 
gin need boc cover interest and dividends 
on the debt and stock of the present com- 
peting «orporation8. It may be that the 
contest should ruin these corporations, and 
that their successors, with a smaller demand 
for profits, might continue the struggle. 
But this is too large and too refmote a ques- 
tion to be discussed here and now. What 
it is pertinent to remember is that the City 
of New- York has everything to gain and 
nothing to lose from the success of the Cen- 
tral so long as that road does not cripple 
itself iu the fight. That such a misfortune 
shall be avoided is a care for the share- 
holders. In the meantime the moral sup- 
port of the merchants of the City is cer- 
tainly due to the road. 



THE TRANSVAAL REPUBLIC. 

The belief may have gained acceptance, 

of late years, from the tone the English 
press occasionally assumes toward the older 
dependencies and from the comparative in- 
frequency of wars Avith barbarous nations, 
that Great Britain, as Joshua FuUaiove might 
say, is "cool on colonies." But that om- 
nivorous power -Jftfia discovered a process of 
accretion less noisy than invasion and con- 
quest and quite as successful in gratifying 
the national appetite for territory. She seems 
to have taken a leaf from our book, aud 
" annexation" is now her favorite mode of 
picking up " unconsidered trifles" in the 
way ot islands and fragments ot continents. 
The intervals in the announcemeirts from 
Asia of Khanates and other subdivisions 
annexed to the territories ot the Empress of 
India, have been fjjled Avith similar informa- 
tion from Oceauica aud Afiica, with a regu- 
larity apparently designed to divide atten- 
tion. One or two morsels of South 
Africa have- for many years., been 
much coveted, and the pretexts^^under 
which possession of them has been 
sought are suspiciously tainted with the 

logic of the wolf In his negotiations with 
the lamb in the fable. The' small but proud 
republics of the Boers — the Orange Free 
State and the Transvaal Republic — have 
had more than one controversy with Eng- 
land for the maintenance of independent 
existence. These have generally terminated 
in the triumph of the strong power, and 
the removal of 'the main body of the Boers 
. from tho abiorbisd tenit'orv to uew soil. 



"^ 



where they have chosen to begin national 
life anew, with all the vicissitudes of pioneer 

existence among savage and w.arllke tribes, 
rather than be reduced to the state ot mere 

colonies. It is not half a century since 

they wore plainly told by Gen. Napikr that 

independent republics would not be tol- 
erated so near the British provinces. It 
seems probable. In the light of the recent 

advices from South Africa, that one, at 

least, of the republics of the " emigrant 
Boers" may be compelled to relinquish the 
cherished idea of antonomv. 

It is urged with some degree cf justice by 
the British authorities that there exists be- 
tween the Republics of the Boers and the 
colonies a community of interests, as op- 
posed to the fierce and warlike native 

tribes, which is ignored while no danger 
threatens, but is assumed to be fully op- 
erative when the perils of war are present. 
This sentiment of common advantage 

and common danger has been made the ba- 
sis for proposing a confederatiou of all the 

states and colonies of South Africa, with a 
view to the establishment of a uniform pol- 
icy in the treatment of the natives. This 
scheme of Lord Carnarvon has not been 
wholly acceptable to the colonies, thiem- 
selves, whose local jealousies du- 
ring the long peace they have enjoyed 

have overriddsu the fears iu which 
the project, to some extent, was 
conceived. The Transvaal Republic refused 

emphatically ts entertain the proposition 

when submitted ; but her temper seems to 
have undergone a radical change since, it 
the recent advices are to bo believed. From 
these it appears that not only was British 
assistance solicited, but that hitherto much- 
suspected power was invited to "take over" 
the Republic bodily. 

The events which have brought the Re- 
public into this humiliating position can be 
briefly stated. The Government of the Re- 
public Bot long ago laid claim to territory 
lying beyond their eastern boundary, be- 
tween them aud the coast, and occupied by 
three powerful Kaffir tribes, the Zulus, the 
Amazwazies, and the tribe ot Skcocont, who 
bar the route of tho Boers to the sea. 
The Zulu King, Cetewayo, exercises 
a kind of suzerainty over the others. The 
Boers formed an alliance with the Amaz- 
wazies in an invasion of the territory of 
SucocoNijthe ambitious Amazwazies^opiug 
m turn to secure the aid of the Republic iu 
throwing off the yoke of Cetewayo. 
The annexation of territory by the 
Boers means the virtual expulsion 
of the natives. Although adopting 
a republican- form of government for them- 
selves, the Boers have been very niggardly 
of privileges to the Kaffirs living within 
their borders. No Kaffir is permitted to 
carry arras, to exercise constitutional rights, 
or to own land in the Transvaal, and the 
consequence is that the natives have for- 
saken every fresh district appropriated by 
the Reuublic and withdrawn beyond her 
frontiers. The pretension, therefore, to 
the territory of Secoconi was op- 
posed with vigori-^=^l» invasion was suc- 
cessful in the early stage, and several 
strongholds were captured, it would seem, 
mainly through the valor of the Amazwazi 
allies, who were also animated by an old 
feud between their Chief and Secoconi. The 
Amazwazies grew weary of doing all the 
fighting, while the Boers secured aU the 
plunder, and they withdrew from the alli- 
ance, but were alter ward prevailed on to 
rejoin the Boers. The indications now are, 
however, that they again withdrew, and 
the Boers, left to themselves, suffered 
ignominious defeat at the hands oi 
Secoco.nl Their position is rendered still 
more perilous in the last advices from South 
Africa, for the Zulu King is said to threat- 
en thefr existence with an army of forty 
thousand warriors. This is not an improb- 
able force, for Cetewayo is extremely popu- 
lar throughout the Kaffir tribes, who regard 
him as the champion of native rights as 
against European encroachment. 

The English authorities were keenly alive 
to the danger of a general Kaffir war, and 
warned President Buroers, of the Trans- 
vaal Republic, of the peril in which he 
placed the entire white population by his 
aggressive policy. The colonies were not 
free from apprehension of such a result, for 
the bigns of discontent were visible in the 
sudden withdrawal of natives and half- 
breeds employed as servants and laborers 

by farmers and others, some with the avowed 

intention of rejoining their tribes for war. 
The frankness of these admissions wa 
usually proportionate' to the attachment for 
the employer or the stage of advancement 
in civilization of the native. Afready naval 
reinforcements have been sent to the Cape 
of Good Hope, but whether with the view 
to intervention between the Boers and the 
natives or merely to protect the colonies, 
does not yet appear. While there is much 
grumbling in England over the pros- 
pect of " taking over " a lively 
Kaffir war as well as the Republic, 
the seBtiment is not unfavorable to 
intervention and assistance, for it is now as- 
sumed that the Boers are not in a position 

to reject any conditions that may be at- 
tached to the service to be rendered. There 
is even a feeling of resentment manifested 
towards these people who have so long re- 
sisted both the hostile and friendly ap- 
proaches of British diplomacy, and it is 
plainly intimated in some of the English 
journals that the first and chief condition of 
assistance will be that the independent ex- 
istence of the Transvaal Republic shall be 
surrendered and the colonial condition as- 
sumed. __^____________«_ 

A MYSTERY. 
Next Sunday morning Mr. Talmage's 
congiegation will listen in vain for the 
familiar pounding of the pulpit wherewith 
their powerful Pastor is accustomed to call 
them to witness the weekly whirlwind of 

his eloquent arms and legs. Ou that day 

Mr. TalmaGK will rest his muscles by 

abstaining from active preaching. Whether 

he has sprained his ankle or dislocated a 
wrist, or snftered some other injury that 
interferes with the easy performance of his 
sermons, we are not told. All the informa- 
tion he has given us is the simple announce- 
ment that he wiU not perform a sermon 
next Sunday, and that his place at the 
comic desk will be taken by Mr. Tcppeb. 
who will read his poem on the "Immortality 
of the Soul." Lovers of athletic sports will 
therefore have to do without Talmage for 
one day. Of course, any man can stand on 
his head in his own house' next Sunday 
morninc. aud read one of Taj-mage's se> 



mons alond, while an assistant beats a targe 

tin pan. Ry pursuing this plan, A devoted 

follower of Talmaok can obtain almost as 
much pleasure and profit as can be obtained 

by attending Talmiok's personal preach- 

inc; but it requires practice as well as an 

unusual degree of muscular devotion. 

When wo attempt to conjecture Tal- 
mage's probable motive in substituting Mr. 
Tuppkr's mild poem for one of his own 

resonant sermonsj a vast field is open to us. 

Most peonle would imagine that if Tal- 
mage desired to obtain a day's relief from 
duty at the Tabernacle, he would ask one 
of Mr. Barnum's acrobats to exchange 
trapezes with him, or would induce an 
" end man" in some popular minstrel com- 
pany, to sound the warning tamborine or 
to rattle the cheerful bones for the edifica- 
tion of the Tabernacle congregation. But 
instead of so doing, he deliberately invites 
Mr. TuppEH, who, being not only a gentle- 
man, but also the least muscular poet in 
the language, is in these respects the .direct 

Opposite of Talmage, to feed his flock 
wita the milk of proverbial philosophy. 
Had Bradlaugh invited Mrs. Van Cott to ^ 
preside m hirf stead over a meeting of an 
atheistical society, he would not have done 
a more unaccountable thing than that 

which' Talmagk has just done. He must 

know that \Then his moral hearers find his 

pulpit occupied^ by a gentleman, they may 
possibly make comparisons unfavorable to 

Talmage, and may discover that they pre- 
fer decorous proverbs to vulgar and bpis- 

terous idiocy. It is clear that Talmage 
would not rUn this risk without a powerful 
motive, but what this motive can be is as 
yet hidden from us. 

Every one is, of course, familiar with the 
celebrated poem which Mr. Tuppkb pro- 
poses to read next Sunday. The beauty of 
its opening lines has rarely been surpassed : 
" Tbe soul ii immortal, bat the body it lUible to a 
varie'tT of fatal disordara. 
The onion dies and is eaten, bnt tbe aonl Uvea, 
^ and ii never tusd as so article ot diet 

Why is the aonl immortal t Cbiefly, becanss tt 

never dies. 
The horae-fly differeth from the canal-boat, and 

mortality la not tbe aame aa immortality." 

Profound truths like these, couched in 
language of wonderful lucidity and beauty, 
are surely unfitted for ears that have been 
attuned to the wild bray of Tau^ age. It is 
possible that, were Mr. Tuppkr to deliver 
them 'with one leg thrown over the pulpit, 
to intersperse them with occasional war- 
whoops, and to add to the end of every 
fourth line the popular chorus, " Whack, 
fal lal," he might be accepted as a partial 
substitute for Talmagb. But will Mr. TcP- 
PER consent to imitate Talmage's oratorical 

method T He is not as fnll of lungs as is the 
windy interior of Talmage, and hence he 

could not yell as loudly as the latter, no 

matter how axious he might be to please 
his audience. He is not a tall man, and it 
is doubtful if he could succeed iu throwing 
a leg over a pulpit built entirely with ref- 
erence to the length of Talmage's legs. 
Moreover, he is not a gymnast, and were 
he to try Talmage's favorite feat of bal- 
ancing himself on his abdomen in order to 
clutch hypothetical sinners from an imag- 
inary abyss in front of the pulpit, he would 
very likely topple over, and crush an aston- 
ished deacon iu his fall. Even if Mr. TUP- 
PER was physically able to emulate Tax- 
maok's style of eloquence, he would doubt- 
less refuse to do ^. He may not have a 
gigantic intellect, but he certainly is neither 
an acrobat nor a buffoon, and we may safely 
assume that he will deliver his poem with 
the placidity which is appropriate to it, and 
he •will refuse to mingle it with either vul- 
garity or blasphemy. 

In spite of Talmage's announcement, he 
may yet change his mind and refuse to risk 
Mr. TUPPER in his pulpit. If his arms and 
legs are capable of the intellectual process 
termed reflection, he must perceive that he 
has been somewhat hasty. If his people do 
not like >fr. Tdpper, they may feel that 
T^^^AGK has played an unfafr trick upon 
them by thrusting a gentleman into the 
pulpit ; while if they happen to like him, 
they may dismiss Talmage with the advice 
to go and bowl on the back fence, while 
they permanently install Mr. Tuppek i# his 
place. In either case, Talmage would be a 
loser, while in no event will he be benefited 

by using Mr. Tupper as Ms temporary 

substitute. If i he Is too ill to preach next 
Sunday, he can at least lie on the sofa in tke 
end of the pulpit and occasionally wave his 
legs in the sight of the congregation. To 
do this would be far wiser than to put his 
trust in Tuppbh, and to subsequently find 
that he had prepared the way for his own 
downfall. 



NOTES OF THE CAMPAIGN". 



Hayes, says the Toledo Blade, defeated the 
rebels ; Tildea detested tbe tax-oollactor. 

A prominent Indiana Republloan adds sm a 
postscript to a letter. " We are golne at 'em tgaiii." 

The Cincinnati Times calls for a Registry 
law ID Onto, to inolude not only cltiea of tbe "firat 
class," bnt of the teoond also. 

The peraiitence of Hon. H. W. Hilliard aa an 
indepondent Democratic candidate for Conf:raaa in 

Georttia is aa K^h and ▼ormwood to the Tlidenitea 

in that State. ** 

The Indianapolis Jounud apeaks warmly in 

pralaB of the eff-ctlveaeas of /ndge A- B. Sloanakar, 
ot Louisiana, on tbe atump In Indiana daring tbe 
late canvasi. Ho ia oomine to tbia State. 

The Repablicans of the Third District of Alar 
bama have nominated Col. William H. Betta for 
CoflKresa. In the Fiftb Dlatriotof the aame Sute 

Hen. i). B. Booth is the Bepablican candidate. 

The PouRhkeepaie HagU says that the 
DutchesB Coanty Democratic ConveBtlona were 

conspicaoos for the abaenoe ol Hon. .Tobn O. Whit*- 
house, Hon. Jacob B. Carpenter, and Hon. Charles 
Wheaton. 

Judge John Critoher has withdrawn aa an 
independent Democratic candidate fox Coogresa in 
the Plrat Dietriot of Virtjinia, two atraight partv 
candldateK, Republican and Demooratio, having en- 
tered the field. 

Ex-Senator H. V. M. Miller, of Georeia, has 
troubled the DemocraU by writing a letter approv- 
ini! the action of Dr. Felton in ranninx aa an Inde- 
pendent 'candidate for Consresa in the Seventh Dia- 
tricc of that State. 

Mr. William M. IVeed at least may be inter- 
ested in tbe vote of Tlgo Conuty, Ind. It waa: 
Kepnblican, 3,425 ; DemooraUc, 3,673 : Greenback, 
1,933. Demooratio plnraHt.v, SM8. Jadt:inii from 
the vote Tweed wonia find mora frieuda there 
than in tbe yigo acroaa the aea. 

The Montgomery Journal saya that the Ee- 
publicana of tbe First District of Alabama have 
nominated Col. W. W. D. Xn^er of Mobile for Con- 
Kreaa. Laat week it was repWted that the conven- 
tion indorsed the candidacy ot Mr. F. M. Brom- 
bare, wbe ia ninaiiig aa an indepeodeBt Democrat. 

The Parkersburg (West V«.) Timss, a Green- 
back paper, bat formerly Bepnbiioaa, ia srieved ar 
heart by the dishonesty Ot the Demoeratlo wins of 
(be QreeabMi Parur in tbat State. Xht Beoob- 



Iloao reemits. It saTS. voted Che Oraeabaek ttaka* 

booestij at the itteclseloo, bat tbt M Dsttoenti 

proved to be incurable, and it waa foand that ac 

pledcc* ol theirs could be reliod upon. 

Col. ft, w. Flournoy, ot MUsitsippi, hai 

written a letter to den.T that be hae cos* orer ts 
Tilden. He aafs: "Of all men, not exoeptinc Ba 

chiJisD and Van Baran, 1 look npoo Tildaa m tlit 

moat exceptional, nnworthr, and damnro>a osas 
that haa ever been preaented for the office <>f Preef 

dent, a man who e aoapoa an indictment for Mritij 

aimply by the etatate ot limitations." 

Hon- Tfaomaa Fiieh waa annoanoed to sptA 
m a Nevada town the other day, and thU is tbe way 
a local paper heralded him : " Ftiob'a talk ia Itka 
champagne, very pleaaant to Uke and Jost beady 
enoogh to makp everybody feel good, snd whoerar 
gets tall of it never seta over It. His flow ia per': 
petnal, and tbe more one g«ta of it the more he 
vanta. At timea there cosies a barat of eloqaeae* 

like tbe pop of %new buttle, and ever; llatenat i» 
anre to fill up. 

The New-Haven Journal bringa tbe gratify 

ing Bsaaraoce that reporta from all parta of Cona«e> 
ticnt indicate a greater amoaat of esthasiasa 
amonK the Repaohcana than was ever koown be- 
fore, sarpaaslne o-ren that witne«sed to the Un«ata 
campaiena. The boaeat and toyat people of tM 
State are tboronehly aroosed. and are determloed 
to do everytbinK m their power to redeem Conaee- 
ticat and place her six electoral votes to the credit 
ol Hare*, besides electing their eaadidates tot ftaitl 
and ConKresaiooal ofBoes. •.'^' 



AM US .MUSTS. 



MR. THOMAs' CO.'VCEBTS. 

The programme at Steinwav Hall, last «rea- 
Ibk, was divided into two parts, toe flrat ooitaiat. 

ing of miaeeilaneoaa mosic and tbe aecosd laciadiai 
the comi^iions interpreted at tbe openiBC of the 
Sxbibidjo lb PbiUdetphia. The faatare of ap«etal 
intereat of the first part waa aa aamirabie atebe*' 
tral performance of Liasi'a "PrMadee." Xhia 
work la ' nnqneationablr one ot the compoaet'a 
flneat achievementa, beeaoee melodioaa, vivid ia 
color, and, relatively, eieeedlngty statpU 
as an Ulnstrative tone-poeflL It was 
apleadidly rendered, yeaterday. by Mr. Tbeaiaa' 
men, and waa ao tbcvncbly aajoyed that 
any inquiry as to the expediency of repeadnc the 
whole ot it woold nnqaeationably hare bad a^ 
affirmative answer from tbe BndleBca. The aeloista 
of the concert were Mr. Timm and Mr. Whltaar. 
Mr. Timm's appearance on tbe platform aeams ta 
be a pleasant apeetacle for many local dilattonti, tu 

every now and then tbe seatlemaa aaaerta Ua ec 

istcDce. and ia welcomed back to ■u>den art bfa 
with real cordiiUtv. Qaite thirty yeare have («■• 
by since Mr. Tuam came te a wnM-ti..^ and hia retssB 
to the eoncert-room oarriea, no doabt, many ot Us 
hearets back to a period which it ie not on jUaaaat 
to occasiooally recall to their BiemoriaB. We caaaeC 
aapply any other reaeon for Mr. TinuB'a 
as bis execntion of Chopin wonld be searealy 
emotional and Impressive If be were to cooat i 
while playing the compoeirions of tbe least fonaal 
and of one of the freshest and moat tender of noilacm 
writera. The second part of tbe procraBn% e^ 
wbiob, aa we observed some montba age. Mr. Back's 
cantata la atiU the moet conspieooos denoBC, JBtnr 
daoed Mr. Ttaomaa' choma. Ibu body, of whiak • 
great deal is expected, did net strike as aa 
partienlarly well-balanced, the grave voleee quite 
oatnnmbering tbe ntbara. As for cplrit and aiosty 
of shadiBK, tbeae qnaUties may be looked for later; 
at present, tbe chonu ainga — aa all ebrnvl bnHtaa tm 
not— both va. time and tnaa. Tbe inatirantloa pao- 
gramme, we may here note, wlU be repeated to- 
morrow, and, IB the firat part of the •Btertaiaaea^ 
Mr. George 'Werreoratb — a aew tenor— and Mc 
Franz Remmerta vnll be beard. A "Swedish pi9-' 
gramme" ia in reaerve for FridaT'e per fo r m ance. 



MBS. POMKROr'S DEBUT. 
Ura. Looiae M. Pomeroy laat evening etfjees^ 
her tkavA aa aa actteaa on the a ag) of the Tjaaiia 
Theatre- She appeared aa JvUsl, and >wak>^ai 
and siutaiaed Intereat in the ropreeentatlon by a 
performance in whieb intelligence, rasta, and cat- 
tore were thronghont diaeemible. It wooM bo 
idle te aav that Mra. Pomeroy 'a JuiUt raaka 
with tbe personaaoBs of three or ton 
well-known artiste, nor can it be ad- 
mitted, either, that yesterday'a efTart rereatad 
tbe lady's peasessioa of the divine spark which ae 
smdy can kindle and no amblUoB atnke. Mxa. 
Pomeroy lacka depth ef eentiment and power; hat 
face u but mildly expreasive of the atteager paa> 
aiona, and hex volee atterty aneqoal to the lUaetia- 
rion of their ioflaence. Yet her work plaaaed har 
hearers, and eometlmee imnreaaed theai- I» wbb 
clear that Mrs. Pomeroy nnderatood the rSie. that 
abe lelt tbe emodona of tbe pcraenagai aad thai 
ahe had fixed upon definite methods by whien to 
portray them. She had nndoabtedly b eea 
tanght tbe "bosineas" of Ju&sc: bat it 
bad been practiced ao aasidnaaaty that ita 
traneaetion waa aceesspliahed witfaoot efTsrt or 
gauehtris. The attempt Aerefbre, was a revanat 
one, and it having been preceded by JadickNia i 
paration, it waa entitled .to and it commasded i 
eral respect Unkke the disagreeable dftbotaatea 
who are now remembered chlefiv by thelx 
painted eara and their hberal vitapasttoa 
of writere inaensible to their cbarBia. Mas. 
Pomeroy's JuUct, while It wa^ftea (beWe aad eoa' 
orlesa, waa never once ridionlooa- The rasoU at 
tbe cfibut may therefore be snmmed aptaadeciaMia 
favorable to the lady'a bopea. JvKsl ia hayoad har 
reach, bnc there are nomeroaa eharaet«(e to wkiA 
it will be easy for her to adapt herself. Mra. Pom-' 

eroy is itill yooiut; iks is s nthtr prvpoMssilac 

blonde, with a laobile face, a tang froid wiiiah im 
bappUr Bot akin to boldness of manner, and, w« 
fchoald opine, exceptional persevaranoa. A lady 
with ancb gltts and qaaU'les ts not oat of place in 
the Dtofeaaion she has cbeeen. and if MtB. Poa» 
roy's aspiradoBs do not repeatedly orerieap then- 
selves, she wiU have no oaase to regret 
her d6out ^ Her enpport, laat aight, wai 
paaaable. Mr.° M. V. Ltngbam portrayias iieaua 
with commendable earn es tn es s . ''Koaeo aad 
Jaliet " will be given thie evemngand to-aoROW, 
and, on Taareday, •' The Lady of Lyoas" will ba 
acted. We wjald adviae that, during these reprea- 
en rations, the theatre be heated; the Temprratora^ 
j<>srerdit.\ , snggesred an tinexpeeted dleeoveryoi 
tbe north-west paaaage in tba immediate vioiai^ 
of Funrteenth street and Sixth avenna. 



BRIKF MBNTION. ^ 
Mr. Max Strakosch departs for Canada to> 

day, nreparatory to giving a week of offoca la 

Toronto. 
A matm^e petfermanee will b« gtvaa at 

Cbickerlng Hall, to-day, by M. Caaeaear^ tot th* 

eapeoial delecution of lasidaat msBb«rs of ths dt» 

matie profession. 

"The Lottery of Lifs," with its aaimatsd 
Btorr and hlghly-iUoatrattve iattdeata, w«a hraoght 
oat at Wood'a Masenm, last evening. 

The Eagle Theatre, tbe Theatre CoBuqas, and 
the Olympic last e vemng iotoaed aew life late theii 
Uneral and ▼aried progxammes- 

Mr. Eben Plympton will support Kiss STsflsob 
during her a*proaohlng toor. ana Mr. Edwia V. Da 
iryse wUl aet aa the lady'a boslnaa 



COTTON CROt FBOSPSOTS. 
■WAsmKOTOK, Oot Ifi. — The reporto to tha 
Deptrtment of Agrtenltore indicate a redaetiea •( 
tbe condition of ootton dnriaf the paat Konth la 
the ten principal ootton States from aa average of 
0S.3 to 82.7. The October average of tbeee Ssatea 
was 88 in 1875 and TL4 la 1674. Thadeelinafag 
September is slight in Georgia, Florida, aad MJaia- 
sippi. greater in Looiaiana aad Arkaaaaa, aa4 
greatest in Alabama and Tenaeaaea. There iaa 
small advance in Xexaa. The flgtirea for tne coadi^ 
lion of Sratea are as fellows: North CaroliaiL S« ; 
South Carolina, 80 ; Georgia, 89 ; Flarlda, 80 > Ai* 
bama, do ; Misaisoippi, 83: Loaisiaaa. M; Texaa, 
01 ; Arkansas, 68 ; Tenn«a»a«. 91. Tae impairaaen* 
uf the crop pro«p«ct baa been caaaed by the eoai- 
noctial storm in Sonti CaruUna, divagbt and mat 
in Georsia. tha caterpillar In Florida and Alabama, 
the lH>ll-woriB in Arkauaaa, aad icoet ia Xenaaaaee. 
Tbe caterpillar ts ounflaed to the southerly oornoB 
of iheOalf Siatea. Iu depredations are m««t ee* 
Tere in Alabao-a. In moet of the inteeted aUtricie 
its reproduction waa too late to destroy more than 
tbe top crops. 

TBB Fast mail sssrics. 
PHXLABBLPHLa, Oct I6.— At a meetaag of th» 
Board of Trade to-aight the Committee ea lalaod 
Tranaporutiun presented a report relative to the 
Fast Mall aervice. The board aent qoeattraa to tbe 
merchants of the citr. to which repliee autiag «b»t 
the Fast ilM service Waa desirable were rewtvel. 
The committee recommBBd the board to ar^e ap la 
the special committee •PP"^*?*J«' ^'^Ji^^^^J!}?, 
suHleotthe propriety of eeUWf«hlag Shs »»»•»*»" 
service, if the arnvala aad departowa can be ar 
ranged at hoaia ta.hatt thawaatetf tae ew>M B al T T 



S^-'-Ji:. 




^-1^ '" 



"J.-^ 




51 b^" 



-t-^m ■ ■■ 







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\ UTEST Mm BY CABLE. 

♦ — 

TUBKErS CONCILIATORY NOTE. 

>:OMMENTS OF LEADING KUROPEAN JOUR- 
NALS niRBBON — PRINCB QORT8CHA- 
^t soft's CIRCtTLAR — RUSSIA DISPOSED TO 
' IKSIST ON A^ ARMISTICX — 8ERVIA WILL- 

=«4«r EfO TO ACCKPr—ENQLAND'S P081TI0N. 
j IxjUDON. Oct. 16. — Thto Ifmetto-^lay publisliea 
'lb« fall t«xt of the note in wliloh Turkey offered 
tbe lix months' armistioa, all the details of which 
l>»ve alreadr been telegraphed to the United States. 
The Paris correspondent of thKt paper commeDtias 
UitreoD, uya : " The note is conciliatory, sabmi»- 

■I've, and alinost humble." Tbe Times, in a Isadinc 
•dltorial artiele sari: " Tarke7 coald not possibly 
luva he«n more oonoillatorv. Tbe note Jadioionsly 

■bvtalas ftom dsoouncinz tbe foraieo ▼olantears as 
Xcvtao*. Toere is Dotbinj; in it at whicb Ratsia 
or any ot.ner povrer canld reasonablr take offen8e." 
The time* further «aya : "' The fact of Russia's 
haTinc raverted to the demands oriKinally made by 
JbiglaDd. would bei encoaragirg if we coald reeard 
tHth confidence tbe animns which prompted this 
<0onr8e." 
'A Paris dispatch says that the Tempt pablisbes a 
•TtTDiiiary, which it believes to be accurate, ot 
^rfuce Gortschalcoff's oiroolar totbe Russian repre- 
MBtstives abroad, in reply to Tnrker's oiTer of the 
nx Bontba' armiRiice. Prince Qortschakoff points 
oat that no durable peace coald proceed from the 
Tarkish proposal. Servia and lionteneKro coald 
Bot be expected to remain so long in a critical posi- 
tlon. He c<^no!adea with the statement that Rassia 
la disposed to insist upon an armistice of a mouth 
or six weeks, which micht be extended if the 
trorreas of nesotiations rendered it necessary. 

The Time*' Paris correspondent points to the fact 
Ikat this is tbe Brst time that Rnssia has clearly 
accepted solidarity with Servia and Mnnteneero. 
la advisinsc them to reject tbe Turkish proposl- 
tlona. ahe has accepted the rewonsibllity of anch 
':cfa3al. 

A Timtt dinpalch from Berlin, dated Sunday eren- 
^Ojt. annoaoces that the Rassian objections to 
Turkey's proposal are stated In a calm and argu- 
neatativetone, indicating a deslte for nesotiatien. 
There seems to t>e no daneer of an immediate col- 
llaion. 

The Petther Lloyd (newspaper) reports that M.. 
RisTira, tbe Seman Prime Minister, has informed 
til* Zoglish CoDAuI at Belgrade that Servia would 
OMMent to an armistice till Dec. 31. 

mw DttUy Kev>t has a apecial from Belgrade 

ifliich savs : " Servia is willing to accept the 

statu* quo, provided the Turks give guarantees for 

tbe proper covemment of Bosnia, but Servia wiU 

aot consent td any armisilce longer than Qec. 31. 

If tliat is refused now she does not bind herself to 

acoept ft at any f atare time. The prospect of an 

armi»t)ce or peace is not flattering." 

A dispatch trom Vienna ssys the semi-official 

-'Montag* Jievu*. commenting on the Porte's pro- 

p o sa l of the six months' armistice says : " The 

. anaistice is evidently too extended, but tbe greater 

pailoa implies the less, and the Porte has incon- 

testablj fta:fllled tbe reqairements of the powers. 

Anjhow the Tuikish proposal does away with all 

question of occapation, intervention, naval demon- 

Vntion. or ruptnre of diplomatic relations." 

Tbe Fall ilaU Gazette this aft(>rooon has a strong 

' - leading article ou Sassia's position. It says it be- 

llev«sa tbe Porte will anci oasht to regard tbe alter- 

tutive demand for a short anuistioe at the proposal 
of an almost undisgcisad belligerent seekine mili- 
tary adv^nta^e* ratber than of a mediator sincerely 

dMitlng peaee ; and as sacb will and ought to re- 
ject it. It i>eiievea it would be mere weakness on 
the part Of the other powers to admit Baasia's de> 
orasda. To arge the Porte to aocept these demands 

' la not only a hopeless course, but one whioh no in- 
te|>«ndent power of Earope oan adopt without loss 
■f Mlf-rupect, and without the risk of becoming the 

totA of diplematio trickery. It observes with 
profound regret that an opposite coarse is 
advocated in laaguage which is almost the language 
•f p«iuc [Ibis refers to tbe leading editorial in 
tke Tim49 uf this morning in relation to .the orisls.] 
Ibe I'M MaU OazetU says it does not see the ad- 
vaatase* of such a cuorae. It hopes the Ejgliab 
Goremment will withdraw trom diplomatic at- 
tempts which are too plainly exposed to frustration 
br disgolse i or enforced hoatility. It says if we 
withdraw from interierence at this point nothing 
wors'e can happen than if we go further into pour- 
parkra to hopelesa of good result It ia with an 
alaieet iaexpr*s>i^;9 shame that we read, and know 
"that all £arop« will read, the abject entreaty of 
out leading Jonmal to Prince Bismarck to save na 
aad all mankind A-om the terrible Muscovite. With 
what acorn will this be read, and how wall calcolat- 
•d la panic like this to restrain the Bassian war 
partv f Wo miv rely upon it that Prince Bismarck 
will do what be thinks giod for the empire In his 
keeping, and it mav bp le thinks Bjssia at war 
^with Turkey rather a i.V«irable eventoalitv- Rassia 
arast begin by fighting somebody and somewhere, 
if she ia to l>e shattered, aud t»e ns longer a menace 
in acraaj bate and posaible alliances against tbe 

Q«nnaii Empire. 

Tke national QgzetU, of Berlin, discussing the 
lefiBrecee to Germany in the I<i>ndon Timet this 
aoming, tayt the power of Germany neither gives 
bar the rieht nor imposes on her the duty of placing 
T»«r own p«Jice in jeopardy tor the advantaze of 
othen. Tbe North Oerman GautU says the Timet 
la lU article Ignores the exiatenoe of the alliance of 
tke three Imperial powers. 
-*TLoti>os, Oct. 17.— The Vienna eorrespondent of 
tbe i>tandard telegraphs that Austria has informed 
Servia and Montenegro of her acceptance of Tur- 
key's proposal for the long armistice. 

TKe Dailjf lelegrapk't Vienna correspondent saya 
It la believed tn.t the Czar favors peace, but it is 
^ iknuwa that the Empreaa and Czarewitch are 
•tiongly allied with tbe National Party and are ex- 
erting tbeir effirts to further its projects. 

The timet dispatch from Belgi-ade says the Ck)y- 
OBmeat states that 4 000 Cossacks arrived at Sla- 
dora laat weeV, bnnging 700 horses, and marched 
to Deligiad. A thooaand more were ex- 
pected to ' arrive yesterday. The Sossian 
Sovemment is concentrating troops In the Can- 
aaaos. The iuflax o\ Bassian soldisrs is assuming 
more aarlona prosortions. Many arrive in uniform 
with arms. The advent of 500 a day is not unasoal. 

The Bdriin dispatch to tbe Timet siys that Col. 
BetasbkufTs mission in behalf of Bnssia will ad- 
ittm* iUeU particalarly to the military party in tbe 
ABStrian Court, who advise making common caase 
vitta Rass i a, and introdncing tbe policy of conquest. 




^rT-^4!ff ^^ 1 •^='^*-f* t^fp^"' 



%^i ^ilt'pnmr^mro; 









■ '-,:.,~ . '- --.- -• -.*.-.-■■ ---J'-- ;;-'.i <*"! .% 



v-:?0 



^ 



Rnstiaa loan of 300,000,000 ronblea has been resolved 
upon at Livadia. 

London, Oct. 17.— The Standard't dispatch from 
Constantinople savs : " Tbere is great uneasiness 
here and little hope of averting war. Popular feel- 
ing against Roasia ia very bitter. Some warlike 
demonstration is expected on the occasion of tbe 
Bairam, which is the great annual Turkish festival 
beginning this week. The Turks now talk calmly 
of their determination to fight Russia siogle- 
bandad. They claim that they will have all the 
money neoassary to carry on tbe campaign." 

London, Oct. 17.— The Timet' Berlin special says 
after spending 20.000,000 roubles in tbe last throe 
months in attempting to maintain the nominal 
valoe of the paper currencv the St. Petersburg Na- 
tional Bxnk has avowed its inability to proceed 
with the operations, and declares the bills will no 
longer be paid in gold. It ia believed that the Ras- 
sian Government is trying to obtain a loan in Hol- 
land. 

TBE BRIT IS hi GRAIN MARKETS. 

WEEKLT REVIEW OF THE MARK LANE 
BTXPRESS. 

London, Oct. 16. — The Mark Lane Express, 
in its review of the British corn trade during the 
past week, saVs harvesting is still unflaishfid in 
the north, and the unsecared crops are suffering 
both ingrain and straw. There has been a slight 
imprevement in the quantity of grain marketed 
by farmers daring the week. bat the 
balk offered is still in an unsatisfactory 
condition. Only dry samples have met 
with any attention and these bave been rather 
bigbfr, presumably beoaase of tbe demand for flue 
grain for sowing purposes. Values do not appear 
to bave been raised by tbe prospect of war. 

Oar return of cranary stocks on tbe Ist of Octo- 
ber compared with that of July 1 shows that the 
gnantity of maize in granary is quadrupled. Wheat 
is increased bv rather over half. Flour is somewhat 
diminished. These stocks, though certainly large, 
flnght not, considering the recent and prospective 
large diminution of imports and the deficient home 
growth, to depress trade. They show only a mod- 
erate increase npon the corresponding period of last 
year. The large imports then arriving were ac- 
cnmulating week by week, whereas at present the 
draft is ratber ontot than into grannry. All things 
considered, the condition of trade is healthy, 
althoazb the large stocks and the difficulty 
of warehousing grain exercise an ioflaence 
adverse to holder.^. On tbe other band, 
no decline seems possible wbilo sbipments from 
abroad continue on tbe present moderate scale, and 
any political event of moment might cause some 
excitement, the countries concerned being im- 
portant grain producers. The local trade remains 
abont the same at last week, tbe^only increase be- 
ing a demand for Indian wheat, which millers 
thought freely. The floating cargo trade ruled very 
firm, with only moderate arrivals off the coast. 
Ratber mere attention bas been , paid to flnating 
cargoes. Ghirka wheat bas been held at full prices. 

MISCELLANEO UH FOREIGN NOTES. 

DISTRESS IN INDIA — FAILURE OF AN KNG- 
LISiI CORPORATION. 

London, Oct. 16. — A soecial dispatch to the 
Timet from Calcutta reports that distress prevails 
in tbeDeccanand Southern Mahratta because of 
the failure of the crops. Tbe Government have 
opened relief works. Scarcity is also expected in 
!Ekbandeiah and Nasaick. 

The Alexandra Palace Company has filed a peti- 
tion in bankruptcy. Tbe Alexandra Palace is a 
well-known place of amusement situated on Mas- 

well HiU. 

Renter's telegram from Madrid states that tne 
Bishop of Minorca bas issued a new circalar en- 
joining masters of primary schools not to admit tbe 
sons of Protestants and other dissenters. 



timate with the dangbrer of Baockns and was for- 
bidden the house. This rooming Myors called on 
Bacokaa aiid an altercation ensued. Shortly after- 
ward Myers shot the old man in his own yard, 
fourteen buckahot entering his body. Myers was 
arrested. 



THE HOSTILH INDIANS. 



BIOTIXG IN SOUTH CAROLINA. 



CONFLICT BETWEEN WHITES AND BLACKS 
AT CAINHOy, NEAR CHARLESTON — TWO 
WHITES KILLED AND FOURTEEN WOUND- 
ED — A BAND FROM CHARLESTON TO 
"RECOVER THE BODIK8." 

Charleston, Oct. 16.— The joint canvass of 
Charleston County by the Bemocrats and Republi- 
cans which bas been in progress for some days, bas 
resulted in a seiious collision at Gainboy, about nine 
miles from here. It bad been agreed that 
both whiles and blacks should attend tbe 
meeting without arms. Daring tbe speaking 
an altercation arose between two tndivilnals of op- 
posite parties. A shot having been fired by one of 
them, tbe negroes belonging to tbe State Militia, 
and comprising the maj >rity of the meeting, se- 
cured their mtiskets, wh.ch were secieted near by, 
and aimultaneouJy a volley was fired into tbe 
unarmed whites from busbcii skirting a neighbor- 
ing ravine. The whites being few in number 
and altogether unprepared to figni, retreated to the 
ateamer that had brougbt them from the city, out 
not before two of their number bad been killed, 
and foarteen wounded. The dead were left on the 
groand, in possession of the neirroes. Abouteighty 
armed whites left tbe city this evening for Cam- 
hoy, to recover the bodies, and to afford protection 
to the whites of that viciaity, who are in dread ot 
being attacked or burned out. 

OFEKAIIC MANAGERS SUED. 




xtEFORTS OF RENEWED FIGHTING. 
^ TURKISH ATTACK REPULSED BY THE SER- 
VIANS — A BATTLE IMPBNDINO AT JAVOR 
—DEATH OF A TURKISH COMMANDER. 
London, Oct. 16.— A Beater dispatch irom 
Selgrade sjys: "It ia generally believed here and 
tiDeligrad that the Turks will break tbrouijh tbe 
tiaeof the Drina upon wbioh they have t)een con- 
tlansily making attacks daring the last few days. 
Teaterday the Turks attacked the Servian position 
at LJnbowJi for an hours. Tbe attack was re- 
paise4 by the Servians. The ServUn General No- 
voaaczoff baa telegraphed to head-qaarters announc- 
la^ that a battle is imoending at Javor. An armis- 
tice is considered impossible." 
:^^ A dispatcii from Ragusa says that Dervish Pasha 
■^^'^.■hKtiaz received reioforoemeats succeeded in re- 
;pa(liaK the attack on Podgoritza, which was com 
riienced t>y five battalions ot Montenegrins on the 
'^i'iXth inst 
, I>)elaleddin Pasha, commander of a division of 
Turkiab troops under Monkhtar Pasha, has died of 
Vonnda received in action. 

; FRESH COMPLICATIONS. 

JPOPULAR demons: RATIONS IN ATHENS IN 
»AV0B OtP WARUKE PREPARATIONS — 
THBORECIAN AUMT PLACED ON A WAR 

rOGTISrO — THE TURKS TALK OF FIOHT- 

IHO RUSSIA SINGLE-HANDED. 

LoHDOH, Oct 16,— A dispatoh to Beuter'a 
Telegram Company Irom Athens, reports that grrat 
popular demonstrations continue to be made in 
favor of warlike preparations. 
• Tbe Vienna correspondent of tbe Paris Temps 
(Aports that the King of the Hellenea, in conversa- 
aon with Count Andrasty, declared that while he 
tealred p^aoe ha felt compelled to pat the Army of 
Gnaeoe on a war footing, iafvlaw of the critical state 
of aiialrs, and especially of tb* BMMllsation of tho 
Koamanian Army. ., jA^'- ' 

A Vianaa dispatoh aaya ffaa* tba TagKatf aa- 
Bouuaaa BotitlTaly tiwt th* |MM of a Mtiimal 



MISS CLARA LOUISE KELLOGG AND C. D. HESS 

IN TROUBLE, 

Sf>eeial Ditvatch to tne Neto- fork Timig. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 16. — Miss Clara Louise 

Eellogi and C. O. Hess, iraveling as the English 

Opera Company, had a Sberitt's summons served up 

ou them while encaged in the performance of "Lucia 

di Lammermoor" at the Academy of Music this 

eveuiog. This U notice of a aait to be brought by 

some twenty-flve peraens who aver tbaL the; 
wcro engaged a» the cborua of tbe opera 
Company, aud were sammarlly discharged. It 
seems that about the 17th ' of Angusl last one 
Arthur Tbamma came here as tbe agent of Mr, C. 
D. Hess, and eagaged about sixty persons to act as 
cboros singers lor the operas lor tbe season of 1876-7. 
Written contracts were had, and in some cases 
individual contracts were made, but the majority 
of tbe singers signed a paper binding themselves 
to sing wiih no other troupe. .JUnJast-Saturday, it 
is alleged, Mr. Thamms gave notice to all but eight 
or ten persons that tbeir services would not be needed 
luaitiug as an excuse tbat it was not thought the 
season would be g >od eooagb to warrant them in 
having Euch a large chorua. The contracts guaran- 
teed to the choristers pay for at least four nights in 
a week, at the rate of $4 per night, tbe season-to 
commence this evening. As a rrsalt of this sudden 
termination ot their engagements many uf tbe 
cboriu are left witUont muni-y and deeply in debt. 
Cue >oung iaiiy resigned her position lu ttie Church 
01 the Immactilate Conception, on the strength ot the 
engagement ; several guutlemen came from distauc 
parts of the countrjr in Auixast and bave paid their 
board here since, I'orsakiug tbeir business, and all 
attended renearsai I hrce times a day, each paying 
for their own masic ana their pro rata share of 
expenses for the rent uf the hall at Sixth and Arch 
streets, wbere they praoticud. It is alleged tbat 
Mr, Tbamma kept them together under the most 
profuse promises, ana even last week would not 
hear uf any uf tbe company going elsewhere. After 
being disposed of in this manner the m umbers of 
the cnorua engaged Bon. JoUu G^furth as counsel, 
and suit will be commonoed at once. It will not in- 
terfere With the Company's engagements, as Mias 
Kell gg aud Mr. Hess are proviueU with bail for a.l 
the suits. ^^^^^^ 

THE OHHKHMAN CASE. 
Boston, Oct. 16.— The Herald to-night says 
that further investigation of the antecedents of 
Mrs. Chessman discloses the fact that she is tbe 
same person who called herself Cora Hey wood, and 
was formerly a publicly known olalrvoTaot. The 
Blancbards, of Lynu, say that her only conaectiuu 
with tiiem WHS oi a ousineds character, they having 
boarded her child while she was in Baston. 



FOROED LETTER OF CHEDIX AND DRAFTS 
Mllwackee, Oot. 16,— The Firet National 
Bantc of this city baa been advised tbat a forged 
letter of credit and forged drafts purporting to be 
drawn by it on tbe American Exchange Bank of 
Kew-York have been offered at Memphis. 

HEAYT ROBBEMI IN MOISTREAL. 
Montreal, Oct. 16.— Lazarus' pawn-broker 
ahop, on Notre Dame street, was entered by burg- 
lars last night Jewelry and diamonds to the 
value ut 930,000 were stolen. No clue has been ob- 
tained as to the robbers or the buoiy. 



THE BLACK HILLS TRKATY SIGNED BY THE 
INDIANS AT STANDING ROCK — THE EX- 
PEDITION PROM FORT LARAMIE. 
St. Paul, Oct. 16. — The Pioneer- Prets special 
from Bismarck, »ays tbe Indians at Standing Rock 
signed the treaty relinquishing tbe Black Hills on 

"Wednesday. The treaty .was so far modified aa not 
to insist on their removal to the Indian Territory. 
TbeiToops Intended for the expedition go Into 
camp to-morrow, and will probably leave abont 
Weaoesday. Gen. Starsea is on tbe way to Join hia 
regiment, and will probably command the expe- 
dition unlets Geo. Terry goes in person. 

THE WEATHER. 

PROBABILITIES. 
Washington, Oct. 17—1 A. M.— J^br the Mid- 
dle and Eastern Statet, falling followed by rising bar- 
ometer, fresh and britk south-west or westerly winds, 
warmer, clear, or partly cloudy weather, and possibly 
occasional raint in Northern Ne^o-York and Northern 
New-England. 

IN THIS CITY. 

The following record shows the changea 
in the temperatnro for the past twenty-four hours, 
in comparison with the corresponding date of last 
year, as indicated by the therniomoter at Hudnat's 
pharmacy : 

1875. 1876.1 

.SA-M 65° 340| 3:30P.M. 

6a. M 56° 340| HP. M.... 

9A.M 66° 41° 9 P.M.... 

12 -U 59° 45°ll2 P. M 

Average temperature yesterday. 

Average temperature for corresponding date last 

year 63%° 



1873. 


1876. 


...59° 


48° 


....53° 


46° 


...47=> 


45° 


...42° 


43° 




...42- 



THE SNOW IS THE SOUTH. 

Washington, Oct. 16.— Yesterday was tbe 
coldest day of the season. There was a slight fall 
of snow in the morning, and ice formed last night. 
It has moderated a little to-day, but a cold wind is 
blowing. 

Richmond, Oot. 16. — There was an hour's snow- 
storm at Kerfolk yesterday, and also in this neigh- 
boraood. The weather is extremely cold. The 
thermometer here yesterday and at sunrine to-aav 
registered 31°. It is feared tbe heavy gales which 
have prevailed off the Capes have been disastrous 
to vessels. 

MR. BLAINE IN NEWARK TO-DAT. 

Hon. James G. Blaine will address the ci ti- 

zens of Newark on the issues of the campaign 

this afternoon, at 2 o'clock, in the Rink. An 
immense audience is expected. 



THE YELLOW FEVER. 
Savannah, Oot. 16.— Tho total number of in- 
terments to-day were eight; four being of colored 
persons. Tbe deaths from yellow fever were three 
FaiherKelly and John H. Duppisb, of the firm of 
Palmer & Deppiah, were buried to-day. 



STEIN WATS VICTORY AND LAURELS. 



The toliowuig official report of tbe Judges of 
Awards shows conclusively tbat the highest honors 
in the gift of the Centennial authorities were unaji- 
imously awarded to Steinway h6 Sons. Tbe report 
speaks for itself, and an attentive perusal and a 
critical comparison with other published reports is 
respectfully solicited. 

THB ALI/-IMPORTANT JUDGE'S KEPOBT. 

The undersigned, baviDg examined the Giand, 
Sqnaro, and TTpright Pianos exhibited by Steijjwat 
& iiONS, respectfully recommeod tbe same to ibe 
Uoited States Centennial Commission for award, 

for the following reasons, viz.: 

For greatest concert capacity in Grand Pianot, as 
alto highest degree of exeellence in all their styles of 
pianos, viz. : largest vohtma, purity arid duration of 
tone, and extraordinary carrying capacity, with pre- 
cision and durability of. mechanism; also, novel dis- 
position of the strings and construction, and bracing 

of the metal frame. 

Imoroveiueats applied by Steinway & Sons were 
ihe following : 

I. A Disposition of the Steinos in ths foem of 

A FAN, placing the bass string across the steel 
strings, and materially elongating tbe sound-board 
bridges by moving them nearer to the centre of tbe 
sound-board itself, thus setting greater portions ot 
the latter into vibratory action, ana so producing a 
greatly inoreaaed volume of sound. 

II. A Duplex Scalb, patented in 1872, brings 
into action those portions of the strings which 
heretofore lay dormant and inac ive, thereby in- 
creasing tbe richness, pliability, and tinging quality, 
as well as the carrying capacity of the tone, e/pe- 
clallv of the npper notes. 

IIL A Cupola Metal Fbame, patented In -1872 
and 1875, with its new system of a crussbar and 
bracings, giving absolute safety against tbe pull of 
the sttlngs, and increasing the capacity to stand in 
tune. The space gained by tbe use of the Capo 
d'Astro bar permits the use of more heavily felted 
hammers, whereby a pure, rich quality of tone is 
retained much longer than heretofore. 

IV. A CONBTBOCTION OF THB SOUND-BOABD, with 

its system uf comoreasion, (as shown iu the patents 
of 1866, 1869. and 1872,^ preventing thst relaxation 
of tbe souud-board which is the natural result of its 
constant concussion, caused by the strokes of the 
hammers against the strings, and by atmospheric 
ipflaences. 

' V. A Mktallio Tubulak Frame Action (pat- 
ented in 1868 and 1875,) being entirely impervious 
to atmospheric influences, in eonjunction with the 
new system of escapement, resulting in unerring 
precision, power and delicacy of totteh, and durability. 
VI. A TONK-SUSTAININQ Pedai. (patented 1874) 
extends tbe capacity ot the piano for tbe produc- 
tion of new masical effects, by enabling the per- 
former, at pleasure, to prolong the sound of a single 
note or group of notes, leaving both banda free to 
strike other notes; is of simple construction, not 

liable to get ont ot order, and its ase eaiiily ac- 

q aired. 

steinway & Sons exhibit in " Machinery Hall " 
samples of Metal Pabts and Haudw.«bb, and Pull 
Metal Fbameb of Grand, Siiuare, and Upright 
Pianos ; also samples of their Patent Metallic 
TuninAB Fbaub Actions, all pruUnced at their 
foundry and metal works at Astoria, Long Island. 

These articles of composite metal show the hioh- 
est perfection of finish and workmanship aud tbe 
greatttt firmness and uniformity of metal structure, 
a steel-like and sounding quality with a tensile 
strength exceeding 5,000 pounds per square ' centi- 
metre, as demonstrated by actual tests. The full 
metal frames of oayola shape, pO'tsess an unequal d 
degree of resintance, permitting a vastly lncrease.1 
tension of strings without the slightest danger of 
break or crack in said metal frames, thereby eonsid. 
erably increasing the vibratory power, and augmenting 
the lasting qualities of their instraments. 

Signature of the Judge : H. K. OLIVEK. 

Approval of Gronp Judges: 
J. SCHIEDMATEB, P. F. KUPKA, 
GEO. F. BRlSTOW, Sir W.M. THOMSON. 
JCSKPH HENRY, JAMES C. WATSON, 

E. LEVASSEUR. ED. FAVRE PEN^ET, 

J. E. HILGARD, F. A. P. BARMARD. 

— Evening Post. 



[ 



BRUTAL MURDER BY A SBERIFF'S SON. 
St. Loms, Oct. 16.— A Jefferson City special 
to the Evening Dispatch says James Myers, son of 
Sheriff Myers, of thia county, shot and killed 
George Bacokos, a feeble old German living in the 
aouthein part of the dltv, about ten o'clock this 
BtondaiL It ii said Toaag Myert had b««n too in 



HERRINGS SAFES PREEMINENT. 
Centennial Grounds, Philadelphia, Oot. 
16. — The Judges' report accompanying tbe medal? 
awarded Herring's shows coaclusively why these 
safes are justly ranked as the best in the world. 
One clause says : We connider Herring's safes se- 
cure from all modes of attacK by burglars, and 
award them medals for their special claltns, as fol- 
lows : For their high and low steel wulded when 
used with tbe patent franklinita iron, rubber pack- 
ing, tongue and groove, detached bolt, secured by 
their combination looks, with their otber improve- 
ments, render them secure from burglars. The 
Herrinir's patent flrc-iproof safes are flrst-class, as 
well in beauty as iu workmanship.— t'ispatcA to the 
Evening Mail. 



HUGGED TO DEATH! 
A young man called upon his intended wife 
last evening and surprised her by producing from 
hii pocket a copy ot the New-York Weekly contain- 
ing tbe opening part of the great story " How Sbe 
Luyed Him." Sh3 was so delighted that tbe almost 
bugged him to death.' Any young man who likes 
to be bagged should present to his affianced 
wife the New-York Weekly containing tbe story 
■' How Sbe Loved Him." Then if he hugs her until 
he faints ha will know " how she loves him." — Ex- 
change. 

Pond's Extract.— Experience baa heralded its 
virtues for all kinds of paini, aches, and liMories. It is 
a apsolfio tut blaadiog from any eaata.->^tl«i«r<if immfr 




The Present Centuht has been noted for Itt 
progress In tbe useful arts. The alements of nature 
nave been utilized and combined In an unparalle'ed 
deuree. but we Itnow of lew flner exhibitions of this 
than in B. T. Babbitt's Babt Soap. ^ This new inven- 
tion for tnllHt and hath is the hi);bPtt of possible ro- 
snltsforpurlty, di'lloiicy, and r.leanslilg power. It is 
certjlu lo supersede all others.— ^<<v*rli«rr>«nt 



Frobabtllttes. 

For ihe Eastern and Middle Slates, somno\at cloudy, but 
clear as to the fact that it InHoates a m h to Batmond 
It < o.'s Old stand, uornT Nassau and Fultnn sts.. tor 

flue Ovbbcoats and W irtbr Qarhbnt^.— .i<dt;«r(iiem(n(. 



•ToiNTED PPBINO TRUSSES. — Silver mndnl at Ameri- 
can Institute Fair. Hard pads, soft pads, flnger pads, 
aud water pads. Pombbut Truss Cokpani, No. 746 
Broadway,— .i<dver(l«emmt. 

■■ ffl^ 

The Highest Award granted nny exhibitor bv 
Ceniennial t,xposition Is given the Elastic Truss Co. 
for Silk Klastic TuCdsas. Sold only at 683 Broadway. 
— .ddtxrHtement. 



Parker'a GiiiBev Tonic. 

Why snffeT with i YSPEPtsI-V or aBADACHF, when 
the% may be speedily cured by PAatER'S GINGKR 

TONIC ? A (lose belore meals sireagtbeiis the appetite 
ami enablos.the stomach to easily dlzest its food. This 
pleasant remedv promptly checks DIAKRHE.A withont 
CUNSTI.'ATTnG the bowels. UONiUMPTI VEtS fln.l 
welcome relief, and steadily gain strength from Us In- 
vigorating properties. It is tho best remedy lor 
CoL'ijUs and COLDS, aud the AGhD and those too fee- 
ble to bear the fOLil) of Winter find ? comfurtiiig 
Btrenzth in Its vita izing warmth. CRAMPS, COLIC, 
UVSK.'JlKBlf. FL.^TUi-KNUK and CHUiiii.tt\ I.SF.IiN- 
TU.Vl quicklv yield to this remedy, and it overcomes 
R .EU.NIATIS.\I and GOUT bv correctina aciulty of tbe 
stomach and promoting healthy secretions. 
Bold by all drajig'sls. 



Doctor, it Feels Like a Ball of Fire! ! 

So speaks oftentimes the sufferer trom dyapepsla. 
After eating it stems as if there was a veritable ball of 
fire running up aud down through his stomach. Ii be 
eats much he'feels It ; if he don't eat much he feels it. 
It destroys his enjoyment of life. It the doctor be 
really desirous of curing lils patient be ehdUJU not ex- 
periment with the sufferer; fie should recommend him 
to use PKttUVl.AN SVRDP, whose ments have been 
tesci d so long and always satisfactorily, BalU of lire 
in the stomach and PKROVIAN BYKUP can't dwell to- 
gf'ther. Send to your druzzist, he keeps it always 
ready, and try it. It will wck like a charm. 

For Consba and 'Ihroat Disorders, use 

BROWN'S BRONCHIAL TROCHEi, havingproyed their 
efficiency by a test of many years. Lozenges (called 
Iroches) sold by ths ounce or pound, are but a worth- 
less imitatlou, and do not possess the curative proper- 
ties of BROWN'S BRONCHIAL TROCHES. 



Elcctro-!t11lcoii 

snould be in every family f>r cljiain-j and polishlns: 
tbe silveT^ware anl hnu.^ebold nt msils. It Is free from 
any iiijurious cb^mioils or crib. It saves labor and 
kee; s tne ware as brilliant as naw. Sold by druggists, 
hoiise-turnliihers, jewe.ers, aud grocers. 



Active aervlce cannot wear ont the teetb 

th't are brasiied dally wit < SOZ JUONl . It it were iu 
universal use tea dentist woula have little to do, for it 
is a positive prrventive of dental disease. The t< eth 
of persons who use it cannot decay or turn yellow. 



Don't Lioae Your Hair. Cheralier'a Life 

FOR THE UAlR restores gray hair p«itectly, stops its 
falling out. at once, i.ncreases its growth r-ipidly, and 
makes theh,ilr beautiful.' Sold by all aruggists. 



S3 80, vrortb 80t Fall Hilk Hats. Fine Felt 

flats. 9>3 Hais, $1 UO. ^o. 15 New Church St. 



To llotliers.— Mrs. Winslow's Soothinir Syrap 

for children teething softens the gums, reduces iim:un. 
mation. allays all pain, and cures wind colic. 



TVI-AJRR,IB1D, 

HEWITT— WILSON.— On Thursday, Oct. 12, at the 
residence of the bride's parents, by Rev. Wm. A. Mc- 
Giney, JoBL r^EwiTT to Cabrib G„ daughter of P.M. 
Wilson, a.l of Brooklyn. K. O. 

li03KK— HlbLIARu.— At ihorfiBldenceof the bride's 
parents, Oct. 9, by Rev. Prederlct brown, Mr. Krank 
LosEB to Miss Magoib J. HiLLiABP. Ikoth ot tbis City. 

Ni!:WBAUti:<— .UArUBR.— In tarlen, t^onn., on ihe 

3d inst.. by Kev. Mr. Bell, at the resitenor of the 
bride's fatner. Michaei, Nbwbaubb. of .New-Tork, and 
Sarah C. Matbbb, otDanen. 

PKliiCK— SAiIiOS. — Uu rhursday, Oct liJ. 1876, at 

Schuylkill Haven, fenn., by Rev. B. K. Feirce, U. D., 
Dr. Ubnrt T. I'BiROB. ot New-Vork City, to Makt, diugh 

ter ol Uenrv Sa\ lor, Esq.. of .'<cbuvlkill Haven, i'eiin. 
KAPP — L.A.>OASrKtt. — On MouOay, Oct. Itj, at the 

residence ot the biide's mother, Ujooken, N. J„ by Rer. 
Dr Oeer, D. I)., CharlbsG. Uapp. of New-York, to Katb 
K., danubter ot tbe late Alfred L,ancaster, of ^ew-Turlc 
Ho cards. ^^^^^ 

ATMAR.— On Monday morniasc, Oct. 16, Edmdsd 
Bbandt Atmah, in the 44th year of bis age. 

Tbe relatives aud friends Of the family .re invited to 
ntteud the funeral trom nis late residence, No. 14 West 

14tb St.. on Ttauradav morning, the 19tb InaL, at 10 
o'clock without turther notice. 

BiRliSALL..- Suddeuly on oabbath, Oct. 16, at her 
late residence, Newburg, Mabion Blaih. wife ot Samuel 
A. Blr sail. 

Interment on Wednesday morning in Green-Vvood 
Cemetery. 

UBCS.l.— On Sunday, Oot 16, John T. Bbdbh. in the 
53d year of nu age. 

r,.e relatives and friends of the famil,y are respeot- 
fttlij Invited to attend the fu'ietal at Trinity Church 
on Wednesday moruiug at lu o'clock. 

CLARKbON. — At Fotsdiim, ^t. Lawrence County, N. 
Y., ou Sunday, the 15tb lust., LBViirDS, sun of the late 
Ih'imas :»treatfleld Clarkson. 

DK . OPPHT.— OU ilnia.v. Oct. 16, Kinloch Faw- 
CBTT Uk Coppbt, only ciiild of Henry and Laura F, xie 
coppet, aged ^ years, 1 montu, aud 10 days. 

^Ol.lce of luneral hereafter. 

FIELD.— At Gre n&e.d, .ita^a, Oct. 14, Katk M., wife 
of Putnam Field, aged 31. 

Formerly reslued in .New- York. 

GaiKi'liN.- At vvilUamstown, Mass., Oct. 16, Eev. 
Nathakiki. Ubbbick UBiVFi.t, i). U., iu the ti2d year of 
hi i age. 

Funeral at his residence at WlUlamsto wn on Wednes- 
day at 2 P. M. 

ua;<T.— Sunday, Oct l."*, in this City, Charlks S. 
Bdnt, ageii Si years, of iuflammacoa of the braiu. 

Funjral ths (Tue day) ufteiuouu at 4 o'clock from 
the lute residence of the deceased. No. 102 Kast 54th 
St. ttelaiiVes and irion is are invited to attend. 

LANGLOlS.— un hilday, Oot. 13, bsANK ALBXANnsB, 
son Oi tbe late Charles kad .dart^arct Laagioi^, iu the 
4btb year of bis age. 

1 he friends 01 lue family are invited to attend the 
fnuerai, fiom his late resideuce, So. 130 West 42d st, 
ou A^on lay morning, liita iiist , at lu:dO o'clock. 

LUW.SI/ES. — Oct. 16, ac bef lata reiiiJeuue, .so. 46 

West 65th St., Fblkcib 8. Lowndbs, widow ot the late 
Thoma.i Lowndes. 

KeUtives aud friends and those of her sister and 
brut er. Liaise a. d Henry Aiker, are reHpecbin.ly in- 
vited lO attend the luuerai from bt. Tho uas' Cutirch, 
6th av., corner V/est 53i St., oa Wednesday at iOiiiO 
A. A. 

MILLER.— At New-ICocbelle, Oct 14, 1876. Lkokakd 
P. JUillbk. 

Funernlirom his late resideuce, at New-Rochelie. on 
Tuesday, Oct 17, at l:3t> P. .U. Friends s..d relatives 
of cbe family are respecti'uUy requesttd to attfnd the 
tuueral services without inrtaer notice. Train leaves 
Grand Central Deput. ai 42a St., at i'2 M. 

KOMGii. — ouMoadAy morning, Oct ItS, ISTB.Estbbb 
A, youngest daughter nf tbe late Harvey Rumer. 

Keluiives aud frieuds of tbe family ar? invited to 
attend ibe fuuerai service at her late re^idunce, .Mo. 
347 West 4th st, on Tuesday evening, Oct. 17, at 8 
o'clock. A short service will alao be held at Pieasant- 
vilie ou Wednesday morning. Train leaves Grand i en- 
tral Depot 10:30 o'clock a. .tl. 

SA-MLKLSUN.- Oct. IH, Cabolinb J. Bahcblson, in 
the 39th year of tier age. 

Fuueral fiom No. 447 West 33d st, Oct 18, at 1 P. M. 

Relutlvra and friends luVited. 
.SHAFEii. — Oil tunday. Oct. 15, 1876, Jclia Rsmskk 
bLT, wUe o* Joseph a. cibafer, of tbe hrm uf Shaier ti 

ijouglas. 

Funeral services from her late residence. No. 139 
Monmouth St., Newark. .S. J., oa Wednesday. Oot. 18, 
at 'Z o'clock P. M. Relatives and irleuds are innted to 
attend. 

VAN N08TBAND.— At her residence, Kllzibeth. N. J., 
Satuidav Oct. 14, 187t>, Lillik only dau.(lite.of the 
late James Van ^ostrand and itiurthaj. Van Mostr.md. 

Fuuerai from St. John's Church, iilizabeib, on Tues- 
day, Ouu 17. at 11:30. 

WOOD.— At FishkiU Village, on Sunday, Oct 16, 
Mahy a., wife 01 Bart'in vVooX i 

The rtflat.ves aud triends of the family are inyl ted 
to aitenii the tuiierai, at tne residence of ni-r sonlu- 
law, Rev. W. F. Brush, Fishklil Villajie, on Tuesday, 
Oct 17, at 3 o'clock. 



SPEOI AL^OTTO KS. 

liUPOBT£D 

HECK. WEAK. 

FALL STYLES, 
y 

WAHD'S, 

381 BBOADWAX, CORNER WHITE ST. 
862 BROADWAY, CORKER 14TH ST. 
1,121 BROADWAr, C0R5KB 25TH ST. 

~ZZ JUKUiYlAN TUOUT 6e. CO., 

Impoiters of French China, 

DINNER. TEA, DESSERT AND CHAMBER SETS, &o.; 

Table Glassware, Clocks and Bronzes, 

Bohemian Fancy Glassware In great variety. 

SEVRES, DRESDEN, BERLIN, AND WORCESTER 

PORCiiLAI.N', 

Parian Marble Statuettes anl Busts. 
MODERN AND ANTIQPK .MAJOL1C..S AND FAIENCES, 

PALISSll AND SIMILAR WAKES, 
in various gratieftu, unique, and curious snapes, such 
as Vases, Jues, Flower-huldtirs, Flagout, Brackets, lie, 
exact ri-proiiuctlons uf Autique Models. These novel 
and very artis.ic articles are particularly appropriate 
as presents fur uruameutiog dlnina-room, parlor, or 
hall. 

Many articles origiaally intended for tbe Philadelphia 
Exhibition were sent by tbe Euroueau manufacturers 
to us. and are now^ in oar store ou view and for sale. 

NOS. 48, 60, 62. AXD 64 MURRAY ST., JfKW-YORK . 

CMlNii.'^K AMD JAPA.SKHlf DKPU'i'! 

JAPAN KSE BR0.SZE6I JUST RKCEIVEDI 

CHINiiSE KNAMEL. (PKKIS,) VASES. «tO. 

WKUDLVQ AND CKNTKN^IAL PKESiiNTSl 

TETl-.-A-TEl'E BKid, VASES, TRAYS, to. 
PARKE'S, NO. 186 FRONT ST.,^eiir F ulton. 

l5 Si'rUAUT W1L1<I.>9. A'fTOK.VJiy AND 

XtieCouuseior at Law, .Notary P ubdc Now l&i Broafl 
*>ay. Riiuui NOb 4 New- York. 
N. &. -.Speslal attoiiciou pud u> sattUa; ~'HkU**i' } 



SPEOIALJJOTIOES. 

A GRAND HTOAV. 

A POWERFUL fiOMA.VCB OF THE AFFBCTI0X8, 
entitled 
HOW SHE LOVED HIM, 
HOW SHB LOVED HIM. 
HOW SHE LOVED HIM. 
HOW SHE LOVED HIM, 
HOW SUE LOVED HIM. 
HOW SHE LOVBD HIM, 
HOW SHE LOVkD HI.M, 
now bHE LOVED HIM, 

HOW SHE LOVED HIM. 

HOW SHE LOVED HIM. 

By LouiBi C. Rbtnolds, 
win be oommenRed in No.' 50 of the 

PEW-YORK WEOKLY, 

NEW-YORK WEEKLl. 

NKW-TOUK WEEKLY. 

NEW-YORK WEEKLY. 

NEW-YORK WBiiKLY. 

NEW-YORK WEEKLY. 

NEW-YORK WEEKLY. 

NEW-YORK WEEKLY. ^ 

NEW-YORK WEEKLY. 

NEW-YORK WEEKLY. 
Ready and for sale by every News Agent and Book-seUer. 
STREET & S.VlITa, PublUhers, 

NEW-YORK WEEKLY. 
Fbascis S. Stbebt. 
Pbancis S. Smith. 

POST OFFICE NOTICE. 

The foreign msils for the week ending SATURDAY 
Oct 21, 187d, will close at ihis office on WKDNKS' 
Day at ll'hL tor Eump? per sceam-jiiip Abyssimt via 

gueenstown. On THURbUA^. at 11:3U A. M.. for 
burope, per steam-kiiip Frisla, via Plymuuth, Cher- 
bourge. and Hamburg. On SATDRUAY, at 4:30 A. M., 
fur Europe pi-T steam-sbip Germanic, via Qneenstown; 
correspondence for Scotland, Getiua:iy, und France, lo 
be forw<irded by this ateamer, must oe spe iaily ad- 
dressed; and at 4::jO A. M. for franco direct, per 
Bteam-ahip M. Germain, via Havre ; aud at 4:30 A. M. 
for Scotland direct, per steam-sb-ip Aiichciria, via 
Glasgow; and at 11:30 A. M. f>r l^nrope, per ntenm- 
ship Neckar, via Southampton and bremcn. Tbe 
ateam-shi: 8 Abyssinia and Germanic do nut take mails 
•or Uenmarlc, Sweden, and Norway. The malli tor tlie 
West Indies via Bermuda and St. Thomus will leave 
New-York <)BR8^. Tbe mails for Chinu, tc, will leave 
San Francisco ^ov. 1. The mails tor Australia, &.C., 
will leave San Francisco Nov. 8. 

T. L. JAMES, Postmaster. 

CBKAPKKT BOOKHTOKKI.N THU \V.iUL.D. 

LIBRARIES AND BOOKS BODOHT. 

160.000 NEW AND OLD . OOK8 

ALMOST GiVKN AWAY. 

CATALOGUES FREE. SE.ND STAMP. 

Lh.GGAT BROS.. 3 BEEKMAN ST., 

OPPOSITE NEW POjT OeFICE. 



»pHE ANNtAt. .MKEMM* OK I'HK pj 1". 

X Luke's society will be lieid at St. Lake's Hospital, 
54tn at aud 6th av., on WHa.VuSDAt. Oct. 18, at 8 P. 
M., f,>r tile purpose of electing a Board of Mauagers for 
the ensuing year. 

C YRUS CURTIS^!, Presiaent 

EEP*.-. CUSIO.'VI saiRfS .XAUB TO 

MBASUBK.— The viry best, sir fur $9 ; not the 
bligates oblisaiion to take or keep any of KliKP'S 
sbirisuniess perfectly satisfactory. No. 671 Broad- 
way, and No. tl2l Arch st-r**Laaelphla. 

/ IHROMC, HlIUiNEY, B1.AJ>1>1<:U, THEIR 
V 'coguate and hitherto ratal diseases, with full direc- 
tions fur toalr cuie, in DEt HKATrl'S book of 100 pages, 
gratis, at Na 200 Broadway. Mew- York. 



^[EW^PUBIJOATIONS^ 

LIPPINCOTT*;^ MAGAZINE 

FOR NOVEMBER, 

HANDSOMELY ILLUSTRATED, 

NOW READY, CO.STAINING 

THE FIRST FART OF 

A NEW SERIAL STORY, 
"THB MARQUIS OP LOS5.IE," ^ 

By QeoBGB Macdonald, 
Author of "Malcoluj," "Aleo Forbes," tc 



L 

IL 
III. 

rv. 

V. 
VL 

VIL 
VIIL 

IX 
X. 

XL 

xn, 

XIII. 



CONTENTS : 

THE CENTURY: Its FiuitsandltsFestivftL Part 

XL Agriculture and Horticulture. Illustrated. 
WALKS AND VISITS IN WORDSWOtlTU'd 

COUNTRY. Two Papirs. Na L llluBtrated. 
By Eixis Yabnall. 
ACK.'^OWLEJGJiE.v'T. A Posm. By Sidnei 

Lakibb. 
THE MARQUIS OP LOSSIE. Part I. By Qeobgb 

Macponald, Author of " Malcolm," &c. 
HIGHER KDU Affo.V. By Jauks Moboa.v Habt. 
LOVE 1.1 IDLHNKSS. A Story. Part IV. By 

Blucn W. Olsbt. 
THii AAGNBR FESTIVAL. By R. C. V. 
THE PENDDLUil OF FOliTCINE. A Stoiy. 

From tbe German uf Rco>>lph Li.vo.iU. 
TO A FIRK-FLV. By Charles Qtriax. 
LETTERS PROM SOUTH AFRICA. No. X. By 

Lady Babkbb. 
CURIOSITIdJ OF THE PARISIAN POST OFFICE. 

By Ldct H. Hoopbb. 
OUR MONTHLY GOSSIP. Unpnblrshed Story of 

Lord Byron and Mary Chaworth. A Letter 

from Braemar. Dilon. 
LITERATURE OF THE DAY. '' 



FOR SALE BY ALL P;2RI0DICAL DEALERS. 

TERMS: Yearly Butiserlptiou, $4, postage paid. 

Siufle Number, 3.5 cents. Liberal clubbing rates. 

Specimen :. umber mailed on receipt of 2U ceuta 

J. B. LIPPI >COTT & CO., PDMLiSHSas, 

NOS. 715 A.VD 717 MARKET ST.. PHILADELPHI.\. 

A >Oi'AUl..>% oOOH. 

Just published, a reprint ot the Loudon edition of 
CON. TA.\Cfc.'d FATE; Oit, DKNZILPLaCE, alove story 
iuyers::, by Violbt Fanb. Pricu $1 50. 

" Al.isf tbat 1 ve sb uld be a bii^bc and snare. 
To those who seek nil sympatbie^ in one." 

Q. W. CaRLEION & CO.,Puollsher«. 



NbW LiAW ISOOH.M. 



LITTLE. BROWN t CO. 
PUilllSH TalS DAY: 

OTTO'S REPORTS OF PHK Diii'lSloNS OF THE SU- 
PREME COURl' OF TUE UNITED STATES. VoL 
I. 8vo. $J. 

QRKENLBAF ON THE LAW OP EVI lENCR. Thir- 
teenth bditiim, carefully rev'sed. with large audi- 
tions. Bv John Wildbb Mat. VoL L 8yo. $ti. 
Vols. II. and III. nearly ready. 

BELFl.iLD O.^ TdK LAW OF wlLLS. Vol. IL Con- 
taining Devises, Legacies, Testamentary Trusts. 
Third Edition. 8vo. $B. 

CoNsJ lAiNCK*?* fATK. DiJ.ZIlil-l.ACK. 

Just pDblished, a reprint of the Looiloa edition of 

this lamuus loye story iu yerse, bv Violet h knu. 
Price $1 50. 
G. W. CARLliTON It, CO., Publishers. 

AlAV AGNttrt Fl.B.rlJNU'^4 NEvt^ SfiYii.ii, 

KATE DANTON. 
One of the best books e\er written by tbis popular 
author. Price, $1 75. 

G. W. CARLE rO.V t Co.. PublUbers. 



POLITICAL. 

POl.iriCALi POLiITICAIj 

CAMPAIGN CAMPAIGN 

EQUIP dENTS. EQOIP.vlENTA 

< lubs, organize at once, that victory may cio vyn your 
effuits: wesr our imposing Continentil bat und cape, 
m.'tde of blue and yeliow, witn silver eai^lei on liat. 
i>'ullBet80t campaign cqulpmea s. cousistius ol huts, 
or caps, and capes, any color aud stvle^ with patent 
double swin^ zinc torob and stick, furnished to clobs 
at laciory prices Send for lull particulars or come to 
bead-qua le.s. WlLLiAJl U. KNAUSS, No. 2t)8 ilroad- 
way, iNew-York City. 

THE KEGUL,AK ltlONTHL.r .WEBTIWG 
HKPUtJLlCAN CK.STRaL CO .Ldil'TEE of the Cltv 
of .Vew-York, wi.l be heid at Republican Hall, 33d St., 
near Broadway, on TUESDAY EViiNlNO, Oct 17, 1876, 
at 8 o'clock. Bv order of 

JAi OB M. PATTERSON, Jb., President 
WiLLABP BcLLARD J Secretaries. 

CHAHLRH h. lUBLL. J 

The meeting of the lixecutiye Committee will be held 
at 7:30. JOEL W. MASO.S, Cuairmau. 

Will ABO Bullabo. Secretary. 

SECONO ASWESIOliY DISTRICT kEPLFB- 
LICAN ASS iCIAriON.— clegular meeting at bead- 
quarters. No. 466 Pearl St., THlj EVENING at f» o'clock. 
Taos. Bbown, secr'y. DENNIS SHKA, Presidint 

LINCOLN CL.UU, SBVE.NTH 01.STRICT,— 
.1 mas^-iueetiug ol the Repuolicans of tbis di-.trict 
will be hold at tbe bead-ducrteis. No. 12 i niveraity 
place, THIS EVENI.NG at 8 o'clock. The meeting will 
be addressed bv Hon. A. J. liUtenboefrr and Hon. 
George W. Clarke. CORN KLlUS VAN COTT 

Jambs J. Cabboll, .'Secretary. i'resident 

BOY.S IN «1.UE OK 'I'HK UIGHTEKM H 
ASSEMBLY DISl'ttlCT will rally at uead-quarteri*. 
No. 4r>3 4th av,, TUESDAY KVKM.NO. Oct i7, at p 
o'clock. 

Hon. I. I. HAYES and Col. JAS. R. ADAMS wUl ad- 
dress the meetiue. 

TnOS. B. ODELL, Colonel commanding. 
Wm. H. ARNOLD. Arljucant. 

HON. W. T. B. itlliiLIliliN, 

R. A. ADAMS. Esq.. 
EUFUS B. t;oWI.\G, Esq., and others 

will address tbe Republicans of the Twentv-flrst As- 
sembly District at LINCOLN H \LL. corner 3d av. and 
llUth St., TUIs (Tueiday) KVENI.SU, ac 8 o'clock. 

CHI.VEME L.A.'^rEitNai. "~ 

$3 PER HUNDRED. 
Torches, from 12 cents e icli upward. Excelsior fire- 
works at low prices. Flajs, traaspareucies, to. 
DETWILLEK, STREET U. CO., Ao. 9 Dey st, Ncw-lorlc 

HEAD-QU ARTE Its FOR POLITICAL NUT BAN- 
uers. Portraits. Trausparencics,S[.o. Cap, Cape, and 
Patent Torch, $1 per set. M. R. LEVY & Co. , 

corner Broadway and Howard st 



Al^Li HJNDIS OK POLITICAL. BAN2SBR!!), 
flaiCB. aud portraits on band and to order, at low 
prices. UOJbR k GRAHAM, No. U7 Duane st 

TBR CP-TOWN OFPlCa OP THE TlitliiS. 
No. t,257 Uroailvray. bet. Slat aad 33d sta. 

iDVjKitriiiBJlit^'ir tJLKiUir^i) M&TiiU^ g.iS. ,^ 



DEN. 



STATE OF NEW.rORK. 

REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN, 187a 

Bbap-quartebs Rbpublicait State CoiimTTiii7> 
FiFTB AVENUB Hotel, NbwYobk. J 

HEPUBLICAV MaETINGS. 

TUESDAY, Oct. 17. 

Blnghamton S Hon. E. W, 8T0UGHT0N. 

K •"""'" JCoL ALBKRT D. SHAW. 

Syracuse Hon. CARL SCHCRZ. 

Mount Kisco Hon. JOSEPH H. CHOATE. 

Sherwood^ P M. } "'*"• GEORGE W. CURTIS. 

' • *^ \ Hon. JOHN H. C»MP. 

Evans Mills .'.Hon. J. H. WARWICK. 

Cane Vincent Hon. BUTLER Q. NOBLE. 

Nyack Hon. A. W. TBNNEY. 

Johustown Hon. BEN.T. K. PHELPS. 

Waterford Hon. HENRY BALLARD. 

ParenaHall Yiirkrllla {Hon. ETHAN ALLEN. 

arepBMail, Xortvtlle.... { ^oL GEORGE W. CARTER. 

Hempstead Hon. L.BRADFORD PRINCE 

Port Leyden Hon. WM. HKRRINO. 

Genesoo Hon. THOMAS G. ALVOED. 

Bridgeport. Conn jHon. WM. P.^H BHO. ^^ 

Schodnck i ^^'^- J- BRADF-D CLEAVER. 
J g FOSTliR. 

Na 12 University place.... Hon. A. J. DITTENHOEFR. 

Hancock Gon. DA'NIKL ULLMANN. 

Hlehland Falls Major Z K. PASGBORN. 

Hi'lson Gen. CLARKE. CARR. 

Olford Hon. HENRYR. WASHBON. 

Armonk Hon. MELVIIjLE C. SMITH. 

PerthAmboy, N.J Col. T. B. THOttPK. 

Moreland 5 Hon. JOHN H. 8ELKRKQ. 
JS. C. KEELER, 

Hast Nassau 5 '^o'- ^- ^- ^'^^ ARTHUR. 

nasiJMassau ^^^ COMiTOCK. 

Havana i "<>"• J- W. DWIuHT. 

*^* \ C. W. DAVI.S. 

Brush's Mills Gen. T. B. GATES. 

North Otselic Hon. JaMKS R. A^GEL. 

Can»^eraga. Col. .K. E. BAXTER. 

Victor. Hon. C. D. MURRAY. 

Alabama Hon. B. T. M('RGA.>7. 

Ma«ee's Comers \ 'l^; I'^^h^^''^'-''' 

Greenwich Hon^A. H. FAERAR. 

Greenville, N.J Honr*r=««rGLEASON. 

Spring Valley Gen. JOSEPH JACKSON. 

wiiiBtt J Hon GKOROR W. BUNGAY. 

'"®" \ Hon. .VI. M. WATERS. 

Colton Hon. R. G. PETT130NE. 

Hempstead Hou.L.BRADFORD PRINCE 

Cannonsviile Hon. 8A.V1DKL P. MILLER. 

Killawog Gen, GEO. W. PALMER. 

Rural Grove, P. M Hon. AUSTIN A. YATES. 

(Hon. GEORGE HKCKBR. 

Horseheads <JOUN T. DaViDSO.s. 

(Dr. L. W. BAlLliY. 

Newtown, Ulster County... F. X. SCHOO.NMAKER. 

Guilford.. Hoa H. G. PRInDLE. 

Morris Hon. SOLOMON BUNDY. 

We8t<:hester Hon. JOSEPH J. COUCH. 

German JOHN W. CHURCH. 

Bovini Hod. JAMES OLIVER. 

JacKsonyille ?. Major HENRY D. TYLER. 

Maryland CHARLES D. BAKER. 

(J.J. LAMORER. 
• \Vf. M. McNALL. 

Freetown 5 "•'°- ^ ''• SMITH, 

rreeioyyn ^g^ BbNEDlCT. 

Esperance Bridge. Hon.JOHN HLITFLEFIELD 

Rockville Centre Hon. GEORGE W: HOXIrl. 

Nn Aiq Ati, »^^ V V 5 Hon. ISAAC L HAYES. 
No.453 4thav.,N. T— -JjamESR. ADAaIS. 

Splegletown. j j; f; Ifi^l' 

M-ine J "0"- 'f- ''• Mcdonald. 

'"""*' {KitANKSTiiWART. "• 

Osborne Hollow {j.TjSsON. 

^""P®' Jd. acARVEa 

Three-mUe Bay Hon. LUCIUS BIQELOW. 

Barrisburg Hon. H. .-. HBNDB;?. 

Ohio City ; Hon.CLI.\'TON L.MERRIAM 

Columbus D. L. ATKYXS. 

Massena Centre. Hon. GEO. M. GLSASON. 

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18. 

fGen. N P. BANKS. 
oi^» ei.,., .».>,......... .nrf I Oen. DANIEL K. SICKLES. 

Sing Slug, afternoon and! Q ixaKK E, CARR. 
evemn«. Mass-meeUnx. J^h..^^^ ELUOXC.COWDIN. 

I Gen. JAMES W. HUSTBD. 
Buffalo Hon. CARL SCHDRZ. 

(Gen. GEO. A. SHKR'DAN. 

Troy I Rev. J. BRADF'ii CL-:AVER 

( Hon-MARTIN I.TOWN8END 

Rochester Hon. A. J. DITTENHOBFEB. 

„ . tCHARLK> E. SMITH. 

, coboes ^ JAMES KILBOUEN. 

Katonab Hon. A. W. TE.XNEY. 

(Hon. BUTLER G. NOBLB. 
BrovmvHle, P. M < Hon. J. H. WARWIiK. 

itloa. LUCIUS BiGKLOW. 

Little Falis CoL ALBERT D. SHAW. 

Dlskiueon Centre Gen. T. B. G.\TES. 

Moh.wk .Hon. HENRV BALLARD. 

No. 266 Cumberland st, (Hon. HENRY E. HOWLAND, 

Brocvlvn tool. GEORO W. CARTER. 

Turin -Hon. WM. HERDING. 

Sherbum Hon. JAMES R. ANGRL. 

„ ( Rev. J. BR VDPD CLEAVER 

^™y rrion.MARTI-* LTOWNSbND 

„ . D « J CoL T. B. TilORPE. 

Peconlc, P. M J Hon. ISAAC L HAVES. 

( Hon. JOHN H. SELKRKQ. 
> Hon. J. W. UWIGHT. 



Port Ontario . 



Orange 

Morean Wisrwam .Seventh \ Gen. JOH V A. DIX. 
Wsrd.Biookljn.... '"■" "'">«"^'' " «=' 

Cftry- -.... 



Chatham Village 

Greene 



5 Gen. GEORGE H. SHARPS. 
..Hon. B. T. .Morgan. 

( Hon. THOMAS G. ALVORD. 
jH(.n. JOHN H. CAMP. 

..Hon. FRANCIS SILVESTER 
..Hon. H. E. WASUBON. 

North Shore, Staien Iiland.HoD.L.BRADFOBD PRINCE. 

Boon-vine Hon. H. J. COOGEjHALL. 

Caledonia Col. A. E. BAXTER. 

Rye Hon. JOSEPH J. CO :ca. 

„_ .,, 5 Hon. GEORjE W. BUNGAY, 

McGrawvllIe ^ Hon. M. M. WATERS. 

Mount Morris Hon. 8ETH L. MILLIKEN. 

„. ^„ C Hon. .A. W GLEA O.V, 

Mount Vernon J Gen. JOSEPH C. J.ACKSON. 

East Bloomfleld Hon. C. D. MURRAY. 

Jamaica Hon. WM. P. FlBRO. 

Mott's Corners Major HiiNRY D. T YlkR. 

Harvard Hon. SAMUiiL F. MILLER. 

Uoier Lisle". Gen. GEORGE W. PAL ..ER. 

GuUdfr'and J. R. VAN WORMER. 

Rock City FaliS Hoil WILLIAM H. TEFPT. 

(Hon. GBORGii BECKER. 

..^r. »^ COWKN. 
/ Dr. L. W. BAILEY. 

....Gen. DANIEL ULLMANN. 

CHARLES D. BAK2R. 

Hon SOL iMoNBDNDT. 

Hon. H. Q. PRINDLE. 

Hon. JAMES W. QLOVEE. 

(Capt. J. O.VBN MOORE. 

•-- \ Hon. jAilKS G. GRAHAM. 

J. W. CHUEOH. 

Hon. PETER W. HOPKI.VS. 



Kne Valley, P.M.. 

Hsmden 

Portlandvilie 

Qilbertsville 

Preston 

LlDCklaen 



Cralgville 

Coyentr y 

OnrefO 

Prinoetown Hon.JOHNH.LITTLE'='IKLD 

(Col. ANSON S. WOOD. 
Palermo J lion, w M. H. BAKER. 

Grube'sHali.lOOtbst.N.Y.JOH.N F. MINES. 



..Hon. W. H. HYDX. 
....Hoiu HRNKY R. JAMBd. 
....loL JOHN E. S A VERY. 

(Hon. L. C. L4NQ. 
•■ \i. A. VANCE. 

^, „ ^, < Hon. T. P. McDonald. 

Glen Castle J vy 34 ROSS. 

Westbury ..Hon. J. T. M. DAVIB. 

in. C. MILLARD. 
--- } GEORGj B. t DRTIS. 

C Hon. H. A. PADDOCK. 
•••i!«. S. PARMELEE. 

c Hon. WILLLiM GLEASON. 
••- \S. C. MAaVIN. 

Hon. H. S. HK.NDKE. 

Hou.CLINTON L.MERRIAM 



McDonougb 

Briei Hill, P. M 

Sempronlus 

Stockholm 



Conklin Forks... 



Bombay... 



Grand Gorge 

Harrisville. 

Newport 

Stockholm \j^A. VA.^CK. 

Massena Hon. GEO. M. GLEASON. 

Upper Lisle Gen. GEO. W. PALMER. 

„ _ , „ , , (Hon. L. INGALLS. 

Natural Bridge {ix.i. WELCH. 

THURSDAY, Oct 19. 

(Gen. N. P. BANKS. 

Geu. DANIEL E. SICKLES. 

Hon. A. W:T.NNi-.Y. 

Gen. JOHN COCHRANE. 
I H n H. 1). CUL > BR. 
1 il JorZ. K. PANGBORV. 

Gei. JAMtS VV. BUSTED. 

Hon. JOH ■. OAKY. 

Hon. SILAS B. DOTCUER. 

Hon. WM. A. 8141MOV<. 
5 Hon. JA.MES G. BLAINE. 
•-•■ I Hon. BKNJ. K. PHELt'S. 

Hon. CARL SCHURZ. 

Gon. GSO. A. SHERIDAN. 

Hon. B. T. MORGAN. 

Hon. BUTLER G. NOBLE. . 



Brooklyn. . . 



Buff-lo. 



Albany 

Amsterdam 

Richville 

Skaneateles. 



Fulton Hun. HKNRY BALLARD. 

Clyde Col. ALBKRTD. SHAW. 

SchuylervUle Hon. FRANCIS SYLVESTER 

, , . t CHARLKS E. ^MITH. 

Green Island JjAMiiS KILBOUB.>. 

Plessia, P. M Hon. J. H. WARWICK. 

Martinsburg Hon. WILLIAM HERRING. 

Liberty lialLNo.231 West 5 Gen. GEORGE H. SHARPE. 
ietli8t.,N. Y JCol. OjIO. w. CAETER. 

Westville Gen. T. B. G.ATES. 

Athena Hon. GEORGE W. flOXIK. 

WestSandlake Hon. M. I. TOWNSKND. . 

SmithvUle Hon. JAMKS R. ANGEL. 



Scottsborg 

Newark 

Romiilas.... ' 

Constantia, P. M 



.Col. A. E. BAXTER. 

GBCtJLARK E. CARE. 

Hon. JOHN. H. CAMP. 

J CoL ANSON 8. WOOD, 
'-- 1 iloj. WILLIAM H. BAKBR. 

(Hon. JOHN H. RELKREO. 
•• t Hon. J. W. liWIQHf. 



Tyrone 

No. 12 University place.... Hon. W. W. GOODRICH. 
60th St., near 8th av., ( CoL CHA8. a SPENCER. 



New-York. 



iUOu. WM. A. DARLING. 



-/ 



Na 748 Broadway CHARLS8 H. KITCHEL. 

^•"P - Hon. A W. OIiRASOir. 

B"^'"' ...Hon. C. D. UCBRAT. 

MlUport. i 9°°- ^ 1"- FRI8BIK. 

^ I JOHN T DAVID80.V. 

Pea sails Gen. JOSEPH C, JACKSOJfA 

I-oti Hon. THOHAB G. ALVOBDj 

Leonai-dsvllle Hon. H. J. COQQBSIlALLi 

BleeckerBuHdiug, K:T... J«- V^IV^2^iSt 

Gardinertown Hon. JAMES O. ORAHAlfc 

Tar.-vtown J Hon. JAS. A GARFIKLD. 

lar.Tiown {noa. WM. P. FIERO. 

Clarksville Hon. HENRY 2. HO>VLAin 

Breesnnrt > ^°^ GEORGE BRCKBfi. 

ureesport ^.^^^ ^ b.ULKY. 

White Plains Hon. ISAAC I. HATK3. 

PortvlUe, P. M Geo. RUFU3 6C01T. 

Petersburg (I^JJs?!!"''"^^^^^'^, 

Clifton, SUten Island Hon. MBLVILLE C. SIOTB. 

Ballston Hon, A. H, PAREAB. 

DownsTille Hon. SAMCSL F. MILLBk 

Harpersvine Gen-GRORGE W. PALnBK) 

Andes Gen. DANIEL ULLJCASE 

Centre Lisle Hon. O. W. CHAPMAN. 

Cbappaqna Hon. DOBUAN B. EATO«^ 

Afton Hon. H. B. WASH SOU. 

No. 171 Thompson st, N. T.JOH.V F. MINBS. 

Po^o,^ (Hon. ORORG8 W.BU^'GAI; 

"*"°'" \ Hon. WILLIAM H. CLARK.! 

Chariton Hon. WILLIAM H. TZfTtJ 

Brldgeharopton CoL T. B. THORPE. 

King's Bridge CHARLES E. ABBOTT. 

East Glenville Hon. J. H. LITTLEFIBCO. 

Danby Mj^ir HENRY D. TTLKB. 

Cato. P. \L Hon; WM. R WOODIK. 

Middiefield CHARLES D. B\K a 

East Pharsalia Hon. H. O. PRINDLE. 

.'^ouTE'Otselic Hon. JAMES W. GLOV^ ' 

Berne. J. V. VAN WORMKR. 

Sparrowbnsh Capt J. OWBK MOORE 

Stony Point F. S. SCHOONMACEB, 

«_-..„ ( Hon. B. E. PATSK. 

"^*»**' > CoL JOHN E. SAVENT. 

Ph-^„. cj. M. J0H."T80T. 

Chenango J GEORGE B. CD 'HS. 

North Sterling Hon. DANIKL T. FORTB. 

„ . ,, cj. J. SB AVER. 

Constable ^ j^ g parMLBE. 

Depsnville Koo. LUCIUS BIGBLOW. 

No. 466 Pearl st, N. Y Mj^jor J. a P. BETLAJTU. 

Falrfiehl Hoo. C. L. UEBRIAJL 

«,»»., I 1 .• < CHARLES F,.bM>TH, 

Green Island. J jAMBS KILBOUKN. 

Bnjokdale (Stockholm) Hon. GEO. M. GL8AS0V. 

Herman. Gen. N. M. CCBTU. 

FRIDAY, Oct 20, 

vn»+v..di« -o «• cG-en. GEO. A flHBRIDAK. 

Aorthville, P. M {nin. AUSTIN A. YAIES. 

Brooklyn. Ho.«. CARL SCHCRZ. 

HooslckFaUs Hon M. L TOW.NSEKO. 

Newburg Hon. GHOROE W. CCRTIfc. 

Cold Spring HoilCHaUSCET M.DBPE^ 

„ . ^ ( Hon. HENRY BALLARD. 

Rochester J uon.L. BRADFORD PSIjrOB 



Batavia 

Catsklil....'. 

Saratoga Springs.... 

Backet's Ha;rl>or 

Bainbridge 

Nunds 

Copenhagen... 



Lndlownlle . 



Delhi. 



Hon. BUTLER a NOBLE. , 

. . . Gen. JUO >0 « KILP iTBICK- 
...riou. A. W. TBNKKT. 
...Hox J. H^AEWICK. 
...Hon. tfi B. WiSaBOa." 
....Gen. CLARK K. CaBB. 
...HoK. WILLIAM HBBBOk 

Mlddletown Hon. E. D. CULVKB. 

Fayetteville C.L ALBERT D. SHAW. 

Belmont Gen.'.T. B. GATES. 

HomellaviUe CoL A. E. BAXTER. 

irredonia Hon. 0. P. VBDDE8. 

Coi8ackie....J*K Hon. SIfTH L MILLITUl- 

p„^ To..^. c G :;a J A M B3 W. HUSTBa 

Port Jerrts...... J Hon. WILUAM P. FCBBa 

College Point... Hon. SILA& B. DCT QgBB. 

South Glen's Falls Hon. FRANCIS 81LVB8TU 

Stamlord.Conn Hon. JAMES A BElGOB. 

New-Baltimore. Hon. MiJLVILLB C. SMIT^ 

_ , ( Hon, GEORGE W. BCKQAIi 

Ca.v'"- loBORGEL. WaTuBS. 

Ctaenaogo Hon. JAJlltS E. ASOBL. 

Honeoye Hon. G D. JfCBEAT. 

Fiahkill Gen. JOSgPH C. JACKSON 

_,. »,^ < Hon. J. W. UWlGHX. 

WatUna { M. M. ttKAD. 

North Salem -Hon. DOBMaS B. EATOV 

Waddington _Hon. HENRY R. JaMEB. 

Crescent •- Hon. -\. H. FAEEAB. 

Herkimer .jAMKS KILBOUBS. 

t Hon. John H. SELCRSa 

\ Uiij;ir HaKRT D. TIl'LEiC 

tGen. DANIEL CLLMAK. 

Jdou- BAMOEL Y. . ILLS* 

Jessup'sLanding Hon. WILLIAM H. TltFTt 

Windsor Gen. GEORGE W. PAIiMBR 

Concordia HalL 28 and 30 5 Hon..JOHS A. T AlLOS. 
Avenue A, New-fork.... I rfon. JOH.N OaKaT. 

Pearl Riyer Hon. A. W. OLBAiiOS. 

Elba Hon. B. T. MORGAN. 

AlBsnv Prof P. B- BAKRMA ty. 

Rotterdam aon.JO.iJI H.LITTLKPIMA 

„ _^ „ (Gen. JOES B. MCaEAT. 

Hajts Comers JcoLAS. BAKtR- 

Mlddlefleld Centre CHARLES U. B.OlBB. 

Theresa Hon. LUCIUS BIGSLOW. 

C Hon. GBORGS BECKBB. 
Van EttenvUle \ qi. L. W. BAILEY. 

Bufferin - F. X 8CHOOSMAK.KR. 

Plymouth. Hoa JAMES W. GLOVBl. 

...,JOHW F. MINES. 
( J. BlLBR CADY. 

— \ .RAfllDSOOO-T. 

.Capt J. OWKN MOORB. 
... J. R. VAA WORILBB. 

c Hon. A. F. SMITH. 
-- J HENRY »l. AVLES^OBT* 
„;... Hon. CLIN ' OS L- MBRBlAlf 
n^oL HA LB KISGSLKI. 

Kings Ferrv ."'.Hoa. JOHN H. CAMP. 

Posterville Hon. GEOKGSO. BATHBI*. 

Victory. Hon. JOIN L. PABKKK. 

c Hon. GtORGE L POUT. 

New-Hope P. M. \ Hon. 8. K. PAY.Mt 

< Hon. WM. J. COBNWBLft. 
Venice taon. P. m. PABSOJrs. 

Lafayette FRANK HIScOCK. 

EajmondyUle... Hon. GEO. M. GLBASOH. 

Edwards -Gen. N. M. CURTIBl 

SATUBDAT, Oct 21. 

..,.„.. c Gen. JDD80N KILPATRKV 

Glen's FaUe, P. «.. \ Hon. A. W. IB.^.iET. \ 

I Hon. QEORGa W. CXXtV 
) Hon. JOHN A. KING. 

VanderbUt Landing. -{Hon. H. J. bcU..DER. 

lHon.M.TOMr'Kl.>& 

ATon Gen. CLABfC B. CARR. 

Penn Yaa Hoi.L.BRADF^>BItPEIN<^ 

Westfield. Hon. BUTLER Q. KOBLE. 

Naples Hon. C. D. MURRAY. 

Eighth Ward, Brooklyn....flon. SILAS B. iCrCHXg. 

c Coi. GEO. W. CARTBB. 
Yonkers {Hon. SBTHL. M1L.I.IKJKBU? 

New-Berlin 1 Hon. H. B. WA8HB0S. 

Onondaga -Hon. J. H. WARWICK. 

P.itchogue Hon. GEOEGK W. ROZIB;. 

\f Hon. K. S. FRISBEt 1 
BigFlats - {JOHN T. DAVIDiON. 

HaskinsTille CoL A. K. BACTBR, 

Pine Plains. P. M CoL T B. THtfRPK. 

Greenpoint Hon. A. W. GlEASON: 

Greenfield Centre Hon. A H. FaBRAO. 

( Hon. JOHN H. SELKREO. 
Enfield Centre ^M-Jor HENRY D. TiLBB. 

Brusbland Hon. SAMUEL F. MILLEE. 

Onion Gen. GEORGE W. PALME* 

CBon. GKOBGE BBt KBB. 
rhf>mnnir . JDr. L. W. BaILHT. 
Chemung ^^ ^ picKSRI.n'Q. 

Scotia Hon-JOHN H-LiTTLEPlBL* 

Springfield Cestro CHARLES D. BAKER. 

Champion Hon. LUCIUS BIGKLOW. 

Westerlo JAMES KILBOURN. 

Clifton Park J- S. LAMORKAUX : 

( Hon. PBTSK W. HOPKU^ 
Tracy Creek — J E. C. MOODY. ; 

t KDMCND O'CONNOR. 
J GEORGE B. CURIIB. 

,.J. M. JOHNSON. 



■4^ 



Lmolennivtlle 

Weaver Hollow. 

Otlsviile 

New-Scotland. 

Oneouta.... ....... 

Mobawk 

Kaox. 






ft ■ 



Riverside. 

East Union... 
Sand Lake... 



Cicero, 
Ira.... 



( Be V.J. BRADFORD CHATSk 
Is. FO>Tt.R. ' 

{ Hoo. GEORGE N. KRNNBDI 
)T. K. FULLtR. 

Col JOHN E. 8AVEET. 

MONDAY, Oct 23. 

„ ,. ^ i_ii ( Gen. DANIEL E.8TCKLB% 
Parepa Hall Torkville... { hou. J. H. WARWICK. 

Whliestowu Gen. GEO, A. SHKRIDAK. 

Plattsburg Gen. JUDSOK KILP-ATBICB 



Rome... 



...Hon. A. W. TKN-VBT. 



EepubUcan He»d-quar-,jGen. "^8. JiATES. 
tSrs.J3rookl.vn... .?-.... i Hon. W. W. GOODRICa. 



Hon. RICHARD CROWLBt^ 

( Hon UEORGK W. H0XI8. ; 

1 Hon. ORANGE FERRIS. 

Gen. JAMKS W. HCSTKD. 

Hon.L.BBADFORDPBlNCB. 

Hon. C. D. MURRAY. 

Hon. JOHN A. TAYLOR. 

HawklnsTille Hon. O. J. COGGK3HALL, 

Candor. Gen. GEORGE W.PALMB^i 

Meridian Hont JOHN H. C4MP. 

GrotonClty Hon. JOHN H. 8ELKB«a 

McUan Major HENRY D. lYLMfc 

Burlington Fhits CHARLES D. BARKE. 

Flashing B. HAMMOFD. Jr^ 



Attica 

Loxeme. 

Hayerstraw. . . .. 

Palmyra. 

Shortsville 

Closter, N. J 



POLITICAL 



'bAV£S and WHKEtiBK CL>OB 

OF TORKVILLE. 

Pablio meeting at PAREPa HALL, 

■-;> ^ Sd av. and Seth ft., 

TO-NIGHT. 

Aiidresses by Col ETHAN ALLEN and others. 



ELiBVKNTH ASHltAIUI^V l>l.<«TK10r HS» 



......PO8L1ICAN A8SOClATI<)N — ,V special meoting cJ 

tids AssociAtlon will be held at Repnulioaa Hall, So. N 
West 8Sd St., on TCKBOaY BVE.M >0. OctTlf: «t I 
o'clock. A caneus will be held at ifcSU o'clock »t mmM 
place and eveniug. SJ&OX UnAMdK. An«MMk 

Sa 3.298 M ST.. S.T ^Om. JAUHaA. JUiGQit.^ J; ^ J. BrAktt.JMMm^ 






><'> 






i'k.i, 



.... ^ - .^ 



v^i-^i- 



& 



Tfa.-t.ri 



' _^ JL^ 1 













J^iqjilnmitt 






t^ V'h*^^^ 



.-% 



; SITUATIONS WAKTED. 

«IU LI'.TOWN UFFICB tfV-THK TiniM. 

TTm sp-town offleeof THB TIKBA la 1oost*drt 
h*. 1,437 Droadvray, b«t. Slstaad .^iiidsn. 
Open d»ily, SuiMtay* liMladod, ftom 4 iL M. totf P. tf. 
tnlMvnptloiu icoatT«a. nad eopiM of TU5 TUMSbr 

APVKRTTyKMRir rS RKCKIVgD CWTIIi 9 P. ML 

(^HA >IB£R-.>iAlU AND MSlAiSTRBsSS.— 
jBj a reapao;*ble ProtMtant prl as first-elas* 
«lmmber-mahl and leamatnaa : ia wlUlnn and oblig- 
ina I ean operate on saTrral m*elunea : beat refereneo 
K«u<re<l. Adftreaa M. K., Box Ko. 286 TIUES Ol>-rOWJI 

oyyicii yp. 1,257 BftOAPWAT. 

CH^itlBEK-.tlAID AND WAlTitKSS.— BT A 
a ri>v Dir rjl Mrenteem Toara old, ma ei L-mber-mald 
and VbtreiS In • pxirate tMilI.r. « take oare of oliU< 
drrn: good CitT raferanett. OaUat Ko. &?6 7tii ar., 
between 31«t and 32d ata., ting tonrth beU 

GHA.MttfiK-MAID OR FAMlMIK-iMAKD.— BT 
» lady to^ a ar«t<«lasj .bambe>inaid, or la parlor- 
oMid: mtloefonnd trttworthr and oblielMi nine 
rear*' Citr refbrenco from iaacplaoe. Call Jtor tirodaya 
U !(a a] West 'Jim) St., nrea lU to 5. 



CHAAUKK-nAID AND WAITJifi9S-0B 
r,^i.ui'.eiMaald ami plain aaw«r. —By a amart yonn^ 
■Irl, ProCe«it«nt; itood Oiqr rai(ex«no«b CaU atorad- 
teeas M. ^.ai .Idar. 



CHA.>]Ut<'K->IAID.-Br A aSSP£OrA»IiK OlRIi 
as cL«_btfr-m»ia and aawuiKi ia a ffood oj>er:itor 
oa Gri)>».- .. liu<f?r'g machiap; naa aerao yeura" City 
;«ftmie..nom lastplao . Call at Moc 1V8 Weat ITtlktt. 



HA-tlBBR-nAlU AND WAlTKttSM.-Bf A 

ipeot jble Kit: aa otaamber-aiatd aad'waitreaa 1 
City rer. •«ne«. Can be seen at ber preaent •mployer'a, 
la> 3tfi *.adlaon av ; eaU irom 9 nntll i2. 

CBAMBKK-.'HAID AiNO .'^BA.nSTRBHS^BT 
a Proteataiit woiaaa ; oao operate on tlie >^ healer k. 
IVUaon machine; haa a Wilaoa mkolklaa of her o-wn. 
C»a at Nu. 8el hiaat a7th at. 

• .r^HAMBBtt-tlAlD AND WAITRESS.-BT 

\J% rvatieoubie frtrl aa cbamber-niaiU and vattreas ; 
hasthebeat of Tef«reacefroia her last place. CaU at 
Kow 22g B^ac 3»lh su. rear. ^^^ 

i |1HA.>IUKii<.ai«ID AND WAITKU.S-.-BY A 

\ V'jroant rlrl in a or. rate fkmUr : folly capable. niU- 

i liML ana obllfflnc; brat City reifarenoeu CaU a» Ku. 

;; taa 3<1 «▼., near ai>t at. 

ClUAt>iBi£R-.U A1U~€00K.-BYA LADfOOINa 
.to Kutope for two food •errants, one as «hMuber- 
Bald and isaudresa. or -aa 000k. the etbex aa -vrultraso. 
Xaqdtra at Nu 191 Madison av. 

inHA>ifiliK-J1AlD.--BY A RBSHBOTABUSOIRL; 
V/W-ottin assist in wRltlmr: best of refereaoa. Can b« 
■aen at ber preueiit employer's. Soi, 9 <aat Idth at., for 
*wo days. 

HAMBRK-n^Ut) AND WArrKiMr<.~l5T A 

reaprct-tble youujc gifi as obamber.mald and wolt- 
, leas: naa Htc jura' referenoe from bar last place. 
^911 at S.?. 129 VVea t 49th at>. 

l:|^HAMaK&-inAiD.~Br \ tounq oirl. 

v>"eUhte«n ysira of axe: nadarsMads ebam b«T»woric 
■M p ain watting : would take oare of cblldr(>n. CaU 
Jbr tare da y» •« Mo. 44^ weat 60th at., third docs, 

/laAMBJtlt-.nAIO.-BY A TOUNQ OitU< Ad 
\y«liaiBo«>maid ai:d tine washing, and la an uxoelleot 
awraat; t.Ujr rel.aeaeek CaU at Bo. 842 £aat 4&tb 
/M., first floor. 



riUA.HiiKR.HAlU.-Br A TOD-SQ SoUTHERff 
V/Klxllo ajkrivatefitmlly; Orrst-«)ass refereneei CaU 
Ma-laraaa B. Uiasuo. Nu. SIT Waat 3Ath at., top fiooi. 
fi«at. 

pUAAIUiSU.WOtltf. AND FI.MiS VVASBINU 

v^ — 07 a i-e^pvciable wa|uaa; andersiauda It tbor- 
oaxhty. sua gau alra gooa City ivferenee. call at So. 
ISa v«eai )!iitaat. 

^'^«ALA..ttBG.U-.HAIU A.VD s*EAM.STR.K?.S.— BIT 

x>/art-speccaoie wo.'caa. or aa BQiao aad aeamatrass; 
wlUins And obnKliig : aereo yean^ b«*t Olty n»ii»t»uo«b 
CaU at .\>i. 10 K»at 35th s;. 

C1HA.flttKU.MAf D.— a¥ A UteSPUCTABL^ hNQ. 
ytiab rrocea ant kiri aa oL>amb«r-maid and help wita ' 
vaaaiug; is wUiiaz Hndobiietajci (ood nterenee. CaU 
•r addrt as No. 78 Weac 48. b at. 

t*A.nUKU-.1kAIll.-3V A PRotKSTANT YOUSQ 
wan.tn to do chamber-work and Una waahlnc cr 

wititliic: goud City zetaranee. Ca<l at Ao. 131 W«a« 

2Sth»t. 

/ U]A.nilBR..1IAID ANtt WAlTSItfM^BY A 

V^iudir for aglet who baa Uved with her nlneyeara 
CO du cbamber-work and waiting CaU J«r twu diy* 
at >« 3^ Kaat 3uth at. 

CHAliBKu-iUiAlD ANU \\ Al riClidSt.— Blf A 
y<iaug womaabo da chamber- work andwaittox, and 
txMsisi ^ithrrnwaabiagandiroBinst City i«&ef«ne«. 
t.«ii at .'<a, 570 ceeonU aT. 

C mA J i WJBIt-.UAlA*, dec- By a rery oompetent 
/paraona* cliacil>,:c-uiaia ana dotbe cewiug; h»a 
ttrat-^laaa xelai-aucoa. CaU tor two dayaat&Ob XU4 
Waal ;ilsi tfc 

^a 70UB4 girl t or kaaist lu taking oare of pbUdren t 
loarjrMn'ieftreaoe ri:»ia ia«t «aptoyes. CaUMAca. 
ttol :^ av.; Second oeli. 

/ tBAJlBKU-aiAID.— BTAQEBHAM OIKL; WLU. 
Vduwaahini{*nu troamx ; beat zeleraooea. C<Jii at 
Jig i^i W eat 4 jd st. 

CABAJIl»t.K-JlAtli A.MU WAtTKlSdS. Bf 
/a aweuiaU jtirl lu Apdrate tamilf j beat of City ref- 
twiue. c.iUatNo. 2 ;<J nast 47tQ it., flr«t floor. 

C\iiAJaaKu.>.HAll».— BT A flidT-cX.ASi v,a vM- 
/uex-BiAid aaa to a4aUt th« waiter or culldren; eoud 
t;:t.y teiyreaoe. Cai l at s«. 10 West 44th at. 

t fUA.tlUKK-MAlD A.\D LAtiMJKKSisi.-Br 

vy.* fxuicstaitt idri; oruo aewiajc; tirat-«i<ias City 
tetereuce. CaU afc .<o. 742 ad ay ., comer of ■iBtb at. 

riUAJIBlfK^llAlD A>D WAirt£B9Ji.-BT A 

VyreapaAt.tbie viermaa girl in a amaii fJamiif, a;* ehaoir- 
Urr-ax^a and wattrea*. Apply at So. 239 Siwt 3ath at. 

C^tlA.niiiiK>.UAll> A.">iD WAlXKBeid.-Br A 
/'rea^iiectaLlo yoani{ Ktii as ehamoer-maid and walt> 
leaj ; ijood City refere nce. Call at 120 vVeat 2Utb at. 

CUlAMBBii-.MAIO BT A CuLO.^KQ OIitL Ab 
■'chaoiuet-taald aud to da sewioz : best City lefur- 
•oec. C.U ax Six. \i<i West 17 tb a& 



p(BA31UJdll..>«Alll.— Bf A aSaPKClAlU^ OIEi 
Kjitm c.ium.>«r-maiti aud Ltondieaa. Can be s^en iaz 
'.wo days at b»r ia sb empJoyct'j, .-.o. 23 iiast 37tb si. 

CUAiUBItK'il.VlD.— BY A uisPECrABLK 
yiNiDs woman ; six years' xafaxasee. Can be aeea 
nit iniced at praaenr am player'a. >o. 661 6th av. 

I UMiil-CaA.tiBKlU.>IAID AilK WAi'fKBdS.- 
yjMj two siatera, together: both girU guod Ima- 
diesaes i will do liie wor,^ of a amaUiamlly betwaea 
tOem ; country or tity : beat v* n^reaees. Addreaa 

^-o*.; ?"* **.^=*'** Tuuuj i;F-'row« u^nca, mo. 

XAil UitUAliWAV. 






^OUK. WAaiHl:.!^, A.\U lK,Ui\Jl£tt— CUA.n- 

w/uer-miii auu Wa. tress. — By two youug girls, sla- 
ters, in a i>rlTai« tiBUij, together, oae as «ompetent 
<.ettk, vaancr. aud iibiier, the other as chambe -uaid 
tmA waltrea*, aud would aasist In eeaeral iiouae-work : 
wferetoe. caU at Sg 6 7 West 4Utb st. 

flOOtt., dee.-CUA.>lilKtUJriA ID, dcc-BY 
Vytwu yvang giris ; oite aa«ook, waaher, ana Ironer; 
Vi» otber aa ebunsber-aiaiil aibi. waibcaaa ; so oUtottoa 
waaaiat wltli Wjo wishing and ironiug; beat City ref- 
txaa^e. ta ll at .vo. CI tVoai; 42d au, aecond flat. 

CWOii— HAllKKaS hUO CHA^Bmt-MAIli.— 
By rwo gSrU ir jin Scotland ; one will cooic and 
aaaiat wiiJt wvauln^. the ottier aa waitreaa anu Cham- 
D«s>iiuia ; can loruisii twu years' Wty refoence. CaU 
tor twotiays t.t nao taat "Jith st. Bia g faorth XmW. 

^"M>"<a.— By A FiitBT-, £ia« PAHItT COOK IJf A 
V>imyate laoiUy; takes «^atur» eiiari$» of kitchen; 
voaU do marKeiing if r equiiou ; mt obiecdua to tba 
coautry : hus the very riest City relereuce from last 
plaoe. Caji at Ao. 47i oth ar., in hiacy axore. 

Aouik— VVAlTjUkSa.— BX TWO BJSSPJBCTABili 
V'tprla, one aa flxat-olaas cuok, the othnr aa tiist-ciasa 
watUesaj best City laforenee. CaU at Mo. 23« least 
a7ta at. 



r'*J*f*^«. *C'^'»'f THro aKaPKCTABIiB Y00«9 
V^gUrU, bistera, one at first-ciaas oeek and the other 
u cbamber'ssaid aad walttasa; tturea years' r«tar> 
«nee &om their laat plaee. Call at : t08 liaat 4flth at. 

UO«.-WAlXltJ£»l*.-BX TWO BE8PECTAflI.« 

girls, ooa aaeookand the other aa waliraas : beat 

UL^n^Asrenea dTea U xeqaired. OaU at Ko. i*20 Weat 



f1«H»lt,->lKi)T.cLAa» 1 CAiJ DO ALL KihlMi OP 
V/aaoking, bunlug, and larding ; exoellent baker- 
JeaaUttyreeBroneS: CaU at Kt? 141 wSt gWb al'. 



C®">tS.'^ * coJiPitTKST Yooata womak as 
Kood pUin 000k aad flrat-claa*^ lanodreas : eood 
long xeftoeoee from laat piac« Cidl M Ko. 3*26 aaat 
doth (t., for two davs. 



ClUOtt. Jke.— BXA YOC-SO WOUAN IV A PRIVAIK 
/famjly as uoox, waaher. snd Itotier, or would do 
jtsueral houseworit ; fl.st-olass City retorenoe. Call 
*« address 2 Jtl 1st aT., near Uth st. top flour, front. 



CtOUK^BY AN fcXPiUUJi.SCliW iJniRAlAS WO«- 
/ao as Srst-elass cih)Ic; undorstaads all kinds of 
Muns, boaijw, htrdiog, and oaaaactsi OUy refezeaces. 
CalTat Ay. -Ml West isth St. *«>«i:eu«>a. 



CAUUK., W2^>4UlUi AND IKO.NiSiC.-aV A 
/amori., aotlve woman in a pclrate family; keeps her 
hueben neat aad tidy ; wilUiig and obUgingj best re? 
wreaee. Call at .No. 351 3d av. 



C'lO«»It.— PHUJT CiAUd, BT A PaOTHSTANT 
/woman; uuderatanoa coofclni; m all its branches- 

KT? ^JiT *'^'** ' ,6'^'^ tefaranoB. Cail at So. 447 
W a»t iSlth •(. , near 9th ar^. 



C\OOi&.— dY A KBBPjiarABl.it WOMAJ. ; WlLb A»- 
/■lat with waaulug and ironing; five vaars' «.ity ref- 
eraaoe from last piMe. Call at Mo. 240 West iiith at. 



C>OOK..-l»V A RiiLlABl>K EW01.IBU WuJlAK A3 
;go#a cooit J ex<;olleut baker ; good waaher auJ 
j5?^/= CltTjeterenoe, Address O. i. Box i,o. 2j»3 
•tlUAA ff-roWM oyyiCK. NO. i;a67 BROADWAr. 



COUK.— tT A B&jPlSCTABua WOiiAN aB t'lBaT- 
claa. Cxok; ih -roughly understands het bualness: 
f ity or oounuy ; beat rmereneoa. Addisas K . O.. Box 
W7 THH%M Uf.l'OVVM pytflon. 1.257 BBOAD VVaY. 

Ciu«iH.— UY A fci;iii.iBiB scoi'caatKi,. would 
/-asa-ai wiih the washlitK: has ijood refereuco iroiu 
her hut olai*. caU at f(o. lOtt Sth st, between 3d 
ttiMi 4tit ays. « 

C1OOHL.-BT A YbOaO WOalA.".- AM Flkdl-CLASS 
/cook, thoruoijhiy competent In all brsn<hes ; beat 
Uity reforeuco ; citjf ur coautey^ UaU at Jia. 124 We«t 
iad St., baicmeut. 

C'lOUIA..— UY A ttatfiPriiOTAaUB YOUiW OLttt, AS 
^'guoutook; ooJeisiaads aU ktuds ot oooklug; wiU- 
lug to assist wirn wasblu« and Iroaiag: best City 
ceTMenee. CaU at So. 15 7 West alat at. 

r^OUM. — BK A IttiSPKClABLS roU.\Q WOilAN AS 
V>gaod plaia eook: liist-olaM washac aud ironer; 
City ur vouutrr I best City raAnreaoe. OaUatliaw3U3 
Bastatfthsu, bakery. 

OOK.— BY A KiajT-OLAdd oOOiC: DSdSkT 
■ laudB Doups Jelly, pastry, luid Kama) English aud 

Amermao cooclnx ; elgtit years' reA-reneo if required. 

Call at So. 157 West 2 7th st., secon d floor back. 

C10MK, «Sro — UY A Bl^PKCrABi^B WuttAZI AB A 
/rood CO. k; hasnoobjeotioa te> aaaiat witu wash- 
lusi aight yaara' i«£erauae from her laat plaoa. CaU 
tor modayi uNq. 2i9 togt 8fctb at. 

•»<»3i WAMHKK, AND XHMSOteU-Vl A SB. 



SITUATIONS WAN^TED. 

jnSMAL.B8. 

COOK.-IN A PRIVATO'pAmLY BY A PRR80V 
who thoroughly uoderstanda her bnslaess : has 
first-class refereooe ; Kood baker. Call or address No. 
840 West 26th si. third floor. 

aOR,— BY 'k PROTKffl'AST YOUNQ WOHAM j 
tboron^blr nnderstands her business; willing to 
assist ^Ith waahtng; beat refereooa. CaU at Mo. 451 
Weat 14th St. 

DOK.— BY A BBSPKOTABLB WOMAN AS FIRST. 

elaas oook; understands all kinds <>f soups, bnad, 
and paatry; beat City rafeieoo^j from mat place. CaU 
at Ng 211 Kiut 4(nh st. 

C(IOK.-BY A PKOTKSTANT AMBttlCAN WO JAH 
as cook: Is an excellent bread and cake baker; 
City or country ; City refereaoe. Address M. 41. C, No. 

808 West 2a<l st. __^ 

UOK, WAriHBU. AND IKONKR.-BY A 
mlddlc-ased Sootoli Protestast woman la a smaii 
family. Can be s««d at iwesent employer's, *g lv<8 
Bast iCthst, ^ 

DOIC-BY A EBaPR€T.4BLK OIRL TO COOK. 

waah, and iron la a private lainlly! (tood ( ity rer- 
eronag CaU at So. 317 t'aat 39th St., top floor, front 
room. 

C100K, WA5IRBR, AiND IKONER^BY A 
^reapectaWj woman aa sjood plain cook, woslior, and 
iioner, or geaerai fconse-workj City or country. Call 
at Sg .341 East 25tb st. 

OOK.-6Y A KfcSPBCTABLB GiRL A3 GOOD 

o»ot, good bread and bisuult maki^r ; in .i private 

family j will do the plain washiog it required ; good 

City reference. ( . aU at No. 22 l>o>viilng St.. first floor. 

C UOK.— BY A WKLSH PEOTiSS I'A.ST COOK: H 
fir8t-cla?s ! best Cltv Tt-fereuoe. Address C. A., B(>x 
So. S24 TtJa BS DP-TOWS OPPIOH 1.257 BRUAP.yAY. 

COOK.— BY A KIRSr-CLAtJS K^aLIS^ COOK; 
flompetent, rellabte, obliging: can take entire 
charge, rail at ^o. 118 VVeai 2tjth st., i>«scment 

COOK.— UY A PlR5T-CL»-»i tOoK IM A P (IV.^TB 
ftimilyi heat City refcreneg CaU at Ng 2iM Bast 
S6th at^ 

OOK, WA*iHBR, AND 1RONKK.-BY A 

respectablg ateadv woman as cook, washer, and 
Ironer ; good ity relerenog Call at 6 3 East »Oth st 

ODI&.-Bir A YOUNG WOHA.-« A8 riRoX-CLASS 
cook; will do ooarss washing; good City refer- 
ences. Call at 109 ^a West ISth st, reir; flrat floor. 

0<tK.— BY A YOUSQ WOJIAN A- FiBsr-;;LAS3 

Ihmily cook; best of^ty referwice. c»llfttN(». 

221 Bast 2l8t at., room No. S. 

COOK A>0 %.AUNDREiSS.-8Y A YOUNG 
woman With good City reference. Call at No. 231 
West 33d »t 

C<»<»K.— BY ACOLOItlsD WOjIAJI AS Pia jT-iJLASS 
oook la a nrivate famUy. Call or addraiis J. V., 

No. 2» 6tt> ay. 

■ ■ *■ 

/ mUK.— BY A QIBL AS COOK AND TO AS.BIST 
Vxwjth tiie Traabiiig s good City rf feronoea. CaU at 
215 Kaat 41b» at., near 3d rt., t op floor, for two daya. 

ClOOK.-FiftST CLASS ; 6Y A PRO TK^ TiN f WOM- 
/an ! Is wiiling and obliging ; oouotry preferred ; 
beat reterencg Call at 134 West 17th at., baa>^ment. 

OOK, ifcC— BY A GOOD COOK AND LAUNDKaSS ; 
nhie years' City refereuce. Call at A'o. 244 East 

44th at. 

OOK.— liY A ViaST-OLASS COOK, SOW DISES- 

gagrd; baa the btgbest testimonials. CaU at Kg 



24/^1 



ea 3 3d «t, betwe-n 7th aud 8th avu. 

UOK.— BY A FIRST-CLASS l-ROfUdf ANT COOK : 

City or oounuy j beat refdrenog CaU at Ng 4a 4 
We8t64tbst. 



COOK, \VA!SHKa, A.M> IKUNfiK — BY A EB. 
speotable girl; haa the best of City ri-terence; 
wBl^ and Obliging. Call at No. 15.'? Kaat 59th st 

OOK«— 6YA ttE^PBcT-ABLK WOMV.^; WIl.L AS- 

Blst with waabiBg; beat City reference from last 

place. CaU at .\ g 666 7th a v. 

OOK, WASHBtt, AND IK'JNEK.-bY A 

young girl ; haa good Ciiy referenog Cull at &g 
82 6 Weat 26th at. 

COUK.— BY A RKSPKCTABLt: WuMA^N' ; UOOD 
I Ity ref erence. Call at Ag 120 W6«t 2utn at. 

OOK.— BY A COMi'Kl'B.ST WOJIA.S. CAM BE 
aeen at her preaeat em ployer'a, 237 West 21»t st. 

UlM«t-»fAKlSR.— BY AN AMKaiOA-<l. A 
thoiooeb cutter, Utter, and trlmm^T, aa dress- 
tnakt-r and seamatress or as lady's m it I, (no hair- 
drssslag;) operates on Wheeler b. Wl.s -n':» maoiiiue; 
would be ireuerally useful In rlgot pl<»<;e ; tiighes ret- 
ereueea. Address Urd. Beliable, No. ViO 6th av., ae»r 
41at St., ill millinerr stire : ^11 caU ?» eveiilni. 

ttE»!*-MAKKIt.— APiiHPiiiC'r FA dU-Y CUITKB 

wintsvfork; Win give lessons on Wheelir &. Wli- 

•oB'tf ttt«ahinet at $1 per day ; ten years' Clr y rt^fer- 

ence. Addresa ». U. Box JfJg 320 T1.WB3 UP-TO.vN 

OPglC B, KO. 1^7 B-^OAPWAr. 

DaE»»»MAltKK.-BY A cOLOtt 1) UHr.SS- 
maker a few mure oustomt-rs by the day ; com- 
Wft-i-at, litter and triiu^nrr ; moderate chargaa. Cail or 
addreaa 1). M., Ng48 Oleecker at. 

RE!H.'!U.UAKER.— BY A FUIST-ULAS • D.:E3S- 

maker; w«rk hy the day or week ; uoderstanda all 

kinds ot family sewing t alao machine. Litil at No. 153 

East 2»ta St. thUOUelL 

a£.M!^.iTlAKKlt.— TO 00 BY KAY OK WREK: 

would take work home; goo 1 fitter aud tilmmei ; 

Wheeler fe Wilson uaobtne. Call or addreaa U. M., 

oarB Y, L, 0. Aiwcl atlon, »o. 7 Bant 15 h at. 

KH»r^.:HAKti:K.— BY > CO U f r.Tli.S f UiiKSS- 

tnaker a few more engagemeu's by the day oc 

week ; City or oouatry. CaU or address xVo. 102 Wa- 

Terley places _______^ 

DtCKHH-.^IAKKR.— BY A RKhPKCTASLK A.MERI- 
can girl as dreaa-maker aad saamjtress, or will iis- 
sist la chamber-work i>r waiting. CaU or adiresa 
Seamatreas, Mg 621 .Sd ay. 

DRESS-ylAKUa.— SY A COMPIiTEI'lT D.iK8S- 
m&ker, to cut and fit by the day in private fam- 
Uies. Ca.l a t So. 474 3d av., nt-ar 3id at. 

|(l£«»8..13A<VKlil.r-BY TUB \).\\ \ CAN i<rr Ii.V 

dies' and ebildren'a Suit^: mootiily fashloos; ^iil 

take wor k homo. Call at Na 224 West 30th st 

DKK»&I-.>IAKKR.— BY A COUPBTK.NT bR<i>8' 
maker and seamstress. CnU or adilreas ^o. 100 
Weat 64th bt., oomeKfit h av...,rltig first boU. 

Kb.<>i!!^MAKBK^TO GO oUi' B if THB DAY. 
0«a at Sg 284 3d av.. between 22d aud '^^Sd sts. 

OUSKKUBPBK.— BY A TRUSTWOaTd V ANU 

honorable mJd(ile-aged American ; willing to do 

th':i ap-stalrs worlr; Is a beautifai seamstress ; can 

cut out, mskiii, and trim ladies' garments. Address M. 

K.. iiox Ng 29STIllKd CP-TOWN Ot'flCIi. NO, 1.257 

BKOAUWAY. 

OUdBKBEPRR.-BY 15 KXPhlRlENcED 
housekeeper wh(> can furnish reUable refftreoce : 
troald like to go ijouth aa hotel liouaaket-per. Call or 
addresB, for ona week, 3. KU C, l(g 22 Hudson Ter- 
race, Uoboken^ K J, 

HOfMBKUBPBR.— BY A BBLIABLb: PKU80N 
as houaekneoer In a widower's f.iisliy wh^re tbete 
are children preferred: good refennte mniisiio'l. Ad- 
dress E. H. L., Box i'<o. 2S0 TlJlEi UF-iOvVS OF KICK, 
Na l.'2d7 BROAOWAY. 

HOti!HJitvlIi£PitK.— By a respectable Fiotesiant 
womauaa working hunsekeeuer tn a sm;>il family 
wiiere she can have her little girl; can fornish beat 
refereiiaas ; na obi'Ctioua to the country. Addreaa U. 
B. HUI. No. 1.462 3 1 av. 

BrOUKbKKBKBK OR NU .SiB.— BY AN EX 
Lperienced woman, or wnnld take charge o! linen in 
a hotel, or othi-r respectable employment; good City 
reterence. Apply at Young Women's cbrldtiun Asao- 
tion, No. 7 East 15t h st ^ 

HOL'HEKBLPjmt BY A QKUMAX LADY, AS 
hona^kceper lu an American f^vnitly ; nndcrntands 
ocoking in all its branches, aud ia Inlly competent to 
fill the situation. Inqmre at No 117 ifast 70lh st. 

HOU8K-WOBK.— BT AN AMERICAN GISb IN 
atmall (.'bnsttsn family In the City, where she 
would tnrefer a good home to hi^h wagoa; understands 
boase-work to aU Its branches ; is » very gooa plain 
sewer, or is capable of takiug the position of working 
houaekeeper ; raf^srennea. Call at No. 475 2d av.; ring 
fourth bell: no poatal cards or notus noticed. 

OUSB-WORK.— BY A RBSPKCTABLK SCOTCH 

Proteataot woman to do general house-work ; 

waxes not so muoh of so object as a good home ; no 

objections to the country ; good refereuco.^. Call at Ng 

252 West 22d st 

HOUSE-WORK.— BT A NOKTa OP lUKCAND 
Proteataut aa general house-worker ; is a good 
plain cook: ex''ellent^waaher and iroSer; best refer- 
•sees. CaU at 117 Weat 41st st 

OUBE-W«>RK.— BY A YOOVO WOMAN TO DO 
.genend house-work: ia a good plain uook, first 
cUkss waaher aod ironer: willing and ohliginc; best 
City refe rences. CaU at No. 693 Oth a v. , tirat beil. 

HUC^E-WORK.- BY A YOUNG WO.UA.N" TO \)0 
general house-wotk ; ia a good plain oook ; lirst- 
elats washer aud Irouar; heat references. CaU at Ng 
693 6th av. 

OUSE-VVORK.-BY A Oiai. TO DO OiiSiiUAL 
bouae-worK; goo J waaher ua<l Iroaec ; four years' 

City reference irnm her last plaog Call at No. 251 

West 41st St. first floor, buolC' 

H' OV.'^BWORK.- A TOONG WOilAN VVISUKM 
to do housework ; no objection to a short distance 
ill the country; best roferenog Call at No. 333 i^ast 
25 tb St. 

OUH£.-\VOHK.— itY A RKoPUCTASLK YoUNG 
girl in a small private fsmliy ; good City rofer- 

encg Apply for two days at No. 1,026 2d av. 

Ot'iSK-WOKK.— BY A RESPKCTABLE WOMAN: 

is a good plala oook, washer, and ironer ; best re£> 
erenog Call mr Ng 144 East 43d st, near 3d a v. 

(>[;»>£-WORK.— BY AN BXfBtilKNCKU OIRL 
for general houae- work iu a private family; good 
refsieace. CaU at No. 329 hast 30th sr. 

KIlTHJiN-MAID.— BY A YOUNQ GIUL LATutY 
landed as kitchen-maid or general house-work ; is 
willing and obMgtug. CaUatNglOv> 9th at., between 
3d and 4th avs. 

ITCilKN-niAID — BY A PROTESTANl' YOU.nQ 
girl a» kttch«u-maid ; City retereuee. Call at iNo. 
41.:> West 2dth at., room jio. 13. 

ADY'S iViAlli.— B)C AN h.SUUStl PKOilitil'ANT 

Ut a ladj^'s m.-Ua; 1* an excellent bair-uressir, 

Kcuva, aad uoiielug; a good dreKO-maker; willing to 

travel; la a goad operator ; firai-class refereuco. Cull 

or addreai Mo. 138 West 41st st 

A U Y 'Si .>! A I D.— BY AN KXPifUrBSCEl) I'BIt- 
a lad.v'ti maid ; Prutestnnt; bootib; balr-Uiesu- 



H< 
a 



H 

Hty 



J_iso 

er aud dreas-makac; obUfciug: City r- lerenca. Address 
Lady's il .1(1, dox No. 234 TIMKi UP-ToWN OKrlCii, 
SO. 1,267 BKOADW.1Y. 

AUV>.H AIAIU.- THB AUVliHlIaEli, A CO.U- 
petent KreauU maid and laundress, desires a posi- 
tion with a lamily going to Burope; would take charge 
of chlldreg Address uy note H. B., No. 121 oth ar. 

AUNDKiiSrt.— 31f A .NEAr.TlUY, AND Ki-,c!PaCr- 

able girl as Uandr>.iis la a privace family; llrteeu 

montha' beat City rererouoe irom last place. Can be 

seen for two days at proaest empiover'si No. 118 Haat 

40tb St. 

AUMDRBSrt.— BY A KKSPflLiTABCi PBOTrST- 

iuit girl aa laundress in a small private lam ly ; la a 

good Wttaher aud ironer j williog aad obliging ; good 

City refazeoce fi'om \\vt ItMt piacg Call or address for 

two dava at .^o. 519 Istav. 



LAtJNOteBaiM.— BY A BCOTOri PltOlK.STA.\T AS 
itint>olan taaodveas ^x a niivata lamlir. Caiiat 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



FEMAtiKS. 



LAUN'DRK.HS.— BY A FIRST-. 'LASS LAD.N'ORKSS; 
KntiUsli Prot4*8tant ; haa good ref(?rence, and can 
come well rt-commendvd from the lady she last lived 
%'itb. Cull or address No. 652 2d av., between 35th 
and 30tb ktn.. Room Ng 7. 

AUNDREsiM.— BT A VVKL3H PROTIiSTANT GIRL 
as flrxt-class lanndress ; cood City referoic. Ad- 
dress B. D., Box No. 301 TIMES UP-TOWN OFFICK, 
NO. 1,2.57 BROADW.W. 

Al'NDRK.>^K.-BY A COMPKTENT WOMAN AS 
flrst-nass laundress; b^st r.-fer'^ncg Address L. 

A., Box No. 293TI.dt;3 UP-TOWN OFFICE, NO. 1,257 

BROADWAY. 

AUNimES«i oa OHA.'VIBKR-MAID.-nY A 

respectable young girl : no obieotion to it private 
boardlug-house ; good City re&rencg Apply at No. 
411 Kast 12th st ^^^ 

rADNORESS.— P1R8T-CLAB8, WHO CAN GIVE 
Jthf best iif City refureuce. CaU at No. 115 West 
41st st. near Oth av. 

AID AND SEA.'tlSi RE!^*«.-BY A YOUNG 
."^orlh-Gernian Protesi ant girl as maid nnd seam- 
stress; dues not cut and fit d-esses; is » very neat 
sewer; willing to give Oenoan lessons to cLlMron, hut 
flfx s not want to tak^ nny further care of them ; good 
City teferenues. .Apply at No. 50 Oirlsion st, first floor. 

URSK AND CHA.>IBUit.f1AIO BY A ORR- 

mau Protestant who is a good and careful girl: 
very onedlent, aul is thoroughly trained for hsr oa- 
pacltv ; la a^ood and ltl:id uurse ; can sew well ; < 'ty 
or c UBtrv. Address C. D.. Bor No. 256 TIMES UP- 
TQW.S OFFICE, NO. 1.257 BROADWAY. 

IIRSE AND !SBAMSTItEi'4S.-CAN CUT AND 
fit far young clilldren; prcfpri the care of a young 

b,iliy ; Is a Protestant: no ol-.lectlou to the country; 

Cjtv rnfprciico; notes not received. Call at No. 211 

West 20th st 

NIJR?<E.— BY A COMPETENT KKAMSTRE'fl; 
nurse to growing children; outs childrfn's ciothes 
neatlv; operates WUIoox t GIbbs'. Orover t Baker's 
machiaea; beat City reterence. Call at No. S3 West 
44th St. 

HKfiE. — BY A RE-iPKGTABLR PROTE-ilANT 
girl as nurse an?' cha'nber-raald, or would do 

chamber-w rb and waiting In a ami 11 private fm.illr; 

has flratclass City reff rence. Call at No. 1 East 33il at. 

\rH«tl»B.-OAN TAKK THR EN 11 ;E .'H .RGB OP A 
r^ D.iby from Its birth ; three years' City refercnoe 
from last plaee : City or eoantrv. CaUot No. 48 Kost 
4l8t st ___^ 

NL'RSR.-BV A YOUNG WO<iAS; CAN TaKB EM- 
tlr« charge of an ialant t. om Its birth: is a good 
hatr-dre«ser ; best City reference. CaU at Ng 143 
West SOlh st ■ 

\ri'-^**B.-BV A OiR', A3 PIRsT-i'LAsS NORSK; 

L~ can tat" a baUy from Ifa birth; flrsc-ciass refer- 
ence; no obj ectloa to the country. CaU st .No. 123 
Weit I7th st 



NUKSR, «fee— BY A R^3P2CTABLE GIRL TO 
take oare of grown chlMrea. do chamber- work, 
and plain sowing; Citv refs'iences. Call at No. 150 
Kast 47th St., hetwpen Lexington and 3d avs. 

IIRSE.- BY A RaiPrlCTABLK VOUNG GlR'j AS 
nurse and seamstress or to wait, on hu e'deriylady; 
willing and oiiligiii'^: six yeara' refer nco &om last 
place. Call at No. '.'3 1 bist 36th st , top fl lor. 

URHE AND SKA.VI."^TRE8««.-8Y A NK.IT. 

raspec^abie Protestant yonng ■woman to take care 
of children and <h> plain sewing; best reCereuce can 
be eivcn. Call at No. 4'i9 West 26th st. 



NUB^R.— BY A PIRdT-v'LAsS CHILD'S KUH8H; 
understand! care ot baby from birth; willing and 
obliging; no obJ■^otlOB to travel; beat references. Cail 
at Nt. IcQiu West 15th a ., re»r. 

•IJR>*E, <5rc.— BY A RKSPKOrABLK PRO ri-;ST.\NT 
girl to take o;irt> of cht1dr»n an 1 assist in chamher- 
work; can dres hair uico'y; four years' reterencg 
CaU Ht A'g 226 West Slst st. hSsement - ^ - ■ -- 

T^UasK ANU CHA.HB^H-MAID.— BY A COM- 

JJl i>etmit yoang woman; fully underit.iDds the eai'e 
ot children fro u birth; is a ctce, fine wasier •'nd 
Ironer: g'>odOity referenoe. C^ili nt No. 808 6th av. 

N' t;R.SB.— BT A COMr'Krii.^T .■VM'5;RI UN. WOM \S; 
ia DOW dis^tngage.) ; would Uko to mak>} ah engage- 
ment us m-mthlv or Invalid's nmise ; tirst-claas retat- 
enog Call or ad'Iress No. 328 West Z7d st. 

L'RHB AND MEAMSTRE.-ifS.— BY AN AMERI- 
can young \voman aa eaild's nurse and seamstress ; 

Is fiiil. competeot; beit City reforenc>i from last placg 

CaU at No. 881 Oth v. 

L'USE BT A PROTBSTA.vT WOMAN: CAN 

take full charge of a baoy troni its b no and bring 
up on the bottl ; is careful and rcliahlo; has long 
Ciiy reference. Call at !< . 2JS Stii ay. 

-KTVHSa OR »EAHl.«!lTU«;i'i.S.— BY A CoMl'E- 
.,..1 tent person: ur woula wait on a l^idv and do light 
cL^uber-worU; the best of city reference. CaL at 
lji.1. 363 3d av., top fl.ior. 

VUi*K.—ar A KK-'SPii: t.ablk p.iorKSTANT 

■■roman: can taks the en ire chir^e of an infant, or 

will attend to small cbltdrcu; good Olty reieieucg 

Call at No. 332 6ta ar. 

\riJRsE.— BY A YOD.>'a GIRL, ro TAK; vJARi OP 

11 ohiUrmi, or w.ll do cham ier-wor t ; good reference. 
CaU. for two davs, at No. .-i^iJ. We^t ii<i st. 

URi!»E.— BH A~RK3PicTArfLi I'ttOTcJsTAST 
w.iman as Intaut's nursi^: goj.l City reteronco. 
Aopiy at or address for two dava No. 9 West Ifltb >.t.. 

IIUMB A.NO Si EXn ^TttUn v.— BX A R-JSPBOT- 
able girl ; or chainb'-r-woik ; 'the best of City leie - 

ence. Cull at No, '^I'J West 83d st. 

lJK--tE.— BY A LADY AS I.Sf.lNl' T ) BlU sG OP 
on tha oottla ; will have the best carg call at No. 
346 i-aat Slid st 

,\rt'R-»ii.— BY A COilP,il'ivM' P,-;ttSoN; CAN DO 
H sewing ; Lj«st City reference. CaU at No. 276 Weat 
19th st 

UK5sB.-BY A BCOrOU QIBj ; FlB^f-OLAMS IN 
tikut's ntirse ; takes entire <:hirj;e, auJ best reter 
euoo eirtrn. Call «t -No. 715 Oth av., l.i tan"y jtorg 



NURSE.— BY AN A.Vl '.fllCi-S UiaL AS NOltSli IS 
toud ol children; pood refjrenca Call or address 
>io. »0» .-Jdav., near 4.id st 



N 



UKS>E.— BY A won N LAfri .Y LA.iD,ii> PRO.M 
Kiiglun-1 ; CUD do plain sewi..g ; is wah educated. 
Iraia >o. 318 East 33d <it. 



Addra:.a 



(^EAilairRuts.-^.— BY A YOU.>ia eiBti as -kam- 
i^Bivess; auiteistfinds m:<cuine sewing; nnobijeirtion 
10 miud children or do cham'>er-work, or assibt iu any- 
tolu^; has be::u a family seam -treat ibr the past two 
years aud seveu mjutha ; City or country; City refer- 
euoe. t all at No 240 Bast 33d st. - 



SEAl>l!STUB»ti, dfcC— BY A MlUULli-.\0«D 
Woman- suenks c'leucn and Oe-mitD; understjods 
dress-miikiDg t > pe feotion, aud all km Is of sewiag; is 
very usefai; exealtttut ieferc;ucca. CaU at No. 215 
West31si/ st 



s 



KA.tlSTKE.S-* A\D CHA WBER-.MAID.- 

._iiy a competent girl: or would wait on grown 
ehiidreu ; nn itrstands cutting and fitting lor children; 
belt City lefeieuce. CaU at No. ',242 vv^est 47th kt. 
Room Ng 4. 

EAiJiaii'RE^al.— bY AN K.SGLieH PttuTKal'A^T; 

jt good sewtr ; oa.\ cut aud fit : cap.iL)le of ausistlug 
alndy With ber aouuistic duties Call at No. 4c'&th 
av.. preaant em Liyer'ij. N.ica-ns. 

SEA.^jSTBE?*!'*.- BK ACoilPSFKNT .iKAMSTRtSS 
lunpivat.; f luily; would w,»it du hidleji or aasist 
trith chamber-w rit; very best City refetenoe. Cali at 
No. M'6 LarzlngLOu ar. 

OEA.n."«TtiKS?i.— OPii ^TriS ON WHsliria""*" 
Ow'Laou's machine; witl aas'st In light ciiamboi- 
woric if required ; (It; or e.>a.itry. call at prendui em- 
ployer's, >.). 50 V\eat Oth su 

EA.WMTjiUSaS.-BY AN JiXPtCRIiiNCED AXD 
trustwortby £ueli4b Prute3t..at iiurs» uad seani- 

etress; can o.eratj and fiuLih ; best City re.eroncg 

Call atNg 14J West 3iKt kC. ^ 

\MTt.'£ N f ItasB.— uY A UiSAL.HY, R.-i.si'E 'lABLS 
Ml young woman, m a private ftmily ; City refisr- 
ence. caU or address, from 11 until 3 u'clook, No. 33 
West 44tb St. 

KT NUR.-jB.— BV A liBaP«C'lA3L.'i MAHRIBO 
woman as viet nurse; baby three weeks old. 
Apoly at Ng 308 liast 4Uth at. tor two days. 

AXrRiC!w4.— BY A bsjPectabli'; girl as 

first-class waitress iu a private r.imily; no objec- 
tion to tvsstst witu cbamuer-woru ; best City relereuco 
frem former | la cs ; six years in proiient place. Call 
at No. 116 West lOib St. 

WAiraE«t*.— BY A R.>CSPi:CrAELK YOUNQ 
woman as waitress; is wutijiE! to assist with (he 
cliamoer-work ; bus four years' reference from laat 
place. CaU at Su. 706 ;5d uv., between 41th and 4oih 
Sts.; ring third b«lL 

AlTHKUti — UY A FlaHr-Vu.\S!i WAll'stli-jS; 

understands all Kiodiof saiads, care of si ver, and 
waiting la all its b.-anchei ; bcbt iiity refeioucc. CaU 
at Mo. 43^ 7th mV. No cards ausweind. 

vyAlT«.JSS<*.— FlitST-CLA.Htl, IN A f ttlVAl'ii F.'.jI- 
tT ily; understands the care of 8 liver; also the orass- 
Ing ef salads ; best refecencs. Cull at So. la'S West 
33d St. 

AliUttSM A.N.i CUA.V|<it£R..H,kJi>.-BV A 

respectable girt ; or would take care of grown 
ohildrea. and do pUin sewiuK ; tijree years' r«/'ert-ncg 
Call at No. 347 Kaat 9tb st', tirst floor. 

AITR E-r^S.- BT A Ftitir-i."LA;Sd vVAITltS.SS ; 

Understands all kinds of anLuLi, cire of Lilvur, 
aud waliiug in aU brauoliea ; three years' City refer- 
ence. Calfat No. lu West 44tii st. 

WAITRESS.- BY A RBSPKCTABLK GIRL AS 
waitress in a private family; ha. sev.-rnl yf-nra' 
referonoe from ber laat plitcd. Ojti be seen tor iwo 
days at her prcieot employer's, No. 148 oth av. 

Al TKES!*.— 3Y A LADY FOR A CDill'jTtiNT 
waitress, who,u she, can thoroughly recummeud 

Apply tor two days, betwaen 10 aud 12 o'clock, at No- 

6 Bafet 38th St.. pre«eut emvlof^r's. 

AlTKEf*S.— BY A FIRST-CLASS WAITKKSS; 

understands taiclug charjtu of dlulng-rooin ; no 
o',7«otton to a flist class boa.'uiag-house ; ;.-oo<l i ity rcf- 
ersuoe. Call at No. 3Ut 2d av. , necoul floor, back. 

WASHINU.— DY A FIRST-CLA.SS LaUNDRKSS 
laales' o.'d gentlomei.'s waibiug ; seventy-Jive 
cout< per dtzen ; puCQug. flu in;;, uud poli^liiii^f duna 
p-oi:>pily; best reieruucg tali or address Mrs Fegne, 
No. l3'j West 25th at, between Oth aud 7lh ars., 
Boom No. 14. 

•\TrA.^Hir<li>i.-A BK.^l'liuT.^iJLE VOU.\G sVOMAN 
T T wUUe« a low tent em-n'* or family's wa*hlug ; or 
-wuuid go oui by tiie day ; reference lirst cia«s. CaU 
ur addreds tor one week at .No. 652 2d av., bctw^u 
3drh uud iiOth Hts.. Room -So. 7. 

"VtrA.rjai.NG.— OV a .•^LeiilHOit L.^UNDKuS.*; SO- 

11 lioitg 1 1 ic:s' find gentluiuea's wauiiiiig to do at her 

house: puffini:. flutin;;, and linens done iu Uial-claSS 
style. Can at No. 1 ,1 cUiicon place. 



w 



\v 



Ai»Hl^H.— UY A F.Kdl-CLAS. LACNUrthi.So 
YT family or single waehiug at moderate tei-m.-ij flut- 
ing in all its braucuca. Addi-oss ilti. Ii.tL.lL, Ng 151 
\i%si 24tb St., top door. 

AStHSU.—Bi A FIRST-CLaSS LAUNURUSSTO 
KO one by the ci»y or month ; understands ail 

kiiidi of washing nni flutiaR; i>est ret'eiencg Call at 

Ng 13-1 Weat 17lh st, basemeut. 

A!!:)H1NC; BV A BliBfKOi'AUliK COLOHKD 

woman; solicits waehlug and Irouinz, o.tber la- 

Oies' or geutlcmeu's ; best reiereaue. Cairaiiio, I&4 

W«>it 3Jd st 

ASHliXti.— uY A PUisT-OtiAjiS tlUNUBtii" 

tu go out by tue day or take in wanbhig ; uadei- 
•tandaaUktaaaaf flutitig; l>?^st City nftxwuMs. Uali 
at S«e ma liaat dSd sk. sM^ad HaM tnttb. 



SITUATIONS^ANTED. 

FEMALES. 

WA."*HING.— BY A BKMP.-;CTaBLR WOMAN TO 
CO out by rhe day. or will take wanhing at her own 
house; good reforencg CaU at No. 3..;4 liaat 2eth St., 
Room Ho.H. 

A.-SHINtl.— BY A FIrl.sT-CLA»S LAUNDRESS 
who uudeistands pufllng. flutin;, and polishlue ; 

willing to sssist with chamiier-wnrii ; has good tssti- 

moulsli. A«<dressNg 224 Bast 47rh st 

AMHINU.— BY A RESP.sCTA-lLS WOvlAN. 

ladies', gentlemen's, or fiiulUos' washiiig; fineries 
done ucat.y ; good City reterences. Apply at No. 206 
Bast fi7th St. top floor. ' 

■VTD'ASUING.— BY A RiC PE.IABLH WOMAN, liA- 
f ¥ dies' or gentlemen's wasbiui; refereiioe'lf r-. 
quired. Call at No. 146 East 4iid st, third floor, 
bach room. 

A.'!<HlNW.-,hlTH.-.R FAMILlE>' OE Q^NTLK- 
m*n's, from fifty cents toitl nerdoeen; aiso lace 

eurtaius done up; good City leferencg Call at No. 

ll.S Weat 26th St., basement 

ArtMf.XG.- BY A RESPdo'r.idiiJJ WOMAN FA.d- 
ilies' or guntiemen's washing. CaU or address 
No. 115 West 33u at. 



^gT£ATIONSJWANTED. 

AIALBM. 

USEFUI.. ftlAN.— ANlTpERSON IN WANT OF A 
neat, clean, and agreeable m.nn to attend to a fnr- 
upce and do JobSloif around a house will find cue by 
applying at mo. 135 East 23d st; the best of City rcfc 
erence. 



U.-^EFIJL i>LA>.— av A YOUVG MAN. NINBTBUN 
vears of age. Id «ome good wholesale house where 
he can make liim-,elf generally n^ful ; Is a good pen- 
■mun; unexceptionable reference. Address M., Box 
No. 179 'fimts Offlcf 



WA!?iM»NG.— BK A FlHsl-CLA-iS lAUNDRKSi; 
larally washing by the month or doseu. CaU or 
address No. 3.J6 West 48 h st 



WA«HI.\C4 — BV A RK.SPKCrAbLB WO.dAN 
wa.Hhin* aud ironing, or wouid go out by the di.y : 
eoud tefereuoe. t;aU or addresi N6. i>71 3d av. 

VVTA.r<MIS«j;.— BY A KeiiPK^jrABl-B CoLOi.ED 

Tt woman g(«ntloi«en'8 <ir ladies' wanbinc; a good 

iauniiretis. CaU at 23 Charles si., top floor, uaok room. 

Ci.ERKfS AND SALiiCsi.UKN, 

fpO HO'fKL KElti'ER:sriT"fo0N^'lu5ro^ 
X good addresi and education seeks employment as 
Bsblstaut boot-lieeper, cash! r, or nlgiit clerk in a 
hotel; can furnish highest relereuces ond security if 
desired. Aadresai RELIABLE. Bot No. 252 TlM.i3 UP- 
TOWN OPflCK, -NO. 1,2^7 BROADWAY. 



B 



.VtALE?i. 

AKEH.— AS THIRD HAND. 
J. Seybel, Ng l94 Henry st 



CALL OR ADDRESS 



CV>«K.— BY A FlRsTCLASSEREN, 11 MAN COOK ; 
/can iM ik" loe-oresm. Jellies, and pastries; private 
fumily Ol- ooarillu^-bonie: Citv or country ; Uis City 

reforence. Addresj French Coij. Bf.i 6. 310 TldhS 
Uf-roWN OJi'FlCB, NO. 1,257 Bfl.JADWAY, 

ToikVa'yiAsI~B7~I~aasTlI^^~^ for a col- 

.'orjd coachman; pi-rfeotlv sober aud tnst worthy, 
aud haa ot«u iu my employ for four years i I o'.a 
vuiicb lor lilm aa a c ireful jrlycri iiod a good uoatier, 

undis acquniuled witli nil the principal Srivra Ot the 
Cicy or country, luqulru of O. Wheeler, No. 132 vVest 
27 th st 

pOACilMAN ANDGiiOO.M.-BY A rt.vSf tfiCTA- 

V^olo Bi'.igia man; strictly temoerata ; uuderatanils 
care of hors<-H and carriages: careful urtvcr; will tje 
generally nsi-ful on a gentleman's plaoa ; (ity or cauiv 
try; r«f.-rence glyen. tali or ;iddr si, for tw / eavs, 
toachmau, at present employer's arable, No. 11 East 
S7th at 

COAOH.nAN AND GttOOlI.— BX A COMPE- 
tent man baying a flrst-ciass Ithowledge of bin 
huslnskS i oarefni ( ity <li*ver; willing ant obliging; 
highly reoomiucnded by present and loriner eiuployerd 
in City at present. Ad.ire3s. fjr two days, T. D., 
Box Na 307 TiJliiS Ul'-rOWN OPKlCfi, Ho. 1,257 
BaOADWAY. 

OACH.yiAN, UROU:n, ANJ> LSEFUL. MAN. 

— i«y a rjsp .ctable young mou ; nnderstauds steum- 
baater farnsce; will be fonod civil and ouilg ng : 
strlo'ly tbuip«,-ate : is not alrald of nard u ork ; would 
work for low wages : city reforesce. AddrooS Coach- 
man, iox .'■o. 210 Ames utflce. 
. — ' ' 

C^OACHHAN AN»> GROO,»J.— Bl A RliSl'ECT- 
yabie Protestant Scotchman ; thorough y under- 
stands hU business ; expeiianced City driver : honest 
sober, wil.'in.;, and ubiigini:. as Ills fet'eience will state. 
Address W. B., Box No. 296 ilMiiS L'P-TO*V'N Ol'FlUii, 
KO. 1,257 BROADWAY. 

UACU-nA.^.— BY A NORf a OF IR-vL ..SU FKOl- 
estaiit; la a good, oarefui driver and experieucod 

groom; aan attend to furnaces and do g» deiiiiig; will 

luave himself generally uaoiul; excelleut i-pfen-nces. 

Audiess .»Uil9iB .(., Box No. 322 TljaEJ UP-ToWN 

OKl'TcK, No. 1 2.-)7 8R0A WaY. 

ClUACU-fiAN AND GKOU.VI.— BY A V.-.tiY RK- 
/>peoiibl« Protestant young man; unierstanda bis 
lusioess pei'fectiv ; is very wiUiug and oulig.n ;; good 
tliy dilver; has seven years' oesi Cliy refereuoe: 
wauea m<>darat3. Address Uorseman, Box No. 236 
limn Otflce. 

C'iOACHMAN— OOOK.— BY A MAN AND WIFE 
/'togo^her; mao la ufiraL-cas:! coachman und grooiu; 
williuK .to make hlinself geuofaiiy ua<fu}; wiio is a 
good p. ain conk and Nundresi; wngo-i uo object Ad- 
dress J. K., Box .So. 290TIM.ij>UP-iOV>if oFrlCB,NO. 
1.25 ( BuOADA'AY. 

OACM.»lAN.— BY A olNOLK MAN WU .» f lOK- 
oughly understinds bla Dusiness; has lived iu soma 

of the b st t.-iinl'les in the <.ity. oy whon lie can ue 

recommended lor integrity, sobdety, aul honesty. 

Addrets F B.. Box No. -.^70 i'lJiBS Uf-t'OWN OFFICii, 

fro. l.L'67lJROADWAf. 

elOACM.nAN A.NU GKOO:*!.- J¥ A M\rtRlBi) 
/man, a Protestant; thorougbiy underaiande the 
ears 01 ui'iausaud. cjriiag,:s; \yii„Dg and ubdgi'ig: 

cretul driver: over tiltuen years' v'U.v rererMUce C '11 
or address J. T., Ng 1,4.<'2 Bro.tdway. ueur 421 St.; har- 
uesi ctorc. 

C^OACtl.WAN.-rilOUoDQ iLl UNi^EavP \NU3 His 
yousineta- flrsi-ci'!as c^iy driver: lived with Horaa 
of tue bant fauttiie-,, by wh lui he can be recomiuendt-a ; 
five yeitrs with late empi 'yer. Ca.loiioi- addr^sj li. H., 
Rt Maur b Cg'a, No. m 6tb ay., bcf#eau 20th and 
27th sts. 

COACHMAN AD GAKDENER.-BY A 8IN- 
gle Pri>it!<iant m.ti!,^ (German ) nnCersiamls the 
ea re of hordes, h ruess.' c rr age-i. aui driviugi aUo 
i.'urdeii5i-i< ; can milk, toud furnuce ; sober Kud oiilig- 
in:; ; Ixst City rulrreucg Addr.iBs F. &., Box ^o. 203 
Timet ofBce. 

C1<PAC'HJ'1AN.-Bi: V .iI.VGLK MAN; li A PlRSl- 
^cl , as groom i-.cd careful Citv driver ; is "obar, trust- 
worthy, and otrri,ait/ ; can milk and he ueauiuliy n^e- 
ful; can tivc reicreuces. Address J. M.., BoxNg 229 
Ttineg Offlcg 

COACH.V1AN -ANO GROO.W BY A SINGLE 
_ youn.; man : thoroajiUly understands his busiuei^s ; 
cau milk, and IS willing to make hiinaelf usetal ; has 
five ye rs' beat reiereuoe. Audresa N J., Box Ng 232 
Hhnet OfBcg 
^ , , I , *■ 

COACHlWAM'.— BY A EESPajiABLK YOONQ 
man ; thorou^diy uoder^tanils the care of bercei 
and oarri ges, sbowiu? tbs best of C^ty refpreuoea 



UfSEKlILi itlAN.-kBY RKsprid'ABLE MAN. TO 
lulid fires in a uotel and make hiniseU geueraUy 
useful about tho place, or take charge of a 
furnace ; good recommendations Irom his last employ- 
er. Addre^aJ. K., Box No. 2^9 Timti Ofllce. 

WAITER.— Bi AGiiNl'LhllAN KoB UlS WAITiiB, 
ft colored man; he oan givo him the very highest 
character for auy place of trust which he' ia oooi- 
pelent to flu in a fomiiy or institution : he ii a man of 
exce lent liiieUigence and agreeable address. He may 
be »-tu at 37 I ast 37th st. his employer's re-idecca. 



VirAlTER-CHAUBER-yiAlU AN.» luAVS- 

11 DKB-iS. — by a reliable, Indus. riousm^iried couple, 
witboui Incumorance, Iu a pr vate family; the roan aa 
flrst-cliui& wiiiter ; ihe woman as chamoer-m<id nnd 
I'Uiidfoas. Address J. H, box No. 277 TlilKS UP« 
TOW.V OFFIOa. NO. 1.257 B R. )AD WAY. 

WAfTtiR— FIii-ST-C'LASS-rTTv A Rii -PBC'rABLK 
.man laielt- from i Uiope; first-class tcstiiitonials; 
■wa«e8 no i k)«ot to a coiul'.,rtable liome, or would t.^ke 
B lootman'ti poslrlon. that would oAi^rau honest iiv.nt. 
Address for two dtys James, Bix .yo. 29:^ TIMES UP- 
TOVSN OFFICK, NO. 1,J57 BROADvVAV. 



WAJTEK.— :.Y A COLORKI) YoUNG M.N A3 
flrst-cluBS waiter In a private lamlly ; is willing 
and obliging; fli-.ir-clasa City r •lere:icg Address U. 
I'., Box No. 294 TIMES UP-TOWN Ol'FlCB, NO. 1,257 
BBOADW. Y. ' ^' 

WAITKj'.— BY A RsSPECTABLii MaH IN A PKI- 
v.its Ibmliy, who nnderstmds his business; Is 
most willing and obliging; Is a Protestant: flist-Oiass 
reference ; a quiet place more than wages. Address 
H. B., No. 207 >Vest I3th s'. 

YSTf.JTER.-BY A K, LlABLli AND CuMPETKNT 
Tt Protestant man as firnt-ciass waiter In t orlvate 
family; bus the bust C ty r;-Terence3; no oh}.-otlon to 
C ity or country. Address J. M., at Rowan's ice-oream 
talooa. No. 334 Oth uy,, btween -.'Otii .,ud 2l8r sta. 

WAITEK.— bV A SvVi-.DK AS Pia.T-CLASS 
we.Her In a priv.nte familv ; ba» the best City ref- 
erence. Address W. ll., Box No. 302 TlHIiii UP-T0M5 
OFFICK, .SO. 1..57 BuOADWAY. 

WAirKK.— ilY A YOU.^Q KNUblsHMA V. PB.iT- 
estaut, as waitc r In a private family; itood City 

reference. Address P. J. A., Boi No, 281 TIjIBS OP- 
TO»VN OFFICE. No. 1.267 BUOADWAY. 



w< 



w^ 



'Aft'l'KH.— BY A TMOR iUjIuLY TltAIItKii UBK- 

vant; b>s tiod firicen years' ozpertcace in tbi> 

City i good Citr refeieiioris. Calior uddtcsi John E. 
Catatdy, So 294 Madison av. 

WAITlfiK.- £iY A RjJ'SP.iOiAliL.ii VOD-NO MAN 
(coljred) In a flrst-cla«s p-irate bnarding-houve ; 

wUiiug and oULging ; City reference. CaU or addteu 
J. T. B., No. 151 West "JAth St., top floor. 

WAITER.— ^toY A MAN OK I-ONU . XfBRI- 
euco; City or country: best or refereuoe. Address 
B. D., Box Ng 265 TIMES UP-TOvVN OFtlCB, NO. 
l,tS7 BROADWAY. 

'Al'i'UR.— B^ A OOLOHHD -HAN WHO CAN GIVE 
• T i<erfeot satUfaciiun as to oipaiiillty, honesty, and 
sobilety CaU or audreas for two days, D. i., Hw. 132 
«> est 16th st 

VyAl'l'KK. — .Y A CoLoa'iD ,1AN AS l-TR-JT- 

»T ciisa waiter lu a private f.imily; good reference 
from list eicployer, wn« cau be seeu at ^ay tioto. Ad- 
dress N . 455 7tn av. 

Ai'l'liiR.— JY a KhSPKCTABLB MAN AS 
& at-clua wjltsr la a priy.itfl lamtlyi beat o: 

reteieuce from last emploxor. Call ot address J. W., 

No. 13,1 West 19th it. 

WrAlTUK. -IN A PiilVATii KAilILY Bi A PBOT- 
TTesiautm^n; Ua flrst-claas servant: has excel- 
lent City roler'-noe; no objeotiou to go In the couutry. 
Addr a> Hmr-/ Middleton. Nu. 54 Piiuce st. 

VVTAl I'Eri.— bY A laoitOUGlLir cO dc-iiTtiNT 
T T man witu six years' refereaue flrom laat employer. 
Addro.s Waiter, No. 334 Oth av.. ice cream Salooa. 

AllER.— oT A BJY rO .^SSlSr IN WAITING; 
his suppoit and eiotbing wiij at lirst be aatisfae- 
toiy wages. Apply at .No. 44 West 22dst. 

____HEjyP^JWANTED^ 

A. 'i\ mTB »V art de CO. 

want flrst-clais s <lesmen of large eXDerlenee and grod 
address for their retail dress goods dep.r:ment Those 
thoroughly competent may apply at the Basaget'S 
desk between 9 and 11 A. M., or by letter stating ref- 
erence, Broadway an I luth st. 

GENTU£.>IaN INrfiNOl.iG TO 'I'AKE 

hu daueuter of seventeeu -oath tor the Winter, 
would like to find a. lady oi nndoub;ed respectti&ility 
ftiid experh-ucd wbo wonlil tai:c charge of her; nnex- 
cpptioiuble rererenue i euuiie L Address J. f... Box No. 
25« TI.\lii3 UP-TOr.'iNOl->'H,E, No. 1.257 BR- AIJWAY. 

AiS' IliO— sALBSMiiN- iWO IN -NEvV-YottK CITY 
and three for N. w-Vork anJ Aew-Jersey; iiusineas 

('lea^out, permanent, and no petltlliug ; $adamoutn, 
bi/tel and ir..vehii<; expenses j^aid. A.^dress, with 
stamp .«ONiroit MPG. COMPANY, Cluciuuati, Ohig 

WAM'EU-SALKSM N OAK I. tVKtllf STAlB; 
saury. :E90 per mouth, an. I traveaug expenses 
paid. Address GUM jiAjtUFAurUiUNG COMPANY. 
St. Louis, Alo. 

WA.^TlD— A TUORoUUa W.iHRtibS, ALSO A 
chamber-mrud, botn huviuz City rrfeienee ; Prot- 
estauts preferred. Apply at No. 29 West 19th St., 
batwe n 9 aud 11 o'otock. 

WANl'EU— A .Vr.tOiSG BOlf IN A SIOVU STORK: 
ais^i, tinners' t^ola fur aaig Apply at Ng 44 
Jam^« st, Brooklyg 



fi-om list employer. Apply or address J. W., Bot No. 
)t'-TOvVNOM«.CE, NO. 1,2J7 BBOAUWaY. 



318 TIMKS V?- 



CiOACH-^lAN AND <iRf)0.»l.-BY A YOUNQ 
Jitiiia who tooronghly understandu his badness as a 
servant; la striccly sooer and om be highl.v recom- 
mendnd by bis la,3t employer Address U. .^., Box Ng 
206 fidlij D/-iV>WN OFi.Ci;, M. l,2o7 BE lAUWAY. 

UACH.MAN.-BY 1 RETP^icTTBLE YOO.NO 

mau; thor lU^hiy undors a ida the care of hotses 

aud cairliges] nus the be.st of reierences from lasi 

employer. Apply or audcess f. SUapparJ, No. 1U9 tfaat 

13th st 

COACH-nAN XSU GARDENER. — BT A 
Bce-oy, aompetaiit, jonng ma.ried mau: ud«1oi- 
stands t .e ear* of .i gva.laman's tiloed ; oaa'tha best 
of re.e.eucg Addresi *V. .->., U.i i>(o. 318 TtdEd Ui*- 
TO.V.^ oyV.CS. .^0, 1,257 -ROADi' AY. 

^-lOACB.HAN AND GROODL— BY A COilPE- 
V^'teiit man ; uudorataudi hisbusin>«sa thorouihly; is 
stncily t mpirr t- ; wuHug aud o>>lt.;lag; C:»v ister- 
ence; will b,- highly recommeuded In every respsct. 
Apply at Sit. 30 West 2Gt li st ^ 

CIOACH.IIAN AND ^iA^iDE^ER BT AN ENG- 
y>llab servant ; good groom and driver; nnderstant!a 
greeii-houties, gruperiea. aud nenaral work about a 
aen leinan'a pUtce; wages $14 ; City relereuee. Ad- 
dreaa Jam^s. Box Ng 203 Tiinei Office, for two davs. 

CilACa.UAN.-BY A SINGLiJ MAN; U«LiKit- 
staiids tha buaiuess thoroagbly; will be giuerally 
usfful ; v^ry best retereuues. Address C. C. Box No. 
220 J imrt OUioe. 

COACHI»IANAND GROOl). BY ACOMPEfKNT 
young man. age twenty -eight years; oan lurnlsh 
nose references from l.-st employers. Address J. W., 
Box No. 23"> Plm^s t>flicg 



/ lOACIl.nAN AND GARDENKK.-BV A >IN. 
V../iile Protestant maa; can mitii, aitend Jurnaco; will 
make him.olf useful; gr.od I Itv and <-ouutrv relerenog 
Audross W. B., Box No. 20.1 n^.iet i-ffice. 

OACHMAN.-BY A VOUNG MAN AS COACH- 
mau Hud t<. make niui-ielt jienerally useful. Address 

W. v.. Box N.'. 258 XlMliS CP-TOWN OFFICK No. 

1,257 BR0.1DWAV. 



c 



lOAt)a*JAN ANO t;tROO.W.— rfl' A YOUNG 1 

.^y.S('Olch;n ,n as cuacbm.ia and gr lom, garden r, or ! 

useful mou: best of roter^noe. Addr"8o C. C. Box No. 1 
270TIJIi:i Ui'-TOWN OFFl :K, 1,257 UKO.-iDWA Y. 

C1U.^CU.»IAN.— BV A SlAGLirt MAN WHO U.VDliB- 
/srands t!ie uuamest thorouihlv: can give the best 
ot C-t.y reftiencg Artdie s P. N.. Box No. 320 iLdi^iS 
UP-TOWN OifrH'E, NO. 1,-J57 BROADWAY. 



OACH.WAN.— BY A FIRST-CL.A.3S COACHMAN 
Hudxrojm; single; can be highly recommended 



.. , _ . 

la wiliinj; to m.tue himself generally meful io every 
■way. Cull or address Thomas, No. 100 linst -8ta st. 

ClOACHIiJA.N.— FlRdX-ULASl; 13Y AN BNOLiISU- 
>man ; married, with ou« cliild ; uuexoepiiouable 
I Ity reference. Address Georgo, Box No. 2'i 7 TlilES 
Ul'-TOWN oirPICiJ, NO. l,-.:;57 ilROADWAY. 

C1«ACH:V1 AN.— BTi A COMPKTiiNT MAN IN EVERY 
/'particular, with tlrsl-claaa references. Address V. 

G., No. 644 Oth av., haruosa store. 

C10ACHMAN.— BY A COLORiiD COACHMAN; 
/eigDt years' roiereuog Call or addr;:8j No. 25U 
W est 18th at 

GWliDESElt. — >Y A SiOrcUMAN: MAhlRiLD, 
fuo family; uudei'Stands all its brani'hes: has good 
rciiraiice; wiie wil,ln"t.jdoaDythiug uOout the buuhe. 
Call on or undress Fiui'l:<t, i>o. 1^8 West I4th »t., or 
No. 333 EuBl ItJtb St., P.-Caven. 

GAKllI'-NKR.— BY A ^I Gl-E MAN, I'liKF. C'lLY 
ci'inp'jt«i}C to taUe charge of a geuilemau's piucc; 
eipoiieiice lu grnp-.-ritfa, greenhouses flower uud 
vet'etao e gardening: satisfactory relcreuces. Address 
.s. T.. Box So. J2i I'Miii's .ffl e. . 

1ROU.»t ORtlOACH.VIA.N.— BV A YOU.>G I'lto 1 - 
I'catant man: experienced gro^m uud care. ul City 
driver; understands tlio^are of fine horse, harness, 
aoa carriagui* ; c:*ii tend fi.rntM:e» rttrlctiy tern per.., te-: 
will iiialLO biwst'lt useful: good refereuces. Address 
Coaclim.;n, Box No. 2 16 Jimta Olflce. 

ROUn.— HY A Ktij liOTALLE YOCG MAN 
^PrutekCuut) as groom; cau take caiu of furuace 

cud malie in.vsoif generally use nt ; fully ca^iabiu; 

requites a moderate salary; iu lie well reoommeudcd 

from liis last employer. Address U. J., Box ho. 234 

r».-Ji<r» Offli'C. 

ROOiW AN1> FOOl .114iN.— uY A YOO.sG MAN 
who thoroughly undercitHrtils tha business, with 

the boat of Ci(y rofereuce : i» willing aud obliging. 

(;uU or ociJreS!! at present employer'a private atable, 

K. M., Ng 47 West 18th at. 

GROU.M.- BY A RK.-^P^(^Acl^,t; y,.0Na man A3 
i;ri>om ; uudersiiuidd his bustaesa woL. Cal. atNo. 

li{F\^iesr33diit 

PURTiJK AvD KIHui-tlAN, OR WAXl'alai..— 
By a yonu'cProtestani man: oan tend st;.>Ain and 
hot air ttirnu«e« ; nut afraid ot bard work: wiUltig to 
j>)akeblm».«lf Btefdl; good ity rt»Ceicu<;M. Adunss 
V 11.. btfxl^ aiB »jeifsc«.« 



___^TEAOHERS^ 

WANTED-BY A W1D.>W LADY F VIRGINIA, A 
bltn tion as goveruesa la a school er to teach 
small ctiUdren in a private family; she haa h.ul much 
e-°(.penei'ee uud haa beeu countoted for some yeara 
With the first fempie colleges of the State. Adoress, 
a la tiug terms. Teacher, lUia aud Uarsoail sts,, iiioh- 
mond, Va. 

A.N EXP-ERIENCEO CL<A ^isICAl.. ANO 
mathematical leaclier, classic •. gold madslist of a 
lorei^n uuiversitv, oeaireS private putHis ; prepares tor 
college, (bugliah or American; ) highest City refoienoe. 
Addr, as tAR.>E-ir, box Ng 325 TlMEj UP-TOWN 
OPFiCL;, NO. 1.257 rfHOADWAT. 

GKAIIDATE U If YAt.iL, WtTH UIGUEST 
testimosiii'S aud city reference, desire* private 
uuulU : flttlus for college a specialty. Address YALE, 
iJox No. 1 j6 Tunrs Offlcc. 

PO.SlllON VVANi'ED AS WAITING 

governess to young ohildrea ; music aod l>.ngii«h 
r inches. Addresii ..Oi-BFUL, Box Mo. 303 TIME8 
LP-TOWN OFFIOii, No. l,2oV BROADWAY. 

or?* EII'lbD PltlVATEhV FOR COLLEGE 
by an experienced gradui'e of Uatvarl j highest 
rtuvreuces. Address TBaCUEB, Box Ng 239 TldiKS 
UP- 1 > VN OFFICE, NO. l./i>7 a& O >D vV AY. 

yiaili. ROBBLSa, A vVEi.LaKtOWN AND 

i luLaUccea^ful ,e..aher of French aua urlmary Engliau 
b.''arie..aB, desires pujdU, aud reads for invalids. No. 

t8 WtrstoB h st 

"VfRr-. .tiAi'CHBiX SlJFfi.iiE.'!) fAiUlUBS 

XTXwithont cbarsre, with oomostaat vUl.ia^ or resi- 
u. UL governesses, tut.irri, processors of l,in.;U,u;es and 
miisio. Teachers' Bureau, Ng OT West 35th st 

Tlf IS«« Mli^rOR ANO MLSri WiGLiEif, OdR- 
i-TXiiflcated Eugliab te-icher.*, receive pnpils tor pii- 
v:it» tuition In Euiilish brunciiea. lauguag.:s, music, 
&c. He.i lence. No. 07 vVe t 35th st 

RiVATE INSTltUCTRuSS DbailREM EN- 

gagemeuts to tsucu ehildi-en BugUsh and mnslc; 
references. UUs HORG N, No. 3U9 \^ est 14th st 

N £XPERIt<:NCEU TEAOtlUR. P0RM>;RLY 

iostruc.or in llarvaid. desirsa puoils; i>es I refer- 
ences. MAKVARD, Ng 115 East 20:)li est 

_J[NSTKaOTiOI^ 

. MOUNT WAtiUINGTUN 

Collegiate Institute, 

No. 40 WAaUiNOrON SQUARB, NEVV-IOEK ClVl 
GEO. W. CLARKE, Ph. D., PrlnoipaL 

Prepares pup'.ls of all azas for baiium or o>U<)g), 
and opens its thirty-fourth ye\T Sspt 13. Circulars 
at tiook store<i and at t'<ie Instltuta. 

'mTl!!>S HAINES AND I»IL,LE. DE JANON 

-^'-■-wlll reopen their boarding and day school t'r 
' young ladies and chilu;-en, at Ng 10 Gramercy Park, 
Sept. 28. Kindergarten and boys' class, Oot. 2. 

iMi-t nV yKU..\til\ A«s>lsTEi» BY OOJ- 

oetent masters, will reopen her Boarding and Day 

iscliojl fur boy* nuJer diteea, at No. 102 Weit 29th St., 

one door from Oth av., 0.1 ilO.vDAY, Sept. 2J; day 

boarders an- taKen to tliu Park alter an early dinner. ' 

.MTERSii'V URA.'WMAR &.CUOOL., NO. 1 

Winlhrup place, (one bluox Irom New-York Dm- 
veribity.) hcKins itn Portiatb Yenr Sept 18. Classical 
cuiuiuerclal, aud primary dapartaieuts. 

M. 11. aOilBY, B. S. LA-iSITER, Prinotpais. 

18.S MAKIO.N A. UOIXU>,'<> .^CUOOli FOR 

children. No. Dl East 21iit St. wili open Weoueit- 
oay. ^ept. 27. Kinder,:arten system adopted lor Very 
youQtf chlldr n. 

nri. HOBjiUTti AND i\il!iM \VAA.HEtt'S 

□chooi for Toung ladies. No. 1-18 Mad:aou av., re- 
op iis-epi 25. To ree young ladies will t>e received 
into the family. 

EAU.MAKGE tsCHOOL. FOR BOYH, 

i.-vUGiiltlTES, N. Y.—l'ac SBhool reopens Sopu 14. 
hor Icu-ther iuforiuation ad.irebs, 

Fjti-.Di<;itli:K THOMPSON. PrioclpaL 

Rye; S-E.VlJNARir. 

RYE, N. Y. 
For particulars .iduress Mrs. B.J. LIFE. 

rl^^\E i»ils?«Es RuyEic*' enuIjIsiu and 

A French B.iurdiag aud Day Nchnol lor young ladies 
and i-hildreii. No. .i52 We,c 2;itli St.. reoieued i^ept, 18. 

OHN iyjac:»ILI.l.E ''.■> ^»Cii«»«JU, No. 1.214 

Broadway. —Three boarders takaa Circulars at 
i utn un's. 



jggTgUCTION. 

M. W. LYON'S 
Collegiate Institute. 

NO. 6 BAflf MD ST., COnHER OP BROADWAT. 

Btcadfast patrons are a fkir test of a sohooL W*ll 
known names ot list year patrons fbUow. Prefixed 
numbers show the years of patronage : 

12— Henry M. Alexander, 9— Benjamin OurUs. 

la— Heiirr Day, »— Calvin K. Knox, 

10— John Brooks. 8— James B. Adrianoe. 
9— Dr. Kd. 0. Bartlett, 7-Or8<.n D. Mann. ■ 
Seyera l have had sons fitted for eullngg 

/^UAMLIBR INSTirUTE, CENTRAL PAKIC. 
Mew-Y'ork City, for boys and yonu? gentleaenof 
seven to twenty yeara. Boarding aul Day Bubool, 
College, Buain»s% West Point and Soleatlflo .Schooii^ 
Prenoh, German, and Spanish carefully taught and 
Spoken. Bui. ding new. the best of Us kiad. 22d yrar 
beginaaeptia Prof. RLIK CHARLlBtt, Direc tor. 

R«. isYhVAM.S HHKif-i BOARDING AND 
DAY SCUOOL FOR YOUNG LADIBS NOi. 6 ANil 3 
EA..T BSD SI.. MBW.iORK.— Roopoas Oot 2; Pfe&Ch 
and German practically taug'it; cv-eful training in 
priraaiy and preoirdtory I'eoirtments ;. i:oll.-«riata 
Course of study meets all demmds tor higher educa- 
tion of womeu. arrangements for ho il h aa I cumiOi-t 
«u A geueroua aoale. a saooeastat kinaur,£artea eon- 

Dected with tlie school. 

Cliarlier Institute for Younw Ladies, 

No. t67 itladlsanav-, .Ne«r«Vor^ 

Win reopen Sept. 26 A few ix.ardws Wiil be taken. 
fhA BeUe^Letrres class will itijo begin at the same 
time. Circulars can be had la application, or at 
PutTMin'g Hlig SOPHIE LENZ and Prof. H. i. DESK- 
NAN, Principals. 

iUiME. O. DA («1IjVA 

AND 

MRS. AliEX. BRADFORD>9 

(formerly Mr.'!. Ogdea Hoffnan'O S-igUah, French, and 
German hoar ling itnd day seho.il tor yoinzttdlis aul 
oliildren. with ckltstheniuSL .>o. l7 vVest 38thst., New- 
York. Keop as .-ept 25. Applicatiuus may be mala 
by fettef o r parsinally, as abiva, 

Mms COJI8T0CK. 

Nas. 33 and 34 Weat 4:0tb at., 

FACl!«G RKSKIiYOIU PAdK. Engrtah, ifreneh. Ma 
German Boarding and Day school Reo'iens 'teut 27. 
BOARDINQ f'Oi'ILS UMlXaO TO SiXTfiK.V. 
Intermediate ctasi and p.-iv ite class fur boya 
EINDKRGABTE.'r IN CHABQE OS 

MIS'^ LEONOWBNX. 

ANTHON GRAMMAR SCH6OL7 

No. 252 Madison 'T., 

Between 38th and 3dth sta. 

Eebool bones, 9:3'J A. M. to 2s3U P. &£. 

The ratea ol tnltlon l iaTe been rednced. 

MLI.ES. L'UARBONMBR'ri 

FRENCH BOABDI sO AND DAx SO 10 )L 
for vcnng ladles. No 30 Bast 35tli at., (for.narly No. 43 
Avenue (lu Roule. NeaiUy PAtl^j n.ti. ta09'ii 03 Wed- 
nesday . Sept n AdJress a\ al>)yi, uilii Sopfc 8, 
whem Mile. ChARBO-'OIKR wl'l bw lu NffwYorg. 

ARNEtST TEAOBlMt>. 

COMMON SB.XSK MANAGEUB5T, 
YOJJKKRI JillL.TAKY INSTITUTB. 
A BOaRDING-bCUOoL FOR BOY J. 

BENJAMIN taASO.f, 
Box No. 504. Yoa'ica rs R. T. 

ADLAMS} FOR B07.<«.— TH8 DB&IGN o? PHM 
cl-tss is to thorouzhly prepare boy, for our best 
oolleges; number of pupils limited to twelvg 

Reierenctrt: President bliot, of Uarv.,rd Unlvsrsity; 
tlieodore Roosevelt. Esq. , and WlUiam H. Oabnrn, E*a.. 
New-YorK Citv. For circulars avply to ARTHUR U. 
CUTLER, at Class Booms. Ng 713 Oth av. 



E 



KNOLI'H kVt) FftESCH DaX_90-'O0L for ytmng 
ladles and children. No. 121 bast 36th st.. near Park 
av., will reopen THURSDAf, Sept 21. A separate de- 
partment for little boys aad girls to whleh speoial at- 
tention is given. 



MRl^. MARV RODGBRM GKIKFITTi^ 
wiU reopen her English, French, and Oermau dav 
Soliool fir yoang ladies and e'lildr^m at No. ii West 
48to bt. on Tuesday. Sept. '26. Advanced classes m 
Kn&lish literature anil the German languass for post 
graduates auo others. 

T TUOyiKMON';^ aVafS^rii*. i:oi<L.BUE, 

No. 20 4th av., uppoaite Cooper Imtliute, Bo«g- 
keept g, Writinif, Artthmetlo. Grammar, epeUIng 
taught day and evening. Itadtes' DeOtrtment — fele- 
graph.^ taught practically with instruments. Demand 
tor o, eeaiors. commenoe ImmetUately. 

MAie. t. ItlEAR.S, 

ASSISTED BY HLLB. L. »V.M. 

EHQLISB, FBS.SCH. and GERMAN BOARDING ANO 

DAY S''UOoL. NO. 222 MADISON AV., 

FOR VOOMG IilDlaS AND CHILDRSS, 

WiU reopen WsDNBSDAY, SEPl. '27. 

I!). ByBR(SON>:« COLbBGlATB ^CHoOu 
•corner 4.'d at and 6th av.— Primary Department 
for young boys. Refers to the following present patrons: 
Rev. Dr. How,<rd '"rosby. Rev. Pror. H. B. emittt. 
Rev. ProL B. D. Hitchcock, Rev. Thoa S. H««ring 
Rey. Proi. Geo, L. PtentUa ReT. Dr. K. N. Wbite. 

mi.'s.M ayrbm, 

KO. 16 WKSr 42J ST.. 
NEW-YORK, 
W^ill reopen her GDi(1i>ti, Pfooeu, anl Qsrraaa SshMl 
for Young Ladles and Children MONDAY, Sept. 18. 

C. A. lVIIL.£ai, ' 

ENQLtSU AND CLASSICAL 8CU00L FOR BOIS, 
No. 100 West 43d st, comer Oth av. 
BchOQl hours. 9:30 A. M. to 2:30 P. M. 

THR fll<TH AVBMIB SCHOOL FUR BUVH, 

AT NOB. 589, 541. AND 543 6lfi AY. 
RiiOPKN;* SEPT. 18. 
K. A. GIBBENH, Harvard. } p-„^_^,. 
D. BftAOd. J8.? Yale. 5 "'^oiP*^ 

t*'P. JOtlN>!« (»ClfO<»L.. 

BOARDIKG AND DAI .st^HOOL 
FOR YOCNQ LADIES ANil CHILDRKN. 

Rer. THBODORB IRVING, JaU. D., Reet«n 

No. sil Wear .^iM at. 
RBOPEMS WEDNESDAY. ?>ttl*T. :<y, IS7B. 

MRS, ANO .>Il<»!:!l !STEER!S> 

Boarilingand Day School for young ladiea and cbildten. 
No. 12 Ease 47th st, will reopen Kept 2L A sohool 
and Kiadergarteu cass will commence Uct*2. at Ng 62 
West 12ta st '- School Omnibus." 



rB1HBOOriI..E«lA'rEf>iC!llOOL.. NO. 79 WB8T 
J. 62d st, eoru^r 6th ay., Eev. Dt H. B. CHAPlS, 
PriuclpaL— Boy b prepared for college or bnsinesa' A 
piimaiy department. The 'fifty-seventh school year 
jutt began. 

PREFARATOKF SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL, 
Ng 1,267 uroadway, near 82d st, for tbe schools 
ef science, technology, mines, arcbUectnrg Seven en- 
ter college this year. A. COLIN, M, K,, lat-e Eugineer 
Corps, U. 8. 'S., and Proieasor at Mayal Aoademy. 

RUPAKATORV CL.AS.S OF MB. WM. W. 

>EWELL l>r Harvard and other ooUegea Elefers 
to parents of pupils. B. A. McCurdy, Esq., Bohert R. 
Liviugston, Gs^. Jaryis Slade, lisq., Govemear M. 
Ogdea, Ks4}.. ko. Rooms No. 115 Kast 26th st 

MEUlOAN KINDKRWARPEN AND TRAIN- 
ISG CLASS FOR SIOTdKEi AND TEACHERS, NO. 

44 EAST 43D ST.— Oldest and best la tbeaty; all the 

FroeUel oeaupations taught thorouirh.y. 

Miss R M. cOK. PrluclpaL 

CBBiJTBR TALL^Y ACADdMY— A Boarding School 
forbora. DoWDington. Pa.; Uml «d in namber; boys 
have houieoomtorta aud earefol training: eaayot a e o a s aj 
$200 to *-.i«0 a yo-\r. F. DON uKA V i IjoN G. A. M., Png 

(;NDKEDS of young flUJ?mAVE BKE.S 
quailfloJ for bualnesa aud scores of ladies for 
te.ehers. P INt'S COLLUGE, Ng 02 Bowery; Up- 
town Collage, Ng 2.S4 8ib av. 

IRVING INSTITUTE, TARRYTOWN, ON 
iiUUsON.— Tbotongh iosSioctiou in all hranchas. 
Preparation for eoUege or business. Careful training. 
tend for circular to ARMAONAU h HOWK, Principals. 

RARE CHANCE A NOTBD BOARDING SCHOOL 
m-'ar New-York t^ complete its nnmner will re- 
ceive boys this season at a dit.ooaQt of $ 1 00 ; $30<X 
AddreadBox Ng 4,047 Poet Office, New-Yorg. 

OTHIC HAL.1., STA.tlFORD, CONN.- 

i^nglish, Preaoh, ani German BOARDINQ and DAY 
B^HOOL tor YOUNG LADIES. Reopeus Sept. 20. Ad- 
dreaa Misses AlKSN k. cHA.sH, Pnnelpala. 

MLLE. JAC(itJB.noU*ji 

Boarding and day S'lbool tor young ladlea. and chU- 
dreii. No. Iu8 Weat 42d at., WiU reopon Wednesday, 
Sept 27. 

UK. WJL.t.IA.MESJ KNULISH AND FRENiB 

boarding uud dav sohool for yonog ladies luid cbil- 

areu, No 26 West 39th au, wiU reopen on THUB8- 

PaY, Sept. 28. . 

IS*.-* A.N.NA C. BRACK BTT ANU MISS IDA 
M. BlIOT. No. 9 West 39th St.. wUI reopen their 
home and D^ ^school tor girla ou TDKbDAY, Out 3. 
CIreulars sent on applioatiou. 

RS. J. i . BKNBOIl T>S HOARDING AND 

Day Soaool for youug Imdiea ana children. No.7 Bast 
420 SU, >. T., will r< open Se^it 28. Send for eircolax. 

|!-.rs BAIil.OW.S ENGl.l.sa AND FRENCH 
.school for Young Ladies auu Cbin.ren, No. •;4 B«st 
3*^d st, will reopen on Weiinesday. Scot 27. 

ORT CHEMTBU INSTlfUTE, PORT CHB8- 

tar, N. T— limited to 2,* boya O. WINTHROP 

bTARB, a. M.. Principal. 

R. A. CAI/LISEN'S DAY .SCHOOL FOB BOYS 
No. 131 Weat 43d st,r«oi>eus Wednesday. Sept 20 



D 



U 



Mi'JiU »..*'i"E.*5 SrA.viyiKJtClNG iN»TI- 

..^ 1 UTc;— Dr. Wllii'K. 4i7 4th av. Abtuidant refer- 
ences. No pay ULtii <. ured. 

1S.«4 WAUREN'.:5 SCHOOL. FOR BOYS. OTH 
av.. opposite Bessrvotr Park. Pu;iUs of aU ages im- 
prove horg 

H, MOKsB'.-^ SCHOOL.- 1,267 EktO.VD.VAY. 
• reopCDS Sept 2.): prepares for Harvard, Yule. fau. 

OI..DEN %\\l.\, SE.'hTnaSY FOR YOUNG 

lodies Brldgeburu Coun. Miss KMILY NELSON, 

AttNEY UMVERSITi bCaOOL. 25 EAST 29TU 
St.; <,ji'oi>'iratIoa torcollsKe: circulars ou appUcatiou 



G 

b 



tiUAi^n Fl»K Y<»17MU ^iHtt'VUVi.nH^ AND 

Lorivate tnstmetiun. Thos. R. Ash. 103 WastAOth st 



M 



M 
M 



R.'4. GREEN'S BOARDING AND DAY SCflOOi.. 
lor youug Isuiea aud children. C'6 Weat .S6th st 



iSS F. B. PRIBST»S SCHOOL.. NO. 229 

Kast lath St., will reopen MONDAY, Sept 25. 



jiiyjpinNG. 

ONI.V UIRECT ^r.-^B TO ^KANCE. 

THE G KH ERAL TBAN lATLANTlC C > dPA if * JAIL 

8TKAMBHS BKT W 8KN N 8 ,V-YORK AN i> H WR^ 

Calling at PLYMOOTH (G. 0.) for the tanJIajj^ 

l'ass<>nzera 

Caiiins rrovided with I'lectric bella iMMIIng from Pier 
No. 43 Noi'to Klver, foot or Sorrow st , as lollows: 
*i1. LAohKNi' LionesueaPaluraay Oct ai.ut 8 A. M. 

FKANCL, irudelle Snturdav. Oct 28. at 2 P. M- 

tl.UkBMAii. Hecuionx.Satnrdav. Nov. 4, at 7:30 A.M. 

PKICE OF PASSAGE iN OoLO. (including wine.) drst 
rabln, $110 to S12v>, aocoriin; ti> acconimodatiou, 
fieoondo^iila, §72: third cabin, 9ia Hetora tlcgats it 
redueeil rataft .Steerage, it'^ j. with anpen-ir ai conn ia- 
tloa. mclu itag wine, bedding, aud utensils wltnont 
extra charge, ^t<■<ltu era marked thua* do not uarry 
Steerage pussengftra 
LOL'IM DM BKBUW. Agent 65 Broadway. 

HA.MBLiRO American Pseaec <'omp.uy'& Line, 
far PtTMOUra. CHERBoaRG. and tlAM BUBO. 

FRLSIA Oct 19 G LLEitT ^0^. A 

CIVIBKIA Oct •26iP()MMRRANlA Sov.S 

Rates of passage to Plymouth, London, Cherbourg, 

Hamburg, aud all points iu Enslan I. First Cabin. $100 

sold; Second Cabin. $60 gold: steerage, $30, cnrreuoy 

KONHARDT 4. CO.. C B. RICHAttD t BOAd. 



Geiierai Ag nts, 
61 Broad st. ?r. Y. 



Qeaersl Paasenqrer Agents^ 
61 Bioadway, N. y. 



ISH WiJiBJNS' e»CriOOti FOR aiRUd. 
^o. Ill West 44th St. ccoacu M.,& mtx 



WILJ'iUN L.tNB FOR SOUTHAAtFTON ANO 

OaiHfic from Pier Rg 68 Nortti m vat. as foltoWK 

BAVAWBU ...Oct aiioTHKLL0.........»OT. 1^ 

COi^OlTBO ...Nov. 4iaiK»UO Kov. '25 

First caMn. :f?Uroar;r«D«.i^ sKOoai etMo, *&>. oar. 
renov; exennion ttariats oa Ver^ fararaalg teras. 
TbfouikttelMtalMBSdtfttiofitiamitalaad itaitto »»(«, 
Applyiwfull pardcoUnto OdAaiiAi b Waltfttr> 



!iA5flfloat&s» 



SHIPPING. 



WHITE HTAR laNh. 

FOB QCBENKTOWN AlCD LIVERPOOL. CAnanKfl 
DKtTEI) STATES M.AIL. 
The steamers of this lin-i take the Lan* ftouCM re- 
eominenoed by Licnt. Maary. 0. 8. N . going sonib of 
the Bauks on the passoga to Queenstown tiu th" year 
round. 

^i^t^Jf-^ SATURDAY, Oot 21.7:3(1 A K 

ip?ili;'vtV- ^AltikDAI.Oet. U. UHl P. S 

M^I\J\]y SATURDAY, .Nov. H. j:3<»P. Jf 

GEKMA.viC .... KATC.iDAY, Sov. 25, at aaM 

Pram White .-tar Doek, Pier Ng 52 -lorth Ki ar. 

Thes- steamers are unlf.rm in silt; aod nnanrolS^ 
In appoiDtm' Bt«, Tbe salo.m. statrroomi Kreokiao 
and bath rooms are amM^hii.s. wherj tiiu uuiao an) 
motion »r^ least felt affording a Hi-tros of c<»afert 
hitherto unattaiaabie at sea. 

Rates— Salons $80 nnd $100. ^M rctura tickets 
on favorable terms- steeraz*, $'2-i 

Par Inspertion of plans aad other info rmi tion appl* 
St the Comp.any's ofau«a, Ng 37 Broa<iway-.New-t ,rk 

R. J. '^oafii 'gent. 

CUNARO LiNE B. & N. A. H. M. S. P, CO. 

KOTICK. 

With the view («f dhhinishlngih.* ch<»nces nf coTlifloo 
Ihe steamers or this line take a spaelfled coarse for m^ 
seasons of the year. ' 

On the outward pi tsai^ «totn QtincnttOWQ to New- 
York er Boston, c: .^Sising m rridlan of So at 43 latitale, 
•r nothing to thf tiorlh of 4,3. 

On the honieward p-ass ige. eros^la^ the meridian ai 
eoat42, or iiothiagtothe onrthof 42. { 

mOX SBW-TOItK FOR LiyitRPOOt ATTP (HHt^JTrrTW* , 

ABV8.SlSt.A..WKD, Oct ISi-Ji^YTHIA v«, RU., Kov.'l 

•RUSSIA.... WBIi.. Oct 25lALGERIi WKD , Sov. 8 

Steamers marked ■> do notearrv 8tA3ra?e paSS9n?era, 

Cabin passage, $80. $lou, an! $i3J, g .1 ), a. Kordiig 

to accomm.idatinn. Return 'iCcetsoi favjraale t<r:n». 

6te«riMre tickets to an I froai all parts of Europe at 

very low rates. Freight aul p-^Maze olfioi. No. 4 .*owl- 

mg green. <;ha8 G. praS'.:KLV.'«. Airent 

ASSENGER8 FEB s'i'EA.tl.HH IF ABYsI 

Sf.NiA embark from tbe Cnnar.i wnaff, foot <A 
Oraad st, Jersey Ctty. at 3 P. B. on ^vi.dvESDAT, 
18th Octoiipr, 1876. CHARLES Q. FRaXCKlYN. Ka 
4 Bowling GrcBp, New-Toric. 

LXVERFOUL AND GREAT WESTERN 

etTEAM CO.MPANY. (LIJllTsav 

LIVSEPOOU (riaQaoeD8&>wa,i 

CARBXIHQ Tfl8 UJTtTIID SIArtl tfAlk 

Tt7B*DAT. 
L»»y*iigPler Kg 46 Hwtii fUVar \i tiAifr\ 

UONTAKA , Oct 94 atlO A. X 

NEVADA.. ,...„ Oat. 3Lat »ni. 

WISCONSIN Nov. 7, at 9:30 A. M 

WYoMINa .„.. ,...,...S»r. 14, I ', .'. U 

DAKOTA. ._aoy. SUat A. V 

liATESPja>>Ai)4<.*«Ci SiJa;2J. 

6te«iaiie. f 2ft loMroiPdUt^ U): atdx lr> ;« }l). 
according to state-room. USaas. tg 23 im\r\r. 

A'rJLAH .>1A1L lONB. 

8I.M0STHLV SBRVICS TO JlHilOi. HaYH. 
COLOMBIA, anl ASPINWALL, aul to PAStWv •si 
SOirrH PACIFIC POitfi (yiaA^ymwV.Ul F:rji-jt»ji. 
luU-powered iroa sofdw 8tj.»aari, fraa ?i»: Ka 5'; 

Korth River: 

^orHAYTI.COL01^BIA. rSTHMO* OF PvNA^lA aa4 

BOOTH PACIKIO POUfS (Us »tMaw»U.i 

tTNA _ Oct it 

ANDES _.Soy.. 

For KINGSTON (Jam.) aud HAYfL 

^T^lt^; - ^^- I 

CLARIBKL About H*r. St 

Bapcrior irst-sl t<s >*nii;>f >«ci a a > l»vi > i. 
PIM, FORWOOU k. CO.. Ageatl 
So. ot; WaU rt. 

STATE LINE. 

KBW-YOEK TO Gi.AdOOW, LlVr.RP,»Oi.,, OCBLUL 

BELFAST, AND LoSD 'NDEtRY. 
These flrat-elasa tun- lowered steamers wt.l sail ftOiB 
__Pter >ig 42 North River, foal »f Can%l at. 

STATE OF VIRGINIA Thnradav. Oct ;l 

8TATK OP NBVAOA ^Thorsdav. Oct M 

STATE OF INDIANA _Tlmra.iay. X .v. J 

And every olteinate Thursday tb? r«after Pirs: eahii, 
$60, $i1:'>, aud $70, aeeording to arvorirmocatiuns; r» 
tnro Ucketa, $110, $125. SeooD'i eaOig •45 zstaB* 
tlcketa a80. ^:t»>Tage at lowest rates. Apply to 
AVHtlH BALDWIN <k CO.. AseK% 

Kg 72 Broadway. ^ew-Zark. 
STKKRAGE tickets at So. 45 Ijroadw y. aad at tb« 
fomptmy 'B pier, fo>t«f * 'assist. !*ortn Rtver. 

GREAT SOUTHERN 

FREIGHT AND PA.SSENWEK 1,1 ^B. 

SAILI.-.Q FROM PIKR .^O 29 KOtTU KIVBB, 
TUK8DAY8, TH0R8UAY8,aiHiSAT0aiUYd at Sit H. 
BOti. CHAHLEM'rON, H.C., FL.UKIDA. TBA 
__ SOITH, AND SOCI-H-WBST. 

CBARliEBTOA TUEKDAT Oet 11 

eUi.K hTRBAM THCRcDAY Oct ij 

err* op atla.nta _.8atcrda» ^oets: 

Insurance to destination ne-balt of ou ■ p^r cast 
OoQih for'irartie I flfea ot coai oiasiog P:is*«"!Mr tiofe 
e>€aBd bills of lading iasu:<'l an I si-ma 1 at th^ oi^eeof 
JAtfB.<!> W. Qt'INrABU Jk CO., Aceatt, 
5g 177 West »t., comer w'arrea. 
Or W. P. CLYDE t fU. N* li Bitwilns 3re««». 
, Or Bii>;TLEr D. HASiiL^ General Vernal 
Gyaat soMtaer I Freight Mae. SlT Bftadway'^ 

ANCfiUK UNB t. B. »A1L STEA.HBRS. 

fiBtV-TORK ASD GLASGOW. 
AnctM>ria...Oet 21.XA. B. I Rtblo^a...>iay. 4. 7 «. 11 

Cali£0i-nia, Oct. 28, i P. M. | Vjcti/ria. .-ov. 11. 1 P. IA 
TO GLASGOW. LIVKRPOOL, OR D TRRl. 

Cabins $6s to $80, accor ing to accmam i latiaas; I» 
termediate, $35: St e« rage, $28. 
NEW-YORK ASD LONDON. 
Australia, Oet 28, noaik I Aa?iia .lar. 18. 7 A. Bi. 
hlysia. Nov. 4, 7 A. M. i Utopia. Nov. 25 11 '. K. 

cabins. $35 to $70 Steerage, $28. Caitin exea» 
sion tickets at redoeed ratea. nnrfts issaed ttt aas 
amount at current rates. Comoanv's PM-r Kos. 2u aM 
21, North Ktvcr, H. X. HENUBRSOK BR I'UERS. 

Agents. Na 7 Eawdng Gtaeo. 
■ " ■ ■ . 

NATIONAL LINE* Piers NoA 44 and 47 .N. Uvea 
fOti LOSDOy. 

FBARClt 8at".wsy, Oct. SI. at 7:90 A K 

FOR QUEKNSTOWN AN!> LIVERPOOL 

The wneen.oet.21,7:3'JA.i*. iSpafa Nor. 4, 7 A il 

Italv oet. '28. 2 P.M.! England. .Nov. 11, 1 r. %. 

Cabin paasage, $55, $6(i, or $7i-, i-um-ncy. Bntcra 
tickets. $100. $1 10, or $120, eurrenty. Steerage pa» 
sage, ^26, ootmiey. Drafts issaed ir»a Al npwati ai* 
current I ates. 

Company's oOlee, »a 69 Broadway. ^ 

P. W. J. HPRgrTMnuggc 

AMERICAN MfBAM-HHiP Li.NE 

Between Phllad'a k Livcrpooi, ealltn^ at Qae»nst«rWx 

Thursdays ITom Philad'a, Wedneadiys from Liverpook 

Stiamers to saU firum Philadelphia as fhUoWa: 

IlMmda^ ......^.Oct 18 | PenasytTaala Ro*, f 

•Lord CUyg Oot 26 |*dtyof New-YoiLKoT. 18 

Ohio «oy. 2 I ladiaaa Maiy.SS 

Priee ef p assa ge In eauanay: 

CabiQ.$75to$10a Intermeoiate, $40. Steerage, J38b 

PETER WRIGHT k .sOif-S. lien. .Agents, PhUad'A 

Ng 42 Broad at, Naw-fark. 
JOHN MoDO <AL D. No. 8 Battery place. Nnr.Toglt_ 

NOKVJI eBKiHAN LI.UYD. 

tTKAB-SUIP LIKE BBTWBEM NEW-TORC SOOXBi 
AldPTON, AND BKBMKM. 

r«aip«BT'e Pier, tao(o< -Jdtc. tlobeVeik 

BKCKAU tiat.Oot 2. I WESbE Sat..50«| 

B08EL „Baf..Oet 28 I RHB» Sat. .Votr.lJ 

kATjUi or PA-<«AOI PBOM MaW-TOKK TU flOCTa* 
AJiPTO.I HAVit& OB BREJfRN: 

First cabin .<.. $1007>II 

Second oatoia ^ ....^.. 90fleld 

liteerige SOeiuceae> 

Betorn ticketa at redno^ r.iC)-s. prepxkt sieera;;* 
eertifioat«s, $32 corrOBcy. Par frsiga: or pjsaagn a»» 
plytu OELKICUS A CO.. Xg 2 SowUnt Gr.:en. 

IN.ViAN l>iNK .HAII.>SI'KA.tlEKJ«. 

FOR ongUNSTOW ■> aNP LIVKRPOOL. » • 

CITV oFrHE8TBR..satar<lay Oct 28.atlP. B. 
CITY f )F RICHMOND. .Saturday. Nov. a. at 7 A. <L , 

CITT or BBRLI9. Satttrdav. Nov. 18. at 7 A B. 
Proa nar 4.5 North iUy<iK. 
CABIN, $S0 and $100iGald. ftaturu Uexsti aafa- 
yorable teriaA STBKRaGK ^Si, corruaor UraOi 
issued at htwtMt rates. '" 

Saloons, State-room 3, 8moklng, and Path mniaa 
smtdablu* JOHN a DaLB, Agent' 

Kea. ] 5 and ;->d Broail way, N. t. 



FOR MAYAXNAH. GA., 

THB FLORIDA PORTS, 
AHD THB SOUTH A!»D SOilTd-WllSZ 

SBBAT SOUTHERN PEBIUUTA-VD PA"<SB.NOSR LWI 

CENTRAL RAILROAD OF QSJRGLA ANU A^ 

LANTIU AXD ODbK aAli.SOAa. 

WKDNESDATS AnI) SaTURDATR, 

GENBRALi BARNSS, Capt. Chbxsbait, WEDNRSDAY; 
Oct 18, ttom Pier Ng 16 Kast Kiver. at 3 P M. 

BUBRAY. PERIUS k oa, Ageala 

Ag6<; Sooth at. 

SAN JACINTO. Capt luHao. SATDRDAT, Oet « 
from Plar Ng 48 North River, at 3 P. B. 

GEO. YONGK, Agrat, 
h'g 400 Broadway 

Insurance on this line ONK-HALP PER CB:«V. Sopa 
rior aeoommodatieus for oasfe.igera 

Through ratea aa.i tdlls uf lading la connection w'aSk 
< entral Raliruao of Georgia, to all points. 

Tbrougfa ratea aad Mils of lading In conneetioa wtt^ 
the Atlsiatio aod Uaif Rsilcoad and Pi'.rida steamers. 

GEORGE YONGE. 
Agent Cesbai Railr«<ad ei G«K>r.;ia. 
Ng 4<J0 Broadway 

FiMHISITMOFniUil 

FOR CALIFORNIA, JAt»A», oaiN.A, AOSrXiW.X. 
HKW-ZEALANO BitlTIStl tOLJJim, OKiimi. kX 
Sailing irom )'l:i .Vg ii North .livar. 
For SAN KRA.'JCt,Hl«. Via ISfllMOi OF PANiHV 

Ete:im-shiD COLiON ^Wednesday, Oct If 

connecting lor central Amenea and Sjuca i*aail4 
porta 

FromSAR PRANOISCOta JAPaS and UHtTV 

6lean)-ehip< ITTcPToKlc Weauvsday. NaT. ) 

Prom Stui Pranuiaco to Sandwien islands, Australia, 
and New-zi>alanl. 

8team-8hiD CITY OP Mi. NeV JSior. I 

For irelgut or pisuso aaa.y;* 
H'M.P. cu)C.'iistCj..ittti.J. JOlibAX. Sa»3rtnt:<al«ak 
ag a iji.wiiiig irjea. r'i-»r -li. N. t..ti». -jAlti sk 

HEW-YOEK. HAVANA, i.lD daXiCAS d VlLS. 3. USi 

Steamers leave Pier Nn. 3 .<r.rrt j lU, ir rt I .'. iL 
.,™^ - ..,•"'« rtAVA-^^A UfAbKCr. 

cmrop MEKioA -.Tnowiay, <'ct i7 

en f OP Vn, A c. 0* * „«hn - y Oct 19 

i;?l! *"L >EW.YORR.. ...Thursday. Oct. 2d 

CITK OP ttAVAj<A ,., tu, av, Oer. 8* 

rUK VBRA CRUZ ANU IVEW-»»ai'ttA V..-. 

Via HavMia, Projrasg OamJSAoaf Tuxpia, and 
larapioa 
Crn OK MERIDA Tnewlar, Oct 17 

For ftreigut or nissaze ^Dply to 

P.Al«KXAMDRS«;»3.4i. jioi. il *il 3* ar)»»w»f. ^ 

feteamera will uMtva New-onaaus OohiJ am Nov. la 
for Vrra «;ras »u<i -Ul men •«►*,• j •«». 

NE W' YORK AN1> HA VAN A 

W^ DIBBCvr MAIL I.INE. 

|\S>X These flrat-ciaas *teaa*al,M isll e»5Ji*e»r 
J»C\lat3f. JH., ffMh Pier sfa id -*>»«« •<»'« »» 

JSfe.'-'-....: —:^^ft}r "ToA 

COLOtfBtJjf - ..TBthglMT j.oy, a 

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910.000 P.fl.8^.B.'dl.ll7 
lO.UO<J C. a. 5,it>», g. 

^.new Il2>f 



OUi>W, Lrne.) 

» .. lOjO h.e.l03s^ iOo 



do 136 "a 



t,0flUT4l.%v¥ lit 
e.o<.OT. k^C i'.. 
1.000 11. 4 Ut. F«oJ 
7:fclo 



9i 
47 



f.OOO S. icd«-ea.lat 




<i"V««^ 



. . ^ p. I iti)ai.t>.e. 

loo da ...c 

too do 

lOOMd. CoalCo.:,... 
iOO Weet. p. i oL 1). e. 

!8g 



t:::.. 



JOO 

«a ; loo 

»»7?4; 9 

69 I -JOO 
69 lino 
tj^»4l 100 
Ilf 1500 
70'b 500 

b3. 71 

..- 71 
7Ha 



lOOC, H. t .-I. p.bc. 

do e. 

lOOC.M.itS.P.Pf.ke. 
iliiO Gee- o( >>• i..b. c 



-^ - 



500 WTk. K»....u.e. Sals 
SO0P»«4£e U4U..b. t-. 2410 

JMKJ .^Q., 2l% 

1 00 S.T.C. *a. b.e. 03 . 10 r if 

P SS:::;;;:;;: ll§ 
iioa 6a:.... 45* 

loOlfeL % M. W .'a. e. 86% 

luo dt, atiw 

llQe{i.8L44.s.D.e.4a. 57 

fevO 

loOO 

iOOU oa. 

&.Q do. 

Uoa to.. 



000 

7J0 

!■ 



ISOO DfV L- 
foo 

loo 

loo 

JOO 
Md 

w 

100 
JOO 
Jo« 
4aS 

■JoQ 
10 > r,, 




7^^ 



..a . 71 

rio....„.83". 57 'J lO>'r., W. iW'.Vu a.' 5«t 
40 ,.>»- 57\ yj Ohj« fc Mlss.fi 



, , ,. ,., fi. 11 

6, »ii 3d I Sib, K. fl'..b. a. 'h 

— *H. ST>6i i«-0 St.l).,K.d^. .'•.■I.e. S^a 

Vf .,,.,,U.a, 2712 



f ALBS FBOM 2:30 TO 3 

H.e«OT».e».r.aiD.«. ea^iaootei. 

" ■ " --'ilioo "■ 

.... , , _ -iiUo 

i>«>0 do. 0O>aiJOa 

304 4.......;.. ■■'^' ••■ 

li»« J«*>-»i«-d o» . . 

JOQill^r. l'iu{.....»s 
iOoA- 4*^. ■i"6l.-V).0 

^M 4o, 

ZOo i^asMi^ Luioa.' 



p5.ij«oT».9».r.aiD.«. ea^iaoc 
10,000 Ps».oi iia Js(. fl.i S,4oC 

100 pel. *i hI«.8oi.... 2'3^iiiii; 



00 'jvtJO 

40 aOa 

OWouQ 
1U»8 jjO 

16 ijoo 






|0o iUcU- t* 
auOSt. fail 

loU o«t »5. 

SluOKt. P««»lKroj..... 

100 



•Jo'!* 

6a 5? ; 



.. . - ,io a 

iQAd..nii r^p e,s..lo9A .WO 

'■■'■' " » ■ - ',; o 

1 00 

•^00 

SI 100 

U7%i.:UO 
„r«0 

7^d!40i' 

67'..|.;(iO 
"....b» 67\«llOO 

" &7!vldoO 

6.^1 JOO 

u7? .OJ 

&7%hOJ 

d I Hi 3^0 

+ 00 

|.o 




9. w. 

Lack, 

rto.... 

dol... 
do.... 
do... 
do. .. 

do. 

do 

no 

do 

do. 

du..n. r. 

do 

do....... 

do 

dp 

tio..u. 1- 

110..U. r 

do.:,... 

do 

du..u. 1 

do 

do 

do..:... 

do...... 

do 

A-...,.:... 

LO 

a-.-.- . 



*.W. 7138 

7,1a 

74*4 

75 

7i5U 



w. 



\i. r. c. 7o-'8 
........ 71*^ 

r. c. 73 14 
..... 74'5 

74»d 

741^ 

..... 74m 
r. c. 7o>8 

..... 7 ^8 
7414 

74 

-, 7-i»4 
0. 74ab 
c. 7414 
... 74»a 
..74 
7 J 34 

7J78 

74 
7lHi 

7iai> 



c. 



', 0bla k. ■ iae... 
400 Paeide Uxii... 

iv» da 

IoO do 

VJO d.. 

10PUt»burg 



7iia 
■-^4»9 
24i'4 



•S 



MojiDAv. Oct. 16— P. M. 
Ppee»riat|pn on the Scoc^ Exchajise to- 
lajF i»6«uMl tirm, bqH pi'ioad eiliihited an ad. 
mtutfiQ^ teuOencj. _ 'J'l^e itHprovemens, how- 
eWf^ wg* au^tieiiiy piieoiieil by £|, report to the 
e&sct, ib|>li Cum.iautl^^rij Vand^rbilt was dead, 
yjji* ^gort, eoimn;? tUraagh the chanuel ot 
th« Aii«oiake4 l^feas, had all the appearauce of 

|«PW«fto4ilt W4 waa generally credited- It 
fforqd, hawdTer, to be utterly devoid 
ftf l9Uatl*t\0ft, 1W4 ViW evideutly put 
sQ^^t fey »0in^ peoundrol acting in 
sone«Tt with parties whose interests 
<rere4a bo subservad hy • deohne in values. 
Tba iolamoua acheoie, i% la gratifying to he able 
ta itato, vM Bot attended -mt^ anything like 
khe txxcMbiB which it« ooQcoqtf^a m^st bayei an- 
tloipated, as the icarket , after - temporarily 



be<3i>TBe firm, and, i4deod, buoyant Xa %aaa. 
Tbo nu'bodtios of the Stpate jSuhange intond 
{ to institute a thorough inresiigation with the 
j view of disooverinjt tba authoiship of the 
t^boKusdisoateh, and Should the guilty parties 
i be discovered no oflfort will bo spared to hold 
j tiiem to a strlot aeoouutability. 
[ T|ie eutire business for the day aggregated 
j 129,450 share*, of which 43,240 were in Dela- 
wnro, Laqka^yanna and Woatern, 38,800 in Lake 
I Sliore, 10.310 in New-Jerssy Central, 9,800 in 
Pacitio Mail, and 5,225 in Western Union. Del- 
aware, I^ackawauna and Western doolined at 
the opening from 72 to 71, aavanced to 75?8, 
and at the close reacted to 74 "j^. Delaware and 
Qudsoo Caiial roae fromefiV^ to 69^4, and finally 
sold at 69. -Morris and Essex ranged between 
9i% and 95. New^Jarsey Central, after selling 
down from 36 to 3}%, adyaneed to 3r?4. There 
was a reaction ot about 1 ■P' cent, at the close. 
NewrYork Central declined from 102 '4 to 100"^, 
recovered to 102, and closed at 101%. Lake 
SUore declined fron> 56'/^ to 55 Ti, and later rose 
to 57^, closing at a slight reaction. MichiL;an 
Central advanced from 44 to 45, St. Paul com- 
mon from 28V4 to 29 Ti. preferred from 53% to 
S?))*. Rook Island trom 101 '4 todOl^i, Ohio and 
Mississippi from lOVi to 11. Pacific Mail de- 
clined from 25V4 to 21?8 and rallied to24^t. 
Western Union fluctuated between 70 '^5 and 71, 
opnning and closing at the latter price. Atlan- 
tic and Paoifio Telegraph sjld in small lots at 
Id. The North-w.'8torn shares were quiet and 
firm, and Erie steady. Sales of Harlem were 
made at 135 and Union Pasifio at 63. The r e- 
niainder of thelistwaa devoid of special teature. 

The week opened with the mouey market in 
a very easy condition, and nearly all the busi- 
ness on call loans to Stock Exohange borrow- 
ers was at 2@2^ W cent., until near the close, 
when stdi lower rates prevailed. Prime mer- 
cantile paper was quoted at 5a 6 ^ cent. Tne 
national bank notes received for redjmplion 
to-day amounted to §430,000. The following 
were the rates ot exchange on New-York at 
the undermentioned cities to-day : Savatinah, 
selling par, buying ^& discount; Cbarieston, 
easy, ^4 discount to par; Cincinnati, moderate 
demand, 103 discount; New-Orleans, commer- 
cial, 746, bank, ^4 ; St. Louis, 125 to 160 dis- 
count, and Chicago, 80 discount. 

The foreign advices reported the London 
market for securities quiet, and prices showed 
no special change for Consols or United States 
bonds. The fortoer closed at 95^ for both 
money and the account, and the latter at 103 
for 18603 (old), 108^ for 18378, IO^Mj for 10-40s, 
and 106H for new Ss. Erie was % per cent 
lower than op Saturday, selling down to Oif^. 
The Bum of £5.000 sterling went into the Bank 

of England on balance to-day. At Paris Rentes 
declined to lOSf. 87\6o., and subsequently recov- 
ered to I06f. 7Vio. 

The Sterling Exchange mar ket was firm and 
somewhat higher for actual bu-^iness, which 

was on the basis ot $4 83 V^ for prime bankers' 
60-day bills, and $4 85 for demand. The nom- 
inal rates remain at $4 84 and $4 85H. 

The gold speculation was quiet, but some- . 
what firmer, in consequence of the European 
advices on the Eastern question. The sales 
were alternately at 109i,6 and 109V4, the latter 
having been the opening aud closure quota- 
tion. Cash gold was easy and loans ■were 

made flat to 2 f cent interest for carrying. 

Government bonds displayed greater strenjctb 
than for some time past, and prices made a gen- 
eral advance of "ife to Va ^ cent., closing at the 

highest point. The demand was more active 

tlian usual, especially for new 18633 and 1867 s, 
which sold up to 112Vfe and llSVa respectively. 
Railroad bonds were strong and m some cases 
higher. Toledo and Wabash consolidated con- 
vertible advanced to 47, and C. C. and 1. C. 
firsts to 43. a rise of 2 %* cent in the former 
and Hi ^ . cent, m the latter. Toledo and 
Wabash firsts ^ose to 92, Chicago and North- 
western consolidated gold coupons to 95, and 
Ohio and Miasisaippi Consoliaated Sinking 
Funds to 92. Harlem coupon Firsts sold at 
118^, Rock Island 7s at 109?4, do. Sinking 
Funds at 103, and Cleveland and Pittsburg 
Consolidated Sinking Funds at 111. Milwau- 
kee apd St. Paul. La Crosse Division, declined 
to lOai-i, Hannibal and St. Joseph Convertible 
to 7914, and Ohio and Mississippi Second to 
58^. State bonds were practically neglected. 
Tennessee, new aeries, sold at 44, and Virginia 
Consolidatod, ex-matured coupons, at 68^. 

UsiTBD States TnE.\suBY. ) 
NEW-yoBK, Oct,. 16, 18/6. 3 

ei.l0l,49l 85 

131,124 11 

44.13d,19J 51 

66U.481 93 
452.967 Zi 



C^t g[dt>>§urfe €tmtB, ^m^Kj}, <^nJ0tt n, ^sie^^^-imxt^ '3x^f^ltmtm. 




■cf'- 



Grold receipts , 

Gold payments 

Gold oaiance... 

Currency leoeipta.... 
Carrency pavment^.. 



Ccirrency ^ala^ce... 
Ciistoina. 



40,062,511 43 

343,000 00 

CLOSING QUOTATIONS — OCT. lb. 

Soturdsy MondaT. 

American Gold .lOQia 10914 

TJnited 8 ates 4I3S. 1891, coupons llQii llOi^ 

UaiiPd Sr^tes 5^, ISdl, coupons 114 114^ 

tTnited Stales 5 203, 1867. conpans ll.i^ Uolg 

Bills on London $4 83ai§4 83ia $4 83g)!4 83I9 

New-York Contral 102 lOlSg 

Koek ialnnd 101 101% 

Pacific MhiI Sols 2473 

Milwaukee and St. Paul 28^ 28'7g 

Milwaukee and Bt Paul Preftrrfed 536^ 5g7g 

Like Sliore SfiSg 573g 

CbioaKo and Kortb-we.si,ern 36 36ia 

Chicago snd Nortn-weatero Pref 60 6OI2 

Western tTnion , 71 71 

Tfiiion p^cifto .,..,.. , ea^s _e3 

DeUw^Fe, l^aekawanha aJad NVesterD. Tl'^a 74*8 

New-Jersej Central ...,.,..,,......., ^d^ 36^ 

ilelaware and Sadsen Canal. ,. . ...... 66 69 

Morria aad £asex, 94 95 

Pap^ina. .',.....,.,....., 123 Its 

Erie, , 1,,,,..., e^g 10 

Oiiio and Miasissippi lOS^ lO'^s 

Harlem., 135 135 

Hanoi tial and St. Joseph 13<2 laia 

Ha Dibal and Sc. doaepb £*re>errad... 24^ 24 

Idiehiaan Ceatral 44 44% 

liiiaou Cttotral ,--,,,, ■ 83% 84 

Tlie estreipe range of prices ii^ stocks and 
the niimoer of sharaa sold are as followe: 



pigbe^t Lowest. 



..10^14 
.--135 
... 10 
... 57% 

:.. 5^8 

.. 361a 



37% 

691a 

95 

45 

63 

4 
131-3 
11 
71 
9314 

6la 

8 
85 13 

1458 



100 19 

135 

5j% 
5% 
3638 
60 14 
161I4 
23 13 
5533 
71 

31% 
66 14 
9488 
44 
63 
4 

i:ji^ 
101^ 
7(m 
3433 

61^3 
558 
8 
85 12 

14T8 

63 



No. of 

Bnar«8. 

5,100 

300 

1,300 

38,800 

40J 

300 

400 

3<i0 

1,500 

2,800 

43.240 

10,.110 

2,450 

5J5 

3,800 

100 

100 

100 

1.500 

5.ai5 

9,800 

100 

100 

300 

100 

100 

IUO 



New- York Central... 

Harlem. 

Eiie.... ,,.., 

Like Shore , — 

Wabasii.... ......,:,, 

Ngpth-weatora. ... . . . __ _ 

Noreh-wfaterp Preferred eoii 

liocb laUad,...,.., ..:..J01% 

Mi'fvaukee^ and Sf. p.ti]l 2^i^ 

Milwaukee ami St. Paul Pf. SOi^ 

Dt»l.. Lick, and Weatera 7538 

New-Jersey Oen'ral... ., 

IJelaware and Uudaoa Daoal. 

Morris and fI-«seT 

Aiirhigau General 

TJuiop Pdciflo 

C., C. and ludiaoa Oontral.. 

H.inniuai aud St. So^eDn 

Ohio aud Miati atppi 

W^enfern Uiiiju ,. 

Paoiflc Mail 

Maripo^ia , 

S . Louis. K. Vj. and N>rih.. 

Kitisus anil Texas 

Wulis, Fargo & Co....,.;... 
lion Mountain 

United Scatts Express...... 

Total sales, 

The tollowing were the 
Government bonds : 

Bid. 

iJuited States Carrancy, 61 134 

Uuiied Slates 6% 1881. r"2Mtered 110% 

TJuitb'i Slates 6<. 1881. coupoug llS^a 

Uiiited Sfates 5.20i, 1-^65, iefiii»iereJ..109i4 
Uui cQ States 5 20i, 1865, coupcns II212 

U.iitBi'. Statea 5-10i, 18o5, uhw Tea - llJ^a 

TJuited S uU»s52J8, 186.1, new coup...H33g 

UuuedState!i5-?Q!i, 1867, regi8terea...llaio 
Uuiie«l States 5 2Q., ltiu7, coupons U»»a 

tTuiteil Sxatoj 5-i!Jj. 1868, r<i;jisterBd...llBi3 
Uut'.ei1 StateH 5-iOH, 1868, Coupons 

IJniteil States IO.4O1, registered... 
Duittd S ate.s 10-40s. coupons 

United Srar,e8 53, 1881. registered. 
United States 5.s 1881, coupons.. , 
United Stales 413*---, 

The following table shows the transaction 
at the Gold Exchange Bank to-day : 

Qold cleared - f 2G. 896,000 

Gold balances 1.53),800 

Currency balapoea 1,675.678 

The lollowing is the Clearing-house state- 
ment to-day : 

CBrrenpy exotianfees 

Curienoy DalaQQes. , 

Gold Mohanges.... ,,.„..,,,.,.,.,, 
Qold halaace«,.,. ,„.,,, ,,,.„,,,., 

' The Sub-Treasurer disbursed 



, 129,450 

closing quotations of 



Asked. 
18) 
II7I4 
119 
1031-2 
11J% 
112% 
113% 

lliSft 

115% 

117 

117 

11458 

l'.51-2 

113 M 

114% 

111 



-.1161a 
..11438 
..IIJI4 
..113 

-.11412 
..1101a 



m 



,.t7s.e43.86a 

.. 3,120,083 
„ 11,034189 
. 1,468^75^ 

gold coin > 



XMldxiigJkjpoint or two iUueuX:iZafiOTac^a, aA^JLSSaOO X«».>»i^ra«tw82,i300.fc«.c»UedJ»o»Ldfc.aaii.JLaa g8®$6 eo.clUeflj: Extras at SH> '<id99A.6dijerr^. 



T 



511,500 silver coin in exchange for fractional 
currency. 

The lollowing were the bids for the various 
State securities : 

Alabama 5^,1 8s3 

Alabama 5\ 1886 

Alaliama S.^, 1986 

Alabama Bs, 1888 

Ala. ei.,M. &,E.R.. 

Alt. 6s, Pnnfled 

A. 7.», L. R.&Fr.S.i*. 
A. 7'<, Mem. & L. R. 
A.7H,L.R,e.B.&N^0. 
A. 7s, M. 0. & R. K. 

A. 78, Ark. C?n 

Conueulit'ut St.. 

Geirgia 6< 

Ga. 7s, new ods. 
Ga. 7s, indorsed. 
Ga. 73, Gold bds. 
Illinois coup. Ci,1877102 
Illinois coup. 6s,1879.10i 
Illinois Wai Loan.. .102 

Kentucky 6.^ :103 

Ljuisiana Cs 41 

La. 6s. new bda 

La. 6.<, n. F'iiiE Dht.. 
La. 7^, Pemtentiary. 
La. 63, Levee bus... 
La. Hi, Levee bda... 
La. 8.S, L. bds. ot '75. 

La. 8i, Uonaoi 

Michigan 6s, 1878-79.10^ 
Michigan 6s, 1883.. .11)3 
Michigan 7,^ 1890. ..110 



33 
32 
33 
32 

30 

9 

8 

8 

8 
. 8 
.110 
. 92 
.I04I2 
.101 
..10412 



41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
09 



n. & St Jo. due '86.107 
H. &St. Jo. due '87.107 
N. Y. reg. B. Loan.. 103 
.K. -Y. coup. B. L'n..l03 
N. C. 6«, old, J.&lu. 15 
.V. C. 6', Ap. & Oct. 15 
N. C.,N.C.R.,J-i&.ln. 60 
N. C , N.C.R,,A,(feO. 60 
N.C.N.C,K.c,o.J.&J, 40 
N.C.N.C.Rc.o.A&O. 40 
N. C. Fuii.l. Act, '66. 8 
N. C. Fund, Act, '6S. 813 
N. C, now bds.,J.&J. 6 
N. C.new bds.,A.&,0, 6 
N. C. Sp.Tax, class 1. II4 
X.(J. Sp, Tax, class a. 1 
N. C. 8p. Tax, class 3. 1 
Ohio 6s. 1881......:. 10713 

Ohio 63, I8e8 113 

{south Carolina 6*... 3i 
a. V. 63, Jan. &. Jnly. 33 
S. C. 6h, Ai). &Ocr.. 32 
S. C. Fund. Act, 66. 33 
S. C. L. C, '89,J.& J. 40 
S. C.L.C, >9.A.&0. 40 

S. (J. 7s ol 1888 33 

S. C. Non-Fund. bds. 2 
Tennessee 63, old... 44I4 
Tenn. 6s. iiow bds.. 4.!ia 
Tenn.6s,X.bds.,N.S. 44 
Viririutu 6s, old 27 



Mo. 63. due in 1876. .10183 Va. 6-, new bds., '06. 27 
Mo. 6s, due in 1877. .101% Vh.Ss, new bds.,'C7. 27 
Mo. 63, due in 1873.. 1C2 Va, 61, Cone, bonds. 78 



L.Bs.,duo'82to'92in.lU7 
Fund. beta, due 1894.107 
Asy. orUn. due '92.107 



Va. 6 
Ya. 63, 



ex mat. coup, 
('ous. 2d Sd. 



6a I3 
3.-.12 



Ya. 6s, Deterred has. 61.3 
And the following for railway mortgages : 

Alb. &. Susq. 1st 1081a C, P. &, A.«h., old B.105 

C., K & A8b„newB.105 
Buft". &, Erie new bs.l04iG 
Hull. & state L. 79..1U4i.j 
24i4!Kal. & W. Pie, ist.. aO 
L. .Shore Div. bda. ..104 
L. S, Cons, (;oup,lat.l07 
L. S. Cons. Rep. 1st. 104 
L, S. Cons. Ri-e, 2J..100 
Miir. &. Cin. 1st..?.. 107 



Alo, (fcSq.-q. 8d 101 

Alb. &, Su-iq. 3d 100 

B„ C. K. it M. 1st 7a. 37 12 
Cdea. &, O. 6.s, Ist.. 
Ches. <fe O. Ex. Cou. 21 
Lou. & Mo. isi G... 85 
St. L., J. & Chic.lat.10-J 
C.,B. &Q. 8p. c. 181,118 
C, B. &Q. Con. 7s. .111 
C, R, 1. as P. lat 7^.10058 

C.l{.I.&P.S.r.l.65'05.101i2 
Cen. 01 >i. J. I8i.newl03 
Cen.of N. J. lat Cou. 87% 
Cen. of N. J., Cou... 87 
L. & "W. B. Con., G. 65 
Am. D. it Imp. bda. 60 
M.&St.P.lst 8s, P.D.llO 
ld.&St.P.3a73,lOP.D 9738 
M.&dt.P.lstLaC. D.102 
M.&3t.p.lsrLifcM.D. 04^-2 
ai.&>t.P.lst, C.ifcM. 95 
M.&St. P. Con. S. F. 87 
MiL cfcSt. Paul 2 J... 9Jifl 

C. & N. W. S. F luOiS 

C. & N. W. Int Dds.lOlia 
C. &N. W. C. bds.. 10413 
C. & N. W. Ex. bds. 100 

C. <&N. \f. iKt 106 

(;. &N. W. C. C.G.. 9478 

Pen. Ist Con 100 

Chic. & !d\\. lat lOSlg 

Win.&St. Pbtera 2 1. 70 

c..c.c,»fci.i»t7«, s.r.iio 

Eel., Lack. &VV. 2d..l06ia 
Del.,Lack.&\V., Con. 103 
Morris &£s>iex Ist. .116 
Morris & Essex 2d..l05ia 
Mur. & Ess. 7s ot '71.100 
."Vlor. & ISss. 1st CO. 101 
Erie 1st, Exi.ended..llO 



ErielxtTd, 1879 103 

Erie 3d 73, 1883 100 

Erie 4th 7», 1880 03 

Erie 5th 79. 1888 10 J 

LongDucK bds 104 

B-.N.Y.&B 1st. 1877. 911- 

Kau.&Si.Jo L.U HO 

Han.ifcSt.,Io.88,Qon.. 79 

lud. Bl. &, West Ist 20 

M. So. 7 per oeni. 8d.l04l8 
M.S.&InM.S.F.,7 p. CillX 
Clev. & Toi. S. F....109 
Clev. &Tj1. n. bds.. 104 



..1011-2 
..111034 

-.91% 
.. 83 



.vi. Cen. Con. 7i,1903 1021-3 
M. C. lat 83, '82, S.F.113% 

S. J. So. Isr 7a 20 

N. Y. Ceu. 6s, '83...IO413 
X. Y. Cen. 6s, '87... 106 
N. Y, Cen. 61, R. E..102ij 
.V. Y. Cen. 6s, Sub,.102iij 
N. Y. C. & a. 1st C..117 ^ 
N, Y. C. &H. IstR.n? 

II 1. 1st 7s, Coup 1181-3 

Nortn Mo. Ist 93 

Ohio & Al. Con. S.F. 91 
Olilu & Miss. Consul. 90 

Ohio &M18.S. 2.1 58io 

Cen, Pac. Gold bds-.lonsj 
West. Pac, Bda.. 
Uq. Pac, L. G. 73. 

Un. Pao. S. F 

Pac. R. of Mo. 2 I 
e.. Ft.W. <feC. I8t..ll9l3 
P., Pt.W, &C. 2d...ll3 
Cle. & Pitta. C. S. F.lll 
Cle. & Pitts. 4i,h S F.105 

C, C. & 1. Ist 42 

C, C. ft L2d 10 

St. L. <fe 1. M. 1st... 100 
Alton & T. H. 1st... 108 
Alann&T. U.2.1Pf. 88 
Alt & T. fl, ailnc. 70 

T.. P. & W. 13,,ED. 88 
T.,P. &W.lst,VV,D. 85 

T„p. &\v.ad 85 

T., p. 6c W. Cou. 73. 25 
i'ol. & ^Vau. lat Kx. 9Ha 
T. &. W. l8t St,L.i>. 60 

Tol. &W.Eq.Bds.. 10 
Tol. JfeW.Cou.Conv. 45 

Gt. Wast. 1st, 1883.- 9J 
Gt. West, 2d, 1893,.. 63 !« 

Quid. &Xol. 1st, 1800. S6 

ill. & S. Iowa lit 65 

Han. &V. Mo. Isi... 85 
\Y. Un. Bda., 1900, C,103i« 
VV. Un. Bd.1., 1900, R.I031-2 



Manhattan .125 

Alercantile 102 

Mereaarita' II5I3 

.Metronolitan ... 120 

>few-York 117% 



And the following for City bank shares 

America 136 

.4.merieanExcbange.l09 

City 300 

Commerce 108 

E.iSt Kiver 95 

Firat National 200 Pbeuix bS 

Fulton — 145 xtepuo.ic 72 

Filth Avenue 212 St. NicUolaa 100 

Imp. &■ Traders' ISo^a 

PHILADELPHIA STOCK PRICKS — OCT. 16. 

TAa. iakpd. 

Citv63, now 11213 11214 

United Railroads of New-Jersey... ...13013 i;i7 

Pennsylvania Railroad 47^8 49 

Reading Railrourt ; 23% 22'^^ 

Lebi^h Valley Railroad 49 49i-j 

Pnilauelpbia &. Eiie R lilroad 15 1514 

SoDuvlkill I^avig4ti<>c Preferred U 12 

Nori.hern C atral Rulroad 27I3 29 

Lehiifh Navlftatiou 32^8 32% 

Oil Creek & Allegheny Railroad 933 gi.^ 

Uestuu»iile Railway 26 C6I4 

Cen, ral Transportation 3938 39% 

Hr. Honry C.Emmet, of Emmet, Couillard &• 

Co., has been admitted tp membership in the 

Stgok Exchange. ^ 

CALIFORNIA MIMXO STOCKS. 

San Francisco; Oct. 16.— The Joliowing are 

the closing otfloial prices of ml nine stocks to-day : 

Consolidated Virginia. .49 la Crown Point 13 

Cidifor..ia , r)7iij Yeliow Jacket 24ia 

Segr gated iielcbtsr.... 70 Alpha , 4.d 

Ophir ..46 T'elclifr 1084 

Chollar , 80 Co.idleuie 16 

Sav,.ge 14 Sierra Nevada 12% 

I onsiiidated Imperial. 4 Exchequer 14 

Mexcau 27 Ovfniinn 83 la 

(iould and L'ur~y I4I4 Justice.... 23% 

1 est and Belcher ^4"-^ Ja.eJonia lui-j 

llale and ^0. cross 8I4 

COMMERCIAL AFFAIRS. 



New-York, Mouday, Oct. 16, 1876, 
The reoeipta of the principal Kinds of Produce sluce 
our last have ueen as follows : 



Aihes, pks 


5 


bees- wax, pks 


5 


n. b. f'eaii, bass... 


64 


Beana. hois 


547 


Cotton, ball a 


10,154 


Cotton a'd Oil,bbl3. 


200 


Copper eakes 


16 


Dried Frut, pka... 


3i8 


KKgs, bills 


28,1:5 


Fiour. buls 


Vheat, buahels 


183,703 


Corn, bushels 


231,337 


oatp. buahfla 


1QO,07» 


Kye, bushels 


.•1,747 


Barle.v. husliels 


89,343 


Peas, bushels 


6,8)0 


Gr;i8s-seed, pks... 


1,678 


Flax-aeed, oaga... 


1,058 


Hops, bales 

Hides. No 


432 


239 


Hides, balea 


574 


jcather, aides 


6.503 


Lead, pigs 


B.OUO 



Oil, bbia 




. 49 


spirits Turp., 


afa.. 


50 


lil-cak , pis... 




.2,61^: 


Pork, uk^ 




. 191 


.'6ef',pk8 




51 


Cut-meuti nks. 




.2,568 


Gie.ise, pts 




. 55 


Lard, pks 




. 744 


^tt-arine, pks... 
Butter, pks 




. 36 




.2,425 


Cbeese, pUs 




-4,-.^48 


Tallow, pks 




.. 65 


Lubncatini: Oil, 


bbU 


. IOO 


Pe.i-nut8. bags. 


, 


. 127 


KiCG, pka 




. 151 


uice-chaff, bags 




. 120 


,Slareh, bSB 




.1,51VJ 


Skiua, bale 




1 


duniac, bags 




- 140 


roUaceo, hhua.. 




. 255 


Tobacco, bxs. &. 


ca.. 


.1,088 


Auiiky, bbl^. .. 




. 608 


Woel, bales 




. 367 



COFFKE — Rio has been quiat, but held with firmneag. 
Sales have been reperteil 0/ ob1.v--1,683 b.iga, by the 

Clara, on private terms The weeVa receiots of Eio 

and Santos here have baeii .^ — bR.(;s; aalea, (to ihia 

inoKDlB.g[,) 3.10d liaga Stock of Uio and '8ant08 in 

^r«t uauds, here this 'murnlnj;, 1,078 ba^s; at 
the putports, 9,957 ba^s. and afloat and 
loading for iho United states to Sept. 6, 76,013 
baea ; DUfchasad for the United Stat a to Oct. 14, 
235,000 bags... .other kiuda have been also in 

liehc stock and wanted, prices rulinj; striirig 

We quote invoices tons: bio, ordinary, ICc.oillj^c.; 
fair, 18c.®l8i4').; pooJ, 18i-2C@18%u j primi-, lOc.a 
19140 , gold, #■ HJ., 00 dava' evedit; uio, la jju iocs, 
16i40.'3i20'ae., (sold; Santos, lair to good itivqicea, 
1714c. 3) J 8 'ec, and, in joo iota, ordinary to very clioioe, 

16c.®'20i4C Java, inroieea, 20c._^23e.; Maracaibo, 

It)i4e.a)lsi4c.; Lasiuayri, lt)%p. a)i7'30.; Savanilia, 
15 "-.iP O'lSe.; Aleiicin, 16iac,@17'2C.; Ceylop, i&^c.'S) 
180; Costai H^ca, i6'2C.®19c., aud 8an Oomiugo, 1513C. 
ai6c.. aoid, ^Ib. 

COTTON — .\ mure aoMye movemont has been re- 
parted tor eari.v delivery, cuiefly for spianiag pur- 
poses, at steadv priisea — Oruinary quoted at Oc; 
tiow Middling, 10%i-,@l()=90 : Ididdling. lO'^^.'ip 

li ll,lt>c Sales were offloia.l.y reoorled for jirompt; 

d^liverv of 2,704 bales, (of wbicli l,ll4 bales were on 
Saturday eyeuing.) includinii 9o5 balt-a to shippers, 
1,699 bales to apinueis, and 100 bales to 
sueculituis And tor I'orwarl delivery busi- 
ness moderately aetlve »t improved prices 

8aies have been reported slice our 1 ,st of 17, 200 
bnle», of which 2, -00 Oalei were ou .'iaturdiy evening, 
and 15,20i) bales te-day, with 1,3lO biles on the 
calls, on the basis of .Muldliue, witu October options 
01081U? at 10 lo-lOcoili) 3i-32c.: AovemOei". 
11 31-32c.®ll l-16c.; Oecember. III4C.; Jaiiuiiry, 
11 15S-e.; February, 11 11-. Oc; Marcu, 11 29-32c. 
®11 15-16c.; April. 12 3-32o.®12V..; May. 12 0-32c. 
'a'12 5-lOc.; June, 12 15-3i!u ® r<i»-2C ; July. l2'^a.'S> 
®ia 21-3zc.i Ausust. 12%o.S'12 2,")-.^2fi. #■ lb . show- 
ing an advance 01 l-16c.®a-32o. ^ lb . closiui; Arm 

The receipisat tnio port to-day were 10,154 balea, and 
at the Biitpoing ports 3H,3i>4 bales, against ^-'1,803 
bales same dayla-t week, aud thus far tills we k 
58,059 bales at;aiuat 50,837 b ib's same time last 
wicK ...Thii receipts at the aliippiag pores since ^'e-.it. 
1. 1876, have beeu 539,5,i7 b.il.'S. a^'ainst 469,7 6 
bales for tbe oorrespunding time in tne prLcedina 
t otton ,year Consolidate. 1 eiep u'ts (one iia> ) for 

Great Britain trom all bhippiug porta, 13,4'J3 bides ; to 
the Continent, 14,."i20 bales ...Stock iuNtw-lork to- 
day 56.'/H9 bales; consolidated stock at the ports. 
365, 5B0 balos. 

Olosiiig Prices of Ootton in New- YoriC 

New Cotton. Up andB. Alabama. N. O. 
Ordinary.. 



y 



Texas. 
9 
934. 

9-8 

■16 



9 9 

.strict Ordinary.', 9^8 '•'% '•''"s 

G od ord.naiy... H's O's 9''e 

Strict Oi)oaOrd..lOia luig 10 3-16 10 3 

Low AliUilliuj ...lO'^s IOI3 10'^ lU^a 

Siitct Low did. ..U>»a 10-'4 10 'g liLg 

Slii.diiu.; lu'a 11 11 1-10 11 1-16, 

Oooil .Mi idliug...U 1-18 11 3-16 11 6-10 11 ."i-ld 
Strict Good .Hid.. 11 516 11 7-16 11 9-16 11 9-16 
Miilaliujc Fair.. ..11 11-16 11 13-16 11 ln-16 11 1516 

Fair 12 7-iUl:J 0-16 13 11-10 12 11-iO 

Stained. 

Good Ordinary 8%|Low Middling 0% 

Strict ijood Urd BaxlJliildliuB 10 3-16 

liLOUa ^SV iIK-4L— state aud Western Flour Tias 
been in comparatively limited request to-day, with 
values, as a 'ule. quoted di'preased and somewhat ir- 
legulav. From buyers for the Kuriipein market uida 
were reported for lines of good shippiug bxtra^ on tbo 
basis ut $5 20, bqt bolders claimed ocSlOc. a bb). 
more, and reporud very slow progress in uegoiiationa. 
Prom the VVeat India iuterest the inquiry to-day was 
cou^parativeiy tamp. Home traae deaiiags were licht 
in most binds, and mainly to provida 
for urgent wanta. N^w otop 8p>in2 Wheat lixtra* 
have been in more liheral stuck, thrpugh reoent'free 
arrivals, with receivers ahowing tuar« eagarnaas to 
clos^ opt Buppliea of the lea,* desirably hrai^da (roip 

dock i^afea have beeii reported aiuce our last of 

including unsoimd Flour at 



2 at $3'®*4 23, mostly at 



poor to very cboics No. 

63 50W$4; pnor to ver.y choice Superfine Webtaru, 
«4 .^5®, 5, mostly at *4 50a^$4 75; poor to good 
lixtra tjtate, *5 05 ^$5 25 ; good to strictly choice do. 
at $5 •2ya;$o 60; City Mida Hxtras, siiippine giaoes, 
85 15®i!6 25. mainly at *aai.td 25 for tlie West 
Iiidie8,ana$5 25 asked for brands for the hngliah trade, 
interior to goed shipping Kxtra Western, $5 05 a) 
$5 25: Rood to vpry choice do.. $5 ',.i5®$j 00; louud- 
hoiip Ohio ehippiog at ijij 05'<i>ii>5 50; good to very 
choio'i Western trade and Family Jixtras, Spruij? 
Wheat stock. SjjD «0a>;*7 05; very poor to very ciiolce 
do. do.. 01 Red and Amber Winter Wbeat stock, at 
$j Co®*? 6j : ordinary to very choice Wbite Wheat, 
do. do., $5 75'tf$8 50; poor to very choice 8t. Louis 
hxtras, $5 75^*8 25, (with amali lots of fancy at 
hi«Ue;fiyuies;)KitraGeneoeeat$5 60®,tG 75; p orto 
faiic% Miuuesota htraiuht Eitiaa. $5 «0'<»$7 'ii), chiefly 
at SO loa$7i Mlnuf!-ot» Faient Kxtras, Inlenor to 
very fancy, at $ti 75i4'$0 50, mainly at $7 25®*9.... 
luciudcii in the aalea have beeu 3,900 hola. shipping 
Kiras, (of wnicli 1,800 bbls. t Uy Mills,) 1,900 buls. 
ilinnebota »t.-ai>;hl Kxtras, 900 bbls. do. I'aieut do., 
850 tiois. Winter Wheat Kxtras, (for shipment, these 
mainly at $5 iib'tiSti 15,) 550 hbli. .'■'upeifluo, 

700 bbls. Ho. 2, and 375 bbls. «uur Extras at/ ..,,,.,..^ . .,,, >v..l.ui,m 

quoted rates. ...A nioderalo business bas beeu^-^giBC • nrime do <lUc. tiir 

Ti.norti.n ill .Snilth^.rn 1,'iiiiiv i.n/.Aa ,.t ..d-),;..!. 1,,.,-a i.....,, .>.o _ ^^ , ,-. .. '', -^ .' ■,*i^ 



reported in .Southern Flour, prices ol wliich have Peen 

witUout important obaueo julea have been repotted 

hero of ] ,100 bbls. at S4 ;;5®;J5 for very poor to fancy 
.Superlino; $6 10a>*6 20 for poor to very choice eliip- 
pinir liittas: $6 2u®$8 50 for (air to veiv choice 

trade and family Uje Fiour h.a been quoted about 

stea iy, ou a fair jubuiug inquiry, mostly f.ir favorite 

hranJa of huperline Wo quote at from $i 40«)$5 10 

for poor to fancy Superfine, and *2 60ff'$;< 5o for poor 

to choice flue bales 400 bbls. in lot", mainly at 

*4 75'ffi',t5 for fair to choice .superdne, aud $5 10 
lor fancy .tate, the la^tcr an extrejie, nud 

$4 40 lor ordinary Western Corn-meal has ocenlcss 

active, but desirable lota have been held with flrmness 
ou restricted otlerings for early uclivery We quote 

at.$2 7oa).'H3 10. for orliuity 10 choice Yellow West- 
ern; .$2 70'3J«3 10 lor Yellow Jersey, and ^3 25'» 
43 30 for Urnnd.ywiue. Sales have ueeu reported of 
1.250 bills., of which 700 bu:8. of 3rand,v wiue, aud 500 

bbls. Yellow Wtetern at the quoted rales Coru- 

niial. iu biigB, has Oteu in demiiud at ateady rates, 
with saies reported 01 about 3.600 bags, within the 
rau^ie 01 95c. &$! 3o for ordinary to very choice ■|)' loO 

tb Most ottue sales have beeii of coarse lots at 95c. 

"$1 07 lor 0.iIt:morB aud City .^ill coarse 

Oat-meal has been lu very slnek request even iu a 
j.ibbiug way, within the range of ij-o 2oO'$ti 60, very 

choice Western, new proeesa, $7 5o Buckwheat 

Fiour has Peen sellius. In lots, within tne range of 
$3 25ai;r3 76 for lair to choice new state, aud $4 for 
Very liincy. 

GRA1?<--Sprinir Wheat has been moderately active, 
cbieflv tor exp.irt, at generally firm and, lu tne iu- 
Btauce of piiiiie new Ko. 2 Chica.ro, stronger prices. 
Wiutcr Wheat has been in lair request, clutfly for 

local milling purposes, at lull fl^urea bales have 

been lep rteu to-day of 113,000 oushels, including 
Hiioiil fair to orJiuary extra ctiotce now crop vVhue 
We .tern at $i 25@$i 34, ehiedy extra choice new 
crop White Micbii'an, at $1 34 ; choice new JVmber 
Indiana at $1 27; nevr Hed Western, in lots, 
at *1 '.iOa-Sl 23; primo White Canaua, iu bonl, 7 8u0 
buahels, at $1 27 la; lair new crop ^o. 2 lUilwaukee 
Spriug attjjl 24j do. No. 2 Chicago do., 2,400 bualiels. 
ai$i ;j2. with $1 231a reported as tl,a, and up to 
$\ 25 asked for prime do,, afloat; pilme nevr xio. 3 
Milwaukee do. at iiil 20 ; new crop No. 3 Ch oaao, aud 
Old aud new .>". 3 .^lOwaukee do., at $1 16; and un- 
graded SpiingatSl 13(i$[ 20 Corn has oeen mod- 
erately active, partly tor export, but quoted lower, the 

oft'eri.igs 01 nioBC kinds bavins been more urseut 

Hales have been reported siuce our last of 135,000 
bushels, iuiluding ungraded sailini vessel .Mixed 
Western, fair tocboiee, at 67i4C.'^68c., adoat; Kansas 
do. at 58I0C.; ungraded steamer Mixe.l do., 57o ® 
57it!C.; New-Vork 00. 1 ut 58'-2C.; New-York Mixed, 
57i.2C.S58f.: New-Yprk steimerMixed at 57c.a'57'2C , 
eloaiug at 57c.; New- font Yellow at COiuC; New-York 
No. 2 White 'at 5Hc.®j9'-20.: Weste.n Yellow at57iai'. 
ao^c; Yellow Southern at 57c.'a'o8c. fromdocK; warm 
Corn, in iota, vritliin the range of54c.®56i2C And 

for lorwaid ai-livery, prime sailing vctsei Mixed 
Western for October quoted at 0Sc.'S>5S^c.. withiut 

transactions Kye has been quiet, but held tirml.v ; 

prime new statu held at 90c,<i91o., with 87 ^sc, re- 
port ed aa the best bid; new Westeni quoted "t 72c.® 

7oc.; car lots selling withhi tbis range Barley was 

dull. and heavy ; ordipar.y to stneliy cboi,;e Canada 
quoted at 05c.'®.$120; good to choice Bix-rowed 

State at SSca^Ooc baiea, 9.000 bushels aix-rowed 
State (Laks Shore) on mivatu teims, anil iO,Oi)0 bush- 
els No. 2 Canada at $1 13 Barlev Malt has b?eu 

more active at previoUB quotations; '25,000 bushels 
prime to choice Canada West sold at $1 25'S>$i 30, 
cash and time Cauada Peas, in bond, in leiive de- 
mand for esp«rt, chiefly for the London maikek, at 

aavanced prices. iSales reportud to-day nf 9,000 bush- 
els, in boud, at 93>4c.. and 6,'.200 bushels do., to ar- 
rive, at 94Q. f bu8tjei...,3uckwhettt hag 
been very dull; State quoted nominally 

at 8(ic.®a3c. — Uats have lieen more ac;ive 
but at lower prioea, ou a fieet offering of most quali- 
ties, especially of Cir stock Salea reported of 02,- 

500 bushels, incluiling new White w'estern, in lots, at 
35i!.'a45o., as to quality at 3Uc. a'42''2C.; new White 
State at 44o.®49e.; nivw Mixed Western at 2Uc. ai 
421.JC., mostly at 32c.a'39c., the littfr for Toledo; 
.New-York No. 2 White at 4lc.; New-Yort No. 2 at 
36c.'a/37c.; New-Yort No. 3 at 32c.'a>33e.: New-York 
rejected at 31c. ■&3.;o.; new Mixed State, 42e.®47i2C., 
lor poor 10 very chuice, of whioli 6,00j bushels very 

choice, afloat, at 47 -jc A good demand has been 

uoted for desirable lois of Feed at essentially un- 
changed quotations We quote as before, witnitithe 

rang,' 01 ijili 50@$'J2, us extieiue,, $> ton The 

mam dealings nave b-on at ijil J^$i3 for 40-16. stocu:. 
$14'3'*lt> Ou for OO-H) , *l(j®$l« tor 8o-tb., *I9®*Ji 
lor lOo-tb., $15'«S«i7 lor Kve Feed, aud $.ii'3iip2j for 

•Sharps, Y tdu Tbe offerings of Oale Hav are 

ratuer nio. e liberal, and the demauil ia 011 a restricted 

scale, l-ricea favor buyer:* sliythtl.y We quute ship- 

pina qUMlities wiihin the rnn;4e of 05c.®tj0o., aud re- 
tjliiug qualities ai70o.a9JC. f ' 00 lb Clover, 60c.® 

60c. .sa.t Hay, SOc.'fl'd&o straw has been 111 request 

lit about former dgures ttye straw is quoted wtiuiu 

the rMn.jo ot oOc.WdOc,: Oat, 50o.®60e. #• iuO lb. 

UKalt* — Of Jute butts, 200 bales sold ai 3c., currency 

hiDUS— loniihue active and flriu ; gales, 6.300 Jry 
Caiilorni.i, (yart to ai rive,) part at iOc, cash less 60 
dava' interest ; 10.122 oueuoai ayrea, (fc m curope.)at 
l7c.. H8 they run; 1,611 Moutovi.ieo at 20c., gold, 4 
m ntho: 1,500 Oouota, 2.700 Dry Tei-s, 60O Wet- 
salted Oaliioruia, 60O Ualiioruia Kips. 500 Wet-salted 
lexas C0W8, aud 200 Wet 8.ilted New-Orleaus. 011 
private terms, aud inmured large sales of Moule video, 
out Witlmut reliable partieulais. 

iVll^K-,-TliB contract price paid to dairymen for a 
supply ot .Uilk for uetouer is 4c, ^^ quart, the receiver 
paying the railroai* trcight, which is x^2C. 4^ quart, 
iiaies were mane at the railroad depots to-day at the 
rate 01 ic2a'4J.ii 20 # can. 

MOti\SSE.S— A very tame market I'sa been reported 
for most kiuds of foreign. ItuQucrs liave beeu 
seemin.ijly in little need of supplies, aud refiuiLg grades 

h.ive beeu dull and some what nouiiuai iu price Cuisa 

Museovauo quoted uomiuall.y on tne oasis of S'Jc.ai 

'doc. fur 50 test .\ Black demand has beeu noted for 

qualities suued to the job.jjug trade with prices rulinc 

uoout stead.y l^oMu lUoa quoted at 4bc.a'56c.; cni;- 

lish Island ut 40c.®48c ihe jobbing inquiry lor 

ruieigu has been cuiitiued to the must urgent vvauts, 

prices aliovvimf no chauKe 01 moment New-Orieaua 

nas bLen scarce apd qpiet at Sac. o-jOc. for 
about f kir to choice, aud in exceptional instanc, s up 

to 02o.(»04o. lor very ta;.oy ^ gail in 

Syrup h,i8 been moderately active, with Sugar 
syrup quoted at 38e@5je. Molasses at 3jc.<£40c. <)?' 
gallon. ...Su>;ar-hon8e Molasses has been iu rather 
more demand, anu quoted at °.^lc. for hhds. aud 24u. 
lor obs.; extra lots quoted higher. 

NAV.iL oTOlvKS— A lair demand prevails for Resin, 
which h<ia b en ottered with reserve, and quoted strong 
iu price. ...We quote at $1 90 for Strained, 4>i 95@4>'.j 
for good straiucd, i(i2 o51z^$2 15 for i>o, 2, $.: 6b'a> 
$3 7a for Na 1, ^4 '2o'a)$!i for Pale to extra Pale aud 
Window Ulasa, -f^ 2bO tt>. Sales, 3oo bbls. good 

Strained at $2 .far baa oeen quiet, bat steady, at 

$2 i2'i:'g<$2 37112.. ..Pitch at $3<S$2 Iz^ ^ bbl.... 
Spirita '1 u>pentine has beeu iu good demand, with 
merchantable, fur prompt delivery, quoted at the closo 
up to 35c ''a)::t5 190. ^gallon. Sales, ali5 bbls., at 35u, 
for mercuautsble. and 36o. tor New-York pk». 

PETUOtiKU^l— Baa been held with a lair show of con- 
fidence, but has) been dull throughout — Crude has 
been quoted fot eaa:l,y delivery here at 13130., in hulk, 

and 17 *ifc. , in shipptug order tlotiued has oeen qu iteU 

firiuat'.:5c KctfueiT, Ju eases, quoted at bOc.'aiSlc. 

torstHndard Naphtha at 14c .^t Philadelphia, Ke- 

fined Petroleum, foreariy delivery, quoted at 26c At 

Jialcimore, tor early deiiver.y, at 'J6c. 

fU iVIalOiNS-^-Mesa Void has Ueen more freel.y 
purchased for eany deliverv at somewhat ft;mer 
prices SaLs repurted since our mat, lor eajlv de- 
livery, J25 hbla. Western Aiees, for ahipment, at 
S16 75®$17; 300 bbia, do-j fresh inupection, at 

$17 12l<4 Other kinds nomiual,...And lor forward 

deuv'i rv Westeru 5|es8 contiuues inactive ; (juoted fat 

October, $16 70 ; hel.er the remaiuder of toe year ar. 
$15 05 ; sel.er January sit lilio 05'<£1>15 70 ; February 
at $15 65«<$15 70, fiales 250 pbla.. seller tne re- 
mainder of tbo year, at tjio 6§..,,liie8sed 
Hogs have beeu in mote demand, aud quoted 

hit;hi»r. with City quoted at 7'sc.@8'*8e 

Cut-meats have beeu iu Jair lequeBt aud held with 

paure h.-mness Kaha iueiude 5.000 16- Pickled Ocl- 

lies. inuulk, at lie.; 50 bxa. Clear Bellies, 16 11)., on 
piivatu terms, andsuudr.y small lots of City bulk with- 
in our range We quoie : Cit.y Pickled .-houldera, 

IU bulk, ut /S8c.'a'7%c.; Pickled Hams at i2iijc.'aii3i4C^: 
Smoked Sbou.ders at 9c.; Smoued llama at lAhm.^ 

15c Bacou has beeu inactive for early delivery at 

droopinu prices Lojg Clear quoted here at y^co) 

d\jii.\ ,--h.,rt Clear, lOe ,^nd, for Westeru delivery. 

Long and Snort Clear, lor Decemiier. quoted at 7"8C. a* 
Sc. Salea, 100 bxs. Long aud Short Clear Cniiago 
deliverv, prompt, at 8 *jo., and 250 bxs , Ileeeoi- 

ber, at t'sc \\ estcrn Stedju Lard has beeu 

laiHy active for earl.y delivery, out again quoted 

lower 01 Western ^le..m, for eariy delivery here, 

sales reported of 550 tea. prime old at $10 4u<i'ai0 50, 
closing at itio 40 asked; 402 tea. new at $10 3)® 
$10 37 >2, cloain« at $10 30®$10 35; and 200 tea. 

aboufprirao at *10 aO'c-SlO 35 And for forward ue- 

livory, vVeatern Steam was inau.ire: quoted at tho 
close, for October, noiniiial ; Novpmber at $9 80a) 
49 85, January at ;ii9 6Uffl'4'0 65 ; sellor the remainuer 
of tiie year at $9 65 asked ...Saiea have been lepo.-ted 
pf Weaieru Steam to tho amouut of 1,250 tcs., 
sellei the rematud»r of the ,vear, at $9 65 ; 
City Steam aud Kettle iu light demand, aud 

quoted it $10 25; sales, 95 tea Aud Nd. 1 at $10 

lictiued Lard also dull; quuted fur the Coutiuent ou 
t e apot lit stilO 7j i Ogtooer option at $10 75; No- 
vember i,t $10 37 "a; Oeceml*er and January at $10 25, 
aud ihe West Indies iit $lO®$10 y5... .Sales, 200 tea. 
for tne Coutiuent ipr November at $10 37ifl, aud 2 .0 

tea. for tne West ludius at $10 beef has been in 

f.tir oemaud in a joboing way ut about previous quo- 
tations vVequote uarrel lieei at $10'S'$li forbxira 

We 8. $8o'$10lor Plain Mess, aud $12a'$13 5o for 

Facket, ■!> obi.; sales, 76 bbls Tierce Beef quoted 

thus: . riuie .HebS nominal; ludi 1 Mess nominal ; i'i..y 
Kxtra Inula Me^s, ^Mev.-B^ti; Fhila lelpUia at $2260 
$24 ; sales, 200 tea. Philadelphia ou private terms. 
Beef Hams have beeu iu moderate de- 
maud. We quoto choice N^estern here at 

$JO Tlie ni veinenta iu Buiter have beo.i 

on a comparatively limited scile, with more liberal 
supplies available, givipg buyers tne advauta;;e as to 

vaiues W'e quote State, fair to olioice pais, ut ^8c. 

a'dc: do , tuba, fur to tauc.y, at 25c.&33c.; no., Welsh 
tubs, 23c.®.ilc.; do., drkiiia aud half flikias, fair to 
8trictl.y fuuc.v, 25c. ai33e.; Westeru pails, talr to fau 'y, 
ar2jc:®34c; do., tubs, couiiuou to strfttly ch, Ico, 
ITc'oi-ac.; do., lair to slrictlv prime Yellow, in fliirius, 

3Gc.'a'21c The iuquiiy lor C leese hiis been l.ss sat- 

lafactor.v, yet vi^lues on tho Uiiost liiaKes have oeen 

i'liir.y supported — .,0 quqto ataie Factoiy at from 
lli4C.a'13^4C. lor line to strictiy laaoy, the latter 

«u extieme; Oe.aJllXic. for fair to flue, aud 
at oc.'wSc. for Sliiinmed ; and Weateru F;ic- 
tory at 9c.'5il2c. for t.iir to strictly fancy; 

State, dair>-mai'e, fair to choice, 7c.®riH;c 

Ecus liave ba.'ii offered with reserve, aud have been 

iu f.iir request at ateady i)rices We quote fresh ligga 

within ttie ran^te of 22e. ai 60. tor ordinary to stncilv 
fancy. The ui iln de^^iu){a have been in round lots of 

good to sti-iciiy choice at from 23'ac.@2jc Ta'l iw 

oontinucs iu moderate drmand aud quoted ateady; 
sales. OiLOpO tb. good to prime at Slac a^SOae.; aiso, 60 

tea. very choice at S'sc Steanue inactive with 

prime to ehoice Weateru, in tea,, quoted at $11^ 
$11 35; pales. 19 tos.. at $11 25, ^nd 2O,OO0 ft. City, 

in hhds., at$ll.fe7ifl Doineatlp Rice l^as beep of- 

}er<d sparinglv. and has been lb moderate demand at 

fullpricee We quote fair to prime Caroliqt, in joo 

lots, at $5 25®$0 50; Louislaua, $4 50SS5 7o 

Fast India Rice has tieen iu some request at unchanged 
figures. We quote Raugoou at; $2 70®$2 73, gold, in 
bond: Patnaat $7®.-J7 I213, currenov. Iree ^p 100 ft. 
SKEUB-rTbe demand is less active lor export, maatly 
to Cterpaap.y. 'I'imAthy at soniewbat irreimiar priqea. 
rangiog firom $i 10®$? 20 tor pnn)0 to ohoice. 

Sales were made of 450 bags choio'e at $2 15'3 

$2 20. and. rumored, of 600 to 800 bags do. at $2 20, 
..bat - tboa»,;;^HmfiSs^waca.BaCi>aaa<'j - 



Rougb Flax has been Iq name retiuest and quoted 
ateady at $1 443i$l 45 » bushel.. ..Clover has been 
comparatively scarce and wanted; quoted at 13>ac'd 
14o ^ tb., within which ran^e considerable lots of 
prime to cnoicc. aiuouuting fi om 2,500 to 3,000 bags 
to arrive, partly in Movemher, have been dracently sold 
tor export, cldaing ut Uc for stiictiy ptirho.... Foreign 
Hemp-seed continues inactive ; quoted here at $1 90® 
*2... .Canary-seed has been in very good request, and 
agaiu quoted stronger In price, ranging from 
$,. 50-U'H 25 ^ bushel. ...Calcuttn Linseed 
has been in moderate d.-mand and quoted 
film at $1 80a$i 82i<i, gold, ^ 50 111. 

.Snlcs reported of 7,000 bags by tho Npgpore, at 

$1 82^. goiri, 4 month»' credit. Tlie stoek of Grain in 
store at this port to day embraces 1.923,074 bushels 
Wheat, 1,491,662 bushels Com. 234,'749 bushelB Kve, 
190,808 bushels Bat ley, 433,778 buahels Mult, 938,743 

buihels Oats, and 36,402 bushels I'eaa The agijre- 

galeof Grain in store is 5,239,216 bushels, as against 
4.6ii0,l00bu8bel8ia8t Monday, and 5,057,464 bushsla 
Oct. 18. 1875. 

SUGAR— .\ firm hut quiet market tor Raw to-day 

Sales Include 500 hh is. C.-ntritiigal at lOc; and, on 

Saturday eveuing, 1,700 hhag, do. at lOc.SlOigc. f' ft. 

ue quote: F.Or Heflning Cuba at STrP.; good do.. 

to v«rv chuicB Urooery. 



0^c.®10<!.; No. l-.!ila,yod at O^'gcsgi^c.; Centrifugal 
stock at 9'V®ll)i8C,: Manila liagn, 7V-®8%c.; .vio- 
laR8ea.-;UKar, 7%c,ai8%i'.; Mclado, 5i4C®7'4c.... there 
has be^n a tairiy iietivo demand uoted for Kofined 
Sugnrs at abiiut previous prices, with Crushed Quoted 
at lilac; Powdered, lie; (iranuiateil at lie; Cut 
Loaf at lilac; Hard Loaf i,t UI4C,; Soft White, iO»a«. 
®!0''8f.. and do. Yellow. O^caSlOUo. 

WHISKY— Mag been iu fair demand at $1 ISio : 
sales, loo bbls. 

FrtElGHl'S— Business shows leas animation In this 
!iue. Bcrtli-rooin, fur early use, has been offered less 
treely, and has been quoted strong ns to rates ; iu the 
instanoo of Groin, higher; but the demand 
has been moderate at the ruling figures. And 
in (he way of charferg, a limited movement has 
been reported on, hot»ever, a Arm basis os to rates, 
tonnage f.ir Grain and Petroleum attracting most at- 
teutiou, partly for outport loading, .. .For Llveipool, 
tbe engagements reported aluoe our lust hare been, by 
sail. 500 balea t otton at 0-32d. ^ tb., 600 bblg. Flour 
at 2s. bbl., and, by steam, 2.300 bxs. Uaoua at 35b.: 
small lots of Cheese, reported at 50g. <>■ 
tun ; 2.500 bbls. Apples at 4a. ^ bbl. ; 
anil, (of throu-h fieixhl,) 1,650 bales Cotton, 
part at "sd. ^ m,; with Grain room quoted at 8d. bid. 

For London, by tteam, 9,OJO bushels Peas, inbags, 

nt8d. <1^ buihel; 1.400 pfs. Hides (of recent ship- 
ment) on private terms For Glasgow, by steam, 600 

hols. Flour, reported on private terms; 1.6t)o bbls. 
Apples at 48. ^ bbl.; 1,000 pks. Butter on private 
terms, quoted at 50a.; and (of recent shipment) 2,400 

Staves, on private terms For Falniouth and orders, 

a Gorman bark, 413 tons, hence, wilh about 
2,800 bbls. Utfiiied Petroleum, at 58. 3iL if to 
Bremen. or Os. 3d. if to the Gorman 

Baltic For the east coast of Irelind, an lt*l-an 

bark, 36.' tons, hence, with aoout 2,000 bbls. Refined 

Petroleum, reported at 5s. ^ bid For Cork aud 

orierB, au Italian bark. 459 tons, hence, with about 
2,500 bb.s. RedueJ Petroleum, at 5s, ^ bbl. Tounaga 
for Siiaiu in some request and quoted dim 
at 6s. ^ quwt;.r, for yesaela of med'um 

B ZB For tlarve, a Norwegian bark, 067 

teas, heuce, with about 4,()0o bbla. Crude 
Petroleum, ou private terms, quoted at a'lout 48. 6d, 

^J^ bbl For the Contiijent, a German bark, 717 tons, 

with ah lOt 4,500 bole, Keflued Petroleum, from Balti- 
more, at 4s. 6d. |> bbl Por Antwero, by steam. 46.- 

000 bushels Wheat, ou orlvats^ terms, "quoted nomi- 

nallv at ii^(\. ^ bush=l For Hamours, bv steam, 

1,200 bags TimJthy Seed, part at 2.60 reii;bmjrk». 



THE LIVE STOCK MARKETS, 



New-York, Monday. Oct. 16, 1876. 
On a heavy run of geneiali.y eoarae qu.ilit.y Beeves 
trf.de on Ibis f irenoou was ver.y slow. At Sixtieth 
Street Yards prices were 7%o.®llc. ^ ft., weight* 6 
to 10 c wt. At llarsimus Cove prices ranged from 6%c. 
to 10840. ^16., weights 5 to 9i<j owt. The markets 
closed we:ik, with several car-loads onaold. From 

55 to 57 ft has been allowed net; a few head were 
disposed of on 54 to 58 ft. net Milch Cows of good 
qua'it.v scaroe, in consequence trade fallen off; ex- 
treme range of prices, $30®.t80 *" bead; general 
sales at $.')0®«7ll#^ head. Calves included. Springeia 
sold at $47 50 0^157 ^ head, Tesdo iu Sheep fallen off 
I40. J^ft, since our last dail.y report. Lamosalsi off 

^c. #■ lb.: tradfl ilull. .Sheep sold at hc'Si<i'^4,c. » flj. 
Lambs at 6c.®7o. ^ IB. Mixed Flocks at 6c. !>• IB. 

Live Hogs sold at lac. 4?' IB. City-dressed opened at 
7l4C.®8l4C. ^tb. 

BALES. 
.At axjcltetk Street Yards— V. C. Eastman sold for self 

55 grass-ted llilonis Steers at 8%e. f'ft., weizht 6*4 
cwt; 63 common IMiiois Steers at 914C. ^ ft., weight 
7I4 cwt,: 58 oommon Illinois St-ers at Oi4e. 3^ Vi., with 
SI on ■P' heaJ, weight 712 cwt.; 95 geneial.r talr 
Illinois Steers at 9'go.®9%c. %> ft., weight 8% cwC; 
85 lair IHiaoia Steers at 9%c. ^' ft., we i^it 8 cwt ; 125 
geiiorallv good Illinois Steers at 10c.® lOUc. 4* tt>., 
weight 9 cvrt.; 30 good rilinois Steers at 10140. 4?' JB., 
weight 81^ cwt. T. .Wheeler gold for T. 0. liast- 
mau 75 Ililno's Steers, ft-om common to good, from O-j. 
®10i4C. ^ lb., weight 7J2 cwt.; these herds 
arrived in 44 car loans. 0. J. Vagau sold 
for self 18 lllin is Steers, terms not obtainecL Ulery 
& Cary sold for Ulery t Goff 105 Kentucky steers, from 
cnmuion to good, frojn »'«4C.® lOijjo. ^ lb., genernl 
sales 9c.®i0i4C. ^ ft., weight 8 "u cwt.; 18 grass-fed 
Kentucky ^teel•s at 8kiC. $>■ ft., weight 6I4 cwt.; 95 
coarse Kentiiuk.y gteers at Oc^Oi-jo. *• lb., weight 734 
cwt. to 8 ewt.. strong : 16 dry Kentucky Cows at 8c. 3^ 
tb., weight 71-jcwt.: 66 coatoe Kentucky Oxen at 80. 
®8i20. ff ft,, weights 7% cwt. to 8 cwt. O. P. Evans 
sold tbr Belt and House 48 common Indiana Steers at 

8-'4C. ccOc. %* lb., weight 8 owt., scant. For 
G. Boats, 16 ludiana Steers at 8%c. ^ lb., 
quality generally coarse, weight 714 cwt C. Kahn soiq 
tor H. Kahn 30 coarse Kentucky Steers at 8%c. 3^ flj.i 
weight 7% cwt.; tor I. Brown, 65 common Kentuck.y 
Steers at 9c. #■ lis., weight 7 cwt., scant; for Kaim it 
Furst, 42 common Keutucky steers at 9130. ^ ft., 
weight fci^ cwt.; 26 good Kentucky Steers at IOI4C. ^ 
ft.. Weight 9 cwt., strong; held on sale lor G. Mecter, 
34 Kentucky Steers, li. W aixel eoid for I. Waixei 
83 Colorado Steers at 7240. ^ ItJ.. weight 6>4 
cwt.j 17 giasB-fed Illinois Steers at 8*4C. ^ lb., 
weight 6 cwt; held oa sale 34 Illluois Steers 
and 03 Illinois Steers. Gillis & Brown sold for selves 
08 good Kentucky Steers from 10e.®I0i2C. ^ Jlj,, 
weignt 8*3 cwt.; 29 choice qu lit.v Illinois Steers at 
10i2C.®llc. ^ ft.. Weight gi-j cwt. Coon & 'ihompson 
sold for ( oon & Hat, bury 9^ common Iilin its Steers at 
9c., with $1 ou !p' head, ®9i.jo. 3^ ft., weight 
7 '2 cwt,; 27 geuerally good Illinois Steers at 
IOI4C. ^ lb , weight 10 cwt. G. Reid held on sale 
fur H. Si F. Ciisby 52 Ohio Steers ; for Woodworth 
&. Co. 19 Oliio .steeis; add 17 fresh 
Cows, with their CiilveSj at $45®$75 ^ head; 18 
Springers at #4V bU'a>!eo7 3^ head. H. F. Jjurehard 
sold for L, Ashbrook 96 common Kentucky Steers at 
9c. f>'ft., wilh $1 onl^ head, weight 714 cwt; lor O. 
Day 80 Ohio Steers, tioiu common to good, from ^c.® 
1014c. 3^ lb., weight 8cwt.. scant -, for A. Van Atta 112 
grass-lei Illinois Steers at »i20. ^ IB., weight 7 cwt.; 
102 common Indiana Steers at 8%c. 3^ lb., weigut 
714 cwt.; 97 conimon ludiana Steers at 9e. ^ lb., 
weight 713 cwt. J. U. Williams sold for J. 
Ford 5.S Kentucky Steers, from common to lair, from 
914C. 3^ ft., with $1 on f bead. ®iOe. 3^ lb., weight 3 
cwt., scant. Unme -^ Elliott sold 323 Ohio sheen, 
weight 26,150 lb,, atjeiac. i^lb.; 221 Ohio Sheep, 
weignt 19.940 lb,, at o%o. .(p m.; 185 Ohio Sheep, 
weight 17,770 Ui., at Oi-jc. 3p ft.: 144 Oaio Sheep, 
weight 18.030 tb., at 6i-ic. *>■ lb.; 113 State Sheep, 
weight 10,060 ft., at 6 isi-. ■!>'».; 162 Canada Sheep, 
weigat 16.2dO IB,, at6i«o. ^ft.: 138 lUinoia Sheep, 
weight 1J,300 tb., at 5».,iC. 3^ lb.; 231 State Sheep 
and Lamiis, weight 15,440 lb., at 6c ^ 
lb.; 181 Canada Lambs, weight '11,800 ffi., 
at essc.^ft.; 121 State Lambs, weight 7,950 1b., at; 
6380. -^ IB ; 31 Western Calves, weight 7,230 tb. at 5o. 
3^ lb.; 40 State Calves at $8 60 3^ head. Sold tor week 
.ending Oct. 14, 1876: 5,822 8heep and Lambs at 
$4 27 average ^ head ; 524 Veals and Calves at $7 77 
average ^ head. W. Elliott Hold 176 Canada Lambs, 
weight 12,250 lb , at 6I4C. 3^ ItJ. Sold for weeK ending 
Oct 14. 1876: 3,961 .Mbecp and Lambs at $4 6J av- 
erage ^ bead. 

4 J Fortieth Street Hog Fartb— George Reid sold 115 
Ohio flogs, live weight 23,410 IB., at 61qc. ■^ lb. 

Ai Haifimus Cove Farda- Cpuey b MoPherson aold 
forM. Maxwell 346 Illinois Steers, from common to 
good, from 8iflc.®10iac. #- ft., weight 7iu cwt,; for H. 

Uiggina, 40 common Kentucky Steers at 90.99 iqc.^ 
lb., weight 719 cwt.; for tiiracb & Joseph. 68 illinAig 
Steers, from common to good, from Oioc.® lOigo. ■P' ft., 
weight hi-j cwt,; for M. P. Flsti, 32 Ohio Steers, from 
oommou to fair, from O'-je.'a'loUc. <»• lis., weight 7 cwt.; 
for F- M. Fish. 31 good Ohio esteera at 
10 "-jc. 3^ ft., weight 319 cwt.; for E. Newton, 
30 Ohio St?erg, from cemmoa to ftiir. fiom ScSHOc. 

^ lb., weight Sia cwu; tor B. Williamson, 31 Ohio 
htiers, from common to fair, from ai-^CffilOc. ^ IB , 
weight 7 cwt^; for M. Truegdale, 17 common Ohio 
Ste. 18 at 8i-2('.®9c. ^ ft,, weigut? cwt.; fur M. Davis, 
36 common Ohio .steers at 8c.®9c 3^ ft.., weight (j 
cwt.: lor H. Harrison, 40 ludiana Steers," geuerally 
coarse qu.iUty, at 8iac.®9c. ^ tb., weight 
7 cwt., lor J. Boyle, 32 common Ohio Stoari 
at 9 1-20. Sjft }b,, wel^iht 7'.2 cwt.; for A. Costelino 
17 common Ohio Steers at Oi^c. 3^ to., weight 7 'a 
cwt.; lor 1). A. Jones 17 common Ohio Steers at 8c.® 
Oc. 4|>'tb.. weight 6 cwt. K. Vogel so.d for N. Morris 
113 common tlliuols Steers at 8%e.@9'ao- ^ 13.. 
weights Oi^SS cwt. C. J. Pagan sild lor *v'. V. 
Woods 19 poor lUinois Steers at 'f'ao. ^ ft., weight 5% 
owt F. Samuels aold tor N. jlorrls 69 common Ilunola 
Steers at 8'4®9'-2C. 3^ lb., wit« $i on 3^ 
head. Weights to 7 owt,. strong. Jlartio 
i ulier t Co. sold for selveB 29 ftiir Ohio 
Steera at 9%c. ^ ft., weight 8ia cwt Toffey it Sous 
sold tor N. Morris 110 common llUuois tUeora at 7*^0. 
aShjc. ^ tb., wilh 50c. ofl;' 1?' heatt on 18 head, sold 
at 8iac. #■ to., weights O to 6% cwt. W. K. Dudiei- 
Bold for N, Murris 04 common Illinois Sieera at 8c. 3^ 
ft., with (Si off 3^ head, weight owt.; 
i#l common Illiuois Steers nt SI30. 3^ lb., 
weight 6'-2 cwt. M. Goldschmidt afll"! for llirsch 
it Joseph 96 good Illinois S:eera at 10o.'<{>lOi40. ^ ft., 
weigiils 7 '•J to 9 4 cwt.; for Klopfer at Co. 81| t-oloiado 
Steers at 80. ^ lb, welglit 6 ewt.: 37 common Mis- 
souri Steers at 8%c. '#'iB., with 60c. off ^p- Dead, weight 
7% cwt.. scant ; for N. Morris 8 common Illinois Steers 
at 'dUc. *■ IB., weight 7I4 owt.: 4 good Illiuois Steers at 
10%c. 3^ to,, weight SIq cwt.: for Saddler U Co. 
16 fair I.liuois Steers at lOc. *»• ft., weight 8»3 cwt.; 
belli on sale, 2o ear-loads of Biieves. M. LsuterbacU 
a jld for Klopter & C ). 119 Cherokee Steers, direct trom 
tne Plain*, at b%o. %>• ft., weight 5 c\rt. strong; 34 
common .Missouri Steers at SIqc. #" ft., with $1 off *> 
head, weights 6% cwr.; lor N. Murns, 80 common Illl- 
uiiis Steers at S^jc.sg^o. 3^ to.; weigh ts la to 7 "a 
cwt. B. & H. vvestheimer sola ftir Flvyfleld 
k. Co. 16 poor Illinois Steert at 7H:o. ^ 
to., weigjit 6% ewt.; for J. H. Williams 
2.S Illinois Steers, from common to ftiir, from 9e. * 
]0c. 3^ to., with $1 oir^K head on h nd sold at 0140. 
^P" ft., weights 7 la to 7% cwtj for A. Glllesoio, 30 cflw- 
mon Iliiniiia Steers, ut 81.2c. ■©9140. ^ ft., weights 7 '4 

ti) 7% cwt.; for Smith k. Co., 18 poor Illiuois Steera 
aod lleilera, at 314C. 3^ lb., live weight 370 tti. *> Head: 
Jumi'S Kiroy sold 110 State Lauibs wei:;!it62 to . tit 
6c p ft ; 54 Stito Calvea at $6 5o ^head. Jiidd k 
liucklngham sold 220 Canada aheep, weight 81 lb. ^r 
head, at 5e. 4>tB.; 04 Ohio sh ep. weight 100 tB.i>head, 
at 5 40. ^ ft.: 263 Ohio Sheep, weigi.ts 87 to 90 
lb. 3p' head, at o=8'-. f*" lb;; 112 .-State Sheep, welglit 81 
ft, |>'head, at 5\(i. 'IP' ft.; 57 Penusylvania iJwes, 
weigtit 9n lb. #'liead. at 5c. 3^ tb.: 135 Peniiaylvania 
Lambs, wcijjhi 03 tti. 'ip' head, at 00. 4? tb.; 70 State 
Lanius, weight 0."> lb. 3^ head, at O^-je. 3^ IB ; 236 State 

Lainlis, wei:;tit 76 ft: f he■^d, at 7c ^p ft. Sold lor 
week ending Oct. li, 1870,3 310 Sheep and Lwubs at 
$5 06 averago 4^ head. K.ibo k Hide ek sold 90 Ohio 
Sheep, Weight 93 It). *>^ head, at *5 .SO ^■ 
cwr.; 173 Ohio Sheep, weight 97 to. 43' Uoad, at S%c. 
^ ft ; 109 Ohio Sheep, weight 81 ft, #• head, at S^^c. 
■^ to.; 212 Ohio Sheep, weigblaSG to 102 ft. ^ head, 
at Oc. # to.; 162 Kentucky Sheep, weight 98 tb. i)" 
head, at 6c. 3^ tb.; 39 Ohio LamUa, weiglit 62 to. *»■ 
head, at 6 V- ^ ft-: 06 Olilosheep, weight 129 ft., at 
03^(., c^jb.; 611 Canada Lambs, weight 71 tt.^ head, 

ei iiHjc. ^ to.; 33 < anada Laml>8, weight 7l to. •(p'tead, 
at 6i>4e ■g> ih. .Snlil lor weeic e»ulng Oct. 14, 1876, 
6,491 Sheep aud Lambs at $5 43 average ^ head. 

UKOKIPTS, i 

Gross arrivals at Sixtieth 8t r c et\ Ya rds for week 
ending Oct. 16, 1878—5,037 head ot hoxned Cattle, 
14 Cows, 703 Veals at\d Caives, b,810 Sbeep and 
Lambs, Gross arrivals at Fortv-elzhtb Street sheep 
Market for week ending Oct. 1(1. 1876—10,830 Bbeeb 
aud Lambs, 32 Beeves. 407 Veaia and l.'alvas. 

Orosa arriials at Porti*'th StreetiUog Vards lli>r w««k 
ending Oct. 1& 1876— 17,l<k,'S Hogs. >resh arrivals at 
same va?ds for yestar4a.y »nd to-oay, ftv6|i0 Hogs. 

Gross arrivals at Uaralmi^ Cove Tarda foe week end- 
ing Oct. 14, 1876-6.307 Dead of homed Cattle, 327 
Veals and Calves. 11,824 Sheep and Lambs, 16,004 



to-day: 2,957 head of boraed Cattle, 87 Calves, 4,190 
Bheep ana Lambs, 4,138 Uogi, 

Chicago, Got. 16.— Cattle—Receipts. 2,300 he»d;» 
Bbipmenis, 2,000 head ; market dull fcud nominal for 
ahlppin/Tl Texans and Cows. $2 80ai*3 40 ; Stuokcrs, ; 
$3 40 ; choice nominally $4 '70®$ a. Bsgs— Receipts, ' 
13,000 head; shipments. 4. OOO head: market opened 

dull, but closed HOtive : Pigs aud Culls. $.'5®.*5 30: 
commou to lair, $5 60 ^$5 85; good to choice, $69 
$6 15; assorted, $6 25. Sheep dull and uucbauged: > 
receipts, 600 head. 

PniLADKLTHiA.. Got. 16.— Cattle active: sales, < 
3,800 Iiead ; extra Pennsylvania and Western Steers, 
bc.toOV; fair to good do., 5c.®6%c.; common, 3I2C . 
®*%c. Sbeep unchanged; sales, 12,000 head. Hogs 
iu fair deiAaod ; sales, 5,0o0 bead at $8 7&®$9. 



TEE STATE OF TRADE. 

BUPFAI.O, Got. Ifl.— Receipts by lake— Flour, 4.100 
bb's.; Corn, 214,246 bushels; Wheat, 188,554 hUBh- 
ela; Barley, 4,087 bU9h«»lB; P. ye, 23,400 bushels. By 
railroad— Flour, 3.500 bushels; Corn, 12,000 bushels ; 
Wheat, 9.000 bushels; Oats. 12,000 bnshela; H.ye. 
2,800 buahslg ; Barley, 1,000 buaiiel*. Shipments by 
cannl to tide- water- Corn, 146,764 bugbels ; Wheal. 
78.072 buahels: Barley, 9,973 bushels. To interior 
poiuts— Corn, 20,000 buahels; Wheat, 31.787 bushels. 
By railroad— Flour, 6.080 buBhels; Corn. 17,049 bush- 
els ; Wheat, 46,030 bushels; Oats. 11,900 bushels; 
Kye, 2,800 bush»l8; Barley. 1,600 bushe's. Flour 
steady and unchanged ; sales, 000 bbls. 
Wbeat— Pair milling demand; sales, 1,275 bush- 
els Wbite Michigan at 51 23®«l 25; 6 ears 
No 1 White at $1 26: one car extra do. at $1 32 : 
3,800 bnshels No. 2 Milwaukee at *l 22; two cars 
Michigan Spring at $1 22; two cars new White at 
$1 25; three cars sample do. at $1 20(^$1 23. Corn 
quiet, firm; gales 2,000 bushels high Mixed, to millers, 
-ill lots, at 53c.; 2.000 bushels No. 2 at r.2e.: 3,000 
buahels do. at 51 Igc; 1,300 bushels, by samolc, at 
51c ; 5,0o0 bushels Low Mixed Toledo at 52c.:'20,000 
do. on priva'e terms. Oats and Kye without move- 
ment ; prices unchanged. Barley— Fair inquiry ; sales 
450 bushels Canada, on track, at 93c.; 500 bushels do. 
at 90c.; 500 bushels do. at SI; two cars four-rowed 
State at OOo.: four cars two-rowed State on private 
terms. Milt- Fair trade demand ; prices same ; held 
firm. lUgUwinea— Fair demand ; sales,' 160 bbls.; 
prices unchanged. 8?eds— Xoihing oolog ; held at 
same prices. Pork and Lard— Fair inquiry; unchanged. 
Canal Freighta- I4C. higher ou Wheat. Corn. K.ye, and 
Barley; quoted: When t, 80.; Com, 7*20.; Rye, '7'^.; 
Barley, 6*40. to New-Tork, toll^ tuclnded. In store 
in elevators- Wbeat, 120,297 bushels ; ''-ora, 157,548 
bushels; Oats, 20,139 bU8liei»; Barley, 70,517 buahels ; 
Eje. 1«,484 bushels ; .Malt, 33,268 bushels; estimated 
Malt in store in malt houses. 100,000 bushels; small 
houses now in operation, but rannlng lightly. Grain 
afloat on the Krie and Oswego Canals lor Tide-water — 
Wheat. 382,931 bushels; Corn, 1,640,816 bushels; 
Rye, 60.219 oushels; Barley, 291,466 bushels ; Oats, 
9,363 bushels. Grain afloat on lakes bound for Buffalo 
—Corn, 468,000 bushels; Wheat. 161.000 bushels ; 
Barley, 37,000 bushals; Bye, 9,UU0 bushels. 

Chicago, Oct, 16. — Flour nominally unchnnged. 
Wheat active, firm, and higher; No. 2 Chicago Spring. 
$1 08% cash ; $1 09i<j. November; $1 lOia. Decem- 
ber;; j>o, 3 Chicago Spnng, 95c®Sl 01; Rejected. 
82e.@88'2C. Corn dull and a shatle lower; Ko. 2 at 
42ia{)., cash and November; 42%o., October; 4134C.. 
ail tbe ypar ; Rejected, 41c. Oats dull and lower; 
3218C. &'32i4C., cash; 3214C.. other options. Rye 
steady ana unch luged. Bai lev strong and higher 
wt 92iaC., 088b : 87iac.®88c., November. Pork dull and 
lower; Old, $15 25. cash ; New, $16 25, cash ; $15 90 
October, $14 38ia all the year. Lard heavy;, old, 
$iO 50, cash; New, $9 76, cash; $9 30, November; 
$9 20»*9 22 13, all the year. Bulk-meats steady 
aud uuuhangetL Whisky steady and uDchanged. 
Freights higuer. Wheat to Buffslo 5c.; corn 
to Buffalo 4'.jc. Railroad freights unchanged. 
Receipts— 12,000 bbls. Flour, 132.000 bushels 
Wbeat. 318,000 bushels Com. 79,000 bushels 
Oats. 12,000 bushels Rye, 66.000 bushels Barley. 
Shipments— 14.000 bbls. Flour, 60,000 busheU Wheat, 
164,000 bushels Corn, 46,000 bushels Oats, 17,000 
bushels Rye, 86,009 bushels Barley. At the afteinooa 
call of the Board: Wheat. I4C lower. Com un- 
changed. Oats lower; 3i7sc.®32c., oasb. Provisions 
dull aud anehaiiged. 

St. Louis, Oct 16.— Floor qnlet and unchanjfed. 

Wheat steady, with a fair demand : No. 2 Bed FalL 
$1 -21%, cash; No. 3 do. do., $1 11®$1 lli». cash; 
$1 14, November. Com inactive and lower at 401-20., 

cash and (.tctober; 4014C, November. Oats weag«r 
at 34c., oaih and October. Rye dull at 68c., bid. 

Barley dull; sample lota of Mlnuesota at SOcitS-l 20. 
Wbisk.v actiTe but lower at 41 lo. Porlc dull ana 
lower; jobbing at $17. Lard quiet and unchanged. 
Bulk-meats ioaotive and lower; packed lots of new 

m«at. Shoulders. 7i80.; Clear Rib Sides. B'^gc.^^ 
9u.t Clear Sides, Oi^c. Bacon unsettled and lower; 
market irregular; few sales at 8c. for Sbouiders; OHjO. 
lor Clear Rib Sides ; 9%c. lor Clear Sides. Hogs dud 
and lower ; Light Shipping and Y'orkers. $3 40a)$5 70^ 
Bacon, $5 Oiia/io 75 : Butchers'. $5 75®$5 90. Cat- 
tle dull aud uncUauged. KecelDts— Flour. 6.000 bbls.; 
Wheat, 74,o0o bushels: Corn, 34.000 bUBhela; 
Oats, 30.000 bushels; Rye, S,000 bushels; Barley. 
33.000 bushels; Bogs, 4,0C0 aead: Cattle, 1,000 
bead. ;_ 

CinciNNA-n, Oct. 16.— Flour steady; Family, $5 SO 
•S9o 75. Wbeat scaroe and firm, but qnlet ; Red, 

$1 10®$1 18. Corn quiet, but steady at 47c®48c. 
Oats dull at 30c.®37c Rye dull at 6t;c.@68c. Barley 

steady at $1 OMa$l 15. Pork inactive at £ra®$17 25. 
Lard quiet: Steam-rendered, $10 bid. $10 1%^ asked ; 
Kettle-rendered, $10 25^$10 75. Bulk Meats dull 
and drooping; Shoulders, 7c S7>8C.; Clear fuo Sides, 
8iac.®8^c; Clear Sides, S^gc Bacon qciet, but 
steady: shoulders. 7 ''8C.®8c.; Clear Rib Sideav9a^c.® 
0%c.; Clear Sides, 9~8(^®10c. Wblaky steady and 
firm at $1 10. Butter dull: Westeru Eeserre, 22c® 
25c.; Central Ohio, 18o.®23c. Hogg quiet; Commou 
Ligut, $5 25®f5 6a ; lair to good light, $5 75®$6; do. 
heavy, $5 80®$6 10; extra Butchers', $6 25. Ee- 

veipti, 2,060 head. Shipments, 960 head. 
Louisville, Oct. 16.— Flour active, flrm, and 

higher: extras, $4®$4 50 ; Family, $4 75®$5 ; A. 
«o. 1,$5®$0; fancy, $6 6o®.S6 75. Wheat iu good 
demand and a shade higher; Red, $1 U6®$U.O; 
Amber, »i 10®$1 18; Wtiite, $1 J6®$1 22, Com 
in good demand, but lower; Whita, 45c; Mixed, 43c. 
Rye ingoou demand at Hoc. cats in tairnemaud, bnt 
lower; White, 3tio.; Mixed, 34c. Pork scarce; firm, 
aud higher at $18($$i8 60. Bulk-meats iu fair de- 
mand; sbouiders. 714C.; Clear Kit> Sides, 9c.; Clear 
sides, 9140. Bacon firm; shoulders, 8c.; Cxear Rib 
Sides, 9''eo.T Clear Sides, IQiao.; sugar-cured Hams, 
loiao. Lard steady and firm; tierces, ii%c.; kegs, 
121^0. Whisky, $1 10. Bagging buoyant but onset- , 
tied 8(12140. 

OswKGO, Oct. 16.— Flour nnehaogea ; sales, 1,500 

bbls. Wheat firm; No. 2 Milwaaken CIu}. $1 25; 
No. 1 White Michigan, $1 30; Extra White Michigan. 
$1 55. Cora uucbsnged. Barley ateady; sales ol 
18.000 bushels Ho. 1 (;anada at $1 15 ; 3,000 bushels 
No. 2 do. at $1 06; 3.000 bushels No. 3 do. at 98c.: 
4,u00 bushels by sample at $1 04. Corn-meal, $26 
for bolted and $25 tor uub .Ited 3?" ton. -Mill-feed un- 
changecL Canal Freights ou Grain firm and unset- 
tled; Lumber, $2 to the Hudson, $2 35 to Newourg, 
$2 60 to New-York. Lake Receipts— Wheat, 18,000 
buBbeisj Barle.>, 08,000 bushels; Kye, 7,oo0 bushels; 
Lumber. l,2l7,0OO feet. Canal Shipments — tsailey. 
2u,300 busb^'U; Lumber, 294,000 feec . Bailroad 
Shipmemts— Flour, 1,600 bbls. 

TOLBDO, Oct. 16.— Flour stead.y. Wheat firm j 
No. a White Wabash, $1 25 ; No. 3 do., $1 18 ; Na 1 
W hite Michigan, $1 10%; Extra do. do., $1 25; Amber 
Michigan, $1 19; November. $1 21; No. 2 Amber 
Michigan, £1 11 ; No. 2 Bed Winter, $1 1754; Novem- 
ber, *1 iV^; i*o. 2 Dayton aud Michigan Red, $1 17 ; 
No. 3 Red, ijjl 11 : Rejected Red, $1 04 ; No. 2 Amber 
Illinois, $1 26. Corn ateady ; High Mixed. 49 i-iC; Low- 
Mixed. 47*20.; no grade. 4714C Oats steady ; No. 2 at . 

32%c. Michigan, 3314C. Rocetpts— 800 bbls. Flour, 
32,000 bushels Wheat, 36,000 Dushels Com, 6,000 • 
bushels Oats. Shipments— 600 bbis. Flour. 74,000 
bushels Wheat, 30,000 bushels Com, 1,400 bushels . 

oats. 

MiLWAUKEJ, Oct. 16,— Flour quiet bnt Ann. I 
Wheat opened dull at a shade lower; closed dull; No.- 

I Milwanaee, $1 ISU; No. 2 do., $1 lli*; November,^' 

SI 12; Peoember, $1 13; No. 3 Milwaukee, $1 o3i-j.i 
urn quiet but steady; Ns. 2 at 43c, Oats higher; 
No. 2 St 31%o.®32c R.Te scaroe and firm; No. 1 at^ 
61iqo. Barlev excited ana bigber ; Mo. 2 Spring, cash 
or October, SOa'a^sgi-iC.; No, 3 Spring, 60o. Freights'; 
quiet but ^m ; Wheat to Buffalo, 5o. Receipts— j 
Flour. 14,000 bbls.; Wheat. 102,000 bugbels. Ship-i 

monti— Flour. 11,000 bbls.; Wheat, 80,000 bushels. .^^ 
ALBAjnr, Oct; 16. — 'Wheat uncbanged. KveV 
Steady. Com steady at former prioei. , Barley Arm, ^ 
with one sale or^o. 2 Canada at $1 03. ' Barley Malt f 
in better demand. Oats in fair demand, with sales of 

II carl rejected Western Mixed and Wbite at 35o.9i 
S6a; Na ii White State at i4%c.®45(s., and Kow 1 do.| 
at *7o. _ *" 

Naw-OHLKAJia, Oct. IS.— BaeoD dull, weak, »nd' 
lower; Shoulders, 8 >4C.; Clear Rib Sides. lOiflC; Clear 
Sides, 10^0. other articles uncbangad. Excnange— 
New- Vork bight, I4 discount; Sterling, $6 Sdiaforths 
Bank. Gold. loOV 

Wilmington, N. C, Oct 16.— Spirits of Turpen- 
tine firm st3l>ao. Reitu firm at ijl 60 for Strained. 
Tar is firm at $1 50. 

PuovinBNCE, Oct 15. — Printing Cloths oontinne 
dull, with scarcely transactions enough to establish 
quotfttioiu. 

THE OOTTON MARKETS. 



KBW-OELRAKa Oct. 16 Cotton Arm ; buyers Bnd 

sellers apart ; Middling, 10>ac.; Low Middling, lOVtc: 
Good ordinary, 9 140.; uet receipts, 14, 07s biles; gross. 
15.824 bales; exports to Great Bntaln, 3,606 bitles; 
sales, 4.UU0 bales; stock, 104.631 balea. « 

Chahleston, Oct. 16. — Ootton steady ; Middling, 
10%c.; Low Middling, 10c®10i80.i Good Oidinary, 
9i4C.®9V!.; n«t receipts, 6,115 bales ; exports to Great 
Britain, 3,591 bales; coastwise, 3,197 bales ; sales. 
1,600 bales; Skock, 44,299 baits. 

Galvbstov. Oct. 16.— Ootton steady ; Middling, 
lOc; Low Middling, V^o.; Good Ordinary, Oi^c.i net 
reoeipta, 3,581 b.>les ; gross, 3,624 bales; expo^t^ 
coastwise, 1,843 bales; sales. 2,649 bales; stock, 
48,668 bales. 

Mobile, Oct. 16. — Cotton quiet and firm ; Mid- 
oUug, lOc; Low Middling, 0i90.®9^o.; Good Ordinary. 
9^0.; net recil.its, 357 oalqs ; exports, coastwise, 93a 
ba.«B ; sales, 1,200 bales; stock, 2,389 bales. 

Savannah, Got. 16— Cotton quiet t Middling, 

lpi*o; Low Middling O'^sC.; Good Ordiaary, a^so-j net 
receipts, 3,591 bales; gross, 3,616 bales; sales, 1,791 
bales; stuck. 61,769 italeg. 

Memphis, Oct. 16. — Cotton steady; Middling, 
10>40.; receipts, a,0ul bales; shipments, 2,469 bales; 
sales, 2,400 bales ; stock, 18,068 bales. 

FOREIGN MARKETS. 



L0NT)0N, Oct 16—12:30 P. M,— Consols 95 IMC for 
both loouey and the account. United >*tates bouda, 
new 5s, louV 

3:30 P. M. — Consols 95»4 for both money and the »c- 
couut. The ambunt of bu lion gone into tbe Bank of 
Enuiand ou balinoo to-day is j55,ooO. 

6:80 P. M.— Paris advirei quota 5 ^ cent, rentes at 
loot. 7 '•jc. for the account. 

LivsHruoi., Oct, 16— 12:30 p. M.-Cotton-The market 
iSBte»d.y; Mlddlti^g UulandsO 15-16d.; .Middliag Or- 
leans 6 3-16d.; sales 12,000 hales, lucludlug 2,000 
bales for ipeculatiou and export; receipts 4,400 bales, 
of which 1,500 bales were Auiericaa. Futures dull 
and easier ; Uplands, Low Middling clsuss, October 
delivery, o^a"!.! Lplands. Low .Middling clause, new 
<rop,. shipped November and Ueeembci-, sail, 6'8tL: Up- 
lands, L')W Middliag cluuse. uow crop, shipped Pocew- 
bor and January, sail, 6 15-l6d. 

1 P. M.— Cotton— Uplands, Low Middling clause, new. 
crop, shipped 0<!t»ber and NuvembBr. sail, StgtL; Up.: 
lands, Low Miadling clauije, new crop, shipped Noveiu - 
ber end t>«eem)>er. sail, fi'al.; Uplands, Low Middling 

elanse, FewHsry •nd Warch deUvejy, 6 ao-sad. 4 

1:30 P. M— Cotton— Uplands. Low MiddUng olatue, 

Jauuary a^d Febrosty deriv«r.y, B^ 
S F. M.— Oo t»a-,-<)t tka s»le« to,<i»7 T.OOO bales 

ware Aiaartaso. ^ 

a»8Q?. M.-i<!«*toii'-Oplan4s, Low HMdUagelavsa. 

Ontoberavrtl hovambai 4*Uv«(7. 6V-i Qpl*n<ts. Low^ 

Mlidbn| 4cl»n«fc. Y%\mVS and Marob^^UvaxxY 

S p. IC.— Cotton— TntittM -firm I VptaadL^Lowlllds, 
fil>1Hfti""f1" lll^Tinlil""""— ' " *""' ** 



lands. Low Middling clause,' new opop, •hiVDe&Ji 
ary and February, sill, Bd. «"F(»eo-« 

6:30 P. M.— Pioduoe— fiDirits Turpentine, 2Ab. «d.l 
cwt. ^^- 

LoNDO^. Oct. 1 6-6:30 P. M.— Prodnce=:Bafinod Pe 

leuik ll'jff f eallOD. • Common Reslh Ofc^ailoi 
458. 9d,®46g. 4>'cwt. *•»«»» 

A.VTWK«p, Oct. 16.— Petpolenm, 49iatA)rSfine.p4U' 



American. 



BAISIKEUPT irOTIOBa- 

COURT OF THE . UNIT£I 

I District of »ew-Jersey.— In Bank 
ruptoy.— In tho matter of GEORGE aoLDb.N, Junioe 
bankrupt. — District of Hew Jersey, - as.: . This 1 
to give notice thas on the third ' day ' o 
October, 1876, a warrant in bankruptcy was Israed 
out ot the District Court of tbe United StatSs for th« 
Distnet of Dew-Jsrsey against tbe cstato of G«om 
Holden, Junior, of Newark, lu the County of Essex, la 
said district, adjudged a bankmpt on his own petltiont 
that the payment of any debts aud the delivery of aay 
property belonging to such bankrupt, to him or for tii« 
use. anil the transfer of any property bv him, are toi3 
bidden by law, and that a mcetin^of the creditors o( 
said baakruot, to prove their debis and to choose oat 
or more Assignees ot his estate, will be held at a Conr! 
of Bankruptcy, to beholden at No. 603 liruad streot. 
in the City of Newark, New.Jerscy. before Staats 3 
Morris, Ksq.. Register In Bankmptcy for said distri«s2 
ou the fourth day of KoTember, A. li. 1876 at ll 
o'clock A. M. SAML'Bt, PLUMMKR. ~ 

Cnited States Marshal for said Listrtct.*! 

I.N BANKRUPTCY.-IS THB DI8TEICT COUBlf 
ot the United states for the Southern District •( 
New-York.— In tho matter of ELIPHALET WlCKBa! 
bankrupt.— Notice is hereby giv.n that a petition haS 
been filed in said court by Bliphalet Wicke», in said 
district, duly declared a bankrupt under the act of 
Congress of March 2, 1867, and the act* amendatory 
thereof, for a discharge a.id certiUcate thereof Iroa; 

all his debts and ptber claims provable under said acta, 
and that the twenty-sixth day of Octooer, 1876 M 
two o'clock P.M., at the office of Kdgar fcetohum. 
Rsqulre, Register in Bankruptcy, No. 129 Fulton stre^ 
In the City of New-York, is assigned for the hearingol 
the same, when and where all credit rs who bav« 
proved their debts, and other persons in interest ms4 
attend sud show cause, if any they have, why ilu 
prayer of the said petition should not be granted.-^ 

>ated Ne w-Y'orknOn tha aecond As^v nt t \ntni. 

o3-l»w3wTu* 1 



Dated New-Yorfcr,on the second day of October, 187a. 1 
-o , — o_.„_* .„ F. BBTTS, Clerk,M 



cJi 



UBO. 



IN BAM1RCPTCY.-IN THE DISTRICT CODrP 
ot the United States for the Sontbera Dlstiiet ot- 
New-York.— In the matter of CHARLK.i IRVING, Bank- 
lupt. Notice is herehy given that a petitijn hss be«i 
fi «d In said court by Charles Irving, iu said district, 
duly declared a oanUrupt under the act or tyoneress of 
March 2, 1867. for a discharge and certificato thercM 
from all bis debts, and other claims provaole under 
said act, and that the sixth day of November, 1876 at 
11 o'clock A. M., at the office of Mr. Henry Wiidec 
AUeo, Iteglster in Bankruptcy. -No. 152 Broadway, i^ 
tbe City of New-Tork, is assigned lor the hsanng al 
tbe Bame, when and where all creditors who have 
proved tiieir debte. and other persona In interest mar 
attend, and show cau«e, if any they have, why tba 
prayer ot the said petition should not be granted.— 
Dated New-York, on tne ninth day ot October, 1878. 
olO-law3wTu GKOEGa F. BKTTs, Clerk. ' 

IN BANKRC1»TCY.— IN THB DISTRICT COURT 
of the United States for the Southern District ii 
New-York.— In the matter of DAVID SOLIlTQBb 
Bankrupt.— Notice is hereby given that a petition bal 
been filed in said conirt by David Soituger. in said <Uai 
tnct, duly declared a bankrupt under the act of Coni 
gressof March 2, 1867, for a discharge and oerttfieaM 
thereof from all bis deots and other claims provable 
under said act, and that tbo ninth day of November, 
1876, at 11 o'clock A. H., at the efBco ot Henry Witdec 
Allen, Register in Bankruptcy, No. 152 Broadway, ioi 
the City of New-Y^ork,i8 ags:(^<'S for the hearing of 
the same, when and where alt creditors who hav*.' 
proved their debts, and other persons in interest may 
attend, and show cause, if aoy they bave, why tber 
prayer of tbe said petidoa shoold not be granted. -i* 
listed New-York, ou tne sixteenth day of Octuben 
1876. GEORGE F.,BiiTTS. Clerk."' 

di7-law3wTu* • ,. 

THIS 'l!* ITO GIVR NOTICE— THAT OH THB 
luth da.r of octouer, A. IX IciTtf. a w^arr&at in b»ajK< 
ruptcy was issued against the estate of jAURd COt'K- 

CROrr, of the City ol New-York, la the County of 5«w« 
York, and State ol >'ew-York, who has beea adladgMt 

bankrupt on liis own petition; that the payment ol 
an.y dents and delivery of i&ny property 1>e longing t« 
such bankrupt, to bim ur for his use, and the transfea 
(if any property by him, are forWdden by law ; that • 

meeting of the creditors of the said bankrupt to prove 
their debts, and to choose one or more assignee* of hix 
estate, will be held at a Court of Banlcruptcy, to bs 
boiden at No. 4 Warren street, in the City or New-Iorl . 
aforoMtid, before Isal.^h P. Wlluama. tsq., Reeister. oa 
the 27th day of October, A. D. 1876, at two o'clock H 
M. OLIVER FISKB. 

United States ilarshal, as Messenger, Southern Dtstriei 
Oi New-Yor^. 



JtJ 






E 



N THE BISTRICT CO CRT OF THE DSITM 



.atta lor tiie houthern District of Kew-Vork. — la 
»h6 matter of WILLI.\M. a^JdiSrCALF. bankrupt.- Ia 

Bankruptcy. — Soutnem Dtstiict of N>w-York, sa.— At 
the City ot New-York, the fifth da.T of September, lfft%. 
— The nndersigned hereby gives notice of hia eopea^ 
ment as Aesignee ot the estate &ud elfecta of WiUtaoi 
H. Metcall, of the City of Brookl.yu. in tbe County oi 
Kings, and State ot New-Iork, but who has oarrieo oe 
business tor six months next immediately preeediai 

the fiiiae ot'hlB petition at tbe City of New- York:, wlilb. 
in said Judicial District, who was on the twenty-seiwnf 
dayof July, A. D. 1876, iidjndged bankrupt, upon bk 
own petition, bv tbe District Court of the United State! 
for the said Sonthem Kistrict of New-lork. 
olO-law3wTu* U. B. KINGHORN. Assignee. 

IN THE DISTRJCT COURT OF TBE nSTTM 
States for the District of New-Jersey.- In tha manes 
ot ABKAUaM M. REYNOLDS and HENRY A. kLtiCa. 
SLING, bankrupts.- rue said bankrupts havincappUed 
to the court I'or a discbarge trom tneir deots and tb* 
debts of each oi them by order of the court, ootioe ta 
hereby given to all creditors who have proved their 
debts, and other persons in interest, to appear l>«tt>iei 
the said court, at the State House, in tee Citv of Trea- 
ton, in said district, on the thirty-first day of October. 
A. D. 1876, at 10 o'clock A. M.. and show eause. if any; 
tncy have, why a discbarge should not bs granted t9 
tbe aaid bankmpts. W. 8. BblLViLLii, Clerk. 

olO-law3wiu 

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE USITBD 
States lor the Southern District of New-York.— Ia 
tne matter of CHARLES T. PbGO, bankxnpt.— in bank., 
ruptcv. No. 5,6o3. — Before Jnmes F. Dwight. Ke«ia« 
ter. ^To whom it may concern: The andersigiui4 
hereby gives notice of his appointment as Assignee ol 
Charles T. Pegg. of New- Tort, in the County of New.j 
Toxk, and Sta.-e of New-York, within said district, whff 
has been adjudged bankrupt upon bis own petition by 
the District court of said district. —Dated at New- Yoch' 
the 6th day of October, A. D. 1876 
, JONAS L. McKLEOT, Asslgnosy^ 

Ko. 29 West Washington piace, New-lork CUk 
s- olO-law3wTu* ^ 

\ 

LEGAL NOTICES. 

SUFBE3IE COURT.— CITY AND COUiTTr Of 
New-York.— THK MUiOAL LIFE INSCRANCS COJO 
PA.SY. ot New-Tork, plaintiff, against DAISY LEVKa> 
VMG^ Bt':ERIAN TDt^KER, otherwise known »a OADSX; 
LKVEREDi.B BBRRIA.V, George Tneker. Ralph S 
Prime. Jane Byland and Daniel dyland, her hnsbaadf 
Annie Warren and Ueorre Warren, her hnshand ; Mar} 
L. Varianaud 'William vanan. her husband; Ctiaile< 
S. Berriau and Maria Berrian. his wile ; William H. S. 
Berrian aud Emma Berrian, his wife; Rlchaid B. Bv^^ 
nan. Charles L. Cbadeavne. Hyatt L. Garrison. Cart 
neliua B. iSchuyler, Paul W. LeDoux, WiUiam,S. De-* 
Witt, Ebenezer Valentine,' John H. Overbaugb. KatH 
thias Warner. John Warner, Francis Skiddy, Daniel U, 
Fetter, Gdbert A. Mann, The First National Bsnkei 
Northampton, The State of New-York National Ban^ 
The Bank of New-Tork National Baninng AssociatlaBL,' ' 
Meaks Stem, Theodore Stern, George A. Osgood, aaS 
Cyrds Curtis, as Receivers, Jto., deiendants.— Amended 

BummouB for relief. — (Com. not served.) — To tbe d* 
fendants above named : . Ton are hereby sununonee 
and required to answered the.amendeu and snpplei 
mental complaint In this action,'whicb will be filed t| 
the office ot the Clerk of tbe City and County of Newt 
Yorg, iu the County Court-house in the City of Newt 
York, and to aerve a^oopy of your answer to tbe aatl 

complaint on tbe sabscnbers at their ofllces, numbei 

113 Broadway. In tho City of New-York, witain tweai 

ty days after tbe service of this siunmons on yon, ex., 

-rtitisive ef the day of such service; and if you toil t« 

answer the said complaint within the time aforesaid.' 

the plaintiff In this action wiU apply to the couit fM 

the relief demanaed ^iu , the , oompiaint.— Dated Svm 

York, August 2, 187B. / - ■ " , 

\ DKVELLN it, MILLER. rUtBtlS>8 AttomejI. ... 

i ' Jio. 118 Broadway, New-lorV.' . 

• The complaint In tbe alKive entitled action was files 

In tho office of the Clerk ot the City and County o4 

New York, on the 3d day of August, 1876.— Dated New! 

York, October 7, 187a < 

DEVELIN It MILLBB, Attorney's for FlaintUt ' 

Ol0-law6wfu 

\ I ^ 

COCRT. COUNTY OK ONTA- 

~~ HARTSHORN, PlalntiS agaius* 
Gi.ORG R W. NICHOLAS and Olivia M. Nicholas, bia 
wife, James O. Sheldon, Alonzo J. Farr and Ann U 
Farr, IHS wife, Frederiok W. Piince, Erastus J. Eoger^ 
Timothy J. E. McCarth.y, David Barrow, ITie Geneva 
NatiOBal Bank. AViUiam Q. MoKelvie. Executor, Ito.,: 
of Vincent Price, deceased, Elisi M. Kicholaa, Lymaa 
Root, Timothy J. SKilton and Raphael U. Skilton, 'The 
First Natioual Bank of Geneva, 1 Phineas Proat.rJ 
Mathew Wilson, Gecrge A. Fordon, James Alexander, 
James Welsh. W illiam Martin Welsti, and Jametf 
Alexander, Jr., Alexis Cbaroze. Bdmnnd Charozs and 
Melaucthon Kinney, defendauta To the above namee 
defendants: You are tiereb.y required to answer tbe 
oompiaint of tne plaintiff in ttiis action, which has t>eeo 
filed with the Clerk in the County ot Ontario, and t^ 
serve a copy ot your answer on the subscriber, at bl( 
office, in Pennian, Yates County, New-York, wtthia 
twenty days after the eerrice of this snmmons upoj 
you, exclusive of the aav of servioe, or tbe plalnti^ 
will oppiy to tbe court for tbe relief demanded la ttis 
complalnU , B. W, i-RANKUK, . 

PUintUTs Attorney. 1 

N. B.— Tlie eomplatat In tbe alMve entitled action 
was filed in tbe office of tbe Clerk of Ontario ('ounty o^ 
the 13th oav of June. 1876. . . B. W. PBANCLIM, , 

s26-]aH6wTu* ^ Plaintiff's Attorney. 4 

COURT OF THE STATE Ol^ 

,.«»», City and County of New-York. AD&U 
UbilUK MUBKi-.N. plaintiff, against JOHN MUEKEIC 
defendant. — Summons | for relief. — (Com. not 
seived.)— To the deteudant. John Murken. Bsq.: \om 
are hereby summoned and ritquireu to answer tbe corn* 
piaiot in this action, which will be A%d In t.'ie ufflo< 
of the Clerk of this court, at the County Court-house, 
iu tho Cit.y of New- York, and to serve a cop.y of your an- 
swer to tbe aaid cotuiilamt on the subscriber, at bit 
olfiee, No, 234 Broadway, In tbo Citv of New-Tork,i 
within twenty days after the service of this snmmonei 
ou you, exclusive of tho day of such service ; and if; 
Tou tail to answer the said complaint withio the time; 

aloresald, the plaintiff in this action will apply 10 (hOi 

couit for tbe reliet denanded in tbe comphiintH 

Dated September 16. 1870. „ .^ ; 

J OHJI B. PERKY, Plaintiff's Attorney. ' 

The complaint on this action was this day filed bk 

the New-Iork County I'leik's office. , 

JoaN B. PiBRV. Plaintiff's Attorney. ,« 

"? o3-law6wTu* No. 234 Broadway, N. T.j' 

COUNTV COURT, COUNTY OF &IN6.S.-. 
JAMES W. TL'R.SKR against JOHN V. D. BMSIONS 
And ALETTA K- EMMD.N'S, his wile —To each of tbe 
deiendauts above named: You are hereb.v eummonod 
and required to answer the complaint in this aoUoa, 
this day filed in the offloe of the Clerk of tbe County 
of Kings, at the Kinsta County Cour^hon8e. In the City 
of BrooKlyn. in said County of Klnga. In the State oT; 
New-York, and to serve a copy of your answer to ttie; 
said complaint on the subschbers, at tbeir oSloe. Ha^ 
13 Wilioughby street, in tbe eald Olty of Broouya, 
within twenty days after tbe servioe of t^ sumaMiia 
on you, exclusive ot the day of sucb serrtoe i aad tf 
Tt>a fail to answer tho said oompiaint witmn tbe ttsa 
afttreaald, tbe plaintiff in thU aotlon will aoply to tbe 
eourt for the relief demanded ie tbeoempbOak-iDaled 



'& 



SUPRB.'ttB 
RIO.— IS.^C W. 






CUPRE-^B 

iO »ew.lfork, 



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utft CCtrms, CucsBaii, 



It, i8->6,— Miiifj ^tt^rcmem 



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y??^^ 






LAW REPORTS. 

tbe seizure of the coloy. 
•xx of tflk pacific mail steam-ship 
company's vkssels levied on for 
uon-paymknt of taxes — argument 
cth a motion for an injunction to 
ukstrain the collection of tee 

TAX KB. 

The steamer Colm, of the Pacific Mail Stcam- 
jb!p Companv, wan seized at her wharf by Marshal 
Haves yesterUi.r, on a warrant ot the Receiver of 
I'ixes, lasned becau'se of the non-payment of City 
taxes by the company on ita vessel* in lc74. Later 
to tiio day the matter was bronght boloro Jadee 
Barreti in Suprome Court, Chambers, on an aovlica- 
lion bv ths compiiny for aa inlunction to restrain 
ibe city from collpctiuff the taxes, which amonnt to 
»btint one hundr?f*and forty thon»and doliars, pond- 
Ip2 «o appcfti now before the Supreme Court of the 
Uuited Sutes. The Commissioners of Tnses and 
Aasessmenta of this City, it appears, first rated the 
Paciflo Hill Company's oroportv at 120,000,000, that 
btin^ the full par vr.lue of the capital stock. Ob- 
fecii'in ^as raised to this, and after further con- 
iJdoraiioa rUo valuation wa« reduced in June, 1874, 
10 65.740,513- The company was atiU Oisaatisfied, 
and aroaiiht ap ibo maiter by certiorari in the Sa- 
prenio CDurt, thi> Genernl Term of which reduced 
l«e Taliintion bv $li4,'250- Tne valuation aa so re- 



cused, 
iH:al8. 




was aftiruiea by the Court of Ap- 
,.^w.-. The company claims that its ve'^sfU on 
tho P sctGc Ocean, amounlinit in value to J2,344,368, 
which woie included in the assessed propricv, and 
the unflnii'hed vcssela should not have been taxed 
1 1 thi-i City. Aftertho decision of the Court of Ap- 
peals iu the suit, a wrU of ermr wag obtained from 
rtiB FL-deraU'ourts. and a bond of $250,000 civen on 
fceh;»lf of he compniiy for ail damattes which might 
b« sustained bv the City. No otay of proc^'erlinffs 
wan ffmuted. bowtver, and the Corporation Counsel 

'thtrrt.iie gave noticw to tuo company that, notwiih- 
stanrtin" the aiipeal taken by the latter to the 
UaUrd 6tale8 supreme Court he-would proceed to 
cUlecc mo tax. In accordance with this notice th e 
Colon » as seized. Tiiese laotn were pre.senwid to 
Ju:ce B;in»tt in an afiivlavit and a letter from A.n- 

diew Boatdnian, the latter beinu the counsel and 
Olio or the Directors of the company. Mr. Board- 
man, ia 'ui.< letter, stateU tliat they stiii^ believed ail 
pcocoedines nan been stayed by the writ ot 
wror, tf»j>«<.'ially sinco the filinij of tne bond 
lis security. Even if this were ' not 
rbe ease be thouj:lii it would be well to deal liber- 
•l:y or at least onsiderately with the liu«. The 
(^UOMiL^e caii.-<ed by the detention of the Colon wotdd 
l)o about JL 000 "per day. James C. Carter, who 
appoartu fur the City, s.iid the conpany had re- 
•laied the Taxation bv tne State of California of its 
Tw»si-l8 piyinj: on the Jfacitlc, ann that the United 
States Supreme Court had sustained the company 
bauause tne veasels wore recistered in this Slate, 
tTjm which, also, the corporation derived lU pow- 
Ais The company now souiiht to evade the pav- 
iBcnt ot taxes aitoffetuer on this portion of its 
property. The writ of certiorari, the counsel 
argued, did not stay prooeedinea in the matter, 
bime this matter was not a court proceedine but 
tiiirpiy the aciion ot the Keceiver of Taxes, 
aiicnael H. Car<:oro, who anpeared for the com- 
pany, arjiued in ooposilion, ana Judge Barrett tooK 
lAe papers, miimatiuc. however, that he did not see 
«ha£ pewer bo hjd to reotrain the colieoclun of tne 
lax ^ 

DEClfiiOSS. 

'. 6CPKKMB CO0RT — cnAMBEKS. 

JSy Jviiyi Barfitt. 
Jodfrey vs. Moser. — Taxation affirmed and 
BoWindtr t» BerAerg. — Motion denied, with $10 



!'"»*> " 



i4. 



:w:>-' 



Com- 



ment and execution vacated on pa.yraen'. by plain- 
till of costs, and issue to be of oato when ongiual 
answer was duo. 

Ketarehanvg. TTAftinj.— Ordered on special calen- 
dar toi- Oct. 27. 

Och'! vs Orft*.— Reference ordered. , j^ 

^Vyekof vi. O' Connor.— OrAac grantine leave to 
reply. 

COMMON PLEAS — EQUITT TEESf. 

ByJudfie Robinson. 

IHUebar c». Knickerbocker Life Inmrance 
pan]/. — Motion uraiiied. See memorandam. 

MARINE COCRT— CHAJIBEES. 

By Chief Justice Shea. 
Motions (?ron««fZ.— Ellia vs. C)nK; Knapp vs. 

O'Donoshuo ; Chase vs. O'Donoehue. 

Orders Qranted.—Gnetcbmh va. Bears; Bafder 
vs. AiltzseherliDg. ZmcKe vs. TJIzheimer; TiieR",-!! 
Eitnte Trust Company vs. Kaster; Phillip 
vs. Gallagher : National .Batik Ver^eniios vs. Wall- 
brideo; Murray Hill Bank vs. Vooibi.s : Hard v vs. 
Hornby ; Giles va. Bucklcv ; Schullicb vs. Zimmer- 
man ; Crowley vs. The Knickerbocker Liia Insu- 
rauco Comoany ; Turner vs. D.ikin; lodde vs. 
Fiske; Scott va. BearJsley ; Billman vs. Fliihr- 

Williatns vs. Duryee. — The taiati-jn as made is 
correct. 

Uoyt vs. Qoff. — Motion denied ; no costs. 

Motions i)(;nte£i.— Frank vs. Oienstein; Hyatt vs. 
Miller; Marder v.s. Lachnian. 

B\i Judge McAdarfi. 

Klein VI. Sehumberg — The motion to vacate the 
order of arrest will bo denied upon conditions that 
plbintiflf serves his complaint this dav, the defenri- 
ant »o serve his answer on the 17th, and case be 
tried on tne 18th inst.. (flrsi case,) in Part L, with- 
out notice of trial, &c. 



COURT NOTES. 



Ff=5^ 



|. 





BOSIS 

Saaional Pbotoftraphers' Chemical Company vs. 

Xnijhi. Motiou lo cnanee place of trial granted, 

•wiii 9VJ cosla- . , ^ 

Jiattonal Photooraphtrt Chemieal Company r$. 

Xm»a/it.s5-3»me ileciaioi-- 

Mumsteni m- hohef. — Motion to vacate order oi 
apr«-bt Oeu ed, wiin ♦lO cotta. 

JotepK <tc. vs. Unued Utates Trust Company, <£e. 
^-Ai.vi- caielol conidaeraiion. I am uuwiiliutf to 
eooiirm the report or to frant the decree asked ; 
under ;he peculiar circumstances of the case, how- 
t:Ter,^I am wiUing to permit toe Trust Company to 
deliver np snlHcienc of the securities to enable the 
jiurcok'se to t>« comnleteti. 

lYtc* vs. O'iief/e.— Motion aeniedjWith $10 costs. 

MerLUcs. Irving National 5o»i.— Motion to con- 
tinue it^jjuctiou uenied and temporary injunction 
lUmolveU. witn #10 •MJsts. 

Mallvagai vs. hoUwagtn. — Motion for extra allow- 
^e. ue i.eo. without costs. ' 

ikobi4-i^ Jr., vs. OMtid. — I have no doubt that this 
cab* waa a dUHcult and extraordinary one witbin 
Uie lueaniiuc ot the code. It the issues were at all 
limiior to toose in Taylor against aame deieuaants 
(cruiC betore me i«oiiie moi^ths since) tUe queiitiousof 
lew and tact were numerous, Ueiictte, and compli- 
CMed. It ut-rwialy was nuc an ordinary action for 
tiftacta Afcontnact. Tne plaintiff on the proofs con- 

. taia«d la Mr. Soermau's atSdavit ia fainy eatitted 
to », moderate allowance, and I think that, con- 
tuieiius the amount luyelved, the labor and ex- 
priuie slated. SSbO would be but reasonable. 

Jiict vs. M,ux. — U.ation to v<icate order of Auj. 
%t, lo16. or to reopen the prooeedinjis denied, with 
lljcobis. Toe SUV of plain ili^s proceedinits oon- 
taiiie-i IU aaid oruer is Teiustated, and tne sta.v of 
acfendaai's procesainga uouiained m the order to 
tiatiw c«iuse, upon vmch tnia motion is made, is 
v-cat6o. 

- Mog.rsts. f^aiUr. — Motion granted. 

^ Vudtn VI. ll-tlUr. — TLie suostaUti^ averments as 
to LuB -yitiJa are staled upon loiormation and be- 
lief ; as to ihese. ibeie must De proof. 

huntoon vs. Huntoon — Kefecred to Charles H. 
Huarcta, E^q., lo late proof aa to uetendant's 
ffSMyori., luouuie, and eamioua, and lo report with 
)ua opiniuu as lo woat wou^d be a proper sum to 
Im auuwed lur coULsel tee aad alimony, pendente 
Hie. Motion W be brought up aeain on two uaya' 
but>o«> upou the comin:; in of the report. 

OooU^noMgh vs.De G.root — Motiou Kranred, report 
•OBiLuiou, audaneiaa allawance of |50 awarded 
te tljievidiint. 

Guinver VI. Junes. — Mr>iiup eranted and cause ro- 
f«rrcu U) I'uiio i-. Jiu^ijUM, £cq.. to- near ana dcter- 

Btiue. 

Ocfon national Bank vs* Ifaarwf^e.— Motion 
«»u;eu upou paVEBeuL of SIO costs. 

i'orritt v». PiCkhardL — I am satisfied that the se- 

eun.its must ji^'J'V i>«ibre a Jusiice of the court ' 

S tile cooniv lu wnich the action is pending, or a 
O u..ty JuOije of such county, and 1 aee uo way of 

ie.piu;{ the piaiuuff ill the motioa. The motion 

Hills-, fe srantert, wiin $10 costs- 

M.itid ea Packard. — Uase and amendments eet- 
iled ; toe ca-e lo aliiolly in accotuance witn tbe 
Meiio;.rapuer's notes: tiie amendments are disai- 

loWou. 

James vs. Simonion: — Keferred to Charles H. Hil- 
ai'ciu, Eiq , to tiiJie proof of the tacts stated in the 
coDQ cdi g atiijants. and to report with his opiuiou. 
lUe moiiuu can bo brought unon two days' notice 
op in !ue coming i" of tne report. 

tiuedmogcL vs. I'oung. — Tbo ex-parte order extend- 
ing i no liuie wit.« irrt--t;ular afur such time baa been 
Axati uy lue court on modioli. Further time could 
iiiily be obtained on motion, and not by an ez-parte 
3tUlge'» ortler out ot court. Motion gianted^-witCi- 
oul ciists, to lar as lu vucate theoruer exiendiuK l^e 

Usui:. 

Beiitley vs. Sehuihof. —^elorred to Philo T. Rng- 
fclc^, Laij , to lake piooi of lUe facts mated in the 
papers ou both siues, aod to report with his opini.n. 
The moiion can i>e brought on on twa days' notice 
upon (he cotuing in of aucU report. 
' .t'rior vs. ArenL — I see no reason why Mr. Thomp- 
■un ojuUid he ueprived of his coats. Ho was forcud 
to deJeud, and uo outside arrangsmeut nor pa^'inent 
of interest on bis mortgage allected nis position In 

- ttiis suit. Be was .justified in btingine tne cause on 
as liis ootB woie not tenderea. That was tbe only 

- way of lurcing payment to which he was entlileu. 
iiution d«niec'. witn *10 costs. 

luOUU vs. 0««i/.— Oruer settled. 

.Auty ot. Irving JSulional Bank. — Motion to con- 
unne iajai.Ciiou dKnieU. and temporary inlunction 
liCM>.veu .wiib Sl.'l costs. 

Oroistnuch VS. liichards. — Tbe third person claim- 
tngsii ell' ci, »uobiaui.ia.iy denied a part of the de- 
ft-uauut ; uuder aectioa 399 such deot can only oe 
recovered i>v acuion by a rcceiN'er. The i>laiuiiff is 
^aiiucd lu an lujanotion notii a sufficient ooponu- 
fiity i* givoJi to tne receiver to commence an ac- 
tion. Toe o.her question uiscnssed can a.so be bet- 
tor detoriuiiKsd on sucii an action. 

JirJutrdt vs. nanburn. — This is not to be treated as 
to-4Uiiioai y detauii. out as a juoj^raent in an action 
ou an a«»id. Toe Uefendaut executed the submia- 
mua, unu aj rtprcsculed oeiore.the aruitra'ion. it 
llio «x.eut ot Lbo award were the result of au iaade- 
fjualo prcaeDfuli.jn of his case, bo must iook to his 
tk-toroey aa OKlwten niiaaeif and iho piaintilf. Xn«* 

awu.d la biniiiu;i ; were It a matter of diacreiiou, 
)iuwev9r, 1 must aay that the deieudant's atUuavit 

la ovn.wueimiuiilv disproved in ita oiosc important 
■ Malemeuia. and tnac tUo opposing atbUavita Uiace 

tbo aeiccdant betore the court in a most uutavora- 
' b.e' litflit. The motion mtut be denied, wiiU %10 

CuSl£- 

J'legeri vs. Walsietn. — ilhe injunction must bo 
5ttul.;'Ucu until loc ciuso can be properly tried at 
tao r^p. ci:il ivriu, <10 coBtti to abide the event. 

brmth vi. Beiiton. — Exira allowance ot '$500 to 
plaiOwiU'j ii;ioinc.v. aiu alike sum to Messrs- Pu- 
SIlHVd. C.iO-ttoi <Si sraith- 

jn Uir, matter of iiachudo, <£c.— Mr. Elliot F. Shep- 
Ottru li appointed Tru-toe. fho order will conta.in 
D' SpcCi.U piovi-'iou such as is sug^oated by Mr. 
bh;i»r, bui Us loriu as to security, &,<:., may bo set- 
tled I'll one d«\'s U'liice. 
L, fnrralt vi. Crawf(rrd.—Tha confession is bad. It 
is not aiatod ihat tne board was tuniisiied at de- 
tOU-ia'''Ca request. Tue remainder is incoherent, 
li does not appear how much is due or how much 
Con-in,:e:ii, nor to whom the notes were really 
^iven "ye* above it is stated that the debt is justly 
«ine. ' AA lo amenOint, the p^rty has not lakeu the 
tloubln iboii to tiio au affidavit. Motion granted, 
Villi SlU costs. 

»D1'EL.ME COUHT— SPECIAL TEKM. 
liy Judge Lawrence, 
^ennger vs. icAa<y6r.— Aiiowauce of $1,000 grant- 
sd iiiu uuieiidaui. 
Lafimd el at. vs. Deems et al. — Memorandum for 

COUiUaoi. 

bCPBEMB COCaT— CIRCmT — PABT IIL 
By Judge Lawrence. 
MulUr vs. Tht Mayor, £c. — Memorandum tor 
(ou'jsei on settling order. Sue order a.i settled. ^ 

Siri'EKiOR COUHT — SPECIAL TERM. 

By I :hipj Justice Curtis. 
Earding va. i/ordtny.— pauses referred back to 

Blticie • ior lur.hfr leslimoiiy. 
i'nTsai V*. Orinoao ^'aniaation Conuionv—^IiulCK 



Chief Justice Daly, of the Court of Common 
Pleas, is confined to his house by sickness, and 
Part I. of that Conrt was yesterday adjourned in 
consequence of his illness. 

In the '• Black Friday" suit of Thomas Rob- 
bins, Jr., ano others against Jay Gould and others, 
which was recently discontinued. Judge Birretc 
yesterday awarded an extra allowance of $500 to 
the defendants. 

Judge Barrett, in Supreme Court, Chambers, 
denied the motion made by John D. Sanborn to 

onen » iudcrment obtained bv default against him 
for 15,000 by Joel B. Erhardt. Tne grounds of the 
denial ara given under the legal decisions. 

Jenny Morris, a concert-saloon waiter, who 
stole $7 from an English visitor named "William 

"Watson, in a Broadway saloon, was sentenced by 
Jud:ie Gilderileeve, in the Court of General Ses- 
sions yesterday, to one year in tne Penitentiary. 

The Society lor the Reformation of Juvenile 
Delinquents obtaine'i an injunction from Judge 
Barrett, in the Supreme Con^^, Chambers, yester- 
day, restraintng the giving of theatrical perform- 
ances in the Third Avenue Theatre until the pro- 
nrietor of the latter has paid the requi.site license 
fee. 

John Burke, a youth of nineteen, living at 

No. 329 East Thirty-first street, who snatched a 
pocket-book from Mrs. Mary E. Pray, ot No. .36 West 
Twenty-third street, ou the 6th inst., was tried by 
Assistant Di.'^trict Attorney Rnsaeil yesterdav, iu 
Part II. of the Court of General Sessions. The 
jury oouTicted Burke, and Judge GiWlersleeTe sent 
him to the State Prison for three years and si:x 
months- 
John R. Smith and John WiHams, the tvro 
burglars who were caught by Capt. Caffrey in H. B. 
ClafBin's work-rooms, on the second fl )or of the build- 
ing at the corner ot "West Broadway and Leonard 
Street, in the act of pacKing up silks and velvets 
valued at S5,C00, which they had taken from a cal i- 
net, the lull particulars of which appeared lu THE 
Times, were brought to tbe Tombs yesterday and 
committed in default of $2,000 bail each. 

A number of proceedings have been began 
by various religious and charitable institutions in 

this City to set aside assessnieuis levied on their 

pronerty. Nearly fifty of such procpedinga are now 
on the calendar of the Supreme Court. This has 
teen caused by the recent decision ot the Court of 
Appeals, which afSimed a decision of Jndge Law- 
rence holding that pronerty -jsed for religious or 
cnaritable purposes cannot be made the subject of 
assessment for local improvements. 

On April 14 last George Keys, of No. 10 
Spring street, borrowed $15 from McKenna &Dnfiy, 
No. 222 Third avenue, ou a check for ?50 signed by 
G. R. Hodgett, which he said was genuine. The 
check was subseqnentlv found to be woitbles^, and 
Keys was arrested. In Part II. of tne Court ot 
General Sessions yesterday Assistant Di^'triot At- 
torney Russell secured the conviction of Keys, and 
he was sentenced by Judge Gildersieeve to ttiree 
years m the State Prison. 

G. W. Dunham, of No. 293 West Fourteenth 

street, who waus emplored as a driver during the 
past Summer bv the Common wealth Ice Company, 
was arraigned before Justice Kasmire, al the Wash- 
ington Place Police Court yesterday, on the charge 

of obtaining money under false pretenses. It ia al- 
leged that he cad collected a bill of $20 35 trom 
Michaelu AKastie, No. 633 Broadway, wuhoat the 
authority of his employers, and had apnbed the 
monev to his own use. He was held in $3,000 bail 
to answer at the General Sessions. 

The trial of the case of Catherine Davis 
against the German Savings Bank of Morrisiana was 

begun before Judge Joseph F. Daly and a Jury in 
Part III. of the Conrt of Comman Pleas yesterday. 
The plain I iff sues as Pre-.iJeot of the St. Matthfws 
Sick Aid Society of Morrisiana, which had $700 on 
deposit with the bank. The former President of 
the society died in 1872, and then tjjere cams a di- 
vision into factions. Tne pass-book oaraeiuto the 
hands of one Dorbtta Heleii, wbo claimed to be 
President, and' she was paid the money. The 
present action is to recover the amount from the 
hank. 

The case ot 'WilLLam Herries against Norvell 
and others was brought up before Judi;e "Van 

■Vorst. in the Supreme Court, Special Term, yester- 
day, on demurrer, but a .\oung man who appe.ired 
in tne place of the defendants' att ;rnoys not being 
able to titate the grounds of the demurrer tbo case 
was adjourned for a few days. The action is 
bT' ught br tbe plaintiff for himself and other em- 
ploves of tbe Jiepublic to recover unpaid salaries. 
Judgment was recovered against the corporation 
which published the Eepiiblic, but the execution 
iasued was returned uooatLtued, there beina no 
property. Tbe present proceeding is against tne 

■tockbolders individually. 



A MOTSCER SEEKING HER CHILD. 

A rather remarkable series of allegations 

were made to Judge Barrett in Supreme Court, 
Chambers, yesterday on the apv'ioation by Kate 
Palen for the custody of her child. According to 
her story she gave birth to a female child in July 
last while an inmate of the New-"£"ork Infirmary for 
"Women and Childion. "When the child -vas four 
days old a stracge woman came Iti her bedside at 
the Infirmary and told her she wanted to obtain 
possession of tbe child. The woman in question 
said she had adopted a male infant and also wanted 

a femala one. Tne motlier reiused to part with the 
little one, however, anu the woman went away. 
The latter returneu about three weeks afterward, 
and then the nurse took tbe child awav trom its 
mother and gaveit to the woman. Kate Palen then 
took out a writ ot habeas corpus to regain posses- 
sion ot her child. A return to tbe writ was lUdde 
by the officers of the Inflrmarv, stating that they 
had never had possession of the little girl, and That 
the mother beruelf bad given hei;_awav. This, how- 
ever, the mother denied aod areference wai Ordered. 



SVIT AGAINST DV^^AN, SHERMAN <t CO. 
The suit of David "Watts and otUera against 
Duncan, Sherman & Co. and others was argued on 
demurrer before Judge "7an Vorst in the Supreme 
Conrt, Special Term, yesterday. The plaiuiiffs. it 
avpears, had money on deposit with tiie firii ot 
Ducan, Sherman &, Co., and on the day preceding 

th© failure of the firm obtained their chfck drawn 
against the firm. This piainiifi'i deposited in their 
own bank, and it was next day presented through 
the Clearing-hocse to the NutiBnal Bank of the 
State ot Now York. It was not paid. The plaiii- 
titfa in tbeir comlilaint allege tbe bauk held seciiii- 
ties for such cuecks as Duncan, Sbormiu &, Co. 
might draw, and that the A^^itjnee of ihn latter on 
the mc ruing of the faiinro withdrew these securi- 
ties. Toe comphiinl was demurred to oy tbe de- 

fendaDts on vanous grouada, an;l attor art:iimentby 
counsel. Judge Van Vorst reserved his decision. 



tinuallv with the latter. This w.is a snurce of an- 
noyance to Bourne, who, as alleged, on the night iu 
question veniod his wrath on the woman, with ihe 
result stated. Che luriher heaiiag of the case will 
be continued to-day. 



TRE OUT LIABLE FOH UNSAFE AWymaS. 
The case of William H. Hume against the 

Mayor, itc, argued ou appeal belore the Supreme 
Caurt, General Term, yesterday, isa rather peculiar 
one in gome aspects. Toe plain tifi' 8;}od to recover 
$25,030 as damages on account of injuries received 
in consequence of the falling upon h.m of a wooden 

awning, at Fourth avenue and Oae Hundred and 
Tweuty-Hftn street. Tbe awning projected over 
the sidewalk, and fell ou Feb. 22. 156'i, on account 
of Its being overburdened with suow. The plain- 
tiff claimed that it was the Ciy's duty to See mat 
the awning was securo. L'lu- jury gave a verdict lu 
the plaintiff's favor lor $18,335. TUo City now ap- 
peals, claiming that the lietect was a latent and not 
a patent one; that its duiy was ended by the pass- 
ing of suitable oruinances regarding unsafe nroiec- 
tions on buildings, and it cuuid n it be held respou- 
sihle for accidents of that character. Decisiou was 
reserved. £dmuuo Biudolph I! >Lins >n appeared 
for the plaintiff, and ex-Judge A. J. Kequier for the 
dol'endants. 



ITALIAN SWINDLERS SE.yTE.VCED. 
A very interestin;r case was tried bv Assist- 
ant District Aitomey Russell yesterday in Part 
II. of the Court of General Seasijns. Tbe onsoners 
were two Italians, named Loreaz > Mizzin and 
"ViraUii Michel, and their offL>n6e was grand lar- 
ceny by trick and device, better known as a con- 
fi tence g.ame. It. appeared that on Sept. 20, an 
Italian b.arber named Michael Mona. wbo had 
saved some $500 out West, came to this City to take 
pas.sago for Eurone and was mot on tbo Battery by 
Michel, who speedily ingratiated himself into tbe 
cocflJence of the stranger. Michel said that he 
was the seiv.int of a good priest with whom be was 
going to Europe, and advised Mona to meet his 
master, who wou'd procure bim a ticket for Eu- 
rope cheap. Mona fell into the trap, ani accom- 
panied Michel to "Washington Square, where of 
course, "tbe good priest,'' in lull eceieaiastical garb, 
was waiting. Bis reverence immediately took a. 
deep intere.st in the barber's affairs, and conversed 
With him freely on spiritual matters. Tbe bogus 
pii^stalsj Ehuwed Mona a valise filled with what 
be said were cold coins, which he wa-« taKing with 
lum to Europe, and pictured the good time all three 
would have on the vovaee. At the solici- 
taiion of Mii'hei Mona was induced to vive all bis 
sifvings — cimti.Htiug of United Stales tnoni'v 
am luutine to 1460, and f5U in French coin — to the 
pretended priest for safe keeping, tbe "seivant" of 
nis reverence statin? that this course would insure 
special lavors from Providence. The swindlers 
then sent Mona to nurchase cigars for the party, 
and during his absence disappeared. On the de-. 
stripilnn furnished the rmiice. M?zr'n and Michel 
were arresied and identified bv M;)ua aa the men 
who had swindled him. Jmi of the twenty dollar 
gold pieces were found in the pos8t3ssiou of Mazziii, 
and he wa.s recosnized bv'the police as a notorious 
swindler. Mr. Ru3,-.ell secured the convicti ju ot 
both swin'llers, and Jndge Giidersle^ve sentenceo 
the fraudulent priest and his "serv-int" to five 
years each in the Staie Prison. 



COURT CALENDARS— THIS DAY. 

SUPEEME COURT— CHAMBEHS. 
Held by tSarretl. J. 

Nos. 



Nos. 

3S — McNauchton versus 
t bave- 

39— Begg V . Chave. 

64:— Ci 1 vs. The N. J. Mid- 
land W. H. Ci. 

93— Culle.i vs. The Fire 
Commissi'>uers. | 

Call begins ut No. 119. 

6UP1.EME COUET — GENERAL TERM. 
Held by Datiia, P. J.; Brady and Daniels. JJ. 
No 
VS. 



94— 'Wallace &. Sons vs. 
t astle. 
102- The -V. Y. it H. I. Fer- 
ry Co. vs. Wickham, 

lis — The Mayor, tc, vs. 
Lee. 



Nob. 

204— B«wman t Co. 

Keenan et al. 
205 — Oestnch et al. vs. 

Giloert et cL 
155— Bigier er al. vs. The 

.Mayor, 4lc. 
173i»— The. ilecrODOlit^n 

Gas L. Co. va. The 

Mayor, \.c. 
194— WhalfU et al. vs. 

i urUe. 
154_SillcouUa et al.vB.The 

Mayor, itc 
1S7— The lio.of Ins. Co. ve. 

The Penn. E. K. Co. 
196 — Casseriv vs. .Manners. 
198— A beam v8.tiood.ipeetl 

et al. 
14— Joni-8 et aLvs. Butler 

et a!. 
15 — Same vs. Same. 

BUrHEME COUBT— 6PF.CI.4.L TEUM. 
B.ela by Van. Vorst, J. 
>08. iiKos. 

g.-i — Devoe vs, Boyd et al. ' 547— Ferris et al. vs. Foran 
119- VauJerbilt vs. Van-' et al. 

dfcroiltetal. :54S — Samo vs Same. 

361 — LooKe v». Locl<e et aL ,549 — Water bury v8.Bouker 



147— The Peonle ex rpl.The 
(i. -Nat.B'K et al. vs. 
The Tar t'om'rs. 

166— The People ex rel.The 
J radesineu's Bnuk 
v<. 1 he Tax l om'r-t 

20612— Tlie St. Nicb. N. ii'k 
vs. The Nat. b'k of 
the ri. of N. Y. 

207— W.iod V . The Erie 
Raiiwav (0. 

208— Gettv et al. vs. Dev- 
lin et al. 

209— Chapin et al. vs. Doi)- 
son. 

210— Classman vs. The L. 
I. R iilroaa Co. 

211~Alexauder et al. vb. 
isrown et aL 

ZVi — Litiauer vs. Goldman. 



591— Beekiiian vs. Van Der 

veer. 
]46 — CucTV vs. Witters. 
334 — SieveuB vs. atevens, 

to. 
445— Auff^-rth vs. Schme- 

deeke. 
322— Da.uomjnn versus 

Scbultiug. 
474_Uhl, &.C., vs. Mil- 

hauser. 
475 — SaiOP ■^s. Same. 
477 — Br^.^s, Jr., vs. Boebm 

et al. 
479 — Breslervs. Valkenlng 

> t ai. 
487— Phillips et al. vs. Hv- 

man et al. 
494— The .iiutual I,ife Ins. 

("o. Vs. timith et aL 
499— The .Uuttnl Life in-i. 

Co. vs. Trask et aL 
577— Valentin.-, itc., vs. 

Hcydecker. &c. 
501— The Lnion Trust Co. 

of N. y. vs. Cornish 

et al. 
502— Cameron vs. Mitt- 

naeht et al. 
504 — ^^ ales vs. sberwood. 
oOli— Oiii. •Sc, VS. cjoharn- 

ber°;. et al. 
520— O'l onuer, tc, vs. 

'ih.i .viayor, &c. 
521 — Negoaur tb. Booth et 

111. 
C24— Siooll vs. Scrymaer. 
5-9 — Cof'sey vs. Me,irs et 

al. 
630— Bowne et al. vs. 

Crawinrd et al. 
320— Tbe 1-irsL >..t. B.ink, 

&.C., Association vb. 

Bandmanii et al. 



etal 
551 — Abraiiam. &o.i et al. 

vs. 01 lusen et al. 
315— Vandeihjet vs. Tuck- 
er. 
578— Rngen vs. Collins, tc. 
5Si — Lyues, &.c.,vs. Brand- 

er. 
583- The Standard Life 

Ina. t o. vs. Cohurii 

et al. 
584— Wei I ley vs. VVelchold 

et al. 
711— Phelos vs. Piatt etaL 
60t> — Stewart vs. Boyntou. 

&c. 
57 — Dec leer vs. IngeraoU 

et ai. 
610— Pike vs. Salter etaL 
bl4 -Bulger v_-. Bites. 

34 — v\ eir vs. Vail et al. 
61ti— The German Amen- 

tan Bank vs. Vii- 

mar et aL 
621 lo — Jooephthal et all 

vs. bevman et al. 

622— Jo»ephtnal et aL vs. 
Stiffen et aL 

626— Earle vs. b i nr?eB et aL 

G'2:i — Aileo vs. Beinaoetal. 

6'^9— Uhl, Sic, vs. Uusz'.ier 
StC. 

631 — WatiB etal. vs. Dun- 
can et bL 

632 — Knowison et aL vs. 
lie.tts et aL 

644— Beruhsrd vs. Mc- 
Caithv- 

645— Josepiithal et aL vs. 
Piene et aL 

646— Pat.uUo 
ei aL 



>vs. (I'Donnell 



SUrREME COURT — CIBCCTT— PART I. 
Sttd by Donahue, J. 



Nob. 

lo72 — Colten VB. Morris- 
BJV, SlC. 

976— ^ohnsou et aL vs. 
Klsuerg. 

1051— Bobins, Jr., et aL ve. 
Gouid et au 

1859- Amet et ai. versus 
8ml7h et aL 

1877— Manning et aL. itc., 
vs. ISrisoane. Sec. 

1947— MiiAa VS. Green. 

1.919— Brutim vbr.us The 
.Mayor, kc. 

2063 — Greeubaum vs. Con- 
ner. Aic. 

2091— Lonieii v. Cassidy. 
lol9iQ— Koolie vs. P. ice. 
2.3o — Jlubiy versus The 
^lavor, k. . 

1875— Pratt VS. BrutOD. 

1488 — Gi <0B vs. Hieboorn. 
14S9 — .Same vs. bame- 
•2111 — De Revere vs. Pren- 
diT^ast. 

1703— Blascheci versus 

Pliilops 
1059 — Eckeri et al. verstas 

tstory et a I. 
2'J25-Kiri)V va. The N. Y. 

C. St H. R. R Co. 
1617— Miller vs. Miller. 
77,"— McHars vs. .->t.-atton. 
3'j47 — Wines vfrsus The 

Mayor, ic. 
1905— Sis=ou3 vs. Cum- 

niiMtis. 
1889 — Tompson vs. Gould 

et iiL 
1148— Lou'ihran, Jr., vs. 

Matthews et al. 



^oa. 

1911— PiPhl vs. Clark et aL 

2iiil— Kodman vs. King. 

ao6d— Laserowitsch versus 
Mo quin. 

1611— DickluBon vs. Dud- 
lev. 

2117— Tavlor vs. Surget. 

1985 — Jamison vs. Conner, 
Uc 

2107— Toffey etaL vs. Wll-. 
iiauis. 

1723 "2— Bruce et aL vs. 

Norwall et al. 
1329— Gapen v». Urawforl. 
l9c>\) — Baiiibriaqe veisus 

Browue et aL 
1350— Pannd^je versus 

T »ver. 
1965 — -Meyer versus The 

Kuiekerbocker L.fe 

iusur.ince Co. 
3473 — liramman versus 
Tuoper- 

1967— The Rjgers' Loco- 
motive and Machine 

V\ or s vs. The St. 

li. i. JI. &. d. R. Co. 
2129— Jones vs. Slcoli. 
216o— Hommedieu versus 

Wing et .1. 
2179 — Llviiigstou versus 

riooper et al. 
1937— fMiler et aL vs. The 

Cbamplain b. I, M. 

Co. 
2303— Post vs. The St. 

Louis. KansiB Citr 

and\. tt, K. Co. 
3663— Bates et al. vs. The 

Muyor, !i.c. 



Sos. 



6UPBBME COCRT, CIBCUIT— PART U.. 

Held by Lawrence, J. 
Xos. 



680 — SnportaB vs. Vander- 
biit. 
1404— Koebler vs. Marshall 

2838— harrinston vs. The ^3566— Schauck, tie., 
M lyor, ic. ( Tne Mayor, Ilo. 

3102-Th- heorow Free!366S— Tne >. Y. UiBpjnBary 



878— The Guardian Mut. 
Life loaurauce to. 

VS. Thj Atlantic 
Nat. Bank. | 

vs. 



vs. The -Mavoi, tc. 
1224— St. John vs. The 

Pies., tc,., of tbe 

DeL it Undson Canal 

Co. 
3662— Ro.lervs.GoIdflnger. 
14i.'4^j — Kerrlcan vs. .uu:- 

lius 1 1 aL 
2614— Avery et aL vs. Con- 

uer. 
1734— Lent vs. Tiie Mayor, 

&. ■. 
1164— tohn vs. F.oersheim 

et hL 
2482 — Uaibes vs.Sharp, tc. 
i2i8— Leudrum vs. jiead 

et aL 
1370— Tiie Loanprs' Bank 

vs. .Mabie et al. 

SUPREME COURT- CIRCUIT— PART IH. 
held bti Larremore. J. 
Case on — No. 24S9 — Snebly vs. Conner, &c. No Hay 
Calendar. 

SUPERIOR COUKT-»-TRUL TEEM— PART I. 
Hfld by t>an/ord. J- 
'NOB. N'os. 

•J 90— Walsh vs. Love. 
6 — NVaruei vb. The West- 
ern 11 alls. I o. 
97 — Newcauijvd. Terry. 
267 KoUurr tb. Hljigins t 



hchao! Associaiion 
vs. 'The Jla>or, 4tc. 
1086— heather vs. iNeiU. 
3224— Biowo VB. The 
Mayor, Jcc. 
602 — Peiine vs. DeueL 
500— ijailey vs. i edge. 
2860— samaon et aL, &.O., 

vc. Harrison. 
1096 — Hewlett tb. Wood et 
al 
7;58 — Wagner vs. Lewis eti 

al 

1654 — Von Geriohteu vs. 
'1 lie Major, tc. 
948 — Baiilwin va. ilehr- 
baoh. 



2a 

99 



aiio 
163— Baikwill 

ot al. 
261— Robeublum 



R. 



D. D., t.. B. t B. 
R. Co. 
286— 8 lu ler et al. vs. Eub- 
s.im. 



Whitman et al. vs. 

COle. 
W.l.sh vs.^ Tbe Ger- 
uiaa -Aiuer. Bank- 
I'^H")— Moran vs. Moran 
8Ty— Johnson vs. Luxtou- 
Dickell47o — -Moigan. i.c., vs. Mc- 
I Vlckar it ano. 

vs. The 227 — TJel< b« r vs. L'ixon. 



3u7 — ^aruw vs Slewarc 
■.;47— Uisber vs, Frey. 
319 — Tlio flavor, ic, vs. 
J. Dur.vee. 



A WEST SIDE HOMICIDE CASE. 
Assistant District Attorney Rollins com- 
menced the trial of his filth homicide case during 
tbe past week before Judge Sutberl&nd yesterday 
in Part L of tbe Court of General Sessions. The 
prisoner is a man named Daniel Bonrne, living at 
Ko. 70 Gantevoort street, and be ia charged with 

murder in the sscond degree, m having, on tbe 
night of Sent. 14, struck a woman named Margaret 
Soabourg uu the head with a club, indicting injuries 
fiom which she died almost immeaiatel,'. I; ap- 
pears that the deceased, wbo was related to the 

x>rlaou«r'a wife, was IB Uui "na hitnf drinkiiig cun- 



BUPERICR COURT— GEXEUAL TERM. 
Adjourned until .Monday, Oct. 23. 1876. 

SUPERIOR COURT— SPECIAL TERM. 
Held by Curtin, C. J. 



No». 


.N'OS. 


Issues of Fact. 


74 — Ifflnger et aL vs. De 


42— UU3 nbury et al. vs. 


W olf et al. 


Riiler. 


53— Recti .ger, Adm'i, vs. 


4.0 — Spadar vs- New-York 


Joh.o. 


fclev..ted K. it. Co. 


1 emurrer. 


50— Polha . us VB. Meigs 


7 — Gimbernato vs. Gould 


Jr.. et aL 


et al. 


58— imub vs. Schw, rz 




cbem. 






COMMOX PLEAS,— TRIAL TERM— PART I. 
Adjourned lor the term. 

COMMON PLEAS — TRIAL TERM— PART U. 

Held by ..Van Brun , J. 



COJOIOX FLBAS — TRIAT. TERSI — PART UI. 

Held by J. F. Daly, J. 

Nos. ,N08. 

901— Rittenbouse et ttI.|lUi2— Whitlns ot nl. vs. 
V.S. O-ff'y. I .Sd. u.-ei- et at. 

101.^— Rfbvveiiror vs. HULj 8' 9— White v. .Yinford. 
9au— The People c!t rel ' 813— fJnttou vs. H stinia 

NiLsh vs. Kyan. in 3 — La ene vs. Brush. 

915— rojiert vs. Clark et 993— Klsner vs. MeGarry. 
al. I 

COMMON PLEAS - EQUITT TERM. 
Held bi- Van BrutU. J. 
No. — Heimlel vs. Krooks. 

MARINE COURT— TRIAL TERM— PART I 
Held by lUcAdain. J. 



il. vs. 



Nob. 

3026— Gott In.b et 

Ktiuzeiman. 
4701— Sawn et al. versus|6r)9 

Murphy. 
4796—1 li" KonaldVcHirt 
439j— N. Y. College Vet. 

."^ur. va. UicUeL 
8IS9— -hiwvs. Lo3--e. 
4814— liearn vs. Hurd. 
y.v.t — .S'uarpe vs. F.arl^ 

4778— iJacr va. Williams- 
burg tlty F. I. Co. 



Nos. 

829- McDonald vs. Han- 
over .sat. Back. 

845— Porter vs. Law et aL 

84'7— Buach Vs. Aorahams 
etaL 

850 — Freuhdenburg vs. Irv- 
ing. 

852— Mctnery vs. O'Con 

iOC 



Nos. 

48t>l — Von Briesen vs. 

Wilfing. 

Irwin vs. fteeJ. 
■1862— HoHcatbal et al. vs. 

L' o lold. 
4864- Kirdfiy vs. JacUley 

et al. 
4Sfi5 — Hirsc'i vs. Mavrr. 
4.S6 ■ — Javizlcl vs. Go dstein 
4371- Rosenthal et al. vs. 

■ te n 
4549 — .\1 my etaL vs. Smith 

MARINE COURT— TRIAL TERM— PAKT U. 
Held by Goejp, j. 
.Noe. 

46ii2— Mar'iK vs. Martin. 
4005- Haeies vs. Poliack- 
4053- Ui'.i.ijr et uL vs. 

Coi^-ioan er al. 
4875— Jlclniosh ct aL vs 

Ri'iim m et al. 
4S73— ilutobinsou vs. ilc- 

Cor.i.ick. 
46i6— Kie'er et aL vs. 

Ui'ler etaL 

M.VRINE COURT— TRIAL TERM— PAST III. 
Held by Svnnott, J. 

44:8— Dalton vs. Hoffin'in.'587G— Knhu v». Marks. 
4869 — Hayiuan et ai. vs. |7u53 — .liller et aL versus 

Eb;i8 et al. I I''.iBdl>ei-<r. 

6182— Uclo et al vs. iSee- 6018— v> Oif va. Moi^es. 

ger. 8;M0— itaraford vs. Bl^iselL 

7106— Centre vs. Smith, d^iOo— i oates vs. Winter, 
8473-The .v. K. Susai- rtef. &c. 

Co vs. Van saner. 18407— l.iosby et b1. vs. Mc- 
8474 — Moller et al. vs. Vaui Dermot:, it . 

Sau?r. 81G2— Van noru et al. vs. 

8491 — i<ame vs. Same. Clarke. 

7u83— N. V. Nat. Ex. Bank 

vs. Laii'tl, ii.c. 

COUET OF GENERAL SESSIONS— PaET 1. 
Held by Sutherland. J. 
Daniol Bourne, tiomicide, jKrajcis -VIcGalre,hoi)iicide. 
(continued.) | 

COURT OF GENERAL PEBSIOSS— PART n. 

Held by Gilderileeve, J. 

Bridget Ryan, arson. J^imes Dajy, grand 1 jceny. 



Nos. 

46;^1 — Rehleroan vs. Clux. 

8029— Fu.Icr vs. Sterufe s 

et al 
4626 — Blauobard vs-Fums. 
47.-13 — Sni th % s. Sexton. 
8111— O'Owyer vs. -Mo.lr- 

tbur. 
8417— Ba-2 v-<. VonSchoeu- 

ine et aL 
8192— 0'i.ea vs. Irvine. 



George J. Geis, rapa. 

Patrick EeotieiLi, lelonlous 
assaali and b tcer.y. 

Charlei ins ey, bur.iljry. 

JoUu Power, uurgiary. 

John Oonuellv, L.ur.:larv. 

Jiiiues O Brien, buisrlary. 

John Krnost, ouruiary. 

Rose .>Jurtb.t, grand lar- 
ceny. 

Frauk MuUer, grand lar- 
ceny. 

John Gleason, grand lar- 
ceny. 

Arthur MoCue, grand lar- 
ceny. 



FrHuk vValser, grand Lr- 

ceiiy. 

George Hill, grand larceny. 

Bauiei KoiU, false i>retenses 

b'm '.nuei Maubeimer. re- 
c iviug stolen goods. 

William Dalton, mlsde- 
tuea nor. 

Frank R-tchuoi and John 
Duou, petit larceny. 

John Uairisou, petit lar- 
ceny. 

Gtor.'.e Rothman, assault 
aud battery. 



THE WEST VIKGIJSIA ELECTION. 



THE DKMOCRATIC VOTE NOT UNDSUALLT 
LARGK, AND THE UKSCLT ONLY WHAT 

"W.4.8, 10 HAVK BKKtff KXPKCTBD. 
From the Wheeling InteUigenor, Oct. 13. 
There is no reason to doubt that the Democ- 
racy have carried the Sta:e by a large majority. Id 
is pretty near the old and well-known case of tne 
Dutch taking Holland for the Democracy to carry 
West Virginia. Tbe highest -voi^ ever polled by 
the R'puuiicans was in 1672, at which time they 
oast 32,315 votes lor G-en. (jrant. This was their 

<i most ssrensth in the Scate ) in f.tct, it was rather 

over than uuder their strength. We ste no reason 
thus far iio suppose that their vote has fallen off in 
the late election. It has most Ukely increased con- 
siderably. Tba vote was decidedly increasedi in 
thi* county. We presume it was also elsewhere. 
The Bepubiicans have not votes enough — nor have 

they uad since 1868 — :o carry West Virginia. The 
Democracy showed in 1872 that tuey oonld poll 
40,305 siraight-oui votes lu West Virginia, and yet 
hayu plenty lo spare among tho^e who voted lor 
Gov. Jaooo- Gov. Jacoo aud nearly all bis Demo- 
cratic friends were united in lb') re<:ent election 
with the 40,3j3 men who voted against him id 1872. 
So that tue way to apnioximace the relative 
streugib of the Republican and Uemooraiiu Parties 
in West Virginia is to subtract Gen. Grant's vote 
in 1872 fi'uni ibe comuined vote of Jaooo aud Cam- 
deu mat year. This Ci<mbluea vote was 83. 193, and 
tbe Kepubiican vote tor Grant was 32,315. Sue- 
iractiug the latter from ihe turmi.r, and we 
have as a reniauider a Democratn: maj^'ritv ot 
18,5o3. This moority is to some extent fictiaouK. 

tor tue rea^ou tu.^t in lci72 tbe vote «-aat was be 
youd tbe voting ratio mat well-sotlleu statistics 

have prescribed to pouplation. Ihe per cent, ot 
voters was so l^ree toat ever ciuce that time a 
suspicion has rested upon the vote as moie or less 
oogus. But di^conntiugeren 5 01)0 votes as iileiiiti- 
male, aud still we have over 13,UUd Pomocraao ma- 
luritv in West Virginia ou tuo baRis ot siiustra.!-- 
tion that we have assumed in Grant's vote ot lo72. 
U we are cuirect lu this calculation, no one neel 
be snrbriseu if it sbonid turn out tnat West V.r 
gmia uas now given all the Demoorauc m.>J3ricy 
k.ht.t the Demorrats claim. As we Save saio, it ia 
aimpl> tne old ca.e of ihe Dacca taking Hol>and. 



NOT DBA WN TO I BE DEMOCRATS. 
Dr. £. J. Bonine. ot Niies, Mich., who was a 
Representative m the State Legislature four years, 
and Surgeon ef the Second Michigan Infantry dur- 
ing tbe war, denies a report in cironiation that be 
had gone over to the Democratic Party, and had 
written a long letter "in support of the conglomer- 
ated mass ot rsbe.s, Democrats, aud fag ends, who.-e 
principal leaders are Southern traitors and Northern 

copperacids." The Doctor says that wbeo he loses 

his 8<:u!H:s bO that be cannot see in nis dreauia cnose 
emaciated human fuims oomios forth rrom Belle 
Isle and Audenonviiiu be may bo ludocod to 
vote tbe rejel-Democratic iiukoi. Ai. the bditle of 
tne Wilderness the Doctor vnlunteerea to remain 
uu tne field to look , afcer the woonued, add wit- 

besised some most burrid outuhenes ut Uniun 

soldiers. Duriug the loug, (Varit night he bad lo 
.isteu to the groans and crie<» tor iieip, and wueu toe 
morning came, instead of uemg alli>»ed lo help tile 
sicii auu woauoed suidirrs, he was surroanded by 
rebels aud ooui polled to look on wniie bis comrades 
were shot down like dogs. Hundreds oi Uuiou men 
were shot after iney had surrouuerea ou that 
muining, under bii immediate ooservation, and no 
colored man wa^bpareo, to say nothing or toe whiie 
soldiers wuo were most crueily assassinated. CjI. 
Frank Graves, of iJiies, as brave a man as ever 
wintuito battle-, was murdered on that morning 
because be lexuseii to puii off his boots and give 
them to a gang of reoel soldiers. In Dr. Honiuo'a 
letter, embodying ihese tacts, he says: "Alter 
having seen all this and more loo, it is hard to be 
accused of goiug over lo iha liouiocratic Party, 
while ii, Is iu full fellowship with th^jse vilo mur- 
derers of Col. Frank Grave* and so many others 
ol our brave uuiou soluiors." 



Nos- 

857 — Carroody vs. Spcot. 
859— Betz vs. Connor. 
8d- — acltuckmau versus 

DOKtifc. 

TSO — Hoe et ai. vs. Bropby. 
42 — Loughrau vs. Reily, 

ther^ff. 
.34— Ryauvi». Slatteryt 



GEN. BAKlLEirS ILLNESS. 
Speaking of Gen. W. F. Bartiett, tbe Boston 
Journal of Jklonda,' says : '• During tbe past week 
encouraging advices have been received trom Pilts- 
fleld which lead bis frieudd to hope that a change 
may take place and enable him to regain his 
sirength. Last week Gen. Bariletl was so low that 
it was leared he cnuld not recover, and while he is 
yet a very sick man, there are sliabt imp ovements 
in his Condition, which make his friends hope for 
tne best. The precise cause ot Lis lUuehS is not 
kuoi^n, bnt is probabiy tne result oi tbo disease of 
the bowe.s which he coutroiciea wnile confl.jed in 
Lioby fnson, aud irom whictj he has never been 
iree. liii food uas not giveu hiiii that nourishment 
and strength whicu are necessary to health, aud as 
a result ho has grown veri ihm and Weak. His 
leg iioujied him a anort time ago, but that is better 
a^ain, bis most serious d.Hijuiiy at present being a 
sore ihioar. Ho la able to sit up lor a «>hori time 
and partake of uiffeteut kinds of nouiishmeut, 
whic'i It IS coattdentiy expected will euauie bim to 
recover his screngtii and be convalescent; but still 
there is some uangor oi bis sutteriug a relapse 
whicn may prove mure than his enieejled cousiita- 
tiou can wiibstaud. We uuils with his many 
lrie..ds in this cityiii the wish that be may spccaiiy 
regain his strengtu and heauh." 

VIiLlZL\a A HUSBAND. 
From, the I hUago Journal. 

" Your husbaud ia sicii a good sight of late, 
ben't ne J " remarked a Southeru IiUuoia woman to 
another, oue day last week. 

•' Ye J," answered the wife, ''he's got ink down 

mighty hard with them 'ere ager shakes agin." 

"I sbuu think it 'ud be sorter uittressiu' like ter 
have htm 'rounu the house," remarked the oiher, 
syinpain.zinaiy, ''sp^-c'iv when yor al house- 
cieaiiin ." * 

" Wal, so it wud be," replied the wife, in self- 
CGUsoliug tones, '■ but when he's got inter one of 
his chills, aud 1 want the rag carpet shuk, yereee 
bo's a powerjul smart baud ter biceh ouio it." 

Toeu cue Woman wended her way home, envying 
her neighbor the knack she bad of ntuiziug her 
buaband. . 

THE OLD COLONY A C CI DENT. 
Tbe Coroner's jury, iu the case of Thomas 
Abbott, the dreman who was kilied by the collis- 
ion ou the Old Colony Railroad, retorned a verdict 
on Saturday as loUows: '• That the said Thomas 
Abbott came to bis death on Friday, the ISth day 
ot Ootober onrreu., at the hour ot. 6:23 A. AI., by 
the colliaioo Ol tho Uoa. irain wita tUe local treiglit 
train on tbe Old CidoiiV Rai.ruad. aud we, the 
jurors, find oy evidence that a portion of rbe local 
iroiuht train was out ot us piaco, btijg on tne 
maiB track, when it should nave been uu tbe side 
track auu waiaug it.ere uucil the boat train bad 
passed; and we luriber hud by exaaiiuatiou of the 
rules OI said railroad, tnat it strictly adhered to 
tlus accident would not nave occuzie4> 



ANOTHER REFORMER. 

o 
A liEMOCRAT CaMPAIGNI2}G UyDER 

nilTICULTIES. 

HOW A DRMOCRATICCAXniDATR TV KAXSAS 

WITH THRICE CFIILDRiCN, LOVED AND 

WOOED A WIDOW OF ST. LOUIS — SO.MR 

FKKLING LETfEItS ANT) A PAINFUL DIS- 

CLo.suiu:. 

From the iSt. T.ouis Globe- Democrat. 
The foilowing intarestiu'r and aniusinj story 
win be read wim a g/eat deal of interest by the 
many fiiends of Mr. T. L. Davis, a gentleman who 
resides at Eureka, Ran., and who is a candidate for 
Congress ou the Democratic ticket. It will prove 
especially attractive to all wbo ilehght in romance. 
Of ilr. Davis liitlo U known, except thit he is th? 
possessor of a soft hcirt, an equally soft head, a 
wife and three children and bai been desperately 
smitten by tbecharm^ of an estimable widow. In 
the latter p^rt of June last, when this Congres- 
sional aspirant packed his carpet-bag. la- 
beled it ■' Tilden and Reform," and hastened 
to St. Louis for the purpose of danoinz 

arteudance on tho National Demooratic C inven- 
tion, hs little dreamed that he was t^ituig the ore- 
liminary step toward furnishing the Globe-Democrat 
with a t-ocial sensation. Be this as it may, Mr. Da- 
vis, of Eureka, K in., reached St. Ljuis in safety, 
gazed wi b wonder on the big bridge, played an ac- 
tive part in Dorsheimer's circus at the Chamber of 

Coinmeroe, sa-^v all that was to he seen, and then 
started for Kentucky. Oi the same train there 
was a widow find her little daughter, w.io «ere en 
route to viait some relatives m an interior 
village. The lady was abnut, twenty-six years 
ot aee. Uer " lovely, beautiful, sal face, 
with golden hair anJ hpaveniy eyes," played 
havoc witli the heart of tbp C Migres.smiu. He was 
smitten at first si^ht, and in order to ga-n the good 
will of the mother, very naturally made fneuos 
with her Child. He perted and carressed the Utile 
one in tbe most fatherly manner, and the result 
aimed at was accomplished. The ladvaud her ad- 
mirer en eriained each other as travelers wbo are 
accuie tally thr >wn toee.her usnally do, and when 
the time came for tnem to part it was «lih a feeling 
Of regret on one side at least. The widow had been 
in her new home only a day or two when she re- 
oeivea a lei ter from Davis requesting ths plensur i 
of being allowed to oorresoouu with her. Ths re- 
quest WHS graiuerl. and tbe politicians suH appa- 
■ cntly progre.ssed swimmingly, as, on Aug. 3. Davis 
used up au hour's time and ten cents worth of sta- 
tionery iu inditing tbe following humorous epistle 
to his acquaidtauce of a few hours: 

LOVE AND POLITICS. 

Eureka. Kax.. Aug. 3. 1876.— M ,s. : I acknowl- 
edge vviih a great deal of Pleasure tne reception of 
vour letter, and 1 ara elated beyond measure at the 
character of it, aud ibe prooiotness with which you 
respond. Alter reading your letter the first time. 
I felt that I would give anything and evcrvthiug in 
the World that is mine to give ii 1 could but ^ ee vou, 
look into your eye aud talk to you ; after reading 
it a si^cond aiid ib rd time I felt an a.most, irresisti- 
LL» impulse to ba»cen to you. Please don't think 
from (nis tb4t I am rashly impulsive, 
for I &m not. Please dun't tniuk that I am 
given to exa;fgeration, Jor »1 am not. I know 
1 am 1 ot given to flattery. If there is anything I 
can boast of it is of oeiug frank and candid with all 
men aad all women. When you said in your leiter 
that my letters are "tiucere and manly,' you pai i 
me a compliment that 1 prize very higbiv. I have 
traveled a great deal in my life; have met a great 
many cbarming women in my travels, but never 

DDtil I met VOU did I meet one who so completely 

and effeotnalK won mv admiration and — I dare not 
pen the saored word now — as yoorse.f. Tuis is 
true, aud I feel that I am not violating anv rule of 
proonely, or writmc auvthlng that would incur rbe 
censure of tbe most fastidious, when I t ll you so 
In black and white. From the time 1 parted from 

\ouat McLeausboru, your image has bObU coo- 
stuutly 800 continually betore my eyes. Altbou<;h 
I am iramnieled and Burronndod IJv the cares ol bu.-i- 
ness, and about to piunge into the wuir.nool of nuii- 
tics, >etl find myseii thinking of you. hoping and 
praying that 1 may meet you again, and wimdermg 
If fa.e has not rendered a decree lu which we are 
D, to dee ly and vitally inreresied. "lij arrange, 
passing strange, that you should have so mooh in- 
flaence over me upon an acquainiancffshortas ours. 
But It is so — trutn is strauier than hcdon. How 
I would like to be with ywu and enjoy with you 
some of the horseback riaes vou have. The ix- 
ercise is deligaUul and health-giving. I am ex- 
ceedingly tend of if, and usea to prioe myself upou 
being a graceful rider, although I have ucver seen 
you on hoisebauk. The days will seem long rrom 
now until your reium to St. L 'ni«. I mean they 
will Heem lung lo me. for I am determined to see 
more of you, and tuow more or you lietore many 
luoous ■' wax and wane." My faiiure to aocompaby 
you to Shawneetown is a coniiuual source of regret 
t> me. I tdouebtof it ana would have proposeo o 
do so, but was afraid you would not conoeot 
lur me to go. The truth of the matter is 1 
ou/ht to have gone. I have forgucten the 
uame of the laoy who left tbe train wuo you. I 
tbougut her a very pleasant laay. X shall aiways 
haveakiudly reineuiurauoe ut her, oecause sue is 
intimately associated with my first a.qaaintance 
with you. I thank you for your &ind wishes ;or 
ray success iio itiuaily. This Cougressoual district 
is a very lime one, composed of twenty-eight coun- 
ties, and the canvass wiil necessarily oe a very ia- 
oorious one. I shall canvass the aiatriot tburoueb- 
ly. 1 o< mmence the canvass with a luaiorlty ol 500 
agaiunt me out am coudaeui lean overcome ii and 
will the elec.ioo. I teel coufi'ient that you will 
meet a memoer of Coniire.-<s when you meet 
lue at St. Ljuis iu a few months. As to the success 
of the national Democratic ticket there can oe. I 
think, htcle uoubt. The lodicaaons are all encour- 
aging. Poiitiojl excitomeut always runs high iu 
Kentucky, and I am quite sure the campaign will 
be at White beat toeiu this > ear. Iu my struggles 
lur success and victory I suall always think of 
you. and by that name 1 soall ounqnor. flow vejy 
ihankiul I am tuat 1 met you. Tuat good will come 
to both of us IU the near luture there 
can be no doubt. I think our meetiug 
]ust as it occuiTei was foreordained. Now i 

am gtdng to make a request of yoo. whicb 
1 pray you will grant. Send me pictures of your- 
self aad uarliog mile gin. Piease do ihis. Uou't 
refuse me. Send it at ouoe, aud I will bu so grate- 
ful- .1 pray that you will not oisappuint me- 
Please write me as sown as you get ibis. I do love 

vuur letieis Hu. I tnist yuur sffdet little i^irl is 

well now, and that you, my dear, cear, arc iu good 
health. 1 would to Cx>>d S. oould see you to-day. 

(jod speea the day wheu I shall ^ee yuua];diu, 
Again I ask that you write me an soou sb you get 
this, and senu the picture. Truly and smc-ieiv 
yours, 'i. L. Davis. 

HE PREFERS THE 8UB5TA>-CE TO THE SHADOW. 

Ten days later the ardor ui tue fasc.uated lover 
had by no meaas cooled. Hd had reoo.vod a picnre 
wh.cii screiigtneus his lovti, aud sigQs tor the aub- 
bluuue iu.Htea.i of lue snaaow, also asi^ing if he can- 
not sooo make tue original his. He then branches 
olf into pol.tics, rouews h.s declaration of uadviug 
love, aud wisues that lUe oo)dct of his atf^jciiono 
could look lata his eve in order that she might bo 
convinced of nis sincerity : 

JiUllEKA, Kan., Sept. 13. 1876. 

My Dear Mrs. : Yjur charming leiter of 

29iu ot August 1 louu J awaitin.: treou my return 

aa.urJay irom a tiio SjiitQ. 1 ao love your letiers, 
ana I am so luankrui to you tor tbe plCLUiu. It 1 
could but have ihe suostance instead of the 
shadow I wouid be happy. May 1 not hope to 
Call Ihe origiual mine some day ? Yju can 
answer this question wituout any fueling of 
emb.irrassiue(it, and I sincerely hope you 
will. Your letter encouiugod me mote 
man I have boeu encouraged .-lince I became 
a canoidaie. luueed, I nave uerived an imioeose 
deal ol consolation irom it. To know that aucu a 
woman as you takes and feels au inteioot lu my 
weiiare, anil waicues wiih iriendiy solicitude tho 
result ot the des,)er*ie political' battle lu wnich I 
am engaged, nerves me lor increased exertion, 
and IS lu truth the noblest iiiceutive man could 
have. God grant me tucoess, for your sake is 
well as mine. If the Slates toat vote in Ooiober 
go Democraac, I am coudaent I wili be elected ; 

00 yo\i can have some luea of Ihc palulul auxiet.y 
with whicu I shall watch tue result lu iiiu.^e St<vtu8. 

lamsdiiaa (o hear luat \ou navo eiijo.,ea your 
visit to Kentucky, and uops you will re. urn to St. 
Louis teedug oenonied by tue trip. I suall cer- 
tainly be lu St. L lUis i" See vuu aoout tho 15th of 
JSovember. it seems a Ijug lime ofl[^ but tue lima 
will ajun pasi away. 1 sometimes ihLuk I am a 

little louiisa about you, I am ihiuKing about you 
So much to tue ixclusiou ot other thiogs. Wueu I 
see you i Will tell you my opinion ot you. I had 

uiucu ratUcr teil .vou in person than write it. Ior 
the reason that you Can lell better wuethor X am 

bi. cere if yod are looKing nuo my eye. i have 
oiten Uioughc h,yW aeii;iuiiul it would have Ooen 

goiojj to Jjrew-Yorl£ at tne t.mo we met. by cQauce. 

1 niissed \ou bo sadU' after yuu l2it the traiu, ior 
about that time I Legan to oeconie very deepiy 
interested, and tor days ana weelis — ludeed, most 
all the time sinoe — a luvely, beautiful, sad lace, 
wilb goldcu hair aLO n-.av*jiry_ syos, uas been cou- 
studd>— yo.^, cousiautiy — jelore my eyes. Howl 
i.o love Lua,. pictuie ! ! I teel lo-day mat I would 
giva ixuviuiug iu tho world to be at your side but 
lor an hour. I will be lu I'opeka on tue 2J i oi tnis 
luouih, aud Willie toete will have some large-siza 
photograpns laaen. Will senu you one after your 
retain lo Si. Ljuis. I do hope this will fiaUiou 
and yuur sweet little girl in the nest ot oeai.n. I 
luve thai cuild for its motaer's sake. 1 cau write 
uo mote now. 1 beg of you lo wrue me as soou as 
you get this. Devotedly yours, T. L,. D. 

6WEETER THAN EVER. 

Having received au epistle in which he is told 
that bo may hupo, tua Btricueu swain wishes that 
be nau wiu,is tn fl^ to ibe oojjct ot hii attections, 
aud desires not to us laughed ac for exprnsaiuc ina^ 
wish. Alter seuoiug his ladv-iovo a icugthy ex- 
tract from a couutiy uuwapap I, which details his 
mauy values aud aavoca.os uiscluimiforCougiesa, 
Davis agaiu writaa: 

Eureka, Kan., Sept. 28. 1876. 

^BS. : Your dear, uear loiter ot IJiu lUSt. 

received yeoieiday. Tuis letter must be very br.ef, 
tor the rea.sou thai I must s arc on a two-aays' tup 
this evcuiag, and oonstqaeu.ly cau'c wri.e very 
much, i wouid love to write vou a long letter, aud 
the next one 1 piomise you aha. 1 be. Aoi' you tell 
me I may hope. BoucVo me when 1 »ay to you that 
1 am supremely bappv. "Your' le; ter assures nie ot 
Ibe iuuesciib.'Oiu j ly aud od»s tuaiuwaiis me in 
tbe future. I have ie..d your le.ter I know not now 
ujan> limes. Oj. I wou.o give auytliing in luo 
wor u to oe wilb you ibUcveuiug. luoub: it I would 
leave your piesenceat ail. 1 caunot and wiii not 
wiite aslieeL We will talk with each oihor a 



grtod long time when wo meet, won't we I I will 
want to be wiih you all the rim*. Cod bless von 
for this precious letter of yours. I want ynu to look 
.lost an you looked when I first met von. Thiit f*ce 
I shall nevtr rorget . ata so glad you are bacV in St. 

Lti'.is ogaln— I can hoar from lo'u ottener. I pray 
that you and narlin>r littlo girl inav not suffer wiih 
cbilU auy more. It I bid the piwer I would fli' to 
your side inotanrlv. I^ow, don't laugh at me tor 
writing in this style. I know it isn't manlv, bui I 
can't help ii. I can't write more now — will write 
aeiiiu Roon. Please write me as soon as vou got 
this. Do not fail. Truly yours, T. L. D. 

A STAETLIN'G DENOUMENT. 

About thi6 time toe lady, as well aa her friends, 
thought iliat if Davis wcie tbe great man wh'iCli he 
rcprisenled niiiiself to be, and if he were really 
in earnest in bis protestaiioiis of Inve. it whs 
about linie that they learned Bomething in regard 
to bis aiueceQfUts. A relative of tho widow be- 
iug c^mnccttd with one of tbe largest dry goods 
bousss in St. Louis, was tbereforo taken into tbo 
coi.fi lence of hers»lt and brother-in-law. As the 
houxe tr.nsacts businees with several merchants 
in Euieka, it was fufigested that oue_of theiu be 

wiitien to, more as a matter of form than anything 
else, the lady and her inends believing that Davii 
was a ceiitioman of boiior. Being a cancii.Lute foi 
Congress, they ooubtless argned in their luoocenco 
toat ue could not err. How gnevously they 
were mistaKen and how the uutortnnate 
lady had been deceived by tbe aspir- 
lug etalesman were soon to be made 
known, lor in a day or two the following reply 
came from the £u' ttka dry ifoods merchant, sbow- 
ing that Davi-i was not <inly a married man, but 
that lie had never been separated irom his wifa. 
that he was the lather of three chilareo. that they 
were all living together, and that nlthougu tbe 

decrltful suitor was a candidate lor CongrL-sa, he 
hadnoeirihly show of being elected. Tbo letter 
speaks for its«lf : 

A WIFE AND THREE CHILDREN. 

Eureka Kan.. Sept. 16, 1876. 
Dear Sir : Yours ot iue9iii iust leoeiveu, and 

wlils.iy iu regard to the subject to wiiiob you refer. 

til-' first thought presented to my mind is this: 
What disposition will Mr. T. L. Davis make of his 
wile and family of three cnildrcn with whom be is 
now living, aud has been, to my personal knowl- 
e ige, for ihe last tour years 1 You tmve been 
wrouely informed as to Mi. Davis' politics, Me 1.4 
the Democratic candidate ior Congress, and bis 
chances lor election are about as good as are his 
cliaucesof being stiuck by lightnin; boi ween this 
i>n<ilhe Xovenioer elections. Thinking tbe above 
ioiormatiou will he all that you require, I am yours 
truly, . • 

A FEW APOLOGIES. 

When Davis'flnds that all has been discovered," 
and that " tne Jig is uu," he sees at uoce toat ex- 
posure will ruin him poiitically. and that unless 
the alFiir o.n be hushed up in some way his £e- 
ouoliean opponent will glid'' gently into tbe next 
Congress. He therefore hastens to pen toe suo- 
iaiued apolOjty, suppleuienting it a day later with 
another, ancfnuaiiy winding up by beaeecbing that 
exposure may at least be oostponed until "alter 
the UovemOer elecuons." Kead the apologie* : 

EUREK.A, Kan., Uot. 2, 1876. 
Mrs : 

I cau only explain by seeing you. I snpnose no 
oue knew of our correspondence bu* you and L I 
am not to blame. Let our corresponocnce cease till 
I can nee you. I return the picture. Do not think 
hard of me. I will explain all. Very respectfully. 

ilo one knows that I have ever received a letter 
from vou. Do not rum me. I will explain to your 
satisfaction. 

EXEUNT OMNE8. 

Eureka, Kan., Oct. 3, 1876. 

Mas. : My married iio is as a uliUk. This 

is au 1 Cau say about that now. When I met you I 
was completely infatuated with you- X'hisis>rue. 
My impuistveueoB aud blind iniatuatiou may have 
led me Coo lar, and doubtless has. God knows I 
had no evil iuientioiis. I intended to v. bit St. 
Liuis in I^oveinber, at whicu time I hoped to see 

^ua and explain all. There are some things I cau- 
uoi explain in a letter, flow bitieriy I regret ail 
this. 1 pray God aud beg of you to forgive me. 
Gad kuows 1 intended no evil 10 you. Cdusure me 
uot 100 harshly until you know alu 1 will btt in Su 
L mis some tidie uetKeeo the 15vb and tbe .asiof 
jyovember, and if I coald see voo in ner ton I be- 
lieve I cau explain my commct. I aga.iu beg that 
you furi;ive me. Please do not rain aod blast my 

whole tuture. Very respectruUy, 

T- L. DAVIS. 
POSTSCEIPT. 

It might be added that later letters have been 
received from Mr. Davis «>t » similar tenor, but 
me/ nave had nu eH ui ou tbe brotber-in-law ut tbe 
laay in the case, wuo has taaen the matier in bano, 
and asseris that he will attend to thewiiteriu 
person. Ct was ihrough ibe lostrnmenlaliiy 01 this 
geuileuian that lUo (Jlobe-liemoerai came iu pusses- 
oiou ot the aoove curresponaouo.-. In tbe meanume 
Mr. T. L. Davis, Demooratic Keform canaidate tor 
i;ougross, IS carrriug on the cauvass uuuer ai£Scul- 
ues. 



tion and his bsarty wishes for the soooew of tM 
partT. bot could nut now be iM oanAuUM. It vw 
urged an m bim that it was his Aulj to ItU ooaatnv 
to bis district, an4 to bis Uemoeratio «oBStita«aM 
TO acce-it toe candidKcy, bot to this Mr. &«acMi r* 
plied tha: he bad eniIei»vored to ooDfider the qoe» 
tion V h ally in the light of duty, vti tngnxXoi thai 
bis de< isiou wuK necessarily adverse to tb* wishM«l 
bio political friendt." 



A CALIFOIiMA CENIENKlJiL, 



^m- 



*^ 



EON. ALEXAMDEH H. STEPHENS. 



A VISIT TO HIS HOME— THK GRAVES OF HIS 

AXCESTOKS. 

From the Augusta (Ga) ConstUiutionalist, Oct. 13. 
We spent some time this wees with Hou. A. 

H. Stephens, at Xi.oerty HalL The old statesmaa 

has quite recovered his ordinary stare of health, 
and looks as well aa we have seen bim during tbe 
last five years. He has an excellent appetite, en- 
joys the bouutitui repasts ot his home table, and is 
never sc well pleased as when old and new friends 
partake of hi* good cheer. His removal from a 
uismai and iil-veuiilaied room, or lather den, to 
ciieertul aud oomtortabie ap^rimouta in the reno- 
vated main ouiining n.is oeen attended 
with the h est results. This change was ma a e at 
tbe suggestion of a laoy, tbe wile ot one ot taia 
oldest kud most distiUj;uisQed tnends. Sue ce'- 
laiuiy did US much for bis physical well-being as 
any of the doctors. So wel- luueeo is M.r. Stephens 
ihat vien. Xoomos, woo tarried oetwoou trains 
while we were there, aud is himoeif iu robust con- 
duion. declareaetnpuaticaily cuatJie ual "named 
Alecu: as his executor." The General was in one 
Of his bcSL mooua, and become so aosoruea in the 
ttiscussion ot local and Fcucr.»i politics that be had 
to make an expediiious bolt for me depot, lorgeuul 
of Lis stout Cane, bui laitbtuiiv intent upou meeir 
iug legal engageiiieu IS. He caugnc tue train, by a 
second, but v»aa uot any tbe better tor an uuauciu- 
lomea race down one hul aud up anomer. 

Wnile at Liberty Hall, wo look advantage ol a 
bright day, and visited tbe old houieateau uud plan- 
taiiou 01 jiir. Stephens' toi etathera. I'be hous&anj 

wuicu Mr. Stepneus was ouru uo lunger eimis. The 

family eravey-iu is well preserved. It was in the 
•■ardeu. Xue first who '• lell upon sleep " were two 

Chilareo who died the same day. aud were boried in 

the same grave. At tne date 01 tueir death two 
siuaii cedars were planted alongside of tbem, ami 
lueoB nave now grown into a pair of mighty treee. 
Air. Stephens' fainer, bis motuer, aud slep-moiber 
repose bine by siae. Au elaer brother, -Aaron. 
IS also buried here, and two or tuiee uiber memueis 
ot tne family. Wiib filial r«veieuce, Mr. Siepueus 
has inciuseu this buriai-giound with a solid stone 
^^ all, and apprv-priaiely marked tbe graves. Just 
wiih'iu a stouo's ihiowol where tbe house siuod, 
iu the valifcV, IS a ooid spnug ol crystalline wa.er. 
Od tbo rocks around it, Mr. Stepbeuf, in 1631, 
carved his initials, and ihi-y remain uuueraoeu to 
tuis day. His bro.her Aaiuu also cut hi» iuidals 
IU auucuer atone, bat uot a trace of tneui remaiuod 
tweuy years ago. luis would seem to nave iv pi- 
tied lyeir uitt'ercut careers. Tne brotbei died young 
and' leit no marii. ou tua World- Tne grand old 
sta esman of i^iuercv HaU suiviyed to mutLe a pure 
aud Icsiiug impress upon his generation, aud many 

more 10 come- ,_ ^ . ., , ..u 

lu a thicket, about one hundred yards from the 
spring, aua ou a geuae aociiviiy, is me grave of 
oil, siepueus' glaautachei, who was a native 01 
Eugiaud, a 8=ti.er oi Peuusylvania, aud afterward 
oue"of me earliest coiouisia of Geor^jio, He was a 
Captain in mo Bevoiuuon»ry War, aud npon his 
lomostviUe the great commoner has recorood that 
hiaauceoiorlousut for local seit-govommeut and lUe 
sovereignty ot me Sutts— a docii ine of whicn the 
sage ot Liuorty Hail has been oue ot tbe most il- 
lustrious cuampious in the loium of nis country. 

Air. S.epneus' intellect beams with ail ibe bright- 
ness of youth ; it 18 the one imperishabla aud un- 
decayed power .of his mortal irame. That it may 
cjuiiuue to be iipuorne, for a long lime yet, by his 
teehie but inlouse, physical organisation la the 
prayer ot thuuaauus who reverence Bim as a yerita- 
dic apostle of cousliiUlioual libern, and upon 
whoso leachings naug mo hopes ol " millions yet to 
be." ^ 

EX-GOT. CLAtLIN ON t>FEClE PAYMENTS. 

Since Gov. Ciaflm's nooiiuation for Congress 

by the Eighth District Kepuoiioan Convention of 

Massachusetts the followiug letter has been made 

^'^'"'"^' ' Kkwtonville. Oct. 11, 1876. 

Qen. Underwood: 
DitAR csiR: Some question baa snsen, to my «ar- 

prij.:^ iu i.-gard z^ uiy views aLouc resumpiion 01 
bpccie pa\ meuis. 1 can ouiy sa, tuat luuUeve that 
resumpnouii possible iwo iears eur.ier ibau the 

oate n^ed by Congress, and that it is tho duty Of 
the (j.iverumeiit Co provide moans tor tuat puipose 
toithwiih thus giving Confidence to tbe commuuiiy 
that uo oackwaiu step shall ue peimitieu. 0. course, 
wuh tncae opinions, I coruially suoBCrioe to the 
priucipai article ol me Ciocinuati plaiioip), "Ud I 
Oellevo that CougiesS bUouiu lak-* further measures 
ior tbe speeoy accomplishment 01 the pieuge of 
specie payments made toereiu. i-^t 4 pt tv 

Kespeciluiiy yours, \v. CL..i_tL,Lai. 

HiS STOMP SPEECtJ. 
From the Oh ago Journal. 

"That shows how I shall vote," said a Uaion 
ei-soldier, as be pointed to his armless shoulder, at 
au Illinois Itepublican meeting the otner night; 
••agdiust the meu Who shut that ott"." 

'• Yec, ycs," cried the audieuoc 

•• Ami that is all the •stump ' speech X can make 
you," said me veteran, as he climbed down trom 
lue Staud. 

GOV. GASION'S li±.FUSAL I'O RUN. 
The Boston Herald has the loliowiug in ref- 
erence to Gov. Gaston's refusal to acoepi the Damu- 
crat'O nomination far Congrsss in the Fourth Dis- 
trict ot Missaohnsett*: 'Tbe odioers of the Con- 
vention colled at Mr. Gaston's office. Saturday, and 
officially n itided him of his nommatiou, ana lu the 
Qauie ot tne Democracy of me disj'icl requested its 
acucpiance. Mr. Gosiou repiiod that be nad oon- 
si.loiod the matter fu ly and oarefuUy, aud that bis 
declin*il-tu must be taken as fiual. He expressed 
Ills warmest giatiiude tor the aotiou of the oonren-. 



CELEBRATION- IV gAiT FllAXCISCO OF 
ESTABLISHMENT Or TIIE MWStOX 
THE COKYEfiSlON OF T»IK ISDIANS. 

From Ou 8an Francisco A Ita, Oct. S. -^ 

To-day is to bo celebrated by the Catbollk 
Church as the ouotenatai annlrortary of tb* foa»> 
dfttien of the Mission of San Francisco. Tho cvti^U 
mony of establishing tbo misstuo took piece on th* 
9ih of October, 1T7C but tbe cslebration is hsU lo* 
day (the dth) beeanae it is Sunday, and approptlMft' 
for a religious CemoDairstlun. 

Tho Mission was foandod with tho intcntioa of 
saring the souls and civilizing rbe life of tbe Iiv- 
diaas on this peniosnla. and 1.3.00 re<1 men woro 
colloc.ted under its jurisdiction sixty years ago, bat 
nut one of thfm or their dusceud^nis of nurs Indus . 
blood now lives anywhers upon the earth. Tb*r»' 
are probably somewhere a favr indiv dnal* <ie- 
8cend*d on ono side trom San Franciacu M:saiini 
iDdim;, and nn the other side from wliit«a. Dot if 

so tnev are few in number, and we do not Iebov 
where they are to bo fou,;a. Tne sbodzlaee at. 

tlic Mission ncvor wore odocated nor fully civil- 
ized, ana tbouch they did not dieoiTso rapidly m 
in later year*, tbey ncvor reached a condit.oo oC 
skiliiul ludnstry and of stead? natiirsl increase. 

The result was the same at moat of tbe otb«c 
lU'suon*. Not an Indian retnalns at Hux Ba> 
lael, Sonoma. San .ioti or Santa Clara, 
and those who survive aboat the mlasiMis 
further sooth do no credit to tbe instroarfoa 
g;veii to their fathers. Dot, however defeetiv« 
may have been the system of tbe friurs, we bav* 
the' most r/meiusive inviaenee that tbe wealcninc 
and overthrow ot the Spanish aucborit,. the Mca-; 
larizatiou of the missions and the American Coa> 
quest were dlsasiroos to tbe aoorigiual raoea ot 
(;aiifornia. Thev were bappier when tbe miastoat 
were at the kumtnit of their power tbao ev«r 
afterwartv. From the tiute when tbey flrak 
heard of tho rebellion for laaepeBaeDoe te 
Mexico until now, everv political change rff~gt1m 
their condition, has been a change tor the won«M 
to tbem. If the Franciscans did not soecerd Ux 
establishing a high .and permanent oivilixatSi^ 
amjug tbe r^d men ot C:Uitornia, the blame moatt 
not be thrown upon tbem — ^at least not ootiraiyJ 
The Jesuit missions in Lower CaiifoniM. after titi 
labors of tbree-qoariers of a centurv, bad not m»4 
cured betier r aults: and the raaervstiona nuia-' 
tamed by tbe Federal Government in this Staw^ for 
the last twenty years, have been muexmble tailoMm.. 
Tbe Franciscan experiment does not aaftor ht oaoM 
pat ieon with the iufiueuco of tne Jeaaits or of tsta 
Mtxican or American politiciaot npon the red mm; 
of the coast, and may therefore be aaid. "HMt<tfafl-' 
lory OS it was, to have been a relative aucoaaa. 

It wa^ perhaps well that the Indians were BOt 
capable, uiiit-r sncb instrociion a* thev received, oC 
raising tbemselves to tbe level of Snanisb civiiixa^ 
lion. It woald have been a great TuliCortnae rur 
California to have been oocUpied ia 1S46 by a 
Indian popnla'^iou, ignorant, fanancal, idla, 
hostile to foreigners ano to foreign ideas, manaara. 
machinery, and mode of w.>rkiug. Taere wusli 
have been ii: tie room for Americans, and tbe fnr 
who woold liavu come would have foaad tbeniaalTM 
powerless uiLess tbey submitted themselves tvbaaa 
orejudices, and thai sacnficed a large part of tbalr 
superiority. Tbe Sta e might have sirocgtad tor 
centurifs before its iubabitants reacaed the aicbsMi' 
level of civilization, as tuey havo now doue inaaiiki 
gle generation. ^ 

'ihe most notable bcilding of gaa Franciaoo^ li • 
historical point of view, is tbe Mission Clbucvta, 
which was e'eo ed m tbe laat oeotui-y ; bnt we bav* 
no record of either its bsgluning ur compleooa.. 
Ten yearx is not an nureasonable period to asanma 
as the interval between the founoaiion of 
siou aod the final oonseoration of ita 
bouse ot worship. Tbe work was nearly aU 

uv the ladians, who had to oe previoosiy oouTvnM, 
conciliated, instracted ia Spanish ^d la v^iiovs 
a.-eiut arts nnkDOwa to tbem in tneir aivage atare^ 
Th^ making of a sappiy of adobe.^ au£Scient rorsooh 
a buil.iing was a simple process ; but U xeQuired m 
coiubiuauon and persisteucee in la'oor beyood OM 
experiencu of the red men of Califumia. It warn 
neuesssiy. also, to get timbers tor ratters, aad ovstt 
if we suppose tbat these were notliiiig tnu rod* 
poles, we must oonsider that tu p. ace tbem oa rhe 
ground was a serious task. Bren aa late aa IStd^ 
uot a good wagon or a goiMl boat had been madai, or 
even purchased, for ordinary bosisesa purposes br 
any Spauish-Calitomian ; audit la probattie that 
many of the timbers used m bniidlue In tb«]aat 
Century were transported from tbe toreatsoa (!>• 
shoulders ot meu. 

Oiher matters raqaired attention befm* th* bfdl^ ■ 
lag of ine oburcb. The ereccioo of dweliutaa tarn 
the friars, soldiers and converts, tbe calrivatio* oC 
the grouud and the uerding of tb« cattla, took vn- 
"^^eucr- All mis went verv alowly, beoaaaeoith* 
alMolure ignorance of tbe Indiana, ot whom tiuff 
were tor year* very few. The first oonvoru w^ 
made to 1777, when three were baptised ; aud vt 

n'4ve no lopuii of tha ui^mbeca trom ikiat time anMl 
nS3. when there were ia San Fraociaou 9G0 
rou Chnstians. In 1730 there were 354 ; tue aveiv 
age increase was abuai thirty in a year, and not 
mi.re than one in four waa an adult maia. competeat 
to 00 much woric If tbe Indian learned to apeak 
8pinlsh, *o break bursas, to h«rd oaiUa, to plow. 
sow. retp and thrash, to make ana Uy adodea, mm 
and to cut and hew umber, and besidoa bails t^oir 
dwellings and their cbnrcb witbin tea ye rs, tb^ 
must have been driv.n harder than ji waa tbe ou«- 
torn of tbe triar tu drivn tnem In later years. 

Tbe cuutch when first bn It was uoabtleas 
thatched with reecs, wbicb could be ubcaineo witt^ 
i.at tro:2bi(> and support*d-on light polee: wheraaa 
the molding and burning of tiles were oompii^ 
lively absirnse art5, aud tbe tiles when made !•• 
a aired a atrong framework to bear their wei^chb 

We do not find any aucoont tbat toe MtsaiBa 
Church of San Francisco was ever rebuilt or 
seriously injured. An earthquake in laos sbau«r*d 
t he houses at tbe Presidio, bat tne anuaol rsport •! 
Fnsr Aoelia for that year mentioss bo dama g e nM 
tue Mibkioo. In 1813 the churuu at San Joan Caot*- 
iraiio was thrown uuwo, anl tbe baildui;is at Parta> 
sima, SanU Inea. San ilnenaveutora, and Sa«U 
Barbara injitrea. but San Franci»co waa apareo. t»« 
It WHS again la 1818, when Santa Clara aofflsrod so 
mnch by earthqaake that anew church wtu cracnd. 

Since tbe AmeIi<^anB tooK possession ot tha <>aaB> 
try, tbe tiles ot the Misel -n Charca and ol lAe 
priests' residence adjacent have been repiaood ay 
shingles, which make a mnch lt(rht«rroof; CMUMI 
has been recoustrncted and iba ittterior reneirad, 
but tne walla and some of tbe aneie m or o a m a wM B 

tioD renuiD. ^he adobe bmldiogs oo SIximqU 

street in tront 01 the ouurch wars erected tor tlM 
couveris, but umat of ,*iieir boosea have diaa» 
peared, tor at one time tbey must have eeoapsM 
more than a hundred dwellings, and nut a dusaa to 
main. 



^' - 



S-.i 



*:- 



TEE FOSSIL FOOTPJSIIfTS. 



'■'"'S- 



ANOTHEB SIDE OF THE SrORT— SOM« 1CT8>. 
TERIOC8 CIRCL'MSrASCHS — ^DOUBTS MM 
TO WHETHER IHEY ABB GKyClSK, 
From the Hartford Post, Oct. 14. 

There seems to be a diflEerenco of opinion aA 
to whether the atones cjutaining fossil fajtprli|iv 
found on the farm of Henry BaicK. in iTorta Ca»>.* 
ton, are or are notgeoume. Certainly Uwrkar* 
the appearance of being S". andno scientido goatf^ 
men compettsnt in rough experience in suca matton 
to pronounce iudgment have yet seen tbem. A itr. 
William Dooliitie, claiming to hail from H*w-Tor^ 
purported 10 hsTe purchased them from Mr. itaiok 
tor tlOO. anOFndsy evcuxug thev were at tbe St. 
Johu'o Hotel for Several hours npen lo inspeotioa. 
Among I be gentlemen who aaw tbem waa i>ru£ J, 
Hammond TruBu bull, who thought tbey war* no<; 
genuine, and, on the contrary, that it was anotber 
Cardiff Giant hoax. 

Several reasons ior this theory are riven. In «na 
first place the edges of the two ston::s are similar 
in contour, which ia regarded as su.picious. Ajcaia. 
Ibe indenuiions in tne lower stone are clear aad 
perfect, and this could scarcely be tbe caoe with tba 
genuine article, for 8*nd or otber d6uru woolil 
most liEely have drifted in after the depressions 
were formed end before the other atratam ol 

satid had formed over them. In no p?erlm 
instancs have any impresaions ao' perfect ia 
shape been discovered. Too peealiar lor^s . 
of the great and liitle toes in the mau'a foot DSirs 
been noted berore. and lead to the saspicioa tbot 
they were made from a rough wooden mold vro* 
pared with little care, and by some inextMtrienoad 
person. Tbe compoeiiion of the stonea could nut be 
readily ascertaineu, as tbsy wore coated on the ou^ 
side wiiiia thin sarl'aee of mingled day aud flaa ' 
sand, and ibe owners wore careful not t«» penail 

auv outiiug to delermine the character of Um Uum» 

materia!. ~ 1 "\ 

Mr. Kaick is an old resident of Caatoa aad aa 
douui believbs tbat the stone* are geuuine. toat be 
was uot pib.Heui when the stones were taken ttoa. 
the earth by the workmen, and. in fact, the? could 
previously have oeen taken to hU farm in the mebt 
time ano placed where tbey were discovered. Tba 
actions ol the purchaser, Mr. D-Kilitlle. ate »on*^ 
what suspicious, tbougb they may bare l>eeo aU 
re"ulat. Tiie landlord of tbe St. JuUu's reports 
mat Doolittle came to bis bouse ihuraday evanms 
viitha thick-set man, aud alter looking sroaud 
for a while and Ulkiog in low tones with bu ooooc 
paiiiou left tbe premises. Shortly after Mr. ituick'a 
arrival Ihe next morning with tbe stones ou bia 
wa.on, Mr. Doolittle and his companion made thuiF 
appearance and were the first 10 mingle In tba 
crowd that gathered arouod the vebioio. Ha flnaliT • 
stated that he had bought the stooes, and an •»• 
pioye reports that bs saw writings pass betweeiv 
Doolittle aad Kniok and that they aubar^aenliT 
Wfut off together for a short time. Towara evouinic 
became to tbe proprie. or and asked iteiiaission to 
store the r..lioB in tbe bot«l uetil ne oould 
ship them, stating tbat be Intended »» 
lake tbem to New-Haven or JTew-York. or 
possibly ro r. T. Baruuni at Bi: lc> port, m 
whom be hoped to flud a i,urcha»»r. Pormiasloa 
wasgrautea, and after dart Dooliiilo brought ai 
wo-don box to the hotel, packed the stouaa la it 
surrouivlsd with atraw, nailed " "•'.•'l',*^'?,^*" 
marked on it m pencil. "Wm. DoolitOo. Krldir*. 
port. ' Late in the evening h» mad* an eacacoa*«e« 
with Mr UcorgeF. Wr.Kbt.of Jlariford. wbouaomo. 
what versed in such mailsrs. to exhibit the sf»»aa 

to buu at 9 o'ci.Kig this '""'V'"'? ..^"^•^"V-Si^^i.- 
o'clotikbecamfcto ths hotel with aa expiaasmaa 

I ano removed tbe box witboui giving *»» «*P'^ 
lion. This is all t hat can be «?*';"*f„*^?»» ^^ £2 
to-day, and there l» no foundaitoo o» which to baao. 
a p.-siiive stalouibut as to whether the aff^"" « ««>• 

LUWe ot » li"«t con«oct<4 jnerelr M * iPOCUWttfcu 



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TMJB REAL ESTATE MARKET. 

. Dm following basiuM* wm traauot«d «t tl)« 
]lTCbaose yeatierday, <^Iaiid»r,) Qou 10 i 

i^ H. Mallw & Soo, by ord«r of tb« Saprtme 

Oeorr, in forecloaofv, Thamaa D. CottnAn, Esq.. 
noferef, aold* briek stcble. wltk lot 85 by iUO, on 

West 40 h St., norti) ildcS^S toet Mito'^thaT., 

/nr $8,0i)0. to Georfi^o- A. n..«dler. 

B. v. Harnett, ander • Sapreae Court foreoloaare 
Older, J. M. Lerv, Esq., Jtoforto, sold ■ atoae 
•hniott. mth plot of puid 75.5 by lOO on Madison 
»T., uortb-e*»t corner of 47th ^t., for $34,000, to W. 
7. Moore. X^p umt aifcUon^er, nader slall^r 
««0rt order, William G. DaWitt. Esq., Rdfe^e^ 
dilDOMdof two Lore, each 25 by 103.2 ca East 78tn 
it, toatb udo, 60 feet etst of 4th av., foi flO.ttM, to 
a. W. Plnld, jplolatilTiu ibe legal action. 

S. A. Z.awrenoe & Co., by order of the Supreme 
Cot^.-.ln torecluAure, B. C. Choiwood. Eaq., B«fere». 
ielrt one flve-storv briJK tooensent hg^^o, with lot 
fiS by IlO on EA<*t iBih nn, nurih aide. 15J loot aatt 
V< »a av., jur SaiSO lo Anae A. tforaa, plaintiff <n 
tbe letcal pn>ce«>iiinfrs. 

V.K. SteyeoiiOD, Jr, alio under a Sapreme Goort 

tM«cli>8ure Older. H.£. Xallmaase. E-iq., Rerotee, 
told one Qve-AtorT brick tooi*meat-hou«e. with lot 
•5 Of 00. Q.I lit av , enf I tide, V leet aoaib ot 47rb 
•t., for (0,133 to iiaaiael S. Ct^ostaat, piaintiill Tta 
Muie anuiiouoer. uiioior aimilar ouurt order, aame 
R?teree, SiJd ooe tiirco-atory and baaenifot brnwu- 
»ioue I root house, iri»h lot 19 by lOCll, on E^at 
lS4ih St, tnutli Aide. 13-J.6 leet west of 1st ar., for 
t>.UOO lo Meuhaniofr' and Trader*' lire Inanrance 
Couitfaiiy, ptaintiit 

',^t:e lu.lutfin;; Jexal sales were a<\Joamnd t Sale 
bv £. V. Uaruetfeof twn lets oo 5th av., nortb-ea*! 
abrnt^r Sl^t au. to Out. S3; sale by V. K. Stevenaon, 
tT.. of a Uuitso, witlt lo(^ on liast 37tb at., east or 2j 
k*.. tQ •aa>e iIhio; sale by A. J. Uiuecker A Son of 
tot on B<s( ttlat St.. east of Sob av., tu same date, 
a«>l aals bf James M. Miller of tbe batldinst, with 
*iot of land, Kos. 441 and 443 Canal at.. weaC of 
^artok St., tu ^or. l& 

to-dat's Avcnonn. 

To-day'a sales, all at thsSxcbaojie, are as follows: 

By K. E. Cuatea, Supresse Cjurt toreolusure sale, 

fl. K. Wmidward, Esq., Keft-ree, of a house, with 

lot 'ii by 99 9. on East ■iOtb at., north side. 175 feet 

W*Mt <lt l.t( »▼. 

By Bernard Smyth, Supreme C'mrt foreolonure 
•ale of tliirt«en lots. eacU 35 by 103.2, on 1st «T., 
s<'>iitti-west coriuT 103J at. 

By William Keuaudy. Sapenor Court foreelosnre 
Mi«>, J. J. f reediuao, Esq., Beteree. of a plot of 
laou U5 by 154.S by Ut6.7 uv 13(.i.9, un Emi 52i si., 
eimsh »iviu,'iao teat w«ai ol In ar. Also, Suprnme 
Cuort ioreciodure sale, W. C. Conner, E-q., Shorilf, 
ot one lot 25.8 by 100, on Sib av., sooth-eitat ooruer 
•r 7dih St. 

Uv B. V. Hv'aet*> Saprerae Coart foreoloanre 
aalc, S. il. MorehoasB, Esq., Retrree, of a plot of 
land MA by 100, on 11th ar., soutii-east oorner of 
60:h sL. Also, similar sale, Georife A. Halaey, Esq., 
Kcteree, of a plot of laud 145.3 by 290 by 14u bv 241, 
on Walton av., oadt atae, 179 feet uurth of OroTO 
•'.. West Morrisania. Also, a plot of liind 150 by 
•Jri. oi: Walton ar.. east side, adjoining above. Also, 
iiureo osare sale, by ordor ot the Conft or Comoioa 
fi^aa, F. \V. Loow, Saq.. Retere», of tbe Duilding, 
%itb lot iS by 100, Hu. 63 Sheriff sk, west siae, 135 
f^et 80U(U ot fiiviuscon st^ 

EXOHASeS SALJit>-MOyDAT, OCT. IB. 

KSWTOBK. 
BgJl, a. MuUtr ^ aan, 

4 brick stable, with lot. West 40tb si,, o. a. 

3^5 tLe. oftithav.. ]ot24xiaU $8,050 

_ " By B-r. HarntU, 

I atone ebnreli and plot of Iaa:i, Madison ar., 

-&.■>. oonier uf i7vb at., plat 75.6xIU0 $3i,000 

. 9>ocB,iast 7itli St, s. a., 6bft.e.of4tbaT., 

eaou' i5xHW.2..» 10,600 

Bv S. A. LaKrtnct 4 CA 

1 Sve^atorr brick teneiwat.boase, with lot. 
liaat^tb St., □. a, Huh. a. of ^ av.. lot ^5 

XiJO {.. $8,160 

/ By v. K, SUaenton. Jr. 

• Cve-story bick tenement-boaae, with lot, 1st *■•• 
ir., f. e., 2j ft. s of 47tta ot. lot 25x60 S9,1S5 

X taree-etorr and oaaemenc urown-atone front ' 
boas*, with lot. Hast l:J4tb st. a a, 19u.9 ft. 

^. af 1st ST.. lot iaiau(/:ii o.ooo 

HSOORDED RE A L KSCAIB TEASSFEBS. 

NEW-TOHK. 
SatwrOati, Oct. 14. 
M BT.. n. «. oorner of 115th St.. 60.10x80; A 

Aold and bosband to a H. Glover $65,000 

iand->.-rd St.. o, s . 11H> ft. w. of Thomas av., 25 

X9;^3. (Z4t0 Ward ;) »>'■ uoogan and wifd to 

to L. V. Fulin 400 

Ueuoe c. e. a, aii5 /t. a. of CIUT st, 7exlb9.t}X 
' irnsKaiar, (23 i w'ard;)C. DecKeraudbasbiind 

Ho M. K .X. Wheeler 8,000 

S84 St., n. a. 7d ft. e. of Ibtb av.. lUOzlUJ.o ; 

aiso Ittb av.. e. a. 75 ft n. of 63 i St., '^5x 

75 ; M. &nck and busbsod to C. Seldner 80,000 

Had aon av.. e a.. -Jati ft a. of 8Jtb itt., 25.6x 

IDO i also 8k>tb St.. a a. XOU ft e. of MndUon 

ST., -JdxlO::.^ ; also Sc av., e. a., V!6 ft. r. of 

87U)St..S)7.axl0k^: L. Puydam to J. du vd^m. 40,000 
CcioB PUoe,e. S.. »U ft. n. of I4th St.. '.29x9j; 

aiaoBbib at., n. s.. between 9U and 4tb »va.. 

50x10; a^iaetoaame 27,600 

UStii St.. u a. 18o ft. e.oi4thav.. 20x100.10; 

alao e7tb St.. i>. s , ^H.i fl. W- of 2d ay. Id 8x 
- lUti.b ; tieor^js B. anuth aaa wils to E. a. 

frnoiuer nem, 

tSUi St.. a r.. 16U It. w. or ath av., t6x9».8| 

J..Jeraaii« and wlte to L A. Terbane. 10,000 

S8th SE , a. V. uornsr of J trtb av. , irre^lar, (7 

luta> i & v. Tbomal and buiband to it. L. 

Lex/ctt i..,. non. 

lOih av.. a w. (O'lavt of 68th at., (4 lo;8) ; 8. 

Cpaoa and wife to 8. V. Tuorual 14,000 

Ktii aU. a. a., 3.>(t ft. w. of lOfh »v., 26xlu0.5: 

B. Ci>aou auU wiie to H. Beid 3,000 

Mnv.. w. i, 60 fl. n. of llStb at., «Ux9J; T. 

WTiruke anil hoaband to F. iiohuet som. 

.Jtb.-t.. n. s.. ISdit w. ol ad av., 26x97; F. 

ceheil. S«feiee, toP. bcavy.... 10,800 

Grant at. ^o. oSd, 75 a. ot Ko.folk st.. ;;5x 

l.b.J. 6. 8iue!air, Baferee. to M. J. Law- 

ItlL <.t., a. s . 'J7U n. t. of 'ill ar-. 2^xlU3.J; 
Jt a, Aewcombe, Keferee, to U. ttyers... 11,000 

*'iiii ' ' '1 . .1 

CITO REAL ESTATg. 

FOB HALIi IIRBXtJqANOE^^^^toTlirTUATKD 
en a'vromiueat corner of eth av. will oe soid a bar- 
ptiu, or wil. be axcbanged fbr a dwelilnir eli^bly ait- 
a»t*>u: verj little money required provided the pnr- 
stiaa«<r aiu improve tbe anme forthwith. Address l>r. 
P. bma. Wo. \6H * est 44tb tt 

Si^O i\f\{\ -*■ t'ovu-svoav ao-FooT 

V<-'"9^""*oxusDaiuu raaidencc. 39. h at., ad- 
|«ua&K tt.e avtuue. Mo. i fine or Ao. 38 bast 17th st. 
V. K. bTliVB|i8u8l, Jk. 

^i<rH~TAEF~o5~~BXC5ANGaI5liSTr5EISi 
A teueioaat propert.7 on tba iuac aide, to oxcbaoze 
for a wcUiam-Mse dweUlnf-uoase, ll^tly incumber^ 
10 ft sood utsiibuorliood. Address ONV.<)Klt. Station D. 

I ' ' 1 I I I wmm 



■'*,*:■ 






I 



'^^ 

:^-: 



COUNTBy KKAL JgTAXK^ 

OHAjma. N. J,— CUUSI'RY HUUSKS. LAHDI. 
aikdvilian uttM tor sal*-, ame^it vorisir Alau 
turuiaiied and aaftuuisbed ilQuaos tu let for aeasou or 
>3e»r. bv WIlTkk b. «MiTH, lorm^Hv BlaubweU k 
IPHth.Oi-uiiice, corner ufftain and Oonesta. 

BEAL EST ATE AT AUCTION. 

f N VUB DlJiTKIt; P VpVHT OF TH« ONITED 

JU^ausa for tb« District of 5ew-Jeraey.— In th« mat- 
JOrof KUWAKD J. W.\TM.i and HLNRI CDW.'^I.vq- 
UiA. baakrapts.— !n puisaaooa of an order m^de and 
li;«d bereiu, ocarin; date tue 5to day "t cioptember, 
Ia76. I wi'l ex;>ja« an4 a«ll at pablid auotiea at tlie 
Ff ukbp bou»«, in tbe * ity of Pati-rsoii.New-Jersey, on 
tb« ^Sttt day f October, 1876. at iX o'clock A M.. the 
I»la>w;iii{ds8crtbi:d preiti.oes to wit: AU that ccrtaiu 
lodeuiuru of leaae made by the Daniorth liocomorlve 
and JSaabine Cumoany to one tidward o. Jdffray. dated 
lliiy I, .^869, aiid iiuly recorded in the Cierii's offlco of 
i^aa.ilc Ccnnty, in tUe State of New-Jersev, in Boole B, 
H ol Deeda for aaiu county, p. 447, ko.. of the toilo iving 
deMiribed premtaes : Br^nutnjc at tbe south edge of 
tbn wu}l of tbe present middle canal at a pDlnt one 
biindred and tbce<j feet westerly iirora the north-west 

rve <tt tbe lot foTm*;riy bocnpled by Caleb 
Godwin; theace runnlnx westerly aloo;: aaid 
wall irioctj-sevan Csei to lue nortb-f^st corner of tbe 
lot. sold, by ibo ttocietr for E^tabtiabinx Oai;ftal Maoo- 
(betorva to P. LorillarJ. Ksq , Ibenoeaonbberly alone 
thi tiue of htslot about one hondri'd and seveii; v feet 
to tbe line of Coueres) atreet; thence easterlj "alone 
the tine of Oon/iess street ninety-saveu feet, and 
*b«o<-e aertbcrly about one bandred an>l seventy teet 
tethepiace of bejtiiiiiin^.lt boiu(t the w ausrn ha^f of 
the lut leased bv thi said society to cue James Khepard 
by ludenturoof leaae, dat'd the thlitiutb day of Jan- 
uary, 18J7. which ieaaa la reoordrd In Clerk'a office of 
tho Couniy of Kenex m Boole V,. 2 of Deeds, pagd /id, 
fcc, Kiiyther with the rt«ht and privilege of taking 
^iid usiug ai>on tba aaid lot froia tbs iiresent mtddln 
canal of tba aaid aooi-ty, one foot aqaare of water, 
eqoal to oue hundred and »orty-four aqairo ineheii 
or water, to bd taken aad used noiipr orrtatn 
oonditioua. reatriollo'is. and limitations mentioned 
111 tbe aloreaaiii indenture of lease, and in said inden- 
tures "I lease tbereio uientionsil and tlieteby renewed, 
pattii'Ulanv a i^citleJ aad tua unexpired t<rm of 
years therein mentioned, and all ttie wat^r rlxbta and 
PTl^leava thereby ;aauted, aud all the right, title, and 
iniareatiuaiild loi ot laud thereby created, ana alLtbo 
rlxbc, title, and interest qt the sala Watson it Dun- 
Biuxbaa) lu atad to said laiaaa and tt.e unexpired term 
of veara. Water rights and priviiefcea and lot of laud, 
aud at. in, and toall ttiDMreements. ooreqants, and 
provisiona of the said leaae, and a.l tbe ilicht. title, 
and ititerest ot said Watson k Cuunlnciiam of, in. aud 
to tbe ongioial leases in said lease ineatiouud, subject, 
however, to all tbe a^jreements. ooreounts, 
and provisiooa In aaid renewal ot lease 
aud sbid oti){lDal leiases therein obligatory 
np.>n or to lie observed, kept, and performed by 
aaid hssseoa therein named, or by ibetr aastjrQa. 
And alao all tostoertalo ladectnre of leaaa made by 
tbe -society for Kstabll^hl^c Uaelul Uanufactures to 
ofaeliMaardU. Jaffiay iatxd .May 1, 18o9. and duly 
recoMl«d In tbe Cle:k's Ufioaof Passaio Oauaty, in 
Book U. 3 ot Dee.<a lor aaid countr, P- 44 1 , Itc, or i he 
foli'Wiug deacrtbed premiaes, v.z : The privilege of 
takiataul diaurlni; fronraaid middle canal in the rear 
of Siiid loi, t*o buiHlred and eigUty-oigbt square inches 
OI water, strict lue^aqr'-, to oe used on satU lot ud ler 
cartuin ooaditioait, restrictleua, ana limitations, and in 
t|Ui oiaiinei as i.-^ lu said indenture of lease, aad in said 
indeutiirt"* of .enso thernia lueutioned ami thereby ro- 
T.ewed, uartioulrirlv soeclhed. and the unexpired term 
of years tbi-rela uientionrd. and all tbe wgcer riftbta 
an. priviieitea thi rui>y gtiotad, aad ail the riEbk, 
tlt|f. aud Intaieat oi said kVat^on and Cunmngbam ol, 
f}\, aud :« saM leaae, uuexuiri-d term of year., water 
rltflita and prlvUe 'e<, ard of, m, auil to all the 
eOvansiits and piovutuna or tba sai<l leaae. Aud also all 
tlieir riKbt. title, an-i inteceac of tu, ana to tbe oiigi- 
ual leaeo in ifcid io'se an iva mentioned, *iih)eot how- 
ever, to all t^a agreeineuts. coven mts, uud provisions 
Ix) iiaia rruewui o~ lease ami saM oilKinal lease tlieielu 
Ai'llCHtory upon or to o« obsi^rved, kept, a^>d perfonued 
by tbe BHid lesace i tb<-rstu tiame<l i r by tbetr usdcas. 
Also .-111 the liuildiiig*. wat'T-whi el. and upright sbatt- 
tng ap<>ii the premises described in the first alMv« 
muutloned Indenturu of lease, made bv and between 
tue Uanforth Locoinolive and Maobine Company ot tbe 
first part, aud the said Bdwara S. Jaffcay of the second 
tnrt.— Unteii tfat«rM>B. popt 12, lil^a 
kuBLH HKATK, Jr.. No. 88 ObsBuers st. Msw^Tark. 
AMilinee of tsdward J. WbtaOS mbA Bear? Cnnmng- 
{UM. Bankniaf^ „ «S«Uaw4W11«i^ 



"i- *+,j 




AoKiaK H. HtjLUR, Anctjoneer. 

£STATS OB* WIL.L.IA.n SPBNC£B, DB- 

CEAHBD. 

SALS BT ORDER OF TUB 5EWT0ItK 

bUPttriMB CODliT. 

129 VALUABliK l<OT9 

ON BBDFOBD, N03TBa.Nt>, LKZI'iGTOH, GBESirE, 

ei'H^ AND 7Ttt AYS., 

JBFFEMO», HAiriOCK, VAN BURBM. 8TH, AXD 

9TH 8TS,, 

IN Cirr OP BROOKLTiT, 

to be aoid at aui;tion 

On WBDNKSD.VY, OCT. 18, 

af 12 o'clock, at the 

EXCnAIfOB 8AL63£<>OM, tiO. Ill BBOABWaT. 
NKW-rOEK, 

BT OBDER OP THK NEW-lfOUK SDPKKMB COtJBT, 
nader tke direction q/ Ueruutti D. Aidricb »od Saoiuel 
Wyuan, Jr., Executors, 

asid aitoatcd as follows: 

Besfobd AV.— Ibree lota, weat aide, between Fulton 
av, and Uancoek st 

Hancock it,— Six lots, north sldo, and four lots, south 
side, oel weeu Uodfar.1 and Krauklin uva. 

JcrVEBioKST.— Two lots, south slue, between Bedford 
and Vraiiklin avs. 

5'usTnA.vo AT.— fiisht lots, comprtsioK the'entlre east- 
erly ftont, Uotwecn tireeuo av. and Van Buroa St.: also, 
four lots, south-east corner of Nostrand auit Lexington 
arn., and fotir lots south -vresc corner of Nostraad and 
Lcxiagtoii avB. 

Vas bVKKS IT. A3D GRBK5a AV.— Twenty lots, run- 
niii;^ ihrouiib from street to avenue, and between {loa- 
trund and Bedfor<l avs. 

Ohrrke at.— Twelve lots, south side, 100 feet east 
of Bodiord av. 

LaxixciToif AT.— Eight lots, north side, in the rear of 
the reeue av. lots. 

LEXiif(}To:i av!— Twelve lots, south side, 100 feet 
west of >08traud av. 

bxnyoao AT.-Koor lots, sonth-eut oortiei of Greene 
av. 

6rH Airo 7th avs.. 8tk awd 9th bts— Fortr-two Iota 
in the block bounded by btb and 7ib avs., 8tb und 9tb 
sts. 

Kany of tbe avenues and streets on which these lota 
are l<>c»ted are SEVVEaSD, PAV£D. AKO LIQUTBD 
WITH GAS, 

Fif y per ceat. laay remain on bonl and mortgage. 

Book m^itw Ht the olBoe ol' 

ACElAiS H. MUbbER k, SOS, Auctioneers. 

Ko. 7 Flue St. 

Di Witt, Lockka^ t Kip, Attornpys, 

No. 88 Nassau st. 

By AnitlAX U. Ml;i.lkr k. 83X, Anctioneers. 
THUUSDAT. OCT. JO. 

At 12 O'clock, at the ExcbaTine Salesroom, No. Ill 
Broadway, important aale of 354 IiOl'S in parcels, 
tiauuaocuelv eituaied on Fonlham UeieliM, Twenty- 
tonrth Ward, with 765 feet ot water front ou Uarlam 

River This property is reached in tuirty mlautes 
ftrom Grand Central Depot: titty per cent on mortgage 
lor three yoara. For paridculurs and mapa. apply to 
tho auctionrcra. No. 7 Pine st. 

.A URIAH H. MrLLSa, iuotioneer. 

HOUHB AM) I.Or MO. 147 WEST 27TH 
.ST. AT Al/'CTIO.V. 

At>RIA."( H. MULLKR k. SON wiil sell at sue ion on 
TUIiSDAY, Oot i7. at 12 o'oIock, at tho Kxchango 
Sales-rnom. No. Ill Broadwav : 

WasT TwBNTT-SBVBHTB 8TRR»T. — The three-story 
brlek boiue anJ lot sltuito on the northerly bide of 
West 27tb St. between 6th and 7tli avs., No. 147. 
Lot. 19.1 by 0!:i.9. 



FIB!!«T>CLA»iS INFLUiNl.SHEO HUU8F8 
TO LhT.— t7th st. corner of Broadwjy. thieo 
atorlvB, size. '20x.>OxlU!), in go id order: 4.^tb at., be- 
tween droadway and 6th av., three stories, 17x45x 
mo. Will bu pat in excellent order ; 48th aX.. neur oth 
av.,four stores, 17x53x100, with oitrpels, mirrors, 
ahaidea, Itc: 49th st , near Madison av., four stories. 
21x50x.Ui>,in good order; 51st St., between 5th and 
6tb avs.. foar stories. 16.3xo0xlilU ; 54th st., between 
5th and 6th avs., three storiea. ',2.^x50x100. 
B. W. WIlblAMS. 
__ • Ho. 8»7 6tb av. 

O I.BT— TO A PRIVATii FAiJILlf FOtt TrfB 

Winter or lonaer, a very saperlor hoa-=e, very fbUy 
and han<lsomelr rumisbtyl; wnter runs free on all tbe 
floors ; fiztf, toor-ator.v brbwn-stone higb-stoop, V0x6U, 
and dining-room on panor floor; eituut d i.ear tfie 
central Paik al 83.1 st: owner going to Lurope. Apply 
to iloMBii MUHQAN, Na 2 PI e St. 

PARTNEIST NO. 17.-E1GHT BOOMS IN THR 
"Saratoga" to let; $7o; several in the "Orleans;" 
V^o to $4U ; three-story brown-stone house, near Park 
and Elevated itoad, *9li0. J. \V. hTHVhS8, 

baratogi bunding. Broadway aud 52d st. 

'WEL.tAfiCi'HOVSE 'fit I.BP FOitNtSHED.— 

A family of thrre adults would rent their house to 

a gentleman upd wife nnd take rent io board. Adareas 

8. D„ Box No. 263 TiMBa DP-TOWN OFFK'ii. No. 

1,257 BROADWAY. 

Oijn ^ »I«»N1'H. IfUilNlSHEll.— A PRKfTT 
*5P^v/cottage, seven rooms, at Batneriurd P. rx, N. 
J., tifty miuutea fiOm .Ifeir-X'ork : near depot : on best 
av. Address E. (J. T., tost Office Box 4Ba, New-York. 

PAU'lMKNTS.— TE.STBRDliN, NO. 28a WkST 

25tb st or amall tamlliei; brown-stone; light; 

ve^itiUte I ; Oiiei win jowa ; Jackson's grates; eleomt 
gab-flxfurt-s ; soacious garden : $480 to $1300 ; janitor. 



T.« ILKT VKRY BLKQiNi', PAHriALlif-KUB- 
nlshed EngUsb-biMement biiuse, centrally located, 
tor Winier < r longer. Addresa, wiibname, RYAN, Box 
No. ^92 XmKH Utf-TOWN OFFICE, 1,257 dBOA pw..Y. 

UULCiiU KEM'S.- i^Kt? CiAfLSTS FUtt- 
jjisbed and onfuruiahed lists. Offices 4 Pine or 33 

Diast 17tb st 

Y. K. 8TBY SNB0S, Ja. 

O t.E r— FDESlaUKD— A NICE HoOiK AT UUB8'3 
Ferry; ten rooms; ten miuutes' wh Ik from depot ; 

with large lot; rent r^-duced to :£6U0 per annum. F. 

BfibP, No. 119 Broadwav. 

NbLEQANTPliAl'TOLEl'— liNFURNIiiUbD; 
Ave rooms ; rent $1,000 per annum. No. 7l Lex- 
ington av. 

O LET.— FIKST STORT AND BASlillKNT AND 
aeconi story of nousa No. 153 West 28th St.; terms 
reaaonaole and all improvements lu. 



rpo LET— AN OFFICE IN THE TIMES BUILDING. 
•*■ second floor, 23 feet by 23 leet. In good condition, 
suitable for a lawyer's office. Apply to 

GEOaOB J0NB3, 

Tima Office. 



KLNANOIAL. 



VERMILTE 

&ca 

BANKERS 

to 9mi4l 18 Aasitan mUt^ewTTU. 

' 9JULKBS in AZX IBBDBfl OF aOTBBHUBSTr 
^ECUaiTIKS. 

FRW-TOaH CITY 

AKl) BROOKLTN BONDS. 

BtTT AND SELL ON COMMISSIONS 

KAII..WAV HTOfJKS, iIU\Uei. AN» GOL.D. 

INTEREHT UN UEP0HITi4. 



VIAUB'V R. VERHILYK, 
JA.s. A. TBOWBRIUGB 



DONALD UACKAT 
LATHAU A. PISH 



Detroit, Mow iiToMDR,iCo.'s 

FIBST MOBTGAGB BOJiDS, 

DUE 3 BO0« Interest Sevea Per Oeut., due February 
andAorut Total issas, 99 24*000 oq 62maesor 
road, WITH NO OTHBB DESr 09 Ai(V O.B JOSIPFION. 

P:iINaPAL and INTBREST ODARANTBED by the 
LAKE 8HOEB AND MIOaiGAN SOUraEEiV BAIL WAT 
COMPANY. 

A LUUTBD AUODNT FOR SALE 87 

CHASI & ATKINS, Mm, 

NO. 18 BROAD 8TRBBT. N. Y. 

INVESTMENTS 

FOR MALE. 

ROCHESTER CITV WATER BONDS. 7 
Per Cent., Ke|rl*<«i^ed. 

BERGEN CITV (now Jersey City) BONDH, 
7 Per Cent., Registered. 

WATER JBONDb. 

STREET IMPROVEAIENT BONDS aad 

SEWERAGB BONDS. 

HATCH & FOOTE. 

NO, l:t WALL 8T. 

BROWN BROTH UR.<!l d(s CO.. 

NO. 69 W.aLL, HI'., 

U8UB COMMERCIAL and TRAVELSRS' CREDITS 

AVaILaBLB in aHPAIiTa of tbe WORLD. 

DiyiDBNm 

T'^'hB COVVVtSrir^OP THE BLESCIKER 
Street and Fulton Ferry Railroad Uomp.ny Bonds 
due July 1, 1875, January and July 1, lh76, wiil do 
paid ou pieaeataclon a^ ^io. I'S Weat 44tli at. by 

JOHN M. UaKLuW, Trustee. 
Naw-YoBx, October, 187 & 



UNION DIME SAVINGS BANK, 

Nob. 398 aud 30d CANAL ST., eorner of Laigbt aK 
Open dilly, Hi to 3, and Mouaay evenin.<i, 5 to 7. 

ASSETS OVER TWELVE MILUON DOLLARS. 
snaPLua over ons milho.n. o^d hUxN-dred 

TUOUilAND DOLLARS. 

N. J. HAl.SRS, President 
G. 8. CHAPIN, Treasurer. T. Fi,oTi>JoaB»,. Secretary 



___JPJD\BLI0_NOTI0ES^ 

LIIIRARY OF CONIjr'kmN, iNqT I1,«30 O, 
Jop.vrigiit Offloe, Wasbingtoo.- To wit: ljk it ro- 
meiubered, that on tha 14th dav of O.ituber, Anno 
DoDilni 1876. Banks k. Brotbera of .Scw-York. bava 
del OS ted lu thia office the iltle of a book, tho title or 
draoiiption of woloh is in tha foUowiug worda. to wit : 
Kepurts of oases argued and d^'utrmined in thi^ 
Supreme Court and in the Conrt for the ( orreoiion of 
Krruts of tbe State of Hew lerft. bv Hiram DpbIo, 
Conuseior at Law, v I. 4, New-York, Bfinks jl brother*. 
1876, the light whereof tbey clxim as proprietors, la 
eonfurntUv with thoUwa uf the United .stat-^s respect- 
ing capyrlgbts. A. R. 8POKFQBD, 
Al7.1aw4wTlS Iiihrartan ta Caonaa* 



TUE lli'-TUWN OFFtCil OK THE Tli.ntf4. 

T^ouIvtow^l offic* orT:lK TIMR.S Is located tt 

No>l«'^d7 Broadway, bnt. 3lsc and 3 ji its. 

Op«odai'.y. auaiiaya lanla la J. (tau 1 .^ A. 13 i) t*. If. 

Habscriptlous received. >andi:api as at TiiS rrji:iS i'>r 

sai& 

AnVBRTT.^BMENTH flKCatVrtn PWTTEi P. M. 

reaioval, and kedUceo pricks. 

WOOD BBOTHERS, 

OABHIJ.GE MANOPACTUaEBS, 

Hvye removed tbe entrance of tboii WareroomB from 

No. 74U Broadway to 
NOS. 40, Si, ANO 33 LAFAYETTE PLACE. 

In calling notice to tlie change, WOODBHOTHRRS 
invite atteUtiou to their cbofee stock of carefully 
made Carilagus of new and ar,ioafuI forms, maoulau- 
luredexpresHiy for tbs best City trade, undt)!- tbe pur- 
sonai sapt-rriHlun ot a memiier of tbe firm ol great 
experience, with special oara to durability and 
streugtb. as wellas that beauty of st In aiiT fine finish 
for wbiub ^h-y have so loug maiutaiued a justly 
earned reputation. 

Orders ft-om a distance, by mail, receive the same 
faithful attention as tboufli pieced in peraon. 
MED.^L and DIPLOMA at the t'entenuial Hxhib tion, 
1876, und 
PBIZE MEDAL at the Paris Exposition, 1867. 

FODR-IM-UANDS AND COACHIXQ-OARBIAGBa BE- 
CEIVE SPiillAL ATTKNTION. 

SHKRXPF':^ HAIjE.— (lY VIBTUB OF A WAR- 
rant of attaobment issued out of the {Supreme 
Court of tbe State of New-York, and also, by 
virtue of an Oder ot 8a;e granted bv Hon. 
George C. Barrett, Justice of said Court, on tbe 14th 
day of October, 1870, I will expose to sale at publio 
vendue, on .tfO.Sl/AY, the 'iH dav of October, 187d,al 
11 O'clock in the forenoon, at No. 264 Wis:^ 27th st,, 
two l>ay lioraea ; said horaea are closely matched, of 
beantiiul eolor, stylish, aal fxst, 

WILLIAM O. CONNER, Sheria: 
Jaxsi Fat, Deputy. 
Datep Oct. 10, ltt76. 

EIJU13.H.A HOUsiE BLANllf^T COiriPANV. 

No. 510 Broadway, oppante 8t. Nicholas Hotal, 

WILL OFFER AT BETAIL 

$yO.0ilO Hl'OOK Of GOODS, 

AT VVUOLK84LK PrtlUK LIST. 

A RARE Cd\Ni;i'; TO .-AVd MO.^BY. 

OK^ALE— A PAltt OF.siVLlStl Bl^iAilK PUNlEa, 
fourteen tiauds three inches bi'.!b, perfecti.v aound 

aud gent.e ; sold as uwaer has no further u:io for them. 

Apply at piiv ite stable, .No. 107 Last lt)th st. 

rilO LBT.— PKIVAl'd M'AUL8. cO. 14 i BASI' 32.) 
JLst.; room lor tbree lioraea; rent $65U a vh >r. Ap- 
pll' to M. 8. C, Siurterant House, Broadway and 
29th St. 

OKSK itttiAMriTJs CAttKIAGiC AND 

ntAVBLI.NG KOuilS in quciiitiiics and grades to 
Suit buyers. Piicea largely rednoed. 
HAHiWJiR. HAVw & CO.. .So. 72 Beekman st. 

TO LKT— HALF OF P&IVAT.'; rifABLK, WITH 
board ior two norses; room for two carriages. Ap- 
ply at stable, No. 120 Wtst 40th at. 

STKAMBOA'l'S. 

GREAT REDUCTIOill OF FARE 

BY PEOPLE'S U.sE TO .iLBANY. FIRdr-CIiAsS PASS- 
aQb only $1. 

Wm RiTor lij Mooiililt 

Cententual visitors can enjoy a viaw of the Oiist and 
most magutficent scenery ot the Ht ;blan Is on tho Kul 
son by traveling on th»'PB->PLt.'ci LINE" of eieg:*nt 
and commodious boita Passing (Peat Point and all 
places o> inlereacearly in tbe eveaing, and eoanectinx 
at Albany with ruorniog trains f >r Chicago and ail 
pointa NaBTU and Vf at>'f. Boatiile.tved;uiv i<t6 P. .a.. 
Sundays excepted, from pir-r .Vo. 4l North River, near 
Peuusylvama uallroad Pier, in NewsYork. State-rooms 
wstrmed oy st^am. Meali on tbe i:iuropeau plan. 

N. B.— Reirnlar Hudson River R ilwiiv tioaets taken 
andpasaage aud state-room berth allowed iu excbs:ige. 
All C'ei.teiiuial excnreiuii tickets good on other lines 
to Aloaiiy taaeu for passage and b> rth. 

IMPORMT NOTICE. 

THE CENTaNNIAL THAV£L. 

PEOPLE'S EVENING LINE 

of 
STGAHBR8 BETtVKBN NBW-YORK AND ALBANY. 

HUDSON RIVER R. R TICKETS TAKEN 
FOR PASSAGE AND STATE-ROOr^ BERTH. 

Centennial Excursion Tickets Taken 
forPaasas^e and Cabin Berth. 

STATE-aOOlIS WARJZED BY STEAM. 
MEALS ON THE bOROPEAN PLA.N'. 

STONINGTON LINE 

FOR BO!9TON AND ALL POl.VTit EiST. 

Elearant ateamrra BHODR ISLAVD anl ^ARRAOAN- 
.SKTi leuve Pier Na 33 North Rtver, foot of Jn v st , at 

6 P. -M. NOT A TRIP JU-SS <D IN SKVB.1 Y^AR-^. 

I1(;ket8 for sale at -M orinolp:^! tlolcet o'Sces. Stat J- 
room< seeure<I at xflloes of WesCcott dixpress Oumpauy, 
aud at No. 863 droadwuy. 

proViiJenck line. 

St«am-s!ilps klectra and Galntea^ leave Pier Slo. 27 
^n^th River, foot of Park ol^ne. iU4:30 P. M, Freiithcs 
viaeltbor liue tatceii at lowest ra'^i. 

D. 8. bABUOOK, Pres. L. W. Ktt,Ki;fs. Q. P. AgenL 

SEA BIRD, 

Gapt. H. B. F<EKER. will run between New-York (foot 

of KranVIin St.. Pier ^'o. iS5)and Rel Bank, as follows : 

■~ LKAVE RiiD B.-»NK. 

Tuesdjv, 17.... 7:0!) AM. 

Weduesrtay. 18. b:lX) A. Ji. 

Friday,, iiO 8:30 AM. 

Jlonilay, 23 10:00 A. M. 

Tuesday, 24. ...12:30 P. Al. 



LEAVB MsW-YORJS:. 
Tue djy, 17.... S:Od P. M. 
Thursday, 19. .> 9: lO A. M. 
Saturday, 21. ..10:00 A M, 
Tuesday, 24-... 8>3l> A. M. 



ALBANY AND TROY BY DAY BOATS 
C. VIB3AE1I AND D.*NIEL DoEW.— Leave Veatry 
Street Pier nt 8:lU, aud 24th St. at 8:'S<i A M., landiog 
at Weat Point, Newburg, Pougbkeepsie, Uhinebock. 
CatskiU, and Hodeon. CoabectionsatAlbHB.y with new 
train &X 8 P. M. tor the West, over Kew-Torit Central, 
aiTlving at Bui$.iIo at 7ilO, busp^osion Bridge 8::^D, 
and Magara Falla at 8:20 thfi following morning, 
t oniicuous trains on Lake Shore nnd Canada Southern 
Roads. To Weat Point Rnil >'<cwbarg and return the 
sanie (lay, $1. Pou^biceepsie, $1 SOi 

FOR.NEW-U.^VBMi. HAJtTFilltlJ. SPRIXQ. 
FlKLl), WHITE MODSTAt.NS, HOsTlE.lL, .V.'*.> 

hNTEttMEDlAru P0INr.i.-8te>inir» Irtiva Piar Sa. 
25 K«8t ttlverilaiiy (duiiday excepted) at 3 P. M. (23d 
at. E. v.. ;<:15f. M.») *ii I ll ?. M.. connecting with 
special trains at ^ow-Haveii, 'or H^rtforJ, .>prlngaL'til, 

kc. Tickets «oii and bagKagu chiul^ai at No. 944 
Broadway, NS'Viorit. sail .No. 4 t^outist., BrooklyiL 
Kxcuraion Co New- Haven and return. :S I 5 J. 

FOR NORVVALK OIRI^rT. 

donneotiiig wi''b Daiibnry, Morwalk anJ New-Haven 
Railroads, by steamer 

AMKKTCIH. 
datl.v, (Sanday exeeptel.) iroot Jewell's Dock. Brook- 
l,vn, at v:30 P. vi. pioi- »o, 37 E ut Itivsi-, at ,i:15 P. iL, 
and f lot of 33 J st . Kaat Hi ver. at » P, M. 

Fare. 35 oents: excursion ickets, 50 centa 

l.U>E!«YABLI»UiiD L.INE FOR tiTDY- 
VE3ANT, CAISKILI-, AND Lyi'KRHRDlATK LAND- 
INGS.— (Steamer ANDBKW U.MIDER. from Praiik.in at.. 
Pier H9, Tuea lav, Tbursdav, au..< Satur.lir. fSteamer 
M>/MITOR, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 5 P. .H. 

t|lORURn)i;»KP0liTA.VUALI. POINTS UN 
Hoiuatoaic ^d .Waagatusk Railroad.— l<'ar% iiil. 
Steamera leave ORchasliie 3itj> ir, xlr3J A. H. 

Hy W. B, >tiTCBsi.i., Auctioneer. 
pEREIU^TORY »ALE 

By ORDER OP TADNTON 8ILVEB PLATR COMPANY. 
For couveoleoco of sale, at atere f.o. 729 Broadway, 
ooxner Wuverley place, oomaienctug TUESDAY, tba 
17th. at 10 o'clock A. M., and continue daily uuiil the 
entire stock is aoid, the entire stock of tha 

TaON'TuN otLVES PLATE i;oaPANT. 
All rezular goods Oi their own munnfacturi^, new 
and elegaiit deaigos df; the iiusit quality and bearing 
their trade mark. -i 

POaJTIVKLY To BKiBOLI WITHOUT BE3EEVB 
AMupSTlNtS TO OVElt $60.(J(»0. 
Stock c6bsi3:s la purt of ten aets, urns, ice pitch'^rs, 
salvers, go dets, cake baskets. IriUt disuea, vases, 
mugs, castors, torks, spoons, A.c. 

In addition to above stock 
A LABOH I.NVOICE OH' FI.1K TABLE CUTLERY. 
Attention of dealei's is oallad to titls sale. 

MoRHis H'tLKiirg, Auctioneer, 
PaREMf I'Uiti: SALt; OF 

ELEGANT HOUSEHOLD FUKVITIIIZJS^ 

li80NZii.S, l5TAl'UKTrE.-,~5lANTt!ti 8ET, '— 
PAINTINGU A.SD E-NGiAVLSOS. 
FINE CARPliT.i, kc. 
B. H. LGDLOVV k ( O. will sell at auction ou 
THURSDAY, Got. 19, at 11 o'clock .\. M.. at luo pri- 
vate lesidenoe No. 7 West 37tb St., all tbe elsgaat 
furniture or tbe above liousp, const,iling of bl ick- 
waiuut par. or suita iu uatin and reps, parlor cabinets, 
centre tables, etagerea, marble statuettes, paiutinus 
and niigravlDCB, carved aiaciC-viraUiut dining exteusloa 
table, buffet sideboard, oblfoniecesaud chairs, carved 
black-walnut bedsteads, druaaiiig bureaus, commodes, 
lounges, escritoires, mantel SL-ts and ciocks, flue Turk- 
ish and ether carpets, curled hiilr mattresses, jto.; 
also a general assurtme^it oi onttnge furiiltui-e, kitclien 
and laundry tur.iiture. coolclag uieugi.a. bu. Cata- 
losues at Auolioueer's o£Qce, No. .3 I'ine at. 

Kdwako tscRSiiox, Auc'toneer, 
ASSIGNEE'Ji THIRD i^ALE 

of 

FEENCn CHINA AND GL.48SWARB, 

by order of Ur. E. P. PABBRI, asaignee of Messrs. 

JOHN VOUT t CO., 

at their stores, Nos. 35 and 37 Para place, near Church, 

the third sale of which will tal^ place on 

THDRSDaY AMD FRIDAY, 

Oct. 19 aud 20, 
at 1U:30 o'clock each day. 

By John U. Drafbu & Co., Auuti-inEeia 

THB ilKLiA WAitK, L,:lUrt.A\YA.-tiNA AMD 
VVESTaKM RAILROAD LOdPA.NV 
Will sell 
100,00b IONS 
8CH^.N1•0^ COaL 
at publie auction, on WEDXE DAY, Oct, 25, at 12 
o'clock noon, at Na 20 Exeh,in<te plao». 
^A.mUBL ml dan. President. 

rpHE LSPAIO book ACCOUNTS. PRO- 

iMId.SOIlY NOXaS Judgments, ko., of WUiTE k 
DoUULAB will lie sold at auction at noon, Occ 20, 
1H76, bv GERARD BBtTS k CO., Auctioneers, at No. 7 
Old slip. Hew-foiK, by orde^- of EDWARD W, VTi^BT, 
Esq., as Assignee of estate of Whits k Uoug.as. For 
^^till0gues aOPir to (ha Saaia-naa otJlA. hfi»iMM.mJt^ 



hoakdi:n^g akd LODaT^n. 

TUE LP-TOWN OFFICE Ol< TBu T.Jl^.3. 

Tlie ni>-town ofQce of THB TlilBS is located -kt 

N«. J.«a» Broadway, bet. 'i\nt and Md m. 

Op«>n "laily, Sundays inchiJed, from 4 .A. .NL to i P. JL 
Subscriptions received, nnd copies of rau TIJitfa tor 

AnVERTlSEMKNTS RhCKIVgn tlNTTL ^ P. V. 



A S VI AIjL, PRIVATE FA-yilt.y OFADTLiTe* 
will let tbe whole or a pait of the second floor of 
their own flrst-class well luruishod houjp, west ol'pth 
av. and very near the Windnor Hotel, to a eeutleman 

and his wifo or one or two efoplo g^utJemen ; bo*rd 
and all appointments nn6Xccpiion.nDle, and fninily of 
high social renpeciabihtv. Address Box No. 3,448 
Post Office. 



ri^WO (>ENTm.TlL<.N CAN OBTAIN A LABQK 
A third-story back room, nicely furofshtd, good 
olosft, grate Arc, hot and cold water, flrat-clasa bo.irdj 
tflrmg$25per week; bi;;he8t reterencea exchimgtd ; 
MauiBon av. n (ir 30th at. Addres i K. T.. Box No. 300 
TItoKS UPTOWN OKFICB, No. 1,J67 BKOAUWAY. 



rjlVVENI'Y-ljiKVMTH ST.. BETWEliN STH 

X and 9th Hvs.— A private American family have a 
1 crgB furnished room, third floor, southern cxposuru. to 
let to one or two giutleiuen, with or wjthoui i.oatd: 
refereuc.'s exchanged. Address A. R.. Boi .^o. 2bi} 
TIJIEM ^P-TO>^ N OFFICE, NO, 1,267 BROADWAY. 

O. 123 \VE8T 45I'H WT.— PkIVATK HOUSK; 

oocup.eU by owner ; an elegant necnnil floor, with 
b lard for gfntlemau anJ wifo ; also third, eu suitt- or 
feparite: appjiuvments uuexceptlon-iblo; hi;;hest 
refertnco. 

"jW^O. 54 EAST 49TII ST.-A PARiY OWMNG 
Xi the r bouae navn a second floor; also oih''r rooms, 
en suite or siparately, with excellent board, refer- 
t-nces. 

NO. SO >• EST jorH|S»r. 

Rooms sinsleorenenUe: .ooms for gentlomen: pri- 
vate table or tai>le d'hdte ; house and appointments 
thoroughly flrst-rla'S : r fer^-nces. 

NO. 5!s WE.r>T aao ST. 

Large, hanasomelv-fumlshed roomt ou seconl fl'ior 
to le., with flrst-cltSB taiile: one room ou fourth floor; 
leims niod^^rate: re ereoces. 

LfTh AV., NO. ;{51.-P KLOB FLOOR; 

other desirable rooms, i.an if o ne.y furnished; 
piano. &.C., with or without piivute table: modi r,ite 
terms. 

ARTIES .•4l<:CliiNG PLrJASANT ROOMS 

lor the Wi iter, with good board ai.d home ooiu- 
torrs. in tfr ceutrHl lo. aiirv, near Broadway. oaJl at iSo. 
38 Bast 12tn st ; lef rences. 

BIRTV-KIGHTH S'W, NO. 67, BETWEEN 

oVH AND 6TU AVA-Tolot from -■...v. 1. pos?ib!y 
sooner, with pri vut« lables only s.oon I, tblrd, or upper 
floors in a firsi-clas'' fiiniiiy iiou^e 

msriLOOi{A.\OSECOiM»-8TOJiVFKO.ST 

room tort-nt, with bo,ira, ea tuire o sius'.v; also, 
oth.T rroms; retercnces- Call at &os.lu8aud 108 
East 23d sc. 

NO -..= 8 tVESr liTil 8«'., WiiST OF 6TH AV.— 
With boarl, hand omoly furnished rooms, laigu aud 
smnii. tuited for • fimily or patty of gcntlomou ; house 
nnd t'llile ilrst-clams. 

NO. 14WE.«*T16rH ST., NBlRSTH AV. 
— Ha iilso.ne room*, with extseifnt boar i, suitable 
fir families or sinele geutlomo-i ; 'Sblo and si;rvioe un- 
escep lonoble. F. L-iCHcXMElf ER. 

Oti. 51 AND 63 \VK<ir 35 TH ST.. NKAR 
Madison square. — KlegantlV-furnished parlor s>eic 

Inz rooms, bathroom, &c,; private table if desired; 

house lirst-clusi. 

RJ". SI) WISER, .>0. »a EAXT 33 TH ST., 

baa tliree Wrge rooms lo offjr tn firs, aud secoiiii 
floors ; exclusive b.ith, tc; with or without privato 
table. 

» REN"!"— WITa BOAitD, HA.VDoOMKLY-FOR- 
nisbcd room, w th alcove; also, rue wth 'jrivate 

'• til ; fna.i y own tbeir lioaae. Apply at i\0. 118 East 

SOtb St. 

Ull*"i'B AV.. fiO. 21 », ( HE,-i. BRFIKLD HOUSE.— 
jn Secnd so V, froac. wli,n or Aithoat piivate taoie t 
other rooms for gantlsmeo aud wtvei, or ge. tiemen. 

JOHN P. VV03STLLL. 

MRS. FiiLTER, OF NO, S3J WEST 38 JH 
St., off'ts. with board, suilee ou second and third 
fl'iocs; aiao a largo room on tourtb floor; moderate 
terms. 

O. 143 WEoT 47rH yT., .xKAil 6Ta AV. 

Secoua Btory room, wl.h boiird, lor one or two 
ailults nppreriatiug superior acoommodatious in 6m;ill 
private bmiiy. 

SMALL PA JULY WILL LET A OOdPLKTE 
suite of spacious apartmeui 8, with private table 

au'latte.idance, (Jail at No. 14 East 32d St., between 

5th and Madison avs. 

OTH AND 6i'H AVsi. 

Mr:-. M. E. JKEN.S, No. 43 West l.'ith St.. offers pleas 
ant wetl-nii'nt^hed rooms, witb g.iod tnoio. to respon- 
sible par. ies,ac prices to suit the timt-a. 

i>IRS. J. U. REin. 

No. 17 East 31st st. Madison and 5th avs.— Hand- 
somely-furnished suita of rooms ; private table; higb- 
est lefoie.ice. 

NO. 37 WE.sT 31.^1' Sr.-CHOiCi A'ABI- 
msutd, with supaiior table ; hrst-ciass appuint- 

mj.i a. 

O. 30 E.IST a.*U ST.— 8 irKSOFH.^NDSOME- 
ly-furnlMbed rooms, with board, tor families ; hall 
room ; rjfteiphoeB. 

J JO, U KA!-if 32 ' Si".— .lA.MUSO ..E ttOJ.tfS OK 
I p rlur floor, t-ecoa i floor, and third, front, together 
orteparaie; private tabl} if iiesirod. 

IKlH AV-, NO. 4ai.— SECOND FLOOR. WliH 
board; also rooms uu toira floor; nnexo^ptionable 
r6fereiiCi>s. 

IV O. 19 EAyT 4iirH ST.— SECOND-sTOBY 
iv front touil another room, Inrniihed, with board; 
refer, nces eici)ang«'d. 

NO. 33 WEST 830 ST.— 8D.VNYFS0N f eCI IE ^ ; 
supcri'T board, o.- priv.i.te t,ibles; also rooms for 
genilemen. 

JVJO. 273 .yJAUlSt«N AV lIAND.So.YlELY-^Ul^ 

xl iiisoeu buiies ; also rooma for gentlemun; private 
labK- 11 desited. 

NtCdiUirEOi^VliitV JiEsIUAUi.li: SEUOND- 

sior.y rooms, with boariL No. 153 illadiaou av., 
corner 32d at, 

O. ft7 WEST39rH ST.-DBtlBAdLE ROOM, 
with hall- .'oom ou third floor; oue o:i fourth floor, 
with board; i-*^feteoces. 

"\rO. 4S UNIVERa«|TV I'l.ACE.— A FiJlE FUU- 
XV iiished flooi wiih t'oar rooms aud closets for a fjaii- 
ly, with liood board, or without it. 

TVrO. 8 KAST OTH ST., NEAR 5TH AV.— 

1 V Hesiiable suites of fnniijued rooms to let, with or 
without private tabie ; reforeuer's. 

BVKNTEIiNTU St., NO. 6 1 WK.XT.— HOICK 
rooms, with board, for i.artiea desliiug a refined aud 
peiraaneot home. 

rjilPTH A v., NO. j23-ftO0JJS SINGLY OS KN 
X? suite, with Htiiotiv nrsc-olasa table; terms mod- 
erate; lefereneee. 

(L 41 WKST 36i'P ST.-ONE SUiTK, POUa 

rooms, saeond floor; with or witliont private taiile; 

bouse appointment.! first olaas ; references excli .used. 

O, 29 WliST aiSr .•sT.-HANDriOMH SDITH 
ot rooina, with supeiior board ; reierencea ex- 
changed. 

O. iiS VVKSr aiST ST.— riANuSU.MELK FUR- 
Kisnnu rooms, witn piivate tab.e if deti.red; also, 
sintile roomi, with lioarl; relereaces. 

r]naiKTV.FOUKr<i ST., No. 133, west.— 

JL dandsomely turoished roums on tbird and fourth 
floors, wi.h firs .clans board; references exchanged. 

0.33 W^EST aiSI" ST.— A SiUTl; OF HOOilS 
wiiJi private table or without board, tor a family or 
gentlemen, 

IPTH AV.. NO. 8lr-FIl'-»T DOOR BELOW 16th 
ST. — Two rooms together or separately; with board ; 
relerdnces reqnir. d. 

Mi DOOH FROM iUADlSON .SQUARE. 

Sn. 33 East 23d St.— Eleguutl.y-.un]lshea floors, 
with private taOiea 

1;>JFi.B AV., NO. 34i.-MR.i. SEAVtJR WILL 
rent second floor, with private table, irom Nov. 1 ; 
tblru floor Immeitl.Uelv. 

17IFTII AV., NO. 0, NEAR THE LBEVOORT.— 
A second floor. band:iOiaely furnished; also, single 
rooms; table unaxo ■piioiiabla. 

O. 29 WE.ST ,6rH ST., NIJAtt BROAD- 

WAY.— Desirable second stor.y sunuy raom, with a 
superior table. 



N: 



AT NO. 27 J 3 riJ AV.— '.LEGANr Al'ARTMliA' , 8, 
with or without board or private table; transient 
gut Its accomiuodated. 



OM£ ELU»ANT SBCONU FLOOR — AL^O 
otber rooms; uneroeptioaable t:iale, private if 
deolred; rcfe.enees. No 18 Ka it ;i2.-l st. 

IVrO. 3 « WEST 420 SI'., FdOSlIi\0 BKttERVOIR 
isi Pa bK.— House now; Bowly furnished; with or 
without private table. 

Vro.2B2 iVEsT21si' ST.— Handsome rooms, 
Xv en sniie or singly; ta.-uilies or single gents ; excel- 
lent table. 



AIO. 331 We'«T 32l» ST.— PLBASANl" ROOMS 
Xv tu families or siogio gentlemen; I.ication good; 
couvenieut to Elevated Rsilroad ; good table. 

WO OR THREE UEollCABi.E ROOiVlS. 

with flret-cl ssboaril; rrference. .>n. 5 Bast 46th ht. 



T 



T^O.5 W11ST420 .ST.— ilANDHO-MB ROO.HS TO 



I let. with boanl ; refereucrs exchHiig«d. 

(Fill AY. i\0. 291.— jUPBuIOii tiUITK OP 
apartments; pilvate tabir, it desired. 



N 



J'O. 18 WEST •-'l.ST ST.— SK ELV-FDRMSUKD 
looma. with boar.i ; references exuiianged. 

O, 42 EASl' lOTH Si'.-Tu LEI, FUA.«il8aED 
rooms With or without lioard 

UEASANI' UOOM.S, WITH BuAUU, K.\- 
>lre third floor ; leieroacoH. .N'o. llti vveai 4oth St. 



N 



0.43 EAST 91'H ST. 

rouuis to let, with I'OarJ. 



-A FLOOR AND oI.NQLE 



T 

N 

^^ 
D 

IN 



HRiilE ROO.ns (iN PARLOR iLCtOH TO 

let, with or v itbout ooard. at No. 128 Ea.<i 2.{d at. 

O. 5 4 WKSi' 38 Til St' — A FA.dlLY O? 
F.ieudi have a room to let with bond; referf.m o. 

O. 20 tVEST ;I20 ST.— Ha iBOil Lf KU l- 
uiahei r.joms a.idflrst-ciaas labii-; terois in iterate. 

b.^lllA L,£ Ki>0.>(S, WITH iioAKDT 

refT iices given aud required. 3.-S8 West 23tl b». 



O. 23 E.tSi 40l'i* ml.- FUitNliUnD fiOoMi 
tu lei,, wiL.i b<miu; refereuuia 



J$.S;£MMl____ 

F'^U.SSELL*'* ICK-CKEAH.— CHURCUE3 A.ND 
f.iirf. vfb oouts per ()uart. « hari'.ttH Ruiae by the 
doaeu or quart. Special a tentiun toout-o.-towu orders. 

_ ^ 



WA.NTKD— A OOOl) PEW*ISDa HALL'SCHUBCIJ, 
gi'ouinl floor, to rent, not to exceed S35o per 
year. Address J. 8., Box No. 810 TtilB,} Ui'.TOWX 
i^XCU. UO-OJi^? 3BUADWAK- 



^iMUSEMENTS. 

8TEINWAY HALL. TIIOJIAS TO-SIQUT. 

TBEODOHE THOMAS' 
fn >.r,T.r,?^''JiSJ^^^ POPULAR CONCERT 
TO-MOREOW (WBliNEilDAn KVENI.N'G, Oct 18, At& 

„„„ Keoond and Last Nii-ht of 

r^^^^J^^^^^^'^i^'^^ PHOGKAaiMK OF THB 
CKNTE:»NIAL IKTER.NaT10N.AL EXPOSITION. 

Overture, . uryanthe Weber 

Prayer, Eienzi, V. Act Wagner 

^ ^^ Mr. QliOEOB WAttRKMaATU. ^ 

LarKbetto, S<-oond Smpliony Beethoven 

Aria, -Non Piu Andrai " (Nowe dl Figaro) Uosart 

„ , ^ Mr. FRANZ REMMEKTZ. 

Scherjio. Komarinskaja GUnka 

°°b8» Rubinstein 

Air. Gf.OKliE WARBIiNRATH. 

Bymphonlo Poem, LeRouet d'Omohale Baint-Saens 

l^hNTENNlAL INAUGURATIO.V PriOSRAAIME. 

Grand Centennial Iiiaaguration March. Wagner 

Centennial 11 ymu— Words by J. O. VVaittler.J. K. Paine 

CUORLS ANDOROHBhTRA. 
Cantata, "C^ntenai.tlMeditaaun of Columbia" 

_ Dudley Bnalc 

CHORDS, Mr. FRANi! BKMMKitTZ, (Bass audSolo,) 
IT „ , . ,. ^^ ORUdESTRA. 

Hallelujah Chorus, ■• Messiah " Handel 

CHORUS AND 0RCHE81RA 

FRIDAY. Oct. 20— Scandinavian Nigbt. 

SATURDAY / FTiiit.\00.>— Last alatinee. 

Admission ticketa OHR DOLLAR KACH. Reserved 
seats, 60 cents extra. Aumissioa to second bnlcony, 60 
cents. Tiokets to m.itlnee, Includin? reserved seat. $1. 
Can be obtained for the above-named concerts at tue 
Box Offi,:e i)f Steinway Hall; BChirmer'B, No. 701 
Brnadwiivj Schubertu's, No. 23 Union square, ftud tbe 
ticket office, No, 1 11 Broadway. 

THEO. THO.YlAS' SYMPHONY CtiNCERTS, 

WITH PUBLIC HFHEARSALS. tJBASOS 1876-'77, 

AT MTEINWAY HALL, 

PRICE OP 8UBi>CRlPTI0N TICKETS: 

To Synnphony Coneerta, with reserved seat $8 

To Ptthlio Ilobearjais, with reserved sojt 4 

Purcb iseis of season ticlcots can select tb.-^ir scats 
fiir the s-jasou on aud ».rterTUi8 ilOSNlNQ, at the box 
office of Steioway Ual!. 

B«»OTII»S THKATitE. OVtiR AT 11. 

JARRBTT& PALMER Lesstjesand Managers. 

• niK (iLORY OF THE STAGE. 
TE.NTU WiEKot tbe triumphant pro- 
„ duoilon of LOl'.D BIKON'.} exq.ui.lte ro- 

GrANO mauUu ploy, 

SARDANAFALt'S. 



ITALIAN 



BAIiLET 



.VIARVELOU.SJ.Y MAWNIPICENT 

M>.e-.<ry, costumes, rcgalii, weapons, 
banners. &c. 

TUB GREAT CAST INCLCDISQ 

01R. b\ C. itA;NUS and 

AUNKS BOOTH. 

THE GRANO ITALIAN BALLET, 

inlroduoine the renowned BAitTiiLK I Tl, 
p enilere oaiideusu aoaoiuta ol tbe 'Irini 
Opera, I'arls, and La Sala, Milan , Mg. 
.y A8v'A0.N"u, principal dancer of La .Scaia, 
Milan, aLd San oarlo, .Nap cs. 

MATINEE EVERY SATURD-AY AT li3«. 

*r* bveiy ■-U.'iD AV BVKM.NG a Grind Concert. 

WALLACK»S. ' 

Mr. LESTEE WALLACK Proprietor and Manager 

DIO^ BOU ICAULi'3 

LATEST TRIUilPH, 

FORBIDDEN FRUIT. 



EVERY EVfi.NINO at 8 P. M. 
and SATURDAY MATI.'TKB at 1:30 P. M. 



Characters by 
Mr. H. J. MONTAGUE, Mr. HARRY BECKETT, Mr. E. 
ARNDTT, Jlr. W. uaRBE-lT, Mr. J. bH INNON. Mr. W. 
EYTINGE, .Mr. EDvVIN. Mr. LaON EJ. Mr. PriCK: 
Miss ADA DYAS, Mmo. P0S13I, Miss EFFIE GERMON, 
and Miss BLaISDSLL. 
Eoi ofBcn open from 8 A. M, to 4 P. M. 

ACAOE.1JY OK MUSIC. AI.MKE. 

AIMEE :i MQUT.< ONLV, A.ND WEDNESDAY MATISTBB, 
wl U her c mplet" .-reai b Opera Bouflj Company, be. 
lore their departu.e for Havana and New-Orleaiis. 
MONDAY and TU SDAf KViiSLSG-i, Oct. 23 aud 24. 
and WrDNE^DAY sFfBRKOJ.-^, Out. 25, at 1:30, 
uffeubaeu's erer-pnpular work. 

LA JOLlii PaRFU^IEUSH. 

AlMEEdnher greatest character) ROSE MICHON 

introdu(;iiig her woriil-timou* Kngiisu ong and Dance, 
" PftivTff AS A PlOf ORE." 

Wile. LCPARC fS Havolet. 
Debut of M. BttANClART (the new tenor) as Pnlrot. 
Mile. GOEl'MAHD as Cio,lnde M. Duplao La Cocardiere. 
WEDNESDAY EV.'G, Oct. -Jb, La Fjlle de Mme. Angoc 
AIMiiE aa LUirette. 
Sale coninner.fiea Thtusday, Oct. 19, at box office. 
Academy oal.v. 

THEA IRE COiVIIQUE. 614 BROADWAV. 

HAKhlGA.V & HaKI' Proprietors. 

■A. W. llANLliY M -nager. 

UAKRiaAX i a .ar. malosk's NiGur OFF, oa 
fHK ilrj«V,;rjjis Ff-SriV r. Sam Uaylls, Bonnie 
Runnells, Frank Livintrsloa, Dolehmty k Cummngs, 
Huu 111 a Kit hen. Billy Barry's Power of .da^ic. Walk- 
ing for Dat iJake, Billy Grav, Billy i.artor. Larry Toolev, 
UarrigHn i. Hart everf evening in Maloue's Niibt ff, 
or tha Turaverein Festival Wednesday ..nd Saturday 
Matinees. 

OLVl>|i'IC NOVELTY THEATitK, 624 B'WAY. 



MATINEKS 

WED.N KSDAY, 

SATURDAY. 

16, 26. and 60c. 



Adinissi m 15, 35. 50, 75, and $L 
Sam Devere uud N"velty Company 8. 

1 7 ^pacialty .>tars and i>'aai^ ot 
THE LU.VBLY MAN Oi-' i HE Ov EAN. 



GKA.ND «>Pr;KA HOUSE, 8TU aV. AND 23D df. 
CiN>.LE TOM'd CA81N 

UNTIL FURTHER N0TIC3. 
HOUSES rROWDKD. UDNDKEDS TURNED AvVAY. 
MATIN arS WEDSB DAY AND SATURDAY. 

ivELLV M LEON'S MiNSlRELS. 

23d st ana 6th av. Tiie fashionable minstrel temple. 

TneenlyUenn. The Two Ofil-Dns. The only Leon. 

Kiss'jg in the Slarliirht. Tbe Five (French) Flats. 

Forty Artists. Toe Black Doves. Forty Artists. 

'. . ' " L-l » 

WANTED— PL \IN, LIBERAL BOARD FOR Tfl" 
Winter sea on, by gentleman, wife, th.-oe oiiil- 
dren, and nurse, oue ema.l aud two connecting fair- 
sized rooms reqaired, on unquestionably reasonable 
luims; private familv pr.ferredj undoubted refer- 
ences requ red mid givetL Address M., for two days, 
box No. ;-.07 TIMES I.P-IO.VN O. F»CE, NO. 1,257 
BUOAi)V?Af. 



r.iAi»iiLy (TWO ADUt/rs, one child of 

J? eleven) want floor, eitber aecoud or third, fur- 
nished or not, witu ooard, iu private family j locution 
aud table flcat clae.*, with uu otacr boarders. Addri-ss 
X. Y Z., Box No. 258 TIMES UP-TO»VN 0FFI0E,"*O. 
1,257 BROADWAV. 

l,iOR TWO ADULTS, 'THREB SiVlALL CHIL- 
J?DttEH, A.ND NUl'Sc;.- Not above 40tu St., and be- 
tween 3ii and 8th avs.- pleasant rooms and good board 
required; terms must h reasonable. Address 

W., Post Office Box 8a 1,844. 

OARO WANTBD.-IS A .sTRlCTLT PRIVATE 
uamily by a gentleman, wife, ntirae, and child; 
terms moderate. Address ''INDEX," Station D. 



B 



APRlVA^rE A!HERICAN'"RAMir.y WIL.L. 
let an alcove viom, ueatly furnished and all coo- 
veniences. to one or two gsiitlemen, withonc board, at 
moderate price. No. 1°.^^ East 4lst St., near Lexing- 
ton av. 

I^lUANISBKO ROOMS TO KENT IN TBU 
: hve-Btor.y dweiilna. iNo. 63 Madisuo av., from $3 to 
SJ» per week, accor Ting to size and location; inquira 
of .Mrs. AlcDIiRMoTr, in the bou^e, who refers to 
Homer Morgtin. No. 2 Pine st.; references r quired. 

VERY PLEASANT K003IS, E.V SOirS, WITH 
every oouvanience, handsomely furoiahed, with- 
out boa^d, or with a private tabio: flrst-olMS bouse. 
No. 140 )IVe»t42dsC, near ^t Cioul hotel 

UlilMSHKD UUO.HS ON PiRST, SBC- 

u.nD. and third flojrs : quiet honae ; teims low to 
gentlemen. iNo. 100 E»Bt lith St., near Ooiim square. 

ANUSUItlELV-KUaNlSHED RoO.US, EN 

au:ts or ^lnuly, to gentlemen; breakfast if re- 
quired. No. 91 West 1 1th sr. 



BOOMS WANTED. 



^.'N.-N^^^/- ^ 



A FURNISHED APARTiTiaNT WANTED 
for tbe Wioter, oy two gentlemen; rent moderate 
aud location central. Aildr^ss, stating terms. W. L., 
Box No. 289 TIMES UP-TO.VN ol'FIOB, NO. 1,257 
BROADWAV. 



WANTED- KOR A oilALL FA.dlLY, AN APaRT- 
mont or part of a bouse, eoasistlug of parlor, 
dining-room. kltcheiL two or three bedrooms, snd 
abnauuni closet room, unturuisbeiL Address R., No. 
43 West 28th st. 



^COUNTHY BOARD. 

C CENTENNIAL HOARD— MRS. SWAXJ« HAS 
ybeaatifully-furnlshed rooms iu choice residcuee 
Na ;5,91i .>oodUnd av.. West Pbila>lelpbia, flfteen 
minuiei' ride tu horse cars, wnicb run to aud from Ex- 
hibition, within hall block of house, aud six blocks 
from West fhlladeiPbia Depot; terms reesonablo : 
house has ail conveniences, i^anis and iaformatlou at 
ha 6 Pine st. Room N*. 2, New-Y>.tk. 



HOTELS. 



WEST END HOTEL, FORT WASHINGTON.— 
First class ; heated throughout ; low rates to fam- 
ilies lor tho Winter; two min,>tca from depot aud 
twenty m:nutes from 30th st. by Hudson River Rail- 
road. 

ITSEI-L HOUSE.- -NOS, .H8, 40, 42, aNd 44 

West 14th st booms with board; transient tunns, 
$ii per day. 

■ I I mmm*mmmmm i i i —i— — .— 

KAlXRO>ADa_____ 
'^ krieIiailway. 

Snmmer Arranceinent of throusrh trains, 1873. 
FromCuambers Street Depot. (Kor ',i!3d si. see note 
below.) 

9:00 A. M., dBlli. except Sundays, Cincinnati and 
Chicago Day Eipiess Drawing-rooin coaches to Bufifalo 
aud sleeping coacue. to Ciucinnaa and Detroit Sleep 
ing coacliea tu Chicago. 

lii:45 A .M., tlaiiy, except fundays. Express Mail for 
Buttalo and the West. .SieeiOng coacti to Butlalo. 

7:00 P. M., dally, Pueiflo Express to the West. Sleep- 
ina ooavbes through to \>vJi*ia, Niavra Falls. Ciiicio- 
uutl. and Chi('a.£u, wlibout ohange. Hotel ulnmg coacU- 
es to Cleveland and Uhlcaito. 

7:U0 P. M.. exiept Sundays, Western Emigrant train. 

Aoovo iriilns leave Tn.-uty-third Straat Ferry at 
8:45 and 1 li: 1 S A. .'i. and 0:16 P. M. 

For local tiains leo liinfa-tabiea and carda iu hotels 
and depofs. 

JNO. N. ABBOTT, General Piiss«n«er Agent 

NEW-VOitH. NEW-IIAVE.M. AND HAJIT- 
FORD RAILROAD, 

After June 11, ls7d. ir. us leave Grand ('cntral De- 

rt (4'2dBi.) (or New-Canaan Uailrvad at f?:05 A M., 
414U, and 0:45 P. M.; Danuury and NerwaU Rail- 
road at 8:b5 A. M., 1, :t:i5, aud 4:i0 P. \l.; Nangaiucic 
Railroad at 8: J5 A. .XL and 3 1*. d.- Uoiiaatiouio Rail- 
road at 8:J5 A. M. ami 3 P. M.! .N'ew-Havea an I 
Nortliampton ftii.roA.l at 8:05 d. M. and 3 P. M.; lor 
Newiio-t at 8:05 A .«. and I P. .>L; Boston and Albany 
Railroad at &J5 and U A. M., A and 9 P. M.. (9 P. sf 
on Sunday;) Bu^ttou (via sbore Linej at 1 aad IU P. 
N., (10 P. Jf. on Sua lay*.) 
Way ti-ams as per Isual time tibles. 
J. r. MOODY, Superintendent New-Iork Division, 
K ^ iLkku. Visa f resident. .Haw.io<«. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



flRBAT NEW.YORK. AQUAUICAfai*' 

BEOADWAX AND 85TH BT, 
OPES FROM A. VL. TILL 10 P. M. 
- OBBAT trviNO W HXTB IVBAX1S. 

BEODQHT TO THE AQUARIDU AT BffOBXOUS EX. 

PBNSE. 

A FBAT DNFAKBALLELBO U FErrATl> J»T8»» 
PRI8B. 

HB COSTS $100 A DAY FOB PUOB SALT vWATBB 
ALONB. 

THB BRIGHTON AQUARIUM HAS OFFEEBD 430,000 

TO HAVE ONE DBLIVBbSb ALIVK 

AT THAT INSriTDTlOH. 

THE MONSTER SEA LION I THE PLATFUL BBAL 1 

AND THE TENS OF THOUSAND;* OP OCEAW 

MOS8TEBS FRUM BVEBT BBA 

THE BEAUTIFUL TROUT I TOE MAMMOTH STUB- 

GEOM THE ENORMOUS TURTLE I THB 

INTERESTING LITTLE sTIOELEuACK. 

TOGETHER WITH THOUsTwDa OF CTUBIOOS. 15- 

TERE&TINO, AND WONDnRFUL SPECIttElfs 

FROM THB OREAT 0( EAA'S DEPi'HA 

BEEN SPORTING I» DEEP 

SUA TANKS. 

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL EESOBT 15 THB CTTT. 

MINIATURE OOEANSt 

CONSTANT CIBCULATIO* OF WATBB I 

HAEVET B. DODWOETH'8 GRAND ORCBBSTRA. 

PROUENADB C-OSUERrS AFrBBNOONS 
AMD KVBSIHGS. 

A™«PJJ .Z!7 50CBHTS 

CHILDREN hALF FBICB 

NltSLO's UARDEN. 

pPcL^- ^F',i^^ '....Lessee and Maoacer 

EENSEN sHKRftuOD , Director 

SECO.^D MONTd op THE 

GRANDEST SP.iCTACLE EVER PRODUCED. 

THE MARVEL OF THE oTaQE. 

BABA 

BaBA 

HABA. 

A THOROUGH SUCCESS. 

HUNDREDS lUa.NKD AvVAf NIOHTLT, 

PRONOUNCED Uir OF 

Miss ELIZA W EATHKR3B V and Mr. W. h. CRANK. 

THE D.-<KQtJAL«D MKNZ'iSld. 

Mr. Bt:.>>EN >H .RWOOD'S MYSTICAL 

TRAN.SP0RMAT10.i8. 

MARITZK'i BKIGriT MCsIC. 

BLAXDOWiKI'S BALLlifS auc ilAtl.'HBS. 

MATl.NiiE KVERV SATURDAY it 1;30. 

SECURii SEATS. BOXOFFICB OPEN DAILY. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



HgeCOND WE, 

OBIATUT SHOW ON BaKTH 
Sm>OI>B<>in I GIHt OBB'l QAaOES.) 

TWO BZHlBCrion SAUT. 

ttVSSmf, XBIAQBRIB. AVD (SBCUA 

A ourrvBrs festival op featumi 

OHB BUSCSBD BTAB PSBFOBMZB& 

The most meinorabia cf mortal marrela. 
C»pt, eSOBGB OOSTENTBNCS. 
• SMl* Owok Albaiiiaa, Tattooed from Read to FooftI 

The wcvld-renowoed Uttls ™»» 
ADMIRAL DOT. ^^ 

HEW A»D VAHXED ATTRACTIONS WILL FOLLOIT 
IK BAWD eoccBsaioa. '""•"'^ 

n^iuIt'-i^KA*' •I«7 dewrtmeBt of the Co]<wmI 
Exblbltloa. 60 Mntc CHILDREN oJider otss vaanl 
26 cents. EE3EBVBD SBaTS. 86 cIk-M EX?sS^ 
Doors oi>on at 1 and BiSO P. M.; Grand Anla^«id 
Arspte Bpsctacalar Kutrae at a an.l 8. '^^"««« 

FIFTH AV. TBBATRE. BEOAOWATk 28Ta ir£ 
ProBzlator and UaDatcar. Mr. Anaa^TlK OALT 

Ma Angastia Dalys new Kpee«a«nlar Comedy, 
AN OFBRWBBLMIliO 8DCCES8I 
COBTINOO08 ANDCPBOABIOU3 MBKBIXBXT FBOK} 
CROWDED HOUSES I 



m'. 






LIfE. 



CHlCKEUiNG UAL.L.. 



GRAND ACIORS' MAHNBE. 

hi COHMANDEUR. 

CAZENEUVB, CAZEN8UVR, 

THK EMPEROR OP PRB8TIDIGITATBUR8. 
Will give a grand Mattn6e performance to the ladles 
and gentlemen oi the leading theatrea of this City, 
THIS DAY, (fnesday.) Oct 17. at 1:3a 
Seats may be secured at echnbectb It Co.'f. No. 28 
Union square. 

L.VCEIJM THEATRE. BEGINS AT 8. 

GREAT KUCCBS.? OF 

LOUISE M. POMBEJY, 

as 

JULIET. 

Vi ROMEO AND JULIET. 

THUBSDAIf, FRIDAY, nnd SATORDAT 

MATINEE. 

THE LADT oF LYOX8. 

PADLINR LOCfl-iB M. FOMBROT 

STIilNWAV £IALL. 

The public Is respeotfullv informed that 

IHE N.-JW-SOaK MOZART CLUB 
Will give a series of cfasslcal and modern oh«mber 
music soinjws, to commence on 

THURSDAY bVi-,.iiINO, OCT. 18. IE76. 
For programme see Thursday's advertisemaut 



from 
New 



EAILEOADS. 



GBNTRAL RAILROAO OF NBW-JERSBY 
-ALL :•:^i rows LK-«E.— Ferry stattonslu Now-Yorlc. 
foot of Libi'rt;r^t. andfootof ClarJuun st., np town. 
Freitrht station, f)ot of Libe(t.y st 

C(>mu]eneii:a Oct 'J.' 1870— LeaTa New-Tork, loot 
of Liberty at., as follows: 

6:4(1 A.' M.— Mail Traik for Easton, Bslvldere, Bethle- 
hem, Bath. Aileiitowu, Maucli Chunk. Tamanend, 
WUuesbirre. .-cranton, &c.; coanacts at Bound iirook 
lor Trent III atid PlilladeliibU at Junction with DeL, 
Lpclt. and W«^. Rnliroa--i. 

7:15 .i. M.— For SomerviHe and Flemlngton. 

8:45 A. H.— Uoayixs Exrnass, daily. (exoaiH tan. 
days.) tor Uji^h Bridge Uranob. Easton. Allrntown, 
Harrlsbiirst, and tbe West Conneeta at Kastoii tor 
Mauob ('bun:- Tamitina. Towsnda,WiUAsbarre, Potts- 
vide, tsoraiiton, Danville. Wll famaport, bo. 

*1:00P. M.— EiPRBss f ir Klemiogton. Kaston, Allen, 
town, Maurb Chmik, WllSeabHrre, 3 raaton, Tamaqna, 
Mah.tnoy City, H"ileron. Reading, Columbia Lancaster 
Bphrata, Pottsville, Harrlsbnrg, ic. 

4:00 P. M.— Por Hieh BridRO Branch. Easton, Allen 
town, and Manoh Chunk; conneets at Junosian with 
Del., Lack, and West. Railroad. 

'►4:30 P. At.— For .Snmetvlll»- and Flemlntrton. 

•5i30 P. M.— EvasiNo Bxparss. daily, lor Easton, AV- 
lentown, Mautrh Chunk, Wilkesbarre, Townndiw Bead- 
ins, and Harrisbnrg. 

*8:30 P. M.— For Bastnn. 

Boats If-svA foot of 'Martrsoo St., North Blver. at 
6:3.'!. 7:35,9:05, I0:i)5, 11:35 A M.: 12:50, l:.iO, 8j90. 
4i20, b:VO. 6:20, 7:2 », 8:20. l'i:U5. IbSO P. M. 

Co .'iiectinn la made by ClarHaon Street Ferry at Jeiw 
Bcy C!tv with all trains xaarKed * 

For trams to local potucs see time-table atstationa. 

NEW.YORK AND LO.NO BRANCH RAlLRQAa 
ALI.-RAIL LINE BETWEEN NBW-YORK. LONG 
BEAN. -H. OCEAN GROVE, BEA GIRT. AND 8Q0AN. 

Tline-t*blo of Oct. 2, 1876: Trains leave New-York 
from loot of Liberty st. North Btrer, at 8:13. 11:45 
A. »!.. «l:4iP. M. 

From toot of ClarksoDst at 11:35 A. U., 4:20 P. M. 

Stages to and from Eeyport conaeoc at Matawa* 
Station with all trams. 

KEW-TORK AND PHILADELPHIA NBW LIKi 

BOUtiD BROOK BOUTB. 
For Trenton, Phliadalphla and tha Centennial, 
(ommencing MONDAY, Oct 9, 1870, trains 
Leave New-York, foot of Liberty st, at 6:40, 6:15. 
7:43. 0:15 A tf. 1:30, 6. 6:30 P. M. 

Leave foot of Clarkson at at 6:35, 7:35, 9:06 A M., 
J 2:60, 4:20, 6:20 P. !tf. 

Lam re Philadelphia from station Rnrtfa Pennsylvania 
Railroad. 3(1 and Berks sts., at 7:80. 9:30 A. M^, 1:30 
3:20, 6. 6:30 P. M. Lnave CeoteBnial Oroosds at 7:15, 
9: iS A. M.. 1:15, 3, 4ii0, 6:10 P. *L 

PULL.\1A.V DRAWLNQ ROOM CARS are attached to 
tbe 7:45 and 9:15 A. M trains Irom New- York, and to 
trains leaving Centennial Qronnds at 4:60 and 6:10 
P. M. 

AU train* eonneet at ZWnlon J«m<(4oii(o<nuiJVon Treti- 
tatt. 

Rates fbr passeneers and freight as low as by otber 
rentes. 
( B.N^TENNIAL PASSBXOBRS delivered at the awla 

>n trance to the Centennial Grounds. 

H. P. BALDWnr, 

Gen. Pasa Agent 

PENNSYLVANIA EAILEOAD. 

GREAT TRD.XK. I. INK 

AND USITBD STATES MAIL fiOUTB. 

Trains leave New- York, via Desbrossas and (Tortlandt 
Street Perries, as toliowa: 

Fzpress for Harrlsbortt, Ptttsburc, tha West and Rontb, 
with Pullmau Palaoe t3ars attaohel 9:30 A M.. 9 
and %30 ^. M. Bumlay, 6 and 8:30 P. it 

Por Wllliamsport. Look Haven, Coitv. and Brio at 2:40 
and 8:3U P. .U.. connectinx at Oorry fur TitusviUa. 
Petroleum Centre nud tho OH Regions. 

For Baltimore. Wssblngtnn, ani tbs Soath. limited 
Washington Fxvress" of PtJlman Parlor Cars daily, 
ejccept tinaday,9:/<U A. M.i arrive WasUIogtoa. 4:19 
P. M. Hecular at 8140 A U.. 2:40, and 9 P. H, 
So day 9 P. at. 

Hipressfor PlilladeipWa, 7:80, 8:40, 9:30 A. M., l!^.30 
2i4D, 3, 4, b. 6. 7, 8:30, 9 P. M. and 13 ni<bt Ao- 
commodatioo 7 A. M. and 4:10 P. >L isnndav S A. M., 
6. 6, 7. Ki30, sod V P.tL Emigrant and seoond class 
7 P. tL 

For CenteuDtal Depot at 6:8^ 6:^ 7:80, 8 8:40, 
9:30 A. .M.. l2:.-i0. 3, and 4 P. M. On Hnnday 8 A 
M. Retni-ulng, le^tve Oeutennlal Depot at 7:lo, 8:1S, 
Itli^O A. .\i.. ", li15,S. 81311. 4:45, 5tS0^ 6. 6:50, an^ 
7:05 P. M. On Sonoay 7:20 A M. aud 7 P. M. 

For I rains to Newark, EllBftbetb. Rabway, Prlnoetoa, 
Trenton, Perth Ambor, Fiemlmrt«ii, BalTlderr. and 
atht>r jxiints, see lu<:al sobadulss at all Ticket Ol&oea. 

Tniina ^irive: Froin Pittsbnrr. '>:20 and lOtSO A M. 
and 10;'2(i P. M. d3l.y; HClOA. M. and iij50 P. M. 
daily, except Monday. Prom Washlnet n and Balti- 
more. (>:30 9:4i' A iL, 4:10. 5:10i and 10:2D P. M. 
Su .Inv, (1:30. 9:4J A M. From Philadelobla, 5:1»5 
6:20. 0:3a 9:40, 10:10> 11:20, 11:.'V0 A. M., 2:1(1. 
.=!;5(), 4:111. 6:10, 6:U>. f;-.50, 7:36, 7:40. 8:40. and 
10t20 p, M. liun dav, 6:05. '^aO, 0:30. 9:4o, 10:10. 
ll:Ho.A. M.. 6:60 and 10i20P. H. 
Ticket OaScea- .SOS. b'Zti and 944 Broadway. Na 1 

Astor Uons.>, and foot ot iiesbrosses and '''ortlandt 

sts.: No 4 Court st Brooklya Boa 114. 116, and 

118 Hudson Si.. Hobokea Depot. Jersey City. Emi- 

graat Ticket ottce. No. 8 Battery plaea. 

a M. BOYD, J%., General Passenat^r Agent 
F RANK TUOM80X. General Manager. 

TVTK^V-YOKK UBNTRAI/ AND HUOtsON 

1>I RIVER RAILROAD.-After Sept. 18, 1870, tbroUKh 
trains will leave Giand Central Depot; 

8:00 A. .M., Chicago and Nartberu Express, with 
drawing-room cars tbroujrh to Boebester and St Al- 
bans. Vt 

10:3il^A. M.. ipeoial Chioaci Express, with drawing. 
roi m oars to Rocbecter, Buttalo, and Msgara Falls. 

11:00 A. .11., North' ro aud Western Bzpress. 

3:S0P. M.. special Albany, Troy, and Western Br- 
pres<. Oonnocts at bast Albany with nlgiit expreas 
lor tbe Went 

4:00 P. M., Montreal Express, with sleeping ears from 
New-York to MontrenL 

6:U.i P. .M., Express, with sleeptuK oars, for Water- 
town and Canaudaigua. Also for Mentreal vim Platta- 
burs. 

8:30 P. M.. PaelBe Express, dally, with sleeplnir cars, 
ior R ichester. Niagara Falls. Buttalo. Cleveland. Looia- 
ville. aud tjt Loui.. Also forCbtuago, via both L, & 
and M. C Railroads. 

11:00 P. M.. ExuresB, with sleeping cart, for Albany 
and TroT. War trains as ix'rlooal Time Table. 

Ticketa for sale at Nos. 'ioS aud 413 Broadway, and 
nt Wcstcott Express compan.v'a offices. Nos, 7 Park 
place, 785 nnd 842 Rroadway, New-Yo;ic, and 333 
Wnsbbigtoii St.. Brooklyn. 

C B. AIKEKHR. Oenenkl Passenrer Agent 



A OOMEDT OF CJTT TYPES, with Mc Ckart^' 
Cogblao, John Brongbaa, Cb^las Fisher, Jama* 
Lewis, wraiam David<^ Barrymors. Beaaett. Mia* 
Amy Fawsltt, Sydney Oowell. KmUy Elgl OM>r^ 
Drew, Mary Wells, and Mrs. O. H. Gilbert im moM 
amualng obacactera; and. In tbe ravUhlog snow baUsi 
•nd eergrons traasfbrmaUan, U1I& Marie Beaftatf' 
»nd Asfssta Sohlke wUi appeac 
MATIHBg OF LIFE. BATU BPAY a¥ 2. 

^SL^M^J EESBItrED gEATrt FOR ALL 

AZ^^^lf^S^ •>•?• '» edvaaca, at TYSON'S ^^ 

"' WILL CLOSE NOV. lO. ^ 

THE ITBW-YOBB: CONTSmnAL 

LOAN EXHIBITION. 

DAr AND £TBN|NO-a« CBNTS. 

Vationai agaobmt OF DBsier 

Corner of 23d St. and 4 tb av, ->. - 

KETROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART. 

No. 128 West 14th st 

Tbas* KanitAcet collaetlens of pietuies, i-'ufil 

-om the private galleries of the vealthv ei lacaaoi 

j.ew-lork, and insured for more than a milHou dolian, 

incinda the diasterptMes of too most celekratei 

artists ot Enrtipe and Aberica. ^^ 

XVm felMe FRIDAY NIGHT, Way. 1». 

AMERICAN institute; 

2D AND 8D ATA. BBTW£)£B 680 AND (UTh ffa, 

4$TH GfiiNO lATlOIAL EXHlBITMlf 

EBDD0TI050P ADMISSION T«^0 DAIS EACH WBEK. 

Monday and Friday, 25 oents. 

PABK. TUBATRE. ' 

Every evening at 8, 
SWEETUBAST6, ;.. 

and at &^4a. >»~r 

TOM CtiiiB 
Tbe tw« great London successes from t^ sea of W. ft' 

Gilbert 

BettnrSay m»tin<e»tg- 

EAULB TBBATl^E, iiBOAD«^AY aN.i 33D 8T.~ 
Proprietor and Managed iTt JOSH UABr 

Evarything new fbr tba week comuienring Oct. 16. 
The entire company in the fOllowinz ak«t<^es : 

DODGIsa FOB A WIFE f !;Bi>ita»ks 

KB.nOBICE'S EBTUR Mtntai AbernS^ 

and tbe comie local sketch OLD AJ>A|( 

List of prices : Orchestra and baleuay. 75c: nrrfcce 

tra,(ra8erred.)$l; dress circle. .'>ue.: famtlv<nre)e. 26«. 

MArl^EBS WKD.VK8DAY Al> SATtjaD >Y. 

PAKIIilAN VARIB1IE8, ItfTH ST. ANDB'WAT: 

Tampie «f SeaastiouU Art I Nothine Hkt- it elsewhere' 
Graataat array of Talent in t.ie L'niverse^ 
Natm*. Art, beauty, and M'>rit eombiaed. , 
100 Artist! in 21 New smd Bicbiy-Aavured Aeta. 
tmiy theatre in the irorld where ev^ry act Is encon4 
Turkish Uarea Life, I A Tfaoasand MUliaeia, 

Artlitt's Studio. | Living f»icturt;a, 

EveninKB ot 8. Uatin€f s Tuea , Thuia.. aud Rat rt ^ 
Grand entertainment everv auuday evening at & 




,4/ ? 



UNION "SQUARE TH.ICA rKK. 

Proprietor Jlr. SnERIDiS SHOOK 

Manager Mr. A M. PALMES 

Tbe most aacoesstul play of tbg 
oeatnry, 

THK TWj ORPHASa, 
with Its unrivaled original eaet. 

* every day flrom 8 A4 



aager... 
E^^Y EVENING 
at 8. 
SATURDAY MATTNBB 
at 1:30 
Box cffice open lor sale «( 
.\L to 10 P.M. 



THIS DAT. ^~^\ 

Erenloig at 8. i Ai^iate at 2. 

JOHN BROUGHAM'S I SOPHIE MILES, 

OBBAT PMY, I THE OLD MAID, 

LOTTEKT OF LIFE. llN Ht^H WINDING StfKCT, 

»AN ITRA-NCMCO JltNt^TRBLS. 



OPERA 

UOOSK. 

BROA0»AT 

t •.i9 1 H bT 



THE MIXSTREL PALACE. 
BIBCB, WAS30La. BAClCCa, 
•ndTHI&rT BRiLLiAKT ABTUTa 
The orime de la ere me 01 minstrels7. 



MATINbB. SATURDAY at 2. 



tieats aeenriBA 



Ji5§SiAL^ 

AfiREAT0FF£8l-rSKl";Su" 



sr J»0»ewa«» aeeu4.ta«« PlANUseiu osC- 
UANSo/irat-clasa iMaLiLera. uuAiutiny WATERS', 
HtefBwaylk siad CMckerivs'* «< lesrar ys 4ee « 
tium evrr before elGsred. 9^^iwk Puaaa,' 
i^lSa I 7 1-S OetaTe« 4o. fi>r fiFd. ea^ sfC 
need a ygm*% «-«ctBTe,^ flHetep <ti«aai^jMf j 
4-etep, SFtt t U s»tops, 1^80 1 8 »itepe, «90 1 1# 
bcepe. SJ lo, oash, «ntA fceek elwseta ««4 mtmm. 
not Bwd a Tettz. in perfect order and w«n«Bl9sl« 
MoBtbly {■istallmeita recelTed,aad te l^t ttt 
extraorainsrilFlew jarloMk BORACBWA»< 
ERS de siUNa>. NO. 481 tfreadway, N. Y. 






DRY GOODS. 



16 



L.EHI»H VAI.LiUY lCAIL.KOAI>. 

ARR.iKGK»IKNT OF PASSKNOER TRAI.N'A Aptil 
1870. 

Leave depots foot of Coriiaodt antt Oeabrosses sts., at 

7 A. M.— For EAston, Betbrfihom, Alloatown, Maaoh 
Chunk, HMl"lon,B«'Ovcr Msailows, Mabuuoy Otty, Sa* 
iiandoali. Mount Cnrmel, .SbiimoKin. VVilkr«i):,rre, Pilts> 
lou, isavre, kluua, lie.. couo^pcUor with -.rains tor 
ItbaoA, Auiitlru. Uochcstux BuCBilo. Niagara Falls, 
and llie vv"»st 

IP. il.— For kaston. Betokslmra. Allaiitown. Maneb 
( bnnk, llaaietod. ilahAiioy City, tiheuanloah, Wllica*. 
b«rra, Plttsion. kc, m^iKtor olua'^ ouuuectiau :.ir KeatV 
lug, Potfsvillo. and Hatnsbura. , 

4 P a, -For Kaston. 8>t5lshe«n, inentown, and 
NaiioliCbaiik, stopping It »ti stuioftx 

e-JlO P. il.-Nisbt Rsoroas. "UUly, for Kaston. ,Bf»J«lo- 
hem. A|i«ntown, Jlaiicb Chunk. \Vllkeab.irr8. piltatoa 
bnviB. jTrmirn. UliacO, Aui'ttm. Ro<;beeter, DuflW 
Kiaeara Ftdls. and tlia W<>st Pullntaifa .sk:eDiuj 
coaclies attacb«'l. ^ „. . , „ ., . 

Generil>,a«i,i;rn oflioe eomer Chnreh and Oortlandt 
kts., t:iUltLiiS H. tUilMlNOH. Acpnt 

ROBERT It. tiAVRK Kupeiiu If ndsut 



R.H.MACY&CO^ 

14TH «T. AND 6TH AF.. KKW-YORK. 
USLIKB any otber eatablishment In the conntry. 
FORBIGIT DRY GOODS, FanCY G^ODS. and SQYMU* 
TIB8 by every E0ROPEA5 8TKAMKR. 

OEDERS BY MAIL BBCEIFji 6PBCIAL CAB^ 
CATALOGUB& FBBB. 

BLACK DRESS SILKI^ 

AT POPULAR PftlCBS. 

R. H. MACY & CO.. 

liT H ST. AND 6TH AV. 

.vr^wLn^^^r^gpA^^ LiMAN, OF PARI^. 

Oifers a oomplete and alexant assortment of ftnaat 
P»r» milUaery, witb eeaeteat renewals front new ar* 
rivals. " Courtald's " orapaa. Ko. 423 Uth av. 
26(h at (Lata Mlcbels.) 

DANCING. 

ALLEN DOO\VOHTH>8 OANCXNO SCHOM^ 
REMOVED TO BA 681 6TH AV. 
How open for the reception of popUA 
For partlonlars send for cireolac. • 

' J>E OAK.no'S 

PRIVATE DANCING PARL0B3. 

HO. 7 WhST S2D bT., 

Two doots from 5th av. 

SUMMER RE^^OKT&^ 

Famous Health ResorL . 

f er laraltds dnrlac Antoma aad \VIater» 
OUR HUBLB ETTUIKNIC INSTITUTB. 

DAJfBVlLLB, LIVmOBTOS OOOJITr, i. i. v 

is the finest plaoe on tbe Amsttoan Onttnant Ibr tbe 
sick to recover health, or for Invalids to beeone 
strong by tbe nse of sanitary agencies onl.r, dtirlag 
the Fall aad Wioter months, iaat Wiatsr we IimI 
eighty lady and seventnMatLemeupAtl'ntd, this Win- 
ter we oan cam for nearly twlua as many: rlronlars 
idvlDgfuU informaMonana n<rei«aoes. and a beau itol 
steel engraving of the Cure and !ts r>oitaj(es. wit! s< 
seat f^i-e to all who ask ttor them bv postal eacd.MM 
alUetters of (naolry will be promotiy and eonrteonstr, 
•aswcrML Address a* aboT*. JAMEfl a J At KSOA 

■ I ■■_■ ——— - ' " — — ^ 

MEETINGS. 






So^- 



and Enilnaar 



WlfJKFORO RAfLROAO ROUTB T<> ITBW. 
POUT, H. L-~Pa8«on«»rs h>r this line tala 8tOS A. 
M. wxd 1 !'• M. exBcres tr-itna from tireita UwttrA 

DaPet airiviflgat 4Ll."<ao" a P. M.atBewport — .,„ _. , 

^w»g<ip>?i* vfABB^fc miminynrwi^,.*- .LA n a i >at ti« .a fon im ed*tiBn e t aa n ar ee- 



AMRKICAN INSTITUTE rAR.tlERS' » LOB. 
-Krgular weekly meeting TO-DAY, ( Tnesdgr,) M 
1 o'clock P. M., in Room Xa V4 Cooper bulldlu7. All 
int<Tcated in airrlcultural imsroveut are invited to es- 
tend. AdmUaioa free. MaTUAK C, BLV, Prcaidont. 
Joifir W. Cbambjou, Se cretary. ^- 

JOHN>l« UUILD.— rUE AN.NUAL MKEliFci 
>of the GniM Witt l>e held TCKSDAT hVKNI.N(4, uet. 
17, at So. 43 BaBtl4tb at. to eieot oflicerx. aud ta 
ciiange tho oaaona ALVAH WISWaLL, aiaater. 

M^^gLB^MA^raLS^ 

TEVVAKT».«< SLATeT wXrKLE, ANtt 

WOOD .'Ha.VTSLs'.- .Sear end elt^rant draigua, 
rancinz in iirioa trom $1U up I'he trada liberziUy dealt 
wlib. Moa «0 and 282 Weat 'iM at 



M^ 



reduced priees; alao, nionumORt*. bi^aJ-Htoue.-*, 

plumbers' and turuUnre slabs, marble counters, and tU* 
a?. A. KLADSB, 184 « ISil'Eaat 18th st, near Sd av. 



EESTAURANTa 



LAbBRR*S RB.STAURANT, 

CIUITBKSIAL ORODSTDS. 

AEAR BORTICUt'TCKAb UALL, 

lately destroyed by Are, and rebuilt wli hln eight ^Kr^ 

u again in fiul operation, well heated, -jtli jmstit 




i-s. :_"i. 






^p& 






'-A '!•-,: .-fji'.li-Ui <:i 




fj^ 



C^ jttfo-fmrh €xmn, Cmstrag, (BdsAiiti7,iS7%~'Wiii^ SngpfamnC!;" 






■fl.-f?-' 



'^.!?r^^*'^-'8^':^: 



-r=*i-. 



lit 



..ir 



.%-' 



THE STATE CAMPAIGN. 

\JREPUBLICAN ACTIVITY IN 
SOUTHERN COUNTIES. 

'A THOROUGH CANVASS BKINO MADE IN 
BROOME COUNTY — A MAJORITT OK 1,300 
PRKDICTKD— THE COXTEST FOR THE 
CONQRKSSIONAL NOAHNATION — THE 
nEMOCRATS RK80RTINO TO FALSEHOOD 
AND CORRUPriON. 

From Out Special CorrttvondenU 
BiNGHAMTON, Saturday, Oct. 14, 1876. 

was a fortunate thing for the Eepubli- 
»B Party of New- York that the October elec- 
tions did act all go in their lavor. Had Indi- 
ana and Ohio boh gona Republican, the same 
apathy that has hitherto characterized the 
eanrass of that party in this State would have 
eoudnned, and there would have been some 
daiieer that filden's "still hunters'' would have 
OMight them nappini; on the day of election. 
.As Jt is, thev are now satisfied that they have 
got work to do in this oampaign and they are 
goiOK to do it. The result in Ohio and Indiana, 
•Itbongh hi;;hly favorable to the BepublfCaws 
in both States so far as national issues were 
ooQcerned, gaining, as they have, ten Congress- 
men, is regarded by the party here as a trans- 
fer of the battle-ground to this State, and has 
shown the necessity of every man rallying to 
his standard and carrying on the campaign with 
Tigor from now tilir the day of election. If this 
is done and the full strength of the party is 
toooght ont at the polls, I have not yet 
seen • Sepnblioan who doubts that we will 
oarry the State by at least thirty thousand ma- 
jority. The Republicans ot Broome County 
appreciate the situation, and are determined to 
poll a full vote of the party on the 7th of 
November. A thorough canvass is now being 
made in every township and school district 
under the direction of Mr. C. E. Martin, the 
Chairman of the County Committee, and, thus 
fu, the result is most encouraging. No defec- 
tion is found in the ranks— only one Republican 
in the whole county having been discovered 
irho has a leaning for " Tilden and Re- 
form " — and the Liberals, who in 1872 and 
1874 were very nnmerous here ibouts, are now 
BK>re than ninety per cent, of them, for dayes 
aod Wheeler. The lowest estimate that any 
Bapnblican makes of the maiority in this coun- 
ty hi^ November is 1,000, and the general opin- 
ion is that it will reach 1,300. Two years ago, 
when Tilden ran for Governor, it was 535. The 
party is thoroughly united and harmonious. 

Tbe slight disaffection in this city with regard 

to the Congressional nomination in this district 
■ kas all passed off, and the man who threatened 
a bolt art now taking the stamp nightly for 
the ticket. The district oomprisea the Counties 
Ot Broome, Tioga, Tompkins, and Schuyler, and 
nsnaliy polls from 1,500 to 2,000 Republican ma- 
jority- Hon. Jeremiah Wt D wight, the Republican 

candidate. Is a retired merchant living in Dry- 
den. Tompkins County, and will receive the 
fall rote ot his party and probably more. His 
Demoeratio opponent is Gen. Edward F. Jones, 
of this oity,^who ran against Mr. Piatt two 
years ago and was defeated by about seven 
bandred votes. He was formerly a Republican, 
•fterward a LJl>eraI, and finally was captured 
and held fast in the Democratic Party by a 
Congressional nomination. When he ran two 
jears ago he went around among all his ac- 
^naintanoes m this connty and asked them 
as a particular favor to vote lor him 
aerely as a compliment, sajring that 
ke did not, of course, expect to be elected, but 
he was anxious to have a flattering compli- 
mentary vote, which might give him strength 
iB the Democratic Party, and, perhaps, enable 
him, some time or other, to get a nomination on 
their State ticket. Undec^ these representar 
tions, coupled with the fact that Jones is a 
"good fellow" socialty, some three or four 
hondred Repablicans voted for him. To their 
astonishment, they woke up the next morning 
aXter election and found that Jones and his 
iriends were claiming a victory. Fuller re- 
torus showed that JoDes had not been 
awarded a seat in Congress, but be made 
soon a close mn as to prpduce a "scare " 
among his gtH>d-natured Republican friends, 
and they don't propose to voce for Jones out of 
^eompliment" any more. This "compliment- 
fag Jones" has been found to be a risky busi- 
ness, and he will not get a single Republican 
Tote this FalL The Bepahlican nominee for 
Aseomblyman from this county is Edwin C. 
Moody. The Democrats have nominated 
Jerome De Witt Both are young lawyers of 
this city, and both are respectable nomina- 
tioDB. Moody's election, however, is conceded 
by both parties. Last year the Democrats 
elected tbeir candidate, [At. Ford,] because 
tb^ pat np' their strongest man, while the Re- 
pahficans nominated a very weak one. Mr. 
Ford declined a re-nomination this year, and, 
if be had not, he could not be elected against 
Mr. Moody. The county nominees of the Re- 
publican Party this year are all satisfactory, 
and there is nothing to cause a split or to 
prevent a lull party vote. The Republi- 
cans are holding from three to five meetings 
each night in thu county, and expect to 
increase the number from now till elec- 
tion. Mr. Martin, the Chairman of the 
County Committee, is an indefatigable 
as well as a very shrewd worker, and if a single 
Bepahlican in the county stays away from the 
polls this Pall it will not be his fault He has 
arranged to have a public meeting in every 
■ehool district in the county between now and 
election, and there are 239 districts outside of 
this city. He also intends to have as many as 
four ont-door mass-meetings, at different points, 
at wtaieh he hopes to be able to secure speakers 
of national reputation. He says that he never 
has known a time when meetings were better 
attended or more enthusiastic than now 
although at first the people were very apa- 
thetic and did not care about having 
any meetings. He thinks if Chauncey 
Pepew, or District Attorney Tenney, of 
Brooklyn, would come up here and make one 
or two speeches it would accomplish a vast 
deal of good. He is also very anxious to have 
.Speaker Blaine or "Bob" IngersoU here once 
daring the campaign, and promises to have an 

ftoJience that may be measured by the acre. 

Thus far the Bepublicana of Broome County 

have bad to depend almost entirely on local 
speakers. Among those who are out address- 
inn the peojtle almost niphtly are : Hon. 
,0. W. Chapman, late Superintendent of 
Insnrance ; P. W. Hopkins, G. F. Mc- 
Donald, 8. C. Millard, Hon. Greorge 
Sherwood, A. E. Andrews, Frank Stewart, 
and E. O'Connor, of this city. They all report 
' inU andiences and great enthusiasm wherever 
'. they gO' Mr. O'Connor is a lawyer ot this 
, etty, and a llfje-long Demoerat, who has become 
>^ disgiuted with lilden and his fraudulent pro- 
ieadone of " Reform," and has made up his 
jnind to support Hayes and Wheeltr. He is 
doing a good work among the Irishmen ol this 
eoonty by showmg them how they have been 
made tools of by demagogues calling them- 
■elves Democrats, and are driven like cattle to 
the polls to vote uniformly and in one solid 
mass for the Democratic ticket. He urges 
them to show more mdepend ence, like the Ameri- 
cans and Germans, and indicate that they have 
minds of their onu by distributing their votes 
among parties according as tbeir principles 
shall deserve their suffrages. 

In Broome County, as everywhere else 
throughout the State, the tracts snd handbills 
issued from the Tilden printing shop in Lib- 
erty street are found scattered broadcast, 
(ing placard crediting Tilden wUJx >.»>. 



duction of seven or eight millions in the State 
taxes stares every farmer in the face through- 
out the county, and is calculated, in the 
opinion of many Kepubhoans here, to do a 
good deal of damage, notwithstanding its 
falsity has been so olten exposed in speeche* 
and newspapers. The Chairman of the County 
Committee here thinks that more effort 
ought to be made by the State Committee to 
counteract these handbills, and says that the 
distribution of a tract published by the 
Queens County Republican Committee and en- 
titled "Facts for the People," would, in his 

opinion, do a great deal ot good m the rural 
districts. 

The Democrats are holding comparatively 
few meetings in this section. Thoy do not dare 
trust thoir cause to open discussion, but are re- 
lying on the falsehoods circulated in the 
printed tracts that emanate from the "literary 
bureau," and in corrupt personal influence 
with tlie voters. As far as can be ascertained 
here, thoy propose to secure a certain number 
of votes in each school district, whenever it is 
possible, by bribery, in case they cannot be 
reached by other means. It is not believed 
that many Republicans in this county can be 
captured in this way. but there is no doubt that 
the "still hunt," whieh i? the distinguishing 
feature of Tilden's campaign in this State, is 
intended to cover some kiud of rascality, and 
it is very certain that any man or party that 
will persist in circulating such a barefaced lie 
as is contained in Tilden's placard about the 
State taxes would not stiok at bribery if he had 

a chance. 

♦ 

THE GERMAN RKPUBLICAN8 OF TROY — 
LARGE MKKTING. 

Sperfal Ditpatch to the New-Tork Timet. 

Trot, Oct, 16.— The German Republican 
mass-meeting at AdoUo Hall t'O-uigbt was largely 
attended. Addresses were delivered bv Solomon 
Spltzer, -f Willlamsburi, N. Y., and Dr. E. H. 
Mskk, editor Buffalo Freie Presse. There was ranch 
entbasiasm, and the Germans are thoroughly 
aroused. 

THE GREAT BHUOKLYN BARBECUE. 



PREPARATIONS FOR A GRAND REPUBLICAN 
DEMONSTRATION — OUTLINE OF THE PRO- 
GRAMME. 

The arrangements for the great Republican 
barbeone, to be held at Myrtle Avenue Park, Brook- 
lya, under the auspices of the Eighteenth, 
Twenty-flrst, Twenty-third, and Twenty-fifth 
Wards of that City, are now sabstantisUy complete, 
and the sereral committeeit haviaa; the affMC in 

Charge have isaned extensive programmes of the 

proceedlugif. Over fifty thousand tickets have 
been Usaed, and a vast mnltltude are expected to 
respond thereto. Two of the oiea to ba roasted 
wUI be exhibited in the viciaity of the City Hall, 
Fifth Avenue Hotel, and in Wall street, this morn- 
ing, drawn In trucks by horses gavly dec- 
orated, and m the afternoon they will be ex- 
hibited in Brooklyn, in diifdrent parts of the 
City. The barbecue exercises will open at 11 o'clock 
on Thursday morning ; and during the day and night 
speeches will be delivered from flva stands which 
hava been erected for that purpode. The follow- 
ing-named speakers axe expected to address the 
people : Hon. Ifathaniel P. B.tuks, Geo. Daniel E. 
SicKles, Hod. A.W. Tenner, John Cochrane, Judire 
Ditteunueter, .ndge E. I>. Culver, Rev. Matthuw 
Hale Smith, Gen. James W. Hnsted, Major Z. K. 
Pangboru, Hon. Daniel Doueberty, Hun. iS. B. 
Dntcoer, Hon. William H. Simmons, Hou. John 
Odkoy, Hon. Richard Busteed, Gen. John W. 
Mahar, Hon. Henry O'Cunuer, C*pt. James Sanur, 
Dr. David Bell, Capt. Robert Crowe. Joiiu C. Green, 
Key. Henry Hyland Garnett, U. E. Brown, A. B. 
Copes, Joseph Brewer, T. S. Stewart, Key. W. 11. 
Dixon, C. H. Cnrtis, Hun. John Q. Alien, Patrick H. 
Reason. William Rico, of Troy; Pe'er Gait:noD, 
Rev. J. S. Peterson, and Rev. Jacob Tnumas, and 
mnslc will be furnished by Conterno's lull band; 
and a choir of lUO singers, inclading the Hattun 
Glee Club, nn<ler the leadership of Profs. Bechter, 
Rjuinsd, and Emit, who will open tne proceedings 
by a grand chorus especially arranged tor the oc- 
casion. The pane wiil be tioely decorated and bril- 
liantly illuminated )n tho evening bv c.^icinm lights, 
Chinese lauteruc, and lire-works. S.ilate8 will also 
be fired during the day and erening Irom Brooklyn 
Heights, Washington, ard Myrtle Avenue Parks, 
and m the evening there will be a eraod torch-iight 
parade of the Boys in Blue, Minato Men, aud other 
uniformed organizations of New- York, Brooklyn, 
and other cities. The atteodance of many promi- 
nent speakers, in addition to those mentioned 
above, has been piomiseo, incluiliuK Hon. 
James G. Blaine, Hon. RoberD G. lueer- 
soll, Hon. Carl Scburz, Gen. John A. Dix, 
Hou. RJwin D. Morgan, aud Hod. William A. 

Wueeler. The followinK named gentlemen yriU 
have charge oi the vanons stands erected for 
the speakers: Stand No. 1 — Charles W. Godard, 
Chairman; stand No. 2— Darwin K. Jamet, 
Caairman ; stand No. 3 — Irish-Amcrican, Wuliain 
H. Grace ; stand jSo. 4 — Germdn-Auierlcan, Salo- 
man Spi>zer; stand No. 5 — Colored, Dr. P. VV. Bay, 
Chairman. It is Conhdenily expected that this will 
bd one of the liraudesc Oemonatrations ot the kind 
ever witnessed in this State. Mr. Cbarlea W. God- 
ard 18 President of the Committee on Orgauizatioo. 
assisted by iJarwin B. James as Yic«-Pre:iident aud 
Aivin Tenney as Secretary. 

HOME WORK. 



To-morrow, Wednesday, is the second day 
for registration ot voters. Don't fail to register 
early. 

The citizens of the First Ward will meet t his 
evening at No. 36 Greenwich street, to organize a 
Hayes and Wheeler Campaign Club. 

Gen. Sbarpe and Gen. John A. Dix will 
speak in the Morgan Wigwam, comer of Classou 
and Patcam avenues, Brooklyn, to-morrow evening. 

A meeting of the Republican Club will be 

held at No. 152 Franklin street to-moirow evening, 

when a number of good campaign speeches may be 
expected. 

A ballot taken on Saturday last on the 2 P. 

M. Lehigh Valley train, between Maach Chunk 

and Philadelphia, re8nlt::fd in 193 votes lor Hayes, 
40 for XiiUen, aud 2 tor Cooper. 

The Boys in Blue ot the First Assembly Dis- 
trict oeld a meet.ng at No. 154 Franklin street last 
evening, and organized their third company, with 
the lollowing officers: John Glynn, Captain; 
Patrick J. Hiokey, First Lieutenant, ana George 
Hanley, idecond Lieutenant. 

Active preparations are in progress tor the 

grand monster Republican mass-meetintt which is 
to be held at Sing Sing to-morrow. By special ar- 
rangement ths Hudson River Railroad will run 
trains at half fare trom the Tnirtieih street depot, 
ana from the u^-river stations. 

The Boys in Blue of the Ninth Assembly 
District will naraae this evening, and after march- 
ing throagh the principal streets of the di trict, 
they will proceed up town, uassiuu ika rejidenoeof 
Gen. DiX aod the Fitih Avenue Hotel. Tae organ- 
ization id tuiiy unitorniod and thoroughly drilled. 

Gen. E. B. Fowler has issued a general order 
commanding a erand parade of the Brooklyn Boys 
in Bi^e, to take place on Iharsday, the day on 
whiuti the gre..t Republican baroecue is to be held. 
Over live thuosKUC ut the iioya id Blue trom tnis 
City >vill be lu line. They are to be Joiuud ia the 
paradb uy the New-York reuimeuts. 

A largely -attended meeting of Republicans 
was held uu Saturday night at .A.rohO old's Hall, 

Newcastle. Eiwaril B. Line, of Newcastle, pre- 

sideX Toe Y'jaan American Boys in Blue of biug 
Sine, an orcau.z iIju Dumberiut: 100 memOais, were 
preseiit, h.iviug marched Irom the village meu- 
ii'iued. Sarnug addreuaea were ueliverea oy Col. 
Lambert, of New- York ; Maior Willard Ballard, 
aud Jacoo M. Patteiaou, Jr. 

A correspondent, writing from Schuyler 
Coauty, siiys that ine Repuoncana are all alive. 
They are holding iiumeroas aod spirited meetings. 
The seutiiueut lu tavor i>t Hayes aad Whemer and 
against I'liaen is growing rapidly. Hundreds of' 
iite-long Democrats avow lueir luteution to vo.e ihe 
Rrpatmcan li ket. buhuyier County promises to 
give one of oer ruusiUi: old war-iiiue R:)puUiican 
majorities. Among lue most efficient norKers in 
Scuuyier and Sieubeu Counties i« Mr. George 
Becker. He is upeai<.iug day and night wltn excel- 
lent effect. 

The Boys in Blue of the Ninth Assembly Dis- 
trict, numueriug 350 members, will para \o through 
the principal streets of the di<irict to-nigbt, atter 
which they will visit the residence of Major Gen. 

Dix, P'lssins the Fifth Avenau Hotel. A pioneer 
corps has ueea furmoU lu coauectiun witu this ur- 
ganizaauu, which will parade with tbem. The 
mouuteu Corps will also join lu the march. Col. i^. 
M H. Enters is. the commander, who is ablv as- 
sisted '>y many ex-at my othoers. The organiziiton 
in ihis (listriut was muateied aud trained by Major 
William A. C urea. The Repablicans of tue Ninth 
Distnok will make a good show in Novomoer. 



magnificent soectsole. Manv houses alone the 
route were handsomely illuminated, and at various 
points the procession was greeted with enthusiastic 
cheers. The line of march was formed ou Broad- 
way, riEbt resting on Miin streer, nnd moved in the 
foUowlnc order: Eiebtb Ward Club. Seventh Ward 
Club, Texas Rangers, Sixlb Ward Club, Mill's 
Guards, Fifth VVard Club, Haves and Wheeler 
Central Club, Eourrh Ward " Tiger " Battalion, 
thePnelps" Guards, Blauvelt Battery, Third Wartl 
"Lion" Battalion. Hobart Guards, Tattle Conti- 
nental Guards, First Ward Club. The principal 
streets were trayersen, and the clubs dismissed at a 
late hour. The demonstration Was one of the 
largest ever seen In the city. 



REPUBLICAN PARADK IN JKR3KY CITY. 
There 'was a large and imposing Bopublican 
parade in Jersey Ciov last night. The main streets 
of the city were thronged as if on a gala occasion, 
and the procession was accompanied on its entire 
route by an immense crowd of people. There must 
have been 6,000 in line. The most noticeable fea- 
tures In the procession were the Robeson Battery, 
led by an immense fohr-borse transparency and fol- 
lowed by a lite-boat manned with sailors ; the Far- 
rier, Spodone, and Payne Gaards, all colored, and 

nomberlng about six huodrsd men; the Tuffey 
Lauciers, Muunted "Veterans, the Hayes and 
Wheeler Riigiment of Biys in Blue, ao.f (be im- 
mense number of citizeDs on boraoback, in car- 
riages, and every conceivable vehicle crowded 
wiih men. Some of the carriat;es contained 
ladles. There were a numlier of trucks con- 
taining representations of difterent trades, such as 
blacksmiths, carpeuters, and batcners. One car- 
nage contained the Goddess of Liberty. Tuere was 
aprolu'lon of tireworkd, and the truck" and car- 
riages were almost luaded down nith flags. The 
houses all along the line, aud particularly in Jersey 
avenue, were handsomjlv illuminated and deco- 
ra. ed. In 01 e window was a litile girl with the 
American fl ig wrapp»d around her, and waving a 
tiny Uiig. S.ie was vocifemuslv cheered. A large 
number of iransparencieH were carried in the pro- 
ression, bearing appropriate mjtroes. The Hvening 
Journal h..d a huge irauspareucy in line. 

THE BROOKLYN RING DEMOCRATS. 



M'LAUGHLI.n's FOLLOWlCRS P GHTINQ — A 
MAN WHO WAS I.N Did ED FOR BALLOT- 
BOX SIUFFI.NG — HIS CHOXCK FOR AS- 
8KMBLY. 
The Democratic General Committee of Kings 
County met last evening foe the purpose of reosiv 
ing the credentials of tha delegates elected to th e 
varidus nominating conventions. Iha "Boss' " follow- 
ers had a very unhappy time of it. The two prin- 
cipal contests ware in the Third Assembly Dis- 
trict and in the New-Lots District. The del- 
egation from the Third Assembly District 
in favor of the nomination of John Shanley 
for Assembly were admitted, but not without a bit- 
ter ountesr. Mr. Edward Toohil, who was a candi> 
date against Shanley, charged excitedly that the 
grossest frauds were perpetrated at the prlmarv, 
and that both Shanley and James Dunn, his backer, 
were guilty of treachery. Tbe backers of Dunn re- 
torted, aud some very unpleasant epithets were free- 
ly biiDdied about. It is the opinion ,ot 

many Democrats that in givins the nomination to 
Shanley, who was indicted and tried for ballot-box 
stuthug, that an injury has been worked to the 
ticket which the best nomiuatloas lor o her posi- 
tions will fait to oouuieraot. la tbe New-Lotd 
District the deles>a:lon in lavof^uf Rernaid iHidas 
for the ofiSceof Charity Commissioner was admitted, 
defeating Mr. Gilliam Scheuok. Midas who is now 
a Charity Commissioner, is perhaps McLaughlin's 
most fawulng follower. Mr. bobenck Is one ot 
the roost respnctable Uemocrats iu tbe party. Ic 
\sas rumored last night that a change of policy had 
been agreed on bv tue "Boss "and bis counselors 
concerning the couven lions to be held to-dsy. On 
Saturday the purpose was to adjourn lae conveu- 
veniions until atier the Republicuns and Inde- 
pendent Djmocrats have made tbeir nominations. 
The "Boss," it was saia, had determined to carry 
tbiDgi with a high hand, aud that the admissiun of: 
the bbauley and Midas delegations were indica- 
tions of the policy to be puraued ia making all the 
nominations. A number of prominent Democrats 
are siiil in favor or aojourningthe oonveutions until 
atter the Republican nominations. One ut these 
said yesterday toat if the couven lions were not ad- 
journed the regular Democrats would surely be 
beaten in November. 



REPCBLICAX DEMOXSTRATION IN PATKB90X. 
The various Hayes and Wheeler Clubs of 
Pateisuc, N. J., had a large toroh-liirht parade last 
evening, and noiw.tbstauding the decided coolness 
of the weather the streets were lined with paople. 
About two thonsand men appeared in line, and 
with their handsome unitorms, illumiuatei bV 
torches, fixe<> jcka and ealuiom lishta. nrnaantad a 



THE OITY VHMOOBAOT. 
A meeting of the Conference Committee ap- 
pointed by the Tammauy County Couvdutlon was 
held yesterday at Tammany Hall, Peter B. Olney in 
the chair. Gommanioations were receiver from 
a number of clubs and organizations recom 
mending tha nomination of different caudj. 
dates, and the committee, witbont tak- 
ing any action upon them, adjourned until 
this afternoon. The Anti-Tammany Conference 
Committee will meet this evening at Irving Hall. 
The conventions of the two factions to nominate 
Assembl.vmen met in all tbe districts of tbe City 
last eyening, and'eaotrappotlcrted a Conference Com- 
mittee^ A meeting ut tht) various Cuutereuce Com- 
mittees appoiu ted at t'he Tammany Congressional, 
Aldermanic, and Assembly couventions will meet 
this afternoon at tne Fonrteenth street wigwam, 
to agree upun a plan uf action. The friends of 
James O'Brien appe.ir to be very well satibfied with 
tne Mtand taken Oy him at the Anti-Tammany Con- 
vention, and there will be a mass-meeting in his 
favor held to-night in the Fifteenth Asnembly Dis- 
trict, at the corner of Tnirty-fourtn street aud 
Eighth avenue. If MorriHsey should withdraw 
from tbe Anti-Tammauy organization, it is said 
that a large number of aissatistiea Democrats who 
are now in the Tamroany ranks, anu wno are un- 
friendly to him, will desert Keily and join the op- 
pOsitiou. The two "Johns," it is said, have been 
in private consultation several times since the 
taiiure ot Ihe conferences ueld before the late con- 
ventions. The irieuas of O'Brien charge Mornssey 
with an attempt to sell out the Aati-Tammany 
Party in his own Interest. 

nSMOCSATlC yOMlJ^A-TIONS. 

The Democrats of the Fifth Difltriofc of Hud- 
son County, N. J., have nominated Hon. Garrett D. 
Van Be:pen fur member of Assembly. 

Daniel L. Martin has been nominated for Assem- 
bly by tbe Democrats of the Third District ot Mid- 
dlesex County, N. J. 

The Keoablioans of the Fourth Assembly Dis- 
trict of Newark, N. J., yesterday decided to make 
no nominatioo. There are two Democratic candi- 
dates fur this district — Clark, rsgniar, and Vsghte, 
iodepeudent. 

Tue Hnnterdon County Democrats have nomi- 
nated James M. Pidcock tor btate Senator. 

SEPVBLIOAN HOHINATIONS. 
The Republicans of this State have made 
nominations as foiluw'S : 

MoNTOOMBBr CouNir. — For Assembly. David W. 
Shulet; ISueiilt, Poier D. Mjyer; CouuiyC<erk, A. 
H. Barton ; Justice ot Sesmuns, Joseph Noxun. 

iOB ABSBilBLY -^Albany County, ±'irst District, 
James J<i»uei; Second District, Waters W. 
Braman. Erie Cuuot.v, Tuud District, Edward 
UallSiiiber. Oswego Coauty, Second Distiict, 
George M. Case. 

A SEVJiltE HIT. 
The Lockport Union ia»a Democratic paper, 
and has its own way to rap Tiideuism over the 
knuckles. This is what it s.id ou Friday : " The 
great victory achieved iu ladidua, it is conceded, is 
largely due to the personal influence and discreet 

counsel of Hon. Thomas A. Hendiloks. He was 
vigi>ant trom the opeuiug to tt;e close of the cam- 
paiictt. Ho encouraged aii Democrats In tbe work 
necessary to csusummate a inuuipn. He held up 
Cu view the impuriauce uf a uui^ed par >, and. 
wuuld not for a inomeut tolerate tue suspiciuu that 
tnure wat in the Svaie a Heudiicks party in ountra- 
disliuu.isa to the universal Domocratic Parly of 
tne country." ^^^^^^^ 

ovB oyta coNiEsr. 

Alter speaking enoouragiiigly of the Kopub- 
licaa prospects la tuis State, the Ogdeusburg Jour- 
nal says: "We count little npuu discord In the 

Dcmucratic ranks, aUhou^b we know XildPn and 

his iiiumates and political associates are iutouael.v 
disliked in ail tbe Democratic strongholds of the 

iSiate. It IS not neccasurv ihal Kepuulicaus anoulu 
Itiiild their hopes ut success upon a knowledge of 
Tilden's unpoouisruy wuu bis own party, lor the 
reaMOU than tUey nave ouiy to do vheir uucy euer- 
getiuaily and bring tueir own party sirougih to the 
liulis to win a giuriuas victory." 

A WHALE ly THK CHESAPEAKE. 
The Baliimure San of the 12(u lust, says ; 
"Tbe ohiuers and sevuial passeugers by the steam- 
ship Helen, of tue Eastern Sucre Steam-boat Com- 
pany, report that on Sunday morning a largd black 
whale gruuudttd on Occonanuock bar, Noitbampton 

County, Ta., about forty milea trom tbe mouth of 
tue Cacsa^jeake, ana wa^ allied next day. Ouco- 
bannock Creek is un the loute ot the steamer 
Helm, and Capt. Ra\ nor, her commander, tojietuer 
with his cruw, had ahiht wim the wha.e. The 
leviacnau gruuuaeu aoout 7 A. JJ.. in dix teei water. 
Where he remaiued all day, aud crotvds of people 
came trom alt sections to get a look at the nuosual 
Visitor. The whale at intervals spouted up tue 
water, anil maoe ttreat exertions to get od; 
but each snuceeuing effort sent it turther 
into Shadow water. Ou Monday the catcass 
was to oe taken ashore at high tide. The oii will 
be tried out aud sola. Mr. John Ad^iisoo, a resi- 
dent of tbe locality, brou^ut a piece ol the tiiil of 
the whale to Baliimoie. The wuale wasSTigfeet 
lung, weishc abouc two tons, length of tail H feet, 
muuib 3 feet It is thought the wbale was 
either uriven into the Chesapeake br a south-east 
irale or todowsd a vessel, and in attempting in put 
tA sAA Aniared the wrooic inlet and was straBded." 



CITY Ml) SUBURBAN NEWS. 

— ♦ — 

NEW- y ORE. 

To-morrow, Wednesday, is the second day 
for registration of voters. Be sure you register 
early. 

Controller Green paid yesterday the salaries 
of tbe public school teachers tor the month of Sep- 
tember. 

John Littlewood, of No. 20 Desbrosses street, 
died yesterday from a fracture of the ba^e of the 
skull, caused by a fall on the pavement on Saturday. 

The members of the Gold and Silver Com- 
mission met yesterday at the Post Office, and trans- 
acted roatine business. The sessions are held with 
closed doors. 

The Board of Apportionment met yesterday 

and authorized the Controller to issue City Parks 

improvement fund stock, amounting to f25,000, for 
the Park Department. 

The tug-boat Louis, 'with two garbage scows in 

tow, unexpect«dly sank yesterdayafternoon oflConey 

Island, while returning to this Ciy. Assistance 
has been sent bv the Coast Wreckmx Company. 

The following is the weekly statement of 
Chamberlain Taopan : Balance in the City Treas- 
ury OiiU 7. tl.iD0,684 77 ; receipts, $2.3e3,716 24; 
payments, $2,388,384 62 ; balance, Oot. 14, *1,236,- 
011 63. 

The Young People's Christian Association of 
the Sixteenth Baptist Church announce a coarse ot 
lecturer, to be held in the church. Sixteenth atree", 
near Eighth avenue, Wednesday evenings, Oct. IS 
and 25, and Nov. 1, 8, and 15.- 

City Marshal -Hayes yesterday seized the 
steamer Colon, of the Pjcifio Mail Line, for arrears 
of pergonal taxes alleged to bi» due by the company 
for 1874, amounting to CI80,000. Tiie seizure was 
made at the company's dt>ck tootof Caual street. 

The fourth annual meeting of the choirs of 

Trinity Parish will take place at Tnnity Chapel, 

West Twenty-fff h street, near Broadway, on 
Thursday evening next at 8 o'clock. An address 
will be delivered bv Rev. Dr. Dix. and 100 selected 
voices of tbe Trinity choir will tender tbe mnsic. 

Controller Green presented to the Board of 
Apportionment at the meeting yesterday a petition 
ot the Trustees of the Nineteenth Ward, asking for 
an appropriation, to bo included in the estimate for 
1877, for the erection ot a building in said ward for 
school purposes. Tbe petition was referred to tbs 
Controiler. ^ 

The trial of Capt. Josiah L. Grindle, of the 
ship St. Mark, charged with cruel and uunaoal 

punishment on shipboard, was concluded yesterday 
atternoon in the United States Circuit; Contt, berore 
Judge Benedict. The argument of: counsel was 
heard, and Judge Benedict will charge the jury at 
tho opening of court this morning. 

The twenty-fifth anniversary of St, Luke's 
Home for Aged Women 'will be celebrated on 
Wednesday, Oct. 18, at the Home, corner ©f Eighty- 
ninth street and Madison avenue. The house will 
be open to visitors from the hour of 11 A. M. 
The exercUes will be held in the Church of tbe 
Beloved Disciple, next the Home, at the hour of 
2 P. M. 

Between the hours of 9 o'clock on Friday 

night and 6 o'clock on Saturday morning last, tho 
store ot Hand E. Merkle, merchant tailor, at No. 
64(r Sixth avenue, was visited by burglars and 
loobed of clolbmg and cloths valued kt $732. Tbe 
barglars anlooked tbe ball door ot tbe premises knd 
gained access to tbe store by forcing open a door 
leaaing trom tbe hallway. 

Ephraim L. Snow and George W. Snow, com- 
posing tbe firm of Snow & Son, iron merchants, of 

No- 206 Water street and No. 516 East Twentieth 
streer^ assignHd tbeir property for the Denefit ot 
creditors to Ferdinand St^ern yesterday. Jacob 
Floeraheim and Nehemiah Floersheim, coa'posiag 
tbe firm of Floersheim Brothers, made a similar as- 
signment to Reginald Hart yesterday. 

Mr. W. S. Ward, naturalist of tbe New- York 
Aquannm, will be at the library of the Aqaariam 
this evening for the purpose of conferring with 
those who desire to avail themselves of the privi- 
leges of the library aud Ihe lanoratory connected 
with it. In the consideratiou of the applications 
special attention will be paid to tbe request of those 
who are engaged in such lines of soieutitic inquiry 
as relate to tua anatomy of fish and marine animals. 

At the meeting of the Board of Police yester" 
day the lollowing transfer j were made: Sergt' 
Stephen Keating, Fourth to Twenty-ninth Precinct; 

Sergt. J. J. Taylor, Twenty -ninth to Fourth; 
Roundsmen Ernest Schrott anu John T. Kelly, from 
the Twenty-ninth to the Thirteenth and Twenty- 
first Precincts, respectively; Patrolmen John 
OMahoney, Fifth to Twenty-third Precinct; Mi- 
chael Fiynn, Twenty-first to Nineteenth Sub; and 
James Curry, trom Nineteenth Sub to Tvrenty-first 
Precinct. ■' 

BROOKLYN. 

The primaries of the Slooum Democrats 'were 
held last nignt in Brooklya, and passed off quietly. 

Oliver Cotter detected ten liquor-dealers 
violating the Excise law on Sunday, and has pre- 
ferred charges against all of tbem. 

Last Wednesday Patrick Ennis, of Maspeth, 
Ljng Island, came to this City to give testimony 

in a suit pending before Mr. P. Barnard as Referee. 
Since that time he has not been seen or heard of by 
his friends. 

Mrs. Robert Thackenberry was iatally burned 
while ligbtiuK a fire at her residence, No. 196 Smith 
strePt> yesterday. Her dress took fire, and before 
the flames could be extinguished by her husband 
she was so badly burned that hoi life is despaired 
of. 

The Commissionera of City Works will to- 
day open proDosals for stone laoiag the dam of tbe 

Hempstead Reservoir. Kingsley & Keeney sent a 
protest to the Mayor yesterday denying the right 
of the Board of City Wurka to make any new cun- 
tracts lor work on the reservoir covered by their 
contract. They offer to do any portion of the 
work If they are allowed. 

The Woman's Union Missionary Society 'will 

bold a convention for three days, beginning at 10 

o'clock this morning, in the Church of the Pilgrims, 
corner ot Bemsen and Henry streets. Reports from 
the homo missions will be read and addresses will 
be made by the ladies present. The evening meet 
ings will be conducted by clergymen, aud addresses 
will be made by RdV. Drs. Storrs and Scudder, 
Cnancellor Crosby, and others. 

Rev. Norman Beaver, D. D., for eight years 

Pastor of the First Presbyterian Churcb, yesterday 

resigned his vastorate. It is stated that tbe main 
incentive to the change is the desire on tbe part of 
the Pastor for a larger field of laoor. A meeting of 
the societ,y will be held to-morrow eveuins to take 
action upon the resignation, and a meeting of tbe 
Presbyter,' next week will formally sever the rela- 
tions between Pastor and people. 



NEW-JERSEY. 

Collector Love, of Jersey City, reports the 
week's receipts to be (3,764 87. 

The ofiScial Republican majority at the recent 
charter election in Newark is 1,792. 

The trial of Patrick Carr for the murd er of 
bis wife, at Paterson, has been postponed until to- 
morrow. 

The Presbyterian Synod of New-Jersey will 
assemble in the First Presbyterian Church at Eliz- 
abeth to-day. 

Robert W. Shannon, aged sixty-two years, 
fell down stairs at his residence in Ticbenor street, 
Newark, and died Sunday night from bis injuiies. 

Charles Tag, a residept of the Hackensack 
Plank Road, Union Hill, has been missing for over 
five weeks, and bis friends fear that he has met 
with foul play, 

The Republicans of Union County will hold a 

grand niase-meetlng at ClizaOelb to-morrow even- 

ine. Hou. H. C. Tceat, of Maiue, and Fruf. J. M. 

LontrMton, -. the well-known colored orator, will 
apeak. . 

Justice Strong, of Hoboken, yesterday issued 
a warrant for tbe arrest of Catherine Booney, of 
Ei{;hth street, on a complaint made bv Caroline 

Guischy, who alleges that Mrs. Booney set two 
blood-houods upon her aud tbrealuued to have her 
torn apart. 

Patrick Bagley, residirg at No. 125 Washing- 
ton street, Hobukun, was thrown from his buggy in 
Ninth street, Jeraey City, by bis horse taking 
inght, and striking on the pavement fiactured his 
skull. He was taken tu St. Francis Hospital, where 
ho lies in a critical o ndition. 

A sleeping car in a Pennsylvania Railroad 
train oauiiht fire while ruuning hetwoeu Newark 
and Elizabeth Sanday night, ana burned fiercely 
belure it was discuverud. Tbe pasaeugrrs were 
conoiderably Irighiened at first, as the uoors were 
locked, but all escaped without Injuri". The car 
was seriously damaged, 

/ A tramp, who gave his name as Henry Hoff- 
man, stopped Cjuii.y Clerk James U. Bracn on 
Newark avenue, Jersey City, late on Sunday niebc, 
and demauded a sum of mouey. Wueti Mr. Biaun 
refused ti> Land over the amount the telluw 8iracli 
him in the tsce. Mr. Braun grappled with bun 
aud held him uutil an ofiiuer appeared. Yesterday 
Hoffman was committed lor examination. 

The coal-heavers ompl oyed at the Port John- 
son coal docks, strut k recently, owing to a reduc- 
tion of their wages. Yesterday morning the coal 
cumiiatiy put on a new force of two hundred men, 
and the old hands gathering around It was thouubt 
that there wiinid be a not. Chief Whitnpy, who 
was sont for, arrived with a squad of offieeisand 
siicceeded iu^getting tbe old bauds to return at tbe 
new rates, and at the end of the week if they found 
that ibev could not make enou.h to live on tb ay 
onnia auare tUeir Aaaa to t^e officers of the comnanv 



and doubtless get tbe old standard of -wages re- 
turned. 

A POSTMASTER AS A DISTILLER. 



AN ILLICIT STILL DE8TR0YBD IN NKW-JERSEY 
— THE POSTMASTER OF HOMESTEAD STA- 
TION ARRESTED AS THE PROPRIETOR. 

Another successful raid on "crooked 'whisky" 
was mads yesterday afternoon by Dspnty Collector 
P. R. Hawley, of this City— this time In the anbnrbs 
of Hoboken, at a quiet place known as Homestead 
Station. The information received as to the place 
was very direct, and early yesterday a narty con- 
sisting Of Deputy Collectors Hawley and Ryan, of 
this City; Revenue Agent A. H. Brooks, of New- 
Jersey ; Dennty Collector Reed, of Jersey City, and 
Deputy United States Marshal Denbeit, and a 
posse of assistants, proceedoa to the place. Passing 
beyond TTnion Hill, to the flats on the other side, by 
the railroad track, an unpretentious coal 
and wood jard woj surrounded, and 
a still of about one hnndred and fifty gallons ca- 
pacity was found ia full operation. There were 
but two persons at work In the place at tbe lime, 
one of whom mvsteriouBly escaped. The other 
rushed to tbe second floor of tb^ bnilding and 
jnmped from the window. He ran into the woods 
ac'j lining, but was soon caught and brought back. 

While the officers were taking an invenlorv of the 
placethoywe:eapproached by Jacob Stoffer, who rep- 
resented himself as tbe owner of tbe premises, aud 
inquired tbeir authority lor trespassing upon tnem. 
Upon beini; Informed, be stated that though be 
owned and carried un tbe coal business there ; 
though he lived in the same building, a portion nt 
which was used as the Post Odice of the plnce, 
he nad no Knowledge whatever of toe business just 
discovered oy the otficers. He was also taiien into 
cnstodv, and at this time his anxiety in regard to 
an approaching train disclosed tue fact tnat he was 
the Po8tma»ier, a position he has held tor three 
yearn oast. Seizure was made of the entire prem- 
ises, valued prouably at |15,0U0, and then began the 
de.^trdction of tbe still aud appurtenant^s. In a 
short time ail semolaiicf of the former prosperity 
was lost, aud still, worms, and connections were 
piled m tbe yard. 'The contents ol tour large mash- 
tubs, containing about one thousand gallons of 
masb and two barrels of molasses, were then run 
iniu tbe sewer, and the two parrels of rum kept as 
evidence. Quite a large crowd collected uefure this 
Work was coucluded, and among all there wa-s a 
seeming astonishment that such a business could 
have been carried on in their immeuiate vicinity 
without their knowledge. 

The bniidiug seized is a two-story frame, tbe 
frunt portion, taciug tbe road leading to the rail- 
road station, tieiug occapied as the Post Office, and 
also as the ousiness i-fiioe of the coal yard. Adjoin- 
ing, in the rear, is a t>iable, and connecting v^ith 
this the still in question. Appearances wunld iu- 
dicaie that tbe wuod aud co'al business was not a 
very extrusive one, judging from tbe stock on 
uand. Postmaster Stoff r aud tbe other man ar- 
res:ed, giving the name of Michael Day, were 
brought tu Jersey City aod held iu |5,00u uail each, 
before United States Csmmissiuner Muirbead. tor 
examiuauon, on charges ot owning and runniug an 
illicit still. The property seized, mcluaiug two 
fine horses and wagons, were turned over to United 
States Marshal Bailey, of Jersey City. 

A BOATMAN UHOWIi ED. 

The body of Thomas Tanner, a canal boat- 
man, was fuund floating in the Morris Canal, at Pat- 
erson, about 10 o'clock yesterday muining. De- 
ceased, who was Captain of a buar, was last seen 
about 7:30 u'clock, Saturday evening, when tbe boat 
was guing ibruugh the canal near the Stony Road 

Bridge. At t^battime he cailed oat to the boy who 
was driving the horses, lu look out for the rocks. 
A short distance further uo tbe boat ran on the 
bank, and .hen the ooy discovered that tbeCaptain 
was midsiui;. The case is a mysteriuus one, as 
Tanner was an ablebodied, visorous man, a good 
sniiumer, and there weie nti marks ot violence upon 
the body. He resided at W^lugton, N. J., where 
be leaves a wife and two chlldrou. An inquest wiil 
be bwld. 

INSPECTORS OF JiJUEOUOS ON TRIAL. 

Messrs. Anthony C. D'Ozevillc, Charles S. 

Joucs, Cuarles W. Soerbeck, and De vV^itt Clinton 

Judah, comprising tbe full Board ot Registry in tbe 

Eleventh Election District of the Fifth Assem bly 

District, were arraigned before tbe Board of Police 
yesceiday tor trial, charged with bavmg failed to 
leave the public copy ol tbe rogiitry iu ibe poll- 
ing-place, as required by law. Tne lacis in the 
complaint were a.mitted b^tne accused, who haii 
uo valid excuse to offer. The matter was referred 
to tbe board lor decision. 



ARRIVALS AT THE HOTELS. 
Lieut. Gov. Dursheimsr is at tbe Hotel 

Bronswiclc. 

Col. H. S. McComb, of Delaware, is at the 
New- York Hotel. 

Ex-Congressman E. B. Morgan, of Aurora, 
N.Y., is at the St. Nicholas Hotel. 

Gen. Daniel E. Sickles, and k\'K Church, the 
artist, are at the Brevoort House. 

J, Nabuco, of the Brazilian Lej;ation at 
Washingtou, is at tbe Buckingham Hotei. 

Judge Nathaniel Sbiptnan, of the United 
States Distr.ct Court fur Connecticat, is at tbe bt. 

Jamus Hutel. 

Giuseppe Dassi, President of the Italian Cen- 
touniai CouimiHsion, is ac tna Gilsey House. 

Baron Bleiohroder, of Berlin, and Fritz Cun- 
liffi^ Owen, ot tbe Japauess Centennial Commission, 
are at the Windsor Hotel. 

Leon Warshowsky aud Pierre OrlofF, of the 
Russian Ceuieunial Cummissiun, and Congressman 
John O. Whitehouse, of Poughkeepsie, are at the 
Albemarle Hotel. 

Hon. James G. Blaine, of Maine ; Col. Georgg 
W. Vriediy, Chairman ot the Bepuulioan State Com- 
mittee of Indiana, aud Lieut. Col. LaMontagne, of 
Quebec are at the Fifth Avenue HoteL 

Senator James F. Starbuok. of Watertoiyn, 
N.Y.; Senator GiMrge B. Braaley, of Corning, N.Y.; 
De Witt C. West, ot LotvTille, N. Y., and Uol. 
Eiisha H. Ludington, United States Army, are ac 
the Metropolitan Hotel, 



Do NOT BE Induced 
To waste .your money on worthless medicines. Pai,- 
lSt's Magicai, Pain bXTaxcTOB has stood lor over thirty 
years, an<i is the greate«t cure fur files known.— .<id- 
vertUtment. 

PASSEHiGERS ARRIVED. 

In tteam-ihtp Otmianie, /rotn Liverpool— A. J. Cston, 
Mrs. A. J. Caton, ftirs. U. bymou^ and infant, W. U. 
Libtiy, Sirs. W. H. Li .by, iL Furman Hunt, .rs. M. 
turm.tn Bunt, infant and uurse, Mis^ aunt, U: N. 
Couitar. Mrs. H. N. (..'ougar, U. H. Cougar, Jr., MUs 
Florence Congar, Mis. .A. itilll^r. Uias H. tvbite, G. K. 
i.arney, Mrs. G. li. Harney, C. Klelu, Jaoub H. Schiff„ 
Mrd. Jacob U. Scbifl' aud infant, J. Darcy Wilson, C.J 
Mactavish. Mrs. Jdactavish, Miss M. Mactavish, Mts«^ 

E. .vlactavisli, idissF. lUactaVish. Col. b. D. Judd, Onion 
Bethe I, Mr. Laugermanu, A Ziun, H. W. ito^euteii, 
Edmund w. F. vvhitjey. Mrs. Kdmund W. F. >Vbltney, 
Mrs. iirby. AvloS Kirby. BlighiSwlft,; J. R.Callender, Jr., 
Capt.K. Harpiu Crewe. James Unntijigton, Mr. » ILiams, 
VT. A. Low, Mrs. W. A. Low, Uawer Arthur h. Low, 
Miss Vera Low, and two maid lervants, Abraham 
Marks, Airs. Abraham Marks, JUiss CeciUa llariis, .Mas- 
ter bimon .Marks, Master Joseph Marks, and nurse, 
Capt. vVaierman, Mrs. U. U. Waterman, Miss 6terlinx. 
Mr. Potter, Jl. M. Wart>arg, William ..rosa bucuanao, 
•Ura v> illiam cross Bacbana|i„dli<>s Buobunun, Miss 
Int'Z Buchanan. MibS Alice Buoua^n, aud uurse, John 
ttobinsOD. -Mrs. Johuuooiuson, U. Morgan, .Mrs. U. .\lor- 
ssn, Miss Wuodbndge, .vilsa aorfietd, Mi88 Lucv UarriB, 
Jane Ferris, U. K opiuney, vV. O. Ferris, Mrs. W. (i. 
Ferris. James U. Lyles, James U. If'art, cbarles Coun- 
selman, Mrs. Chailes CounseimanrF. D. ueau, Mrs J. 

F. Head, K. Uiggs, Mra B. J. babbitt, Jlisa Lilly Babliiit 
and maid servant, J. U. Vau Zaudt, Ariuur aarria, 
W. U. Feebles, J. tsoott Feeolea, Mrs. J. ocjtt Feebles. 
W. A. Camdwell. Mrs. W. 4^' Cauldweil aud inaid, 
Misa Carrie CauldwiU, Thomas W. Cau.dwell, Mateter 
8 Miloank Cuuldwell. £icnard G. Uawjuos, Mrs. May 
E. i-awklns, P. W. Livinvstou, Mrs. F. W. Livingston, 
tj. M. Niclfersou and maid, K. u. Nlokeraon, .>ir. Juruao, 
Mrs. Jordau, ttooert oe. Jr., Mrs. drUOc-rt Uoe, Jr. . 
iniant. ana two maidservants, Miss Hoe, Miss Carrie 
H.e, H. M. Warren, Mrs. U. M. Warreu, vV. I), iress. 
George Taylor, James WiUiamson, Master J. WUIiam- 
sun A. M. cbiiili gtord, Mrs. A. M. bbillingfurd, 
Dr E. M. Bale, .'J. A. Glberr, Mr. Barker, J. 
Ambler, W. H. Tilllughurst, - mts. Kingman's maid, 
H J be Santa ..xuriua, Mrs. K. J. lie bauta 
Mariua, G. W. Lewis, Mrs. 1 btsbe Williams. Mi. VValsb, 

Beujitniu Ingle, Hubert. Taylor, Jatne* l^arragh, H. d. 
HiujpBon. J. F. sarg, C. W. Whitman. U.iited tJtates 

consul. Mrs. C W. vVhitmaD, Mailer Wnitman, K It. 
Haibe , , Mrs- F. K. aaisey anu maid, W. H. Caldwell, 

Mrs. vV. H. Caldwell, Mrs. IS. A. i'ownseud, D. E. nyre, 
H. H. Pbipsou, Airs. Drake, Thomas d. Crsig, Joscpn 

W. Kegicy, John K. uaccn, Kdw..rd NoUam, J. M. v\ ooJ- 
buusi-, .Mcuolas Uatta, K de Uary, Arcour drt Uaiy, 

Ucury Turner, Oavid LODez, L, U. Ihidon De Wit, .\lired 
J. Mauuinij, aeniy J.-Uate, A. F. I Ijke, H. U. Tbomp- 
Bim, Ruben James Kogers, Mrs. Kiiza>HJtb ttogers, Jiisi 
Eveline May Kogerj>. ..Usa Maty cstbei- R jteis. Joun 
A. Coleman, ttov. J. Simpson, Charles C Heron. Kev. 
James Moran, Kev. H. Cassliiy, oamuoi WaJace. 



MINlATVliE AL^AjHAU—illlS DAI. 
Sunrises 6 13 I Sun sets 5:17 I Moon rlses..'{:10 

UlOa WATBB— THIS OAT. 

Bandy Hook... 7: :i6 | Gov. island.. o:l-t | fleU Gate. ..9:36 

MABrnJH INl't)LLiaENCE. 

• 

JfgW-roRK MOXDAV, Oct 16. 



CLhiAliUD. 



Stearo-8hlp». Old Dominion, Walker, Norfolk, tc. Old 
Dominion ftteum'Sblp Co.; a. C f^timora, Wairon. Pliil- 
aiteinhla. James .i.nd ; irapooula, UragK. Portland, 
Me., J. F. Ames I W. kvoodward, louug;, Baltimore. 

LarSB Ir^umad, (cpau.,) Sens. 'IVneriffe via Las Pal- 
mas, tv.W. Defori'est li, o'o.; Brisuaue. (ur. ) Uendle- 
Btoue, Loadou, feaOudy. wVil.ls Ji. Co i ViUe de Nuuei, 
(Fi-.,>Hotow, Marseiles, &c., James neiiry; iSxp>or%- 
ture, (Itai ,) Lungooarau. Uioralcr, fur orders, I'uncb, 
Edye t Co. _ 

brigs Ktoteru Star, Foster, Georgetown. (Demcrarn,) 
H. Trowbridge's Sons; D.J. cSouie, douie, tj.ie enstowu. 
J. H. WliiolieKtrr t Co.; curacao, (Br.,) Faulkner, vvii- 
liamstedt. (Curacoa,) Joseph Foulke's oous. 

bchiB. Nettie, (Dr..) St. Joiiu, iN. il.. A. i. Ueney; D. 
H. Fo'k, iSeyiuoui, Ouib.irien, Tuomss Hull, .Sylv«Bter, 
boston. 

ABRl VED. 

Steam-ship Blebmond, Kelly, Kichmond, City Point, 
and Nurtolx, w.tu mdse. and passengers to uld Dbinlu- 
ion tit«8m-sn(p Co. 

k.k<n Guscban. Uiat..! Heins. fiaii^)>nrK Sent 1. m bal« 



laBltofharles Lolingt Co. Anchored m lower bay 
for, orders. 

Bark Antonio G., (Itol.,> Caflero Trslee 60 da, m bal- 
'*** .♦'O """^ef' '"ePt- 26, lat 46. Ion. 40, had ahei.vv 
"• !^,- B*'*' lasting four days, lu which stove bulwarks 
and broice rails, k.c. 

Bark Post, (Aoi w.,) Gundersen, Boulogne 49 ds. , f n 
DBlliiBt to C. lo'jias b Co. 

Kcbr. 7. C. Boners, Fletcher, Bath, with lumber to 
John Bo- nton's Sod. 

Sohr. I'bouiau R. Wooley. Osborn, Virginia. 

Schr B. 8. Briggs, Furmore, Vireinia. 

WIND— Sunset, moderate, W.; clear. 



^^/^JTjSrlS^ ^"^^ "•'' •**« BTOunding ap9«. 
▼ZtVJ""?.^*^ •*'^''- l»«>ell». Cspt Hanson. Ne». 

Tork Aug. U., tor Hull, bss been towed into Oov^t. 
?% I *i?'"*?*°*'^ damaeo In a ooliision wlib th*- Brttl 
B™^Y,h^i"*°J**,'i^- ^llM latter has been towed wt« 
Bremorhaven. Holland 

rii?'''^!;.',;,?'';- ' "--'f *»e AacKoT Uw steamer Bolin* 
i.«?« r^ , '"• ^i/™ New-York Oct. 7 for GuMaow.Mb 
here to-day, and proceeded to destination. ^^ 



SA J LED. 

Steamer Wyaioke, for Norfolk, tc; ships Chrvso- 
mene and Sarah falgnett, for Liverpool; bat its Maria 
for Hamiure; Oinen, for Cork, tor orders; Prof. 
8cnw<-igaard, tor Cork or Falmou-h, for orders ; Anna 
vva.8», for aavant. Also via Lomr Island 8onnd : 
Behrs. George W. Jewelt, >nUto, and A. &. Dlverty, 
for boston ; James M. Bayles, for Providence. 

♦ 

ST CABLE. 

I oTOow, Oct. 16.— 81d. Oct. 9, Lizze ZIttloxen, Fan 
Francisco, Templar; Oot 15. Harvester, Cirrler oove, 
Svnneu, Lucy A. Mckes, Bernardo; Oct. 16. Harriet 
upbam. Soluiier. Ben Nevis. 

Arr. Oct 10. Gbicier, Kensett, J. P. k. >. C. Adams. 
Frauk; Oct. 14, British America. Da;*Cd Babcock, 
Derby Pedro Pianlolet. SlrluB. Ed'ward; Oct. lo, 
Uhland, H. B. lUzeltirie, (f) (both In the cliannel.) 
Oanter Rolf, Aretie, (both nt Falm. nth,) City of 
Al>eideen, Oxfordshire, Rebus, Dolp'.iia. William. 
.Mercur, Erlinjt, aonor, j. H. Cbadwink, Delia 
O. lates, oau Jacinto. Falcon, P. C. Merryman, 
Jupiter. James R. Boyd, Teocie. Excelaor. (C of- Aen- 
son,) Emma, (Capt. i.evi:) Oct. !6. Little Susie. <iff 
Plymouth; Principe /mo'eo di tjavola, latt«r at Fal- 
mouth : Gordjn Oastic, Juventa, Josepo Fish. Lamcck. 
Forest Belle, Jose V. Bueno, Llvinustone, Ch.srlesion, 
Eutb Palm(»r, Gazelle, AJa B.4r'.oa, Viile de Anver-; 



SILVER 

PLATED 

WARE^ 

MAirOTACTOBED BV THE 

MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO. 

No. 550 Broadway, N. Y. 

PBOPRIBTOaS AND PATK.vrUEU OF TAB CEL» 
BBAT.:D 

Spoons and Forks 

SJCVBB-PLATED HgAVIBST Off THE FA-trS HOST* 

EXPOSED TO WEAR, snd bwrlng the trale-^nark. 

•* J847. ROGERM BSO!$. XII.»» 




Onr Faultless Shapes, Elegant Styles, and Low Prices have RemoYed m 

Prejndicss, and Won the Tictory. , ^i 

OVERCOATS, 

SUITS, 

ULSTERS^ 

FOR MEN, BOYS. AND CHILDREN. 




No. 487 BROADWAY, Corner Broome St 



MASON & HAMLIN 

CABINET ORGANS 

Have been Unanimously Assigned the 




WL 



V^E SEVERAL REQUISITES" 

Of Such Instruments at the 

U. S. CENXENNIAL, 1876, 

and are the only organs assiffned thla rank. 

Their superiority is thus deolareJ, not in one or two 
respects only, but li all the important qaallties 
ofanorgan. AMe:Ialand Diploma have also been 
awarded tbem, but medals of equal TSlne ■wore 
awarned all articles deemed worthy of recognition, so 
that many makers can advertise " first medals " or 
"highest awards." But comparative rank in excellence 
has been determinett by the Ja Jge j' Reports alone, 
in which the MAoON & HAMLI.s OBGIANS are ananl- 
monslr assigned "Tbe FIRST RINK In tho 
several reqai lies " of such instrameuts, and are 
the only ouea assigned ths ranlc .S«e Judged Beportt. 
This result was not unexpected, for these organs nnve 
onilormly taken highest awards la such competi- 
tions, there being I :«» than tix exception* in hvadredt of 
comparttons. They were awarded first medals and 
highest honors at Paris, 1867; Vienna, 1873; 
Mantiaffo, 1875: Pliilatlelphia, 1876; havine thus 

bt-en awarded tiigbest honors at every World's 
ExUlbltion at which they have competed, and being 
the only American organs which ever obtained any 
award in Europe. 

NEW STYLES, with improvements, exhibited at tbe 
CENXBUNIAL; elegant new cas -s in great variety. 
Prices tiery lowest conslst<>nt with best material snd 
workmanship. Organs sold for cssb or iost ailments, 
or rented until rent pays. Eoerv organ tDar-aated to 
give entire tatufaction to every r'.asonahle piiixhater or 
the mouey returned. Illustbatsd Catalogiies sent 
free. 

MASON & HAMLIN OEGAN C0MPA5T, No. 154 Tre- 
mont St., Boston; So. 25 Union square, New- York; 
Nos. 80 and 82 Adams St.. Chicago. 



THREE 

CENTENNIAL MEDALS 
AMD THREE! 

Honorable Mentions 

AWE GIVEN TO 




FAIRBANKS' SCALES 




THK 



STANDARD. 

Ako, Miles* Alarm Cash Drawer. 

Rforc True Js, Baegase Barrows, »ll Sises. 

Coffee and Drug Mills, Letter Fresses, tci, so. 

PRINCIPAL KC.\LK WARKHOD-SKti: 

FAIRBANKS* ifc CO., 31 J Broadway, N. Y. 

FAIRBANKS Jt CO , 166 BaUimore St.. Baltimore. 
FAIEBANKS t VO., t>3 Camp st.. Nf w-Drleans. 
FAIRBANKS t CO., 93 .Main st.. Bnflalo. 
P.A^RBA^Ks t ( O., 3.18 Bri)8dw»y. Albany. 
FAIRBANK < &. CO., 403 fit. Paul's St., Montreal. 
FAIRBANKS t CO.. 34 King William St., London. 
FAIRBANKS, BROW . & t'O., 2 Mlik St.. B...ton. 
FAIRBANKS & EWING, M isonlc Hatl, Phila a.. Penn. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE & 00.. Ill Lake St.. Chicngo. 
FAIRS iNKS, MORSK t CO.. 139 Wa^nnlst , > moiiinatL 
FAIRBANKS. MORSK & CO., 182 .Sunetlorst., ( level'ad. 
FAIRBA.VKS. -MOR-'E t CO.. 48 Wood st. Pittsbn.g. 
FAIRBANK.S. MORSE b CO., 5lh & Main sts., Louisville. 
riIRBA.N'KS4tCO..302t3o4 Wa^4hi iztonav..bt Loals. 
KAIRBANKo Ji iiart;HIS'SO.'>i. Sa Francisco, CaL 
For salu by leading hsrdware deiilerB. 1 



BOYNTON'S FURNACES. 

EKpecinlly od'ipted for he%tlQ^ 

DWELLINGS, CHCkCHES. SCKO.'LS. to. 

MOST POV^EBFCL AND DURABLE FUEXACliS «0U> 

OVKE 2t;,<iUil IN USK. 

BOTNTOM'8 " 187ij" BALTIJlaRK FISEPIUai 

HEATER. 

Extremely powerful io beatinjt: Attraotive. brft 

liact, ourable, economics* u 

BOYNTO.N'8 "TILE" OPEN-GRATE STOVE, 
the most attractive library «t jTe ever made. 

Send lor circulais. Bstimates given for heatiac; aa# 
work done by ^ 

RICHARDSON. BOYNTOW & CO,, 

MANUfACTOafiBH, NO. 3 14 WATRU. STm 
NEW-VORK. 

WEBER 

PIANO-FORTES 




y 




NO. 23 JOHN ST., UP STAIJiS. 

DIAMONDS "& JEWELRY, 

STONE CAMEOS, 
Silverware and Bronzes, 

Clocis aii Mitel Onaiaeits. 



NIIiSSON. I shsll takeerpryopportaaJ^toi 

nend and praite your iastromeats. 
BlSUjOOG* For tbe last tix years your pi in >• Iwv* 

been my eltoice fsr tbe oonttrt ro— 1 

and my own kousf. 
LCCCA. Tour uorights Sx•er^roo^d£llor»\B«tta^ 

mrnts and deserve their ^raot meaosiL 
PATTI. ^ have used the Piaa' s oj everv ce!«- 

brateil toaker, oat give vour»tkeprtfi 

eraux over all. 
STBAUSfl. Tour Pianos sstonlsti SB». / %av imsw 

yi-t seeo any PiawiMyoiichemutli/van. 
W£HliI. Madame Parepa called voor i^aao Om 

fiaeat iu the Cntteil States. / .ftOt 

inilorst Lb it "piaion. Tb6yliav«.a« 

riiwl osyichers. 

Prices Koasoaable. Temu Saar* 
WAKEKOO>l!!«t 

Fifth afss corner Sixteenth sts, ]l« Ts 

J.B.&J. M.CORNELL 



IRON WOKE 



Office l!ro. 141 Centre st^ IVew-T«rk.i 



CAST AKa» HV&OUGBT ISON OP JlI4 
KINDS. »._.«- 

ON ABB AFTER N0t!)8 






WILL BE 8E5T PO.srAGB PAID TO ISDIVipOAIf 

.SUeSCRiBBR^ AT 

One Dollar ifl Tweity Cents 



Our extraordinary display 
at the Centennial wiU remain 
complete untU the close of , mmitm 

the Exhibition. ONE DOLLAR PER ANNUM 



PEtt ANNTAl. 

IN CLDBS OF THIErr OR MOBB AT 



C. G. GUNTHER'S SONS 

(hATE 50:2-504 BUOADWAY) 

Call attention to tbeir Stock of 

LADIES' FURS. 

.Also, to th<4r assortment of 

SEAL-SKIN SACQUES 

AXD 

rUR-IilNED GARMENTS. 

Tlie Largest and most Complete e^er Ollered. 

No. 184 Fifth Avenue, 

iSBMkdwSLV SLBd ^iSkA m*~\ *TIETV.VAI2.1& 



KITCHEN FURNITURE 

CBOCKeEY. , 

COOKING DTENSrLS. 

f;ke cirTJ-SRT. 

EDD¥'8 REFRIOERATOK.<i. 

BBSr GOOD:i AT LOWK.sr PBiOKS. 

LEWIS & CONGER. 

KO. 6.)1 cm AV. ASP no. l.SQfi BROAOW.\Y. 
— S.M1T11».S VAT. J'KKFOliA I liO 

BUCKSKIN UNDEBGlRMENTtSd 

Greatest protection to chest aod lunjrs ever "ff red. 
Prevents ooidsunl cures rbeumatasm. E«coxasx9s» 

BT WKST-CIJISS PHTSIOIAJIS. 

H, C. BAIjI< As Cf>" <^*t« Maonfaetwrecw 
SO. B33 BEOADWAT. KIW.XOait 









~4^ "^s&i 



* *^ 



\^^-^^-sv/,< 



'•^'-tH' 












w^ 



»f?p 






.- V ■ 



^kW 



"•TK'^i' 




^31?p? 



:■*' 



;^t^^ 








'^JC i, -- » 



t r».^ ^ v,J-<.« **X 



.^■v;^^ 








'(J- 



:r- 



VOL. XXVI mo. 7830. 



MEW-YOiK, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBEE 18, 187G. 



PRICE FOUR GENTS. ' 



THE TERROR IN THE SOUTH. 



#- 



if -t-' 



THJS CAiNBor, 6. a, encounter. 

'IOI.ATION OF THK AORKEMENT FOB A 

; jroiNT Ductrssiox bt the dkmocrats 

'"'AFTKB TJIMR MAK HAD STOKKN— AN 
0I>0 KSGEO SHOT DEAD SY THKM AT 
IHB OUTSET — COOLNESS AND DETER- 
MINATION or THB COT.ORED MEN— 
P^OMPr AND BNKRGECIC ACTION OF 
GOV. CHAMBERLAIN. 

a^aeiai Disprnteh to On Ntw- T»rk Time*. 

Charleston, Oct. 17. — ^The fight which 
t(K^k place between the whites and blacks at 
the poJtiral uieetinij at Cainhoj yesterday, 
aad which resulted in the killinK of at least 
UirM men and tber woondioe of many others, 
waa dearly the result of the "shot- 
goa poKcy" inauxamted by the white 
rifle elobs at HamborK and EUenton. The 
iniBediate and direct cause of the onfortnnato 

affair wilt never be definitely ascertained, for, 

»8 ia usual m such oases, both sides vebemently 
protest that their opponents were in the wron^;. 
It win be noticed that now. for the first time 
■•n the history of the race conflicts of the South. 
ub« nr);roes were victorious. They " drove"' ' 
aff the whites with but slight loss to tbem- 
jelTcs. From this fact it may be ar- 
(oed not only that they are losing their 
Bnastitutional fearot white men, but that the 
reeent outrafes upon men of their race in the 
ipper part of this State bare imparted to tbem 
tome oi the d-'Aperate courage of the stag at ■ 
aay. That they are desperate there 
MO be ao duabt. lor thej have been 
^neeoted beyond bnmao endurance, 
aa I have already intimated, the reports of 

fte oMses Of tlie riot »re various and oonfiict- 

Mgf 'Tbe.foUowing aeooont is from an impar- 
^ and erwbbie eye witness, and may be rehed 
apoo as cnbetaatially oorroot. 

The Bceamer Pccasin left Charleston at 9 
./ekiek yesterday mommg to ooorey a nomber 
of Democratio and Beoabltcan speakers and 
their friends to a joint discussion, or divided- 
tine meeting, whiob bad been announced to 
taka pace at Cainhoy, about twenty • 
xnilea Itom the eity. Fearing that trouble 
mi^ht occur, it was arranged between Sheriff 
Bowen and the Democratic leaders that neither 
party should brine arms on the boat. Ihe 
Demoeratio speakeis. Messrs. Jervey and 
Aikcr, and Mr. O'Connor, the Democratic ' 

«MHidi<late for Congress, were accom- : 
panied by about two hundred members of the ! 
Batler Guard and other -"bite men, who i 
carrifKi no nfles, but were well snoplied with ; 
piatola. Sheriff Bowen, W. J. McSIinley, and ' 
(X OafllanL the S^^pabitcan speakers, had just i 
fitteea cf their fnends with them. No trouble ', 
jco u red dnrmg the trip on the river, and the ; 
rtaaraer reached Cainhoy at noon. Here the 
Cbarieston party was met by a number of ne- I 
zroea. and proceeded quietly to the place 
of meeting, where they found three or four 
anndred colored men aaeembled. They had • 
aome irom all parts of the parish, many of them 
fna wild and remote distnote. and most of 
theaa were armed with old shot-guns and mus- 
kets. These tber plaeed upon the ground or 
acainst trees. A large number ot them they . 
laU m tbe comer of an old building near 
tbe speaker's stand. This they did i 
with no purpose of secreting their 
weapons, as has been claimed, but that they 
oonJd easilT lay their hands on tbem when the 
meeting closed. Tlie guns and muskets were 
all tbe private property', of the freedmen. 
There wm^ no Militia rifles among them, and 
tb* statement that there was a Militia company 
on tbe ground is not true. Tbe meet- 
ing waa opened with the understanding i 
that eaoii party should be allowed 
two honrs for speeches. Before the regular 
proeeeaings, 3hen£f Bowen earnestly requested 
ibe people to listen to the speakers and to be 
wderly and qniet. Mr. St Julien Jervey, a ; 
wetl-boown Democrat of Charleston, was then 
introdneed f od spoke for nearly an hour with- ' 
oat interruption or dlstorbance of any kind. He . 
was followed by Mr. J. W. Mckinley, for | 
the Bepablicans, who had only spoken ' 
a few word* when he was startled by a num- 
ber of tbe negroes crying : " Look out, dar ; ' 
look out. dar!" McKinley looked around in thu 
lixeetion indicated by the blacks, and then in a 
recy excited tone exclaimed, pointing to a 
number of white men who were approaching 
the arms in tbe old house: "Those men have 
eot tbe guns. They are soing to shoot me and 
the rest oi yon." He then Jumped from the 
stand. Tlie colored men. ereatly alarmed by ' 
bis wards, ran trora the meeting place in all di- 
rsetions. taking their arms with them. Ten or 
a dossn of the whites secured a number of tbe ; 
gnns in tbe old boose, and pointed them toward 
tbe n^croes. Sheriff Bowen, seeing this demon- 
oration, called on Mr. O'Connor to ke(>p his ' 
mem quiet. O'Connor tried to do so, asking ; 
tbe white mei> to lay down their arms. Instead 
(tf doing this, however, they went to tbe other 
and of tbe buildine and formed a liae, and then, i 
without a moment's warning, o.ie of tbeae white 
sen discharged his gun, and a decrepid old > 
negro fell dead. Upon this the blacks fi^-d be- - 
hind che tiees and kusbes and opened a ruanin;; 
ire upon tbe whites, thirteen or fourteen of 
wbom fell wounded. Two of tbem afterward 
died, and one other is missing, and probably ; 
dead. 
Tbe blacks displayed tbe most remarkable 

ooolot'ss, and took ap a favorable position io- i 
stead oi running wildly and aimlessly about, aa 
'.bey did at the Vicksburn, New-Ga«oon,v, and ' 
Hamburg massiicres. It was this coolness tbat 
saved them irom slaughter. Tbe whites find- ' 
lug tbat tbey intended te fijcbt gavs ap tbe 
etote«t, ai.d retreated rapidly to tbe village. 
The 'negroes then dispersed in all di- 
reetiims, taking their wounded with 
tbem. On this account it will be 
impossible to report their loss. It is not 
doubted, however, tbat a numbar of tbem were 
more or lesi dangerously wounded. Upon 
reaobing tbe villaze a number of the whites 
who were members of the rifle club and could 
seoare arms stationed themselves in a largo 

one-bouse, and ma'le preparations to meet ary 
attack wlucb might be made n;>on tbem. Noue 
was made, however. 

lu the eveuiuE the boat retarned to Charles- 
ton and reported what bad occurred. There 
was a greui dual ot excitement in the city, and 
a company of tlie Palmetto Guar i, numberias; 
Agbty men. well armed with breecb-loadin); 
rifles, left for the scene of the disturbance. 
Tnoy went with the avowol intention of pro- 
leotinir the whites of C iiuhoy, bat there 
is, uo doaht that tlieir real desire 
w.as to avevge tbclr wounded friends. It 
is not expected that there yrili be any further 
sreanized disturbance, for the negroes have 
dispersed and many of them will doubtless 
leek sa^tety m the woodd and swamps. Bat 
the whites swear tbat somebody will have to 
iUffer for yesterday's work, and as a 
genilemau of this Citv expressed it, " by 
this time next week there will be at 
least hsOi a ^oaan ialtc«aca less in (ha Farlah at 



St. Thomas." If prompt action Is not taken by 
the authorities and by tbe United States 
troops this prediction will doubtless prove oor- 
root. Gen. Ruger has been iufonnert of the 
affair, however, and will do everything in his 
power to prevent further trouble. Gov. Cham- 
berlain has also gone to work pix>mptly. This 
morning he sent the following dispatch to 
Sheriff Bowen from Columbia: 
C. C. Bowen, Charleston : 

I have DO <1etails of tbe Galoboy affair, bat 
whatever they are yon muat arrest and briDe to 
Justice at onoe every man eogaged in the killine 
and riot, witboat regard to race or party. See that 
Trtal JnstlOFB do their duty or report them to me. 
Warrants mast beisaaed immediately. Call on any 
eye-witness or person htivine knowleilse to make 
affidavits. D. H. CHAMBERLAIN. Governor. 

There ia no doubt that Sheriff Bowen, who 
has the reputation of beinj a determined and 
fearless man, will do all be can to obey the in- 
structions of the Governor. He may prevent 
nnoiher conflict in Charleston County, where 
the negroes are very largely In the majority ; ' 
hut the whites in the up-country are greatly in- 

ceused at the Cainhoy aSfair, and It is feared 
that tbe negroes of Edgefield and Aiken will 
be made to suffer lor the act of their brethren 
in St. Thomas. 

TBE PBESJDENl'^ PROCLAMATION. 

THE PEACE OF THE COtJ.NTRY DISTURBKD 

THE PURITY OF THB BALLOT-BOX IM- ' 
PERILED BT RIFLE-RAIDING LAW-BREAK- 
ERS — FRRB CITIZENS TO BK PROTECTED 
— THE MILITARY FOHCK ORDERED OUT. 
Special DispateK to the yeiO'Tork Times. 
Washing f ON, Oat. 17. — Ihe President's 
proclamation of to-day waa determined upon 
in Cabinet this afternoon. The Dreamble Itilly 
states tbe reasons tor tbe proo'amation, aud 

leayeB no npceasity for explanation. The Gk)v- 

eroment is determined to use every power 
under the Constitution and the laws to protect 
tbe peace of South Carolina. Tbe Democratic 
press will no doubt immediately fill the air 
with 8 clamor that the President intends to 
carry the State for Hayes by tbe forde of Fed 
cral power," but everj body knows that with a 
Iree. and peaceable election South Carolina 
is as certain to vote for the Ilepublican 
candidate as Vermont or Iowa. If, therefore, 
the Administration has tbat wicked design ol 
eecunog Republican success in the election 
there, it can be executed best not by intimida- 
ting Democratic voters, but by preventing 

Democrats from murdering and intimidating 
Republicans. This is the sole ground of com- 
plaint by the Democrats. It may be question- 
able wbeiher tbe power ot tbe Federal Oovern- 
ment is not so restrained that it cannot afford 
sufficient protection, but the need and duty ot 
protection are undoubted. If American citi- : 
zens were to receive such treatment in ; 
England or France aa they are sub- 
jected to in South Carolina, there 
would be immiediate war. Tbe plans for the 
execution of tbe purpose disclosed by tbe 
proclamation are not revealed, but it is be- 
lieved tbe ridings and raidmgs of tbe rifle 
clubs will lead to speedy arrests and indict- 
ments, and measures have undoubtedly been 
taken co secure evidence. Tbe military will 
aid tbe civil authorities in making arrests 
when the civil power needs such reinforcement. 
Whatever measures may be eifioient and lawiul 
will be promptly taken, and it is quite probable 
important orders have already been forwarded . 
to the South. > 

Dinatch to theAuomated Fret*. 

At tbe Cabinet meeting to-day every department 
of the Government was represented. There was a 
fall and earnest iiica-ssion of tbe condition of 
aff^rs ia Sualh Carolina, m represented to the 
Guv^mment by the chief execntire officer of that 
State. Tbe views of the Cabiuet, acting apoa in- 
formation officially rendered the GDverninent, were 
that prompt action was neoeasary for the purpose 
of dispersinz tbe rifle dabs and other armed 
bodies organized, aa alleged, against tbe peace of 
the State and the rights of voier«, and to ibis end 
tbe Attorney General began tbe immediate prepar- 
ation of Ihe toilowiug proclamatiun. which was 
issned to>oight ; 

By the trtgident of the Vnited States <tf Ameriea: 
A PROCLAMATION. 

Whereas. It has been Batistacturily shown to me 
tbat Insarreotion and domestic violence exist in sev- 
eral counties of the State of South Carolina, and that 
certain combinations of men against law exist in 
many counties of said State, known as "Kifle 
Clubs," who ride up and down by day and night, in 
'arms, mnrdering aome peaceable citizens and in- 
timidating others, which combinationa, thonirh for- 
bidden by the laws of the Stale, cannot be controlled 
or suppressed by tbe ordinary course ot Jnstiee ; 
and whereas, it is provided in the Coos itution of 
tbe United States tbat the United States shall nro- 
tect every State in this XTnion on the applioattou of 
the Legislature, or of tbe Executive when tbe Legis- 
lature cannot be convened, against domestic vij- 
lenoe ; and whereas, by laws In pursuance of the 
above, li is proposed (in the laws of the Unitea 
States) that in all cases of insurrection in any Stale 
(or obstiuction to tbe laws thereof) it shall be law- 
tul for tbe President of tbe United F.tates 
on application of the Legislature of snch 
State, or ot the Execntive when the Legis- 
lature cannot be convened, to call for 

the Militia of any other Stae or States, or to em- 
ploy snob Dart of the land or naval forces aa shall 
be tadgeJ neceisary for tbe purpose of sappressini; 
such insarreo.ioD, or oausini; tbe laws to be auly exe- 
cuted ; and, whereas, tbe Legislature of said State 
is not nuw la sestion, and caonot be convened 
in time to meat the present emergency, 
and tbe Exooative of said State, under section 4 
of ardcle IV. ot the Coastitation, and of tbe 
laws passed in parsaancj thereof, bas, therefore, 
made one application to me in the premises lor snch 
part of the mUitary torce of tbe United States aa 
may be necessary and adequate to protect said State 
and the oiiiz^os thereof against domextio violence, 
ana to enforce tbe dae execution ot the laws; and 
whereas. It is required tbat whenever it maj be 
necessary, in the jadsment of the President, to use 
the military force for the purpose atore»aid, be shall 
forthwith by proclamation command such iuaor- 
gents to disperse, and reti'°e peaceably to their re- 
spective homes within a limiced time; now, there- 
lure, 

I, Ulysses S. Grant. President of the United 
States, du hereby mike proclamation and commaod 
all persons eincaged in sain unUwtol anj insurrec- 
tionary proceedings to disperse aud retire peace- 
ably to their respective abodes within three days 
from this date, and berrafcer abandou said combina- 
tions and bubmit them^elve* to Ihe laws and oon- 
stltated antborlties of said State, and I invoke the 
aid and oo-ooeratioa ot all good citizens tbereot to 
opbold the laws and preserve the pablic pnace. 

In witness whereof I have hereanto set my hand 
and caused tbe seal of the United States to be affixed. 

Done at the City of WaaUington Jhis I7th day of 
October. 1876, and of the iuddpenrteaoe of tbe 
United States the one hondred and flrnt. 

By the President, U. S. GRANT. 

John L. Cadwalladkb, Acting Secretary oi State. 

The following order wjs issned this evening in 
parsoance of the action taken ac the Cabinet meet- 
ing to-day: 

\ Wae Depabtmbkt. t 

I Washejoton dry. Ooc. 17. 1876. 5 

i Osn. W. T. Sherman, commanding United iStitet 

Army: 
{ Sir: la view of the existing eondition of aiFairs 
I in Soath Carolina there is a noMibility that the 
proclamation of the President of this date may be 

disregarded. To provide agaiaat such a ooDtlneency 
Will Immediately srUet ail the avulaoie farca 



In tbe military division of the Atlantic to report to 
Gen. Rueer, commanding at Columbia, South Caro- 
linn, and iustract that officer to station his troops in 
such localities that they may be most speedily and 
eflfactuaily used in caseof resistance to the aatburily 
of the United States. 

It is hoped tbat a collision may thns be avoided, 
but you will instrnot Gen. Roger to let it bo known 
that it is the fixed purpose of the Government to 
carry out the spirit of the proclamation, and to sus- 
tain it by the military force of the General Govern- 
ment, sapplemented, if necessary, liy tbe Militia of 
the various States. Very respectfullv. your obedi- 
ent servant, G. D. CAMERON^, 

Secretary of War. 



THE ENGLISH COTTON SPINNERS. 



THE CONTROVERSY WITH THE OPEKATlVlilS — 
A LOCK-OUT TO TAKK PLACK NOV. 23. 

Manchester, Oct. 17. — At a meeting of the 

Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers' Association of 
Northern and North-eastern Lancashire yesterday 
It was resolved tbat tbe operative cotton 
spinners having givpn no ice that they will 

be bound no longer by the arrangement 
by which their wages bavo hitherto been reeu- 
latrd— action which would give thaf^body control of 
tbe position of wages in thedistiict — therefore tbe 
mill-owners retnse to oonlinue work under 
tbe proposed conditions, and decide to 
give a month's notice tbat tbey will closo their 
mills on Nov. S3. A res ilntion was alsj adopted 
declaring that the masters are ready to discuss 
The present standard with tbe operatives and arrange 
for the removal of any irregularities, but 
refuse any adjustment whiob would practically ad- 
vaace wages. The lock-out, if it sbonld take 
place, will throw 80.000 operatives out of employ- 
ment. 

CURRENT TOPICS ABROAD. 



FANIC AND DKCLINE I.\ FORfMG>f STOCKfl 

IN LONDON — SPAIN RELAPSING IN BIG- 
OTRY — THE LIBKRAL8 OPPRESSED BY 
THE GOVKKNMENT. 
LoNDOx, Oct. 17. — There has been a panic on 
tbe Stock Exchange in some of the foreign bonds 
this afternoon, principally in Bassian. which have 
t>6en largely offered at a decline of S^c to 5. Hun- 
garian were also very heavy, and declined 2; Tork- 
ish declined ifi to 1 ; Ezyptito, Portnguesn, Uru- 
guay, sua Austrian, ^ to %; Peruvian, % to IH, 
and French ^ 
Silver is qaoted to-day at 52 7-16 J. per ounce. 
A speciil dispatch to tbe Times from Barcelona 
states that tbe Liberal organ, X9 'Irxbuna, has 
been sentenced to six months' suspension, and 
consrouently ruin, for publishing an article written 
by Se&ar Castelar. Tbiouehoat Spain the Liberals 
are now oppressed by the Governmeni, which daily 
becomes narrower in tone and moderado m sympa- 
tbi<>8. Tbe arrogance of the priesthood increases 
daily. 
Some, Oct. 17.— The Pope yesterday received ten 

thousand Spanish pilgrims in tbe Basilica. Tbe 
pil;frima were enthasiastio, and tbe ceremony lasted 
over an hour. 



THE YLLLOW FEVJiB SUFFERERS. 



NO FURTHER AID NKEDED — A QKATEFUL 
LETTER FROM THE MAYOR OF SAVAN- 
NAH. 

The subjoined letter from the Mayor of Sa- 
vannah and tbe acting President of the Benevolent 
AHSOciation announces tbat Inrtfaer aid is cot 

needed : 

Cnr OF Savannah, \ 

Mayok 8 Officb. Oct. 17, 1876. > 
lo our ber^efaUors throuqhouc the Union : 

It Is impuseible 10 exprsMS ad qaately tbe deep 
Dense of gratiiade felt by tbe people of Savannah 
for the gener. us benevolence which has been ex- 
tended to us from all parts ot tbe Uoitea Scutes, in 
tbi« our snpreme hoar of distress and destitution. 
It has so tbed many a dying pillow and relieved 
many an aching heart. Snch deedn do more to bind 
tbe luhabitaots of tnis laud in sympathy together as 
citizens of a common country than all the political 
theories that were ever aavinced. All tbat we oau 
nuw retain to our beueiactorj are oar heurtfei 
thanks and sincere prayers tbat the Almigcty 
may bless and preserve in their own homes 
the noble people wbo have so readily csme to oar 
rescue, and long saield tbem from the pestilence 
tbat waiketb m darkness aud the destruction that 
wostetn at noonday. Ju.itice and candor require us 
to announce aftbis time, tbat by reason of tue large 
Uberality of suoacriptious in money and sapulius 
already afforded to us, we are no longer in immetli- 
ale need, and we (heretore astt our inends every- 
where t.o cease for the present their charitable eon- 
triuuilous. If tbe necessity for assistance shall 
again arise among aa, we will frankly and unbesi- 
tatinglv apiieal to tbem tor relief. 
EDWARD C. ANDEitbOX, Alayor of Savannah. 
dOHN F. WHEAiON, Acting Preaidenii of the 

(Suvannah lienevolent AsuociaLlon. 

The total number ot intbrmeu.etu-day was fifteen, 
of which six were iroiu yellow fever. Ten of tbe 
above were colored persoos. 

PHII.ADELFHIA, Oot. 17. — Mr. Joseph Newman, the 
exbiuitor ot ualiioruia trail in AiirlcaUurdl liall, 
to-day banded to Mr. Lanuretb, Ctiiet of tbe Agri- 
cultural Buruan, il23 76 for the relief fund ot tbH 
yello w-fever suHcrers. This amount represents the 
uet profits of thesu^ds of Calitornia truit from Out. 
5 to Oct. 14. 



TOM OCHILTREE AND TEN BROECK. 



THE PROPOSED KACI2 BKIWEEN TWO GREAT 
HORSES— MR. LORILLARD'S BOLD CHAL- 
LENGE NOT ACCEPTED— TKLKGRAPHIC 
COKRESPONDaNCK. 
Lexington, Oct. 17. — The following tele- 
grams have passed between Gen. James F. Robin- 
son, President of tbe Eeniucky Association, and 
Mr. George Lorillard, the owner of Tom Oshiliree : 

Lkxisgton, Ky. 
To George Lorillard. New-York: 

Tbn Irienusol leu BioecK. Heeiug by the Aasooi- 
ated Press dispatches that you desire to match Tom 
Uobiitree a^iaiusi Tau Uroeck in a four-mile dasn, 

to be run iu the Spnng ol 1877, have authorized me 
to sav (bat sucn a maicb ouu be mace it yoa will 
run over tbe KemncKy Assooiatioa Coarse, tor 
ilO.UOO or mure, the parlies here to allow yon tl.OOJ 
to cuver traveling expense*. Tbe Kentucky Ans'j- 
ciarioQ will aud oue-U.>lt of the Kate reueipin oi tbat 
day to tne winning norse, and will exiuiid to you a 
he»riy welcome. J. F. itOBINSON. 

Nbw-Xokk. 
lo Oen. James F, Iiobir.son. President .- 

i. njve received .\i.ur lelejiram. Tue Associated 

Press buve mistateu my proposiuou. I utterea, 
and still ofi'er to ma<ch Tom O^iblUree tne lait day 
of tbe B.iltimoru Races, or ibe ex ra day of toe 
Jeiomu Park Races m Novemoer, a^aiust Ten 
Bruevk a tour-mile dash tor llO.tKK). American 
Jockey Club Rules and new weiga.s. 

Xijars truly. G. L. LORILLARD. 

Please ausw^ur by telegraph. 

Lexingtox, Ky. 
To Oeorge Lorillard : 

i'ne r4too proposed by yoa la impossible. Ten 
Broeck is not in training. Should you desire to ac- 
cept iuy proposition, or alter iis terms to ran over 
tbe Kentucky As«ooiauuu Ouarse I snali bo pleaded 
to bear irom you. J. F. ROBLNcjON. 

BOILER EXfLO^lON IN YIROISIA. 
EiCHMOND, Oct. 17.— George Smoot, White, 

and Isaac Uowell, colored, wuru killea, aud iSen 
. Ford, colored, fatally injdred by the explosion of 
lour boilers to-day at lht> Carbon Hill Goal Mines, 
Goochland County, loarteea miles from thib city. 
The cause of tbe acciuent was careiessuess lu al- 
lowing the water in tbe boilers to become exhausted 
and then turuiog on cold wa er. There wure 
thirteen boilers m all about the mines, Several 
bmtdings in the vicinily were wrecked. No one in 
the uiues was hurt. 



THE CONTEST IN NEW-YOM. 

♦ — ■ 

THE REPUBLICANS OF TIOGA COUN- 
TY AROUSED. 
AN ENERQRTIC CANVASS IN' PROGRESS — 
LARGE AND KNTHU8IA8TIC MEKTING9 
HELD NIGHTLY-T-A FULL VOTE AND A 
ROUSING MAJORITY FOR HAYES AND 
WHEELER PRKDICTED. 

tYom Our Special Correspondent. 

OwEGO, Monday, Oct. 16. 1876. 
The Republicans of Tioga County, liko 
their brethren of Broome, are now thoroughly 
aroused to the necessity of exerting them- 
selves, and have set about the work before 
thom with energy and determination. They 
have resolved to briqg out the lull vote of the 
party in November, and, by so doing, 
to secure tbe old- time Republican ma- 
jority. Upward of twenty meetings 
aro to be held in the county this week, and 
they are to be kent up nightly from now till 
election day. One or more meetings will he 

held in every school district during the cam- 
paign, and several out-door mass-meetinga have 
been arranged at tbe more important centres of 
population. A thorough canvass of the whole 
county is now in progress, and the result, thus 
far, is more favorable tbnu was anticipated. 
Mr. E. F, Jones, the Chairman of the County 
Committee; Hon. T. C. Piatt, Chairman of tbe 
Congressional Committee and member of the 
National Committee, and Mr. Smythc, the mem- 
ber of tho State Committee and editor ot the 
Oweeo Times, are all working \n harmony and 
all agree in predicting a larger Republican ma- 
jority in this county thau haa been given 
for several years past. Among the 
local spostkers who are addressing crowds 

nightly are W.H. Blair, brother of ox-Gov. 

Blair, ol Michigan ; Hon. E. B. Gere, Repub- 
lican Asaembiyman from this county; W, D. 
Pearne, Hon. O. H. P. Kinney, Lyman Settle, 
H. Bostwick, Mr. Warber, of Wnverly, and A. 
G. Allen. Among the speakers from abroad 
wbo have thus far addressed , the Republicans 
of the county are Hon. A. W. Tenney, of 
Brooklyn, and Butler G. Noble, of New- York. 
Mr. Tenney's speech, which was delivered to an 
audience of 1,500 people, aroused great enihu- 
Biasra, and there is a strong desire throughout 
the county to hear from him again before the 
campaign closes. Qen. Georgo W. Palmer is to 
speak in tbe county every night next wcok. 

It is the unanimous testimony of all who 
have attended tho meetings in this section tbat 
more interest and enthusiasm is manifested by 
Republicans now than at any time since tbe 
war. The young Republicans of Owego have 
formed one of the best glee clubs in the State, 
which dresses in uniform and travels all 
over the county, singing at public meet- 
ings every night, without pay or re- 
muneration of any kind. All the out- 
ward indications point to a full vote 
of the party this Fall, and a full vote means a 
victory for Hayes and Wheeler in this State by 
a majority anywhere from 20,000 to 50,000. In 
this county the ma,ioa'ity will not be less than 
500, and is more likely tb be 800 and over. 
There are no Republicans hero who have bad 
the boldness to declare for "Tilden and Re- 
form," although there are several Democrats 
who do not hebitato to deelare against 
It. Ei-Troasurer Whesler H. Bristol, a 
" born Democrat," of soft-money tendencies, 
has been instrumental in organizing a Peter 
Cooper Club in this village, which affords a 
safety-valve for those Democrats who can't 
eat the 'niden crow and yet don't like to stifle 
all political enthusiasm during the campaign. 
It comprises thirty members, and is said to 
contain also a few liepublioans of the "Lib- 
eral" stripe. Nearly all the Liberals of this 
county, however, with the exception of those 
whom the Democrats have nominateil for office 
are openly for Hayes and Wheeler. The Demo- 
crats are making great exertions to re-elect the 
County Clerk, wbom they smuggled into of- 
fice here three years ago, and, as be is the only 
Democrat who stands any chance in tho 
county, they will trade otf anything to elect 
bim. His name is John J. Van Kleeck. He 
was a "Liberal" in 1872, and claimed to he 
more of a Republican than a Democrat when he 
ran ; otherwise he would not have been elected. 
Tbat game cannot be played this year, and Mf. 
Van Kleeck will probably have to step aside for 
John C. Gray, ot Tioga, tbe Republican nomi- 
nee. All the othef county officers are sure to 
be Republican, including the Assemblyman, 
Hon. E. B. Gere, who haa been re-nominated. 

The Democrats are not holding very many 
meetings in this county, but they are hard at 
work " on the sly" and pretend that tbey are 
going to receive large accessions from the Re- 
publican ranks on e'ection day. Your corre- 
spondent has been told a dozen times by Dem- 
ocrats, when inquiring whether there wore any 
Republicans going to vote tor Tilden ? *' Oh, 
yes, lots of them ; I can name more than fifty 
right around here." But they never name tho 
fifty, nor even one, and Republicans say there 

are no men ot the kind in existence. They ad- 
mit, however, that th<» Democrats are makinc 

desperate efforts to accomplish Komothing this 
Fall, and that their " still bunt" canvass may 
bo fraught with danger unless the Republicans 
are equally vigilant. There is no " tidal 
wave" in favor of tbe Democracy this year, 
nor even a ripple in tbat direction, and if 
Tilden gets any Republican votes in this sec- 
tion they will be from men who are ashamed to 
announce the fact in advance. 



Georore H. Power; Connty Clerk, George M. Bui. 
lock ; (Jounty Treasurer, Charles^ W. Hinsdale ; 
Saperintendent of tho Poor, Thomas Berridge; 
Justice of Sssslons, John Busby; Coroners, Dr. W. 
C. Bailey and Dr. Bennilict A. Wicks. The una- 
niniity of the convention and the conceded streneth 
of the ticket has very mnch discouraged the lend- 
ers of the opnositloa. Tho campaiim promises to 
be waged with unceasing activity in this locality 
from this time forward to tlio election. 



IRISH OPPOSITION TO MR. ADAMS. 



THE FALL HI VciU STEAilEB. 

Pkovidence. Got. 17. — Tho steamer Provi- 
dence, fiom New-York, while entering the haruor 
of Newport this muroiog, which was crowded with 
vessels, endeavored to avoid a collision, aud in so 
doing strack the bottom and wrenched ofif Der rud- 
der. Tbe Providi^noe bad 1,300 passengei's on 
bnard, who were forwarded to B.>ston by train from 
Newport. 

Fall Eivee, Got. 17. — The steamer Newport will 
take [be place of the Proviaenca to-nigbt. 



A LAKE MIOHIQAN STEAMER BTTRNSD. 

Dethoit, Oct. 17. — The steamer Daniel Ball, 

of East Siginaw, Bay City Line, was burned this 

attemoun wLile aporoacbiog Bay City. Passengera 
and crew all saved. The vessel was valaea at 

*i5.uoa . inBoranoe about ona>h«^ 



A ROUSING republican MEETING AT HUD- 
SO.\— 8PKECH BY A DISTINGUISHKD IL- 
LINOIS SOLDIER — THK BOASTED ECON- 
OMY OF THE BEBKL CONGRESS. 
Special Dispatch to the .Veui- rori Timss. 
Hudson, Oct. 17. — The most ardent Republi- 
can would have buen well satistted with tbe num- 
bers and entbaslasm ot tbe audience which crowded 
City Hall this evening to listen to Col. Clark 15. 
Carr, of Illinois, present his vi^ws of the cam- 
paign. Dr. A. P. Cook, of this city, presided 
and introduced the speaker, wbo delivered 
a calm, clear. and dinpassiocate address 
which carried conviotiou with it His vindication 
of the Kopublican Purtv was very effective, as was 
likewise bis arraignment ot tbe Udmocracy on their 
war record and the work of the Confederate Con- 
gress last Winter. The boasted economy of tbe lat- 
ter he showed to have been merely parsimony, aud 
proved that it resuliett solely iu embarrassing the 
public service, liis arraignment of Tilden was 
eoathing, bat truthful. Ue depicted him as the 
scheming railroad wreckor rather than tbe samt- 
lilce refoimer. His tribute io Hon. John H. Ketoh- 
am. ths Republican Congressional canuiiate in this 
district, was a warm one, and met with responsive 
plaudits Irom tbe audience. The'speakei was rap- 
tnroasl.v applauded throughout hi« address, which 

was full of facts, logical arguments, and iiifurma- 
tioQ. The address wa.'< one ot the rngat effective 
bipard here during the campaign. 

A STBONG COUNTY TICKET NOMINATED BT 

THK COLUMltIA COUXIY REPUBLICANS. 
Svecial Dmateh to tlte Mew- Yort Ti,nrt. 

Hudson, Oot. 17. — Every town was fully 
resresented to-day in tbe Republican C»unty Con- 
vention, wbiob met in this city, and placed the fol- 

iowlBg admirable tlokei is nomiuauon 1 si>«T\fi; ( 



POLITICAL ANTI-ADAMS CLUBS— THE DIS- 
AFFECTED KLE.MENT — SF.CRKT SOCIK- 
TIK8 WORKING AGAINST THK SAGK OF 
QUINCY. 

Spc:ial Dispatch to the Xew-Tork Times. 
Boston, Oct. 17.— The opposition to the 
candidacy of Charles Pjancia Adams by certain 

Irish societies and other organizations in East- 
ern Massachusetts lias taken political shape in 
the formation of political anti-Adams clubs. 
They are to be found in this city, Worcester, 
Wakefield, and elsewhere. Th«8e disaffected ele- 
ments are not in favor of Mr. Bice, but are 
simply opposed to Mr. Adams, and having no 
candidate to support will paste Gaston's 
name over that of Adams. They are the 
same men who a year ago went around swear- 
ing against Gaston because ho would not re- 
view tho Irish procession on St. Pat- 
rick's Day. They helped to defeat him 
then and think tbey can materially 
aid now in . continuing Mr. Adams in 
his privacy. One of the Worcester men said 
to-day, " W^e haven't att^ehed a great deal of 
irbportance to the public meetings of the club, 

although it has a decided influence. More 

reliance is placed upon a certain 
secret society whiob has members 
all over this State, and which indeed extends 
over the entire country, from Maine to Califor- 
nia." The gentleman said that he couldn't 
give the name of tbe my8teriou.s organization. 
"Ciit,"said be, "it is an Irish nationalist society, 
and its members must, on principle, object to 
voting for a man like Mr. Adams, who neglected 
the interests of naturalized Irish citizens. 
Personally we say nothing against him. 
Doubtless he is a man of ability 
and entitled to some respect, but his conduct 
toward Irishmen is the one thing w-hich tbe 
members of this society can never, under any 
pressure, bo brought to condone." 

" You have concluded, then, to give up those 
public meetings and rely wholly on the influence 
of this society V " Not at all," was the reply. 

The club is doing a good work, and exactly 
what the Irish voters need. There has long 
been too much subserviency to party dictation, 
and this nomination of Adams has emboldened 
many to come out and mako a protest. It is 
true enough that the club is hot large in mem- 
bership. 

The Democratic politicians have used every 
effort to smash the men concerned in the public 
movement. The opponents of Mr. Adams seem 
to be very sangtiine that there will bo a beayy 
vote agamst bim by Irish Democrat i next 
November. " As to Worcester," said one man. 
we count on at least 500 votes. The club rep- 
resents 100 voters, and two other organizations, 
which are secret in character, will roUup 500 
anti-Adams votes, and at least 100 other Irish- 
men will be ready to join this force on the day 
ot election. We expect to have 60O vetes on 
our side in Boston. There has been no public 
club in opposition to Adams, but the secret ele- 
ment is very strohg. Indeed all through 
the State, wherever Irishmen are found 
there will he votes cast against Mr. 
Adams." Said a politician : " The head and 
front of the movement is credited to the Clan- 
na-Gael Society. Only a few of its members are 
voters, and only tbe most rabid of tbem will 
come out openly and bolt Adams. Why, look at 
the way tbe campaign has been carried on. 
No Democratic orator has failed to speak of 
Charles Francis Adams, and the name has 
always been received with the heartiest enthu- 
siasm. Go to any Irish Democrat of any 
standing in the Fifth Ward, and he will 
tell you that in tbe very stronghald of Irish 
Democracy in Worcester this anti-Adams ob- 
jection is a very thin affair. I don't deny 
that there was a little feeling regard- 
ing Mr. Adams before his nomina- 
tion, but its all gone now. When the 
Irish leaders all over tbe State came out and 
showed what Adams' record really is, the op- 
position was sent out of sight." This is hardly 
consistent with the claim ma«le by some of tbe 
anti- Adams men, that 5,000 anti'Adams men in 
Boston would be found to scratch the name of 
the Sage of Qumcy in November. In Boston 
very little has been said to indicate the exist- 
ence of a society which cannot consistently 
support him. 

NEW-JERSEY DEMOVRAIS SUBDUED. 



LARGE AND ENTHUSIASTIC REPUBLICAN 
MEETING IN NEW-BRUNSWICK — GEN. 
KILPATRICK INSULTED BY DEMOCRATIC 
BOUGHS— HOW THKY WERE COMPELLKD 
TO REMAIN QUIBT. 

Soecial Dispatch to the Ifew-Tork Times. 
New-Brunswick, Oct. 16. — Tbe largest meet- 
ing ever held in this city convened to-night to hear 
Gi3n. Kilpatriok and Prof. Langston. Two or throe 
hundred Democratic roughs, determined to break 
up the meeting, also put in an appearance. Every 
time Gen. Eilpatrlck mentioned Tilden's name 
tbey would obeer and yell. The General stood it as 
long aa be could, aad then said, " I wiU not say 
another word till those men are silenced. Thank God, 
we are nut in South Carolina. Kopublicana, sbatthe 
doors i don't let a man escape, and if I am insulted 
again choke the rulfians till they are black in tbe 
face." The old soldiers present responded with a 
will, and from that moment quiet reigned. For two 
honrs tho General spoke as never before. Never 
have our people been so moved. If this meeting 
halt no't gained us voles by tbe huudrod tbon no 
meetiug ever did. Prof. Langstun is still speaking, 
sad the hoiiso is packed. 



PARADE OF BUYS IN BLUE. 
A parade of the Boys iu Blue of the Fifth 
and Ninth Assembly Districts took place last night. 
It was a very imposing demouitration. and the 
nigbt being bright and not too cold, tbe turn- 
out of spectators all along tbe roatu was im- 
mense. A preliminary muster took place at 
Bloecker Uall. Tbe difierent companies formed 
into line in Abingdon square a few minutes after 8 
o'clock, under the tunuwing commanders: Col. 
Kills, commanding ; A. D. Pillet. AiJe de Camp; 
Lieut. Cul. Meeks. M^or Edwards, and Auji. 
Clarke. Compauv A was uoiter tbecomaiaad of Capt. 
Piulay ; C.impaiiy B. Cin>t. Brennan; Cumpaay C 
Capt. Diiler; Company D, Capt. Souder j Company 
Ji, Cant. Ward i Company F, Capt. May. A c<im- 
pauy of Pioneers was under tbe command of Cap', 
(dilian, and a company of cavalry wa* cuinmanded 
by Capt. JacobuK. Tbe total muster numbered over 
oiie thousand men. Preceded by the Cavalry Divi- 
sion and the band playing patriotic airs, tbe Bo.vs 
marched from Abingdon square ihrough tbe follow* 
iug sirrets : Bleecker. Bartow. Hudson, Spring, 
Greeuwich, Greene, Houston, South Fifth avenue. 
Filth avenue, arriving at thu Fifth Avenue Hotel a 
little after 10 o'cliick. They did not halt here, as 
was expected, a great crowd having gathered to 
greet tbem. but marched down Twenty-third street 
tu Sixth avenue, and then to Head-quarters, where, 
alter Kreat cQeeriug, thef were disbanded. 



NOK-PATMEAT OF BAILBOA-D RENT. 
St. Albans, Oct. 16. — This morning the Og- 
densbarg and Lake Cbamplain Baihoad Company 

seized tbelr road from the Central Vermont Com- 
paov for non-payment of rent. William J. Averill, 

ot 0<[deiuOurg, wM anpoiaMd by the Sanrem* 



Court of New-Tork Receiver of the pr operty, and 
he appointed John C. Pratt, tbe President of the 
old coinpauy, General Manager. The Central Ver- 
mont ofljcers have notified tbeir employes to obey 
the R»ceiver at present, and until soms otGuer ar- 
rangement is made will transfer passengers, lug- 
gage, and freight at House's Ptiint. 



HOME WORK. 



Gen. Daniel Uilmann will pass this week in 
Delaware County, speaking every day. 

A grand Ilepublican rally was held .at Parepa 

Hall, Yorkvillf, last night, when speeches were 

mace by Col. Carter, of Loaisiaaa and Gen. Thomas 
M. Couway. 

Hon. Dormaa B. Eaton addressed a well at- 
tended meeting of Republicans at Irvmgton on 
Monday evening. 

The Republican Association of tbe Twenty- 
first Assembly District met at Lincoln Hall, Har- 
lem, last evening, when eloquent addresses were 
made by W. T. B. Milliken and R. A. Adams. 

A vote taken on the train leaving New-York 
at 8:30 P. M. Thnrsdiy. on ths iSew-York Central 
Road, lietwi'en Svracune and Rochester, resulted as 
follows: Hayes 100; Tilden, 63; Cooper, 4; Smith, 4. 

The Republicans of Kings County met in the 

several wards and connty towns last night, and 
elected delegates to the Connty. City. Congresiion- 
nl, and Assembly Convcntiong. all of which are to 
be held during tbe present week. 

The Republicans 6f the Fourtb Congressional 

District, New-Jersey, have declined to make any 

Congressional nomin.atlon. as they coald not elect 
their nominee, and they have determined to sapport 
Hun. R, Vegbto, the Indep«>ndont candidate. 

Yesterday a vote on the Presidential candi- 
dates was taken .ou a train on the New-York Cen- 
tral and Hadson River Railroad between Sing Sing 
and Now- York with the following result: Hayes 
and "Wheeler, 96 ; Tilden and Hendricks, 34; Cooper 
and Carv, 3. 

A First Ward Hayes and Wheeler Cam- 
paign Clnb was organized at No. 36 Greenwich 
street last night by the election of tbe loUowiog of- 
ficers : Dr. Merrill, Pn-sident; Jonn Mclntyre, 

Sr.. and Michael Halpiu, Vice Pregldents, and Ed- 
ward P. Collins and T. F. McCabe. Secretaries. 

Gen. Joshua T. Owen, having been elected 
Major General of the Boys In Blue of New-Yerk 
Citr, has issned an order assuming command of the 
First aud Second Brigades. Tbe command mil ioe 
known as the • New- York Division of the Boys in 
Blue." Lieut. Col. J. C. Reed has been aetalled to 
act us Assistant Adjutant General of the Division, 

A number of citizens of tbe Fifteenth Ward 
met last night at No. 2S3 Greene street, and formed 
an organization to be. known as " The Fitteenth 
W..rd Ri'pubiican Club." Several epesches were 
made, iadorsing the national aud State Republican 
nominatiuus, and tbe meeting anjonrned to meet 
this evening, when an election ot officers will be 
hold. 

The grand open-air mass-meeting at Sing 
Sing tO'day will not be held on the State Farm near 

that place, aa intended, bnt will take place in the 
village Fqiiare. Soecial trains will be ran by tbe Kew- 
York. Central and Hudson River Railroad to and 
from New-York. Delegations irum several coanti<» 
are expected to be prese.nt, and among tbe speakers 
who will address the me«tiue are Geo. N. P. B.tnks. 
Gen. Daniel E. Sickles, Hon.Klliot C. Cowdln, Gen. 
Clara £. Carr, and Gen. James W. Hasted. 

The Republican Central Committee met last 
evening ot Repablican Hall, corner of Broadway 
and Thirty-fourth street, Mr. Jacob M. Pattemon in 
the chair. Col. Spencer reported from the Executive 
Committee that tbat body was actively at work. 
and that the Naturalization Committee was making 
progress. He then moved that as all the important 
bnaiuess at present pressing upon the organisation 
bad beeu transacted at the recent special tseeting of 
tbe committee, an adjonrnment take place. The 
motion was carried, and the committee adjourned. 

LARGE FIRE AT LOUISVILLE. 



SEVERAL HOUSES BURNED — LOS.S, $600,000 
— PARTIAI. LIST OF INSURANCE. 
ITie most destructive fire which has visited 
LouisviUe in many years occurred early yesterday 
morning. The flumes were discovered in Hesht St. 
Harris' clothing house, thence communicating to 
Davis Sc Haden's liquor store, Carson, David & 
Co.'s grocery, and A. Levy's clothing house. All 
these establishmeuis represent large wholesale 
firms, and were In one block, owned by Messrs. 
Thomer & Co., of Cincinnati. Tbe tlrtraea bpread 
serosa the street to anether blocK, damaging the 
Alexander Hotel, George W. Wicks Si. Co.'s tobacco 
and cotton house, and C. G. Seviers' hardware 
store. The Falls City furniture factory and other 
houses were also damaged. Tbe loss wUl 
exceed six hundred tboosand dollars, with 
very heavy insnrancos. Among tbe losses are: 
The Tborner Block, owned and bniU by Samuel 
Tburncr, of CiacinnatI, valued at tl50 000 ; Insured 
for |50,0o0— 115.000 in the Western Company, of 
Louisviile, and (35,000 in tbe London, Liverpool, 
and Globe. George W. Wicks' loss is small and 
covered by tSS.OOO iuauranoe in the Williamsburg. 
Westchester. German, of Loaisvilte, and Western 
Assurance, ot Toronto. Tbe Alexander Hotel, valued 
at ^,000 ; insurance $20,000. as toUows : Kentucky 
and Louisville Mutual. »10.00U ; North British, 
$5,000; Springfield, MassacbuHeita, $5,OU0. A. Levy 
Si. Co., clstbiers ; Bt«ok, $100,000 ; lusuiance. $33,000. 
Carson, David & Co.. grocers; stock, $40,000 ; in- 
surance, $25,000 ; Davis &. Haden. liquur dealers ; 
stock. $55,000; insaranoe, $47,003. Brandeis. 
Saunders & Co., cotton dealers ; loss, $5,000 ; msa- 
rance, $5,000, in tbe Royal. Sevier &. Co., loss small ; 
ibsuraucc, $5,000. in tbe Royal. Hecht & Harris, 
clothing aeaiers ; loss, $60,000; insurance. $33,000. 
John Sims' estate, furniture factory, loss, $20,000. 
iasuranc^, $10,000. and on f>took of fornitura. $-25,- 
000, insurauce, $iiO,000 ; J. J. Hare, elevator maker, 
£1,000, insured lu lull ; J. B. Alexander, proprietor 
or the Alexander Hotel, also lost in furniture and 
Stock $20,000, insurance, $10,000. Tbe damage sus- 
tnined^iy George VV. Wicks, C. G. Sevier a. Co., 
and Branders, Saunders & Co., is very lights and 
will not interfere with the oontiu nance of tneir buai- 
nssit. 

OTHER FIRES. 

The village of Jordan, Onondaga County, N. 
Y., was devastated uy lire cu Monday last. Tbe 
Muurue block, owned oy R. S, Sperry, and occupied 
by business firms, together with the adjacent build., 
iugs, being the entire business portion of the place, 
were consumed. The loss is $61.,6UU ; insured tor 
about «30,000. 

The store of Absalom N. Gardiner, in North 
Kingston, was uuiered and robbed early .yesterday 
uioi'Bine, and then set 00 fire. The store, a barn, 
aud an unoccnpied dweliing-boase were destroyed. 

None tf the Koudi were saved. The Iosb is esti- 
mated at $3,000. 

Tbe bai-n and outhouses of William Conover, 
at Dayton, N. J., were destroyed b.y fire late, ou 
Monday nig J t, and three valuahU horses perished 
in tbe flames. Tbe loss is $6,500. 

Tbe sash and planing mill at Chester, Penn., 
owned by J. Murguu Baker, was destroyed by tire 
early yesterday morniug. 'Ihe less is estimated ac 
$a0.00b ; insurance. $1I,0U0. 

Draper's founur.y, at Norwood, Maes., ^wos 
partially consuuied uy fire Monday. Tue loss ij 
about eigbt thousand dollars ; partially insured 

Tbe residence of James Murphy, at Newton, 
IMass., wasdesiroyed by bre. Tbe loss Is $:2,000; 
Insured for $1,500. 



BY MAIL AND TELLGBAPH. 



A colored student at Dent's Hill, Me., name 

unknown, acciaentally ahul aud ii.illed himself 
while hnntins. 

Mrs. Kufus Benson, of Camden, Me., com- 

milted suicide ov taking arsenic .yesterday. She 
was aabjuot tu fits ot despondency. 

A change has been consummated in the pro- 
prietorship ot tbe Toledo hladt uy ibe resumption 
oy D. R. Locke ot his old positron as managmg 
nartner. 

A. K. Yount, a well-known citizen of Boulder 

Coaniy, Col., la aiiempting to board a paaeuger 
train at Bouider, yesturday, tell across tne track 
and was instantly killed. 

The Quebec tram, yesterday, arrived at St» 

John, .N. B., SIX boars aud a halt late, havine beeu 
det.ilned by a snow storm in tbe no-tb, where two 
feet ot snow covered the track in some places. 

Goods irom Canada intended fur the exhibi- 
tion at Sydney, Austiana, have beeu selected, con- 
sisting priU'-ipally of «uwiu£ macbiues, machloerv, 
luinitare, wooleu goods, and agricultural imple- 
Kunts. 

The schooner A. C. Buckley, of Groonport, 
■put 'into Newport vesteruay atternooo to lana 
Charles Woolong, of Salem, a seaman wbo fell from 
alofr, oreaking his jaw and probably both le^a. He 
was sent to the hospiul. 

An excursion party embracing about two 
thousad scuool cblidreu airived lu Poiladelpbia 
yesterday Irom Pittsburg. Alt>-r parading throngb 
some ot tbe priucipal streets they halted in Inde- 
pendence square, aud were addressed by Gov. Hart- 
ranfi, after wniob they proceeded to the Exhibition 
gruuuds. 

Yesterday, in Lancaster Parish, four miles 
from St. John, Rev. ii. AicQairk attempted to force 
an entry to a bouse occupied by his relatives, a 
family named Morris, olaimmK the property as le> 
gailif bis, when be waa shot and badly woauded by 
bis oephew. Hugh Morri» '^..Qpirir was removed 

to the gMtnl bMi9iti»- 



THE EASTERN WAR CLOUD. 

THREATENING ASPECT OF AFFAIB8. 

A PEEVADING SENSB OF THE IHiaNKHCE OF 
A GREAT KASTERN WAR— AUSTWA ASD 
RUSSIA APPABENILY IN CONCEBT— RUS- 
SIAN OCCUPATION OF ONK OF THE 
PROVINCES TO BE TOLERATED BT AUS- 
TRIA WITH ULTERIOR VIKWS TO A SHARE 

IN THE SPOILS THE RUSSIAN COCNCII. 

AT LIVADIA— 0P1SI0S8 OF ERGLtSa 
«, JODP.NALS. 

London, Oct 17.— The correspondent of thk 
Tivut at Belgrade, disctusing tbe situation says i 
" Every diplomatic agent here believes we are on 
the eve of a great eastern war. The on!.y diffArenc* 
of opinion among them is as to whether it wiU 
commence in the Spring or almest immediately. 
All outward indications ae:m tii> favor tbe lattcK 
Idea, Which would give" Eu«fla(aD^ Servla great 
advantages. Strange romora 'tee' oarrent eon- 
corning tbe Intended action cf Austria. 1 

On Sanday semi-official Intelligence reached Bc^ 
grade that the Emperor of Austria bad iofonaedtha 
Czar that Austria would remain neutral, and would 
make no objection to certain limited ocenpatioB oC 
one of the Christian provinces 01 Turkey. 

A dispatch from Vienna to Reoter'a Telegm 
Company says : •• It is believed iu well-informad 
circle!* here that an alliance between Austria asd 
Russia is on tbe point of being oonclnded, aeoortftsg 
to which Russia, m the event of Turkey's refosmg 
a short armistice, would enter upon military iiit«r 
ventioii, while Austria would remain nentral. Bq*. 
sia would not pcrraanently occupy the Turkiab 
provinces, bat sboaid events lead to tbe overtbrM* 
of the Ottoman Government, Russia would yield H 

Anitris snch extension of temtorr as the ndchl 

claim on groundsot oomasercial or general i&tnrest.* 

The St. Peteiiibarg Jovmal, a semi-official papeiv 

says : " There are indications tbat the people oi 

Constantinople regard w^ar as Tmavoidat>]e and w«t, 
come Russia's decision to finish the matter witboi< 
further delay. The meeting of Russian stateaitoac 
at Livadta indicates a crie'S in oar politic*. Tldf 
meeting repreients official Russia assembled in vImi 
of the Bosphoms and the seat of war." 

A St. Petersburg letter to tbe Times <lated Oct. U 
says: "Boabtless tbe general impres'lon here If 
tbat Rnssla is on the eve ot the long-wUhed-for 
straggle with Tnrkey." 

A Renter telegram from Bnchsreat aanoaneaa 
that a convention has been concluded between tba 
Roumanian and Russian Railway CompaBioa.: 
by which tbe former andertake to bold in readinasa 
at the disposal of Russia sufficient trains toteas-*. 
:<port 4 000 troops daily. 

A S7>ecial to tbe Times from Vienna states thafc 
" the Rncii.'th and French Govemmenta, eapecialljp^ 
the former, have decidedly proooDBced for tbe te< 
cept.tnce of tbe six montht' armistice. Anstna if 
inclined to do likewise, and has asked &ermany'a 
opinioo, which, however, haa not yet been givea- 
Italy on being premised by England to give a definit* 
reply, says it does not want io aav war to antiotpati 
Servia's deeiaion, as it regards the armisiiee aa dl» 
advanlageons to Servia." 

The PaUMall 6a?«ttepablitbes special disnatch 
from Berlin which eays - " Tbe great powers hava 
now reverted to Lord Derby's earlier pn>posat to- 
conclude an armistice for six weeks without oob-' 
dittons. in order U> devise daring tbat period » 
basis for a treaty of peace. There Is no tratk la 
reports ot German mobilization." 

The Times in a leading article points eat that 
peace or war depends upon a prompt reply by th* 
Pane to Knssia's demand for a six weeks' armis- 
tice. The limes repeats its argnments m favor o< 
the powers' nrgiag Tarkey to accept Bossia'a A» 
maud. 

Tbe Pall XaO Oautte of this afternoon, ia a lea* 
ing article, contends tbat Russia Is at present aeS- 
nallyatwar with Turkey, and that any farttoi 
efforts at diplomacy are nssless. 

Col. DetaahkofC mentioned is a Berlin diapatefc 
to the Timet as being on a miseiac to Anacria on 
behalf of Rossia, Is the Caar's Afljatant. 

A special dispatch to tbe .Stan^rc! from Belgrade 
states that the unseasoai^le beat ia causing unuh 
sickness. Last week an ontbreak of piagae oe- 
cnrred at AgauKelovatx from which 313 Serriana 
died. Tbelr bats, clothes, and bedding wet* 
burned and the grocmd plowed up. when the peati- 
lence ceased as suddenly as it apoeared. 

A dispatch to Renter's Telegram Cofflpaay JIhMB 
Zara reports tbat t>acbir Piisba haa repalaed the in. 
■argents and relievea Bilek, which has been be- 
sieged by Peko Panlovitch since Friday la^t Tli« 
insurgents of the district of LjaDiDie aad Neveaiafs 
have separated from the Montenegrins and retained 
to their homes. 

LoNDOX, Oct. 18. — The (Standard's special dispateh 
from Vienna anaoaooes that a Rasstan ooaxier Hm 
jast arrived with the second letter from tbe Csar u 
the Rmperor of Austria. Letters from Odessa r* 
port tbat 5,000 men have arrived f^m tbe intecioi 
of Russia to work on the fortificatioas of tbat cUij 
and of other placss near the seashore. 

Tbe leading editorial in the Times reviowins fbt 
sitaatioa conclades as folUws: "Eaglaad's i» 
terest^ is less immediate than tbat « 
German.y, Aastria, and France, and m 
may await with equanimity oven the oatbreak of 
war. Bat there may be a point at which regard for 
the well-t>eing and reputation of the British £(»•, 
pire would necessitate a resolute attitude." 

The Tim.es' Belgrade dispatch says Germaay's afr 
titnde is not understood by tbe diplomatitta. Bu- 
marok is supposed to be biding his time, with th« 
view of assisting, if opportnaity offers, io a disrap-> 
tion of ths AustriBD Enpire. 

The Vienna correspondent of the Timet says: 
" Kow that there is 00 locger any nUBonderatand' 

ine regarding the real moaning of thi 

English indignation meetings over the 
atrocities ia Balgans, it is remembered 
that evea single-handad England's oppoaitios 
may be more eSectaal tnan any other power apar( 
from her sapenorit.v at sea. The land forces ar« 
in a very difi'erent condition from what thsy wert 
at ths oatbreak of the Eastoru war." 



■;ir^- 



THE LONG OR THE SHORT T3UCR 

RUSSI/-. OPPOSED TO THE PROPOSED FTVI 
MOXTHS' AUMISriCE — ENGLAND, TBAKCZ 

AND ITALY IX FAVOR OF IT— ACSXRU 
UNDECLARED. 

London, Oct- 17.— Renter's telegram trow 
Vienoa reports that the Anstrian Government bat 
not approved of the Porte^ proposal for the long 
armistice. On tbe contrary, it is nador- 
Stood that Count Andraaay will ennport tha 
steps taken by Russia in favor of a shorter ami 
tice. and will second Kassla's action in hanaonj 
With the triple alliance. 

Renter's Beilin telegram states tbat Bossla'a tela 
graphic dispatch rejecting the Porte's propoaal ii 
dated Oct. 14. and is textually as folio irs t 

'- We regard a six months' armisUoe as inmeeea 
■ary and anfavorable te tbe conclusion of a-durablf 
peace, which we desire. We are not in a positioi 
to ex»i«ise upon Servia aod Montenesro pressure 
to obtain their oonsent to such proloneation io th^t 
nocertatn and diffionlt pcsition. We consider thai 
the financial and commercial condition of Rorope, 
which Is already unbearable, would •uffer atill 
more by saoh postponemeui. We must insist npoi 
an armistice of four or six wseks, with provisior 
tbat it be farther prolonged sbeuld tbe progress el 
segotiaiions render neoeasary." 

Renter's correspondent at St. Peterebarg tel» 
graphs tbat it is understood that Sa» 
«:a, reverting to England's original proposal, 
demands that gnaraatees should be ■ff.irded 
for tbe execntioB of reforms in Turkey by means o.' 
an iateruational act The Porte previously ref asoc 
this. It is sow stateA tbat Servia is resolverd to ro' 
Jcct any armistice. 

LONDOX, Oct. 18. — Tbe Vienna oorrespoadent 9i 
tbe I'imes telegraphs tho following: "I have Josl 
been informed tbat England, France, aod Italy tuv« 
declared their aooeptanoa ef tbe five raontbt' 
armiflilee and have appomtod delocates to taka part 
In drawing np tho line of 4ea>ac«atloB. Aaatna aas 
mt jot B«da bar d— Ug^wu ^ -'" ' 



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CHANGES IN THE AMI. 




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FBOMOTIOyS, TKANSFEBS, AND AP- 
POINTMENTS. 
Wa8hixoto?i, Oct. 17.— Thelollowlii;jE«ner»l 
order Ba« been Issueo bv Ihe War Department: 
HKAD-QUARTSna oK^HS Abht, f 

ADJUTANT CiKNERAL'S OFFICB, > 
\V A8HINOTOX, Oct. 13, 1876. ) 
OznCBAL Okdkb No. 103.— The foUowmjt promo- 
tiona and Appointinoats in the Army of the United 
bUtf a. I3»(ie by the Proaident, by and with the ad- 
vice and consent of the Senate, and 1)t the Preal- 
fleut alone, slnfo the publication of General Order 
No 60 of JulvSe, lo76, and np toOct. 10, 1876, are 
auuoQDced. thi>80 mad* by the i'reaident alono 
&re marked thus * 

I. — PHO^IOnONS. 

Mtdieal Devartment.—Onv^ Alfred A. Woodhnll,* 
AkSMtjuit ;;arte.>n, to be Surgeon witii rank of 
M Jor, Oi't. 1, 1676, vice Milhau, resiipied. 

Ateond Itegiment of Cavalry.— Firat Lient Joseph 
L»w»ou' lo tio Captain, b^pu \i5. 1870, vice Sntorms, 
lismmaed, Cxmpanv E. First Lieut. Cbarlea Mor- 
ton' to be First Lieuioaant, Sept. 23, 1676..vioe Law- 
Si loii. promotttd, Conip.»nv A, ,, ^«,. ,. 

i^- yWh RcQiment of Cavalry.— T\nt LJent. Calbraith 

P. ItjdBer* to be Captain, Jnlj SO, 1876. vice WU- 
ioo, resJffoed, Company A. Second Lieut. Walter 
S. Schiller to be Firi»t Lientenant, July 29, 1876, 
Tlce Roilgers, rromoted, CompanT D. 

Stventti liegiment of Cavalry. — Second Lietit. vvil- 
Uam \V, Kpuiuaou, J r.,* i« be First Lieutenant, Auk. 

14. 1576, Tice Larned, who resigned bis rejtlmeatai 
eomnii.ision only, Cotnpany F. 

Jiijjhth Kegiment of Cavalry.— Tint Lient. John 
IikflMty,* to be C»pt*in, Ooi. 3. 1S76, noe Hartwell, 
deceased, Company K j Second Lieut. Eaward 
A. Godwin.* to ba First Lieutenant, Oct. 3, 1876, 
»lco L'tfftTrtT, promoted. Company L- 

Stewui Kegimvit of /»^/antry.— Second Llotit. Hot- 
,|co B. Sar».>u,* to be First LifUtenant, Aug. 16, 1678. 
■Vioo Biril. di»niis?»e«1, ConjBanyF. 

Jhirteenth Ktgiment of in/an^ry.— Second Lient. 
BrntTsuD Crnliitli, to be First Lieutenant, Jane W, 
1876. vice B»Ker, appointed Rapimonta! Adjutant. 
Company G. - -r . 

iitvtnt«ef^th Regiment of lt\fantry. — Second Lient. 
Daniel 11. Brush, to be Fiwt Lioutenant, Aug. 4, 
1876, vice Caims, deceased. Company F ; Second 
Lieut. Georee liublen,* to be Jiirst Lionteaant. 
BepU li», ISitJ, Tictj Mclaagart, deceased. Com- 
pany E. 

2*c»nty-ftr3t Regiment of Infantry. — Seconu Lient. 
flarrv I)a W. Moore,* to be Firsi Lieutenant, July 
13, 1878, Tioe Ebstein. appointed Kemmental Quar- 
t«niM«ter, Company F. 

II. — APP01NTMEXT3. 

• JfMfiaoi Dtpartment. — To be Attsisrant Snrgeons, 
tiltx tbe ranlc ot i<irdt Lienteuant, £awin F. Ganl- 
»er, of ilaine, Ang. 5, 1376, vice Forwood, pro- 
muted to Soreeon ; WiUiam F. Corbusier, of Call- 
lornia, Aug. 5, lS7d, vice AlcClellan, promoted to 
Siirx«on: .^arnes \V. Bueli, ot New- York, Ang. 5, 
l«7fl, vice Storrow, momoted to Surgeon ; Kt>bert 
W. shnfeliit, of the Dlatrict of Columbia, Aug. 5. 

1575. vice 'VVolverion, promoted to Soreeon ; D<iniel 
IL Appel, of Pennsylvania, Au^. 5, 1876, Tice Ha^^ 
•u£ jironioted to Surgeon j William.C. C. Andrews, 
of Ohio, Ane. 5, 187G. vice Greenleaf. promoted to 
Bargeou; Thomas A. Cnnningham, of Vlreinia, 
Aaff. 5, 187t>. vice Miodieton, promoted to Surgeon ; 
Harry 0- Perley. of Michigan, Ang. 5, 1876, rice 
Jtinewav, promoted to Surgeon ; Henry G. Barton, 
Of Vermont, Au,;. 5, 1576, vio» Tilton, promoted to 

SorgeoD. . .„ 

/•oy Department. — Col. Benjamin AlTord, Pay- 
master General lo be Paymaster General, with tbe 
rank of Brigadier General, July 22, 1876, under the 
act of Congi-ess of that date, esublishine the rank 
of the Paymaster Generai ; James R. Wasson,* ut 
low^ lo oe Prtymaater, with the rank of M%jor, 
bapt. H 1376, Vice Steward, deceased. 

FoM ChApiain. — George W. Dunbar, of "Wiscon- 
sin, lo Oe I'usc Coaplaiu. Aug. 15, 1876, vioe Biidger, 
fleGAa^ed 

Uttond Regiment of Cavalry.— li. Edwin P. 
^foewer,' ot Uiiio, to be Second Lieulenaat. Aug. 31, 

1576, vice Kue. appointed Kegimental Adjutant, 
Company F. 

Tkird Hegimtnt of Cavalry.— \. Fnacis H. Ha*- 
di«, irom ai large, lo be S«oond Lieutenant, Joly 
88, le76. vicd (Jrtsham, transferred to the Seveutfa 
UavaLry, Coiupanv D. 

Foi,r h litgiinetU of Cavalry. — t. Sergt. J. Wealey 
Ro'<euqae«., all' luo Geuefiu Service, to b« Second 
Lieuttfuaut. A112. 15, 137S, vice Grant, promoted. 
Company F. 

Svpk Kegiment of Cavalry.—U. Benjamin H. 
Cheevar, Jr.. ot the Disiricl ot Colnmbia, to be See- 
owl Lieoienant, Ang. 15, ls7S, vice JNiohois, re- 
■isaed, Company G. 

iitrmth Eegiiaent of Catalry.—li. William J. 
NicbolMU, ui ine Uisirict ot Columbia, to be Sacond 
Li«ateuaat, Aug. 15, 1876, vice Bobinson, promoted. 
Company B. iiO. J. Williams Biddle,* of Peunsyl- 
vaoiii, to be Second Lieateuani, Ang. 31, 1876, vice 
AJidrua, who deulincs transier irom Fiitli Cavalry, 
i;omp.ujy K. 

AijAJA Hegiment of Cavalry. — 6. Joslah H. King, 
of PcuusVivauki, to ue Second Lieatenanr, Ang. 15, 
IHK, viM Witkiiuou. trsQslerred 10 the Seventh 
U«VdUry, Cum^ny D ; T. Jons Gaeat, Jr., of 'Mary- 
land, tu k>e Second L:entenant, Aug. 15, 1876, vice 
yuiier, tta&dterred to the Seventh Cavairy, Com- 
INUiyK; 9. Joscpa \V. Pinder, of Georgia, to be 
becuuU Llea;euitut, Aug. 15, 1876, vioe Carleton, re- 
aignctl. Company F. 

'ienth Uegiment of Cavalry. — 2. Isaac B. Dankel- 
berger, 01 oa.itoruia, (Lace Captain, First Cavalry,) 
lo bo Second Lieateuaut, Aog. 15^ 1876, vice Xu- 
iny, reelgaeu. Company Al. 

tonrth Jxegiment of Infantry. — 10. Henry F. 
Weiio, of Kuoue lalaiid, to be Second Lieutenant, 
Auit. m. 1670. vice Foster, transferred to the Third 
Artillery, Company U. 

ienth Uegiinenl of Infantry. — 18. Bogardas 
X.driuge,*oi .tlaxsacuasetta, to ue Second Llenten- 
KBi, Aug. 31, 1£7J, Tics Clark, dismissed, Com- 
pany i>. 

tJuventh Segiment of Infantry.--^, Corporal 
H«ni:y liifauy. Company H, Third jjifantry, to be 
iiocond Lieutenant, Aug. 15, 1876, vice Gorringe, 
resigned. Company F. 

Uweifth Hegiment of Infantry. — 17. Gny Howard,* 
ttvai at laru*. lo bo Secouu Lieutenant, Ang. 31. 
1876, vice Jaeger, resigoud. Company C. 

H'ourteeiitii ^^egiment of Infantry.— 11. William P. 
Gouuwin, of Ouio, to UKi becouu Lieutenant, Aug. 
U, 1($70. vice bwilt. transferred to ti'.e Fif to Cav- 
auy. Company C ; 16. William A. Kimball,* of 
UlaiL, to be Second Lientenant. Ang. 31, 1876, vioe 
ttickei, tzaiuierred to the Seveutn Cavalry, Com* 
panv G. 

MixtsetUh Kegiment of Infantry. — 3. Theodore 
B. Kci.»T.-.uu,' ii'uui at large, (lace Second Lienten- 
tait, sixth luiantry,) to be Second Lieatenaui, Aug. 
l», iSnH, vice W'euie, ptomoted. Cuinpaoy C 

IvtntUth Uegiment of Irtfantry. — 13. John C. 
D«mi, iroui at Uigo, to be Second Lieatenant, Ang. 

15. ^876, vice Critteuden, liiUed in ac.lon, Com- 
iwuv G. 

ivetU,y.Otird Begiment of Infantry. — 8. LeaFebi- 
fCer, tiuiu atUrsc, lu be Seuoiiu Lieuteoant. Aag. IS, 
1876, vice Nichols, deceased. Company G ; 19. S. 
Aaeo l>yer.* of the District of Colnmbia, to be See- 
Biia Lteatenant, .^u^. 31, 1876, vice Cherry, trans- 

,terr«a to the Fitcti Cavalry, Coupaiiy F. 

To b« Captain lu the Army in accordance with 
the aet ot (Jt/ni:re3a approved July :i4, 1S76, George 
r. Oimsfead, Jr., ot ^ievr -Jersey, (laie (Japtain Seo- 
Uia ArtU.ery.) July 24, 1876. 

MilUary Academy.— h\iiii Lieut. Charles \T. 
Lanit^d. »eveucu cavalry, to be Pretessor of Draw- 
»*i Jtiiy 25, 1876, vice "Weir, reiired irom aetive 
, lervice. 

IlL — TRASSFEES. 

Second Lieut. S«muet A. Cnoiry, from the Twen- 
tr-tkird Infantry to ilio Fitth Cavalry. July 38, 
la75. Tjoe Hrtii, promoted. Company F; Second 
Xiienleuant Cbarli^n W. l:'osLer, from the Fourth 
lalaotry to lUe Third Artillery, July 28, 1876, vice 
▲t>t>i/tT, pconioted. Buttery A.; Second Lieuc. Eben 
bwifi, Jr.. iruni tiie Fourteenth Infantry to the 
Vifth Cavalry. July 28. Ia76, vice Schuyler pro- 
noted. Company B . Sucoud Lieut. Horatio G. 
bickal, Jr.. irom tb<3 Fo&rceentu lafautry to the 
Beveoih Cavairv, July 28, 1876, vice Schoflold. who 
Aediuea transfer frooj bocond Cavalry. CcTajoany F. 
Baouud Lieur. Cbai-loa L. Uummood from the Ninth 
' Lavalrv to the Thud Cavalry, Jane 28, 1876, yiee 
KobinaJD, transterrea to the Seventh Cavalry, 
Company M. Second Liout. John Pitcher from the 
Winin Infantry to uio First Cavalry, July 28, 1876, 
vta«> — -, to be piomoted. Company — . fecund 
LifiOt. George Palmer Irom the Twenty-lonrtb In- 
fantry to the Nintn Intantry, July 28, 1876, vlco 
Pilcbar, traniiferied to Uie First Cavalry, Companv 
V^v^ ' %■ becond Lieut. Josepu F. Cnmmings from the 
\'ifi '.tnitb Cavaury to the Thlni Cavalry, .J aly 2iJ, 1878, 

^ viee Cnase. iranslerred to the Seventb Cavalry, 

Company L. Second Lieut. Altred M. Falter 
irom the Tenth Cavalry to the Second Cav- 
•iXV. Jnlr ^, l''-7C, vice Pearson, truns- 
larred 'o the Seveutb Canalr.v, Company A. 
Second Lient. Herbei-t J. Sloeuw, Uom tne Twenty- 
fifth lulautry tv liio Seventh Cavairy, June 2, 1876, 
vice Kalon. <nho declines tiauster from the I'ititi 
Cavalry, Company C. 'SocuuU Lieut. Alfred C. 
btaarpe, frmii lUu Xeuth Cavulry to the T\fent.v- 
tecuua lutauiry, July 'HH, ld76, vice Smith, pro- 
uowl. Company B. 

IV. — RETIHEU. 

With the rati red pay of Brigadier General, In 
Mttiormliy with the act ot Cougiess approved July 
tu, 1676, Col. Clement A. Fmley, United States 
Aimy, letiied, to oate from Juiy lU, ls76; with the 
tetired pay oi Colinel, lu coutunniiy witn the act 
•f Coof^t-ss approved July 25, 1876, Capt. Albert 
\V. Preston, L'luied Stuten Aruiy, retired, to data 
from July a3, 1876. 

v.— CASUALTIES. 

huignei. — Kajur douu J. Mllaan, Surgeon, 
Oc'.. 1. 1876; Cupt. Rocior. P. Wilsou. Fifth Cavalry. 
July 20, la70; First Lieut. C'harlea W. Larued, tSev- 
aiith Cavalry, Aug. 14, 1875, (his regimental uora- 
BiiasiCHi only ;) Second Li<'ui. Henty G. Carletou, 
Eigiilli Cavoliy, Aug. 1, l&7d; Second Lieut. J. 
Bauaeli French, Kiiitii Cavdiiy, Aug. 1, 1876 ; Second 
Lieac CbriBtopiier Ici. Conicgo, liieveutli Infautry, 

Aug. J, 1875 i Second Lieut. WiliiamW. Solpmau, 
Dleveuib Xafuntiy, Au£. 10, ltj75 ; Second Lioat. 
Gw^rge A. X^aeger, Twelfth lulautry, July 31, 1873; 
trecoud Lient. Wiliiam N. Dykmuu, Twenty -second 
In tan try, Oct. 1, \^i. 

Diei. — Major Augustus IL Seward, Paymastsr, 
St Montrose, Wtiiii-uester Ci.uuty, N_ Y.. S.jpt.. 11, 
lt$76 ; Capt. Alexander 11. iiutf. AsaiACant Surgeon, 
at Germautowu, Pens., Aug. 19, 1676 ; Capt. Loww 
Tbompsou, Second Cavalry, at camp on Yel- 
lonrstune Kiver, Montana Torriiory, July 13, 1876; 
Capt. Charles A Uanweli, Eigtitb Cavalry, at, ban 
Ancouiu, Tuxa«, Oct. 3, 1870; ^irst Lieut. Douald 
Jackson, Aitsistaut .Surgeon, si Woodvillo, Ontario, 
Ciuada. Stpt. 2^, 1870; First Lieut. Kobert Calms, 
(ievi;nteenih luiamry, ai Fort Aberorombio, Da- 
kota Xetritory, Auu. 4, 1876; First Lieut. Calvin 
P. iJoTaggart, Seventeeutb Inlautrv, at Logans- 
CHirt. Ind., .Sepc. IS, 1:70 ; Second Lieut. Albert U. 
Ileitou, Second Artiliery, at Vort Johnston, N. C, 
sept. 81, 1876; Second Lieut. %. De Russy Niehois, 
Cweuiy-tbinl lufantix at Omaha Uarraeka. Ne- 
kraskt>, JulyS3. 1&70. 

li*<iixntd.—)is Second Lieut. Ckarlta B. Schofield. 
£«(!«ud Cavalry — the aopoinuuent, by trans. er, of 
&ecnud Liouleuanr, beyanih Cavalry, Jane 35, 
1878 ; by beooDd Lieut. George O. Eaton. Fifth 

pavAlfy»ta9 fkfi99!iiU»«Bt, b; WASiier, oCSflcwMi 



Lieutenant, Sarenth Cavalry, June 86, 1876 ; by 
Second Lieut Edwin P. Andrns, Fifta Cavalry— 
the appointment, by transfer, of Second Lieutenant, 
Seventh Cavalry, June 25. 1876. 

JZ«io*«d.— The appoinfinent by transfer of Second 
Lieut Horatio G. Siokel, Jr., Fourteenth Infantry, 
to be Second Lieutenant, Fiftn Calvary, Jnly 28, 
1876; the appointment by transfer of Second Lient. 
Herbert J. Slocnm, Twenty-fltth Infantry, to be 
Second Lientenant, Second Cavalry. July 23, 1876. 

Canceled. — The appointment of Theodore H. 
Eokerson, to be Second Lieutenant, Fifth Cavalry, 
Ang. 15. 1676. 

Z>i«mi«fed.— Capt. Alexander Sutorlns, Third 
Cavairy, Sept. 25, 1876 ; First Lieut Robert W. 
Bard, Second Infantry, Aug. 16, 1876. 

VI. 

OfiScera have been arranged in the foregoing 
order to the companios and batienea to which tbev 
have snooeeded in the natural course of 
promotion or appointment, or to which they have 
Deen assigned Dy competnit authority. 

vir. 

Acceptance or non-acceptance of appoint- 
ment and, in case of aoceptance, the birth-place of 
the officer appointed, his age and residence when 
appointed, and his full name correctly writteD, will 
in all cases bo promptly reported to the Adjutant 
General. 

viii. 

In case of the ^eath of an ofiScer, it is 
hereby made the duty of bis immediate command- 
ing officer to report the fact at once direct to this 
of&ce. stating the cause, date, and place. When an 
officer away from bU command dies in hospital or 
under treatment, the medical officer in charge will 
forward the report as above requlrrrt ; if not under 
treatment by an army medical officer, the report 
will be made by any officer having cognizance of the 
fact. 

By command ef Gen. Sherman. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT. 
Assistant Adjutant General. 
' By direction of the Secretary, of War Major J. 6. 
Chandler, Quartermaster, alter Tiavine reported to 
the Qaarterniaster General, will report in person to 
the commanding otficwr of the Department of the 
South, to relieve Lient. Cok J<*me8 A.Ekin, Dep- 
uty Quartermaster General, of his duties as Chief 
Quartermaster of that department. Lieut. Cul. 
Kkin will continue to act under the orders of the 
Quartermaster General, as in command of the 
Quartermaster's Department at Jettersonvjlie, Ind., 
and iu the liivescigation of claims referred to hlni 

by the Quartermaster General, and as Disbursing 
Agent at Lonisville, Ky. 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. 



THE ART AWARDS AT PHILADELPHIA. 
To the Bditor of the New- York Timea : 

I have read in The New- York Timbs (Oct. 1) 

which yon so ably direct, an article about awards 
of medals in tho Art Department of the Interna- 
tional Exhibition. As my name is there mentioned, 
I ought to declare that neither the German, Judge 
nor myself " refused with indignation to take hand 
to increase tho nnmber of medals." Wliat we both 
wrote and signed was as follows : 

•* We wished to express ourselves In sympathy 
with the opinion of those members of the commit- 
tee tbeie present who thought the nnmber of 
medals proposed far too small, yet in view of the 
fact that we were members ot the subcommittee 
(for oil paintings) which sdindged these awards, 
and which have voted that tbeir labors were defini- 
tively closed, and the members of the committee 
beine then atjsent excepiine ourselves, we did not 
feel at liberty to join in the recommendations of any 
farther awards." 

Trusting in yonr acknowledged impartiality, I 
beg of you ihe kindness to publish this correctioo. 
COUNT OF DONADIO. 

Philadelphia, Wednesnay, Oct 11, 1876. 



NORTH RIVER 8AVING3 BA.NK — CARD FROM 

KX-PRE8IDKNT HOOPER. 
To the JSditor of the Neno- York Times: 

The proceedings of the majority of tho Tni.i- 

tees of the North River Savings Bank relative to 

me ingeuiouslv cover the real motive of their ac- 
tion. It IS but ]ast that the public soonld know 
the facts in order that a coireot conclusion may be 
drawn. Jan. 16, 1876, was the regular meeting of 
the Trustees for the annual elpctiou of President of 
the bank ; up to that evening I did not know there 
was to be any oppositien to me. Five minutes be- 
fore the meeting of the board I was informed by 
one of the Trnstees, Mr. C. Y. Wempie, that a 
minority of them were golnz to vote against me 
for President I told Him that it was a burprise to 
me, as I had heard bo complaints, and that it was 
the first information I had of it, but if that was 
their determination all I had to do was to submit. 
About an hour after this conversation the elec- 
tion took place and I was chosen by two majorii;r, 
one ot the opposition being absent At this election 
nothing was said obieotlonable to my management 
nor waa there any complain c of the want of atten- 
tion lio the duties of the office. A few days after 
this election Dr. H. D. Ranuey, tho first Vice Presi- 
dent, seot me a note requesting me to meet him at 
his residence. Oa oallini; tiiere he demanded my 
lesignatioa ; whtreupon I asked blm if there was 
any special reason for it. He answered none, except 
it was desirable to have a fiuaucial man for Presi- 
dent better known to the public. Preanmine that 
he wanted the position himself, and that the bank 
would not be greatly benefited by the change, I de- 
alined to comply with the request. Thereupon he 
declared that the Trnstees who voted against me 
at the last election would " war upon ine to the 
knife." Notwithstanding on the evening of the elec- 
tion there was no oomplaiut or protest against the 
report of tbe tellers who counted the vote'*, nor any 
Objection by anv of the Trustees as to its correct- 
ness or legality, this faction, after the death ot a 
friendly Trustee, made an effort to refer the report 
back again to the tellers, apparently for the pur- 
pose of brealdng np the election, changing the 
Nominating Committee, and dispossessijig me at 
the same -, time. This was defeated, if my 
recollection is correct, by a tie vote. 
At this election the Nominating Committee was 
changed, a majority of my friends being elected. 
This committee met and recommended thrne gentle- 
men, supposed t« be friends of mine, to fill the 
i vacancies tlen existing. Iu tbe meantime one of 
my friends, the late Secretary and Trustee Jame.-i 
Oj Bennett died, and another had become dis- 
ufracted, leavini: mo in the minority. The opposi- 
tion, thus strengthensd. attempted at the meeting of 
the ooard. March 13, in vioJa.tion of tne charter, to 
limit the Ti-usrees to the number tnen existing. 
Which would effectually prevent the tiiree gentle- 
men recommended by the Nominatini; Committee 
from being elected. I resisted this factions legis- 
lation by declaring It informal and not in accord- 
ance wiih the QDaner. Itafiords me pleasure lo 
say that I was sustained in my ruiinic by the Super- 
intendent of the Bantcing Department Hon. D. C. 
Eliia, who, upon learning fruia me tbe particulars, 
replied aa follows : 

OrricE OF THK Hew-Vobic Bank DKPABTUByr, ) 

ALB.ISY. March 3l. io7d. J 

J»hn Hooper, president of yortb, RUer aaulngs Bank: 

BiAsSia: Keternn^ tu your letter of yesterday I 
think you t.tke the right view inreitard to amauding 
your by-laws, la order to reiluue toe nuiDijer of 1'lus- 
teei. SeccioQ 50, of the Geonral act, seems cle:»r aud 
explicit an that pomt Very truly yours, 

D. C. hLLlS, Superintendent. 
Losing all confidence in tho man wuo were re- 
sorting to snch extraordinary means to i:et control 
of the bank, I withdrew my depoiiits from it July 1, 
and many of my friend.s hanng knofvledge of taese 
transauiiona did the same. Some of tbe opposition, 
upon learning these facts, succeeded in getting a 
committee ot turee appointed to iuqutru into dam- 
aging rumors mads by one or mure Trnstees con- 
cerning the bank. No charge or specificaiiou was 
made against any oSiuer or Trustee in the resolu- 
tion appointiug this committee. It wa^ intended, 
however, to strike at me, as sausequent events will 
prove. 

This committee was appointed July 11, and held 
several meetings without inviting me to be present. 
Sept. 6, the Cnairman. Dr. H. D. Rannev, sent me 
a note requesting me to meet tne committee at a 
private bonse, without intoriainu me that I was iu 
any way implicateit in tbe proceedings. I declined 
to moot tfaoui there, aud suggested the bank was 
the proper place. Thus, witnuut appednug be:ote 
them, aud without any charges or specifications 
being made, the committee reported to thu board 
Sept 10. uud recoiumouded that I be removed 
froui the Presidency. Thereupon Mr. John Graliam, 
seconded by Erastas Littledeld, moved that I be 
displaced. The resolution was laid over to tbe 
next meocing, Oct 9. they not havine euongh vote^ 
to pass it. This radical way of geitiag rid of an 
officer legally elected ci-oated csnsiderabio astonish- 
ment in the neighborhood, aud at leagib found its 
way into the papers. In the earlier pa.ii ot the year 
myfnsuds in tbe board moved that tiiese ag^rensive 
procaedings be published, and the opposition unan- 
imously voted against it; showiug couulasively that 
they were ashamed of their uotious. These lacts 
are mainly corroborated by the minutes of the 
board, and I challenge coutiadiction. 

On lb* 9th of October, wishing to allay tbe ex- 
clteuent which tbeir actions had engendereil. aud 
becoming satisUed that my Iriends and acquain- 
tances understood the motive of the attack to je a 
determination on the part of a few persons to rule 
or ruin tna banl£. I reuiguod perempturily and aouu- 
lutely three hours before the board met, both my 
position as Presidkint and Trustee. Noiwitbstaud- 
lug this, these " honorable muu." more or less blind 
with spleen and malignity, without impugning my 
integrity or maral churdcier, tvenc tnroa;:n the 
farce of displacing an officer when there was none 
In existence to removu. Could absurdity go fur- 
ther I 1 am quite willing to compare records wilh 
any of tbe opyositiou wbo were so anxious lo oust 
me from tbe bank. 

JQAt its I rganization I advanced ^'rom my personal 
tuuds t2,5Ub to Kucure the lease ot tbe pie^ont ioua- 
(lou. 1 itlso advanced {500 toward itu couiin^fout 
expenses, ytaiing at thu time that I would not be- 
come ltd Presidout unless I oouid say tiuthtiihy to 
tbe depositors their money had not been u?ed for 
fitciog up the bank. I have attended eyery meet- 
ing or tbe board, both regular aud special, lor ten 
years past eicei>t two or three ; 1 cau eiiy tue same 
as to committee meetings. I hare made uii of its lu- 
vestmeiua required ef ine, aud neiilected uoibinc 
tnat was esaeulial tor a President co do, without re- 
ceiring or asking any compensation whatever. 
I admit that I did not atibud the mettiuga of 
the board tor the months of Auguxi and 
SeptemlKtr last, nor have I been at the bank 
so otten since January last, for the reason it was not 
agreeable to meet soowliiig and piuttinic faces. Yet, 
even siuue then, I have not oljected lo do auy- 
tbing that was desired. Gentlemen, what have you 
done } I don't mean these remaiks to apply to all 
t>i the opposition, but I do believe, from tne grovel- 
ing disposition of some, and tho ambition and 
greed ot others, the deposits bave been greatly re- 
duced. Notfflthstandiug all this, when I left tbe 
bank, it oould pay its depositors a hundred cents on 
a dollar, and it it was then in as sood a condition as 
the opposition ]>reteuded, the inference is plain to 
any unpreindiced mind tnat there whs no c>iue tor 
a ohanaa iu its management aoit that theli- action 
toward ne was evidently uniiur, usJ. deserviniz of 
jtnyfMM, «i,i«,.i.-r' TOH {f >»onp££, .^ 




THE TRIAL OF MRS. HOUSE. 

TESTIMONY IN THE CASECONCLUDED 

THE ACCUSED TAKES THE WITNESS-STAND 
AND TELLS THE STORY OF THK SHOOT- 
ING EVIDKNCE OF OTHF.B WITNESSES 

— TUK PROSECUTION CONDUCTICD IN A 
FEEBLE MANMSR — AN ACQUITTAL EX- 
PEC TED. 
The trial of Mra. Irene A. V. House was con- 
tinued in the County (ionrt-houso at Trenton yes- 
terday. Miss Lncetta House, witness for the prose- 
cution, was recalled for cro.ss-exaniinatlon, but 
nothingof importance was elicited. Coroner Boaine 
was next called and told the story of his inveatiga- 
tiona, which was reported in The Times at tho time 
of the Coroner's inquest; Ellen Collins testified 
that she was employed on the House fsrm at the 
time of the homicide ; she saw Mr. and Mrs. House 
together just prior to the shooting ; Mrs. House 
told her husband that h'B father was crying; 
House then said to his fnther, "This is the wsy I 
Lave been living with this womau tor the last six 
or seven years;" she said to her husband, "What 
makes yoa boat me so?" "Why don't you behave V 
he replied, "I try to ;" Mr. Honso then threatened 
to heat his wife to death ; she went into tbe hall of 
the house and he followed her; he Vnoc.kod her 
down, kicked her, and pouuded her bead against a 
trunk; Willie Anderson rushed in and said, "Mr. 
House don't you kill my mother ;" Mrs. House was 
at that time upon her knees, and her husband 
was holding her by her wrists;^ seeing that House 
contemplated an attack upon her son, she said, 
"Orson, don't hurtmy boy;" all three then went to- 
ward the door of Mr. House's sleeping-room, and 
House pushed her into the room and partly closed 
the door upon her; Willie tried to enter the room, 
but was pulled back by House; Mrs. House came 

out of the room and a^ain begged her husband not 

to kill her boy; the witness then went to the 
kitchen and there heard the pistol-shot. 

Louisa Thompson, a fellow work-girl of the pre- 
vious witness, said that she saw tbe attack upon 
Mrs. House; her husband struck her squarely in 
the forehead and knocked her down ; after she had 
fallen, witness saw Mr. Honse kica her repeatedly. 

THE DEFENSE. 

Here the prosecution rested afid the coansel for 
the defense was ordered to proceed. 

In his opening address for tbe cefonse Connsellor 
Greene gave a brief forecast of the drift of the tes- 
timony be was about to Introduce. He would show, 
he said, that the killing of Mr. Honse was not a 
premeditated murder, but that the tbousbt to kill 
was born in a second of time, and was conceived 
while Mrs. House \yas in dread of her life, fearing 
that Mr. House was about to actually peiform that 
which he bad often threatened. He would further 
show that at the time wbea Mr. House was shot he 
bad his hand in the hip pocket of his tronsers, 
where be carried a pistol. He would convince the 
jnry beyond a doubt that the killing of Mr. House 
was pnrely an act of self-defense. 

Edward R. Snlliday was the first witness for the 
defense. He testified that he bad drawn the map 
of Mr. House's house and premises exhibited in 
court The drawings were made from actual meas- 
urement. Witness explained the diagram. 

Willie Anderson, son of Mrs. Honse by a former 
marriage, testified that he was living with his 
mother at the time of tbe homicide. He told the 
story of his interference and his attempt to ra-^one 
his mother from the inhuman treatment she was 
undergoing at tbe hands of Mr. Honse. Ue found 
his mother upon the floor of the hallway. Mr. 
House had her by her hair and was busy poanding 
her head against tbe comer of a trunk aud hitting 
her with his fist. Willie said that be rushed up to 
Mr. House and said, " She is my mother ; you can 
lick me if you want to, but yo\i must not beat her." 
Mr. House at once turned upon him, and 
with a blow felled' him to the fioor. He 
picked himself np and rushed to the bed-room 
door a few feet away, believing that his mother was 
in the room, and fearing that House would kill her. 
House stopped him as be was entering the door, 

and catching bim between the door and the Jam 
tried to crush him. House then seized witness bv 
tho collar imd dragged him toward the porch door ; 
saddenly he loosened his grasp, and the next thing 
witness knew House was shot dead. 

(iross-examined— Willie acknowledced that he 
did not tellthe Corener's Jury that he was knocked 
down by House. He was asked why he did net 
te.'^tifv to this tajt. He said he did not know ex- 
actly what to say before such a tribunal. He was 
then asked how he came to know that he ou^nt to 
tell it betore the court. He had learned, he said. 
While listening to the testimony of other witnesses 
that every word was important. 

Anstin Matthews said he was laboring on tbe 
House farm at the time of the homicide. The prin- 
cipal point made in his testimony was that he saw 
Mr. House's band in the bip'-pocket of bis trousers 
just jts he was shot. The question whether or not 
Mr. House was about to draw a pistol was fought 
over most strenuously by the opposing counsel. 
Tbe witness was obliged to point out upo-j the 
diagram the exact positions of Mr. and Mrs. Honse 
and of himself at the time of tbe shooting. Attorney 
General Vanatta. who conducted the cross-exami- 
nation, made it clearly appear frem the answers 
given by the witness t'uat in order to have seen Mr. 
House put his hand into his bip-pucket be must 
have seen riubt through Mr. House's body. Witness 
was asked if both he and his father lookud on while 
Mr. House was abusing bis wile aud step-son. He 

replied that they did. " Why didn't you intertere J" 
asked the Attorney General. " Why, because Mr. 
House said he would shoot anybody that interfered 
with him when he was correcting bis wife, and I 
didn't want to set my head blowed ofi." 

Morris Mattnews, tatbur of the precedlns wit- 
ness, was an eye-witness of tbe wbule fight between 
Mr. and Mrs. House aud Wiilie Anderson. He was 
standing on the porch in full view of all that 
transpired in the ball. Ue said that bo saw House 
knock his wlte down, kick ber, and throw her by 
the hair across the room. Ue made uoaitemptat 
inierterence. He was on the Coroner's jury and 
sieued tbe vernier, swearinx that it was bis belief 
that Air. House had been willtnlly and deliberately 
murdered. He said he saw Mr. House put bis band 
in nis bip-pocket tor his pistol, but be did not cry 
out and tell Mrs. House and Willie to look out for 
their lives. He didn't dare interfere m any way, he 
said. Witness was placed in the same dilemma iu 
which his son bad suif^:rud. He gave the positions 
of the persons substautially as his son, aud was 
asked ho (7 It was possible for him to see through 
Mr. House's body. 

TESTiaiONY OF MRS. HOUSE. 

Mrs. House was then called. The connsel for 
tbe deieuse called out her name in a most impres- 
sive manner. Tne accused rose Irom her chair, as- 
cended the steps, and took her seat in 
the witness chair. She told her story glibl.y 
in response to 'tjbe questions of ber counsel. 
I am, said ohe, the' daughter of William Vausint, 
of this city, and I was the wife of Orsun A. House ; 
I was living on the farm known as the Dey tarm 
the 30th of last June; I met my busuaud on bis re- 
turn from New-Y..rkBt the corner of the barn; I 
spoke to him, among other things, about going to 
Now- York; from that point I went to the porcii, 
and then I went into my room; I saw my husband 
attain when 1 OAme to tho h^ll door to get him to 
pay ofi' the men thit nigtit; he refused lo go into 
tho room with me; I went back to my room; Willie 
came to my room and told me tatuer Hjuse was 
crying; 1 weut out aud asked old Mr. Hou»o what 
was the matter; he pu»>bed me away; he is old, 
ieeble, and childish; he went toward the lane with 
Wulie, and I followed ; I saw Mr. House standing 
by a pile of lumber ; Icalled to him, "Orson, I want 
TOu ; he came up aud was very angry ; he 
swore at me and uaiii he would beat me lo death ; 
I was liighteued, and started to the house; he fol- 
lowed ; I I urued lo speuk. aud be kuocked me oown, 

Kicking me as I leli; "Oi'son," 1 said, "you are 
killing tne;" he put, his hand over uiy mouth to 
keep me from speaking; he then took mo by the 
haif aud threw me atiaiust a trunk; Willie cime 
np to intorrore; I told him to go away, ho would 
make matters worse; Mr. House threw Willie irom 
him, aud I iir&sped Jilr. House by tbe wriuts and 
beuiied Uiui not lo liuzt my Ooy; Willie tfot up and 
came toward us again ; once more my husband 
threw Willie away and then he took me by the hair 
and threw me iiiio my heaioom ; I struck aj:aiust tbe 
Dedstead aa I teil ; 1 supx^osed that loy liuaband nud 
put me into the room to coutiuue his beating; I 
saw a pittol hanging at tbe head of tne bed ; 1 took 
the pistol and looked coward the door ; I thought 
he was cooiina niter me ; 1 saw Willie Oeini: 
eq'-ieezad in tne door with Mr. House's hand on hi* 
ti'tuai; Mr. House was pressing against the door 
witn ail ills might ; ha was a veiy stion;[ man when 
he was angry ; I ran to Wiiliu's Hssistance ; the 
door opened suddenly, and 1 wooc out and stood 
over Willie and begged Mr, Hou^e noD to kill my 
boy ; Air. House had inreatoued to kill anyoody 
who intertered witli him wcilo he was whipping 
me ; he showed his teeth at me and hissed at ue ; 
he took me by the hair and threw mu against thu 
trunk ; 1 recovered, and looking up I saw him 
striklue Willie; Willie waa lying down; Mi'. 
House was standlug over Willie, his back toward 
me ; he put his baud into bis iiip pocket, ami I 
thought he was going to take oul hi.s \iUiul and 
sUooi. botn Willie and toe : I took aim aud tired. 

Attorney General Vanatta t.:ok the. wuness for 
cross-exam iuatioi,', and questioned her qmetiV and 
Dolltely lor a shoi t time. She answered readily 
enough so long as the questions were of a hurmless 
natnre. But soon she became uneasy, aud twitcned 
about nervously ut each new interrogatory. Sud- 
denly she ruse from her seat, thiew up her hands 
iu a tragical manner, and de.icen(led from the wit- 
ness Stand, remarking, "If you waul my treedum, 
take it, but Gou't aak me any more questions." The 
counsel lor the deiense tuaned to tier relief, aud 
conducted her back to the seat. Tbe janitor was 
sent tor a botlle of medicine, a spoonful ot which 
was administered to her. Mrs. House soon recov- 
ered, and said she would try to go uack to the wit- 
ness stand tand testily. But the prosecution, seem- 

1R2 to tbiai, liM tho whole ȣ^ had bean warkM 



-?;««* 



up for effect upon the Jury, and believing that an- 
other and perhaps more startling p'ece of acimg' 
would follow a renewal of the examination, decliued 
to ask any more queaiinni. 

The testimony being all in at this point, tbe coun- 
sel for the defense addressed the jury, and at the 
concinsion of his speech tbe court acij.iurned ti'l 10 
o'clock this morning, when Attorney General Van- 
atta will make the argument for the prosecution. 
The case will be given to the |ury early in the day, 
and it is generally bell' ved that a verdict will be 
given betore nignt The belief that Mrs. Houno 
will be acquittcil seems to be almost univers*!. 
Even the orosecuMng connsel aoknowledired in the 
outset that the acquittal was a foregone conclusion, 
and this opinion may have had something to do 
with til© feeble manner In which they have puahod 
their case. 

NATVBALIZA TION FRA UDS. 

TWO ARRESTS MADE Yi;STERD4T— FRAUHS 
COMMITTED AND COUNTENANCED BY 
TAMMANY HALL. 

Patrick Reilly and Bernhard McDonald were 
arrested yesterday, by Deputy United States Mat: 
shal Crowley, on charges of naturalization frauds, 
and upon being taken before TJaited States Commis- 
sioner Davenport were held in $5,000 bail for ex- 
amination. Reilly was the applicant in the Court of 
Common Pleas lor naturalization papers, McDonald 
acting as bis witness. The latter at the time of the 
application swore that ho had known Reilly for a 
nnmber of years, and afterward said that he had 
only been introduced to him the previous day, and 
upon this information the arrests were made. Upon 
Reilly's person was found a ticket from Tammany 
Hall tor h-8 naturalization papers, showing by whom 
the iraud was countenanced. Reilly presented him- 
self lor registration alter securing his papers, and 
they were retained by tho Supervisor of the district 
and It is said that he has now caused the arrest of 
the Supervisor for alleged oetit larceny, but ot this 
no particulars could bo gained. 

It IS stated in official quarters that the manner of 
naturalization in the Staie Courts bids fair to occa- 
sion muct* iroublo betore the electvin. It, lo said 

that the course pursued in 180S is in a 
great measure being followed now, despite 
I he enactments since tbat tlmd. Officers from the 
United States Marshal's office have been watching 
these operations for the past fortnight and their 
reports give abundant evidence of fraud, which Is 
mainly perpetrated by those coming from Tam- 
many Hall, and eHSilv caiTied out through 
hired witnesses. In the Court of Common Pleas it 
is understood that clo^e scrutiny is observed, and 
every requirement of the law followed, while in 
other State Courts great carelessness has been ob- 
served. Alargenumoer of traudulent cases have 
been reported, aud it is stated that utiless more 
cautioD IS taken in the future, arrests will be made 
from a quarter little expecte I. It Is prohable that 
tbe ariest of Reilly aud McDonald is but the be- 
ginning of a number on similar charges. 

MR. GREEN AND THE MATOBALIT. 
Controller Green was waited upon yester- 
day by a committee representing the Independent 
Bepublican electors of the Eighth Congressional 
District, consisting of Messrs. Messier, Foster, 
Cleveland, Michaels, Mitchell, Tomokins. Dewey, 
Barker, and Drummond, who presented bim with 
the following resolutions: 

First That it is the mature conviction of the Bepub- 
liC:in masses of the Cliy of .Sew-iork and of ah inteili- 
tteot citizens ot every paity that the highest interesU 
oi our Citi' and t ounty will Ok bL-s served by a strictly 

uuu-p trtisau municio^il administration. 

Seconu — Tuat we deplore iu the interest of Mtmicipsl 
reioim thai, owing to political burgains between the 
macbiue maua;{era of ttie dominant political parties 
for a division ot ofBeial spoils between iLem. the pro- 
posi.d amendm-int to the < ity ch.irter, proviuing for a 
i:>priug eieciiou so as to effect a comilute separation ot 
Municipal affairs from the issues of atate and national 
politics, tuiluo iu our last Legislature, and we lie.eliy 
pledge our voted stna lutlueuue Co secure the adoptiou 
of .-'Uch amendment at the next Legislature. 

r/ttrd— Thui ouiy men ol ability aud tried iBtegrlty 
should be selecteu tor official positions in the great 
Wanicipaiity of r>ew-I'orl£, meu who will SKlmiuiaier Itia 
att.:irs upon stilL-tly business piinciplus, aud iu the in- 
terest 01 uo clique or party li meu. 

Fourth — That in a loug period ot service Controller 
Andrew H. Greeu bus mit tliis demand fully by tho 
sdmlnistraiiou of the most responsible trust in the 
Municipality on a strictly non-partisaii basis, aud iu a 
manner which has met with the highest praise of men 
ftom ail parties auu sections of tbe country, aud in no 
dotug ments tiie comiueudatiou of every citizen and 
tax-payer in tUe City of New-Y'ork- 

i^iuA— That, thereioro, it is tbe sense of the Inde- 
peudeul Kepubllcan electors of the Eighth Congres- 
aiouul llistriet, relvin? upon tbe hearty 'sympathy ana 
support ot the best men of all parties, tuat the nomi- 
nauoii of Controller Androw H. Ureeu IVr ihe highest 
Municipal office iu our gift, tbe Mayoralty of the Cit.y 
of New-Yom, ought lo bi and will he ratified by tue 
people at the euaulug eleciiuu. 

Gen. I'oster addres»ed the Controller, stating 

that the Independent Bepublican electors of that 

district had no sympathy with rings, and that tbey 

desired to see the various Maulcipal offices filled 

with men whom the people knew not only to be 
honest, but likewise capable. 

The Controller, in reply, said" that be highly ap- 
preciated the kindness oi tbe committee iu calling 
upon him, aud was mucli obliged lor their rei^olu- 
tions. If tne people thoaijht well enoush of him 
to elect bim to the Chief Magistracy of the City he 
would try to administer tbe duties of tbe otlice to 
the entire satisfaction of the public. 

A committee, consisting of Messrs. Martin Larkin, 
John McMakin, Thomas Hugan, and Micaael 
Kiernan, representing a large number of the ciii- 
zeus of the Sixteentn Assembly District, also called 
to tender their support The Coutroiler expressed 
his thanks for their kindly olfei, after which the 
committee withdrew. 



COULD NOT SJ^E THE POINT. 
A very funny incident marked the trial of a 
suit brought by one Aumiral Nelson against an in- 
surance company, which was brought before Chief 
Justice Shea in tbe Marine Court yesterday. The 
company pnt in a counter-claim amounting to more 
than 91,000, and ex-Jnage Joachimsen. who appeared 
for tbe plaintiff, demurred to this, as the amount 
put the case out of the Marine Court's jurisdiction. 
Tbe counsel for .the company, wishing to have bis 
iirtle joke, observed that it did not Ue in the month 
of "Admiral " Nelson to demur to anything " Ma- 
rine," This caused a general smile to overspread 

the countenances of parties, counsel, and auditors. 
In fact the witticism was arpreciated by every one 
except the Chief Justice, who remarked dogmati- 
cally and serionsly that tbe Marine Court had no 

jurisdiction of maritime matters. 

Mr. Joachimaen explained — Tour Honor, the op- 
posite counsel is only attempting a ioke on the 
name of my client, "Admiral '' Nelson. 

Chief Justice Shea— Ah! I perceive. A Joke. 
Ob ! vos. 

Several gentlemen were observed to bury their 
faces in their hats very suddenly at this, and seemed 
to be moved by some stronir internal emotions. 



IRE TICIIM OF A SOOLNDREL. 
Lucy Lawrence, the young woman who was 
arrested on Saturday last by Detective Titus, of the 
Central Office, for having stolen a quantity of lace 
goods from her employers, Eirscb & Simson, No. 27 
Greene street, and the young man, Henry Lewis, 
who disposed of the goods, were yesterday ar- 
raigned before Justice Kasmire in tbe Washington 
Place Police Court. Ou examination it was tound 
that Lewis had prevailed upon her to steal tbe 
goods in order to support him in idle- 
ness. She at last refused to do ho any 
longer, and as be srill persisted in perse- 
cuiini: her, had him sent to the Work-hnuso on 
the Island. Out of revenge Lewis wrote a letter to 
Messrs. Kirsch & Simson, informing iheiu of the 
dishonesty of thi'ir eiuploye. Justice Kasmire in 
terse language expresiied bis great disgust at tbe 
actions ot Luwi^, and'committed blm to the Tombs 
ill default of 13.000 bail, saving, as the prisoner 
quitted the court-room, that he only regretted it was 
not in his power lo send him to the State Prison. 
Tho unfortunate dupu of Luwis' perfidy was alse 
comniitied in detault of (500 bail, to answer at the 
General Sessions. 

THE SI A TEN ISLA.ND FERRY LEASE. 

Argument waa had before Judge Barrett, in 

Supreme Court Chambers, yesterday iu tbe matter 
of the application by the New-York and Staten 
Island Ferry Company to compel the City to award 
it tbe lease of the terry irancbise from the loot of 
Whitehall street to the south shore of Staten 
Island. The ferry company's bid offered the City 
ten per cent, of the gross receipts, but John H. 
Starin put in a bid of fifty per cent, of tbe gross 
receipts. Tbe company claims tbe latter bid is 
fraudulent an<i sham, and tboueh it has been acr 
cepted for nine mouths, Starin has run uo boats on 
the terry. 

Assistant Corporation Counsel Andrews claimed 
that, the City was justified in accepting Stariu's 
bid. Starin had run no boats because the company 
hud possession of the dock at the foot of Whitehall 
street, which it had received by lease Irom the 
Department of Docks. A proceeding was now 
pending, liowever, to have the company ejected 
from the premises. Further argument will be had 
to-day. 

A BUICBER'S AMUSEMEyr. 

Henry Leech, a butcher living at the corner 
of Slity-thirJ street and second avenue, was yester- 
day arraicued before Justice Otterbcur2,in the Filty- 
seveutb Street Police Coort, on a charge of leloni- 
ous assault with a pistol, preferred by John Sbee- 
han, ofNo. 338 East Sixty-third sireet Sheehan 
and two other boys climbed over a fence that in- 
closed a vacant lot belonging to Lrsch. Tnis so en- 
rased the prison'-r that without any warning what- 
ever be discharged tbe contcaut of a large pis ol at 
the boys. The shot took < ff'i.-cc in the thigh and leg 
of SUeehan, laeeratinc the fln-.li in a horrible man- 
ner. A physician was at once sent tor, who ex- 
tracted twenty buck-shot from the wounded boy. 
Sheehan's wounds are pronnuiioed serio'is. lint not 
mortal. Is detauU ct ^1,000 bail Justice Otterbourg 
committed the prisnnec to answer at the Gaaeral 
S«asiaiw> 



LAW REPORTS. 

■» — 

A MATTER OF POLICY. 

JOBN MORRISSEY SUED FOR MALFEABANCE 
AS RECEIVER OF A POLICY BUSINESS- 
HE SETS UP THE ILLEGAL NATURE OF 
THE CALLING I.\ DEFEKSE — THE COM- 
PLAINT DISMISSED. 
The suit of Henry Col ton against John 
Morrissey, Receiver, &c., was brought to trial before 
Judge Donohue, in Supreme Court, Circuit, Part I., 
yesterday. The plaintiff^ brought the suit, the com- 
plaint States, for bimselt and others who may join 
him. On Deo. 16, 18G9, ho says, Mr. Morrlssey was 
appointed the Receiver of the business heretofore 
earned on by and under the firm name of C. H. 
Murray & Co., and all grams, charters, and cor- 
porate rights owned by them, in an action then 
commenced, in which Zaoharlah E. Simmons was 
plamtifl and Colton, Benlamin Wood, and others, 
were defendants. The property of the firm which 
came itto the possession of Mr. Morrlssey was 
of great value, worth at least fSOO.OOO, 
and the business carried on was very profitable, 
the profits for tbe year preceding the commence- 
ment of Mr. Morrissey's receivership amounting to 
£400,000. The property of the firm had been di- 
vided into 120 shares, of which Colton owned twelve. 
Mr. Mornssey, in violation of his trust, the plain- 
tiff alleges, fraudulently combined and conspired 
with Simmons, Murray, and others for the purpose 
of defrauding the plaintiff of nis interest in the 
property and business of the firm, and in pursuance 
of the combiLation offered all the bneinees for 
sale in the early morning at the Hoffman House, 
without prior notice of any kind, and before 
the summoDs in the case wis served 
on plaintiff, who was defendant In that action. 
The property was pnrohased by W. L. Simmons, a 

brother of the plaintiff, for 125,000, Mornesey ac- 
cepting $5. ooo cash and taking four notes for the 
balance, without security. This price was grossly 

inadequate, aud the property was transferred 
without order or direction of the court. Morns- 
sey, who had a lien on twenty-six and a halt shares 
as security for $18,000. appropriated to himself the 
f5,000 cash. Ou tm- 28(h of nne, 1873, the order of 
judge Cardozo in 18G9 making Morrisaey Receiver 
was vacated on the ground of fraud. Colion asks 
8100,000 damages. 

Mr. Mornssey. in bis answer, makes a general 
denial of these charges, and says he executed a 
bond as Receiver in ibe case, supposiug ihe action 
to be legal and valid. He was lecentlv inturmed 
toat at that time no suit had been commenced until 
after the attempt to sell the props: ty, aad that all 
lie did in the matter was in ieuorance of the facts. 
He denies that tbe property was valuable, and says 
tbe business was the sale of lottery tickets, policy 
slips, and wagers, in violation of the statutes ot 
this State. He believes that though this illegal 
bubiuess had at one time been prufliable, it was so 
conducted by Colton that it had ceased to 
be so, and denies any frand or conspiracy 
on his parr, claiming that the sate to 
Simmons was bona fide and for the highest price 
Obtainable, thoush he admits the sale was not ad- 
veriised The ousiness, being held for iliegiland 
gummg purposes in this State, ana -by parties within 
its jurisdiotiou, was not In fact the subject of law- 
ful sale, and the plaintiff, who waa a pariicipani in 
such illegal business, and on which be bases bis 
illegal claim, Mr. Mornssey insists, is not emitted 
to relief in respect to U against bim. He denies t je 
order appointing bim Receiver was vacated on the 
ground of fraud, and avers that the same matters 
are involved iu another action now pending, begun 
by Colton in 1869, which he sots up as a bar to the 
present action. 

Tbe case had been on the calendar of the conrt 
for the whole of the present month, both parlies an- 
swering "ready" when it was called. As ♦hetiial 
was about to begin yesterday morning, however, 
the painiiff askeu for an aojoumtueot because of 
the temporary absence in St. L^uia of W. C. France, 
who was relied on to prove the owoeisbip bv th<j 
plaintiff of twelve shares of stock in the business. 
A63davits were presented on hebalt of tbe plainritf 
avemng that Mr. France's absence in St. Louis 
was merely temporary, aud that his residence is iu 
this City. 

Counter-af&davlts were, however, put in by the 
defeniJant to the effect that Mr. France is a resident 
ot St. Louis, and only visits this City occasionally. 
Judge Donohue said that alter tbe case bad been 
answt red as ready for so long a time be could not 
allow an adjournment, especially as it did not ap- 
pear that Mr. Franca had left tbe City tiuce the 
case had been called. He therefore ordered the 
trial to proceed. The plaintifi' then sufi'ered the de- 
fendant to take judgment aismisaing thu complaint. 



head, and the expoanre to which be had 
been snblected in th- Army, had rendered him sub- 
ject to fits of lunacy. Assistant District Attorney 
RoUin, conducting the prosecution, made onl a 
powerfill case against the prisoner in his summing 
up. The Jury, after a few minutes' consultation, 
found Boi»ue gniliv of manslaugeter in the second 
degree, and he was sentenced to seven years' ooa- 
fiuemeni in the State Prison. 




A SON'S CONDUCT TOWAHD IIJS MOTHER. 
The suit of Horace Corteiyou against William 
G. Mulock was brought to trial before Judge Law- 
rence and a jury, in Part III. of the Supreme 
Court, Circuit, yesterday. The action was brought 
to recover $6,000 on a note made by tbe defendant's 
mother and indorsed by the detendant on April 13, 
1873. The note was discounted at tbe Cnemical 
Banlr. The defense was that tbe indorsement waa 
merely tor accommodation, and that the note bad 
been paid by Corteiyou from funds belonging to the 
defendant's mother. In reply to this Mrs. Mulock 
said that tbe note had been made for ber son's— ihe 
defendant's — benefit, to pay certain taxes when they 
became due. She being unable to take up tbe note, 
Corteiyou went to tbe bank witb her and then 
agreed to indorse four new notes of tl,500 each tor 
lier if the #6.000 note were turned over to him. 
This arrangement was made, and Corteiyou has 
since pud tne four $1,500 notes. The court charged 
the jury that if the 16.000 note had been made by 
Mrs. Mulock for the benefit of ^her sou or for tne 
joint benefit of herself and son, and Corteiyou had 
advanced either bis money or his credit to take up 
tbe note after it was dne, it was perfectly proper 
that Corteiyou should be subrogated to the position 

held by the ban^ ana he oouui recover. Tbe Jury 
gave a verdict in favor of the plaintiff for |6.437 39. 
The action so decided grew out oi the business re- 
lations formerly existing between Mrs. Mnluck 
aud her son. Toe latter was the bnsiiiess mauaerer 
ot his mother's property, which amounted to aoont 
(950,00U. Iu two suits new psndiug-Hine in Netr- 
Jersey and tho other in this City — ilrs. Mulock 
charges ber sou wi>h defrauding; her out of a large 
portion of her property by procuring her aienature 
to papers which he represeute<l to be other than 
tbey really were. There is another suit jiendiug 

against Mulock in this City, in which an order of 
arrest was recently isaued, and under this order the 
Sbeiifi seized Mulock on Monday afternoon and 
locked him np in Ludlow Street Jail. Tbe court, 
however, discharged Mulock from arrest yesterday 
becausa be was a witness, ou condition, however, 
that he should not sue tbeSherifil In the sui. tried 
yesterday Richard C. Elliott appeared for the 
piaintifi andD. N. Garniss for the defendant 



THE CITY SUED By A OAS COM PANT. 
The appeal in the case of the Metropolitan 
Gas-light Compauy against the Mayor. &o., was 
argued before the Supreme Court, General Term, 
yesterday. The action was brought to recover 
1158,868 40 for gas supplied to street and park lamps 

during parts ot 1871 and 187-3. Tbe Board of Ap- 
pnrtiunment and Audit reauced the ciaim-bv $37,- 
687 51. The oumpapv, not satisfied with this re>1uo- 
tion, brought the j^resent action. The City claims 
that the action of the Boaid of Apportionmeui and 
Audit ^as tudicial. The case was sent te a Beieree, 
who decided in the company's favor for the full 
amount claimed. From this tbe Citv now appeals. 
The question reallv involved is as to the charge for 
iiaa appplied to each lamp. The City for several 
years prior to 1871 paid the company's demand of 
(50 per lamp. This the company insists made an 
implied contract. Corporation Counsel Whitney, 
appearing tor the City, claimed, however, that there 
could be uo Implied concraot ot that kind for moie 
than the reasonable value of the gas furnished, and 
the gas turniahed each lamp was not worth $50. 

Decision waa reserved. 

^ 

TESTING TITLE TO AN OFFICE. 
The case of the People ex rel. George W. 
Nash against Bernard C. Ryan wa^ brought to trial 
before Judge Joseoh F. Dalv in Part ILL of the 
Court ot Common Pleas yesterday. The suit is in 
the nature of a quo warranto proceeding to test (he 
title to tbe office of Assistant Clerk of tbe Fifth 
District Court, whiob Rvan is now iu possession of. 
Nash was appointed to the position on May 15, 1872, 
by Joseph Koch, then Justice ot the court. Ho was 
to bold the office for six years. On Feb. 1, 1S76, 
Nash was ousted and Ryan put in his place by the 
preaeni Justice of the court. Nash claims that tue 
new appointment was illegal, while Ryan maintains 
that It was perlectly legal. Toe lormer relies ou 
tne case of the People ex rel. Healy against Lsask, 
which was somewhat eiolilar, aud lovoived ihe title 
to the ifBce of Clerk ot the Eighth District 
Com t. R\an insist.8, however, that this latter case 
was decided under a special act aft'actirig theEigbth 
Dialrici Courr, but not the Fitih District Courr. At 
the trial yesterday Judge Daly directed thejnry to 
find a verdict in favor of Na^h, and ordered iho ex- 
ceptions to be heard at the General Term, the judg- 
ment to be stayed pendiug tbe decision of the lat- 
ter. Nelaon J. Watcrbury appeared for the relator 
aud J. Henry McCarthy lor tbe reipoadent 



MAS SLA VGHTER 



SECOSD J>E. 



IN THE 
GREE. 
The trial of Daniel Kowne for the murder of 
Margaret Seabourntr, an old womau of sixty, who 
lived with the prisoner and his wifo at NeC 70 
Gansevoort street upon tho nicht of Sept. 14, was 
continued yesterday in the Court of General Ses. 

sions. Part L, before Jodge Sutherland. Two wit- 
nesses only were called for the delense. Tbe pris- 
oner's wife testified ihat at some remote period 
her Husband bad been srruck on tbe head with 
a butchers' cleavtr aud that more recently 
be had lalleu down a hatchway a distance 
of sixty-four feet, striking noon his head. 
A male iriebd of Bowne's testiflsd that the latter 
haJ been in theAimy for several years. Upon the 
testimony of these two people, prisoner's counsel 
attempted tu set op a plea of insanity, contending 

that tha efiiBot Of tiie tvu wooDda uDob tbe pisonw'-^ 



COURT NOTES. \ 
« - ' 

The United States Circuit Court, Jury 
branch, was opened yesterday by Judge Sbipman. 
The oalendsi was called np to No. 301 ioclnsivc 

The trial of the case of Catharine Davis 
against the German Savings Bank of Morrissnia 
was concluded before Judge Joseph F. Daly. In 
Part IIL, of the Court of Cikcm on Pleas, yester- 
day, a juror being withdrawn by tbe plaintiff 

Two judgments, aegregating ^7,207 52, were 
entered in the County Clerks office yesterday 
against John H. Keyser, in suits brought by Wil- 
liam J. Keyser. Tbe actions were on notes, some 
of which were made in 1862, and the others lu 1872. 

Eaymond Verea, aged 42, of No. 206 Bergen 
street.Brooklyn.wasarrestedyesterdayatNo.lO Wall 

Street on the charge of dealing mCatan lottery ilck- 
ets. This lottery office has been seized by thePoliceon 
Jormer occasions, tho sale of such tickets having 
been pronibited by State law. 

Judge Gddersleeve, holding Part IL of the 
Court of Gener.Tl Sessions, ysslerdav sentenced 
Arthur McCue, of No, 220 West Eighteenth street, 
to the State Prison for three years for having, upon 
tho 6ih Inst, snatched a pocket-book troni the hands 
of Mary C. V. R.sley, ot Fort Washington. 

Patrick Kinsella, of No. 807 Sixth street, was 
yesterday at the bar of the Court of General Ses- 
sions, Part U., before Judge Gildersleeve, charged 
with having stabbed Catherine Duun on tbe Sth 
inst. Tbe prisoner pleaded Kuilty, and was sent to- 
the State Prison for lwo and one-halt years. 

William Gilm an and Henry Bagel, Droprie- 
tors of tho Senate Hotel, comer of Canal and 
Chrystie streets, were detained at tbe £:sex Mar- 
ket Police Court in defanii of #300 bail, ou the 
charge of keeping a disoiderly bouse. E'ghi women 
arrested at the same bouse were fijjed £10 each, and 
nine men were aischarged. 

James O'Brien, of No. 328 West Fifty-fourth 
street, broke into the premises of F. S. Barnes, No. 
315 East Fifty-fourth street, on Saturday Iset vriih 
ioceut to steal. He was oauybr in tbe act, and 
being arraigned Detore Judee Gildersleeve yester- 
day, in the Court oi General Sessions, Part II., be 
Pleaded guilty, and was condemned to spend five 
years in tbe State Prison. 

Judce Barrett in Supreme Court, Chambers, 
yesterday ordered a reterenoe in a suit begun by 

Angust Belmont uo foreclose a mortiiage of (45,000, 
made to bim by Thomas J. Creamer, on May 25, 
1875. Tne property covered by the nioriaage is tne 
block of giound between Third and Lexington 
avenues and One Hundred and Sixth and One Hun- 
dred and Seventh streets. 

At the conclusion of the Bo'wne homicide, 
tried in the Court of General Setsions, Part L, yes- 
terday, Francis Maemire was arraienea upon an lu- 
diciment lor. murder in the first de^res in having, 
as ailet<eM, laiallv slabbed bis wife at tbeir residence. 
No. 335 Eas' Thirteenth stieet on Ang. 13 last. 
The priaouer is uefenaed by Messrs. A. Oakey Hall 
and William F. Kmffing. A jury was impaneled 
before the court adj lurued. 

On the 12th of October last P. Donohue, who 

retused to gire his address or oooopation, broka 

into tae City warerooms of Wallace St Co., situated 
at No. 89 Chambers sireei, and carried away $175 
worth ut nickel plate. He afterward admitted tu 17. 
T. Hungetfelr, the company's agent, anu OiHter 
Hogau, of tbe Fitth Precinct that he committed 
the theft and was then arrested. Yesterday ut the 
Tombs Poliue Coort. before Justice DufiV, in de- 
tault ot £600 bail, he was held to ausw«r at the 
General Stssions. 

Tbe suit of Marcus Sosenblum against the 

Dry Dock, East Broadway and Battery Bailroad 

Company was brought to trial betore J udge San- 
ford anu a Jury in Part L of tne Superior Court 
yesterday. The plaintiff's son, twelve years of age, 
was run over and killeo hy one ot the oars of ti e 
company ou Jan. 29, 1814, aud tbe present action 
waa to recover (>5,U0O lur loss of servioes. The 
court aisuiissed the complaint because the plaintiff 
failed to prove negligence on the part of tbe de- 
fentiant, or absence of contributory negligence on 
the part of tbe deceased. 

Tbe case of James Bigler and others agamst 

the Mayor, &c., was argued on appeal before the 

Supreme Court, General Term, yesterdaj, decision 
bring reserved. The plaintiff cuen to recover C66.- 
Ia7 Irom the City for timber, &c., lum:sbed under 
a contract wib the Department of Docks, the ma- 
terials to be used in the construction of piers and 
wharves. The City set up by way of answer that 
the timber tnrnisbed was nomervnaniable, and put 
in a counter claim for damages suffered by reason 
of this. Tbe jary gave a verdict tor the plaintiff, 
and tbe Citv tuerefore brought the present appeal. 

William Awe, residing at No. 63 Norfolk 
street, on the 14:<h of October laat presented an 
order mirportlng to come from J. Nounenba«her ii, 
Co., No8. 102 aud 104 Mulberry street to Frank A. 
Spencer, a clerk Jn the employ of Wbittemore 
Brothers, importers of French olaie looking-glasxes, 
of No. 579 Broadway. Mr. Spencer had frequently 
beard that Awe had defrauded various firms in a 
similar manner, and he therefore detained bim 
until Mr. Nouueobacher arrived. Mr. Nouneubacber 
declared the order a torgety, and handed Awe over 
to an officer. Yesterday Justice Kasmire commit- 
ten him in detault of 11,000 -bail to answer at tbe 
General Sessions. 

DECISIONS. 

6TTPEE3IE COUBT— CBAUBEB8. 

By Judge Barrett. 

Motions Denied WiOunit Uostt.—Jotdsa vs. 

Crosby; Beech er vs. St rbuck; Cambridge Valley 
National Bank vs. Matthews. 

Motiong Granted.— Bra'nerd vs. B?rtram; The 
New-Y -rk and Rosendale Lime and Cement Com- 
pany vs. Smith; In the matter of the North Ameri- 
can Fire lusurance Company ; Manhattan Life In- 
surance Company vs. Anthcny;' New- York Life 
Insurance Company vs. Kearney ; Midnleton Plate 
Company vs. Hart Mannfactnrinjj Company i Clark 
vs. Levinger; Belmont vs. Creamer; Fearing vs. 
Scblffr: Moore VS. Schpiitt ^. 

Motiom Granted for First Friday of Novembtr — 
Handren vs. Remington ; ^lauoren et »1. vs. 
Rooker. 

Motion! Granted for Nov, I0.~.&tn Printlnf and 
Publishing Association vs. Stearns j Syerson vs. 

Post. 

Montgomery v§. Sumner. — ^Motion for reference 
denied, with |10 costs to abide the event 

Motions Grzntedfor Fourth Friday— Sehty et sL 
vs. Clark ; Weaiern National Bank of Baltimore vs. 
Orcutt; Philadelphia Warehouse Company vs. 
Jones. 

Motions Granted for Third Friday.— Delaware, 
Lackawanna and Western Railroad • ompany vs. 
Daly, (No. 1;) Same vs. Same, (No. 2 ;) Herts vs. 
Baer ; Foschheimer vs. Hoffman ; Harvey vs. Har- 
way ; Weeks vs. Bowles; Delaware. Lackawanna 
and Western Railroad Company vs. Gess. 

Maretzek vt. Cameron.'-i:ti& pleadings are want- 
ing. . 

Heron vs. Phvfe- — Granted for third Friday. 

C<mimitsion Gronted.— PresiMent and Directors of 
the ijaiik ol Louisiana vs. Matthews. 

Ca p6eJZr». fii3D«r.-Eeference ordered. 

Reference Ordered to Compute. — Betts vs. "Vyse; 
Roberts vs. Rowe; Beimout vs. fiolladay ; SCeiu- 
hardt v*. Blessnn ; Cutting va Stevens. (Nos. 1 to 9.) 

Jxidgm^nt Granted.— Ltuos. i'lre Insurance Com- 
pany vs. Gaige. „ „ 

Williama vs. ITood.— Tbe affidavit of service is 
bad. 

American Paddle wheel Company vt. Ooeulmg — 
Proof of service wauling: upon tuat being sup- 
plied the applicaht may take an order of reference 
to John N. Lewis. 

Mv^ual Lift Inswanee Company vt. Courtney.— 
Judgment ordered, and reference to Philo T. Rug- 
glea. Esq., to sell ; tlOO allowance to plaintiff cost«; 
but no allowance to nuardian. 

Southold Savings Bank vs. .Honutn.— Referred to 
John E, Brodskv. 

Deyo vs. Spearing. — Judgment ordered. 

SUPREME ConRT— SPECIAL lEBSL 
By Judge, Van YorsU 

Covert vs. Henneberger. — Judginent for defendant 
on demuirer with leave to plaintiff to amend on 
terms. Opinion. 

Watts et ai. ts. Duncan et aL — Judgment for plain- 
tifi ou demurrer with leave to defendants to answer 
on pavmeni of costs. 

Monarque vs. Revna et oZ.— Judgment for plaintiff 
allowed. 

2 homson et aU vs. Thomson et aj.— Ord 'red signed. 

SUPERIOR COURT— SPECIAL TERM. 
By Chief Justice Curtis. 
Smith vs. Canirell—Qa the papers before me the 
motion must be denied without prejudice in its re- 

111 fi W AI 

Discher vs. Frey. — Motion for leave to discontinue 
wiihoui costs to eithtr party as against the other 
granted. 53 N. Y.. 76. 

Adams, Receiver. <6c, vs. Gray et ol— Findings «f 
fact aud condn^n na oi law signed aud filed. 

Duveny vs. Phoenix.— Taxa.uoa of clerk, allowing 
trial lee, aflirm'ed on appeal. 

MARINE COURT— CHAMBERS. 
By Chief Justice Shea. 

Motions Granted —Davis vs. Warwick ; Ratbbnn 
v.«. Tb4 Cinzeus' Steam-boat Company of Trey; 
Henkell vo. Stamper: Polheinu- vs. Binder; Slan- 
aland vs. Kuck ; Filman vs. Henriques ; Fisher vs. 
Edrebi. 

Orders Granted. — Gellert vs. Abrahams; Clark 
vs. Graler;FitoU vh. Eustace; flovt vs. Goff; 
i'srley va. The Second Avenue Riallroad Company ; 
Rossiuau vs. Mamcher ; Mclntyie vs. Underbill; 
Eliaa vs. Biake; Siebrecht vs. Sievens. 

Raynolds vs. Salmion. —Motion granted. 

Welsh »»- Lazarus.— M.otiou to overrule demurrer 
tirspted. 

COURT CALENDARS— THIS DAT. 

SUPREME COURT— CHAMBERS. 
Held by Barrett, j. 
Nos. 



Nos. 



35— Mackenzie vs. Cutler. 
as— 3leNaughton vs-Chave. 
3S.I— Begt vs. thave. 
4&T^Perkias vs. The Mobile 
a>'d <^^'o a. B. Co. 



8ti— Wehle vs. The Great 
boat hem R. R. Ca 

39— Heiiget vs.t»chlaebter. 

34^W»li«ce k, ttoua vs. 
CasUe. . 



Bnram cotjbt— <ncxAi> xsm. 

Held bv Fm Fortt. J. 

K^^.T'r"'^ 288-The Grand BapUs ni laOiW 
Bauroad Company vs. Saunders. Bq day oslendaifc^ 

SCFREKK COCET— OKSEBAL TEKK. 
Meld by Davis, F. J., Brady and DaMtU, Jf. 



Kos. 

206— Oestnoh et aL vs. 

,„. Gilbert et al. 

194— WhaUn et aL TS. 
Burke, fco. 

154— SiUooclu et al. vs. 
'1 he Mayor, to. 

187— The Home las. Co. vt. 
TheHtnn. R. K. Ca 

198 — Ca«s^iy. ko.. v%. 
Mttuiiers. 

198— Abearn vs.Goodspee4l 
ei aL 

SOB'S— The St. Rich. Nat 
Btink VS. The Nat. 
B'koftheS.ofN. T. 

207— Wood vs. The Erie 
UaJlwav Co. 

205— Getty et aL vs. Dev- 
lin. &c., et al. 

209— Chapin et aL va. Dob- 
son. 

210 — Clnssman vs. The 
Long Ishind k.B.Co. 

211— Alexander et aL va 
Brown et al. 



I* OS. 

21 '.'— LittMier TB. Ooldaaa 
138— -llie People ex tlA 

liniltb va Tba Tm 

Ooin'ia. 
139— The People ex nL 

Bvmea ra The Tai 

COBl'ft. 

140>-The Ptople az mL 

Renwick vs. The 

141— The People tx rtt 

Conilng et »L Va 
1..0 TUe Tax Com'** 
142— The Poopl. «x rel 

8blP2«a e* al v«i 
,.- ll'eTaxCoiii'rfc 
148— Ti.e People ez ML 

Roich Vs. The T»j{ 

•Jom'ra. 
144— The PeoDle ex t«L' 

The Central g. g. i? 

km- J'- '■''• Tax, 



6U7SEMB COUET— CIBCUIT— raw t 
Hetd by Donohmt. J. 
No*. 



. ,# 



Nos. 

3435— Campbell, fca, vs. 

6 lire hard. 
076— Johnson et aL vs. 

iilsoerg. 
1049— Bussl itjer et aL vs. 

Ooald . t*L 
1051-Roblns, Jr., etaL vs. 

Gould et aU 
1S30 — Ameu ec at versus 

^mith et al. 
1877— MaunluE et aL. IcC, 

vs. B lis bane et aL 
1947— Maris vs. Green. 
Viu61 — Greeubanm va Con- 
ner, kc. 
2u01 — Cxrroli vs. Cassldy. 
ISla'a— Kolibe vs. Price. 
iil35— Mulry v«rsas The 

Mayor, kc 
1875— Pratt vs. Brotoa. 
1488— Gibba vs. Blcbbom. 
1489 — .>uaie vs. Hame. 

aiil— De Hevcre va Pren- 

derras.. 
1703— B.&schech versus 

PIdlllpa. 

lOo^Kckert et aL va 

Story et aL 
2225— Kirby vs. The N. T. 

<..and U. U. B.CO. 
2227- Tiqjilerdo vs. Oould 

etal. 
1617— Miller va MUler. 

777— McHay vs. f^tratton. 
3<!47 — Wines versus The 

Mavor, ko. 
1389— TompeOB vs. QoiiM 

ctaL 



1143— Lottffaraa. h., ^^f 

MaltlKwsetat, 
1941— Diehi va • 'lark ataL 
2ui 1— bedaao vs. KlOc 
2065— L^•erowll•ch vei 

Monqoin. 
ICll— Dlckiasoa vl DttAi 

ley. 
2117— T».v lor ve. Bargslk 
198a-^euoiaon ra Omom^ 

2107— Toffey eteJ. Tfc ITiW 

Hams. 
1733>»-iinK:« et at vw 

NorvaU. 
1329— U.pen va. OMwftttfl. 
1938 — Hamurl4ffe vetsaa 

Browne et aL 
1350— Pflttndge vMVM 

Thayer 
1967— The Bosrea Leeeme. 

trre una tt^-uim* 

W rks vs. Thi St 

L. I. ILandS. ILOaw 
8663— Bate et al. va. Tke 

M.iyor. tc 

1885— Peck et aL vs. lada. 
,«/,• bary..Jr.. et el. 
1983— FntU et aL va, 

Onderdonk. 
2027— Kaaoel fce.,vm.^Cea. 
2243— Marthiea vs. IM 

Valle. 
2249— Tbe >. T S. Lmi 

and Tru.t Oe. vi> 

Koeeland. 
2266—DaTid.oa tt al ti^ 

KaowUnd. 



MmtR 



BUFBivx court— aacvn—rjja n. ^^-: 
Eeld by l/usmet. J. *:,»^ 

Nos. I Nos. ' ' ' 

680— Seportas ▼•. Tan- 3662— Roller va.OeUftaMb 
„„„, ,derbiit. 1424Ja->'errlc»n r*. Kab 

2833— Harrington vs. Tbe Uns et aL 

,„»» .J'^y?'"' ^<^ - „ 17S4-LeatTaThei«a7«fc 
108&— BeaUier vs. WellL tc ^^ 

738- » agner va Lewis 2482— Matbes va 

eta!. fc«. 

600— Bailt-y vs. Dodge. 1 124S— L«Bdram vs. 
Ib9t}— Hewlett vs. Wood et et aL 

aL 1228— BianJy ra GeoU et 

1654— Von Oerlebtra va aL 

The Mayor, fco. S239— Moore va. tbe Umn 

948—1 aldwin vs. Mehr- or. Ice. 

bach. S210— Gerdte va. XahiHaa, 

878-Tbe Guar. Mut. Lsfei tc — — « 

Ins. to. »a The Ai-il313— Hoagve. Cmaer.ker 
l:iiitic Nat, Bonk. 12646— Ctvanacb vs. Ma* 
3566— Scbanck. fcc, vb.| more. 

The Mayor. »e. (1322— he vs vt. Stera. 
3668— Tbe N. Y Dispensary i062— Cu tance v». Bnjt 
vs. The Mavor. ka. < 138d— Devoe et aL ^ 
1224— St. John vs. The i eL SaaaUiDg. 

and Hod. Canal Co. I 

BCPBEMB cousT— dscnr— rasx hl 

Held by barremort, J. 

No*. 



23<Sl~Tlie Cbatbaa XMi 

Bk. ra CSnea.M, 

871— Lowensteia Ta.Uoi«« 

entbal. 
811— Sher.dna. fce.. «■, 

Ueekisa 
691— Vm Winkle vsiaaa 

wti«,ock. 
S87 >o— Vermi lye et aL vik 
Tbe .<Cinth {Tat. Vfc. 
82834-Tbe P««p aex rd_ 
Barae va. O'tetof 
eval. 
1828— Atewertf versa* Thai 
PhcBix Fire InaOoi^ 
of Biook-ra. 
3076— WQd etai.jra Cmf 
ner, fce. 



Nos. 

1160— Rose vs. The F. T. 
GsB-Ugfat Ca 
278— Reck va Tna Pbe- 
nix Ins. Co. 

174II3— Palibee va Ham- 
mond 

1918— Genet va The May- 
or, ae. 

296S— Klsberg vs. The 

Msyor, Ice. 
718— Waiin va Ashler- 
657— Drisc 11. tc.. vaThe 
Mayor, be. 

3 161 — Donovan vt. Coanet. 

&C. 

1735— H. ndersoa versus 

Whi e et aL 
1549>a— Hlckey vs. The 

Mayor, ac 

BUFBBIOB COTnCI— OKXnUL TIBIL 

adjourned until Monday. Oct. 23. 187G. 

8UFEEIOB COCBT— eFECIAL TKSIC. 

AeM by Curtis. O. J. 

Nos. Istuet of F; et. 
40— Spader vt. New-Tork 
Elevated B. R. Co. 

,^0— Polhamus va Meigs, 

Jr., et aL 
74— IfBuKpr et aL rt. De 
Wolf. 

Demnrrsr. 
7— Gimberoate va GouM 
ei ai. 

Issue* of Faet. 
11— Inaersoll vs. The Tenth 

National ^flank 
25 — SoderiKaa vs. Eaat 

River t'av. IntL 
26 — Eoderuas. .\dm'r, va 

East B. 6av. lust 
27 — Fowler va. Butterbr. 
67— Ulne* vs. Maranam. 
Demurrer. 
8— Health Dei^artiBfnt. 
ac. vs. gmitbet eL 

BD7KS10B COUBT— TBUI. TBBM— TABI I. 

MsUi by Saajbrd, J. 



Soa. 
■ 6— Warner va The West 

em Transportation 

Tompiny. 
297- Kohncr va Eicglnt 

etaL 
163— BalkevlU vt. DIckel 

et «L 
286— 8trober et aL va Bab- 

sam. 
S87^Wnitman vs. Cele. 
299— Welsh v». The Oer- 



Noa laanes of ' 

30— Ft-ls<-hi v«.6eaeree<. 
31— Mci>«-sa, ke.. vt. !Uu»> 

battau Quo. TeL Oa 
45— Wardrup v^ HeweU et 

al 
47— Wsketnau. Beoecwt^ 

fco., vs. Qroes et aL 
Domnrrex. 
1— Stauf vs. The Mayeck 

ao. 

IsaiKe of Fact 
78— Battel field va Ktabtc/ 
12— Amoid et aL va JteH 

xia 
IS— Gsnt vs. Bidgely. 
36— Baadte va Biowms^ 

et aL 
58— Sauth vt.8chv 

etaL 



P: 



Nos. 

z83— Moran v« Xi 
S79— Johns >a va 
i7o—3ionna. Adn's, va. 

HeViekax. 

.^7— fiaraoo va Stevatt. 
252— I'he Marshall H. £k 

< a. vs. WiWssti ^ 
263— Myer vs. Peet et ak 
^€9 - i be«aai« vs. dray. 
320-~tfatUiewt «t aL va, 

Doones. 
maB^Ameriean B'k. 331— Ilc<^y va CQiaka% 

COMMON PLEAa— BQUTTT TBBK. 

Bel* bv FVm Sr^Mt, J. '% 

Soa |>'oe. 

16— Van Delsen et aL vallS- Braoy va BraAr. 

Smith. I&3— Baler vt. BaaaekOCa 

Sa— The .N'. T. LlflsTnt. Co. i 24— Phelan vs: MeOnisneir 

va Mcaxber et aL [35— Aao vt. brliatetw. 
46-Cricbton et aL ti. sr^-Same va aaaa. 

Bleston et aL 164— Davis va Mf*ta 

coioios nxAB—Taxki. rtoM—thMX l. 
A.4}owned tti the term. ^:t 

COMMOa FLSA*— TBIAL XMaM-mtAXt VL 
Meldbt r«a£rMU.X 

B.s6-CoBth>eBtaI UH 



Kos. 

730— Pc» •♦ aV vt. Brephy. 
eSS-fcLj-T-h va Mciauy. 
929— Cook vs. Clark. 
932— ^e vs. B&e et aL 



Ca va Paamaraaalr 
9S8-;Pangbora va. r»ria(. 

etaL 
731— Thumpaeo vs.QaaiW« 



Kaa 



COMMON FLXAB— TaiAL TKKM— PABX ip. 
BeU byj.'r. Daiy. J. 

,Noa 



827— Heldlek va. Bert. 
918— Bo.ve« va watm 

tt nL 
913-0«rbet va faMr. 



lOlS-r^sbweitierva. HilL 
gift— White VI. WlnfortL 
813— 1 rition v*. Ha* ing*- 
6S7— Ellla va Mauriee. 

UABINB COUKT— TBIAL TK&M— PAST DL 
Held tySMMOtt J. 

Noa S<^ 

618.<-Otte«tal.vaBeeger. 433a-KlJur_va TM 
7 16t>— Center va draith. 
2025— DUnan et aL vs. 

Freldenrich. 

756— ^cott vs. Dreaaan. 

7168— Ue Forest va. Chija- 

Ua 
7227— ijnvaer vt. Tolkea- 

ning. 
7179— Khrhardt va Dnstat- 

ter 
7iS9— Seligman vs. Bhlnd. 



V«4 
son Oasbcfat Oa. 

6583— Bra .s vaUoitfaaa, 
ImplaadeA. «t eL 

7073— Railway Aav««tiaia| 

Co. va UOBM. 

7165-Rn*tea fc'S. M^ 

C^ vt. G-4eCfMi 
7201— Oonnor vaKiveaal 



584&<<i>attrech( TI. fi^otlc 

et aL 
653— Hugart va *~Tf*T 

MABINS COU BT— TBIAL TSBH— fABT L 

BsUt by McAdas^ J, 

Nos. I Kos- 

451-:— /:!nrr et aL vaStnttb USS'^— Oeaard va Oatw^M' 



*i/Oi- 



et aL va 



4btt4— Smith vaTsueridcr 

etaL 
4885— Beeb vs. Kxsnae. 
4 SS6— M cPorlandv*. CrOMt 
4sS7— Mu onnick va.Davik 
4889— Mev«r va The JiaV 

tlsnal loe Co. 
4891— Levy v*. Lew. 
43t9— Uttt^r vs. Phillipa 
4155— Kennedy va Waxlns 



erbmall 

Vath. 
4700— Kofcd vs. Enss. Jr. 
4«Ut}— llie Board of Com 

fflissionela of PliOtS 

-s. DlbbelL 
7930— Boehm vs. Geyer. 
4768— White vs. Katsa- 

bercb, 
4881— Branch vt. Barker. 
4S82— Cassidy vs. Bon- 

eraud. 

MARINE COUBT-^TBLAL TBBM— PABT IL 

Mtunp aeei>p,J. >-{ 

Nos. 

44;iU— Clan Ronald va Koc 

aonald. 
4564— Leoubardt TaOitka 
4647— HiAgiat va iiteveiMi 

4723 iLiro^.ervs. Mi«a*la 
4727— eioh vs. Levy. 
4USM)— BonnaffoB vemu 

Chamberlia. 
4670— Non-m«n vt. mOsr 

bt eL 
4312— Dooiittte 

Schwarta 



Nos. 

4754— Zahn 
L 



vt. Boy I an et 



va 



4625— Freudenber gar 

Walker. 
4693 — Uote t-t al. vs. Bus*. 
4722— Roberts vs. Usher. 
4651 -Kehleman va Ciux 
8u2:^l-uller vs. Stexufeis 

et al. 
473.3— 8m itu vs. Rextoo. 
8492— O^oea vs. Irviua. 
4545— Fuerth vs. Isaaca 

COUBT OF OENBBAL SBSSlO^a— PAST I. 
Beta by HutherlatHi. J. 
The People va James McUutre— Homicide (oontlaae^Lt 

COURT 'of GENERAL SEaSlONB— PABT IL 

JJeid by OUdertieeve, J. 

Charles Fletcher, robbery. William a. Eenn7< ("ON 

"' iarcenr. 

Angus ns P. eaela. gnatf 
laioeiiy. 



Ignatiui J. sjcuelnier, felo- 

n.ous assault and but- 

ter.v. 
jonu Donnelly, burglarv. 
Ueurv treediBau and 

7 homas Keely, burglary. 
John i o«ers. burK ary. 
George «V i Uiams and •ihera, 

buralary. 
John wood gT«nd Uroeny. 
Patrica Harvey, graua 

laroenv. 1 

Henry U. Pollard, grand 

larceny. I 

Mary iJower, icrand lareeny. 



Joliu Harris, Krand iMwenw 

ThoiUHs Heuiiesv ana Jouj 

Williams, grand larceuf 

John hurte, reoeivUn 



stolen gpoaa. 
jjicbati Vmu. 



false 



CaU liulna ttSo^i,^ 



"<' 



pm 

teuses- 
Jon II Bain. £siae pceteaaaa 
Patrick Doyle, petit hm 

coay. 
jobu Harruoo, petit Ian 

Ot'DV. 

w rilt Jordan miul l»r-; Thomas Wlllard MMt Kat^ 

«^v ^^ I WUlaid,disotdenyuooial 

Ells Hiudarson, grand '"• Chti««*f " ^'o:'»«. •»»«*• 
AAuv neriy uoute. 

*""'• - ... J '-- iJaooU Bender, vlolatloa ** 

iettcty law. 
Walte» Beetly |nnt*" 



George Smith, ciaad i« 



H^-Vj^v ^^^ 



■ i> 1 -i .'• 







■Mfi^g. 
















gpgt glttu^^xnrR ODtaigB, ^ai^mttSBaa, tatfundrt ife, ist^j 



JFI2fA2fOIAli AFFAIRS. 

KAXJB8 AT TBS STOCK KXCHANGE-^OCT. 

■ALCS BIPOBm TUH CAU. — 10 A. it. 



17. 




100 Del. k Hn.lson.... S8k 
20U WesUrn Union... TO^e 

160 do b8. 71 

100 do TIH 

eOi> do 7M< 

lOOPItUbur;^ SSs; 

100 ttxah. UentiaL... 44 a. 



eoo 

700 

100 

600 

1900 

iiHt 

BOO 

eoo 

B00Lak»SbQ(«. 
500 

sdo 

»(»0 



44 

in 

45 H 



600 

1800 

TkO 

1100 

1700 

500 

iOO 

eoo 

BOO 

600 

laoo 

BOO 

eouo 
2109 

nuo 

1000 

800 

BOO 



do . 

do 

do... 

do 46»4 

do 45^ 

4o 46V, 

do.......b8. 43Ji. 

flo «3. ioh 

6-h 

do ST*^ 

do 673t 

do ts. 67T» 



455N. T. C.JtHud...l02 

•-'00 ao 10-"^ 

300 Pacific Mail '24 "a 

400 do 0. 243* 



do... 
do... 
do».. 
do... 
do... 
do... 

do... 
do... 

do... 
00. 



.bS. 58 

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SSSg 

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58»4 
69 



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.... 6y»4 

.... 6«% 

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5938 

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sS. r.9>4 

do •.1. 5918 

do bS. 59>« 



do... 
do... 
do... 
do... 
do... 
do... 
do... 
do... 



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:)OORooK Island.. 

10 do.: 

20i) Central of .V. J 

100 do c 

too do 

■JOO do 

50 do 

)Oi>Nortb-w. Bttrn... 
200 Xorth-wpst. Pf... 

200 <ln 

300 do s3. 

400 do 

000 ErleEailway 

600 do c 

200 St Paul 

400 do 

100 do ..aS. 

00 do 

lOOSt Panl Pref... 

,"iOO do 

4()0 rto.,..j.... 

20Uorrls U Essex. 

20 do 

30 •'O 

1 00 Ohio &. M<S8 

100 Del.. Lack. b. W 



100 

300 

7 JO 

300 

900 

1400 

200 

600 



do.. 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 



. 2t'4 
..102 
..101 >2 

. .H(534 
c 37 
.. 37 
.. 3734 
.. 87 '■a 
303* 

CDS, 
0034 
01 
6118 
lOif. 
lOV 
29 
29 \« 
VOU 
. 2938 
. f.O 
. 69»8 
. 5914 
. 94 v, 
. 04»« 
. 91 
. 1084 
. 74 »4 
. 7439 
. 74 >4 
-74i« 
.'74 
. 7419 
. 74>4 

. 7438 

. 74»4 



aOVSIUUtlKT STOCS»r-10:13 AND 11:30 A. M. 

ttO.000 V. Si 6 20. 

C.'«5, N.. ..0.113Tg 

10,0000. a. B-aoc. 

WW n*\ 
000 u. a 6«,'8i.a 

K c 115 



$2,000 U. 8. 6-20 C, 

•08 b. 0.117 

6,500 U. 8. 68,10-4a 

S b.c.U43i 

1.500 0.8.4'3 R.'91.111 
10,000 0. 8. 6»,'81,B.113% 



nSST BOAHD— 10:30 A. U. 



48,00OM,at8t.P. Ist 

laC. DiT....102M 

,000 Erie 2d 103»9 

t,000 Har. 1st 78, C. 119 
J.W10 Jf. Mo. ]»t.... 98V, 

le.OOO do OH^^ 

1,000 -10 9SVj 

2,0 rtOhlo*,Ml9«,2d. .-.8V! 

i 000 a Piie &. iwi8.no 

2.000 0. Pacific IsMOfii* 
«4. 00 P. R. of M. l8t. 94 

1,000 0. fc p. -. .P.lll ^-" 
10,000 C. i P1tt«.4tb.l05V 700 

l,oo«<\.r.iLai»t 42»4 

1,000 T. k W. a r.. 47 
lOOOUfcN.C.. 'Oa 911a 
»3,0O0 Caind* 8. ; g . 6" 
SnSunfe fS. r.KcllS 
lOakB. raDaLb.e. *>^\ 
300 W. 0. Tel....b. c. 7'i» 

20 d.. 71 

200 do 71'H 

Sup d.. »8i>. 70>o 

4W do. bS. Tm 

SQOPMllUU«U..i>.o. 24^ 

400 do 24^ 

do 24% 

«U> c. 241^, 

= ^ do U^ 

100 do 24«g 

is© do c. 24>s 

«0o Can. ot a. J..bLe. 37 



15 cm. & B. I..b. cl01>>> 
100T.,W.sW.b.C.b30 5ig 
1000L.8.tM.ij.b.c.B3. 591*1 



600 



Ll>. 



d-v.. 

do 

do 
««"""! 

do 

do 

do"::::: 

do 

>lo 



88. 37 
.... 37iii 
.... STH 

.... 3738 

.... 8718 
.... S714 

»&', 
38 ^, 
S7 

.H6\ 

..s60. 36 

....... SCTg 

-...b8. 37 

-.86 J. 
..860. 



ffl-S 




do. 
100 do. 

200 do. 

WBjteBJ!waV:b;a 
»00 • do.... 

M Siia Rallwar Pt. 

IBC *P Gfd..bLC. 

100 ao 

IOOC.J1N. W.Pfb.c 
JOO do 

100 do : 

300 Mich. Ceo.^.bi c 



25 00 


do 83. BO"* 


l.sno 


do 69H 


500 


do 59'4 


IIOO 


do 83. BOV 


T3Q0 


do 50 


1 100 


do. »3. fS^s 


200 


do 8(30. n8U 


?400 


do BS34 


800 


do S8V 


700 


do 59 


100 


do 68^8 


5.10 


do 5334 


31 


do 83. SHSg 


1000 


do 5834 


1300 


do B.S'a 


1300 


do 60 


1000 


do ngV 


It'OO 


do 591* 


3400 


do 69% 


2 10 


do 9"* 


700 


do BflV 


400 


do B.i 



lOO c.. M. t St. P.b.c ia=^ 

2jo do -08. 2939 

.>00 do..ii.-.b3. 39 1-, 

300 do -29^ 

200C..U.t 8.P.P£b.c. 69% 



300 

400 

1500 

100 

100 

1*0 

900 

100 

200 

2uO 



do.......... 69^ 

do P9»4 

do.......... B934 

do 59 H) 

do b60. 693^ 



do. 83L 

■•o. ,, ...«•*• 
do 

do.."!:::::: 

do 

do «3. 

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do 

do 

do....... .. 

do."!"!!!: 

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do 



35 
S4T9J 

2ii 
89 
88's 

611., 
61V 
45 V 
45 V 



do.... 

do 

do.... 
do.... 
do.... 
do..^. 

do 

tiO 

do.... 



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45% 
4514 
45 V 

45 

45 V 

43»2 
46«6 
4534 

4.88 

-83. 45 J^ 
45% 

•10. 4534 

45-8 

46 

46«4 

46V 

46I4 

46% 

46^2 



do 11 

do IIV 

C. fcH.D. C.103 

do lU'i34 

no 102% 

do 1021.J 

do lv,5J% 

ttO 860. loo hj 

do b3.10:4V 

do 102'q 

46%, 100 U. 3. E2pre8«.ao. 6:^1" 

46V 

BALKS BKFO^ THE CALL — 12:30 F. H. 
$13,0eo^lI.P.L.Qrant.l00%. 200 Sorth-weBt. Fret 61V 



do oQhi 

do 69% 

do oO'-j 

do 59V 

do 5934 

100 Alton k T. U. Pf. 15 
lOo Pacific of Mo. b.c. 3^ 

tOO d,. 3V 

10 W.T..N.H.iH.b.c.l51 
It^OMwg., K. t T.b.c. 8 
^00UeL4-.t W.b.c.0. 74% 

lUO ,10 74 

oOO do 74's 

5"0 do 74 

"0 do 7:^'4 

..^. do...., 73V 

dOo do c. 73»2 

;}"U do 73% 

fO}^ do 73-1, 

^'>0 do 73% 

yOO do 73V 

J"0 do S3. 72% 

f"0 do 83. 72% 

iH*^. do c. 73V 

204 do o. 73% 

100 do 73V 

200 do 73 

*V}J ^» '7;^'3 

1« do 83. 7334 

100 do 73% 

lOO do 73V 

iuO do c. 73 V 

25 Cbi. & illtOD.b. clOO 

300 Ohio JiM..b.c.b3. 11 
200 

iOO 
lOOK, 

lou 

400 
140 
iOO 

2UU 

^t)0 
100 



> 


'.fiOU 


. -^^400 


*-■-«■- 


StiO 


«..*■ ■, 


m 




600 




eou 




60u 




1000 




700 



100 Del. k HoUaon... 68 

loo W«Bt. Uu1ou...b3. 71V 

2tJO do 71% 

100 Pacific lUi]...b;i. 24 V 
3oOMlcJ». Central.... 46V 



do 46V 

do 46% 

do 46 V 800 

do 46li 200 

do 46 

do 45% 

to... 46 

do.... ba. 46% 

do 46V 

— do 4«V 

SOO BMa Kailway lu% 

500 do. 83. lov 

««0^ «o. lOV 

100 Cm. of S. J.taO. 341, 

400 do 36<, 

500 do 36% 

J«0 do iSO. 3534 

3flUUtet|boi« 68^ 



aXUO 
IJO 

Bo 



900 



do Bos: 

do B8% 

do b3. 58 

do a3. 6s% 

do 68% 

do 6«% 

do o9 

do 69V 

do.... 69 



lOOC.CC. ti 38152 

100 da l>3. 39 

32 do 39 

10 Chic. & Alton loov 

lOODel., Liica. kW.. 73I9 

4oOas. Paul 29 V 

100 do 29% 

do 2a34 

do ii9% 

200 do -g-^ 

auO do 29% 

100 St Paul Pref..... 6i;34 



lOO 


do b3. 5a% 


100 


do 6934 


200 


oo b3. 09% 


200 


do b3. 6934 


400 


do fi9^4 


300 


do 59% 


700 


do 60 


20U 


do b3. 00 


4u0 


do 60V 


1000 


00 6..V 


100 


do 60% 


30O 


do 60V 


300 


do 6u% 


600 


do -Suv 


60O 


do 60% 


300 


do 6OV 


;:0O 


do 60V 


300 Toik Wabash... 5V 


100 St. h 


. kUonU... 14V 


23 


do 15 



100 Bo«k Ulaad: . 63 . 1 02 

QOyjtSSitXST BTQCSS— 3 P. U. 

§8,000 D.I.6i.H.,'81.1l8 I «3.000 0.S.6».C, '81.115 

UCOUD BOARD— 1 P. M. ' 



tl,QooVo. 6a. L. B..103% 
1,000 Ala. »8, '86... 3i>2 
[ i,0U0 S. J.Cen.lsta 88 
1,000 .N.J.Ceu. r.b.c 89 
2.000 CkB.IkP.78.110V 
.. 1 ,000 L«off Ooek h a. 1 04 
U.0oaP.fi.ot>lo.l8>. 94 
I,00OC..C.fcLC.lBt. 42V 
4,000 P.lr.w.kC. 1st. 120 
l,uOO Lou.kN.C.'88. 913. 

lOO QmokBilrer 14 

pO do b. e.13 

100 O. k B. canal. b.(i. 68 

IOO d... 7. 67% 

>Wm& V. TeLh. c 71 V4 

4".. 71% 

. - do 71^ 

l(iO 4«Mricanl£x Q-H.^ 

Jm) do bb c. 62 

OQOPacUc jtaiL.b. c. 24<? 
200 S-l.C. k Hud. b.c. 102% _.„ 
MoKHe u. 0.03. 10% luO 



1400 L. S. k U. 8.b.c. 
100 do...... 

lOOu eo...» 

400 do...... 

400 do...... 

500 do.. ....83. 

200 do...X.<-.. 

400 do...^. b3. 

300 oo. .r.bs. 

luO do...i 

500 do... I 

lOOO do....^ 

-•500 do... I 

500 do - 

600 do....,...i3: 

1200 do.... 

loODHnola Cedt 

100 bu k K. W ^. e. 
250 C, U. tt. >t. Ph>o. 
aoo do.. ......._ 

200 C.,M.t s.P.P£:b.c. 



200 do... 
801* Utah. Cen 

100 do 

900 do 

900 do 

goo do 

SO" do 

800 do 



10% 300 
.b. c 46V 800 

46% 700 

46>8 200 

...85. 46 100 

46VlOa 

b3. 46V 100 T., 
. 4*} iloO 



?S8 f?- * !L ^-^A^ <^ «1 1 100 DeL L. k '^llb. 
loacaa. of N. J.b.cc. 36%il00 




Buff 
MM 
100 

loo 

600 
100 



io 830. 

do 

do 

do 830. 

do. 



000 

xoo 



do... 
do... 
do., 
do... 



.830. 
.".•30: 



3512 
36% 
803^ 

....... 36% 



35341600 
363i!-.'00 
8b%ll00 
8i%|600 
36%; loo 



MO 
■MO 



59 
68% 
0834 
58% 
583., 
63% 
59 
59 V 
b3. 5SiV 
59V 

58 V 
69% 

59 V 
5939 

"^"^ 

5918 

84 

»6V 

29% 

29 V 

60 V 
6H3 
60% 
60 V 

60% 
60 14 
60 V 

60 
BV 
6% 

73 la 

do c. 73% 

do.... 73% 

do...^...e. 7a% 

do..._ 73V 

do.... 7334 

do o. 74V 

do.......c. 74 

do.... 7334 



ao... 

do... 

do... 

do...^ 

do..^ 

do.....b3. 

do.... 

vr. iL W^..b. a 
do. 

c. 



B8tL,.i..Cb'5:b;o. 15 

100 do 13 



BALKS FBOM 2:30 TO 3 P. U. 
fl.OpqKorthMalBt. 08 V, 200 Central of N. J.. 86 V 




3,000 U.t3t.P.C.3.P. 88V 
1,000 Do. Pac l8t„10G% 

JobDetkHud 68 

100 West ' Blou..s3. 71V 

100 do 83. 7i 

20VP»elfle Uiol 24% 

100 do b3. 24% 

100>. TC kHnd...l02i2 
20«»£xto Kaaway.... lO-y 

BtIO do bS. 10% 

100 a«nh-weat Pxef. 61 

loo do 6H« 

tgOO Lake Bboio 69 

do 68% 

do 83. 583^ 



do. 

do 

do.... 

do.::. 1:1:1: 

do 83. 

do .'63. 

do 

do 83. 

do 



6»34 

68% 

B9 

69 V 

S9V 

bd^ 

59% 

69% 

69% 



loo 10«h. Central.... 45t, 



700 do 463j 

low do 46% 

1^ do 46 

MOTol^dok wiV.'.V *6% 

JtS^ do.. 6% 

«OO.fM.B. of uo.... 334 



loo 
mo 
400 
loo 
200 
lUO 
loo 
•iOO 
30O 

loo 
300 



do 

do., 
do . 
do., 
do., 
do.. 
do., 
do.. 

do., 
do., 
do 



.83. 



200 St Paul... 
4oo do 
400 do... 
200 do... 
200 D«L, Lack, i w" 
r. o. 



b3. 



60O do...u, 

3oO do. 

<^0O .V do...u. r. c 

300 do 

100 do 

500 .;. do 

50O ' do c. 

100 do 

100 do... 

500 do... 

200 do......... 

20 do 

300 at Paul Prcf.bS. 

200 do 



loo 
'^00 



do., 

do 



36^4 

36V 

36 

»3. 35% 

3.')34 

....... 36 V 

....... 00 

35V 

36 

30% 

3o% 

29% 

29^1 

1:034 

3o 

73% 

74 V 
7334 

73 1q 

7:^.% 

73V 

...c. 73V 

73% 

. »3. 73V 

73% 

7334 

73% 

60 

60 



60V 
60% 



noanceii ant that at an informal meetint; of the 
freight agents last eveninji cattle Ireights 
from Chicago to New- York wcro ad- 
vanced Irom thirtv-flve to forty-five 
cents, and that at the meeting to be held at 
iJetroit on Friday an advance in cc-neral ireights 
VoulJ be made. On the street these reports 
were regarded as indicative ot an early settle- 
nieut of the railroad war. The cable advices 
from Europe reporting a large increase in the 
demand for .American grain, and the probabili- 
ties of a war in Europe which would involve 
Rnssia and thus shut out from the English mar- 
ket our chief competitor in supplying gram, 
aro also important elements of strength to the 
current speculation. 

The entire business for the day aggregated 
173,200 snares, of which nearly one-half were 
in Lake Shore. Michigan Central figured for 
84,200 shares, Delaware, Lackawanna, and 
Western for 16,720, St Paul for 19,950, and 
New- Jersey Central for 10.750 shares. The im- 
provementinprices ranged from Mj to2ir& ^cent., 
the latter in Lake Shore, which rose from 57 Mi 
to 59*6, and closed at 59%. Michigan Central 
followed, rising from 44% to 46M», with the 
last sales at 46\^. Both of these stocks are 
largely oversold and the favorable advices in 
regard to the grain movements at the West 
caused large purchases 10 cover. New- York 
Central was strong in the early dealings and 
advanced from 102 to 103, but later became 
quiet and sold at 102%®102Mj. Eock Island. 
North-western common. Erie, Ohio and 
Mississippi and Pittsburg were iirm at 
a fractional improvement. North-western 
preferred advanced from 60 'li to 6lMi, 
St. Paul common from 29 to 30, preferred from 
59 to 604fe, and Western Tlnion from 70% to 
713fe. Sales of C. C, C. and I. were made as 
high as 38Mj®39. Pacific Mail fell off from 
24% to 24 Vl!, and closed at ii4^. Among the 
coai stocks, Delaware ana Hudson Canal de- 
clined from 68^ to 67%. Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna and Western fell off from 74% to 72%, 
recovered to 74^, and closed at 73%. There 
was a difference of %'S% ^ cent, between 
cash and regtiJar sales. New-Jersey Central 
rose from 36% to 37%, fell oft to 35 regular, and 
recovered to 35%. The remainder of the list 
was qniet and steady. 

There was no important change in the money 
market to-day. The demand was fairly active, 
and Stock Exchange borrowers were supplied 
at 2s>3 V cent., the former having been the 
closmg rate. The banks and trust companies 
ask 3®4 ^ cent., and are able to find employ- 
ment for their funds at these figures. Prime 
mercantile paper is quoted at 5® 6 ^ cent 
Exchange at the interior cities on New- York i9 
without material change, and the currency 
movement tlierefore continues against this 
centre. The national bank notes received at 
Washington for redemp'ion to-day were $350,000. 
The foreign advices were more important 
than for Aome time past, reporting a marked 
depression at the difterent money centres on 
the Continent The hopes that a European 
war ma.y be averted are evidently disappearing, 
and that this view is entertaiaed on the other 
side is reflected in the declining tendency oi 
securities at Londoa to-day. the latest 

dispatches reporting a panic in. Hus- 
sian, Hunganan, Turkish, and other 
foreign bonds. British Consols declined 
Mi V cent, closmg at 9514 ®96% 
both for money and the account United States 
bonds were noticeably firm, and advanced hb 
V cent, for 1867 b and new 5s, which closed 
at 108% and 106% respectively. Old 1865b and 
10-403 were unchanged, at 103 for the former 
and 108^ for the latter. Erie advanced Mi ¥ 
cent. — to 9%. The sum of £72,000 sterling was 
Withdrawn Irom the Bank of England on bal- 
ance to-day. At Paris Rentes declined from 
106.7 14 at the close yesterday to 105.32 Vfe. The 

weekly statement of the Imperial Bauk of Ger- 
many shows a decrease of 10.700,000 marks. 
United States new 5b were quoted at Frank- 
fort at 102^. 

The sterling exchange market was firm, with 
few bills offering. Actual business was done 
close on to the nominal asking rates of the 
bankers, namely, at $4 SSMi'aiH 83% for long, 
and at $4 85®^ 85V4 for deiiiand sterling. 

The exciting news from abroad iu regard to 
the Eastern question produced a changed com- 
plexion of affairs in the Qold Boom, and the 
dealings were attended with unusual anima- 
tion. Early in the day the price advanced 
from 109Vi to 109%, and in the afternoon 
reached 109%, at which closing sales were 
made. This rise in gold in connection with the 
increasing firmness of exchange will stimulate 
the exports of cpreaU and hasten the move- 
ment of the crops from the interior to the sea- 
board. Cash gold was easy and loaned fiat to 
1 ^ cent, interest ft.>r carrying. 

Government bonds, in sympathy, with 
gold, were strong and hiirber. The improve- 
ment ranged from Vi to % ^ cent., without in- 
ducing any large offerings. Coupon, 18678, 
sold up to 115%; do., 1868s, to 117, and new 
53 to 115. The new 4Mj ^ cent, registered 
loan advanced to 111. In railroad mortgages 
the transactions amounted to $191,000, ot which 

$75,000 were in Pacific of Missouri Firsts at 94, 

an advance of Vi ^ cent, over yesterday's prices. 
One lot of $32,000 Canada Southern Firsts sold 
at 55. Harlem coapon firsts sold at 119. Cen- 
tral Pacific advanced to 110. iCew-Jersey Cen- 
tral Convertibles were 2 ^ cent, higher, sell- 
ing at 89. North Missouri firsts rose from 98^ 
to 981*. Milwaukee & St. Paul, La Crosse Di- 
vision, sold at 102 V4, and Consolidated Sinking 
Funds at 88V4. State bonds were dull, the 
sales being confined to Missouri Long 6s at 
107%, and Alabama 83, of 1886, at'32V4. 

The exports of produce from the port of 
New- York for the week ending this date were 
^6.137,981, against $5,460,834 lor the correspond- 
ing week in 1875, and $5,552,953 in 1874. The 
total exports of produce from the port since 
Jan. 1, this year, were $213,994,210, against 
$201,618,541 for the corresponding period in 
1875, and $235,651,962 in 1874. 

United ^'tates Treasdhy, > 

i«'BW-YOKK, OCU 17, 1876. j 

Gold receipts $1,121 88b 52 

pavments 88,146 76 

45,174,b74 27 

757i^45 60 

234,911 12 

40,585,445 96 



~; Hijcbept Lowest 



Del., Lack, and "Western 7438 

N«w Jersey Central • 373i 

Uulaware und Hadaon Caoal. CSia 

Micbiean Central '3i^ 

XiMBuari I'acific S^ii 

C, C, C. and 1 39 

Ohio and Mixsissippi lUs 

%S'e«leru Union 7i'-<a 

I'ayilic Mail 247^, 

Quicksilver 13 

Ailautic and Pacific I'rei.... 15 

Kansas and Tuxas .' 8 

Iron Mouurain 14V 

Uuiiod States Express 62I2 

Total sales 



7208 
35 
67I2 
4434 

3l8 
381^3 
lU^ 
7u'8 
24 13 
13 
15 

8 
13 
62 12 



No. of 
. shares. 

16720 

10.750 
500 

24200 
400 
200 
700 
2,690 
3,800 
230 
lUO 
100 
200 
11)0 



173,200 

The following were the closing quotations of 

Government bonds : 

Bid. Asked. 

UoHed States Currency 69 124V 124^ 

United States 63, 1881. registered...! 17 1^ 113 

United States 6-, 1881, coup ns USSi llOijj 

United Stales 5-20s, 1665, registered. 1093i 110 

U. iteii States 5-20s, 1^6.5, coupons.. 113i6 11338 

United States 5-20j, 186."). new ree..ll27g 113H( 

United States 5 20g, 186.1, new coup.i:278 v* 113^ 
United Slates 5-20S, 1867. reiiistered.lloiH - 16 
United States 5 208. 1807. coupun8..I15^ -" 116 
United States 5-20,s, 1668, registered. llGi^ II734 

United States 5-2Q3. 1663, couDons..llC".. 117V 

United States 10 403, reeistered j.^i-j II434 

Uuiied States lU-40rt. ouupons lloSg 115'^ 

United Stares 5.*. 1881, retji.stered 11338 113^8 

United Slates 5s, 1831, couoons 11478 115 

United States 413* Ill lllV 

The Sub-Treasurer disbursed in gold coin 
112,500 lor interest ; S3,000 for called bonds, and 
$7,300 silver coin in exchange for.tractional cur- 
rency. 

The following table shows the transactions at 

tlie Gold Exchange Bank to-day : 

Gold cleared $25,680,000 

Gold balances 1,473,433 

Currencv balances. 1,616,228 

The foUowiug is the Clearing-house statement 
to-day : 

Currency exebanges $66,843,263 

Currrccy baiailces 3,6.36,138 

Cri)ld exchauges ."5,438,318 

GtiiQ balances ) 46,725 

The following were the bids for the various 
State securities : 



30 

8 
8 
6 
8 
8 



N. C. 6«, old A.&O. 15 
F.C. N. C. K. J. & J. 60 
N. C. N. C. E.A.&.O. 60 
N.C.N.C.E.c.offJ&J. 40 
N.C.N.C.K.C.1..A&O. 40 
N. U. Fund. Act '65. 9 
!N. C. Faud Act '68. 
N. C. K. bds. J. &. J. 



N. C.So. Tax ciass 3, 

Oaio 6s. 1881 107 

OnioSs, 1886 113 

Rhode Island 6^ 109 



ArK, Cj, Funded 

: Aik,7.^L R.&Ff.S.ls. 
Ark. 7s. M. &.L.R.. 
A.7S.L.R.P.B&N0. 
Aik.73,M.O.(tK.Riv. 
Ark. 7i, Ark. (Jen... 

Couueo icuc Sj 110 

G-eorgia 6s 92 

Ga. Ti, new bonds... 104^ N. C. N. Dds. A. <t O. 

Ga. 7s, indorsed 101 iN.C. Sp. Tax class I. 

Ga. 7.S, Gold bonds. .105 '"" ~ 

Liuuidiana 63 41 

La. 69, new tionds. .. 41 
La. 6s, new F. Debt. 41 
La. 7s, Penitentiarv. 41 
La. 63, Levee bjuds. 41 
La. 8s, Levee bonds. 41 
La. 84, L. bus. of '75. 41 
La. 73, Consolidateil. 59 
Uicuigan 6^ 1878-79.102 
Michigau 63, 1883... 105 
Michigan 73, 1890... 110 V 
Mo. 6s, due in 1876.. 101% 
Mo. 63, due in 1877.. 101% 
ivlo. 63, due in 1878.. ICl^ 
L.ba.,oue '82 ro '90. :n.l07 
Fund, bs., due 1S94-5.1U7 
Asy. or Un., due '92.107 
H. &St Jo., due '86.107 
H. (tSi. Jo., due '87.107 
N. Y. R. B. Loan...l02io 
N. Y. U. B. LodD....102io 
N. C. 6a, old, J. &. J. 15 

And the following for Railway mortgages: 

Al. & Sns. 2d, bds.. 100 C, P. & A. old bd8..105 



COMMERCIAL AFFAIRS. 



9 

6 
6 

IJ4 
1 



32 
32 

32 
32 
40 
40 

32I2 
2 



South Carolina 6s. 
S. C. 63,JaD. & July. 
S. C. 63. A. & Ocf.. 
S. C. Fupd. Act '66.. 
S.C.L. C, 1889, J. &J. 
S.C.L.C.,1889,A.&0. 

S. C. 73 of 1888 

S. C. non-F. bds 

Teon. 63, old 44V 

Tenn. 63, uewbd.-i... 4313 
Tenn. 6j, new series. 

Va. 68, old 

Va. 63, new bils.'eo.. 
Va. 68, new bd8.'67.. 
Va 63, Con. bonds.. 
Va. 6.1. ex-matu'd C. 
Va. 63, Con. 2d ser.. 
Va. 68, Det. bds 



44 
27 
27 
27 
78 
6818 
35 
6I2 



.<V1. & S119. 3d, bds...H)0 
B.,C.K.<tMla ,78,G.. 3758 
Ches. & Ouio 63, Ist. 24V 
Cues. & 0. Ex. «oup. 21 
Caic. & Alton S. F.-.lOO 
ChiuaKO ic Alton loo 102% 
Joliet J,^ Chicago lat.llO 
St. L., J. & Chic. lat.lOli* 
Chic.,B. &Q.8p.o.lsi.ll8 
Chic..R.I. & P.lst,78.lo9i« 
C.K.I.&P.S.F.I.es 93,102 
Cen.R.otH.,J.l3t,new,110 
Cen. K. otN.J.l8t.C. 85 
C.R.of N.J. lst.Couv. 87 
LBtigb&W.B.CoB.G. m^ 
Atu. Duck & Iin. bdsi 80 
M. &St.P.l3>8j,P.D.116 
M.&S.P.2J.7 310P.D. 97V 
il.& St.P.lst,LaC.D.102V 
.u.&St.P.l3t,l.&.UD. 95 
M.&StI'.l3t,C. &M. 95 
il. &Sf.P.Cou. S. F. 88 
Mil. & St. Faul 3d.. 90 
C. & N. VV. Int b(is.l04 
C.& N. "W. C. bds. .104V 
U. &. :N. W. Ex. bds. 100 

C. &.N. W. lat 106 

C. &N.W. C.C.G.08. 94% 

I .wa Mid. lat, 8s 93 

Peninsula 1st, Couv.103 
Chicago & Mil. I8t..l05-i2 

Winona <t St. P. 2 1.. 7U 
C.,C..C.&l.l3t.7s,SF.110 

Del.. L. & W, 2 J 107 

Aloriis & Essex I3t.ll7i2 
VI or I is & Essex 2 J.. 106 
Mor. & Es. 7.S ol '71. 9913 
Alor. & Es. lit C. G.lOl 
Erie 1st Extended. .110 

Erie 2d, 7s, '79 I02I2 

Erie 3ii, 73, '8J IGO 

Eno 4tn, 73, '80 98 

Erie 5ih, 7s, '88 100 

B., if. Y.&E.lst,'77. 92 

Duo. ifcS. C. Ist 105 

lud., B.&W. ist 23 

Mich. So. 7 3^ ct. 2d. 104 
Cieve. &. Toi. n. bs..l'04i<i 



C, P. Si. A. new b8..105 
But'. & Erie new bs.l04]^ 
Buf. Si, State Line 73.10413 
Kal. & W. Pig 1st.. 82 
Lake Shore C. C. I,=it.l07 
AlicQ.Cen.C. 73, 1902.104»3 

N. J. So. Ist 73 20 

N. Y. Cen. 6,s, 1883.. 10478 
N. Y. Cen. Os, E. E-.1C2»2 
N. Y. Con. 63, Sub-. 10213 
N. Y. C. & H. Ist 0,117% 
H. K.73 2a.S.F. 1385.111 

H. l3t 7s, cuup 119 

H. Ist 7ii, registered. 119 
Norib Missouri Ist.. 98 V 

O. &M. C. S. F 91 

Ohio & Miss Con 00 

O. & M. 2d Con..... 57 
Cen. Pac. Saa J. B.. 91 3^^ 
C. P. C. &. Olat.... 93 
C. P. L. G. bonds... 94 
West. Pac. bonds... 102 
Uu. Pac. L. G. 73...10US8 

Uu. Pac, S. r 9II4 

Pac. R. of Mo. lat... 94 
P., Ft. W. &C. I3t..ll9l3 
P., Ft. W. &C. 2d..li4 
P., Ft. \Y. & C. ,3d.. 103 
C. & P. Cod. S. ¥.. .111 
Cleve.&P. 4rh, S.F. 10538 



C, C. & L 1st 
Alton &. T. H. 2.1, Pt. 
i'ol., P. & W., E. U. 
Xol., P. & V?-., \VM>. 
Tol., P. & W., B. D. 
T0I..P.& W.,Co:i.73. 
Xol. & Wab. lat, Ex. 
T.&. W.l»t,St.L.Div. 
Tol. <fc Wabash 2d... 
Xol. & Wab. Eq. bds. 
Xol. &. Wab. Oou. (;. 
Han. & Naples lit.. 
Gc. West. Ist, 1888.. 
Gt. West. 2d, 1893... 
Illinois & S.Iowa 1st. 
Han. & Cen. Mo. Ist. 
W.U.bds.,1900, coutJ.lOSBa 
W.U. bds., 1900, reg.l0338 



89 

87 

84 

25 

26 

92 

65 

641a 

10 

46 

36 

91 

64 

65 

85 



And the following for City bank shares : 



America 136 

American Ex 109 

City 300 

Cwmmerce 108 

Coniinental 6^ 

First National 200 

Foaith iS'atiuual 80 

Fifth Avenue 212 



Gieenwlch 115 

Imp. & Traders' l85^ 

Merchants' llpia 

Metrop jlitan 120 ly 

New-York m^ 

Pheoix 85 

Republic 72 

3t. Nicholas lOJ 



PHILADELPHIA STOCK PRICES — OCT. 

BiQ. 

City 6s, new , ll2ia 

United Ballioad ot New-Jersey 

Peuusy 1 vania Railroad » 

Reading Kailro?id 

Ltrbigh Vidley BailrSad 

Catawissa R.iilroad, preferred 

PbiladelDbia and Erie iiailroad 

Schuylkill Navigation, preferred... 

Northern Central Bailroad 

Lehigh Navigation 

Oil Creek and Allegheny KiUlroad. 

Uestonville Eailw^iy 

Cenual Tiansportation 



.136 Ja 
. 48 
. 23^8 
. 49 
. 39 
. 15 
. 11 
. 27 
. 32% 
. 933 
. S15% 
. 39I4 



17. 

Asked 

112t<! 

137 

4Sis 
24 
49l« 
39% 

15V 
12 
2s! 
33 

9I3 
257e 
3912 



CA.LIFORNIA MlXISa STOOKS. 
San Feancisco, Oct, 17. — The following are 
the closing otiirial prices of mining dtocks to-day: 

C(>nso1idai.«d Virstiula-49i2 Crown Point 12*4 



Cal furula 58 '•2 

Segregated belcher... 7o 

Oi-hir r-***** 

(. hollar '^3 

a..vage 16 

C'onaoliaated Imperial 4 

Mexican 273.: 

(iotdd and Curry 14- 

Best and Belcher 44-. 

Uale and NorciosB 8\ 

Jjullion .'I. -.33'-. 

Julia Consolidaced 7%{Uaymoua h Kly 

Kcniuclt 1134 Sb vet Hill 



Kossuth. 



Yellow Jacket i25\i 

Alpha iii^i 

Oeichjr 191^ 

Conudence lOHi 

lcrr.i ixevada 1314 

• xchequer I5 

iveruiau Si's 

'ustice ii5 

', leilouia 103^ 

uopara .a 34 

>..rthern Belle 2^^.^ 

... 5'a 
.. 31-3 



1*41 Union Uonsolidaced.... 12 la 



FOREIGJH MARKETS. 



Gold . 

(iold balance. 

Currenc.y receipts 

Carreucv payments.. 

Cuirency balance 

Cus toma 



CLOSING QUOTATIONS — OCT. 



297,000 00 

17. 



Monday. Tuesday. 

American eold 11314 109''8 

United States 41a-', 1891, coupon llOio 111 

United States 5«, 1^81, coupon II4I3 11473 

United States 5 iiOs, 1867. coupon II5I2 115% 

Bills on Loudon Ig4 83®i4 8313 $4 e3i2'a'?4 83% 

New.York Central lOlSs 102i-j 



liook Island 101% 

Pacihc Mail i>4'^8 

Milwaukee & St. ^uMi SS'^s 



' TUESDAT, Oct 17— P. M. 

Til* stock speculation to-day waa de- 
tg *— <d for the ooal shares, but stiong and 
baojr«i$ Sat tha stooka of the leading trunk 
linei. • 

Wbfl* the false report of JC. Vanderbilt's 
death is oondemned by alt partiea as an out- 
rage, meriting the eeverect punishment, the 
operators who loek fas an advance in values 
derlTe no little oomfort from the fact that 
loiifc betore the report iras cocti-adioted the 
market rallied from the moioentary shook and 
exbitthed » Tezydeeided upwitfd teodenoy. - 

TtM oatuee irhioh odntribated to the marked 
Impt^Ttmeat 1b the rallwaj eharea to<d»7 are __ 



Milwaukee &c, St. Paul Prettrred SS'a 

Lake Shore 5784 

Chicajro & North-western 36ia 

Chioaeo Sl North.wesi«ru Preferred.. GOia 

Weatern Union 71 

Uuion Pacihc 63 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western... 74la 

New-Jersey Central seSg 

Delaware &, Hudson Canal 69 

Morris & Essex ^ 95 

Panama 128 

Ene 10 

Ohio Si, Musisslppl lo'^a 

Harlem 135 

Hannibal & St. Joseph 1313 

Hannibal Sc St. Joseph .deferred ii4 

Michigan Central 44% 

Illinou Central 84 

TheeiCtreme range of prices in stock s and 
the number of sbarea sold are as follows : 

„ . No. of 

HlKhest, " 
...103 
.. 10«^ 
.. 69S8 



102 

<i4Sg 

30 

6038 

5938 

30% 

6II4 

71 

63 

74% 

307tt 

68 
95 

128 

lOSg 
11 1« 

135 
I3I4 

S4 

4618 

84 



New-York Central... 
Erie. ................. 

Lake Shore 

Wabash .•... 

North-westem 369i 

Northwestern Preferred.... el's 

Rock Island 108 

Mllwaakseand St Paul.... 30 
Milwaukee md St.;Paai Jfnt. 00 



Lowest. 
102 

1018 

'i' 571a 
:■ 514 
sets 

fiOifl 

102 

39 

69 



'V 



Shares. 

2.495 

, 4,800 

81,300 

. X.050 

200 

1,800 

400 

S.45U 

r\w)o 



LOKDOS, Oct. 17—12:30 P. M.— Consols. 95 9-16 for 
both Bioney and the account. United States bonds, 
18078, lo»i>4; new 5s, 10634. Erie Kuil way Shares, yi-j. 

2 P. M.— Console, 93 7-16 for both money and the ac- 
connt. 

3:30 P. M.— Consols, 95 5-16 for both money and the 
account. The amount of bullion with di-awu from the 
Bunk of BnpiauLi on balance to-day is £7-^,000. 

0:30 V. U.— Paris advices quote 5 ^ cent. Kentea at 
105t 3ai<!C. tor the accouui. 

FKANKFoax, Uct. 17. — United States bonds, new 58, 
lO'/Oa- 

Berlin, Oct. 17 — Eveninjf. — The weekly etatetnent 
of ihe lui penal Uaok of Ueriuauy shows a decrease iu 
specie of l0.7oO,000 marks. 

LiVEHPooL, (oc. 17— X'2:30 p. M. — Cotton — The mar- 
ket la stead.v : MiduiinK Uplands, 5 15-lOd.; Middilnir 
Orleans. 6 i;-16d.; sales, 10,000 bales, iuciudinjj 2,000 
bales lor speculation and export ; receipts, 5 500 bales, 
of which ii. IOO hales were American; Futures quiet ; 
fee sellers l-3i;d. aavance : Lpiauds. Low Miudlini; 
clause, new crop, bhiupud October a. id November, sail. 
6 'J9-32d.i Uplands, Low Altddlinn clause, new crop, 
shipped .November and BecemUfr, ami, 5 29-3.;d,; Up- 
liiuds, Low VlidUling clause, Bhipped Januar.v and Feu- 
ruhry, »all, 6J.; Uplauila, Low oiiddliug clause, No- 
vember and December delivery, S^gJ. Breadstuffs — 
The receipts of wheat for the past three days were 
45,0OO quarters, of which 32,000 quarters were Amer- 
ican. 

2 F. M.— Breadstuffs— The market Is Ann. Wheat, 
lOs. 2d.'a>l0B. 5d. <l> cental lor averaeo Caliloinia 
v\Uito and Ids. 4d.'a/103. 8J. lor Cluii do. Peas. 3'73. 
Cd. 'jp quarter for Canadian. Pruvitioas — Lard, 483, 
9d. ^ cwt. for American. Pork, 778. •J> bbl. for prime 
Mess. Bacon. 4»b. Od ^ cwt. tor Shore Clear .Middles. 
Cotton— Ol the sales to-day 4,5o0 hales were Ameri- 
can. 

4 P. M. — Gotton — Uplands. Low Middling Clause, De- 
cember and January dtlivery. O^gd.; Uplands, Low 
MiddUnK (Clause, January and February dcliver,y, 5'8'i. 

LivBRPooL, uct. 17—5 P. AI. — Cotton— Futures weaic j 
Upl.'iuds, Low .tilddIlD<; olause, UctuOer and .Novumbur 
delivery, 5 '21 -'6'J,iL; Uplands, Low JUiddliug clau»e. 
new ctv^, shipiied October and November, sail 5''gd; 
Uplands, Low iMiJdiiuK clause, November and Decem- 
ber delivery, 6 28-32d.j Uplands, Low Middling clause, 
new^ crop, anippod December and January, sail 
6 i5-16d. Trade "Beport — The market for Yarns and 
Fabrics at Manchester is quiet but Arm. 

LosDO.H, Oct. 17—3 P. M.— Piovisious— Sn?ftr, 24b. 9d. 
'3258. %>' cwL-^br No. I'i Uutch M'.audard on the spot, 
and '25b. 3il.'i^25s. Ud. for >lo., afloat. 

5:.S0 P. M.— Produce- Kefined Petroleum, IS^td. i^ 
aallon. Spirits of Turpentine, 248. ^ cwt 

KveninK— Liu8«eu-oil, ii68. Ua.®278, #■ cwt. 

Havana, Oct, 17.— Spanish Gold. 223ia®22<. 
Exchange weak ; on the llcited States. 6o da.vs, oni- 
renc.v. 3i4C.'a3c., discount ; short sl^^ht, 234C.®^<8a, 
diseoant; on Loudon, 17c. ®18v., premium. 



^Nrw-Iokk, Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1876. 
The receipts of the principal kLiUB or Produce since 
our last have been as toUows: 



2 

2 

101 

467 

.. 7,576 

2U3 

102 

.. 1.578 

.. 7,746 

.- 89,450 

..1S2,7'<1 

15,h7.i 

1.125 



Hops, bales 

HiOfs. No 

Hides, bales. 

Oil, i.bls 

UcBln, bbls 

uil-cak(,'. Dks. 

Pork, plis 

Beef, pks 

Cut meats, pks 

Lard, pks 

Sceailue. pks 

Butti-r. pks 

Cheese, pka. 

10,027 |Ta.low, pks 

46, -73 Laid-oil. bbls 

17,984lRice, pks 

1.395 jBice-chair bago 

1,3J3| lea. LalCchests... 

2-.'4|Tobacco, hlias 

14,354 1 Tobacco, bis. it. cs. 

436 iVblsky, bbls 

7ti5 Wool, bales 

lool 



771 
519 

34 

100 

512 

1,326 

438 

50 
916 
930 

24 

5,528 

5,95;} 

102 

55 
174 

40 

79 

82 
313 
2:;6 
383 



Ashes, pus. 

Bees-wax pks 

Bro..m-corn, ba'^es 

Beans, bbls 

Cotton, bales 

Cooper bbls 

Dried Kruii, pks... 

Hubs, bbls .. 

I'li.ur, bbls 

Wheat, buBbels. 
Corn, huanels... 

Oats, bushels 

five, bushels 

Malt, busliels 

I arU-y. buahela 

Peas, bushels 

Grass-seed, baits... 
Fliix-3?'ed, basjs. . . . 

Coro-uieul. bb's 

Leather, sliles 

liuiid, pijf* 

C riimeal, bags... 
Oat-meal, bbls 

rOKFKE— Has benn held urmly but Inactive to-dry. 

Offerings very 11 bt v\ o quote Invoices thus : hio, 

oidiiiaiy, 16c.<ilo'4e ; fair, iSe.'dlS'^o.; gooJ, ia-jc. 
®1S34C ; p.ime. lOo. telOi^c., )|old. ^y to.. 60 nays' 
credi, ; Rio, in Job lots, 16ix..;.'oi20i3C.. KOld; Santos, 
talrtogood invoices, 17i4C.'al8'<.C., and, in joo lots, 

ordiniu-y to very choice. H5c.^2ui4C Java, Invoices, 

2oc,-»23c.; Muraca1t>o, 16i4C.ai8if.; L.^uavra. IGaje. 
'SiiT^.; .Savanllla, LH'^coDlSo.; Mexican, la^iC'S) 
n^2C.; Ceylon, 16iac.®l8c.; Costa Rica, lG''jC.®i9c., 
and San UomLi^O, In^c'.&Hic, (jold, ^ lb. 

CoTTOS — Ua» been In muOeratc deinaud for early 

deliver^-, and quoted rather wc.ik iu price Ordinary 

quoted ut Oc; Low Middling, lO^gc.'aiOOgC.; Middling, 

lo^scail ]-16c haU'S were offleially reported for 

prompt delivery of 1,084 bales, (of which 607 bales 
Were on last evening,) inuluoanj} 410 bales to shippers, 
824 bales to soinhers, audi 450 bales to soecu- 

lators And for forward dtlivery business 

has been less active .at easier rates 

Sales huve been reported since our ia^t ot 16,4(J0 
bales, oi' which 2,400 bales were on last evening, ana 
14,000 hales lo-daj, with l.OOO bales on the calls, on 
the basis of Middling, witn October options ciosni;; at 
lOVg.; Novemaer, 10 lo-ltiCieiO 31-K2c.; December. 

II 6-32c,®ll 3-16d.: January, llV-a-H 13.32c.: Feb- 
ruary, li ll)-32c.®liV.; -March. 11 25-32c.® 
,11 13-16C.; April. 11 31-3.;c.-2)12c.; May, 12 3-lOe.: 
June. 12 ll-3'2c.®12!>so,: Julv, 12 17-32C.&12 9-16c.; 
Audust, l2S8c.®12 11-16C. ^ lb., Bhowiuz a da- 

clineof i-lOc.'S'iac. 4? Hj, closins; quiet and steady 

The receipts at tbis port to- ay were 7,670 bales, and 
at the shipping ports 20.818 bales, against 24,444 
hales same d^y last week, and thus lar this week 
78,917 bales, against 75,231 bales same t'.me last 

week The receipts at the suippiug ports since tsep^. 

1.1876, have been 560,4o5 bales, against 49J,i.i3 
bales foi the corresponjiug time in the preciling 

Cotton year « onsoiiiiated exports (three da.vs) for 

Great,. Britain, from all shippiatc ports. 2ii. 750 bales ; 

to the Continent, 14,520 oales Stock in .New-Yoik 

to-da.v. 65,082 bales ; consolidated stock at the ports, 
391,181 bales. 

( losing Prices <y Oo'ton in Nein- York. 
New Cotto... 1^.. ..uaa. Alaoauia N O. 



Oroiuary 9 

Strict tii'diu ry.. O'a 
Coed Ordiuar. .. y'-g 
^•'trict (jooU Ord..loi8 

Low Mlddiine 10!^ 

btric . Low jila..l05a 

Mladltiiff 10^8 

Good :UiddliuB...n 1-16 
otrict Good Mid..il 0-16 
Midd.ing Fair. ...11 11-16 
Fair 12 7-16 



Texas. 


9^8 

"•16 



-J y 

9^8 i-i38 

lo'8 10 a-16 10 '3- 
IOHj lOOa 10"^ 

10% JO 'a iv'e 

11 11 1-16 U 1-16 

11 3-16 11 5-io 11 o-lt) 
11 7-16 11 9-16 11 0-16 

11 lo-i(J 11 lo-16 11 15-10 

12 9-16 12 li-i6 12 11-iO 



ins NATAJ^ STOBSa llAHEfiT. 
"WlLUDfOXOH, Oct 17.— Spirits of Turpentine qaiet. 






axjui e>» a»«»tBed. 



stained. 

Good Ordinary 834|Low Middlinp-. 9% 

Strict Goid Ordinary... 9^1 jliddhnt! 10 3-16 

FliOUR AND MKAL — A comparatlvei,y active u:ove- 
ment has been reported in State and Western 
Fiour, I rices of which have generally shown more 
steadioess. The eucoiiraKiuK leature of the buirluess 
has been in resdlar shippiuK grades. City Mill Extras, 
and Medium VVlutor W neat Extras, tor export. The 
home trade call has also been rather more satisfuc- 
torv. in (fooo part for the better class of Minuesoti 
txtras, especially of Patent Sales have been re- 
ported Biuce our last (if 21.900 bbls. ot all grades, 
iucludin); unsound rlour at $3 25S'$5 50. CLiedv Ex- 
tras, ut iS4 25teit4 76 ; ver.y poor to lahcy N'o. 2 at $3® 
$4 25, tt'ostly at %Z 5u®i'4 ; poor to very choice Super- 
hue Western, $4 35©$5, mostly at iSl 6U®$4 75 ; 
poor to good Extra sitate $5 i0'<z>$5 25, mo8tl.y ai 
$5 20®.r.) 'it; good to strictly choice do. at $5 25® 
$5 60; Cit.v Mills Extras, shiopiug grades, $5 \.o'a> 
$o 25, mainly at $6 10-d)$6 26 lor the West Inilies 
and $5 25 asked forStaudaid brands for the Kng;li8u 
trade: interior to ifood shippina txtra Westarii. 
$5 lOS^o 25. chiefly at $5 25 for lines ; good to very 
choice do., $5 2o®.-ji5 60; round-hoop Ohio shipping 
at $5 05'a>$j 60 ; good to very choice Western tra4iM 
and l'amii,v Extras. Spring Wheat stock. $5 60® 
$7 65; very poor to Very choice do. do., of Ked and 
Amber VV inter Wheat stocit. at $5 6oa'$7 65 ; ordl- 
nary.to very choice White Wheat.do. do. ,$5 Tuc-^SSO; 
poor to vety choice Sl. Louis KxtriP, $j 7i3®j^8 25; 
txtra Genesee at $5 60®4>6 75 ; poor to fancy .Minne- 
sota straiubt Kxtra#. Jiij bOd/il 'ib, chiefly at £6 40® 
$7 2!> ; Minnesota Patent fcixtras, inferior to very 

laucy, at leU 85a'$9 60, mainly ut $7 5(ia/$s 50 

Included in the sales have beeu 9,700 bbls shipping 
KxLraa, (of wulch 6,400 obis. City iiills.) 1.960 bbls. 
Minnesota Btiaight Kxtras, 1,100 bbls. do. Patent do.. 
2,100 bbls. Winter Wheat Kxtras, (for shipment, these 
luaiulyi at $5 6.~;®$6 20,1 675 hbU. Superline, ij^O 
bills. No. 2, and 350 bols. Sour Extras at 

quoted rates A moderate trade has beeu 

noted in (Southern Flour at aOout lormiT rates 

Sales have been reported here of l,4.'>o bbls. at $4 35 
®i5 lor very poor to faucy Siiperhue; $5 10®. 6 20 
for poor to very choicu shipping Kxtras; 
$6 25®$8 50 for fair to very cboice trade 

and family Kje Flour has been without 

iurther clianges of moment as to values. The 
business has beeu moderate <ind mostl,y in the better 
qualities of Superflne, chiefly ot State and Pennsylva- 
nia product We quote at from $4 40®$5 10 for 

poor Western to fancy state buuerflue, aud $2 00® 

$3 50 for poor to clioice flue .sales 32o bbls.. iii 

lots, mainly at $4 76 a$5 lor fair to choice Superflne, 
aud$J lU tor tauc; State, the latter au extreme 

Corn-meal has beeu iuoderatel,v sought after at steady 

rates We quote at $2 lU'wifS lo, for ordlnai-v to 

choice Yellow Western; $2 7oai$3 iO for 
Yellow Jersey, and !r3 25®*3 30 for Brandy- 
wine, hales have beeu reported of 050 bbls,, 
ot which 400 bbls. of Bram,ywine. aud 450 
bbls. Yellow 'Western at the quoted rates. 

Corn-meal, In bates, bas been rather less active, 

with sales reported of auout 2,300 bags, withiu the 
range of 95c.®afl 35 for ordinary to yer.v oiioice ■#>' 

loo lb .Most of the saics bive be n of coaroo lots at 

ySc. for Baltiiuore and$l 06 for City iuillcoar.-e 

uat-meal has been Belling. In lots, to meet the urgent 
wants chiefly ot the locai trade, within the range of 

$5 2o®4>6 aO Buckwue.it Flour has beeu iu hiod- 

erato demand witniu tiiu raugu of a^3 25®$3 75 tor 
fair to choice nev* State, and $1 for very fancv. 

Q3A1M— A livelier business was reported in Wheat 
to-day, largely in the better qualities of Winter, and 
chiefly for export, at f^eneraily flrmer prices, the ad- 
vance of Spring grades having beeu ouoled about Ic. 
a bushel, ciosing strong, luflueneed In uail by the re- 
ports and rumors as to tbeprospei^tsof war in Europe. 
....Sales have beeu reported to-day of 210.000 bush- 
els, including new No. 1 White Michigan at 
$1 31; prime new White Toledo at $1 30; new 
VV'hIte State, about prime, at $1 28; new Amber 
Western, good to very choice, at $1 26ii$l 30. chiefly 
prime to ver.y cboice ; Amber ^ui^souri and Mieuli;au at 
$i ;i8®$l 30, of which 8.000 onshcls .^mber Missouii. 
to arrive, at $i 30; new Amber State. lair to very 
Cboice, atSl 25®$1 30, of whuh 5,000 oushels at the 
latter rate; new Bed Western, partly In lots, at $1. 20 
®$1 25; old Hed Toledo, in store, at $1 22; fair new 
No. 2 idilwaukeeSpring ut $1. 24; fair to prime new 
No. 2 Chicago do. at $1 21a;£l 23, of wbieh about 
30,000 busuels prime, for export, at $1 23; old No. 1 
.riiiwaukee do., l-..',tOO bUbUels, iu store, at<$132; 
old So. 1 .Viiuuesota do., lu store, lo.ouo 
busheJs, at $1 25; old i>o. 2 .iiilwau^ee 
do., iu store, 8,000 bushels, at $1 20: uew 
No 3 Chicaso do. at $1 17; J<ew-5tork No. 2 do., 16,Ji 
bushels, ut £1 21 ; New-York Nos. 2 aud 3 uu. at $1 16; 
New .So. 3 Milwaukee do., 10,000 buthjis. at $1 21; 

ungraded Spring, in lots, at $1 10®$1 21 Corn has 

beeu in moderately active request, chleajr tor export, 
but at u tnflu lower prices. TUo flrojur range ot ocean 
Grain F'reigQis worked against the outward movement. 

Sales nave beeu reported sluue our last of 15o,UO0 

busnels, lucludea ungraded sailing vessel Mixed 
U e&terii, fair to pritue. at 57e.'2i57'<jc.. ..float, chiefly 
at 07 ^c aal ^zG.; Kansas do., at 08c.: uuuradea steamer 
Mixed do., 67c.®57i4e.; New-York No. 1 at 68c.; New- 
YorK Mixed, 57iec.; New-York s earner Mixed, at 57c.; 

NtW-Yort Ye.low at.oOc; Nesv-Yorn steamer do., at. 
67^30.; Western Yellow, at 57'-jc.®i|9c.; warm Coru, in 

lots, within ihe range of 54c.®56c And lor forward 

deiivery, prune sailing vessel Mixed v\ est- 
eru tor Octooer quoted nominally at 57 "-.iC. 

'itaSc, - without trausactio.iS Ijaies were also 

reported ot 60,000 bushels prime saiiiug 
MlTed Western, Philadelphia uedvery, freo onboara, 

al o7c tiye has beeu held finuly. IncluUiug prime 

Stale, at 90c.; new Western at 72c.® 76c , on moderate 
otferlu^s. Out haa«beeu without uotaole auuuatiou. 
About 3.200 bU'^heU new Wosteru sold, lu lots, at 

72i2C.®74c barle.v baa been iu moder.ito request 

as a rule, with othT thin Canada product quoted 
rather heavy; ordinary to stricllj' choice Canada 
quoted at 9oc.®$l 20; good to ver,v choice sli-rowo J 
biate at 85c.®90c. bales. l.OoO bushes six- 
rowud State (Lake Shore) ut Hoc; and 
2,500 bushels No. 2 Cliicasfo ut 9Uc. 
Bailey Halt has beeu firm aud wanted, particularly 
prime to choice Canada West, wliich bas been quoted 

at $1 26®4>1 30, cash aud time Canada Peas, in 

bond, have beeu in lequesl for export, with 93c. re- 
ported as freely bid, and up to 95o. asked, f ales were 
reported of 6,000 bushels, in bond, at 93c.®i)4c. %> 
huabel ; also, a lot 01 1,000 buslie,8, freu, sold ut i^l Ucj 
^ bushel.... Luckwneat has beeu thus lar very uihi- 
cult to market : .--.tnte is quoiert nonjiually at 8tJc.a< 

fc5c., but as yet attracts little atteucion Oats have 

shown' less activity, with prices ruling weaker and 
lower for other than pnme. lots, afloat, which latter 
were offered with less i'rcedom, and were in ;:ooii re- 

Quest lor local traoe purposes Sales reported <it 

45.000 iiushcls, luuludiug new vvhiie Western, la lots, 
at 32c.®40c.. us to quality at 34c.®40c.; new Wliito 
state at 44c.®49c , chicfl.v at . 4tJc/a48c.; uew 
.Mixed Western at 2S'2C.'5 44'-jC., mosil.y at 30e.®3Sc.; 
New-York No. 2 While at 41e.; New-York No. 2 at 37c. 
®38c.; New-Vork No. 3 White at 36c.; New-Yor.i No. 3 
Ht 3Hc. ©33^40.; New-York rejected at 3:ic.. new .Mixed 

Utate. 4"^e.to47H;C. for poor io very enoico liay. 

Straw, and Feed essentially as last quoted ut Tim- 

ofny-seed further saloa were repnrteu heio 01 260 oa<;b, 
f(ir ex ort, at $2 20; a.id. recently, of about 1,200 
baga, fiee on board, at BiUituore, at .'£2 15'u$2 2(1 ^ 
husbel- Of Calcutta Liiiseeu &ules were made 01 0,500 
bass, from store, at $i 85, goU ; cU^Biug held at 

$1 9i!— au aivancc Other seeds uhouc as lust 

quoted. 

MILK— The contract price paid to dairymen for a 
sup|) ,y of .viilk for October Is 4e. # quart, tue receiver 
paving the railroad treijjht, which is li-jc. ^ quart. 
Sales were made al tha raiiroad depots to-day al the 
rateof *2'»Sa 50 ^ can, 

N'aVaL sTuKKS—Kesin has been again quoted flrm- 
er, with a good demand noted tor supplies vve quote 

at $1 9o®.'t2 lor Strained, $2®,'SJ 05 for good 8tr..iued, 
$2 15®*2 25 for No, 2, $2 36®«3 76 for No. 1. $4 2.. 
■aiSfor Pale to extra Pale aud Window Glass ^ 2oO lb. 
Sales, 200 bbls. good Straiued, at $2. aud 1,300 bbls. 

good Strained to Pale-.Ri$2a$4 #^ 280 &i Keeent 

oeahnfM in Tar have been on a limited scale, but priees 

have been quoted stead.y at $2 12Hi'a)«2 371^ litch 

Rtdi2u*2 1213 ^ bol ^spinls Turpentine hfia beeu 

in more urgent demand, with merchantable, fir 
prompt delivery, quoted ut the close up t^ 3i;c. ^ gul- 
lou. .sah'B 19ii bbls at 35iae ®36c. lor miirchantaule. 
OILS— Wuale and Sperm have attracted more altoo- 
tioii, es.ieciiiUy the latter, puces of wnJch have beeu 
quoted much etrouser. Liujeed, Cottou-seed, Olive, 
Parafliuo, Lubricating, and Cocoa nut Oils have aUo 
been n:ore soi.gbt alter aud held wiih moie flrmness. 
Lard, Tallow. Ked. and 31enhadeu uils have beeu in 
quite mod. rate ri quest and somewhat irr^gu'er ss to 
values. Most other kiudn ouiet aud otherwise wlth<|'.t 
important cbanges. We quote 1 C'ruda Wbitle, tfJcHj) 
OOc; Unbleached Whale, 0'Jiac-®65c.; Bleached do., 
02''jC.®67'-,jc:_Crtide Sperm, £1 40; Unbleached 



bperm, $1 60; Bleached apetm. $1 65 ; Lard-oii, 82 4.0. 
'»95c. for prime; 07'2C.®75c, for No. 1, aud 00e.®65c. 
for Ho. 2; Hed-oil, 65o.®67'sc: Saponlfled do., 57130.® 
60c.: Llnsetd-oil, 54c.®6oc., iu cks, aud bbls.; Olive- 
oil. $1 25<^$1 35, In Cks. and bbls.; Menhaden, 3&c.® 
40c.; Bleached do., 43c.®45b.: Crude Coiton-seed, 34o. 

_ _ 13400.: Eeflned Yellow da. 47('.ao3c.; White do., 

Ter.aiuewJ e2iac'965o.: Parafflae, S0o.®32i-jo.; Palm-oil, fi^o.'a 
f 0.1 Aeslapoli. 16c.9lt6eit Tallow-eU..72iai).980e.iCeiU 



55c®65c.; Neatsfoot, 80c.®$l 10; Cocoa-BUt. IOI4C. 
®1234e.; Tanuers-oil, 37c.®40c ; Lubricatiiig-oll, 
22i3C.®37i^c. " ' 

PKTKOLKUM— Holders are yet quite firm in their 
Tlesvs us to prices, general l.y refusing to recede from 
extreme asking llgures. and making no show of ur- 
gency in their ofl'ijrlugs of stock, which are generally 
very moderate. The -iemand, bowover. is quite lim- 
ited, buyers purchasing only to meet pressing wants, 

and paying asking rates with much reluctance 

Cnide has beeu voiy inodpr,«tciv sought alter; quoted 
at 13ivc., in bulk, and \T^2C.. in shipping order Re- 
fined h.iB been without niueh show of auimaifiu, but 
has been generally quoted llrni at 26c.. irom rcflneis. 

and 25c.. on resales of contracts Beflned, incases, 

has beeu selling to a very moderate extent, but lias 

btonquoted at 3oc. a'31c. lor standard Napbtbaat 

14c Ati'hlludelphia, KehuedPcti oleum, lor esriy de- 
livery, quoted at 20c At Baltimore, for early deliv- 
ery, at 20c. 

PKOVISIONS-Moss Pork ha=i oeen less active for 
early delivery at somewhat easierprices Sales re- 
ported since oUr last, for o,;rly delivery. 280 bbls. 
WwSiern Mess, for shipment, at $16 70®$16 75, 

eliding at $10 70 OtUer kinds quiet; 5.> bbls. 

cuo.^o Western Prime .Vlens sold at $10 And for lor 

v.ar.i deliveiy Western Mess has been in q_ite mod- 
el. Ki^dem^ina: quoted for October, iiomiual; i,ovem 
bii 510; seller the remainder 01 tlie year at V-5 t»5® 
*TJ 75; teller January al $15 65 t$lo 75. S^leg 60O 

bo 3., seller November, at $16 bressed 

lioi^ have been in moilerate demand, and quuted 

steady, *ith Citv quoted at 7'ec.'a;S'\iC 

(ut-meuts continue in fair request at unchani.:cd 
figures — !,aieg include 8.000 th. Pickied Bellies, in 
bulk, 12 It., at lie, ami suudrv small lots ol Citv 

bulk wituin.our rang"- We quote: City Pickled 

Shoulders, In bult, at 7°ec.®7''4C.; Pickled Bams at 
12i2<;.®13i4C.; .siuoked Shoulders al 9c.; smoked 

Hams at 1412C ®15c.; fresh Bellies at 9c Bacon has 

been quiet tor early delivery, but quoted somewhat 

steadier t^ong Clear quoted hero at OUco-ai-jc. 

Kales, 100 bx3. Ciiy Long Clesr, for November, on 

private terms Aud, for Western deliverv. Long 

and short Clear, for December, quoted at 7''flC.@8c 

Sales. 250 b.ts. Long and Short clear I'hicago delivery, 
prompt, at Si^c, aud 500 bxs, Decenioei, at 778"---. 
VVesieru Steam Lard has been In moderale demand lor 

early delivery, and quoied firmer cf Western Steam. 

f<ir early delivery here, sales reported of 360 tea. 
prime old at $10 'il ^/a)$\{i 40, closing at $10 37 1-2. 
asked; 300 tcs. n(?w. mostly to arrive, at $10 lo® 

$10 25; and liJO tes. off grade at $10 25 

Andfor forward delivery. Western Steam was uilfj 
freely dealt in; qufitcd at thti close, for Ociobe., 
$io 35; Novemuei at $9 90; January al $9 77 "-i; 
seller the remainder ot tbe year at .$9 7 5® $9 77I3; 
aud 1,000 tcs. do. at *9 7 2 "2; and February at $y 80. 

Sales have been repoi ted of Western .S team to the 

amimutof 500 tcs., October options, at $10 35; 500 
tcs.. NoTember, at 5=0 9 ': 600 tcs., seller tlie remain- 
der 01 the year, at $9 77J-j; aud 3.750 tcs., selierJau- 
uary, al$.; 75S$0 80. ...City Steam and nettk- lu 
Qioaerate demand, and quoted at $10 26 ; sales, 15,) 
tcs. ...And .So. 1 ut$10; sales, 80 tcs....Rffiued LarJ 
has beeu in more request : quoted for the Continent on 
the spot at $li> 75 ; October option at $10 75 ; Novem- 
ber al$10 3712; December aud January at $10 2i>, 

and the West Indies at $10®lO 25 Sales 100 tcs. 

for tlie Continent at $10 75 ; 275 tcs. 00.. Novcmbi r, 
ut$i0 37ii!; 500 tcs. do., Januaiy, 81*10 25; 100 
tcs. for tbe West Indies at $10 ; and 150 tcs. for Soufh 

Amorica at $11 25 Beet has beeu la lair request, 

in tlie j luoiug Hue at essentially unchongeu quota- 
tions We quote barrel Beef at $10a$ll for Kitra 

iless, $8®$10 for Plain Mesa, and il-J®*13 5o for 

Packet. ^ bbl. ; sales, — bblS Tierce Beef quoted 

thus : Prime Mess nominal ; India Mess nomiual : Cit^ 
hxtra India Mess, $24®$26 ; PhliadeiphiB at $22® 

$24: sales, IOO tcs Beef Uams continue iu 

moderate deman I. with choice Westcru here 

quoted at $20; sales, 25 bbls Buttei, 

Cheese, aud Eggs about as quoied in out last 

Tallow has been rather quiet at about former 
piices; sales, OJ.OOO.tb. good to prime at 8'<2C.®S''8C. 

Stearino has been iu quite moderate request with 

Western, in tcs., quoted at $11; sales, 50 tcs. atiiill, 
and 100 tcs., November delivery, at $10 75 Of Ran- 
goon Rice, in bond, sales have beeu reported of 2,000 
bags at $3 057^t»lu. a decided advance 

SALT— Ihe inquiry for supplies, even in the Jobbing 
way, has been recently moderate, aud prices nave 
shonn rather less flrmness, with Liveruool Ground 
quoted at SOCoOUc; Liverpool Fine at;$i 15a$2 60, 
Lorn store; Turk's Island, iu bulk, 2Uc.'2i>30o.; St. 
^urtin's. 20c.®j;0j. 

SALTPK IKE — Continues inactive Crude quoted 

nominal at 4"8U.®5c., gold. |> tt> 

SUAP— The general moyeiuL>nina3 oeen comparative- 
ly slow al unchanged prices.. L.eastile quoted at S^ac. 
'aiS'^tjC., gold; Colgate's Family, 8c., currency, aud 
Sterling and otiier brauds at proportionate flgures, 
less Usual (iiscount. 

STAtiCU — Has been iu moderate request, with Pota- 
to quoted at 4 I4C. a 4 i-.iC. ; Western Corn, 3i2e.®4itiC. 

sUGAbi — Kaw have been firm but have been nn- 

usually quiet tu-day We quote : Fair iteflning Cuba 

at 8^82-; good do., yisc; pniue do., 914C.; fair to ver.y 
Choice Grocer.,-, 9''6c. "lOc; No. 12 Clayed at 9 V-® 
y'-2C.; Ceutiifuaal stock at a'^scSlOigc.; Manila bans, 
77eP.®8"4C.; MoiBsses Susar, 7^4C.®S34C ; Melado,,5i4C. 

®7i4C Keflned Sugars have been moderately dealt 

in, with Crushed quoted at lligc.; Powdered, lie; 
Granulated at lie; Cut Loaf at III4C.; Hard Loaf at 
I414C.; Soft White, 1038C.®10'bO., and do. Yellow. 

9=%C.@10l4C. 

SUM.AC — Idas been recently in rather slack demand, 
with .><iuily quoted at fiom $60S>$L22 50 for Inferior 

to very cboice. afloat and trom store, aud Virginia at 
from ^tjOS'iSoo. 

ToiiACiO— Has been -in belter request on 
the b;isi8 01 the rCcQutl.y moJitieJ prices. Tue move- 
ments iu .'<eed Leal' have been most sailsfactofy. 
Mauutactured stock has been moderately sought atter. 

.-jalea iocluac 30o hbds. Kentucky Leat, Oe.®16c.; 

100 cases Seed Leaf sundry lots. 7c.®.jOc.; 62 cases 
1872 and 1873 crops Ntw-hugland, 8iuc.; 42 cafcs 
ls74 crop do., 5ii!C; 668 cases ia74 crop PenusY'l- 
yaoia on private terms ; 302 cases 1874 and la75 
ciops Ohio, b^«c.®7c.; 30 cases do. Wisconsin on 
Drivate terms; 36 cases do. New-iork, 684'.; 140 
cases 1875 crop New-Kugland on private terms; 500 
cases 1875 eroo .New-Yuric ou private terms ; i>8 cases 

l876crop Wisconsin, 4 I4C.; 300 bales Havana, 8sc.® 
$1 15. 

WHALEBONE- Has beeu held firmly, with Arctic 
quoted at $2 20, curreocy ; North-west at $2, cur- 
rency, ^ Bj.. but has been quiet 

WHISKY— Advanced to $1 Uig; sales 100 bbls Al- 
cohol quoted at $2 11. free. 

WOOL — Values on nearly all grades of domestic show 
declced firmness, the offerings being comparative light, 
and the demaud, oarticularly lor manufacturing pur. 
poses, quoted aciive. Foreign product is aiso offered 
witn reservo and quoted steady lo price, but without 
much show 01 animation ai tbe moment. Desirable Iocs 
of JOreign clothing stock are reporiel as being par- 
ticularly scarce iu this market Sales 'have been re- 
ported since our last of 20,000 lb. XX Ohio fleece at 
45c.: 13 bags California Fall, scoured, reported at 19c.; 
SO.UOO te. Ohio Deiamo at 47c.; 6,000 tB. CalUornla 
Lambs' pulled at 22c.; 3,000 Us. Oregon at 27c.; 4,000 
tS. Caliturnia pulled at 19c.; 53 bales and ^ 9,000 lb. 
Calilurnia Spring at 23c.®2»c.; 52,600 ID. Texas at llic. 
® 25c., and 15,00J 0}. Domestic Noils on private terms. 

FtthlGH'fS — iioom OD berth ana tounage of a desira- 
ble class available for chartering purposes are offered 
quite moderalclv. and ship-owners show decidedly 
more confldence, with berth rates quoted 8tron;^er. 
11 e demaud for accoinmo iation ia mure active for 
Grain, lair for Provliiona, Flour, Seed, Apples. Resin, 
Tobacco, and Cotton, but lu most otber lines compara- 
lively tame at tlie moment. II10 high p ices claimed 
for Petroleum supplies mark decidedly the ex- 

Eort movement iu this trade specialty For 
Iverpool the engagements repirted tince 
our last Include. by sail, 10 oOO busbels 
Cr,iin at 8d |> oushol; 100 bales Cot on at 9-32il. f 
nSi 200 to. ^8 (111 Cake at 228. 6d. ^ ton ; 20 hlids. 
Tobacco at 35s., and 40.000 bu.ihels urain at os. od. 
^ qaarter: «nd, by steam. 1.100 bales Cotton, (part 
ihiough freight.) at W-'ii.iL'ai'^i. 4t«- Cj , 32.000 
bushels Giain at b^. ^ bush.-l ; 113 
hlids. Tobacco at 458.. and 1,3U0 pi;s. 
Provisfms. in lots. on the basis of oos. 
for Bacon aud Lard; also an Austrian bark, 1,205 tons, 
placed on tbe bertu hence for general cargo, a British 
ship, 1,070 tou3, vrith Cotio.i, from Savannah, at lud. ^ 
Bj., and a ship, 1.287 tons, with Wheat, from San Fran- 
cisco, (reported as chartered tiiere,) at 60a, with op. 

tion of H.ivre For Loudon, by sail, 1.000 bbls. F'lour 

at 2s. ^i*'' bbl.; 750 bbls. Besiu at 2s. 6d. f 280 
Hs., and, by steam; 44.000 bushels Grain at 
8d. ^standard bushel; 6 bales Hops at 3^4. ^ tb.; 
also a . orwegian bark, 497 tons, hence, with Oil-cake, 
at 2 :s.^ ton; and a British brig, 214 tons, hence, 
with equal to about 1,000 bbls. Petroleum ut 63.^ 
bbl.; aud Slate, to complete cargo, reported at 

2.>s. ^p ton For Glasgow, by sail. 600 bbls. 

Flour at 2s. Od.; and, 1>v steam, l,oOO 
Vols, do., at 3s. 3d; 1,800 biils, Apples 
at 4s. ^ bbl.: 16,000 bushels Grain at 8 M. #• bushel ; 

and 60 hbds. Tallow at 363. #■ ton For Bristol, by 

eteatn. 40,000 busiiols Graiu. on private terms; also, 
an Amejioan bark, 461 tons, hence, with nbout 3.000 

quarieis Oralu at 6a. 6d. ■jp'quarler For Hull, by 

rieam. 250 bxi^. Bacon at o5b. 4^ ton For Cork, a 

Norwegian bark, 669 tons, bence, witb about 3,800 
quarters Gram at 5s. 6d.. (with option of 

Waterlord, Belfast, or Dabllu.) For C»rk 

and orders, un Italian bnrk, 5(:0 tons, 
hence, with about 3.611O quarters (Jrain at 68; and 
another, with alfiiit 3,500 quarters do., from Pniladel- 

phi», at 08. 1 lad. ^ quarter For Havre, au American 

lark, 633 tons, with about 3,600 bbls. Petroleum, 
from Baltimore, at 5s. (with option of Dunkirk at tbe 

same rate, or Antwerp at 5s. id.) ^ bbl.; also aBiltisli 
bark, about 500 tous, with (Cotton, from 
N'on'olk, reported at 40s. <P' ton, reg- 
ister For Cop'uhagen, a Swedish bark. 

376 tons, hence, wth about 2,200 qii.irters Grain, at 

Oa. 6tL <p Quarter For the .Medite,ranean, a British 

brig. 332 tons, witn about 2.O0O bbl3. iteflned Petro- 
leum, from Phiiadelphia, at 5s.3d. ^ libl For Alexan- 
dria, an Austrian bark, 342 tons, hence, with about 

10,000 cases Kefiued Petroleum, at 29c. ^ case For 

Ilohart 'lowu. Dune iin, or Sydney, two brigs, 167 and 
162 tous, hence, with gsnerai cargo, on private tcnns. 

For Pernnmiiueo, a British brig, 206 tone, heuco, 

with Flour, reported at a>l 10 # bbL 



TEE LIFE STOCK MARKETS. 





Buffalo, Oct. 17.— The Cattle receipts to-day 

were 2.737 he.id. making the tola! number received 
tliia week 7.303 head, asainst 8,585 ticad for the 
same time last week. The market is dull aud de- 
prei^sed. with a fall of from 140.^^40. as compared with 
last vteek's quotations for the best shipping gradfs, 
and I4C. ott'ou ail ori.er lots. The quality oflering Is 
fair to good, wilh a tew lots of scalawag stuflf. The 
attendance of liaslern purchasers was slim, only 33 of 
12 j cars disposed of beiu lor Kastem marketa tales 
of native Meers wore made at $4 10, $4 25, $4 5o, 
and $j 10; of Cows and Heifers at $3 15 and 
$3 8(1; of Stoeker< at $3 15®.t3 65. No 
'J uias or Cherokees vvero diaoosedol; fe.T offering. 
Of sheep and Lambs the receipts to-da.y vyere 4.800 
head, making tb'! total su:,ply for tho'week 10.200 
head, against S.SOOhead for the same timo last week. 
The market ruled active and lower, with a decreasa 
of ifli;. on Westcru Sheep, and i«e.®i4C. on i ana;i» 
stocn, as compared with I ist week's prices. The East- 
ern deiuiind was ;;oo,l. witb transactions reported ot 
34 Cars Western Sbeep, 6 ears of Canadian Lambs, 
and o cars of feeJi;is : sil s. Western sheep, f nr to 
beti, . at $4 9U'ii,+5 ; medium grade lots at S!4 02i9,'i> 
$-t 80. and a few lo;3 01' jjoor to medium, at 
$-1 25a>.-ii4 85: Feeders. averaging 86' lb., 
at $4 40; 91 lb., at $5 i;25. Canadian Lamos 
.It $5 75®$6; Ci.nadiiii fheeu at .$5. 
Of Hogs tbe receipts To-day were 0,600 head, making 
the total supply ihis week 1 7 300 head, a;iaiu8t 1 5.2(0 
head for tno samo time last wee». Tho market is 
aciive, prices are weak, and the sup.l.v Is largely iu 
e.\.ce8s of the dem;ind. Fud 100 cars wore disposed 
of. Quotations: Yorkers, $5 fiOair.i 75 fir lair to 
good, aud a tew lots ol light. $5 SOSia 40; heavy 
Hogs, $5 lo'W^o 96; selected singeis, $6 lOO'.fO 15. 
.Aiiout thirt.y o^rs remain uusold, mostly of fair quality 
and light grades. 

Chicago, Oct. 17— Cattle— Keceipt?, 1,300 head; 
shipments. 100 head ; market dull and nearly nomi- 
ual ; Blockers and Feeders, $3 20<i$3 75 for fair 
light: closed dull and droopmg. Hogs— Ueceipts. 12.- 
000 bead ; shfpmeats. 2,700 head; market dull; 5o.^ 
l(>c. lower, closiuit rather moru active, but weak ; 
common rough heavy to ll?ht Bacou, $5 5()®,$5 75 ; 
tair to good, $5 30®$6 ; choice he.ivy smooth, $3 10® 
$6 15. Sheep — Receipts, 640 he^l; market uemand 
good for fat, but few offering, closing strong; sales at 
$4 60</$4 87^2. 

"Watebtown, Mass.. Oct. 17.— Cattle— Receipts, 
1,815 head : nest sold off orirly at full prices, but slim 
lots at i8C.®i4e. lower; Choice. $7 6oS$7 75: Extra, 
$7<»S7 25; first quality, $6®$6 76 ; second, $5* 
Sd 75 ; tbira. ;;4®$4 75. Sheep and Lambs— Receipts, 
9.356 bead; prices 1 an on best lots igc. off, while oa- 
ordinary flocks the redaction is %c. to Ic; trade slow ^, 
,:^tkdacU&ei SAles la. lota at j^ 60932. and sa 60^^ 



ss>»^iib:i 



$3 : Extras, $3 25®$4, or ftom 3o.®5iac ^1b. 
Lambs at 4 I3C, a 5 "ac. i^ B. 



Spring 



East Liubrty. Peqn., Oct. 17.— Cattle— Eeceipts 
to-day 55 cars or 935 head, all for sale here ; supply 
good, with a lair demand and sellfng; briskly ; qunltty 
cenerall.v common to medium, but many good to extra 
yet on hand ; best held at $5 25 ; medium to good at 
$4 602$4 75: common to fair at $4®$4 25. Hogs— 
Receipts to day 2,585 head : Yorkers held at $5 80® 
$6 ; Philadelphias at $6 35®$6 56. Sheep- Receipts 
to-dav 3,000 head ; selling at $3 50®$5. 



THE STATE OF TRADE. 



Chicago, Oct. 17.— Flour steady and firm. Wheat 
strong aud higher, closing easier: No. 2 Chicago 
Soring. .*! 0914, cash; $1 093*. November; $1 11, 
December; No. 3 Chicago Spring. 95c. ®$1 OII4: re- 
jected, H;^c.®89p. Com fairly active aud a shade 
hisher; 42i2C.,caeh; 4234c., November. OutsduUaud 
lower at 3158c. ail round. Rye steady and uncbanged. 
Barley stronir and higher at B3c., cash; 89c.. Novem- 
Oer. Pork unsettled, but generally higher for 
options: $15 75 for new; $16 25 for old. cash; 
$15 90®$15 95, October; $14 05®$114 97I9 all 
the year. Lar.l in vood demand aiid a shade 
higher; $9 75 for new: $10 50 for old, cash ; $9 30® 
$9 40 Novemaer; $9 30®$9 32i2all the Rear. BulU- 
nieais dull aud a shade lower ; Shoulders./O^.; Shoit 
Rib Middles, S^ac; Snort Clear MiJdlea<^S3.c. Whisky, 
$1 10. Freights advancing; VVheatr to Bufialo 5c ; 
t oru to Buflalo i'^e. Receipts— Hovr. 14,0U0 bbl».; 
Wheat, 148,000 bushels; Corn, 219.000 bushels; 
Oats. 70,000 bushels ; Rye, 14,000 ftushels; Barley. 
73,000 bushels. Shipments- Flour. 15,000 bbls.; 
Wheat, 111,000 busuels; Coru, 185.000 busbeU; 
Oats, oO,(»(.{) bushels; Bye, 39,000 bushels; Barley, 
53,000 bu.hels. At the afteruoop call ot the boarti : 
Wheat strong and higher, $1 \.\^ November; $1 123*, 
December. Corn flrmer; 43c. ®4Hi80., cash ; 43^e.. 
November. Oats higher ; 3'/i4C., cash ; 323gc., Decem- 
ber. Pork higher; $15 95. October; $16 02 ig® 
$15 05. all the year. Lara higher at $9 35. 

Buffalo, Got. 17.— Lake Eeceint.s— Floar. 3.350 
bbiB.; torn. 118,413 bushels; Wheat, 76 oOO bushels; 
Barley. l-.;,000 bushels. Railroad Receipts— Flour, 
3,300 bbi.s.: Corn. 13,000 bushels; Wheat. 7,000 
bushels : Oats, 14 000 busbels : Rye, 2.000 bushels. 
Shipments by C.anal to Tide-water-iCorn, 74,798 bash- 
e's; Wheat. 102,050 bushels ; Barley, 16.850 bu-ihela. 
Interior Poiuts— Corn, 7,900 busbeU; Barley, 9,500 
biishelR. Railroad Shipments— Flour, 6.300 bbls.; 
Corn. 18,500 bushels; Wheat, 7,200 bugheiB ; Oats, 
12,600 bushels; itye, 2.000 bushe.s. Flour quiet, ua- 
changed ; sales of 750 bbls. Wheat only in miliiug 
demand; sales of 9 cars if No. 1 White at $1 27 <* 
$1 28; 3 cars of do. al $1 23®$1 25; 5,000 bushels 
of Green Bay Club on private terms. Corn dull ; sales 
to millers ot cars ot No. 2 High Mixed at 52c.®:'>2i2C.; 
2,500 bushels of No. 2 at 5'.^c.; 900 bushels Toledo 
Low i\;ixed at 52c,; 8,o00 bushels samole atSOc 
quoted; No. 2 held strong at 61i2C.®52c. 
(.tats dUil ; sales of 2 cars uhio, on track, at 38c.; 
quoted at 36c. ®39c. Bye reglected. Barley in light 
inquiry ; sales of 1 car two-rowed .'-tHte at 81c.; i car 
ef I'our-roned .State at OOc: 500 bushei* Canada at 
95c. Malt iu fair trade inquiry; prices unehanged. 
Pork aud Lard dull and unchanged. Highwincs iu 
fail demand; prices unchanged; aaies of 120 bblB. 
Seeds — Nothing doing; quotations unchanged. Canal 
Freights firm, unchaugeo. 

St. Louis, Oc. 17. — Flonr qniet and unchanged. 
Wheat belter; No. 2 F"all, $f 22, cash and all the 
year; No. 3 do.. $1 11>2. Corn lower; 40I4C. bid, 
cash and November. Oats lower; White, oa traci;, 
32ii.c. Rye (julet at 58c.®58i<jc. Barley dull and un- 
ohanjjed. V\ hisky quiet at $1 10. Porkdull; lobbing 
at $17. Lard ouiet ; current make, lOcSlOigc. 
Dr,y-B.ilted Meats— Packed lots of new Meat, 
Shoulders, 7i«e.; Clear Rib sides. 8340.; Clear Sides, 
9c. Bacin lower; shoulders, 7 lac® 7 34c.; Clear Rib 
fides. 9'4C.®938C.; Clear Sides, 9120- Hogs lower: 
light shlpyiing and Yorkers, $6 4o»$o 60; Bacon, 
$5 50®*5 60 ; butchers'; $5 70®$5 80. Cattle qoiet 
and unchanged: little doing. Receipts— Flonr, 4,000 
bbiB; Wheat, 48.000 bushels; Corn. .6 000 bushels ; 
Oats. 25.000 bushels; Ryo. 2.000 btuheU : Barley, 
28.000 bushels; Hogs, 700 head ; Cattle. 670 head. 

ClKCiN.vATl. Oct. 17. — Flour Steady and nncbanged' 
Wheat firm ; Red, $1 10®$1 20. Corn steady and un- 
changed. Oats dull at 30c.®37o. Rye dull and droop- 
ing at 66c.®68c. Bailey in fair demand and firm for 
prime to cboice Fall at $1 ]0®$1 15; other qualities 
dull. Pork dull and drooping at $17®$17 25. Lard in 
good demand; steam rendered, 10c.; kettle do., lOijc. 
®i034c.; Summer, 934-. Buls-meats duli, weak, and 
lower; Shoulders, 7c.; Clear Rib Sides. Si^c.; Clear 
Sides, 834C. Bacon dull and drooping; Shoulders, "7840, 
'a7V-; Clear Rib Sides, 9 i^c.; Clear Sides, 934c. Whis- 
ky in fait deuinnd and brm at $1 10. Batter quiet and 
weak : uomlually unchangeil. Hogs dull and lower. 
Common ;ight, $5®$o 25: fair to good llgbr, $5 ku^ 
$6 75 ; do. heavy, *.i 80a"$6 05 ; receipts, 3.762 hekd; 
Shipments, 675 head. 

Toledo, Oct. 17.— Flonr steady. Wheat dull ; 
No. 3 While Wabash, $1 19 ; No. 1" White Michii'an. 
$1 20I4; No. 2do., $1 lyi-i; Extra White Michiijaul 
$1 25 ; Amber Mich gan, soot, held at $1 18Hj, $1 I8I4 
biiL;. November, $1 2o ; x>o. 2 Amber Michigan, $1 11 ; 
No. ^ Red Winter, $1 17; So. 3 Red. $1 IOI3; Re- 
jected Red, $1 O4I2; do. Dayton and Michigan. $1 04 ; 
iSo. 2 Amber Illinois. $1 25. Corn quiet: High Mixed, 
49y.; bow Mixed, 47^c.; do. new, 46c; new No. 2 

White, 43c.; no grade. 47c; newdo.,44iQC. Oats quiet: 
White, 3ac.; Michigan. 3314C. Ueceipts — Plour, 700 
bbls.; Wlieat, 62.000 bushels; Corn, '78 OoO bushels • 
Oats, 13,00 J bushels; Bar.ev, 18,000 bushels, ship- 
meuts— Flour, 16.000 bbis.; Wheat, 14 OOU bushels ; 
Coru, 67,OuO uushels ; Oals, 6,000 busbels. 

OSWKOO. Oo;. 17. — Flour auchanfced ; sales 1,500 
bbls. Wheat firm; sales of No. 2 Milwaukee cluo at 
$1 26; No. 1 White Michigan $1 30; extra do. do, 
held at $1 3j. Com uachauged. Barle.v stead .y : 
sales of 19.000 bushels prime Canafa at Sl 12® 
$1 131^2; 9,500 bushels No. 3 above grade at $1 01. 
Canal Freights— Wheal, 6I4C; Corn, 634c.; Barley, 
6I4C. to New- York ; Lumber, $2 to the Hudson ; $2 60 
to New-York. Lake Receipts — Wheat, 17.200 bushels S 
Barley, 17.700 bushels. Canal ^hlpmeflt8— Barley, 
19.300 bushels: Lumber, 781,000 feet. Grain on tbe 
caoal from Buffalo and Oswego for tide- water .yester- 
day noou— Wuear, 491,000 bashels; Com. 1,698 UOO 
bushels; Oats, 9, 30u bushels ; Barley, 337,000 bush- 
els ; Rye, 58, OoO bushels. 

Louisville. Ost. 17.— Flour steady and un- 
changed ; ail offerings taken at yesterday's prices. 
Wheat firm; Ked, $1 05®$1 10; Amoer. $1 10® 
$1 18; White, $1 15®*! 22. Corn nomiaally un- 
changed.* Rye quiet but firm at 65c. Outs steady and 
firm ; White. 36c.; Mixed, 34c Pork scarce anil Arm 
at $i.8S>$18 60. Bulk-meats in fair demand; Shoul- 
ders, 7>4e.; Clear Rib Sides, 9c.; Clear Sides, 914C. Ba- 
con quiet but stead.v ; Shoiildera, 8c ; Clear Rib 
Sides, O'eC; Clear Sides, IOI3C. .-^ugar-cured Hams 
steady, with a lair dem.ind, at 16iac. Lard flrmer ; 
tierce, II34C.; kegs, 12i3e. Wnisky in fair demaud 
andflrmat$i 10. Bagging active at 12 140. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 17.— Wool in demand; prices 
flrin. Ohio, Peuiisyly,iiiia, and West Virginia, XX and 
above, 430. a45c.; X, 43c.; medium. 40c.®42i<2C.: 
coarse, 3oc. a'39c. New-Y'ork, Michigan. Indiana, and 
Western, flue. 35c.®4oc.: medium, 39c.®42c.; coarse, 
35c.®39c.; Comtdug, wasbeo, 45c.®50c.; do., un- 
washed, 06c. Canada Combing, 60c.; floe, unwashed, 
25c.® 27c.; coarse and medium, unwashed, 28c.®3()c.; 
tub washed, 40c.®45c. Colorado, washed. 19o.®26c.; 
do., unwashed, 18c.®22c.: Kxtra and Merino pulled, 
32c.®35c.; No. 1 and Super puiie^I, 33o.'3'36o. Texas, 
fine and medium, 18e.®25c.; do., coarse. lSc®22c 
Caiifomia, flue aud medium, 19a®:j7c.; do., coarse. 
19c.®2'<:c. 

Milwaukee, Oct. 17 -Flour quiet, but steady. 
Wh^at opened firm at au advance of I2C. and closed 
strong; No. 1 -Milwaukee. $1 I6I3; No. 2 do., $1 I214; 
Novemoer, $1 13^; Oecember, $1 l4%; No. 8 MU- 
w.iukee, $1 0514. V orn scarce and higher; No. 2 at 
43 '•jc. Oats firm; No. 2 at 32c. B.ye scarce and 
higher ; No. 1 at 62i2C.®63c. Barley esoited and 
higher; No. 2 Spring, 9i;c.®90i2C.; N(\ 3 do., 6lc. 
Fielgbcs film; Wheat to Buffalo, 6c.®5i<iC.; do. to 
Oswego. 9c. Receipts— Flour, 13,000 bbls; Wheat, 
114,000 bushels. S nipmeats- Flour, 22,000 bbls.; 
Wheat, 17,000 bushels. 

New-Obleans Oit. 17.— Flour In good demand 
and a shade lighter; Superflne, $4®$4 26; Double 
Eilra, $4 .')0®$4 75: Treble do., $6®$6 2:-; high 
grades. $6 5o®|f7 50. Corn scsriie and firm at 60c 
®65c. Oats guiut ; St. Louis, 44o.®60c. Hay quiet ; 
pyrime, $17; chiice, $20. Pork quiet, but firm at 
9I8 60®$19. Coffee scarce and flrm; Rio cargoes 
Would command 16c.®19l4C. Bran steady; Texas, 
7oc.: Weeteru, 80c. Other arricles unchauged. Bx- 
Chanoe — New-York Sight, \ discount; Bteritog, 6.26 
fortheoani ; eold, 1U934. 

Pbovidence, Oot. 17. — Printine Cloths are un. 
usually stead.v. at 4^gc.'^434c. for best Standard and 
Kxtra 64x64 S., without quotable sales. 



THE COTTON MARKETS. 



New-Obleaks. Oct. 17.— Cotton firm, eood de- 
mand; Middling. 10 "no-; Low Middling, IOI4C.; QooJ 
Ordinary, 9>4C.: net receipts, 4,267 bales; gross, 5,- 
073 bales ; exports to F^rauce, 3,128 bales; to the Con- 
tinent, 4,977 bales; sales, 1,90U bales; stock, 101,- 
699 bales. 

Kavavn'ah, Oct. 17. — Cotton flrm ; good demand ; 
Middling, lOHc; Low Middling, OVgc.; Good Ordlnarr, 
8'^ac-; net receipts, 2.491 bales; exports coastwise, ^ 
4,660 bales; sales, 1,406 bales; stock, 69,695 bales. 

Mobile, Oct. 17.— Cotton flrm; Middling, lOo.; 
Low Middling, 9 i2C.®9 "85-: Good Ordinary, Q\t..; net 
receipts, 1,281 b..le8 ; exports coastwh^ 1,138 bales ; 
sales. 1 ,500 bales ; stock, 23,947 bales. 

Galveston. Oct. 17.— Cotton firm; Mlddlinsr. 

lOV; Low Middling, 9340.; Good Ordinary, 914a; net 
receipts, 1.985 bales; exports coastwise, 1.296 bales; 
sales, 2,323 boles ; stocK, 49,257 bales. 

Chauleiton, Oot. 17.— Cotton ste.idy; Middling, 
lO'V-i Low .Midddng, lOisC; Good Ordinary, 9140.® 
9%c.; net receipts, 4,084 bales; sales, l,000'bale8; 
stock, 48,383 bales. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



pSkHRi 



mm 

ONI 



BOKER'S BITTERS. 

Mo. 78 John at., New-York. Post Oflloe Box No. 1.02a 
I,. FUMIE, Jr.. sOl.h! AGENT. 



DEY GOODS. 



s 



S I LK S. 

Special Bargains. 

A,T,Sti!ffaft&Co, 

WILL OFFEE 05 >VED>-SSDAV AIOBNINQ 

OCT. IS, 

3,000 PIECES 

Black, Colored, 
and Fancy Silks, 

PCBCHASBD BJSiroHE THE LATE ENOR.YIOUM 
ADVANCE in PKICB, and WHiCU WILL to 
OFFERED at THEIR UiUAL 

LOW PRICES. 



THE ATTENTIO.^ OF PURCHASERS SB SKIXO 
BAUGAI.NS is SPECIALLY ISVITED. 



Broaiiway. 4tl av., 9tli & Ifllh sts. 



NOW 

THE LATEST 



OPEN, 

STYLES 



PARISIAN 

IN 



Street iS Cmaie Costiioes, 

RECEPTION AND EVENING I^RESSES, 

PBOUBKAUE, OPEEA. and TUEATRB CLOMJit, 
DOLMANS, tc. 

GAMME^TS 

01 every desciiption of THEIR OWN POPULAR ItAVIl. 
P.^CTURK. 

FASHIONABLE AfiD GEXULNE" 



FUR 



IB 8ACQUES, 



3 

TRIM MINGS, of 
at the 



SETS, and 
STYLE. 



STEnr 



MOLD, CONSTABLE & CO.. 

BROADWAY AND 19TH ST. 

I^LAMM £!,!$, BbANUETS. CLOTH*, CA^S^ 
. meres, waterproof, So.hineham lace«, table llne.-a, 
napkins, &c, from the late auction salea. ,f>lso a laigs 
quantity ofbeavyim bleached muslins. siii;ht<jdamace4 
by water, for sale rerj cheaa WSL MATiiKWS. Hm 
64 Catharine st. 



HORSES AND CAKKIAGES. 

THJb, Uf-TUWN UKFXCii OK TUU. TLMiCa. 

Theup-town offlce of THE TIMR5 is l«oat«i «t 
No. 1.257 Braatfvray. beU Slat ani d.21 jts. 

Opeudailr. a-.ujday» laola-lsl, fraji 1 A. jtL tj j .'. 4. 

Hubscrlptioua reoetyed, andcapidsjf Td2 ViAiHu 

sate. 

AiivBRt'iRE-MKXTs aurnrvp.r) rT!«'rtL o p. m. 

lN VAS»!$KL.L. ic KEAUNKy, 

QfiXEEAL ADCTIO-VKEBS 

aud 

COMMISiilOK MERCHANTS 

HORSB AUCTION MART AND CARRIAGE EEPOSfr 

TOKT. 

KOS. 110 AND 112 EAST 13TH st.. 

NEAR 4TH AV., KEW-TOBK. 

BEGOLAE SALES EVEET TCE<DAI A.ND FiUUAT, 

AT 10 O'CLOCK. 

Entries of HORSB5 and CARRIAGES for htX" at aue- 

tloD should be made at 6 P. M. oa MO.sDaT tjc TCKS- 

DAfS Baie, and at tbe same time on THURSDAY for 

FRIDAY'S sale. Entries dan be forwarded by maii. 

bPBCIAL ATTISNII.J.S GiVtiN to SALiiS of HOUSES, 
CAUaiAGES, FDR-NlTUaK. and every kind of property 
at private reaideoces, iu and out of Town. 

HoasE'i. CAaRUG£>, HAR.SEjIS, BLiSCETS, 
BOBR8, WHIPd, tc. of every aescripOou. at pnT»t« 
aal«. 
LIBBBAL ADVASCE8 MADE OJT CO.N'SIG.VMESTS. .* 

HERIFF'S SAKE.— bT ViltTUS OF A WAR. 

rant of attachment usued out of the i^upreIaa 
Court of the State of Kew-Yur^ and aiso. \ij 
virtue of an oider ot 8a;e grioted by Kou. 
Geori^e C. Barrett, Justice of said Court, ozi the 14t]i 
day of October. 1876. I Till expose to sale at jpubtif 
vendue, on MO-Vl^AY, the 'iSa day or October, iSid.al 

11 o'clock in the forenoon', at No. 261 WtBt 27th st., 
two bay horses ; said horses are closely matched, vt 
beautilul color, styliah, and fast. 

WILLIAM C COSXSB. Shwift 
Jamzs Fat, Deputy. 
Dat)u> Oct. 10, 1876. 

BUKBKA HOUSE BLiAMKET COHFANV. 

So. 610 Broadway, opposite St. Xicholas UoSel, 

WILL OFFER AT EETAIL 

$20,000 SfOCK OF GOODS, 

AT WHOLliS.iLli PitICK LIST. 

A Bare chamck to bAVs MO.sHr. 

im 8AIJS.— A PAIR OF BAr CARRiAOd 

borses. 16 bauds hieb ; gentle and kind iu sinj(ld 
or double harness; cne is a very find dog-carthorse; 
sold on account of family goius to Europe ; ebean. 
Apply at private stable, So. 124 West both st.. befix* 

12 o'clock, for four days. 

i^iuil POTTBK S BV RUB rr. o* 

Rochester.N. Y..haTe jast arrived atCoL Barker'a, 
corner of Bioadway aud 39th St., with a oar-load ot tb( 
finest load, coup^, and match horses, and most supert 
coach and trotting teatos to l>e found. Private said 
only. 

OR!4B BL.ANK.KT»T GARiClAGfc: AND 

TRAVELING ROOLiJ lu quH|ititie8 aud grades to 
suit buyer*. Piices largely reduced. 
H.4RA1BR, UAY!^ & CO.. Ko. 72 Beekmaa at. 



TO 
bo< 



BAHKUsi' A.\U CO.NFKCTIO.NBRS' 

TOOLS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Bread Trougba, Peels, New leer's Cake Prints and 

Hollers, Sp.mgorle's Forms, Moulds, &c. Every tool 

necessary iVir bauers and confectiouors. WILLI.4M 

UARl". Manulac:urer, 34 Catharino st, Sew-York City. 

Ai'FMCATIOM FOR AO.ni8.sXON TO THE 
' OLD GE."{rL .MEN'S U.X.^BCTAU1AN HOME," No. 
521 Kaat 12utn St., for aged inalgent men residing iu 
New-York. Brooklyn, or viciuity, should be made at 
the Home. 



GUKEA-WOOD LOT OR u/LFLOT WAJJTKD. i 
Address C, No. 11 iieaob St., New-York. 

MM^INEEY. ^' 

iJlARIE^TILMAN, OF PARIS. 

OfTers a complete and elegant assortment of finest 
Pans millinery, with constant renewals from new ar- 
rivals. " Cour, aid's " crapes. So, 423 6th av., i>ear 
26th St. (Late Michels.) ' 

■ ■"■■ — ■— — ii 

^ESTACTRA^fTS^ 

LALBER»S RESTAURA.NT, 

CliNTKSNI.\L GROUNDS, 

WEAR HORTICUl,TUUAL HAH, 

lately destroyed by Are, and reoudt within eight days., 

IS again in full operation, well heated, with greater 

and uetter accommodations than ever. ' 



PUBLIO^NOTIOES^ 

MA.NY^ Of"oUR FR^BNOsl eiUPPOiSINa 
tue late Cornelius Poidoo, Just deceased, was tha 
member of onr firm bearing the aame name. w« t»k«: 
this 9Pportunity to correct the arror, aad to stata tbat 
the deceased g«>uti«uiiau was in no .wise^connaotadwlth 



LiET— HALF OF PRlVAT^i SIASLK, WITH 
tward tor two horses ; room for two carriagea. Ap- 
ply at stable. No. 129 West 49ih st. 

' . ,1 

AUOTION SALES. 

A PKRE.UPTOaV SAI.B, ' 

KICaiRD V. HABNETT, Auctioneer, 
Will sell at auction on 

WEDNESDAY, Oct -25, 

at 10 o'eiook A. U., at 

Ko. 18 East 40th St. between 6ih and Madison ava., 

By or.:er of Josiah Jex. Esq.. 
large and valuable collection of oil-paintings by tb« 
following artists : Geutz, De Guel, ^'tark«abor;;h. Fits- 

Estrick. Beuaro, Aclieubach. Toas»«uit, Freeman, 
eed, HUbner, ^iotnmer, C hater, vVei&er, Jacobaeo, 
Corbett, Oordoae,4tobbe, Bali, Uo^uet, Tait, aad ota- 
er» : superb bronies. &.c. 

Rich rosewood parlor aultes, pier itnd mantel mii^ 
rors of the most beautitui designs, Ph> Ian & LollenJer 
bilUard-tat>le, sete of harness, lao« ana satio-damaaK 
window-haufnugs. woquet aud Brussels carpets, cbau- 
dehers and gas-nxtures. carvnd blaek-walnat book- 
cases, — feet high, and — leet wide, library Xuruiluna 
rosewood, blark-walnut, and oak bcdsteadti and bed- 
room suites, bedding, black-walnut buifet. black* 
walnut extension diiuug-room table and chairs, china 
and glassware, black-walnut hall hat-stand witb nAi» 
ror, kitchen furAiture, refrigerator, and all that ba- 
longs to a first-ciasa h> u>8. 

Catalogues aud petmits to inspect picturas at aoo- 
tloneet's office. No. Ill Broad wa,v, t>asement. 

"> 
UoKRis n'lLKixs. Auctioneer. 
PuKEMPTORY BALL OP 

C BLEGA>T HOL'SEHOLD FtRMTURB, ' 

BEONZi$.S, sTArUETrKs, MASTcL SET, 
PAINTINGS AND KNGR-^VINGS, 
FINE CARPETS, tc. 
B. B. LUDLOW Sl CO. will sell at auction oa 
TUCESDAY, Oct. 19, at 11 o'clock A. M,. at tue pri- 
vate residence No. 7 West S7th 8t, alt tbe elecaut 
furuiture or the above h'^usts consisting uf bt-ick- 
walnut parlor suits in satin ana reps, parlor oablnota, 
centre tables, etageres, marble statuottcs. puintine* 
and eugraviugs, c.trvcd ulack-waluut uuiiiiit exteusloq 
table, buffet sideboard, ohifonieres and chairs, carved 
black-waluut bedsteads, dressing bureaus, commodes, 
Ivuuges. eacritoires, mantel sjts and clocks, fine I'urk- 
ish and ether carpets, curled hair mattreases. Jkc.: 
also a general assortment 01 cottage furuiture, kitcaaa 
and laundry lurnituro. cooking uteusiiS, Ito. Cata< 
logacB at Auctioneer's office. No. 3 t^iue st. 

Edwakd Scubkck, Auc!iooecr. 

ASSIGNB£>.S THIRD SALB 

of 
. FBENCH CHIKA. AND OLASSWaRB, 

£ by order of Mr. £. P. FABBRI, assignee of ilassra 
' JOHN VOGT & CO., 

Bt tlieir atorea, Nos. S3 and 37 Pars piaoo, near Church, 
the third sale of which will take place oa 
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY. 
Oct 19 and 20, 

' at 1C:30 o'clutt: each day. 

' V 

By JoHX M. DKiPBB it Co.. Auctioneers. 

rUHB bBtiAWARB. L.lCK.AWA.^iA AND 

)X WESTEKN EAILKOAD COMPANY 

Will sell 

100.000 'JONS 

SCR.^N lO-S CO.CL 

at public auction, on WKD.SEtiD.AY, Oct 25, at It 
o'clock noon, at Na 26 ExchauEe plac». 

8AM0EL SLOAN, Praaident. 



i_^__GEOOEEIES^_&a__ 

■7 ^ "'^'"' BRBsH^AlllOERNE Y Bt'TTB& 

-,■ XT ■, 

/*>'- MACT t CO.'s, Na 433 and »«. 757 6th sr,' 



^,-i 



MS-- 



W^ 



.>i 



t.' 



LOST Ain) FOUNUr 



autraainno wiseconnaotadwlth ."DdPNO.— ▲ 6UM OF MOSJtT, WEIOa TBi 



rw 




i:&i- 



.i:.-¥ 




.'■<--<-i,-!»-^J-^. 




WS^SE^^^^i^ 



4e^F^'!)^i^V^r^i 



■^s^^r- 



■^^jt/^-ssgg^r^^....,^^ . 



'«*>!."• r )f 




*':»**^>^ 



^i>'r 






.*w"*«^ 






;''T?r*^*^>[?5'^C?^»*'^*3 



C|^ gtlxr-gtfrft gpxmeg, tE&tbtt^gaag, ®d0lbit is, 1876;; 



^ '- '^'^^r^^€''^'^':' 



|Ufo inrh Cimcs 



VOKK. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 18. 1876. 




JOiZ PBESIDEJST, 

jGEN. fiUTHEEFORD B. HAYES 

OF OHIO, 



proper regard for the reqairements of the 
situation, there is no reason why the coun- 
ty ticket should iiot stand a fair chance of 
election. There is certainly a number of 
Democrats who are disgusted with the 
management of their party affairs, and who 
might he enlisted in a well-concerted plan 
to secure good government for the City. 



K^' 



•S'- 



FOE VICE PBJi^SIDENT, 

WILLIAM A. WHEELER, 

OK NEW-YORli. 



AMVSEMEMS THJS EVENINO. 



(IFALIiACK'S THKATRK.— FoRBiBDBX Frmt— Mr. J. 
V Moa:atca«, Mr. Harry B«c>ett, Ulas ACa Uyos. Miss 
Kffie Q«rmoa. 

(nFTH AVENCB THR.\TRE.— I.im— Mr. a F. Coeblan, 
Hr. James Lewis, Mr. Cbar.es l/iahbC, Miss Amy 
rawsitt, Mrs. G. U. Gilbert. 



0rtSI<O>S GARDKS.— Baba— Mr. W. A. Crane. Mr. 
Bowers. Mlaa Hllaa W e»tliersby, Miis Mluxelli. 



taoOTH'S TIIKATRB.— Sarda-Vapalcs— Mr. F. 0. Bangs, 
Mrs. Acnes Booth, sraad 'i>iill3C aal cliora). 



IPAKK THBaTRK.— «\TK«T IlEAHTS and Toh Cobb. 



<tBW-TORK AQCARIUM— RARJt A-^TD Curious Fish ajtd 
MjlSiVaua, Statuakt. &..'. 

iBlLMORk'S GARDEN.— P. T. Barxum's MutRUif, Circus. 
itTCEUM THKATRR-RoMRO and Jplikt— Miss Louise 

It. Pomcrwy, ter. J. P. Ho&orts. -Mr. M. V. Liiignam. 



■» «_ 



trOOD'S MUSKOT.— Dramatic !'brforjca.vcb — CiTRloai- 
t:s*— Altemouu auil evpaiaj. 



lUXBRICAX ISSTITUTE HALti— Anxoal 
or Art. Scibvcb. axo Mxchanics. 



EXHIBITIOS 



IBBIOK SQUaRK THKATRE— Thb Two Orphans— Mr. 
I C Thonxe, Jr.. Mr. J. O'.Nelll. Miss KaU) Claxton. 

^GLK THEaTRK— MixsTRRtsT, Comkdt, Buri-ssqub— 
Meaara. Sheridan arid Mack, Miss Kato Castiotun. 



tiSAKD OPERA-HOCSK.— UsciB Ton's Cabin— Mrs. 
, C. Howard and Georgia Uinstrels. 



jOLTMf'IC THBATRS.— Grand Notrlti a,td Tariktt 

1 EaTRRTAIXRRSI. 

CTEINiVAT HALL.— Gra.td Coscbrt— Mr. G. Wjinen- 
rath, Mr. F. EemmertB. and Theo. Tlioma*' or- 
etiestn. 



ftATlO.NAL 4CADKMY OK DrtSlGS. 

Paistinq^ Day and evenins. 

JTBEATRK rOMIQtJE. — Variett 
Measra. Uarrisiui and Hart. 



-BzaiBiTias' or 



KHTBRTAUrKRJra. — 



BAJ» FRANCISCO MINSTRELS— MISSTRRUT, 
ASD NBeRO COXICAUTIBS. 



Farcbs, 



^CBLLT h LEON'S HALU— Mixstrbut akd CoKicAb- 



^othinfr can be of more service in the few 
iKmaininj; days of the canvass than careful 
mttention to the local organizations. The 
interest of the public is now thorougkly 
aroused, and, while the State and National 
Committees wiU see that the work of dis- 
!C088ion goes on with all necessary vigor, 

(the eatherinj; of the harvest will depend on 

Itbe neighborhood organizations. Tho voters 

•till doubtful should be ascertained, and 
«verv honorable means used to deter- 
onine them in the right direction, 
land especial pains should be taken 
(that those of them who can be secured are 
;got to the polls early on election day. But 
,'we seed not enumerate the details of the 
fwoit -which will fall upon the local commit- 
. tees. It is sufficiently understood, and 

Sere shonld be no possible mistake as to 
i being promptly and fully performed. 
-^Thro great benefits which Republicans be- 
^ oieve will accrue to the country from the 
X ^ection of Gen. Hayes, and a Congress in 
Sympathy with him, can only be had at the 
price of steady, careful work in each ward 
•smd ooantry town, and in no State is this 
<lDore essential than in New- York. 



u 



"*- '- Mr. Stoughton on Monday evening; 

Incidentally suggested a good point against 

pDemocrats who affect virtuous iadigna- 

•tion in regard to the exposures of 

Mr. TrLDsai's false pretenses which 

Slave been made by The Times and 

other journals. It is convenient for Mr. 

.TiLDZN'S apologists to pretend to be shocked 

by the publications which fasten upon him 

Ibe gnilt of peqary and fraud and a long 

Bourse of sharp practice in his financial re- 

Isitiona with men who trusted to his " honor" 

* fcnd reputation. Mr. Belmont holds up his 

hands in horror at the freedom of the crit- 

leism from which Mr. Tildex suffers, and 

the oTor-niee Mr. Parkk GoDWtx employs 

genteel epithets to express his disgust at 

.the Rlender respect shown toward his favor- 

-- ite candidate for the Presidency. But when 
di«i these gentlemen, or any of the crowd of 
Democratic talkers, act upoa the precepts 
Ibey enjoinin their comments upon President 
Bka>'T T With what crimes ha^ he not been 
Ebarsed by the Sun and the World and the 
rest of the Democratic press T What unjust 
Insinuations hav& they not leveled at his 
^ndnct f What foul asx>ersions have they 
act cast upon his character f , What base 
imputations have they not heaped upon his 
Kfie and associations, his motives and pro- 
,«eeding8f There is hardly a sin in the 
decalogue which they have not attributed 
to him, or an act unbecoming a President 
which they have not alleged against him. 
Hi* splendid career aa a soldier has not 

shielded him from coarse abuse; his per- 
■sonal integrity haa not been allowed to 
moderate the assaults to which he has been 
vabjucted. And the men and the papers 
Vho, for the sake of partisanship, have thus 
Bsligned the actual President, prate of 
"decency," and " scruples," and " courtesy," 
when the mask is torn off the Democratic 
candidate for the Presidency, and his greed 
»nd unscrupnlonsness and hypocrisy are 
^4. «xpo8ed in the full light of day I ' 



The remarkable murder trial now going 
on at Trenton, N. J., bids fair to come to a 
close to-day. Yesterday the prisoner, Mrs. 
DiKNE House, was on the stand, as was also 
her son, the step-son of the murdered man. 
Their testimony disclosed a revolting state 
of affairs in the Housk family. There seems 
to be no doubt that at the time of his death 
the victim was engaged in a general quar- 
rel with his wife and step-son, and w is con- 
ducting himself in a most brutal fashion. 
It was sought by the defttuso to show that 
Mrs. HousK believed, when she shot her 
husband, that he was drawing a 
pistol upon her son, and was like- 
ly to use it upon 
evidence was not 
free from contradiction, 
was in great passion 



her 



but 



the 

conclusive nor 

That the woman 

of fear and anger 



seems pretty well established. How far 
the jury will think she was justified in kill- 
ing her husband remains to be seen. Mean- 
while, it appears that she has 
maintained relations of the most 
friendly character with the brothers of 
her dead husband, negotiating with one as 
to a marriage with him, and writing the 
other letters alternating between unctions 
piety and light pleasantry. Behind these 
strange and disgusting revelations lies the 
question of what shall be done with the 
property of the murdered man. The whole 
case reveals a depth of vulgar wickedness 
on all sides which is not pleasant to contem- 
plate. ^_^_^^^______»« 

A Washington dispatch to a New-York 
Democratic paper says that "a well-posted 
Republican" reports from the Pacific States 
that he " concedes Oregon to the Democrats " 
and fefirs that they will also carry California 
by adecided majority." Nevada, this singular 
person magnanimously regards as doubtful. 
On the other hand, a California Kupublican, 
undoubtedly quite as " well-posted" as 
the WorUTa fly-gobbler, writes to a New- 
York correspondent that he considers 
California absolutely sure for Hayes 
a»d Wheeler ; that he has strong 
hopes of Oregon, and that "Nevada 
has never been uncertain — but cer- 
tain for Hayes." Ex-Attorney Greneral 
Williams, who has just returned from 
Oregon, says that that State is " as sure 
for the Republicans as Maine is." Usually 
all three of the Pacific States are classed as 

doubtful. And it is certain that any so- 
called " well-posted Republican" who sends 
comforting news to a Democratic newspaper 
is merely a temporary invention of the Til- 
den " nincompoops." 



To-day another opportunity is offered for 
registration. The Boards of Registry will sit 
from 8 A. M. to 9 P. M. We trust that our 
friends will not neglect this important 
duty. It is not weU to postpone it, think- 
ing to attend to it at one of the succeeding 
meetings. The voter who secures his right 
to vote to-day will not be exposed to 
danger of losing it by inability to attend 
hereafter. When the next registration day 
comes around, sickness, or absence, or un- 
avoidable business may interfere to disfran- 
chise the man who neglects the present op- 
portunity. Registration is an annoying 
necessity, but it is absolutely indispensable 
to an honest vote in New- York, and no good 
citizen should fail to recognize it as being so. 



U3i,v5 Th® Ring Democrats in Brooklyn have 
entered the field in a most defiant mood. 
rhey yesterday named a county ticket, 
^hich was mainly in exact accordance with 
the programme of "Boss" McLaughlin. 
A.11 idea of recognizing the strength or the 
e l a ims of the reform wing ot the party was 
abandoned, and the nominations were in- 
tended as an announcement that the Ring 
believes itself powerful enough to do what 
it chooses. That this was the feeling of the 
** Boss " was to be seen from the course of the 
Pemocratic General Committee on Monday 
•vening, when the friendsof John Shanlky 
were recognized in the Third Assembly Dis- 
fcriot. Shanley is a notorious character, 
who has been indicted for election frauds, 
and who is thoroughly detested by the peo- 
ple of his district. A like sign was the ad- 
missioa of the supporters of Bernard 
Midas for Commissioner of Charities. 
Mii>A8 is one of the w-orst of a bad lot in 
this commission, to which a very large part 
of the corruption in Kings County tor the 

last five years has been traceable. He was 
tMiominated yesterday. Now, if the Ee- 



FEDERAL POWER IN SOUTH CARO- 
LINA. 
After long deliberation and a close scru- 
tiny of the representations made to him, the 
President has decided to issue a proclama- 
tion setting forth the condition of affairs in 
South Carolina, warning ai^ed bodies of 
men to disperse, and declaring his deter- 
mination to maintain peace and order in the 
State. The proclamation is to be followed 
by the farther dispatch of troops to 
render its terms effectual. The announce- 
ment comes not one day too soon. And 
we mistake the character of the President, 
if, after satisfying himself that this exercise 
of authority is just and expedient, he allows 
it to fall short of the obiects to be attained. 
Any hesitancy, any half-measure, now, 
would compromise the character of the 

government and aggravate the evils that 
should be corrected. The force to bo sent 
must be equal to any emergency, and it 
must be sent with sufficient promptitude to 
prove that the Federal power sustains the 
Executive of the State in his 'unequal con- 
test with lawless men. 

The constitutional authority under 
which the President acts is clear enough. 
"The United States," says article 4, sec- 
tion 4, " shall guarantee to every State in 
this Union a republican form of govern- 
ment, and shall protect each of them against 
invasion; and, on application of tho Legis- 
lature, or of the Executive, (when the Legis- 
lature cannot be convened,) against domes- 
tic violence." Under the first clause of 
this section, and under the legislative au- 
thority conferred for the enforcement of the 
fifteenth amendment the United States 
Marshals have been enjoined to make pro- 
vision for 8?curing freedom and purity at 
the polls next month, with the understand- 
ing that their right to_ act in the election 
extends to meetings, movements, and efforts 
anterior to the voting but connected with 
it. To what extent the requisite measures 
have been taken by Federal officials to give 
effect to the instructions of tho Attorney 
General, we have no means of ascertaining. 
We do know that they did not prevent 
tho recent election in Georgia from being 
a mockery of republican goverumoat, and 
that any check they have imposed upon the 
Democratic system of intimidation and vio- 
lence in Mississippi and other parts of the 
South has beou too slight to be appreciable. 
The 7th of November will tell whether and 
with what results tho Marshals carry out 
their instructions in Mississippi, Louisiana, 
and Florida, which la ordinary circum- 
stances would as surely yield Republican 
majorities as South Carolina. It is evident 
that more harm than good will have been 
done' if the instruotious from Wash- 
mgton, with the law on which they are 
based, be allowed to remain a dead letter. 
The Grovernment cannot afford to leave un- 
finished any work it undertakes. If it as- 
serts its power at all. it must make that 



yatiiiaaDa^tnaka thsir uominatioos witfa 1 nowax aoiml to the emerxency or itself be' 



come contemptible. The practical difficulty 
lies in the wholesome unwillingness of the 
National Government to interfere except at 
the instance of the State Goverumout ; and 
no appeal for intervention is likely to come 
from Mississippi, where violence and co- 
ercion are carried on without so much as an 
attempt at prevention or punishment by 
its Democratic rulers. 

As regards South Carolina, the only rea- 
sonable ground of fault-finding is not the 
fact of interference, but tho tardiness with 
which it has been resolved upou. The ex- 
act condition of things which the Constitu- 
tion contemplates as one of the causes of 
interference has existed there many weeks. 
It would be technically incorrect to say 
that a large part of the white population 
of the State, with Wade Hamptox at 
their head, are in actual rebellion 
against the Gover«ment. Over their most 
outrageous proceedings they cast a thin pre- 
tense of respect for Federal authority, and 
certainly in no case have they tailed to obey 
that authority when it has been sustained 
by military force. Nevertheless, the great 
mass of the whites have assumed a position 
with reference to the election of Tildkn 
and Hampton which in any other country 
than this would have been treated as in- 
surrectionary. They did not affect obedi- 
ence to local authority — they openly defied 
it. They did not profess a willingness to abide 
by the electoral decision of the State, freely 
expressed — they avowed a purpose to carry 
the State by organization, threats, and vio- 
lence, with the full knowledge that in any 
fair election they would be the minority. 
They adopted the Mississippi "shot-gim 
pohcy," which Wade Hampton had studied 
on the spot, and for two months they have 
applied themselves to it with as much vigor 
and method as though they were preparing 
once more to issue an ordinance of seces- 
sion. They formed military companies, with 
the drill and discipline of war time, im- 
porting into the State batteries of artillery, 
tens of thousands of rifles, and small arms 
to an unlimited extent. These are not the 
tactics of law-abiding citizens. There is 
nothing in an election. State or national, 
that can justify these preparations, which 
are intelligible only on the supposition that 
the threats uttered by Wade Hampton and 
his outspoken supporters were to be put in 
execution. No room was left for doubt upon 
this point. Simultaneously with organization 
began intimidatioa and murder. The in- 
timidation has been directed against white 
and black alike. Both have been subjected 
to a terrorism which is without parallel on 
this continent. The scores of murdered 
Republicans have been blacks, who have 
evidenced by martyrdom their attachment 
to the party which emancipated and enfran- 
chised them ; the system of coercion having 
w^orked more effectually with the white Re- 
publicans in the towns. Had Wade Hamp- 
ton and his followers been in open insur- 
rection, they could not have been 
more merciless or persistent than 
they have been in their war against Repub- 
lican voters. In truth, they have been in 
revolt against the State Government. They 
trampled on its laws and dared it to pun- 
ish them. When Gov. CHambrrlaiv is- 
sued his proclamation setting forth the 
lawlessness of their organizations and re- 
quiring them to disarm and disband, they 
declared that they would do neither. Then 
Wade Hamptox, realizing the imminence 
of Federal interposition, bade them to dis- 
band ; and now we are told that they are 
disbanding in obedience, not to the law, but 
to the request of their rebel chief. 

Such is an outline of the case which yes- 
terday came before the Cabinet at Wash- 
ington for its decision. With many of the 
details the country is familiar. Each suc- 
ceeding day adds to theni in number and 
brutality. The whole story, whenever it is 
told, will be an indelible. blot upon the civ- 
ilization of the South. It will make for- 
eigners wonder whether the difference be- 
tween the " chivalrous" murderers and ruf- 
fians of South Carolina and the Bashi- 
Bazouks in Bulgaria is, after all, more 
than a difference in degree. The Turks 
cut throats as a pious duty. The 
Sguth Carolina Democrats have shot 
and mangled negroes, and hunted 
them like wild beasts, to rid the State of its 
Republican majority. The mere stoppage 
of this condition of things will not be 
enough. The Grovernor confesses himself 
powerless without Federal aid. The Presi- 
dent announces to tho State that the aid 
shall be rendered. We accept his word. 

The reluctance with which he has acted ex- 
onerates him from the imputation of parti- 
san motives. Peace and order must be re- 
established at whatC'fer cost. This, 
however, should not be all. The 
outraged laws need vindication, and 
we trust that Gov. Chamberlain, 
with the Federal power at his back, will 
take immediate and energetic steps to ar- 
rest the guilty parties who are known,' and 
to crush the system of coercion and outrage 
which has thriven and grown more and 
more audacious under prolonged impunity. 
The time has come when the American 
people should know whether murder and 
violeijce are to be recognized features of a 
political canvass ; and the question can be 
nowhere answered more properly than in 
South Carolina. 



THE DEMOCRATIC IDEA OF REFORM. 
We fear that the devotion of the Demo- 
cratic Party to the cause of civil service 
reform has not received as much attention 
as it deserves. The people hear a great 
deal of vague talk from the Democratic 
orators and editors about the necessity of- 
reform, but these oracles provokingly for- 
get to say of just what their idea of reform 
consists. Happily we are able to supply the 
omission from no less a source than that 
fountain of pure Democratic dectrlne — the 
St. Louis platform itself. That document 
sums up the whole Deipocratic creed on tho 
subject in the declaration that "the first 
step in reform must be the people's choice 
of honest men from another party." This 
18 a master stroke. It is worthy of the cun- 
ning hand of the great Democratic Reformer 
himself. It is not sufficient that the people 
should choose honest men for the public 
offices — that would not comport with the 
Democratic idea of reform — hut the honest 
men must be " from another party." As 
there is only one other party that amounts 
to much, it follows that in order to have 
that true "reform" which is declared with 
such frequent reiteration to be " necessars'," 
we must fill the public offices with Demo- 
crats. The choice of honest Beoubiicana 



will not answer the stern demand of the 
Democracy for reform. Ordinary reformers 
would be content simply with what Col- 
lector Simmons would call " unrestricted" 
honest men, but these thorough-going re- 
formers have set their hearts on the still 
more difficult achievement of finding honest 
Democrats for the public offices. In our 
mind's eve we can see the Great Reformer 
going about the Five Points and Maekerel- 
ville like a modern Diogknes, with a lan- 
tern in one hand and a bottle of smelling 
salts in the other, searching for the 80,000 
honest Democrats who are to be his aids in 
the work of reform. The stress laid on tho 
assurance that the new crop of public offi- 
cers are to be from another party — to wit, 
the Democratic Party — ^justifies the tear 
that this expectation possesses more impor- 
tance to the average Democratic mind than 
the demand that they shall be honest. Cer- 
tainly a shrewder device to gratify the 
keen longing of the " unterrilied" for a nib- 
ble at the public crib under the guise 
of reform could not have been invented. 
In the first place, the honest men must 
all be Democrats, which is the essential 
thing. Then the assumption runs through 
the whole platform that Democracy is sy- 
nonymous with honesty, so that a man need 
only prove his Democracy to establish his 
honesty. This brings us at length to the 
naked idea of reform which possesses the 
breast of the average Democrat, which is, 
that the miserable Radicals ought to be 
kicked out and Democrats put in. The 
platform reaches this result by rather a 
roundabout road, but nevertheless it con- 
veys the right idea to the Democratic mind. 
True, the platform elsewhere declares that 
the civil service should not be subject to 
change at every election. This means, of 
course, when taken in connection with the 
strenuous demand for a complete upsetting 
of the civil service at the coming election, 
that it is only necessary that there should 
be a change at those elections which result 
in turning the Black Republicans out and 
putting Democrats in. The meanest Demo- 
cratic capacity can comprehend the necessity 
for a change at such a time. The platform 
also asserts that the civil service ought not 
to be " a prize fought for at the ballot-box," 
but, as it elsewhere urges the Democrats to 
fight desperately at the ballot-box this Fall 
for the self-same prize, we can only conclude 
that, like Rip Van Winkle, it " doesn't 
count this time." 

Gov. TiLDEN takes up the strain of re- 
form where the platform leaves off, but 
there is nothing in his letter to militate 
against our interpretation of the Democrat- 
ic creed. He plainly intends that the 
"usufruct" of reform shall inure to the ex- 
clusive benefit of the Democracy. He shows 
no conception whatever of the true causes 
of the demoralization of the public service, 

which existed in mach greater degree than 
now before the Republican Party came into 
power. He deals with effects only, not with 
causes. He declares that two evils infest 
the civU. service: the notion that the public 
service exists for the benefit of the office- 
holders, and the organization of the official 
class into a body of political mercenaries. 
These are not causes, but effects. The true 
cause of the low tone of the public service 
is the introduction of partisanship into the 
rank and file of the sertice, and the usurpa- 
tion of the appointing power by Congress- 
men. Of a comprehension of these funda- 
mental evils Gov. Tildkn gives no evidence. 
He panders to the Democratic cry for a 
change, and holds out. the delusive notion 
that the evils of the civil service may be 
remedied by good resolutions on the part of 
the Executive. He might as well try to pay 
the interest on the public debt out of his 
own income, or to stop a locomotive at full 
speed with an injunction. He does not see, 
or does not . wish to seem to see, that the 
first thing necessary to a real reform is a 
radical change of system. He i^peaks 
of a change of system, indeed, 
but only as something to be done 
after the whole service shall have been 
pulled to pieces. Moreover, in order to 
discourage any " delusive expectations " of 
real reform, he asserts that the Executive 
can only be delivered by a constitutional 
amendment " from the greatest temptation 
to misuse the power of patronage." If, 
therefore, he should be elected President, 
and should do nothing to reform the civil 
service, but should yield to the temptation 
to misuse the patronage, the fault would 
not be his but the Constitution's. The Con- 
stitution has been used by the Denatooracv 
in times past to " cover a multitude of sins ;" 
but this would be subjectin^g the covering 
capacity of that venerable document to a 
tension that might break it altogether. On 
the whole, we may conclude that the 
prospects of a real reform of the civil ser- 
vice under Democratic rule would not be 
very bright. 



preferred making some changes in his ante- 
mortem bequests. After a brief resistance, 
the trustees resigned in some disgust. 

Evidently Mr. Lick, who had been, to 
all practical intent, dead and buried, was 
preparing for a new lease of life. He in- 
sisted that he should have a share in the 
management of his money, although he had 
given It away and had appointed his own 
executors. After some delay he seemed to 
have once more made up his mind how he ; 
wanted his property tied up ; he according- 
ly appointed a new Board of Trustees, with 
a new chart of sailing directions in a fresh 
deed of trust. About this time a long-lost 
and apparently alienated son of the fickle- 
minded millionaire turned up in the person 
of John H. Lick. This gentleman was , 
put in the second Board of Trustees, and all , 
went well again ; the fnend of humanity ' 
appeared to have vindicated himself; the 
philanthropist was once more a model, with : 
a few drawbacks, for all who had more 
money than they conld carry away with 
them. This satisfaction was of short dura- 
tion. Mr. Lick ruthlessly dismissed the 
second Bc^rd of Trustees when they had 
been on office about eighteen months. Sin- 
gularly enough, the cause of this new ebulli- 
tion was the junior Lick. The old man had 
taken offense at something which John had 
done, or had neglected to do, and he was 
annoyed because the Trustees had not put 
his son out of the board without 
more ado. He annulled the trukt and dis- 
missed the Trustees in order to' get rid of 
his son. A third board were appointed and 
are now in possession, and Mr. LiCK is dead. 
It may be seen at a glance that the dis- 
putatious philanthropist succeeded in leav- 
ing a very pretty legal muddle behind him. 
When the first Trustees w^ere requested to 
quit, they insisted that the trust vested in 
them could not be resigned ; that for all 
practical purposes Lick was dead, and that 
the trust deed was his^ill, which he could 
not rise up from the grave and revoke. 
Eminent legal counsel sustained this view 
I of the case. The reader will not be surprised 
I to learn that equally eminent legal counsel 
: took the opposite view of the case. 
If this question should now be revived 
I by either of the throe several Boards 
\ of Trustees, or by persons claiming under 
; them, it is apparent that there would be a 
! long conflict, which would be more profita- 
\ ble to the aforesaid legal counsel than to the 
i prospective recipients of Mr. Lick's mil- 
lions. The appearance in California of the 
junior LiCK is another threatening incident. 
' In the first deed he was cut off with a shil- 
\ ling or two ; in the second he was given 
i $150,000 as a paternal souvenir, but was 
\ finally left out ot the board, though 
, his legacy is continued to him. 

■ This John Lick, who appears to be a chip 
of the old block, has thus far kept his own 

' counsel, but ttiere is a dreadful suspicion in 
California that he is meditating a suit at 
: law for the ousting of all trustees and the 
• securing of the paternal millions. 

; " A grotesque, though somewhat pathetic, 

; feature of this case is the preparation of 
' trustees No. 3 for a suit to set aside the old 
man's deeds, on the ground that he was not 
of sound mind. Mr. Lick had been so 
' querulous, changeable, and violent that 
' it Was felt that a suspicion of his 
j sanity might not be unnatural. Ao- 

■ cordingly, while he was dying, he 
i was carefully inspected, cross-exam- 
ined, and reported upon by experts. 
The published accounts of interviews with 
these pre-ordained witnesses are among the 
curiosities of newspaper literature. Oa the 
whole, people who have not money enough 
to make their heirs quarrelsome, when they 

are dead and gone, may properly congratu- 
late themselves. If the Lick bequests are 
finally set aside, it will be because the tes- 
tator, in his anxiety to have everything 
exactly right, boggled and tangled the 
whole business beyond extrication. What- 
ever happens, the disposition of this vast 
estate has lost the charm of novelty, and 
the dignity with which it was first invested. 



A LEGACY OF LAWSUITS. 

It 18 likely that " the great California 

philanthropist," as the late James Lick is 

sometimes called, has left a valuable legacy 
to the lawytTs, whatever may have' been 
his intentions toward the human race. The 
world was all agog with wonder and ad- 
miration when it was first announced that 
Mr. Lick had disposed of several million 
dollars for various charitable and public 
purposes. The novel thing about this ac- 
tion was that tho donor had designated 
the objects upou which his great wealth 
waste be bestowed during his lifetime, and 
had nominated a number of eminent citi- 
zens who sh'mld act as trustees 
of his estate. To be sura, there was a slight 
feeling of apprehension that bequests for 
monuments and statues of marble and 
bronze were a little premature. There was 
a suggestion that a half million in gold could 
be better employed in art education thaii in 
settiBg up works whioh might — probably 
j would — hereafter bo regarded as incum- 
I hrances of the ground which they covered. 
I Even the millionaire's specification for one 
i of his chief mouumonts was alarming for 
j the open opportunity which it afforded 
j for mythology, allegory, common-place 
j and disordered fancy to disport themselves 
j in enduring bronze. But American good 
I nature forebore to look a gift horse in the 
mouth, and Lick was regarded as an ad- 
j mirable example to all rich men who 
i were getting ready to die. Popular en- 
j thusiasm received a check when, one fine 
day, tho trustees wore served with a notice 
to quit. Then it came out that Mr. Lick 
was not at all satisfied with tho way things 
were going, that he thought he might live 
some years longer, and. ou the whole, ha 



CONNECTICUT FOSSILS. 
There are certain wavering opponents of 
the theory of evolution who are ready to 
admit that the lower animals may bo ad- 
dicted to development, but still stoutly de- 
ny that man compromised his manhood in 
any such way. Just as we calmly concede 
that some man in whom we take no possible 
interest mav very likely be the descendant 
of a plumber, while we indignantly repu- 
diate the suggestion that any of our own 
ancestors ever committed plumbing, so 
these people are willing to let Prof. Huxley 
defile the graves of the ancestor of the horse 
or the crocodile, provided he will not graft 
an ape on their own private family tree. 
Of course, this is an evidence of weakness 
and vanity which deserves to be rebuked, 
and scientific persons who are themselves 
notoriously quite free from vanity or weak- 
ness of any sort, will hail with delight a re- 
cent discovery made by two Connecticut 

farmers, which conclusively proves that 

man is the result of evolution. 

For many years the geologists of the Con- 
necticut Valley have been in the habit of 
discovering the tracks of fossil chickens of 
enormous size on sandstone rocks. Quan- 
tities of learned pamphlets have been writ- 
ten concerning these bird-tracks, and it is 
now thoroughly established that at an early 
geological period certain birds of the gen- 
eral character of chickens, but of a height 
of, say thirty feet or more, were in the 
habit of walking over soft sandstone and 
leaving the prints of thefr feet to cheer 
and comfort subsequent geologists. The 
other day two farmers of North Can- 
ton, Conn., while digging a well, laid bare 
a slab of sandstone bearing the clear im- 
pression of a human foot of eleven inches 
in length. The impression was that of a 
man's left foot, but, curiously enough, the 
print of his right foot was not found. The 
l>roprietor of tho foot evidently did not own 
another one, and from the fact that accom- 
panying the print of this left foot was tho 
print of a large fossil chicken's claw, the 
two farmers, and the rest of tho inhabitants 
ot North Canton, f<>rmed the opinion that 
the prehistoric man must have hopped 
through life on one leg, and been on inti- 
mate terms with the poultry of the period. 

This opinion was, perhaps, excusable in 
an unscientific farmer, but no true scientific 
poraon would dream of adopting it, or of 
mistaking in any way the real meaning of 
the saudstone record. If we see on the 

snow the print of a man's left foot, and at a 
short distance on the right the print of a 
man's riirit foot, we do uof^najriue that 



two men, each with a single leg, have been 
hopping in that precise locality. The mean- 
est intellect would attribute both feet to 
one and the same man, and would draw the 
inevitible conclusion that the two footprints 
proved that a man with the usual supply of 
legs had recently walked over the snow. 
It is in precisely this way that the intelli- 
gent student of paleontology — than which 
there is not a nicer word in the whole dic- 
tionary — wonld interpret the North Canton 
discovery. He would unhesitatingly de- 
cide that the same person who left the print 
of a left foot in the sandstone left also the 
impression of a chicken's claw. Where two 
hypotheses are admissible, the simplest 
should always be chosen, and it is certainly 
far simpler to suppose that the early Con- 
necticut man had a loot and a claw instead 
of two regulation feet, than it is to suppose 
that one-logged men, in company with one- 
legged birds, once inhabited the Connecti- 
cut Valley. Nature is not guilty of such 
parsimony as this would imply. When she 
serves out legs, she does it fairly and liber- 
ally, and it is grossly improbable that even 
in Connecticut Nature was ever so economi- 
cal as to refuse to supply men and birds 
with more than one leg each. 

Let us now, in a spirit ot love, inquire 
what the existence of a prehistoric man 
equipped with a foot and a claw implies. 
Obviously, it implies that in the Connecticut 
sandstone period man was closely allied to 
the birds. That the modem man differs 
from his sandstone progenitor is, of course, 
the result of evolution. If, , at an inconceiv- 
ably remote period, some ambitious birds 
had determined to evolve man, the process, 
if successful, wonld lead to the development 
of a being half bird and half man, living in 
a period midway between that of the evolv- 
ing bird and that of the finally evolved and 
perfect man. The proof that such a being 
has existed has now been nnearthed by the 
North Canton well-diggers. Thus we see 
that' the evidence that man has descended 
by evolution from a bird is precisely the 
same in quality as that on which the 
Copernican system of astronomy rests ; and 
scientiflc persons can only stand amazed at 
the wonderlul flexibility of the intellect 
which can claim to entertain any doubt of 
I this assertion. 

I Of course, no candid man can henceforth 
' refuse to believe that man is the result of 
; evolution. At t^e sane time even Prof. 
HuxLKY will be surprised to find that a bird, 
and not an ape, is his and our common <in- 
cestor. The ape has been so generally ac- 
cepted by evolutionists as their undoubted 
progenitor that they will feel as though 
they had sustained a severe family bereave- 
ment, when they are compelled to surrender 
their ideal ape and to promote some primi- 
tive fossil bird to his honored position. 
However, they will soon forget their sor- 
row, and will be delighted to find that the 
truth of evolution is firmly established. 
Doubtless, other fossils will be found which 
will show us more clearly the successive 

steps of man's evolution from the bird. 

Men with wings must have existed at one 
period, and there must have been another 
period when crops gave way to stomachs, 
and feathers were supplanted by coats. We 
may feel confident that the rocks will yet 
yield us the skeletons of fossil men with 
wings, and crops, and caudal feathers, and 
thus furnish us with a complete and minute 
history ot the race since the day when the 
prehistoric owl determined to evolve a sci- 
entific person with dress-coat, spectacles, 
and ingenious theories, all complete. 



by the Repnbhouis of the Tint DIstriet ot Orence 
ConDtv. Mr. Graham wm » member of A.«*abl/ 
from UUter County in 1849. viA seals U 188X 



AMUSKMUNTS. 



PARK THKATRE. 

Two pieces now to Am,eric8n aadianoes 
broaebt tmt at the Park TbMtre lut 9r»aiag. 
Both are from the pen of W. 8. OAbmrt. end botk, 
M may be interred from the nam* of that wriHC, 
have literarv meriu of do commuD order. "Sweet- 
heart*" is s iw.vact comedy, and its theme is ttie 
separation ot two voane peraons in their yoatb 
and their reamon In aiter Vfars. It 
is a drlicate and almost sentimental work- 
and Iti dislosae la written with thnt 
deMzhtful ^race end finish, which wnnid redeem 
the play from any accnaerion of wealcneat wblob 
m^ebt be trronnded on ite sliKbt atmctare. *- Tom 
CoDb " is a three act faree, in which the anthor de- 
picts tte mishaps of a poor jAvsician. who oannot 
marry for lack of money, end who nltiaateiv In- 
herits— witbout. particalar rtavme ot reaaon— « ter- 
tane beloneinv to en ageJ miser, who ij 
proved to hAve been hit. frandfatber. AithtnA 
yesterday's performance of th»ae pieoei was ex- 
ceedinslv amooth and enterulninc we eaoeot tntt 
think that notblnr will be lost by a postponemeat 
of s detklled notice. Plsya of thii tort aost £«!» 
impre««iTeness by repeated reprMen'mliona, end w» 
therefore propo»e to defer conslderatl(.n of the ani^ 
j ;ct for a day or two. Meantime, it is oklj fair to 
monnon that " Sweethearta " and " XomCObb" were 
received with so much favor that they ep^ar bkoly 
to reyive the somewhat droopiiig furraae* of tba 
bouse. In the comed.r, Mr. Cyril Soerlo and Iti** 
Mary Howard bore off the honort; in "Toas 
Cobb," Mr. Thomaa VTblAo. a comMUa who has 
not acted in this city fur some teara, neraonitea 
the hero, and lit. J. C. Padeett and llias Analo 
Edmonson were particalarly conspicooaa in 
respective roles. 



l 



THE INDIAN CAMFAlQtf. 

OEN. WRSLBT MEBRIIT'S KXPE^tlOK— « 
PICKED FORCE OF MOUXTKD 1R0OP»-> 
HORSES STOLEN BT IKDtAlCfi. 
CniCAOO, Oct. 17.— A apecial diapatch froa 
Camp on Ampfcibions Creek Black Hills, Oet. U, 
via Fort Laramie 16b. aays: Gen. Merrlrr, with aiJ 
the best horse* of the Fifth CaTalry, Icfthm ihU 
mcmine, taking sixty aelectrd men trom the Seeond 
and 120 from the Third Cavalry, ten day*' rmlftmK 
and 150 roand* of carbine and twelve of putBl 
ammunition per man, en root* for tb* fork 
of the Cheyenne Bivrr, where a lort;* band of 
Indian* led by Crazy Horae and and other bosiile* 
are reported in Winter camp. The trenyt are in 
three detachments, officered by Capta. Peelc, 
Monahan, uia Van Vilet and by Llaota. HsH, 
King, and Smead. No WAgoas were tAkea. aad 
rations are carried by paek matea. The foor hun- 
dred fresh horse's which reached her* day betote 
yesterday, with recrnita for the Fifth. wiU b^ oaod 
in remoantinK the old aoldiera of this r«,iiaNat. 
who will accompany Gen. Merritt** flvlnc coloaaa. 
Cbetekmk, Oct 17.— The body of Pnyafa 7A*k«z, 
of £. Ciimpany, Srcona CarahT-, wa* broojihc Into 
HnnlOD'8 Kanche yestetd y. It waa not anrliatedi, 
bnt was atrp-ied or all clotbiDe. In tb* debt, Me- 
Elvaine and McFarlane. of Cbimner Sock, eaeh had 
a hnrte shot under him, and the latter neaiTed, a 
aligbt flesh-wonnd in the ri£ht aboolder. Tk« 
Indians were armed with Sharp's improT«d 
rflea, calibre forty, tbe number *ef tk« 

ahella beioE brought in by Seret. Parkar. 
±L B. Kelly, who cbbm in lo-day 
from tbe cattle cronnd, reoorts tweaty 
hedd or horse* stolen by Indian* fi^m Soarichtf* 
raoche laat oisht, and Asheotetter. a lanchoiaa. 
wuo started Irom George's rasche yesterday tor 
SeariEbt'ii, has nut arrived, aad it la sapuoaed 
be hai< been killed. A large band of Indiana are 
believed to be in tbe mouuiains, toward tha baail 
of the SabiUe. and more raids are booriy looked <ac 
in this Oirectiun. ▲ party is now orKanlsinc at tB« 
Chn r to fo tu tbe Sablile in aaatcb ot AsheaMtir. 
A traia just arrirod at tbe teleiiraph aaaap tt<«r 
Cun er reports aeeiBiC ZodUBs between that plaoa 
auU Bed Call .n. The line wiU reach Caster to-msc- 
ruw tiighi. ^^^^^ 

A PERMANENT EXHIBITION. 



NOTES OF THE CAMPAIGN. 



Tbe Democrats of the Eighteenth District ef 
this Suite have nominated 'Wallace W. Hartwell for 
Congress. 

The Democratic vote in Ohio did not come 
within 20,000 ot the expectations of the Democratic 
State Committee. 

The Bepublicans of tbe Fifteenth district of 
this State hare nominated Thomaa H. Tremper, ot 
Kingston, lor Conigress. 

Gen. MoCIellan being announced to take the 
Btump again, a Pennsylvania paper inquires if he 
can do it without calling tor retnforcemnnta. 

" We would say to Indiana, Gh>d bless you 
for the triumph vou haye given us." Thus did an 
ex-rebel General conclude a speech at a meeting in 
NashvlilP, TeniL 

Tbe Kentucky Republican State Committee 

Has requaated Col. T. O. Shaeketlord to anooonce 
himself a* a candidate for Congrea* in the Ssventb 
District ot the State. 

Tbe Democrats of tbe Tenth District of Mas- 
sachnsetts bave nominated S. 0. Lamb, of G-reen. 
field, fur Congress, and T. S. WUaon, of fltcbbarg, 
for Preaidenllal elector. 

Hon. Martin L Townsend has declined a pro- 

posiaoD from Hon. R. A. Parmenter, bis rival for 
election to Congreis, for a joint canvass of the dis- 
trict. Mr. Townseud regard* such a plan aa im- 
practicable. 

Democratic papers in Georgia are compelled 
to acknowledge the high -character of William 
Markham, tbe Republican candidttte for Congress 
in the Fifth District of ihsir State, and they evi- 
deutly dread the lasae of tbe contest 

One of the Demooratio candidates for Electors 
in Georgia, in a speech in Columbus, Saturday 
ni);bt, laid: "Oar record from Msnasiaa to Appo> 

matox is made, and by that we stand or fall, att to 
who was right in the war between the States." 

The Chattanooga (Tenn.) Commercial says 

that a Suuthero Democrat being asked if be did not 
tbink Mississippi is a Repablloan State replied : 
" Yes. they have 30,000 or 40.000 mijonty there, but 
it ia not avdilable just at present." It is time it wa* 
made available. 

A correspondent of the Rochester Democrat 
asserts that a few months ago Mr. Dorshoimer de- 
clared thav there were not twenty -five houMt Dem- 
ocrats In the County of Monroe. The Lieutenant 
Goyeruor was to* ill to speak in Bochester Friday 
night, as advertised, bnt was well enough to pursue 
bis Journey Saturday morning. 

In a recent letter Col. R. W. Ploumoy, of 
Mississippi, writes : " Constituted as oar i arty is. 
we are powerless to dei'end ourselves, and I ac- 
knowledge it But I think the Dem-wrata ought 
to permit us to vote unmolested. If, however, it is 
decided anywhere in the State that we shall not, 
let us rutoru home and appeal to the country for j 
protection ' 



THE PROJECT FOR CONTIXOraG THK CSS Of 
THk MAIK CEXTEXNIAL BtriLJDTKG WITH 
ITS (XaiBITS — PHILADELPHIA OCUCST* 
ED WITH TBE IDEA 

S^Kial Ditpatek to tkr Sei^York T%mm. 
I Philadelphia, Oct- 17.— Tbe idea of retsi»> 
: ing the Main Exhibition Snildin/, end aettisx np 
\ there a permanent extilbition. after th* style of tke 
j S5|denbam P^aoe, London, which ba* l>*«n talked 
; of here tor aom* time past, is now aMoain.' daf- 
; cite Hhape, and it waeld aeem that it wUl lie as ae- 
\ compliahed tact An inportaat oiioferwioe ma 
' held here to-day between the Paik CommiBsioi^era, 
' Board oi Finance of tbe Centeoniat CommissSoa. 
' and a cimmittee of citicens. It was learned at the 
' conference what the true latest of the pretectota of 
I tbe scheme la- Thcv propoae to aecar* aa many as 
I possible of tbe exhibit jis now in the OenraaBiad. 
I and have them maintain permanent eatabiiahneats 
i in toe bnildiog. Mr. Pettit aUted tbst at Icaat 
.' twenty per cent- of those now liavinc exhibit* had 
! promised to allow their di:>piay* to remain. TIm 
I agantof tbe Mexican Grovernment prumlsed that 
I his Govemaaeut exhibit ahonld remain, toe Vor- 

wegiaus are of like mind, and the Germaaa will do 
i tbr aame, proviied the duty i* paid on their rooda. 
I Mtssi*. Tiffkny &. Co- of New- York, the Oortiam 
i Comoan.v, and tbe largeat Jewe'ry and aliver-wara 
' manufacturers in tbe eoantry have oooaeoted to set 
I up exhibit* here, renewing them from time to time. 

The great poin t of intereat to i>artie* r**idiac ta othei 
i States and citiea, who wonld place sxhibtu there, 
■ is this : That in the eveat of the aaccM* of Ae 
' scheme they can place ir"Od* on txbibiaoa and *eU 
; by sanipl* as at present, bat no guods to be taken 
'•■ from tne cases. T5l« ia the aame as«theralea of 
j the present Centennial SxnibitioD. There U a fta- 
I tnie of some intereat at this point ia th* fact that 
I to 8^11 goods by sample here manafaerareta anal 
' dealers in N^w-York. tor instaoee, woe d 
; be compelled to take out a State lieriaae, 
' a* ia done now tor their " drummers." The cii*T 
' of starting this permanent exbioinoD will IMaboal 
i sir hundred tboaaaiid dollars, it is tnooyht, el, 
i wbicb tialf can oe raised at once and th* rrm^iBdei 
' iu a short time. The great trouble now i* in trtm- 
• ing tbe Main Building, as the P..rk Cummi»4onen 
! desire the company to take the itaobinery Hall, 

which is not a all ad.pted to tne wants of a jxwma- 

nent •how. This wiU b* an advanta<«on* •Xm te 

Philadelphia if it can be made soeceaafitl, aad tM 
I geutlemeo who bare the prolsat in chare* ue>»t 
\ the most ro»pect«i class or bastoes* men here. 

What is now de<irad Is aid from on side th» cl j. 

The exhibition fdver Is 8* wild here that the pH^wl 
I meets with grea'er Uvor than the CeotenBUl E* 

hluiUoo itaelf did^ 

THE CLOSISO OF THE EXatmTlOW, 
Philadblphia, Oot 17. — The Centwuiial 
Commission, in aeoret session to day, adopted tkt 

following: 

Hetolfd, That the eonmisaion adheres to ita de 
tenniuatlon to close the ExnllAtton the lOrh day o< 
iNovember, aud exhibitors wlU theivfur* be at 
liberty t<» commence the temoval of their good* mi 
the morning ot tbe 11 tb ef Norembet, In Moord- 
anf-e with the ragnlationa. 

R^olved. That tn order to permit persoas to ontMC 
tho ground* and buildings to receive article* »hic« 
were *old lo l>e deHvrred at lb* eloas of the Kxhibi> 
tion, and to afford exhibitors an oppjrtoniiy to dia 
pose ot nnsoid articles, the grounds shall be kept 
open aud au admission tee ot fltty cent* M chatVM 
during tbe wi-ek tollowing the close of ibeSniW' 
tiOQ sdU as long thereafter as tbe Dlreotcr Oeartal 
may deem necessary an* expadieut i«r th* urerset 
ot tn* exhlbitur*. 



VNIYEKSAL PEACE COSFBRESOM 
Philadelphia, Oct 17.— There was a oobxw 
ence ot various •v.iiigelical religions deaomlnatloas 
held at the Franklin InstitnU tbu morning, rep- 
resentatives from all aections of th* eonntry betag 

. ^, ^ .1 nrpaenL The oWoct of the meeting, aooordtac tc 

A Washington telegram says that an exami- f"''"',,'- T, ,„ /^^^er th. ln,«r«««f uniyeraal 



nation of ihe records of the Southern Claims Com- 
misbien shows that a number of rebel soldiers, who 
guarded the prison pens at Andersonville, .Sa is- 
Dary, and Libby have claims peudlog, and that in 
every insiance tbtre is an abundance of uiannfac- 
tnred evidence to ahow that they were always bit- 
terly hostile to seceusion and loyal to the Union. 

A Democratic orator in Georgia put this 
home question to Uia auditors! "Scratinizo tho 
reports of the Controller General and see if Georgia 
ought not to do well on less than $1,977,235 21 per 
annum. This wfta the estimate lor 1876. Cannot 
a lower estimate be mad* for 1877 f Ko p udent 
business man can doubt it. If we are aincere as 
to retrenchment and reform, ought we aot to begin 
at bomat " 

KcM'Bcaai Oct. 17.— Hon. J araea G- Graham, 



0] 



nf tMa altv. W«a 



to-dav neminated to |,J^| A^*t]^^ \ f}i|y{irjt*4 (y.f tkf ^^t 



the call, was to 

peace. A letter was read from J.ihn Bnghl, 
England, and apeeche* were daltvered by eereral o: 
the delegate*. The fotlawing permanent officers 
were splected : Preaident Rev. Dr. Howard Mal- 
colm ; Vice Prealdoiit, Barnabas.lobbs; -Seorewrr. 
Uiram Iladley. oi Cuicaso. Another •e*»ii*a wiu 
be held this evening. 

At the aftemtmn srsaion of the Peace CouV*aiion 
« aeries of reaointian* wa* adop'ed approvins oi 
the etfort* that hav* b«eu luade aud ar* b^iui m»;ie 
to devise aud pi..™ iteotber nie*n- taan war fur tne 
BPttlement of difficultie* between naujn*. and oro- 
viaing for the Rppointmeut of a com mt tie* I 
pare an address to the cbnrctios 
awaken a deeper intereat in 
of peace. At the evening 
resolution approving of the policy UJaajmnite4 by 
Presidenr Graot "f mtms.lBg the C'^*.'«'yr "r."^ 
of the Indians to otfioera nomiuated by ihe Chrla- 
tiau muBi-.narr socieOe* ot th* coun.rv. »m 
adopted. The Committee flta Biufness Arraosi*- 
meiits forto.morrt).r«>erte-,ai«t the o«.T«»Uon 



Pra- 
ia ordei to 
tbe snbjeoc 
Session a 



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AiNOTHER TRACE OF TlLDEiN 

— ♦ — 

INTERESTiyG IJlSI lAlONY IN COURT. 
ins JOINT INTKRK T WITH THESOtt W. PAUK, 

OF KMMA MINE FAME, IS A $25,000 FUKD 

TO SKCCUB LEGISLATION IN TUB 8TATB 

OP WdlCH H£ IS OOVERNOR — TBK NKW- 

' TOKK CSCNTRaI. ONl>KRGBOnNI>RAIL.WAY 

, COMPANY AND SOME CF ITS D0INO3. 

Special DUvatch to tht JftW'Forlt Times. 
PoCQBKSKPSis, Oct. 17. — ^The following im- 
portant osite Cuui« np in the Sapreme Court to-day, 
bMore Justice Jotepb F. Batnard : 

OU»er W. Hartif vt. George H. Brown, John S. 
ScXultx. Jot^h HeligmaTi, John Q Hoyt, Trenor IT. 
Park, A ndreic McRinixtv. CharUt L. KimbalL Orot- 
vmor i». y.oterv. CharUt J- Canda, and Abia A. 
S««»cr.-.TUep1minMff«lleKedtnatio 1878 he wm 
PnaiUfDtur ud tbeoiTDerof the mulonty of tb« 
»bares ok the Nkw-YoiIc Centrul TJnderarrouoa 
B..Urotd Cooip my. anil also intereated in n cootract 
With ona Bnne. for tho conatrnctlon of the road; 
tftat defendants Browu and S«li]cniBn entered Inio a 
AMitrttct TTith hiiD by which they were to acqaire tho 
euntzol of the road and Bo^rdof Dir«otors.andlie was 
to a«II ibetD bis stocic .ind bis interest m tlie Byrne 

coBtnet and was to rcceiv« the gnm of 1875. OCO, and 
in th« rrent of cerraio ameodnieota vasain? the 
X«Cislctiire waa to hare 3,000 shares of 
fttllT paid up stook in the companv. which 
waa to be stven bim some time in Janu- 
ary, lc73; that to JanuAry. 1873, tho money 
was paid, and defendant Brown dellTered to him 
two o«rvi6oares of stock amotintine to 2,000 shares ; 
that afterward plaintiff foond out that this atoclr 
waa not rally paid np, bat wa^ issued to .persona on 
pi^tended claims (la plaintiff claimed) for ser- 
Ticea and then given to plal itiff; that John Q. 
Hoyt r«o»JTed 500 shares; Trenor "W.Park, 950; 
C^«rt•s J. Canda, £50, and others, all atbount- 
inrto S,(00 Uiares, which was siren for adTancea 
and aemces, and were frauduUnt and worrhleai). 
Plalnnffalso ciaimed that after he had reoelTed 
hia 2,000 sbarev the defendants then Inrtber 
eomblned ae?.iaat him to preTont bim from bavioK 
opntrol of the company, which the 4000 shares 
woali sire him, aod is>aed on pretended claims to 
tWaaielTes S,4J0 shaies of otber stocic Plaintiff 
«Ialm d damages (250. COO. 

Xbe flr»t witnea* «'xamined was Trenor "W. Pari: 
«f Emma Mine notorieiy, and his appearance on 
tba wlrupss stand exoited much ioterest. He 
tcvttOed that he resides at Benntncton, Yt., and on 
the ll;b of January, 1873. waa told he wasaDirescor 
of the Central UaderKruaod Bail way Comnany; he 
attended hut one maetlog of the board and 
bad nerer presented a bill to the company. 
IZk \% % I«wf«T. He did not prerlotu to the 
meeting of the Directora that he attended aathorize 
any one to T>r««ent a bill for bim. One was pre- 
wored and made oat in hi!) nam", bat he hain't an- 
Tbt>r!X -A aiiy sneh tbiuK. The bill waa for {33,000 
for arrTicea rendered. He testified, however, that 
ha la4 an asr^nt who was aotin{( for him, and he pr<>- 
ssated the LLi. bat never by any special reqaeat of 
witaeaa. ', 

ioAffi Kelson, of counsel for Oliver "W. Barnes, 
the pUiotiff called tbe above witness to show that 
tb« latter'a bill aa presented was a bozoa one, and 
as tbere were several others of a like nature. Judge 
Sfelaon took the gronnd that all were fraudulent. 

In addition to his testimonr aa presented aoove, 
air. Park furthrrtestifisd that at the meetine re- 
terred to be told tbe Direotora he had rendered no 
•errlce. but bad an houeat claim of SS3,000 aKainat 
tb« ITadersronnd Bailway Company for money ad- 
'vanoed. and atterward he reoeired his pay in the 
stock of the company, and transferred It and ro- 
'Orived cash for It out nf the funds of the Kew- York, 
&i»4ton end Montreal Bailroad Company. 

At this JuDclnre wi.nesa waa aaked why he had 
made advances to the Central Fodaricround Bail- 
way C<>mpany. fie replied quickly, cansisx much 
sarpnse, aa fullowa : 

"I bad male advancea to the TJoderfETOund Btil- 
way Cbmpany of l&S.OOO to be used in procuiine 
certain leci*ia'ion. I was never informed of ibe 
entire au-onuc that waa raiaed, but the $25,000 was 

'«ODr ahari*." 

Tbefi the qnes'ion was put to him as to who he 
aeactby ''oar " tbare, and he replied as follows 

"I bad •iT-ti'nths of it, Mr. Selkman one-tenth, 
Bimoel J. 11 den one-tenth, and Mr. Tildeo's two 
brothers each a tentb. We were all interested in a 
hne uf rail way aireody constructed from Char ham 
iFour Coroers to Bailand." (Harlem Extension.) 

This fand <it tS5.000 waa pat m tbe hands of Mr. 
I>ai.can to pay L- eialative expenses tor procurins 
unaodroents to the cnarter to saunre to tbe Under- 
esoondSMiroid an inlet into New-Turk in connec- 
Hon with the Sew-Turk, Boston and Montreal Ball- 
i»4d. 

Oa h<a erosa-examination wltneas testified that 
110,000 was pa:d to Jaize Hilton fir coins to Albany 
and anpeartoK before th<> Committee. 

Tbe above teatimony waa givtrn in a atrsizbtfor- 
mtii manner, and caoaed looka of aatonisbment 
aaenfc tbe mt-mbera ot tbe Bjir. 

Xbe next witness called was Mr. Canda, tbe 
treasorar of the UadsiKmuod Bailro<id C^impany. 
33.a testified that, alttaoajth boldins the ofBce of 
Tr«<»ur«r. he had nerer sees anythins of tbe 
t9$,0a0 alluded ta 

Tht.t Closed the testimony when Justice Bernard 
ordered a oun-aait on the grtmoos that tbe oilKinal 
eon tract between B.irnea and Brown and Seligman 
waa void tor two reaaona. 

ifint— It purported to convey tbe ri^t to 
Barnes in a contract to build a road of which be 
waa Preaideat, which waa against nubUo polity and 

£iee^d— That the asreement to transfer the con- 
' tSDl of tbe Board of Direvtora from Barnea to Brown 
tfrcted ibe tlsbts if the mincrity of the stcck 
holders, anJ was asaibst public polity and void. 

In its remaiks the court was aevare upon the 
maebioations cf larce corpoiations, in wbioh a few 
n«B scU out the rights of tbe iiotorant and Inno- 
Best, gtvine tbeir victims no wamtuir whatever. 
Iba lawyer* yreaent worked harmonionaly toee b<>r 
to tot the recoid lizht, it beins conceded that the 
I will now go to tbe Geoeral Term. 



SAIBTMEA'S DAY IN I'RILADELPEIA. 



on the tabloA or moat of the third-otaaa baardlng- 
houses In ibo ooutiiry, and even find Ita way Into 
hosiehieaof greater preteoaious. TheBuiierand 
Kjfiio AsMOClatiou will t«ko viittiroiis measures, at 
the next seMniDii of tha rariouit St ite Lpgi^lttiures, 

to see thai hereafter, when oleoiuargarine butter 
is sold, it sbflll be so uiiirked, aud thai th% dccep- 

tioii piac'iced on the paolic atiall be done awav 
witb. A diacniiaioa waa also had rt'laiive to a gold 
and silTpr medal which the assocatiun desire to 
nward for the best display of butter and cheese, and 
ll wan decliled lo refer the matter to the Cen ennial 
Joduen io Dairy, Products, with the audition of an 
expert from the aasooiutiou. 

1)! theaiternoon ihu American Dairvmen's Asso- 
ciation met, (.TAnluer B. W<:ek», E-q., presiding in 
tDi> absence ot ilun. Horaiio Soymoui. the Presi- 
dent. ■ This meetiog was held for the purpose of 
hearing papers read relative to sciontiflo farininj!, 
unJ of advancing the interests of the farmers in 
relatioD to butter and cheese making. Prof. L. 
Wctherill, of Boatou, read a pHper on '"Dairy 
Stock." )tud Hon. Harris Lewis, ex-President. «t the 
JTew-Tork Slato AKricultur.il Society, followed by 
one on ••Bntter-maklnit." Ppp^r* will also be read 
at the meeringa bv Henry V. Wood. Esq., of Lon- 
don. En«lan<J; Dr. E. L. Stuitevant, Boston; J. H. 
Bt-all. PbilHdelpiiia; Prof. E. W. Stewart, Hon. 
Thomas Biillautvue, Stratford, Canada; Prof. G. C. 
Caldwell, Conieil UniverM y; Prol. E. S. Horstord, 
Cambridge, Mus. To-morrow attenioon both asso- 
ciations will be entertained by the Produce Ex- 
change, of f hiladelpbia. 



preaent, and in tbe judgment of the committee the 
apmnpriatioDs shoald b« 1300.000 and not lesi than 
150,000 of this sh uld go to payiue off the ilebt. R>- 
P'jrts were reaU from ihe missions in China, India, 
and Turkey. John 7iiuni; wa» noiumau-d t'>r Indi- 
an Agent at tbe Biackleet Agency. Three miasion- 
anea in Chioa left tbe st-rvice. but nn aDpnintments 

wure made in tbeir plactis. Kev. Bishop Levi Sco t 
was elected Pri-sident in place of Bishop Janes, de- 
ceased, and Rev. Daniel "Willy was elected Vice 
Pretildent. A committee of twelve were appointed 
to represent tbe society at the meeting of the Gen> 
eral iiiaslonarj Committee. 

TEE WEAiaEE. 



THE WOkK ON THE BRIDGE, 



ONB END OF THE FIRST CRAPLE CABLE 
FIRMLY ANCHORED — INFORMATION THAT 
MAY BE OF VALUE TO MASTERS OF 
LARGK VESSELS. 
The work of stretching the first of tho " cra- 
dle " cablet! of tbe Ea^l R ver Bridge was resnmed 
yesterday, and the end which had been carried to 
the sammil of the Brooklyn tower on Monday, was 
aafelT taken to the anchorage and firmly secured. 
The slaclc waa then hauled in on the 3[ew> 
York side, leaving everything in readiness 
fur tbe workmen to begin tbe opera- 
tion of carrying tho otber end to the 

anchorage on thia aide of the river thia morninir. 
FarnngtOD, tbe master mechanic, who has ooen 



M 



superinteudiiig tbe work, said that ita prosecurion 
bad necessarily been vet y slow, as the cable was 
couiparatively a very larite one, and oul.y two of bia 
lueu had bad any previona expeiit-nce in that kind 
ot wiirk. Tbo.y bad gained considerable knowledge 
within the last two days, however, and be tbougot 
tbai they would be able to place tne iuur remaining 
cables iii put»l ion in much leas lime than tbat occu- 
pied in Placing this one. Qe said that he exoecied 
to carry toe eua of the present cable to ihe anchor- 
aee oo this side of the river bv tnia aftei-noon, and 
that al bough be might possibly accomplish it 
early in the day, he did not ihink that be would be 
able to release ihe caOle from the carrier puliies by 
which it is suspenoed trum tbe smaller cable un'.il 
to-moirow. Tola operation, be said, would not be 
attended with any difficulty. Ihe large cable would 
be hauled taut, and would then be so close to tbe 
carrier that there would be no titrable in liberating 
it trum tbe hooka by which it ia now suspended 
troui tbe palliea. This would be elfeuted by two 
men, who would atari trom opposite sides ot the 
river in " boatswain's ohaiis, controlled by a mes- 
senger lino frtm each tower. They would be ;:rad- 
ually lowered along the earner cable, releas- 
ing dko large cable aa they went along, 
and would mret in the middle of tne space between 
the towers. Each would then be hauled back by 
meana of the messenger linea, and the operatiou 
would be oonclnded. Tne master of a Bniiih ship 
called at the 2(«n-Tork office yesterday moruiog in 
order lo learn tbe neigfat ot tbe cable, which is now 
banuing In gracdtui loops between the towers, 
above toe varrace oi tbe water, as be wanted to take 
hitt vesael from the £<8t to the jduaHon Biver. lie 
said tbat the disiauce trom his main truck to his 
snip'* water .ine waa Just 175 feet. Mr. Alartin, the 
en;;iueer iu charge, at once weut to tbe top of the 
iiiew-york tower, aod ascertained by observation 
that at 200 feet from the aoore there was 210 feet 
clear between tne cable and high water. 



PROBABU-ITIES. 

Washington, Oct. 18—1 A. M. — For tKe\Mid- 
die and Kattern StaUi riting barometer, colder, and 
generally clear weather, heavy frotU ; and wind* veer- 
ing to north weit or northeast in the latter, but veering 
to north-eaeL and later to totUh-eaet,^ with falling 
barometer, in the former, 

IN THIS CITY. 

The tollowlng record shows the changes in 

the temperature for the past twenty-fonr hours, in 

comparison with tbe corresponding date of last 
year, ns indicated by the thenuomeier at Undnnt's 
pharmacy: 

1876. 1876.1 1876. 1876. 

3 A. M 4l-> 42°\ 3:30P.U....tiZ° 53° 

6 A. M :19° 44°i 6 P. M 60° 47^ 

9 A. M 41° 47° 9 P. M 48° 43° 

12 M 47° 65oll2P. M 48^ 410 

Average teinpera'ure yesterdiiy 46'a° 

Average temperature for correapuuding date last 
year. 46 V 



KlSGSLkT AND KISENEY'S SVIT. 
The trial of the salt uf Kingsley and Keeney 
againat tbe City of Brooklyn for the reeovery of j ^p'romilnd consequently 
$178,000, alleged to be due for extra work performed ' 
on ihe Hempstead Biservoir, was continued yester- 
day in the Common Council Chamber of the Brook- 
lyn City Hall, before the Ktferees, Messrs. Lutt, 
Rodman, and Fisher. The prooeedinga consisted of 
a long argument by Mr. Van Cott, one of tbe coun- 

bel# >r tbe plaintiffs, in reply to the argument of 
Mr. John H. Parsooa, oo the m:>tion of oelendant's 
coonuei to dismiss tbe suit on the ground 
that the City ot Bruokl.vu was not bound by the 
rontracr, because it-was Hi.;nedoiily b; Mr. Fowler, 
PreMdentof the board, and he waa not authorizei 
to Hign It. Mr. Van Cu^t argued that Mr. Fowler 
was a city official, and as^sucb. author ized to sign 
the contract, and tbat the city waa boand by the 
act i. n of its agents. Besidef, il tbe otber Commis- 
fei luers did not sign tbe cout-auc, they were pre^eot 
when It waa signed, and beuce were bound by its 
pruvisiona. Io waa true that tbe cLutract-jrs had 
Hut completed tbe couiraot, but they would bave 
done so it ihey bad not been preteuted by the city. 
Mr. Van Cott waa follower by Mr. Do Witt, io be- 

baif iif the motion. At the uoucluuon of Mr. L>e 
Witt's remarK.i, tbe Referees announced that they 
had decided lo adjouru the case unul Tuesday nexi, 
at which time they will render their decision on the 
luoiion to diaiiiias tae comolaint. 



ARRIVALS AT THE HOTELS. 
Hon. Luke P. Poland, of Vermont, is at the 
Grand Central Hotel. 

Prof. E. E. Salisbury, of New- Haven, is at the 

"Weatminster Hotel. 

Ex-CoDKresaman Bart Van Horn, of Lock- 
port, N. T., Is at the Astor Honse. 

T. N. M. Yosio, of the Japanese Centennial 
CommiialoD, Is at tbe St. James H3teL 

Gen. Albert G. Lawrence, of Eh'de Island, 
and Llent. Command<>r Frederick Badgers, United 
States Navy, are at the Gilsey Hunae. 

William D- fiiabop. President of tbe New- 
York, New-Haven and Hartrord Railroad Com- 
pany, is at the'Everott House. 

Bey. Dr. James Eells, of San Francisco, and 
M. Mngbitt, General Manager ot the Chicago and 
Northwestern Railway, are at tbe St. Niobolaa 
Hotel. 

Lortl Dufferin, Governor General of Canada ; 

C. B. Bright, Preaident of the Northern Pacific 
Kallroad Company, and Frederick Billings, of Ver- 
mont, are at the Breyoort House. 

Ex-Congressman J. M. Warren, of Troy; 
,'Wiiliam H. Eeiuble, of Poiladelphia ; Katbaniel 
Wheeler, of Conneotlcut, and Wiiliam R. Joynt 
and W. O. D. Goff, of rhu Irish Bifle team, are at 
,the Fifth Avenne Hotel. 

THE AMERICAN CENTENNIAL, 1876. 

WHERLER St, WILSON VTCTORTOUS ! 

Again the Whbeler & Wilson Sewino- 
}IACHI.N'£B trinrapb over the world. Tbe Centennial 
Commission have otUclaliy announced the awarda, 
and decreed for tbe new Wheeler & WiUon mac^e 
two Diplomat of Honor and two Medals of Merit 
This IS a double victory, and the highest award 
which it was in the power of tbe Centennial au- 
thorities to bestow. Xo otber sewing-machioe re- 
ceived such a recognition. More than thirty of the 
best producers of machines in tbis and other coun- 
tries entered for competition, and at Philadelphia 
in 1876, as at Vienna in 1873. and at Paris in 1667, 
Wheeler & Wilson lead the list. After a careful, 
rigorous, and exhaustive examinatiuu, the jud.^es 
unanimously decided that tbe superior excellence 
of these machines deserved more than one medal or 

they recommended two 
of each. The Centennial Commission unaoimonnly 
ratified the action of the judges, and the public 
will indorse tbe decision of tbese ablest of meoban- 
leal experts. A claim of equally distinguished 
honor fur any otber aewing-macoine is only an at- 
tempt to hoodwiuk the peoole. Read the following, 
which stamns the "New Wheeler & Wilson" as the 
standard setoiTig-machine of the world. From the 
official report : 

; AWARDS TO WHBKLKE & WILSON. 

1. A Medal and Diploma for the "^ew Wheeler 
Si. Wilson Sewing Machine," for the folio wiog rea- 
sons : 

" A LocJe-stiteh Sewing-maeMne, unsurpassed in 
the fine workmanship q/ tt» parts, great originality, 
great adaptabi'.itu to different kind* of work both in 

Cloth and Leather, beauty of atilek, ease and rapidity 
of motion, and eompletenet* of display." 

S. A Medal and Diploma for tbe "Ifew Wheeler 
& Wilson Sewing-machine " for Leather, for " Su- 
venor qtiality of work in Leather Stitching." — ix- 
ehar^ge. 



FIRE IS A PUBLIC SCHOOL. 
Between 12:30 and 1 o'clock yesterday after- 
noon a fire broke oat on tbe second fi )or ot the 
school building in Broome street, near Sheriff, occu- 
pfed by Public School No. 31. of which H nry C. 
Martin ia the Principal The floor on which the fire 
i>ocarred is occupied by the primary department, uf 
wbico Mrs. Hannah M. Gedney Is tbe Priucipal. 
The fire occurred in a recess between tbe s airway 
and a dreaalug-room used by the female teaober<). 

Through this recess runs the main steam pipe, 
which Conveys the stOim trom the apoaratua io the 
basement to the radiators in the dittereut class- 
roumx. It was very loitunate that tbe fire oc- 
cuired during the uoon recess when very few of the 
childron were in tbe bniidiog. Michael Morao, 
when informed of the ilre, endeavored to extiu- 
gaish It, but wiiboui success, anil an alarm was 
sent out to the FiieDepanmeiit. The firemen were 
promptly at the i<choo>, aud tbe fire was quickly ex- 
tliiKuislied. Tbe daoiase to the ouildlug; will out 
exceeo $200. Tbe fire ia suoposod lubavo origiuated I 
irum uvcriieaiiug ihe steaui-pioe. ' 



the 



yana or thr seckicts of BarrER-MASiNO 
— :hi! National buttbr and egos 
aaiOCiAiioN— s.^LLKRii of oleoharga- 

BIAK FOB HUTTKB TO BE PROSECUTED. 
Upeetat Ditpateh to Oie Hmo- Torh Ttmt*. 

Philadelphu, Oot 17->A (creat melting ot 

(b« National Batter and Eggs Asaoclation waa bald 
to-day at tbe Jadgea Pjviiioa on the Centennial 
grotnds. Tbe attendance waa larss, incladlng 
abvat seTenty-3ve representativea. The day 
gathared addiii<mal tmpirtance firom the fact of 
being termed '• Dairymen's Day," and the aitond- 
anoe wasaeatly one bnnjrjd tbaasaod paying viai- 
tota. Mr. George £. Groome presided at tbe meet- 
lag. Tbe d^irv interests of America are ot vast 
Importance; It ia estimated that there are 13,- 
000 COO cowa in tbe country, and the producta trom 
lb«m in tbe «hape of batter, oheeae. condensed 
nUk, &c.. Is valued at between fire and six millions 
ftf dollars per year. Of tbis the oen'ral and northern 
per.ivaa of Kew- York State coma in for a larize 
parecBtage. ThaaCdressof <he President oalied 
tUantion to the fact tbat 10,000.000 pounds of but- 
"■Mt. rained at nearly two miilii.-B dollars,' had been 
ixponad from tbeTToited State i to Europe since 
the 1st of Jannaiy last. Tbe batter rate on rail- 
Miads baa been reunsed trom second to ihird class. 
Baking a saving of t60 per car. He oalied a>- 
laoitoti tba manntaotor* and sale of ols'imarxa- 
Ine lathe large citie«. where it is dlspoael of 
I* para batter, at tbe saire prices aa tbe genuine 
irtiela. This has grown to such great propertiona 
i»io call for le^slat re aid iu tbe butter-producing 
Statca and demands tbe panUhment of the parties 
Who sell It and practice the deception. Cases were 
rited where larg'- manatactarea in Giaawow make 
ap the article and «npply th<> United Kinizdom with 
Hi, one of tbese factories being a nublicly-kcow u 
**au«p works." Its general use teods to ruin legiti- 
mate trade, while it^ brings large proflta to the 
Biakna. Oleomargarine i^ a cumooand made of beef 
fat finely renderfd and cleared of impuritiea by a 
aocret proeead. Ids packed m barrels and tierces, 
■Ml exported <trer the whole world, oils and greases 
!< various kinds and floe quality belnz made from 
lt;\ UlXed with ftesb mtilc it haa the appearance 
cf/ good batter, and ao oioae la the 

eptiun that it reqatrw an expert to 
SettMsr tbe fraud. The mani;laeture of It requires 
Costly niAcbiurry aud a tboroiutb knowl«d£<>ol the 
tti^iuexa. else what Will bu made will turn out only 
Ht tur Wheel grease. Tba OOKt ot fitting out the lac- 
lorl a no doubt deters many from embarking lu tbe 
burliieaa. IC l« represented that butter made 
rr m this article la sold axtenkirely in STew.Yurk 
dity. aatt tiieco eaa b«A.o dattbt ttotitirlU bo XOiuil 



TBE aCAyTi WATJiH t-XTPPLY. 

In respon.se to a communication from 
Board ct Health in relation to the scanty water 
snppl.y on tbe eait side of the Ci.y, based upon a 
report maue on tliat subject by Sanitary Inspector 
Viele, Mr. Allan Campbell, Commiaaioaer of Public 
Worlts, has sent a letter to the board. In which he 
says : " The Depar meat of Public Works will not 

be ab'e to tumish a full supply of water until after 
a rainlall of aever.l daya in toe Croton baain. Toe 
rsceui rains only aii«intiy and temporarily lu- 
cre sed the fl3W of water in the Croton Kiver, 
Which, at no time since Jane 37, was tqaal to the 
capacity of the i queduct and the snpul.v needed fur 
the City. Thearatu upon the atored water in the 
rexervoir an;! lakes to make up the dtficienov ia 
the natural fi jw have been so heavy that the suppl^- 
iu the City was ueues arily reduced." 

MOHVALILY STAIISFICS. 

At the meeting of the Board of Health, yes- 
terday, Dr. NagliN tbe Deputy Eegister W Vital 
Statiatics, preaented the following report : 

There were 486 deatba reported for tho Week endlno' 

Satard<i.v, Oct. 14, being a decrease of 14 us compaied 
with tbepreoedini; weeic, and 61 less than the num- 
ber luportuu uui-iuj; the Rorres >ondlni: weea ot 1»75. 
Tli»- acta^ uiort ilitv ror too weeK euding Oct. 7 wiis 
469. which is 13 below tbe average numter of deatba 
reported lor tbe coirespoudiag weea of the past five 

years, and repiesentj an anuuai death-rate ut ;i2.8S, 
tl e populatioa estimated at l,((<i6.746. Deaths irom 
oiputhei la d> creasc'l 4 ; Djeiuuranous croup, i; whoop- 
in i cough, 3; typhoid fever, 6; puerperal diae-ses. 
3: diarnieai diseases. 0; caa-er. 7; phthiais 
pulmo.iaiis. 1; miraamua a<id bcrotula. 3; ueaiba 
o; persoua soTcnty vea.s of ag»j or more, 3. and 
chil'izeu- uniier flveye-arsot age, 15: and kcarlatina 
iucreaaed 2; bruuihiils. l ; diHeasca of the net reus 
k.y .tern 3, and liriaht's disease 10 darlnx the past, 
compared with the previ.^us weelc Mo deaths w.-rs 
repurteil fisin siuuli-pox and ineaaels durinit tlie week. 
Ijoriutfthe three uoutiia eiidlue tiept. .1.), there were 
8,f^u>:eaths.ade reasei.f ^47; 6.1113 hlrths, a dccieivse 
ol 5 ; ],57iJ m irria^sej. a deer aae of '-'IS: 532 still 
births, an tnciease of 18. as compared with tho lorr— 
s^/omlinu quarter or iU76. Une thousand three huii- 
oieU aud t riy-uight dei«th» were reported iu lustliu- 
tioiis; 2.45.i inb'-use* coutaliiiiiK three familiba aud 
less; 5,ul2 iu hiiuitea cuutuiiiin^ fjur f,iiui;les aud 
more (tciiemeat-buua<;k,) anu 55 lu hotels aud boarJ- 
iiig-huuses. 

A BANCO "STEEUtlH" IN OUSTODT. 
William Morgan, a well-dreased young man, 
was Drought before Superiuteudi^nt Waltiug, by 
Capt Murray, of tbe Fourth Precinot, yeaterday, 
charged with being a " ateerer" fot a ''banco" 
game. Morgan was arrested on complaint of Charles 
Van Dyke, aresident of Illiaoia, at preaent a cuest 
at Leggett's Hotel In Chatham stree', who alleges 
tbat .vlurgau attempted to inveigle him into a 
" banco" gums iu the ueiabborbood of Park row, 
but he had bem swindled before lu a similar manner 
and SFizliig tbe young mau by tbe collar held him 
nn il tbe antvai ut a policeman. Morgan's picture 
will Ia a lew oa>a adoi-u the R tga^s' Gailery. , 



AMERICA AHEAD IN SPOOL COTTON. 
The Judges of Awards and tbe Cemtennial 
commission have dispelled another delusion which 
haa prevailed in thia country in favor cf cotton 
thread of British minutao are, aud against tbat ^ f 
domestic production. Heretofore it has only been 
neopsaary to place an Enelish trade-mark on a ap'>ol 

to insure its sale. Now. however, a diff rent order 

of ttainga ia introduced, and after a careful teat of 
all tbe cotton threads and yams from the most 
noted factories at hiiiae and abroad, bv twdlve ex- 
pert ludifes, we are told tbat the Wiluuantic i cm- 
FAXr. of Hartforl. Conn., produces the best cotton 
thread in the world ! 

Let Amenuaus read tbe following and be glad of 
another triumph tor American industry and enter- 
prise : (Olllcial copy.) 

Centennial Exhibition, Philadelphia, 1S76. 

The UNriED .-states Cknte.snial <,ommibsion an- 
nounces the Tollowiui; as rue hknes ot au award lo 
the WiLixuANTic Lurait CouPANT, Of Uartford, 
Conn.: 

PKO DUCT.— Spool Cotton, Fine Yams, and Ma- 
chines for winding and ticketing spools tor sewing 
threads. 

AWARD. — For originality and completeness ofsys- 
tim ; excellence of machinery and appliances, (the 
vnnding machine being theinvention of tiezekiah < o- 
TiantJ andfur oVPalilOlil I X and HCONuiiY «/ 
production; alto for exeeUenee of material and variety 
of colors qf threads. 

Sigue.i, A. T. G03H0RN, Director General. 

J R. HAWLEY, Preat. J. L. Camfbell. Sec'y. 
—Exchange. 

Bilious Disorders, LrvER Complaint, Cos- 

TiVBNESS, Sec., are speedily removed by Dr. D. 
Jayne's Sanative Pili^, a remedy mild and oenaln 
in aciiun, and may be taken at any time without 
ri»k from exposure. Sold everywhere.— AdverttM- 
ment. _ 

To BE FIB8T in any biauch of effort is a praise- 
worthy effort that all enersetlc men strujgle for. This 
has been attained bv B. T. Babbitt, he soa|im'>nu- 
facturer. In his last urodu^'t the itAnr koap, he has 

surpassed himself, for be has orcxiuced an ur li!ie ab- 
solutely liee from everything daugeruus to the most 

driicote skin, tbe fai«hest attainment in loiiet and 
Bathing Soapt.~-AdverlUement. 

AOBiAN H. MULLBB & SON sell at auction on 
Thursday at the Exchange, some 364 lots at PorJbnm 
Heights. Twenty-fourth Ward. Maps of the property 
at their office. — .^dvertu^ment. 



The Hiohbst .^WARD graated any exhibitor bv 
Centennial i>xpoaitloa Is olven the Elastic Tbcss (To. 
for ijiLK KzasTic TuvitBi. Sold only at 6S3 Broadway. 
— .^dv«rli««iMn(. ^^^^^ 

In Everybody's .VI oath. 

The niime of Jobs a. Docoan. Na 10*2 Nasssu st.. Is 
faiaiiiax, but his tiATs are taiuous. — .Advertiaement, 



VVilbor'a Cod l.iver Oil and Liime.— The 
frieuda uf persons who omvo been restored fr,im cun- 
£rmed conaaniptio.i b.y the use of (Ins origin il prepa- 
ration, and the grateful imrties themseiveii, have b." 
recummeimiog it aud Bcknowledviu>< lis wonderfiil 
efficacy, given the article a vast pupu'aritr In New- 
Eu;a>ind. Tlie Col) LIVkB OIL is iu tnls combina- 
tion r iltbed ot ita unple aa t taKte. aud r^-miered 
doubly effective iu beina coupled with the lime wbtch/f' 
is itselt a restorative pHncipie. supplyiiii; mtute with 
.lust the aanist.ince r. quired to he .1 .ind reiurm ihe 
diseased lunss. A. b. vy ILBUB. Boston, proprietor. 
Sold by all drugglata. 

Bxtracf of Canhmere Bouquet and Other 

fioe uertumes tnr tbe hanukeru tei, »ud FINU 1 uiL,r.T 
bOAPS, madeby CULtl.^TK k CO, are offered at toair 
Store, No. 1,166 Br.adwar, near 27tli at, 



Reduced rrltb water, Parker's GIn-er 

TOMC gives iQst.,nl relief from the I'aiui and bowel 
difflcultits of Chlldien Teething. 



BODHNE.— In BrooTclyn. Monday, Oct. 16. Mixiria, 
only daughter of Ansel and Julia C. Bourne, iu the I9th 
ye r other aga 

'ITie rel tivei and friends of the 'amll.y arc re«pect- 
fnllr inviteil to attend tbe tanei-al fium the resilience 

of her parents. iSo. 25 ■* Reap St., on Thursdty, lilth 
liibt„Bt2o'cl.ckf. M. 

BUUkN.— Oil Monday Oct 16, GAXiLiai. Baoair, In 
th 18Hi .year ot ui3 uae. 

Fuiieai te take place at his late realdence, Nn. 76 
Uihst, Biooklyn, B. U.. to-day at 3 P. M. he tc- 
maius to be talieii to Westpoit, Coon., for interment 
to-m'irrnw morning. 

CLAIiKbON.— at Pntsdnm. St. Lawrence t-onnty, N. 
T., on Nunday, tbe 15tli Inst., Lavuroi, Suu of the late 
Thiimts Streatheld Clarkivun. 

bs t'OPl'RT —On Uoadav, Oct 16, Kixlooh Fawcstt, 
only child of Henry and/Laara F. de Coppet, aaed 2 
years. 1 iniinth. and In uVvs. 

Belatlves and friends of the family ar« respectfully 
invited to attend the ftinenl from thn residf nee of his 
grnodtHthor. No. 22 West 17th St., on T hursday. the 
19th. at 12 o'clock. 

Dyorr.— At New-Roohelle, on Tuesday, Oct. 17, 
Hbnbibtta, wife of John Dyott, formerlr of the o.d 
Park Theatre. 

Noiiee uf luneial hereafter. 

hDVyAKDS — On th loth uf Oct., In the 65lh year of 
her age, .sarau cowabds. widow i f Uenrtre Kdwjids. 

Her friends ind 'hose of the family are Invited tc the 
funeral on Thursday, the I9th, from th.- residence of 
her Bon-lu-law. Jesse Haney. No. 1,233 3daT.,at IP. 
M. precisely, to piocend to tVoiidlawn for Interin-nt. 

KLLIOTT.— On Saturday, 14lh inst, at the residence 
of her son-hi-lttw. A. L. Rapp, at Germantowii, Phila- 
delphia, OiAKiii. widow or Samuel m. Elliott, late ot 
Stafen Island, in the 65th .year other age. 

The friends of the tarn I'y are invitetTto attend the 
funeral at the Christian Cliureh, Irvlogtou, S. J., on 
Wednesday tbe 18ta, at 2 o'clock P. M. 

FIbiLD.— At Somers, Westciiester County, N. T., on 
Mondav, Oct, 16, Olivbr FiKi,n, sou of Blbert and 
Lydia Field, aged 14 years, 

luneral from toe house at 1P.M., andfWimthe P. 
K. Church, bomers. at 2 P. M.. on the 18tli inst. 

FULLliR.— Lost at sea, In the ship EadUiit, from Cal- 
cutta. Natbanikc Uoddako Fullbr. of Boston, only 
souofUeur.T W. and .Uury S. Fuleri Anns Janb, wife 
ot Nathaniel Uoddard Fullnr, aud dauahter of tue late 
Uaik Uaegard, hst]., ot Lundnu, Emsiand ; Mart ,!<•, 
Nina O., Louisa G., Nathamiei, O.. and rt lick LikXbb, 
children ot tbe above-named Nathaniel Ouddard aud 
AnneJaneFaller. 

UAfitlWl^LL.— On Monda.y, Ella Halliwbll, widow 
of Joseph H'llli well. 

Notice of funeral hereafter. 

HICKS.-1II Brookiyu, B, D., Oct 17. Phebb Ann, 
wile of William 1>. Hicks, iu the 7oth year of her aire. 

Notice of tnneial hereafter. 

JOHN.JON.— On Monday. 16th, at the residence of 
her son-in-law, Alvin Higgins. Pelham, Wesiche^iter 
County, Mra Hannah Johnson, aged 76, vridow of the 
la>e Jeremiah Johnson. 

Frayers at the hon.-e'on Thursday, 19th, at 11 
o'clock. Her remains will be taken to Portsmouth, 
N. H., her former residence, lor Interment, 

Lowndes.— Oct. 15, at her late resilience. No. 46 
West 65th St., Fblecis B. Lownoes, widow ot the late 
Thomas Lowndes. 

Relatives aud friends and those of her sister and 
brot.er, Lnuise a d Henry Ailcer, are re«pec[iuil.y in- 
vited to attend the funeral from St. Tho uas' ChiiTcb, 
5th av., corner VVeac 63d st., on Wedneaday at Hl:30 
A. A. 

MARVIS.— Suddenly, of croup, on Tuesiay, Oct. 17, 
John Van Nostkand Marvin, soi of George U. and 
Sarah U. V. N. Marvin, aged 21 moutlis. 

Funeral from tue resilience ot bis grandfather, J. J. 
Van >os:rand, No. 441 Uen y at, BrooKlyn, Wednes- 
day afternoon, Oct 13. at 2 o'clock. 

MlUDLUl'uN.— OnOct. 16, Sarah Midolbton, aged 
85 years. 

Relatives and friends, the members of Forsyth M. B. 
Church, also the officers and memoers of tlie Ladi-.s' 
L'ni n Aid Soc.ety, are lespectiully invited to attend 
the funeial from No. 256 West 42d st., on Wednesday, 
Oct 18. at 10:30 A. M. 

O'DhLL— At fifth Avenue Hotsl, Monday, 16th inst.. 
Mart W. Makvin, daughter of Hon. Seldeu Marn i, of 
trie, Peiin, ana wiie of Daniel o'Dell. ot this City. 
Funeral at Erie on Wednesday. 

RAf.UO U.— On Tuesday, Oct 17, JoHif Ratmond, in 
the 67th yenr of his age. 

Relatives and friends of tbe family are invited to at- 
tend ' he tnnera) at tbe rexideuce of his son. John B. 
Ka.vmoud, t'omwall, N. Y., on Thursday. 19th, at 1 P. 
M. Carriajces wiu be in attendance at the Cornwall 
station to meet the ej;l6 A. M. train from .Sew-York. 

8AMCKL3UN.— Oct. Irt, Carolikb J. Samoblson, in 
the 39th year of her aee. 

Kuiieral from Na 447 West 83d st, Oct 18, at 1 P. M. 
Relstives and friends invited. 

THOMSON.— On the 16th inst, Mrs. Maria, relict of 
the late William Thomsoa, ot Brooklyn. 

Funerul services at St. .Inn's I'hurch, com»r of (lln- 
toa and Livingston sts., Broolcl.Tn. on Thursday, lOth 
inst, at 12 u'c.oolt. Friends and relatives are Invited 
to attend. 



SPEOIAX^^XmOES. 

DMDflRSJHIRTS 

ASD 
ORAWfiAS. 
WARD'S, 

381 BUOADWAT, COKNEB WHITE ST. 

862 BBOADWAT, COBNEB 14TH ST. 

1,121 BRO.ADWAY, COBKEB 26TH ST. 

A GUAiND sTUitV. 

A POWERFUL E0)1ANCE OF IHK AFFECTIONS, 
entitled 
HOW RHB LOVED BIM, 
HOW SHB LOVED HIU. 
HOW SHE LOVBO HIM. 
BOW SHE LOVED HIM, 
HOW SHB LOVED HIM. 
BOW SHB LOVSD HIM. 
HOW SHE LOVED HIil, 
HOW bHB LOVED HIM, 
HOW SHB LOVED HIM. 
HOW SHB LOVBD BIM. 

By Lomsa C. RBrNocos. 
Wai b« oommenned iu So, 00 of the - 

NEW-TOBK WE -KLTv 

NEW-TORK WEBKLl. 

KEW-YOItK WKEKLT. 

BEW-TOBE WBBKLT. 

XfEW-TORK WErKLT. 

^KW.rf)EK WEEKLY. , 

NEW-Toae WEtKLT. 
KBW-YOEE WEEKLY. 

NEW-YOBS WEKKLT. 

NKW-YOBK WEEKLY. 

Beady^aodfor sale by every News Agent and Book-seller. 

STBEBT b SMIT.1, PuhlUhers, 

HBW-YOBK WEEKLY. 
Phancis S. Sthbit. 
Francis .S. Smith. 



POSI' OFFICE NarlCK. 

The foreiea mails for the week ending SATUBDAY, 
Oct 21, 187'l. will oloBo at .his oltice on WtsDNKS 
D.^Y at 12 M. tor niump? per a.eam-^uip ADyasimi via 
gueenstowQ. On TBURaUA , at 11: 3U A. Al,, tor 
mrope, per steam-ship Prista, via I'lymouth, t,her- 
bourge. andUatni>arg. On S.^.TUBJAY, at 4:30 A. M., 
lur i^u ope p-r sieaui-ship Germanic, via Queenstown; 
correspondence for Scotland, Oermaa.v, und Frauue, to 
be forw.irded br thia itteamer, mudt oe ape tally lul- 
dressed; and at 4:.^il A. M. for franco direct, per 
steam-ship .>t. Germain, via Havr j ; and at 4:30 A. M. 
for Scotland direct, per steam-sii p Anch< ria, va 
Uiasg <w; 'andat 11:30 A. M. t'T bnrupe, per a.eKm- 
ship Xseckar, via Southampton and i>remen. Tbe 
steam-shi s Abyssinia and Ucriuanic do not take mails 
■or Denmara. Sweden, and Norway. The mail • tor the 
West Indies Via Benuula and St. Thomis will leave 
New-fork Oct. 2). The mails for Chin i, bo., ill leave 
ban Franuiscu . ov. 1. Tne malls tor Austraha, be, 
will leavd Ban Franoiaoo ^oy. 8. 

T. L. JAMES. Pootmnsler. 



FOR SALE— A BODND FILR OP TH^ NEW-YORK 
riMESifrum the coinmencemeat. 8 pt 18, 1851, to 
Mrtrch, l!576. except tlie months of iiepteuiber, Occohor, 
au<i Noveoioerof 1863. and October, idod. Addresi 
B. W.. BoXi.>o. 117 Timet UfQce. 



VJ .S'i'I/AKT VViLiUI!^. A'IT<IK>BY 

XV»Couuse>or at Law. .MutAi-y PutMic. Nu. IdJ 



ANU 

Broail 
v\av, itooiu Nfib t ."iew-VorlE. 

X. S. -.Spetintl attrtiiCiou i) ud to,tettlld{ -* ditiot.*' 
eouveranoina. 1 1 1 I'ltv iii i Mtiitrv •lutrtntlio. 



eOLiU PK.NS. * 

FOLUY'S CKLKBRATED GOLD PE.S3. 

NO. 2 Asro.i UOO.SB, 
Opposite Herald OiSce. 



EA.B..CIWK. 
WO ~ 

ev 

tc. 

KEEP'S HARTLSr-.TlADE iiitVf 
— Ihe very best, six for $6; 



Giye up Dosing 

with powerful druits fut Dyspepsia ana try that bland 
but searching specido. jilLK oF MAUNBSIA. 

'Waukenphaa '. 

Tbese popular Englisa .-iHOi^S can always be found 
at CA.NTBhLL'S, No. 241 4tb av. 



MtTUODl.sT MISSIONS. 
A meeting of tbe Beard of Managers of the 
Uiaaionary Society of tbe M. K. Church was held 
yesterday at Ko. 805 Broadway, Judge Panoher pre- 
siding. The Treasurer presented a reoort. of which 
an atMtraet is as tollows : Balance Sept. 1. Treasu- 
ry tin debt, $233,702 17; receipts, 147,434 76; dls- 
buraemeuta. $243,213 14; Treasury in debt, |24Q,- 
54S 55 ; leas amount in the hands of the Ajssisiant 
Treasurer iu Ciactunad. S3d.899 83 ; net iudebted* 
nesi, (330.645 73. Tbe special committee on the 
debt of the societ.v made a report, which was adopt- 
ed, that they deem it inexpedieot to make ta.j 
apeCiai ellott to liuoidata the existiaa dabt at 



83 SO, worth SO. Fall 8ilk Hata. Fine Felt 

Hats. $3 lia«s, $1 yo. No. 15 New Church si. 



To .tlotbprSa—ilirs.Winalow'aSoottalair Syrup 

tor children teethinit softens the );uias. reduces inn uii- 
matiou. allays all pain, aud cures wind eulio. 



DAVENPORT— J ONES —On Monday, Oct 16, by Rev. 
Dr juead, Danibl DAvanpouT, of Bridgeport, to Mrs. 
U.AJIT K JoNBS, of Wiltun, Cunu. No cards. 



ATMAR.— On Monday morning, Oct 16, Edxvnb 
BSANOT Aykah, lu I ha 44th year of his age. 

The relutiTos and friends of the fauiilv >ire Inrlted to 
attend cnefaneral troiB wis la'e reiiUehce, No. 14 West 
14th St. on Thursday niomL}g,thi> 10th iast^at li^ 
o'elocfc without ftu'tharuoties» . ., 



.^Mv. HbAI/rH, AinUSHiyiKNT.-J. 

loD'o Gymuasium, Ao. 6 Ea»t 28th s'., open <la.y 
and eveniu;; ; boxUig. fenolug, private training, bath- 
ing, &c. tend for circular. 

iS SHIRTS^ 

_ ^,^J , can be finlihed as 

easily as heuimiui; a hauukerehtef. No. 671 Broad- 
way aiia No. i):.2l Ar' n St.. Piiliaileiphi^i. 

A.nAGEJ> COT'INJN AT AUCTION- ihVi.K- 
al bLU lied hSl'S, (In lots to suit purohaser:i ) will 
be offered at noon on THURSDAY in Burling klip ; dam- 
aged by hrv while on lighters. 



KIO>ET, 



cognate aud hitnertorutal diseate 



BI.AI>0I£K. TUEtR 

, isea*ei, with full direo- 

tioUM fur tneir cure, in DR. uKAT.i'd book of 100 pages, 
gratis, at No. 200 Broadway. New-York. 

_ ■'"■ ■ ' . -— — 1^ 



NEW PUByOATION^ 
CHEAPKS'P BOOK.SITOKE I.N roEvnuii^n. 

LIBRARlK;! AND BOOKS BODGHT. 

15U.0UO NKW An'D OLIJ OOKS 

. LMOST GlVKN AWAY. 

CATALOGUES FREE. SEND STAMP. 

UbOOAl' BROS.. 3 BBBKMA.N ST., 

OI'POSIfE NKW POjT OKFILE. 



SEVEN HtJ:4'l)KED KBCEIPTfi FORdO CENTS 
—THE Tl.dnS' UuiOIPild, by a thouaaud practical 
housekeepers; tne art of cavviu? with wood-cutT*. 
&.I' - flora tue household odIuiiiU or the New-Yor< JSmtt. 
MaUed by iho AUIiRICA.ii NKWj COilPANY. 



MAY Aii'SkS.ii Kh£UING'.iJ iNEW NOThl., 

KATE UASTON. 

One of the bent Iiooks e\«r written by this popular 
aatbvr. Pnutf, 91 75. 

Q. W. CAfti.Brp.'J It Co.. l'ubUshat% 



^^JJBWJPUBLIOAITO^^ 

BAUFEa'ji 
NEW MONTH LiY ItlAGAZINE 

POaKOVEMBER, 1876, 

CONTAINS : 

MA0ND8 AND MORNA : A SHETLAND FAIBY TALE. 
By the author ot ''John Ha ifas. Oentleman." 
With Six ninstrations by Alfred Fredericks. 

DAWN.— A POBM. By Batabd Tatlor. 

MEDI.SVAL FDRNITURE. By Hahkutt Prbscott 
Spopporo. With Thirty-one Illustrationa. 

A PURITAN GENTLEMAN IN NHW-BNGLAND. By 

HoKACB E. St^DPKR. With Slx lUustrations. 

POET'S RESIGNATION.— A POEM. 

AN ENGLISHWOMAN AMONG THE HIMALAYAS. 
With Nineteen Illustrations. 

A WOMAN-HATER. Part V. 

ONLY A 8TDDY.-A STORY. By Anki* Thoiia«. 

T» MBS IN OLD TRINITY. By Martha J. Lamb. With 

fifteen lllustratloiu. 

SO.NO. By A. F. 

THE LAUREL BUSH. -(Concluded.) By the Author of 
"John Halifax, Gentleman." 

COMING.— A POEM. 

MISSION ENDEAVOa— A STORY. By Constancb F. 
WOOLSOW. 

PEAT-FIELDS. By Miss Tbackxrat. 
A GRAND BUSINESS MAN OF THE NEW SCHOOL. 
GARTH. A NoveL By Julian Hawthornx. 
JOHN LOCKE. By Pro£ Charlb* MiTRRAT-NAiaNB. 
MARCIA — A STORY. By Rbbboca Haroino Davu. 
THE STORM.- A POEM. By Qborob Lunt. 

THE DONATION PARTY AT WILLOWBBOOK. 
RARITY.— A POEM. By Edqae Fawcstt. 
EDITOR'S EASt CHAIE. 
EDITOR'S LITERARY RECORD. 
EDITOR'S SCIENriPIC BSCORD. 
EDITOR'S HISTOBICAL BKCORD. 

EDITOR'S DRAWER. 

HARPER'S MAGAZINE. WEEKLY, and BAZAR. 
Pottage free to Su'>terit>er» in the United Staitt 

and Canada. 

HARPERS MjOAZlAB. HARPER'S WETSKLY. or 
HARPB .'S BAZAR wiU be tent for one year to anv 
lubienber in the United ntatea or Canada, POSTAOE 
PR HP AID by the publithere, on receipt of Four 
Dollart. 

HABFBR'3 MAGAZINE, HARPER'S WEEKLY, and 
HARPER'S BAZ.IR, for one year, $10; or any two 
for $7 ; poatage fTee. 

A complete Analytical Index to the first fifty volumes 
of HARPER'S MAGAZINE has just been published, 
renderina available for reference the vast and 
varied wraith of tafortnation which mak°a thia 
periodical a perfect il.ustrated liternry cyclopedia. 
8vo. clotb, $3; ha.f calf, $d 26. Sent postage pre- 
paid. 
Aadreu HARPER & BROTHERS. New-York. 

G. P. PCTNA.>I»5 80Vri, 

NO. 182 FIFTd AV., NEW^-YORK, 

Have DOW reiMly the following 

CAPITAL BO0K3 FOR BOYS. 

B.V Batarp Tatlor. 

rots OP OTHER COU.S TRIES. Stones for American 

Boys. iBy Batard Tatlor. Octavo, cloth, illtis- 

trated; uniform with "PixBiother" ..$1 60 

BY GEORGE GARY KGGLBSTON. 
CAPTAIN SAM; or, Tho Boy Scout of 1814. By Gborob 
Cart Eoqlbston, author of " The Bik Brother," 

" How to Educate Yourself," bo., be. Octavo, it- 

lustrat4^ SI 50 

The tbonsands of boys who read with delight Mr. 
Bggleaton's flist yDlume, wLl eagerly welcome the ap- 
pearance of the further hlitory of " The Big Brother " 
and bis fUends. 

A new edition of 
THE BIG BROTHER. A Story for Boys, of Indian War. 
ByCtsoRoa i'art F.oglkston. Small octavo, illus- 
trated, cloth extra. $i 50 

An aamlrable story * * strikingly realistic. — 
Soston Tranteript. 
Leaves little to be Af6itt<\.— Philadelphia Enquirer. 
BY THE AUTHOR OF THE YOU.VG MECHANIC. 
AMONGST .UACHI.NES. By the author of •• The Young 
Mechanic." Square octavo, very fUlly illustrated, 
cloth extra. $1 76 

A NilW EDITIJN OF 

THE YOUNG ME(;HANIC. Prictiual Carpentry. Con- 
talnlna Directions f >r the use of all Icindi of Tools, 
and for the constmction of Steam Bug nes and 
Mechanical Hodeis, lucluding the Art ot Turning 
in Wood and Metal II nstrated amtll 4to, clotu 

extra $1 75 

A va.u .b'e book, eminently uselnl to beginners, and 

snggeatlve even lo the experienced and skiUfuL — 

.Albany JoutnaL 

BY MARY E. CRAIOIB. 

ONCE UPON A TIME. 8tori?s for Children, of the 
Ancient Gods and Heioes. Bv Mart E. Craiqib. 

Eqture 16mo. doth extra, lllui^trated $1 

They have also in their series of SCHOOL HlaTO* 

BIES: 

HISTORY OF QESMANY. By Suthbrland Mbnxibs. 

lUmo. illustrated $1 

In the ELEMENTARY >CIBNCB SERIES: 
THEORETICAL MESHANI 8 AND APPLIED ME- 
CBA.VICS. By Pro£ Wm. Bossitkr. Each 16iU0, 

illustrated 76 cents 

Audio the ADVANCED SCIB.'fCE SERIES: 
BUILDING CO.VSTRUwTIO.'T. Part L— Masonry. Text 

l'2mo, plate 4to. 2 vols $4 

And in the series of MBOICAL AND SURGICAL 
MfN. GRAPHS: 

THE USE O? THE SPRCTBOSCOPE IN ITS APPLICA- 
TION TO SCIENTIKin AND PRACTICAL MEDI- 
CINE. By Dr. Emil Rosbnbbro. 8vo, cloth, iUas. 

trated $1 23 

For sa:e by all book-sellers, or sent prepaid on re- 
ceipt ot price. 

TAB 
POPULAR SCIENCE JUOMTHI.F, 

Established May, 1872. 

CONDUCTED BY PROF. E. L. YODMANS. 
THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY for November 
contains tbe first part ot Prof Morsb's address on 

•■ W HAT AMKRIl'AN ZOOLOGISTS HAVjJ DONE FOB. 
EVOLUIION." Itli avaloaole original contribntion 
to the history of American science, and sbows that 
we had ■• Darwinists" here before Darwin. ''THE 
EARLY HISTOitY uF FIRE," by Pro<". Jolt (illustrated) 

Is a curious study of the arts of producing fire made 
use of by primitive peoples. "PHYSICAL 8CIBNCE 
IN BNQLI3U SCHOOLS" deals with several ot its Im- 
pediments, and contains usi ful suggestions to educa- 
tors in t bis coun r.y. Dr. Bastian concludes his illus- 
trated discussion of tbe " N.i I U.^K OF TUE INVERTB- 
BR.tTE BRAIN." an instrnctive chaDcer ia uervoua 
physlolupy. In "PiliiNA I'AL and INFANTILE CUL- 
TURE," Dr. Seouin treats a most important snhJect 
iu an ortciaal manner, aud reports upon the appliances 
for infant education exhibited at the Vienna World's 
Fair. "TUF. THREE HYPOTHESES OP THE HISTORY 
OF NATUitK." Prot Uoxlbt's first lecture in New- 
York, cargfuljy revised by bimaelt, appears in the 
present number. Prot M. A F. Prkstbl puts forth 
Slime new views eonceruing the "MOOA'S I.sFlU- 
ENCE OS THE WEATHKR." The •' DlFFlCDLTIEo 
OF U.^VBLOPMBNT AS APfLIKD TO MAN," by Al- 
FKBD BussEL 'A'allacb, is a brilliaut statement of the 
obstacles in the way of one application of evolution- 
ary doctilnes. Priucipal I.'awson discusses with bis 
usual ability •' THE SO-CALLtD CONFLICT OF 8t;l. 
ENCB VMTU RELKilON;" and "IS THK DEVELOP- 
MENT HYPOTHESIS SOKFICIENTr by Dr. McCosh, 

contains a revi-w of Hdzlbt's leotures and a lloeral 
treatment of the sulject. In " A.STRONOMV IN AMER- 
ICA." by Mr. Phoctor the English astronomer gives 
the history of our progress in that acience during the 
last hali^entury. The number closes uith a biograph- 
lual sketch of Dr. Nkil Arnott, and coutaina, alao, his 
portriit 

Teims— $5 per anuum, postags free, or 50 cents per 
number. 

APPLBTON'8 JOURNAL and THE POPULAR SCI- 
ENCE MONTHLY, together, tor $7 2U per annum, 
postage prepaid uy the publishers. 

D. APPLKTON k. CO.. Publisbera, 
Kos. &49 and 661 Broadway. New-lfork; 

A NOTABKU l«OOK. 

Jost published, a reprint ot the London edition of 
CO.N. TANCL'rt F.\TB : OR, DKNZlLPLACS, alove story 
lu vers-, by V101.BI PaSB. tllca SI BO. 

" Al st tbut i vo »b uld lie a blight and anare, 
'itt those who seek all syapatblci ta one." 



STATE OF \EW-YOXK, 

KEPOBLICAN CAMPAIGN. 1»76. 



BBAI>-<)DARTP.Rg RBPlTBLtCAN STATB CoaMITTSB, j 

Fifth Avbxcs tloriL, Niw-Yoag. ! 
REPUBLICAN MsETI.N'GS. 

WEDNESDAY. Oct. 18. 



Sing Sinz, afternoon and 
evening. Mass-meeting. 



(Gen. N P. BA 
I Gen. DANIKI 
\ Gen. t LaKK 



Port Jervls . . J ^^n. JAMRS V»'. TTOSTTO, ' 

rort jervis j ^^^ WILLIAM P. PIEBO^ 

Wawarslng Hon. LEWI % E- CASK. 

College Point Hoil SILAS B. DUToHBR. 



Katonah 

Brownville, P. M.. 

Little Falls 

Dickinson Centre. 
Mob iwk 



BASKS. 
■L K SICKLES. 1 
[K E. CAHR. I 

|"Hoii. KLLI'ifCCOWDIN. 
Itieu. J AUKS vV. IiUsTED. 

Buffalo IloD. CAUL SCUCRZ. , 

(Gen. GEO. A. SlIER'DAS. 

Troy <K(^'. J. BRADPIML ;AVXR 

I Hon.MARTI.N I TOWNSEND 
Orange. N. J Hon. E. D. CULVER. 

Cohoes cr-HARLE-* E. SMITH. 

^°'"*** UAMKS ICILBOURN. 

..Hon. A. W. TEnNKY. 
<Hon. BUTLi-E G. N03LB. 
<Hon. J. H. WARWICK, 
(lion. LUCIUS B.OKLOW. 

..Col. ALBERT D. SHAW. 

..Gon. T. B. GiTBS. 

..Hon. HENRV BALLARD. 

No. 260 Cumberland st, < Bon.HENRT E. HOWLaNO. 
Broo.avn { i.oi. OBORO . W. CAttTEEt 

Turin Hon. WM. HERiilNG. 

Sherburn Hon. JAMES R. ANOEL. 

p-_„_.- p ». 5 CoL T. B. TilOaPE. 

Feconic, P. M { Hon. ISAAt; L HAVKS. 

0,^.„ J Hon. JOHN H. SELKREQ. 

"'*"''• } Hon. J. W. DWIOHT. 

Morgan Wisrwain. Seventh ? Gen. JOH i A. DIX. 

WarJ, Brooklyn 5 Gen. GiiOROE II. SllAEPE. 

Cary Hon. B. T. MjEOAN. 

0M.1 i Hon. THOMAS O. ALVORD. 

""" iH.-n. JOHNH. CAMP. 

Chatham Village Hon. FRANCIS SILVESTER 

Greene Hon. H. R. WASHBO.t. 

New-3rlghton Hon. L.BRADFilRD PRINCE. 

Boouevliie Hon. H. J. COGGE HALL. 

Caledonia... Col. A. R. BAXrER. 

Rye Hon. JOSEPH J. COVCn. 

( Hon. GEOR IE W. BUNGAY, 
I Hon. M M. VVATKR8. 

Mount Morris Hon. SETS L. MILLIKEN. 

(Hon. A. W GLEA O.I, 
- 1 Gen JOSEPH C. JACKSON. 

..Hon. C. D. MURRAY. 
..Hon. WM. P. FIERO. 
..MniorHSNay D. TYLKB. 
..Hon. SAMUitL F. MILLER. 



South Qleu's Falls..., 

Btanilord. Ilonn 

New-Biiltimore. 

Cuyler. 

Cheoanso 



H on. FRA S CIS SI L V IWTEi 

Hon. JAH!^>^ A. BltltiGa. 

Hon. M ^LVILLH C. SMITB. 

( Hon. GKOHGK W. BUNQA* 
•••iOitoRQEL. WAThRS. 



.Hon. JAMK-! B. AKOBL. 

Honeoye Hon. C. D. MURRAY. 

vy- .u:-, { Hon. J. W. UWIOUT. 

North Salem Hon. DORMaN B. BATOIfr 

Vvad^ingtou ..Hon. HENRY R. JaM£8. 

Crescent Hon. A ii.FaRRAR. 

Herkimer .JAVBS KiLBOURN. 

LndlowviH* J "*«• '""'* ^ SELKREQ 

Lndlowvdle } ^gj ir HhNRY D, TYIiltd. 

n 1M cOen. DANIEL ULLMSN. 

"*^^"" idoa. SAUUBL f. . lLL<;a 

Jessup's Landing Han/ WILLIAM IL TKPFr. 

Windaor Gen. OEOBOEW. PALASt 

Concordia Hall. 28and30 < Hon. JOHN A. TAYLOR. 
Avenne A. ...ew-York I rfo.-u JOHS OaKi^T. 

Pearl RiTer '. Hon. A W. OLHAttON. 

Elba Hon. B. T. MOROAT 

Aloany Prof P. H. BAKBMA^17 

Bot.'erdam Hon.JO.iB H.LlTnEFlEL» 

aEAZ. 



(Oen. JOHNB-MUj 
' I Col. A. 8. BAX.<s.kL. 

..CHARLE<( D. BUKifS. 



McGrawvtlle. 



Mount Vernon 

East Bloomfield 

Jamaica 

Mott's Corners 

Harvard 

Uoier Lisle Gen. GEOR jK W. PAL.,.ER. 



Onild-rland 

Rook CityFahs 

Pine Valley, P. H 

Hamd'^n 

Purtlandvilie 

Gilbertsville.*. 

Preston 

Llaci<laen 



...J. R. VAN WORUER. 

...Hon. WILLIA.y H. TEFFT. 

( Hon. OKOIIGH: BECKER. 
.^T. I. OOWKN. 
} Dr. L. W. BAILEY. 

...Gen. DANIEL ULLMANN. 

.... CHARLES D. BAKSB. 

...Hon SOLIM i)N BUNDY. 

...Hon. H. Q. PEINDLE. 

...Hon. JAMEi W. GLOVER. 



Venice 

Lafa.yette 

-Raymoudvlile. 
Hdwarda 

Red Bock 



fv.i„.ni- jCaPt J- O.VEN MOORE. 

Cralgvllle | „„„ j^iigg q. grahaM. 



Coventry 

Owego 

Princetown. 

Palermo 



J. W. CHCBJH. 

Hon. PKfER W. HOPKINS. 

HonJOHNH.LlTTLE'IKLD 

cCol ASaiS 8. WOOD. 
— JHod. WM. H. BAKER. 

Qruhe'sflalLlOOth at, N.Y.JOHN F. MINES. 

McDonongh Hon. W. H. HYDa. 

Briei Hill, P. M Hon. HKNKY ^AMBS. 

Sempronlus Col. JOHN E. SAVERY. 

m«„ r.».»i. 5 Hon. T. F. McDO.VALU. 

Glen Castle J^ ^^ gggg 

Westhury ......Hou. J. T. M. DAVIE. 

(S.C.MILLARD. 
-•••iGEORGJiB. tURTI.S. 

( Hon. H. A. PADDOCK. 
-■•- in. S. PARUELUE. 

r~«.i nnr^,. 5 »°°- WILLIAM GLEASON. 

i;irand oorge. ...... ---.--. i ^ (j_ MAriVIN. 

Harriaville.. Hon. H. S. UaNDBE. 

Newport...:. Hoj.CLINTON L.MERRIAM 

Stockholm 1 J."!^" VANcK. 

Maasena. Hon. GEO. M. GL3A80N. 



ConkUn Forks... 
Bombay..... 



Natural Bridge 

South Berlin...* 

THUESDAY, Oct 19, 



(Hon. UINOALLS. 
"-ia. J. WELiJU. 

(Col. C. L. MaoARTHCR. 
-■"itlon. S. FOSTiiB. 



Brooklyn. Myrtle Ave- 



Gen. N. P. BANKS. 
Geu. DANIEL E. SICKLES. 
Hon. A. W. T NNr.Y. 
(ien. JOHN COCHRANE. 
H n IJ. D. CUL ■ BR. 



nue Park, afternoon and < tl jor Z. K. PANUBORV. 

evening. Gei. JAimS W. HUST£D. 

lion. JOH > OAK Y. 
Hou. SILAS B. DUTCHES. 
Hon. WM. A. 8IMM0V . 
Hon. A. J. DITTENUOBFRR. 
„ _ , J Hon. JAMES G. BLAINB. 

Bnff 10 luon. BENJ. K. PHELPS. 



Alban.T 

Tarry town. 



..Hon. CARL SCHORZ. 

( Hon. JA8. .A. GARFIELD. 
; Hon. WILLIAM A MERO. 

Amstetdam Oan. G iO. A. SHERIDAN. 

RichviUe Hon. B. T. M1RGAN. 

Staneateles. Hon. BDTLER O. NOBLE. 

Fulton H.n. HENRY BALLARD. 

Clyde Col. ALBERT D. SHAW. 

S.huylervllle Hon. FRANCIS SILVB3TEE. 

„ , , „^ <CH\RLK8E. SMITH. 

Green IsUnd ) JAM.<S KILBOUR.. 

Plesals, P. M Hon. J. H. WARWICK. 

Martinsburg Hon. WILLIAM UERRI.KG. 

Libcrtv ilall.No.231 West CQan. GEORGE H. SHARPB. 
16th St., N. Y JOol. Qio. .V. CAErBB. 

Westvllle Gen. T. B. QSTE*. 

Athens Hon. GEORGE W. HOXIB. 

WestSandlake Hon. M. I. TOWNSKKD. 

Smithvllle. Bon. JAM HS R. ANGEL. 

Scottsburg I..C0I. A. E: BAXFER. 

Newark ,,..Qen. CLARIC i^. CARR. 

Romulus :..... ..Hon JOHN. H. CAMP. 

CoL ANSO.S 8. WOOD. 
;0 I. WILLIAU H. BAKER. 



Hayt's Cornera 

V Iddlefield Centre . . . 

Theresa Hoa LD.IUS BIOP.LOW. 

v.„ i?t»„„,riii„ 5 Hod. GEOKO:? BECKER 

VanEtUnville J^^ l. W. BAILET. 

8uff«rlD F. X. KCHOo.^MAK^'.R. 

Pljnionth 'Hon. JAMBS W. OLOVSft 

L'nolenmvllle JOHN F. MINES. 

w..-..., n»ii». 5 '■ BIDB1 CADY. 

Weaver HoUow J RA8TCS CVOS. "t 

OtlsvUle Oapt J. OWKN U09EC& 

New-Scotlatid. /- R- Va* WORMgO. 

n^i^nt. J Hon. A. P. bMlTH. 

oneonta. {uB!(RY V. AlLESWOBTft 

Mohawk B011.CLIH.O.S l. MBREIaM 

Knox CoL HALE KINUSLKY. 

Kings Ferry Hon. JOHN H. CAMP. 

Postervllle Hon. GEORGE O. BATBBVff 

Victory. Han. JO tW L. PaRKEK. 

K»» n«~. P M J Hon GKOROE L POST. 

New-Hope P. M. J ^„^ g ^ PAY.^ii. 

< Hon. WM. J. CORinVRLU 
\ a«n. F. .1. PAR30.<S. 

FRANK His, OCK. 

H.m. GEO. M. GLEASOJT. 

Gen. N. H. CCRriA 

< WM. C. DAlET. 
tPiof. E.H. WBiTHSBBBK 

Maiden Bridge A. B. OASSEHIgR. 

SATUBDAY, Ot;t 21. 

Glen's Pails, P. « \^^'IT^.I^M^'^'^ 

Whitestown Gen. GEO. A. SHERIDAN. 

lHon.GEORQZ W. CUBTIA 

VanderbUt Landing. <-y^^^ „. J. ocC DEB. 

( Hon. X. TOMt'Kl.sS. ^ 

Hackensack, R. J., P. M Hon. JA& A. GA3tFlBUL 

Avon ....Oan. CLa£K E. CARK. 

Pean Tan Hai.L.EiADF »ED PRI.VCff 

Westfleld. Hon, BCTLEB O. NOBLS. 

Naples Hon. 6. D. MCRSAT. 

Eighth Ward, Brooklyn.. ..Hon. SILAS B. tOrcHtB. 

Fishkill Gen. JOSgPH C. JACKSOJK 

v„„v i Coi. GEO. W. CAB TBE. 

""''«• \ Hon. SiiTH L. MlLUiEX 

B.„— ^-. $ Hon. ISAAC L HAtBS. 

Baugertiea. J ,;^„_ ggo. H. 8HABP<£. 

New-Berlin Hon. H. E. WASHBON. 

Onondaga Hon. J. H. WARWICK. 

P:>tcbogne Hon. GEORGE W. RoXI^ 

Ellenville .'Hon. LBWIS E. CASB. 

J Hon. IS. S. FRISBES. 
BlgFlaU IJOaN T. DAVIOiOS. 

Haaklnavflle Col. A. B. BAXTEB. 

Pine Plalna, P. M CoL T. B. THORPK. 

Greenpoint Hon. A W. Gl^^OX. 

Greenfield Centre -Bon. NBIL QILMOUR. 

i?,«.M P^«™. $«<»• JOBS H. SKLCRE« 

Enfield Centre iM-jurHKKBY D. TiLKR. 

Bmshland. Hon.«AMUEL F. MILLER. 

Union Gen. GEORGE W. PAL if Eft 

(Hon. GROKGi; RRt XE&^ 

Chemung. ^.<DcL. W. BilLJiT. 

^ iu. F. PICKERLiO. 

Seotia Hon-JOHS U.LlTrLEPlEa^ 

Springfield Centre _CH4BLES D. BAKER. 

Champion. Hoi. LUCIUS BIGaliOlfi 

Westerlo JAMES KILBOUEN. 

Clifton Park J- S. LAMORaaCX. 

„__.,. c Hon. PETBH W. UOPKU% 

Tracy Craek \%. C. MOODY. 

_, .. « KDMTJND O'CONNOR. 

Rlyerside. {uboRGE B. cCRlTl. 

SastUoion J. M. JOHSSOS. 

' Eev.J.BRADFOR:) CHAV0 

\a. FU-TtR^ 

„^ ,^ _ , - < E. *. CARPENTER. 

j Shelter laland -,. J L J. BELLO as. 

! , . ' ( Hon.GEORGB N. KBKNIA 

• Cleero- Jt. K. KOLLbB. 

j tra Col JOHN E. BAV^T. 

MONDAY, Oct 23. 



Sand Lake. 



Deposit, P. M. ... 



( GeiL JAS. A ARFIELD. ^ 

\ Hon. HE.v'RY R. WA^HBO^ 



Conatantia. P. M 



...|< 



Tyrone. 



; Hon. JOHN H. HRLKRi!;0. 



I Hon. J. W. iWIGHi'. 

No. 12 Uulveraity place. ...Hon. W. W. GOODRICH. 

bUth ST.. near 8th av., < CoL CHAS. 8: SPENCER. 

^ew-York } Hon. WM. A. DARLING. 

Na 2,'J93 3d av., N. Y Hon. JAUKS A BRIUG.^I. 

No. 748 Broadway CHARLES H. KITCHEL. 

lalip Hon. A, W. GLKA O.V. 

Bri8tJ....t Hon. C. D. MURRAY. 

..., , i^lou. B. N. FRISBIR. 

UUiport JJOH.>J T. DAVIDSON. 

Pea sails G«n. JOSEPH C. JACKSON. 

Lodi Hon. THOMAS G. ALVORD. 

Leonardsvllle Hon. H.J. COGGESHALL. 

0,^0 oi.-» w V J Hon. J iSBPH J C lUCH. 
BleeckerBnadtng, N. Y... J j,^^ jQy,f ^ TAYLoR. 

Gardlnertown Hon. JAMBS G. GRAHAM. 

Bon. Hd.NRT S. HOWLAND 

i Hon. GEORGE B'fCKEX, 
"iDr. L W. BAILKY. 
....Hon. HAAO L HAYE9. 
....Gen. RUPU3 SCOTT. 

Rev. J. BRADF*!) CLEAVER. 



New City'. ..... 

Bteespnrt 

White Plains 

PortvlUe. P. M 



(B. 
"l-i. PviSTtEl. 

....Hoa. MELVILLE 0. SMITa 
....Hon. A.H. FaRRAR. 

Hon. SAMUSL F.MILLER. 

Gen. OnORGE W. PALMER. 

Gen. DANIEL ULLMA.NN. 

Hon. 0. W. CHAP.UAN. 

Hon DORMAS B. KATON. 

....Hon. H. R. WASHJO.N. 
No. 171-Thompson st, N. Y.JOU.'i F. M1N.S3. 

. , c Hon. OKOltGE W BUVGAT. 

Harford ^ Hon. WILLIAM H. CLARK. 

Charlton Hoiu WILLIAM H. TEFFT. 

Bridaehamptou CoL T. B. TUORPrl. 

King's Brldite CUAELKS E. ABBOTT. 

East GlenvlUe Hon. J. H. LITTLKFIELD. 



Petersburg 

Clifton, Staten laland. 

Ballstcm 

DownsviUe 

Harperrville 

Andes 

Centre Lfsie 

Chappaqurt 

Alton 



DanDy........... .... 

Cato. P. M. 

Midliefleld 

Esst Pharsal'.a 

^oUl.h Otselic 

£eroe. -.. 

Sparrowbusb 

Stouy Point. 

Ow^asco. 

Chenango 

North Sterling 

Constable 

Depnuville 

No. 466 Pearl st, N. 
Fairfield 



Uajjr HiNSY D. TYlKB. 

Hon. WJd. a WOODIN. 

I'UARLESD. BlKi'.R. 

Hon. H. G. PRINilLK. 

H.n. JAMES W. OLOVEB 

J. V. VAN WORMKR. 

Capt J. OWEN MOORE. 

F. 2. ScUOONMAKER. 

( Hon 8. E. PAYN"'. 
) CoL JOHN E. SAVENY. 

(J. M. JOH.SSO'?. 
-•••) GEORGE B. CU TI8. 
Hon. DAM.iL T. FORTE. 

<J. J. SEAVRR. 

••••|m. 8. PABMLKE. 

Hoo. LUCIUS BIOELOW^. 

Major J. C P. BBYLAND. 

Hon. C. L. MERRIAM. 

( CHARLES E.sM'TH. 
IJAME-IKILBOUKN. 

.Hon. GEO. M. GLEASON. 

Gen. N. M. CL'RTIS. 

Coi. C. L. MACARTaUR. 



TT „ .=• >_ii t Gen. DANIEL E.8'CKH_ 
Parepa Hall. YorkrHle... \ ^^^^ j y. WARWluiL 

Elmlra G«n. CLARK E. C4RR. 

PlattsbWB GexL JODSONKILPATBltl 

Salem Bon.MAETIR LTOW.\SR» 

Enme Hon. A W. TaJtNKT. 

Marcellus.P. M... Gen GKa A SHtBIDAJt 

Republican H ead-qoar- ( Gen. T «• <*A ,rR^,,__ 

teiB. rirookl.Tn....„.... I Ana. W. W. OOOOKICH. - 
Attica Han. RICHARD CBOWXSS 

(Boa GBOBGK W. HOZil, 

Luaeme. jHon. oBaNGE FWtBU. 

Haverstraw ^.Gen. JAMES W. HCSTKn. 

Tioupabnrg. CoL A. K. BAXTER. 

Palmyra. Hon.L.BRADFOil0PRl»Cr 

ShortaviUe Hon. C D. MCI£2.AT. 

Audover. Gen. KUFU > SCOTT. 

Cloater, «. J Hon. JOHN A. TAXLOK. 

Hawklnaville Htm. H. J. COGGBiHALl.. 

Candor. ©en. GKOROE W.PALMBB 

ilrtdian Hon. JOHN H. CIMP. 

Maaonio HaH. East SOtb jGen. J. tX PINCRN^. 

at -York. ^. don. JOHS O.^KKT. 

GrotonClty..... Hon. JOHN H. SKLKRRa 

McLean - Major HENRY D. lYLKE. 

turUnirton Plata CHARLES D. BAKER. 

Fiushlng B. HAMMOND. Jr. 

Na lOe West 30th at, N. X.Rev. HE.NPY H. OABKIT. 

Aurora Hon. S. E. PAYNE. 

Genoa. Col JOHN E. bAVBBT. 

,..,, jBev.J BRADrDCLEATX^ 

Poeatenklll. Jj. i{.gr;iB.n". 

TUESDAY, Oct 24. 

,. ^,. » »r c Gen. JAS. A. GABFIBLD 

BomeUsvlUe, P. M \Qw. CLAfcK K. CaRR. 

Ithaca. Gen GEO. A. SHBSiDAA 

Schenectady - Ex-Gov.WAL'aHABRIMAl 

Ausable Forks, P. U Gen. JUDSOK KlLPATBlCf 

(CV>1. aLOERI D. SHAtSr. 

{ Major Z. K. PA,N6BoBK, 

..HoilAW.TE.SNKY. 

.Hod. L .WI.S BARKkB. 

..Hon. HORACE bBMIS. 

Hempstead.. Hon. BCfLERG. .\OhL«. 

-^ =M J Hon. K. D. CUlVEH. 

Monl^mery, P. M.. J H„n. LJSWIs K. CABR. 

^^gjgg^ ..Hon. RICHARD CROWLBt, 

Ch-rry vlileyl. .'..-. Hon. SILAS R DUT3HKR. 

Myack Oe»- JAMliS W. HUSTBIX 

Potsdam Hon.L.BRADFOR0 PBINC< 

Farmington...... Hon. C. D. MURRAY. 

< Hon. GFOEOK W. H.IZZ^ 
Thnnnan ; Hon. ORA.NUE FERBIi. 

Smlthtown flo»- J- «• WARWICK. 



Bro a da l bln. P. M 

BoonviUe. • 

Cauijjoliarie. ...... .•—• 

Hudaon... 



Green Island 

Brookdale (Stockholm).., 

HennoiL 

Pott Schuyler. ... 

FRIDAY. Oct 20. 

( Gen. GEO. A. SHBRipAN. 
' \ ilou. AUsPlV A. VAiES. 

...Hoa CARL SCHDRZ. 

...Hon. JAS. A. GARliIELD. 
...Hon M. L TOW.VSKND. 
.,.Uon. Q?ORGK W. CURTia 
...Hon.CHAU.VCEY M.DEPKW 
Hon. HENRY B.^LLARD. 



NorthviUe, P. M.. 

Brooklyn 

Paterson. N. J.... 

Hoosick Kalli 

Newburg 

Cold Spring 

Bocbester 



Gieenwood 

Heliport............ 

KnoxvHle. 

Yorkshire — ....... 

Putney 

tipencer.. ........... 

Stone Arabia 

Victory 

WhlteavlUe 

Bartw'ok ... 

Caroline Ceuire.... 
German.. ........... 

Noith Pitcher. 

East Guilford 

Baymertown ... 



.CoL A. E. BAXl'ER. 
Hon. GEORGE W. BCNGAf 

{ < oL ANSo.N 8. woaa 

— ••jHou.CL KENNKUY. 

Hon. WILLIAM P. KlBSa 

."....Hoo. EUi8-<E B. OSR& 

Geu. QiiORGB W.PaLM -.% 

Hon. AUSTIN A lATBS. 

Hou. JOHN H. CArfP. 

'......Gen. RL'FUS SCOTT. 

CHARLES D. BAKBS. 

Major HENRI D. TYLXt, 

..'.'....Hon. W. H. HTPE. 

, GEORGE W. BAT. 

J. W. CHDECIl. 

Rev. J. BBADF'DCLBAyBt 



(Rev. 
■ ts. B. 



FOSTaR. 



POLITICAL. 



Batavla. 

Catakiil 

Saratoga Sprinas.- 

Backet's Harbor 

Bainbridge 

Nuoda. ............. 

Copenhagen........ 

Mlddietown....^.. 

Fayetteville 

Warwick.... 

Belmont......^..... 

llomellavllle 

ITedonla.......... ........ 

Coj^aackia .... 



(He 
— • I iion.L. BKaOFORD PRLTCE 

Hon. BUTLER O. NOBLr;. 

,.....Gen.JUi> < KILPvTRICK. 

Hon. A. W. TE.NNKY. 

Hoa. J. H. WARWICK. 

Hon. H. li. WASHBO.N. 

Gen. CLARK E. CAER. 

Hna. WILLIAM HKRRING 

Hoa. K. D. CULVER. 

01. ALBERT D, SHAW. 

CoL GEO. W. CABTEB. 

Geo. T. B. GATl-S, 

Col. A E. BAXTER. 

Hon. C. P. VEIJDES. , 

Hon. SKTH U UIIiLIKBN, 

»pn.JO|«tfU*.WU*>^ 



THIRTKiiNtH ASME-VIBLY DISTRICT Rt 
PUBLICAN A.tO lATlO.N-.— A special meeOoa wil 
1k> held at Ltbeity Hall. No. '2Si West ld:n st. 01 
THIS (We.lnoaday) EVENIi.G, at 8 o-cIook. lor t hi 
puruose of nominating deleg.itea to tue Keoui-Ucai 
tonvenUons. *.H .RlEj bLAcKIE, Preaideut. 
0. G. AR CaiBALP, Secretary. . 

B' OYS 1-"W BULK. Nl.NETlSliNTH AS*iKJ«« 
BLY DISTRICT, wJI r.lly at Oi«uo's Hal!. lOJti 
I ,t,bet«-eei. 9th and lO.h ars.. WE j.-Ji^SDAl^ BVB* 
' INU, Oct. 18, at 8 o'clock. Hon. John F. Mluas aad 
■ Audrew J. Plumb will address the moetiufr^^ ^ _^ 
Aunrewv. riu 'ifioM^a HA'-AN, Preaidaat. 

' L. O. SixcvB, Secretary ; C. W. Sxarca, Captain. 

AHURBW HL HAKLBT, I reasurer. ^ 

CBI.NliMK LANTBUNit. 

I $.S PER HUNDRelD. 

1 Torches, from 12 cents e .ch upward. Exeaialor fiiw 

works at low prices. Fl»«, tr»nsi>areucies. ko. 
; DKTiVlL Lhit, 81 RKKT fc CO., No. 9Dey st. Wew-korH 

HKAD-QUAKTEKS* FOR POLITICAL NET 8A» 
uera I'ortr JU. Trausparencies.to. Can, X/tipe, and 
Pat«nt I'oroh. H per soi. M. R LhVf k CO., 

ratAWHot' "'.^ *^ corner Broadway and Howird at 

AL.L. KJ.MJS OK POL,ITlt:AL. BANNKKt*. 
fians aud portraits on baud and to order, at loa 
UOJiiR Jt liUAHAd. No i)7.iia<)ne St 



prices. 



m- 






TBB DP-TOWN OFKIOK OF THit TlJ<Bai. 

N»; t,:W7 Ur*adway, beu Slat ud 304 wmt 



Zti^^i*-^^., 







/i 



r..il..,:„3^^.^^.,..,^.>, 



% 




*:^-> 



•v- 







'^v-^^^l?^-!^?^ 



gaUJbi KEAL ESTATE MARKET. 



- Th* following busmess was transacted at tbe 

^chanjcv yeaterday, TneadaTi Ooc 17 : 

It. V. UnrDvtt, luidet a foi«clo«tire decree, by 

'' Vdsr f>f tb* C4>art of Common Pleaa, F. W. Loew, 

fctq., Rffrrco, lold a three-story briok-front hooso, 

vitii lot 83 br 100, No. 03 Slieriff 8t.,^att side, 135 

fe«t soutli or KiviDKtca at., for $7,10^ to Emaiiael 

|>vi, plaintiff is tbe l«|ial action, '^e a ime auc- 

tiucrer, by order of tbe Snpreme Court, in fure- 

clusuro. Qtor^o A. Halaey. Xaq-, Hefereo, auld a 

lilot of land, 146 d by 890 by 140 b; S-(l. on Walton 

•Vh east aide, 179 feot north of Groye at., West Mor- 

xttnnia % alio a plot of land, 130 by £06, on Walton 

av.. caat aide, adjoining aboTCi, for $3,200, to Samnel 

I). Webstrr, plaiaU£ 

Wltllau Keooeliy, by order of the Supreme Conrt 
In furceiosure, W. C. Conner, B«q.. Sburlff, aold on^ 
{fa>i, SS.8 by 100, on Sth ar^ aoatb-east comer 78th 
•t^ lor 138.000 to A. L. Brown. Tb« same anotiooeer 

bnder «lBiilar conrt order, J. Grant Sinclair. £8q.,> 
Rererec, aold a three-atory and baaement browa* 

itune-fVout honse, with lot 35 by 103.3. oo East 74tti 
It.. «<>ntb ali>e, SS5 feet weat of Avenue A, tor 
11^095 to tb« plaintiff in the lecalaoiioD. 
. lieruard Smyth, «!.'«<> under a Supreom Court fore- 
ftlokui-e orJefi K. M. Honry, Esq., Keteree, sola 
thirteen Iota, each S5 bv 103.2. on lat av., aontb> 
treat coraer 109d at., for 18,000. to Globe Life In- 
lar >iace Company, plaintiff in the lei;al action. 

The following aalea were adjourned : Sale by 
William ILauoeliy of a plot of Una on £ast 53i at, 
We«( ot lat ar.; sale by H. £. Coates of a houHe with 
lot on E^at 30tb st, west of Ul av., to Oct. S4, and 
a«le of a ]>l.>t of land on 11th av., south-east comer 
Nth «t., to Oct. 27. 

Xlia toUuwioK property was knocked down bv 
A. U. Mnller 3t Son at the price noted, but not 
>ohl: The three-atory brick nouae with lot, No. 
M7 Weat S7.ti au, nortn aide, between 6lh and 7th 
»n^ fur (7,300. 

IO-DAT'8 ADCTIOKil. 
a!l at the SxoiianKa, 



are aa 



fol- 



' To-day'a aalea, 
Jo<»et 

By JMiiea if. Itiller, Saprene Csort foreolosore 

lalo. Jobn C. Bnatneil, S q., Eeferee, of a nlot of 

\ IBB.I, so iiT 99.11, na lOOlti St., soatb side, 900 feet 

Weat ut lutb ar. Alao, similar sale, Gporice U. Hal- 

> My,' Esq.. Keferef. ot a boose, with lot 18 by 103.2, 

OM £<«( Tdtn 6t., 334 feet east of 4th sv. 

Br R. V. Uarnetr, foreoloaore sale, I. O. Buyce. 
Kiq.. Koierte. uf ibo three story and a half brick 
bouse aud two-story irick stable, with kaeo of 
Iwu iota, aacb 25 by U3, No. SO Washington Ronare, 
soatb side, betweaa Macduoical st. and Sth arr. 
Bv £. H. Ludlow & Co., Sopretue Conrt fore- 
' tlooare sale. J. Grant Sinclair, E^q., Referee, of 
1>iul<:lnss, with three tots, each 19.3 by 94, oo Ay 
•outt A, wwat aide, 35 f^^et soaih ot 78th st. 

Uy Benjamin P. f airchitd, Snpreme Conrt fore- 
itia^are sale, H. A Braun, Esq.. Keferee, of a bouse, 
-with lot 18.10 by 99.2. So. 4Dd West 33d st., north 
'atdr, 193.8 teet east of 10th ar. Also, similar Hsie, 
same Keferc«, of eight lots, each 25 by 99.U, on Wast 
183d St., uurtb-west comer ot 11th ar. 

By William Knnelly, Sopreme Court foreclosnre 

'■itn, W. J. Marios. Bbq , Sitl'eree, of a bouse, witn 

tot l».« bv 98.8^ on West lUu sb, north side. 300 feet 

««a«oi9:b av. 

Br Bernard Srartb, Snpreme Court foreclosure 

^ ^e, Juhu A. Goodleit, E;iq.. Beferee, of a plot of 

Mud, 83 by 201.5, on Eisi eOtb St., north side, ex- 

teidiit); ibroush to STch St., 06 feet esst of 1st st. 

'▲laii, Bxecntor'a sate of the two three-story briok 

liuased, (iroQt,) two two-story frame bouses, (rear,) 

"with two iota each i25 by 100.5, Nos. 507 and 509 

"West 4-Jd St.. north 8i'i^ lSt3 fuet west ot lOih ay. 

By A. J. Bleecker & S<ip, Supreme Court fore- 
)doa«re sale, William Watson, Esq, Beieree, of 
«arec iota each 2S by loas, on Weal e8;a st, soutb 
•ide, SOU ie:t east ot 13cb ar. 

By A. H. MnKer it. Son, Snpreme Conrt fore- 
«1o«nre sale, ot tbe'tuUuwiog Brooklyn property be> 
ituBsmg tu ihe esute of William iSpenoer, deceased, 
^nnuer the direction of 11. B. Alar^ch and Samuel 
W'Tmau, Jr., Kxecutors, 1£9 vaiuable lots situate 
aa Bedturd, Kostrand, Lexinston, Greaoe, Oih ana 
Ytb «▼«., and J«fferaoo, JUanevok, Van Bucaa, Sth, 
■Ml 8U> ata. 

a 

XXORASQM aAL£S-IU£SDAT,\O0T. 17. 

KKYTTOBX. 

By ibcterd K Manutt. 

I three-stery and basement briek-front bonse^ 
VI. b It, Aa (i3 slieriff St.. a. a, 125 fL a of 
kiriuKtu.^ St., lot 26xlUU „ 

I plot of Uad on Walton ar., e. a., 179 it. n. fit 
biuTo St.. 14a8xii»'>>xl4ux21L Aiso a plot 
•t l&aa oa H aluto ar., acjoiniue abora, 160x 

Jig WiUkm ScaiwUy. 

Ilot on Sth ar., s. e. cor. of 78tb st.. 25x100.. SS.SOO 
1 ttttee-atory and (jaaemeot bruwn-stooe-irout 
l^iMaa. wlib lut. B. T-ltta sw. a a. i'io ti. w. of 

ATeliaaA.l0t'iOXlUi!.-i lifiiS 

by Btrnard SmyiK 
)S lots oa 1st ST., a. w. ooi; 1024 st.. eaeb SSx 
Iwa.:! .-....„... $8,000 



$7,100 



RKOORDSD RMAL HJiTATM TRANSfEBX 
XKW-TOBK. 
Monday, OcL 16. 
«»4>ews place, a. a, 175 tt. ir. of Central ar., 
:e%joxZuv, :i»td WarO, W. L. Andrews to B. B. 

cuff at., a. s., I'iM 5-7 ft. a of concord ar., 
:txx:Hi.o a-l. 23i •' axd ; O. V. J. Beiui« and 
hUfi^ind to J. tiosrts 

L5..d sk. n s., 175 ft. w. or Curtland ar., 25x 
IMJ, S3« Ward ; k. U. BnUe aud husband to 
la. iieiaa... .«. 

Mwb >t., •. a, 4;:4 tt. e. of Utu ar., MiUH-H', 
U. Irwia and wiA, Kxecatoca, to 1^ C. Kara- 



IK" 



8:^ »t., iba, ;'i(n/ tt. w. of t>tb ar., l»9.il>3X 
luu.ox Irrcjtuiar; b. Jarrts, Jr., a'ad wifs to 
J. r. gulj 

MMr.,.-..s.. oti.lon. n^ of ilfitb bt.,4ux<M>: 
A. Auld ituO biuuaud to B. Auld ■ 

t6Ui.i.,n. a., -^72.6 tt. e. ol lUtb ar.. S'i.-.'x 
luaO: .1. H Kailake and u ire to CL Michel... 

B.3d st.s s..UV't w. of 8tU aT., 16x^8.9; 
U. J. t-ipp* Hiid wife to L. M. Tbuin 

C«u:ral ar., s. a. coroer of lUOtb st, bU.llic 
11.5.0%! C. Michel to A 8. Kalislce 

12ia St., n. a, 145 ft. w. of Arenua A, 5Ux 
icu iui M. a. Muere and buabaod to J. T. 

M.ii at.'.Vir'i"ido"tfc' w.' of iotb arl,*a5x foit V;' 

li. A. Maudel to J. llayua. ........ ............. 

•axier »t.. Aa 4. 3a.Cx'<:;ixiri'eKnl'iir;"K'uch 

. aui..rM to Jobu ^iauuit 

B4tb cv a. s . lou It. a of .Xatluon ar , viUx 

lu-,^:^ ; J. K. JJurray and wif/to V. W^nlnier. 
iiast.. I!. •..diJjii. e. orsto av.. 80xlUi.4; 

u. ti. Wellatu (jeruiuu .St. ItSKe'sUuarcb 

Mnlbtirry »i.. w. s.. 9j.:i: n. s. uf Uraud, 6u.5x 

1.8.9 to Baxter: Jdary iUveu aud others, 

bZrcutora. to J P. Jaraine 

74UiS(.. s. s.. 16>> jL e. ui Ala<ti>on av., '^ux 

IV—'J. vhari«sW. tvbitney and wile tu j. 

I Aurtay 

»lst *t. a. s., M/o Ik a Oi ata »r., lo>xliHi; W. 

». Vier... lioieree to U. ileyiuan 

73u St.. 11. »., loatt. ^. of ',i!d«T.,iuiixlU-,<.-4!; 
K. U. U.kie, tfeCetee. tj V. lieU QiueKsa- 

•tauiousi.. .\a no, u. a. eti.it tt. e. ot Allen, 
2 . .;>xtf i, h. D, Oale, acferee. t » L. JJ. Pabst. 

40ias»-. ». s , 116 .t. w. Ol au»T., I9.xi0a5; 
i. Jf. t arreli. iUtAae, to i.auA lor eATi.<«a. .. 



It 

$3,000 

1,175 

1.20U 

18,250 

95,000 

82,000 
6,600 
8,600 

, 3,700 
' 3,000 
13,00J 

nem. 

oom. 

70.000 

DOlDa 

12,750 

5,000 
19.C00 
10,000 



CITY REAL-ESTATE. 



FUB SACK tlKtXCHA.NGK.— bOl SITUATED 
su a prumliient i-orui-r of stb ar. will be soi<l a bir- 
gai.<, or »il. be exchanged f jr a dwelUn^r eliy^bly ••'.t- 
lwt*.u: v«ry little inouL-y rtquired prorided itao pur- 
ecuMnr will itu)>roTe tlio snoie furtbw.th. Adares* Ur. 
r. HaKKH. So. 13^ vVt!St 44lb it. 



$30 



1\IU\ -^ •UUU-SrOHl '^U-fOOT 

• Vf\7\/*3xu)iisiua residonne. 39. ii at., ad- 



iut^tax tue ar.uu.2. 
Ik 



Ho. 4 fiJM St. «r Kii. n.i Kast 17 th 

V. It. arnvB /(SOW, js. 




L,<«»K nkLii ittl ttXVtiASG^—flli^V-OL^Ai 
A t«u«nuoi uropuiijr oa tbe aasc side, to (■xcluoKa 
ferHUi<-uJaiu-»iz<9 dweuin^-auuse. ll.i(AtlY (aenmberMl. 
laaaifua iieijitiviornoud. addtoss uW.siitl. .'•tation 1). 



CO U N TR y K KAL EglWrjhl^ 

OUANiiH. K. J.-«;uUMl'aY HUCHKS. LASOO, 
aB'i T.iivgo uits tor xaie: ane^t rariatr Alsu, 
hiruialii-(i ami onfuniisUed iiouaes to let for seasc 
uiKK K. »MiTH. lormasrly BI 
, uin'iifr uf Uala aud Com* sis. 



tenr bv Wai.1'KK K. »MiTH. lormasrly BlacltWiii k 
fa..lli. oriiicr " ' ■ 



S90U 



or 



tlOtMKY hEAT FOR HiALE-hlUHT KX- 
./CiiA.NUB.— eleaa it Improrement*. fcc; liealthr, 
SluiTiukoi;. accessible : cost $.^I,0UU; for sitie at a bar* 
piui. LLS'iuM, owner, Ko. '^i Xilberty st. 




U'' 



PEAL ESTATE AT A UCTION^ 

Aoaiaa U. Mvixaa. Anctioueer. 

fWtATS UV Wil.LlA.M ttPENCEA. DC 

CBAMKD. 

•ALS BT OHDBB UF TUB NEVy-TOBE 

bDPttiJIlB COUKT. 

^^ —,»-«- ^^20 VdLUABbK LOT* 

#H BBDTOBD, ^0:jTaA^D. LiiXI \aT05, OBEESE. 

,-»» - 6''"' ^^^ 7Ta AV8., 

JBIViiBSO:!(, UA.VCOCK. VAW liUBliN. 8TU. AKO 

gra bt.-*., 

IK CITY OF iEOuKLTH, 
ti< b« sold at au.:tl»n 
'■. On WEDMiSDAl, Oi.T. 18, 

^_„; al l'.J o'clock, at the 

VZCHA2IOB 8ALE8i:<>Ull, no. ill BEOADWaT. 

NKW-YOBK, 

J»I OBDSIR OF TITR NEW.iOEK SUPEKHE COORT, 

sadrr ibr dneciion of Herman I). Aidrich and Samuel 
Wyaiaa, Jr., i:xe.;utoi's. 

and situated as follo-ws: 

BanyoBB 4r.— Ibree lots, west side, between Fallon 
KT. aiKi Hancook st. 

UahoiCk ST.— six lot*, north side, and four lota, luutb 
side, oeiweeo BeJfuM sod Franklin ars. 

/syraaaoa ST.— Two lots, suntb sloe, between Bedford 
and i'raitkliu •%a 

J!t«TMAXS Ar.— lilKtat lota, comprlMoc tho ontire oaat- 
erlv riEini,, bet worn Ureene ar. iiu<l ynn Curen sr.; also, 
(oar \v:». a<iatb-eust comer of KostrauU ftu'i Lexington 
ar/<., aud fuor lota south -west corner of Kostraod and 
Lexto/ioii .-ITS. 

VjkM i>vaxx (T. AKv (iuumxm Ar.— Twenty lota, run- 
Bliix ihniut^b from sireet to areano, and between Mos- 
UiMU 'tail BeOfoid avik > 

Q:t.Buir! Ar.—Twelre lou, south slda. 100 feet east 
Of Bedioid ar. 

LaxiaoToa ar.— Bight lots, north side. In the rear of 
,tb* i-trtiiin ar. lota 

LVxuroToa ar.— Twelre lots, soutb side, 100 fSet 
west »f .Nustraud ar. 

baaaoaa Ar.-.i<'onr lota, sonth-east corner of Oreene 
ar. 

CVH AW^H an.. 8t« a»i> 9th sts. — Portv-two lota 
la the olock buuaded by 6th ana 7ta ara, Sth and Otb 

Uauy of the arenues and streets on which these lots 
MN tvc^Uri are SBWEBED, FaVBD, aMO UOUTBO 

Fif r pur oent may remain on bond and mortgage, 
•ook m ins »t tbe ollloe of > 

aSUaII H. UUXil.Ba fc BOX, Anetttmears. 

n. •> . »•• f **•• s» 

»■ wm, LoocHA* k Kv, Attoraers, 

Jla.86iiiMMa». 



REAL ESTATE AT AUCTION. ' SITUATIONS WANTED. 



*». A, J. LT2fCU k. Soss, Auctlouuors, 0£Bce 10 fini; St. 

THE VAl..llAlli.c: l,>«PRr»VKl> fHOPiOKTY 
on north-west eoruer it Uroomu anJ .VluU'eTv its., 
win be sold at auction ou Tuewluv, Uct 31, 1876, ac 
VJ M.. Mt Excodiijje saiesioom. No. Ill Bio'ilway. 
in foilowinj; parcels: Cornar parcel. H i.H, on Bromiio 
St., IIG leet ou .Mulocrry st..wiMi lour brick builainus 
lher»'OTi ; lot on Miilttrry st , acjoiuing a.mve. 2-ii7."), 
■witb biick 'b..tldlu7 thireiia: lot on Broome st., a<l- 
jolT.lntt same, aix98.«xli-4 6. wltn bnck bu.ldtiig 
tbereOn. 

by AD,(iA.-< d. Mi;li,kk ii. Hoy. .Auctluueeiii. 

THURSDAY, OCT. 19. 

At la o'clock, at tbe Bxchan?o S:\lesroom. No. Ill 
BroadTr.iT, iniporlaiit siIl. of 354 LOTS iu parcels, 
liauosomeiv situated ou Fonlbam Heislits, Ivrt-nty- 
toiirlh W.ird, with 7t>5 feet oi wat?r liont on Harlum 
River Tills property is r'-achHcl in tuirty minutes 
from Grand Central Depot: fifty per ceut. on mortKajfO 
lor ibree ytiara Fur particulars aud maps, apply to 
the auctluneers, Mo. 7 Piue at. 



__^WEIXmj8JTO^^^ 

A8LIPBUB MrRRAY HILL, FL LL f*IZK, 
exquisitely furnished and reacted inangion. tine 

bruDZt-s. statiisry, to., at a low reutai. V. K. SfEVK.N- 
80.V, Jh., No. 3;^ feast l~th »t.. or W.r. 4 I'.ne a-. 

FAK'lMii.NTS.— TK.^TgllDU.N. iSO. -JCI Wl-ST 

•iothst.— Kor sn>:ill lamliie*; brown stone; liunt; 

yeiitiluteJ ; Oiiel wia lowa ; JaoUson'd (k'ruti s: I'le^'jint 

(sas-flxturt-s: stiacions utardf n ; $180 to StiOO ; .lanitor. 

RLHAJi." FLA T-, 8 1'H AV. AM) 57 ill ST. 

— Keren rooms, ail iniproTenii^nt", prlvato halis, 
bo : $i!6 to S4'i ; cheapest Id N«w-\urlt. 

J. KDUAti L^.AYCH^FT. No. 702 Sth av. 

N tLEUAN r KLA T T« LK I'-U.SFUKN l.SHKD; 

five rooms ; rent $1,000 per aniiuai. ^o. 71 Lox- 

iiiKton av. ^^^ 

RHUVVeU RK>'TS.-iNqvV CO.«i'LETB KUB- 
aished and unfurolsbed iisls. Offices 4 Fiuo or o'S 
ISaat 17th St. V. K. ^l'EVK;>SO.^^ Jk. 

rj^O LiBT— FL'KMoeSU, A TURKoHTOKV HOUSE, 
X near Broadway. Ap]))y at No. 4B Weat 3:>d st. 

OL'ssB. Ntl. 8 W«S T '2S TH ."ST., TO rtXSNT. 

— FilTute residence or fur business. Apply as above 



H 



__STORESj_&C;^jr^^ 

rTpcTijiT^^^A^ 

•A second floor, iS feet br 23 leet, in Kood condition, 
suitable for a Uwyer's oi&ca Apply to 

QSOEQB J0NB3, 

Timet OfBoe. 

WANTBU— TWO PULL LOTS SDIT.IBLS KOR A 
clinroh, era church already ert-i-tod ; must bi- lo- 
cated hetween Sth and Otb ars. and 14th and oiith sts. 
By addressing JOHN C. VViJJCU, No. 440 West 20th 
St.. -with lowest prico, terms, to., may find a purchaser. 

A>TitD.— FROM isT NOVE.MBKa UNTIL Isf 

May, at a molerate rent, a neatly f irnlehed hjus;) 
on Hudson iitrer, not aiK)ve Yonkers or beiow Wash- 
Ington Ueljtbts. Jtd Iresa for two d.ivs, statiiK? particu- 
lars, tent, fcc, T. W. a.. Box No. 245 i'ost ofBce. 

WANTKIJ— I'O H1R8 FO* SBVKN ilO.STH.-, BT 
a small fami'y. (three p.dults,) a furnished house ; 
terms not to exceed $250 per moutli. Address Post 
OfHce ^ox So. 2.705. 

TITANTEIJ— AUA>D»OilcIiY FURNISUBD UOUdfi; 
Yt vent from $i.«00 to $4,8t»0. JAC03 V. D. 
W YCKOFF, Nos. SO and 32 Pine st. 

SITUATIONS^ANTED. 

FE.11ALEM. 

.tbE VV-VUWH UKFICE OF TBK TiiUEai. 

The np-town office of TttB TIAiJK 1« located il 
>•. 3.^57 Broadway, bet. 3J stand .'ttjdjci. 

Ocen daily, Sundays iiioliuled. trom 4 AM. toU P. M. 

«nbacnptious lt^o«tred, and copies of TUB TlMi(90r 

sale. 

A PVKR T18KMHSTK RKCErvim I'STIL P. W. 

CHAKVV'O.YIA>.— iSY A EaSPi-CrAHLK WOilAN 
to (ID out br trie day to house-clean, wash, or irrn; 
can gire satistEKStnry reietence. Call at Ho. 324 Easu 
asi tt., oue fliirat, b^c teroom. ^^^^^^^^ 

CHA.nUEU-.MAIO.— BY A HIGHLY RKSPECTA- 
ble £irl as chamber-maid and do fine wvshinz end 
Ironins; has the best of recommendations irom her 
last Diace, where slie has lired two aud a half years. 
Can he seen for two days at No. 34 J K^^t ISth st., up 
t wo flights of stairs. 

HAAlBbR-HAIU OU FARLO^<>.>iAlU.-BY 

a lady tor a first-class cbamner-maiil, or us parlor- 
maid; will be fuund irastwoitby and obXeiu?; niau 
years' City reference from laat place. Call for two days 
at So. 310 West 2i)th st, from lU lo 6. 

CHA.'VIBER-:>IAI0 AND »«£W'I\'6}.-1}Y AN 
Americiri ProteatanC: or wonlU do gRueral Lonse- 
work in a French flit ; best ritv refereui-e. Adilri-ss 
A. B., Box .No. 810 llilES UP-TOWN OFFICE. KO l,i57 
BEOADWAT. 

CHA'aBi£K-4AIi> AND SUW^ISU. (IK 
Chambermaid and Wai'iua. — By a Welsh Protestant 
girl ; aood Oty reference : I'ity or coantrv. A Idress 
C. I)., Box Bo. 308 TU1G9 UP-TOW.N OFFICE. MO. 
1.257 BROAOWAY. 

CHA!»lBES-.1lAtD AXD VVAITRKSa:.— BY A 
rrspectahle, smart ttdr vounx i;irl lo do cliamber- 
work aud waitiOfT, and nss'st with the wnsbiag ami 
ironiue in a private family; best Uity reference. Cail 
atJNa 1,127 2dsr. 

HA9lBB.>-.WAIU AND WAI Tifli'f*.— 8Y A 

very respectiible |{irl ; would do all kiuils of fanu y 
sewinK on Wheeler U Wiliou macbiae : hve years' rel- 
erence. Andreas C. B.. i>ox So. ^66 TIMES UF-TOW'N 

OFFICE, so. I..ii7 BKO.\l)W4Y. 

HAMBER-WAill.— BY AR.'.Sl'ECrADLKYOUXQ 
womiin 88 first-class utaambei-mald or t1<i plain saw 

iuc: has dretciasd City reference. Cau be seen at Ho. 

l;n. West 3lith St. 

HANUER-.UAID AADL<Ai;NDi[iK.S«.— BY A 

competent youns woiuaU. as ehamb< r-mHld aud 
lanudress: best City refeieuoe. Call at iSo. 225 West 
DSust 



CI 



'1HA.>JBEU-31AJI>. — lit' A R'.aPliCTABLE 
._.'>oauK eifl to assiai 'with cbamb»r-wora: or uiitid 
children; ia widing and obli|;:ns; privdt- tamily pre- 
ferred, .^ppiy to No. 4U4 Kast '<:9th St., room So, 20. 

ClUAiVIBii'K-nAiD AND W'AITKU^«^.— 61 A 
^coinpeti-nt yount; woman or as chanib r-maid and 
to do fill" wasliioi;; good rererence. Cull at No. lo8 
West 28th St. 

'-^A.VfoER-.nAID.-BY A FiaoT-u'LA.>S CH.AM- 

ber-mai<J : v<ou d <io pltln sewing, or minaMiir cbl:- 

dien : llreit p|)tbt yems in one ol ine. CiillathL-r last 

employer's, 14 t.BSt 40tb tt .Weilm-sday ."JndTliursila.v. 

CtHAMBKK.»lAlU UY .\ Kri.lP -ItTi UL •. GtUL 
./na chaml>('r-iii<]i<i aud waitr> ss no'l neaist W'th. 

wasUiog ; u(i ooidctiou to do bousc-woik fur a euiall 
family; b^ st Cicy refe ejc-. Cull at 551 3d av.. re ir. 

i iUAMHEU<>IAID A»D WAl Taii.-".**.— BY A 
V-yonni girl; will asalet with wnsbins nnd iionin° : 
go^>d reference. Call at her present employer*^. No. 72 
West 11th St. 

HAItUUK-AIAlU.— i^T A YoUNii iUKl am 
chambei-muid and waitress oi' cbfimacr-muil and 

washing : the b -st of i itv refereucea cui be {liren. 

Call ut No. 245 Bast ^ 1 at st. 

IIAi'»IBKa-.VlAII).— BVA YoU.NG PHOi'K-TANT 
girl to do i^bamber-work iiud w,iiiijie: best Ci°y 

refereucea given, call at No. 212 East 28tb st., secoud 

floor. 

C'lUA.nBKlt-.nAJl) ANO VVAlTrtEs><.-BY A 
/'respectsole girl: would mind cbinlreii ami sew; 
City or oouutry; Itest leferences. Caii at No. 158 West 
18th St. 

UAyiUEif ..VIAIa A.NM HKA.H^rKtisia jiY 

an Arae-iCiUa x>ri; is urst claisS; or wil iuk to wait 
ou ladles; best t ity refeieuoe. Can be seen irom iO to 
£, at No. «i2 K ist 41st St. 

4 1llA.>IB.^K-.tlAIU— CfOK.— UYA l.AoY001N<J 
V.,to :-urui>e f.>L' two eooJ servauts, one as caamoer- 
maid and tauudress. or as uooi. the other as waitress. 
Inquire at Ka 191 ^''adison^r. 

C^HA.nukiH-»IA^t).—Bi A YjU.su LilitL. aNU 
.'taliH care of children : Is a enod sewer; ur would 
do waiting in a private family ; best uf City lefeieiicc. 
Call for two da.\8 at No. Ib6 bast 3(.tli St.. jpcouU floor. 

ClriA.MBKU-.tlAlD ASV AS.yl>l' u 1 1 II tVASil- 
nva and Iioning. — ay a re.pectuble Protestant tjlri; 
good reiereuce. Cail at No. :^a'J Kast '.ilst st. 

CHAYlBElt-.VIAllI AlND WAIT. li!SS.-BY A 
yuung culund gi^l; or to uiiud children. Can be 
SeeuAt-.o. 13 i-asc '.^2U <t. 

ClHA.>lit«£K-JlAll). — BY A RK^JPUCTAULB 
^.yuuug gill and to take care ofcuildi-eu; goudrcler- 
euce. Call ut .no. 6 East 19ta ac 

riaAiViBKii-:)iAii> ami ska.mstkiis-.— by 

X/'a Protestant givl : kooc opci^tit ; williugiind .ijii/'- 
ing ; best vicity reference, t a<i i^t 3;^3 ii»' t 3Ji.' st. 

U»Oli, dkc— t;H-\.>ltUiK-nAll>.— oY TWO 

/re'>peutab:e younit gris; oue aa liai.i cook wash- 
er, uud irouL-t ; tbe otfa, r, lately l»ndeii, us cuamber- 
maid, iir to make herself geuerully uieiul: i ity or 
country. Call far two days at No. J.l^Bast Ulst St., 
betnetm Sdautsou and 6tb ars. 

C^OOK-SliA.nsTKES.S.— ttV A FlMT-CLAbS 
/fujilish 1'rote.^tiut cook ; uuderstauds all kiuda uf 
faucr dishes and detssrts ;aud duughCer us seams iress 
and childrun's maid; gooO City re.eicnc :. Aildress. 
tor two dars, J.. Box No. 30;J TiJllia UP-TOW5 OF- 
FlCK, NO. 1.267 BdOAUWAY. 

/ -OOK, WAHHKK, Ai^ U IKO.NKU— OHA.tl- 

V^ber-niali aud Wa tiess.— Bv two young girls, sis- 
ters. In a i)rivHt ' f .miiy. t 'gather, one as cmupetcnt 
couk, wasUer. ai:d icvner, the otUer as cbambu -maid 
auo wuitresb, aud wouiu uuHist in Keaerut bouae-work ; 
ri'tference. » ail at So. 67 West 4ytU st. 

CKiOK, drc.-€HA;MBli;ii.UAiD, d^c-BY 
/'two young girls ; one as cook, washer, anu irouer: 
ti.e other us cb.imber-ni^id i:n i waitruau ; no o!j?ctiou 
tu assist with the WHshing and ironing; besr Ciov ref- 
erence. Call at No. 61 West 42d nt., second flat. 

C100K— tVAI'i'UiiS&l AM> t Ha.'lBf.U-WAID.— 
/lEy two gills iram .>>cotlaad; oue ulll cout end 
assist wiUi wasblog. th<- oluer as waitress and cham- 
ber-maid ; Ciiu fnruish two years' City refe euce. Call 
tor two (lays ut 22t^ ICast 2Tlh st. lUL.g fourth bell. 

COOii.— BV A iliWT-ltATK COoITj U«Di;K- 
jiaudis <'aulcing in all its branched : is mn exceil^'ot. 
baker of breal aud bUcuU ; all kiuds uf dpssfriii: 
would assist with waHhiu;; itud Irouiog ; Iwst leierence 
given. Cull ut ^o. 214 7lb uv. 

CUi'.iii,, WASHliU.. AND IKM.NEU.-ur AUK- 
''succtable woman, withou. 'umily; would eo out 
by the day or week to wasli, Iron, or cnol;, and mako 
herself goaerally usejui; good lotereuoe. Cull atNu. 
bO'Z Jd av., sccuud lionr. 

OOH, WA^HKK, AND IJtOMEU.-aY A 

comi>elect Ncotciiwomau us ccok, washer, and 
iiouer In a smuU tamily, oi ns couk lu u prlv;.tu ooard- 
iii',{-tiu<ibe ; iicst City refercuues. Call or iidtlress lor 
tbreo diys, Jirs. McOulloch. ^o. 1^5 v> e-»l