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Full text of "Royal purple"

rub lis ned by 

the 

Senior Clas.s 





$ 



■ 







FOREWORD 



ft 



Oftkis kistorlcal volume of 
tke JRoyallTurple recalls tke 
kapptj memories qf'21and'22, 
revives and establiskcs some 
of tkc traditions qf ourytlnxa — 
J^ater, avxd Keeps alive in us tkc 
altruistic spirit of tke student 
body atXansas Stat^/tgricuttur- 
-al Col lege, its purpose will' — •> 
Have been accomplisked. 




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Top Hov,^WB«hnrOTi,C<)«fc : 5Wf?eTKT. ; H.clxilt.R. 

M.ddlo Row-S«o»t!,,F;&.;&i-ovvo,9.B.; 3miih, C.E . ; Bry^U.H. ; Cov*«ll, R.H. 
Bo++o<t. Row-Hahn.UO.; But-W>, ft.rt.;. 3t-«rK,U-.H.) CI«\ar,d,C.(CapVJ;3w<.ai,C).B.;3-b'i-ir,g,R.E. ; 3 = V„ndUr RO 
AG.SIE "WILDCATs"l92l 



DEDICflTO 



J kis jburteentk volume oftke 
JRoyal9urple is dedicated to tke 
men andtke coack qfourl921jbot 
ball team,tuko by tkeir consistent 
Jlgkt.endurance.andteam vuorK, 
uutkout an individual star, but — 
bacKcd by an undefeated student 
body ,u>onfor3£ S.yt.C.tke last 
iug respect and admiration of^ 
tkeAliddleVUest in sport as me 1 1 

as sckolarskip, and made- v 

possible a stadium on /thearn 
GJicld 







■HHH 




EROFBO 



1. College 

2. Classes 
3 Jlghtmg/lggie Teams 

4 Literary Society 

5. Greeks 

6. D-fonorary &.0\ufessional 

7 OrganizationsV^ctivities 

<S/tlumni OOstory 

9. AVititary 

10. feature 








Golle^e 




BLUEMOXT ENTRAN ( E 
Not leaves burned shapeless, nor leaves sere 

But the green, green bough: 
Not love forgotten, nor love remembered, 
Hut love now. 



Photographs by A. 0. Bn 
Lini \r,t '.mi ( rawford 



KEDZIE JIALL 

Does ivy mean anything? 

What does ivy signify to the Archangel Gabriel? 

\\ ould he train it around the walls of Heaven? 









^■^M 





CEDAR BEND 

The grey small stream, a wayfarer, 
Winds down between sad shores, 

Like one who carries dying hopes 
To ever closing doors. 






^H 






President Jardine is the man of the minute. He is a real optimist and a 
close observer of human nature. He believes the best in people and is always 
ready to assist in any worthy enterprise. 

Prexy believes in students and does not hesitate to transfer responsibility 
to their organizations. He has said many times, "You students can make of 
yourselves what you wish to be," and his reaction to students' requests bears 
him out. The S. S. G. A. has been organized and put on a sound basis during 
his administration. 

Action and service are the president's great goals. He believes in serving 
a great student body and through them serving our great state and nation, and 
he insists on doing it now. 

President Jardine has K. S. A. C. close to his heart. He has turned down 
offers for more money with great opportunities because his heart is with the 
Aggies, and he wants to see our campus continue to grow and develop, and our 
Alma Mater spread in fame by the class of men and women who go out from it 
to serve mankind. 

26 






<^o>^r^ j^jyu 



Z5l)e "Kansas State .Agricultural (TolUa,£ — 
yest£r6a?, Z3o6a?, Oomorrow 

By President W. M. Jardine 

The Kansas State Agricultural college has a splendid history— a history of 
which every student, every former student, every graduate, may rightly be 
proud. 

Every era in its history has made its contribution. When Bluemont 
Central college was founded by a group of earnest, God-fearing men in order 
to furnish sound higher education to Kansas youth, there was implanted the 
pioneer spirit and with it the spirit of higher ideals than merely those of 
material progress. 

When this institution was turned over to the state and became the Kansas 
State Agricultural college, the principle of an education offered to every citizen 
by the state was definitely established in Kansas. 

From that time to the present the college has set forth ideal after ideal. 
It has emphasized training for vocation and training for life at the same time. 
It has stressed the importance of being both a good workman and a good citizen. 
It has given greater and greater opportunities for specialization and along with 
them more abundant means of securing adequate knowledge of the problems of 
organized society. The material equipment of the college, in the form of 
buildings and grounds, class rooms and laboratories, and its mental and 
spiritual equipment, in the form of capable and devoted faculties, have been 
the means toward these great ends. 

The men and women who have gone out from the institution are living 
proofs of the institution's success. In their works, in their lives, the ideals of 
the Kansas State Agricultural college are realized. The college today may be 
proud of the human results that it has achieved through sixty years of service. 

We must not rest complacently upon past achievements or present success, 
however. Throughout the United States, and indeed throughout the world, 
education is being subjected to more penetrating criticism than in any previous 
age in history. Here in the Kansas State Agricultural college, as in every other 
institution, there are problems to be solved, and they must be solved for the 
good of humanity. 

The students of this institution need higher scholarship ; greater interest in 
the problems of the state, the nation, and the world; more specific ideals of 
service; and, more than all else, a deeper desire for the truth on every subject. 
The search for truth is the highest ideal of any institution of learning, for it is 
the truth alone that makes men free. 

It is for the students and alumni of the college to adopt, maintain, and 
cherish these ideals. 

27 




"Executive" (Touncil 




lone Aspey 
Clara Evans 
Robert Spratt 
T. J. Foley 
Luella Sherman 



Chas. F. Hadley 
Kent Dudley 
Edith Fairchild 
Emmet Graham 
L. W. Gorthusen 



T. O. Garinger 
Opal Seeber 
Harold Howe 
Alice DeWitt 
Alice Marston 



E. E. Huff 
Ivan Riley 
C. C. McPherson 
C. W. Howard 
Myrl Barnhisel 



OFFICERS 



Chas. C. McPherson President 

T. J. Foley Vice-President 

CHAIRMEN OF 

Harold Howe Discipline 

E. E. Huff Social Affairs 

Robert C. Spratt School Spirit 



Alice DeWitt Secretary 

T. 0. Garinger Treasurer 

COMMITTEES 

Kent Dudley Finance 

Clara Evans Calendar 

Ivan Riley Points 



Opal Seeber Collegian Reporter 



28 






1 Q ^ -2L, 



Ifistor? 



THE Student Self Governing association had its beginning in 
the spring of 1920. The purpose of this organization is to 
place the control and advancement of student interests and 
activities in the hands of the student body. The association 
presents a representative form of student government. The 
executive council composed of 21 members is the governing body. 
The members are chosen by the student body in the following 
manner: President and vice-president from the entire school; two 
members from each of the college classes; two from the Inter- 
Society council; one from the Women's Pan-Hellenic; one from 
the Men's Pan-Hellenic; one from the "K" fraternity; one from 
the Woman's Athletic association; one from the Y. W. C. A.; one 
from the Y. M. C. A.; one from the Girl's Loyalty League; one 
from the Federation of Cooperative Clubs; and one from the 
School of Agriculture. 

The Student Self-Governing association through the Execu- 
tive Council is regulating the social as well as the school life of the 
students and in every way functioning as a law making and law 
enforcing body in handling college affairs. 

Within the last year, the S. S. G. A. has been active in 
passing the varsity activity fee which means that athletics, 
oratory, debate, and stock judging will be assured a steady source 
of income without placing a burden upon any student. An im- 
proved system of giving final examinations, is another innovation 
of this year's S. S. G. A. 

The aim of this organization is to foster a more wholesome 
social life and to elevate the standards of morals of the college. 



29 



1^0>C*?Zs J=>ZSJ^Z=>. 




"-1 ^ s, 2^1mi 




A view from the southwest of the east wing of Waters hall (agricultural building). Work on the west wing 
to be located to the left of the judging pavilion, will begin in the near future. The appropriation available for the 
erection of this wing is $275,000. 



I3l)£ JHvisioit of .Agriculture 

The welfare of all the people in the country is inseparably connected with the welfare of 
American agriculture. Agriculture is the biggest business in the country. It represents an 
invested capital of 80 billion dollars. This is more than all the manufacturing industries and 
all the railroads combined. 

This great business is short of capable leaders. It must have the services of many thousands 
of high-class, scientifically trained men in positions of responsibility and leadership, on the 
farms and in numerous other fields of agricultural work which must be done if agriculture 
is to develop properly. 

It is the function of the division of agriculture to give young men special training in 
preparation for careers of useful service in American agriculture and American country life. 
The division has departments of agricultural economics, agronomy, animal husbandry, dairy 
husbandry, milling industry, horticulture, and poultry husbandry. These departments train 
men for more than 150 agricultural occupations, including the various types of farming in which 
emphasis may be placed on livestock breeding and feeding, fruit production, seed production 
poultry raising, dairying, etc.; work as agricultural teachers, county agents, experimentalists, 
inspectors, seedsmen, creamery operators, orchard managers, and agricultural experts for banks, 
railroads, breed associations, cooperative marketing associations, mills, and fertilizer companies. 
The teaching staff and the equipment and other facilities for instruction are such as to make 
K. S. A. C. second to none in training men for agricultural service. 

The fundamental object of the division of agriculture is not merely to train men to be 
farmers. It is, rather, to train men to be leaders in American agriculture, on the farm and 
elsewhere. The division has not failed in the accomplishment of this object. 



30 



J^Z/I* 



^1 ^ ^2^ 



division of Agriculture 





f"vn doWe^e "Farm- 

II il ~ S 111 



5« 

I 
I 





e)uddin^ Daipy Cattle 




^Ll^L03<^Tl^ j>xs&lr 



7 






"2Divison of Agriculture 




JK Purebred Belgian (?olt 



„A PurebrecMyrshire ^Purebred Guernsey mi Her Twii 




Tat iambs Ready fWlartet 



J\ f1rat-Prize.Herd 










I *• 



Experimental Livestock - College in the Background- 



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JDivUion, of Cagineeriag 

The division of engineering has for its chief purpose the 
training of men for the various branches of engineering. In recent 
years the tendency of professional engineering practice has been 
toward specialization; but successful specialization must be based 
upon thorough general training. The division of engineering meets 
these requirements by giving instruction in the fundamental 
sciences and arts upon which all engineering is based and imparts 
such special and technical practice of his profession. 



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MACHINE SHOP 



The shop practice department has, in addition to the machine 
shop, extensive shops in foundry, blacksmithing, woodworking 
and automechanics. Few college shops are so well provided with 
modern equipment. 



33 



^^ ^i^o^c^Zy jf>tsrt>z^je; 





^=pf 1 £^ 



Division of ^Engineering 




Four year curricula are offered in the division of engineering 
in agricultural engineering, architecture, civil engineering, electrical 
engineering, flour-mill engineering, and mechanical engineering. 

In addition to the four year curricula, special instruction in a 
number of vocations is offered. A three-year curriculum in 
mechanic arts with trade practice electives in blacksmithing, 
carpentry, concrete construction and stationary and traction 
engines is given. Short special courses for automobile mechanics, 
tractor operators, carpenters, machinists, blacksmiths, electricians 
and foundrymen are designed for those who desire training in 
these trades and who find it impossible to take advantage of any 
of the longer courses offered. 




ARCHITECTURAL DRAUGHTING ROOMS 




The architectural department is one of the popular depart- 
ments of the college. Its enrollment has shown a marked increase 
in the last few years. 



34 



Z^03<^?1^ 2>ZSl^T>ZsE 





^ s, 2, 



division of lEngtneerutg 




The division of engineering at the Kansas State Agricultural 
college occupies an honorable place among similar divisions found 
in other collegiate institutions. Few engineering schools in the 
middle west are so fully equipped and so well prepared to con- 
duct efficiently the instructional work. The effectiveness of the 
course may be measured by the fact that a very large percentage 
of its graduates are engaged in technical pursuits. 

The growth of the division has been remarkable. In the last 
ten years the number of students enrolled has increased to three 
times the number at the beginning of that period. At the present 
time the division has the largest enrollment of any of the divisions 
at Kansas State Agricultural college; an enrollment larger than 
that of any other engineering school in the state of Kansas. 




DYNAMO LABORATORY 



The electrical engineering department has, in addition to the 
dynamo laboratory, extensive laboratories in illumination, tele- 
phony, electrical measurements, and dynamo winding. 





division of (General Science 









■gS^. 




vx\y\ 



KANSAS STATE 
ENGINEER 




In writing, editing, printing and distributing college publica- 
tions students get interesting experience and valuable training. 




Root-rot and smut greatly affect the yield of corn. The department 
of botany and plant pathology conducts investigations of plant diseases. 



V 




With the radio apparatus in the 
physics department, telegraph and 
telephone messages are received from 
all parts of the United States. 
Weather forecasts are broadcasted 
over the state daily. 



Young women are given instruc- 
tion in physics and its numerous 
applications in the household. The 
cut illustrates a test of vacuum 
sweepers. 





One of the seven large greenhouses used for investigation and 
instruction. In this one experiments in the control of wheat rust 
are being carried on. 



37 



1 



8 




i s :2, -2u 



division oflftomeTEconomlcs 




Designs from Peruvian and floral motifs adapted to different materials 
and used on surfaces of different shapes. 

In home economics, art and science 
are applied to the problems of living 
and of home making. Students prepare 
for responsible work in the world 
whether it be as wage earners or man- 
agers of their own households. Work 
in household economy was announced 
in K. S. A. C. as early as 1874. A 
curriculum in home economics has been 
offered since 1898. 




Textiles are studied under the micro- 
scope and tested for permanence of 
color and for wearing qualities. 




The final fitting. 



38 



RC»5*?Zs jpz^j^2=>j^^: 





A group of seniors preparing to serve an exact dietary, adequate in calories 
and all other requirements. 




Living room and laundry at Ellen Richards Lodge, the cottage where 
students put into practice their knowledge of housekeeping and home making. 



W 





1 o ^, 2, 



Division of Veterinary Mle6icine 



The division of veterinary medicine of the Kansas State Agricultural col- 
lege offers a four-year course leading to the degree of Doctor of Veterinary 
Medicine. High school graduates interested in live stock production and con- 
servation are enthusiastic matriculants. 




A veterinary clinic scene. 




I 



A veterinary animal disease research laboratory scene. 

40 



F>,O30<?Zs J>XSJS*T=>lL,E/!2zm> 





Hyper-immunizing and tail-bleeding in the preparation of anti-hog cholera 
serum. 



41 



R.C^C^JE, J=>ZSjZ>2^>2^ ^ 





1 Q 2, ^ 



Waiting 





Serene, I fold my hands and wait, 

Nor care for wind or tide, or sea; 
I rave no more 'gainst time or fate, 

For low my own shall come to me. 

I stay my haste, I make delays, 

For what avails this eager pace? 
I stand amid the eternal ways, 

And what is mine shall know my face. 

Asleep, awake by night or day, 
The friends I seek are seeking me; 

No wind can drive my bark astray, 
Nor change the tide of destiny. 

What matter if I stand alone? 

I wait with joy the coming years; 
My heart shall reap where it has sown, 

And garner up its fruit of tears. 

The waters know their own and draw 
The brook that springs in yonder height; 

So flows the good with equal law 
Unto the soul of pure delight. 

The stars come nightly to the sky; 

The tidal wave unto the sea; 
Nor time, nor space, nor deep, nor high, 

Can keep my own away from me. 

— John Burroughs. 



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/IIhRoCJI-I A TH<HX5AND TH°<].SAA/D YEARS THE EARTH FORME, 
Then A. PROTOPLAfM CAMB- INTO BEING AND SPENT ANOTHER 

thousand thou^anp years' in becoming a man. ff 
Adam ano Eve were made the ronorary parent? of the race. 
Ey the tike China had developed into a nation or pi6tails, 

CHOPSOEY ANP LARGE FAMILIES THE BEST OF A51A GREW AM 

Civilization spread to sreece./^acepo/vla uon£ eflRTH&ofr s? 

v AiND AS TAR WEST AS ULSTER, IRELAND. ' ■^^-^fll^ 

CuLUMMJ DEVELOPED A THIRST FOR FOREIGN TRAVEL CBOX/EO THE AT- N 
LANTIC, GOT HIS FIRST GXIM.P/E OE A CKEWI«C.'-OUrt ADVERTISE- ** 
MEM, AND WAS TENDERED THE KEV TO PLYMOUTH ROCK. A 

Civilization was spread successfully m ambrlca through tks- 

AGENCY 01 GUNPOWDER, PRAYERBOOKS AND VTIAMInES UnTIL^ 
-y THE WHOLE COUNTRY, INCLUDING HADDAM.KS.WAS SETTLED 

"KANSAS JAYHAWKS BECAME SHOCKED AT THE ATTEMVT OFAPOOR^ 
CHEYENNE TO PRODUCE OLEO TRO/-Y A BUFFALO ANO THOUGHT 
.SOMETHING SHOULD BE DCWE IN ECONOMICAL UPLIFT. 

The Kansat Jtate Agricultural College was established a«d 

' v for sixty years it laboriousxv develops ceeamery butter 

i pqetj, sax puyep.5, co-eps, k-men, slide rules and a payroll 

or sixty years the heart or america has poured its best 

life blood into the kan/a/ jtate agricultural college 




AND THE RESULT OF IT ALE IJV^ 

4k CLA/^0F"1922 ! 



Il\% 







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1 



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Senior (Tlass IHistor? 




HO HUM. Gosh. Well, here we are at last. Seniors — soon to join the ranks of the 
alumni. Just what we have been working for all these years. We're at the end of 
our collegiate rope, if you please, and now that we're here we don't feel a bit stuck up. 
According to recorded history, all the classes that have been graduated from K. S. A. C. 
were select bodies of assorted geniuses. We are workers, and now that we are about to graduate 
are looking for a job. Say, you don't happen to need a handy man around the house, do you? 

Our class believes in success via steady plugging. In the autumn of 1918, when the Great 
World War was yet in full swing, we entered our college course. No one can doubt that the 
war, with its subsequent period of depression, has had its sobering effect upon us. It taught us 
to see things in their proper perspective — stripped bare of their usual glamor. We have learned 
to appreciate the value of honest toil, and have displayed this realization in our unprecedented 
interest in school and class affairs. 

The class held its first meeting in the old chapel — now recreation center — in the fall of 1918, 
and elected Dewey Houston president. Unlike the cases of more recent freshmen classes, there 
was but one election, and the guiding hand of a faculty member was not needed. This same 
saneness and interest has been potent among our attributes ever since. 

Many of our boys were in the army, and a large number — softly now — were in the S. A. 
T. C. Maybe it was the rest the boys got there that has kept them going ever since. Let us 
mention a few of the things we have accomplished besides making good grades. In the first 
place it was the seniors who really showed the world what honest-to-goodness class politics 
was, when in the election last spring more votes were cast than ever were cast by any previous 
class at K. S. A. C. At every class meeting since that time the room has been filled. 

A senior class, you know, is composed of both boys and girls. Senior girls have been promi- 
nent in class athletics, in politics, in beauty contests, May fetes, and — well, what haven't they 
had a hand in. This year four out of the six girls chosen in the popularity contest were seniors. 

Athletically speaking, here is more evidence of our importance: Brady Cowell, Murphy, 
Freddie Williams, Schmitz, Clapp, H. Brown, Guilfoyle, Griffith. Those names are self- 
explanatory. 

Nor does all our fame come from the gridiron, the diamond, or the cinder path. On the 
platform in both debate and oratory seniors hold the foreground. Interest in forensic affairs 
at K. S. A. C. is growing rapidly, and largely because of the impetus given by this year's class. 
Howard won the intersociety oratorical and Barger took second place in the Missouri Valley 
contest. The Ag Fair is another thing which the seniors have developed for their alma mater. 
Practically all the student executive offices on the hill are held by seniors. We have accomp- 
lished these things by plugging. 

Good-bye everybody. You'll have to get along the best you can without us. 






ii 



i^oyoTZs i^zsri^z^^;, 




1 Q ^ -2L 




Officers of <l\(x%% of 1922 




WBfM 

m 

J. J. Seright; Georgia Belle Crihfield; T. O. Garinger; Luella Sherman; E.E.Thomas 
H.I.Richards; Eva Leland; Earl Means; Ruth Cunningham; Eugene Huff. 

First Semester Second Semester 

President J. J. Seright Earl T. Means 

Vice-President Ruth Cunningham Georgia Belle Crihfield 

Treasurer H. I. Richards E. E. Thomas 

Secretary Eva Leland Luella Sherman 

S. S. G. A. Representatives... E. E. Huff and T. O. Garinger 





45 



RO>Z*TZs ^zsj^j^j^jeT, 



1 Q 2, 2/ 





ADAMS, KATHRYN R. 
Home Economics 

Franklin; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Loyal- 
ty League. 



ADEE, JESSIE G. Wells 

Home Economics 

Theta Sigma Phi; Quill Club; Big 
Sister 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 



ADEE, JAMES F. Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 
President Veterinary Medical Asso- 
ciation; Secretary Disabled Veterans 
World War. 



ALBRIGHT, JAMES H. Winneld 
Agricultural Economics 
Delta Tau Delta; Purple Masque; 
Hort Club; Scarab; Pax; Theta 
Sigma Lambda; Tobasco; Discipline 
Committee of S. S. G. A. 



ALLEN, DALE Burlington 

Agricultural Engineering 
Athenian; A. S. M. E. 



ALLEN, JESSE L. 
Agronomy . 
Klod and Kernal Klub. 



Norwich 



ALLEN, JOSEPH L. Leavenworth 
'Miry Husbandry 

Webster; Forum; Y. M. C. A.; 
Dairy Club. 



ANDERSON, NELSON H. 

Neosho Falls 
Agricultural Economics 
Omega Tau Epsilon; Agricultural 
Economist; S. S. G. A.; Agricultural 
Association. 



ROK^ZZs 




AUSTIN, ALDIS L. Oldham, S. D. 
Agricultural Economics 
Scabbard and Blade; Webster; 
Agricultural Economist; Agricul- 
tural Association; Elkhart; Captain 
R. 0. T. C. 



AYRES, LILLIAN E. LaHarpe 

General Science 

Eurodelphian, Kappa Phi, Prix, 
Xix; Freshman Commission; Vice- 
president Y. W. C. A. (4). 



AYERS, VIDA M. Sabetha 

Home Economics 

O. E. S. Club; Kappa Phi; President 
French Club; Girls Loyalty League; 
Y. W. C. A.; Big Sister. - 



BAKER, HARRIETT 
General Science 



Emporia 



BAKER, HARRY L. Baldwin 

Agricultural Economics 
Omega Tau Epsilon; Alpha Zeta; 
Agricultural Association; President 
Agricultural Economists; Phi Kappa 
Phi; College Band; Zeta Chi; A. B., 
Baker University. 



BANKS, MARION H. Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Scarab; A. S. M. E.; 
A. A. E.; Engineering Executive 
Council; Junior Honors; Phi Kappa 
Phi. 



BARGER, JUSTUS WHEELER 
Agricultural Economics Manhattan 
Athenian; Pi Kappa Delta; Quill 
Club; Forum; Agricultural Econom- 
ists; Agricultural Association; Inter- 
collegiate Debate (1, 2, 3); Class 
President (3); President Y.M.C.A. 
(4); Missouri Valley Orator, 2nd 
place (4); Collegian Board (4); 
Scholarship in Debate (3, 4). 



BATCHELOR, HAROLD W. 

General Science Manhattan 

Hamilton; Star Masque; In plays — 
Daddies, Her Husband's Wife, 
Nothing But The Truth, Potash 
and Perlmutter. 




Z^,<Z>3>C^Zs 





BATDORF, FRANCES Burlington 
Home Economics 

Alpha Delta Pi; Y.W.C.A.; Big Sis- 
ter Captain; Kappa Phi Cabinet; 
Xix; Beacon; Enchilidas. 



BAYLES, BURTON B. Manhattan 
Agronomy 

Acacia; Alpha Zeta; Tri K; Scarab; 
Hamilton. 



BEST, ANNA L. Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Alpha Beta; Zeta Kappa Psi; Wo- 
men's K Fraternity; Forum; Purple 
Masque; Royal Purple Staff; "K" 
Debater; K Sweater; Class Hockey 
Team 1, 2, 4; Class Basketball Team 
(2, 4;) Class Baseball Team (2) ; Di- 
rec tor ot Frivol; PresidentW.A.A. ; 
President of Bethany Circle; Plays 
— Her Husband's Wife, Nothing 
but Lies; Author of "The Ink Girl," 
Senior Class Play '22. 



BEYER, JOSEPH E. Mooreland, Ok. 
Electrical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Webster; A.I.E.E.; 
Secretary of Engineering Associa- 
tion; Band; Orchestra; Phi Kappa 
Phi. 



BONDURANT, MARGUERITE 
Home Economics Ness City 

Chi Omega; Enchiladas; Women's 
Pan-Hellenic Council 1, 3, 4. 



BOST, CURTIS C. Matthews, N. C. 
Agricultural Economics 
Block and Bridle Club; Franklin; 
Y. M. C. A. 



BOURASSA, ORILLE Topeka 

Industrial Journalism 
Theta Sigma Phi; Ionian; Kansas 
Authors Club; Quill Club; Aggie 
Press Club; St. Cecilia Club (3); 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (3); Associate 
Business Manager of Brown Bull 
'21; American Journalists' Assn. 



BRADLEY, RAYMOND Kidder, 
Electrical Engineering Mo. 

Edgerton Club; Athenian; A.I.E.E. 



7Z?OX^J^ J>TSRT>2^E 





i o :2. 



^^g^ 



BROOKOVER, MARIAN E. Eureka 
Home Economics 

Kappa Delta; Omicron Nu; Ionian; 
Y.W.C.A.; Prix; Xix; Girls Loyalty 
League; Freshman Commission; 
Second Cabinet Y.W.C.A.; Big Sis- 
ter Captain; Junior Honors, Phi 
Kappa Phi. 



BROWN, HENRY L. Blue Rapids 
Civil Engineering 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; K Fraternity; 
A.A.E.; C.E. Society; Theta Sigma 
Lambda; Football (4); Freshman 
Baseball; Glee Club (1); "Naughty 
Marietta" (1). 



BRUBAKER, ALBERT J. Ellsworth 
Mechanical Engineering 
Y.M.C.A.; A.S.M.E.; Engineer's 
Reserve; R.O.T.C. 



BRUBAKER, ORVILLE K. 

Electrical Engineering McPherson 
Elkhart Club; A.I.E.E.; Intramural 
Basketball. 



BRUCE, NEAL D. Marquette 

Architecture 

Beta Theta Pi; Band 1, 2, 3; Orches- 
tra, 1, 2, 3; Play, "James Wakes 
Up;" Men's Pan Hellenic Council; 
President Wampus Cats (4); Vice- 
President Architecture Club (3); 
Baseball '21; Tobasco; Royal Pur- 
ple Staff, Art Editor. 



BRYSON, HOMER G 
Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Delta Chi; Quill; Athenian; 
Brown Bull Editor (4); Assistant 
Editor Collegian (4); Class Histo- 
rian (4); Press Club; Business 
Manager Brown Bull (4). 



BUMGARDNER, R. L. Manhattan 
Agricultural Economics 



BURGER, LESLIE Seneca 

Home Economics 

Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; Big Sister 
Captain. 






49 



/io^^x ^tsi^i^z^ie:, 



A v^J ZaaLt 4^ t 





BURK, EARL F. 
Horticulture 

Franklin; Horticulture Club; Y. M. 
C . A. ; Ag.Association ; Mendelssohn 
Club (3); Vodvil (3). 



BUSH, GEORGE H. Little River 
Electrical Engineering 
Phi Delta Tau; Phi Mu Alpha; 
Apollo Club (2, 3, 4); A. I. E. E ' 



BUSH, GEORGIANA Little River 
Home Economics 

St. Cecelia Club; Y. W. C. A.; 
Loyalty League. 



BUSSY, JOSEPHINE Centralia 

General Science 

Ionian; W. A. A.; Aggie Press Club; 
Y. W. C. A. 



BUTLER, OLIVER P. Farmington 
Animal Husbandry 
Farm House; Block and Bridle. 



BYERS, LAWRENCE WILLIAM 
Architecture Abilene 

Scabbard and Blade; Alpha Beta; 
Architect Club; Apollo Club. 



CARVER, ADELAIDE E. Oakley 
Home Economics 

Ionian; Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; 
Girls Loyalty League. 



CASTO, FRANCES Guymon, Okla. 
General Science 

Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; Girls 
Loyalty League. 



9 



i^,o>c^tj^ i>tsri=>z^e^^ 




CHAPMAN, R. L. 
Electrical Engineering 



CLARK, L. M. 

Architecture 
Delta Tau Delta. 



Paola 



Chapman 



CLEGG, ROY E. Altoona 

Agricultural Economics 
Webster; Agricultural Economist; 
Y. M. C. A. Board. 



COE, SYLVESTER JOY 

St. Augustine, Fla. 
Animal Husbandry 
Sigma Nu; Alpha Zeta; Block and 
Bridle; Ag. Association; Science 
Club; Pan Hellenic Council; Publi- 
city Board of Kansas Ag. Student; 
Treas. Ag. Fair; Tobasco; Wampus 
Cats. 



COLES, EMBERT H. Manhattan 
Agronomy 

Acacia; Alpha Zeta; Scarab; Pax; 
Theta Sigma Lambda; Tri K; Pan- 
Hellenic (2-3) President (3); Presi- 
dent Ag. Association; Class Treas- 
urer (3); Publication Board Ag. 
Student; Business Manager Royal 
Purple. 



COLES, FERN G. Manhattan 

General Science 

Basketball (3); Baseball (3); Phi 
Kappa Phi; 
Washburn College, Phi Sigma Omega 



CONN, GERTRUDE Coffeyville 
Home Economics 
Chi Omega; Y. W. C. A. 




I^C»^^I^ 




1 Q ^, 2T&H 




CONNELL, HARRY H. Bazine 

Civil Engineering 

Phi Delta Tau; Sigma Tau; A. A. 
E.; Society of Civil Engineers; Y. 
M. C. A.; Phi Kappa Phi. 



COOPER, HELEN LUCILLE 

Home Economics Manhattan 

W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Bethany 
Circle; Browning Literary Society; 
Class Hockey(l, 2, 3;) Class Basket- 
ball (1, 2, 3); Varsity (2, 3;) Class 
Baseball (3;) Big Sister Captain (4.) 



COPELAND, LYNN Hutchinson 
Dairy Husbandry 

Alpha Zeta; Webster; Dairy Club; 
Ag. Association; Edgerton Club; 
Dairy Judging Team; Intersociety 
Debate. 



COULTER, BESSIE Wichita 

Home Economics 

Kappa Delta; Y. W. C. A.; 
Enchiladas. 



COWELL, WARREN C. Clay Center 
Animal Husbandry 
Delta Tau Delta; K Fraternity; 
Football (2, 3, 4); Baseball (2, 3, 4); 
Basketball 2, 3, 4. 



CRAMSEY, CLARA L. McPherson 
Home Economics 

Omicron Nu; Alpha Beta; W. A. A.; 
Y. W. C. A.; Intersociety Debate; 
Class Hockey Team (4); Class 
Basketball Team (4); Phi Kappa 
Phi. 



CRIHFIELD, GEORGIA BELLE 
Home Economics Manhattan 

Alpha Xi; Eurodelphian; Prix; Xix; 
Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A. Treasurer 
(4) ; Vice-President Senior Class. 




CROW, R. M. 

Electrical Engineering 



Manhattan 



.-,:_' 



JF> TS1^1^>J^ E^ ^^ 



^m 




r^nni 



CUNNINGHAM, JOHN D. 
General Science Manhattan 

Phi Kappa; Webster; Newman 
Club. 



CUNNINGHAM, RUTH L. 
Home Economics Manhattan 

Ionian; O. E. S. Club; Y. W. C. A.; 
Kappa Phi; Vice-President Senior 
Class. 



DAVIS, DAVID E. Manhattan 

Vb t B T % 71 d T Zf 

Beta Theta Pi; Scarab; Vet. Medi- 
cal Association; Phi Kappa Phi. 



DETHLOFF, CARL C. Manhattan 
Agronomy 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; Tri K; 
Wampus Cats. 



DICKENS, ELIZABETH 
Industrial Journalism Manhattan 
Delta Zeta; Theta Sigma Phi; Phi 
Alpha Mu; Quill Club; Eurodel- 
phian; Prix; Xix; Kansas Authors 
Club; Aggie Press Club; Y. W. C. 
A.; Freshman Commission (1); 
Editor Kansas State Collegian (4); 
Collegian Staff (2, 3); Assistant 
Editor Brown Bull (3); Assistant 
Business Manager Brown Bull (4); 
Royal Purple Staff; Collegian Board 
(2). 



DUBBS, MARGARET Ransom 

Home Economics 

Bethany Circle; Omicron Nu; 
Franklin; Intersociety Council. 



DUMOND, L. A. Holcomb 

General Science 

Alpha Tau Omega; Tobasco; Y. 
M. C. A. 



ECKART, ROY F. Paola 

Mechanical Engineering 
Kappa Phi Alpha; Webster; A. S. 
M. E. 





J^O^^Z, j<~>TS1^Z>Z^E"a 





ELLIOT, JOHN B. 

Itfusic 

Delta Tau Delta; Phi Mu Alpha; 

Apollo Club; Orchestra. 



ELLIOTT, RICHMOND K. 

Electrical Engineering Manhattan 
A. I. E. E. 



ENGLUND, ARNOLD J. Falun 

Animal Husbandry 
Edgerton Club; Pi Kappa Delta; 
Athenian Literary Society Presi- 
dent (4); Block and Bridle; Y. M. 
C. A. Board (4); Agricultural Asso- 
ciation; Forum; Intercollegiate 
Debate (1, 2, 3); Royal Purple 
Staff; Phi Kappa Phi. 



ENNS, ANNA B. Newton 

English 
St. Cecelia Club; Alpha Beta. 



EVANS, CLARA B. Liberal 

Home Economics 

Ionian; Prix; Xix; Beacon; W. A. A. 
Women's K Fraternity; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (4); S. S. G. A. Executive 
Council (3, 4); Class Vice-President 
(3). 



FINDLEY, GLENN E. Kiowa 

Agricultural Economics 
Farm House; Scarab; Pax; Hamil- 
ton; Intersociety Council; Ag. Asso- 
ciation; Agricultural Economist; 
Wampus Cats. 



FLOWERS, GERTRUDE E. 
Home Economics Hastings, Neb. 
Browning; Y. W. C. A. 



FLOYD , RUTH Sedan 

Home Economics 
St. Cecelia Club; O. E. S. Club. 



I 




FORD, ASA H. 

Electrical Engineering 

Acacia; A. I. E. E.; A. A. E.; To 

basco; Rifle Club; Band. 



FULTON, ELSIE Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Browning; Y. W. C. A.; Kappa 
Phi. 



GARDNER, GRACE L. Hutchinson 
Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Browning; St. Cecelia 
Club; Y. W. C. A.; Spanish Club. 



GARINGER, TRUMAN OLVARD 
Animal Husbandry Manhattan 

Athenian; Block and Bridle; Forum; 
Agricultural Association; S. S. G. 
A. Treasurer (4); Apollo Club (2); 
Star Masque; Vodvil (1); Opera: 
Spring Maid (2); Intersociety Play: 
Nothing But Lies (3); Junior 
Honors, Phi Kappa Phi. 



GARLOCH, GERALD LYNN 
Electrical Engineering Garden City 
Sigma Tau; A. I. E. E.; A. A. E.; 
Kansas State Engineering Associa- 
tion; Vice-President Electrical En- 
gineers (3); Treasurer A. I. E. E. 
(4); Junior Honors, Phi Kappa Phi. 



GATES, G. E. 
Civil Engineering 
Scabbard and Blade. 




GEESLING, DAVID MARTIN 

Arkansas City 
Electrical Engineering 
Phi Delta Theta; A. I. E. E. 




Kansas City 



jRlo>c*?Zs j=>tsi^2>j^je; 



^, 2, 




GEIGER, J. C. 
Civil Engineering 

A. A. E. ; Executive Board Engineer- 
ing Association; President Civil 
Engineering Society. 




GILLESPIE, J. HARRY 

General Science 
Beta Theta Pi 



GLENDENING, GEORGE M. 

Manhattan 
Electrical Engineering. 
Elkhart Club; A. I. E. E. 



GRAVES, EARL F. 
Animal Husbandry 



Manhattan 



GRAVES, HAZEL L. 
Home Economics 
Bethany Circle; W. A. A 
C.A. 



GRIEST, T. R. 

Architecture 



Manhattan 



Y. W. 



Topeka 



GRIFFITH, EVAN L. Manhattan 
General Science 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Tobasco; K. 
Fraternity; Spanish Club; Baseball; 
(3, 4) Captain (4); Freshman Foot- 
ball; Men's Pan Hellenic '18; Coach 
of Freshman Baseball '16. 



GRISWOLD, LESLIE H. Rossville 
Dairy Husbandry 

Farm House; Phi Mu Alpha; 
Apollo Club; Webster Literary So- 
ciety; Ag. Association; Dairy Club. 



r.<» 



X30ST^ 



^ :2, 2, 



GRUNDMEIER, EDITH G. 
Home Economics Barnard 

Kappa Phi; Omicron Nu; Y. W. C. 
A. 



GUILFOYLE, LUKE Wamego 

General Science 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; K. Frater- 
nity; Pax; Theta Sigma Lambda; 
Tobasco; Freshman Men's Pan 
Hellenic (1); Baseball (2, 3) Cap- 
tain (4); Students Council '17; 
Men's Pan Hellenic (3). 



GWIN, BERTHA M. Morrowville 
Home Economics 

Alpha Beta; Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. 
A.; Girls Loyalty League; Publicity 
Manager of W. A. A..; Treasurer 
Women's K Fraternity; Hockey 
(1, 2, 3, 4); Baseball (3) Captain 
(4); Varsity Basketball (1, 2, 3); 
Hockey Captain (4). 



HADLEY, CHARLES F. Huntley, 
Agricultural Economics Illinois 

Wrangler Fraternity, Northwestern 
University (1, 2); Ag. Economist; 
Webster; Scarab; Basketball (1, 2, 
4); Football (1, 2, 4); S. S. G. A. 
Council; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (4). 

HAGANS, BELLE Manhattan 



General Science 

Eurodelphian; Kappa Phi; Y. W. 
C. A.; Women's K Fraternity; 
W. A. A. Council (3, 4); Big Sister 
Captain (4); Hockey (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Basketball (4); Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4). 



HALSTEAD, MILDRED J. 
Home Economics Manhattan 

Ionian; Newman Club; Y. W. C. 
A.; French Club. 



HANNA, JEAN Clay Center 

General Science 

Pi Beta Phi; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; 
Girls Loyalty League; Enchiladas; 
Freshman Women's Pan Hellenic. 



HARDER, WALTER ROY 
Agronomy Minneapolis 

Acacia; Alpha Zeta; Hamilton; 
Tri K. 





57 



Z^Q3>5^1L, J^iyj^J=>J^JEf^^^ 





HARTMAN, ERNEST 
General Science 

Webster; Forum; Student Volun- 
teer; Cosmopolitan Club; Oratory 
(2); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3). 



HATFIELD, C. R. 

Civil Engineering 



Wichita 



HARTLEY, J. GLADYS Manhattan 
General Science 

Quill Club; Phi Alpha Mu; Brown- 
ing; Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; Phi 
Kappa Phi. 



HAYS, IRENE Manhattan 

General Science 

Eurodelphian; Kappa Phi; W. A. 
A.; Y. W. C. A.; Basketball (3); 
Big Sister Captain (4); Oratory (4). 



HEADRICK, GRACE F. Winfield 
Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; 
Baseball Team (1, 2); Hockey 
Team (2). 



HEADRICK, HERBERT B. 

Mechanical Engineering Winfield 
A. A. E.; A. S. M. E.; Y. M. C. A.; 
Athenian; Major R. O. T. C. 



HEMPHILL, CLYDE R. Chanute 
Animal Husbandry 
Farm House; Alpha Zeta; Gamma 
Sigma Delta; Block and Bridle; 
Franklin; Stock Judging Team. 



HEPLER, E. A. Manhattan 

Animal Husbandry 
Block and Bridle; Ag. Association. 



^ g^OJ^Z. J>ZSJ2,2=>2^^7 








^HHfiT 



HERR, GRACE Medicine Lodge 
Home Economics 

Y. W. C. A.; Kappa Phi; W. A. A.; 
Browning; Forum; Intersociety Ora- 
torical (4). 



HERSHEY, PERRY J. Whitewater 
Electrical Engineering 
Alpha Tau Omega; A. A. E .; 
A. I. E. E. 



HOATH, FRANK R. Anthony 

Agricultural Economy 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Tobasco; Ag. 
Economist. 



HOCKMAN, HERMAN G. Beattie 
Electrical Engineering 



HODGSON, ERNEST E. 

Animal Husbandry Harveyville 
Omega Tau Epsilon; Scabbard and 
Blade; Scarab; Block and Bridle; 
Rifle Team; Gallery Team (3); 
Captain R. O. T. C. (4); Royal 
Purple Staff. 



HOLMES, CECIL C. Wellington 
Agronomy 

Edgerton Club; Athenian; Tri K; 
Ag. Association. 



HOUSER, KENNETH OSCAR 
Electrical Engineering Wichita 

A. I. E. E.; Webster; Engineering 
Association; Staff Kansas State 
Engineer '22. 



HOWARD, CLARA BELLE Colby 
Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Forum; Browning; 
Y. W. C. A.; Big Sister. 





2^03072^ i>tsi^,2=>j^je: 





HOWARD, CHARLES WILBER 

Winona 
Industrial Journalism 
Athenian; Sigma Delta Chi; Pi 
Kappa Delta; Edgerton Club; 
President Federation of Coopera- 
tive Clubs (3); Winner Intersociety 
Oratorical (4); Varsity Debate (3, 
4); Pi Kappa Delta Orator (4); 
S. S. G. A. Council (3); Discipline 
Committee (4); Y. M. C. A. Cabi- 
net (2); Collegian Board (4); 
Royal Purple Editor (4). 



HOWARD, MABLE A. Manhattan 
Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A. 



HOWE, HAROLD Chapman 

Agronomy 

Phi Kappa; Pi Kappa Delta; Pax; 
Scarab; Athenian; Newman Club; 
Forum; Tri K; Ag. Association; K 
Debater; S. S. G. A. Executive 
Council (4); Pan Hellenic (3, 4); 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4); Inter- 
society Council (3, 4); Chairman S. 
S. G. A. Discipline Committee; 
Chairman Oratorical Committee '22. 



HUFF, E. EUGENE Chapman 

Agricultural Economics 
Kappa Phi Alpha; Phi Mu Alpha; 
Purple Masque; Scarab; Pax; 
Franklin; College Band (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Orchestra (3, 4); Plays: Believe Me 
Xantippe, Daddies. 



HUNTER, MAY A. Rock Creek 
Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; Kappa Phi; Y. W. 
C. A. 



JELDEN, EDWARD JOHN 

Columbus, Neb. 
Veterinary Medicine 
Hamilton; Veterinary Medical As- 
sociation; Forum; Y. M. C. A. 



JENNINGS, HARRY C. Manhattan 
Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Treasurer Student En- 
gineering Association; President 
A. S. M. E. 



JENNINGS, R. S. 
Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. 



LeRoy 



(in 



O ^. 2, 



JOHNSON, ERNEST B. Holdrege, 
Flour Milling Neb. 

Alpha Tau Omega; A. A. E. 



JOHNSON, FLORENCE M. 

Manhattan 
English 

Kappa Phi; O. E. S. Club; Life Ser- 
vice League President (4); Student 
Volunteer; Quill Club; Forum; 
Franklin; W. A. A.; Swimming 
Manager (3); Girls Loyalty League; 
Y. W. C. A. Second Cabinet (4). 



JOHNTZ, TRACY E. Abilene 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; A. S. M. E.; Alpha 
Beta. 



KAMAL, MOHAMMED M. 
Agriculture Manhattan 



KELLOGG, RAY E. Wichita 

Flour Mill Engineering 
Delta Tau Delta; Pax; Scarab; 
Tobasco; Scholarship (3, 4); Theta 
Sigma Lambda; Ag. Association. 



KNOSTMAN, CAROL Wamego 

Home Economics 

Kappa Delta; Kappa Phi; Euro- 
delphian; Intersociety Council; Y. 
W. C. A.; Forum. 



KOENIG, WILLIAM H. Nortonville 
Architecture 

Scabbard and Blade; Sigma Tau; 
Architect's Club; Band; Hamilton. 



KRAYBILL, EMMETT E. Abilene 
Architecture 

Sigma Tau; Alpha Beta; Archi- 
tect's Club; Band. 





61 



<y 



2^o3Q?Zs j=>z^j^i=>z^je;. 




q ^, ^7^^^ 



KREHBIEL, HERBERT H. 

Animal Husbandry Moundridge 
Block and Bridle Club; Ag. 
Association. 



LAHR, MAUDE ELLA Waynoka, 
General Science Okla. 

Ionian; Phi Alpha Mu; Zeta Kappa 
Psi President (4); O. E. S. Club; 
Forum; St. Cecelia Club; Interso- 
ciety Council; Winner of Inter- 
society Oratorical '21; Y. W. C. A., 
Big Sister Captain (3); Manager 
Intersociety Play (4); Treasurer 
Royal Purple '22; Junior Honors, 
Phi Kappa Phi. Washburn Col- 
lege: Intercollegiate Debate; Glee 
Club; Expression Club. 



LAINE, MAURICE D. Herington 
Industrial Journalism 
Phi Delta Theta; Sigma Chi; Green 
Masque; Tobasco; American Asso- 
ciation of Journalists; Aggie Press 
Club; Men's Pan Hellenic; Scarab; 
Collegian Board; College Plays: 
Clarence, Lottery Man. 




LAPSLEY, RALPH C. 
General Science 
Y. M. C. A. 



Burlington 



LAU, WING KEI Canton, China 
Animal Husbandry 
Vice-President Cosmopolitan Club 



LAW, WALTER F. Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 
Phi Delta Tau; Sigma Delta Chi; 
Aggie Press Club; American Asso- 
ciation of Journalists; Brown Bull 
Board; Business Manager Brown 
Bull (4); Scribe Quill Club (4). 



LEE, AUBREY M. 
Veterinary Medicine 
Omega Tau Epsilon; 
Medical Association. 



Manhattan 
Veterinary 



Glen Elder 



LEE, VERA L. 
Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; 0. E. S. Club; Kappa 
Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



&L030?JL 



LELAND, EVA B. Wichita 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Eurodelphian; Fresh- 
man Commission; Y. W. C. A. 2nd 
Cabinet (2, 4); Big Sister Captain 
(3, 4); Class Secretary (4). 



Protection 



LUND, N. DALE 
Civil Engineering 
Alpha Tau Omega; A. A. E.; C. E. 
Society; C. E. Dept. Editor K. S. 
Engineer. 



LYNESS, HAZEL A. Walnut 

Home Economics 
Franklin; Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



McGINLEY, H. J. Rogers, Ark. 

Dairy Husbandry 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Ag. Association; 
Dairy Club; Pan Hellenic Council 
President (4). 



McKEEVER, HAROLD.T. 

Horticulture ' Circleville 

Omega Tau Epsilon; Horticultural 
Club; Ag. Association. 



McKITTERICK, JAMES A. 

Greenwood, Mo. 
Veterinary Medicine 
Alpha Psi; Tobasco; Theta Sigma 
Lambda; Pax; Veterinary Medical 
Association; Wampus Cats. 



McKOWN, PAUL M. Manhattan 
Electrical Engineering 
Webster; Scabbard and Blade; A. I. 
E. E.; First Lieutenant R. O. T. C. 



Mcpherson, charles c. ioia 

Engineering 

Alpha Tau Omega; Scabbard and 
Blade; Athenian; Major Cadet 
Corps (3); Colonel Cadet Corps (4); 
President S. S. G. A. (4); President 
Engineering Association; Scarab; 
Pax; Theta Sigma Lambda; Adver 
tising Manager Royal Purple; 
Vice-President Y. M. C. A.; Forum; 
A. I. E. E.; A. A. E. 




J^O^C^SjE, 




1 ^ ^L 2, 





McQUILLEN, KATHARINE C. 
Home Economics Clay Center 

Kappa Delta; YAW. C. A.; Big 
Sister Captain; Ionian Literary 
Society. 



McSTAY, ESTHER H. Downs 

English 

Phi Alpha Mu; Eurodelphian; Y. 
M. C. A. Second Cabinet; Kappa 
Phi; Xix; Freshman Commission; 
French Club; Hockey (2, 4); 
Basketball (4); Baseball (1, 3). 



Manhattan 



MALL, DUELLA M. 
Home Economics 
Franklin; Kappa Phi; W. A 
Y. W. C. A. 



A.; 



MALTBY, R. J. 

Architecture 
Architect's Club. 



Salina 



MANGLESDORF, LOUISE H. 
Home Economics Atchison 

Delta Delta Delta; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet; Prix; Xix; Beacon; Treas- 
urer S. S. G. A. (3); Ionian; Presi- 
dent Girls Loyalty League (3). 
Royal Purple Staff. 



MANRY, THORNTON JASON 
Electrical Engineering Manhattan 
President Webster; Forum; A. I. 
E. E.; Business Manager Kansas 
State Engineer; Intersociety Orator 
(4); Manager Senior Play. 



MARSHALL, RAY E. Manhattan 
Animal Husbandry 
Scabbard and Blade; Block and 
Bridle; Captain in R. O. T. C; 
Indoor and Outdoor Rifle Teams 
(4). 



MATHER, ROLLAND S. Grinnell 
Agronomy 

Athenian; Tri K; Ag. Association; 
Y. M. C. A. 








i s ^, 2L5M 



I 



MAUK, EZRA PERLE Hillsdale, 
Animal Husbandry Okla. 

Athenian; Edgerton Club; Block 
and Bridle Club; Ag. Association; 
Y. M. C. A.; Third Winner Grain 
Judging Contest (2); Junior Hon- 
ors; Royal Purple Staff; Phi Kappa 
Phi. 



MAUST, ORPHA Garden City 

General Science 

Kappa Delta; Phi Alpha Mu Presi- 
dent (4); Ionian; Spanish Club; 
Freshman Commission; Junior 
Honors;Y. W. C. A. Second Cabinet; 
Phi Kappa Phi. 



MEAD, ALBERT V. Manhattan 
General Science 
Sigma Delta Chi; Aggie Press Club. 



MEANS, EARL T. Everest 

Animal Husbandry 
Acacia; Alpha Zeta; Quill Club; 
Webster; Block and Bridle; Editor 
Kansas Agricultural Student; Inter- 
society Council (3, 4); President (4); 
Secretary Ag. Association; Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet; President Senior Class. 



MESSENGER, M. VIRGINIA 
Home Economics Kingman 

Eurodelphian; Omicron Nu; Y. W. 
C. A.; Hockey Team '18; Phi Kappa 
Phi. 



MILLER, EDITH P. Council Grove 
Home Economics 

Kappa Delta; Y. W. C. A.; Spanish 
Club. 



MOODY, HALFORD E. Riley 

Animal Husbandry 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Mu 
Alpha; Alpha Zeta; Block and 
Bridle; Apollo Club. 



MILLER, J. MARSHALL 
Electrical Engineering Manhattan 
A. I. E. E. 





65 






I^O^C^TJ^ J^Vl^l^J^. 



1 Q Z2. -2L 





MOORE, JEAN 
Home, Economics 

Pi Beta Phi; Ionian; Omicron Nu; 
Phi Kappa Phi. 



MOORE, JOHN M. Stockton 

Dairy Husbandry 

Omega Tau Epsilon; Dairy Club; 
Ag. Association; Dairy Judging 
Team '22. 



MOXLEY, J. J. Osage City 

Animal Husbandry 
Farm House; Block and Bridle; Ag. 
Association; Hamilton; Stock Judg- 
ing Team. 



MURPHY, DONALD D. Newton 
Animal Husbandry 
Beta Theta Pi; Theta Sigma 
Lambda; Pax; Scarab; Block and 
Bridle; Ag. Association; K Frater- 
nity; Class President (2); Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet (2); Freshman Football 
(1); Intramural Football (1); Var- 
sity Football (4). 



MYERS, HARRY A. Americus 

Animal Husbandry 
Omega Tau Epsilon; Ag. Associa- 
tion; Block and Bridle. 



NAY, H. S. 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. 



Manhattan 



NEVINS, IRMA Dodge City 

General Science 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Ionian Literary 
Society; Y. W. C. A. 



NORDEEN, FRANK E. Dwight 
Electrical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; A. I. E. E.; Editor 
Kansas State Engineer. 



f 

I 
1 



R.O>OTZ, J=>XyjS.JPZ^E, 




>£<' ' ! '■ < f -, 1 



ODEN, GUY Sterling 

Mechanical Engineering 
A. S. M. E. 



OLSEN, HAZEL 
Home Economics 
Ionian; Y.W.C. A. 



Topeka 



PAINE, VERNON E. Admire 

Animal Husbandry 
Hamilton; Y. M. C. A.; Band; 
Block and Bridle; Ag. Association. 



PALMER, R. L. 

Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Delta Chi 



Jewell 



PAYNE, A. O. Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 
A. S. M. E. 



PERSONS, FLORENCE U. 

Home Economics Manhattan 

Y. W. C. A.; Girls Loyalty Club. 



PECK, RUTH J. Berryton 

General Science 

Eurodelphian; Phi Alpha Mu; Y. 
W. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3), President 
(4); Beacon; Prix; Xix; Class Presi- 
dent. (3); Junior Honors, Phi Kappa 
Phi. 



PERRY, ARTHUR C. 
Horticulture 
Horticulture Club. 




I^OZOTJ^ 




Greenleaf 



1 Q *2L 2, 





PHILLIPS, PAUL J. 
Electrical Engineering 
Scabbard and Blade; A. I. E. E.; 
Scarab; Captain R. O. T. C. 



Manhattan 



PLATT, EVA M. 
Home Economics 
Alpha Beta; Forum; W. A 
Y. W. C. A. 



A.; 



PRATT, CHARLES W. Frankfort 
Industrial Journalism 
Phi Delta Theta; Sigma Delta Chi; 
Scarab; Aggie Press Club; Tobasco; 
Collegian Staff (4). 



PRIESTLEY, HALLY R. Wichita 
Civil Engineering 

Athenian; A. A. E.; Civil Engineer- 
ing Society; Intersociety Debate. 



PTACEK, MICHAEL E. Emporia 
Animal Husbandry 
Beta Theta Pi; Pax; Theta Sigma 
Lambda; Block and Bridle; Ag. 
Association; Freshman Pan Hellenic 
'19; Vice-President S. S. G. A. (3); 
Class President (1). 



QUINN, JEREMIAH THOMAS 
Horticulture Manhattan 

Horticulture Club; Hamilton; Ag. 
Association. 



RALEIGH, GEORGE J. Clyde 

Horticulture 

Phi Kappa; Alpha Zeta; Alpha 
Beta; Horticulture Club; Newman 
Club; Ag. Association. 



RATHBONE, RUTH B. Manhattan 
Music 
Eurodelphian; St. Cecelia Club. 




l Q ^ r2/)!!lll 



RATTS, FLOYD S. Atlanta 

Veterinary Medicine 
Elkhart Club; Federation of Co- 
operative Clubs' Council; Veterin- 
ary Medical Association. 



REED, OLIVER B. Manhattan 

Agronomy 

Klod and Kernal Club; Freshman 
Football '17. 



RICHARDS, H. IRVING Howard 
Animal Husbandry 
Pi Kappa Delta; Scabbard and 
Blade; Block and Bridle; Hamilton; 
Y. M. C. A. Board; Agricultural 
Economist; Elkhart Club; First 
Lieutenant R. O. T. C; Forum. 



ROBERTS, CARSON B. Manhattan 
Animal Husbandry 
Farm House; Block and Bridle; 
Hamilton; Scarab; Ag. Association; 
Stock Judging Team '21; Treasurer 
Ag. Fair (4). 



RODERICK, GAIL C. Attica 

Home Economics 

Browning President (4); Y. W. C. 
A.; W. A. A.; Kappa Phi; Forum; 
Class Hockey Team (3); Basketball 
Captain (4); Spanish Club. 



RODERICK, GLADYS I. 
Home Economics 
Browning; Y. W. C. A. 



Attica 



ROGERS, W. J. Hays 

Flour Mill Engineering 
Alpha Tau Omega; A. A. E.; A. S. 
M. E.; Ex-Service Men's Club; 
Track (3). 



ROLFE, WALTER T. Wetmore 

Architecture 

Alpha Tau Omega; Sigma Tau; 
Phi Mu Alpha; Pi Kappa Delta; 
K Debator; Forum; Band; Orches- 
tra; Architect's Club. 





I 



69 




s, -2. 




ROSSEL, LEE E. 
Electrical Engineering 
Webster; Scabbard and 
A. I. E. E. 



ROTHROCK, THOMAS 
Horticulture Springdale, Ark. 

Horticulture Club. 



RUSSELL, CHARLOTTE F. 

Journalism Winfield 

Browning; Quill Club; Y. W. C. A.; 
Theta Sigma Phi. 



RUSSELL, ESTHER A. Manhattan 
Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; Kappa Phi; Student 
Volunteer; Life Service League; 
Y. W. C. A. 



RYHERD, DOROTHY K. Horton 
English 

Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. 
A.; Kappa Phi; Class Hockey 
(3, 4); Varsity (3). 



SCHMITZ, HENRY W. Alma 

Animal Husbandry 
Alpha Zeta; K Fraternity; Ag. Asso- 
ciation; Horticulture Club; Foot- 
ball (3, 4). 



Burlington 



SCOTT, E. S. 

Animal Husbandry 

R. 0. T. C; Block and Bridle. 



SERIGHT, JAMES J. Colby 

Electrical Engineering 
Pi Kappa Delta; Forum; Athenian; 
A. I. E. E.; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; 
Engineering Association; Treasurer 
Junior Class; President Senior 
Class; Coach Intersociety Debate 
(4); Intercollegiate Debate (3); 
Circulation Manager Kansas State 
Engineer (4). 



RC&Z^TZs 




SHANE, GERALDINE F. 

Music Villisca, Iowa 

Alpha Chi Omega; Mu Phi Epsilon- 
Y. W. C. A.; St. Cecelia Club. 



SHELLENBERGER, CLARE L. 

Agriculture Manhattan 

Kappa Sigma; Tobasco; Ag. Asso- 
ciation; Band (1, 2, 3); Apollo 
Club (2). 



SHERMAN, LUELLA P. Grinnell 
Home Economics 

Omicron Nu; Zeta Kappa Psi; 
Kappa Phi; Xix; Beacon; Brown- 
ing; Intersociety Council; Basket- 
ball (2); W. A. A.; Forum; Y. W. 
C. A. Octette; First Cabinet (4); 
Big Sister Captain (3); St. Cecelia 
Club (3, 4); K Debater; Class Sec- 
retary (4); Junior Honors, Phi 
Kappa Phi. 



SHORT, MAC Salina 

Mechanical Engineering 
Beta Theta Pi; A. S. M. E., Secre- 
tary (3), President (4). 



SILKETT, ROSS J. Downs 

Agronomy 

Tri K; Scabbard and Blade; Ag. 
Association; First Lieutenant R 
T. C. 



SMITH, CLARAMARY 

Mound City, Mo. 
Home Economics 

Kappa Delta; Ionian; Purple 
Masque; Enchiladas; Women's Pan 
Hellenic Council; Xix; Beacon; 
Bethany Circle; Zeta Kappa Psi; 
Ionian Orator; Plays: Wicked 
Winder of Clocks, The Girl with the 
Green Eyes, Overtones, Clarence. 



SMITH, MARION A. Topeka 

Agronomy 

Beta Theta Pi; Tri K; Green 
Masque; Apollo Club; Phi Mu 
Alpha. 



STALCUP, ERNEST F. Hutchinson 
Mechanical Engineering 
Alpha Tau Omega; Sigma Tau; A. 
S. M. E.; President A. A. E. (4); 
Theta Sigma Lambda; Pax; Scarab; 
Track (3, 4); Mendelssohn Club; 
Athletic Editor Royal Purple. 



&>,03<*TU 





1^:2.^ 




STAMBAUGH, VERN W. 

Agricultural Engineering Maple Hill 
Pi Kappa Delta; Forum; Athenian; 
A. S. A. E.; Triangulars; Inter- 
collegiate Debate (3, 4); School of 
Ag. Debate Coach (4); Engineering 
Executive Council. 



STARKEY, GEORGE E. Syracuse 
Dairy Husbandry 

Webster; Dairy Club; Ag. Associa- 
tion; Dairy Judging Team (4). 



STARKEY, JAY R. Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 
Omega Tau Epsilon; Veterinary 
Medical Association. 



STAUFFER, FLORENCE Marion 
Home Economics 

Delta Delta Delta; Ionian; Y. W. 
C. A.; Prix; Xix. 



STEWART, J. SCOTT Coldwater 
Agriculture 

Delta Tau Delta; Block and Bridle; 
Tobasco; Stock Judging Team. 



STURGEON, HENRY C. 
Animal Husanbdry 
Dairy Club; Ag. Association. 



Lane 



TARPLEY, H. I. Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Phi Kappa Phi. 



THAYER, HELEN Manhattan 

General Science 

Pi Beta Phi; Xix; Prix; Ionian; 
Enchiladas; Y. W. C. A.; Freshman 
Commission; Girls Loyalty League. 






THOMAS, EARL E. Argonia 

Electrical Engineering 
Edgerton Club; A. I. E. E.; Sumner 
County Club; Engineers Associa- 
tion; Treasurer Senior Class; Y M 
C. A.; Radio Club. 



THOMPSON, LOLA Geneseo 

Home Economics 
Omicron Nu; Phi Kappa Phi. 



THORN, JOSEPHINE M. Beattie 
General Science 

Girls Loyalty League; Y. W. C. A.; 
Kappa Phi. 



THORNBURG, MERYL 

ETHELYN Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; Kappa Phi; Y. W. 
C. A.; Big Sister Captain. 



THORNBURG, ROWENA Formoso 
General Science 

Chi Omega; Ionian; Phi Alpha Mu; 
Star Masque; Xix; Prix; Beacon; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4); Girls 
Loyalty League Council (3); As- 
sistant Manager of Junior-Senior 
Prom; Plays: Believe Me Xan- 
tippe, The Girl With the Green 
Eyes. 



THRESHER, CHARLES A. Jetmore 
Animal Husbandry 
Webster; Block and Bridle; Elkhart 
Club. 



TRAVIS, EVA L. Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Ionian; Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; 
Big Sister Captain. 



TUPPER, PAUL Lecompton 

Industrial Journalism 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Sigma Delta 
Chi; Scarab; Pax; Tobasco; Block 
and Bridle; Men's Pan Hellenic (3, 
4); Freshman Pan Hellenic (1); 
Ag. Association; Aggie Press Club. 




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1 s> 2, 2, 





UHLRICH, CARL F. 

Animal Husbandry 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Block and Bridle 

Club; Tobasco. 



UNDERWOOD, JOHN B. 

Manhattan 
General Science 



UNRUH, SUE Pawnee Rock 

General Science 

Ionian, W. A. A.; Women's K 
Fraternity; Y. W. C. A.; Basket- 
ball (2, 3, 4); Hockey (3, 4); Base- 
ball (2, 3); Varsity Baseball (3). 



VAN BLARCON, H. S. Manhattan 
General Science 

Apollo Club; Willard Chemical 
Society; Phi Kappa Phi. 



VAN GILDER, ETHEL Manhattan 
Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A. 



VAN SCOIK, GRACE 
Home Economics 
Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



Aulne 



VAN VLIET, JOHN W. Manhattan 
Veterinary Medicine 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Scarab; Veterin- 
ary Medical Association; Men's 
Pan Hellenic Council (3). 



WALKER,»EUGENE H. Manhattan 
Agronomy . 

Phi Kappa; Newman Club; Tn K; 
Ag. Association. 



I^O>^^J^ 




WATKINS, MILLARD C. 

Electrical Engineering Clay Center 
A. I. E. E. 



WATTS, SIBYL Winfield 

Home Economics 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Xix; Euro- 
delphian; Bethany Circle; Pan 
Hellenic Council; Y. W. C. A.; Big 
Sister Captain (4). 



WAUGH, ESTHER Amherst, Mass. 
Home Economics 

Kappa Delta; Ionion, President (4); 
Omicron Nu; Girls Loyalty League; 
Junior Honors; Freshman Com- 
mission; Phi Kappa Phi. 



WEAVER, W. WALLACE 

Gravette, Arkansas 
General Science 

Alpha Beta; Triangular Club; 
Forum; Y. M. C. A. 



WEBER, ARTHUR D. Manhattan 
Animal Husbandry 
Farm House; Alpha Zeta; President 
Block and Bridle (4); Athenian 
First in Dairy Judging Contest (2) 
First in Stock Judging Contest (3) 
Stock Judging Team (4). 



WHAN, LUCILE C. Manhattan 
Industrial Journalism 
Phi Alpha Mu; Zeta Kappa Psi; 
Ionian; Purple Masque; Forum; 
Quill Club; O. E. S. Club; Aggie 
Press Club; W. A. A.; Varsity 
Swimming (2, 3); Class Hockey (4); 
Intercollegiate Debate (3); Plays: 
Daddies, Neighbors, The Girl With 
the Green Eyes; Phi Kappa Phi. 



E. 



Manhattan 



WHAN, VORIN 
General Science 
Phi Delta Tau; Star Masque. Ham- 
ilton; Theta Sigma Lambda; Pax; 
Scarab; Wampus Cats; Stage Man- 
ager Aggie Pop (2, 3, 4); Manager 
Purple Masque Plays (2, 3, 4), in 
The Road to Yesterday, Stop Thief, 
Daddies, One Night Out, Potash 
and Perlmutter, Clarence. 

WHEARTY, LAWRENCE 

FRANCIS Westmoreland 

Civil Engineering 

Pi Kappa Delta; Webster, President 
(4); Forum; A. A. E.; C. E. Society; 
Intercollegiate Debate (2); Debate 
Council (2); Intersociety Council 
(3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4); 
Treasurer Kansas State Engineer (4 ) . 



^03^Z 





1 Q ^, 





WILLHOITE, CLAUDE MERLIN 
Animal Husbandry Drexel, Mo. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Ag. Associa- 
tion; Block and Bridle; Pax; Theta 
Sigma Lambda; Stock Judging 
Team '21; Assistant Manager Ag. 
Fair (3), Manager (4); Wampus 
Cats. 



WILKINS, HERBERT L. 

General Science Manhattan 

Athenian; Elkhart Club. 



WILLIAMS, FRED WOODS 
Veterinary Medicine Hunter 

Alpha Psi; Theta Sigma Lambda; 
Pax; Scarab; K. Fraternity; Tobas- 
co; Wampus Cats; Class President 
(2); Pan Hellenic Council (3); 
Veterinary Medical Association; 
Varsity Basketball (2, 3, 4). 



WILLIAMS, ROY Manhattan 

Animal Husbandry 
Farm House; Block and Bridle. 



WILLIS, EVERETT H. Manhattan 
Horticulture 

Kappa Sigma; Pi Kappa Delta; 
Scabbard and Blade; Pax; Tobasco; 
Forum; Wampus Cat; Ag. Associa- 
tion; Horticultural Club; Agri- 
cultural Council (3, 4); Captain R. 
O. T. C. (4); Rifle Team (3); Gallery 
Rifle Team (4); Varsity Baseball 
(3); Intercollegiate Debate (1). 



WILLSON, LOIS M. Manhattan 
Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Alpha Beta; Life Ser- 
vice League. 



WILSON, E. BEE Wichita 

General Science 

Browning; Y. W. C. A.; Kappa Phi; 
Willard Chemical Society. 



WILSON, WM. CLYDE Manhattan 
Agronomy 

Kappa Phi Alpha; Scabbard and 
Blade; Forum; Rifle Club '20 
Athenian; Tri K; Ag. Association 
First Lieutenant R. O. T. C. 
Business Manager Junior-Senior 
Prom (3); Y. M. C. A.; Social 
Affairs Committee S. S. G. A. (3). 



7R 




WINGFIELD, JESSE C. 

Horticulture Junction City 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Scabbard and 
Blade; Horticulture Club; Tri K; 
Men's Pan Hellenic Council; Pax; 
Scarab; Ag. Association. 



WOLNICK, ROBERT W. 

General Science 

Webster; Forum; A. S. M. E 



Blair 



WOODRING, EARL HUBERT 

Stockville, Neb. 
Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. 



WORSTER, MABEL L. Manhattan 
Home Economics 

Alpha Beta; W. A. A.; Women's K 
Fraternity; Y. W. C. A.; Hockey 
(2, 3, 4); Baseball (1); Basketball 
(2); Track (2). 



ZELLER, LULU MAY Manhattan 
Industrial Journalism 
Alpha Delta Pi; Phi Alpha Mu; 
Theta Sigma Phi; Forum; Aggie 
Press Club; Enchiladas; Prix; Xix; 
American Association of Journalists; 
President Collegian Board (4); As- 
sistant Business Manager Brown 
Bull (4); Assistant Editor Brown 
Bull (4); Assistant Editor Collegian 
(4); Pan Hellenic (4). 



ZIMMERMAN, CHARLES 

Mechanical Engineer Manhattan 
A. S. M. E. 



SALIMAN, BOUTROS Manhattan 
General Science 
Cosmopolitan Club; Y. M. C. A. 



STANLEY, PRUDENCE Topeka 
Home Economics 
Chi Omega; Enchiladas; Y. W. C. A. 




ROK^jL 





Class of 1923 

A "Comedy of Errors." 

Fresh from our homes, timid and suspicious, the class of 1923 first appeared on the campus 
in the fall of 1919. 

Who can forget that registration? 

At a third or fourth class meeting we succeeded in nominating officers. Politics appeared 
early with plenty of help from the upper classmen. First semester officers were Ellis Kimball, 
president; Faith Martin, vice-president; Frances Johnstone, secretary, and Earl Chappell, 
treasurer. Those for the second semester were: R. C. Spratt, Mary Fitzgerald, Irene Shoe- 
maker, and Renna Rosenthal. 

The Freshman-Sophomore hop, given in the spring, was a howling success. At least we 
thought so when we successfully escaped with the key handed down by the Sophomores. 



I3l)£ Sophomore Vear 

"Much Ado About Nothing." 

We came back to our sophomore year much more sophisticated. We had learned that 
permits to roam the campus need not be bought, and that Phi Kappa Phi pledging is not 
done the Freshman year. Our usual elections were held both semesters as follows: President, 
vice-president, secretary, and treasurer for first semester, H. L. Sebring, N. V. Platner, Mary 
F. Turner and Joe McGuire; second semester, L. G. Grandfield, Gretchen Rugh, Lucile Smith 
and M. R. Getty. 

Another very successful Freshman-Sophomore hop was held in the gymnasium in the 
spring of 1921. The key was again handed down to the Freshmen. 

Thus ended our sophomore year. 



3unior ^ear 

''As You Like It." 

Here we are back in our junior year. Much more sedate and dignified, for we are upper- 
classmen now! Our first election was very quiet, every officer unanimously elected. Under 
careful administration the first semester ended without a stir. Second semester election was 
not so quiet— a second voting on vice-president and treasurer was necessary. 

In athletics we have always stood high. In fact, most of the athletes in college are Juniors 
-Sebring, Sears, Schindler, Matthias, Erwin, Hope, Constable, Franz, and McKee are only 
a few of them. We took first in the track meet with Hope high point man, and our girls won 
the championship in basketball. 

Not only in athletics but in any worth while organization on the campus whether it per- 
tains to oratory, debate, dramatics, journalism, college band, or orchestra you will always find 
members of this class on top. 

Next year we will return and it is safe to say, will again prove our sterling worth. 





1 Q -2. 




Officers of Class of 1923 



o 

J. W. Farmer Renna Rosenthal Irene Maughlin Lillian Rommel R. C. Spratt 
K. I. Church Osceola Burr A. R. Paden Opal Seeber Alice De Witt 

First Semester Second Semester 

President Alice DeWitt A. R. Paden 

Vice-President D. M. Wilson Renna Rosenthal 

Treasurer J. W. Farmer Osceola Burr 

Secretary Lillian Rommel Irene Maughlin 

Marshall Tim Foley K. I. Church 

Historian Dora Dean Dakin Dora Dean Dakin 

S. S. G. A. Representatives. R. C. Spratt and Opal Seeber 





si 



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it^=. 



1 & ^, 





ABBOTT, EDITH D. Mound Valley 
Industrial Journalism 



ABRAMS, ROMONA Arkansas City 
Music 



ADAMS, WARNER Maple Hill 

Animal Husbandry 



ADAMS, JASPER D. Darlington, Mo. 
Agricultural Economics 



ANDERSON, DELMAR C. 

Civil Engineering Phillipsburg 



ANDRE, VIOLET A. 
Home Economics 



Horton 



ANGUS, FRANK M. Sterling 

Mechanical Engineering 

ANSDELL, MARGARET P. 

Home Economics Jamestown 



ASH, LEOLA E. 
Home Economics 



AULT, MARJORIE 
Home Economics 



AYERS, AGNES M. 
Home Economics 



Cullison 



Naponee 



LaHarpe 



BAHGAT, MONIR M. Egypt 

(Graduating with class of 1922) 
General Science 



BANE, MARGARET 
Home Economics 



Libera 



BARKLEY, ATWELL S. 

Animal Husbandry St. Joseph, Mo- 

BARTH, LAWRENCE F. 

Animal Husbandry Manhattan 



i 

I! 

I 



82 



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1 ^ s, 2/ 



BAYER, THEODORE L. Yates 
Industrial Journalism Center 



BEAVER, R. S. Harlan, la. 

Veterinary Medicine 



BEELER, DOUGLAS C. Manhattan 
Animal Husbandry 



BETZ, HATTIE 

General Science 



Asherville 



BETZ, PERRY Asherville 

Industrial Journalism 



BLACK, JAMES J. Carterville, Mo. 
Veterinary Medicine 



BLACKLEDGE, VICTOR R. 

Industrial Journalism Junction City 

BLAGG, CHARLES E. Fort Scott 
Agriculture 



BLAIR, HELEN 

Home Economics 



BOWER, LEONE 

General Science 



Mulvane 



Manhattan 



BRIDENSTINE, ALBERT L. Leoti 

Agricultural Economics 



BROWNING, NINA M. Manhattan 
Home Economics 



BUCKHEIM, GRACE Randolph 
Home Economics 



BURDETTE, HAZEL Severy 

Home Economics 



BURNETT, HARRIS L. Dodge City 
Industrial Chemistry 




Z^OZOTjL 






BURR, OSCEOLA HALL 

General Science Manhattan 



BUSH, BELLE 
Home Economics 



Little River 



BUTCHER, CLAUDE R. Solomon 
Architecture 



CASE, GLEN M. 

Music 



Alta Vista 



CHAMBERS, CHESTER B. 
General Science Quenemo 



CHAMBERS, PENN S. Quenemo 
General Science 



CHURCH, KAY I. Haddam 

Agricultural Engineering 



CHURCHWARD, DOROTHY Z. 
Home Economics Wichita 



CLOUD, CHARLES H. Winfield 
Music 



COLEMAN, INEZ 
Home Economics 



Manhattan 



COLEMAN, NELLIE Manhattan 
Home Economics 



COLLINS, HUBERT L. Wellsville 
Animal Husbandry 



CRAGUN, ORVILLE R. Kingman 
General Science 



CRAWFORD, F. W. Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 



CROSS, THOMAS Belle Plaine 

Animal Husbandry 



1^030<?Zs 




1 Q ^, 



DbWITT, ALICE L. Medicine Lodge 
General Science 



DOWNING, LLOYD H. 

Electrical Engineering 

DUBBS, MYRTLE 
Home Economics 



DUDLEY, KENT R. 

Veterinary Medicine 



Colwich 



Ransom 



Iola 



DAKIN, DORA DEAN Ashland 
General Science 



EMERY, FRED 
Veterinary Medicine 



Baldwin 



ENGLUND, VICTOR J. Falun 

Civil Engineering 

FARMER, JUNIUS W. Manhattan 
Animal Husbandry 



FLEMING, ROY L. p ao la 

Dairy Husbandry 

FOLEY, TIMOTHY J. Chapman 
Veterinary Medicine 



FOSS, WILLIAM D. Churchs Ferry 
Veterinary Medicine N. D. 



FRANZ, JOHN E. Rozel 

Flour Mill Engineering 

FULTON, WILLARD CLARENCE 
Agricultural Economics Harper 



GARDNER, HAZEL Hutchinson 
Home Economics 



Louisburg 




GARDNER, F. A. 

Civil Engineering 



JF^O^C^^J^ 




1 s> ^ 2/ 





GASTON, HAROLD P. 
Horticulture 

GEORGE, C. R. 

Agriculture 



Pratt 



Manhattan 



GILLETT, MARGARET Junction 
Home Economics City 

GOFF, MERLE E. Manhattan 

Animal Husbandry 



GRIFFENHAGEN, R. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Veterinary Medicine 



GROSS, CARL D. Russell 

Agricultural Engineering 



HAINES, EDITH Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 



HALL, L. E. 
Agriculture 



Manhattan 



HANES, HELEN EVELYN Ottawa 
General Science 



HART, QUEENIE E. Minneapolis 
English 



HARTMAN, HUGH E. Manhattan 
Electrical Engineering 



HELSTROM, BEULAH F. 

Home Economics McPherson 



HEMKER, ELFRIEDA Great Bend 
General Science 



HEMKER, HERBERT F. Great 
Mechanical Engineering Bend 



HENNEY, FLORENCE 
Home Economics 



Horton 



Rc&a~z±_z> 




1 s> ^ -2; 



HIXSON, BROM DWIGHT 

Animal Husbandry Wakeeney 



HOFFHINES, H. W. Manhattan 
General Science 



HOFFMAN, JOHN Manhattan 

Civil Engineering 



HOUSTON, FRANK W. Twin Falls 
Animal Husbandry Idaho 



HOWARD, AGNES 
Home Economics 



HOWARD, ANGIE 
Home Economics 



HUNT, L. V. 

Agriculture 



HYDE, BELLE S. 
Home Economics 



Colby 



Colby 



Wilmore 



Altoona 



JOHNSON, ANNA MAY Manhattan 
Home Economics 



JOHNSON, ETHEL A. Marquette 
Home Economics 



JOHNSON, LOUIS G. Manhattan 
Mechanical Engineering 



JOHNSON, MAMIE B. Manhattan 
Home Economics 



JOHNSTONE, FRANCES A. 

Industrial Journalism Manhattan 



JONES, HENRIETTA A. 

General Science Manhattan 




JORNS, NELLIE R. 
Home Economics 



Preston 



I^OKZ^J^ 




1 ^ -2. 2/ 




8S 




KAUZER, ANNETTE Hutchinson 
Home Economics 



KELLY, MARY F. 
Home Economics 



Bucyrus 



KING, JULIA Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 



KINGSLEY, FRANK C. Formoso 
Agricultural Engineering 



KIRKWOOD, G. B. 


Marysville 


Veterinary Medicine 




KIRKWOOD, I. B. 


Marysville 


Civil Engineering 




KITCH, FORREST W. 


Rozel 


Animal Husbandry 




KITTELL, RUTH 


McPherson 


Home Economics 




KNOX, ELSIE 


Leon 


Music 




KOUNS, ZELLA 


Manhattan 


Home Economics 




LEASURE, E. E. 


Solomon 


Veterinary Medicine 





LEEPER, WILLIAM W. 

Mechanical Engineering 



Goff 



LEMERT, AMY 
General Science 



LEWIS, ROSE A. 
Home Economics 



LEWIS, FRED C 
General Science 



Cedar Vale 



Ottawa 



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F2,C»^¥Zs I>XSRJP>Z^JE 





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LONG, GRACE B. Cuervo, N. M. 
Home Economics 



LONGLEY, G. M. 

Civil Engineering 



Lebanon 



LOVE, ROBERT S. Kansas City 
Civil Engineering 



McADAMS, LAURA E. 
Home Economics 



Salina 



McCANDLESS, RUTH E. St. John 
Home Economics 



Mccarty, w. o. 

Agronomy 



Ames 



McCONNELL, J. PAUL Manhattan 
General Science 



MCDONALD, HELEN Manhattan 
Home Economics 



Mcdonald, lawrence d. 

Mechanical Engineering Parsons 



McKEE, ANDREW J. Manhattan 
Veterinary Medicine 



MARONEY, MARY E. Manhattan 
Home Economics 



MASON, MARGARET Belle Plaine 
Home Economics 



MATTHIAS, WILLIAM JOSEPH 
Animal Husbandry Perry 



MAUGHLIN, IRENE 
Home Economics 




Sylvia 



MEANS, LESTER Everest 

Electrical Engineering 




89 



Z^O^C^^ J^Z^J^I^J^^ ^^^ 



1 Q ^, ^, 





MEYER, GEORGE A. LaCrosse 

Electrical Engineering 



MILLER, KEITH W. 
Rural Commerce 



MITCHELL, HELEN M. Topeka 
Home Economics 



MOORE, ESTHER A. Protection 
Home Economics 



MOORE, NELLIE D. 
Home Economics 



MORAN, RAY H. 
General Science 



Protection 



Claflin 



MOSTERT, JOHANNES F. 

Balfour, Transvaal, S. Africa 
Agronomy 



MUELDENER, ALICE Lyons 

General Science 



MUELLER, EDWARD J. 

Civil Engineering Washington 



MURPHY, MABEL Nickerson 

Music 



NEAL, J. H. Williamsburg 

Agricultural Engineering 



NETTLETON, MARGARET 

Home Economics Lenora 



NEWCOMER, LESTLE W. 

Civil Engineering Alexander 



NONKEN, EDITH B. Manhattan 
Home Economics 



PADEN, ALFRED R. Manhattan 
Agronomy 



i^o^c^^j^ jpzrj^j^j^^: 




i± s> ^, 



r^mii 



PAINE, CECILE B. 
Home Economics 



PAULSEN, FRED H. 
Animal Husbandry 



Admire 



Stafford 



PENCE, MILDRED L. Dunavant 
General Science 



PETERS, R. H. Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 



PFAFF, NETTIE 


Beloit 


Home Economics 




PICKRELL, DON H. 


Leon 


Mechanical Engineering 




PRIESTLEY, HELEN J. 


Kansas 


Home Economics 


City 


PRUITT, RUBY E. 


Goddard 


Home Economics 




REDMAN, GORDON S. 


Kansas 


Architecture 


City 


REED, LEONA 


Ottawa 


Home Economics 




REED, LOUISE E. 


Ottawa 


Home Economics 




REED, THOMAS B. 


Glasco 


Civil Engineering 





REICH, MARGARET Glen Elder 
Industrial Journalism 




RICHARDS, HAZEL 
Home Economics 



RICKLEFS, RUBY 
Home Economics 



Howard 



Troy 



^o>^^ 




1 Q ^ 2/ 





RICKLEFS, RALPH B 

Horticulture 



RILEY, HAROLD B. Kansas City 
Agriculture 



ROBINSON, MOTT L. Lowemont 
Agronomy 



ROMMEL, LILLIAN F. Waterville 
General Science 

ROOTE, PAUL M. Eskridge 

Industrial Chemistry 



ROSENTHAL, RENNA R. Topeka 
Home Economics 



RUGH, GRETCHEN 
Home Economics 



Abilene 



SCOTT, SUSIE Madisonville, Ky. 
Home Economics 



SEEBER, OPAL S. Great Bend 

General Science 



SHERER, R. Z. Mullinville 

Veterinary Medicine 



SHRADER, MARGARET E. 

Home Economics Cedar Vale 



SIMPSON, W. E. Welda 

Agricultural Economics 



SIMS, PERCY Little River 

Animal Husbandry 



SINDERSON, L. 0. Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 



SMITH, CHARLES R. Herington 
Industrial Journalism 



1 ^ ^, :2,^p£^ 



SMITH, FRANCES 
Home Economics 



Durham 



SMITH, STEPHEN R. Manhattan 
General Science 



SPENCER, HAROLD C. Baldwin 
Industrial Journalism 



SPRATT, ROBERT C. Kansas City 
Civil Engineering 



STAIB, HARRY J. 

Electrical Engineering 



Turon 



STAUFFER, MARION W. Marion 
Industrial Journalism 



STEBBINS, FLORENCE Ellis 

General Science 



STEINER, JOHN 
General Science 



Whitewater 



STOCKEBRAND, FRED C. 
Agronomy Yates Center 



STOCKWELL, GLENN D. Larned 
Agricultural Economics 



SWENSON, MILDRED Clay Center 
Industrial Journalism 



TAYLOR, G. E. 

Agriculture 



Hiawatha 



THACKREY, JOSEPH E. 

General Science Manhattan 



TREGO, W. W. Sedgwick 

Mechanical Engineering 



THUROW, LEONA ESTHER 

Home Economics Macksville 




^^-OJ^P^Z^ 






TRIPP, ORVAL W 

Civil Engineering 



TUCKER, FLOYD J. Minneola 

Mechanical Engineering 



VINCENT, MABLE I. Sterling 

General Science 



VOWEL, I. N. 

Agriculture 



Anness 



WARREN, REES C. Manhattan 
Mechanical Engineering 



WATSON, ELEANOR ElDorado 
Home Economics 



WATSON, MARGARET Turon 

Industrial Journalism 



WELCH, MARION Emporia 

Home Economics 



WERTMAN, ALBERT P. 

Dairy Husbandry Washington 



WERTMAN, ZOE 
Home Economics 



Manhattan 



WHEARTY, RUTH IDA 

Home Economics Westmoreland 



WHITE, W. J. Ada 

Mechanical Engineering 

WHITTEN, SUSANNA Wakarusa 
Home Economics 



WILSON, C. C. 

Agriculture 



WILSON, ELLA 
Home Economics 



Canton 



Luray 



2^03O?Zs 




WILSON, HAZEL M. 
Home Economics 



1 Q ^ 2, 



Luray 



WILSON, J. L. 

General Science 



Ottawa 



WOOD, CHESTER S. Manhattan 
Agronomy 



WOOD, ORWIN C. 

Electrical Engineering 



Topeka 



WOODWARD, LUCILE Wichita 
Music 



WOODY, ALDEN B. 

Industrial Journalism 



Lincoln 



WORSTER, FRANK Manhattan 
Industrial Chemistry 




WURST, LEROY L. Russell Springs 
Electrical Engineering 




95 



Z^O^^Zjr, j=>\ 







BtttHMTB' ?fcsro 



Wc lilt a song of oth'fct .times. 
Of other days we sing', 
When rules were mild and Frosh tan 
And men could sAJng 
A Handle. 

C horus — Oh what fun. Oh what fun - 
TraleOle addle 
When rules/were mild 
And Frosh ran wild. 
And men. could swing a paddle 

am. ■■#$ 

O gallant age. adventure s child. 
When Fiosh were on the wing, 
And each sphrtsman biave with a bai i 
Fared forth to swing 
"#&V A Paddle 

.Choi us- Oh what fun. Oh what fun — 

i TialeOle addle 

'■ When each sportsman brave 

With a band stave 
* I aied forth to swing a paddle 



OH FOR THE DAYS WHAT WAS.' 

'•.'.>'•>'' A Lamentation*'*'.-'/.. '.'•*.'■ 

am:" 



rlsta 



Not c en the day when chivaliy 
Was grecii can evei bring 
1 o tongue or pen, such sights as men 
Who raise and swing" 

A Paddle. . , 

V •,;•■ 

C horus — Oh what tun. Oh what fun - 
TraleOleaddleYvV;.. 
Not to tongue or pen *.* . 

Such sights a» men' 
Who taise and swing a paddle 

&DQGtOM. ';;'■■' .■'-"■ 

Rut (nan made laws are Cieepmy 
Soo.i they'll ban the thing 
What sadness then, what sadness wh< 
wr cannot swing *•■%• '"'* 

A Paddle V - 

HMGIO ffl di/L f. '■■'■ 

C hoi us When we re done, when we r 

lia- aleC) u le addle. ; ;v'V;;: : :: 

What sadness then. sj '..';. "/v-," 

W'hat sadness when "■'.'■"'',;■ 

We cannot swing a paddle, '" 

no longei swing a paddle 



Oulld, 



paddle 






Class of 1924 



Motto— "Plus Ultra" Colors— Gold and Green 

Class Flower — Yellow Chrysanthemum 

Sophomore class history! We write those words with a feeling of exulta- 
tion and satisfaction. We are no longer designated by that odious appellation 
Freshmen! We have pushed forward until now, at last, we decorate your pages 
as Sophomores, and such words as chemistry laboratory, freshman caps, and 
paddles have only historical significance in our minds. 

Now about this history of us. Eight hundred and seventy-eight boys and 
girls, potential engineers and journalists, Greek pledges, ags., and home ec'ers, 
athletes, musicians, debaters, cynics, daters, and students, enrolled as Freshmen 
one sweltering day in the fall of 1920. 

We soon became bold enough to pass daily through the aisles of the 
standing market in Anderson. Later, after several desperate word battles, we 
elected the class officers. We then started out to express ourselves and make 
our mark on college life. 

During that first year our one achievement was borrowing money from 
the Sophomores. But now, near the end of our second year, our influence is 
felt in all college activities. Our lounge lizards are of the fiercest species; our 
athletes are helping make victorious Aggie football, basketball, track, and 
swimming teams; our students have startled the professors by their application; 
The Brown Bull and the Collegian could hardly be published if it were not for 
our "Newsies," artists, jokesters, and satirists; and our girls — well, at the 
present rate there won't be any frat pins left for the frats by the time we are 
Seniors. Our presence is essential to the happiness of the music department 
because our actions at the Artist Series are perfect. The literary societies 
recognize our ability in debate and oratory, and dramatic organizations are 
enlisting a number of us. 

With such a past can we fail? No! We modestly admit that we are des- 
tined to be the greatest class at K. S. A. C. 




98 



i^o>c*?Zs j=>xsri>i^je: 



\ 





Officers of tl)e (Tlass of 1924 




L. W. Grothusen; Alma Hallowell; J. M. Leonard; Doris Riddell; 
W. R. Pendleton. 

Dorothy Knittle; Emmet Graham; E. J. McWilliams; F. R. Barnhisel; 

Julia Caton. 

First Semester Second Semester 

President F. R. Barnhisel E. J. McWilliams 

Vice-President Doris Riddell Dorothy Knittle 

Treasurer W. R. Pendleton J. M. Leonard 

Secretary Julia Caton Alma Hallowell 

S. S. G. A. Representatives. L. W. Grothusen, Emmett Graham 





BRANN, WILLARD Mound City 



BREESE, VERNA 



Wichita 



BROOKS, MARGUERITE VERA 
Hutchinson 



Garrison 



BROOKS, L. B. 



BROWN, Wm. E. 

Walnut Grove, Ark. 

BRYAN, H. C. Osage City 

BURGER, CHRISTINE Seneca 

BURTIS, PENELOPE Manhattan 



BUTEL, F. C. 



Carbondale 



CABACUNGAN, E. A. Philippines 



CARNAHAN, H. H. Garrison 

CASE, HELEN Collyer 

CATON, JULIA Winfleld 

CHEATHAM, HAZEL Mulvane 

CLARK, LOIS A. Delphos 

CLEAVINGER, EUGENE 

Lowemont 

COE, ROY A. Fayetteville, Ark. 

COPELAND, M. J. Quinter 

CORRELL, MARIE Manhattan 

DAWLEY, FRANCES Manhattan 



HAGGARD, FLOYD Topeka 




1 Q 



HEALEA, F. C 



HERMAN, R. E. 



Frankfort 



Wichita 



Kingman 



HERR, MABLE Medicine Lodge 

HERING, OLIVE Stafford 

HESHION, MARGARET 

Manhattan 

HILL, RANDELL C. Manhattan 

HINSHAW, LEE Wakeeney 

HOLLIS, GENEVA Fredonia 

HOPE, H. R. Garden City 

HOWARD, CLARA L. Manhattan 

HULING, ESTHER Manhattan 

HULL, GERALDINE Manhattan 



HULSE, HAZEL 



HYDE, BERTHA 



Manhattan 



Altoona 



JARVIS, BERNICE Kansas City 



JOHNSON, BERNICE Simpson 



JOHNSON, JULIA Herington 




JONES, CHARLES A. Manhattan 



l^OK^jr, 




l Q :2, 





KAISER, EULALIA 



KELLEY, SANKEY Manhattan 



KEILHORN, C. E. 



Cambridge 



KIFER, R. S. Springfield, Mo. 



KING, ELMIRA Ellsmore 



KNEELAND, NILIE Kismet 



KNITTLE, DOROTHY Manhattan 



KIRK, V. L. 



LAMSON, MARIE 



LOW, H. M. 



Iola 



Paola 



Topeka 



LENTZ, J. C. Holton 

LEONARD, RUTH Manhattan 



LEONARD, J. M. 



Newton 



LINGELBACH, G. D. Minneola 



LITWILLER, E. M. 



Freeport 



LOCKHART, W. K. Humbolt 

LUKERT, DOROTHY Topeka 

McCOIN, BETTY Wichita 

McCONNELL, ETHEL Russell 

MCDONALD, G. A. Frederick 



i 



R.030?Z^ 







McWILLIAMS, E. J. Alta Vista 



MADDOX, L. E. Hazelton 



MARDIS, FRANCES Preston 



MARLEY, ANNA Phillipsburg 




MARSTON, ALICE 



Wilmington, Del. 



MAYDEN, COLETTA Manhattan 



MEBUS, DOROTHY Kansas City 



MERRILL, EDWARD LeRoy 



MEYER, ROXIE 



MILLER, B. J. 



MOORE, LENA 



Wamego 



Piedmont 



Wakarusa 



MORRIS, SARAH Manhattan 



MOTT, GENEVIEVE Herington 



MUELLER, A. D. 
MUSE, J. K. 
MUSTOE, NANCY 
MYERS, W. E. 
NORTHUP, RUBY 



Hanovei 

Manhattan 

Norton 

Eskridge 

Cuba 



NUTTLE, MARY ElDorado 



O'LEARY, ZOE 



Phillipsburg 




OLIVER, FLOYD R. 



O'NEIL, MARY 




PASLAY, RUTH 



PATTERSON, NEOLA Gerie 



PEAK, VIVIAN 



PENCE, R. O. 



Manhattan 



Colby 



PENDLETON, W. R. Manhattan 
PEPPIATT, ETHEL Ellsworth 



PFEIFER, A. H. 



POST, JOHN C. 



Hamlin 



Manhattan 



PORTER, Mrs. SYBIL Fredonia 



PORTER, R. G. 
PRETZ, OTTO L. 



Norton 
Olathe 



RAFFINGTON, MARGARET 

Hutchinson 



RANKIN, Wm. 
RATLIFF, ANNE 



Manhattan 
Manhattan 



REASONER, MARGARET 

Herington 



REECE, EDITH 




1 s> 



REICHART, E. L. Toledo, O. 

REID, HELEN Cheyenne, Wyo. 
RETTER, H. W. Topeka 

REYNOLDS, L. O. Pierce City, Mo- 
RICE, M. D. Cullison 

RIDDELL, DORIS Salina 

ROBINSON, L. G. Galesburg 

ROOFE, P. G. Spring Hill 

ROSE, JOHN W. Luray 

RUSSELL, LEONORA Lyons 

RYAN, C. R. Manhattan 

SANDERS, DOROTHY 

Leavenworth 

SCHEEL, ELWIN Emporia 

SELLERS, L. R. Great Bend 

SHERMAN, RALPH 

Burlington, N. J. 



SMITH, PAUL E. 



SMITH, R. L. 



Herington 



Cedar Vale 



STEWART, ANNA Morganville 



STEWART, RACHEL Winchester 



STOCKEBRAND, A. L. Vernon 




Z^OJOTZs 




1 Q s, 2/ 





STOVER, R. L. 
STUEBER, O. E. 
STUEBER, THEO. 
SWARNER, J. F. 

SWEET, HAZEL 
THEISS, H. H. 

THOMASSON, N. R. 



Manhattan 



Hutchinson 



Parsons 



THOMPSON, M. S. Manhattan 



TRUE, FLORENCE 



TURNER, D. O. 



UGLOW, NINA 



UHLAND, VERNE 



Perry 



Milton 



Ames 



Rozel 



VAN GILDER, HELEN Manhattan 



VOILAND, FERDINAND Topeka 



WEITERS, ADELAIDE Lanham 



WEBERG, N. N. 



Salina 



WATSON, VIRGINIA 

Ash Grove, Mo. 



WATTERS, NORA 



Axtell 



WEBB, RUTH Tonganoxie 

WERHAM, F. L. Bennington 



S 



ROy^TZs j=> xyj^T^z. E^^ 



'i q ^, ^^nm 





Officers of Class of 1925 

Circle Charles Humbert 

Justin Barnhisel Aspey 

First Semester Second Semester 

President G. C. Charles Charles Long 

Vice-President L. N. Circle Bernice Humbert 

Secretary.... Bernice Humbert Lucile Martin 

Treasurer Grace Justin John Brown 

S. s. G. A Myrle Barnhisel lone Aspey 

REFLECTIONS 
We came to school a motley crew, The football season soon began, 

Believing thoroughly we knew And introduced a two-fold plan. 

Just how a college should be run, One meant a cap of purple hue, 

And good advice we sought from none. The other brought the wood to you. 

So many things we could improve, They sent us down two long, long hnes- 

And guide them through a brand new groove. We traveled down the "Rue de Pines. 
Among them was assigners' speed; The question ends where it began— 

They moved as if the course were treed, To wear the cap or dodge the fan. 

And took so long to get it down, The bright headgear with button green 

We pulled up chairs and parked around, Will really make a "Frosh look keen. 

Sometimes an hour, sometimes all day. And next fall may the saints protect 

They had you there; you had to stay. Each capless "Frosh" that we detect. 

— H. E. Monroe. 



m 



^q^^-^ z>tsi2.t>z^je: 





ACKARS, MABEL; ANDERSON, C.j ANDERSON, MAE; ARCHER, INEZ; ATZENWEILER, W. H.; BABB, 

VIVIENNE; BALLINGER, VIVIAN. 
BARNER, IRENE; BARNHISEL, MYRL; BATDORF, W. N.; BAYER, DOROTHY; BEESON, VIRGINIA; 

BEGGS, MARCIA; BELL, EVERETT; BELL, HELEN. 




BLACK, M. J.; BLACK, HILDA; BOAL, RUTH; BOWMAN, L. J.; BRENNER, MARGARET; BRENNER, 

MIRIAM; BRESSLER, ELIZABETH. 
BRITT, B.; BROCK, CLARA; BROWER, E. L.; BROWNRIGG, ESTHER; BROWN, VIRA; BUNKER, K. R. 

BURGWIN, JESSIE; BUTLER, VIDA. 





CAMPBELL, R. A.; CAMPBELL, B. A.; CAPPER, MARY; CHAPIN, EDNA; CHAPPELL K R • CHURCHILL 
MILDRED; CIRCLE, LUTHER. 
. i " 2 R, C. SAMUEL; CONNETT, HELEN; CONSTABLE, GRACE; CRAWFORD ALETHA- 
J l . ! I J IV 3 X, F. H.; D.VD3, K/J33ELT,; D.VLIAS, GLADYS; DANIELSON, ETHYL. 

113 



Z^OKZTZs z>tsri=>il,je\ 




DAVIDSON, INA W.; DAVIS, EILEEN; DAWSON, MILDRED; DEAL, VIRGINIA; DELFELDER, G. H., 

DEMPSEY, ELEANOR; DeWOLF, DOROTHY. 
DEY, M. L.; DOANE, N. F.; DOBIE, MELDA N.; ELLIOTT, BLANCHE; EMERY, DELBERT; ENGLISH; 

IVA; EPLEE, HAZEL; ESHBAUGH, CLIFFORD. 




EWING, OPAL; FAIRBANK, EVELYN; FEAREY, K. M.; FERRIS, VESTA; FINNIN, F. E.; FISHER, ALICE ; 

FOSTER, A. W. 
FREEMAN, HILMA; FROST, DOROTHY; FROST, HILDA; GILBERT, C. R.; GILLESPIE, MILDRED; 

GILMAN, HAROLD; GREEN, VELMA; CHARLES, G. C. 





GUNN, C. L.; HAACK, AELIZE; HAAS, WALTER; HALBOWER, KENNETH; HALE, JOHN; HALL, VIVIAN, 

HANNEN, ALICE. 
HARRIS, PAUL W.; HASSLER, EMMA; HAWKINSON, CAROLYN; HEIMERICK, MARJORIE; HEMKER; 

W. D.; HENRY, J. D.; HEYL, E. W.; HIGGINBOTHAM, MARY. 

114 







HOLSINGER, EDITH; HOMMON, C. E.; HOPKINS, MARGARET; HORNER, JENNIE; HOWARD, CHARLES 

L.; HOWE, MARGARET; HUCKSTEAD, EMMA JEAN. 
HUMBERT, BERNICE; HUMISTON, MAUD; HUNGERFORD, M. N.; HURST, CLAIRE; HUTCHINSON, 

EDNA; ILES, C. G.; JOHNSON, GEO.; JOHNSON, GRACE. 




JOHNSON, J. M.; JOHNSON, MILO; JONES, CHESTER R.; KATE, GERTRUDE; KEAS, J. C; KELLER- 

STRASS, MARGARET M.; KENT, ROBERT. 
KITTLE, AUDRIA B.; KISER, M. E.; KLOSTERMEIER, RUTH; KNIGHT, WINIFRED; LANGMADE, 

FRANCES; LAUGHBAUM, MARY; LAUGHLIN, H. A.; LEEPER, MARY. 




LEEPER, R. G.; LIMBOCKER, RUTH; LIPPS, F. W.; LONDERHOLM, CARL W.; LUKRITZ, RUTH- 

McILVAIN, RANDALL; McNEELEY, H. H. 
McLENON, O. P.; MACALPINE, MARGARET; MAHAFFEY, POLLEY; MARTIN, LUCILE; MAST 

MILDRED; MAUPIN, VALLIE; MEERS, R. H.; MESSENGER, W. H. 

115 



i^oj^z, J^xsi^i^i^^; 




1 Q ^, 12^^^M 




MEYER, GRACE; MITCHENER, MILDRED; MILLER, LEO. C; MONROE, H. E.; MOORE, MILDRED; 

MOORE, H.; MOORE, ANNIE L. 
MOORMAN, ALLEN; MOORMAN, C. E.; NEWBY, LUCILLE; NEWELL, KEITH; NISSEN, MARIE E.; 

NULL, MARGARET; OTTO, ESTHER; PADDLEFORD, ALICE. 




PATTERSON, ALTA; PATTERSON, VEORA; PEFFLEY, IRVIN; PEPPER, LAURA; PERHAM, W. W.; 

PICKINS, HELEN; PERKINS, ROBERT. 
PILLEY, MYRNA; PINKERTON, ERNESTINE; PLOUGHE, M.; POWELL, MAUDE; RAND, ZENDA; 

RANDELL, CLEO; RANSOM, MAXINE; RAUB, MARJORIE. 




READ, G. A.; REASONER, MILDRED; REECE, A. S.; REED, GERALDINE; REED, G. M.; REED, W. B.; 

REHBERG A. F^RHOADES, G. L.; RICHARDS, EVELYN; RICHARDSON, HELEN; RIEGEL, MILDRED; 
ROBERTS, NORMAN L.; ROBERTSON, ROBERTA; ROSS, INGA. 

116 



I 




SCHRUMPF, ELLA; SCHULTZ, FRED; SHAVER, MURIEL; SHEEL, FRED; SHERMAN, RALPH; 

SHIELDS, D. A.; SHORT, B. E. 
SMITH, CORINNE; SPECK, R. M.; STALEY, L. M.; STEWART, RUTH; STEWART, VELMA; STITT, 

JEANETTE; STRATTON, T.; SUMMERS, BERTHA. 




SUTTON, ESTELLA; SWIM, F.; TEALL, H. A.; THOMPSON, LAUREDA; THUROW, M. M.; THUROW, 

RALPH; TIMBREL, MYRTLE. 
TIMMONS, EVA; TROCK, MAE; TRUBY, G. E.; UHLRIG, H. W.; WATERMAN, J. R.; WATKINS, HOR- 

TENSE; WEGE, HARRY; WELSH, R. E. 





WICKHAM, AVIS; WILLIAMS, H." C.; WILLIS,[HUGH; WILLIAMSON, HENRIETTA; WITWER, RUTH; 
WOODS, G. I.; YANDELL, K. E.; YAPLE, C. N.; YOUNG, MARGUERITE.; CHARLES, G. C. 

117 



II 



l^OZOTZs 







lZ£,03arJL JF>TSRT>Z^E, 




^^^TaS^g^g^PSSajy^a^E^^g^^agi^S j^^^^^^g^ gggglipi w'-'ssw"-'- 





SZZG5Z4A7C MZT 



-^mjSgg/AGRICULTURl 

|T(hE JCHtL OfAg HOUVAPLAC&- 
TftAT AOTHVSJ6 EL.TE CAN PILL, 

IT FlTT YODWO ^OLRf SoR THE RACE 
To GLIMBUpLlFE'.T J-TEEPH1LL. 

Pew THERE ARE WHO DLVIPATE- 
ThEIR TIME- IN FOOLISH JEJ*TIN<i ; 

Their Education! has come late, 
And its value- they're invejtingt 

CHRISTIE- He-PLER.. 



I^OZOZZs 




School of Agriculture 



Organized 1913, and is a secondary school offering three year vocational courses, intended 
to meet the educational needs of the boys and girls of the state who cannot afford four years 
of high school work and then four years of college work. 



GRADUATING CLASS 



Motto — Out of school life 
Into life's school 



Colors- 
Floxver- 



-Carnation Pink and White 
-Pink Carnation 







I 

■ 

First Row—M. C. Wallace, H. A. Kinman, N. P. Olson, J. N. Barber, P. Knight. 

Second Row—Fern Ward, Christie Hepler, Mona Vogelman, Anna Fletcher, Christina Martin, 

Faye Wickham. 
Third Row—FL. J. Hixson, H. L. Wobbe, W. C. Boiler, F. A. Hagans, S. N. Rogers. 

MEMBERS 

0. H. Mickey India Reinhold 

E. B. Coffman J- G. Stanton 

E L Siler Maryld C. Roberts 
OFFICERS 
First Semester Second Semester 

President M. C. Wallace H. A. Kinman 

Vice-President Mona Vogelman Christie Hepler 

Secretary Christie Hepler Faye E. Wickham 

Treasurer H. A. Kinman W. C. Boiler 

Marshall Fern Ward P. Knight 

120 



2>TSRF>Z^E 




^ ^, 2, 



Activities 

BASKETBALL TEAM 




The basketball team of the school of agriculture just closed their most successful season, 
winning eleven games and losing five. With less than a dozen candidates, several of whom 
had never played in a basketball game before, Coach Frank Meyers whipped together a fast 
clean playing team. Captain Brooks, Stutz, Sprout, Karns, and Lutz won letters this year. 

ST. MARY'S DEBATE 




Boiler Spencer p acker 

Keck Briggs 

Von Trebra 
QUESTION: Resolved, That the Agricultural Bloc should be sanctioned by the American 




1 
4 



Affirmative team (won) 
C. B. Keck 
E. B. Packer 
J. T. Von Trebra 



Negative team (lost) 
W. C. Boiler 
Corwin Spencer 
P. J. Briggs 



121 



l^OJOT^ 




1 ^ 2, 2/ 



ILincoltt Citerar? Society 



Motto — Knowledge is our goal. 
Organized the fall of 1916. 




Colors — Navy Blue and Gray. 
Publication — Lincoln Review 




First Row—R. A. Kinman, V. D. Wickham, M. C. Wallace, C. Spencer, E. B. Packer, E. L. 

Canary, A. G. Jensen. 
Second Row— J. G. Stanton, L. I. Burris, W. C. Boiler, A. M. Downey, W. A. Piper. C. W. Rowe. 
Third Row—S. N. Rogers, H. J. Hixson, G. E. Stutz, W. I. Walker, P. J. Briggs, C. M. Hooten, 
R. J. Wismer. 

E. R. Honeywell F. Brandysky 

W. Haynes R- B. Sundgren 

J. T. Von Trebra C. A. Mathein 

INTER-SCHOOL DEBATERS 
Question: Resolved, That the next session of Congress should pass the soldiers' bonus bill. 




J. T. Von Trebra 



j^loiozzs j>tsi^i=>z^je; 





1 ^ 



P l)ilomatl)ian Citerar? Society 



Motto — Learn to live and live to learn. 
Organi:ed— Fall of 1916. 




Colors — Blue and Gold 
Publication — Graphic. 




First Row — Anna Fletcher, Mona Vogelman, Dorothy Ross, Christina Martin, Rose Leshosky. 
Second ~Roiv — Faye Wickham, Mariam Haynes, Christie Hepler, Myrtle Piper. 
Third Row — Blanche Holder, Fern Ward, Jennie Nettrouer. 

Helen Swallow 
Mary Fankhouser 

INTER-SCHOOL DEBATERS 

Question: Resolved, That the next session of congress should pass the soldiers' bonus bill. 





FtehMA^eTeams 





First Row—M. Dobson (2), H. V. Zimmeriman (3), G. T. Harkins (2), N. V. Platner (3) 

D. S. Hall (2), J. H. Epperson (3), J. A. McKitterick (4). 
Second Row—S. J. Coe (4), H. W. Hoffhines (2), N. D. Bruce (4), F. W. Williams (4) 

J. M. Leonard (2). 
Third Row—C. M. Wilhoite (4), L. G. Grandfield (3), C. A. Brantingham (2), C. C. Dethloff 

(4), G. E. Findley (4), G. S. Wann (2). 
Fourth Row—V. E. Whan (4), E. J. McWilliams (2), Ed. Watson (2), J. W Ebv (3) D H 

Pickrell (3). 





M. F. Ahearn 



Charles W. Bachman 



M. F. Ahearn 
During his second year as Athletic Director Mike has definitely proved that he could 
"come back" to the job he had ten years ago and more than make good. Mike is popular with 
the students, with the faculty, with the townspeople, and with all Aggies who have ever met 
him. His conscientious work for the athletic program of the college has made for a more effi- 
cient system of athletics. His work is felt throughout the Valley and his influence in things 
athletic is known all over the United States. 



Charles W. Bachman 
The last two football teams from the Kansas Aggies have been receiving favorable comment 
not only from other Valley schools, but also from colleges and universities in the Big Ten. 
Coach Bachman is the man who has developed a football system that has made a winning 
football combination for this institution. "Bach" was a star athlete at Notre Dame university 
in both football and track. He is the possessor of a trunk full of medals and shields gamed in 
intercollegiate track and field events. The Aggie tracksters will tell you that "Bach knows 

his stuff." , . , 

The "Big Coach" is a keen student of football and is ever ready to take time to demon- 
strate a new play or a new idea in football strategy. 

During the past two months Coach Bachman has been approached by members of the 
Big Ten, but his heart is in the work here and the good news has gone forth that "Bach will 
act as mentor to our football team next fall. 





1 Q 



E. C. Curtiss 

"Ted" Curtiss, a graduate of the University of Chicago, 
coaches basketball and baseball. The University of Chicago 
showered athletic honors on Curtiss, awarding him eight 
varsity letters. "Ted" has had a world of experience in ath- 
letics and shows it in his coaching. He fits in well with the 
Aggie coaching staff and is a great help to Bachman in football. 
"Bach" believes that Curtiss is without a peer as a football 
scout and avers that he shows unerring judgment in picking 
candidates for the various places on the freshman football squad. 



Racely, Geo. 

Coming here from Nebraska university, Racely took 
charge of the baseball team and immediately won a home for 
himself with the Aggie students. He knew baseball inside and 
out and knew how to impart such information to his men 
When the business world called him from the coaching game 
this institution lost a first-class coach and a fine sportsman. 




^^p,. : ^fe: 



ATHLETIC SEASON 



hardest teams in the valley to stop. Basketball and track were marked by ncreased mterest 
among both spectators and participants in these sports. Tennis came into vaUey competition 
-r» A ™ mmm e U P of th * sea son's athletic activities shows that several hundred more student, 
are taking an active part in some form of athletics than ever before- that ther^ has been n n 
appreciable increase in attendance and, last but not least a fine loval ™l'w e L;£! u a , 5 
that should accomplish much for Aggie athletic .and Uther'tKt S^ti^ M d ^ 0Ped 



127 



Z^C»5<TZs 







'l Q S* :2/^S*5^sj 




129 



2Z£,O30^Zs 





Tootball in 1921 

"The most successful football season in the history of K. S. A. C. athletics." 
This was the unanimous verdict of the followers of the great college game, and 
the record of last fall's football team certainly justifies the decision. 

Dating back to the last game of 1920, when the scrappy Aggies tied the 
champions of that year in a thrilling battle, a fighting spirit was born that 
could not be denied. During the following winter and spring it spread rapidly 
through the student body and when college opened in September everyone was 
shouting "This is the Aggie year." Real, unadulterated pep was rampant and 
the first mixer of the year held in the Y. M. C. A. building, started the campaign 
for a winning team. 

Facing the stiffest schedule ever procured for an Aggie team called for all 
that was best from the players and students alike, and may it be said to the 
everlasting credit of both that they delivered the goods. 

The team finished in a tie with the University of Missouri for second place 
in the Valley, but the Wildcats had previously twisted the Tiger's tail and 
knotted it with a 7 to 5 score. Washington University bowed to the superior 
team work of the Aggies in the first game of the season and was decisively 
beaten 21 — 0. Two games escaped Bachman's net — one to Ames and the other 
to K. U. The season ended in a blaze of glory when the Wildcats, playing true 
to name and form, outplayed the fine team coached by Bennie Owen and 
representing the University of Oklahoma. It was the Homecoming game and 
the best ever from an Aggie viewpoint. 

Old grads and visitors, attending the dedication of the Engineering hall, 
were in attendance at this game. Bachman's proteges, inspired by their pre- 
sense, played a whirlwind game that sent every loyal Aggie home with his 
head in the clouds. A wonderful football machine, well coached, finely trained, 
working as one for the best interest of the many, backed by the most loyal 
student body in the country, was bound to result in the best season ever 
enjoyed by an Aggie eleven. 

Next fall the Wildcats will have nearly all of the 1921 bunch with the 
addition of some promising material from the freshman varsity. 

Let's go, Aggies, the old fight and every student a loyal rooter. 

SUMMARY 

College of Emporia 3 

Washington 

Creighton 14 

Grinnell 3 

Missouri 5 

Kansas University 21 

Ames 7 

Oklahoma 7 



130 



z^lo>c?Zs r>xsRT=>z^E 




Aggies 7 

Aggies 21 

Aggies 7 

Aggies 21 

Aggies 7 

Aggies 7 

Aggies 

Aggies 14 



s 






^, 2/ 



Stauffer 

Big "Stauff" was crowned with hard luck 
during the football season. Early in the season 
an injury to his knee kept him on the side-lines. 
He was shot into the fray often enough to show 
flashes of his old time form, and the Wildcats are 
counting strongly on Stauffer's tackle play to 
help bring home the Missouri Valley title in 1922. 

P. S.— Marion Stauffer is busy writing journal- 
istic yarns and putting on flesh. 



Nichols 

"Nick" reported for football in 1921 with about 
165 pounds of flesh and bone, a smile, and a 
fighting spirit. Injuries to veterans gave the 
youngster a chance and he made good. It is a 
pleasure to watch this boy play tackle. He is 
endowed with everything that a good athlete 
needs in his work. Heady, aggressive, and fast. 
The way he sizes up the opponents' strategy is 
uncanny, and many a time "Nick" has broken up 
opposing plays before they were well under way. 

Schmitz 





Possessed with a fine pair of shoulders, two long 
arms, and a pair of corking good hands, Schmitz 
was able to smear 95 per cent of the plays sent at 
his side of the line. There may have been better 
students than Henry in the Valley, but it would 
be hard to make the Aggie Profs believe it, and 
there may have been better tackles in the Valley 
but you could not make the Aggie rooters admit it. 
Schmitz has been carrying the ball for consistent 
gains in his class room work and if he doesn't 
watch out he'll graduate in three years and lose 
one year of athletic competition in the Missouri 
Valley. 



Bryan 

"Dodo" won his letter for the first time this year 
as a substitute for Stark. He was a hard driving 
runner, a good passer, and the possessor of an 
educated toe which did excellent service on several 
occasions during the season. Called upon as he 
was on numerous occasions to kick from behind 
our own goal line he showed that he could be 
depended upon to turn the trick when under fire. 



L32 



OX^Tj 





Stark was captain of the 1921 freshman team and a 
regular on the 1922 varsity team. Playing his first year 
on the team he proved to be one of the king pins on 
offense. He was a hard driving off-tackle runner, an ex- 
cellent passer, and a player with good team spirit and 
determination. The Stark-to-Burton and Stark-to- 
Winter and Cowell passing combinations were feared 
throughout the Valley. 





Swartz 

Burr proved in his very first game, to the satisfaction 
of the big coach that he knew his eggs and removed one 
of the wrinkles from Bachman's brow. Many a Valley 
team received the surprise of its life when Swartz 
started throwing passes with left and right. His left 
handed flip has paved the way to several touchdowns. 



Winters 

Left end on the Varsity, just over six feet in height 
and 175 lbs. in weight. "Ship" had the speed of a grey- 
hound and was always down the field on punts. On 
account of his speed and drive, he was used in some 
games to carry the ball from a half-back's position. 
"Ship" was a hard worker and developed into one of the 
star ends of the conference. 




Sebring 

A tower of strength offensively and defensively. 
He knows football and plays it with his head as well as 
with his hands and feet. Tom is a fine type of athlete, 
being a good student and a leader in college activities. 
He was recommended to Walter Camp last fall for a 
place on his all-eleven. Harold is one of the best re- 
ceivers of forward passes on the Aggie team and no one 
who saw the Wildcat-Tiger game last fall will forget the 
pass he grabbed and carried to the Missouri goal line, 
turning- sure defeat into glorious victory. 



133 



l^C»C^Zs 






^ 2. 2/ 



Cowell 

"Brady" is a living example of the true Aggie spirit. 
A student on the field and in the classroom, with him the 
college came first and Brady second. He was one of the 
most aggressive and consistent performers on the team, 
his specialty being to grab short forward passes, which 
he usually converted into long gains. It is around such 
men as Brady, with his cool temperament, courage, and 
loyalty, that winning athletic teams are built. Brady 
graduates in June and is the last of the famous Cowell 
brothers whose athletic achievements have made Aggie 
and Valley history. 



Murphy 

Tim is an example of what bulldog tenacity and ag- 
gressiveness can accomplish if properly applied. A 
substitute for three years on the varsity playing at 
tackle, guard, and center, he finally earned the right this 
year to wear the coveted "K." 





Sears 

The hard-hitting full-back of the Kansas Aggies was 
known and feared by every team on the Aggie schedule. 
"Susie" could hit a line like Babe Ruth punishing a Reach 
ball and could always be relied upon for a consistent 
gain. "Susie" has a fine disposition and comes out of 
every mix-up with a generous smile on his classic features. 
He has one more year of varsity competition and judging 
from past performances he is due for the best season of 
his football career. 



Brown 

Henry is a notable example of what perseverance and 
college spirit may accomplish for a man who believes in 
college ideals and traditions. Henry alternated at half 
and quarter on the football team and showed excellent 
judgment when called upon to pilot the team. 





134 




1 Q s, 2/ 



Smith 

A center, a tackle, and end, and able to play any of 
these positions well. Burr is one of the most dependable 
men on the squad. Never flashy but always in the right 
place when needed. He has a valuable cog in Bachman's 
machine. He was a fierce tackier and a keen student of 
the game and should rank high in Valley circles in 1922. 





Steiner 

A new find — playing his first year of college football, 
he proved himself a satisfactory under-study for Ray 
Hahn. With the experience gained last fall and in spring 
practice John should develop into a star lineman. He is 
built like the Sig Ep Bungalow, but is astonishingly fast 
for a man of his avoirdupois. 



Schindler 

A running mate to Hahn and, therefore, needless to 
add, a sterling football guard. Schindler was handi- 
capped to some extent by injuries, but his game was al- 
ways sound and at times it was brilliant. With Schindler 
and Hahn back next fall the Wildcats are bound to have 
two of the best guards in the Valley. Ira weighs more 
than 180 lbs. and is fast and aggressive. 





Burton 

"Ding" was moved to half-back position this fall and 
the result proved that Bachman is unerring in selecting 
men for a particular position. Burton was the most 
spectacular half-back in the Missouri Valley. He was 
especially brilliant on the receiving end of a pass, and 
many a gain was made by the aerial routes, Starke to 
Bui ton, or Swartz to Burton. "Ding" is absolutely 
fearless, a wonderful broken field runner, and a fellow 
who always tries to live up to Bachman's slogan of 
"One for all and all for one." 



135 



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MISSOURI GAME 

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2^oj<^rc j>x^i^t>z^^:\ 




basketball Season 

The basketball season was not a glorious success in the 
number of games won, but Coach Curtiss showed that he could 
take a bunch of new material and develop it rapidly during a 
heavy schedule of games. The graduation of a team which had 
played together for three years left only one regular player and 
three substitutes around which to build a new team. That the 
team was a coming one was proved when it gave Nebraska and 
Missouri very close decisions at the end of the season. A return 
of all but two of this year's men will mean a more experienced 
team with which to start the 1922-23 season. 




i 



c< 



no 



Brady Cowell 

Brady was all that a captain of a team should be, a 
true leader, and a fighter on the floor. He was one of 
the cleverest defensive men in the Valley besides carrying 
the brunt of the Aggies' floor work. His sportsmanship 
stands as a splendid example of Aggie spirit. 





Favol Foval 

His smooth passing and knowledge of basketball made 
"Fav" one of the main cogs in the Aggie team. At for- 
ward or guard he played a strong defensive game and 
scored his share of the points. In Captain-elect Foval 
the Aggie team has an able successor to Captain Cowell. 




Freddy Williams 

Freddy was the team's leading scorer. He specialized 
on long shots and was the most dangerous man on the 
floor when shooting from around center. The loss of 
Williams will put a big dent in the Aggie scoring machine. 




141 



2^<Z»^TZy X^XSRI^l^^ 





Ray Hahn 

In basketball Ray showed that same fight and ag- 
gressiveness that made him a terror on the football field. 
He was particularly good at taking the rebound from 
the back board and made the most of his size and speed. 



Andy McKee 

Andy was a consistent worker at center, playing par- 
ticularly good games against K. U. and Oklahoma. 
However, he was handicapped most of the season by 
sickness contracted during the Christmas holidays. 




"Hank" Webber 

"Hank" was an example of the "Old Aggie Fight" and 
played a hard, clean game at all times. Webber was the 
backbone of the Aggie defense, doing stellar work at the 
guard position until sickness put him out at the end of 
the season. He should be one of the most valuable men 
on the squad next year. 



Maurelle Dobson 

"Dobby" was not eligible until the second semester 
but started right off by shooting baskets from all over 
the floor in the game against Missouri. Dobson was one 
of the most spectacular players in the Valley and should 
prove a big help to the team next year. 



TSRT>Z^E 




£l Q -2L ^^^ 









143 



I^,C&C^?2^ 





1921 OracK Season 

Featured by one or two strong men rather than by a winning 
combination, the track season of 1921 from the standpoint of 
Aggie victories was not particularly successful. With the excep- 
tion of two or three such strong men as Watson and Gallagher the 
remainder of the team was made up of new material. The season 
opened with a meet with the Haskell Indians who were the 
winners of the contest, while Missouri and K. U. later defeated 
the Aggies by scores of almost two to one. 

The ability of the Aggies to take points in the long distance 
events was the strong point of the team. In the hurdles and 
sprints the work of Gallagher featured at the beginning of the 
season. Several new men showed up with promise of future de- 
velopment. Riley did some nice work in the hurdles, Hope and 
Axline in the pole vault, and Von Reisen and Kuykendall in the 
distances. 

New records for the Aggies were set by Watson in the half 
mile and two mile runs, and by Gallagher in the 100 yard dash. 



2^C»C 




Q -2. 2, 




Watson 

Captain Ray B. Watson has completed a unique 
career at K. S. A. C. When he first trod the campus of 
the college four years ago, none, himself included, would 
admit that he was an athlete. But in the three years of 
his track competition he has blazed a trail in track ath- 
letics that has given him an international reputation as 
a middle distance and a general all-around man in 
scholastic attainments. In his junioi year he earned 
the right to represent his country at the Olympic Games 
in Antwerp, Belgium, and in his senior year he closed his 
careei by clea.ly demonstrating that he was the class of 
the collegiate world by winning the mile at the National 
Inter-Collegiate meet in Chicago in record time. 



Matthias 

Bill is one of our star distance runners and was 
unanimously elected captain of the 1922 track team. 
His specialty was the mile in which he was a consistent 
winner. Bill was a member of the four mile and cross- 
country teams. 



Kuykendall 

"Kyk" was Ray Watson's running mate in the mile 
and two mile. He was a member of the cross-country 
team and the four-mile relay team. His best time in 
the two mile was 9:51 made in the dual meet with 
Haskell. 




Clapp 

Clapp ran the half-mile in dual meets and was one of 
our most consistent point winners. He was also a mem- 
ber of the cross-country and four-mile relay teams. 



145 




i 




2^03C^3TjEs 






The "Swede" was the surprise package of the track 
team. With only three days' practice, because of heavy 
assignments and outside work, he vaulted 11 feet 9 
inches at the Missouri Valley meet and won second place. 



During the indoor season Riley ran the quarter and 
was a member of the mile relay quartet. During the 
outdoor season he was switched to the 220 yard low 
hurdles, and finished the season with a third place in 
the Valley meet. 





Hope 

Hollis ranked as one of the most versatile track ath- 
letes in the Valley. The pole vault was his specialty, 
yet he won many points in dual meets with his hurdling, 
high jumping, and broad jumping. At the K. C. A. C. 
he vaulted 11 feet 10 inches. 



Heme 

Henre, our diminuitive two miler, came to the Aggies 
with a reputation of being a distance runner and has 
more than made good. He was a member of the cross- 
country and four-mile relay teams. 



i k. 



r J^F>J^& 









^~'"%> 



Jennings 

Competing his first year in track, Jennings developed 
rapidly as a high jumper, 
of strength and spring. 



He has an unusual amount 



Collom 

Collom was our lone representative in the weight 
events, and while he was not a big man, he more than 
made up for lack of weight by speed and form in throwing 
the weights. 




Von Reisen 

Von is a middle distance runner of no mean ability- 
He shows promise of being a worthy successor to Ray 
Watson in the middle distance events. Von has records 
of 1:59 and 4:31 in the half and mile respectively. He is 
a sophomore and has two years of competition left. 




Stalcup 

"Stally" showed great promise as a broad jumper. He 
is a faithful worker who can be depended upon at all 
times to exert all the energy at his command for the 
college. 




147 



I^O^O^J^ 





1 ^ -2L 2, 



3\ela? Oeam 




With a large group of distance runners to work with, the coach started 
early in the season to develop a relay team. When the tryouts for the Illinois 
Relay were held in the gymnasium, the competition for places on the team 
was so keen that six men ran the mile under 4 minutes and 40 seconds, which 
is a faster average time than the Armory record made by Illinois in 1919. At 
Illinois we finished second to the Illinois quartet. Both teams broke the Armory 
record. At the Drake relays, held the first Saturday in May, we again placed 
second to Illinois, defeating Wisconsin, Minnesota, Chicago, Ames, Kansas, 
and Drake. 

Ray Watson is the only member of the quartet that was lost by graduation 
and with such men as Von Riesen and Price to fill his place, we may look for 
our relay team to bring added laurels to K. S. A. C. 



148 



1 S> Z2. ^ 



^S:: 



Cross (Tountr? 1921 




The second year of the revival of cross country running showed a marked improvement in 
interest and team ability. There were no outstanding men, but rather a group of evenly 
balanced runners. The squad was finally singled out from about 45 aspirants. 

In the handicap run, which was open to freshmen and varsity, the Aggie followers of this 
sport saw the beginning of the hard grind of the daily running. "Bill" Matthias, captain of 
the team, was first man in despite his handicap of two and one-half minutes. M.' R. Henre 
handicapped the same, was second, and E. H. Bradley was third. 

The team which ran against K. U., and which met the big defeat of a 17-38 score because 
of the unknown stretch of almost a mile of brick pavement, was composed of the following 
men who placed according to the number following their name: Matthias, .3- Chapman 7- 
Bradley, 8; Clapp, 9; Bryan, 11; and Ibach, 12. ' ' 

Just previous to the meet with Nebraska university, November 5, the team was greatly 
strengthened by the addition of M. R. Henre. As a result, the Aggie men won a decisive 
victory over their opponents by the score of 17-38. This team was composed of Clapp Matthias 
and Henre who tied for first, with Chapman, fifth, with Bradley sixth, and with Bryan ninth! 

The final meet which the Aggie "antelopes" entered and which gave a good comparison of 
the relative merit of the individuals in a valley setting, was the M. V. meet at Lincoln Neb on 
November 11. The team which made the trip was the same as the week before, and a'mong'the 
thirty-six entries made the following places: Matthias, Henre, Clapp, Bradley Chapman 
Bryan. The placing of the teams was: Iowa State, first with 31 points; K. U second with 50 : 
Kansas Aggies, third with 75; Nebraska, fourth with 80; Grinnell, fifth with 88; and Washineton 
sixth with 140. & 

Captain Matthias, M. R. Henre, and W. J. Clapp reached the requirements for monograms 
and were presented with the cross country sweater. 



149 



i 



i 




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"2s >=E»SS 





151 




m 



1 ^ ^ 21/ 



baseball Season 1921 




Although the team gradually improved throughout the 
season, 1921 was not, in consideration of games won, a particularly 
successful baseball year for the Aggies. The season opened with 
a tie game with St. Mary's. A week later, St. Mary's played a 
return game, making it 11 — 1 in their favor. Then followed a 
game with Haskell with a 7 — 5 win and Kansas University with 
two wins. The Aggies finally found their stride and held Nebraska 
to close scores in a pair of games on the home field. Missouri next 
visited the Aggie camp and a pair of games was split between the 
teams. Oklahoma came along and was defeated in two games. 
Nebraska took the next two on her home grounds and the season 
closed with divided honors in two games between the Aggies and 
K. U. 

The combination of a change of coaching system and poor 
weather conditions for training made itself felt at the beginning 
of the season. 



s 



152 



^ S, -2^ 




Guiljoyle, Luke (Captain) 

Captain Luke was the backbone of the Aggie varsity 
last spring. Steady as Doctor Hughes of the chemistry 
department, possessor of a keen baseball mind and as 
full of fight as a wildcat, Luke made an ideal leader. 
Playing his third year on the team, Captain Guilfoyle 
displayed a brand of catching and qualities of leadership 
that stamp him as one of the best receivers in the 
Missouri Valley. 



Griffith, Evan 

A finished first-sacker; a brainy ball player; cool in a 
crisis, and a dangerous man with the stick, aptly de- 
scribes Griff. The 1922 baseball squad will be under the 
leadership of this sterling athlete. 




5 





T**^ 



Start of the two-mile against Haskell 



ls.-f 



Z^OZO^Zs 



h L 







Cornell, Everett 

"Shorty" Cowell, a veteran on the squad, played left 
field. A dangerous hitter in pinches, he was a thorn in 
the side of opposing pitchers. "Shorty" closed a brilliant 
college athletic career when he made the final put-out in 
the last game of the season. 



Mershon, C. F. 

Last year "Rosy" was a mighty good third baseman 
but Racely placed him at short-stop and he performed 
like a big leaguer in his new role. A dependable hitter, a 
classy fielder, and an all around good fellow is the 
verdict of the fans. 




$\ 



Otto, Merlon 

Mert pitched his final game for the Aggies last spring 
and the fans are still in mourning. When "Riley's" fast 
ball was working there was nothing to it but to chalk up 
a win for the home team. Mert was one of the most 
willing slab artists that ever wore an Aggie uniform. 



Hewey, Geo. "Dutch" 

Big "Dutch" was a crafty slab artist. He has a fast 
ball but depended largely on his slow ball to win games. 
Hewey was a student of baseball, and pitched with his 
head as well as his arm. Many an opposing batter 
whiffed the air because Dutch outguessed him. His 
long drives made him a batter to be feared. 




154 



^jce,CX^^Z> J>XSZ2.J>Z^JE 





S> "2. 



Dicker son, Walter E. 

Dick was a wonder at first base in '20 and better still 
at third in '21. He was fast, aggiessive and brainy, the 
type that fits well into any man's team. This is his last 
season here. 



fe-< 




Sinderson, L. E. 

"Sindy" held down the center-field job during part of 
the season. He got every ball that came his way and 
should develop into a second Tris Speaker in 1922. 





Cornell, Warren 

It is the most natural thing in the world to see "Brady" 
Cowell cavort around the keystone sack. As a fielder he 
was hard to beat. When "Brady" took the bat we 
naturally expected a hit. He played with the kind of 
pep that put the old fight in his team-mates. In addition 
to this he was a fine student, and a modest, unassuming 
chap, admired by all who follow the fortunes of Aggie 
teams. 



Burton, Howard "Red" 

Playing his first year of varsity baseball, Red gives 
promise of becoming one of the best short fielders in the 
Valley. He is a rangy youngster, blessed with a fine 
throwing arm and a good pair of legs. At the bat he 
swings naturally and should develop into a cracking 
good hitter. 




155 



I 



i^o>c<*tjl, 2>xsi^i>z^jE * ££Em*=*~ ^ m!sSm 




E. A. KNOTH 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 



Untra-^ttural .Attics 

Intra-murals have become permanently established at the 
Kansas State Agricultural college. Great impetus was given to 
this branch of physical education when the department of physical 
education secured Prof. E. A. Knoth to take charge of gymnastic 
work and intra-murals. Through his efforts intra-mural events in 
basketball, baseball, track, and swimming have met with hearty 
response from the student body and much interest has been 
manifested by faculty and public in the results of these games. 

In the fall of 1920 the first intra-mural games were scheduled 
at this institution and now at the end of two years the physical 
education department possesses a thriving young enterprise that 
seems to be winning its way with the student body. The success 
of intra-murals at the Kansas Aggie is due to Coach Knoth and 
the hearty cooperation of the student organizations. 



m 




1 Q 2, 2, 








Swimming 

A surprising amount of interest was displayed in the first 
annual intra-mural swimming meet. Unusual talent was dis- 
covered and resulted in the forming of a varsity swimming team. 

Intra-Mural Results 

Points 

B. E. Colburn 1st 23 

J. M. Mackay 2nd 21 

W. N. Neitzert 3rd 10| 

R. A. Hakel 

F. H. Dilts) 4th 7§ 

0. Payne 5th 5 

. J- Hale 6th 2 

Varsity Swimming 
Aggies 30. Nebraska 28. Dual meet February 22. 

160 yard relay won by Nebraska. 

Fancy diving— Mackay 2nd; Colburn 3rd. 

40 yard free style — Colburn 1st. 

40 yard breast— Colburn 2nd. 

220 yard free style— Mackay 1st; Magill 3rd. 

100 yard dash— Colburn 1st; Mackay 2nd. 

40 yard back stroke— Mackay 2nd;'Foltz 3rd. 

157 



t> 









basketball 




The second season of intra-mural basketball found 30 teams entered in the 
race. The Pan Hellenic division was composed of the 12 national fraternities. 
Each of the two independent divisions had eight teams competing. Good 
competition in all the divisions resulted in some very snappy games. That the 
interest was at a high pitch was proven by the crowds which packed the gym- 
nasium for the games. The Pan Hellenic division ended the season in a four 
cornered tie for first place, namely: Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Delta Tau Delta, 
Sigma Nu, and Beta Theta Pi. In the play-off Sigma Alpha Epsilon turned 
in the winner. 

Pan Hellenic champions — Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Division "A" Independent champions — Triangulars. 

Division "B" Independent champions — Elkhart Club. 

In the play-off between the two independent champions the Elkharts 
duplicated their record of last year and are hailed as the independent champions. 

The Sigma Alpha Epsilons and Elkharts battled for the college cham- 
pionship and it was anybody's game until the final whistle blew when the 
score stood 11 to 12 in favor of the Sigma Alpha Epsilons. 

The Champions 
Wilhoite, C. M.; Brown, Henry; Brown, John; Frudden, W.; Wareham, 
R.; Kohlar, S.; Ernst, L.; Guilfoyle, Luke (Capt.). 



baseball 

The first baseball season last year brought out 22 teams. Bad weather 
and lack of playing space caused the season to drag out but after the shuffle 
was all over, Sigma Nu was holding the honors in the Pan Hellenic and the 
Veterinary Medical Association in the independent division. The college 
year ended before the two champions could meet and as a result the college 
championship was not decided. This year baseball bids fair to be every bit 
as popular as the basketball, 25 teams having entered with still a week's time 
for entries to come in. 



Oetttus 

Thirty-six men were entered in the tennis singles which were conducted 
on the elimination basis. C. A. Downing and J. E. Burge battled their way 
to the finals, Downing defeating Burge in the finals. Twelve teams were 
entered in the doubles. C. A. Downing and G. Wann defeated E. Wareham 
and L. T. King in the finals. 

Boxing, wrestling and hand-ball tournaments are under progress and the 
spring will see a big intra-mural track meet. 

158 




1 Q 2L 2/ 



Somen's .Athletics 




Miss Louise Tausche 



Miss Mary Worrall 




Miss Tausche, head of the department of physical education 
for women, came to K. S. A. C. in 1920 and has been responsible 
for the growth and popularity of women's athletics. This is Miss 
Worrall's first year here, but in true "Merry Whirl" fashion she 
has made many friends and is an enthusiastic athletic coach. As 
honorary and advisory members of the Women's Athletic asso- 
ciation both have been very valuable. Miss Ruth Kittell and 
Miss Frances Johnstone are student assistants. The department 
prides itself in that it encourages girls to engage in the various 
sports and also gives them a chance to play in a large number of 
games thus not limiting the sport to those who have made teams. 
Every girl who wishes to try out for a sport is placed on a team 
which is designated by a color. A color tournament then is played 
before the class teams are picked. 



159 



r^oyc^ri^ 



ml 




ygztjz&xf*- 



2^.<0»5*7Zs Z> iyj^2=>2^ E, 




Grace Gardner 
Lucille Whan 



Louise Tausche 
Ruth Kittell 



Elsie Bergstrom 
Julia Caton 



LIFE SAVING CORPS 
Chartered May, 1920 

The national committee of the Life Saving corps, American Red Cross, 
reposing full confidence in the character, fidelity and ability of the applicants, 
to form and disseminate a knowledge of life saving in all its various phases, does 
hereby grant to the individuals named in the succeeding paragraph a charter 
for a local Life Saving corps. 

This organization will be known as the "K. S. A. C. Women's Life Saving 
corps" of Manhattan, Kansas, and is hereby authorized to act as a Life Saving 
corps, under such rules and regulations as are now in force or may be pro- 
mulgated by the Bureau of First Aid. The members work diligently throughout 
the year to increase the membership and to spread the knowledge of life saving. 




CHARTER MEMBERS 



Ruth Kittell 
Julia Caton 
Faith Martin 
Edith Russell 
Renna Rosenthal 
Mildred Swenson 



Elsie Bergstrom 
Betty McCoin 
Lucile Whan 
Hazel Gardner 
Grace Hesse 
Louise Tausche 



OFFICERS 

President Miss Grace Hesse 

Vice-President Ruth Kittell 

Secretary-Treasurer Mildred Swenson 

Captain ... Julia Caton 

Medical Advisor Dr. Ruby Engler 

Instructor Miss Louise Tausche 

161 



J^O^C^jEs 





Belle Hagans, Esther McStay, Dorothy Ryard, Irene Hays, Clara Evans, Mabel Worster, 
Anna L. Best, Sue Unruh, Ruth Cunningham, Clara Cramsey, Bertha Guin. 



JUNIOR CLASS TEAM 




Bernice Hoke, Margaret Shrader, Amy Lemert, Hattie Betz, Helen Larson, Inez Coleman, 
Lucille Anderson, Angie Howard, Agnes Howard, Ruth Kittell, Lillian Rommel, Grace 
Schwandt. 

The hockey season begins the last of September and ends in November. 
This year 107 girls came out for class practices— 38 freshmen, 35 sophomores, 
16 juniors, and 18 seniors. This group was divided into nine teams, and each 
team was designated by a color. The color tournament was very interesting 
and aroused a great deal of pep. The Blue team, with Miss Helen Priestley as 
captain, was the winning team. After a few class squad practices the class 
teams were chosen and the class tournament was played. The sophomore 
team was the champion. 

162 



%z^o>z*?Zs 2>tsrz=>z^je: 



? 





Top — Mary Nuttle, Marie Correll, Florence Barnhisel, Velma Lawrence, Eleanor Davis, 

Lenora Russel, Elmira King, Lenora Doll. 
Bottom— Alice Marston, Helen Van Gilder, Mary Roesener, Betty McCoin, Roxie Meyer, 

Laura Fayman, Ruth Leonard. 

FRESHMAN CLASS TEAM 




Winifred Knight, Josephine Boggs, Eunice Hobson, Grace Johnson, Mildred Mitchner Laura 
Fayman, Mabel Russel, Phyllis Burtis, Ruth Limbocker, Vira Brown. 

Miss Alice Marston was hockey manager and at the close of the hockey 
season planned a spread which was attended by 50 girls. The main event of 
the evening was the announcement of the varsity team, which is honorary and 
is chosen from those who played on class teams. The hockey varsity team is as 
follows: Bertha Gwin, Hattie Betz, Lillian Rommel, Mary Roesener, Eleanor 
Davis, Mary Nuttle, Alice T. Marston, Lenora Doll, Eunice Hobson, Phyllis 
Burtis, Dorothy Frost and Grace Johnson. 



163 



Z^OK^ZZs 




f 



basket ^all 



SENIOR CLASS TEAM 





II 

m v awJL " 












r ■■ 






Clara Cramsey, Sue Unruh, Clara Evans, Esther McStay, Frances Casto, Belle Hogan, Anna 
Best, Gail Roderick, Bertha Gwinn. 

JUNIOR CLASS TEAM 




Marjory Melchert, Florence Stebbins, Ruth Whearty, Edith Haines Hattie Betz, Inez Cole- 
man, Agnes Ayres, Blanche Kershaw, Dorcas Weir, Verna Smith. 

In basketball, as in hockey, a color tournament, class tournament and 
spread were held. This is a very popular sport and over 150 girls played in the 
color tournament. The class tournament was well attended by students and 
faculty and a large amount of pep and enthusiasm was displayed. Alter 
severe battles, the junior class won the championship. The same class was the 
winner of the cup in the basketball tournament last year Those selected for 
the varsity basketball team are: Ida Conrow, Hazel Humbarger Bertha 
Gwin Inez Coleman, Blanche Kershaw, Ethyl Danielson Grace Johnson 
Hattie Betz and Dorothy Lukert. Miss Belle Hagans was basketball manager. 



164 



z^LO>c^rZs 





l Q :2, 2/ 



basket »all 

SOPHOMORE CLASS TEAM 



Wh^r« 






ji *» ii #* * * «* *■ K ' 



Ann Klossen, Lenora Russel, Lenora Doll, Amy Conrow, Helen Adams, Mary Rosener, Beatrice 
Gaither, Alice Marston, Hazel Humbarger, Dorothy Lukert. 




FRESHMAN CLASS TEAM 




ji jk m a & a a< 



Vira Brown Ida Conrow, Ethyl Danielson, Margaret Howe, Viretta Maroney, Floy Berridge 
Grace Johnson, Ethel Paige, Inga Ross, Hilda Frost. " 

, , T ! ie w , m en of K. S. A. C. indulge in various spring sports, which cannot 
be featured in pictures because the teams are not chosen until late in May 
These sports are tennis, track, and baseball. Tennis and track practices are 
mostly individual work but the color tournament is used in base ball The 
managers for the sports are: Tennis, Lucia Biltz; track, Renna Rosenthal- 
and baseball Lenora Russel. Another interesting sport which is popular all 
the year is hiking. Miss Grace Schwandt is hike manager and Miss Sue 
Unruh is assistant. 





JUNIOR-SENIOR TEAM 

Top — Marion Welch, Helen Larson, Faith Martin. 
Bottom— Ruth Kittel, Lucille Whan. 




SOPHOMORE TEAM 

T p_Clara L. Howard, Betty McCoin, 

Florence Carey 
Bottom— Roxie Meyer, Julia Caton. 



FRESHMAN TEAM 

Top— Myrna Smale, Zana Wheeler, 

Laureda Thompson. 
Bottom — Fern Richards, Corinne Smith. 




There are more opportunities to make honors in swimming than in any 
other sport engaged in on the campus. Class teams, red cap and blue cap 
honors and the Red Cross Life Saving corps are all for the girl who likes to 
swim Miss Louise Tausche directs and instructs all swimming activities and 
Miss Faith Martin is W. A. A. swimming manager. An annual swimming 
carnival is held in April and is competitive between the class teams. Races, 
dives plunges and various swimming stunts are the features of this event. 
The honorary varsity swimming team, which is chosen from the class teams, is 
composed of Ruth Kittel, Faith Martin, Lucille Whan, Florence Carey, Clara 
Howard, Julia Caton, Myrna Smale, and Laureda Thompson. 



166 



^RQ3C<*?Zs 





g*=J=aK 1 ^ 



3\ifle Z3eam 




Bert Howell, W. J. Clapp, Capt. C. N. Jackson, (Coach), E. H. Willis 

B. E. Colburn, E. E. Hodgson, G. E. Stutz, H. E. Ratcliff 



Camp Perry Team 

The Kansas State Agricultural college rifle team won the seventh corps 
area championship against 13 teams representing the larger colleges and uni- 
versities of the middle west. The winning of this championship entitled them 
to a trip to Camp Perry, Ohio, where they placed fifth in a national match 
against 32 representative colleges of the United States. Several of our men 
won special medals by placing in individual meets. Coach, Captain C. N. 
Jackson, accompanied the men on their trip. 



Gallery Team 

Our Indoor Gallery team won the Seventh corps area championship in 
1921, competing against 27 teams, thereby bringing to this school a permanent 
championship cup. First Sergeant McGarry coached this team. 

167 



■^O^^ J^TSJ^J^T^T^ 




Prof. Hugh E. Rosson, Debate Coach 
Professor Rosson came to K. S. A. C. in December, 1921, to take the place 
of Mr. 0. H. Burns in the English department as debate coach. Mr. Rosson 
immediately demonstrated his coaching abilities by turning out three winning 
teams in about two weeks time. Increasing interest in debate at K. b. A. U 
was evidenced by the unusual number of persons who tried out for the debate 
squads this spring. 

(Tolora&o Agricultural College i>ebate 




Farmer Moran Richards 

Resolved: That the closed shop is justifiable in American industry. 
Affirmative Team (lost) 

J. W. Farmer, R. H. Moran, H. I. Richards. 





Stambaugh Stover McKibben 

Kimble Thaekrey Collins 

Resolved: That universal disarmament of the armies and navies of the 
world could be made practicable through the League of Nations. 
Affirmative (won) Negative (lost) 

Austin Stover Hubert Collins 

Verne Stambaugh Joe Thaekrey 

Wayne McKibben Ellis Kimble 



Cmporia JDebate (men) 





Hill Merrill Anderson 

Manry McConnell Englund 

Resolved : That coastwise trading vessels of the United States should be 
permitted to pass through the Panama Canal free from tolls. 
Affirmative (won) Negative (lost) 

Thornton Manry Victor Englund 

Randall Hill Paul McConnell 

D. C. Anderson E. W. Merrill 




Hart Best Flemming 

Gillette Burr Newcomb 
Resolved : That Kansas should adopt a unicameral form of legislature. 

Affirmative {won) Negative (lost) 

Bernice Flemming Margaret Gillette 

Georgia Newcomb Queenie Hsrt 

Osceola Burr Anna Best 

Iftansas l£rdversit? ^Debate 




Swarens Hemker Correll Thurow 

Herring Enns Bangs Gerkin 

Resolved : That a court of industrial relations similar to the Kansas plan 
should be adopted by the several states. 

Affirmative {lost) Negative (won) 

Marie Correll Mary Gerkin 

Anna Enns Edna Bangs 

Elfrieda Hemker Leona Thurow 

Alternates — Olive Herring, Opal Swarens 

170 



I^O>5^rJEs Z>TSRT=>ZJE 






Dr. Howard T. Hill 
Professor of Public Speaking 





J. Wheeler Barger 
Missouri Valley Orator 



171 



Charles W. Howard 
Pi Kappa Delta Orator 



I^OlOZZs J>jyi^.2=>I^E 




C. B. Quigley 
A. D. Webber 



C. B. Roberts 
J. S. Stewart 



F. W. Bell (Coach) 
CM. Wilhoite 



Clyde Hemphill 
J. J. Moxley 



For the third consecutive year Kansas has won first place in the students' 
stock- judging contest held in connection with the National Western Livestock 
show at Denver. The score, 4287 points out of a possible 5000, made this year 
by the Kansas team was the highest ever made in one of these contests. By 
winning three times Kansas now gets permanent possession of the $500 
National Western Challenge trophy. 

With 21 teams competing, Kansas placed fifth in the international contest 
at Chicago. Kansas has competed in the international contest 16 times and 
has never placed below ninth, and only four times below fifth place. This 
gives Kansas, on the average, an equal ranking with any of the teams that 
have competed in this greatest of all judging contests. 

A. D. Webber was high man in the United States, and won the gold medal 
offered by National Block and Bridle Club for the second man in the contest. 

The coach, Professor F. W. Bell, is an expert judge and is often called 
on to judge. His wide experience and the thorough training he gives each man 
accounts, in a large measure, for the success of his team. 



i 



172 



ROK^TZs J=>ZSJ^2^>2^^] 



1 ^ ^, -2j 



iDatr? ~3ub%in% Oeam 





Lynn Copeland 



Geo. Starkey 



Prof. H. W. Cave (Coach) 



J. M. Moore 



Our dairy judging team won first place at the national dairy show, St. 
Paul, Minn. This is the third consecutive year that Kansas State Agricultural 
college has won first on judging all breeds at the national show, giving our col- 
lege permanent possession of the National Dairy Show trophy and the Hoard's 
Dairyman cup. In winning this cup the team members have set a mark that 
our rival agricultural colleges may shoot at for a long time, and have made a 
reputation that our future teams must uphold. 




173 





1 S> :2. -2L 



3nter50ciet^ (Touncil 




Barger Knostman Lemert Seeber 

Thackrey Lahr Rommel 

Howe Kauser Stover Abrams 

Weaver Dubbs Sherman 



Means 
Farmer 



Adams 
Findley 



_ The object of the Intersociety Council is to promote literary and social 
activities, college spirit and other matters pertaining to the mutual interest of 
the college literary societies and of student life in general. 

_ ., OFFICERS 

President... Earl Means Secretary Austin Stover 

Vice-President J. W. Farmer Treasurer.. Margaret Dubbs 

MEMBERS 

BROWNING 




ALPHA BETA 
Wallace Weaver 
Annette Kauser 

ATHENIAN 
Harold Howe 
Jasper Adams 



HAMILTON 
Glen Findley 
J. W. Farmer 

FRANKLIN 
Margaret Dubbs 
Joe Thackrey 



Luella Sherman 
Ramona Abrams 
IONIAN 
Maude Lahr 
Lillian Rommel 



HONORARY 



Opal Seeber 



MEMBERS 

J. W. Barger 



WEBSTER 
Earl Means 
Austin Stover 

EURODELPHIAN 
Carol Knostman 
Amy Lemert 



-£e,C»£^Z> 





INTERSOCIETY PLAY CAST 



dinners of Untersociet? J)ebate 21 




Priestley 



Englund 



Seright 



Paden 



The intersociety play has become an annual affair looked to with an interest 
second only to the oratorical contest. The play "Never Say Die" was presented 

this year Saturday, April 8. . tt„„i,„,j 

The Athenian debate team composed of H. R. Priestley, V. J. Englund, 
and A R. Paden and coached by J. J. Seright won the intersociety debate. 
This is the second consecutive time the Athenians have won the cup ottered by 
the department of English to the society winning the annual intersociety 
debate. 



176 



&LO>5*3rZs 




Irene Hays 



Charles W. Howard 
A. P. Wertman 



Claramary Smith] Don Ibach 

Grace Herr Paul Roote Thornton Manry 



HISTORY 

The first Intersociety oratorical contest was held in 1901, when the contest was won by 
T. J. Woodworth of the Alpha Beta literary society. Since then it has been the crowning event 
of the year for the literary societies. In 1902 Clara Pancake, and in 1903 Alice Ross were 
winners for the Ionians, with Wilma Ross in 1904 adding another victory to their list. Frank 
E. Palmer in 1905, C. E. Davis in 1906, and Raymond Brink in 1907, all Hamiltons, were victors. 
Clara B. Shields won first for the Franklins in 1908. In 1909 another Hamilton, John Martin, 
was winner. In 1910 the Athenians, the youngest society, won their first victory, with L. G. 
Folsom as orator. Edwin McDonald carried away the first victory for the Websters in 1911 and 
again in 1912 Roy Davis won for them. Lucile Berry again carried the honors for the Ionians 
in 1913. In 1914, Wallace Hutchinson, and in 1915 Walter Ott held the honors for the Alpha 
Betas. In 1916 Leo Moser, Athenian, was successful and in 1917 Arthur Boyer, another 
Hamilton won their latest victory. In 1918 Earl Taylor, and in 1919 C. J. Medlin, both 
Athenians, were victorious. In 1920 J. O. Brown, Alpha Beta, and in 1921, MaudeLahr, 
Ionian, took first place. This year C. W. Howard, Athenian, was winner with the oration 
"The Forward Step!" This victory is the fifth for the Athenian. The Ionians and Hamiltons 
have each won five firsts. 

The orators for 1922 are: 

Athenian C. W. Howard— first place 

Ionians Claramary Smith— second place 

Hamiltons Donald Ibach— third place 

Eurodelphians Irene Hays 

Alpha Betas A. P. Wertman 

Brownings Grace Herr 

Franklins p au l Roote 

Websters t. J. Manry 

177 

/i03^Z, J=>jyj^J=>J^ J=7^^^^mm^ 





E N. Litwiller, D. O. Turner, Eva Piatt, Annette Kauser, Zoe Wertman, G. I. Raleigh, R. C. Hill. 

R C Welsh, W. O. McCarty, Mildred Dawson, Zella Kouns, Mary Kelly, A. P. Wertman, E. E. Kraybill. 

Leona Thurow, C. C. Button, Anna Best, Bernice Hoke, Meria Murphy, L. W. Byers, Lois Willson. 

P. S. Chambers, G. A. Filinger, Clara Cramsey, T. W. Crawford, Marjorie Ault, C. B. Chambers, W. W. Weaver. 

F. E. Emry, Anna Enna, Bertha Gwinn, Bertha Summers, Mable Worster, T. E. Johntz. 

MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE 
Ann Amstutz Grace Cook, Jessie Newcomb, Iva Mullen, Rose Cunningham, Matilda Pospisil, Caroline Perkins, 
Nellie Griffith, Doris Healey, Chester Canary, Merriam Cook, Noel Dunbar, Maurice Spear, Herman Scott, 
Walter Dahner, Kenneth Piatt. 

178 





^ 2. -2L, 




.ALpfya ^eta Citerar? Society 

Motto — "Slowly but surely we progress." Colors — Gold and Blue 



HISTORY 

The Alpha Beta literary society was organized October 17, 1868. It was 
the first permanent society to be organized at K. S. A. C. 

The Gleaner, the weekly periodical, has been a profitable feature of the 
society since 1875. Many of the Gleaners exhibit exceptional talent and literary 
merit. 

During its history, the Alpha Beta literary society has led other organiza- 
tions in promoting worthy activities, whether in forensics, oratory or dramatics. 
In 1920 the Alpha Betas won first place in the annual oratorical contest, re- 
cording for the fourth time a victory. Alpha Beta has many "K" debaters on 
its roll. Never has there been a time when the society was not represented on 
the college debate squads. The Alpha Beta literary society has been a place of 
training for many widely known people. 

J. T. Willard, vice-president of K. S. A. C. and dean of the division of 
general science, was one of Alpha Beta's first presidents. 

J. W. Zahnley, assistant professor of farm crops, Mrs. C. A. Kimball, 
president of the Federation of Women's Clubs in Kansas, and Ed Shellenbaum,' 
editor of the Manhattan Nationalist, were Alpha Betas during their college days! 

Major General J. G. Harbord, the most distinguished graduate of K. S. A. 
C., and one of the most distinguished citizens of the United States, was an 
Alpha Beta. In a recent visit to the college General Harbord paid Alpha Beta 
a tribute in saying that Alpha Beta was a worthy organization and that he de- 
rived much good from being a member of the society. 

These men and women are only a few of the Alpha Betas who have gone 
out into the world and made good. 

This year Alpha Beta has 50 enthusiastic members. They are active in 
athletics, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., debate, dramatics and in the men and 
women's glee clubs. Alpha Beta is represented in the honorary fraternities of 
debate, oratory, athletics, dramatics, architecture, engineering, agriculture, 
home economics and veterinary medicine. 

This year the Alpha Betas have participated in the various activities with 
success. They were fifth in the oratorical contest, third in the intersociety 
debates and second with their Aggie Pop stunt. 

The members of Alpha Beta will always be true to their motto: "Slowly 
but surely we progress." 




179 



I^OK^TZs 




A K. Banman, A. B. Woody, H. L. Burnett, A. E. Saunders, C. L. Howard, D. C. Anderson, H E. Monroe. 

C L Gunn, V. G. Englund, H. L. Collins, M. S. Cook, J. D. Adams, C. R. Gilbert, F. C. Kingsley. 

W R Bradley H. G. Bryson, H. L. Hemker, C. R. George, M. E. Goff, Walter Hemker, Earl Domoney. 

J W'larg r, i J. Seright, R. S. Mather, Sankey Kelly, A. J. Englund, C. W. Howard, W. C. Wdson. 

R C Warren, A. B. Headrick, H. O. Reed, T. O. Garinger, Elwyn Seheel, C. W. Londerhom, Frank Houston. 

a' R Paden C M Spencer, Frank Swanson, O. M. Williamson, Paul Roofe, E. P. Mauk, B. J. Miller. 

H. R. Prfest.V?C^ Holmes, V. W. Stambaugh, C. H. Howe, J. H. Neal, H. O. Williams. H. L. Wilkin, 

MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE 
, „ r> ., PR FnfielH W L Farmer C R. Fitch, K. L. Ford, Walter Hemker, F. F. Kimball, K. Knouse. 
L - \.Mumke% L NolL R M R r h ie, H. B. Riley,' W. A. Russell, H. P. Thomas, C. H. Thomas, Ben Thomp- 
son, O. C. Woody, Elmer Young. 



1811 



i^o>o^rzy 





1 Q s, 2/ 



,&l\)<iniati Citerar? Society 



Motto — "We strive to conquer." 




Colors — Purple and Old Gold 



HISTORY 

The Athenian literary society was organized in 1907, and is the youngest 
men's society on the hill. Due to increase in enrollment in the year 1906-07 
the societies then existing were unable to meet the demands of the students 
desiring literary work. Accordingly a group of students met December 15, 
1906, at the Park Place dormitories, to consider the problem of forming a new 
literary society. 

At this meeting a committee was appointed to draw up a constitution, and 
to secure a meeting place for the society. Sixteen men were present at this 
meeting, and each member was allowed to invite one additional man to form 
the charter members of the society. 

The society first met on January 12, 1907, in a class room in the library 
building. O. A. Stevens was elected as the first president and under his guidance 
the society started its career. At first no permanent meeting place could be 
secured, but in 1909 the Athenians secured what is now known as the Forum 
room, in the basement of Fairchild hall, as a permanent meeting place. 

The minutes of that day contain many interesting references to the condi- 
tion of the new hall. At one time the marshal was instructed to catch the rat 
that was interfering with the program by running across the stage. At another 
time he was asked to keep frogs that were living in the damp corners, from tak- 
ing too active a part in the evening's program. 

On October 10, 1910, the Browning society was organized. The Athenians 
immediately adopted it as a sister society and on October 29, invited the mem- 
bers to a joint Hallowe'en party. With the advent of the Browning society 
several important social events were started, among them the annual Christmas 
party, the spring Owl Bake, the Daisy Hunt and the fall hike in honor of 
new members. 

The Athenian-Browning societies bid the old hall in Fairchild farewell 
November 4, 1911, and moved to their present quarters in Nicholas gymnasium! 
This event was the occasion for a big joint meeting. 

During the 15 years the Athenian society has been organized it has pro- 
duced five winners of the intersociety oratorical, has won consistently the inter- 
society debates, has placed men 63 times in the intercollegiate debates and at 
the present time furnishes half of the college K debaters. 

The society was founded primarily to promote literary and forensic work 
and this idea has been kept in the foreground throughout the history of the 
society. The success that the Athenians in and out of the college have attained 
can be attributed largely to the training which they received within the 
organization. 



181 




z^03c<*zrzs 




Violet Andre Ella Mae Paustian, Irene Bradley, Florence Henney, Elsie Fulton, Ramona Abrams, Ethel Johnson. 
Charlotte Russell, Gail Roderick, Gladys Roderick, Rachel Stewart, Lola Gudge, Luella Sherman, Grace Herr 
Nettie Pfaff Mary Maroney, Ruth Reed, Ruth Pasley, Ruth Webb, Clara B. Howard, Mildred Churchill. 
Helen Mitchell Ruby Ricklefs, Edith Nonken, Elfrida Hemker, Alice Mueldener, Gladys Hartley, Adelaide Wieters. 
Eunice Anderson, Agnes Aldridge, Grace Gardner, Zoe O'Leary, Mildred Pence, Isabel Laughbarem, Bee Wilson. 

MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE 
Leah Arnold, Lottie Bute, Alta Barger, Ina Butz, Grace Currin, Marjorie Collins, Helen Colton, Hazel Hulse, Grace 
Hinnen, Alice Jennings, Grace Johnson, Bernice Johnson, Snoda Krider, Florence McKinney, Viretta Maroney, 
Grace Summers, Ethel Stateler, Helen Fears. 

182 




i 



&LC&5><?JL 





drowning Citerar? Society 



Motto — "We'll keep our aim sublime" 

HISTORY 




Colors — Brown and Blue 



In the fall of 1910 a small group of girls, of whom Minnie King, Myrtle 
Bower, Kate Penn and Harriet Dunn were the real moving spirits, felt the need 
of a new society for girls. Moreover the Athenian society felt the social need 
of a sister society and encouraged the movement. 

The society was named for a woman who stands high, not only in literature 
but in truest womanhood, Elizabeth Barret Browning. The Bluebird, the 
symbol of true happiness was chosen as the emblem of the society, and the 
brown and blue of its plumage became the colors of the Browning literary 
society. Organization was completed on October 10, 1910, and Harriet Dunn 
was elected the first president. Twenty-eight girls signed the constitution as 
charter members of the new society. 

On October 31 of the same year, the Athenians invited the new society to 
be their guests at a Hallowe'en party and at that time the Owl and the Bluebird 
became brother and sister. The first meeting in the present society hall was 
held over a year later, on November 11, 1911. A joint meeting of the two so- 
cieties is held on Hallowe'en and Christmas. The Daisy Hunt, Owl Bake and 
Princess Feast are annual events of the societies. 

The first years of the organization were marked by a spirit of cooperation 
in the society and by helpfulness from the faculty. There was room for a third 
girls' society, and being smaller than the others it was able to assign real active 
work to every member. 

In the years that have passed the Brownings have ranked among the first 
in debate. In 1917 and 1918 the debate scholarship was held by Lola Sloop. 
In 1917 the Brownings had over 75 per cent of the K debaters on the squad. 
The Brownings have also made great progress in oratory, for in 1921 Gladys 
Addy won second place in the intersociety oratorical contest. 

The society owes much to Prof. J. E. Kammeyer under whose direction the 
organization was perfected and who has since been chosen God-father. 



183 



i^o>c^rj^ 





X O :2, *2L 



JVaitkliit £iteran> Society 





Joe Thackrey, Hazel Lyness, Margaret Nettleton, Chester Herrick, Lawrence Reynolds. 

Paul Roote, Kathryn Adams, C. C. Bost, Earl Burke, Myrtle Dubbs, Orlin Bonecutter. 

E E Huff Florence Johnson, Louise Reed, Leona Reed, Lena Moore, Hazel Burdette. 

Mott Robinson, Margaret Dubbs, Clyde Hemphill, Susanna Whittier, Verna Breese, A. M. Johnson. 

Mamie Johnson, Eugene Cleavinger, Mary Nuttle, Lenora Doll, Duella Mall. 

MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE 
Fills Babbit Earl Bradley, W. J. Clapp, Glen Case, Earl Crall, Eleanor Davis, Samuel Decker, Myrtle Dubbs, Charles 
Eberwe'in Cullen Frey, Winifred Edwards, Fannie Gorton, Lois Gorton, Susie Houston, Ruth Mauk, Hazel Miller, 
Hazel Ma'y, Donald McMillan, Shirley Rogers, John Rose, Lois Sargent, Ross Stapp, Clara Sours, Edith Smith, 
H. Shirck, Paul Vohs. 




^ ^ -2^ 




.franklin literary Society 

Motto— "Life without literature is death" Colors— Red and White 

HISTORY 

On December 14, 1901, a movement was started in the college which re- 
sulted in the organization of the Franklin literary society. A constitution was 
drawn up, which was adopted on January 13, 1902, and the first regular meeting 
was held on January 18, 1902. 

During the fall of 1903 the society was legally incorporated and obtained 
a charter from the state. 

During the first year the society had no permanent meeting place, and met 
first in one place then another. For a time meetings were held in a room on the 
second floor of Anderson hall, later in the history room on the second floor of 
Fairchild hall. Then the society obtained the Franklin hall in the basement of 
this building. This hall was shared with the Eurodelphian society, and re- 
mained until the fall of 1911, when the Franklins moved into the new Franklin 
hall in the Nichols gymnasium. 

About 1907 it was decided to have an outing and a committee was appointed 
to plan this affair. The committee succeeded in keeping the rest of the society 
in suspense as to the nature of the outing, and when the day arrived and the 
members met at the scheduled place, they beheld a steam engine "hitched" to 
a hayrack waiting to convey the members. This event proved so successful 
that it was made an annual affair. 

Some very interesting events are always connected with the engine ride. 
On the second trip for a reason now unknown, the driver ran into a windmill 
on a farm a mile or so from town. The engine being a substantial one rather 
demolished the windmill. Another year, as is so often the case, it rained and 
the engine slid into a ditch where it remained, so the members were obliged to 
walk back to town. There have been only two years since the engine ride was 
organized that it has not been celebrated in the original style. 

The Franklins in 1913 won the silver loving cup in the intersociety spelling 
contest, and in 1916 won the banner for selling the most tickets to the Lyceum. 




185 




Georgia Belle Crihfield, Margaret Raffington, Helen Northup, Nina Uglow, Nellie Jorns, Margaret Gillett, Alice 

Marston, Muriel Shaver. 
Penelope Burtis, Florence Stebbins, Lenora Russell, Ruth Leonard, Margaret Shrader, Amy Lemert, Lucia Biltz, 

Ruth Rathbone. 
Edna Russell, Esther Russell, Orpha Russell, Agnes Ayers, Lillian Ayers, Irene Maughlin, Frances Mardis, Carol 

Knostman. 
Georgia Newcomb, Julia Caton, Dorothy Frost, Olive Herring, Ruth Whearty, Dorothy Sanders, Coletta Mayden. 
Ruby Northup, Frances Smith, Opal Ewing, Eva Leland, Esther McStay, Vida Butler, Margaret Mason, Mildred 

Thornburg. 
Virginia Messenger, Belle Hagans, Marguerite Brooks, Erma Jean Huckstead, Lois Clark, Elmira King, Marie Lamson. 
Opal Seeber, Irene Hays, Mable Vincent, Dorothy Ryherd, Vera Lee, Roxie Mayer, Mary Gerkin, Meryl Thornburg. 

MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE 
Ruth Peck, Mae Hunter, Sybil Watts, Henrietta Jones, Elizabeth Dickens, Marjorie Melchert, Harriet Allen, Mary 

Clark, Lois Holderbaum, June Harter, Vera Hedges, Velma Lawrence, Mary Willis, Ruth Bachelder, Hazel 

Bowers, Phyllis Burtis, Georgia Daniels, Ina Davidson, Bertha Egger, Thelma Gossard, Ruth Houston, Jeanette 

Shields. 

186 



ROKZ^Zs ^TSRI^Z^E 






1 ^ ^, 2, 



"TEuro&elpljiait Citerar? Society 





Beta Chapter — Purdue 
Motto— "Row, not drift." 



Charter granted January 19, 1921 

Alpha Chapter — K. S. A. C. 
Colors — Brown and Gold 

Flower — Sunflower 

HISTORY 

The Eurodelphian literary society was founded in December, 1904, with a 
membership of 25. The name Eurodelphian meaning sisterly love was chosen 
for the society. The society adopted "While we live let us live," as its motto; 
brown and gold as its colors, the sunflower as its emblem, and the Delphi as 
the society paper. 

The first program was given Saturday afternoon, January 14, 1905. In 
the business meeting immediately following, the constitution was adopted and 
the following officers elected: President, Ethel Clemons Nicolet, '05; vice- 
president, Elva Akin Shepard, '05; recording secretary, Artie Edworthy Berk- 
ley, '06; treasurer, Lula Rannels Adams, '07; critic, Lora Perry Chestnut; 
marshal, Irma Davis, and chairman of the program committee, Helen Huse 
Collins, '08. In 1907 they were represented in the intersociety oratorical con- 
test for the first time by Helen Huse Collins. 

The society has grown in membership until it now stands at 71 with a 
limit of 75. In 1921 the society was granted a national charter with the Alpha 
chapter at K. S. A. C. and the Beta chapter at Purdue University, La 
Fayette, Indiana. 

The national literary society took for its motto, "Row, not drift," its colors 
brown and gold, its emblem the sunflower, and its society paper the Delphi. 

In February, 1922, Kalamazoo college at Kalamazoo, Michigan, was grant- 
ed a charter as the Gamma chapter of the organization. 




OFFICERS 

Fall 
President Eva Leland 

Vice-President Opal Seeber 

Secretary Henrietta Jones 

Treasurer Florence Stebbins 

187 



Spring 
Irene Hays 

Irene Maughlin 

Vera Lee 

Florence Stebbins 



RO>0?Zs J>TS1^T=>Z^E 






J. L. Allen, A. S. Austin, T. L. Bayer, J. F. Beyer, A. L. Bridenstine, Lynn Copeland, Roy Clegg, Roy Eckart. 

J. Egger, L. H. Griswold, Ernest Hartman, H. E. Hartman, L. V. Hunt, L. G. Johnson, C. R. Machir. 

C. D. Gross, C. F. Hadley, Paul McConnell, P. M. Kovar, E. T. Means, L. H. Means, J. F. T. Mostert. 

F. H. Paulson, R. H. Peters, C. R. Ryan, L. E. Rossel, R. W. Wolnick, Ray Smith, F. M. Angus, C. N. Yaple. 

J. K. Muse, A. W. Stover, F. Nicher, I. N. Vowel, L. F. Whearty, T. M. Stratton, A. L. Stockebrand, H. H. McGee. 

J. Johnson,' K. W. Miller, R. A. Coe, C. Thrasher, J. Cunningham, E. L. Reichart, E. W. Merrill, T. J. Manry. 

MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE 

M. F. Aiman, H. T. Baker, Chester Bradshaw, Harley Burns, D. C. Bushey, E. J. Chapman, Clarence Cross, H. W. 
Evans, J. S. Fuller, A. Goering, H. A. Goering, Jerry Harris, Sim Heath, J. W. Honeywell, K. O. Houser, F. L. 
Howard, Lester Jennings, Henry Karns, W. C. McKibben, L. W. Marshall, Eugene Nelson, George Reazin, A. V. 
Ritts, R. M. Sallee, Geo. Starkey, Raymond Stover, Louis Wendelburg, Bruce Whitney, Wiley Whitney. 

188 



1 



5 - 1 = 3 



I^C&Z^TJ^ 2=>TSZ2,T>l^E^^m 




1 ^ ^, 2/ 



Matioaal Webster literary Society 





Motto — "Labor Conquers All" 



Colors — Green and White 



HISTORY 

The Webster is the oldest society now in existance at K. S. A. C. Its origin 
dates from October 12, 1868. 

In January, 1871, a charter of the society, setting forth its name, object 
and standards, was placed on file in the state auditor's office. The society grew 
rapidly and soon became an influential factor in the college life. A library was 
started which at one time numbered 250 volumes. This library was sold when 
the college library was opened in 1898. 

In 1878 the first monthly edition of the Webster Reporter appeared. The 
publication was soon changed to a semi-monthly which it continued to be until 
1895. At this time it was changed to the weekly which it is at present. 

Upon the completion of Nichols Gymnasium in 1911 the Websters secured 
possession of the southwest room on the third floor. This room they now jointly 
occupy with their sister society, the National Eurodelphian literary society. 

In the fall of 1921, this being the fiftieth anniversary of the chartering of 
the society, the Websters affiliated with the Webster society at the University 
of Minnesota to form a national organization. The chapter at K. S. A. C. is 
the Alpha member and that at the University of Minnesota, the Beta member. 
The nationalization was announced at the annual Web-Euro homecoming ban- 
quet held at the Gillett hotel, November 19, 1921. 

Since 1887 over 2,000 Aggie men have sworn allegiance to Webster. As a 
national organization the society promises to foster and promote among college 
and university students a greater interest in literary activities and to provide for 
college men a greater opportunity to obtain that development which will insure 
their own success and which will enable them to be of the greatest benefit to 
their fellow men. 




i 



189 




Leone Bower, Dahy Barnett, Orpha Maust, Leola Ash, Louisa Moyer, Mable Murphy, Hazel Olson, Beulah Helstrom. 

Lillian Rommel, Hazel Richards, Edith Reece, Sybil Porter, Cecil Paine, Marjorie O'Neill, Ruth Kittell. 

Renna Rosenthal, Claramary Smith, Florence Stauffer, Helen Thayer, Rowena Thornburg, Eva Travis, Lucille Whan, 

Maude Lahr. 

Alice Paddleford, Helen Van Gilder, Lois Richardson, Lavina Waugh, Esther Waugh, Sue Unruh, Dorothy Lukert. 

Hilda Black, Irma Nevins, Osceola Burr, Edna Bangs, Helen Blair, Orille Bourassa, Marian Brookover, Betty McCoin. 

Christine Burger, Leslie Burger, Josephine Bussey, Adelaide Carver, Marie Correll, Ruth Cunningham, Katharine 

McQuillen, Louise Manglesdorf. 

Queenie Hart, Mildred Halstead, Edith Haines, Josephine Fulmer, Bernice Flemming, Clara Evans, Alice DeWitt, 

Winifred Knight. 

MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE 
Blanche Brooks, Florence Barnhisel, Blanche Berry, Lenore Berry, Hilda Black, Dorothy Brown, Margaret Brenner, 
Miriam Brenner, Gertrude Cate, Evelyn Coburn, Grace Constable, Dora Dakin, Ruth Day, Marie Foster, Mrs. 
E. V. Floyd, Mary Heller, Eunice Hobson, Achsa Johnson, Grace Justin, Kathleen Knittle, Ruth Kell, Olympia 
Kubic, Helen McDonald, Laura McAdams, Annie Laurie Moore, Elsie Puckey, Neva Solt, Audra Wolf, Margaret 
Watson. 




Uonkm Citerar? Society 



Motto — "Diamond Cut Diamond" 




Colors — Silver and Gold 



During the spring of '87 a number of young women discussed the advisa- 
bility of organizing a literary society. Under the leadership of Mrs. Kedzie the 
plan was tried in the fall of the same year, developing into the Ionian literary 
society. As this was the first and only society of women, its development was 
watched by everyone. A constitution and by-laws were adopted. Twenty- 
three names were enrolled as charter members. From among these, the follow- 
ing officers were elected: 

President Julia R. Pierce 

Vice-President Dora Van Zile 

Recording Secretary Carrie K. Hunter 

Marshal Tina Louise Colburn 

The preamble of the constitution well states the object of the society, 
'For our mutual improvement and the cultivation of the forensic art, music 
and literature." The society held its first public entertainment in chapel, 
April 25, 1890. 

Ionians have not been backward in oratory and debate but have taken an 
active interest in both since they were established. Out of the 22 annual inter- 
society oratorical contests, the Ionian society has placed twelve times, of which 
five have been first place. In inter-collegiate debate they have had 22 repre- 
sentatives, some of these girls making more than one team, thus giving a sum 
total of 34. 

The society has witnessed changes in its surroundings. During the first 
year of its existence the society met in the north corridor on the second floor of 
Anderson hall. From '88 to '94 the southeast room on the third floor of the 
same building was allowed the Ionians and Hamiltons. Then both societies 
moved into the room granted them in Fairchild hall. They occupied this until 
1911, when they moved into their hall in Nichols Gymnasium which they and 
the Hamiltons now occupy. 

OFFICERS 

Fall Spring 

President Ruth Cunningham Esther Waugh 

Vice-President Ruth Harrison Osceolo Burr 

Secretary Eda Travis Mabel Murphy 

Treasurer Sybil Porter Edna Bange 




I 




1 » 2. s, 



Ufamilton Citerar? Society 




W. H. Koenig, E. J. Jelden, R. H. Moran, W. R. Harder, G. E. Findley, K. C. Frank, H. W. Bachelor. 

B. B. Bayles, H. I. Richards, J. F. Quinn, C. B. Roberts, E. V. Whan, J. J. Moxley, V. E. Paine, C. O. Dirks. 

K. I. Church, W. C. Fulton, J. W. Farmer, L. Hall, Donald Ibach, L. Knight, H. Ratcliff, G. Meyer. 

R. Ricklefs, F. Stockebrand, F. Billings, R. Ewing, A. Edward, C. Harder, F. Healea. 

R. C. Lane, G. W. Pate, L. Sellers, T. Steuber, N. Thomassen, J. Post, A. Heywood, L. Circle. 

E. Kimble, L. Fairchild, H. Wilkinson, A. C. Depuy, H. Irwin, N. Roberts, F. Haggard. 

MEMBERS NOT IN PICTURE 

W M Altimarie, J. W. Ballard, Ray Circle, C. D. Compton, C. C. Griffin, A. W. Gudge, Francis Houlton, H. Johnston, 
L A Kettenring R S. Kifer, Oliver McLenon, A. C. Magee, F. O. Northrup, J. F. Quinn, P. P. Rumold, C. S. 
Russell, Myron Soupene, F. D. Strickler, Hugh Willis, B. W. Wright, Henry Wright, L. E. Woodman, L. H. 
Strickler. 





O 2, -2L 



IHamiltoit Citerar? Society 



Motto— "Truth Conquers All Things" 



HISTORY 




Colors — Red and White 



The Hamilton literary society traces its history back to a Saturday evening 
on November 8, 1884, when a small group of students met in the north corridor 
of Anderson hall and decided to form a society for men only, and literary "in 
the broadest sense." Sixteen names were enrolled on the list of charter mem- 
bers. The society grew so rapidly that within three years it was compelled to 
place a limit on its membership. 

During their first five years the members had no society room, but since 
then they have occupied successively what is now Dr. Siever's office, then the 
reserve room in Fairchild hall and finally their present place in the southeast 
room on the third floor of Nichols gymnasium to which they moved in 1911. 

But these chronological events do not tell the true history of the society. 
To know this one must know the men who have made it, the ideals that have 
guided it and the traditions that have grown up about it, only a small part of 
which can be told here. 

The Hamiltons have long been known as the "rag chewers." The term 
was originally applied to the long parliamentary battles, over the discarding 
of an old Hamp rug (snapshot page). Since then all parliamentary battles 
have been officially known as "rag chewing." 

Another custom which is surrounded by a great deal of tradition is the 
Hamp-Io egg roast. The Io's started things in the fall of 1904 by throwing 
a hen into the Hamp hall during meeting. This hen was fed and cared for by 
the Hamps, became their mascot, and was known on the hill as the "Hamp 
hen." She produced so bountifully during the winter that in the spring the 
Hamps invited the Io's to the quiet nooks of Cedar Bend to help devour the 
eggs. They termed it the Hamp-Io egg roast, and each spring the Hamps 
invited the Io's to help devour the eggs laid by the old Hamp hen (snap shot 
page). 

About the year 1909 a very pleasurable custom known as the Hamp-Io 
banquet was started. The first banquet was held in the old gymnasium or 
what is now the chemistry annex. 

The aims and ideals of the society have been "literary in its broadest 
sense. ' These ideals naturally have led the society into a prominent part in 
oratory and debate. This year the Hamps were very ably represented in the 
mtersociety oratorical contest by Donald Ibach who placed third. In inter- 
collegiate debate, the society was represented on the K. S. A. C. vs. Ames debate 
by Ellis Kimble, and on the K. S. A. C. vs. Colorado debate squad by R H 
Moran, J. W. Farmer and H. I. Richards. 

+ u T T his . 1 brief history may account for the definite and distinct character which 
the Hamilton literary society has built up, and which is known as "Hamp type." 

Hamp Yell 
Role, bole, 0! Role, bole, 0! 
Hamiltons! Hamiltons! 
Role, bole, 0! 




193 



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seis 



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G-reeks 




Ansdell Zeller Dakin Fairchild White 

Knight Rosenthal Ratliff Bondurant 

Watts Swenson Hull Smith Riddell 



The purpose of the Women's Pan Hellenic Council is to fix the date of pledge day; to regu- 
late the rules for rushing; to regulate other matters of the women's inter-fraternity interest in 
this college presented to it for consideration; and to cooperate with the college authorities and 
all other college organizations in questions of general college interest. 



MEMBERS 




DELTA ZETA 
Ila Knight 
Renna Rosenthal 

PI BETA PHI 
Edith Fairchild 
Geraldine Hull 

DELTA DELTA DELTA 
Anne Ratliff 
Mildred Swenson 



CHI OMEGA 

Marguerite Bondurant 
Doris Riddell 

ALPHA DELTA PI 
Lulu Mae Zeller 
Margaret Ansdell 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 
Margaret White 
Sibyl Watts 



KAPPA DELTA 
Claramary Smith 
Dora Dean Dakin 

203 



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i^OJJ^^-Z^ Pl/KPLE, 



Alp^a ~Delta "pi 





Founded at Wesleyan Female College, Macon, Georgia, 1851 



ALPHA ETA CHAPTER 
Installed October 30, 1915 



Flower — Violet 



Colors — White and Blue 



Lulu Mae Zeller, Manhattan 
Frances Batdorf, Burlington 



Margaret Ansdell, Jamestown 
Susie Scott, Madisonville, Ky. 



MEMBERS 
Seniors 



Juniors 



Neosho Fredenburg, Council Grove 
Lucille Kinnamon, Larned 
Mildred Wright, Washington 
Helen Swope, Kansas City, Mo. 
Louise Mowry, Manhattan 
Helen Hutchins, Kansas City 
Rae Frank, Manhattan 



Sophomores 



Bernice Spence, Hanover 



Mercides Sullivan, Fort Scott 
Lucille Woodward, Wichita 



Helen Smith, Salina 
Winifred Rhodes, Anthony 
Bernice Meyers, Manhattan 
Helen Reid, Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Florence McCall, Salina 
Vivian Peak, Manhattan 



Freshmen 



Marguerite Kellerstrass, Kansas City, 

Inga Ross, Amarillo, Texas 

Mary Leeper, Topeka 

Laura Pepper, Conway Springs 

Hazel Eplee, Parsons 



Mo. 



Dorothy Neeley, Abilene 
Margorie Heimerick, Clay Center 
Ruth Lukritz, Downs 
Grace Weyer, Centralia 
Myrna Pilley, Kansas City, Mo. 





S 



205 



2^030<?Zs J>TSJ^2=>. 




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i>dta ~Delta ~Ddta 




Folsom 


Beggs 


A. Haack 


Gillespie 


Barrett 


Dockstader 


Elliott 


Rand 


Archer 


Hanes 


Godden 


Mebus 


Stauffer 


Manglesdorf 


Swenson 



Crow 

Ratliff 

R. Stewart 

Hallowell 

F. Haack 



200 



Fisher 
Bahan 
V. Stewart 
Hardman 
Taylor 



I 



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Delta "Delta ~Delta 




Founded at Boston, Massachusetts, Thanksgiving Eve, 1888 

THETA IOTA CHAPTER 
Installed June 5, 1915 



Total Membership, 119 
Publication — The Trident 



Florence Stauffer, Marion 



Mildred Swenson, Clay Center 
Marion Hardman, Downs 



MEMBERS 
Seniors 

Juniors 



Frances Godden, Caney 
Mary Bahan, Independence 
Anne Ratliff, Manhattan 
Helen Crow, Dighton 

Edith Dockstader, Manhattan 
Bethel Barrett, Lillis 
Evelyn Hanes, Ottawa 
Velma Stewart, Herington 
Mildred Gillespie, Harper 
Ruth Stewart, Coldwater 



Sophomores 



Colors — Silver, Gold and Blue 
Flower — Pansy 



Louise Manglesdorf, Atchison 

Florence Haack, Florence 
Gladys Taylor, Chapman 



Alma Hallowell, Washington 
Dorothy Mebus, Kansas City 
Esther Folsom, Manhattan 



Inez Archer, Hiawatha 
Zenda Rand, Concordia 
Blanche Elliott, Caney 
Alice Fisher, Manhattan 
Aelize Haack, Florence 
Marcia Beggs, Washington 



House Mother 
Mrs. Gertrude Dockstader 




^OJ^z ^>iyj^. 




Rosenthal 


Jacobs 


Dickens 


V. Smith 


Locke 


Samson 


Powell 


E. Wilson 


H. Wilson 


Grover 


Knight 


Young 


Barner 


Edgerton 


Watson 


Babb 


Klostermier 


Powers 


Crawford 


Freeman 


Willison 


Jensen 


T. Smith 


Reeder 


Hassler 



208 



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Delta Zeta 




Colors — Rose and Nile Green 
Publication — The Lamp 



Garnet Grover, Iola 



Founded at Oxford, Ohio, October 24, 1902 

LAMBDA CHAPTER 

Installed May 22, 1915 



MEMBERS 

Seniors 



Flower — Kilarney Rose 

Total Membership, 96 



Elizabeth Dickens, Manhattan 



Ha Knight, Jamestown 
Verna Smith, Manhattan 
Ella Wilson, Luray 



Juniors 

Thelma Smith, Manhattan 
Hazel Wilson, Luray 
Madge Locke, Erie 
Renna Rosenthal, Topeka 

Sophomores 

Marguerite Young, Kansas City Maude Powell, Kansas City 

Rachel Jacobs, Council Grove 



Lois Edgerton, Randolph 
Irene Barner, Wellington 
Henrietta Willison, Dale, Ind. 

Mary Jensen, Waterloo, Iowa 
Cleo Powers, Herington 
Margaret Watson, Turon 



Freshmen 



Pledges 



Kate Hassler, Chapman 
Virginia Reeder, Troy 
Hilmarie Freeman, Courtland 

Ruth Klostermier, Atchison 
Aletha Crawford, Stafford 
Grace Samson, Topeka 



Vivienne Babb, Douglass 

Sorores in Urbe 
Opha Zetta Babb, Douglass Madge Price, Fredonia 

Sorores in Facilitate 
Mary Poison, Fredonia Evalene Kramer, Washington 



Araminta Holman, Leavenworth 

House Mother 
Mrs. G. A. Bice 



Izil Poison, Fredonia 








1 1 Q ^, 2, 



IKoppa iDelta 




K. Knittle 


Ransom 


Shaver 


Paddleford 


McKnight 


Humbert 


Hall 


Frost 


Dobie 


Kuns 


D. Knittle 


Gritz 


Stebbins 


Faulconer 


Shrader 


Pruitt 


Lemert 


Brookover 


Gillett 


Dakin 



Robertson 
Knostman 
Coulter 
Waugh 



Smith 



Miller 



McQuillen Maust 



Chandler 



210 



1! 






F>TS1^.JP>Z^E 




Founded at Virginia State Normal, Farmville, Va., October 23, 1897 
SIGMA GAMMA CHAPTER 




1 Q S, -2L 



liawa iMta 




Installed December 4, 1920 



Publication — The Angelos 
Flower — White Rose 



Marian Brookover, Eureka 
Marian Chandler, Tulsa, Okla. 
Betty Coulter, Wichita 
Carol Knostman, Wamego 
Esther Waugh, Amherst, Mass. 

Dora Dean Dakin, Ashland 
Margaret Gillett, Junction City 
Kathleen Knittle, Manhattan 
Amy Lemert, Cedar Vale 

Bertha Faulconer, Eldorado 
Gladys Gritz, Fall River 

Melda Dobie, Eureka 
Dorothy Frost, Blue Rapids 

Grace Knight, California, Mo. 
Alice Paddleford, Erie 
Roberta Robertson, Alma 



Total Membership 51 
Colors — Olive Green and White 



MEMBERS 
Seniors 



Juniors 



Sophomores 



Freshmen 



Mrs. Alice Fitch 
Mrs. Frank Coffman 



Sorores in Vrbe 



Orpha Maust, Garden City 
Katharin McQuillen, Clay Center 
Edith Miller, Council Grove 
Claramary Smith, Mound City, Mo. 



Ruth Merritt, Vermillion, S. D. 
Ruby Pruitt, Goddard 
Margaret Shrader, Cedar Vale 
Florence Stebbins, Ellis 



Dorothy Knittle, Manhattan 
Laurene Kuns, McPherson 

Vivian Hall, Clinton, Mo. 
Bernice Humbert, Hutchinson 

Maxine Ransom, Downs 
Muriel Shaver, Cedar Vale 
Elizabeth Van Ness, Topeka 



Mrs. Jessie McCampbell 
Mrs. A. A. Holtz 



House Mother 
Mrs. Mary Zeigler 




1 s> 2. 



Iftapp a IKappa (Bamma 




Whitehead 
Wood 
Holsinger 
Catlin 
S. Watts 



Woodruff 

Pickett 

Hubner 

Hepler 

Rugh 



t 



Deal 
Nissen 
Maupin 
Hedges 
M. White 

212 



Southern 
Leighton 
Null 

Hibarger 
C. Watts 



Barnhisel 

Mahaffy 

Martin 

Glass 

Strong 



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Iftappa Iftappa (Bamma 




Founded at Monmouth, Illinois, October 13, 1870 

GAMMA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Installed September 23, 1916 



Publication — The Key 
Flower — Fleur-de-lis 



Grace Hibarger, Wichita 



Total Membership, 127 
Colors — Light and Dark Blue 
MEMBERS 

Seniors 

Miriam Glass, Springdale, Ark. 
Sibyl Watts, Winfield 

Juniors 
Gretchen Rugh, Abilene 

Sophomores 
Margaret White, Parsons Maude Irene Whitehead, Abilene 

Curtis Watts, Winfield Polly Hedges, Hutchinson 

Faye Strong, Conway Springs Beth Hepler, Manhattan 

Gertrude Catlin, Fairbury, Neb. 

Specials 
Ruth Martin, Hiawatha 



Margaret Null, Spring Hill 
Vallie Maupin, St. Joseph, Mo. 
Marjorie Hubner, Newton 
Gilberta Woodruff, Parsons 
Rebekah Deal, Kansas City 
Ruth Southern, Manhattan 



Pledges 



Myrl Barnhisel, Wichita 

House Mother 
Mrs. N. A. Miller 



Edith Holsinger, Rosedale 
Margaret Pickett, Galena 
Elizabeth Nissen, Newton 
Winifred Wood, Manhattan 
Polly Mahaffy, Ottawa 
Ingovar Leighton, Helena, Ark. 




M 



1 Q ^, 2, 



TH^etaT)!)! 





i 



Otto Timmons Middleton Coons Bressler Dempsey 

Thayer Hanna Welch Helstrom Churchward Hull 

Rannells F. Martin O'Brien Stocker Barnhisel 

Caton Fairchild Johnson Heaton Mott 

A. Moore Smith Deal Watkins L. Martin Higinbotham 



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7i»ctalll)i 



Founded at Monmouth College, Monmouth, 111., in 1867 

KANSAS BETA CHAPTER 
Installed June 3, 1915 



Total Membership, 124 
Flower — Wine Carnation 



Publication — The Arrow 
Colors — Wine and Silver Blue 



Helen Thayer.'Manhattan 



MEMBERS 
Seniors 



Jean Hanna, Clay Center 



Marion Welch, Emporia 
Beulah Helstrom, McPherson 
Dorothy Churchward, Wichita 



Juniors 



Geraldine Hull, Manhattan 
Ruth Rannells, Manhattan 
Faith Martin, Winfield 



Lillian O'Brien, Manhattan 
Gladys Stocker, Concordia 
Florence Barnhisel, Wichita 
Julia Caton, Winfield 



Sophomores 



Edith Fairchild, Denver, Colo. 
Julia Johnson, Herington 
Alvareta Heaton, Concordia 
Genevieve Mott, Herington 



Freshmen 



Annie Laurie Moore, Nowata, Okla. 
Corrine Smith, Topeka 
Virginia Deal, Kansas City 
Hortense Watkins, Lyons 
Lucile Martin, Clay Center 
Mary Higinbotham, Manhattan 



Eleanor Dempsey, Manhattan 
Elizabeth Bressler, Manhattan 
Elizabeth Coons, Manhattan 
Jean Francis Middleton, Manhattan 
Eva Timmons, Riley 
Esther Otto, Riley 



House Mother 
Mrs. Elizabeth Warner, Herington 







2LS 









1 O 2. 2/ 



(Tl)i Ome^a 




J. Stitt 
Smale 

Case 
Uhlrich 
Falconer 



Hannen Corby Randall Wheeler Burgwin 

L. Herr Ebert Aspey Pinkerton Bondurant 

Allen Wight Richardson Voiland 

Hollis Fayman Riddell Pickard Wright 

Conn Stanley Johnstone R. Thornburg Miller 



216 






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1 o ^, 2/ 



(tl)i Ome^a 




Founded at Fayetteville, Arkansas, April 5, 
KAPPA ALPHA CHAPTER 



1895 



Total Membership, 92 
Flower — White Carnation 



Installed September, 1915 



Publication — The Eleuses 
Colors — Cardinal and Straw 



MEMBERS 
Seniors 



Marguerite Bondurant, Ness City 
Prudence Stanley, Topeka 



Juniors 



Frances A. Johnstone, Manhattan 



Laura Fayman, Kansas City, Mo. 
Margaret Falconer, Kansas City 
Doris I. Riddell, Salina 
Gretchen Voiland, Topeka 
Gladys Ebert, Boulder, Colo. 



Thelma Allen, Manhattan 
Fern Case, Alta Vista 
Marjorie Wright, Concordia 
lone Aspey, Hutchinson 
Helen Richardson, Topeka 
Ernestine Pinkerton, Clay Center 



Sophomores 



Freshmen 



Rowena Thornburg, Formosa 
Gertrude Conn, Kirbyville, Tex. 



Enola Miller, Salina 



Anne Uhlrich, Wamego 
Dorothy Pickaid, Kansas City 
Geneva Hollis, Fredonia 
Miriam Wight, Salina 



Lucile Herr, Hutchinson 
Myrna Smale, Manhattan 
Jessie Burgwin, Manhattan 
Cleo Randall, Holton 
Margaret Corby, Manhattan 



Pledges 
Alice Hannen, Detroit, Mich. Zena Wheeler, Des Moines, la. 

Jeanette Stitt, Neodesha 



Dr. Mary T. Harmon 
Miss Esther Fayman 



Members in Faculty 

Miss Irene Huse 
Miss Mary Worcester 

Miss Caroline Perkins 

House Mother 
Mrs. J. A. Gray 




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Tresljmatt Women's jpan-Hfellenlc 




Dobie Weyer Nissen Heimerick Aspey 

Elliott Smith Fisher 

Klostermier Crawford Moore Holsinger Corby 

The Freshman Women's Pan Hellenic was organized for the purpose of promoting good 
fellowship as well as cooperating with the Senior Pan Hellenic in matters of fraternity interest. 



DELTA ZETA 

Ruth Klostermier 
Aletha Crawford 



MEMBERS 



CHI OMEGA 

lone Aspey 
Margaret Corby 



PI BETA PHI 

Corinne Smith 
Annie Laurie Moore 



ALPHA DELTA PI 

Grace Weyer 
Marjorie Heimerick 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 

Blanche Elliot 
Alice Fisher 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

Edith Holsinger 
Elizabeth Nissen 



KAPPA DELTA 

Melda Dobie 
Ruth Merritt 

218 



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I^LOZ^TZs J^Urj^J^J^JO 





i q ^ rajm 



O.TE. S. (Tlub 



5s^ : 



F irsJ Row — Maude Lahr, Florence Johnson, Vida Ayres, Edna Bangs, Ruth Floyd. 

Second Row — Lucile Whan, Margaret Mason, Edith Haines, Esther Huling, Ruth Cunningham, 
Pauline Keith. 

Third Row — Anne Sturmer, Marjorie O'Neil, Coletta Mayden, Mildred Kaucher, Georgia 
Daniels, Alta Barger. 



Colors — Gold and White 



Flowers— Yellow and White Chrysanthemum 



Vida Ayers 



Maude Lahr 



Seniors 
Ruth Cunningham Ruth Floyd Florence Johnson 

Vera Lee Lucile Whan 



Juniors 
Margaret Mason Edith Haines 



Sophomores 
Esther Huling 



Pauline Keith 




1 



Freshmen 
Georgia Mae Daniels Marjorie O'Neill 



Mildred Kaucher 




1 Q ^, -2L 



.Alplja Xi 




Ausherman Thomas Knox DeWitt 

Jackson Waugh Johnson Lukert Knight 

Crihfield Cooper Reece Colburn Moyer 



Elsie Knox, Leon 



MEMBERS 

Senior 
Georgie Belle Crihfield, Manhattan 

Juniors 

Alice DeWitt, Medicine Lodge 
Louisa Moyer, Hiawatha 

Sophomores 
Lavina Waugh, Oskaloosa Edith Reese, Riley 

Dorothy Lukert, Topeka 

Freshriven 
Ina Davidson, Ramona Achsa Johnson, Aurora, Neb. 

Louise Ausherman, Ramona Winifred Knight, Medicine Lodge 

Esther Jackson, Manhattan Evelyn Colburn, Manhattan 

Mabel Cooper, Hannibal, Mo. 

Special 
Ilene Thomas, LeRoy 

220 




1 ^ ^, 2, 



>=i 



^ttert's #an-~3'U[hnic (Touitcil 




First Row — M. D. Laine, Kent Dudley, A. J. McKee, Charles Cloud, Neal Bruce. 
Second Row—L. G. Grandfield, S. J. Coe, J. C. Wingfield, Glen Case. 
Third flow— Paul Tupper, C. M. Rust, Harold Howe. 

The object of the Pan Hellenic Council is to govern the national fraternities of the college, 
placing such regulation and restriction on them as will benefit the fraternities and the college. 



MEMBERS 




ACACIA 
G. M. Case 

ALPHA PSI 
A. J. McKee 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA 
C. M. Rust 

BETA THETA PI 
N. D. Bruce 

DELTA TAU DELTA 
K. R. Dudley 



KAPPA SIGMA 
C. H. Cloud 



22] 



PHI DELTA THETA 
M. D. Laine 

PHI KAPPA 
Harold Howe 

PI KAPPA ALPHA 
J. C. Wingfield 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 
P. Tupper 

SIGMA NU 
R. A. Maupin 

SIGMA PHI EPSILON 
L. G. Grandfield 



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^Acacia 




Founded 'at' Michigan University, May 12, 1904 

KANSAS STATE CHAPTER 
Installed December 6, 1913 

HISTORY 

The Acacia fraternity was fc vr. ded at Ann Arbor, Micb., by a group of college men who were 
Master Masons. 

It was felt by that group that there was a place in college life for an organization which had 
back of it the traditions and ideal s of the oldest secret organization in the world. 

The local organization to which a charter of Acacia was later granted was founded March 
5, 1910, by a group of Master Masons. This organization was known as the Masonic club. The 
Masonic club became the Kansas State chapter of Acacia on December 6, 1913. The house at 
821 Osage was the first to be occupied by the fraternity. In 1917 Acacia completed its new 
home which is located at 340 N. 16th. In the fall of the same year they took possession. 

During the war period which followed, Acacia virtually ceased to exist, there being only 
two members of the chapter in school. The house was used for a time by the government for 
housing members of the S. A. T. C. Later it was turned into an emergency hospital. In the 
spring of 1919 the men began to return from the service, and by the next fall fraternity affairs 
were almost back to normal. 







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Alpl)tt T3au Omega 





Founded at Virginia Military Institute, Richmond, Va., September 11, 1865 

KANSAS DELTA THETA 
Installed October 22, 1920 



Colors — Blue and Gold 



Flower — White Tea Rose 



I National— The Palm 
Publications j Local ^ The vintage 

HISTORY 

In a Y. M. C. A. room, April 6, 1912, six students with common interests decided to or- 
ganize a club to be known as the Red Tie Club (R. T. C). In 1917 the Greek letter name, 
Alpha Theta Chi was adopted for the purpose of working for a charter of a national fraternity. 
Since the organization as R. T. C. a house has always been maintained. The first house was at 
1211 Moro. For several years as Alpha Theta Chi, the fraternity occupied the house at 1408 
Laramie. During the spring of 1920, the local fraternity purchased the house now occupied 
at 1642 Fairchild. Near the close of the spring semester in 1920 the petition to Alpha Tau 
Omega was granted and the Kansas Delta Theta chapter of Alpha Tau Omega was installed 
October 22, 1920. 




225 



FSLOK^TJ^ 




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:?Upl)a psi 




Founded at Ohio State University, January, 1907 

ETA CHAPTER 

Installed April 5, 1912 

Flower— Red Carnation Colors— Blue and Gold 

Publication — Alpha Psi Quarterly 

HISTORY 

The Alpha Psi fraternity was founded at Ohio State University in January, 1907. The 
next chapter to be formed was Beta Chapter of Cornell university. It was April 5, 1912, that 
a chapter of Alpha Psi was granted to a group of men at K. S. A. C, the chapter at this school 
being Eta chapter. The first chapter house was at 909 Fremont. In 1918 several members of 
Delta chapter came to Kansas State and took an active part in school life. The last of these 
men graduated in '21. It will always be felt that these men had a very prominent part in making 
Eta chapter what it is today. 




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3Seta Oljeta #i 





Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, 1839 



Flower — Red Rose 



GAMMA EPSILON CHAPTER 
Installed October, 1914 

Publication— The Beta Theta Pi 



Colors — Pink and Blue 



HISTORY 

Gamma Epsilon chapter of Beta Theta Pi had its beginning October 14, 1901, and was 
known as the Sphinx club. It was the oldest existing society of the nature of a fraternity 
organization to be installed at K. S. A. C. Its first definite step toward a fraternity came in 
1906 when it moved out of its club rooms down town into its first home on the corner of Ninth 
Street and Poyntz Avenue. Here the Sphinx club first became known to the public as Tau 
Omega Sigma, a Greek letter fraternity. 

In 1908 the alumni of the organization formed a stock company and built a home at 821 
Osage which was occupied by the fraternity until 1913. The organization first formally peti- 
tioned Beta Theta Pi in 1913 and again in 1914, at which time the charter was granted. In- 
stallation as a chapter of Beta Theta Pi took place on October 17 of that year. At the time of 
installation the fraternity home was on the corner of Sixth Street and Poyntz Avenue. The 
present home at 1614 Fairchild was purchased and occupied in 1916. 




22"J 




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2>elta Z5au iDelta 




Founded at Bethany College, West Virginia, February, 1859 



Flower — Pancy 



GAMMA CHI CHAPTER 
Installed June 6, 1919 

Colors— Purple, White and Gold 
Publication — The Rainbow 



HISTORY 

Gamma Chi of Delta Tau Delta had its inception February 19, 1910, when the Aztex 
fraternity was organized with 17 charter members: Oley Weaver, '11; Clif Stratton, '11 
Walt Osborn, '11; Ray Anderson, '11; 'Gene Blair, '10; Roy Johnson, '10; Karl Musser, '12 
Clay Lint, '11; Kenneth Phillips, '12; Claude Smith; Harlan Smith, '11; John Wilson, '10 
D. E. Lewis, '10; Tom Hall, '10; John Z. Martin, '11; Van Smith, '10; George Young, '12. 

Application for Delta Tau Delta was made at the next annual conclave, but the charter 
was not granted until 1919. Sixty-five Aztex were initiated into Delta Tau Delta when Gamma 
Chi chapter was installed, June 6, 1919. The fraternity now carries 148 men on its rolls. 
The Aztex first home was at 1030 Fremont, a later residence at 901 Moro. The present home, 
1224 Fremont, was bought in 1916. During 12 years of fraternity existence, Aztex and Delta 
have taken a pride in doing their share in college and intercollegiate activities. 




231 



J^O^O^J^ J>] 



1 ^ ^, 2, 



IKappa Jpl)i .Alplja 




Founded at K. S. A. C, April 20, 1920 
Colors — Brown and Gold 

HISTORY 

The Kappa Phi Alpha fraternity was officially announced at its spring banquet, April 
20, 1920. It was organized for the purpose of promoting fraternal spirit, mutual helpfulness 
and social enjoyment among its members. 

In the spring of 1915 several of the leading non-fraternity men of the college began working 
toward the organization of a new social fraternity at K. S. A. C. While the plans for the or- 
ganization were still incomplete, these men entered the military service and did not return 
until the fall of 1919. They then took up their work where they had left it, and in a short time 
the constitution for the organization was complete. The fraternity is incorporated under 
the laws of the state of Kansas, its charter being dated June 4, 1920. 

The fraternity was first located at 1126 Bluemont Avenue, but soon outgrew that domicile 
and was moved to 1116 Bluemont where it is housed at the present time. The house mother, 
Mrs. Alice E. Marcotte, has been with the fraternity since its organization. 






233 



Z^<0&^¥^, 




Iftappa Sigma 





Founded at the University of Virginia in 1869 



GAMMA CHI CHAPTER 

Installed June 6, 1919 

Colors — Scarlet, White and Emerald Green Flower — Lily of the Valley 

j Star and Crescent" 
Caduceus" 



Publications 



HISTORY 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity was first organized at the University of Bologna in Italy 
during the fourteenth century. It was brought to the United States and established at the 
University of Virginia on December 10, 1867. During the first decade of its existence in the 
United States it made a rapid growth in the southern states, later spreading to all parts of the 
country. At present there are 91 active chapters. 

The Gamma Chi chapter of Kappa Sigma was installed June 7, 1919. The chapter now 
resides at 519 N. Eleventh Street having an active membership of 31. 




235 





'i o a, :2,^ m 



Pi Iftappa Alp!)a 




Founded at University of Virginia, 1868 



Colors — Garnet and Gold 

Publications 



ALPHA OMEGA CHAPTER 
Installed June 14, 1913 

Flower — Lily of the Valley 

Shield and Diamond 
Dagger and Key 




HISTORY 

Phi Gamma Theta was organized February 8, 1911. The men forming this chapter re- 
turned in the fall of 1912 and rented a house. Membership continued to grow and with added 
strength the critical point of a new fraternity was passed. 

In 1912, 20 of the men returned and through their efforts a petition was presented to 
Pi Kappa Alpha for admission as a chapter of that order. After a long period of waiting a 
charter was granted and all the members of Phi Gamma Theta were initiated into the Alpha 
Omega chapter of the national fraternity. 

The fraternity occupied the house at 1104 Vattier Street for four years. In the fall of 1918 
Alpha Omega opened another house at 931 Osage Street which was occupied only about two 
months when it was turned over to S. A. T. C. The latter organization was disbanded in 
December. 

At the beginning of the second semester, activities were resumed. During the summer of 
1918 several of the men spent a great deal of time selecting and buying a house. The present 
home at 331 North Seventeenth Street is the result of their efforts. 




1 







1 ^ 'ZL -2L 



Sigma .Alplja Cpsilon. 




Flower — Violet 



Founded at Tuscaloosa, Alabama, March 9, 1856 

KANSAS BETA CHAPTER 

Installed January 24, 1913 

Colors — Purple and Gold 
Publication — "The Record" 




HISTORY 

In the fall of 1905 six Manhattan boys who had just entered the Kansas State Agricultural 
college met and organized a local academic fraternity. Later the local petitioned Phi Sigma Chi. 
Meetings were held in a room which the members had rented over a down town store. Phi 
Sigma Chi continued as an active chapter until 1909. During this year the members decided to 
petition Sigma Alpha Epsilon but were advised that the liklihood that their petition would be 
accepted would be greatly increased if they petitioned as a college local rather than an academic 
national. The result was that the organization turned its charter into Phi Sigma Chi fraternity, 
although the members retained their membership, and reorganized as a local college fraternity 
known as Phi Alpha Theta. The down town room was abandoned and a house rented near the 
college. In December 1912 Phi Alpha Theta was granted a charter at the Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon national convention. The chapter was installed January 24, 1913, and was the first 
national college fraternity to enter Kansas State Agricultural college. The members of Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon were also the first at the college to build their own fraternity house. It was 
completed in 1915. It is a three story stucco structure of Spanish Mission architecture. Since 
the installation of the chapter 191 men have been initiated into the chapter. 





239 



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Flower — White Rose 




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Sigma ytu 





Founded at Virginia Military Institute, January 1, 1869 



BETA KAPPA CHAPTER 
Installed May 23, 1913 

Colors— Black, White and Gold 
Publication — "The Delta" 



HISTORY 

On October 28, 1901, Iota chapter of Kappa Delta Pi fraternity was established. The 
founding of this chapter marked the beginning of fraternity life at this college. 

On May 23, 1913, Kappa Delta Pi was granted a charter as the Beta Kappa chapter of 
Sigma Nu. 

The home at 1031 Leavenworth Street was purchased in 1913. 



Fratres in Facilitate 



H. H. Haymaker 
A. P. Davidson 
C. F. Baker 
C. E. Aubel 



D. M. Fullington 
J. D. Colt, Jr. 



Wm. A. Lippincott 



Fratres in Urbe 



H. W. Marston 
P. L. Mann 
H. P. Wheeler 
M. C. Sewell 



Paul Winne 
L. E. Hobbs 




i ^ ^ :2,^^ 



Sigma Jpb* CpsUott 




Founded November 1, 1901, at Richmond College, Richmond, Va. 

KANSAS BETA CHAPTER 

Installed February 23, 1918 

FWm-American Beauties and Violets Conors-Purple and Red 

Publication— Sigma Phi Epsilon Journal 

HISTORY 
The Kansas Beta chapter of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity had its origin in an organi- 
zation known at the Eureka club, founded March 20, 1915. By the end of the academic year 
the club was put upon what was virtually a fraternity basis, inasmuch as new members could 
?Q1 1- Ta n y I a UnammOUS vote - This club maintained a house during the school year 
FnionF r ng T SPnng ° f 1916 the Mme ° f the or g an i-tion was changed to Epsilon 
Epsilon Epsilon and recognition as a fraternity was obtained from the college authorities The 
formal announcement was made at a banquet held June 7, 1916. 

During the fall of 1916 the question of nationalization was considered and a formal petition 
was prepared and presented to the Grand Chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon. A charter! 

sTmS The 8 ° C t al by , th t na t ti0 " al ° rganiZati ° n and inStallati °" ^ were held FWy 
23 1918. The fraternity chapter house, which was purchased in 1920, is located at 221 North 
Delaware Avenue. More than 100 men are now members of this chapter 





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Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, 
KANSAS GAMMA CHAPTER 
Installed February 25, 1921 
Publication — The Scroll 

Colors — Azure and Argent 



1848 



Flower — Carnation 



HISTORY 

The present chapter of Phi Delta Theta had its origin as the local fraternity of Sigma Phi 
Delta which was established at the Kansas State Agricultural college in 1914. In 1920 the 
local fraternity, after petitioning six years, received a charter from Phi Delta Theta and became 
the Kansas Gamma chapter of the organization. 

The alumni of the chapter now number 119, of whom more than two-thirds have received 
degrees from the college. Twelve others have received degrees from other institutions. 
During the late war there were 54 members of the chapter in the service. 





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246 





Jpl)i i>elta Oau 




Organized May 21, 1919 



Flower — Sweet Pea 



Colors — Purple and Gold 



The Phi Delta Tau fraternity existed as a club for some time, but changed its status to 
that of a local fraternity on May 21, 1919, with ten charter members. The fraternity was 
organized and has continued to live up to the present time at 1447 Aanderson Ave. 

The organization has an active membership of 30 members, about equally divided between 
the divisions of work in the college. Its total membership is 55. 

Mrs. L. M. Roark has been with the fraternity as house mother since its organization. 





247 







s> ^, ^'^m 



Omega Z3au Cpsilon 




Total Membership 50 



Flower — Jonquil 



Colors — Lavender and Wine 



The Omega Tau Epsilon fraternity was first organized because the members felt that through 
cooperation they could enjoy the advantages of college life to a greater extent. However, as 
the club was not gaining the greatest advantages to be obtained from college life the members 
organized the club as a Greek letter organization May 16, 1920. 



Charter Members 



Harry B. Hickman 
Jay E. Stanton 
Samuel R. Johnson 
Brainard L. Taylor 
Sivert Eriksen 
Aubrey M. Lee 



Winfield J. Bitter 
Marion M. Williams 
Ben F. Clapham 
Ralph Simonsen 
Kenneth Farley 



Fratres in Facultate 

Dr. C. H. Kitselman 

House Mother 

Mrs. A. Cave 





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3Farm 3'fouse 






Founded May, 1905, at the University of Missouri 



KANSAS CHAPTER 
Installed June 2, 1921 



Colors — Green, White and Gold 



Flower — Sunburst Rose 



HISTORY 

Farm House was originated by a few agricultural students at the University of Missouri 
in May, 1905. The fifth chapter was installed at K. S. A. C, June 2, 1921. 

The organization of the Kansas chapter was the result of a need felt by a group of agri- 
cultural students and faculty members who had, from time to time, associated with Farm House 
men of other colleges. 

The Kansas chapter, being new, looks to the future for its history. It hopes to attain 
its ideal which is: To foster good fellowship and advance scientific agriculture. 



Alumni 



David Capper, Ames 

Ira Landon, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Charles Stinson, Carlyle 

Karl Quisenberry, Newton 

George Anderson, Bronson 



Charles Davis, Manhattan 
Samuel Gilbert, Arkansas'City 
Rolla McCall, Brewster 
Orin Peterson, Caney 



Honorary 
Prof. B. M. Anderson, Manhattan Prof. F. W.;Bell,* Manhattan 

Vincent Lambert, Manhattan 




253 



RC&Z*?Zs 1>IS1^1=>Z^J5 




1 ^ 2, 2, 



Tresl)matt ^en's 7 an- U'fellenic 





Hanna 
Charles 



Phifer 



Eble 



Lange 



W. Overton 
Robbins 

Diefendorf 



Pomeroy 
Lovitt 
Staley 



MEMBERS 



ACACIA 

D. M. Pomeroy 
ALPHA PSI 

W. Overton 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA 

L. M. Staley 
BETA THETA PI 

G. Hanna 
DELTA TAU DELTA 

Charles Long 

KAPPA SIGMA 
Leon Phifer 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 

P. Lange 
PHI DELTA THETA 

C. E. Robbins 

PHI KAPPA 

C. W. Lovett 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 

D. M. Diefendorf 
SIGMA NU 

J. A. Eble 
SIGMA PHI EPSILON 
F. E. Charles 





i s s, 2,)ib 



pl)i ^boXa Sigma 




Top flow.-— James W. Pryor (4), Francis G. Fry (3), Roy P. Garrett (4), Gordon G. Ford (2). 
Middle Row— Wirt D. Walton (3), Ulysses S. Arnold (2), Gomez B. Robinson (1), G. Thomas 

Bronson (3), Claude L. Wilson (1). 
Bottom Row— Raymond M. Williams (3), J. Leod Wilson (3), Theo. H. Miller (1), Ross W. 

May (2). 

Founded at Howard University, January 9, 1914 

DELTA CHAPTER 

Installed April 9, 1917 

Total Membership 30 
Colors — Blue and White Flower — White Carnation 

Publication — Phi Beta Sigma Journal 

MEMBERS 

Seniors 
James W. Pryor, Kansas City, Mo. Roy P. Gairett, Manhattan 

Juniors 
G. Thomas Bronson, Waldo J. Leod Wilson, Ottawa 

Francis G. Fry, Bastrop, Texas Raymond M. Williams, Kansas City, Mo. 

Wirt D. Walton, Leavenworth 

Sophomores 
Ulysses S. Arnold, Kansas City, Mo. Gordon E. Ford, Burlingame 

Ross W. May, Holton 

Freshmen 
Theodore H. Miller, Kansas City, Mo. Claude L. Wilson, Ottawa 

Pledge 
Gomez B. Robinson, Kansas City, Mo. 

House Mother 

Mrs. E. J. Scott 

255 




I 



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i 



I 



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ySiHl 




Ansdell 



Wilson 



Smith 
Knittle 
Swenson 



ALPHA DELTA PI 

Garnette Westbrook 

Louise Mowry 

Lulu May Zeller 

Frances Batdorf 

Margaret Ansdell 

Helen Swope 
KAPPA DELTA 

Dorothy Knittle 

Laurene Kuns 

Ruby Pruitt 

Dora Dean Dakin 

Claramary Smith 

Betty Coulter 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 
Ruth Martin 
Margaret White 
Curtis Watts 
Miriam Glass 
Maude Irene Whitehead 
Gretchen Rugh 



Haack 
Caton 
Bondurant 
MEMBERS 



Grover 
Thayer 

Whitehead 



White 
Stanley 
Zeller 




CHI OMEGA 

Marguerite Bondurant 

Prudence Stanley 

Frances Johnstone 

Doris Riddell 

Laura Fayman 

Enola Miller 
PI BETA PHI 

Dorothy Churchward 

Julia Caton 

Beulah Helstrom 

Edythe Fairchild 

Helen Thayer 

Jean Hanna 

Gladys Stocker 

Faith Martin 
DELTA DELTA DELTA 

Mary Bahan 

Ann Ratliffe 

Mildred Swenson 

Florence Haack 

Frances Codden 

Marian Hardman 



DELTA ZETA 
Garnet Grover Ella Wilson 

Ila Knight Hazel Wilson 

Renna Rosenthal Madge Locke 
Verna Smith 
270 




Griffith 



Kellogg 



Shellenberger 



GOVERNING BOARD 



Evan Griffith— Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Donald Hall— Alpha Tau Omega 
William Skinner — Acacia 
I. M. Leonard — Phi Kappa 
Harold Zimmerman — Beta Theta Pi 
Ray Kellogg— Delta Tau Delta 



Tobasco dancing club was organized January 1, 1919, by two students who foresaw the 
need of mterfratermty dances in order to continue the democratic spirit already so characteristic 
of K. S. A. C. In the beginning seven fraternities were represented in Tobasco, but upon the 
growth of national fraternities in our school, this number has been increased to twelve. 

The governing board consists of one representative from each fraternity, and the organi- 
zation proper is controlled by these men. Dances are held each month and the best music 
possible is obtained for these parties. 




Maurice Laine — Phi Delta Theta 
Fred Williams— Alpha Psi 
Emmet Graham — Pi Kappa Alpha 
C. L. Shellenberger — Kappa Sigma 
L. G. Grandfield— Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Rex Maupin — Sigma Nu 



271 



Z^O>C*ZJrs 





Honorary ^Professional 





Mostert Roofe Hemphill Baker Harder 

Webber Coles Ausemus Dethloff Taylor 

Schmitz Bayles Means Raleigh Moody 



Coe 

Copeland 
Herrick 



National Honorary Agricultural Fraternity 

Founded at Ohio State University in 1897 

KANSAS CHAPTER 

Installed March 16, 1909 

Color— Mode and Sky Blue Ffoteer— Pink Carnation 

Publication — Alpha Zeta Quarterly 

leadershi P an^abint^^ ^^ ^ t0 ^^ t0gether men P ossessin g the qualities of personality 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Ausemus, E. R. Knight, L. M. 

Hathaway, I. R. Mostert, J. F. T. 

Seniors 
Bayles, B. B. Copeland, L. S. 

Baker, H. L. Dethloff, C. C. 

Coe, S. J. Harder, W. R. 

Coles, E. H. Hemphill, C. R. 

Weber, A. D. 

Graduates 



Roofe, P. G. 
Taylor, G. E. 

Means, E. T. 
Moody, H. E. 
Raleigh, G. J. 
Schmitz, H. W. 



Herrick, C. A. 
Davis, C. D. 



Wells, E. B. 
Gemmell, Geo. 



273 




1 s> 2, 2, 



Omicron ^tu 






Dr. Thompson 
Brookover 



Grundmeier 
Poison 



Pittman 
Cramsey 



Sherman Dubbs Messenger 

Waugh L. Thompson 

Founded at East Lansing, Michigan, 1912 

Theta Chapter Installed in 1915 

Publication— Omicron Nu Magazine Flower—Sweet Pea 

Colors — Lavender and Pink 

Purpose — To promote scholarship and leadership in the field of home economics. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Luella Sherman 
Esther Waugh 
Marian Brookover 
Jean Moore 
Margaret Dubbs 
M. Virginia Messenger 



Edith G. Grundmeier 

Clara Cramsey 

Lola Thompson 

Izil I. Poison 

Ina F. Cowles 

Dean Helen B. Thompson 



Martha S. Pittman 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
Dean Mary P. VanZile Dr. Jean Bogert 

Prof. Hildegarde Kneeland 






274 



Z>TSRJP>Z^E 





1 ^ 2, 2, 



Sigma Oau 






First Row— Prof. Ward, Gerald Garloch, N. U. Platner, H. I. Tarpley, F. A. Smutz C D Gross 

C. F. Irwin, R. G. Scott, Prof. J. P. Calderwood. 
Second Row-J. E. Beyer, Prof. C. E. Pearce, E. F. Stalcup, Robert Spratt, M. A Durland 

T. E. Johntz, Prof. C. E. Scholer, M. H. Banks. 
Third Row— Harry Connell, L. 0. Sinderson, Dean R. A. Seaton, S. P. Hunt Oscar Cullen 

H. C. Jennings, Prof. G. A. Sellers, Prof. F. F. Frazier, Prof. L. E. Conrad. 
Fourth Row— Prof. J. D. Walters, Claude Butcher, W. T. Rolfe, Prof. W. W. Carlson M A 

Wilson, I. B. Kirkwood, R. S. Love, Prof. M. W. Furr. 

Sigma Tau was founded in 1904 at the University of Nebraska for the purpose of grouping 
together those students who had the scholastic, social and practical requirements of a successful 
engineer. The mother chapter spread her influence to other schools where chapters have since 
been established, until the national fraternity is now composed of twelve chapters and two 
alumni associations. 

Epsilon Chapter at Kansas State was chartered in 1912 by 18 men. Its membership 
consists of men in the junior and senior years who rank in the upper third of their class in 
scholarship and who are deemed to meet the other requirements of Sigma Tau At the close 
of the 1922 school year there are 27 active men in the chapter, seven alumni in the faculty 
and fourteen honorary faculty members. 




275 



I^OZO&l^ I> Z^J^J^JL 




1 Q ^, 2, 



Pl)i^Vlpl)a 3ttu 





Top Bow— Ruth Peck, Hattie Betz, Lulu Mae Zeller, Amy Lemert, Mildred Pence, Rowena 

Thornburg. 
Second Row— Orpha Maust, Dora Dakin, Bess McKittrick (Sponsor), Esther McStay, Elizabeth 

Dickens, Gladys Hartley. 
Third Bow— Lucille Whan, Edna Bangs, Leone Bower, Elfrieda Hemker, Lilliam Rommel, 

Maude Lahr. 

Colors — Green and White 

HISTORY 

Phi Alpha Mu, honorary general science fraternity for women was organized in the spring 
of 1919 under the name of Theta Chi Gamma. In 1921 the society was reorganized and given 
the name under which it now exists. Under the old constitution membership was limited 
to those who met special requirements in English as well as in scholarship in other departments. 
Later under the new constitution membership was opened to all junior and senior girls whose 
grades ranked in the upper 15%, and who were enrolled in the general science division. 

At present Phi Alpha Mu has 18 active members who are promoting leadership and scholar- 
ship among the women students at K. S. A. C. Since there is no other national fraternity for 
women of this type in the colleges of the middle west, Phi Alpha Mu is looking forward to 
nationalization. 




'l Q S, 2/^ m 



Scabbard anb 3Ma6e 





First Row — McPherson, Plyley. 

Second Row — Koenig, Jolley, Willis, Phillips, Overton, Marsh. 

Third Row— Marshall, Gates, Means, Wingfleld, Hodgson, McKown. 

Fourth Row— Thackery, Major Claeren, Major Chapman, Capt. Jackson, 

Major Davidson, Richards. 
Fifth Row — Henre, Bucklee, Frank, Byers, Aydelotte, Austin. 

Honorary Military Fraternity 

Founded, University of Wisconsin, 1905 

Publication — "The Scabbard and Blade" 

Company L, 1st Regiment 

Installed, June, 1914 



or Terrill, 



ROLL 

Honorary Members 

President, Wm. M. Jardine Major L. C. Davidson, U. S. A. 

Major E. L. Claeren, U. S. A. Major C. A. Chapman, U. S. A. 

Major F. B. Terrill, U. S. A. Lieut. G. Wm. Brower, U. S. A. 

Captain C. N. Jackson, U. S. A. 



W. H. Sanders 

C. C. McPherson 
W. J. Bucklee 
R. C. Plyley 
K. C. Frank 
R. E. Marshall 
P. J. Phillips 
E. E. Hodgson 
G. E. Gates 




Alumni Members (college) 
W. C. Wilson 

Active Members 
W. H. Koenig 
P. M. McKown 
L. L. Marsh 
L. C. Rossel 
J. C. Wingfleld 
E. H. Willis 
O. H. Aydelotte 

277 



C. E. Sawyer 

J. E. Thackery 
M. R. Henre 
W. J. Overton 
H. I. Richards 
C. C. Jolley 
L. H. Means 
A. L. Austin 
L. W. Byers 




Elsie Bergstrom, Mabel Cooper, Marguerite Brooks, Ella Mae Paustian, Lavina Waugh. 

Eunice Anderson, Arrilla Wadsworth, Mildred Thornburg, Orpha Russell, Ruth Pasley. 

Eugenia Harris-Lee, Elsie Knox, Mary Gerkin, Mable Murphy. 

HISTORY 
The MacDowell club, women's honorary music club, was organized at K. S. A. C. in the 
fall of 1918 for the purpose of stimulating interest in all musical activities of the college. An 
outlined course of study is followed with monthly programs which afford members of the club 
opportunity to perform and hear compositions of the best in musical literature. 



MEMBERS 



Eunice Anderson 
Marguerite Brooks 
Elsie Bergstrom 
Mabel Cooper 
Mary Gerkin 
Elsie Knox 
Eugenia Harris Lee 



Mabel Murphy 
Ruth Pasley 
Orpha Russell 
Mildred Thornburg 
Arrilla Wadsworth 
Lavina Waugh 
Ella Mae Paustian 



Helen Colburn 
Edna Ellis 
Ruth Foristall 
Helen Hannen 
Ethel Hassinger 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Fanny Keller 
Katharine Kimmel 
Ethel Robinson 
Elsie Smith 
Gladys Warren 



278 



^nR03<^¥J^ 



1 O 2, 2, 



Ttyi Mlu A\p[)a— Sinfonia 





Top flow— Chas. H. Cloud, K. R. Dudley, H. I. Hemker, G. H. Bush, H. T. Hill, Ira Pratt 
H. L. Collins. ' 

Second Row-U H. Griswold, M. A. Smith, R. G. Scott, R. M. Hardgan, L. S. Hulshizer, 
(j. M. Case, F. N. Erwm. 

Third Row— Robt. Gordon, Wm. Lindquist, H. P. Gaston, F. L. Myers, D. M Diefendorf 
W. 1 . Kolie. ' 

Bottom Row— Boyd Ringo, H. C. Ashe, J. P. Clark, J. B. Elliot, H. E. Moody, V L Kirk 

Phi Mu Alpha is a professional fraternity, composed of men interested in and working for 
the betterment of American music in America. The fraternity was founded at the New England 
Conservatory of Music, October 6, 1898, and at the present time it has 22 active chapters. 

Tau chapter of Sinfonia was founded at K. S. A. C. on February 19, 1921, and was composed 
of 22 members at that time, but since that time the personnel of the chapter has increased until 
at the present time the total membership is 44. 

Tau chapter has been in existence only one year, but in that time it has endeavored to 
push American music by supporting the Artist's Series, recitals, concerts, etc that have 
been promoted by the music department from time to time. 

The active membership of Tau chapter is composed of 28 members. 



H. W. Davis 
Robert Gordon 
0. I. Gruber 



In the Faculty 
H. T. Hill 
William Lindquist 
Ira Pratt 



Boyd Ringo 
H. P. Wheeler 




w 



X ^ ^ ^^ MmM 



Ol)eta Sigma "pl)i 




■ 




Edith Abbott, Lulu May Zeller, Elizabeth Dickens, Frances F. Johnstone, Dahy Barnett. 
Julia King, Jessie Adee, Charlotte Russell, Orille Bourassa, Margaret Reich, Edith Haines. 

HISTORY 

Theta Sigma Phi as a national organization dates back to 1909 when the Alpha chapter 
was established at the University of Washington. Mu chapter was installed at K. S. A. C . 
June 8, 1916. The membership of Theta Sigma Phi, which is an honorary and professional 
journalistic sorority, is limited to upperclassmen who are doing creditable work along practical 
as well as scholastic lines of journalistic endeavor. The Matrix is the national publication of 
Theta Sigma Phi. 

The recently organized Women's National Journalistic Register, which is open to all wo- 
men engaged in journalistic work, is supervised by the national organization of Theta Sigma 
Phi. One of the principal activities of the local chapter of the sorority is the work done in 
cooperation with Sigma Delta Chi, on The Brown Bull, the college humorous magazine. 



-sip 



TSRT>ZsE, 




1 Q 2. 2, 







Sigma iMta (Tl)i 





Top iJow— Prof. H. W. Davis, C. W. Howard, Albert Mead, Prof. C. E. Rogers, V. Blackledge, 

M. Laine. 
Second Row—R. L. Palmer, H. G. Bryson, R. C. Nichols, Prof. E. T. Keith, C. R. Smith. 
Third Row—C. W. Pratt, W. Law, Prof. N. A. Crawford, M. Salisbury. 

Installed May 4, 1915 

OFFICERS 1921-22 

President Walter Law 

Vice-President Maurice Laine 

Secretary-Treasurer V. R. Blackledge 



HISTORY 

Sigma Delta Chi was installed at Kansas State May 4, 1914. Since that date it has been 
continuously active. 

The chapter has always been composed of the most active and the most able men of the 
journalism department. It has been the special aim of this group to encourage journalistic en- 
deavor in the college, and to uphold the highest standards and ideals in the public press. To 
furnish that great institution, the public press, with leaders and workers who are men of the 
highest type morally and mentally, and who recognize and accept the great burden of responsi- 
bility which falls upon those who would serve the public through the printed page; this has 
been the high purpose of Sigma Delta Chi. 

The eighth national convention of Sigma Delta Chi will be held at the Kansas State 
Agricultural college in the fall of 1922. The local chapter and the school looks forward to this 
convention as one of the great events in the life of the school and the department. 




281 






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113 2, 



Zzla Iftappa ~JUi 




Gillett Smith Sherman Seeber Newcomb Lahr 

Hart Flemming Derby Thurow Whan 

Best Burr Thompson Burtis Correll 

Honorary Forensic Fraternity 

ALPHA CHAPTER 



Colors — Violet and White 



Publication — The Zeta 



HISTORY 

Zeta Kappa Psi, a national honorary forensic fraternity for women, was organized at K. 
S. A. C. in the spring of 1914, by eight girls who secured a charter from the state and perfected 
a local organization. 

Early in 1917, the absolute success of the organization as a local being established, the 
fraternity became national with Gamma Zeta of the University of Oregon and Kappa Rho of 
the University of Minnesota as the Beta and Gamma chapters. Chapters have since been 
installed at the Iowa State Teachers college, the Kansas State normal, and the Oregon Agri- 
cultural college. The first national convention was held at K. S. A. C. in November of 1920. 

282 



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piliappa^)elta 



First Row—E. H. Willis, Dr. H. T. Hill, Arnold Englund, J. W. Barger, V. W. Stambaugh. 
Second Row — C. W. Howard, Hubert Collins, H. E. Rosson, J. W. Farmer. 
Third Row— Dr. W. F. Slade, W. E. McKibben, J. J. Seright, H. I. Richards, J. E. Thackrey. 
Fourth Row — L. F. Whearty, Austin Stover, C. W. Matthews, Harold Howe. 

Honorary Forensic Fraternity 
Founded at Ottawa University in January, 1913 



KANSAS GAMMA CHAPTER 



Colors — Cerise and Cream 



Publication — The Forensic 



HISTORY 

Pi Kappa Delta is a comparatively young fraternity having been established at Ottawa 
University in January, 1913. In 1914, a group of men who had won letters in debate were 
granted Kansas Gamma Chapter. Conspicuous among the early workers were President H. J. 
Waters and Dr. J. R. MacArthur, now national president of Pi Kappa Delta. 

Before being considered for membership to Pi Kappa Delta, a student must have partici- 
pated in at least one inter-collegiate debate contest, which means at K. S. A. C. the winning of 
a debate K. Pi Kappa Delta, nationally, is a fraternity composed of both men and women 
the matter whether men or women may be members being left to the individual chapters! 
At K. S. A. C. the membership is limited only to men. At present, there are 55 chapters of 
Pi Kappa Delta. 




1 ^ ^ -2L 



"purpk Mtasque iDramatic JVaternit? 

STAR MASQUE 






Vorin Whan, Renna Rosenthal, T. 0. Garinger, Rowena Thornburg, Queene Hart. 
Not in Picture — Harold Batchelor. 

PURPLE MASQUE 







Eugene Huff Clifford Jolly Claramary Smith H. L. Sebring Cecil Wilson 

Ruth Martin Lucile Whan James Albright Louise Mowry 

Not in Picture — Lewis Bryan, Kennith Carter. 



284 



S^ffi&l 



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i o 2, ^"nm 



Purple Mtasque iDramatic JFraterttit? — (Cont'd) 

GREEN MASQUE 





Margaret Ansdell, Myrl Barnhisel, lone Aspey, Fay Strong, Blanche Forrester, Marie Correll. 
F.L.Haggard, H.W.Hobbs, H.O. Garth, M.A.Smith, M.D.Laine, E.A.Stephens, D.S.Pfeutze. 
Osceola Burr, Bethyl Barrett, Penelope Burtis, Beulah Helstron, Julia Caton, Edith Dockstader. 
Not in Picture — Anna Best, Milton Eisenhower, Paul McConnell, Curtis Watts. 




285 



2^Q3>C^jL J>ZSJ2lJ=>J^J=?^ ^^ 



Q S, -2j 



purple Mtasque JDramatic J^raternitj— ((Toitt'6) 





Florence Heizer 



Ray E. Holcombe 



HISTORY 

Purple Masque, honorary dramatic fratemity, was organized in December, 1915, from the 
old K. S. A. C. dramatic club. In the spring of 1921, the organization was changed into an 
order of three degrees so as to give more students a chance to become associated with dramatic 
work. 

Green Masque, first degree of Purple Masque, elects to membership students who do good 
work and show promise upon their appearance in some college play. Purple Masque confers 
its second degree on Green Masque members in good standing who successfully carry a promi- 
nent part in a college play. Star Masque, third and highest degree is conferred upon Purple 
Masque members who have been faithful in all fraternal duties and have shown exceptional 
ability in several college productions. 

Purple Masque added another play to its list of successful productions when it presented 
during festival week, Saturday, May 7, 1921, Clyde Fitch's "The Girl With the Green Eyes." 
Rowena Thornburg starred in the original Clara Bloodgood role of "Jinny." It required the 
versatility of such a girl as Rowena to portray the part of the charming bride in such a way as 
to make every one love her and yet portray her cruel jealousy. "Rocky" Bryan played opposite 
Miss Thornburg in the role of John Austin, her husband. The supporting principals of the cast 
were Kennith Carter, as Geoffry Tillman, brother of Jinny; Adelaide May Smith, as Ruth Ches- 
ter; and Lucile Whan in the role of maid. Claramary Smith and Herbert McClelland did ex- 
cellent character work in the roles of Jinny's parents. Clever comedy work was done by 
Hamilton Riggs as Peter and Gladys Newton as Mrs. Cullingham.. Other members of the cast, 
all of whom played finished parts were: bridesmaids, Mildred Wright, Margaret Ansdell, and 
Gertrude Conroy; housemaid, Faye Strong; butler, Clifford Jolly; Mrs. Lopp and daughter, 
Osceola Burr and Queenie Hart; French couple, Renna Rosenthal and Marion Smith; German 
couple, Alice Husted and Floyd Works; tourists, Marie Correll, L. L. Haggart, Anna Best, and 
Helene Bentley. 

Manhattan audiences have come to expect much of a Florence Heizer play. They were 
not disappointed in "The Girl with the Green Eyes," which in artistic stage setting and capable 
characterization of its unusually large cast was fully worthy of her genius. A Belasco interior 
could hardly have been more complete than the drawing room in which was the wedding scene 
of the first act. 

286 



.purple Basque iDramatic .fraternity— ((Tont'&) 




Cast of Play 



In the spring of 1921 Purple Masque, under the direction of Miss Heizer, presented two 
one-act plays, Zona Gale's "Neighbors" and "The Wicked Winder of Clocks," for the benefit 
of the student loan fund. During the fall and spring of 1921-22 the members of Purple Masque 
coached and presented a series of one-act plays for the purpose of selecting material for Green 
Masque and college plays. On November 12 Vorin Whan, Rowena Thornburg, and Kenneth 
Carter represented Purple Masque by giving in chapel the one-act play "The Strike," directed 
by Ray E. Holcombe. 

On December 12, 1921, Prof. Ray E. Holcombe, who had become a member of the public 
speaking department in the fall, made his debut in Aggie dramatics by successfully presenting 
the first Purple Masque play of the season, "Clarence," the Booth Tarkington comedy. Herman 
Fleming splendidly portrayed the character role of "Clarence," the soldier who had "been in 
the army." Maurice Laine, as Mr. Wheeler, Margaret Ansdell, as Mrs. Wheeler, James Al- 
bright, as Bobby and Louise Mowry, as Cora, played finished parts. Other members of the cast 
all Purple Masque members who lived up to their reputations made in former productions' 
were: Claramary Smith, as Mrs. Martyn, Renna Rosenthal, as Violet Pinney Queenie Hart' 
as Delia, Vorin Whan, as Dinwiddie, and Clifford Jolley, as Hubert Stem. This cast was sent 
on a tour to advertise K. S. A. C. successfully producing "Clarence" at Marysville Wetmore 
Horton, and Sabetha. 

287 



1 




Somen's "1ft" fraternity 




Top Row — Clara Evans, Belle Hagans, Renna Rosenthal, Hattie Betz, Katherine Horner. 
Second Row — Sue Unruh, Mabel Worster, Anna L. Best, Lillian Rommel. 
Bottom Row — Helen Priestley, Ruth Kittel, Bertha Gwinn. 

Members not in Picture — Grace Schwandt, Alice Marston, Betty McCoin. 

Founded at Kansas State Agricultural College in 1917 

Insignia — Official Athletic K 

The purpose of this organization is to promote friendliness among the women of K. S. A. C. 
who have won honors in Athletics, and to promote all things pertaining to the welfare of Women's 
athletics. The K sweater is an emblem of achievement in athletics and is awarded by the Wo- 
men's Athletic association. 

K sweaters were first given to K. S. A. C. women in 1917 and those who earned the required 
number of points to possess this award were organized as an honorary group of the W. A. A. 
The fraternity was reorganized in 1922 by the present group of K women. 



288 



<?Zs Z>TS1^Z>Z^E 





"If jFraternit? 



The "K" Fraternity is composed of men who have won letters in K. S. A. C. athletics. 
The purpose of the fraternity is to promote better athletics, and to work in unison with the 
athletic department. The fraternity binds the athletes together in one common cause, and 
by doing this fosters better spirit between the men themselves. The fraternity has a well 
equipped room which is used for meetings and as a general place to get together. 




Top Row— H.. L. Brown, Kuykendall, M. W. Stauffer, H. W. Schmitz, I. H. Riley. 

Second Row—h. A. Guilfoyle, R. D. Hahn, I. F. Schindler, L. B. Smith, D. E. Murphy, E. L. 
Griffith. 

Third Row—M. B. Swartz, P. Hope, R. M. Sears, F. W. Williams, L. J. Bryan, J. Steiner, H. 
L. Sebring. 

Fourth Row—M. R. Henre, W. C. Cowell, A. R. Stark, W. J. Clapp, L. O. Sinderson, F. L. Foval. 




289 



2^03O?Zs 




Frances Batdorf Claramary Smith Luella Sherman Clara Evans 

Louise Manglesdorf Rowena Thornburg Ruth Peck 

An organization of Senior Women chosen at the close of the Junior year. 



MEMBERSHIP 

Frances Batdorf R"t h Peck 

Clara Evans Luella Sherman 

Louise Mangelsdorf Claramary Smith 
Rowena Thornburg 



290 



&>,C»Z*7JL I>IS1^I>Z^E, 




^^d^^t^txi=i=z^^ i <3 ;2, 2/ 



American (Tollegc Ouill (Hub 





Top Sow— Dahy Barnett, Orille Bourassa, Homer Bryson, Ada Rice, Osceola Burr, Gladys 
Hartley. J 

Second flow— Elizabeth Dickens, Leone Bower, Victor Blackledge, Walter Law, Earl Means. 

Third Row— Charlotte Russel, Lucile Whan, Florence Johnson, J. Wheeler Barger Jessie 
Adee, Julia King. 

Colors— Black and White Wow— Pansy 

National Publication — The Parchment 
Motto— Truth and Art United By The Pen 
HISTORY 
The Quill Club was organized as a local society in October, 1913. In January, 1914, the 
Writers' Club of K. U. completed a national organization, and in March, the K. S. A. C. club 
applied for membership. The petition was accepted, and on May 23 installation took place 
the local Quill becoming the Beta or Ur Rune chapter of the National organization Mr E A 
Vaughn, '14, became the first chancellor. The installation services were held in the dungeon- 
like Forum room where the black and white bunting, the black shaded lamps, and the black 
robed installing officers from K. U. sufficiently impressed the 48 initiates. The banquet was 
given at Harrison's Cafe. 

At present the society is limited to 30 members, chosen on merit of manuscripts presented 
This year our local chapter is honored in having one of its members as the High Chancellor 
of the High Witan, Professor N. A. Crawford, a writer of note. There are now twelve chapters 
of the American College Quill Club. 

291 



I 



ROJi^i 




Top Row— Anna Best, Joseph Allen, J. J. Seright, Tom Stratton, Robert Wolnick, T. 0. Ga- 
S e comd n RL-OseeoTa m Burr, Margaret Gillett, Florence Johnson, Georgia Newcomb, Ethel 
T^SaSffiTFtaSft; Srce H Wheart y , Maude Lahr, W. C. Wilson, Lulu May 
FouHkKow-Z, S:'L*S& Verne Stambaugh, Walter T. Rolfe, Paul Roote, 
W&SK^SMSS^ E. J. Jelden, C. H. Howe, Ernest Hartman, Annette 
SixthRow-A. J. Englund, Hubert Collins, Lois Clark, Marjorie Ault, Ted Bayer, C. R. George. 




ZZLO>C<^Zs 





JForum 



Honorary Society for Debaters and Orators 
Colors — Black and White Motto — To be, rather than to seem. 

On June 2, 1911, President Henry Jackson Waters attached his signature to the constitu- 
tion of the Forum and it came into existence. All of the credit for the founding of the society 
is due to Professor Searson, father of debate at the Kansas State Agricultural college. It was 
through his earnest efforts that the society was sanctioned by the president. 

The society is open only to those students who have either represented their society in a 
regular contest of oratory or won a place on an inter-collegiate debate squad. 

The Forum has the authority to grant K's to the official inter-collegiate debaters. Winning 
a K in debate is as great an honor as winning one in athletics. 

During the eleven years of its existence 377 students have become Forum members and 
have repeated the Forum slogan: 

The Forum owl sat on an oak, 
The more he saw the less he spoke, 
The less he spoke the more he heard; 
Let us strive to be like that old bird. 





Top Row— Truman O. Garinger, E. Perle Mauk, H. I. Tarpley, Esther Waugh, H. H. Connell; 

Lola Thompson. 
Second Row—M. H. Banks, G. L. Garloch, Ruth Peck, Luella Sherman, Arnold J. Englund, 

Marion Brookover. 
Third Row— J.E.Beyer, H.L.Baker, Jean Moore, Maude Lahr, Orpha Maust, David Davis. 
Fourth Row— Fern Coles, H. S. VanBlarcom, Lucille Wahn, Gladys Hartley, Clara 

Cramsay, Virginia Messenger. 
Members not in Picture— C. H. Morgan, M. A. Wilson, Oscar Cullen. 

Graduate Students— F. A. Coffman, Elizabeth Kirkpatrick, Bess Jane McKittrick, F. M. Wadley. 
Faculty— Professor L. Jean Bogart, Assoc. Prof. E. V. Floyd, Asst. Prof. Frank C. Gates, 

Prof. J. G. Peterson. 




294 



ROK><ZZs 



1 o 2. 2, 




iteration of (To-Operative (Hubs 




Opal Seeber, Esther McStay, K. I. Church, Frances Mardis, Floyd Ratts. 

Chas. W. Howard, Floyd Tucker, A. R. Paden, A. B. Woody, Vern Stambaugh. 

The Federation of Co-operative clubs has for its purpose the fostering of good feeling and 
fellowship among the members of the various co-operative clubs. It also serves as a medium 
for the interchanging of mutually helpful ideas. 

The Federation of Co-operative clubs was organized in the fall of 1920. During its brief 
existence it has grown in influence and prestige in college affairs having received recognition 
from the S. S. G. A. and the faculty council of student affairs. 





1 s> 2, 2, 



£6gerton (Hub 




Top .Row — Nels P. Olson (S. A.), Arnold J. Englund (4), Lyle Cushing (1), Victor J. Englund 

(3), John Goheen (1), Earl Thomas (4). 
Second Row — Earl Bradley (2), Alden B. Woody (3), Lloyd Downing (3), Charles W. Howard 

(4), Cecil Holmes (4). 

Third Row— Oscar Woody (2), Albert L. Bridenstin (3), E. Perle Mauk (4), Charles L. Howard 
(1), W. R. Bradley (4), Ralph Ricklefs (3). 

Fourth Row— Lynn Copeland (4), Lowell Domoney (1), Ferris Kimball (3), Earl Domoney (4), 
Harris Burnett (3). 



Motto — Be Square 



Flower — Jonquil. 



HISTORY 



The Edgerton Club was organized in the spring of 1916 by a group of men who desired 
to obtain the benefits derived from fellowship with one another and from co-operative manage- 
ment. It has continued a permanent and active organization up to the present time. Scholar- 
ship and high moral ethics has been the chief aim of its members, and many of the prominent 
leaders in college activities in the past few years appear on its roll. 




297 



^OJ^^Z. ^=*X^1^F>Z^^ ^^^ 





TElHart (Hub 




Top Row—V. L. Uhland, K. I. Church, J. W. Ballard, F. C. Healea, E. W. Wickman, George 

Glendenning, M. C. Wallace. 
Second Row — Ben Thompson, C. E. Keilhorn, Chas. Zimmerman, H. J. Kapka, L. W. Gro- 

thusen, O. L. Norton, E. S. Kanzig, O. K. Brubaker. 
Third Row— Lynn Austin, H. I. Richards, Raymond Gard, J. C. Wilkins, Jerry Harris, Dean 

Elliot, Floyd Ratts. 
Fourth Row— Herbert Wilkins, F. W. Kitch, B. J. Miller, Howard Ames, B. E. Keirns, D. C. 

Anderson. 



Colors — Purple and gold 



Motto — To be what you seem 



HISTORY 

The Elkhart club was organized in September, 1915, by a group of college students who 
sought to gain the advantages of cooperative management, and at the same time to secure the 
social benefits of such an organization. It encourages participation in college activities by all 
of its members. 




298 



■^\ 



J^OJ^7> *>Iyrj2,J=>j£sJE7 





Oopeka (Hub 




Top row— A. Ritts (1), M. Conard (1), M. Buck (1). 

Second Row— L. Haggard (2), L. Covert (1), C. Button (3) G. Wheeler (2), H. Prisbie (2). 
R. Stover (2). 

Third Row—O. Wood (3), R. Baird (2), A. Stover (2), H. Retter (2), W. Haynes (S. A.), 
H. Jury (2), T. Griest (4). 

Organized May 15, 1921 

HISTORY 

The Topeka Club was organized by a number of students from Shawnee county with a 
view to bettering their living conditions while at school. 

This organization is unique in that it is the only one of its kind in the college which is 
composed solely of students from one community. 

The club is a member of the Federation of Clubs. 




299 



^o^^z, j>tsi^t>z^^: 





l Q :2, 2/ 



Orian^ulars 




Top Row—R. Morris Ritchie, Geo. W. Pate, F. N. Wray, Robert Sallee, Charles C. Griffin, 

Theo. D. Cole, Verne O. Clements. 
Second Row— Floyd O. Northrop, Howard H. McGee, Raymond Lane, C. E. Minner, Virgil 

Murray, Charles R. Fitch. 
Third Row—O. P. McLennon, Harold W. Johnston, Fred W. Stockebrand, Galen A. Barber, 

J. E. Norton, Kenneth Knouse, Jewell Johnson. 
Bottom Row— Alvin K. Banman, Claude Yaple, Iro N. Vowel, Horace D. Williams, Louis B. 

Deal, F. D. Strickler, L. H. Strickler. 

HISTORY 
The Triangular club was organized in September, 1921, for the purpose of securing the 
benefits of cooperative boarding and rooming facilities. As a member of the Federation of 
Cooperative clubs of K. S. A. C. the organization has striven for mutual benefits for all and a 
general helpfulness to the community and the college. Members of the club have taken active 
part in college activities such as literary societies, including inter-collegiate debate and oratory. 
In athletics the club placed first in division B of the Intra-mural Basketball Tourney. Social 
features of the club included an annual fall hike and two organization dances. 



.hid 





Top Row — Mary Russell, June Harter, Eva Leland, Erma Jean Huckstead. 

Middle Row — Opal Ewing, Ruth Bachelder, Hazel Bowers, Vera Lee, Irene Maughlin. 

Third Row — Mabel Vincent, Lillian Grubb, Jennie McComb, Ruth Houston. 



MEMBERS 



Eva Leland, Wichita 
Vera Louise Lee, Glen Elder 
Irene Maughlin, Sylvia 
Mable Vincent, Sterling 
June Harter, St. John 
Ruth Houston, Delavan 
Mary Russell, Lakin 




Nellie McComb, Topeka 

Jennie McComb, Topeka 

Lillian Grubb, Wetmore 

Hazel Bowers, Great Bend 

Ruth Bachelder, Fredonia 

Opal Ewing, Great Bend 

Erma Jean Huckstead, Junction City 



House Mother 
Mrs. Annie Swanson 



301 



i^c&ztjl 




Top Row Left to Right — Herrera, Javier, Cabacungan, Banman, Kamal, De La Garza, Bahgat, 

Leite, Saunders, Raraboc. 
Second Row — Solomon, Mostert, Albino, Hartman, Lau, Lo. 
Front Row — Danheim, Jennings, Knerr. 

The K. S. A. C. Cosmopolitan club is a member of the Corda Fratres Association of 
Cosmopolitan clubs. The K. S. A. C. charter was granted in January 1922. 



Publication — Corda Fratres Review 



Motto — "Above all nations is humanity 



MEMBERS 



N. J. Albino (Serbia) 

M. Bahgat (Egypt) 

P. Correa (Brazil) 

A. V. De La Garza (Mexico) 

J. Herrera (Mexico) 

Alice Jennings (U. S.) 

Frances Knerr (U. S.) 

A. K. Banman (U. S.) 

N. Q. Quain (China) 

A. R. Saunders (South Africa) 

A. C. Leite (Brazil) 

J. F. T. Mostert (South Africa) 



E. A. Cabacungan (Philippines) 

May Danheim (U. S.) 

E. Hartman (U. S.) 

R. Q. Javier (Philippines) 

M. Kamal (Egypt) 

W. K. Lau (China) 

C. S. Lo, (China) 

A. N. Ludolf .(Brazil) 

J. Renaux (Brazil) 

S. B. Ramboc (Philippines) 

P. Solomon (Egypt) 



Mr. and Mrs. Alden F. Huse 
Prof, and Mrs. L. H. Limper 




HONORARY MEMBERS 

Dr. and Mrs. A. A. Holtz 
Jessie McD. Machir. 



302 




& ^ -2L 



Tb\)<i Agricultural Association 




E. H. Coles W. R. Harder Earl Means J. J. Moxley C. B. Roberts 

OFFICERS 

President E. H. Coles 

Vice-President W. R. Harder 

Secretary Earl Means 

Treasurer J- J- Moxley 

Marshal C. B. Roberts 

HISTORY 
The Agricultural Association was organized in] the spring of 1921. At the suggestion of 
Dean Farrell, Alpha Zeta called a mass meeting of all agricultural students at which it was 
decided to organize, and a committee was appointed to draw up a constitution. 

At the annual smoker held in the Community House, the constitution submitted by the 
committee was adopted. Permanent officers were elected at a meeting on March 3, and the 
association settled down to fulfill the mission for which it had been organized. 

It was organized for the purpose of uniting the efforts of the students of the division for 
more effective work, maintaining and supporting all meritorious student activities of the 
division and conducting such other business as might from time to time come before the 
agricultural student body. 

Since its organization, the Agricultural Association has undertaken two projects: the annual 
Ag Fair the first one of which was held on May 3, 1921, and the publication of The Kansas 
Agricultural Student, a periodical, which first appeared last fall. So far, both have been 
successful. 





A. S. Barkley J. S. Stewart Earl Means 

C. M. Wilhoite C. B. Roberts Fred Irwin J. W. Farmer 



Ol)e Iftaitsas -Agricultural Student 

STAFF 

Editor Earl Means 

Associate Editor J. w. Farmer 

Business Manager J. S. Stewart 

Circulation Manager A. S. Barkley 

Advertising Manager Sam Pickard 

Advisory Editor Hugh Durham 

The Kansas Agricultural Student is a periodical published by the students in the Division 
of Agriculture. It is a new venture, the first number of which appeared in December. Prac- 
tically all of the articles published are written by students, on topics relating to Agriculture. 

£3l)e ZK% IFair 

BOARD 

Manager C. M. Wilhoite 

Assistant Manager Fred Irwin 

Secretary-Treasurer C. B. Roberts 

The 1921 Ag Fair was the first undertaking of the Agricultural Association. Tuesday, 
May 3, was Fair Day, and the fair grounds presented a scene which would give any one the 
impression that the association was accomplishing its aim of unifying the students of the 
division. 




305 



^o^^z; 




Q ^2, -2L 



-Agricultural Ccottomtsts 





First Bow— G. D. Stock-well (3), F. H. Shirck (3), N. H. Anderson (4), Prof. Eric Englund, 

J. W. Barger (4). 
Second Row— H. L. Baker (4), Prof. R. M. Green, C. F. Hadley (4), W. C. Fulton (3). 
Third Row—R. I. Richards (4), H. D. Karns (3), C. E. Dunbar (3) G. E. Findley (4), J. D. 

Adams (3). 
Fourth Row— I. N. Vowel (3), R. E. Clegg (4), A. L. Austin (4), N. N. Dunbar (3). 

HISTORY 

Founded at the Kansas State Agricultural College January 18, 1921 
Purpose— The furtherance of mutual, professional, and social interests of the club mem- 
bers and others, along agricultural economic lines. Membership is composed of students major- 
ing in agricultural economics and of the faculty members of the department. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Prof. E. L. Rhoades Prof. Eric Englund 

Prof. R. M. Green Prof. W. E. Grimes 

Mr. Morris Evans 



306 



T^LOZO&Zs Z>TSRT=>Z^J5 





Top Row—R. L. Fleming, T. D. Cole, C. C. Button, J. M. Egger, E. L. Reichart. 
Second Row—G. E. Starkey, A. P. Wertman, L. H. Griswold, R. L. Welton, S. H. Estes. 
Third Row—R. B. Becker, E. Watson, J. E. Norton, E. C. Scott, H. C. Sturgeon. 
Fourth Row—F. W. Houston, J. C. Wallace, 0. A. Lambert, J. L. Allen, S. L. Copeland. 

The Dairy Club was organized in 1914 for the purpose of bringing together all students 
interested in dairying. Meetings are held every two weeks, when interesting programs are 
given concerning the dairy industry. 

OFFICERS 

President C. R. George 

Vice-President R. L. Fleming 

Secretary-Treasurer A. P. Wertman 

Marshal T. D. Cole 

Chairman of Program Committee S. L. Copeland 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



J. B. Fitch 
H. W. Cave 
R. B. Becker 



N. E. Olson 

P. C. McGuillard 

C. R. Gearhart 




307 




BLOCK AND BRIDLE 
F W Houston E. E. Hodgson, B. D. Hixson, C. R. Hemphill, T. 0. Garinger, J. W. Farmer. 
A J Englund, Tom Cross, H. L. Collins, S. J. Coe, C. C. Bost, O. P. Butler. 
C E Blagg D C Beeler, A. S. Barkley, Warner Adams, C. M. Willhoite, E. A. Hepler. 
E' H Jackson H H. Krehbiel, R. E. Marshall, W. J. Matthias, E. P. Mauk, Earl Means. 
H A Meyers F H. Paulson, J. J. Moxley, M. E. Ptacek, H. I. Richards, C. B. Roberts. 
J S Stewart, E. S. Scott, C. A. Thresher, Carl Uhlrich, A. D. Weber, Roy Williams 
Members not in Ptore-Paul Evans, D. B. Ibach, F. A. Irwin, L. E. Erwin, L. M. Knight, 
Ruben Lind, C. G. Russell, Deal Six, Paul Tupper. 

308 





^lock ati6 ^ri6le (Tlub 

The Block and Bridle Club is a national organization of animal husbandry students who 
have completed one and one-half years of the prescribed four year course. 

The aim of this organization is to further promote the improvement of the live stock 
industry and to better the educational facilities for students following this line of work. 

This organization became national in January, 1920, the charter members being Kansas, 
Iowa, Nebraska and Missouri. 

The club now has a membership of 41 active members and it is steadily growing. 
The men on the stock-judging teams, which won first at Denver at the Western Live 
Stock Show and fifth at the International Live Stock Show at Chicago, are members of this club. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

C. W. McCampbell H. B. Winchester 

F. W. Bell B. M. Anderson 

C. E. Aubel H. I. Ibsen 

A. M. Patterson H. W. Marston 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

President A. D. Weber J. W. Farmer 

Vice-President C. M. Wilhoite F. A. Irwin 

Secretary C. B. Roberts F. H. Paulson 

Treasurer H. E. Moody A. S. Barkley 

Marshal J. J. Moxley T. Cross 




309 



Z^O^C^ZI^ 




Top Row—Wm. Martin (4), J. F. T. Mostert (3), H. W. Schmitz (4), J. T. Quinn (4), W. S. 

Wiedorn (Asst. Prof.), W. F. Pickett (Asst. Prof.). 
Middle Row— K. P. Gaston (3), J. C. Wingfield (4), H. T. McKeever (4), C. A. Perry (3), 

Prof. R. J. Barnett, R. B. Ricklefs (3), J. G. Woods (Sp.). 
Bottom Row— J. H. Albright (4), E. F. Burk (4), Prof. Albert Dickens, S. W. Decker (2), W. 

B. Balch (Instr.), T. Rothrock (4). 
Not in Picture — Everett Willis (4). 



HISTORY 
The Horticultural club was founded at K. S. A. C, December 16, 1920, for the purpose of 
advancing the horticultural interests at the college and creating a closer relationship between 
the horticultural students and their instructors. In the fall semester of '21 the Horticulture 
club, besides their regular horticultural activities, presented a stunt at Aggie Pop, and or- 
ganized a football team, which defeated a team organized by the Tri K, in a game played 

December 17, 1921. „„„„ 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

President Wm. L. Martin J. T. Quinn 

Vice-President J. T. Quinn H. T. McKeever 

Secretary-Treasurer R. B. Ricklefs J. H. Albright 

MEMBERS 
Seniors 
James H. Albright Harold T. McKeever George J. Raleigh Everett H. Willis 
Earl F Burk C. Arthur Perry Thomas Rothrock Jesse C. Wingfield 

William L. Martin J. T. Quinn H. W. Schmitz J. Guy Woods 

7 Wfl/LOT S 

J. F. T. Mostert Ralph B - Ricklefs 

Sophomores 

S. W. Decker H - p - Gaston 

Faculty 
Albert Dickens W. F. Pickett W. B. Balch 

R. J. Barnett W. S. Wiedorn L. C. Williams 



.tin 



^^^^?^Cȣ^Z> 





1 O <2L 2/ 



IKI06 anh IKernel 



C.C . DethlofF, J. F. T. Mostert, W. R. Harder, R. J. Silkett, E. H. Walker, Cecil Holmes. 
W. C. Wilson, E. H. Coles, O. B. Reed, Harold Howe, R. S. Mather. 
B. B. Bayles, Jesse Allen, H. B. Riley, M. A. Smith, C. Stockebrand, L. V. Hunt. 
A. R. Paden, F. A. Swanson, E. E. Bates, E. R. Ausemus 

Founded at the Kansas State Agricultural college in 1917 
Total Membership 120 Colors— Dark Green and Gold 

Purpose— The object of Tri K shall be to develop a spirit of good fellowship among the 
students and faculty members of the agronomy department. 

HISTORY 

The Klod and Kernal Klub, commonly called Tri K, was organized in the fall of 1916 by 
Prof. R. I. Throckmortin, W. E. Grimes, and G. C. Gibbons. It started with 20 charter members, 
and has increased to a total membership of 120. 

The purpose of the club is to develop a spirit of goodfellowship among the students and 
faculty members of the agronomy department. Social meetings are often held at the homes 
of the faculty members. The first Grain Judging contest was put on by the club in 1917, and 
this has become an annual event at K. S. A. C. 

Tri K is now cooperating with similar clubs at other agricultural colleges in a movement to 
form a National Agronomy club. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

R. E. Hensel H. H. Laude 

S. C. Salmon W. E. Grimes 

J. W. Zahnley Morris Evans 

M. C. Sewell N. E. Dale 
E. S. Lyons 

wll 




L. E. Call 

R-.-J. -Throckmortin 

L. A. Fitz 

J. H. Parker 






* 1 ■ 

■-* 



Veterinary Mteoical -Association 




T J Foley E. J. Jelden, G. A. Read, E. L. Brower, Frew W. Williams, E. E. Leasure. 
J W Van Vliet, Jim McKitterick, F. D. Foss, D. E. Davis, F. W. Crawford 
J J Black Floyd Ratts, R. Z. Sherer, R. R. Griffenhagen, R. F. Beaver, A. M. Lee. 
A J McKee G. B. Kirkwood, J. R. Starkey, F. C. Emery, K. R. Dudley, J. F. Adee. 



312 









^L^Z^g^^ 




^ 12. *2L 



Veterinary 3tte6ical .Association 

This association was organized in 1906 and operates under a state charter. It has for its 
purpose, literary training along professional lines. Members in good standing are granted 
a diploma. 

HONORARY MEMBERS 



Dr. R. R. 


Dykestra 




Dr. 


E. 


J. Frick 


Dr. J. H. 


Burt 




Dr. 


J. 


P. Scott 


Dr. W. E. 


Muldoon 




Dr. 


C. 


H. Kitselman 


Dr. H. F. 


Lienhardt 




Dr. 


N 


D. Harwood 


Dr. C. W. 


Hobbs 




Dr. 


C. 


E. Sawyer 


Dr. W. M 


. McLeod 


ACTIVE MEMBERS 
Seniors 


Dr. 


w 


P. Shuler 


J. F. Adee 




J. A. McKitterick 






F. S. Ratts 


A. M. Lee 




J. W. VanVliet 






D. E. Davis 


J. R. Starkey 




F. W. Williams 
Juniors 






K. C. Farley 


A. J. McKee 




R. B. Griffenhagen 






T. J. Foley 


A. H. Riley 




F. W. Ketchum 






H. E. Larson 


J. J. Black 




E. E. Leasure 






W. D. Foss 


K. R. Dudley 




G. Kirkwood 






F. C. Emery 


J. A. Howarth 




F. W. Crawford 






D. Yandell 


D. A. Sanders 




R. F. Beaver 






C. Brandley 


R. D. Taylor 




F. Griffenhagen 
Sophomores 








P. Burke 




W. D. Parrott 






C. J. Coe 


E. R. Frank 




G. R. Killian 






A. J. Miller 


V. H. Miller 




E. F. Hoover 

Freshmen 






E. R. Moberg 


E. Brower 




E. A. Manker 






A. O'Toole 


A. Porter 




J. F. Savage 






E. Young 


F. E. Hull 




W. T. Miller 






H. P. Quinn 


G. Read 










R. Z. Sherer 



1 





s $=t=*T l ^ 2, 



Ol)e Student "Engineering Association 





H. C. Jennings Gail Lynch E. E. Thomas J. E. Beyer 

Treasurer President Vice-President Secretary 

The Student Engineering association of Kansas State is composed of all of the engineering 
students. Its objects are, to coordinate the efforts of the separate departments of the division 
of engineering, to further the interests of the division in the college and the state, and to promote 
acquaintance and fellowship among the students of the division. 

The association holds its regular meetings the fourth Thursday of every month. Members 
of the engineering faculty and eminent consulting engineers deliver addresses on engineering 
topics at these meetings. 

The association also issues a quarterly, The Kansas State Engineer, a publication dealing 
with the activities of the engineering division. 

The executive council acts as advisor to the president of the association. It is composed 
of the presidents of the various divisional organizations. 

MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

First Semester Second Semester 

W. J. Bucklee W. J. Bucklee President A. I. E. E. 

E. F. Stalcup Harry Nelson President A. A. E. 

M. A. Wilson J. C. Geiger President A. S. C. E. 

M. H. Banks M. H. Banks President Sigma Tau 

Gail Lynch Mack Short President A. S. M. E. 

W H Koenig R. C. Swenson Pres. Architects Club 

T F. Swarner E. Scheel President Electrical Seminar 

R. B. Crimmin B. W. Stanbaugh President Ag. Engineers 

F. E. Nordeen F. E. Nordeen Editor K. S. E. 

T J Manry T. J. Manry Business Manager K. S. E. 

Robert Spratt Robert Spratt Chairman Entertainment Committee 

R Emmit Welch R. Emmit Welch President Freshmen Engineers 

G D Morris G.D.Morris President Mechanical Seminar 





1 S> 2, 2/ 



American Institute of Clectrical Cngitteers 




G. L. Garloch 
Treasurer 



H. S. Nay 
Cor. Secretary 



W. J. Bucklee 
President 

HISTORY 



J. E. Bayer 
Rec. Secretary 



L. E. Rossel 

Vice-President 



The American Institute of Electrical Engineers is a national organization of men in the 
electrical industry working for the betterment of the electrical profession. Student branches of 
the Institute are maintained at the larger technical schools for the same purpose. 

The branch at Kansas State was organized in 1908. Its work was carried on separately 
from the regular seminar, which was added for juniors and seniors in 1912 as a required subject. 
Meetings were discontinued in 1917 on account of the war, and in 1919 the A. I. E. E. and re- 
quired seminar were combined, with the A. I. E. E. officers taking charge of the seminar meetings. 
The present branch was organized in April 1921, its regular bi-weekly meetings taking the place 
of seminar for the juniors ani seniors. 

ROLL 



Abbott, Earl 


Davidson, C. C. 


Hopkins, H. D. 


Nordeen, F. E. 


Antle, C. L. 


Deibler, 0. 


Houser, K. 0. 


Peters, R. H. 


Aydelotte, 0. H. 


Domoney, E. R. 


Jennings, L. E. 


Pfundstein, W. 


Barber, G. A. 


Downing, L. H. 


Jennings, G. A. 


Phillips, P. J. 


Beyer, J. E. 


Ebenstein, C. S. 


Jennings, R. S. 


Ritchie, R. M. 


Bradley, W. R. 


Elliot, R. K. 


Jobe, C. L. 


Rossel. L. E. 


Brubaker, 0. R. 


Frank, K. C. 


Kibler, R. S. 


Seright, J. J. 


Bucklee, W. J. 


Ford, Asa 


Kovar, Paul 


Sinderson, L. 0. 


Bush. G. H. 


Fry, F. G. 


McKown, P. M. 


Staib, H. J. 


Chapman, R. L. 


Garloch, G. L. 


McPherson, C. C. 


Tarpley, H. I. 


Church, K. I. 


Geeslin, D. M. 


Manry, T. J. 


Thomas, E. E. 


Cook, M. E. 


Gillespie, F. A. 


Means, L. E. 


Tustison, J. G. 


Corby, D. K. 


Glendening, G. M. 


Means, L. H. 


Reazin, G. H. 


Counsell, H. J. 


Hershey, P. J. 


Meyer, G. A. 


Watkins, M. C. 


Crall, E. H. 


Harner, J. E. 


Miller, J. M. 


Williams, H. N. 


Cross, P. C. 


Hockman, H. G. 


Nass, V. 


Wood, 0. C. 


Crow, R. M. 


Holzer, 0. E. 


Nay, H. S. 


Woodring, H. E 


Dailey, C. 0. 

Prof. C. E. 


In the Faculty 
Reid Prof. J. L 


Wurst, L. H. 
. Brenneman 


Prof. R. G 


Kloeffler 


Instr. D. 


M. Palmer 




315 



J^O^O^jr, 







X iz^ ^J. r*^/ 




^llecl)anical "Engineers 




D. D. Chase, Mac Short, J. P. Calderwood, T. E. Johntz, N. V. Platner, 

George Morris, L. D. McDonald, Victor Kirk D. G. Lynch 

The mechanical engineers are made up of three groups: the freshmen, who are a part, of 
the freshman engineering seminar; the sophomores, who have their own organization; and the 
juniors and seniors who compose the A. S. M. E. student branch. The latter organization is 
associated with the national organization of A. S. M. E. and the student branch members 
enjoy all the privileges of the active members. 

The total mechanical engineering enrollment for 1921-22 is 125 men. 



316 




1 Q ^, -2^ 



(Tivil engineering Society 




J. C. Wilkins, Geo. S. Davis, Victor Englund, J. C. Geiger, D. C. Anderson 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semest :r 

President M. A. Wilson J. C. Geiger 

Vice-President R.G.Scott D.C.Anderson 

Secretary J. C. Wilkins R. T. Schidler 

Treasurer Victor Englund Geo. S. Davis 

ROLL 

Seniors 

Brown, H. L. Englund, Victor Priestley, H. R. 

Bumgardner, R. Gates, G. E. Scott, R. G. 

Burgwin, W. H. Geiger, J. C. Whearty, L. F. 

Connell, H. H. Hatfield, C. R. Wilson, M. A. 

Lund, N. D. 

Juniors 

Anderson, D. C. Hedrick, T. 0. Longley, G. M. 

Binford, Raymond Hendrix, J. J. Love, Robert S. 

Cole, W. D. Hoffman, Jno. Mueller, E. J. 

Eby, J. Holland, Geo. S. Murray, G. A. 

Epperson, J. H. Hopper, R. Nelson, Harry 

French, H. S. Kibler, J. A. Newcomer, L. W. 

Farmer, W. L. Kirkwood, I. B. Osborn, E. W. 

Gardner, F. Larner, Frank 

Sophomores 

Anderson, G. R. Hornish, W. N. Robb, Frank B. 

Anderson, I. E. Jury, W. H. Shaw,' R. J 

Bradley, Earl Kelley, Sankey Shideler, R T 

Brooks, F. N. Lain, C. 0. Simpson, F. L. 

Burge, Joe Londerholm, C. W. Smythe, H. W. 

Chapman, Edwar Lesher, W. L. Stapp, R C 

Crilley, L. B. McConkey, R. E. Steens'on,' Carl 

Dougherty, H., Jr. Marshall, J. F. Stratford, C. O. 

Gard, J. C. Mayden, R. D. Thogmartin, L. A. 

Garrison, L. E. Miller, B. M. Valdes, Manuel 

Harris, H. W. Oliver, Floyd R. Nicholson, G. T 

Dinklage, W. H. Preston, Earl Voiles, G. E 

Healea, F. C. Rankin, Wm. Wise, P. R. 

Hoffman, H. A. Retter, H. W. Wray, F. H. 

317 






Iftcmsas State Cttgineer 



Established 1915-1916 



Nordeen 



Fuller 



Whearty 



F. E. Nordeen, Editor 

J. S. Fuller, Associate Editor 

Dean R. A. Seaton, Advisory Editor 



ORGANIZATION EDITORS 
Walter Rolfe, Arch. Walter Rogers, Alumni 

K. O. Houser, E. E. George Meyer, A. I. E. E. 

A. C. Depuy, M. E. Amos Payne, A. A. E. 

N. D. Lund, C. E. F. T. Reyling, Ag. E. 

The Kansas State Engineer, the official publication of the Engineering association, is pub- 
lished by the students enrolled in the division of engineering. It is issued four times during the 
school year: October, December, February, and April. 

It is devoted to the best interests of engineering, and reaching, as it does, every engineer 
enrolled, has become a potential factor in the promotion of engineering at K. S. A. C. 

The Kansas State Engineer is a member of Engineering College Magazines Associated. 
Through exchange service it goes to all important universities in the United States. It also 
goes to the larger high schools and to the county engineers of Kansas. 




Manry 



STAFF 

T. J. Manry, Business Manager 
J. J. Seright, Circulation Manager 
L. F. Whearty, Treasurer 





o s, 2, 



Ol)e IKansas State Collegian 



Bryson Johnstone Pratt 

Zeller Blackledge 

STAFF First Semester 

Editor Elizabeth Dickens 

Business Manager Victor Blackledge 

Associate Editor C. R. Smith 

Assistant Editor H. G. Bryson 

Society Frances Johnstone 

Sport S. C. Swenson 

Feature Harold Hobbs 

Exchange Editor C. W. Pratt 

HISTORY 



Smith 
Dickens 

Second Semester 
C. R. Smith 
Victor Blackledge 
C. W. Pratt 
Lulu May Zeller 
Frances Johnstone 
N. S. Barth 
Harold Hobbs 
Alan Dailey 



The Kansas State Collegian, official organ of the student body at K. S. A. C, had its 
beginning in The Student's Herald, the first issue of which appeared January 8, 1896. It was a 
weekly publication of four pages. In the early days of the paper it had from five to seven editors 
and one reporter. Long and scholarly articles on various subjects, written by students, were 
printed. These all appeared on the middle and back pages. No headlines were used then and 
all the news was placed on the front page in the form of locals. Sport writeups comprised one 
small paragraph. 

The Student's Herald continued as the students' publication for the next 17 years. In 
April, 1913, the name of the paper was changed to that of The Kansas Aggie, the first volume 
of which appeared April 3 of that year. By this time the growth of the college had warranted 
a semi-weekly paper. The Kansas Aggie survived until April 25, 1914 when it became known 
as the Kansas State Collegian which title it still retains. 

The Collegian is published twice weekly and has a circulation of 2,000. It exchanges with 
every other publication of any size in the country. 




i^oion^ 




l & :2, 2, 



!ftatt6 .Association 




Herbert F. Hemker, 
Vice-President 

George D. Morris, 
Business Manager 



H. D. Collins, 
President 



R. Bainer, 
Treasurer 



Harold P. Wheeler, 
Conductor 



E. E. Huff, 
Secretary 



it 



Last April the band made a tour of eastern Kansas and Missouri, playing seven concerts 
in 40 hours. Concerts were given at Topeka, Atchison, St. Joseph, Kansas City and Argentine. 

During the past year the band has made over 50 appearances at formal concerts, open air 
concerts, pep sessions, parades, and send-offs. This does not include the activities of the 
military band. Last fall President Jardine succeeded in securing 80 blue dress uniforms for the 
band. 

When Prof. H. P. Wheeler came here in the fall of 1919 the band began a new era of develop- 
ment, and due to his ability, personality and tireless efforts, the band has become what it is 
today. 

In September, 1921, feeling that a closer union should be formed between the first and second 
bands, a committee drafted a constitution which was presented and accepted at a joint meeting 
of the'two bands on December 12. O. F. Fisher was elected the first president. The band has 
thus far held two social events. The first, a banquet in honor of Mr. Fisher, and the second a 
smoker at which 60 members were present. 

The Band association, although still in its infancy, is bringing the band members into a 
closer relationship with each other and is doing much to foster good fellowship and to advance 
band music at K. S. A. C. 



320 



^k 



roi^zj^ i^xsr^z^je:, 




1 S> ^, 2, 



5. A. <L ^an6 



t u""" i i j i 






STAFF 

Harold P. Wheeler Conductor 

Wm. Illingworth Assistant Conductor 

Geo. D. Morris Business Manager 

G. H. Winters Publicity Manager 

L. A. Schaal Librarian 




Flute 
W. Hartgroves 
H. F. Hemker 

Piccolo 
L. E. Woodman 

Oboe 
M. Russell 

Clarinets 
L. R. Sellers 
Wm. Illingworth 
D. K. Corby 
C. L. Gunn 
W. T. Rolfe 
R. W. Martin 
H. L. Baker 
C. M. Stanley 
M. W. Smith 
J. V. Lansing 

B. D. Hixson 

C. D. Compton 
L. S. Hobson 
A. L. Stockebrand 



R. Bainer 
W. M. Carlson 
G. K. Chew 
W. Dalton 
E. B. Edwards 



PERSONNEL 

R. A. Moorman 
H. H. McNeeley 
L. H. Dudey 
J. Haines 
H. P. Gaston 
Bass Clarinet 

F. N. Erwin 
Saxophones 

R. N. Hartigan 

D. Neweomb 
W. H. Koenig 
J. H. Kolbus 

E. B. Amos 
I. Peffley 

Trumpets 
O. F. Fisher 
R. S. Love 

G. D. Morris 
W. W. Trego 
G. H. Winters 
W. Rankin 



SECOND BAND RESERVE 

O. F. Fulhage 
R. P. Garrett 
A. A. Goering 
H. A. Goering 
A. Henson 



3H 



C. B. Wisecup 
French Horns 

E. E. Huff 
R. L. Welton 
J. C. Lentz 
W. D. Smith 
G. M. Case 

Baritones 
H. L. Collins 

F. A. Bleger 
Trombones 

J. E. Beyer 
E. E. Kraybill 
R. B. Ricklefs 

Basses 
M. S. Cook 
M. McClelland 
L. V. Wimer 
W. D. Hemker 

Percussion 
C. M. Rust 
C. E. Moorman 



C. E. Meek 

W. H. Messenger 
R. P. Moyer 

D. B. Rising 
F. E. Rodgers 
R. M. Williams 




King, Leonard, Coleman, Whearty, Angie Howard, Etzold, Priestly, Rommel 
Whan, Paddleford, Nuttle, Brown, Knight, Rosenthal, Gardner 
Limbo'cker, Graves, Kittell, Kneeland, Cramsey, Correll, Adams, Sherman 
Ryherd, Best, Jorns, Bergstrom, Cooper, Reich, Worster 
Gaither, Unruh, Swenson, Betz, Evans, Bussey, Gwinn, Hoke 
Hagans, Van Gilder, Marston, L. Russell, McCoin, Headrick, Meyer 
Wilson, M.Russell, Hyde, Hays, Stebbins, Young, Bradley, Caton 
Biltz, Doll, Frost, Agnes Howard, Piatt, Roderick, Johnstone 

322 



I>TSRZ=>Z^^ 





^ 2, -2L, 



Somen's .Athletic .Association 

Organized nationally at Madison, Wisconsin, in 1917 

Local chapter organized at K. S. A. C. the same year 

Colors — Purple and White 

Publication — A. C. A. C. W. Magazine 

Purpose — "To foster ideals of good sportsmanship, to create an interest in gymnastic 
activities, and to promote high physical efficiency among women of K. S. A. C." 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

President Anna L. Best 

Vice-President Lillian Rommel 

Secretary Helen Piiestley 

Treasurer _ Hattie Betz 

Hike Manager Grace Schwandt 

Assistant Hike Manager Sue Unruh 

Field and Track Manager Renna Rosenthal 

Basketball Manager Belle Hagans 

Baseball Manager Lanora Russel 

Hockey Manager Alice Marston 

Tennis Manager Lucia Biltz 

Swimming Manager Julia Caton 

Initiating Director Betty McCoin 

Publicity Director Bertha Gwin 

Advisory Members \ Louise Tausche 

) Mary Worrall 

HISTORY 

It was through the efforts of Miss Edith Bond that in 1917 a Women's Athletic Association 
was established. This organization opened up a field of activity for women in the various sports, 
and we now find such events as swimming carnivals, indoor gymnastic meet, and tennis, track, 
basketball, hockey, baseball, and tennis tournaments. Hiking is an important activity and the 
W. A. A. girls take five- and ten-mile hikes to vicinities around Manhattan. In May, 1920, 
Miss Louise Tausche secured a chapter of Red Cross Life Saving corps for the college girls. 
This organization encourages the college women to engage in the various sports and gives 
points to those making class teams and other awards. A "K" sweater is given when 800 points 
are earned and this year there have been twelve sweaters presented. To aid in financing its 
activities the W. A. A. gave an entertainment, November 10, called "Frivol" which was a 
great success both as an entertainment and financially. Other good times have been the 
Annual Costume party for new girls, Hockey Spread, Basketball Spread, and Hare and Hound 
Race. The Athletic Conference of American College Women was held in Boulder, Colorado, 
April 14 and 15, and Miss Lillian Rommel and Miss Hattie Betz represented this chapter. 



323 




O^e !&rown ^bM 





HISTORY 

It was in the early spring of 1920 that the first forces, event- 
ually resulting in the creation of a college humorous magazine, 
began to stir themselves. After mature and careful consideration 
the apt title of Brown Bull was bestowed on the publication and 
the initial number came forth in May of 1920. 

Milton S. Eisenhower was the guiding spirit of the first three 
issues and much credit is due him for the firm base upon which the 
Brown Bull is now established. His successors have ably upheld 
the standards he set. Edward Shaffer was responsible for the 
Chaperone Number. R. L. Palmer directed the Wampus Cat 
Number. Homer G. Bryson dictated the policies of the Knickie 
Knumber, while R. C. Nichols was the master mind behind the 
early spring issue, the Dumb-bell Number. 

The Brown Bull was started by Sigma Delta Chi, professional 
journalistic fraternity, and the first two numbers were published 
under its auspices. With the February, 1921, issue, Theta Sigma 
Phi, women's honorary journalistic fraternity, began to participate 
in the publication of the magazine. 

Now a Brown Bull board is being organized, composed of repre- 
sentatives from both fraternities, to take full charge of the 
magazine. 

Contributions to the Brown Bull are received from all students 
of the Kansas State Agricultural college. In this way the publica- 
tion is made truly representative of the student body. Banquets 
for successful contributors to the magazine have added much 
interest to each issue. 

The Brown Bull goes out to many Kansas high schools. It has 
been quoted by magazines in all sections of the country, and 
quotations for use on the screen have been reserved by the Inter- 
collegiate Films Company. 



325 



&L03O7Zs />, 





Smith 
Stauffer 
McStay 
Moore 



Lillian Ayers 
Frances Batdorf 
Marion Brookover 
Georgia Belle Crihfield 



Batdorf 

Crihfield 

Thornburg 

Zeller 

society for Senior 



Watts 
Peck 
Dickens 
Ayers Sherman 

Women founded in 1916 



MEMBERSHIP 
Elizabeth Dickens Luella Sherman 

Esther McStay Claramary Srmtn 

Jean Moore Florence Staufier 

Ruth Peck Rowena Thornburg 

Helen Thayer 
326 



Thayer 
Brookover 
Manglesdorff 
Evans 



Sybil Watts 
Lulu Mae Zeller 
Louise Mangelsdorf 
Clara Evans 




1 Q 2, 2/ 



Scarab 




fftfffr 


h 


\ 



Top Row— Laine, Roberts, Murphy, McPherson, Phillips, Banks. 
Second Row — Coles, Bayles, Hadley, Van Fleet, Wingfteld. 
Third Row—RuS, Lynch, Hodgson, Stalcup, Findley, Davis. 
Bottom Row — Whan, Tupper, Pratt, Howe, Albright. 

An organization of Senior men founded in 1914 



James Albright 
Paul Tupper 
Glen Findley 
Paul Phillips 
Jess Wingfield 
John Van Fleet 
Hartzel Burton 
Maurice Laine 



MEMBERS 
Wallace Pratt 
Don Murphy 
Fred Williams 
Morse Salisbury 
E. F. Stalcup 
Embert Coles 
Charles McPherson 
Gale Lynch 



Roy E. Kellogg 
C. F. Hadley 
C. H. Howe 
E. E. Huff 
V. E. Whan 
E. E. Hodgson 
M. H. Banks 




327 



^o^^z^ 





E3^~ 




^ :2. 2, 



a>.^v.v. of w.w. 




Adee 



Gage 



Ward 



Carlson 



O'Connor 



OFFICERS 

Commander Walter R. Gage 

Vice-Commander Leo S. Ward 

Sergeant-at-Arms A. O. Carlson 

Adjutant J. W. O'Connor 

Assistant Adjutant ...J. F. Adee 

Treasurer H. L. Simpson 

HISTORY 

The Disabled War Veterans club, composed of men at K. S. A. C. who are under the 
jurisdiction of the Federal Board of Vocational Education, was organized January 18, 1921. 
The club was formed with a view of furthering the spirit of fellowship and cooperation resulting 
from service in the United States Army. The club is a social organization. Its activities 
extend to all the disabled veterans. The club makes possible unified action in all matters of 
policy affecting the vocational students. 

The organization at the beginning of the year 1921 was only local. As conditions affecting 
the disabled veterans extend beyond the immediate jurisdiction of the college, the Veterans 
decided to affiliate with the national organization which has headquarters at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and Washington, D. C. The veterans voted to apply to the national organization for a charter. 
This was granted July 1, 1921. 

About 50 Federal Board men entered school at the opening of the Fall semester in 1919. 
Since that time the number has increased to over 300. The men are enrolled in every depart- 
ment of the college and in various trade courses. 

Dean J. T. Willard was supervising the men at first until the numbers grew so large the 
St. Louis district office installed a representative to take charge of the trainees. His duty is 
to look after the matters relating to the work of the men. O. W. Price held this position until 
the beginning of the second semester, when he was transferred to another school. He was 
succeeded by E. L. Littleton who held this position until the beginning of the spring semester, 
1922. Howard A. Joslin represents the Federal Board at the present time. 



329 




i 



^o^^z, J^iyi^j=>r. 





!b£i ^ ^ 



D.^V.V. of WW.— (Cont'o) 

ttoll 



A dee, James — Manhattan 

Azbell, John T. — Fredericktown, Mo. 

Aikens, E. L. — Manhattan 

Aspley, R. W. — Abilene 

Austin, W. S.— Collyer 

AUm, N. M. — Junction City 

Agee, W. A. — Raymondville, Mo. 

Ausmer, E. L. 

Arnold, F. R. 

Achey, J. C. 

Aument, C. G. — Manhattan 

Akers, Raymond — Anderson, Mo. 



Byler, J. A. — Girard 

Beremes, A. H. 

Burris, L. I.— Labette 

Bickford, N. R.— Bartlett 

Ball, Edgar L. — Parsons 

Bridenstine, A. L. — Marienthal 

Bell, G. L.— Goff 

Bigelow, Guy C. — Peabody 

Bradshaw, R. — Blowing Rock, N. C. 

Baker, M. L. — Syracuse 

Bockhaus, B. R. — Halstead 

Baker, W. L. 

Blackson, L. H.— Goff 

Brown, Guy — Bellaire 

Buntzen, Ed. — Abilene 

Baldwin, E. W.— Howell, Mo. 

Bird, A. G.— Fort Scott 

Brown, E. B. 

Bohling, Chas. B. — Meade 

Brown, W. S. 

Brown, James 

Browne, A. O. — Manhattan 

Bhear, Geo. M. 

Boyle, J. E.— Harlan, Neb. 

Barnes, O. A. — Canalon, Mo. 

Badlard, William 



Grayson, Ellis — Newbury, Mo 
Gui, Harry L. — St. Louis, Mo. 
Gard, John — Manhattan 
Grugg, A. B. 

Gottshall, C. R.— Manhattan 
Goheen, J. C.— Clay Center 
Gibbons, J. F.— St. Louis 
Gage, Walter — Manhattan 
Grappia, Sam — Italy 



Hook, L. W.— lola 

Hannigan, W. E. — Milton, Mass. 

Hansen, Peter — Nora, Neb. 

Hennon, J. J. — Kansas City 

Humphrey, G. F. — Herington 

Halloway, W. G. — Lecompton 

Heaton, Raymond — Manhattan 

Heberley, O. J. — Minneapolis 

Harris, L. E. — Beaver, Neb. 

Hoyer, Henry — Marysville 

Holder, W. C— Pleasant Hill, Mo. 

Horton, Robert — Weingarten, Mo. 

Hirdman, C. M. 

Hopkins, Harold— Winfield 

Hoover, Earl F. — Manhattan 

Harrison, Ray — Santanta 

Holfle, M. L.— Highland, 111. 

Hastings, Vernon — -Council Grove 

Horn, H. A.— Troy 

Huntley, C. C. — Lebanon, Mo. 

Humrick, Fred — Gaylord 

Hutto, Oale N. 

Huston, R. N. 

Hogan, Frank — Simmons, Mo. 

Houghton, R. — Emporia 

Hudson, Chas. B.— Fort Scott 

Holmes, G. N. 

Hendrick, G. E.— Bixby, Mo. 

Hamilton, W. S. 




Mitchell, M. O. — Langley 
Meisner, F. W. 
Merrill, E. W. — Leroy 
Morris, Alva B. — Manhattan 
Milton, E. P. — Lanard 
Mickey, O. H.— Wichita 
MaGuire, L. R. — Geneseo 
Martin, W. M. — Dunavant 
Mitchell, John F. 
McKenney, M. S. — Valley Falls 



Niemann, John — St. Louis, Mo. 
Nicholson, Geo. T. — -Hutchinson 
Newman, Robert — Cassidy, Mo. 
Nelson, C. O. — Agenda 



O'Connor, J. W. — Leavenworth 
Ormsbee, E. O. — Smith Center 
Osburn, Chas. C. — Neodesha 



Parrish, Fred — Ottawa 
Peoples, Fred — Elgin 
Prior, J. H. 

Prescott, R. M.— Manhattan 
Porter, Armer — Manhattan 
Paschall, C. E.— Great Bend 
Patterson, W. S.— Ford 



Reep, E. L. — Abilene 
Robison, C. L. — Downs 
Rose, L. A. — Salina 
Raisch, J. M. — lola 
Russell, A. L.— Peabody 
Rommelfanger, W. J. — Greenley 
Rosenberry, H. C. — Manhattan 
Russell, R. C— Soldier 



Curley, J. J.— Manhattan 

Carlson, A. O. 

Conard, W. — Golorado Springs 

Carter, D. H.— Trenton, Mo. 

Cooley, Roy — Bavaria 

Crowcher, Sam — Osage City 

Cobb, Joe — Manhattan 

Colburn, E. P. 

Campbell, J. J. — Manhattan 

Carkuff, A. M.— Miltonvale 



Doane, J. T. 

Dowell, Geo. M.— Topeka 

Dimmitt, J. A. — -Brookville 

Dunlap, F. A. —Sterling 

Davis, Tom 

Dunbar, M. M. 

Daily, C. O.— Garden City 

Duree, Arlie — Leavenworth 

Dirks, Chas. — Wichita 

Daily, Elton M. 

Douglas, W. J.— Piper 

Dean, Floyd R. — Pawhatton 

Durham, H. I. — Norton 

Dinklege, W. K.— Fort Scott 

Eshelman, T. O.— Springfield, Mo. 
Everett, J. — Marston, Mo. 
Elmer, C. T.— Williamsburg 
Eastlick, Lee M.— Manhattan 



Fowler, T. J.— Muscatine, Iowa 
Friend, Clarence — Hodgenville, Ky. 
Freeman, L. M.— Paola 
Fleming, R- C— Harlanetown, Mont. 
Fitch, Chas. R.— Miltonvale 
Fulton, Ralph— Manhattan 
Faidley, G. E— Wakefield 
Fletcher, S. W.— Alton, Mo. 
Funk, Hugh H. 




Inman, Herman — Hurley, Mo. 
Ingram, Urwin 



Jenkins, Fred I. — Manhattan 
Johnson, Carl E. — Sharon Springs 
Jacobson, P. G. — Morrill, Iowa 
Jorgenson, H. F. — Wakeeney 
Jensen, A. G. — Neodesha 
Jacobs, Gray 

Knight, Peter — Savannah, Ga. 
Keller, H. V.— Kansas City, Mo. 
Kling, Fred— Scott City 
Kreiger, G. L. — Cincinnati, Ohio 
Krebs, H. L. — Manhattan 
Keer, O. O. — Henry, Mo. 
Kohrs, H. G.— Dillon 
King, A. S-- — Manhattan 
Koepsel, E. F.— White City 
Kostelecky, L. J.— Milford 
Koehn, Alex — McPherson 
Klein, A. L. — San Marcial, N. M. 



Lindley, E. L.— Wichita 
Leach, J. L.— Xenia, Ohio 
Lasley, S. H. — Prescott 
Lentz, J. C. — Holton 
Lane, H. C. — Manhattan 



McKinney, H. 
Malone, W. H 
Magill, W. S.- 
Moenning, J. H 
McGuire, P. R. 
Mathis, O. N 
Mahaffey, F. R. 
Murphy, F. F. 
McKee, W. H.- 
Meldrum, E. E 



-Horton 
—Fort Scott 
Manhattan 

. — Castleton 
Yates Center 
— Rieeville 
-Springfield, Mo. 
CedarVale 



330 



Spencer, C. H.— Oakley 
Slaughter, O. T. — Montrose 
Simpson, H. L. — Manhattan 
Suddarth, E. L.— Scottsville, Va. 
Stumbaugh, R. W.— Marsh Creek, Mo. 
Schultz, John C. — Hornick, Iowa 
Stout, C. E. — Manhattan 
Seamands, I. W. — Minnimum, Mo. 
Sisk, R. M.— Caruthersville, Mo. 
Stucky, R. R- — Moundridge 
Sanders, J. B.— Memphis, Mo. 
Sharer, G. E.— Salina 
Stanton, J- G.— Wakeeney 
Schilcker, C. M. 
Swayer, G. R. 
Swarner, F. J. — Hartford 



Tappa, B. A. — Wier 

Townsend, F. R. — Madison 

Tyson, L. R. — Wichita 

Tinker, W. H. — Windsorhenry, Mo. 

Tommer, E. F.— Ogden 

Thogmartin, L. A.— Fort Scott 



Upham, Ralph— Ogden 
Uphers, R. N.— Herington 



Waters, L. E. — Preston 
Wilson, L. A. — Junction City 
Welch, L. R.— Cherryvale 
Wetherman, C. O.— Springfield, Mo. 
Ward, Leo S. — Kiowa 
Watson, Carl— Wier 
Wobbe, H. L. — Uniontown 
Williams, F. R.— Boughton 
Whiston, J. L. — Lost Springs 
Wenger, J. L.— Sabetha 
Welborn, LeRoy— Axtell 
Willis, Joe— Greenville, Mo. 
Whitson, C. F. 



^OJ^fZ^ 




1 9 2^Z 

FIRST CABINET 




Marie Correll, Georgia Belle Crihfield, Marian Brookover, Lillian Ayers, Ruth Peck. 
Rowena Thornburg, Agnes Ayers, Luella Sherman, Louisa Moyer, Alice DeWitt. 

Lavina Waugh, Louise Manglesdorf, Clara Evans, Ila Knight, Opal Seeber. 



SECOND CABINET 



i 




^Mz^rs^^-i^^-^^^^S^^^^ 



:«6 






l^OK^Zs 





1 s 



i>. W. C. Z&. (Cont'd) 

BIG SISTER CAPTAINS 




Top #ou— Katharine McQuillen, Marian Brookover, Sibyl Watts, Leslie Burger, Florence 
Henney, Eva Travis. 

Second Row— Helen Lucille Cooper, Gladys Taylor, Irene Maughlin, Belle Hagans, Agnes 
Ayers, Irene Hays. 6 

Third Row— Frances Batdorf, Esther McStay, Ruth Cunningham, Eva Leland, Jean Moore. 



HISTORY 

The Young Women's Christian Association at the Kansas State Agricultural 
college was organized in 1886. The association was then, as now, directed by a 
cabinet of earnest students and an advisory board of loyal and faithful town and 
college women. Soon the need of having some one person to devote all her time 
to the organization became apparent and in 1898 Miss Ellen Norton, a graduate 
of this college, became the first secretary. 

Ever since its formation here the Y. W. C. A. has grown. In 1905 there 
were 240 members and at the present time there are 630. 

The Young Women's Christian Association is responsible for two of the 
most important college events of the year, the May Fete and Aggie Pop night 
The former was first organized by the Y. W. C. A. in 1912, and the latter in 
1915. 

Throughout its history the organization has sought to make the principles 
of Christ real on the campus, to cultivate world vision, and to be ready at all 
times to be of service to the college and especially to the women of this 
institution. 




33? 



I^OZO^JTs 





1 Q 



V. W. £.^\. ((Tont'6) 

FRESHMAN COMMISSION 




Top ftow— Henrietta Willison, Edith Holsinger, Ruth Witwer, Lois Richardson, Mildred Riegel, 

Ella Schrumph, Laureda Thompson, Muriel Shaver. 
Second Row— Mildred Mitchener, Annie Laura Moore, Eileen Davis, Ruth Limbocker, Alice 

Hannen, Edith Holsinger, Myrtle Timbrel, Helen Northrup. 
Third Row— Emma Huckstead, Vida Butler, Edna Chapin, Vivian Hall, Gertrude Cate, Ina 

Davidson, Melba Dobie, Clara Evans (Leader). 
Fourth Row— Alice Paddleford, Myrl Barnhisel, Audria Kittle, Mary Dey, Hilda Black, 

Elizabeth Bressler, Bertha Summers, Esther Otto. 

Not in Picture— Bernice Humbert. 




338 



2^.C»5*7Zs r> TS1^F>Z^ E 





Top Row — Lawrence Whearty, Earl Means, A. B. Woody, C. R. Smith, C. F. Hadley. 
Second Row — Sankey Kelley, H. I. Richards, J. J. Seright, J. W. Barger, A. A. Holtz. 
Thitd Row — Harold Howe, Marion Stauffer, B. D. Hixson, A. R. Saunders, Fred Paulsen. 



BOARD 




Top Row— Paul McConnell, J. Wheeler Barger, Arnold Englund, Dr. Howard T. Hill, Rev. 

A. M. Reed. 
Second Row— Dr. A. A. Holtz, Dean R. A. Seaton, H. I. Richards, H. D. Hagden. 
Third How— Roy Clegg, Dr. H. H. King, Prof. L. A. Fitz. 

340 






V. 3tt. <t. Zh. (Cont'd) 

HISTORY 

In the days when it was customary for commencement day to be celebrated 
by holding a plowing match, and at the time when the college catalog stated 
that "Undue social attention is not allowed,"— right there you will find where 
the college Y. M. C. A. started. 

It was in 1885 that a national secretary of the Y came to Manhattan and 
started the organization. C. A. Murphy of the class of '87 was elected the first 
secretary and D. G. Robertson of the class of '86 was the first president. 

This first organization started by providing some non-sectarian form of 
religious instruction. The Sunday meetings which the Y started thrived for 
many years, and grew until they placed the Y first among the organizations of 
the college. 

In 1890 the Y published the first student's directory and the same year the 
custom of meeting all new students at the train was started. These two move- 
ments did much to relieve the inconveniences of the freshmen'. 

One of the big tasks undertaken and pushed to a successful end was the 
building of the Y building at the corner of Eleventh and Fremont Streets. 
The campaign to raise this fund was started in 1904 and completed in 1908. 
The student body during this period donated an average of forty dollars per 
man. Other funds came from Manhattan business men, alumni, and the 
national Y. 

For several years after the completion of the new building it served as the 
center of school activities and as a gymnasium for all the varsity teams. At 
this time the Y employed in addition to a general secretary an athletic director. 

The big man in the history of the local Y is W. W. McLean, who was the 
moving spirit in the building movement. He organized weekly religious 
meetings and Bible study classes, and his administration of Y affairs is one of 
the brightest pages in college history. 

In 1918 McLean resigned, and to work with the boys in the S. A. T. C, 
two men were employed— Cool at the building and J. S. Daniels on the campus. 
At the end of the war Daniels resigned and Dr. A. A. Holtz was called. Since 
that time Doctor Holtz has continued as general secretary. 




311 




1 Q ^, -2j 




y. 3tt. <T. ^V. (Cont'd) 

FRESHMAN COMMISSION 




Top Row — George Hanna, Tom Stratton, Frank V. Houska, I. H. Heath, Floyd C. Cooleyi 
Charles L. Howard. 

Second Row — Harold Howe, H. A. Wright, Dr. A. A. Holtz, Homer L. Summers, Everett Bell. 

Third Row—h. M. Staley, Paul Cobb, Jewell Johnson, C. R. Smith(Leader), Hugh Willis, 
Donald E. Lathrop. 



342 



ROX^Zs J>Jjrj^,J^J^E 





M. Bobb 
Agnes Ayers 
Gail Roderick 



Cecil Paine 
Margaret Mason 
Belle Hagans 



June Harter Edna Russell Luella Sherman 

Queenie Hart Mary Maroney Esther McStay 

Lois Wilson Opal Seeber May Danheim Frances Batdorf 



IOTA CHAPTER 
Installed at K. S. A. C. March 5, 1921 

Colors— Blue, Green and White 
It became a national group in 1919 and now 



Flower — Pink Rose w „ . -,. • -,o*c 

The Association was first organized at Kansas University in 19 irj . 

1133 MTto-Eve'rT'Methodist woman in the university world today a leader in the church of tomorrow 

OFFICERS 

„ ;j _t Luella Sherman 

?i e li™ ■::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Esther Mcst ay 



Secretary.. 



Gail Roderick 



Corresponding Secretary gSl^ST 

Vice President Bslle Hagans 

SS^:z:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::" °p"** b « 



j^ us j c Edna Russell 

Program.'."!!!!!! Agnes Ayers 

Religious Education Queenie Hart 

Religious Effort Lois Wilson 

Handbook June Harter 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

Social Mildred Bobb 

Alumni Margaret Mason 

Missions May Danheim 

Advertising Frances Batdorf 

Membership Mary Maroney 



MEMBERS 



Anderson, Eunice 
Ayers, Agnes 
Ayers, Lillian 
Avery, Madalyn 
Batdorf, Frances 
Bobb, Mildred 
Browning, Nina 
Clark, Lois 
Coleman, Nellie 
Coleman, Inez 
Crihfield, Georgia Belle 
Danheim, May 
Cunningham, Ruth 
Gardner, Grace 
Gardner, Hazel 
Hagans, Belle 
Hart, Queenie 
Harter, June 
Hartley, Gladys 



Hays, Irene 
Headrick, Grace 
Herr, Mable 
Herr, Grace 
Hering, Olive 
Hinnen, Grace 
Howard, Angie 
Howard, Agnes 
Howard, Clara Belle 
Hull Geraldine 
Hunter, May 
Jennings, Alice 
Johnson, Anna 
Johnson, Mamie 
Johnson, Florence 
Jorns, Nellie 
King, Elmira 
Knerr, Frances 



Kouns, Zella 
Lee, Vera 
Leland, Eva 
Lyness, Hazel 
McStay, Esther 
McCandless, Ruth 
McCoin, Betty 
Manley, Alice 
Maroney, Mary 
Mason, Margaret 
May, Hazel 
Mayden, Coletta 
Payne, Cecil 
Roderick, Gail 
Russell, Orpha 
Russell, Edna 
Ryherd, Dorothy 
Sargent, Lois 



Schneider, Louise 
Schwandt, Grace 
Seeber, Opal 
Sherman, Luella 
Smith, Frances 
Stewart, Anna 
Sower, May 
Spiker, Katherine 
Thornburg, Meryl 
Thornburg, Mildred 
Travis, Eva 
True, Florence 
VanScoik, Grace 
Waits, Myrtle 
Waters, Nora 
Wertman, Zoe 
Wilson, Bee 
Wilson, Lois 
Warlick, Ruth 



F2,03<*?Zs 






iEpwortl) league 



The Manhattan churches have as a part of their program, organizations 
and activities especially planned to meet the needs of the students. The 
Senior Epworth League of the Methodist Episcopal church is such an organiza- 
tion. The Sunday afternoon fellowship hours of friendly good cheer and the 
week night parties help to drive away that homesick feeling, to furnish excellent 
opportunities to meet young people from other Christian homes, and to form 
those congenial friendships that make college life so vitally worth while. 

The Epworth League is a laboratory in Christian Leadership. This year 
Henrietta Jones is the president. Belle Hagans, K. W. Miller, Gail Roderick, 
and Hubert Collins are the vice-presidents who carry the responsibility of the 
work of the different departments. However, each member has the opportunity 
to crown his college education with the highest type of religious development. 
He may plan devotional services, attend mission study classes, do social service 
work, go on extension trips, or lead recreational groups. Throughout this entire 
program the Epworth League strives to keep before the members the motto, 
"Look up, lift up." 

LIFE SERVICE LEAGUE 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

President Florence Johnson Frances Knerr 

Vice-President Alice j en nings 

Recording Secretary Orpha Russell Lois Willson 

Corresponding Secretary Lois Willson Esther Russell 

Treasurer Albert Bridenstine Penn Chambers 

The Life Service League was organized during the school year of 1920-21 
under the direction of Rev. and Mrs. M. S. Collins. The membership consists 
of those individuals who are contemplating entering Christian life service and 
those who already have chosen their specific field. It affords its members an 
opportunity to study conditions, problems, and opportunities for service as 
they exist in both the home and foreign fields. In addition to the study and 
preparation for future service, its members now give of their time and service 
to various forms of work at Manhattan and over the state. 




I^OKZTXs 




i q :2, g,)ii§g 




Top Roiv — Myrtle Dubbs, Beth Hepler, Orlena Baker, Eileen Davis, Claramary Smith, Katy 

Feary, Ethel Feese, Margaret Dubbs, Margaret Scott. 
Second Row — Zoe O'Leary, Elizabeth Ellidge, Eulalia Kaiser, Hazel Graves, Lanora Russell, 

Hattie Betz, Irene Bradley. 
Third Row — Mabel Reasoner, Sybil Porter, Mabel Russell, Avis Wickham, Laureda Thompson, 

Julia King, Anna L. Best, Mildred Reasoner. 

Fourth Row — Helen Fears, Kitty Faulconer, Polly Hedges, Bertha Faulconer, Sybil Watts, 
Ethel Paige, Pearl Dooley. 

Founded at Illinois University, 1911 

BETA CHAPTER 

Installed March 1914 



Colors — Green and White 



Publication — "The Radius" 



Flower — Daisy 



Purpose — To establish a friendly relationship among college girls interested in the 
Christian Church. 



HISTORY 

In 1913, under the leadership of Rev. J. David Arnold, a group of girls organized a Bethany 
Circle. The next year it became a national organization with the Alpha chapter at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. In 1915, Bethany Circle became a college organization as well as a church 
organization. Since that time there have been four other chapters added. They are located 
at the Universities of Michigan, Missouri, Iowa, and Kansas. 

Members not in Picture — Helen Lucile Cooper, Grace Rudy, Emma Stutz, Curtis Watts, 
Leona Jennings, Josephine Fulcher, Mary Dudley, Dorothy Pickard, Bess Hansen-Bower, 
Garnet Grover, Callie Coats, Clo Bixler, Fern Bixler, Ruth Mauck, Mae Humphrey, Jeanette 
Stitt. 




:u- 



F^C&Z*?Zs 2>TLS1^T>Z^E 





Meria Murphy Bernard Conroy James Leonard Mildred Halstead 

CoJors-Purple and Gold Motto-Faith and Friendship 

The Newman Club was organized in 1912. At the time of its organization it had a member- 
ship of 50 men and women. In 1916 the local club became affiliated with the National Federa- 
tion of Newman Clubs. 

The purpose of the club is to promote unity and friendship among the Catholic students 
of the college. This is accomplished by holding social functions during the school year. 

OFFICERS 

President . Irene Conroy Secretary... Bernard Conroy 

Vice-President... James M. Leonard Treasurer ...Meria Murphy 

Marshal Mildred Halstead 




Irene Barner 
George Bhear 
Joseph D. Buchman 
Morris B. Burns 
Mary Bunsold 
Earnest E. Cabacungan 
Irene Conroy 
Bernard Conroy 
Mary Cunningham 
Rose Cunningham 
John Cunningham 
Thomas E. Watson 



Rev. A. J. Luckey 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Timothy J. Foley 
Marie Foster 
Esther Glenn 
Mildred Halstead 
William Hannigan 
Julian Herrera 
Margaret Heshion 
Harold C. Howe 
Mary F. Kelley 
Roland C. Knight 
James M. Leonard 
Norman Weberg 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Miss Mary Schell 



Argen C. Leite 
Jose Angel Mier 
Andrew J. Miller 
Raymond H. Moran 
Meria Murphy 
Vincent Nass 
Matilda Pospisil 
Otto L. Pretz 
George Raleigh 
William B. Reed 
Ida J. Walker 





yflumniMisto 





Major General James G. Harbord, '86 
United States Army 

James G. Harbord, '86, major general in the United States army and assistant chief of 
staff, is one of the most prominent and popular alumni of the Kansas State Agricultural college. 
As assistant chief of staff, General Harbord is outranked only by General John J. Pershing. 

"General Harbord's army experience reads like a romance," comments I. D. Graham, 
honorary alumnus, who wrote "An Appreciation" of Harbord for '86 class book of 1921. He 
and William Allen White both lost out in the same competitive examination for entrance to 
West Point two years after Harbord received his degree from K. S. A. C. The Aggie enlisted 
in 1889, received a commission in 1891. Following service in Cuba, he was sent to the Philip- 
pines in 1902, where he remained 12 years, helped organize the constabulary, and was active in 
pacifying the Islands. 

He sailed for France in May, 1917, with the rank of lieutenant colonel, served one year as 
chief of staff, commanded the Marine brigade at Chateau Thierry in June, 1918, and was 
placed in command of the Second Division in July, with the rank of major general. Need 
for greater efficiency in the Service of Supply called him to reorganize that department in August. 
By the time the armistice was signed he had that department functioning efficiently. 

In 1919 General Harbord was appointed head of the mission to Armenia and the Near East, 
Returning to the "States" in 1920, he was commissioned a major general in the regular army, 
in command of the Second Division, and a few months later was made assistant chief of staff! 

Among the decorations received by General Harbord are: Distinguished Service Medal 
(United States', Commander, Legion of Honor (France), Knight Commander, St. Michael and 
St. George (Great Britain), Grand Officer, Order of the Crown (Belgium), Croix de Guerre 
with two palms (France), and decorations from Italy, Montenegro, and the Republic of Panama. 

The college has had the pleasure of honoring General Harbord twice since the Great War. 
He was given the honorary degree of Doctor of Law i by his Alma Mater at a special convocation 
in 1920. Last fall he dedicated the memorial flag pole in the gymnasium quadrangle, presented 
to the college by the class of 1920. 



I 



2^0J5£^Z^ 



szze&l 




i o :2, 2/ 



'A\ 



umm 



1-figl) jLi^ts in tl)e Ifistor? of tt»e 
Alumni Association 





Emma (Haines) Bowen, '67 

Manhattan 
Our First Girl Graduate 



It is rather an interesting commentary on alumni in general that the alumni association 
of the Kansas State Agricultural college was first organized by students instead of by alumni. 
Also that it originally had an unwritten motto, strong as the unwritten law: "Let the treasurer 
foo. the bills." 

The class of '79 started the Alumni association, 12 years after the first class was graduated 
from the college. In other words, Harry C. Rushmore, '79, is the Dean of the Alumni associa- 
tion. Under his leadership, the cla s of '79 wrote a constitution and by-laws, and declared the 
Alumni association in existence, while its members still were seniors. No meeting of the 
association, as such, was held in '79, but the first annual meeting was held under this consti- 
tution in 1880. 

First Reunion in 187 U 

There had been several alumni reunions previous to this time, the first one in 1874. No 
records of these meetings are available. At the 1880 meeting the following officers were elected: 
George H. Failyer, '77, president; A. N. Godfrey, '78, vice-president; Harry C. Rushmore, '79, 

350 



2^03<*?Zs Z>TSRT>2^^^^ 






1 Q S, -2j 



2\lumni 

secretary; A. T. Blain, '79, treasurer; Noble A. Richardson, '80, marshal. The marshal seems 
to have been an heirloom from the literary society whose constitution was adopted bodily by 
the enthusiastic "Seventy-niners" when the association was formed. 

The Industrialist, ever alert, carried the following account of the first meeting: 

"We understand that the alumni meeting, called for last Tuesday afternoon, was 
largely attended, and that a thorough organization was perfected. We have received 
no report of the meeting thus far, but are informed that a grand reunion of the alumni 
will take place at the college at next Commencement. We hope to be able to give the 
names of the offic rs next week." 

Evidently the secretary took the hint, and furnished a report of the meeting, for the next 
issue of the Industrialist carried the names of the officers. 

An alumni banquet, with an address by W. D. Gilbert, '74, was planned for the 1881 
commencement, but illness cancelled the address. The banquet was held the evening of June 
8, and was a successful affair. The principal address at the 1883 banquet was delivered by 
John J. Points, '67, a member of the first class graduated from the college. Mr. Points, by the 
way, writes that he expects to attend the commencement exercises and annual alumni-senior 
dinner this year. Mr. Gilbert, whose illness in 1880 prevented his appearance on the program, 
delivered an excellent address at the commencement reunion in 1884. 

A Shortage of Treasurers 

A dearth of candidates for treasurer in 1884 apparently caused a readjustment in the as- 
sociation. The custom was to finance the dinner and reunions by contributions from those 
present. This left the treasurer with a deficit of from 15 to 20 dollars to be met from his own 
bank account after each reunion. At the 1884 meeting it was decided to hold the banquets 
triennially. This custom was followed for a quarter of a century, when the annual faculty- 
alumni banquet replaced it, to be again replaced in turn by the present annual alumni-senior 
dinner, commencement day. 

Alumni Association in 1906 

An article in the '06 Banner— one of the ancestors of the Royal Purple— tells the story 
of the objects and attainments of ihe Alumni association up to that time, and in fact until a 
decade ago: 

"In the language of the present constitution the object of the association is the 
promotion of the interests of the college and of acquaintance among its graduates. 
The latter point has been well attained, not only by means of the triennial reunions 
but by the informal ones held in the intervening years, which are to many more enjoy- 
able than the triennials and nearly, if not quite, as well attended. There is now in 
progress a movement looking toward the publication of an alumni magazine by the 
association. 

"This college has no more active and helpful friends than some of its alumni, yet 
while individual 'promotion of the interests of the college' has been accomplished, it can 
scarcely be maintained that the Alumni association as such has done much. From the 
nature of its present organization, by which action must depend upon the sentiment of 
those who happen to be present at the business meeting commencement week, little 
continuity of effort can be expected, since those present one year are likely to be almost 
entirely different from those present the previous year or the one following. Resident 
alumni may be present with some regularity, but they should not expect, nor be 
expected, to direct the affairs of the association. 

"It seems evident hat no sustained policy looking toward promoting the interests 
of the college, or carrying out any large plans, will be possible until means are adopted 
whereby all alumni, whether or not in attendance at business meetings, can have equal 
opportunity to propose action, and to vote on proposed action. Such plans are in suc- 
cessful operation in other large societies." 



Struggles for Recognition 

Net that the work of the Alumni association had been confined to annual reunions, tri- 
ennial banquets and addresses, and the election of officers. The foregoing article in a way does 
not do justice to the association of 25 or 30 years ago. As far back as 1894 the Alumni associa- 
tion had taken action toward ha ing alumni appointed on the board of regen s. This board 
was replaced by the board of administration for all the state institutnons of higher learning in 
1913. Resolutions were adopted in 1894 urging the appointment of alumni on the board. A 
committee presented the names of five alumni to the governor the following winter for ap- 
pointment, but the recommendations were "placed on file." In 1898 W. H. Phipps, '95, was 
named on the board of regents. He was the first alumnus so honored. 



z^c&5><3rzs ^^jyi^2=>i^ 



m sU 




Harry Umberger, '05 
President of the Alumni Association 

In 1899 it was voted "that a committee of seven (afterward increased to nine) members 
be appointed to appoint a committee in every county to help keep up the work for our college. 
This was the first step in the creation of the present advisory board, and led finally to the em- 
ployment of a full-time executive secretary to work in conjunction with the advisory board 
and under the board of directors in promoting the interests of the college. 

This first committee issued a circular to alumni pointing out the following ways in which 
the alumni could work for the college: 

"(1) By bringing the work of the college before the leading farmers, business men, 
statesmen, and newspapers of the state, and (2) by helping the college to place its cata- 
logs and circulars in the hands of the teachers and in the schools of the state. 
Detailed suggestions also were made as to the furnishing of news of alumni, extending 
mailing lists for experiment station bulletins, working up farmers institutes, and 
so forth. 

Settled Engineering Policy 
Ten years later the need for such a program was made evident A systematic campaign 
to limit the "sphere of work" of the college culminated in a bill in to »^^ * ^S? 
engineering courses at the college. The campaign was opened by _tiw » caDinj o la joint ^confer- 
ence of the members of the boards of regents of the three state institutions oT higher learning [to 
define their "spheres of work." This conference was called in 1908 It soon developed that 
the real purpose was to annihilate the engineering courses of the college. 

The conference itself got nowhere in particular. Af er the fall elections it was recommended 
bv the head of another state institution, in his biennial report to the legislature, that the 
legislature settle the matter by abolishing engineering at the Kansas State Agriculural college 
or better still by combining the two institutions under one board and one executive The 
bill was introduced to do awly with engineering. It had been preceded by a barrage of news- 

352 



7^03>C*TZs j^z^j^j^z^je: 





2\lumm 

paper publicity favoring restricting the college to the teaching of farming. Alumni and friends 
of the college hurriedly organized relief committees, swamped the legislators with protests, and 
the bill never got out of committee. But the 1909 experience demonstrated that the Alumni 
association itself was not organized for effective work. The temporary organization which 
handled the legislative and publicity campaign was formed and directed by students. It did 
result in the appointment of a legislative committee from the Alumni association two years 
later, and such a committee has functioned somewhat at every succeeding legislature. 

This experience ended the agitation to abolish engineering at the Agricultural college, and 
reaffirmed the principle of the Morrill act under which land grant colleges were established — 
that these were to give instruction in agriculture and mechanic arts. The immediate and pressing 
need for a strong alumni organization apparently passed, and it was several years before the 
Alumni associations really undertook to become an active factor in building up and protecting 
the interests of the institution. 

In 1912 the association undertook a new project, the publication of an alumni register. 
This was carried through to completion the following year by Albert Dickens, '93. Alumni 
were assessed one dollar each to cover the cost of publication, and nearly 1,500 responded. 

Established Student Loan Funds 

In 1916 the alumni loan fund for needy students was established, following the creation 
of the Henry J. Waters Loan fund by Doctor Waters, then president of the institution. Nearly 
100 alumni took out life memberships at $20 each, the money to go into the permanent fund 
thus established. The fund has grown but little since that time. Annual dues had been fixed 
at one dollar several years before, but fewer than 10 per cent of the graduates of the institution 
bothered to pay them. 

The Alumni association rested another four years. Construction of new buildings at the 
college practically had ceased in 1912. In 1920 a further step in making the Alumni association 
an active factor in college affairs and in college support was taken. The annual election com- 
mencement week resulted in the naming of the following on the board of directors: Harry 
Umberger, '05, president; Helen B. Thompson, '03, vice-president; J. T. Willard, '83, 
treasurer; Frances L. Brown, '09, secretary; George C. Wheeler, '95; C. W. McCampbell, 
06; Harry L. Kent, '13; Waldo E. Grimes, '13; Orville B. Burtis, '16. These decided to open 
a full time headquarters at the college and to employ a permanent executive secretary. Clif 
Stratton, '11, was elected to the new job and opened headquarters in September, 1920. 

Reorganized Alumni Association 

Since that time the Alumni association has taken an ever increasing interest in college and 
alumni affairs, made possible largely thru the hearty cooperation of President W. M. Jardine 
as well as of the alumni and college students. 

One of the first steps taken was to arrange for at least one page of alumni news in every 
issue of the Industrialist. The following year the special eight-page alumni editions of the 
Industrialist were started. An attempt is made thru the Industrialist to give live information 
about college and alumni activities. 

The first six months of the reorganized association was largely taken up with obtaining 
adequate financial support for the college. It might be noted among other things, that the 
1921 legislature appropriated more money for building than had been allowed in the past 15 years. 

The association also is working along other lines. The Homecoming last fall was the most 
largely attended and successful in the history of the college. Commencement reunions are tak- 
ing on added interest and attendance. The "Go to College" teams of students that visit high 
schools illustrate another line of association activities, cooperating with other organizations 
Local alumni organizations are being formed, rather slowly, it is true, but on a permanent 
basis. The main effort in organization lines is to get the allegiance of the alumni direct to Alma 
Mater. More alumni today are taking an interest in the college than ever before, to the benefit 
of the college and themselves. 

One of the factors contributing to the higher standing in football circles of the Missouri 
Valley attained by the college last fall, is the renewed interest taken by the alumni The pres- 
tige of the college over the state is as high now as it ever has been, and the Alumni association 
had its small share in that. 

Two immediate projects ahead of the Alumni association are the publishing of an alumni 
directory and the Memorial Stadium. The directory probably will be published this summer- 
there still are a number of alumni who are chary of furnishing information about themselves. 

353 



XI 



v! 



Roi^zzs j>tsi2,f>z^je; 




Alumni 




Now for the Memorial Stadium 

The Alumni association will take over the crusade for the Memorial Stadium after the 
students, faculty, and Manhattan folk have erected the first section. This probably will be 
next fall. The Memorial Stadium will be one of the most completely appointed and imposing 
of its kind in the Missouri Valley. The outer walls of the stadium will be of native limestone, 
following closely in architectural design Nichols gymnasium. Inside all will be of reinforced 
concrete. The completed structure, horseshoe shaped, will seat 21,000 persons and will cost 
$350,000. It will be situated in the southwest corner of the campus, on Ahearn field. The 
west section, to be constructed first, will seat 6,700 and cost $125,000. 

The Alumni association in its present form still is an experiment. Indications are that it 
will continue to function along the same lines, but perhaps with slight modifications. Out of a 
total of 4,392 graduates there now are 105 Life Members and 900 Active Members for this 
year. It is working effectively toward the goal set by the constitution of the association: "The 
promotion of the interests of the college and of acquaintance among its graduates." 

Officers of the Alumni association for this year are: 

Board of Directors: H. Umberger, '05, president; Helen B. Thompson, '03, vice-president; 
J. T. Willard, '83, treasurer; H. H. Haymaker, '14, secretary; G. C. Wheeler, '95; C. W. Mc- 
Campbell, '06, '10; Joh?i R. McClung, '10; W. E. Grimes, '13; O. B. Burtis, '16. 

Advisory Council: J. W. Berry, '83; H. W. Avery, '91; G. C. Wheeler, '95; Bertha (Spohr) 
Smith, '98; G. O. Greene, '00. 

Executive Secretary: Clif Stratton, '11. 




354 



izlc»c*tZs jf>zsrz>z^^; 





Henry C. Rushmore, '79 
President Kansas City Alumni Association 
Dean of Aggie Alumni 

"I doubt very seriously that I shall live to visit, what I 
have for years called the kindergarten, in celebration of my 
fiftieth anniversary— that will be in 1929. I have always re- 
garded the College as a Kindergarten— so, really it is. As a 
dutiful son, it has given me unalloyed pleasure to render to her 
service and loyalty, the return of which has been more profit 
to me than to her. After all, that is one of the profound things 
of life, the realization of which so few ever comprehend. Long 
years ago it came to me that life derived most where it bestowed 
most. Life is gloriously worth living. I am exceedingly rich in 
the basic elements of wealth. Was it the count of Monte 
Cristo who said, 'The world is mine'? Pshaw, Clif, he was a 
pauper — Forget him — But not 



s 



Yours truly, 



H. C.R." 



355 




1 s> 



Alumni 




"Kansas (Tit? .Alumni .Association 

The alumni in Kansas City were the first to organize a local association. 
Will E. Smith, '93, now practicing law at Wamego, is given credit by Harry 
C. Rushmore, '79, for originating the idea. This was in 1903, and as Rushmore 
notes was promptly followed by the Kaw flood of '03. Smith still believes it 
was in '01 — the first meeting, not the flood. Other prominent persons in the 
organization were: S. L. Van Blarcom (now deceased); Phil Creager, '91, news 
editor of the Kansas City Journal (now deceased); Dr. A. T. Kinsley, '99; 
Mrs. Anna (Smith) Kinsley, '01; Frank Yoeman, '98; and Horace G. Pope, '94. 

Smith was the first president of the association. He was followed by 
Rushmore, Doctor Kinsley, Mrs. Kinsley, Eusebia (Mudge) Thompson, '93, 
Yoeman, W. H. Phipps, '95, and others. This year the presidency has worked 
its way back to Rushmore. 

Harry Rushmore of Kansas City generally is known as] Dean of the Aggie 
Alumni. It was Rushmore who organized the first alumni association the year 
after he was graduated. In fact Rushmore was accused by the old timers 
of his day of having organized the alimni association before he was graduated. 
It is a fact^that when the class of '79 was graduated they had arranged for the 
first meeting of the alumni association the following commencement and the 
constitution presented in 1880 was written before the authors were alumni. 

"I am serving my last term as president," Rushmore wrote in a letter this 
spring. "I have been so often stuck for the job that I am worm eaten, flea 
bitten, and corrupt. I have sworn an awful swore, that nevermore will this 
local have for president, Harry Rushmore. Our children down here are in need 
of a new and younger man. I am going on the turn table, but believe me some 
other fellow will get on the main line and make this local what it should be." 

The Kansas City association has held an annual dinner during the winter 
or early spring every year since it was organized, except during the World 
war. It also has held a number of summer picnics. The '22 annual dinner 
was held at the First Christian church, Kansas City, Mo., April 21. Among 
those on the program were President William Jardine; Dean J. T. Willard, '83; 
Dean Helen B. Thompson, '03. The officers of the Kansas City association 
for the past year were: 

H. C. Rushmore, '79, President. 

Roy M. Wyatt, '09, Vice-President. 

Florence Carvin, '13, Secretary-Treasurer.XCity Hall, Independence, 
Missouri. 






David G. Robertson, '86 
President of Chicago Alumni Association 

<L\)ica%o Alumni ^Association. 

The Chicago Alumni association was organized about 17 years ago. The 
first meeting was called by W. E. Whaley, '86 (now deceased), and David G. 
Robertson, '86. Robertson was the first president of the Chicago organization. 
He was elected again in 1920 and is still on the job. Among the past presi- 
dents are: Doctor Mayo; Paul C. Milner, '97; E. T. Morton; John B. Patton 
'95; and E. H. Freeman, '95. 

The annual dinner during the National Live-stock show has become a 
feature of the Chicago alumni organization. There generally are several of the 
faculty members from the college on the program at these meetings. Student 
members of the stock judging teams also are guests. 

[SI "I wish you would make it clear," Robertson wrote recently to the execu- 
tive secretary of the Alumni association, "that my office is to be known con- 
tinuously as headquarters for all of the former students and friends of K. S. 
A. C. When coming to Chicago they should report and let us have their names 
and addresses so we can keep in touch with them and see that each new-comer 
shall be enrolled in our organization and receive an invitation to the different 
meetings which we have from time to time." 

Robertson's offices are at 1140 Otis Building, 10 S. LaSalle Street, Chicago 
Roy Breese, '21, is secretary of the Chicago association. His address is 5115 
Windsor Ave., Chicago. 



357 



Z^O^O^J^ 





John B. Dorman, '96 
Permanent Secretary Eastern Alumni 
Association, New York 

TEastera Mew $?ork ^Vlumni ^Vssoctahoa 

The Eastern Alumni association of K. S. A. C. whose members live in New York and 
nearby hamlets, held their fifteenth annual dinner at Murray's, 288 42nd Street, March 25. 
The following officers were elected for 1922: President, Earl Wheeler, '05; vice-president, 
Mrs. Henrietta (Hofer) Ross, '02; secretary-treasurer, Earl W. Frost, '20. John B. Dorman, 
'96, was made permanent secretary a year ago. 

The attendance this year was the largest in the history of the association. The program 
included: Vocal solo, Henrietta (Hofer) Ross, '02; "Some Funny Ones," Dorman, '96; "K. S. 
A. C. Today," Pauline Richards, '18; "Why a Stadium," Carl J. Merner; "The Department 
of Journalism," Clementine Paddleford, '21; Vocal solos, H. A. O'Brien, '19. 

Officers of the Eastern Alumni association since its organization in 1910 follow: 

1910, President, Paul Fairchild, '86; vice-president, Miss Henrietta M. Hofer, '02; secre- 
tary-treasurer, Lyman H. Dixon, '88; 1911, President, Miss F. R. Corbett, '95; vice-president, 
J. B. Dorman, '96; secretary-treasurer, H. M. Hofer, '02; 1912, president, Lyman H. Dixon, 
'88; vice-president, Miss Minnie Copeland, '98; secretary-treasurer, Henrietta M. Hofer, '02; 
1913, president, J. B. Dorman, '96; vice-president, Minnie Copeland, '98; secretary-treasurer, 
L. A. Ramsey, '06; 1914, president, L. A. Ramsey, '06; vice-president, Mrs. Christine (Hofer) 
Johnson, '02; secretary-treasurer, Minnie Copeland, '98; 1915, president, Miss Spohr, '99; 
vice-president, Mrs. Gilbert Burnes; secretary-treasurer, Donald Ross, '07; 1916, president, 
Mrs. Christine (Hofer) Johnson, '02; vice-president, J. B. Dorman, '96; secretary-treasurer, 
Donald Ross, '07; 1917, president, H. Clay Lint, '11; vice-president, Mrs. A. L. Burns; 1918, 
president, R. S. Kellog, '96; vice-president, Minnie Copeland, '98; secretary-treasurer, Mrs. 
Donald Ross; 1919, president, J. B. Dorman, '96; vice-president, D. G. Blattner, '11; secretary- 
treasurer, Mrs. Christine (Hofer) Johnson, '02; 1920, president, P. H. Fairchild, '86; vice- 
president, Mrs. Pearl (Dow) Peck, '91; secretary-treasurer, W. E. Deal, '16; 1921, president, 
Wilhimena Spohr, '97; vice-president, L. A. Ramsey, '06; secretary-treasurer, C. W. Mc- 
Campbell, '19; permanent secretary, J. B. Dorman, '96. 

358 








2\lumni 

Washington Alumni Association 

Officers of the Washington Alumni association, which numbers on its rolls some of the most 
distinguished of our alumni, are: Judson H. Griswell, '89, president; Henrietta (Willard) 
Calvin, '86, vice-president; Harlan Smith, '11, U. S. Department of Agriculture, secretary; 
C. H. Kyle, treasurer; Hazel (Bixby) Davis, '10, 1425 Crittenden Street, assistant secretary. 





Edwin H. Snyder, '88 
President Colorado Alumni Association 

(Tolora6o Alumni Association 

The Colorado alumni have given an annual dinner at Denver during the Live Stock Show 
for several years. The formal organization was not perfected until this year, when representa- 
tives of seven classes met at the Metropole hotel, the evening of January 19, and elected the 
following officers: 

Edwin H. Snyder, '88, president. 

Evelyn M. Potter, '88, vice-president. 

Mary (Strite) Burt, '05, secretary-treasurer, Boulder, Colorado. 

The following responded to toasts following the dinner at this first annual meeting- Harvey 
A. Burt, '05, and Mrs. Burt of Boulder; Helen Haines, '13, of Boulder; Helen Hornaday, '14 
of Denver; Miss Potter, of Boulder; Vera (Peake) Noble, '17, of Denver; Walter H. Olin' '89* 
of Denver; and Edwin H. Snyder, '88, of Denver. 

The Colorado alumni have arranged for an alumni picnic this summer in Boulder Canon 
near the state university. Any alumni who expect to be in Colorado this spring are invited to 
correspond with the secretary and make picnic arrangements. 



359 



I^030?Zs 




Samuel E. Barnes, '16 
President K. S. A. C. Club of Muskogee, Okla. 

3ttusko<3ee Hi.S.^A.d. Club 

One of the most active alumni associations is the K. S. A. C. club of Muskogee, Okla. The 
Muskogee club holds quarterly meetings and since its organization has increased steadily m 
membership and attendance at the meetings. Its first meeting was held August 17, 1921, with 
17 present. The Muskogee club gave a dinner for visiting K. S. A. C. folks October 4. The 
winter meeting was held at the home of E. E. Barnes, '16. Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Hole were 
hosts at the spring meeting in April. 

"In our club we have members of classes from '89 to '21 inclusive, " Estella (Soupene) 
Crowthers, '10, the secretary writes. "We welcome any K. S. A. C. people at any time. Two 
of our members, S. S. Cobb, '89, and Mrs. Cobb, live in Wagoner." 

Officers of the K. S. A. C. Club of Muskogee are: 

S. E. Barnes, '16, president 

Ernest Anthis, '17, '18, vice-president. 

Estelle (Soupene) Crowthers, '10, secretary-treasurer, 537 N. 11th Street, Muskogee, Okla. 

T,os Angeles Alumni Association 

Eliza (Davis) Stringfield, '73, was the first president of the Los Angeles Alumni association, 
which was organized about 10 years ago. 

The Los Angeles club holds an annual picnic the first Saturday after commencement. 
For the past five years this picnic has been held at Sycamore Grove in Los Angeles, where the 
next annual meeting will be held this summer. Officers of the Los Angeles association are: 

F. H. Mayer, '09, president. 

C. C. Smith, '94, vice-president. 

Alice Allingham, '88-'91, secretary-treasurer, 5600 Monte Vista, Los Angeles, Calif. 

360 




1 ^ ^, 21,^^ 
Historical 






flip 

Bluemont Central College 

Bluemont Central college, the predecessor of the Kansas State Agricultural college, was 
the first educational institution chartered in Kansas territory, the charter being granted 
February 9, 1858. The college, which consisted of one building, Bluemont Central hall, was 
established by the Methodist Episcopal church of Kansas. In 1863 the college was ceded to 
the state for use as a land grant institution. The Bluemont college building was built on the 
college farm of 100 acres near the old site of the anti-hog cholera serum plant, which was located 
about a mile north of the college. The corner stone of the building, which was built of the 
native stone, was laid May 10, 1859, the construction of the building being in charge of J. H . 
Brous, the father of three college graduates. Included in Bluemont Central hall was a chapel, 
with curved ceiling and a cupola where hung the same bell that still rings from Anderson hall. 
The lettered arch and roof truss are now on the Marlatt farm, in the large stone barn owned by 
the college and used by the animal husbandry department. 

Hospital First Building 
The first building to be erected on the site of the present campus was one wing of a stone 
barn, which, under President Anderson's administration was used as a class room building. This 
first building was used for a long time as the armory. It is now occupied by th ■ agricultural 
engineering department. Though the first building to be constructed on the campus, this 
structure is not the oldest, for when the land was purchased by the college, the farm house which 
later was used by President Anderson and President Fairchild, as a residence, and is now used 
as the college hospital, came with it. That the buildings to be erected in the future might 
have appropriate landscape setting, a design for their location and the improvement of the 
campus was made in 1872 by Professor Henry Worral of Topeka, but his designs were never 
used. A second set of plans which provided for a semi-circular court of buildings was drawn up 
by Professor Maximilian Kern of Columbia, and his plans were the ones used in the first plant- 
ings made on the grounds. These plans were followed out by Professor E. A. Popenoe in planting 
the shelter belt and the main tree groups. 

361 



^QJ^^Z. J=>XSI^2=> 





First Building to Be Built on Campus 

Besides the building now used by the agricultural mechanics department which was built 
in 1872, three structures on the campus were completed before Anderson hall, which was the 
first of the semi-circular grouping of buildings. These other three buildings were the main 
part of the shops, built in 1876, the building now used as the chemistry annex, built in the same 
year, and the old horticultural hall now used as the illustrations building, built in 1877. 

The cornerstone of the north wing of Anderson hall was laid in 1878 and the wing completed 
in 1879. The central part of the hall was finished in 1882, and the south wing in 1884, both 
during President Fairchild's administration. An enlargement of the Chapel was made in 1887. 
The entire building was planned by Anderson, and the three wing construction was necessitated 
by the fact that it was impossible to secure sufficient appropriation for its entire construction 
during one fiscal period. E. T. Carr of Leavenworth was the architect for the principal structure, 
and the plans for the chapel addition were made by Prof. J. D. Walters. 

Later Buildings 

Fairchild hall was finished in 1894. Kedzie hall, at present the home of the cafeteria and 
the journalism department, was completed in 1897. The old agricultural hall, now used as the 
school of agriculture building was completed in 1900, and Denison hall in 1902. In 1904 both 
the auditorium and the dairy building were finished. The present horticultural building was 
completed in 1907, and the home economics hall and the veterinary building in 1908. In 1909 
the east wing of the engineering building was finished. In 1911 Nichols gymnasium was com- 
pleted and in 1912 one wing of the new agricultural building, Waters hall. In 1913 the stock 
barn was completed. Appropriations have been made for the construction of a cafeteria 
building to be completed by next fall and for the completion of the west wing of Waters hall, as 
well as for the construction of a girls' dormitory and of a building for veterinary clinics. The 
engineering building was completed in the fall of 1921. 

Throughout the construction of the various buildings, the old semi-circular group plan 
has been kept in mind, and with the completion of the cafeteria at the south entrance of the 
campus, it is planned to construct a drive which will emphasize the plan. 

In 1888 the city of Manhattan built a complete system of waterworks with a pumping 
station near the Blue River and a reservoir on Bluemont Hill. The fo'lowing winter the legis- 
lature appropriated $3,000 for an extension of the pipe line to the college and in July, 1889, the 
buildings, greenhouse and nursery plots were supplied with an abundance of water. This was 
a real factor in the experimental work of scientific agricultural research and afforded protection 
in case of fire. 

362 



l^C&C^ZZs l^TSR-J^Z^E 





The Campus when You and I Were Kids 
The excellent library of K. S. A. C. is of long standing. Early in the days of Bluemont 
college a library of nearly 3,000 volumes was accumulated, chiefly through the efforts of Mr. 
Goodnow, who wrote hundreds of letters to eastern publishers, philanthropists and personal 
friends asking for books. 

THE PRESIDENTS 

A broad understanding of the forces that have contributed to the growth of the Kansas 
State Agricultural college cannot be gained without a knowledge of the men whose lives have 
been bound up with the history of the institution. The Reverend Joseph Denison who was nom- 
inated to the presidency March 5, 1863, retained the position for ten years after the conversion 
of the old Bluemont college into a state school. 

During the administration of Denison a one-year preparatory course was offered. In the 
four years of the college course there were just four recitations a day. For two years and two 
terms, one was Latin and another Greek. These studies were replaced by "mental and moral 
sciences" during the rest of the course. There were four years of natural sciences and three 
of mathematics, rounded out in the fourth by more natural sciences. In 1864 President Denison 
instituted a three year agricultural course, including such practical subjects as soils, plant 
physiology, care of domestic animals, and horticulture. In 1868 a military course of 
five terms was added and the preparatory work was lengthened to three years. Later a 
course in veterinary medicine was added, but these changes were short lived. In 1871 a four 
year course in mechanic arts was added and the work in agriculture lengthened to four years 
with two years preparatory. Following his resignation in 1873 President Denison became the 
head of Baker university, Baldwin, Kansas. 

Upon the election of John A. Anderson to the presidency in 1873, ideas completely at vari - 
ance with those of the previous administration were adopted. The new board discontinued the 
school of literature and reorganized those of agricultural and mechanical arts. The college was 
one of the first to include instruction in manual training, which was made obligatory during 
Anderson's administration. It was during Anderson's administration, too, that the Industrialist 
was established. The first issue appeared April 24, 1875, and has been published continuously 
since that date. The Industrialist was at the time of its founding, and still is, edited by the 
faculty. 

John A. Anderson was a vigorous executive with keen insight into the possibilities of vo- 
cational education. The catalog of 1874 states: "Radical changes have been made since the 

363 




&lo>c^Zs ^>jyy^j=>j^^; s ^ ^ 



Ll^-L, uU»>-L 






Joseph Denison, 1863-1873 
publication of the last catalogue," and goes on to explain the value of practical training. Three 
courses are listed in the catalogue of 1874, one for farmers, one for mechanics and one for women. 
Each is six years in length and requires grammar school examinations or certificates for entrance. 
One hour of practical hand work is introduced. The courses are chartered, comparing the time 
given to three elements: 1. Practical work. 2. Knowledge used in practical work. 3. Aids 
to practical knowledge. The order of grouping was characteristic of Anderson. But resent- 
ment was stirred in the souls of many by these revolutionary ideas. Most of the students at 
this time lived in Manhattan, and the town was torn in factions "for" and "against" Latin, 
which had no place in the new curriculum. The feeling subsided when time proved the wisdom 
of the new president's policy. 

Later, as conditions called for economy, President Anderson felt it wise to reduce all the 
courses into one of only four years. During Anderson's administration attendance at chapel at 
8:30 each morning was compulsory. The rest of the morning until one o'clock was divided into 
fifty minute periods. 

This same system was continued with little change until the resignation of Anderson in 
1879, and all through the administration of President George T. Fairchild, which lasted until 
1897. The first elective course appeared in the announcements of 1890-91. 

In 1897 the brief sway of populism in Kansas resulted in the ousting of President Fairchild. 
His administration was more conservative than Anderson's, but under him the work did not 
lose any of the progressive character it had gained under Anderson. 

Thomas Elmer Will was chosen to take Fairchild's place. His administration lasted only 
two years. During this time the work was separated into four courses, agricultural, household 
economics, engineering, and general. Because the populist regime demanded more practical 
work in economics and political science, these subjects were increased 300 per cent. 

364 



I 




John A. Anderson, 1873-1878 

It was in 1899, during the administration of E. R. Nichols, 1899-1909, that short courses 
were first introduced at the college. A commercial creamery short course, a farmer's short course, 
and a general agricultural short course were offered. 

Dr. H. J. Waters became president in 1909. He organized the work of the college into 
five divisions, placing a dean at the head of each. The divisions organized at this time were 
agriculture, general science, home economics, mechanic arts and college extension. The summer 
school was lengthened and work was offered by all departments instead of by the home eco- 
nomics division alone. Entrance requirements were raised from four high school units to eight, 
and later to fifteen. The school of agriculture was organized with three year sub-collegiate 
courses in agriculture, mechanic arts, and home economics. Short courses were extended 
and developed. 

In 1918 Dr. W. M. Jardine succeeded Doctor Waters. Since the beginning of his adminis- 
tration courses in agricultural chemistry, biochemistry, industrial chemistry and rural commerce 
have been added. 

AGGIE TRADITIONS 
To talk of "starting an Aggie tradition" has a futile sound to the majority of folk to whom 
spontaneity is an inborn quality of true tradition. Perhaps, properly speaking, few of our 
Aggie traditions have sufficient age to be termed traditions, and are rather customs. Certainly 
two so-called traditions of the Aggie campus are little more than slogans which the students 
have lived up to with more or less faith. These are the slogans "No Smoking on the Campus'' 
which is in reality not a tradition at all, but is based on an act of the board of regents, and 

365 





George T. Fairchild, 1879-1897 

"Loyal Aggies Use the Walks," probably invented by some ingenious member of the horti- 
cultural department for the preservation of the campus beauties. On the whole it is probable 
that the first slogan has had the better observance. Its observance even stood the test of the 
S. A. T. C. days at which time it was infringed upon more than at any other. The "Loyal 
Aggies Use the Walks" slogan originated in the days when the first sidewalk on the campus was 
an old stone walk along Lovers Lane. This walk was used by the entire student body, as going 
any other way necessitated crossing what was then a corn field. Even at this time it was the 
aim of the faculty to have the students use the sidewalk instead of making unsightly paths 
across the campus, hence the slogan. The year 1906 saw the construction of concrete walks 
on the campus, the first being in front of Anderson hall. 

The tradition that the freshmen shall wear specially constructed caps during their first 
year in college, perhaps one of the most sturdily upheld of college traditions, was begun by 
the class of 1916 who of their own accord purchased and wore the caps. The class of 1917 re- 
fused to follow the example of the class of '16, but the class of '18 revived the custom and in the 
spring of 1915 freshmen caps were again seen on the campus. The caps were sold to the fresh- 
men by the sophomore class until 1921 when the sale of the caps was turned over to the ath- 
letic association. In the year 1919 the freshman class was unusually strong. When the upper- 
classmen tried to make them wear the caps they met with great resistance. Among the means 
of force used to compel the freshmen to wear the customary headgear were duckings in a large 
water tank. After a number of freshmen had been ducked they organized and ducked a number 
of the upper classmen, and also a young professor whom they took to be a sophomore. This 
organization was called the "Kan't Soak Me" club. Since at this time there was a mania for 
painting class signs on the campus and buildings and other conspicuous places, K. S. M. was 
given considerable publicity. The letters still remain on the arch above the entrance to 
Ahearn field. 

366 





Thomas E. Will, 1897-1899 

The custom that each class leave some sort of memorial, is one that has been generally 
observed at K. S. A. C. Sometime during the nineties one of the graduating classes decided 
that a tree planted on the campus would be a beautiful and lasting memorial, so a tree was 
planted. The graduating classes following liked the plan, and a tree was planted each year 
up to and including 1905. The tree planted by the class of 1904 was uprooted and burned by 
the juniors. The mystery of the location of the tree of the class of 1905 has been kept inviolate 
until recently when it was disclosed by Dean Harry Umberger of the extension division and Miss 
Gertrude Nicholson, who is connected with the department of horticulture. The tree, a pin 
oak, stands 25 yards south of the main walk and six feet west of the cinder path which inter- 
sects with it. The tree was secured from the horticultural department by J. B. Thompson 
Harvey Adams, Helen Bottomly, Mamie Cunningham, Gertrude Nicholson, Harry Umbereer' 
and Lena Finley. ' 

One of the causes of the cessation of the tree planting custom was the advent of the year 
book, but many classes have left some memorial. Some of these are, the stone pillars at the 
south entrance of the campus by the class of 1911; and those at the entrance of the athletic 
field, class of 1916; the lights in front of the auditorium and the gymnasium, 1912 and 1913- 
the drinking fountain in front of the home economics building, 1908; and the flag pole which 
was donated by the class of 1920. 

The College Colors 

The report of the committee on college colors which was made in 1896 was officially 
approved by the faculty in 1921. This official approval has served to disillusion the large pro- 

367 




&±03C^rZs J>TSRT>l^£^k 




Ernest R. Nichols, 1899-1909 

portion of students and alumni, who have believed that the college had two colors, purple 
and white. One color, the royal purple, is all that the college has. The white was the idea 
of some decorating committee. Officially, however, the college did not even have the purple 
until the faculty's action in 1921. The body that selected the colors, Miss Ina E v Holroyd 
of the college believes, was composed of two representatives from each class, but only four 
are known today. They are Frank Uhl, '96, now living near Las Cruces, New Mexico; Winifred 
Houghton Buck, '97, Topeka; Ina E. Holroyd, '97, K. S. A. C; and Minnie Copeland, '98, 
New York City. One color was chosen because it was believed that, as each of the classes 
had two colors, two would be superfluous. Thus the idea of brown and gold, sunflower colors, 
was discarded. Both because of the beauty of royal purple, and because it could not be found in 
use in any other school, it was finally selected as the official college color. 



Shepherd's Crook and Wooden Key 
The memory of each senior who has graduated since '98 probably holds a place for the 
shepherd's crook and the excitement which its presentation to the junior class always causes. 
The class of 1898 made a large shepherd's crook on which were tied the colors of the class. 
Upon graduation they presented the crook to the class of '99. When this class graduated the 
crook was offered to the class of 1900, but this class scorned to receive it, whereupon the class 
of '99 tied a piece of black crepe where the colors of the 1900 class should have been. A year 
later the crook was presented to the class of 1901 by a committee selected from the class of '99. 
Thereafter the crook was handed down by each graduating class to the class graduating the 
succeeding year until 1907. In the spring of this year the crook was stolen from the senior girl 

368 



I 




Henry J. Waters 1909-1918 

who was keeping it, by the sophomores, and was held by them until they graduated in 1909 
when it was presented to the next class. Although the presentation of the crook has resulted 
in considerable excitement it has been handed down at the junior-senior since that date. In 
1918 some sophomores again succeeded in stealing the crook from George Gibbons, and its 
hiding place was a mystery until the spring of 1920 when it was brought back at junior-senior 
prom and presented to the class of '21. In 1921 the ambitious sophomores once more laid 
plans to make themselves famous by capturing the crook, but while they watched for it to be 
handed out thru some door or window of the gym, the coveted symbol slid quietly along a wire 
above their heads to the home economics building and the juniors successfully guarded it until 
presented to the class of '23,, at the prom on April 28. 

The freshman key is a large wooden key made by the class of 1915 and given to the freshman 
class at the freshman-sophomore dance. The key was stolen in 1917 and did not reappear until 
1920. The sophomore class of 1921 made a duplicate key which was presented to the freshmen 
of that year. The original key was presented by the sophomores of 1920 to the freshmen of 
1920 and it is now held by that class. 

Probably the best established annual event which is held at K. S. A. C. is the oratorical 
contest which has been held every year since 1901. Contestants are chosen from the literary 
societies, now eight in number. Other annual affairs which have been held for a number of years 
are the May Fete under the auspices of the Y. W. C. A.; Aggie Pop Night, first held in 1916; 
and Roughneck Day, first held in 1917. 

Probably the most interesting feature of the annual May Fete is the crowning of the May 
Queen, who is usually elected by popular vote sometime before the day of the fete. At Aggie 

369 



Z^OK*3rJ£s JRXSl^l^l^. 




John Daniel Walters 

Professor of Architecture, Emeretus 

1876— 



Pop Night seven stunts are presented by organizations whose stunts have been voted on as 
most promising by a committee who judge the stunts in preparation some weeks before the date 
of Pop Night. A silver loving cup which was given by the Y. W. C. A. advisory board is the 
reward of the organization with the best stunt. To keep the cup as a permanent possession, an 
organization must take first place at Aggie Pop Night three times. Roughneck day which is 
celebrated on the Ides of March is a day of intense freedom, when classes are cut at pleasure 
and great informality of costume is allowable. 

The first Homecoming day was held October 23, 1915, the game with K.U. being the occa- 
sion for the celebration. Coach John Bender was head coach at that time and Guy Lowman 
was head of the athletic department. 

The junior-senior which was first held in 1910 originally took the form of a banquet, but in 
1915 the banquet was discarded as a feature of the entertainment and dancing now occupies 
a large portion of the evening.' 

The popularity contest which is conducted annually under the auspices of the Royal Purple 
was first held in 1915. In the first contest, the most popular girl, Ruth Hill, and the most 
popular man, Walter F. Smith, were elected. Since then no "most popular" man has been 
chosen. 

The senior pin design which is now used was adopted by the class of 1910. 

The present centralized system of registration was put into use in 1913. Before the advent 
of this system the students had enrolled at the offices of their respective deans, and considerable 
confusion had resulted. 

370 



F^C»C*3rZs 2>TSRI=>JLs^; 




i ^ ^, -2L^^m 




Top Row— Clarence Paul; F. A. Dawley, '95, G.; C. Williams, T.; Dr. H. G. Johnson, C; C. V. Holsinger, G. 
Center Row— J. B. Harman, T.; Dr. B. W. Conrad, F. B.; N. H. Will Q B ■ 
Bottorn Row— George Menke, H. B.; O. A. Otten, B. Kirkpatrick, E.: Bryan, W. E. 
Lying Down — Emmet Hoffman. 



During President Denison's administration, the faculty made a ruling that all students 
should attend church every Sunday or present an acceptable excuse. Roll call was taken in 
chapel on Monday mornings and each student was required to answer the roll by telling where 
he or she had attended church the day before. 

A public plowing match was a feature of the comencement exercises in 1880. 
The first ivy is believed to have been planted on the campus in 1879 by Prof. H. E. Van 
Deman, then professor of horticulture. 

The first roads of the campus were gravelled in 1883. 

The first trees in Lovers' Lane were planted before the land was a part of the campus. In 
1871 when the city of Manhattan bought a quarter section of land to re-locate the college, it 
purchased in that tract the beautiful homestead of Prof. Elbridge Gale who had preached trees 
so long that he was known as the orchard authority of central Kansas. The large maple trees 
that sentinel Lovers' Lane and the north college creek, and the cypresses and spruces directly 
north, were planted by the tree-loving professor before the college bought the land. The lane 
got its name about 1879. At that time it was actually a lane, three of four rods wide, fenced on 
both sides, and ran across the farm east and west. The old stone walk, since replaced by cinder, 
was the only access to the college grounds. 




371 



l^,03O?Zs *>ZSJ2lJ=> 



1 Q '2. -2j 

Historical 
^Hike's <Tl)Oice, Z3r)<i TAU-^Vggie "Jootball X3eam 





J L 

i F 



Top Row— Harvey Roots, '11, R. T.; "Bunt" Speer, '11, R. H.; "Jake" Holmes, '12, L. T.; Clemens Felps, '12, C. 
Center Row — Carl Roda, '20, L. G.; Carl Mallon, '07, L. H.; "Horsepower" Bates, Q. B. 

Bottom Row— Tom Sebring, '23, R. E.; Cool Blake, L. E.; Ray Hahn, '23, R. E.; Eddie Wells (Killed in the 
Argonne), F. B., Captain. 




The Campus When Papa Was a Boy 
372 



i^c&ozrjTs jf>tsi^z>z^^: 






Military 






The Kansas State Agricultural college is a land grant college, which under the law main- 
tains a course in the mechanical arts, practical agriculture and military science. 

Under the provision for maintaining a course in military science the War Department has 
established three (3) units of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps — namely: Infantry, Coast 
Artillery, and Veterinary. 

In the last war it was found that trained leaders, who knew something of the science of war 
were not available, and much of the delay was caused because of the necessity for training these 
leaders after war was declared. 

With England and France holding the enemy at bay this was possible; but in the war of 
the future with an enemy knocking at our gates, a serious situation would arise without leaders 
ready for battle. 

Realizing this, Congress created the Reserve Officers' Training Corps to be placed in col" 
leges, thereby making it possible for college graduates to receive military training, which would 
fit them to be officers in time of war. 

At present this college gives training to about 1,000 students each year. This training is 
an asset to the nation's scheme of national defense, as it is democratic. It is also beneficial to 
the individual student in many ways. 



373 






1 Q s, 2, 



(Ta6et JiM Officers 



Lieut. Col. C. C. McPherson 





Capt. R. C. Plyley, Reg. Adjt. 




Major J. C. Wingfield, 1st Bn. 



Major W. J. Bucklee, 2nd Bn. 




Major O. H. Aydellotte 



374 



ro>5*tZs jozsj^t^j^^; 




1 ^ 2, 2/ 



personnel 



*%*%-%*• # ♦' 




Firsi Bow— Sgt. M. Coffee, Sgt. Connolly, Capt. D. Norris, Capt. C. N. Jackson, 1st Lieut. J. 

V. Cole, Sgt. Wilson, Master Sgt. B. McCarey, Staff Sgt. F. Cumiskey. 
Second Row — Major L. C. Davidson, Major C. A. Chapman, Major F. B. Terrell, Major 

E. L. Claren. 



^&an6 





i ^ :2, 2, 



Compart? .A 




Capt. E. H. Willis 



1st Lieut. G. E. Stutz 



1st Lieut. B. E. Colburn 




I^O^C^TZy 2>XSRT=>Z^E 





(Tompait? ^ 






Capt. A. L. Austin 




2nd Lieut. H. C. Smith 



2nd Lieut. J. H. Neal 




"1 mMmSSSSSti IJ LSBfit a 







RO>OTjEs 2>Ty£2.T>Z^JE: 





1 Q ^, -2j^^m 



<Tontpart? £ 



^fc»=fe^ 




Capt. P. L. DePuy 




1st Lieut. W. J. Overton 



2nd Lieut. Nelson Barth 





1 ^ 2, 



(Tompatt? JF 






Capt. W. H. Koenig 




1st Lieut. F. Houlton 



2nd Lieut. H. B. Riley 




2^o3<z*?Zs j^zsi^t^z^je; 




ll fi Q sL"~g7l |M 



-■^^■< 



Compart? 3f 






Capt. V. R. Blackledge 



1st Lieut. H. I. Richards 



2nd Lieut. R. E. Regnier 







386 









Ol)£ Spirit of tl)£ 016 ^ften Survives 





Turn hack, turn back, oh ye pursuers of 
knowledge, to old Ben Franklin, and learn 
from him the simple lessons of the ages. 

In the matter of examinations the old 
printer is particularly wise. "He that knows 
nothing of it, may by chance be a prophet, 
while the wisest that is, may happen to miss," 
he says. Moral: don't cram; take a chance. 
But professors as well as students can draw 
comfort from him, for he also says, "The 
learned fool writes his nonsense in better 
language than the unlearned; but still 'tis 
nonsense;" and "Great talkers are little 
doers;" and "What signifies knowing the 
names, if you know not the nature of things?" 
Though he is great in knowledge of these 
matters, old Ben rises to a state of tran- 
scendent genius in giving a few final advices 
about taking tests. "Better slip with the foot 
than with the tongue;" and "The first de- 
gree of folly is to conceit one's self wise; the 

second to profess it; the third to despise counsel;" and finally, "Blessed is he 

that expects nothing for he shall never be disappointed." 

In the matter of high finance Poor Richard knows whereof he speaks. For 

instance, he says: "He that drinks fast pays 

slow," probably referring to coca-colas; and 

"Learning, whether speculative or practical, 

is in popular or mixed governments, the 

natural source of wealth and honor." Another 

side of the financial question will be of in- 
terest to Manhattan merchants. "He's gone 

and forgot but to say farewell — to his 

creditors." But then Manhattan merchants 

ought to remember that "There's none de- 
ceived but he that trusts." 

In matters of morals the old printer has 

some very definite opinions. "Be temperate 

in wine, in eating, girls, and sloth, or the gout 

will sieze you and plague you both;" and 

again he discourses wisely in the same vein, 

"Women & wine, Game & deceit, Make the 

wealth small and the wants great." The truth 

of "Keep flax from fire, youth from gaming," 

is especially realized when one has put too 

much confidence in two pairs, tens high. 




387 



I^OK^Zs 1=>IS12lJ>. 




[When the trousers of the old suit have gotten 
thin, and new suits are shouting at one from 
every store window let him memorize this and 
S" ^^v repeat it over and over: "Fond pride of dress 

is sure an empty curse: E're fancy you con- 
sult, consult your purse." And lastly let all 
Vets remember that "He that lies down with 
dogs shall rise up with fleas." 

As to affairs of the heart, old Ben gives 
much sound advice. To parents he says, 
"Marry your son when you will, but your 
daughter when you can." Girls will find their 
own porch-swing opinions reinforced by 
"Though modesty is a virtue, bashfulness is 
a vice;" and perhaps they are not so sure that 
"Men and melons are hard to know." But 
surely they will concede the truth of "Keep 
your eyes wide open before marriage, half 
shut afterwards;" "One good husband is 
worth two good wives; for the scarcer things 
are the more they're valued;" and lastly, 

"Let the maid servant be faithful, strong, and homely." 

But it is to men that Franklin offers most of this tender wisdom. "He that 

goes far to marry will either deceive or be deceived," which means do your 

trading at home; "Would you persuade speak of interest, not reason," or talk in 

terms of mahogany suites and forget that dad has always footed the bills; 

"Happy's the wooing that's not long a-doing," which brought up-to-date means 

to make it short and snappy; "You can 

bear your own faults, and why not a 

fault in your wife," or don't be mean, let 

her smoke too; "A man without a wife 

is but half a man," and generally no man at 

all in her opinion after a year of married life. 

But with all of these remember that "He that 

takes a wife, takes care;" and "Why does the 

blind man's wife paint herself?" and "If 

Jack's in love, he's no judge of Jill's beauty;" 

and that "Three things are men most likely to 

be cheated in, a house, a wig, and a wife." 

A fitting summary of marriage from the mas- 
culine view point is this: "Epitaph on scolding 

wife by her husband, 'Here my poor Bridget's 

corpse doth lie, she is at rest — and so am I.' " 
Finally, is it possible old Benjamin was 

thinking of unmarried members of the 

ancient and honorable teaching profession 

when he said: "Old maids lead apes there, 

where the old bachelors are turned to apes?' " 





38S 






ZjTJF2,J=>lL,JEy^ ^ 




STUDIO ROYAL 




* 



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<9% 



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* 



photos bu 
STUDIO ROYAL 




Photos by 
STUDIO ROYAL 



r" 




f^hotos by 
STUDIO ROYAL 




photos by 
STUDIO ROYAL 




Photc: *y 
STUDIO ROYAL 




rz> JF>U r l^T>Z^JE'^m 




Z^C&C*?Zs 2>ZSI^2=>2^jE:a 




{ROK^Zs j>tsrt> 



1 Q ^, 2^^^ 




Crowning ihc Qwatu 





t ^^^m ^OJ^Z, J^ISI^l^J^^ 




E. F. Stalcup, E. E. Hodgeson, Elizabeth Dickens, N. D. Bruce, E. P. Mauk 
Louise Manglesdorf, A. J. Englund, C. C. McPherson, Anna Best 
E. H. Coles, Maude Lahr, C. W. Howard 

Charles W. Howard .Editor 

Embert H. Coles . Business Manager 

Maude E. Lahr Treasurer 

Chas. C. McPherson ...Advertising Manager 

E Perle Mauk Associate Editor 

E. F. Stalcup Athletic Editor 

Arnold J. Englund Organization Editor 

Anna L. Best Women's Athletic Editor 

E. E. Hodgson Military Editor 

Elizabeth Dickens Historical Editor 

Louise Mangelsdorf Feature Editor 

Neal Bruce Art Editor 



401 




I^LC&C^Zs 





1 Q ^. 2, 




^Acknowle6smeitt 




This Historical Volume of the Royal Purple was made possible 
only by the heartiest cooperation of faculty, students, and or- 
ganizations. We take this opportunity to thank those who have 
assisted so kindly in gathering material and planning the Annual. 

We especially want to thank Miss Louise Everhardy who ar- 
ranged snap shot pages and assisted in choosing the color scheme 
of the book. Others who attributed much to the success of this 
publication, in a business as well as editorial manner, are: Prof. 
N. A. Crawford, Prof. H. W. Davis, Prof. J. W. Searson, Dean 
J. T. Willard, Prof. Albert Dickens, Miss Ada Rice, Asso. Prof. 
E. T. Keith, and Asso. Prof. C. E. Rogers. 

The plan of the book is conservative. We have tried to get 
something of every happening of interest during the year. We 
started early and continued late. After going to press, we have 
pulled a page, and on next to the last page you will find the 
story of the Stadium Drive. 

We have done our best to keep this volume free from errors. 
We have not succeeded, but trust that we have reduced them to a 
minimum. Some of the copy that came to us was illegible, much 
of it was late, and in a few cases we were ignored and had to gathe r 
what we could. We have labored long and faithfully, and hope 
our errors will be excused and our effort accepted. 



405 



i 




1 o 2, 2, 




As the U.S. Veterans' Bureau dopes 

MAIN STREET, 1930 



Get all you can — 

CThat may sound as though we're 
telling you to be selfish; what we 
mean is, that when you pay out your 
money lor clothes, you ought to try 
to get all the value possible. It isn't 
selfishness; it's good sense. 

CBecause we expect you to do that, 
we give more than other stores, in 
quality, style, and lower prices. 

Society Brand 

and 

Hart Schaffner & Marx 

Clothes 

<LThey are the means we use to give 
you all we can and to assure you ol 
getting all you can. 

C.If you don't get what you think 
you should — money back. 

THE BIG DOWNTOWN STORE 

STEVENSON CLOTHING 
COMPANY 

Successors to E. L. KNOSTMAN CLOTHING CO. 




409 



Everything in 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

TRI ELECTRIC CO. 

"Let Us Figure Your Wiring Job" 

CHAS. W. SHAVER 
ARCHITECT 

Sauna, Kansas 
i 

Class of '15 




If you want to play 
A REAL GAME 
OF TENNIS start 
right by using a 
REAL TENNIS 
RACKET. 

Get a 

THUNDERBOLT 

The racket with the rawhide 
reinforced frame, $13.50 



lliott 



SPORTING GOODS EXCLUSIVELY 
Kansas City, Missouri 



C. E. FLOERSCH, President 

E. M. BELL, Cashier 

L. J. MACK, Ass't Cashier 



CHAS. D. MIDDLETON, Vice-President 
DON L. ABINGTON, Ass't Cashier 
R. C. BARR, Ass'tJCashier 



UNION NATIONAL BANK 

MANHATTAN, KANSAS 
CAPITAL and SURPLUS, $120,000.00 



C. E. FLOERSCH 
CHAS. D. MIDDLETON 



DIRECTORS 

H. W. BREWER 
S. A. BARDWELL 



L. R. EAKIN 
H. W. ALLMAN 



Interest Paid on Time Deposits and Savings Accounts 



the HALLMARK S- 



mmffcssm 1 



«JEWEI^EI^» 



MANHATTAN, ^*— ' ^ KANSAS. 



One s Character 
and Likeness 
reflected in the 
camera with 
thought and art 
is the effort of 
the 



Studio T^oyal 

"PORTRAITS OF DISTINCTION" 
1 101 MORO STREET PHONE 574 
MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



IF YOU WANT TO BE RICH, GIVE! 

IF YOU WANT TO BE POOR, GRASP! 

IF YOU WANT ABUNDANCE, SCATTER! 

IF YOU WANT TO BE NEEDY, HOARD! 
BUT 

IF YOU WANT Quality, Service and Satisfaction 

in all of your 

PRINTING and ENGRAVING 

take it to 

The *Art-Qraft 

"EXCLUSIVE COLLEGE PRINTERS" 

Phone 796 106-a N. Third 



WHAT THEY SAY IN THE SPRING 
Freshman: "Look, we have come through." 

Sophomore: "We'll have to pay for the Junior-Senior prom next year.' ! 
Junior: "Wonder how it feels to a Senior." 
Senior: "I want a job." —Albert Meade 



J. L. JOHNS 





Ice 


Cream 




Sherbets 






Ices 




Students, we thank you for 


your 


patronage, may 


we serve 


you 


again next 


year. 


1201 


Moro 












Phone 890 



Seniors 



We congratulate you most 
sincerely upon graduation 
and we will allways wel- 
come you back. 



COLLEGE 
BOOK STORE 



Chappell's Ice Cream 

for your parties, picnics 

and socials. — Put up 

in any quantity 

at reasonable 

prices. 



CHAPPELL 
CREAMERY 
COMPANY 

Phone 142 118 North Fourth St. 



CThere is a certain 

« 

touch of smartness 
and in divid ualty, 
which distinguishes 
our shoes from ALL 
others. 



"Your Hosiery Shop" 




Tour Comfort and ^Pleasure 
is Our Business 

The Gillett Hotel extends to 
college visitors hospitality and 
service which is distinctive. 

It offers to students and organ- 
izations a most adequate and 
pleasing service for banquets 
and special parties. 

%aiti (StUrtt 

"S afe ty in Service' 



No Matter What Your 

Style Preference — You 

can be Suited in 

K A H N 

MADE TO MEASURE CLOTHES 

Your individuality will be expressed 
not repressed — your physical "good 
points" will be emphasized. 

McGILLICUDDY 

"AUTHORIZED DEALER" 



HULL'S 
HARDWARE 

The Best in the Line 



104 N. Third 



Manhattan 



"Watch Our Windows'" 



406 Poyntz 



Phone 49 




Fas hion Park and ^rTZ^ 
Harvard Clothes 




ffiAgffllllON 



dLwinffliiEws 



Athletic Goods for Every Sport 



UAT rAo>INU.1 rMlll 



GIVIN CLOTHING CO. 

FASHION PARK CLOTHIERS 
Manhattan, Kansas 



WATCHES 



DIAMONDS 



JEWELRY 



Maddock and Zerby 
JEWELERS 

Cjoods of Quality 



MANHATTAN CAFE 

Good Food 

at 

Popular Prices 

E. A. Brockman 

404 Poyntz 



The MARTINS FLORISTS 

Marshall Building 

Phones 56 and 92 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS' 1 



COTTAGE BEAUTY SHOP 

Wanda Hisle 

Scalp Treatments a Specialty 
also Marceles, Shampoos, Hair Dress- 
ing and Facials 
523 Poyntz Phone 1155 



JOHN DEERE PLOWS 

ARE THE 
STANDARD OF THE WORLD 



REMIND ^ 
YOU " 



OUR BUSINESS 
IS PRESSING 



Cleaning 

Pressing 

Repairing 
Hat Work 
Tailoring 
Dyeing 



CROWDERS 

Phone 503 

1109 Moro, Manhattan, Kans. 




The "GENTEEL" 

15 ruby jewels, adjusted movement 
RK67G — 8?4 ligne, 14-kt. green gold, plain 

case % 75.00 

RK67 3 4 G— 8*4 ligne, 14-kt. green gold, hand 

chased bezel and center 87.50 

Also in 18-kt. white gold, prices range from $80 to $165 



}. A. H O L L I S 

Jeweler & Optometrist 



113 S. Fourth 



Manhattan, Kans. 




Bank Note Ritildinz 



We Specialize in 

School Annuals 



This Annual is a Sample of Our Work 



Our organization of craftsmen 
is trained to produce the best. 
Modern and thorough equip- 
ment furnish the tools to make 
the finished product perfect. 



We produce the best of letter- 
press printing, offset litho- 
graphing, steel engraving and 
embossing, copper-plate and 
direct-mail advertising service. 



Union Bank Note Company 

FRANKLIN D. CRABBS, President 

Tenth and Central Kansas City, Mo. 



Dewey Grocery Company 


HIKING and LUNCH GOODS A SPECIALTY 


We Deliver 


Any Place 


Phones 213 - 342 


1208 Moro 


WE ARE BACKING 

THE AGGIES AND 


The COLLEGE CANTEEN 


THE STADIUM 


for— 




SERVICE and 


Brewers Book Store 


BEST of EATS 


Poyntz Ave. Manhattan 


N. S. SPANGLER, Proprietor 


Run No Risk— Be Sure 




It's Lisk Twins 
Quick Service Lowest Prices 


&&Z4Z&& 


_/^ ili'il'l'j i f* imm 


1212 Moro — Aggieville 




Phone 533 12th and Moro 


COLLEGE TAILOR SHOP 




W. P/Barber 


FINK ELECTRIC CO. 


The Oldest — The Largest — The Best 


Electrical Goods - Mazda Lamps 


CLEANING, 
....■• PRESSING 
ALTERING 


Shelf Hardware 
and Bicycle Sundries 


The Place Where Satisfaction Is 

Guaranteed 

Phone 398 1202 Moro 



The 



"NEW EDISON" 

is the only phonograph 
which sustains the drastic 
test of direct comparison. 

For Men 

When your mind is overtaxed 
and your body tired, 
take complete rest on a 

SEALY MATTRESS 

A pillow for the whole body 




For Women 

The greatest labor saving device 
that the world has ever known, 

"HOOSIER" 



We Invite You to Our Store 



Manhattan Furniture & Undertaking Co. 



PHONE 209 





ouchdoibti 



Tfas passed 



United States Depository 

The First National Bank 

Manhattan, Kansas 

Capital - - $100,000.00 
Surplus and Profits, - $110,000.00 

Interest Paid on Savings Accounts 
and Time Certificates 

DEPOSITES GUARANTEED 



Officers 
Geo. S. Murphey ----- -President 

W. D. Womer - - - - Vice-President 

C. F. Little - Vice-President 

J. C. Ewing ----- - - Cashier 

M. S. Spencer - Assistant-Cashier 

F. C. Romig - - - . Assistant-Cashier 
Don H. Wageman - - Assistant-Cashier 

Directors 

Geo. S. Murphy C. F. Little E. A. Wharton 

J. C. Ewing Geo. W. Washington H. P. Wareham 

C. M. Breese W. D. Womer 



SKILLKRAFTERS 

(incorporated) 
"Honor, Quality and Sincere Service" 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE 

engravers, stationers, jewelers 



Commencement and Wedding Invitations, 

Class and Fraternity Pins and Rings, 

Dance Programs, Menus and 

Favors, Die Stamped 

Stationery 



Samples on Request 



Philadelphia, 



Pennsylvania 



HATS 



We guarantee satisfaction on cleaning and 
reblockin? ladies' and gentlemen's hates 



GILLETT HAT WORKS and SHINING PARLOR 

For Your Convenience 

THE PINES CAFETERIA 

BANQUETS AND SPECIAL PARTIES 
We Take Orders for Home Made Pies and Cakes 



1120 MORO 



PHONE 167 



"Place for Everything'' 

Orderly habits identify the successful man or woman. They profit by the 
old rule of "A place for everything and everything in its place." 

We frequently hear of people however, who have not learned that the place 
for money is in the bank. The report comes that they have been robbed or 
that their savings have been destroyed by fire. 

BANK YOUR MONEY HERE! USE OUR SAFE DEPOSIT BOX! 

The Farmers and Stockmens State Bank 



HART SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES 

ARROW SHIRTS MALLORY HATS 

HOWARD AND FOSTER SHOES 

Elliot's Clothing Store 



Quayle Quality 
QUAYLE AND SON, Inc. 

Steel Engravers to American Universities 

Class Jewelry and Commencement Stationery 
ALBANY, N. Y. 

Samples of Wedding Stationery upon Request 

CORRRECT FORMS MODERATE COSTS 



Stockmen 



You will find it to your benefit 
to ship your cattle, hogs, and sheep 
to us ' when you send them to 
market, and to buy your stockers 
and feeders through us when fill- 
ing your feed lots. 

Ask your Agricultural college 
about our ability and integrity. 



John Clay and Company 

LIVE STOCK COMMISSION 
STOCK YARDS 



CHICAGO. ILL. 

SOUTH OMAHA. NEB. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 

OGDEN. UTAH 

SOUTH ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

SIOUX CITY. 1A. 



DENVER. COLO. 
EL PASO. TEXAS 
SOUTH ST. PAUL. MINN. 
EAST BUFFALO. N. Y. 
EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. 




1 23 



Rhabdomancy 

Sounds like the name of some outlandish and invariable fatal disease; 
but it is only the official name for the use of the divining rod. 

From time immemorial certain persons have claimed the power to dis- 
cover water and minerals beneath the earth by the manipulation of a witch- 
hazel twig. In superstitious quarters the belief still persists. 

A lot of folks expect to discover the treasurers of life by magic or good 
luck rather than by earnest application to its eternal principles. 

No divining rod is needed to discover good merchandise. The selection 
of the right store is all that is necessary. 

Cole Bros. Dry Goods Co. 



The Store Where Students Buy Their Wearing 
Apparel for Fall, Winter and Spring. 



HICKEY-FREEMAN CLOTHES 

WITH A WORLD WIDE REPUTATION 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS OF A HIGH QUALITY 

ROGERS CLOTHING STORE 

1222 MORO AGGIEVILLE 



Leadership 

Real leadership comes only through 
service; it endures only through service. 
By its service to farm families of Kansas 
through more than a quarter century, 
Kansas Farmer and Mail & Breeze 
maintains its leadership in its field. 
Here are a few "high lights" of its 
predominance. 



—It reaches twice as many farm fami- 
lies in Kansas as any other strictly 
farm paper. 

—In 1921 it carried more advertising 
than any other farm paper or farm 
. newspaper in this territory. 

—It carries more livestock advertising 
and more land advertising than any 
other farm publication in this 
territory. 

—It has a more complete Farm Home 
Department, and a more complete 
editorial service than any other 
farm publication for Kansas. 

—In 1921 it carried more news about 
dairying, more about implements, 
more about tractors, more about 
electricity than any other farm 
publication in this territory. 

—In 1921 it carried more advertising 
for automobiles, motor trucks, build- 
ing materials, clothing, engines, trac- 
tors, farm supplies, financial, hard- 
ware and cutlery, silverware, heating 
and water systems, electric lighting 
systems, paints and varnishes, silos 
and cutters, stock foods, real estate, 
and livestock than any other farm 
publication in this territory. 

-Last year it far outstripped all other 
farm publications for Kansas in the 
amount of letters and other editorial 
matter written by farmers, and also 
in news of county farm bureaus. 



It Pays to Read 
The Real Farm Paper of Kansas 



KANSAS FARMER 

AND MAIL & BREEZE 

Arthur Capper, Publisher 

Topeka, Kansas 



A Word of Appreciation 

WE wish to thank the members of the 
class of 1922 for the generous pat- 
ronage extended us during the four years 
they have been in Manhattan. We have 
appreciated this and have endeavored to 
give the kind of service and the quality 
that makes each purchase one of mutual 
satisfaction. If we have succeeded in our 
aim, kindly tell the many Freshmen whom 
you send to K. S. A. C. next fall. 



Co-Operative Book Store 

Distributors of Senior Caps and Gowns for 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

MANHATTAN HIGH SCHOOL 



"He who cannot smile, ought not to keep a shop." 

— Chinese Proverb 



I 



You will always be assured of courteous 
treatment and willing service at 



THE A. V. LAUNDRY and DRY CLEANERS 



Phone 701 for the Yellow Wagon 



Aggieville 



Time is ^hConey 

Welcome is that individual 

who appreciates the value 

of another s time. 

OUR AIM IS TO DELIVER 

What you want 

Where you want it 
WHEN you want it 

FOUR DELIVERIES EACH DAY 

Shafer Grocery 
and Market 

Where quality and service 
reign supreme. 



We Save You Money on 
PIANOS AND PLAYERS 

Our One Price, No Commission 
Plan of Selling is the reason. 

NEW PIANOS 

$285 and up. 

NEW PLAYERS 
$365 and up. 

EASY PAYMENTS IF DESIRED 

Southwestern distributors for the 

STEINWAY PIANO and 

DUO-ART PIANOLA. 

Call or Write 

J.W.JENKINS'SONS 
MUSIC CO. 




1015 Walnut St. 



Kansas City, Mo. 






TRANSPORTATION 



MAIN PLANT 
^GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

A Gateway to Progress 

There it stands — a simple forty-foot 
gateway but unlike any other in the en- 
tire world. Through it have come many 
of the engineering ideas that have made 
this an electrical America. 

The story of electrical development 
begins in the Research Laboratories. 
Here the ruling spirit is one of know- 
ledge — truth — rather than immediate 
practical results. In this manner are 
established new theories — tools for fu- 
ture use — which sooner or later find 
ready application. 

The great industries that cluster 
around Niagara Falls, the electrically 
driven battle ships, the trolley cars and 
electrified railways that carry millons, 
the household conveniences that have 
relieved women of drudgery, the labor- 
saving electricol tools of factories, all 
owe their existence, partly at least, to 
the co-ordinated efforts of the thousands 
who daily stream through this gateway. 





General Office 



ctric 

Schenectady, 
N. Y. 

95-48GF 



fcjjfegWjtaesf 




\ ELECTRIFICATION 



FARM ELECTRIFICATION 



HOME 
CONVENIENCES 




family* 



The Qroverbkd 

Hose 



Gome 
you $ewru 



Our ~£ast Word 



The Royal Purple is essentially a student publication, but 
without the cooperation of the business men of the city of Man- 
hattan and of the state of Kansas it would be impossible to publish 
a book of the desired quality. When these people were solicited 
for advertising we received the best of support. It is, indeed, a 
pleasure to work with such men. We can express only in a small 
way, our sincere appreciation of the patronage so willingly 
extended by our advertisers. 



l.ji 



Oable of (Torttents 



COLLEGE 

Views 9 

Administration 25 

CLASSES 

Senior 43 

Junior 79 

Sophomore 97 

Freshman Ill 

School of Ag 119 

FIGHTING 

AGGIE TEAMS 

Pepsters 125 

Coaches (Athletics) 126 

Football 129 

Basketball 139 

Track 143 

Baseball , 151 

Intra-Mural. ..' .. .U r :i ... ... 156 

Women's Athletics 159 

Rifle Team 167 

Debate 168 

Oratory 171 

Stock Judging 172 

Dairy Judging 173 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 

Intersociety Council 175 

Societies 178 

Snaps 194 

GREEKS 

Sororities 203 

Fraternities 221 

Snaps 256 

HONORARY AND 
PROFESSIONAL 273 

ORGANIZATIONS AND 
ACTIVITIES 

Cooperative Clubs 295 

General 302 

Religious 335 

ALUMNI AND HISTORY 

Alumni 349 

History 361 

MILITARY 373 

FEATURE 
Spirit of Old Ben Survives .387 

Aggie Girls 389 

What Not? 397 

ADVERTISING 408 



430 



Stadium 



The twenty-two hours ending at 9 :00 a.m, April 26, 1922, marked an epoch in the history of 
the Kansas State Agricultural college. During that time the students and faculty of the college 
assured a Memorial Stadium on Ahearn field. In a quick, enthusiastic, and decisive campaign 
the students raised $76,000, and the faculty raised $25,000, of the $350,000 which the completed 
Memorial will cost. 

All but $10,000 of the student contributions was contributed at the Student Memorial 
Assembly called by Charles C. McPherson, president of the S. S. G. A. Council and chairman of 
the Student Memorial committee. Speeches by Prof. H. H. King, chairman of the General 
Memorial Stadium committee, Mike Ahearn, physical director, Coach Charles W. Bachman, 
and W. A. Biby, of Topeka, father of Ernestine Biby, '20, were followed by the appeal from 
McPherson for funds. 

"You know the situation," McPherson said, "It is up to us to decide whether we will have 
a Memorial Stadium or not. I am going to ask all who will contribute to the stadium to rise." 

It looked as if the entire audience arose. Ushers distributed pledges which were signed 
and turned in immediately. The total contributions made at that assembly were $66,000- 
By 9:00 the next morning this was increased to $75,000. A holiday was declared by McPherson 
and approved by President W. M. Jardine. A parade over most of Manhattan practically 
marked the close of the campaign so far as the students were concerned. 

Seventy-nine college organizations were the backbone of the Memorial Stadium campaign. 
A checking of the subscripions on April 27th showed that fifty:two organizations pledged 
100% of their members in the drive. These organizations are: Acacia, A. I. 
E. E., Alpha Beta, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Psi, Alpha Tau Omega, Alpha Zeta, 
Architect's club, Athenians, Men's Athletic fraternity, Beta Theta Pi, Block and 
Bridle, Chi Omega, Dairy Club, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Zeta, De Molay 
club, Edgerton club, Fairchild club, Farm House, Hamiltons, Kappa Delta, Kappa Phi Alpha, 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Kappa Sigma, Klix club, Life Service League, Men's Pan Hellenic, 
Phi Delta Tau, Omicron Nu, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa, Pi Beta Phi, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi 
Kappa Delta, Scabbard and Blade, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Delta Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma 
Phi Epsilon, Sigma Tau, Theta Sigma Phi, Topeka club, Triangulars, Webster, Women's Ath- 
letic K fraternity, W. A. A., Women's Pan Hellenic, Zeta Kappa Psi. 

Three hundred fifty members of student teams organized by divisions put over the cam" 
paign among the students following the special assembly. Working under McPherson as di- 
rector were the following majors in charge of teams in their division: 

Division of Agriculture Tim Murphy 

Division of Engineering R. C. Spratt 

Division of General Science Ruth Peck, Paul McConnell 

Division of Home Economics Marian Brookover 

Division of Veterinary Science Tim Foley 

School of Agriculture Paul Briggs 

H. H. King was director of the faculty campaign. The division teams were in charge of 
Dean F. D. Farrell, Agriculture, Dean Roy A. Seaton, Engineering; Dean J. T. Willard, 
General Science; Dean Helen B. Thompson, Home Economics; Dean R. R. Dykstra, Veterinary 
Medicine, and Cliff Stratton, Alumni Secretary. 



431 




Ol)e tfinisfy