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Full text of "Susquehanna - Student Newspaper (Vol. 36; Nos. 1-29)"

THE 
SUSQUEHANNA 



Apr. 1929 

to 
Apr. 1930 



^ J 




I Wl*Hi> I> 



TIIK DEBATERS 



The susqueh ANNk rr " 



Volume XXXV 




•1 -^'tXl^lA't 



5ROVE. PA.. T 



I'EfflVAY. 



APRIL 30, 19-19 



Number 1 



Seibert Hall Enjoys Dr. Driver Lectures 
Moonlight Serenade On Hoosier Poet 



STUDENTS TAKE NOTICE 



Fair Co-Eds Given Relief From Real- 
ities of the Day by Inspired 
Orchestra 



Former Indiana Resident Explains Life 

of Riley, and Reads His Most 

Important Works 



Seibert Hall in particular and the en- 
tire University in general were on the 
receiving end of a tuneful and melod- 
ious serenade played by a group of en- 
terprising embryo musical artists from 
Hassinger Hall and broadcasted from 
an impromptu radio station on Steele 
Science Hall steps, last Monday night 

Serenades are generally given di- 
rectly beneath the windows of the 
"ones" for whom the serenades are in- 
tended. But this one was given from 
one of the most distam corners of the 
campus. Just why such a place as 
Steele Science Hall should be selected 
for the locale of the presentation is al- 
most beyond human comprehension. 
The serenade, although heard all over 
the campus, in fraternity houses, and 
even down town, was ostensibly meant 
for the fair co-eds. Nevertheless, the 
obliging young men of staid Hassinger 
Hall presented their pleasing concert of 
popular air from a vantage point far 
across the campus. The reason for this 
is not known, but detectives and news- 
paper men working on the case have 
propounded the theory that these boys 
must have lacked the proper sartorial 
vestiture to make themselves present- 
able to the fair listeners-in. 

It all began in one of the rooms on 
the third floor of the dormitory made 
famous by many student escapades. 
One of Susquehanna's most promising 
orchestras was rehearsing for a concert 
to be given in the near future. Inspired 
by the fragrance of Spring in the air 
(Concluded on Page 4> 



Dr. Lee Driver, a member of the De- 
partment of Public Instruction of 
Pennsylvania, delivered a very enter- 
taining and instructive lecture on 
•James Whitcomb Riley" in Seibert 
Chapel Hall last Tuesday night, under 
the auspices of Pi Gamma Mu Nation- 
al Honorary Social Science Fraternity. 

Born and reared in the community 
in which Riley was reared, and living 
on adjoining farms. Dr. Driver spoke 
from authority which came as a result 
of close association with Riley's 
people, which added to the interest of 
the lecture. 

Dr. Driver presented a short sketch 
of Riley's life, interspersed with amus- 
ing anecdotes with regard to his ex- 
periences in life. 

The Hoosier people who inhabit In- 
diana. Dr Driver explained, are a mix- 
ture of Yankees from New England. 
Pennsylvania Germans, and Southern 
Huguenots, who migrated to that sec- 
tion of country and settled there. Riley 
was one of these Hoosieis and is one 
of their favorites. 

Like many other writers. Riley, some- 
times known as "the Lazy Poet." be- 
gan his career m journalism, the lec- 
turer said. He first wrote under an as- 
sumed name, but in a short time was 
forced to divulge his identity by popu- 
lar demand His first, and probably his 
most important work, was the "Ole 
Swimmin' Hole." so familiar to the 
boys. This was followed by the "Frost 
is on the Pumpkin," "Pictures of Pio- 
( Concluded on Page 4> 



♦ 
i 

| It is evident from the number of! 
I students who pay daily visit- to the ♦ 
J library to study and to read maga- 1 
tzlnes, newspapers and books, that I 
{ this latest addition to the physical { 
I equipment of our university, is be- 1 
| lng appreciated. But, as usual, there { 
t are the few who are selfish and j 
| thoughtless in their afctions in the J 

• library, as well as other places on t 
I the campus. Seme make It a meet- J 

• lng place for a f rien ily chat and • 
{disturb those who areltrying to ac- 1 

• complish something. But worse than I 
{ these are the studentslwho deliber- 1 

• ately and intentionally mutilate • 



"All a Mistake" is S. I. Debaters 
Presented bv '29 



S 



peak Over Radio 



Comedy Drama is Produced by Senior 

Class — Directed by Professor 

Nathan Nesbitt Keener 



J newspapers and maga; 
• ting out anything of 



nes by cut- i 
pecial 



inter- • 



| est. This is a seriou: offense, as J 
| he State statutes make anyone com- • 
I muting such acts liabl i to a heavy ^ 
| fine, lengthy imprisons .ent. or both. » 
I Copies of this law b kve been re- j 
jceived and will be polled. Hereaf-j 
I ter, it will be strictly enforced with ( 
•no respecting of persons. All the J 
I magazines which are bought through j 
{the library and placed on the refer- { 
» nee shelf are of the flljst water and» 
{ need to be preserved for future } 
I binding. The equipment of the lib- » 

irary is too important and too val- 1 
uable to permit a fev. unthinking I 
{students to destroy It to the disad- { 
I vantage of the majority. Some of » 
{these magazines cannot be replaced. { 
• but if they can. the expense does not » 
{warrant it. { 

It is to be hoped that student | 
opinion will oppose such actions and { 
will call all violators of the law to f 
{account for their actions. 
( 



Negative Debaters Sigma Sigma Delta 
On Extensive Tour To Present a Play 



Orange and Maroon 
Nine Wins and Loses 
In Doubteheader 



"All a Mistake," a modern three-act 

comedy drama was presented'in Seibert 
Chapel Hall by the Senior Class, last 
Thursday night. The play was directed 
by Professor Nathan Nesbitt Keener, 
head of the Department of Public 
Speaking, and managed by Henry Car- 
ichner. president of the class. The 
cast : 

Captain Obadiah Skinner, a retired 
sea captain. J. Stanley Smith; Lieut. 
George Richmond, his nephew. Wilfred 
Groce; Richard Hamilton, a country 
gentleman, Joseph Means, Jr.: Ferdi- 
nand Lighthead, a neighbor. Thomas 
Dixon; Nellie Richmond. George's wife. 
Helen Auchmuty; Nellie Huntingdon, a 
friend. Mary Shaffer: Cornelia Nellie 
Obadiah's sister, Mary Rover; 
Mclntyi ant, Kathryn 

Ian. 

We commend the Senior Class for re- 
viving the custom of producing Senior 
tys, a custom which was not 
followed during the last two or three 
years. 1. ol this play 

marks a new interest in the drama and 
sets a model for other classes to follow, 
to be hoped that other classes and 
organization.-- will follow the example 
Of the Class of Twenty-nine and pre- 
sent their histrionic talent in theatrical 
productions of some kind. 

The play Thursday night was pri- 
marily one of comic situation. The 
comedy, however, was genuine and not 
of the slapstick type. Nor were the sit- 
i Concluded on Page 4> 



Forensi< Contest is Broadcast by Two 

Teams — Telephone Messages and 

Letters Received by Manager 

lams 

ed a forensic contest from 
n WHP. Harrisburg, "the Radio 
Voice of Central Pennsylvania," April 
25. from ten o'clock until midnight. It 
was conducted along tegular American 
procedure. 

The debated the same question they 

have used in all the ■ -.hate 

debate.- this season. Only cne man on 

nted rebuttal. Frank 

• presented the rc'J i the 

n and Waiter Foulkrod, 

mative. 

They debated the same question they 

radio Russel 

: the 
nd Daniel Donnell. Byron 
' 

?:.: . eon- 

ducted tl an- 

He mad ictory 

remarks prior to the deb. .. I then 

each 
• • the 
phone. H : ' of 

! debating at the 

were prepai .. I ittaL 

Duri • of the debate, 

numerous teVphone m were re- 

ceived especially from Idenw of 

Harrisburg, who were listening In. and 
from points as far as Hazleton. Since 
then, the managenv received 

numerous letters commending the de- 
baters for their splendid work. 
(Concluded on Pase 4) 



Arbor Day Observed Two New Members 
By Planting Trees Elected to Faculty 



Team Ends Season With Three-Debate 
Tour in New Jesery — Will De- 
bate Princeton Wednesday 



Barrie's 'Quality Street" to be Pro- 
duced bv Non- Sorority Group 
on May 10 



Little Crusaders Swamped in Garnet 

Batting Onslaught— Groce and 

Donnell on Mound 



Seniors and Theologs Conduct Arbor 

Day Exercises and Plant 

Trees on Campus 



New Heads of English and Mathematics 

Departments Are Chosen by 

Board of Trustees 



Determined to continue in their 
winning streak and to maintain their 
excellent record, the Negative Debating 



Sigma Sigma Delta, non-sororky 
group, will present "Quality Street,' a 
four-act play by James Barrie. in Sei- 



ULLERYITES DOWN P. M. C; 

DANKS PITCHES ENTIRE GAME 



Team set out Monday morning on an bert Chapel Hall, the evening of May 10. 



extensive debating tour of the State of 
New Jersey. They will be traveling the 
major part of the week, during which 
time they will debate at three col- 
leges. 

The team is comprised of Daniel Con- 
nell, Byron Hafer, Frank Bruno, and 
Frank Ramsey, alternate. 

Monday night they debated at State 
Teachers College, Upper Montclair, 
New Jersey. Tuesday night they will 
debate at Upsala College, East Orange. 
New Jersey. Our affirmative team de- 
feated a team from Upsala on the 
home platform some time ago. by a 
unanimous decision by the judges. 

They will end the season May 1 when 
they will debate at Princeton Univer- 
sity, Princeton, New Jersey. This de- 
bate will be judged by the audience, if 
sufficiently large to the two parties 
concerned. 

The team expects to return Thurs- 
day. 



James Barrie is the author of "Fetor 
Pan," "What Every Woman Knows," 
"The Old Woman Shows Her Medals ' 
and other plays. Someone has called 
him a whimsical writer. His plays pos- 
sess a certain humor mixed with pathos 
which immediately captivates the aud- 
ience He gives us a glimpse into the 
human heart without making his plays 
heavy by moralizing There is a certain 
wistful atmosphere about all his works 
which distinguishes them from the 
plays of other playwrights. 

M.st of us are acquainted with 
"Peter Pan." the boy who wouldn't grow 
up. Once more Barrie immortalizes 
another species of human heart in 
-Quality Street " Here we have a pic- 
ture of the life of the days when men 
were — oh so gallant and a lady was so 
r/.odest. 

In brief, the plot of this play is as 
follows: Phoebe Throssel, almost an old 
(Concluded on Page 4» 



Susquehanna Rampage in Last Inning 

Trips Cadets in Fast Fray: 

Good and Shilling Star 



Susquehanna University's baseball 
team defeated P. M. C. 7 to 2, and lost 
to Swarthmore 16 to 3 in its invasion of 
the Philadelphia region last week-end. 
Both games were played Saturday be- 
cause of the condition of the Garnet 
field Friday afternoon. The team play- 
ed at Swarthmore in the morning and 
at Chester in the afternoon. 

In the Swarthmore game, which by 
agreement was limited to seven frames, 
the Little Crusaders started scoring in 
the opening inning. Good led off with 
a single, Snyder walked, and Groce and 
Malasky came through with singles to 
bring in the first runs of the game. 
However, the Garnet team retaliated in 
its half of the first frame and more 
than matched the Susquehanna tallies. 

Donnell kept the Little Quakers in 
check during the second and third, but 
(Concluded on Page 3> 



Arbor Day was observed with appro- 
priate exercises last Friday morning 
during the regular Chape! period and 
the class period immediatley following. 
These exercises were conducted by the 
Senior Class. 

Governor Fisher set aside April 26 
as Arbor Day by official proclamation, 
and it was in keeping with this proc- 
lamation that the exercises were con- 
ducted by this class 

A Scripture passage appropriate to 
Arbor Day was read by Lester Lutz, a 
Senior in the School of Theology. 
Prayer was offered by William Schwir- 
ian, also a Senior in that Department. 

Henry Carichner. president of the 
Senior Class, read the official procla- 
mation of the Governor and conducted 
the remainder of the exercises. Several 
appropriate songs were sung and Ellen 
Bonney gave a reading on the planting 
of trees 

Dr. Surface gave a very humorous 
and interesting talk on the subject of 
trees in which he presented a few novel 
ideas about the life of a tree in its 
relationship with our lives 

(Concluded on Page 2> 



Dr. Smith announced a few days ago 
that two new professors have been add- 
ed to the present faculty, with a view 
to strengthening the faculty and rais- 
ing the scholastic standard of the in- 
stitution. 

Mr. Adelbert C Hartung, A. B . Uni- 
versity of Rochester. AM. Harvard, 
and two years graduate study 
at Johns Hopins University, has been 
engaged to head the English Depart- 
ment. He had passed his preliminary 
examinations for his PhD, Mr. Har- 
tung is at present teaching at Johns 
Hopkins. He comes to Susquehanna 
very highly recommended 

Mr Franklin G Williams, of Cornell 
University, has been engaged to head 
the Department of Mathematics. Mr. 
Williams will receive his Ph.D. in June 
from Cornell, and comes with excep- 
tionally gratifying qualifications. 

These men will begin their work next 
fall. 



Susquehanna University Symphonic Orchestra 



College Orchestra 
Will Give Concert 




Members of Conservatory Faculty to 

Assist in Concert in Seibert 

Chapel Hall on May 3 



The University Orchestra will pre- 
| sent Lta annual Home Concert in Sei- 
bert Chapel Hall Friday night, May 3, 
at 8 15 p m 

Members of the Conservatory Fac- 
ulty will assiat the orchestra in pre- 
senting lta conceit These are Mrs, 
Bertha I analng Rodgers, contralto: 
Professor P M Linebaugh. i 
and Prof Elrose L. Allison, pianist, 

Prol Donald Hemphill, instructor 
in Violin and Pianoforte I directing 
the orchestra, 

orchestra li.i i been rehearsing 
weekly in preparation for this concert 
A musical treat m classical music is 
in store for those who 'ake advantage 
of this opportunity to hear the or 
■ nd its assisting artists. 



Success is kept m pickle for the 
courageous That It, It la never found 
u. i can't, but always to a "can." 

After a man reaches forty, he looks 
about him to see how many began to 
distinguish themselves at that age. 

To be the last man in the procession 
is good training— if he don't stay last. 



f AGE TWO 



THE SCSQEUHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1929 



HE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly by the Students of Susquehanna University 



Sigma Sigma Delta has gives advance notice of a forthcoming 
dramatic production. An Inter-collegiate Dramatic Contest was 
held at Gettysburg last week-end. All these factors have given 



Subscription $1.50 a Year. Payable to Luther Kurtz. '30. Circulation Manager us an idea. 

Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove. Pa., as Second Class Matter. ,..,-,.,.-„ i , 

Why didn t Susquehanna have a representative group at 



ARBOR DAY OBSERVED 

BY PLANTING TREES 



tdember Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 

Editor-in-C hief Frank E. Ramsey 30 

Managing Editor News Editor 

Russell Carmichael '31 Clifford Johnston '31 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 
Betty Wardrop '32 John Kindsvatter '32 Lewis Rich '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Lloyd Bedford '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Leonard Olsen '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

John Auchmuty '32 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Miss Tressler obliged with several 
selections with the organ. 

The student body and faculty then 
moved to a spot on the campus where 
the Senior Class and the Theological 
Department each planted a tree. 

The exercises were closed by singing 
a song in harmony with the occasion. 

13 

Funny thing about money; the more 
you check it, the faster it goes. 

The good example, of the boss is 
better than the prod of the superin- 



TUESDAY. APRIL 30, 1929 



this contest? Surely we have sufficient histrionic talent to war- 
rant our participation in this animal affair. What, then, was 
wrong? 

We suspect that it was for want of proper organization and 
leadership. Altho Sns(|iiehanna is already much-organised, we 
present for your approval what we think should be the next 
important step at our university toward raising its standards. 

t t • o ^ tendent. 

We propose that an active dramatic club be organised with '?■ ^ 

a view toward the production of several plays thruout the yearjj \VM ^CHNTTRE 
and to arrange for our representation in the contest next year. ! j 

Even tho the did) at first will be a mere handful of interested I Real Estate and Bonding 
THE OLD AND THE NEW students, we believe that in time students will want to try for j j Bflll Phone 

With the passing of the old dynasty in control of the college the cdub*s productions just as they vie for honors in our glee ! | _ ,„., . _ 

newspaper and the advent of the newly-elected staff, it is only clubs and similar organizations. j 

fitting and ptopei that a few words of comment should be given Wouldn't you like to see Susquehanna taking part in this^ 

in regard to the work and policies of the retiring staff, and at contest and bring home some more laurels? What do you say?! j "JT A (f\ r ■ "* A'S 
the same time a lout as to the aims of the new staff. Here is food for thought anyway, and we invite comment thru' 

Without a doubt the paper was an improvement over for- these columns. 
nier years. There was a greater diversity of topics and less 
emphasis on minor ami uninteresting details. The Alumni De- 
partment was enlarged in its scope and improved in its general 



100 East Mill St. 



S 

R EV( >LUTH )N NEED El) 

Present administration of this paper, as well as every ad- 



make-up thru an efficient and energetic Alnmni Editor. The 

, I t \ . , „. ,i,,, ,i t ,,,1,1. t* ~ nna aH-™./»+««i an A ministration before us, has been hampered by a constitution and I 

form ot the paper was altered to make it more attractive ana 1 . , .„,..-, t *■ 

pleasing to the eye. 

The retiring editor is to be commended for the conscientious 

manner in which she fulfilled her duties and for the prompt- 
ness with which the paper was made up and mailed to its readers. 

Naturally, our readers will wonder what the newly elect- 
ed editor and his staff plan to do. We do do propose to make 
any specific promises or set any goal except that our aim at all 
times shall he to serve the interests of the institution, its stu- 
dent body, and its Alumni to the best of our ability, and to 
place our collegiate paper on a par with similar papers in 
Other colleges. Furthermore, this paper shall at no time be con- 
trolled by any single party or faction, but shall be of service 
to all. 

At times we shall, thru these columns, suggest certain 
reforms which are deemed necessary, especially with regard 



BEAUTY 
SHOP 



202 S. Market St. 

Second Door Below 
First Lutheran Church 



JHONE 58*Z_ 



a system which to us seems grossly inefficient because they do',/ 
not meet the needs of our institution. They are directly opposed 
to the democratic principles on which our school life is built. 

For example, the staff was elected last Thursday and was 
obliged to edit and publish this week's issue. Can't van see how 
absurd this situation is? You might as well elect our President 
of the United States one day and give him full charge of the 
government the following day and expect him to do it efficiently. 

Furthermore, there is absolutely no cheek whatsoever on 
the ability of those who are elected to the staff. So far, thank 
our lucky stars, we have been fortunate in getting men and 

women on the staff who are worthwhile and really interested { m mmm ^ mK ^ m Pm^hmhI 1 
in the work and we hope this state will continue. But can't you j ^dhier b ntMauraiu 



LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS 
DRAWING SUPPLIES 

JOS. L. MENTZ 

The Stationer 
Remington Portable Typewriters 



21 N. Third St. 



Sunbury, Pa. 



see the dangers which may arise under the present system? ! 

There are too many loopholes thru which one who does not 
to the newspaper itself, and we shal ikewise instigate move- possess editing ability may slip into editorship and then what 
meats to impove present conditions. The staff will at all times i* the student body to do? The dangers are too great to warrant 
be ready to receive any constructive criticism or comment our our continuance under the present system. A change must take 
readers care to make and will give them due consideration. P il,( ' 1 ' and * e wil l foster such a movement thru these columns. 

The fact that a student is not a member of the staff does 7 
not mean that he shall not contribute to this paper. In fact, » 



"WHERE STUDENTS MEET t 
AND EAT" 

Market Street Selinsgrove 





we invite all who wish to submit articles of timely interest for j 

publication, ("ampus groups ami organization! are encouraged • 

to appoint a special correspondent who will keep the staff in- ♦ 
formed at all times of news items which might be of interest 

to readers. • 



S A Y I T H' IT H FLO IV E R S 

FRESH CUT FLOWERS and POTTED PLANTS for WEDDINGS, 

PARTIES and FUNERALS— FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS 

Visitors Always Welcome at Our Green Houses 



SHOE REPAIRING 
Work Guaranteed 

SHOES — SHINE 

C. E. POE 



GE 



INE 



-S- 



FLORIST 



BELL 32-Y 



SELINSGROVE } 



A SUCCESSFUL VKAK 
Now that our collegiate year is rapidly drawing to a close 
it should be worth our while frankly to survey our accomplish 
nieiits. if any. since last September. Has Susquehanna gom 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 



America's leading instruments. For churches, colleges, lodge rooms, 
residences, etc. Every organ designed and built specially for the par- 
ticular place and purpose and fully guaranteed Booklets and specifica- 
forward? We must answer in the affirmative, but must, at the { tions on request. 

■ame time, guard against a sense of complacency which would • 

I eadening to all future progress. We do not assume a lioast- 
ful attitude; we merely have an honest pride in what has been 

do 

"las advanced along all lines. Tin- recenl com- 



M. P. MOLLER 



I HAGERSTOWN 



MARYLAND 



t 

I 
t 
t 
• 
t 
» 
I 
t 
J 
( i 



SHOTER'S 

White Deer IJrand 

Ice Cream 

For Health 

The T(t$te TelU 



>UK([ueiianna 
pletiou of the president's home has not only added another 
modern building, bul has contributed greatly to the beauty ol 
thai pari ol Campus. The Conservatory of Music building } 

has Imhmi remodeled, making it much more attractive. Constant { 

ition i.as been given to the care of the Campus. 

increased interef ur new Library has been shown by 

the entire studenl body. This is a healthy *ign in any university. 
Books to satisfy th< - oi students pursuing any line of 

a e< den lie uaik have been added. N^\ books are constantly being 
ph i shelves. 

Nut the least in bringing our Cniversity in high repute has 
been the debating teams ol the year. Competing with some ol . 
the lx*sl teams of the Eastern ml],. ^es. and winning in practi- • 
tally every rase, rhey have brought credit to themselves and to 
Susquehanna. 

In athletics, we had a good year. The football season was | 
th<- mosi successful in the history of the Cniversity; basketball * 
made a commendable showing' s. I', won two ol the three base* ■ 
had games she has played this year, thus getting the right start- 
off in i hat major sport. 

With the reorganization of the courses offered in the 1'ni- 
versity and a new system of marking, both of which become 
operative at the beginning of the next acedemic year, the Ad- 
ministration has taken definite steps towards raisin- the scholas- 
tic standi! _. 

The conditions citi d are indicative of a growing Susquehan- 
na, but much is still to be done, a program of advancement, 
h as we have had this year, should be a challenge for the 
h. st efforts of every student and alumnus to strive for still 

better things in the future. 

g 



KAUFFMANS 

Candy and Soda 



J AS. H. STYERS 

PICTURE FRAMING 

PROMPT SERVICE AND LARGE 
SELECTION OF MOULDINGS 
Sell 



First National Bank of Sdim Grove 

Welcomet Students' Accounts 
RESOURCES IX EXCES8 OF f 1,500,000.00 



FEEHRER & NOLL 

BARBERS 

4 WEST PINE STREET 



SPEIGELMIRF.'S 

Furniture. Cnrpett, Floor Coverings 

SELINSGROVE 






ONE REAL NEWSPAPER 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 

SUNBURY, PA. 



DRAMATICS AT SUSQUEHANNA 
Senior Clan presented a very excellent play last week. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

REV. O. MORRIS SMITH, A.M.. D.D., President 

Susquehanna University is located in the heart of the beautiful 
Susquehanna Valley, in the home-like borough of Selinsgrove. Dor- 
mitories and recitation buildings are in excellent condition with all 
modern conveniences. 



Dean of College 

DR. HERBERT A. ALLISON. 

A.B.. A.M., Litt.D. 



Dean of Theology 

DR. r. P. MANHART. 

A.M., D.D., L.L.D. 



The Strand 

SUNBURY, PA. 

PICTURES THAT SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 

Home of the Best the Silver Screen 

with Special Musical Numbers by 

" Allan Kissinger on the Big Organ 

■ ■■■■■■ 

Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday, 

April 18 - 19 - 20 

"TRAIL OF '98" 

In Sound 

New York Paid $2.00 to See 
This Picture 



TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1929 



THE SUSQEUHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA, 



PAGE THREE 



Little Crusaders 
To Have Big Week 



Baseball Team Will Play Hamilton and 

Juniata— Track and Tennis Teams 

Will Open Their Seasons 



This will be an unusually busy week 
for Susquehanna's athletic teams, with 
baseball, track, and tennis teams in 
action, the latter two for the first time 
this season. 

Susquehanna's batsmen will play 
two games this week, one on the heme 
diamond and one on foreign ground. 

Hamilton College and the Little Cru- 
saders will cross bats on Friday after- 
noon. May 3. beginning at 3:00 o'clock. 
This game, which will be played on 
University Field, marks the opening of 
athletic relationships with Hamilton, 
which is located at Clinton, N. Y. Ham- 
ilton plays Haverford on Saturday. 

The Ullery men will play against 
their traditional foe, Juniata, on Sat- 
urday afterncon. May 4, on the Hunt- 
ingdon college diamond. Juniata lost 
to Penn State's nine last week 4-0. 
Much interest is being shown in this 
game because of the traditions which 
surround athletic relationships between 
the two colleges. 

Susquehanna's courtmen will swing 
into action next Saturday. Their first 
match will be with Juniata and will no 
doubt be played off after the baseball 
game. The team, hampered by inclem- 
ent weather during the past few weeKS. 
has not been selected as yet. Juniata 
will be met on the home courts on Mav 
7 

The track and field men will hold a 
meet with Elizabethtown College on 
University Field, Saturday afternoon, 
beginning at cne-thirty. The Snyder 
County Interscholastic meet will be 



held on the same day, the Junior Di- 
vision in the morning at nine and the 
Senior Division simultaneously with the 
Collegiate events in the afternoon. 

S 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

Annual meeting of the Athletic 
Association will be held immediate- 
ly after chapel on Tuesday May 
2nd. 

At this time the four student 
representatives on the Athletic 
Board for 1929-'30 will be elected. 

Any under-graduate student, who 
shall be of at least Junior standing 
when they assume office is eligible 
for election. Lists of eligible stu- 
dents will be found on the Bulletin 
Board. 



Swarthmore 

AB R H O A E 

Burr, cf 2 2 1 3 

Christian, rf 4 3 2 

Johnson, lb 3 2 2 6 

Adelman, 2b 3 1 1 3 1 

Barnes, If 3 1 1 1 

MaGuire. ss 3 2 1 4 1 

Dellmuth. 3b 4 1 1 2 2 1 

Redman, c 3 2 2 4 

McFeely. p 3 2 2 2 

Head, If 1 

Dawes, 2b 

Sinclair, rf 1 1 1 



ORANGE AND MAROON 

NINE WINS AND LOSES 



Totals 30 16 14 21 10 2 

Two base hits— Swarthmore 4; three 
base hit — Swarthmore 1; home run— 
Swarthmore 1: hits — off Donnell, 10 in 
5 innings, off Groce 2 in 1. 

Susquehanna 200000 1—3 

Swarthmore 300652 x— 16 



pitched his first game for the Little 
Crusaders on Saturday, had eight 
strike outs to his credit. 

Susquehanna showed superior field 
play, executing two nice double plays 
when P. M. C. was in a position to 
score. The lineup: 

Susquehanna 

AB R H O A E 

Good, 2b 4 3 1 3 1 

Snyder. If 5 1 

Shilling, 3b 5 1 2 1 

Groce. rf 3 1 1 

Palmer, lb 5 1 7 

Malasky, cf 4 1 3 1 

Heim, ss 5 1 1 1 

Wall, c 2 2 111 2 

Danks, p 3 2 1 1 3 



Kane. 2b 4 1 1 3 

Wilson. 3b 4 1 1 1 

Hanna, lb 2 1 1 3 

Montrezza. rf 



Totals 37 2 8 27 12 

Two base hit— Snyder; three base hit 
— Good; struck out — Danks 8, An- 
drews 5. 



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(Continued from Page 1) 
in the fourth and fifth the Garnetmen 
broke loose and turned a batting on- 
slaught into a rout by scoring eleven 
runs in these two frames. This an- 
slaught was featured in the fifth by a 
sensational home run by Johnson with 
two on. Susquehanna again sent an- 
other counter across the pan in the 
final inning. Groce was substituted in 
the sixth frame and the Swarthmore 
machine was held to two more runs. 
Lineup: 

Susquehanna 

AB R H O A E 

Good, 2b 4 1 3 2 1 

Snyder, If 2 1 1 4 

Shilling. 3b 4 1 1 1 3 

Groce. rf . p 3 1 1 

Palmer, lb 3 1 6 

Malasky. cf 3 1 1 

Heim, ss 3 1 1 

Wall, c 3 1 

Donnell, p 2 2 

Sprout, rf 1 1 1 

Totals 28 3 7 18 7 2 



Beats P. M. C. 7-2 

The Ullery men fared better in its 
game with the Cadets at Chester. They 
clinched the victory by a last minute 
rampage in the last stanza. The fray 
was fast throughout, with Good and 
Shilling starring with their timely 
drives. 

The P. M. C. men began the scoring 
in the first frame, counting one run 
in this period. The Cadets again 
threatened in the third, but a man was 
called out when he tried to steal third, 
which prevented them from scoring. 

Susquehanna scored first in the fifth 
inning, counting three in this period. 
In the final inning, Andrews, the Ca- 
det hurler went up in the air. and Sus- 
quehanna added four more counters 
to its list. Good, diminutive second 
sacker, tripled to deep left in this 
round, scoring Heim, Wall and Danks. 
Goid subsequently counted when Sny- 
der hit for two bases to right. 

Danks, Susquehanna hurler, who 



Totals 36 7 9 27 11 3 

P. M. C. 

AB R H O A E 

Miller, ss 4 1 2 4 2 1 

Brown, If 4 1 

Layer, cf 5 2 3 

Warren, c 4 8 3 

Shaw, rf 3 

Greenfield, lb 2 7 

Andrews, p 4 1 3 



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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQEUHANN A SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY. APRIL 30. 1929 



Sigma Sigma Delta 
Pledges Entertain 



Active Members of Non-Sorority Club 

Arc Guilts of Pledges at 

Informal Dance 



Charles E. Fisher Local Men to Attend 
Honored by Club "Y. M." Conference 



Pk 



na Delta en« 

bers i a d - 

n in soci i' 



.- : 

.il informal dai 
day nighl 

Tl:> room v . i ollegiately 

with a wide range In the variety of 
college pennants, representing many 

hool I learning thruout the 

country. Now our cur..:- y . troused 
as to where the pennants came from 
originally.) The music was furnished 
by Keller's Reproducing Orchestra 

Several tables of cards seemed to be 
the center of interest quite frequently. 

The punch bowl was usually hidden 
from sight by a host of 'hasty dancers, 
which gives evidence ot :ts pleasing 
savor. At a reasonable hour the pledgees 
served a lovely plate lunch. 

The enjoyable evening was brought 
to a close by the singing of the familiar 
strains "Good Night Ladies.* 



SIGMA SIGMA DELTA 

PLEDGES ENTERTAIN 



• Continued from Page 1' 
maid, abandons her modesty and al- 
lows "V. B.' 'to k: . >re he has 
spoken of love. Miss Susan, Phoebe's 
very much thrilled by this 
and between the ■ and the 
Misses Willoughb: > as good 
as man i'd to "V. B. I. ■:. come the 
tragic moment when "V B." leaves the 
home in Quality Street as a soldier. 
When he returns the plot has an in- 
dilemma. Everything ends in 
the fairy tale fashion. 

Barrie's plays are p ►pular among the 
theatre-going people ■>: xlay. Susque- 
hanna studei fortunate in 
having this amateur production of a 
famous play by a famous author. 
"ALL A MISTAK" IS 

PRESENTED BY '29 



(Continued from Page 1> 
uations beyond the realm of possibility. 
The proximity of an Insane Asylum, 
people acting strangely to cover up 
their actions, four men in hot pursuit 
of four girls with the same Christian ! 
name, all are bound to cause a misun- 
derstanding in any place. 

It is difficult to specify any particu- 
larly outstanding player because the 
cast was so well balanced. However. 
Miss Mary Royer deserves special men- 
tion for the splendid way in which she 
portrayed the role of Nellie Skinner. 
Captain Skinner's "superannuated" 
spinster sister. 

The play was presented before an au- 
dience that tested the capacity of the 
chapel. It was a success from the 
financial standpoint, as well as 
dramatic. 

S 

Plod is a good partner but a 
manager. 



Popular Member ot Senior Class Hon- 
ored by Club He Founded — 
New Officers Elected 

Charles A Fisher, founder of the 
Pre-Theological Club, was presented 
an appr token at the reg- 

ular meeting of the club last week, in 
grateful re i . I >n of his service 
the organization which he founded. 

Realizing he need of a club for pre- 
theologians v. here discussions of mutual 
i: eresl co d be held in open forum 
and talks could be given by members cf 
t'e faculty. Mr. Fisher called together 
a number of young men preparing for 
the ministry and interested in such a 
project. The club was organized as a 
• of this firs; gathering and has 
been prospering since then. The meet- 
ll gs are held at the home of Dr. and 
Mr- Ahl. 

Mr. Bollinger, the president, led the 
devotions of the meeting and Dr. Ahl 
spoke on "Christ, tire Firm Founda- 
tion." 

At the business session Herbert 
Schmidt was elected president. Wilson 
Seiber. vice-president and Lewis Fox. 
sccrei. 

Wilson Seiber was in charge of the 
tn of the evening and fur- 
nished the entertainment. Light re- 
: e "ere served by Mr.,. Ahl, 
her sister, Mr- Poulson, and hei dau- 

• 

S 

DR. DRIVER LECTURES 

ON HOOSIER POET 

i Continued from Page 1 > 
neer Days." "Little Orphan Annie," and 
others. 

Riley is accredited with starting Paul 
Lawrence Dunbar, famous negro poet, 
en his literary career. 

Dr Driver read the most important 
poems of Riley in the original dialect. 
He presented them just the way they 
were written, simply and sincerely. He 
climaxed his lecture by reading "An 
Old Sweetheart of Mine." an old fav- 
orite. 

Quite a large number of students and 
members of the faculty took advantage 
of this opportunity to listen to this in- 
teresting lecture. 

We appreciate the efforts Pi Gamma 
Mu put forth in bringing Dr. Driver to 
our campus and their kindness in in- 
viting the faculty and students to hear 
him. 

S 

S. U. DEBATERS 

SPEAK OVER RADIO 



Members of Cabinet of Local Club and 

Faculty Advisors Will Attend 

Gettysburg Conference 



the 



bad 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Tuesday. April 30 — Debat 4 at Up- 
;ala C ilege. Negative Team 

Wednesday, May 1 — Fraternity and 
Sorority Meetings at 7 o'clock. De- 
bate at Princeton. Negative Team. 

Thursday. May 2 — Annual meet- 
ing of the Athletic Association for 
"lection of the Athletic Board. 

Friday. May 3— Baseball game 
with Hamilton at 3:00 p m, Orches- 
tra Concert in Seibert Chapel Hall 
at 8:15 p m. 

Saturday. May 4 — Baseball game 
with Juniata at Huntmgd n Tennis 
Match with Juniata at Huntingdon. 
Snyder County Inter-Scholastic 
Track Meet on Athletic Field at 
1:30 p. m. Track Keel with Ehza- 
bethtown Colli ge at 1 10 p m 

Sunday May 5 — Sunday laho >i .t 

) IS Church at 10:30 ind 7. 10 Ves- 

. 5 30 p m 

Monday v >, Susqui 

• 
ertCl .'■■ . H 

the 1 

: 



should no 
wish 



• Continued from Page 1» 
The following are excerpts from two 
:f these letters. Space does not per- 
mit to qucte more. The first la from 
John Brinses. Middletown, who in 1927- 
28 was captain of the Elizabethtown 
aebatmg team and debated at Susquf- 
anna. He writes in part: First. I 
.vish to congratulate your debaters up- 
on the excellent manner in which they 
).;. across the 'forensic disputati n' on 
the question of the 'Jury System.' Sec- 
:id y. I can oot help but refer to the 
honesl efforts ot the talented announ- 
:er— keep up the go:d work! — I now 
n view of all the facts presented ac- 
ord.ng to logic, presentation, and re- 
) il. vote for the negative team; but 
I wish to congratulate especially the 
third speakers— they were great ' 

Mr, Meyers, of Paxtang. also voted 
for the negative. He especially com- 
mended Mr. Bruno for his work. He 
laid: "They proved to me positively that 
he present form of the jury should not 
be abolished." 

S 

COLLEGE PERSONALS 

President G M rril Smith was in at- 

endance at the inaugural ceremonies 

u Dickinson College, when Dr Marvin 

: was ii. i a- :• - 

. ' h president 

Dr Smith add •■ Father and 

l 

Bus* 
\ led tl ban- 

s 

to 
b |oing 



Relay Team Places 
Fifth in Fast Race 



Manhattan College Places First Willi 

Fast Team— Wins Middle Atlantic 

States Championship 



. followed in the order 



Officers of the local Y. M. C. A. and 
the faculty advisers, Dr. Smith and 
Dr. Ah!, will attend the Thirty-eighth 
annua! Y. M. C. A. Training Confer- 
ence of Eastern Pennsylvania, at Get- 
tysburg, May 3. 4. and 5. 

Dr. Henry H. Crain will address the 
conference. He is one of the gtron 
speakers In Pennsylvania. He graduated 
from Wesleyan University, where he 
was a three-letter man. He is a Chi is- 
tian leader, very active in his duties, 
and vigorous in his delivery. 

Mi'. Arthur Ri.gh. formerly of China, 
and well-known to student audiences, 
will speak on "World Work." 

S 

SEIBERT HALL ENJOYS 

MOONLIGHT SERENADE 



| Continued from Page I) 
and the full moon which sent its shim- 
mering, silvery rays upon the river 
and the silent valley be;, ay. someone 
conceived the idea of presenting a con- 
cert in the form of a serenade. Forth- 
v. ith and immediately the orchestra. 
accompanied by a few of its most loyal 
patrons, made its way to the hall where 
Susquehanna's potential scientists pur- 
sue their daily laboratory work. 

The concert was begin with the fam- 
ous "Rhapsody on Decrepitude." pop- 
ularly known as "Tha;'> My Weakness 
Now." Scarcely had the first note rung 
out when simultaneously all i f Seiber' 
Hall's lights were extinguished, pre- 

sumbably because oi short circuits caus- 
ed by the wave of excitement among 
the girls. Every window was thronged 
with girls thrilled by the sweet melo- 
dies floating thru the air accompanied 
by the silvery rays from Luna herself. 
The conclusion of the first number 
was followed by thunderous applause 
from the galleries, accompanied by 
cries from every nook and corner for 
"more." The skillful musicians gracious- 
ly replied by playing "The World is 
Waiting for the Sunrise." Despite the 
masterful way in which this number 
was played, the girls failed to agree 
with the theme of the song because of 
the tuneful melodies they were hearing 
and because they enjoyed flrting with 
the man in the moon. Time could stop 
now. for all they cared. 
Sync pation in its jazziest form was 

; presented in the next number. It was 

' none other than the famous old musi- 
cal character sketch. "Sam. the Old 

, Acc:rdion Man." By this time the 
patrons became "hot and bothered" and 
began to "make whoopee." Spring 
dances on the lawn and arcund the 

' fountain were much in evidence and 
continued until Sam locked up his 
accordion and bade them adieu. 

Moved by the moon and the gesticu- 
lating figures in the dormitory win- 
dows., the orchestra played the num- 
ber which made famous and put dream 
interpreting on a sound basis. "Girl of 
My Dreams" was received with such 
deafening and prolonged applause that 
the orchestra had time to grope about 
and catch a few notes which the bass 
horn of Cora;polis' favorite son had 
missed during the playing of the "De- 
crepitude" song. They thought it fitting 
and proper to repeat it. adding the 
newly discovered notes which added 
much to its original flavor. 

With the approach of midnight it 
was feared that the voice of the violin- 
ist might suffer too much from night 
air and consequently be lost to the 
church choir, so the concert was Closed 
for the evening. They played the very 
appropriate "Song of Farewell" from 
one of our greatest operas, which for 
simplicity's sake is called "Goodnight 
Ladies" With this number as a finale 
• l most excellent serenade, the mem- 
bers oi 'he orchestra and then satr n 
retired to their respective rooms to pn - 
k the grind of the next day. 



The sentiment of women who do not 

V9 in innovation is "Stick to the 

iboard; but to practice it— ah. 

there's the rub 

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The Orange and Maroon Relay Team 
placed fifth in its heat in the Penn 
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The following men comprised the 
team: Paul Bishop. Lee Fairchild. 
Charles Fisher and Fred Norton. 

The time In which this race was run 
was unusually fast. It was 3 minutes 
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Manhattan College took first place 
Geneva. Franklin & Marshall. Juniata 



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HERE SATURDAY 




SUSQUEHANNA* 1 : 



«*- 



BEAT EM 



SI SQl'EHANNA 



Volume XXXV 



SELINSGROVE, PA.. TUESDAY, MAY 7, 1929 



Number 3 



University Orchestra Susquehanna Nine S. U. Track Team "Quality Street" to Changes Outlined in 
Gave Annual Concert to Play Ursinus Beats Elizabethtown be Produced Friday Teaching Schedules 



Splendid Program Presented in Seibert Ullery Proteges Prepare for Fracas Grossman Cohorts Defeat Down River National Open-sorority Club Will Pre- President Smith Announces Changes 
Chapel Hall May 3 by College With Collegeville Batsmen Here College Team, 99-27; Rhine sent Famous Barrie Play; Aims for Next Year in Important De- 

Orchestra Next Saturday Breaks 2-Mile Record of Sigma Sigma Delta partments in College 



Susquehanna's baseball nine v% ill 
I > • bats with the Ursinus College dia- 
mond team on University Field, next 
Saturday afternoon. 

The Collegeville team lost a closely- 
fought game with Lebanon Valley by a 
score of 4 to 2 last week. Lebanon Val- 
ley's team will meet the Orange and 
Maroon team in two games subsequent 
to the Ursinus game Saturday. 

Ursinus plays Albright on Thursday 
and Bucknell on Friday. Lebanon Val- 
ley played Bucknell last week and de- 
feated the Snavely nine, 3-0. 

Ursinus defeated St. Joseph's. Phila- 
delphia. 14-4. last week also, but lost 
to Muhlenberg, 3-1. 

Coach Ullery will put his cohorts 
Intensive practice this week in 
preparation for Saturday's fray 
S 

Susquehanna Nine 
Loses to Juniata 



Susquehanna University Symphony 
Orchestra, directed by Professor Hemp- 
hill of the Conservatory of Music, pre- 
sented its annual concert in Seibert 
Chapel Hall Friday night. May 3. at 
8:15 p. m. 

The program began with the Orches- 
tra playing "Symphony in G Minor 
(Finale)" from Mozart. Professors 
Linebaugh and Allison presented a 
splendid musical interpretation of P. 
Yon's -'Concerto Gregoriano i Finale," " 
in ensemble on the Organ and Piano 
respectively. 

Mrs. Rodgers. who was accompanied 
by Miss Lois Brungart on the Violin- 
cello, gave several vocal selections. Her 
feature number was "Rachem." from 
Mana Zucca. which was sung in Yid- 
dish. 

The final division of the program 
consisted of selections by the Symphony 
Orchestra. The closing number was the 
famous "Hungarian Dance No. 5," from 
Brahms. 

The Orchestra has been rehearsing 
diligently, and its work shows much 
progress over former years. Rehearsals 
will continue and prepartions will be 
made for a concert to be given at 
Commencement. 

The complete program presented was 
as follows: 

Symphony in G minor (Finale), Mo- 
zart — The Orchestra. 

Concerto Gregoriano (Finale), P. Yon 
—Prof. Linebaugh. organ: Prof. Alli- 
son, piano. 

From "The Peer Gynt Suite," E. 

Griee- a Asa' Death; b. Anitra's Dance. . 
uneg, d.n« ^* . h fat the Indian victory 

Hungarian Dance No. 6, Brahms— 

The Orchestra. 

Songs: a. Rachem (In Yiddish). 
Mana Zucca; b. "Love Like the Dawn 
is Stealing, Cadman; c. "I Wept While 
Dreaming," d' Hardelot— Mrs. Rodgers. 
('Cello obligato by Miss Brungart). 

March Militaire. Schubert; On the 
Mountain, Godard; Hungarian Dance 
No. 5, Brahms— The Orchestra. 
S 



Susquehanna easily won the dual 
track and field meet with Elizabeth- 
town College by 99 to 27. The contest 
was held on University Field Satur- 
day afternoon simultaneous. y with the 
Snyder Interscholastic Meet. Senior Di- 
vision. 

The two mile record was broken by 
Ray Rhine. Ail of the other events 
were slow because the contestants were 
handicapped by the high and chilly 
wind. 

At no time was the lead of Susque- 
hanna seriously threatened. Most of 
the competition was offered by team- 
mates of Prof. Grossman's squad. 

The track meet was remarkable in 
that a very large number of Varsiry S 
letters were earned and also in that 
of the squad was comprised of 



"Quality Street," a brilliant four-act 
comedy of the Napole a in Eng- 

land, written toy Sir James B. 
rill be presented by S.a::ta Sigma 
>;t.i next Friday night, in Seibert 
Chapel Hall 

The cast of the play is as follows: 
Susan Throssel, a maiden lady. Re- 
becca Puffenberger; Miss Man Wil- 
.by. Miss Fanny, and Miss Hen- 
rietta TurbuH, spinsters ot Quality 
Street. Martha Dilling, Ruth Lang and 
Grace Lauer; Phoebe Throssel. a 
young lady. Margaret Markle; Patty, 
the Misses Ti. Maid. Nancy Le- 
I Recruiting Sergeant. By- 
ron Hafer; Valentine Brown. R b< ti 
Children In Misses Tit: 
Concluded on Page 4 
p 



Additions to the faculty of Susque- 
hanna University make It necessary 
that the teaching schedules for next 
year undergo some readjustment 

With the a . : two new profes- 

- rs to Susquehanna's faculty, certain 
i hangi 9 will become necessary in the 
several departments in order to equal- 
ize more neariy the teaching loads of 
the faculty, This readjustment is be- 
s.iade in the interest of greater 
efnciencv in the instructional program 
of the institution. 

It Is expected 

ih Depart n 

by Pro 

now a* j 
and Miss 

: nf 



Freshmen. Vincent Jones deserves spe- rViicjorlppa I /*££» ifl 

: commendation, for after three vl U»aUCl 8 IjUSC III 

Hamilton Batsmen 



Orange and Maroon Team Downed In 

Fatal Sixth Inning, 6 to 3— 

Good Stars in Eighth 

Juniata won a tightly-contested base- 
ball game from Susquehanna by a 6-3 
score at Huntingdon Saturday. The 
game was featured by tight pitching 
and good fielding for five innings. Then 
it resolved itself into a battle of heavy 
hitting, accompanied by several breaks 
at opportune moments which resulted 



years of hard work, during which time 
he trained and practiced in the event 
ot his choice he secured the much- 
coveted letter in Saturday's meet. 

Results of the meet: 

100-yard Dash— Wellicky. Susque- 
hanna, first: Bishop. Susquehanna, sec- 
ond; Bower. Elizabethtown. third. Time 
10.5 seconds. 

One mile run— Fairchilds. Susque- 
hanna, first; Rhine, Susquehanna, sec- 
ond: Reber. Elizabethtown third. Time 
5 minutes. 2.5 seconds. 

220 yard dash— Bower, Elizabethtown, 
first; Norton, Susquehanna, second; 
Neiswender, Susquehanna, third. Time 
23.9 seconds. 

High jump— Gearhart. Susquehanna, 
first; Delay, Susquehanna, second; 
Concluded on P. - .,*- 2 
S 

Member of Faculty 
Is Highly Honored 



Ullery Cohorts Low Close Game 
New York State Team. 2-1; 
Danks Pitches 



to 



Fraternal Clubs 

Elect Officers 



The Huntingdon College team crash- 
ed through for a single tally in the 
second for the only score in the first 
five innings. Donnell for the Crusad- 
ers and Hunter on the mound for the 
Indians, both worked well during the 
opening innings to baffle opposing 
stickmen. In the last half of the sixth 
Juniata bunched two home runs with 
several other hits and an error to bring 
in four runs. 

Susquehanna came back in the sev- 

enth frame with two singles. Groce a. W. Ahl. professor of Greek and 
brought both men home with a double Bible, has recently had two very great 



Dr. Ahl Has Two Great Honors Con- 
ferred Upon Him In Field 
of Research 



Greek Letter Organizations Elect Lead- 
ers for Next Year; Phi Lambda 
Will Elect Soon 



to center. He was called out on what 
appeared to be a poor decision as he 
tried to come home on a wild toss, 
which went over the catcher's head to 
roil back to the grandstand. 



honors conferred upon him. 

He has been made a member of the 
Source Research Council. Inc.. which 
is equipped to render practical and au- 
thoritative service, as it has arranged 



Coach Uliery's proteges were forced 
to bow in defeat for the second time 
this season when Hamilton College won 
a close game from the Little Crusaders 
by 2-1, Friday afternoon. 

Despite the football weather, which 
held its chilly sway, a fair-sized crowd 
of students and townspeople attended 
the game. 

This game marked the opening of 
athletic relationships with the Clinton, 
N. Y. college. 

The New York Staters scored the 
first run in the second inning, when 
Chatfield, Hamilton's receiver, reached 
first on an error, stole second, got to 
third on a fielder's choice, and stole 
home. 

Susquehanna tallied when Wall hit 
a single, went to third on Good's two 
bagger, and scored on Malasky's sac- 
rifice. 

Hamilton took the lead in the sixth 
frame. Chatfield led off with a single, 
stole second, and sped home on Eggles- 
ton's single. Lineup: 

Susquehanna 

Good. 2b 

Malasky. cf 



Officers for the ensuing term were 
elected by the various fraternal clubs 
on the campus during the past few 
weeks. Phi Lambda Theta will elect 
their officers in the near future. Those 
who have been elected are announced 
as follows: 

Bond and Key 

Clifford Kiracofe president; Howard 
Lukehart. vice president: Russel Yoas, 
treasurer, and Ira Sassaman, secretary. 
Epsilon Sigma 

Howard Wertz. president; Frank 
Ramsey, vice president; John Senko, 
treasurer, and Bryce Nicodemus, secre- 
tary. 

Phi Mu Delta 

John Wall, president; Wiibur Berger, 
vice president; Charles Kroeck, finan- 
cial secretary, and Herbert Schmidt, 
recording secretary. 

Kappa Delta Phi 

Frances C Thomas, president; Ida 
Sweitzer, vice president; Ethelynne 
Miller, secretary; Beatrice DeWire, fi- 
nancial secretary, and Lena Baird. 
treasurer. 

Omega Delta Sigma 

Anna Moore, president; Marjorie 
Phillips, vice president; Betty Watkins, 
secretary, and Signe Alford, treasurer. 
Sigma Sigma Delta 

Rhea Miller, president; Anna Losch, 
vice president; Miriam Keim, secretary; 
Corinda Sell, treasurer, and Irene 
Brouse. assistant treasurer. 

Sigma Alpha Iota 

Dorothy Beck, president; Dorothy 
Lesher, vice president; Janet Dively. 
secre f ary. and Virginia Moody, treas- 
urer. 

S 



Groce. lb 
Heim. ss 
Snyder. If 
Sprout, rf 
Wall, c . 
Danks. p 



The Little Crusaders bunched two l for consultation and advisory privileges Shilling. 3b . 

more hits in the eighth to produce an- 
other tally. Donnell did his best to 
win his own game in this inning by 
pounding a long double to centerfield. 
but he died on second 

In the last half of the eighth inning : 

Heim muffed a hot grounder to place 

an Indian on firs: The runner prompt- 

Concluded on Page 3 

S 

Women's Cooperative 
Government Installs 



New Members Were Sworn Into Office 

Thursday; Anna Cleaver Is 

New President 



with leading authorities on all sub- 
jects. 

Dr. Ahl also received a communica- 
tion from Jal Dastur C. Pavry. M.A.. . 
Ph.D., the son of Dastur Cursetji 
Erachji Pavry. an eminent orientalist. 
The younger Dr. Pavry is arranging to 
publish a Commemorative Volume of 
Studies in honor of his father and our 
own Dr. Ahl has been requested to 
make a contribution to this volume 
His paper may be on Iranian or Indo- 
Iranian languages, literature, history, 
philosophy, science, religion or some 
similar subject and may be written in 
English. German or French. 

Dr. Ahl is to be congratulated on his 
success. 



R 


8 


O 


A 


I 





o 

it 


1 


O 











1 














2 


2 











8 


1 








2 


<y 





1 








i 














i 








1 


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§ 





2 






iat the work of the 
111 be carried in 
l Adelbert C. Har- 
ds Hopkins Univer- 
lomi K. Hade, our 
ot Women. Dr. Woodruff, who 
headed the Department of English for 
■ years, v ill p. I of Phii- 

phy and will devote practically all 
his time to that field. He will, how- 
evei continue to give throughout the 
ne com - . Eng- 

ind Education Department Misi 
Woodruff, at present an nt in 

English and La - ;;: will give all of her 
time to the teaching of Latin. 

Dr. Thomas C. Houtz. who has served 
Susquehanna for forty-five years as 
Professor of Mathematics and Astrono- 
my, will be relieved of his duties as 
the head of the Department of Mathe- 
matics through the election of Profes- 
sor Franklin G. Williams, of Cornell 
University. Professor Williams is at 
the present time an instructor at Cor- 
nell and will receive his Ph.D. degree 
next month. 

Dr. Houtz. however, will continue his 
teaching as Professor of Astronomy and 
Meteorlogy. Professor Williams will be 
assisted in Mathematics by Professor 
John J. Houtz and Coach Ullery. 

Professor Brungart will remain the 
Head of the Department of Latin Mis3 
Woodruff will relieve him of a consid- 
erable amount of the Latin in order 
that he may devote more time to the 
supervision of Observation and Prac- 
tice Teaching. 

S 

Negative Team Ends 
a Successful Season 



Debating Team Defeats Princeton 
Audience Decision; Loses to I'p- 
sala and N. J. State 



by 



Totals 1 5 27 

Concluded on Page 4 



8 1 



Man's Best Friend 
Attends Chapel Here 



New members of the Student Council 
were installed into office with impres- 
sive ceremonies in Seibert Hail, on 
Thursday, at 5:00 p. m. 

The retiring president. Miss Rebecca 
Foster, opened the meeting. Miss Ida 
Sweitzer. secretary-treasurer of the 
1928-'29 Council, called the rati and 
read the financial report for the past 
year. 

Dr. Smith gave a brief talk in which 
he stressed the idea of faculty and stu- 
dent cooperation. Miss Hade also made 
a few brief remarks. 



Tennis Team Drops 
Match to Juniata 



One Who Is Exempted From Chapel 

Attendance Visits On Own 

Free Wilt 



Susquehanna's negative debating 
team lost two and won one debate on 
its extensive tour thru New Jersey last 
week. The team was comprised of Dan- 
iel Connell, Byron Haffer. Frank Bruno, 
1 with Frank Ramsey acting as alternate. 

The team debated a strong team at 
New Jersey State College. Upper Mont- 
clair on Monday night, and at Upsala 
College. East Orange on Tuesday night, 
losing both by very narrow margins. 
The team was slightly off-color after 
two weeks of idleness during which time 
no debates were held 

Determined to bring home some 
laurels to Susquehanna, the debaters 
put forth their best on Wednesday 
night and defeated Princeton Universi. 
ty by an audience decision. 

This debate was the climax of a very 
remarkable forensic season in which 
eighteen out of twenty-two contests 
were won with teams from the major 



Susquehanna Racqueteers Play Fast 

Gaines But Fail to Score; 

Here Today 



On Its Own 

"Why doesn't you-all put a self- 
stahtah on youah cah?" 

"No, suh! I don' want to see it agwine 
off sometime when Ah'm not aroun'." 



Some men are like eggs; they have 
to get bad before they attract any at- 
tention. 



The oath of office was administered enough to excite the interest of a well- 
to the following members of the new filled gallery. 



progress being made and to make a re- 
port. 

Last week someone's stray hound, evi- 

Orange tennis team dropped its first dently a "homeless Hector," was sent 

match of the season to Juniata at to see whether the students had im- 

Huntingdon, Saturday. proved on the singing of hymns To us. 

Although the match was lost, most of he seemed very methodical in his habit-s 

the individual matches were close inasmuch as he reported at Seibert Hall 

at the exact time designated for the 
beginning of Chapl. 



Compulsory chapel attendance at 
Susquehanna has become an important 
factor in life on the CMtpUl 

Even the animal world has been at- 
tracted by it, and every once in a 
while sends an ambassador to note the " iles ^ ilIld universities of the east. 

The affirmative teams lost one out of 



ten, and the 
twelve which 
vtctOfiM 



negative, three out of 
gives each team tune 

S 



Junior Prom to be 
Held May 18 in Gym 



council: Miss Anna Cleaver, president; 
Miss Ethelynne Miller, vice president; 
Miss Enza Wilson, secretary-treasurer; 
Miss Harriet Leese. Miss Evelyn Brin- 
ser. Miss Isabel Moritz, Miss Dorothy 
Beck. Miss Edna Tress-ler Miss Edith 
Erdly and Miss Ruth Jacobs 



Susquehanna's singles team was com- 
prised of Burford, Michaels, Captain 
Kiracofe and Helwig. Juniata's team 
was comprised of Longwell, Captain 
Flory, Orosswickle and Underkofflet. 
In the doubles. Burford and Michaels 
opposed Longwell and Flory, and Stern 



Anna Cleaver, the new president then and Helwig opposed Grosswicfcle and 
gave a short talk asking for the co-op- , Underkofflet. 



eration of the girls with the new Coun- 
cil during the coming year. 

Retiring members are: Rebecca Fos- 
ter president; Mary Eastep vice presi- 
dent; Ida Sweitzer secretary-treasurer; 
Gladys Staub and Ethel Weikert. 



The Little Crusaders hope to change 
the results in a return match with 
Juniata here, today, Friday, the Gross- 
man racqueteers will meet the Eliza- 
bethtown team on the Elizabethtown 
courts. 



He was promptly requested to oblige 
ua with his absence. When he refused, 
he was thrown out bodily, only to re- 
turn thru the main entrance 

He calmly walked down the aisle and 
sought a place among the august sen- 
iors. They resented his canine presence, 
and encouraged by remarks and ges- 
ticulations from the faculty, they threw 
him out again 

He has not been seen since, but we 
feel safe in making the assertion that 
either he, or perhaps a more formidable 
representative will again seek the data 
they desire. 



Novel Scheme of Decoration Arranged; 

Subscription Fee Five Dollars; 

Juniors Required to Pay 



Final preparations are being made 
I for the annual Junior Prom which is to 
bf held May 18 a.s a climax to May 
Day festivities. 

A novel scheme of decoration is being 
arranged by the committee. It will be 
something different from the usual dec- 
orations in the Alumni Gymnasium 
It will require the cooperation of all 
student groups to insure success. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SCSQEUHANNA. SELlfNSGROVE, PA- 



TUESDAY. MAY 7, 1929 



HE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly by the Students of Susquehanna University 



(■(1 and receive the benediction of the aires. Have we gone TOO panna, first : Gilliland. Susquehanna, 
,. . , . , , . e j. , - D . v . second; Bower, Elizabethtown, third. 

far in athletics on the one hand and m disregard tor the *tu-; Time 2 miriutes n seconds. 

dent on tlie other? 11' we have, now is the time to reC0118ider.| 120 yard high hurdles— Glenn, Sus- 



6ubK'ription $1.50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berper, '31, Circulation Manager, 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrcve, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Let lis produce both better athletes and better students. Let ! quehanna. first; Dreibelbis Susque- 
us give to each his due praise and honor in his respective field. 



•flember Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Frank E. Ramsey '30 

Managing Editor News Editor 

Russell Carmichael "31 Clifford Johnston '31 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 
Bettv Wardrop '32 John Kindsvatter '32 Lewis Rich '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 
Herman Fenstermacher '32 Leonard Olsen '32 

John Auchrnuty '32 



-S- 



"OVEREMPHASIS" CRY 18 NEVEB SILENCED 

Evidently, the over-emphasis of college sports is an all-year 



hanna. second; Angst adt, Elizabeth- 



town, third. 



Time, 18 seconds. 

S 



! 



f Personal Cards and Stationery, 
topic Of dieilssioil. It doesn t die With t lie last tOUChdOWIl. Major J De Luxe Line of Printing 

Griffith, athletic commission of the Big Ten, and prominent in J u? E si?cLw XG Writ\ E x > or C Sa R mpies. i 
all amateur sports said in a recent address : • p i J?1£W X V PRESS 



TUESDAY, MAY 7. 1929 

busy 

Yon have no doubt noticed the unusual activity on The 
Campus. Everybody seems to have something to do: in tact. 
more than they can do. We believe this is an augury of whole- 
some conditions. Yet we feel an adjustment could he made in 
our college calendar which would prevent the crowding in of 
ho many events during the last months of the year. 

By way of making clear just what we mean, we will men- 
tion some of the activities of the present month, The Men's 
Glee Club gave a concerl at Northumberland May 2: the College 
Orchestra presented their home program, May;!: Sigma Sigma 



'We will make progress more rapidly if we concentrate our J 
efforts on methods of improving amateur sports and on means 1 
of promoting athletics for those who have so far been neglected. < 

Lawrence Fisher '32 t j ulH M . (l w jj] ^y AVOr]v ing because football lias suddenly grown 

popular with a large number of people." 



berland, Pa. 



Northumberland, 



Si- 



Delta will present Barrie 



'Quality Street."' Max HI; Phi Mil 



ADVERTISING SUSQUEHANNA 
The colleges of our nation are now engaged in extensive 

advertising. The competition in periodicals is keen. In their 
chapel exercises High School Seniors are being impressed by 
College representatives. These few weeks before graduation con- 
stitute a critical moment in the lives of many High School Sen- 
iors. For they must decide what college they wish to attend. The 
great amount of sharp competition between these advertisements 
tends to make the selection of a college rather perplexing. Usual- 
ly the senior turns to his friends fur advice and bases his decis- 
ions on their words. 

As loval students of Old S. U., we can be of inestimiable 



WM. SCHNURE 

Real Estate and Bonding 



Btll Phone 



ICO East Mill St. 



-4> 



LEAOTTA'S 

BEAUTY 
SHOP 

a, 202 S. Market St. 



value in bringing the finest type of students here thru our in- 
Delta will offer then- annual play May 17, and the following day ^^ • ■ ^ ^^ ^ ad(]n . SS( . s Qf om Wenda at 

the College May Day Festivities. This .Iocs not include prepara- ^ ^ th ; nftl( . ( , i AVt . will be uf mll Bervice t0 our eolu . C( , Don't 

tion for the presentation ol "Hamlet, Coinineneemeni Week 

any of the other listed events of the month, twelve in all. 



ueiice. 
home to the offic 

«" delay, tomorrow may be too late. Act now! Boost Susquehanna ! 

We •" ■ . : 



nor 



I 



Second Door Below 
First Lutheran Church 



PHONE 58*Z^ 



TRACK TEAM 

BEATS ELIABETHTOWN 



third. Distance. 99 feet 1 



Continued from Page 1 
Susquehanna, third. Height. 5 



Susquehanna 
4 inches. 

Javelin— Gearhart. Susquehanna. 1st; 
Winters, Susquehanna, second; Bed- 
ford. Susquehanna, third. Distance, 146 

feet. 6.5 inches. 

_.. _. . j 21 N. Third St. Sunbury, 

Two mile run— Rhine, Susquehanna, , l. m ......... ............ 

first; Shantz. Elizabethtown, second; — 

third. Fisher. Susquehanna, third. Time, 10 

minutes 35 seconds. 

Shot put — Fisher, Elizabethtown, 1st; Running broad jump— Jones, Susque- 

Winters, Susquehanna, second; Bed- hanna, first; Bower, Elizabethtown,!! TUDENT 



: 



had seventeen events in April and fourteen in .March. In con- s - 
trast, we had seven college events in October and seven in Nov- 
ember. Without comment, this clearly shows a preponderance 
of activities in April and May. J-. f 

It is true that snme of these activities eouM not be presented ^ Vault _ paralis< £usque h a nna 
to their best any other time. But a ureal many of them should fi rs t ; coldren. Susquehanna, second 
ami COUld be given in October. November, or between the Thanks- Crouthamel, Elizabethtown. 

giving and Christmas recesses, tn other words, with proper ] 
planning, these extra-curricular activities would be distributed 

thninnt the college year. If any Organization plans to give a ford. Susquehanna, third. Distance, 32 second; Wellicky, Susquehanna, third. 

play during the year, is it not reasonable that they could do as feet 3 inches. Distance, w feet v* inches. 

well in Fel rmirv as in \nril or Mav'* 440-yard dash— Norton. Susquehanna, 220 yard low hurdles— Johnston, Sus- I | 

' ' • ' s " • . *' , . . , first: Gilliland, Susquehanna, second; quehanna. first; Neiswender, Susque- ; - 

As students, we should welcome any carefully planned col- Johnson , tnird . Time , 58.2 seconds. hanna, second: Barber, Elizabethtown, : | 

lege calendar for the COmillg academic Fear. Such a plan would Discus— Fisher, Elizabethtown, first; third. Time, 29.3 seconds. 
Systematize all OUr College activities, preventing the recurrence Yoim «- Susquehanna, second; WtotW 880 yard run-Fairchilds. Susque-' 

of the annoying situation we have now. 



LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS 
DRAWING SUPPLIES 

JOS. L. MENTZ 

The Stationer 
j Remington Portable Typewriters 

Pa. 



Feaster's Restaurant 



AND EAT" 

Market Street Selinsgrove 



STEP-SINGS 

With the change in the administrative policies of our in 
■titution there necessarily has been a change in the traditions 
which surrounded student everyday life. It therefore devolves 
upon each student t<> suggest and put Into effect new customs 
to add to the color of college life. 

Sonic of our sister institutions have adopted a custom that 
to us seems very interesting. It is the custom ol "step-tinging" 
and we should like to propose that Susquehanna take up this 
custom in earnest next year, it being too late to begin this year. 

Our plan is as follows: Every Mondaj evening, Immediately 
after dinner, the student body would assemble on the steps of 
Seibert Hall, or it the weather be inclement, In Seibert Chapel 
Hall, to sing class, sentimental and humorous songs. A complete 
s of thes,,. would be given to each student participating. After 
all the songs which had been requested were sung, one of the 
chases or studeni groups would present a short and entertain- 
ing skil of some kind. The Alma Mater would follow this and 
bring the sing to a lose. 

We honestly Indievo thai such a custom would do much 
toward Improving studeni relationships and quickening the col- 
\\ npe thai one oj our leaders will take this idea 
up and promote 



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FRESH CUT FLOWERS and POTTED PLANTS for WEDDINGS, 
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Visitors Always Welcome at Our Green HouMt 

GEO. B. MINE 

FLORIST 



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PICTURE FRAMING 

| PROMPT SERVICE AND LARGE j 



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,ECTION OF MOULDINGS 

.- • : 






.'A 






A STUDENT 

i college determines what he will be in 
-i- I H 'ivi ii ' ,■; :_.• ill the people who uu 'o 



First National Bank of ScJins Grove 
Welcomei Students' Account* 
RESOURCES 1^ EXCESS OF fl,5OO,OO0.OO 



FEEHRER & NOLL 

BARBERS 

4 WEST PINE STREET 



- n loaf 'it four yearn or as many as H taken ♦->■ 



tin in _• < thru. Ma> this, then, be the reason why the lisl » 

i college graduates \\li<» are failures is ><» itrikingly long? Is 
this why they cannot compete with the fellow who did not have 
• i . opportui ii to secure a college degree bul who it a real work- 

Our newspaper, our conversation, and our thoughts are 
extra-curricular activities, One wonders if 

one iv realh layii _ - i«l foundations for later life. When nine 
i i w in a basi ball game, we talk about it. we write about it. and 
we -' ; ■ in for 'heir vi< n A studeni studies for hours on 
a subject and in It, spending as much energy perhaps ;ls 

th. - ers a competitive contest. Dues he re- 

f Absolutely no. [nstead many look upon 
him with contempl and scorn for his efforti because they do 
he backbone to fighl the mental problems as he has. 

i> waul si - .ill fields. The colleges 

with the biggesi and besi 'earn- will flourish. Others will look 

upo envy, bul it tin y do not produce real men and 

,,iit in . i their aj hey will tail in their 

»sion. They will be remembered for a season only whereas 

the ollege which prodm <•> real leaders will always be remember- 



SPEIGELMIRF/S 1 1 The Strand 



Furniture, Carpi t$, Floor Coverings 

SELLNSGROVE 




om: real newspapeb 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUNBURY, PA. 



SUNBURY, PA. 

PICTURES THAT SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 

| Home of the Best the Silver Screen 
| with Special Musical Numbers by 
» Allan Kissinger on the Big Organ 

» 
t 

{ 

Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday, 



.,,,, 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

REV. G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 

Susquehanna University is located in the heart of the beautiful 
Susquehanna Valley, in the home-like borough of Selinsgrove. Dor- 
mitories and recitation buildings are In excellent condition with all 
modern conveniences. 



Dean of College 

DR. HERBERT A. ALLISON, 

A.B., A.M., L1U.D. 



Dean of Theolopy 

DR F. P. MAXHART. 

A.M., D.D., L.L.D. 



May 9-10-11 



I 

j "Cohens and Kellvs 
In Atlantic Citv" 



Q m — — * 



! 



TUESDAY, MAY 7, 1929 



THE SCSQEUHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



f 



7 



THE ADVANTAGES OFFERED TO 
STUDENTS IN A SMALL COLLEGE 



By Dr. H. A. Surface, Sc.D. 

Professor of Biology, S. U. 
I have taught in three of America's 
large colleges (Ohio State University. 
Cornell and Penn State), and in two 
cf the smaller (University cf the Pa- 
cific, and Susquehanna), and in my 
many years of experiences and per- 
sonal observation I have decided that 
for undergraduate students the smaller 
college has many distinct advantages. 
Among these are <1> the acquaintance- 
ship and personal touch with nearly all 
ether students; (2) the much closer 
contact of students and teachers, not 
only in classes, but also socially; (3) 
the smaller classes, which make it pos- 
sible for each student to take direct 
part in every recitation; (4) the great- 
er opportunity for each individual stu- 
dent to use all kinds of apparatus 
available; '5> the more ready access 
to books in the library, because there 
are fewer students rushing simultan- 
eously for some assigned book: (8) the 
lessened number of "outside interests" 
to take the time and attention of the 
students; -Ti the realization that the 
student is known to nearly all other 
students and to most members of the j 
faculty, and may be named and brought 
to account for any personal misde- 
meanor at any time and place; (8) the 
realization of one's greater influence 
among a few rather than among many; j 
<9) the better opportunity to forge- 
ahead and achieve recognition and 
awards where there are fewer competi- 
tors, and this means greater incentive 
to making efforts; <10) the near prox- 
imity to "the Heart of Nature" for 
nature students in the smaller school, 
which is generally located more "in the 
open." 

On the other hand, it is true that the 
larger college offers >a"> larger library 



facilities, (b) greater laboratory equip- 
ment, (c) more technical professional 
services by more technically trained 
teachers, id) and a greater range of 
subjects from which too choose. Yet 
these are certainly features to attract 
graduate students rather than under- 
graduate, and may be even a serious 
handicap to the latter. For example, 
if a Freshman student should wish to 
get some practical knowledge of insects 
through the study cf Entomology, will 
it not be puzzling and disadvantag- 
eous to him to be offered a choice of 
from twenty to thirty "courses" in En- 
tomology rather than just one. and 
that fitted to his needs? 

As to the greater knowledge of 
teachers in the larger schools, this is 
doubtful, and ever if true, what advan- 
tage is it to an undergraduate stu- 
dent? Educationally, we have passed 
beyond the time when pofound knowl- 
edge of any one or more of all sub- 
jects marks the ability of the teacher. 
The greatest value of a teacher today 
lies not in his ability to impart facts, 
but in his ability to develop character, 
to help others to form correct habits, 
to train his students in methods of 
study and habits of thought, and how 
to learn what they wish to know, to 
be honest, earnest, self-reliant, sober 
and industrious, useful and service- 
able citizens. The world says today, "It 
is not the size of your college, nor of 
your head, by which you will be mea- 
sured, but by the size of your heart 
and hand. You will not be measured 
by the number of stored facts that you 
have packed away, but by your char- 
acter, common sense, and ability to ren- 
der a worth while service." 

Now what are the observed results? 
A year ago last summer, one of Sus- 
quehanna's graduates of that season 
was an applicant for an appointment 
to a position in one cf Pennsylvania's 
largest high schools, in competition 



with graduates from each of the larg- 
est three educational institutions in 
this State Through the fact that he 
had a general knowledge of many re- 
lated subjects in Nature, and could 
teach one as well as another, he re- 
ceived the appointment, although in 
competition with the specialists trained 
by recognized experts. As a sequel. 
last spring he was the first of fifty 
teachers in that high school to be 
asked to remain the following year, 
with a considerable increase in salary. 
Many specific examples of just this 
kind can be cited. These are definite 
supporters of the facts expressed above. 

S 

COLLEGE PERSONALS 
Dr. Geo. E. Fisher Heads Organization 
Dr. George E. Fisher is president of 
the Snyder County Sunday School As- 
sociation which was in session May 1 
and 2 at Shamokin Dam. At the ban- 
quet. "Bill" Roberts sang a solo, after 
which Dr. Smith brought greetings 
from Susquehanna. Dr. Dunkelberger 
spoke on the "Religious Life of Young 
People." 

S 

I don't believe in spanking; the more 
you lick a postage stamp the less it 
sticks. 



SUSQUEHANNA NINE 

LOSES TO JUNIATA 

Continued from Page 1 



ELECTRICITY 



the modern prospector 





A STOUT heart; a burro laden with pick, shovel, 
and the bare necessities of life; and the pros- 
pector was ready for the gold rush— Sutter's Mill, 
the Pike's Peak country, Cripple Creek, Klondyke. 
A scattered trail of half-wcrked claims marked 
his sacrifices. 

To-day mining is a business, with electricity 
replacing wasteful brawn in mine and mill. 

The deep mine, with electric lights, hoists, and 
locomotives; the surface mine with huge electric 
shovels scooping up tons of ore in a single bite; 
the concentrating mill with its batteries of elec- 
trically driven machines; the steel mill with its con- 
stant electric heat — here are but a few of elec- 
tricity's contributions to the mineral industries. 

So in every industry, electricity increases produc- 
tion and cuts costs. It is the modern prospector, 
leading the way into wider fields and tapping 
undeveloped resources — that we may enjoy a finer 
civilization and a richer, fuller life. 










s" * V -'~'»~_V 
sr - «->• - 



You will find this mono- 
gram on powerful motors 
that drive heavy mining 
machinery and on tiny- 
motors that drive sewing 
machines. Both in industry 
and in the home it is the 
mark of an organization 
that is dedicated to elec- 
trical progress. 



Sv.sci;ehanna seven. Bunching their 
bits :.: opportune moments proved the 
deciding factor in favor of the Indians 
Lineup: 

Susquehanna 

AB R H O A E 

Good, 2b ... 4 2 2 

Maiasky, cf 3 1 

Shilling, 3b 3 1 

Groce, lb 4 2 10 

Heim, ss 4 4 

Snyder. If 4 

Sprout, rf 3 

Donnell, p 3 

Wail, c 3 



3 





1 1 



Totals 33 6 10 27 11 

Palmer batted for Wall in inth. 

Two base hits — Harley. Hunter, Don- 
nell, Groce; three base hit— Sprout; 
home runs— Steele and Berry; stolen 
bases — Maiasky 2. Andrews. Berry, base 
on balls — Hunter 3, Donnell 1; strike 
outs— Hunter 11. Donnell 1. 



1110 



1 
2 



'Palmer 



ly stole second and came heme on a 
wild throw several feet over Groce's 
head at first. This was the last tally of 
the game. 

Good, diminutive second baseman, 
prevented an Indian rally in this same 
frame by a spectacular catch. Run- 
ning back en a hard and swift fly, he 
caught the pill with one hand by leap- 
ing high into the air. and closed the 
frame. 

The game was fast and interesting 
throughout. Juniata had ten hits and 



3 7 23 14 3 



Totals 31 

Juniata 

AB R H O A E 



Steele, ss 4 1 2 2 1 

Berrv, cf 3 2 1 



Andrews, lb 4 1 3 10 

Laporte, 2b 4 1 

Ataski, If 4 1 

Miller, c - 4 o l 13 

Harley. 3b 4 1 1 1 



Conner, rf 3 

Hunter, p 3 





1 



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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQEUHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA- 



TUESDAY. MAY 7, 1929 



SPOT NEWS OF ALUMNI 



Bv MARY EASTEP '30 Aumni Editor 



-^ 



Parson Helps Save a Home 

The following story was published last 
week in the Harrisburg Patriot. It con- I 
cerns the Reverend W. E. Swope, a I 
well-known alumnus of Susquehanna | 
and a former pastor of the Lutheran 
Church at Watsontown: 

"The story of how the Rev W. E. 
Swope, pastor of Trinity Lutheran 
church, Camp Hill, saved a home from 
d miction by fire in Campbellstown, a 
week or m >re ago and then slipped 
away after the blaze with his name un- 
known to the widow and I lldren 
whose dwelling was threatened was 
told last nlghl by the pas > a sur- 
prise party given in his honor in the 
Camp Hi!' fl e hall. 

"The fire fightrn' parson as he was 
dubbid by speakers at the party last 
night was motoring from Lebanon 
where he will become pastor of the First 
Lutheran church on May 12. when he 
saw the blaze In Campbellstowr. When 
he arrived at the burning home the 
firemen had exhausted their chemical 
supp had no supply of wat< I 

n the pumper. They had folded up 
thei . d were w itching the build- 

ing bui 

"The pastoi remembered instructions 
he had given . I fife fig 

classes in Camp Hill and told th< 
men how to fig the blaze 1 
nk ...•-■' 
ming a "b lumping 

•<Th building 

and su] 

■ n compani< arrived from ai 
town to complete the work. 

"The Ri". Mr. Swope told the : 
In i lustrating the use that can be made 
of fire fighting knowledge. In his talk W ould one 
to !■< men md friends who E nli 

att nded the farewell party he called a 
fireman's work 'a Christian as well as 
a civic duty.' " 

S 

ALUMNI BRIEFS 
These Alumni were seen on the cam- 
pus over the week-end: 

Harold Ditzler. now attending the 
Princeton Seminary at Princeton, New 
Jersey. 

Patsey Gimmie, teacher and coach at 
Central City High School. 

Theodora Rogers, teacher in Danville 
High School. 

Alice Glou. doing secretarial work at 
Wilkes-Barre. 

Reverend Andrew Beahm, preaching 
at Ickesburg. 

Theodore Cameron, teacher at Mil- 
lerstown. and his famous "cowboy." 
S 



have been more or less — chiefly less— 
ir. Both have been rendered at 
Susquehanna and the latter has pass- 
ed its second edition. 

At present "we" are pastor of Christ 
English Lutheran Church of Birming- 
ham Alabama, the greatest city in the 
New South and destined to become one 
of the biggest and finest cities of the 
world. We have not regretted our com- 
Ing here a single day. 

A small congregation and its pastor 
are trying vigorously to make our- 
selves felt in the community of 285.000 
with some degree of success. I have 
been writing a series on "The Life of 
Christ," for the Sunday edition of the 
Birmingham News, circulation .80,000. 
and through the feature section of this 
paper I am preaching weekly to many 
more thousands than I ever did in my 
life before. Have been writing "short 
and pithy" editorials for the News as 
time and opportunity afford. 

With sincere apologies to Horace 
Greeley I would say to the young men 
of Susquehanna, who crave opportunity 
and are not afraid to launch out into 
real life:— "Young man. go M 
Come to Birmingham 

Very sincerely yours. 
SANFORD N. CARPENTER. 
S 

TALES VOL LOSE 

thought 
H ow much. 11 will mean to 

A 11 of us. if we sit still and 

I ie fi i.llow all the 

L it tie Seminaries? 



EDITOR'S NOTE 

Ma eriai for this week's edition 
of THE SUSQUEHANNA was writ- 
ten by the class in Journalism, Miss 
Hade, instructor, in the absence of 
the Editor-in-Chief. 

The members of this class are: 
Arnold Michaels. Glenn Clark, John 
Senko, Gerhard Kern. Edward Bol- 
linger. George Dumbauld and Frank 
Ramsey. 

These young men have been 
studying the technique of news- 
paper writing since the beginning 

f this term and have contributed 
aumeroui articles to this weekly. 



The club is open-sorority but not 
anti-sorority. It is open to all non-sor- 
ority girls. Its aim Is the improvement 
of campus social life, and it is in keep- 
ing with this aim that the play will be 
presented on Friday night 
S 

CRUSADERS LOSE TO 

HAMILTON BATSMEN 

Continued from Page 1 
Hamilton 

R H O A E 

Morris. 2b 5 

Stevens, ss 

Knox, cf 2 

Chatfleld, c 2 l 5 l 1 

Rrzelle. rf 1 

E fgleston, 3b 1 2 1 

Crowley, lb 15 2 

Calkins, p 1 l 5 



wa: 



if 



o 1 



"o~~ff 



Total3 2 4 27 15 2 

Two base hit— Good; struck out— by 
Danks 9, Calkins 3: base on balls— off 
Dar.ks 1, Calkins 2; hit by pitcher— 
F.czelle. Umpire— Duck. 



STUDENTS 

TRY 

HEICHLEY'S 

LUNCH - SODAS - CANDY 



QUALITY STREET" TO 

BE PRODUCED FRIDAY 



Continued from Page 1 
School,. Nan McHugh, Anne Gilbert. 
Miriam Keim. Netty Senko, Corinda 
Sell and Martha Gessnes; Charlotte 
Parratt, a gay young lady. Harriet 
Leese: Harriet. Margaret Pink; Ensign 
Blades, John Sto tz; Lieutenant Spicer. 
Herbert Schmidt 
This play was first produced in 1902 
iccess from the be- 



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excellent plays 



I I . one. In I 

-aid that 

In the school 

.: mi a battle- 



of Lutheranism 
.. v. ion? 



Bu :anna does not need 

U nion. as she needs her endowments. 
P. emember also our best plea — 

V es, "A Lutheran Seminary!" 

O f course you know the big fish 
U sually swallows the small ones; 
R emember then who baited the hook. 

S usquehanna began as a Seminary. 

E xists chiefly thru the Seminary; 
! M ay we never kill the goose that 
! I s laying the golden eggs! 

N ow as to location of this high and 

A 11-Eastern Seminary; guess? 

R ight! And the cost will drive us?— 

Y es, all aboard for Quaker City! 
—By An Alumni Advocate of Will 
Rogers 



finning It is ha..' 
Ics as ( ne : most 

.. epoch. 

B 
. contemporary i 

there Is 

Quality s ■ 

iield" 
The play will be produced by the 
mal pen-sorority organization 
the view of presenting to Susque- 
hanna audiences a drama of the high- 
est order. It was secured only after 
the payment of a high royalty. The 
iming will also require the ex- 
penditue of a considerable amount of 
m : ney. The club will be competing 
with the down-town theater on that 
night but it is hoped that Susquehan- 
na's students wil give the play the pat- 
ronage which it deserves. 

Sigma Sigma Delta was founded as 

a local club at Bucknell in 1924, where 

it was known as "Lanterna Laetitiae." 

j The club was nationalized in 1928. 

! with the old Lanterna Laetitiae be- 

1 coming the Alpha Chapter, and the 

Susquehanna Theta Chi Lambda Club. 

Beta Chapter. Other Chapters have 

1 been added since that time and the 

organization has been progressing nice- 

iiy. 



Dancing at Island Park 

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— • 



April 26. 1929. 

To The Editor of The Susquehanna 

My dear Editor:— 

Alter about a year of delay The Sus- 
quehanna has finally been forwarded 
to my new address. The first number 
to arrive "en the scene" was the Alum- 
ni number I was impressed with the 
tact that so many of my former asso- 
ciates at Susquehanna have been 
climbing the "dizzy heights" to fame. 
But fame ll only a passing shadow, 
which is cause for neither boasting nor 
envy It la v. hat Its Latin origin pro- 
Ina II to be— "fama," only a repor. 
the whistling of the wind; less than 
the wh \ on tombstones 

Our happiness should be measured by 
the joy and comfort we bring to others. 
Let the name pass. There is enough 
to overshadow the glory of each. 

I note also that the chronicler gives 
me credi* for writing "a treatise on 
original sin!'' It is a great mark of 
distinction. I remember that I once 
was guilty of such an offense; in fact 
1 still have somewhere among the trea- 
Mires of my library some of the pale 
green copies of that tract which the 
Pittsburgh Lutheran Ministerial Asso- 
ciation thought was worth publishing. 
It was one of my early efforts 

Since then. I have tried more am- 
bitious projects with the usual propor- 
tion of success Somewhere, deep in 
the dus' of the Su.squchanr.a library 
you should find a copy of my "Refor- 
mation in Principle and Action," pre- 
Dted by the author— no one would 
buy such a book, although the "first 
edition' is about exhausted Two pag- 
m Ob "The Cross in the Midst of the 
"Year," and The Banner of the Cro 



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r -p^ 



MAY DAY 



May 18 



The Susquehanna" 



^UBif, 






>OM 



18 



Volume XXXV 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY. MAY It. 1929 



Number 3 



Eighth May Queen 
to be Crowned Here 
Saturday Afternoon 



Junior Dance to Top General Program for 
| May Day Festival; 1929 Commencement 

Week Is Announced 



,/ 



Identity of May Queen and Her Lady- 

in-Waiting Will be Disclosed 

Saturday Morning 



Nesbit's Pennsylvanians to Provide 

Music for Annual Hop in Gym; 

Subscription Fee S2.30 



PEER GYNT" BY WM. ROBERTS 
TO BE PRESENTED BY STUDENTS 



Amphitheater Will be Erected on Ath- 
letic Field : Admission 
by Tags Only 



f 



".>•' 



Susquehanna's Eighth Annual May 
Day exercises will be held on the Uni- 
versity Athletic Field, Saturday, May 
18, under the auspices of the Y. W. 
C. A. At this time the Queen of May, 
whose name is as yet unannounced, 
will be crowned with fitting ceremony 
and pageantry. 

The royal procession will move 
promptly at 2:30 p. m. The Queen, af- 
ter reaching the throne to be erected 
on the held, will be crowned immed- 
iately and the pageant will follow. 

Under the leadership of Winifred 
Meyers, president of the Y. W, C. A. 
Cabinet, a new system of election of the 
May Queen has been established. 

The women students elected • 
girls, whom they believed most capable 
of serving as Queen of May or in her 
court. These girls, all members of the 
Senior class, are as follows: Ethel Wei- 
kert, Betty Kemble. Sara Moody, Mary 
Lucinda Shaffer. Lucille Smith. Ruth 
Pace, Grace Detwiler and Rose Xhna 
Gumbert. 

In a subsequent election one of these 
was chosen to preside over the May 
Day festivities and another one was 
chosen to be her Lady-in-waiting. The 
identity of these two girls will not be 
disclosed until eight o'clock on the 
morning of May Day. 

• Cancluded an Page 4> 
S 

Observe Music Week 
With Special Number 



Joe Nesbit's Pennsylvanians have ' 
been retained by the Music Committee ! 
to provide the terpsichorean melody for j 
the Junior Prom to be held in Alumni 
OymnMium, May IT. This orchestra is 
one of the best in the State, appearing ! 
in numerous engagements in this State 
and in the South. They broadcast from ' 
Charlotte, N. C, on numerous occasions. 
They will play for a social function at 
the University of Pittsburgh on the 
night preceding the Prom. 

This affair is the only all-college 
dance on the entire social calendar for 
the year. Customs provide that it be 
held as a climax to May Day festivities 
This year's Prom will be a fitting close 
to a day of pageantry and ceremony 
at Susquehanna when the Queen of 
May. as yet unknown, will be crowned. 

The subscription fee for the dance is 
iohars and fifty cents. Tickets 
must be secured from members of the 
each of whom has two. ! 
her ticket - v 111 be sold. 

Dancing will be from eight to twelve. 



Many Interesting Features Are In- 
cluded in This Year's Com- 
mencement Week 



Seminary Merger is S. I . Batsmen 
Approved by Board Trip Fast I rsinus 

Qualifications Inserted in Resolution Machine Here, 4"3 

of Approval— Synods of Lutheran 
Church Must Also Approve 



DR. MARTIN BRUMBAUGH WILL 
GIVE COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS 



Alumni Day June 8 — Old Grads Will 

Play Ball; "Hamlet" Will 

be Presented 



pro- 



Formal announcement :: 

gram of events for the 1923 C >rnmence 

men Week was made today, with the 

publication of the official programs 

Perhaps the highlight of the entire 

am .- the Commencement Address 

which will be delivered June 10 to the 

graduating students by Dr. Martin G, 

Brumbaugh president of Juniata Col- 

and ex-govern I Pennsylvania, 

be de. 
•d June 9. by Rev. William M Horn. 
DD„ of : X. Y The - 

exercises on | ■: 

d ■ will be : 

'Concluded or. Page 



Meeting in special session, the Board 
1 of Directors of Susquehanna University 
last Thursday approved the proposed 
consolidation of the theological semi- 
naries of Susquehanna University, Get- 
tysburg College and Mount Airy Semi- 
nary 

Certain qualifications to its decision 
were made at the same time and are 
embodies in the following resolution: 

"Whereas the report of the Joint 
Committee on Seminary Relations has 
been brought before a special meeting 
of the Board of Directors of Susque- 
hanna University for its action— 

Therefore, be it resolved by said 
Board of Director they acquiesce 

In the recommen .: the Joint 

Committee with the following qi 
cations: 

1 • proposed 

tall be a new 
location, 

years to come. 

i Concluded or. Page 3' 



CollegeviUe Team Makes Two Tallies 

by Spectacular Home Runs 

With None on 



GOOD AND HELM STAR AT BAT; 
DANKS PITCHES CONSISTENTLY 



Opponents Rally in Ninth Frame, But 

Fail to Score Enough Runs as 

Danks Shuts Them Out 



Coach Cilery's nine won a thrill in g 

at from Ursir.us on Saturday af- 
ternoon to the tune of 4-3 on the" Uni- 
versity Field diamond. 
Good and HeUn led m hitting for 
inna, Qood with a three-bag- 
ger and double. He r.ting 
th rou tie eighth 
%. Sterner and Peters, ol Ursinus, 
also h a homer apiece. 
The teams presented a • ■• • credit* 
-■xhibiuo: 

inna'i 



.ne 



Debaters at McAdoo Trackmen Downed 
In Forensic Contest By Drexel, 70-56 



College Men to Form 
New Hotel Orchestra 



Jury System Discussed in Inter-Team Grossman Cohorts Show Excellent 
Debate Before Teachers' Institute in Form in lMeet at Philadelphia: 

Hazleton Suburb Last Thursdav Lose in Two FinaI Events 



ix Susquehanna Students Comprise 
Orchestra Which Will Play at Bed- 
ford Springs During Summer 



Musical Organizations Appear in Chap- 
el in Observation of Special Week 
Devoted to Study of Music 



• 



Music Week was fittingly observed at 
Susquehanna last week with special 
musical numbers presented by the mu- 
sical organizations and outstanding 
artists on the campus These numbers 
"were presented during the regular 
Chapel periods each morning. 

A violin solo, entitled "Serenade,' by 
Friml, was exceptionally well executed 
by Miss Morning, accompanied by Prof. 
Allison, Tuesday. 

The Choral Club, directed by Mrs. 
Rodgers, sang two numbers Wednes- 
day morning. They presented 'The 
Sweetest Story Ever Told." by Stultz, 
and "Southern Medley." 

Thursday morning the College Band, 
under the capable leadership of Prof. 
Allison, favored the student body with 
two numbers. "Semper Fidelis," by 
Sousa and the "Alma Mater," by our 
own Prof. Sheldon. 

Susquehanna's Male Glee Club, di- 
rected by Prof. Allison, sang two se- 
lections Friday morning. They present- 
ed "Cruiskeen Lawn," by Lefebere and 
"Hurrah for the Roaring Sea," by 
Flinck. 

(Concluded on Page 3> 



Both of Susquehanna's forensic 
teams appeared in an inter-team post- 
season debate in McAdoo Boro, a sub- 
urb of Hazleton. Thursday night of 
last week The debate was held in the 
auditorium of St Patrick's Parochial 
School. 

Approximately seven hundred people 
attended the debate, It was a select 
audience of teachers and educators who 
were attending a local teacher's insti- 
tute. 

The speakers were at their best and 
presented a fine lebate to them, both 
as to argument and delivery. It was 
a no-decision debate. 

The six young men. Daniel Connell. 
Byron Hafer, Seiber Troutman, Russell 
Klinger. Walter Foulkrod and Frank 
Bruno, were entertained at dinner at 
the latter's home prior to the debate. 
Mr Bruo lives at Kelayres, near, Mc- 
Adoo. 

After the debate, the Supervising 
Principal of the McAdoo public schools 
showed them a royal time in the city 
ol Hazleton. The boys returned to Sus- 
quehanna that same night. 



Susquehanna trackmen were forced 
to take the short end of a 70-56 score 
at the hands of Drexel at Philadelphia 
last Saturday in a very close nip and 
tuck dual meet. 

The victory for the Blue and Gold is 
only their second triumph over the Or- 
ange and Maroon since they have been 
meeting each other annually. The meet 
this year was much closer than last. 
In fact, it was not until the final two 
events that the victor was decided. 

Our team was very consistent in plac- 
ing. There was not a single event that 
passed on without a Susquehanna man 
in either the winner's column or the 
runner-up berth. 

Winter's discus heave of 108 feet 5 
(Concluded on Page 3> 



Campus Rules Detain 
Sisters at Same Time 



Accumulation of Demerits Forces Popu- 
lar Co-ed Sisters Under Campus 
Restrictions One Week 



New Inter-Fraternity 
Council Men Elected 



Loving Cup Will be Presented to Frat- 
ernity Attaining Highest Schol- 
astic Average Each Year 



P. G. M. Installs and 
Elects New Members 



V, 



'T Or. Smith and Four Seniors Received 
\ Into Membership in Honorary Frat- 
ernity; Junior Election Announced 



I Dr. G. Morris Smith and four mem- 
bers of the Senior Class were received 
Vi vnto membership in Pennsylvania 
jfchapter of Pi Gamma Mu National 
'/Honorary Social Science Fraternity. 
H and the Juniors elected and to be in- 
stalled later were announced, in the 
course of its regular business meeting 
last Monday night. 
^ The Seniors installed were Misses 
rSelen B. Ammerman, Gertrude M Ar- 
bogast, Helen Weaver and Mr H. AU- 
ers Hartley. 

The Juniors who were elected and 
who will be received into full member- 
ship at the annual banquet of the 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Newly-elected members of the Inter- 
Fraternity Council held their first 
meeting under the direction of the old 
members last week. Formal installa- 
tion of these members and election of 
officers for next year will take place 
at a subsequent meeting next week 

The new members are Lukehart and 
Barber from Bond and Key, Ramsey 
and Senko from Epsilon Sigma, Mat- 
tern and Bchxack from Phi Lambda 
Theta. and Rhoads and Berger from 
Phi Mu Delta 

One of the outstanding accomplish- 
ment! of the outgoing council is the 
purchase of an inter-fraternity schol- 
arship cup which will be presented at 
the end of the first semester of each 
year to the fraternity which shall have 
attalntd the highest scholastic average 
in both the last semester of the pre- 
ceding year and the first semester of 
the year in which the cup is presented 
The cup will be presented each year 
Ctt this basis. Permanent possession is 
attained after a fraternity wins the cup 
three consecutive years. 

a 



Seibert Hall chuckled when one of 
its number was "campussed" because 
she screamed when an innocent little 
June bug frightened her without malice 
aforethought. 

But Seibert Hall did more than mere- 
ly chuckle when two sisters were "cam- 
pussed" simultaneously because of an 
accumulation of demerits and forced to 
remain within Susquehanna's limits for 
one solid week. Here was food for 
thought 

The affection between Jonathan and 
David of Biblical lore, had nothing on 
the congenial companionship and mu- 
tual interest between these two sisters. 
The thoughtfulness with which they 
treat each other has received the ad- 
miration of all those with whom they 
have come in contact. The care with 
which they administer unto each oth- 
er's needs has become proverbial in 
Seibert Hall. Whether in peace or 
strife, pain or pleasure, trial or tribula- 
tion, the two girls are known to have 
always clung together unflinchingly and 
undauntedly for one common purpose. 
mutual happiness This last incident Is 
typical of their entire lives 

Poets, novelists, playwrights, and 
what-not. who have in their writings 
given cross-sections of life, have al- 
most always led us to believe that 
brothers and sisters are always "scrap- 
ping" and quarreling. But this Inci- 
dent Is a shining example of the fal- 
lacies in their arguments 



Six Susquehanna students have band- 
ed themselves together into a unique 
little orchestra and signed a very re- 
munerative contract to play at the Bed- 
ford Springs Hotel, near Altoona, dur- 
ing the entire summ» r season This is 
one of Pennsylvania's most popular 
summer resorts. A number of Susque- 
hanna students are employed there 
every season. 

The contract was closed with Mr. 
Carter Gardner, manager of the hotel, 
last week-end. after giving him a dem- 
onstration. It calls for conservative 
jazz and light concert music. 

The engagement will begin June 8. 
immediately after the close of school 
and will continue until September 21. 

The men who comprise this orchestra 
are Bryce Nicodemus, drums and busi- 
ness manager; Arnold Michaels, violin; 
Jack Ambicki. trumpet; Arthur Gelnett. 
banjo; Sherman Good, piano, and Dan- 
ny Nesbit. saxophone. All of these men 
are experienced artists at their instru- 
ments and when playing together will 
produce excellent music. 

The student body joins with THE 
SUSQUEHANNA in wishing them suc- 
cess in their venture. 



pitched vei I 

1 ■: for 

tame 

field Ma- 

H ■■ cored. Shill- 

mt a ■: to Oi h Groce hit a 

to Cob'" and was sate at first, 

Heim walked, but Snyder was thrown 

' ' »nding the first Inning with 

two on 

The Little Crusader-: again scored in 
the second, when Wall took first on a 
passed ball and took second on pitch- 
er's error. Danks singled, placing Wall 
on third. Malasky drove a hard ball to 
Bateman. who muffed it and Wall 
scored, Malasky being safe on first. 
• Concluded on Page 3) 



K.D.P. Honoraries 
Entertain Actives 



Sorority Girls Guests at Theatre Party 

and Dinner in Sunbury Last 

Wednesday 



Phi Mu Delta Will 
Present Mannequin 



Annual Stage Production of Fraternity 

Will be Given Friday Night: 

Prof. Keener Directs 



Dr. George F. Dunkelberger and 
president Smith were in Harrisburg on 
Friday attending to certain matters in 
connection with the university. 

Sunday. May 12, Mother's Day presi- 
dent Smith addressed the Reformed 
Church at Sunbury on a Mother's Day 
theme. 













EDITOR'S 


NOTE 




In 


addition to the regular . 


staff. 


the 


following have 


contributed to 


this 


week's i>sue: John Senko 


Ar- 


nold 


Michaels, Glenn Clark, 


and 


George Dumbauld 







Phi Mu Delta will stage its annual 
play this Friday evening at 8:15 p. m., 
in Seibert Chapel Hall. This year's 
production is a musical farce entitled 
"The Mannequin," revised and directed 
by Prof. N. N. Keener. 

The play is divided into three acts 
The first takes place in the home of 
Hon. Patrick T McCarthy, a multi- 
millionaire cigar manufacturer, who is 
entertaining Count De Tour, a suitor 
for the hand of Hon McCarthy i dau- 
ghter, Angelina Her heart. hOWtVtr 
been won by Jack, against whom 
the family is prejudiced, as they do not 
believe he has any business ability, 

Act two Mkes place m the Manne- 
quin shop where Hon Patrick McCar- 
thy and his guests have gathered to 
see the talk of the campus. "The Beau- 
tiful Mannequin " 

In the third let, Count De Tour chal- 
lenges the college boys to a duel for 
the affections of the Mannequin, with 
whom he has fallen deeply m lo 

Into these tons acts have been woven 
special numbers, snappy songs, and 
choruses. I i „iv nothing of beautiful 
women. The identity of Jack will keep 
one guessing from the very beginning. 

Following is the cast of characters: 

Mr Patrick McCarthy, John McHugh. 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Honorary members of Kappa Delta 
Phi were hostesses to the active mem- 
bers of that organization at a theatre 
party and dinner on Wednesday of 
last week. 

The ladies calied for the girls in cars 
at four o'clock and drove them to the 
Strand in Sunbury. where the first 
three rows of seats in the loge were 
reserved for them 

Following the show, the party as- 
sembled at the Homestead Tea Room, 
where a delicious five-course dinner 
was served The tables were beauti- 
fully decorated with pink and white nut 
baskets and sweet peas. Covers were 
laid for forty-four guests. 

At the close of the dinner the ladies 
drove the happy group of co-eds back 
to Seibert Hail 

Among those present were Mrs Aik- 
ens. Miss Hillard Mrs Manhart, Mrs. 
Walter, Mrs Brungart, Mrs. Groce, Miss 
Seal, Miss McElwee. Mrs Bucher, Mrs. 
Eyer, Mrs. North. Mrs. Charles Walter, 
Mrs Magee. Mrs Kretschmann, Mrs. 
Mowles, Mrs Nicodemus, Miss Allison, 
Mrs G. Morris Smith, all of Selins- 
grove, and Mrs Barnes of Middleburg. 



Schedule Special 
Game for May Day 



Susquehanna and Selinsgrove Nine* to 

Clash on May Day, Saturday; 

Drexel Cancels 



Lending a decided bit of local interest 
and color to Susquehanna' i annual May 
Day festival will be the game of base 
heduled between the Selinsgrove 
West Branch League team and Susque- 
hanna's nine. 

Due to a cancellation by Drexel the 
date of May 18th is open on Susque- 
hanna's baseball schedule. 

Interest in Susquheanna's May Day 
-al has increased each year The 
scheduling of this game, as part of the 
afternoon's program, should make a 
definite contribution towards making 
the 1929 May Day Festival the most 
attractive ever presented it Susque- 
hanna. 



fAGE TWO 



THE SUSQEUHANNA. SELEVSGROVE. PA. 



Tl'ESDAY, MAY 14, 1929 




Published Weekly by the Students of Susquehanna University 



Subscription $1 50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Frank E. Ramsey '30 

Managing Editor News Editor 

Russell Carmichael '31 Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 
Betty Wardrcp '32 John Kmtisvatter '32 Lewis Rich '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager AdverMsing Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Krceck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fer.stf rmacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



the past year it was only in debate that we were able to hold 
our own with the major schools of the East. 

In full justice to the efforts and achievements of our de- 
baters may we be permitted to suggest awards of the same 
character as those given last year? — A. M. 

s 



* * * 
* 



******** 



I TALES YOU WIN 1 

■j t t ,, . t t > * I ********** * 

Four weeks until finals. That ac- 
counts for so many busy students. 



Tl'ESDAY. MAY 14. 1929 



WHICH DO YOU PREPEB 

Not so many years ago it was the custom of the heads of 
the administration of our college in have faculty proctors on 
duty during ('Impel exercises every morning to enforce order 
among 'In- student body. In fact, this policy is still recalled by 
the members of the upper classes as being in vogue when they! 
were beginners at Susquehanna. 

The students resented this procedure and dubbed it any- 
thing from "childish" to "ridiculous." Were we not in'collegel 
instead ot hiuh school and could we not as college students be 
depended upon to behave in accordance with our position? Did 
we have to be treated like so many kiddies in a kindergarten? 
Did we as the future citizens ol America not have the right to 
govern ourselves? These and many other similar questions were 
fired at the administration. 

Finally, after due consideration of the proposition, the 
faculty graciously complied with the demands of the students 
ami removed the "unwanted" proctors, placing the students 
on their own honor to behave as college student! should, 

But, as in numerous other cases, the students have failed 
to abide by their promises to the faculty. What has happened? 
Today the conduct of some of the students in chapel is positively 
unbearable and an insult to these leading the morning's devo- 
tions. Continual talking ami murmuring in an undertone, shuf- 
fling and stamping of feet, boisterous laughter, the insulting at- 
titude towards speakers and entertainers on the platfom, all are 
disturbing and annoying. In fact, all the bombastic language 
at our command fails to paint accurately tin- situation as it now 
exists. No doubt these acts are innocently i< i e with no harmful 
motive but nevertheless they are very trying and should be re- 
stained. 

When students were first placed on their sense of right and 
wrong, 'his vexing attitude prevailed until immediately after 
the singing >U the opening hymn. Now, however, the noisemak* 
ing barely ceases by the time prayer is being offered, only to 
begin again when announcements are being made. 

The wh.de affair was brought to a climax last week by the 
continual and uncontrollable applauding, accompanied by 
screeching which closely resembled that of a screech owl on an 
early morning, by a number of students when several musical 
numb' is were being presented. We do not know whether or not 
they were asking for encore numbers, but if so, they certainly 
were ill-mannered in the way in winch they demanded it. 

College students should have a sense of courtesy to and re- 
spect for others. Pun-making has its place in college life but 
certainly Chapel is not the place for it. it is during 'his brief 
period of morning devotion that visitors see the entire student 
body assembled and it is then thai they receive their impressions 
as to what kind of a student group we have here at Susquehanna, 

It this state ol affairs eon nuns, something will have to 
be done. We simply cannot go on like this and permit visitors 
to go away from here with a bad impression regarding our 
student body and report it to their friends; we cannot afford 
it. Furthermore, if we show more respeel to speakers and enter- 
tainers during Chapel and exercise more restraint, the faculty 
will place us in a much higher plane. 

There are several alternatives, one of which must be select- 
id. 'her.- being uo middle ground. First, we may choose to con- 
duct ourselves as college students should. Second, we may per- 
mit our Student Council to take the matter in hand and act as 
disciplinary agent, Third, we may return to the old and undesir- 
able system of proctors and be treated like so many Inmates in 
1 house 'f detention. It is up to us to choose which it shall be. 
— F. E. R. 

s 



GAMBLING DOESN'T PAY 

There is an old saying that "you can't beat the horse" tho 
there are hundreds of hopeful low-bows who tire always folow- 
ing the races with their "systems" by width they are going to 
show the world sooner or later. 

That old saying has been verified and strengthened by old 
Tom Cheek, who died along the track at Havana, one hundred 
and four years old, after he had "followed the horses" for ninety 
years. Last summer he lost all that he had when his horse, 
Basha, came in among the "also ran." -lust after witnessing his 
failure, he fell over dead. If a man who loves and studies the 
game for ninety years cannot win, what is the use of suckers 
trying every spring and fall? 

Life is largely a gamble. Ulysses 8. Grant rose from the 
village drunkard to the most responsible position in the world 
because fate so decreed to cast the cards. Many other men have 
risen from humble parentage and surroundings to great heights 
bu 1 they always used their opportunities to the best advantage. 
How many college'students should benefit from this? How many 
are the fellows and girls, too. who do nothing but loaf thru four 
years of college life! Many could learn the lesson taught by 
Tom Cheek that gambling doesn't pay. How possibly can one 
bluff thru college and then face the world as an educated man? 
Life may be a gamble but the fellow who wins is the one who 
has a pat hand oi four aces and the time to start drawing the 
cards is now, in college, where the best opportunities of life are 
offered— G. H. C. 

B 

THE WHY OF MAY DAY 

In order that we can better understand and more highly 
appreciate the May Day exercises which will be held on our 
campus in the near future, a short history of the development 
of May Day should be given. Contrary to what many believe, 
May Day is not of American origin, but its beginning lies far 
back in history and forms one of our numerous traditions. 

May Day is the popular name of the first day of May, on 
which form an early period general festivities took place. May 
is generally termed a period of gladness because then everything 
is bursting out in new life. 

Among the Romans the feeling of the time found vent in 
their Floral games. Among the Celts, a festival called Beltein 
was held, it being a form of sun worship. The Celts here wor- 
shipped the Sun because he was the giver of all the beauty of 
May. In England, during the Middle Ages, it was customary of 
the people, even the king and queen, to gel up at an early hour "to 
fetch the flowers fresh." The fairest maid of the village was 
crowned queen of May. A little bower or arbor was placed about 
where she sat in state, receiving the homage and admiration of 
the youthful revelers who danced ami sang songs around her. 

The custom of having a May queen seems to be a special 
relic of the old Roman celebrations of the day when the Goddess 
Flora was worshipped. Perhaps the most conspicuous feature 
of these festive proceedings was the erection in every town of 
a May pole, as high as the mast id' any vessel, on which flowers 
were hung and about which the youth of the community danced 

am] sang. 

In France. Germany and many other European countries, 
May poles and May Day festivities have been common and con- 
continuos from early times. In England, however, the Puritans 
succeeded in prohibiting them for a time. It is only very re- 
cently that these festive af fairs have been growing in popularity 
in the British Isles. In America. May Day celebrations have 
come i!iN» favor during the present century. In neary all of 
the public parks of the cities, games and processions are held. 
Few indeed, are the American colleges who do not in some way 
observe this ancient custom. — <;. H. C. 



Ar.d right now, with so many Campus 
activities, we wonder how many are in- 
differently watching the other fellow 
do the work? 



Susquehanna students should remem- 
jber that it doesn't take any more tc 
! boost than to knock. And it pays bet- 
j ter, too. 



A recent Congress of the National 
Student Federation of America, meet- 
ing at the University of Missouri, de- 
cided that the campus activities which 
receive the most analytical attention 
Ere student government, the honor sys- 
i tern, fraternities, and athletics. It seems 
| all colleges have problems calling for 
! solution, and it isn't all done in a year 
; or even several years. 



LEAOTTA'S 

T BEAUTY ' 
SHOP 

202 S. Market St. 

Second Door Below 
First Lutheran Church 



JHONE 58#Z_ 



LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS 
DRAWING SUPPLIES 

JOS. L. MENTZ 

The Stationer 

Remington Portable Typewriters 

21 N. Third St. Sunbury, Pa. 



Feaster's Restaurant 

"WHERE STUDENTS MEET 
AND EAT" 



Market Street 



Selinsgrove 



SHOE REPAIRING 

Wcrk Guaranteed 

SHOES — SHINE 

C. E. POE 



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PICTURE FRAMING 

* PROMPT SERVICE AND LARGE ] 
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First National Bank of Sclins Grove 
Welcomes Student? Accounts 
RESOURCE* IS EXCESS OF 11^00,000.00 



v. 



FEEHRER & NOLL 

BARBERS 

4 WEST PINE STREET 



ft* 






SPEIGELMIRE'S 

Furniture. Carpeti, Floor CoreriiK/s 
SELLNSGROVE 



\li;\i;ss TO OUR DEBATERS 
Much talk has been prevalent on the campus the last few 
(l.-ivs .ilmiit awards for our debating teami. I' seems thai the^e 
ni>- .i number of small buttons which were awarded to our teams 
two rears ago, left over. and it is proposed that these !>• absorbed 
in awards - ar'i team. 

We are not in any way prejudiced but are interested in 
seeing the fair thing done In all <>i our various departments. 
These inn inns are nol in any measure suitable reward for the 
distinction achieved both \'i>v our college and for our debaters in 
the season jusl closed. Our athletii department 1ms provided 
sweaters for winners of the varsity "S," and we believe that 
award in keeping with thai in athletics should be given our 
debaters. Espwialh so, since it must be remembered thai during 



ONE REAL NEW8PAPER 

SUNBUEY DAIEY ITEM 

SUNRURY. PA. 



The Strand 

SI NBURY, PA. 

PICTURES THAT SPEAK 
FOR THEMSELVES 

Home of the Best the Silver Screen 
with Special Musical Numbers by 
Allan Kissinger on the Big Organ 



» 

: 
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{Till RSOAY. FRIDAY. SATURDAY 



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8 AY I T \V I T II FLO It'/; E8 

FRESH CUT FLOWERS and POTTED PLANTS for WEDDINGS 
PARTIES and FUNERALS— FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS 

in- ;it I iur OrHfl tl< 

GEO. B. KINE 

FLORIST 



SPEAKEASY 

Hear New York City Talk 
MONDAY and TUESDAY 

The Bellamy Trial 



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♦ 
» 
i 

J BELL 32-Y 



FOUR DAYS STARTING MAY 22 » 






SELINSGROVE 



Broadway Melody 

All Talking, Singing, Dancing 



TUESDAY, MAY 14, 1929 



THE SUSQEUHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



/ 

I. 



Orange Netmen Lose Susquehanna Track Tennis Team Drops 
to Eliazbethtown 5-2 Team in Meet Sat. Match to Juniata 



SEMINARY MERGER IS 

APPROVED BY BOARD 



Stern Surprises in Winning First Col- 
legiate Match: Adams Wins 
Straight-Set Match 



Crusaders in Central Penna. Meet at Orange Netmen Not Up to Form in 
Dickinson; School Boys in Meet Match with Indians; Wind 

on University Field May 25 Spoils Playing 



The Orange netmen lest their third 
match cf the season at Elizabethtown 
Friday by a 5 to 2 score. The match 
was listless and uninteresting to Sus- 
quehanna backers, except for the bright 
spot gained by Sam Stern, New Jersey 
ex-prep star in a brilliant victory over 
the Elizabethtown No. 1 player. The 
match was the first for Stern in col- 
legiate company, but his consistent play 
came to the fore, overshadowing the 
brilliant stroking of his older and more 
experienced opponent. 

Bill Adams, playing No. 5 on the 
heme team, won the other victory for 
the Crusaders, crashing through to a 
straight set victory. Capt. Kiracofe was 
defeated in a hard-fought three-set 
battle, with breaks finally deciding the 
issue. 

Helwig and Speer were also defeated 
in singles matches, while Speer and 
Stern lost their double match as did 
Helwig and Kiracofe. The Crusaders 
feel confident of turning in a team vic- 
tory when the Masons come here to- 
morrow. 

S 

GENERAL PROGRAM FOR 1929 

COMMENCEMENT ANNOUNCED 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Rev. Foster U. Gift. D.D., of Baltimore, 
Md. 

The Annual Alumni Banquet of Pi 
Gamma Mu will be held June 7, at 
which time ten members of the Junior 
Class will be initiated into membership. 
Sorority parties will immediately fol- 
low, beginning at nine o'clock. 

Class Day exercises will be held Fri- 
day morning, when the president of the 
Class will present a gift to the Univer- 
sity. Dr. Smith will receive it in behalf 
of the University. Fraternities will be 
held in the evening, beginning at nine 
o'clock. 

Alumni Day, June 8, will be of special 
interest with its crowded program of 
events of which the highlights are the 
baseball game in the afternoon in 
which the Varsity nine will cross bats 
with the "old timers." and the presen- 
tation of "Hamlet" by the Drama Class 
in Seibert Hall in the evening. 

The complete program: 

Thursday. June 6th 

5:00 p. m., Annual Banquet of Pi 
Gamma Mu, Trinity Lutheran Church. 
with address by Dr. Charles C. Peters, 
Department of Education. State Col- 
lege. 

9:00 p. m.. Sorority parties. 

Friday, June Tth 

10:00 a. m., Senior Class Day exer- 
cises College campus presentation of 
1929 Class Gift by Henry R. Carichner. 

Acceptance by President G. Morris 
Snnth. 

7:30 p. m.. recital by students of the 
Conservatory of Music, Seibert Hall. 

9:00 p. m.. Fraternity parties. 
Saturday, June 8th 

ALUMNI DAY. 

Registration upon arrival at the In- 
formation Desk. Selinsgrove Hall. 

9:00 a. m.. Alumni tennis matches. 

10:30 a. m.. Alumni Class meetings in 
Gusta\us Adolphus Hall 

12:00 m., Alumni Dinner. Horton Din- 
ing H..11. 

2:30 p. m.. Baseball game. Alumni vs. 
Varsity. 

4:C0 p. m., reception by president and 
Mrs. Smith at the president's home. 

6:00 p. m„ supper and step singing. 

7:00 p. m.. Band concert. Campus Il- 
luminations. 

8:00 p. m., "Hamlet." presented by 
the Drama Class. Seibert Hall. 
Sunday, June 9th 

10:30 a. m.. Academic Procession 
starts from Selinsgrove Hall. 

10:45 a. m.. Baccalaureate sermon in 
Trinity Lutheran Church by the Rev. 
William If. Horn. D.D.. Ithaca, N. Y. 

4:00 p. m., Memorial Exercises in 
Unicn cemetery. 

7:30 p. m„ Graduating exercises of 
the Department of Theology in Trinity 
Lutheran Church with address by the 
Rev. Foster U. Gift. DD,. of Balti- 
more. Md. 

Monday, June 10th 

9:45 a. m.. Academic Procession starts! 
from Selinsgrove Hall. 

10:00 a. m., Commencement exercises, 
Pt Hall. Address by Dr. Martin G. 
Brumbaugh. President of Juniata Col- 
toge 

Conferring of degrees. 

Announcement of Honors and Prizes. 

12:30 p. at., University Dinner for 
guests and friends. 



Susquehanna's track team will vie for 
honors in the Annual Central Penna. 
Track Conference Meet next Saturday, 
May 18th, which will be staged at Dick- 
inson College. 

The Orange and Maroon, winners of 
the Class B Championship in 1924, will 
make another bid for the trophy. Jun- 
iata, Schuylkill, Drexel and Ursinus 
will be the other Colleges competing in 
Class B. while Gettysburg. Dickinson, 
Muhlenberg and Bucknell will be pit- 
ted against each other in Class A. 
School Boys Meet on May 25th 

University Field will be the center of 
interest on Saturday. May 25th. when 
school boys representing the high 
schools in the Anthracite League will 
compete in their Annual Track and 
Field Meet. 

Plans for this event are now being 
completed. Each year some school and 
some individual has thrilled the crowd 
with the unusual performance. 

The installing of devices to permit 
the spectators to follow more closely 
the performances in the field events has 
greatly increased the interest to the 
spectators. The 1929 meet promises to 
surpass all former Anthracite Meets. 

Susquehanna's Varsity nine will meet 
Juniata in their annual diamond tilt 
immediately after the meet. This 
double bill will be one of Susquehanna's 
best sports offerings this season. 

S 

TRACKMEN DOWNED 

BY DREXEL, 70 TO 56 



Captain Kiracofe and his Crusader 
netmen fell prey for the second time 
to the strong Indian aggregation from 
Juniata, by a score of 6-0. The match 
was played on the heme courts last 
Tuesday. The day was anything but 
ideal for tennis, being cold and excep- 
tionally windy, resulting in poorly play- 
ed tennis. 

Burfcrd, Michaels, Kiracofe and Hel- 
wig played in the order named, while 
Burfcrd and Michaels, and Helwig and 
Kiracofe teamed in doubles. 



i Continued from Page li 

2. That it be understood that Sus- 
quehanna University can bring no part 
of its endowment, nor other properties 
to the consolidation, except its theo- 
logical library. 

3. That the consolidation be contin- 
gent upon the contemporaneous unit- 
ing cf at least three seminaries in 
Pennsylvania. 

4. Provided, further that the pro- 
posed consolidation receive the approval 
of the majority of such synods as nomi- 
nate representatives to the Board of 
Susquehanna University.'' 

The plan is that a new seminary is 
to be built at a place near Philadelphia 
to take the place cf these three semi- 
naries as well as by the synods of the 
Lutheran Church in Pennsylvania is 
necessary to complete the project. 



S. U. BATSMEN TRIP FAST 

URSINUS MACHINE. 4- 



OBSERVE MUSIC WEEK 

WITH SPECIAL NUMBER 



'Continued from Page 1> 
inches was one of the outstanding 
events. This is "Big Joe's" longest throw 
of the season. Gerhardt also perfarmed 
in regular style in catching two first 
places. He won the javelin throw and 
the high jump, tieing the record of 
5 feet 4 inches in the latter event. 

Winters, Welicky, Norton. C. Fisher, 
Gerhardt and Johnston were again the 
leading point-getters for the Little Cru- 
saders as they were in the Elizabeth- 
town College meet, by acquiring over 
five points apiece. 

The summary: 

100 yard Dash: First, Welicky, Sus- 
quehanna: second. Robinson, Drexel; 
third, Josephburg. Drexel. Time. 10.8 
seconds. 

220 yard Dash: First. Schoenhut, 
Drexel; second. Norton. Susquehanna; 
third, Bishop. Susquehanna. Time, 
25.4 seonds. 

440 yard Dash: First, Josephburg. 
second. Fisher; third. Gilliland. Sus- 
quehanna. Time. 55 seconds. 

880 yard Dash: First, Edwards. Drex- 
el: second. Gilliland, Susquehanna; 
third. Robinson. Drexel. Time. 2:13 

Mile Run: First, Edwards. Drexel; 
second. Althouse. Drexel; third, Fair- 
child, Susquehanna. Time, 4:52.8. 

Two Mile Run: Rhine. Susquehanna, 
and Richardson, Drexel, tie for first 
place: third. Krammer, Drexel. Time. 
10:42. 

120 yard High Hurdles, First. Wright. 
Drexel: second, Glenn. Susquehanna; 
third. Dreibelbiss. Susquehanna. Time. 
18.4. 

220 yard Low Hurdles: First, Johns- 
ton. Susquehanna: second. Schoenhut, 
Drexel; third. Wright. Drexel. Time, 
29 seconds. 

High Jump: First, Gerhardt, Susque- 
hanna; DeLay. Hess and Moore tied for 
second and third places. Height. 5 feet 
4 inches. 'Ties record.* 

Pole Vault: Firs'. Moore, Drexel; sec- 
ond, Fisher, Susquehanna; third. Col- 
dren. Susquehanna. Height. 10 feet 6 
inches 

Discus: First, Winters, Susquehanna; 
second. Major, Drexel; third. Markle, 
Drexel. Distance, 108 feet 5 inches. 

Javelin: First. Gerhardt. Susque- 
hanna; second. Markle. Drexel; third, 
Winters. Susquehanna. Distance. 137 
feet. 9 inches. 

Shot Put: First, Major, Drexel; sec- 
ond. Markle, Drexel; third, Winters. 
Susquehanna. Distance. 37 feet. 3'j 
inches. 



'Continued from Page 1) 
Danks was thrown out at home plate. 
ending the frame. 

Ursinus gained their first run in the 
third inning, when Sterner knocked a 
hard-hit ball over Malady's head for a 
home run. 

Susquehanna again tallied in the 
fourth inning. Snyder opened the in- 
ning with a grounder to Coble and was 
safe at first. Sprout sacrificed and 
Snyder advanced to second. Wall 
grounded to Sterner and was thrown 
out at first. Danks was hit by a pitch- 
ed ball and stole to second as Snyder 
scored. Good was thrown out at first 
by Sterner. 

Strine, Ursinus pitcher, opened the 
eighth inning with a hot single to cen- 
ter. Francis struck out. Meelley singled 
to left. Young hit to Groce, Danks 
tried to cover first, but dropped Groce's 
throw as Strine scored. No further 
damage was done when Schrink 
grounded to Groce, ending the eighth. 

Susquehanna also came through with 
another tally when Heim made the first 
home run of the season by knocking a 
long drive in center territory. 

Ursinus threatened to do seme ser- 
ious damage in the ninth, when Pet- 
ers, pinch-hitting for Coble, circled the 
bases, when he hit a long drive to right 
field. Hunter walked. Danks had 
Strine's number and struck him out. 
Sterner hit to Danks. who threw him 
| out at first, ending the ball game. 

The fielding feature of the day came 
in the sixth, when Young hit a hard 
drive to Good, who caught it and threw 
j it to Groce for a perfect double play. 

The line-up: 

Susquehanna 

R H O A E 

, Good, 2b 1 2 1 3 

Malasky, cf 1 

, Shilling. 3b 1 2 

, Groce. lb 14 1 1 

Heim, ss 1 1 4 2 1 

I Snyder. If 1 2 

! Sprcut. rf 2 

Wall, c 1 1 6 1 

Danks. p 1 3 1 

Totals 4 6 30 12 3 

Ursinus 

R H O A E 

Sterner. 2b 1 1 1 4 1 

Francis, rf 1 1 C 

Meelley. c 1 6 1 

Young, a 1 o 

Schrink. lb 10 2 

Bateman. 3b 1 1 

Coble, ss 4 2 1 

Hunter. If 1 

Strine. p 1 1 2 1 

'Peter 1 1 

Totals 3 6 24 12 3 

Score by Inning! 
Susquehanna 11010001 x— 4 

umnui ooiooooi 1—3 

T-.vo-base hit— Good; three-base hit- 
Good; home runs — Heim, Sterner. 
Peter: struck out— by Danks 7, Strine 3; 
base on balls— off Danks 2, Strine 2; 
hit by pitcher — Danks I Schrink >, 
Strine ' Danks): umpire— Duck. 
S 

The price of tickets for our Junior 
Prom certainly decreased rapidly. 
Which all goes to show that there IS a 
little college spirit here when we per- 
sonally are concerned. 



(Continued from Page 1> 
All these numbers were well received 
and thoroly enjoyed by the audience. 
THE SUSQUEHANNA wishes to con- 

>rganizations and their 

directors on their splendid accomplish- 

men I 

The Band deserves special commen- 

D uch as it has been many 

years since there has been such an or- 

tion on our campus. 



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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQEUHAVN.V SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY. MAY 14, 1929 



EIGHTH MAY QUEEN TO BE 

CROWNED HERE SATURDAY 



(Continued from Pa. 

A new idea is going to be used in 
costuming the court. Last year the 
Grecian robes were used, but 

3 modernized the costume 
committee decided to modernize the 
court costumes to a certain extent. 

Gladys Staub is general chairman in 
charge ol making arrangements for the 
affair. 

"Peer Gynt" to be Presented 

This year's pageant is an original one 
written by William Roberts, a student 
in the Conservatory of Music, and en- 
titled "Peer Gynt." based on the opera 
of the same name by Grieg. Mary Rov- 
er plays the title role and Dorothy 
Lesher plays opposite her in the role 
of Solneig. 

Brieflly. the story is that Peer Gynt. 
a Norwegian lad. a ne'er-do-well, is in 
love with a beautiful Norwegian maid- 
en. He travels through many countries 
of the world and squanders all his mon- 
ey. He then returns to his homeland, 
poor, broken in spirit, and dies in the 
arms of his sweetheart. 

Work on the pageant, under the sup- 
ervision of Miss Reeder, is progressing 
rapidly. 

The gala affair will take place in a 
little ampitheater which will be built 
in a corner of the Athletic Field. Ad- 
mission to the grounds will be only 
through tags which are now on sale 
at the small sum of twenty-five cents. 

Mr. Marion S. Schoch. editor of The 
Selinsgrove Times, has very kindly do- 
nated the covers tor the programs, so 
that . the fl • pro- 

ven free. The courtesy 
of the ad as also helped to 

make this possible. 

First May Dav in l'>n 

• Susque 'as mod ! 

pa iible ' -plendid efforts of 

Pr head of the * 

servatoi I Music. Mildred Winston, 
of Sunbury. was crowned the first 
Queen of May in 1921. amid colorful 
dances by the classes of the University. 
by the local public schools, and by the 
Camp Fire Girls. The whole affair was 
climaxed by the winding of the May 



P ■ . ■ i dropped last 

event among 
trad o: S„ ...;-.a since 

Bea i queen in 

122: Maj : In 1923 Mar- 

1921. Helen Buliock 
In 1925, Arlene Koyt in 1326. Marion 
Pounder in 1927, and Ke:en Ott in 1928. 
Last year an original pageant by- 
Margaret Buyers '28, entitled "Six 
Pomegranate Seeds," and based on 
Grecian myths, was presented. Up un- 
til that time, operettas were presented 
by the Ladies' Choral Club, among 
them the famous "Pirates of Pen- 
zance," by Gilbert and Sullivan. 

S 

COLLEGE PERSONALS 
President Smith adr • Lancas- 

• inference of the Ministerium I 
Pennsylvania at Mechanicsburg, on 
Tuesday evening. Wednesday, he at- 
•d a meeting of the Presidents of 
Pennsylvania Synods together with the 
Pr aidenta of Pennsylvania Colleges. At 
this meeting matters concerning the 
constituencies of the several institu- 
tions in Pennsylvania were discussed. 
The Susquehanna Synod of Central 
p nnsylvania will meet in Trinity Lu- 
heran Church from Tuesday to Thurs- 
»f this week. Important matters of 
Church and religion will be discussed, 
including the proposed consolidation of 
.binaries. Wednesday evening 
- will have dinner in Horton 

•lit body. Pro- 
A 

dele t t his 

Y M. C. A. ' 
ited by both faculty and student 

' 

:.: c a 

• ■■ 

I ■ mce discussed the 

for the 
D. Henry Crane, of 
oi the 

Bus- 
Dr, Ahl and Dr. Smitl 
Charles F 
Pcx, H - It, P il Hart- 

line, Wilson Seiber, Arthur Lecrone. 
Kindsvatter, as studer,- rep: 
• es. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



OLD GRADS PLAN TO 

RETURN ON JUNE 8th 



Saturday. June eight! This date is 
daily becoming more important to an 
ever-increasing number of Susque- 
hanna Alumni. Plans for Class Reun- 
ions are materializing, interest in the 
Alumni Dinner and Business Meeting 
is manifested by the receipt of early 
requests for dinner reservations; re- 
ports of old time bail players loosening 
up their arms gives added promise for 
an interesting ball game. 

Students are busy rehearsing for the 
Shakespearean play — Hamlet; Susque- 
hanna's band is preparing for its in- 
itial appearance on the Commencement 
Program— there is a general atmosphere 
of interest and anticipation in connec- 
tion with the happenings scheduled for 
June 8th. 



P. G. M. INSTALLS AND 

ELECTS NEW MEMBERS 



(Continued from Page 1> 
Chapter on June 6 are Mary Eastep. 
Ruth Erdman, Oren Kaltriter, Clifford 
Kiracofe, Virginia Moody. Anna Moore. 
Frank Ramsey, Simon Rhoads, Frances 
Thomas and Margaret Young 

About ten students of the Junior 
Class are elected annually to member- 
ship in the fraternity with the follow- 
ing qualifications: Special interest in 
Social Science; an average grade of at 
ast eighty-five per cent in all social 
■e studies; at least twenty semes- 
ter hours of social science; good gen- 
eral scholastic standing, and good char- 
acter. 



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Rev. J. Eider Hunes. pastor of the 
St. Paul's Lutheran Church of Wurtem- 
berg, New York, visited friends on the 
campus recently. 

"Elder" graduated from college in 
1916. completing his work in Theology 
in 1919. 

Recent news flashes from Wilming- 
ton. Del, announce the presentation of 
a new Hudson Super-Six Sedan I i 
Rev. Park w. Huntington, a.m., b.d. 
Doc' - is carrying on a splendid piece 
immunity work and has a strong, 
i! group of in . 
31 Stephen's L 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Mrs. Patrick McCarthy, George Dum- 
bauld 

Miss Angeline McCarthy, Ravtnond 
Watklns. 

Count De Tour. Robert Kembie. 

Cirsette, his Body Guard. Jack Auch- 
muty. 

Riley, the Butler. Donald Wonnley. 

Shopkeeper, John Delay. 

Mannequin, Luke Rhoads. 

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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

REV. O. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D D . President 

cuaquehanna University Is located in the Lean of f nt- oeauuful 
Susquehanna Valley, in the home-like borouih of Sallnsgi ;ve. Dor- 
mi ><v\es and recitation buildings are tn excellent condition with ali 
modern conveniences 



Dean of Coliege 

DR. HERBERT A. ALLISON, 

A.B.. A.M.. Litt.D. 



Dean of Theology 

DR F P. MANHART, 

A.M.. D.D., L.L.D. 



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CAMPUS ENTRANCE 



The New Catalogue Is Here 

The best Advertising Agents a School can have are its 
Students and Alumni. You can direct students of the 
right sort to Susquehanna's Campus. 

Our Students and Alumni 



are our chief assets. When students grow 
into their finest fruitage, and our alumni 
"make good," your Alma Mater rejoices. 
Send us word of any outstanding achieve- 
ments. We follow your careers witli deep 
interest. 

Btudentf and alumni! You are a l>ig 
part of Susquehanna's success. Will you co- 
operate by filling in the blank, and mailing 
it to the Dean? 



TO THE DEAN: 

i 

Please send the New Catalogue to the fol- , 
lowing Prospective Students: 



M 



i M 



•Signed) 



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Soda Fountain THE REXALL STORE Ice Cream 

Refurnished Throughout, Modern and Appealing In Every Respect 

Talcums, Face Powders and Toilet Articles of All Kinds 
VITED CIGAR STORE AGENCY SELINSGROVE 




F. K. SUTTON 

Furniture and Funeral Director 

SERVICE EXCEPTIONAL 
Competent and Courteous Attendant M of Motor Equipment 
Bell Phone 121— No . 1 North Market St., Selinsgrove 



Era & Berick's 

Newt to the Movies 

KODAKS — TOILET GOODS — SODAS 

8unbury — Northumberland — Shamokln — Selinsgrove 



— ♦ 



The Susquehanna 






■:-:- 



Volume XXXV 



SELINSGROVE. PA. TUESDAY, MAV 21, 1929 



■*>9*0 



Number 4 



► 






IB 

V 



Crusaders Vanquish Four S. U. Students l 
Selinsgrove Batsmen Injured in Wreck 
In May Day Game 



Donnell Pitches Airtight Ball 
Pinches to Beat Fast 
Town Team 



In 



Young Men Escape Death in Spectacu- 
lar Crash on Highway; Victims 
of "Hit-Run" Driver 



Four Susquehanna students were in- 
jured when the car in which they were 
riding wis struck by a "hit-run" ma- 
SHILLING AND WALL KNOCK TWO chins cn the Sun burv-Shamokin High- 
SPECTACULAR HOMERS IN EIGHTH way Monday nignt of last week. 



Susquehanna Tallies Three Runs in Big 

Eighth Frame; Kelly and Martin 

on Mound for Visitors 



The students were: Stephen Dormer, 

Daniel Kuasnaski, Edward Helwig. and 

Luther Spangler, all members of the 

Freshman Class. 

Dormer suffered serious lacerations 

Susquehanna's nine defeated the Sel- and bruises about the head and a bruis- : 

insgrove West Branch League team to ed arm Heiwig suffered a fractured 

the count of 7-3, on the University srK >ulder. The ether two escaped with 



Field Saturday afternoon. 



minor lacerations and bruises about the 



Captain Shilling and Wall, pinch- k od y. 
hitting for Shaefler in the eighth inn- Harry Raup, of Danville, driver of 
ing, connected with the apple for a the "hit-run" car, was caught about a 
homer apiece. These were the long- miie awav fl . om the scene of the crash, 
est and cleanest hits made on Univer- H? was driving a Packard touring car, 
sity Field this year. Both were made in 192 2 model. At a subsequent hearing he 
deep center field. ua3 f orC ed to pay for medical atten- 

Good, Susquehanna's star second- : - - n f or the young men and damages 
sacker, was dropped from the starting t ;, e car. He was held for court where 
line-up due to minor infractions of; he will be tried on four charges: fail- 
rules of Coach Ullery's strategy board, j ure to lend assistance after an acci- 
Sprout, a regular outfielder, was called dent, driving while under the influence , 
in to fill Good's shoes. This caused f liquor, driving without an operator's 
much trouble at times and Good was license, and reckless driving. 
called into the fray in the later inn- The four youg men were enroute to' 
ings. j Susquehanna f..iiowing a trip to Sha- 

Susquehanna's fielding was poor in mokin in a Ford coupe. They were 



spots, but the hitting outfeatured this. 
Bob Donnell pitched good ball for the 
college nine. He got into trouble sev- 
eral times. In the sixth, seventh and 
eighth innings he filled the bases, but 
managed to tighten up and retire the 
side each time without doing any 
further damage. 
"Lefty" Martin was on the mound for 



traveling along at a moderate rate of; 
speed when a Packard touring car, ' 
driven by Raup. who was unaccompan- 
ied, approached in the opposite direct- 
ion. Kuasnaski, who was driving, saw 
the car swerving cn the road and edged 
over to the extreme right, coming al- 
most to a complete stop. The Packard 
ideswiped the Ford and did consid- 



110 Couples Attend 
Gala Junior Prom 



five innings for the "towners." Kelley j erable damage. The young men were 
was then called from third to pitch ; knocked out of the car by the impact, 
and for a while it looked as tnough he I Dormer going thru the windshield. All 
had Susquehanna's number, but this j (Concluded on page 4) 

idea was reversed in the eighth inn- [ S 

ing, when Shilling and Wall faced him 
in succession to pound out two homers. 

Susquehanna made the first tally in 
the first inning, when Malasky doubled 
to left field and advanced to third on 
an overthrow. Donnell sacrificed to 
Miller with a high fly and Malasky 
scored. Groce pounded to Willard and 
was thrown out at first. 

The big inning for Susquehanna 
came in the fifth. Sprout, opening with 
a single over Kelley's head, advanced f rain and torrid heat, the Junior 
to second on Malasky's single. Both prom proved to be the outstanding so- 
base runners took a steal. Donnell 
struck out. Groce, hitting a hard 
grounder to second, was safe at first, 
with Sprout scoring and Malasky ad- 
( Concluded on page 3) 



Only All-Colle?e Dance on Calendar 

Is a Social Success; Music by 

Nesbit's Pennsylvanians 



Annual Retreat Held 
by Y.M.C.A. Cabinet 



Plans For Next Year Are Laid For 

Student Organization; Dr. Ahl 

Is Faculty Advisor 



Annual Retreat of the student Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet cf Susquehanna Univer- 
sity was held Sunday, May 19, in a 



cial event of the season. It was the 
only all-college function of the year. 

Approximately one hundred and ten 
couples tripped the light fantastic toe 
from eight until midnight, while Joe 
Nesbit and his Pennsylvanians meted 
out the terpsichorean melody. This was 
the largest crowd that ever attended 
the Prom 

A collegiate atmosphere was added to 
the Alumni Gym by means of flashy j 
colored pennants and banners and also 
by means of special corners decorated 
by the fraternities and sororities. 

Much credit is due the committee for 
the splendid work they did to make the 
Prom a success. Frank Ramsey, presi- 
dent of the class, served as general 
chairman. Clifford Kiracofe was chair- 
man of the music committee; Howard 
Wertz. of the program and favors corn- 



cabin near Kantz. 

Although the weather pointed toward mittee: Adda Newman, of the decorat- 
a very unpromising day, the Cabinet ing committee 
members were not daunted. At six 
o'clock in the morning, the small group, 
with Dr. Ahl acting as chauffeur, start- 
ed for their destination. 

Despite the terrible downpour of rain, 
the heating of the cabin and the cook- 
ing of breakfast was very efficiently 
done for it seemed that Harr'.ine and a 
few others had inherited the poineer 
ability to build a fire from wet wood. 

The Retreat is a day spent in medi- 
tation and planning for next year's 
program of the Y. II 0. A Manv of 
the problems of the organization, and ! 
consequents of Susquehanna, were 

discussed and definite plans laid. The, Dr. Surface telL among his scientific 
extent to which these plans will be tales also a rat story 



Ninety Snowbound Rats Perish in 

Poultry Palace When Forced to 

Eat Distasteful Food 



n the M*y Day Festival Synod Votes Against Mary Grace Detwiler 

Seminary Merger Reigns as Queen of 

Mav Dav Festival 




Annual Convention of Susquehanna 

Synod Adopts Resolution Against 

Proposed Consolidation 



GRACE DETWILER 
Queen of the May 




SARA MOODY 
Lady-in-Waiting 




Susquehanna Syn:d of Central Penn- 
sylvania, holding its annual convention 
In Trinity Lutheran Church. Selins- 
grove, last week, adapted a resolution 
against the plans for the merger of the 
seminaries of Mt. Airy. Gettysburg and 
Susquehanna, adding that the present 
is not an opportune time for such a 
consolidation. This synod was the first 
in the state to pass on the proposed 
merger. 

At the same time a resolution ex- 
pressing the hope that the merger may 
eventually be realized was rejected and 
In its stead a substitute regarded as a 
compromise was passed. The substitute 
said that the Synod expresses Its faith 
"that under the providence of God, the 
Synod and the churches cf the United 
Lutheran Church will solve the prob- 
lem of theological education in har- 
ts my With His Will and in the best 
interests of His Kingdom." 

Another resolution said: "That it is 
the judgement of the Susquehanna Sy- 
nod cf Central Pennsylvania that the 
preseir is not the opportune time for 
the ratification of the plan of union 
which the board of directors of the 
seminaries adopted and are now pre- 
senting to the synods for consideration 
because it is evident that such a merger 
would not receive the degree of unani- 
mity necessary for a happy consumma- 
tion of such a momentous project. 

The committee which offered the res- 
olutions was headed by Dr. George W. 
Nicely, Williamspcrt. The fight for 
adoption of the resolution favoring ul- 
timate union of the seminaries was led 
by Dr. Norman Wolfe, Dillsburg. Dr. 
C. R. Bowers, of Banbury, replied to 
Dr. Wolfe's plea. 



Popular Senior Co-ed Coronated With 

Much Pomp and Ceremony in 

Annual Fete 



SARA MOODY SERVES AS 

LADY-IN-WAITING TO QUEEN 



"Peer Gynt" is Presented 
Coronation, With Mary 
in Title Role 



Following 
Royer 



MARY ROYER 

In Title Role of "Peer Gynt" 



Student Statistics 
Announced bv Dean 



Marred only by a steady downpour i 



Dear Alumni: I 

Saturday. June 8. is the day of{ 
i our Commencement Week, which* 
| we have set aside for the especial} 
enjoyment of the "old grads." If you' 
will examine the commencement in- 
vitation you will find that a day of 
delights has been outlined, 
1 ample opportunity for 
"kinks" out of the 



Dr. and Mrs. George N. Wood, Dr. 
and Mrs. Herbert A. Allison, and Prof, 
and Mrs William Ullery were present 
M representatives of the faculty. 
S 

Rodent Epicures Die 
Thru Pastor's Ruse 



Greetings to Alumni 
from President Smith* 



Males Lead Females by a Hundred: 

Lutherans in Majority; Low 

Absence Percentage 



getting 

system 

Other 

a real 



from 
band 



|:he 

through tennis and baseball, 
features of interest will be 
Alumni dinner, "step singing 
■he steps of Seibert Hall, i 
concert, and in the evening one 

'the world's greatest plays 

I must not forget that Mrs. Smith 

! and I want to welcome many of you 
at the first reception at the Presi- 
dent's home, from 4 to 6 in the af- 

1 ternoon. 

We want you to have a happy day 
at the old school. To insure this we 
should have not less than 200 alum- 
ni back. Plan now to come. 
The commencement speakers will 



the best 
our campus, 

events 



and all Com- 
I bid you a 



| be of 

I To 

'mencement 

t hearty welcome. 

Faithfully yours, 

G. MORRIS SMITH 

llCay 18. 1929. 



Total number: Male 257. female 153. 

By courses: Education 153, Social 
Science 55, Music 23, Business Admin- 
istration 82. Commercial Education 11, 
Pre-Medical 30, General Science 38, 
Classical 9. Special 9. 

By religious statistics: Lutheran 192, 
Methodist 50. Presbyterian 35. Catho- 
lic 35. Reformed 29, Evangelical 14. 
United Brethren 11, Episcopalian 9, 
Brethren 5, Hebrew 5, Baptist 3. Con- 
gregationalist 3, Christian 2. Church 
of God 1, Ukranian 1. Unitarian 1. 
Universalist 1, Unclassified 13. 

Total number of hours carried— 7,444. 

Average number of hours carried per 
individual— 18.1. 

, Total absences— 4,625. Number ex- 
cused— 4,351. Number unexcused— 274. 

Average absences per individual— 
11.2. 

Percentage absences (based on 78 
days of actual recitation)— 3.9%. 

A sister institution reports its per- 
centage of absences for February, 1929 
at 5.1 ■■' 

Note: 205 or 50"! of our students had 
Let! than 10 absences during the sem- 
ester. 

S 

Clifford Kiracofe 
Elected 1930 Pres. 



Grace Detwiler was crowned Queen 
of the May with much pageantry and 
ceremony before a large throng of in- 
vested spectators Saturday afternoon. 
Miss Detwiler. elected by popular vote 
of the women students, is Susque- 
hanna's eighth May Queen. 

The coronation was performed by 
Sara Moody, Lady-in-Waiting to the 
Queen. A proclamation concerning the 
month of May was give:; in response 
by Miss Detwiler. 

Six other senior girls comprised the 
royal court. They were Rose Ann 
Oumbert, Betty Kemble. Ruth Pace, 
Mary Lu Shaffer, Lucile Smith and 
Ethel Weikert 

Miss Peggy Weeks, daughter of Capt. 
John W. and Mrs. Weeks and Miss 
Betty Smith, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
G. Morris Smith, were flower girls. 
Coronation Ceremonies 

The royal procession began at Sei- 
bert Hall at 1:30 p. m. It ended in a 
special amphitheater erected on the 
upper campus for the occasion. The 
coronation ceremonies took place in 
this unique little open-air auditorium. 

A lattice-work background was 
erected for the throne and for the set- 
ting of the pageant. The whole was 
decorated with flowers and shrubbery. 
"Peer Gynt" Presented 

In conjunction with the ceremonies, 
a pageant entitled "Peer Gynt," drama- 
tized by William Roberts '29, was pre- 
sented by a cast of approximately sev- 
enty-five co-eds. 

Mary Royer '29 played the title role. 
The other principals in the cast were 
Ase. Signe Alford: Solneig, Dorothy 
Leisher, and Anitra. Ellen Bonney. 

The pageant was directed by Miss 
Dorothy Reeder, director of Physical 
Education for Women. Miss Reeder is 
to be commended for the splendid man- 
ner in which the pageant was pre- 
sented. 

The entire program was under the 
supervision of the Y. W. C. A., Winifred 
Myers, president. 

S 

Queen Announced 
At Y. W. Breakfast 



Names of Queen and Her Lady-in- 
Waiting Disclosed at Special 
Breakfast in Her Honor 






Pulitzer Prizes in 
Letters Announced 



Other Classes Elect Officers: Foulkrod 

President of '31; Kummel! 

Heads Class of "3J 



A 



carried out depends wholly upon the 
cabinet. 

The Y. M C. A. is an organization 
that, to a certain degree, at least, ful- 
fills one of the needs of a student's 
well-rounded life and It is hoped it j 
will even better than bef N fulfill that ] 
n°ed next year. 

Those who attended Retreat included' 
Paul Hartline, Edward Bollinger, Wil- 
son Seiber. John Kindsvatter, Charles 
Fisher, Raymond Rhine, Herbert 
Schmidt, Lewis Fox, Andrew Kozak. 
and Dr A W. Ahl, faculty advisor. 



It happens that a Rev. Stonecypher 
of Susquehanna Heights has a chicken 
bouse on his farmlette The house had 
an extra bedtelkw in the form of a 
rat during the winter who tried to 
share the beds with the hens. 

This quadruped became very bold 
and began to hunt for chicken nMh 
and eggs He even had a sensitive nose 
for butter but none of the flock he 
adopted could produce such a delicacy 
so tM satisfied himself with omelettes. 

The Reverend provided food of the 
(Concluded on page 3) 



Julia Peterkin's "Scarlet Sifter Mary' 

Best American Novel: Benet's "John 

Brown's Bodv" Best Poem 



Annual Pulitzer prizes in journalism 
were announced last week by tTU 
)t Columbia University These prizes 
ire made pontfU thru the gift of Jos- 
eph Pulitzer, an eminent New York , 

> :: tialist, who died a few years ago. 
leaving his fortune to the interests of 
nahsm. 

Julia Peterkin's "Scarlet Sister Mary" 
(Concluded on page 3) 



Clifford Kiracofe v.a- elected Presi- 
dent of the Class of 1930. at the annual 

election, last week Mr. Kir.« 
btl been a very active leader oi nil 
Class since his matriculation at Sus- 
quehanna as a Freshman in 1926 He 
lias served at various tunes as treasur- 
er, as head of important committee, 
and so forth, Hh classmate 
him Business Manager of their issue 
of the Lanthorn, a recognition oi his 
business ability. 
Other officers wtrt: Sherman Good. 

president; Marjorie Phillips, sec- 

v; Harold Cros-man, treasurer; 
Anna Cleaver. Girl's tin. mica! secre- 

John Wail. Boys' final -ecre- 
( Concluded on page 3> 



May Day festivities were begun with 
a breakfast in Horton Dining Hall, at 
eight o'clock. It was sponsored by the 
Y. W C. A. with the kind cooperation 
of Miss Marriot. 

The tables were very prettily dec- 
orated with miniature May Poles in 
the center of each, with a streamer 
fastened at each plate. Special tables 
were reserved for the May Day Court 
and the members of the Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet 

Miss Winifred Meyers, President of 
the Y. w. C. a., mnounced that the 
names of the May Queen and the Lady- 
in-Waiting were on ible and that 

the guests should search for them. The 
slips revealed the secret which had been 
lithfully guarded for weeks. Grace 
Detwiler was announced Queen of May 
and Sara Moxly, Lady-in-Waiting. 

Miss Detwiler made a tew remarks 
expressing her gratitude for the honor 
bestowed upon her 

Following the breakfast Miss H 
Dean of Women, gave a very approp- 
ria: ■ 

S 

COLLEGE personals 
Dr. Smith addressed the Dtstrit Lu- 
ther League Rally Saturday evening it 
J Milton. 

Sunday evening, he delivered the 
Bacct hi Belleville, Pa„ 

in the Presir Ciuirh 

Pres Smith • .ding the annual 

lynoc sting of ; Pennsyl. 

v una Synod and the Allegheny Synod, 
both of which are being held this week 
Dr. Smith will i lie Allegheny 

8ynod on w • m 



fAGE TWO 



THE SUSQEUHANNA. SELWsSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1929 



HE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly by the Students of Susquehanna University 



Bub^nption $1 50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berber. '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 



Frank E. Ramsey 

News Editor 

Clifford Johnston '31 

Alumni Editor 

Mary Eastep '30 

Exchange Editor 

Anna Cleaver '30 



30 



WE INTELLECTUALS! 
i Reading Time '2 minutes, 25 seconds) 
Susquehanna is rising intellectually! Three men students 
were seen at the university orchestra concert recently, which is 
an increase of one over the previous entertainment of this type! 
We often hear discussed tin- apparent lack of culture at 
Susquehanna, which is always followed by a comparison with 
other and larger universities. True, one of the reasons for the 
exclusiveness of colleges such as Vale, Princeton, Williams, and 



****** 

* 



: TALES YOU WIN 

********** ******** 



Dr. Surface, under the heading "The 
Benefits of the Small Colleges,' in last 
week's Susquehanna gave something 
that has been on our mind for some 
time. Do you agree with him? 



Lewis Rich '32 



If we may judge, we feel that the 
co-eds failed to mention the "matri- 
BOme others is that the students acquire while There that quality ! monial" advantage to Dr. Surface. 

Of culture so inherent and forming SO great a part of life at G n a Spring mo^ng, it's a question 
these universities. Students go to universities like the foregoing if the early bird enjoys the worm as 
to acquire culture and even then some of them graduate without j much as the late bird enjoys the sleep. 

a true appreciation of the finer things of life. This is because Betty Watkins ~ U£ually goes to 

culture is not a thing that can be acquired in a day, a week, or a chapel, has quit trying to read a book 

vear. It is something that must be Cultivated thru the things one because she lost her place when she 

stopped to applaud. 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor 

Russell Carmichael '31 

Sports Editor 

y< mon Biough '31 

Social Life Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 

Assistants on Reporiorial Staff 
Betty Wardrop '32 John Kindsvatter '32 

Fred Norton 32 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Krceck '31 

Herman Fenstermacher 'S^'^^I^^SchS 5" Lawrence Fisher '32 does and the things one appreciate*. 

Jack Auchmuty '32 t,» become cultured does not mean that one must necessarily . 

TUESDAY. MAY 21. 1929 , have an enormous amount of money. Not does it mean that being 

cultured or having culture requires a bigh-hattish attitude. One; 
flow ABOUT IT? niay be horn "with a silver spoon in his mouth"; but culture' 

Susquehanna has at various iin,<>s been accused of lacking dors not come so easily. May we be allowed to attempt to define 1 
leaders to direct ts timorous activities, or at least that there culture as we see it? Culture is simply paying attention to thej 
are only a fewworthy of mention. We are no1 prepared to argue little things, being goeiable and tolerant, able to lose without j 
as to the truth or falsity of this - nent. But we do have a having a dozen alibis ready, able to take victory graciously, pos- 
few things we want to say about the few leaders we arc positive gessing a well-defined appreciation of the finer things of life, 
that we have. which must, of course, include a worth-while intelligence. 



Take away from our learned men the 
pleasure of making themselves heard, 
learning would be nothing to them. 



LEAOTTA'S 

BEAUTY 
SHOP 



What do we do wil ader alter h i is elected to office? Tin 



.More than half a century ago Francis Galton suggested the 



first thing most groups do is to abandon him immediately after possibility of -obtaining a general knowledge of the capacities 

the leader-elect assumes the office, to work out his own salvation, f man by sinking shafts, as it were, at a few critical points/' 

to fulfill his duties single-handedly, without cooperation. If a Tin- idea Galton had in mind was essentially the test method. I 6 
leader complains of the heavy burden placed on his shoulders, intelligence can be fsted by well-defined tests covering a range 

and appeals for cooperation, he is cul short with a pert reply f matter and subjects, but culture can only be tested by the - 

about the ••price ot popularity." things Ave do and appreciate willingly. j 

Furthermore, the leader is always being subjected to the \y e believe our faculty is doing the utmost in bringing j 

most caustic and most caluminous criticism that can be thought musicians f note here in order that we may cultivate a taste ij 

of, but never is there a word of compliment or praise in recog- for good music. Our library is constantly being augmented by j 

nition of some -ask accomplished in a masterful way. the hest of fiction, references, and periodicals. If we fail to j 

For us to argue that students should cooperate with their take advantage of these things it is our own fault. It has often « 

leaders in carrying out the work of student groups, would be been said that "a man is recognised by the things he apprec- f 

folly and a waste ,,t precious energy. Scolding and coaxing iates." 



( 



202 S. Market St. 

Second Door Below 
First Lutheran Church 



LPHONE 58*Z 



LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS 
DRAWING SUPPLIES 

JOS. L. MENTZ 

The Stationer 
Remington Portable Typewriters 



21 N. Third St. 



Sunbury, Pa. 



Iii a crowd it is extremely simple to pick out a man of! I 
ilture. We notice this wherever we go. The first man of fifty 1 ! 



never get us anywhere. The word "eoopera^on" is entirely 

too abstract for practical argumentation. 

What else is there to do, in order to encourage leadership S(1 . |t( , 1 in ., stl „,, t ( . a] . to offf ,. Ug ^J to a ladv— the man whol ! 

at Susquehanna and to insure a bountiful supply oi captains? allow- ]adies pre f eFencei at a bargain counter— we could go on 4 
• propose and commend to faculty that every year a naining countless illustrations showing where the man of culture, M- 

of manners, in short the gentleman, is very easy to distinguish.; 
It is impossible to select betwen the average college graduate and 
a young man of the same age who lias never been inside a college 
unless that college man has a certain ••finesse"' — a ••noblesse 
oblige,' 1 which distinguishes him from the average. 



Feaster's Restaurant 



"WHERE STUDENTS MEET 
AND EAT" 

Market Street Selinsgrove 



tain number, say five or six. of the Senior <'lass be selected 
by a faculty Committee for outstanding work both as to leader- 
ship and scholarship, and duly recognized and awarded for 
their service to the Institution. Mere election to an office would 
not be considered. Fulfilling his duties to the utmost and ac- 
complishment of some noteworthy task would be absolute pre- 
requisites. 

We believe that in this manner leadership would be encour- 
aged and more would be accomplished in our student organiza- 
tions. 

s 



SHOE REPAIRING 
Work Guaranteed 

SHOES - SHINE 

C. E. POE 



The thing to strive for is to be a university man — not a 
college man of the rah-rah type. The former require! culture — 
the latter simply a high school education and a good street-cor- 
ner acquaintanceship. — A. M. 



i 



s- 



LITERARY "HOAXES" 

Once again it appears that the American reading public i 



has been hoodwinked, this time by the widely-discussed "Thi 
Cradh of thi lieep" by Joan Lowell. I ; appears that this wide- 



: 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 



America's leading instruments. For churches, colleges, lod:;e rooms. 
I residences, etc. Every organ designed and built specially fcr the par- 
I -raided book, which is receiving oceans of publicity, is not J ticular place and purpose and fully guaranteed. Booklets and speclflca- 

t'hc real life narrative that is was supposed to be. The story was i t,cns cri request 

< ! d to be the experiences of .Miss Lowell on her father's { M . P . Al L L. E R 

wimlpammei-M in the Houth Heas. Ho many of the incidents were I hagerstown 1 A R .^. I 1 A . N . 1 ^ . 

challenged that the Book-of-the-Month Club, which had selected ~ 
"The Cradh 0/ the Deep" an the best book of the month, came to { 
the conclusion thai it was less ''factual" and contained more j 
"i unauticized fact" than the chiles judges had supposed. 

The book is somewhat similar to "Trader Horn" in nature. 
Both were Introduced to the readers with the same blustering 
publicity. "Trader Horn" which had a pheonmenal sale, pre- 
turned to be the autobiography ol a sea-roving trader. Despite 
the artful writing and the subsequent personal introduction to 
the American shores of an old-timer heralded as "Trader Hern.'" 
the storv could nol be saved from the shadow of doubt.. 

A third literary hoax looms in the widely-read book of the 
cartoonist, Ripley, called "/>< lien it ot Sot" containing alleged 
Statement ol facts easy to read but difficult to prove. It appears 
that the statement thai the American people like to be fooled is 



SHEFFER'S 

White Dy.ym Brans 

Ice Cream 

For Health 

The Taste Tell* 



KAUFFMANS 

Candy and Soda 



JAS. H. STYERS 

PICTURE FRAMING 



•4 



i 

J PROMPT SERVICE AND LARGE 



SELECTION OP MOULDINGS 
• Selinsgrove 
I 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 
Welcome* Student** Accounts 
RESOURCES iy EXCESS OF $1,500,000.00 



FEEHRER & NOLL 

BARBERS 

4 WEST PINE STREET 



true awl that the reading public likes to be hoodwinked. If the J 
operation is painless and made interesting and fascinating. 

g 

A SERIOUS MISDEMEANOR 

Taking baseballs during games and practice periods is be- 

coming a serious problem ami something must be done. On an 

average, ai least four balls arc taken every night. When we are 

t<>M thai these balls cost two dollars apiec, we can readily see 

enormous gum of money lost by the Athletic Association each 

ion, 

Fellows, 'his misdemeanor is a handicap to the dminist ra- 
tion of our Athletic Department. The Athletic Association has 
man) ways of spending the money alloted it other than in the 
replacenii itolen baseballs, CauM you see that ever} time 
you rake a baseball you are stealing out of your own poeketbook 
and cheating rourself? It any of us are guilty of 'his offenae, 
we do nor have the proper "college spirit*' and <lo not belong at 
Busquehanna. Furthermore, we are guilty ol a misdemeanor 
punishable by law.— II. V. B. 



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TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1929 



THE SUSQEUHANNA, SELINSGROVE. FA. 



PAGE THREE 



Good's Slugging Too Inter-Class Baseball Mrs. Dodson Attends 
Much for Miff linburg Series on This Week Library Convention 



:•: I ok the opportunity to pole 
\tt homer from Pitcher Keiley. 
The line-up: 

Susquehanna 

R H O A E 



West Branch League Team Defeated by 

Susquehanna, 3-2. Wednesday; 

Hanks and Donnell Pitch 



Six Games Are Scheduled to Determine 

Inter-Class Baseball Champions 

For This Year 



Head of Library at Meeting of Ameri- 
can Library Association: Miss Sup- 
ers Completes Cataloguing Here 



Sprout. 2b . 
Good. 2b . . 
Malasky, cf 
Donne 1 .!, p 
Groce, ri 



Led by the slugging of Good, Sus- 
quehannas handy man at the bat, the 
varsity won from Mifflinburg on Wed- 
nesday afternoon in a seven-inning 
contest by the tune of 3-2. 

Good had a perfect day at bat. He 
faced Mifflinburg's slab artist four 
times and each time got a perfect 
single. Good also scored two of the 
varsity's runs. Malasky had two hits, 
a base on balls and a strike out of four 
times at bat. 

Lontz and Steele did the only stick 
work for Mifflinburg. the former get- 
ting a double and the latter a triple. 

Danks pitched his usual good game 
for Susquehanna. He was on the 
mound for the first five innings, after 
which Donnell relieved him to com- 
plete the fray. Steese performed well 
for Mifflinburg. 

The line-up: 

Susquehanna 
R 

Good, 2b 2 

Malasky, cf 

Donneil. rf . p 

Groce. lb 

Heim, ss 

Snyder. If 

Shilling. 3b 

Shaeffer. c 

Danks. p 

Foltz. 3b 

Stroup. rf 

Wall, c 



H 
4 
2 














o 

2 
1 

9 
1 
1 

7 







Inter-Class Baseball League season 
opened with the Frosh playing the 
Sophs. Games will be played thruout 
this week and the early part of next 
week. A total of six games has been 
scheduled. 

length. Varsity men of last year's sea- 
length. Varsity men of las year's sea- 
s:n are excluded from participation, as 
well as all men of the present squad 
who have played more than eighteen 
innings. 

The class of 1931 won the pennant 
last year. 

The complete schedule follows: 

Monday. May 20, 4:15 — Frosh vs. 
Sophs. 

Tuesday, May 21. 3:15— Sophs vs. Jun- 
iors. 

Wednesday. May 22. 4:15 — Frosh vs. 
Seniors. 

Thursday. May 23. 4:15— Frosh vs. 
Juniors, 

Monday. May 27. 4:15 — Juniors 
Seniors. 

Wednesday, May 28. 4:15 — Sophs 
Seniors. 



s. 



Crusader Tennis Men 
Toppled by Bucknell 



Total 3 6 21 9 1 

Mifflinburg 

R H 

Thomas. 3b 

Lontz, ss 1 1 

Badger, lb 

Walker. 2b 

Soloman. cf 

Hummell. If 1 ° 

Steese, p ° * 

Chambers, rf 

Sechler, c 



O 



1 

7 
2 



3 

o 

2 




E 






1 





Michaels Wins Only Match of Tourna- 
ment After Long Struggle; Speer 
Also Battles Hard bu Loses 



2 17 7 1 



Totals 2 

Score by innings: 

Susquehanna 101100 x— 3 

Mifflinburg 10 1—2 

Two base hit— Lontz: three base hit 
—Steese: struck out— by Danks 5, Don- 
nell 1. Steese 1: base on balls— off 
Steese 3: hit by pitcher— Danks 
(Steese >. Steese iHeirn). Umpire— 
Wormley. 

Rhine Wins Two-Mile 

Run In College Meet 



Misses Breaking Conference Record by 

One-Tenth of a Second; Gerhardt 

Places Second in High Jump 



Ninth Annual Championship of the 
Central Pennsylvania Collegiate Track 
Conference was held last Saturday, at 
Carlisle, under the auspices of the 
Dickinson College Athletic Association. 

The colleges competing in Class "B" 
were Albright, Drexel. Juniata, Ursinus 
and Susquehanna. Juniata won the 
Class "B" title by scoring 47 points. Al- 
bright wm close at their heels for the 
runner-up berth. 

It was an ideal track day and many 
records were broken. 

Rhine and Gerhardt did all the scor- 
ing for the Little Crusaders. Rhine 
easily won the two-mile run and al- 
most lapped the Drexel man, who ran a 
dead heat with him just the Saturday 
before, and who placed second at that 



In a much closer match than was 
expected, Bucknell's veteran tennis 
team vanquished the locals here Sat- 
urday afternoon, by the score 5-1. 

Michaels turned in the only point 
for the Crusaders when he came in vic- 
torious in a two and a half hour 
singles struggle with Wilkinson, of 
Bucknell. The match was very close 
thruout, the score being 6-3, 6-8, 7-5. 

The Baker-Speer match also proved 
to be somewhat of an endurance con- 
test with the final score 6-2, 12-10, in 
Baker's favor. 

Bucknell meets the Crusaders in a 
return match at Lewisburg next Thurs- 
day. 

Summaries: 

Frost, Bucknell defeated Adams. 6- 
4, 6-4. 

De Fillippo. Bucknell defeated Stern, 
6-4. 6-2. 

Mtckham. Bucknell. defeated Kira- 
cofe, 6-3. 6-2. 

Eaker. Bucknell. defeated Speer, 6- 
2, 12-10. 

Michaels. Susquehanna, defeated 
Wilkinson, 6-3. 6-8, 7-5. 

De Fillippo and Baker. Bucknell, de- 
feated Kiracofe and Burford. Susque- 
hanna, 6-4. 6-4. 

S 



Mrs. Dodson, head of the University 
Library, attended the annual meeting 
of the American Library Association in 
Washington, May 13-18. Various prob- 
lems relative to the administration of , 
libraries were discussed. 

About twenty-five hundred people at. 
tended the convention. Representatives 
from the leading libraries in America 
were present. Miss Linda Eastman, of 
the Cleveland Public Library, was the '■ 
retiring president. Dr. Koregh, chief 11- 
: brarian of Yale University, was eleted 
I president for the ensuing year. 

The convention was held in the 

! Washington Auditorium, owned by the 

I business men of Washington. The audi- 

m has a seating capacity of six 

I thousand people. 

Over fifty publishers and bookbinders 
exhibits of books and library sup- 
plies in the huge basement of the 
auditorium. This proved of special in- 
to the delegates. 

The main meetings were held :n the 
Auditorium, Small group meetings were 
held in the various Washington hotels. 

Miss Helen Supers, who spent the 
winter here cataloguing books left Sus- 
quehanna some time ago. having com- 

■ '■ d her work. She will sail next 
week for Rome, where she will attend 
the meeting of the International Li- 
brary Assoiation. 

S 

The Reticent Scotch 

Lady (to new housemaid engaged 
by letter*: "Why didn't you tell me, 
when you wrote answering my ques- 
tions so fully, that you were Scotch. 
Mary?" 

Mary: "I didna like to be boasting, 
mam." 

S 



Stroup, rf 

Heim, ss 

Snyder, If 

Shilling, 3b 

Shaeffer, c 

Wall, c 

Palmer, lb 



1 



2 



1 
1 
1 
1 



15 2 




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Totals 7 9 27 15 7 

Selinsgrove 



R 

Willard, ss 2 

Boiig, lb 

Kelly, 3b, p 1 

Miller, rf 

Wagner. If 

Bright, cf 

Beam, c 

Farleman, 2b 



Groce. 2b 
Martin, p . 
Schadle, 3b 



H 
3 


1 

2 

1 
1 








O 

1 
7 
1 
1 




11 

3 






A 
1 


1 





1 
1 
1 





Totals 3 8 24 7 1 

Two base bit— Malasky ; three base 

hit _ Willard ; home runs — Shilling, 

Wail: struck out— by Donnell 6, Martin 

5, Keiley 6; bases on bails— off Donnell 

H Martin 1. Umpire. Duck. 



KISSINGER 

The Jeweler 
Selinsgrove. Pa. 



PULITZER PRIZES IN 

LETTERS ANNOUNCED 



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RODENTS EPICURES DIE 

THRU PASTOR'S RUSE 



'Continued from page 1) 
commi rcial variety for the rats. How- 
ever, the rat took it as food for thought 
and refused to touch it. A heavy snow 
hep' the rat in over a period of days 
under the chicken house floor and the 
unfortunate fellow was snowbound for 
such a Ions time that he was forced to 
eat the Reverend's phosphated bread. 

Several days ago Reverend 
cypher took up the old floor 



(Continued from page D 
was adjudged the best American novel 
of the year. Awarding the prize to Mrs. 
Peterkin was indeed a gratifying act 
because it recognizes the work of a 
competent and graceful writer who has 
definitely added to the sum total of 
America's literary trflWUre and com- 
mends it at a time when her career is 
still in the making. Mrs. Peterkin writes 
of the Negrces who inhabit the swamps 
of South Carolina, her home state. 

Elmer L. Rice's "Street Scene" was 
adjudged the original American play 
which best represents the educational 
value and power of the stage. 

Stephen Vincent Benet's "John 
Brown's Body" was adjudged the best 
volume of verse by an American. This 
author has been receiving wide ap- 
plause for his distinguished work in the 
realm of poetry. The success of his 
poem marks the rebirth of the hope 
that American poets will return to Am- 
erican themes 

Burton J. Hendricks was awarded the 
prize for his "Earlier Life and Letters 
of Walter H. Page" as the best Ameri- 
can biography teaching patriotic and 
un elfish services to the people. 

Fred Albert Shannon's "The Organi- 
satii n and Administration of the Union 
Army, 1861-1865" was adjudged the best 
book on the history of the United 
States. 

All the awards in letters carry prizes 
'of $1000. except that tor history, which 
Stone- ■ es a prize of $2000. 
in the Other prizes in the field of journal- 



IH. L. ROTHFUSS! 



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ken house and counted ninety sk.le-. ism were »ls editors, re- 



tons of rats. They bit! 

Getting His Rout«> Fixed 

A \ery small boy was trying to lead 



time Raymie" came within one-tenth a big St. Bernard up the road 



of a second of breaking the Confer- 
ence two-mile record. Gerhardt placed 
second in the high jump. 

The other luminaries of the Little 
Crusaders failed to place. Five new 
Conference records were made in Class 
"B." and just as many occurred in 
Class "A." Summary: 

100-Yard Dash: First, Grant. Al- 
bright: second, Gutshall, Juniata; 
third. Haines, Albright. Time. 10.4. 

220-Yard Dash: First, Grant, Al- 
bright: second Gutshall, Juniata; 
third, Robinson, Drexel. Time, 24.1. 

440-Yard Dash: First, Grant, Al- 
bright: second, Joseisbure. Drexel; 
third, Miller, Juniata Time, 50.1. 'New 
record > 

880-Yard Dash: First. Josefsburg, 
Drexel: second, Miller. Juniata; third. 
Newcomer. Ursinus. Time, 2:05. 

Mile: First, Conover. Ursinus; second, 
Richardson, Drexel; third, Igft. Ur- 
sinus. Time. 4 47 

..'-Mile Run: First, Rhine. Susque- 
hanna: second. Richardson, Drexel; 
third, Kramer. Drexel Time 10:29.2. 

120-Yard High Hurdle.-: First. Hol- 
singer. Junlftta; second, Anderson. Al- 
bright; third, Wright, Drexel. Time, 



•White are you going to take that 
dog, mv little man?" inquired a passer- 
by. 

"I— I'm going to see where — where he 
wants to go first." was the breathless 
reply. 

16.3. 

220-Yard Low Hurdles: First. Apel, 
Juniata; second, Templin. Albright; 
third, Himes, Juniata. Time, 27.3. 

Shot Put: First, Holsinger, Juniata; 
second. Nachath. Ursinus; third. 
Markle, Drexel. Distance, 40 feet 6 
inches. iNew record.) 

Pole Vault: First, Holsinger, Juniata; 
second, StaufTer, Albright ; third. Moore, 
Drexel. Height, 10 feet 64 in- 

High Jump: First, Stauffer. Albright; 
second, Gerhardt. Susquehanna, and 
Pentz. Juniata; third. Black, Ursinus. 
and Holsinger, Juniata. Height, 5 feet, 
B . niches. 'New record.! 

Discus: First, Nacbeth. Ur-nnis; sec- 
mid, Holsinger, Juniata: third, Markle, 
Drexel. Distance, 124 ■ • ' QChea. 

«New record.) 

Broad Jump: First, Staines. Albright; 
second. Stauffer. Albright; third, Om- 
wake, Ursinus. Distance, 20 feet, 44 
inch- 



porters, and newspapers. 

CLIFFORD KIRACOFE 

ELECTED 19:50 PRESIDENT 

t Continued from page 1) 
tary; Anna Moore. Girls' historian and 
John Delay. Boys' historian. 
Class of '31 Election 

Walter Foulkrod. president; Lena 
Baird, vice president: William Wehky. 
treasurer: Corinda Sell, seretary; John 



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Salt m. Boys' financial secretary; Ida } Fislier'S JeWell'y SlOl'e 



Schweitzer. Girls' financial secretary; 
Eth.-lynni Miller, ctaM historian. 
Class of '32 Election 
Herbert Rummel, president; Charles 
Varner, vice president; Muriel Camerer. 
secretary; Burton Goodyear, treasurer. 

S 

CRUSADERS VANQUISH 

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i Continued from page D 
vaneing to third. Malasky tallied on 
Heim'l sacrifice Snyder singled and 
stole second, bu' was called out. Shill- 
kied to Willard. Palmer reached 
when Farleman made an over- 
throw to first and then advanced to 
third and stole heme. 

Thl wo 'allies came in the 

eighth, With two men down, Cap- 
'am Shilling Itepped to the plate and 
crashed a long drive for a home run. 
Then Johnny Wall ninch-hittintr for 



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"\\ ',,<,< The Susquehanna u Printed" 



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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQEUHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Elizabethtowu Netmen 
Again Defeat S. U, 

Elizabethtown again walloped the 
Oran en last Wednesday by a 

6-0 score 

The individual matches were very 
close, the majority going to three sets. 
On the whole, the tennis displayed was 
by far the best of the season. 

Stern, Speer. Kiracofe and Michaels 
played singles for the locals, while 
Speer and Stern, and Burford and Ad- 
ams comprised the doubles teams. 
S 

GLEE CLUB ENTERTAINED 

SYNOD DELEGATES THURSDAY 



TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1929 



S. U. Entertains Pony Express System 
Synod Delegates In Vogue at S. U. 



Members of Susquehanna Synod Guests Ed. Bollinger Handles Hassinger Hall 
At Student Dinner; Band Mail in Efficient Manner; Fox 

Furnishes Music and oisen Assist 



Dr. Manhart to Sail 
for Denmark June 15 



Dean of School of Theology Will At- 
tend Lutheran Conference in Cop- 
enhagen; Resigns Pastorate 



A recital was given by the Men's 
Glee Club of Susquehanna before the 
delegates to the annual convention of 
the Central Pennsylvania Synod, 
Thursday night of last week. 

The delegates held a banquet in Zicn 
Lutheran Church, Sunbury, as a cli- 
max to their convention. The recital 
was given immediately after the ban- 
quet. About five hundred attended. 

Music during the banquet was pro- 
vided by the Susquehanna Campus 
Owls. 



Did someone say we had chicken? 
Yes. you were hearing properly, for we 
certainly did have chicken and not that 
alcne, but all the fixings on Wednes- 
day evening when S. U. entertained 
the members of the Susquehanna Sy- 
nod assembled in Sehnsgrove for con- 
ference. 

The Dining Hall looked very gay 
with the brilliantly colored geraniums, 
which decorated the center of each 
table. 

Dr. Smith gave a short address of 
welcome and also expressed his appre- 
ciation for the splendid support which 
Susquehanna has been receiving from 
the Susquehanna Synod. 

During the meal music was furnish- 
ed by the S. U. Band. 



TALES YOU WIN 



-s- 



FOUR S. U. STUDENTS 

INJURED IN WRECK 



• Continued from page 1) 
were unconscious for a time after the 
accident. 

Raup did not stop but continued in 
the direction of Shamokin, altho his 
car was badly damaged, A patrolman 
happened on the seen? and traced the 
car by means of a headlight and a hub 
cap found at the scene of the crash. 
Raup was caught, traveling about ten 
mik's an hour, and was lodged in jail, 
pending his hearing the following night. 

1 he Ford was badly damaged, almost 
bey >nd repairs. It was owned by Mr. 
Kempski, also a Freshman. The escape 
of the four students from more serious 
injury was nothing short of miraculous, 
acording to those who witnessed the 
smashup. 



Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



j Queer it is how creatures act. When 
they aren't compelled to do anything 
they do it anyway and when they are 
forced to do something even to pay for 
doing it, they fail to do it. Recently a 
creature of the lower order, better 

:. wn as "Man's Best Friend" had 

.. attending Chapel regularly. Not 

wanted there even to the extent of 

. put oul bodtl) he nonchalantly 

titers and patrols the aisles. He is not 
rapeUed to attend yet he appears 
periodically. How differently the crea- 
tures of the highest order react. They 
are paying the full price of admission 
yet very deliberately react to the con- 
trary and take pride in the number of 
times they can "put-it-over" on the 
professors and get away with it. Funny 
isn't it. how it's done. You think you 
have put-it-over on some one, only to 
find out later that the boomerang 
comes back to the thrower when it is 
too late to alter things. 



Pony Express is the name of the sys- 
tem. Ed. Bollinger is the founder, pro- 
moter, and manager. The happiness of 
thirty of our most dignified Frosh in 
Hassinger Hall is dependent upon the 
precise and systematic way in which 
"Ed" handles the job. 

Far the small sum of twenty-five 
cents any student can insure the 
prompt delivery (for a whole semester) 
of the "sweetest" letters from the one 
left behind, the longed-for check (which 
seldom comes >, and even the box of 
good eats frtm home. 

Twice each day, 7:40 a. m. and 6:30 
?. m„ regardless of weather, the shrill 
piercing locomotive whistle indicates the 
last call for outgoing mail. "Ed" boasts 
that the express is on time, every time, 
all the time. Fox reports that "Ed's" 
best time from the Hassinger cathedral 
of learning to the Post Office is two 
minutes and fifty-three seconds. Com- 
ing from Fox. this statement can hard- 
ly be challenged. 

Fox and Olsen act as substitutes 
when Bollinger is n;t in college. Fox 
is expecting a pretty handsome com- 
mission at the end of the year, chiefly 
because his goloshes are always miss- 
n rainy days. 

We said in the beginning that the 
"peace" of Hassinger can be directly 
traced to the Pony Express. 
S 

Animals are such grateful friends— 
they ask no questions, they pass no 
criticisms. 



WM. SCHNURE 

Real Estate and Bonding 

Bel! Phone 100 East Mill St 



Dr. Frank P. Manhart, Dean of the 
School of Theology, will sail from New 
York on June 15, for Copenhagen. Den- 
mirk, where he will be one cf eight 
delegates from the United States to the 
Lutheran World Conferene, to be held 
In that city from June 26 to July 4. 

Practically his entire life has been 
spent In Christian service. He was 
graduated from Missionary Institute in 
1375 and received his Doctor of Divin- 
ity degree from Gettysburg in 1899. Dr. 
Manhart assumed duties as dean at 
Susquehanna in 1904. He received a 
degree of Dcctor of Laws from Witten- 
berg In 1925. 

He has served as pastor of St. Mat- 
thew's Lutheran Church at Shamokin 
Dam for many years. He has resigned 
from his pastorate only recently be- 
cause of pressure of other duties.. A 
dinner in honor of him and his wife 
was giver, him by the members of 
his congregation in the church, Friday. 

THE SUSQUEHANNA wishes him 
"bon voyage." 



Suits and Topcoats 

D AND F 

$1,00 



CLEANED AND PRESSED 
FOR 



AT TRIMBLE'S 

433 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 



STUDENTS 



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Bath Phone.s — Sellnsgrow 



Merchant Tailor 
Ed. I. Heffelfinger 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

Market Street Selinsgrove 




SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

REV. G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D.. President 

Susquehanna University Is located in the neart of tfte oeautiful 
Susquehanna Valley, in the home-like borough of Selin^guve. Dor- 
mitories and recitation buildings are tn excellent condition with all 
modern conveniences 



Dean of College 

DR. HERBERT A ALLISON, 

A.B., A.M.. Litt.D. 



Dean of Theology 

DR. F. P. MANHART, 

A.M. D.D., L.L.D. 




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University Barber 

CUTS HAIR YOUR WAY 
Walnut and Markets Sts. 



WHITMER-STEELE COMPANY 
South River Lumber Company 

Manufacturers of 

Pine, Hemlock and Hardwood Lumber 

Lath. Prop Timber and Ties 



STUDENT CO-OPERATIVE STORE 

(Alumni Gymnasium) 



I 65 King Street 



Northumberland 



t 

Tennis Rackets Restrung 

TENNIS RACKETS. BASE BALL GLOVES, GOLF SUPPLIES, Etc. 

All Kinds of Athletic Supplies at a Real Saving 



1 1 »»»»»», 



^miijumiuiiijiiuji! 



m)imiiiii ii i ii n i i»iiiu iiiii i iii i i uii i ii iii i i iii i iiiiiiiiii..iiiiMi i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui 



in i iimmiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiii i i i iii i miiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiii i i ii i i mii 



tinijmii i i i ii i nii ii iuin i M iii mimi i iiH ii Miiiiiv 



WELL 

ARTICULATED 

COURSES IN: 

Liberal Arts 

Science 

Education 

Business 

Administration 
Music 
Theology 




Susquehanna 
stands for a well- 
rounded educa- 
tion, clean sports, 
recreation for all. 
earnes t n e s s in 
study, and above 
all CHARACTER, 
as the hall mark 
of a gentleman. 



»»»-»»»»»» »<& 



WHEN IN WILLIAMSPORT VISIT THE NEW STORE AND FACTORY OF 

Mi The Smith Printing Company 

" ■■—■■■" 



•i MANUFACTURING BANK STATIONERS 



OFFICE OUTFITTERS 



THE CITY INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
PENNSYLVANIA— Sunbury, Pa. 

Organized IS TO 

Surplus to Policy Holders $866,962.08 
Kama L.nRer. President A . p. . Danle , SecreUpy 



CAMPUS ENTRANCE 

The New Catalogue Is Here 

The best Advertising- Agents a School can have are its 
Students and Alumni. You can direct students of the 
right sort to Susquehanna's Campus. 

Our Students and Alumni 

are our chief assets. When students grow r - - -------------- 

Into their finest fruitage, and our alumni , TO THE DEAN: , 

"make good." your Alma Mater rejoice* ■ , piea ~ e send , the New catalogue to the foi- , 

•' lowing Prospective Students: 

8 md us word of any outstanding achieve- ' M ' 

ments. We follow your careers with deep ' 

intereat. 

i i 

Studentl and alumni! You arc a big < M • . 

part of Suaqnehanna'i anceeat, Will you co- 

opera' • by Ailing in the blank, and mailing ' 

IttotheDean? <si B ned> ' 

'------------». ...4 

uii m uu U ui*u^u» m .. 1 i.n i -. ih. , .. . M l ,i n ,i ,Miii i l ,m l mi ii 1 i y iiii iiiiiui l iii„i, i l „ MI „„ii, l , ii „ umi m i,i l l i- in n i mn i m,, ,. , i . iimiuiUiuum mruMiiiiiiiin i mmiiiiimiiiinMniiiKiiHt i iiHi i iHBminiiiimiHi ■--■■■■ 



S. L MCE, Jr. 

Equitable Life Insurance Co., of Iowa 

906-908 KUNKEL BUILDING, HARRISBURG, PA. 




Farmers National Bank 

of Selinsgrove 

WELCOMES ALL ACCOUNTS RESOURCES OVER $946,745 99 




LYTLE'S PHARMACY 

Soda Fountain THE REXALL STORE lc . «■ 

Refurnished Throughout, Modern and Appealing in Every Reject 

Talcums, Face Powders and Toilet Articles of AH Kinds 

UNITED CIGAR STORE AGENCY SELmSGROVE 



F. K. SUTTON 

Furniture and Funeral Director 



SERVICE EXCEPTIONAL 
Competent and Courteous Attendants 



Bell Phone 121— No. 1 North Market St., Sell 



Best of Motor Equipment 



nsgeove 




ra & Derick's 



Next to the Movies 

KODAKS - TOILET GOODS - SODAS 



Sunbury — Northumberland — Shamokin — 



Selinsgrove 



— 4> 



/* 



?>** 



ALUMNI DAY 



JUNE 8 



The Susquehanna 



% 



-™* 



% 



P^ -S DAY 



Volume XXXV 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY, MAY 28, 1929 



Number 5 



S. U. Blanks the 
Juniata Indians 
With Four Hits 



Old Grads Plan for 
Gala Alumni Day 



Crusaders Overwhelm Indians 3-0 in 
Interesting Game on the Uni- 
versity Field 



SHILLING MAKES SPECTACULAR 
CATCH IN THE NINTH INNING 



Baseball Game Between Veterans and 

Varsity and Commencement Play 

Features of Program 



Snyder Makes Three Hits and Two 

Rons; Shilling's Single Brings 

in Two of the Tallies 



Susquehanna was victor by a shut- 
out of 3-0 over its ancient and tradi- 
tional rival, Juniata, Saturday after- 
noon, on University Field. 

"Lefty" Danks allowed but four scat- 
tered hits and had the Indians at his 
mercy during the entire route. 

Snyder took the batting honors for 
the day and shared in the fielding hon- 
ors as well. The "Middleburg Flash" 
had three hits in four times at bat, in- 
cluding a three- bagger, a double, and a 
single. It was evident that the Juniata 
pitching ace did not have Snyder's 
number. In the fifth inning Snyder 
made a nice catch of Ataski's fly, going 
clear over the track to make the catch. 
In the eighth frame he also made a 
nice catch of Berry's high fly. 

Captain Shilling also came into the 
hitting and fielding honors of the day. 
"Whitey" had two hits in three times 
at bat. In the fourth inning it was his 
single that scored two runs for Susque- 
hanna. "Whitey" fielded the ball at all 
times like a veteran of the big leagues. 
In the ninth inning he made the pret- 
tiest catch of the day, taking LaPorte's 
fly back of third, rolling over several 
times into the pole vault pit, but still 
hanging on to the pill. 

"Lefty" Danks seemed to have the 
fate of the Juniata sluggers all mapped 
out, for Berry and LaPorte were unab'e 
to get a hit off him. Andrews, another 
slugger for the Juniata nine, was held 
down by "Lefty" to one hit four times 
up. Susquehanna's southpaw had the 
Indian sluggers cut down to his size 
from the very beginning. 

Susquehanna gained their first tally 
in the first inning. Good grounded to 
LaPorte and was thrown out at first. 
Malasky grounded out to Andrews, who 
ran him down at first base. Snyder 
stepped up to the platter and tripled. 
this being his first of three hits. Sny- 
der then took home on a passed ball, 
scoring the first run of the game. Groce 
struck out. 

'Concluded on Page 2) 



Reports from the office of the Gen- 
eral Secretary of the Aumni Associa- 
tion are to the effect that an increas- 
ingly large number of old grads are re- 
turning their coupons to reserve plates 
for the Annual Alumni Dinner, one of 
the high lights of the gala day of events 
arranged for former students, June 8. 

From morn until night the old grads 
will be kept busily engaged in an inter- 
esting program of events beginning 
with tennis in the morning to take out 
the old "kinks" and revive the college 
spirit, ending with a collegiate presen- 
tation of the famous Shakespearean 
drama, "Hamlet," in which the in- 
imitable Prof. Nathan Keener will play 
the title role. 

A baseball game between the Alumni 
players and the Varsity team will be 
one of the outstanding features of the 
day. This game will be played on Uni- 
versity Field, beginning at 2:30 p. m. 
Many veteran players have already sig- 
nified their willingness to participate 
in this annual fray. 

Reunions will hold sway in the morn- 
ing. These classes are planning meet- 
ings: '79. '84. '94, '99. '04, 14, '19, '24. 

President Smith and wife will hold a 
reception immediately after the game 
in their new home. 

Immediately after supper, to be serv- 
ed at 6:00 p. m.. the group will gather 
on Seibert Hall portico for participa- 
tion in Step Singing. The college band, 
directed by Prof. Allison, will give a 
twilight concert at 7:00 p. m. 

"Hamlet," the Commencement Play, 
will be presented in Seibert Chapel 
Hall at 8:00 p. m., under the direction 
of Prof. Keener. The cast has been se- 
lected from the student body. 



R. Rhine Elected 
1929 Track Captair 




Seniors Erect Lights Crusaders Win f roi* 
As Class Memorial Lebanon Valley With 

Graduating Class Places Four Boule- Big Leaglie Forffl 

vard Lights Along Proposed 
Campus Driveway 



KAY x.M//se~ 

1929 Track Captain 



Juniata Downs S.1 T 
In Dual Track Me<* f 



Holsinger Outstanding Star as Juniata 

Defeats Susquehanna by a 

99!^ to 16>_. Score 



Mrs. H. A. Surfaw 
Heads Faculty Cluh 



Social Organization Entertained by 

Symphonic Trio and Readings by 

Mary Royer '29 



At a meeting of the Ladies of the 
Faculty Club of Susquehanna Univer- 
sity held at Seibert Hall on Monday ev- 
ening, May 20th, the members were de- 
lighted by a fine program, which had 
been arranged by a special committee. 
Miss Mary Royer gave in her usual 
charming manner the following read- 
ings, "The Old Maid Address." "In flhe 
Morning." and "The Carpenter." 

Miss Bartlow acted as vocal soloist 
for the Symphonic Trio consisting of 
the Misses Brungart, Berlew. and Tress- 
ler. Miss Bartlow sang two beautiful 
numbers with obligates, "Out of the 
Dusk to You" by Dorothy Lee, and "Ah, 
S\veet Mystery ol Life" by Victor Her- 
bert. The Trio also played "Romance" 
by Wieniawski. 

Mrs. H. A. Surface WSJ elected Chair- 
man of the Faculty Club No other of- 
• were elected because it is pkm- 
ned to make the club merely social in 
purpose and to have but one officer to 
cull the meetings 

Much fun and amusement wh pro- 
vided thru gam.' itted by Mrs. 
Aikens and Mrs Ahl. 

Those serving as hostesses and pro- 
viding the refreshments were: Mrs. 
Sheldon, Mrs. Rodgers, Mrs. Woodruff, 
and Mrs. Wood. 

S 

The Lesson 

"Oh, John. I've just discovered that 
the woman next door has a hat exactly j 
like mine." 

"Now, I suppose you want a new i 
one," 

"Well, dear, that would be cheaper | 
than inuviii 



Aided by the brilliant performance 
of Holsinger, who captured 12 l - 
points to help carry his team to victory. 
Juniata trounced the Little Crusaders 
by a N -i' : . tabulation on University 
Field Friday afternoon. 

The bad weather codintions hinder- 
ed the Chidermen and proved uncom- 
fortable ■ pectators. 

Wi lik; and Rhine each got six points 
I : Si ! [i > hanna WelUty got a first in 
hi broad imp and a third In the 100- 
yard dash. Rhine was unable to better 
his record at Dickinson last week, due 
to the adverse weather conditions, but 
easily took first place in the two-mile 
run and a third in the one-mile. Gear- 
hardt placed second in the high jump 
and third in the javelin throw. 

Summary: 

100-Yard Dash: First, Gutshall, Jun- 
iata; second. Apei, Juniata; third, We- 
liky. Susquehanna. Time, 10 4. 

Mile: First, Henery, Juniata; sec- 
ond. Corman, Juniata; third, Rhine, 
Susquehanna. Time, 4:53.3 

220- Yard Daslt: First, Gutshall, Jun- 
iata; second. Apel, Juniata; third, Neis- 
minter, Susquehanna. Time, 54.4 

120- Yard High Hurdles: First, Fet- 
ter, Juniata; second. Holsinger, Jun- 
iata; third, Glenn, Susquehanna. Time, 
17 2. 

Two-Mile Run: First. Rhine. Susque- 
hanna; second. Corman, Juniata; third, 
Gimbell, Juniata. Time, 10:5. 

220- Yard Low Hurdles: First Apel. 
Juniata; second, Johnston, Susque- 
hanna; third, Holsinger, Junita Time, 
27.2. 

880- Yard Dash: First, Jamison, Jun- 
iata; second, Miller, Juniata; third. 
Henery, Jumiat Time, 2:10, 

Pole Vault: Four tie for firs!- place — 
Fisher and Coldren, Susquehanna; Hol- 
r and Roland. Juniata. Height, 10 
feet. 

High Jump: First. Holsinger, Jun- 
iata; second. Gearhatdt. Susquehanna; 
third, Bents, Juniat. Height, 5 feet 9 
inches. 

Discaus Throw: First, Sproul, Jun- 
ita; second, Fetter. Juniata; third. Win- 
ters, Susquehanna. Distance, 99 feet, 4 
Inches, 

Shot Put: First, Boyer. Juniata; sec- j 
ond, Fetter, Juniata; third. Hoteinger, 
'Concluded on Page 3> 



"Raymie" Rhine, one of me out- 
standing members of the Orange and 
Maroon varsity track squad, was re- 
cently designated by the Athletic 
Board as Captain of the 1929 cinder 
men. Leon Chesley, elected last year 
by his teammates to captain the track 
and field men. left college at the end 
of the first term. Rhine was elected to 
fill that vacancy. 

He has been doing remarkable work 
in the one-mile and two-mile runs this 
year. He has distinguished himself in 
every meet as a man of endurance and 
remarkable physical stamina, all of 
which came through sincere and regu- 
lated training and drilling 

He was a sure point-getter in even- 
meet. He came within an are ol break- 
ing the record in the jg i-mlje run in 
the C. P. I. C. C. at Dickinson two 
weeks ago. His time waa one-tenth of 
B i cond short of the origin*! record. 

Rhine, who will graduate from the 

ileal Department this spring, ex- 

ti to take up the ministry, He has 

the best wishes of his classmates in 

particular and the .student body in 

general. 

Tamaoua Hiah Wins 
School Rov Meet 



Erection of four boulevard lights 
along the proposed campus boulevard 
as a memorial of the Senior Class of 
1929 was begun yesterday and will be 
completed some time this week. 

The four lights, of Old English type, 
will be placed near the Conservatory of 
Music, at the entrance of a proposed 
driveway to be constructed soon. This 
driveway, beginning at the present en- 
trance to the campus, will lead past 
Alumni Gymnasium to Hassinger Hall. 
It will turn where "Sleepy Hollow" now 
stands and will circle Steele Science 
Hall and Seibert Hall. 

"Hank" Carichner, president of the 
class will present the gift to the college 
as a part of Class Day exercises, June 7. 
at ten o'clock. Dr. Smith will accept in 
behalf of the university authorities. The 
Senior Class is reviving an old and 
traditional custom of holding Class Day 
Exercises at which time a gift is gen- 
erally presented to the college. 

The committee in charge of the pur- 
chase and erection of the lights is 
headed by Adam Bingaman. Other 
members are Helen Weaver, Robert 
Wolfe and Ruth Steele. The work is 
being done by the Edward Gass Electri- 
cal Shop, of Sunbury. 

The presentation of the lights will 
no doubt give an impetus to the con- 
struction of the boulevard which will 
enhance the beauty of the campus. 
Other classes are expected to follow 
and present similar lights prior to 
graduation. The Seniors are to be com- 
mended for their pioneer efforts in this 
line 



Four Errors and Five Free Passes Help 

S. U. Win from AnnviUe 

Team, 7-3 



DONNELL KNOCKS SPECTACULAR 
THREE-BAGGER, SCORING ONE 



Fast • Double Play in Opening Frame 

Starts Drubbing of Mylinmen; 

Piela Wild 



Juniors and Senior 
Tn Annual Recital* 



Holder of Title During Last Three 

Years Retains Crown with Scant 

Lead Over Mahanoy City 



Tamaqua High School retained the 
crown which it won on three previous 
occasions in the Fifth Annual Cham- 
pionship Meet of the Anthracite Dis- 
trict, Saturday, on University Field, 

Mahanoy City offered stiff opposition 
to the Tamaqua athletes, trailing by 
only a few points after the final tabu- 
Ition was made. 

Results by points were as follows: 
Tamaqua 56, Mahanoy City 48'., Shen- 
andoah 28'.. Mount Carmel 18, Ash- 
land 3. Coal Township o 

i Concluded on Page 3» 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

Mrs. Dodsou wishes to announce 
through these columns that the Lib- 
rary will be closed during all of 
Memorial Dy Books may be remov- 
M. m mi; Day. Books may be remov. 
Friday morning. 

A large number of college news- 
papers received in exchange are on 
hand and I ill be placed on a shelf 
in the Library lor the use of the 
students. A knowledge of other col- 
leges is (fundamental in understand- 
ing our own campus problems Tire 
Sana rule applying to the defacing 
or removal of periodicals and books 
will apply to these publications as 
they are Library prop 



Conservatory Students Present Two 
Excellent Programs of Clas- 
sical Mu- : : 

Annual Junior and Senior Recitals of 
the Conservatory of Music were held 
in Seibert Chapel Hall last week. These 
recits Iven as a part of the Con- 

servatory program to furnish incen- 
tives to study and experience ui public 
performance. 

The Senloi I ■'. : ■ <- givmv *• 
Mlssu •■ Prteda Dreese and Ruth Divs»'- 
and Mr. William Roberts last T ."■' • 
' The prnsT*—- 

Concerto in e minor— Allegro M«*" 
toso, Chopin— Miss Ruth D>»< ' 

R < the Seashore, Smetar.a : Bailer i« 
D, n.-hnsvv — Vis- Fried p D*"*-— 

R, st Du bei mil" 'Stay, My Beiov- 
<"■"' ,1 g Bach: "II Neise" i'Tis Sunrr- 
lnt>. Members;; "La Oirometta " •' 
bella— Mr. William O. Ra**"*- 

Scherzo < Fireflies ». Hinton: "Ce qua 
<-u ie d°nt rl'Ouest" (The Wast Win: 1 ' 
Debussy — MlM rv -•;■■ 

OflHwaHq in E minor— Romance-Lar- 
shetto. Chooln — Miss Dee*** 

T>i ? "Plover Song" from the opera 
"Carmen." Bizet— *tr. R/yv»!-» 

Berceuse. Oo. 57, Chopin: Ballad? 
No. 1 in 4 flat, Liszt— Miss Divelv 

Intermezzo. No. 1. Brahms; Poloufl-Ue 
in E, fitsjr Mil Dr*«"i» 

"Have you seen but a White Lily- 
grow?" old English; "Must I now par' 
from Thee?" Old German; "ffugh'l 
Song of the Road" (Hugh, the Drover). 
Williams — Mr. Roberts. 

The Junior Recital was given by 
Misses Janet Dively, Edna Troisier, 
Kathryn Morning, and Dorothy Beck. 

Tiie program 

Piano — Concerto m C Major— 'Is* 
movement), Moaart— Mise Janet Dive- 
ly. pianist; Prol P. M. Linebaugh, or- 
ganist 

Piano — a. The Eagle (A Tone Poem>. 
MarDowell; b. Cantique d'Amour. Liszt 
- Miss Dorothy Beck. 

Organ— Sonata in C minor. No. 3, 
movement, Guilmant-AIiss Edna 
Tressler. 

Violin— Concerto No. 6. Op 70. Al- 
. moderato, DeBeriot— Miss Kath- 
r,vn Morning 

Piano— Polonaise, Op. 46, MecDowell 
—Miss Edna Tressler 

Piano — a. Nocturne, MacFayden: b. 
Waltz in E Hat, Areflsky— Miss Janet 
Dively 

Piano — Concerto in C major < Finale). 
Mozart— Miss Dorothy Beck piai 
Prof. E L. Allison or«amv 

'Concluded on Page 3t 



Lebanon Valley was trounced by the 
Little Crusaders at Anville in its final 
game of the year, to the count of 7-3, 
on Friday afternoon. Donnell, who 
pitched brilliant ball throughout the 
nine innings, was aided considerably 
by a team which played heads-up base- 
ball consistently. 

The second play of the game was a 
fast double play pulled by Good to 
Heim to Palmer. This play in the early 
stage of the battle put confidence in 
Coach Ullery's diamond stars. 

The Crusaders faced one of the best 

; pitchers in college baseball in the per- 

I son of Piela. but by the successful 

bunching of their hits were able to 

! amass seven runs, 

I The Susquehanna men opened up in 

the fourth inning, scoring two runs, 

Donnell was given a free ticket to first. 

Groce wa3 hit by a pitched ball. Hetm 

I sacrificed, advancing both runners to 

second and third bases. Snyder step- 

,ped up to the plate and beaned out a 

! two-bagger, scoring both runners 

Susquehanna again tallied two mark- 
| ers in the fifth inning. Malasky singled 
I and Donnell drove him in with a three- 
I bagger, the best hit of the game. Groce 
| scored Donnell when he laid down a 
perfect sacrifice along the first base 
line. 

In the seventh inning, Malasky got 
to first safely on Wentz's error at 
short. Donnell sacrificed to second 
base. Malasky scored on Groce's single. 
Heim took first on a walk in the 
eighth frame. Snyder flied to Zappia. 
Shilling struck out. Wall got on 
through, an error at first base and both 
runners advanced a base. "Swede" Pal- 
mer drove out a hard single, scoring 
both runners 
Besides the fast double play pulled 
ftrsl Inning by Susquehanna, 
the most spectaculai feature 

i nth Inning when Al- 
ire hit. Shill- 
u Palmer pi : -up came 

2) 



Personnel Vnmo/* 
For 1931 Lan thorn 



Senko Heads Editorial Staff, Yoas the 

Business Staff; Work to Begin 

for Next Year 



With the 1930 Lanthorna already dis- 
tributed, preliminary work has begun 
on 34th volume of the annual to be 
published n u x* year bv the Class of 
1931. 

Staff appointments have been made, 
and actual work will begin early next 
fall. Plans for the Business and Edi- 
torial Staffs have been made, and as- 
signments will be given to the mem- 
>f the Staff. Friday afternoon at 
13 40. when a meeting of tins group 
be held. 

The following is a complete staff 
ted for the 1911 Lanth *rn; 

Editorial Staff 

■■-■-m-Chiet John P. Senko 

ii Editor . Donald Lesher 

Editor , Ida Schweitzer 

Chief Statistician — Ethelynne Miller 

Ass't met a i vm 

EditOl :. Biough 

Athletic Editor Nellie Shue 

Humor Editor . Alt m 

I its Edl >•- Walter Fouikrod, 
Julia Morgan, Clifford Johnston, Dan- 
iel KwasnosH, Herbert Schmidt, Bryce 
Nicodemus. 

Business Staff 

Business Manager Ru 

. . . Glen Clark 

Advertising " Warren Wolf 

on Advertising Staff, Lena Baud 
Al\ n Barber Walter Berford, 
> 
Radio mated 
l Waldo was much impressed by 

his firal trip thru the garden Coming 
mornh tie shouted, "Oh, 

Mother, eome tnd see the vine with the 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, MAY 28, 1929 



lore especially thru student project*, erected a hut or Susquehanna 



10 2 x— 3 



rHF SUSOUFHANNA mt > lmt ,non ' ^ri th + rn Bt ?,l eDl ] 7t^' ^ . .oooooooom 

r. ± ± x-, J u j v^ \^>±^i.xj.±j.^x^u.3> a ca t, ln f or W eek-end retreats or hikes of student groups. Two base hits— Snyder, Hariey, mai- 

Susquehanna should have such a cabin within walking (lis- i ler; three base hit— Snyder; struck out 

tance from the University. Thru the combined efforts of the I-** Da „ nk * *-, by , Hu ^" 6 ; *■■ on 

• ,, , , __ t , .,\. . ■., balls— off Danks 1, off Hunter 1. 

• Men s and W omen's Athletic Associations, such a project could umpire, Duck. 



Published Weekly by the Students of Susquehanna University 



iubscription $150 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager, 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter 



adember Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 



THE STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Frank E. Ramsey 30 

Managing Editor News Editor 

Russell Carmichael '31 Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Verncn Blcugh '31 Mary Eastep '30 

fecial Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 
Betty Wardrop '32 John Kindsvatter '32 Lewis Rich '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 . Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 
Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



Lebanon Valley Nose? 
Out S. U. Tennis Team 



TUESDAY. MAY 28, 1929 



be worked out. 

This cabin would be an invalulable addition to the physical 

equipment of our colege. It would be of special value to the men 

during the fall hunting season. Co-eds could use it for week-end 

llikes T ^ e Little Crusaders lost a close ten- 

J, i, •/• r _i -j i j. j nis match to Lebanon Valley at Ann- 

Furthermore, if such a place were provided a certain rep- vi]]e Friday by the £Core of *_ 3 

icsentative group from both the men students and the co-eds The orange came through in singles, 
could b>- selected for a special excursion during which student winning three out of five, but dropped 
and college proWem. could be ducuwd ami ttmhed out, fac , ™ *%* ZlT me SSSL^E 
ulty members accompanying them on these trips. A firm re- saders. 

lationship would thus l>e established between student and faculty s. u. is fully confident of turning the 
member, 1 „,,«. they would meet on comon ground and dtal»ta^ , £ , £2 l WV5 

Saturday. 

, __ ! s 

S. U. BLANKS THE JUNIATA ! Economy is re i at ive. and the fewer 

INDIANS WITH FOLK HITs the re i a tives the more the conomy. 



Lawrence Fisher '32 Common problems. 



CRUSADERS WIN FROM 

LEBANON VALLEY 



■con; j hi i e : ETTF, 



(Continued from Page 1) 
hird and first, respectively. Both 



(Continued from Page 1) ''* 

Susquehanna scored their other two , 



We do not want to be gtliltV Of meddling with affairs pert- snatched many hot grounders for put- runs in the fourth inning. Malasky J 



incut to the administration of our Alma Mater, nor do we desire outs or assists, summary: 

Susquehanna 



opened it up by skying to Berry. The » 
heavy artillery was again in action J 



to trample upon the inviolate and sacrosanct rights of our Facul- t o a e when Snyder doubled to center. Oroce 

tv. Bill We <lo Want to propose that for tll«' Welfare Of all the Good. 2b 5 11 sacrificed to Steele, Snyder advancing! 

students a new course should be added to our curriculum for next Maksky, rf 2 2200 to third. Heim was given a pass and 

. , 1 , , 1- i -i 1 rpi ; , „ veiQ Donnell. p 2 1 5 then stole second. Shilling singled to i 

year, said course to head the list ol required work, pis course Oroce d 1 i o o o center, scoring two runs. This put the! 

Would be known as "Court Etiquette*' or ''The Polite Way Ol Helm, as 10 2 3 game on ice for Susquehanna. Wallj 

Doing Things on Susquehanna's Tennis Courts." It would be Snyder, if 01100 grounded to third and shining was' 

offered during the second semester, immediately before the op- ^^J* *,'.\\\\\\'."! 10500 
ening of Susquehanna's "court" season. It would be taught by p a imer, n> 1 11 

Anyone with common sense. e 27 12 1 

Thru 'In' mediums ol the bulletin board and these columns, ° as ; "" 

. „ ,. _ . 1 • , , 111 Lebanon Valley 

the heads of our Athletic Department nave plainly and specm* R H O A I 

cally reminded us 'hat the upper courts are reserved for the Patrizio, rf 01000 

co-eds and for mixed doubles, with the added reservation that shortiidge rf 



JOHN H. KELLER 

—Dealer Je— 

Meats and Groceries 



Both Phones — Sellnsaro'-- 







Zappia, If 1 2 

10 



Albright, cf 1 1 1 

only one set may be played 111 the case 01 singles and two sets in Wentz ss 1 2 1 

the ease of doubles, if there are others who desire to play. 

Attention was recently called to the fact that a certain Bendigo. c 

, , . , ..' . , .... . ,. Piela. p 

young man and his "flame occupied one ol these courts for over Dlsney 2 b o 1 2 

two hours with many co-ed tennis enthusiasts waiting in line to Light 3b 1 

plav. How any one can take two hours to play one set of tenuis Dennis, ib 8 

f • • , ._, • i vi ♦ Stewart, lb 3 

is almost beyond comprehension. Tins was not only a flagrant 
violation of the rules of 'lie "courts" but was also a decided act 
of rudeness and impoliteness. 

The suggested course might alleviate conditions somewhat. 



Corman 







4 1 



1 
4 
4 
1 1 
1 
1 




thrown out at second. 

In the fifth frame. Steele, shortstop 
for Juniata, robbed a single from Heim. 
making a very nice catch. Andrews 
also played a good game for the losers 
at first. Summary: 

Susquehanna 

R H O A E 
15 



For a Little Recreation 
Stop at 

FISHEM & SON 
Billiard Parlor 



Good. 



Malasky, rf 

Snyder, If 2 

Groce, cf 

Heim, ss 1 

Shilling, 3b 

Wall, c 

Palmer, lb 

Danks, p 



2 

3 4 

1 

1 1 

2 3 
4 

1 11 





J. C. HAAS 
University Barber 

CUTS HAIR YOUR WAY 

wamut and Markets Sts. 



BOOST SUSQTTEHAXA ! ! 



Totals 3 24 14 4 

"Batted for Patrizio in seventh. 
Two base hits— Snyder, Albright; 
three base hits — Donnell, Disney: stolen 
bases— Snyder. Zappia 2, Heim; double 



,. , i , ; ; ■ c. plav— Good to Heim to Palmer; hit by 

\\ e hear nmeli discussion on the campus aboul raising mis- h , 



pitcher— by Piela (Groce); bases on 



quehanna's scholastic rating to a level with the best colleges in bails— off ' Donnell 3. off Piela B 



America. What, we are asked, is the best way to achieve this f 

The surest and safest means are directly in the hands of our 
student body and Alumni. It they will encourage the best and 
most desirable students in their respective communities to ma- 
trlculate al Susquehanna, then our Alma .Mater may and will 



struck out— by Donnell 3, Piela 9. 

S 

Sunk Without a Trace 
"83 your little boy wasn't really lost?" 
"No, we found him under the Sunday 
paper." 



Totals 3 7 27 12 1 

Juniata 

R H O A E 

Steele, ss 1 4 1 1 i 

Berry, cf 1 

Andrews, lb 1 8 3 1; 

LaPorte, 2b 3 2 

Ataski. If 

Miller, c 6 2 

Hariey. 3b 1 1 2 

Connor, rf 1 1 

Hunter, p 1 



STANI EY 



$est m Moving Pictures 

Selinsgr-,-. ~ 



►4 



Selinsgrove Lumber 
Company, me. 

We Manufacture NottUng Hut me »es> 

LUMBER, MILLWORK ana 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 

Selinagrove, Penna. 



Totals 

Score by innings: 



4 24 10 



bej:in a gradual pr 



ol selection of the best and elimination • 



of the undesirable prospects. 

It we want to be sure that our credits will be received at 
face value al sister institutions when transferring, by the state 
Departmenl when applying for certification, or by graduate 
schools when desiring additional preparation for a profession, 
then now is the time to begin to aid our Alma Mater in reaching 
the much-desired position in scholastic rating. 

All the advertising in the world will fail unless each and every • 
studenl and Alumnus Is loyal to his Alma .Mater and sends sin- j 
cere and conscientious prospects to Susquehanna. Special eou- } 
pons have hecn inserted in T his paper from time to time for this 
k|i-i i,i 1 i eason. t T se them ! 



i Mr a & Deficit's 



•Suits and Topcoa 

) and P 

$1,00 



CLEANED AND PRESSED 

£1 t\i\ 

FOR 



yewt to the Movies 

KODAKS — TOILET GOODS — SSUPAS 

ounbury — NortnumDenana — MWmwiii — 



u 



AT TRIMBLE'S 

433 Market Street. Sunbury, Pa, 



or.ii.ss.iovr 






-8- 



ATTACK <>N BOOK CLUBS 

\ inouncement by Brentano's Ias1 week that 'hey had joined 
E. i». Dutton and Co., ai d Frederick A. Stokes and Co., in the 
"war" against the Book Clubs was read with special interest. 

The American Booksellers Convention in Boston renounced 
tlie Book-of-the-Month Club and similar organizations an "in- 
tellectual sham." Harold Guinzburg, presidenl of the Literary 
Guild, says thai Brentano's could no1 have consistently done 
Otherwise since Arthur Brentano Is secretary "i the Booksellers 
Association. 

The fight against the clubs started recently when the Book* 
of-the-Month « 'lub chose "Tl> ' 'radle of tfa h> ■ i>" by -loan Low- 
ell, a breezy tale of a girl's life aboard her father's >lii]». rather 
than the offering of E. P. Dutton and Co., "Th Pathway" by 
Henry Williamson, a hook of real' literary merit, 

Lowell Brei idds "The publishers see in the clubs a 

vicious cycle < I - dardization and mechanization and atrophy 

Mr. Haas, of the Book-of-the-Month Club 

coi tention by saying, "Up to date only 

me fifty or more have said thai they will 

ind of these two, one has made the 

thai he will submit the hooks 

unit.*'— G. W D. 






r. K . SV T 1 O IN 

Furniture and 1-unerai LHreuiui 

SERVICE EXCEPliUiNA^ 
nd Courteous Attendants :;- c t oi Motor £.i)uipm 

:'.-ii Pbont 121— No. l North Marlctt »fc, mu»b«*v«« 



Fin /»' tl< r .1/ ■ / ■I'liiiitniao 

ffl tlttOHO})})/ I'lti i ,, 

Sriop ttv 

FEHR's 

COA'IS ana DRESSco 



| STUDENT CO-OPERATIVE STORE | 

Tennis Rackets Restrung | 

{ 'Alumni Gymnasium. • 

fEXNTS RACKETS, BASE BALL GLOVES, GOLF SUPPLIES, EU. } 

All Kinds of Athletic Supplies at a Real Savu^ 

i I 



Paxton Brick Co. 

SMOOTH AND ROUGH FA7E 

BUILDING BKICK 

—and— 

PAVING BLOCKS 

Office — Watsontown, P*. 
Factory— Paxtonvllle, 1%. 



Farmers National BanK 



of Selinsgrove 



WELCOMES ALL ACCOUNTS 



RESOURCES OVER $940.. i,... 



Bogar Brothers 
Lumber Co. 

LUMBER, MILLWORK and 

BUILDING MATERIAL 

PROMPT SERVICE 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 



< i literary t - 
ji srwei'K Mr. lire 
two publishers oi 
inn submit book 
remely ini 



Monogram Stationery 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 

"When Tin: Bukquehaniu m Printed" 






IH. L. ROTHFUSS 



— Pfulf-r In — 

1NSURA.NCE 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

MEATS and GROCERIES 

MACHINERY 



t 101-Y 



3elln»| 



An artii 
I \ K. • 
«ueh iM'« tings m 

< Kher i ollegi 



-! \ COTTAGE SM.M.I. 

- issue i*eg»i i<l I Y. M. 

- - of the need of a definite place where 
: . be held. 

ersi ong since, thru public 



POIAI? WAVE 



gUNBURY MILK PROPUt 
We Solicit Your Patronagi 




KESSINGER 

/ /m •/* iri !< i 
8ELIN80BOTB. I'A. 



%, 



TUESDAY, MAY 28, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SEL-1NSGROVE, PA. 



PAG THREE 






* TALES YOU WIN * 

• » 



now they look like sacks with legs- 
Booth Tarkington. 



Other dogs may come and go but it 
seems that we will have our pet "Joe 
College" for a long time— that is, if 
Dr. Surface doesn't need a speiman. 



A flapper never has her nose buried | 
so deep in a book that she can't get at | 
it with a powder puff. 



Rastus: "Yoh she is ignorant, boy, 
yoh sho is. Why a millennium am jest 
de same ez a centennial, only it done 
hab mo' laigs." 



JUNIORS AND SENIORS 

IN ANNTJAL RECITALS 



One thing is clear— if you want to 
start an argument, mention Freshman 
rules or Student Government. 



When a co-ed falls in love it doesn't 
affect her as much as it does the boy 
student— Thomas Arkle Clark of the 
University of Uinois. 



The song of many Hassinger Hall 
Sheiks : 
Moonbeam or star gleam 
Or sky of midnight hue- 
It matters not the kind of night, 
If it is devoid of you. 

Dawn of gray, or dawn of gold — 
It matters not to me, 
For dawn of gold is dawn of gray 
If it's devoid of you. 



'..-.- 4 | 



We know of a Hassinger Hall boy, 
who, when told by friends that he had 
a tobacco heart, gave up tobacco for 
candy and now has a sweetheart. 



: COLLEGE CRAX : 

Oh. My, Yes! 

He had neither been outside England, 
and neither had she, but both were re- 
counting their experiences abroad. 

"And Asia! Ah! Wonderful Asia! 
Never shall I forget Turkey, India, Ja- 
pan—all of them. And most of all, 
China, the celestial kingdom! How I 
loved it!'' 
She held her ground. 

"And the pagodas — did you see 
them?" 

"Did I see them?" She powdered her 
nose. "My dear, I had dinner with 
them." 



The Puzzler's Natural History 
The Ai 

The Ai is found in the jungles of 
Africa, and in crossword puzzles. Be- 
fore being captured by the latter, the 
Ai was considered merely as two vowels 
in search of their consonants. 

The Ai has only three toes, and there 
are times in the subways when women 
wish they were Ais. 



Department Store Proverbs 

Lost children will be found in the 
toy department. 

There's always room for one more on 
the elevator. 

There are no one-way aisles, but 
there ought to be. 

Unpaid goods are always returnable. 

If you don't see the topcoat you 
want, the saleman will. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Organ— Carillon, Sowerby— Miss Ed- 
na Tressler. 

Violin— The Son of the Puszta, Keler- 
Bela— Miss Kathryn Morning. 

Piano— Capriccio brillante, Op. 22, 
Mendelssohn — Miss Edna Tressler, 
pianist; Prof. P. M. Linebaugh, organ- 
ist. 

S 

TAMAQUA HIGH WINS 

SCHOOL BOY MEET 



Merchant Tailor- 
Ed. I. Hef f elfin e-er 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEE^ 
Market Street Selinscrra- 



Most of girls today don't seem to 
care as much for a bright future as a 
bright present. 



Early to bed and early to rise — 
And your girl goes out with other I 
guys. 



We know of a Freshman who thinks 
he can use ocean current to make salt 
water taffy, eat door jam, sleep in a 
phosphate bed, drink cocoa thru a jack 
straw, shear hydraulic rams and eat 
mush from a hyperbole. He thinks that 
phlebitis is caused by the bite of a flea 
and that the "Whispering campaign" 
is a new song. He does not know the 
mating call and is seen quite often at 
Seibert Hall. 



Just Why 

There were guests at dinner, Charles, 
aged 5 waited long and anxiously to be 
served, for his father had some diffi- 
culty in carving the chicken. 

At last, when he received his plate, 
he had the same experience as his 
father in cutting his portion, so he 
turned to his mother and said: "Moth- 
er, now I know why they call them 
Plymouth Rocks." 



Giving Way 

"That tenor's voice was to powerful 
for such a small hall." 

"Yes, even though half of the audi- 
ence left to make room for it." 



Headwork 

"Just look at that native carrying a 
basket on her head!" 

"Yes, that's her idea of a well-bal- 
anced diet." 



Considerate 

"I want," said the house-hunter, "a 
house in an isolated position— at least 
five miles from any other house." 

"I see," said the agent, with an un- 
derstanding smile. "You want to prac- 
tice the simple life?" 

"No," answered the house-hunter, "I 
want to practice the cornet." 



He Got It 

"I would like a rise in salary for two 
reasons." 
"Those are?" 

"Twins." 



JUNIATA DOWNS S. U. 

IN DUAL TRACK MEET 



When I went to colege the girls 
looked like hourlglasses with shoes; 



Defined 

Sambo: "What am dis heah millen- 
ium that Ah heah folks talkin' about?" 



i Continued from Page 1) 
Juniata. 

Javelin Throw: First. Snyder, Jun- 
iata; second. Sproul, Juniata; third, 
Gearhardt. Distance, 144 feet, 3 in. 

Broad Jump: First, Weliky, Susque- 
hanna; second, Pentz, Juniata; third, 
Henery, Juniata. Distance, 19 feet, 6 
inches. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

The events and the winners were as 
follows : 

220-Yard Low Hurdles: Gothic, Ta- 
maqua. Time, 28.2 seconds. 

One-Mile Run: Sheaffer, Tamaqua. 
Time, 4 minutes 55.5 seconds. 

220-Yard Dash: Gothic, Tamaqua. 
Time, 23.8 seconds. 

380-Yard Dash: Bergar, Mahanoy 
City. Time, 2 minutes, 9.5 seconds. 

440-Yard Dash: Wrona, Mt, Carmel. 
Time. 54.6 seconds. 

Mile Relay: Shenandoah • Lizewoskie. 
Jefferson, Gibson, Yeninos). Time, 3 
minutes. 45.3 seconds. 

High Jump: Allen, Tamaqua. Height, 
5 feet 6 ;: i inches. 

Pole Vault: Allen, Tamaqua. Height, 
10 feet 8 inches. 

Javelin, Amhose, Mt. Carmel. Dis- 
tance, 156 feet. 

Broad Jump, Petrucka, Mahanoy 
City. Distance, 19 feet 9 inches. 

Discus: L. Gudiatus, Mahanoy City. 
Distance, 119 feet 6 inches. 

Shot Put: L. Gudiatus, Mahanoy 
City. Distance, 42 feet 7 inches. 



EAT AT 

LEIBY'S 

Sunbury, Pa 



l<3 



LEAOTTA'S 

BEAUTY 
SHOP 




Water under pressure-water 
that is always available at 
the turn of a faucet. This is 
possible if you have a Deleo- 
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And you not only have the 
many conveniences of water 
under pressure — you elimi- 
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of pumping and carrying 
water for your every need. 



When watering thirsty stock 
it is very easy if you have a 
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field; simply turn a faucet 
and the Dependable D-L 
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Water. Systems 



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202 S. Market St. 

Second Toor Below 
First Lutheran Church 



I 



LP HONE 58*Z- 



S 



LEARN THE flA.NO 


IN TEN LESSONS 


TENOR-BANJO Un, 


MANDOLIN IN FlVt 


LLsSu.Na 


w itnoui m i ■. • -ra kit ■-. heart-breaa- 


ir 'y i exercises You are 


regular pru- 


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SEND FOR IT ON APPROVAL 


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" i" rr< ■ i i his gr«»i 


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ed men Mi 81 ud< nl ma y examine 


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i :.•• later part <■' the "HallmarK seu- 
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i peri tne : ■ any copy 


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tne seal unoroKen, we win retuna in 


iu.i all mom y paid. 


Deposit with the Postman the sum of 


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in fuil, upon written request. The Pub- 


lishers sue anxious to place this "Self- 


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lovers all over tne country, and is in 


a position tfi make an attractive prop- 


osition to agents. Send for your copy 


today, Address The "Hallmark Self- 


.:.-:. toi Station G, Post Office Box 


- Self-Instructor win be 


hen \ ou do n t need to 


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■ - method of teaching music. 


: I, '■ • Y( rk, N. Y. 



New York Life 

Insurance Co. 

ARTHUR C. BROWN 



-burg, Pel 



STUDENTS 



TRY 



JREICHIEY'S 

I LUNCH — SODAS — CANDY 



! 




i SHIFTER'S 

WHiTI DEEH BttAND 

Ice Cream 

For Health 

The Tatte Telh 



t 

i 

i 
i 

i 



Grover D. Savidge 

Representing 

New York Life 
Insurance Co. 

Sunbury Trurt Bidg. 
SUNBURY PA. 

"DECORATIONS FOR YOUR 
PARTY" 

Fryling Stationary Co 

411 Market Street 
Sunbury, Pa. 



I Eat at 

TThe Don Mar 

h. M GABEL, Propr. 



FEEHRER & NOLL 

BARBERS 



4 WEST PINE STREET 



JAS, H. STYERS 

PICTURE FRAMING 

PROMPT SERVICE AND LARGE 
SELECTION OF MOULDINGS 
Sell 






Fisher's Jewelry Store! 

D1AMON1 s, WATCHES, SILVER ! 
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SHOE REPAIRING 
Work Guaranteed 

SHOES - SHINE 

C. E. POE 



Feaster's Restaurant 

•WHERE STUDENTS MEET 
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.Market Street 



Selinsj,Tove 






LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS 
DRAWING SUPPLIES 

JOS. L. MENTZ 

The Stationer 
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'REMEMBER YOUR COLLEOl 
DAYS WITH PHOTOGRAPHS' 

Schindler Studio 

51,*) Market Street Banbury, Pa. 



T. T. WTCHM \:N 

SUNBl RY, PA. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, MAY 88. 1929 



Juniors Compete in 
Oratorical Contest 



: ALUMNI NOTES 



Four Members of 1930 Deliver Orations 

in Pearson Prize Contest; Winners 

Announced Commencement Day 



Annual Junior Oratorical Contest 
was held in the Chapel on Wednesday 
evening. This contest was held in order 
to determine the winners of the two 
Gold medal" Prizes established by Rev. 
P. H. Pearson, of Easton, Pa. 

Those who competed were: Stewart 
Schrack, who had for his subject 
"Fear;" Miss Mary Eastep, who spoke 
on "The Pearl of Great Price;" Miss 
Margaret Young, who chose "The Am- 
erican Constitution" for her subject; 
Arthur Lecrone. who spoke on "Wood- 
row Wilson." Miss Grace Lauer had pre- 
pared an oration on "Mother" but was 
unable to compete because of illness. 



Dr. Foster U Gift, D.D., (Seminary) 
will become the pastor, or executive 
head, of the Deaconess Motherhouse in 
Baltimore. 

Dr. Gift has been Superintendent of 
Instruction of this important institu- 
tion for some time. He is the author of 
two volumes. 



Pres. Hoover Names 
Law Commission 



Ten Lawyers and One Woman Educator 

to Study Law Enforcement: Wiek- 

ersham is Chairman 



President Hoover, in carrying forward 
the program announced in his speech 
of acceptance, has appointed the Nat- 
ional Law Enforcement Commission to 
study failure of law enforcement and 
shortcomings of judicial procedure. 

George W. Wickersham, of New 
York, who was Attorney General under 
President Taft. was selected as chair- 
man, and with him are associated nine 
lawyers and one woman college presi- 
dent. 

President Hoover has given the com- 
position of the commission his attent- 
ion since inauguration, and the select- 
ion of commissioners, regarded as em- 
inently qualified in practical and 
theoretical law. is viewed as the most 
significant step in his administration. 
This commission consists of men rep- 
resenting both sides of the Volstead 
Act, which is likely to be the question 
upon which public interest will center 
in the inquiry Three of the commis- 
sioners are experienced men in crime 
study, who have served as legal prac- 
titioners for a number of years 

It was announced at the White 
House that the ommission probably 
would organize late this week or as 
soon as ail the members could arrange 
to be present. President Hoover has 
talked over the problem with most of 
a, but wil his views 

len the comn . tiizes. 



Bucknell Defeats 

S. U. In Tennis, 6-0 

down 

■ *. 6-0. 

I 

Baker di 
Melcham • 

Wi;i; ted Burtord. 

Don i 

Frost and Wilkinson defeated Mich- 
aels and Burford. 



( OLLEGE PERSONALS 

Dr. Bml ding Cmunence- 

i;--. '.: ihlenburg College 

today, 11, ■•■ which the m- 

ititutton irating the twentyflfth 

annlversa Ldency of the 

colli ge ui ! i J inn A w Re 

Preside] . Will make the Mem- 

orial Day add Middleburg Thurs- 

.; .• : ■ be Ameri- 

Prof, imbers a 

track . ■ n he Onen- 

■. c ter to 

. 

ended 

natole 

ise of 

MillCt. 

S 

SADTLER Pit! LEGAL 

( U B ELECTI OFTH l Rl 

• i 

: 'ires- 

' i 

-. 
i 

■ 

fi. del " ; i. secre- 

Wihna Walker; Boys' " 

C>r- 
Bel] 



Rev. Kurt Molzahn (Sem.) recently 
became pastor of St. Michael's and 
Zion Church in Philadelphia. This Is 
the oldest and most historic Lutheran 
congregation in Philadelphia. It called 
the Patriarch. H. M. Muhlenburg, to be 
its pastor in 1742. In its spacious 
church auditorium, then the largest in 
the United States, the memorial service 
to Washington was held by Congress in 
1799. General Harry Lee was the orator 
and in this oration characterized Wash- 
ington as "First in war, first in peace, 
and first in the hearts of his country- 
men." 



Seth Gustin, '26, teaching at Bedford, 
spenl the week-end on the campus. He 
was accompanied by three young mem- 
bers of the Senior Class of Bradford 
High. 



Addison Pohle. '26, teaching at Al- 
toona, spent a few hours in the cam- 
pus Sunday. 



Rev. John Lenker. D.D., Dies 

Dr. John Lenker. a graduate of Mis- 
sionary Institute, died recently in Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota. He served as West- 
ern Secretary of the Board of Church 
Extension of the .General Synod, 
taught theology at Blair, Nebraska, 
founded the California Synod, etc. He 
was greatly interested in Lutheran im- 
migrants and in their interest visited 
nearly every Lutheran educational and 
missionary center in the world. 

He wrote and published a large vol- 
ume entitled "Lutherans in All Lands," 
an English edition in American and a 
German edition in Leipsic. He himself 
translated or had translated, thirteen 
volumes of Luther's work, of which he 
was the publisher. 

He is well-known and highly esteem- 
ed for his valuable services by Luther- 
ans in all parts of the world. He was a 
descendant of John Harris, founder of 
Harrisburg. and was reared in Sunbury 
where three brothers and a sister, all of 
whom attended Missionary Institute, 
still live. 



Joseph Fopeano '26, visited the cam- 
pus over the week-end. He has been 
taking graduate work in Engineering at 
Lehigh University and will complete 
that work this week. 



"Whiskers" Lyons, of Sunbury, who 

tor the Crusaders varsity team 

- '~ and i. ■■• wearing the garb of 

. in the Blue Ridae 

I acted i • •■ hurler 

nt down to 
the hands ol F; 
i 7 



-8- 



S-Dimension Film 
Startles Scientists 



Ten Years of Research Crowned With 

Unusual Achievement — Make Fir*t 

Shewing of Invention 



Aft ibor and scientific 

George K. Spoor and John J. 

Berfgren have succeeded in demon- 

ig to le movie world that per- 

Ive can be added to height and 

m of moving pic- 

. ■ films 

E:;u::: j ' : ■- and Q licture experts 

idio one a 
sreek and m i i o Chica- 

i- ills on a 
- ii ' ■•:•- that « i 
vivid . j emed the room would be 
d 2 d. 

'rfr'ed b 8 who 

demonstration that the 

are Industry than did 
' V. l\ . ig i the 

. atres 
i >rmous screen 30 
ed 

•lied Hal 
P I :ve is 

tied by pi i Ith d 

picture from two 
• :i, ob- 

i . pictin thrown 

■-■•.. 

thi eye. 

The tain used is phot graphing un- 

■ m i- wider than oi- 
i film. The camera re- 
«emb 

tn\v the films 

— , — s 

kdshlpl mysterious oemeni of the 
ml! 
Sweet'ner ol Ufa and solder .>: society! 



Freshmen Lead in 
Inter-Class League 



First Tear Men Gain Three Easy 

Victories; Sophomores in 

Second Berth 



CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS 

Two notable improvements have been 
made to the campus during the past 
week. 

Grading about the library and the 
n^wly-rerected President's home is 
about completed. A new walk leading 
from the street to the President's home 



i . 



By winning the three games which 
thsjy have played thus far in the Inter- 
Class Baseball League, the Frosh are 
undisputably in first position. The 
Sophs are second, having lost one and 
von two. The Juniors lost both games 
which they played. The Seniors lost 
the sole game in which they have par- 
ticipated. 

Sophs Drop First Game to Frosh 

The Sophomores got the short end of 
the string in a game with the Frosh 
Monday afternoon, 7-4. The defeat was 
partly due to hard and well-bunched 
aits of the Frosh and the loose fielding 
)f the Sophs. 

Herman, the Sophomore stellar 
ihort-stop, hit a single and a home 
run. C. Herring got two hits in three 
limes at bat. Fuller performed well 
for the Frosh at bat with three hits 
jut of three times at bat. 

W. Herring of the Sophs yielded six 
aits In five innings. Herman was on 
;he mound for the other two innings. 
Erdly had the Sophs at his mercy most 
)f the time, having eight strike-ouw. 

Score by innings: 

freshmen 110121 l—Z 

Sophomores 001102 0-^4 



is being laid. 



Screens have been hung on the win- 

I dows of the first floor of Selinsgrove 

Hall, now being used for administra- 

I tive and executive offices. This adds 
I much to the comfort of the newl#-laid 

out and conveniently appointed office 
i suites. 

I S 

; Funny thing about temper; you can't 

get rid of it by losing it. 



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Manufacturers of 

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/. narris Linker, President A. F. O' Daniel, Secro„. 



Sophs Wallop Juniors 

A rejuvenated Sophomore team wai- 
oped the Juniors, 15-1, Tuesday after- 
noon. The Sophs poled out eleven ter- 
rific hits off the combined efforts of 
fioutzahn, Lukehart and Garman. 

The hitting of Scharfe and Senko 
featured for the Sophs, Scharfe slug- 
ged out three hits in three times up, 
and Senko three in four times. The 
lone hit and run for the Juniors was 
tallied by Lukehart in the third Inn- 
ing. 

Ambickl started on the mound for 
the Sophomores, but, being slightly wild 
at the plate. 

Score by innings: 

Sonhomores 3 3 4 5 — 15 

Juniors 1 — I 



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Frosh Gain Easy Victory Over Seniors 

The Frosh had little opposition in 
defeating the Seniors. 12-3. Wednes- 
day afternoon. Beam, varsitv baseball 
manager, was in the role of risrht field- 
er, but was unable to gain a hit and 
was charged with several bad errors 

The hitting of Stineman featured for 
Hie Frosh. He had four hits La four 
Tips to the plate. Hchman had two 
hits in two tries. Maneval Btarrtd for 
"he Seniors rtavina two hitu lr hi 

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Frosh Win Deciding Contest iro.r. 
Juniors 

Juniors went down to defeat at 
,he hand? oi the Freshmen fi-2, ThuiK- 
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Stroup, Stemman and Fuller were 
he heavy hitters for the Frosh, eacn 
,'cllecting two bingoes. Stroup had a 
.riple in his pair. Lukehart and Gear- 
,iart held up the batting end for the 
/uniors, and also played stellar games ! 
n the field. 

ilohman was on the mound for the 
froth the full time and had the Ja:.- 
.ors at his mercy. Garman served his 
.ime on the rubber for the Juniors. 

Score by innings: 

/reshmen 2 2 2— ti 

/uniors 2 0—2 



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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSIT* 

REV. G. MORRrS SMITH, A.M., D.D., Preaideot 

Susquehanna University Is located In the heart of the b"' M'o 
Susquehanna Valley, In the home-like borough of Selinsgrove. P 
nitories and recitation buildings are in excellent condition with 
nodern conveniences. 



Dean of Coli«*"- 

DR. HERBE&T A. ALLIP"* 

A.B.. Tl?M.. Littn 



Dean of Th«**iA<»~ 

DR. r. P. MANHAB^ 

A.M., D.D.. I**.^ 






n 




-^0 



„. 






■ 



„ 



CONGRATULATIONS 



TO SENIORS 



The susquehann 



/"* 



^ 

.&£'«& 



v^ 



ft»^ e HOPE YOU HAVE A 



NICE VACATION 



Volume XXXV 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY. JUNE 4, 1929 



Noted Educators to 
Address Graduates 
Sunday and Monday 



Seniors Guests at 
Alumni Dinner Sat. 




Recognized Leaders In Educational 
Field Will Appear on Commence- 
ment Program This Week 



Annual Fete of Old Grads Will be 

Important Event of Alumni Day; 

Class Reunions Arranged 



DR. M. G. BRUMBAUGH WILL 

SPEAK MONDAY MORNING 



Approximately Eighty Will Receive 

Degrees; Dr. Smith Will Confer 

Degrees and Award Prizes 



Three noted and gifted speakers 
have been secured to address the grad- 
uating students, both seminary and 
college, in the course of the Com- 
mencement Program this week. 

The Baccalaureate sermon will be 
preached by Dr. William M. Horn, D.D., 
of Ithaca. N. Y., in Trinity Lutheran 
Church, Sunday morning 

Reverend Foster U. Gift, D. D., Bal- 
timore, Maryland, will address the stu- 
dents graduating from the Department 
of Theology on Sunday night, in Trini- 
ty Lutheran Church. 

Dr. Martin G, Brumbaugh, of Hunt- 
ingdon, Penna.. will address the stu- 
dents graduating from the college, Mon- 
day morning. 
Dr. Wm. Horn Preaches Baccalaureate 

Dr. Horn has spent his entire minis- 
try of twenty-five years in New York 
City and Ithaca. While in New York he 
was pastor of the Church of the Ad- 
vent, at Ninety-third Street and Broad- 
way. 

(Concluded on Page 4) 



Members of the graduating class will 
be the guests of honor at the Annual 
Alumni Dinner, in Horton Dining Hall, 
at twelve oclock Saturday of this week. 

Arrangements are about complete for 
this affair, one of the outstanding 
events of the Alumni Day program. An 
increasingly large number of reserva- 
tions are being received at the office 
of the General Secretary, Professor 
Luther Grossman. 

Separate class tables at the dinner 
have been set aside for those classes 
who are having their reunions this 
year. Special programs are being ar- 
ranged by the officers of these classes. 

Reunion classes this year are 79, 
'84, '89, '94, '04, '09, 14, 19, '24. 

At this dinner, members of the Class 
of 1929 will be formally received into 
membership in the Alumni Association. 



General Program for Commencement 
June 6-10, 1929 



Thursday, June 3th • 

5:00 P ^ U .J nnU l [ ^ nqUet ° f Pl Gamma Mu ' Trmitv Lutheran Church, I 

College ° harleS ° Peter3 ' Department of Ed^ation, State ! 

9:00 P. M. Sorority Parties. 

Friday, June 7th 

10: °?oo A o « **%% £*£ Day Exerci5es - College Campus. Presentation of 
1929 Class Gift by Henry R. Carichner. ,! 

Acceptance by President G. Morris Smith. !j 

; 7:30 P. M. Recital by Students of the Conservatory of Music, Seibert Hall 
| 9:00 P. M. Fraternity Porrioc 



UUerymen Drop 
Tough Game to 
Lebanon Valley 



Homer in Fifth Frame With Bases 

Loaded Proves Fatal to Orange 

and Maroon Batsmen 



DONNELL RELIEVES DANKS 

IN HECTIC FIFTH INNING 



> 9:00 P. M. Fraternity Parties. 

! Saturday, June 8th 

♦ ALUMNI DAY. 

{Registration upon Arrival at the Information Desk, Selinsgrove Hall 

[9:00 A. M. Alumni Tennis Matches. 

! 10:30 A. M. Alumni Class Meetings in Gustavus Adolphus Hall 

12:00 M. Alumni Dinner. Horton Dining Hall. 

■ 2:30 P. M. Baseball Game. Alumni vs. Varsity. 

;4:00 P. M. Reception by President and Mrs. Smith at the President's Home ! 



Annual P. G. M. 
Banquet Thursday 



Shilling and Palmer Play Consistent 

Games; Wail Scores Lone 

Tally in Seventh 



» 
» 

the! 
♦ 
» 

» 



Ten Juniors Will be Received Into 
Membership; Drs. Smith and Pet- 
ers Will Address Gathering 



S. U. Players to 
Present "Hamlet" 



Immortal Play Will be Given |1 Part 

of Commencement Program 

Saturday Evening 



"Hamlet" has been selected for the 
Commencement Play to be presented 
by the Susquehana Players for the en- 
tertainment of the Alumni, friends and 
students of Susquehana. 

In choosing a tragedy for the Com- 
mencement dramatic production, it was 
thought that "Hamlet" would be the 
best for instruction to the student in 
committing the lines and would give 
a better tone to a Commencement Pro- 
gram, since this is the five hundredth 
anniversay of the death of the Strat- 
ford Bard. 

Colleges and Player Leagues all over 
the world have been using this im- 
mortal play as an Anniversary pageant. 

Booth's Player Edition is used, cut in 
order not to lose any of the immortal 
lines and to make a fine evening's en- 
tertainment. 

The entire production is under the 
supervision of Prof. Keener, who like- 
wise appears in the play. 

The costumes have been ordered from 
Waas and Sons, Costumers of Philadel- 
phia. There is a great deal of expense 
attached to the costuming of this play 
and for that reason your patronage is 
solicited. 

The play will be presented in Seibert 
Hall Chapel on Saturday evening, June 
8. There will be two hundred seats re- 
served at one dollar each. General ad- 
mission will be seventy-five cents. 



Pi Gamma Mu will hold their Annual 
Banquet in Trinity Lutheran Church, 
Thursday. June 6, at five p. m. 

This is the first event on the five-day 
program of events during Commence- 
ment Week. Including Alumni mem- 
bers, faculty representatives, invited 
guests, active and newly-elected mem- 
bers of the society, it is expected that 
about forty or fifty people will attend. 
Manv hav** ahead" accepted the invi- 
tation and it is expected that more will 
be heard from this week. 

Ten members of the Junior Class will 
be received into membership formally 
at this banquet. They are: Mary Eastep, 
Ruth Erdman, Oren Kaltriter, Clifford 
Kiracofe, Virginia Moody. Anna Moore. 
Frank Ramsey. Simon Rhoads, Frances 
Thomas and Margaret Young. 

Paul Hoover, president of the local 
chapter of this National Social Science 
Fraternity will be toastmaster. The 
principal speakers will be Dr. G. Morris 
Smith and Mr. Charles Peters, of the 
Department of Education. 

The committee in charge of the ban- j 
quet is comprised of Dr. George N. 
Wood, Mary Royer and George Beam. 
Their extensive and well-laid plans will 
assure a successful affair. 



1 6:00 P. M. Supper and Step Singing. 
7:00 P. M Band Concert. Campus Iluminations. 
8:00 P. M. 'Hamlet," presented by the Drama Class, Seibert Hall. 

Sunday, June 9th 
10:30 A. M Academic Procession Starts from Selinsgrove Hall. 
10:45 A. M. Baccalaureate Sermon in Trinity Lutheran Church bj 

Reverend William M. Horn. D.D., Ithaca, New York. 
4:00 P. M Memorial Exercises in Union Cemetery. 

7:30 P. M. Graduating Exercises of the Department of Theology in Trinity! 
Lutheran Church wr l - 
| Baltimore, Maryland 

| Monday, June 10th 

• 9:45 A. M. Academic Procession Starts from Selinsgrove Hail. 
» 10:00 A. M. Commencement Exercises, Seibert Hall. Address by Dr. Martin ♦ 
G. Brumbaugh. President of Juniata College. 
Conferring of Degrees. 
Announcement of Honors and Prizes. 
1 12:30 P. M. University Dinner for Guests and Friends 



Lutheran Church with Address by the Reverend Foster U. Gift. D.D., • 



S. U. Loses Services 
of Faithful Couple 




Rev. and Mrs. Schwirian Will Leave 
Susquehana; Rev. Schwirian Ac- 
cepts Montgomery Pastorate 



Senior Class Day 
Exercises Friday 



Fine Gift Will be Presented to College; 

Miss Stauffer WiU Read Class Poem; 

Class Trial by H. Alters Hartley 



There is no dependence that can be 
sure, but a dependance on one's self. — 
Gay. 

<»— — - — , 

« 
ATTENTION SENIORS! » 

; Your attention Is called to the! 
Academic Processions in connection • 
with the Graduating Exercises. The} 
procession to Baccalaureate Exer- • 
cises will leave Selinsgrove Hall J 

; promptly. Sunday, at 10 o'clock, and • 
will march to Trinity Lutheran J 
Church. Monday morning, at 9:45} 
sharp, the procession will leave Sel- { 

I insgro\e Hall and will march to J . 

i Seibert Chapel Hall lor Commence- 1 

!ment Exercises 
Seniors should familiarize them- 1 • 
. selves with the program published { 
In this paper and watch the bul- 1 
letin board for further announce-! 
< ments. ■ 

Caps and gowns may be secured } 
| Friday and Saturday of this week • 
at Phillips Tailor Shop. A deposit 
of Ave dollars will be required j 
when the gown is obtained. Three j 
dollars will be refunded when the • 
garment is returned 



Formal presentation of the Gift of 
the Class of 1929 will be made during 
the course of the Class Day Exercises. 
Friday morning, at ten o'clock. The 
four boulevard lights are now in posi- 
tion and will be lighted for the first 
time Friday night. 

"Hank" Carichner, president of the 
class, will present the gift in behalf of 
his classmates. President Smith will 
respond in acceptance in behalf of the 
college. 

The exercises will be held near the 
entrance to the campus, if the weather 
permits. Should the weather prove un- 
favorable, they will take place in the 
Chapel. 

Miss Blanche Stauffer has written 
the Class Poem and will present it for 
the first time at the exercises. 

A novel feature in the form of a Class 
Trial will be presented under the direc- 
tion of H. Allers Hartley, potential law- 
yer, and a member of the graduating 
eia^ 

Students are urged to attend these 
exercises in grateful recognition of this 
noble act of the Class of 1929 in pre- 
senting such a fine and much-needed 
improvement to the colle 

S 

All in Favor Say "Aye" 
A teacher wanted to convey the 
meaning of the word "invisible " "Now, 
what do we call a person " she asked, 
"who is present without ever being 
s*en?" i 

"I have it." one little bov offered. 
"The janitor." 



Susquehanna will lose the valuable 
j services of two faithful assistants in 
the administrative force this summer, 
in the persons of Rev. and Mrs. Will- 
iam R. Schwirian. 

Rev. Schwirian. whose home is in 
Pittsburgh, and who will graduate 
from the Seminary this week, has 
spent seven years at Susquehana. in- 
cluding summer terms. During that 
time he served the institution in var- 
ious capacities, mainly as head of the 
Book Room. 

During the past winter he served as 
coach of debating and produced two 
champion teams, for which he deserves 
the admiration and commendation of 
the student body and faculty. 

"Bill," as he is popularly known, has 
distinguished himself as a brilliant stu- 
| dent and an eloquent speaker, and is 
bound to be successful in his chosen ' 
profession, the ministry. 

Mrs. Schwirian, likewise a resident 
of Pittsburgh, came to Susquehanna ' 
four years ago. immediately after her ' 
marriage to Mr. Schwirian. During 
these four years she has proved a 
very efficient assistant in the Credits 
Office. 

The two will remain here until after 
Summer School registration is com- 
pleted. Both will be sorely missed in 
the administration of the college and 
or. the campus where they have made 
a host of friends 

Rev. Schwirian has accepted the pas- 
torate of St. John's Lutheran Church. 
at Montgomery, near Williamsport. He 
has been serving at this charge for 
some time as a supply pastor. He will 
aamma his actual duties as pastor 
some time this summer. 

THE SUSQUEHANNA wishes them 
bundanee of itKCfM .md happi- 
ness 

S 



College Will Clean 
House This Summer 



Hassinger Hall Will be Completely 

Renovated; Other Buildings 

Will be Painted 



The Little Crusaders dropped their 
return game with the Lebanon Valley 
sluggers, 10-1, Saturday afternoon oa 
University Field. 

"Lefty" Danks started the contest, 
out was taken out in the fifth inning 
when Stewart hit a homer with the 
bases loaded. Bob Donneil went in for 
Danks in the same inning as a relief 
hurler and had two strikeouts to his 
credit in the hectic frame. 

It seemed the UUerymen didn't dis- 
play their usual brand of good baseball 
m this game. They were matched with 
a bunch of real sluggers who were anx- 
ious to avenge the defeat they suffered 
several weeks ago at the hands of the 
Little Crusaders. 

"Lefty" was a little uneasy in the 
first inning, but after being warmed 
up. settled down and had no trouble 
until the fifth. This first inning with a 
few bad blunders pulled bv his team- 
mates is what sent 'Lefty" to the show- 
ers. With one hand out in the initial 
frame, Albright singled; Wentz, the 
(Concluded on Page 3) 
S 

Saturday Classes on 
1929-1930 Schedule 



Extensive improvements will be made 

on the buildings and the campus during 

|the summer months, according to re- 

j ports from the office of Mr. John Oberv 

|dorf. superintendent of grounds an5 

buildings. 

Hassinger Hal! will be given a new 

; coat of paint on the exterior. Thorough 

1 renovation of the interior will also be 

made. The dorm will not be occupied 

• by summer school students. 

In the basement there will be a Day 
: Students' Room, Men's Parlors, and 
Y. M. C. A. quarters, as well as several 
! class and recitation rooms. 

The corner rooms on the three main 

| floors will be remodeled so that there 

will be twelve suites of two rooms each, 

with doors between instead of the large 

arches. The rest will be single rooms. 

New floors will be laid. Metal laths 
and plaster will improve the walls and 
ceilings. A new finishing of woodwork 
will add to the attractiveness of the 
rooms. 

Shower baths will be placed on each 
floor for the accommodation of the oc- 
cupants of the rooms. i 

Seibert Hall and Steele Science Hall i 
will likewise be given new coats of 
paint 

Driveways and walks will be improv- 
ed with concrete curbing. 
S 



Extension Department Bulletins Ready 

For Distribution; Preparations 

Made for Summer School 



Dr. Dunkleberger. Dean of the Col- 
lege, in an announcement today, veri- 
fied the rumor on the campus that Sat- 
urday classes will be included on the 
schedule next year. 

A complete schedule will be posted on 
the official bulletin board not later 
than Thursday of this week, so that 
students may make plans for next 
year's work. 

Full schedules and bulletins for next 
year's Extension Department are ready 
for distribution. Dr. Dunkleberger also 
stated. This includes the classes on the 
campus, at Wilkes-Barre, Shamokin 
and Mt. Carmel. 

Preparations are now being made for 
the annual Summer School. A large 
number of students have already sig- 
nified their intention of entering when 
the summer term opens this month. 

In accordance with a recent ruling 
by the State Department of Education, 
no more than eight credit hours of 
work may be carried by students dur- 
ing one summer term, if proper certifi- 
cation is desired 



SIGMA ALPHA IOTA GIRLS 

ENTERTAIN AT DINNER 



DR. DINKELBERGER COM- 
MENCEMENT SPEAKER 

Dr George F. Dunkelberger. Dean of 
he College, is busily engaged in deliv- 
ering High School Commencement ad- 
dressee during this week. 

He delivered the principal address at 
•lie Commencement Exercises at Mid- 
dleburg. last Friday night. Last night, 
be appeared on the platform a: Dal- 
matia. 

Tonight, he will ipeak f o the gradu- 
ating class of Mili Hall High School, of 
which Bruce Lytle, '28. is Supervising 
Principal. 

Friday night he will address a I 
at P'ymouth. 



A very delightful dinner was served 
at the Fairy Tea Room, Friday eve- 
ning. May 31, at six o'clock, by the 
girls of Sigma Alpha Iota, in honor of 
Miss Gertrude Evans, Province Presi- 
dent 

Although Miss Evans' home is in 
the Shamokin district, it* came to us 
from Ithaca Conservatory of Ifuslc, 
Ithaca. New York, where she oversees 
the new girls. 

The local chapter was charmed by 
MIm Evans, having received much en- 
thusiasm for the coming year',- work. 

The party was graced by the pres- 
Ol Mi-< Hade. Dean of Women, 
Mr> Diehl. and Laura Oemberling, one 
at lie alumnae. 

Many fine things are short-loved. 
Mlu Evans came— and left; yet her 1 
influence will be last 1114 The local girls | 
hope for frequent viaits from one whom 
they have learned to love dearly. 
S 



LEBANON VALLEY DEFEATS 

SUSQUEHANNA AT TENNIS 

Lebanon Valley College defeated 
Susquehanna at tenls 4 to 2, on Uni- 
versity Field, Saturday afternoon 

Singles: Capt Schroyer, Lebanon 
Valley, won from Stern, 6-0, 6-2; Hert- 
zel, Lebanon Valley, won from Adams, 
|>-1. 6-1: Capt K:i 1 >:•• Susquehanna, 
won from Oyer. Lebanon Valley, 0-6, 
6-1, 6-3; Speer, Susquehanna' won 
from Barnes, Lebanon VaUes 6-' 1 2-6 

6-1. 
Doubles: Schrover and Oyer, Leban- 
n Valley won from Spee and Stern, 
8-1; Hertzel and Barnes, Lebanon 
Valley, won from Michaels and Bur- 
ford. 6-1. 6-4 



Keeping Up With the Joneses 

"Ar- 1 thai exclu 

"Exclusive— why even their finger- 
bowl water comes in cans," 



< 

» 
: 

1 
t 
1 



PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION 

President and Mrs G Morris 
Smith an no u n ce 1 wm hold 

a reception in their new home Sat- 
urday afternoon, Immediately 

baaeball • the ] 

Alumni and the Vanity froo 

■tubers of the itudent I 
body, the Facui- Board of Truj 
Alumni, and ft. end- j 

This reception is a new feature 
Commencement Program, and 

at It ;, believed. -,ul! be ap- J 

predated bv e veryb o dy 

A cordial u |j extended! 

to all 



FACE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1929 



"Up STTSOTTFTTANTNTA Jya fa<iin 8 gesture of the so-called 'revolt' of youth. Two years 
I 11L JUjyULliniMMV ago saw the lowest moral trend among students. Today it is very 



Lebanon Valley 



.10 1 
46 45 



much higher and mounting steadily. Good Leads Nine 

Students of l»*>tli sexes are displaying more religious reel- 



Published Weekly by the Students of Susquehanna University 

Subscription ?: 50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager. i n g. They do not care SO much for the church, but their religious „ . } ^ at l ln 8" ^ Ve , ra ^ 

Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa, as Second Class Matter. ' ,. . ' , , . , ., ,. . ' Good, diminutive second sacker, led 

' feeling IS limeli deeper. Some Ol tllein consider religion as "sooth- the crusaders in batting averages with 

member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic Btetet ipy gypup ,•„,. S(H . ()m] childhood, rather than food for mankind: a tabulation of .378. This mark is 

THE STAFF but these are bovs and girls noted for selfishness." slightIy Iower than last year ' s - 

Editor-in-Chief Frank E. Ramsey '30 ! „,. ' . ' . , ,. .. With only the game with the Old 

Mi b Editor News Editor 1 he survey shows that from eighteen to thirty-five people Grads remainingi final tabulation of 

Russell Carmichael 31 Clifford Johnston '31 who have gone tliru College do not attend church regularly, but batting averages was made by the man- 

w.55Sf nvSiS^i JSTtLSSP&t I t,,( '. v tuni *° church devotedly after they have children. Regard- a * erial staff - The taem hit the °PP° n - 

Veinon Blough 31 Maiy Eastep 30 i • . ■ J fe ent batsmen with an average of .244. 

social Life Editor Exchange Editor less of their own ideas, thej want their children to come up un- f 

Frances Thomas 30 Anna Cleaver '30 | der the refining influences of the church." "iSlebure Twins flowed htebud 
Assistants on Reportorial Staff . MiacaeDurg iwms. lo.lowed his Bud- 
Betty Wardrcp '32 John Kmdsvatter '32 Lewis Rich '32 -H- dy closely with an average of .308. "Al" 



TO THK SKNIOKS 



played left field. 



It is far above our humble position to write a long disserta- t J h % averag ^ of th ^" em , a " lder °J the 

. , . team dropped beiow the .300 mark. 

tation to the members ol the graduating clagg on the proper way The complete tabulation is as foi- 



Fred Norton '32 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 
Herman Fenstennacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 "' living after college and embarking upon the Hup ol Lite. lows. Good. 378; Snyder. .308; Malas- 

jack Auchmuty '32 T^ir additional year of experience pales us when we think of at- ^S' £^S! JS^ wS SSj 

TUESDAY, JUNE 4. 1929 tempting it. Shilling. .208: Helm, .162; Danks, .154; 

But one ihinii we can do — everybody can do. We can laud p aimer, .125. 

what PRICE STUDENT GOVERNMENT the Class of '29 for the splendid work they have done during their 1 

The subjeel of student govern n1 at Susquehanna is such [asl year at college in particular. J JOHN H. KELLER 

an evasivi and perplexing issue that we approach it with a greal This class was one of the most active groups on the campus. I 



— iL-aK-r In- 



deal of temerity. Nevertheless, .1 lamentable condition which is Guided by a very capable leader, they were the instigators of a ! ^ r *. l p . 

almost withoul parallel in the history (»i our institution, or any number of important movements on our campus during the col- j lv * e ^tb ^ llf ' VTVOCeriP-* 3 

institution, for thai matter, exists on our campus al present and legiate year which is now closing. ! 

warrants, or demands, some thought and consideration. They presented an excellent Class Play. They supervised 

The Constitution of the Men's Student Government Assoc- Alitor Day exercises and planted a tret'. They are presenting a 

iation. Article V, Section 1. provides specifically, that ^election gift to the school this week. Last bur not least, they have re- 

of the Student Council shall be held annually on the second vived the historic custom of holding Class Day Exercises. 
Thursday of May Pillow inn the < 'hapel service.'' Further, Article This group is to be commended for their fine spirit of loyalty 

X. Section 5, reads that "the retiring Council shall continue in to the institution and to the fellow-students. They have paved 

office until the dose of the scholastic year and the Council- the way and set a goal for succeeding classes, 
elect shall assume full powers and obligations at the beginning The Susquehanna congratulates the Senior class for their] - 

of the next scholastic year."' achievements and wishes each individual member success and 

Why, we ask, was there no Student Council elected on the happiness in whatever vocation or profession he or she may 

regular election Day? Where, we wonder, will we get the Coun- choose. 

cU-elect which is to "assume full powers" next year? Orane-P Ratsmen WirT ~™e tallymen wereTupported by a 

There is "something rotten in Denmark somewhere," as the ^*« ,, &v uaiauicn „ 11 group of consistent players, both in the 



! 



Far a Little Recreation 

Stop at 

FISHEB & SON 
Billiard Parlor 



J. C. 

University Barber 

CUTS HAIR YOUR WAY 

wainut and Markets Sts. 



Immortal Hard has said. Either it has slipped the minds of the 
present incumbents that we need a Student Council next year, or 
else it means thai we are to have no more Student Government. 
Can anyone enlighten us and help us out of our dilemma? 

s 



WHO SAID WE'RE BUMS? 



Seveil Out Of Tei1 infield and the outfield. Good did ex 

ceptionally well at second. The initial 7 



I 

Susquehanna's baseball nine won sev- sack was occupied at various times by J QTT A T\T ' TT"W 

en out of ten contests with other col- Palmer and Groce. 3 JL 1 \.l^l J_ JL/ J. 

leges. Some of the teams defeated Captain Shilling played his position J 

ranked among the best in small col- at third in big league fashion. Heim, I g^gi t n y or ilia Pictures 

lege circles. at short, stopped many hot grounders. ! i, „ 

The Crusaders scored 45 runs and In the outfield were Malasky. Sprout. ( 

College students mav still enjoy the dubious pleasure Of their opponents scored 46. This high Snyder and Groce. all playing their po- ; JJ •— — ■•■■■■..# 

hitch-hiking ami "blimming" from college to their home, to ath- Nation for the opponents may be sitions consistently. r. 

" ... . explained by the overwhelmingly large The Summary: 

ietlC contests, and Other points of interest, without running the number of rruis scored by the oppos- Washington 3 

hazard Of being incarcerated for a few unwholesome hour in ing teams in the Swarthmore game at Swarthmore 16 

Philadelphia and the Lebanon Valley P. M. C 3 



receiving end during almost the entire Lebanon Valley 3 

Juniata 



some local Bastille or of handing over a few odd "bucks' which 

pame on the home terra firma. Hamilton 2 

it took weeks tO collect from Dad. The success fo the team was due in Juniata 3 

This happ\ State is the result of the masterful stroke of a large part to the star pitching of Ursinus 3 

Governor John's. Fisher, who, when considering the newlv-form- Dott 9? and Danks ' Wal1 was at the SeIins g rove 

... , receivi 

ed Motor Code, struck out the provision prohibiting hitch-hiking, season 

The new code wen? into effect dune 1. minus the "rider*" so de- i 

Ipised by college men. { 

We propose a rising vote of thanks for the Governor of our j 

Commonwealth, for his gracious acl means that for two years J 

al least, college men may wend their way via the hard-surface } 

rittbons without fear of interference from state authorities. .More j 

power to the Collegian's governor! { KODAKS — TOILET GOODS — SUUAS 

! 



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A i.om.n lain ii t < HAAJii, { , 5 / ,,, Hitter Uercnanafc 

rhe announcement by our Dean that we shall have Saturday * •-■-.>----■---»■■— -»«^-<-»-— ■—»»-■»•— »-<-■—">-"- -■■"' j Ki'itHfinnhlu I'rictu 



LOIOI LtjUipiiit ii 



classes uexl \ear should meet with the unanimous approval of ,' 

the simleiii body. There are several important features about } If' . K . S U ' O IN 

such a Rysteni which make it \ • ■ r \ attractive and helpful. I Furniture and r'unerai uirec ui 

In the first place, it will mean that the class room work will j SERVICE EXcepiiuina^ 

he mo re evenly distributed thruout the week, permitting more in- { umptwnt and courteous Attendants -t 1 

tense preparation and additional research work. There will be J ,; "" F ' hI " !:I ~ 

no uniHH'eesHary crowding of six classes Into one day's work. .— """" . 

^V,„dly, it willme;,; that more studenU will remain on the STUDENT CO-OPERATIVE STORK j 

campus over the week-end, which will tend to quicken our col* 
lege spiril and increase [nterest in extra-curricular work. A\- 
tendance at athletic contests will be increased and more support 
will •»■ given the teams. 

Thirdly, it will mean that Susquehanna will now rank with 
other colleges ol similar size in scholastic work. The system is 
one v. hie 1 1 was adoptee] a few years ago by the larger Institutions 

n being adopted wid< Iv by the Miialh-r institutions who have 

'I its lllelil- 

A large slice has been cut from die college loaf by adopting 
this policy. It will mean much toward raising our scholastic 
standing. 



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''WHOOPEE" l> WAXING AMONG i'OUNG PEOPLE 

• lilcjju Ntiidt'iitu and other youngsters are rapidly reeov- 

eriuu from the "whoopee' pei*iod, and the plane of morality, es- 

tally in the colleges, is much higher than 11 was two years ago 

- am ty rising. 

Thiw ix the concluHion of the Rev. Leslie Glenn, secretary of 

roll eg? work of tin 1 National Council ol the Epixcopal church. 

'iv! eighteen months has been conducting an inten- 

■nmej i -imieni morals in all sections ol the country, with 

e>»l„ , ial reference to the "whoopee" craze. 

"Thert* are still cocktail and petting parties, of course," said U'« Solicit Your Patronage . 
ih" Rev. Mr. Glenn, "bul they are diminishing and are now mere- '....,, __ , . . .,,,,,,.,,.,,.,.. 



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Belinsorove, r.\. 



TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Young College Head 



PAG THREE 




ALUMNI NOTES 



DR. GEORGE MORRIS SMITH 
Susquehanna's New President One of 
the Select List of Youthful Heads of 
Important Institutions of Learning. 



S. U. Too Has a 
Young Man at Head 



Selection of Dr. Smith in Line 

With New Program in 

Educational Work 



"Robbing the Cradle for a Univer- 
sity's Prexy" was the startling head- 
line in the Literary Digest cf a recent 
issue. That magazine and many others 
thruout the United States have been 
full of this "juvenile stuff." 

For, indeed this is the day of the 
young college president, whose keen in- 
telligence visions future developments 
and wlK se irresistible smile and charm- 
ing personality win friends wherever 
that type of educator gees. 

No longer is it fitting that the car- 
toonist depict that time-worn picture 
of the decrepit old man with thick 
tensed glasses, carrying many books 
and with a few scant hair standing on 
perpetual end, as the symbol of the 
educatcr. 

The young prexy of today is a dif- 
ferent man. His model resembles close- 
ly that of a sporty golf hero. 

Si squehanna University is fortunate 
in having one of thai younger type as 
her president, to wit: Dr. George Morris 
Smith. 36 years old, a man of vision 
with the promise of greater days for 
the institution of learning he heads so 
ably. 

Others :n '.hit select class of young 
college presidents are Robert H. Hutch. 
ins, 30 years old, president of the Uni- 
ve^.ty of Chicago; Dr. Clarence Cook 
L: tie, .7, president of the University of 
Michigan; Dr. Glenn Frank, 38, presi- 
dent of the University of Wisconsin. 

e late Dr. Charles William Elliot 
was ..iily 35 years old when he entered 
upon his illustrious career a* president 
of Harvard University. 

M.st of those young men come from 
famil.es of educators, as too is the case 
of Di Smith, of Susquehanna, whose 
f«th< superintendent of the 

schools of Shenandoah county, Virgin- 
ia, and whose brother, Dr. Charles J. 
Smith, is the comparatively young and 
very successful president of Roanoke 
College. Virgin*. 

Dr. Charles Smith made a never-to 
be-forgotten impression on Selinsgrov- 
ers while here last Fall for the inaug- 
uration of his "Little Brother," as he 
affectionately calls "G. Morris,' when 
he breezed into Rotary passing out the 
cigarettes and Issuing the instructions 
"forget the Doctor stuff and call me 
Charles." 

Dr. and Mrs. G. Morris Smith and 
the two little Smithlets, "Betty and 
Buddy," are now at home in the beau- 
tiful residence just completed for Sus- 
quehanna's president on the site of the 
Zimmerman home in the corner of the 
campus at the junction of Pine and 
Walnut streets. 

That structure is not a modernistic 
house filled with cubist pictures, but 
rather a beautiful type of Colonial ar- 
chitecture, expressing Mrs. Smith's 
■• taste and untiring efforts to the 
end that the building is not merely a 
house but a real home. 

Dr. and Mrs. Smith and their chil- 
dren participate wholeheartedly in ev- 
ery campus activity, whether it be the 
president tossing out the first ball at 
the opening of the base ball season or 
the family adding their desired pres- 
ence to May Day fetes, musical pro- 
grams, amateur theatrical presentations 
or others of the social festivities, which 
Susquehanna contributes to s 
grove's routine and makes Selinsgrove 
so glad to be known 
town—With a young college pi 



President of Wilmington Council of 
Churches 

Rev. Park W. Huntington. A.M.. B.D.. 
of '17 and '21. minister of St. 
' Stephen's Lutheran Church, Wilming- 
i ton, Delaware, was recently elected 
president of the Wilmington Council of 
Churches which comprise all the 
Protestant churches in the city. This is 
a wonderful honor for Rev. Hunting- 
ton who has been in Wilmington only 
a little ever two years. 

New Manager of Paradise Falls 
Paradise Falls, the noted scenic spot, 
is located in Paradise Valley in the 
i Poconos. It is the popular and rapidly 
: developing mountain resort section 
nei r Henryville. It is owned and op- 
erated as a resort for Lutherans by the 
I Paradise Falls Lutheran Association. 
I iii a late bulletin we find a 
j graph with the heading, "Our New 
' Mr. E. Ivan Prey, is a resi- 
dent cf York, Pa., a member c: C 
Evanj Lutheran Chuch. 

.i.eher, A Sujx rin- 

if Young Peoples work and 
; Vestryman. He is a graduate of Sus- 
nna Uivei Ity, '15. and Vice Pres- 
General Alumni Associa- 
' ticn H Mir. b - ' 
Y. M. C. A. work for ten years, A 
. ant Secretary, Religious and Boys Work 
jDiiector, he is very well qualified. 

The committee in charge of the 
selection of a manager for the Associa- 
tion feels very much gratified in being 
able to secure a man of so fine a type 
and character, as well with excellen 
business ability to handle their project. 
Dr. Manhart and Wife Are Honored 
Dr. F. P. Manhart, '75, is one of our 
oldest Alumni. He has given many 
years of service in the ministerial field 
and has won eminence. In honor of the 
thirteen years of service that he and 
his wife have given at St, Matthew's 
Lutheran Church, at Shamokin Dam, a 
reception was given recently. 

The resignation of Dr. Manhart as 
pastor of this church has been accepted. 
He is Dean of the Susquehana Semin- 
ary and has well executed the duties 
as pastor of this church in addition to 
those of his regular office. His ever in- 
creasing duties have made his recent 
action necessary. 

Dr. Manhart has the honor of being 
a delegate to the World (Lutheran) 
Convention at Copenhagen this sum- 
mer. He will sail from New York on 
June 15. Susquehanna extends con- 
gratulations and best wishes. 
Happy Parents 
Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Morning an- 
nounce the birth of a daughter. Mr. 
Morning graduated from Susquehanna 
las: Spring and is now a member of the 
R' id.--. !le High School Faculty. Mrs. 
Morning is likewise a former student of 
lehanna. We extend congratula- 
. . ns to the happy parents. 
Captain in the Chaplain's Corps of the 
Officers' Reserve 
Rev. Wilson P. Ard. pastor of Mes- 
Church, Denver. Colo., has been 
promoted :o the rank of captain in the 
' corps of the Officers' Re- 
:: the United States Army. This 
promotion comes to Chaplain Ard after 
having served the required four years 
as first lieutenant and having complet- 
ed 300 hours of service and work. Cap- 
tain Ard is president of the Denver Ki- 
Club and a member cf the board 
of directors of the Pennsylvania Society 
of Colorado, the Big Brother Move- 
ment, the M*eker Home Association ,a 
charitable institution of Denver, and 

of the Rocky Mountain 8; 
of the United Lutheran Church. 

S 

DEBATERS GIVEN AWARDS 
Member! oi the two debating teams 
and the manager were given awards in 
Chapel las'. Friday for the excellent 
work they did in the forensic s< 
jUSl past. 

They had the unique record of win- 
ing eighteen out of twenty-two con- 
Witi the major colleges and uni- 
venitiei of the East. The season also 
included a radio broadcast. 

-e men were given awards follow- 
ing a short talk of commendation by 
Pi'psiclent Smith: 
Seiber Troutman. Russel Klinger. 
:■ Foulkrod. Walter Swank; alter- 
Frank Bruno, Byron Hafer. Dan- 
iel Connell and Frank Ramsey, mana- 

S 

li Adam came on earth again the 
only thing he would recognize would 
be the old jokes— Lord Dcrvar. 



All-Star Team in the 
Class League Named 



Erdly and Shafer on Mound in Myth- 
ical Intra-Mural Nine; Luke- 
hart on First Base 



Inter-class baseball champio] 
won by the Freshmen in the series 
of games played during the past two 
weeks. 

So many individual stars were 
brought to the surface in these games 
that it has been decided to pick a 
mythical team from the long list of 
players to be designated as an All-Star 
Campus Team. 

aturing these games was the ex- 
cellent pitching and here Erdley -tar.ds 
t>u1 -i. firsl place for the honors. Erd- 
ley is left-handed and has a real as- 
of balls. "Peck" is on 

. y but was eligible to play class 

baseball because he had no partlcl- 

: : in 18 innings of va. 
• "Peck" 
. - the varsity r.ex: year. ' 
another Fi sshi i; n pitched 
go d ball and is bound to make a real 
ball player. 

her, we have 
nominated Shaeffer. who is 

. ial. He was on the first squad 
all season but was eligible to play 

With the year's experience 
Shaft hould be a real a. -set to the 

y next year, 

It was not hard to pick Carmichael 
to fill the position of 
catcher. "Carp" has plenty of pluck and 
is a good hitter. 

A Junior has been chosen to fill the 
position on the initial sack. Lukehart 
fielded the ball in fine fashion around 
first in the games in which he partici- 
pated. 

We have picked from the ranks of 
class baseball players a real second 
sacker in the person of Scharfe. "The 
Newark Flash" fielded the ball at ail 
times in big league style and was the 
leading hitter of the league batting at 
a clip of .666. 

At short we have chosen Herman, a 
snappy ball player. "Bill" was on the 
varsity during the present season, but 
was kept out of the game several weeks 
on account of an injury. We expect 
Herman to earn his letter next year. 

It was hard to pick a third baseman, 
but it seemed that the playing of Senko 
was outstanding around the hot corner 

From the ranks, our classy outfield 
era have been picked. Stroup, moved 
from the Junior Varsity to the Varsity, 
.ble to play and did well at 
left field. We expect things from 
"Lolly" in the coming years. Dixon, a 
Senior, played real baseball at the cen- 
leld position. Fuller, a Freshman 
right fielder, followed the ball in fine 
on and hit well. Stineman, anoth- 
er Prosh, hit the ball at a lively clip 



good game in the field, but this failed 
to give confidence to the rest of his 
teammates. Palmer also played well in 
the field. Summary; 

Susquehanna 

R H O 

Good, 2b o 1 1 

MaJasky, rf 2 

Snyder, If o l l 

Groce, cf o 1 3 

Shilling, 3b 1 3 

Heim. ss 2 1 

Wall, c l i 7 

Palmer, lb o 12 

Danks. p 

Dtnnell. p o 

xShaefer r 

xxStroup o 



Merchant TaiW 
Ed. I. Heffeliiiwr 

SATIS FACTION GUARANTKTT- 
Market Strpet Selinscrrrr 



EAT A'l 

LE1BY S 

Sunbury, Pa 



Totals l 9 27 12 

xEatted for Wall in ninth. 
xxBatted for Palmer in ninth. 
Lebanon Valley 

R H 

Shortlidge. If l i 

Albright, cf 2 3 

Wentz, ss 2 l 

B' ndigo, c 2 3 

Zappia. p 

part, lb 

2b 

to 

, :zio. rf 

xDobbs. rf 



O 



2 

1 
3 5 
2 
1 12 
1 3 
1 2 

2 

1 



J-Otals 10 14 27 15 1 

xSubstituted for Patrizio in 8th. 
Two base hit— Stewart; three base', 
hits— Went/, Groce; home run— Stew- 
art; double play— Light to Disney to j 
Stewart; base on balls— off Danks 1,1 
second-string off Donnell 1, off Zappia 1; struck out 
—by Danks 3, Donnell 5. Zappia 3. 
Umpire, Duck. 



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ULLERYMEN DROP TOUGH 

GAME TO LEBANON VALLEY 



(Continued from Page 1) 
next man up, also singled, and Malas- 
ky was undecided about throwing the 
ball in again because it looked like a 
foul, and Albright scored. Bendigo, 
.- xl man up. sacrificed, scoring Wents 
The inning that proved to be a 

mare to Suso.uehar.na came in the 
filth. Shortlidge, first man up for Leb- 
anon Valley, was thrown out at first 
by Shilling. Albright was passed and 
advanced to second on Groce's i 
0X1 Wentz's high fly ball. Bendigo 
then singled, filling the bases, Zappia. 

man up. singled, scoring Albright, 
With the bases loaded again, Stewart 
hit a home run. At this point in the 



For Health 

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Representing 

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Runbury Tru/t Bldg. 

SUNBURY PA. 

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DECORATIONS FOR 
PARTY" 



YOUR 



battle Bob Donnell relieved Danks and J FrvlillP' Stntinr>/ >r'J Cr\ 
d the side without any further J «,„ ^T I ^ 



Ideal 

M Knotts: - T can't understand why 
y ii .' n't like ' band. 

H * considerate man I know 

of '• 

Mr, Knotts: "Why ail lira- 

tion for our neighbor?" 

Mrs. Knotts: "He never passes a mail 
box but that he doem't feel m his 
pock' 



we have a 
gentlemen prefer blondes is that they 
are tired squeezing blackheads. 



In the Juniatan we read as follows: 
\ ! ertain S. U. athlete may have 
d a good day for Juniata last 
fall He may or may not be >'■ 
of our disapproval, but never* h- 
real Juniatians never razz an oppos- 
ing player." 



damage. 

In the sixth inning Susquehanna had 
some more bad breaks and Lebanon 
Valley scored another run. Shortlidge 
singled. Albright singled. Snyder left 
the pill roll through his lees and 
Shortlidge scored. 

In this same inning, Groce had a ter- 
rific hit to center field and it looked 
hke a sure hemer. The coach on third 
stopped the runner and when the bail 
was overthrown Groce started for hom e 
but was caught. This was another of 
the tough breaks for the Oramte men. 
OS scored their lone tally 
in th< '!i frame Wall sinaled to 

r. Palmer skied to Bendigo. Don- 
kied to Light. Gi.ee singled thru 
third, and Johnny advanced to third 
w in a position to score. Mn- 
! .V. ill for the 
tally. 
Bendigo wa n an inflek) hit 

•rt doubled to center and Ben- 
,>-d when Shilling tnitstd ■ 
peg to third red on i | 

ed ball by v. 
Captain Shlllin d his usually 



411 Market Street 
Sunbury, Pa. 






Feaster's Restaurant } 



; 



"WHERE STUDENTS MEET 
AND EAT" 

Market street SelinsfcTove 



Eat at 

The Don Mar 

h. M GABEL, Propr. { 



- <i> 



Rfo \i. Shoes— DiREfj CJni- 

vcksitv BEBVICB 

W.G. Phillips 



< OLLEGE TAILOR 

<'!■ <iiti)if! and Fretting 

SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 

Oppos'te Post Office Phone 125-Z 



LOOSE LEAP NOTE BOv)KS 
DRAWING SUPPLIES 

JOS. L. MENTZ 

The Stationer 

Remington Portable Typewrit ra J 
11 N. Third m Sun 



"REMEMBER YOUR COLLEGE 
DAY1 WITH PHOTOGRAPHS" 

Schindler Studio 

Bit Market Stroei Sunbury, Pa. 



T. T. WIFRMAN 

SUNBTJRY, PA. 






PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1929 



Annual Dances to Students in Music j 
End Social Season In Recital Program 



his campus on more than one occas- 
ion. 



beth Newman, Danville; Fred William 
Oser, Harrisburg; Mildred Idella Pot- 



Conservatory of Music 

Bachelor of Music— Freida 



Emma 



Relations in athletics and otherwise teiger S elinsgrove; Nicholas Lawrence ' Dreese. McClure: Ruth Greist Dively, 
between Susquehanna and Juniata _ ___„ „ .•„. r>_„„ a /-.. v, Q ^t n Q ,-iin. 



Sororities and Fraternities Will Make Orchestra and Ladies' Chora! Club 
Merry at Commencement Affairs Featured in Varied Program 

Thursday and Friday of Musical Number* 



Susquehanna's social season of this The Students of the Conservatory of 
collegiate year will reach its climax Music gave an evening recital on Tues- 
Thursday and Friday evenings. June 6 day of last week. The program was as 
and 7, when the annual Sorority and follows: 

Fraternity dances will be held in the Orchestra— March Militaire, Schubert 
various fraternity houses. — the University Orchestra. 

From all arrangements that have Song — "All the World's in Love," 
been made, this year's Commencement Woodman— Miss Oneida Dern. 
Dances premise to be the biggest in the Piano— Nocturne Op. 55, No. 1, Chop- 
history of the college. Very fine orches- in— Miss Margaret Kirkpatrick. 
tras have been secured by the various Piano — March mignonne, Poldini— 
groups, which will insure successful Miss Eleanor Kreamer. 
dances. Organ— Rex Gloriae. G. H. Ray- 

Thursday evening has been reserved Miss Virginia Moody, 
for the sorority dances. Omega Delta Piano— Romance. MacDowell — Miss 
Sigma will dance to the melodious Margaret Shipman. 
strains of Ed. Minnick's Orchestra in Song— Eili, Bill (Traditional Melody 
the Bond and Key House. Kappa Delta of Russia)— Miss Violet Wachowiak. 
Phi and Sigma Alpha Iota, in the Phi Barcarolle, Spross— Miss Jean Schaf- 
Mu Delta House, will synchronize with fer. 

Wainwright's Blue Band of Bucknell. Piano— Polish Dance, Severn — Miss 

Relda Dubs. 



McQuirk's Band of Shamokin will har. 
monize for the Sigma Sigma Delta at 
the Phi Lambda Theta House. 

Fraternity parties will be held Friday 
evening. "Sunny" Andrews and His 
Playmates, a Columbia Recording Or- 



Song — The Birthday, Woodman — 
Miss Janet Dively 

Song— The Heart Thats Free, Robyn 
— Miss Geneva Nace. 

Piano — Impromptu in C sharp min- 
chestra, have been engaged to furnish or, Reinhold — Miss Esther Thurston, 
the music at Epsilon Sigma. Ed. Min- Organ— Choral— Improvisation, Karg- 
nick's Orchestra has been selected for gjert — Miss Edna Tressler. 
the evening's entertainment at the Choruses— a. Serenade, Schubert; b. 
Bond and Key. Phi Lambda Theta will impatience. Schubert — The Ladies' 
enjoy the music of Wainwright's Blue choral Club. 

Band. Phi Mu Delta has secured the s 

services of Joe Nesbit and his Pennsyl- 
vanians. 

S 



S. S. D. Patronesses 
Entertain Actives 



University Plans a 

New Baseball Field 



Susq 
have always been pleasant and mutual- 
ly esteemed. 

Degrees and Prizes Awarded by 
President 

Dr. Smith will -award the prizes, in- 
cluding the Junior Oratorical Prizes, 
and confer the degrees on the gradu- 
ating students. 

The salutatory address will be given 
by Ruth Steele The Va'.edictor will be 
de'„vered by Claire Dauberman. 

The graduates and the degrees which 
will be conferred upon them are as 
follows: 

DEPARTMENT GRADUATES 
College of Liberal Arts 

Bachelor of Arts — Gertrude May Ar- 
bogast, Mt. Pleasant Mills; Helen Mary • 
Auchmuty, Tamaqua; Paul Hane Au- j 
miller, Selinsgrove; Kathryn Virginia J 
Bastian, Berlin; Ruth Glendora Beck, • 
Sunbury; Adam Philip Bingaman, Gor- { 
don; Helen Erma Bradley, Swissvale; 
William Fred Breining. Trevorton; 
*John Richard Brunozzi. Glen Lyon; 
Frank Anthony Bruno, Kelayres; Vera 
Gertrude Burns, Girardvtlle; Henry- 
Robert Carichner. Pittston; Helen Eliza 
Carter, Jersey Shore; B. Loretta Clark, 
Pittston: Daniel Joseph Connell, Pitts- 
ton; Robert Wendell Crouse. Dry Run; 
Claire Adaline Dauberman, Northum- 
berland; William Henry Decker, Mid- 
dleburg; Helen Rebecca Dehoff, North 
Braddock; Lee Swab Deppen, Mifflin - 
town; Mary Grace Detwiler, Marion; 
"Beaver Stanley Faust. Snow Shoe; 
Charles Edward Fisher, Port Carbon; 
Rebecca Louise Foster. Altoona; *Eliza- 
beth R. Gannon, Inkerman; *Helen C. 
Gannon, Inkerman; Helen Gemberling. 
Selinsgrove; Henry A. Hartley. Kearney, 
N. J.; Walter Stanley Hennig. Wilkes- 
Barre; Paul Raymond Hoover. Johns- 



,Ricciardi, East Rutherford, N. J.; John Berlin; Rose Ann Gumbert, Berlin; 
j William Riden, Jr., Yeagertown; Isa- | William Owen Roberts. Wilkes-Barre. 
j bel Irene Slotterback, Natalie; James Department of Business Administration 
Stanley Smith, Williamsport; Gladys , Two Year Commerce and Finance— 
j Marie Staub, Scranton; 'Allen Cornell Charles Herbert Miller, Selinsgrove. 
, Tressler, Dalmatia. Two Years Business Administration, 

♦Graduates February 6th, 1929, Virginia Elizabeth Ulsh, Millerstown. 



I 



vVHITMER-STEELE COMPAin . 
6outh River Lumber Company 

Manufacturers of 

Fine, Hemlock and Hardwood Luitll^_ 

Lath, Prop Timber and Ties 
oo King Street Northumoc. 



A T HEN II>~ WILLIAMSPORT VISIT THE NEW STORE AND rAuiv... ^. 

The Smith Printing Company 



vlANUFACTURING BANK STATIONERS 



Ot'nOcj uuir it'£«»M 



THE CITY INSURANCE COMPAIN i ur 
PENNSYLVANIA— Sunbury, r«. 

organized 1S70 

aurpius to Policy Holders $866,yo^.v- 

. narria Linker, President A. F. O'Danlel, Secre._ 



SL L. MCE, Jr. 

Equitable Life Insurance Co., of low. 

90b'-908 KUNKEL BUILDING, HARRISBURu, . . 



Mrs. Stenger Directs Program of 

Games; Misses Steward and Bastian 

Entertain With Musical Numbers 



Patronesses of Sigma Sigma Delta 
entertained the active members and 
pledgees of the organization on Fri- 
day evening. 

The girls met at the home of Mrs. 
Watkins where they were cordially 



In accordance with the policy of the town; 'Mary B. Hopkins. Pittston; I j 

university authorities of providing the 'Frank Hricko. Dickson City; Alice ! J 

best in athletic equipment, a new base- Jennings, Glen Lyon; *John Kanyuck, j 

ball diamond is being laid out in the Glen Lyon; Frances Elizabeth Kemble, I j 

lower part of the field. It is to be ready Mt. Carmel; Gertrude Marion Klinger, 

for use next season. Herndon; Nancy Harriet Lecrone, Dal- 

This new diamond will permit the lastown; *Guy George Luck, Montours- 

removal of the present field from the ville; "Helen W. McFee, Mt. Carmel; 

cinder track and abolish all conflicts John Francis McHugh. Glen Lyon; 

between the field and track events on Sarah Sloan Moody. Selinsgrove; Anna 
the one hand and baseball on the other. 

Practice en the track is exceedingly 
iiazardous with the baseball players 
batting and throwing during the after- 
noon practice, and the field events 



SPEIGELMIRE'S 

Furniture, Carpets, Floor Coverin( r -i 
SELINSGROVE 



J 



Mary Moyer, Selinsgrove; Alice Wini- 
fred Myers, Lancaster; Adda Ruth 
Newman, Danville; "Catherine A. 
O'Brien. Wyoming; Ruth Pace, Han- 
over; Rebecca Carolyn PufYenberger, 



Ing when going after high flys in the 
• of a game 
The new diamond, built after big 
league specifications, will have longer 



'Frank John Rutkoski. Wilkes-Barre; 
"William Robert Schwirian. Pittsburgh; 
Harry Parker Shaffer. Johnstown; 
Marv Lucinda Shaffer. Johnstown; 



welcomed. The joyful laughter soon make it danger0U3 £or the outfielders Mifnintown; Helen Bernice Reiter, 
gave evidence that everyone was in the t0 hold their positions Karthaus; Raymond Otto Rhine. Mc- 

best of party moods. When the change is made, outfielders Clure; Charles Ira Rowe. Mifnintown; 

A delightful program of games was . vill not be stU mb:ing cver a track curD - Mary Elizabeth Rove;. Sunbury: 
directed by Mrs. Stenger. who proved 
that most of us have need of a little 
mental exercise now and then. 

Misses Steward and Kathryn Bastian 
gave several duets. "Kay" whistled the 
melody while Miss Steward sang. 

A delightful lunch was served by the 
honorary members. The problem of 
pleasing a college girl is easily solved 
when there are plenty of sandwiches 
prepared In case anyone doubts the 
authenticity of this statement, we re- 
fer you to "Mim'' Keim or Vera Burns. 

The patronesses were: Mrs. Stenger. 
Mrs. Morton. Miss Steward, Mrs. Wat- 
kins, and Dr. Knights. 



ONE REAL NEWSPAPER 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 

SUNBURY, PA. 



8 AY IT WITH FL W E R 8 

FRESH CUT FLOWERS and POTTED PLAN1S for WEDDINGS, 

PARTIES and FUNERALS— FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS 

Visitors Always Welcome at Our OrtoC H)us"j 



boundaries and will permit a wider Russell Theodore Shilling, Reedsville; 

range of play. It will be a valuable ad- Margaret Henrietta Shu*, Sunbury: BELL 32- Y 

dition to the athletic equipment of the Millard Clyde Smith, Hanover: George 

university, which ranks high with that Amos Spaid. Selinsgrove; 'John Fred- 



GEO. B. 

FLORIST 



INE 



SELINSGROVE 



>'•> 



of the smaller universities and colleges 

S 



NOTED EDUCATORS TO 

ADDRESS GRADUATES 



Science Students 
Form New Society 



Club to Take Place of Natural Science 
and Pre-Medical Clubs; High Aver- 
age Required for Membership 



A great deal of curiosity was aroused 
by an announcement which Dr Smith 



erick Stamm. Catawissa: Blanche 
Louise Stauffer. York: Ruth Elizabeth 
Steele. Northumberland: David Ernest 
Straesser, Curryville: Walter Wilson 
— — Swank, Sunbury; James Helman Trout- 

( Continued from Page 1) man. Millerstown: Seiber Emanuel 

For about ten years he has been pas- Troutman. Millerstown; Clarence Fred- 
• M' ■ f the Student Lutheran Church, at erick Updegrove, Selinsgrove; Lewis 
the entrance gate to Cornell. Under his Arthur Wagner. Sunbury; Dorothy 
leadership a splendid new stone church Frances Wassell. Mt. Carmel; Ethel 
has been built in Ithaca which is at- Mae Watkins, Seflhsgrove; Frank War- 
•d regularly by hundred! of stu- ren Weaver. Media; Helen Kathryn 
dents and professors of Cornell. Weaver. Johnstown; Ethel Irene Wei- 

H.s work air. >ng students is regarded kert, Hanover; Robert Clyde Wolf, 
as one of the most conspicuous Sunbury. 

of its kind in the county. Bachelor of Science— *Max Englebert 

In addition to being pastor in Cor- Adams. Glen Lyon: George Elmer 

nell, Dr Horn takes an active interest Beam, Johnstown; Ellen Esther Bon- 

::i the work of the church at large. He ney . Pen Argyl; *Leon Carey Chesley. 

! Secretary of the Board of Education Hop Bottom; Martha Olive Dilling, 



KAUFFMANS 

Candy and Soda 



—> 



Firsr National Bank of Selim 


Grove 


Welcome* Students' Accounts 




IIESOURCES IK EXCESS OF $1,500,000.00 



he United Lutheran Church which 

made in chape! on Friday morning The aids Susquehana vers materially with 

list of Damei he read comprised those an annual granl )J money. 

Who are eligible for membership in the Dr. Foster U. Gift 

newly organized Science Society. A Dr. Gift, who will address the gradu- 

meeting of these persona wis held on ating stud • the Seminary on Sun- 

Pridaj wn and the matter was day evening In Trinity Lutheran 

otne lerv Church., at W o'clock, and ' piainfleld. 

Tin ike the place Of who hai bean ed in days gone j Montgomery 



Altoona: Robert Penn Kemble, AB. 
Mt. Carmel: John William Keyes, 
Moosic; Edward Haas Livingston, Dills- 
burg; Harry Joseph Lupfer, Blain; 
James Edgar Maneval, Williamsport; 
Charles Wa?ei.seller Marks. Selins- 
grove; *Harold Norman Moldenke. 
j.; Charles Christian 
Wilkes-Barre; Russell 



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Membership is hunted to pe 

>: 80 in 

■\ irl tin number of 

houra In I - [Uired 

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Irman Mr. Ps md Miss 

l draw up a 

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At ■ 

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on I 



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H» is regarded 

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is the head. 

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in Deac 
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■m the 8 
' >hn Will- 
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Dr. Martin (i. Brumbaugh Will AUdrer-,« 
Crxduati- 

4 
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Talcums, Face Powders and Toilet Articles ot au aum** 

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MARX BROS. 

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Siti'^n Hats 

S' ml I 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSIT* 

REV. G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M.. D.D., President 

Susquehanna University Is located in the heart of the b»' H'i. 
■*usquehanna Valley, in the home-like borough of Selinsgrove. P 
"Utones and recitation buildings are in excellent condition with 
modern conveniences. 



Dean of CoM*™ 
DR HERBERT A. ALLIP'"* 

an.. a.m. nun 



Di'iiu of Tb<»«l^«— 

DR. r. P. MAVHAW 

A.M.. D.D.. M.»* 



Wx 



r;U> 



I 



4 






CONGRATULATION'S 
TO SENIORS 



r 





:eama 



hope you have a 



NICE VACATION 



Volume XXXV 



SLLINSOROVE. PA.. MONDAY. JUNE 10. !!< 



Number 7 



CLASS OF 121 WAS GRADUATED TODAY 



-«> 



Stick to Your Task Prove All and Hold Con ferredDe gry MUST REALIZE HUMAN IN A DEQU 4CY 
and Use Personality Fast to What's Good /JflrV TO SOLVE THE QUESTIONS OF LIFE 



Ministers Cautioned Against 

Being Community Busybody 

at Sacrifice of Pulpit 



Thus Declared Dr. William M. 

Horn in Baccalaureate 
Sermon on Sunday 



Just as the shoemaker is expected to 
stick to his last so is the minister to 
confine his activities to his ordained 
duties, according to Dr. Foster U. Gift, 
pastor and superintendent of instruc- 
tion in the Lutheran Deaconess Moth- 
erhouse and Training School. Balti- 
more, who elucidated the point in his 
sermon on "An Abounding Ministry," 
delivered last night in Trinity Luth- 
eran Church at the commencement of 
Susquehanna's School of Theology. 

Doctor Gift viewed with disapproval 
the occ&5icr.a! tendency to subserve 
pastoral work to temporal concern, say- 
ing in part: 

"An abounding ministry as the out- 
standing objective must not be sub- 
merged or overshadowed by that which 
is secondary or incidental. Civics, phil- 
osophy, eugenics, ethics, political is- 
sues, social betterment, etc., have their 
place, but not as major themes in the 
Christian pulpit — not as a substitute 
for a redemptive Gospel. 

"He who seeks real success and an 
abounding ministry, he who aspires to 
become a real prophet, who speaks for 
God to men, will not make these the 
central themes of his pulpit messages. 

"The prophet of God will not inter- 
pret his commission to involve chiefly 
the ideal to be that of a director of 
agencies, a manager of organizations, 
a live-wire functionary, a prominent 
factor in uplifting movements, a pro- 
moter of civic clubs, an administrator. 

"He will find that his chief business 
is that of saving souls If he is a true 
prophet he will be impelled to go forth 
with a passion to save men from their 
sins, so to present the crucified and 
victorious Christ as to make men and 
women want Him. 

"He will be moved with an impas- 
sioned desire to reveal the Christ who 
died, not merely to provide a social 
Gospel, which will make life here more 
comfortable, but to save men's soull 
from eternal death. To preach the 
Gospel is to preach lite, to reveal the 
formula by which we can get the most 
out of this life and be assured of eter- 
nal happiness. 

"The times in which we live are 
charged with a spirit, which tends to 
silence the voice of the prophet, who 
lives with God and proclaims the mys- 
tical realities of the spiritual. 

"Achievement seems to be the great 
ideal just now. Efficiency is one of the 
most popular terms today. The utili- 
tarian note is strong. The humanitar- 
ian complex is dominant. In the busi- 
ness and scientific world achievement 
is the great objective and success is 
considered in terms of a tangible or 
visible output or accomplishment. 

"The marvelous achievement in the 
medical world has been broadcasted 
with feverish enthusiasm and properly 
so. The marvel of the radio has stirred 
the imagination of man. The twenty- 
story skyscraper is no longer a wonder 
and scarcely receives first-page notice 
in the daily press 

"The Abounding Ministry is timely. 
It is not enough to say that the rem- 
edy for present-day ills is the Ten 
Commanding 



Thoughts, you have proved to be 
good because you searched them out, 
and ideas, free and fearless, whose liv- 
ing exponent you have become, were 
cited as guides to achievement in the 
baccalaureate sermon to Susquehanna 
graduates in Trinity Lutheran Church 
on Sunday morning by Dr. William M. 
Horn, of Ithaca. N. Y.. pastor of The 
Lutheran Church "at the gate of the 
campus." 

Dr. Horn chose as his text — "Prove 
all things; hold fast to that which is 
good." I Thessalonians V:21. and said 
in part: 

"In this institution, which you are 
preparing to leave, you have had both 
your knowledge increased, and your 
critical faculty developed. You should 
be equipped to carry out the words of 
this text. 

"Do not take everything for granted, 
because people say so, or because it 
has been so for a long time. Evil has 
been in the world practically since 
man began, but that is no reason for 
its acceptance. The Scriptures them- 
selves tell us to prove all things. 

"How shall we do it? We must use 
our reason, our experience and our 
faith. We must compare it with those 
things, which we unow to bo right. 
Morality is not relative. We have an 
absolute standard in the Ten Com- 
mandments, given by God on Mt. Sinai, 
ar.d later enforced by our Savior. Is a 
thing reasonable? Is it in line with 
experience? Is it true? 

"It is not so easy as it seems to 
know what is good. Men have been 
'lying for all time to find that out. 
Scm- 3 things have been determined: 
make use of them just as the bridge 
builder does of the advances in bridge 
builct . 

"There are certain standards, which 
a man can use to know the good. Is 
it like Christ? Anything that is like 
Him is good. Does it serve mankind? 
The s*andard of service of one's fellow 
man la scod. and the more one serves 
the better it is. Has it temporary or 
eternal value? These are simple 
thoughts, but you should know them; 
zv.d if you practice them you will save 
youraelvtl endless trouble, and at the 
same time be on an independent basis. 

'Many are lost in the process and 
bring no fruit to perfection. What is 
it all for? That after you have proved 
whit is good, you may have the grace 
to hold it fast. Appropriate it. make 
it yours and pass it on. As you go out 
from these halls to make your way all 
over the world, be men and women of 
free and fearless thinking, who know 
and hold fast the good." 




Former Governor Martin G. Brumbaugh, Presi- 
dent of Juniata College, Stresses Necessity of 
Humility in Commencement Address Today 



DR. G. MORRIS SMITH 
Susquehanna's President Bestowed 
University's Mark of Approval on 
Many Persons This Morning 



Host Here Today at 
Commencement End 



Class of 121 is Graduated- 
Degrees in Course and 
Honorary Conferred 



Unanimous for Good 
to Head Base Ball 



Middleburg Collegian Chosen 

Captain for Next Year's 

Diamond Brilliants 



Salutatorian 




RUTH E. STEELE 
of Northumberland 



Sherman E. Good, of Middleburg, 
was accorded the exceptional honor of 
;;nanimous vote in the election of Sus- 
quehanna's base ball captain for next 
year 

The varsity "S' aided to the 

captain-elect and these others. Allen 
J. Snyder. Captain Russel T. Shilling 
Wilt red K. Owe*, Russell C. Heim, 
Frank Mala-ky John H Wall. Robert 
P. Donnell, Aldred J Danks. and Man- 
. George E. Bean: 
Wi. 'heir numerali were Rua- 

Hl I Sprout, Maurice C. SI. 
ChariM W. sunup 
For n> baseball. Harold 

* and Ira 
:u manager. 

S 

PROF LI NDQl'IST HERC 
Prof. Matthew L. Lundntiist. director 
of Susquehanna's conservatory of 
Music thirteen yt i com* 

mencement vlait >i h< n t xiay 



Susquehanna's seventy-first annal of 
m \ \M in the cau,->e of Christian edu- 
cation concluded gloriously with the 
Commencement Exercises for 121 sen- 
iors in Seibert Hall auditorium this 
morning. 

A memoiable week-end of collegiate 
and social activities reached its climax 
near the noon hour, when President G. 
Morris Smith conferred the degrees 
ar.d awarded the certificates by which 
a class of 1-1 person- was graduated. 

Honorary c eg tees of Doctor of Divin- 
ity were conferred upon Rev. Calvin 
P Swank, of Philadelphia, and Rev. 
Charles D. Russell, of East Pittsburgh. 

Recognition was given the ability 
and sterling integrity of the honored 
incumbent of the highest office within 
the gift of the people of Union and 
Snyder counties, when President Smith 
conferred the degree of Doctor of Civil 
Laws upon Judge Miles I. Potter, of 
Middleburg. presiding officer over the 
courts in that Seventeenth Judicial 
District of Pennsylvania. 

By the time the academic procession 
moved forward from old Selinsgrove 
Hall across the upper campus to Sei- 
bert Hall the auditorium held a color- 
ful assemblage of relatives of grad- 
uates and friends of Susquehanna. 

President Brumbaugh, of Juniata 
College, and President Smith, of Sus- 
quehanna University, led the capped 
and gowned procession. 

Those educators, heads of the de- 
nominational institutions in the vast 
central State valleys, thru which course 
the mighty rivers by whose names their 
respective seats of learning are identi- 
fied too. were symbolic of the unity 
of purpose of those two colleges and 
streams in their services to those who 
would drink from the fountain of 
knowledge or benefit from the waters 
of purity. 

As the column filed in, the audience 
arose and the college orchestra struck 
up the inspiring notes of the March 
Militaire. 

Th° invocation was offered by Rev. 
Dr. Harry C Michaels, of Johnstown, 
prominent Susquehanna alumnus and 
many years a member ot t lie univer- 
board of director! 
Highest honors in the College of 
Liberal Arts were won this year by 
two women from Northumberland, 
ai.-,. who also finished their high 
school i . • ame hoi 

tership. 
Miss Ruth e BtCH -nan. 

chose "Social ASS) he lubjt 

her oration, and Mi-- Claire A Daab- 
oi, valedictorian, discussed "Edu- 
cation for a Changing Civilization,'' 
They were the orat<<: 
President Brumbaugh's address con- 
• amed a wealth of valuable Information 
not only for the graduates, but for hun- 
i Concluded on Page 4) 



Don't bo cocky because you have had a college education hut 
rather utilize that advantage to develop a needed humility. 

That was th<- urge of former Governor Martin (J. Brum- 
baugh, president <>(' Juniata College, in his masterful address to 
the graduating classes of Susquehanna University at the Com- 
mencement Exercised in Seibert Hall auditorium this morning. 

"The world seeks sane guidance, baaed on sound learning'," 
that internationally known educator stressed. 

But sound learning fulfils its destiny best, onlj when char- 
acterized by a humble, reverent trust in God and when tempered 
with courtesy, dependablenesa and honesty, he summed up in 
his admonitions to those about to engage in their initial fray in 
the real battle of lite. 
Highlights of the address by Doctor Brumbaugh follow: 

''The choicest fruit earth holds up to its maker is a num. 
To ripen, to elevate, to educate a man — that is the first and fore- 
most duty of the race. Education is a means to this end. set by 
experience as the necessary procedure by which civilization is 
conserved and advanced. 

'•The purpose of the college and university is to train lead- 
ers; to equip thinking guidance for the race, to give the gen- 
eration the visioned and charactered men and women with whom 
we rest the issues of the generations to be. 

•To accomplish this they must (a) impart sound learning, 
That is their primary function, their direct ami specific duty. 
It measures its procedure in terms of knowledge. They have no 
warrant to be if they be not guardedly careful in securing in 
their graduates sound, usable knowledge. The test of the value 
of teachings is, as < 'omening has declared, its usability. His wise 
and earnest demand is "Turn to use.' 

••I5ui if sound learning alone were the goal of the College and 
University, one might with great show of reason challenge their 
right to function. There are in addition to this Important and 
significant end others that may prove in the last analysis to have 
even greater worth. Of these I wish to speak to you briefly. 

"(b) In addition to sound learning the Institutions of high- 
er learning should teach and stress the virtue of our civilization, 

i Concluded on Page 2 I 

Fine Concert Friday Dr. and Mrs. Smith 
by the Conservatory Received Saturday 



Credit Reflected Upon Work President's New Home Scene of 

Done Under Direction of Brilliant Function That 

E. Edwin Sheldon Afternoon 



Commencement Concert by the Con- 
servatory of Music in Seibert Hall audi- 
torium on Friday night was a valuable 
contribution to the week's festivities in 
Susquehanna's year-closing prog:am 

The offering not only delighted a 
vast audience but also showed the 
thoroness of the work in that depart- 
ment directed by E. Edwin Sheldon. 

The program follow i: 

Orchestra — a. On the Mountain, 
Godard; b. Hungarian Dance No. 5. 
Brahms. — The University Orchestra. 

Piano — Nocturne, MacFayden— Miss 
Janet Dively. '30. 

Piano — Polonaise. Op 46. MacDoweli 

Miss Edna Tressier, '30 

Organ— Hosannah, Dubois— Mill Vir- 
ginia Moody, '31. 

Violin — Perpetual ! No, 5, 

Bohm — Chester B> 

Aria— "Pleurez. pleurez, MO yeux ' 
(Le C:d>. Massonet— Misi Florence 
- 

Piano— Ballade In D rial LI 
Ru h O. Dively. '2a. 

Organ — Romance from Concerto in E 
>:■. Chopin — M 
_''.» pt inlit. Prof, P, M I. i .. Or- 

-.ill 

din— "The S >n of the Puszta," 
Miss k ithryn M >rntng, '30. 
Aria — The Flo TO "Car- 

men " Btiet- I i Robert 

Ed- 
ler, '30. 
Choruses— a There was a Lad Born 
in Kyle. Andrews; b Songi My M 
Taught Me, Dvoi ;;ee Club. 



Dr. and Mrs. George Morris Smith 
were at home at "Pine Lawn" to the 
board of directors, faculty, alumni and 
citizens ct Stlinagrove Saturday after- 
noon. 

assisted in receiving their guests by 
KlM Naomi K. Hade, dean of women 
Of the university Three young ladies 
of the graduating da i pound tea. 
Miu Florence Beatty >: Burial}, the 
tlOUSO-fUtat of Doctor and Mrs. Smith, 
also assisted. 

Mrs Smith wore a shell -pink gown 
and Miss Hade a flowered chiffon, while 
: Miss Helen Auch- 
'Concluded on Page 3> 

Valedictorian 




C! \IRF A DAUBERMAN 

Northumberland 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA. 



HE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly by the Students of Susqaehanna University 



Subscription $150 a Year, Payable to Wilbur Berge: , '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., a; Second Class Matter. 



irfember Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Frank E. Ramsey '30 

Managing Editor News Editor 

Russell Carmichael '31 Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 
Betty Wardrop '32 John Kindsvatter '32 Lewis Rich '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistant! on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32' 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



MONDAY, JUNE 10, 1929 



NEW ALUMNI 
With the close of commencement exercises this morning 121 
men and women arc transposed from the undergraduate to 
alumni roster of Susquehanna University. 

Next tall a hundred more, fresh but inexperienced /will fill 
the gap and the college will continue to run along smoothly. 
oblivious of any change. 

Invigorated with a supply of new blood its progress will not 
be halted. And with the passage of a few years it is quite pos- 
sible that the deeds and achievements oi the class of 1929 will 
be forgotten, except insular as their beautiful memorial will re- 
call them to us. 

It would seem that fate had again lined up with her old 
adjective cruel. Yet all these tacts are easily compensated by the 
alumni reunions. Bach year the alumni return and every five 
years each class has an official homecoming. At tins time old 
friendships are renewed and the pleasures that arise from re- 
lating stories of the good old days are unlimited. 

A college is comparable to a river. It is constantly pouring 
fourth a steady stream of undergraduates into the sea of life. 
At the source, when the undergraduate enters as a freshman, 
the speed of the river is slow. The first year of college life is 
always the longest. As the undergraduate river descends the 
mountainside of time, momentum is gained rapidly until, when 
the end is reached, everything is happening at such a terrific 
pace that i student's snapshot of the swift moving picture ran 
be but an indistinguishable blur. 

The undergraduate stream has met rocks of custom and tra- 
dition and lias worn them down so that their structure is com- 
pletely changed. But one part of the river remains unaltered. 
Its lied, composed of the lofty ideals and noblest thoughts of the 
founders, will always remain immutable. 

Altho at times they may be lost sight of as the water is cloud- 
ed with mud. nevertheless, they will always persist as a firm 
foundation and will ever reappear to act as a dependable guide. 
Commencement from college marks a peak in the graph of 
one'.* lifetime. <>n the surface education from books and exam- 
inations are at an end. With slight analysis we see that they art' 
not. With four years background at Susquehanna many have 
learned to apply themselves, to concentrate, to think (dearly. 
It is only the beginning of examinations. In the outside world 
one will constantly be on trial and people will frequently subject 
you to examinations t«> determine your abilities. 

It is only natural that the graduating senior should experi- 
ence a touch of. sadness at the thought of departing from his 
Alma .Mater. His friends will be scattered over all sections of 
the count ry and he is on his own in an unsynipat hetic world. 

He is t,old on all sides that his college days are the happiest 
ones of his life. When he nurs to work the four years spent at 
college will seem as play. Altho unable to speak from experi- 
ence, we question the truth of such statements. A textbook of a 
college student would frighten a high school student and the 
work of the latter would strike fear in the heart of a grammar 
school child. 

Yet when each in turn progresses to the next stage he is able 
to master the higher field. Of course, there are many who fall by 
the wayside, some because of Jack of mental capacity but a great- 
er number only because of laziness. 

A student graduating from Susquehanna should not be con- 
cerned with either of these reasons, The going will be rough at 
first. Everything worthwhile i> only gained after hard, diligent 
labor. But we are confident that the class of L929 will succeed. 

Seniors, 'I ntire undergraduate body and faculty bid you 

good-bye and wish you good luck. 



hless you if you ate lucky enough to marry the stenographer of 
the boss." 

Dr. Copeland's advice was not given as a part of his pre- 
pared address, but in commenting on the address made by Profes- 
sor Rogers, 

"I care not what particular calling you may follow, you will 
not live up to your responsibilities as an American unless you 
have a part in all those things having to do with the common 
welfare," the Senator said. "There is nothing nobler than to be a 
citizen of this republic." 

Fortunately, nature has intervened against the advice of 
Professor Rogers, It has made snobs of persons of small minds 
and silly, sordid ambitions. They are to be counted among the 
saddest of life's failures, condemned to the resentment and ridi- 
cule of that part of humanity that seeks for higher and better 
things in life, and doomed no less to the society of their peers. 

"The men of culture are the true apostles of equality" said 
Matthew Arnold. It would be a good motto for us to follow. 
Certainly snobbery never came from Susquehanna, a demo- 
cratic institution where all may have an equal opportunity. 

S 



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MARX BROS, 

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Must Realize Human Inadequacy 

to Solve the Questions of Life 

(Continued from Page 1) 
which is courtesy. One's education should equip him to live with 
Ins kind in cooperation, in sympathy, in good will. 

"(c) To this virtue should be added as an avowed goal of 
the college and university the virtue of the moral life, which is 
(lependableness, reliability, honesty. University trained men and 
women should stand four-square against every evil that fastens 
its fangs upon our civilization and they should actively and def- 
initely promote honesty of life and loftiness of character in the 
great groups of less favored ones, who naturally and properly 
look to educated men for example and for leadership. 

"(d) The College and University ought also to promote and 
foster in its students the virtue of our Ethical life, which is 
humility. When one is rightly taught he knows that he has limits 
to his knowing. These are questions above reason. These are 
movements in the soul of a man before which his own mind must 
stand in awe. If in these crises of one's career, one has been 
taught aright he will place his hand confidently and joyously in 
the hand of the Omniscient God and say reverently 'Lead thou 
me on." 

"Then arises the first virtue that flowers in the human 
soul — humility, the recognition of human inadequacy to solve the 
great questions of life and the recognition of the adequacy of 
God to guide ami govern men, ami then one bends his spirit and 
says: 

" -Holy, Holy Lord God Almighty.' Then he is educated and 
not until then. 

"I commend to you a world that seeks sane guidance based 
On sound scholarship: that demands courtesy; that needs hon- 
est v; and that fulfils its destiny best by a humble, reverent trust 
in God.*' 



JOHN H. KELLER 



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HNOBBERY 

We read a great deal aboul snobbery today in connection 
with advice to college graduates, li lui> been a featured subject 
ot many a commencement address during the past two weeks. 

h all started when Professor Robert Emmons Rogers, of 
the S&assachusettes Institute oi Technology, advised the mem- 
bers oi the graduating class to be "snobs," Senator Royal 8. 
Copeland, of New York, retaliated to thi> statement in an ad- 
dress to tin- members of the graduating <-lass of Davis and Bikini 
College, who advised them nut to be ••snobs."' 

"Don't try to marry the i><»s' daughter," lie said. "God 



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MONDAY, JUNE 10, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAG THREE 



!<»♦ 



h 



Senior Gift to Alma Alumni Good While Hamlet Well Played Varsity Insignia for 
Mater at Class Day They Lasted— But by Dramatic Class' Many Athletes Here 



Graduates Present Susquehan- 
na Boulevard Lights as 
Campus .Standards 



Well, Believe it or Not— They 

Just Practiced Too 

Much for Fray 



Senior Class Day exercises as a fea- 
ture of Commencement Week at Sus- 
quehanna were revived in glorious man- 
ner with the program of Friday morn- 
ing, when this year's graduates present- 
ed boulevard lighting standards to their 
alma mater as an evidence of apprec- 
iaticn for what has been done for them 
by the institution and faculty co-work- 
ers. 

Henry R. Carichner, president of the 
Class of 1929, delivered the address for 
his graduate associates. 

The gift was accepted on behalf of 
Susquehanna by President Smith, 
whose address follows: 

"President Carichner and members of 
the Senior Class, on behalf of Susque- 
hanna University I accept this gift 
from the class of "29 with gratitude and 
deep appreciation. 

"In presenting your Alma Mater with 
these beautiful lamps you have exer- 
cised discriminating judgment, for your 
gift fills a felt need on our campus. May 
I express the hope that others seeing 
your good work may follow your ex- 
ample with succeeding lamps until our 
campus from this point on, past Has- 
singer Hall, and then along a boulevard 
sweeping around back of Steele Science 
Hall and coming out again to the main 
highway at Seibert Hall is marked off 
and illuminated at night by a number 
of beautiful lamps? 

"In making this gift you have also 
identified for future sons and daughters 
the class of '29 with a very significant 
symbol— the symbol of LIGHT. "LET 
THERE BE LIGHT" is one of the crea- 
tive commands of God. "Send forth 
Thy light and Thy truth— let them lead 
me— let them bring me to Thy holy 
hill." Men and women of renown have 
all seen a very great light. The aspiring 
heart of youth is "by the vision splen- 
did on its way attended." The Master 
of men has said that we are to be 
lights— 'Ye are the light of the world.' 

"The need of today is light not heat: 
for vision, not passion. As educated men 
and women let us weigh values before 
we choose — let us act after the facts 
are in, not on snap judgement. 

"One of your professors said to me 
the other day, do you realize we have 
an exceptional number of good minds 
in the graduating class this year. I 
agree. Be good stewards — follow the 
gleam. 

Not of the sunlight 
Not of the moonlight. 
Not of the starlight! 

O young Mariner, 

Down to the haven, 

Call your companions. 

Launch your vessel, 

And crowd your canvas, 

And, ere it vanishes 

Over the margin, 

After it, follow it, 

Follow the gleam. 



Athletes cf yesteryear cast aside their 
formal raiment, donned their base ball 
togs and engaged in serious combat 
with Sir William Ullery's Susquehanna 
varsity chaps as a Commencement 
Week attraction on Saturday after- 
noon. 

Those old timers were a serious 
banded group of men, while they last- 
ed. 

One of the troubles was they prac- 
ticed too much. "Bitta" Benfer didn't 
assay to play in the game, but he 
knocked the ball around for the in- 
fielders' practice and hit them so hard 
and far away that by the time the 
fray was started actually many of the 
alumni were ready to quit. 

Dr. Jack Auchmuty, of Tamaqua, 
was at his old station at second and 
whipped a couple dandies down to 
Gawinske, of Pittsburgh, while Bitta 
was giving them some practice, but by 
the time the first varsity hitter came 
to bat Dr. Jack had thrown out his 
arm and Gawinske was so exhausted 
that every time he leaned over he just 
fell down and went boom. 

Naturally, the varsity made whoopee, 
especially Malasky, who hit a circuit 
drive the first time up. Palmer crack- 
ed a single in the second, stole second 
and third and went home on Dank's 
bunt. 

Ditzler dropped Snyder's high fly, 
and Stroup and Malasky tallied on the 
misplay. Snyder, Heim and Shaffer 
scored in the fifth. 

By that time the showers were beck- 
oning up in the gym and the game was 
called, but not one varsity man would 
admit that this year's winning team 
was as good as the one he played on 
here years ago. 

Susquehanna 

R H O A E 

Stroup, 2b 1 2 1 

Malasky, rf 2 1 

Snyder, If 1 1 l 

Groce, cf 1 

Shilling, 3b 1 1 1 

Heim, ss 2 2 1 

Wall, c 6 

Shaffer, c 1 4 

Palmer, lb 1 2 1 

Danks, p 

Donnell, p 



kdlegiana Under Direction of 

Professor Keener Scored 

a Big Hit 

"Hamlet" without Hamlet would be 
! no less lacking in important attribute 
I than a Susquehanna Commencement 
without a play by Keener. 

Fortunately both of them were pro- 
| vided in the offering of the university 
dramatic class on Saturday evening, 
] when "Hamlet' was presented in Sei- 
bert Hail auditorium under the direet- 
ion of Nathan Nesbit Keener, head of 
: Susquehanna's department of expres- 
: sion. 

That tragedy by William Shakespeare 
was presented before a large gathering 
of commencement week attendants, who 
were pleased with the amateur acting 
in that classical production. 
Adam P. Bingaman managed the af- 

: fair from the business standpoint, and 
music for the occasion was furnished 
by the university orchestra under the 
direction of Professor Hemphill, of the 
Conservatory of Music. 
The cast included: 

Cladius, King of Denmark. Henry 
Hartley; Gertrude, Queen of Denmark, 
Mary E. Rover; Hamlet, son of the late : 

,and nephew to the present king, Nathan 
N. Keener; Polonius, Lord Chainbeilin, 

j Lee S. Deppen; Laertes, son of Polon- 
ius, William J. Weliky; Ophelia, dau- 
ghter of Polonius, Margaret Young; 

j Heration, friend of Hamlet, Russel E. 

'Khnger; Ghost of Hamlet's Father, L. 

; Arthur Wagner; Rosencrantz, Courtier, 
Wilfred K. Groce; Guildenstern, Cour- 

itier, Henry W. Seiber;Court:ers: Mar- 
cellus. Casper E. Burns; Bernado, 
Charles I. Rowe; Francisco, Adam P. 
Bingaman; First Soldier, Leolin Hayes: 
Second Soldier, Clifford W. Johnston; 
First Gravedigger, Russel T. Shilling; 
Second Gravedigger, Theodore J. Wach- 
owiak; Ladies-in-waiting to the Queen, 
Mary L. Shaffer and Mary Weaverling; 
Player King, Byron Hafer; Player 
Queen, Dorothy F. Wassell. 



Sports Participants Awarded 

for Achievement! for 

Alma Mater 



Merchant TaiW 
Ed. I. Heffelnne-e* 

SATISFACTION QUARANTUSW 

Market Street Selinsffro* 



Delightful Dances by 
Greek Letter Groups 



Sororities and Fraternities Bev- 
eled to the Poetry of 
Rhythmic Motion 



Announcement of the awarding of 
track letters to thirteen men was made 
at Susquehanna's Athletic Association 
office today. 

These men decorated are: Captain 
Raymond Rhine, of Lewistown: Miller 
R. Gerhardt, of Johnstown; Vincent 
Jones, of Centralia; Charles E. Fisher, 
of Post Carbon; Manager David E. 
Straesser, of Curryville; Josiah Winters, 
of Sewickley; Clifford Johnston, of Al- 
toona; George A. Paralis, of Pringlc;; 
William J. Weliky, of Newark. N. J.; 
Lee H. Fairchild, of Canton; Fred L 
Norton, former Perry H. S. athlete. 
Pittsburgh; Harold Glenn and John 
Gilliland, of State College. 

Numerals in track were awarded: 
Paul Bishop, of Harrisburg; John Delay, 
of Tamaqua; Archie Young, of Potts- 
ville; Wayne Neiswenter. of Sunbury; 
Clair Dreibelbis. of Mifflinburg, and 
Smith Coldren. of West Brownsville. 

Tennis letters were bestowed upon: 
Captain Clifford Kiracofe, of Carlisle; 
Manager Harry Shaffer, of Johnstown; 
Walter Burford, of Bellvue; Arnold 
; Michaels, of Selinsgrove: Samuel Stern. 
1 of Bernardsville, N. J.; Reed Spec-r and 
William Adams, of Crafton 

By qualifying with over 500 units in 
WC men's athletic activities. Miss Mary 
Eliza Grenninger won her Varsity "S." 

These girls won their class numerals: 
Twila Amanda Crebs. Shirley Elizabeth 
Reich, Helen Erma Bradley, Ethel Irene 
Weikert, Vera Gertrude Burns, Nellie 
V. Shue, Agnes Marie McMullen, Mir- 
iam Emma Keim. Ruth Elva Maurey. 
Bernadine Louise Lehman, Lorene Mil- 
ler Shoemaker, Harriet R. Leese. Lucille 
Mae Lehman, Muriel Beatrice Cam- 
merer and Isabel Irene Slotterback. 

John Salem and Fre"d. Fisher were 
chosen assistant managers of track. 
S 

Well, it certainly was a grand and 
glorious Commencement. 

LEAOTTA'S 

BEAUTY 
SHOP 



Totals 8 9 15 2 

Alumni 

R H O A E 

Christensen. p 2 1 

Sigler, c 2 

Gw3inske, lb 10 

1 Auchmuty, 2b 1 

' Kemmerer, ss 1 1 

Shaffer, 3b 1 

• Shadle. If 1 1 

Vorlage, cf 1 

Ditzler, rf 1 1 



-8- 



Henzes to Assist 
Ullery As Coach 



Totals 1 1 

Alumni 0—0 

Susquehanna 1 3 1 3—8 



Widely Experience Athlete Will 

Also Study Here for His 

Bachelor Degree 



Weliky and Kiracofe 
Next Year Captains 



Hectic examination days and gay 
commencement activities were opened 
with Sorority and Fraternity Com- 
mencement parties at Susquehanna. 
Many Alumni members returned for 
these colorful affairs. 

Sorority Dances were held Thursday 
night, after the Pi Gamma Mu Ban- 
quet, beginning at nine and continu- 
ing until one. 

Kappa Delta Phi and Sigma Alpha 
Iota held a joint dance in the Phi 
Mu Delta home. The popular •Blue 
Band" provided the music. Sigma 
Sigma Delta danced in the Phi Lambda 
Theta house. McQuirk's Alphians, who 
have appeared on the campus on num- 
erous occasions, played for this affair. 
Omega Delta Sigma tripped the toe 
in the Bond and Key house. Minnich's 
Orchestra meted out the melody. 






202 S. Market St. 

Second Toor Eelow 
First Lutheran Church 

LPHONE 38<Z- 



STU DENTS 

I BEICHLEY'S | 

I LUNCH — SODAS — CANDY } 



Susquehanna's Coaching staff for 
1929- '30 was completed with the an- 
nouncement of the selection of John 
Henzes as an assistant in the Depart- 
ment of Physical Education. Mr. Henzes 
is a graduate of East Stroudsburg State 
Normal School and Dickinson College, 
completing his course in Law at Dick- 
inson this month. 

At East Stroudsburg, Henzes played 
,two years of Varsity Football, Basket- 
ball and Baseball, being Captain of the 
team winning the Eastern Pennsyl- 
vania Normal Scholastic Championship. 

During the 1928 season he played 
halfback on Dickinson College football 
team and during the 1927-1928 and 1929 
seasons successfully coached the Dick- 
ins- n College Freshman baseball team. 

In addition to his college playing and 
coaching experience Henzes has play- 
ed summer baseball for the past seven 
years, being identified with the Roches- 
ter Internationals, San Antonio, Texas. 
and Evansville, Ind., Three Eye League. 

While a student at East Stroudsburg 
he pursued a course in Health and Phy- 
sical Education, which qualifies him to 
assist in Susquehanna's general pro- 
gram of Physical Education and Ath- 
letics 

Henzes plans to complete his college 
work at Susquehanna in order that he 
may secure his Bachelor's Degree in 
addition to his Degree in Law from 



•John S. Rine to Manage the 

Track Squad and Frank 

Ramsey Tennis Sport 



Dr. and Mrs. Smith 
Received Saturday 



Susquehanna announces the election 
of William J. Weliky as Captain of 
Track for the 1930 season. 

Weliky is from Newark, New Jersey 
where he attended the South Side High 
School. He later attended Newark Prep, 
where he was an outstanding perform- 
er on the track team. He has been a 
letter man in track during his Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years, and as a 
Junior has been honored by being elect- | 
ed Captain. 

John S. Rhine, of Lewistown. will i 
handle the business affairs of the 1920 
track team. He is a brother of Ray 
Rhine, Captain of the 1929 team and 
holder of Susquehana's two mile record. 

Susquehanna's 1930 Tennis team will 
be piloted by Clifford Kiracoffe, of 
Carlisle. 

Kiracofe was Captain during the 
present season and his re-election is a 
tribute from his teammates. He is also 
President of the Bond and Key Club 
and a member of the Athletic Board. 

Frank Ramsey, of Selinsgrove, Senior 
and Editor of the college weekly, has 
been selected student manager of ten- 
nis for next year. 



Grover D. Savidge 

Represonting 

New York Life 
Insurance Co. 

Sunbury Trurt Bldg. 
SUNBURY PA. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
muty and Miss Ethel Weikert were i 
charmingly attired in afternoon frocks j 
of Alice-blue, ashes-of-roses and vio- 
let. 

"Pine Lawn" with its magnificent 
pine trees planted about 1858 by Mrs. 
Henry Zigler, the daughter of John 
App. who gave the land for Susque- 
hanna University, and whose husband 
was the first president, is once more 
the location of the chief executive's 
residence. 

This new home was attractively dec- 
orated with roses and peonies, and Wtl 
open to the inspection of the many 
guests. 



SHELTER'S 



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PAGE FOUB 



wa 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. -ELINSGROVE, PA. 



MONDAY, JUNE 10, 1929 



Doctor of Civic Laws 




Karrlsburg ; Mildred Idella Pot- 
Selinsgrove; Nicholas Lawrence 
' ' Rutherford. N, J ; John 
im Riden, Jr., Yeagertown; Isa- 
bel Irene Slotterback, Natalie; James 
Stanley Smith Willi: Gladys 

Allen Cornell 

I iruary tith. 193 

helor of Divinity— Rev. Russel 

ank Auman, Yea . Rev. Wal- 

tei E Brown, Danville; Rev. Melvin C. 

tn, Middl< I " Mer- 

^^sH8 ■ ■ Ben- 

f 3 1$ mln Lut .■ ■ n; Rev. Donald 

Luther Rhoads. Johns wn; Rev. John 
A. Rine. Beaver Springs; Rev. Harry 
T. Shoaf, Kulpmcnt, Rev. Chester W. 
Tcdd. Sunbury; Rev. John J. Welkel, 
. 

Bachelor of Music— Ruth Greist 
Dively. Berlin; Preida Emma Dreese, 
McClure; Rose Ann Gumbert. Berlin; 
William Owen Roberts, Wilkes-Barre. 
Master of Arts— Paul B. Faust. Har- 
risburg: Charles A. Fisher, Selinsgrove; 
Harry I. Frymire. Shamokm Dam; 
Charles E. Hilbish, Northumberland. 
Mastsr of Science — Frederick J. Re- 
Kingston; Edward S. Williams. 

Peely. 

CERTIFICATES 
Business Administration Department 
—Commerce and Finance: Charles E. 
Miller. Selinsgrove. 

Business Administration— Virginia E. 
Ulsh, Millerstown. 
ceremony wherein President Smith j Department of Expression— Henry A. 
conferred these degrees, awarded dip- ' Hartley. Kearny. N. J.: Clifford W. 
lomas and certificates and announced Johnston. Altoona, Pearl I. Kawel, 
these honors and prizes: Sunbury; Milton M. Kemeny. Newark. 

Theological Graduates— John W. Fry. N. J.; Ethlynne V. Miller. Scottdale; 
Newville; Franz A. Lundahl, Kingston; Alice W. Myers, Lancaster: Dorothy A. 
George O. Sands. Jersey Shore; Charles Tumbach, Hazieton; Wilma N. Walker. 



Cornell ( o- Worker 



JUDGE MILES I. POTTER 
of Middlebr 

Host Here Today at 
Commencement End 



(Continued from Page 1) 
dreds of other auditors, who have long 
since passed out from college halls — 
some academic and others only the gan 
university of stern reality 

The exercises were concluded with 
the audience singing America, after 
which the benediction was pronounced 
by President G. Morris Smith. 

Very impressive before that official 
ending of the collegiate year was the j 




The fraternities held their dances 
Friday night in their respective homes. 
| Dan from bine to one. 

Bond and Key had for their orches- 

' tra the popular Ed. Minnich aggrega- 

r. Sigma glided about to 

| the melodies played by "Sonny" An- 

: t and His Playmates, a Columbia 

ding Orchestra. This orchestra 

was a newcomer to the campus and one 



of the best ever to appear for a local 
dance. Phi Mu Delta had for their or- 
chestra Joe Nesbit and His Pennsyl- 
vanians. who played for this year's 
Junior Prom. Phi Lambda Theta 
ed to the tunes of Wamwright's 
"Blue- Band." 

All the dances were successful af- 
fairs, outstanding social events of the 
Greek letter groups. 



v\ H I T M E R - S T E E L E C M P A is 
•South River Lumber Company 

Manufacturer! of 

.Pine, Hemlock and Hardwood Lunik*,.. 

Lath, Prop Timber and Ties 
85 King Street Northumoci — 



*. 



DR. WILLIAM M HORN 
Pastor of The Lutheran Church "at 
the Gate of the Campus" in Ithaca 
Beccalaureate Sermonizer Here 



♦ 



-v T Hli.V 1>" WILL1AMSPORT VISIT THE NEW STORE AND (Aliv,u „, 

j f he Smith Printing Company 



.fAXUFACTURING BANK STATIONERS 



OFFlCfS OU'jL'S iTf MIm 



8th of Weaver Kin 
An Alumnus Today 



His Grandfather a Member of 
First Class Graduated l>y 

Missionary Institute 



I 



THE CITY INSURANCE COMPAN i ur 
PENNSYLVANIA— Sunbmy, r*. 

organized 1S70 
surplus to Policy Holders $866,90*.*,.. 

j. rtarris Linker, President A. F. O' Daniel, Secret- 



! 



A. Sauter, Jersey Shore; William R. 
Schvirian. Pittsburgh. 

Bachelor of Arts— Gertrude May Ar- 
bogast, ML Pleasant Mills; Helen Mary 
Auchmuty, Tamaqua; Paul Hane Au- 
miller, Selinsgrove; Kathryn Virginia 
Bastian, Berlin; Ruth Glendora Beck. 
Sunbury; Adam Philip Bingaman. Gor- 
don; Helen Erma Bradley. Swissvale: 
William Fred Breining. Trevorton; 
*John Richard Brunozzi. Glen Lyon; 
Frank Anthony Bruno. Kelayres: Vera 
Gertrude Burns. Girardville; Henry 



Fnedens: Margaret Young. Salisbury 
PRIZES 

Rev. Dr. M H. Stine Mathematical j 
Prize— Martha E. Laudenslager. Sel- ; 
insgrove; Ruth E. Jacobs. Burnham; 
Florence Lauver. Mt. Pleasant Mills; 
Ira C. Sassaman. Williamsport. 

Rev. P. H. Pearson Junior Oratorical 
Prize— Margaret Young. Salisbury; sec- 
end. Stewart M. Schrack. Booneville: 
honorable mention. Mary M. Eastep. 
Williamsburg. 

Senior Music Prize, award of Sigma 



Pi Gamma Mu Met 
on Thursday Night 



Third Annual Gathering of 

Honor Fraternity Held in 

Trinity Thursday 



Robert Carichner. Pittston; Helen Eliza Alpha Iota National Fraternity-Freida 
Carter, Jersey Shore; B. Loretta Clark, E Dreese. McCmre. 
Pittston; Daniel Joseph Connell. Pitts- 
ton; Robert Wendell Crou.se, Dry Run; 
Claire Adaline Dauberman. Northum- 
berland; William Henry Decker, Mid- 
dleburg; Helen Rebecca DehorT. North 
Braddock: Lee Swab Deppeu. Mirflin- 
town; Mary Grace Detwiler. Marion; 
*Bcaver Stanley Faust. Snow Shoe: 
Charles Edward Fisher. Port Carbon; 
Rebecca Louise Foster. Altoona; 'Eliza- 
beth R. Cannon, Inkerman; "Helen C. 
Gannon, Inkerman; Helen Gemberling, 
Selinsgrove: Henry A. Hartley. Kearney. 
N. J.; Walter Stanley Hennig, WUkes- 

town; M iry B. H pi ' ' 

ik Hrlcko Dick ion Ci 

Fohn Kanyuck. 
, mble. 
Mt. Can .rude Marion Kill 

km: Nam " Harriet Lecrone, Dal- 
:k M nl 
W M : 
McHugh, Olen Lyon; 
Anna 
Mary M Wini- 

fred Myers, Lancaster; Adda Ruth 

nan. Danville; 'Catherine A. 
O'Brien. Wyi Ruth Pace. Han- 

a Carolyn PurTenberger, 
Mifflin town; Helen Bernice Reiter, 
Karthaus; Raymond Otto Rhine, Mc- 
Clure; Charles Ira Rows, Miffllntown; 
Mary Elizabeth Rover. Sunbury: 
•Frank Jahn Rutkoski. Wilkes-Barre; 
William Robert Bchwirian, Pittsburgh; 
Harry Parker Shaffer, Johnstown; 
Mary Lucinda Shaffer, Johnstown; 
Russell Theodore Shilling, Reedsville; 
Margaret Henrietta Shup. Sunbury; 



Firs • oi Susquehanna's Corn- 
was the 

iet of 1 f ■ mm C 

1 P: Gamma i 

Thursday i 
> ; >'- v< . 

by 
Smith unci Dv. 
Pi ij the State I 

f Pub tion, h 

oi fraternity are: 
R H •- : >' 

Ident; Dr. T. W. Kretehmann, 

C . were; 

lal i Cm - N. Wood, Mary E. 
: and George Bi 

Program: D: George F. Dunkcluerg- 
er, Ruth Steele, Henry Carichner and 
Edward Livingston, 

Publicity: Claire Dauberman. Paul 
;: • i and Di t W. Kretehmann. 

Faculty members include President 

Smith, Dr. A W. Ahi. Dr. George F 

Dr. Jacob Diehi, Dr. 

Harold N Follmer, Dr. Charles A. 

Fisher, Beatrice Herman, Dr. T. W. 



Kretehmann Dr Frank p Manhart, 
Millard Clyde Smith. Hanover; George Dr William A Sadtler. Dr. John I. 
Amos Spaid. Selinsgrove; 'John Fred- woodruff and Dr George N. Wood 



erick Stamm, Catawisaa; Blanche 
Loul i ffer, York; Ruth Elizabeth 

lumberland; David Ernest 
ViUe; Walter Wilson 
Swank. Sunbury: James Helman Trout- 
man. Mi Q; Seiber Em 

■man. M I I ' 11 MCe Fred- 

nick Updegrove, Selinsgrove; Lewis 
Arthur W., 
"■ 

Frank War- 
Media: 1 

: 

H ' ci; Wolf, 

>• 

I 

I 

1 



Graduate members are: Helen Am- 

. rude Arbogast, George 

:-" Beam, Henry R Carichner. Helen 

ibeth Carter, Claire A. Dauberman, 

S. Deppen. Aileis Hartley, P*' '. R 

Hoover Edward H Livingston, Harr; 

' Lupfer, Harold Moldenkt. Sara s. 

M i • E Royer, Ruth E. Steeie. 

Sunbury Dorothv ^ , :> . S \<.ar.k and Helen Wo.r 

■-: i Eastep, Ruth 

B K Clifford 

W 

1 Jim :: B. 

C I nd Mar* 

Offlcers-elei I are Clifford Kir., 

'.:. " rel Young 









ph '.-■■■' p 
■ 

- 



1 ' 

dman, 

- Tl. 



Frank 














R 




' 


U«t !■ 


1 | William 



pnders Should !$<■ Prompt 



To be the eighth member of the 
family to graduate from Susquehanna 
is the unusual distinction falling to 
Frank W. Weaver, a member of the 
1929 Ofass. 

For a period of nineteen years a 
member of the Weaver family has been 
a student at Susquehanna. In the fall 
of 1910, three sisters— Catherine. Alice, 
and Gertrude entered Susquehanna, 
graduating in 1915. In 1911, a younger 
sister. Mary, matriculated and in 1916 
received her degree. Ere the fourth 
member of the family had completed 
her course another sister. Marion, en- 
tered Susquehanna in 1915 to be join- 
ed the following year by her sister 
Charlotte, who graduated in 1920. Dur- 
ing the latter years of Charlotte's col- 
lege course, a brother. Luther. Jr.. com- 
pleted his preparatory work at Sus- 
quehanna Academy, later entering the 
University and receiving his degree in 
..-. 1926. In the fall of 1920 a broth- 
er George entered Bi and 
v. . s student thruout that year. 

In Luther's Sophomore year his 

ver Frank c Susqueh 

and his gradi M of 

1929 i: it unique 

and i i family rec »rd in Busque- 

•ry 

Grandfather a Merrier of First Class 

\\\. . [ I Bus- 

quehani tJn opened her doors 

, : 

■ . A1 the same tun. 

W in trf George 

Belli icade- 

ciy ■ d his course at 

. Lite in 1861 and <■• 
ed th€ ministry Alter an active minis- 
een yea ' u r e:ed Medical 
School, completed the course and took 
up the practice of Medicine 
H:s son. Luther M.. desired to study 
Istry and being unable to secure 
the o studies at Missionary In- 

red Pennsylvania College 
| now Ge- where he completed 

his work In pre-dental work and grad- 
uated in 1882 later entering the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania graduating in 
1338 

When the class of 1919 graduated a ? 
Susquehanna with three of nil daugh- 
Cathettae, Alice and Gertrude 
members, the class, in recognition of the ' 
unusual distinction of having three 
V, members of their class, elected 
their father an honorary member. 

Dr. Weaver's dental offices are lo- 
cated a* 5723 Woodland Ave., Philadel- 
His daughter Gertrude, following 
her graduation at Susquehanna in 1915. 
completed here dental work at Penr.- 
•nia in 1918 Since that time she 
•Kiated With her father. 
Catherine continued her studies in 
Teinpl.- and Columbia Un. 

•me economic* She is 
the Vare Jim: >r High 
■ ■ 

snt I member oi 1 1 
H ol in 

Bt ol Business During the 
■a:11 bi I member o 
■ at Busq 

'.v 
B "ike and Lincoln 

. Media. Pa L 
Bber of the ' I 

and Chai the 

I ' ildr, Prlncip 
Bo o 8c! OOll Benson. Pa 

. s 

The Simile 

i:er." 
Jinks "Yes he is as full of stora 



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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVEHSIT' 

REV. G. MORRIS SMITH. A.M., D.D., President 

s usr|uehanna Universltv U located m the btsurt of the b»' '1'g 
Susquehanna Valley, in the home-like borough of Selinsgreve. n 
mtones and recitation buildings are in e:ccellcnt condition with • 
nodern convenienct"- 



Dean of CoH»~ 

DR HERBERT A AIJ,H«^*' 

*.R.. A.M., I IM n 



Dean of TT •"'**- 

DR F. P. MAMH*"' 

A.M., D.D ».»» 



<v 



s 



s~t 






WELCOME NEW 
STUDENTS 



The Susquehanna 



\3tvW 



etsWS 



. 

GET OFF TO A 
GOOD START 



Volume XXXVI 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1929 



Number 7 



College Professor 
and Wife Celebrate 
Golden Anniversary 



Little Crusaders N EW MEMBERS 0F Susquehanna university f aculty Susquehanna Opens 



Building Fast Team 



Dr. and Mrs. T. C. Houtz Celebrate 

Fiftieth Wedding Anniversary 

With Family Dinner 



Arrival of New Men Aid Coach Ullery 

to Shape Grid Eleven For the 

Washington Opener 



SERVED IN DEPARTMENT OF 

MATHEMATICS SINCE 1885 



Known as "Grand Old Man of S. U."; 

Both Still Very Active Despite 

Their Advanced Age 



Dr. and Mrs. T. C. Houtz, of West 
Walnut street, one of the most highly 
respected couples in Selinsgrove, cele- 
brated the fiftieth anniversary of their 
marriage last Saturday. The former 
has long been a member of the Uni- 
versity faculty, in the department of 
mathematics. 

The Snyder County Tribune has this 
to say in tribute to this couple: 

In the manner which has character- 
ized the actions of this cultured couple 
the occasion will be celebrated by no 
elaborate display. A family dinner, 
which will be attended by the children 
and grandchildren, will mark the happy I 
event. 

The couple were married at the home i 
of Mrs. Houtz's parents, near Lemont,! 
on September 23, 1879. Mrs. Houtz was 
Miss Margaret C. Duffle and was born 
at Pine Grove Mills on November 5, 
1857. Dr. Houtz was born on a farm 
near Lemont on September 28, 1853. 

It is of special interest to Selinsgrove 
people to learn that a former pastor of j 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Rev. Jacob' 
Yutzy, D.D., united the couple in mar- ; 
riage. This was the first marriage cere- ' 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Coach Bill Ullery is making rapid 
progress in preparing the Susquehanna 
eleven for its opener with Washington 
College at Selinsgrove on October 5. 

With staunch veteran material at 
hand, together with many promising 
new candidates the coach is hopeful of 
building up a team that can stand up 
under Susquehanna's heavy schedule, 
which includes games with Haverford, 
Delaware. Ursinus, Drexel and Juniata. 

The sight side of the line was shat- 
tered with the loss of Brunozzi and 
Means by graduation, but capable sub- 
stitutes from the reserve squad and 
the addition of several promising fresh- 
men may help Coach Ullery in build- 
ing a line that can stand the assaults' 
of Washington, Haverford, Ursinus and 
P. M. C. Miller and Zak, both 200; 
'Concluded on Page 4) 




Seventy-Second Year 



Dr. Nireley Tells Students to "Get a 

Good Start"— 433 Enrolled; 

Ninety Freshmen 



LILAl^w 



"JkO^A 



IS 

Three New Members of Susquehanna University Faculty 

Left to right: Adelburt C. Hartung, Miss Lucy T. Irving. Franklin G. Williams 
Three new faces were added to the Susquehanna University faculty at 
the opening of this term. Adelburt C. Hartung is professor of English, He 
has his A. B. degree from the University of Rochester, his A. M. degree from 
Harvard University, and has just completed two years of graduate work at 
Johns Hopkins University. Miss Lucy T. Irving, instructor in Spanish, comes 
from Middlebury College, Vt, where she was made an A. M. She has lived 
in Cuba and speaks Spanish fluently. Franklin G. Williams, professor of 
mathematics, has won degrees from Middlebury College. Vt., State College, 
and Cornell University. He can place A.B., A.M., and Ph.D. behind his signa- 
ture. 



Fountain and Clock 
Given Susquehanna 



Improvements 
Made on Campus 



Freshmen Guests at 
Social Functions 



Summer School Graduating Class Pre- 
sented Two Valuable Gifts; Fifty- 
Three Were Graduated 



Hassinger Hall Completely Remodeled; Upperclassmen Entertain Newcomers 



G. A. and Seibert Hall Painted; 
Grounds Graded 



Evangelist, Former 
Actor, Speaks Here 



Rev. Walter Bentley, Shakespearean 

Player, Lectures on "The Church 

and the Theatre" 



Rev. Walter E. Bentley. of New York, 
for many years a Shakespearean actor 
but now an Episcopalean Evangelist 
and Missionary delivered a very enjoy- 
able and instructive lecture to a meagre 
audience made up of townspeople and 
Susquehanna students, in Seibert Hall, 
last night. 

His subject was 'The Church and the 
Theatre," in which he brought out the 
close relationship between the two in- 
stitutions. 

During the course of his lecture, he 
traced the development of the drama 
from the classical Greek dramas of 
Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, 
down to modern times, emphasizing the 
part the Church played in the process. 

Both professions, he claimed, get 
their living by their tongues and appeal 
to the same fundamental wants of the 
human race. The two are so inter-al- 
lied that it is difficult to distinguish 
the one from the other. Each helps 
each, he asserted, and if the two were 
joined together they would move the 
world. "Without the church," he ob- 
served, "we would become barbarians; 
without the theater, we would become 
lunatics." 

He sought to explain Shakespeare's 
masterful writing of plays by saying 
that it was the result of divine inspira- 
tion. 

Won from the stage by a sermon 
preached by the late Phillips Brooks, 
in Boston. Masschusettes, where he 
(Concluded on Page 4> 



Cheering fans, who vociferously urge 
on the Little Crusaders' football eleven 
to victory this fall, to the point of 
hoarseness, may cool off their vocal 
chords for further work, thanks to the 
gracious act of the Summer School di- 
vision of the graduating class of 1929. 

Funds were provided by this graduat- 
ing body, numbering fifty-three, for the 
erection of a drinking fountain on the 
Athletic Field, west of the grandstand. 

A glacial boulder, similar to the one 
near Steele Science Hall, and unearth- 
ed during the construction of the Ath- 
letic Field, was used for the founda- 
tion. River stones, found on the cam- 
pus, were used to build the fountain 
itself. Cool, refreshing Snyder county 
water is piped to the fountain, so that 
the entire gift is a purely local pro- 
duct. 

Another very valuable gift was pre- 
sented to the college by the same group 
of loyal students in the form of a hand- 
some and much-needed electric clock, 
which was placed in the Library. This 
will be a great aid in following the i 
advice of a recent speaker here to be 
punctual in order to get a good start. ] 

S 

EXTENSION COURSES BEGIN 

Susquehanna's Extension Courses will j 
begin this week. They will be of fered 
In four centers this year. They are: 
Wilkes-Barre. Coal Township, Mount i 
Carmel, and en the University Campus. 

A large number of teachers enroll in 
this department of the University ev- | 
ery semester, in order to secure addi- 
tional training and advanced certifica- ; 
tion. 

The courses are under the direction j 
of Dr. John I. Woodruff. 

The maximum credit allowed for a 
semester to teachers in service by the 
State Department of Public Instruct- [ 
ion is six credit points. 

Copies of the Extension School Bul- 
letin may be secured upon application 
at the Dean's office. 

S 

NEW HOUSEMOTHER AT 

SEIBERT HALL 



At Three Parties During 
Freshmen Week 



Students and friends of Susquehanna 
are very loud in their commendation 
and appreciation of the splendid im- 
provments to the campus and physical 
equipment during the summer months. 

Hassinger Hall has been made es- 
pecially attractive, both on the interior 
and on the exterior. The exterior has 
been given a new coat of ptint and the I 
interior has been so completely re- 
modeled that it is scarcely recognized ! 
as the same building. 

A spacious lounge room has been 
placed at the main entrance. New 
floors, doors, windows, etc., have also 
been put in. Showers have been placed 
on each floor. In the basment comfort- [ 
abl accommodations have been made 
for commuters, including lockers. Y. M. 
0. A. and class recitation rooms will 
occupy the rest of the basment floor. 

Seibert Hall has been given a new 
coat of paint on the exterior. With the 
improvements made on the interior last 
spring, the whole affords very excellent 
accommodations for the co-eds. 

New floors have been laid in Gus- 
tavus Adolphus. Other wood work has' 
been painted. An attractive case has' 
been placed in the main entrance for 
the display of Susquehanna's trophies. 

The grounds about the library and 
the new home for the president have 
been graded and grass and shrubbery 
planted, adding much to the beauty of 
our campus. 

S 

Y. MCA. SECRETARY 

SPEAKS IN CHAPEL 



Leo Cole. Secretary of the College of 
the Young Men's Christian Association, 
led the Chapel Exercises this morning 
He gave a short talk to the students 
en a phase of this work. 



SUSQUEHANNA LIBRARY 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 



Library Hours— 8:30 a. m. to 12 m. 
1 p. m. to 5 p. m. 7 p. m. to 10 p. m. 

Books which circulate may be 
kept out for two weeks Aftei 
time a fine of two cents a day is 
charged. 

Reference Books and Magazines 
(bound or current! cannot be taken 
from the library 

Reserve Books for assigned read- 
ing must be used m the library ex- 
cept: from 10 p, m. to 9:30 a. m. 
and 11:30 a. m. Saturday to 9:30 a. 
m. Monday. 

A fine of 50 cents is charged for 
all Reserve Books not returned by 
9:30 a. m. with an additional fine of 
five cents for each hour after. 



Mrs. Susan Little has been engaged 
M housemother for the young women 
Of Seibert Hail. Her duties are chiefly 
hostess for Siebert Hall and assistant 
to the Dean of Women. 

She is the widow of the late John 
Wesley Little, well-known artist. She 
la a woman of experience in her de- j 
partment, having held a similar posi- 
tion at Buckr.ell University the 
i years. 




Parties, entertainments, and a stunt 
night were the outstanding social fea- 
tures of Freshman Week, the first in 
in the history of Susquehanna 

After a day of exams and addresses 
Friday, the entire class was assembled 
in the social rooms of Seibert Hall for 
their first college social function. Each 
one present introduced himself, giving 
his name and home town in the form 
of a rhyme. 

When assigned groups of the new 
students were called upon to give 
stunts, two of the six presented mock 
weddings. One stunt, which perhaps 
came as a surprise to the Frosh, was 
the one presented by a group of upper 
classmen picturing a paddling party. 
After refreshments were served by the 
Y. W. C. A., the evening closed with a 
story of fraternity life. 

Under the auspices of the Y. W. C. 
A., another evening of entertainment 
was provided for the Frosh, Monday. 
There was little trouble in getting the 
Seibert Hall and Hassinger Hall groups 
divided into sections, as their bash- 
fulness had been dispelled by the pre- 
vious function. The Frosh assisted 
largely in the entertainment for the 
evening. In addition to a play by a 
group of upperclassmen, readings were 
given by Miss Wilma Walker. Wilson 
Sieber and Clifford Johnson. 

The new students showed some fine 
talent in their class, with Mr. Burns 
entertaining at the piano, and Miss 
Miller favoring with a few vocal 
selections. Mr. Wilson, who transferred 
to Susquehanna from New York Uni- 
versity, also sang a solo and entertain- 
ed with stories 

Prof. Grossman presented a unique 
program on Tuesday evening, running 
an indoor track and field meet for the 
Freshmen The class was divided into 
two groups, the Orange and the Ma- 
roon. 

Paper bags were used for shot-puts, 
pie plates for the discus throw, and 
lead pencils for the javelin. The climax 
of the evening came with the pop- 
drinking contest, nipples being at- 
tached to the pop bottles 

S 

FA( TLTY RECEPTION 

TO STUDENTS 



'Getting Off to a Good Star:" was 
the theme of Dr. George W. Nicely in 
address to the student body and 
faculty of Susquehanna University St 
the opening of the seventy-second year 
of the college's existence as an insti- 
tution of learning, Thursday morning, 
Dr. Nicely, who is a pastor of St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church at Williamsport, is a 
Susquehanna alumnus and booster, and 
brought a very interesting and appro- 
priate message. 

In his address he emphasized the 
necessity of punctuality, preparation 
for meeting an emergency, self-re- 
liance, and God-reliance, four impor- 
tant factors in "getting off to a good 
start." 

Dr. Smith, president of the college, 
presided over the first assembly of the 
435 undergraduates and a score of stu- 
dents in the school of theology. 

Of the 435 undergraduates who en- 
rolled on registration day, 90 are Fresh- 
men in the college department and 15 
are new upperclassmen. 

The raising of the admission re- 
quirements has assisted Susquehanna 
University in sifting out those appli- 
cants for admission who most likely 
would have failed in their work during 
the year. This has slightly reduced the 
number of Freshmen students. How- 
ever, the present Freshman class is 
better qualified to carry on college work 
than former classes. 

The pastors of the Selinsgrove 
churches attended the opening exer- 
cises and were introduced to the as- 
sembly by Dr. Smith. 



Hockey and Soccer 
Games Scheduled 



Inter- Sorority Hockey Games to Fea- 
ture Fall Sports Program 
For Women 



SPONSOR SOCIAL AFFAIRS 

Several upper-el. is.-, girls including 
ma Moore, Wilms Walk- 
er, Mary Eastep and Bnsa Wilson re- 
turned to the campus a week early for 
■i welcoming the Fresh- 
men and helping them to adjust them. 
It new surroundings. Sev- 
. W< re sponsored by 

committee during the week and a 

deal of credit is due this group 
brll for the splendid way in which 
they carried out their work. 



CAPTAIN GARMAN 
Above la a likcne.-.- of Captain "Al" 
(ii: man. a strong aspirant for the cen- 
tl r position on the Orange and Maroon 
n. "Al," is a former Sunbury II; ; ' 
star, played spectacular football on the 
Susquehanna team during the past two 

md played an Important part 
in the IU0CSI i's team. His 

kci n wit and sparkling humor keep his 
teammates in the be ■urits and 

will help greatly in keeping up the 
morale of the team in a game. 



Hall WSJ the scene of the an- 
nual reception given the students by 
v. last Thursday evening, fol- 
lowing Registration and the Opening 
Exercises 
Both the parlors and the dining 
re verj illy deco: 

•• many vsrle 
Member.-, of the Faculty Club were 
gracious ho . occasion. 

Mu ic was furnished during the evening 
by a trio comprised Of P Alli- 

son, piano, Mlsa Kathryn Morning. 
violin, and aflsa Lois Brungart, 

The affair v <3 by the 
student body. It proved I very 
for the • i.illy. 
s 

PRACTICE GAME FRIDAY 

A practice football game between the 
Orange team and the Mare m team will 
be played Friday afternoon. 



Inter-class Hockey and Soccer and 
Inter-Sorority Hockey schedules have 
been arranged by the Athletic Office, 
to decide the championships in these 
three departments. 

Girls not affiliated with any sorority 
i will have a team. They have been 
; given the name of "The Campusers" 
on the schedule. 

The Inter-Sorority schedule: 

Oct. 4 — Sigma Sigma Delta vs. Kap- 
pa Delta Phi 

Oct. 11— Omega Delta Sigma vs. The 
Campusers 

Oct. 18— Sigma Alpha Iota vs. Sig- 
' ma Sigma Delta. 

Oct. 25— Kappa Delta Phi vs. The 
Campusers. 

Nov. 1 — Sigma Alpha Iota vs. Omega 
, Delta Sigma. 

Nov. 6— Sigma Alpha Iota vs. Kappa 
Delta Phi 

Nov. 8 — Sigma Sigma Delta vs. The 
Campusers 

Nov. 15 — Omega Delta Sigma vs. 
Kappa Delta Phi 

The Soccer and Hockey Schedule: 

Tuesday. Oct. 1— Soccer B — Frosh- 
Srs— 4:10: Hockey G— Jrs Srs— t:io. 
Bra 4:10 

Hockey G— Jrs-Srs— 4:10. 

Wednesday. Oct 2— Soccer B — Jrs- 
Sophs— 4:10. 

Hockev G— Jrs-Sophs— 4:10 

Thursday, Oct 3— Soccer B — Sophs- 
Frosh— 3:10. 

'Jr. Gu'ls practice Soccer* 

Monday. Oct 7 S O CCST B— Sophs- 
Sr->— 4:10. 

'Concluded on Page 4) 



NOTICE, EDITORIAL STAFF 

A very important meeting of the 
Editorial Staff of this newspaper 
will be held in Seibert Chapel Hall 
Tuesday evening at (5:45 o'clock, im- 
mediately after dinner. 

Every member of the staff is re- 
quire*, .-lid tin, meeting and 
be pi. , > begin work. Your co- 
operatlon ;■ vers al to the 

future success of THE SUSQUE- 
HANNA, 

Severs] Faculty Representatives 

end this 
meeting and address the staff on 
things pertinent to their work. 
FRANK E RAMSEY, '30, 

Editor-in-Chief. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1929 



T H IF ^ 1 T ^ (O ITT "H A ^\ l\f A spiritual deprivation, before the woes of his external plight began. 



Published Weekly by the Students ot Susquehanna University 



Subscription §1 50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger. '31. Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove. Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 

Editor-inC hief Frank E - Ramsey, "30 

Managing Editor News Editor 

Russell Carmichael '31 Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 
Betty Wardrop '32 John Kindsvatter '32 Lewis Rich '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty 



If there is an inclusive meaning in life, an inclusive purpose 

in all our good purposes, then for the sort of education that I 

have been outlining should include some apprehension of, and 

feeling for, the divine; the ideally educated man will reverence 

God, and know how to worship. — By George A. Coe in "What 

Ails Our Youth" 

g 

SHOOTING AHEAD 

Susquehanna is making' real progress in the matter of rais- 
ing her standards along academic lines. 

As evidence of this statement, Ave have an increase in the 
faculty staff where men and women of high qualifications have 
recently been added. The raising of admission requirements 
has assisted in bringing in a fine type of students and eliminat- 
ing undesirables. 

Various testimonials to the same effect are being received 
from time to time by the executive offices. 



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'32 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1929 



***************** 

TALES YOU WIN 

By F. E. R. 



SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS HAD 
TENNIS AND BASEBALL TEAMS 



Five strong tennis teams played a 

tournament during the summer 

months. A team representing the men 

COMFORT : staying at the Bond and Key House; 

The simple word "comfort" has been | «£; "«• "^8 ^ fP^on Sigma 
brought to our notice in our da ily Ho ^e: one those at Selinsgrove Hall; 
reading to such an extent that it has Jf; tht * € „ at a™**™* Adolphus and 
been deemed advisable to make an te- *SJ ♦ i V f„ >"* h * !*?*' 
vestigation concerning its promiscuous | KfHJLS £ SS^SSL^ 
use. Newspaper columns and advertis- 
ments, books, outdoor posters, and 



whatnot present to us in bold and 
glaring letters this little seven-lettered 
word to such an extent that it has 



become almost trite and hackneyed. three at Sunbury, and two at Middle- 



In fact, it spoils our fifteen-minute- 
a-day reading period every time we 
come across it. 

In days of old the psalmist sang 
to the tune of his lyre about 
the comforts of the rod and staff of 
the shepherd. From this time on we 
have traced its usage until we have 
reached the point where it has be- 
come a by-word in American life. Peo- 
ple want to eat, sleep, drink, walk, 
ride, travel, dream and live in comfort. 



FR08H 

You first-year men and women have jnst entered upon one « ♦*«««.*«*** 

of the most important periods of your life— a four-year course 
in college. It is a period during which you will be prepared for 
your life's work and for your contact with the outside world. 

The educational agencies with which you have come in con- 
tact up to this time should have given you a rudimentary but 
firm foundation upon which to build a future. More than that, 
they should have taught you to be ladies and gentlemen— to be 
yourself. It, therefore, does not devolve upon this publication 
to call to your attention certain obvious rules of conduct on our 
campus. 

More important (at least, so it seems to us) is this question. 
Do you know what you are here for? Are you of the opinion 
that the mere possession of a diploma at the end of four years 
spent on our campus will insure success? If so, you may as well 
steady yourself for a severe blow — it will not. 

A college education does not help one to earn a living — it 
helps one to learn to live, It merely gives you an index to know- 
ledge — helps von to find what von want to know at a moment's 

notice-place's the keys of the world's library at your disposal They demand comfortable homes 
l • ' ' r . , | theatres, automobiles, buses, street 

as it were. The business oi a college is to enable you to nna! cars hotels, and so on. 

yourself in relation to the world. The interpretation of the word may 

__, ,,,».•, t .• well be added to the psychologists's 

With these few tacts m mind, enter upon your new duties ]jsfc of individual differences because , 

with sincerity and enthusiasm and make yourselves collegiate every being on the face of this earth 

has a different definition of the term. ' 
Webster, whose authority remains un- ' 
disputed, claims there are two mean- 
ings. In may imply "strength and re- 
lief received under affliction" or, on 
the other hand, "positive enjoyment 
of a quiet and permanent nature." It 
seems that we moderns have applied 
the latter to our conception of com- 
fort, Johnston asserts that comfort im- 
plies "an augmentation of power of 
bearing rather than a dimunition of 
power." This means that if sister Mary 
is jilted by her sweetheart, our "com- 
forting" words do not mean an allevi- 
ation of the burden of sorrow but an 
increase in the capability of endur- 
ance. In such a case, it might be of 
value to quote from William Wads- 
worth and tell her that there is "com- 
fort in the strength of love; 'twill 
make a thing endurable, which else 
would overset the brain or break the 
heart." 

Our contention that different peo- 
ple have different interpretations of , 
the word is vividly illustrated by the I 
words of Robert T. Morris, which give ' 
his unique idea of comfort. He says 
"I know the beds of Eastern princes, 
and the luxurious couches of the Occi- 
dental plutocrats, but under the raft 



tavus Adolphus and Sleepy Hollow won 
the championship and the Faculty 
team was runner-up. 

A baseball team, representing the 
Summer School, played five games, 



burg. They won two, lost three, and 
tied one. 

An inter-group baseball league, sim- 
ilar to the tennis league, also played a 
number of games. 



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men and women 



-S- 



T ! [ E W ELL- E 1 1 H ATE1 ) M A N 
1 
An educated man is one who is trained to use the tools of 
human intercourse with readiness, precision and accuracy. We 
mean, especially, language i particularly the mother tongue, both 
in speech and in writing) and the rudiments of numbers. Our 
aye is adding in the tools of intercourse statistical symbols, such 
as tables and graphs. 

11 
An educated man must be aide to study and think without 
the guidance of others. He must have command of the method 
of the mind, and he must U — to some extern — a thinker, not a 
mere imitator. He may or may not have more opinions ihan 
other pel-sons, bur he 1ms more opinions to which lie has a right. 

Ill 
An educated man must have sufficient knowledge of nature 
to understand the main processes upon which human life and 
happiness depend. He must likewise possess general Intelligence 
as to the method of science and as to the main achievements of 
the sciences. 

IV 



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perspective. 



V 



An educated man knows enough Of history to enable him to ers of a farmhouse, where the mid- 

Wlderstand the main achievement! of man. He is able to put "^ » * «nw rm 'or.« "Jf*"* 

1 and the cobweb takes the place of a 
each type of Society, and each Change of society. Into a general Murillo. there is a feather-bed into 

which one softly sinks until his every 
inch is soothed and fitted, and settling 
down and farther down falls Into 
An educated man is acquainted With the major resources sweet unconsciousness, while the 
for intellectual and aesthetic enjoyment He knows nature, lit- screech-owl is calling from the moon- 

erature, music, and the other arts rofficiently to choose super- ' 
jor to inferior enjoyments. 

VI 
An educated man is marked by his interests as well as by 
his trained abilities. His attention is habitually attracted by 
significant rather than trivial objects, events, pursuits, and en- 
joyments. He lives iii a larger and more finely discriminated 
■world than the uneducated man. 



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VII 
An educated man must have not only this general culture 
but also training for a specific occupation. 

VIII 
All educated man must have toward his fellows the habitual 
attitudes commonly called ethical — inch attitudes ;is honor and 
itV, helpfulness and goodwill, and cooperation. 

IX 

An educated man must have loyalties to at least some of the 

important organisations and institutions of society, such as one's 

family, one'i country, one'*- church Bdward Everett Hale's 

Man Without a Country wai internally undeveloped, a victim of 



facturer of beds plays upon the peo- 
ple's desire for comfort while sleeping. 

Perhaps the greatest and most uni- 
versal comfort Is derived from money. 
It is all very nice and superior to de- 
spise money as the root of all evil, 
but it must be admitted that it is 
responsible for most of the comforts 
that come to us. It goes without say- 
ing that, money gives one shelter, food, 
and raiment. The implication is that 
that is about all it does. But is this 
true? Isn't money a tremendous power 
and agency for good thru charity and 
philanthropy, giving comfort to thou- 
sands of needy people? 

We are still carrying our notebooks 
with us and jotting down all such data 
that we are able to gather, and In a 
subsequent treatise we will give further 
details and a more thoro study of the 
intricate problem of "comfort,"— F.E.R. 



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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

REV. G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 

Susquehanna University is located in the heart of the beautiful 
Susquehanna Valley, in the home-like borough of Selinsgrove. Dor- 
mitories and recitation buildings are in excellent condition with all 
modern conveniences. 

Oean of College Oean of Theology 

DR. GEO. F. DITNKELBERGER, DR. F. P. MANHART, 

AB,, AM., Ph.D. AM., D.D., LL.D. 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



t 



Big League Diamond 
Built on Field Here 

When Susquehanna's batsmen report 
for training next spring under Coach 
UUery and Captain Good, they will 
make use of' a brand new diamond 
built during the summer vacation on 
the eastern end of University Field. 

The infield of this new diamond is 
patterned after the Polo Grounds at 
New York. The infield and the base- 
lines were dug out and built in, thus 
insuring an excellent playing field. 

The outfield will also afford better 
ground upon which to meet Susque- 
hanna's foes in the national game, be- 
cause it eliminates the possibility of [ 
stumbling over the cinder track, a ser- 
ious menace in games in the past. 

Selinsgrove's West Branch League 
team used the field for its home games 
during the summer months. 

S 

DR. SMITH AT NEW BERLIN 

AND TRINITY CHURCH SUNDAY 



Dr. G. Morris Smith delivered the 
Rally Day address at the Lutheran 
Church at New Berlin Sunday morning 
at 9 o'clock. 

He returned to Selinsgrove in time 
to fill the pulpit at Trinity Lutheran 
Church at the regular services at that 
church. 

Dr. Diehl, former pastor at that 
church, and Executive Representative 
of Susquehanna for one term, has ac- 
cepted the executive chair of Carthage 
College, Carthage, Illinois. 
S 

Susquehanna plays Washington Col- 
lege here October 5th. 



TENNIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

(Concerning Use of Courts) 

COURTS ON UPPER CAMPUS 

(Old Courts) 

1. Girls to have preference in use 
of courts. 

2. These courts are not to be used 
between 8:00 a. m. and 12:00 o'clock 
noon, or between 1:00 p. m. and 
3:00 p. m., daily except Saturday. 

NEW COURTS 

1. Courts reserved exclusively for 
men. Play "Mixed Matches" on old 
courts. 

2. Tournament Matches have 
preference on Courts. 

GENERAL SUGGESTIONS 

1. Do not use courts when wet 
(You can easily determine if shoes 
make imprints). 

2. Heelless rubber soled shoes to 
be worn when using courts. 

3. Loosen nets at end of play. 

4. If ail courts are occupied and 
students are waiting to play, play- 
ing time should be limited to one 
match in singles or two in doubles. 



MAP PREPARED FOR S. U. HIKERS 

For students interested in hiking, a 
specially-drawn map has been prepar- 
ed by the Athletic Office. It gives in 
detail ten very interesting hikes, rang- 
ing in distance from three an one-half 
to eighteen and one-half miles. 

Copies of these maps are in the 
hands of Miss Reeder and Prof. Gross- 
man and may be secured free of charge 
by calling at their offices. 
S 

"I see that more than 12,000 works of 
fiction were published last year." 

"Does that include all the seed cat- 
alogues?" 



Inter-Class Tennis 

Tourney Announced 

An Inter-Class Tennis Tourney for 
men has been arranged by Prof. Gross- 
man, Director of Athletics, beginning 
with a match between the Sophomores 
and Juniors on Friday. September 27. 

Prof. Grossman announces that any 
regularly enrolled male student is elig- 
ible to participate in the tournament. 

Each match is to consist of four 
singles matches and one doubles. 

Officers of the ciasses are urged to 
appoint or elect their managers as scon 
as possible. 

The complete schedule follows: 

Friday, Sept. 27— Sophomores vs. 
Juniors. 

Friday, Oct. 4— Juniors vs. Sopho- 
mores. 

Friday, Oct. 11— Frosh vs. Sopho- 
mores. 

Friday, Oct. 18— Sophomores vs. Sen- 
iors. 

Friday, Oct. 25— Frosh vs. Juniors. : 

Friday. Nov. 1— Frosh vs. Seniors. 
S 

BUILD BOARD RUNNING WALK 

A board running track to be used 
| out-of-doors during the winter months 
was constructed during the past few 
months. 

It is built in a number of sections. 
The curves are banked to afford easy 
and safe running. The track will have 
twelve laps to a mile. 



.• Our Gridiron Rivals ,* 

West Chester S. T. C 12 

Drexel Institute 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE 

LIBRARY THIS SIMMER 

The following is a lis: of books 
added to the Library this summer: 

Fiction 
My Antonia - - - -Gather 
American Tragedy— 2 vol. Dreiser 
Count of Monte Cristo - Dumas 
Quare Women - - - Furman 
Forsyte Saga - . Galsworthy 
Return of the Native - Hardy 
Green Mansions - - Hudson 
Where the Blue Begins - Morley 
All Quiet on the Western Front — 
Remarque 

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn — 
Twain 

Snake Pit (Nobel Prize) Undset 
Fortitude - - . » Walpole 
The Children Wharton Wharton 
Bridge of San Luis Rey - Wilder 

Non-fiction 
Understanding Human Nature — 
Adler 
Promised Land - . Antin 

Plays Barrie 

Whither Mankind - - Beard 
John Brown's Body - - Benet 
Microbe Hunters - - DeKruif 
Art of Thinking - - Dimet 

Plays .... Galsworthy 

Spies Gollomb 

Royal Road to Romance— Hallibur- 
ton 

Spoon River Anthology - Masters 
Black America - - Nearing 
Etiquette - - - - Post 



f—_ i ^ 

Rfcvl Shoes — Direct Uni- 


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COLLEGE TAILOR 


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L. M. GABEL, Propr. i 






Utter 

Motorist: "Somebody had a big pic- 
nic here yesterday." 

Companion: "Why, how do you know 
that?" 

Motorist: "The papers say so." 



ALMA MATER 




NEWS . . . . 






V0U'LL enjoy keeping in 
touch with the activities 
of your University and 
your alumni friends by 
reading every week's issue 



1 



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The Susquehanna 



Subscription $1.50 the College Year 



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PAGE FOUR 

************* ****** 

; ALUMNI NOTES . 

********* ****** 4*** 

Mary Eastep, '30, Editor 

Christie Zimmerman, '25, to Enter 
Mission Field 

Miss Christie Zimmerman, granddau- 
ghter of the late Rev. and Mrs. A. K. 
Zimmerman, has decided to dedicate 
her life to mission service, and 

to qualify herself further for that work 
sh< has i i i U( d In the New York Bib- 
lical Seminary. 

Her course of study there will be of 
two or three years duration. She will 
ai signment to a foreign 
mission field. 

Miss Zimmerman was graduated with 
high honors from Susquehanna Univer- 
sity with the class of 1925. She be- 
came a member of the Derry township 
high school faculty the following year, 
and taught there with exceptional suc- 
cess the following four years. 

Her marked talent as a teacher 
brought her constant advancement in 
that profession. However, she decided 
to undertake a broader scope of that 
work than merely the academic and 
thus will fit herself to include religious 
teaching in her profession. 

Pastor Publishes Bulletin 

Rev. C. R. Botsford, '98, pastor of 
St. John's Lutheran Church, Cumber- 
land, Maryland, is the editor and pub- 
lisher of a clever little bulletin called 
the "St. John's Record." The periodi- 
cal is published in the interests of the j 
congregation and practical Christian- 
ity. 

The pastor gives us his summer rec- 
ord in one of these bulletins, which we 
have on hand: 

July August 

Sermons, etc 21 14 

Visits 253 144 

Baptisms 2 2 

Marriages 4 

Funerals 4 2 

Miles walked 104 118 

Hoffman, '22, on Temple Faculty 

Miles Hoffman, a graduate of Sus- 
quehanna University in the class of 
1922, has accepted a position as an as- 
sistant in College Economics in the 
College of Liberal Arts of Temple Uni- 
versity. He took up his new work with 
the opening of the present scholastic 
year last week. 

Anna Norwat, '26, at Columbia 

Miss Anna Norwat, who graduated 
from Susquehanna in 1926, and who 
was a medical student at Women's 
Medical College. Philadelphia, the past 
few years, has gone to New York City, 
where she is taking courses at Colum- 
bia, and also holds a secretarial po- 
sition. 

In her communication with the 
Alumni Secretary, she says: "Any S. U. 
Alumni in N. T. 0.1 I saw a suitcase 
with an S. U. seal in Grand Central 
Station the other night. A. N." 

Miss Norwat was Secretary of the 
Philadelphia District Alumni Club. 

Alumnus to Enter Aviation School 

George A. Spaide, '29, of Selinsgrove, 
has been accepted as a student in the 
army aviation school and will be sta- 
tioned at Brooks Field, San Antonio, 
Texas. Completion of a year's course 
of instruction carries with it a com- 
mission as a second lieutenant in the 
aviation corps. 

Harry (Hank) Knorr, '17, was a re- 
cent campus visitor. Hank is now lo- 
cated at 435 Fifteenth avenue, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 

Walter Swank, '29. of Sunbury, has 
gone to Harvard University, where he 
has enrolled in the School of Theology. 
Swank WW B member of Susquehanna's 
very successful 'varsity debating squad 
last year been alternate on the 

Afflrmath team 

s 

NEW MEMBERS ADDED 

TO ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1929 



LITTLE CRUSADERS 

BUILDING FAST TEAM 



(Continued from Page 1» 
pound tackles, together with Joe Win- 
ters, another 220 pound tackle, and 
Yon, a promising freshman from Au- 
gusta Military Academy, will no doubt 
be the nucleus from which the line 
will be built. The guard positions will 
be well taken care of by men from last 
year's team, which include Auehmuty, 
Carmichael, R. Garman and Berger. 
Bill Ramick. another new candidate, 
gives much promise as a guard. The 
center position is well cared for with 
Al Garman back, aided by Wagner, a 
big huskie from Johnstown. 

It is in the backfield where UUery ex- 
pects the main strength of his team. 
With the return of Moser to school 
along with Malasky. Susquehanna has 
two of the hardest hitting fullbacks in 
small college football. Both boys re- 
turned in excellent condition. Wall, 
last year's quarterback, should have his 
greatest year. A natural, athlete and a 
great football player with his ability to 
run, punt, pass and buck, should prove 
to be a dangerous man. 

Lefty Danks, a halfback, is one of 
the coming stars of the team. He is 
probably the best punter on the squad, 
and averages 50 yards per kick. Lefty 
is also an excellent passer and one of 
the best open field runners on the 
squad. Great things are expected of 
him, both in football and baseball. 
Other halfbacks include MacDonald, 
Wormley. Speer, Scott, Heikes and 
Myers. Rupp. a former Lewistovvn Hi 
star, and Paul Edwards, from Blair 
Academy, are understudies to Wall for 
the quarterback position, and are prov- 
ing to be very capable. 

Approximately 55 men are working 
out daily. These men are all needed, 
as Susquehanna will run Varsity and 
Junior Varsity squads this year. 
S 

EVANGELIST. FORMER 

ACTOR, SPEAKS HERE 



sionary Institute, later Susquehanna 
University, whom we love to honor. 

Not to many couples of so much 
prominence are we privileged to extend 
heartfelt congratulations and good 
wishes no such an occasion as a Gold- 
en Wedding celebration. 

Dr. and Mrs. Houtz continue to live 
a busy, useful life and enjoy the bless- 
ings of health and happiness, for the 
Doctor is still teaching in the Mathe- 
matics Department of Susquehanna. 
while Mrs. Houtz is active about the 
household affairs. 

The influence of the lives led by this 
admirable couple ia so great that it is 
impossible to measure the good done 
by them in their half century of service 
in Susquehanna and Selinsgrove. 



HOCKEY AND SOCCER 

GAMES SCHEDULED 



(Continued from Page 1) 
was acting in Shakespearean plays at 
the time, Mr. Bentley entered the 
Episcopal Ministry and has become one 
of its most important figures. He is at 
present connected with the National 
Council as an Associate Missionary. 

In his new role, he has not forgotten 
the needs of his actor friends, for 
thirty years ago he founded the Actors 
Church Alliance to bring the Church 
and the theatre together and overcome 
the prejudice which, on both sides, has 
existed for centuries. He explained in 
detail to the audience the important 
part he played in the organization of 
this Alliance. 

For the first fifteen years the Al- 
liance included the clergy of all the 
churches. Episcopal, Roman Catholic, 
Protestant and Hebrew, and grew so 
large it finally divided into the Episco- 
pal Actors Guild I including the various 
Protestant clergy), the Catholic Actors 
Guild, and the Jewish Theatrical 
Guild. The headquarters of these 
Guilds are all in New York City, the 
Episcopal being centered in the Little 
Church Around the Corner, with 
George Arlis.s as President. 

He is also Chaplain of the Stage 
Childrens' Fund which sees to the 
proper schooling and training of actor's 
children while their parents are away. 
He is the ex-president and now lectur- 
er for the National Shakespearean Fed- 
eration. 

Rev. Bentley came to Susquehanna 
by the invitation of Bishop Darlington 
and the Executive Council of the Dio- 
cese. He will preach in the local Epis- 
copal Church tonight and tomorrow 

After the lecture, the former actor 
entertained with a number of readings 
from SI. . and also amusing 

anecdotes !*,:ardin? the acting and 
preaching professions 

g 

COLLEGE PROFESSOR 

AND WIFE CELEBRATE 

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Hockey G — Sophs-Srs — 4:10. 

Tuesday, Oct. 8— Soccer B— Jrs-Srs 
—4:10. 

Soccer G— Frosh-Sophs— 3:10. 

Wednesday, Oct. 9— SoccerB — Frosh- 
Jrs— 4:10. 

Hockey G— Frosh-Jrs — 4:10. 

Thursday, Oct 10— Soccer B — Sophs- 
Frosh— 3:10. 

Soccer G— Jrs-Srs— 4:10. 

Monday, Oct. 14— Soccer B— Jrs- 
Sophs— 4:10. 

Hockey G — Sophs-Frosh— 3:10. 

Tuesday, Oct. 15— Soccer B — Frosh- 
Srs— 4:10. 

Wednesday, Oct 16— Soccer G— Jrs- 
Sophs--t:10. 

Thursday. Oct. 17— Soccer B— Jrs- 
Srs— 4:10. 

Soccer G— Frosh-Jrs — 4:10. 

Monday, Oct. 21— Soccer B — Sophs- 
Srs— 4:10. 

Hockey G— Jrs-Srs— 4:10. 

Tuesday, Oct. 22— Soccer B— Frosh- 
Sophs— 3:10. 

Soccer G— Frosh-Srs — 4:10. 

Wednesday. Oct. 23— Soccer G— 
Sophs-Srs— 4:10. 

Thursday, Oct. 24— Soccer B— Frosh- 
Jrs— 4:10. 

Hockey G— Frosh-Jrs — 4:10. 

Monday, Oct. 28— Soccer B— Jrs- 
Sophs— 4:10. 

Hockey G— Sophs-Srs— 4:10. 

Tuesday, Oct. 29— Soccer B— Srs.- 
Frosh— 4:10. 

Hockey G — Frosh-Srs — 4:10. 

Wedesday. Oct. 30— Soccer B— Sophs- 
Srs— 4:10. 

Hockey G — Jrs-Sophs — 4:10. 

Thursday, Oat. 31— Soccer B— Jrs- 
Srs— 4:10. 

Hockey G— Sophs-Frosh— 3 : 10. 

Monday, Nov. 4 — Soccer B— Frosh- 
Jrs— 4:10. 



Several new membera have been add- 
iti'.e staff during 

the ! 

Mi.ss Emily Swettman has been en- 
gaged ■ Dunkel- 

Slie d her dutie 

July 22 

Mu.. M aph- 

f-r in tit. id I . 

: the 

from 
and 

p 
dual A the 
Ing, who 
' 

•lie 
has a position 
In >i: • iblic Welfare, 

at H 



i Continued from Page 1> 
mony performed by the minister. 
In the year 1888 Dr. and Mrs. Hout2 
where the Doctor 
ed on whal was to prove a long 
professor. It was 
here thai d their two chil- 

dren, Lucy C ! the wife of Dr 

r of the Lutheran 
Chui tnd John J . who 

Ml Sus- 

I 

much 
)■■ understood by 

■ .-.lately 
r Susque- 

havi i- 

11 

I whom Dr. 

I 

and la ; money, 

preached 
somew inday, 

thought, worked, and lived for Mis- 



KISSINGER 

The Jeweler 
Selinsgrove, fa. 



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— Dealer In — 
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The Susquehanna 




1 



DOWN WITH 
WASHINGTON 



Volume XXXVI 



SELINSGROVE, PA. f TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1929 



Number 8 



Fledglings Surprise 
Sophs in Getaway 



Upperclassmen Taken Completely by 
Surprise in Clever Escapade; En- 
counter at Conservatory 



Taking the Sophomores and other 
upperclassmen completely by surprise, 
the Freshmen staged one of the most 
cleverly-planned getaways in the his- 
tory of the institution, Tuesday ev- 
ening of last week. 

Immediately after lunch, Tuesday, 
the first-year men and women gath- 
ered in the Gym in Seibert Hall to 
arrange for their escapade, while the 
unsuspecting upperclassmen passed to 
and fro, directly in front of their 
meeting place. 

When the students assembled in 
Horton Hall for the evening meal, 
they discovered that only a few Prosh, 
for some reason or ether, had report- 
ed for dinner. Then it dawned upon 
the upperclassmen that they had been 
tricked by the yearlings. 

Using strategy that rivalled that of 
the Roman consuls of old, the saplings 
had wandered, in small groups, to a 
place at the northern limits cf Sei- 
insgrove, along the meandering Penn's 
Creek. At a spot popularly known as 
Books Bank, the Frosh held a wiener 
roast and organized, while the outrag- 
ed upperclassmen, some gulping their 
dinner, others leaving it untouched, 
prepared to go in hot pursuit of the 
audacious group. 

Running helter-skelter, the Sophs 
and a number of recruits from the 
other two classes traced every clue and 
rumor to discover the whereabouts of 
the fledglings. Meanwhile, the Frosh 
continued in their organization work, 
unmolested, and elected these officers: 
president, Charles Yon; vice-president, 
Miss Margaret Ide; secretary, Miss 
Geisel; treasurer, Harold Kreamer. 

Finding all their efforts to find the 
Frosh frustrated, the S^plis continued 
to the business section of the town. By 
this time, some of the timorous sap- 
lings had proceeded to their respective 
rooms on the campus, while some of 
the more bold proceeded to go to the 
theater. At the close of the perform- 
ance there, they marched in a body 
thru the dark and murky streets in the 
direction of the campus, while threat- 
(Concluded on Page 4.) 



PI GAMMA Ml' MEETING 

Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter of 
Pi Gamma Mu will hold its first 
business meeting this fall on Mon- 
day, October 7, at 6:30 o'clock, in 
Room 104 of Gustavus Adolphus 
Hall. It is expected that all mem- 
bers will be present to assist in 
making plans for the work of the 
year. 

T. W. KRETSCHMANN, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 



Debaters Petition 
Tau Kappa Alpha 



S. U. Will Clash 
With Washir gton on 
Gridiron Saturday 



Ulleryites Have First l'raetice Games 

In Preparation for Cpening Tilt: 

No Definite Line-Up Yet 



Forensic Society Hopes to Establish 

Chapter of National Debate Society; 

Dr. Kern Selected as Coach 



Y. M. C. A. Inducts 
Thirty-Two Men 



Dr. Smith Addressed Gathering on the 

"History of the Y. M. C. A."; 

Hartline, '31, Presides 



Thirty-two new members were in- 
ducted into membership in the Young 
Men's Christian Association, at the 
first regular meeting of that body, 
last Friday evening. This increase in 
membership in this organization gives 
impetus to the work it is carrying on. 
Harold Burns, '33. played a special 
selection on the organ at the opening 
of the meeting. 

Dr. G. Morris Smith addressed the 
members on the "History of the Y. M. 
C. A." In this address, Dr. Smith 
traced the history of this organization 
from its beginning down to the pres- 
ent time. He credited John R. Mote, 
one of the great "Y" men with being 
of great influence in the lives of a 
great many men The Y. M. C. A., he 
said, which was the outgrowth of a 
prayer-meeting, is next to the largest 
organization in the world. 

Dr. Smith, in the course of his ad- 
dress, spoke in reminiscence of his 
own experiences in the "Y" at Roa- 
noke College during his student days. 
He said that 'he man who showed 
him the real meaning of the organi- 
zation and who was its president at 
Roanoke, la today the greatest mis- 
sionary of the Lutheran Church in 
Japan. 

He commended the lot 
tion for upholding aii that is uood and 
true and how it 1 SUCh a 

influence m moulding bh< han- 

na of today He thanked the cabinet 
tne mben who wni I i chool a week 
early in order ii. I rould b. able 

to help the | onied 

to college life 
Paul I! ir hue pr< idem of the or- 
ation, conducted the Unpn 
induction ceremonies He received the 
new men into membership bj living 
them the pledge cf the Y. M, C. A. He 
invited all of the members to take 



Formal petition has been made by 
the Debate Club of Susquehanna to 
the National Council of Tau Kappa 
Alpha Fraternity, national forensic 
society, to grar.t a charter for the es- 
tablishment of a local chapter of that 
body. 

That fact was announced at thfe 
first regular meeting of the forensic 
organization, last Thursday evening. 
The petition takes the form of a print- 
ed booklet, giving the history of Sus- 
quehanna, a complete record of de- 
bating here, with emphasis on last 
year's work, and information regard- 
ing the petitioners themselves. They 
are: Sieber Troutman, '29, Walter 
Foulkrod, 11, Russel Klingler, '29, 
Frank Bruno, '29, Byron Hafer, '32, 
Henry Hartley, '29, and Daniel Con- 
nell. '29. 

Should a chapter be established here. 
Susquehanna will have gained deserv- 
ed recognition in the forensic field. 
(There are approximately one hundred 
'chapters of Tau Kappa Alpha at 
present. 

At the same meeting, it was made 
known that Dr. H. A. F. Kern has 
been officially selected to coach this 
year's aspirants to berths on the 
varsity squad. Dr. Kern has announced 
the first practice debate Friday af- 
ternoon of this week, at four o'clock. 
at which time ten speakers will be 
given an opportunity to show their 
forensic abilities. 

Just what material is available is 
not known yet. Only three members 
of last year's squad remain: Walter 
Foulkrod. '31, Byron Hafer, '32 and 
Frank Ramsey, '30. It is anticipated 
that there will be teams for men and 
teams for women, and very probably 
mixed teams. 

The managers have no definite 
schedule to announce as yet. The in- 
tercollegiate question will be selected 
at a conference at Harrisburg within 
several weeks. 



Parents' Day to be 
Observed Oct. 12 



Formal Invitations Are Issued to Par- 
ents of S. U. Students by Dr. 
G. Morris Smith 



Susquehanna will pry the lid from 
its f:otball season this Saturday after- 
noon when the Orang- and Maroon 
eleven combats the W.ishington Col- 
lege team from Maryland on our own 
gridiron. 

Although the football season is in 
its infancy and the strength of the 
various college elevens is still more or 
less unknown, Washington promises to 
be a strong opprnent ih the opening 
game of the season. Washington lost 
its first battle to the strong Maryland 
University team last Saturday after- 
noon by the score of 34 to 7. Thus the 
warriors from the Chestertown insti- 
tution will invade Selmsgrove this 
Saturday with the experience of one 
game behind it. 

Ever since September 12, Coach Bill 
Ullery, with the able assistane of 
Wayne Daubenspe«k, Wilfred Groce, 
and Jack Henzes, has been getting the 
squad into the best of shape for the 
coming campaign. By last Thursday 
afternoon, the squad was well enough 
prepared to go thru its first practice 
game of the season. 

In the first few minutes of action, 
the first slashed and tor? its way thru 
the second team for two touchdowns. 
The varsity took the kick-off on its 
35-yard line, and without a single halt, 
Wall, Duke and Wormley, with good 
interference, marched to the 5-yard 
line where the hard smashing Malasky 
took the pigskin over for the score. 
The second team took the next kick- 
off but was immediately stopped. The 
first string men again s 'ook the ball 
down the field for a fcftre with Ma- 
lasky again taking it over the line. The 
only important game made by the sec- 
onds was on a pass of Spigelmyer for 
20 yards. Moser. DeLay and Berger al- 
so did some fine work for this team. 

On Friday, another similar practice 
game was held, but the first team was 
put to a stif fer test, making two scores 
to the second teams' one. Malasky 
again battered his way over the line 
twice, and Moser tallied for the re- 
serves and also kicked the extra point. 

The first team lined up as follows 
in the scrimmage Thursday: Adams, 
left end; Winters, left tackle: Auch- 
muty. left guard: Captain Garman, 
center; Carmichael, right guard; Zak, 
right tackle; Dreibelbis, right end; 
Wall, quarterback; Wormley and 
Danks. half backs; Malasky, full back. 

The second team was as follows; 
• Concluded on Page 4.) 



NEW MEMBER ON STAFF 

An important acquisi . a to the 
Editorial Staff c! thi i itlon 
has been made In "It" person of 
Bruce Worthlngton, '33. Mr. Worth- 
lngton, whose home is In Yonkers, 
has been a member of the staff cf 
bis home paper, and also of the 
New York Times for some rime 
past, will assist Vernon B! 
'31. in the Sports Department. 



Spain Gives Alumna 
Research Fellowship 



Lillian Fisher, 12, Honored by Spanish 

Government: Is Scholar in History; 

Author of Several Books 



Lillian Fisher, '12. has accepted the 
fellowship offered her by the Spanish 
Government for research work in 
Spam. She has the honor of being the 
first one to receive this recognition 
from Spanish officials. She will spend 
' one year in research work in the ar- 
chives of Madrid and Seville. She vis- 
ited the campus last week prior to 

! -ailing for Spain. 

Former Head of School of Expression After graduation from 



Prof. Keener Joins 
King School Faculty 



Will Begin Service to Alma Mater 
In Extension Department 



sity. Miss Fisher went to Mexico where 
she taught in the Mexican schools and 
mastered the Spanish language. Then 
Professor Nathan N. Keener, who! she atten ded the University of Cali- 
I recently resigned his position as head Iornia - where she received the Doctor 
i Of the School of Expression at the | of P hiI »sophy degree in 1925. Her 
I University, here, is now an instructor i ma -> or sub i ect w ' as history. 
I and lecturer in the Byron W. King ; In lm her first bcok ' "Viceregal 
: School of Oratory, of Pittsburgh, ac- ' Administration in America," was pub- 
! cording to a recent announcement ! lished - The book is a comprehensive 
i from that institution. His work will be s P ecial stud y of viceregal administra- 
tis of extension instructor, lecturer, : tion in the Spanish-American colo- 
and entertainer. Prof. Keener is a ! nies ' representing patient and diffi- 
graduate of that school. ! cult research among the original docu- 

The announcement from the Byron ment ' s bear ing upon the relations of 
King School says in part: i s P ain and her American colonies. The 

"A school should be noted princi- ! investigations cover a wide field and 
pally for the opportunity offered stu- ' examm( ? a11 phases of the guberna- 



dents for contact with instructors 
distinguished by high ideals and per- 
sonality. Year by year new men and 



torial duties of the viceroy under vary- 
ing conditions in different centuries. 
It is a field in which verv little has 



women must come forward to fill the ! been writt en and many of the ma- 
place which new demands have ere- J terials are here used lor the first 
ated. Happy is the school that can j time - 

find the desired type among its! She received Ietters of congratula- 

alumni. j tion ^ rom leading colleges and univer- 

„«_ . ... . , , Isities in the United States, Mexico and 

ourfn* IK ,: iL hM ! Tfh ?■"■»■» AmeriCa ' She alS ° reCeiVed a 
curing the services of Nathan N. . ,„.. f „ „. ... TrTT .„. ,, 

Keener, graduate in the class of 1907. 1 Iette fV ™ Kmg Alfons0 VI1 ' wlth his 

royal seal. 

Dr. Fisher was a teacher in the Uni- 

j versity of Oklahoma prior to the ac- 

■ ppj->tpri' , « > o f h*»r mouo4«4sb9 from 

Spain. She has written two other 

books which are contributions to the 

Jr . K T 6 k, ■ gW f' = tWenty «eW of Education. Her research work 

years of valuable service to Susque- 



the services 

Keener, 
i His work has been confined to the 

eastern states, but we hope under the | 
', auspices of the Byron King School of 

Oratory to extend his influence thru- 
: out the south and west." 



hanna, having first come here in 1909 
The school of expression has steadily 
grown and improved under his di- 



gratulate her and wish her continued 
success in the field of History . 

S 

Hassinger Boys Plan 



Parents' Day will be officially ob- 
served for the first time at Susque- 
hanna. October 12, when Ullery's 
Little Crusaders meet this year's 
edition of the Haverford College foot- 
ball squad, on University Field. 

Formal invitations are being sent 
by Dr. Smith to the parents of all 
regularly enrolled students, to visit 
Susquehanna on that day as the guests 
of the institution. 

A special luncheon will be served for 
them at noon in Horton Dining Hall, 
After that, they will attend the foot- 
ball game, scheduled to begin at two 
o'clock 

Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. members 
are cooperating with the authorities 
to make the parents feel at home 
when they visit here. Ample provis- 
ion will be made for their accommoda- 
tion Plai for a gala event, riv- 
alled only by H mecoming Da 
S ■ 

A well educated Vienna man has 
offered to sell the film rights to his 
suicide, which be is planning for thf 
near future He plani to blow bin- 
ill up with a bome-mfcd4 infernal 
machine. 




will enable her to add more facts to 

our historical knowledge 

Susquehanna is very proud of her, 

winning distinction in the field of his- 

rection. His work has been especially . • , . , ... ... . 

, . . , ,. . p * toncal scholarship. We heartdy con- 
noted in the splendid orators sent out 

from the Theological school who have 
been under his instruction in express- 
ion. 

For the past few weeks he has been 
instructing in public speaking in the 

Gettysburg Seminary where his work rp jy l O *|* 

was appreciated to such an extettvt JL I IllVCIlftSc 3, IvilfllO 
that offers were made him for a full 

time position in that institution. He i 

is now finishing a contract with Seventy-Five Per Cent of Funds Are 
Gettysburg before beginning his new Raised to Place Radio in 

work Social Room 

S | 

With the intentions of making Has- 
i singer Hall, now known as Hassinger 
i Palace, the last word in a modern and 

"Vlimhar OpfnKar 1 Q ! u P- t0 - date dormitory, the fellows have 
iiUlllUCl V/LlUUCl LO taken it upon themselves to secure a 

radio for the new social room, and 

„ . . " _ , „. . . . add another touch of home atmos- 

R. Leon Tnck, Buffalo P.arust, and I phere r _ the beautifully-remodelled 



First Star Course 



Joseph Phillips. Baritone, to 
Give Concert Here 



dorm 

Various sets have been installed for 
demonstration but no choice has been 
made as yet. 

The proposition is being handled by 
the following committee: Edward Bol- 
linger, chairman, Leohn Haye.s, treas- 
urer; Andrew Kozak, George Pheas- 
ant, Purchasing Committee, and Lewis 



R Leon Trick. Buffalo's favorite 
pianist, and Joseph Phillips baritone, 
are the two artists selected by Prof. 
Sheldon, Director of the Conservatory 
of Music, for the first Star Course 
number, on October 18. 

Mr. Trick, an artist of rare ability, 
is a personal friend of Dr. and Mrs I Fox - Vernon Blough. Andrew Kozak, 
Smith, who formerly resided at Buf- collector, of assessment 
falo. Several faculty members are also 

A more detailed announcement of | contributing to the cause. To date, 
this concert will be given in a future seventy-five per cent of the funds 
tttUI have been raised, with the thud floor 

Prof Sheldon announces tha* not all j leading Is thi apportionment collect- 

of the number- for this year's Star ed. Tbil week ihOUld find Hassinger 

Course have been booked jrel I MOO Palace enjoying radio programs and 

irrangementi ire completed the burning midnight oil in their attempt 

entire program will be announced thru to get distant Static 

•olumn., s 

Tickets will de distributed among i\teR-soROR1TY COUNCIL 
the students about a week prior to the 

number. 

s 



HOSTESSI - AT TEA 



Ml \ S BIBLE CLASS 

ORGANIZED SUNDAY 



part m the morning prayer-meetings 
Which arc held every morning in the 
seminary rooms, at 6:30. 

Dr. Ahl gave a few remarks to the 
old and the new members. 



JOHN WALL QUARTERBACK 

This young nun. who played three 

of Varsity Bull on the Orange 
and Maroon Ek W D I one of th< 
pirants to the Quarterback position. 
OUght to be Johnnie's big year. 
Bt is a callable ball lOU I . pun'rr 
and passer, and will be "Johnnie OO 
the spot" to help bring defeat to Wash- 
ington this Saturday. 



Inter-sority Council were hostesses 
at a tea for the Freshman and new 

uiil" On Saturday 

In Seibert Hall parlor., from four 
Lai Bible Class for college men to Uxi 

The tea table v. ,Iy arranged 

with salmon-colored dahlias and blue 



only was organized at Trinity Luther- 
an Church Sunday morning Approxi- 
trtv-fivt were In at- 

tendance, with more expected next was played duriai 



.Sunday 

Prof Adciburt Hartung I 

: to teach !: I 

a 

S. U. opens football lure Sat- 

urday with Washington Colli 



The pi i arort- 

i received and Misses 

>nc Phillips, Ida Sweltzer and 

i » >■ U er po d The ait air was 

a very delightful one. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly by the Students of Susquehanna University 



Subscription $1.50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31. Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



First Stenographer: "I don't like this 
pie crust." 

Second Ditto: "No, it's as pale as the 
fourth carbon copy." 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

—■' ■ ■ , „ .,..-.. — ■ ... - 

THE STAFF 

Editor-inChief Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

Managing Editor News Editor 

Russell Carmichael '31 Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 
Betty Wardrop '32 John Kindsvatter '32 Lewis Rich "32 

Fred Norton '32 
Bruce Worthington, '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeek '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



tin- face of things, it would appear that the self-help student 
has the advantage over the student who has everything within 
his reach. 

S 

MORAL VICTORIES CHTIO TXTTT^ 

Susquehanna's moral victories have become a joke on rival i ^ Nf £\ |^ j 

campuses, Constantly comes the question, "Will the orange J ^^ 

and Maroon ever win real victories?" Students wish that their sunbury 

team would have successful seasons, and then it is time to won- I ■ «■»■■■■«.■■■■■■-■»■■»»»■ 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1929 



SOMEONE STANDS TO BE CORRECTED 
A number of Susquehanna students and others in and 
about the university have made the very unfair remark that 
the editorials and a number of the features of this publication 
are copied from other periodicals, and that they are not origi- 
nal. 

This statement is very unkind, inasmuch as the members 
of the staff are at all times doing their best to publish a paper 
of which Susquehanna may be proud. Those who have made 
this statement are reminded that all material in this publica- 
tion is original, except where mention is made of the fact that 
we have selected an outstanding article from another publica- 
tion. This is our policy — the policy of every live first-class 
college newspaper. 

Be a booster — not an iconoclast ! 

S 

THE SELF-HELP STUDENT 

The student working his way thru college has always been 
the subject of much discussion among our leading educators. 
Dining the past few weeks we have had our attention drawn 
to the sell-help student by leaders of three different education- 
al institutions. 

Dr. Oinwake. head of Ersinus, in his address to the stu- 
dent ' , 



der if the preceding seasons have been absolute failures. The 
answer may he yes or no according to different ideas of success. 

In the opening football season, it is hoped that the majority 
of victories will be ours, but the fact that the schedule includes 
many larger schools must be considered. If a team fearlessly 
goes to battle against a stronger team, puts forth the best it 
can, and goes down to glorious defeat, isn't that a measure of 
success? Or what does constitute success? 

In the field of business and in life in general, success usual- 
ly means laying up a fortune, tho often we find an individual 
who is pointed out as having lived a successful life but is in 
reduced circumstances. Perhaps the person has been especially 
happy, or brave, or self-sacrificing, or talented. Money does 
not always mean success. 

The same logic might also be applied on the athletic field. 
It is not always the victorious team that should be congratulat- 
ed. Perhaps to gain that victory they had to use methods that 
weren't entirely honest, perhaps they scheduled the game be- 
cause they were certain that they could win, perhaps the losing 
team had suffered severe casualties. There are always many 
reasons that could be given for a lost game, and perhaps the 
successful team is the one who can lose and not give the excuses. 

— B. W. 

<8>- 



SEPT. 30, OCT. 1 and 2 

"The Cock Eyed 
World" 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3 

"The Wonder 
Woman" 



a 



OCT. 4 and 5 

River of Romance" 






OCT. 7 and 8 

"Studio Murder 
Mystery" 



•- 



<*!> 



»^^^^<» | I 



Insights Abroad by 
Dr. F. P. Manhart 



Dean of Susquehanna's School of The- 
ology Addressed Local Rotary 
Club Last Friday 



Interesting highlights of his sum- 



the hand a grasping one, intent only 
upon getting Yankee money. 

Doctor Manhart said the British, tho 
at first they impress you as feeling su- 
perior, are revealed by closer associa- 
tion as being kind at heart. He found 
their personality like their mode of 
habitation — growers of flowers in their 
back yards and lovely people when 
their inner-selves are known. 

His closing thought was that people 



{Fisher's Jewelry Store 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVER 
AND GLASS WARE 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

344 Market St. Sunbury, Pa. 



Home of 

PRINTZESS COATS 

THE BON TON 



345-347 Market St. 



Sunbury I 



r, flo C v,aH of opulent United States should re- 
mers travels in Europe were flashed C__ .,.-.. t, *_ j.i^ , j ^ 



i "DECORATIONS FOR 
PARTY" 



YOUR 



™ 6 V" rZa ;"""," Wo™ nh t member that Europe is debt burdened 

before the *Jto«rove Rotary Club jrt L^ h f may account for much IJTJWHno. QfofinnPrv To 

Friday s meeting by Dr. Frank . P Man- ^ ^ f Uncle Sam Jj< lyimg fctatlOliery L/O. 

hart dean of Susquehanna s School of but nev ™ heless intelligent perS ons { 411 Market Street 

Theology. should ever be on their guard that » 

Doctor Manhart's observations were , wmle patriotic thev are not unfair to « 
made, when that 'grand old man of ; fo i ks of otner C0U nties. 
/ , i Susquehanna'' crossed the pond in 

a1 guj opening^ exercises <>• the < ollegeville mstitii- . Jun ; to carF yto Ut his mission as one 



Sunbury, Pa. 



tioii. rUuWed tilt" Belf'Slipporting BtUUerif. Ambition, effort, and Of the four representatives from the 
, ,, , . . . . , l : i i i» United States to the World Confer- 

moi-jiI purpose were the traits m a student emphasised by Dr. j ence 0{ the Lutheran church, in cop- 
Oinwaki- as lie cited the example the self-help student. 

"The sacrifice and struggles necessary to gel an education," 
he said, "create in considerable degree the frame <>f mind in 
which the student pursues his course. It is serious business, 
JJlutl and sham are foreign i<> his mode of work. A college 
made up largely of students dependent wholly or in part upon 
their own resources has a decided advantage educationally over 
the No-callec] rich men's colleges 

•■The presence «>i considerable numbers of this type of stu- 
dents raises the general standard of thoroughness and enables 
the institution to turn out a larger proportion of genuine scholl 
ars" 

ias something interesting to 
to figures given out by the 
that institution, the popular 
hat college students are youths with their own cars 
and lots of spending money, is false. Reports from that bureau 
ihow i hat lasi year students at the Berkeley, California Univer- 
sity earned a total of more than one million dollars while taking 
their regular college courses. Efforts will be made this year to 
increase that earning power of students to two million dollars. 
Five thousand students at the school arc said to be either total- 
ly or partially self-supporting, which represents To per cent of 
The student body. 

In favor of working one's way thru college, one mijilit say 



r 



The t T ni\ ersity of California 
offer along that line. According 
Alumni Bureau of Employment ol 
conceptioi 



enhagen. Denmark. 

That gathering of representatives of 
the 81,000,000.000 Lutherans in the 
world was held in that city of 700.000 
population in a country where the 
Lutheran faith is the church of the 
State, and where, incidentally, motor 
vehicles are not so popular, for 107.000 
of the city's people travel hither and 
yon on bicycles. 

Tho Denmark was neutral in the 
great war. the financial structure of 
the country suffered in the reconstruc- 
tion and to recoup the losses a tax of 
10 per cent is added to all public eat- 
ing house checks for food. 

Just as Denmark leads the world in 
porcelain manuiacture, so does it rank 
as the country with the best educated 
population in the world. Not only is 
there no illiteracy in Denmark, but 
the rank and file of the people are ex- 
ceptionally well tutored, a gratifying 
condition, due to the influence of the 
schools of Bishop Solderlon. 

One fine phase of the Solderlon sys- 
tem is the conduct of continuation 
schools, which may be attended three 
months of the year by persons between 
the ages of 18 and 25 years. That tut- 
oring is of exceptional value because 
it is available to people after they have 
developed more mature judgment than 
is the case of their juniors in the lower 
grades and high schools. 

Doctor Manhart credited Martin 
Luther's translation of the New Testa 



STANIEY 

I!> st in Moving Pictures 

Selinsgrove 



STUDENTS 



TRY 



I 

S 

<8* 



BEICHLEY'S 



LUNCH — SODAS — CANDY 






, — ^ 

EAT AT 


LEIBY'S 


Sunbury, Pa 



JOHN H. KELLER 

— Dealer In — 

Meats and Groceries j 

Both Phones — Selinsgrove J 



Monogram Stationery 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 

"When The Susquehanna it Printed" 



• 



i POLAR WAVE ICE CKE AM 



■ ^♦♦^^^^ ^m^9^»^^^^mm»^m ^^^^^^♦♦^^♦^ '♦> 



SUNBURY MILK PRODCC?*' COMPANY 

^Yc Solicit Your Patronage . SUNBURY, PA. 



•*> 



that ii affords valuable training for a future occupation. Even ment in 1521 with the standardizing of I 

1 • . 1,1,1 .. .1 1 , _• i 34 German dialects and the establish- i 



ing of the German language as a lit- ] 
erature. Incidentally, Doctor Manhart i 
reaffirmed that his travels thru Ger- I 
many added strength to his previous • 
conviction that Luther did not throw « 
an inkwell at the Devil, as so generally • 
I related. 

Doctor Manhart declared that what 
pleased him most in London was to 
behold a statue of Washington and one 
of Lincoln prominently erected near 
the House of Parliament and West- 
minster Abby. 

Doctor Manhart passed a fortnight 
at Oxford, studying educational meth 



. 34 German dialects and the establish- 

t|]<> tin- position lie holds does not eonlonn to the work no is 
taking at his college In preparation for a career, he neverthe- 
less luis a decided advantage, It' al the end of his college course 
he finds himself unable to find an opening In the profession <>f 
his choice, he has the second one to rely upon as an alternative. 
In addition to this, working geti a student used to earning t 
living, t tains him in the value of money, and keeps him lnisy 

All this may be true for men students, bul Dean Virginia 
Gildersleeve, of Barnard College, says that working one's way 
thru college is aboul the ■ureal way for a girl to assure herself 

wroM breakdown. It is far hotter for the average girl to ( 

v away from college than to work her way thru, the Barnard [twenty-one colleges over 600 years old. 

deiii RAVI As a humorous "delight he recounted 

u ■•<.•• an incident in the ceremony of con- 

"II is practically Impossible," she saya in her annual re* nwrini degrees, just before the grad- 
port to the president of Columbia, "for all except a few unusual ^"d^ SeSSm S^tSS 
women to wort their way thru college without serious injur) 
to their health or their academic standing, or both." The ideal 
manner for the poor or moderately poor oirl to go thru college 
is for her to gel a scholarship, or borrow the money, the Dean 
said. As tremens job pay lesa money than men's, Dean Gilder- 
sleeve thinks women's colleges should offer more scholarships. 

All this reminds us that carrying the idea to excess may 
mean a serious menace to health and afford insufficient time 
for study and valuable outside activities. But, nevertheless, on 



SPEIGELMIRE'S 

Furniture, Carpets, Floor Coverings 

SELINSGROVE 



ONE REAL NEWSPAPER 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 

SUNBURY, PA. 



and that is the moment any shop 
keeper or boarding house proprietor 
with an unpaid bill due them from any 
students to be graduated, is to speak 
up to get their money, or forever hold 
their peace. 

Doctor Manhart's observation of 
Europeans' ieeling toward Americans 
that the Germans are courteous, 
the French covetous and the British 
condescending. While in Germany a 
glad hand was awaiting travelers from 
the United States, in France he found 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 
G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 

A. B. and B. S. Degrees— Strong courses in Liberal Arts, Science, Edu- 
cation and Business Administration. 
Extension Courses at Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township and Mt. Carmel. 
Courses of instruction for teachers on the University campus on 
Friday evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four- Year Public School Music Course with degree in Bachelor of 
Music is attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music. 
Susquehanna stands for a well-rounded education, clean sports, re- 
creation for every student, earnestness in study, and above all, Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For information write 
GEORGE F. DUNKELBERGER, Ph.D., Dean. 



•# 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



******************* 

; ALUMNI NOTES I 

Mary Lastep. '30, Editor 



DR. AHL, 12, SPENDS VACATION JACK HENZES, FORMER DICKIN- I CLASSES ORGANIZE FOR PAR- 

AT LAKE GEORGE AND BOSTON SON STAR AID TO CLLERY TICIPATION IN FALL SPORTS 



Alumnus Writes on "Visit to Susque 
hanna" 

The following was takrtn from a j 
small circular published every week by j 
Dr. George Niceley, a graduate of Sus- 1 
quehanna, and pastor of St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church, Williamsport. Dr. j 
Niceley delivered the main address at j 
the Opening Exercises. 

"Last Thursday, Dr. Niceley, on in- { 
vitation of President Smith, delivered j 
the address at the formal opening ex- 1 
ercises of Susquehanna University. It 
was good to be at Susquehanna. It is 
well located for undergraduate work; 
far enough away from the great in- 
dustrial centers that a youth may con- 
centrate without interruption; in suf- 
ficiently close proximity to God's great 
open spaces to see the sunlight, look 
up at the stars, behold the mountain 
tops and cry with the psalmist, T will 
lift up mine eyes unto the hills;* in a 
valley of promise and plenty; is also 
located on the banks of a beautiful 
body of water — our Susquehanna — that 
none of her student family may for- 
get the river of the water of life which 
proceeds from the throne of God. 
Susquehanna has a good faculty, 
finely improved physical equipment, 
and a president who knows the ways 
of men and the heart of God. Her stu- 
dent body is an unusually earnest 
group of typically American youth. 
Susquehanna is achieving greatness 
thru vision, steadfastness, and quali- 
ty of soul." 

Whereabouts of Susquehanna Grads 
1894-'97 

Rev. Wm. A. Rearick is a very prom- 
inent minister at Mifflinburg, Pa. Rev. 
Rearick has been in the ministry for 
a number of years and is to be heart- 
ily congratulated for his excellent 
work in that field. 

1900 

Rev. Arthur E. Cooper is pastor of 
the Millersville and Landisville charge, 
residing at Landisville, Pa. Rev. Cooper 
is also secretary and manager of the 
Teachers Protective Union and Clergy- 
mans's Cooperative Beneficial Assoc- 
iation. 

•14 

Rev. Harry W. Miller is pastor of St. 
Luke's Lutheran Church at Williams- 
port, Pa. 

•15 

Ralph Witmer is Treasurer and 
Trust Officer for the Snyder County 
Trust Company at Selinsgrove. 
'25 

Hon. David F. Davis, a resident of 
Taylor, Penna., is teacher of History 
in the Technical High School, Scran- 
ton. Pa. He is also in the law office of 
Attorney David W. Phillips, of Scran- 
ton. Pa. Mr. Davis is also a member 
of the Board of Education at Taylor, 
Pa. 

'26 

Hon. Oliver J. Decker (degree of 
LL.D. in '26 1 is a prominent Lawyer 
at Williamsport, Pa. 

Rev. Louis C. Rode graduated from 
Gettysburg Seminary in May '29. Mr. 
Rode is residing at Camden, N. J. We 
wish him success in this noble field of 
work. 

'28 

William Dykens is a teacher of 
Mathematics in the Nanticoke Junior 
High School, Nanticoke, Pa. 

Florence Trometter is teaching in 
the Gordon High School at Gordon, 
Pa. 

Prof. Richard G. Hoffman, now at 
Gettysburg Seminary, visited the 
campus over the week-end. He was 
one of the originators of the Pre- 
Theological Club. 

Theodore Kemmerer has become As- 
sistant Principal of Fayette Township 
Schools at McAlisterville, Pa, 
*29 

Clarence Updegrove is a teacher of 
Science at Millerstown, Pa. 
Weddings 

Walter Haupt and Miss Ruth Lang 
were married at the home of the bride 
in Williamsburg, on Aug. 22, 1929. Mrs. 
Haupt is a graduate of the summer 
class of '29. Mr. Haupt, '28, is a teacher 
in the High School at Espy. They are 
now residing at Bloomsburg. Susque- 
hanna friends extend congratulation 
and best wishes. 

On August 15. 1929, Jacob L. Drake, 
'27, was married to Esther L. Stuff, of 
Mercersburg. She is a graduate of 
Cumberland Valley State Teachers 
College, '23. Since graduation she 
taught in the Lemaster's High School 
at Lemaster's, Pa., and at New Mar- 
ket, New Jersey. Mr. Brake is Prin- 
cipal of Fannet Township High School. 
Susquehanna extends congratulations 
and best wishes. 

Births 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. George Schoch, 
September 20, 1929, a daughter, Mil- 
dred Matilda Schoch. We extend con- 
gratula'ions to the happy parents. 
S 

Washington College here Saturday. 



E.. Augustus W. Ahl. class of 1912. 
after working hard during the last 
college year and the summer session 
as professor of Greek Literature and 
Eng Ish Bible, at Susquehanna, at- 
tended a confeier.ee of leading edu- 
cators and pastors at Columbiona on 
Lake George, N. Y. Then he visited 
Boston and many of the numerous 
places of interest in the city and vi- 
cinity, such as Bunker Hill, Plymouth, 
several Museums, Churches, the Com- 
mons, Harvard University, and other 
places of note. The vacation ended 
with a delightful cruise on the ocean 
from Boston to Baltimore. 

S 

UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA 

HOLDS REHEARSAL 



University Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of Prof. Hemphill, met and 
organized on Friday evening of last 
week. These officers were elected: 
Kathryn Morning, president; Margaret 
Markle, vice-president; Janet Dively, 
secretary; Walter Strandquest, treas- 
urer; Andrew Kozak, Business Mana- 
ger. 

A large number of new students re- 
ported for the first rehearsel. With 
this great interest being manifested, 
another very successful season is as- 
sured. 

Prof. Hemphill has selected a very 
fine repertoire for the coming year, 
which will be presented in its annual 
concert here next winter. 



Election of Jack Henzes. former East 
; Strcudsburg State Teachers College 
and Dickinson College star, as assist- 
ant coach is a great aid to Coach Ul- 
lery in the course of trying cut a win- 
ning football team. 

At East Stroudsburg, Henzes played 
j two years of varsity football, basket- 
ball and baseball. He was captain of 
the team winning the Eastern Penn- 
sylvania State Teacher* College Cham- 
pionship. 

During the 1928 season he played 
1 halfback on the Dickinson College 
football team, and during the 1927-28 
i and 1928-29 seasons successfully- 
coached the Dickinson Freshmen 
; basketball teams. 

In addition to his college playing 
and coaching experience, Henzes has 
\ played summer baseball for the past 
i seven years. He was at various times 
; identified with the Rochester Inter - 
; nationals, San Antonio, Texas, and 
JEvansville, Indiana, in the Three Eye 
League . 

He plans to complete his college 

I work at Susquehanna in order that he 

will secure his Bachelor's Degree in 

addition to his Degree of Law from 

Dickinson. 



Prof. Grossman, Director of Ath- 
letics, has arranged interesting sched- 
ules of the fall sports for men in in- 
ter class competition. In order that 
the different groups may function 
properly, they have elected man. 
to take care cf the affairs of each 
team. 

The Freshmen have organized and 
elected the following managers: Soc- 
cer, Charles Geistweit; Tennis, Jack 
Petry; Cross Country, Robert Burns; 
Football, James Ahl. 

The Sophomores have elected the 
following managers: Soccer. Olson; 
Tennis, Mahaffey; Cross Country. 
Fairchild; Football, Rano. 

The other two classes have not com- 
pleted their organization yet. 



LEAOTTA'S 

BEAUTY 
SHOP 

202 S. Market St. 

Second Eoor Eelow 
First Lutheran Church 



LPHQNE 58»ZJ 



'< 



DR. SMITH AT SIPESVILLE 

Dr. G. Morris Smith delivered an 
address at Sipesville, near Johnstown. 
Sunday morning. 

In the afternoon, he delivered an- 
other address in the Lutheran Church 
at Davidsville, of which Rev. Gortner, 
an alumnus of Susquehanna, is the 
pastor. Several members of his con- 
gregation are now students at Sus- 
quehanna. 



STATISTICS OF THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE FOOTBALL TEAM 



Position Name 



High School 



Height Age Weight 



MARY EASTEP, '30, 

CONDUCTS VESPERS 

Vesper Services Sunday evening were 
conducted by Miss Mary Eastep, '30. 
The lesson topic was "Jesus Teaching 
Us to Pray." Several other students 
offered discussions on this subject. The 
services were largely attended, with 
over a hundred participating. 



L. 
L. 
L. 

R. 
R. 
R. 
Q. 

R 

L. 



E. 
T. 
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C. 
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B. 



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Hope 
Sherkey 

Bringhurst 
Phillips 
Plummer 
Alexander 



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H. B. Dopson 



| L. H. B. Dopson 



Chester, Pa. 6 

Chester, Pa. 6 

Towson, Md„ 5'8" 

Snow Hill, Md. 6'1" 

West Town, Pa. (Prep) 6T" 
Sharptown, Pa. 6T" 

Chester, Pa. 5'10" 

Crosby Hi (Waterbury Conn.) 

5'9" 
Chester, Pa. 5'10" 

Woodbury, N. J. 5'7" 



22 
18 
20 
23 
20 
20 
19 



170 
175 
175 
165 
176 
170 
170 



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22 


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19 


160 



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C7/) ]HILE Yale and Princeton were battling to a 
\xJ tie at Hoboken, New Jersey, a small group 
of scientists, directed by Thomas A. Edison, was busy 
at Menlo Park, only a few miles away. On October 
21, their work resulted in the first practical 
incandescent lamp. 

Few realized what fifty years would mean to both 
electric lighting and football. The handful who 
watched Yale and Princeton then has grown to tens 
of thousands to-day. And the lamp that glowed for 
forty hours in Edison's little laboratory made 
possible to-day's billions of candle power of elec- 
tric light. In honor of the pioneer achievement, and 
of lighting progress, the nation this year observes 
Light's Golden Jubilee. 

Much of this progress in lighting has been the achieve- 
ment of college-trained men employed by General 
Electric. 



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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1929 



*»♦*******•*»**»>* * ** 



* * * * 



Cornell University has applied for a 



TALES YOU WIN 

Bv F. E. R. 



! Intercollegiate Sports 1 

By Intercollegiate Press 



• * * * 



******* 



******* 



****** 



*********** 



Tie-l'p Days in Reminiscence 

Abolition of hazing at Susquehanna., 
as well as at other Institutions o; 
higher learning, has been a gradual 
process. Perhaps the most important 
step in this line was the removal from | 
the traditions of the Orange and Ma- 
roon of the pernicious custom of the 
tie-up several years ago. 

In this class scrap, which depended 
upon brute strength and endurance 
alone, and which added not a bit of j 
usefulness to either class, the two 
lower classes lined up on the athletic J 
field, one at either end. Only football 
men and the physically unfit were ex- 
ceed. Each man was provided with 
two pieces of string which, according 
to the Constitution of the Student 
Council, were to be of definite length, 
but which never seemed quite long 
enough when it came to doing the 
actual tieing. At a given signal, the 
two classes rushed upon each other, 
and in the worst ten minutes of their 
lives, tried to tie up the opponents. 
The team having tied up the most 
opponents at the end of that period 
was declared the victor. 

Large crowds of spectators attended 
these frays. The school children down- 
town were dismissed from their classes. 
It was considered a holiday event by 
the youngsters and was eagerly looked 
forward to. 

The present Senior class, incident- 
ally, was the last to participate in this 
class scrap. They have many interest- 
ing anecdotes to tell about it. 

In searching thru the archives in the 
Library, no account of this last en- 
counter could be found. However, this 
very interesting story was found in 
the October 5, 1915 issue of THE SUS- 
QUEHANNA. We print it herewith, 
just as it was printed in those col- 
umns: 

FROSH-SOPH TIE-UP 
"Last Thursday iSept. 30, 1915), one 
of the big events in the annals of all j 
Freshman and Sophomore history took , 
place. The tie-up took place about 
2:30 o'clock, all classes having been 
dismissed. The class of 1919 after a 
hard scrap succeeded in tying up the 
class of 1918 At the appointed time 
the members of the respective classes 
lined up on opposite sides of a space 
roped off on Warner Field Each man 
was equipped with two short pieces 
of rope and at the crack of the pistol, 
they leaped at each other like hungry- 
lions let loose in the arena. The Soph- 
omores were confronted by over- 
Whelming odds, being outnumbered al- 
most two to one, and had decided on 
a plan of defense entirely. They threw 
away their ropes and began a cam- 
paign of dodging their opponents. The 
great numbers of the Freshmen soon i 
began to tell on the Sophs, who werel 
all pinned to the earth with a couple i 
of husky Freshies sitting astride of i 
their chests. After a terrific struggle 
of five minutes. Frank Traupe was 
subdued and carried, securely tied. 
over the boundary line. After the 
downfall of this mighty leader the 
Sophs lost heart and one by one were 
earned over the goal. The last five 
minutes of the scrap were concentrat- 
ed (m two 18 men, Riden and Horton. 
Riden being small and wiry seemed 
to elude the ropes almost by slight of 
hand, while Horton 's manner of 
fighting was more elephantine, for it 
took almost the entire Freshmar. 
class to subdue him and tie him up. 
Even then the pistol cracked before 
he was carried over the line. 

"Many individual scrap.-, were en- 
Joyed by the ipi the most in- 
teresting one being when H> 
up b I iftti tii" re 
fight w» over The era;) was attend- 
ed by almost five hundred spec 
Critii .' was one of the best 
Witnessed In many years. 

■•The Judge! and e i ere Bar- 

man, Oro and Brown. '16. Hunt- 

ington and Mohney, '17 These men 
are to b< I >n the orderly 

manner in whicl ■ crap was con- 
ducted per Swope 
be i ■•' ive m inner in 

u 

M 

feet Ft 

s 

»•*****»*• 



Some Recent Books 
of Interest 

By Intercollegiate Press 



Prague. Czechoslovakia — < I. P. > — If 
American college students are the ob- 
jects of criticism because they place 
too much apparent importance on foot- 
ball games, they may point their crit- 
ics to Central Europe, where the win- 
ning of international football contests erar >- Guild selection, it is an entirely 
has become second in the importance new wa - v of "reporting" the Civil War. 



sity. The process is said to yield a 
milk sugar not formerly used on the 



to the honor of the various countries 
only to that of winning military scraps. 



Elaborate ceremonies are being plan- 
ned for the opening on Oct. 15 of the , 

uir;ni„~, u- twli u „» j- ,,,u .patent for a new and inexpensive pro- 

wilham H. Welch Medical Library and | 

the Wilmer Opthalomological Institute ' cess of makm g milk su 8 ar - a process 
of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and ■ discovered by Dr. Paul Sharp, profes- 
University. Medical men from nearly ; sor of dairy chemistry at the Univer- 

*******.»*„*,****„* every country in the world have been : 

invited to attend. Approximately 80- 

' The Wave," bv Evelyn Scott. Jona- 00 ° books are housed in the new lib- ; 

than Cape and Harrison Smith. $2.50. ™V- . market whl u c , h ma ^ be substituted for 

Probably the most unusual book of the /°™er Attorney General Edward L. ordinary table sugar. 

year, and the most talked of. A Lit- Katzent >ach, of New Jersey, has joined Heidelberg College students drove 

the Princeton University faculty, out of town three men suspected of be- 
where he will teach in the department ing scouts for Ohio State University, 
of politics. seeking to induce Merle Hutson, an 

Dr. Morton Prince, one of the coun- all-Ohio tackle, to come to State. The 
try's most prominent neurologists, three suspects were escorted from 
died recently at his home in Boston. town in a truck. 



"Red Likker," by Irvin S. Cobb. Cos- 
According "to" the "outlook " of the mopolitan Book Corporation. $2.50. 
Czechoslovakia!! press, if this nation The stor >- of three generations of Ken- 
loses its football game with Hungary. tuck - v residents and the tradition of 
the future of the nation is lost. the community in which they lived. As | 

Similar interest in an international good as anything this humorist ever 

football game was experienced last 

year when Austria beat Italy in a game 

at Vienna, and the Italian press was 

so outraged at the loss, that it almost 



has done. 



"The Dark Journey," by Julian 
Green. Harper & Brothers, $2. This 
seriousl7asked for a military invasion Har P er p ™e Novel, selected by Carl 



S A Y I T W I T II FLO W E RS 

FRESH CUT FLOWERS and POTTED PLANTS for WEDDINGS, 

PARTIES and FUNERALS— FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS 

Visitors Always Welcome at Our Green House* 



of the opponent's territory. 



GEO. 



INE 



FLORIST 



BELL 32-Y 



Van Doren, Ellen Glasgow and Grant 

One ""Prague " newspaper recently Overton, is by the author of "Avarice *- 

shouted to the players, calling them House " and '"The closed Garden." 

individually bv name: Overton says, "Julian Green has taken 

"You footballers must realize the a universal subject that can come 

great and honorable responsibility nome to any reader, in any country, in 

which is yours of carrying our colors anv a § e ' 
in the greatest football match in our 



SELINSGROVE 



.... 



history. Do not disappoint the hopes 
of hundreds of thousands of Czecho- 
slovaks who with tears of pride await 
your victory." 



"Omnibus of Crime." edited by Dor- 
othy L. Sayers. Payson & Clark, $3.00. 
Not only because it was the selection 
of the Book of the Month Club for 
August, but also because everyone 
should have on his shelf detective 
Washington. D. C— (LP.)— The foot- stories for instant relief from a hum- 
ball year 1929 is to be featured by the drurn worldi tnis ^^ ^ well worth 
newest formation, worked out this owning. In it are sixty-two detective 
summer by Coach Lou Little, of < stories termed by Christopher Morley 
Georgetown. : "The greatest anthology of detective 

"The Scrambled Egg" formation, he stories ever compiled." Be that as it 
calls it, and he firmly believes that it may, it's a good book. 

will eclipse them all, including Georgia 

Tech's Heisman shift, Penn's hidden "Long Ago Told," by Harold Bell 
ball trick, and New York University's i Wright. Appleton, $2.50. Legends of 
Prussian March. the Papago Indians, which the novel- 

The play, which it is said, will be ist has gathered during his long resi- 
used only on the offense, resembles dence in Arizona. 

somewhat a moving picture reverse re- 

construction of a dynamited rtck. "Caps and Crowns of Europe," by 

Two groups are formed, the players Thomas Guerin. Louis Carrier & Co., 
crouching, facing each other in straight ! $3.50. In which a French-Canadian, 
lines. Upon the calling of the proper j who lets us know that he has met as 
signal each man starts wandering, ap- ' many statesmen of Ifurope as anyone 
parently aimlessly, about the field. Al- not a diplomat, amuses us with what 
though 'his appears to opposing play- he has seen. 

ers and spectators to be highly foolish, ' 

every player knows just what he is , "Marriage and^ Celibacy," by Juanita 
doing and the reason why. The object j Tanner. Bobbs-Merrill, $3.50. An ur- 
bane and humorous treatment of the 



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STUDENT CO-OPERATIVE STORE 

Tennis Rackets Restrung 

(Alumni Gymnasium* 

TENNIS RACKETS, BASE BALL GLOVES, GOLF SUPPLIES, Etc. 
All Kinds of Athletic Supplies at a Real Saving 



is to become so hopelessly mixed up, 
that the opposing players find it im- 
possible to figure out who is where and 
who is who. 

Of a sudden the mess takes form, [ "John Knox: Portrait of a Calvin- 
every man jumps to the position he ist." by Edwin Muir. The Viking 



4" 



serious business of sex. alive with wis- f 
dom and chuckles. Worth reading. 



Press, $3.50. In which we find the 
founder of the Scotch religion was a 
"walking inferiority complex." 



occupied before the ball was snapped 
Then the play as called by the quar- 
terback in the huddle, is executed. 

Little believes no one ever will be 
able to decipher the play because it I "The Byzantine Achievement," by 
can be worked in so many hundred Robert Byron. Alfred A. Knopf. $5.00. 
different ways. No matter how often Of special interest to art students is 
the opposing team shifts its formation, this defense of the arts and customs 
it never can be sure it has done it cor- of the Eastern Empire. Also of inter- 
rectly, Little says. est to others. 

g S 

FLEDGLINGS SURPRISE A soccer game played recently be- 

SOPHS IN GETAWAY tween Worcester. Mass.. and Worcester, 

England, for the purpose of developing 

i Continued from Page 1.) 
ening figures hovered in the offing. 

Meanwhile, the second-year men 
had discovered the whereabouts of the 
object of their pursuit, and awaited 
them at the entrance to the campus. 
When the fledglings reached this 



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friendship between the two communi- 
ties, ended in a tie match of six goals 
each. Both teams were made up of ( 
amateurs. 



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HEN IN WILLAMSPORT VISIT THE NEW STORE AND FACTORY OF 



The Smitli Printing Company 



Increasingly So 

'Why haven't you creased vour 
point and met the enemy face to face trousers?" said the sergeant-major. 
for the first time since their secret »| put tnem under my ma ttress, 
escapade, a fistic encounter ensued. same as the others." said the recruit, 

Very little blood was drawn in the "but I'm such a light sleeper." 
scrap. Disc »vering their leader. Yon, ~~ • 

and several of his aides-de-camp had 
been captured by the enemy and rush- 
ed far behind their lines, beyond the 
field of combat, the saplings lost 
heart and desisted in their fistic as 
well as verbal tirade. 

Thus ended one of the most spec- 
! hi ilar getaways ever to take place at 
V '.r. incidentally, was 
tble to report tor football practice the 
following day. His aides occupied their 
regular cht its Wednesday morn- 

ing 

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OFFICE OUTFITTERS ! 
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SELINSGBOVE, I'A. 



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Organized 1870 
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DRAWING SUPPLIES 

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The Stationer 



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Susquehanna 
Is on the March 



The Su 




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!A 



Congratulations 
Fcotball Team 



Volume XXXVI 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1929 



Number 8 



Susquehanna Tops 
Washington College 
In Opener, 20 to 



Speer Intercepts Pass and Runs 

Twenty Yards for Touchdown 

Featuring Game 



MANY SUBSTITUTIONS MADE 

BY COACH IN SECOND HALF 



Danks and Wall Tear Off Long Runs; 

"Lefty" Scores Two Touchdowns; 

Wall Boots Two Extra Points 



Susquehanna pried the lid off the 
1929 football season by tramping on 
Washington College 20-0. on Saturday 
afternoon, on University Field. 

It seemed that Coach Ullery had a 
perfect machine in the first half, this 
machine not yielding a yard by scrim- 
mage to their opponents in the first 
quarter, and not giving them a first 
down until in the second quarter. 
Many substitutions were made in the 
second half. 

Johnny Wall and "Lefty" Danks tore 
off long runs, which enabled Danks to 
score two touchdowns. The first touch- 
down came in the first quarter when 
Danks on an off-tackle play, twisted 
his way 30 yards down the field for a 
touchdown, and Johnny's trusty toe 
booted the extra point. In the latter 
part of the quarter, Wormley's neat 
running placed the ball on Washing- 
ton's five-yard line and Danks took it 
over for the second touchdown. 

The spectacular feature of the battle 
came late in the third quarter, when 
Speer intercepted a pass and rushed 
20 yards for a touchdown, 

Moser was substituted at different 
times of the battle and displayed some 
real line bucking, averagmg nearly 
eight yards every time he rushed the 
ball. Scott, substituted in the fourth 
quarter, tore off some real fast end 
runs, which seems to be Scottie's spe- 
cialty, gaining at least fifty yards. On 
the line, Captain Garman proved to be 
the bulwark of strength. Joe Wmters 
and Zak also showed much strength 
on the line, and Wolfe played well at 
end. 

For the visitors Alexander seemed 
to be the main cog in their backfield, 
and Plummer and Bringhurst played 
well on the line. 

The game, play by play: 

Adams received the Washington 
kick-off and carried the ball back to 
the Susquehanna 37-yard line. Worm- 
ley slid off tackle for 8 yards. Wall 
went through for a first down. Line 
plays by Wormley and Danks gamed 
another first down. Wormley circled 
right end for 25 yards, bringing the 
ball to the Washington 10-yard line. 
Susquehanna was held at the one-yard 
line for downs. Dopson immediately 
punted to his own 30-yard line. Danks 
on a beautifully executed off-tackle 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Quintet of Linemen Who Played in Saturdays Game 




Dr. Smith Speaks 
In Chapel On Our 
Collegiate Rating 



MlULBR 



J Jayvees Defeated 
by Mansfield 51-6 



Second String Men Handicapped Be- 
cause of Lack of Organization. 
Speigelmyer Elected Captain 



While the Varsity was having a hap- 
py time with Washington, the Junior 
Varsity was downed by the Mansfield 
State Teachers' College, at Mansfield, 
by a score of 51-6. 

The Mansfield outfit seemed to have 
a real team. The Jeyvees were handi- 
capped because of a poor organization. 
Coach Ullery chose his squad that 
should go to Mansfield at the last 
minute, so that the team had not 
played together before the game. 

Even if the Junior Varsity was de- 
feated, the game brought to light some 
players that have some real football 
ability. Speigelmyer, playing an end 
position, was elected captain of the 
team, and played a very good game. 
Witkop, a tackle, displayed excellent 
playing ability and broke through tthe 
offense to nail many tackles behind 
the line of scrimmage. Rhoari.s also 
played well at guard. 

In the backfield, Wagner, formerly 
coachrd by Patsy Gimmie, '28. a for- 
mat football itar and captain Of 'Sus- 
quehanna':; football team in 1927, came 
through with many line plumes and 
long- twisting runs, scoring the only 
touchdown. Edwards also displayed 
much tain t in running a ball. 



Parents Guests of 
University Saturday 



Special Dinner to be Served in Horton 
Hall; Addresses Will Feature Pro- 
gram; 60 Acknowledge Invitations 



Elaborate preparations are being 
made for Parents' Day on Saturday of 
this week, the first in the history of 
the University. Students are manifest- 
ing much interest in the event which 
promises to be a gala one. 

Approximately sixty of the invita- 
tions issued by President Smith to the 
parents of Susquehanna undergrad- 
uates have been accepted, with many 
more acknowledgments expected with- 
in the next few days. Parents seem 
very appreciative of this affair arrang- 
ed in their honor. 

A number of Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. 
C. A. members will be deputized to 
extend the courtesies of the institu- 
tion to the visiting parents. 

The main ceremony will be held in 
connection with the dinner to be serv- 
ed them in Horton Hall at 12:15 
o'clock. A representative of the par- 
ents will give a talk to the gathering. 
A response will be made by a member 
of the faculty. 

The visitors will attend the football 
game, which will be played by Haver- 
ford and Susquehanna on the athletic 
field, starting at 2 o'clock. 

S 

TRY-OUTS FOR S. U. GLEE 

CLUB HELD LAST WEEK 

Try-outs for the Susquehanna Men's 
Glee Club were held last Monday 
night in the Conservatory of Music 
under the supervision of Professors 
Sheldon and A!lr < n 

All of the old members who have 
returned to the campui this year have 
made appll tioi '. C the berths they 
had ! along with some twenty 

or ti' ■ men, coming from all 

it i id thai ■ 

will cany thirty men on the club this 
year, B more men available 

than : been In the past three 

The business manager, Lawn 

■ r, Ls planning many large trips 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Five of the Orange and Maroon 
linemen who saw action in Saturday's 
tilt are pictured above 

Rip Garman was seen in action at 
the guard position in the game on 
Saturday against Washington. He 
proved beyond any shadow of a doubt 
that he is a capable warrior of the 
gridiron. 

Zak, a 185-pound tackle, has been 
fighting for a position on the team for 
three years. He showed great improve- 
ment in the game Saturday and has 
promises of developing into a strong 
lineman. 

Capt. Al Garman started at the pivot 



Haverf ord Gridders 
Meet Crusaders Sat. 



President of University Outlines Sur- 
vey Made by Lutheran Church; 
Makes Appeal to Students 



Quaker City Institution Has Fast and 

Heavy Aggregation; Played 0-0 

Tie With Ursinus Last Week 



Coach Ullery's Crusaders, after 
trouncing the Washington eleven last 
Saturday, have begun an intensive 
campaign in preparation for the sec- 
ond fray on University Field Saturday 



post and proved he is capable of hand- afternoon, this tune with Haverford 
ling it. He again showed his ability in! College. Efforts will be made to iron 
making his passes sure and also in ! out the defects revealed in last week's 
backing the line and knocking down 
the opponent's passes. 

Miller has shown that he has the 
"stuff" in him required of a good 
tackle. He has unproved greatly from 
last year and we can feel certain that 
he is going to fight hard for a tackle 
position. 

Berger has been changed from the 
center position to that of a guard. 
This change has not affected his fight- 
in,' spirit, nor his determination to 
win. 



STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 

OF SATURDAYS GAME 



Ground gained from scrimmage — 
Susquehanna 331 yards, Washing- 
ton 50 yards, 

First downs — Susquehanna 23, 
Washington 4. 

Forward passes attempted — Sus- 
quehanna 12, Washington 14. 

Forwards completed — Susque- 
hanna 7, Washington 4. 

Opponents forwards uitercepted — 
Susquehanna 1, Washington 1. 

Ground gained by forwards — Sus- 
quehanna 47 yards, Washington 16 
yards. 

Susquehanna n. Wash- 
Ini ton io. 

laities Susquehanna 19 Waah- 

n 4. 

| by penalties— Sus- 
quehanna i~' r > yards, Washington 40 

Fumbles Susquehanna S, Wash- 
ln ton 2. 
Own tumble 

n 1. 

Opponents fumble', 
iphanna 1, Wash 



Wi 



"red- 



on 3 



tilt. 

Haverford will bring on the field this 
year practically a rebuilt team with 
the exception of the guard and tackle 
berths. This does not mean that they 
will have a weak team by any means, 
for the Philadelphia institution is look- 
ing forward to one of the best foot- 
ball teams in the history of the insti- 
tution, and it is the Crusaders that 
are going to try to put a dent in their 
expectations Saturday. 

Captain Morris, a veteran 215 pound 
tackle, is being shifted to the fullback 
position. Bill Cadbury is calling sig- 
nals for the Haverford team, Hoen- 
auer, who tips 180, will play one of 
the halfback positions, and probably 
Rice will be at the other position. 
Simmons, a six-footer, weighing 160 
• Concluded on Page 4) 

S 

BAND MAKES INITIAL APPEAR- 
ANCE AT FOOTBALL GAME 



President Smith addressed the stu- 
dents in chapel, Friday morning, con- 
cerning the recent survey of Lutheran 
ci lieges winch was made by experts 
in education from Columbia Univer- 
sity 

The survey was authorized by the 
United Lutheran Church In America 
and was produced by Professors R. J. 
Leonard. E S Evenden. F. B O'Rear, 
all of Columbia. These men visited all 
the Lutheran Colleges, sent out ques- 
tionaires to students, faculties, and 
the administrations, and on the basis 
of these reports plus their own per- 
sonal visits to the colleges, wrote the 
three volumes of the survey. This sur- 
vey is looked upon as a great forward- 
looking move for the church. 

Now the college presidents will ap- 
point committees from the trustees to 
study the surveys, and to make recom- 
mendations for the improvement of 
the several colleges. 

President Smith's talk was based on 
the question, "How are we rating?" He 
approached the question from various 
angles. First, How are we rating day by 
day in scholastic ideals and thorough- 
ness. In this connection, the students 
were commended to a consistent, day 
by day mastery of their lessons, and 
to a bountiful use of the library. 

Are we developing in our leisure 
moments a taste for good reading? "A 
man makes or breaks himself by the 
way he uses his leisure time. Some of 
this leisure time," said Dr. Smith, 
"should rightfully be given to outdoor 
exercises. Keep the body fit." 

Secondly, how are we rating in moral 
and spiritual meals? "This is a Chris- 
tian college. We believe that no edu- 
cation is worthy which is not shot 
thru and tempered with the Spirit and 
Idealism of Christ. That spirit means 
high moral earnestness, consistent 
study, no cheating, much cooperation, 
reverence and apsiration." said Dr. 
Smith. 

Thirdly, how are we rating in our 
housekeeping or dormitory life? Here 
Dr. Smith read from the report of the 
survey specialists showing that often- 
times college dormitories are poorly 
cleaned, and student rooms are quite 
disorderly He appealed to the students 
to learn habits of cleanliness and tidi- 
ness in the keeping of their rooms. 
Dirty rooms, paper thrown out of the 
windows or littered about the rooms, 
unkempt beds, and unswept floors 
militate against the highest self re- 
spect and lower our morale. 

Students, our record is being made 
daily. Let's cooperate to make it of the 
highest. 



Allison '27 Writes 
Song for Rooters 



Band Director Composes Snappy Song 

to be Used at Athletic Games; 

Pep Meeting Friday Night 



Susquehanna University's Band, un- 
der the direction of Professor Elrose 
Allison, made its initial appearance 
Of the collegiate year at the opening 
football game, Saturday afternoon. 
From present indication, not much 
rial has been lost thru graduation 
and excellent new material Dai been 
drafted from the Fn simian Olai 
that the band Is expecting to haw ■ 
' ill year. 

Activil lei were started with ■ pai 

Of the band thru Selim-.grove. The per- 
sonnel of the hand was dretsed m 
i m iweaten and 

Several of the men had 
by tin 
University. 
The band, after leaving the Conser- 

ncluded on Page 4) 



Rooters of Susquehanna have an- 
other song to use at athletic games, 
thanks to the work of Professor El- 
I rose Allison, '27. member of the Con- 
servatory faculty. Both words and 
, music for this song were written by 
i this talented young member of the 
! School of Music staff, who is also di- 
rector of the University Band. 

The new song was first presented 
] at the Pep Meeting, Friday night. Sev- 
| eral more practice periods will be re- 
; quired before the student body will be 
1 sufficiently able to sing the song at a 
game. 

The tune is a very lively one and a 
catchy one and will do much toward 
spiriting the players on to greater 
honors. The words are vrey suitable 

for cheering at any athletic contest or 
any Otih of Busqm hanna 

sturit nts. 

Cheer leaden Host tter, '30, Kira- 

D te, '30. Norton, "82, and IV! rv, "33, 
ded at the Pep Meeting. Dr. 

Smith h Ullery, Captain car- 
man, 

gave short talks on the tl of 

the game Rousing cheers were 

each man after he had delivered his 

eh 

(Concluded on Page 4) 



PAGE TVVO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly by the Students of Susquehanna University 

Subscription $1.50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger. '31. Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa„ as Second Class Matter. 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 

Editor-inC hief Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

Managing Editor News Editor 

Russell Carmichael '31 Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 
Betty Wardrop '32 John Kindsvatter '32 Lewis Rich '32 

Fred Norton '32 
Bruce Worthington, '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wiibur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1929 

"SUSQUEHANNA IS -ON THE MARCH' " 
Stoney McLinn, eminent iporti writer of the Philadelphia 
Public Ledger has recently made the following statement in one 

of his "stories" — "Sneh a thing as a "Moral Victory' does not 
exist. An individual succeeds or fails in his undertaking! in 
life. A team wins or is defeated in a contest. However, many 
a team has been defeated but in defeat won and deserved much 
glory.*' 

To say that Susquehanna's "moral victories"' are a joke 
Among our rivals is a statement that could be made only by a 
person who has failed to follow and be familiar with Susquehan- 
na's recent athletic achievements (not to mention the record of 
the debating team). 

WOULD ANY LOYAL SUPPORTER say that when the 
Orange and Maroon waved triumphant over the field, after hav- 
ing stieeesfully turned back the onslaughts of our grid rivals 
from Upsala, Juniata, Pennsylvania Military College and (Jal- 
laudet on four successive Saturdays, Susquehanna's football 
team and students were OBLIGED TO BE CONTENT WITH 
"MORAL VICTORIESf 

Did the University of Delaware consider it a "moral vic- 
tory" for Susquehanna when the Orange and Maroon five de- 
feated Delaware on their own floor last year? Susquehanna's 
iriiYU'essive victory over Pennsylvania Military College, the fol- 
lowing night mighl also be called a "moral victory" but not by 
that loyal group of Buaquehanna Alumni who "played" the 
game from the sideline every minute of the torrid battle 

To register a defeat over our rivals from Juniata on the 
indoor court for the first time in a period of years should be 
marked down as another "moral victory" by our would be sports 
enthusiast. 

Susquehanna was defeated on the basketball court last sea- 
son, i Name the team thai was not turned back). However. 
the games were the most thrilling, best played and closely con- 
tested tilts witnessed in Alumni Gymnasium lor many a year. 

/;///< i Htm ball! 

SEVEN WINS TO THREE DEFEATS. Study Susque- 
hanna's diamond records. Acquaint yourself with her history 
and match the record of Susquehanna's tune as hung up last 
Spring. AND THE CRUSADER NINE PLAYED \<> "SET 
UP" GAMES. SUSQUEHANNA NEVER DOES. Where is 
the ''Big College or University" that can boast of no "set up" 
games? It Susquehanna played three or four "set up" games i 
in each of her sports "what a whale of a difference it would 
make." She could enter each season of sport checking off at 
least three or four sure "wins." whereas every contest on Bus- 
quehanna's various sports schedule is a real test -A MAJOR 
ENGAGEMENT. 

We agree with our good friend Stoney McLinn. There are 
no "Moral Victories." Susquehanna will ever put forth her 
best to win. When defeat crosses her pathway we want to 
lneet it manfully, giving to the victor the honor and the glory 
•hat is rightfully his. BUT HE M 1ST WIN BEFORE HE 
BECOMES THE VICTOR. 

The pasi college year (1928*29) was a great year for the 

Crusaders. Wholehearted cooperation; willingness tO Sacri- 
fice; unwavering Loyalty on the part of members of the teams 
and the students will make 1929-30 Susquehanna's greatest year. 

REMEMBER! "SUSQUEHANNA [SON THE MARCH," 
Some max have t hought that she was marking time. SII ]•] WAS 
NOT. SUSQUEHANNA WAS QUIETLY, CAREFULLY, and 
POSITIVELY planning for her Drive. The drive is on. 
WASHINGTON HAS BEEN MET AND CONQUERED. 
JIVE SUCCESSIVE WINS ON THE GRIDIRON WHAT A 
RECORD! 

Tn the ( lassroom, on the athletiee field, everywhere— "SUS- 
QUEHANNA IS ON THE MARCH." ATTENTION! PALL 
IN LINK. 




very much to the success of this news- 
paper. It also means that a greater 
number of our Alumni will be kept in 
contact with the weekly activities of 
their Alma Mater. 

S 

Susquehanna is on the march. 



! Fisher's Jewelry Store 



DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVER 
AND GLASS WARE 



ship cards were provided thru the generosity of Marion S. 
Bchoch, an almnnns, and now editor and publisher of the 
Selinsgrove Times. 

Each member promises to occupy seats assigned to them, 
to stand and cheer for Susquehanna when asked to do so, and to 
protect the property of the University and the players. Each 
member is expected to be a good sport at all times, especially 
to the visiting team. 

The object of the movement is TEAMWORK between the 
boys and girls of Selinsgrove and Susquehanna University, and j Fine Repairing a Specialty 
the development of the spirit of chivalry, which means truth* j 3 
fulness, courage, courtesy, and loyalty. Its success depends < 
upon each boy and girl who signs a membership card. 

A tai ' g tf number of the school kiddies took advantage of the 
offer and attended the Washington game. They occupied the 
bleachers alloted to them. 

They are to be commended for the splendid way in which 
they enducted themselves at the game, for the excellent man- 
ner in which they followed the leaders in giving the Orange and 
Maroon cheers. They fulfilled their pledge to the last letter. 

g 



' "—Sib 



DECORATIONS FOR 
PARTY" 



YOUR 



Pryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market Street 
Sunbury, Pa. 



♦ 



STUDENTS 



TRY 



REICHLEY'S 



LUNCH 



SODAS 



CANDY 






JOHN H. KELLER 

— Dealer In — 

Meats and Groceries 

Both Phones — Selinsgrove i 



SNYDER COUNTY TRIBUNE 

JOB WORK A SPECIALTY 

Phone 68-W 



8 



EXTRA CURBICULAB ACTIVITIES 
Should a college student indulge in any work not in his 
i regular college curriculum? Or should he confine himself solely 
to preparation for his classroom work? 

The questions are the subject of much study and discussion 
among educators and college students. Varied theories pro 
and con extra-curricular work have been set forth. Although 
the problem is as yet only in the process of being solved, the 
theory thai indulgence in extra-curricular activities is detrimen- 
tal to scholarship has at last been relegated to its philosophy, 

The Sociology departments of several large universities 
lave produced statistics to the effect thai those who are most 
interested in their work, not included in the curriculum, are 
those who rank highest in scholarship. Good students, they 
found, are Interested in three outside activities and honor stu- 
dents, in four. 

One can easily conceive the reasons underlying these find* 
ings, without much difficulty, Pint, it is only the capable stu- 
dent who can get thru studying soon enough in the day to have 
jtime left for extra-curricular work. Secondly, the student who 
'can not make good grades is seldom capable of succeeding in I 
l lie field of outside activities. Thirdly, the pretence of an am- 
hit ion to succeed ill any given field of endeavor is usually ac- 
companion! bv the ability to attain some measure of success ill j 
thai chosen field. The student iiiusl have ability to rank high 
In any phase of activity. In view of this it is therefore obvious 
that the same student will rank high both in scholarship and 1 
in extra-curieular endeavor, 

In making the division of time between academic activities 
and the so-called exl ra-currieiilar activities, consideration must 
be given to the ability of the student concerned. Participation 
in one does not necessarily lower efficiency in the Other. 

The matter is one to be solved by the individual student 
and one which can be Correctly Solved in the light of ability and I A rather daring story, but true 
personal situations. 

At all events, ii is urged that new students form an interest 
in the extra-curricular life of the institution of which they are 



STANLEY 

Best in Moving Pictures 

Selinsgrove 




Till-: JUNIOR CRUSADERS 

A Junior Crusade tnovemenl of Susquehanna University 
has been organised by the Administration authorities. This en- 
titles a boy or girl in the Selinsgrove grade schools to free ad- 
mission to all athletic events held on the University Field. 

Bach boj or girl is given a membership card which lie or 
she is requested '<> si^n and present at the gates. The member- 



I 



a part. These activities play an important part in mnlergnul- 
uaie life and their Importance is being recognized more each 

vear. 

g 



THANKS ALUMNI 

A large number of the cards sent out 
out by the Alumni office to former 
Susqu&hanna students encouraging 
them to subscribe to this publication, 



have been returned by the Alumni 
with requests that their names be put 
on the subscription list. 

The staff is indeed grateful to these 
loyal Alumni, lor their support means 



STRAND 



SINBIRY 



OCTOBER 9 and 10 
GRETA GARBO in 

"Single Standards" 



|| "The Barker" 

with 
Milton Sills and Dorothy Mackaill 



I 

OCTOBER 14, 15 and 16 

"On With the Show" 

First 100'; natural color, singing, 
talking and dancing 



* 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1929 



f 



Phila. Newspaper 
Features Crusaders 



Sunday Edition Contains Lengthy 

Story About .the Present 

Football Prospects 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



"Ullery, Former Penn State Foot- 
ball Ace. Has Molded Weil-Balanced 
Eleven at Susquehanna; Selinsgrove 
'School' Boasts Experienced Grid Ma- 
terial Despite Small Enrollment; Sixty 
of Susquehanna's 225 Students Out for 
Team; Forward Wall Averages 175 
j Pounds: Six Philadelphia Elevens on 
Schedule." 

With these attractive lines as a head, 
the Philadelphia Sunday Public Ledger 
featured a very interesting article con- 
cerning the Orange and Maroon foot- 
ball prospects. The article was very 
cleverly written by Clair Hare, a mem- 
ber of the staff of that newspaper. A 
picture of the team accompanied the 
write-up. The entire article is printed 
herewith : 

"A small school that goes in for 
sports in a big way; one that is equip- 
ped with a modern, extensive and well- 
conceived athletic plant and where 
sports spirit runs so enthusiastically 
rampant that one out of every five 
students is a candidate for the school 
football team. 

"That paragraph, which might arise 
from the Chamber of Commerce, but 
doesn't, best describes Susquehanna 
University, situated in this lofty little 
community of little more than 2000 in- 
habitants. 

"Susquehanna is of especial interest 
in football this season inasmuch as 
three of its eight opponents in grid- 
iron grapples are considered to come 
from Philadelphia and two others are 
from within close proximity of the 
Quaker City 

"Luther D. Grossman, director of 
athletics, who is well known to Phila- 
delphians for his winning teams at 
Lower Merion High School, explains 
the Philadelphia aspect of Susquehan- 
na's schedule in this manner; 

" 'Juniata is considered our big 
game, but naturally our games with 
Philadelphia teams are also features of 
our schedule. We're pretty much alone 
here, since there aren't any colleges 
located conveniently near for us to 
compete with, thus the many Phila- 
delphia teams on our card,' 
UUery Enthusiastic 
"W. W. Ullery, once a Penn State 
great, is head coach of football at 
Susquehanna. He came here as di- 
rector of the gridiron destinies last 
year. He is very enthusiastic about his 
proteges' prospects this season and 
doesn't hesitate a bit in saying so 

" ' Pretty good.' he answered in reply 
to the usual query of how his squad 
shaped up. It was the tone he employ- 
ed rather than what he said that dis- 
played his satisfaction with the out- 
look. 

"Ullery is the type of coach who 
quickly gains the confidence of his 
players. Susquehanna's gridders are 
only to anxious to please their coach 
— not as their teacher, but as some- 
thing more. 

"An idea of the spirit that predom- 
inates here can be gathered by a few 
figures. The enrollment totals no less 
than 225 students. Last season Ullery 
carried a squad of fifty men. This year 
his call for candidates brought out 
more than sixty, fifty of whom will 
remain thruout the campaign. 

"The fact that Susquehanna lost sev- 
eral experienced men thru graduation, 
and that it was Ullery's first term here 
had much to do with the loss of three 
games. Georgetown, Swarthmore and 
Drexel. trounced Ullery's charges be- 
fore they hit their stride and won from 
Upsala, P. M. C, Juniata and Gallau- 
det. 

"The schedule, that opened yester- 
day with Washington, also lists Hav- 
erford, Delaware, Drexel, Juniata, Ur- 
sinus, Gallaudet and P. M. C. Hopes 
for a more successful season appear 
well founded. 

"Only two regulars and two first - 
string substitutes were last thru grad- 
uation. Ullery has welded the remain- 
ing lettermen and new prospects into 
a well-balanced band. 

Garman Heads Eleven 
"Al Garman. a Sunbury High pro- 
duct, is captain and center of the ag- 
gregation. Jack Auchmuty and Russ 
Carmichael are the guards. Joe Win- 
ters and Joe Zak the tackles, and War- 
ren Wolfe and Bill Adams the ends. 
This forward wall averages 175 pounds. 
"Winters scale- 215, Zak 185. Auch- 
muty and Adams are sophomores, Zak 
the only senior, 

"The regular backfield has another 
senior, John Wall, at quarter. He is a 
170-pounder. George Moser. a 200- 
pounder, is the fullback Oldan Dank-. 
of Elmira, N. Y.. and Don MacDonald 
are the halfbacks 

"Corch Ullery has a left and a right- 
footed punter when using this quartet. 



Much is expected of Danks. who punts 
with his portside foot, passes and runs 
well. He also starred as a southpaw 
twirler on the baseball mound. 

"Wa:i is the right-footed punter and 
also parses. He is more adept at toss- 
ing aerials than :s Danks. 

"On the line. Auchmuty is the son 
I cf a famous athle:e of old a: Susque- 
| hanna, as is Charles Yon, a freshman, 
who threatens to win a tackle berth. 
Plenty of Reserves 
"Coach Ullery has plenty of reserve 
strength. Walt Miller is another tackle, 
weighing 205 pounds. Dixon City pro- 
duced Bill Ramik, a freshman guard. 
Paul Wagner, another yearling, was 
moved from fullback to center. 

"Bill Berger and Rip Garman, the 
latter a brother of the captain, are 
:ther guards, as is Herb Speigelmyer. 
a sophomore, from Staunton Military 
Academy. They scale 185 and 195, re- 
spectively. Jack Delay and Al Barber 
are 170-pound ends. 
"Clare Rupp is a capable relief 
1 quarterback. He comes from Lewis- 
town High. Paul Edwards, a freshman, 
from Blair Academy, is another who 
may grab the signal-calling job. 

Don Wormley, Reid Speer, John 
Heikes, Ray Scott and John Meyers 
are among the halfbacks. Meyers is 
fast and shifty. Scott worked in the 
mines until 7 A. M. of the day school I 
opened. Then there's Frank Malasky, 
a 180-pound fullback. 

" 'I really believe we'll do all right," 
said Coach Ullery, momentarily let- 
ting Jack Henzes and his other as- 
sistants put 'the players ;thru their 
paces, 'maybe with a clean slate.' 

" 'Last year we were handicapped; 
if we took a man out of the line it was 
Just too bad. This year it's different; 
we have plenty of reserve material 
for both line and backfield and should 
go right along.' 

"So there you are." 



INTER-CLASS SOCCER 

TOURNAMENT OPENED 



PAGE THREE 



The opening games of the inter-class 
scrcer tournament were held last week 
with the Seniors, Juniors and Sopho- 
mores each gaining a victory. 

Tuesday afternoon, the Seniors took 
advantage of the inexperienced Fresh- 
men and trounced them by the score 
cf 6-0. While the forwards were scor- 
ing all of the points, Grossman, the 
goal keeper, along with the aid of the 
halfbacks, kept the Senior goal well 
protected. 

Thursday afternoon, the Freshmen 
took a second beating at the hands of 
the Sophomores by a 5-3 count. This 
game was more evenly fought and the 
score stood 3-3 until a few minutes 
before the contest ended, when the 
Sophomores rallied to tally two goals. 

The most exciting and evenly fought 
battle took place Friday afternoon, 
when the Juniors won over the Sopho- 
mores with a 2-0 score. It was any- 
body's game throughout the contest. 
Inter-Class Standings 

Seniors l o 1.000 

Juniors i o 1.000 

Sophomores l i .500 

Freshmen 2 .000 



NOTICE SOPHOMORES AND 
JUNIORS 



An election for two Assistant 
Basketball and Tennis Managers 
will be held in the near future. 
Members of the Junior C!as<. de- 
siring to be considered as candi- 
dates are requested to present then- 
names in writmg at the Alumni 
Gymnasium office on or before Oc- 
otber 18th. 

Four Sub-Assistants for Baseball 
and four Sub-Assistants for Track 
will be elected at the same time. 
Members of the Sophomore class 
desiring to be considered as candi- 
dates are also requested to present 
their names at the Alumni Gym- 
nasium office, in writing, on or be- 
fore the above mentioned date. 



LEAOTTA'S 
BEAUTY 

SHOP 

202 S. Market St. 



Second Eoor Eelow 
First Lutheran Church 

LPHONE 58*Z- 



FORMER STUDENTS RETURN 

TO RESUME STUDY 



DEBATERS HELD FIRST 

PRACTICE CONTEST FRIDAY 



• •••••a************ 

: ALUMNI NOTES .* 



• * • • * 



***** 



***•••* 



Mary Eastep, '30, Editor 



Meeting Mr. Win. Lahr in Florida 

1896 
We must go South to meet one of 
our oldest graduates, William B. Lahr. 
He is a real estate broker for "Lake 
Wales Little Farms, Inc." Mr. Lahr 
served in the ministerial field for a 
number of years. He served in this field 
in Williamsport, and in Cleveland, O. 
In 1904 he became owner of W. B. 
Lahr & Co., Architects and Builders. 
Success in this field soon led him to 
his present position in Lake Wales, 
Florida. 

This spot (the land of sunshine, 
where life continues to be young) is a 
resort of fame and beauty. The Moun- 
tain Lake Sanctuary and "Singing 
Tower," erected by Edward Bok, ad- 
join Lake Wales. This was erected, 
keeping in mind the ideas of the wor- 
• ship of the Indians of Florida, who 
nn at this site each spring in rever- 
ence to the Great Spirit. It is a sanc- 
tuary for birds and human folks. Its 
beauty will help each person make his 
world a bit more beautiful and better 
because he lived in it. 

The Tower holds the finest and larg- 
est carillon ever cast. It was made in 
England. On February 1. 1929 it was 
dedicated to the public by President I 
Calvin Coolidge. 

We congratulate Mr. Lahr on his' 
work in so beautiful a section of the , 
United States. We are very glad to 
note his interest in Susquehanna and 
her growth. Quoting— Mr. Lahr says, 
"As I grow older I live in memory of 
my college days at S. U." 



Six men participated in the first 
forensic practice contest last Friday 
afternoon, in Steele Science Hall. 
They were Byron Hafer, a veteran of 
last year's squad, Stewart Schrack, 
manager of this year's teams, Wilson 
Sieber, Marlin Spaid, Lawrence Fisher 
and Anthony Lupas. 

These men debated the collegiate 
question of last year, "Resolved, That 
the American Jury System Should be 
Abolished." Two men on each side 
carried the constructive arguments, 
and one on each side carried the refu- > 
tation. No judges' decision was made, 
as it was merely a practice contest. 

Dr. Kern, coach of debating, is high- < 
ly elated over the prospects for this : 
year. Another practice debate is to 1 
be held this Friday afternoon in 
Steele Science Hall, at four o'clock, to 
which all students interested in this i 
work are invited. Announcement will 
be made on the bulletin board con- 
cerning who is to take part in this 
debate. 

Seveial members of the debating 
club plan to attend the conference of 
delegates from Pennsylvania colleges 
and universities Saturday of this week, 
at which time the collegiate questions 
of the year will be selected, and other 
vital business connected with collegiate 
debating will be discussed. 



Miss Mary Hutchings and Reno 
Knouse. both former students at Sus- 
quehanna, but who left at the end of 
their Sophomore year, have returned 
to our campus to continue their work, 
the former in the College of Liberal 
Arts, and the latter in the School of 
Business. 

Miss Hutchings, whese home is in 
New York City, is a former hockey 
star, and a member of Sigma Sigma 
Delta. 

Mr. Knouse, whose home is in Sel- 
insgrove, was employed for the past 
year in the accounting department of 
Westinghouse Company, in New York. 
He is a track star, having won his let- 
ter in that sport. He is a member of 
Epsilon Sigma Fraternity. 

S 

CARMICHAEL LEAVES COLLEGE 
"Russ" Carmichael, playing varsity 
guard for the past two seasons, has 
left college. He probably would have 
been varsity guard again this year, but 
now that he has left college, Coach 
Ullery will have two letter men to 
draw from to play guards, Berger and 
Auchmuty, and also R. Garman and 
Ramik, who have shown much prom- 
ise. 

Whatever -Russ" will undertake in 
life, we wish him the best of luck and 
hope to hear of him again. 



RPCUL Shoes— Direct Uni- 
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W. G. Phillips 

COLLEGE TAILOR 

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"Where The Susquehanna is Printed" 



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SUNBURY MILK PRODUCTS COMPANY 

We Solicit Your Patronage . sunbury, pa. 



Feaster's Restaurant 

} "WHERE STUDENTS MEET 
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J Market Street Selinsfcrove 



Whereabouts and Doings of Sus- 
quehanna Grads 

'10 

Rev. Clyde W. Shaffer is serving the 
St. Peter's Lutheran pastorate at Eas- 
ton, Pa. 

'12 

Mr. Thomas J. Betman resides at 
Freeland, Pa. He is principal of the 
Foster Township High School. 

Having done creditable work at Co- 
lumbia he received his A. M. in '25. 
On July 1st he was elected president 
of the Freeland Rotary Club for the 
1929-30 term. 

'22 

Rev. Charles E. Held serves the 
Lutheran Charge at Sagamore, Pa. 
After Nov. 1st he will move to Homer 
City. Pa., where he will have the Trin- 
ity Lutheran pastorate. We wish Rev. 
Held success in his new field. 




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ONE HEAL NEWSPAPER 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 

SUNBURY, PA. 



Alumni Visitors 

The first game of the season brought 
many Alumni back to Susquehanna for 
a visit. Among familiar faces were^ 
those of Lucille Smith, Shirley Reich,, 
Isabel Slotterback, Mary Royer, Wil-j 
liarn Bonney, Marvin Sleigle, Ethel 
Weikert, Helen Auchmuty, Gertrude I 
Fisher. Margaret Buyers, Catherine' 
Boyer, Russel Glace. Marlin Bickle, 
Raymond Klinedinst, Louis Lesher, 



.. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 
G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M.. D.D., President 

A. B. and B. S. Degrees— Strong courses in Liberal Arts. Science Edu- 
cation and Business Administration. 
Extension Courses at Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township and Mt, Carmel 
Courses of instruction for teachers on the University campuj on 
Friday evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four-Year Public School Music Course with degree in Bachelor of 
Music is attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music. 
Susquehanna stands for a well-rounded education, clean sports re- 
creation for every student, earnestness in study, and above all Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For information write 
GEORGE F. DUNKELBERGER, Ph.D.. Dean. 



Grover D. Savidg-e 

1 Representing 

! New York Life 
Insurance Co. 

} Sunbury Trust Bldg. 

SUNBURY, PA. 



Paxton Brick Co. 

SMOOTH AND ROUGH FACE 

BUILDING BRICK 

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Office — Watsontown, P%. 
Factory— Paxtnnvlllp, r». 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1929 



Susquehanna 
Gridmen 




m&SMBKIBISIZmai'i 



I 





GL£HN 




SCOTT 




JOE WINTERS 




OU RGRIDIRON RIVALS 

Haverford 0, Ursinus 0. 
Delaware 19, Rutgers 0. 
Drexel 7, St. John's 12 
Juniata 0, Johns Hopkins 7. 
P. M. C. 20, Lehigh 20. 
S 

TRY-OUTS FOR S. U. GLEE 

CLUB HELD LAST WEEK 



' Continued from Page I) 
this year, one west through Pittsburgh, 
and one south through Maryland. 

From present indications, and from 
the large number of candidates, it is 
■ xpected that the Glee Club will have 
one of its biggest years at Susque- 1 
hanna. 



BAND MAKES INITIAL APPEAR- 
ANCE AT FOOT BALL GAME 



(Continued from Page 1) 
vatory, proceeded thru the main 
street.-, of Sellnsgrove, after which it 
returned to the athletic field. They 
filed to their positions before the 
1 grandstand just at the time of the 
kick-off, thus spurring the team on to 
a good start During, the course of the 
game, at the quarter intervals, the 
music and cheering assisted greatly in 
the spirit of support. 

The band has added much to its 
equipment thru the purchase of sev- 
eral new instruments. A much needed 
saxophone, two alto horns, and drums 
have been purchased for the use of the 
band. 

Plans are being promulgated to have 
the band accompany the Crusader 
gridmen on one or two games away 
from home. 

S 

HAVERFORD GRIDDERS MEET 

THE CRUSADERS SATURDAY 



(Continued from Page 1' 
pounds, will likely be on the one end 
position and Batter or Conn at the 
other end post. Harry Fields, a 260- 
pound Frankford boy. will be seen in' 
action at one of the tackles. Milliken, 
185 pounder, will swing over to Morris' 
old position. Wriggins, 190 pounds, 
will be at guard. Abbe, 190 pounds, 
and above the six-foot mark, may be 
at the other guard. Jones will be at 
center. 

Haverford and Ursinus, both Sus- 
quehanna rivals, fought to a 0-0 tie 
last Saturday afternoon. This was 
Haverford's first game this season. 

Johnny Wall and "Lefty" Danks, 
compelled to leave the game Saturday 
with slight injuries, will be able to 
take part in light scrimmage and 
practice during the week, so as to be 
in good condition for the Haverford 
contest. MacDonald, receiving a leg 
injury in pre-season scrimmage, will 
be in the best of condition for next 
Saturday. 

S 

ALLISON '27 WRITES 

SONG FOR ROOTERS 



(Continued from Page 1> 
Cheer practice and singing of the 
new song and the Alma Mater closed 
the first pep meeting of the season, 
attended by a goodly portion of the 
student body. 
The new song is printed below: 
For old S U. is the school and to- 
gether we'll pull. 
Forever grand must she stand for 
each man; 
So we must take for her sake, every 
victory to stake. 
So be true to our dear, dear old 
S U 

For old S U has the pep and she'll ; 
make their, all step. 

Forever high as tha sky is our cry; 
For we ail say you must play. 
You'll be winning the !; 

So be true to our dear. dear. S U. 

For old S U you'll come thru and 
that's all you must do, 
Forevei tame must remain vic- 
tory '.i gain 
For at our school we don't fool. 
And that's our golden rule; 
So be true to our dear. dear, old 
S. U 

S 

SI SQI LHANNA TOPS 

WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

IN OPENER, in TO 



ley netted 9 more yards and Malasky 
crashed through for a first down. A 
pass. Danks to Wormley, gained 6 
yards. Danks and Wormley made 5 
and 6 yards at each tackle, bringing 
the pigskin to the 5-yard line. Danks 
took the ball over for the score and 
Wall kicked the extra point. 

Wall ran the kick-off back to the 
22-yard line. Danks sprinted around 
left end for 15 yards and Wall around 
the other end for an equal number of 
yards. Danks again circled end. this 
time for 10 yards as the quarter ended. 
Second Quarter 

Wall fumbled and Sherkey recovered 
the ball on his own 35-yard line. Wash- 
ington punted, but Wormley errored 
the kick and the visitors recovered the 
pigskin on the Susquehanna 45-yard 
line. Washington gamed its initial first 
down of the game on a pass and line 
play. Susquehanna was penalized 15 
yards. Washington failed on three at- 
tempts to pass and Susquehanna gain- 
ed the ball on its own 19 -yard line. 
Wall punted to the Washington 47- 
yard line. A double reverse, a 5-yard 
penalty and a line play gave Washing- 
ton two first downs. Susquehanna held 
on its 22-yard line. Wormley and 
Moser hit the line for 8 and 7 yards 
respectfully. On an exchange of kicks 
Susquehanna finally gained possession 
of the ball on the Washington 45-yard 
line. Moser smashed center for 5 yards. 
Washington was penalized 15 yards 
Wormley received a forward for a gain 
of 15 yards, bringing the ball to the 
10-yard line. Moser fumbled just as 
the half ended. 

Third Quarter 

Malasky took the kick-off to the 
26 -yard line. Wall kicked outside to 
the Washington 36-yard line. Wash- 
ington punted back to the Susque- 
hanna 35-yard line. Danks on a re- 
verse play gained 11 yards. Washing- 
ton was penalized 15 yards. Susque- 
hanna was twice given 5 yard pen- 
alties. Wall punted to the Washing- 
ton 20-yard line. Malasky fell on a I 
fumble made by the visitors. Susque-! 
hanna was penalized 15 yards for hold- 
ing. Wall booted over the goal line so | 
that Washington was given the ball 
on the 20-yard line. For interfering 
with the receiver of a pass, Washing- 
ton was given the ball on the 32-yard 
line. An exchange of kicks gave Wash- 
ington the ball on its 20-yard line. 
Dopson made a fine punt to the Sus- 
quehanna 15-yard line. Wall circled 
the ends for 12 and 20 yards. On a 
fake reverse, Malasky found an open- 
ing at tackle for 15 yards. The Sus- 
quehanna advance was halted by a 15 
yard penalty. Wall made a pretty 
kick outside at the Washington 10- 
yard line. Speer intercepted a pass 
and ran 12 yards unmolested for a 
touchdown. Wall missed the try for 
point. Adams ran the kick-off back 
to the 35-yard line as the quarter 
ended. 

Fourth Quarter 
Moser hit center for a first down. 
On an exchange of kicks. Susquehanna 
received the ball on its 35-yard line. 
Wall punted outside at the Susque- 
hanna 45-yard line. Washington was 
given 15 yards when the receiver of 
one of her passes was blocked. Wolf 
threw Washington back for a loss of 
5 yards. The visitors received the pig- 
skin on the Susquehanna 27-yard line 
after an exchange of kicks. The Or- 
ange and Maroon held and gained the 
ball on the 21-yard line. On two plays 
MacDonald made a first down. Glenn 
punted to the opposing 30-yard line, 
where Ramik dropped the Washing - 
' ton safety man in his tracks. Dopson 
kicked back to the 48-yard line. Scott 



sped around end for 15 yards. Moser 
hammered his way through center for 
two 8 yard advances just before the 
game ended. The line-up: 
Washington— Susquehanna— 20 

Burke L. E Adams 

Dwyer L. T Winters 

Hopele L. G Auchmuty 

Sherkey C A. Garman 

Bringhurst — R. G R. Garman 

Phillips R. T Zak 

Plummer R. E Wolfe 

Alexander Q. B Wall 

Dopson L. H. B Wormley 

Robinson R. H. B Danks 

Clemente F. B Malasky 

Score by quarters: 



Susquehanna 14 6 — 20 

Washington 0— 

Touchdowns — Danks 2, Speer. Goals 

from touchdowns — Wall 2 (placement). 

i Substitutions : Susquehanna — Moser for 

| Malasky, DeLay for Wolfe, Berger for 

I R. Garman, Speer for Danks, Scott 

for Wormley, Barber for Adams, Glenn 

| for Wall, MacDonald for Wormley. 

j Yon for Winters. Miller for Zak, Fen- 

stermacher for Auchmuty, Ramik for 

Berger, Meyers for Speer; Washington 

— Vigilante for Burke. Hoffman for 

Dopson, Treeney for Hopele, Clemente 

for Plummer, Johnson for Sherkey. 

Officials: Houtz, referee: Miller, um- 
pire; Peifer, head linesman. 



SAT IT WITH FLOWERS 

FRESH CUT FLOWERS and POTTED PLANTS for WEDDINGS, 

PARTIES and FUNERALS— FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS 

Visitors Always Welcome at Our Greor. Housej 



GEO. 



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FLORIST 



BELL 32-Y 



SELINSGROVE 



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KAUFFMANS 

Candy and Soda 



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Welcomes Students' Accounts 
RESOURCES IK EXCESS OF $1,500,000.00 



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Tennis Rackets Restrung 

(Alumni Gymnasium., 

TENNIS RACKETS. BASE BALL GLOVES, GOLF SUPPLIES, Etc. 

All Kinds of Athletic Supplies at a Real Saving 



— — <i 



WHITMER-STEELE COMPANY 
South River Lumber Company 

Manufacturers of 

Pine, Hemlock and Hardwood Lumber 

Lath, Prop Timber and Ties 
65 King Street Northumberland 



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UP-TO-DATE HARDWARE and ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 
HEATING AND PLUMBING 

MARKET STREET SELINSGROVE 



i WHEN IN WILLAMSPORT VISIT THE NEW STORE AND FACTORY OF 

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Organized 1870 

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AUCHMUTY 



tlnu< '1 irom Pa| 
play twist id his way 30 yards for a 1 
touchdown Wall .scored the extra 
w 1th .t placement kirk, 
v/aii kicked ofl over the Washington 
[oal line The visitors received the 
ball on the line. Zak threw 

Robinson : is a low, Dop on punted 

Da; i ,. who Carried the ball back 

the Washington SO 

■.as penalised 15 

I i , Wall tn 

Alexander 
on i.i.s 33-yard 
'.■ 

Wall toww (I a pa i to Woit for 
11 yai ( >n a reverse play w 



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CLEANED AND PRESSED 
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AT TRIMBLE'S 

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Soda Fountain THE REXALL STORE Ice uica.. 

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Talcums, Face Powders and Toilet Articles oi ad cmmm* 

UNITED CIGAR STORE AGENCY KKL1NSUHU v* 



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University Barber 

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wainut and Markets Sts. 



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Sunbury — Northumberland — Shamokin — Sellnsgrove 



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Susquehanna 
Is on the March 



Us 



THE SUSQUEHANTfX 



Let's Beat 
Delaware 



Volume XXXVI 



Henry H. Crane 
Will Speak at 
"Y" Conference 



Prominent Scranton Minister to be 

Featured in Program of 

Addresses 



ANNUAL MEET OF STUDENTS 

AT READING NOV. 1, 2 AND 3 



Dr. 



Daniel A. Poling, of New- 
City, is Also Scheduled 
to Speak 



York 



Two outstanding contemporary lead- 
ers of American thought, Dr. Henry C. 
Crane, of Scranton. and Dr. Daniel A. 
Poling, of New York City, will be fea- 
tured in a program of addresses and 
discussions planned for the annual Y. 
M. C. A. Fall Students' Conference of 
Eastern Pennsylvania Colleges, which 
will be held this year at Reading, No- 
vember 1, 2, 3. Dr. Poling is the pastor 
of Marble Collegiate Presbyterian 
Church in New York, and Dr. Crane 
is minister of the Elm Park Methodist 
parish in Scranton. Both are talented 
and widely known speakers. 

The Conference Theme 
The theme of the conference will be, 
it is announced, "Jesus Christ and My 
Life." Aside from the addresses by Dr. 
Crane and Dr. Poling, the conference 
will be conducted largely by young men 
from the undergraduate ranks of the 
colleges. One of the special features of 
the program will be an open forum, 
led by Dr. Crane, which will follow his 
address on the first evening. Oppor- 
tunity will be afforded, thruout the 
conference, for those attending to be- 
come intimately acquainted with both 
Dr. Poling and his distinguished fel- 
low-preacher. 

To Begin Friday 
The Conference will begin at 2 
o'clock on Friday, and will continue 
thru until noon Sunday, with a full- 
day program scheduled for Saturday. 
The Saturday program includes the 
annual banquet at 6 o'clock in the ev- 
ening, preceded by a football game at 
2:30 o'clock. Paul Meng and Dr. Poling 
will address the banquet. The Satur- 
day and Sunday roster will be begun 
by a brief morning watch service. 

It is anticipated that over two hun- 
dred delegates will attend. If this 
number is reached, it will be the larg- 
est registration in the history of the 
conference. An invitation to attend is 
being extended to all college men. 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1929 

FIVE ASPIRANTS TO BACKFIELI) POSITIONS 



Number 9 




Haverford Gridders 
Batter Susquehanna 
Eleven Here, 19-7 



Two Damaging Fumbles at Crucial 

Points Net Thirteen Points for 

Visiting Team 



SCOTT HEM'S STAGE FLASHY 

RALLY IN FINAL PERIOD 



Moser's Line Plunges Result in Count- 
er; Capt. Garman Plays Hard Game; 
Glenn Stars at Quarter Post 



mgcDo~gi-o 



':i / 



M&SE.&. 



200 Parents Were 
Honored Guests of 
University Saturday 



Fathers and Mothers of Students Visit 

Campus in Annual Celebration; 

Guests at Dinner and Game 



Collegiate Debate 
Question Selected 



Central Penna. Conference Selects 

Kellogg Peace Pact as Subject for 

Intercollegiate Debates 



Withdrawal of the United States 
from the Kellogg Peace Pact will be 
the subject used by debating teams 
representing colleges and universities 
of Pennsylvania in their intercollegiate 
forensic relationships this year. 

This proposition was selected by the 
Debating Association of the Colleges 
of Central Pennsylvania, holding its 
annual Pall conference in Harrisburg 
last Saturday. A special committee 
selected a number of questions perti- 
nent to present-day economical, po- 
litical, social and educational prob- 
lems. Final choice was made by vote 
of the delegates from the various in- 
stitutions, members of the association. 

Eighteen colleges and universities of 
Pennsylvania, including Penn State, 
Bucknell, Lafayette. Temple, Lehigh, 
Susquehanna, and others, were repre- 
sented at the conference which serves 
as a clearing house for forensic prob- 
lems. 

Walter Foulkrod. '31, Lawrence Fish- 
er, '32 and Stewart Schrack. '30, rep- 
resented Susquehanna. They found 
the convention very helpful. 

Prof. Kline, of Gettysburg, was elect- 
ed president of the association. He 
succeeds Prof. Witmer, of Ursinus, who 
served very capably as head of the or- 
ganization for the past tew years. 
(Concluded on Page 4> 



Parents' Day, the first ever observed 
at Susquehanna, was celebrated Sat- 
urday in fine style and with one of the 
greatest responses to an invitation of 
that kind that could have been expect- 
ed. 

The parents began to arrive Friday 
night. Saturday morning the campus 
was the scene of many happy reunions. 
To have Dad and Mother come to col- 
lege was quite a treat for most of the 
students. It was with a great deal of 
pleasure that the sons and daughters 
and specially deputized members of 
the "Y" escorted the visitors thru the 
various buildings on a tour of inspect- 
ion. 

Activities began with a dinner at 
noon. Horton Dining Hall was filled to 
capacity and several extra tables were 
placed thf?re to accommodate the 
guests. "Whitie" Schilling and his force 
of "white coats" are to be commended 
for the proficient manner in which 
they served the dinner. 

Rev. J. V. Royer, pastor of the Cata- 
wissa Avenue M. E. Church, of Sun- 
asked the blessing. The Men's 
Club, under the direction of 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



A quintet of Coach Ullery's long list 
of back field men is shown above. Four 
of these saw action in Saturday's 
game; one was on the bench because 
of injury. 

"Lefty" Danks, halfback, who scored 
two of Susquehanna's counters in the 
opening fray with Washington, injured 
his leg in that tilt ana* nas been un- 
able to report for practice since. His 
injury is slowly responding to treat- 
ment, so that it is expected that he 
will be able to play in the tilt with 
Drexel, October 26. 

Malasky, fullback, played a fine 
game Saturday, chiefly in plunges thru 
Haverford's husky line. 

Speer, halfback, is playing his first 
year of varsity football. 

"Tubby" Moser, fullback, played a 
bang-up game Saturday, both on the 
defensive and offensive plays. His line 
plunges netjted considerable yardage 
for Susquehanna. He scored the Cru- 
saders' lone touchdown in the game 
with Haverford. Moser displayed re- 
markable ability in backing up the 
line. 

MacDonald, halfback, who has taken 
a new lease on life after a bad injury 
to his knee, played an excellent game 
Saturday. 

S 

Eight States Are 
Represented at S. U. 



Music and Dramatic 
Artists Appear on 
1929-30 Star Course 



R. Leon Trick and Joseph Phillips in 

Concert Friday; Sprague Players 

Appear in Return Engagement 



bury 
Glee 



-S- 



LADIES' CHORAL CLUB 

HAS LARGE ENROLLMENT 



Entire Enrollment, Excluding Exten- 
sion Department, is 498; Snyder 
Heads Counties With 71 



Ladies' Choral Club of Susquehanna 
University was organized Monday eve- 
ning of last week, with a membership 
of forty. There is promising material 
in the club, and under the direction of 
Mrs. Rodgers a very successful season 
is anticipated. 
The membership is as follows: 
Edith Ash, business manager; Janet 



11 



The following constitutes an itemiz- 
ed statement of the enrollment for the 
first semester: 

College Department 

Graduate 

Undergraduate- 
Seniors 74 

Juniors 94 

Sophomores 109 

Freshmen 88 

Unclassified 2 

Special (College) 6 

Special < Conservatory) .... 



Five very excellent entertainments 
have been secured for this year's Star 
Course, by Prof. Sheldon, head of the 
Conservatory of Music. The series in- 
cludes both musical and dramatic 
numbers. 

The first number will be given on 
Friday night of this week, in Seibert 
Chapel Hall, when R. Leon Trick, 
pianist, and Joseph Phillips, baritone, 
will give a concert. These gentlemen 
are among Buffolo's leading musicians, 
personal friends of our President, Dr. 
G. Morris Smith, and recitalists of 
more than local experience. 

Their program will open with an 
aria, "Vision Fugitive" from "Heriod- 
iade" by Massenet, sung by Mr. Phil- 
lips. Mr. Trick will play a Chopin 
group of special interest to students. 
From this point the program brings 
one to songs and piano compositions 
of the presene time. 

"Lightnin' " Players in Return 
Engagement 

"Back Home," a comedy drama 

based on the Irvin Cobb stories, will 

be presented by the Herbert Sprague 

players, on Friday, November 15. This 

(Concluded on Page 4) 

S 

CLASS MAKES TRIP TO STUDY 

GEOLOGICAL PHENOMENA 



Haverford's broad-shouldered battle 
formation checked the victorious ad- 
vance of the Crusaders on the Univer- 
sity Field on Saturday afternoon, win- 
ning by a 19-7 score, despite the prim- 
ed up enthusiasm on Parents' Day to 
back the team. 

It seemed that in the first quarter 
when the husky gladiators from Hav- 
erford came out on the field, the Cru- 
saders had lost the game already by 
one touchdown, because of the enor- 
mous size of the Main Line eleven. 
After the first quarter, when two dam- 
aging fumbles were made, the Ullery 
eleven started to function and display- 
ed excellent defensive and offensive 
play that came as a complete surprise 
to the Harmonites. 

Wormley made the first fumble in 
the first quarter and started Susque- 
hanna's downfall. Simmons recovered 
the fumble on the Haverford 43-yard 
line. A pass, Morris to Cadbury, net- 
ted 15 yards. Then successful thrusts 
by Simmons and Morris gave Haver- 
ford their first touchdown. In the lat- 
ter part of the quarter, the ball was 
kicked to Susquehanna's 16-yard line. 
It was here that the second damaging 
blow of the game came when Speer 
fumbled, Simmons picking the pigskin 
out of the air and taking it over the 
line for a counter. 

In the third period, Haverford play- 
ed straight football to gain their only 
earned touchdown, recovering the ball 
on a punt on Susquehanna's 36-yard 
line. On the next two plays, Morris, 
the big 210-pound fullback and cap- 
tain, gained 25 yards. Runs by Dot- 
hard and Rice placed the ball on the 
one-foot line. Morris took it over for 
a touchdown. 

Glenn took the kick-off on his own 
27-yard line and made a beautiful run 
through tackle for 20 yards. Moser 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Pre-Legal Society 
Held First Meeting 



Kwasnoski, '30, Elected Vice President 

to Fill Vacancy; Seven New 

Members Added 



373 
82 



Dively, Anna Dunkelberger, Mary ; Theological Seminary- 



Graduate 14 

Undergraduate 18 

Total Enrollment 



\\i 



498 



NOTICE 

Special and important meeting of 
the Science Honor Society will be 
held Tuesday evening in the Lec- 
ture Room of Steele Science Hall, 
at 6:45 o'clock. 



p. Mable Fulttz, Beatrice Gentz 
ler. Jo. Hoy, Mary Hummel. Mary 
Hutching!, Margaret Ide. Arline Kan- 
yuck. Helen Lahr, Anna M. Leinbach, 

secretary; Dorothy Leisher, vice presi- . 

dent: Elizabeth Long. Ida Lyons, Mar-j Geographical distribution of College 
garet Merkle, Ruth Maurey, stage .students enrolled in the regular ses- 
manager; Alma McLean Irene Mangel, talon, by stat. 
Marjorie Michael, Harriet Miller, Vir- Indiana 3 



ginia Moody, president: Anna Gage 
Moody, librarian; Isabella Morlta, 
Kathryn Morning, Elizabeth Olshefksy, 
Estella Pearl, Marjorie Phillips, Dor- 
othy Puckey. treaaurer; Fannie shipe, 
Frances Bhafflbaugh, Freda Stephens, 
Florence Steward, Dorothy Strine, 
lie Wagner. Beryl Wyman, stage 
manager. 



Maryland 4 

Massachusetts 1 

New Jersey 11 

New York 10 

Ohio 1 

Pennsylvania 342 

Waahingtcn, d. c l 

Total 373 

• Concluded on Page 3> 



Members of the Methods in Biology 
class made a trip to the S. & S. Trol- 
ley Company's quarry in Grangers Hol- 
low, near Shamokin Dam, Tuesday af- 
ternoon. The class, under the direc- 
tion of their professor, Dr. Surface, 
spent two very profitable and enjoy- 
able hours studying the geological 
phenomena of that region. 

Some interesting specimens were dis- 
covered and studied. In this way, the 
students were given an understanding 
of geological formations, which could 
never have been adequately explained 
within the four walls of a biological 
laboratory. 

The data visited the region of the 
old canal bed on Thursday to view 
many other geological wonders. 
S 

OIK GRIDIRON RIVALS 

Delaware 0, Ursmu 
Drexel 19, Juniata 0. 
P. M. C. 7, St. 6. 

Washington 0. Loyola 3. 
Gallaudet 0. St. John 

S . 

—Beat Delaware Satu: • 



Sadtler Pre-Legal Society of Sus- 
quehanna held its initial meeting of 
this collegiate year Thursday night of 
last week, in Gustavus Adolphus Hall, 
Twelve members attended this very- 
important meeting at which Anthony 
J. Lupas, president of the society, pre- 
sided. 

Daniel H. Kwasnoski was elected 
vice president of the society to fill the 
vacancy left by withdrawal of "Pete" 
E. Kawalchik, who did not return to 
school this season. 

Seven new members were taken into 
the society at the meeting. They are 
as follows: Albert L. Anselmi, J. Don- 
ald Steele, William J. Weliky, William 
S. Herman, Laird S, Gemberling, Har- 
old Reynolds, and Samuel Pascoe. 

A special meeting of this society will 
tant questions. All the students of 
be held to decide several very impor- 
Susquehanna are cordially invited to 
attend this meeting. 

The Sadtler Pre-Legal Society was 
organized in 1927 by the students of 
Susquehanna dwirtng to take up the 
legal profession. The society was nam- 
ed in bOOOr of Justice Sylvester B. 
Sadtler. Justice of the Supreme Coun 
in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
at that time. 



NOTICE 

The Library will ( I 
o'clock on on winch a Star 

Ooune number appears on the col- 
lege calendar It will be open from 
seven to eight, and books nia\ be 
taken out for the evening at that 
tune 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA, 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Itunity to make valuable friendships on the campus, but they 

are subjecting themselves to fatigue and excitement which bring 

them back jaded and unfit to do their college work on Monday." 

President Henry N. McCracken, of Vassar College, whither 

many a Yale man goes week-endly, listened to President AngelPs 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States ' statement, and quotes: 

"1 cannot conceive of such trips being as harmful as they 



JUNIORS LEAD INTER-CLASS 

SOCCER WITH NO DEFEATS 



Published Weekly by the Students of Susquehanna University 

Subscription $1.50 a Year, Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



THE STAFF 

Editor-inChiof Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

News Editor Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Prances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 

Betty Wardrop '32 John Kindsvatter '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Bruce Worthington, '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Edna Tressler. '30, Conservatory of Music 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



| are depicted by Dr. Angell." Vassar allows its women one 

week-end off each month. 

It will be interesting to note what will be the reaction of 
the Vale student, ordinarily accustomed to the utmost freedom. 
towards such action bv the Vale authorities. 



* * 



ALUMNI NOTES 



* | University while her husband was 
* j studying here. 

We extend heartiest wishes to them 
Homecoming Day Draws Near I for success in th ™ nobl e field of work. 
Plans are now in the making for ! 



** + *••• 



TUESDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SIM KIT 

Susquehanna students are to be commended for the splen- 
did spirit which they manifested in connection with both the 
Parents' Day Exercises and the Haverford-Susquehanna game, 
Saturday. 

It goes without saying that the University authorities were 
extremely "ratified to note the splendid spirit of friendliness, 
courtesy, and respect shown towards the visiting parents. The 
impression of the general Susquehanna atmosphere on the par- 
ents could only have been the best. The whole affair reminded 
one of a huge family gathered in reunion, 

On University Field, at the football game, the student body 
again displayed a fine spirit of loyalty to a deserving squad. 
The way in which the student rooters boosted the team until 
the final whistle, in spite of unfortunate tarns in the game, was 
genuine, and did not come from any sense of trying to show off 
to the honored guests of the institution. 

The Alma Mater was exceptionally well-sung between 
halves. 

Fellow-students, let's keep right on fighting lor the team. 
Tile next game, with Drexel Institute, will be the occasion of 
the annual Home Coming of the Alumni. Let's show them that 
the student body is back of its team to the last minute and that 
SUSQUEHANNA IS ON THE MARCH. 

S 

FOOTBALL VEBSUS WAR 

President Gil of .Mexico, after witnessing a game of Ameri- 
can football between two Mexican teams coached by experts 
from above the Rio Grande, expressed his hearty approbation. 

"Americans,*' he observed, "must encourage this sport so 
they will not have revolutions. It contains marvelous lessons 
for Mexican youth, leaching valor, self-control and coopera- 
tion." 

And the Mexican is right. There are two countries in 
which university students have always been keen for sports, 
(ilea! Britain and America, and those two countries have been 
singularly free from revolutions. More noticeable still is the 
fact that in these two countries political riots among the stu- 
dents are practically unknown. In nearly all other countries 
'lie stlldelils seeni lo watch tin- governmenl for a chance to make 
trouble. 

Good scrappy games with mass enthusiasm over them are 
good lor these young men full of animal spirits. Such sports 
make good fighters but poor revolutionists. Thru football 
young men gel a small taste of war just as vaccinated persons 
get a small taste of smallpox, and are healthier and more nor- 
mal afterwards. — Tin Pathfinder, 

S 



one of the biggest and best Home 
Coming Days in this history of Susque- 
hanna. We want to see you and share 
memories of happy days. Your class- 
mates are anxious to greet you once 
again. Help make October 26 a banner 
day. 

Father and Son in New Firm at 
Sunbury 

J. P. Carpenter, '91, announced re- 
cently that he and his son Alvin W. 
Carpenter, '24, havci formed a new 
law firm in Sunbury, under the name 
of Carpenter and Carpenter. 

J. P. Carpenter, senior member of 
the firm, is one of the most prominent 
Attorneys in Sunbury. He has prac- 
ticed there for about 35 years. He is 
an experienced trial lawyer, not only 
in State Courts, but also in the United 
States Courts. 

Alvin W. Carpenter, has practiced 
since 1927. For the past year he has 
divided his attention between Sunbury 
and Lewisburg offices. In the future 
all of his time will be devoted to Sun- 
bury practice with the new firm. 
Missionary on Furlough 

M. L. Dolbeer, '16, has spent the 
past year in the United States on fur- 
lough from the Gunter Mission Field. 
He took work at U. of C. and received 
his A. M. degree this summer. Mr. and 
Mrs. Dolbeer expect to return to the 
mission field some time in January. 
They are now located at Springfield, 
Ohio. 

Dr. Bateman to be Guest of the Fords 
at Lights Golden Jubilee 

Dr. Sidney E. Bateman, distinguish- 
ed practitioner in Atlantic City, and 
Mrs. Bateman will be guests of Henry 
and Edsel Ford at the celebration of 
Light's Golden Jubilee in honor of 
Thomas A. Edison, and the 50th an- 
niversary of the incandescent lamp at 
Dearborn. Mich., on October 21. 

The program will open on the af- 
ternoon of the 21st with the dedica- 
tion of the Edison Institute of Tech- 
nology by President Hoover. This will 
be followed by a tour thru the school 
and also thru the Industrial Museum, 
which Mr. Ford has created at Dear- 
born. Following a banquet in Indepen- 
dence Hall, the guests will adjourn to 
the Menlo Park Laboratory. Here 
Edison will reconstruct the lamp of 50 
years ago. This event will be broad- 
cast over an international radio hook- 
up. 

Whereabouts and Doings of Grads 
19 

Joseph L. Hackenberg received his 
A. M. degree from Penn State this 
year. Mr. Hackenberg is Principal in 
Sandy Township High School and re- 
sides at DuBois, Penna. 
'21 

Joseph Streamer, of Norristown, Pa., 
is teaching in the Senior High School 
at that place. 

'22 

Rev. John J. Weikel is pastor of the • 
Lutheran Church at Espy, Pa. 
'24 

Dr. Frank O. Zillenson, of Sunbury, 
graduated from U. of P. Medical 



PATERNALIST 

Paternalism in colleges is defined as a benevolent despot- 
ism whereby the administration seeks to maintain with the stu- 
dent a relationship like thai between a father ami his dependent 

Children. College alter College, according to press reports, is | School in '26. He practiced in Sunbury 
fastening its hold on the student in order to keep him from out- for over a y ear - Lat€r - ne received an 
side influences which interfere with his study ami character 
building. 

The latest report conies from Yale I niversity, where one 
Of the most sacred traditions of (hat institution the custom 
I making weekend journeys from tin 

the various New England and New York women'* Colleges, is eral ]&r « e Insurance companies. Dr. 

. i • i • ' • Benner's wife, formerly Lorelle Dun- 

threatened with extinction, can of B lairsville, is a graduate of 

In his opening address tO the students Of the I niversity, Jefferson College Hospital Training 



appointment to the Mayo Clinic in 
Rochester, Minn., where he now holds 
a position. 

'25 
Dr. Norman Benner is in general 
medical practice at Farrell, Pa. He is 
Vale Campus to those of also chief medical examiner for sev- 



Presidenl .lames Rowland Angell heartily condemned the prac- 
tice, and informed his surprised audience that the I niversity 
authorities might be forced to curb such activities by requiring 
one or two registrations every Sunday by Yale undergraduates. 

••The generation to which you young men belong is notor- 
iously restless.'* said the Yale president, "and does not feel that 
v is really enjoying Itself unless ii is ^oiup. somewhere at top 
ipeed, the destination a matter <>r relatively small consequence. 
It will be only two or three years before the airplane will be 
*akin<: out week-enders to points at present impossibly remote. 
Palm Beach is quite likely to be a rival with New fork for un- 
dergraduate patronage, 

"The men who systematically withdraw from New Haven 
each week end are not only depriving themselves of the oppor- 



School. Dr. Benner tells us that he 
has met Lee Vorlage, '27, who has been 
added to the Farrell High School Fac- 
ulty. Rev, Edgar Hanks, another alum- 
nus, is a successful and highly-respect- 
ed minister in the Lutheran Church at 
that place. 

A. Allen Gleitz, M.D., who graduated 
with Dr. Benner at S. U. in '25 and 
Jefferson in '28, is now practicing in 
Erie, Pa. 

'26, Sem. '29 

Rev. William Schwirian is now serv- 
ing the Lutheran pastorate at Mont- 
gomery, Pa. Rev. Schwirian is well- 
known to all Susquehanna friends who 
were interested in the successful De- 
bating Teams of '28-'29. Mrs. Schwir- 
ian was secretary to the Dean of the 



John M. Leese, former Principal of 
Abbotstown School is this year Prin- 
cipal of Noxen Public Schools, Noxen, 
Pa. Congratulations, "Johnny" and best 
wishes for success in your new position. 
'29 

George Spaide, for four years a 
member of Susquehanna's football and 
basketball squads, departed from his 
home in Selinsgrove last week for San 
Antonio, Texas, where he will take up 
a course in aviation. He will also study 
the art of flying at Santiago, Calif. 
Best wishes, "Jack," in your chosen 
career. 

Alumni Visitors 

Susquehanna is always glad to wel- 
come Alumni. Among those whom she 
welcomed the past week-end were 
Frieda Dreese, "Sally" Stahl, Sarah 
Bell, "Bill" Riden, "Bill" Roberts, 
Helen Simons, Lee Vorlage, Harold 
Ditzler, Essex Botsford, Nancy Lecrone, 
Helen Auchmuty, "Bob" Baird, Patsey 
Gimme. "Hank" Carichner, Dick Shaf- 
er, Ted Cameron, Charles Shoemaker 
and Elward Livingston. 
Weddings 
KROEN-STOLZ 

Rev. Jacob Kroen, '25-'28, and Miss 
Nargethe Stolz of Beaver Falls, Pa. 
were united in marriage August 11, 
1929. Rev. and Mrs. Kroen reside at 
Conneat, Ohio, where Rev. Kroen is 
serving a Lutheran pastorate. Con- 
gratulations and best wishes. 
FROST-FICKES 

Tuesday morning, September 24, in 
the Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church 
at Herndon, Pa., Rev. M. M. Enders, 
an alumnus, pastor of that church, 
united in mariage the Rev. Samuel R. 
Frost of Lebanon and Miss Georgienne 
I. Fickes, of Newport. 

Rev. Frost is a graduate of Susque- 
hanna University and the Lutheran 
Theological Seminary at Philadelphia. 
Mrs. Frost is a graduate of the Sus- 
quehanna Conservatory of Music and 
was a teacher in the public schools of 
Newport. 

They will reside in Washingtonville 
where Rev. Frost is pastor of Trinity 
Lutheran Church. We extend heartiest 
congratulations and best wishes. 
VOUGHT-WHIFFEN 

Prof. George J .Vought, '27, and Miss 
Elizabeth Whiffen, of McClure, who 
took work here, have announced their 
mariage, after having kept it a secret 
for six months. 

They were married in Sunbury at 
the parsonage of St. John's M. E. 
Church by Rev. Allen C. Shue, on 
April 20. 1929. 

The bride is an instructor in the 
grade schools of McClure. The groom 
is assistant principal and athletic 
coach at McClure High School. Sus- 
quehanna extends felicitations. 

S 

BUCKNELL FRATERNITY 

MEN GOOD STUDENTS 

Lewisburg, Pa.— Discounting the old 
argument that "fraternities prevent 
study," members of fraternal groups 
at Bucknell University earned higher 
average grades than non-fraternity 
students last year, according to fig- 
ures given out at the offices of Dr. 
Romeyn H. Rivburg, dean, here. 

The average for all the fraternity 
men in college was 76.13 while students 
not in fraternities showed an average 
of 74.46. Fraternity women had the 
high average of 80.24 while their non- 
fraternity sisters reached an average 
of 78.29. The averages are based on the 
sophomore, Junior, and senior classes, 
as freshmen are not permitted to be 
members of fraternities. 

Seniors who stand at the top in the 
averages, with a mark of 81.37, and 
the marks of other classes are signifi- 
cant in that they show the juniors 
second; sophomores, third; and the 
freshmen in the rear. 

Apho Mi Chu heads the list of men's 
fraternities with an average of 79.20, 
while Alpha Ci Omega brings up an 
average of 83.13 to give this group of 
young women the lead in the college. 



Juniors, with two victories to their 
credit during the week, took the lead 
in the Inter-Class Soccer Tournament, 
and the Sophomores, with two defeats 
chalked up against them, were prac- 
tically eliminated from the running. 

In the first contest of the week, held 
Monday afternoon, the Seniors won a 
3-0 decision over the Sophomores. 
Rhodes scored all the goals for the 
victors. 

In the most important contest of the 
tournament thus far, the Juniors took 
j the lead in the inter-class standings 
by defeating the Seniors 3-1 on Tues- 
day afternoon. The Seniors held the 
upper hand during the first half of the 
contest, gaining a 1-0 lead, but went 
to pieces in the latter part of the 
game. 

The Juniors won another victory 
Wednesday afternoon by trouncing the 
Freshmen with a 5-0 count. In this 
game the Juniors were held to a 0-0 
score until the last quarter, but again 
rallied to turn in a winning score. 

A much improved Freshmen team 
won its first victory on Thursday af- 
ternoon by beating the Sophomores by 
the score of 2-0. Swarm and Petry 
scored goals in the first and second 
halfs. 

Inter- Class Standings 

W 

Juniors 3 

Seniors 2 

Sophomores 1 

Freshmen 1 






1.000 


1 


.667 


1 


.250 


8 


.250 



'>>- 



Eat at 

The Don Mar 

L. M. GABEL, Propr. 



Fisher's Jewelry Store 



j DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVER 1 
AND GLASS WARE I 

Fine Repairing a Specialty t 

344 Market St. Sunbury, Pa. j 



"DECORATIONS FOR YOUR 
PARTY" 

Fryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market Street 



• 



Sunbury, Pa. 



STUDENTS 



TRY 



REICHLEY'S 

LUNCH — SODAS — CANDY J 

i JOHN H.KELLER 

— Dealer In— 

j Meats and Groceries j 

j Both Phones— Selinsgrove 



SNYDER COUNTY TRIBUNE 

JOB WORK A SPECIALTY 
Phone 68 -W 



< !>•• c.»»»« 



»** — «'^»*^ >A 



STANLEY 

Best in Moving Pictures 

Selinsgrove 



... 



STRAND 




T. T. 

Jeueler 
8UNBTJBY, PA. 



SUNBURY 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 

"On With the Show" 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 
VICTOR McLAGLIN in 

"The Black Watch" 

Story of a man's man who be- 
comes a lady killer to save his 
country. 



FKI. and SAT., OCT. 18 and 19 

Four Marx Brothers 



in 



•- 



"COCOANUTS" 

MON. and TUES., OCT. 2 "and 22* 

"The Gamblers" 

With H. B. WARNER and 
LOIS WILSON 



... 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

I 
♦ 

♦ 

1 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



AGE rHREfe 



* * * * 



r r 



i 



? 



■>■ 



* * 1 *:>***** t * * ^ \ * 4 ******* it ****** :t * * 



GRID GAFF 



********* 



SCIENCE 

By Intercollegiate Press 

$ $ 

* s'rf A sit :Je £ :K ;1c « * # Q * $ ifr :'fi. ft t)i $ 



Issue Call for Another Cheer Leader 

Head Cheer Leader Hostetter '30 has 
issued a call for, another cheer leader. 
Any Freshman, Sophomore or Junior 
interested is requested to hand his 
name to him at once. Here is an ex- 
ceptional opportunity for the Frosh 
to get rid of some of his excess en- 
ergies and at the same time to boost 
his team. 



Cleveland, Ohio— (IP)— The $500,000 
Brush Foundation for the work of find- 
ing means of limiting and bettering the 
world's population, has completed or- 
ganization one year after its founding, 
and has set up headquarters here in 
the Western Reserve University Medi- 
cal School. Much study already has 
been accomplished by the foundation 
during its year of organization. 



EIGHT STATES ARE 

REPRESENTED AT S. U. 



Ace Hudkins Fractures Arm in 
Scrimmage 

Ace Hudkins, a sub tackle, who has 
been playing very good football in the 
past two years, had the misfortune of 
fracturing an arm in scrimmage last 
Wednesday. He continued in the daily 
workout until Friday night when the 
injury became serious. The bone in 
the forearm was set that same night. 
He will probably be out for the rest 
of the season. 



Injured Football Men Improving 

Johnny Wall will be in the best of 
condition for Saturday's game with the 
University of Delaware eleven. Ram- 
ick, a guard, will also be in condition 
for the same fray. 

"Lefty" Danks still has a rather bad 
ankle, and probably will be out for a 
come through for the Drexel game, 
week or so yet. He will no doubt 
DeLay, a varsity end for the past two 
years, sustained a bad knee injury in 
scrimmage, and will be out for several 
weeks. 



Crusaders Priming for Game With 
Delaware 

Susquehanna will play its first con- 
test away from the home field Satur- 
day afternoon of this week, when the 
Ullerymen will travel to Newark, Dela- 
ware, to play the University of Dela- 
ware eleven. 

Not much is known of the individual 
players on the Delaware outfit. They 
opened the season by defeating Rut- 
gers 19-0. Last Saturday they played 
a 0-0 tie with Ursinus, another of Sus- 
quehanna's rivals. It was the same Ur- 
sinus team that played Haverford to 
a 0-0 tie earlier in the season. 

A victory or a defeat may mean an- 
other turning point for the coming 
season. Coach Ullery will bank all his 
hopes in a fast combination he hopes 
to whip into shape this week. In or- 
der to do this, there is much hard 
work ahead for the boys in the daily 
work-outs this week. 

Orange and Maroon Hopes to Avenge 
Drexel Defeat 

With the passing of the first Parents' 
Day, one of the most successful and 
important days in the history of the 
university, Susquehanna is now : look- 
ing forward to and making prepar- 
ations for the annual Home Coming 
Day on October 26. On this gala day. 
the Crusaders will meet one of its 
most friendly rivals on the gridiron, 
Drexel Institute. 

The Orange and Maroon will be out 
to avenge the 38-0 defeat suffered at 
the hands of the fast Engineer ma- 
chine last season. The victory of the 
Philadelphia institution over Susque- 
hanna was the first for Drexel in the 
thirteen years during which football 
relations have existed between the two 
institutions of learning. 

To date, Drexel has been defeated 
three times this season, once by West 
Chester State Teachers College, 12-0; 
once by Swarthmore, 14-8; and once 
by St. John's, 12-7. Last Saturday, 
Drexel defeated another of Susque- 
hanna's strong rivals, Juniata, by a 
19-0 score. 

At all indications, it looks as though 
the contest between the Crusaders and 
the Engineers will be no "petting 
party," but a hard-fought contest on 
both sides. 

S 

STUDENTS AND FACULTY HEAR 
SPLENDID LECTURE IN CHAPEL 



Rhodesia— < IP) — What is believed to 
be the oldest human footprint, has 
been found on the banks of the Lim- 
popo River by Professor Lidio Cipriano. 
of the Italian Research Expedition. 

The imprint, found in stone, reveals 
that the man who made it must have 
been of great stature, with many ape- 
like characteristics. The foot had a big 
toe which turned out. and a narrow 
heel. It is believed this type of primi- 
time man was responsible for the large 
stone axes found in the Transvaal, 
which have troubled anthropologists 
because they must have been used by 
a large-handed people. 



San Francisco — (IP) — Returning here 
from an expedition to northern Aus- 
tralia, W. Lloyd Warner, anthropolo- 
gist .reported that he had found the 
existence of a people of Stone Age 
culture on a group of islands in the 
Arafura Sea. 

The people have no religion, he said, 
and they have not yet reached the 
stage where they can use bows and 
arrows. 

"The inhabitants of the Crocodile 
Islands," Mr. Warner said, "are the 
last stone age people in the world. 
They cook their food in holes in hot 
rocks. Their only weapon is a stone- 
headed spear. The women do most of 
the work." 



New York — (IP) — First national 
conference en birth control is to be 
held at the Hotel Astor here on Nov. 
18, 19 and 20, it has been announced 
by the American Birth Control League. 
It is expected that a large number of 
sociologists, pastors, legislators, phy- 
sicians, club women, and labor leaders 
will be present. The conference will 
censider birth control in its social, 
moral, religious, economic and legal 
aspects, according to those in charge. 



Winnipeg. Manitoba — (IP) — A. Read- 
ing, geologist and mechanical engineer 
of a staff of Dominion explorers just 
returned here from the Hudson Bay 
legicn. has exploded somewhat the 
shivery tales of the Arctic northland. 
He reports that he has found fauna 
in the Arctic which is of a tropical 
nature. 

Included in his finds were red coral, 
starfish, jellyfish, and other fauna us- 
ually associated with the tropics. A 
species of edible clam were found in 
the region, also, Reading said. 




(Continued from Page 1> 
By counties in Pennsylvania: 

Allegheny 13 

Armstrong 1 

Bedford 1 

Berks 1 

Blair 8 

■ Bradford 1 

j Cambria 6 

I Carbon 2 

I Centre 10 

I Clearfield 6 

Clinton 5 

Columbia 3 

Cumberland 2 

Dauphin 13 

Delaware 1 

Franklin 7 

Huntingdon 4 

Indiana 2 

Jefferson 2 

Juniata 3 

Lackawanna 2 

Lafayette 1 

Lehigh 1 

Luzerne 27 

Lycoming 15 

Mifflin 14 

Monroe 1 

Montgomery 2 

Montour 2 

Northampton 1 

Northumberland 51 

Perry 6 

Philadelphia 1 

Schuylkill 14 

Snyder 71 

Somerset 15 

Susquehanna 4 

Union 9 

Washington 1 

Westmoreland 3 

Wyoming 1 

Wayne 1 

York 7 

Distribution of students according to 
Church membership: JOSEPH PHILLIPS, Baritone 

Lutheran 174 ! Who will appear with R. Leon Trick, Pianist, in Seibert Hall on Friday eve- 



Methodist 38 ! 

Presbyterian 33 ! 

Catholic 29 

Reformed 28 

Evangelical 21 

United Brethren 14 

No Preference 12 

Episcopal 10 

Congregational 4 

Baptist 3 

Jewish 2 

Christian Science 1 

Christian 1 

Church of God 1 

Unitarian , 1 

Universal 1 



The Mammal 

Conductor: "You can't take that dog 
into the train; you'll have to put him 
in the baggage car." 

Lady: "This isn't a dog; this is a 
mammal." 

Conductor: "Well— all right— take 
him in; but he looks a lot like a dog 
to me." 



ning of this week in the first number of the 1929-1930 Star Course under 
auspices of Susquehanna University. 



EUREKA 
TAILORING CO. 

ONE DOLLAR CLEANERS 

Work Called for and Delivered 
East Pine Street Phone 74-Y 



"REMEMBER YOUR COLLEGE 
DAYS WITH PHOTOGRAPHS" 

Schindler Studio 

615 Market Street Sunbury, Pa. 



EAT AT 

LEIBY'S 

Sunbury, Pa 



Home of 
PRINTZESS COATS 

THE BON TON 

(345-347 Market St. Sunbury 



Merchant Tailor 
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SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
Market Street Selinsgrove 



Dr. Rollo Walter Brown, of Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, lectured to the 
faculty and student body assembled 
in Chapel yesterday morning. 

His theme was "The Romance of 
Being a Student." His address was 
filled with significant, pity statements 
which kept the assembly in an uproar 
during the entire talk. 

During the course of the address, 
Dr. Brown gave his recipe for a suc- 
cessful outlook on life: seeing things 
as they are and comprehending them; 
setting up a task to perform here on 
earth; finding satisfaction in satis- 
fying others, without hope of enum- 
eration. 

Dr. Brown is a scholar of note. He 
has travelled widely and lectured at 
all the larger universities and colleges 
of the country. 

S 

—Susquehanna is on the march. 



Honolulu.Hawaii— (IP)— Seven scien- 
tists aboard the ncn-magnetic ship 
negie, have reported the discovery of 
two new mountains in the Pacific 
Ocean. Although the summits of the 
mountains are far under water, they 
are said to rise 10.000 feet from the 
floor of the sea. Another ridge has 
been found by the scientists, which is 
6.000 feet high. 



Dance Pro g r a m s 

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PI GAMMA MU HELD 

ITS FIRST MEETING 

Pi Gamma Mu held a business meet- 
ing on Monday evening with President 
Kiracofe presiding. Secretary Kretsch- 
mann read several reports concerning 
both local and national business, also 
some letters recently received from 
headquarters. Mr. Kiracofe appointed 
the standing committees for the year: 
Program, Dr. Woodruff, chairman; ; 
Miss Eastep, Miss Moore, Mr. Kaltrit- ', 
er; Social, Professor Wood, chairman; 
Miss Erdman, Miss Thomas; Publicity,! 
Dr. Charles Fisher, Mr. Ramsey, HiM 
Moody. 

S 

—Susquehanna plays the University 
of Delaware at Newark, Del., Saturday, i 



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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D.. President 
A. B. and B. S. Degrees — Strong courses in Liberal Arts, Science, Edu- 
cation and Business Administration. 
Extension Courses at Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township and Mt. Cartnel. 
Courses of instruction for teachers on the University lumpus on 
Friday evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four-Year Public School Music Course with degree in Bachelor of 
Music is attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music. 
Susquehanna stands for a well-rounded education, clean sports, re- 
creation for every student, earnestness in study, and above all, Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For information write 
GEORGE F. DUNKELBERGER, Ph.D., Dean. 



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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Artist Here Friday 




R. LEON TRICK. Pianist 
Who will appear with Joseph Phil- 
lips, baritone, in Seibert Hall on 
Friday evening of this week in the 
first number of the 1929-1930 Star 
Course under auspices of Susque- 
hanna University. 

S 

STUDENTS GO TO STATE PARK 
A number of Susquehanna students 
motored to Snyder-Middleswarth State 
Park, more familiarly known as the 
Tall Timbers, Sunday afternoon. They 
were Edith Erdly, Twila Crebs, Thelma : 
Crebs, Lillian Kordes, Frank Ramsey, . 
Andy Kozak, John Senko, Frank Mc- 
Cormick. Nevin Dorsheimer and James ' 
Herrold. 

The party hiked about eight miles 
through the park, after which a de- 
licious supper was enjoyed. They re- 
turned to Selinsgrove early Sunday 
evening. 

S 

MUSIC AND DRAMATIC 

ARTISTS APPEAR ON 

1929-30 STAR COURSE 



i Continued from Page 1) 
talented group of players appeared on 
Susquehanna's campus in a previous 
engagement in the 1927-1928 season, at 
which time they gave a very delightful 
interpretation of Bacon's "Lightnin'. " 
Kneiscl String; Quartet Engaged 

A rare musical treat will be offered 
Friday. December 6, when the Mari- 
anne Kneisel String Quartet from New 
York City will appear here for a con- 
cert. 

The first violinist of this Quartet is 
the daughter of Franz Kneisel. who 
for years was the most celebrated vio- 
linist of Boston and New York, as well 
as concertmeister of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. The Franz Kneisel 
String Quartet later made a great 
name thruout the East, and this dau- 
ghter, trained by her father, is carry- 
ing on the traditions of this particular 
organization. 

The press for the past four years has 
been unanimous in praise of the Mari- 
anne Kneisel String Quartet. 
"Tarn O'Shanter" and Boston Male 
Chorum 

Thursday. January 25 brings the 
Scottish Musical Comedy Company in 
"Tarn O'Shanter." This company plays 
in New York City and Brooklyn the 
week of this date, and it has been with 
considerable urging that they have 
agreed to make this side tup for one 
night. 

The Course will be closed Thursday, 
March 6. with a concert by the Boston 
Male Chorus, who generously gave the 
Students I noon concert last Winter 
while oil a concert tour thru Pennsyl- 
sylvania, Their personnel has been 
somewhat changed and improved. 
They bring with bhCHQ the popular 
sno, May Korb, ■ protege of Mme. 
Sembrich, who has successfully ap- 
peared in concert and opera in our 
Eastern cities. 

Students who were unable to secure 
then Course tickets yesterday or today 
in the Bursar's Office will be able to 
n by calling at the Conserva- 
tory office between one and two, any 
day this week, 

S 

200 PARENTS WERE 

HONORED QUESTS Of 

UNIVERSITY SATURDAY 



Dr. Auchmuty by saying that the Fac- 
ulty really are net so bad as the stu- 
dents represent them. He also said 
that he thought the faculty now are 
better looking than they were thirty 
years ago. Dr. Smith stated that he 
did not know where that placed Dr. 
Manhart. 

As the parents came from the din- 
ing room, several members of the Y. 
W. C. A. distributed roses to the moth- 
ers. 

The parents were guests at the foot- 
ball game which immediately followed 
the dinner. Many a son played harder 
on Saturday because his Dad and 
Mother were on the sidelines watch- 
ing him. 

At the close of the game, a tea was 
held in Seibert Hall parlors in honor 
of the parents. Miss Hade. Dean of 
women was hostess at this affair. She 
was assisted by several Seibert Hall 
girls. 

In the evening, many cars and trains 
carried the parents back home. The 
day was a success from beginning to 
end. Many parents were heard saying 
as they left the campus: "It was good 
to have been at college." 
S 

COLLEGIATE DEBATE 

QUESTION SELECTED 

i Continued from Page 1) 

Forensic relationships were resumed 
with Southwestern of California. Wash- 
ington and Jefferson. Temple, Lafay- 
ette, Lehigh, and others. Debates with 
these institutions have been scheduled 
tentatively. 

Excellent progress is being made by 
Dr. Kern in selecting and whipping in- 
to shape both men's and women's var- 
sity teams from the list of those desir- 
ing to participate in forensics this 
season. Many more aspirants await 
their turn at a trial debate. 

The second practice debate was held 
Friday afternoon of last week, when 
John Schiavo. Sarah Shaulis. Frank 
Ramsey, Walter Foulkrod. Mary Weav- 
erly, and Wilson Sieber debated the 
Uniform Motor Code. Another debate 
will be held Friday of this week, when 
the Constitutional governments of the 
United States and Great Britain will 
be discussed. 

Susquehanna's debating society has 
been heartily congratulated for the at- 
tractive petition to the authorities of 
Tau Kappa Alpha. National Debating 
Society, and also for the splendid rec- 
ord of the personnel appearing in the 
petition. Final word as to the accep- 
tance or rejection of the Orange and 
Maroon debaters into the national or- 
ganization will be made by the execu- 
tive of that body about Nov. 15. 

S 

HAVERFORD GRIDDERS 

BATTER SUSQUEHANNA 

ELEVEN HERE, 19 - 7 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1929 



'Continued from Pa :>' 1) 
Pro! - Ullsoi 

during the serving of the 

[1 eemed ■ . ■• natural 

■ i Bill R '!). with the ciub.i 

i h ■ m of 

Pre idem 

Dr. 

■ 

In behalf 
I 
o be hei 
tnembei 

■ the invi- 
tation to 1 ; • He 



( Continued from Page 1 » 
ploughed his way through guard for 
15 yards. Out of seven plays, Moser 
took the ball five times to bring it to 
the 5-yard line. Wormley brought the 
ball on the two-yard line and Moser 
ploughed his way through the center 
to get the lone Susquehanna touch- ' 
down. 

Glenn must be given much credit 
for the way in which he ran his team 
in times of much demoralizing distress. 
He helped gain yards on Susque- 
hanna's scoring play. This being his 
first college game, much may be ex- 
pected from Skippy in the coming 
years. 

Saturday's game was the first in the 
past three years in which Johnny 
Wall's name was not seen on the start- 
ing line-up Wall was seen in action 
in the latter part of the game, and did 
well in spite of his injuries, which arej 
slowly responding to treatment. 

Besides Glenn. Moser deserves much 
credit In keeping up the morale of his 
teammates When yardage was need- 
ed the most, it seemed it was always 
Moser wlu> came through. 

On the line it was Captain Garman. 
Auchmuty and Wolfe who stood out. 
Captain Gaiman and Moser stopped 
many plays in backing up the line. 
Auchmuty played a bang-up game at 
guard, tearing through the line and 
throwing many a Haveitord man for 
I Iota, Wolte had a peach of a day 
at the wing po.st. snaring many passes 
tor considerable gams One pass he 
caughl several InehM Off the ground. 
On i he defense, Wolfe got through 
Haverford strong end and spoiled 
several pi 

ii h Ullery substituted Scott for 
Wormley in the last quarter, Like a 

Hash. Sim ted a rally that look- 

ed like a touchdown. However, it 
the final whistle stop- 
ind tun 

only half the 
ii tverford ks, made 

them look fOOllSh 111 'he tew 1111! 

ol plaj in' was in the game Tee 

oatch- 
I DS : about 30 1 

but the rally « i 
The game, play by p] 

First Quarter 



Captain Morris, of Haverford, kick- 
ed off to Wormley. who ran the ball 
back to the Susquehanna 27-yard line. 
Malasky hit the left side of the line 
for four yards and Wormley slid off 
right tackle for eight more yards. Ma- 
lasky brought the pigskin to the cen- 
ter of the field with two smashes at 
the center of the line. Wormley 
fumbled and Simmons recovered the 
ball on the Haverford 43-yard line. 
Simmons immediately twisted his way 
for 15 yards off tackle. Auchmuty 
threw Litchfield for a loss of five yards. 
A pass. Morris to Cadbury, was suc- 
cessful for 15 yards. Simmons gained 
11 yards around right end. placing the 
ball on the Susquehanna 15-yard line. 
Morris plunged through tackle to the 
5-yard line, where he finally took it 
over for the touchdown. Morris also 
kicked the extra point. 

Glenn ran the kick-off back to his 
27-yard line. On a reverse play, Speer 
gained 12 yards at left end. No farther 
gain was made and an exchange of 
kicks finally gave Susquehanna the 
ball on its own 15-yard line. As Speer 
fumbled, Simmons picked the pigskin 
out of the air and took it over the 
line for a touchdown. Morris missed 
the uprights for the extra point. Glenn 
received the kick-off on his 15-yard 
line. Speer fumbled, but recovered 
again for a loss as the quarter ended. 
Second Quarter 

Susquehanna again fumbled and re- 
covered for a loss. Glenn punted to 
tbje Haverford 47-yard line. A re- 
verse netted 8 yards. Cadbury and 
Morris made 6 and 7 yards apiece at 
center. Morris kicked outside at the 
Susquehanna 8-yard line. Glenn punt- 
ed back to the center of the field. 
Morris cut in at end for 10 yards. 
Haverford was penalized 15 yards for 
holding. An exchange of kicks gave 
Haverford possession of the ball in 
the center of the field. Morris circled 
end for 12 yards as the half ended. 
Third Quarter 

Moser kicked off to Dothard, who 
ran the ball back to the 40-yard line. 
Auchmuty tossed Dothard for a five 
yard loss. An exchange of kicks gave 
Haverford the ball again on its 38- 1 
yard line. Another exchange of punts I 
followed and Haverford recovered the 
ball, this time on the Susquehanna 
36-yard line. On two plays Morris! 
crashed through to the 25-yard line. 
Rice circled end for 15 yards. Dothard; 
then brought the ball to the 1-yard' 
line, where Morris took it over for the! 
score. The try for point was blocked. 
Glenn took the kick-off on his 27- 
yard line. Glenn made a beautiful run 
through tackle for 20 yards. Moser 
plowed his way through guard for 15! 
yards. A pass, Glenn to Wormley, was 
good for 5 yards. Moser battered cen- 
ter on two plays for 9 yards, bringing 
the ball to the Haverford 16-yard line. 
Out of seven plays, Moser took the 
ball five times to bring it to the 5- 
yard line. 

Fourth Quarter 

Wormley brought the ball to the 2- 
yard line, and Moser drilled his way 
through the center of the line for the- 
touchdown. Wall kicked the extra 
point. Haverford received the kick- 
off at her 34-yard line, but failed to ; 
gain and punted to the Susquehanna 
37-yard line. Wall tossed a pass to; 
Wolfe for 15 yards. Another forward 
pass by the same pair netted 10 more 
yards. Haverford grounded three suc- 
cessive attempts at passing and gained 
the pigskin on its 35-yard line. Morris 
punted to the Susquehanna 32 -yard 
line. Scott tore off gains of 5 and 10 
yards around end. Two passes, Wall 
to Scott, gained five yards each just 



before the final whistle blew. 

Line-up: 
Susquehanna— 7 Haverford— 19 

Wolfe R. E Crawford 

Zak R. T Milliken, 

R. Garman — R. G Swan i 

A. Garman C Jones 

Auchmuty L. G Wriggins 

Winters L. T Fields 

Adams L. E Conn 

Glenn Q. B Cadbury 

Wormley H. B Litchfield 

Speer H. B Simmons . 

Malasky F. B Morris, (C) 

Score by periods: 

Haverford 13 6 0—19 

Susquehanna 7 — 7 



Touchdowns — Morris 2. Simmons, 
Moser. Points after touchdown — Mor- 
ris and Wall (placement). First downs 
—Haverford 14, Susquehanna 11. 

Substitutions: Haverford— W. Mas- 
land for Crawford, Rice for Simmons, 
Scramm for Wriggins, McConnell for 
Jones, Barnhurst for Conn, W. Dot- 
hard for Litchfield, Abbe for Milliken, 

E. Hogenauer for Cadbury, Smith for 
Abbe; Susquehanna — Moser for Ma- 
lasky, MacDonald for Speer, Wall for 
Glenn, Scott for Wormley, Berger for 
Garman. 

Officials: Referee— H. S. Shaw; um- 
pire— P. L. Reagan; head lineman— R. 

F. Stein. 



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WELCOME 
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The Susquehanna 



DRAG THE 
DRAGONS 



^ 



Volume XXXVI 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY. OCTOBER 22, 1929 



Number 10 



Pianist and Baritone 
Appear in the First 
Star Course Number 



Buffalo, N. Y., Artists Delight Audience 

With Well-Balanced Program in 

Seibert Chapel Hall 



R. LEON TRICK AND JOSEPH 

PHILLIPS PRESENT RECITAL 



Numerous Encores Given; Mr. Trick 

Plays Original Composition; Mr. 

Phillips Recording Artist 



Star Course at Susquehanna for the 
season of 1929-1930 was inaugurated on 
Friday evening by a joint recital given 
by R. Leon Trick, pianist, and Joseph 
Phillips, baritone soloist, both of Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

The program given by these two 
artiste included a number of classical 
and popular numbers which were well 
received by the large audience that 
greeted the opening recitalists. 

Mr. Phillips had a rich baritone 
voice which was especially pleasing in 
the melodious themes he presented. 
His encores, which were popular in 
nature, were also very appreciatively 
received. He was called on to give sev- 
eral encores and make several bows 
by the delighted audience. 

Mr. Trick proved himself a brilliant 
pianist whose musical ability showed 
marvelous technique and interpreta- 
tion. As accompanist he also was very 
pleasing. 

As an encore, Mr. Trick pleased his 
audience by playing an original com- 
position called "Tints of Spring." 

Students and faculty turned out in 
good numbers to hear the first recital. 
Artists Famous in Musical World 

Mr. Phillips has sung for the Victor 
Recording Company and before royal 
audiences abroad. He sings in the 
Richmond Avenue Methodist Church 
of Buffalo, in addition to his recital 
work. 

Mr. Trick has a commanding posi- 
tion in the musical world of Buffalo 
as a teacher. He has four teachers 
working for him in his studio. He also 
directs the Rubinstein Chorus of Buf- 
falo which gives three annual concerts 
of a public nature in Buffalo. The 
chorus is comprised of seventy-five 
women. Mr. Trick is organist of the 
Church of the Redeemer in Bufaflo. 
of which Dr. Smith was the pastor for 
eight years prior to his coming to Sus- 
quehanna. 

Following the recital, a social hour 
was enjoyed at the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. Smith at which the faculty of the 
Conservatory of Music was introduced 
to the guest musicians. 

Both Mr. Phillipa and Mr. Trick 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Annual Frosh-Soph 
Game Here Saturday 



Inter-Class Fray WUI be Played as a 

Preliminary to Susquehanna-Drexel 

Homecoming Game 



Sophomores and Frosh will meet in 
the annual Soph-Frosh football com- 
bat this Saturday on the University 
Field, as a preliminary to the Susque- 
hanna-Drexel Home Coming feature. 
The kick-off for this inter-class game 
will take place at 12:45 p. m. 

Last year, the present Sophomore 
class won, 2-0. It was a hard-fought 
battle thruout, with both teams play- 
ing good ball. This year, the Sopho- 
mores are out to enter the Hall of 
Fame. They have a slight edge over 
the Freshman, but a hard battle is an- 
ticipated. 

The Sophomores, under the faithful 
guidance of Coach Bedford, have been 
working out eviery night, perfecting 
many deceiving trick plays to pull on 
the Frosh 

The yearling- IN being brought into 
shape under the efforts and guidance 
of Coach Bishop According to all re- 
ports from ' Bish. he expects to clean 
U p o) .!• men. He claims 

; w , w; ,: h ' combination out 

on the field the coveted foot- 

ball trophy Hum the class of '32. 

Looking iMft OfW the records of the 
various uruout the past num- 

l Jer of HI fhid th at no 

team. eithe: In rtotorj or defeat, has 
scored HUre ttSlB NVW point.- 

Both team- are oul to .shatter this 
rd. 



Jr. Varsity Loses 
to Lock Haven, 6-0 



Rejuvenated Team Holds Morganites 

to Only One Counter in 

Fast Game 



A strong Junior Varsity nearly turn- 
ed the tables on Lock Haven State 
Teachers College Saturday, when the 
up-river team registered only a 6-0 
victory over the Susquehanna reserves. 

The first and lone counter of the 
game was made early in the first quar- 
ter. Up until this time the JayVees 
did not seem very well organized, but 
from this point on, the boys settled 
down and held Coach Morgan's boys 
scoreless in the remaining period. 

Captain Speiglemeyer played a whale 
of a game at end. Paired with Meyers, 
a halfback, he kept the Lock Haven 
tackle from making a tackle during 
the entire game. 

Rummel played well at the opposite 
end. Traxler. Rhoads, and Witkop 
proved to be the bulwark of strength 
on the line. Witkop tore through the 
line on every play to make a tackle 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



PRESIDENT SMITH 

WELCOMES ALUMNI 



Saturday. October 26 has been 
designated as Alumni Day at Sus- 
quehanna University. We are to 
have a big attraction in the after- 
noon in the form of a football game 
with Drexel Institute, of Philadel- 
phia. In addition to this the stu- 
dents on the campus are arranging 
to have open house for the old 
"grads" during the day. 

We hope that you will find it 
possible to come back to your Alma 
Mater and renew the old ties of 
friendship. You will be interested 
to note the improvements in things 
in various respects and I am sure 
will want to see one of the finest 
football teams that Susquehanna 
has had in many years as they join 
in battle array with Drexel Insti- 
tute. 

This is a word to welcome our 
Alumni, and to express the hope 
that Saturday, October 26 will be 
a source of a great deal of joy to 
everyone who is able to return. 
Cordially yours, 
Pres. G. Morris Smith. 



-♦ 



Susquehanna's Gridiron Coaching Staff 




Reference Books 
Received at Library 



New Edition of Encyclopedia Britan- 
nica Placed on Shelves; New In- 
dexes Also Received 



t ■ i -.<* 

DAUBENSPECK 

ASST. COACH 



"BILL" ULLERY 
HEAD COACH 



"henzes 
asst coach 



-£H>a- 



Drexel Gridmen Here World Honors 
For Alumni Day Sat. Edison on Golden 

Electric Jubilee 



The Library has recently received 
the new edition of the Encyclopedia 
Britannica. This is an important ac- 
quisition to the Library equipment. It 
will facilitate reference work to a great 
extent. 

Although the title is the same as the 
one of the older edition, the work is 
entirely rewritten so that the con- 
tents are practically new. Progress in 
new fields of knowledge and achieve- 
ment are here brought up to date. The 
last volume of maps is accurate and 
very accessible. 

Fifteen hundred superb illustrations 
are found in this new monumental 
work. These pictures alone are an end- 
less treasure-house of interest and 
education. Here is a unique gallery of 
art and nature and science. Volcan- 
oes, machinery, pyramids, marvelous 
color plates of flowers, birds, precious 
jewels and famous paintings — these are 
only a few of the 15,000 superb illus- 
trations. 

The New York Sun says of it: "By 
all odds the finest encyclopedia in Eng- 
lish, if not in any language, and a work 
on which our age may pradonably 
pride itself." 

The Library has now two volumes 
of the Dictionary of American Biog- 
raphy. By the end of the year two 
more volumes will be ready. When this 
set of twenty volumes is completed, a 
much needed gap in the field of Ameri- 
can biography will be filled. 

By the end of October the two sup- 
plementary volumes of the New Inter- 
national Encyclopedia should be here. 
These volumes will bring this work up 
to date. 

Last week the Library was the recip- 
ient of a gift of about seventy volumes 
of bound magazines from the James 
V. Brown Library in Williamsport. 
These are very valuable and will be 
an aid in reference work. 

To supplement the card catalog it 
is necessary to have certain indexes, 
as much important material cannot 
be shown there. These indexes are be- 
ing added to the Library from time to 
time. The Short Story index is now 
in the Library and the Poetry Index, 
Song Index, Essay Index and Index to 
Plays will be added. 

S 

SUSQUEHANNA NEEDS U. 

As plans for Home Coming Day near 
completion, Susquehanna finds that in 
order to make the day a complete suc- 
cess, U must be there. 

Help make October 26th a Banner 
Day! 



$50,000 Heart Balm 



Crusaders' Aerial 
Attack Defeats 
Delaware, 6-0 



First Game Away from Home Featured 

by New Combination in Backfield: 

Malasky Shifted to Half 



DELAWARE MAKES ONLY TWO 
FIRST DOWNS; S. U. ELEVEN 



Lone Touchdown of Game Scored by 
Malasky on Long Bullet Pass from 
Wall; Forwards Sensation of Game 



Susquehanna's stalwart footbal 
hopefuls journeyed to Newark, Dela- 
ware to score a 6-0 victory over a 
strong and determined Delaware elev- 
en in their first game played away 
from home, last Saturday. 

The Crusaders, strengthened by the 
return of Johnny Wall, a quarterback, 
displayed a fine brand of football. The 
new combination in the backfield 
worked smoothly and came through 
with large gains. 

In the first three periods Delaware 
found a stone wall in its way every 
time a line play was tried. The mas- 
terful punting of Wall kept the Dela- 
ware tribe from obtaining a first down 
until the last period, when they ob- 
tained two. Susquehanna ran up a 
total of eleven first downs during the 
course of the game. 

The closest Delaware came to Sus- 
quehanna's uprights was on the twen- 
ty-five yard line. Then they were 
forced to kick when the Crusader line 
held them. Susquehanna carried the 
ball up the field several times within 
scoring distance, but failed to come 
through with the necessary push and 
was forced to kick or lose the ball on 
downs. 

Both teams resorted to an aerial at- 
tack. The Crusaders completed several 
passes, but the opponents' passes were 
all grounded. Coach Ullery evidently 
self, playing the fullback position. He 
tore off large gains through the line. 
Rupp called signals and played a good 
game. 

was prepared for an aerial attack with 
a strong defense, every man covering 
an opponent. 

The lone score of the game came in 
the second period. After the ball was 
pushed down the field by Moser, 
Wormley and Malasky, the ball rested 
on Delaware's 20-yard line, when 
Johnny Wall zipped one of his bullet 
passes into the waiting arms of Ma- 
lasky, who carried it the twenty yards 
for the deciding touchdown. 

A very deciding change was made in 
Susquehanna's starting line-up in Sat- 
urday's fray. Yon and Miller, a pair of 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Glee Club and Band 



Ullerymen Begin Intensive Workout for 

Coming Fray; Fraternities Will 

Hold Dances in Evening 



Susquehanna will welcome to her 
Campus grads and friends of yester- 
years, Saturday, October 26. That date 
has been officially designated as the 
annual Alumni Home Coming Day. 

Coach Ullery and his assistants are 
pointing their men for the Home Com- 
ing game with Drexel. Some hard 
work-outs are being booked this week 
in order to perfect to a higher degree 
the new backfield combination which 
was used last week in defeating the 
Delaware eleven. 

Drexel comes here with many stars 
on its team and with several enviable 
records. Two weeks ago the Drexel ag- 
gregation defeated the Juniata In- 
dians, Susquehanna's traditional rivals, 
19-0 Last Saturday the Dragoons de- 
d C. C. N. Y., 12-4. These two 
scores indicate that the Crusaders will 
hav all they can handle. 

Captain Redmond of Drexel is a it*] 
halfback and is going to be one of the 
hardest men to stop. Drexel hi. 
husky line which may cause some 
trouble for Ullery's men. 

Last year the- Dragoons turned bad; 
tin 1 Crusaders in the Quaker City, but 
this year's tilt promises to be a di: 
ent story. Barring unfOfseeu Injuries, 
Susquehanna will be ready to throw 
her most powerful lineup in the fray 
on Saturday. 

The Alumni Office is already receiv- 
i Concluded on Page 4> 



Many World Celebrities Join to Honor 

Edison on Fiftieth Anniversary 

of Electric Light 



Greenfield, the early American com- 
munity which Henry Ford has trans- 
planted to Dearborn, Michigan, from 
many parts of the country, yesterday 
was the scene of festivities watched 
by the whole world, and listened to by 
a great many Americans by means of 
the radio. 

It was the occasion of the celebra- 
tion of the Golden Anniversary of the 
invention of the electric light. Green- 
field was the center of the jubilee. 
Many other centers participated in 
the event. 

Thomas Alva Edison, octogenarian 
scientist and inventor, yesterday re- 
visited the scenes of his early life 
brought to one central point by Ford 
in the famous monumental town and 
museum. 

Smith's Creek Station, where he 
ejected from a train for setting fire 
to a baggage car while in an experi- 
mental mood; the Menlo Park labora- 
tory and boarding house, and many 
other scenes of his career, all are 
found there, oriented exactly as they 
m the original letting. 

600 Attend Banquet 

A banquet in honor of the inventor 
was held in Ford's reproduction of In- 
dependence Hall In the center of the 
(Concluded on Page 4' 



Suit Filed at S. U. Personnel Complete 

Names of Plaintiff and Defendant Not Band Has Thirty-Four Members, Men's 

Divulged; Trial Will be Held in Glee Club Twenty-Seven; Prof. 

Seibert Chapel Hall Allison Directs Both 



One of Susquehanna's most prom- 
inent men, whose name was not divulg- 
ed, has been sued by an unknown wom- 
an for $50,000 "heart balm." 

A speedy trial will be given the 
unfortunate young man, it is report- 
ed. The time of the trial will be made 
known just as soon as the authorities 
can come to a definite argreement. At- 
torneys have signified their desire to 
hold the trial in the auditorium of Sei- 
bert Hall. 

By this time, no doubt, the gentie 
readers of the SUSQUEHANNA are 
aroused that such a thing could occur 
on our campus. However, we are as- 
sured by the erstwhile members of the 
Sadtler Pre-Legal Club that it will 
merely be a Mock Trial, and not a 
genuine one. 

A petition drawn up in proper form 
was duly presented to the faculty by 
the embryo lawyers. Permission has 
been granted thrm to present this 
trial to the student body sometime be- 
the Christina n e I It will be 
given in Seiben Chapel Hall. 

The attorneys to represent the 
plaintiit and th dent In the 

where duly elected by the mem- 
Of the oeiety. They ai 

Senior Attorney for the Plain- 
John A. ScbJavo 
ney for the Plaintiff, Anthony J. Lu- 
Senior Attorney for the Defend- 
i Concluded on Page 4 



Twenty-seven young men have been 
selected by Prof. Elrose Allison to 
comprise the personnel of this year's 
Men's Glee Club. Prof. Allison is di- 
rector of the Glee Club. 

The complete personnel is as fol- 
lows : 

First tenors: R. Hostetter, secretary, 
J. Ballentine. W. Swarm, L. Fisher, 
business manager. R. Fisher. R. Wil- 
son; Second tenors: R Minnich, B. 
Nicodemus. R. Watkins. W. Welicky. 
treasurer. R. Hepner, J. Shoemaker, 
J. Petry, L. Olsen; First bass: L. Kurtl, 
president, C. Johnson, F. Metzgar. L. 
Legacy, C. Kroeck, J. Devers; Second 
basses: G. Hess, A. Lecrone. R. Lahr, 
J. Long. R. Rotfgers, F. Norton. L. Fox 

Thirty four men ire member- of the 
band, likewise diretoed by Prof Alli- 
son. The personnel of the band . 
follows : 

Trumpets, J. Ambicki. C. Mahaffey, 
J, Ballentine. .7 Burkey, R. Minnich, 
P. Haines. \V. Swarm, H. Hohman; 
Trombones, A Barber, R Mat tern, C. 
Yon, H. Gelnett; Clarinets: A. Snyder 
H. Graybill. H. B: r, C Shi 

P. Freed: Basses: A. Kozak. J Shoe- 
maker; Saxophones: D. Steele, w 
Metzgai P Wright, Coleman: A 
H. Burns. W. Hart man. J Rhine; Bav- 
>od, O. Kaltri'er: Drums: 
Newcomer. W, Strandquest, J. Ober- 
dorf, R. Bpeer, B Nicodemus; Piccolo. 
Haine.. 



FAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly during the College Year except Thanksgiving Week, Christ- 
mas. New Year and Easier Week. 

Subscription $1.50 a Year, Payable to Wilbur Berger. '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 

Editor-inChief Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

News Editor Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 

Betty Wardrop '32 Andy Kozak '32 John Kindsvatter '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Bruce Worthington, '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Edna Tressler, '30, Conservatory of Music 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1929 

SOCIABILITY 

"There seems to be a lack of sociability on the part of the 
Frosh, both men and -women, on Susquehanna's campus this 
the other day. Since we were looking for a timely topic for 
the other day. Since we were looking for a timely topicc for 
this department, we decided to investigate. 

Observing the student body from a distance with this par- 
ticular thing in mind, we noted that their statement unfortu- 
nately was true. The Frosh seem entirely indisposed to assoc- 
iate and converse with others unless a formal introduction has 
been made. They seem to want to revert to the Dark Ages, the 
Middle Ages, or what have you, during which no one ever con- 
descended to speak to a fellow -being until a formal presentation 
had been made. 

Even the formal introduction sometimes is insufficient, 
and you'll find many a first-year man that you met last week 
passing you by. unnoticed. 

rjpperelassmen, passing thru Hassinger's corridors, are not 
even shown the deference a visitor should be shown. 

When an upperclassman is strolling thru the down-town 
itreets, and passes some Frosh, the latter, including the women, 
seem to be saying to Themselves: "I hope tliis guy doesn't talk 
to me or top me, because I don't want to let any of my friends 
know that 1 know him." 

Seriously speaking, though, such a condition cannot con- 
tinue here any longer. It is <i <ii-oss violation of one of Susque- 
hanna's most sacred principles — friendly companionship and 
fellowship. 

Surely some one will take up this new problem and solve 
it. In former years, a rule requiring Frosh to speak and show 
deference to faculty members and upperclassmen was in force. 
Why not now? 

S 

AMERICAS THINKING IS FEMININE THINKING 

American thinking is feminine thinking, inculcated by wom- 
en teachers, highly competent in detail, immediate in its appli- 
cation, rigidly idealistic regardless of the winking facts, and 
weak on critical examination, Professor Robert E. Rogers, of 
Massachusettes Institute of Technology told the sixteenth an- 
nual national business conference al Babson Park, Wellesley, 
Massachusettes, recently. 

The professor, who created a national sensation last spring 
by advising i he senior class at M. I. T. to be snobs, analyzed "Our 

Young People" at the conference. 

"Our boys and girls have not been taught to think," he said. 
"They are interested in applications, not ideals ami principles. 
They have had. in school at least, no fundamental instruction in 
the problems of ethics and conduct, in the problems of society 
and government, in genuine science as opposed to tinkering. 
Above all they have not been taught to criticize or analyze. 

"They come to higher education and life with a settled eon- 
Viction that the only allowable criticism is •constructive.' as if 
one could construct without first tearing down. 

"Whose fault is it? I will hazard one unpopular guess. 
For a half cent my now the largest part of our young people have 
been trained exclusively by women leachers. The faults I have 

been speaking about are the faults of women teachers. Fifty 
years of this has produced a people incompetent to think politi- 
cally ami philosophically." 

Here is some food for thought and an interesting subject 
for a round table discussion or "bullfest." 

S 

COLLEGE \<> PLACE FOB ART STUDENTS 

Colleges are no place for art students, according to .lames 
Montgomery Flagg, well-known illustrator, who recently set 

'li his views on the matter in a letter to the editor of the 
A' ir York 'linns. 

Such a statement, says .Mr. Flagg, is difficult to explain to 
the layman. 

"Nevertheless," he continues, "no general course can be set 



may be absorbing, observing the phenomena of life, translating 
them into form and color in his mind, learning to see what others 
are blind to, meditating on life, weighing the emotions, discard- 
ing traditions, philosophizing, loving, lusting, drinking, despair- 
ing, hoping, enthralled in ecstasy, being generous, being selfish, 
hating, sympathizing, dying and being born again the next morn- 
ing, learning to control his feelings — this usually is the most dif- 
ficult lesson of all. an artist being a person with an exalted con- 
sciousness — all this is preparation for his life. 

"Where does a place with rules and regulations come in in j 
these years? It doesn't. It would crucify him, atrophy his en- 
thusiasm, standardize him. I believe an art student should have 
a high school education and then plunge into art study. That 
does not prevent his reading onmiverously."' 

Flags savs that when he finished high school he considered 



ZlirPKE HONORED 

BY COLLEGE HUMOR 



< 



***************** 

ALUMNI NOTES 



• * * • 



********* 



* * * * 



Pastor Interested In Sunday School 
Growth 

Rev. Clarence E. Naugle, '21 and '24, 
pastor of the St. Luke's Lutheran 
Church at Roaring Springs, Pa., de- 
serves credit for leadership in the 
erection of the new Sunday School 
building which was recently dedicated 
as an annex to the church. Shortly 
after his coming to this charge, he no- 
ticed the crowded Sunday School con- 
gregation. Upon encouragement from 
several members, he began to make 
plans for a new building. Rev. Naugle 
is to be congratulated for the excellent 
work that he is doing in this charge. 
Oldest "Susquehanna" Subscriber 

Makes a Significant Statement 

W. R. Wineand, '73, who resides at 
Altoona, Pa,, the oldest subscriber to 
the "Susquehanna," make a significant 
statement on his return card. He says, 
"I am resting and waiting my transla- 
tion to the better and larger life." On 
December 17, Dr. Wineand will cele- 
brate his 91st birthday. We extend 
heartiest wishes to Dr. Wineand! 

Dr. Huntingdon Writes on Loyalty 

In the "Every Evening" newspaper of 
Wilmington, Del., of October 12th. an 
article written by Rev. Park W. Hun- 
tingdon, President of the Wilmington 
Council of Churches, and pastor of St. 
Stephen's Lutheran Shurch, set forth 
the principles that should be kept up- 
permost on Loyalty Sunday, which was 
observed on Sunday, October 13. 

"In this so-called materialistic age 
it is well for us accasionally to call a 
halt in our made behaviour for earthly 
success and to commune with our God 
in the definite environs of the church's 
worshipful atmo.sphere. Each day we 
are confronted with great problems, 
especially in the business and profess- 
ional world, and an hour spent on Sun- 
day in fellowship with believers makes 
our burdens lighter; eases our minds 
and soothes our souls. . . . The Chris- 
tian Church has always been civiliza- 
tion's strongest support, giving it a 
moral dynamic, a spiritual force, a re- 
formative strength, and an unseen 
power without which our great com- 
plex civilization could not stand nor 
long endure. The power in the church 
is expressed in the home by love and 
the home without religious influence 
is only a building with four walls. . . . 
Well may we boast of our great cul- 
ture; our wonderful achievements in 
the arts and in the sciences, but we 
must not forget that they are impos- 
sible without the work and influence of 
the Christian Church. Take the church 
out of our national, state, and city life 
and civilization would soon retrograde 
and die in vice and sin; because hu- 
manity would have no restraining in- 
fluence nor strengthening power to 
point to mankind to the finer and 
higher ideals of life." 

Whereabouts and Doings of Grads 
'83 

Rev. C. F. King is serving a pastorate 
at Charleroi. Pa. 

'86 

Rev. J. W. Glover is serving a pas- 
torate at Ashland, Pa., in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Field. 
'90 

Dr. Warren L. Kauffman is in the 
Educational Field of work. He receiv- 
ed his Ph.D., from Susquehanna in '17 
and is at the present time Superin- 
tenden of Schools in Yonkers, N. Y: 
'92 

We must go to the Western Coast 
to meet Dr. Richard W. Mattern. He 
resides at Glendale, Calif. He is Civil 
Service Commi.s.sioner for L. A. Co. He 
is also lecturer on Dr. Martin Luther. 
94-'97 

Rev. M. McHenry Allbeek. pastor of 
Zelienople for the past eleven years, 
mves interesting facts. He is a member 



every art student, because no teacher knows wlmi is best to 
develop in each student. The very nam re of his i a lent, supposing 
ii- has any, is elusive even to himself, niiiil he has studied for 
come lime. Sometimes his studying takes the dreadful form <>!' 

ling which i* possibly only seeming. Curiously enough he 



going to Yale — but that he is glad ho decided not to. Instead 
he "loafed for four years at the Art Students' League, went to 
England, studied there, and then a year in Paris.'' 

"And I learned a lot more," he says, "than if I had allowed 
myself to be a part of a system — an inmate of an institution." 

John A. Herman, student of Mission- 
ary Institute, and football star of early 
days, is engaged in Scientific Farming 
at Fombell, Pa. 

Rev. Allbeek and his son, Rev. Wil- 
lard Allbeek, visited the campus re- 
cently. They echo the spirit of the 
campus, "Susquehanna is on the 
march," when they say, "The place 
looks fine.' ' 

'98 

Frank Ellis Woodley, after receiving 
his D.D. from University of Pennsyl- 
vania, entered the medical field as a 
dentist. He is now practicing at Ni- 
agara Falls, N. Y. 

'02 

David B. Moist, Harisburg, Pa., is a 
Civil Engineer for the Harrisburg Rail- 
way Co. 

'07 

Rev. Charles W. Barnett, Evans City, 
Pa., in addition to his regular parish 
work, is secretary of the West Confer- 
ence, Pittsburgh Synod. 
'06-'09 

Dr. Thomas B. Uber is pastor of the 
Reen Memorial Lutheran Church at 
St. Lois, Mo. He is building a new 
church. The cornerstone was laid on 
Sept. 9. It will be of solid brick and tile 
masonry. He is not only serving suc- 
cessfully his pastorate but also is sec- 
retary of the Illinois Synod. 
'10 

Miss Elizabeth Taylor, who received 

her M. S. from Susquehanna in '27, 

is now instructor in Mathematics in 

the Senior High School at Altoona, Pa. 

14 

Miss Julia D. Liston, Braddock, Pa., 
is teaching History in Braddock High 
School. 

'18 

Rev. Henry C. Thomsen is serving 
the Lutheran Church of Good Shep- 
herd at South Ozone Park, Long Island. 
N. Y. 

Miss Eva Herman, of Selinsgrove. 
Pa., is head of the English Department 
of the Selinsgrove High School. 
19 

Rev. Willard Allbeek, Chairman of 
County Church Committee of the 
Pittsburgh Synod, sponsored a special 
Country Church Edition of the Luth- 
eran Monthly for August. Rev. Allbeek 
has been pastor of St. John's Church, 
Highland Parish, for more than seven 
years. 

'21 

Rev .and Mrs. James Shannon are 
living at Jennerstown, Pa., where Rev. 
Shannon is serving a Lutheran pas- 
torate. Mrs. Shannon was formerly 
Miss Rearick, and was a graduate of 
the class of 1920. 

'21 

Professor Ellis K. Lecrone is in the 
educational field of work in Wilming- 
ton, Del. He is Math. Instructor and 
Athletic Coach in the high school of 
that city. 

Mr. Peter E. Turik is practicing law 
at Glen Lyon, Pa. He is also Poor Di- 
rector for Luzerne County. 
'23 

Oliver I. Ramer is instructor in 
Mathematics at Hartwick Seminary. 

Ray V. Laudenslager, Weatherly, Pa., 
is Supervising Principal of Schools of 
that city. 

'25 

Frank R. Kerlin is Science teacher in 
the Camp Curtin High School at Har- 
risburg, Pa. 

'27 

Miss Arline Fisher is this year Latin 
Instructor in Bradford Senior High 
School at Bradford, Pa. 

Harold A. Swank is teaching in the 
Connellsville Senior High School at 
Connell.sville, Pa. He is also coach of 
the Debating Team, which entered the 
Fayette County Debating League, and 
Faculty Advisor of the High School 
paper. Susquehanna has several other 
men on this faculty, namely, George 
Beam, '29, teaching commercial sub- 
jects; and John Lewis, '26, teaching 
Biology. 



Robert C. Zuppke, whose University 
of Illinois eleven survived a hectic sea- 
son in the Western Conference last 
year to win the football title, has the 
distinction of being the first person 
honored by "College Humor" Magazine 
for marked success in the collegiate 
field. The Illinois coach, whose teams 
have been a constant menace to schools 
thruout the country since he took 
charge of the grid staff at Illinois, has 
consistantly developed championship 
contenders. 

In recognition of Zuppke's winning 
the Big Ten title two consecutive sea- 
sons and his contribution to college 
athletics, "College Humor" recently 
presented him with a beautiful Gruen 
Paladin watch, "The Croix de Guerre 
of American Achievement." This is the 
first of a series of watches to be pre- 
sented to coaches, faculty members and 
students whose achievements in the 
collegiate field entitles them to the 
honor. 

The watch given to Zuppke was en- 
graved with the initials of this col- 
orful football coach in orange and 
blue enamel, the colors of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois. The following inscrip- 
tion also appeared on the rear of the 
gold case: "Outstanding Football 
Coach— University of Illinois — Present- 
ed by College Humor — September 1, 
1929. 

S 



— Come to Susquehanna for the 
Home Coming Game Saturday. 



Eat at 

The Don Mar 



L. M. GABEL, Propr. 



J 



Fisher's Jewelry Storej 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVER 
AND GLASS WARE 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

344 Market St. Sunbury, Pa. 



<$- 



■»»4>> 



! "DECORATIONS FOR YOUR 
PARTY" 

iFryling Stationery Co 



{ 411 Market Street 

Sunbury, Pa. 



• 



~-4 



STUDENTS 



•«> 



TRY 



REICHLEY'S 

LUNCH — SODAS — CANDY 



•- 



JOHN H. KELLER 

—Dealer In — 

Meats and Groceries 

Both Phones — Selinsgrove 



SNYDER COUNTY TRIBUNE 

JOB WORK A SPECIALTY 

Phone 68-W 



STANLEY 



Best in Moving Pictures 

Selinsgrove 




... 



phans Home Board, and a member of 
the Board of Directors of Susquehanna 
from the Pittsburgh Synod. 



-S- 



— Drexel Institute is the guest of 
Susquehanna for Home Coming Day. 



STRAND I 



SUNBIRY 

MON. and TUES., OCT 21 and 22 

"The Gamblers" 

With II. B. WARNER and 
LOIS WILSON 

WEDNESDAY and TIU'HSDAY 
OCTOBER 21! and 21 



The Mysterious 
Dr. Fu Manchu" 

A Paramount Picture 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
OCTOBER 21 and 26 

"SALUTE" 

with GEORGE O'BRIKN and 
HELEN ( UANDLKR 

All Talking Movietone 

You'll Mt KttTM wondeifui shots 

of the Army-Navy game 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



•AGE fHREfc 



1 



li X 



SOPHS LOSE TO SELINSGROVE 
HIGH SCHOOL IN SCRIMMAGE 
GAME BY SCORE OF 12 TO 6 



A hard-fought practice game with 
Selinsgrove High School was lost by 
the Sophomore class eleven last Tues- 
day afternoon, by a score of 12 to 6. 

The scrimmage was an exciting one 
for the rather, large group of specta- 
tors who witnessed the fracas. It was 
very noticeable that the Sophs had 
gathered a smooth working outfit. 

Three weeks ago Coach Bedford is- 
sued a call for Sophomore class foot- 
ball material. Since then he has been 
regularly holding practices, drilling a 
few fundamentals with his squad and 
organizing an offense. Tuesday's game 
showed that the line, as well as the 
backs were pulling together well. 

The town lads received the ball on 
the first kick-off and promptly began 
to march up the field. A long run 
around left end brought them within 
ten yards of their first goal. Then 
several line plays put the ball over for 
the first score. They failed to kick the 
point and so had a 6 point lead on the 
yet-bewildered Sophs. Selecting to 
kick again, the Sophomore kicker made 
a short kick and fell on the ball, after 
the Selinsgrove man fumbled. Then 
the Sophs started their march for a 
touchdown. Two first downs were 
made through the center of the line 
and then several end runs were tried, 
but these failed to gain any ground. 
Then through the line the Sophs car- 
ried the ball to within five yards of the 
goal line. A short pass over the line 
brought six points to the Sophomores. 
The try for the extra point was a for- 
ward pass which proved unsuccessful. 
The score stood 6-6. 

The Selinsgrove boys selected to re- 
ceive again and then began a struggle 
one way and then another. Selinsgrove 
was not playing up to par and the 
Sophs rather well. But the fact that 
Selinsgrove was in better condition and 
was experienced gave them an upper 
hand. Gradually they worked their 
way up the field for another goal, but 
failed to make the extra point. This 
gave a sufficient work-out to the Sophs 
and the game was ended with the Sel- 
insgrove lads leading by a score of 12 
to 6. Line-up: 
Selinsgrove— 12 Sophs — 6 

Forster L. E Foltz 

Long L. T Hartman 

Wentzel L. G Broscious 

Fisher C Kozak 

Brouse R. G Greaves 

Kerstetter R. T Hubbard 

Oberdorf R. E Palmer 

Shadel Q. B Norton 

Rishel L. H Bishop 

Sholly R. H Varner 

Riegel F. B Fairchilds 

S 

INTEREST GROWS IN 

JUNIATA GAME 



Much interest is already being man- 
ifested on the campus concerning the 
coming Juniata football battle which 
will be fought at Huntingdon, Novem- 
ber 2. 

Juniata, one of Susquehanna's out- 
standing rivals, is within so close a 
proximity that many loyal supporters 
may follow their team and help cheer 
them on to victory. A larger number 
of students are formulating plans to 
do this very thing. 

Despite the loss of Berry, Miller and 
Douglas thru graduation, and of Burket 
thru failure to return to college, the 
Indians have a formidable team. An 
abundance of new material is master- 
ing the positions left vacant by these 
men. 

The Crusaders will have to stop men 
like Andrews, captain, the left-handed 
passer and scoring ace. 

The game at Juniata will feature the 
Indian's Homecoming Day. A defeat on 
such a gala day as this will surely be 
a hard one for the Huntingdon college. 



EDUCATIONAL CONTACTS 

WITH AMRICAN RED CROSS 
SHOW SIGNIFICANT TREND 



STUDENTS WITNESS GOOD 

INTERSCHOLASTIC GAMES 



SENIORS DEFEAT JUNIORS 

IN TENNIS BY 4-1 SCORE 



Addressing an audience at Harvard 
last summer, an official of the Ameri- 
can National Red Cross observed that 
multitudinous forces were striving con- 
tinuously to penetrate the surrounding 
walls of the country's educational sys- 
tem, to impress it in some way, in- 
fluence its trends, or utilize it other- 
wise. 

The fact that these well springs of 
education are so guarded makes it es- 
pecially significant that the American 
Red Cross is accepted at increasingly 
numerous points of contact between 
its services and those of educational 
bodies and institutions throughout the 
Nation. 

This association of the Red Cross 
wit hthe Nation's educational programs 
begins with earliest school years, and 
flourishes in the highest institutions. 
It ranges through a variety of Red 
Cross services of intense practicality. 

Today, in Physical Education depart- 
ments of leading universities, the 
American Red Cross course in Swim- 
ming and Life Saving, and First Aid, 
is standard. Some of these courses 
originally were conducted by Red Cross 
representatives, and are now continu- 
ed under experts trained and qualified 
according to Red Cross requirements. 
Some of the best instructors in these 
subjects who have served on the Red 
Cross staff formerly were college ath- 
letes, members of swimming teams, 
crews, etc. 

Women's colleges not alone have 
adopted the Red Cross in Home Hy- 
giene and Care of the Sick, and Nu- 
trition, but many give credits for com- 
pletion, including extension credits to 
teachers who take these courses. 

Summer courses in the fundamentals 
of Junior Red Cross administration 
were given the past Summer at 97 
State universities and normal schools. 
The Junior Red Cross "credit course" 
was given this year at Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University, New York; 
George Peabody Institute, Nashville, 
Tenn.; University of Wisconsin, and 
University of California. 

Another Red Cross summer course in 
the atmosphere of a center of higher 
learning was afforded at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, where Red 
Cross representatives gave First Aid 
instruction, first to a Police officer's 
group, which so impressed the heads 
of the institution as to lead them to 
request special lectures to a class of 
athletic coaches, composed of students 
from nine States. 

These university contacts of the Red 
Cross are fitting cap-stones to foun- 
dations laid in the primary grades, 
and extending through high school and 
preparatory years, modifications of the 
aforementioned Red Cross courses be- 
ing used, with credits granted by a 
number of school for completion. 

The combination of infusion of ideals 
of service with practical instruction 
enabling the individual student to ren- 
der such service in a material as well 
as spiritual sense, makes the appeal of 
the Red Cress. It leads, as the stu- 
dent matures, to a deeper interest fre- 
quently exemplified in community ser- 
vice in later life. Here too, the Red 
Cross stands ready, its local Chapters 
the medium for such service. 

Strength of Red Cross activities is 
measured by general Red Crass mem- 
bership, enrolled annually from No- 
vember 11 to 28. 

S 

S. U. REPRESENTED AT 

DISTRICT Y. M, C, A. MEET 



There being no college football games 
in the immediate vicinity of Selins- 
grove Saturday, many of Susque- 
hanna's students who remained here 
for the week-end saw Coach Jay Rid- 
en's Sunbury High eleven trounce 
Steelton 26-6, or Coach Harold Bolig's 
Selinsgrove High squad win its twen- 
tieth consecutive victory in three sea- 
sons by defeating Muncy High 32-0. 

Both Riden and Bolig are Susque- 
hanna alumni and former Orange and 
Maroon grid stars. 

S 

DR. AHL AT BEAVERTOWN 

Dr. A. W. Ahl, professor of Ancient 
History and Greek Literature, deliver- 
ed the Sunday school Rally Day ad- 
dres at Beavertown, last Sunday. Rev. 
John Rhine, an alumnus of Susque- 
hanna, is pastor of the church at which 
Dr. Ahl spoke. 

S 



Hamilton. N. Y.— (IP.)— Colgate's ••••••••••••••••••• 

football team is to be well taken care * OllF GrFidirOll RlVSlS " 
of on its travels this year if Trainer ) l<lt , •••••••••••• • 

Jack Rourke has anything to say about 

it. 

The team will travel 5,200 miles dur- ; 
ing the season, going twice into the 
mid-west to play members of the Big 
Ten, and on all such trips, the team 
will take its own drinking water with i 
it, to say nothing of having special 
training table menus provided on the 
dining cars. 

Included in Colgate's schedule this 
year are Wisconsin, Indiana, Colum- ; 
bia, Syracuse and Brown. 



The life of Dr. Charles R. Madness, 
professor of mathematics at Princeton 
University, was saved recently when 
several of his students gave blood 
transfusions. 



Drexel 12, C. C. N. Y. 4. 
Haverford 19, Trinity 0. 
Juniata 0, Alfred 21. 
Ursinu.s 0. F. & M. 18. 
P. M. C. 0, Gettysburg 9. 
Swarthmore 18. Washington 0. 
Gallaudet 6, Maryland U. 13. 
S 

Logs of 130 species of trees brought 
back from Liberia by an expedition, 
are to be experimented on by Yale 
scientists this year in an effort to find 
their medicinal qualities. At least 75 
per cent of the trees are said to con- 
tain poison either in the barks, leaves 
or fruits. 



******* 



********** 



Intercollegiate Sports . 

By Intercollegiate Press * 

* 

****************** 



New York— (IP)— Elimination of the 
right of a defending football team to 
run with a ball fumbled by the of- 
fense will greatly increase the thrills 
of the game, in the belief of Edward 
K. Hall, chairman of the rules com- 
mittee. 

"Every team," he says, "now can try 
anything behind the line of scrimmage, 
take chances, pass, open things wide, 
without fearing loss of the game thru 
one fumble. 

There is great opportunity for every 
coach to exercise his ingenuity for the 
spectacular football game ever known, 
and all within the rules." 



Students at Henry Ford's old school, 
recently moved to Dearborn, Mich., will 
have to study by oil lamps to preserve 
the atmosphere. 



The University of Edinburgh has a 
chair of American History, Literature 
and Institutions, whose purpose it is 
to give Scots a correct interpretation 
of the past and present of thus part of 
the New World. 



A greater number of students were 
graduated from public schools in North 
Carolina in 1928 than were enrolled in 
all public schools in the state twenty- 
five years ago. Enrollment for the sea- 
son 1907-'08 was 7,144 students. The 
total number of graduates in 1928 was 
12. 512. 



Boys of 14 nationalities and sixteen 
religious sects are in attendance at the 
American School for Boys in the old 
city of Bagdad, Iraq, founded four 
years ago. 



Max Epstein, art patron and phil- 
anthropist, has given a million dollars 
to the University of Chicago for an art 
center. 



Champaign, 111.— (IP)— Prof. George 
A. Goodenough, 61, of the University I 
of Illinois, and chairman of the Big 
Ten faculty committee for the past 23 j 
years, died Sept. 29 of heart disease. 

Professor Goodenough was professor 
of therdynamics at the university here, 
and was chiefly known outside Illinois 
as head of the Big Ten Eligibility 
board. His last official act was to an- 
nouce the eligibility of Alan Holman, 
star quarterback on the Ohio State ' 
team. 



Mexico has set out this year on an 
organized program to wipe out all il- 
literacy in the state. 



Fay Gillis, a student at Michigan 
State College last year, became tired 
of study, and has become one of the 
first airplane salesladies. She recently 
became a member of the Caterpillar 
Club when she saved her life with a 
parachute. 

For HALLOWE'EN REFRESHMENT 

the SEASON'S LUXURY 

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Washington. D. C— (IP)— Whether 
or not the Army and Navy ever meet 
each other again on the football field 
is to be left up to the schools them- 
selves, according to an announcement 
made here. 

It was revealed that Secretary of 
War, Good, and Secretary of Navy, 
Adams, have decided to keep their 
hands off the dispute between the! 
academies, unless they find is possible 
to aid the two institutions to come to 
a suitable agreement. 



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The Senior tennis team defeated the j 
Juniors in the Inter-Class Tourney, 
4-1 last week. 

Rhoads and Kiracofe defeated We- 
Hky and Herman in a rather one-sid- 1 
ed doubles match, 6-0, 6-0. 

Results of the singles matches arej 
as follows: 

Rhoads. Senior, defeated Reamer,) 
Junior, 6-4, 6-0. 

Kiracofe, Senior, defeated Clark, j 
Junior, 6-1, 6-0. 

Kaltritcr, Senior, lost to Herman, 
Junior, 6-2, 3-6, 2-6. 

Groce, Senior, defeated Weliky, Jun- 
ior. 6-3, 7-5. 

Because of inclement weather at the 
time of the opening of the Inter-Class 
Tennis Tourney it did not begin on 
scheduled dates. Managers will be re- 
sponsible for their individual class 
rourneys until the regular schedule is 
reached. 



A district meeting of the college Y. 
M. C. A.'s of this territory was held in 
the Wilhamsport Y. M. C. A. Wednes- 
day, October 16, to discuss the work of 
the Associations for the remaining 
term. Colleges of the district that were 
represented were Bucknell, Mansfield, 
Lock Haven, State College, Blooms- 
burg and Dickinson Seminary. 

John Oberdorf gave the main talk 
of the conference. He spoke on "The 
Task of the Y. M. C. A." 

Susquehanna was represented by the 
following persons, Paul Hartline. Ed- 
ward Bollinger, Wilson Sieber, Lewis 
Fox, John Kindsvatter, John Oberdorf. 
Herbert Schmidt, and Dr. Ahl. 



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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SeHnsjrrove, Pa. 
G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 

A. B. and B. S. Dejrrees— Strong courses in Liberal Arts, Science, Edu- 
cation and Business Administration. 
Extension Courses at Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township and Mt. Carmel. 
Courses of instruction for teachers on the University campus on 
Friday evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four-Year Publir School Music Course with degree in Bachelor of 
Music is attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music. 
Susquehanna stands for a well-rounded education, clean sports, re- 
creation for every student, earnestness in study, and above all, Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For information write 
GEORGE F. DUNKELBERGER, Ph.D.. Dean. 

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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY. OCTOBER 22, 1929 



LITERARY NOTES 

By Intercollegiate Press 



************ 



By Howard Crawford 
Boston, once the stronghold of lib- 
eralism and intelligence, has once 
again been made ridiculous in the 
eyes of the understanding world by 
the act of her mayor in prohibiting 
the Theater Guild production of En- 
gene O'Neill's "Strange Interlude." 

Fortunately for Massacrusett's Quin- 
cy, a few miles from Boston, believes 
its citizens grown up enough to have 
graduated from McQuffey'a and Pil- 
grim's Progress, and so the Quincy 
Theater is showing the Pulitzer prize 
play. 



Whatever one thinks of Prohibition, 
one must admit that it is always ac- 
companied by its antedote, following 
the revelation from Adapazar, Turkey, 
that the Prohibition of the Arabic al- 
phabet has originated bootleggers of a 
new sort. An old woman and three 
Mohammedan priests were recently 
placed in jail for teaching the Arabic 
alphabet in a cellar. 



The feeling that Poe has been some- 
what neglected in his role as a great 
American poet has been widespread, 
and it is interesting to note that the 
Edgar Allan Poe Society, Inc.. has an- 
nounced that beginning in 1930 it will 
offer an annual prize of $100 for the 
best critical essay on the works of 
Poe. The essays, which are to be sub- 
mitted to the society not later than 
April 30 of each year, are not to exceed 
two thousand words, and may deal 
with some particular work or group I 
of works by Poe, or give a general in- ' 
terpretation of Poe's significance in ( 
world literature. Further rules of the 
contest may be obtained from the so- 
ciety at 640 Fort Washington Avenue, ' 
New York City. 



The seemingly established idea that 
only the great in literature shall sur- 
vive more than 300 years has been 
contradicted by the University of Cali- 
fornia Press, which has published a 
biography of Anthony Mundy, Eliza- 
bethan writer, who never wrote any- 
thing great, but who wrote so pro- 
lifically that his life and works are of 
value for the interesting sidelights 
they cast upon the sixteenth century. 

The author Ls Celeste Turner, who 
prepared the volume for her Doctor 
of Philosophy degree. In her intro- 
ductory chapter Miss Turner says: 

"In the latter half of the sixteenth 
century patronage decayed and the 
market price of literary wares was low. 
Every poet, in consequence, unless he 
were nobly born, was forced to com- 
pete strenuously with the prolific 
hackwriter for the attention of an in- 
telligent, eager, but ill-discriminating 
group of readers. The life of the scrib- 
bler became so interwoven with that 
of the genius that the fustian survived 
along with the cloth of gold. 

"Such was the happy fate of many a 
second-rate playwright, many a penny 
pamphleteer, many a gifting ballad- 
makrr in Elizabeth's small capital 
city; and such was the fortune of An- 
thony Mundy, who was all of those 
things and more," 



party proceeded to Menlo Park lab- 
oratory where Edison re-enacted the 
concluding experiments which resulted 
in the perfection of the incandescent 
lamp. 

The re-making of the first lamp was 
broadcast over the radio. Many homes 
were darkened during this ceremony, 
and were lighted again after the ring- 
ing of the bell in Independence Hall, j 
the signal that the experiment was 
completed. 

Edison Honored 

Edison's inspiration for the incan- 
descent lamp came to him in Philadel- 
phia in 1878 as he examined the first 
arclight he had ever seen, in the lab- 
oratory of Professor George F. Barker, 
professor of physics at the University 
of Pennsylvania. 

He was interested in the sputtering 
and blinding brilliance of the lamp 
and so proceeded to experiment. After 
a years' hard labor, he produced a 
practical lamp, with a cardboard fila- 
ment which had a maximum life of 100 
hours. Subsequent experiments with 
vegetable materials enabled him to 
increase the maximum to 600 hours. 

Edison was thirty-two when he per- 
formed this experiment. Now he is 
eighty-two. 

Einstein Telephone Thibute 

Many tributes were sent to Edison 
yesterday in commemoration of the 
event. Perhaps the outstnding one 
come from Professor Albert Einstein, 
who telephoned his message from his 
study in Berlin. 

The message was sent by wire under 
the English Channel to Rugby, Eng- 
land, where it was picked up by the 
transcontinental radiophone transmit- 
ter and sent to Netcong, N. J. From 
there it was sent by land wires to the 
N. B. C. headquarters in New York and 
distributed to the stations in the net- 
work. 

Short-wave transmitters in Pitts- 
burgh and Schenectady re-broadcast- 
ed the Einstein tribute to all parts of 
the world. It was given in both Ger- 
man and English. 

Sunbury Building First Lighted by 
Electricity 

The City Hotel Building, Sunbury, 
Pa., was the first building in the world 
to be lighted by electric lights. Edison 
was in that city when he completed 
his experiments sufficiently to light 
an entire building. 

A plaque has been placed at the 
main entrance to announce to all 
comers and goers of what transpired 
there. Edison was present himself 
when the plaque was unvelied. 
Mt. Camel's Streets First Lighted By 
Electricity 

The streets of Mt. Carmel were the 
first in the world to be lighted with 
the incandescent lamp. A recent cele- 
bration was held there in celebration 
of the event. 

S 

PIANIST AND BARITONE APPEAR 

IN FIRST STAR COURSE NUMBER 



One of the most important of the 
recent books is "The Tragic Era." by 
Claude Bowers. The author has given 
us an entirely new picture, not only 
of a president who ffli really great, 
but ol the mast disastrous period of 
American history— that after the Civil 
War 

S 

-II DINTS SERVE AS TEACHERS 

Two of Susquehanna's Seniors are 
teaching regularly enrolled classes in 
the ihjjh School of Selinsgrove in con- 
nection with their regular Practice 
Teaching work. 

Harold Grossman, of the Busmen 

Department, is teaching a claw of 
Business Arithmetic, 

Frank Rai I the Education 

rtment, aching a class of 

ash 

men have tail ch 
peetlve classes md an 
their own work to conform with the 

of the 8 
authoril li 

WORLD HONORS I l>l son on 

l ll.( TRIC LIGHT JUtll.l l 

, e 1> 

and ly Mm* ; 

' 

laiison Re-enacta Experi ment s 

III)!' > 



and Sub-assistants Charles Varner and] 
Maurice Sheaffer. After the game, a 
dance was given by the student body, 
of the Teachers College In honor of the: 
Jayvees. The line-up: 
Lock Haven — 6 Susquehanna — 

Poust L. E. ... Speiglemeyer i 

Smith L. T Corl ! 

Bonn L. G Traxler - 

Parsons C Carl 

McCaU R. G Rhoads 

Sundberg R. T Witkop 

Malone R. E Rummel 

Hatter Q. B Rupp 

Renninger L. H Reynolds 

Auchembach ... R. H Meyers ! 

Cowf er P. B Kline i 

Substitutions for Susque hanna: 
Johnson for Rupp. Hazlitt for Carl, 
Harry for Corl, Lenker for Traxler, 
Sutphon for Rhoads, Carl for Haz- 
litt. Rupp for Johnston, Corl for Harry, 
Traxler for Lenker. Rhoads for Sut- 
phon, Kozak for Carl. 

Touchdown : Auchembach. 



usual good game, getting off many a 
good kick and punt. Moser again dis- 
played his ability of tearing off at least 
six or seven yards through the line 
and backing up the line. Malasky, 
shifted from fullback to halfback in 
the new combination, showed much 
strength and ability in carrying the 
ball and catching passes. MacDonald 
and Wormley also acquitted themselves 
well in the backfield. 

Boggs, center for Delaware, was ser- 
iously injured in the third quarter. All 
of the Susquehanna men came through 
the game in fine shape. 

Touchdown— Malasky. 
Delaware— Susquehanna— 6 



The line-up: 

Hill L. E. 

Henning L. T. 

H. Walker L. G. 

Boggs C. 

Mudron R. G. 

Dillon R. T. 

Sloan R. E. . 

Haggerty Q. B. 

Warren L. H. 

Tunnell R. H. 

Riely F. B. 

Substitutions: Susquehanna — Win- 
ters for Miller, Zak for Yon, Berger 
for R. Garman, MacDonald for Ma- 
lasky, Glenn for Wall. Scott for Worm- 
ley. 



Wolfe 

Miller 

. Auchmuty 
A. Garman 
R. Garman 

Yon 

Adams 

Wall 

. . Wormley 
. . . Malasky 
Moser 



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FRESH CUT FLOWERS and POTTED PLANTS for WEDDINGS, 
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Visitors Always Welcome at Our Green Housea 



~— -<?> 



DREXEL GRIDMEN HERE 

FOR ALUMNI DAY SAT. 



i Continued from Page 1) 
ing communications from Alumni who 
are planning to return to the Campus 
for the day. Last year hundreds of 
Alumni returned for the occasion and 
witnessed their Alma Mater's grid ma- 
chine trample under foot their old 
rivals from Juniata. 

A Frosh-Soph football game will be 
played at 12:45 as a preliminary to the 
main feature. 

The University Band of about thirty- 
pieces will be on hand to add zest to 
the occasion. 

Fraternities are arranging to have 
open house in their various chapter 
houses. Dances will feature these par- 
ties. 

S 

$50,000 HEART BALM 

SUIT FILED AT S. U. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
ant, Albert L. Anselmi; associate at- 
torney for the defendant, Daniel J. 
Kwasnoski. 

A Judge to preside over this very 
important "Heart Balm" suit is to be 
elected at a subsequent meeting. The 
names of the plaintiff and the de- 
fendant were not divulged by members 
of the society. 

The society has at its head Dr. H. A. 
F. Kern, who is entering upon his du- 
ties with much enthusiasm. Much legal 
talent is presented in the attorneys 
elected to represent the parties to the 
suit. 

This form of entertainment will be 
a novelty to the campus and promises 
to meet with success. 

S 

CRUSADERS* AERIAL ATTACK 

DEFEATS DELAWARE, 6-0 



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(Continued from Page 1) 
spent Saturday with Dr. Smith and 
writ*. They returned to their home 
Saturday evening. 

The program which they presented 
Ls as follows: 

Aria— "Vision Fugitive" from "Her- 
odiade," Massenet — Mr. Phillips. 
Sonata Op. 27 No. 2 (Moonlight), 
Beethoven 

Adagio S:stenuto 

Allegretto 

Presto Agitato— Mr. Trick. 

Ich Grolle Nicht, Schuman 

Im Zitterndcn Moonlight. Haile 

Der Sieger, Kaun — Mr. Phillips. 

"Fantaisie-Impromptu" C Sharp 
Minor, Chopin 

Etude Op. 25 or No. 1. Chopin 

Etude Op. 25 No. 3. Chopin 

Waltz. A Flat. Chopin— Mr. Trick. 

Kitty, My Love, Will You Marry Me. 
Hughes (Old Ulster Songi 

Bird Songs at Eventide. Coates 

Tally-Ho. Leoni— Mr. Phillips. 

La Fille aux Cheaveaux de Lin, De- 
bussy 

Staccato Etude. Rubinstein^-Mr. 
Trick. 

Vale ( Farewell >. Ru i I 

Drums Meale— Mr. Phillips. 

S 

.IK. VARSITY loses 

TO LOCK HAVEN. 6-0 



(Continued from Page 1) 
tackles, took the places of Zak and 
Winters. Both of these second-string 
men performed in a very capable man- 
ner. The regulars were substituted for 
them in the second period. 

Berger was substituted for R. Gar- 
man and performed well. Captain 
Garman again proved to be the bul- 
wark of strength on the line, passing 
true and always blocking out his man. 
Auchmuty again flashed on the line, 
tearing through the line and getting 
many a tackle behind the line. Wolfe 
played heads-up ball at end, intercept- 
ing several passes and making left 
end a hard end to circle by the op- 
ponents. 

In the backfield. Wall played his 





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'Continued from Pa«c 1 1 
behind the line Kline Came to him- 
ielf, playlni the fullback position. He 
tore ofl this through the line. 

Rupp 'mi ■ — and played • 

game 
Me; through hi. 

tenl and bull 

His run was a 20- 

piiri around i> This fleet- 

howed much nerve 
dura game 

The loi (down of the fraj 

25-yard line. 
Auchemb ball over 

The Junior Varsity mad( 

Lurk llr I DJ i- • BOB1- 

pamed by Assistant Coach Dauben- 
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SCALP THE 

INDIANS 



Volume XXXVI 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1929 



Number 11 



Susquehanna Invites 
Survey of Her 
Athletic Program 



No Representative of Carnegie Foun- 
dation Appeared Here to In- 
vestigate Conditions 



Seniors Give Talks 
at Alumni Pepfest 



Graduating Members of Football and 

Cheering Squads Participated 

In Peppy Gathering 



ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS AT 
S. U. WERE ABOLISHED IN 1921 



Sports Equipment Provided for Every 

Student on Campus; Athletic 

Field is Enlarged 



Praising the work of the Carnegie 
Foundation's athletic survey, Dr. G. 
Morris Smith, president of Susque- 
hanna University, said it should ren- 
der a distinct service in the field of 
education. "There can be no question 
that inter-collegiate atliletics has 
needed for some time past the jolt the 
Carnegie Foundation's report, recent- 
ly published, has administered. The 
fine edge of idealism and true sports- 
manship must inevitably be taken off 
college athletics, unless the colleges 
embark together on a program where 
no special concessions are given to 
athletes. Every student at college 
should have a chance to make the 
Tarsity. Alumni and local fans should 
delight more in a bona-fide college 
team, than in the most powerful ma- 
chine built by wrong methods." 

Susquehanna Will Welcome Survey 
Contrary to announcements in some 
newspapers, Susquehanna University 
was not visited by any field represen- 
tatives of the Carnegie Foundation, 
making the survey of conditions ex- 
isting in College Athletics. An invita- 
tion was extended to Dr. Howard J. 
Savage, staff member of the Founda- 
tion's special commiotee, to send a 
representative to Susquehanna's cam- 
pus. However, they did not find it pos- 
sible to make such a visit. Susquelran- 
na will welcome such a study of her 
athletic program. 

New Era Launched Eight Years Ago 
In the fall of 1821 definite action 
was taken at Susquehanna abolishing 
"athletic scholarships." At the time 
plans were approved for a new and en- 
larged athletic field and work on same 
was started in the spring of 1922. To- 
day Susquehanna possesses unusually 
fine facilities for her sports and recre- 
ational program. Instead of one small 
playing field Susquehanna has avail- 
able University Field, which embodies 
the usual features of a quarter mile 
track and 220 straight away with 
space within the oval for her Varsity 
(Concluded on Page 4t 
S 

Photographer Starts 
Work For Lanthorn 



One of the greatest pep meetings of 
the year was held in the auditorium 
last Friday evening. With the guid- 
ance of the cheering squad and the 
help of the band, the pep was greater 
than ever. 

The pepfest before the homecoming 
game is always big. The one on Fri- 
day night came up to par. The band 
gave a proper atmosphere by playing 
several peppy marches. By the time 
the crowd had all gathered there was 
very much noise and enthusiasm. 

Several cheers were given for the 
team. Then "Milt" Herman, an alum- 
nus and veteran of one of Susque- 
hanna's first gridiron squads, was 
called upon to give a little talk. His 
dry, witty remarks added much pep 
to the gathering. 

Coach Ullery and Captain "Al" Gar- 
man both said a few words about the 
spirit of the college and the hopes they 
were entertaining for the Drexel fray. 

Each Alumni game is the last game 
for several members of the football 
squad. Therefore, John Wall, Joe Zak, 
Rip Garman, and Jack DeLay were 
called upon to make their last little 
speeches before an Alumni game. All 
expressed their desire to give their best 
to win the game. 

Between speeches rousing cheers 
were made and peppy songs were sung 
for the team. 

Not only was this the last Alumni 
game for several gridiron warriors, but 
also for two cheerleaders who were 
leading the crowd in their last Alumni 
pep meeting. Bob Hostetter and Cliff 
Kiracofe each led a big cheer for S. U. 

After the meeting in the auditorium 
the crowd, led by the band, marched 
to the athletic field to light the huge 
pile of wood gathered by the Frosh. 
As the fire rapidly burned the pile of 
wood, cheers were given and songs 
were sung. The crowd retired slowly 
as soon as the pile of wood was reduced 
to a few glowing embers. 
S 



BASKETBALL NOTICE 

All basketball candidates whose 
schedules will permit, are to report 
for practice at the Gym each day 
at 3:10 p. m. 

These practice periods are for 
those students who are not en- 
gaged in any other form of sport 
activity, such as football, gym, soc- 
cer, etc. 

Luke Rhoads, Manager 



Pennsylvania State 
Library Association 
Honors Mrs. Dodson 



Head of University Library Elected 

Vice President of State Association 

at Conference in Poconos 



Ullerymen Priming 
For Annual Game 



Band and Many Students Will Follow 

Team to Huntingdon to Witness 

Classic Tilt With Juniata 



One of Susquehanna's faculty mem- 
bers was very highly honored by the 
Pennsylvania State Library Associa- 
tion at its annual meeting last week, 
when Mrs. Dcdson, head librarian, was 
elected vice-president of that very im- 
portant organization that plays a very 
great part in the educational program 
qf this state. The honor conferred 
upon her by that body of librarians 
is a recognition of her work as a li- 
brarian. 

The meeting of the Association was 
held at the Pocono Manor Inn, in 
the Pocono Mountains, from October 
22 to October 25. Approximately one 
hundred and seventy-five people in- 
terested in library work were in at- 
tendance. Mrs. Dodson reports having 
a very enjoyable trip and having se- 
cured valuable information regarding 
up-to-date library methods and prin- 
ciples. 

The theme of this conference was 
"County Libraries." The association is 
attempting to secure legislation in this 
state that will provide library facili- 
ties in each county, as well as library 
trucks to reach the remotest sections 
of the Commonwealth. Pennsylvania 
is very deficient in this respect, other 
states having gone far ahead and solv- 
< Concluded on Page 4> 



Sophs Trounce Frosh 
In Class Tilt, 28 to 



Powerful Second-Year Men Too Much 

for Fledglings; Score Largest Ever 

Made in a Class Game 



Individual and Group Pictures Will be 

Taken This Week in the Seibert 

Hall Parlors Every Day 



Personal appointments are being! 
made by members of the Lanthorn I 
staff for the individual pictures which) 
are to be taken this week for use in | 
the 1931 Lanthorn. 

A representative of the Whyte Studio I 
of New York City arrived on the cam-| 
pus yesterday morning and set up aj 
temporary studio in Seibert Hall par- 
lors. The work will continue until Fri- 1 
day evening of this week. 

Group pictures of the various or- 
ganizations will be taken every eve- 
ning from 6:30 to 7:30. The head of 
each club will be responsible for his 
own organization. The individual pic- 
tures will be taken during the day. 
according to the appointments made. 

Everyone is urged to be present at 
the exact time of the appointment to 
facilitate the work. All students who 
desire to have their picture in the 
year book (and everyone should) ought 
to have the work done this week so 
that the engraving may be done im- 
mediately 



,,*»»••»*♦ 



I Our Gridiron Rivals .' 



Juniata 6. Dickinson 19. 
Ursinus 9. Muhlenberg 7. 
P. M. C. 26. U. of Baltimore 0. 
Gallaudet 80. Shenandoah 0. 
Del" ware 0, Mt. St. Mary's 39 
Haverford 16, Kenyon 7 

S ■ 

—Let's go to Juniata 



The Crusaders will meet the Juniata 
Indians on a foreign field this Satur- 
day in the annual football classic of 
both the Susquehanna University and 
Juniata College gridiron traditions, as 
the feature attraction of the Hunting- 
don institution's Home Coming Day. 

This game will probably be one of 
the hardest fought frays of the sea- 
son, because of the rivalry existing 
between the two institutions. The In- 
dians have never defeated the Cru- 
saders. The score was tied several 
times when both teams were blanked. 
The Junata team scored on the Cru- 
saders for the first time in 1927 when 
a most hectic game ended in a 13-12 
score with the Orange and Maroon in 
the lead. Last season the Ullerymen 
downed them 21-6 at our own Home 
Coming celebration. 

Juniata has an excellent bunch oi 
fighters in its tribe. Capt. Andrews 
seems to be the "Big Chief" of the 
outfit. Andrews, a last year's letter- 
man, is a left-handed passer and a 
scoring ace. He plays the quarterback 
position and will do the bulk of the 
work in the backfield. 

LaPorte and Petty are two husky 
halfbacks, who carry the ball well. 
Harley plays fullback. The line will 
probably be composed of Marks at 
left end, B. Holsinger at left tackle. 
Beeghly at left guard. Jamison at cen- 
ter, Reber at right guard. Coder at 
right tackle, and A. Holsinger at right 
end 

The Indians will probably have many 
deceptive plays in their bag of tricks, 
for most of their plays are based on 
deception. 

The Siersemen have won only one 
game thus far this season They de- 
ieated Johns Hopkins 7 to 0. They lost 
to Muhlenberg 25 to 0, to Drexel 19 
to 0, to Alfred 21 to and to Dickin- 
son 19 to 6. 

Tlif Indian camp is located not far 
away from Selinsgrove. From all in- 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



In the annual inter-class football 
classic held Saturday afternoon in pre- 
liminary to the varsity game the 
Sophomore class trounced the Fresh- 
men by the score of 28-0. 

In doing so the second year students 
established a new inter-class record 
and tied another. The score run up by 
the Sophomores was the largest ever 
made by a class in the history of the 
school. It is also the second successive 
football victory for the class of '32, 
which ties the mark made by the class 
of '29. 

The Sophomores eleven with its 
height, weight, strength and exper- 
ience had a tremendous advantage 
over the first year students. In spite 
of the difference between the two 
teams the game was clean and hard 
fought. 

The powerful Sophomore line was 
one of the features of the game. The 
Freshmen were held without a single 
first down, while the opposing line 
was opened up by the forward line- 
men to allow the backfield men to go 
through for fifteen first downs. The 
second yeai students were also very- 
successful with their forward passes, 
completing eight out of ten. 

Along with the forward wall, the 
Sophomore backfield worked together 
in machine-like precision. Fairchilds 
plunged through the center of the 
line. Varner sliced the tackles, Gilh- 
land punted, and Norton ran the ends 
and tossed passes with deadly MOMM 

The Freshman team did well consid- 
ering the fact that most of the players 
had never taken part m any kind of 
football contest before. Ballentine, 
Geisweit, Burns and Worthington were 
perhaps a little more outstanding, 
while Swarm punted well, 

The Sophomores took the kickoff and 
immediately rushed down ithe field, 
where Fairchilds plunged over for the 
score. The Sophomores again took the 
kickoff and rushed the ball down the 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Many Grads Here for Crusaders Bow to 



Home Coming Day 



Alumni Return to Their Alma Mater 
for Annual Celebration; Fraterni- 
ties Entertain Saturday Evening 



Several hundred old grads returned 
to their Alma Mater last Saturday to 
attend the Annual Home Coming Day 
celebration of Susquehanna University. 
A number of them arrived Friday af- 
ternoon and evening and participated 
in the pepfest and bonfire that night. 
Many more arrived Saturday morning. 

The highlight of the entire day was 
the football fray between the Orange 
and Maroon and the Drexel Dragons. 
The outcome of the game no doubt 
was disappointing to many of the re- 
turning graduates who were eager to 
see their team victorious, but neverthe- 
less it seemed like home to them to 
watch the Crusaders in battle array 
against such a formidable opponent 
as Drexel Institute. 

It seemed like old times to many of 
the undergraduates and likewise the 
Alumni to see the former students 
back again and to renew acquaintances 
and reminisce. Bill Roberts '29 and his 
cheering were as much in evidence as 
ever. Bill always was a very hearty 
booster of the team and the band. 

In the evening, the old timers were 
the guests of the four fraternities at 
the annual Home Coming Day dances 
given by those organizations, in their 
respective chapter houses. 

"Stew" Black and his orchestra pro- 
vided the necessary rhythm for the 
occasion at the Bond and Key House. 
West of them, at the Epsilon Sigma 
House, "Nick" and his Susquehanna 
.Campus OwLs furnished the terpsi- 
chorean stuff. Opposite Bond and Key 
Art Zellers and his Sylvanians tooted 
for Phi Mu Delta. On Pine street, the 
Penn Ramblers meted out the melody 
for the Phi Lambda Theta strutters. 

Taken as a whole, this year's Alumni 
Day proved highly successful. The 
weather man was unusually kind the 
entire week-end and provided just the 
kind of weather desired for the occas- 
ion. 



Dragons In Home 
Coining Tilt, 13 - 



Drexel Mixture of Passes, Reverses and 

Line Plays Proves Too Much 

For Susquehanna 



HUGHES STARS FOR VISITORS 
WITH FORWARDS AND END RUNS 



S. U. Hopes Raised by Successful For- 
wards in Second and Third Periods, 
But Drexel Holds for Downs 



S. U. Student In 
Clutches of Law 



Clifford Kiracofe, '30, Named Defen- 
dant in "Heart Balm" Suit Insti- 
tuted by Grace Lauer, '30 



Clifford Kiracofe. one of the most 
prominent members of the Senior 
class, has been named as the unfortu- 
nate defendant in a $50,000 "heart 
balm" suit for damages for breach of 
promise of marriage. 

The broken-hearted victim of this 
tragedy, who is the plaintiff in the 
case, is Miss Grace F. Lauer, who is 
suffering from a nervous breakdown, 
and is at present under the care of a 
Selinsgrove physician. Miss Lauer is 
also a member of the Senior class. 

Miss Lauer is considerably upset by 
this unexpected turn of affairs. Her 
social standing in the community has 
been seriously affected by the neces- 
sary exposure of her private affairs. 

However, the plaintiff will have 
"sweet revenge" against this rash heart 
breaker and Tin Lizzie Romeo in the 
form of a passible verdict to the 
amount of $50,000. 

It is sincerely hoped by the many 
friends of Muss Lauer that she be 
awarded full compensation, which is 
the only possible way of mending her 
broken heart and providing retribution 
for the mental anguish and suffering 
to which she has been so ungratefully 
subjected. 

Miss Lauer in an interview this 
morning intimated that she thuiks 
that men should be taught a lesson. 
She said she is pressing the charge 
very vigorously so as to make an ex- 
ample of the stronger m 

The pluintitl m the ea.se la repre- 
sented by Attorneys John A Schiavo 
and Anthony J. Lupas, and the defen- 
dant by Attorneys Albert Anselmi and 
Daniel K. Kwa.Mio.sk i 

The Honorable Judge QeOfffj Para- 
Ils la to preside over this very impor- 
tant Mock Trial," which is to be 
staged in Seibert Chapel Hall just as 
soon as the plaintiff lias recovered 
from her lover's jolt sufficiently to 
warrant her appearance on the witness 
stand. 



A strong forward wall and equally 
powerful Drexel forward passing at- 
tack spelled a 13-0 defeat for Susque- 
hanna in the football game which fea- 
tured part of the Home Coming Day 
celebration held here Saturday. 

A well mixed variety of passes, re- 
verses, and line plays kept the Sus- 
quehanna defense in a bewildered state 
during most of the contest and con- 
sequently the Crusaders never did 
settle down to the brand of football 
they have displayed in previous games 

The fine forward wall featured the 
Drexel team. Time and again it would 
open the way for Hughes, Redmond 
and LaBove, the flashy visiting backs, 
to work play after play in clock-like 
precision for long gains. Hughes was 
unquestionably the star of the game. 
His generalship could not be equalled, 
while his forward passes and fast end 
runs were of tremendous value to- 
ward the Drexel victory. 

Drexel completely swept Susque- 
hanna off its feet during the first few 
minutes of the game when it worked 
the ball the length of the field with 
long passes and sweeping end runs. A 
cleverly-worked and unexpected pass 
of Hughes to Wright scored the first 
touchdown of the battle. Another short 
fast pass over the line to Snider tal- 
lied the extra point. 

As the battle went into the second 
and third quarters it became an un- 
interesting punting duel between Red- 
mond and Marsh for Drexel and Wall 
for Susquehanna. The visitors outdid 
Wall in this department of the game, 
due to the fact that the wind was with 
them. Nearly all of Wall's punts were 
hurried, making his job all the harder 
for him. At times during the second 
and third periods of play successful 
Susquehanna passes would raise the 
hopes of the Orange and Maroon fol- 
lowers. However, the powerful Drexel 
line would always stop the Crusaders 
when within scoring distance. 

Near the closing minutes of the 
game Drexel made its second touch - 
i Concluded on Pago 4> 



Y. M. C. A. Acquires 
New Headquarters 



Room in Basement of Hassinger Hall 
Renovated and Furnished for Re- 
ligious Organization 



Headquarters which they may call 
all their own have been obtained by 
the members of the Y. M. C. A. after 
having worked hard along that line 
lor a long time. 

Since Hassinger Hall has been remod- 
eled, one of the basement rooms has 
been given to the "Y" for its own use. 
The room is a very large one and faces 
"Sleepy Hollow." 

The furnishing of the quarters was 
done under the supervision of Mrs. A 
W. Ahl, who very kindly made the 
drapes for the windows as well as pre- 
sented .several pictures which :..i. I 
been placed upon the walls 

Several of the first-year men who 
are members of the orgnization have 
given the cement floor a coat of gray 
paint to give it a more home-like ap- 
pearance. 

The furniture which was m the re- 
ception room of the men's dormitory 
until the new was secured and wliich 
*M the property of the Y. M. C. A, 
ha been moved to the new room, so 
Mint now the orftniitlon b do longer 
hampered by not having au&elant 
room in which to eontint: npor- 

tant work on the i ampus 

Up until this time, the headquarter.; 
of the organization were generalk 
UP m the room of one of the members, 
generally of the president However 
through the hard work of the .several 
of the members and the assistance ot 
a few faculty members the new quart- 
ers have been secured and furnished. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29. 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly during the College Year except Thanksgiving Week, Christ- 
mas, New Year and Easter Week. 



Subscription $1.50 a Year, Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 
Editor-inChief Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

News Editor Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 . 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 

Betty Wardrop '32 Andy Kozak '32 John Kindsvatter '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Bruce Worthington, '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Edna Tressler. '30. Conservatory of Music 

Business Manager Lather Knrti '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck *31 

Assistants on Easiness Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29. 1929 



the team to play for, and proceeded to sign up high school games 
all over New England. "For the sake of old Hiwash" said King, 
the "faculty manager," "don't you boys ever win a football 
game. If you do your fired." 

The plan was a success. High school coaches thiuout New 
England were overjoyed every time their boys played the "Sal- 
cm Trade School." The Trade School line had holes in it a mile 
wide and if the opposing team couldn't make such a hole, the 
Trade School boys made it for them. High School fans always 
turned out to see the games, because thye knew the home lown 
boys would win. Had the team been strong and victorious, the 
envious rivals would have started hinting and investigating. 
But no one was suspicious of a team that always lost. 

Thus the lads went on losing games and collecting their 
shares of the large gate receipts. In the joy of victory, no high 
school official ever thought of investigating the gridders from 
Salem. 

Finally, however, some school principal wanted to play the 
Salem team on its home field, and the result was an exposure. 
Nobody could find the school and when whispers of the fact got 
around, nobodv could find the team anv more either. 

Meanwhile, the eleven youths on the Trade School team 
have pocketed considerable money on the gridiron. And a large 
number of New Englanders are lamenting the fact that they 
have once more been hoodwinked. 

8 

JUNIATIANS PLEASE NOTE 

Says The Juniatian, student publication of .Tuniata Col- 
lege, Susquehanna's traditional rival : 

"Some wit in the publicity department at Susquehanna 
recently sent a shipment of pictures of S. U. gridders to Jun- 
iata for use in campus publications and wrapped it up in 

WALLPAPER." 

Well, why not? The Indians may as well be prepared for 
the worst. The "wit" who stmt this "material" no doubt want- 
ed to give the Siersemen a silent but fair warning of what may 

be expected. 

g 

WHY WE SHOULD OWN AND READ BOOKS 

There is nothing that gives more lasting satisfaction than 
a library of one's own. Of course there are some books that 
one only wants to read once, but how many there are that one 
would like to have within easy reach at all times, to take down 
from the shelf and enjoy again and again. 

To have l>ooks in one's own home and be able at Avill to 
read the history of a nation, the biography of a great man or 
woman, the speculation of a philosopher or the fancies of a poet, 
the drama of conflicting characters as set forth in a novel — this 
is to be rich and fortunate. Certain hooks suit certain moods 
discussion. We personal!) feel thai this method would not be an< i needs, but if one chooses carefully one will have friends at 
sufficient to stir the student about a question. There must be han( j t() snit every 1H ., l( j all( j UHHH \ ' ^j, bo^ ()11( . i mV s — if 
a zest of competition and a knowledge of reward If students w(i]] ( ., luS( , n —foecc-mes an asset, so much added information or 
are to be aroused. The debating met hod trains in effectively [ nRp i ra tioii or pleasure. A hook thai is borrowed is more like 
presenting a proposition and the attacking of fallacies has a & cnanw acquaintance than a durable friend ; if one has enjoyed 
social as well as an intellectual value in the training of citizen- h ()1|( . js . lhva> . s sighing to read it again. 

•hip. Build a library of your own and then use it. Great will he 

Furthermore, Mr. Miller bases his condemnation on the y OUr profit. As your own experience widens and deepen* yon 

idea that debating is intended solely as a purely disinterested wi ]j (i)1( | 1|(1>v lll( . SSil o ( , s j„ <V our books, understand the author's 

search for truth. Any debating manual will show him that In | meaning better, have a (dearer vision of his story. To write a 

good hook requires work, to appreciate it requires reflection; do 



THE WHY AND WHEREFORE OF COLLEGE DERATING 

"Debating is a training ground for the crassest kind of 
Babbitt salesmanship ,and Babbitt pulpit practice" was the 

damaging condemnation of high school and college forensics as 
an extra-curricular activity, made by Clyde R. Miller, director 
of the Bureau of Eduation Sendee at Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University. "High school and college debating in their 
worst aspects represent not a search for the truth but a desire 
to win," he continued, adding that intelligent young men, after 
a single forensic victory, "invariably conceive the notion that 
they are wonders, and they are never again concerned with the 
pursuit of truth. They become, often for all time, glib, arro- 
gant, superficial." 

Mr. Miller also contends that debaters appeal to predjudicc, 
use generalities too much, and practice crowd psychology exten- 
sively. He charges that they bring the tactics of the football 
field and the appeal to the partisian emotions of the crowd to 
the forensic platform. 

The director of the educational service of Columbia be- 
lieves that "if debaters were really interested in arriving at an 
approximate truth they would use the discussion method and 
would not \h> concerned with the prizes and applause of vic- 
tory. They would look on truth as rhe worthiest prise they 
could attain." 

Evidentlv Mr. .Miller here refers to the seminary method of 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS TALKS 
AT VESPER SERVICES SUNDAY 



"It Pays to Advertise" was the theme 
of a very interesting and enjoyable 
talk given at Vesper Services by Paul 
Lucas, '28, Sunday night. 

Mr. Lucas was valedictorian of his 
class and was interested in debate work 
at Susquehanna in addition to a large 
number of other extra-curricular ac- 
tivities. He is at present a student at 
the Gettysburg Theological Seminary. 

Miss Stewart has been appointed 
song leader of the services in order to 
add spirit and zest to the singing of 
hymns. 

The Vespers were led by John Kinds- 
vatter, '32. 

S 

DR. AHL SPEAKS AT 

REFORMATION RALLY 



Dr. A. W. Ahl, professor of Ancient 
History and Greek Literature, was a 
speaker at the Reformation Rally of 
the Northeast Conference of the Pitts- 
burgh Synod Sunday, October 27 . 

His theme was "The Challenge of 
the Reformation." All churches of the 
conference were represented at the 
rally. 

Dr. Ahl preached at the Lutheran 
Church of Shippensville Sunday morn- 
ing, prior to his address at the con- 
ference. 

S 

The Type 

We are told of the good mother who 
was disturbed over her son, who had 
been in Italy studying for three years. 

"I am so afraid he'll get so Italicized 
he won't come home." 



Eat at 

The Don Mar 

L. M. GABKL, Propr. 



re\ 



j Fisher's Jewelry Store 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVER I 
AND GLASS WARE I 

Fine Repairing a Specialty I 

344 Market St. Sunbury, Pa. I 



! "DECORATIONS FOR YOUR 
PARTY 

JFryling Stationery Co. 

{ 411 Market Street 

» 



Sunbury, Pa. 



.-<& 



STUDENTS 

TRY 

REICHLEY'S 



I LUNCH — SODAS — CANDY 



a debate each Hide h committed to make the besl ease h can for 
a particular proposition. Bach debator musi analyze liis par- 
ticular roneliisioiis. He must learn io weigh testimony and 
*<> detect and show up fallacies. He must, of course, consider 
the viewpoint of bis opponents and the evidence they will pre- 
lent. Last of all, he musi learn to speak convincingly and 1 1 u- 
entlv. No good debator would ever commit himself to the glib- 
ncss and arrogance of which Mr. Miller accuses him, for fear 
of delivering himself to the mercy of his opponents. Every 
good debator is aware of the fact that if he appeals only to 
predjudices and argues only generalities and presents distort- 
ed evidence he will invariably lose. 

Surely Mr. Miller cannot deny the intrinsic educational 
value of the activity known as debating. Forensics afford men- 
tal training and give the student the ability to focus his thoughts 
and present them effectively to others. 

More than that, the Columbia man ought to realise that 
simply because a number of people may be guilty of demoralis- 
ing practices he mention! in his condemnation does not mean 
that ample recognition of its substantial merits as part of school 
and college training should not be made. 

8 



not think you have squeezed it dry by one casual reading, 

Books are like windows: each one you add your house gives 
so much more vision, lets in so much more light. To buy a hook 
is to make it your own; it is yours thenceforth and always ready 
to give you its store of entertainment or wisdow. From the 
Philadelphia Inquirt r, 

RECITAL CLASS PROGRAM OMEGA DELTA SIGMA 

BY CONSERVATORY STUDENTS; ENTERTAINS ALUMNAE 



A HOODWINKEB 

A number of readers of tin- report of the Carnegie Foun- 
dation concerning collegiate football have found comfort In the 
fact that the honesty ol the game itself lias nowhere been im« 
peached. They feel proud to be able to say that no one can 
maintain that a football game was ever deliberately thrown. 

Such people, however, find themselves in an embarassing 
situation if a recent report concerning a phantom high school 

With a most obliging football team is true. The team was real; 
the high school was a myth. The hoys were smart young busi- 
ness men who put over a rather clever financial deal and prob- 
ably had a lot of fun doing it. The "Salem Trade School" will 
never lose another football game, nor will it ever win one again. 
As a matter of fact it never won a game, for there isn't such a 

team. 

six years ago, it seems, Ritchie Bay King, itching to take 
unto himself some of that which is called filthy lucre, organised 
u football team, created the mythical "Salem Trade School" for 



Students taking work in the Con- 
servatory ol Music attended the first 
recital class of the year, Wednesday 
afternoon of last week, in Seibert 
Chapel Hall. The following program 
was given: 

Piano — Swaying Roses, Ogle— Miss 
Betty Bogar 

Piano— Oavotte, Gilcher— Miss Betty 
Buffington 

Violin— By the Brook, Boisdeffre- 
Ray Minnich. 

Piano— Spring's Witchery. W. G. 
Smith— Miss Martha Womeldorf. 

Piano— Twilight in the Forest, Bar- 
bour— Miss Margaret Ide 

Song— "When Phyllis Danced the 
Minuet.' Gil berte— Miss Margaret 
Markle. 

Piano— 2nd Mazurka, Goddard— Wal- 
ter SUandquest 

Piano— Waltz Brilliante. Op. 34, No. 
1. Chopin— Robert McNally. 

Song— "Rose Softly Blooming," 
Bpohr MLss Anna Lelnbach. 

Piano— Carnival of Autumn. Bar- 
bour— MLss Margaret Kirkpatrick 

Organ— Offertory No. 1, Batiste— 
Miss Edna Tressler. 

Officers of the class were elected at 
the same time. They are as follows: 
Edna Tressler, president; Kathryn 
Morning, vice-president; Janet Dively, 
secretary; Dorothy LeLsher, treasurer; 
Robert Rodgers, monitor. 

Practically Nothing 

"How many in your family, mum?" 
"T bun six children but they are all 
girh It's a ll^ht wash." 



Not every one can have breakfast 
served to her in Seibert Hall at the 
convenient hour of nine-thirty, but 
such was the distinction enjoyed by 
the O. D. S. Alumnae last Saturday 
morning, when the active members 
served a delicious breakfast to its 
home coming members. 

The menu included grapefruit, waf- 
fles with maple syrup, bacon, and co- 
coa. The task of preparing and serv- 
ing the breakfast was a labor of love 
and brought about many burned An- 
gers but not a word of complaint. 

A newly-furnished sorority room also 
greeted the returning members. The 
refurnishing and redecorating of the 
room was done last week. The color 
scheme, maroon, taupe, and ivory, is 
carried out in the furniture, rugs and 
curtains. A beautiful davenport, scoop 
bottom chairs, antique mahogany 
tables, taupe rugs, new lamps, and an 
ivory lace curtain replace the reed fur- 
niture formerly used by the sorority. 

Another feature of O. D. S. Alumnae 
Day was the wearing of yellow chrys- 
anthemums by both alumnae and ac- 
tives. When the twenty-eight alum- 
nae and their hostesses appeared on 
the field and took seats in a body on 
the grandstand, their emblem added 
much color to the gala occasion. 

Gone Here and There 

Secondhand-Car Salesman: "There's 
no road to rough for her, nor any hill 
too steep. She's gone everywhere." 

Customer (modestly): "I'm afraid 
she has." 



♦■ 



J JOHN H. KELLER 



— Dealer In — 






j Meats and Groceries | 

Both Phones — Selinsgrove 



SNYDER COUNTY TRIBUNE 

JOB WORK A SPECIALTY 

Phone 68 -W 



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REVUE 



THURSDAY and FRIDAY, 
OCT. 31 and NOV. 1 

GREENE MURDER 



^ ^ ^■**^*^*^^^*»^^^^^^^^^^^^r 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGBOYE. PA. 



-ACx£ fKREH 



i-' 



* > :( 'I :> ft » * » ) 1 .( I •, , , ., , , 

; ALUMNI NOTES " 



* » * * * + :.*:* „ 



***«;»* 



Susquehanna Alumnus Lays Corner- 
Stone of New Parish House and Church 
School Building; President Smith 
Preaches the Sermon 

Reverend John B. Kniseley. class of 
13, was happy in the presence of a 
throng of 550 people, who assembled 
Sunday, October 27, at St. John's Lu- 
theran Church. Northumberland, Pa., 
for the corner-stone laying of the new | 
parish house and church school build- j 
rng The Hen. Charles Steele. Superin- 
tendent of the school made a brief | 
address, while the pastor, Rev Knis- ' 
eley, performed the act of dedication. | 
Following the laying of the comer- 
stone, the audience repaired to the ! 
sanctuary of the church, where special 
services were conducted by Dr. G. 
Morris Smith, President of Susque- 
hanna University, delivering the ser- 
mon. 

The new building will supply a long 
felt need for St. John's growing Sun- 
day School. The building has dimen- 
sions 60 feet wide by 115 feet long. It 
is of steel frame and brick construct- 
ion on the exterior walls. The first 
floor contains rooms for the cradle 
roll, beginners, and primary depart- 
ments. There are separate class rooms 
for each class in the primary depart- 
ment, equipped with blackboards, 
tables and other accessories. The new 
building will also provide church of- 
fices, a Ladles' parlor, and a sewing 
room. On the ground floor will be 
found an auditorium to seat about 500 
people, together with a large kitchen 
apd a room for double bowling alleys. 
The SUSQUEHANNA congratulates 
Pastor Kniseley and his people for 
their vision in meeting the needs of 
adequate facilities for Christian edu- 
cation. 



Dr. Woodruff Gives Opening Address 

Dr. John I. Woodruff, an alumnus of 
Susquehanna and at present a prom- 
inent member of our faculty, was priv- 
ileged to give the opening address of 
the Northumberland County Institute 
at Sunbury, on Monday afternoon, Oc- 
tober 18th. The subject of Dr. Wood- 
ruff's lecture was, "The Incentives of 
the Teaching Art." 



Program Broadcast 

Miss Margaret Keiser, '26, gave a 
very delightful program from one of 
the Philadelphia Broadcasting Sta- 
tions last Saturday evening at five 
o'clcck. 



S. U. Grads Doing Educational Work 
at Avis, Pa. 

Newton L. Barges, 18. is completing 
the twelfth year as Supervising Prin- 
cipal of the Avis schools. Miss Helen 
Carter, '29, is head of the English de- 
partment of the high school. U. Grant 
Morgain, '28, is head of the Science de- 
partment. Prof. Bartges says that Mr. 
Morgain is maintaining his usual high 
staandard in this work. Both Mr. Mor- 
gain and Mr. Bartges are doing grad- 
uate work at Penn State. 



Sup't Erdly Honored at Lock Haven 

At the Central District Teachers 
Association meeting, which was held 
at Lock Haven from Oct 10-12, Prof. 
Erdly, '20, was elected \ice-president 
for the coming year. He is Superinten- 
dent of the Public Schools at Hol- 
lidaysburg. Pa. Prof. Erdly is one of 
the youngest superintendents in the 
district. 



An Alumnus Writes 

In the October number of "Scien- 
tific Monthly" an article was written 
on "The Chemistry of the Formation 
of Poison in Plants.'' by Lieutenant 
Robert E. Sadtler. He is now teaching 
Chemistry in the Castle Heights Mili- 
tary Academy, Lebanon. Term. 

Letter Received from Rev. Ridenour, 
28 

Recently one of our Professors re- 
ceived a letter from Claude S. Riden- 
our, of Hurlock, Md., in which he says: 

"I am a Lay -reader in the Episcopal 
Church ; taking their Seminary work 
under an ordained man. I have passed 
my examinations so far, under the 
Board of Examining Chaplains. It is 
a three year course of study and 
preaching before I will be ordained." 



Rev. Brown Doing Excellent Work. 

Sunday, October 13th, the Re-dedi- 
cation Services cf the Pine Street Lu- 
theran Church at Danville, Pa., mark- 
ed the completion of successful work 
on the part of Rev. Walter E. Brown. 
15-'19, pastor of the church. 

The approximate cost of the beauti- 
fying of this church is $3500. A beauti- 
ful four-figured art glass window, a 
reproduction of the sacred classic, 
"The Women at the Tomb," was pre- 
sented in the memory of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Lawrence by their family. The 
symbolism of Love, sacrifice, and eter- 
nal hope portrayed by the cross and 



the empty tomb in this window repre- 
sents the Christian faith in which 
those memorialized lived and died. 
Other improvements that were made, 
include the refinishing of the organ 
pipes, installation of radiator covers, 
the placing of a new choir screen, the 
hanging of remodeled light fixtures 
and the refinishing of the woodwork. 
Rev. Brown was honored at the Lu- 
theran Summer Assembly at Susque- 
hanna, when he was elected Director 
of the Assembly for 1930. He accepted 
this responsibility, realizing that it was 
a call to a larger service of the church. 



'24 



Miss Helen Bloom, a rtlident of 
Syracuse, N. Y., is Assistant to the 
Rate Expert of the Syracuse Lighting 
Co. 

'25 

Hon. David F. Davis, of Taylor, Pa., 
is teacher of History in the Technical 
High School at Scranton, Pa. 



Hershef. Pastor Speaks at Lutheran 
League Convention 

Rev. Paul M. Kinports, 15, pastor of 
the Holy Trinity Lutheran Church at 
Hershey, Pa., was the speaker of the 
evening session of the Philadelphia 
District Luther League Convention at 
St. Mark's Church, on Oct. 22nd, at 
Philadelphia. 

On Oct. 17th, he conducted the de- 
votional services at the morning ses- 
sion of the 66th Annual Teachers' In- 
stitute of Dauphin County, at Harris- 
burg. 



Rev. Myrcn E. Cole and Miss Elda 
L. Swenson were united in marriage 
October 24th at the home of the bride 
in Irwin, Pa., the Rev. Willard D. All- 
beck officiating. Rev. and Mrs. Cole are 
spending their wedding trip in the 
East. The groom was for some years 
pastor with unusual success, of St. 
Paul's Lutheran Church of Sewicklev, 
Pa. 



Whereabouts and Doings of Grads 

20 
Miss Esther Cressman is a Mathe- 
matics teacher in the Lewistown Sen- 
ior high school at Lewistown, Pa. 
'21 
Luther O Good, resides at Ventuon 
City, N .J. He is teaching in the Atlan- 
tic City high school. 
•22 
Glennis Rickert received his A. M. 
degree from Columbia this year. At the 
present time he is Principal of the high 
school at Kane, Pa. 
'23 
G. Herman Goetz is a member of the 
faculty in the Mathematics depart- 
ment of the Harrisburg High School. 



Rev. J. Paul Harman, of Braddock, 
Pa., during the past year was chaplain 
of the Allegheny County American 
Legion. 



A number of Susquehanna alumni 
were in attendance at the Ninth An- 
nual Memorial Service of Immanuel 
Church of Muncy Valley, Pa. The Rev. 
Herman G. Steumpfle of Hughesville, 
Pa., was in charge of the service. The 



Rev. M. M. Allbeck, D.D.. of Zelien- 
ople. Pa., preached the sermon. Rev. 
Harland D. Fague, of Millheim, Pa, 
and Rev. Wm. R. Schwirian, of Mont- 
gomery, Pa., spoke at the service. 



—Let's go to Juniata. 



Rev. and Mrs. Roy J. Meyer continue 
their efficient work in the parish of 
First Church. Vandergrift, Pa. 



Ernest Walker, Esq., la building a 
substantial legal practice in Johns- 
town. Pa. He has plans for a new house 
and a wedding in the near future. 



Rev. Willard D. Allbeck recently ad- 
dressed the students of Hamma Divin- 
ity School. Springfield, Ohio, on the 
basis of research work done in the 
graduate school of the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

S 

New York— (UP) —Philip Edwards, 
Negro Olympic star and captain of the 
New York University track squad, has 
married Miss Edith Margaret Oedel- 
schoff, 19, a white girl. Edwards will 
graduate from New York University 
next June, and then the couple will 
go to England, where Edwards in- 
tends to study at Oxford University. 



Kfc\l Shom— DiREfrr Uni- 
versity Service 

W.G. Phillips 

COLLEGE TAILOR 

Charting and F retiring 

SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 

DpposHe Post Office Phone 125-Z 



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blind flying! 

Three new G-E contributions 
to the conquest of the air 

1INDBERGH, flying blind much of the way, 
4 hit Ireland "on the nose" as he winged 
toward Paris Now, as an aid to air navigation 
comes the magneto compass, a product of Gen- 
eral Electric research, which gives pilots a nav- 
igating instrument of extraordinary accuracy. 
Meanwhile, two other General Electric contri- 



butions to aviation have been developed — the 
electric gasoline gauge and the radio echo alti- 
meter. The ordinary altimeter shows only 
height above sea level. The radio echo altimeter 
warns the pilot of his actual distance above 
ground or water by flashing green, yellow, and 
red lights on the instrument board. 



Every year hundreds of college-trained mm orJuwm enter the mpkymmt of 
General Electric. Research, similar to that which developed "eyes" for blind fly- 
ing, is one of the mary fields of endeavor in which they play an important part. 

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Merchant Tailor 
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Shop at 

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FEEHRER & NOLL 

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4 WEST PINE STREET 



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Representing 

New York Life 
Insurance Co. 

Sunbury Trust Bldg. 
SUNBURY, PA. 



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Paxton Brick Co. 

SMOOTH AND ROUGH FACE 

BUILDING BRICK 

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office — Wtttontown, P*. 

I'm-tory — Puxtnnvllle, r». 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY. OCTOBER 29. 1929 



CRUSADERS BOW TO DRAGONS 
IN HOME COMING TILT 13-0 

'Continued iron; L'age 1> 
down. Miller intercepted a pass to give 
the visitors possession of the ball. A 
long penalty for intertenng with the 
eecelver of a pass put Drexel in scor- 
ing position and a short forward pass 
coupled with a line plunge tallied the 
touchdown. Line-up: 
Susquehanna — Drexel — 13 

Adams L. E Wright 

Yon L. T Markle 

Auchmuty L. G McFayden 

A. Garman C Kerns 

R. Garman .... L. G Keller 

Miller R. T Marsh 

Wolfe L. E L Grace 

Wall Q. B Hughes 

Wormley L. H. B Redmond 

Danks R. H. B Snyder, 

Malasky F. B LaBove 

Score by periods: 

Drexel 7 

Susquehanna 

Touchdowns — Wright, Redmond; 
point after touchdown — Snyder I pass i . 

Substitutions: Drexel — Lentz for 
Redmond. Redmond for Snyder. Mc- 
Fayden for Heckman. Miller for Lentz, 
Barr for Kerns, Cardoni for LaBove. 
Hagerman for Hughes, L. Grace for A. 
Grace, Barr for Keller, Gugenheim for 
L. Grace, Devaney for Miller, Grove for 
Markle; Susquehanna — Winters 
Miller, Zak for Yon. MacDonald for 
Danks. Scott for MacDonald. Berger 
for A. Garman, Glenn for Wall. 

Referee, L. P. Jenkins; umpire. L. J. 
Kern; head linesman. P. L. Reagan. 



took a pass for a gain of 13 yards, 
thus placing the ball on the 2-yard 
line. A plunge through the center of 
line gave Redmond a touchdown. 
The try for the extra point failed. 

Winters ran a short kickoff back to 
the Susquehanna 40-yard line. A try 
at end and tackle by Wall gained a 
first down. An exchange of kicks 
placed the ball on the Drexel 37-yard 
line. Scott pulled down a pass for a 
gain of 17 yards. Susquehanna fumbled 
and recovered again for a loss on the 
Drexel 25-yard line, Susquehanna was 
held for downs and Drexel punted out 
of danger as the game ended. 

S 

SUSQUEHANNA INVITES SURVEY 
OF HER ATHLETIC PROGRAM 



SOPHS TROUNCE FROSH 

IN CLASS TILT, 28 TO 







6—13 
0— 



First Quarter 

Wall kicked off to the 5-yard line 
where a Drexel player ran the ball 
back to the 24-yard line. On the sec- 
ond play Drexel fumbled and Yon re- 
covered the pigskin for Susquehanna 
on the Drexel 31 -yard line. Wall tried 
lor a field goal, but the kick was short 
and Drexel received the ball on the 
20-yard line. LaBove twLsted his way 
20 yards through tackle. Snyder, with 
an 8 yard run brought the ball to the 
center of the field. A pass, Hughes to 
Lentz was good for 20 yards. Lentz 
skirted end for 10 yards and LaBove 
brought the ball to the Susquehanna 
7-yard line with another 10 yard gain. 
A pass. Hughes to Wright, scored a 
touchdown. A short forward pass to 
Snyder scored the extra point. 

Wormley ran the kickoff back to his 
27-yard line. Wormley and Wall went 
through for a first down. Wall punted 
to the Drexel 25-yard line, where Drex- 
el punted back to the Susquehanna 
34-yard line. Susquehanna gained on 
another exchange of kicks, when it re- 
ceived the ball on its 43 -yard line. 
Wall tossed a pass to Danks for a gain 
of 17 yards. Lentz intercepted a for- 
ward and ran to his 33-yard line as 
the quarter ended. 

Second Quarter 
Three exchanges of kicks followed 
and each time Drexel recovered the 
ball on its 33-yard line. Redmond cut 
in at end for 7 yards and LaBove hit 
center for a first down Drexel was 
penalized 15 yards and punted out- 
side at the center of the field. Wall 
kicked back to the Drexel 30-yard line. 
Drexel tumbled and Wolf recovered on 
the 37-yard line. A pass. Wall to 
Danks, gained 15 yards and put the 
ball in scoring distance. Susquehanna 
was held for downs on the 23-yard line. 
Hughes circled end for 25 yards. A for- 
ward pass to Redmond was good for 
20 more yards. A triple i-ever.se brought 
Hughes around end for 8 yards to the 
Susquehanna 12-yard line A pass over 
the goal line failed and Susquehanna 
received the ball on the 20 -yard line. 
Wall punted U the halt ended. 
Third Quarter 
Malasky ran the kickoff back m Sine 
style to the Susquehanna 40-yard line. 
Wall tossed ■ pass to Aaams t« 23 
yards to place the ball deep in Drexel 
tern:, it Wall failed to gel a past away 
and was thrown for a 
The Susquehanna kick 
and it only carried to the center of the 
field. Drexel also punted poorly to the 
Susquehanna 43-yard line Wormley 
lost yardage on an exchange of kicks. 
Walls punt was again hurried and 

Drexel gained tne ball on the Susque- 
n;w.na 43-yard line Lentz went 
through tor a first down Susquehanna 
was penalised 20 yard . Redmond 
rounded rlgght end to bring the ball 
to the 6-yard lb Susquehanna 

iu,i u i.e. j, on 

(•yard hue. Drexi - i 
20 yard i for roughing 9 e punt- 

ed Won 

I 

IJre 

11 -yard line 

Fourth QiurU'r 

Sco punt back •■•■ ttonal 

t;,i line to the SUA- 

quehanna W-yard hue Miller Lnter- 

; | . .mi line A 
chan 'e ot kick., gained nothb 
Drexel When Susquehanna interfered 
With eiver of a pass Drexel was 

.n of 25 -, mi Redmond 



(Continued from Cage 1> 
gridiron and Track and Field events. 
Adjoining University Field are located 
two additional football fields, used for 
practice and the playing of class and 
group games; two soccer fields for 
similar use and a hockey field. Four 
new tennis courts were constructed 
during the year. Last spring a new- 
ball diamond was built. 
Susquehanna's Objectives Gradually 
Being Realized 

During the past eight years Susque- 
hanna has gradually been realizing 
the two chief objectives set up in her 
sports program in 1921. First: To place 
r her sports — intercollegiate and intra- 
mural — on a clean basis, thereby mak- 
ing this phase of Susquehanna's edu- 
cational program a definite and inter- 
esting part of the life of every student, 
rather than have a selected few ath- 
letes represent the University. Second: 
To provide the best passible material 
facilities for the conduct of the var- 
ious sports together with adequate in- 
struction and coaching in these ac- 
tivities . 

Susquehanna's present enrollment, 
in the college department, totals 372 
students. Of these 234 are men and 
138 women. It is not an unusual sight 
to find 150 or 200 students enjoying 
some form of sport every afternoon on 
Susquehanna's ample playing fields. 
In fact, this is a normal occurence. A 
visitor at Susquehanna will find the 
various group and class teams busily 
engaged in competition in soccer, field 
hockey, football, tennis, archery, etc. 

Susquehanna Has Large Football 
Squad 

Fear is sometimes expressed that 
with intra-mural sports interest in 
Varsity competition may wane. Sus- 
quehanna has found the opposite to be 
true. Susquelianna's football squad 
during the past two years has been 
larger than at any other time in her 
thirty-five years of inter-collegiate 
competition in the grid game. Between 
forty and fifty students are numbered 
in the 'Varsity and Junior Varsity- 
squads. In addition to these about 
thirty-five more men are members of 
the Freshmen and Sophomore class 
grid squads. 

To conduct her sports on the high- 1 
e.-t plan conducive to the best interest j 
of her students is the untimate pur- 
pose of Susquehanna For this reason 
Susquehanna will be pleased to have a 
study made of this phase of her col- 
lege life 

S 



(Continued from Page 1) 
field, where Varner received a pass, but 
fumbled as he went over the goal line 
and a Freshman recovered for a safe- 
ty, making the score 8-0 at the end of 
the quarter. 

The class of '32 was held during 
most of the second quarter because of 
its many fumbles, but a pass, Norton 
to Gilliland, went for a score as the 
half ended. 

An intercepted pass and another for- 
ward, this time to Fairchilds, account- 
ed for a touchdown in the third quar- 
ter. At the start of the last period of 
play a long pass brought the ball 
close to the goal line, where the line- 
smashing Fairchilds again took it over 
for the score. 

The line-up: 
Sophomores — 28 Freshmen — 

Foltz L. E Kramer 

Hartman L. T Hepner 

Swartz L. G Ahl (0) 

Kozak (C) C Metzger 



Hamel 

Hassay 

Worthing ton 

Burns 

. . Ballentine 
Petry 



M. Shaffer .... R. G. 

Hubbard R. T. . 

Palmer R. E. . 

Norton Q. B. . 

Varner L. H, B. 

Gilliland .... R. H. B 

Fairchilds F. B Ramer 

Score by periods: 

Sophomores 8 7 7 6—28 

Freshmen 0—0 

Touchdowns — Fairchilds 3, Gilliland. 
Extra points — Fairchilds (rush); pen- 
alty. Safety — Freshmen. 

Substitutions: Sophomores— Brosious 
for Foltz, Greaves for C. Shaffer, Bish- 
op for Varner. Coldren for Gilliland, 
Hess for Foltz; Freshmen — Swarm for 
Ramer, Geistweit for Petry. Petry for 
Hepner. 

S 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE 

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

HONORS MRS. DODSON 



(Continued from Page 1) 
ed the problem. In this state, the bat- j 
tie is just beginning. Much opposition | 
is anticipated to this program 

Several nationally-known men at- 
tended the conference and addressed 
the librarians on important topics 

A. Coleman Sheetz, Bureau Secre- 
tary of the Pennsylvania State Library 
at Harrisburg was elected the presi- 
dent. Miss Eh£S Martin, of Bucknell, 
was made secretary, and Miss Root of 
the Bethlehem Public Library, treas- 
urer. 

The SUSQUEHANNA congratulates 
Mrs Dodson on the honor that has 
been bestowed upon her and, incident- 
ally, upon the university. 

S 

A Suggestion 

Mother: "You say you think that 
you've solved the dishwashing prob- 
lem?" 

Daughter: "Yes. with paper plates 
and an eraser." 



I'LLERYMEN 



PRIMING 
FOR ANNUAL 



I he Jeweler 
SELIX8G10VE, FA. 



GAME 



20 yard loss. 
wa.s hurried 



| Continued from Page It 
dieations a large number of students 
will follow the team to Huntingdon, 
the scene of the battle. The entire 
squad under Coach Ullery will make 
the trip. 

The band will also go to the game 
to provide pep and spirit and to show 
the team that the entire student body 
and faculty are back of them. 

S 

JUNIOR LEAD IN SOCCER 

LEAGUE IS THREATENED 



LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS 
DRAWING SUPPLIES 

JOS. L MENTZ 



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\ Remington Portable Typewriters 

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The Sophomores created an upset 
In the inter-class soccer league by de- 
feating the Juniors 3-2 on Monday af- 
ternoon. October 14. Up to that time 
the Juniors had been undefeated. The 
league Itandlngt are in a critical state 
The Benton have t chance to overtake 
the Juniors for the championship, 
while the Sophomores have a splendid 
opportunity to wrest second place from 
the Senior- The games this week will 
probably be most crucial of the season 



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CRUSADERS 



=4 



Volume XXXVI 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1929 



Number 12 



Ullerymen Take Time Out to Pose for Cameraman 




Crusaders Defeated 
By Juniata Indians 
In Sea of Mud, 12-0 



Orange and Maroon Lose> Football 

Fray to Juniata College for First 

Time in Seven Year* 



MANY VARSITY MEN NOT ON 
LINEUP BECAUSE OF INJURIES 



Wolfe Plays Excellent Game at End: 

Wormley Makes Many Gains. 

Malasky Hits Hard 



Talkies Make Debut 
at Stanley Theatre 



Sound Pictures Will Feature Program 

of Local Theatre; College Paper is 

Represented at Pre-View 



Talking pictures made their debut 
in Selinsgrove last night, when the 
Stanley, the town's only theatre, offer- 
ed its initial program of sound pic- 
tures to the public. 

A large crowd of Selinsgrove citi- 
zens and Susquehanna students at- 
tended the first showing. "On With 
the Show," the first techni-color all- 
talking production, was the feature of 
the program. 

The inauguration of talking pictures 
in Selinsgrove means much to theatre- 
goers of Susquehanna. It will elimi- 
nate the necessity of going to Sunbury 
for entertainment, and its incidental 
loss of time and additional expenditure 
of money. 

Silent pictures no longer attract 
theatre-goers today when it is pos- 
sible for them to attend "talkies." 
Representatives of The Susquehanna 

at Pre-View 

Newspapermen and a number of in- 
vited guests attended a pre-view of the 
program Sunday afternoon. Several 
representatives of The Susquehanna 
were among the newsment present. 

Those who were permitted to wit- j 
ness the first showing were loud in 
their commendation of the equipment 
which has been installed. The repro- 
ducing apparatus has an unusually 
clear tone and lacks the metallic 
harshness of the equipment of some 
theatres. 

The walls of the theatre have been 
padded so as to add to the clearness 
of the sounds as they are reproduced. 
Additional improvements will be made 
in the future. 

High Class Pictures Promised 

The manager of the theatre an- 
nounces that he will have a program of 
high class pictures and entertaining 
short features at all times and that 
he will give up-to-the-minute service 
in the endeavor to give Selinsgrove 
high grade entertainment. 

The theatre is owned and managed 
by the Comerford Amusement Com- 
pany, with headquarters in Scranton. 
Mr. Search is the local manager The 
corporation owns about one hundred 
and fifty theatres in Pennsylvania and 
New York. 



Susquehanna's entire football squad, and also the coaching staff and 
manager, appear in the photo above, taken on the Athletic Field: 

Left to right, rear row — Zak, Kline. Rummel, Myers, Malasky, Miller. 
Wagner, MacDonald, Wormley, Wall, DeLay, Winters, Mertz, manager; Wm. 
Ullery. head coach. 

Middle row— Rupp. McGeehan, Sutphen, Fenstermacher, Hudkins. Yon. 
Barber, Speer, R. Garman. Wolfe, A. Garman, captain; Witkop, Auchmuty, 
Adams, and Assistant Coach Daubenspeck. 

Front row — Traxler, Harry, Lenker, Dreibelbls, Spigelmyer, Glenn, Carl, 
Reynolds. Scott, Schoffstall, Johnston, Rhoads, Corl, Hazlett, and Assistant 
Coach Henzes. 
— ♦ 



361 Are Enrolled 
In Extension Dept. 



Many Teachers Avail Themselves of 

the Opportunity to Secure 

Additional Work 



Begin Dismantling 
"Sleepy Hollow 



A total of 361 men and women are 
enrolled in the Extension Department 
of Susquehanna University, according 
to statistics compiled by the Dean's of- 
fice. 

Most of these are seeking advanced 
credit or are working for a college de- 
gree to meet with State requirements. 
No one is permitted to take more than 
six credit hours of work. 

The largest enrollment in this de- 
partment is in the Wilkes-Barre cen- 
ter. The Campus center is second. The 
campus classes are given Friday eve- 
nings and Saturday mornings. 

The complete statistics are as fol- 
lows: 

Campus Center: Dr. Thomas C. 
Houtz, Meterology. 34; Dr. Geo. E. 
Fisher, Educational Biology, 57; Dr. 
Geo. F. Dunkelberger, Educational 
Measurements, 36; Miss Emily McEl- 
wee. Typewriting, 9; Dr. F. S. Wil- 
liams, College Algebra, 10; Miss Hade, 
English Drama, 25 

Wilkes-Barre Center: Prof. E. M. 
Brungart, High School Methods, 41; 
Prof. J. T. Park, General Physics, 15; 
Dr. H. A. Allison, American Govern- 
ment. 45; Miss Evelyn Allison, French, 
15; Dr. John I. Woodruff, English Ro- 
mantic Poets, 55; Miss Mary Woodruff, 
Fundamentals in English, 28; Dr. H. A. 
F Kern, German, 24; Dr. A. W. Ahl, 
28. 

Coal Township Center: Dr. Charles 
A. Fisher, The Teaching of Commercial 
Law, 22; Dr. H. A. Surface, General 
Biology, 29; Prof. John Houtz, College 
Algebra, 18. 

Mt. Carmel Center: Prof. Geo. N. 
Wood, Economics, 45; Prof. Hartung, 
The Teaching of Shakespeare. 29. 

Dr. John I. Woodruff is director of 
the Extension Department. 

S 

RACE FOR SOCCER LEADER- 
SHIP IS CLOSER THAN EVER 



Buffalo Minister 
Will Speak Here 



Allen Knight Chalmers, Widely -Known 

Religious Worker, Will Address 

Students Here Tomorrow 



Band is Sensation 
at Juniata Game 



Orange and Maroon Band Follows 
Team to Huntingdon; Gives Dem- 
onstration at Lewistown 



Susquehanna University's splendid 
thirty-five piece band, under the di- 
rection of Prof. Elrose Allison, accom- 
panied the football squad to Juniata 



Playing on a miserable field and in 
a steady drizzle, the Crusaders were 
trampled on by the Juniata Indians to 
the tune of 12-0. The Orange and Ma- 
roon was forced to leave the field de- 
feated for the first time since football 
relations were opened with the Hunt- 
ingdon county institution. This was 
the seventh consecutive season that 
the two teams met in battle array on 
the gridiron. 

With the weather marring what 
should have been a perfect day. and 
with a large squad of loyal Susque- 
hanna rooters and the band behind 
them, the Ullerymen failed to come 
through on Juniata's Home Coming 
Day. 

Petty's sensational runs and the 



College last Saturday, to add zest to j stonewall defense of the entire line 
the football fray which has become gave Juniata a slight edge. Andrews' 



traditional between the two institu- 
tions. 



masterful guidance and his many 
forceful gains through the line fea- 



Ancient Edifice. Formerly Used as 

Science Building and Dormitory. 

Being Torn Down 



Workmen are busily engaged at pres- 
ent in dismantling "Sleepy Hollow," 
one of the oldest buildings on Sus- 
quehanna's campus. The building has 
served in various capacities ever since 
it was constructed many years ago. 
Has Colorful History 

Dr. Manhart, Dean of the School 
of Theology, himself a graduate of ' 
Missionary Institute, gave a very in- , 
teresting history of this ancient edi- i 
flee in an interview with a Susque- 
hanna reporter today. 

The building originally was a double 
house of frame construction. It was 
one of several built in 1870 for the ac- 
commodation of married theological 
students. 

The present residences of several 
(Concluded on Page 4> 



The Inter-Class Soccer League was 
not very active during the past week, 
due to the unfavorable weather con- 
ditions On Monday afternoon the 
Sophomores defeated the Juniors 5-1, 
and the Seniors downed the Freshmen 
4-2. On Tuesday afternoon the Sen- 
iors again trounced the Freshmen, this 
time 4-0. 

As a result of these three contests 
the race for the league leadership is 
closer than ever. The few remaining 
games will decide the soccer cham- 
pionship this week. The remaining 
contests are the Seniors and Sopho- 
mores, two games; the Juniors and 
Seniors, one game, and the Juniors 
and Freshmen, one game 

The present standings are as follows: 
W L Pet. 

Juniors 5 2 .714 

Seniors 4 2 .667 

Sophomores 4 3 .571 

Freshmen 1 7 .125 

S 

—On to Ursinus Crusaders! 



Allen Knight Chalmers, pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Church, Buffalo, N. 
Y„ will visit Susquehanna's campus to- 
morrow to deliver two lectures, one 
during the course of the regular chap- 
el exercises and one in the evening. 

He is coming here through the Mid- 
dle Atlantic Field Council of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. 
He will also visit Franklin & Marshall, 
Dickinson and Bucknell while in this 
section of the State. 

Rev. Chalmers entered the ministry 
because he considers the church the 
only group even professing the spirit 
ual ideals that he believes are essen- j 
tial as the foundation of a stable 
world. At college he planned to become 
a professor of history, and he had one 
year's experience in this field, but the 
ministry seemed to him a larger and 
broader work. 

Attended Johns Hopkins 

The noted worker was born in Cleve- 
land, Ohio. In 1913. he went with his 
family to spend six months in Eng- 
land. While there, he attended the 
Oxford Summer School. After his 
graduation from his school in 1914, he 
entered Johns Hopkins University at 
Baltimore. There he took the four 
years' course in three years. He earned 
the money for his education in most 
varied ways. 

His extra study and work did not 
keep him from participating in col- 
lege athletics. He played football and 
lacrosse on Johns Hopkins teams, put 
the shot on the track team, was busi- 
ness manager of the varsity base ball 
team. He was also business manager 
and associate editor of the college 
weekly newspaper. 

Served in World War 

In 1916 Mr. Chalmers answered the 
call of the French government for men 
with experience in organization. He 
spent ten months at Verdun in aux- 
iliary service with the second French 
Army and in Motor Transport Corps 
of the United States Army. When he 
returned to this country, he taught 
history at the Gilman School for boys 
at Baltimore, where he remained for 
one year. Then, in 1919. he entered 
Yale Theological Seminary. During 
the last two years at Yale, Mr. Chal- 
mers was assistant pastor at the 
Dwight Place Congregational Church 
at New Haven. 

His first call was to the Congrega- 
tional Church at West Springfield, 
Mass.. where he remained two years. 
Then he returned as pastor to the 
Dwight Place Church, where he spent 
three years. In October. 1927. he was 
called to the pastorate of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Buffalo. 

Works With Young People 

Mr. Chalmers ha,s done a great deal 
of work with young people. Yale, 
Princeton, Hamilton. Colgate, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, State 
Teachers College at Buffalo, Wells, 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



The band caused quite a sensation : tured. The Orange and Maroon line 
at the game with its lively music and seemed to crumble at times when its 
cleverly executed marches. The uni- strength was needed most, 
forms of the members of the band Team Hampered by Injuries 

added color to an otherwise drab oc- ; The crusaders were hampered con- 
caslon - ! siderably by injuries. Capt. Al Oar- 

The trip, which had been planned ; man missed the starting lineup the 
for a long time by the young men of '■ first time this year on account of in- 
the band, was made possible through I juries received last week in the game 
the courtesy and generosity of .'ov- ! against Drexel. Garman went In .sev- 
eral faculty members and business eral minutes in the last quarter, but 
men of the town, who provided trans- was immediately taken out. 
portation. Jess Newcomer, manager of Danks and Moser were both missed 
the band, was in charge of all ar- on the starting lineup, but broke into 
rangements and deserves a lot of cred- the fray in the last half. Both were 



it for the work he did. 

First Stop at Lewistown 



still nursing injuries. Moser added 
much strength in backing up the line 



Arriving at Lewistown at about 12 ; in the second half. 
o'clock, the band paraded through the Glenn was again at the helm of the 
main thoroughfare of that city and | Orange and Maroon and displayed 
gave a little demonstration on ,the | muc h ability for the first year of col- 
main square. le 8 e Dal1 - Wormley did the bulk of the 
The peppy marches brought the I ball-carrying and got off some nice 
whole town out to listen to the musi- runs - Malasky flashed real form in 

Saturday's game, tearing off many 
runs, running perfect interference, and 
hitting hard. It seemed that when 
Frank hit a man, his opponent car- 
ried a souvenir for a while. 

Wolfe Outstanding on Line 
On the line, Wolfe was the outstand- 
ing man, making his end a difficult 
one to skirt. In the first quarter, he 
blocked a kick which made things look 
disastrous for Juniata for a while. In 
the same period he broke through the 
line and spoiled many plays. How- 
( Concluded on Page 4> 
S 

Many Rooters Go to 
Juniata With Team 



cal proteges of one of its own sons, 
for "Rosy" Allison calls that city his 
home. 

The large crowd that gathered 
around the square was highly pleased 
with the demonstration and was pro- 
fuse in its applause and commendation 
The stop-over proved an excellent 
boost for Susquehanna. 

Band Arrives Late at Game 

As is always the case on such a trip, 
something happens to delay the pro- 
gram as scheduled. Fifteen minutes 
were allotted for lunch before starting 
for Huntingdon. The period proved 
all too short, however. 

After chasing through the ftve-and- 
ten-cent stores, for which some of the 
boys seemed to have a mania, the band 
was finally rounded up and started on 
its way to Juniata College. 

Unfortunately, however, the band 
did not arrive in time for the first 
kick-off. They arrived about the end 
of the first period and made their I 

presence known by a few lively airs I Neither threatening, overcast skie.s 
outside the wooden fence that sur- i nor slippery detours could prevent a 
rounded the scene of battle. Although j large portion of Susquehanna's stu- 



U. Students, Faculty and Alumni 
Witness Traditional Game 
at Huntingdon 



it was raining and the field was cov 
ered with mud, the boys were not 
phased because they were out to show 
that Susquehanna has a band of which 
she may well be proud. 

Demonstration Between Halves 



dent body and faculty from following 
their team to Huntingdon Saturday 
where the Crusaders met in the annual 
football battle with the Juniata In- 
dians. 
As a result, the campus was almost 



Between halves the band gave its | entirely deserted from eleven o'clock 



customary demonstration, this time in 
a sea of mud resulting from several 
days of rain. Up and down the field 
they marched to the tune of peppy 
march airs, executing their marches 
with military precision, which brought 
acclaun from the large crowd that 
thronged the stands 

Even the make dance ot the Juniata 
Injuns failed to mar the progre 
] the Orange and Maroon clad musi- 
cians. 

An offer to make some money wa.-, 
given the band on the trip. One of 



Saturday morning until late at night. 
A number of the rooters spent the re- 
mainder of the week-end with friend; 
and relatives in that section. 

Most of the enthusiastic rooters made 
the trip In cars of their own or of their 
friends. A few. however, resorted to 
the familiar "hitch-hiking" method. 

Many alumni of the Altoona section 
took advantage of the proximity of tlw 
name and journeyed to Huntingdon to 
wttntM their Aim.i Mater clash with 
an old-time foe. 

The trip, fortunately, was without 



the business men of Lewistown offered mishap to anyone, other than perhaps 
a sum of money if upon its return the I .t tire or two One car was re- 



band would give a, short concert before 

his place of business But the weather 

proved extremely unfavorable for such 

( Concluded on Page 4' 



ported to have been stranded near 
Lewistown in a nun- detour, so that a 
few prospective rooters were lost along 
the wayside 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, FA. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly during the College Year except Thanksgiving Week, Christ- 
mas. New Year and Easter Week. 



Subscription $1.50 a Year, Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 



THE STAFF 

Editor-inCbJef Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

News Editor Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportoiial Staff 

Betty Wardrop '32 Andy Kozak '32 John Kindsvatter '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Bruce Worthington, '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Edna Tressler, '30, Conservatory of Music 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz *30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1929 



THIS BUSINESS OF BEING COLLEGE BRED 

Most people of today are of the belief that a college edu- 
cation increases the earning power of an individual : and that 
as a result of having pursued a technical eourse of study in an 
institution of higher learning, the many young men and women 
graduating from all kinds of schools and colleges today are 
capable of earning more money than had they entered busi- 
ness immediately upon leaving the secondary schools. 

Dr. Harold F. Clark, professor of education at New York 
Teachers' College, maintains, however, that such people are 
laboring under a false impression, and points out that a college 
education actually cuts earning power because it overcrowds 
the professions and vocations. Questioning the notion that 
j ach year spent in college adds a definite number of dollars to 
earning power, Dr. Clark says: 

"The persons who are earning high wages today would have 
liade them without the help of education. It is quite natural 
hat if you compare non-educated persons with educated per- 
sons you will find the latter earning more money because that 
ype of person is going to school today. To reveal actual re* 
. suits of education you are obliged to compare the two groups 
* )f equally capable persons. If any one thing stands out from 
ill the material it is that numbers are a determining factor in 
he economic effects of education. It cannot he too strongly 
smphasised that any one kind of education can he over-supplied 
"rom the economic standpoint." 

What Dr. Clark wants to demonstrate here is that edu- 
ction is a commodity just as much as oil or cotton and is 
therefore subject to the laws of economics. The laws of supply 
uid demand will determine the remuneration of the individual 
in a profession just as much as they will determine the price of 
>il and of cotton. It is almost self-evident that it' you pre- 
pare one hundred men for ninety positions, you will create 
pressure to decrease the remuneration. 

The noted educator, to our estimation, is quite riiilit in his 
statements. Too many people are in college today with that 
mistaken idea — or shall we say delusion? — that merely because 
they are going to college they will be worth a fortune when a 
diploma is handed to them or a degree conferred on them. 
What really counts is natural ability. As Dr. Clark remarks, 
"the boy with ability will yet to his destination in the business 
world quite regardless of a college education," to which we 
should like to add, "if he applies himself." for no amount of 
talent will be of avail to any individual if it is permitted to 
lie latent within him or to remain undeveloped thru lack of 
initiative. 

Other men of prominence in the educational world voice 
the same opinion. One of the greatest criticisms of the college 
of today is that it turns out too many A.B.'s and no geniuses. 
It is mass production thruout our entire educational system. 
No amount of attention is paid to individual differences in the 
majority of colleges. 

The New York man finds support in his arguments in no less 
a personage than the greal Roman orator, Cicero, who cen- 
turies ago said that "natural ability without education has 
oftener raised man to glory and virtue, than education without 
ability." 

a 



"RIME OF THE RUMBLING FOOTBALLER" 

It is a matter of common knowledge that u fumble in foot- 
ball game is one of the m<»st heartbreaking events in the grid- 
iron fray, especially if one happens to be a party to the side 
that makes the fumble, Sus<|uchannans have experienced this 
sensation on several occasions when its gridiron stalwarts ac- 
cidentally lost the ball at a crucial point. 

The coach of the South Carolina University football team, 
Wishing to cure his team of the damaging habit of fumbling 
that much to his consternation it had acquired in several games, 
required each of his half-backs to carry a football to and from 
chisses. to his meals, and even to sleep with it. It must have 
very closely resembled the practice among Uppei classmen of 

many colleges oi requiring all Froth who violate the ban againsl 
hands in the pockets, to carry bricks for several days. 

Commenting in a very clever manner on the football-fumb- 
ling cure, the Philadelphia Inquirer sa_\s, editorially: 



"Whether the plan will work is uncertain Practice in 
carrying the ball may help muscular control if not overdone to 
the point of fatigue. On the mental side the problem is more 
difficult. Disgust may be as fatal to the training as weariness. 
Constant propinquity is expected to make the player love the 
symbol and hate the unfavorable act associated with it. The 
experiment worked when the Ancient Mariner had to wear the 
alabatross he had wantonly shot. But sometimes familiarity 
breeds contempt, and one is not sure the player will not event- 
ually find football as odious as the scarlet letter." 

S 

TWO SIDES TO THE QUESTION 

By Charles W. Lawrence 
Editor, Intercollegiate Press Service 

Whatever the results of the Carnegie Foundation investi- 
gation of intercollegiate athletic conditions so far as football 
is concerned, the immediate result of the report and the com- 
ment upon it has been the. revelation that North American edu- 
cators, whose lives have been dedicated, supposedly, to the busi- 
ness of building up philosophies based on fundamental or radical 
facts, are unwilling to apply the same thesis to a discussion of 
college athletics. 

Assuming that the purpose of college is honesty, intellect- 
ual as well as moral, we find ourselves less able to say with fi- 
nality that subsidizing of athletes by college is either all right 
or all wrong. If honesty is to be the basis of our higher edu- 
cation, to be sure we must assume that efforts to conceal sub- 
sidation when it is practiced is wrong. 

The right or wrong of the subsidizing itself, however, can- 
not be determined by the fitting together or high-sounding 
phrases about the purity of amateurism, the evils of big-time 
football, or the necessity for such form of athletic competition 
between colleges. To come to some conclusion on the subject 
we must go further and decide first of all what is the end to be 
accomplished by higher education. 

We find tw T o distinct schools of thought with which we 
must contend here. One school, roughly represented by the 
small private college with very high scholastic requirements 
for admission, holds that the purpose of education is to develop 
an intellectual aristocracy. This class of colleges, as a rule, do 
not find it necessary to solicit students, nor do they care for 
mere size in student body. Many of this sort of college are now 
engaged in effort! to reduce themselves in size, by greatly rais- 
ing the standards for admission. 

Another school of thought, represented in part by the great 
state universities, tell us that the purpose of higher education 
is to raise the level of all intelligence, to give every boy and 
girl an opportunity to become a college graduate, regardless 
of his degree of intelligence, or his fitness for higher education. 

The lines, one must remember, are not so finely drawn as 
we have assumed for the purpose of our argument. Many 
state institutions are raising their entrance requirements, while 
many private coleges are seeking size rather than quality. 

However, investigating the two schools of thought, Ave find 
the question of subsidized athletics much more complicated than 

we had supposed. 

Theoretically, at least, the former school should be opposed 
to intensive intercollegiate athletics id' any sort, and should ap- 
ply themselves merely to the development of infra-mural sports 
wherein every college student may have the opportunity to sup- 
plement his development of the brain with development of a 
healthy body. A name as a football school is not needed by such 
a school, nor is it desirable. 

On the other hand, where size rather than quality is to be 
desired, intercollegiate activities are necessary, and subsidiz- 
ing of athletes is quite clearly advisable, for such a school needs 
advertising to attract the youth who otherwise would not be 
tempted to attend college. Big-time football is as much I part 
of the business of that institution as its courses of study. Foot- 
ball arouses a college enthusiasm which inspires otherwise dull 
minds to become I graduate of that institution, and the ulti- 
mate result very probably is more college graduates than there 
otherwise would have been. 

Roughly speaking, therefore, we must assume that before 
we solve the right or wrong of subsidized football, we must know 
what is to be the purpose of education. And since the two 
ideas of the purpose of education undoubtedly will exist always, 
side by side, we must expect that there will be two sides to the 
question of paying youths to play football. 



NEW BOOKS ADDED TO THE 
LIBRARY 



Fiction 

Bellamy— Looking Backward 2,000- 
1887. 

De La Roche— White Oaks of Jalna. 

Galsworthy— Modern Comedy. 

Richardson — Ultima Thule. 

Zweig— Case of Sergeant Grischa. 
Non-Fiction 

Beebe— Arcturus Adventure. 

Blackhurst — Directed Observation 
and Supervised Teaching. 

Brown— Essays of Our Times. 

Brown— Poetry of Our Times. 

Dorsey— Why We Behave Like Hu- 
man Beings. 

Eddington— Nature of the Physical 
World. 

Eddington — Science and the Un- 
seen World. 

Garland— Daughter of the Middle 
Border. 

Gerwig— Crowell's Handbook for 
Readers and Writers. 

Hackett— Henry the Eighth. 

Jastrow— Keeping Mentally Fit. 

Jefferson— Essays and Essay Writ- 
ing. 

Lawrence— Revolt in the Desert. 

Lynd & Lynd— Mlddletown. 

Marble— Study of the Modern Novel. 

Masefield— Gallipoli. 

Morley— Mince Pie. 

Morley— Shandygaff. 

Presbrey— History and Development 
of Advertising. 

Rolland— Beethoven the Creator. 

Stryker— Andrew Johnson. 

Thwing— Education and Religion. 

Traver— Christ Who is All. 

Vallery-Radot— Life of Pasteur. 

Wiggam— New Decalogue of Science. 

Zangwill— Melting-Pot. 

Kelsey— Physical Basis of Society. 



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The man-made gem about the size 
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Dr. Hershey believes the day will 
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MON., TUES., WEDNESDAY, 
OCT. 28, 29 AND 30 

HOLLYWOOD 
REVUE 



THURSDAY and FRIDAY, 
OCT. 31 and NOV. 1 

GREENE MURDER 
CASE 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PA. 



nr,E rtTREis 



• 



John Wall Seriously 
Injured in Practice 



Quarterback of Orange and Maroon 

Eleven Injures Right Shoulder 

While Tackling "Dummy" 



Johnnie Wall, '30, was seriously in- 
jured in practice last Wednesday night, 
and it is feared that he will be lost to 
(he squad for the remainder of the 
season. 

He was taking his turn in tackling 
the "dummy," when he glanced off 
the sack and forced all of his weight 
on his right shoulder, tearing loose 
all the ligaments. The X-ray picture, 
which was taken immediately after the 
accident, revealed no fractured bones. 

The husky quarterback Is getting his 
share of misfortune this season, for in 
the Washington game, the opening 
fray of the season, he received a bad 
injury to his right hip. On account 
of the latter injury, Wall's name did 
not appear on the starting line-up for 
the first time in his football career at 
Susquehanna, when the Crusaders 
played Haverford on Parents' Day. A 
glance at Johnnie's record at Bossie 
High School, Evansville, Indiana, re- 
veals that his name appeared on the 
starting line-up of every game. 

In the three years of varsity football 
at Susquehanna, Johnnie always gave 
his best, not because he wanted in- 
dividual glory, but because he loved 
football. During his college career he 
was twice elected captain by his team 
mates, serving as captain in his Junior 
year, but ruled ineligible this year. 

While Johnnie's career at college 
grows to a close his name will go down 
in the history of football at Susque- 
hanna as one of the best football play- 
ers that has ever toted a pigskin for 
the Orange and Maroon. 

Everyone wishes Johnnie a speedy 
recovery and deeply regrets the inci- 
dent that has marred to a certain ex- 
tent his splendid record. 

S 

*********** * ******* 

! ALUMNI NOTES | 

******** *********** 



to man is the book of nature, and 
where, my friends, can you find a 

bcok having more life?" 

* * » 

"Just as in the book of nature, 'the 
early rays of the morning dawn in 
the crimson streaks of the ocean cheek 
grow into the great Sun,' so in this 
Book of Books when the fullness of 
time has come after its rays had been 
seen in history, in phrophecy and in 
type, then Jesus Christ, the Son of 
Righteousness, burst forth in all his 
dazzling splendor, giving Light and 
Life and Immortality to all who would 

bathe in His rays.." 

* * * 

"My friends, 'tis a grand and glor- 
ious truth that the Life of the Book 
of Books has transformed the world 
frcm heathenism, barbarism and de- 
struction to civilization, mortality and 
Christianity, and have given to man 
the hope of Immortality." 

* * * 

"Take Jesus Christ out of this Book, 
or rob Him of His Diety and Divinity 
and this blessed Book will be robbed 
of its Light, Life and Immortality. 

"In Him was life and the life was 
the light of men." 

Anniversary Programs Conducted 

After the meeting of the Northeast 
Conference of Allegheny Synod on Oc- 
tober 7-8 in the Clover Creek Luther- 
an Church in one of the churches in 
the pastorate of Rev. Vernon Naugle, 
anniversary sqn#ces were conducted 
until the close of the week. This was 
a celebration of the 125th anniversary 
of this church. Each service had four 
special features, viz.. a sermon, a trib- 
ute, a greeting and a series of lantern 
pictures. An Anniversary Book, includ- 
ing an interesting history of the church 
up to the present time was published 
by the pastor and the council. 

Last June Rev. Naugle conducted a 
similar 125th Anniversary Celebration 



Susquehanna Graduates Are Officers 

- At the closing session of North 
Branch Conference of Susquehanna 
Synod on October 29th, the offices of 
president and secretary-treasurer were 
filled by the Rev. W. E. Brown, pastor 
of the Pine Street Lutheran Church 
at Danville, Pa., and the Rev. H. R. 
Shipe, pastor of a Lutheran Charge at 
Berwick, Pa. 

Rev. Brown was also chosen as the 
Clerical Delegate of this Conference 
to the Convention of the United Lu- 
theran Church of America. 
Members of the Southampton Town- 
ship High School Faculty 

Anna L. Gilbert. August Class of '29, 
of Freeburg, was recently elected to 
the faculty of the Southampton Town- 
ship High School Faculty at Richboro. 
Due to the large number of pupils at- 
tending this school, it was necessary 
that the faculty be enlarged. Miss Gil- 
bert will teach in the Social Science 
and Biological departments. Philadel- 
phia being only about four mile dis- 
tance from the school, "Anne" will be 
given opportunity to do post-graduate 
work at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania 

Raymond O. Gilbert, '26, also a 
member of the Richboro faculty, had 
been a very successful teacher for the 
past three years in the Science depart- 
ment of the Freeburg High Schoo. We 
are told that he is making out unusual- 
ly well at Richboro. Mr. Gilbert has 
taken a summer course in post-grad- 
uate work at Ohio State University. 
He expects to receive his Masters De- 
gree from U. of P. We congratulate 
both brother and sister on their splen- 
did success. 

Reopening Services 

Rev. John A. Richter, pastor of the 
Grace Lutheran Church at Rummel, 
Pa., conducted reopening services in 
his church on Sunday, Nov. 3. The 
entire week will be devoted to services 
of a similar nature. Every service is 
especially arranged to carry out the 
thoughts of the occasion. Visiting pas- 
tors will deliver the addresses and vis- 
iting choir members will give special 
music. 

The following are excerpts from a 
sermon recently delivered by Rev. 
Richter on the subject, "Christ, the 
Life of the Bible." 

"In every case a book is judged by 
its life or vitality, which in some way 

it manifests." 

• * * 

"God is the author of two books, and 
because He is Life, insomuch that from 
Him all life proce;eds, therefore of 
whateve. work he may be the Author, 
that work, that book is permeated by 
and abounding in vitality. 

"The first book that God has given 



in Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church 
at Williamsburg, Pa. 

Both of these celebrations proved to 
be successful in every way. Rev. Naugle 
deserves congratulations in his excel- 
lent work. 
Rev. Greninger Dedicated New Churh 

Rev. Fred R. Greninger, pastor of 
Temple Lutheran Church at Altoona, 
Pa., recently built and dedicated a new 
Church building. 

The work of a competent architect 
can be seen plainly in the results of the 
building. Nothing but hearty congrat- 
ulations of the beauty, symmetry, util- 
ity and stability of this structure can 
be given. It is a churchly and worship- 
ful building. 

The stone work is of the finest 
stone mason's art. As one approaches 
the church he sees a magnificent stone 
structure. The roof give the appear- 
ance of the many-colored autumn 
leaves, - and thus enhances the beauty 
of the building. 

The inside of the building makes 
one believe that nothing is missing in 
the form of needed space or arrange- 
ment. The basement proper is well ar- 
ranged with a social room and all 
modern equipment to aid in effective 
church work. The church proper is very 



beautifully arranged in harmony with 
the Gothic type which is followed 
thruout. The Gothic designs in the 
bronze lanterns, both inside and out, 
match the architecture of the church, 
and the glass used radiates a beau- 
tiful light. The antique windows are of 
the thirteenth century construction 
and design. They are a reproduction 
of the old masterpieces in European 
Cathedrals, both in quality and struc- 
ture. They are "The glories of the rain- 
bow frozen into glass, held a prisoner 
to reach our souls and aid us to find 
'the peace that passeth understand- 
ing.' " The installation of the "Church 
Acousticon" helps to make the church 
more complete. The ohancel furnish- 
ings lend an atmosphere of worship. 
The electropneumatic Pilcher organ 
will enable people, from all seats in 
the room, to hear tones which will 
create a sensation of the very highest 
quality. 

Rev. Greninger deserves hearty con- 
gratulations for the splendid work he 
has accomplished and in being the pas- 
tor of this sincere and active congre- 
gation. 

Marriages 

On Wednesday, October 30, Miss Jen- 



nie Kauffman, '27, was married to J. 
Lawrence Pennel, of Loyasburg, Pa. 
C.ngratulations and best wishes! 
Births 
Mr. and Mrs. Jay M. Riden, of Sun- 
bury, announce the birth of a son, J. 
McCarty Riden. Mr. Riden is coach of 
athletics of the Sunbury High School. 
Congratulations, happy parents! 



i 

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1INDBERGH, flying blind much of the way, 
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Meanwhile, two other General Electric contri- 



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electric gasoline gauge and the radio echo alti- 
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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA 



S. U. Gridmen Play 
Ursinus Bears Sat. 



TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 5. 1929 



Orange and Maroon Eleven Will Meet 

Fast Collegeville Team at College- 

ville Next Saturday 



Susquehanna will aqain play away 
from home next Saturday, when the 
Orange and Maroon eleven will meet 
a fast Ursinus eleven at Collegeville. 

Ursinus boasts of some very speedy 
and shifty backs and a strong line. 
Thus far this season the team has 
been making a specialty of very close 
scores. The team has made a splendid 
record thi. ; far this season and will bo 
fighting hard to keep the Crusaders 
from marring It. 

The Collegeville eleven has a heavy 
and fast -charging line. The probable 
lineup is Donaldson at left end. Strine 
at left tackle. McBath at left guard. 
Black at center. Allen at right guard, 
Helfrich at right tackle, Coble at right 
end. 

The backfield will; probably be com- 
prised of Hunter af quarterback. Soder 
and Sterner at halfback and Young at 
fullback. 

Young serves .as the nucleus of the 
backfield and does most of the ball 
carrying. He is very fast and shifty 
for serving at the fullback position. 

Ursinus' record ithus far has been 
two scoreless games, with Haverford, 
0-0; with Delaware, 0-0; and another 
tie with Dickinson, 6-6. They won 
from Muhlenberg, 9-7; lost to F. and 
M., 18-0, and to Rutgers, 19-13. Ur- 
sinus has amassed only 28 points to 
its opponents' 50, while the Crusaders 
have amassed 33 to their opponents' 
44. 

, S 



Princeton, N. J,—' IP)— On Sept. 25. 
the Princeton Theological Seminary, 
the official divinity school of the Pres- 
-ar. Church in the United States, 
opened for its 118th academic year. 
The school is one of the oldest in the 
country. 

S 

BEGIN DISMANTLING 

"SLEEPY HOLLOW" 



'Continued from Page 1) 
faculty members on University Heights 
a part of this interesting group. 



er. Wormiey passed and was in- 
tercepted on Susquehanna's 40-yard 
line. The ball was brought to the 15- 
yard line on successive thrusts by An- 
drews and Petty. Juniata was held 
here for downs by the dogged Susque- 
hanna defense. Glenn then punted to 
midfield, and again Andrews and Pet- 
ty advanced the ball to the Orange 
and Maroon 15-yard line. Petty, who 
was given the ball on the next play, 
scored the first touchdown of the game 
on a wide end run. 
The Indians failed to make the ex- 



Dance P rogra m s 

of the More Artistic Kind 

THE SELINSGKOVE TIMES 



<e> 



K. D. P. SORORITY HOSTESSES 

AT A LITERARY BRIDGE TEA 



lappa Delta Phi was hostess to the 
er sororities at a literary bridge tea 
i in their sorority room on Friday 
'.moon. The room was attractively 
inged and the tea table very beau- 
lly decorated. 

pon arrival, each guest was given 
illy bearing the name of some lit- 
•y figure and assigned to play with 
►articular person, likewise of lit- 
y fame. Accordingly William 
kespeare played bridge with Jane 
ten, while Charles Dickens and 
riet Beecher Stowe sat at the 
e table. 

le various sororities were repre- 
ed by Muriel Camerer, Janet Leitz- 
Betty Watkins and Anna Moore, 
>mega Delta Sigma; Dorothy Lesh- 
Cathryn Morning, Margaret Markle 
Anna Dunkleberger, of Sigma Al- 
Iota; Dorothy Goff, Lillian Kordes, 
;e Lauer and Mary Hutchings, of 
la Sigma Delta. 

le prizes were distributed after an 
• and a half of diligent playing. 
Dorothy Goff won first price. "The 
Dark Journey." Harper Prize Novel. A 
volume of Thackeray's "Vanity Fair" 
went to Dorothy Lesher, who obtained 
second highest score. Lillian Kordes 
was low scorer and received a volume 
of Edna St. Vincent Millay's poems. 

Following the bridge, tea was served 
and the afternoon ended in a happy 
half-hour of tea drinking. The girls 
retired to their rooms, leaving behind 
them the ghosts of the characters they 
had represented to again become S. U. 
co-eds, with only the memory of a 
happy afternoon. 

S 

STUDENT RECITAL FRIDAY 
First Student Evening Recital of this 
collegiate year will be given by stu- 
dents of the Conservatory of Music 
Friday evening of this week, beginning 
at 8:15 o'clock. 

This recital will be given in Seibert 
Chapel Hall. The public is cordially 
invited to attend. 

S 

For a Change 
"Why don't the men want their 
wives in lodge?" 

"Oh, a man likes to feel important 
once in a while." 



are 

The one that became "Sleepy ~HoUow" I tra point on a Une { Susquehanna 
stood about 200 feet south of the house j blocked another klck on the 30 . vard 
now occupied by Mr. Oberdorf and his line . but WM unable tQ advance Th(? 

» _, • ,™^ half ended wi th the ball on Susque- 

Moved in 1900 hanna's 23-yard line 

About 1900. Dr. Manhart tells us. i ,, , „ 
the building was moved to its present T Much Punt,n e in Third °- uarter 
site. It was reflnlshed and encased In the third 1 uarter ' the teams 
in brick. It was used as a science !fT ed t0 battle ° n eQUal tCnM again ' 
building and housed the laboratories : * oth teams resorted w P untin * in or - 
of the university for many years. ' der . t0 get the bal1 out of dangerous 

Steele Science' Hall was built in 1913., territory. This quarter ended with 

Susquehanna in possession of the ball 
on their 25-yard line. 

S. U. Rallies in Last Quarter 
The last quarter opened with a 



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the science equipment was moved to 
its new quarters, and "Sleepy Hollow" 
became a dormitory. It was used as 
such until the close of the summer 
school session of 1929. 

The remodeling of Hassinger Hall 
made it possible to house more than a 
score more men in that building, so 
that the. old house will no longer be 
needed. 

The campus will be beautified and 
terraced to conform with its surround 



i 
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fumble on a punt by the Indians. 
Ramick recovered it on the 50-yard 
line. The recovery of this fumble 
started a rally which almost scored a 
touchdown for the Orange and Ma- 
roon. 

From Susquehanna's own 25-yard 
line, the pigskin was advanced by 



ings as soon as the dismantling process ! Wormiey, Wagner and Moser to Jun 



KAUFFMANS 

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is completed. 



BAND IS SENSATION 

AT JUNIATA GAME 



( Continued from Page 1) 
a venture, for by the end of the game 
the boys were drenched by the steady 
drizzle. 

The band has been progressing nice- 
ly, and if matters continue in the fu- 
ture as they have in the past, Sus- 
quehanna will have one of the best 
bands of colleges and universities of 
its size. 

S 

BUFFALO MINISTER 

WILL SPEAK HERE 



iata's 35-yard line. Disaster then en- 
tered the local camp when Wormiey 
fumbled a pass from center and Jun- 
iata recovered. 

Juniata then punted to Susque- 
hanna's 30-yard line. Wagner ad- 
vanced the ball 61 yards thru tackle 
followed by a kick to Juniata's 43-yard 
line. Petty took the kick when Barber 
missed a sure tackle and dashed with 
the ball to the one-yard line before 
being forced out of bounds. Harley 
went over for the second touchdown 
on the next play, as the game ended. 
They missed the extra point on a line 
play. The line-up: 

Susquehanna — 

Wolfe R. E. 

Zak R. T. 

R. Garman R. G. 



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MARYLAND 



( Continued from Page 1) 
Rhode Island State, Connecticut State. Berger ""*" *C 

Wesleyan, and Springfield are number- ; 
ed among the colleges where he has 
preached, and the boys' schools in- 
clude Loomis. Taft. Exeter, Moses 
Brown and Lake Placid. 

He is in constant demand for sum- 
mer conferences. For the past four 
summers he has been chaplain of the 
Education Conference at Northlfield, 
Mass., and he has served as speaker 
and leader at the Northfield College 
Conference for three years, and at 
Wells College two years, Diciknson Col- 
lege summer conference one year. 

In his own church Mr. Chalmers 
conducts a discussion group of college 
age young people each Sunday eve- 
ning after the vesper service. The dis- 
cussion takes the form of an open 
forum. He has in addition discussion 
groups meeting through the week, 
which are considering topics ranging 
from problems of personal religion to 
strictly social problems. 

S 

CRUSADERS DEFEATED 

BY JUNIATA INDIANS 



Juniata— 12 
A. Holsinger 

Coder 

Reber j 

Jamison 

Auchmuty L. G Beeghly 

Yon L. T. ... B. Holsinger ; 

Adams L. E Mark I 

MacDonald ... R. H. B. 
Wormiey L. H. B Petty- 
Glenn Q. B Andrews 

Malasky F. B Harley 

Substitutions : Susquehanna — Win- 
ters for Yon. Scott for MacDonald, 
Moser for Scott, Ramick for R. Gar- 
man, DeLay for Wolfe, Barber for 
Adams. Wagner for Glenn, Danks for 



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i 



TO ALUMNI IN PITTSBURGH 
DISTRICT 



The Plttsburgh-Susquehanna As- 
sociation will hold its annual ban- 
c|i:et on November 16, 1929. at 6:30 
p. m. at the Port I J iti Hotel. Rev. 
G. Morns Smith. D.D., president of 
S. U.. will be our .speaker as well 
as honored guest. It i. the desire 
.!■ officers that everything pas- 
sible be laid aside to come and not 
only meet Dr .Smith, but to hear 
what good he ha- u, .tore for us 
about OUT Alma Mater. If there 
ny newcomer* m our district, 
will they kindly send address to 
mdersigned? 

Alfred ( I Gawiruske, 
2419 OtgOOd Street 

N. S Pittsburgh, Pa 



• Continued from Page 1) 
ever, he was a marked man and suf- 
fered much punishment. Even though 
he was forced to leave the game, he 
displayed much spirit and fight. 

DeLay was substituted for him and 
did well at the end post. Auchmuty 
and Berger at times flashed real form 
and stopped many plays. Zak had a 
good day at tackle, getting several nice 
tackles behind the line of scrimmage 
and breaking up plays. 

Teams Even in First Quarter 

In the first quarter the teams bat- 
tled on even terms. It was in this 
quarter that Wolfe blocked a kick on 
Juniata's 45-yard line. On successive 
line thrusts, the ball was brought to i__ 
the Juniata 30-yard line, where it was 
kMt when the Crusaders failed to come 
through for a first down. The quarter 
ended with Susquehanna in possession 
of the ball on their 20-yard line. 
Petty Scores on End Kun in Second 
Quarter 

Af the opening of the second quart - 



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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 
G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 
A. B. and B. S. Degrees— Strong courses in Liberal Arts. Science Edu- 
cation and Business Administration. 
Extension Courses at Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township and Mt. Carmel. 
Courses of instruction for teachers on the University campus on 
Friday evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four- Year Public School Music Course with degree in Bachelor of 
Music is attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music. 
Susquehanna stands for a well-rounded education, clean sports, re- 
creation for every student, earnestness in study, and above all, Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For information write 
GEORGE F. DUNKELBERGER. Ph.D., Dean. 



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LET'S WIN 
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^r 



The Susquehanna 




Volume XXXVI 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1929 



Number 13 



i 



X 



"War Has Given Us 
International Mind" 



Gallaudet Gridmen 
Play Here Saturday 



Thus Says Herbert O'Donovan, Speak- 
er at College Armistice Day Exer- 
cises in Seibert Chapel Hall 



Strong Washington, D. C, Team Will 
Try to Avenge Last Year's 28-7 Set- 
back; Lost to Temple Sat. 31-0 



Armistice Day was celebrated here 
with appropriate exercises in Seibert 
Chapel Hall, Monday morning at 11 
o'clock. 

Mr. Herbert O'Donovan was the 
speaker of the occasion. Mr. O'Dono- 
van has been for the past six years a 
missionary to Liberia and at present 
is representing the Student Volunteer 
Movement while on furlough in this 
country. 

His address was inspiring and pre- 
sented a point of view that is some- 
times forgotten. A short paragraph 
sums up his whole address. 

"If the war has done anything worth 
while," he said, "it may be this, that 
it has attempted to give up a great 
vision for an international mind. It 
has taken us from our isolation be- 
tween two large seas and brought us 
into contact with the world. The sig- 
nificance of Armistice Day is some- 
times overlooked. It should be remem- 
bered as a day which began a per- 
petual armistice for the whole world. 
The United States has a great contri- 
bution to make toward world peace, 
and just as God used Noah for a pur- 
pose so he gives America the respon- 
sibility of a great opportunity for 
world peace." 

As a conclusion, Mr. O'Donovan stat- 
ed the words of a great financier, one 
who generally thinks in terms of dol- 
lars and cents. This man who had 
been sent to investigate the economical 
conditions after the war and to esti- 
mate what would be needed to set the 
world straight said: "Money can do 
many things, but the world can only 
be set straight through the spirit of 
Jesus Christ as it enters the individ- 
ual heart." 

Miss Stewart and Mr. Ira Sassaman 
each sang a vocal solo and Prof. Line- 
baugh played an organ solo. 



"Back Home" Will be 
Presented Friday 



Herbert Sprague Players Will Present 

Comedy in Seibert Chapel Hall Nov. 

15 as Second Star Course Number 



A fast Gallaudet College combina- 
tion will be the opposition for the 
Orange and Maroon in the last home 
game of the 1929 season, Saturday. 

This Susquehanna-Gallaudet game 
will be the second in as many years. 
Last year the gridders from Washing- 
ton, D. C, were shoved aside while the 
Crusaders scored 28 points and the 
Mutes scored 7 points in the last few 
minutes of play. 

Gallaudet's aggregation this year is 
said to be better than the past season 
and will afford some hard opposition. 
The team's record to date would seem 
to bear out that statement. 

Two victories were gained and three 
engagements were lost. 

St. John's, of Maryland, won 20-0. 
Maryland triumphed by a 13-6 score. 
This same team tied Yale last Sat- 
urday 13-13. The Washington boys 
sank Shenandoah University 80-0, and 
nosed out Baltimore 6-0. Last Satur- 
day they lost a hard -fought game to 
Temple 31-0. 

The Gallaudet eleven that faces the 
Orange and Maroon on Saturday will 
have only one newcomer to the ranks 
of the team that tried its best here last 
year. Clyde McMullen, right end, is 
the only exception to an all -veteran 
line. 

Captain Johnny Ringle, fullback, and 
Paul Zieske. 147-pound quarterback, 
points to his credit in five games, this 
are the Mutes' aces. Ringle has 59 
being his third season as a regular. 
Zieske handles 'most of Gallaudfcfs 
passing attack. Against Maryland, 
Zieske's 45-yard aerial to Bible Mona- 
ghan, end. gained a touchdown. 

The probable line-up for Gallaudet 
will be Monaghan at left end, Parks 
at left tackle, Stack at left guard, 
Wurdeman at center, Grinnell at right 
guard, Antila at right tackle, McMul- 
len at right end, Zieske at quarter- 
shall at right halfback, and Ringle, 
back, Hokanson at left halfback. Mar- 
fullback. 

S 

ANNUAL CROSS-COUNTRY 

RUN ON FRIDAY 




Nat'l Farm School 
Downs Jayvees, 39-7 



Reserves Outweighed by Fanners; 

Johnson Seriously Injured — Taken 

to Philadelphia Hospital 



70- Yd. Run Spells 
Defeat For S. U. 
at Ursinus, 6-0 



'Sinus Backs Makes Sensational Run 

After Receiving Punt and Scores 

Lone Touchdown of Game 



While the Orange and Maroon first- ' 
string men were staging a brave battle ! 
against the formidable Ursinus College 
eleven at Collegeville Saturday, just 
across the hill at Doylestown, the Jay- 
vees were bravely fighting against a ; — 
team that completely outclas ed them i Ba I be 5 *«»*_peLay "*y ■■••" Game at 
because it outweighed them very much. 



WAGNER ON STARTING LINE- 
UP; PLAYS EXCELLENT GAME 



The reserves were defeated by the Na- 
tional Farm School to the tune of 
39-7. 

The Junior Varsity played real foot- 
ball at times. Had they played consis- 
tently they would no doubt have won, 
even if they were outclassed in weight. 

The Susquehanna second-string men 



End in Fine Form; Both Teams 
Battle on Even Terms in Fray 



A touchdown scored in the last two 
minutes of play in the first half, the 
breaks coming Ursinus' way when 
Sterner took Wagner's punt on his 
own 30 yard line and ran the length 



of the field, gave the Ursinus crew a 

goriheTrlone" touchdown In" th7latt~er | 6 " victor >' over tne ° ran « e and Ma- 
part of the third quarter when Rum- roon . last Saturday afternoon at Col- 
mel blocked a punt on the Farm j le 8 evu »e. 

School's 20-yard line. Witkop gathered Time and a ^ ain thereafter the 
the ball into his arms before it had j v ™ n «* Susquehanna aerial attack, in- 
grounded and stepped off the rest of I terspersed with a varied line offensive, 
the distance for the touchdown. Rupp | drove the bal1 dee P mto the Perkiomen 
kicked the extra point in a nicely- Valle y collegians' territory, only to have 



WOTFE" 
Warren Wolfe, '31, who has been 
playing first-rate football at the wing 



executed play by a placement kick. 

Time and again the Jayvees broke 
through the line of scrimmage and 



"Back Home," a comedy in three acts 
will be presented here on Friday ev- 
ening, November 15, at 8:15 o'clock, in 
Seibert Chapel Hall, by the Herbert 
Sprague Players, as the second Star 
Course Number of this collegiate year. 

The comedy is founded on "Back 
Home" stories by Irvin Cobb, publish- 
ed in the Saturday evening Post. The 
scene is laid in Waynesboro, Georgia. 

Mr. Sprague appears in the role of 
"Judge Priest," a lovable old man who 
has held the office of Circuit Judge 
for thirty-five years. 

Nash, the Commonwealth's Attorney, 
is seeking the judgeship and endeavors 
to strengthen his case by indicting and 
attempting to convict young Robert 
Carter, a member of the Anti-Child 
Labor League. The story becomes com. 
plicated when Sally Priest, the Judge's 
daughter falls in love with Carter. 

The humor of the play centers 
around Sara Anna Barbee, the Village 
Postmistress, and Jeff Davis Poindex- 
ter, a colored gentleman. 

There are seven acting people with 
Herbert Sprague playing the leading 
roles. The past ten years. Mr. Sprague 
has appeared in "Rip Van Winkle." 
"Lightnin Sun-Up." and many oth- 
er dramatic offerings. 

Mr. Sprague will be remembered at 
Susquehanna for his excellent inter- 
pretation of "Lightnin' " in 1927. His 
company appeared on the campus at 
that time as a part of the regular Star 
Course. 

Last year's Star Course had for its 
dramatic offering a very excellent pro- 
duction of John Drinkwater's classic 
"Abraham Lincoln." 

S 

DR. SMITH SPEAKS 

AT MUHLENBERG 



After a lapse of a number of years 
the annual Inter-Class Cross Country 
Run will be included in Susquehanna's 
sports. The 1929 run will be held on 
Friday afternoon, starting at 4:30. 
Each class is expected to enter at least 
five contestants. The distance covered 
on Susquehanna's crass country course 
is 3'1. miles. 



Heart Balm Suit to 
be Tried Dec. 12 



Grace Lauer's Breach of Promise Suit 

Against Clifford Kiracofe Will be 

Tried in Seibert Chapel Hall 



p7sition,"was""not"abie""to"appear on stopped many a play. The Fanners 
Susquehanna s hne-up against Ursinus 
Saturday because of an injury to his 
nose, received in the Juniata game. 
Wolfe caught numerous forward passes 
in every game to gain considerable ter- 
ritory. Few runs came around his end 
on the defense. 

S 



Music Students Give 
Evening Recital 



were rushed by the Crusaders when 
the former tried to punt. 

Kline made a nice run in the be- 
ginning of the game when he sliced 
through guard for about 12 yards. 
Rupp also made some pretty runs. In 
the last two minutes of the game, 
however, the reserves were unable to 
recover the form which they had dis- 
played earlier in the game. 

Captain Speigelmyer played a good 
game at end until he was forced to 
quit the game on account of injuries. 



the Kichline-coached forward wall 
suddenly turn from the leaking sieve 
of midfield to an impregnable rock 
within its own 30-yard line. 

First Downs About Equal 

The first downs were about equal 
and it seemed that both teams were 
battling on equal terms during most 
of the game. At times, the Orange and 
Maroon worked with clock-like pre- 
cision in the center of the field, but 
failed to advance very far toward the 
Ursinus uprights. 

Sterner's Long Gallop Scores 
Touchdown 

At an unexpected moment in the 
last couple of minutes of play in the 



Excellent Program Enjoyed by Very 

Large Audience; Orchestra and 

Ladies' Choral Club Assisted 



- "Surprise 
University 

-Miss Mar- 



5 Seniors Play Last 
HomeGameSaturday 



Rummel played a bang-up game at the :flrst half ; Wagner punted, and Ster- 
other end. Witkop proved to be the ner ' crack Ursinus *»«*• sent ta •» a 
bulk of strength on the line by tear- substitute immediately before the play, 
ing through the line on all plays and , gathered the ball on his own 30-yard 
making his presence felt. Une and •£» P* 1 ** interference, 

Kleinman and Hartenbaim proved to 'Con cluded on Pag e 4) 

be the bulk of strength for the oppo- 
sition, scoring five touchdowns between 
them. 

Late in the game, Johnston received 
a bad injury to his neck. He was 
promptly removed to a Philadelphia 
Hospital, where it was at first thought 
his spine was broken. Examination re- 
vealed, however, that his condition is 
not critical. He will be able to return 
here soon. 

Assistant Coach Daubenspeck and 
Assistant Manager Herbert Schmidt 
cared for the needs of the team in 
every detail on a splendid two-day 
trip. 

(Concluded on Page 4) 
S 



Worm lev. Zak, Garman, DeLay, Ram* 

ick Will Play on University Field 

Last Time on Saturday 



President Smith addressed the stu- 
dent bodj of Muhlenberg College on 
Thursday at their morning assembly, 
on the theme "The Way to Victory." 

On Armistice Day, Dr. Smith de- 
livered the address before the District 
Luther Leaguers of Wilkes-Barre at 
Wilkes-Barre. 



The case of Grace F. Lauer. plaintiff, 
versus Clifford Kiracofe, defendant, be- 
ing Case Number 1, of December Term, 
1929, is to be tried before the Honor- 
able Judge George Paralis, on Decem- 
ber 12, 1929. 

Miss Lauer, a heart broken student 
at Susquehanna University, has insti- 
tuted legal proceedings against Clif- 
ford Kiracofe, who is the "Sheik" of 
Susquehanna University, for damages 
in the amount of $50,000 for breach of 
promise of marriage. 

This thrilling romance is to be 
heard and reviewed at Seibert Chapel 
Hall, on Thursday evening, December 
12, 1929. Any young lady or young man 
contemplating marriage can well bene- 
fit from the experiences of this un- 
fortunate couple. 

The plaintiff, Miss Lauer, has re- 
tained as her legal advisers Attorneys 
John A. Schiavo and Anthony J. Lu- 
pas, and the defendant, Clifford Kira- 
cofe. is represented by Attorneys Al- 
bert L. Anselmi and Daniel H. Kwas- 
noski. 

The prosecution and defense counsel 
have worked up a very complete "Mock 
Trial," which is expected to meet with 
much success. 

S 

Doctor— "Your condition is such that 
you should go to bed every night be- 
tween nine and ten. 

Dumb— "Isn't that too many for one 
bed?" 



Students of the Conservatory of Mu- 
sic of Susquehanna University gave 
their first Evening Recital of this col- 
legiate year, Friday evening of last 
week, in Seibert Chapel Hall. 

An unusually large audience was 
present to enjoy a very excellent pro- 
gram of varied musical numbers and 
instruments. 

In addition to the regular recital by 
the music students, the University or- 
chestra and the Ladies' Choral Club 
both took part in the program. 
Program 

Orchestra — Andante - 
Symphony." Haydn — the 
Orchestra. 

Piano — Serenade, Jeffery 
garet Shipman, Sunbury. 

Piano — Marche mignonne, Poldini— 
Miss Mildred Lyon, Sunbury. 

Aria— "With Verdure Clad" (The 
Creation*. Haydn— Miss Martha A. 
Fisher, Sunbury. 

Organ — Reverie, Frysinger — Miss 
Martha Womeldorf, Pittsburgh. 

Song— The Green Eyed Dragon, W. 
Charles — Miss Janet G. Dively, Berlin. 

Violin— Spanish Dance, No. 5, Sara- A condition that is unique in the 
sate — Miss Kathryn Morning, Han- sports annals of Susquehanna Univer- 
over. sity exists at present in the captaincy 

Piano— Carnival of Autumn. Barbour of the 1929-30 basketball squad. 
—Miss Margaret Kirkpatrick, Sunbury. Much difficulty was experienced in 

Organ — A Song of Praise, C. Shel- selecting a captain of the cagemen for 
don— Miss Virginia Moody. Selinsgrove. the coming season. Last season there 

Piano — Valse de Concert, Levitski— were only four men. including the 
Miss Edna Tressler, Sunbury. manager, who were awarded the Var- 

Song — Hindou Chant, Bemberg — sity "S" in basket ball. 
Miss Dorothy Leisher, Renovo. .. Tom .. DiX on was lost to the squad j 



S. U. Cagemen Will 
Have Co-Captains 



Glenn and Stlneman, Sophomores, Will 

Alternate as Pilots of This Year's 

Basket Ball Squad 



EFS^SLI? 22?' Joseffy ~ Miss through graduation, leaving only "Moe" olBrunozzi tnrough graduation 



Janet G. Dively. Berlin 

(Concluded on Page 3) 



THE SUSQUEHANNA is a mem- 
ber of the INTERCOLLEGIATE 
PRESS, a national news service for 
ccllegiate newspapers which supplier 
weekly bulletins for use by the edi- 
tors of the member papers. Among 
other features, this service selects 
the best Editorial of the week from 
all the member papers and includes 
it In its bulletin. 

This week's Editorial selected by 
the news clearing house was the 
one entitled "This Business of 
Being College Bred." original edi- 
torial appearing in THE SUSQUE- 
HANNA last week This shows that 
the editorial department of this 
publication as well as the whole 
make-up in general, is attracting 
attention among its many readers 
and that it is meeting with success. 



Stineman and "Skip'' Glenn. The lat- 
ter are the only men eligible for the 
captaincy. 

At a recent meeting of the varsity 
men. it was decided that in the com- on the line tni j season , will be ^ 
ing season there would be no individ- 
ual captain, but co-captains This ac- 



When the Crusaders meet a fast 
Gallaudet team on University Field 
Saturday, five Seniors will bear their 
Alma Mater's colors for the last time 
on the home field. 

Two backfield men will be lost to 
the squad next year, Wall and Worm- 
ley. Wormley. who has been playing 
very excellent ball this season, will be 
seen toting the pigskin for the last 
time on the home field Saturday after- 
noon. "Dinny" has been doing a large 
bulk of the ball-carrying this year and 
has gained much territory in the Or- 
ange and Maroon campaigns thus far. 
Wall, who has been followed this sea- 
son for the first time in his career by 
a "Jinx" that has kept him from the 
starting line-up since the Delaware 
game on account of injuries, will not 
be seen in action against Gallaudet. 

On the line, two varsity men will 
battle for their Alma Mater the last 
time on home territory. "Rip" Gar- 
man has been very efficiently filling 
the gap caused by Carmichael's leav- 
ing school. Zak, playing his first year 
of varsity football, has been plugging 

to the loss 
has 
been holding his own v°ry well thus 
far. 

DeLay and Ramick. two Seniors, who 
have not been playing very regularly 



in action in the Gallaudet game. r>- 
Lay, who has been hindered this sea- 



tion has been ratified by the Athletic son by a bad knee nas fully recovered 
Board, now and will no doubt see plenty of 

Stineman and Glenn will be the co- action in the Gallaudet game 
captains who will lead their team- R aimc k. a newcomer this year, who 
mates in the coming campaign The, nas ^ ieen handicapped bv a bad in- 
honor will alternate, each being cap- , jury to his shoulder in the Washing- 
tain every other wame. ton game has not had mucn chance to 

Both Olenn and Stineman are only show his ability. What playing he had 
Sophomores. They played first rate done at the guard position has been 
basketball last year. Great things are very excel! 
expected from them again this y. These boys _ wno have been luboruu 

Glenn plays a forward position, for their team, and their school for the 
where he proved to be a wizard on the past four years without any pecuniary 
court last season. Being fleet of foot, benefits whatsoever, but have been 
he was hard to equal on the college playing for their love of the iport, de- 
courts. Stineman proved to be of great .serve much credit. The least the stu- 
strength at the guard position. (.Concluded on Page 4> 



FAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly during the College Year except Thanksgiving Week, Christ- 
mas, New Year and Easter Week. 



Subscription $1.50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 



THE STAFF 

Editor-inChief Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

News Editor Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 

Betty Wardrop '32 Andy Kozak '32 John Kindsvatter '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Bruce Worthington, '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Edna Tressler, '30, Conservatory of Music 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1929 



EXCHANGING YELLS 

Rooters of Susquehanna have a custom which they use 
during the course of a home football fray of which they may 
well be proud. The custom we refer to is the exchange of col- 
lege yells for the visiting team while the game is being played 
and also the custom of giving a cheer for an opposing player 
who is temporarily "out."' 

It is a custom which is common to all the larger institu- 
tions of learning, especially so at traditional football battles. 
The exchange of yells was very much in evidence at the recent 
Pennsylvania — Penn State game at the Quaker City. 

This custom at several institutions where the Crusaders 
have played this year has been conspicuous by its absence. In 
one instance, the hosts gave the Orange and Maroon one yell 
before the march to the field prior to the kick-off, and that in 
so feeble a voice it could scarcely be distinguished. 

At another institution where the Susquehanna gridiron 
stalwarts played recently, the name of the visitors was never 
mentioned by the hosts in a body, much less the name of a play- 
er who was injured in the fray. 

Tlie lack of this practice of courtesy on the part of our 
hosts detracted from an otherwise pleasant visit. And so it can 
easily be seen how the visitors to our campus must feel when 
we fail to fulfill pur duties as hosts in this point. Let's keep 
up the good work in all the sports, cheerleaders. 

S 

SPOUTS VEE8U8 SPECTACLES 

Collegea and universities lay too much emphasis on inter- 
collegiate athletics, according to a recent address to the Lafay- 
ette faculty and student body made by Dr. William W. Com- 
fort, president of Ilaverford College. Dr. Comfort's address 
is another ripple in the ever-roughening stream of intercolleg- 
iate sports. 

"It is possible." he said, "that some day our educational 
institutions may become the home of students. Today a col- 
lege is known better by the brand of football its team plays than 
by its educational standards . . . Today tot* many people be- 
lieve that tin- chief object of college life is to have thousands of 
frenzied students and alumni gather on a football field and 
cheer crazily. Even the professors are obliged to make less of 
an intellectual demand on the student, while the football coach 
is making his great physical demands." 

Dr. Comfort here reverberated the statements of many of 
our leading educators today who decry the over-emphasis laid 
upon intercollegiate sjkuIs until they have ceased to 1m- sports 
but have become spectacles. When we realize that last year 
eleven of our leading universities had a total of over $50,000,000 
in gate receipts in football, and that one of these had almost a 
million in profits, we readily see how true is the statement that 
our universities are in the grip of the spectacle mania. 

Simply because a college or university has a championship 
grid team does not mean that that institution has sound bodies, 
because the Intercollegiate athletics do not seem to awaken in 
the average student a desire to take more exercise himself, but 
rather the desire to take it vicariously. 

The expenditure of much time and energy on the part of 
the players and the danger of permanent injury are also too 
great to warrant the emphasis laid upon collegiate football, ac- 
cording to these educators. 

What they seem to be working for is wholesome exercise 
for every student who is matriculated at an institution of high- 
er learning, with no intercollegiate competition in the major 
sports as at present, but rather inter-class and intra-mural com- 
petition, where a larger number of students would be participat- 
ing and the desire for spectacles minimized as much as possible. 
Which institution shall take the lead in this new endeavor to 
promote the welfare of the vast number of American students 
is the next problem to be solved. The institution which makes 
the first move in this direction will no doubt meet with much 
adverse criticism in the beginning, but will be better for having 
done so in the end. 

8 ■ 



KEEPING GRADES SECRET 
Oberliu College officials last year at the instigation of 
some of the students Instituted a plan of keeping from under- 



graduates their classroom grades, allowing them to know mere- 
ly if they were passing or failing. This system, much discussed 
by heads of other colleges and others interested in education, 
was meant to offset the emphasis placed on grades by students 
and to instil a desire for knowledge rather than for grades. 

The Oberliu students are finding fault with this system, 
saying that it is not working satisfactorily. In the Obrrlin 
Review, student publication of that college, we read: 

"Student opinion ... is heartily in favor of returning to 
the old system of making marks known. This is as it should be. 
The present system, established last year through the efforts 
of students desirous of ending the pernicious practice of work- 
ing for grades instead of knowledge, has failed signally to ac- 
complish this end. 

"Many reasons can be stated for this failure. Where be- 
fore the student considered his A an indication of excellent 
work, his B of good work, his C of average work and his D of 
passing but poor work, he now receives only the letter P on his 
bluebook for his grade term. . . . 

"The saddest thing about the present system is that Avhile 
the dictum has been laid clown that grades are not the primary 
goals of scholarship, grades are still the primary basis for 
scholarship aid, senior unlimited cut privileges, the pursuit of 
honors and recommendations by the college to prospective em- 
ployers. . . . 

"The ideal system would be the total elimination of grades; 
but this is a matter for the high schools to begin, for the habit 
of working for grades is too strong by the time of entrance into 
college. This ideal system being as yet far off, and the grades 
being yet the basis of our judgment of students, the only sensible 
thing to do is to reveal these grades/' 

S 



RUBE GOLDBERG SAYS COLLEGE SPIRIT IS THE BUNK 

"I most certainly think that college spirit in its true, native, 
poetic sense is the bunk. Now, wait! Don't hit me. Let me 
explain,'' Rube Goldberg sets out in the December College Humor 
to define college spirit. 

"First let me say that I am concerned only with old age, 
bald headed, gouty, bulging bodied college spirit — the kind you 
should find in the old graduate who grasped his diploma twenty 
or twenty-five years ago and swore everlasting allegiance to 
every blade of grass that lifted its academic head upon the camp- 
us green. This is the only phase of the subject that is really im- 
portant, 

"The pyrotechnic display of love for the dear old alma mater 
during the undergraduate days must be taken as a matter of 
course. The* undergraduate, unless he has premature hardening 
of the arteries, cannot help being infected with the virus of loud, 
glorious enthusiasm for the flaming black and blue, or was it 
the iridescent green ami white? The so-called undergraduate 
college spirit isn't spirit at all. It is merely a healthy display 
of temporary patriotism due principally to proximity. The col- 
lege boy is on a four year educational spree before going out 
into the world to pay his own rent. It is his college because he 
eats in it. sleeps in it, plays in it and studies in it. He naturally 
thinks it is the best college in the world, if for no other reason 
simply because it is his college. 

"Did you ever meet any person who said your radio was 
better than his. or your car would go up a lull faster than his, 
or your dentist could pull teeth better than his? Not on your 
life. So. it is no surprising phenomenon that a college student 
likes his college — yea, loves it. It is much more expensive than 
a radio or a car or a dentist, and one should be that much more 
proud of it — if that is possible. 

"You may say that when a boy is willing to break his neck 
for his college on the football field, he is displaying the highest 
form of colloge spirit. I don't think so. He is breaking his neck 
because he loves the glamour of it, and because all the other 
fellows are breaking their necks, and localise he is just a big 
healthy kid who likes to break his neck. I used to try to kill 
myself, making points for my side in a sand-lot football game, 
and 1 don't believe I displayed any hysterical love for sand-lots. 
It is the spirit of wanting to win rather than wanting to express 
a love for old Whereisit. 

"The w hole thing is relative. If there is any such thing as 
college spirit, it is the four year variety. After that, it is just 
like belonging to a lodge, only you go once a year, if you go at 
all, instead of every Thursday night, And then it's pretty hard 
to get good beer." 



NEW CLUB FORMEO BY 



STUDENTS IN SPANISH 



Another organization has been form- 
ed on the campus, this time El Club 
Espanol. The first meeting was held 
last Thursday evening at which time 
the following officers were elected: 
president, Herbert Rummel; vice pres- 
ident, Lee Pairchild; secretary, Lena 
Baird; treasurer, Charles Yon. 

A short program followed the elect- 
ion. Harriet Leese favored the club 
with a violin solo, accompanied by En- 
za Wilson, at the piano. The members 
MBS some Spanish songs and were en- 
tertained by some records in Spanish. 

The club was organized under the 
direction of Miss Lucy Irving, Spanish 
instructor. There are approximately 
thirty members. Any student having 
completed one year of Spanish is elig- 
ible for membership 



Gallaudet here Saturday, November 
16th 



CLASS SOCCER CHAMPIONSHIP 

TO BE DECIDED TOMORROW 



As a result of the three soccer 
matches last week the Sophomores 
bounded from the lowly position of 
third place in the inter-class stand- 
ings into a tie for first place with the 
Juniors, 

On Monday afternoon the Seniors 
were eliminated from the running 
when they lost to the Juniors in a 
heated contest by the score of 3-0. On 
Tuesday and Wednesday the Seniors 
lost to the Sophomores in two games 
1-0 via the forfeit ruling. 

The all-important play-off game for 
the championship will take place to- 
morrow afternoon at four o'clock when 
the Junior and Sophomore teams will 
line up against each other. All the 
Karnes so far between these two teams 
have been cloae so that the} game 
which will crown the inter-lass cham- 
pions of 1929 promises to be an exciting 
one. 



******************* 

I AMUSEMENTS . 

* ,1, ,;» * * * + * w * * + * a ,* * * + # 



"Noah's Ark," the "spectacle of the 
ages," will be the feature picture at 
the Stanley Theater Wednesday and 
Thursday of this week. This picture 
stars the beautiful Dolores Costello, 
who plays in both the main story and 
the Biblical sequence. This is a Vita- 
phone production. "Steam Boat Wil- 
lie" will be one of the added features. 

"River of Romance," a picturization 
of Booth Tarkington's famous novel, 
"Magnolia," will be shown at the same 
theater Friday night. Charles (Buddy) 
Rogers and Mary Brian star in this 
production. This is an all-talking pic- 
ture. An all-talking comedy, "Family 
Picnic," is also a part of the pro- 
gram. 

Saturday evening, "Fox Movietone 
Follies" will be the feature attraction. 
Snappy song and dance numbers in- 
terspersed with clever comic sequences, 
make this a delightful picture. 

George Bancroft, who made that 
thrilling picture of life on Wall Street, 
called "Wolf of Wall Street," stars in 
"Thunderbolt," the fast-moving under- 
world drama that will be the feature 
of the evenings of November 18 and 
19. 

Two shows are given each evening, 
one at seven, and one at nine, with a 
matinee every Saturday afternoon. 
Former prices still prevail. 
S 

Beat Gallaudet! 



T. T. WIERMAN 

Jeweler 
SUNBTJRY, PA. 



• «.-—« 



I 

j Fisher's Jewelry Store 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVER ! 
AND GLASS WARE 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

344 Market St. Sunbury, Pa. 



"DECORATIONS FOE YOUR 
PARTY" 

Fryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market Street 

I 
♦ 



Sunbury, Pa. 



STUDENTS 



,.$ 



TRY 



EEICHLEY'S 

LUNCH — SODAS — CANDY 



t^m^m mm n 



JOHN H. KELLER 

— Dealer In — 

Meats and Groceries 

Both Phones — Selinsgrove 

►■•••■^ * • • • •■^ 



SNYDER COUNTY TRIBUNE 

JOB WORK A SPECIALTY 

Phone 68-W 



STANLEY 

Best in Moving Pictures 



Selinsgrove 



STRAND ' 



SUNBURY 



9*W^*&*9* n +*W*M^I&*&SM* M +SWSBt m 



THURSDAY and FRIDAY 
NOVEMBER 14 and 15 

MADAM X 



WEEK OF NOV. 18 to 23 
Strand's First Anniversary Week 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

SAY IT WITH 
SONGS 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



•AGE rfTREfc 



» * 

Miscellaneous 1 



Oberlin, O.— (IP)— Co-education as 
an American collflg? institution be- 
gan here 98 years ago. but it is diffi- 
cult for Albert Brown, Oberlin College 
freshman from Jackson, Mich., to 
realize it. 

In 1843, ten years after Oberlin Col- 
lege was formed and began admitting 
women students with the men, Brown's 
great- grandfather met his great- 
grandmother here. 

All four of Brown's grandparents 
were Oberlin students, their marriages 
climaxing college romances. 

Albert's father likewise found his 
mother at Oberlin, and three of his 
aunts met their future husbands in the 
student body here. 

Although Freshman Brown hesitates 
to commit himself, he declares after 
looking around that he is not decided 
as yet to let the tradition drop. 



Cleveland, O.— (IP)— '"Every lesson 
is a lesson in English." 

Dr. Howard L. Driggs, professor of 
English teaching at New York Univer- 
sity, talking before high school prin- 
cipals here declared that English was 
still the frame of the curriculum, that 
every other subject was dependent 
upon it. 

Quoting a business leader he said: 

"The greatest overhead of business 
comes from the use of 'bunglish' in- 
stead of English. In a thousand dif- 
ferent ways, through faulty speech and 
writing, we are wasting great sums of 
money constantly.'* 



Princeton — <IPi — Sunday evening 
discussion groups are being tried at 
Princeton university as a solution of 
the compulsory Sunday chapel attend- 
ance rule here, which has had such 
little support recently among the stu- i 
dents. Those who attend the discus- 
sion groups need not go to church on 
Sunday. 

In instituting the new plan. Dean 
Wicks is following out his own belief 
that one can get to the heart of relig- 
ion with students far better by talking 
informally than by holding prayer and 
hymn-singing meetings. 



It is said that a movement for the 
revival of whiskers has been started 
in France. However, those undergradu- 
ates who summered in Europe can tell 
you that whiskers were never in such 
a lest state in France as to justify the 
use of that word "revival." 



Timid Wife <to husband who has 
fallen asleep at the wheel i: "I don't 
mean to dictate to you. George, but 
isn't that billboard coming at us awful- 
lv fast?" 



melon is 92 per cent water. Which is 
about the same as most of the rivers 
which run thru our cities. 



HUMOR 



Football is going en as usual, indi- 
cating that the players have not yet 
formed a union and struck for higher 
salaries. 



git*********** 



President Hoover has undertaken to 
settle the Army-Navy football dispute; 
and if he succeeds, the nations of the 
earth would better give him the per- 
manent job of arbitrator. 



George Charles Jenks, creator of the 
Diamond Dick nickle novels, has died 
leaving an estate of $300. He must 
have spent his money on something 
besides literature. 



Her eyes were black as jet, 
This charming girl I knew; 

I kissed her and her husband came, 
Now mine are jet black too. 



The British Privy Council has ruled 
that a woman is a person, and the 
women of England have voiced their 
gratification. Why is it, then, that 
when one woman refers to another as 
a "person" she gets mad? 



Writer Mixed His Slogans 

"Good to the Last Drop"— Haviland J 
China. 

"Has the Strength of Gibraltar"—! 
Blue Valley Butter. 

"The Danger Line"— Santa Fe Rail- j 
road. 

"The Paper is Part of tne Picture" 
—Douglass Shoes. 

"Best in the Long Run"— Onyx Hos- 
iery. 

"What a Whale of a Difference a 
Pew Cents Make"— Listerine. 

"They Satisfy"— Haig & Haig. 

"They're Roasted"— Editors. 



Eat at 

The Don Mar 

L. M, GABEL, Propr. 



i 



A Chicago chemist says that a water - 



MUSIC STUDENTS GIVE 

EVENING RECITAL 

(Continued from Page 1 
Piano — Valzer, Cajani — Miss Mar- 
garet Markle, Millheim. 

Organ— Fantasia, Siant Saens— Miss 
Edna Tressler, Sunbury. 

Choruses— a. "Still as the Night, 
Bohm-Page; b. Rain Drops, Huerter— 
the Ladies Choral Club. 




SPEIGELMIRE'S 



Furniture, Carpets, Floor Coverings 

SELINSGROVE 



Ishbel MacDonald told reporters 
that she marveled at the ability of 
American football players to fall 
gracefully. She said that before the 
Carnegie Foundation report caused so 
many of them to fall from grace. 



mm ■■■■■■•»»■■' 



■ » « «» ^ 



ONE REAL NEWSPAPER 

SUNBUEY DAILY ITEM 

SUNBURY, PA. 



ALMA MATER 




NEWS 



VOU'LL enjoy keeping in 
touch with the activities 
of your University and 
your alumni friends by 
reading every week ; j issue 



of 



The 




USQUEHANNA 

Subscription $1.50 the College Year 



Kf«\l Shoes — DiREnr Uni- 
versity Service 

W. G. Phillips 

COLLEGE TAILOR 

Cleaning and Pressing 
SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 

Opposite Post Office Phone 125-Z 



EUREKA 
TAILORING CO. 

ONE DOLLAR CLEANERS 

Work Called for and Delivered 
East Pine Street Phone 74-Y 



EAT AT 

LEIBY'S 

Sunbury, Pa, 



Home of 

PRINTZESS COATS 

THE BON TON 



345-347 Market St. 



Sunbury 



&-m~m~ 



"REMEMBER YOUR COLLEGE 
DAYS WITH PHOTOGRAPHS" 

Schindler Studio 

615 Market Street Sunbnry, Pa. 



Merchant Tailor 
Ed. I. Heffelfinger 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

Market Street Selinsgrove 



For Better Merchandise 

Reasonably Priced 

Shop at 

FEME'S 

COATS AND DRESSES 



# 



New York Life 

Insurance Co. 

ARTHUR C. BROWN 



Freeburs, Penna. 



Feaster's Restaurant 



! "WHERE STUDENTS MEET 
AND EAT" 

{ Market Street SelinsfcTOTe j 



FEEHRER & NOLL 

BARBERS 

4 WEST PD4E STREET 



fmn 



Grover D. Savidge 

Representing 

New York Life 
Insurance Co. 

Sunbury Trust Bldg. 
SUNBURY, PA. 






.„ 



Co. n 



{ 



Paxton Brick 

SMOOTH AND ROUGH FACE 

BUILDING BMCK 

—and— 

PAVING BI 



Office— Wationtown, P». 
Factory— Paxtonvllle, P». 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



DOPESTER'S NOTE! 



It would not startle me a 

Nor would it make my pulses q i 
To heai Rutgers plastered Pitt, 

To hear that Amherst won from 

Yale. 
It would not jar my fragile frame 
II Alfred conquered Notre Dame, 
Or Norwich flattened N. Y U„ 
Or Muhlenberg outclassed Purdue. 
It would not stumble my feeble 

brain 
If Harvard lost to Dear Old Maine. 
And I could stand it very well 
If Susquehanna trimmed Cornell. 
Nor would it make me tear my hair 
If Princeton lost, to Delaware, 
Nor would I wear a puzzled frown 
If Wabash slapped Northwestern 

down. 
Nor would it be a jolt to me 
If Centre won from Tennessee. 
Some distant day I fondly hope 
To see a game run true to dope. 
And if that fervent hope comes 

true 
I'll throw a fit and so will you. 
By George E. Phair— taken from 
the New York. American. 



Your Alma Mater extends heartiest I touchdown of the day. This certainly 



congratulations! 
Dr. Bannen, Graduate of Missionary 
Institute, '87, Sets a Record 

Thirty-eight years in one pulpit is 
the reccrd set by Rev. R. G. Bannen. 
D.D., pastor of Messiah's Lutheran 
Church, South Wiiliamsport. In these 
years lie has received more than 2,000 
persons into church membership, and 
has united in marriage more than 1.000 
couples. 

Messiah's Lutheran Church has had 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1929 



was a lucky break for the Perkiomen 
Valley team at the expense of a de-| 
termined and hard-fighting bunch of | 
Crusaders. 

In the second period, line plunges by i 
Alalasky and Wormley helped Susque- 
hanna to advance the pigskin from its i 
own 20-yard line to Ursinus' 23-yard 
line, only to be halted when Hunter 
intercepted Wormley's pass over the 
line. 



Dance Progra m s 

of the More Artistic Kind 

THE SJE1INSGRQVE TIMES 



■•• 



******************* 
; ALUMNI NOTES | 

* -I * »'■ # * «: * .!: *,:;,,,: , «. ft 



Susquehanna Gaining Merited 
Recognition 

Susquehanna's present program of 
higher scholastic requirements and 
ideals is calling forth much favorable 
comment among educators, friends of 
Susquehanna and the Lutheran 
Church at large. 

Typical of these comments is that 
appearing recently in the weekly 
church bulletin of St. John's Evangeli- 
cal Church of Jenkinstown, Pa. "It is 
a pleasure to read of all our Lutheran 
Colleges opening this fall with increas- 
ed numbers. Susquehanna University- 
alone reports a decrease in additions 
to the Freshman class. This is due to 
the raising of admission requirements. 
Susquehanna refuses to be a dumping 
ground for boys and girls who can't 
or won't study." 

"Charlie" Travels 

The name of "Charlie" Fisher need 
not be mentioned to upper-classmen 
more than once until he is remember- 
ed as one of the most active fellows of 
'29. After graduation he attended the 
Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Conference at 
Eaglesmere. He spent a short time at 
home in Port Carbon. Pa. and then 
left for New York, from where he ex- 
pected to leave for Europe, as a la- 
borer on a ship. Plans were somewhat 
changed and before sailing for New- 
York, a trip was made down the East- 
ern coast, to Panama and California. 
This trip was made on a freighter, on 
which he worked. After completing the 
trip he sailed for Europe. From the 
last letter received from him, he was 
working as a deck hand on a passenger 
steamer, wnich was enroute for Nor- 
way, Denmark, and Sweden. "Charlie" 
is taking this trip fcr the purpose of 
gaining a better understanding of peo- 
ple before he takes up his preparation 
for religious work. Susquehanna's pride 
for "Charlie" and his ambitions go 
with him. 

A Collection Trip Is Being Made 
Harold Moldenke. one cl tl.e mfet 
ambitious students of '29, la making a 
trip to "The Sunny Southland" to col- 
lect specimens for study in the botani- 
cal field. He will spend the wlntei 
months in various parts of the south- 
ern parts of the United States in this 
work. After graduation he spent sev- 
eral months working and studying in 
the Botanical Gardens oi New \ ;rsi. 
He is making commendable pi 
in this field. While at school his col- 
lection numbered over a thousand, Wi 
extend best wishes for continued suc- 
cess. 

Personals 
After many efforts record has at last 
been made of the. whereabouts of Miles 
E. Hoffman, '22. He took work at Col- 
umbia in the field of Political Econo- 
my, and in '25 secured his Master.- de- 
,..,.,.,. Fcr Ul(1 past {0(U . V|ii . , ui h;( , 

been Professor of Economics at Temple 
University, where he Is still located. 
From time to time he has publ 
treatises on Labor Problems and ' 
il Economy. 

Dr. Oeorge R. Ulrich, '86. is an ac- 
me worker in St. John's, also being 
r Of tilt- weekly buiic.i. H- is 

v Interested In Busqueh inna and 

is a. member of the Pin! id« i i Dis- 
trid Club 

Ke\. Lau Elected Pastor 

I{| ■■ E, Law, 'Xi and 26 oi 

v/M unanlmou 

Of tl < ran Church ,,f the Re- 

deemer at Wiiliamsport a a recent 
tint Th 
recently ci mpletad ■ 
185,000 

Rev Law, who l:, 1] ydai OJ I 

■ graduate <»t leraey Shore High 
"i and of Bu quehann . Re 

so a World War veteran 



Time and again Moser and Malaskv. I 
a steady growth under the guidance of ; the Crusaders' pile-driving backs, bat- 
her efficient paster. Several times it l tered against the Ursinus line for! 
was found necessary to enlarge the gams, only to be held for downs, or i 
church edit ice. At the present time, being forced to punt in the fading 
ways and means cf providing more , shadows of the Ursinus uprights 
room for the congregation and Sunday 
SchcDl pupils are being considered. 
This is the only church in the Susque- 
hanna Synod that entirely supports a 
foreign missionary. For many years it 
has financed a religious worker among 
the natives of Africa. 

The church remains free of debt, 
despite the large apportionment. It is 
also a leader in charitable work in the 
community. 

Dr. Bannen and his wife recently en- 
tertained the church council and their 
wives at a dinner at The Cedars. Jer- 
sey Shore, in celebration of his 38th 
year in the pastorate as well as the 
anniversary of his marriage. 

Susquehanna and friends extend 
congratulations and best wishes! 
S 



POLAK WAVE ICE CREAM 

SUNBURY MILK PRODUCT?? OUMPAKY 

We Solicit Your Patronage . 



ANBURY, PA. 



♦ 



UNIVERSITY BAND IN SUNBURY 

ARMISTICE DAY PARADE 



Susquehanna's prize thirty-five piece 
band, under the direction of Prof. Al- 
lison, participated in the annual Ar- 
mistice Day parade at Sunbury, yes- 
terday. 



in the parade with its natty uniforms 
its excellent marching and lively mar- 
tial airs. It was the subject of much 
commendation and applause along the 
line. 

The boys had the privilege of lead- 
ing the large marching club of the Phi 
Beta Lambda Club of Sunbury in the 
parade. 

FORTY-FIVE GIRLS PARTICI- 
PATE IN Y. W. C. A. HIKE 



i 



Wagner Plays Excellent Game | <3> 

Wagner, the Freshman halfback, who , { 
showed brilliant form in last week's J | 
practice sessions, was given his chance I I 
on Saturday and did well, handling i | 
the punting and the passing until late | J 
in the second quarter, when he wasj j 
forced to leave the game on account 
of injuries. 

••Dinny" Wormley played his usual 
bang-up game at the other half. "Din- 
ny" has real talent in carrying the ball 
and tearing around end or sliding off 
a tackle. He gained much ground for 
his team-mates in Saturday's fray. 

Moser again displayed much strength 
in backing up the line and keeping his 
running-mates on a fighting edge. Ma- 
lasky was up to his old game again, 
hitting hard and low. 

Coach Ullery was forced to start a 
new pair of ends. Berger and Barber, 
in Saturday's battle. Both these boys 
did well on the line. Captain Gar- 
man played his usual good game at 
the center post, breaking through the 
line and getting some nice tackles. 
Berger. substituting for R. Garman, 

The band made a fine appearance ? id T H „ at the gUard P osition - where 
tu<> ™„„,^ ...i*u lt ^.. 'I he at all times spilled his man com- 

ing through the line. 

The line-up: 
Susquehanna— Ursinus— 6 

DeLay L. E Miller 

Zak L. T Herron 

R. Garman .... L. G Wilkinson 

A. Garman C Lentz 

Auchmuty R. G Simmers 

Yon R. T Helffrich 

Barber R. E Cole 

Moser Q. b Hunter 

Dltterer 
. . Super 

Conover i I 
Score by periods: 

Susquehanna 0—0 

' | Ursinus o 6 0—6 

Touchdown— Sterner. 

Substitutions : Susquehanna — Danks 

for Wagner, Scott for Danks, Berger 

for R. Garman, Glenn for Scott;Ur- 

sinus— Strine for Herron. McBath for 




SAY I T W IT II FLOWERS 

"j ™ OgT FLOWERS and POTTED PLANTS for WEDDINGS 
PARTIES and FUNERALS-FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS ' 
Visitors Always Welcome at Our Gre«n Housej 



BELL 32-Y 



GEO. B. MINE 

FLORIST 



SELENSQROVE 



~<S> 



KAUFFMANS 

Candy and Soda 






$> 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 
RESOURCES IK EXCESS OF fl,500,000.00 






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MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

«c 1 ^ erica ! lea l lng instruments. For churches, colleges, lodge rooms, 
residences, etc. Every organ designed and built specially for the par- 
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i 



HAGERSTOWN 



M. P. MOLLER 



MARYLAND 



Wormley L. H. B. 

November days are calling— and the I ^^l* R ' H- B 

rls of Seibert Hall iiii»imI Uu „<,n M alasky I 



j girls of Seibert Hall answered the call 
| when forty-five lassies participated in 
a hike sponsored by the Y. W. C A 
| Saturday afternoon. 

With Miss Woodruff and Miss Reed- 
j er as chaperons, the girls left the dor- 
mitory about two o'clock. In less than 
1 an hour the destination— Rhoads Cct- 
| tage, this side of Freeburg was sighted. 
A great volume of smoke arose from 
i the cabin but soon the smoke cleared 
; away and the odor of onions, bacon, 
; eggs and coffee predominated. A lunch 
was served by some girls who had gone 
ahead in Crossman's chariot and made 
the necessary preparations. 

A cross-country route was followed 
homeward. 

S 

FIVE SENIORS PLAY LAST 

HOME GAME SATURDAY 




Before Buying' Athletic Supplies Visit Your 

Store 

It Will Mean a Real Saving to You 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTS" 

STUDENT CO-OPERATIVE STO] 



Wilkinson. Black for Lentz, Sterner { 



for Super. Soeder for Conover, Julo 
for Black, Hess for Simmers, Conover 
for Sterner, Egge for Miller, Thorough- 
good for Coble. Masser for McBath, 
Black for Julo, Lentz for Helfrich, 
Scirica for Hunter. 



WHITMER-STEELE COMPANY 
South River Lumber Company 

Manufacturers of 

Pine, Hemlock and Hardwood Lumber 

c . ... _, Lath, Prop Timber and Ties 

65 King street Northumberland 



i 
I 



• Continued from Page 1» 
dents can do as loyal supporters of 
their team, is to be out on the field 
cheering them on to victory in their 
last game on the home field. 

S 

NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

DOWNS JAYVEES, 



KESSINGER 

7 lie Jeweler 
Belinbgioyi, 1'A. 



Herman HAMD W \RE & Wetzel 

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"Continued from Page 1> 
Jr. Varsity Nat 

Speigelmyer . . L. E. ... Grisdale 

Korl L. T Rolerbaugh 

Rhoades L. G Geisling 

Carl C Bowman 

McGeehan .... R. g Campbell 

Witkop R. T Goldfarb 

Rummell R. e Edelman 

Johnston Q. b Rodoline 

Ru PP L. H. B. . . . Kleinman 

Reynolds R. H. B. . Wattman 

Kline F. B. . . Hartenbaim 

Score by period.-: 

Junior Varsity 7 — 7 

National Farm School.. 6 7 7 19—39 

S 

70-YD. KIN SPELLS DEFEAT 

FOR S. V, AT IRSIM S, 6-0 

'Continued from Page 1) 
made a sensational gallop for the Cru- 
saders" goal line, scoring the lone 



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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 
, . a o G MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 

A. B. and B. S. Degrees— Strong courses In Liberal Arts. Science, Edu- 
cation and Business Administration. 
Intension Courses at Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township and Mt. Carmel. 
Courses of instruction for teachers on the University campus on 
Friday evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four-Year Public School Musk Course with degree in Bachelor of 
Music ls attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music. 
Susquehanna stands for a well-rounded education, clean sports, re- 
creation for every student, earnestness in study, and above all, Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For information write 
GEORGE F. DUNKELBERGER, Ph.D., Dean. 



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SHAKE OFF 
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^ - J J 



Volume XXXVI 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1929 



Number 14 



Gallaudet Sinks 
Ullerymen Here 
by 14 - 7 Score 



Improvements Made j Pittsburgh Alumni Heim '30 Finishes 
In Dormitory Life i In Annual Meeting First in X-Country 



Mutes Defeat Crusaders for First Time 
in Three Years; Captain Ring It- 
stars for Visitors 



Renovation of Hassinger Hall, Loung- 
ing Room, Radio, and Full-Time 
Janitor Add Much to Comfort 



TEAMS BATTLE ON EVEN TERMS 
IN FIRST AND FINAL QUARTERS 



Susquehanna Within Scoring Distance 

Several Times, But Unable to 

Pierce Visitors' Defense 



Failing to overcome a losing jinx, 
which has been following the Orange 
and Maroon gridders in the last four 
games, Susquehanna was defeated in 
a hectic game with Gallaudet by a 
14-7 score on University Field Satur- 
day afternoon. 

The visitors displayed a strong de- 
fense, which the Crusaders were un- 
able to penetrate twice when they were 
within the guests' ten-yard stripe. The 
attack of the Gallaudet eleven was 
consistently strong throughout the 
game. On the other hand, the Cru- 
saders were not consistent in their at- 
tack and lacked organization and co- 
operation within the team's ranks. 

It seemed that in the first quarter 
the teams were pretty evenly match- 
ed, although Gallaudet threatened 
when Susquehanna fumbled a punt 
from Zieske's toe, giving Gallaudet the 
ball on the home team's 25-yard line. 
An attempted kick from the field by 
Williams failed and the Orange and 
Maroon received the ball on the 20- 
yard line without additional damage. 
Ringle Scored First Touchdown 

In the second quarter Gallaudet's 
powerful attack brought real results. 
Danks got off some poor punts, giving 
the visitors the ball on the Orange 
and Maroon's 25-yard line. Susque- 
hanna's line, very weak in spots, fail- 
ed to hold the approaching avalanche, 
led by Captain Rlngle and Zieske, who 
sliced through big holes opened up by 
their team mates. Ringle hurled him- 
self across the final chalk mark for the 
first touchdown of the game. Williams 
kicked the extra point on a place- 
ment. 

On the next play on the kickoft* Ma- 
( Concluded on Page 4) 



With the employment of a full-time 
janitor and the renovation of Hassing- 
er Hall, student life in the dormitories 
has made commendable progress to- 
ward higher ideals of neatness and 
general decorum. 

The provision of a lounging room and 
the purchase of a radio by the boys 
and several faculty members has ad- 
ded much to the home-like atmosphere 
of the dormitory. 

Early in the semester it was pointed 
out that education is tested by our 
ability to rise to higher ideals of daily 
living. Students were appealed to in 
the matter of keeping tidy rooms and 
of not throwing paper and litter on 
the campus beneath the windows of 
their rooms. 

There is still something to be wish- 
ed for in these matters—and yet prog- 
ress is noted. And all are grateful for 
this improved sense of decency. It 
shows a laudable respect for Susque- 
hanna's name. 

S 

— Patronize Susquehanna advertisers, 
they make this paper possible. 
S 

COLLEGE PERSONALS 

Dean George F. Dunkelberger gave 
an address Sunday evening, November 
17, in the Jewish Synagogue in Sun- 
bury, on the "Psychology of Religion." 

President G. Morris Smith preached 
in St. Luke's Lutheran Church. Pitts- 
burgh, on Sunday morning. November 
17. Dr. G. Arthur Fry is the pastor of 
the congregation of which A. G. Ga- 
winske is a member. 



President Smith Addresses Gathering 

at Fort Pitt Hotel on Progress 

Made at Susquehanna 



Gridiron Schedule 
for 1930 Completed 



Next Season's List Includes Eight 

Games, Four of Which Are on 

University Field 




Susquehanna's list of gridiron op- 
ponents for the 1930 season was an- 
nounced recently by the Director of 
Athletics. Prof. Grossman. Eight games 
appear on this schedule, four of which 
are on foreign fields and four on Uni- 
versity Field. 

The first game will be played at 
home, the same as this year. Wagner 
college has been scheduled for this 
game. The three remaining games at 
home are all feature games: one for 
Parents' Day. one for Home Coming 
Day, and one, the last, for Founders 
Day. 

The complete schedule is as follows: 

Oct.4 — Wagner. Home 

Oct. 11— Haverford, Away 

Oct. 18— Alfred. Away 

Oct. 25 — Ursinus. Home I Parents' 
Day i 

Nov 1— Hamilton. Away 

Nov. 8— Juniata. Home. (Home Com- 
ing Dayi 

Nov. 15 — Washington. Away 

Nov. 22— Penna. Military College, 
Home i Founders Day. 

S^ 

THOMAS MANN WINS NOBEL 

PRIZE IN LITERATURE 



The Pittsburgh Alumni Association 
of Susquehanna University held its an- 
nual dinner and meeting at the Fort 
Pitt Hotel. Pittsburgh, on Friday eve- 
ning, November 15. Tho gathering was 
called by Mr. A. G. Gawinske, presi- 
dent of the Pittsburgh Association, and 
one of Susquehanna's loyal alumni in 
that district. Worthy of note was the 
fact that two of Susquehanna's "baby 
alumnae" were present— Miss Helen 
Dehcff and Miss Helen Bradley. That's 
the spirit! 

After the transaction of some neces- 
sary business and the election of offi- 
cers for the coming year, Mr. Gawinske 
introduced the toastmaster. Rev. 
Charles D. Russel, D.D., one of Pitts- 
burgh's popular Lutheran pastors. He 
led the banqueters in an original song 
adapted to the occasion and then in- 
troduced Dr. G. Morris Smith. Presi- 
dent of the University in felicitious 
words. 

Dr. Smith in nis opening words 
pointed out how our district alumni 
associations might get larger attend- 
ances. Then he launched into an in- 
forming and stimulating address on 
the largeness of Susquehanna's work, 
recent progress at the institution, and 
drew a word picture of his hopes for 
the future that was inspiring. Near 
the end of his address, President 
Smith pointed out that alumni could 
greatly aid Susquehanna by directing 
students of the right sort to her portals 
and by laying hold of every opportun- 
ity to give her worthy publicity in the 
newspapers. 

Other speeches testifying to what 
Susquehanna had meant to them were 
made by several of thp alumni pres- 
ent. 

Those present were Dr. Charles D. 
Russel, Mrs. Charles D. Russel, Mr. 
G. W. Rayman, Mrs. G. W. Rayman, 
Miss Julia D. Liston, Miss Kretsch- 
mann, Prof. Claude Mitchell, Prof. 
Newton Kerstetter, Miss Helen Dehoff, 
Miss Helen Bradley, Mr. Albert Ga- 
winske, Mrs. Albert Gawinske, Rev. G. 
Arthur Fry, D.D., Mrs. Gillespie, Mr. 
S. P. Burkhart, Dr. L. A. Glasgow, Mr. 
Geo. Gassier. Mrs. Geo. Cassler, Mr. 
Geo. Gross, Mrs. Geo. Gross, Rev. E. 
E. Teischart. 

Officers elected for the coming year 
were : 

President, Mr. A. G. Gawinske. 

First vice president, Prof. Newton 
Kerstetter. 

Second vice president. Mrs. George 
Cassler. 

Secretary, Miss Helen Dehoff. 

Reporter, Miss Helen Bradley. 
Treasurer, Mr. G. W. Rayman. 
S 

INTER -CLASS SOCCER LEAGUE 

FORMED IN GYM CLASSES 




JACK DELAY 
Jack DeLay played his last game of 
football on University Field Saturday. 
He played a? the end position in the 
game with Gallaudet. The wing posi- 
tion is his specialty. Jack blocked a 
punt near Susquehanna's own goal 
line, which aided materially in the 
scoring of a touchdown later on in the 
game. 



Thomas Mann. German novelist, 
was awarded the 1929 Nobel Prize for 
literature, worth $46,299 The prize is 
given annually to the one doing the 
best work in the field of literature of 
the world A prize is also given in var- 
ious sciences. 

Mann's best-known books are "Bud- 
denbrooks." and "The Magic Moun- 
tain." He is well-known in America 
and is at present a resident of Mun- 
ich. 

Ordinarily, the Nobel Prize Commis- 
sion keeps its selection a matter of 
mystery until the last moment, some- 
times awarding the prize to some 
little-known author Mann, however, 
is one of the most widely read and 
generally respected of modern Ger- 
man novelists 

Other writers mentioned for the 
prize were John Galsworthy and Gil- 
bert Keith Chesterton, in England; 
Sinclair Lewis, of "Babbitt" and "Dods- 
worth" fame, and Thornton Wilder, 
author of "The Bridge of San Luis 
Rey," in America, and Erich Maria 
Remarque, author of the famous "All 
Quiet on the Western Front." Re- 
marque is also a German 



Juniors. Only Class With Complete 

Team, Capture Meet Held for First 

Time in Number of Years 



Russel Heim. member of the Senior 
Class, finished first in the inter-class 
cross country run held Friday after- 
noon over the Susquehanna 3'- mile 
course. This was the first time this 
run has taken place in a number of 
years. 

Heim. one of Susquehanna's track 
stars, ran a beautiful race to cross the 
finish line, the winner. Considering the 
condition of the ground he made re- 
markable time in covering the dis- 
tance in 19 minutes and 17 seconds. 
Hepner, Freshman, followed not far 
from Heim. Showalter. Junior, was 
third. 

The Juniors, being the only class 
represented with a full team, captured 
the meet, Clark stepped into the race 
without a gym outfit in order to make 
the necessary fifty runners for the 
third-year class. The Freshmen would 
have won the meet had they had an- 
other member on their team. The Sen- 
iors had only two men entered. 

The order of their finish is as fol- 
lows : 

I. Heim, Senior. 19:17 
Hepner, Freshman, 19:35 
Showalter, Junior, 20:47 
Sala, Freshman 
Worthington, Freshman 
Bishop, Sophomore 
Haines, Junior 
Hartline, Junior 
Fisher, Sophomore 
Lesher, Junior 

II. Hartman, Senior 

12. Burns, Freshman 

13. Clark, Junior. 

S. U. Will fry to 
Evade Jinx Saturday 



2_ 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 



Sprague Players in 
Delightful Comedy 



Orange and Maroon Eleven Will Meet 
Formidable P. M. C. Team at Ches- 
ter in Season's Final Game 



In order to make the work more in- 
teresting, Professor Grossman has 
formed soccer leagues within his phy- 
sical education classes. 

In the Freshman class the Blue Dev- 
ils captained by Carolin and the Rinky 
Dinks captained by Matlack, are lead- 
ing and will play for the Freshman 
championship thus week. 

The final standings of the Sophomore 
teams are as follows: 

W L T 

Trivoli Whirlwinds 6 2 

Island Rats 3 3 

Puddle Jumpers 3 3 

Golden Tornadoes 2 4 

The present standings of the Juniors 
are as follows: 

W L T 

Corn Borers 3 1 1 

Scorpions 3 2 

Priggly Hall Pepper Pots . . 2 2 1 
Never Sweats 1 4 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
MEETING 



A meeting of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation will be held tomorrow morn- 
ing i Nov 20 1 immediately after 
cliapel service. At this time two 
assistant basketball managers will 
be elected. Norman Brought, Ran- 
dolph Harvey. W infield Hudklns, 
and Reno Knouse are the candi- 
dates. 

When securing your ballot to vote, 
your student identification card 
must be presented to the tellers. 



When the Crusaders journey to 
Chester Saturday, they will meet a 
fast Pennsylvania Military College 
combination which will seek its fourth 
straight win and Susquehanna will try- 
to rid itself of a jinx which has fol- 
lowed the Ullerymen in the past four 
games. 

P. M. C. has a splendid record thus 
far this season. It consists of four wins: 
from St. Joseph's. 7-6; Baltimore. 20-0; 
Dickinson, 7-6; and Delaware. 18-6; 
they tied Lehigh 20-20. The Cadets 
have a clean slate except in two games: 
Gettysburg, 0-7, and F. & M. 7-14. 

It will be remembered that Warren 
playing half-back position, proved to 
be the main cog in the machine in 
former years with tile Orange and 
Maroon. Warren is living up to his 
reputation to a high degree this year, 
handling most of the punting and pass- 
ing this season. It is to this versatile 
left halfback that belongs most of the 
credit for the overwhelming victory 
over Baltimore. 

The Pennsylvania Military College 
has an enrollment of only ninety-seven 
students, twenty-seven of whom are i 
eligible for the college football team. 
It can be seen from this that P. M. C. 
has plenty ol spirit and will be out to 
win over the Orange and Maroon if it 
is at all possible. 

The probable line-up of the Chester 
eleven will be as follows: Shaw, left 
end; Maljan. left tackle; Langton. left 
guard; McGulgan, center; Hanna. right 
guard : Loeper, right tackle; Jack, left 
end: Layer, captain and quarterback; 
Warren, left halfback; Brennar.. right 
halfback; Andrews, fullback. 

Susquehanna was on top of the score 
last year with the Chester boys 26-20 
The Orange and Maroon will certainly 
be out to stay on top thus year 

S 

SENIORS NEAR THE INTER- 
CLASS TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIP 

Having won all three of its teiuus 
matches, the Seniors appear to have 
just about captured the inter-class 
tennu championship. In the last 
matches to take place. November 1, the 
graduating class conquered the Fresh- 
men easily by the score of 4-0. 

Due to the unfavorable weather 
conditions the teniiLs schedule has been 
considerably hampered, but it is expect- 
ed that many of the postponed matches 
will take place this week. 



Professional Group of Players Present 

"Back Home," Three-Act Comedy, as 

Second Star Course Number 

"Back Heme," a delightful comedy 
based on Irvin Cobb's series of stories 
of the same name appearing in the 
Saturday evening Past, was present- 
ed before a capacity audience in Sei- 
bert Chapel Hall. Friday night. The 
play was produced by the Herbert 
Sprague Players, a professional group 
of actors and actresses, who appeared 
on the campus several years ago in a 
splendid production of the famous 
"Lightnin'. " 

The story centered about the extreme 
cruel treatment administered child la- 
borers by the cotton mill owners, the 
attempt of a young northerner to cor- 
rect the condition, and his subsequent 
trials and tribulations ending up in 
his trial for murder before the father 
of the woman he loved. 

Clean, sparkling humor was the out- 
standing characteristic of the dramatic 
production. It was interspersed with 
several pathetic situations that count- 
er-balanced the laughter with occas- 
ional tugs at the heartstrings. 
Herbert Sprague Splendid as Judge 
Priest 
Acting honors went to Herbert 
Sprague. leader of the troupe, in the 
role of Judge Priest. He portrayed the 
white-haired, witty, clever old circuit 
judge very convincingly and with a 
technique that made him stand out 
from the remainder of the troupe 

Floy Sprague gave the audience a 
very excellent interpretation of the 
role of the "superannuated" Miss Sarah 
Anna Barbee, the village postmistress, 
She was particularly good in the court 
room scene. 

The exceedingly difficult role of 
Buddy, the boy laborer who was in- 
jured during an altercation between a 
mill worker and a Northern reformer, 
was played in a very excellent way by 
Lucy Hillier. 

Hubert Smith showed himself to be 
a very versatile actor by portraying 
both the part of the case-hardened, 
cruel-hearted "J. W„" wealthy cotton 
mill owner, and the part of the kind- 
hearted old judge who substituted for 
Judge Priest in the trial of the North- 
erner. 

Virgil Mcintosh as Jeff Davis Pom- 
dexter, a colored "pusson." did his 
acting very well. However, he seemed 
to lack the diction and accent ordinar- 
ily attributed to the black race. 

The entire cast seemed to lack the 
Southern accent. Had they been able 
to add that to their lines, their pro- 
duction would no doubt have been 
even more delightful. 

The courtroom scene would probab- 
ly have been more convincing had the 
audience been able to see a jury com- 
posed of confederate soldiers, and the 
reminiscences and pleas of the old 
judge would have been more appeal- 
ing. Nevertheless, the troupe made The 
best of their handicap 

S 

ALUMNI NOTES 

'27 

Addison Pohle is a member of the 

Altoona High School Faculty. He 

teaches business subjects. This school 

has an enrollment of 2700. 

Albert Salem is a teacher in the 

Franklin High School. Conemaugh. Pa. 

"29 

Charles Shoemaker is employed by 

an insurance company m Wilkes -Barre. 




JOE WINTERS 
Joe Winters is Susquehanna's biggest 
lineman. He is tall, rangy and fast, 
is a hard, consistent player, holding 
down one of the tackle positions. "Big 
Joe" hails from Sewickley High He 
is a Junior with another season to play 
after this year. 



rAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA 



TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 19, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly during the College Year except Thanksgiving Week, Christ- 
mas. New Year and Easter Week. 



Subscription $1.50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 



THE STAFF 

Editor-inChief Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

News Editor Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 

Betty Wardrop '32 Andy Kozak '32 John Kindsvatter '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Bruce Worthington, '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Edna Tressler, '30, Conservatory of Music 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 
Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1929 



THE TASK OF TEACHING 
The teaching profession is becoming increasingly difficult, 
according to Dr. Martin G. Brumbaugh, president of Juniata 
College, and former Governor of this Commonwealth, The 

reason for this is that tin* amount of knowledge is inn-casing 
tremendously and the necessity for presenting it accurately is 
becoming greater. 

"The inherited right of every child is the information left 
by generations that have gone before," said Dr. Brumbaugh in 
the course of a recent address at a teachers' institute." Every- 
thing left on record by the human race is material for the edu- 
cation of the present generation. That information is a con- 
stantly growing mass of material, consequently the teacher must 
become more efficient as the years come and go to have the 
child come into full possession.*' 

The perspective which every good teacher should attempt 
to give his pupils has become so broad that ii will be increas- 
ingly difficult for the average teacher to make the proper im- 
pression. For example, a century ago. the teacher had no elec- 
tric lights and appliances, radio, aeroplanes, and whatnot to 
take into consideration when teaching a perspective of the past. 
Nowadays, children are apt to take all these things for granted 
as though they had always been there unless the teacher assumes 
his full responsibility to show them that they are only of recent 
origin. 

In the literary field, we find the same thing to be true. The 
mass of literature that is every year produced, is so great that 
it can scarcely be imagined. New movement! arise and fall. 
Authors come and go, some to be remembered forever, some to 
bo forgotten in a few short years. All thin makes the job of the 
teacher of literature more difficult than it was years ago. 

All this may be said to be true of every field of learning. 
It is therefore only natural that every school system should de- 
mand the best of the men and women it employs to teach its 
children. It also behooves all Susquehanna students win* are 
interested in teaching to make the best possible preparation 
in their particular field BO that they can face the task with 
confidence in themselves and their ability and preparation. 

g 

THE REWARD FOB FIDELITY 

The flag over Louisana State University recently flew at 
half mast as students, professors, and townsmen of the old south- 
ern river city of Baton Rouge mourned the death of Jefferson 
Davis Wilson, aged negro servant at the University for half a 
century, and a former slave in the family of .Jefferson Davis. 
He was given a military burial by the 11. 0, T. C. unit of that 
university. 

Coming from the South, this tribute to a negro is indeed 
amazing when we consider the relationships that have existed 
between white man and black in the past and in the present. 
Possibly this is an evidence of the gradual removal of this spirit 
of animosity and the rise of sympathy for each other. Possibly 
it was only that Wilson's service to the institution was so great, 
that it merited such recognition. At any rate, this act on the 
part of the student body of that university will do much to 
create a feeling of understanding in the South. 

S 

srSQlEHANNA VS. JUNIATA 

Most colleges in these days of intercollegiate contests have 
home neighboring institutions of which they are rivals. Juni- 
ata has steadily built up a mutual sense of rivalry with one of 
her nearest neighbors. Susquehanna University. The two schools 
are located rather close to each other, are of about the same size. 
and have similar standings in the world of college affairs. As a 
result, the spirit of friendly rivaly has grow up. 

Too often when such a spirit grows up between two col- 
leges there also develops a spirit of animosity. On the occasion 
of any intercollegiate contests the two schools meet with far 
from friendlj feelings. The idea in most cases is how much 
harm ran Ix- done to I he el her school and not how mueli good. 

As a very contrasting condition Juniata and Susquehanna 
may point with pride to the relations during the late Home- 
coming football game. The two cheering sections vied with each 
other in cheering for the other SChooL When the one school had 
the misfortune to lose a player by injury, the other took the op- 



portunity to offer a cheer for the player. Both schools stood 
with bared heads while the other was singing its Alma Mater. 
And all the while in the stands the Presidents of the rival grid- 
ders sat together and watched the contest. Surely it can be said 
that S. U. and -I. C. ate friendly rivals. 

It. is probably unnecessary to close these observations with 
the usual plea. Juniata wants to keep up the friendly part of 
the rivalry and she wants to keep her reputation of being a 
gracious host and a well-bred guest. — Tht Jitniatiun. 

S 

VAGABONDING 

From time to time new words come into the undergarduate 
vernacular. One of the recent arrivals at Harvard is the verb 
"to vagabond." There is no such verb in the dictionaries; but 
it helps to express an idea, and that is what verbs are for. "To 
vagabond" means to rove around into classrooms where one does 
not belong. When an undergraduate remarks at the breakfast 
table "1 think I'll vagabond Professor Kittredge's 'Shakespeare' 
this morning," he merely vouchsafes an intention to wander into 
Harvard G at ten o'clock, help himself to a vacant back seat, 
and listen to what is going on. 

Vagabonding began last year, but this autumn it has under- 
gone a noticeable increase. Every morning the Crimson prints 
a list of lectures which will be given that day and have been 
picked out by the editors as likely to be of somewhat general 
interest. The information used in compiling the list is obtained 
thru the courtesy of the instructors at the beginning of each 
week. Sometimes a dozen or more lectures are put down as 
worthy of the vagabond's attention, and from his assortment 
he chooses one or more for his casual patronage. By vagabond- 
ing two or three times a week, as many do, the student makes 
the round of numerous courses and during the year manages to 
see a goodly sprinkling of the Faculty in action. 

In looking over the list of lectures announced dav bv dav, 
one is struck with the amazing variety of the subjects which are 
covered by a college curriculum within the confines of a single 
morning. Everyone, it would seem, can find something that 
articulates with his interest, if he has any. 

To some extent the practice of vagabonding has been abet- 
ted, no doubt, by the general examinations, which encourage the 
undergraduate to broaden his interests and to appreciate the 
essential unity of knowledge. The work of the tutors, moreover, 
has helped to break down the old idea that college courses are 
so many watertight compartments, each sufficient unto itself. 
And as a practical matter, the arrangement by which candidates 
for honors may reduce the number of required courses has made 
vagabonding a good deal easier. Juniors and seniors who are 
candidates for honors, and whose scholastic standing is good 
enough, are now required to take only three regular courses in- 
stead of the four courses which used to be essential. With only 
nine hours of classroom work, these upperelassmen have time 
tor roving around, and they are taking advantage of the oppor- 
tunity. In any event, and whatever the reasons for it. this 
growing habit of vagabondage at Harvard is a hopeful sign. It 
shows that the quest of academic credits is not the only thing 
that brings undergraduates to the classroom. — Tht Hanurd 
Alumni Bulletin, 

S 

A TRIBUTE To MB. MENCKEN* 

For the first time since the appearance of 77/* American 
Mercury some two years ago of the widely noised and ill-reput- 
ed "Hat Hack," Mr. Mencken is causing a stir among the col- 
legiate-minded — and quite justifiably, for he has accomplished 
the difficult and usually unpopular feat of showing both sides 
of a question. 

The occasion is the presentation to the public, with appro- 
priate editorial introductions, of the two prize-winning essays 
in the competition Mr. Mencken sponsored for the members of 
the <lasses of l')29 all over the country. And these essays make 
interested and stimulating reading, because of the sharply con- 
trasted attitudes they represent, if for no other reason. Their 
subject is, simply, "Four Years of College.'' 

Samuel Lipshutz, University of Pennsylvania graduate, is the 
author of "Dim Joys — Cloudy Sorrows;" Solive Brossow, fresh 
from a less well-known institution, Northland College in Wiscon- 
sin, calls her essay "With Honor." 

The former writes with ease and an elegance only moderate- 
ly self-conscious. In the analysis of college as a whole, that com- 
prises the destructive criticism in this essay, he is little short 
of brilliant— and it is this section that is most profitable to the 
reader — but when he attempts constructive suggestions for the 
improvement of higher education, he, alas, only succeeds in 
making all criticism seem futile and passive acceptance of the 
existing order seem the only advisable course. 

Mr. Lipshuts knows what is wrong with College and puts 
his knowledge into words better than most of us. lie sees that 
there are four groups of students, idely varying in tastes and 
potentialities, and that college strives so hard to be all things 
to all four groups that it does nothing for the student who can- 
not conform to any one of the four. 

(The four are, by the way, the social group, the "wicked" 
group, the serious thinkers who are not social about it, and the 
serious thinkers who art social about it.) 

. . . lie writes, '"The University is in trouble because it is 
a prey to two stupid movements. The New Efficiency tends to 
make it large and gangling, and all-comprehensive. And the 
New Psychology, realizing that this has a chilling effect on what 
is known as college spirit, tries to remedy the evil of growing 

(Concluded on Page 3) 



> * * !V f 



************* 



AMUSEMENTS 



•■f « :* * * * 



«*•**** 



Selinsgrove 's home of talking pic- 
tures, the Stanley, entered its third 
week of high grade "sound" pictures 
with "Thunderbolt," starring George 
Bancroft, supported by Richard Arlen 
and Fay Wray. This mighty drama 
cf the underworld shows for the last 
time in the Stanley tonight. 

"Broadway Melody," starring Charles 
King, Anita Page and Bessie Love, will 
be the feature attraction of the week. 
This all-talking, all-singing, all-danc- 
ing dramatic sensation has made his- 
tory in motion picture entertainment, 
both because it was a new type and 
because of its excellent story and 
musical comedy sequences. 

"The Man and the Moment," a pic- 
turization of Elinor Glyn's story of the 
same name, will be the attraction Fri- 
day night. This picture stars Billie 
Dove and Rod LaRocque. 

"Thunder," a stirring railroad drama, 
starring Lon Chaney, America's fore- 
most character actor, will be the fea- 
ture of Saturday's program, both mati- 
nee and night. 

Numerous short features are added 
to each feature picture to make a well- 
rounded program for entertainment of 
the public. 



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WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY, 
NOVEMBER 20 and 21 

Thomas Meighan in 
"The Argyle Case" 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY, 
NOVEMBER 22 and 23 

Clara Bow in "The 
Saturday Night Kid" 

SB *S S >S S *0< S >— — S ^S S <S S <« B >S S >S j tSBS j ^S S *S S *S B jS>S j frS S *S S *S S *S B 



MONDAY and TUESDAY, 
NOVEMBER 25 and 26 

Moran and Mack in 
"Why Bring That Up" 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SEL1NSGROVE, PA 



•ACE rHREfe 



************* 



ALUMNI NOTES . 

****************** 



Latest Reports Show Susquehanna's 
Contributions. 

The latest reports, received from 
graduates, show in part what contri- 
butions Susquehanna is making to 
progress. These statistics are gathered 
from reports of the '27, '28, and '29 
classes respectively. 

Class of '27— Teachers, 13; Princi- 
pals, 6; Business positions, 1; Ministry, 
2, preparing at: Central Theological 
Seminary of Reformed Church at Day- 
ton, Ohio and Susquehanna School of 
Theology; Civil Engineer, 1; Medical 
profession, 1, preparing at Jefferson 
Medical College. 

Class of '28— Teachers, 24; Assistant 
principals, 3; Principals, 5; Post Grad- 
uate work (in science) 1, Duke Univer- 
sity; 1, New York University; (physi- 
cal education), 1, Columbia; Medical 
profession, 2, preparing at School of 
Medicine, Philadelphia and George 
Washington University. 

Class of '29— Teachers, 19; Principals, 
3; Business positions, 3; Post Graduate 
work (in science), 1, Duke University; 
Law, 1, preparing at Dickinson Law 
School; Nursing, 1, preparing at John 
Hopkins Hospital; Medical profession, 
1, preparing at Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege; Librarian, 1, at Syracuse Univer- 
sity; Business Training, 2, preparing 
at Williamsport, Pa. (U. S. Rubber 
Co.) and at Scranton, Pa.; Ministry, 4, 
preparing at Susquehanna School of 
Theology, Gettysburg Seminary and 
(2) Harvard Divinity School. 



Rev. Peters of Altoona Speaks at Will- 
iamsport. 

Rev. B. A. Peters, 14, '17. of Altoona, 
had the honor of preaching the Ar- 
mistice Day sermon in the St. John's 
Lutheran Church at Williamsport. His 
subject was "Memoirs of Yesterday." 
Rev Peters was very well informed on 
a subject of this type, as he served as 
an overseas Chaplain in the Great War. 

Father and Son Day observed in 
Pine Street Lutheran Church. One of 
the special observances on the church 
calendar of the Pine Street Lutheran 
Church, of which Rev. Walter E. 
Brown is pastor, is Father and Son Day. 
This was very properly observed on 
Sunday, November 10th. The morning 
services were conducted especially for 
fathers and sons. 

Severn Years in Present Position 

Charles A. Miller, '12, has been 
Supervising Principal of the South 
Brownsville Public Schools for the past 
seven years. Prior to this position he 
was Principal of this high school for 
two years. He has 58 teachers under 
his supervision, of which the following 
are Susquehanna graduates: Lee Trie- 
bels, head of History Department and 
assistant coach, and Claire Dauber- 
man, teacher of Latin and Algebra. 
The enrollment of the schools is 2100. 
Trainmaster in Nevada 

William B. Hilbish, '17, is trainmaster 
for the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company, Salt Lake Division. He re- 
sides at Sparks, Nevada. 

Whereabouts and Doings of Sus- 
quehanna Graduates 
'07 

Rev. Charles M. Teufel, seminary 
graduate, now has a charge at Staun- 
( Concluded on Page 4) 



pains by the use of psychological methods: a personnel officer, 
supers iscd play." 

Why not confess that division into groups and popular 
neglect and even censure of the extra-group individual, arc in- 
evitable outcomes of community life? The history of civiliza- 
tion is sufficiently convincing on this score. 

And the student of human nature with a sense of humor 
might chuckle, we fear, at Mr. Lipshutz" ••suggestion for the 
future": "Would it not he a good thing if there were a college 
in which hard work were the custom, and therefore much more 
obligatory than if it were the rule? Would it not be well to 
try to make a college fit only for students each with a poten- 
tial something to say — and would it not be doubly well if this 
same college-to-be could teach its students to pick out those of 
their fellows who also had something to say? etc." 

... To the second writer. College represents pleasant as- 
sociations, a gentle stimulation of the intellect, hard work to 
attain a concrete goal, extra-curricular activities, preparation 
for a future job and only very occasional and very vague doubts 
— the sort adults usually attribute to adolescents — as to the 
"use of it all." ' 

Who will say that one side is less true or less real than the 
other? And we disagree with Mr. Mencken's explanation in 
terms of geography of the differences in opinion expressed, for 
we believe that there are Mr. Lipshutz' and Miss Brossow's in 
every college. — Campus News, New Jersey State College for 
Women. 



ONE REAL NEWSPAPER 

SUNBUKY DAILY ITEM 

SUNBURY, PA. 



ALMA MATER 




NEWS 



VOU'LL enjoy keeping in 
touch with the activities 
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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



VLUMN1 NOTES 

'Continued from Page 3 1 
ton, Virginia His pa bora ol 

tin 1 Chi Evangi i 

James H. Keys, re I Scenery 

Hill, Pa. He Is Ju tee tl the Peace of 
his respective vicinity. The following 
information Lb given by him 

S. Bruce Burkhart. "02, Is employed 
by Hughes Ogilre Cc. dealer.- In bank, 
office and lodge furnishings 

Rev. Charle.s E. Held, graduate of 
the seminary, is now preaching at Sag- 
amore. Pa. 

Rev. Russel Steininger is now- 
preaching at Mt. Olivet Lutheran 
Church, North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Thomas Dixon. '29, tour basket ball 
star) is a member of the High School 
Faculty at East Liverpool, Ohio. 

Rev. Harvey M. Erb, '25, is preaching 
at St. Mark's Lutheran Church. North 
Side Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Rev. Myron E. Cole, the genial pas- 
tor at Sewickley. Pa., is having his 
parsonage thoroughly renovated at the 
present time. 

'12 

Miss Laura M. Knepsliield is at pres- 
ent time a Music Teacher and Organ- 
ist at Apollo. Pa. After graduating from 
Susquehanna, further study was mad? 
at Pittsburgh Musical Institute, New- 
York School of Music and Aits in '24 
and '25. In '26 she studied music in 
Paris, France. 

13 

Rev. Hetman H. Flick is pastor of 
St. Mark's Lutheran Church at Traf- 
ford, Pa. At the present time he is tak- 
ing graduate work at Pitt. 
'14 

Miss Mary Steele, of Northumber- 
land, Pa. She is a teacher of piano. Af- 
ter graduating from Susquehanna, she 
followed a Course at the Peabody Con- 
servatory of Music and in '19, receiv- 
ed her B. A. Degree. 
16 

Rev. William E. Swope is pastor of 
Zion Lutheran Church at Lebanon, Pa. 
'17 

Prof. P. Kepner Jarrett is head of the 
Mathematic Department of the Sun- 
bury High School, and resides in Sun- 



inches Gallaudet then kicked and 
Wonniey returned the punt to the 20- 
yard line. 

Here the Orange and Maroon backs 
settled down to business again and 
short stabs by Moser. Wormley and 
Malasky placed the leather on the 5- 
yard line. Wormley was called upon 
to carry the ball on the next play and 
circled the end for the lone touch- 
down ior the Crusaders, and Moser 
kicked the extra point from place- 
ment. 

The final quarter was a deadlock, 
with neither team threatening. Sev- 
eral long passes by Glenn in the last 

minutes of the game failed to advance | held for downs. From a kick forma- 
the ball to a scoring position. j tion Zieske rushed around end for 47 

Wagner got off some beautiful punts j yards, the longest run of the game, 
in the last period, placing the ball be- j Gallaudet punted to the 10-yard line 
tween the five and ten yard stripes as the half ended, 
several times. Third Quarter 

Captain Ringle and Zieske seemed j DeLay made a beautiful run of the 
to be the bulwark of strength for the | kickoff to the Susquehanna 45-yard 
visitors in the backfield. while on the I line. Wormley and Moser hit the line 
line Marcus was the center of power. | for a first down. Wcrmley gr.ined 7 

The line-up: 

Gallaudet Susquehanna 

Monaghan L. E Dreibelbis 

Marcus L. T Miller 

Wurdeman C A. Garman 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19. 1929 



As a penalty for interfering with the 
receiver of a pass Gallaudet was given 
the ball on the 10-yard line. Ringle 
circled end for 7 yards. Moser stopped 
the next play, but Ringle then plunged 
through for the second score. Wil- 
liams again kicked the extra point 

Malasky made a fine runback of the 
kickoff to the Susquehanna 47-yard 
line. Glenn broke loose for a brilliant 
end run of twenty yards. Moser tossed ! 
a pass to Malasky. placing the ball on| 
I the Gallaudet 20-yard line. An off ' 
tackle smash by Moser and another! 
pass to Malasky brought the ball to 
the 9-yard line. Here Susquehanna was | 



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R. Garman 
Zak 

.... Barber 
. . . Malasky 

. . Wormley 

Danks 

Moser 



yards at end and Malasky made an- 
other first down on the 30-yard line. 
Wagner punted over the goal line, giv- 
ing Gallaudet the ball on the 20-yard 
line. DeLay blocked Ringle's punt and 
then fell on the ball on the Susque- 
hanna 15-yard line. On three succes- 
sive tries Wormley plunged the ball to 
the 4-yard line, but failed to make a 
first down by inches. Wormley re- 
turned Ringle's punt to the 20-yard 
line. Short stabs by Moser, Wormley 
and Malasky placed the ball on the 
5-yard line. Wormley circled end for 
the touchdown. Moser kicked the ex- 
tra point from placement. 

Gallaudet ran the kickoff back to its 
40-yard line. Gallaudet was penalized 
15 yards. A fumble followed and the 
visitors recovered, but lost 15 yards on 
the play. On an exchange of kicks 
Susquehanna gained when Wagner 
Susquehanna — Scott for Wormley I made a beautiful P un t to the Gallau- 
lenn for Scott. Wagner for Danks det 10 - vard line Gallaudet failed to 

gain on another exchange of kicks. 
Fourth Quarter 
Ringle punted to the local 37-yard 
line. Wagner cut through tackle for 
7 yards and Moser battered his way for 
a first down. Bradley intercepted a 
pass on the Susquehanna 37-yard line. 
A long pass. Williams to Zieske, gain 



Antilad R. G. . 

Parks R. T. 

Bradley R. E. 

Zieske Q. B. 

Williams L. H. B. 

Marshall R. H. B 

Ringle F. B. 

Score by periods: 

Gallaudet 14 0—14 

Susquehanna 7 — 7 

Touchdowns — Ringle 2. Wormley. 
Points after touchdowns— Williams 2, 
Moser. 

Substitutions 

Gallaudet — Carlson for Antilad, j 
Toffmeyer for Marshall. Holster for] 
Johnson. 

Susqui 
Glenn for Scott, Wagner for Danks, 
Yon for Miller. DeLay for Barber. 
Scott for Malasky, Glenn for Scott. 
Berger for R. Garman. MacDonald for 
Moser. 

First Quarter 

Captain Ringle kicked off to Moser, 



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'20 



Jay M. Riden is a Coach and teacher 
in the Sunbury High School at Sun- 
bury, Pa. 

'21 

M. P. Moller. Jr., is a joint partner 
with his father M. P. Moller, world 
famous organ builder, m Hagerstown 
Md. 

'22 



o. 



bury. Pa 

Mrs. Gladice Harkgton „ *«*, I %£if%?L*2& £ Sm%\ * TySS '.ffiW't 
of the Climax Cleaner Mfg. Co.. in | Jackie , t „ seven yards. !^5!i?^*1»S^ t SrS ,1 « £ 

ij 1S ? m . 'T ™ * the ~ nter . of the i complete pass over the goal line and 
field foi a first down. No gain was j Susquehanna received the ball on ttl 

SStSJJfSL % nte V°A he H G K al - ! ^0-yard line. An exchange of kicks 
laudet 20-yard lme Ringle kicked, but; put it on the 15 d stri w 

ball aTzS Payer ^y J2?\ made a flne P» nt to the Gallaudet 42- 

S^Jf n, ?? f cove «* » *>r Gal- !yard line . Ri le hit the , ine f . f 

he on tl ^ USqUe ' lam ; a 35 ->' ard first down and then kicked to the Sus- ' 

1° oT 9 P d lays ^ ingle «** quehanna 42-yard line. Glenn tossed a 
thiough to the 24-yard line. On a re- 1 pass to Worml for a flrst down 

verse play Zieske brought the ball to other forward J Moser gained 9 

Mrs. Leon R. Richard is a home- 1 LffA pTan^ E SF^MIStJS 
keeper and resides at Brooklme. Pa. fai.d . so ~JS+ml fined gj «$« £*3 t^Gal^ 

K In Jri f V I US , °J^ det 25 ->- ard line - Susquehanna lost the 

b n'nn ti « ge /r ^ ^^ thC bal1 on downs ' Williams lound his way 

™ Zr.jJ^'T , S " sqUehanna araulld end f0 '" » n^M as the game 
was penalized 15 yards. On a poor ended 

kick Gallaudet ran the pigskin back . 

to the Susquehanna 25-yard line. An : — — - — 

exchange of kicks put the ball back to 
the Gallaudet 42-yard line. 
Second Quarter 
Another exchange of kicks gave Gal- 
laudet the ball in the center of the 
field. Zieske lost and Ringle punted to 
the Susquehanna 14-yard line. Sus- 
quehanna also punted, but the kick 
was poor and Ringle ran it back to 
the 25-yard line. Ringle gained 9 
yard, and Zieske crashed through to 
the 15-yard line for a first down. 
Ringle sliced left tackle for 5 yards 



MARYLAND 



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'24 

Bruce M. Dreese is Principal of the 
Herndon High School at Herndon, Pa. 
'25 

Miss Catherine Fopeano became a 
registered nurse at John Hopkins in 
'28. At the present time she is Assist- 
ant Head Nurse in It he Obatatrical 
Department of the University of Mich- 
igan Hospital, at Ann Arbor, Michigan 
'26 

Theo. E. EMwtl KSlde In Buffalo. 
N. Y. He holds a position in the invest- 
ment Department of the M. & T Trust 
Co. 

S 

SOPHOMORES CROWNED INTER- 
CLASS SOCCER CHAMPIONS 

The Sophomores were crowned 
champions of the inter-class soccer Zle ske again hammered the center of 
league last Wednesday afternoon when the une f01 ' a nrs t down, bringing the 
they defeated the Junior, 2-1. In ihe ! bal1 t0 tne 4-yard line. The Susque- 
play-off game to decide the champion- J hanna line neld twice, but Ringle fin- 
ship. These two elevens were dead- ' all - v burled himself across for a touch - 
locked when the regular schedule I down ° n a placement kick Williams 
ended. j put the ball between the upright* for 

As the score Indicates, the Juniors;" 10 " xtra point, 
and Sophomores fought a hard, close, Malasky carried the kickoff to the' 
game to decide which would be the s ''' '< :t 'hanna 17-yard line. The Or-i 
class champions At halt time the I an ^ e and Marcon was penalized 15 i 
Sophomores held a 1-0 e ' uds '<* holding, placing the ball backi 

g on the Susquehanna 2-yard line The I 

GALLAUDET SINKS i li.ervmen Cruaadera punted to their 25-yard line.! 

HERE BY 14 TO 7 SCORE 



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<s>. 



(Continued from Page i> { 

la.sky carried the ball back on ■ peach * 
of a run. only to bt* downed after he { 
had lugged the leather bark it yard*. 
The way lor the next touchdown foi 
Qallaudei wai paved whei oi an at- 
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0. the .Su.nueha.uia 10-yard l,n ;; Cap- ^SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY} 



talc Ringle 'hen cln I 

■even yarda and then on he next two 

plays he took the pigskin over fo: then 

hdOWn Willi i:: 
kicked 

Rejuvenat.il I tain Set mid ilall 

Thi came back on the 

with renewed trength, Moser 
Ofl yards on the line play.s 
and Wormley around the ends Gal- 
laud- t kicked Sinm i.lieir 20-yard line. 
but DeLay broke through and blinked 
it. falling on the ball on his own 15- 
yard line On three HlflOOHlVI tries 
Wormley failed to |* t lit / down by'^, 






Selinsgrove, Pa. 
G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 
A. B. and B. S. Dejrrees— Strong courses in Liberal Ai nee, Edu- 

cation and Business Administration. 
Extension Courses a' Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township and lit. Carmel. 
Courses of instruction for teachers on the University campus on 
Friday evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four-Year Public School Musi. Course with degree in Bachelor of 
Music is attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music. 
Susquehanna stand,, for u well-rounded education, clean sports, re- 
creation for every student, earnestness in study, and above all, Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For information write 
GEORGE F. DUNKELBERGER, Ph.D., Dean. 



4 
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LYTLE'S PHARMACi 

Soda Fountain THE REXALL STORE Ice otco^ 

K. 'furnish. ii Throughout, Modern and Appealing in Every nooyov. 

Talcums, Face Powders and Toilet Articles or ah n-iw^ 
UNITED CIGAR STORE AGENCY SELINHUKUv* 



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w — «—"«■■- -• —■**• ---■«««»*-■•*., »j.w t »».»., ..,».., i 



Next to the Movies 

KODAKS — TOILET GOODS — SODAS 

Sunbury — Northumberland — Shamokln — Selinsgrove 



^ 




Don't Eat Too 
Much Turkey 



ȣ= 



The Susquehanna 






vX^" 



^s 



Vacation Begins 
Wednesday 



V-_; 



Volume XXXVI 



8ELIN8GROVE, PA., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1929 



Number 15 



Fall Conference 
of I. N. A. Held In 
Washington, D. C. 



Sixteen Institutions Represented at 

Fall Convention of Intercollegiate 

Newspaper Association 



Basketball Season 
Opens Here Dec. 13 



Schedule Includes Fifteen Frays With 

Fast Quintettes, Seven of Which 

Are on Home Floor 



Susquehanna's basketball season will 
get under way on December 13th, when 
GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVER- i the annual game with the Alumni will 
SITY IS HOST TO GATHERING lbe (*•!•*■ 

The 1929-30 card, as announced, calls 

Editor of The Susquehanna Attends; \ for seven games on the Orange and 
Bucknellian Wins Double Honors; j Maroon court, and eight games on for- 
Dean Doyle Makes Address ! eign floors. 

With games listed with Western 
Sixteen colleges and universities of Maryland. Ursinus, Juniata, Lebanon 
the East were represented at the fall j Valley. Delaware and Elizabethtown at 



Manhart Will Give [ Debaters Prepare j Orange and Maroon 

For Coming Season Loses Hard Fought 



Travel Lecture Here 



Dec. 13 Selected for Date of First Lec- 
ture to be Given Under Auspices 
of Pi Gamma Mil 



Pennsylvania Gamma chapter of Pi 
Gamma Mu, National Social Science 
Honorary Fraternity will present for 
the first lecturer of the year Dr. 
Franklin P. Manhart in his travel lec- 
ture on Monday evening. December 9. 
at eight o'clock, in the .ecture room of 
the Charles Steele Science Hall. 



conference of the Intercollegiate News 
paper Association held at George 
Washington University. Washington, 
D. C, Friday and Saturday of last 
week. 

About forty men and women attend- 
ed this conference to discuss in a frank 
manner the problems and accomplish- 
ments in college journalism. 

The institutions represented by these 
people were Susquehanna, Bucknell, 
New York, Brooklyn Polytechnic, 
Cooper Union, George Washington, Al- 
bright, Westminster, Washington and 
Jefferson, Haverford, Juniata, Ursinus, 
Gettysburg, Muhlenberg, Stevens and 
Dickinson. 

Frank E. Ramsey. '30, editor-in-chief 
of The Susquehanna, represented this 
publication at the conference. 

Banquet at National Press Club 

Round-table discussions of prob- 
lems pertinent to the publishing of 
papers as a student project were held. 
Each delegate gave a report on the 
work of his own paper. Some very in- 
teresting points of help to others were 
suggested by the reports of these dele- 
gates. 

The conference was ended with a Saturday, February 8— Franklin and 
delightful banquet in the famous Na-j Marshall, away, 
tional Press Club. This banquet was ! ^day. February 14— Lebanon Valley. 
attended by all the delegates and sev- ' home, 
eral invited guests. Thursday. 'February 20 — Haverford, 

Dean Doyle Addresses Gathering away. 

Dr. Henry Gratton Doyle, Dean of Friday. February 21— P. M. C away, 
the George Washington University, Saturday, February 22— Ursinus, away, 
who is best known to college people for j Friday, February 28 — Delaware, home, 
the questionnaire he conducted last ] Tuesday. March 4 — Juniata, away, 
winter, gave a short talk, in which he Friday. March 7— Elizabethtown, home. 
emphasized the responsibility of col- Staff 

lege journalists in giving the public Harold R. Glenn '32, Captain, 
the true view of college life. Lsadore Steinman '32, Captain. 



home. Susquehanna's campus will wit- 
ness some fast quintets in action. 
Two Court Captains 

An innovation at Susquehanna is the 
designation of two Captains for the 
basketball team. 

With but two letter men available 
from last year's court squad a dead- 
lock existed in the selection of a lead- 
er for the 1929-30 campaign. "Skip" 
Glenn, former State College Hi player, 
and "Mo" Steinman, from Sommer- 
ville Hi, N. J., were the two letter men. 
They are both Sophomores. They will 
share the honors and responsibility of 
leading the Crusader quintet through 
the coming campaign. 

The Schedule for 1929-30 

Friday, December 13— Alumni, home. 
Saturday, January 11— Western Mary- 
land, home. 

Friday, January 17— Lebanon Valley, 

away. 
Saturday, January 18— Elizabethtown, 

away. 

Saturday, January 25— Juniata, home. 
Thursday, February 6— Ursinus, home. 
Friday, February 7— Drexel, away. 




FRANKLIN P. MANHART, D.D. 



Dr. Doyle, in the course of the busi- 
ness meeting of the association, was 
elected Executive Secretary to fill the 
vacancy left by the untimely death of 
Dr. James M. Lee. of New York Uni- 



Luke H. Rhoads '30, Manager. 
William Ullery. Coach. 
Luther D. Grossman, Director 
Athletics. 
Randolph Harvey '31. and Winfield 



Dr. Manhart, who is Dean of the 
Susquehanna School of Theolcgy, was 
a member of the delegation from the 
United States to the International Con- 
ference of the Lutheran Church held 
in Copenhagen last summer. His lec- 
ture will be based on some of his ex- 
periences during his travels. 

He will use the stereopticcn in con- 
nection with his presentation of the 
life of Norway and Sweden. 

The lecture is open to all persons 
who desire to be present. There will be 
no admission charge. It is the first of 
several lectures to be given here under 
the auspices of the lecal chapter of Pi 
Gamma Mu. 



Manager of Teams is Arranging Excel- 
lent Schedule for Varsity Squad 
Coached by Dr. Kern 



At I. N. A. Conference 



of 



versity, the secretary for the past eight Hudkins '31, assistant managers. 



years. 
Thomas 



-S- 



L. Donohue, instructor in , WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS GIVE 



Journalism at Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn, gave a very entertaining talk 
on his experiences as a reporter and 

M an instructor. 



AID TO RED CROSS FUND 



When in need of aid, look to Seibert 
Hall Girls. It is seldom that they do 



"Japanese Journalism" was the | not help a worthy cause if they are 
theme of Gideon A. Lyon, associate i able to do so. 



editor of the Washington Evening Star, 
who gave a short discussion of jour- 
nalism of Japan. Mr. Lyon was a 



The generous spirit of the girls' 
dormitory was again shown in the Red 
Cross Drive of S?linsgrove. Voluntarily 



member of the Carnegie committee to the Girls' Co perative Council and the 



study conditions in that country re- 
cently. 

Bucknellian Wins Honors 

Awards were made by Lowell Mel- 
lett, editor of the Washington Daily 
News. The Bucknellian. publication of 



v. w. c. A. Cabinet made gifts of 
twenty-five dollars each in behalf of 
i these organizations. 

These two bodies have been doing 
much this year in a silent way and 
•his lias been the first opportunity for 




Susquehanna's debating schedule for 
this scholastic year is rapidly nearing 
completion, acc.rding to announce- 
ment by Stewart Schrack. '30. mana- 
ger of the Men's Teams. It is antici- 
pated that within the next few weeks 
the complete schedule will be ready for 
publication. 

Although the traveling of the team 
will be limited to some extent this 
year, Susquehanna can be assured of a 
strong and interesting schedule. 

The year's program will consist of 
s me eighteen or twenty debates with 
the leading debate teams of the coun- 
try. Following are some of the trains 
that Susquehanna will meet in the 
near future: University of Buffalo. 
University of California. Temple Uni- 
versity, Albright College and Eliza- 
bethtown College. 

WU1 Debate Kellog Peace Pact 

The question that has been selected 
by the Debating Association of the 
Colleges of Central Pennsylvania for 
this year's issue is "Resolved. That the 
United States should withdraw from 
the Kellogg Peace Pact." This proposi- 
tion will be debated by many other 
colleges thruout the United States. 

With the services of Dr. H. A. F. 
Kern as coach and the return of most 
of last year's teams in addition to a 
group of new candidates, all indica- 
tions are that Susquehanna will again 
be represented by a strong team. 

The varsity teams will be announced 
within the very near future. This 
year's squad will endeavor to duplicate, 
if not excel, last year's record of eigh- 
teen victories and four defeats. 

This first trial debate was held Fri- 
day afternoon with Foulkrod and An- 
selmi upholding the affirmative and 
Hafer and Schiavo supporting the 
"«eative of the collegiate question. 



Game to P. M. C. 



Ullerymen Outplay Pauxtismen in Hec- 
tic Game, But Emerge on Short 
End of 12-6 Score 



MALASKY AND WORMLEY STAR 
IN SUSQUEHANNA BACKFIELD 



Crusaders Make Fourteen First Downs 

to Cadets' Eight; Game Ends With 

S. 17. Near Scoring Point 



Junior Girls Win 
1929 Hockey Trophy 



Nellie Shue Stars for Juniors in Scor- 
ing 18 Points for Her Team; Frosh 
Show Marked Improvement 



ghis in this great national movement. 



Bucknell University, won both cups them to do public go d and show that 
given semi-annually by the assocla-' they are wide awake 
tion, one for the best all-around news- Proudly the doors of Seibert Hall 
paper represented in the association, bear the Red Cross stickers that de- 
and one for the best editorial printed note the sympathy and interest of the 
in a member newspaper 

The convention was presided over 
by Mr. Herbert E. Angel, chairman of 
the Board of Editors of the George 
Washington Hatchet, who is president 
of the association. The Hatchet was 
the host paper of the conference. 

The delegates were the guests of the 



ALUMNUS WILL SPEAK HERE ON 
WORK IN THE MISSION FIELD 



FRANK E. RAMSEY 
Who Attended the Intercollegiate 
Newspaper Association Convention 
at Washington, D. O., last 



DR. WOODRUFF AT H N'AT\ 

TEACHERS' INSTITUTE 

Dr. J. I. Woodruff was one f the 
speakers before the teachers at the 
recent sessions of the Juniata county 
teachers institute at Mlffllntown, Pa. 



Rev. M. L. Dolbeer, member of the 
class of 1916. expects to visit the cam- 
pus of his Alma Mater on December 
management of the Earle Theater af- 2 and 3, immediately after the Thanks 



ter the banquet. 
Sightseeing tours and an inter-frat- 



giving recess, and to speak to the stu- 
dent body and faculty members on 



ernity basketball championship game various phases of his work as a mis- 
between Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Phi sionary 



Sigma Kappa were also included in 
the program of entertainment arrang- 
ed by the Capital City institution. 



He is now on his way back to the 
Guntur, India, missionary field, where 
he has served for a number of years. 



Bucknell was selected for the site of He has been on a year's furlough, dur- 
the spring convention, some time after ing which time he took his master's 



Easter. 



-S- 



Y. M. C. A. MEETING TONIGHT 

The regular monthly "Y" meeting 
will be heid Tuesday evening in Sei- 
bert Hall Chapel at 6:45 p. m. The re- 
ports of the Reading convention will 
be given at thus time. 

S 

— Basketball practice begins immed- 
iately after vacation 



work at the University of Chicago. 

The missionary will speak in Chapel 
Tuesday morning of that week and in 
the evening will give an illustrated talk 
on his work in the mission field. 

Personal interviews will be given to 
those students who may want to ask 
him concerning his work. 

Dolbeer was a tennis and track star 
while he was a student here. He was 
graduated from Wittenberg Seminary. 



CHAPTER OF TAl KAPPA ALPHA 
WILL BE FORMED ON CAMPUS 



Word was received yesterday by 
the officials of the debating I Tin 
iation that a chapter of Tan Kappa 
Alpha National Debating Fraterni- 
ty will be formed at Susquehanna 
in the near future 

The petitioners were: Seiber 
Troutman, Walter Foulkrod. Russel 
(Dinger, Walter Swank. Daniel Con- 
nell. Frank Bruno, Byron Salter, 
md Henry Hartley Then petit- 
ioners will be formally installed 
into the fraternity before the be- 
ginning of the Christmas recess, 
according to pi-esent plans. 

The forming of such a Chapter on 
this campus will mean much to de- 
bating at Susquehann, because it 
will make the aspirants to the teams 
work harder for their positions. 



The Junior Class Hockey Team 
romped away with the interclass 
trophy in that sport. Three classes 
were represented in the league. The 
fourth-year students did not have a 
team entered. 

Two rounds of hockey were sched- 
uled this year, making it possible for 
each class to play every other class 
twice. 

In the first round, the Sophs and 
Juniors won from the Freshmen by a 
large score. The Sophomore-Junior 
ended in a 1-1 tie. It was a hard- 
fought game thruout because the teams 
were evenly matched. 

T he yearlings lost both games in 
the second round too, but showed 
marked improvement in their playing. 
Hockey was a new sport to every one 
on the Freshman team. None had ever 
seen a game played before coming to 
Susquehanna. The 1-0 score in the 
game with the Sophs shows just how 
marked their improvement was. The 
M0 nd-year girls were tested to their 
utmost to score the sole counter. 

The second game between the Jun- 
iors and Sophomores ended m a 2-1 
score in favor of the Juniors. Both 
teams had good teamwork and played 
better hockey than last year 

When it came to scoring goals, Nellie 
Shue was an invaluable aid to the 
Juniors. Shue handles a hockey stick, 
dribbles and drives possibly better 
than any other player. She scored 18 
goals for the Juniors this season. 

Next year the present Juniors should 
give the underclassmen an even hard- 
er battle for the trophy The Sopho- 
mores are good, and the Fresh, if they 
continue in their spirit will also be 
able to test the strength of the pres- 
ent champions. 

Wound 1 

S-'phs— Frosh 8-0; Jrs.— Frosh 12-0; 
Sophs — Jrs. 1-1. 

Round 2 

Sophs— Frosh 1-0; Jrs— Frosh 9-1; 
Sophs. — Jrs. 1-2. 

S 

Strange Land 

Eustace: "Do you speak Latin?" 

Erica: "No; I've never been there." 



A rejuvenated Orange and Maroon 
eleven went down to defeat by a score 
of 12 to 6 at the hands of Pennsyl- 
vania Military College, at Chester be- 
fore a crowd of 5,000 in the final game 
of the Susquehanna gridiron schedule 
for 1929. It was one of the hardest- 
fought games of the season. 

Susquehanna found itself up against 
a genuine test of strength when it 
faced the Cadet eleven. The Rivermen, 
however, outplayed their opponents in 
every department. The Orange and 
Maroon completely outclassed the 
Pauxtis-coached men in the yardage 
gain through scrimmage with about 
260 yards to the Cadets' 160 yards. 

The Ullerymen also outclassed their 
opponents in the number of first 
downs obtained, having fourteen to the 
Cadets' eight. 

Cadets Feature Aerial Attack 

It seemed that the only flaw in the 
machine appeared in the second and 
third periods, when the Crusaders were 
unable to stop the Cadets' aerial at- 
tack, 

P. M. C. crossed Susquehanna's goal 
line soon after the opening of the sec- 
ond quarter. A pass from Layer to An- 
drew started the march toward the 
Susquehanna goal line. 

With the ball on the Crusaders' 25- 
yard line, Captain Layer bucked cen- 
ter for a first down, and in the next 
play caught a pass from Brennan, re- 
sulting in the first counter of the 
game. 

The Chester team scored again in 
the third period on a pass from Cap- 
tain Layer to Miller. 

Susquehanna's fighting combination 
kept the Cadets from receiving their 
extra points. The first time the Ul- 
lerymen broke up a line buck before 
the ball was pushed over the zero line 
for the extra tally. A kick from the 
toe of Captain Layer failed to go be- 
tween the uprights 
Susquehanna Scores in Final Period 
Susquehanna's lone touchdown came 
in the last period when the Crusaders 
worked the ball the entire length of 
the field from their own 30-yard line. 
Long runs by Wormley and off-tackle 
smashes by Malasky coupled with sev- 
eral beautiful and well-executed passes 
from Glenn brought the ball to the 
five-yard mark. 

Here Malasky was called upon for a 
line buck, which set the pigskin on 
the one-yard mark Wormley plunged 
through for the touchdown on the fol- 
lowing play. His placement kick was 
wide. 

Wormley and Malasky. by dint of 
their brilliant work and running, car- 
ried the ball nearly the entire length 
Of the field in the early part of the 
firs! period. However, the Orange and 
Maroon lost the ball on the Cadets' 
6-yard line, where it was booted out 
of danger by Layer. 

Game Has Exciting Finish 
In the tinal period, the Crusaders 
gave the Cadets plenty of worry, when 
they carried the ball up the field by 
sensational runs of Malasky and 
Wormley to the Cadets' 35-yard line 

From this mark, the Orange and Ma- 
roon resorted to forward passes and 
completed some nice ones. With 
twenty seconds to go and the ball 
resting on the 6-yard line, cmel fate 
snatched a probable victory or a tied 
score when Glenn's pass was ground- 
ed behind the goal line just as the 
game ended. 

"Dinny" Wormley, playing his last 
name of football for his Alma Mater, 
directed the battle from the field and 
played one of the best names in his 
college career. He not only proved to 
be ■ capable field general, but also a 
dependable gainer of necessary yard- 
age. 

In the third period ,,r "nny" made 
a beautiful cork-screwing run in car- 
rying back a punt for twenty-two 
yards. Besides making beautiful runs, 
he also threw some well-placed passes. 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weekly during the College Year except Thanksgiving Week, Christ- 
mas, New Year and Easter Week. 

Subscription $1.50 a Year, Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 

THE STAFF 

Editor-inChief Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

News Editor Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 

Betty Wardrop '32 Andv Kozak '32 John Kindsvatter '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Bruce Worthington, '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Edna Tressler, '30, Conservatory of Music 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1929 



• *••••*•«*•*•*•*••• ******************* * * * * * 

• * I * 



* * * * 



ALUMNI NOTES * * Intercollegiate Sports 



Some student* may demonstrate by their conduct the kind 
of homo training they have received. — Professor Glen A, Black- 
burn. 

e 

AX APPEAL FOB COOPERATION 
Tt lias been said, and probably with sonic truth, that this 
publication docs not entirely cover all the news of Susquehanna 
University and iis environs. A close examination of the facts 
in the ease reveals, however, thai the Editorial Administration 
of this newspaper is not to blame for this unfortunate situation 
in nine cases out of ten. 

The fault no doubt lies indirectly within organisations and 
(dubs themselves. While the administration of this weekly has 
attempted to develop a keen "nose-for-news,' as it were, never- 
theless it is sell-evident that it is impossible for a few members 
of the student body holding positions on the staff to know 
what is being done by each organization on the campus. 
Mav we suggest, therefore, that 



tust 



«****«*♦******»*•** 

Song Dedicated to President Smith at 
Recent Pittsburgh Alumni Meeting 

(Written by an Alumnus to the tune 
of "Merry Heart") 
We're happy. Prexy Smith, to have 
you present, 
We're glad you're here! — We're 
glad ycu're here! 
We'll sit tight— While you speak 
we'll all look pleasant; 
We'll give you ear— we want to 
hear. 
We'll eat and talk and smile and 
knew you better: 
We'll listen in — We'll listen in. 
While you talk of Susquehanna — big- 
ger, better. 
Or some yarn spin— Well listen in. 

Hearken! Hearken! Prexy has the 
floor! 
Hearken! Hearken! To his college 
lore. 
We're glad you're here — We're glad 
you're here. 
Tra-la-la-la, Tra-la-la-la, 
Sure we're glad you're here, 
Tra-la-la-la, Tra-la-la-la. 
Reports from the Class of '29 
David Straesser. of Curryville, Pa., is 
a student at Lutheran Theological 
Seminary, Gettysburg, Pa. 

Walter Swank, of Sunbury, Pa., and 
Raymond Rhine, of Lewistown, Pa., 
are students in the Harvard Divinity 
School at Cambridge. Mass. 

Another member of this class, Adam 
Bingaman, is in preparation for the 
ministry on our own campus, being a 
member of the Junior class of Susque- 
hanna Theological Seminary. 
Will Practice Law 
Seiber Troutman. one cf the excel- 
lent debaters of our winning team last 
year, is now attending Dickinsin Law 
School at Carlisle, Pa. 

A New Vocation for Women 



By Intercollegiate Press 



* * * * * 



; AMUSEMENTS 

******* *********** 



*** ****** 



******** "The Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu," a 
! thrilling all-talking mystery drama. 

Wisconsin University— (IP)— Wiscon- , based on Sax Rohmer's stories, will be 
sin. left out in the cold consistently ! tne feature attraction at the Stanley 
when it comes to selection of All- toni ght- 

American football players, has never- : Bessie Love and Conrad Nagle star 
theless, an All-American on its squad | hi the uproariously funny picture of 
this year. ! married life called "The Idle Rich," 

He is John Rasmussen, 37-year-old j appearing at the Stanley Wednesday 
college senior, whose football days date night. 

back to 1912, when he began carrying ! pi Gamma Mu will present Dr. 
the pigskin (for the Oshkosh, Wis., Franklin P. Manhart's very entertain- 
high school. , ing lecture on life in Norway and Swe- 

In 1915 he entered the University of j den on December 9, in Steele Science 
Nebraska and played a season as end i Hall. The lecture will be illustrated 
for that team. He then transferred to with stereopticon views. Admission 
Wisconsin, and in 1917 joined the A. I will be free. 

E. F., where he continued to play foot- The Marianne Kneisel String Quar- 
ball. j tet, famous musical organization, will 

In 1918 Rasmussen was chosen on I appear on the campus on the evening 
Walter Camp's All-American eleven j of December 6 as the third Star Course 
which was composed of college men j number of this season, 
with the colors. The Sadtler Pre-Legal Club will pre- 

Returning from the war In 1919, hei^ 1 * a very interesting Mock Trial in 



entered business, but after ten years 



Seibert Hall December 12. Admission 



of this decided to finish his college win ** twenty-five cents 



course. This fall Coach Glen Thistle- 
waite promised him a berth if he could 
return to form. 



Pittsburgh— iIP) — The generally ac- 
cepted theory that big men are essen- 
tial to a football squad if it would be 
successful, is being disputed by Du- 
quesne University here, which has sev- 
eral small men as its most important 
players. 

Captain Buff Donnelli, who has the 
distinction of being able to get off 
long punts with either right or left 
foot, is only five feet seven inches tall. 
Several other players are the same 
height, or smaller. The biggest man on 
the team is Kass Kovolcheck, plung- 
ing fullback, six feet two inches tall. 



Don't forget to come back before 1 
o'clock, Monday. 



New York — »IP> — That the average 

lootball coach in American colleges 

The opportunity for interesting work I and universities receives a salary of 

in the field of Library work is realized I $ 6i i 7 a year, or more than a thousand 

by some of our students, among whom , do u ars more than the average highest 

the executives 01 tin* various | there is Helen Gemberlingr. She is now p^ professor, was one of the discov- 



groups (in the campus, such as fraternities, sororities, govern- 
nuMit organization**, pre-profewiiona] groups, and all others. 
make it a point to inform either the Editor or any members of 
his stall concerning any activity or occurrence that may be of 
general interest to the readers of this weekly, so that these items 
may ge given their proper positions in this publication. 

May we also make a similar plea to the members of the 
entire student body and facultj to do the same thing. This will 
simplify mailers for the staff and produce a better Suqqui hanna, 
which is our goal. 

May we count on you? 

S 

THE [MPORTANCE OF COLLEGE NEWSPAPERS 

College papers play an important pari in conveying to the 
genera] public the true view «»t college life as it is today. This 
fact was brought out very forcibly and emphasized very strongly 
at the recent convention of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Assoc- 
iation at George Washington Cniveroity, at Washington, 1>. <".. 
of which association Tin Susquehanna is a member, 

The twenty-seven member papers of ibis organization have 
a total circulation of about 53,000 and a reading public of over 
a quarter million per issue. Thru proper placement of articles 
and constructive editorials these papers influence a largo num- 
ber of people in the forming of an opinion about college life. 

1 >r. I leiiry <; rattan Doyle. Dean of the university which act- 
ed as host to the association, in e speech to the gathering, einpha- 
fcdzed the responsibility of college papers in this respect. "We 
cannot blame the press." he said, "for printing only a fraction 
Of the t rue view of college life if only a tract ion is given it. You 
know the serious worth-while and important things that college 
boys and girls are doing and it is up to you to let the press know 
alKiut these things." 

Prom another source we learn that there are more I lain four 
hundred college papers published at least once a week, with an 

average of some twenty-five students working on each paper. 
There are thirty-two college dailies in the country, about half 
of which use the service of some nationaally known newsgather- 
inji organization. 

About thirty-five college paperi are published either twice 
or three time a week, and nearly a hundred or more small col- 
leges have papers coming out less often than once a week but 
more often than monthly. Academic credit lor work on college 
papers is the exception rather than the rule. Twenty-four out 
of twenty-five dailies reported financial compensation for the 
editor and business manager, while seven divided the profits 
among the members of the entire staff. As for the money the 
staff members are paid, in about forty percent of the cases the 
amounts are based on the percentage of profits. 

The significance of college journalism and the role it plays 
in modern life is made very evident by these statements and sta- 
tistics. The Susquehanna itself has a circulation totaling ap- 
proximately eight hundred. Taking four readers for each paper 
(the number generally assumed b\ advertisers) this publication 

reaches over three ihousand readers ami controls the viewpoint 
with which these readers regard the university and its life and 
act ivilies. 



attending the School of Library | eries made by the Carnegie Founda- 
Scienee at Syracuse University. Syra- • tion in its recen t investigation of col- 

Uie - N - Y - I lege athletics. 

In the Field of Science, Nursing, .... . . . ., ... , M 

t When paid by the Athletic associa- 

.« ,-., , o' edl " ne ; _ _ i t ions, the full-time head football coach 

Miss Gladys Staub. of Scran ton. Pa eg and ^ 

is following her interest in the field L es themselves , $5058 , or $100 

ofscienceassheisast^enlnurseat iless than th( , a 

John Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. I, . .... t 
t t.* , c fL • i, highest paid professor. 

J. Stanley Smith is following the 



Milwaukee. Wis. — <IPi — Marquette's 
freshman football squad has as mem- 
bers two players named Robert Galla- 
gher and Eugene Sheehan. 



medical profession. He is a student at ; 
Jefferson Medical College at Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

The Business Field Has Opportunity 
and Openings 

James E. Maneval is clerk for the 
Lycoming Rubber Co. at Williamsport. 
Pa. 

Miss Ethel Watkins is in training for 
business executive work at Scranton. 
Pa. 

Miss Rebecca Foster is bookkeeper ]s teaching in the High School at Avis, 
and prcol reader for the Dunmire i p a . 
Punting Co.. at Altocna. Pa. s. Arthur Wagner is employed as a 

Allen C. Tressler is employed by the ; teacher in the Dalmatia High School, 
John Phillips and Sons as a salesman > Dalmatia. Pa 



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New Brunswik, N. J.,— (IP)— R. Ber- j 
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lootball team, has completed thirty- j 
six consecutive football games without 
ever being relieved. 



TRY 



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for the Oakland and Pontiac Motor 
cars. 

Ray G. Sheeler is the distributor for 
Chevrolet cars at Downington. Pa. 

Edward H. Livingston is following a 
course of training with the United 
States Rubber Co., at Williamsport, Pa. 
At Duke University 

Leon Chesley, after graduating from 
S. U.. took work at Duke. In Septein- ' 
ber '29. he secured his M. A. degree 
from that school. At the present time 
he is taking more graduate work and 
is also instructor in Zoology in the 
University. 

High School Principals 

Miss Catherine O'Brien is principal 
of the High School at Exeter, Pa. 

The Clinton High School at Alden- 
ville. Pa., is supervised by George Luck. 

John Kanyuck, of Glen Lyon, Pa., is 
principal of the Newport Township 
High School. Under his supervision 
John F. "Jack" McHugh is teaching in 
the History department. The principal 
says that "Jack" is doing good work 
Teaching Field Not to Crowded to Use 
Susquehannans 

In the I, O. O. F. Orphanage Muss 
Isabel Slotterback is doing fine work 
as teacher. 

Miss Ethel Wnikert is a member of 
the faculty of the Junior High School 
at Hanover, Pa. 

MKs Helen Weaver, of Johnstown, 
Pa., la I ■ ubstitUte teacher in the Hlffh 
School of her city. 

Charles Marks, of SeUnffTOVe, Pa.. 
*s coach of athletic! and al*0 a teacher 
In the high school at R anus; St> 
Pi 

Miss M'i >v t Shue teaching 

• d History In the Nicholson 

I ,,, Vj,,' 

i:> len Bun f '29. re- 

i' BrooN 

wile Pa ' ■■■ ' ve of 

,1. 

Miss ii Shore 



In the western part of the state 
there are two of last year's class in the 
teaching profession. They are Miss 
Helen Dehsff, teaching in Nrrth Brad- 
dock, and Miss Helen Bradley, teach- 
ing in the Junior High School at East 
Pittsburgh. 

Harry Lupfer is Science teacher in 
the Brady High School at Luthers- 
burg. Pa. 

On the Boswell High School faculty, 
we find Miss Rose Ann Gumbert, a 
graduate of the Susquehanna Conser- 
vatory of Music. 

Miss Nancy Lecrone is teaching Eng- 
lish in the High School at Williams- 
burg, Pa. 

Fred Oser is teaching at Harrisburg, 
Pa. 

Miss Mary Royer is teaching English 
in the South Williamsport High School. 
Miss Ruth Steele is teaching in the 
Milton High School. Milton, Pa, 

Miss Martha Dllling is teaching 
Commercial subjects in the High 
School at Kane, Pa. 

William Breining is teaching in the 
Elementary department at Trevorton, 
Pa. 

Excerpt from Wilmington Parx-r 
An excerpt Irom a Wilmington paper, 
November 11, gives the following ac- 
count of a member of '17, '21: 

"Impressive services were held No- 
vember 10 in many Delaware Church- 
es. An outstanding cbservance in our 
city wns in St. Stephen's Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, at which a powerful 
patriotic sermon was preached by the 
Rev. Park W. Huntington, the pi 
Who had laaont hil hearers Governor 
Buck and m of hil staff, Ad- 
jutant General, J Auetin BHieon, of- 
ficers and men of the Delaware Nat- 
i u. i! Guard, officers of the Ri 
Oorpi Of Delaware and nt of 
City Council. William N. Cann. 
^ 

Read The Susquehanna, 



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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PA. 



AoE rHREfc 



**s**iy :!< ,<f * ft * ijt * * * if & ft * * 

i LITERARY NOTES ! 

* By Intercollegiate Press 

* * 

» * * t • • * t # * * * * * • * » * * 



The College Babbit 
By Howard Crawford 
"Pigskin." by Charles W. Ferguson, 
published this month by Doubleday, 
Doran will cause more talk on the 
campus than Percey Marks' "Plastic 
Age," albeit the two books have dif- 
ferent subjects. There are a number of 
college librarians, we feel safe in pre- 
dicting, who will not send special de- 
livery orders for this expose of "The 
Prima Donnas of Higher Learning." 

It would be futile to attempt in this 
short column to take up a thorough 
discussion cf the merits of the charges 
against North American colleges which 
are impled in "Pigskin." Suffice it to 
say that Ferguson has sketched us the 
truth insofar as any caricature por- 
trays Truth. Just as the cartoonist 
wishing to instruct as well as to amuse 
accentuates the peculiarities of his 
subject, so has the author of "Pigskin" 

exaggerated to gain his point. This is 
not only legitimate but necessary if 
the end in view is to be accomplished, 
and those college enthusiasts who un- 
dertake to argue the exaggerations 
• and we know there will be many who 
will attempt this) will accomplish 
nothing but a display of their ignor- 
ance — and their lack cf a sense of 
humor. 

Briefly, as the publisher tells us, Fer- 
guson "leads one to wonder if the pig- 
skin has replaced sheepskin as the 
symbol of higher learning." 



As an ironic dramatist, Ferguson is 
among the best. We feel that he has 
accomplished at least one thing which 
Sinclair Lewis has attempted and fail- 
ed in the attempt— that of keeping the 
reader's intense interest from begin- 
ning to finish. And Fergus: n has a 
keener sense of humor. When the en- 
tire college migrates, for instance to 
the scene of the seasons big game. Fer- 
guson disembarks his gang of colleg- 
ians, and remarks joyously. "To the 
courthouse square the army of higher 
learning marched." Find anything quite 
so good in Lewis, if you can. 

The book, we should tell you, is about 
Dr. Horace Ethelmore Dickey, new 
president of the Martha Sumner Uni- 
versity, a weakling in the Southern 
Conference. Dr. Dickey's wife calls him 
something which resembles more than 
anything else. "Horse." Since the Doc- 
tor's profession heretofore has been 
that of the Baptist ministry, his first 
hope is that he can create a great re- 
vival on the campus. He soon finds 
that before he can accomplish this he 
must play up to the football team. Let 
us journey to the stadium with the 
Doctor. 

"He had never seen such a daring 
and superb spectacle as the plunging, 
lunging, speeding figure of the Sphinx. 
Thousands of eyes had been centered 
upon him. Every young man and wom- 
an in the institution would have him 
for an idol. He was, the doctor had to 
admit, the most important man in the 
university. And he realized that if his 
high resolve to clean up the moral life 
of the campus were to become a reali- 
ty Sphinx must be the bellwether who 
led the way." 

The revival turns out gruesomely, 



and the doctor soon turns toward 
greater things. Martha Sumner must 
be the largest university in the South. 
The story has to deal mostly with the 
means of obtaining this end, and the 
results. Perhaps the highpeint of the 
book is reached when the doctor and 
the scholarly Professor Eastman meet 
in argument. 

Says Professor Eastman: "I stand 
for a college where something else be- 
sides skull practice shall be taught, 
where the reading of books shall have 
chief part. I stand — and here Dr. 
Dickey, we are poles apart — for - a col- 
lege which shall not be forever play- 
ing to a stupid constituency with de- 
vices and courses calculated to arouse 
the interest of a populace drunk on 
practicality. ..." 

Whereupon the president agrees that 
the two are poles apart, that Professor 
Eastman is against the best interests 
of the school, and "I have no time for 
failure. Professor. I am commissioned 
to build here and for eternity a school 
which shall stand as a beacon light in 
the storms of cheap intellectualism, a 
school which shall have its solid foun- 
dation on the rock of Christian prin- 
ciple and its bulwark in the affections 
of the people." 

But Dr. Horace Ethelmore Dickey 
soon sells his soul for thirty pieces of 
silver. 



"Dido: Queen of Hearts," by Ger- 
trude Atherton. published by Liveright. 
is the romantic story of the magnifi- 
cent Carthaginian queen, as only the 
author of "The Immortal Marriage." 
and "The Jealous Gods." could tell it. 

"Dawn," by S. Fowler Wright, pub- 
lished by Cosmopolitan, tells what hap- 
pens when people are suddenly thrown 
on their own resources, with the tags 
of a dead civilization clinging to them. 
Wright is the author of "Deluge." 

"The Big American Parade." by E. 
Haldeman- Julius, published by Strat- 
ford, is America dissected, compared, 
and summed up. 

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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1929 



RED AND BLACK, W. & J. NEWS 
WEEKLY, AWARDS CUP FOR BEST 
HIGH SCHOOL NEWSPAPER 



Entering a paper that won the ad- 
miration of all the judges, the "Central 
High News." of Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota, was announced the winner in the 
competition for the best high school 
weekly newspaper in the United States, 
which has been sponsored during the 
past six weeks by the Red and Black, 
Washington and Jefferson College 
weekly, Washington. Penna. The win- 
ner will be the recipient of a Dirigold 
trophy, which, with its base, stands 
fourteen inches. 




interpreter, that the film was on a 
roll and that to give them the one 
negative would ruin the entire outfit. 
As the gr up was discussing the mat- 
ter, an officer appeared, and in no un- 
certain terms, ordered the professor to 
produce the picture. It was then that 
the idea occured to the professor that 
he could fool the government of Rus- 
sia. 

He was using a roll of eight films, 
and the disputed picture was the fifth 
exposure en the roll. Therefore, he 



Second Period 

Brennan punted to Susquehanna's 8- 
yard line and Glenn returned the kick 
to his own 34-yard line. A pass and a 
line buck by Andrew netted the Cadets 
eleven yards. Layer tore into the line 
for another first down, the ball now- 
resting on the 12-yard line. On the next 
play, a pass from Brennan to Layer, 
gave P. M. C. their first touchdown. 
Brennan's attempt to add the extra 
point with a run was stopped. 

Layer's kick-off hit Captain Gar- 



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THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



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could tear off the last film, which was man and bounded back to Brennan, 

1 who recovered on his own 45-yard line. 
Garman intercepted Brennan's pass at 
midfield. The Crusaders were then 
penalized 15 yards for holding. 

Glenn picked to Brennan on P. M. 
C.'s 36-yard line. Cook recovered on 
the 43-yard line. Glenn kicked to Mil- 
ler on P. M. C.'s 41-yard line. The 
half ended when P. M. C. gained sev- 
eral yards on a pass. 

Third Period 
Layer kicked off to Wormley. who 
returned the ball on a beautiful cork- 
screwing run of twenty-two yards, 
placing the pigskin on his 26-yard line. 
Glenn kicked out of bounds at mid- 
field. Andrew fumbled and Barber re- 
covered for Susquehanna. Glenn kick- 
ed across the field to P. M. C.'s 42- 
yard line. The Cadets on the next two 
plays gained seven yards through cen- 
ter and Layer took the ball through 
for 6 yards, making the first down. 

A pass, Layer to Brennan. gained 

seventeen yards. Shaw, on a reverse, 

made twelve more, putting the ball on 

Susquehanna's 13-yard line. A pass. 

Layer to Miller gave the Cadets their 

second touchdown. Layer was stopped 

i in his attempt to add the extra point. 

Layer kicked off to MacDonald, who 

! returned to his 26-yard line. Wormley 

and MacDonald made a first down in 

three thrusts at the line. Glenn punt- 



a blank, hand it to the unsuspecting 
guards — who would not find out it was 
a blank until they developed it— and 
retain the prized photograph. At this 
point Dr. Van Horn's interpreter step- 
ped up and demanded less harshness 
toward her employer. 

The official was sufficiently calmed 
by this to permit Dr. Van Dorn to go 
to a dark passageway and remove the 
negative. He gave the soldiers the 
blank film, and they were perfectly 
satisfied. 

Dr. Van Dorn has had the negative 
developed and a print made, and finds 
that he has an excellent picture of the 
gates of the Kremlin. 

S 

ORANGE AND MAROON 

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(Continued from Page 1» 
Sharing honors with this backfield 
star was Malasky, playing at the full- 
back position. He starred with his 
many off-tackle smashes which dented 
the Cadets' line and drove the ball 
deep into their territory. 

MacDonald and Glenn did very good 
work in the backfield. Captain Gar- 
man with his boys on the line, seemed 



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to hold well at all times. For the Ca- 
dets the work of Captain Layer and , ec j to Miller and Brennan returned the 
Brennan featured in the backfield. I pim t to Susquehanna's 35-yard line as 

The lineup: the period ended. 

P. M. C— 12 Susquehanna— 6 Fourth Period 



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The winning paper is a six page, 
seven column weekly, which was con- 
sidered far superior to many college 
publications of a similar type. Albert 
Goustin is the editor, and Harold Mun- 
ger is business manager. In the final 
decision the judges took little time in 
deciding that the paper from the | Susquehanna 



Shaw L. E Dreibelbis 

Maljan L. T Winters 

Langton L. G Auchmuty 

McGuigan C Garman 

Lewis R. G Berger 

Hanna R. T Zak 

Jack R. E Barber 

Miller Q. B Wormley 



Keni L. H. B. 

Andrew R. H. B. 

Layer F. B. . . 

Score by periods: 
P. M. C 



Glenn 

MacDonald 
. . . Malasky 



0—12 
6— 6 



Wormley, in two attempts, gained 
eighteen yards through left tackle. On 
the next play, Susquehanna lost twen- 
ty yards on a bad pass. Glenn punted 
to Brennan, who returned twenty yards 
to his 46-yard line. Here the Crusad- 
ers held the Cadets like a stone wall. 
Brennan was forced to kick to Worm- 
ley. 

A reverse with Wormley carrying the 
ball, gained nine yards. Malasky shot 
through for a first down. MacDonald 
sliced right tackle for eight more yards. 
Wormley added four more for a first 
down. 

A beautiful pass from Glenn to Mac- 
Donald was good for 15 yards. This 
placed the leather on the Cadets' 20- 
yard line. An offside penalty and Ma- 
lasky's punch at center put the ball 
on the 5-yard mark. 

Malasky again smashed through 
center to the one yard strip. On the 
next play Wormley dived over for a 



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Touchdowns— Layer, Miller, Worm- 
Middle West was by all odds superior * ' 
' " lZ 1 T * „,„.. i„j„_j lev. Substitutions: Susquehanna — 
to the other entrants. It » as judged, ^ MacDonald. Wagner for 
on the basis of its editorials, newsj^. p ^ c _ Bmman *J Kern 

style and makeup. ephnnl ' Richardson for Maljan. Cook for Jack, 

The papers received trom the schools _,..,. T * T • * /-. , 

, \, ^ «• a j »i,„ » vm , I Biddle for Langton. Jack for Cook, 

of 21 States far exceeded the expec- ' & «- „♦„ \ 

7 771 i j tho „„ o1it „ i Kuntz for Shaw. McKee for Kuntz. 

taticns of the judges, and the quality, . . 

was so high that they decided to name; * lrs * e "■ 

, . .. „ Hnm „„!,-„ „u Glenn kicked off for the Orange and 

several as honorable mention, although; . „ = 

•ill be awarded 'Central Maroon - Kern kicked to his own 45- 
Hfeh" Tunes'' of Saint Paul Minne- , vard line Two smashes at the line touchdown, but his placement kick was 
sou "The Pine Cone," oi Pine Bluff. § ained a nrst down for Susquehanna, wide. 

a i7' „.. »ti,. n iwi „,nnt wiirhia nrier " Malasky shot off tackle for twenty-five Glenn kicked off to Layer, who re- 

lde t r ne yards to the Cadet 14-yard line. P. tlirn ed to his 35-yard mark. Brennan 
M. C. took the ball on its 6-yard line then punted to Susquehanna's 42-yard 

line. Again the Crusaders started to 
,even column , -— • -> gathered ma rch the length of the field. Worm- 

Sertlies with the exception of the *>™ **»* But two passeswere 
,Z. , „, . , _ .„,. .. t-. „„ ,_.„_„ grounded and Glenn was forced to 

Piedmont Highlander They were 

_, " ,, . „ ,. „ f „i™i punt over the line for a touchback. 
considered excellent examples ol school * 

Layer now kicked to Wormlev. who 



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1 . . , „„♦;„,, tv, oco ;m ci Laver punted to midfield 

were given honorable mention. .. . 



On two rushes 



papers One stnkitm fact was made 
manifest by the contest namely the 
superiority ol the Western papers as 
a whole. 

The competition for high school 
paper-, was sponsored by the W. & J. 
weekly on th on Oi its -0th an- 

niversary to call attention to journal- 
ism a.s a worthy school activity. The 

cup was given to reward the efforts 
of the winning .staff. 

s 



returned .seven yards to 
yard line. 
Wormlev and Glenn 



Malasky 

ley and Malasky gained a first down 
on two smashes at the line. 

Malasky and Wormley added an- 
other first down on the Cadets' 11- 
P. M. C.'s 43- yard line. Another pass. Glenn to Ma- 
lasky. netted nine yards. With about 
knocked off twenty seconds to go and the pigskin 



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POLITICAL SCIENCE PRO- 
FESSOR GETS PICTURE 

OF THE KREMLIN 



Dr. Harold A Van Dorn. proft 
Of political science at New Jei.-ev 
• College for Women, WSJ arrested 
temp ianly this summer for defying 
the laws of Russia by taking photo- 
h i ol B gate in the Kremlin at 
Moscow. 
When he crossed the bo: 
b in Van Dorn wai pern 
to take la. camera With him Arriving 
in Moscow he intended to take pic- 
tur< i ')t variou poln i ol Inl 

cularl; of the Kremlin an un- 
called fortn by many 

11, burly I iter 

Accompanied by a I 
acted .i ■ his tei Di v in 

arrived before th< ol the Krem- 

lin (. : hand The oldien seetn- 

y , Dorn took out 
b . 
i i noticed him 
man, came upon him Befora 
ti ey could reach him, however be 
uni became the 
,„, . . chidden ph itograph ol 
the gate to the forti 

The oldien immediately demanded 
that he na the plate Di Van 

Dorn explained, with the aid of his 



eleven yards for a first down on three 
nice plays. A pass, Glenn to Wormley. 
placed the ball on the Cadets' 20-yard 

me. P. M. C. braced and took the 
ball trom the Crusaders. Brennan 
sliced right tackle for twelve yards and 

hen kicked to Susquehanna's 39-yard 

re Wormlev raced around an end 
for twelve yards. Following this, the 
Maroon quarterback shoved through 

>n a delayed buck for another first 
down. Glenn again was forced to boot 
the ball over the last strip for a 
touchback Layer and Andrew made a 

Irii down on then- II -yard line as the 
period ended 



lying on P. M. C.'s 6-yard line. Glenn 
tried a forward pass. It was grounded 
behind the goal line, however, just as 
the whistle ended the game. Final 
More P. M. C. 12, Susquehanna 6. 

R 

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Wednesday and ends Monday noon. 



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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 
G. MORKIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 

A. B. and B. S. Degrees- Strong courses in Liberal Arts, Science, Edu- 
cation and Business Administration. 
ExtomkM Courses at Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township and Mt. Carmel, 
Courses of instruction for teachers on the University campus on 
Friday evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four-Year Public School Music Course with decree in Bachelor of 
Music is attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music, 
.ehanna .stands for a well-rounded education, clean sports, re- 
el rat ion for every student, earnestness in study, and above all. Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For Information write 
GEORGE F. DUNKELBERGER. Ph.D., Dean. 



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UNITED CIGAR STORE AGENCY SELlNHUKUvi* 



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KODAKS - TOILET GOODS 



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1 



Volume XXXVI 



The Susquehank 







,•0 $>• 



String Quartet Gave 
Program of Chamber 
Music Here Friday 

Marianne Kneisel Quartet of Women 

Appears Here as Feature of Third 

Star Course Number 



SELINSGROVE, PA., TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1929 



MISS KNEISEL CARRIES ON 
TRADITIONS OF NOTED FATHER 



Concert Marked by Pleasing; Tones and 

Well -Balanced Rhythm; 'Cellist 

Charms With Solo Numbers 



Mrs. Anna McLain 
Shaffer, '86, Dies 
at Clearfield 



Number 16 



Mother of Four Former S. U. Students 

Dies in Clearfield Hospital; Was in 

Social Service at Clearfield 



Mrs. Anna McLain Shaffer, '86, wife 
of Rev. D. E. McLain, '86, '89, and 
mother of four former Susquehanna 
students, died in the Clearfield Hos- 
pital, at Clearfield, Penna., on De- 
cember 1. 

This devoted mother and teacher 
spent her early days in Selinsgrove and 
was a graduate of Missionary Insti- 
tute, forerunner of Susquehanna Uni- 
versity. Several years were spent in 
teaching in local schools. 

She married Rev. Delbert McLain, 
graduate of Susquehanna University I 
and Seminary. The death of Rev. Mc- 
Lain left her to care for six children, 
whom she succeeded in guiding into 
vocations of usefulness. This proves 
the strength and character of this sac- 
rificing mother. 

She later married John E. Shafer, 
of Sunbury. She was a teacher in 
Hartwick Seminary for several years. 

Her latest work was in teaching 
among the foreign born in Clearfield. 



A delightful program of chamber 
music was presented here Friday night 
by the Marianne Kneisel String Quar- 
tet. This feature was the third Star 
Course number of this collegiate year. 

A fairly representative number of 
students and townspeople attended the 
concert. 

The quartet was comprised of four 
skillful and talented young ladies. Mar- 
ianne Kneisel, leader and organizer of 
the group was first violinist. Marie 
Vanden Broeck was second violinist, 
Katherine Fletcher, 'cellist, and Bella 
Posner, viola. 

While none of these musicians claim 
to be a virtuoso, yet each one played 
her individual instrument with sucli 
grace and charm that the ensemble ■ 

achieved a harmonious tone that 'in this line of work she was doing 
sounded sweet and pleasing to the ear special social service. When a blood 
and produced a pleasantly balanced ' 
rhythm. This was the result of sound 
schooling in music and a real under- 
standing of the classic spirit. 

The solo numbers by the 'cellist 
proved especially delightful to the au- 
dience. 

Miss Kneisel is the daughter of the 
famous Franz Kneisel, a violinist of 
note a number of years ago, likewise 
the leader of a string quartet which 
featured chamber music. The daughter 
of this distinguished man is carrying 
on her father's traditions in a brilliant 
manner and has made a name for her- 
self in the music world. 

The program: 

I— Quartet in D major, Op. 64. No. 5. 
J. Haydn. 

Allegro moderato. Adagio cantabile. 
Menuetto allegretto, Finale vivace. 

II — Cello Solas— Apres tin reve, 
Faure; Scherzo, Van Goens — Miss 
Fletcher. 

Ill — "American" Quartet in F major, 
Dvorak. 

Allegro ma non troppo. Lento. Finale 
vivace ma non troppo. 

IV — Anrante doucement expressif, 
Deburry; Assez vif et bien rythme. An- 
dante cantabile, Tschaikowsky; Molly 
on the Shore, Grainger. 

S 

CAMPUS OWLS ORCHESTRA 

POPULAR IN THIS SECTION 

Susquehanna Campus Owls Orches- 
tra, under the direction of Bryce Nico- 
demus, '31. is proving very popular 
with dancers of this section. 

This band has filled numerous en- 
gagements at several other institutions, 
especially at Bucknell. where it has 
proved one of the most popular or- 
chestras to appear on that campus 
this year. 

A letter to Mr. Nicodemus from 
Sigma Sigma Delta Sorority. Alpha 
Chapter, of that university, for whom 
the orchestra played recently, says in 
part: "We were all so pleased with the 
orchestra that the girls have requested 



Glee Club Prepares 
For Concert Tours 



Musical Organization Directed by Prof, 

Allison Holds Additional Rehearsals 

in Preparation for Western Tour 



Members of the Men's Glee Club 
have been doing much rehearsal work 
during the past month, preparing for 
their western tour, which they expect 
to make at the opening of the second 
semester. 



This western tour will take the boysi 
to Pittsburgh, playing Altoona, Johns- 
town, and other towm en route. 

Another tour east through Hershey, 
as well as a number of single night 
engagements, are also being planned. 

The boys have been holding a num- 
ber of extra rehearsals so that they 
may have their program in excellent 
shape by the end of the first semester. 

The program this year is expected 
to be the best that any Susquehanna 
Club has ever placed before the pub- 
lic. Prof. Elrose Allison is directing the 
organization, of which Luther Kurtz, 
'30, is the president and Lawrence 
Fisher. '32, the business manager. 
-S- 



Dallas Baer '20, '23, I Crusader Cagemen 



Elected Pastor of 
Trinity Lutheran 



Newly-Elected Pastor Has Had Inter- 
esting Career as Student and Min- 
ister; Comes Here in January 



Open Season Friday 
With Alumni Tilt 



transfusion was felt necessary for her, 
the entire football squad of Clearfield 
volunteered, but the blood of only one 
was found satisfactory. The trans- 
fusion was without avail, however. 

The Summer Sessions at Susque- 
hanna in 1926 and 1927 enrolled Mrs. 
Shafer as one of its students. She felt 
that her work necessitated modern 
study. 

Susquehanna extends sympathy to 
relatives and friends of a loyal mother 
and teacher, and is proud that she was 
among her graduates. 

S 

SIGMA SIGMA DELTA 

GIRLS HOLD DANCE 



Heart Balm Suit to 
be Tried Thursday 



Grace Lauer's Breach of Promise Suit 

Against Clifford Kiracofe Will be 

Heard in Seibert Chapel Hall 



About thirty couples danced from 9 
until midnight to the peppy music 
meted out by "Nick's Campus Owls" 
in the Phi Lambda Theta House last 
Saturday night, when the girls of Sig- 
ma Sigma Delta held their first dance 
of this collegiate year. 

Even the gloomy weather failed to 
dampen the spirits of the happy group. 
Each one heartily enjoyed himself. 

The crowd which was continually 
gathered around the spot where the 
punch bowl stood, gave evidence of the 
quality of its contents. 

Seven girls from Bucknell, members 
ol Alpha Chapter of the National so- 
rority, journeyed here with their es- 
corts to attpnd the dance and were 
enthusiastically greeted by their hos- 
tesses. 

Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Ahl. Dr. and Mrs. 
George W. Wood, and Prof, and Mrs. 
Luther D. Grossman represented the 
faculty. 

S 

SPECIAL CHRISTMAS 

VESPERS SUNDAY 



A special Christmas service has been 
arranged for next Sunday evening. 

The subject of the program will be 
"Prophecy and Fulfillment of the Sav- 
i ur in Scripture Reading and Music.'' 
This program lias been presented 
me to tell you how much we enjoyed else where and will be well worth hear- 
it Girls from other groups on the ling and seeing. 

campus said in all sincerity that you I S 

had the best orchestra which has hit I DR. MANIIART'S LECTURE POST- 
our campus this year. POKED UNTIL MONDAY NIGHT 

The band filled an engagement here I 
Saturday night when the Sigma Sigma Dr. Manhart's lecture which was to 
Delta Sorority. Beta Chapter, held its have been given under the auspices of 
dance in Phi Lambda Theta House, j Pi Gamma Mu National Honorary Fra- 
They will play for one of the fraterni- Eternity this week has been postponed 
ties when the men's Greek-letter clubs until Mcnday night of next week 






hold their annual Christmas dances 
next Saturday. 

Five Susquehanna men are members 
of this nine-piece band They are, in 
addition to Mr. Nicodemus, leader and 
organizer and player of traps and 
drum: : David Oraybill. '31. cornet; 
John Ambicki, '31, cornet; Arthur Gel- 
nett. '30, banjoist; Sherman Good, '30, 
pianist. 

One hundred college presidents and 
hundreds of other educators were pres- 
ent November 19 when Robert M. Hut- 
chins, 30, youngest college president 
in the world, was inaugurated as the 
offlcUUhead^fthtJJniversitvofC^ 



The lecture will be given in the lec- 
: hi t- room of Steele Science Hall, be- 
ginning at eight o'clock. 

In a statement to a Susquehanna re- 
porter this morning, Dr. Manhart said 
thai he will not confine his lecture en- 
tirely to the conference which he at- 
tended, but will speak chiefly on four 
Buropaan capitals he visited: Copen- 
hagen. Stockholm, Berlin and London. 

He will speak on several universities, 
cathedrals and castles which he visit- 
ed, including Oxford where he spent 
some time in study. 

The stereopticon views will be shown 
In connection with the lecture. Every- 

- 



The case of Grace F. Lauer. Plain - 

I tiff, versus Clifford Kiracofe, Defen- 

j dant, being Case Number 1 of Decem- 

| ber Term, 1929, is to be tried before the 

j Honorable Judge George A. Paralis on 

Thursday evening of this week. Court 

will be called to order promptly at 7 

o'clock. 

Miss Lauer, a heart-broken student 
at Susquehanna, has instituted legal 
proceedings against Clifford Kiracofe, 
the "Shiek" of the same institution, 
for damages in the amount of $50,000 
for breach of promise of marriage. 

Thus thrilling romance is to be heard 
and reviewed at the "trial" to take 
place in Seibert Hall Chapel, Thurs- 
1 day evening. Any young lady or young 
I man contemplating marriage can well 
benefit from the experiences of this 
unfortunate couple. 

The plaintiff, Miss Lauer. has re- 
tained as her legal advisers Attorneys 
John A. Schiavo and Anthony J. Lupas, 
and the Defendant. Clifford Kiracofe, 
is represented by Attorneys Albert L. 
Anselmi and Daniel H. Kwasnoski. 

The prosecution and defense counsel 
have worked up a very complete "Mock 
Trial." which is expected to meet with 
much success. 

The cast of characters comprising 
this Court Case, has been rehearsing 
for the past three weeks. Everything 
is in readiness for a successful "Mock 
Trial." 

Tickets for this "Mock Trial" are on 
sale at the following places. Rea and 
Derick's Drug Store. Reichley's Con- 
fectionery Store, and "Ye College Inn." 

, s 

FACULTY NOTES 
Prof. Grossman Addresses Rotary 
Prof. Luther D. Qronman, director 
of athletics, addressed the Rotary Club 
of Selinsgn.ve recently. His subject 
was "Keeping Fit." He i tp cia'Jy c'i - 
cussed the importance of physical fit- 
ness and cited experiences of the World 
War to emphasize his talk 

Prof. Grossman also attended the 
meeting of the Executive Committee of 
the Middle Atlantic States Collegiate 
Athletic Conference at Philadelphia 
ast Monday. The director of Susque- 
hanna sports is a member of that com- 
mittee The meeting was held to make 
final arrangements for the annual 
meeting of the conference to be held in 
Philadelphia on December 21. 



Dallas C. Baer, B.D., graduate of 
Susquehanna in the class of 1920, and 
Seminary in 1923, was recently elected 
to the pastorate of Trinity Lutheran 
Church, Selinsgrove. 

He will succeed Dr. Jacob Diehl who 
is President of Carthage College. Car- 
nage, Illinois. 

Rev. Baer. who is at present pastor 
of Bethany Lutheran Church in Phila- 
delphia, has had a very interesting 
career. 

Worked Way Thru College 
Being the oldest of seven children, 
he found it impossible to leave home 
for college until he reached his ma- 
jority in 1916. Induced by Dr. Levi 
Ycung, deceased, former President of 
the Board of Directors, that 'it was 
financially possible for him to enter 
college, he enrolled in the preparatory 
department of Susquehanna in the 
spring of 1916 with less money than 
the term's tuition. 

He did many sundry things to sup- 
port himself while in school. He served 
in the college refectory as waiter for 
three years. During his vacations, he 
sold books, raincoats and hosiery. He 
accepted other odd jobs as opportuni- 
ties presented themselves. 

Was Very Efficient 
That he received early training in 
business efficiency and economy which 
later proved of inestimable value to 
him is evidenced by the work which he 
accomplished in extra-curricular ac- 
tivities while in college. 

As Business Manager of the Lan- 
thorn he cleared $500 above all ex- 
penses of publication. In u similar ca- 
pacity of the SUSQUEHANNA, he paid 
off an accrued debt of over $100, en- 
larged the paper, provided a better 
grade of stock, and accumulated a bal- 
ance of approximately $500. 

Serving as Business Manager of the 
Men's Glee Club three successive years, 
he put that organization on a firm fi- 
nancial basis and saved several hun- 
dred dollars each year. From these sav- 
ings a fund was established for the 
purchase of a large clock for the Uni- 
versity at seme future date. 
Won Many Prues 
Rev. Baer won the Gold Medal in 
oratory in his Junior year in collee. He 
divided the Greek prize with a class- 
mate; also the Sociology prize. He held 
second place in mathematics and was 
the only one in his class in theology 
who graduated with a Bachelor of Di- 
vinity degree. 

Participated in Chautauqua Work 
Summer vacations were spent upon 
Chautauqua circuits. For one season he 
was employed by Redpath Chautau- 
quas of Columbus, Ohio as advance 
man traveling throut the eastern and 
mid-western states. The following 
three years were spent in the employ 
of Community Chautauquas, Inc.. of 
New Haven, Conn., as Superintendent 
and platform manager. 

Has Met with Success as Pastor 

He served m pastor of Trinity Lu- 

i iheran Church. Hughesville. Pa., for 

I four years. During which time one 

hundred and eleven persons were add- 

< Concluded on Page 3) 



Twenty -Five Men Report for Practice; 

Only Two Letter Men Left from 

Last Year's Squad 



MO STEINMAN AND SKIP GLENN 
WILL ALTERNATE AS PILOTS 



Alumni Gather Strong Team of For- 
mer Cage Stars; Bolig and Auten 
Included in the List 



Basketball will make its seasonal 
bow Friday night of this week in the 
Alumni Gym, when the Orange and 
Maroon quintet engages with the 
Alumni in the starting scrap. 

This game is a traditional one in the 
regular cage schedule of Susquehanna. 
Every one of these annual tilts thus far 
have been replete with thrills and no 
end of comedy. This year's fray prom- 
ises to outclass all former games in 
this respect. 

The Alumni will again put a strong 
team on the floor this year. It will in- 
clude such stars as "Pete" Bolig, Sel- 
insgrove Hi coach, Johnny Auten, Sun- 
bury Hi, and many other former Sus- 
quehanna court performers. 

Twenty-five Answer Call 

Actual practice was begun immedi- 
ately after the Thanksgiving recess. A 
squad of twenty-five aspirants report- 
ed to Coaches Ullery and Henzes at 
that time. 

Among these men were a trio of vet- 
erans left over from last year's team, 
two cf them lettermen. Glenn and 
Rummel. both forwards, and Steinman, 
a guard, comprise this group. It is 
probable that the 1930 varsity will be 
built around these three men. 

Finding a center capable of filling 
the rather largelj proportioned shoes 
if long Tom Dixon is Ullery's main 
problem, and if it is solved, the main 
barrier will be passed. 

To fill this post, Shaffer, a product 
of S. Williamsport is well liked, but 
Gerhart, Palmer and Driebelbis will 
give him a hard battle. 

Several recruits from last year's 
Jay Vees are making strong bids for 
positions en the first-string squad. 
They are Rano. Coldren, Varner, 
Scharfe and Kozak. Helm. Knouse and 
Ramik. upperclassmen. are also likely 
candidates for berths on the varsity. 



Several Frosh Show Promise 

Among the first-year men seeking 
jobs there are several prospects. Mat- 
lack, of Altoona Hi. and Rupp. of Lew- 
istown Hi. come with enviable sec- 
ondary school records. Both of these 
men are forward*, McGeehan, of West 
Hazleton; Carl, of Mt. Carmel; Worth - 
ington. of Yonkers. N. Y.; and Petry, 
of Salisbury, are also showing up fine. 

Johnny Wall and Joe Winters of last 
year's squad have failed to report thus 
far but are expected to join the team 
early this week. 

The team this year will be captain- 
ed by Mo Steinman and Skip Glenn. 
both members of the Sophomore class. 
They will alternate the leadership in 
every other game, 

S 



SKATING RINK AND OUTDOOR 
TRACK ADDED TO EQUIPMENT 



Miss Hade Addresses Girls Hi-Y Club 

Miss Naomi Hade, dean of women 
and instructor in English, addressed 
the Girls Hi-Y Club of Selmsurove 
High School last Tuesday evening on 
Hie subject of "Books." She gave the 
history of early bo ks and told about 
several of the first novels. 

CONDOLENCE 

THE SUSGUEHANNA wishes to join 
the faculty and students in expressing 
their sympathy to George Moser. '31. in 
his recent bereavement. 

S 



Skating enthusiasts of Susquehanna 
University were given the opportunity 
to indulge in this sport on the home 
field during the cold wave which 
swept the country durum the Thanks- 
giving recess 

The tennis courts near the grand 
stand on University Field were flooded 
so as to provide a nnk ot smooth ice 
for skaters Many student* took ad- 
vantage of the brief cold spell U 
dulge in this sport. The rink has the 
advantage over the Electric Light Dam 
Dam or Rolliim Green Lake favorite 

skating spots, because the water is not 
quite so deep 
Workman are at present laying a 

board outdoor track near the Gymnas- 
ium for use during the winter. The 

i track Ls about an eighth of a mile long. 

•This innovation will permit track men 
to do winter training. Any student de- 
siring outdoor exercises mav take ad- 
vantage of the track, too, 



NEW Kl IKS IN BASKETBALL 

Several new rules which will change 
the c nn game to tome extent during 
the present season were recently adopt- 
ed by tin Rules Committee of Basket- 
ball. 

Technical fouls on the jump ball, 
such as tapping the ball on the way up 
or leaving the circle, have been chang- 
ed to violations and the ball is to 
be placed in the hands of the opposing 
team out of bounds at the spot nearest 
the point where the violation was 
committed. 

In addition to this important change, 
when a player ha.s been fouled m the 
act ot ihOOting, the ball la u> go to 
t« alter the second free throw provid- 
ed the field goal was made, but if the 
field goal was missed, the ball is in 
play it the second and last free ihrov, 
is mi 

The duties of the umpire have been 
enlarged SO as to tend to make a "dou- 
ble-referee" system. Moreover, on a 
Jump ball a! center or elsewhere, the 
jumpers are forbidden to touch the ball 
after it ha.s been tapped until it has 
touched the floor or one of the othei 
eight players, except that the him] 
may tap the ball more than once in at- 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



* * * * * 



Published Weekly during the College Year except Thanksgiving Week, Christ- 
mas, New Year and Easter Week. 

Subscription $1.50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger. '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Echoes from 
Hassinger 



* * * * 



I AMUSEMENTS 

* * :■/ * * * * A ill * * rfc * $ * * * 



■■•.-;.'****» 



s)< * + iff % %t 



By A. Coustics 

********* 



* 
* * * 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States 



THE STAFF 

Editor- inChief Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

News Editor Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep '30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas '30 Anna Cleaver '30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 

Betty Wardrop '32 Andy Kozak '32 John Kindsvatter '32 

Fred Norton '32 

Bruce Worthington. '33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Edna Tressler. '30, Conservatory of Music 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz '30 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck '31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1929 



({K.MS FOR THOVGHT 
(Wise Sayings of Men, both Past and Present) 
Of itll <la\s. that one is most wasted <>n which one has not 
laughed. — Chamfort, 

Present day athletic* are not the creation of college facul- 
ties but of the public. — President Ruthven, Michigan University 

Our incomes are tike our shoes: If, too small, they pinch: if 
too large, we stumble. — Cotton, 

g _ 



ADDITIONS TO NEWSPAPEK 

Several new departments have been added to this paper this 
week in a sincere attempt to give more life to the paper and to 
make the publication of more interest to every reader. 

"Echoes from Hassinger," a weekly review of happenings in 
that famous hall, both serious and ludicrous events, will appear 
under that head. For a number of reasons the identity of the 
writers — there are two of them — must remain unknown. They 
will be known to you only as "A. Coustics." Don't spoil the fun 
by turning into a Sherlock Holmes and Watson. 

Another column which should prove of interest is the one 
headed "Collegiate Comment." In this department we will aim 
to give you a iligesl of importanl events on other campuses, The 
column -will also appear weekly. 

The third column to appear in this issue is called "High 
Lights of World News." In this department we will attempt to 
give an accurate digest of outstanding world events for the busy 
college students who may not have time to read the daily papers, 
(This does not mean that other readers da re not indulge in this 
department, i 

Constructive criticism on these three innovations will be 
welcomed l>\ i he staff, especially the Editors. A few more are 
being arranged for you and will l>e published just as soon as time 
and space will permit. 



General inspection of the rooms of 
Hassinger Hall was made by Dean 
Dunkelberger and Mr. Oberdorf im- 
mediately following the Thanksgiving 
vacation. 

The general consensus of opinion 
among the men of Hassinger is that 
everything was found to be in satis- 
factory order. The boys are taking 
great pride in their newly-remodeled 

dormitory. 

* $ * 

The Christmas shopping rush is 
causing Merchant Crossman to be a 
very busy man. It is rumored that he 
is contemplating engaging several 
clerks to meet the emergency. 

if if * 

A budding author of Hassinger is 
lumored to be considering the pub- 
lishing of a new book on the "Ele- 
ments of Cosmic Law." Also on "Life 

as T Have Found It." 

* • • 

When bigger and better moustaches 
are raised. Shearer will raise them. — 

Adv. 

t * * 

The Hassinger sleeping record was 
broken recently when Joe Zak slept 
twenty-three hours, four minutes, and 
fifty-nine seconds consecutively with- 
out the use of narcotics or anaesthet- 
ics. He was timed by Crossman, who 
secured a timing instrument from the 
Bureau of Standards, Washington. 
D. C. 

Hassinger is a paradise for hunters 
this year. Wolf and Pheasant may be 

found there. 

* * * 

Wilson is watching the construction 
of the outdoor track with great inter- 
est. He is advised by certain athletes 
that it is possible for him to reduce 
his 
of at least ten pounds per day. 



The outstanding event of the pro- 
gram this week is the "Mock Trial" 
to be given by the Sadler Pre-Le;jal 
Club on Thursday night of this week, 
beginning at 7 o'clock. Admission will 
te twenty-five cents. 

Basketball will have its debut here 
for this season Friday night when the 
annual Alumni- Varsity game will be 
held in the Alumni Gym. 

Fraternities are now making ar- 
rangements for their annual Christmas 
Dances, to be held Saturday night, 
December 14. 

Dr. Manhart will give his lecture on 
his European travels Monday night, 
in Steele Science Hall. 



"The Trial of Mary Dugan," the in- 
tensely dramatic version of the play 
of the same name, starring Norma 
Shearer, will be shown for the last 
time in the Stanley tonight. 

Dolores Costello is the star of the 
"Glad Rag Doll," an all-talking com- 
edy-drama to be shown Wednesday 
night only. 

"The Cocoanuts," a film version of 
the stage production, starring the Four 
Marx Brothers themselves, will be 
shown Thursday and Friday night. 
Oscar Shaw and Mary Eaton, of musi- 
cal comedy fame, also star in the up- 
roariously funny production. 

Saturday's feature will be "Two 
Weeks," starring the excellent ac- 
tress, Dorothy Mackaill and her star- 
ring partner, Jack Mulhall. 

"The Dance of Life" will be the fea- 
ture of the beginning of next week. 
S ■ 



I High Spots in World 

\ News 



Congress convened after a brief va- 
excessive avoirdupois at the rate: cat ion at the close of the special ses- 
sion. Roll call was held on Monday of 
last week and organization work be- 
The Freshmen appeared in a state I gun 

Outstanding in the work accomplish- 
ed at the opening was the rejection of 



but in some mysterious manner the 
uprising of the fledlings was entirely- 
quelled by lunch time. The change 



! Collegiate Comment ! 

* • 

University of Minnesota 

Salesmen for the University of Min- 
nesota year book had a brilliant idea, 
but college authorities did not agree. 
Consequently, the offer of a chorus 
girl's kiss with every copy of the year 
book purchased did not materialize. 
I Managers of the drive had engaged 12 
I girls appearing at a local theatre who 
j were to have appeared on the campus 
I for an hour and fifteen minutes. Be- 
| fore the plan went into effect, how- 
ever, Dean C. E. Nicholson heard about 
it and said: "We can't have this." The 
subscription campaign returned to its 
normal ways. 

Shurtieff College 

When co-eds at Shurtieff College, 
Alton, Illinois, recently declared that 
the men did not dress neatly nor with 
good taste, the men adopted the slo- 
gan, "We Pay for Shows— That's Why 
We Wear These Clothes," and pro- 
ceeded to dress in overalls. 
Oberlin College 

The "grading" system, condemned 
by students who "came to college to 
get an education, not marks," is back 
in full force at Oberlin College. The 
faculty has granted the request of 
the undergraduates to do away with 
the system, inaugurated last spring at 
their asking, whereby students were 
simply informed that they were pass- 
ing or failing. 

Discontent grew steadily under the 
new system. The Oberlin Review de- 
clared that as long as grades were kept 
by the faculty, the students had bet- 
ter know what those grades were. The 
best way, the college paper said, was 
to have no grades at all. The college 
was not willing to go that far, how- 
ever. 

S 

— Buy Christmas Seals. 



Fisher's Jewelry Store 

DIAMOND'S, WATCHES, SILVER 
AND GLASS WARE 



I 



Fine Rvpaititig a Specialty { 

344 Market St. Sunbury, Pa ♦ 



Senator-elect Vare of Pennsylvania. 

who has been waging a war for three 
was marked by the reappearance of: u> ■..• >-u i 

., . ,. •- _, F v , "years to secure his position in the 

the somber ties and neophyte head- . V, „ m U __«**! , _, »m 

H ' Senate. The committee refused Wil- 

liam Wilson. Vare's opponent in the 
election, in his plea that Vare did not 
The Radio ha.s been silent for a few obtain a legal majority. The Senate. 
days, while undergoing repairs. Its however, voted that Vare spent too 
music has been missed, but Bruno, Ru- much money t0 secU re his seat. The 
dowsky. and Devers have done their 'amount was almost a half million, 
best to serve as substitutes. This is a I The r P has been much speculation of 
splendid spirit, but the entertainment late M l0 w ho the probable successor 
they produce would no doubt sound | wi u b e. Leaders think that Governor 



" 



{"DECORATIONS FOR YOUR 
PARTY" 

JFryling Stationery Co. 



411 Market Street 
Sunbury. Pa. 



better under water. 



none 



is our mot to 



Wi 



von 



del 
S 



i) us reach oin- iiim : 



Leolin Hayes states that he finds his 
'All improved Susquehanna, Of service tO all, controlled by 'practice teaching at Northumberland 

| becoming more pleasant as the days 
go by. We wonder why. 
• • • 

i Editor's Note— This is a new de- 
railment in this publication. It is 



Fisher will appoint Joseph R. Grundy. 
president of the Pennsylvania Manu- 
facturers Association. The appoint- 
ment will be announced in a few days, 



THE i'i;i:sii.MAN issri-; 

During the past lew years it has been the custom at Susque- 
hanna to have one issue <»! 'his publication written and edited ex- 
clusively h\ members of the Freshman class. An Editor was 
elected by his classmates and he in turn appointed Ids stall' of 
assistants. Only sufficient editorial supervision on the part of 
the Editor-in-< hief was made to insure a carefully written and 
well-balanced issue. 

The purpose of this issue was evidently twofold. First, it 



The Ambassador Bridge, the largest 
suspension bridge in the world, stretch- 
ing for two miles over the Detroit 
River between the United States and 
written by two young men in Hassinger i Canada, was dedicated Armistice Day. 



STUDENTS 

TRY 



Hall, whose names must remain un- 
known to the reader. It will appear 
here weekly. We trust that any report 



The bridge was constructed at a cost 
of $22,500,000 and is considered a mar- 
vel of modern engineering. In the 



"reverberated" in this "colyum" will be i dedication ceremonies the bridge was 



taken in the spirit in which it is writ- 
ten.) 



Credit 

Not long ago a man living in this 

Stimulate,! general interest in the publication itself on the part community saw an article in a mail- 

., ,. , | u ., , ,. , . ,11 order catalogue that he decided to buy. 

iss. Second, it bronchi to light probable ma- hrhii man possesses quite ■ stack 



symbolized as a monument to the 114 
years of peace between the two coun- 
tries and their spiritual unity in the 
future. 



of the Freshman el 



Commander Richard E. Byrd and 
his assistants recently completed a 
flight over the South Pole, a distance 



teria with which to bin < a stall for I he succeeding rear. shekels and anybody would be glad to 

. _ *J sen him and charge it. He wrote the : of 1600 mlles from Llttle America, 

may not be amiss to Ix'iilii work along that line at tills mail-order house this: "Send article, i seat of the South Pole expedition. The 



If good, will send check. 



journey was filled with many hazards. 



time. Freshmen are requested to survey their clan carefully to 

Aim, ... ,. ., i;i. I. . .,,,.i;,i.,i, c, , tiw . Lul ,, ,t . u*. ,. e /i.,;,. In due time h « received the follow- | Bernt Balchen served as pilot 
discover a llkch candidate for the position Of editor of theil' mg: -send check If good will send 

issue. Past experience in journalism in high schools should Im' j article." 
made a prerequisite, Mere popularity Of a prospective candi- 
date will not insure a good edited' and incidentally not a good 
issue. 

An election will probably be held before the beginning of 
the Christmas recess. The Freshman issue will no doubt be pub- 
lished toon after the return to studios at the close of the recess. 
The regular staff Of this paper will be in readiness to help the 
first-yea r students publish a banner issue. 



-S- 



\ow thai seveml Susquehanna Alumni have become air- 
minded and have made aviation the means by which to earn their 
bread and butter, the next thing our Alma Mater will have to do 
is to provide for a landing field and hangar for some of the 
home-coming Alumni when the Crusaders and the Indians once 
more enter into gridiron combat next year. 

— _ s — 



The next aspect of lobbying will be a federation of school 

kids urging longer vacations and higher marks. Marquette 
Tribune, 

8 



It takes all kinds of people to make up I world, including 
*!.-.«.,. u l./, « \ah it would snow so that the weather could jjcet nice 



1929 ALL-PENNSYLVANIA 
FOOTBALL TEAM 

Selected by Committee of Coaches 

First Team 

Left end Donchess. Pittsburgh 

Ltfl tackle Douds, W. & J. 

Left guard Montgomery, Pitt 

Centre Dreshar, Carnegie T. 

Right guard Magai. Perm 

Right tackle Miller, Lehigh 

Right end Riblett, Penn 

Quarterback . . .Davidowitz, Lehigh 
Left halfback , . . Uansa, Pittsburgh 
Right halfback ...Hinkle, Bucknell 
Fullback Parkinson, Pitt 

Second Team 

Left end Sherwood, Lafayette 

tif tackle Woerner, Bucknell 

Left guard Dimeola, Pitt 

Center Warren, Penn 

Right guard Ellor, Bucknell 

Right tackle Utz, Penn 

Right end . . Stonebraker, Bucknell 

Quarterback Masters, Perm 

Left halfback Rush, W. & J. 

Right halfback .Diedrich, Penn St. 
Fullback Woodfin, Lafayette 



Colonel Charles Lindbergh recently 
aided in the search for a former buddy 
in the mail service, who crashed 
somewhere between Bellefonte and 
Cleveland. Over a dozen planes were 
employed to search for Thomas Nel- 
son, employed in the mail service. 
The plane was found in a mangled 
condition in a ravine not far from a 
public highway. Nelson's body was 
found about two hundred feet from the 
plane. A partially-opened parachute 
showed that he made a last desperate 
attempt to save himself. It is not 
known what caused the accident. 
Lindbergh is reported to have flown 
oyer this section when he went to the 
section in which Nelson crashed. 

S 

Time Test 

Bill: "What makes you think ancient 
buildings arc of much better construct- 
ion than the modem homes?" 

Jim: "Well, for one thing they've 
la ted longer." 

According to Dialect 

Small Boy: "Granny, what's the dif- 
ference between a buffalo and a bi- 
son?" 

Granny: "A buffalo is an animal and 
n Wlcnn l<; \vh<>t von makes ver mid- 



. __ JCHLE Y'S | 

| LUNCH — SODAS — CANDY j 

JOHN H. KELLER j 

— Dealer In — 

Meats and Groceries | 

Both Phones — Selinsgrove ♦ 
I 



SNYDER COUNTY TRIEUNE 

JOB WORK A SPECIALTY 

Phone 68-W 







■STANLEY 

Talking Pictures 

Selinsgrove 




STRAND 



Sl'NBlRY 



ALL THIS WEEK 

Comes That Joyous Dramatic 
Spectacle 

"RIO RITA" 

with 

Bebe Daniels and 
John Boles 

AND ONE THOUSAND OTHERS 



MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

WILL ROGERS 

In "THEY MUST SEE PARIS" 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



AGE rHREte 



COLLEGE GIRLS MAKE 

THE BEST MOTHERS 



"Recently a dean of women has add- 
ed to my joy in this debate, by defin- 
ing indirectly her idea of a good 
mother.'' says Maude Parker in the 
January College Humor, opening her 
article on 'Collegiate Mothers," with 
a quotation from the dean's article: 
" 'The modern college girl is intelli- 
gent, cultured, capable and industrious, 
but she is not a great success as a 
home maker, wife and mother ... In- 
telligent young women resent the im- 
plication that they are only fit to cook 
the meals and wash the dishes.' Then 
there is a crack about the study of 
higher mathematics causing them dis- 
satisfaction with 'performing tasks 
which a high grade moron could do 
equally well.' 

Concisely expressed, the dean believes 
the test of a good mother lies in her 
happy willingness to wash dishes and 
cook! 

"And right there is where I take my 
joyful departure from the professor's 
theories. For to me the one and only 
test of a good mother is that she shall 
prepare her children physically, men- 
tally and psychologically for the fullest 
and happiest lives possible. On each 
one of these counts the college girl is 
more apt to succeed than her untrain- 
ed contemporary, other things being 
equal. 

"Surely no one can maintain that 
four additional years of education will 
warp a woman's fundamental and 
primitive love for her child. There- 
fore, all college training can do is to 
provide her with greater insight into 
how this material love can be intelli- 



gently translated. To assume that its 
highest expression lies in the personal 
sterilization of feeding bottles is a 
shocking belittlement of life-work. 
Motherhood is such a vast and unend- 
ing job that it calls for every bit of 
intelligence and training a woman can 
acquire in college and out. The quali- 
ties which education should develop — 
judgment, resourcefulness, regard for 
authoritative sources of information on 
any given subject iwith its corollary of 
scepticism about hearsay and super- 
stition), open-mindedness and the ca- 
pacity for logical thought — are the very 
qualities most needed in this difficult 
profession of maternity. For good mea- 
sure, one might add an enriched cul- 
tural background. 

"The practical application of these 
begins with the fact that as a rule col- 
lege girls marry at a later age than 
girls who do not go to college. On the 
theory of chances therefore, they will 
be less irresponsible and more compe- 
tent and poised when they do marry. 
Probably the first duty of a conscien- 
tious mother is to select the nearly 
perfect father, and one likes to think 
this can be done with fewer chances of 
failure by the mature woman. 

"The actual physical care of the child 
again requires professional guidance, 
and I should like to call attention to 
the fact that our national infant mor- 
tality rate has markedly decreased 
since women began to accept the wis- 
dom of experienced medical specialists, 
and discount the hearsay of an un- 
trained older generation. 1, 

S 

Her Choice 

He: "Would you like a small dia- 
mond or a large rhinestone?" 

She: "Yes. I'd love them, George." 



DALLAS BAER '20, 23, 

ELECTED PASTOR OF 

TRINITY LUTHERAN 



i Continued from Page 1) 
ed to the congregation, and the finan- 
cial condition of the church was in bet- 
ter shape than ever before in the his- 
tory of the church. Almost $45,000 were 
expended for all purposes. A comfort- 
able balance was left in the treasuries 
of all organizations when he left that 
church to accept another charge. 

For the past three years he has been 
pastor of Bethany Lutheran Church. 
Philadelphia, during which time both 
church and parsonage were thoroughly 
renovated, all benevolences paid in 
full, and 90 persons were received into 
church membership. 

He is married to Ruth M. Albert, 
daughter of Prof. C. H. Albert, for 
many years a teacher in Bloomsburg 
State Normal College. Bloomsburg. 

It is expected that he will begin his 
work in Selinsgrove sometime next 
mcnth. 



J. C. HAAS 

University Barber 

CUTS HAIR YOUR WAY 

30 South Market Street 



KESSINGER 

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JOS. L. MENTZ 

The Stationer 

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21 N. Third St. Sunbury, Pa. 



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Work Called for and Delivered 
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"REMEMBER YOUR COLLEGE 
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Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street Sunbury, Pa. 



Merchant Tailor 
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SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



• ***•********•**••• 



I ALUMNI NOTES . 

********** ********* 



West Liberty Has a Coach! 

Harry Sweeney, athletic director and 
coach at the West Liberty Teachers 
college, in West Virginia, brought his 
football season to a close with a record 
of seven victories and one defeat. 

Sweeney has established a remark- 
able record in Athletic* at West Lib- 
erty In his coaching of the Hilltop 
teams, within the last four years, he 
has not had a disastrous season in any 
sport and has not had more than 25 
men on any of his squads. 

In the four years that he has coach- 
ed at West Liberty, he has won thirty 
and lost six games. His basketball 
games have twice won the Conference 
title in four years and conference 
championships have been won in bas- 
ketball during that time. 

This coach first gained recognition 
in the Ohio Valley thru his work at 
Follonsbee High School. During three 
years of coaching there, his football 
team won twenty-five games and lost 
two. In '25, the team came thru with 
an undefeated season. In basketball, 
he captured the Tri-State baske ball 
championship in a tournament play at 
Bethany College. 

The West Liberty mentor was a four 
letter man in high school, prep school 
and at college. He captained even- 
sport in high school and college. Dur- 
ing the Colgate game in '22, he ran 103 
yards from a kick-off against Colgate. 

Success is creating a problem, as 
West Liberty is finding it difficult to 
schedule events with schools of similar 
rank. The eligibility question does not 
enter as the Hilltop school says: "If a 
player cannot carry his studies, he 
cannot carry the ball." Sweeney faces 
the problem of playing schools that are 
not in West Liberty's class or going 
without games. "It is characteristic of 
the Liberty mentor to go forward and 
his first step toward this line is the 
signing with Ohio U. for the opening 
game at Athens for the 1930 footbal 
season." 

Keep up the excellent record. Sus- 
quehanna is proud of you. 

In Business in Rumania 

Wilfred N. Keller, '16, is new a 
manufacturer of radios in Oradea, Ru- 
mania. He is employed by the Broad- 
casting Company, Limited 

Prior to this work, Mr. Keller was 
Physical Director of the Moline Y. M. 
C. A. in Illinois. In '21-'22 he was Phy- 
sical Adviser attached to the Ruman- 
ian Army. He did Near East Relief 
work in Russia. Armenia and Turkey 
from '22-'24. 

Mr. Keller is one of our men who 
carries the name of Susquehanna to 
Europe, showing that her influence is 
felt in other lands. 

Just Returned from Amsterdam 

Dr. Luther C. Peter, Professor of Op- 
tholmology at Temple University 
School of Medicine and Graduate 
School of Medicine of U. of P., has just 
returned from attending 'lie Twelfth 
International Congress oi Optholomo'.- 
ogy in Amsterdam. Dr. Peter presented 
a paper at this congress and took pari 
in the general proceeding I 
state Chairman of Intermediate Luth- 
er League HV.rk 

Rev Paul Kinports. 14. 17. is serving 
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church at 
Hershey, Pa. He was a speaker at the 
Allentown-Jrhnstown District Luther 
l ague Convention. Ii wa I here that 
li» WM appointed Stat-' Chairman ot 

diate work < I tiie Luther 
ie "I Pennsylvania, 

Director af Music at Oneida. Ky. 

Mi- Margaret (Benner) Burns, 13, 
i, now teaching piano and voi« 

Itute, Ky., o! which her 
husband. J A Burns is pr sldent. Mrs. 
li Id pot Itlons In Summer- 
land College 8. C; Lei C Uege, n. 
c Milli ; --lie State '• ial school. 

■ del School 
Art. Publication Society In Philadelphia 

Marriages 
AUCHMUTY-BRANEN 
. Helen Auchmuty, '29. and wii- 
Branen, a tuden il Penn Mi di- 

. a' School, were m 
Fr>n-'e on November :il-t ,< u o'clock 
M ..lid Mn Phll- 

I 
ROBEH IKON-WALKER 

Mis' Mary Rob 

■ p Waikn "21, i Johnstown 

Firs; 

■: the 

:. the 

monj 
v • 

: cl i In 

a i . given In the 

Attorney Walker i- 
well known profe r nally, having beet! 
in practice m Johnstown for teveral 

I dlnf their honey- 
moei '. New York and At- 

lanta City, hi Ing the principal ■) 

Tlrw.i tin ir return in sihnnt n U'Ppk ' 1. 




K, 

tuberculosis away 
from them 

BUY 
CHRISTMAS SEALS 



Tl 



TH1 NATIONAL, STATE . » / LOCAL 
HI I<( 1 LOSIS ASSOCIATIONS of the UNITED STATES 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1929 



D a n c e Programs 

of the More Artistic Kind 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



V 



POLAR WAVE ICE CREAM 

Sl/NB.URY MILK PR<)l)('<' r > ^UMJ'AXY 

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FRESH CUT FLOWERS and POTTED PLANTS for WEDDINGS, 

PARTIES and FUNERALS— FLOWERS for ALL OCCASIONS 

Visitors Always Welcome at Our Greer. Houses 

GEO. B. RINE 

FLORIST 



►*s> 



BELL 32-Y 



SELINSGROVE 



><J> 




KAUFFMANS 

Candy and Soda 



• ************»*»**« 

i LITERARY NOTES S 

By Intercollegiate Press * 

* • 

******************* 



By HOWARD CRAWFORD 

"The law of true art," said Lafcadio 
Hearn, "even according to the Greek 
idea, is to seek beauty wherever it is to 
be found, and separate it from the 
dross of life as gold from ore." 

It is not at all difficult to under- 
stand why E. P. Dutton has selected 
J. L. Campbell's "The Miracle of 
Peille" for its November prize book. 
The author has discovered a beauty in 
crude superstition, separated it, refined 
it and given us a golden story of I 
perfect life. Were the Christ to return 
to earth as many tell us He will, in 
person to single out those who have 
followed his precepts, we suspect He 
would find very few of us came so 
near— especially among his professed 
followers— to reacting his life in earth 
a* the shunned, uncouth little Gypsie 
orphan, Therese Ursule Corbeille. 

The reviewer, it must be admitted, is 
I rather hard-boiled agnostic, temper- 
ed with a bit of pragmatism, who 
found it impossible to read this book 
without searching diligently for some 
scientific explanation for the miracles 
of Peille; and thereby, of course, the 
k viewer failed temporarily to catch 
the spirit of the author. 

What we would impress on prospect- 
ive readers of the story is the spiritual 
necessity — and we use the word spirit- 
ual necessity in its most scientific, 
psychological connotation— the spirit- 
ual necessity of forgetting for an hour 
r so OUT unsentimental logic, and live 
1 r a tunc in the world of the super- 
natural, knowing as we will, and 
should, that it does not exist. Read the 
book, believe every word of it while \ou 
arc reading; and when you finish you 

j will occupy .1 new home at West- 
inont. 

Susquehanna extends Congratula- 
tions and best Wishes 

Makea Sato PUgkl 
Oeorge 'Jack' Spaide. '2!). who is a 

student ol the Kelley Plying Field at 
Bar Ant; nlo, Ti xas, made his first solo 
rilghi last week, according I i word re- 
ceived here Re entered this school only 

a I October Thai he has been able to 

go through his tests successfully since 
thai tune is an indication that his am- 
I ltion to become an aviator will be 
ealizi 



will have done no harm. There will be 
no sour taste in your mouth. You may 
even look a bit beyond the surface the 
next time you meet a fellow being. 

This is no apology for having read 
"The Miracle of Peille," but rather an 
apology for having failed at the outset 
to catch the spirit of the thing. Of the 
art embodied therein there never was 
a doubt. Read for yourself: 

"The sun was setting. It cast a rosy 
glow across the valley. Already the vil- 
lage had resumed its usual life— chick- 
ens clucking, goats bleating, and a grey 
donkey descending a rocky path, its 
back laden with green boughs. Mas- 
sino struck sphays of apple, plumb and 
cherry in the mound of soft earth to 
mark her grave . . . and people now 
say that all that night there was music 
in the air. A strange sweet music, 
sometimes like a harp, sometimes like 
a distant singing." 

There is description, brief, but sure. 
There is beauty, swiftly moving among 
the ugliness which one glimpses here 
and there, and when you finish the 
hour of reading from cover to cover, 
you have lived many years. 
— I-P— 

As a college student one of the most 
interesting bits of research made by 
yrur reviewer was a check up on the 
accuracy of history as represented in 
newspaper files — accomplished by 
reading of events which later were in- 
vestigated by Congress — and the result- 
ing findings left the researcher con- 
vinced that there is no harm whatev- 
er done in what has come to be known 
as "debunking " Even if the debunking 
process requires interpreting events cf 
the past in the light of present day 
human nature, the process is desirable 

Professor Claude H. VanTyne. of thr 
University of Michigan, is doing f 
pretty, and commendable piece of de- 
bunking in his history of the War of 
Independence, the second volume of 
which is just of the press of Houghton 
Mifflin Company. He is making no at- 
tempt to spoil our past for us. but 
rather is giving us a better understand- 
ing of the events which led up to and 
to k place during the Revolution. He 
is making angels less angelic and move 
human, and devils less devilish and al- 
so more human Naturally, most Am- 
erican benefit less in the exchange 
than the English against whom they 
were rebelling. That is inevitable. The 
new history is a notable addition to 
and correction of the record of our 
national birth. 



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— -v 



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SI'S OI! EH ANN A UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 

A. B. and B. S. Decrees Strong courses In Liberal Arts. Science. Edu- 

catlon and Business Administration. 
i:\tensioii Courses at Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township aiid Mt. Carmel. 
Courses of instruction for teachers on the University campus on 
Frida . evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four-Year Public School Music Course with decree in Bachelor of 
Music la attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music. 
Susquehanna stands for a well-rounded education, clean sports, re- 
creation for every student, earnestness in study, and above all, Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For information write 
GEORGE F. DUNKELBERGER. Ph.D., Dean. 



LYTLI'S PHARMAti 

soda Fountain THE REXALL STORE Ice umn. 

K.iiirinshKl ThroOffhout, Mod e m aafl Appealing In ttvery riT«in 

Talcums. Face Powders and Toilet Articles oi ah %*«•* 
UNITED CIGAR STORE AGENCY SELUMSUKuv*. 



Re a & Derick's 



Next to the Movies 

KODAKS - TOILET GOODS 

Sunbury — Northumberland — Shamokln 



- SODAS 

— 8elinsgrove 



MERRY CHRISTMAS-- HAPPY NE^ 5 

The Susquehanna 






frart 




piifte 



Volume XXXVI 



8ELIN8GROVE, PA., TUESDAY DECEMBER 17. 1929 



Number 11 



I 



Frosh Give Reasons | Greek Letter Clubs 
for Coming to S. U. | Stage Xmas Dances 



Manager of Football 

1929 SEASON 



Quarterly Bulletin Published This Week | Fraternities Hold Christmas Parties 
Will Contain List of Reasons for in Pre -Holiday Celebration; 

Matriculating at S. U. No Migration 



A quarterly bulletin which will be 
published by the Administration this 
week to show the progress made dur- 
ing the past and plans for the future, 
will also contain a list of reasons why 
the present Freshman class came to 
Susquehanna. 

The material in this department was 
secured by means of a questionaire 
given the members of the Freshman 
Orientation class given last autumn by 
Dr. Smith. 

The reasons which they gave furnish 
an interesting commentary on reasons 
why students pick a given college. This 
is a point which many educators of to- 
day are trying to answer satisfactorily. 

Following is a list of the reasons giv- 
en by the first-wear men and women, 
in the order of frequency in which they 
were cited: 

1. Courses desired were offered. 

2. Influence of friends and Alumni. 

3. Proximity to their homes. 

4. Normal and spiritual atmosphere; 
also friendly spirit of school. 

5. High rating of institution. 
Desire for a small college. 
Comparative low cost. 
Desire for a Lutheran institution. 
Beauty of campus. 

S 

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

WILL MEET IN N. Y. 



6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 



A meeting of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association will be held in the 
Hotel Astor, New York City, Decem- 
ber 31. President Smith expects to at- 
tend this meeting. 

At this meeting matters of consider- 
able interest will be taken up. Definite 
action will be taken upon the Carnegie 
Foundation survey which recently 
brought out problems in the field of 
collegiate athletics. 

The question which is uppermost in 
the minds of educators is this problem: 
"What can be done to correct the 
abuses and excesses in athletics estab- 
lished by this survey?" 

The general council of this organiza- 
tion will give this matter serious con- 
sideration. 

Dr. Kennedy, of Princeton Univer- 
sity, who spoke at the Susquehanna 
football banquet last year, is active in 
the affairs of this association. 

S 

INTER-CLASS TROPHIES 

PRESENTED TO CAPTAINS 



Fraternities held their annual Christ- 
mas dances last Saturday night. Some 
of the affairs were formal ones, others 
informal. 

These dances were unique in the an- 
nals of fraternity parties in that noi 
migration from house to house was 
permitted. This was done by action 
of the Inter-Fraternity Council as a 
matter of experiment. A subsequent 
meeting of this body will determine 
whether or not this will be continued. 
Santa at Epsilon Sigma 
Epsilon Sigma House was the scene 
of gay festivities attended by about 
thirty couples. The house was very 
attractively decorated for the Christ- 
mas event. Nick's Campus Owls fur- 
nished the right sort of music for the 
occasion. 

Just before intermission, Santa Claus 
himself dropped out of nowhere into 
the presence of the dancers, much to 
the surprise of the guests. Novelties in 
keeping with the disposition or whim 
of each individual were handed out 
by Santa. 

Bond and Key Dance Formal 
Bond and Key held one of its most 
beautiful and successful formal dances 
as its part of the general pre-holiday 
celebration. 

The boys in their tuxedos and the 
girls in their evening gowns presented 
a delightful scene of merriment and 
enjoyment frcm eight to twelve. 

Doc Getkin's Nighthawks furnished 
the music for this affair. They were 
up to par and pleased the many sway- 
ing couples who attended. 

Fifteen couples strutted their terp- 
sichorean stuff while Fritz's Orches- 
tra meted out the proper melody at 
Phi Lambda Theta House. This dance 
was an informal one. 

The Colonial Club Orchestra, a new- 
comer to our campus, presented a fine 
program for the Phi Mu Delta dance, 
also a formal affair. 




Dr. Kern Selects I S. U. Courtmen Win 
1930 Debate Teams Fast Opening Fray 

With Alumni, 26-22 



Susquehanna's Representatives in For- 

ensics. Both Men and Women Are 

Announced bv Coach 



HOWARD J. WERTZ '30 

Wertz, more commonly known as 
"Beby," has just rounded out a very 
successful year as manager of varsity 
football. He proved himself a very ef- 
ficient worker thruout the entire sea- 
son. 

Ready to lend a hand to both coach 
and player, he was of inestimable worth 
to the team. His frank, open nature 
has made for him innumerable friends. 
If he carries his enthusiasm into his 
chosen vocation (teaching*, he will cer- 
tainly make a success. 

"Beby" is a member of Epsilon Sig- 
ma Fraternity, of which he is the pres- 
ident. 



-S- 



Boxing is Added to 
Inter-Class Sports 



Coach Ullery Will P.rect New Snort 
for Men; Seven Weights Represent- 
ed on Each Class Team 



Trophies for the various inter-class 
fall sports were presented by Profes- 
sor L. D. Grossman to the captains of 
the championship teams last week at 
Chapel. 

The Juniors captured the most 
prizes, winning in cross country, girls' 
soccer and girls' hockey. 

The Sophomore class took the foot- 
ball and boys' soccer championships. 
The Seniors won the cup for inter- 
class tennis. 

The following class captains were 
presented with trophies: 

Miriam Keim. soccer; Beatrice De- 
Wire, hockey; Andy Kozak. football; 
W. Neiswenter, soccer, and Paul Bish- 
op, who received the tennis trophy in 
the absence of Clifford Kiracofe. cap- 
tain of the Senior team. 

Having completed the fall sports, 
the classes will now point toward the 
class trophies in basketball and track. 



Spanish Club Holds 
Christmas Meeting 



Argentine Tango and Christmas Carols 

in Spanish Feature Delightful 

Meeting of New Organization 



WILL ATTEND ATH- 
LETIC CONFERENCE 



Prof. L. D. Grossman, head of the 
athletic department, will attend the 
annual conference ot the Middle At- 
lantic Collegiate Athletic Association in 
Philadelphia this week-end 

He will be one of the speakers at this 
meeting which serve- M ft clearing 
house for athletic matters pertaining 
to colleges. Grossman is also ft member 
of the Executive Committee of that as- 
sociation. 

Income tax reductions totaling $160,- 
000,000 will receive the attention of 
Congress now that it has met again 
after a brief recess at the close of the 
special session. 



A special Christmas meeting of the 
Spanish Club was held last Thursday 
evening in the social room of Seibert 
Hall. The room was attractively dec- 
orated in Christmas greens and a bril- 
liantly-lighted Christmas tree. 

The program was opened by the 
Argentine Tango, featuring Senorita 
Maria Hutchings and Senorita Lena 
Baird. who wore the national costumes 
of the country. 

Spanish songs were sung by the 
members. Senor Rummel. president of 
the club, gave a talk on Christmas in 
Spain, which differs from our Christ- 
inas in that the Spanish do not have 
a Santa Claus. Instead they have the 
three kings, representing the three wise 
men. who bring them gifts on the 6th 
of January. 

After singing Christmas carols in 
Spanish, three Wise Men made their 
appearance, bringing gifts and sweets 
to every one present. 

The meeting was adjourned after a 
short social hour, each member say- 
ing "Adios — hasta la proxima." 

S 

CHRISTMAS DINNER WEDNESDAY 

The annual University Christmas 
Dinner will be given in Horton Dining 
Hall Wednesday evening of this week. 

This affair is held from year to year 
immediately before the beginning of 
the holiday recess It is always a hap- 
py and delightful occasion and is eag- 
erly looked forward to by the student 
body. 

Gifts are customarily exchanged at 
this dinner. 

-S- 



Immediately after the Christmas va- 
cation, a new sport will make its ap- 
pearance at Susquehanna. Boxing as 
an inter-class sport will be inaugurated 
fcr the first time on this campus. This 
new sport will be under the direction 
of Coach Ullery. 

The coach intends to choose a team 
from each class comprising seven dif- 
ferent weights. In selecting these 
teams, different weights will be match- 
ed in the same class and the best man 
will be selected from each class to rep- 
resent his class on its team. 

After each class has selected its 
team, semi-finals will be held with a 
man frcm each class in the same 
weight. Later, a final match will be 
held to decide the champions. 

Basement of Gym Remodeled 

The basement floor of the gymnas- 
ium has been remodeled to some extent 
so as to provide plenty of room for the 
practice of this sport without conflict- 
ing with the work on the Gym floor. 
Equipment has already been secured 
in the form of gloves, sand bags, 
punching bags, and many other in- 
instruments used in this popular sport. 
Much enthusiasm has already been 
manifested in this new phase of sports 
j at Susquehanna. This will be an ex- 
j cellent opportunity for the manv fnm- 
ou.s pugilists cf Hassinger Hall to dis- 
play their prowess. This ought to prove 
very interesting. 

S 

An appeal was recently made by 
China to the League of Nations and 
signatory nations of the Kellog peace 
pact to halt and punish the Russian 
invaders who have penetrated 100 
miles across her borders 



Personnel of this year's men's and 
women's debating teams was announc- 
ed by Dr. H. A. F. Kern, coach of de- 
bating, at the meeting of Susquehan- 
na's forensic association, last Friday. 

The affirmative group includes Wal- 
ter Fculkrod. Jr.. of Philadelphia, cap- 
tain; Stewart Schrack. '30. of Boone- 
ville; Lawrence Fisher, '32. of Selins- 
grove. and Wilson Seiber. '32. of Mif- 
flintown. alternate. 

The negative group comprises Byron 
Hafer. '32. of Milton, captain; Albert 
L. Anselmi, '30; Anthony Lupas. '30. of 
Plains, and John Schiavo. '30. ot Hazle- 
ton, alternate. 

This year's team is again very strong. 
Walter Foulkrod and Byron Hafer were 
members of last year's crack teams. 
Foulkrod. a representative of last year's 
affirmative squad, is a valuable man. 
an effective speaker and budding ora- 
tor, and should prove a backbone for 
the affirmative team. 

Byron Hafer. who last year as a 
Freshman stepped into the ranks of a 
debater at mid-season and made a fine 
showing, should be a capable leader of 
the negative team. 

Strong Teams on Schedule 
The schedule this year includes some 
of the very best opponents in the 
United States: University of South- 
western California. Buffalo University. 
Colorado College and Temple Univer- 
sity. 

Some of these are still tentative, 
however. The debates with these teams 
will rest on the Disarmament Problem. 
The question for the intercollegiate 
debates with members of the Central 
Pennsylvania Collegiate Debating As- 
sociation this year is Resolved, That 
the United States should withdraw 
from the Kellcg Peace Pact. Such a 
timely and important question is of in- 
terest to all thinking people of today. 
(Concluded on page 3 



Orange and Maroon Basketeers Barely 

Defeat Old Grads in Traditional 

Game in .Alumni Gym 



ROGAWICZ, FORMER ATHLETIC 

ACE. STARS FOR ALUMNI 



Coaches Ullery and Hemes Place Three 

Separate Teams on Floor; Much 

Material Available 



Treatise Published 
by Two Professors 



Dr. Dunkelberger and Prof. Romberger 

Co-Authors of Article Based on 

Original Experimentation 



Word was received here last week 
from the Clark University Press of 
Worcester, Massachusettes, publishers 
of the Journal of General Psychology 
and other psychological data, that they 



With a large group of ardent stu- 
dent rooters and many of the towns- 
people filling the stands ot the Alumni 
Gymnasium. Coach Ullery's floormen 
won a 26-22 decision over the Alumni. 
Friday night, in a thrill-packed game, 
which had many comic stripes. 

Coach Ullery used at least three dif- 
ferent quintets in the opening fray 
with the old grads. Much excellent 
material was available for all three 
teams. With additional coaching and 
training, this material should be de- 
veloped into a winning aggregation for 
the coming court schedule. 
Five Freshmen on Squad Get Chance 
In this first contest five Freshmen, 
several of whom showed much prom- 
ise, got their first chance at college 
basketball — Matlack. B ri r.n i n g e r. 
Worthington, and Rupp, at the for- 
ward position, and McGeehan at the 
pivot post. 

Glenn was the outstanding star for 
the Orange and Maroon varsity, scor- 
ing three field goals at difficult angles. 
Because of the many substitutions 
and the change of different teams, it 
was difficult to tell the work of one 
individual player. On the whole, how- 
ever, the squad flashed real form at 
times. A winning combination is an- 
ticipated for thus year. 

Rogawicz Stars for Alumni 
Chester Rogawicz, coach of Newport 
Township high school, one of the best 
athletes who has ever graduated from 
Susquehanna, stood out as the star of 
the Alumni. He took the scoring hon- 
ors with five field goals. 

This big, husky former fullback or. 
the football team and forward on the 
basketball team time and again work- 
ed the ball up the floor for a tally, 
much to the bewilderment of the var- 
sity. 

Thomas, another former star in both 
football and basketball, showed much 
skill as a fioorman and made some ex- 
cellent shots. 

The Alumni were given the advan- 

i tage by having the referee recruited 

; from their ranks Evidently it was 

agreed upon before the start of the 



have accepted for publication a manu- I game not to call fouls, for it seemed 
script from Dr. Dunkelberger and Prof. , that there were plenty of them mu,- 
Romberger entitled "An Experimental ! ^ by the trusty eyes of the "reff " 
Study in Perceptual Insight. " ,' 

Dean Dunkelberger and Prof. Rom- 



Walter Edge was appointed Ambas- 
sador to France recently to succeed the 
late Myron T Herrick, who died last 
fall. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALL- 

AMERIC AN CAMPUS ELEVEN 

i Compiled by 80 News Service 

LE— Kimmell 

LT— Pheasant 

LG — Schiavo 
C— Bollinger Capt. > 

RG— Scharfe 

RT— Fox 

RE— Devers 

QB-- Blough 

LH— Rhine 

RH— Pascoe 

FB— Bob Wilson 

They carry their own officials too. 

Referee — Romig (The town cop) 

Umpire — "Woo" Hoffman (A sec- 
ond Strangler Lewis) 

Manager— Stroup (A Bellevue 
High School product). 



berger. both members of the faculty 
who instruct in psychology, here crys- 
tallize results of experiments with stu- 
dents of last year's session together 
with the present Freshman class. 

It is an original investigation design- 
ed to weigh scientifically the percep- 
tual insight of the average Freshman. 

The SUSQUEHANNA rejoices in this 
distinction won by our psychological 
department 

S 

Ursinus College 

President George L. Omwake of Ur- 
linu* College recently announced to 
j the student body a Christmas present 
of $200,000 to the institution. The gift 
was presented by Cyrus H K Curtis. 
a Philadelphia publisher The fund will 
be used for a new letftWM building 
Three years ago Mr Curtis brought 
Christmas cheer to the Collegeville In- 
stitution in a similar manner when he 
•:U-d a gift of $75,000 
Havcrford College 

A new sort of gift to their Alma 
Mater will be given Haverford OoUefC 
by the Senior class of that institution 
this year. The 1930 graduates have vot- 
ed to present in insurance policy as a 
class gift instead of the usual "knick 
knacks." They hope to make their gift 
of great value and to avoid overloading 
the college campus with sentimental 
odds and ends. 

8 



jay Vees play a practice game with 
| Danville "Y" Wednesday night. 



The Alumni gained the first blood 
wlier they worked the ball down the 
floor to their goal and Thomas put it 
through the hoop for the fust marker 
Immediately after the tOM«up at cen- 
ter. Brinninger got the ball and work- 
ed down the floor for the Orange and 
Maroon's first tally. 

Varner then fouled Rogawicz. but 
"Chet" failed to come through in eith- 
er one. Coldren again received the bal'. 
and scored after working it down into 
his own territory. 

Alter the ball was passed down the 
floor by the Alumni. Rogawicz received 
it and tallied his first double-decker 
from a short distance. On the nex* 
tip-off Kemmerer dribbled through 
mid-floor to add another two poim> 
Brinninger received the ball under his 
own basket and tallied after it had 
worked up by his team m I 

Rogawicz, taking the ball on 
toss-up made a shot from the middle 
of the floor Bingaman fouled Stein - 
man on an attempted shot. "Mo," 
however, failed to tftkft advantage o: 
his opportunity. Rogawicz. sneaking 
m close under his own basket, tossed 
another double-decker through the 
hoop. On the following play, a well- 
executed pass from McGeehan 
(Uenn tallied a two-pointer from un- 
derneath the basket. Groce then scor- 
ed another goal for the Alumni. Glenr. 
to McGeehan netted another goal un- 
der the basket and the half ended wtl . 
the ball in possession of the varsity. 
(Concluded on page 4> 



PAGE TWO 



THE 8U8QUEHANNA, SELINSGBOVB, PA. 



TUESDAY. DECEMBER 17, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Published Weeklv during the College Year except Thanksgiving Week, Christ- 
mas. New Year and Easter Week. 



Subscription $1.50 a Year. Payable to Wilbur Berger, '31, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Ma tter. 

Member Inti Newspaper Association of the Middle Atla ntic States 



******** 



****** 



ECHOES FROM HASSINGER 

By A. COUSTICON 



THE MIRROR 



THE STAFF 

Editor-inChief Frank E. Ramsey, '30 

News Editor Clifford Johnston '31 

Sports Editor Alumni Editor 

Vernon Blough '31 Mary Eastep 30 

Social Life Editor Exchange Editor 

Frances Thomas "30 Anna Cleaver 30 

Assistants on Reportorial Staff 
Bettv Wardrop '32 Andv Kozak '32 John Kindsvatter 32 

Fred Norton '32 

Bruce Worthington. 33, Assistant Sports Writer 

Edna Tressler. '30. Conserve tory ol Music 

Business Manager Luther Kurtz ' 3 ° 

Circulation Manager Advertising Manager 

Wilbur Berger '31 Charles Kroeck 31 

Assistants on Business Staff 

Herman Fenstermacher '32 Lee Fairchilds '32 Lawrence Fisher '32 

Jack Auchmuty '32 



We believe that there are many students In Hassinger with real dramatic 
ability. None, however, seem over-anxious lo play the role of Santa Claus 
this Christmas. It is evident, nevertheless, that in spite of the fact that 
none wear red knickers or white beards, that many of the more romantic 
youths are preparing to do quite a bit of Santa Claus-ing. 



It is rumored that several of the sons of Hassinger of Scotch ancestry 
have jilted their fair "Co-ed" friends during the past week. Can the ap- 
proach of the Yuletide season have any significance? 

m ft * s) * 

Jack Petry. popular young Freshman, seems less "Moody'' of late. 

Admonition— The Gloria trumpeters of Hassinger are to be congratulated 
on their perseverance in musical pursuits. The cadence, however much ap- 
preciated during working hours, becomes as a "sounding brass and tinkling 

cvmbal" after eleven o'clock. 

» » i * * 

Little Edward Bollinger had a birthday last week and invited ^hree^ of 
; his college playmates to his home in Williamsport for a party 
had romped a while, delicious refreshments were served. 



Reflections of Past Events as 
Found in The Susquehanna * 
of Twenty-Five Years Ago • * 



****** 



******* 



TUESDAY. DECEMBER 17, 1929 



(JKMS OF THOUGHT 
f Word* of Wise Men, Both Past and Present) 
The only novels thai live are those whose characters the 
reader calls 1>> name without the quotation marks.— Edith 
Wharton 

The unspoken word never does harm— Kossuth 



s 



A CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 
The need of a definite calendar or schedule of meetings of 
student extra-curricular activities which would have to be fol- 
lowed to the last letter by every club or -roup on the campus, is 
becoming more and more urgent an this collegiate year wears on. 
It is true thai a Faculty committee is arranging a calendar for 
all entertainments, athletic games, dances, parties and other 
events so as to avoid all conflicts, bul it is quite evident thai this 
is not <|iii te sufficient. 

Meetings of student groups are called in such a haphazard 
manner thai oftentimes students cannot possibly arrange to at- 
tend the meetings which they rightfully ought to attend. It is 
iometimes difficult for a studenl to decide jnsl which of two, or 
perhaps three, meetings lie oughl to attend. 

Take the Husquchannu staff as a case in hand. Because of 
to many conflicting activities and because no definite meeting 
time has been set aside, the editorial staff of this publication has 
been able to hold only one meeting thus far this year, ill spile of 
very frequent announcements calling the reporters together. 
Certainly such an important organization as this cannot con- 
tinue effectively without some discussion of its problems and 
plans for the future. It deserves a definite meeting time and 
place as lunch as any other activity on the campus. 

For years it has been the custom to have fraternity and sor- 
ority meetings Wednesday evening immediately after dinner. 
Latch . however, other activities have been allowed to hold meet- 
ings at the same hour, and the consequence is that the Greek- 
letter men and women find themselves in a dilemma as to which 
activity deserves their presence most. 

Something should be done aboul this to avoid so much con- 
fusion. A definite schedule should be arranged either by a cone 
mittee of representatives of the various student groups or a fac- 
ulty committee. When once such a schedule were put into effect. 
ever? association should be obliged to follow it rigidly; there 
should uoi be any exception to the rule unless by mutual agree- 
ment of t he parties concerned. 

a 



Harold Grossman is greatly interested In Roman mythology, particularly 
Diana, the Goddess of the Forest. 

4 * * * 

Some one has said that there may be an interesting boxing bout held in 
Hassinger in the future, the contestants being Roy Harry and Paul Edwards. 

• ■;, f •> * 

A careful survey of Hassinger revealed the fact that several of our trust- 
ing and gullible vouths still believe in Santa Claus and are looking about for 
extra large stockings. The boys are as follows: Warren Hoffman, Billy Stahl- 
man Ralph Lenker, Glenn Clark. Carl Pheasant and Johnny Henzes. 

;, * « * * 

With the approach of the new year, many have contemplated making the 
following resolutions: William Hazlett, Edward Bollinger. Joseph Zak, Lolly 
Stroup and Ted Foltz will resolve to visit Seibert Hall for social purposes more 
frequently "Al" Lasher will resolve to keep out of trouble; Johnny Shoe- 
maker to be o ntime for breakfast; Charlie Yon to -house-clean" his room 
now and then; Andy Kozak, to find a bigger instrument to play in the band. 



College Nods 
Many of our male students spent a 
pleasant, evening; with the fair sex on 
Saturday evening. Dec. 17. as the young 
ladies were permitted to entertain 
from 7 to 10 (o'clock, of course >. Light 
refreshments were served and games 
were indulged in. Many a careworn 
face was wreathed in smiles for the 
hours, but the evening passed all too 
quickly. 

Athletics 
Immediately after the Indian 
game on November 19, George Whit- 
mer, right half-back, was elected cap- 
tain of Susquehanna's 1905 eleven. 
After they | Whitmer has played three seasons on 
the first team. He started in as a cen- 
tre, but during the past two seasons 
has played a hard game at half-back. 



* * * * * • 



*•*•••••*•**• 



• • • • * 



Collegiate Comment 



High Spots in World 

News 



*»»••••••* •»•*•••• 



THE ALUMNI GAME 

The traditional game with the old timers on Friday night 
which nerved as the opener of the Susquehanna l!)2!i-:!0 court 
schedule was without a doubt the finest Alumni game ever play- 
ed on the local court. The basketball material which the grads 



Nation's Football Champions 
The close of the 1929 football season 
in the United States has left little 
doubt in the minds of the nation that 
Noire Dame is the champion of the 
country, although both Pittsburgh and 
Purdue as well as several other unde- 
tailed elevens stand ready to dispute 
such a title. 

None Dame, however, has been 
awarded the Jack F. Reisman nali nai 
IntercoMelate football trophy for 1929 
for the second time in the last five 
years, In announcing the winner of 
this trophy. Dr. Frank Dickinson, ot 
the University of Illinois, whose sys- 
tem is rated on strength of team and 
opponents rathe* than percentages, de- 
clared Purdue second and Pittsburgh 
third in strength. 

By general agreement, the following 
champions of the country's sections 
have been selected: 

; Pittsburgh; Midwest and Nat- 
ional Notre Dame; Big Ten— Purdue; 
South—Tulane; Big Six— Nebraska; 
BouthWi Texas Christian; Rocky 
intaln Utah; Pacific Coast— St. 
! Mary's. 

Northwestern I'niversity 
Bigger and better parties is the goal 
of a movement launched by students 
f Northwestern University. The stu- 
dents object to the 2 a. m. closing rule. 
;mei ask instead for a It a. m. curfew, 
and they ask. instead of a $6 per per- 
| sen expense limit for formal dances 
that they be allowed an increase so 
that they can "throw a decent party 

It appears doubtful that the faculty 
will consent, 

( olumbia University 
Professor David Snedden of Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University, be- 



Joseph Grundy, president of the 
Pennsylvania Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion, was appointed junior Senator of 
Pennsylvania last week. He will fill the 
.- ( at which was contested by Senator- 
elect William S. Vare for over jthrea 
years. This long battle was lost when 
the Senate decided that Vare spent to 
much money in securing his election. 
Grundy took the oath of office 
Thursday. Immediately. Senator Ger- 
ald P. Nye, of North Dakota, a purist 
in the Senate, moved that Grundy be 
refused a seat on the grounds that he 
was a lobbyist in high tariff. Several 
Senators are supporting Nye in this 
move but it was doubtful whether 
Grundy will be refused the seat, The 
opposition is trying to require Senate 
approval of Governors' appointees in 
the same manner as Presidential ap- 
| pointees. 

The new Senator will serve until the 

' next election, At that time someone 

will be elected to complete the term 

which ends in 1933. Grundy says he wil 



Basketball is now the go. An attempt 
was made to introduce class backetball 
during the balance of the fall term, 
but owing to several disagreeable fea- 
tures developing, the attempt was 
abandoned. Next term, however, a 
game between the Sophomores and 
Freshmen will likely take place. 

The 1905 Schedule 

Jan. 14— Milton H. S„ H. 

Jan. 20— Bucknell, A. 

Jan. 21 — Open 

Jan. 28— Dickinson Prep., H. 

Feb. 2— Open 

Feb. 10— Danville, A. 

Feb. 11— Wyoming Sem., A. 

Feb. 18 — Lebanon Valley, A. 

Feb. 27 — Bloom Normal. A. 

Mar. 2— Bloom Normal, H. 

Mar. 10 — Shippensburg Normal. A. 

Mar. 11— Lebanon Valley, A. 

Mar. 18— Lehigh. H. 

School of Theology 

Barry, 07. was the recipient of a 
handsome Morris chair. They say it 
was made at the Mifflinburg buggy 
f actorv . 



For a little amusement each day. 
there is nothing like a little Hebrew as 
the juniors say. If it were not for the 
number of the page they could not. tell 
when the book was upside down. They 
keep their finger on the word when 
they recite, for when once lost, "all 
coons look alike." 



The days are evil when even Theo- 
logical students skip class. 
S 

ft*********** ******* 

1 AMUSEMENTS \ 



* * * * * 



* * * * * 



Tonight, will see the final shoving 
at the Stanley of Paramount's all- 
talking, all-singing, all-dancing version 
run for the office at the next election. i f t he famous drama entitled "Bur- 
Vare also .-ays he will run. He suffered i f . squr - which made history on the le- 



lieves that in the near future colleges 
! will have to divide themselves into 

assembled produced ;i remarkably smooth-working aggregation three types, one for the "bread and 

butter" students who come to college 
to get a ioundation for later business. 
one for the coon-skin coated youth who 



another nervous breakdown last week 
su I result of his long struggle to se- 
cure his seat in the Senate. 

For lack of funds and sufficient sup- 
port on the part of the public, the 
Provincetown Players were forced to 
close house last week in New York City 
where they have been doing excellent 
work in the interest of modern drama 

This group of players originated in 
Provincet-wn. R. I„ in 1915. Their abil- 
ity was soon recognized by the general 
public and they were able to move to 
New York in 1917 into a theater of 
their own. They are responsible for the 
rise cf Eugene O'Neill, the famous dra- 



which iit times baffled the 'varsity. 

one thing worthy of note oilier than the fact thai it wan 
such a splendid game is thai thii fray did more to cement feel- 
ing between the sliident body and I lie Aliuniii lliaii anything that 

lias been done for a long time in the past. The student rooters 
were as eiithnsiasi ie in applauding a play made by the Alumni 



prefers ■ football game to the class- 
room and one for the quiet seeker af- 
ter learning. 

University of Chicago 

The greatest need of American edu- 



Ultimate stage several years. Starred 
in the production is Hal Skelly in the 
role of "Skid." the part he played in 
the rriginal play on the stage. Playing 
opposite him is Nancy Carrol in the 
role of "Bonnie." 

"Love and the Devil." starring Mil- 
ton Sills and Maria Corda, will be the 
feature for Wednesday night only. 

"Say It With Songs," Al Jolson's 
third mction picture production, will 
be shown Thursday and Friday night. 
Davy Lee. the famous juvenile actor, 
plays with him in this production. 

S 

RED CROSS CONTRIBUTIONS 

The American Red Cross Call has 
matist. Other famous dramatists and been heeded by Susquehanna as fol- 

. , ..l^f., brum nlfn nnnonroH /~\n t Vl O no I' _ ■ 



actors have also appeared on the per 
sonnel of this professional group of 
actors 



,„. The splendid spirit Of cation, according to the youthful pres- 
H*» mt \ >- Kiirn Uenl of this university, Robert May- 

iporUmanship on the pari ol the undergraduate* could not na\< nard Hutchins is more money for fac _ 

■" • ■' kl : — ' '"' .■..•i;,.ii,.o,.,l In. ! ulty members to "make education re- 

spectable and to enable colleges and 
universities to compete with business 
for the nation's best minds." 
"In the past 25 vears." he says, "the horsepower Wasp motor, and uses a 

Th4 Busuuehanna present* in this issue for your approval a beat minds in America have been special cowling which U supposed to 
' ' ,, -, ,, •■ mm ; i„,«« will drawn into business. Hence, American 

new department known a* "Fraternity Row. ring column Willi 

k, a feature of ever} reek's issue and will contain briefs and 



PIU'I I .-'IIKMl.-m J' "" .i». |-.-- r- 

helped but effecM the Alumni who either participated In the game 
or wathced it from the sidelines. 

FRATERNITY ROW 



lows : 

Y. W. C. A. of S. U.. Enza Wilson. 
Sec. $25; Girl's Cooperative Govern- 
A debt of $25,000 has been incurred. ment , $2 5; Kappa Delta Phi, Lena 
Most of the recent plays did not sup- Baird. Treas., $5. 

port themselves. Pledges of $60,000 Tne following members of the facul- 
could not be collected, probably be- ly and students have contributed one 
cause of the recent depression in Wall dollar each for annual membership: 
Street. , President G. Morris Smith. Dr. T. C. 

Heutz. Dr. J. I. Woodruff, Dr Geo. E. 
Colonel Lindbergh has had a private Fisher, Dr. H. A. Allison, Dr. Harold N. 
airplane built for himself by the Lock- \ Follmer. Dr. W. A. Sadtler. Dr. Harvey 
heed Company of Los Angeles. Prelim- A surface. Prof. E. M. Brunart, Dr. H. 
inary tests show that the plane, built A F Kern. Dr. T. W. Kretschmann. 
secretly, has a top speed of 100 miles Pro f s sj, e. Sheldon. L. D. Grossman. 
per hour. It is equipped with a 450- j P M Linebaugh. J. Theodore Park, J. 



notes of happenings in fraternities and sororities of general in- 
terest to our readers. The material is compiled bj a representa- 
tive of each fraternity and sorority on the campus and arranged 
bv a stall member, 

The Editor takes this means to express his appreciation to 
the various clubs for sending representative,, to the meeting of 
that group Last week and for their participation in this new ven- 
ture. 

Constructive criticism b) fraternity men and sorority worn- 
en concerning this department will at all times be welcomed 



new problem in com- 
on competition with big bus: 
for the best mas if you spread $ioo,- 

000,00 he worthy coile. 

the land you might increase each pro- 
much at $1.54. You 
row the money in the 
lake, But spend it on the key univer- 
sities and you will develop pacemak- 
ers that will revitalize American edu- 
■>n." 
His plan would be to select three 
•'key universities," one in the Ettft, OBI 
in the mid-West, and one on the Pa- 
cific, 



reduce air resistance greatly, 



An order for 150 electric locomotives 
costing $i6.ooo,ooo mi n cently made 
by the Pennsylvania Railroad for 
trification of the roads between Phila- 
delphia .mri Trenton, and between 
New Brunswick and Manhattan Ti 
fer. 



Pasqual Oritz Rubio ot the National 
Revolutit nary party wa recently elect- 
ed President of Mexico. Many persons 
were wounded and a number killed in 
rioting between the two opposing par- 
ties. 



J. Houtz. G, N. Wood. Mary Woodruff. 
Evelyn R. Allison. Emily McElwee, Wil- 
liam W. Ullery. Martha Dodson, Mrs. 
Little, Mrs. T. W. Kretschmann, John 
C. Oberdorf. Miss E. Beatrice Herman. 
Adelbert C. Hartung. Evelyn Bwi i%- 
man. S. Walter Foulkrod. Jr., Anna 
Moore, Oren S. Kaltriter. Margaret E. 
Young, Alice Mulligan, Florence Mary 
Stewart, Edward Bollinger, WUma N. 
Walker Lewi.- R fox Betty Watkins, 
Edith Erdley Harry R: v. Ch.irlt . Yon. 
Robert McDeehan, William R. Swa'm. 
Jack Petrj d Steel and J, Worth- 

ington. 

S . 

The next issue of THE SUSQUE- 
HANNA will be published Jan. 14, 1930. 






TUESDAY. DECEMBER 17, 1929 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA. 



AoE r«REte 



Susquehanna Uni rersity in Review 




KISSINGER 

/ !n ■! i tr< h r 
SEI.INSGUOVE, i'A. 



Eat p.t i 

e Don Mar 

♦ 

L M GABEL. Propr I 



T. T. WFERMAN 

■ h uel'i 

SUNBFjRY. pa. 



<&«. 



♦Suits and Topcoats! 



CLEANED AND PRESSED 
FOR epl.UU 

AT TRIMBLE'S 



I;f<- \i. Sikh;,- ! >IKF,< r I Nl 
\ eksi i v Sk:;\ i k 



W. G. 



IPS 



433 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. » 



I OM,EUK T.\ !.<>!! 

f 7' mi in ii mid I' ending 
SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 

Dppos'te Post Office Phone 125-Z 



"LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS 
DRAWING SUPPLIES 

JOS. L. MENTZ 

The Stationer 
Remington Portable Typewriters 
j V N. Third St. Sunbury fa. 



J. c. 

University Barber 

CUTS HAIR YOUR WAY 

30 South Market Street 



EUREKA 
TAILORING CO. 

ONE DOLLAR CLEANERS 

Work Called lor and Delivered 
East Pin* Street Phone 74-Y 






L 



EAT A'i 

LEIBY'S 

Sunbury, Pa 



{Fisher's Jewelry Store 



VMONI/8, WATCHES. SILVER 
v.M> GLASS WARE 



SE LINSGROVE HAL L WAS FIRST BUILDING ERECTED ON CAMPl S AS PART OF MISSIONAR Y^ INSTITUTE 

Susquehanna Scribe 
Traces Its History 
and Development 



-May the walls rise upon the foun- 
dation we have this day laid, and ma.y 
the building .stand and prove a bl 
ing to the world, as long as B wave 
murmurs in the Susquehanna. And 
when in after years, those who have 
received their education here, shall re- 
visit their 'Alma Mater.' may they be- 
dew the graves of its founders with 
tears of gratitude and affection and 
thank God that he ever put it into the 
hearts of his people to raise such an 
edifice." 

With these words, filled with fond 
hopes for a brilliant future for Mis- 
sionary Institute (forerunner of Sus- 
quehanna University), Prof. R. Weiser. 
President of Central College, Des 
Moines. Iowa, closed a very eloquent 
address at the laying of the corner- 
stone of the first building of that in- 
stitution. September 1, 1858. 



• '• po in u also on the same floor. | 
The other two floors are still used for 
undergraduate dormitory purposes. 
Speaker Makes Prophecy 
J i eph Casey : ' ■ ' • 

guprort • i ' li ' ' l ' 

ry Inst: ate, made a very beautl- | 
ophec; con i ' Eu 'ire of i 
1 e school, In the coi rse of an sdi 

d at the laying of the coroer- 
:< ne. 
A -or! ion of the pr phecy lo.lows: 
"When many thousands descended 
am those now before me, atter many 
ations shall astEhible on the pot 
:■' are today dedicating to religion and 
•atriqtism— to God and our country— 
( brat" some yet far distant anni- 
iry of the laying of the Corner* 
of this Mi sienary Ii 
"When this little 'grain oJ mus 
:e; planted by ' & 

efforts and contributions, and main- 
i ii and > ' : ' 

:. c i succi baH have grown to b- 



• 



nd antic 1 with 
iry and firmly se , its branch i 
Missi nary Institute was established | 
bv the Maryland Synod of the Lull r- [joking ill M i * ii 



m Church" to meet the demand for i 
more ministers and in the interests of 
general education. 

Selinsgrove Hall the First Building 

The first man to occupy the build- 
ing was the Rev. Peter B. Born, D.D.. 
who lived in it fr m 1859-1878. Rev. 
Born later was president of the insti- 
tution from 1881-1893. 

Funds for the building were provided 
through the generosity and civic pride 
of Selinsgrove and its vicinity. The 
total cost exceeded $25,000. The money- 
was raised by popular subscription. 

The first man to occupy the Rev- 
erend Peter B. Born. D.D.. who lived 
in it from 1859-1878. Rev. Born later 
was president of the institution Horn 
1881-1893. 

Students Furnished Own Rooms 

In the early days, the occupant ol 
the several rooms were obliged to fur- 
nish and equip their own rooms, in- 
cluding individual lighting and heating 
systems. Each student was also respon- 
sible for the care of his own room. Sev- 



v, ;i (!i m nj e 1: ' un " 

b m shall haw '.hod. and do d. and 
been buried in the earth; when th 

;t village shall hove beepmi 
with thousand! of busy, bustling 
habit ints; and when ol build- 

ings shall have been erected to ac- 
commodate the thousands, who thirst- 
ing for knowledge, shall c me to drink DR. KERN 
at this fountain; ai:d many of the«4 
broad acres now devoted to husbandry 
shall be transformed into the lawns 
and classic groves rf this day's infant 
•Missionary Institute"; when improve- 
ments in thi arts and developments in 
science shall have reached their cul- 
mination, what a brilliant and glorious 
celebration that will be! 

"Whose heart does not gl W and 
beat with a higher enthusiasm and 
loftier purpose as he contemplates the 
scene. . . . 

"Who shall then be able to recount 
the blessings and benefits that shall 
have resulted from this enterprise?— 
when thousands who shall here have 



csorting in a holy joy to the to- 
ri. er at the store. Gone are j 
I liar faces at dormitory : 
w ; n{ j • that once watched practice 
ird of assignments and 
writtens. Gone even the bleachers. 
■ Z ed to the ground by Messers, Null 
Void, of i*e campus caretakers' 
c rps. and carted thence by their 
faithful steed. Invalid. Game's over! 

There seems to be nothing to do but 
study. Back ,0 normalcy. But on sec- 
hcught, we wonder Just what 
phase Is normalcy: the lull after the 
storm, or the storm itself? We just sort 
of w ndtr.— The Wesleyan Argus. 

s 

I,- high University 
Lehigh's first vlctorj over her tradi- j 
... foe, i afaye te, in a decade, was 
d by H. C. Hess. Brown and 
White b- ich in a wedding 

i .< menj i' ' and G 

of Massil n. Ohio, took 

tar in 1925. The 
i Li high squad and all the CO 
es were pn ei the waddii 

Arkansas S. T. C. 

Carldon Patton, it, a freahma] 
Arkansas Sta hera' Col 

Conway, Ark i centls < ■ wn 

I ( i ■■ :.. . ; ol Ann rica," and giv- 

en I priM of 11,000 to go with the 
:■ on b m dest. drawling 
earned more than $2,500 
ion operation in the past three 
i ars. 



I 
I 

i ••- ! 

{ Fine Repairing a Rpecwlty \ 

{ 344 Market St. s; tl nbury, Pa. j 
♦ 



Home of 
PRINTZESS COATS { 

THE BON TON 

Sunbury ♦ 



345-347 Market St. 



YOUR 



DECORATIONS FOR 
PARTY" 

{Fryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market Street 
Sunbury. Pa. 



"REMEMBER YOUR COLLEGE 
DAYS WITH PHOTOGRAPHS" 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street Sunbury, Pa. 



STUDENTS 

TRY 



REICHLEY'S 



LUNCH - SODAS - CANDY 



t 
» 



Merchant Tailor 
Ed. I. Heffelfinger 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

Market Street Selinsgrove 



JOHN H. KELLER 

— Dealt 1- In— 

Meats and ( Groceries 

Both Phones— Selinsgrove 



For Better Merchandise 
Reasonably Priced 

Shop at 

FEME'S 

COATS AND DRESSES 



SNYDER COUNTY TRLUNE 

JOB WORK A SPECIALTY 

Phone G8-W 



New York Life 

Insurance Co. 

ARTHUR C. BROWN 



Henna 



sioie lor tne caie ui iua ""■• »» »— ■■ — ••— 

eral rooms were furnished by churches drunk deeply at the springs of learning 
<r,r the use of theological students from and knowledge, shall have gone forth 
certain congregations, however. over every par. ol the continent 

This was the onlv building occupied j into every department of business and 



, 



by Missionarv Institute except for five 
frame dwellings which were occupied 
bv married theological students. 
'One of these later became Sleepy- 
Hollow, dismantled only recently. The 
four remaining dwellings were moved 
from their former site and placed on 
new foundations on Univc: I tj H< 
These h« .aipletely rein del- 

. and out and are now occu- 
pied b\ several faculty 
other member- of the Btuequehannt 
administratlo! tail 

Kimwleled Twice 

The' building Wl ; iU 1 ' 91 " 

at ti Of S8.000 and (daotd m its 

present condition. 

The lower DOOI ; ' n ri modeled 

in 1928 into a splendid sent s of offices 



life, in every succeeding year, to exert 
their influence in purifying and ele- 
vating mankind. 

"On that high festival dav iom< 
and venerable alumnus of the 'Insti- 
tute,' endued with wisdom and 
with eloquence will rise before that 
BUgUSt and brilliant assemblage, and 
recount to them the rise and proi 
great work— its smal] I* 

t hop* and 

earh and difficulties, and 

nd of its found 



SELECTS 

1930 DEBATE TEAM 

i Con tinned from page 1) 
Girls Teams Selected 
The girls teams have also been select - 
ed by Dr. Kern. The affirmative team 
Includes Wilms Walker, '30. of Fried- 
j n . captain: Corinda Cell. "31, of Al- 
\ toona. The third member and the al- 
ternate have n.t been chosen as yet. 

Ruth DeTurk. '32, who comes from 
Bucknell University where she was en- 
gaged in debating activities, captains 
the negative team. Mary Weaverly, '31, 
S and Nellie Shue. '31, of Sunbury. are 
also members of the negative team 

The coach has been actively aiding 
I the debating organization since 1924. 
with the exception of the season ol 
1928-29. during which period Rev. Wil- 
i Ham Schwirian coached the debaters. 
! He has had a wide experience in coach- 
j lng as well a^ actual debating. 

He WM one of the foremost member- 
| of the Concordia Club, a forensic or- 
Lution, while a student in the Uni- 
versity Of Erlangen. Germany. 
Last year's teami set a record for d< - 
.Susquehanna when thej 
en out of twenty-two debate 
Wch were with the strongest team 
I «t, 

S 

Ti, I The SUSQUE- 

HANNA will be published Jan. 14. 1930 



ST AM FY 

Talking Picture* 



Selinsgrove 




L 



Feaster's Restaurant 

"WHERE STUDENTS MEET 
AND EAT" 



Market *tr«et 



SelinsfcTOve 



STRAND J 



SUNBURY 

ALL THIS WEEK 

Comes That Joyous Dramatic 
Spectacle 

"RIO RITA" 

with 

Bebe Daniels and 
John Boles 

AND ONE THOUSAND OTHERS 



FEEHRER & NOLL 

KAKBKR8 

4 WEST PINE STREET 



MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

WILL ROGERS 

in "THEY MIS! m PARIS 



■ » 

t 

! 
I 

• 
• 



Oover D. Savidge 

Representing 

New York Life 
Insurance Co. 

Sunbury Trust Bldg. 
SUNBURY, PA. 



NOTHING TO DO 

T)a lOthing to <vi but 

study. "Var- Ity mi 
self-consciously r< connoitering the Li- 



of the Administi tne Praaldenl brary-^hm they are not loitering, in 

Dean, Bursar and Superintendent ofevident bewilderment, about the camp- 



ONE REAL NEWSPAPER 

SUNHU1RY DAILY ITEM 

BUNBURY. PA. 



Paxton Brick Co. 

SMOOTH AND ROUGH FA'TE 

HIDING BRICK 

—and— 

PAVING BLOCKS 

, , \\ at«ontown, Pv 
■ tonvlllo, P%. 



1 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1929 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Dr. Manhart. Graduate of Missionary 
Institute, Addresses Students 

Dr. F. P. Manhart. graduate of Mis- 
sionary Institute, and at the present 
time Dean of the Susquehanna School 
of Theology, was presented by the 
Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter of Pi 
Gamma Mu as the first lecturer of the 
year on the evening of Decv. 16. The 
lecture covered the outstanding ex- 
Manhart on his trip 
Denmark, during the 



periences of Dr. 
to Copenhagen, 
past summer. 



Missionary Addresses Students 

Rev. M. L. Dolbeer. '16. en route to 
Guntur, India, where he is engaged 
in missionary work, visited the cam- 
pus recently. He addressed the stu- 
dents in chapel and gave an illustrated 
evening lecture. Both lectures were 
very well received by the entire au- 
dience. Mr. Dolbeer and family have 
spent a year on furlough in this coun- 
try, and are about to go back to their 
■work. 



Elected Master of Grange 
More than a hundred members of 
the local Penn's Creek Grange attend- 
ed an oyster supper in their hall re- 
cently, when the election of officers 
was held. Samuel P. Stauffer, of Mar- 
ket street, was named Master. 



Prof. Grossman Rotary Speaker 

The Rotary Club, at its recent meet- 
ing, was addressed by Prof. Luther D 
Grossman, alumnus, and at the pres- 
ent time athletic director of the Uni- 
versity. 

The subject of Professor Grossman's 
speech was "Keeping Fit." He discuss- 
ed the importance of physical fitness 
and cited experiences of the World 
War to emphasize his talk. 



CHOIR PRESENTS CANTATA 

The College Choir gave a very de- 
llghtful Xmas cantata Sunday evening 
m Trinity Lutheran Church before a 
large congregation. 

Dr. G. Morris Smith gave a Christ- 
mas address at the same services. 

S 

S. U. COURTMN WIN 

FAST OPENING FRAY 
WITH ALUMNI, 26-22 



Fraternity Row 



• Continued from page 1' 
Score. 12-12. 

Second Half 

Rogawicz immediately scored on an 
easy pass under his basket. Heim shot 
a short one, but missed. On another 
try. the ball dropped through the net. 
The longest shot of the evening was 
made on the next play, when Rogawicz 
made a goal from quite a distance be- 
yond mid-floor. 

Bingaman then sneaked under the 
basket and on a pass from Thomas 
scored another. "Mo" Steinman. after 



.'.. 



O. D. S. Holds Xmas Bridge 

To promote the holiday spirit of fes- 
tivity Omega Delta Sigma held a 
Christmas bridge, to which they invit- 
ed four representatives from each so- 
sority and faculty honorary members. 
Friday afternoon. 

The O. D. S. girls and their guests 
played at cards in the newly-furnished 
sorority room, which was decorated in 
a manner that fitted the occasion. A 
Christmas tree, greens, bittersweet. •■■■■■•■■— »- »*»■■»« 
and red candles made an attractive <§>-— --»-■ —— » --..--., 



Dance Prog r a m % 

of the More Artistic Kind 

THE SELINSGHOVE TIMES 



♦ 



POLAR WAVE ICE CREAM 

SI'Mll'RV MILK IM{OI/('< ,r * ~'t\lI'AXY 

ll i Snlnit ) Out I'ntroiKiift . 



>T «URV. PA. 



setting. Everything was appropriate | 
from the poinsetta tallies to the prizes j 
dressed in gay holiday attire. 

Prizes were received by Miss Mar- 
garet Young as high scorer, and Miss 
Dorothy Reeder, second. Miss Alma 
Bowersox was given the consolation 



! 



working the ball back up the floor to gift. 

near the center, took a shot and buried , Dainty refreshments were served af- 
it in the net for a double-decker. A I ter the prizes had been awarded, 
technical foul was called on Vamer | These informal gatherings are be- : 
and Thomas tallied on the shot. coming a part of Seibert Hall life and 



S .IV IT W I T II PL o w /•: H a 

FRESH CUT FLOWERS and POTTED PLANTS for WEDDINGS. 

PARTIES and FUNERALS— FLOWERS for aLL OCCASIONS 

Visitors Always Welcome at Our Greur. House i 

GEO. B. RI.NE 

FLORIST 



, BELL 32-Y 



SELINSGROVE 



•<$> 



are something new this year. They 
show a fine spirit, which tends to 
create a feeling of friendliness and co- 
operation between the different groups. 



Kozak, substituted for Rummel, im- 
mediately took a shot and dropped the 
ball through for a marker. Thomas 
got the ball on a toss-up and made 
another shot. Glenn then made a 
beautiful shot from the middle of the Kappa Delta Phi was represented at 
floor. Kozak fouled Thomas on an at- the Christmas bridge by Patsy Cleav 
tempted shot at the basket and Thorn- i er, Margaret Young, Leona Holtzapple 
as took advantage of only one of his and Alma Bowersox. 
f 0U l s , Sigma Sigma Delta was represented 

Glenn sank a double-decker on a ! b >' Mar y Hutchings, Twila Crebs. Lil- 
beautiful one-handed short shot from j »*" Kordes and Grace Lauer. 
a difficult position. Rupp buried one i 

from near the center of the floor. Mc- 1 Mary Eastep will represent Beta 
Geehan sneaked one from under the Chapter at the National Sigma Sigma 
basket and scored as the game ended. , Del ta conference to be held December 

at Marietta College, Marietta. 



KAUFFMANS 

Candy and Soda 



i 

i 

6 



Score. Susquehanna 
Alumni 22. 

Line-up and scores 
Varsity 

Worthington . 
Brinninger . . . 
Varner 



Varsity 26, 



27-28 
Ohio. 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcome* Students' Accounts 
KKSOl/RCES [K EXCESS OF $l.r>00.000.00 



Alumni 

F Kemmerer 

New Board Member "nger P Thomas 

Mr. Ralph Witmer, an alumnus of Varner C Rogawicz 

Susquehanna, became a member of the i Kozak G Groce 

Selinsgrove Board of Education for thej Coldren G Bingaman 

present year. Mr. Winner's interest in I Po" 1 goals— Rogawicz 0x2. Steinman ; Sigma Alpha Iota girls were de ii g ht- , 
educational work will enable him to 0x2, Thomas 2x3. j f u n y entertained by their patronesses , 
be an efficient member of the Board. Substitutions— Matlack for Worth- j Saturday afternoon. Beautiful prizes 
ington, Glenn for Brinninger, McGee- ' were awarded. 

Alumni Celebrates 90th Birthday han for Varner, Rummel for Kozak, \ Following the bridge, the party was 

Rev. W. R. Wieand, '73, who resides Steinman for Coldren, Gearhart for : escorted to Trinity Lutheran Church, 
at Altoona. Pa., celebrates his 90th McGeehan, Rupp for Glenn, Rano for j where a delicious dinner was served, 
birthday today, Dec. 17. He was a min- Matlack, Heim for Rummel, Ramick The entertainment was a great sue 
ister of the gospel for many years. Now | for Steinman, Palmer for Gearhart, 
that age has made him physically un- i Coldren for Steinman. Kozak for Rum- 
able to perform these duties, he is liv- mell. Rupp for Matlack, Daubenspeck 
ing a retired life. In response to an j fey Bir.-raman; Alumni— KaufTman for 
invitation to attend the 72nd opening J Kemmerer. Witmer for Bingaman. 
of Susquehanna he wrote the follow- j Referee— Houtz. 

ing greeting: ; 

"To the Officers, Dean, President and ' 500 to 830. 

Faculty of Susquehanna University: : "The following ministerial acts have 

"Thanks for the kind and pressing been performed by the pastor since I Actives and honoraries of Sigma 
invitation to the opening of the 72nd 1919: 650 new members received lofjsigma Delta sorority will conduct a 
year of my Alma Mater, formerly Mis- whom 178 were confirmed >; 1,600 ser- \ Christmas party in the social room on 
sionary Institute! . mons delivered < besides 200 outside ad- 1 Wednesday evening. Committees have 

"I rejoice in her splendid progress ' dresses i; 151 marriages performed ; j been appointed, one to decorate the 
and noble work achieved up to the j 251 funerals conducted; 451 baptisms j room and give it a real holiday ap- 






The following Alumni attended the 
Bond and Key dance Saturday night: 1 | tions on request 
Mr. Harold Bolig and wife, Mr. Walter 
Pinand and wife, Lukehart, Derr, 
Ditzler. Deemer, "Bill" Riden, "Joe" 
Means, Foust, Spangler. 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

America's leading instruments. For churches, colleges, lodge rooms, 
residences, etc. Every organ designed and built specially for the par- 
ticular place and purpose and fully guaranteed. Booklets and speciflca- 



{ HAGERSTOWN 



M. P. MOLLER 



MARYLAND 



»♦ 



■ ■■■■■■■■■■■I t 



Before Buying- Athletic Supplies Visit Your 

Store 

It Will Mean a Real Saving to You. 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTS" 

STUDENT CO-OPERATIVE STORh 



cess. 

Epsilon Sigma had as its guest over 
the week-end Prof. Addison Pohle. '27, 
who is now a member of the faculty 
of the Altoona Senior High School. He 
is an instructor in the business de- 
partment. 



<$>' 



WHITMER-STEELE COMPANY 
South River Lumber Company 

Manufacturers of ' 

Pine, Hemlock and Hardwood Lumber 

Lath, Prop Timber and Ties 
65 King Street Northumberland 



«# 



present and her glorious promise for and 8.000 pastoral calls. 

the future. I should be too glad to Rev. Smith is proud of the fact that 

be with you at the 72nd annual open- ' he has eight people from his congre- 



ing, but I must forbear on account of' nation attending college. 

physical ailments, and infirmities, and whom are at Susquehanna. 

rest with my fervent prayers for twr| Rev. Smith is to be congratulated 

continued success in the years to come, i for this record. Your Alma Mater 

May heaven's richest and choicest j wishes you continued success in this 

blessing rest upon teachers and! work. 

taught! 



pearance, and another to produce suit- 
able refreshments. Games, dancing, 
and the presentation of gifts will be 



three of the features of the evening. 



Herman HABDW \RE & Wetzel 

UP-TO-DATE HARDWARE and ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 
HEATING AND PLUMBING 

MARKET STREET SELINSGROVE 



Following the regular business meet- » WHEN Qf WILLAMSPORT VISIT THE NEW STORE AND FACTORY OF 



Susquehanna 

tions and best 



Sincerely. 

W. R. Wieand. 
extends congratula- 
wishes to Dr. Wieand! 



Music Company Recently Organized 

Charles R. Streamer. '94, residing at 
Boulder, Colorado, is serving a pastor- 
ate at that city. He has recently or- 
ganised the Streamer Music Co., with 
the assistance Of two sons. For six 
via:, be wu secretary ot the Cham- 
ber of Commerce and pastor ot a mis- 
sion church at Boulder He says: "Hur- 
ra ii for s. u." 

A Record for Ten Vears 

a graduate of 14, "17, the Rev, A j 

w Smith, paator ol a John's Luth- | 

eran Church, at WUliarnsport, Pa., ha • 

made a record for hli ten years of ser- { 

. in that church. We t'md the fol- J 

li ", or) it! hi I : pap-""; 

i ago. the pastor as su med 

leadership oi this church. His first 
sermon m as preach d 
•Paul, tin' Preacher. I < 

T! i . i' I tilled With 

Kiv and orroa i ind hard 

work. The reeuH 

d enoouragln 
membership \a '.»75, ha\ id an in- 

v e 1919 All our prob- 
ation ->t $830,000 with 
an ii r) In the past 

ten years $60,000 M d toward 

I. bt and our new Sunday 

il building; $40,000 was raised for 
benevolences, and $65,000 for current 
making a total of $16,000 re- 
ceived (ran ail sources. The Sunday 



Whereabouts and Doings of Grads 

'25 

Lester M. Shaffer, of Johnstown, Pa., 
is studying medicine at George Wash- 
ington University 

'26 

Theo. Ebbetts holds a position in the 
Investment Department of the M. and 
T. Trust Co.. in Buffalo. N. Y. 

Mary Ella Gougler. Middleburg, Pa.. 
:- teaching history m the high school 
at Clearfield. Pa. 

21 

Clovd A. Stahl is a student at Jef- 
ferson Medical College at Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 



ing on Wednesday evening Sigma Sig 
ma Delta will initiate as honoraries I 
Mrs. W. A. Sadtler, wife of Dr. Sadt-J 
ler; Miss Lucy Irving, instructor in j 
Spanish, and Miss Emily Swettman, 
secretary to Dean of College. 



The Smith Printing Company 



I MANUFACTURING BANK STATIONERS 



OFFICE OUTFITTERS 

1 



Miss Sue Thomas and MLss Wilma 
Walker spent the week-end in Sun- 
bury. 



Crabtree and Maxheimer, of Epsi- 
lan Sigma, are of the belief that hob- ] 
bies have their merits. They're in the j j . 
Gobbling business now 
applying his general psychology ; ... 
knowledge on his pet biped "Mike," 
and studying it from the behaviouris- 
tic point of view for the benefit of 
psychology. 



THE CITY INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
PENNSYLVANIA— Sunbury, Pa. 

Organized 1870 
Surplus to Policy Holders $866,962.08 
Harris I.enker, President A. F. O'Danlel, Secretary 

Crabtree is ' ■^-»»»«~»» »-»»»«»--- — .»«-»■»—»■»»■«■ «.»»...»....-»»»»«■■■ ■ ■ ~~ < $> 



■ -.! 



; 



SPEIGELMIRF 

F 11 1 iff 11 r< . ('nipt'ts. Flotn Corrrjn,.' 
8ELINSGROVE 



•^ 



.— — ~$ 



Farmers National BanK 

of Selinsgrove 



WELCOMES ALL ACCOUNTS 



RESOURCES OVER $1,000,000 00 



*- 



» — * < » 






SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 
G. MORRIS SMITH, A.M., D.D., President 
A. B. and B. S. D egress Strong courses in Liberal Arts, Science, Edu- 
cation and Business Administration 
Extrusion Courses at Wilkes-Barre, Coal Township and Mt. Carmel. 
Course, ol instruction for teachers on the University campus on 
Friday evening and Saturday morning. 
A Four-Year Public School Music Course with degree in Bachelor of 
Music Ls attracting young people who contemplate teaching Public 
School Music. 
Susquehanna stands for a well-rounded education, clean sports, re- 
creation for every student, earnestness in study, and above all, Char- 
acter as the hall mark of culture. 

For information write 



j GEORGE F. DUNKELBEROER, Ph.D., Dean. 

Choool enrollment has increased from ^,... ........_.....-.- .^...- -.---.....,..-.-..--- . . . 



LYTI.E'S PHA 



All 



soda Fountain THE REXALL STORE Ice o»c<»... 

Keturrilsht'd Throughout, Modern and Appealing In hivery ac<,,„, . 

Talcums, Face Powders and Toilet Articles 01 au *vi»^ 
UNITED CIGAR STORE AGENCY SELlN8UKuv£- 



Me a & Derick's 

Next to the Movies 

KODAKS — TOILET GOODS — SODAS 

Sunbury — Northumberland — Shamokln — Selinsgrove 



^> 



l*°\ 



1 



The SusquehannS' 




Volume XXXVI 



SELINSGROVE, PA^ TUESDAY JANUARY 14, 1930 



Crusaders Vanquish 
Western Maryland 
in Court Tilt, 37-27 



Number 18 



LTlerymen Down Formidable Team in 

Thrill-Packed Game In 

Alumni Gym 



RUPP, LEWISTOWN STAR, HIGH 

SCORER FOR SUSQUEHANNA 



Rapid Passing and Splendid Team- 
Work Feature Aggregation of 
Capt. "Skip" Glenn 



Kiracofe Attends Pi I Frank Eyer Presents 
Gamma Mu Meeting Two Horns to Band 



President of Local Chapter of National 

Social Science Honorary Fraternity 

Delegate to Annual Gathering 



The fast-moving, keen-eyed tossers 
representing Bill Ullery's basket ball 
quintet, were more than a match for 
the fast Western Maryland combina- 
tion, tramping on the visitors to the 
tune of 37-27 in Alumni Gymnasium 
Saturday night. 

An exceptionally large crowd of loy- 
al supporters of the Orange and Ma- 
roon greeted the dribblers as they came 
on the floor, and marveled at the pass- 
ing and scoring talents of the Cru- 
saders as they chalked up their second 
win of the season. 

The game was replete with thrills 
from its very beginning. Western 
Maryland was the first to score when 
the ball was worked down the floor on 
the tip-off and then dropped through 
the basket by Hammil. 

The Western Maryland crew gave 
evidence of their usual scoring procliv- 
ities during the first few minutes of 
play. However, the half ended with 
the Orange and Maroon on top, lead- 
ing by a 17-12 score. 

Rupp High Scorer 

Rupp. former Lewistown High ace, 
playing his first game of college bas- 
ket ball, appeared on the starting line- 
up, and played the entire fray. He 
played a whale of a game at forward 
and displayed a brand of basket ball 
which is essential to a winning com- 
bination. 

He took scoring honors for the eve- 
ning, dropping the ball through the 
hoop five times for double markers, 
and making three fouls. This fleet- 
footed forward displayed wonderful 
ability on the floor at guarding his 
man and at all times set a killing pace. 

The cooperation of Capt. Glenn, who 

is one of the fastest men on the team, 

with his flashy forward proved to be 

(Concluded on page 4.) 



Clifford Kiracofe '30. represented 
Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter of Pi 
Gamma Mu, national social science 
honorary fraternity, at the annual con- 
vention of that body at the Hotel May- 
flower, in Washington. D. C. Decem- 
ber 27 to 31. 

Kiracofe is president of the local 
chapter. Ten Juniors are elected ' to 
the society every year. There are also 
a number of faculty members. 

The convention was devoted to dis- 
cussion of social science problems, the 
enlargement and promotion of the or- 
ganization itself, and the discussion of 
the various rituals. 

The program included two banquets 
and a number of lectures. 



Valuable Instruments Added to Equip- 
ment Through Generosity of S. U. 
Booster ; Concerts Planned 




CLIFFORD KIRACOFE '30 

Who Attended the Pi Gamma Mu 

Convention 

One hundred and ten chapters were 
represented at the convention, coming 
from all parts of the nation. Pi Gamma 
Mu is now the largest social science 
honorary fraternity in the world. 

Mr. Kiracofe also attended the con- 
vention of the American Economic As- 
sociation at the Willard Hotel. 

S 

PRESIDENT AND DEAN 

NOW IN WASHINGTON 



Two new Holton trombones were re- 
cently presented to the University 
Band by Frank A. Eyer. secretary of 
the Board of Directors. They comprise 
a very valuable addition to the grow- 
ing instrumental equipment, of the 
band. 

The horns were given to Alvin Bar- 
ber, '31, and Richard Mattern, '31, two 
members of the band. They are of 
very fine quality both in finish and 
workmanship. 

The band and its director, Prof. El- 
rose Allison, '27, feel very greatly in- 
debted to Mr. Eyer for this very valu- 
able gift, and desire to convey to him 
their sincerest words of appreciation. 

Mr. Eyer, who is a loyal supporter 
of Susquehanna, is president of the 
Middlecreek Valley Telephone Com- 
pany, serving this section, and is 
prominent in the business, civic and 
social life of the college town. 
Band Plans Several Concerts 

Rehearsals are being held every Fri- 
day afternoon during the basketball 
season in preparation for a series of 
j concerts, one of which is to be given 
J on the campus. 

The band has been making rapid 
strides under its leader and organizer. 
Recent additions included stands for 
the snare and bass drums. More equip- 
ment will be added as finances permit 
or as more of Susquehanna's friends 
like Mr. Eyer see fit to boost this very 
valuable part of the Orange and Ma- 
room campus activities. 

Glee ClubWUl Give 
First Concert Friday 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY TO LAUNCH 
INTENSIVE CAMPAIGN IN SEPTEMBER TO 
RAISE $650,000 FOR ENDOWMENT FUND 

$150,000 Wlil be Used for Campus Improvements; 

$500,000 Will be Used For Strengthening 

Faculty and Adding to Equipment 



ARRANGEMENTS COMMITTEE APPOINTED 

Garman Reelected 



Football Captain 



Dorshimer and Schmidt Elected Man- 
agers; Thirteen Men Receive 
Varsity "S" 




Phila. Alumni Meet 
in Hotel Adelphia 



Quaker City Division of Alumni 

Association in Annual Gathering; 

Streamer Elected President 



r 



Alumni in the Philadelphia area held 
their annual meeting in the Hotel 
Adelphia in the Quaker City, Friday 
night of last week. Dallas Baer, '20, '23, 
recently elected pastor of Trinity 
Lutheran Church, Selinsgrove, presid- 
ed over the very excellent gathering of 
over thirty graduates. 

President Smith was to have ad- 
dressed this meeting, but could not 
attend, because of illness. Prof. Gross- 
man attended in his stead. 

Hayden Streamer, '14, was elected 
president for this year. Other officers 
are Marshall Fasold '28. vice president; 
Barbara DeRemer '26. secretary; Luth- 
er A. Fisher '22, treasurer; Dr. Ger- 
trude F. Weaver '15. member of Execu- 
tive Board for three years. 

Margaret Keiser '26 and Ruth 
Schaner, a member of Rev. Baer's 
church choir, delighted the group with 
several solos throughout the evening. 

Alumni who attended the meeting 
were Stanley Smith '29, Ray G. Sheel- 
er '28, Prudence Wilson '28, Margaret 
Keiser '26. Barbara DeRemer '26. Louis 
Rode '26, Helen Ohl '25. Angelina 
Showers '08. Ralph W Showers '08, M. 
Marion Weaver '19. Gertrude F. Weav- 
er '15, Ellis K. Lecrone '21. Mary E. 
Weaver '16. Luther M. Weaver. Jr.. '26. 
Luther A Fisher '22, Marie Romig 
Huntington '21. P. W. Huntington *17, 
'21, Ruth B. Stauffer. Mildred D. Dinn- 
son, Cha.« C Dlnnison, Tacies H. 
Brungart, Roscoe Treaster *19, Mary 
E App '22, M. E Hoffman '22, Mar- 
shall Fasold '28. Spurgeon T. Shue '28, 
R. M. Swartzwelder '27. and Hayden 
Streamer '14. 

Others who attended were Mrs. El- 
lis K. Lecrone <B. U. "23), Mrs. Mar- 
shall Fasold 'Ursinus '29), Ruth A. 
Baer, and Prof. Luther Grossman. 



President Smith and Dean Dunkel- 
berger are in Washington at present, 
attending the Council of Church 
Boards of Education and the meeting 
of the Association of American Col- 
leges. 

Arrangements have been made to 
have the delegates greet President 
Homer during the course of the meet- 
ing. 

S 

NOTICE SENIORS 
Any member of the Senior Class who 
had a cut in last year's Lanthorn may 
secure the same by applying to Clif- 
ford Kiracofe. business manager. The 
purchase price is fifty cents. 

S 

Breaking It Gently 
"Mamma, you know we had an 80- 
piece dinner set?" 
"Yes. darling." 
"Well, it's 79 now." 

S 

First Winter Track 
Meet January 25 



Male 



Choristers Will Open Season 
Mifflintown — Additional 
Concerts Planned 



ALTON GARMON '31 
Elected Captain of 1930 Gridmen 

Alton Garman '31, captain of the 
Orange and Maroon gridiron aggrega- 
tion during the 1929 season, was re- 



Formulating plans for a campaign 
next September to raise a minimum of 
$650,000 for Susquehanna University 
was the chief business of the annual 
meeting of the Board of Directors Jan- 
uary 9. 

Of this sum. $150,000 will be devoted 
to improvement of buildings and the 
campus. The remaining S500.000 will 
be placed in the endowment fund. 

The addition to the endowment 
fund is necessary to strengthen the 
faculty, to improve laboratories, and 
to increase the library facilities. 
President Smith Reads Report 

President G. Morris Smith, in his 
report to the board, showed that pro- 
gress has been made along many lines, 
such as the improvement of publica- 
tions of the university, the renovation 
of Hassinger Hall, and the improve- 
ments in the Freshman class entrants 

His report showed that there are 
498 students enrolled at the univer- 
sity, of which 373 are in the college 
department. The extension depart- 
ment has 360 students, most of whom 
are teachers in service. 

The report also showed to the board 
the need of establishing a student loan 
fund, with which to assist deserving 
students, who might not otherwise be 
able to get a college education. 

Other points brought out were a re- 
tirement system for the faculty and 
the principle of the Sabbatical leave 
for the heads of the departments. Un- 
der this plan, the faculty members 



Men's Glee Club will make its first 
appearance for this season Friday 
night of this week when its gives a 
concert in Mifflintown, near Lewis- 
town. 

Special rehearsals are now being 
held under the direction of Prof. El- 
rose Allison, '27, in preparation for 
this event. A splendid program of 
vocal numbers makes up the first part. 
A very entertaining operetta occupies 
the second part. 

Beginning with the second semester, 
an average of two concerts a week will 
te given for a period of six weeks. 
S 

Non-Frat and Phi 
Mu Tied for Lead in 
Intra-Mural League 



seven years for further study and re- 
search. He would be furloughed one 
year at half pay or one semester at 
full pay. 

Committee Appointed 
A committee consisting of the i'ot- 
• Concluded on page 3.) 

Dr. A. W. Ahl Attends 
Philological Meeting 



Seven Events Comprise Initial Meet 

in a Series of Five: Open 

to All Men 

The first Winter Track Meet of this 
collegiate year will be held January 
25. beginning at 2 P. M. Prof. Gross- 
man, director of athletics, will be in 
charge. 

The meet will be held on the 
outdoor pine board track, a very 
ful and valuable addition to the 
letic equipment of the university 

Similar track meets will be 
every week for a period of five weeks 
in order to condition and prepare men 
for the track season next spring. 

The events are: 30 yard dash, 440 
yard dash <3> laps. % mile run (9 
laps i, 40 yard low hurdle, shot put (16 
pounds), discus throw, and running 
high jump 

This meet will be open to all Sus- 
quehanna men, and should be especial- 
ly appealing to all who anticipate to 
be aspirants to berths to the Varsity 
track team during the coming season. 



new [ 

use- 

ath- 

held 



As a result of a swift-moving game 
between the unaffiliated boys and Bond 
and Key fraternity last night, the Non- 
Frat boys and Phi Mu Delta are now 
tied for first place in the Intra-Mural 
League, now in full swing. 

Both these teams will play Wednes- 
day night of this week, beginning at 
six-thirty. 

Epsilon Sigma stands second in the 
league, having won a game and lost 
one. 

The standing of the league is as fol- 
lows : 

Non-Fraternity 2 

Phi Mu Delta 2 

Epsilon Sigma 1 

Bond and Key 

Phi Lambda Theta 



In elected to that position in a recent 

election held by men who won their! could leave their positlons^once 'every 
varsity letter in that sport. 

The re-election is a splendid recog- 
nition of "Al's" ability as a leader and 
pilot. He has played three seasons of 
varsity football at Susquehanna in as 
| manv years on the campus. Kis fav- 
orite position is the pivot post. 

The former Sunbury High gridiron 
star only recently returned to his 
classes after a short stay in a hospital, 
t where he underwent a slight operation. 
■ This was made necessary by an injury 
| received in a game last season. 
Two Managers Elected 
Two managers were elected for the 
1930 season. They are Nevin Dorshim- 
er and Herbert Schmidt. 

This action was taken by the Ath- 
letic Council because both candidates 
to the position were very capable and 
efficient workers, and because it was 
felt that there was ample work for 
two managers. Both will enjoy the 
privileges which former managers or- 
dinarily had. 

Charles Varner '32. and George Hess 
'32. were elected assistant managers. 
(Concluded on page 1) 

Bruce Worthington 
is Frosh Editor 



Susquehanna Professor at Annual 

Gathering; of Learned Society; 

Many Interesting Lectures 



January 21 Issue of SUSQUEHANNA 

Will be Published by Members 

of Freshman Class 





1 
2 

J 



1.000 

1.000 

.500 

.000 

.000 



Non-Frat Defeats B. A K„ 20-17 

Non-Fraternity tossers downed the 
Bond and Key cagemen, 20-17, in a 
closely contested game Monday night. 

Both teams played a great game on 
the defense, but the unaffiliated boys 
managed to penetrate the B. & K. de- 
fense and score the points necessary to 
take the decision. 

Good played an excellent game at 
forward and scored six points for his 
team. Wolfe played well at center. For 
Bond and Key, Herman was the whole 
show, dropping them in at every angle, 
scoring eight points for scoring hon- 
ors. 

(Concluded on page 3.) 



Next week's issue of The Susque- 
hanna will be published by members of 
the Freshman class. 

Bruce Worthington. of Yonkers, N. 
Y., has been elected Editor-in-chief of 
this issue by his classmate.-v He has 
appointed a staff of assistants to help 
in the editorial work. 

Worthington is at present a member 
of the regular staff, where he serves 
as assistant Sports Editor. He was 
appointed to that position last fall. 

Ho has had considerable experience 
in journalism both in high school and 
as a member of the staff of The New 
York Times. Sports writing is his spe- 
cialty. 

Several novel feature are being 
planned by the neophyte journalists. 
As a whole the publication promises 
to be a very excellent one 

Regular members of the staff will 
supervise the work just enough to in- 
sure a properly edited and well-bal- 
anced publication. 



Dr. A. William Ahl represented Sus- 
quehanna University at the sixty-firs': 
annual meeting of the American 
Philological Association, held in Bos- 
ton, December 28. 

He reports very profitable and in- 
spiring sessions as well as delightful 
hours of fellowship with philologists 
and archaeologists from all parts of 
the United States. 

Among the outstandmg lectures was 
the "Psychological Aspect of Clytem- 
nestra in the Greek Drama Agamem- 
non'." in which the two emotions, in- 
tense love and madness of hatred were 
pictured as constantly striving for the 
supremacy in the queen 

Another lecture of special merit was 
"The Fate Motive in the Greek 
Drama." which dealt with the problem 
of fate and lreedom of the will. 

Undoubtedly, the most thrilling lec- 
ture was delivered by Professor Wil- 
liam C Green, of Harvard University 
on the "Murderers of Laius m Oedipus' 
by Sohpocles." The lecturer held the 
convention in such a gripping manner 
that it was literally "spellbound." The 
various phases of tragic irony, the 
characterization of slave, messengers, 
and shepherd gu\e 'he whole an 
pect of reality as. it thil most perfect- 
ly constructed tragedy ever written by 
man had become an actual happening 
at that hour. 

The lecturer, who was greeted with 
the greatest enthu.sia-m and applause, 
u.i Dr. Charles Rockwell Lamnan, of 
Harvard University Among other 
books, he has written a very extensive 
Sanskrit Grammar, which book caused 
Dr. Ahl. according to his own state- 
ment, many sleepless nights and much 
headache when he was doing post- 
graduate work at Vanderbllt Univer- 
sity. 

(Concluded on page 2.) 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 14. 1930 



THJL SUSQUEHANNA 

Published Weekly during the College Year except Thanksgiving Week,