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Full text of "Newmarket Era"

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Total Paid Nov. 1.-1,107 

Ntwmavfcat - 395 
Aurora - - - 160 

Dittricl - 513 Outiidt - 141 



El OHTY - EIGHTH YEAR, NO. 9 



NEWMARKET, ONTARIO, THURSDAY, MARCH 30TH, 1939 



EVERYBODY 




TANNERY HEAD IS 

BACK FROM ENGLAND 

Aubrey Davis, president of the 
Davis Leather Co., has returned 
from a business trip to the old 
country. He is scheduled to give 
some of his impressions of the 
changed political situation to the 
Lions club at an early meeting. 

HOSPITAL AID WILL 

MEET APRIL 4 

A meeting of the Hospital Aid 
will be held in the council 
chamber on Tuesday, April 4, at 
3.15 p.m. 




SINGLE OOMtt, 8c UOH 



PREDICTED 



BAND SAY THEY 



WILL SERVE FREE 



CELEBRATE THEIR 

42ND ANNIVERSARY 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Gordon 
celebrated their 42nd wedding 
anniversary last Friday. Tliey 
were presented with a beautiful 
lamp by their children. 

IS IMPROVING 

AFTER OPERATION 

Mrs. Jack Stallard, who under- 
went an operation at the Western 
Hospital, Toronto, last week, is 
improving nicely. 



IS CONVALESCING 

Mrs. Robert Fountain, who has 
been confined to her bed for the 
past few weeks, is able to be 
up a few hours each day. 

IS RECOVERING 

John Davey is still confined 
to his bed through illness, but 
is slowly recovering. 



WILL BE APRIL BRIDE 

-. ' JMlas Muriel Lloyd Law. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James S. Law, 
whose engagement has been announced to Mr. Orvillc A. Clarke, son of 
{|t?V and Mrs. Alva Clarke of Ottawa. The marriage will take place 
early In April. Photo by Budd Studio. 



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Back To 



RETURNS TO SCHOOL 

Miss Nellie Holladay has, re- 
turned to her duties at the 
Alexander Muir school after an 
illness. 



The Citizens* band have issued 
the following statement: There 
has been a rumor circulating 
around town that the Newmar- 
ket Citizens* band have definitely 
asked a stated sum of $250 for 
their services during the old 
home week. This is due to some 
misunderstanding on the part of 
the bandmaster of Newmarket 
Citizens* band. 

"The arrangements made by 
the executive of the band were 

on the request of the old home 
committee to put on a tattoo, that 
they could not do this Without 
expense money of $250 to cover 
cost of bringing bands to town, 
but as regards to our services we 
made no charge for same. 

"Our position is still the same. 
If the old home committee desire 
a tattoo it will cost us at least 
to make same a success. If there 
i= no tattoo there will be no 
charge made whatsoever for the 
services of the band. 

"We trust this explanation will 
correct any possible wrong im- 
pression that may have been 
created. 

"Newmarket Citizens* Band 
(Signed) 
"Leslie Rowland, president 
"Joseph Cribar, vice-president 
"Kenneth Bennington, secretary 
"Tom Watts, treasurer 
"Clarence Burling, librarian.' 



TT 



RETURNS FROM HOSPITAL 

Master Clyde** Bat ten. son of 
Adj. and Mrs. Batten, has re- 
turned from the Hospital for 
Sick Children in Toronto very 
much improved in health. 



Bike Men Want Dominion 

s Here For Reunion 




» — 



L. 



'! 



Another Close Game 

Gives Title To New. 

market Team 

By GEORGE HA9KETT, U. 

The Davis Leather squad were 
again crowned champions of the 
Newmarket-Aurora mercantile 
league on Thursday evening last. 
'Tftfsy captured the second game 
of the play-offs from the Aurora 
winners, the town of Aurora 
team, by a two-to-one count in 
Newmarket arena. 

This victory, coupled with a 
3-2 victory, in the first game of 
the series, brought the mercan- 
tile cup back to the Davis Lea- 
ther Company for the second 
consecuivc year. Although the 
ice was not in the best of condi- 
tion, owing to the mild weather, 
both teams showed a good brand 
of hockey and what was lacking 
In hockey was more than made 
up for in the fighting spirit dis- 
played by both teams. 

Both teams battled back and 
forth and although the goal- 
tenders were tested on some very 
dangerous rushes in the first 
period, neither team could break 
into the scoring column. 

The tanners took the lead 
early in the second, when the 
left-winger, Freddy Evans, snap* 
jkhI n close-in shot past the 
Aurora goaler, Cowieson. The 
visitors then went to the fore 
nnd gave the tanners some very 
anxious moments but were not 
able to beat the stout defence 
put up by the local lads. 

The final period saw the tan- 
ners add another to their count. 
Watts making a pretty solo 
effort on a break-away. Scott 
counted for the Aurora towners 
shortly after, but, owing to the 
close-checking barrage laid down 
by the local squad, the visitors 
were unable to get the tying 
counter. 

For the visitors, the town of 
Aurora team. Cowieson in goal 
turned in a smart game to keep 
the tanners count down to two, 
Scott and N. Heaney were going 
great guns for the Aurora squad 
and were dangerous all might 
Harry Sutton on the Aurora de- 
fence also played well, turning 
back many tannery rushes. 

For the Davis Leather cham- 
pionship sqund a great deal of 
praise is coming to every man 
for the brand of hockey they 
dished out to bring the mercan- 
tile trophy back to the leather 
works. 

Peters, in goal, turned in his 
usual high-class job of goal- 
keeping. The defence of J. Peat, 
R. Smart and W. Townsley was 
a hard barrier for the 'Aurora 
■quad to get around, while both 
forward line*, the first of &. 
Groves, H. Brown and Alf. Har- 
den, and the second of Ab. Watts, 



HAS CLOTHES STOLEN, * 
SOME LATER RECOVERED 

Charles Gordon of Toronto, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Gor- 
don, Gorham St., on returning to 
his rooms one night last week 
found that they had been entered 
and two suits of clothing and 
other articles had been stolen. 
One suit was later recovered in 
a pawn shop. As yet the thief 
has not been apprehended. 



MINSTREL SHOW WILL 
BE GALA SPECTACLE 



The Citizens* band and the 
director, Norman Williams, are 
leaving no stone unturned to 
make the minstrel show, coming 
on April 12 and 13, one of the 
greatest achievements of its 
kind to be presented in this 
community. 

Splendid voices have been dis- 
covered for the various solos and 
male choruses and the best loved 
southern melodies will be great- 
ly appreciated. 

The cast is working overtime 
in preparing plantation scenes. 
monologues, jokes and gags that 
will have everyone in art uproar. 

Music h being supplied by a 
14-piece orchestra, which is one 
of the finest to be assembled by 
loral musicians. 

Special costumes are being 
arranged for the entire show, and 
together with a most spectacular 
color scheme and lighting effect? 
will make a colorful setting for 
I he first-class, streamlined min- 
strel show. 



Fred Kvans and P. Townsley 
played a good offensive game 
and checked well all night. 

Davis Leather: goal, Robt. 
Peters; defence, Joe Peat, Ross 
Smart; centre, Bohmer Groves; 
wings, Alf. Harden, Howard 
Brown: alternates. Bill Towns- 
ley, Fred Evans, Penny Towns- 
ley, Ab. Watts; coach, S. Towns- 
ley, H. Thorns; manager, Leo. 
Forhan. 

Town of Aurora: goal, Cowie- 
son; defence, Harry Sutton, H. 
Yakcs; centre, Scott; wings, N. 
Heaney, Preston, P. Knowles, K. 
Knowlcf. ' 

The Davis Leather band was 
again on hand to keep things 
livened up between periods and 
their music was greatly appre- 
ciated by the fans who were on 
hand to witness the battle. 

Both teams then lined up and 
the Davis squad were presented 
with the mercantile trophy by 
Geo. Haskett, Jr., president of 
the mercantile league, and this 
brought to a close another very 
successful season in the mercan- 
tile group. 



Citizens' Band Fee For Re- 
union Of $250 Asked 
By Bandmaster 

Canadian bicycle champion- 
ship finals could be brought to 
Newmarket for July 1, as part 
of the old boys' reunion program, 
officials of the Canadian Wheels- 
men's Association, told the re- 
union committee at a general 
meeting Tuesday evening. 

The association would ask pay- 
ment of $150, and five per cent 
of the gate, if any admission 
charge were made, and would 
bring all officials and would look 
after prizes and all incidental 
expenses. 

One of the officials of the 
association estimated that the 
finals would bring about 400 bike 
fans from Toronto. 

The racers would include girls. 
There would be 40 races, and a 
hard track would be needed. 

A. C. West, chairman, said that 
the committee thought of not 
making any admission charge. 

Frank Bowser gave details of 
one midway company's offer to 
come for the reunion. Mr. West 
estimated the probable revenue, 
on the basis of this offer, at $700. 

A letter from Smiths Falls, 
obtained by Robert Moore, band- 
master of the Citizens' band, 
contained the information that 
Smiths Falls had a turn-over of 
$16,000 for its successful reunion, 
revenues exceeding expenses by 

a few hundred dollars. There 
was no grant from the town, but 
40 business men each guaranteed 
S40 in case of need. There was 
no need. 

"We are not RQinst \o spend 
10 hundred dollars." said Mr. 
West. "We haven't the money." 

Mr. Moore *nid that the Citi- 
zens' band did not wish to 
arrange a tattoo for the reunion, 
as this would interfere with their 
tattoo later on in the summer, 
but he had something else in 
mind that would be a drawing- 
card. He asked a fee of $250 for 

the band for their services dur- 
ing the reunion. 

Mr. West said that the reunion 

committee had received a grant 
from the town; of only $\5Q. 

"We look on a reunion as an 
engagement," said Mr. Moore, 

Asked what the R. S. A. Bugle 
band expected, Mr. Andrews said 
that they hadn't given remunera- 
tion a thought, and that they felt 
it was up to them to get behind 
the reunion and push. He made 
it understood that if there were 
any remuneration, the band 
would find it welcome. 

Rev. Dr. D. Mclntyre reported 
that the Newmarket Ministerial 
Association is planning an open- 
air service after church on Sun- 
day, July 2. He was asked to 
consult with Alfred Smith, presi- 
dent of the Veterans, who are 
talking of a drumhead service. 

The meeting was one of the 

best attended so far. The next 

meeting takes place Tuesday, 

April 11, in the council chamber. 

(Everyone is welcome. 



PLAY FOR ROYAL VISIT 

The R.S.A. Bugle band have 
been engaged to play for the 
Danforth Business Men's Asso- 
ciation on the occasion of the 
visit to Toronto of the king and 
queen on May 22. 

REEVE IS ILL 

Reeve F. A. Lundy, a popular 
member of the Lions club, has 
been ill at home for over a week. 

MERCHANT IS LAID UP 

Frank Robinson, coal mer- 
chant, has been in Wellesley 
Hospital, Toronto, for the past 
three weeks. 



PREPARE FOR REUNION 

Plans are being made for the 
redecoration of the interior of 
Trinity United church. The out- 
side was painted and the shingles 
were replaced last year. 

PRESENT "THE MIKADO" 

The Pickering College* 
Glee club's presentation of 
"The Mikado" begins this 
evening and will continue on 
Friday and Saturday even- 
ings. 



FOUND EVERYWHERE 



Here Is 'another reunion com- 
mittee list of Newmarket people 
away from home. 

Mr. and Mrs. J, M. Kennedy, 
184 Florence St., Ottawa. 

Mr. and J-frs. J. W. Bell, 413 
Pr. Arthur Blvd., Fort William, 
Ont. 

Miss -Emma Fox and Mr. Fred 
Fox, Lamb Ave, Toronto, Ont. 

Mr. Wellington R. Townley, 
7224 Coles Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Prof. F. Arthur Oliver, 322 

College St., Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. J. S. Marshall, Canning- 
ton, Ont. - 

Mr. Byron Keer, 2290 Wall St, 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Keith, 128 
Glasgow Ave, Guelph, Ont. 

Mr. W. A. Johnson, 41 Sach's 
Bldg., Joubert St, Johannesburg, 
South Africa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Black, 389 Bruce 
St, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 

Miss A. Appleyard, 85 Gren- 
villc St, Toronto, Ont. 

Mr. W. A. Peterson, 637 2nd 
St, S., Kenora, Ont 

Mrs. Chester Jennison, 36 Fer- 
rier Ave., Toronto, Ont 

Mrs. E. Graham, 6927 Pushing 
Ave., St Louis, Mo. 

Rev. A. McKenzie, Hilton, N. 
Y., R.R. No. 2, near Rochester. 

Forester Bros., Beulah, Mani- 
toba. 

Harvey Cocksedge, 1021 St. 
Clair Ave., Niagara Falls, Ont 

W. H. Mosier, c-o Home Fur- 
nishing Co., Queen St. E., Toron- 
to, Ont 

E. J. Barry, 117 Portage Ave., 
Page 4, Col. 5 



MRS. WM. DENNE DIES 
IN EIGHTY-THIRD YEAR 



Two-Faced Goat Born In 

i Couldn't Stick It Out 




<?> 



Kid Used Only One Of 

Two Mouths, Had Two 

Noses. Four Eyes 

_^ t 

■ 

A two-faced goat is being 
mounted by W. J. B rough ton, 
Newmarket. The animal died 
when ii was only a few days old. 

Elmer Harrison, R.R; 1 Kettle- 
by, had this freak of nature,, a 
kid goat, born last week. The 
strange creature has a large 
head, two ears, four eyes, two 
noses and two mouths. It used 
only one mouth. 

The owner hoped to raise it 
It was doing well for a while. 



NEWMARKET MEN 

ATTEND BANQUET 

Among those who attended the 
annual banquet of the 127th bat- 
talion in Toronto on Saturday 
evening were George Young, 
Alfred Elphinstone, John Mor- 
ritt, Edgar Starr, Wesley Brooks, 
Wm. Andrews and Harry Lundy. 

Col. F. F. Clarke, Montreal, 
war-time O.C., was the principal 
speaker. Company Sergeant- 
Major George Cooper as presi- 
dent of the organisation was in 
the chair. 

On behalf of the Newmarket 
old boys* reunion committee, Mr, 
Brooks extended an invitation to 
the members of the unit to come 
to Newmarket on July 1. 

A subscription to The Era will 
make * friend happy. 



SUFFERS BAD INJURY 

Donald Smith, young son of 

Mr. and Mrs; Stanley Smith, 

broke his wrist while using the 

horizontal bars in' trinity United 

gymnasium with .the second 

troop of Boy Scouts last evening. 

He was attended by Dr. J. C. R. 
Edwards, 




IS LEAGUE SPEAKER 

John Colltngwood Reade, jour- 
nalist and newscaster, will 
present the views of the Leader- 
ship League in the town hall on 
Monday night 




Emily Marsh Denne, wife of the 
late William Mintern Denne, died 
at the home of M.'s. Fred Hoaxe, 
32 Srigley St, last Friday, after an 
illness of about two years. She 
was in her 83rd year. 

Born in Barharn county, Kent, 
Engl And, on June 23, 1856, she was 
married In Aurora on Dec. 6. 1876. 
Mr. Denne was a coal and seed 
merchant In Newmarket for many 
years, and later farmed for a few 
years on the land now known as 
Connaught Gardens. He and his 
wife left Newmarket in 1912 and 
spent a year visiting relatives in 
England. They then made their 
home in Toronto, where Mr. Denne 
worked as a clerk at Osgoode Hall 
until he was 80 years of age. 

He and bis wife then returned to 
Newmarket where they lived with 
their adopted daughter. Mrs. Fred 
Hoare. Mr. and Mrs. Denne had 
a son and daughter who both died 
in childhood. Mr. Denne died two 
years ago. Two of his ten brothers 
and sisters . stttl survive, Lyson, 

Lome Ave., and Henry, Quecns- 
vllle. A sister, Mrs. Newton, died 
five weeks ago. Mrs. Denne has 
no surviving relatives. 

Mrs. Denne was a member of 
the Anglican church. The funeral 
' service was held at the residence of 
Mrs. Hoare on Sunday, with Rev. 
A. J. Patstone conducting the ser- 
vice. 

Pallbearers were Albert Stick- 
wood. Herbert SMckwood, Roy 
Denne, George Hoare. J is. Denne 
and Ernest Bennitz. Interment 

was made in Newmarket cemetery. 



ADVIGETO JRS. 

Jim Faris Re-elected Sec- 
retary Of County 
Juni or Far mers 

Hold Annual Meeting 

The annual meeting of the 

York County Junior Fanners 
was held on Tuesday in the 
agricultural representative's of- 
fice at Newmarket and was one 
of the best attended and profit- 
able in the history of this organ- 
ization. All local Junior Farmer 
and Junior Institute and Home- 
maker clubs, according to the 
newly adopted constitution, had 
held their elections during the 
first two weeks of March and 
the annual meeting, attended by 
the officers-elect of the locals, 
took the form of a rally or 
leaders' school. 

All clubs, with one exception, 
were fully represented and en- 
joyed a program especially de- 
signed to enable the various of- 
ficers to carry out more effi- 
ciently their respective duties in 
the coming year. The business 
session in the forenoon was pre- 
sided over by the president, Wm. 
Champion of TJnionville, who re- 
ported on the success of the 
year's activities, including the 
drama festival, judging competi- 
tions, county field day, the 
record-breaking home plowing 
competition and the skating car- 
nival. Secretary Jas. Faris of 
Newmarket, being ill, had ar- 
ranged with his brother, Neil, to 
give the financial report, which 
showed the treasury to be in a 
healthy condititon. 

Following the nominations of 
the county officers to be voted 
on in the afternoon, Rev. W. H. 
Fuller of Markham addressed 
the group on "How to conduct 
a business meeting." The speaker 
gave some valuable hints on the 
proper handling of motions, 
amendments, voting, etc. In 
fact, a school of this type open 
to presidents or chairmen and 
secretaries of the various organi- 
zations of the county would be 
most valuable. 

After the adjournment for 
dinner at the King George hotel, 
they reconvened in two groups 
to discuss program planning. 
Miss Florence P. Eadie and Miss 
Betty Wallace of the Women's 
Institutes Branch and A. H. Mar- 
tin, assistant director of agricul- 
tural representatives, offered 
several helpful suggestions for 
preparing club programs, stress- 
ing the importance of having a 
detailed month-by-month pro- 
gram, the value of having the 
members do something to help 
themselves and keeping the 
entertainment features in the 
secondary position to Mie educa- 
tional work. 

The ladies had an interesting 
discussion of the project club 
work beinc carried on this 
spring in which they are making 
a study of meats. The leaders 
had visited the packing plants 
the day previous as a part of 
their training to lead their re- 
spective groups. 

W. M. Cbekburn, agricultural 
representative, spoke on the 
duties of the secretary and 
treasurer, offering many sugges- 
tions to help these officers to 
carry out their duties more 
effectively. He explained the 
simple filing system which he 
had supplied to each secretary. 

"A good secretary is a tower 
of strength to any president in 
helping to keep the business 
running smoothly and even in 
the conducting of a meeting," 
said Mr. Cockburn. 

The speaker stressed neatness, 
accuracy and prompt and proper 
attention to all correspondence 
rather than waiting perhaps 
three weeks for a meeting to 
discuss matters. 

"Someone familiar with ac- 
counting should be elected as 
auditor rather than 'one of the 
boysV he said. "A good auditor 
not only protects the members 
but the treasurer as well. Mem* 
bership cards with stubs as a 
••ecord are preferable and in fill- 
ing out these cards, cheques or 
receipts, the stub should be 
filled in first. The recipient 
will tell you if his part has not 
been written up." 

In the balloting for officers the 
following were elected; presi- 
dent, Jerry Walker, Todmorden; 
vice-president, Miss Doris Cook. 
Maple: sec.-treas., Jas. Faris, 
Newmarket. 

Owing to sickness and other 
factors, it was decided to hold 
the Junior Farmers' drama fes- 
tival at Pickering College on 
Monday. April 17, instead of 
during Saster week. Plays will 
be presented by Poplar Bank, 
Vellore. Unkmvllle and Victoria] 
Square clubs, 1 



F ?!S! ? Enem y Bombers May 

Have Oil Caches In 

North Wilds - Loudon 

ARMING TO STOP TOTALITARIAN BULLIES. 

URGED BY UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

TEACHER. SPEAKING ON AVIATION 

STATES TORONTO COULD B E EASILY BOMBED 

Planes in as common use in five or ten years as automobiles 
are today, was the prediction of Professor T. R. Loudon, of the 
faculty of applied science and engineering, University of Toronto, 
at the Lions club on Monday evening. 

Wilford Duffy, a war-time aviation instructor, introduced Prof. 
Lcudon. Elman Campbell and Morley Rowland moved a vote of 
thanks. President Alex. Eves was in the chair. 

"I think back to ten or 11 years ago, listening. to lectures by 
Prof. Loudon on dynamics," said Mr. Campbell. "It seems strange 
now to be hearing him talk on aerodynamics." 

"For some peculiar reason Canadians are air-minded," said 
Prof. Loudon. "They are brought up in the open, and that must 
make them independent-minded. You need to have an independent 
mind for flying. 

"When I was in Germany I was not impressed with the men- 
j tality of the German people. I have seen a good deal of them. 
People of a totalitarian state are not independent-minded. 

"Flying is now within the reach of the average young fellow 
in a factory or office. 



"We have been backward in 
declaring our support of Brit- 
ain. Why is this? We have lost 
all sense of responsibility. The 
reason is that it is well known 
that Canadians arc air-minded 
and that the air is going to play 
a big part in the next war. As 
a result every use of propaganda 
has been made to hold Canadians 
back. 

"The only way to stop a bully 
is to be prepared. Some people 
say that preparedness breeds a 
war-like spirit. As a boy I 
learned how to defend myself, 
and being prepared has never 
bred in me a war-like spirit." 

Prof. Loudon illustrated his 
remarks with pictures. 

"Flying is easy to learn today," 
he said. 

"Boys come to me wanting to 
be aeroplane designers. Aero- 
I plane designers must have 
1 mathematical ability, 

"One way to get started in the 
industry is to go into an aero- 
plane factory, but a boy will 
never become a designer unless 
he has the engineering training. 

"Another field is transport fly- 
ing. For this you must have a 
university education. Ordinary 
flying is easy, but transport fly* 
ing requires special knowledge 
and tiaining. 

"The aeroplane wing is con- 
vex on the upper side. This 
causes the air rushing past it to 
go through a narrower space and 
to go faster. The faster air goes 
the less pressure there is. In 
other words, there is suction or 
lift. 

"Wind tunnels, some of them 
large enough to take a full-sized 
areoplane, are used to test 
planes and for experimental 

purposes. 

"We should remember that 
two Canadians, Casey Baldwin 
and John McCurdy, were among 
the first fliers in the world. 

"The first planes went at 30 
or 40 miles per hour. They went 
up only a few hundred feet. 

"Count dc Lesseps flew in 
Toronto in 1910. 

"In the next five to ten years 
I predict people will use planes 
as they use automobiles today. 
You can buy a plane for $1,500. 
You can get a good used plane 
for $500. n is the cost t of keep- 
ing them in hangars' that is 
I keeping back the use of planes. 

"The modern plane pulls up 
its landing-gear, which is called 
retractible. This saves friction. 

"Today you have to fly 200 
miles per hour to be going at all. 
We have planes which can go 
400 miles per hour. 

"Above the elouds you wonder 
if there is such a thing as a dull, 
dark day. It is a peculiar ex- 
perience. 

"One of the problems of avia- 
tion is to get the landing speed 
down. Flaps arc used. You 
might call them air brakes. 

"Another solution is the use of 
a nose wheel. Planes land on a 



STRUCK BY CAR 

A youngster was knocked 
down by a car on Main St on 
Saturday morning. He went 
home crying, but apparently un- 
injured. " t 



Coming Events 

(Coming Event* announce- 
ment» one cent a word per week, 
minimum 25 cents.) 



Wednesday, Thursday, April 
U, 13— Newmarket Minntrel fihow 
of !«*, •pofuwr** fey NvvBMukat 

Cltlaena 1 band. 



tricycle arrangement. There is 
a danger of going over on the 
nose. Now a nose wheel is used. 
The new Douglas plane lands at 
80 miles per hour, and then uses 
brakes. 

"The most modern plane is a 
monoplane. A biplane will 
never get over 150 to 200 miles 
per hour, except some of the 
fighting planes. Biplanes are 
more manoeuvrable. 

"Planes go out of date in five 
years, but old planes are still 
safe to go up in. Every plane 
is gone over annually and a cer- 
tificate of air-worthiness issued 
by the government. An out-of- 
date plane is still perfectly safe. 

"The question is frequently 
asked; Why don't they develop 
the autogyro? People have the 
wrong idea. With engines as re- 
liable as they are now, twin 
engines are safer than an auto- 
gyro. The autogyro is out be- 
cause it can't get much beyond 
100 miles per hour. 

"There arc all sorts of planes 
made with folding wings, flap- 
ping wings, etc. 

•The fuselage or framework of 
n plane looks much like the 
Quebec bridge. That is what it 
is, a double cantilever. 

"An Imperial Airvj^yj plane 
at Croydon, buiit in 1932, has 

gone 1.500.&W miles, yet people 
say that planes are not safe. It 
makes the trip from Paris to 
London in about an hour and 
three-quarters, and carries about 
38 passengers. Imperial Airways 
keeps the same planes in opera- 
tion for a period of years even 
though they have gone out of 
date, and newer planes would 
make better time, 

"Imperial Airways routes go 
all over Africa and to Australia, 
Page 8, Col. 6 

HOLD SPECIAL SERVICE 

ON PALM SUNDAY 

Palm Sunday, April 2, is 
Christian Endeavor Sunday in 
the Christian Congregational 
church. 

The evening service will be in 
the charge of the young people. 
Rev. T. T. Faichncy, assisted by 
several of the Endeavorers, wllj 
bring the evening message. The 
theme is: "What Christ has 
meant to me.*' A Christian En- 
deavor choir will be in attend- 
ance. 

J, Wm, Rae, of Cooke's Pres- 
byterian church, Toronto, also 
first vice-president of the Ont- 
ario Christian Endeavor Union, 
will be the guest soloist. 

I. Goodman at the piano and 
L. K. Farr at the organ will 
provide the music for this ser- 
vice. 



BARBIE SCOUTS GIVEN 
CAMPING GROUND 



Barrie aervJce clubs and citizens* 
have combined to purchase a 
|2,00O camping site on Georgian 
Bay for the boy scouts of their 
town and district, according to 
O. E. Hollowmy, Barria Scouts com- 
mlutaner, who wm a vUHor at 
Newmarket Uona club on Monday 
evening. 

Th« land Is 100 acre* in extent. 
The purchase was made aa the re- 
sult of crowing difficulty la faaa* 
Ing a suitable camp tlte, and thf 

fear that soon no artea would be 
available, 

Mr. HoUoway, who Is * member 
of the Barrio XJons club, offered 
the local eiob any awbrtanc* they 
might wiab te Swiping Newmarket 

pcouts. 

Ha waa accompanied by Wm. 
IffcCord, Barri*. 



< t 



i' - 



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■■ ■■ ■ 



EWWARKET ERA, THURSDAY, MARCH 30TH, 1038 



Vi 



■ 



£rje Jtetomarfeet Cta 

Founded 1852 



Published every Thursday. Two dollars 

* ■ 

per year in advance. Three dollars for two 
years. Single copies five cents each. 



- 



ANDREW OLDING HEBB, 

Editor and Proprietor 
142 Main SI., Newmarket 



THURSDAY, MARCH 30TH, 1939 



! 



CRITICISM OF THE SOVEREIGN 



- 



Did you ever read in a magazine or newspaper 
or hear in a public address criticism of the 
reigning sovereign of the British Commonwealth 
of Nations? Make an exception of any criticism 
of King Edward VIIX before his abdication. It 
strikes us, as we read the report in the Canadian 
Statesman, BowmanviUe, of an address given 
before the BowmanviUe Rotary club, that we 
have never before read similar public criticism 
of the sovereign. However, so far as we know, 

there is no rule of law against it, and we are 
glad to live in a country where a private citizen 
may criticize the sovereign, if the remarks made 
really do amount to critidsm- 

i 



Eammce Gamhlfry 

Let's hear the particulars. Hie report is 
headed: "Monarch Is Criticized by Preacher for 
Giving Stimulus to Gambling." The remarks 
made by Rev. Eugene Beech, Newtonyille, were: 
'*When the king visits Toronto he will go from 
a large gathering of school children to the Wood- 
bine race track. I cannot acclaim him for that, 
when by his actions he creates a stimulus for 
gambling, whether it actually received the sanc- 
tion o( the king or not But I still acclaim him 
as the reigning sovereign, yet feel free to criticize 
his actions " 



Sport of 

One might say that the king cannot be criti- 
cized for an itinerary planned by someone else, 
but bearing in mind that the king does attend 
the races in the old country we must conclude 
that the king was criticized in this instance. We 
did not know that the Woodbine races were on 
the royal itinerary. If so, we suppose it is for 
the running of the "king's plate." King George 
may be an ardent follower of the turf, but it 
would probably make no difference to him 
whether he got to Woodbine or not. A more 
thoughtful committee of arrangement might have 
forgotten Woodbine and avoided any criticism of 
the royal family. 

If The King Were A Canadian 

Wiiile there are many people in Canada, prob- 
ably a majority of people, who have no feeling 
against horse-racing and incidental gambling, 
there is in Canada a larger body of opinion 
against racing than in Britain. The Toronto 
Globe, until taken over by the present publisher 
of the Globe and Mail, would not publish racing 
news. Perhaps the king, if he were resident in 
Canada and knew the extent to which this feeling 
against racing exists, even though a minority 
feeling, would not attend races. On the other 
hand, if he did attend races, and were pictured 
at the races in our newspapers, we think that the 
popularity of racing and "playing the ponies" 
would increase greatly, and the sport would soon 
become as popular in Canada as in the old coun- 
try. Tne king may not be an absolute monarch, 
but he wields a tremendous influence on the 
fashions, tastes and morals of his peoples. 

Pro And Mostly Con 

■ 

As for the sport itself, lots can be said against 
it. Something can be said for it too. It takes 
out into the open a lot of people who might 
otherwise be satisfying their gambling instincts 
(we all have them) indoors over bridge or poker 
tables, or satisfying their desire for excitement 
in beverage rooms. It can be said too that bet- 
ting on the horses is less vicious than drinking, 
as betting, while causing the ruin of occasional 
individuals, involves principally the passing of 
money from one individual to the other and to 
the government (through the pari-mutucl 
machines), whereas drinking is just waste, the 
pouring if money "down the drain." If anybody 
else can think of any other tribute to pay to 
betting on horse races, he is brighter than we arc, 
for we can't see any moral justification for our 
society, our governments, our laws frowning on 
the slot-machine and giving a blessing to the pari- 
mutucl machine. 



who say that all debate in parliament is a waste 
of time have little appreciation of the history and 

growth of our parliamentary institutions. How 
can a nation progress without a national meeting- 
place where the national problems are debated? 
Those who talk at Ottawa do not just talk through 
their hats either. We wonder how many of those 
who criticize parliament ever look at Hansard. 
We cannot look through Hansard without being 
impressed by the excellence of the addresses 
given. Most of the addresses are the result of 
hours of study, or years of experience, or bring 
to Ottawa special knowledge of conditions in 
particular sections of the country. We do not 
see how members of the government could hear 
these addresses and not be greatly helped in their 
almost impossible task of conducting the business 
of ten million people scattered across a continent 
four thousand miles- wide. 

w 

Not Less Talk, But Louder Voices 

No, what we need is not less talk in parliament 
but wider dissemination of the information put 
before parliament by its, members. These speeches 
are too informative and educational for our news- 
papers (with the exception of the Montreal Star) 
to print. They are not sufficiently amusing to 
make good newspaper copy, and we do not sug* 
gest that newspapers have any obligation to 
print them. But if there are any of our readers 

who really believe, as some people tell us, that 
ail the talk at Ottawa is piffle, we invite you to 
drop in at our office and we will give you a 

couple of copies of Hansard. Those who read 

these reports will have a new respect for the 
industry and efforts of the average member of 

parliament * . 

Talk Id Vain Sometimes 

But members of parliament are not always able 
to persuade the government to follow the policies 
they advocate, not necessarily because the gov- 
ernment does not think the policies advocated are 
sound, but usually because the government does 
not think that public opinion throughout the 
country would approve such policies. Govern- 
ments have to do popular things, things that will 
win our votes at the next election, and these 
popular things more often involve the spending 

of money than the saving of it. That is unfor- 
tunate. 

Radio As Hansard 

Our thought is that instead of curtailing the 
debates, an effort should be made to acquaint 
the public with what is being said in parliament. 
We would like to see the entire proceedings of 
parliament put on a national radio net- work. It 
seems to us that that would bring aboui a new 
and far more intelligent interest in public 
problems, that that would encourage the private 
member to study and speak on these problems, 
that that would make the private member's criti- 
cism of the government far mere effective, and 
that that would give the government a means of 
explaining its policies, actions and lack of actions 
to the public. In short, it would bring govern- 
ment and people much closer together and would 
tremendously speed up government action. And 
it would end all this talk of particular viewpoints 
getting excluded from the radio. Any viewpoint 
that could send a member to parliament could 
get on the air. 



' 




ROB ROBIN IS WELCOMED HOME 

BY RBTH DIXGMAX HEBB 



.Mightn't it be possible to start a "clean-up, 
paint-up, brighten-up" campaign in Newmarket 
this spring? 'Tis reunion year, you know, and 
there is lots to do to make Newmarket look 
right up \o the minute. It may be said, to the 
contrary, that it would be better not to brighten 
up and to leave the town more recognizable to 
the old-timers. In reply to that suggestion it 
must be remembered that some of our home- 
coming visitors, though they may have been- 
born in humble Newmarket cottages, will come 
from some of the smartest and most modern 
cities on the continents, and that all, no matter 
where they live, look back on Newmarket, the 
place of their childhood, through rose-colored 
glasses. We can't make the old town too bright 
to match the memories of the boy or girl who 
grew up here and then wandered away in search 
of the right opportunity in life. 



"Well, if it isn't Rob Robin at 
last!" exclaimed Nutty Nuthatch 
happily. "We thought you were 
never coming back." - 

"So did I" laughed the Robin, 
"but here I am and I'm certainly 
tickled to be here. Everything 
looks friendly and just as I 
expected it to look. I have been 
busy ever since I go v t here re- 
newing old friendships." 

"A regular old boys' reunion — 
eh?" Nutty suggested. 

"Yes, exactly," answered the 
Robin. "I hear they're having 
one here in the summer. As far 
as the birds are concerned they 
ought to be having it now. The 

springtime is the time for the 
reunions among the birds." 

"Quite, Quite," replied the Nut- 
hatch. "Just this morning I had 

the nicest visit with a Meadow* 

lark. He got here yesterday. 

He was a little tired after his 
long journey, but that didn't 
seem to affect his lovely spring 
whistle." 

"Yes, the journey is very tir- 
ing." admitted the Robin. "Of 
course, the last part of it was 
quite slow, waiting for warm 
enough weather you know and 
just moving north when the out- 
look seemed promising. But 
even when one does come by 
easy stages, it tires one — the un- 
certainty, and the feeling that 
one should be getting on with 
the trip. It's a relief to feel that 
one has reached one's final des- 
tination." 

"I'm sure it must be," mur- 
mured Nutty. 

"One or two of the Robins I 
was travelling with part of the 
time tried to persuade me to stop 
farther south this year and nest 
there for a change, but I said, 
'No, I'm going to Newmarket." I 
know the town and I like the 
people and I've come here for 
years and I'm not going to 
change at my time of life." 

"That's the right spirit, Rob," 
commended Nutty. "I agree 
with you wholeheartedly." 

"But mind you," warned Rob. 
"I am claiming this little piece 
of land right here for my terri- 
tory and I don't want any other 
birds intruding here. And I 
want it clearly understood that 
this is mine. I've been singing 



in this treetop as loudly as pos- 
sible, so I hope that I have made 
it quite clear to the public. The 
big crowds of Robins will be 
coming along any day now, in- 
cluding the female Robins, and 
we males who come on ahead 
always claim a bit of territory 
for our own, first, you undert 
stand." 

"Of course, I understand," 
agreed Nutty politely. "You 
don't mind my eating in this 
tree this afternoon, do you?" 

"Of course not," said Rob. "Go 
right ahead. But on the other 
hand, I wouldn't like you to 
build a nest here without speak- 
ing to me about it first." 

"Oh, don't worry, I wouldn't 
dream of doing that," hastily 
put in Nutty. "Besides, I won't 
be thinking of nesting for weeks 
yet." 

"Well, 1 won't be building for 
a while either," said Rob, "but 
we Robins don't like any inter- 
ference with our plans." 

"Why, my goodness " exclaim- 
ed Nutty. "It's begun to rain, 
and it's raining quite hard. I 
think I'll make for shelter, if 
you don't mind. It's been per- 
fectly splendid seeing you again, 
Old Timer." 

"Pooh, a little rain won't hurt 
you." scoffed Rob. "It will make 
the spring come all the more 
quickly, too. I must say, you 
have got plenty of mud and 
dirty-looking snow and ice 
around here, yet. However, I 
suppose it can't be helped. Oh, 
good-bye," he called, as he saw 
that Nutty was really going. 

'That sounds to me like a 
Songsparrow singing," Rob said 
to himself a little while later. 
There's certainly no one else 
who sings like that. I must go 
and see if I can find him. I be- 
lieve it was over in these big 
bushes that the sound was com- 
ing from." 

"Oh, fishworms!" he muttered, 
after flying around in a vain 
attempt to locate the Songspar- 
row. "Something must have 
frightened him away, because 
he'a not here now. Perhaps 
those youngsters playing down 
there in the water scared him. 
Well, I guess III just go back to 
my big tree and do some more 
carolling. I feel like it." 





mon 



By Isabel Inglis Colvilie 
WHAT SOMETIMES HAPPENS 



IS PARLIAMENT AS BAD AS PAINTED? 

Is all the criticism of parliament that we are 
hearing today sound? It is easy to criticize par- 
liament, but we wonder if instead we should 
not be criticizing ourselves. It seems to us that 
parliament is performing its function just about 
as well as ever it did, and that parliament would 
not be a very different institution if those of us 
who are most critical were to replace the present 
.M.P/s. 

Governments— Thai's Different 

.But before we go on, let us admit to impatience 
with governments. In our opinion, governments 
should lead and educate, push and struggle, striv- 
ing to improve and butter the condition and lives 
of their people. Some governments succeed to a 

treatcr extent than others. Those that fail most 
liserably are eventually turned out of office. In 
otlycr words the business of governments is to act 
and m gain approval for their acts. Governments 
rare the executive of parliament. 



The heavy blankets of snow this past winter 
have been good protection for winter wheat. 
The farmer has been greatly inconvenienced by 
the heavy roads, but, as the saying goes, it's an 
ill wind that blows nobody any good. 



Boy Scouts in Newmarket are now a going 
concern. An increasing number of citizens are 
lending a helping hand. One business man, B. 
A. Rudd, is giving an evening a week as leader 
of the largest of the three troops. Anyone who 
wants to help by taking out n one dollar (or 
more) membership in the association should get 
in touch with one of the officers of the association. 
•W. H. Eves is treasurer. Scout training is not 

militaristic. It is educational and character- 
building. 



It is evident that the water question in New- 
market is not settled. There are still some who 
do not like the "tattle taste." It "tattles" of 
dirty mains or of an unpleasant combination of j 
minerals. The answer has not yet been given 
authoritatively. There is also some question of 
the sufficiency of supply. Some of us have got 
quite used lo the taste, and are quite prepared 
to put up with the present water for a year or 
two yet, until the tax rate begins lo go down a 
little more sharply. Both the water and tlu> tax- 
rate leave a bad taste In your mouth. 



■-i*i-^ 






1Jut parliament is not an executive body. 

Parliament is the body to which the government 
is immediately responsible. Pafliament is the 
body which the government must persuade id 
VOte money, to approve legislation and to which 
it must explain its actions. The business of par- 
liament is to talk, to debate the problems of the 
country, to criticize and to sit in judgment on the 
government. It is the business of parliament to 
make the government acquainted with public 
opinion. 

Hansard Not Trash 
There is waste of lime in parliament, but those 



Weekly newspapers give a great d<al of service 
for the financial return they receive. Yet there 
is no need to feel sympathy with weekly pub- 
lishers, There are so few weeklies going on the 
market for sale that it is evident that the pub- 
lishers are either making a living or, like many 
farmers, enjoy their work so much that they do 
not mind just getting by. When n town or village 
has a good newspaper, it is pleasant to see that 
the citizens realize it, for their interest and bun!* 
ness patronage make their community newspaper 
better or worse. At the moment we are thinking 
of an ever- improving newspaper not fur from 
Newmarket. It is the Siouffville Tribune, one 
of the most enterprising news-gatherers in the 
whole province. The Tribune is a great credit 
to York county, although it serves both York and 
Ontario counties. 



* 



* . 



j Isn't it good to be alive these spring tlays? The 
first robins have made their appearance. Many 
other birds nro hack, and human beings nre 
beginning to think of picnics and holidays. 

i 



Tuesday night, March 14, I 
looked out of the dining-room 
window just before seeking my 
couch. 

A network of stars seemed to 
weave a web of diamonds around 
the branches of the chestnuts, 
etched so blackly against the 
sky. 

"Come and look at these stars," 
said 1 to mother, "did you ever 
See anything so brilliant?" 

"I hope they're not TOO bril- 
liant," said mother, "for I've 
heard lhat is usually followed 
by bad weather." 

When I woke, it was lo an 
accompaniment of banging shut- 
ters and the moan of the wind 
through tho trees. 

"Nice day for your meeting." 
said my respected parent, "that 
wind will fill up any roads that 
aren't already full." 

"You look like a ghost," said 
I — "ami feel like one," said she, 
"also my head is full of cold." 

"Would you care to go back 
to bed?" asked 1, thinking wildly 
of what lay ahead. 

"Hed!" said mother, with all 
the scorn which a cold in the 
head allows one to express 
vocally, "I've been wauling to 
got up for hours!" 

Just then two young friends 
arrived to help me, and I began 
to feel a bit more cheerful, al- 
though the wind was increasing 
in violence and it was beginning 
to storm. 

Suddenly the telephone rang 

and a voice asked, "What JiO 

you think of the morning— do 

you believe anyone will even 

think of coming to u meeting?" 

•The wonder is mutual," said 
I. 

" "W«.*H. we'll leave It for 
a while," said the voice at the 
other end of the Hue. 

Dora and Ina were in the din- 
ing-room doing various thing* 
i\iul mother mid 1 were in the 
kitchen when -CRASH! IIANCI 
.SMASH! 

Mother sat down suddenly, I 
stood paralyzed, and for u mom- 
ent a dreadful stillness reigned, 

then 1 followed the sound -to flip 
dining-room, and found the two 

fjirls standing fro/on in their 
tracks. 

M Oh. Mrs. Colvilie, look!" they 
whispered— and I looked. 

Where once hud been two 
largo— very large— paiu\s of gins* 
— there was nothing and through 
tho room tore the wind, lifting 
the tablecloth ami setting every- 
thing askew, and filling I he 
house with its toy breath. 

'The shutter banged against 
It," the girls informed me. 

'Archie," I yelled, lo the nuin 



44 



of the house, who, at present, is 
turning day into night. 

"Coming," said a sleepy voice, 
and in the meantime' the girls 
grabbed rugs and covers and 
standing on chairs tried to fasten 
things over the opening while 
the wind, tearing in. pulled 
everything out of their hands 
and ripped the tacks from their 
moorings. 

"I'll go lo town for glass," Said 
friend husband, and off he went, 
through the storm, only to find 
00 his return that he couldn't 
put it in while the wind kept up. 

"The house, in spite of all our 
efforts, kept getting colder nnd 
colder, and I visioned an array 
of women .sitting round sneezing 

and shivering and going home 
saying. "I know I'll have ti cold, 
why did she ever have a meet- 
ing?" 

•Ting-a-ling," went the tele- 
phone, and dropping the end of 
a rug I was holding, 1 grabbed 
the receiver. 

"They say so many are sick 
and Iho roads are so bad (hat 
nobody hardly can come front 
the east," said a voice dismally. 

"We can promise anyone n trip 
In the polar regions niul we 
might ask 'Dick, the Gardener.' 
t«t speak on the flowers of the 
far notih, as being more appro- 
priate to the atmosphere he'll 

have to lecture in," said I. 

"May 1 come on the line — is 
that Mrs. Colvilie?" asked an- 
other voice, while . behind me, 
mother whispered sepulehrnlly, 

"I don't know what to do with 
this pudding." 

"Neither <U I,' 1 said I, Into the 
mouthpiece, while two voices 
asked in perfect unison— "What 

did you say?" 

"I don't know what In say," 
said l> very sincerely. 

"What | want to know," said 
the second voice," Is whether if 

I bring a uleighlmtd, I can stable 

my horses at your place?" 

"Oh dear," saiit I. "there's 
straw in two stalls for the eats, 
and there are implements in the 
other*." 

"Wi'll, I can leave litem quite 

near it's all right," said Voire 
two, and departed, hit! voice one 
still debated the question, and 
'fnubl grew as we looked at the 
racing storm, ami fell a bree/o 
that might have come from 
(irccnlaud's icy mountains seep 
from under the closed doors of 
Ihe dining-room. 'Til nail siime- 
thing over the wlmlo window 
and shut the shutters," announc- 
ed m.v bet tin* half. 

little 
tete- 



1 



"Lei's leave it for n 
while," I stiugciiied lo the 



phone. "Well," «iid lh<; parly of 
the second part, "we'll have to 
reach 'Dick, the Amatour Gar- 
dener/ before he leaves lint nil- 
ton, but we can wait a little," 

So glad of a respite, f ga/J:d 
at the pudding v/ith unseeing 
eyes and just was saved In the 
nick of time from putting j&tl 
instead of sugar, into its com- 
position; then proceeded up- 
stairs to finish various things, to I 
find on entering my bedroom 
that the rugs were sailing grace- 
fully about the floor, propel lei 
by the breeze which came up th<* 
register. "Splendid," I thought, 
"so nice for this afternoon." 

"There's the telephone, Mm. 
Colvilie," called Ina, and de- 
scending ! found a despairing 
voice murmuring "WHAT will 
we do?" and moved by various 
emotions and hearing the lash of 
the storm on the windows and 
the voice of the baker saying 
you can't get a car over the third 
or fifth, f said, "Gall the speaker 
and call it off!" 

"Oh, my potato salad," said 
the voice, "we'll be living on it 
for a week." 

"I've enough lettuce shredded 
to feed 30 people," I came back 
in duet form. 

"I've all the coffee measured 

out," observed mother coldly 

from the rear. 

"Well, it's settled?" I asked. 

"Sure," said the other person 
and we rang off. 

"There's the phone again," 
called my better half, a3 I van- 
ished. 

'The sun's coming out," said 
a lugubrious voice into my ear. 

"Let it," said I viciously, "if 
twentv suns shone for hours it's 
SETTLED." 

"All right," sighed the voice 
acquiescently, and we talked of 
other things. 

That evening, when a sort of 
peace had settled over the house- 
hold, mother informed me that 
I looked as if I were just getting 
over a long illness. 

"It was an operation," I in- 
formed her. "I've lost my rea- 
soning powers, my telephone 
voice and any ideas I might 
have had that you can please 
everybody." 

"Did you ever think you 
could?" she wanted to know. 

"If I did, I'm wiser now. and 
I'm far more tired than if we 
had had 30 meetings/' said I. 
and we let the subject drop, and 
concentrated on the fate of Eur- 
odc. which I had forgotten for a 
few hours, thus Droving what 
creatures we are of environment, 
and solving the problem of why 
we do not work harder to pre- 
serve the principles we cherish 
and which at this moment may 
be tottering in the balance. 

25 YEARS AGO 

From Era file, March 3?, \$n 

Miss Grace Johns is visiting in 
Toronto. 

Mr. Bert Smattey of Toronto 
was home over Sunday. 

Mrs. If. Thomas of Maple spent 
a few days in town last week. 

Mrs. J. D. McKay is spending 
a few weeks in Berlin. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Gttmour 
were visiting in Toronto for the 
weekend. 

Mrs. W. Bosworih is spending 
a couple of weeks with friends 
in Oriltia. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. N T orman 
Wright and son spent a few days 
with the former's parents in 

Toronto. 

Mr. H. E. Smatley of Toronto 
spent Sunday with his mother. 
Mrs. Frank Smalley. 

Dr, Lundy of Tonawanda, N. 
Y., was here for a few days, 
owing to the serious illness of 
his father, Mr. J. C. Lundy, 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Luesby 
spent the weekend in Toronto. 

Mrs. A. C. Finley and daugh- 
ter. Dorothy, of Saskatoon. SaSJc, 
are visiting Mrs. Finley's aunt, 
Mrs. |. Armitago. 

Mr. Irvine Ross of Toronto 
was homo on Sunday, 

Mrs. will Htilliduy and daugh- 
ter from Kegina. Saslu have 
been visiting Mrs. Chas. Traviss 
nnd other friends in town. 

Mrs. A. K. Coombs of St. Cath- 
arines lefl for Toronto on Wed- 
nesday after a most enjoyable 
visit with friends in town. 

Mrs. L. (J. Jackson entertained 
hist Friday afternoon uiul among 
the numerous guests were Mrs. 
K. A. Coombs of St. Catharines 
unit Mrs. I.e Page of Toronto, 
both remaining over Sunday. 

Mrs. K. A. Coombs was the 
guest Of honor at Mrs. II. S. 
Cane's lea on Tuesday afternoon, 
HOHN— At the north end, 
Newmarket, on March 27, to Mr. 
and Mrs. John W. Smith, n 
daughter. 

noitN^Iu Whitchurch, March 
20, lo Mr, and Mrs. Frank Case, 
a >:on. 

DIK1) -At QuernsvMe, March 

a I. 1 1 ti Ida h, wife of Kemp 
Thomtvon. aged *lii years. 

Ditto— In Kast Uwilllmbury, 
March 21, Sarah Ann. wife of 
llohcri Hosi,\ aged t$H years. 



m YEARS AGO 

From Km flic, March 2<>, 2KHH 

Dr. Law of Horn! Head was in 
town Wednesday, 

Miss Tracey of Aurora is visit- 
ing willi Miss Kelman this week. 

Mr. John Smith of Klin vale 
was a Sunday visitor of Dr. 
Itogcrs. 

Mrs. S. C, McKlwain of Tor- 
onto was in town on Sunday. 

Mrs. (iascoignc returned to the 
city yesterday after spending a 
week In town. 

Miss Garrett of Bradford has 
been spending a week in the vic- 



inity of Newmarket. 

Mr, J. P. Jackson and two 
children are spending a week at 
"The Btww" 

Mix Oxtaby and daughter of 
Hhufon will leave for Detroit and 
Chicago on Monday to visit 

itii'i.ti?.. 

Mm Ida Smith of Stouffville, 
who \&n h«:?m spending some 
Wb&ta in ?iVv/market, returned 
b'itiui fm Friday. 

Major Lt/,yd 1* one of the 
HfXamUft** at the Ontario Veter- 
inary College thb w&efc, 

MARRIED— On March 20, at 
uV: Mc-th'idfU parsonage. Aurora, 
by Rev, J, A. Rankin, Htnry 
Mean * ; f Whitchurch to Eliza* 
berth MUgate of King. 



Temperance Federation this 

week. 

Claiming that a further in- 
crease in the gasoline tax would 
reduce consumption, a petition 
signed by approximately 50,000 
motorists was presented on 
Tuesday to Premier Hepburn by 
Bass Dawson, president of the 
Gasoline Dealers' Association. 



TO THE EDITOR 



Editor, The Era: I have been 
reading your reports on our 



mtitt aJUgai*- of King , * * wu * reports on our 

DIKD-Al ft I e h m « n d HilL I * iGCtr t ic BgW system and getting 
March 21, Hannah, wife f,f f£*3 an * ,wtcica J engineer which is 
\st\n ffefijrge Cobb -if Whitchurch ■ S 1 L ritlnccei " ar y pvnoft?fl 
and m<*#m of Mrs. Walter ftl , vea years 1 
Machc-II, Aurora. S Tr -** Af * retain 
I *r s 2m*er but ti 




sn unnecessary expense. 

rs prior to 1938 New- 

" " ed an H.E.RC. 

they wouldn't take 

I *i* s/fvma anr j that » the reason 

| mt .v/.tem j- irt t fc e state - t k 

j I--* todzy. \f r . Rachar 13 trying to 
; tear fevn th<= ]; aes that the H.E. 
;. P.C ha 3 already approved in- 
; .'.tead #f repairing the lines that 
; -*sr* not fixed at that time. The 

Mayor Ralph D*y. of Tor*r*. | gTl&E* £*%E 5JK f!S 
warned taxpayers of xtez # V \ *V* *S^ *t5 1^ JSSta^ 
this week that fen Ux iste wuiU i" i *'£; *" St C 2SS? teft 
probably UWm «v*r*I miiL. [ h^^^u^rn ^n^^^T 
A by any actkn ,f the Ontario It^ln'^J^^Si 
mjpm the city wpm taw!}*^, ^ f^^u^l^ 

cipamies. | o!g . tf Cl ,. hut inataad hc tmkereiJ 

cv ,a* . .* * M - { ' *? te - th * XirA and ttu&t a short 

Since 1314, 1A.C0O utrawtf&'j wctiit -»hir.h firsd it 

students have fc^-n twined as] t Th* ^*7 2a?ie 3t. is serviced 

army officer?, officials of the j is a dia^raca to any town. The 

Canadian Officers' Train tag! '&ftk un nmu£dz?t fee allowed on 

" ■"'■ J ~ ' **7 K.5LP.C. systam and if Sfo 

Hacfcar haij heen vorkins* for the 

H.2.P.C. he ?mtiid hav» been 'jut 



Corps said on Tuesday. 



-Miss Winnifrsd Kydd, C3.S.J H - x ?-C .he -xwM hav» been ^ut 
M.A-, has left her pesitien as ■ rA her ^ !fin * a?o. Mr. Hachar 
dean of women at Queen's \ " v * s g Q *nj? % save the town he- 
university to devote her services] tW9an S-tQflO and S3. MO hut in- 
to the Leadershio League. Miss I f^ 3 ** n * that -' ,e has ^ m 7 b«n a 
Kydd was president of the j QiH of **P«nse, 
National Council cf Women fori * 



I 



Canada for five years, and was \ 

delegate to the League of Nations ; March 23, 1339. 

in 1933- > L 



5&Uf3 vary truly. 
A Rareaayer. 



! 



Premier tfsviHe Chamberlain I ^mLanvS. AOCLZS IODI 
this week rejected conscription i CHURCH OF ESOLAND 

or any other form of compulsory \ % _.- ,>• ■____- 

service at the present time in an ' *'t ^^^ J?^^ 

addre=s given to HO members of £* -,/ n f J S \rJ}l ? U A ?* K * 1 

the House of Commons. 8K2? 1 *£ t 7 f*^?** oy 

~ * ■ Bisnan aevQfley st Toronto. 

Loyalist resistance m Soaia duc4 " %-Z ,mi#' _„*• 

in* & months of civil warJ *.!?* ¥*S5i ^f 1 ? 1 ^^^ 



pa?sed en Tuesday into the hands! a^f 
cf rebel -General Franc?, 



tfar- 



; w«?»?e\ 



. -Whenever the conun** *>**> j g£ *™^l^^**£ 

wealth is at war. wae&er on sh* <•:,.„,. r; . ' : .^ '"■?-?': f ~"^ 
advice of his foueria! advisers : *££ vC?- VV± ' "£ -f * 




England/- \V. F. O'Connor, par- 
liamentary counsel of the senate. 
reported this week. 

Italy is reported to be recetv- » 
ins f shipments ef Czech guns, 
munitions and military stores, 
taken by the Germans" on their 
occupation of Czechoslovakia. 

Renewed attempts to bring 
about a 10 p.m. closing regulation 
for all Toronto beverage rooms 
will be made by the Toronto 



ascress. 

Next Sun-iiy. Fzlm Suadav. 
litem will be a childswTs. ser- 
vice at 11 o'ekek. as is fcrrcar 
Years, when ther* will cv ssQcla* 
hymns and tesscr-s. and at the 
e&£$ of the service each ycoss; 
person will be given a branch of 
palm to take heme. 

O* Wednesday evening ther* 
was a special A.Y.P.A. Lenten 
rally held in St. Mary's church. 
Richmond Hill, when Archbishop 
Owen gave the address. 



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WYE 

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DQUBLKBILL 

(ONftUttCI MANtV ~== 

BENNETT- KilXl" 





ADDED ATTRACTION 

JACK HOI/T 
HKVKiaKY :UOm-UTS 



JOAN DAVIS * CHARLES FARKEU 
JANE WYMAN - KANE RICHMOND 

wmirviin oN ■ jo** v*iuil • O*»ro Hoiut I 

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Strange Case o 




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WEfcNESLAY, THURSDAY, AffRlliipJB 

DOUBLE BILL 



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MBERT MONTGMKM 

■ i lBWBHMBg 

AT)I)KI>' ATTltACTI'ON 



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"GANGS OF NEW YORK" 






I 



WABKKT ERA, THUR 



IDHY, PAJtOH IQTH, 1»3» 



FOUCE COURT 

fOMSTDSNIBUV 
HITS TWO MD.'S CARS 

A sentence of three years in 
the Kingston penitentiary was 
imposed on Nonnan Neale, 
Toronto, by Magistrate W. F. 
Voodliffe in police court here on 
Tuesday. Last % week Neale 
pleaded not guilty "to a charge of 
retaining a car stolen from a 
Sutton doctor but a conviction 
was registered against him and 
judgment was deferred one week 
by the magistrate. 

"Have you anything to say be- 
fore I impose sentence?" the 
magistrate asked Neale. 

"Will you please take into 
consideration my wile and two 
children and date my sentence 
back to my arrest?" asked Neale. 

"I have looked over your 
record in the past week and it 
is a terrible record," stated 
Magistrate Woodlitfe. "For a 
period of over 19 years you have 
been sentenced to 16% years in 
jail and then you ask me to take 

into consideration your wife and 
two children. I don't tbink you 
have taken them into considera- 
tion. You are a dangerous man 

to have at large and I feel it my 
duty to impose a stiff sentence." 
Wm. Volvie, Toronto; was also 
sentenced to serve two years in 
the penitentiary after he pleaded 
guilty last week to a charge of 
stealing a car from a Sutton 
doctor. 

. Mrs. Volvie, who was in the 
court, asked the magistrate for 
leniency and a light sentence for 
ifer husband. l, l think he's been 
led into it, as he's been good to 



me and we have been married 
seven years," Mrs. Volvie stated. 
"He never has been in much 
trouble." 

"Volvie's record dates back to 
1925, at which time he was con- 
victed for theft," the acting 
crown attorney, Joseph Vale, 
stated. "He was granted a 
parole on the sentence but he 
violated the parole. There are 
also two convictions against him 
for indecent exposure. Volvie 
was also convicted in a Toronto 
court recently on a charge of cap 
theft ai.d sentenced to one year 
definite and three months inde- 
terminate in the Ontario Reform- 
atory." 

The sentence imposed on Vol- 
vie to be served in the Reform- 
atory will run concurrently with 
the penitentiary sentence, the 
magistrate stated. 

Cash bail of $100 was put up 
for George Waechter, Toronto, 
who is charged with disorderly 
conduct on the main street in 
Sutton. The case was adjourned 
one week. 

RuthWiesman. Midland, speed- 
^n". - C I0 and costs, charge laid 

by Provincial Constable A. O. 

Ferewcn. 

For rot havine flares on his 
truck, Wm. X Helmkay, New- 
market, was fined $5 and costs, 

or five days. 

"On March 15 at 9 p.m. I 
rtanped a truck on Yonge St. 
driven by Wm. Helmkay," testi- 
fied Provincial Constable A- O. 
Ferguson. "The tail-light was 
out, the clearance light was out, 
and the truck failed to have 
flares. At this time it had been 
dusk for some three hours." 

Convicted on a charge of 




I 



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*. i 



SfiOW« *!arf at 7.30 and 020 p- m_; Saturday Matinee 2 00 p. m. 



■ * 



FRIDAY - SATUJiDAY — MARCH 31 - APRH, 1 
JACKIK 3IORAN — RALPH MORGAN' 

"BAREFOOT BOY" 

WM. BOYD — CEO. HAYES 

"THE FRONTIERSMAN" 



MONDAY - TUESDAY — AiWL - 3 - ! 

•JOAN CRAWFORD — ROBERT YOUNG 

MARGARET SUM J VAX — MELVYN DOUGLAS 

"THE SHINING HOUR" 



reckless driving, Frank V- 
Adam, Toronto, was fined $15 
and costs of $8.29 and in addition 
his driver's license was cancelled 
for 30 days. 

"On March 18 I came on the 
scene of an accident south of 

Eagle St. and from the driver's 
explanation and the stories of 
the other two drivers I found 
out that Adam, who was going 
north, overtook another north- 
bound car driven by a Toronto 
doctor," stated Constable Fer- 
guson. "A southbound car driven 
by Wm. Morris, Lefroy, was 
passing at the time and Adam 
attempted to go through the 
two cars. Adam struck the 
Morris car and glanced off, then 
struck the doctor's car and fin- 
ally endeo in a snow bank at 
the left side of the pavement. 
The snow was piled up on the 
side of the road and made it 
more narrow. The Morris car 
was a total wreck and the doc- 
tor's car was also, damaged. 
Adam's car was damaged to the 
extent of $200 or $250. The 
accused also gave me four differ- 
ent addresses, and I received a 
comolaint that on the same trip 

he had also struck another doc- 
tor's car at Langstaff." 

Adam told the magistrate that 

he was in a hurry north to see 

his sick baby and that he had 

failed to see the southbound 
car. Adam said that he and his 
wife came over to Canada in 
-January when he lost his job and 
that two of the addresses were 
for the United States, one was 
in Toronto, and that one was 
the address of his mother who 
was keeping the baby. 



Keswick 



WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY — APRIL - 5 - C 
ROBERT MVING5TON_-^ JUNE TRAVISS 

"FEDERAL MAN HUNT" 

MVRNA COY — ROBERT MONTGOMERY 

"WHEN LAQIE8 MEET" 



Rev. Mr. Foekler was present 
at both services at the United 
church on Sunday. A special 
choir number was sung at the 
morning service, solo parts 
being taken by Miss Gitroy and 
Mr. George Altridge. The sub- 
ject of Mr. Fo^kler's morning 
p^:?r?-s ttfss "P-ayer." Taking 
fefe text from Psalm 16:8, Mr. 
Pcckler led to this all important 
question, "What is prayer?" 

"Growth is always the result 
of action and where there isn't 
anv growth there is death/* he 
said. "We need to know God's 
will. There is no substitute for 
prayer, even God's word cannot 
take the place of prayer. Prayer 
is not bending the will of God 
*o ours, but rather it is the bend- 
ing cf our wills to God." It was 
indeed a fine message and one 
most opportune for the days 
when the world needs more 
praying. 

Miss Gilroy addressed the 
United y.P.U. on Monday even- 
ing. A pleasant social hour fol- 



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And that is also true of Aunts (and 
Uncles) and all tho inlaws. Be- 
fore Baby is half an hour old 
Ilia arrival is celebrated far and 
wide — and ho is endowed with 
a dozen names. 






f?** * 



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lowed. ! 

There will be the observance' 
of the Holy Sacrament on Sun* 
day morning at the United 
church. New members will also 
be welcomed at this service. 

The C.G.I.T. will meet in the 
Sunday-school room on Saturday 
at 3 o'clock. 

The April meeting of the W. 
M.S. will be held on Thursday 
afternoon, April 13. Mrs. Charles 
Willoughby and her group will 
present the third chapter of the 
study book, and Mrs. Perry 
Winch, second vice-president, 
will be in charge. 

**Earth*s New Mom, 1 ' a three- 
act play written by Rev, H. 3. 
Lovering and presented by 
players from the Trafalgar cir- 
cuit of the United church, will 
he presented on Friday evening, 
Aoril 14. at & o'clock in the Kes- 
wick United church, under the 
ausoices of the choir. 

The play is humorous, colorful, 
full of action, romance and ideal- 
ism. It is a eulogy of the simple 
rural life and provides glimpses 
of life from the early years of 
this century until the year 2065- 

The play is built around the 
romance of a young couple with 

vision and ideals. Ruth Fair bam, 

formerly of Queensviile, and 
Howard Laurence of Sheridan 

■*re the idealistic young couple. 
Jack Lovering provides some 
sparktine humor throughout the 
play* He is first seen as the 
mischievous hired boy and later 
a= a tottering old man who de- 
lights to tell about what went on 
in the dark ages when Mitch 
H^oburn was a politician and 
Hitler and Mussolini did strange 
things. 

A real treat is in store for the 
folk of Keswick and vicinity. 

It was regretted that more of 
the adult members of the con- 
e-^aticn were not present at the 
United church on Friday even- 
ing, to enjoy the very fine pro- 
gram given under the auspices of 
the mission band, whose ener- 
getic leader, Mrs. Bernard Rve, 
had spent much time in making 
it a success. 

Mrs. Gordon Harper, the assist- 
ant superintendent, was not able 
to be present owing to illness. 

The meeting opened with a 
short worship service, conducted 
by the president of the band, 
Geraldinc Gable, who was assist- 
ed by Betty Fisher and Lois 
Marritt. Miss Margaret Foekler 
was pianist. 

Rev. Mr. Foekler was chair- 
man for the balance of the pro- 
gram and introduced the same 
with a few remarks on the very 
worth-while work that has been 
done by the leaders of the miss- 
ion band in the past and also 
that which is being done at pres- 
ent by these in charge of the 
future church members. The 
program consisted of recitations 
by Marjorie Peters, Phyllis Rye 
and Lome Mainprize, several 
much enjoyed orchestral selec- 
tions by F. and W. Crittenden, a 
piano solo by Lome Mainprize, 
vocal number by Phyllis Rye, 
Marjorie Peters and Ruth Mary 
Winch. 

Much merriment ensued when 
Mrs. Austin Huntley, who guess- 
ed the identity of one of the 
actors in a mystery playlet, en- 
acted by Betty Fisher and Lois 
Marritt, had to demonstrate the 
very comical prize she won. 

The pageant, "Good Neigh- 
bors" which was the outstand- 
ingly interesting number, was 
well presented by the following: 
Mrs. Bernard Rye, Marjorie 
Peters, Phyllis Rye, Lome Main- 
prize, ■ Ruth Mary Winch, Win- 
ona Perry, Doris Peters, Lois 
Marritt, Geraldine Gable, Betty 
Fisher, Pauline Pollock, Audrey 
Retter, Betty Morton, Reva Pol- 
lock, and five little "neighbors," 
June Prosser, Clarke Gable, 
Gracie Peters, David Huntley 
and Danny McGencrty. A well 
played piano duet was given by 
Geraldine Gable and Betty 
Fisher. 

Before the final number, Mr. 
Foekler voiced a hearty vote of 
thanks to Mrs. Rye and the 
members of the band for such a 
very splendid evening's enter- 
tainment In reply Mrs. Rye 
thanked all who had, by their 
presence and their contributions, 
assisted the funds of the band. 

In the last number the "Old 
Rugged Cross" was sung very 
sweetly by the children, who 
formed a. background for the 
cross, which was placed in the 
centre, with a group of the 
smaller children around it It 
was an impressive tableau and 
brought the evening fittingly to 
a close. 

Congratulations are extended 
to Eula Pollock, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Roy Pollock, who came 
first last term in Form IC at 
Newmarket high school, which 
she has attended since Septem- 
ber. Eula did remarkably well, 
having a percentage of 75.9. She 
is just 13 years of age. 



Hope 






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H. MeCleiland 



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Manager. 



To Gruidpareng^ chapter of Family 

History begini. Their grandparents may have waited 
for dayi before they had goo^ new like this, but that 
was before the telephone — and Long Diitance — 
became part of our everyday exigence. 

Spread Good News by LONG DISTANCE ! 

Look in your telephone directory wd you'll find itiit hj ming 
Low Night IUte* (alio applying all day Sunday) and placing 
••Anyone" call* you ran talk to neadiy town* or Province* for 
much lew than you expected* 



* 



Sharon 



';yXr- 



The Snowball Young People 
will present their play, "The 
Man From Nowhere," a sparkling 
comedy In three acts. In Sharon 
hall, on Wednesday, April 5, 
under the auspices of Sharon 
Women's Institute. The ploy 
will commence at 8 p.m. sharp. 

Proceeds will go toward the 
equipment of the new kitchen at 
the hall. There will be music 
between acts. 

Mrs. Wm. Ash and Mrs. Lome 
Mitchell of King visited their 
sister, Mrs. f\ McKrill, last week. 

Mrs, P. -McKrill entertained 
the Hope hobby clufc on Tuesday 
last. A pot luck dinner was 
served and a quilt quilted. All 
report a good time. 

Mr. and Mrs, Herb, Moore have 



Mrs. Wm. Croutch and Bobby 
of Poplar Bank visited Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Davis over the weekend. 

Miss Amy Gibson spent Sat- 
urday in Newmarket. 

Miss Mildred Mitchell spent 
the weekend at Mr. August Gib- 
son's. 

Mrs. Geo. Micks has returned 
home after spending a week with 
Mrs. Carl Gordon, Ravenshoe. 

Miss Phyllis Pegg spent the 
weekend at her home here. 

Miss Blanche SUckwood spent 
the weekend at her home. 

The community sends their 
deepest sympathy to the ber- 
eaved family of the late Mrs. 
Coates. 

A number of this community 
have been sick with flu, 

The Home and School club 
will meet on Friday evening at 
8 o'clock, March 31, at S. S. No, 
7. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Williams 
spent a couple of days in Tor- 
onto last week. 



moved to Newmarket. Friends 

are sorry to lose them from the 
village- 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Sabin 

and baby of Toronto visited Mr, 
and Mrs. W. Stevens on Sunday. 
Miss Blanche Hall of Mount 
Albert spent the weekend at 
home. 

Service at the United church 
on Sunday next will be held at 
the usual time, 7.30 p.m., with 
Sunday-school at 10.30 a.m. 
Everyone is welcome at both 
services- 
Mrs. W. B. Selby spent the 
weekend in Toronto. 

The regular meeting of the 
Sharon Women's Institute will be 
held at the home of Mrs. Walter 
Hall on Wednesday, April 5 f at 
2 p.m. The roll call will be 
answered by an exchange of 
perennial roots. Needlework 
completed during the winter will 
be displayed. A paper on agri- 
culture will be given by Mrs. 
Elgin Evans. Mrs. Selby will 
give current events. 

The refreshment committee is 
Miss Nora Shaw, Mrs. Watson 
and 5*rs. Ernest Wright 



FLEASANTVIIXE 

RECENT BRIDE AND 
GROOM ARE HONORED 



Excels fn Quality 






7TH CON., N.G. 



Mr. and Mrs. Percy Brown, 
baby Marion and Mr. Ernie Pike 
motored to Markham on Sunday. 

Mrs. E. Miller spent a day with 
her sister, Mrs. M. Cook, New- 
market, last weekl 

Mr. and Mrs. Garnett Miller 
of Newmarket called on Mr. and 
Mrs. M. Miller on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Longhurst 
and Mervin visited Mr. and Mrs. 
M. Miller last week. 

Little is heard of "checker 
playing" since Mr. Ramsay Sin- 
clair has returned to his home 
in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Stephens 
visited Mr. and Mrs. Levi Ley re- 
cently. 

Mr. and Mrs. Levi Ley spent 
Monday evening with Mr. and 
Mrs. W. 11. Brown. 

Robert Brown is making his 
daily trips on his bicycle to Sut- 
ton high school. 

The snow is almost gone and 
robins have made their appear- 
ance here. 

Mr. Alex. Hopkins made a trip 
to Toronto recently. 

Mr. Joel Hopkins spent Satur- 
day evening with friends. 

Mr. Alex. Hopkins visited at 
Jackson f s Point recently. 

Friday, March 24.— Mrs. Percy 
Brown enjoyed an outing re- 
cently. 

Quite a number of children 
have been absent from school 
since Christmas, but ore return- 
ing. 

Miss Doris Brown visited Miss 
Lorna Norton recently. 

Messrs. Ross Stevenson and 
Clifford Brooks spent an even- 
ing at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Levi Ley. 

Mrs. Manny Miller called on 
Mrs. W. EI, Brown recently. 

Miss Isobcl Hamilton, Sutton, 
spent the weekend with her par- 
ents. 

The roads arc blustered full 
again and the men are busy with 
shovels and snow plow. 

The dance at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Bert Stephens proved 
a delightful affair. Everyone 
renorted a "swell time." 

Miss Emeline Ley and Miss 
Jean Hopkins spent Saturday 
afternoon with Miss Jean Brown. 

The buzz-saw has arrived in 
tins neighborhood and will sing 
n merry tunc for the next few 
weeks, operated by Fred and 
Mervin I^onghurst. 

Robert Brown, Sutton, spent 
the weekend at home. Examina- 
tions are over again and Robert 
came highest in French. 

Alex, and Elmer Hamilton 
have been conveying their milk 
by sleigh to Sutton where they 
connect with the milk truck, 
which is unable to get through 
this way. 

Mr. Joel Hopkins and Miss 
Jennie Brown spent Sunday 
afternoon and evening at the 
Brown home. 

The "Honkonks" and "Rinky- 
dinks" met at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Levi Ley. The "Honk- 
onks" won. 

Mr. W. If, Brown and daugh- 
ter, Ada, spent Sunday after- 
noon nt the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Norton. 

Mr. J. E. Hopkins visited 
friends on Sunday. 

There have been six stormy 
weekends* in succession, hut 
spring Is here, so cheer up! 

Era printer* take pride In tholr 

vrorkmuublp. 



Miss Gladys Harper, Miss 
Harriett Starr and Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmer Starr motored to the, city 
on Monday. This trip was in 
connection with the junior girls' 
project work. 

The first meeting in connec- 
tion with the cooking of meats 
will be held this Saturday at the 
home of Miss Harriett Starr. 

The Willing Workers meeting 
which was scheduled for April 
5 at the home of Mrs. Wm. Reid 
has been cancelled. 

A goodly number attended the 
Bogaritown club on Friday night, 
which was radio night. The 
radio studio was in the basement 
and the audience on the main 
floor. A play entitled; ,l The 
Irish Linen Peddler/' was given. 
The cast included Misses Mc- 
Queen, Harper and Stickwood, 
Foster Williams, Mrs. F. Will- 
iams, Orley McClure and Jack 
Sheridan. The announcer was 
Harry Penrose. 

Other items on the program 
included the Bogarttown Chron- 
icle by Mrs. Chas. Hunt, tap 

dancing, solos and cowboy songs 

by Elmer Johnson. The presi- 
dent, Frances Starr, conducted a 
question box, the studio fans! 
doing well, for many, various 
and humorous were the answers. 

Last Wednesday night about 
60 friends and neighbors gather- 
ed at the home of the newly- 
weds, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Green- 
wood. An enjoyable evening 
was spent in games, speeches and 
songs. Orlcy McClure read the 
address and Mrs. Jack Sheridan 
presented them with a lovely set 
of dishes. A lovely lunch was 
served. 

Miss Margaret Richardson 
spent a few days last week with 
her aunt and cousins, Mrs. G. 
McClure and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. V. Mitchell were 
in the city a week ago to see 
their little daughter, Muriel, who 
is ill in the Hospital for Sick 
Children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Toole had 
as guests for Saturday night 
dinner Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Toole, Mr. and Mrs. A. Forbes, 
Miss McQueen and Miss Taylor, 
a sister of Mrs. Toole's, who is 
spending some time with her. 

Miss ' Eliza Sheridan and Mrs. 
M. Sheridan took advantage of 
the good sleighing and had 
Thursday night tea with Mr. and 
Mrs. E. Bateman, Snowball. 

Mr. Elmer Starr motored to 
Sutton seed fair on Wednesday 
and secured second prize on soya 
beans. Miss H. Starr also spent 
the day at Mr. Roy Arnold's, 
Queensviile. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. McClure at- 
tended the funeral of Mrs. Mc- . 
j clurc's grandmother, Mrs. Joe 
Coates, on Sunday at the home of 
Mr. D. Coates. 

Mrs. G. McClure had her dim- 
inishing tea last Friday after- 
noon. Those present included 
Mrs. J. McClure, Mrs. D. Mc- 
Clure, Mrs. A. Colville, Mrs. C. 
Toole, Mrs. E. Toole, Mrs. M. 
Sheridan, Mrs. G. Hunt, Mrs. M. 
Wilson and Miss McQueen. The 

ladies spent the afternoon quilt- 
ing. 

Visitors at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. I. Kay last Wednesday 
night included Mr. and Mrs. R. 
Patterson and June of Newmar- 
ket, Mr. and Mrs. A. Patterson, 
of Barrio, Miss Lots Passmore 
and Miss Robinson of Newmar- 
ket. 

VIRGINIA 




at 



calves, $7.25 to $9; choice veal 

calves, $9 to $d.5C; off-truck 
bacon hogs, $9; Ontario-fed 
lambs, $7 to $8.75. 



LOCAL MARKET 

Prices on the local market on 
Saturday were, eggs, grade A 

large, 22 cents, A medium, 21 

cents and A pullets, 20 cents. 



Butter was 35 centa a pound. 
Chickens were 22 cents a pound. 
Apples were 25 cents a six- 
quart basket. Onions and pars- 
nips sold at 15 cents a basket. 
Cabbage and turnips sold at 5 
cents each. 

The Era goea only to readers who 
pay for It Tn other words, the 

advertiser can be sure that every 
copj of Tfc~ Era !■ read. 



. -A — L _■ 



STRICKEN SUDDENLY, 
WAS MOTHER OF TEN 



Suddenly stricken with a 
stroke last Sunday evening, from 
which she never regained con- 
sciousness, Mrs. George Roberts 

passed away at her Duclos* Point 

home last Saturday morning. 

She was a true helpmate to 
her husband and a very loving 
mother to her family of six girls 
and four boys. Their loss will 
he great and the sympathy of 
tho entire community is extended 
lo them in their sad bereave- 
ment. 

Mrs. Roberts was in her (32nd 
year and was a member of the 
United church. She was former- 
ly from Eldon township, moving 
how: some three years njjo. 

Members of the immediate 
family are her husband, six 
daughters, namely, Mrs. C. Dan- 
iels of Toronto, Mrs. Brndy and 
Mrs. Taylor of Lorneville, Mrs. 
Stewart of Kirk field, Mrs. Lytic 
and Mrs. Evereon of Victoria 
Rood and four sons, George of 
Jackson's Point, Jim of Peffer- 
law, Jack of Kirkfield and 
Charlie at home. 

The funeral service was hold 
from her late residence on Mon- 
day afternoon by Rev. C. B. 
Brethen, pastor of the Wood villa 
United church. 

Interment took place at Bea- 
verton Old Stone Church ceme- 
tery. 



TORONTO MARKETS 

Graded eggs brought 21 M 
cents a dozen for grade A large 
on the Toronto market on Tues- 
day; ungraded were 19 cents. 

Ontario No, 1 creamery solids 
sold at 21% cents with prints 
selling at 23 \% to 23H cents. 

Spring broilers, ML to 2H 
pounds were 22 cents for dressed 
select A; spring chickens 2% to 
4%: pounds, IV to 18 cents; fatted 
hens, over five pounds, 18 to'W 
cents. 

Butcher steers and heifers 
ranged from $5.50 to $7; fed 



MEN ! 

NOW IS THE TIME 



« 



HERE IS THE PLACE 



TO SET THE GREATEST VALUE IN YOUR ■ 
NEW SPRING CLOTHES 

«24.95 

■ 
INDIVIDUALLY TAILORED 

BY 

TIP TOP TAILORS 

MORRISON'S 

MEN'S WEAR 

DEALER 

TIP TOP TAILORS LTD. 

- 

LADIES! YOU TOO CAM HAVE YOUR GARMENTS 
INDIVIDUALLY "TAILORED BY TIP TOP TAILORS. 




EASTER CARDS 

For firowrwips and Kftddtra 
Purtt Milk Chocolate 

EASTER NOVELTIES 

5C Up 

CREAM FILLED EGGS 

MOIR'S CHOCOLATES 

. EASTER BASKETS 

With Chocolate Novelties, So — 60c 



EASTER CHINA' NOVELTIES - ducks. ouc« and 

iunn.es for the kiddies. 5c to 85c 

CAMPBELL'S 



STORE 



MAIN STREET 



PHONE 417 






C. I. L. PAINTS AND ENAMELS ~ CANADA VARNISH 

PAINT AND VARNISH - JOHNSON GLO-COAT 

JOHNSON WAX - OLD ENGLISH WAX 

CLEARING A FEW QUARTS AND PINTS OF 

SWP PAINT - QUARTS. REG. $1.20 FOR 90c 
PINTS, REG. 65c FOR 50c 



DISINFECTANTS 



NEW IMPROVED CERESAN, A DUST DISINFECTANT 

FOR WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY 
SEMESAN BELL, A DIP DISINFECTANT FOR SEED POTA- 
TOES. COOPER'S DRMflLL AND KEROL DISINFECTANTS 



BUCKEYE BROODERS AND POULTRY SUPPLIES 

Smith's Hardware 



PHONE 39 



<iy 



- 



; 



. *; % 

■ 



NEWMARKET 






ONLY ONE WEEK TILL EASTER 

■ ■ ■ 

WHY NOT STEP OUT IN THE EASTER PARADE WITH A 
SUIT TAILORED TO YOUR INDIVIDUAL MEASURE IY A 

" REPUTABLE FIRM? 

NKW SPRING SAMMEI AND $lMiN*$ ARE NOW ON DISPLAY .- COMf 

IN AND TARE YOUR PICK. 

.'*♦.? 

SHIRTS - TIES - SWEATERS - SOCKS 



* • 



C. F. WILLIS 



Main Street 



TaJtorijif «ad M«irtt Wmu- 






-: y- t 



m$ 



y^ 



;> £f^ 



♦ . 



* 



■ 



- 



I 






« 






■ I 



* 



f*^*f 



II 






■ 



row 




THI WIWMARKET ERA , THUR SPAY, M ARCH 30TH, 1939 



-A 



She r*t* f<* W*at Ada 6» 25 
te IS w*ds for om traertfws; ft 
cents for two isMjttens; 59 cesta 
for ttre* t&MCtioss, For over 25 
wools, «wh wWitfettil word, one 
Insertion, one cent, additional 
Insertions, one-half cent per In- 
sertion* 



WORK WANTED 



Work w * n t e tt~ Married man 

wants work on farm. Experienced. 
Apply J. E. Gain. Mount Albert. 

•lwi» 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FOR SALE 



E. A. BOYD 

17 Main SL 
KEAL ESTATE — For Sale; 
Farms. Houses, Acreages, Lots. 
rNSUftANCE — Automobile, Fire 
and Casnalty. 



_ j sale— Fresh fish daily. Trout, 
whltefish. perch, etc, delivered to 
your door. Frank Grainger, Mark 
St^ Aurora. Pnone 361 t(2 



For sale— Day-old and started 

cftick3, and eggs for hatching. 
Produced from our own flock of 
specially selected, yearling hens. 
Barred Rocks, Light Sussex and 
New Hampshire Reds. All ^ggs 
used, weight two ounces and over. 

These precautions are necessary to 

produce first-class chicks. 

CUSTOM HATCHING 

We specialize in the batching of 
hen and turkey eggs. Twenty-five 
years of experience. All prices 
moderate. 



CHANGE OF SHIPPING DAY 

Harry Hutse, Queensville $03, 
announces change of his shipping 
day at Newmarket CNR. station 
from Tuesday until Thursday. o2w$ 



M Temperance St, Aurora. Phone 
44-j. JO 

f«r sale— Matched teams of hays 
and ?rreys, young and sound. Will 
be at home every Tuesday and Sat- 
urday- Apply Charles Ol^axy, 
Tottenham. '*w3 

For sale— Two chicken houses. 
C3an b* seen at Fred Mcleod's, 
Queett*viHe. Reasonable. Apply 
Gharf?; E. Cunningham, Newmar- 
ket tf7 



NEW SUITES FOR OLD 

Furniture — I»w overhead ■enables 
us to give you high quality work 
at low prices which cannot be 
approached elsewhere. Chester* 
field suite completely re-bnfH and 
re-covered, in othor words, new 
ajrain. for $39. with five-year guar- 
antee. We specialize in repairs to 
upholstered furniture at low prices. 
JXew chesterfield suites as low as 
$59. Drop us a line. We will come 
and see you, or pick up furniture. 
Dyer's Upholstering Shop. Keswick. 

tf9 

Wanted— Small ham, 23 feet x 
30 feet, with room for hay loft 
and small stabling. Apply Mrs. 
AJex McKee, 60 Timothy St., New- 



B flCHURCHES 



CIIKISTIAN CHURCH 

Sunday, April 2 

Kev. T. T. Faichney, M.A., 11». 

I'ntm Sunday 

11 a.m.-CommmUon. 
7 p.m. - -Christian Endeavor Night, 
ftp raker? — Yonnjr prople. 

Choir— Vouufi people. 
Solot*t— Wm. H.v, Ti iron to. 
Duet, piano and organ—I. 'Good- 
man. X*. K. Farr. 
Plan to he present. 



ENG AGEM ENTS 

Mr. and Mrs. M. K. Doane. of 
Willowdalc, wish to announce the 
engagement of their eJdcM daugh- 
ter. Jean, to Gordon, son of Mr. C. 
H. Cotter of Toronto, the weddine; 
to take place in early spring. 



market. 



'Iw9 



ror «ale— Home of late Absalom 
Will-ion, Sharon. Eight-room house 
in -zend repair, and approximately 
% were land. Electricity, soft 
water ci3tern, drilled well, some 

fruit. Apply W, Grose, Sharon. 

«3w8 



For sale— Potatoes, Doolies. 
PttOtre W7-W-12, Xewmarket. clw9 



CAR BARGAIN 

For sale — 1924 Buick touring. 
Good tires. Perfect running con- 
dition. S40. Apply Walter Daniels 
at X E. Xesbltt's. clw9 



For sale — Viking raspberry 
plants. $15 for 1,000. Apply Rex 
Smith. QueensvlHe. - *2w9 

For sate — 1930 Chevrolet special 
coach. Four new tires. Engine 
lira*, class condition. Price $160. 
Apply Era box 85. *lw9 

Pot sai<^— Child's go-cart with 
Storm cover. In good condition. 
Apply Era box 84. *lw9 

For sale — 5eed oats <Erban> re- 
sistant to leaf *ust. Ninety cents 
per bushel. Also 2 year old Jersey 
heifers. Apply R. P. Morton, 
Keswick. *3w9 



For sate— Quantity of turnips 
and mangeJs. Apply Floyd Cunn- 
ingham. Queensville, or phone 
HIS. *iwfl 

For sale— 2 corner building Jots, 
9T r. 100. Price $200. each. Phone 
etO. c3w9 

For *4le — 2 sows, due May 1 and 
Zi. Apply J. Woutere, Newmarket 
P.P.. 2. »Jw9 



For sulr— One horse, two buggies 
an-i two load* of hay. Apply Roy 

Carr, Mount Albert, Ont- clw9 

■ ■- . - — 

For safe— Young work horses. 
Appiy A. C. Maish, Gotham St. 

"3w9 

Chicks for salt?— We want you to 
have our free calendar and poultry 
guide. Send today. Then compare f 
Tweddle chicks and Tweddle prices. 
Extra Profit Heavy, *12.45. Pulteu, 
$19.». Cockerels, S7. Leghorns, 
$11.93. Pullets, $24.00. Cockerels, 

$4. Grade A lower. Started chicks. 
Twaddle Chick Hatcheries Limited, 
Fergus, Ont. clw* 



SAlfREGBTER 



Wednesday, April 5— Auction sale 
of farm stock and implements, the 
property of the Ontario Commis- 
sioner of Agricultural Loans, will 
be sold by public auction on north 
half lot 71, con. 1. King township. 
Sale at 1 prn. Terms cash. Gordon 
Phillips, auctioneer. 



Mr. and Mrs. James S. Law wish 
to announce the engagement of 
their daughter Muriel Lloyd, to 
Orvrlle A. Clarke, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alva Clarke, of Ottawa, the 
marriage to take place early m 
April. 



Wednesday. April 5— Auction 
sale of household effects, the prop- 
erty of the late Miss Forsythe, 15 
Timothy St, consisting of walnut 
furniture, electric refrigerator, 
Chiekerinjj piano, dishes, and many 
other articles. Sate at 72Q p.m. 
Terms cash. F. X. Smith, auc- 
tioneer. 



Thursday, April 6 — Auction sale 
of farm stock, implements, feed 
and grain, the property of William 
Palmer, lot 11, con. 2. East Gwil- 
limbury, on highway, 1 mile west of 

Sharon. Xo reserve as farm has 
been rented. Sale at 1 p.m. Terms 
cash. F. X. Smith, auctioneer. clw9 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 



:- 



In the estate of William Henry 
Smith, deceased. 

All person? having claims 
against the Estate of William 
Henry Smith, late of the Township 
of Xorth York. <also temporarily 
of Blackwater, Ontario, and Sutton 
West, Ontario) deceased, who 
died at Blackwater on or about 
November 10th, 1S33, ate hereby 
notified to send in full particulars 
of their claims to Ellsworth 
Fisher, 451 Fairlawn Avenue, 
Toronto, Executor of the said de- 
ceased, on or before April 12th, 
1939, after which date the said 
executor will distribute the assets 
of the said deceased, having regard 
only to claims of which he will 
then have notice. 

DATED at Toronto this 13th day 
of March 1939. 

Ellsworth Fisher, Executor 
By W. S. Jenkins. 13 Toronto 
Street, Toronto, his solicitor here- 
in - c3w7 



DIES AT 81 YEARS 

Mrs. Bridget McKenna, life- 
long Schomberg resident, died on 
Tuesday in her 35th year. Her 
husband died on the same date 
15 years ago. Four children 
survive, James R. of Heisicr, 
Aita.; Mrs. J. F. O'Neill, Elgin 
Mills, and Frank and John, at 
home. 

A funeral service was held on 
Thursday, with interment in 
Schomberg Roman Catholic cem- 
etery. 



For %aJe— 'Ayrshire 
dam has record for 
butter-fat. Herd 

M*»J fcestedr $20, 
AyrsprinKd farm, 
449, Newmarket. 



bull calf. 

milk nnd 

accredited and 

J. If. Wesley, 

Phone 13. Box 

clw9 



For *ale— Reconditioned vacuum 
cleaners: one Premier Duplex; on& 
3pic<3pon; one Hoover and Hoover 
DtHtett*. C. C. Uaherwood, Eaton'** 
Or^jei-pifice, Phone 590. «lw9 

For sale— Alaska seed oat«. No. 
1 -'registered, 80 cents per bu; No. 
1, government standard, 70 cents 
per bu. Received first prize on 
registered 5 bu. class at recent York 
county seed fair. Also early Warha 
potatoes, Price $1.25 bag. Frank 
-MarrtU, Keswick, Ont. clw» 



CARD OF THANKS 

Mr. Jegsfl Tattori and family 
Wish to express their sincere and 
deep appreciation to th" many 
relatives, friends and neighbors for 
the acts of kindness, messages of 
sympathy and floral tributes ex- 
tended during -the loss of n dear 
wife and mother. 



CAIIO OF THANKS 

Mr. Joseph Coates- Sn, and 
family wish to thank t? Ji; man « 
friends and neighbors Tor th( . (r 

kindness to them in their recent 
sad bereavement 



h ^t^^i^i* 



—^ *v. 



FOR SALE OR RENT 



E. 8TRA8LER A SON 

QUEKNSVflXK 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR8 

AND 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

PHONE8-2509-2502 






— ' 



For *ale or rent — 60 acre farm of 
pasture, opening on concession ft 
6t Noith OwlHlmbmy, bcinK part 
of iat ; 3; concession 4. Never 
falling water supply. Wro. Marrltt. 

clwu 



FOR REfiT 



For rent^Four-roomed 
mer.t. AH conveniences. 
J. O Mulr, 32 Church St. 



apart- 

Apply 

tf6 





vmw s 




For rent— Four-roomed heated 
apartment In the Kvan»* op.nt- 
menU, Maltt St, Apply ISruce 
McMillan, QueensvllU* or KM H, 



Stive.. Newmarket. 



tfft 



BOARDERS WANTED 



iloaniVrft want ed— Comfot tnbte 
home, centrally locate*!, all con- 
venience*. Apply Morton Bros. 
Service Station. Aurora. clw9 



3! em her Florhrta Telefrub 

Deliverf AnoeiaUon 

riowera wired to all parte of tie 

Flower* for every oceaaion 

Funeral Flowers 

A SPECIALTY 

118 Main St Newmarket 

Phone 135W 




HELP WANTED 



Wattled — A bright yotinir man to 
tcaxn the shoe business, Apply 
FoSlocH'a Shoe Store, Newmarket. 

ciwO 



ROADHOUSE & ROSE 

Funeral Directors 

MAIN STREET, NKWMARKET, 



BIRTHS 

Fatton— At York County hos- 
pital,. March 28, to Mr. and Mrs. 
Kwart Pat ton of King, a son. 

Pike— At Suitor* private hospital. 
on Thursday. March 23. to Mr. and 
Mrs. Lloyd W. Pike. <nee Evelyn 
G. Morton, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Morton. Newmarket), 
a 3on. 

Sedore — At York County hospital, 
March £6. to Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
Sedore, Queensville. a son. 

Webster— In Toronto East 
General hospital, on March 30, to 
Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Webster, a 
daughter. 

DEATHS 

Adams — At Newmarket on \yed- 
nesday, March 29, Evelyn Ball, wife 
of Edmund Pearson B. Adams, in 
her 44th year. 

Resting at the residence of her 
daughter. Mrs. Thomas Wadsworth, 
North Newmarket. Funeral ser- 
vice will be held at Salvation 
Army halt on Saturday. April l, at 
2.30 p.m. Interment Newmarket 
cemetery. 

BurradeJI— On Thursday. March 
30, Elwood Barradell. beloved hus- 
band of Matilda Black, in his 74th 
year. 

Funeral service at his late resi- 
dence, lot 31. con. 5. King township, 
on Sunday. April 2. at 2 p.m. Inter- 
ment Kettleby cc-rnetery. 

Burns— At his late residence. 
King City, lot 6, con. 5, on Sunday, 
March 26. James Thomas Burns, 
husband of Jemima Uoss, in his 
8Stn year. 

The funeral service was held at 
the above address on Wednesday. 
Interment Aurora cemetery. 

Ojatcs — At her late home, (east 
half) lot 15, con. 1, township of 
East GwilJimbury, Charlotte 
McLaughlin, wife of Joseph Coates, 
Sr\, in her 81st year. 

The funeral service was held at 
her late home on Sunday afternoon. 
Interment Mount Albert cemetery. 

Denne — At Newmarket, on Fri- 
day, March 21, Emily Marsh, wife 
of .the late William Mintern Denne, 
in her 83rd year. 

The funeral service was held at 
the residence of Fred lloarc, 32 
SrJgley St., on Sunday. Interment 
Newmarket cemetery. 

FrunkJln— At Oak Ridges, on 
Tuesday, March 23, William Her- 
bert Franklin, husband of Ada 
Davenport, formerly of York town- 
ship, in his 51st year. 

The funeral service was held 
Thursday. Interment Prospect 
cemetery, Toronto. 

Furry— in Wellington, Ont., on 
Tuesday, March 28. Alice Bertha 
Cole, wife of Rev. Harry Parry, in 
her 02nd year. 

The funeral service was held at 
the Friends' Meeting liriuae, Thurs- 
day. March 20, at 2 p.m. Interment 
Wooler cemetery. 

FiYrcy— At her bite residence, 
Preston, Ont., on Friday. March 21. 
Gertrude Treacy, wif« of Frank 
Piercy in her 67th year. 

Tire funeral service was held In 

Preston United church on Monday. 
Interment King cemetery. 

Bleckley — At his late residence, 
lot 21. con. 3. King township, on 
Sunday, March 26, Christopher 
Steckley, husband of Mary Whea- 
don, in his 85th year. 

Ttio funeral was held at the 
residence on Tuesday, March 28. 
Interment Aurora MineUay. 

Talton— At her late residence, 
lot 3o, con. 0, King township, on 
Thursday, March 23, Annie Gert- 
rude Stephenaon. wife of Jesse 
Tatton, mother of Mrs. James Shuts, 
rsYwrnnrket, and Mis. Hchmidt. at 
home. 

The funeral service was held on 
Sunday, March 26. Interment at 
Kettleby. 

Thompson— At Willow h Oftc h, 

l^-ike Simcoe, on Thursday, March 
23. William StiUley Thompson, 
postmaster, husband of Ma Sedore, 
ill his 75th year. 

The family service was h.ld n t 
the house, followed by a Am vlc« at 
the United church, Hutlon, on 
Monday, March 27. Interment 
Hilar Hill cemetery. 

Vincent— Alt. >r a brief Illness, at 
her home. Mount Albert, Wednes- 
day, March 29, Elizabeth IHrssie) 
Oilberf, wife of James Vincent, In 
her AatJl year. 

The funeral seivice will he hold 
on Friday. Inteimunl Mount Al- 
beit cemetery. 

H'lirlieiitiu— At the homo of her 
■laughter, Mis. Joseph Sldei, 
Conntey, on Wednesday, March 2», 
Anon Fasl, widow of the bite 
Jacob WarkeiUIn, | n \ wv ^jiui 
year. 

The funeral will be held from 
the above address on Saturday, 
April I, followed by a service in 
Dickson's Hill church. Interment 
adjolulciK cemetery. 



Social and Personal 

- 

— A number of friends and 
neighbors met one night this 
week, at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. M. E. Doane, Willow-dale, 
and gave Miss Jean Doane, a 
bride-to-be, a surprise kitchen 
shower, 

—Mrs. J. IL Collins celebrated 
her 83rd birthday on Monday' 

— Miss Dorothy Smith of 
Aurora was the weekend guest 
of Miss Kitty VanZant. 

— Mr, and Mrs. B. Woods of 
Oshawa returned home after 
spending a couple of days with 
Mr. and Mrs. Bert McCarnan. 

— Miss Edith McCIymont spent 
the weekend in Niagara Falls. 

—Mr. Howard Porritt of Gil- 
ford visited his aunt, Mrs. B. 
McCarnan on Monday. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John Murphy 
visited their son and daughter- 
in-law. Mr. and Mrs. E. S. 
Murphy; Mount Dennis, on Sun* 
day. 

— Mr. and Sirs. Donald McCar- 
nan of Trenton returned home 
on Wednesday after spending a 
few days with the formers par- 
ents. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hills 
and children and Miss Evelyn 
Lupson of Toronto were Sunday 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. 

Broughton. 

— Mrs. Bert McCarnan and 
Mrs. F. T. Porritt of Gilford 
visited their cousin, Mrs. A. Cur- 
tis, Toronto, last Friday. 

— Mrs. Jack Hammond and son 
and a lady friend of Toronto vis- 
ited Mrs. Hammond's uncle, Mr. 
W. J. Broughton, on Monday. 

— Mrs. C. E. Peacey of Toronto 
is spending this week with her 
sister. Mrs. Frank W. Playter. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Grahame Teas- 
dale and son, of Buffalo, and 
Mrs. H. Teasdale of Aurora were 
%*isiting Mr. John Fraser last 
week. 

— Mrs, Carroll of Orangeville 
visited her daughter. Miss Mil- 
dred Carroll, over the weekend. 

— Miss Helen McBride spent 
the weekend in Toronto with 
Miss Frances Baines. 

— Mr. and Mrs. tf J. O. Moss 

marked their 52nd wedding an- 
niversary Tuesday by visiting 
friends in Toronto. 

— Among those from Newmar- 
ket who attended the Cane-Fee 
wedding at the Church of the 
Redeemer, in Toronto, on Satur- 
day, were: Mr. and Mrs. L. P. 
Cane, Miss Lois Cane, Mr. Bel- 
fry Cane, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. 
Tod, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Chant- 
ler. Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Bosworth, 
Mrs., O. P. Hamilton and Mrs. C. 
G. Wainman. 

— Miss Medora Traviss has 
returned home after having 
spent the past month with her 
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. 
and Mrs. R. E. Traviss, Ottawa. 

—Mrs. C. II. R. Clarke has 
returned home from a trip to 
Vancouver where she spent the 
past two months. 



NEWMARKET FOLK 

Continued from Page I 
Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. 

Dr. and Mrs. C. W. Armitage, 
Harbour Beach, Michigan. 

Roy Rogers, 495 St. Clarens 
Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Widdifield, 
846 Lawrence Rd., Windsor, Ont. 

Miss F. Barber, 955 Fisher 
Blvd., Detroit, Michigan. 

Mrs. George Jenon, 302 Pleas- 
ant Ave., Royal Oak, Michigan. 

Dr. Val. Stone, 1154 College 
St., Toronto, Ont 

Mrs. J. W. Green. Ford Hotel, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smith, 
Box 576, Tillsonburg, Ont. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Smith, 
26 Hillcrest Blvd., Lansing^ Ont. 

Rev. T. M. Wesley, Camborne, 
Ont. 

Dr. E. C. Dickson, Stanford 
Hospital, San Francisco, U.S.A. 

Clare M. Lundy, c-o Raynor 
Construction Co., Moncton, N.B. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Traviss, 
1305 Windermere Ave., Toronto, 
Ont. 

Dr. Verne Broughton, Stratton, 
Ont. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. E, Proctor, 11 
Edgerton Ave., Brantford, Ont. 

Lawrence Taylor, General De- 
livery, Copper Cliff, Ont. 

Mr. Eldon Wice, R.R. 2, Allan- 
dale. Ont. 

Mrs. F. R. B. DeGuerre, 17 
Dunbar Road, Toronto, Ont. 

Mr. J. E. G. DeGuerre, 12 
Elderwood Dr., Toronto, Ont. 

Miss Effie Elvidge, 1170 King 
SU Brantford, Ont. 

Mrs. James Grant, 33 Haw- 
thorn Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

Mr. C. H. Haight, 26 Harrison 
Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Thomas Hackling, 92 East 
Euclid, Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Milton Haight, 2281 N. W. 



DIES OF PNEUMONIA 

IN EARLY FORTIES 

Mi's. Evelyn Ball Adams, wife 
of Bert Adorns, died at York 
county hospital yesterday, after 
an illness of one week with 
pneumonia. She was 43 years of 
age. 

Mrs. Adams was horn in Eng- 
land. Her husband farms near 
Mount Albert. She was a mem- 
ber of the Salvation Army 
church. 

She is survived by her hus- 
band, three daughters, Ruth. 
Josephine and Mrs. Thos. Wads- 
worth (Ada), Amelia St., New- 
market, and one son, Edmund. 
Two brothers, Frank Rail, Tor- 
onto, and Arthur, Midland, and 
one sister, Mrs. Josephine Hunt, 
Richmond Hill, also survive. 

The funeral service will be 
held in Newmarket on Saturday 
at 2.30 p.m., at the Salvation 
Army citadel on Queen Si. 
Adjutant Flatten will conduct the 
service. Interment will be made 
in Newmarket cemetery. 




AIM £i>kA» of jft/ 4f U« fjtaftinc uilt 
y U ««*J by NKHVtS l-^i<J 



Chiropractic 

(Hi-W.U.) 

».. Adjustments 

TOMAOt * W ||| 

A»c*r#« Will 

Haft Remorethe 

FtviMirrOitii* 



D 

I 
S 
E 

A 

S 

5j 



1. E. GOWLAND 

CHIROPRACTOR AND 
DRUGLESS THERAPIST 

PHONE 1W riEWMAftKEI 

tv«T OAir iui v/fouesoAY 



Kra Want Ada. brlnjt r**utt*.\ 
I'Alil-ln-rulvnncc U u imaratitiio to 

adver'Wem that every copy If road.'. 



TEAM HARNESS 

SET, $28 AND UP 

OUJt OWM MAKE, MAIERIAU AMD EX- 
rW WQRKMAmrtlr, rUUr 

OUARANIECO 

T>umiHii«*j> $tti.% anil uu 

llrUlh'N $I4MI runt tip 

Trace*, wt of t *1M runt up 

CoIIhih , $1,115 mill up 

CollurM, MnigHtrow , . *.YSa 

ANY OTHM f>m rdlCtO ACCORDINGLY 

nun BRING YOUR REPAIR^WuftK IN 

IIMt, WC ALSO MAKE A SrCClAL lOW 

PRICE ON ANY AtltRAtlOMS 

A. WOLFE* 

MASTER SHOE AND HARNESS MAKU4 
44 4* MAIN SIME1 NEWMARKET 




WHY NOT IRING OUT THE REAUrf 
OF YOUR MEW EASTER BONNET 

WITH A PERMANENT WAVE OR 
flNSER WAYE? 

ALSO MAKE YOUR HANDS MORE 

GLAMOROUS BY HAVING A 

MANICURE. 

PERMANENT WAVES %^ UP TO S7.50 
FINGER WAVES 3SC 

MANICURES 35C 

NORA K. 

FRENCH'S 

B««uty Parlor 

HIXO GEGRCK 1IOTKL 

Timothy St, at Mil In 
Phone 5&{ 



Marshall St., Portland, Oregon. 

Mrs. Robert Hudson, 94 Green- 
sides Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. R. Waddell, 94 Green- 
sides, Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. James Hillins, Cumber- 
land Apt., Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. I. Ianson, 71 Cowan Ave., 
Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. W. Kirton, Ypsilante, 

Mich., Route 3. 

Mrs. John Kennedy, 279 Salis- 
bury Ave., Humber Bay, Ont. 

Miss Ann x Lundy, 17 Dunbar 
Road, Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. P. Lundy, 97 Franklin St., 
Napa, Calif. 

Mrs. W. H. Moore, 918 Tioga 
St. T Ithaca, N.Y. 

Mrs. George Murray, 1283 
Bloor St. W., Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. Albert Moore, 140 Wright 
Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. J. O. Parker, 45 Albert 
St. N., Orillia, Ont. 

Mrs. Robert Rush, 4007 Imper- 
ial St., New Westminster, B.C. 

Miss Huldah Randal, Parkview 
Mansions, Apt. 32, 15 Fannanah 
Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

Dr. Clayton Armitage, Harbour 

Beach, Mich. 

Mr. Martin L. Bogart, Edgely, 
Sask. 

Mr. J. Leslie Bogart, Trixford, 

Sask. 

Mrs. Charles Brewster, c-o 

Hodson & Brewster, Portland, 
Oregon. 

Mrs. W. K. Bowerman, 34 St 
Andrew's Gardens, Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. T. Bowes, 91 G rends 
Road, Toronto, Ont. 

Mr. F. C. Bogart, 336 Millwood 
Rd., Toronto. Ont. 

Miss Ava Bothwel), 12 Isabel 
St., St. Thomas, Ont. 

Mr. Frank M. Bogart, 8 Mait- 
land Place, Toronto. Ont. 

Mrs. R. Burns, 6702 Steel St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Mr. Harold Speirs, 851 Bidwelt 
St., Vancouver, B.C. 

Mr. Arthur C. Speirs, 4681 9th 
Ave. W., Vancouver, B. C. 

Mrs. J. K. Wasley, 96 Isabella 
St.. Toronto, Ont. 

Mrs. George Webster , (Miss 
Basxvick), Vancouver, B.C. 

Miss M. Warner, 3 Old Orchard 
Grove- Toronto. Ont. 

Mr. J. C. Haight, Waterloo, 
Ont. 

Dr. Rachel W. Haight, Ottawa. 
Ont. 

A. A. Perrin, 307 Frederick 
Ave., Peterboro, Ont. 

Mrs. Charles Buchanan. 4449 
Kutztown Road. Box 23. Temple, 
Pennsylvania. U.S.A. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Cryder- 
man. 150 W. Goguac St.. Battle 
Creek. Mich.. U.S.A. 

Mr. G. H. Leppard. 451 King 
St.. Preston, Ont. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Cook and 
Miss Mabel Cook, 432 Waterloo 

St.. Preston Ont. 

Mrs. M. Hilder. 187 Marlbor- 
ough Ave., Toronto, Ont. 




BRUNTON'S 






€< 



MONTH END SALE 



» 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT 



CALIFORNIA SUNK1ST ORANGES ,|,«. 13o 

2 <loz. 26c 



* • 4 h « 



Krn printers take pride in their 
workmanship. 






Look your 
best (or 




WEAR A STUNNING MANN- 
ISH TAUOIEO SUU FOX 
EASIER GAIETY. CHOOSE 
IT HERE. SMARHY TAIL- 
OREO MEN'S MATERIALS 
IN SIRIPES AND HERRING 
•ONE WEAVES WITH IWO- 
YEAR GUARANTIED LINING 
AT MODERATE fRICES FROM 



$15.00 UP 




FLORIDA GRA PE FRUIT, Good Sixe ... 5 In, 19c 
CALIFORNIA LEMONS, Bright new stock, do,. 1 9c 
"ROSE" BAKING POWDER, Pound tins . . w . 14c 
PASTRY FLOUR 24 lh . , Wfg ^ 

EXTRA! EXTRA! 
FANCY SWEET BISCUITS . 



+ * 



* * 



II). 14c 

2 II*. 25c 

GEORGIAN BAY TOMATOES, Large tins, 3 r»7«i[ 

FRESH DAIRY BUTTER 
(Thursday and Friday) 

«• per Hi. 21c 

CLARK'S VEGETABLE or TOMATO SOUP, 

2 tins 15c 

CHRISTIE'8 SPECIAL DE L U X E MAPLE 
WALWUT TOP CAKE, EACH 20c 



GRADED EQQ8, (Thur* .and FrK) ,103, 2Qc 

HAND-PICKED WHITE BEANS ..... 3 lbs, 1 Qc 
"LEEDS" SOAP FLAKES, Special Price, 3 lbs. 19c 



"BLUE MOUNTAIN" TOMATO JUICE, 

^ j-jj-j*^*- .J** ... 2 large tins 19c 



DRY GOODS 



FACTORY COTTON, EX- 

tra Value per yd. 10c 

RAYON TABLE 
CLOTIIS, 50 x 50 in-. 
Four Colors ea. 35c 

FRILLED CURTAINS, 

with tie backs and top 

variance, pair, 49c and 59c 

ICK BOX FLOWERS .... 

10c and 15c 

NOW SHOWING!!* 

CURTAIN NETS 

CURTAINS 

LINOLEUMS 

CONGOLEUM5 
FLOOR HUGS 



MIRACLE NO-RUN, 

Stops runi in your 
stocking pkg. Mo 



SHOE DEPARTMENT 

CHILDREN^ RUBBER 
BOOTS, sires 6 to 10 
and IX to 2, Bargain, 

• » pair SSc 

MEVS HEAVY RUBBER 

BOOTS, |>air *U» 

BOYS' RUBBER BOOTS. 

................. pair $LX3» 

MEN'S, WOMEN'S AND 
CHILDREN^ UGHT RUB- 
BERS AT LOWEST FRICK?, 



W. A. BRUNTON & CO. 

Phone 32 



Free Delivery 



HO^IE AND SCHOOL CLUB 



WILL MEET WEDNESDAY 



,*i 



! 



TAILORED TO YOUR INDIVIDUAL MEASURE 



m*t WW «-f ■ l-**^ 



• —-— ^^^^— m 



THE PICK OF EASTER'S SMARTEST UNTRIMMED CQATSI 
STUNNING FIHED COLLARLESS COATS, FLARED 
REEFERS. BRILLIANT TWEED CASUALS. DRESSY BOX 
AND SWINGBACK SWAGGERS . . . COATS THAT 
"GO WITH" EVERYTHINGI EXPENSIVELY TAILORED 

BOUCLES. COVERTS. TWILLS. 

A BEAUTIFUL ASSORTMENT OF BLOUSES. PURSES, HATS 
AND GLOVES AT MODERATE PRICES. 

* 

WITH All OAJM rORCIIASIS OF JS CEHIS ANP »f, COMMJMCIHG 
SAIU«0AY, Afftll I. Wl ARE GIVING AWAY COUPON* ONCE MOftl ON IMt 
SAME PAUERM OF CIMMA IMA1 WE IIA0 MEVIOUSIY SEEN OWING AWAY. 

LINDENBAUM OUTFITTERS 

NEWMARKET /IANOVER 



A meeting of the Home and 
School Club will be held in the] 
Stuart Scott school on Wednes- 1 
day. April 3» at S.15 p.m. The! 
proposed slate of officers for the 
executive of the club will be 
presented and voted on. The 
selection of the place for holding 
the regular meetings and the 
date for these mvMinss are to 
be finally ratified. 

The creed and aims of the club 
will be reviewed. Speakers 
from Toronto will be present to 
address the group. Any other 
matters of interest pertaining to 
the club will be discussed. 
Anyone paying his or her fee at 
this meeting will become a char- 
ter member. At the close of the 
business session a social half 
hour will be spent. All parents 
and those 1 interested in the work 
of a irome and School Club are 
cordially invited to be present. 






MRS. HARKY PARRY l>lt& 

Mrs. Hurry Tarry of Welling' 
ton. Out., wife of f Uev. Harry 
Parry, passed uway on IVesday 
in her 62nd year, Mr. Tarry was 
pastor of thft Fviends church In 
Newmavk 
is now 




ST>\£3 ?HV\\-\T can 

& tt HM >CU -Mi %$&m 






>CtV& JSTTi* PA*H CCW^ TO 



1 



^V >>0\ 5> IJA C T ?' SAICN 



12.H Ur 



- : t 



THOMP 
BEAUTY S 

4 main nun .^^^M^ 




MtMJJU.lH.A. 




1 



KKTITKNSUOMK 

market n few yem* ago audi Miss Esther Uach hns return- 
ow retiivd. He and his wife 1 ed from a nursing case at Qorav 
hail many friends in this vicinity, ley, ; i-^f 



ANNOUNCING * 

DAILEY'S HAI RDRESSING 

OPENING SPECIAL 
Oil PERMANENT, REGULAR $5.00 

FOR $2.50 

mis offcii u (iocw orjiy to* one whk, «*»iimg march w 
PHONE \2h OR COME IN FOR APPOINTMENT 




yoiiof. smni 



AURORA 



PURE SILK 

FULL-FASHIONED FINE 

SHEER HOSE 

VELVET SUEDE LINGERIE 

t'ANTIfcS IIMt" fUnVNS DKc 

SMl'H ««« 1'Y.rAMAS.. $!.•» 



W. C. LUNDY 



T 



^ 






THE NEWMA 



ET ERA, TH 



SDAY 



ARCH 30TH, 1 930 



i 



/ 



• .-- 



- 



• EDITOR 

J. F. WITHROW 

Wdfihfton Sf. E. Phone 66 

AURORA 



1 



. 1 






ON SALE AT 

Morning's Drug Store 

Whitclaw's Book Store 

5 cents a copy. 



YOUR CO-OPERATION INVITED 



How And Where To Buy 
Is Subject Of W. L Talk 






Women Affect Industry aurora basketball 
More Than They Think. ™*» LOSES TO H1LL 

SAYS MRS. DE LA HAYE The Aurora high school basket- 

ball squad ran into tough luck 

?»lrs. Roy De La Haye, home j with its championship series with 



ABOUT 
TOWN 



It's 



economics convenor, spoke to 
the meeting of the Aurora 
Women's Institute on Thursday 
of last week, at the home of Mrs. 
Frank Grainger, Mark St. Her 
subject was "Buying." 

"In selecting and making pur- 
chases, women affect industry 

more than they dream of," Mrs. 



Richmond HiiL In the two 
games played, they lost by a 

total of only two points, one j 

Doint to a 



WEATHER NOTE 

a nice spring, wasn't it? 
POSTAL NOTE 



CANADA MORE BEAUTIFUL IF LADIES BOUGHT 

SEEDS, N OT COSMETICS , SPEAKER STATES 

"It's not the seed, but the man j the speaker said. "Don't use the 
who grows it. who finally deter- nozzle, let the water run. 



i ; 



game. 



advantage at one place than at 
another. 
"Many women, ignorant of 

De La Haye told her listeners, j textile production, flock to sales 



"Most of us do not suspect how of materials and garments, help- 



closely our buying habits are 
being watched. 

"If we make a business of our 
spending, v/e can make a real 

contribution to the family in- 
come," the speaker declared. 
"The first rule in good buying 
is to know standards of quality, 
then you need not be dependent 
on the salesman. 

"The second rule is to know 
your own needs and not to be 
swayed too much by advertising 
or by sales talks. Keep a list of 
articles needed in a card file and 
make your shopping list from 

these. 
"The third rule is to apportion 

your purchases to your income." 
Mrs. De La Ifaye then went on 
to give information on where to 
buy. 

"Patronize reliable firms," she 
advised. "You will not always 
find the best returns for your 
money at the store where there 
is the greatest parade of cut 
prices and bargains. In the end, 
reliable stores arc the cheapest. 
"Sometimes certain articles 
may be purchased to greater 



ing the storekeeper to dispose of 
stuff that is going bad on the 
shelves. In reliable stores, how- 
ever, you can find bargains in 
the clearing sales " . s , 

The speaker 'warned women 
buyers not to be attracted by 
trading stamps and prizes-*', 

"Remember, nothing is given 
away, and that you pay for 
everything you receive," she 
stated. "It is better to deal with 



*ti 



We received a letter last week 

from the Post Office. Imagine! 

"With your interest in mind," 
the letter says, "we should like to 
point out the decided advantage 
of obtaining your letters from, a 

post office box." 

^ We like the letter. We like 

its courteous tone. And we're 
sure that nothing but a genuine 
spirit of helpfulness prompted 
the post office to write it. 
But we disagree. 

If there is a decided advantage 
to obtaining mail from a box, it ^"E*, .225* , - 
must have been decided by ! *PW«y salvia are 

someone eke — not by us. In the 
cities, mail as delivered to the 



door. In towns, for perfectly 
sound reasons, it is not. 

However, it costs us just as 
a firm that sells standard goods much not to have our mail 



mines the prize-winner," Leon 
Van Cleemput told an enthusias- 
tic audience of flower growers 
in the high school auditorium on 
Tuesday evening. Mr. Van 
Cleemput, an expert in his field, 
is a native of Belgium, and held 
government office for that coun- 
try in Africa for seven years. 

"Buy your seeds from a reli- 
able firm/' the speaker advo- 
cated. "Buy Canadian products. 
Buy colors you can separate, to 

get a definite color scheme. 

"Guard against catalogue de- 
tails," Mr, Van Cleemput said. 
"Be careful where size is empha- 
sized beyond color, variety or 
other assets. Buy an expensive 
packet if you have to, and divide 
it." 

The speaker ridiculed those 
gardens where a half dozen 

"made to do" 
for the decoration of a whole 
season. He advocated "Blaze of 



at standard prices. 

"In purchasing any materials 
for clothing or household fur- 
nishings remember that demand 
causes production and that those 
who are intelligent will make 
the right demands in the right 
places," Mrs. De La Haye con- 
cluded. 

Plans were made for the dis- 
trict annual convention to be 
held on May 25. Those who wish 
to belong to the Institute this 
year are urged to be present at 
the April meeting. The chief 
item on the program will be a 
talk on 'Temperance" by Mrs. 
Chas. Bilbrough. 



delivered to us. as 

right to our door. If 



if It came 
we have to 



"Read What You Like, For 
Its Own Sake" Y.P.A. Told 

Mrs. L C. Lee Urges says reuefi.es should 



Young Folk To Find 
Time For Reading 



BE CANADIANS FIRST 



! 



A proposal that all persons on 

relief should, be naturalized Can- 

"Whatever, the learned' sayi adian citizens was made by 

about a book, unless it interests | Reeve Thomas MacMurchy in 

King council on Saturday, and 

met with favorable reception. 

The council passed a resolu- 
tion authorizing the relief offi- 
cer to cut off all single relief 
recipients on and after the first 
day of April. 



you, it is no business of yours," 
Mrs. L. C. Lee told members of 
the A.Y.P.A. in the parish hall on 
Monday night. 

"None of us are exactly like 
anyone else" Mrs. Lee stated. 
"ft would be unreasonable to 

.suppose that the same books J 
like will be those that you like. 
I don't intend to tell you what 
to read but to interest you in 
reading what you like for its 
own sake. 

"It is well to acquire a habit 
of reading," she continued. "It 
is one sport in which you can 
indulge whether you arc tired or 
not, and in which you are not 
dependent on others to play with 
you. 

"Books that you find heavy 
but interesting, or applicable to 
your own life, or having to do 
with your occupation, I would 
advise* you to read a little at a 
time, in small doses, and as early 
in the day as possible. 

"Lighter, more relaxing books 
should be taken up at the end of 
the day. ft is preferable to have 
several books on hand at a time, 
perhaps one on biography or 
reminiscence and another of fic- 
tion, besides a magazine or two 
to keep up on current events and 
literature." 

Because of varying styles of 
writing, the reader might some* 
timesjie advised to skip parts of 
a book, rather than read half uf 
it and throw it down in disgust 
with the dullness of it, the 
speaker said. 

"Of course, if you are reading 
for examinations or for instruc- 
tion, skipping is a very danger- 
ous tiling to do," Mrs. Lee warn- 
ed. "If you think you haven't 
got time to read, keep track Of 
your days' activities, or butler 

still, of everything that you do, 
from waking to sleeping, for one 
week, and you will find that if 
you really want to read, there 
will be periods that you can re- 
place Willi reading?' 



call for it— fine! We'll do it I stated. 

cheerfully. But to pay out! "Watering 
money for a post office box, 
just because the government will 
not deliver our mail . . . no, 
sir! { 

We don't mind walking to the 
post office, but we don't see 
why we should pay for the priv- 
ilege. Rather, we think, the 
government should pay us, or at I 
least give us the use of a box, 
for the inconvenience the gov- 
ernment has put us to. 

If, by any chance, it's extra 
revenue the post office depart- 
ment is after, let them collect 
ten cents a year from the city 
folk who have extra service of 
door delivery. That will bring 
in more than would charging 
country folk several dollars a 
year for the privilege of going 
to the post office for their mail. 



Fire" as a good salvia. He ad- 
vised Canadians, with a wide 
variety of annual plants to 
choose from, to add color to 
their gardens. 

"A collection of perennials 
doesn't make a garden," he 



is not sprinkling," 



"Bulbs can stand the frost," 
he advised. "But cover them 
once they are frozen. It's the 
thawing and freezing again that{ 
kills them. Don't use maple 
leaves; they rot. Oak leaves are 
the best. 

'"If all the money spent on 
personal beautification by the 
ladies were spent on their sur- 
roundings, Canada would be the 
most beautiful country in the 
world," he declared. 

"We of the municipal body 

are very interested in the work 

of the Horticultural Society," 
stated Reeve J. A. Knowles, in 
welcoming the guest speaker. 
"They improve their homes as 
well as the town property" 

Councillors Dr. E. J. Hender- 
son and A. J. Wilson also enjoy- 
ed the lecture, 

Mr. Van Cleemput gave seeds, 
grown by himself to the follow- 
ing: Mrs. M. Parker, Mrs. L. C. 
Lee, Mrs. R. Stephenson, Miss E. 
Murray, Mrs. F. Underbill, Miss 
M. Andrews, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. 
Waite, James Wilson, Mrs. J. 
Klees, Mrs. D. Hamilton, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. E. Quinn, J. Raeside, J. 
M. Walton, Mrs. W. Waite, Jr., 
Mrs. J. Porter. Mrs. J. M. Mc- 
Dowell, Mrs. F. J. Lightbourn. 



Tells Plan To Pay Doctor 
To Keep Patient Healthy 



Guild Hears Address On 

Co-operative Builoing 

And Medicine 



Health Hints . . 

By J. ft. HARRISON, D.C. 



, 






KING TOWNSHIP; 




The problem of dealing with 
transient vagrants was one 
brought before King township 
council on Saturday by Council* 
lor Burnel Graham. 

There was a lock-up in Sehnm- 
berg. Councillor Graham slated, 
but lie objected to its being 
opened for such a purpose. Hi* 
feared that it might be turned 
into a tourist camp, as it did not 
take long for word to get around 
concerning an "overnight slop- 
ping place." 

A suggestion that vagrants be 
mm to Aurora was not acted on, 
us the councillors were doubtful 
whether they would be Wet* 
.egaicd there. 



Last week we considered the 
difference between raw and boiled 
water: this week we will analyse 
digestion. 

Broadly speaking digestion re- 
quires that starches and sugars be 
mixed with the saliva of the 
mouth; while the gastric or 
stomach juice acts upon protein, 
(meat, etc.). 

The question arises, how shall 
wc accomplish this end most 
readily? Chewing our food not 
only mixes the food in the mouth 
with the saliva but also increases 
Us flow, and besides this, causes 
the gastric juic« to flow Into the 
stomach. 

1 may add that strangely enough, 
the mere presence of food In the 
stomach has little or 
the gastric secretion. j 

The sight of, smell and desire | 
for food has a similar effect of 
making the mouth water and gas- 
tric juice flow into the stomach, 
which explains the health value of 

daintily prepared meals appealing 
to our sense of smell, taste, and 

sight. 

Besides these there are artificial 
stimulants to the flow of digestive 

juices such as smoking and some 
drugs. - *• 

Now, while we can readily see 
the necessity of such stimulation 
when wc are eating. It is equally 
Important that there be no stimu- 
lation while the stomach Is empty. 
If a man smokes or a woman 
chew* gum on an empty stomach, 
the gastric juice thereby caused to 
flow Into (he stomach will have no 
food to work upon and naturally 
will tend to Irritate Us delicate sur- 
face, thus laying the seed fol- 
iate r Indigestion nnd stomach 
ulcers. 

Furthermore the gastric juice will 
tend to be ua*d up when not 
needed, with the possibility that 
there will be a shortage when food 
is eaten afterwards. 

f certainty would not advise gum 
chewing and smoking if only for 
esthetic reasons but If you must 
indulge In these habits, confine 
them to the period Immediately 
following a meal. 

T believe that smoking before 

breakfast in one of the main causes 

of Indigestion, heartburn, etc., In 

those so ad ill etc* I, 

A point for the mothers: Indi- 
gestion in a ImtMc-fed baby can be 
caused by the use of too long a 
nipple, which allows the milk to be 
swallowed without mixing with 
tli a saliva. Allowing a baby to use 

a comforter will have the name 

effect on the baby as gum chew- 
ing on .in adult. 



NOT THE REAL REASON 

However, as you doubtless 
know, that is not the real rea- 
son why we don't want a post 
office box for our bills and cir- 
culars. Our reason for prefer- 
ring to call at the wicket is the 
cordial reception we get there, 
and the courteous, efficient 
handling our mail receives. 

The visit to the post office is 
always the high spot of our day. 
The rest of the populace, having 
read last week's column, may 
snub us, but from the post office 
we're always sure of a glad 
"good morning," or a smiling 
"good night." 

We wouldn't miss it for the 
world. 

So— as long as the government 
won't deliver our mail, they 
must share our inconvenience. 
And, if they wish, they can share 
our delight in passing the time 
of day with their splendid staff. 

No matter haw efficient the 
government may be, wc doubt its 
ability to put a cheery smile and 
a glad hello into a post office 
box. So hero v/e are, at the 
wicket. 

"Good morning!" 



Miss N. Fyfe, who conducted 
a tour to Nova Scotia last sum- 
mer for the purpose of studying 
the co-operative movement in 
St. Francis Xavier college there, 
was guest speaker at a guild 
meeting held on Thursday of 
last week at the home of Mrs. R. 
C. Swerdfeger. 

An impressive feature of co- 
operative medicine, about which 
Miss Fyfe spoke, was that of 
paying a doctor to keep the per- 
son well. So often people prac- 
tised false economy. Miss Fyfe 
said, by delaying a consultation, 
with resultant high medical costs 
later on. 

One objective of co-operative 
housing was to have those inter- 
ested study building construc- 
tion, and build their homes with 
the help of government loans, 
the speaker said, and stated that 



AMBITION BEST, A.Y.P.A. 
DEBATERS WIN ARGUMENT 

A debate on the subject, "Re- 
solved that ambition does more 
harm than good," was won by 
the team of Evelyn Heard and 
Bernice McBride. taking the 
negative side, at the meeting of 
the A.Y.P.A. held last week. 

Gordon French and Donald 
Glass took the affirmative side. 
Rev. G. O. Lightbourn was judge 
of the debate. 



this had actually been done at 
Tomkinsville, Cape Breton. An 
alternative was to have a hous- 
ing commission provide homes, 
with the possibility of another 
slum coming into being in a few 
years. Miss Fyfe declared. 

Hostesses for the next meeting 
of the guild, which will be held 
in the guild hall on Monday, 
will be Mrs. F. C. MeLeod, Mrs. 
J. V. Sfoss, Mrs. W. Thompson 
and Mrs. J. It. Harrison. 



SOCIAL 

AND 

PERSONAL 

Mrs. George Reynolds and Miss 
Elizabeth Reynolds, of Toronto, 
were thetgucste of Mrs. J. Rey- 
nolds, Catharine Ave., on Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bain 
and daughter, Marilyn, of New- 
market, visited Mrs. Bain's 
mother, Mrs. S. Cook, on Sun- 
day. 

Dr. T. II. Hutchinson, of Port 
Arthur, has been visiting rela- 
tives in town. 

Miss Mildred Graham spent 
the weekend in Toronto with her 
aunt, Mrs. M. J. Walker. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Rank* and 
Mr. and Mrs. N. Egan motored 
to Waubashene on Sunday. 

Messrs. A. Ashton, O. L. An- 
drews, V. Jones, W. Dunning, M. 
L. Andrews, attended the church 
service when Northcrest Odd- 
fellows* lodge went to Lansing 
United church on Sunday even- 
ing. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Wheeler and 
family, of Toronto, visited Mr. 
and Mrs. N. F. Johnson on Satur- 
day. 

Miss Sylvester, of Toronto, 
spent the weekend in Aurora, the 
guest of Mrs. H. J. Charles. 

Mrs. M. Murray, of Oakville, 
and Mrs. J. Davidson, of Weston, 
were guests on Sunday at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. 
Davidson. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Doanc of 
Sharon, Mr. and Mrs. J, -L. 
Smith and son, Douglas, of 
Queensville, were the guests of 
Mrs. Charles Dunham on Sun- 
day. 

Mrs. Robert Bradley, of Otta- 
wa, has been visiting her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. N. Teasdalc. 

Mrs. R. Rogers of Saskatoon, 
and Mrs. J. Bain, Roche's Point, 
visited at the home of Mr. R. 
Knowles on Friday. 



THE NOT-SO-FREE PRESS 
• 

We had a phone call from Edi- 
tor John Crysdale on Tuesday 
night. Editor Crysdale, you may 
remember, is the public school 
lad who successfully piloted a 

the winter 



no effect on f school magazine in 



PHIZES WILL BE GIVEN TO PUBLIC SCHOOL 

CHILDREN FOR BEST POSTERS ON FLOWERS 



season of last year. 

We thought it a worthy enter- 
prise and gave it as much sup- 
port as we could. We "wrote it 
up" and wq paid for advertising 
space in it. There wasn't much 
we could do, but wc did what 
little wc could to encourage the 
lads in something we felt was 
worth-while. 

And on Tuesday evening, as 
wc have said, John phoned us 
up to tell ur he was at work 
again on his magazine. We were 
glad to hear it. 

We were not so glad when 
John went on to ask us not to 
write it up too big this time, not 
to put in more than the other 
papers would, as he stated be 
would be criticized if wo did. 

So . . - in order to avoid 
embarrassment, we'll just whis- 
per that Editor John Crysdale 
will put out a number of his 
magazine next week . . . and 
we hope to goodness the other 
papers give him a better Iwost 
than wc do — so John won't be 
criticized again. 

SHOP AT HOME 

We're chuckling, deep down in 
our beard, this week, at h sign 
at the south end of Aurora. 
Ordinarily the sign advertises 
pome product or other, but evi- 
dently the manufacturer of the 
product enme to his senses and 
decided to use weekly newspaper 

advertising . . . al any rate no 
product is advertised or* the sign 
at present. 

Instead, the sign bears Ilk* 
legend, "Buy from your local 

merchant" Tlio sign, we suspect, 
is designed to gain the good will 

of the town citizenry. It's a good 
Idea, but it has one fnult— tho 



When it was found that it 
would not be a good policy to 
have children collecting wild- 
flowers, as it was the society's 
wish that these should not be 
picked, the Aurora Horticultural 
Society decided to withdraw the 
prize for the best collection of 
wild flowers from its flower 
show, at a meeting on Wednes- 
day of last week. 

Instead, the children in the 
four upper rooms of the public- 
school will be given prizes for 
the most attractive posters on 
these flowers. There will be 
first and second prizes for both 
boys and girls. 
I Several classes were deleted 
and several added in making up 
this year's prize list. 

A feature of the meeting was 
the talk given by Mrs. John 
Klees, who reported on the hor- 
ticultural convention held in 



Toronto recently. 

The program was arranged so 
that luncheon would be served 
during the broadcast of the 
Aurora-Milton hockey finals. 



FESTIVAL ENTRIES 
CLOSE APRIL FIRST 



sign faces southward, and instead 

of admonishing shoppers on their 
way to Toronto, it only is seen 
by them as they come up Yonge 
St. on their way back. Then it's 
too late. 

Curiously, this failure on the 
part of the sign symbolizes the 
failure of the local merchants to 
convince townsfolk that they 
would be better advised to shop 
at home. 

Folks go to the city, spending 
money for transportation, and 
come back with their purchases. 
It is not until they get back that 
they find they could have pur- 
chased the same article for al>out 
the same price, or, as is some- 
times the case, for a lesser price, 
at home. 

Then again, it's too late. 

Part of the blame must fall on 
the purchaser, of course. Rut 
the local merchant, who is also 
tho loser from the trip to Tor- 
onto, is also to blame. 

If he had told people of his 

wares and of his fair prices, and 
i if the convenience of shopping 
at home, people would never go 
to Toronto to shop. 

We've been in the newspaper 
business long enough to know 
the value of steady advertising. 
We've' iratn the odd merchant 
come into the paper with the 
occasional advertisement, and 

have seen him wonder why he 
Page fi, Col. (I 



An increase in the number of 
entries in the' piano division of 
the York Musical Festival is evi- 
dent this year. The Era learned 
this week, and there is a pros- 
pect of increase too, in the 
classes for senior elocution. 

Young Joe Pach, the lad who 
pleased audiences and judges 
with his splendid work on the 
violin last year, will again be a 
competitor in this year's festival, 
it was teamed. 

April 1 has been set as the 
last day on which entries for the 
festival will he received, and the 
committee Is anxious to get all 
entries in promptly so that they 
may proceed with the arrange- 
ment of the program. 



UNITED Y.P.S. ENJOY 
MISSIONARY NIGHT 



"The way in 
was the theme 



Monday evening was mission- 
ary night at the United church 
Y.P.S. meeting. The program 
was under (he direction of Ruth 
De I .a Haye, convenor of Chris- 
tian missions, 
stormy places," 
chosen, and resulted in a very 
effective program. 

Accounts of the great work 
carried on in the mission fields 
were given by several members 
of the group. The group is en- 
deavoring to increase Its donn- 
tjnn to the missionary giving.* of 
the church this year. 

All young people of the 

church are invited in attend the 

next meeting of the group, on 
Monday evening, ns plans will 
be made for the spring term. 



ailtl.HTO I'll Kit STECKLEY 

DIES AT SNOWBALL 

Christopher Steektey, native of 
Whitchurch township, died at his 
homo at Snowball on Sunday In 



BAPTISTS WILL MEET 
WITH WESLEY Y.P.S. 



More than forty .Baptist Young 
People enjoyed a meeting under 
the direction of the stewardship 
commission on Monday night. 
Those of the members who had 
attended the life service banquet 
in Toronto, brought back 
"echoes" of what had transpired 
there. 

The pastor. Rev. A. R. Park. 
gave a talk on regeneration, 
baptism and church membership. 

Joseph Stephenson and Roy 
Williams brought their guitars 
to the meeting and added vocal 
and instrumental selections to 
the program. 

The meeting to be held next 
Monday evening is expected to 
have a larger than average turn- 
out, when members of the Wes- 
ley church Y.P.S. will attend 
and take charge of the program. 

POTTAGEVILLE . 

MEASLES REDUCES 
SCHOOL TO EIGHT 



The community is sorry to hear 
Mrs. L. Jenkins is sick and hope 
for a speedy recovery is held. 

A large number attended the 
Leadership League meeting held 
last week at Gart Munshaw's. 
which was mostly signing of 
ballots. 

S. S. No. 13 has only eight 
pupils attending. Most of the 
pupils are down with the 
measles. The village seems very 
quiet, not having the younger 
folk around with their laughter. 

Mr. Ed. O'Brien was home for 
the weekend. 

Miss Verna Houghton of Tor- 
onto spent the weekend with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. 
Houghton, 

Mr. G. Lawrence of Toronto 
paid a visit to Mr. and Mrs. J. 
A. Funncll, on Sunday. 

The Y.P.U. held its usual meet- 
ing on Wednesday, with n fair 
attendance. Mary Wilson was In 
charge of the meeting as con- 
venor of Christian fellowship. 
Howard Pnton read the scripture 
lesson. Howard Pa ton and Ed. 
Houghton sang "No Disappoint- 
ment in Heaven." 

Miss V. Allen, president, gave 
the topic. Len. Erickson gave a 
rending, closing with the bene- 
diction. 

Mr. nnd Mrs. Rhys Williams 
and baby son, Barry, nre slaying 
n few days with the former's 
parents. 



his 85th year. He was of Penn- 
sylvania Dutch stock. He had 
lived in King township for 30 
years and was active in Snow- 
ball United church. 
Surviving are his widow ami 

four children, Robert* Snowball: 
Mrs. George Green, Richmond 
Hill; Mrs. Charles Rush, Snull 
Sle. Marie; and Mrs. Win. Storey 
of King. Five grandchildren 
also survive. 

The funeral service, conducted 
by Rev. W. J. Burton, was held 
nt his late residence, with Inter- 
ment in Aurora cemetery. 



8INQLE COPIE8, So EACH 



Aurorans Upset, 3-2 
In Wednesday Game 



Purple -and -Whites Fade 
From Picture When 

On Galt Ice 

The miracle happened, and 
there's no "We won the cham- 
pionship" headline in The Era 
this week. 

Milton's red-shirts, playing 
with nothing to lose and every- 
thing to gain, set the Aurorans 
back on their heels on Wednes- 
day night when, after being 

beaten easily in the first two 
games of the three-out-of-five 
series, they came back to down 
Aurora to the tune of 3-2. 

With the exception of Collings, 
Bone and Cummings, the purple- 
and-white squad seemed to skate 
in a daze for the greater portion 
of the first two periods. They 
never really woke .up until late 
in the third session and then it 
was too late. 

Milton, facing elimination from 
the championship series, gave all 
they had, and it seemed enough 
to stop Aurora. 

They drew first blood when 
they broke through to score on 
Carr in the initial session, and it 
was left to Bone to tie it up on 
a, long shot. 



CHILD SCALDED 

Little Jean Ball, IC-month-old 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Ball, Pottageville, suffered first 
and second degree burns when 
some heated milk was spilled on. 
her chest on Monday. 



Milton scored again near the 
end of the second spasm, and in* 
creased their lead to 3-1 at the 

beginning of the third. Then 

Aurora woke up. In the ensuing 
minutes they were over Milton 
like a tent, but they could not 
score enough to tie the count, 
though Aurora did get another 
goal, Bone getting the assist 

To those fans who witnessed 
Aurora's attempts to overcome a 
previous 5-0 lead by Orillia, it 
was an old story. There were 
many chances to score, but Aur- 
ora missed most of them. 

Fans are hoping they will 
come down to earth long enough 
on Friday night, when they 
again visit Gait to take on Mil- 
ton, to properly claim their title 
to the Junior "C" championship. 

The best of teams can lose an 
odd game, and it is to be hoped 
the next one isn't so odd. 



Milton Outclassed By 7-2 
In Second Of Final Series 



Aurora Has Wide Mar- 
gin In Every Department 
On Friday Night . 



The red-shirted lads on skates 
who faced the Aurora team on 
Friday night may be bred in 
Milton, but in the Maple Leaf 
Garden?, they're only crumbs. 
That was the belief of many of 
the fans who attended the game. 

What the daily papers coyly 
described as "Aurora's slight 
edge in play" was this: Aurora 
scored seven goals — Milton scor- 
ed twice, only after the referees 
had given them face-offs in 
Aurora territory. 

Almost every time Milton 
came up the ice the puck-carriers 
were skated into the corner so 
fast that it is doubtful if they 
ever got to recognize the Aurora 
goalie. Not that Carr didn't 
turn in a standout performance. 
He did, and deserves full credit 
for the handling of the shots that 
came his way, and had little 
chance on the two pucks that 
popped in from face-offs at the 
side of his net. 

But the fine defensive perfor- 
mance of Collings. Bone, Fol- 
liott and McComb gave more 
than adequate support to a 
superb net minding performance. 
And the work of these lads, 
coupled with the fine job done 
by the Michaniuk, Cummings, 
Donkin line, showed clearly that 
on Friday's fracas Milton was 
slated for a tough time in '"A" 
division. Dennis and Gibbons 
deserve credit for their work In 
alternate positions. 

This reporter started to yawn 
after the first ; two minutes of 
play. In those two minutes 
Welch stole a loose puck and 
tore into Milton ' territory to 
angle the first goal and Bone 
soloed in to take tho second 
tally on a hard shot. 

Folllott and Bone took turns in 
combining with Mk-haniuk on 
attacks that must have taken 
years off the life of McDuffy in 
the Milton goal. Penalties wore 
liberally sprinkled on players of 
both sides, but failed to improve 
the game. 

Folliott went up on n rush, 
shot, found the puck again, and 
scored Aurora's third goal. Then 
Milton was given a face-off by 
the Aurora net and Carr had no 
chance to keep them off the 
score board. 

Milton ran a four and some- 
times five-man attack in the 
first period without success. 
They hud four men on tho 
offensive at the beginning of the 
second, too, but Cummings laid 
u perfect pass to Michaniuk, .who 
made it 4-1 for the purple and 
while squad. 

A tripping epidemic broke out 
nnd five assorted players found 
room on the penalty bench. 
Donkin came into his own again 
when he spurted through alone 
to make it Ii-1, nnd in the fol- 
lowing five minute.* Collings nnd 
Bone had enough shots on the 
Milton goal to fill the net if they 

had gone in. 
Carr also had a chance to 

show his stuff nnd turned in a 

beautiful performance on some 
nasty shots, as Milton's tour- 
inan forward line hemmed in the 
Aurorans for a time. 

The third period was n repeti- 
tion of the first, with Bone going 
through alone to score on a long 
angle .shot after 27 seconds of 
play. Then before tho two-min- 
ute mark McComb placed n 
lovely pass to Collings In front 



CALENDAR 



Aurora's Junior Band will 
present a concert on April 14 in. 
Mechanics' hall. 

May time tea and home bak-- 
ing sale on Saturday afternoon. 
May 15, in Trinity parish hail, 
under the auspices of the guild. 



of the Milton net and the score 
was 7- 1 for Aurora. 

Milton had plenty of shots in 
this period, but most of them 
were lucky to hit the end uf the 
rink. They only managed to 
score when Referee Kuntz, of 
Kitchener, penalized an Aurora 
player and gave Milton a face- 
off, deep in Aurora territory. 



KINO 

MRS. JESSE TAnON 
DIES IN 63RD YEAR 



Mrs. Jesse Tntton, a well- 
known resident of King died at 
her residence, 0th concession of 
King, on Thursday, after a linger- 
ing illness. Born in King, March 
15, 1887, Annie Gertrude Stephen- 
son, she was the daughter of 
Eliza Steele and Major Stephen- 
son of Kettleby. She married 
Jesse Tattoo on Dec. 18, 1901. 
Mrs. Tntton attended the Angli- 
can church. 

Surviving nre her husband and 
two daughters, Mrs. J. K. Sloss 
of Newmarket and Mrs. F. W. 
Schmidt tit home, one sister, Mrs. 
A; M. Hencock, Kettleby, one 
brother, Albert K, Stephenson, 
St. Clair Shores, Mich., and one 
granddaughter, Pauline Gertrude 
Schmidt. One son, Kenneth and 
one daughter, Phyllis, prede- 
ceased her. - 

Funeral service was conducted 
from the family residence, 6th 
concession. King township, on 
Sunday. Rev. F. V. Abbott con- 
ducted the service. Interment 
was made in Kettleby cemetery. 

Pallbearers were I lorry Terry, 
Peter Muirhead, Wm. Irednle, 
Art. McKldon, Harry Stephens 
and Wm. Crawford. 



J, T. IlllKNS DIRS 

AT AGK OF BR YEARS 

J. T. Bums died at his farm 
home near Kinghorn on Sunday;; 
on the same farm where he was 
born 811 years ago. He was the 
son of the Into James Burns, 
pioneer King township former^ 
and was himself a pioneer miller- 
on Maniloulin Island, where he 
went as a young man and built 
and operated the first grist 
mill. 

He later operated n grist mill 
on Don Mills Road on the site 
of Don Aldn farm. He belonged 
to Strange Presbyterian church. 

Surviving are his widow, tho 
former Jemima Ross, whom he 
married 51 years ngo; four sons, 
Jack, at home; Harold, Toronto; 
Ross, Maniloulin; William, Lis- 
towel; nnd one daughter, Mrs. 
Gordon Duncan, Don Mills Road. 

The funeral wns held nt his 

late . residence yesterday after- 
noon. Interment was made In 
Aurora cemetery. 



^-•* 



A full coverage of King town* 
ship news will he found on page 
six, 

Era printers 4pare no pains iq 
moke every # job attractive. 



* 



* 



THE NEWMARKET ERA, THURSDAY, MARCH 30TH, 1030 



1 



KING CITY 

MAKE PRESBfTATION 

TO BRIDAL COUPLE 

On Friday evening a social and 
presentation were held in the 
Sunday-school room of the 
United church in honor of Mr. 
and Mrs. V. McArthur. Mrs. 
McArthur was the former Miss 
Lillian Leece. Many friends of 
the church and community, in- 
cluding Misses Vera Clarke, Ruth 
Goodman and Connie Willis of 
Aurora, were present. 

The first part of the evening 
was spent in a sing-song and 
contests. Miss Mildred Folliott 
played two beautiful instru- 
mentals and Alfred Barker, ac- 
companied by Miss Connie Wil- 
lis, sang, "Beloved It Is Mom." 

Then Mr. and Mrs. McArthur 

were presented with a chester- 
field lounge chair from the 

church and friends. The address 
was read by Mrs. Aubrey Archi- 
bald and the gift presented by 
John McAllister and John Dew, 
Jr. 

The Y.P.U. then presented the 
couple v/ith a pair of bath- 



towels. This address was read 
by Jack Clift and the gift pre- 
sented by Miss Helen Campbell. 
Lunch was served. An enjoyable 
evening was reported by all* 

Mr. Ken. Davis of Hailebury 
spent the most of last week at 
home, while he was waiting to 
take a position at Holner Mine, 
Timmins. 

Mr. Orin Thorpe has gone to 
work at Kirkland Lake. 

Miss Marion Dennison spent 
Sunday at her home. 

Mrs. Koinng was visiting at 
her home in Uxbridge last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vemon McAr- 
thur stayed over Friday night at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs, Wm. 
Carson on their return home 
from their honeymoon. 

The Y.P.U- met last Thursday 
evening with the citizen con- 
venor, Jack Clift, in 

John Dew took the topic "Do We 

Want Democracy in Canada/' 

which was followed by a lively 
discussion. 



KING TOWNSHIP 

KEF SHOW OFF ROAD 

by mmm trees, 

FORESTRY MAN SAYS 



NOBLETON 

TOM CAIN PUTS BUR6LARS TO FUGHT WITH 

SHOTGUN; COUNTY POLICE WOW CRmXBED 




A suggestion that farmers of 
King township consider the 
planting of trees as a step toward 
solution of the problem of keep- 
ing roads clear of snow in win- 
ter was advanced at the council 
meeting in Nobleton on Satur- 
day. 

The proposal came from Isaac 
Marritt, of the forestry branch. 
He had approached a number of 
farmers, Mr. Marritt stated, and 
found that they were willing to 
co-operate. 

"I would be willing to get the 

charge, trees and to spend a day or two 

supervising the planting of 

them," said Mr. Marritt. He 

thought that if the council would 
I act 



in the matter that the pro- 
Mr. and Mrs. Britton Riddel I j ject could be put through. 
have returned from their wed- 



ding trip. 

Friends extend congratulations 
to Mr. and Mrs. Ewart Patton 
on the arrival of a young son on 



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CANDIES 



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PLEASE ORDER EARLY AND BE SURE OF 
YO U R ORDER AS THEY HAVE TO BE 

KEPT FRESH. 

BEST'S DRUG STORE 

MAIN ST.. NEWMARKET 



PHONE 14 






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They're laying RIB-ROLL Roofing 

pi rigM «V#r tk» «U •hlmg^m, too! 

With Pttaton lUMtoU" and "nte-Lep" 
metal roofing there is no moss of old 
■hjcgtoj lying around and no danger of 
ezpecing your building while re- roofing. 

"TOe-Lap" and "Rib Roll", made in the 
famoua Council Standard quality, are 
guaranteed for 25 years. Sore protection 
againat fire and weather for the beet pert 

ofaUfetinxa. 

Meaa are lower than at thla time laatyear 
because there ia no Bales tax. Write tcniay 

for free eetimate. Addreae Dept 906. 



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Edstern Steel Products 



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Not forgetting Macnab's 
you really do get service 
illty with a smile. 



ANNOUNCING 

OUR APPOINTMENT AS 
AGENTS FOR GENERAL 
ELECTRIC REFRIGERA- 
TORS - 193 9 MODELS 
NOW IN STOCK. 
* * ♦ 

Cooper's Products 

kerol - dri-kill 
warble fly powder 

. * * • 

MARTIN SENOUR'S 

100 PER CENT PURE PAINT 
- ENAMELS , 

I ^ ■ 

VARNISH STAINS 



„ V 




QUftUTV MCftCHAWOISE 



JUacnab Hardware 



Tom Cain, Nobleton garage- 
man, did a little -out-of-season 
shooting on Saturday morning, 
but it is doubtful whether police 
will press a charge against him. 

In fact, if the police had been 
with him it is likely they would 
have done a little snooting them* 
selves- 
Mr. Cain had just returned 
from a towing job early in the 

morning, about 5.30 a~m., and 
was about to grab a little sleep, 
when he heard noises at the 
front of his garage that made 
him grab his shot-gun instead. 

He discovered three men at- 
tempting to break in the door of 
the refreshment counter section 
of his garage. The trio leapt for 

their car when Mr. Cain appear- 
ed, and Mr. Cain let loose sev- 
eral salvos with the idea of 

marking the car for future ref- 
erence. 



stable S. Ireland of the township 
police, who lives four miles east 
of Nobleton. The car is believed 
to have made good its escape 
down the new highway, while 
the constable was out on the 
other road. 

The Cain garage would appear 
to be a popular spot for burglars. 
Saturday's attempt was the sixth 
occasion on which the garage 
had been so visited, Mr. Cain 
told The Era. 

The affair came in for com- 
ment at the King township 
council meeting, which was held 

in the Nobleton community hall 
on Saturday. 

"The county council will not 

appoint a constable for King 

township," Reeve Thomas Mac- 

Murchy reported. "TTjey have 
eight s constables around the 
county building without much to 
do. We are paying for them. 



Monday evening at the York 
county hospital, Newmarket. 

Mrs. Chas. Ball, Maple, spent 
the weekend at the home of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
McCallum, King. 

The illustrated temperance i 
service, which v/as to have been 
held last Sunday evening, at the 
United church, was postponed as 
two of the girls from Newton- 
brcok, who were to give their 
oratorical speeches, were con- 
fined to bed with influenza. 



ABOUT 
TOWN 



cause King has failed to protect 
itself. The county patrol, 
it may be imagined, cannot do it 

all, if indeed they are willing to 
do for King township what King 

township is not willing to do for 
itself. 



The car roared away south- Why are we not entitled to a 
wards and Mr. Cain phoned Con- share of the protection?" 



KING TOWNSHIP 

SNOW REMOVAL STILL FORMS BIG PROBLEM, 
KING TOWNSHIP'S NOBLETON MEETING SHOWS 






Obtaining payment for work 
which he was not authorized to 
do, was the problem faced by 
Nick Sapusak, King township 

beepest7ympath7^extended! yo I uth - on Saturday. He and 
to Mrs. J. T. Burns and family 



in their late bereavement in the 
less of a beloved husband and 
father. 



Eversley 



Birds are singing and delayed 

spring is in the air. The moun- 
tain ridges of snow still loom 
large, but look dirty and un- 
attractive. 

Congratulations are extended 

to Nancy Ball, the neighborhood 

| net, who celebrated her eighth 

' birthday on Wednesday last, and 

attended the W.M.S. party. 

Last week Mr. and Mrs. Lyle 
WeJI 3 celebrated the 30th anni- 
versary of their wedding day, on 
Saturday, March 25. Congratu- 
lations are extended to this 
kindly couple. 

On Monday night the Young 
Peoples met at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Lyle Wells. On account 
of the flu, and the roads being 
heavy with snow, the attendance 



ether members of his family had 
kept a mile and a quarter of 
road clear of snow, but had done 
so without orders from the road 
superintendent or his staff. He 
appeared before council with a 
bill of 43 hours for the job, for 
himself, and a total of 125 hours 
for his "gang." 

^ "I was told that it was all 
right to clear a road without 
being told, if there were no snow 
fences along the road" the 
youthful Nick told the council. 

"You can stand in front of an 
on-coming train," Road Superin- 
tendent C. Black told him. "But 
ycu can't get paid for road-clear- 
ing without authorization, be- 
cause the public's money is in- 
volved." 

Nick maintained that the bill 
was a fair one and stated that a 
good number of hours had not 
been counted by him in prepar- 
ing his statement. 

"If I came in to your place and 
pitched hay all day and you did 
not tell me to do it, would you 
nay me?" asked Deputy-Reeve 



was small. It was- musical 

evening, and Miss A. A. Fergu- 1 T% r«mif~f?™ 

con o.™» a «*ltr „*, «**....:.. :„ ?,__ I ** »- OOOClfellOW. 

"Depends on whether there 
was anyone else to do it," grin- 
ned Nick. He stated that snow 



-~on 



gave a talk on "Music in the 



Bible." A sleigh was ready 
go. and the first sleighride of 
when the people were ready to 
the season was enjoyed around 
to Eversley corner, where the 
motors were in wailing. 

On Wednesday afternoon, the 
Eversley W.M.S. met at the home 
of Mrs. Lyle Wells. There were 
19 in all present, and a good ser- 
vice was held. Frances Ross 
contributed a delightful piano 
solo of various hymn tunes, with 
variations. Mrs. Geliatly gave 
the current events. Miss Jessie 
GeiT'Hv pave a reading in place 
of Miss Annie Ferguson, who 
was recovering from the flu, 
and Mrs. Ransom read the Tid- 
ings prayer. 

Quilts are still on the way and 
the needles will fly this week. 



Kettleby 



had drifted in again and that it 
would take Vive hours to get the 
road clear. He received a pro- 
cortion of his bill on condition 
that the road was cleared for 
traffic. 

On the basis of some of the 
hills presented, the council 
learned, it would cost the town- 
ship $180 per mile to clear roads. 
An aeroplane would be cheaper, 
someone suggested. 

Further discussion brought for- 
ward a suggestion from Coun- 
cillor E. M. I.egce that some of 
the road bills be framed and 
nhctographed; a comment from 
the reeve that fishworms were 
beginning to come through and a 
proud claim from Councillor 
Legge that his tulips were three 
inches above ground. 

A request from Mr. Kent that 
his road be opened up met with 
favorable reception. 

"Your taxes are as good as 
anyone's," declared Councillor 
f.egge. The work would take 
four men and a team a day, Mr. 
Kent stated. Four cars could 
not pet out to get their licenses, 
he said. 

A resolution to the effect that 
the King council will not pay or 
recognize any account sent in for 
road work, unless it is duly 
authorized by the road superin- 
tendent or by the council as a 
whole, was passed by King 
council on Saturday. 



SCHO.MBERG 

WORKING IN WELL, 
IS FATALLY INJURED 



Snowball Y.P.S. will present 
their play, "The man from 
nowhere," Friday evening, March 
21, in the United church. 

The Easter meeting of the W. 
A. and W.M.S. will be held at the 
home of Mrs. S. J. Heacock. 

Mrs. L. Jarvis and her son, 
Charles, and his wife, and also. 
a son of Mr. Roy Lcgges, were 
renewing old acquaintances in 
the village Saturday- 
Mrs. J. Archibald and daugh- 
ters, Jean and Marion, have 
been on the sick list. Friends 
wish them a speedy recovery, 

Mr. Ed. Morris has returned 
after spending the winter in 
Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Wells and 
children, nb.o Mrs. Well's father, 
Mr. W. MacMillnn, spent last 
Thursday in Toronto. 

Mrs. Chas. West ia spending a 
few days In the city with her 
daughter, Mrs. C. James. 

Group B of the Women's Asso- 
ciation held a quilting party nt 
the homo of Mrs. S. Geer on 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Jack leopard was called 
to his brothers at Schomberg 
last Sunday to stay with them 
for a few day*?, us they are all 
laid up with flu. 

Mrs. C. Sheard, who has been 
under the doctor's care, is im- 
proving. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Murray 
and family attended the hockey 
game Wednesday night nt Mnple 
Leaf Gardens between Aurora 
and Milton. 

Mr. W. Wells has returned to 
his duties in Temlskaming after 
spending a week at his home 
here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ircdale of 
Toronto and Mrs. William Curtis 
and daughter of Port Hope, at- 
tended the funeral of the late 
Mrs. Jesse Tatton on Sunday 
afternoon. 

Mrs. Geo. Anning is visiting at 
the home of her brother, Mr. 
Howard Black, for several days. 

The Misses Margaret Heacock 
and Lorraine Rockhill of Tor- 
onto spent the weekend at their 
homes here. 

Mtes Kathleen Black spent 

several days last week with her 

' nUter, Mrs. Rom Marchant, of 



Mrs. M. K. Dillane suffered an 
unusual accident a week ago 
when her thumb became caught 
in the car door and the bone 
was broken. It is coming along 
nicely now. 

The flu epidemic has made a 
clean sweep in these parts. 
Many are over the attack. Some 
are still sick. Mr. Irwin Hulse 
had a very severe attack and 
after three weeks illness is just 
able to he around again. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Wood 
and infant daughter spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. G. Tay- 
lor. 

Miss Grace Amey was ill with 
flu last week. 

Tragedy visited this small 
town last week, when Mr. M. 
Hanley passed away following 
an accident sustained while he 
was digging a well on the farm 
of Mrs. R. Bryan near here. 

The rope, which* was hoisting 
a bucket of mud, broke, letting 
the full weight fall on Mr. Hnn- 

ley's head. 

He was rushed to St. Michael's 
hospital, Toronto, where he died 



PINE ORCHARD 

INTERESTING PROGRAM 
IS GIVEN BY GIRLS 



Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Lundy 
spent the weekend in Toronto. 

Mr. Nelson. Misses Minnie and 
Aleta Widdifield and Miss D. 
McEwen visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Colin Widdifield, Newmarket, on 
Sunday. 

Mrs. P. Hutchinson is doing 
nicely and hopes to return home 
from the hospital this week. 

Mr. R. Armitagc has been sick 
with the flu this week.- Friends 
wish him a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Sproxton and 
family had Sunday dinner with 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Oliver and fam- 
ily at Vandorf. 

Mrs. Hope entertained Mrs. 
Skinner, Mrs. Chapman, Misses 
B. and A. Chapman, Mrs. W. 
Rcid and Helen, Mrs. J. Reid, 
Miss M. Widdifield, Mrs. Armi- 
tagc and Mrs. G. Stevens to tea 
on Thursday afternoon. 

Miss L. Starr had n diminish- 
ing tea io replenish the hall re- 
pair fund. She entertained Mrs. 
W. Collins, Miss Lillie Toole, 
Mrs. W. Hall, Miss Alice Hall, 
Mrs. Geo. Mninprize and Mrs. E. 
Mcrritt on Wednesday, March 22. 



the next day of n fractured skull, j By the lime the round of teas 
The funeral was held on Monday I \$ completed, there should be n 



in St. Patrick's R. C. church. 

Deepest sympathy goes out to 
the wife and small daughter, 
Mary. 

Miss Lorna Dillane spent the 
weekend at her home here. 

The concluding bridge of the 
season of the ladies* bridge club 
took the form of a double bridge 
on Wednesday, March 15. Mrs. 
K. A. Stuckcy, Mrs. E. J. Pear- 
son and Mrs. W..B. Dale were 
hostesses, Mrs. F. Claridge and 
Dr. MacLeod were prizewinners 
for the evening. Mrs. MacLeod 
won the grand prize for the sea- 
son. 



WILL CHECK WITH 

WEST GWILLIMBURY 

King council on Saturday In- 
structed the clerk to write the 
treasurer of West GwUlimbury 
and secure from his council per- 
mission for the King auditor to 
hove access to the West GwUl- 
imbury township books to check 
up and secure necessary Infor- 
mation for the private bill being 
sought In connection with the 
Holland Marsh drainage scheme. 



Lloydtown. 

Mr. E. Morris hos returned 
home after spending several 
monUts with relatives In Toronto. 

Mr. Kelvin Shore, a local 
teacher, has been recovering 
from an attack of the flu at his 
home in Woodbridge. 

Mips M. Hambly, teacher of 
the fifth line school, has been 
ill at her home near Bond Head. 



nice amount to add to the fund. 

Miss Viva Shropshire visited 
at Mr. Ford Lehman's in New- 
market on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. McClure ami 
Rae visited at Mr. W. Halt's. 
Sharon, on "Sunday, 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Hoover visit- 
ed at Mr. Engie's on Sunday. 

The community club meeting 
held at the school last Friday 
evening was well attended in 
spite of road conditions. The 
program given by the girls con- 
sisted of several selections by on 
orchestra composed of Mrs. J. 
Hope, Mrs. E. Breen, Misses L. 
Widdifield and it. Rcid. The 
Enterprise was given by Mrs. J. 
Hope; readings by Mrs. If. Wieke 
and Miss A, Chapman; a panto- 
mime, "To Many Visitors," was 
given by a number of the girls. 

A short account of the life and 
work of a few of the better 
known artists was given and 
some of the pictures were en- 
acted by the girls. A treasure 
trail followed, conducted by 
Mrs. L. Rose and Mrs. R. Armi- 
tage. 

Mr. Fred Reid's group are pre- 
paring the program for Thurs- 
day evening, April 6. The 
meeting will be held at the 
school and the program will con- 
sist of two short plays, a fashion 
parade and orchestra selections, 
etc. 



you 



Family Affair? 
He— "If I kiss you, will 

call your mother?" 

She— "What do you want to 

do— kiss the whole family?" 



Continued from Aurora Page 

cannot compete with the con- 
stantly advertised merchandise 
in the big city. 

The buyer goes where he is 
asked. 

One way of asking is to keep 
prices right. Another way is to 
see that the interior and exterior 
of the store are modern. Another 

is to make sure that the customer 
receives "service" and "conven- 
ience" in making purchases. 
Then the customer must be 

told. 

We'll gladly help you tell him 
— in Ontario's first paid-in-ad- 
vance weekly newspaper— the 
paper that in all-Canada compe- 
tition, has won the title of 
"Canada's Best Weekly News- 
paper" — three times, in four 
years. 

Just phone Aurora. 66! 

LEST WE FORGET 
Before we join the "Stop Hit- 
ler" movement. Father Coughlin 
suggested last Sunday, it would 
j be wise to inquire who "started 
Hitler." 

When France and Britain fail- 
ed to co-operate with the Ger- 

I man attempt to establish a dem- 
ocracy, they drove the Germans 
into the arms of dictatorship. 

When they took from Germany 
territories that had been under 
German influence, they provided 

I Germany with full and sufficient 
reason for trying to get them 
back. 

France fought to regain Alsace- j 
Lorraine, and we praised her. 
Germany fights now to regain 
her ancient empire. Who blames 
Germany? 

EVERYBODY, OF COURSE 

We knew that we can be dis- 
honest, vicious and hypocritical 
and still win popular approval, 
so long as people still call us 
"brave." And we know, deep 
down inside, that no matter how 
just and Christian our argument, 
we immediately lose that argu- 
ment if others can place upon 
Us the label of "coward." 

Hence, we hold, the "brave" 
cries of those who ask that Can- 
adians jump into uniform at 
once; and the "cowardly" advice 
that Canadians first learn what 
there is to fight for— if indeed 
there is anything to fight about 
aside from the re-drawing of a 
map of Europe that was mis- 
drawn by us 20 years ago. 

These childish wavers of flags 
and igniters of loud-sounding 
firecrackers who demand that 
Canadians show the world where 
she stands, might suddenly be- 
t'i'nie silent if they could realize 
that Canada should stand for 
justice and for the application of 
Christian principles. 

There is a higher judgment 
than our own . . . and the ten 
million who died in the last war 
should be able to remind us of 
it. 



POLICE FOR KING 

Among the responsibilities of 
county council are those of dir- 
ecting in a broad way the activi- 
ties of county police. In the 
township of King this responsi- 
bility wotdd appear to have been 
ignored completely. - 

King township residents ore 
suffering from lack of police pro- 
tection. 

The King council, earlier this 
year, received an intimation from 
a King City bank to the effect 
that if better police protection 
were not provided, the bonk 
would find it necessary to re- 
move its branch in King City. 

Hold-up men had visited the 
bank just once too often. 

Last week the erime wavelet 
lapped at the doors of a Noble- 
ton business man. Burglars at- 
tempted the breaking in of a 
garage, were frightened away, 
and the township constable 
promptly notified. 

The criminals got clean away. 

"I was out and ready for them 
a few minutes after I was call- 
ed," the constable is reported ns 
saying. "They took the new 
highway and gave me the slip." 

One constable, evidently, could 
not be on two highways at once, 

"My place has been broken 
into about six times in the past 
ten years," was the victim's con- 
tribution to the affair. 

"King township pays a share 
of the cost of county police," 
Thomas McMurchy, reeve of 
King township, told council on 
Saturday. 

It would be interesting to hear 
what county council has to say 



KING TOWNSHIP 

COUNCIL DISCUSSES 
TELEPHONE BYLAW 

Harold McClelland, district 
manager of the Bell Telephone 
Company, asked King council on 
Saturday for approval of a by- 
law governing erection of tele- 
phone lines along the township 
highways. Construction would 
be carried on only with consent 
of the council and under super- 
vision of their road superintend- 
ent, Mr. McClelland assured the 

council. 

"Thus thing has been up before 
council dozens of times in my 16 
years experience," Councillor E. 
M. Legge declared. "We have 
never passed it. 

"We s?et along excellently with 
the Bell Telephone Company and 
hope to continue to do so, but 1 
can't see why they should trv to 
bring in this by-law." 

Mr. Legge expressed himself as 
being willing to co-operate with 
the phone company, but unwill- 
ing to put the council on record 
with a by-law written by the 
company. 

Accounts Paid - 

The following accounts were 
passed: Nobleton community 
hall, rent for meeting (March), 
$5; Canadian Bank of Commerce, 
commission tax collections, 
$20.20; Clarence Boyd, shovelling 
snow, P.V.S- $2.50: C. Fell, re- 
pairs to fire truck. P.V.S., $17.20; 
Btirnel Graham, lumber, P.V.S., 
$3.15: House of Providence, $11. 

Newmarket Era, private bill, 
513 50: Canadian Institute for' the 
Blind, $20; North York Registry 
Office, searches re marsh, $12.50; 
Dr. Kay. S8.75; H. G. Rose, reg- 
istered letters (stamps), $25.27; 
Frank Armstrong, meals, indi- 
gents. $1 ; Woodbridge and 
Vau«han telephone, ro clerk's 
phone, $7.00; Mrs. Robert Weir, 
indigent meals. 75 cents; Gus. 
Farquhnr, constable account, $15; 
Maurice Havward, constable ac- 
count, $14.70. 

S. Jo?celvn, stationery re 
marsh. $24.85: Thus. MacMurchy, 



telephone calls, $3.65; McDonald 
& Wells, $1.41; W. S. Hare, 53 
cents, O. Emerson, $1,53. 

Relief account, $617.81; relief 
voucher. No. 2, $216.03; road 
voucher, No. 6, $618.98; road 
voucher, No. 7, $266.81; road 
voucher No. 5, $321.78. 

COUNCIL SEEKS 10 

CONVERT DEBENTURES 

On a motion sponsored by 
Councillors E. M. Legge and 
Burnel Graham, King township 
council instructed their reeve, 
Thomas MacMurchy, to confer 
with the solicitor to learn the 
necessary steps to be taken to 
effect a conversion of debentures 
of the municipality. 

The township has several 

issues of debentures falling due 
in the future, and at rates of in- 
terest averaging six per cent. 

It is felt that with the lower 
money values now prevailing it 
would be a good time to convert 
the debentures. 



COUNCIL GETS THREE 

TENDERS; SAME AMOUNT 

Three tenders for public liabil- 
ity insurance on township roads. 
sidewalks and property were re- 
ceived by King township coun- 
cil in Nobleton on Saturday. All 
were for the same amount. 
$342.14. and though they came 
originally from the same com- 
pany, were presented by three 
different agents. 

On a unanimous vote of the 
council, it was decided to place 
the insurance through Gladstone 
Lloyd. Schomberg. 



THE OTHER 810E 

Just to get another view of the 
picture, wo trotted round to see 
J, A. Knowtes, reeve of Aurora. 
He pointed out that King town- 
ship did not have an active, full- 
time constable of Its own. 

Instead, King township has a 
constable "on call." That is, if 
you are robbed, you can call the 
constable and ho will investigate, 
and If possible, arrest the rob- 
bers, after the event. But no 
matter how much he may inves- 
tigate, he cannot offer protection 
to King City, Nobleton and 
Schomberg, to say nothing of 
other points. 

At the best, he can only be 
efficient after the dcod, not be- 
fore it or at the timo an offense 
Is committed. 

So if King is unprotected, then, 
according to Reeve KnowleV 
point of view, It is largely be- 



TAX COLLECTION 

DATE EXTENDED 

The time for the collection or 
1938 taxes by Charles H. Ross 
will be extended to April 30. 
following a resolution passed by- 
King township council on Satur- 
day. 



WILL SEEK PAYMENT 

Members of King township 
council will meet representatives 
of Mary Lake farm to enquire 
into the possibility of some 
arrangement for payment of 
taxes. 




arrive alive and 

on livisn 



i 



£ • 



Out of mi Mray Chlelts he Imimht last 
M'rinic. Jamt'K Russell, Charing CvOaO, 
Out., lost only two. lly the first of August 
(6 months) bin S3 pulteta wow luylng up to 

i\j eggs n d*>. 

Illgh HvnMlfly . . . high full prottucHou 
. ■ . these *\H'\\ profits. Every chick you 
loso CUTS INTO profit* l*luy ftafe. n* Mr. 
Russell iiM. Order RRAY Chtckfi thl* ywir. 

BRAY HATCHERY 



Xewmnrket 
Vhoue 4;»0 



or 



John Street N. 
Hamilton, On L 





* i 






M 



32 - PIECE 



I 





TO PERSON GUESSING NEAREST TO NUMBER ON 
BOTTOM OF SEAIED PLATE IN OUR WINDOW. ONE 

GUESS WITH A $2.00 OR OVER PURCHASE OF 

WALLPAPER. 



v 



" 



■ i 





t - 





tl 



"S-IJ 



•Ml 



1 



YORK 



lOW ROUND 

TRIP PARI 

by MOTOR COACH 



OO 



$19.00 



tQUAMY AtfUACTIVI TOWM 

■OITON • WA$H!NS!PM * ATLANTIC CITY 

Ticket* and rnfonnmUon at 

KINO OEORflK HOTEL — PHONE 300 



GRAY COACH LINES 






It i 



I ■ 



■ 



\ . 



■ ' 



* 



THE WEWMARKET ERA, THURSDAY, MARCH 30TH, 1939 



SEVEN 



BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL 



7* 



LEGAL 



■ 



fc 






MATHEWS, LYONS ft 
VALE 

Banisters, Solicitors, 
Notaries 

Solicitors for 
Towntof Newmarket 

Township of East 

Gwillimbnry 

Bank of Toronto 

Office— 100 Main Stv 

N. L. MATHEWS, KX. 

B. E. .aVS$>NS» BJk* 

^ JOSEPH VAUfc 

Ffaone 120 



Barrister, SolfcltoF, Ktc 
Notary Public, Slc_ 

;.. Bank or Toronto Building 

Newmarket 



M — 



MtLlMH ,»WttTM rSQ 

Oarrtstce, Solicitor so* 
ftrtaVy Public. Etc 

ARMSTRONG BLOCK 



■ » 



a. m, »tua 

% Solicitor tn* 
Publto 

IMPERIAL BANK BUILDING 

W*wm**fc*t 



i 



WILSON A WADE 



Bf Barristers, SottcJtor* 

Motorics 



l: 



ABDILL BLOCK, PHONE 15 

AURORA 

j A. J. C. ICllson, MA 

D. E. Wade, H.A. 



DENTAL 



ORJ BARTHOLOMEW 

Dentist 

■ 

Over Patterson's Orug Store 
X-ftays 

Phoaes; Office 255; lies. »50 
Evening by Appointment, 



OR. ». L. HEWITT 
Dentist 



■cCautay atocli, Opp. Post Of- 
fice. If tnlng tap Appointment. 

PHONE 209-W. 
In M%. AlbtH E*«rjf Tuseds* 



L 



MEDICAL 



OR. 8. J. BOYD, MM. 

Gwiuate In Medicine at To- 
ronto University; also Llceatl- 
tte or the ftojnl College of 
Physicians an*l member of Uie 
Royal College of Surgeons of 
England. Former clinical as- 
sistant In MoorcfleM's Eye, 
Bar, Nose and Throat Hospital. 
London, England. 

Eye* tested. Glasses Supplied 

25 Main St Telephone 110. 



- i 



OR. J. H. WESLEY 
65 MAIN-ST.,N8\VMAIlKKT 

Phone 13 
IIOUHS iO-1'2, t-8. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



A. STOUFFER 

19 fttftlen *L 

Teacher of Piano, Singing and 

Violin 
Dealer In Wewnnd Used Pianos 
PUno* Healed. Pianos Tuned 



FURNACE WORK 



EAVETROUGHIHG 



ZEPHYR 

ZEPHYR COUFLE MARK 
SILVER ANNIVERSARY 



OUR SPECIALTIES 



See the- Bathroom 
OUTFITS AT THE SHOP 



R, Osborne & Son 

THE LEADING TINSMITHS 

Imperial Bank Building 



STEWART BEARE 
RADIO SERVICE 

New and Used Radios, 

Radio Parts, Tubes, 

Batteries, Etc. 



113 Main St 



Phone 355 



COAL - COKE 
WOOD 

GENERAL CARTAGE 



Phone 68 



1» Botsford SL, Newmarket 



On Saturday, March 25, Mr. 
and Mrs. Horace Kester of 
Zephyr celebrated their silver 
wedding. During the evening 
about 50 friends gathered to ex- 
tend congratulations. After an 
enjoyable social evening spent in 
games, etc lunch was served. 

On behalf of the gathering. 
Rev. Geol Murray extended j 
hearty congratulations and aj 
happy evening was brought to a ' 
close by singing "Auld Lang 
Syne." 

•"The cross of Christ in a mod- 
ern world/' was the topic of the 
sermon at Zephyr United church 
last Sunday. Paul's declaration 
that the cross of Christ is the 
power of God unto all who be- 
lieve was made in times some- 
what similar to these. Rev. 
George Murray said. 

•"He had seen the very power 
of darkness manifest in the op- 
pressions imposed on people and 
nations," he said, "The vices of 
barbarism, the evils of a then 
modern civilization were some- 
what similar to what we see to- 
day. If the world is to be saved 




I lay in bed with the flu, ap- j 
praising three newscasts which I j 
tuned in each evening. The first 
newscast informed me that Ger- 
many wanted to establish an 
aircraft base on Iceland, strategic 
territory in relation to both 
Britain and America. The sec- 
ond commentator gave much 
more prominence to the matter; 
his paper had rushed calls to this 
authority and that and now pre- 
sented opinions on the import- 



case. 

Seldes points out a clause ui 
the contract of patent medicine 
companies with newspapers 
which caused the contract to be 
ended in the event of legislation 
in the state restricting the sale of 
patent medicines. With a large 
income for advertising threaten- 
ed the papers would do their 
best to hold up Pure Food and 
Drug regulations. Seldes was 
sent to Germany to report fail- 



ance of Iceland as a possible j ures in public ownership; when 



military base. The third re- 
porter, speaking from a United 
States city, did not seem to have 

heard of the Iceland incident 
The three newscasts presented 
j interesting comparisons. After 
three or four days in bed I would 
listen to the first one and then 
speculate about how the other 
two would treat the headlines. 
Even in a time of international 
crisis the news was highly col- 



of paganism. She suffered by 
her own wickedness, which was 
turned in upon herself. 

"The arch enemy of Christian- 
ity destroyed itself by what it 
called power. The mills of God 
grind slowly but surely — ' this is 



* — — . . 



STOCKS 

BONDS & 
G RA I N 

Quotations gladly given. 

ticker ^Teletype 

SERVICE 



y 



F.Eugene Doyle 

Imperial Bank Bldg. 

Ph. 231 Newmarket 



ored by the viewpoint of the or- 

"."il ^i""i. ,, '!r "l "" "Ztei^jl ganization which presented it. 
it must be by the power of God, ; M t f our , § u 

says Paul. The then great? that the vngs ^SlUa tells them' 
Roman empire under Caesar ex- beU ma5l of u without 

p.red under the despairing cry qucstion A few assame a cyni . 

cal attitude and refuse to believe 
anything. But it seems almost 
impossible to know what one 
may believe. The large news- 
papers have reached such great 
proportions in terras of business I 

... . . , , , that they are thoroughly involv- 

what some dictators evidently ed with \ he uene ficiaries of our 
forget today But if the world m tem who esert toW 

is going to be saved from the | inf luenc i 

destroying forces of darkness if | The £ newspapers have 
our civilization is going to be | their lists * { .. sacre d cot*." per- 
saved from a great catastrophe. , sons who for business „ * d £ lo . 
there .s only one power ca a_ d o , t - 3nj %Q be Ucd 

it-it u ,fhe power of God which , as f jb , e d 

,s found in the gospel of Christ , ncver criticize 7; ven by the pub . 
-the teaching of Chnsts ser- ,. f * ^ 



•the teachings of Christ's 
mon on the Mount" 

The buzz of the woodcutters 
is heard all around. 

Snow and ice are disappearing 
gradually, so there is no fear of; 
flood around here. 

There are 



There is another list of people, 
known by a much less attractive 
title, who are lo be criticized but 
never, never praised. In his book 
s on "Freedom of the Press, 



»T 



*.. ' . r |George Seldes tells of how one 

ft,, ,.,„.«: .r'vriw «E?2f m Unitcd statcs magnate pushed a 
flu cases. If. Keller has an at- j , aw th h the s e tate li:eis , alure 



i tack of pneumonia, with a nurse , , . \ x , 

in attendance. Friends hope he \ wh,ch wou,d 
will soon be around again. j 

William Pickering has return- \ 
fid home from the hospital after 
having had an operation for ap- 
pendicitis. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Armstrong \ 
were in the city last Friday and 
in Uxbridgc on Saturday. 

Mrs. Geo. Burnham of Mount 
Albert spent a couple of days last 
week with her daughter. Mrs. A. 



ensure his success 
in divorcing his wife. But the 
papers of the state dared not 
even give publicity to the court 



he reported successes his articles 

were not printed. There are 
cases on record where utility 
companies paid university pro- 
fessors to prepare damaging re- 
ports about Ontario's hydro sys- 
tem to'offset the invasion of the 
utility field by public ownership. 

In this country newspapers 
have carried whole pages of ad- 
vertising attacking the Canadian 
National Railways. No informa- 
tion as to who sponsored the 
material was offered, the most 
recent attack on public owner- 
ship is directed against the Can- 
adian Broadcasting Corporation. 
As a fitting reply to the charges 
against the corporation I have at 
hand a copy of the speech by 
Leonard W. Brockington, K.C., 
chairman of the board of gover- 
nors, delivered before the House 
of Commons Radio Committee. 
One statement deserves particu- 
lar attention: 

"We are opposed also, and 
shall always be opposed to any 
attempt to buy the right on our 
network for the advancement of 
personal opinion or propaganda. 
If opinion sufficiently informed 
on the lips of an attractive 
speaker is available, it will be 
offered by the CBC without re- 
muneration as a contribution to 
national enlightenment and pro- 
vocative discussion. The free 
interchange of opinion is one of 
the safeguards of our democracy, 
and we believe we should be 
false to our trust as custodians 
of part of the public domain if 
we did not resist external con- 
trol and any attempt to place a 
free air under the domination of 
the power of wealth. 




Maple Hill 



The calendars say it's spring, 
but it certainly didn't look like 
it at Maple Hill on Sunday, with 
snow eight feet deep and the 
road dug .out like a tunnel. Cars 
couldn't meet on the hill and 
some had to go to the school 
corner to park their cars, but 
the attendance was very good 
despite the bad roads. 

Pastor James Taylor delivered 
a powerful message on the cru- 
cifixion of Christ, and the dying 
thief. 

Prayer meeting will be held 
Friday evening at Fred Knight's 
home. 

Messrs. Bruce and Malcolm 
Love spent the weekend at their 
home. 

Mrs. Carl Graham is improving 
nicely after her operation for 
appendicitis in York county hos- 
pital. 



Wasted Effort 



(4 



'Ah " sighed the serious-faced 
passenger, "how little we know 
of the future and what it has in 
store for us." 

"That's true," responded the 
other. 

"Little did I think when some 
30 years ago I carved my initials 
on the desk in the old country 
school that I would some day 
grow up and fail to become fam- 



HORSES 

MARKET PRICES PAID FOR WORN-OUT 
LIVE HORSES - DELIVERED OUR PLANT. 
DEAD HORSES AND CATTLE PICKED UP 

FREE OF CHARGE. 

GORDON YOUNG LIMITED 

166 KEATING STREET. TORONTO 

PHONE ADELAIDE 3636 



Cedar Valley 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Widdificld 

and Ruth Mary spent the week- 



end at Ravcnshoe. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Breen are 
preparing to move to Mr. Wesley 
Lundy's Fnrm on the fourth con- 
cession. 




ous. 



>> 



jp^JMurphy Points 

v*m wnarvo ; 

/V : *v& W| " m * fc * four hgai« ■ 

KINO! 



IT 



roast beef. 

Do 1 hear somebody laugh and 
say, **Yes, and spring house- 
cleaning," (in big capital let- 
ters!) But spring cleaning isn't 
i the bogey it used to be when the 



* - 



SALES AND 8ERVICE 

REPAIRS, TUBES 

Reasonable 

WORK GUARANTEED 

BYRON KING 

Keswick 
Phone Roche's Point 95r22 

Or Call Culverwell Hard- 
ware, Sutton 20. 



h 



DR. G. A. C. 6UNT0N 

DENTIST 

£uccc*40> to Or. Ilutler 

Aurora Telephone I0Q 

Schomhe rg . . . Telephone 10 

IWHun Telephone SO 

Appointments may bo hiado 

dally by trailing the n«r*e In 

rli:iJK*' of rach respective 

office. 



Arnold. 

The W.M.S. of the United 
church will be held at the home 
of Mrs. E. Profit on Wednesday, 
April 5. All will be made wel- 
come. 

The hockey boys are having 
another dance next Wednesday 
evening, April 5. A good time 
is promised. 



SPRING 



By GQUmX GLOW 



We can't let this glad season 
pass by without a few special 
words to mark it, and we have 
spring now, for the robins are 
back! They returned on Friday, 
March 24- Everybody, more or 
less, saw them, and I was called 
up several times by different 
friends to make sure I'd seen 
them too. I had! I saw my first 
one down by the Anglican 
church, and my second at Miss 
Hartry's, and my third at Mrs. 
Bacque's, so I was convinced that notise-cloancti. 
the main body had arrived, not K°<>" f,!d "«» 



menfolk in the family had to 
beat carpets hanging over the 
clothesline, get. down on their 
marrow-bones to stretch those 
fame carpels back into place and 
tack them down. Tug and lug 
(such expressive words) to get 
the mattress off every bed out in 
the sunshine, turn them several 
times and make sure they were 
thoroughly aired before hauling 
them back upstairs. How the 
menfolk loved white-washing the 
cellar and basement with the 
white-wash running up their 
I arms and dripping off their 
I elbows! How ihey loved taking 
off storm-sash and going up a 




MACNAB HARDWARE 

PHONE 28 newmark; 



MEETING FOR ORGANIZING OF 

LEADERSHIP 
LEAGUE 



IN THE 



Town Hall, Newmarket 



ON 



MON., APRIL 3 



AT 8.15 P. M. SHARP 



SPEAKERt- 



COLLINGWOQD READE 

OF THE GLOBE « MAIL AND CFRB 

OPEN MEETING FOR ALL -- MEN AND 

WOMEN 

ALL MEMIC8S, SYMPATHIZERS, FRIENDS AND ESPECIALLY SCEPTICS ARE 

URGED TO IE PRESENT 

LET US OPEN OUR EYES TO OUR 

PROBLEMS 

■ m ■ r 

PROVISIONAL COMMITTEE 



!. 



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i 



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ft 



,\t - ".v^'n **JS&i£§K 



ra 



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5«n. She is able to he up again. 

Mr. G. McCormick from Tor- 
onto was a guest at Mr. Los 
Jones' over the weekend. 

A quiet wedding took place on 
Saturday, March 2G, wlien Miss 
Myrtle Crouch became the bride 
of Mr. James Crowdcr. Rev. 
Mr. Slingcrlnnd from Holt offi- 
ciated at the ceremony. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. King moved 
into the old station building last 
week. 

Mr. Ross Mitchell of Newmar- 
ket was a guest at Mr. Roy i 
Crouch's over the weekend. 



n ^ v j*T^ 



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**-*£ 



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: * 



Bloomington 



Mr. E. A. Storry and Ruth 
spent Wednesday last in Toronto. 

Mr. Clifford Lemon is quite 

ill with pneumonia. His many 

high ladder to clean the outside j friends wish him a speedy rc- 

of the windows. cuvery. 

There! I'd better not stir up Mr. Thos. Wright visited his 
such unpleasant recollections of brother at Newmarket on Sun- 
days (happily) long past, when day. 

mtn used to have to eat their The hydro has recently been 

dinner out in the backyard off installed at Clifford Lemon's 



Choose the Car the Public is Buying! 

* 

Tafce a Tip frta otter mttrists . • . 0m • CtevraM aai lit mm far k» 






Isk! Isk! 

Girl Customer: "Does this lip- 
stick come off easily?" 

Cosmetics Clerk: "Not if you 
put up a fight! 



i«» 



The Realist 

,4 lf someone left you a million 
dollars, what would you do?** 

"Hire six good lawyers and 
try to get it." 



r 



J, h, R. BEIX 

Insurance 



/":- 



Fire, Casualty, Automobile, 

Burglary, Plato Glass, 

Wind, Public Liability. 



Phone 358 4 Botsford St. 

iL ^=- 



li fcNER AL MAINTENANCE 

REPAIRING 

Masonry A Specially 

STANLEY I*. STEPHENS 

Phone 55? 23 Niagara St 




AtfttU-aMof »reftht CaOnCfatf wrt$ 
Biy U «**4 1/ NERVES 1-pUttd 
it (he spina by a iuU<iUt*4 \tt\t Ui: 

AM 

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Chiropractic 

nun <SW.VAl» 

ps? Adjustments 

tSs win 

ISSi Remove the 
'&SSI& Cause of 

»Ut> OmUNS 
TrtCri*A*0L*O» 



GOWLAND 



D 
I 

S 
E 
A 
S 
E 



CHIROPRACTOR AND 
DRUGLES5 THERAPIST 

PHONE ISO NEWMARKCT 

EVHY DAY M WiDMESOAY 



V. N. SMITH 

Licensed Auctioneer 

County of York 

AU sales promptly attended 

to, at moderate charges. 
Phone 187J Newmarket 



Kidney Acids 
Rob Your Rest 

M*ny pfople nctcr iccm lo ict a good 
n!|tiT»rrit. They turn and loit lie awake 
and counl *Wp. Often Ihey Mams il on 
"ttttfn" *|ifn il may he ilielr MJneyi. 
Htallliy LMneyi filEir poitdnt front lit* 
MeoiJ. If (hey are faulty anil hit, poiiana 
ttay in Ilia t j item and lleepteainetB, f :vail- 
if fir, hicVadta often folU*. If jtu ibn't 
ileep veil, Uf DodiTa Kidney pills -for 
hall a (future the favorite remedy, jgj 

DoddsKidneyPiEb 



just a few •'scouts," forming a 
vanguard . 

Later in the day. another 
friend called up to ask had I seen 
the Grosbeaks, that there had 
been quite a number along Bots- 
ford St. They are often mistaken 
for robins, and their song cer- 
tainly resembles the carolling of 
the robin. The crows too are 
hack, indeed have been for sev- 
eral weeks. Here's a little bit of 
verse I clipped- out of the daily 
paper las? week, taken from the 
New York Times, by Reginald M. 
Cleveland: 
A new note marks the cawing of 

the crows 
That call across the fields at 

break of day. 
Even the raucous crying of the 

jay 
Yields now to liquid music that 

he known. 
'Mid swelling twigs there comes 

a flash of wing, 
And shrill, sweet piping .sound. 

A restless cloud. 
The warblers, northward hound, 

proclaim aloud 
Their mission as the harbingers 

of spring. 
The jtm<riT of quickening earth 

is in the nir 
The spirit wakens from its win- 
ter's sleep 
To slough Us sadness. There's a 

tryst to keep 
With life again, with blossoms in 

her hair! 
I think the little sonnet de- 
scribes what we all feel: the re- 
turn of the birds, the pushing up 
from the cold earth of the early 
spring bulbs, the sap dripping 
from, a cut place on the maple 
trees, yes and our little friends, 
the black squirrels; enjoying a 
drink of it, the buds and bloss- 
oms on our house plants, the 
seed catalogues getting marked 
attention, the florist's windows 
gay with spring flowers, pars- 
nips on the market that were 
left In the ground over" winter, 
and horse nullah to go with your 



the top of the apple barrel, sit- 
ting on the doorstep, and try to 
get to sleep in a room that had 
been all changed around "so 
folks will know it has been 

Oh dear! The 
good old days, eh? I fancy it 
was the had old days! Spring 
cleaning was the annual night- 
mare, signifying a complete up- 
heaval of everything in the 
house. Now we have more time 
to enjoy spring— our modern 
conveniences, and our more sani- 
tarily built homes with modern 
plumbing and hardwood floors, 
hot water or steam heating and 
vacuum cleaners. 

Bui here is one thing I really 
can't see any reason for, and that 
is why "Hot Cross Buns,'* always 
connected with the tragedy of 
CJood Friday, should lie adver- 
tised and sold weeks ahead. It 
must be the same reason that 
?ome people ncver can wail until 
Raster Sunday to wear their new 
spring bonnet! In the old days 
Easter was always marked, 
wherever possible, health and 
weather permitting, by church- 
goers, at any rate, trying to have 
something new to mark the occa- 
sion, signifying the casting off of 
the old nnd assuming the new 
life, the risen life of Easter, ft 
Is really loo bad to get away 
from all the old customs and 
traditions! ! suppose from now 
on Easter chocolate eggs will be 
the added attraction in the candy 
shops; and they will certainly 
moke small 'folks glad. Easier 
bunnies, Enster chickens, ns well 
as Enster eggs. Pussy willows 
are budding, the early bulbs are 



home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Smith 
visited in Brampton on Sunday. 

E. A. Storry had the misfor- 
tune to lose a splendid cow last 
week. 

Victoria Square 

Quite a number of the Junior 
Farmers took part in the York 
county seed show at Sutton 
West last week nnd for the third 
consecutive year were successful 
in winning the trophy for the 
highest number of points, as 
well as a number of cash awards. 

The Y.IMI. on Sunday even- 
ing was in charge of the Chris- 
tian culture convenor, Mabel 
Caseley. The meeting was most 
interesting but the attendance 
was small, owing to another very 
disagreeable Sunday. Mrs. Har- 
vey Collard told of some of the 
interesting nnd thrilling exper- 
iences of Marie Munston, Nor- 
wegian missionary in China. 
Carol Sanderson gave a reading 
and Earl and Bruce Empringham 

The Junior Farmers and Insti- 
tute will hold their nnnunl 
banquet next week. Supper will 
he served by the Institute mem- 
ber?, followed by an interesting 

program. 

The many friends of Mr. L. I*. 
Nicholls are very pleased to see 
him about again after his serious 

illness. 

Congratulations are extended 
to Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Stcckley 
upon the arrival of n linby hoy. 

Elmer Muggins has secured a 



CASTCST-SEUINO CAR on !h» con- 
■ tinent— that's who* th* records ate 
telling about lh« new Chtvrolttl 
Why? Just see and drive the car and 
it will tell you Hs own story— a story' 
of higher quality at greatly reduced 
prices— of styte* feature^ perform- 
ance and savings that add up to more 

for less money! That's why mora 



— ▼*»■* - 1 



J? 

people on your street, in your town 
and everywhere, are buying more 
and more Chevrolet's than any other 
car. Take thetr tip ;;; compare styling, 
values, performance, comfort, fea- 
tures and economy— «ndyou,too,wll I 
decide "CHfVKHirS THE CHOICM?! 
Low monthly payments on the 
General Motors Instalment Plan. 

!tf«if<4f<tf-C4rw*i Jf«W<' .. W *T C<mc* mltk t/Mju^mm 



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FAMOUS VALVMN-HIAD SIX INOINE 

Only Chevrolet hrttisn you a 
Ynlve-Iit'ltpjut Six Engine at 
such low prlcfx. Greater 



>^r 



I It i position with Nelson Boynlan 
shoving up well in our flower w j lerc j m will spend the summer 



borders— oh for 

spring is here! 



sure, at last, 



NEW STEERING COLUMN GEAR- 
SHIFT with "VACUUM ASSIST" 

You jiiHt giitilo It with your fingertip*, nnit a 
"vnciuim assist" device Minpllw 80% of itio 

tidftlntf effort! Cluivrolel's fllecrlntf column 
fienrxttUt U a Minnie, positive, mrclmnli'ul 
hook-up. It gives n neater, roomier front 
t-ompiirtineut, duo lo thti ellmlnntfon of tlio 
conventional genr lever. It mnkftt tlio cur 
ilrlve like u el renin. (Avullitbto on nil 
moiIeU nt only $l't extra.) 



(Kiwtr, greater nll-roinnl per- 
ornmucc — nt lawcat cosi for 
K*ns, oil nml upkeep— •with ile- 

|iemlnl)I]Ily mill limn life. 



iL 



/CHEVROLET 



So»* 



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'-^jSSfe 



tnt 1 *? 



m 

Brownhili 

Spring seems to he here *ut 
last. It is nice to hear the crow 
calling and everyone Is on tin? 
lookout for Mr. Ilobln. 

Mrs". Miles Sedore is very sleK 
nnd friends hope she will soon 
lie licit tor. 

Mrs; Lawrence Green 'of Mount 
Albert ' has . been homo ■ taking 
care of her mother. Mrs. 1*. Nel- 



months. 

Fred I-e Heck, who held the 
office of vice-president «i Uw 
njiriculturul short course hold at 
Victoria Square in January, has 
secured a position at Don Aldn 
Farms. Friends wish Fred every 
success in his work there. 

Sij-htscelns Mnde Kesy 
•ilow did you mnnaue lo see 
Home in three days?" 

"Oh, we managed very well— 
my wife did the churches nnd 
the shops, my daughter, did the 
ivuseums, nnd. I did the Inns." 






nmm (qumumoion) hynauiic mm 

Mnximiini cinelency with mini* 
mum pedal )iro.stuiro; longer 
Itruko life. Donlilo protection 
added l»y thfl umlfr-cowl Kmer- 
geney ltruko I.vver, wldeli oih 
c rales on both rent wheel lirnko 
e!«oe«. r^^| 



ADVANCED KNE&AaiON RIDINO SYSTEM 

(OnMaatar DatuKaM«SalOFrIe||onleMH Coll fiprtilRS . . » 

pnrnllel-cylinder tyv* Ihuihlc- 
AeUiiR Khock AtiRnrbers 
tfnml nnd rear) , , . Hide 
KlnMliier , , , nml Improved 



Hhoekproof l>unl 
Kteerhiir. 



tiruHn 



G7» 



NESB.ITT MOTOR SALES 

PHONE 197 NEWMARKET 



■* - 



BUY FROM A BUSINESS LEADER... YOUR CHEVROLET DEALER 









- 



■_ , - ■_- 









-■■.^-. 



T^, 



. I 



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«: :*<'& : v + f, : ^v\*^X- 



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"■ . /■■ ' '■'/S^\ 



■HHffT 



THE 



EWMIRKET ERA, THURSDAY 



ARCH 30TH, 1 939 



■ Mount Albert 



* 



Mr. G. Buie, game warden of 
Sirhcce county, was in town one 



day last week and called on i evening under the auspices of the 
friends, Mr. and Mrs. William j Young [Men's Bible class ; of Jhe 
Carruthers. 



The play, "Sis Perkins," put on 
in the town hall on Friday 



CHMSTADELPHIANS 

EARTH'S TBOUBMS — AND THEIR SURE REMEDIES 

OPPRESSION"—^ "He shall break in piece* the oppressor.** 
F«a. 72:4; Zech. 9:8; Isa. «:4. POVERTY-"!** ^ <^f™* 
ST needy" P**. 72:12; 132:15; Micafc 4.4. KEMGIOU5 
DIVISION— The EentUt* shall say our fathers have inherited 
IW vanltj.** Jer. 16:13; Zech. 13;S. WAR— "Neither shall they 
Sn war anv more.** I*a. 2:4; Psa. 46:9; 68:3a DISEASE- 
The Inhabitant shall not say I am sick." Isa. 33:24; Psa. 103:6. 
Christ shaH apply these remedies. Isa. 9:7; Acts 3:20* 
■ Howard Toole, Mount Albert, Secretary 



Jesus 



PRE - EASTER SHOWING 




L 



SEE OUR STOCK OF DRESSES, COATS AND MILLINERY 
BEFORE YOU BUY YOUR EASTER OUTFIT. 

F. N. Chandler 



MAIN STREET 



NEWMARKET 



KM 





SPRING SMILING 




A BIG SMILE OF SATISFAC- 
TION IS YOURS WHEN YOU 
ORDER MADE TO MEASURE; 





IN ALL POPULAR, STYLISH 
COLORS AND PATTERNSI 



WE ALSO HAVE ON HAND 

A URGE SELECTION OF 

BOYS' SUITS. COME IN 

AND TAKE A LOOK! 



LINDENBAUM OUTFITTERS 



NEWMARKET 



HANOVER 




United church Sunday-school 
was a real success, the hall being 
filled to capacity. 

The story was of a family who 
had become financially embar- 
rassed, and wanting to keep in 
society, the mother decided to 
marry her son and daughter to 
someone with money and got 
into a!! sorts of difficulties try- 
ing to do this. The characters 
were well chosen and parts well 
taken. 

It will be repeated again a 
little later on and those who 
missed seeing it will have an- 
other opportunity. 

Mrs. David Harwood has been 
in Welland owing to the death 
of her mother, Mrs- Porter, of 
that town. 

Mrs. Jas. Vincent is quite ill at 
her home in town. 

Mr. Howard Couch is moving 
to Mr. J. Meyers' farm on the 

second concession of Scott and 
Mr. Murray Stokes of Sutton is 

moving to the farm vacated by 
Mr. Couch. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Rogers of 
Glenville are moving in with 
Mrs. Rogers' brother, Mr. Frank 
Brooks. 

Mr. Walter Case underwent an 
operation in the General Hospi- 
tal, Toronto, on Friday last, and 
is doing nicely. 

Mrs. E. Wagg has been con- 
fined to bed for the last few 
weeks. Friends hope she may 
soon be able to be up and around 
again. 

There have been so many 
stormy Sundays Jately and last 
Sunday in place of a snow- 
storm it was rain and a thunder 
storm. The snow is going away 
nicely and the roads should soon 
be good again. 

Mrs. Robt. Thu-sk of Toronto 

spent the weekend in town visiting 
old friends. 

The play, "Sis Perkins," recently 
put on in the town hall under the 
Young Men's Bible class, will be 
given again on Wednesday evening, 
April 5, so those who did not hear 
it will please note the date. 

The monthly meeting of the 
Horticultural society wilt be held' 
in the board-room on Tuesday 
evening, April 4, at S o'clock. 
Everyone interested in beautifying 
the village should join this organiz- 
ation now and send in their options 
and come to the meetings. 

The March meeting of the Wo- 
men's Association was held on 
Monday evening last at the home 
of Mrs. Robertson. The ladies 
have planned a tea at the church 
for April 12, when the stewards are 
to put on a program. 



speaker, Mrs. O. M. Beattte; j were in town over last weekend. 
travel talk, Mrs. Mie Sedore; j Mr. Byron Kay, who has been 
paper on historical research, \ moved from the. Canadian Bank 
Mrs. Carl Morton;, hostesses, \ of Commerce in Bradford, to the 
Mrs. Mie Sedore, Mrs. Wm. j branch in Midland, called at his 

home here one day this week. 
Miss Eva Taylor of Toronto 

spent the weekend with her 

father, Mr. J. A. Taylor. 

Miss Ann McDonald visited her 

aunt, Mrs. J. Frost, over the 

weekend. 

ALEX. BELU61N 

ENTERTAINS BOYS 



Thompson, Mrs. H. Huntley. 

HOLT 

HOLT CHURCH HOLDS 
REVIVAL MEETINGS 



Revival meetings are being 
held in the Free Methodist 
church here. From April 4 to 9, 
Rev. J. F. Gregory, D.E., will be 
the special speaker. Quarterly 

services will be held here from 
April 7 to 9. A cordial invitation 

is extended to all to attend these 
services. 

Miss Muriel Rutiedge, R.N., ] 
has returned to Weston after \ 
spending a 



The Davis Leather mercantile 
hockey team, the executive of 
the Davis Leather hockey club 
and the members of the Davis 
Leather band, and the executive 



of the Newmarket mercantile 

few days with her i hockey league were the guests 

parents. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin j of tne president of the Davis 



inimiinHifmiiminiunmuiiiim™ 

WAR DECLARED! 



ON SUIT PRICES 

FRIDAY, MARCH 31 AND SATURDAY, APRIL 1 

2 BIG DAYS 2 

■ 

Made - to - Measure Suits 

HUNDREDS OF SAMPLED TO CHOOSE FROM ' 

With 2 Pair Pants at 27* 50 






& up 



Rutledge. 

Friends of Mrs. Bert Adams 
are sorry to* hear she is seriously 
ill with pneumonia. A speedy 
recovery is hoped for. 

A number from Holt attended 
the funeral of the late Mrs. Jos. 
Coates, Sr., on Sunday afternoon. 
Sympathy is extended to the 
family. 

Mr. O. J. Wilder of Beaverton 
spent a few days this week with 
his sister, Mrs. R. N. Hoover. 

Miss Gertrude Pegg visited 
Mrs. Walter Couch on Friday 
last 

Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Smith of 
Hartman spent Sunday with Mrs. 
Smith's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Thos. Rye. 

Miss Geneva Babcook of New- 
market spent the weekend with 
Miss Marion Gibney. 

A number from the community 
attended the play given in the 
hall at Mount Albert last Friday 
evening. It will be given again 
soon in Mount Albert. 

Miss M. Forsyth and Miss 
Beatrice Gibney had dinner with 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Watts on 
Tuesday evening. 



WILLOW BEACH 

IS STRICKEN WHILE 
FISHING ON SIMCOE 



William Thompson, 70, post- 
master and store-keeper of Wil- 
low Beach, five miles west of 
Sutton, passed on following a 
heart attack which he suffered 
while in his fish-house on Lake 
Simcoe last Thursday at 12.30 
p.m. 

When a friend, James Sinclair, 
who was fishing through the ice 
nearby, called to find out how 
many fish he had caught, he 
found Thompson slumped over 
:hs hole in the fish-house floor. 
Hauling him out of the house, 
he placed him on a hand sleigh 
and headed for the shore. Al- 
though he summened medical aid 
at once, Thompson had passed 
on before Dr. C. T. Noble of Sut- 
ton arrived. 

Born at Baldwin on Aug. 4, 
1864, the son of the late Eleanor 
and Stutley Thompson, he was 
married to Ida Sedore on Oct. 
28, 1901. In his earlier years he 
was a farmer. He was a mem- 
ber of Sutton United church and 
a school trustee. He took a 
keen interest in the Willow 
Beach Sunday-school. 

The deceased, previous to his 
death, had lived at Willow Beach 
since moving from Baldwin a 
few years ago. He had lived at 
his home at Willow Beach the 
year round for several years. 
Surviving are his wife and son, 
William, one sister and one 
brothe?, 

The funeral service was con- 
dticted by Rev. N. S. Anderson 
of Sutton on Monday, a private 
service at his residence, follow- 
ed by a service at Sutton United 
church. Pallbearers were James 
Sinclair, Clyde Draper, Harlan 
Huntley, II. Crittenden, C- Mc- 
Neill and John McNeill. Inter- 
ment was made in Briar Hill 
cemetery, Sutton. 



MRS. JOS. COATES, SR., 
IS TAKEN BY DEATH 

Mrs. Charlotte McLaughlin 
Coates, wife of Joseph Coates, 
Sr., died at their residence, con- 
cession five. East Gwillimbury, 
on Friday, March 24, in her 81st 
year. 

Surviving are her husband, 
five sons, David of Sharon, Fred, 
Gordon and Joe of Holt, and Roy 
of Queensville, and three daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Dora Traviss of Holt. 
Mrs. May Rogers of Queensville, 
and Mrs. Birdie Kay of New Tor- 
onto. 

Also surviving are two bro- 
thers, John and Carl McLaugh- 
lin of Sutton, and one sister, Mrs. 
Gertrude Burrows, also of Sut- 
ton. 

Rev. Mr. Slingerland of Holt, 
assisted by Rev. Mr. Perry, con- 
ducted the funeral service on 
Sunday afternoon, which was 
largely attended. The floral 
tributes were beautiful. 

Four sons and two sons-in- 
law, Fred Rogers and Bert Kay, 
acted as pallbearers. Interment 
was made in Mount Albert ceme- 
tery. 



Sutton West 



Miss Elizabeth Warren and 
friends of Woodbridge spent the 
weekend with the formers aunt, 
Mrs. Sherman Brown. 

Misses Babe McKelvey and 
Chris. Ardill spent Saturday 
in Toronto. 

Miss Grace Schmidt spent the 
weekend in town. 

Miss Muriel Cockbum spent 
the weekend in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Smalley 



Leather hockey team, Alex. 
Belugin, at a banquet given the 
Davis team at the R.S.A. Bugle 

Band hall last night. 

Alex. Eves acted as chairman 
and a real evening was had by 
all. Bill White provided the 
music for the songs and enter- 
tainment which was put on. 
Harry McGhee gave several fine 
accordion solos, while Jack Ar- 
litt also was on hand with some 
tunes. 

Fred LaBunte helped out on 
the mouth-organ and bones. Geo. 
Haskett, president of the league, 
thanked Mr. Belugin on behalf 
of the mercantile league execu- 
tive for the invitation to be pres- 
ent with the team at this cele- 
bration. 

Bohmer Groves, captain of the 
team, on behalf of the team, pre- 
sented Mr. Belugin with an en- 
graved cigarette lighter, and 

Alex, thanked the boys for this 
gift. 

Jack Arlitt presented Mr, Bel- 
ugin with a painting on behalf 
of the Davis Leather band. Bill 
Hopkinson, secretary of the club, 
gave his financial statement for 
the year. Leo Cull, of the fin- 
ance committee of the club, also 
gave a brief address. The man- 
ager, Leo. Forhan, and Coach 
Sonny Townsley also had brief 
innings. 

Those present were: the team. 
B. Groves, Capt.. Joe Peat, F. 
Evans, R. Smart, W. Townsley, 

A. Watts, C. Gunn, P. Townsley, 
H. Brown, R. Peters, AH. Harden, 
F. Lusted. L. Forhan, manager, 
S. Townsley, coach, H. Thorns, F. 
LaBunte; Davis Leather execu- 
tive, Alex. Belugin, Leo. Cull, 
W. Hopkinson; chairman, Alex. 
Eves: music. Bill White; Davis 
Leather band, T. Watts, M. 
Schrank, H. McGhee. J. Ger* 
main, N. Burling. L. Tunney, C. 
Burling. K. Bennington, H. 
Spragg, R. Denne, L. Little, W. 
Andrews, D. Blair, J. Arlitt, A. 
Bailie, T. Speziali, J. Speziali, D. 
Speziali; mercantile league ex- 
ecutive. President Geo. Haskett, 
Jr., Vice-President Alex. Math- 
ewson. Secretary Frank Bram- 
mer, Treasurer Alf. Smith. 

B. I. FEDERATION HEARS 

INTERESTING ADDRESS 

Harvey Herron of Toronto 
was the speaker at the regular 
weekly meeting of the B. I. Fed- 
eration last Sunday afternoon, 
taking for his subject "The Stone 
Kingdom." 

He based his remarks on the 
interpretation of King Nebuchad- 
nezzar's dream, as described in 
the second chapter of Daniel, 
verses 34 and 45, were the par- 
ticular ones stressed, intimating 
to what nation the "stone cut 
without hands" referred. Mr. 
Herron gave a particularly inter- 
esting address. 

Next Sunday's speaker will be 
announced as usual in the regu- 
lar way in this paper. Rev. E. 
J. Springett in his radio broad- 



OEUYCftY FOR EASTER OR ANY TIME UP TQ JUNE i3tH 



JACK RENAULT OF "JAMES TAILORING CO." WILL BE 
HERE DIRECT FROM THE FACTORY TO PERSONALLY 

MEASURE YOU. 

WE OFFER OUR ENTIRE LINE OF SAMPLES 
AT REDUCED PRICES DURING THESE 

2 BIG DAYS 






"THE STORE FOR MEN" — 
MAIN & BOTSFORD PHONE 505 

latmiiiiMiiaiiiMnniuciniiiiiiiinamiiniiiiiaiiimiiHitnt flnHMHi^^ 




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cast announced that next Sunday 
afternoon the monthly mass] 
meeting, held at Massey Hall, f 
will be the last before his de- \ 

parture for the western prov- j 

inces, and stated that matters of! 
vital importance will be dis- ' 
cussed. 



ENEMY BOMBERS 

Continued from Page 1 
India and the Orient. Places in 
what used to be "darkest Africa* 
are now summer resorts. You 
can fly almost anywhere in the 
world. Since completion of the 
trans-Canada airways you can 
fly right around the world. 

"In their routes across the 
south Atlantic the Germans have 
the advantage of good meteor- 
ological service. In Canada we 
have one of the best meteorolog- 
ical services in the world. That 
is the basis of safe flying. 

'The Americans were the first 
to do anything about flying the 
Pacific. 

"Imperial Airways ordered 28 



eir-boats in 1535. They were 
finished in 1937. One of them, 
the Cambria, came to Toronto. 
They have a cruising speed of 
175 to 200 miles per hour. They 
were ahead of anything built. 
Now the Americans have planes 
twice as big, cruising at 250 
miles per hour. 

"That is the way, out of date 
in a year. 

"Amphibian planes can land 
on either water or land. Unfor- 
tunately, the load is too heavy 
ami the upkeep is high. Mr. 
Bickell, in Toronto, has one. and 
uses it for trips into northern 
Ontario. 

"One aviation problem is to 
get a plane into the air with a 
heavy load which it could carry 
once tt got speed up. The com- 
mon practice is to use a catapult. 

"When I was in Germany a 
few years ago 1 found that there 
was no such thing as the German 
government. There is one man 
as boss. It is almost incompre- 
hensible that people would put 



themselves into such -a position. 
Russia is worse. Mussolini is 
the same. 

"I saw planes in Germany with 
the name ■ 'Berlin Athletic CluV 
on them. They were really gov- 
ernment planes. I asked why 
they had that name on them. 
The fliers said that the athletic- 
club name was more acceptable 
when they were visiting in other 
countries. 

"It would be the easiest thing 
in the world to bomb Toronto 
with hydroplanes, if caches of 
oil have been established in 
some of the lakes in northern 
Ontario or Quebec, They may' 
have been. It would be almost 
impossible to find them. 



LIONS* ClilLDKE.VS 

WORK GOES OX 

One mastoid operation, t w o 
two tonsil operations and two 
families being supplied with milk 
were reported by Jack Luck, first 
vice-president, to the Lions club 
on Monday evening. 



Belhaven 



April IB is the date of the play 
in Belhaven community hall, to 
ho given by the choir of Sutton 
United church, tinder the aus- 
pices of Belhaven Women's In- 
stitute. The previous date 

has been changed to April 18 
owing to April 4 being the date 
of Mrs. Aikens 1 demonstration m 
cooking in Sutton. 

Mrs. M. D. Horner is still in 
very poor health and confined 
to her bed. 

Mrs, Harry Horner Is also in 
very poor health. 

A very enjoyable time was 

spent lost Tuesday afternoon at 
the home of Mrs. Cecil Grant, 
Keawtck, by a large number of 
the ladies of Keswick United 
church, when a very generous 
shower of fancy goods for Kes- 
wick United church bazaar was 
presented. 

The April program for Bel- 
haven Women's Institute, to be 
held April 11 at 2.30 p.m. In the 
community hall, is: roll-call, 
suffgeationfl for the children's 
lunch box; music* Miss Phyllis 
Sedore; report of year's work; 



THE PERFECT EASTER GIFT 




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HYDRANGEA, EASTER HUES, ROSE RUSHES, SrIREA, CINERARIAS, 

fOTS OF DAFFODILS. FORGET-ME-NOTS, ETC. 




POKON 
MAKES HANTS GROW AND 
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FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION 

PERRIN'S FLOWER SHOP 

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HI MAIN STREET, NEWMARKET 






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e thank the many people 
who have sent us work so 
far. They are increasing 
every 0ay, as those who have 
work done tell their friends 

how pleasco they are. 

CITY WORK « coun. 

t " 

IRY PRICES . . , A MODERN 

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DRYXLEANING PLANT IN ^OUR 

OWN townI 



4 * 







24 hour service if 
you request it . . . 

Phone Newmarket 
680 for prompt 

SERVICE. 








. ,, ♦ «-, CLEANED » PRESSED 



75 



PLAIN DRESSES . • • . *,* , wr only 75c 

(PLEATED AND a- PIECE DRESSES SLIGHTLY HIGHER) 

SPRING COATS , . . . • mens a ladies- 75c 
FELT HATS cleaned * ilockeo 50c 

CHILDREN'S WORK • ♦ * its* accordingly, 

PRICES ON REQUEST 



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GLEANERS 
& DYERS 



37 MAIN STREET 

tOOWNTOWN OFFICII 



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