(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Virginia Beach sun"

^•^^^^^i^^w^^mmv'i tMmmmmmmm^f^^^ifmmmmm^mm&mmmmmtmtmHI&9tKfKfltK9tlff/tKK/i 



ymcst^ 




McClamn tdk Scott 



DEC 



1Q"?9 



STKIE 



ubrM. 




Hearing notice short 



A DAY BEGINS for Uiese commuters they make their way to ihcm. Ami c 

Norfolk or to the naval bases or wherever their work might take s:iiiu> iiioloi' 

Planning Commission wins 
zoning ordinance delay 



if^ht hoiirs after Rod Mann made this shot most of these 

ists were makini; the return trip home. . 



Another delay (rf at least 
four months is anticipated 
before the proposed new 
Comprehensive Zoning Or- 
dinance, and accompanying 
Zoning maps, can be adopted. 

City Council Monday 
rescinded its request for a 
December 19 public hearing 
on the material by the 
Planning Commission, and 
rescheduled that hearing for 
next March 30. 

The action results from the 
Planning Commission in- 
dicatii^ it would not be able to 
complete a desired review, 
and revision, of the CZO in 
time to hold a December 19 
public hearing on the new 
zoning material as requested 
^ week by Council. 

planning Directw Charles 
Carrington informed Council 
at least 12 weeks would be 
r^uirfd in revising of 
mMmm meet desires o*f the 
Planning Commission. He 
outlined the time taUe as 
requiring one week to "tool- 
up" for the revisions, one 
week to locate parcels <rf 
concern to the Commission, 
two weeks field work, three 
weeks for drafting map 
revisims and completing text 
revisions, two weeks 
for requiring advertising of the 
public hearing, and two weeks 
for. ttie Commission's final 
decision. The additional week, 
according to Carrington, 
would be rtiat "lost" due to 



inactivity resulting from the 
Christmas holidays. 

Carrington said this would 
result in March 6 being the 
earliest possible hearing date, 
however the Planning Com- 
mission preferred March 20. 

Mayor Robert B. Cromwell, 
Jr., sUted, "We will not 
reinstate the zoning 

moratorium..." which expired 
last Friday. The moratorium 
had been in effect seven 
months. 

The Commission has in- 
dicated it is concerned with 
some 200 parcels (rf land 



which, according to the maps, 
would receive a zoning 

classification lower than 
present standards, and 
whether to accept or reject 
this prq)osal. 

Planning Commissioners 
have also indicated their 
concern over the workability 
of the LUI (land use intensity) 
formula in determining how 
many multi-family units could 
be placed on a particular lot. 
They have demonstrated they 
are concerned to the point of 
perhaps requesting the LUI 
formula not be used in the new 
CZO. 




Delegate Glenn McClanan 
^8 objected to the short 
notice this city's legislatore 
.received for a meeting with 
City Council on proposed 
charter changes. 

In a letter to City Manager 
Roger Scott McClanan ob- 
jected to the fact that only two 
of the 15-man legislative 
delegation was present for the 
first public hearing on the 
charter changes and 
a^gested that notice of such 
meetings be gi^en "several 
weeks in advance for times 
that have been determed to be 
possible for all members of 
the Council and our General 
Assembly delegation..' 

McClanan told Scott that he 
was advised by telephone of 
the first hearing, held 
November 27, and informed 
the caller it would not be 
possible for him to attend. 



"I assumed that a new date 
would the/i be arranged that 
was convenient fw, at least, 
the four members (rf our 
del^ation residing in Virginia 
Beach," McClanan wr(Ae. "I 
suspect that the 11 non- 
resident members of our 
legislative delegation had no 
notice of the meeting at all." 

The city's own l^islators 
are Senator Joe Canada and 
Delegate Ben Middleton, 
Owen Pickett and McClanan. 
Portions of the city are in- 
corporated in some of the 
neighboring city districts, 
hence the additional "11 non- 
resident members" of tfje 
del^ation. 

McClanan suggested that 
council and the legislators be 
given notice of similar 
meetings and public hearings 
several weeks in advance or, 
if that isn't possible, "at least 
adequate written notice" 



"I very much want to h#e 
the benefit of the opinions ftid 
Ideas of all member Jdt 
council as to »ate 
legislation," he explained 

McClanan also noted that 
through an article in The Sun 
"I just learned for the first 
time that an additional public 
hearing has been scheduled 
for December 18," He will be 
able to attend this meeting, 
McClanan saki, but told Scott 
"I hope that you will deter- 
mine whether or not this is 
true for the other people in- 
volved." 

Regardless of when the 
meeting is held, McClanan 
said, the hearing should be 
"well publicized and all 
citizens that wish to do so 
should be invited to appear 
and make orderly presen- 
tations conco-ning our state 
government or proposed 
legislation." 



■B5J* 




47th YEAR NO. 47 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7. 1972 



t$ CENTS 



44 



Upon this rock I will build" 



Christmas hours 
at%Post Offices 



TTie extension (rf Post Office 
window service hours during 
the Christmas seascm has been 
outlined by Virginia Beach 
Postmaster, J.T. Crosswhite 
Jr. 

The Main Office, Seapines, 
Lynnhaven, Oceana, London 
Bridge, Bayside, Princess 
Anne and Witch Duck Stations 
will be open from 7:30 a.m. 
until 5 p.m., on we^days, 
beginning December 4 
throu^ December 19, 1972. 



Window service will be 
available at these offices m 
Saturday, December 9 and 16 
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. All 
offices will be closed on 
Sundays. 

A boothe for the sale of 
stamps will be operated daily 
in the mall at PembnAe Mall 
Shopping Center ftom 1 p.m. 
until 9 p.m., December 4 
through December 19. except 
Sunday, December 10 and 17 
when the ciothe will be closed. 



Blue Ribbon paper 



The Virginia Beach Sun is 
one of only 144 newspapers in 
the entire country to be 
designated a "National Blue 
Ribbon Newspaper" for 1973 
by the National Editorial 
Foundation in Washington, 
DC. 

The Foundation, establLrifed 
in:i%6, is dedicated^ the 
ttfiprovemef^-oL^^dmalimi 
dfid jtNimalism educati(Hi and 
^^pas Uiis annual pn^ram to 




all newspapers in the coimtry, 
dailies and non-dailies. 

Notificatitm of The Sun's 
designation came Friday from 
Foundation President George 
Wortley III, Fayettevile, N.Y. 

Newspapers are judged on 

K criteria, measuring the 

paper's service to its com- 
munity against a national 
standard. 

Among the crito-ia are a 
newspaper's efforts toward 



editorializing on local issues, 
coverage of city government 
and tocal sports events and its 
general contribution to the 
community, including staff 
participation. 

"Tliis award indicates that 
you conduct an alert and 
progressive community- 
minded newspaper 
(^ration," Wortley said in his 
lettH" of notification. 



Bv SHIRLEY MARLOW 

Dark clouds raced across 
the heavens and the wind- 
whipped rain beat down in 
gusts. What a day for an in- 
terview! This Monday had to 
be :is gloomy as El Greco's 
"View of Toledo '. ^ 

A good hard yank on the 
heavy woocien doors. Oh, itow 
thankful to be insMe and get 
warm and dry again. 

It s^med almost automatic 
to tip-toe over the flagstoned 
foyer and quietly peep around 
the paneled doorways. Nobotay 
home? fhat seemed strange. 
This is I^ock Church, Virginia 
■ Beach, The fastest growing 
church in the Tidewater. 
Where was everybody? 

Why did so many pe(^le 
want to come here anyway? 
Architecturally speaking 
Rock Church dlidn't look so 
radical. Not to compare with 
that Catholic fortress in 
Norfolk or that sweeping 
Methodist spire in CharltAte, 
North Carolina. In fact, the 
church right next door was as 
pretty as any yoa'd ever see 
on a Christmas card. Rock 
Church was just a large, 
single story brick building 
topped with an A-rooMine 
and a huge granite 
rock rooted squarely 
in the center of the bright 
green lawn. This could mean 
but one thing. The big at- 
traction had to be inside. 

Suddenly an attractive 
secretary intrcxiuced herself. 
"I'm Margaret Williams. 
You'll have to excuse us. This 



is moving day for our staff 
offices. Reverend Giminez has 
been detained at a business 
men's luncheon. He'll be in 
shortly. Anything I can help 
you with come over to the 
other side." This was a 
blesnng. It wouki providt 




ItcviM-end Gimine? 

time to nose around and ponder 
the mystery of this church. 

The main sanctuary seemed 
a good place to wait. The 
modern blue-green stained 
glass windows c^ restful 
hues over the vast auditorium. 
The long rows and rows of 
empty seats seemed strangely 
quiet now. 

Last night these same pews 
were filled to overflowing with 
happy, hand-claw>ing people. 
Their bodies swayed rhyth- 
mically to the tune of "Just a 



Closer Walk With Thee". 
There were white faces, black 
faces, foreign faces. Short 
hair, long hair and no hair. 
Mini-shirts, maxi-shirts and 
kids in jeans. Thin girls, preg- 
nant women and white-haired, 
wrinkled matrons. Men 
smartly attired in business 
suits ^t next to youths who 
hadn't seen a rtzot in weeks. 
Kven a few babies creid softly 
now and then. Lord, what a 
melting pot. And the music 
rolled on. 

Behind the pulpit there were 
eighty well-scrubbed,_ radiant 
faces. This was just their 
Youth Choir. With or without 
long hair you could tell the 
male from the female by their 
clean blouses and shirts and 
ties. Now and then the choir 
and congregation would lift 
their hands over their heads 
with muted cries of "Praise 
Jesus", "Hallelujah" and 
"Amen". 

The joyous music played on. 
There was a grand piano, an 
organ, electric guitars, drums 
saxophone and lots of tam- 
bourines. Even the husband 
and wife team of pastors and 
their distinguished guests 
clapped their hands. It was an 
electrifying experience for the 
visitors and completely im- 
possible to keep your foot from 
tapping. A neighbor said, 
"Isn't it great to be able to 
clap in church." The sermon 
that followed was intriguing 
and constantly punctuated 
with Biblical references and 
Scriptural texts. It lasted 



twice as long as most Sunday 
evenir^ services, but no one 
seemed to notice the time. 

What drew this vast and 
varied group together for 
worship? A black family from 
Capti, La., said, "We love this 
church. The people here are 
•color blind. You know what I 
mean. We're in the Navy and 
stationed in Norfolk, We at- 
terai our church there in the 
morning, but they no iongo* 
have a Sunday night service. 
We come here and bring our 
next door neighbor because 
she's old and doesn't have a 
car." 

A lovely 17-year old girl 
from Princess Anne Hi^ 
School said, "I- went to a 
conservative Jewish 
synagogue for nine years. My 
church was totally different 
from this. I don't understand 
everything yet, but I'll talk 
with my friends about it this 
week. Yes, I'll prolrably come 
back again. Everyone's so 
friendly and sincere." 

A handsome youth chimed 
in, "My friends came here 
first. I was very skeptical, but 
I dated their roomate- and I 
saw how this church began to 
change all of their lives. Ttey 
talked with me about coming. 
They weren't over-emotional 
about it either. I came. I have 
no regrets. I'm very, very 
thankful for this church. Now 
my life is changed, too." 

A beautiful girl, formerly 
Catholic volunteered, "I like 
the part best about not having 
a church r(41 or membership. 



Saves on the bookeeping, too. I 
like the freedom fr(Mn rules 
and regulations". 

A 23- year oW college student 
profoundly remark^, "It's 
not important whether I c»me 
back a^in, but I do think that 
every minister, |H-irat and 
rabbi in Tidewater shoukt' 
come V«re once. Tli^ MiiM 
see and hear what's hap- 
pening here. That's what's 
really imp(fftant." 

That was last night. His 
words seemed to still echo in 
the sanctuary. Today a young 
man softly sang hymns to 
himself as he pushed the rug 
cleaner across the sea green 
carpeting. In the distance 
there were busy sounds of 
carpent0-s hammering ami 
saws buzzing. Electricians 
wando-ed in and out testing 
the lighting equiment. An 
elderly couple chatted as they 
walked through on a tour. 
Then two young men ob- 
vioiKly students came over 
and asked for the "preacher". 
And indwd, the "preacher" 
had returned. 

The Reverend John 
Giminez, former heroin ad- 
dict, stood before me smiling. 
"I'm ready for your question 
now". 

Rock Church keeps no 
membership records. The 
average collection ranges 
fr(Hn $1600 to $1800 per sa-- 
vice. It has been as lugh as 
$3,000 in a single service 
depending up<m the need. The 

(Continued on P»9» S) 



hitehurst... 



sets priorities for Virginia Beach 



BySONJAHILGREN 
Sun Washington Bureau 

, WASHINGTON-Rep. G. 
William Whitehurst, R- 
Norfolk, says his main in- 
terest during the next 
C(Mgress will be woriting on 
what he calls "bread and 
liitter" p-ojects rather than 
jstx legislation. 

* Whitehurst was elected by a 
50,000'vote margin to his 
fourth term in Congress and 
his first twm serving Virginia 
Beach, 

"Essentially my job is a 
iMead and butter jdb ami I 
think that explains our suc- 
vce^ at the polls this month," 
^hitdiurst said in an in- 
terview. 

"I have a new city in my 
(istrlct and I'm very anxious 
to get two of their pri(Hities 
solved if I can. Om is the loed 
f«w additi(mal sewage lines 
and facilities in the City of 
Virginia B^ch. and I want to 
iee whM fedml aMistanee I 



can get for that," Whitehurst 
said. 

He said the second priority 
is to get federal help to rebuild 
flood walls and replenish Uie 
city's beach area. Whitdhurst 
expressed disappointment 
that a comprel^nsive beach 
raiewal pr(^ram was con- 
tained in the Public Works and 
Ecomtmic Development Act of 
1972 which President Nxxm 
vetoed nine days after 
Congrras adjourned. 

Whitehurst said: "We've got 
to get that beach ta<* in 
shape. And so I expect to go 
and fight very hard to sm if I 
can'tget that program start«J 
again and see if we can get 
some adrame fundir^ so that 
we can tackle it" 

He said he also {riars to 
work to inprove the Hampton 
Roack harbor "so the port can 
be^more competitive," 

He^ed: "Finally is the 
med n> do what we can to 
protect our luval facilities in 
i of the oite ttat ai% bound 



to be coming in the defense 
establishment." 

Whitehurst sits on the House 
Armed Service Committee, 
whk:h has a lot do say about 
the status of naval facilities. 
Looking to the agenda before 
the 93rd Congress, Whitehurst 
said he believes Congress 
mi£t consider legislation in 
the areas of busir^, mass 
transit, health care, tax 
reform and welfare reform. 

Although the %nd Congress 
failed to act on these isj^es, 
Whitehurst said the 93rd 
C(Nigress is more likely to 
pass such legislation because 
the problems "are more 
imminent than they were 
before." 

Whitehurst predicted that 
the President may face some 
opposition in Conqrf-ss from 
members of his c»v. n mirly on 
his proposals dealing with 
tl»se issues because, rt<-spite 
the President's landslide 
*ict<ry, "he was not actively 
involved in trying to get 



co-tain Republicans elected." 
Whitehurst added: "But 
since the Democratic Party 
controls the Congress, I ex- 
pect we'll see a pattern not 
unlike the one weJiad in the 
previous four years. And for 
those of us who are back here, 
I would think that we'll do our 
best to support the President 
when we can." 

Whitehurst said that 
although the President's 



coattails (H-oved to be very 
short in many parts of the 
nation, in Virginia "the 
coattails were fairfy long." 
With the election (rf Robert 
W. Daniel Jr. to represent the 
Fourth Congressional 
District, the Republicans now 
have a 7 to 3 majority in the 
Virginia Hguse delegation, 
WhiWfnu^t 

iob^g^rfiel won that 

(Continued on P^ 5) 



;%¥SftJS:%X::::::Ay:^«:SSSSasa®Sft!S^^JS^®i&^SS 





1N)II. SHE' S PRETTY — Patricia Perroa. 5. weat ttap^g hut 

inolhrr. Mr%. William O. PerrM, Arasooa VlHage. As she te-mvsei tta>Mgh tt» t«y 

department, Patricia was fascinated by this «Me^ye4d<rtl. "Thec^|riMetta^..." 

on paije 'y 



MlteMB^ 



IttHMi 



y 



'^^'•wm^m^^m 



^r^F^^r^amn 



«^^"^""^^p^^ 



MOEZ 




THE SUM 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 7. 1972 



Norfolk Concert-' eveninff of beautiful music^ 



HARPIST JOEL ANDREWS will perform a candlelight concert at the Friends 
I^leeting House, 1537 LaAin Road, rni Sunday. Dec, 10 at 7 p.m. He is a fwmer 
mmician ta resictenc« at North Carolina State in Raleigh, Sandhills Cinnmunity 
College in North Caririina and Fayetteviile Technical Institute. Light refreshments 
w ill be served at the reception after the concert and the audience will be invited to 
meet Andrews. 



Beach Arts Center 
opens new gallery 



The Virginia Beach Arte 
Coiter, spof^or of the annual 
. Boaitiwallc Art Show, wiU 
. open an art gallery at its 
. h^dquarters, 1916 Arctic 
Av«nie, cm Saturday, Dec. ». 
The gallery will open with a 
«ie-man show by Williams- 
burg architect Carlton S. 
Abbott, winner of ttie Board- 
walk Art Show's 1972 Best in 
Sho9/ award. The show will 
also contain the Boardwalk 
Art Show Purchase Prize 
Cdlectim and an Own-Loan 
Eidiibilion d mrnnbos* worics. 
tlie ^Uery, located in the 
City Hall Annex bdiind the 



Civic Center, has been con- 
verted from former municipal 
(rffices. It will contain three 
major opotitions: A rotatii^ 
gallery (rf worics by Arts 
Center members which wiU be 
available for sale or rental; an 
invitational gallery which will 
house changing shows of 
works by members and other 
artists, and a third gallery 
containing traveling shows 
from the Virginia Musoim 
and other established in- 
stitutions. 

Winter hours for the gallery 
are 1 to 5 p.m. on Fridays, 
Saturdays and Sumiays only. 



17 6€cdb:^^B}l@iCS^^ c^^ 

* 

for 'Nuta-ack^' ballet 



Seventeen young dancers 
' from Virginia Beach have 

bwn ch<»ai to dance the 
'second act ci "The Nut- 
^cracka-" with the Nwfolk 

Civic Ballet. The danco? are 
^students at tt« Academy of 

the Norfolk Ballet 

Tl« procbction is under the 
. directiwi of Gene Hammett, 
"with Teresa Martinez as ballet 

mistress of the Academy and 

Penny Martin as drama 

directs. 
Performances are 

scheduled iot the followit^ 

dates; 

. Dec. 9, Franklin, Va., at 
.10:30 a.m. and Chowan 

College at 3 p.m. 
< Dec. 11, Norfolk State 



College at 7:30 p.m. 

Dec. 12, Hampton Institute 
at 7:30 p.m. 

Dec. 16, Chrysler Museum 
at 10:% a.m. and 2:30 p.m. 

Pour performances are also 
to be scheduled in Virginia 
Beaoh in early January. 

The Beach students chosen 
to dance in "The Nutcracko"" 
are Sandra Flader, Leigh 
Smartz, Laurie Carter, David 
Wri^t, Lisa Rinkov, Bonnie 
Ramus, Nancy Lew Guenira*!, 
Catto-ine Wright, Katherine 
Hi^ins, Carol Garrison, Kim 
Patterson, Diane Angleman, 
Stacy Caddell, Kenna March- 
bank, Lynn Brehmer, 
Elizabeth Fulton and Diane 
Gilbert 




l4..vnr^M L^^ Saurte (to|i). daughter of Mr. and 
Mn. G.C. SMff«i ar VIrtfita BMeh. ^m perfora te 
"tte Natop^flr** wM m Mrfalk CMe Biifet. Tke 
attw fmm^ inrrn w i-y§»-m iUiAtrly FMi' 
i^^ilMI) aaiftaqr Um^&f^ •. SmIc« M hmmm 
N mm DoMU Khawy. «. 



For their second subscription 
concert of the season, Maestro 
Russell Stanger and the Nw^olk 
Symphony Orchestra offered, 
on Monday evening, a nicely 
balanced program of music that 
spanned the nineteenth centairy 
with performance of major 
WMts by Beethoven (the First 
Symphony) and Dvorak (the 
Violin Concerto and Carnival 
Ovwture^. And there was a 
{feasant foray into twentieth 
century American music with 
the Poem and Dance by the late 
Quincy Porter. 

Balanced, also, was the sound 
tlw orchestra produced. This 
promising development is 
worth a comment in light of the 
accoustical atmosphere in 
Chryster Hall which, I feel, 
teq^ to favor the timbers of the 
brasses and winds at the ex- 
pense of the strings, which seem 
to lack "presence". This may 
be due in part to the relative 
size of the brass and wind choirs 
vis-a-vis the strings, the former 
being presently nearer full 
symphonic strength. For 
example, I counted five French 
horns among the brasses (a 
number that rarely need be 
exceeded) and only sue cellos 
(can means be found to double 
that figure? ) among the strings. 
At any rate, Mr. Stanger and 
bis musicians have found a way 



to co-exist effectively with these 
accoustical facts of life, for the 
orchestral tone brought forth in 
the Beethoveri Symphony was 
entirely satisfactory. Ad- 
ditimally, attacksand releases 
were precise, and |:^rasir^ was 
meticulous. In all, Oiis was a 
beautifully molded per- 
f(Mrmance <rf Beethoven's C 
Major Symphony, Opus 21. 
Interpretively, It was closer in 
spirt to Haydn and Mozart, 
whose influence, to be sure, is in 
the worK . But by the time 
Beethoven hfcd come to his First 
Symphony, he had behind him 



the transitional String Quartets 
of Opus 18 which ended his 
apprentice period, and, for this 
reason Monday ni^t's per- 
formance, ideally, could have 
been more assertive. 

The Porter Poem and Dance 
which followed was, by con- 
trast, a sersuous piece of im- 
pressionism. Paul Taylor, tte 
orchestra's first trumpet, 
played his solo superbly and 
was singled out for a well- 
deserved bow at tiie conclusion 
of this very interesting piece, 
wiOi its evocation of Detnissy, 
Ravel and George Gershwin. 



concerto itsdf is a delightful 
piece, replete with the 
characterisitic C^ech folk 
idioms for which Dvorak is 
noted, and it deserves a more 
activer(riein ttie viotincon(»^to 
repertory. But m this occasion 
it lacked fire. ; 

Excitement was ati^ndant, 

howevw, in Dvorak's Canuval 

Overture which conclude the 

(x-o^am. It is one of the 

fhis'may have bei^n"more'tte composer's finest worics, arid it 

was played with vexve bnd 



Violinist RuggieroRicci, ttie 
evening's guest artist, was 
soloist in the Violin Concerto <rf 
Antonin Dvorak, whose music is 
beii^ featured on most of this 
season's symphony in'Ograms. i. 
Mr. Ricci played beautifully, as 
he always does, and with 
technique to burn But tlie 
volume of tone he produced was 
insufficient to make his eifforts 
come alive in Chrysler Hall 



fault of the hall, which, again, 
does not favor string sound, 
than an indication of any 
shorteoming of Mr. Ricci's. The 



brillance. It {X'ovided a fitting 
finale to a satisying evening of 
beautiful music. 
K.A. Rangley 



"HAY600D" 

ciiupdi of Clwtet 

Mwttni It ttift oonwr 
of Ha^^pMd and Ferry 
Plantation Roads, Vir- 
ginia Baach, Va. Mail- 
ing Aiklrais: P.O. Box 
6036, Virginia Baach, 
Va. 234S6. 



THEOPH ILro' 

^ I CAN'T 
60 THERE 
AND WRm\?l 




"...how wilt thou say to tiiy brother, let me pull out tiie mote 
oat of thine eye; and, behold, a beam is in thine own eye? Thou 
hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then 
Shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote..." 

Hie man who says, "I may not attend the assembly, but at 
least I don'tlie and cheat like J(An Doe who does attend," is no 



better off than Mr. Doe, both stand convicted as trawgrcMon M 
God's will. Rm. 2:21-23. Heb. 10:25 > • 

Jesus condemned the hypocrites for omitting the "wdghtW 
matters of the biw," but he didn't tell Uiem they could have set 
aside the rest, no he said of these less weighty matters, "theie 
ought ye to have done..." Matt 23:23 




OUR HEMMG SVSIEM 
EQUAL RKHIS TO EVERVONE. 



control isn't the only advantage. 
Electric baseboards give you 
clean, dependable, long-lived, 
trflfuble-f ree heating with 
no cold drafts or hot spots. And 
because they use electricity 

in the winter, 
when there's 
power to spare, 
they help you to 
hold down electric 
-V— y-*i« rates by balancing 

the demand for 
power throughout 
the year. 

So if you're 
looking for a new 
house, or building 
one, ask the con- 
Lw««». tractor about this 
flexible system. Or call your 
local Vepco office. They'll 
be happy to work with you 
and your builder to help 
vou plan for electric base- 
board heat. 

Then all your relatives can 
be comfortable at once. Even 
though comfort is relative. 



■i- 



1 

t 



Where heating comfort is 
concerned, all people are not 
created equal. They're as 
different inside as mey are 
outside. So the thermostat 
setting that's W&rm for one m 
be hot-or cold- 
f or another. 

But there's one 
heating system 
that lets you please 
all of the people 
all of the time. 
Electric baseboard 
heat. Because it 
offers the one 
thing that guar- 
antees everyone's 
comfort: a tnermo- 
stat in every room. 

With multi-thermostats, you 
can warm the bath and baby's 
room without overheating the 
rest of the house. You can lower 
the heat in the kitchen when 
you're cooking, or cut it way 
down in unused rooms to save 
electricity. And money. 

But this room-by-room heat 




Wpco 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 7. 1972 



THE SUN 



water campaign to 
mardi and fish frv 



L'^^^^fe'* 



•l.f 0"^ Sunday afternoon the 

;'ltiitW! ' Virginia Beach 

.J'Cawipiign Clean Water" 

';,tund raising efforts will wind 

,\up with a pledge march and 

' bicycle ride followed by a Pish 

, fry and Dance at 0» Virginia 

;^' peach T)ome. 

;^;. "dimpaign Clean Water" is 

,^,.tryir^ to raise enough money 

,• ,to hi^ a professional staiT of 

, '(lawyers, economists, 

,',( ^engineers, and scientist* who 

',. ^ill focus on envircmmental 

problems relating to water 

pollution from ocean and bay 

^ dumping, destt-uction of 

I" ecosj^tem's through dredging, 

r -and filling, etc. 

il^ There is a definite need for a 

staff of full time professionals 



l:^ 






to work with citizens and 
citizen groups, because ttre 
citizen is hampered by a lack 
<rf time and money, and cannot 
argue his case as effectively 
as his opponant - who has the 
funds, the experts, and the 
time to defend his point of 
view. 

The Fish Fry at the Virginia 
Beach Dome will be from 64 
p.m. and the band "STORM" 
will play for dancing. The 
adult tickets are a $2. donation 
and children's tickets are a $1 
donation and will be available 
at the door. 

For further information, 
call the Virginia Beach Clean 
Water office 425-3896 from 12-4 
p.m. and 6:30-9 p.m. 



Four artists to discuss 
changing tides in art 




Miss Fergusoi 



PAGE 3 






!! 



A.^nel of four will discuss 

*'CJariiging Tides in Twentieth 

L. _Centory>rt" in Oie Chrysler 

,,^useum Theater, Wednesday, 

Dec. 13, at 3 p.m. The panel 

includes Fay Zetlin, Dick 

» Possitt, 4ay Milder and Victor 

-fickett; 

Mrs. ^tlin teaches painting 






k*,l»t 0J4. Dominion Univonity 
— -and her paintit^ have been 
shown in national and r^ional 
exhibitions ami have received 
many awards. One <rf her 
jointings is reproduced in 
**Through the Vanishing 
Point, Space in Poetrj^ and 
Painting" by Marshall 
McLuhan and Harley Parker. 
Cossitt serves as art critic 
for the Richmond Times 
Dispatch and the Virginia 
Pilot, teaches sculpture at 
Norfolk State College, and is 
curator of the Walter C. Rawls 
Museum in Courtland, 
Virginia. Cossitt has exhibited 
throughout the Southeast and 



has completed a number of 
architectural commissions in 
Baltimore, Washington, Rich- 
mond, and Norfolk. 

Milder, a New Yorii ex- 
pressionist painter and 
sculptor, is presently Artist in 
Residence and teacher at the 
Chrysler Museum School. His 
worics have been exhibited 
throughout the United States, 
and in Puerto Rico, London, 
and Paris; and have been 
added to the collections 
Museums in Israel. Puerto 
Rico, California. Ohio, North 
Carolina and Virginia. 

Pickett is an assistant 
professor of art at Old 
Dominion University where he 
teaches sculpture. He has 
exhibited throughout North 
Carolina and Virginia, and has 
executed architectural 
sculi^ure for Old Dominion 
University. 

The program is free and 
open to the public. 



STORM— Fund raisini; efforto for "Campaigii aean 
Water" will start Sunday with a Pledge March and 
Fish Fry at the Virginia Beach Dome. The band 
STORM will play for the event. 



The appointment of Diana 
Rat* Ferguson as the Ad- 
vertising and Public Relations 
Manager for Kastern Auto 
Distributors, Inc. has been 
announced by S. Frank 
Blocker, Jr., President of the 
firm. 

Eastern Auto DistributorSi 
Inc. distributes Renault anc^ 
Peugeot in the states of 
Virginia, West Virginia, North 
Carolina, Kentucky. Ten- 
nessee, Maryland, I>elaware, 
South Carolina, northern 
Georgia, and the District of 
Columbia. 

Miss Ferguson holds a B.S. 
degree in Journalism from 
West Virginia University 
where .she majored in Ad- 
vertising with a markctir^ 
minor. 

Former positions include: 
Account Kxecutive for tl» 
VIRGINIA BEACH SUN; 
Asst. Media Buyer- 
Copywriter for Capital Ad- 
vertising Agency in Virginia 
Beach; Acct. Executive for 
GLOBE Newspapers, North- 
ern Virginia's 10 Weekly 
Newspapers and i'^sst. Ad- 



vertising Manager for Ziff- 
Davis Publishing Co.. in 
Washingtim, DC. 




JoelleT. Ingram, a Virginia 
Beach freshmen of Ball State 
University in Muncie, In- 
diana, is a member of the Ball 
State University Marching 
Band which presented its 
annual stage show, "Half-time 
Highlights," recently. 

The show included music by 



the 194-piece band, baton 
artistry b.' the feature twirler 
and majorettes and drill 
routines by the Cardett«s. 
Choreography for the half- 
time shows and the stage 
concert was done by Roberta 
Litherland, wife of associate 
band director Don Litherland. 



CUFS REPAIR, INC. 



-Spceidtelngln- 

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS 

• Leaky faucets • Painting 

• Carpentry repairs • Floor tile 

• Broken windows and doors 

• Rotted out (utters 
NO JOB TOO SMALL! 



FREE ESTIMATES 



Dianu Rae Ferguson 



PHONE 

497-7349 



4920 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 



EMERQENCV 
NIQHTS! 499-33t9 







Friends of VWC named NOW | MAKES IT 

EASY... 



Violinist Dora Short to 
iplay in New York recital 



Dora Short, violinist from 
Virginia Beach, will perform a 
Sonata Recital witti pianist 
Pnivda Stkorskt SaturdAjl,- 
Dec. 9, in New York^at the 
Town Hall. 

Mrs. Short shidied with I.E. 
Feldman, violin teacher and 
chamber music authority. She 
has been concertmaster rf the 
Norfolk Symphony fw the past 
six years. 

Concerts at 



She is first violinist of the 
Feldman String Quartet, 

seasons,, and has peifornved 
throughout Virginia, North 
Carolina, Maryland, Indiana 
and regularly at the National 
Gallery of Art in Washington. 
Mrs. Short has also played 
many recitals in Vir^nia and 
has been soloist with the 
Norfolk, Roanoke and 
Peninsula Symphony Or- 
chestras. 



Base Chapel^ 



The Tidewater Navy 
Ch(H4sters will pres«it a 
Christmas concert on 
Monday at 8 p.m. in the 
Little Cr4ek Amphibious 
Base Chapel. The one-hour 
program will feature both 
secular and religious music. 

The Choristers will be 
I of Navy, Marine, 
and sen^ieedepSMtents, and 
will be under the Wection 
of Cha^dain Lecm Harbell, of 
the USS GUADALC/ 
Chaplain F.S. Taylor, 
assistant FIFTH Naval 
District Chaplain, is the 
president of the Tidewater 
Navy Choristers. Donations 
will be given to the Joy 
Fund for needy Tidewater 
families. 

On Tuesday at 8 p.m. a 
chdr made up of choral 
groups from the Bayside 
Baptist and Bayside 
Christian Churches will 
present the Christmas 
P!»tton of Handel's 
"Messiah." Tom Pen- 
dergrass, music director at 
Bayside Baptist Church will 
direct the choral groiq). 

The NAVPHIBASE 
Ojapel's Protestant Oioir 
will join the Cdeman Place 
Presbyterian Church Oidr, 
uido* the direction of Paid 
Dickey, director of the 
NAVPHIBASE's Chdr, on 
December 20 at 8 p.m They 
will sing "Laud to the 
Nativity" by Res^^. 

The iMiblic is invited to 
attaid these e^^nts, and 
may otter thnw^ Gate S. 

Crew sou^it 

The USS West Point 
Reunim Association is tryii^ 
to locate all former crewmen 
of tfie WorM War 11 troc^ 
transport. 

The crew members will hoM 
ttinr reunion in Chicago on 
June 21-23. Crewmen are 
asked to contact Sec. Jdin E. 
Daniel. 519 E. Nettleton 
^reet. Indpendence, Mis^uri 
M3S0 tor more irtfwmatiwi. 



Four prominent Tidewater 
business and professional men 
have been named ak'ea 
chairman in the "Friends of 
Virginia Wesleyan" program, 
according to William J. 
Fanney, president (rf Life 
Federal Savings and Loan 
Assocition and general 
chairman of "Friends of 
Virginia Wesleyan." 

Serving as Norfolk Chair- 

P.T.A. presents 
choral program 

The W.T. Cooke School 
P.T.A. will present a 
Christmas Choral {K'ogram on 
Monday at 7:30 p.m. TTie fifth 
and sixth grade chorus will be 
directed by Mrs. Sars Sexton. 
Mrs. Charles Nixon, 
President, will conduct a 
business meeting preceding 
the in^gram. 

The Book Fair will be open 
fib 6:30 p44. )'ip |t|iei library. 
Sweat $hirts"t-Shir4 will be 
on Sale at this time. 

Baby sittit^ is available at 
Beach Lawn Church 
December llth. at 7 p.m. Girl 
Scout Troop 1^ will use the 
small donation to buy trees for 
beautification of the church 
grounds. Reservations may be 
made in advance. For in- 
formation call Mrs. Ethel 
Denton (425-6497) 



man .will be V.M. Barney 
Annas, branch manager of 
Southwestern Life^nsurance 
Company. Virginia Beach 
Chairman will be James P. 
Sadler, president of Sadler 
Materials Corporation. In 
Portsmouth, William B. Cloe, 
Jr., executive vice-president 
of Merchants and Farmers 
Bank, will serve as chairman. 
Russell I. Townsend, Jr., 
attorney and state senator 
from Chesapeake, will serve 
as Chesapeake Chairman. 

The "Friends" program 
seeks annual operating 
support for Virginia Wesleyan 
College, a four-year, private 
educational institution. Last 
year, the program raised 
approximately $56,000 for 
library books, scholarship aid 
and academic equipment. 

Directing last years 
program were General 
Chairman Willis W. Step- 
henson, Norman C. Willcox in 
Norfolk, Eari^ \^ jSJattym in, , 
Virginia Beac^' iJanries I*. ' ■ 
Stephenson in Portsmouth and 
William H. WfiiteT;jf; m '" 
Chesapeake. 



I, 



Littleton 



udqihs 

REAl ESTATE CO. 

13S3 L4iskin M. 421-0044 



GRAND 

OPENING 

IS NOW! 





Dear TIDEWATEI^ 

It is with much pleasure 
that I advise you that our 
new six acre exclusive Toy- 
ota facility is now open. 
This new dealership is the 
most modern automobile 
facility in Virginia. It fea- 
tures: 



SALES: The largest selection of new 
and used Toyotas in Tidewater. A sales 
staff to serve you fairly and efficiently. 
SERVICE: Factory trained mechanics 
working under ideal conditions. 14 ser- 
vice bays, plus a machine shop. Total 
service, including; electronic diagnosis, 
front end, transmission and tires. 
PARTS: More genuine Toyota parts 
than any other dealer in the area. Over 
5,000 different parts items on hand. 
Direct teletype ordering service. 
BEAUTY: This is not just another 
automobile dealership. This is the most 
beautiful one you have ever seen. We 
have preserved and complimented na- 
ture on the site. A genuine JaparMse 
traditional garden has been created 
for your pleasure. 



Drop by during our grand 
opening and enter your name 
to win a free vacation (for 2) 
to Japan (Courtesy Checkered 
Flag Toyota & Japan Airlines) 
complete with first class hotels 
and tours. Nothing to buy, no 
obligation and all licen^d 
drivers are eligible. Someone 

is going to win why not 

you. 

Yours very truly, 

Edward 6. Snyder 
President 




will meet 

"The Equal Rights 
Amendment" will he the 
subject of a talk by Janet 
Mays and Judy Lovell, Nor- 
folk members of the 
Tidewater Women's Political 
Caucus, at a meeting of the 
Virginia Reach Chapter of the 
National Organization for 
Women Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. 
at Bayside Presbyterian 
Church. 1400 Ewell Road at 
Independence Boulevard The 
mt-eting is open to all in- 
lerested women. 

Mrs. Lovell is a social 
worker with the Model Cities 
Program in Norfolk and Mrs. 
Mays is the only woman 
member of the Governor's 
Committee on Welfare and 
Institutions. 

Persons wishing more in- 
formation about the Virginia 
Beach Chapta- of N.O.W. may 
write Box 5613, Virginia Reach 
M455. The group also has 
speakers available for local 
ff^^ ^ I t|i| •^l^bject^ |)i* 
women's history, women's 
Tights, and <he>l^4k. ' " c 

OUtHRST 



m 



m 



i 

m 



TO OPERATE THIS 

MOTOROLA 

CtuasaK 

PORTABLE COLOR TV 

''^Remote Control 

Motorola makes remote control easy by ellmlnatlrHj ttie com- 
plicated color adjustment buttons from its transmitter. All you 
do Is turn set on/off . . . change VHF channels , . . adjust 
volume from your easy chair. Insta-Matic Color Tuning helps 
handle the color balancing at the set. 

e IN8TA-MATIC*C0L0R TUNING 

Push one button to automatically balance color hue, 
intensity, contrast, brightness ... and you can even actlvata , 
the automatic line tuning. ' 



m 



90 



DAYS I VD 

FREE SERVICE *'i W« 




I 
I 

n 

i 
I 



ALL FOR A 
ONLY^ 



Nlolorali • • ■ miiMa of the QuMsr Color IV SyilMii 



PARTS 
WARRANTY 



2-YR. 



PICTURE TUBE 
WARRANTY 



JOHN'S TV 



VA P^ArHRIVD K<N LYNNHAVLNHD 
r a; '>Ar- 1363 -HIO llfiH 

OPE.M MON. THRU FBI. 9 10 9 TIL CHHISl MAb 



m 
m 



m 



-4 



-% 



the holiday fun 

Our cheery stores and services 

are all dressed up for Christmas with 

gift ideas and great values everywhere! 




• ASSOCIATED IMORTGAGE CO 
OF VIRGINIA, INC. 

• THE BEEHIVE 

• THE COLONY BEACH FLORIST 
& GIFT SHOP 

• CROWN GAS 

• DECOR, LTD, 

• ELECTRO TV SERVICE. INC 

• FABRIC CENTER 

• SMUGGLER'S COVE 



• 'FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
OF NORFOLK 

• KUTNKURL » 

• THE MOVIES I & II 

• NEW YORK WIG 

• SAFEWAY 

• SANTAS DISCOUNT 
TRIM A TREE 

• SOUND WORLD, LTD. 
•WHITE CROSS 



PEMBROKE REALTY & INSURANCE CO..INC. 



embroke 
eadoivs 



SHoivrvG ce;vter 



I>A^4 



>><><i|ma<ii[m><i)nmmnmimammni 



THE SUN 




A yes vote for ecfual rights 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1972 



ADm^nMkMkm MiMml To Serving 

lai RM«nont Ad.. Vlr^nis aMch, Vlf«lnta 234S2 
nio«M4tC-»U0 
rally by Onr David Poote, 6«fwr«l Manager 

& Radie Inc Ritf>y <toin PtiNlips, Managing Editor 
dass po^i^ paid 



FViitMa BmcIi, 
" |ii^Homtd»- 
^, - iWwutsptr 

flScMt«|)ymaii.$9 



To the Editor: 

Tlie Equal Rights Amend 
mcnt should certainly be 
accepted by the Virginia Slate 
legislature in January. 

The reasom against it are 
pitlftil. Some male speakers 
have actually threatened that 
they coidd no longer bdiave as 
"gentlemen" toward 



vomankind if the ERA Is 
(Kissed. 

If they really are gen- 
tlemen, they will have the 
fairness and justice in their 
hearts for women and would 
vote in favor of the Equal 
Rights Amendment. 
Dorothy Abdill Miller 
87th Street 



UTTERS 
EDITOR 



Hungupon integratedbathrooms^ 




SUBURBAN 
NEWSIV^PERS 
OF AMERICA 



MamiMr, viralnla. Pn» Aaoclatlon 



B Equal rights is not to 



He needs help 

The Hampton Roads Sanitation District's Little 
Creek plant is a trouUe-plagued operation. The 
latest mishap, in a year marked by mishaps, 
caused the dumping of over SIX BILLION gallons 
of partially treated sewage into Chesapeake Bay. A 
femporary ban presently existe on oyster and clam 
maiiceting. 

Earlier this year, of course, a malfunction at 
this samre plant caused such a severe pollution 
problem in the bay that the Chesapeake beaches 
w«^ closed to swimmers. 

And, as if the mechanical problems are not 
enough, the HRSD has the Hampton fiasco hanging 
around its neck: personnel caught red-handed 
dumping sewage residue into the already polluted 
James River. 

Ttie combination of all these things, and there 

are probably many incidents that go unpublicized, 

spells trouble, big trouble, for this area and for the 

beautiful Chesapeake Bay unless steps are taken 

immediately to relieve the situation. 

;.*- Last summ^'s malfunction reportedly was 

: caused by ffooding. Last week's was a large con- 

;ca-ete pipe winch gave way, according to HRSD 

"manager Colonel William J. Love, because the 

: plant, pilings and all, is sinking into the marshland 

>at Little Creek. 

" * - 

V Colonel Love must often ttiink that every<me is 

> working against him. His plant floods. And it sinks. 
:-The Hi^way Department, he tdd the Water 

> Control BmT6 this week, actually excavated 
7: beneath «ie large pipe and left it suspended.. .a 
% miracle it didn't Inreak. The plant serv^ an area 
:• that persists in grtnving faster than its services can 
fi he^ up with the people. And too few people see, or 
^ esren mm^ what is hat^nkig to Dmb sewage 
*: ^tuation. It is an wienviable position that Colonel 
;' Love is in. 

t; But it is also an unenviable position this area is 
Jin. For the day is fast approaching when the 
n Chesapeake will be destroyed by irresponsible 
^ human bein^. Its tributaries are already sick with 
;: pollution, some portions are dead. Millions of 
I dollars are being lost because of unmarketable 
sheUfish. ' 

It is pitiful to watch this magnificent giant die by 
*T«tegrees. It is infuriating to see officials shrug off 
the danger with another study or another com- 
mittee while the illness creeps on. 

There is no need to point an accusing finger at 
Colonel Love and the HRSD. He has raised the 
rates to provide for future expansions, in addition 
to the expansion due for completion next year. He is 
trying to care for an exploding populartion with an 
inadequate facility, realizing that the growth will 
probably keep ahead of the plant's capacity 
regardless of the proposed expansions. 

Colonel Love told the SWCB "We need help." 
Certainly he does. He needs state and federal aid, 
both financially and in responsibility of controls. 
He needs more suppcfft from local governing 
bodies. And he needs it all immediately if the 
Qiesapeake is to live. 



overthrow male supremacy 



To the Kditor 

In light of the Constitution 
and our nation's high pristine 
ideals. I cannot see aiiv rea.son 
to ohject to the "Fqual Rights 
Amendment" as stated: 
"Equality of rights under lav 
shall not he denied ornhridged 
hy the United .States or anv 
.State on account of sex." F do 
not consider this the 
(•quivalent of the atU»mpt of 
"women's liberation" to 
overthrow the supremacy of 
n^an in domestic matters, 
although the two are un- 
fortunately closely related, 
and this would be my only 
leason to oppose the amend- 
ment 

I do not di'sire all those 
favoring the "Kqual Rights 
An^endment to hi«come anti- 
Gnd becausr of Scripttiral 
statements given in last 
wwk's editorial supporting 
the dominion of n'ale over 
fen^ale. In reply to Mr. 
Sinrmev. with all due respect. 
I would like to .state that 
women's rights are upheld in 
tiM' Hible, In Number 27:1-11. 
God told Moses that the 
women had a right to sp<>ak in 
demand of their justified 
inheritances. 

Another controversial 
passage stated was I Corin- 
thians 14:34 ""Let your 
women keep silence in the 
churches; for it is not per- 
mitted unto them to speak..." 
It is known that in the days 
of this writing women were 
generally uneducated, and 
thereby unable to com- 
prehend all of the mat- 
ters of which their 

husbands spoke in church. So 
Paul was telling these women. 
"Don't interrrupt our church 
services by your constait 
questioning; wait and n^ 
your husbands at home." In 
fact, throughout the New 
Testament women are 
commended for their service 
as co-worters in the church, 
not excluded from it. 

Tn the BiWe women played 
many important roles: 
Deborah served as Irath a 
frophetess and a judge over 
the Israelites (Judges 4:4), 
and Esther saved her entire 
race from extermination. 

In conclusioQ, Mr. Summey 
is clearly ri^t in pointing out 
that in light of Scripture there 
can be no misunderstanding 
God's intent for man to have 



dominion over woman. 
(Genesis 3:16. I (orinthians 
11:3. Ephesians 5:22-24, 
Colossians 3:18. and I Peter 
3:1.5) Therefore the final 
dccisi<m for the wife to work 
for compensation shmild he 
left in the hands of the 
husband, but I find no 



Americun nor Biblical basis 
on which to deny women 
rightfol and just com- 
pensation If her wwk is so 
allowed. 

Sincerely. 

Havid R. Bundrick 

St. Mark Road 



To the Editor, 

It Is unftrttmate that in the 
light of so many actual 
present inequalities of law 
which could be removed by 
ratification of the Equal 
Rights Amendment, your 
letta* writers are still hung up 
on the possibility of integrated 
bathrooms. The Comtitutim, 
of cou%, specifically lists the 
ri0}t to privacy as a basic 
rj^t. However, the point is 
that comixinies, and ?ven the 
Naval Academy, would imt be 
able to stall any Imger on the 
issue by claiming they didn't 
ha"e enou0i restroonvs - a 
technicality which would 
could otherwise hold im- 
plementation up for several 
years. 

On Tuesday, Dec. 12, the 
Virginia Beach Chapter ^ the 
National Organization for 
Wwrierv will present a talk and 
discussion m the Equal Rights 
Amendment at 7:30 p.m. at 
Bayside Presbyterian Church, 



Bible was quoted out of context 



To the Kditor: 

AT 1 .lohn Summey HSN has 
quoted the Bible out of context 
in his letter to the Editor in the 
N(»vember 30, 1972 edition of 
"The Sun" regarding the 
Ratification of the Equal Rights 
Amendment 

Further I di.sagree with Mr. 
Summey's statement. "God 
never intended women to have 
i-qual rights with man and 
(UtA'a. word says so." Mr. 
Simimev quoted Corinthians 1, 
11:3:8:9:14:34 omitting 11:4 
thni 7 which gives the true 
meaning of these quotations in 
the Apostle Paul's the covering 
of the head in worship which 
was (he custom in that era. 

Further Mr .Summey skipped 
Corinthians I. 11:11:12- "Lord, 
woman is not independent of 
n-an. nor nian of w oman; for as 
w ttman wns made from man, so 
man is now horn of woman." 
(Jod's creatures are in- 
terdependent, (also read 
Gen. 1.27). 

Men and women must con- 
tribute to the reflection of God's 
linage if the wholeness he in- 
tended in creation is to he 
nchieved. .Icsus not only takes 
;i\v}>y the joiilt and .punishment 
of our individual and collective 
sins, great as that truth is; he 
comes to set right all those 
things that sin has upset, to 
bring about the completenesss 
God had in mind in creation 
AND AMONG THE BENEFITS 
HE HRINf;S IS A 
RESTORATION OF THE 
EQIiAJJTY OF THE .SRXES. 
He gives to women their in- 
tended place in God's order-full 
partners in reflecting the imago 
of God 

Paul summarizes this when 
he tells the Galatians (gal 3:2«) 

"There is neither .lew nor 
Greek, neither male nor female, 
lor you are all one in Christ 
Jesus." This unity, brought 



about the full participation of 
both men and women, is God's 
intention. 

What about passages that 
sjieak of the man as the head 
and the woman as .subject to 
him? Before we build an entire 
style of life on these verses we 
should consider what the Bible 
as a whole has to say on this 
subject, not overlooking 
iwssages (as in Proverbs) that 
exalt womanhood, or the 
examples of women such as 

Deborah who played pro- 
minent roles among God's 
people. The Apostle Paul- 
whose statements about the 
plitce of women in the 
church are well known - seemed 
entirely at eased when Lydia 
took over leadership in the first 
congregation in Furoptv Yes, 
the A|K»stle Paul realized that 
again in Christ it was not 
permissible to discriminate 
even on the firoimds of sex. 

To say that the sexes are 
(H|ual is not to say that they are 
the same. Vive la difference. 
Many, both male and female, 
s«<em to have a hangup at this 
-poirti -and become overly 
aggressixe or defeasive on the 
matter of women's rights. But 
we don't have to be alike to be 
equal. But both, whatever, the 
nature and amoimt of their 
conlribution. are necessary to 
wholeness. 

According to Mr. Summey's 
concept of the Commandments 
in the Bible, all employers of the 
Nation would have to fire every 
working woman outside of the 
Iwme or the only way a woman 
could wwk outside of the home 
is by slave labor: a woman 
weHild never occupy a position 
«rf authority sucl. as a teacher, 
minister, editor etc. M.. 
Summey. in the eighteenth 
centurv Christians saw the full 



implications of their faith and 
led the attack on the institution 
of slavery. 

TheChrJstian belief is thatall 
the variety of life that is ex- 
pressed in our different colours, 
•different circumstances and 
different sexes, is part of the 
richness of this w(H-ld that God 
loves and that we need the full 
i-ontribution of all of them in all 
their personal worth in order to 
achieve the fullness of our 
humanity. In conclusion, Mr. 
Summey- the right to privacy 
undtT the Constitution would 
IRstify separation of the sexes in 
such places as public toilets and 
sleeping quarters in public 
institutions. 

Readers of "the Sun" - write 
vour legislator and request that 
Ih' vote for the Equal Rights 
Amendment: "Equality of 
rights under ;he law shall not be 
denied or abridged by the 
United States or any state on 
account of sex." The 
ratification of seventeen more 
states is needed to make the 
Equal Rights Amendment the 
27th Amendment to the Con- 
stitution. ^. 

Mrs. Rutli H. killingswortti 
Member, Coordinating Com- 
mittee on Ratification of the 
Equal Rights Amendment, 
First Congress of Virginia 
Women's Organizations. 



versation and listened to the 
teaching of Jesus, and he 
stated that she had "chosen 
the better part... which is no! 
to be taken from hoc." 

In another remarkable 
chapter, considering the 
status of w<»nen at that time, 
Jesus even told a parable 
which {Hvjected God in ttie 
image of a woman, (Luke 
15:8ff,) in Uie parable of the 
woman who sou^t the lost 
coin. Indeed, one wmders if 
Jesus deliberately included 
this feminine image oi God as 
a rebuke to those who had cast 
women in an inferior role. 

"Jesus was a feminist, and a 
very radical one, who 
vigorously promoted the 
dignity and equality at women 
in the midst of a very male- 
dominated society," writes 
Prof. Leonard Swidler, editor 
of Uie Journal of Ecumenical 
Studies and a member of the 
religion department of 
Temple Unlverisity, in a 
recent article oititled "Jesus 
Was a Feminist." (Cathdic 
Wwld, January, 1971.) C^n his 
followers be anything less? 
Sincerely, 
Mrs. F.C. DeBdt 
Abbey Arch 



Studentsagainsteqiialrights 



Sun readers ore 
for equal rights 



To the EditOT: 

I believe the govemmoit 
classes at Bayside can give 
you a reasonaUy meanii^ftil 
response on your questim 
concerning the "equal rights 
for women amendment". 

A discussion of the p|roposed 
amendment preceded the 
vote. The classes have a slight 
woman majority, so the 
feminine vote is rei^esented 



No horse sense 



: Government is |»'obably the most misun- 
:d»^ood fragment of today's society. And with good 
', reas(xi. The average person oftentimes simply 
' cannot comprehend the reasoning behind some (rf 
the decisiois. 

TAe the ordinary busings of highway con- 
struction, for instance. A very necessary evil, to be 
sure, iHjt common sen^ often would make it much 
less painful. 

Near Pembroke Mall Tuesday there was a very 
'. glmnng lack of common s»ise... bulldozers moving 

• teck^om) forth across a heavily traveled thmtMigh- 

• fare at the height of the early morning rush hour. 
Wouldn't it make much more sen^ to allow peofrie 
to get to work, those who are the mcKt pressured fw 
time, before the heavy equipment takes over? 
9i0|^}«^ have more time than those dashing to 
w«ii. 

N^r Ken^^ville a flagman was dir^^ting 
traffK around a mechanize) giant. .ri^t into the 
oncoming lai^ oi b^ffic. Bc^ lanes were Mind to 
the ^h^'s jprmaaee hecame of the grader. But tl^ 

flafpnan wam't Uind. (kilv dumb. 

%. 

People will be people, true, Init that hardly 
exct^ mme of the d^rnkms that jeopardize the 
m<<ori$t's safety wh«i a little c«nmon ^nse wcxild 
f^ • kn^ ««y in making hi^way constnxrtion 1^ 



This second week of the Sun 
Survey question concerning 
the Equal Rights Amendment 
has turned the tie vote of last 
week into a definite 3 to 1 
response in favor of the 
amendment. 

Comments on the Equal 
Rights Amendment question 
came in the form of letters, 
detailed and researched. 
Many are supported with 
Biblical references. 

The majwity of .Sun readers 
do favor the amendment 
which states that "Equality of 
rights under the law shall not 
be denied <w abridged by the 
United States or any State on 
account of sex." 

However, one rea<k»r wrote, 
"I feel that this amendment is 
really unneces.sary and will 
unfortunately cause women to 
lose more rights, respect and 
(Mivileges tlutn they gain." 

The government clas,ses at 
Bayside High School also 
r«rticipated in the survey 
vote. Their results were about 
3 to 1 against the amendment 
(»r exactly (^Jposite of the 
other .Sun readers. 



A reader called th<' Sun 
several weeks ago and asked 
"Why don't you ask a question 
in your Sun Survey about the 
sewage and water problems? 
These are the things people 
really are concerned about." 

With the latest HRSD 
fhinipage into the Chesapeake 
Ray. the reader's question 
now is even more timely than 
it wotild have be«i earlier. So, 
IHJtting women's rights aside, 
let's turn to the more pressing 
problem of sewage, pollution, 
(•tc. 

The new Sun Survey 
question for the next two 
'wi-eks is: "Should Virginia 
Beach legislator be urged to 
press the General As.sembly 
for more .State controls over 
the Hampton Roads Jianitation 
District as well as the private 
ufility companies?" 

Respmise to the last Sun 
.Survey was very gratifying. 
We hope that the interest will 
contii-ie. AH comments and 
lettiTs CMKvrnii* the sewage 
and ptrflutim) proi^ms in 
Virginia Beach are welcmned. 



1400 Ewell Road at In- 

dependmce B(wlevard, which 

will be open to all interested 

women. 

Your writer of November 30, 
chose quotations from the Old 
Testament and from Paul, 
that cranky old bachelm- who 
was anxious to see the rab- 
binic customs of Jesus' time 
carried out in the new chur- 
ches, after Jesus himself had 
preached equally to both men 
and women, although Paul 
also did concede in his letter to 
the' Galatians: "There is 
neither male nor female; far 
you are all one in Christ 
Jesus." Hie attitude of Jesus 
himself toward women was 
quite different from that of 
Paul, who never knew Jesus in 
life, (in contrast to the gentle 
apostle John.) 

The first appearance of Jesus 
after his resw^ectiwi fnun the 
dead was to women, whom he 
then commissioned to bear 
witness of the fact to the 
Eleven. (John 20:11 ff; Mt 
28:9f; Mk 16:9ff.) He thus 
clearly rejected the former 
second-class status of women 
and linked them to the 
spreading of the gospel. (^ 
another occasion, Jesus 
spoke out against both cruelty 
to women and capitol punish- 
ment when he set aside the 
punishment of the women 
caught in the act oi adultry, 
who would have been stoned to 
death under the law of Moses, 
with the wwds, "Neither do I 
cmdemn you: go, and do not - 
sin again." (Deut 22:22 ff.) 

The Bible also makes it 
clear that a number of women, 
married and unmarried, were 
regular followers of Jesus, a 
thing previously unheard-of in 
a time when women were not 

even allowed to study the Binary, by John Lange. 
Torah. or Scriptures, ("with York, Knopf, 1972. $5.95. 
him went the Twelve, as well If you haven't got a few free 
as certain women, who hours, don't pick up BINARY, 
provided for them out of their This novel is packed full of 
own resources." Mark 15:40.) suspense from its puzzling 
Jesus also rejected the idea beginning to its tense conclusion 
that the woman with a flow of and is hard to put down, 
blood, menstrous or continual, The action is set in San Die^, 
was ritually unclean, when he the scene of the 1972 Republican 
healed the woman so af- convention. Seemingly 
tncted with the words, disconnected happnungs-the.. 
"Daughter, your faith has capture of a repairman tappang'^ 
made you well." (Mark 5:25 into t(v secret computer lines of 
ff; Luke 8:43 ff.) the Defense Department, the 

In anoUier instance, when hijacking of high intensity 
Jesus visited at the home of ne«-\w gas {root A gnwclPUIbt 
MarthaandMary, (Luke 10:38 tram, the theft of a large 
ff,) the writer notes that shipment of explosives- all add 
"Martha was distracted with "P to the fantastic |^n of an 
much serving," but Mary "'tra right-wing millionaire to 
joined in the male con- w'I« <>"» the President d the 

United States, a whole political 
parfy, and one million pecHpe, 
What ultimately developes is^ 
a pyschological battle between 
the government's special agent 
and the millionaire. The agent 
is confronted with puzzle after 
puzzle set by his adversary and 
is forced to work against a tight 
time schedule in order to halt 
the mass killings. The result is 
an ingenious and non-stop 
suspense story. 

BINARY may be found at ail 
four Virginia Beach PuUic 
Library branches. 
Marcy Sims 




New 



My experience over the past 
two years in discussing the 
"equal rights for women" 
is»ie has been that a good 
majority of the students, boys 
and girls, are against it 

The ^udoit vote this wedc 
was: FOR (yes) - 14; 
AGAINST (no)-45; and NOT 
SURE - 4. 
Sincerely, 
J.E. Welrlch 



^J 



.^ 




SMXHUm 



—Special Raport from VWlMhinfllon— 



VC GOES MODERATE 

By Jack Andwaoii 

1972 Pulitxer Prize Winner for National Reporting 
(Capyrifbt, lITt, bjr United Feature Sjmdicate. Inc.) 

WASHINGTON-Secret In- tral, th««fore, in name only. 



telligencf reports from Viet- 
nam indicate that the Viet 
Cong are prquiring to chan^ 
their spots during the political 
struggle for control of the 
Saigon government. 

The Communists have sud- 
denly sUrted courting non- 
Communist leaders in Saigon 



• $52 million, or abo^t four- ates is quoted as saying the 
fifths of the total, was spent man is suffering from "ego- 
by the Pentagon. The biggest mania." 
contract, for $47 milUon, went • Other memos are con- 
to N. W. Ayer & Son of cemed with the man's married 
Philadelphia for an Army life. He has "periodically eac- 
'®°^^JP™?"'"- perienced marital discord," 

• The Environmental Pro- says one document. The 
tection Agency alone handed black leader himself is quoted 
out 400 PR contracts. One of as saying his wife "treated 
them called for an expenditure him like a dog " 

of $18,500 for "original paint- • The FBI has even taken 

'"^^mu r, ^ note of the medicines the man 

• The Commerce Depart- ukes. One agent wrote that 
ment spent nearly $4 million the subject "utilize a numbw 
with a New York firm to of medications daily 'to get 
?f°"!?*Q "tounsm" in the going,' and other piUs in order 

in r .r? ; . to sleep at night. At various 

All of this, of course, doesn't times during the day he re- 
take into account the $116 sorts to additional piUs.' 



The real neutralists in South 
Vietnam, who would like to 
rally round General Duang .,,. ., 

Van Minh, popularly known as "T**" government spends The FBI, of course, could 
..ni„ m;-u .. _„ __.....-,. each year to keep its 6,000 spend the taxpayers' money 



'Big Minh," are privately 
appealing to the United States 
for hdp. 
But Henry Kissinger, for 



"information specialists" on more profitably investigating 
the payroll. criminals rather than the pe* 

—Black Files- sonal life of a law-abiding 

The FBI keeps thousands of ^^'^ °^ "K^ts leada- 



%UH SURVEY 

QUESTION: Should VIrpnJi BeKh to|Miton bs 
un|0d to press the General AaenMy for more 
&ate controls over the Hamiiton Roads SanHttion 
District at vmII as the prNrate utility companias? 

Yourc<maMBUaiMlsiinedlettmw(^lManmetitodidsa. 1 

IfES D MO D 

Cfpand^mto: VMGWM KACH SUN, 
Be 2237, ripw Bea^ Va. 2452 



one, hasn't had much time to .^„«, 

who are opposed to Presklent consider the appeals of the citizens under survdUancTfor 
Thieu. The Viet Cong apiwr- neutralists. Negotiating with the crime of speaking their 

Hanoi by day and Saigon by own minds, but one sroun 

night, the Presidents masti especially harassed aro bSk hin'tiT thaT%n^n..2^ 
negotiator has been too busy civil rights leaders ~^- '**"* **'^®^ ^"^ 

to worry about the neutralists. We have obtained the FBI come to the White House next 
-PubUc Relations- ^ <»» « prominent black 

leader that is 



ently want to adopt a more 
moderate front in order to win 
the non-Communist left over 
to their side. 

Meanwhile, the true neutral- 
ists in South Vietnam -those 
who oppose both Saigon and 
Hanoi— are desperately trying 



— IntdUgence Itons— 

White House 
Chief Leonid Brezhnev will 



, . , , year for a second summit 

Two years ago with great malicious and' irXtt'^dt "SJj'L^^i'T f^^ 
fanfare President Nixon t^ils ahn... hi« personal l(^ ??^**",' "** ^."**"* Ea8t...The 

personal life. Centml Intdligence Agency, 



to gain a voice in the pe8<» ordered his chief lieutenants to The file typifies'^the kind" a* Central 
setUement. curtail their public reUtions information the FBI has col- m^T^ " "^"^ 

aftivitioB Rut tun Ka«>a fn.._J 1 1. 1 . . DiaCK 



inside the 
The proposed peace accord activities. But we have found lected on nu'merous""hll^L *"**^'' September Group, 
caUs for a three-part national that the public stiU pays a stiff leaders, includinir the Ute^ *"™' ■ ■°'*^''®^ attempted 
council to work out the peace price for the privU^e of being Martin Lutiier Kinff R^' u""* n^^9t Jordan's King 
terms. One third are supposed U>ld by Uie bureaucrats how Walter Fauntrov Rev' bS ""'f"* " "''"'y- ^^ "ttempt 
to be appointed by Saigon, one good they are. Abemathy Roy Innis md »"ii]"'^'"'^ "'" '■*' "*°^^ 

third by Hanoi. The remaining Inst^ of tooting their own Floyd McKissick amons ^7° " '^^'^ months, we've 
third are supptraed to be horn, government ag^ides others. ' °^^ warning that anti-U.S. 

now firm out pubHc rehtions By no stretch of the imair '^"V'"®"*^ ^'^^ ^^^n buUding 
work U) prival* advertising ination can this man be cafi SLrJ^'*" '^'"^- ^' 
agency. a revolutionary yet here is^ dent N«on, we have said. 

Under the Nixon Adminia- kind of infomation ti« FBI TfiJ^J°T^ t" l^'^^F '^ 
Utition. we have learned, some has collected on him T *^^'**«"' *ho test Utin 

m pHvate publk rations • Much of the man's dossier ^*^'.i.^*" P*f^ ^ 
firms have gotten over a thou- concerns his ail^d hck^ Sf^' ^hwrfore. that the 
.land coniracU at a cost to the leadership abiu7 and th. ^ ,„*"*' ordered the 
public of well over $77 million, troubles he is having^uTwa f^?"^"^! Security Council to 
Here are .nne highUghUs: staff. One of his ciL .tS! ^^H^^J^L.!!?!? '' 



neutral. 

But the neutralisls have tm 
rm\ base of power. So far. they 
have faiW to get the United 
States— or anyone elM— to 
rmxmnae them. H now 
an>Mn> obvious that &igon 
win dioose half of the sonalled 
naitralists and Hanoi the 
**her half. They will l>e neu- 



Latin 



.-•^ 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1972 

Need for security 



A 



THE SUN 



PAGE 



Toy requests can reflect uncertain times 



Bv HELEN CRIST 

i- ' . 

. How's the toy business this 
; Christmas season? What is 
1 capturing the fancy of starry 
J eyed youngsters as they 
.wandq- in and out of the 
, stores, lingering at magical 
toy counters these final weeks 
^ before the big day? 



Dolls, of course. But what 
kind of dolls? 

"But you know it seems like 
we're getting more and more 
requests this year for the bald- 
lieaded tiny infant baby dolls. 
I don't know if it's the little 
girls who want them or the 
mommies who are pushing 
them." 

This is the cuddly infant doll 




kYliito POLICEMAN — The red light flashes and 
rl^volves and the siren wails as Jodi Heine lifts the 
police caf carefully from a toy counter in a depart- 
ment store. Jodi's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Heine. 

Wliitehurst sets 



district by a lot of energetic 
^campaigning, by having the 

advantage of ttie President 
- running. I think I helped him 

some, by asking people who 
■voted for me in Portsmouth to 
5 vote for him." Portsmouth, 
'formerly in Whitehurst's 

district, is now part of the 
•Fourth Congressional 
'District. 

Whitehurst said Rep. 

f' William L. Scott, R-Fairfax, 
' was able to defeat incumbent' 



Sen. William B. Spong Jr. by 
identifying himself with the 
President and with the help of 
a large amount of money from 
multi-millionaire James D.S. 
Coleman in the closing days of 
the campaign. 

Whitehurst said: "But I 
think that much of the blame 
for Senator Spong's defeat 
must fall on his own shoulders. 
I've heard many comments 
from people who were his 
most active supporters to the 



(Continued from Page 1) 

pastor's salary is only $100 
per week (although his wife, 
Anne, is a full-time minister at 
Rock Church, she receives no 
salary). All of his expenses 
are paid. The bulk of his in- 
conie is received from the sale 
of recorded sermons on tape. 
His book entitled "UP 
TIGHT", written by Char 
Meredith and published by 
Word Book in 1967, is 
currently in its fourth printing 
and has sold in the thousands 
of copies. 

Since the church which is 
only two years old (and debt- 
free upon completion) is 
bulging at the seams a new 
building and expansion pro- 
gram is underway. A cir- 
cular santuary is planned to 
seat 3,500. The preliminary 
plans were drawn by Ken 
Thompson, a draftsman and 
"njember" of Rock Church. 
Above the balcony seating the 
interior dome will be covered 
with a dove in small mosaic 
tiles. The church does not 
anticipate any fund-raising 
problems. 

Parking which is a problem 
now will require careful at- 
tention. The church presently 
has a bus, but it is used 
primiarly for transporting 
their three large choirs for 
concerts in other churches. 
Should they go to a bus 
ministry this will eleviate 



son;ie parking headaches. The 

church has a small kin- 
dergarten which they hope to 
increase and again the buses 
could serve a multiple service. 

So much for statistics. What 
about Rock Church 
philosophy? Rev. Gminez 
replied, "There are a lot of 
paid pastors around, but I 
believe I am ordained by "God. 
I'm not controlled by the 
whims of the sheep. My heart 
and soul are given to God. I 
will not do something contrary 
to God. I'm a shepherd - with 
orwithouta salary. The growth 
of this church depends upon 
thepriasein the worship. A lot 
of churches today keep 
people from worshiping. It 
is comparable to fear versus a 
sound mind." 

He continued on discipline, 
"I discipline my own child not 
out of anger but out of love. In 
this church we discipline out 
of love within our 
congregation. The carnel 
mind doesn't understand the 
things of God. In worshipit^ 
we believe we can modernize 
but not liberalize. Too many 
people today think of church 
in terms of being a "plastic" 
situation - they're asking, 
"Where is the Action?" And, 
remember, the sheep will go 
where they're being fed." 

"We also believe in ttse 
power of prayer to heal the 
sick. We do not sponsor social 



that was so popular a few 
years t>ack. 

An interesting statement, 
and one for which Dr. James 
N. Williams, director of the 
Atlantic Mental Hygiene 
Center had an answer. 

"It's a symbol of insecurity 
and uncertainity of ttie times," 
he said. "With the disruption 
of families and homes so 
prevalent today, children need 
something to cuddle up to that 
gives them a sense of 
security." 

Wom.tii''; role in today's 
society Is not so clearly 
defined as it has been 
previously. The preference of 
the infant doll is understand- 
able, he said. "The more 
sophisticated type of doll 
would represent competition 
to the young girl, not 
security." 

Dr. Williams said that many 
children can't go to sleep at 
night unless they have 
something in bed with them to 
cuddle up to. talk to and to call 
their own. 

This type of real-life doll 
was on the list of Mrs. 
Revounda Rice, of .Aragona 
VilBge. as she shopped for her 
four children at Miller and 
Rhoads. Pembroke Mall. 



"No more batto-y dolls - 
Ihey seem so artifical, " she 
said. '' 

Mrs, Betty Bowden. toy 
department manager, pointed 
out the Madame Alexander 
dolls... "These are cuddly and 
feel like real babies," she 
said, adding that they've been 
much in demand. 

A popular item just about 
everywhere is the Fisher 
Price line; especially the 
airport, school and farm 
outfits which are reportedly 
"selling like hot cakes." 

Bicycles? Always number 
one, and even for adults. 

Who can forget that special 
year, when one of the most 
breath-taking sights was the 
unexpected chrome-trimmed 
bicycle shining under the 
Christmas tree? 

They're still special. 
Western Auto Associate Co., 
vm Virginia Beach Blvd., 
selling bieks for 2.1 years at the 
same corner, had tagged and 
waiting for deliver over 1.10 
bicycles last week. 

Owner Buddy Rig^ said. 
"They start putting them on 
layaway around Labor Day. 
They're always a big item for 
us."" 

At National Cycle Sales. 



(Continued from Page 1) 



effect that he did not have a 
well-organized campaign.*' 

Whitehurst said he foresees 
an increasingly vigorous 
Republican Party in Virginia. 
"Now the Republican Party in 
the state offers the most 
comfortable home for most 
Virginians, as the party 
philosophies now stand be- 
tween the Democratic and 
Republican parties in the 
' state." he said. 

But that isn't enough to 



persuade him there is any 
truth to rumors that Sen. 
Harry F. Byrd Jr. will join the 
ranks of the Republicans with 
organization of the new 
Congress. 

"I see no advantage for him 
personally right now making 
that change. Why should he do 
it? He has the best of all 
worlds. He's four years away 
from running for re-election. 
■ Many things can happen 
between now and then," 
Whitehurst said. 




s new expansion 



-*?<! ^1^ "•■•:;??".''-'' -> •.■»!, ./liMt >ji' 



activities such as bazaars or 
bingo ( that's just gambling in 
church). I believe God talks to 
the pastor and the church 
ministffs^ireThere to help the 
pastor You'll tind no refer- 
nece in^h^'fiTBlF as to Ixjsiness 
meetings. As to the physical 
struchire of the church I am 
not subject to land, property 
or boundaires...if I were then 
the building becomes 
God... and that is not, right. 
God is people. I don't own one 
thing in this church. It all 
belongs to God. I am just as 
interested in the church next 
door." 

On leaving the sanctuary 
the Biblical inscription on the 
wall from II Corithians 3:17 
suddenly made sense: "Now 



the Lord is that .Spirit ano 
wlierettie Spirit of the Lord is. 
there is Liberty". It Rock 
Church a new concept or is it 
almost 2.nno years old? It is 
flourishing at the Peninsula 
Rock Church and "Proclaim" 
Drug Rehabilitation Center in 
Hampton. Va.. under the 
dedicated leadership of a 
former Giminez disciple 
named Rev. John Romaine. It 
is beginning with a 400 
"member" congregation in an 
old .lewish synagogue in Rich- 
mond led by a 20-year old 
Giminez disciple named Larry 
Harvey. It has been 
prophesized that .T7 churches 
will spring forth from the 
mother Rock Chjurch in 
Virginia Beach. 




Taxes 



and 



Christmas Mon^ 
Phone 427-2100 



VIRGINIA BEACH FINANCE CORP. 

2413 NORTH LANDING ROAD 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 



piailllllllilllllllilllHIIIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllliillllllllllilllllllliillllllllllllllllllllllllllillliyil^HIIIIH 



5 
I 



CLEARANCE SALE 



3 
I 



ON ALL 



• 



HARDWARE 



and 



CRAFTS 



NOW IN STOCK 






1701 

BaltiQ Aye. 

(At thalplvd.) 



HiiMiiiiuiiiiiimiiiiniiiinmiiiimiiiiiiinmniiinNnnniiitiiminmntiii 



428-^31 

Formerly 
VA. BEACH 
HARDWARE 



2437 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
manager F^d Townes said that 
mini cycles are proving 
popular this year. 

And what of the great 
national sport-football? Has 
the frequency with which Dad 
tunes Into the pro game via 
television made an impression 
on his son? 

Definitely. At Rose's, 
I>askin Road, they say that 
anything connected with the 
game sells big. This was a 
pattern just about 

everywhere. 

And for the young athlete, 
Nesson Sales Co., Inc., a toy 
distrilxitor. says that a new 
indoor game called Puff 
Basketball, complete with 
indoor basketball hoop,' has 
caught on for the 8-11 age 
groiip. 



Ni'sson also names a 
combination game-bank 
called Gum Grabber, for 
which they've had to replenish 
the stock of many customers. 

"It's similar to the gumball 
machines," saitl sales 
manager Lou Goldsticker. 
"The child puts a penny in the 
bank, and a gumball or a prize 
comes out." 

Then there are the once- 
upon-a-time kiddies, the still 
young at heart, the adults of 
most any age... how do they 
feel about the great influx of 
new adult games? 

"Great." said Mrs. Betty 
Warren, at Sears Pembroke 
store, where she was 
demon.strating the games. 

"What's big^" we asked. , 

"The Electro Dice Game." 
she said. "Comes Las Vegas 
style-100 miniature poker 




DISNEY SPECIAL — "It would be fun to take tlilt 
home," says Bontiie Reed, 3, as she gives the Walt 
Disney Special a trial run at the toy couAj^r. Bonnie's 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Reed, of Pembroi^, 
Manor. i 



Chief gets top appointment 




feel they can go directly to the 
commanders. I can. No note- 
taking for the trash can," he 
added. 

As a SEA, he has a direct 
line to the Supply Center 
Commanding Officer, RADM 
E.W. Sutherling, and meets 
periodically with all command 
enlisted personnel to ex- 
diange ideas and disseminate 
inf(M-madon or instructions 
which will affect the enlisted 
community. 



chips. Young people love it. I 
bought one myself." 

Then there's the 21 Black 
Jack game, the Draw 
Poker... "they 're wonderful to 
take on a trip," Mrs. Warren 
said. 

But for the real lowdown on 
the whole situation, we turned 
to that knowledgeable old 
gentleman: Santa Claus 
himself. 

Situated as he is, out there 
at Pembroke Mall, he's got to 
have the real scoop on the 
whole thing. 

"Well, the girls seem to kind 
of go for that Crissy doll and 
the boys for the Electric 
Football talking game, and 
the Action Jackson adventure 
dolls." 



And how's everything ^th 



Santa? 



K 



Well, sometimes, it app^rs 
that the small fry are so awed 
with the white-bearded and'ftis 
surroundings, dispense of all 
good things, that when thpy 
enter Santa's house, titfty 
forgot momentarily tHHir 
request list and just igdk 
around. 

"This one little fellow saw a 
stuffed reindeer on the wall 
and was real worrjed thil^ I 
had killed poor RudoljJ^," 
Santa said, .',. 

Then there was the 16-year- 
old cute girl who came in and 
sat on his lap and asked fAfia 



new automobile. 



<.!• 



"I told her I'd sure havfrjto 
think abojt that one." 



Cotter 

Master Chirf Storekeeper 
(SKCM) Bernard Cotter is 
well known throughout the 
Navy as a helpmate and a "do- 
er." 

In his job in the Fleet 
Liaison Unit at the Norfolk 
Naval Supply Center, Master 
Chief Cotter serves as 
"trouble shooter," helping 
fleet and shore personnel witti 
lirbblems in supply. 
[^■'This month he was ap- 
''pointed as the N^val Suppfy 
Center's Senior Enlisted 
Advisor (SEA), a collateral 
job in which he will act of- 
ficially as representative in 
matters pertaining to the 
welfare and morale of enlisted 
men and their dependents. 

"Navy leaders and com- 
manding officers care— if they 
know about a problem," he 
said. "Too often, people are 
afraid to say anything or don't 



CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, VIRGINIA 

INVITATION TO BID 

INSURANCE EMPLOYEE 
BENEFIT MEDICAL PRGGRANI 

The City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, is requiting cost ra^oposals f6r j^ efff • 
ployee lienefit medical program. Inrorested ^nts and orokers should ob- 
tain copies of specifications from the city s insurance consultants. Insur- , 
ance Buyer's Council, Inc., at 22 West Road, Towson, Baltimore, Maryland-; 
21204 as the specifications copies are not available from any other source. , ' 
The consultants telephone number is (301) 828-1656 for telephone in- 
niiries. Propmals for this employee benefit medical program are return- 
able' January 15, 1973. 

CARROLL & CLOUGH 



PURCHASING AGENT 
BID ITEM NO. 2501 



niiiiNiiiiiiinHMHiiiiiiiiimiiiiuiiifiiiii 



WHICHEVER ONE YOU CHOOSE 
YOU'RE RIGHT. . .WITH SYLVANIA 



w*r 




MATCHED COMPACT SYSTEM MS2712W 
Enjoy aH your favorite records 

• Sylvania Solid-State Amplifier provides 40 Watts total 
peak music power 

• Full-size BSR automatic turntable features ceramic car- 
tridge, dtamond stylus, jam-proof operation 

• Sealed Air Suspension Wide Dispersion speaker system 
features two 4 extended range speakers 
•Separate bass, treble, compensated loudness and balance 
controls 

• Dust cover included 



s 

Y 

L 
V 
A 
N 
I 
A 




■"iT 






.n( 




MATCHED COMPACT SYSTEM CRT2730VW^ 

• AM/FM/FM Stereo and 8-track tape player ja 

• 40 watts peak music power 

• Two 4" extended range air suspension speakers 

• Slide controls for bass, treble, loudness and balance 
Pfionograph jack 
Auxiliary output jack 

Receiver and speaker cabinettatWalnut- 
grained vinyl on wood composition 



$149.95 



COMPONENTS 



MATCHED COMPACT SYSTEM MS2722W 
DekoM turntable MNth magnotic cartridge 

• Sylvania Solid-State AM/FM/FM Stereo Receiver pro- 
vides 1 00 watts peak music power 

• 25 watts total continuous power (RMS) 

• Built-in Sylvania Phase Q4 matrix four channel circuitry 

• Garrard 6 300 Automatic Turntable features Pickering 
VI 5 magnetic cartridge, cue- pause control and anti-skate 
control 

• Sealed Air Suspension Wide Dispersion speaker system 
features two 6 woofers and two 3 high frequency 
tweeters ' 

• Dust cover included 



^24095 



c 
o 

M 

P 

o 

N 
E 

N 

T 




COMPONENT SYSTEM 

ACS12WH 

A oompleCB oomponant systam 

• CR270WH solid-state receiver with 50 watts peak music 
power. 10 watts total continuous jRMS) power . [, 

• BSR micro-mini turntable with cue- pause control ',. 

• Sylvania ASD4WH globe speaker system with two 4" 
extended rartge au suspension speakers 

• Changer ba&e and dust cover included 



17»» 



ADAM'S TV 

M8 LONDON BRIDGE SHOPPING CENTER - VIRGfNIA BEACH, VA. - PHONE 3404»61 

We Sermx AU TV's & Radm 



,\ 



^i,.** * • •¥#♦♦»# 



\ll\US^%MMAU^MMm^W*^^W i ^^' 



THE SUN 




M The Frcmt Burner 



Traditional dishes hiffhlight Southern Christmas feast 



Mrs. Richard BrittfaiKlia 



Janet Elizabeth Oliver 
weds Richard Brittiiigham 



MiraJanetElizabeth OIIvct; 
daughter of Comdr. Stephen^ 
Oliver. U.S. Navy, and Mrs. 
Oliver of the Beach, was wed 
to Richard Savage Brit- 
tingham at 6 p.m. November 
18 in the Chapel in the Woods, 
Naval Air Station, Norfolk. 
Chaplain Clavin J. Gardner of 
NcHTfolk officiated. 

The groom is the son <rf Mr. 
and Mrs. Maurice F. Brit- 
igham of Ttehdbetti, Md. 
The Mde was given in 
rriage by her father. She 
! a gown of white sati peau 
a wide sky blue satin 
id trimmed with bows 
enting the waistlim. It was 
fti(M)ed with a modified A- 
skirt featairing a mock 
ron b'immed witti cluny 
Petals of seed pearls and 
ce applkiu^ adorned the 
irt and sweeping train. The 
rn steeves, high ilhision 
and yoke also were 
ited with cluny lace. Her 
;ertip veil of illusion 
jded from a camelot style 
ipiece of cluny lace. She 
ied a coloiial bouquet of 
ite carnati(His, blue daisies 
baby's breath. 
ir&. William H. Reynolds 
'<rf Norfolk was the matron 
F honor and Miss Catherine L. 
1^ of Chesapeake was maid 
hwK^. Their gowns were 
I with bkie chiffon skirts 



lace with an inset of blue 
chiffon attached with . blue 
flowers formed a yoke on the 
blouse and trimmed the cuffs. 
They carried bouquets of 
white and blue mums and 
wore matching flowers in 
their hair. 

Har bridesmaids were Mrs. 
Sylvia Hurley Minke of 
Wattsville. cousin of the 
groom. Miss Amy L. Kiriisey 
of Livonia, Mich., cousin of the 
bride. Miss Maureen L. Bail^ 
(tf the Beach and Mrs. An- 
thony Osborne of Chamblee, 
Ga. Miss Mary Heather 
Malbon, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Guy C. Malbon of the 
Beach, was flower girl. Their 
gowns and headpieces were 
styled identical to that of the 
h(M)or attendants. 

Mr. BrittinKham served as 
his son's b^t man. Ushers 
wCTe Stephen Jeffrey Olivw 
and Kirk Andrew Oliver, both 
of the Beach, brothers of the 
bride. Allan R. Tarkenton, 
Fred W. Britton Jr. and Peter 
R. DeWolf, all of the Beach. 
Raymond T. Smith of Hamp- 
Um and Robert L. Makarski of 
Haddon Heights, N.J. 

The reception was held in 
the Pennsylvania Room of the 
Commissioned Officers Chib, 
Naval Station. Norfolk. The 
couple will reside at the Beadi 
fdlowing a southern wedding 



The legacy of Southern 
Christmas hospitality dates 
hack 364 years ...to the second 
Christmas celebrated by the 
colonists in Jamestown, 
Virginia, in 16(10. 

For their first Christmas in 
the New World, the small band 
of settlers worshipped at their 
wooden church. Their second 
Christmas - and the first real 
festival — were celebrated in 
Kecoi^Khtan village, as guests 
of Powhatan's friendly In- 
dians. .J 

From this simple beginning. 
Southern Christmases became 
progressively more festive 
and elaborate. Parties, 
dances, games, foxhunts, fine 
entertainment and good 
fellowship became gala 
traditions. 

Early decorations were 
made from materials at hand 
— native fruits, berries, nuts, 
greens, seed pods. Even in 
those days, misteltoe com- 
manded a kiss. It also was 
considered to bring luck and 
fertility. 

The 12-day holiday season 
was hardly long enough. The 
time called for family 
reunions, courtship, wed- 
dings, for the renewal of 
family ties and the bonds of 
friendship. 

And it was a time for 
remembrance with strong 
bonds with the past — to the 
homes, families and customs 
of native lands. 

Immigrants from the Old 
WorW brought their yuletide 
customs with them — to in- 
troduce family and new 
friends to the heritage of 
homelands. Thus a young 
school teacher at the College 
of William and Mary brought 
the German Christmas tree to 
Williamsburg in 1B42. 

But the tempting, mouth- 



watering, delectable, tan 
iaiizing. lavish foo(h became 
the mo.st important legacy 
brought to this New World. 

From England and the 
Continent came the fruitcake, 
roast beef with Yorkshire 
pudding, oyster and sweet- 
bread pie, plum pudding, 
mincemeats tarts, Sally Lunn, 
cracking and batter breads, 
beaten biscuits, roast goose, 
roast suckling pig, luscious 
cakes and other delectables. 

Colonists added eggs and 
milk to the English nog (or 
.strong ale) and continued 
their innovatiim with fried 
oysters for Christmas break- 
fast, wiM turkey, quail and 
other local game, cornbread 
stuffing, journey cake, the 
\jady Baltimore cake and 
large varieties of hmne-grown 
vegetables and fruits. 

The ''groaning boards" — 
overflowing with up to 14 
different kinds of meat, each 
prepared a different way, 
many cakes, pies and other 
sweets, and numerous dther 
side dishes — belong to a past 
age. But the traditional 
Southern Christmas feast 
continues with the serving of a 
few of these favorites during 
the holiday season. 

The Christmas issue of 
"Southern Hospitality" 
features six new recipes (from 
the test kitchen of Self-Rising 
Flour and Corn Meal 
Program. Inc.) for such 
holiday treats in Dixieland. 
Pickled Watermelon 
Fruitcake 

2 jars (10 oz. each) water- 
melon pickle rinds, slivered, 
drained, resa^ing -'i cup 
syrup 

1 cup halved candied 
^berries 

f cup slivered candied 
INnrapple 






RobeK Scott Spidell 



Family reuni(xi 

Mrs. Catherine Bennett of 
Praser. Colo, attended a 
family reunion held by h«- 
mother. Mrs. Nellie Maillett of 
ttie Beach and Mrs. Ada 
Bischoff. Mrs. Maillett's 
sister, at Mrs. Bischoff's 
home. Mrs. Maillett had not 
seen ho- youngest daughter tor 
17 years at the time of the 
rwnion. Guests included Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles 

Hdlingsworth, Mr. and Mrs. 
Earl T. Congleton, Mr. and 
Mrs. William Earl Congletmi 
and family, . Mrs. Bessie 
Borum and Mrs. Emma Day, 
all of tift Virgiiua Beach and 
Norfdk area. 



1 cupgoMen seedless raisins 
1 cup pecan halves 

1 cup slivered, blanched 
almonds 

2 cups enriched self-rising 
flour 

1 cup butter, sctftened 

1 cup sugar 

5 eggs 

one-third cup sherry 
Brandy, optional 

Combine fruits and reserved 
syrup: soak overnight. Drain 
fruits: add nuts and toss with 1 
cup of the flour. Cream butter 
and sugar: beat'in eggs. Add 1 
cup of the flour to creamed 
mixture: stir in sherry. Pour 
batter ova* fruits and nuts; 
blend well. Pour into three 
greased and brown paper- 
lined ?=>« X 3'%. X 2' 1 inch pans. 
Bake in preheated 275 degrees 
oven for 2 hours and 15 
minutes. Cool slightly in pans 
on wire racks. Remove cakes, 
cool completely: then wrap in 
foil or brandy-soaked 
cheesecloth for two weeks. 
Pepiierminl Stick 
Cupcakes 

1 ' •• cups enriched self-rising 
flour-l- 

1 pint (2 cups) peppermint 
stick ice cream. s(rftened 

'■_• teaspoon peppermint 
flavoring 
Pej^rmint Stic?' Icing 
Mix together flour, ice 
cream and flavoring. Fill 
muffin cups two-thirds full. 
Rake in preheated 4(M) degrees 
oven 15 minutes. Cool. Frost 
with Peppermint Stick Icing. 
Makes R cupcakes. 

I'cpiier mint Stick icing 

2 tablespoons buttar, soft- 
ened 

2 cups sifted confectioners' 
sugar 
1 egg yolk 



1 teaspoon peppermint 
flavoring 

2 tablespoons crushed candy 
cane 

Red food coloring 
Cream butter. Add sugar, 
egg yolk and flavoring; beat 
until smooth. Stir in crushed 
candy and a few drops red 
food coloring. 

Ham Roli-U Its with 
Cornbread Stuffing 
6 corn muffins 

3 cups s(rft enriched bread 
crumte 

■v cup chopped onicni 
'i. cup chopped celery 

2 tablespoons butter, melted 
\K cyps chicken broth 

1 egg, beaten 

1 teaspoon crumbled sage 

'■• teaspoon pepper 

3 slices ham, ■ i inch thick 
Coarsely crumble Corn 

Muffins into large mixing 
bowl: add bread crumbs. 
Saute onion and celery in 
butter until soft; stir into 
corn\)read mixture. Combine 
chicken broth, egg, sage and 
pepper; toss into mixture. 
Spread ham slices with 1 cup 
stuffing each, pressing down 
firmly. Starting at short end, 
roll up slices, jelly-roll 
fashion. Secure with wooden 
picks. Place in 7 x 11 inch 
baking dish. Sprinkle 
remaining stuffing around 
ham. Bake in preheated 350 
degrees oven 15 minutes; then 
cover with foil and bake an 
additional 15 minutes, or until 
thoroughly heated. To so-ve, 
cut roll-ups in half. 
Corn muffins 

2 cups enriched ^self-rising 
corn meal 

2 tablespoons sugar 

2 eggs, beaten 

=' I to 1 cup milk 



Miss Nanette Warren 
weds Robert S. Spidell 



Miss Nanette Marshall 
Warren and Robert Scott 
Spidell were married at 4 p.m. 
Saturday at Eastern Shore , 
Chapel with the Rev. Charles 
Riddle III officiating. 

The bride is the daughter (Of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Milton 
Warren of the Reach. The 
groom is the son of Capt. and 
Mrs. Emery Paul Spidell of 
the Beach. 

Given in marriage by her 
father, -the bride wore a 
Victorian-styled gown in off- 
white satin with inlaid lace 
and pearls. A full-length veil 
fell from a beaded cap. She 
carried a bouquet of cream- 
colored roses with baby's 
breath. 

Miss Suzanne Warren of the 
Beach, sister of the bride, was 
the maid of honor. She wore a 
red wool dress accented with a 
white collar and cuffs. A wide- 
brimmed red felt hat com- 
pleted her ensemble. She 
cari led a mixed bouquet. 

Her bridesmaids were Mrs. 
Neil MacDonald of the Beach, 
sister of the groom, Mrs. 
Warren Holmes of Burke, 
cousin of the bride. Miss 
Lyni^ Twifmd of Annadale, 
cousin of the bride. Miss Paula 
Peace of BIneville, N.C. and 
Mrs. William Meyer of the 
Beach. Their red and white 

Hygiene Centa- 
holds first bazaar 

Tl^ first anmial Christmas 
bazaar and open house 
sponsored by the Atlantic 
Mental Hygiene Center will be 
held from 1 to 5 p.m. Wed- 
nes(by at the Cento-, 1876 
Wildwood Drive. 

Bazaar items have been 
made as part of the Daycare 
Program activity Groups held 
at the Caiter. 



checked gowns were trimmed 
with white collars and cuffs. 
They wore wide-brimmed red 
felt hats and carried mixed 
bouquets. 

Michae^vStockten of the 
Reach S(^rd as best man. 
The ushers were Neil Mac- 
Donald of the Beach, brother- 
in-law of the groom, Eddie 
Shuey of Charlotte, N.C, 
William Meyer, Mac McLure, 
Mike Murray and George 
Warren, all of the Beach. 

Following a reception in the 
home of the bride, the couple 
left for 'a wedding ti-ip to 
Vermont, New Hampshire and 
Massachusetts. They will 
reside in Virginia Beach. 

The bride is a graduate of 
Massey Junior College. The 
groom attended Old Dominion 
University. 



"i cup oil 

Stir together corn meal and 
sugar. Blend t(^ether eggs, Va 
cup milk and oil. Add liquid all 
at once to corn meal mixture, 
stirring until smooth. If 
necessary, add more milk to 
make a medium-thick batter. 
Fill muffin cups two-thirds 
full. Bake in preheated 425 
degrees oven 20-25 minutes, or 
until golden brown. Remove to 
wire rack and cool thoroughly. 
Use 6 muffins for stuffing. 
Wrap remaining in foil and, if 
desired to serve with meal, 
warm in oven last 15 minutes 
of baking time for ham. Serve 
with butter. (Muffins may also 
be stored in freezo" for up to 3 
months.) Makes 12 muffins. 
Onion Cheese Ribs 
One-third cup butter 
2 cups enriched self-rising 
nour4 
1 tablespoon sugar 
1 cup buttermilk 
Onion salt 
Parmesan Cheese 
Mdt butter in 13 x 9»/i. inch 
pan. Stir tog^her flour and 
sugar. Stir in enoi^h but- 
to-milk to make a soft dough. 
On floured surface -gently 
knead dough for 30 seconds or 
until smooth. Roll dough out 
on well-floured surface to 13 x 
9 inch rectangle. Cut in half 
lengthwise: then cut into 13 
strips crosswise. Dip each 
strip in pan with melted 
butter, turning until all sides 
are buttered. Place strips in 2 
rows close together in same 
pan. Sprinkle ribs with onion 
salt and Parmesan cheese. 
Bake in preheated 450 degrees 
oven about 15 minutes or until 
golden brown. Makes 26 ribs. 
Mincemeat Favorites 
1 cup butter, softened 
, 1'- cups sugar 
3 eggs 

3"i cujB enriched sdf-rising 
flour-t- ^ 

1 cup chopped pecans 
1 package (9 oz.) dry 
mincemeat, broken into small 
pieces 

Cream together butter and 
sugar until fluffy. Beat in 
eggs, one at a time. Stir flour 
into creamed mixture. Fold in 
nuts and mincemeat. Drop by 
teaspoonfuls onto gr^pfcid 
baking sheet. Bake, in 
preheated 350 degrees oven 
about 12 minutes, or until 
lightly browned. Makes 8 
dozen cookies. 




MRS. EVIE Myatt, formally 
bridal consultant for Rose 
Hull Sho|)s, recently became 
the bride cmisultant and 
associate for Portraits by 
Torres at 4221 Virginia 
Beach Blvd. 



Cranberry Orange Tree 

>/4 cup shortening 

2 cups enriched sc)|;^isii^-(- 

>/<} to % cup orai^e juice 

1 teaspoon grated orange 
rind 

'/4 cup cranberry-orange 
relish 

Orange Icing 

Cut shortening into flour 
until mixture resenibles 
coarse crumbs. Combine 
orange juice and rind; blend 
enough into flour, to make a 
soft dough. Turn out onto 
li^tly floured surface and 
knead gently 30 seconds. Roll 
our to ¥^ thick. Cut into 12 
biscuits with floured cutto*. 
Place 10 biscuits on groused 
baking sheet to form a 
triangle. Make a tree trunk 
with last 2 biscuits. Press in 
center of each biscuit ^nd fill 
with rounded >/^ teaspoon 
relish. Bake in preheated 450 
degrees oven 10 to 12 minutes, 
or until lightly browned. 
Drizzle with Orapge Icing; 
serve warm. Makes 12 
biscuits. 

Orange Icing < 
1 cup confectioners' sugar 
4 teaspoons orange juice 
Stir together sugar and 

juice. 

-f-Spoon flour into dry 

measuring cup; levd. Do not 

scoop. 




Vfeddlipg iip 

Cdltha 

and hripfal bOomnOan 
for thtbridt audi 
to-te. 



' 



^- 




'IMstinctioii 
^Beauty 

Select a gift that shows you really care... 
come in and look over our fine selection 
of distinctive gifts and decorative 
accessories! 

For that country style atmosphere, tmywie 
tiirough our "Bam" am featuring candles. 
paity.-good»^nd much morel 

Rimember..you can still lay-a-way for 
(9irisl|psl 

OPEN MONDAY thru SATURDAY 
10A.M..9P.M. 

THRU CHRISTMAS 

FREE GIFT WRAPPING ffiRVICE! 
HATGOOD SHOPPING CENTER 
lOtt INDEPENDENCE BLVD. M4-12M 




A fVWViam WWtmMN Finn* «rM ntmify iwafii !• Ike Ckwral HaiplM if 
^^iwa BMck 1^ tke S«wise Ck-de af tte Virkiaia Beach Oty Union of tke King's 
iM^hters. The pvmp m med during ehiMbirth to naintain a cMstaat rate of ad- 
^ ii«to-aUon of fV flaids whteh contain a sUmnlant to induce labor. It will enable a 
^ail dwa^ to be clven to the patient at a steady ^ce. Dr. Ramon N. Redford Jr.. 
^ _%letrlcs. ex|rfaiBs the operatlwi of the machine to Mrs. W.G. Ashman <!.). 
^j^Ment ti the circle. Mre. Oscar Beavers, vice-president a^ Mrs. Leo BUIey. 
^ciiKiirer, l^e circle sponsor^ a card party lunchMn for ap^oximately 2» ^-. 
^pm to ratoe CmA to pwehasc the ^mp. 

tree 
heU 

A Cte-isteat tree sale 

gmmttA hf Han Junior 

jKh School Bai^ Parents 

Itfiiiintlnii w tel^ hcM 

ttfttJa y teou^ Deo^Aer 

tiht ^Aool gnuuit. 

jKHMiM M he on d^ M 

feMn a ter: 



VVhaf s Better Than xn Original 

Painting for Christmas 

Meiiiberi of flw Galhry 




• diaries SiMey 

• Barctey ^leirics 

• Kenneth Harrte 

• Bob Price 

• ComeHa Justice 



• HerbJtmes 

• Leonette >Mttw 

• James Kirtyy 

• Wm.Youngblood 

• Robert Trotter 





PREONANT? 




NffOI«LP? 


AidiifXion S*r«ie«, Pnf^»m.f T<Ntint. Bu. ... | 


CALL: 


TOLL FREE (800) 523-34» 




MNiof^ Family nwwtai 




Cowhcil, LW. 



out OarttfkaMs An A»dable 

Imperial Gallery 

§4« Tridon Am 4f7-S42 Va Beach 

AcfSH froei ^fo^ l^oppiei CMrttt 

OpoaftotlMy Itottendi^i 



SAY4mERRY CHRISTMAS 







+: 



Distinctive Flcs-al 

Arrangement Far 

All OccaBons. Choice 

Mooming Plants And 

A Fine Sdection 

C^ P«rmaneat Arran^ments. 



(^n 10 a.aL-S p.ni. 
ttenChriitDiaB 



t 



COLONY BEACH FLORIST! 

FEMMME ViVOm SMN>PIM CENTEX 




y 



--p^ 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 7, 1972 



THE SUN 



PAGE 7 



.-^ 



Former Skating Champion begins career at age f oui 

Most children decide what a .u.„ :. ...^ ,,.^^ ,^^^.__^.^.^.^_,,,,^^^-^_,_^.^^ ^^-^ C7 Z^ 



Most diildren decide what 
they want to do when they 
grow up several times ftrough 
the years. Not John Olsen. At 
age four he decided to be a 
competitive roller skater. 
Following that deter- 

, mination, he began competing 
in local meets at 12. won 'a 
regional championship two 
years later, was the California 

.Champion finalist in the 
-National Meet from 1960^, 

, became National Champion in 
1961 and earned two gold 

, medals in 1963. - 

, Olsen disclosed all of these 
facts over a pepsi at College 
Park Roller Rink, of which he 
is part owner. He also gives 
skating lessons-- 
organizational, public and 
urlvate " 

, A native of Culv«- City, 
Calif., the heart of the movie 
industry, Olsen explained that 

I his Vision to skate was made 
when he accompanied his 
parents to an annual 
production put on by the local 

, roller skating club and several 
movie companies. The 
companies furnished all of ttie 
settii^s and costumes, while 
the club supplied Uie skaters. 
"I decided! wanted to roller 

; skate right then and have 
never been (tff skates more 
than two wedcs at one time 

* since. That was while I was in 
basic training." 

His training for skating 
competition began in Lm 
I Angdesi He eventually went 






I 



to SaiT Diego for additional 
training and to attend San 
Diego State College. 

"I went for five years but 
didn't earn a degree. I was 
more in|brested in taking 
ttie clasfa to learn than in get- 
ting a ^egree." Had he grad- 
ated. He would have had a 
6odb\e major in English and 
history and a minor in 
political science. 

During the four years he 
competed in ttie National meet 
he was a finalist in every 
event except one and placed in 
all but one event. 
At the time he won his g<M 
] medals in figure and dance, he 
< was one (rf 13 skaters to do 80 
from the time the award was 
intiated In the late 1930's. It to 
^ flie4i40wrt«ward that can bb 
earned in rollo* skating and k 
based' on proficiency. The 
participants skate against a 
set score. 

The native Californian 
arrived in Virginia Beach in 
^ .19^. At that time there was no 
^competitive skating in the 
> area. "I came to the Beach 
' because I felt it was a new 

• frontier for roller skating. It 
I had none of the national 
; prominence in the field but 

• there was a lot of talent. The 
I area showed a large amount of 
! potential." He was also im- 

• (H«ssed with the territory and 
I liked the people. 

I Since Olsen's arrival in 
; Virginia Beach, local 
I residents are becoming known 

• in the roller skating field. 



jLeague will 
p-esent views 

• The Norfolk-Virginia Beach 
•League of Women Voters will 
(|X^ent its views on several 
icurrent issues following a 
luncheon which will be held at 
{noon Friday at the Shore 
{Drive Inn, Route 60. 

' The issues to be covered will 
Mnclude the Equal Rights 
lAmendment, environmental 
(quality, justice, foreign 
irelations (specifically, 
jNorifjolk ports), education, 
probation and in- 

tergovernmental relations. 
iState senators and membo^ 
isf the House of Delegates have 
been invited to hear the 
^ague's positions on the 

issues. 

^ 

I Opm to ^ gen«-al public, 

•ttie luncheon at $2.50 per 

^rson will begin at noon with 

•the program immediately 

|rollowing. Sherry will be 

pvailable b^inning at 11:30 

km. 

* Reservaticxis may be made 
calling Kay Gray at 340- 

747 or J^nne Kapta at tilS- 
ISlt. 



IVEPCO hott 
opexi house 



A Chrtetmas open house will 
pae held at the VEPCO Elec- 
kncal Living Centw. 525 First 
jcolonial Road, from 10 a.m. to 
M p.m. today. 

t A Chrttrtas recipe book 
Untied "Charub's Chwce" 
Iwill be available. Mrs. Betty 
Jo Currao. NKn« ecowwitot, 
wUI iammtnte the makiog 
of OtfMfflM dKontion. 



Among them is Joan Young, 
12, who is the current National 
champion of her age group. 
She was also invited to par- 
ticipate in the World Cham- 
pionship show held recently in 
Bremen, Germay. "That was 
quite an honor," Olsen ex- 
plained. 

In ttie Autumn Invitational 
Skating Championship held in 
Lynchburg, members of the 
Virginia Beach Skating club 
won seven firet places. They 
were among 500 contestants 
from the East Coast to the 
Great Lakes area. 

Known for his dexterity in 
both figure-skating and free- 
style skating in Europe as well 
as the United States, Olsen is 
presently training 19-year okl 
Gerry Royakkers, the 
Women's Skating Champion 
frwn Holland, for the 
World Figure Skating 
championship competition to 
be held in Germany. She was 
sent to the Beach at the ex- 
pense of the Dutch govern- 
ment in cooperation with her 
skating club to train witti, 
Olsen a month. In order to win 
a championship, skaters must 
compete in two categories- 
both in free-style and school 
figures. 




Olsen explained that roller 
skating is very popular in 
Europe and is considered 
more of a sport than en- 
tertainment. Clubs may be 
governed by the state or a city 
as well as being private. 

As he skated leisurely t)ack 
and forth behind the snack 
counter of the rink, he 
revealed that future plans for 
the club include the 
development of a skater ex- 
change between Virginia 
Beach and Bremerhaven, 
Germany, its sister skating 
city, during the summer 
months. 



He also talked about the 
individual benefits of taking 
up roller skating. "Skating 
develops athletic ability but 
it's also artistic. It teaches 
self-discipline. Persons just 
learning to skate or 
developing new techniques or 
style have to concentrate on 
what they are doing." 

His interest in the sport is 
not limited to training persons 
for competitive skating. "It's 
a R<K>d family sport There is 
always something for 
someone in skating regardless 
of age. It's something 
everyone can participate in." 



He pointed out that many 
parents who do not skate still 
participate by taking their 
children to cwnpetitiOTis. 

Other instructors at the rink 
are Miss Millie Funda and 
Mrs. Fran Jacobson. 
Beginnii^ skating classes for 
children are held Saturday 



morning and for adults. #i 
Tuesday evenir^. ;^ 

The rink is open from 7 4) 
9:30 p.m. Tuesday throM||j 
Sunday and from 2 to 4 pm. dn 
Saturday and Sunday. It is 
closed Mondays and Is 
available for private parties 
on that day. *; 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Shoney's Hilltop North 



HKATING— Olsen <lves a demonstration oi hwr to do a spin. 




DO YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING! 
WITH MONEY FROM US! 




If Extra Cad) is what YOU need to 
hdp meet Holiday expenses . . . Come 
RIGHT IN OR PHONE! We'll be i^d 
to serve you promptly! 



VIRGINIA BEACH HNANCE CORP. 

2413 NORTH LANDING ROAD 
VIRGINU BEACH, VA. 
PHONE: 427-2100 



I 




COiMBd 



■Two , 

I PLATTERS 

I for the price of ONE 

I Choose your favorite! 



:ofnbo $1.20 



Big BS?C< 

I Slim Jim Combo $1.30 

I Tender Steak Combo $1.30 aii piatten inciudi 

■ * «in French friw and a . 

I Kingfish Combo $1.30 tossed gra«n salad. I 

I -— €DOd thru Decembar 17th f || ^llC 

I HILLTOP NORTH ONLY •^ l-^tlRIJw 



H 




BREAK— Olsen pauses between lessons to chat 
with students. 



CLUB NOTES 



THE WOMAN'S CLUB OF 
CHESAPEAKE BEACH - 
The Bayside High School 
Madrigal Singers will i;H-esent 
a program of Christmas music 
at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the 
Ocean Hearth Restaurant. 

SEACOAST TOAST- 
MISTRESS CLUB - 
"Childhood Holly Day 
Memwies" will be the theme 
of ttie meeting at 9:45 a.m. 
Tuesday in the Atlantic 
Permanent Savings and Loan 
Building on Independence 
Boulevard. A luncheon at $1.25 
per person will be served. 
Persons interested in at- 
toidii^ may call Mrs. K.V. 
Poster at 340-3293. 

THE TIDEWATER SHELL 
AND FOSSIL CLUB - The 
annual Christmas party will 
begin at 5 p.m. Sunday at the 
Atlantic Permanent Savings 
and Loan Association 
Buildii^, with a covo-ed di^ 
supper and gift exchange 
priding the brief iMisiness 
se^on. New offico^ elected 
to serve in 1973 will take over 
ttieir chities. Following the 
busineK mating, a National 
Get^raphic film wiu 

be diown. Interested perscms 
may call Wylda ^ephens at 
499-1073 or Mary Tackrtt at 

OCEAN PARK WOMAN'S 
CLUB — Mrs. Gloma T. 
Mina* (d Ridunond will speak 
on "Tlie day Ch-ist was bwn" 
at noon We^iesday in the cltdb 
roo on ^Mre I^ve. The 
"Christmas Special" will 
include hymn singing by 



membo^, a Christmas tree 
and all of the trimmings of the 
season. Luncheon will be 

cpf*ypH 

THE VIRGINIA BEACH 
ASEMBLY — New members 
will be welcomed at the 
Christmas dinner dance at 7 
p.m. December - 15 at the 
Princess Anne Country Clidb. 
John Derieux's orchestra will 
provide continuous music 
from 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. 
New members are G. Stafford 
Balderson, David L. 
Costenltader, Cairt. William J. 
Gray (Ret.). George P. 
Gr^oiy, John R. Liles, Dr. 
Franlf'D'CMiner, Jr., R.Adm. 
Eric G.F. Pollard (Ret.), Roy 

A. Raney Jr. and J. Prince 
Seidell. 

PRINCESS ANNE 
GARDEN CLUB - 
Jones, a Virginia 
florist, presmied Christmas 
ideas for decorating eadi 
room of the house during the 
November meetii^. 

WESTVIEW GARDEN 
CLUB — The {ntq)a' way for 
making bo\^ and workii^ 
with many different types of 
materials in making 
Oiristmas arrai^ements was 
discussed by Wayne Jwies of 
Herbert Harrell Florist at the 
November meeting. 

THE TOWNHOUSE 
GARDEN CLUB OF 
WASHINGTON SQUARE - 
Mrs. W. M. Gresham 
presented a program on 
decorating Christmas tree 
ornaments with the mMt 
elaborate items being made of 
hen, duck and goose egfs. 



PLAZA 
Wayne 
Beach 



This JoDy old gentfeman 
is one of our l)est customers. 



Each Christmas he brings us an enormous list. 
And we're flattere(i. 

Because he gives more gifts than anybody 
we know. And always manages to choose just 
the right ones. 

We like to think it's because we fill our 
two Alexander Beegle shops 

with the most exciting gifts AlpY^IMlPr RpPflIP 

and fashions imaginable. /mlvAIIIIUvl UVVUIV 



Like nobody else has. 

Maybe you'd like to join our happy 
customer. And bring your Christmas list to us. 
Our prices are just what you had in mind. And 
if you have a hard time decidinjg what to buy 
for whom, let our handsome gift certificate 
be your gift. ' 

Alexander Beegle. The 
Santa Claus in all of us lives here. 



Very fashionable clothes and gifts formen and women. 
207 Laskin Road or Pembroke Mall. Bank American! and Master Charge welcomed. Free gift wrapping. 




Sup ott LatUi Road tloi* MoadiV teoH^ &«miqr faon 9 to6»0r M 




fraoi 10 to 10 wd SatwIqrftMi 10 to 6. 



• ■ WW • » I 



, «,■* <■«,'<•<■<;'* ■>. V-* 



: < ■^,'i*^"<'4'* 



" " iiiijMJ^ku^mmmmmM^^^M 



fAQEt 



2^ 



THE SUN 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1972 




PoKce b^in program to prevent accidents 



PINEWOCW DERBY - Pat McCormick (r) of WeM«i 1 walked away with top 
honore in tte Pinewood Derby of Cab Scoot Pack 3M held recently at Bayslde 
Pi'esbyterian Church. Placing third was David Pecklns (I.) of Webelos 2 while his 
|nnhpr Paul Pecklns of Den 3 placed second. Paul won in absentia. David raced his 
tar for him. The cars, which were shaped out of pinewood blocks by the scouts and 
fteir fathers, were raced on a 32-foot three-car elevated track. The first and second 
|»l«ce winners of each den competed in the eliminaUon heats to determine the Pack 
^ inner. This was the third year for the father-son project. 

« 

iFile Medicare claims now 



• •^About tMs time each year, 
l^y Medicare beneficiaries 
^iirt reviewif^ medical ex- 
|Kns& incurred (hiring the 
ling months to prepare 
filii^ Medicare claims, 
irles E. Teets, manager of 
NorfoDc Social Security 
Ice, suggests that ben- 
^leiaries fite their claims new 
Sind tuA wait until the end of 
Jtiie year. 

I "Traveler Insurance Co. 
*makes payment on Medicare 
!«Iaims in Virginia" said 
'and they have 




jTeets, 



B*ft? 



pr(rt}lems each year during the 
months of December through 
March handling the large 
volume. The increased 
volume often results in 
delay of claims, so 
Medicare beneficiaries are 
really bett^ (rff to try and file 
claims outside th^se peak 
mmths." 

Teets also advised Medicare 
beneficiaries toflle their claims 
throughout the year on a 
mcmthly or perhaps quarterly 
basis. "Of course it is better to 
wait until the $50 deductible is 
::::::::W:W::?ft%WJW:::WftWfSrawS 



met ($60 beginning in 1973) 
before the first claim of the 
year is filed" Mr. .Teets 
rqwrted, "but after that it is 
to the beneficiary's advantage 
to file claims on a r^ular 
basis throughout ^he year." 
If you have any questions 
about your Medicare or any 
social security matters, 
contact your nearest social 
security office. The Norfolk 
Social Security Office is 
located at 220 W. Brambleton 
Avenue. The telphone number 
is 441-6391. 



The Virginia Beach l»olice 
Traffic Bureau launrh<«d a 
concentrated accident 
prevention program Monday, 
entitled "Selective Traffic 
Enforcement", in an effort to 
curtail increasing motor 
vehicle accidents in the city. 

Capt. G.K. Bryan, Traffic 
Bureau CO., says the 
prt^ram was launched as a 
re«ilt of an approximate 15 
per-cent annual increase in 
hiaffic accidents during the 
post several years. Bryan 
pointed out that .SS.OSS ac- 
cidents were recorded durir^ 
the year 1970, while that figure 
had been reached by the end of 
September of this year. 

Records indicate the 

Academy 
graduate 

Virginia Beach Police Lt. 
M.R. Beane will graduate next 
Friday, December 15, from 
the FBI National Academy at 
Quantico. Va. 

His -graduation will climax 
12 weeks of intensive study in 
the areas of: Management for 
Law Fnforcement. Criminal 
Law. Socio-PhS'schological 
Aspects of Tommunity 
Behaviw, Forensic Science 
and Law Enforcement, and 
Fducation and Training in 
I,aw Fnforcement. 

Approximately 15 hours of 
credif. which can be applied 
toward academic degrees, is 
awarded for successfully 
completing. the course. 

Beane. 35, is a six years 
veteran of service with the 
resort city police department, 
he previously served with the 
Norfolk Police Department. 

His present assignments are 
Auxiliary Police CO., and 
Assistant to Inspections Aide 
to Police Chief Col. W.W. 
Davis. 



majority of accidents 
repeatedly occur, at various 
times of day or night and days 
of the week, in certain sections 
of the city. During? this special 
program Traffic Bureau men 
and equipment will be 
.saturated in these areas, while 
men of the three police 
precincts will devote more of 
their time observing traffic 
while patrolling the remaining 
areas of the city. 

In explaining the program's 
advantage to the Traffic 
Bureau Bryan says, "We'll be 
able to spend more time in 
areas of high traffic incidents. 
Based on previous data we 
know where the majority of 



accidents are occuring, as 
well as v,'hen and why. So we 
will put personnel in these 

areas to watch for m- 
fractiwis." 

Bryan is quick to point out 
the (N-ogram still provides 
fiexibility in Traffic Bureau 
operations. He says, "These 
areas of concentration will 
change according to time of 
day, as well as day of the 
week. Units can be shifted |o 
different areas as the ne^ 
arises." 

Bryan added, "We'll be 
using marked police cars and 
unmarked radar units in a 
constant patrol ol these hi^ 
accident areas. The men will 



be closely watching in- 
tersections for traffic law 
infractions." 




WANTED 

Houses To Sel 

Anywhere in Vo. Beech 

For quick results and more cash in your pocket . . . 
let us sell your property. A competent staff of Profes- 
sional experts on duty and always available. 

CALL 497-4851 

STOHL REALTY 

4920 Virginie Beech Blvd. et Aregone Blvd. 



* 



Mind Your | 

Money By Peter Vtenerl 



Births 





Mr. R Mrs. Darrill Royce 
Perry, daughter. 

Mr, «• Mrs. John Finley 
Paxson, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Lee Short, 
daughter. v 

Mr. «. Mrs. Charles Webster 
Owens, daughter. 

Mr. K Mrs. Thomas 0. 
Hewitt, son. 

Mr. A Mrs. Donald 
Bevilacqua, son. 

Mr. «. Mrs. Nichota* Floyd 
Barba, son, . 

Mr. a. Mrs. Pleasant Nance 

Hughes, son '1 

Mr. «■ mrs. Clyde Dc Forrest 
Hathaway III, son. 

Mr. & Mrs. Roy Williams 
Dixon Jr;, son. 

Mr. * Mrs. Glen Lawrence 
Matthews, daughter. 

Mr. ^ Ms. WUIlam Gordon 
Foster, son. 

Mr. & Mrs. James Walter 
Cox, daughter. 

Mr. «■ Mrs. Edward Albert 
Heidt, Jr., son. 

Mr. «. Mrs. Thomas Wesley 
Allen, daughter. 

Mr. K Mrs. Pena Justino 
Quevedo, son. 

Mr. S. Mrs. Walton Belton 
Fanshaw, Jr., son. 

Mr. K Ms. Richard Lewis 
Fusco, son. 

Mr. K Mrs. Carltor Buck 
Edwards, daughter. 

Mr. 8. Mrs. William Carlisle 
Meador, son. 

Mr. fi. Mrs. George Feodore 
Fedon, Jr., daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis Marvin 
Creighton, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Phillip Scott 
Foick, daughter. 

Dr. & Mrs. Milton Aldrich 
Saunders, daughter. 

Mr. & Mrs. Ivey William 
' the Department of Tranq>ortation and the two biggest auto Suggs, daughter, 
aufacturers are suggesting that the states enact laws thai would f^ff!^^^^ Jaughtl?" Thornton 
ke tte wearing of seat belts mandatory. If the police spot you ^^ ^ ' ^^s. Joseph Gerald 



flhe seat bdte hi our cars are a disgrace. They're so bad, most 
ijitorists aren't ushig tbtm. 

flnsurance Institute for Highway Safety says (mly 3 or 4 out of 
^07 100 drivers and passaigers use the complete lap-belt, 
sioiflder-hamMS i»ote<*ive system provided to most cars, 
ame p«6||etB the auto buaijiiess hint di^U^^hat we're not using 
I seat-bdt i^fistems tt^uSe'we must have^me kind of death 
Balon^. "Hie main reason why many moUMists and 
««n't mb^ flHi Mat belts is becatoe ttie beite aren't 
for humus. 
;i^ die belts myotir car. Hie buckles have different sizes for 
liiM^der straps and the auu4ed, spaghettilike mess is often 
:lo ontwi^ before each use. 
■ pevii^ ttiroD^ this siarl, ^w're faced with trymg to reach 
<, dioulder harness without getthig a ^oul(ter separation. Ilien, 
' you're all twckled in, ywi have to choke youi^elf in an attempt 
iw airay at ttie «ieiigen<7-brake release. You're stranded in 

Cairysler (rfficial admitted to the Federal Trade Canmission 

»t tho-e were same 9 million ways you could buy me of his 

apaiqr's aittomoMles. You could get special oigines, wheds, 

[ted giasB, htdxaps, anything, but you could only get (me lousy 

id of s^t belt. 

ametow Snoring the udiuman desiffi of today's seat belts, the 
lent and the nuijor auto manufacbirers are now bent m 
cing people to vroar the bdts. First ttiey tried the shock treat- 
nt of TV spcrts showing horribly disfigured cWldroi who werai't 
arii% s^t belte in crashes. 

I came the Imzzers that buzzed at you if you didn't buckle iq). 

buzzers make an amoying smmd but many motoriste are 

^ ways to disconnect them. Accordii^ to the Insurance In- 

ute bo- H^way Safety, the TV qx>ts and the buzzo^ have been 

nonumental failure. In a sunwy d those not wearing the belts, 

I HHS found it "significant...that many people consUer them 

Bvenlait or uncomfortable." 



nbucUed," yw could g^ a fme 

lis ktod of law could Mrtaiciy hdp save lives. They tried it in 
Aistralia, and the great maj<rity of motorists began 
|ingdieir belts. Traffic deatte(ta-o[^ a dramatic 24 per cent. g 
lint this puts dK entur« onus on driven and passoigers. What ^ 
It a law diat would force the auto companies to gii^ us better 
1? Actually, there is such a law but it wm't force. the _ 
t to provide i^Jly good seat belts tmtil next faU when the S 

74 model cars come out. s 

lie new cars will have «usy-in, ^sy-out seat bdts plus an inertia g 
on the shoidder liame^. The reel will allow c«n|ri^ely tree g 
fem&at for driver or pa^«i^r. In a cras^ it hauls you up sni% § 
Eainst the seat. s 

iU«i« a sort of double standard, Vt» auto companies for years | 
We been |»twidii« this en^lknt seat-belt system (easy-ui-out, | 
1 red) for hi^way poi^e, utili^ companies and other fleet | 
pyen. Don't try to get the good bdts. They won't sdl than toS 
ils. You have to orter a fleet <rf care. Only the Amoican- 1 
Drvette and s«ne Etax>pean cars now {Mtnride this good - 
it-bdt sy^on as standard equipment. 
kWhy doat die automolNte companies fi^ire a w»y to offer tte 
I s^t belts at co^ to those of IK n^o are stu(^ with die bad ODBi 
I (»n't affoid to gd a new car next year m onkr to get better 

EtMU. 



NOW OPEN 



Mullen, IV, son. 
Mr. R Mrs. 



Albert Rufus 



Sharpe, Jr., son. 

Mr. F Mrs. Henry Louis 
Rodes, daughter. 

Mr. K Mrs. Alvin Lee Lannb, 
son. 

Mr. ?. Mrs. Ralph Cornelius 
Pryor, daughter. , 

Mr. f. Mrs. Hugh McDonald 
Forehand, Jr., daughter. 

'Ar. f- Mrs. Edward Anthony 
Foxwell, daughter. 

Mr. f Mrs. Garland Lee 
Eaton, Jr., son. 

Mr. ? Mi's. Jariles David 
Wright, son. 

Mr. f Mrs. Gary Wayne 
Vaugnan, son. 

Mr. P Mrs. Otis Olanda 
Thourogood, daughter. 

Mr. f Mrs. James Allen 
Flora, daughter. 

Mr. P MrS; Stuart Ray 
Bryant, daughter. 

Mr. f Mrs. John Robert 
Dumala, son. 

Mr. Jt Mrs. J.D. Franklin, Jr., 
son. 

Mr. K Mrs. Jimnny Lee Sweat, 
son. 

Mr. R Mrs. Lambert Darryl 
Berry, daughter. 

Mr. f Mrs. Luke Frank 
Biernot, Jr., son. 

Mr. f Mrs. Gary Lewis 
Clayton, daughter. 

Mr. f Mrs. Ronald Bruce 
Bauman, daughter. 

Mr. f Mrs. Carl Bradley 
Foster, son. 

Mr. P. Mrs. Walter Rhea 
Cardwell, daughter. 

Mr. P. Mrs. Richard D. 
HoJmes, daughter. 

Mr. h Mrs. Douglas L. House, 
daughter. 

Mr. P- Mrs. Sean Authur 
McGarigle, son. 

Mr. P. Mrs. Richard Larry 
Lewis, daughter. 

Mr. K Mrs. Victor Russell 
Schutzman, son. 

Mr. K Mrs. Douglas Quentin 
Scott, daughter. 

Mr. P Mrs. John Wayne 
Tawnev, daughter. 



wuTEt IT NrauiDauu! TRIPLE VALUE ALUMINUM SIDING OFFER FROM 

HiWaFAaWRS MSTMBirrOIS WLt NORFOIK'S IMGiST SIDUK CONTIkCTOIIS 




Mhrrxlimi m prrhnfM thr lipsl 
kmtwn iiDNJliiftir in nun. Thiit ' 
nhiminiim tiktng jhIiihIIv will 
|Ktv fiir iltrir Mill III mmnfi'- 
luinit* HiivinKn! Ymi Kd »P t" 
fwHT thr imtidatit^ v.-ihic fiX 
iithrr siding K(ff UKMI m\. II. 



699 



ANYJggUSE 



TIEIIIO-nASnCKBI SIMM 



Alwilulrhf firr-nmnr. w m i iii- ^^ 
tm»i mn ■mliin'-prrain Ap- ^^ 
|itir<l with xpn-Ml hrralhrr 
Hliimtntim nniU and roil lii 
'innHw inMiliiliiiii quality up 
til M tifflw hftiirt than iiawrn- 
liiiiial Mlinio. Vni IMH tn. A. 
nivtraiir. 



889 

ANY HOUSE 

tahM>4 AAotafMi 



CRB>iT 

TERMS 

ARRANGED 

•UY DlliCT AN^ 
TAKi ADVANTAQI 
OF LOW FAaOlY 
raiCES. lUY WITH 
CONFIDiNaf OUT 
OUTSTANOMG KPU. 
TATION FOl DE. 
POiDAMUTY GUAR. 
ANTEES SATBFAC 
TWN! 



•^ 



244IO(n 

moMsavKE 

COUEaCAUS 
ACCEVTB 



For No Obligation 
Shop-At-Homo Service 



Call (703) 499-8537 




nuiav^ 



ROYAL 13 



FOR CHRISTMAS: 

Shiri'Pockei S-Tronsistor 
Portable Radio 



Gbfs Cofi^ioiiy's 

MiMliTUKATION 



MUTOP AREA-. 

o^FimrecaMMALRD. 

TELOHONf: 42M227 



■ISnONINtSAUA 





CompfBfwlthS 
pl9C9 gift 0m0nM9: 
Includoa radio, 
carrying caao, 
aarphone attachmant, 
battarfaa and 
gift box 




NOW 



$095 



8 



THE ESSEX 
ONLY 





QUALITY 
LEADERSHIP 

PHONE 340-1575 



TktaiNTON 
SpKe ComiiMnd* IN Remote Conftel 



$ 



!>olid-State Titan 200 
Chassis. Solid- Stale Super Video Range Tuner. 
Chromatic Tuning. 



359 



95 



L 



Len 5 T. V. Sales & Service 

4113 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. ACRC^ FRWI WILLIS WAYSIDE 
"We offm- the best in T.V. & Sta^ Smwx: Prices - Workmanship • Qwday" 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1972 




THE SUN 



PAG^ 



By T. Jay Bnimbley Wv 

$pom Editor 4^ 



^here will be no meeting of the City Recreation Commission in 
jPecember. The next meeting is set for Wednesday, January 10. 
1973. in the City Council Chambers wi the second floor of the 
plunicipal Administrative Building at 3 p.m. It is hoped by 
^Commission officials that the body's meeting time will be the 
tsecond Wednesday of every month throughout the year. Please 
Inote the change in place. The Commission formerly met in the 
School Board Room of the School Administration Building. 
f +++++ 

aCastern District champion Maury conquered the E.C. Glass 
Hilltoppers in Lynchburg 14-0 Saturday in the State Group AAA 
isemifinal football game. I spoke with two of Virginia Beach's 
•preniier football coaches Friday, and both pretficted the 
'toiymottorfe victory. Bayside's Bob Hicks and First Colonial's 
FVank Webster said that Maury should beat Glass and go all the 
way to the state championship. Maury will meet Northern 
District champion Annandale in Fairfax at Woodson High 
School Sahirday for the title. 

+++++ 
Johnnv. Unitas finished his seventeenth season witti the Colts 
Sund^^ in the old J<*nny U. style. His 63-yard touchdown 
pass to Eddie Hinton in the closing minutes of the game was 
reminiscent of many such aerials thrown by one <rf the game's 
greaVst signal-callers. Many feel that this will be Unitas' last 
season as a Colt. He still has great appeal to the fans and can 
still toss the ball well enough to stay on the roster as a back-up 
quarterliack. if he can mentally comlition himself for a back-up 
role. Earl Morrell is about the same age, and George Blanda is 
evenoide^. yet both are still active in the game. With his great 
knowledge cX. the game, Unitas will be a very valuable member 
<rf the.Qolts. 

k - +++++ 

midef r power plants may have discovered a "rockii^" new 
way to prevent fish from entering the cooling water intakes! 
VEPCo began testing the use of underwater speakers to scare 
the^hih away. The scariest music programmed was aRiarbntly 
blaring rock. The system seems to be working. In other studies, 
thetJniversity of Wisconsin psychologists looking into the ef- 
fects of hard rock music, constant machine noise, and random 
loud no^es, have found that monkeys experience fatigue and 
lethat'gy. Scientists think that these reactions may be similiar in 
humans. 

4-++++ 
Legislatures in more than half of the fifty states approved 
measures in 1972 to deal with various environmental proJblems, 
including air and water pollution, population, solid waste, and 
protection of endangered species. Land use received the most 
attention, witti a myriad of state statutes governing zoning, 
wetlands, natural areas, and strip mining. „ , 

-l--f+-l"l- '**>.,. « 

Although Uie average citizoi is not worried about the impending 
energy crisis in the future, many scientists, engineers, and 
government <tff icials see this to l)e a more serious problem in the 
future than water and air pollution is today. A new government 
study, "The Potential for Energy Conservation," suggests 
possible changes which could reduce the projected national 
energy requirements in 1980 by 7.3 million barrels of crude oil a 
day. The report encourages changes in the design of houses and 
office buildings, more doublii^ up of car pool commuters, 
higher parking fees and highway tolls to discourage driving, 
installation of bus lanes and other mass transit features, more 
facilities for bicycling and walking, less use of airplanes for 



^vi trqw. and mor« shipm«it of freight by ^yind lesi;b^ 
ck. The publication detsn't mention this, butwi^dy of tlfese 
m!ommendations should be a good guide forlwig ran|e in- 
vestment-stodc purchases. The report is available from the U.S. 
Government Printing Offi(5e, Washington, D.C., for $2. 



The rode and blue fishing 
tournament might be over for 
citation-sized fish, but the 
fishermen are having a 
beautiful lime in the 
Chesa|5eake Bay catching 
school rock weighing between 
one and five pounds, jigging 
Iwpktns' or small buck taib. 

The best method to use fw 
making a good haul of school 
blues is to watch for the gulls 
working over the schools. 
Then slowly approach the 
school, cut your motor, and 
drift along with the moving 
schod of fish. As you drift, 
work your lure over them. 

I checked quite a few boats 
coming in at Bubba's Marina 
over the weekend. I have 
never seen so many tautgo. 

Everyone is fishing arouncf the 
first, secmid, and third islands 
fbr them. You must fish over 
the rock beds m- you will not 
have much luck, since the 
tautog feed on mussels and 
small crabs in the rodcs and 
then return to their hdes in 
the rocks. 

I saw some tautog that went 
from two to twelve pounds. 
Tautog th^t size makes for 
some ffsh eatii^ during the 
winter months. 

I also talked to two 
fishermen who had been 
trdling f^ big rock Saturday 
night They had 28 large rodt 
going to 37 pounds as well as 
other flsh. 

There are still fish that can 
be had by trolling below 
Sandbridgoand offshore. With 
the weatherman calling fcr 
som^ nice weather 

Patriot pris* 
powder puff 
game tonight 

The junior and senkr girls 
•t First Coloniid High Sdxxri 
wiD sqmn (^ on die pfdiron 
toni^t. Thireday. Decanba- 
7th. in their araiual Powter 
Puff FootbeQ Game. Game 
time is 7:M p.m. in the First 
Cdoiual m0 Scteol StadUmi. 



through the weekend, be sure 
to get out and catch some of 
Ihese nice rock, tautog, and 
blues. 

I had the good fortune of 
beir^ invited nut to fish with a 
couple <rf oW-timers Sunday 
afternoon around the Bridge- 
Tunnel. Although we were late 
getting started, we caught a 
few nice schooli^. 

Both of my fishing partners 
wanted to run the boat along 
the Bridge-Tunnel while we 
trolled. You should have heard 
them going at it. I sure hope 
that next year's boats have 
two steering wheels to both of 
them can drive. 



Virginia Beach wins City 
junior high football title 



The Virginia Reach .Junior 
High School football won the 
Virginia Beach junior high 
school football title w ith a fine 
.VO-l record. The Seahawks 
defeated evwy junior high 
team, and the only blemish on 
their record was a tie with 
First Colonial in their final 
game of the season. 

The title gave the Seahawks 
their second football cham- 
pionship, hut it marked the 
first season fhaf thev were 



able to finish the season un- 
defeated. The feam is coached 
by Will Hinyc and .lim Capps, 

Coach l'.raye attributed the 
success of^he team to "a 
superb overall team effort and 
the leadership of co-captains 
Terry Harris and Carl Mc- 
Donald. " The coaches ulso 
cited the aitstanding play of 
McKinney Moore, Robert 
Crutchfield, Mark Wray. and 
Valeni Felton. 

The biggest game of the 



year matched the Seahawks, 
who had a 4-0 record at the 
lime, with their nearest 
challenger Plaza .hinior High. 
Plaza entered the game with ^ 
3-1 mark. 

The Seahawks won the 
game in the last two sc»"onds 
when an intercepted Trojan 
phss was returned 55 yards for 
the game's only score. The 6-0 
victory cinched the title for 
the Seahawks. 



r<<iQQ00ftOft^&^>yvWM<WSftft6W O WgW^^ 



SSBSBSBSSfflSSSSSS&SSS 





SIMRTf 

By T. Jay Bnimbley .Sports Editor 



S^jggg 



Princess Anne athlete honored 
at Annual Fall Sports Banquet 



Plaza Chiefs take 
City 904b. crown 



Princess Anne High School 
held its Annual Fall Sports 
Banquet at the school Tuesday 
evening to honor the Cavalier 
athletes in football, cross- 
country, and football. The 
cheerleaders also received 
their letters. 

The evening was highlighted 
by the naming of the out- 
standing athletes in each of 



the sports. Fran Badonsky 
was named the Best Offensive 
Player in Girls Field Hockey, 
and her teammate Judy 
Nicklas walked off with the 
trophy for the Best Defensive 
Player. 

Two special awards were 
given in cross-country. Kevin 
Bargy won the Most Improved 
Award, and RplnH-t Walker 



Wilson edges Chiefs in 
85S2 overtime thriller 




The Kempsville Chiefs 
opened their basketball 
seaswi Tuesday night with an 
exciting 85-82 overtime loss to 
Wilson. The Chiefs, a young 
team who will improve with 
game experience, played well 
for an opening game. 

The game was a nip-and- 
tuck affair throughout. Jimmy 
Roberts, who played an out- 
standing game, tied the game 
at 73-73 when he hit two free 
throws. A good defensive 
effort forced a Wilson turn- 
over on the pass-in, giving 
the ball back to the Chiefs. 

BrittGlisson, the game's top 
scorer put Kempsville ahead 
75-73 with a two-point jumper 
from close range with just 
twelve seconds left in the 
game. As thefina^iew seconds 
were ticking off, Wilson tied 
the score at 75-all to send the 
game into overtime. 

The overtime period' was 
controlled by Wilson, who 



jumped to a quick five point 
lead. A determined Kemps- 
ville team tried desperately 
to narrow the gap, but the 
clock ran out before they could 
succeed. 

Glisson was the game's 
leading scorer with 32 
points. Roberts won runner-up 
scoring honors with 22 tallies. 
Ricky Bliese also hit double 
figures for the Chiefs with 14 
points. Other Chiefs puttir^ 
points on the scoreboard were 
Doug Boone with two points, 
Vito Traino with two points, 
Mike Torrech with four points, 
and Mike Crabtree with six 
poinlb. 

Calvin Brown led Wilson 
scorers with 28 points, (Mhers 
sooring f* Wilson -ff tiij ffl ike 
Whiting 4, Larue^Harri^ton. 
13, Charles Coleman 10. 
ftichard Refers 2, George 
Walker 8. and Reggie Jon^s 
20. 



Bayside downs KeUam 
72-64 in season opener 



Bayside and Kellam 
squared off Tuesday night in 
the opening game of the 
season for both teams, and 
when the final smoke clearrj, 
Bayside was the winner f»fl-the 
long end of the 72-64 score. Thi" 
first half see-sawed back and 
forth, with Bayside holding a 
one-point lead at the end of the 
first quarter. 21-20, and with 
Kellam surging in front by one 
at the end fo the half, .37-36.' 

The scoring in the final two 
periods was tilted in Bayside's 
favor-Bayside held a 36-27 
scoring edge in the second 
lialf-as Bayside pulled away 
from the win. Jim Goffigan. 
the team's defensive standout, 
also led the Marlin scores 
with 22 tallies. 



Two other Marlins hit 
double figures. FIton Gross 
with 18 points and Cecil Duke . 
with 14. Other Bayside scorers 
were Don Harold with four 
points. Ricky Fletcher with 
, seven. Vernon Hyman with 
and Donnie Dugger with 




Sonny RlacJjiwMrlW^ Knight 
scorers with 15 points. Tony 
Davis hit for 12 points and 
Steve Strausbaugh for 14 to 
make the double-figure 
column. Roimding out the 
Kellam scoring were Mike 
Redus withV one* point, Jim 
Perkins wWf six, .Sam Baker 
with five, Doug Benham with 
two. and Ken Bazemore with 
rwne. 




NEW 1972 

4P00IS«AN 

If). tHi fcw. « tin i |»l i wm im rtini net ■ 
MWk ■11 N ill. I«9 Ml M» IMM. MrttttMi^ 

t iiai iMirliprti N< M <M^ on- 



SAVfeNTHEtOMPLETELINEOF 
FRONI WHEEL DRIVE RENAULTS! 




^EASTERN AUTa% 






PMOM SM.»M 



took honors as the Most 
Valuable Runner. 

The football awards weif'e 
highlighted by the naming of 
the Most Valuable Player. 
Danny Allen wot the Athletic 
Department A'vard for being 
the MVP in football. 

The Mike Collins Award for 
the Most Outstanding Of- 
fensive Lineman went to Allan 
Evans. Dick Early won the 
Most Outstanding Defensive 
Lineman trophy. Quarterback 
Mike Ange was honored as the 
Most Outstanding Offensive 
Back, and Robert Hughes was 
named the Most Outstanding 
Defensive Back. 

The C:. M. Tomko Award for 
the Most Outstanding Blocker 
on the football team was 
earned by Mark Wilcox. Carl 
Makley won the Edwin 
Charles Award as the Most 
Improved Player on the team. 

The David Maxwell 
Memo-^ial Award was un-l 
veiled at the banquet. Th^ 
three-foot high trophy will be 
awarded each year by the 
Virginia Beach SUN. on behalf 
of David Maxwell's parents, to 
the Most Outstanding 
Defensive Player in Virginia 
Beach. The complete story of 
the trophy and how it can be 
earned will be in next week's 
issue of the SUN. 
; Pictures of the award 
'4 -.winners at the Tuesday night 
banquet will also appear in the 
next issue of the SUN. There 
was not time to get .the 
photographs processed before 
the deadline fw this issue. 



The Plaza Chiefs finished 
their City Recreational 
League season with an 8-0-1 
record and the Continental 
Division championship crown. 
They became the first ex- 
pansion team in the league's 
history to win a City title in 
their first year of play. 

The Chiefs were coached by 
Sam Perry, defensive coach, 
and Bob Meeks, offensive 
coach, assisted by Jim Wit- 
tenburg, Len Blumenshine, 
and Mike Sanders. As the 
season began, the coaches 
realized that the boys had the 
talent to win some games, biit 
the talent lay undeveloped 
under the surface. 

The coaches told the team 
that they would consider their «» 
first year a success if they won 
just three games. But the 90- 
pound tackle team surprised 
everyone with their drive, 
hustle, and determination. 



The team developed into a 
small, fast squad. The 
average weight (rf the team 
averaged out to 76-pounds per 
man in the 90-pound limit 
division. 

Trophies were presented 

to each team member. 



Leo Anthony, 
Squirettes Spot 
Club guests Ti 

Members of the Squirett 
and I.eo Anthony will 
guests at the meeting of 
Virginia Beach Sports Club < 
Tuesday, December 12th 
the Cavalier Beach ai 
Cabana Club. Cf«ch Anthc 
of Princess Anne High Set 
will tell about his upcomii 
Cavalier Christmas Classic 
Basketball Tournament dfe^ 
December 28th, 29th, and 30tWr 
The Squirettes are the ;^ 
beautiouB Virginia Squir*,;^ 
cheerleaders who statiairSS 
themselves beneath 
baskets'at all our ABA gar 
and then perform during tir 
outs. 

The Virginia Beach Sports 
Club meet weekly oi^ 
Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m. in | M| 
luncheon meeting. All persoi^^. 
interested in sports of all kinds ,^ 
are invited to attend tl^*' 
meetings and becom»;» 
members. I'i 



jtioicgt 



VjitiC' SCHOOL OFn 






SOO WONG LEE m^U 




Mater Imtructor i^-^^^igMp 


W^JSKk 


7lJiDegne Black Bdt ^ ^^a 


■^H 


• SELF DEFENSE AND YOGA 




IIPIII 


and BODY CONDITIONING 




IKI 


• SHOWERS • SAUNA BATHS 




c^ 


Day A Nile Oauei for Men. 


^^^^^■•' 


^Hjta 


Women A ChOdren 




^^^h' 


612 E. Uttia CTMk Road 5«S-6262 




^^^B 


223 Va. Baach Blvd. 428-1246 




d:f^!M 



Mhen there's a nip in the air, 
nothing tastes better than... 



in I 









TZJt' 



MBrsiRilii 

BOTTLED IN BOND • 100 PROOF 



iHow to find lifeinsurance that's] 
'Blue Chip' and low cost, too: 



Look to the 'Blue Chip' agent. 



VIRGINIA 

Roger E. Clark 
John H. Costenbader 
Charles N. Fuller 
R. Robert Larmore 
D. Conrad 
Cornelius D 

NORFOLK 

Fred H. Forsberg 
John B. Hudson, 
H.Gilbert 




POinSMOUTH 



•bi 



E. Gordon Rawb, CLU 
John R. St. George, Jr., CLl 

NANSEMOND 

Clinton G. Carson 

NEWPORT NEWS • HAMPTOtfj 

Wilbughby Newtcm HI ^ 
Stella F. Stephens 
Leroy E. Thompson 

GLOUCESIER 

' John T. Harris, Jr. 



FRANK K. FEREBEE. CLU, General Agent 

1^} Virginia National Bank Building 

Norfolk, Virginia 2%10 

TelepfxHie • 622-1351 

Connecticut Mutual Life 

the'Bhie Chip'Canpaiv 



w^WV^^^p^^^^H^WV^^^P^PWWVPV 



■ *,-** ^ >* ^* t # 



«'£-$,( witw^ %##« i»f «^^ 



SfRHiSIIHllBmUUUlUiU... 



PIP— n,.„^a 

# ♦ ♦ #^ t 



^WJJH 



^ 



OE10 



THE SUN 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER t, 1g72 



• «ia VA. MAOI urn •*rtNWAI«IER fcWTEL 

radNE )40«l I 19* * ATLANTIC AVE. 

imU BAST rip PHONE 42845 II 

KHMtOKE MALL >^'^^*>»*C'tsiu>Ki.v.i>cw«m iUc^ 




»j» «rlNtt»^im.nllf<lSH^»1g.l■^'^l^'^ 



KAFOOO^ 



7. Datrolt Uons 
at Buffalo 




SCOCfCTAfLS 



TOPorAMAia^o 

RESERVATION CALL 428-^411 

HOURS 5 P.M. - 11 PJI. 
39th & ATLANTIC AVE. 



Play The VlijIGINiA BEAH^ SUN'S Second Annual-Weekly 




I ■ \ t ) t ) I - t r M \ ' \ 






NMop north 

li^^Siin^^^SSldns at SiHi 



bt 

m 

.e 



11- 
In 

no 



bn 
■ft II 



FREE ESTIMATES 



For yoau gugq^ 
Heal estafe need 

1. Florida vs. North Carolina (Jacksonville) 



GET IN ON THE FUN 

AND WIN MONEY TOOl 

Use You,- SkiU By TVying To Predict Who The Winners 
WUI Be. That's AU! Use The Official Entry Blank or A 
Reasonable Copy Be A Winners \ 

RULES OF THE GAME 

r 

Weekly Contest is Open To Eve^one Except This News- 
Mper's Employees and Families.' Entries will be judged 
by the Sports Editor and His Staff. Entries must be post- 
ed Friday, 5 p.m. or Brought to our Office Prior to Week- 
end Games, ^j^innor will be pubfished each week. 
Only one entry per person.; CHECK GAMES IN ADS ONLY! 




WIN CASH 



Second Prized 1 O 



00 

Weekly 




LARASAN 
340-5050 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM 



•^ 



Name .'. Address 



aty. 



Zip Phone , 



ENTER J^HE NAME OF THE TEAMS YOU PICK TO VflN OR TIE ONLY 
USE GAMES LISTED IN ADS ONLY! 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4.. 

5. 

6.. 

7., 



8... 
9... 
10. 
11. 
1% 

la 

14. 



ALL ENTRIES MUST BE IN SUN OFFICE BY 5 P.M. FRIDAY 
iCHECK THE WINNERS - NO SCORES, PLEASE! 




■I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

8 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

J 



SNYDER - BVICK, INC. 

aiat ST. and 4960 Vm6INUBEACHBl.VD 
VIRGINIA BEACH. VIRODOA 

Miami Dolphins at New York GMnts 

>NE428-21S3 PH0NB4974IM 

78 BUICKS AND OPELS NOW ON DISPLAY 



w, ^' 



• 2 WINNERS -SPLIT POT 

LTi fRlD MARTIN - WIliJAM R. FARMER 

THIS WEEK WILL BE THE FINAL CONTESH 



YCiUR MAG WHfEL HEADQUAVTERS 




1772 VnGiMIA BEACH BLVD. 



2. Cleveland Browns at Oncinnatl 



>%. 



Moiwfri. 8 to 6, Sat. 8 to 5 
Vk^inio Beach Dial 428-4622 



First Colonial opens Beach cage 
season with loss to Maury 

First Tnlnnia] nnpnm^ thp ««».....,.««.. ...k„ ^..i ii».) ^ 



First Colonial opened the 
1972-73 basketball season 
earliest of all the other Beach 
schools last Friday night in 
Scope, bowing to the strong 
Maury Commodores lft4-45. 
The Patriots Just could not 
control the powerful 



Maury men, who controlled 
the tempo of the game 
thraighout. 

Bert Lewis led Patriot 
scorers with 11 points, the only 
First Colonial eager to hit the 
double-figure column. 




HELP 

LEARN TO DEFEND 
YOURSELF 



(«■ BA^C 



' 1 5 COURSE 

TAUGHT MUVATELY 

3 Black Belt Instructors 

Hone td the 1972 Open Imrttatknal Kwate 
. &aad Ouuvioa, BrowB Belt A Gnra Brit 

Steam 9iown- and Saina 






i 



fiB 



mjKB 




k9.9- 



(H'VlRCaNU] 
9. LOS AnsMM Rams 497-6336 

at u. Louis 5^^ VIIUHNLA MACH BL\TJ. 
WEWiWW.^'lU. S.9P.li 




It. fmmMifi »M\ntikt^um&n 

READ THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN FOR 

COMI»LETF L(K:AL SPORTS COVERAGE 





Patriate' Bert Lewis (33) baltfes a bMt of Maury ^ytn far tiw 



RMdteg r«r a o^aa-eevt pu» ttmm a 
iMMiiiale is Flr^ Calaatel't Clevelaad 

tM». 



PAUL 



4. Atlanta Falconj at San Francisco 



TODD 

Taite to your neighbor next vmk on: 

« Do most women marry their high school sweethteart? 
• What animal does your man remind you of? 

• When is the best time for romanw? 

• Do you ever forget your first love? 



NIflE 

TO 

NOd|« 



1 




HILLTOP 



PDRSCHB AUOl 



1875 LASKIN RD. 



VA. BEACH PHONE 425 0531 



Colonial Lincoln Mercinyjnc. 

2375 E. VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
(AT LONDON BRIDGE) 

6. Chicago Bears at Ptiiladtlphia 

riio Ooolor Wfie Soyi^ 

"SEE US FIRST OR SEE US LAST, BUT SEE US 
BEFORE YOU BUY" 



PHONE 340^00 




"We Install Heating and Cooling Systems! 



I" 



11. New England Patriots at New OrleaiM 



PHONi 
497.5040 




Keafingoil 




GUITAR AND AMPLIFIER SAUl 



American mtde 
AMP with 
tpeakeriAa 
ptitar with 2 
ptcbqaand 
woddfeCta 
Together Hrt 
far$I3a00 

OUR PRICE 

$79195 




AUTHORIZED 
DEALER FOR: 

GurrARS »oawoii •f«mm.: 

• t^etcii vibitiii 
DRUMS • Ludwig eGMdi . 

• Rognt 

^AMFS »Kiittoni •Sunn •Aagmt 
PA'i •KtMom eSuin WtCtaM. 
• JBL • \MileCi 



13. San Dla90 Chargers at Denver 

JACOBS MUSIC COMPANY 

Tidcwatei's Vdame t^conat Mmic Stan 

5834934 
33 Soatbnn awfipfayC^tn - Norfolk 
7New^lnt &o|^^ Crater - Hamptni 




WITH A 



^ Hi OrCMOLA QllM#lcir 



14. New York Jets at Oawtfnd 

COLOR IV FROM 



JOHN'S TV 



SALES k SERVICE 
VA. BEACH BLVD. ft N. LTNNHAVEN ROAD 
mONE MCms - 84MaM 



c THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7. 1972 




THE SUN 



CHECKERED FLAG Toyota held it'i grand Opeidiig 
last Wednesday. The opening provides several unique 
features for car buyers in the Tidewater area — the 
largest selection of new and used Toyotas and a 
traditional Japanese Garden. New carlwyers will be 
happy to find that Checkered Flag has factory trained 
mechanics on hand to service their Toyotas and people 
not in the market for a new car will find "sightseers" 
are welcome. Taking a break from Uie Grand Opening 
of Checkered Flag are Edward Synder, general 
manager of the new dealership, and his wife Jean. 

Graphoanalysts will meet Sunday 



II 



Virginia Beach and Norfolk 
Graphoanalysts will par- 
ticipate In this month's 
meeting of the Virginia 

■ Chapter No. 45 of the In- 
: tomational Graphoanalysis 
Society on Sunday at 2 p.m. in 



Girl Scouts held party 



GTrrSboiit Troop 126 hdd a 
membership Urthday party at 
Beach Lawn Church last 
Friday night. Mrs. Doiton, tiie 
leader, hdped the prls plan 
the party. There was a large 
birthday cake and as each 
scout and mother was in- 
vested acandle was placed on 
ttie cakjft. 

A plaque was presoited to 

ttie church and accepted by 

I. Mr. and Mrs, Strait and Mrs. 

? Mor^, as die new spwisors 

of tnxv 126. 

The mothers and thirty-four 
girls that received 
registration cards were 
Mrses. Herald, Coulthard, 
WMlden, Hall, Knapp, Stokes, 
Linley, Ennis, Humphries, 
Martin, Smith, Scarbough, 
Talbert, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Doitwi. The girls were Beth 
Banton, Karen Barnes, 
Sharon Coulthard, Windy 
Emis, SusMi Freer, Sharon 



Humphries, *^lice Hmlid, 
Joyce Myers, Andrea Clarke, 
Terri Capps, Donna Dougles, 
Brenda HaU,.Patti Hanfy, 
Susan Garrison, Kim Knapp, 
Sherri Jacobs, Cindy Lah- 
mann, Deanna Linely, Deta-a 
Mowe, Cindy Martin, Pam 
McKean, KrisU Smith, Sieryl 
Suman, Sally Scarbough, 
Lea Ann Sanson, Laura 
Seibcrt, Tami Suit, Beth 
Rdbertson, Tareasa Talbert, 
Laura Whitley, Cheryl 
Whiting, Debbie Whilden, 
Marjorie SUM, Marilyn St<*l. 
bj the flag ceremony Sharon 
Humphries carried the 
American flag with Kim 
Knapp ami Deanna Linely 
serving as colw guards. 



Reports were given by the 
scribe, Laura Whitley and 
treasurer, Kristi Smith. Alice 
Herald, the mistress of 
ceremony invited eva7one to 
stay for refreshmoits. 



VOY/W;ERS-Aii«« Marta (tap). PtA »■* B*^ 
Rlccia.^1 of 5Wt Regma Uiie »^*^,fj^^ 
aboard the Italian Lines Iwcary llaer "^*tolf» 
Coliwibo" just before sailing from New York for 
Aag«to Siracusa. Italy where they will take up 
resl^nee for Uw m%t tmr f^n. 



Ogden and his floating classroom 



"Catalytic Provocateur 
MXinds great in French," said 
Fnnk Ogden with a hint of a 
mile, whai he ^ve his title, 
"ftit if ^ur Froich is rusty 
just plain director will do." 

As director and innovator of 
a floating university providing 
a "living-learning adventure 
experioice" via a Cultural 
I^obe h)to 25 countries armmd 
ttw Caribbean, Frank Ogden 
well merits the "Provo- 
cateur" title. 

the classroom is a 92 foot 
former hospital ship outfitted 
with 5 TV camwas, video 
recorcUng equipment, a four- 
btte Honda squadron plus a 
mini s^marine. Known as the 
Lady Anderson she will socm 
be re-named the-Wet Orchid? 
"It's the name of a poem," 
laid Ogden, unabashed, "that 
I hav^'t writtoi yet." 

Thecruisecurriculum offers, 
besides seamanship, classes 
in "futurology", tropical 
cooking, brain control, 
French-Spanish language 
immersim, "Fun for Laughs 
and Profit", and one in- 
triguing what-is-it~"Seeing 
Invisibles." 

How do you see invisibles? 
For the man who was in- 
strumental in setting up 
Canada's first think-tank, this 
was an easy question to an- 
swer. "It's a way of using 



the conference room of the 
Pilot Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 7442 Tidewater Drive, 
Norfolk. 

Sunday's Topic will be "Is 
there a Conflict Between 
Graphoanalysis and 
Christianity? 




ill(^ical instead of logical 
thinking to arrive at sdution 
to a |Mt)blem," he said, "by 
trying to see invisibles that 
are unseen until pointed out. 
For instance," Ogden con- 
tinued, "the object is not to 
focus on the pole and the wire 
but to focus on what's going 
throu^ than." 

Hired by OCA (Ontario 
College of Art) to "motivate 
students, make art in- 
teresting, and to take art out 
into the community", Ogden 
has been doing just that to the 
delight of students and the 
consternation of some 
traditional educationists. 
Starting widi 24 hour long 
classes that offered, among 
otiier things, flyii^ lessons, 
chicken pluckii^, pointers on 
conducting a funeral, and 
survival trips, Frank Ogden 
has held classes in trolly cars, 
flying fields, salt mines- 
everyplace but the con- 
ventional four-walled 
classroom. 

On mie trip, Ogden, who 
believes in first-hand learning 
took stud«its to a mangrove 
swamp for a two week \Tap\<xl 
survival training course. Each 
student was permitted to take 
only what could be carried in a 
21/.! gallon pail. They lived, at 
first, on tamite* larvae and 
snails. "But by the end of ten 



days they were catching land 
crabs and gaining weight!^' 

And water? The students 
extracted water from sand 
and c(H-al by the use of a sdar 
still. "This is made," Og(^ 
ex|dained, "by digging a hole 
in the sand, covering it over 
with plastic, and putting a 
weight in the centor of the 
(dastlc." As moisture forms it 
trickles down the sides into a 
cup. Hundreds of people, 
Ogden estimates, have died of 
thirst in Qie area. "But by the 
end of the period the kids were 
getting oiough water to waUi 
with." 

With ARE (AMOciaUm fw 
Rraearch and Enlightonment) 
as a scheduled port d call, the 
Wet Orchid moM-ed in the 
Tidewater area just long 
enou^ for an "imm«^i(m" 
into the Edgar Cayce readings 
and a side trip to investigate 
oceanography before going 
on to other scheduled events in 
the Caribbean. Among them a 
rapping session with 
Bahamian Prime Minister 
Lynden Pindling and a meet- 
ii% with Richard Shackson 
of the Fend Motm- Company. 

Canadian Frank Ogden 
looks and acts half his 52 
years. Holder of no 
university degree, he comes 
from a varied background- 
including Resident llierapist 



Cub Pack 378 held Nov. meeting 



Cub Scout Pack 378 held its 
November Pack meeting at 
the Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Church. Mr. James 
Peery who is a past Pavab 
District Committee Chair- 
man, and is now a memba- of 
Tidewaters Council Executive 
Board, l^as the packs 378 
guest. 

Wolf Club Awards were 
presented to the following 
boys: Robert Mcallister— 
Wolf Badge and one gold 
Arrow Point; Randy Floyd, 
one silver arrow point 

The following boys received 
their Bear Cub Awards: Kdly 
Lampkin, one silver arrow 
point; Davis Gray, 2 silver 
arrow points; and Sherman 
Howari I gold and 1 silver 
arrow p<mit 

Randy Floyd turned 9 years 
oki and he received his Birth- 
day Bftir Book. The 
foUowing boys turred 10 years 
oW, received their Webelos 
Birthday Book and were in- 
chicted into Webelos: Johnny 
Eakins, Davis. Gray, B(*by 
Hannum, Sherman Howard. 

The following boys received 
the year pins: Randy Floyd, 



Ronnie Francis, Jimmy 
Johnson and Johnathan Jolly. 
Johnathan Jolly also received 
his one year perfect at- 
tendance pin. 

Denner Cords were 
presented to the following 
boys: Randy Floyd for Den 8; 
Allen Cheek for Den 4. The 
following boys receive^^sst. 
Denner Cords: Tommy Irving 
for Den 8, and Mark Ausinn for 
Den 4. For Webelos the 
Denner Cord went to Steven 
Phelps and Asst. Denner cord 
went to William Mosley Jr. 

The following boys received 
their Webelos awards: 
William Mosley Jr., Artist and 
Traveler; Mike Vice, 
Traveler; Allen Horton. 
Sportsman and Traveler; 
Steven Phelps, Traveler; and 
Mark Settles, Artist. 

The following boys 'and 
leaders received patciies for 
their work in helping to clean 
tq) 38 miles of beach in project 
"Soar": William Mosley Jr., 
Scott Whilden. Charles Nixon, 
Tommy Irvii«, Kelly Lamp- 
kin, and Robert Mcallista-. 
The Leaders were Bud Farley 
Committee chairman of the 



Clubmaster is welcomed 



Cub Scout Pack 434 
wdcomed its new Cubmaster, 
James Cornish, during 
ceremonies at the November 
pack meethig hdd in the 
WindsOT Woods Elwnentary 
Sclwdcafetorium. Committee 
Chairman, Brian Spaulding, 
made introduct<M7 remarks 
and introduced the new 
cutoiaster to the pack. 

Cub Scouts receiving 
awards were: Robin Hall, 
Bear badge; Craig Chapman, 
Michael" Chapman, David 
Berard, William Portt, 
William Putnam, Michael 
Sanders, Robert Ware, and 
Daniel Grimes. Athlete ^ac- 
tivity badee; William Portt 
and William Putnam, Sports- 
man activity badRe; Robert 
Ware, Naturalist activity 
badge; and Michael Sanders, 
Robert Ware, and Daniel 

Plays higjbli^t 
Pack484Meeting 

Four one-act |days and a 
puppet vaudeville production 
Mghlighted the Cub Scout 
Pack 484 monthly meetii^. 

Member ci the four dens, 
wrote their plays and made 
costumes as well as {H-e8«i- 
ttng them. The Webelos were 
responsiUe for creating the 
puM>ete and material for the 
vaudeville proikiction. 

Billy Drake was iH-ought 
iirto the Pack ami received his 
Bobcat award. Richard 
Rogers was given his Webelos 
oraflsman bad^, while Dale 
Sentman rec^ivcKl his ttear 
pin, GoM Arrow and recruito- 
award. The Wolf award was 
presmted to Halbo-t Toby. 
Brian Bjorklund and Jeff 
I^k aCcqjted thev D«)ner 
awards and Allan Redifo* and 
Craig McCrea tecame 
MSBtant denners. Jeff also 
receiv^l his recruite award. A 
three-year swTrice pin was 
pr««ited to Mrs. Anne Totqr, 
(ten metier. 

The parents attending the 
meeting, doe^ it with the 
recitatioR ol die Parente' O* 
Scout tedi. 



Grimes, Traveler activity 
badge. 

Service stars were also 
presented to: Daniel Grimes, 
one-year pin; and David 
Berud, Michael Chapman, 
Keith Kephart, Williaipn Portt, 
and William Putnam, tow- 
year pins. 

Special scout opening ard 
closing ceremonies were 
conducted by Akda CHiomas 
LeMere, Cubmaster of I^ck 
152, Hampton) with assistance 
from an Indian brave (Lee 
Elliott. First Class Scout, 
Troop 142, Hampton). 



Pack, Sandy Eakins Den 
MoUier, and Bettie G. Mosley 
Publicity Chairman. 

This montt) the pack was 
proud to honor Mike Arwood 
who received his Arrow of 
light: 

The fun began when a 32- 
foot track was put up for the 
Pinewood Derby. The Judges 
were James Peery, Bud 
Farley and Alfred Kennell. 
Kennell is the Area Supervisor 
for Kentucky Fried Chicken 
and nine boys received gift 
certificates for a free Ken- 
tucky Fried Chicken Dinner. 

The following boys received 
Pinewood Derby Plaques: 
Den 1— First Place, Scot 
Hartley; secomi place, John 
King; Utird idace, Johnathan 
Jolly. Den 4— First phwe, 
Allen Cheek; second ptiup^, 
Ross Miller; third place,^9Ck 
Young. Den 6— First Pitce, 
Bobby Mcallister; second 
place, Sherman Howard; 
third place, Mike Horton. Den 
7— First Place, Dana Bridccr, 
' second place, Douglas Wilfc; 
third place, Ian Falvey. Den 
8— First place, Charles Nixon; 
second place. Kenny Vtee; 
third place Kelly Lampkin. 
Webelos-First place, Mflce 
Vice; second (dace, Allen 
Horton. third place, William 
Mosl^ Jr. 

Charles Nixon of Den 8 won 
the top pack award. He 
received a special Silver 
Plaque. Next Ifmiths Meting 
will be DeceniMr 20, at the 
Va. Beach United Metiiodbt 
Church. f 

On December 15 the boprs 
and leaders will be Christnois 
carolling at Pembroke Mall 
and the public is invited. 

The Cub Scouts of pack 378 
got together and sent a check 
for $10.50 to the Jqr Fund. 



wwking with mental patienti 
at Hdly Wood in New Wnt- 
mimter, B.C.~to enter th« 
educational field. Ogttal 
steadfastly refuses t9 
specialiM in one particdw 
field because "I feel this hai t 
detrimental effect on, tbt 
brain-caiffies atro|^y." And 
sane scientific rationale, ht 
dainB, is now substantiating 
this view. 

Whatever tlK rationale, Ma 
students are all for the "hJi^ 
intoisity learning" as Fradt 
C^den ca\\a it. Om art major, 
Uond and attractive Vimdf 
Morrow, the daughtn* of a 
cbctor and nurse, enroled just 
fw tlw "life exporience-not 
for tl» art" Another, Barry 
Rudachyk, enrolled for a 
^owth adv^ture and im- 
mediatdy got more advoitiure 
than he bargained for when he 
found himself in a strange city 
with just two days to get 
passport, tests, "and 
everything else I would need 
for the b-ip!" He made it 

Originally scheduled to 
arrive in the Virginia Beach 
area during the Thanksgiving 
Holiday week, the Wet Orchid 
arrived too late for her 
students to sit in on an ARE 
Youth sponsored program, 
"Home and Marriage". "We 
ran into heavy flooding In New 
York state," said Ogden 
ruefully, "and a seven inch 
snowfall which made bridges 
in the Barge Canal system 
impassable." A further im- 
passe developed when it was 
discovered that all the Canal 
marker had beoi washed 
away. But teacher and student 
took it in stride. Which idiould 
be easy-after sailing acrosss 
Lake Ontario in full gale force 
winds as part of an "instant 
seamanship" course! 

Why does Frank Ogdai> 
favor this kind of shock 




FLOATING CLAStttOOM - flu INM 
hoapital ship now servet M a elassroom lor Fra| 
Ogden and his ttadento and provlites a liv^^f 
adv«tture experience bito 2S coHBtriet around t| 
CarriWbean. 



learning? Because the 
"cultural shock" of rubbing 
against other attitudes, 
pe<q>le, languages, situations 



can provide immunizat 
against "future sh« 
(^den feds, of changes hi j 
own mi&t. 



Couple wins cruise trip 






This week the Greek luier 
T.S.S. Olympia left Ntu^olk 
carrying the winners of 
Hilltop North Shopping 
Center's Grand Opening 
promotion, Ted and Elaine 
Phelps of Virginia Beach. 

In addition to the cruise, die 
Phelps won a number id otiio* 
valuable prizes, including a 
cruise wardn^ for each of 
them fKHn La Vogue and 
Egerton ai^ Lea, Ltd. Roses 
Dq>artment St<n^ presented 
the Phdps with a matched set 
(rf luggage eadi. People's 
Drug Store |ttve Uion an 
Instanatic Cafnow. In ad- 
dition, they won $100 expense 
money. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pbdps were 
sttmned witt their good for- 
tune, although it took quite a 
tot of schedule shuffling to 



make gdng on die cn|se 
possible. Phelps is * a 
psychology teacher ffid 
football and basd)aU coam at 
First Colonial High Sciipl. 
Mrs. Phdps is a Superviso^t 
die Vbginia Beach Parks Aid 
RecipMtion Departmei^. *> 

tiettbv organized \oe #is 
first expedition out of ^e 
country took on gigantic 
proportions for the Phe^. 
They have^ a two-year old 
daughter, Stephanie, \lho 
must be cared for in their 
absence. Granc^rents arc& of 
course, stepping into |he 
breach, but that entails travel 
to South Caroiba hi addition 
to the Bermuda trip. 1^, 
Mrs. Phdps said they wire 
looking f (nward to the cr&M 
as a second honeymoon tad 
idanned to make it a Ch^t- 
maa shopping ventiire. 




HILLTOP NORTH WINNERS-Charies Tkarpe. (Mt) pnaMntiT theHHNip Nartk 
Shofiping Center's Merchant Asseciatioa, preacnts Mr. and Mn. Ted Phe^ witii 
tickets for a cruise to Bermuda on board the Greek Lines ship T.S.S. Olympia. Th^ 
won the cruise at Hilltop North's grand qiening promotton. 

Beach Cub Scouts held elephant sale 



Pack 65 held meeting 



When Pack 65 held it's 
monthly Pack Meeting at 
Kii^ton Elementary School 
recently, the WtbtAos boys of 
Webelos Dea 1 were truly on 
parade as every member of 
the den had eanied some 
awards, making a total of 62 
awards to 10 boys: 

Those Webelos receiving 
awards were: Samson 
Mikitarian - Crafteman, 
Engineer, Gedogist, Schdar, 
Sciaitist, Arrow of Ught, 2 
year service jwn ; Bryan Jessie 
Arrow of Light, 3 year service 
and 3 year perfect at- 
tendance; Jeff Frizzell - 
Arrow of Li^, 2 year service 
pin, athlete; ftiice Martin 
Aquanaut, Athlete, Crafts- 
man, Naturalist, Out- 
doorsman, Slwwman, Sports- 
man and Traveler; J<*n 
Fairfield AquanaiA, Athlete, 
Sportsman and Traveler; 
John Fairfield Aquanaut, 
Athlete, Craftsman, 
Naturalist, Showman, 
Sportsman, and Traveler; 
Randy Carila Aquanaut, 
Athlete, Craftsman, 
Naturalist, Showman, 
^KTtsman, and Travde* plitf 
a 2 y^r s«^c% pin; Stephoi 
Gramein Athlete, Craftsman, 
Outdoorsroan, Showman, 
Itaveta* «m1 2 yeut swvice 
pn; RdMM Jewd Ai|uanaut, 
Athlete,^ . Craftsman, 
Naturalist, Outdoorsman, 
Showman, Sportsman, 



Traveler and 1 year service 
jHn; Jeff Waller Aquanaut, 
Athlete, Craftsman, 
Naturalist, Outdoorsman, 
Showman, Sportsman and 
Traveler; Stevai Blackwdl 
Aquanaut, Athlete, Crags- 
man, Naturalist, Out- 
docnsman, Showman, Sports- 
man and Traveler. 

In addition to the Webaloe 
Awards, Cubmasta- Clifford 
Falkner welcomed new 
Bobcat, Ward Byii^ton Irto 
the I^ck and awarded SUver 
Arrow Points to Craig' 
Pei^iss, An(Jhrew BankoviMd, 
David Wilkins, and D«vid 
Mitchdl. Paul Hutchins, Bon 
Falkner, Todd MikiUr^an, 
David Mizelle, Mark Her- 
mann, Mrs. DudcBe Grau^rin, 
Mrs. Flwine Martin and Mrs. 
Gwai Fairfield recdved 1 
year service pins. David 
Mitdidl and Riduurd Ibokey 
advanced into Wdtidos D«i 1. 

Pinewood Darby cars *rere 
wdf^ and jjo^ei lor M(»t 
Unmial ami Best Desi^,iWitti 
Jeff Waller hawng te Most 
(ffusual and Randy OffUh tte 
Be^ dMipi. Thai die ^ts 
began widi l^ter S^iMais, 
Brian Monson, David WlUis, 
Jeff Amteoee, Bryan Jeoie 
and Randy Qirila winn^ a 
duuux to ra« Ae flMl r««. 
Brian Monsoi vran 1st ^ace, 
witti Rwidy Carila wtadng 
^ and Bryan ^nie wnming 
8r4 



Cub Scout Pack 416 held its 
monthly meeting recently at 
Eastern Shore Chapel. The 
meeting was highlighted by a 
white elephant sale and 
auctim. An (Higinal paintii^ 
by D«i Mother Mrs. Pam 
Braithwaite was given away. 

John Richt of Den II 
demonstrated a table-tdp 
hockey game he had con- 
structed frran {dans {H-ovided 
in Boys Life, the naticHial 
scouting ma^zine. 



The WebdoB den, led by 
Jon Braittiwaite, presoited a 
ctemonstratiMi on the oper- 
ation and t»e (rf die pulley, a 
simple machine. Jimmy 
Hoover, Sam ScarixMrcugh and 
Bryan Owens earned ttieu- 
Er^ineo- Awards as a result 
of their efforts in this per- 
formance. 

Jam« Hoover also received 
the Athlete Award and 
Ridiard Ndson received a 2- 
year service pin. Sam Scar- 



borough and John Rifht 
rec«ved Dernier Bars. J^ 
Corbett recdved an AssiMnt 
D«iner Bar. ^ 

Those receiving die ^If 
Badge were Jdui Gas^r, 
Mike Knoblett, John C<R%tt 
and Jdm Braitiiwaite. Gwd 
Arrows wore awarded J<im 
Gaspar and Mike Knoble|le. 
Silver Arrows were awarded 
Jdm Ennis and John I|c- 
CcMnbs. •', 

The Pack also wekm^ed 
new Bdbcats Paul Uicas ijnd 
Sbiart Connen. | 



Bennett receives award 



4 



Associate Lmlge No. 8, 
Fraternal Ordar of Pdice 
announced that Patrolman 
Stanley F. Bennett has been 
the named recipient of the 

Meritorious Service Award for 
1972. The award te |N«sarted 
anmially to a member of the 
Virginia Beach Police 

Department ' who has 
demonstrated, through his 
actions, outstanding p^'sonal 
achievement In law en- 
forcemmt and s^^ce to htt 

c(Mnmunity ab«re and b^nrnd 
th(> call ot duty. 

NatlMnid J. "Nick" Cohen, 
preskfeiA of the loi^ com- 
mented, in announeini ttie 



nominee, "This is the first 
year, as loi^ » I can 
remembor, that Uw selection 
has been unanimoM. Our 
pr»enbiti(Mi commitlAe, efts' 
examining the credmtiab ot 

all potential candidates, 
clearly found Patrolman 
Bennett's actions and 
dedwation to his oadi <rf 
pdi^nen without paralM." 

Cohen further said that 
"histtn-y has manifestly 
demonMrated that friat n^ 
are ahvays at tbt ri^t |^ee 
at the rif^t thiw, y<^ to 

BennetTs case, he not onfy 
was die man who ounw toM to 
face widi Ms iriMe in Usliity 
hut aho was aUe, ^pitart 



inc«n|»rable od(b, to mw^ 
his superiority, thrdnih 

stqieriM' training, alertn^n 
and aggressive respmsci ^to 
suiwren criminal ag«M" 

B 

".n essence," he ad^ 
"Bennett has become a Me 

man nra^b to wouM-be b^ 
robbers in the Ci^ of VirgtfM 

Beach. We of A»ociate Lo^ 
No. 8, Fraterml Order ^ 
F(Avx, are vwy prowl ,^ 

wm." :| 

It to anticipated ttet a biJM 
award ecrmoiv vffl be l|fd 
betae City Connell Ms 
regular meethig on MM^B, 
at 1 p.m. 41 



'mmmtmmmmwwnmmvm^r^f^^^^^mm^m^mm^mtmmm^mmmmmmm^^m 



% ^^■i-%-< 



w ^ * * 




THE SUN 



THURSDAY, OECEWBEB 7H97J 



Humphreys honored 
as fireman of year 



thief Ba^w (tefl) itresnits H«mplireys With the plaque honoring him as FOF 
Fireman of tte Year. 

Apts. o.k.'d after struggle 



James W. Humphreys, Jr., 
has been honored as Fireman (rf 
the Year by the Fraternal Order 
iftf Firemen, for his courage in 
rescuing a woman from a 
burning home. 

The incident occurred last 
February when Humphreys, 21, 
responded to a house fire on 
Barcelona Drive with the 
London Bridge Volunteer Fire 
Department. 

When it was discovered a 
woman was still in the burning 
bui Idi ng Humphreys 
disregarded his own safety and 
rescued the women, and 
revived her with mouth-to- 
mouth resusiciation> until a 
rescue squad arrived. 

Humphreys w%s al§() cited for 
his devotion tb*^ duty, 
cooperation with fellow 
firemen, and high pr(rfessional 
standards in performance of 
duty. He recently became a 
raid fireman attached to the 
Beach Borough Fire Depart- 
ment. 



Floyd E. Waterfield. Former 
Mayor A. Frank Dusch, Com- 
missioner of Revenue Ivan 
Mapp, and Father Francii 
Bambrick were also special 
gurats at the meeting. 

During the meeting Fire Chief 
E.B. Bayne announced the 
selection of William R. Gurley, 
Sr., and Fred E. Quist, Jr., as 
district chiefs in the receirt 
centralization of the city's fire 
departments. 

Both men are veterans of 
many years <rf fire fighting 
experience in the resort city. 
Gurley was a paid membw of 
the Beach Borough department, 
and was appointed Captain in 
charge of the department when 
Bayne was named city fire 
chief. Quist held the office of 
assistant chief of the Fire 
Prevention Bureau, as well as 
chief of the Chesapeake Beach 
Volunteer Department. 

Both men will assume their 
new offices on December 15 




Incomina FOF Pres. Harris (I. ctr.) recleves the symbolic gavel from outgoing £ 
IMcsident Benniker as fellow officers (I. to r.) Wright. Gurley and Benke witness the r 
ceremony. i 

City Marina sale filled withdoubi 



Doubt hangs over the 
proposed sale of city-owned 
land, for commercial 



^^After nearly a four year on- 
again <^-again batUe it ap- 
pears Thalia Wayskk Inc. will 
construct its controversial 
aparlmait development 
I The project's use permit, 
» which was revoked by City 
I Council June 5, was ranstated 
I during Monday's Council 
I meeting <m a motion from 
'Councilman Donald H. 
I Rhodes, seconded by Coun- 
{ cilman Charles W. Gardno*. 
I The project involves con- 
istruction of 458 multi-family 
apartment units near the 
intersectim (rf Thalia Road 
and Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. Utilizing nearly 40 
^cres the development will 
;]ude 100 one bedroom units, 
t^o bedroom units, and S8 
bedroom units. 



[New zoning 
Irequests 



Council's June revocation of 
the Usepermit was based on 
^e^iids that there was no 
visible evidence of intentions 
to construct the living units 
since issuance of the use 
permit in October 1968, even 
though proper steps had been 
taken to continue the permit's 
validity. 



lag 



The avalanche of ap- 
ilications for new zoning 
itwes expected with 

turn Jast Kudai^sdlli'r^' j^ 
not occurred, according to 
officials. 

As of M<M¥Jay a total of 19 

applicatimis for rezoning of 

land had been received in the 

^aify's Plannii^ Commission 

*' Office. 

# until the prop(»ed new 

tlComprehensive Zoning Or- 

nce, and accompanying 

ing Maps, is adopted by 

♦fee City these applications will 

^e treated under provisions 

•^tlined in the old Beach 

» Borough and Princes Anne 

teounty ordinances. 

"^^^fl^nt applications for 

I ?6ning changes contain an 

Srjgreement by the applicant 

« lAt should the new CZO and 

Lmais be adopted while action 

on the application is pending, 

the applicant will agree to any 

changes which might be 

reflected in his properly be 

j'irture of the new CZO and-or 

^"niaps revisiois. 




Computer 
expansion 

The city's computer system 
wil be expanded next month 
through the hiring of ad- 
ditional pasonnel in the Data 
Processing Bureau. 

The move results from 
placing higher demands on the 
system through increasing use 
of the facilities by various city 
departments. 

The hiring of additional 
personnel to operate the 
equipment bey<md the normal 
5 p.m. work &y was favored 
over the cost of buying ad- 
ditional equipment. Salaries 
of the additional personnel 
will be covered by a working 
capital fund, and will not 
necessitateaoy additimal hind 
approfH-iations. 



In making his motion 
Rhodes said he had the 
developer's assurance that 
original stipulations oi the use 
permit would be met. In ad- 
dition a 50 foot buffer zone 
would be maintained between 
the buildings and the north 
rear property line, as well as 
constructing a six foot high 
brick fence along this 
property line, plus retaining 
Uie natural environment of the 
area by preserving a con- 
tiguous 25 foot buffer strip 
armmd the development. 

Rhodes told Council he had 
discussed the situation with 
the Thalia Civic League, 
which wittidrew its objections 
after learning of the buffer 
restrictions from the 
developo". 

The approved motion also 
included the stipulation that in 
U» event the development 
generates enough traffic in the 
area to r^uire a traffic light 
system this would be the 
responsibility of Thalia 
Wayside Inc. 

in murder 

Police say George Lee 
Walker, of Chesapeake, is 
facing a murder charge in 
connection with ''a Monday 
night altercation. 

Walker, 52, of Freeman 
Avenue, according to officials, 
is charged with the fatal 
stabbing of Claiborne Morris, 
Sr., 46, at his Indian River 
Road home. 

Investigators said the 
knifing apparently followed an 
argument between the meji 
and W^lka-'s sister. 

Morris reportedly died of a 
stab wound in the heart, 
allegedly inflicted ^ Walker 
afta- he was cut about the 
throat by Morris. Walker was 
taken into police custody aft«- 
treatment of his wound at 
Virginia Beach General 
Hospital. 



... The meeting also witnessed ,_„- ,„„ . , 

Herecervedtheawardatthe the installation of newly elected E '^^ ^,i°"l'"T'^^ 
annual banquet meeting of the FOF officere for next year J^,f '«Pment, a Rudee Basm 

They are Lemuel J. Harris; '°""*'^? « -*='«"" «' P"^«te 
Pres.; William R. Gurley, Sr., 
Vice Pres.; William R. Ben- 
niker. Sec.; Albert R. Benke, 
Treas.; and Rev. David T. 
Wright, Chaplain. '^ 



FOF. which was attended by 
Mayor Robert B. Cromwell, Jr!, 
Asst. City Manger George 
Hanbury, Councilmen Donald 
H. Rhodes, Charles W. Gardner, 
George R. Ferrell, D. Murray 
Malbon, J. Curtis Payne, and 



Anti-poUutionaction 



• The Council of Civic 
Organizations has requested 
action be taken to prevent any 
recurrence of last week's 
pollution (rf Chesapeake Bay, 
resulting from a breakdown 
of the Hampton Roads 
Sanitation District treatment 
|:dant at Little Creek. 

Sam Houston, Sr., made the 
request to City Council 
Monday on behalf of the CCO. 

The State Health Depart- 
ment placed a shell fish ban on 
waters from Cape Henry to 

Old Point Comfort, including 
the Lynnhaven , River, 
followii^ a 17-haur discharge 



ot sewage into the bay. 

HRSD was unable to give a 
specific cause of the break in 
the systems 54-inch sewage 
line used . since the plant's 
constructiorj four years ago. 

A smiliar breakdown at the 
Little Creek plant occurred 
last Summer resulting in a 
ban on swimming in the 
waters, as well as the taking of 
shell fish. 

Vice Mayor F. Reid Ervin 
requested City Manager 
Roger M. Scott to investigate 
the feasibility of Houston's 
request. 



ownership of a portion of the 
present City Marina. 

Edwin B. Lindsley, Jr., 
claims the small strip of land 
between Lake Rudee and the 
marina property is among 
assests of the defunct Shore 
Acres, Inc., which Lindsley 
claims he purchased last May. 

Virginia Beach recently 
accepted a design bid from 
McLeskey-Cohen Associates, 
comprised of F. Wayne 
McLeskey and Lee D. Cohen 
for development of the 
property. MCA plans con- 
struction of a hotel- 
restaurant-marina complex 
on the site. 

When asked how this 
development affects 
McUskey and Cohen's plans 
MCA attorney G rover C. 
Wright said, "We don't have 
any problem, that's Uie City's 
problem. The city's required 
to deliver a marketable title 
on the property to us." 




This office building was desif^ed by f rchitecta Aranyi. MnrreH A AMoeiatet for 
Talbto. Wermers & Associates, en^neers. planners and surveyors. Located near 
Lynnhaven. the building has a facade of fulted concrete masonry units in a soft tan 
coloi-. This Is a compartively new material for exterior construction. 



(Bhitnmti 



'p THEODORE J. BILLUPS 
♦ Tlieodore J. Billups, 64, of 
I 460 Oceana Blvd. died 
I November 30 in a nursii^ 
k home. 

I A rative of Whaleyville, he 

I Mtas a stm of Mrs. Mary BiUups 

-am the late Charles H. BiUups 

and the husband of Mrs. CiMine 

BiUu{». 

was a member of Mineral 

ng Baptist Church, 

/ville. 

QittidK Ms wife aod OMrther, 

;4s sirvived 1^ two sisters, 

i^. MIneola Wiggins of 

lyvilte and Mrs. Harleen B. 

irfauric of Philadelphia. 

j MRS. WARY R. FEAGIN 
|Norf<rfk— Mrs. Mary R 
gin. 68, of §76 Armfield 

died in a hosfNtal. 
' was the vridow (rf Ralph 
fe^n and a daugbte- of 
S. and Mrs. Mary 
Rioe. 
Mtfve of FarmvUe, she 
I ken a year 

was a member of 

renaal Presbyterian 

BtA IM. $JC.. and 

a mmiimt af itate 

Crtege. 

CaH^e hi 



Nwfolk, and Mrs. Susie A. 
Hardy of Cumberland, Md.; a 
brother, William T. Rice of 
Virginia Beach; a nephew, 
William G. Gray, of Ft. 
Myers, Fla.; and four grand- 
chiWren. 

WILUAMJES6E 
SHACKELTORD 
William Jesse Shackelford, 73, 
of 292 Standi St.. Princess 
Anne Plaza, an inmrance 
agancy q)erator, died in a 
hmpital Novembo' H aita a 
long illness. 

He was a native of Watter 
Valley, Tex., a son of Wittam 
J and Mrs Martka Parfcy 
.ShadKiford. «id ike hoAand 
of the late Un JoMfMoe 
Taylor Shadtelfail 

He mulhe owner mwm»m 
J Shadidfod Iimwmm Co 
He wm a mo^er el liorMk 
Elks Ladfc m. hwmi^n 
l^egjow. md Cmm t i n i FOP 
Udiel 

He «iM a mm War f 
vetosa 

tervmag m« utm 



MR.S. FLtmETTA ALTIZER 

Mrs. Floretta Varnell 
Altizer. 47. <rf 305>- 16th St. 
died Sunday in a hospital. 

A native of North Carolina, 
.she was tfie wife of Eugene 
Rufus Altizo- and a daughter 
(rf the bte Mr. and Mrs. 
Ridurd Vaiiieli. 

Besides her husband, 
sioviviqg are a daughter, 
Mrs. Mary A. ThomMIl of 
VirgiiM Bew:h; two swtt, Ted 
B. Altizer of Vir^nia Beach 
and James L. AJfoer of Rich- 
mood: and a granddiild. 

CAPT. RICHARD CAttlE 

Capi. Richard Carle, a 
r^n^u Mval officer at- 
tached to fadaot. died in his 
heow at 439 'noroui^ood 
Otwe NowtmlMr 3, 

He «r»i die husband of Mrs. 
WiMs Carle and son of the late 
Richard Jamei and Mrs. 
EflMl Grace Janes Carle. 

A natfve efSbmi^i, China. 
he ««s a resident of Cuada 
ana wat tt^0atd here ts 



*Mf%f Bm 

utUBti a aflii 






ih- 



mtmam 



was 



a fon^rr 
- 'RoritRil 

'/> (woi^, 
K remgim, ^ 
SC aadllidlMdC 
01 nwlaidi Gthf 
t§mC.mm 



Sr «r 

wttn, Ito, Gm 
^mfmmi «l Tallinn Hc. 
CmW, and Mrs iMrta f 

ftqrds^C«pMsChrliM.T« 4 
a taeikw. W^* mmtMki4 

cMMrra: and it ureat 



aProlcrtam. 
Ms indsir, he m sur 
MMdl^a dM^Mer Mte Gale 
OMIealVir^niB Beach: a son 
K. CMe of Dart- 
Nan Seste; and a 
, MIehael Carle of 
TaMM, WMfc 

. KATHARINE 
6ARRI«)N 

Mff, KattiarineC. Garrsfm, 
tf . of t«| Brickhaven Road 
ited ftmiay in a hmf^l 

Mmanftrmidfnt of the area. 




she was the widow of Herman 
Garrison and a daughter of 
Edward and Mrs. Lillian 
Murden Cooke. 

.She was an Episcqialian. 

Surviving, are two sons, A. 
Herman Garrison Jr. and 
Chirles Garrison <rf Virginia 
Beach; a sister, Mrs. Ruth 
Fames of Walnut Creek, 
Calif.; and two grandchildren. 

HARRY WHITEHURST 

Harry Whit^uret of Route 
4, Blackwater Road, died 
November 27 in a Norfolk 
bo^lita\ after a long illness. 

A native of Princess Anne 
County, he was the husband of 
Mrs. I>ucy Eascm Whitehurst 
and a son of the late Charles 
and Mrs. Eiamer Whitehurst. 

He was a retired farmer. 

He was a member of Gable 
Oiapd AME Church and a 
former trustee and treasura-. 

Surviving are two sons. 
Roger Whitehurat of Norfolk 
and.Harry Wbitenurst ot New 
Ywk; two daughters, Mrs. 
Agnis Armstrong <rf Virginia 
Beach and Mis. Elsie Miller of 
NewYoric; a brother, Nathan 
WMdHjrst of Chesapeake; 
rtve#ffiters. Mrs. Rosa Lewis. 
MrS;EsteIla Kfellam, and Mre. 
B^lte Sivete <rf Chesapeake 
ami Mrs, Pauline Oliver and 
Mrs.' Dorothy Perry of Nw- 
foBc: nine grandchildren; and 
Ifi gr^t-grandchildren 

MR.S. YEUN N. LElfNG 
Mri Yuen Ng Leung, 55, of 
2221 S. Plaza Trail died 



Novembo- 30 in New York wi a 
visit. 

A native of China, she was 
the wife of Kai Ming Leui^. 

Besides her husband, she is 
survived by two sons; Yuen 
Fung Leung and Yuen Wing 
I.^ung, and three daughters, 
Chau Kuen Leung, Lai Kuen 
Leung, and Mei Kuen Leung, 
all of Virginia Beach. 

MRS. HELEN G. RAGUET 

Mrs. Helen Gautio* Raguet, 
82, of 216 44th St. died in h^ 
home November 30. 

A native of Morristewn. 
N.J., she lived here for 25 
years. 

she was a member of 
Eastern Shore Episcopal 
Church and PriiKesi Aime 
Garden Club. 

She was the widow (rf Navy 
Capt Edward Cooke Ra^et 
and a daughter of Thomas 
Brown ■. and Mrs. Elbrabeth 
Cheever Gautiw. 

She is survived by a 
daughter. Mrs. Lee C. 
l^mbert of Norfolk; a sstv. 
Mrs. Oscar Smith (rf Vir^isa 
Reach: a granddai^hter, Mrs. 
David Merritt of Deming. 
N.M.; and three great- 
gramk^Wldren. 

jmEPH A. RUTi^ER 
Jost^ Alton Butter. 51, of 
2312 WIndwartI Shor« Drive 
dwd in a hmiMtal December 1 . 
He was presi(tent of In- 
surance Agency, Inc.. (rf 
Virginia Rrach. 
A mtive at N(rfolk, tip warn a 



lifelong resident of the Nor- 
folk-Virginia Beach area. 

Hevas the husband (rf Mrs. 
Dorothy O'Brien Butler and a 
son of Mrs. Annie Wright 
Butler of Norfolk and the late 
John Joseph Bulla-. 

He was a member of Star of 
the Sea Catholic Church. 

He was a 1939 graduate of 
Maury High School and a 1950 
graduate of the University of 
Missouri. 

He was an Army Air FiHce 
vetwan. 

Besides his wife and 
m(rfher, he is survived by two 
s(»s. Jo^ph A. Buys' Jr. and 
John Martin Butler, and four 
daughters. Neven Wright 
Butler. Regina Bossong 
Butler. Hannah Corey Butlo- 
and Nan Bresong Butler, all of 
Virginia Beach; and three 
ssters. Miss Evelyn M. Butlo- 
arMl Mrs. Norma B. Grissom 
(rf Norf(rfk and Mrs. Olive B. 
Ford of Knoxsville, T^n. 

AMOSW.IX^IER 

Am(» W. D(aia-, 70, of 
Route 1 , West Neck Road, died 
in his home November 29. 

He was a um of Geoi^ W. 
and Mrs. Alice Flanagan 

A lifelong resident of 
Princess Anne County- 
ViTfijrta B^ch, he was a 
retired farmw. 

He is wirvived by a sista-. 
Mrs EttKl Whitehurst of Bade 
Bay. Virginia Beach, two 
nei^ws. and a niece. 



Wright said he noticed a 
possible discrepancy in 

ownership of the land in the 
City's design bid proposal but 
was assured of its inclusion in 
the proposal. Wright says he 
amended the City's invitation 
to bid, stipulated in MCA's bid 
that the City convey a 
marketable title to the 
property to the lan(j, and the 
City accepted the bid. 

Department of Economic 
Development Director A. 
James DeBellis, in charge of 
negotiations on the property 
echoed Wright's remarks. He 

said, "Until it can be deter- 
mined whether he (Lindsley) 
has a real claim with all the 
assests of that corporation we 
can do nothing with the sale of 
the property. We feel the City 
can't sell the property, nor can 
successful design bidders 
execute their plans, until it is 
s(]uared away." 

Lindstey's claim could also 
affect the sale of the 
remainder of City Marina 
property, to the west of MCA's 
tract, for which a design bid 
was also accepted from Joe 
Weller. 

|fas clearly evident in 



Wright's remark, "Th^ 
problem doesn't st(^ here if 
goes on up into Shadow Lawn 
Heights, that'sfor sure, which 
affects the property Joe 
Weller bought." 

As of Tuesday no one in 
Virginia Beach city govern- 
ment was able to acknowledge 
Lindsley had made .any*' 
contact with the Qly^ con-i 
cerning his future intentio^ in 
the situation. ' t* 



Wright pointed out final 
settlement on the- flCA 
property is scheduled for next., 
month between his clients and 
the City. '^ ^* 






iT 




City Council Monday 
authorized an engineering 
study into the construction of a 
pumping station and sewer 
lines to service the Little Neck 
Village area. 

The move followed com- 
plaints from Johnson Streeti 
residents of sewage standir^ 
in yards, unsanitary toilet and 
bathing conditions in their 
homes, and overloading of 
septic tanks. 

The City's investiption of 
the matter indicates servicing 
(rf the area by existing private 
or city owned utility facilities 
is prohibitive either from the 
pomt of expense or system 
capabilities. 

Council also authorized a 
contract with Hampton Roads 
Sanitation District for con- 
struction, maintenance and 
operation of a sewer in- 
terceptor between Shipps 
Corner and the existing force 
main m providence Road. 




PRorECTolk 

of the 1 
air you breathe 



the 

1LICT90NIC Am 



I 



Vitb MQT OMtiai 

MMdigolyrof 
toqr m i udiiU ai 

to lift 

ovad. wwm p^Ma 
CALL 'nXDAY. 




KCH 

ADAMS SERVICE 
COMPANY 



wwffOJiaaa-tWf 

■iipaMaaMMMiilifei 



KELLAM' EATON INSURANCE 
& REAL ESTATE COMPANY 

3111 Pacific Avenue 2406-B Princess Anne Road 

PHONES 
4289161 4272900 

Yirginia Beach, Virginia 



-J.'-. -^ ■';v^''>''>'^>''v;'' 



jrsouR 

POLICY 



i^r:,-':^'^;^.: :.: 



TO 

PROTECT 
YOUR 
HOUSE 

If your hom« was built and 



in- 



sured 10 



you 



yoars 
havon 



ago or moro and 



your insur- 



broughf 



ancm vp to today's robuilding 
valuos, chock your firo insuranco 
protoction today. You may own 
only half a houso. 



HURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1972 



THE SUN CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



PAGE 13 



MvA^ 



*, 



kaQig^mk 






MITCHELLS 

SUITS YOUR 
HCHJDAY AFFAIR 

GO FORMAL 




TUXEDO RENTALS 
AND SALES 



RENTALS AND SALE 

OF MEN'S FORMAL WEAR 

AND AOCBNORIES 

«439Vi.BMdiBNd. 
(N«t to KtaiMGh For4) 
4M-68W 

COMING SOON 
TO HILLTOP! 



YbRMD 



A. ••• Ho> • • • 




ONLY $69 ! 

Portable TV 

irBbckAWhlte 
ModclAR122 



CI 



BRYANT APPLIANa CO. 

4848 VIRGINU BEACH BLVD. (Afl«oi» ^Mpp^ Cntn) 
1278 N. MILITARY HGWY. 543 E. LITTLE CREEK RD. 
4»7-8939 622-9771 5M-4531 





^^ -^ OIL PORTRAITS 

FRAMES, 
PASSPORTS. 




HAYWOOD 

HOUSE OF PORTRAITS 
4634 H A YGOOD ROAD • VI RQ I Ni A BEACH, VA 

460-1003 



i 



} 



X 



THE SHOP FOR COLLECTORS 

|18th CENTURY AND FINE VICTORIANA , 

17th CENTURY DUTCH OAK 
DRAW TABLE. CIRCA 1640 

f i 1361 C.S. Military Hgwy. 
ChesapeakB. Va 420-9855 




NXnONAL 
OrOE SALES 

2437 Va. Beach BML 340-5265 



CANNED 
HEAT 




PLANNING A CHRISTMAS PARTY? 
YOU I^ED US! 

MMGMER'S 

CATERING 

SERVICE 
Sirimp Bowl 
Baked Turkey & Dressing 
Large & Small Cheese Balls 




JOHNNY WAGNER 




497-1149 



Give Her a New iDok 
this Christmas! 

i>ECIAL GIFT PACKAGE - $19.00 
; Complete 4-montti progrtin 
: iud Vin Raalte Body Suite. 
• $24. Vdue 

nctfcSakns Pembroke mall 

T'a'-X SHOPPING CENTER 

W 499-1256 




SINGLE SPEED V4'^DRIU. 

Has W geared chuck. 
Powerful 2.3 amp motor 
and 2,000 rpm speed. 
4 lbs. 



MOWL 70 

•9.99 

104 N. Witchduck Rd. 



"YOUK ONt STOHUILOING 
UAnillALSCeNTlH- 



BUILDIN6 , 
MAmiALS i 



4973547 I 



0ih ii0ri& mim ^^^* 

I (FORMERLY CURIOSITY SHOP 4 HIRTZ BAZAAR) 

i ANTIQUES* GIFTS 
< Christmas Boutiqiie 

rCaliooShop 

^ Complate Decorating Servioe 

4 Ci»tom Christmas ArrwHpements 

222 Pint ColonURd 
(AtOcMUi) 

^»^"8 



CanSnal G&t & Fhr ist 
nHNSETTUIS $4 - $6 

CHRISTMAS FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS 



$7.50 up 

Complete line of gifts, Christmas 
decorations and floral services. \T 

48S-3SS3 "^1 

485 S. LVNNHAVEN RD. . (MlnrVtoTn 





Pafect Pkce for 
Gi^ han$ for Gentlemen 



PermmMuiatUnttim. Stopswty 
fiwn ^ motm mtd huttk at 

mm. • PRL 9:3e-9,SAT. 9:W-« 



.^V^oJisgn 



Ase. 4^1051 



CARSTTEREO 

TIRES 

FLOOR COVHUNG 

GOLF CLI^ BAG 

NEWCLOTHE^ 

WATCH 

SKILSAW 

CALOJLATOR 

DIAMOND RIIW 
NEW BIBLE 
FAMILY PORTRAIT 
VACUUM CLEANER 
GOLF SHOES, CLUBS 
NEW FIGiniE 
ANTIQUES 

MINI BIKE 

BICYCLE 

RAMO 

ROLLER SKATES 

MAG WHEELS 
BOOKS 

HOBBY CaFT 



fORDAWN 



OBT HAIR DONE 
(MIDER FOOD FOR PARTY 
GETnFIQlOOMED 
RENT TUXEDO 



Q^pTHPESHOP 



Oj^J^^^Mj^A^gAV 



BLUE MOUNTAIN GLASS 

MMle exclu^ely in Cuada 



8 TRACK TAPE DECK 



(heorOebMtfileMinS 
tack cat itaeoi. 



ALL ^ 
8 TRACK 
tapes:- 



t^l 



I 



\m 




furniture sales. INC 

5643 Raby Rd, Norfolk 853-7270 



For Only 

$2a99 




CHRISTMAS SPECIAL! 

tied ptiatiiifi pnfeHkM 

$15 - $35 

■g(of yoHich 



IndMdaaify Hlacted ptiatiiifi pnfeHionaily mattad,giaai«l 
■adbened. 



Recite for a fne palntiiw (of your choice) dnwipg Dec 



IN TIME m CHRISTMASL 
(^mstrong ^^ 

Cushioned Vinyl Floorl 

fJludia Carpel ^^J (Drapery On 





3 Mbcmi AuM Flau Shopping Cmtn 
(next to PompPa) 



4864210 



op 



4141 Va. Beach Blvd., Va. Beach 340-6421 



THE PURPLE P(ptE 



481 S. Lynnhaven Rd. (Mini Mall) 486-2871 
.Mariene Gallafv, Owner 





ALL BREED GROOMING 

POODLE PUPPIES 

DOG SUPPLIES 

Open 9-5 Moa, Tue&, FrL, Sat 
12 to 10 p.m. Wed. and Thm 



Join Amerlu's «xcKlng new 
hobby— TrMtura Finding. 
Works tbrougb dirt, und, 
wool, water, and aven rock 
wHh no Ion of power. 
UOHTWEIQMTi 3 lbs. FIva 
Yaar QuarantMi 



Keiit£^»'t49» 



49»^463 



Pa-PUM-RUM-Pa-PUM-PUM-RUM 




1X3 



BOX CARDS 

PRINTED ON PREMISES 

UNTIL DEC. ia g 

Open Evei7 Nite 'Til 9. Z 

First In Oift» and Books 

MAKE YOUR CHRISTMAS fs 2202 ATLANHC AVENUE 428-6351 
SHOPPING EASY! p - m\^ ' l^fld 'I^fld 'gd - l^fi^ -gd-l^n^^ 

GET HER A BERNINA 

SEWING MACHINE 

fHu WorU't Finest) 
CHECK OUR lioUDAY ^EOAL 



436-6116 ^^ 

35 Mnoess Anne Plaza 
Located in the Arcade ■ Behind The Gift Shop 



if 



mm 



SANTA SPECIALS 



%GOlf SHOE SALE 

LADIES AND MEN'S 
GOLF SHOES 

ON SALE AT ^ PRKE 

The Perfect Gift for the G<rifer 
OH Your Chrittmat List 

OCEM VIEW AND SnJMPY UU(E 

GOLF COURSES GOLF SHOPS 
9610 Norfolk Am, 587-0632 ImUui Rim Rd. 4»)-9834 




FLOWERS 

As an exprMsic»] of 
i^ympathy Can Be 
Very Meaningful 
RJ. SCHWARTZ 3404422 

B- vJ- 5 Houf® of f-lowerff 

aOO UONDON aRIDaK CENTER 



CHRISmiAS CARDS 
FLOWERS 





3W PRICES 

Edie Adams 

VMI.Mkt>«i*af M 



it-«»«. 







nppnvwip 



MOE 14 



JJJEmjNCI^JglFIEDADVER™^ 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1972 




SHAPE IS IN 

WE DO THE NEWEST 
AND MOST CREATIVE 
HAIRDOS 




IN VIRGINIA BEACH 

i707 VA. BEACH BLVD. 
8404282 



IN NORFOLK 
127 W. rRE&lf A80N 
622-9056 



LAMPS 

BLOW WAVING 
IRON CURLING 



I.\' A m HAIRDO 




o HmU quickly (5-7 minutes) 
o Rauint hMt 20 minutes 

(without cord) 
o Thermostatiailly controlled 
o Wood grain finish 



m 



HEMDiGlON 



■LKCTRIC SHAVBR 

•ALC8 * anivici mc. 



<6t2 VA. BEACH BLVa 497-6251 



aiiBBBB@BBIBfflBfflEB^BBIa@ 
B Chrisbnas Gifts for that tJnique Home fnm M 

Spanish Casa 



Wai pla^»M, ntM, pttatimi, clutai, gfaMiwue, 
Jnralqr, 10% off ivtth IU« ad. 

Speciall Onyx Chen Sot and ^ 

TaMo, Reg. $129. Now $100. 
PRINCESS ANNE FIAZA SHOPPING CENTER 
(BdiliidRieM) S40-8994 

10 1.10. to 9 am. Moa • Sat 




"THi GREEN THUMB" 

Plants and People 
Belong Together 

POINSEHA 
NORFOLK ISLAND 
PINE 
CHRISTMAS CAaUS 

425-8128 

20th. & Pacific, Across 
From The Dome 




SOU|«J WQR^p Ltd. 

Tkd World of Sound 

, REC»RDSALE NOW 
REG. $5.98 413.99 

oBREM> oY£s oIiELENREI»Y 

^SMLS^XiS* « <»AN b FUNl o MOODY BLUES 
tfELTONIOHN oELVlS oNEALMAMOND 

o tERY SPECIAl<<EA-nJB&. LET IT BE $L99 
^ 4574 Pwifcw ia Mit&iam S hoyy i m C—tw 
; iifcfaii8Mn<wiiiriapMifaM»Bhd. 49»85S5 



BIKE HEADLIGHT RADKHIORN 

$9.88 



ManikUft 
$2L95 



Shatterproof low. Battery opetatad. Tamper- 
^Kmfwitlikny and lock. 




CTRONICS 




store houn 10-9 daily, 10-5 Sat 
SOUTHERN SHOPPING CENTER 583-2651 



PLEASE YOUR FAVORITE MISS WITH 
THIS OLD-FASHIONED 

Doll Cradle T* 



Kw^ PlM, laootUy aaadad, 
inify to fial*, 23"L, 11" H, 
12%" W. 



'^ 



Ooli not inctuded. 




THE UNPAIN1ED FURNITURJE STORE 

Sostten Siioppiiv Camet lU 8-2911 
, TUeinrtwDcALit0aQwlcRd.Optn9-9da8y 




# SANYO 

carateiea 

Bnf ormaiice engiiMaed to 
mtiatt your car. 

Big, full fidelity sound. Yet 
smalt enough to fit your car's 
glove compartment. Features 
a repeat pushbutton to instant- 
ly replay ar«y channel, and fast 
forward for easy musk selec- 
tion. 



WWh 
Speakers 



516 Va. Beach Bhrd. 
Next to Zayie'i 499-5463 




1730 E.Uttie Creek Rd. | 
Next to Zayre'i 583-26691 




GOLF LESSONS FREEI 



FROM DORSEY MEADE 

IRtb Aacfant o£»nr GoV Egugmmt 
Laa^$,Mn%Jmuoroomfdet0Pro 
Um. 20% OffStt oeOdfauba Through 
Cbiitaiaf Phtf i¥of •nxMii Aaatanc* 



•muwy's 

Golj School 



KO-MU 
mT&MlltvjrHfinr 

.Va. 




Apidiance Chrome & 
Mag Wheels-ln Stock 

For Ford, Oievndet, Blazen 
A Hck Up Tnicki 

Smooth Chrome Wheels 

. 14-15x6 ».......- $17.50 ea. 

Dayton Tiras - Railed i4-7 ... $19.50 ea. 

White LAttnn 15-8 ......... $26.00 ea. 

fvniiei.enen j^j^ $3000 ea. 

F60.14_$28.41ph«FET I"?" 
C 60-14 $31.06 phN PET PHILLIPS 

3535NOR'niiiiLn-ARY DISCOUNT TIRE 
HIGHWAY 857-1201 CENTER ^ 



TIRES 

FLOOR COVERING 

GOLF CLUBS, BAG 

NEW CLOTHES 

WATCH 

SKILSAW 

CALCULATOR 

Mi MOM 

DIAMOND RING 
NEW BIBLE 
FAMILY PORTRAIT 
VACUUM CLEANER 
GOLF SHOES, CLUBS 
NEW FIGURE My ; 

ANTIQUES 

WR£0 

MINI BIKE 

BICYCLE 

RADIO 



ROLLER SKATES 

MAG WHEELS 
BOOKS 

HOBBY GIFT 



fCmOHMH 



JEWELRY 
HEALTH FOODS 
PET 

SKATING I»ESS 
DOLL CRADLE 



GET HAIR DONE 

ORKR FOOD FOR PARTY 






Christmas is about Christ 

LONG'S 

Religious Supply 

Your Christian Supply Headquarters 
has the gift you need for that 
someone that's specM. 



t 




4760 VA. BEACH BLVD. 



497-1885 



Looking for 

Bicycles? 

Come See Ours I 

We have aU types for all ages. 



THE PERFECT GIFT 

A PERSONALIZED WATCH 

Fabulous Swin-made watch has a 36 
it(Hie-face, sweep wcond hand and 17 
t jew el movement Yellow gold at 
chrome with genuine All^tm band. 
Pttaonaiized at no additional chuge. 
Was $59.95. Order by mail, 5 day 
deUvery OkmC paid) with check or 
m<Hiey Older to: 

R. B. BRICKERS & CO. 

1400 CHURCH ST., NORFOLK, VA. 23504 





Sidewalk Bikes 12", 16'V 20" 

Standard 20", 24" and 26" 

3Speed26" 

5 Speed 26", 27" 

10 Speed 26", 27' \ 

Wagons, Scooters, Trlcydes, 

Mini-Bikes. Western Flyers. 






lliito^issodato istore 

600 VA, BEACH BLVtt 42fr4351 

We appreciate the opportunity to serve you. 





Give her a 

Kirby 



Jerry s Aquarium, £ij. 

COMPLETE LINE OF TROPICAL 
FISH, PLANTS, ETC 

We quarantine all incoming shipments 
to insure tc^ qualify, disease-free fldi 
and still offer low prices 

We have 3,350 gallons of Water in 
Our Aquariums! 

1315 Harpm RomL 1 Block South (rf NAS Oceana 
PHONE 425^944 




Kirby 



Classic 



TT 



/^ 



for CliristiiKis 

Coll 499-2763 
Kirby Center 
of Norfolk 



f»j^»_. 



CUSTOM FRAMING 

(With over 800 moldings 
to choose from) 

ORIGINAL WORKS OF ART-CUSTOM FRAMING 

8471 Owaapeake Bhrd., Norfolk, near Fiahennan's Rd. 
Open 9-5 daBy,&t 10-3 




Bn-TIBl 



ROLLER SKATES 

BOY'S & GIRL'S 
SKATES & ACCESSORIES . 

• SKATING DRESSES 

• LEOTARDS 

M \ \^^^-//>-^^'^ •SKATE CASES 

^''' 1 v\^2^ ©POMPOMS 

^ GIFT CERTIFICATES 

OOliEGE PARK SKATING CENTER 

4200187 




!■ .V?, 



I 



ANNfvnEEiilT iViifT 

Brtnga reM»aliiee uiriNnNatf la biMel 




New faAions in diamond 

bridal sets, subtly styled 
in many rtriUng, dra- 
matic designs. 

You Choice ^nt%Mm 



W^ve got the wliole world working for joa. 
LAYAWAY NOW FOR CHRIS1MAS 

Jewelers •Norfolk • Portsmouth •va. beach 









UNIR)RMS-$5. 

Latge group, asMxted c<rfora, 
UauaUyioldfor$8to$lS. 

lANWEBSAR UNIR)RM 

3707 Va. Beach Blvd. 340-9647 
B«tween Pembrolte MaU k PrinceM Anne Plaxa 




GET nn groomed 



RENT TUXEDO 



Na 1 IN TIDEWATER 

cycle: wmLD 

SANTA'S HONDA HEADQUARTERS 



THiCMOPHICAL 





SmaU Mini-Tnil Hondu avalaUe now. 
NSL Mw, amqdete Ine of 10 qieeib. 



Just In Time For Christmas 

FIRST IN TIDEWATER 



SUITS. 
SLACKS, 
SPORT 
COATS 



'Wm.atoxTT Outlet 



TIES, 
SHIRTS, 
SOCKS, 
BELTS 



pOi^fMET 



CHRISTMAS CARI» 



W0m4^n SALE OM ALL GIFT 
iraM AMD OREETING CARi:^ 
iUJO OiMIUKAH CARDS. 

4nO Hiy t ood M., y%. Bm^ 4640106 I 



4972 Va. Beach Blvd. 
<N«Anioi«) i^M146 



bankam^kard 
master charge 




MAKE nr ON YOUR OWN 
TWOFEHI 

HKING, BACKPACKING AND 
CLIMBING BOOTS FOR HIM 
OR HER. 

FROM $23. 



1104 W. UriTLE CREOC Ra 
423-7395 
The QMvMe 8<qV>« of WMenMSS 




SAVE UP TO 40% ON FIRST 
QUALITY AMERICAN MADE MDSE. 

1300 E. UTTti CMIK HD. 
(Oppetin MHinry HlfhfMyl , 

Nerfetk, Va. 3Mia 

'ii7-oaoa 



T^T^ 



diuilia Carpet " grapery Shop 

ana 

Ct^nM REUPHOLSTERING 

Ow dacoMot i« hrii« HMe 

S^^NM to VOB. flM^ms. ^R^ 

livaiimaaOBMBiLWal 

ii' 




iloek^afw. 
4141 Vfc Beach Bhrd. Va. BMcb 340-1421 



\ 



Tt^RSDAY. DECEMBER 7. 1972 



THE SUN 



Highway clearing explained 




Tlife hi^ways which" offer 
th6 Mghest degree of service 
ar4 uie ones which will be 
cle*^ flrst oi ice and snow 
(hiru|g a winter storm, a 
Department of Highways 
official said today. 

Interstate and arterial 
routes would obviously have 
top priority, but even some 
secondary roads rate equally 
asipgh when it comes to 
i-^ pl^ng away the ice and 
i% snOw. 



^'»* 



r 



C. 0. L«igh, state main- 
tenance engineer for the 
Department of Hi^ways, who 
recently announced the 
widespread preparations for 
snow removal all over the 
state, said that the "degree of 
service" which a road gives is 
the key in establishing 
priorities tar snow removal. 

A number of factors are 
taken into cmsideration in 
determining the "degree" — 
w-lmportance — of service, it 
was pointed (Nit. 

Traffic volumes, the 
locations of industry and other 
centers of employment, 
schods, hospitals and similar 



institutions are niven high 
consideration in planning and 
establishing priwities, as are 
the roads designated for mail 
routes. 

The standard set by the 
department for clearing 
Virginia's snow-clogged roads 
reads this way in the Main- 
tenance Policy Maiitial: 

"In order to promote safe 
travel on the highways of the 
Commonwealth and to protect 
the investment in our high- 
ways, it shall be the objective 
of the department to provide 
snow and ice control services 
commensurate with the needs 
of all segments of our highw ay 
system and with our ability to 
finance those operations." 

To accomplish this ob- 
jective, all routes are assigned 
one of four pricx'ities. 

Priority One - This in- 
cludes interstate, arterial, 
most primary routes and a 
few hi^ service secondary 
routes. Roads assigned this 
priority receive first con- 
sideration during snowstorms. 
These roads are kept free of 
snow and ice so that' traffic 
can proceed in safety without 



Uk- use ut ilitiiiu-, (.".irpi 
during periods of heavy falling 
snow or drifting. 

Should extremely low- 
temperatures prevent or 
greatly retard the acti<Hi of 
chemicals, these routes will be 
"so covered with abrasives 
that traffic can {nroceed in 
safety without the use of 
chains." 

Priority Two - This in- 
cludes medium service 
primary routes and some high 
service secondary routes. 
Routes with this priority will 
be cleared of snow and ice, or 
covered with abrasives, to 
! ' rniit travel as soon as 
possible during a storm, but 
within 24 hours after the 
cessation of falling weather. 

Priority Three - This 
normally includes low service 
primary and some high ser- 
vice secondary routes, in- 
cluding urban secondary 
feeder and urban secondary 
subdivision routes. These 
roads will receive third 
consideratimi in snow and ice 
removal. They are to he 
plowed as soon as possible, but 
within 24 hours after falling 
weather has stopped. All hills 



and trouble spots are to be 
covered with abrasives as 
soon as possible after a storm 
begins, but within 48 hours 
:»fter the storm ends. 

Priority Four - This in- 
cludes all roads under the 
jurisdiction of the Department 
of Highways which do not fall 
in the above priorities. 

One question which seems to 
come up every lime there is a 
snowstwm concerns removal 
of snow from driveways. 

Department of Highways 
spokesmen say that in- 
dividuals are responsible for 
the removal of snow from the 
area of driveways which frwit 
a plowed street. In other 
words, when department 
plows and-or graders shove 
snow off a main roadway onto 
the front of a private 
driveway, the owner of the 
driveway is responsible fw 
removing this snow. 

There are two exceptions to 
this: snow shoved onto 
driveways leading to fire 
stations and first aid stations 
is the responsibility of the 
Department of Highways and 
will be removed by the 
department. 



ODU studies anti-poverty program 



r 



Two Old Dominion 
University professors have 
found a way to predict job 
turnover and a means to help 
determine the effectiveness of 
government anti-poverty 
programs. 



Jack W. Nickson Jr., 
(M-ofessor of economics, and 
H.B. Karp, associate 
pi^essor of business 
maoagement, recently con- 
ducted a study of 50 working, 

^ low- income blacks in Norfolk 
that has led them to make 

-> some far-reaching con- 
clusions. 



Their study was based upon 
work by industrial 
psychologist Frederick 
Herzbo'g of Case Western 
Reserve University, 
Cleveland, Ohio. In 1957, 
Herzberg conducted a job 
flttttcRle study W fwwwttng 
respdifees to two directives; 
name a time on the job when 
you are happy, and name a 
time on the job when you were 
unhappy. 



The result was, according to 
Nifkso^i, "that nearly all the 
ttiings that made people happy 
had to do with job content 



Qiristmas 
concert Sun. 

The Chancel Choir of 
Baylake United Methodist 
Church of 4300 Shore Drive 
will present its annual 
diristmas Concert Sunday at 
7:30 p.m. 

The Chancel Chdr, undo- 
the direction of Qinton L. 
Tliatdi, director <rf music for 
tbe churdi, wiU sing the 
Advent Cantata "Rejoice", 
"Beloved Christmas', "Diet 
Ridi ^ixtehude", along with 
other Christmas sdecUons. 
Mrs. ^yce AVhittaker, churdi 
organist, will accompany the 
didr. Tlie concert is open to 
the public free of charge. 

The Virginia Weslyan 
Cdlege Choir will sing the 
anthems Sunday during the 
regidar, worship service at 11 
a.m. 

C- 

.Tlie college chwr is imdar 
ttie direction of David Gayton. 



(achievement, recognition, 
responsibility, enjoyment of 
the work), and things that 
made people unhai^y delt 
with job environment (salary, 
company policy)." Herzberg 
concluded that every worker 
has these two needs that have 
to be satisfied by the job. 

The' purpose of the Norfolk 
study was to see if the low- 
income, black workers 
respond like other workers 
(such as professional women, 
food handlers and engineers 
who have been studied), and 
to develop two deprivation 

indexes. The deprivation 
indexes would show the dif- 
ferences l)etween what the 
worker earns on his present 
job and his ideal earnings, and 
between what the worker 
perceives he gets in job 
cMOeot and his ideal. The two 
indexes could then be used to 
predict job turnover. 

Nickson said that he and 
Karp were successful in 
predicting jdb turnover in 
thdr study. Workers who had 



German film Fri. 

Old Dominion University's 
German Club will present the 
film, !'Das Frauiein von 
Barnhelm," 8 p.m., Friday in 
Kaufman Hall Auditorium. 

The movie is based on 
Gotthold Ephraim Lessing's 
dassic comedy, "Minna von 
Barnhelm (1767) "which deals 
with the love of a rich girl and 
an impoverished Prussian 
officer The film, in German, 
does not have English sub- 
titles. The public is invited. 



high deprivation factors in or|e 
(H* both of the indexes quit 
their jobs, he said, bearing out 
their predictions. 

Nickson saw some accepted 
principles questioned by their 
findings. A widely accepted 
principle, he said, is that if a 
low-income worker's pay is 
increased too much he will 
become lazy. He will stop 
working full time, cutting 
back his hours corresponding 
to the wage increase. 

In fact, their study has 
shown, the worker's slowdown 
is tied to job content, not 
wages. He has been lifted 
above starvation level and can 

Sears awards 
$2500 grant 

X>C|J«>>« W^feyan^ QoU^e 
MS feteivtd'iH2,500 grant 
from The , Sears-Roebuck 
Foundation, according to 
Virginia Wesleyan President 
Lambuth M. Clarke. 

President Clarke, in an- 
nouncing the grant, said, 
"Virginia Wesleyan is 
grateful fw the support of the 
Sears-Roebuck Foundatiwi. 
As a private institution, the 
support of such educationally- 
minded foundations is most 
important to us." Clarke in- 
dicated that this specific grant 
will be used to purchase 
lilx-ary bo(d(S and materials. 

Nationwide, 950 private 
colleges and universities will 
receive $1.5 million throu^ 
various Sears Foundation 
educational progrants. 

The Sears-Roebuck 
Foundation check was 
presented by Marvin G. 
HoUenbeck, area manager (a 
Sears. 



Christmas service 



St. Francis Espiscopal 
Church will have several 
special services during 
Chrbtmastide. 

The Annual Christmas 
Pageant, "The Singing 
Christmas Tree", will be 
presented by the Youth 
Fellowship, grades 3,4, and 5 
and the Intermediate Choir on 
December 17 at 7:30 p.m. 

A Christmas Evei Holy 
Communion will be held at 11 



p.m. on December 24 and a 
Christmas Day Holy Com- 
munion at 10 a.m. on 
December 25. 

A Festival of Lessons and 
Carols will be held at 11:15 
a.m. on December 31 and New 
Year's Day Holy Communion 
will be at 10 a.m. on January 1. 

Everyone is welcomed to 
participate in these services 
at the diurch mi Rosemont 
Road. 



now afford to lodi for work 
that will give job content 
satisfaction while paying 
equitably. 

A guaranteed annual wage 
could create a havoc of job 
turnover if not accompanied 
by job enrichment programs, 
Nickson explained. Assigning 
additional responsibility to a 
worker is one way of keeping 
him on the job after a pay 
hike, he said. 

Measuring the effectiveness 
of anti-poverty prc^rams is 
another area in which Nickson 
and Karp see application of 
their findings. Currently, they 
maintain, there is no way to 
guage the effectiveness of 
federal programs like Model 
Cities and redevelopment and 
housing. 

Such a guage is offered by 
their deprivation indexes. If 
an area is to be granted im- 
provement funding, Nickson 
(flroposes. a study should first ' 
be, conducted that would 
determine how high the 
deprivation is. Then, six 
months or a year after the 
program has been 

established, another study 
should be conducted and the 
results of both studies should 
be compared. If the second 
deprivation index does not 
show a decline then the 
program is not working and 
should be reevaluated and 
restructured. 

Nickson and Karp plan 
furtl^ study, research, and 
devmpment of these con- 
cepts. They hope to expand the 
practical application by 
forming an "attitudtnal 
deprivation index" which 
would survey Norfolk Model 
City recipients. 

The first survey should be 
conducted in an area where 
Modd City boundaries were 
recently extended. Three or 
four years should pass before 
the second survey of the same 
recipients. This new study 
should "get at the concept of 
alienation,'' Nickson said. It 
should "find the d^ree of 
alienation, and see if it 
declines over a period of 
time." 




Grim reminder 
may save lives 



The Tidewater Chapter of 
the American Red Cross, in 
cooperation with the City of 
Virginia Beach, Fort Story, 
and the Corps of Engineers 
has erected two very unusual 
warning signs at the Lynn- 
hav«i Inlet 

WIUi fuwis dwiated by an 
anonymous local R«l Cross 
supporter the large warnii* 
signs show the Grim Reaper 
warning ttie public of tt« 
perito the swift current can 
iroduce ami lists ttie age, sot, 
aid date <rf drownir^ of each 
d the 22 victims claimed by 
the Lvnnhaven's treacherous 
currents since 1960. The two 
st(^ tKc the southeast and 
ioottwfst shwes d the inlet. 

fradt N. Wood. Chaimnan 



d the Tidewater Chapto* of 
the Red Cross, said warning 
df orts to date to prevent these 
unfortunate drownings have 
been unsuccessful. "The 
public has either defaced or 
destroyed previous si^is i^ 
people, mostly cMMren, ai<e^ 
still drowning Mch ^ear," te 
said. Wood cited the efforts of 
Jack Jmnii^, board member 
d the Tidewato- Chapter,. as 
being the "driving force" 
belrind this Red Cross cmn- 
munity effort and Jack's 
wmkii^ diligently with Uie 
Corps d Engineers, the Fort 
Story Trai»|>Mtati«i Cwp. 
ath* City d Virginia Beach, 
and m&m other intabsted' 
dtizers sii^e last summer to 
insure the sigm beir^ wected. 
Jennini^ staled that mncv 



all previous efforts to warn the 
public had failed he felt the 
emotional drama (kpicted on 
these special signs may l>etter 
save future lives, especially 
the lives d innocent children. 
"It will take the vigilance ami 
support, of everyone, 
especially the children's 
parents, to really be ef- 
fective." he said. Project 
Chairman Jennings credited 
the U.S. Army at Fwt Story 
and the Tidewater Chapter of 
the Red Cross as being the 
frinwry contriNilors to the 
project's completion Fort 
Stwry provided the manpower, 
engineerii^, and amphibious 
^^hicles needed to attach the 
sigas to the bridge. The Red 
Cross obtained the funds and 
ppovided tlw leadersh^. 



' ADVERTISEMENT 
FOR BID 

Virginia Beach School 
Board, of the City of 
^jrginia Beach will 
receive sealed bids for 
construction of a Junior,,. 
High School to be located 
1200 feet off Independence 
Boulevard In the Bayside 
Borough, until 3 00 P.M. 
Eastern Standard Time, 
21 December 1972 at the 
School Administration 
Building, Princess Anne 
Court House, then publicly 
opened and read aloud. 

A deposit check of S7S.00 
will be required per set of 
Bid Documents and such 
check shall be made 
payable to ysaid Ar 
chitects. 

The inform'^tion for 
Bidders,Formof aid, Form 
of Contract, Plaqs and 
Specifications rrihy be 
obtained on or after 1 
December 1972 from the 
Architects, McClurg and 
Wall, A I. A 1SS9 tasking 
Road, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 234S1. 

Bids must be ac 
companied by a certified 
check or acceptable Bid 
Bond in the amount of 
FIVE PERCENT (5 per 
cent) of the Base Bid, 
made to the order of 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
SCHOOL BOARD. CITY 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH. 
No bids may be with 
drawn for a period of sixty 
(60) days after scheduled 
closing time fw receipt of 
bids. 



A $75.00 deposit is 
required for each set of 
plans and Specifications, 
two sets maximum. 
Reimbursement of 
deposits will be made for 
each set returned to the 
Architect in good, un 
marked condition within 
10 days of bid opening as 
follows (a) General 
Contractors who bid 
$75.00 will be returned, (c) 
Subcontractors, in every 
case, $30.00 will be 
returned. 

Bidders are required 
under Title 54, Chapter 7, 
Code of Virginia, to show 
evidence of certificate of 
registration before bid 
may be received and 
considered on a gcneS-al or 
sub contract of $20,000.00 
or more. The Bidder shall 
place on the outside of the 
envelope containing his 
bid and in his bid over his 
signature the following 
notation "Registered 
Contractor, Virginia No. 



The City Of Virginia 
Beach School Board 
reserves the right to 
accept any bids and to 
.waive any formalities and 
to reiect any or all bids. 
By order of the School 
Board 

City of Virginia Beach 
Edward E. Brickell 
Superintendent 

VIRGINIA in the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 4th 
day of December, 1972 
IN CHANCERY 
DOCKET NO US1S 
LAURALEE CHANDLER 
DUNN, Plaintiff 
vs. 

WILLIE THOMAS 
GARRISON. ALICE 
ESTELLE CHANDLER 
MACCUBBIN, GUY 
GARRISON CHANDLER, 
et als., Defendants. 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to effect partition among 
the owners, by sale or 
otherwise, of certain real- 
property, containing fiffy 
(50) acres more or less, 
located in Pungo Borough 
in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and 
known as Route No. 3 Box 
3006 A Mill Landing Road, 
(fronting 1,600 feet more 
or less thereon), which is 
more fully described in a 
deed dated March 24, 1915, 
from W.A. Capps and 
Alice V. Capps, husband 
and wife, to William Lee 
Garrison and recorded in 
the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Deed Book 97, page ^4, 
of which WilHam Lee 
Garrison died seized and 
possessed . 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Guy Garrison Chandler is 
not a resident of this State 
and that his last known 
post office address is 527 
North 98th Street, Mesa, 
Arizona 85201. 

It is, therefore, OR 
DERED that the said 
nonresident defendant, 
namely Guy Garrison 
Chandler do appear within 
ten days after due 
publication of this order 
and do what is necessary 
to protect his interests. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this order be published 
once a week for four 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper published in 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

I ask for this Robert 
Lee Simpson 

A copy Teste. John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
Robert Lee Simpson 
404 Malibu-Towers 
Va. Beach, Va. 

12 7,14,21,28 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 4fh day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Donna P. Lconomou, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Panagiotis Lconomou, 
Defendant. 

Theobiect of thiss^jit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
Mensa et Thoro to be later 
Merged into a 'divorce a 
vinculo matrimonnii from* 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit havioa 
been made and filed tha]t«, 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address be4ng 
L. Skouroliakou 49, 
Amfkleia, Lokridos, 
Greece. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within 10 days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

Osie H. Gay, Jr. 
2871 River Road, Va. 
Beach, Va. 
A copy Teste; 
JOHN V. FENTRESS. 
Clerk 

By Linda Noel Hill, 
Deputy, Clerk 

12 7,14,21,28 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 5th day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

David A. Sousa, Plaintiff, 

against 

Kathleen Sousa, Defen 



dant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post address being. 
Apartment UK, 100 
Riverdale Avenue, 
Yonkers, New York 10701. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it Is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
Norman Hecht 
North Mall, Military 
Circle 

Norfolk, VA 23502 
A copy Teste 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERk 

BY: Sandra Hargrove 
Deputy Clerk. 

12 7,14,21,28-4T 

VIRGINIA In the Clerk's 
office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach on the 29th day of 
November, 1972. 

IN CHANCERY 
Number 17097 
ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH Sole Sur 
viving Executrix of the 
Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased. 
Complainant, 

V. 

S.J. McAllister Ad 

dress Unknown and the 
heirs at* law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of S.J. 

McAllister, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents. 

ORDER of' 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to quiet title to property 
which is more par- 
ticulcrly described as 
follows that certain lot, 
piece or parcel of land 
situated in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lot 19, Block 31, as shown 
on the certain plat of 
Euclid Place which is duly 
of record in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, in Map 
Book 4 at pages 62 and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
S.J. McAllister is a non 
resident of this State and 
that his last known post 
office address is unknown 
except for the fact that the 
original deed from 
Elizabeth Park and Land 
Company to S.J. 
McAllistet dated May 31, 
1913, states after his name 
" Bluet led , West 
Virginia," but that upon 
information and belief he 
has not been a resident of 
Bluefield, West Virginia 
for many years 'and at no 
time under consideration 
has he been a resident of 
the State of Vii-ginia. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that 
there are or may be other 
persons interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to wit; The 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of S.J. 

McAllister, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office address- 
esar»unknown,allofwhom 
are made parties to the 
proceeding by the general 
description of Parties 
Unknown, it is OR- 
DERED that the above 
named .persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what may be 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and it is 

FURTHERED OR 
DERED that the 
foregoing portion of this 
Order be published once a 
week for four (4) suc- 
cessive weeks In T>*ie 
Virginia Beach Sun, \a 
newspaper printed in ttre 
City of Virginia Beach, 
and having circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

Teste John V. Fentress* 
Clerk 

By; Phyllis N. Styron 
Deputy 

Peter A. Agelasto, III 
1300 United Virginia Bank 
Building, 
Norfolk, Virginia 
12 7,14,21,28 4T 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE IN 

THE CIRCUIT COURT 

OF THE CITY OF 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

IN CHANCERY Number 

17114 

ELIZABETH T. 

OVERCASH, 

Sole Surviving Executrix 

of the Estate of Robert 

Easton Townsend, 

deceased, complainant, 

V. 

JOHN H. BURDIN 
Address Unknown 
NELLIE A PRITCHARD 

Address Unknown 
Ai)d the heirs at law, next 
of kin, devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lltn 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of John H. 
Burdin and Nellie A. 
Pritchard, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office adresses 
are unknown, all of whom 



I 



are made parties to the 
proceeding by the denegal 
description of Parties 
Unknown, Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit it 
to quiet title to property 
which Is more par- 
ticularly described at 
follows: those certain lots, 
pieces or parcels of land 
situated in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lots 5 and 6, Block 31, as 
shown on the certain plat 
of Euclid Place which is 
duly of record in the 
Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Map Book 4 at pages 62 
and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
John H. Burdin is a non- 
resident of this State and 
that his last known post 
office address is unknown 
except for the fact that the 
original deed from The 
Home Realty Company to 
John H. Burdin, dated 
July 7, 1910, states after 
his name "Windsor, North 
Carolina," but that upon 
information and belief he 
died in Windsor, North 
Carolina in 1915. At no 
time under consideration 
has he been a resident of 
the State of Virginia. He 
devised his real estate to 
his niece Nellie A. Prit 
chard whose whereabouts 
are unknown. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that 
there are or may be other 
persons interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to-wit; The 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of John H. 
Burdin and Nellie A. 
Pritchard, all Of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad- 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown; it is 
ORDERED that the above 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what is 
necessary to protect their 
interests and it is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published 
once a week for four (4) 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Besch, SM»i.i«a 
newspaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and having 
circulation in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 

Teste; John V* Fentrett, 

Clerk 

By Sandra Hargrove D.C. 

Peter A. Agelasto, III 

1300 United Virginia Bank 

BIdg. 

Norfolk, Virginia 

12 7,14,21,284t 

VIRGINIA; In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach on the 29th day of 
November, 1972 

IN CHANCERY 

Number: 17095 

ELIZABETH T. 

OVERCASH, Sole Sur 

ving Executrix of the 
Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased. 
Complainant, 
v. 

R.C GARRETT, Address 
Unknown and the heirs at 
law, next of kin, devisees, 
legatees, creditors and 
lien creditors of any heirs 
or devisees of R.C. 
Garrett, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad- 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
gerneral descripton of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to quiet title to property 
which is more par- 
ticular described as 
follows: whose certain lots, 
pieces or parcels of land 
situated in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lots 23 and 24, Block 31, as 
shown on the certain plat 
of Euclid Place which is 
duly of record in the 
Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
In Map Book 4 at pages 62 
and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
R.C. Garrett is a non- 
resident of this State and 
that his last kno^n post 
office address is unknown 
except for the fact that the 
original deed from The 
Home Realty Company to 
R.C. Garrett dated July 
. U. 1910, refers to the 
grantee as "R.C. Garrett, 
Graham, North 
Carolina," but that op«i 
information and belief he 
has not geen a resident of 
Graham, North Carolina 
for many years and at no 
time under consideration 
has he been a resident of 
the State of Virginia. 

And an affidavit havlr^ 
been fifed stating that 
there are or may be othw* 
persond Interested in the 
subject matter to be 
dItiMsed of in Hilt suit 
whose names are 
unknown ana wttose last 
po;$t office addresses are 
unknown, to wit: The 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and tien 



creditors of any heirt or 
devisees of R.C. Garrett, 
all of whose names ar;i 
unknown and whose poftK 
office addresses arp, 
unknown, all of whom ar^ 
made parties to tNi 
proceeding by the gener^' 
description of Parties 
Unknown; it It OR- 
DEREt^ that the above 
named pertons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what it 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and it is 

FURTfiER ORDERE 
that the foregoing porti 
of this Order be publish 
once a week for four ( 41^ " 
successive weeks In The I 
Virginia Beach Sun, a } 
newspaper printed in the I 
City of Virginia Beach, } 
and having circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

Teste: John V. Fentrett, 
Clerk 

By: Phyllii N. Stryon 
Deputy I 

Peter A. Agelasto, III | 

1300 United Virginia Bank i 
BIdg., { 

Norfolk, Virginia I 

12.7,14,21,28-4T \ 



m 



VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach on the 29th day of 
November, 1972. 

IN CHANCERY 
Number 17096 
ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH, Sole Sur- 
viving Executrix of the 
Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased, 
Complainant, 
V. il 

C.B. RICHARDSOH 
Address Unknown and thfe 
heirs at law, next of kiti, 
devisees, legatees,^^ 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirt or 
devisees of C.B. 
Richardson, all of whose ^ 
names are unknown an^^ 
whose post office ad%>*{i 



dresses are unknown, all* 



r. 




of whom are made partlesj^, 
to the proceeding by the^ 
general description o^i 
Parties Unknown, ^t 
Respondents. J** 

ORDER OF i^l 

PUBLICATION ri' 

The object of this suit isS> 
to quiet title to propertyr^l 
which is more particuarly^Ji 
described as follows: that^ 
certain lot, piece or parcellyl 
of land situated in the City^ 
of Virginia Beach^^ 
Virginia, known anr^l 
numbered as Lot 41, Block 
31, as shown on the certain 
plant of Euclid Place 
which it duly of record In 
the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Coyrt Qf the CHy 
VlriHnifr 9cpai, VWIl' 
in AAap Book 4 at luges 62 |; 
and 63, Ij 

And an affidavit havinf;' > 
been made and filed that 
C.B. Richardson is not 
known to have been In 
Roanoke, Virginia, after 
1920 and that his 
whereabouts and lasfc 
known address ar«> 
unknown, and that if he b*, 
living he would be In 
excess of seventy-two (72^ [ 
years of age. 

And an affidavit having i 
been filed stating tha^^ 
there are or may be other 
persons interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and who last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to-wit: — 

The heirs at law, next ol^ 
kin, devisees, legateeS|-«- 
creditors and Meil ' 
creditors of any heirs 
devise^ of C.B 
Richardson, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
who post office addreste^ 
are unknown, all of whom 
are made parties to the 
proceeding by the general 
description of Parties 
Unknown; it is OR- , 
DERED that the above{** 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this ^_ 
Order and do what IS~*"' 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and it is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order^oe published 
once a weeJt for four (4) 
successlve/weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
nespaper arlnted in the 
City of Virginia Beach,,..^ 
and having circulation in • 
the City of Virginia Beachfk| 
Virginia. «#| 

Teste: John V. Fentress, { 
Clerk I 

By. Phyllis N. Styron, | 
Deputy "I 

Peter A. Agelasto, III * I 
1300 United Virginia BanJi, 
BIdg. 

Norfolk, Virginia .* 

12 7,14,21,28 4T- 



VIRGINIA: In ttie Circuit * 
Court of the City of ; 
Virginia Beach on the 29tfi • 
day of November, 1972. | 
In Re; THE ESTATE O F i 
WILLIAM V. H. 

WILLIAMS, DECEASE 
SHOW CAUSE OROfR 
It appearing to the 
Court that a report of the 
accounts of Betty C. 
Ghent, Executrix of ttie 
Estate of William V. H. 
Williams, deceased, and. 
of the debts and demands { 
against her estae, has ' 
been filed In the Clerk's \ 
Office of this Court, and ' 
that six months has t 
elapsed since the* J 
qualification, on motkNi of ,. . 
the said Betty C. Ghentr»t.| 
Executrix of the Estate ef i 
William V. H. Williams* * 
decMsad, It Is. 

ORDERED that the 
crartHM^ of, and all otHers ', 
Intwested in the EtMe, de • 
show cause. N any flwy I 
can, on ttw Ittti day e4 > 
December, 1972, at 10:M l 
a.m. before this Court, N^.J 
Its Ceurtroom, agalfwt the 
payment and detlw^Y e# 



f^v * **• 



^'''(^♦'♦'ll^ 






""■?"•• """"^WjjWJWJW^jj^w^JAW^^jjjaj" 



ipppp^^^w^^^^ 



r a 



<T 



=-r a 






THE SUN 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 7; 197i 




^tll 




J^ 





|«* Est«tc or William v. 
m, Wilitomt, tf«cMs«4i, to 
kth* (i«vlw«s and legatees 
Fwithout requiring 
>r«fwi(ting t>onds. it Is 
Itwrttier 

ORDERED that 
bforgMng portion of ttils 
^thow cause order be 
^published once a week tor 
'two svccessive weeks in 

the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
I newspaiwr having general 

circulation in the city of 
ilnia Beach. 



jrln H. Childress, p.q. 
^1*laza One, 
}lk. Virginia 23S10 
|»py Test: 

w V. Fentress, Clerk 
By Phyllis N.Styron, O.C. 
'i^J 12-4, M2T 

Ct>MMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
■Jtie Circuit Court of the 
-Oty of Virginia Beach, on 
ttK 29th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
, PUBLICATION 

vlMi|Mam Morgan Burse, 
Jr., Plaintiff, 
against 

Elaine Carta Tiertteimer 
Bursa, Defendant. 
.The obiect of this suit Is 
to- -obtain a Decree of 
Divorce A Vinculo 

, Matrimonii from ttte said 
Defendant on the grounds 
of desertion on or about 
lln^Sth day of April, 1971 

.aMrfch dersertlon has 
continued uninterruptedly 

i^ntH the present. 

in And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 

j'asident of the State of 
Vtoginia, her last known 

i»d(^ess being 4602 North - 

::icHge Drive Los 

Angeles, California, 90043. 

Not resident of the State 

S, Virgin la, it is wdered 
at she do appear here 
jMittiin ten (10) days after 
Q^a, publication hereof, 
an^ do what may be 
n^c'assary to protect her 
iitffrest In this suit. 
,A,c9py Teste: 
iLarry Wise 
i»fi. Box 15142 
Chesapeake, va. 
John v. fentress, 

Clerk 

i^inda Noel Hill, D.C. 

\ ., 12 7,14,21,2>-4T 

^'-''^ NOTICE 

This Is to notify the 
public that the un- 
^rsigned, trading as 
wftt's Rexall Pharmacy, 
wlU within ten days after 
publication of this notice 
,i^j^ to the Virginia State 

;^ic^oUc Bayaraga Con- 
trol Board for a ncan,sa 
to sell Beer' and Wine 

jIgEi off premises con- 
si4mption. 
^mr. Dexter Del 
Bar'r's Rexall Pharmacy 
Atlantic Ave. & 17th St. 

sVirglnla Beach, Va. 

^Pamela L. Moblay 

fjWiness 

iKo . 12-MT 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

VIRGINIA, 

i^ Ih the Clerk's Office of 

the Circuit Court of the 
^aty of Virginia Beach, on 
^me^Sth day of November, 

ORDER OF 
^, ^ PUBLICATION 
I'.Eliiabeth Lurix Sparkes, 

Mn"«' 
'against 

Peter Alan Sparkes, 

^ffndant. 

. %ht obiect of this suit is 

^d obtain a divorce A 

ViiVculo Matrimonii w in 

the alternative A Mensa 

Et . Thoro to be later 

magged into a decree of 

divorce A Vinculo 

Matrimonii from the said 

ndant, upon the 

grounds of adultery and- 

or wilfull desertion. 

iCnd an affidavit having 

en made and filed that 

e defendant Is not a 

ident of the State of 

rglnia, tbe last known 

St office address being : 

Iberville Apts. B 6, 265 

ont Beach Drive, Ocean 

rings, Mississippi. 

ot resident of the State 

Virginia, it is ordered 

t he do appear here 

^hin ten (10) days after 

ic publication hereof, 

id do what may be 

essary to [»-otect his 

erest In this suit. 

ry M. Schwan 

Virginia National 

nk BIdg. 

folk, Virginia. 

;opy- Teste: 

HN V. FENTRESS: 

k 

Sandra Hargrove, 

12 7,14,21, 2t'4T 




;iTYOFVIROtNIA 

BEACH 

VISOINIA 

INVITATION TO BID 

INSURANCE 

IMPLOYIE 

WNBFIT MEDICAL 

!j. PROGRAM 

^«« City of Virginia 
Bacli, Virginia, is 
itti^ cMt pr^iMafs 
IM amployee benefit 
idlcal program. In- 
IFlaitad agents and 
''>fcM's Should obtain 
of specif icatians 
Nia city's insurance 

i- ff->0lmt Road, Towsan, 
MMlmera, Maryland 
tlM4 as Hm specifications 
^e0|n are mi available 
|lrwn any oNiar source. 

If^£« cansuitant's 
tammana nvmbM- Is (WD 
ttl US4 for talayhene 
lli^uirios Proposals fw 
I Mils ampiavae banaflt 
IHiadical pr^ram are 
IratwrnaBIa January IS, 

tfiyfoii ft. Cta^ 




l^tf It an iMi UB1 



127 IT 



NEWS RELEASE 
PUBLIC NOTICE 

The Virginia Beach 
Division of Police have In 
their possession SO boys 
and girls bicycles and five 
television sets that will be 
subject to auction sale If 
not claimed before 
December 14, 1972. 
Persons who can give 
proof of ownership may 
report to police 
headquarters at 
municipal center between 
the hours of 1 00 P.M. and 
4:00 P.M. to make such 
claims, Monday through 
Friday. 

Auction will take place 
Thursday, December 14, 
1972, starting at one 
o'clock In the area behind 
police headquarters at 
municipal center. All 
articles not claimed will 
be sold at public auction 
by the Department of 
Public Safety. 
Signed : 

Reeves E. Johnson 
Community Services i 

127-1T 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 1st day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Kenneth W. Rose, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Glad9s Hunter Rose, 
Defendant. 

The obiect of this suit Is 
to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro from the" 
said defendant upon> the' 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
unknown. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

Harry N. Gustin . 
Virginia National Bank 
Building 

Norfolk Virginia 
A copy Teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
»2-7,14,21,28-4T 



VIRGINIA: In the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 21st 
^toy of November, ^V^^- 
ALPHEUS F. STAF- 
FORD, 

Complainant 
In Chancery No. 1M09 
vs. 

WILLIAM HOLLY, also 
known as WILLIAM 
HOLLIE, 1565 Eagleton 
Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and 
JAMES HENRY WIL- 
LIAMS, Address 
unknown, and 
MAGDALENE JEF- 
FERSON, 1525 Eagleton 
Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and 
MOSES WILLIAMS, 
Address unknown, and 
CHAUDIUS HOLLY, also 
known as CHAUDIUS 
HOLLIE, 1553 Eagleton 
Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and 
QUEENIE HOLLY 
MORRIS, also known as 
VIRGINIA HOLLY 
MORRIS, Union Road, 
Fruitland, Maryland, and 
OLLIE HOLLY, also 
known as OLLIE 
HOLLIE. Address 
unknown, and 
HERMAN FENTRESS, 
Address unknown, and 
MILTON FENTRESS, 
Address unknown, and 
ALBERT BARNES, JR., 
Address unknown, and 
BEULAH BARNES, 
Address unknown, and 
LAURA BARNES 
BRIGGS. Address 
unknown, and 
EARLiNE BARNES. 
Address unknown, and 
HOLLIS BRIGGS, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
BETTY BRIGGS, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
EVELYN BRIGGS. 
Address unknown, and 
BARBARA BRIGGS, 
Address unknown, and 
VICTOR BARNES, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
MCCARTHY BARNES, 
Mdress unkiwwn, and 
MYRON BARNES, Ad- 
dress unknown, and 
PEACHES FENTRESS, 
Address unknown, and 
PEARL MAE HOLLY, 
15AS Eagleton Lane, 
Virginia Baach, Virginia. 

Defendants 
and If any of the afwesald 
defendants are dead, their 
surviving consorts, if any 
thwe by, their heirs at 
law, next of kin, devisees, 
legatees, personal 
representatives, lien 
creditors and . lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees, all of whose 
names are unknown, and 
wftose Post Office ad- 
dresses are unknown ami 
who are loinad hwain as 
parties unknoam. 

Oefandanta 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
The iNsiect of this suit is 
to effect partition 
amongst the owners by 
sale or oNterwise of the 
real pr^jarty in the City of 
Virginia Baach, Virginia 

PARCEL ONE d): 

All ttiat certain parcel of 

land MMtod on the plat of 

CM. Fanto-aw property 

(also known as 

to alsa tocated «« Ma 
narflieast • side ef in- 



dependence Boulevard 
(formerly Bayshore 
Road) in the Bayside 
Borough In the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and which Is more par- 
ticularly described as 
follows: 

Lot Eight (8) in Block 1, 
as shown on Plat of the 
C.H. Fentress property 
aforesaid, which plat Is 
recorded in the Office of 
the Clerk of the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Map Book 6 at page 264. 

SAVE AND EXCEPT 
that portion of the above 
property taken by the City 
of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia by Certificate 
Number 47, recorded in 
Deed Book 1026 at Page 
549 in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

PARCEL two (2): 

Ail Of that certain lot, 
place or parcel of land, 
together with the 
buildings and im- 
provements thereon, and 
the appurtenances 
thereunto belonging, 
situate and located on 
the northeast side of In- 
dependence Boulevard 
(formerly Bayshore 
Road) in the Bayside 
Borough (formerly, 
Kempsville Magisterial 
District) in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and more particularly 
described as Lot 21, in 
Block 1, as shown on the 
plat of the C.H. Fentress 
Property, which plat Is 
recorded in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City ofVirginia 
Beach. Virginia in Map 
Book 6 at Page 264. 
of which said property 
Moses Land, also known 
as Moses Williams, died 
slezed and passed. 

And an affidavit having 
been made that (lue 
diligence has been use'd to 
ascertain what county or 
city the defendants James 
Henry Williams, Moses 
Williams, Oliie Hoily, also 
known as OIlie Hollie, 
Herman Fentress, Milton 
Fentress, Albert Barnes, 
Jr., Beulah Barnes, Laura 
Barnes Briggs, Earilne 
Barnes, Hollis Barnes, 
Betty Briggs, Evelyn 
Briggs, Barbara Briggs, 
Victor Barnes, McCarthy 
Barnes, Myron Barnes 
and Peaches Fentress 
reside and that the 
present location or ad 
dress of such defendants 
is unknown. The last 
known address of Ollle 
Holly Is LynnhaVen, 
Virginia. There is no last 
known address/ of the 
defendant James Henry 
Williams. All of the above 
described defendants, 
other than James Henry 
Williams and Oiiie Holly 
have no last known ad 
dress although it is 
possible that some of said 
defendants may have 
resided with Oille Holly at 
Lynnhaven, Virginia. 

And an affidavit having 
been made that the 
defendant Queenie Holly 
Morris, also known as 
Virginia Holly Morris, is 
not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, and that her 
last known address ts 
Union Road, Fruitland, 
Maryland; 

And the Bill of Com- 
plaint stating that there 
are or may be persons 
interested In the sub|ect 
property to be divided 
whose names are 
unknown and making 
them parties defendant by 
the general description of 
"Parties Unknown"; 

It is ORDERED that the 
said defendants whose 
addresses are unknown 
and the defendant Queenie 
Holly Morris, aiso known 
as Virginia Holly Morris, 
who is a non resident of 
the State of Virginia and 
the persons made 
defendant by the general 
description of "Parties 
Unknown" do appear here 
within ten days after due 
publication of this Order 
and do what is necessary 
to protect their interests. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published 
once a week for four 
seccessive weeks In the 
Virginia Beach Sun. 

Enter: Judge 
I ASK FOR THIS: 
Frank E, Butler, III 
4336 Va. Baach Blvd. 
Va. Beach, Va. 

A Copy Testa: John V. 

Fentress, Clerk 

By J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

11 30,12-7,14,21 4t 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission will 
hold a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, December 12, 
1972, at 1:00 p.m. in the 
Council Chambers of ttie 
Admlnis|rition Building, 
Princess Anne Court- 
house, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. The following 
applications will appear 
on the agenda: 
TRAILER VARIANCES: 

Russell E. Mosely - 
West side of Princess 
Anne Road, 7M feet - south 
of Munden Point Road. 
PUNGO BOROUGH. 

Philip & Carol Bracale 
Wast side of Princess 
Anne Road and 550 feet 
soutt) of Munden Point 
Road. PUNGO 
BOROUGH.., , 
DEFERRED FOR 30 
DAYS BY' PLANNING 
COMMISSION ON 
NOVEMBER 14, 1973: 

I. Tidewater M«itessori 
^toei Use permit to 



operate a day care center 
nursery on certain 
property located at the 
Northeast corner of In- 
dependence Boulevard 
and Hinsdale Street ex- 
tending Easterly to 
Constitutioa Drive. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

2. Application of Harold 
D. Pugh, for a USE 
PERMIT for the sale and 
rental of recreational 
vehicles on certain 
property located on the 
Southeast corner of 
Princess Anne Road and 
Arrowhead Drive, run 
ning a distance of 214. feet 
along the South side of 
Princess Anne Road, 
running a distance of 
146.23 feet along the East 
side of Arrowhead Drive, 
running a distance of 212 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running 
a distance of 160.62 feet 
along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 33,496.9 square 
feet. (Arrowhead in- 
dustrial Park Area). 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

3. Application of 
Franklin E. Weigand, Jr. 
fdr a USE PERMIT to 
construct 8 apartment 
units on certain property 
beginning at a point 1130 
feet more or less West of 
Birdneck Road, running a 
distance of75.70 feet along 
the South side of Old 
Virginia Beach Road, 
running a distance of 390 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 119.90 feet 
along the Southern 
property line and running 
a distance of 316.90 feet 
along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1734 acres and is 
known as Tract "G" of the 
James Ben Davis Estate. 
LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. Application of Kay 
Francis Raid for a USE 
PERMIT to construct 14 
apartment units on cer- 
tain property beginning at 
a point 200 feet North of 
Brigadoon Drive running 
a distance of 100 feet along 
the West side of Pleasure 
House Road, running a 
distance of 220 feet along 
the Northern property 
line, running a distance of 
100 feet along the Western 
property line and running 
a distance of 223 feet along 
the Southern property 
line. Said parcel is known 
as Lot 4, Plat of Property 
Owned by Bayside Cor 
poratlon and contains 
22'1599n«9retfl>et more or 
less. (Bradford Terrace 
Ctvesapeake Beach Area). 
BAYSIOE BOROUGH. 

5. Application of Joseph 
Haskel for a USE PER 
MIT for three apartment 
units (triplex) on certain 
property located at the 
Northeast corner of Holly 
Road and 33rd Street, 
running a distance of 50 
feet along the North side 
of 33rd Street, running a 
distance of 140 feet along 
the East side of Holly 
Road and running a 
distance of 50 feet along 
the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
140 feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
is known as Lot 6, Block 
106, Map of Linkhorn Park 
and contains 7000 square 
feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

6. Application of Martha 
L. Waters and Ann W. 
Yarbrough by Donald H. 
Clark, Attorney, for a 
USE PERMIT to operate 
a nursery (babysitting) on 
certain property located 
in a portion of the Windsor 
Woods Convenience 
Center located at the 
Northeast corner of 
Presidential Boulevard 
and South Plaza Trail. 
(Windsor Woods Area). 
LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

7. Application of 
Howard Johnson's 
Restaurant for a USE 
PERMIT for dancing and 
live entertainment on 
certain property located 
at the Northeast corner of 
Atlantic Avenue and 37th 
Street, running a distance 
of ISO.feet along the North 
side of 37th Street, run- 
ning a distance of 325 feet 
along the East side of 
Atlantic Avenue, running 
a distance of 150 feet along 
the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
325 feet along the Eastern 
property line. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

8. Application of 
Thomas E. Hurley for a 
USE PERMIT to con 
struct 12 motel efflclence 
units on certain property 
located at the Northeast 
corner of Baltic Avenue 
and 22nd Street, running a 
distance of 70 feet along 
the North side of 22nd 
Street, running a distance 
of 130 feet along the East 
side of Baltic Avenue, 
running a distance of 70 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running 
a distance of 130 feet along 
the East side of Baltic 
Avenue, running a 
distance of 70 feet along 
the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
130 feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
Is known as Lots 29 and 31, 
Block 54, Plat No. 6 
Virginia Beach 
Development Co. and 
coiftains 9100 square feet, 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

9. Application of Nonnl, 
Cohen, Clark and 
Wcisberg for » USE 
PERMIT to construct 453 
apartment unMs on cw- 
tain property located 
North of. Holland Road. 



East of South Plaza Trail 
and West of Windsor Oaks 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 2305 feet more 
or less along the Southern 
property line, of which 320 
feet is the North side of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 650 feet more 
or less along the western 
property line and running 
a distance of 2320 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
1000 feet more or less 
along the West side of 
Windsor Oaks Boulevard 
(proposed). Said parcel 
contains 28.3 acres. 
(Windsor Oaks West 
Area). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

10. Application of 
Gertland, Inc. fOr a USE 
PERMIT to construct 555 
apartments on certain 
property located on the 
North side of False Cape 
Parkway (proposed) and 
the East side of Indian 
Lakes Boulevard 
(proposed). Said parcel is 
known as Section M-1 of 
Indian Lakes Planned 
Unit Development as 
shown on the Plat by 
Talbot, Warmers 8. 
Associates, Ltd. dated 
November 9, 1972. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formation are available in 
the Department of City 
Planning. (Indian Lakes 
Area). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

11. Application of Whitt 
G. Sessoms, Jr. for a Use. 
Permit for two additional 
apartment units on cer- 
tain property beginning at 
a point 50 feet East of 
Arctic Avenue, running a 
distance of 50 feet along 
the South side of 34th 
Street, running a distance 
of 140 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 50 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running 
a distance of 140 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel is known as 
Lot 19, Block 107, Map No. 
6, Virginia Beach 
Development Co. and 
contains 7000 square feet. 
V.IRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

12. Application of Harlis 
E. Powers by Thomas C. 
Broyles, Attorney, for a 
USE PERMIT to con 
struct 12 apartment units 
on certain property 
beginning at a point 30 ft. 
East of Holly Road, 
running a distance of 100 
feet along the North side 
of 33rd Street, running a 
distance of 140 feet along 
the Western property line, 
and running a distance of 
100 feet along the Nor- 
thern property line and 
running a distance of 140 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
is known as Lots 4 and 5, 
Block 106, Map of 
Linkhorn Park and 
contains 14,000 square 
feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

13. Application of 
Robert J. Eigen by 
Kaufman, Oberndorfer 
and Spainhour for a 
change of zoning from 
Limited Commercial 
District 1 (C-L1) to 
General Commercial 
District 1 (C-G 1) and a 
USE PERMIT for tires/ 
batteries, and accessories 
sales and service on 
certain property located 
at the Northeast corner of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard 
and Constitution Drive. 

Parcel A: Change of 
Zoning from C-L 1 to CG 
1: On certain property 
located at the Northeast 
corner of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and Con- 
stitution Drive, running a 
distance of 921 feet along 
the East side of Con- 
stitution Drive, running a 
distance of 545.71 feet 
along the Southern 
property line of which 
370.71 feet is the North 
side of vi^inia Beach 
Boulevard, j/running a 
distance of 1072 feet along 
the Eastern property line 
and running a distance of 
636 feet along the Nor- 
thern property line. Said 
parcel contains 11.966 
acres. 

Parcel B: USE PER- 
MIT for Tires, Batteries 
and Accessories Sales and 
Service: On certain 
property shown on site 
plan of Robert Hall 
Village by Robert W. 
Kahn Assoc., New York, 
NY. dated 10-9-72. Said 
parcel is shown as 107 feet 
by 40 feel on said site plan. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available 
in the Department of City 
Planning. (Pembroke 
Area) BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

14. Application of 
Idlewhyle Inn and Motel, 
Inc. for a USE PERMIT to 
construct 12 efficiency 
motel units to replace 
existing 19 unit structure, 
totalling 35 units, on 
certain property begin- 
ning at a point SO feet 
North of 27th Street, and 
running a distance of 100 
feet along the East side of 
Atlantic Avenue, running 
a distance of 158.65 feet 
along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 100.74 feet 
along the Eastern 
l^operty line and running 
a distance of 162 feet along 
the Southern property 
line. Said parcel contains 
16,0M square feet more or 
less. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

" 15. Application of 
Vernon H. James and 
Rachel F, James tor a 
USE PERMIT to operate 
a 92 site travel park <m 
certain property begin 



ning at a point 2060 feet 
more or less Siouth of 
Sandbridge Road and 
311.74 feet East of New 
Bridge Road, running a 
distance of 855.83 feet 
along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 934.33 feet 
along the Eastern 
property line (Tabernacle 
Creek), and running a 
distance of 1220 feet more 
or less along the Southern 
property line and running 
a distance of 379 feet more 
or less along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 16.71 acres more 
or less. (Lotus Gardens- 
Sigma Area). PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

16. Application of Roil 
'R" Way Rinks, Inc. by 
Thomas C. Broyles, At- 
torney for a USE PER- 
MIT to operate a roller 
skMIng rink on certain 
property located on 
certain property begin- 
ning at a point 330.39 feet 
North Victory Road, 
running a distance of 240 
feet along the East side of 
Pleasure House Road, 
running a distance of 265 
feet along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 240 feet along 
the Eastern property line 
and running a distance of 
265 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1.45 acres more 
or less. (Braford Acres 
Area ). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

17. Application of 
Wesleyan Properties for a 
USE PERMIT to con 
struct 500 apartment units 
on certain property 
beginning at a point 1190 
feet more or less West of 
Baker Road and 1897 feet 
South of Wesleyan Drive, 
known as Phase III of The 
Hamptons, as shown on 
the Master Plan of 
Wesleyan Properties. Said 
parcel contains 31+ 
acres. Plats with more 
detailed Information are 
available In the Depart- 
ment of City Planning. 
(Wesleyan College Area.) 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

Plats with more 
detailed information on 
the above applications are 
available in the Depart- 
ment of Planning. 

Alt interested persons 
are invited to attend. 
Charles C. Carrlngton 
Director of Planning 

11 30,12 7,2T 



OF 



COMMONWEALTH 

VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach, on the 

27th day of November, 

1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Kathryn Newing Hess, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Alvin A. Hess, Jr., 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Mensa Et Thoro to be 
later merged into a 
divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of constructive 
desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence having been 
,used by or on behalf of 
'complainant to ascertain 
in which county or cor- 
poration the defendant Is, 
without effect; the last 
known post office address 
being 328 Detroiter 
Drive, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this suit. 

Brydges, Broyles & 

McKenry 

1369 Laskin Rd. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

A copy Teste: John V. 
Fentress: Clerk 

11-30,12 7,14,21-41 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

VIRGINIA. 

in the Clerk's Office of the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach, on the 

27th day of November, 

1972. 

ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 
Ruth Anne Tye. Plaintiff, 
against 

James Aaron Tye, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Mensa Et Thoro to be 
later merged into a decree 
of divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
after due diligence 
complainant has been 
unable to ascertain 
respondent's where- 
abouts, the last 
known post office address 
-being: 6319 Adair Street, 
NiM^tk, Virginia 

Net rMident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) ^ys after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necnsary to protect his 
interMt In this suit. 

Brydges, Broyles & 

McKwiry 

13M Laskin Rd. 

Virginia Baach, Virginia 

A copy - Teste; John V. 

Fentress Clerk 

By: Sandra Hargrove, 

Clwk. 

11 W,12 7,14,21 4t 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be 
held In the Council 
Chambers of the Ad- 
ministration Building, 
City Hall, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, on Monday, 
December 18, 1972, at 2:00 
P.M. at which time the 
following applications will 
be heard: 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUQH 

^ 1. Application of Oscar 
E. Northen, Jr., for a USE 
PERMIT to construct 14 
apartment units on cer- 
tain property beginning at 
a point 250 feet West of 
Baltic Avenue, running a 
distance of 90 feet along 
the South side of Norfolk 
Avenue, running a 
distance of 200 feet along 
the Western property line, 
running a distance of 90 
feet along ttie Southern 
property line (Northern 
property line of 9th 
Street), and running a 
distance of 200 feet along 
the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel contains 18,000 
square feet more or less 
and Is known as Lots 17, 
18, 19, 20, 21 and 22, Block 
27, Plat of Shadow Lawn 
Heights). VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

2. Application of Martha 
Washington Hotel Corp., 
by Grover C. Wright, 
Attorney, for a USE 
PERMIT for dancing and 
entertainment on certain 
property located at the 
Southwest corner of 
Atlantic Avenue and 
Eighth Street, running a 
distance of 150 feet along 
the West side of Atlantic 
Avenue, running a 
distanct of 150 feet along 
the South side of Eighth 
Street, running a distance 
of 200.15 fe^t along' the 
Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
140 feet along the Western 
property line. Said 
request is to be conducted 
within the structure 
known as the convention 
center. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

3. Application of Qceans 
Condominium Corp., by 
Thomas G. Broyles, At- 
torney, for a USE PER- 
MIT to construct 215 
condom inum apartments, 
16 studio apartments and 5 
motel units on certain 
property located on the 
East and West sides of 
Atlantic Avenue North of 
40th Street. 

Parcel A: Use PerijiMtto 
construct 16 studio 
apartment and 5 motel 
units on certain property 
located on the East side of 
Atlantic Avenue begin- 
ning at a point 75 feet 
more or less North of 40th 
Street, running a distance 
of 316.15 feet along the 
East side of Atlantic 
Avenue, running a 
distance of 272 feet more 
or less along the Northern 
property line (now or 
forpi^riy Cavalier Beach 
8> Cabana Club), running 
a distance of 308 feet more 
or less along the Eastern 
property line (Atlantic 
Ocean), and running a 
distance of 212 feet more 
or less along the Southern 
property line (Aeolus 
Motel). Said parcel 
contains 1.7 acres more or 
less. 

Parcel B: Use Permit to 
construct 215 con- 
dominium apartments on 
certain property located 
on . the West side of 
Atlantic Avenue, running 
a distance of 388.02 feet 
along the West side of 
Atlantic Avenue, running 
a distance of 252.66 feet 
along the North side of 
40th Street, running a 
distance of 376.50 feet 
along the East side of 
Pacific Avenue and 
running a distance of 
144.05 feet along the 
Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 1.707 
acres. 

Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Office of 
the Department of City 
Planning showing a 
pedestrian bridge con- 
necting the two parcels. 
Total site contains 3.58 
acres including 0.173 acre 
strip. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

4. Application of E.G. 
Harris for a USE PER- 
MIT to construct a 30 
motel efficiency unit on 
certain property located 
on the Northeast corner of 
Pacific Avenue and 37th 
Street, running a distance 
of 140 feet along the East 
side of Pacific Avenue, 
running a distance of 1(M 
feet along the Noth side of 
37th Street, running a 
distance of 140 feet along 
the Eastern property line 
and running a distance of 
108 feet along the Nor- 
thefn property line. Said 
parcel Is known as Lots 4 
and 5 and a 20 foot by 140 
foot strip (formerly 
Norfolk and Southern 
Railroad), Block 87, Plat 
of Virginia Beach 
Development Co., and 
contains 15,120 square 
feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

' 5. AM>licatton of Tar 
Heel Corporation tor a 
USE PERMIT to con 
struct 8 additlcmal motel 
units, totaling 65 units on 
certain property tocatad 
at the Northeast (^"nmr of 
27th Street and Pacific 
Avenue, running a 
distance of 140 feet along 
the East side of Pacific 
Avenue, running a 
distance of 1M.S feet along 
Wie iNorth side of 27th 



Street, running a distance 
of 140 feet along the 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 186.5 
feet along the North 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 26,110 square 
feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

6. Application of the City 
of Virginia Beach for a 
USE PERMIT to con- 
struct a sewage pumping 
station on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 125 feet more or less 
East of Norwich Avenue 
and 210 feet more or less 
North of the Intersection 
of Anoka Avenue and 
Attica Avenue. Said 
parcel is 40 feet by 35 feet. 
(Diamond Lakes Estates 
Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

7. Application of Mary 
L. Jones for a USE 
PERMIT for dancing on 
certain property located 
on the South side of 
Newtown Road 950 feet 
more or less East of 
Goodman Road across 
from Muth Lane, on 
parcel known as 838 
Newtown Road. 
(Newsome Farm Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVgN BOROUGH 

8. Application of Ed- 
mund C. Ruffin and Nabil 
D. Kassir by Grover C. 
Wright, Jr., Attorney, for 
a USE PERMIT to 
operate games of skill and 
science (footsbait on 
certain property located 
In the Princess Anne 
Plaza Shopping Center 270 
feet more or less East of 
North Plaza Trail and 90 
feet more or less North of 
the Norfolk and Southern 
Railway Right of Way 
known as Store No. 64, 
3333 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. (Princess 
Anne Plaza Shopping 
Center Area). LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 
'Richard J. Webbon 

City Clerk 

11-30,tt#-2T 



VIRGINIA: f^ THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT 
FOR THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE 20 DAY OF 
NOVEMBER, 1972. 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, VIRGINIA, a 
Municipal Corporation, 
Complainant, 
vs. 

ALONZO McCoy and 
MAE McCOY, husband 
and wife, Route 4, Box 58, 
Norfolk, Virginia, if 
living, if remarried, their 
consorts, if, any, if ,daad, 
their heirs, devisees, or 
assigns, or any person 
who may have an interest 
in the subject matter of 
this suit and unborn heirs 
and parties whose names 
are unknown, and any 
party who may be the 
holder of an unrecorded 
sales contract, land 
contract, or unrecorded 
deed on the land in 
question. Defendants. 
IN CHANCERY 

DOCKET NO. 16900-B. 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
tor the said Complainant 
to enforce its lien for taxes 
and to sell for the payment 
of certain delinquent 
taxes the following- 
described real estate In 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, to wit: 

ALL that certain piece 
or parcel of land in the 
Kempsville Borough of 
the City of Virginia Beach 
(formerly Kempsville 
Magisterial District of the 
County of Princess Anne), 
Virginia, comprised of 
Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, In Block 
No. Two (2), as shown on 
the Plat of the Queen City 
portion of the property of 
the J. A. Wise Estate, 
recorded in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach (formerly Circuit 
Court of Princess Anne 
County), Virginia, in Map 
Book 4, at page 153, being 
the same property which 
was conveyed to James H. 
Dildy, son of the said 
Ophelia Dildy, by the 
heirs of J. A. Wise, by deed 
dated March 9, 1946, of 
record in the aforesaid 
Clerk's Office In Deed 
Book 278, at page 495; the 
said James H. Dildy 
having died Interstate and 
without Issue on the 10th 
day of October, 194S, 
survived only by his 
widow, Rhode Dildy, and 
the said Ophelia Dildy, his 
mother and sole heir at 

IflW 

IT BEING exactly the 
same property conveyed 
to the Defendants herein 
by deed of Ophelia Dildy, 
Widow, same being dated 
August 29, 1952 and duly 
of record In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach in Deed Book 315, 
at Page 450. 

And an Affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the Defendant (s) is-are 
unknown as to 

whereabouts, address and 
location, although due 
diligence haS been used by 
and on behalf of the 
Complainant, its Agents, 
Employees, and At- 
torneys, to ascertain the 
County of Corporation In 
which the said Defm- 
dant(s) Isare residing, 
but without effect, the last 
known post office ad 
dresij(es) of the said 
Defendant(s) being 
ALONZO McCOY tnH 
MAE McCOY, Route 4, 
Box S8, Nortolk, Virginia; 
it is 

ORDERED that they do 
appear here within tan 



(10) days after dl 
publication heraef, and 
what may be necessary t 
protect their ittHrest(s) 
this suit. 
A copy Test: ,,, 
Larry Wise 
P.O. Box 15142 
Chesapeake, Virgin) 

23320 

Telephone: 547-4095 

547-3264 

John V. Fentress, Cler 

By: J. Curits Fruit, 

11-30,12-7^ 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 21st day of h|ovembqr, 
1972. ,;, 

ORDER OF .. , 
pubiicatiaii \j 
Kenneth Robert Dr«^, 
Plaintiff, ,, 

against , i 

Rosemarie Pamela A,iran 
Drew, Defendant. 

The object of this s\iip% 
to obtain a divorce", JA 
Vinculo Matrimonii fr#n 
the said defendant, ubon 
the grounds of desertij^. 

And an affidavit havtog 
been made and filed ff^t 
the defendant is nqt^a 
resident of the State ;of 
Virginia, the last kn^wn 
Post office being 2)1 
Railroad Ave. Norw{k^, 
Massachusetts. , ^ 

Not resident of the Sta*e 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear tiSL* 
within Ten (10) days a*t,»r 
due publlcatton har^abf, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect', his 
Interest in this suit. '. 
A copy— Teste: „y, 

Bernard G. Barrow 



958 



Laskin 



Vod 



Virginia Beach, Va. , 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Linda Noel Hill, D.C,;„ 
11-30,12-7,14,2li^T 




COMMONWEALTH «F 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Officerof 

e Circuit Court of^'the 
f Virginia Beach»ibn 
the 24th day of Noven^ier, 
1972. Hfc 

ORDER OF . 
PUBLICATION 3d 
Wincel Ann Rowam, 
Plaintiff, ;3-, 

against ^tV 

Thomas Charles RoMai, 
Defendant. oQ 

The object of this sulttit 
to obtain a divorce, t 
mensa et thoro (from wd 
and board) from the aaifd 
defendant upon the 
grounds of desertion. -ub 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed;ittiat 
the defendantr^ts '« 4ioh- 
resident of the State /of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address baifiB: 
Post Office Box 18, BQQ 
Room 308, ResearSh 
Center, Submarine B^w, 
Groton, Connecticut 06440. 

it is ordered that he do 
appear here wHhin -ten 
(10) days aHer du> 
publication hereof, and 'do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his Interest in this 
suit. "i"' 

A copy Teste: ■ 'it 

George H. Heilig, Jr. i' 
Bank of Virginia Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 
John V. Fentress. Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Jru«, 
Deputy, Clerk -•'■^ 

11 30,12-7,14,2T.4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office pf 

the Circuit Court of -Vpe 

. City of Virginia Beact\4.«in 

the 24th day of NovembM, 

1972. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION,,,, 
John Edward Brittefi, 
Plaintiff,. against 
Jane Mary Brittop, 
Defendant. I ,. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce „a 
mensa et thoro, to be iaiter 
merged into a divorcer'a 
vinculo matrimonii fr«m 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is ru)t> ^ 
resident of the State„|^f 
Virginia and that d^e 
diligence has been used'jiy 
the Complainant ',,^0 
ascertain in what county, 
municipality or (EAT- 
poratlon the defend(ifit 
resides in without effaet, 
as the complainant har^n 
deposes, the last known 
post office address: iane 
Mary Britton, 356 North 
9th St., Lebaon f»«hn- 
sylvanla. ' 

Not resident of the Mfte 
of Virginia, it is ord^M 
that he do appear Mre 
within 10 (ten) days iffvr 
due publication hereof^ 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect«-<iis 
interest In this suit. t>' 
A copy -Teste: •'!'■' 

Boyce 8. Spanouiis •*'' 
105 N. Plaza Trail -'«a. 
Beach, Va. ' 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
Clerk ■'■ .' 

Linda Noel Hill, D.C.-ii 
11 30,12.r,14,»«IT 

COMMONWEALTH '^F 
VIRGINIA, -"^l 

In the Clerk's OffKanof 
the Circuit Court oflhe 
City of Virginia BeacRj^i 
t^e 22nd day of Novembar, 
19f2. -^n 

ORDER OF i vk 
PUBLIC ATI0NVI.1 
Carol Ann DaHs, 
Plaintiff. ■> / 

against 

ATC Arthur D. Davis no. 
4KI SO S9», Dafandairtttt 

the object of ttiis stti»'is 
to obtain a div^ea'sa 
mensa et thoro later ivM 
mergmi into a dlvo rjc»»a 
vinculo matrimonii mim 
the said defwidMt w0m* 
the groimds a# dSMTtfen 
en November 2. 1972. 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 7, 1972 




THE SUN 



PAGE 17 



Am Cki//ifieci » 486-I4SS 



PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



. .H* 
' ' ^|^ 







And an affidavit havino 
been made and filed that 
ttie defendant is not a 

resident of ttie State of 
Virginia, the last Known 

■fost Office address being 
107 Scenic Drive, 

Uongvlew, Texas 75601. 

"Not resident of the state 

of Virginia, It is ordered 
".That he do appear here 
'\vithinren (10) Days after 
^oge publication hereof, 

j.a)id do what may be 

'necessary to protect his 
/jtiterest In this suit. 

^ .copy -Teste: 
'Richard Swope 

i70O Va. National Bank 
,J((iildlng 

>«rfolk, Virginia 

.rt>HN V. FENTRESS, 
,Clsrk. 

r;^: Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 
;'; ' 11 30,12.7,14,21.4T 

\=:ciC»MMONWEALTH OF 
;^IRGINIA, 

t In the Clerk's Office of 
'the Circuit Court of the 

City of Virginia Beach, on 

the 21$t day of November, 

W2. 
'■''' ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 
,, Lloyd C. Hayes, Plaintiff, 
' Hgainst 
^Beverly Jean Hayes, 

l)'efendant. 
■—'-The obfect of this suit is 
-'to obtain a divorce a 

Mensa et thoro to be later 
''.merged' into a divorce a 
jrvinculo matrimonii from 
r:the said defendant upon 
.<th« grounds of desertion 

and abadonment. 
And an affidavit having 

been made and filed that 
.<Ai« defendant is not a 

resident of the State of 

Virginia, last known post 
. -sHIce address being P.O. 

Box 3662, Sarasota 
^■piorlda. 

i-^ot resident of the State 
I'll Virginia, It Is ordered 
t'4b«t he do appear here 
''Within (10) Ten days after 

due publication hereof, 
rand do what may be 
!4^css«ry to protect his 
Interest in thik t«lt. 
'(Atopy— Teste: 
rWoore & Brydges Pacific 

Ave. 

1^433 faclflc Aye. Va. 
(Beach, Va. 

'John V. Fentress, Clerk. 
•^Inda Noel Hill, D.C. 

' n-30,12-7,14,21 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

. • In the.Clerk's Office of 

-th* Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 

the 24th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Eugene Flick, Jr., 

PJaintlff, 
/ against 

tnls Lynn Flick,, Defen 
^»nt. 

^ 'The object of this suit is 
,to obtain a divorce, a 

vinculo matrimonii from 
^e-said defendant upon 
^e grounds of Adultery, 
•or' In the alternative a 

divorce a mensa et toro 

from the said defendant 

upon the grounds of 
•aeiertion. 

And an affidavit having 
'6ein made and filed that 

the defendant Is a non- 
;i-es1dent of the State of 
"Virginia, the last known 
'^ost office address being : 
'4<ft5A Pleasant Street, St. 

toUls, Missouri. 
■^-If Is ordered that she do 

Ifp^ear here within ten 
fdO) days after due 
'publication hereof, and do 
Svhat may be necessary to 
'^rtitect her interest in this 
'ttflt. 

'A^opy -Teste: 
"Kelberg & Childress 

307 Plaza One Building 

Norfolk, Virginia 

Jdfin V. Fentress, Clerk 
'6V: J. Curtis Fruit, 

b*|>uty. Clerk. 
y-- n -30,12-7,14,21 4T 

"COMMONWEALTH OF 
^l<RGINIA, 

In the Clerk's OHice of 

«he circuit Court of the 

oC^ty of Virginia Beach, on 

: the 20th day of November 

<(ni ORDER OF 
^■i PUBLICATION 

cDonna Annette Farley 

Reese, Plaintiff, 

•gainst 

Willard Ray Reese, 

■JNfendant. 

The object of this suit is 

I* obtain a divorce A 

Vinculo Matrimonii from 

the said defendant, upon 

>#• grounds of adultery. 

|^».And an.affidavit having 

itoeen mad* and filed that 

the defendant due 

I Icdtfigence has been used by 

I I .-and on behalf of the 
|n#|aintiff to ascertain in 

iwhat county or cor- 
poration the defendant is, 
without effect, the last 
known pMt office address 
^**h«g: 332 Dillon Drive, 
Virginia BMch, Vlrglnta. 
Net resldanf of the State 
I o« Virginia, It Is ordered 
ftet he da appear here 
^ wittiln ten (10) days after 
•> dtte p(*lieatl4n hereof, 
s-tM do what may b* 
snacessary to i»^lect his 
irliit»rest In this suit. 
n^fopy— Taste: 
tt.'Iidewater Legal Aid 



700 Duke Street 

Norfolk, Virginia 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY : Sandra Hargrove, D-. 

Clerk 

11,-3(^.127,14,214T 

VIRGINIA IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH on the 10th day of 
November, 1972. 

IN CHANCERY 
NUMBER 1JU2 



BILL REPKO, Com 

plainant, 

vs. 

BILL A. REPKO, et al. 

Respondents. 

ORDER 
Upon the petition of Bill 
Repko for the ap 
pointment of Lucian B. 
Cox, Jr. as Administrator 
of the Estate of Vera B. 
Repko, presumed to be 
dead, which said petition 
is filled; and it appearing 
• to'the Court that Vera B. 
Repko resided in the City 
of --Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and that she 
went there from and has 
not returned to the state 
for seven years sue 
cessively and has not been 
heard of since; and the 
Court being satisfied that 
the peitioner, Bill Repko, 
would be entitled to ad 
minister the Estate of 
Vera B. Repko were she in 
fact dead; It is, 

ORDERED that notice 
of said application of 
Lucian B. Cox, Jr. shall be 
published once a week for 
four successive weeks in 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper published in 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and that notice be given 
that on the 4th day of 
January, 1973, which is 
two weeks after final 
advertisement of said 
notice in said newspaper, 
the Court will hear 
evidence concerning the 
alleged absence of the 
supposed decedent amlMte 
circumstances and 
duration thereof; and the 
Clerk is directed to 
publish a Certified copy of 
this order as tt»e notice 
required in the Virginia 
Beach Sun. 
A Copy Teste 
John V. Fentress, Clerk. 
By J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
n 23,30 12 7,14-4T 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the ISth day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Dorothy Shuey, Plaintiff, 
against 

Willia T. Shuey, Defen 
dant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Mensa Et Thoro to be 
later merged into a decree 
of divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being 5958 F. Willard 
Street, Hananan, South 
Carolina. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
Rex ford R. Cherry man, 
Atty. 

524 independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
A copy Teste 
JOHN V. FENTRESS 
CLERK 

BY Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

11 23,30 12,7,14 4T 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 16th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Carol Valerie, 
Rickenbaker Lawter, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Zeb Vance Lawter, Jr., 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to ootain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro from the 
said Defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of Va. the last 
known post office address 
being P.O. Box 251, 
Columbus, North 
Carolina. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. 
A copy Teste 



Reril M. Abraham 

407 Bank of Va. Building 

Norfolk, Va. 

Linda Noel Hill, Clerk 

n 23,30 12 7,14 4T 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURTOF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
RUBY TUMEY TORRES 
Complainant 
vs. 

CARLOS TORRES 
Defendant 
IN CHANCERY 
NO. 15939 

AMENDED BILL 
OF COMPLAINT 

Your complainant 
respectfully moves the 
Court aforesaid to amend 
her Bill of Complaint 
previously exhibited 
against the defendant as 
follows: 

1. That paragraphs 1, 2, 
3, and 4 of your com- 
plainant's original Bill of 
Complaint are in 
corporated Into this 
amended Bill of Com- 
plaint as if they were 
specifically said out 
herein. 

2. That the defendant 
willfully and without 
justification deserted the 
marital domicile of the 
parties on October 28, 1946 
and that the parties have 
remained separate and 
apart without 
cohabitation since said 
time, a period of more 
than two (2) years. 

IN CONSIDERATION 
WHEREFORE, your 
complainant prays that 
she be granted a divorce a 
vinculo matrimoni from 
the defendant on grounds 
of separation for more 
than two (2) years and for 
such other and further 
relief as this cause may 
deem meet. v 

RUBY TUMEY TORRES 

Jay H. Zimmerman 
Suite 529 
Law Building 
Noflbtk, Virginia 23510 

11 16,23,30,12 7 41 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 9th day of November, 
1972. 

Robert Merrill, Cacio, 
Plaintiff 
against 

Rosemary Wenzel Cacio, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro to be later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant upon 
the grounds of Desertion 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
Louis Lestini 72 

Ledgecrest Ave., New 
Britain, Conn. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within 10 
(ten) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
Clerk 
By: Linda Noel Hill 

Gay MIIIus, Jr. 
' 524 Independence Blvd. 
Va. Beach, Va. 

11 16,23,30,12 7 4T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In ths Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 8th day of November, 
1972. 

Darryl J. Zacher, Plaintiff 
against 

Carol Anne (Cupp) 
Zacher, Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of wilful 
desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of ttie. State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being : 
4 C Jefferson Drive, 
McKees Rocks, Penn- 
sylvania, 15136. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
prefect her interest in this 
suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS; 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Sacks, Sacks & Tavss 
First & Merchants 
National Bank BIdg. 
Norrtik, Virginia 23510 

11 H,2a^,12.7 4T 

OROfROF 

PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth 
Virginia, 



in the Clerk's OHice of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 9th day of November, 
1972. 

James Clifford Hawkins, 
Plaintiff 
against 

Olive M. Ellis Hawkins, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof this suit Is 
to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
ttie said defendant upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resiaent of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being : 
639 Grant Avenue Bald- 
win, New York. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By; J. Curtis Fruit, 
Deputy Clerk 

Kellam, Pickreil & Lawler 
P.q- 

P.O. Box 15508 
Chesapeake, Virginia 
11-16,23,30,12-7 4T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 9th day of November, 
1972. 

Michael Anthony Hard, 
Plaintiff 
against 

Patricia D. Hard, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thpro to be later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant u^n 
the grounds of desertion. 

AnjJ an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being ; 
4914 Wellsworth Avenue, ' 
Louisville, Kentucky 40202 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
.what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By; J. Curtis Fruit, 
Deputy Clerk 

Osie H. Gay, Jr. 
2871 River Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
11 16,23,30,12 7 4T 



SISTER TINA 

Reader ind Adviiof 
Advtoot on all ProMemt of 
Life Mch IS marriage, but-' 
ineis, love affairs, court- 
Aip, akohol or if you're 
lick Of in need of help, 
oome see Sister Tina. All 
Widings are private and 
oonfi(tentiaL 
Call for Appointment: 
425-5818 
1912V%^BeachBhrd. 

Near Oceana 
Va. Beach, 1 bkxk east 



TeV Someone 
You Care With a 
Sun Newspaper 

Sunshine Ad 




of 



imppy \MMKy 
a Cktmndolate friendi on 

their eogagement 
# Send amrivnsury greetii^ 
a CongratHhte new paienti 
a Bon Voyage whtos 
a Congntiilatioiu on 

VMial aiAtevonents 
aOrJwtay"HELX(r 

inaipecUway 

Look tat Sunshine Ads 

ev«ry weekin 
tbeOiirifM Section 
(rf The Vtoginis Beach 
Sun. 

Cal Classified 
4S6-3433 
«lh3434 

3 daysn Advance 

of PuUcation Dale 

To Race Yow 

SunsMReM 



RATES: "Persan fa 
Person" ads for In- 
dividuals buying, selling, 
renting, or offering a 
service. Up to M words, 
only SI. per issue, add SO 
cents for each additional 4 
words. 

Classified display S2.M 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge of $S.60 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: First 16 
words in straight 
classified are $2.00 Lower 
rates may be earned. 

DEADLINE for 
classified ft classified 
display is Noon on the 
Tuesday prior to 
publication date. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont 
Rd., Va. Beach, Va. 234S2, 
or mail to Classified 
Desk ; or phone 486-3433 or 
486-3434. Classifieds are 
priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 




'l-!UNIkiMIAbl 



OUR HERO ... We think 
you're the greatest. The 4 
Classy Girls. ^ 

- -X- - 

Mom and Dad - Since our 
arms are broken, this is 
the best way. We love you. 
GMSDM 

COME ON, TOOTH 
FAIRY It's getting 

crowded in this phone 
booth. Capt. Magnificent. 

p.p. Keep searching for 
the "real me" - I'm en- 
joying the hunt. 



BENNY Hope 21 brings 
great happenings. CM- 
WKDSBMB 



Captain Jose and his 
"plebian" ale are tem- 
porarily out of com- 
mission, This Is a 
recording. 



GEORGE M. Let me be 
perfectly clear you 
repair autos just great! 
Mary S. 



P^an^t Butter Cup, I love 
you. Speck 

Hey Mom We're glad 
you're back. Urp! Keith 8. 
Mike^ 

BENNY Thank 

heavens, now they can use 
your driver's license. 
Mary & Winnie 

DK Hope you are 
recuperated completely, 
the week end is coming up 
again. KB 



FUNNY FACE 
to find myself. 



I 've got 



' :i;*fe^i4^^*«:pji^^ ff?| 



^3— PERSONAL NOTICES 

CANDY THE CLOWN 
Now Arranging Santas 
snd Clowns for Dec. Call 
early to obtain date. 587- 
3697. 

MAGIC SHOWS Par 
ties. Club meetings, 
luncheons, etc. 
Reasonable. Call 340-0297, 
after 5 p.m. 

;»EDUCE - Safe 6, fast 
,with GoBese Tablets and 
E ■ vap "water pills" 
from Barr's Drug. 



SHAKLEE FOOD 
SUPPLEMENTS 

AU natural Yltamin E. 
Money-back giiaiaatee. 
Martha Swtter, 340-7159. 



3M BRAND INTRUDER 
ALARM HEUS SCARE 
BURGLARS AWAY SIM- 
PLY AND ECX>NOMICAI^ 
LY. CALL 857-5400- ' 
NICaiTWATai SECURITY 
SYSTEMS 




S-SPECIAL services' 1 »~Mft.P WANTIB. M/P ^ ^TT 



3s- Hotigfig P6fl SALE »-PiTt > tu>pn 



PERSONAL HORO 
SCOPES Com 

puted based on the 
Science of Astrology. 
Natal Chart and 6 
questions $15. For In- 
formation write Science of 
Astrology, 420 W. 
Freemason St., 622-8342. 



REINDEER - Hand 
made, candy filled 
ideal for gifts and 
decorations. Order now 
for Christmas. 486-4855. 

SEWING In my home; 
for ladies and children; 
reasonable, also in- 
structions, 340-1192. 

SEWING in my home. 
Also alterations and 
mending. Need a dress for 
ttie holidays? Call 425- 
1959. 

THE PEMBROKE 
•PUPPETS - Are now 
available for Birthday 
•Parties, Special Events,> 
etc. Children and Adult 
entertainment. 497-4141, 
497 0982. 

VIR(^INIA BEACH 
MAINTENANCE 
Specializing In Painting, 
Interior and Exterior; 
Repair Work and New 
Additions. Call 428 7350. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
CHIMNEY Sweep and 
fireplace repair, 
'ireplaces designed, built 
and rebuilt. Dampers 
installed and repaired. 
Guaranteed to stop 
smoking. Call 428 7350 
night or day. 



BUSINESS Is buzzing and 
we need help. Want a good 
career In real estate? 
Apply today. Call Tom 
Kane 497-4851. Nights 340- 
1760. Grow with Realtors. 
Stohl Realty Corp. 

FULL AND PART-TIME 
Sales Personnel needed 
in advertising. No ex- 
perience necessary. 499- 
0919 or 499 3343. 

TUTOR - Wanted for 
Shorthand. Evenings. Call 
PattI, 486-3430. 



■Mif 

PRINCESS Anne Plaza, 
$17,500, 3 bedroom Ranch. 
Cozy, Immaculate home. 
Call ANCHOR REALTY 
428-7421. 




NEWnMfNSOUIN 

2-b«droom dcluxt towntwuM, ix- 
cellent condition, wall-to-wall 
carp«t, refrlgarator, dishwasher, 
disposal, range, central air, fenced 
yard, n<any other extras. Assume 
with low equity or re-flnance. Call 
owner, 499.23ti, altar S p.m. NO 
AGENTS PUEASE. 



pr 



iaalGMaketOrMi 




HAS YOUR AUTOMOBILE 

INSURANCE BEEN 
CANCELLED? REFUSED? 

CUAIVIacait 
Sive-W^ Inmiance Agmcy 

WEFINANCS 
627-9096; anytime niglits 



If—JOIS WANTID 



BABYSITTING - In my 
home for working mother. 
1 child. $25. 420 3650. 

BABYSITTING Large 
play area, fenced yard, 
hot meals. Winsor Woods 
area. Licensed. 340-4456. 

BABYSITTING In my 
home. Hilltop area. 425 
7576. 

BABYSITTING - LIcen 
sed; lots of love, 
reasonable. Dial 428-0081. 

BABYSITTING Ex 

perlenced Mother of 3, day 
and nights. 486-4371. 

BABYSITTING In my 
home; fenced yard; 
Windsor Wood area, 486- 
3469. 

BABYSITTING In my 
iiome; hour, week or day; 
ii^ragona Village; fenced 
yard, 497 6847. 

BOOKKEEPER Full 

charge, excellent ex- 
perience, references, 
wants work in my hpme. 
340-0293.,. I V, .v. 



Hr-OUT OF TOWN 

SPACES for Mobile 
Homes. Large, wooded 
lots. Approx. 15 mi. from 
Va. Line, 15 ml. from E. 
City, N.C. and 25 mi. from 
Nags Head. $25 & $30 per 
month. Call (919) 453 3232 
after 6. 

42-REAL ESTATi 
WANTED 

Buyers and 



GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPS ~ AKC regiatapa*; 
6 weeks; male, .-.CJ, 
Female, $60. 487-739CK' i • ' 

-fif - 

GERMAN SHEPHERDS 
- White, 9 weeks, A*ifC 
registered. 3 females, IM. 
583-2011. <"t 

GERMAN SHEPHERD - 
Hold for Christmasl-*'9 
weeks, registered, shoTii, 
wormed. 588-4679. ' "'> 

^-a- 

GREAT DANE PUPSj?*- 
AKC registered; qiMlity 
blues; ears croppe4t; 
shots; $250-up; term'a; 
8571118. '.M 

»-,-Hj- 

GREAT DANES ^ f^ 
Brindled; shots; wormeM; 
ears cropped; 488'9tfS4. 

ITALIAN GREYHOUN-D 
PUPS - Chosen bread o% 
royalty. Lovable pets. 'il«i.f 
6764. :.tlf 



WE Have 

tenants waiting for 
property in all areas of 
Virginia Beach. Call us 
to sell or rent yours. 
Stohl Realty 
497-4851 



KITTENS - Free. LlWfd , 
box trained. Mothar* 
registered Siamese. 4:aH 
499 7384 after 3 p.m. ' •" 




50— PETS ft SUPPLIES 



ALASKAN MALAMUTE 
Registered puppies, 10 
weeks, shots, wormed, 
$175. Call 3404299, 340 
4202. 



NOR WE I G AN' ELK' 
HduND . - Mil?*, 

AKC reg., wish to rfirffe. 
Only fee pick of ll^et 

Harry Marshall, 425^55lj|. 

■ ^ ' V <* 

PARAKEETS - Babrai, 
assorted colors, EngtiS^ 
and American stock. $f^ 
locally, healthy. A^^ 
Parakeets. 497-0218, 49«- 
3461. ": 



VELVETIZE 
Your walls, car, Ifiln, etc. 
Economical Aluxunou.. 
Stops rust & mildew. 
Custom 24 hi. service, 
VEL-TEX of Tidewater 

623-0098 
10% discount with this ad. 



IRONING 
MY HOME. 
3936. 



DONE IN 
CALL 340- 




16— HILP WANT» . PIMAU 



TEACHER Degreed 

teacher needed for 5 year 
old kindergarten class, 
preferably experienced. 
Call 4286565 between 10 
a.m. and 3 p.m. daily, to 
arrange for an interview. 



"OPPORTUNITY" 

Four Ladles Needed Im- 
mediately For Several Job 
Openings. UIO.OO AAonthly. Call 
4WJ763 tor an Appointment. 




OFFICE CLEANING - 
Night time. Aragona 
Village preferred. Call 
499 2154, after 6 p.m. 

OFFICE CLEANING - 
Will clean offices and 
shops. Call 486 3032 after 4 
p.m. 

■ TYPING - My home, 
Virginia Beach area. Fast 
accurate, reasonable. 464- 
6895. 

20— DAY NURSIRY 

HAPP-y DAYS KIN- 
DERGARTEN - And 
Day Care Center. State. 
Licensed for 2, 3, 4, and 5 
year olds. Open 7 a.m: - 6, 
p.m. year around.' Call 
428-6565 to enroll. Located 
at 612 Fremac Drive (off 
Laskin Road between 
Hilltop and oceanfront). 



CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 
Lovable; 6 weeks; AKC 
registered, 587-4437. 

CHINESE PUGS ~ 3 
months fawn, black mask, 
AKC reg. 855 7914. 

DACHSUNDSv r< RaaUby 
for Xmas; champion sired 
long haired 340-2649. 

DACHSHUNDS 
Champion, small red, 9 
wks. AKC reg. Children's 
pets. 464-5804. 



POINTER PUPPIES -•* 
weeks old, from prpic^ 
hunting stock. FDSB 
registered. 497-1733. ^ 



DOBERMAN PUP - 6 
month red male, ears 
standing; wormed, shots, 
$100. 623 1356. 

DOBERMAN PIN- 
SCHERS ~ 3 months. $150 
each. Ears cropped and 
shots. 8S3-8931. 

ENGLISH SPRINGER 
SPANIELS - AKC 
registered. Five females, 
8 weeks. Wormed and 
shots; $65. 464 5975. 




ENGLISH BULLDOGS 
"Adorable", 6 weeks, AK- 
C registered, perfect for 
Santa. 489-8570. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPPIES - AKC 

females, black 8. tan, 2 
mos., shots, wormed, $55, 
487-5652. 



It— HILP WANTIO, M/P 



224CNe0iS • IHSnUCTIONJ 



1 5— SPECIAL SERVICES wk 



CANE AND RUSH Chair 
SEATS Replaced. 
Reasonable prices. 486- 
5094. 

CUSTOM DRAPERIES 
Fabrics at discount 
prices. Reasonable. 486- 
1295. 

HANDCRAFTED 
LEATHER ITEMS - 
Made to order. Handbags, 
billfolds, etc. Customize 
with name or liiltlal. 3404 
77i6. 

HAULING For con- 

tractors or individuals. 
Need help ? Call 623 3937. 

IT'S CHRISTMAS TIME 
And THE PEMBROKE 
PUPPETS Are /available 
for your Christmas party 
entertainment. Also birth- 
days, special events, etc. 
Call 497 4141, 497 0982. 

PIANO TUNING Also 
lessons. Piano an-i brass. 
Ken Vining, 464^166. 



JOB MART 

3320 Va. Beach Hvd. 
486-3403 

Extra Low Fee-Easy Terms 
Ask about our 12 month 
Job Placement Guarantaa 

CLERK SKIS wk. Good CO. 

DRIVER-S110 wk. small truck. 

BOOKKEEPER S13S to SISO wk. 

SUPERVISOR Prod, line, S3 hr 

experienced, age 25 up. 

MGR TRAINEE tlOO wk. Advance 

fast to saooo year in 12 mo. 

CLERK TYPIST-M wpm. SS5 

KEY PUNCH OPERATOR-Opcn to 

experience 

PAPERHANGERS4.24 hr. for 

experienced. 

STATISTICAL CLERJ(-S150 wk 

requires accounting •xperl«nce^^>. 

MAINTENANCE AAAN-21 up, SIIO 



SERVICE MGR. -SISO wk. plus 

Enmission. Foreign car ex 
icnce. 



PIANO LESSONS 
Expert instruction on ai 
levels. Contact Janice 
Fold, College Professor," 
543-1822 after 5. 

VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced.' 
James Morrlsson, 428- 
0587. 



POODLES Tiny tO)^,, 
Silver. AKC reglstenefl* 
497-0987. ;.,^, ; 

POODLES ~ AKC, WK&i 
toy females, 12 wt^si 
Shots, groomed. I»i''> 
$125. 587-8«3. •'^'| 

PUPPIES PSf-t 

Chihuahua, Tiff - 
fenplnscher; lovable, 3^0- 
6690. ^"j' 

PUPPIES - poodle "and 
chihuahua mixed, ytfy 
small dogs. FREE to'g'dtM 
home. After 6 or all day 
Sat. & Sun. 344 Aravena 
Blvd. c; 

RABBITS - $1. an^'$2. 
each. Dial 428 5644. ^.h 

SCOTTISH TER^iJCR 
PUPS - AKC registarjB. 
6 wpeks, $80. 486 4322. 

ST. BERNARD male.. 10 
mos. AKC BeauilfiJl 
markings; good for shg^, 
497-0723. , V 

42^ 

ST. BERNARD PUifpV 
(SHAGG BARK) ch^ld 
allergic, $300. 487 8956.; , 

STUD SERVICE ''/l,- 
Shetland Sheepdog ,j- 
Champion; proyeo; 
lovely; 340-8907. ,^^ 



GRIMES MUSIC SCHOOL 

GUITAR CLASSES 
In Pembroke Atea 

Studenu Taught In Snail 
QoqM Acoording lo Ages 

499-1428 



1 4, i t 



I 



\ 



SALiSPEOPLE 



Full or part-time, no mparlenca 
necaaiary. High cammMonK. Far a 
confldiiiHM kitarvlew, contact Mr. 
Strickland, 4H-7WI. 



HANDICAPPED (HI ns- 
AILED MB4 AND WO- 
IffiN • Exta iaeona. Pet 
iafamrtoa tkmm 497- 
8571 



SALES TRAINEES 
Re gardl e ss ot ifour past werti 
bacNround, we may be ante to 
train you tor tocal tuN timt sal« 
StW.OI Moneily to start Cal 
41* 2743. 



CHATEAU 21 - 3 
ti'Mroom, 2 bat)i 

toV^nh6use;carpetlng ;$225: 
month. 486 5616. 



GREEN RUN Lovely 4. 
bedroom townhouse in 
The Oaks. Air con- 
ditioned, carpeting, 
recreation privileges. 
Immediate occupancy, 
rent or sale. 486 3518 after 
6 p.m. anii-week-ends. 

31— OPPICK 
OVK.SPACC 

PRIME OFFICE SPACE 
- New space available in 
modern. SUN building at 
138 S. Rosemont Rd. next 
to Expressway. Large and 
small unit for several 
office use, ready Mr you. 
Call 486.34^}. 

HAROLDS TRANSFER 

tai-^nor m4tam 
Miilai tharpe 




^lrV<^^^«'^»'W»*^^^"V^W"«w«*iPiliW»^^»^^^^P^W''^P^ilPB»<lWW»P*^^^<PWP^i»'P|iWPPPBWPWPi^^ 



ri^lt 



THE SUN 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 7. im 



Am Oltt/Hf ied 



486 




PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



486-5454 






*s«»UO SERVICE 
v<'J>«odlc, Silver lea cup toy 

««T«D fgRVICE Irlth 
lfjifft«r Stvd. AKC r«9. 
.t^MmpiOfl ptdigret. 

'.P>'«vtiful color and 
''MI»iMrbi«. fSO pick of 

•WCIMERANER PUP 
• ,PIES i we«k> old, 

, Mf^mad and tiwH, 170. 

,,4^-«49RitS' f'ECO 



49;>AL00SA GeWJfl0: 
/-aeltttrtd, 14.1 hands, I 
ytr, old, very scnflc. 4M 





AVON BOTTLES Very 
alio tome antiQwes. 
.1 499 3MS. 

^BY CARRIAGE 
nverti to stroller and 
bed. Playpen and 
. Ifnt dressing table. 497 

MCYCLE Girls with 
, Msket, $15, 420 «592. 

!,W - - . - - 

>VS SCREAMER 
ice for 12 yr. old; por 
lie Corona typewriter; 
conditioner window 
. , |lt; artiflcal Christmas 
J Irpe 7'. 4f7.«$32 after 6 30, 

••fci^RISTMAS SUO 
ZppSy iOH Baby Tend 
•leove doll clothes. 
•'Itasonablt prices, 499 

.•tDLLECTORS PLATES 
,|" Dresden, Franklin, 
^"Wkshlnaton Mint, Veneto, 
% »lc Private collection. 
I* il^ 0001, 

5 COMPUTER FOOTBALL 
^ MkMC Brand hew; 

^fMiglariy til, now $13, 

$6e'H OR 0>FICB 
#Couch, 2 chairs, Stables, 2 



|l«mp 



s, $200. .4M 174«, 



ECTRIC TRAIN • 
tS«. U4 Log loader, 
Three 316 bridges, 
[SIS, Crane tl. S4S «342, • 

ELECTRIC SAW Sears 
[Craftsman 9" radial arm 
[saw, used twice, $150, 497 
10492 or 153 0796. 

4o»pital bed and chair, 
Hficludet mattress and 
Irails. Latest model, 
laimost new. 417 1009. 

lUNTING BOW And 

irrows. Quiver, glove, 
I3S. 340 3165, 

rOLYMPIC STAINS 
■Assorted colors, cost 
|S6.S0, tacitlce $3.5,0, 
[Owner, 499 lOlO, 

JPURPLB MARTIN 
IHOUSES 14 rooms, 135. 
each, Call 340 1112, 

)UILTS Beautiful 

fiememade. variety of 
colors, 547 2065, 

UWORD Spanish 

Mriglnal. mounted in 
I Antique frame. 464 2711, 

ITYPiWRITER IBM 

llectric II" carriage, very 
>0d condition. 464 9355, 
|42I9179 

IjO gallons waMleis floor 
lllnlsh and 50 gallons 
kommerclal stripper. 
IMust move immediately 
■ at $1 per gallon, which Is 
Ifracllon of cost. Contact 
]Jay Brumblay •< 416 3430, 



WOODEN 
MAIL BOXES 

ICuMom m«d«, for poM or 
InouM. CnoQM from S svaH* 
■ mm* itylM, or will build to 
lyour (Mlifin. 140-JS30 afttf 



ANTIQUES, GIPTS, 
ISED PUMJinJU 
Mr.SMsMlltade 
^MtfOy IOtoS:SO 
1%e ioM MMi nt^er 
IIOJHdlSPM„Vi.tadi 





iractert LM « li^ you 
MitM tMt new Mme 
Maiti^ m r^«irt. We 
Ean far«i«k m«lerl«ls 
Ht H atttc 
•ia iMancint. 

^AM & 




w^ji^w^TOOTu nwlVlK 9eR VI CE 



CLARINET conn; 

velvet lined carrying 

case, excellent condition, 
$45 513 3274. 

CLARINET LeBlanc, 

good condition, includes 
loather carrying case. ttO. 
M7.4I11. 

GUITAR including new 
strap, 2 books and 2 
records. $25. 421 9205, 



ORGAN "Piper" 

Hammond, excellent 
conditton. 340 1739. 

ORGAN Portable with 
music. Good condition, 
$15. 421 9?0S. 

PIANO Stelnway 

console, built in 1941, ex 
celient condition, $900. 
Call 421 9354. 



PIANO Upright, 

Lonesome, wants 
someone to play with. 
Good condition, $125. 421 
9336. 

PIANO Baby Grand, 
rebuilt, new keyboard, 
refinished, $500. 499 0721, 



ME NEED 



Vour not Ming uMd piano. Turn il 
into ipaco ond ceih, Frto Mtlmoiti, 
4t9.3»4S, 4*7 StM, PIANO PLACE 



PIANOS (USED) 


WE 


SPECIALIZE IN 


THE 


BUYING AND SELLING | 


OF USED PIANOS 


. ALL 


ARE TUN 


E D 


DELIVERED, 


AND 


GUARANTEED' 


FOR 


ONE YEAR, 499 3945, 


497 5131, PIANO PLACE 



pWwCflBnpH^ 




64 OFFICE EQUIPMENT 



Interested In telephone 
answering equipment for 
office or car^ Call 497 

6411. 

6»A pimwooD ^ 

FIREWOOD By cord or 
' cord delivered, $40, 
cord, 427 2157, 




#7~H0miMiU 



AIR CONDITIONER 
Window unit, like new, 
$100, 499 1010, 

BAR Leather 

upholstered armrests, 
panelled for speakers. 6 

ft., $75. 464 2711, 



BEDROOM FURNITURE 
4 poster pine bed, 
complete, matching 
dresser; S pc, twin bed 
suite; large oak dresser 
with mirror, 421 3360. 

BEDS 2 full Size, 

complete. Dial 499 9265. 

BOOKCASE BUNK BEDS 
Complete, large 3 
drawer chest, night stand. 
$135. 416 174A. 

CHEST FRENCH 
PROVINCIAL Ivory; 

matching vanity and 
bench; small night stand, 
$15, 416 1746, 

DISHWASHER Port- 
able, Montgomery Ward, 
Harvsit goM, wood cut- 
ting board t^, 2 years old, 
hardly used. 4M 4510 after 
6 p,m. or weekends. 

DRYER 3 years old; 
Gas, white, excellent 
condition. ISS 9437. 



DRYER 

condition, 

9205 



Gas, fair 
$30, Dial 421 



iARLV AMERICAN 
Cherry end tables, $15. 
coffee table to match with 
whitt porcelain knobs, 
$40 499 1161, 

ILECTRIC RANGE 
30"; yellow, tiered, good 
condition, its 3M0397. 

■ NO TABLES And 

cocktail table. Very heavy 
walnut, new. $50. 4M 1127 

FURNITURE 

BUY AND SELL 
623 3937 

HOLLYWOOD BED 
Complete, perfect con 
ditlpn, used i year, $10 
4H 1973, 

K enmore wither. 
Frigldaire dryer. 
Wetlinihoute dtth 
wAtiter, Kingsitt bed itnd 
ittadteard, deubit bpd 
Xmas tret 4 ft tcstci« 
pine. Or^M ivarteiietat 
»i»e»i 4f| i«9< 



KELVINATOR FOOD 

ARAMA 40" wide. 

209 lb. freezer, goot 

, condition, $155. 567 2118. 

LIVING ROOM COUCH 
4 pieces in teal blue; 3 
tables; 2 lamps, wrappers 
still on shades, 1 bunk bed 
needs mattress, after 6 30 
497 6532. 

Maytag washer, new 
pump, fair condition, also 
electric dryer, needs new 
motor, $55 for both. 587 
2118. 

RANGE Electric Sears 
Kenmore, 30", white, $75. 
340 0677. 

RANGE GE 30" 

electric; oven timer, push 
button controls, excellent 
condition, 340 9864, 

REFRIGERATOR 
FREEZER com 

bination $30, 428 1519. 

RUGS (3) 12' X 15' 

allwool sapphire blue with 
pad, velvet plush. I3'6"x 
10'6" Ivory wool, 
sculptured design with 12' 
runner. 464 6011. 



SCATTER RUGS (3) 

Karastan blue wool. Two 
3x5, one 4x6. Call 497 2647. 

TABLE Coppertone and 
white, marbleized top, 
with 8 chairs. 497.1522. 

VACUUM CLEANER 
KIrby, excellent con 
ditlon, used very little, 
with extras. Call 497 5059. 

WASHER DRYER 3 

years old $135 both or $75 
each. 428 1519. 




Home entertalomenf unit 
with 25" color TV, record 
player, AM FM stereo 
radio, remote control and 
2 sliding front doors; 340 
8215, 

PORTABLE TELE 
VISION 19" black 

and white Motorola 
with stand. Needs no 
repairs, $30, 497 0982 after 
5.30 p.m. or weekends. 

STEREO French 

Provincial cabinet, like 
new, all attachments. 
$350. 464 2781, 

TELEVISION Sears 

console color, RCA 
chassis, new picture tube. 
497 2189, 

TELEVISIO")^ 1972 

SyWania color console, 
33", good condition, 545 
6210. 

TV PORTABLE black 
A white also 2 tv consoles, 
after 6 30 497 6533. 

TV STEREO RADIO 
combination, AM FM 
radio, $95, 438 1519. 



ICfXHTOlST 



ANTIQUES — and any old 
furnltura 

CASHCASHCASH 
430-0704 

ELECTRIC TRAINS/^ 
American Flyer or Lionel. 
5456342. 

FURNITURE WANTED 
Couch, Early 

American, blue or green. 
In good condition. Will pay 
up to $100. Call 435 6485. 

WANTED Old or no 

longer needed clothing. 
Call me, 633 3937. 



SMMiPUyiOS 

Are greontly noMotf by PIANO 
PLACE •! m% timt. 0«l tpoM and 
monoy (It will bo preftwiOMliy 
mevMi M at not l« eomaet vowr 
t«omt) HtJMS. 49^ IM, PIANO 
PLACb 



iiDS GET nmrn 

HAVE A WASHER 
10SEU. 

PORTABLE WASHER - 
Mooi»o». mm drvar, A.J, 
C^BOrtOAi^ %r%. 



Mi& J.C aDM iMt MdhM Md 
MtPorlM 



loPHe- 

its** MtaiM^^^^i kft ^^^ 



iBiat«iM]rQ« 
kMt*«||ii.ai4tB>34U 
ot«M4M 



BEDSPREADS 
crocheted; call 



Hand 
489 3716. 



BRASS BEDS 3 floors 
to browse. Oak, pine, 
walnut, Victorian fur 
niture of all kinds. Cut 
glass. Bisque head dolls. 
Nautical and other 
unusual items. Meltcui's 
Anllques, 4201 Intflan 
River Rd. 4205117, 420 
8911. 

FOR CHRISTMAS 
Personal collection. 2 pie 
cupboards. Oak dining 
room furniture, 2 game 
tables, Martha 
Washington sewing stand, 
lamp tables, record 
cabinet, pine blanket 
chest. Tiffany type lamps, 
tea cart, etc. 340 3324. 



YAMAHA 1971, DT 1. 

5375. Dial 464 0875 after 6 
p.m. 

»2— AUTO ACCISS., tiPAlIT 

WHEELS (4; Crogcr 

slotted disc; fit 14" 
Chevy's with locks. Used 2 
weeks. $80. 340 : .54. 



REPAIR GUIDE 



m 



H***->«dMM< 



•O-AUCTIONS, PUBLIC 
SALES 

CALVIN 7EDD 
Auctioneer Appraiser 
■199 5567 



w 



12— IJUqATS, MAKINI SUFFl'l 



mm 



BOAT for Sale 26 ft. 
sloop, converted navy 
whaler; sleeps 4; head 
and galley; no engine; 
stainless steel standing 
rigging; dacron sails; 
dacron running rigging; 
$1500 firm. Call 340 5648 
before 11 a.m. 



H— CAMMBS, TKAIUM 

TRAVEL TRAILER 13' 
Layton, '63, excellent 
condition, extras, water, 
electricity hookup, 
refrigerator, stove, sleepis 
3 plus child. Dial 427 3273. 

IS-BBACH SUPPLIBs"* 

RAFT 6' inflatable, 

maintenance kit, 1 paddle, 
$20. 340 3865. 

SURF BOARD 4'6" 

American, no dings, no 
fractures, $50. 1340 3865. 





88—MOBILB HOMES 

AMERICAN 12'x60', 

appllcances, washer, 
utility shed, air con 
dltloner. Near Oceana. 
Call 425 1796. 

GREAT LAKES 1970, 

12'x64', lots Of extras. 499 
4408 after 4 p.m. 

FRONTIER 1970, 12 x 

60; 3 bedrooms; fur 
nished, on lot; $500; 
assume payments; 497 
9279. 

PARKWOOD 1971, 

12'x56', 2 bedrooms, 
furnished. 420 0165. 




f O-^OTOHCYCLB. SCOOTIM 

GOCART ENGINE 7 

h.p. Brlggsli Straton, like 
new, $35. 340 3865. 

HONDA 50 on 90 frame, 
Speed to 45 MPH, $80. 340 
3165. 

HONDA 1972; CB3»; 

$650 or take over 
payments; excellent 
condition. 625 1880. 



HONDA 

cylinder; 

9490. 



1972 CB1500; 4 
$1300, call 499 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 
1972 Super glide 2100, 
weber carburetor with a 
Cheetah sissy bar. 425 
1403. 



wii 



mmi 



I ' ^r ti v 9, II 



M^ 



120— AUTOMOllLB 



AUSTIN AMERICAN 
1971, must sell, like new, 
74,000 miles, front wheel 
drive $1,000. 4600991. 

AUSTIN HEALEY 1967 
Sprite, good condition. 
Must sell. 428 1711, ext. 
220. ' 

BUICK 1963 Riviera, 2 
door hardtop. Riins and 
looks good. $250. 499 7754. 

CADILLAC 1961, white, 
4 door; pood condition. 
$275. 420 1352, 

CADILLAC 1969 

Fleetwood, like new 
condition, all optional 
equipment. $3700. 855 
3575. 

CAPRI 1971 Ford Capi"), 
2000 CC engine. Brown 
with white Interior. Best 
offer. Call 499 1845. 

CHEVROLET 1965 

Impala, 2 door hardtop, V 
8 automatic, power 
steering and brakes, good 
transportation. $310. 420 
?063. 

CHEVROLET 1967 

Impala, 4 door, 

automatic, power steering 
factory air. Blue. 51,000 
miles. $550. 428 0411. 

COMFT 1967 Cyclone 

190, 4 speed, new tires and 
lew engine, tape deck 
excellent rendition. 857 
4165 ' 

/■ 

FORD 1923 T model, 

street roadster, 97 per 
cent complete. $1495. 547 
8279. 

JAGUAR XK 120, 1952, 
70 percent restored. $1500. 
Dial 625 0785. 

PONTIAC 1971 LeMans 
V 8, automatic, power 
steering and brakes. Air 
conditioned. Excellent 
condition. $2550. or make 
offer. 499 0603. 

PONTIAC 1967 Bon 
neville, 2 door. Call after 6 
p.m., 499 9936. 

4 
PONTIAC 1966 

Catalina, good condition, 
S600. 475 4630 days. 

PONTIAC 1966 

Catalina, white, very good 
condition, $400, 340 5885. 

PORSCHE 1969, 911X, 5 
speed, air conditioned, 
oiloy wheels, many extras 
and options, excellent 
condition inside and out. 
Call 499 8844. 



RENAULT 1f67 

Caravelle; to sell or 
trade; new tires; motor 
overhauled, 4640031, 

ROVER 1969 TC 2000, 
Arden green, brown 
leather Interior, air 
conditioned, FM stereo 
radio, mag wheels, stick 
shift. Lucas driving lights, 
66,(MX) miles, $2,000. Call 
587 1591 ddys. 

VEGA 1971, one owner, 
low mileage. 588 3151, 9 to 
5. 

VOLKSWAGEN 1965 

Sedan, low mileage, 
sunroof, good mechanical 
condition, radio, $S8S. 340 
2966. 

VOLKSWAGEN 1971, 

Orange sunroof, header 
system. Perfect condition. 
Extras. $1550. Call 460 
1085. 

VOLKSWAGEN 1970 

Bug; new tires, lust in 
specttd, $11M. 4275190. 



OFFICE SPACE 

SUN BUILDING 



S^MB BwaHibli now. LooBttd at 13B Rom 
meiM Road (im off EjipratiiMy). AN 
vinmm ' 4BnitoriBl Swioa • Pwfcing. Call 
mm 340-3030. 



LARASAN 



MALTY 



USE THIS HANDY UP TO DATE ALmABETICALLY LISTED 
GUIDE FOR ALL YOUR SERVICE NEEDS! 

Appliance Repair Ceramic Tile Home Improvements Locksmiths 



Appliance Repairs 

Regrigeratofs, fieczen, ak 
c<niditionen, wadien, diy- 
ors, ni^/et, all major appUan- 

<=**• Gas and Electric 
REASONABLE 
583-2702 



TILEVIfOftK 

MUD STICK-UP 
REASONABLE PRICE 

623-3937 



Electrical Contractor 



Asphalt-Concrete 



ASPHALT PAVING 

Ditch line patcMng, drive- 
ways a necialty. No job 
toosmau. 

CALL 
487.6061 



EUaRICAL VyORK 

Electric beat and diyen; 
houses rewired. 
Free Estimates 
Call Mike Levinalcy 

58^9227 



CONCRETE WORK 
fttlos-Sldewalkt-Drlveways 
Slabs-Curb and Gutter 
ALL TYPES CONCRETE 
FREE ESTIMATES 

Wm. M. Beiuon, Jr. 

Genenl Contractor 

399-2268 



QUICK UGHT 
ELECTRIC CO. 

Electrical Contractors 
Naw and Old Work 
i55-42a«, nfjisj 
nightt IS3-t1Sf 




Bicycle Repairs 



BICYCU REPAIRS 

Welding and Ornamental 

Iron Railinn 
VA. BEACH LAWN 
MOWER * WELDING 

42^9029 




ELECTRICAL 
CONTRACTOR 
Reiktontial 
'Conunodal 
Induttriai 

D.E. MITCHELL 
427-1146 



I II I I ' I I ii i'i M- i 

Electricd Contractor 
Service Incroases a specialty. 
New and Old Work. 
Electric Heat Convarslon. 

Reasonable 

ROBERT L. MILLS 
547-8712 

Day or night 



Carpet Cleaning Exterminating 



Ca«h <i Carry 
SAVE 20% 

Bring your rugs In, titen pick 
them up at the Scott plant, 
WMkdayt 8 to 5, Sat. 8 to 1 
and save a whopping 20%. 
SCOTT RUG CLEANERS 
TIdawatar't Largest. 
1S54 Juniper St. Norfolk 
855-3037. 



BURTON PEST 
CONTROL CO. 

Spaclaiizlng in roach and 
Insect control. Residential 
& Commercial. 

497-9182, anytime. 



Bob Roberts 
Cleaning Senjce 

Carpet and UphoMny Ckui- 
ing - Hardwood and tie floor 
dMniqg FREE ESTIMATES 

mm& 



Garages 




BAMBI CARPET 
CLEANERS 

Ma will shampoo any size liv- 
ing, dining room, and hall cai^ 
pet..aM thro* for only $25. 
this siMclai price Is good any- 
tima. 



mm. 



GARAGES 

CUSTOM BUILT 

BANK FINANCING 
STANDARD m CAR 
GARAGES 
$1,050 

HARDISON 
CONTRACHNG 

420-1716 



Heating 



Carpwi^ 



R.0.OTVEYC0. 

"RetkkntUA OtmmaviS' 
Ab CoaAtioiiiag-Re&^n- 
ten- aad Hcatow. Ice Mak- 
aa Huydffierȣlectrouc 
^deanen. 

4a6-r273. 



CARPENTRY 

Is Our BusinessI 
Repairs, Our Specialtyl 
Quality workmanship 
RaasenaMe rates. 

464-4663 

constauction 
scrvicisco. 



RAM 

ieatikk:* 
cooldmsco. 

HEIL. 
Auttiorlxed tJaaler 

489.7364 



Atlantic Building Ca 

Home bnprovementi 
Of Antjrpes 

Alio Conunocial Buildup 

BONDED AND LICENSED 

622-5834 



■i'» 



LOCKSMITH (bonded 

Jim's Key Shop 

2316 Va. Beach Bhrdl 
London Bridge 
J. M.Dnrts 
340-2490 



"«V 



Gorman And Son 
Gimeral Contractor 

No job too large or amtfl 
FREE ESIIMATES 
GUARANTEED WORK 
Licenaed and Bonded. 
24 HOUR ANSWERING 
SERVICE -625-0561 



HANDY SERVICES 



All Home 
Repair Services 

855-4919 




CLEAN UP LOTS, 
HAUL DIRT, 

rOPSOIL FOR SALE 
CALL 623-3937. 



ADDITIONS a REMODELING 

Family rooms, new additions 
bathrooms, kitctiens remodeled, 
Icarports, garages enclosed for 
'extra bedrocms, etc. Free plans 
drawn free estimates one 
year written guarantee. 
ROY ALDERMAN CO. 

428.0484 



AH Types Remodeling 
Ceramic Tile, floor tile, 
panelling, aluminum siding, 
guttering It painting, 
FREE ESTIMATES 

340-0423 



MfiLblt^^S 
Beautify your home with dec- 
orative plastar molding and 
celling canters. Decorative ce-' 
ramie tile for wall and floor 
also available. Free estimate, 
call 

ORNAMENTAL 
INDUSTRIES, Inc. 
5«8-374» or 340-8055 



Over-AI Maintenance 

aid Repair Ca 

Roofing, guttering, carpeiv 
try attd Ininor repairs. We 
fix all those hard to find 
laai^s. Fr«« Estimates. 
OWNER, W.J. Oiivwlus 

587-8638 



f!!*P2?J0*i Home lmprov«m«its 



HOME OIPROVElf ENTS 

All types of repair, remo<^ 
eling, painting, roofing, con- 
CTete work. Foundation, 
brick and Mock work. Gut- 
tering. Aluminum siding. 
OrtvavMys and parking 
area, ^attaring. No Money 
Down. 
Serving Entk-a T idewater . 

Free EAhnetes. 
Celi 627-a553, Ni^ts and 
hc^ldays, 4a6-1306. 

BftSCWSTRUCTIMV 
CmiPANY 



CERAIOC A FLOOR TILE 
Expert work at a very good 
latoft, Get your floors, 
ia|ood 
hVne 



S87.173e 



Old And new work. 
Remodeling and p*tcli 
work Qyerry titte and 
ii«te 

Free Estimete^ 
Jl Nk UMVE TtLC OQ. 

4ti.245l«««^<» 



HOME REPAIRS 
ANY TYPE 



FfaK 



dMNokwdoor! 
CUFFS REPAIRS 
4»-4ftSI 




Houssjackiiig 



aF. BELL 

Hous^cWng 

iFtoor JoMs 



2S Veers ExperlMce 

Ate yewr fl«en anaMne? 



Painting "t 

■ — — — -*^- — — — — — n» *«• 



PAINTING AND ROOFINiS 

Interior and Exterior 
. Quality Workmanship ., 
Estimates 
Reasonable ''•' 



421-3488 



Hi: 



.<;r: 



PAINTING ! 

Licented * Insured * Refer- 
ences • Free Estimates ' 
Interior and exterior 

426-7615 V, 

BOND'S PAINTING i 
SERV ICE . 

w 



Paper Hanging 



oinfilifMli 



Painting - Papertian||ig| 

30 Yean Experience ' 

REFERENCES ' , 
CallOiarUe, 

4994281 or 499-34% 



Roofing 



STEVENS ROOFING 
AND REPAIR 

Also Asphalt paving. Con*; 
merclai & Residential. . 
FREE ESTIIWATE^ , 

587-2442. 



S^ic Tanks 



SEPTIC a SEWAOE 
AODENBROOK 

Septic Tank Co., Inc. 

Continuous Service 

Since 1864. 

Fast Qadio Dispatctied 

Service 

Call 499-6897 



TV Service 



SAVE ME! . 

rm wordi one FREE aervice 
cd with tfib coupon. ,' • 
FREEeatimatoainltoine • 
Same D^ Service 

CAU42&6095 

American T V : ^ 



Upholstery 



■>- 



-r 



OPMOLSTCRY ' ' 

ANDERSON'S UPHOLSTEKYi 

It your furniture is slck....lMind 
it to Anderson's Upholslcry for 4 
face lifting All tworlt first dkaai 



Call 464-4637 



4> 



MMs 



\ 
% 
I 

\ 



We< 



WEU, WATER \ 
SYSTEie^ \ 
1 triea em of yoo^ 



KACH PIAff SRVKt 
4^4597 f 



Yoo : 

GaLtoYovteiiea^ 



IQBAYn 



■ ■ '^^^immmtm 



-^UR^DAY, DECEMBER 7, 1972 



THE SUN CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



IBMfll ftiCflCIL Ulhere The Livin g 1/ lovel u 



Frederic Heutte named 
Greenbrier consultant 



By CHARLES 

* YARBROUGH 
> ^.'WaNhinKton Star-News 

* Staff Writer 

A Virginia tourism 
delegation went to Europe 
In November to lure foreign 
visitors to the state's many 
wonders and, considering 
the product, it was smooth 
selling all the way. 

Except— how can 

j* salesmanship get graphic 

"enough about this largest 

M beach resort city in the 

I v world? 
I? 

I; Imagine trying to tell the 

I, perennial visitor to Cannes 

! tisr.Costa del Sd that you can 

' drive 18 miles on the beach 

<rf Virginia's Outer Banks 

(occasionally detouring 

'ifround an old shipwreck) 

^Wi still be within the city 

• Jimits? 

• Or leaving town one way 
I you drive 17.5 miles across 
! the Bay and be under water 
J part of the time? 

; The fact that the city has 

"TOOO rental rooms wwi't 

boggle the fordgn visitor 

i;"*Wtless he's frwn Finnish 

'•Lapland. 

• ' . .. • 
J'"' But try to get the message 

; over that within a few miles 

'^ (A a great cypress swamp 

;' festooned with Spanish 

• moss there is a great ex- 
tll^nse of lotus blossoms. 

Let's not tax his credulity 

fay mentioning that in the 

.300-plus square miles of the 

city there are four public 

,-^.^Qif courses, a great Naval 

'.t^f station, a National 

'Wildlife Refuges, 38 parks 

; not counting , the seaside 

: aiflusQTient park, and that 

;_ they've"^ just harvested a 

; " masive soy bean crop within 

^15 minutes' driving of the 

• iTotel-lined beach. 

Recent years have seen a 

growing awareness of 

season-stretching and 

. autumn here, a continuing 

■ source of wonderment 

; among the natives. They 

; don't arrive at this 

' reasonii^ simply because 

" the crowds have gone and 

the trafPic thins a little. 

. .Temperatures generally 

remain in the 70s until the 

end of October when water 

temperature is about ^ 

' degrees. The first break in 

^ hotel rates comes just after 

r Cabor Day with a one-third 

: reduction. The next cut is 50 

'. percent of summer rat« 

: about October 1. 

'o This fall and early winter 
' will see at least 75 hotels 



and motels open. At least a 
half-dozen restaurants with 
live entertainment stay 
open through October, most 
of them ni^itly. 

Best source of in- 
formation is the Virginia 
Beach Chamber oi Com- 
merce, P.O. Box 390. 

The two great contrasts- 
almost incongruities— of 
this sprawling city, 
especially in autumn, are 
the Seashore State Parte at 
the city's northern end aixl 
the long barrier reef which 
runs from burgeoning 
Sandbridge south to ttie 
Nortii Carolina line. 

Were it not for Rudee 
Inlet, which harbors some 
of the Virginia Beach 
fishing fleet, it would be 
possible to drive, assuming 
you're a cautious tide- 
watcher, from the mouth of 
Chesapeake Bay to the 
Ocracoke ferry at Oregon 
inlet on North Carolina's 
Outer Banks. 

Even at a summer rate of 
$60 a day for dune buggies, 
traffic is brisk, but the 
(hines are a definite no-no. 
Driving any part of it in a 
conventional automobile 
isn't advisable. There are 
several rusting hulks along 
the way that didn't make it. 

Amid groans of en- 
vironmentalists, there are 
already in-dq)th studies on 
what couW be done with this 
axeat expanse of delightful 
solitude and access to it has 
been discussed to ttie point 
of briding the waters of the 
vast bays to the west of the 
barrier reef. 

One inviolate place will 
remain the National 
Wildlife Refuge a few miles 
north of the Cardina line. 
There'll be no com- 
mercialization there and 
there is even some,thing 
more than idle conversation 
that the beach may be 
closed to traffic .within the 
limits cS the Refine. 

Also along the great 
strand is the "new" False 
Cape State Park— so called 
because old wooden sailing 
ships mis-read the horizon 
and sailed on, right into the 
sand. Many (k them are still 
there, at least in whitened 
keels and ribs. 

Off-shore and visible at 
low tide, is the super- 
structure of a freighter still 
loaded with Italian marble. 

There is an occasional 
"road" through the dunes. 
One such leads to what may 



be, providing there is smne 
access other than the btiich, 
a junior grade Sandbrklge. 
It's caHed "carva" and the 
population right now 
depends on the time of day. 

Just across the Carolina 
line is a huge dune, higher, 
said a couple who had 
driven a Jeep to the Top, 
than Jodceys Ridge on the 
Carolina Outer Banks. 

Beyond is the settlement 
of Carolla, which had a 
postoffice in 1895 and still 
has— witti a population of 
eight families. 

The long, slender Virginia 
strand is even good for bird- 
watching. And don't scoff. 
It's easy to become ad- 
dicted. Then you can 
graduate from that cast of 
characters to the great 
flocks and ever-changing 
birds of the Seashore State 
Park far to the north-but 
still within the city limits. 

With towering pines as a 
backdrop, the yellow of gum 
trees, the red of maples and 
dogwood will soon be the 
scene, just in time for the 
migratory birds, the 
Canade geese and snow 
geese, pausing along the fly- 
way that Broad Bay offers. 

The Park is open year- 
round, sunrise to sunset and 
there is no admission 
charge to the 42 miles d 
trails. Inevitably, one trail 
is open to bikes. 

If some of these blessings 
don't impress the potential. 



Appointment of Frederic 
Heutte, one of the worW's 
most distinguished fibres 
in horticulUire, landscape 
architecture and botanical 
di'sign. as consultant for the 
Ervin Company's Green- 
brier Farms planned 
community was announced 
today by Edward G. Cooke, 
area manage-. 

Heutte will act in an 
advisory capacity to Oie 
company and its planning 
and engineering con- 
sultants, Cooke said, 
providing expert counsd in 
^vel(^ii^ means through 
which nursery stock located 
on the property may be 
incorporated into the 
development. 

Greenbriw-, believed to be 
largest nursery farm in the 
U.S., contains some 
1.000,000 individual plants- 
1 .200 species of common and 
rare groundcovers, 
deciduous shrubs, broadleaf 
evergreens, coniferous 
evergreens, (manientals, 
and minor and major shade 

Under the land 
acquisition agreement, 
Greenbrier Nursery Farms, 
Inc., will phase out its 
operations over several 
years, with Ervin taking 
possession to portions of the 
tract in stages. Stodc not 
removed or sold from the 
nursery will be in- 
corporated into new 
residential. commercial, 
recreational and other 
facilities wherever possible. 



A NEW WAY 



OF LIFE 



OFFERED 



CONDOMINIUM 



-vMter from Europe, leUiiiQ vEStfftftNT'.S- — A 
consider the way the City of ^ 
Virginia Beach glorifies 
plain, old. ordinary trash. 

Over recent years, 
they've made an IB-acre, 6.V 
foot-high dune of it, dug a 
huge hole to cover it with 
eartt) and create a lake. 

Called Mt. Trashmore, it 
is to be the site of a civic 
amphitheater and a 
Soapbox Derby course. 




THE WORLD'S 

GREATEST 

SALESMAN 

WOULD LIKE TO HAVE 

YOUR 
BUSINESS 
AndSo 
Would We 

CROMWELL & AUSTIN REALTY, INC 

Realtors 

Mmborsi METRO MLS^ 
Phone 840-9761 




'Coimfiouses 




SMjOCXSntOMUCeAN 

$17t* PER MONTH 



HMt nd «iM iiK*Mi^ aow I 

447 ■wbertwi Dri*«, V^W« ■««*. 
* F<»YOURKEYTOTHEGOC»'UFE 

chsck iwh Lpt ■..■■■■■.■ 



ana 30th STREET 



428-7421 



^m 




n feels so goodi 



You'ra looking for an ipartnwnt? And you'ra flopping for 
raMonabI* price, locMion and witiat goodia* tha man throM 
in? Hang it all up and tort K out Pmrbfok* Courts Apart- 
mam* matchai tha baat and goaa on from tttara. Click it off 
yourtrtf: all utilitM* inAidad . ComfriaMy aqirippad kitehen 
• fully carpattd, ^ut mtta wund p roo ftn htiida and out 
■ Supar cofflWMant loeation for niilittry.Jb uiina» . 

^^■k t^l^M m^a^Aat^ I II ilal a 



APAirrMtNT* 



1.3m 

^mUb aBaaMtfA wmf ^n i i J ■ " " 






^®m 






Houtte's career as a 
j^garden analyst, landscaper, 
author and teacher spans 
five decades, punctuateid by 
a score of national and 
international awards for his 
contributions to the field <rf 
horticulture. 

Me epiigrated td the U.S. 
in 1911 from his native 
France, served in the U.S. 
Army in World War I, and 
gained his apprentice 
training on large privates 
estates through the 1920s. 
He earned a certificate in 
landscape architecture in 
192.'», and becai'ie manager 
of Norfolk's Parks and 
Botanical Gardens in 1936, a 
position he held until 
retirement in 19B5. 

Heutte is a noted garden 
writer, having published 
several handbooks on 
gardening, and has served 
as garden editor of Not- 
folk's I-edger Star since 
1959. He has also designed 
and taught practical gar- 
dening courses at the city's 
botanical gardens and at 
Sandhills Community 
College in Southern Pines, 
N.C. 

Among the long list of 
commendations, awards 
and citations he has 
received are White House 
commendation letters ftom 
President Cialvin Coolidge 
in 1926 and from Mrs. 
Lyndon B. Johnson in 196.S. 
He was awarded the Merite 
Agricole award and medal 
from the French govern- 
ment in 1956. 



IN- 
New 
Way Of Lite" is a booklet 
being offered by Larasan 
Realty. If you would like a 
copy of the booklet and-or 
an invitation to attend a 
seminar on condominiums, 
plea^ call Mort Morgan at 
.340-3030. ext. 33 or write 
Larasan Realty "Con- 
dominiums", 3401 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia 
Beach. Va. 23452. 



He has received the 1959 
outstanding municipal 
employee award from the 
Virginia League of 
Municipalities; 1957 gold 
medal award from the 
Garden C|ub of America; 
1958 Americanism inedal 
and award from the DAR; 
Hoyt Scott gold medal and 
$1,000 award from Swarth- 
more College in 1964; 
citation award from 
National Christian and Jews 
Association in \9e&. 

In 1966. he was awarded 
the distinguished service 
award from the New York 
Horticultural Society, the 
citation of merit from the 
American Horticulture 
Society, and the gold medal 
award from the National 
Association of Professional 
Gardeners. 

Heutte is a member of the 
Royal Horticultural Society 
of Fngland; the national 
rose, camelia. iris and 
oleander societies; an 
honorary member in the 
Isaac Walton league; the 
Garden Club of America; 
Norfolk Garden Club and 
Federation, Norfolk 



SANTA'S 
HELPER 



JohnM. 

WRIGHT REALTY 

Inc 

PLANNING TO SELL YOUR 
HOME? 
(Price it Right) 

Wa provide a written conven- 
tional Appraltal on all our 
ifliidential listings at no ad- 
^ional expense to the seller. 
Call lis for the PROFESSION- 
AL SERVICE YOU ARE 
LOOKING FOR. 

4^-8702 "•"'«»•"' MLS 

1964 LASKIN RD. 




PAGES 
13 & 14 




Old ^oi)|itioi|. 



GARDEN APARTMENTS 

New and Lovely In Park-Like Surroundings 
1 & ? BEDROOMS NOW LEASING 

Beautiful soacious rooms, fully 
carpeted, with ample closets 
big eat-in-kitchens with outside windows 
large storage area in each apartment 
indhridual entrances 
front door paricing 
close to shopping 

Off Independence Blvd. on Honey Grove Rd. 
Acroas from Haygood Shopping Center in 
Beautiful Old Donation Manor 

CALL 4600921 



Live on the water 




in Virginia Beach 



GEHINfi THERE 



• MMMBAniM 

• Mtap»IMi« 

• iHpMvktnililMi 

• MUHMnTnfe 

• MtiMCapriki 
T ■iliiili tipiii 

2 iHT-nl-fcMBf 

• lire 



Rlvei^. 
Wdodsi 

MafM9«ri>y IlARASAN 




LONDON enioQE 
S»«>WNQ «NTEH^ 

VIRQINIA BEACH BLVD. 



VIBQINIA BEACH EXPRESWAV 



at course 



PIlOM RmiM Office 4M-404« or 340-MM 



Botanical Garden Society; 
the Turf Association; Men's 
Garden Club of America; 
and Garden Wi^iters of 
America, among others. 

He presently resides with 
his family in Norfolk. 

The Ervin Company is 
one of the leading planners, 
developers and builders of 
residential communities in 
the Southeast. The company 
is headquartered in 
Charlotte, N.C. 

Greenbrier will be 
developed in stages over an 
estimated 10-year period. 
The community will Include 
a wide range of residence 
types, blue-and white-collar 
employment centers, a 
championship 27-hole golf 
course, some 300 acres of 
lakes and canals, and 
abundant open space. 

First construction is 
planned for mid-1973. 



effective experience aiw a 
history of ethical praqfice 
as a realtOT. * 

The Institute of ll^l 
Estate Management jlas 
given recognition for ov* 30 
years to individuals Jnd 
firms who conform to tfcid 
ethical standards ^d 
demonstrate sirfned 
management ability in ^ 
(^wation of real estate. 
Founded in 1934 by a small 
group of dedicat«f ;,rBal 
estate managers the" In- 
stitute is recognized today 
as the professional society 
whose membership includes 
men and women oE eut- 
o . ,, , standing prestige with 

Property Management demonstrated ability inJthe 

management of real estate. 




Jam«$ V. Biel^rd 

Larasan Realty announced 
today that James V. Bick- 
ford. Vice President 



Division, has been awarded 
the designation "Certified 
Property Manager" by the 
Institute of Real Estate 
Management of the 
National Association of 
Real Estate Boards, 
headquartered in Chicago, 
IHioois. 

Requirements for 
Qualification as a Certified 
Property Manager include 
passage of a series of ex- 
aminations, over five years 



Mort Glasser has recently 
returned to Tidewatel- after 
attending a Nation^ In- 
stitute of Real Estate 
Boards sponsored Gbm- 
mercial and Investment 
Real Estate course in' Fort 
Worth, Texas. Mort i^ to be 
congratulated on his, out- 
standing grade of 97.5 on the 
course exam. " ', 




REALTOR MLS 
4254)955 




APARTMENT 
LOCATORS 

OFTIOEWAIER 
CAU 49M025 

Tidewater's Ingest apait- 
ment scdectoi sovice . . 
liie eny; FREE wi^ to 
find homing. 

First Floor, Pemtiroke 
One BuUding. 
Ftembioke Realty 




Can you help us find 
homes for: 



'Zfil 



NAVY COMMANDER 



Relocating to Tidewater area... desire home in Virginia Beach witii 4 
bedrooms, large family room and central air-conditioning. Commander 
able to buy V.A. of finance Conventional. Price range: $35,000.00 
$45,000.00 with occupancy on first of January, 1973. 

Sherri Parkinson 

LARGE FAMILY 

Relocatit^ from California... desires 4 bedroom, 2 bath Colonial home 
with large family room. Price range not a factor... desire a wooded lot. 
Family would like to move in 31 December 72 If at all possible, 

Art Hildebrand 
SENIOR CHIEF (NAVY) 

Needs 3 or 4 Bedroom, brick Ranch or 2-story which has be«j 
previously owned. Property must not be over 5 years of age and have 
central air-conditioning. Desired price range: $28,000.00 - $36,000.00 with 
flexible financing and possession in Deceml)er, 1972. 

Sherri Parkinson 
YOUNG FAMILY 

With 2 sm^ll children... need 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch no latar than 20 
December 1972 in Virginia Beach. Family does not desire anytlnng fancy 
other than nice area and price range (tf $22,000.00 

Art Hildebrand 
NAVY OFFICER (LT. COMMANDER) 



Lt. Commander ami family desires 3 bedroom ranch... minimum of It 
20 minutes from Navy Base. House must not be in air traffic pattern. 
Family desires large family room fw entertaining. Possesion: 1 
January, 1973. Officer able to pay owners equity up to $10,000.00 «■ 
refinance conventional. 



LARASAN 



REALTY CORP. 



340-3030 4994911 



2 MBcci Ser^ TU^ivter . . . 
OvK6SSilan» 

MenAa' (rf Iffetio Urt^ SorviM 
Your All Mnto Moatm teiM^ 



MP 



ie^^^^,i4-, T^ T»v-Jn I . V . . -II (L ii^^^^>"u V I. I J . s^ I ( ■iijnii).(iiip 



"^^^^"^F^^^V^P • » f » ^^w^^^^^w^^^^i^-^^^^^^^i^f »*!»»»• If »»i»»r*f 



I 



W^QgZO 



THE SUN 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, li972 




■ 



Bting the Kiddies to see Santa. 

He has a free gift for each and every one! 

Santa's Hours: Monday thru Friday 

3 p.m. to 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m 

Saturday: 

12 noon to 6 p.m. 




^, 



^ 



Andrea's 

Arlene's yniforrm & Tuxedo Shop 

Beach Sail and Ski 

Beacon Book Shop 

Carol Lee Donut Shop 

Carpetown 



Make Hilltop North Shopping Center 
Your Christmas City" 

Laskin Road at Hilltop 



Carvel Ice Cream Supermarket 
Chapman's Jewelers 

Oara's 

Egerton & Lea, Ltd. 

First National Bank 

Food Fair Quality Discount 



Gilbert Optical Company 

Health Food Store 

Hose & Clothes Outlet 

Jorgees Petit Cafe 

LaVogue 

Maternity Nook 

Peoples Drug 



Radio Shack 

Roses Stores, Inc. 

Russell and Holmes 

Sewing Circle Fabrics 

Shoney's 

Somethin Else 



. • 








«e 




9 

Stitches 

Taylor Burgess Hairstyling 

The End 

The Nanny Shop 

Travel House 

Wornoms Arts and Crafts 




1 

i 




A SUN SUPPLEMENT 



DEC. 7, 1972 



Walter Noona is the energetic and dynamic 



director of the Virgima Beach Civic Chorus, 



which is busily rehearsing for the annual 

Christmas concert. The story and more 
photos are on Page 4. 




f 



4*»«* 



Mr I 






J 



P^ 2-WINOJAMMER, DEC. 7, 1972 




Thursday TV 



ENJOYING THE R^^EPTION— Juanita Gardner, president of the Virginia Beacli 
Civic Ballet; Major Biirclifield, ballet artistic director; Al Asercion, musical director 
of the Virginia Beach Civic Orchestra; Councilman Charles Gardner; Olga Ferrigno, 
:ind Frank Ferrigno, president'and founder ttl the orchestra, enjoy a chat during the 
"Behind-the-Scene" reception given by Uie Virginia Beach Civic Ballet. 

Reception offers inside view 
of Civic Ballet achievements 



The Virginia Bead) Civic 
Ballet and tte Academy of the 
Virginia Beach Ballet recently 
presented a "Behind'Uie- 
Scene" preview demonstratb^ 
the pest, present and future 
projects of the ballet 

Over 300 ftojfie were hwited 
toattoid the gala holiday eveiA, 
hortedby Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Gardner at die Hlltan Inn. Mb. 
Gwdner is pr«rideflt flf the 
GhficBaaet. 

The champagne receptlM 
;*m ImM annaitiie JMetr posi 
tt tte Imi wMdi 1NM deMFiittd 
for Christmas. Profits fr«in tbk: 



sde of Herman Heraog patait- 
ingSi ediibited at the receptkm 
by Auslew Gallery of Norfolk, 
will be given to the ballet 

The Virgiida Beach Civic 
Orchestra partidpated in the 
program, prercntii^ selections 
by^Bach. Students at the 
AtiMiemy and Civic Ballet also 
demonstrated techniques in 
modem dance, dassicid ballet 
and jazz dance. TMs portion of 
die program was narrated by 
Major Burchfield, artistic 
direetor of the faaOet. 

Puring the reception, Mis. 
Gndner announced |ilans for 



the two organizations: 

Ei^t students from the Civic 
Ballet wiU be dHxen to attend 
dance classes and per- 
fwtnances in New York this 
montt). 

Ilie oitire avic Ballet win be 
taken to New York to attend 
classes and performances this 
summer. 

Plans are bdng formalized to 
take the ballet into ttie schools 
for demonstratioiis. 

The ballet win join with the 
Virginia Beach Chric Orchestra 
for a perfonnanM in the near 
ftituroL 



A review 

James Taylor in a mellow m^ 



•nil 



James Taylor spread a 
mellow mood throughwt 
WiUiam and Mary Hall last 
Friday night when he per- 
fwmed wi£ his new band, the 
Section, a quartet ot West Coart 
^wBo muiddans. 

Taylor, appearing even 
thinner in penon and wearii^ 
j^ns and a tie, quidly came on 
stage to introduce the SecOon, 
consisting of Danny (Kooteh) 
Kortchmar on lead guitar, 
drummer Riss Kunkd, Qraig 
Doer^ on ke^boods, and bass 
guitarist Lel^ ^Uor. 

The gnrap played for ahnoM 
an hour aflor a late start. The 
sounds ranged f^om very Uuesy 
to va7 w«M. Qraig Doerge 
was oustanding on el^rtric 
piano throu^ the Rnt few 



The ^riinee m the abuost- 
haU seemed tst^g^mk 
^th*'^ fl >ei t lO B ■ itt i tf ^ up'-*' 
fpMtfid »ch Munber. 



Section numbers, die sooid iras 
much too loud with some 
distortion. It was ifpt as 
evidRit during Taster's solo 
porformanoe «Md) MIowed, 
^nce his st^ is much qtnelnr. 

His speaking vdce was so 
distorted, though, that his 
words were often in- 
comprdioisible. 

Hie soaai at WiUam and 
Mary HaU is often too loud for 
nve conc^te and die ackted 
distortion made the entire . 
dww seem out of step. 

Taytar appeared again and 
introAiced himscjf , dien smg 
"Sweti Baby Jama," qwetly 
accompanying himself on 
guitar, foDowed by api^ause 
and ories of "I Love you" from 
dieaudiemx. 

Between mimbors, shouts of 
"hey, James," "alright, 
James" and "we Iwe you. 

Out rest of the eoneert. 



On nwQF of Ae havd-rack ft^er jpligmd #- Uimmil om 



venion of "G r ee nde evcs" on 
die guitw, then re-introduced 
the Section, who him on "High- 
way Song.^ 

"Carolina in My Mind," 
"Bainy Day Um" and his 
biggest applause-getter, his 
first big tune. "Fire and Bain," 

foDowed. 

« 

Four Iraas men joined Taylin* 

and tl» otfao- five muddans fur 

portions of tte remainder of the 

concert. Two trombones, a 

brumpet and an altematii^ sax 

and dariMt added vdume utd 
depth to 1^yl<M*'s c^her songs, 
including some more blues 
souods, a few beegw numbers 
and, finally, Carole King's 
"You've Got a Friend." 

TlM fow monbers ol the 
SectiM , are profenimal 
musicians who have come 
together, thriu^i ' TayNr, to 
farm a sound nMch sliould 0row 
Mo MmetUng big on their 
JiaNaica 



DEC. 

»p.m. 

( 3) Merv Griffin 
(10) Lost in Space 
(15) AAisterogers' Neighborhood 
(27) Leave It to Beaver 
5:30p.m. 

(13) News 

(15), Electric Company 

(27)' Bugs Bunny 

6p.m. 
( 3) (10) News 
(13) ABC News 
(15) Sesame Street 
(27) Jim and Tammy 

i:30p.m. 
( 3) CBS News 
(10) NBC News 
(13) Movicf -"Fighter Attack" 

7p.m. 
( 3) Truth or Consequences 
(10) What's My Line? 
(15) Electric Company 
(27) Daktari 

7:30 p.m. 
(3) Basketball 'Indiana 
Pacers vs. Virginia Squires at 
Richmond 
(10) Parent Game 
(15) The Gig 

8 p.m. 
(10) Flip Wilson 
(13) Mod Squad 
(15) The Advocates 
(27) Right On 



7, 1972 

8:30p.m. 
(27) Say It Loud 

9 p.m. 
(10) Ironside 

(13) The Men 

(15) International Performance 

(27) 700 Club 

9:30p.m. 
( 3) To Be Announced 

10 p.m. 
(10) Dean Martin 

(13) Owen Marshall, Counselor 

at Law 

(15) World Press 

(27) 700 Club 

iO:aop.m. 
(15) 30 Minutes With 

11p.m. 
(10) (13) News 

11:10p.m. 
( 3) News 

11:30p.m. 
(10) Tonight Show 
(13) Truman Capote Behind 
Prison Walls 

11:40 p.m. 
( 3) CBS Movie -"A Patch of 
Blue" 

1a.m. 
If the Appollo 17 mission is on 
schedule. Channels 3, 10 and 13 
will cover the decking at ap- 
proximately I a.m. 



December programs 
at Chrysler Musemn 



The Chrysler Museum theabre 
at N(HfoIk, Olney Road and 
Mowbray Arch, continues to 
offer a variety of progranus for 
the public, many of them 
wittiout charge, ttvough the 
mondi of December. 

On Monday, Dec. 11, at 8:15 
p.m., die Norfolk Society of Arts 
Free Concert series will present 
pianist Thwnas Warburton in a 
recital. 

On Saturday, Dec. 16, at 3 
pm., die Chysler Chamber 
Ballet and Opera Compai^, 
directed by Gene Hammctt, 
performs "The Sights and 
Sounds of Christmas" on 
conjunction widi die Chamber 
Choir of Norfolk State College. 
Selections from Tchflttovrity's 
"Nutcracker Suite" will also ktf 
featured Tidcets are $2 JO. 
students and military ad- 
missifln is $3 and museum 
members are $1.90. 

The OM Domhiion Unhrersify 
Madrigal Singers and the 
Concert Choir of (H)U will 
|>rescnt a joint concert iif 



holiday music on Sunday, Dec. 
17, at 4 pm. 

Saturday morning diikiroi's 
programs ctnAinue on Dec. 9 
widi puppete«r F^gy Begins 
presentii^ a show. On Dec. 16, a 
version of "The Sghts and 
Sounds of Christmas" will be 
presented especially for 
children. 

The musewn's popular film 
program coirttaHies through the 
mofdh. Admi^ontoi^ fibns is 
$1 JS for non-members, .Ti for 
members and fl for students 
andlbilitaiy. 

Plhns sdwdukd dris moi^ 
are: 

Dec. 13, 8 p.m.: "AunUe 
Mame." the di<lightful Rosalind 
Rusidl eoRiedbr. 

Dec. tt; t p^ra.: "Nanook of 
die North,*' the famous Robert 
J. Flaheriy doc um e rta iy about 
die EsUmoa of Canada. 

Dee. S7. 8 p.m.: "Bundle of 
Joy," • wild and romiditic 
Clvistma»4taiie story starring 
Debbie ReynoMs, Eddie Fisher 
and AMfltie Uen^. 




(■^ 



Friday TV 

DEC. 8, 1972 



KMNCMMIIIMER, DEC. 7, 1«72-#i|i 3 



t».m. 
( 3) These Things We Share, 
Agrl-Business, Sunrise 
Semester, Lift Up Mine Eyes 

i:M*.m. 
(10) Garner Ted Armstrong 

7a.in. 
( 3) CBS News 
(10) Today Show 
(13) Tennessee Tuxedo 

7:30a.m. 
(13) Tidewater A.M. 

• a.m. 
( 3) Captain Kangaroo 

9a.m. 
( 3) Dick Lamb 
(10) Romper Room 
(13) Jeff's Collict 

9 30a.m. 
(10) Petticoat Junction 
(13) Movies--"Miracle of the 
Bell," Part Two and "Cowboy 
From Brooklyn" 

10a.m. 
( 3) Joker's Wild 
(10) Dinah's Place 

10-30 a.m. 
( 3) Price Is Right 
(^0) Concentration 
11a.m. 
( 3) Gambit .. 

(10) Sale of t^eCentury 

ir-30a.m. 
( 3) Love of Life 
(10) Hollywood Squares 
(13) Bewitched 

Noon 
( 3) Where the Heart is 
(10) Jeopardy 
(13) Password 
(27) Of Lands and Seas 

12 Mp-a. 
( 3) Search for Tomorrow 
(10) Who, What, Where Game 
(13) Split Second 

lp.in. 
( 3) Mildred Alexander 
(10) News Magazine 
(13) AH My Children 
(27) 740 Club 

t-Mp.M. 
( 3) As the World Turns 
(13) Let*s Make a Deal 

2 p.m. 
( 3) Guiding Li^hf , 
(10) Days of Our Lives 
(13) Newlywed Game 
(27) 700 Club 

2-30pJH. 
( 3) Edge of Night 
(10) The Doctors 
(13) Dating Game 
3p.lll. 
( 3) Love Is a Many Splendored 
Thing 

(10) Another World 
(13) General Hospital 
(27) Insight 

3 30 p.m. 
( 3) Secret Storm 
(10) I Love Lucy 
(13) One Life to Live 
(27) What Every Woman Wants 
to Know 

4p.m. 
( 3) Family Affair 



(10) Superman 
(13) I Dream of Jeannie 
(15) Sesame Street 
(27) New Zoo Revue 
4:30p.m. 
( 3) Andy Griffith 
(10) Munsters 
(13) Ponderosa 
(27) Brave Stallion 

Sp.m. 
( 3) Merv Griffin 
(10) Lost in Space 
(IS) Misterogers' Neighborhood 
(27) Leave It to Beaver 

ssop.m. 
(13) News 

(IS) Electric Company 
(27) Bugs Bunny 

tp.m. 
( 3) News 
mO) News 
(13) ABC News 
(IS) Sesame Street 
(27) Jim and Tammy 

«:30p.m. 
(3) CBS News 
(IP) NBC News 
t13) Movie "Drums of Tahiti" 

7 p.m. 
( 3) Truth or Consequences 
(10) What's My Line? 
(15) Electric Company 
<27) Family Classic 
7 -30 p.m. 
( 3) Tackle Box 
(10) Circus 
(15) Will Street Week 
(2^) Time Life Special 

1p.m. 
( 3) Rudolph the Red-Nosed 
Reindeer 

(10) Sanford and Son 
(13) Brady Bunch 
(IS) Washington Week in 
Review 

• Up.m. 
(13) Partridge Family 
(IS) Masterpiece Theatre 
(27) CtMplain of Bourbon Street 

9 p.m. 
( 3) The Homecoming--A 
CliriMmas Story 
(10) Ghost Story 
(13) Room 222 
(27) 700 Club , 

9-3ffp.m. 
(13) Odd couple 
(15) Orama"Walls" 

10p.m. 
(10) Banyan 

(13) Love, American Style 
(27) 700 aub 

11p.m. 
( 3) (10) (13) News 
11-30p.m. 
( 3) CBS Movie -"The Burning 
Hills" 

(10) Tonight Show 
(13) Movle-"From Here to 
Eternity" 

I a.m. 
( 3) News 

l-isa.m. 
( 3) Movies -"War Kill," "The 
Canadians," "The Hanged 
Man" 



Navy Choristers present 
holiday benefit concert 



The Tidewater Navy 
Choristers wUl present a dioral 
OMKert of Christinas mi^ic at 8 
p.in., rni Monday, Dec. 11, at the 
Little Credc Naval Amf^ibious 
Base Chapel. 

Under the directiwi of Lt Cdr. 
Leon Harrell, Chaplain, USS 
Guadalcanal, tl» choristers will 
present the concert for the 
benefit of the Joy Fund, an 



organization that helps needy 
families at Christmas. 

The Tidewater Navy 
Choristers, a mixed group of 
ai^roximatdy 30 Navy airf 
Marine Corps personnel and 
their dependents, will sing both 
religious and secular music. 

The public is invited to attend 
ttie Christmas conc«-t and may 
enter through Gate 5, Little 
Creek Naval Amphibious Base. 



Combined church choirs 
sing Handel's 'Messiah' 



The churdj choirs of Bayside 
Baptist Church and Bayside 
Christian Church are combining 
with (rther interested singers to 
presCTt the Christmas portion 
(rf "Messiah" by G.F. Handel. 

There will be two per- 
formances of this famous 
oratmio Ml Sunday, Dec. 10, at? 
p.m. at Bayside Baptist Churdi, 
mo Pleasure House Rd. , and on 
Tuesday, Dec. 12, at 8 p.m. at 
ttie Mw chapel at the Navy 
Amphibious Base. 

Dlrectii* the chdrs wiU be 



music at Bayside Baptist 
Church. Assompanying at the 
organ will be Joan Nordstrom 
and at the piano will be Cynthia 
Braua 

Soloists for both p«r- 
formances will be Shirley 
Becka-, Jane Chavis, Donald 
Liverman, J<*n Meulenba-g, 
Jane Smith and Glenda 
Williams. 

The public is cordially invited 
to either performance. There 
will be no admission chai^ and 







A FUNNY T»ING-J«e M««iwy. LoAnw N«Im«. Gaary Wm aai PfcO lIMer ramp 
throuidi "A Fhbiiv TWng ifaiHiewed go Ums Way to the Ftniiii" «t the Cuvlkr Dlnier 
PlaviMMse. The miuical ceoMdy. directed by Jon Dairtes. is sdiedaled to nw threa^h 
Jawiary . The playheose is ia Norfolk at 3S17 Arf;oane Aveaae. Reservatioiis and ticket 
iarormation may he obtained Ify caUiat; the Oeatre at 8554n3. 



Godspell' opens 
at Scope Chrysk 



"Godspell," a rode vamkal 
based on the Goopd accmifoig 
to St. Matthew, will be 
presented at Scope's Chrysler 
Hall fw ttiree periormaiwes 

only. 

The touring "Godspell" 
company will pafcHin Friday, 
Dec. 8, at 8:80 p.m., with two 
performances on Saturday, 
Dec. 9. at 2:30 and 8:30 p.m. 

Tidc^ tot Uie FrMay night 
perfwmance are $7, 16 and $5. 
Tickets fw the Saturday 
matinee are $6, $5 and |4. The 
Saturday evaaing performance 
tickets are $7.50, 16.50 and $5.50. 

"Godspell" is one of the 
loi^est-ruiming am) successful 
mieical shows. It is still playing 
in New ^<^ and has numerous 

Girl Scouts in 
Christmas show 

The Girt Scouts of Virginia 
BeKh and the Bayside Lions 
Ctab will present the fourth 
annual "Living Christmas 
Tree," Sunday, Dec. 10, at 7 
p.m. at Princess Anne High 
School Stadium. 

Thousands d Girl Scouts will 
form a gayly-li^ted Christmas 
tree and sing the Christmas 
st(H7 and other Miday songs. 

Those attemlii^ the inrogram 
are asked to imng dmations of 
good used clothing, canned food 
'and sta{^, which will be 
distiributed thrm^hout the year 
l^ the U(X£ Club. 
,^,AdtRif!|ipn.^^fW-. AM:..v,t 



tourii^ companies wMdi have 
(^ed all over ^ worid. 

The musical has won 
numerous awards, including the 
National Theatre Arts Con- 
ference Award. The original 
cast album was recently 
awarded a Grammy as best 
show album. 



The deadHae for infOnnatiM 
for the -WladJaaiBier. e 
lertaiBBMat galie for VkrgMi 
Beach and sanwadiag irm%, 
is 5 P.B1. Timraday fer tlw neirt 
#cck'8 Issae. Pabttilwd eveiy 
Thursday by the Vtrgiala 
Beach San. 

DONNA JI6NDRICK, EDITOR 
OLGAEDWARM. 

ADVERHSING MANAGER 




RAftlADAlllK 

0CEANFR0NTAND7th 



Featuring 



OANTATUM 



N^htfy 



Cntortainmont |y|t|^ McCLOUD. NoCovor 
CMno and Dance s>so »> s>m i».m. NoMiidmum 



f. 



VirfMBBMcl^Va.- 



.»X>,i «.% M. M iS.*< \y.\ 



,'i'«Tiiih.H! x!,»'» ♦•^^•'•"'iV^ 



xtnz 




1*,^- 



4_ 



^Bl 



Tie spirit of Christaias 
brou^t to life in music 




*T«epita tot if line iBi» 

gettnc Mt tiUc prignm," 

'MdiHMipe 

iryNll»a0ifldllteftaiy 

fafftf 

% "m m^edL, tnditfMMl 

We 
for 



DfOto, itaflnHi. Ita, David 



lfff.CJ. 
the 



the ekene fe epea to tt^flne 



oamgiMejan JIB [hs lime. lHiaf% 
wNatt maHaaB tthis iOi^misHtlran 
00," Ihmu (cnnfinuMfl in 
pEBBiiigtflR72S Tnen and women 
'^HiD AnMntlnr iheir iime tto ilfae 

man wrtm teg served as miffiicol 
(SrrKtorndif the civic chane tor 

fair veare. 

f He tHik tinw< out irom ijhimis 
nciiwanrsaiB at fFhalie Minify 
3>pe4tjyte?jaii Church nteently 

to dseoK te worti with the 
musisal group and the 
Ctitistim^ pn^am it will 



"We de feave m , 

Neeaa Mi<l« "bat irt aet 
tmffia% haid the iMaple 
ate Iqr airt ate totoPMled Md 
<to fHw • iat ir< a caaMaaaity 
fliiH a«Ml SMne tiaMs set 
M he hem i« fte 




'*ttiic«ent, Tratlltional and 
Qmeniqaamn' niristrnw" is 
^te ttknne df tl«e program. 
^•ittJh will te {[iven Smriav. 
HtK 10, at3 p.m. and Tuesdav. 
Htc a. «t « iprni. at J»rnic«B 

'T try to do a W of dffineitt 
tliiiaps atrChFigtnw. taut mrt <te 
onml tthin^," JJoma sxA. 
•Wtet wBhretiy ii^ loiN) B tjcffl 
tihe peq|^ flw difiemtt im^ 
!te coming tf &bM. ilae Unen 
!ttid maBkail^. 



mrnibra-. "U migaMakr j 
"Musae SimBse" %g I 
will Ih> iKsim^pimied % a I 
choir. 

A #<nip tf t^idiHiianl 
and a Bach d)iffa3e «*iO he ia- 
cluded in 1^ fnst tetf «r te 
pp^mm. 

"We oertamiy cwiMr'1 kave 
Mr. ^ch out," Noona soaML 

A highli^it of flK &it Ur 
win be Charpentier's '"^mg nt 
the Btrth irf Otr l^rd Jens 
Chrdt" iar dbsnK. t&^dxr 

Whftlw^. CB^ifa msm^Bsae^, 
H^iwr Psrec^ aind Fa|7c 
£idR»rdE muBTs C^afee is ite 
baritnne 
The 



{faice 

aNra«'ivfielKani0« 
iawie a awA. We Iry to prt on a 
level «f eo- 



The aflly factor KaMtiaK app- 



aee^ted ittptsat^ m (he 
- if Biea. Tm aiear hi^ 
Mos eaa «mei|»w«r 
iffliegnaip). 
'The aMw aMH a« lan^. «K 
aiare wobmb we can *tx*f(t." 
Nawi eiplaiaeiL ^'Bat M)tta% 
•« hvw toe mifly wastes. 
CnaaapMaajr. we Imv to tuna 
re, W«'v€ 
rearifyseta laHt«a4ta> 
■herel rh ^ aa ic a n h mi. . Wg 
fey to keep a h^aaoe " 

liar ike cawk 





"He IB 
wifli ifluw. 

inihv; fpfnooHBtan a 

'%ran;^^Q<E in Ae 

aadtBiiijanww «n^ 

teat, ani '""Jazz 




wriftanaic 



«4i parfara mitt Ak 
%aaphanr af Nev^wt Neas 
April. Itoaaa aad Ito 
aiil alM p»fi 



"HAe PriBDe tf Peace'" is a 

la rackheiA. 

Caral 

(WaMer's wife) wUI 

•f the 

wfll 




wctaHy- The 

sak m faUni chain ia the 




^ihKfts. sweatHs, saeakers aari 

saaaHnHiaaB^a ^Mtb^^ m^t^mm^t^^^k^mJ^Mtm^ 

^■▼■■Hs War cowMc u a p t e. 

Bat there is aaiiBag casaal 
atoail tte wwnl icf s oace they 
^artwQikiae. Itoaai ifepfai^ed 

ha eaetig^ as hr caedactod llran 

a 



^bmmqe aad carrptoe aat the 
pelicies of «be 




tohB Ips 

a <|toet laae fraai the 

^ aaotfcer gtertare 

hraaRJM a dW ercu t raasical 



shed Hi sveater far 
ttnled his 



deaiaastrated 
^"^ ^afessi aaaliaai dariag 

to the (palty af the 



'>bMp*rii««*i*ifeMBak«MMkMMt 



mmmmmmmm 



m 



H 



( 3) Agriculture, U.S.A. 

«:3ta.lll.* 
( Sunrise S««fit«t«r 
(II) Farm Show 

7 a.m. 
I 3) Connie's Magic CoHag* 
(10) Cheyenne 
(It) Patterns for Living 

(13) Animat Fair 

• a.m. 
( 3) Bugs Bunny 
(10) Underdog 
(13) H. R. Putostuf 

•■atajn. 
( 3) Sat>rina 
(10) Jetsons 
(13) Jackson 5 

9a.m. 
( 3) Chan Clan 
(10) Pinli Panttier 
(13) The Osmonds 

9 30 a.m. 
( 3) New Scoot>y Doo Movies 
(10) Houndcats 
(13) Saturday Superstar Movie 

10 a.m. 
(10) Roman HdWays 

10-30 a.m. 
( 3) Josie and the Pussycrts 
(10) The Barkleys 
(13) Brady Kids 

Da.m. 
( 3) Flintstones 
(10) Seaiab 2020 
(13) Bungles 

11 30a.m. 
nO) Pride 
(13) Kid Power 

Noon 
( 3) Archie's TV Funnies 
(10) That Good Ole Nashville 
Music 



7 a.m. 

( 3) Connie's Magic Cottage 
nO) Bible Stwytlme 
(13) Christophers 

7 30 a.m. 
(10) Live and Learn 
(13) Old Time Gaepd Hour 

I a.m. 
( 3) The Archie* 
(10) Rex Humbard 
(27) Brave Stallion 

I 30 a.m. 

( 3) Day of Discovery 
(13) Streams of Faith 
(27) Treehouse Club 

f a.m. 
( 3} Oral Roberts 
(10) Rock Church 
(13) Revival Fires 

9-»a.m. 
( 3) This IS the Life 
flO) Gospel Sing 
(13) Bungles 

' 10 a.m. 
( 3) Lamp Unto My Feet 
(10) Eyewitness Report 
!13) Curiosity Sh(^ 
(27) 700 Club 

10 SOa.ffl. 
( 3) Look Up and Live 
(It) Movie "Apache's Last 
fBttle" 

11a.m. 
( 3) House of Worship 
(13) Bullwinkle 
(27) 700 Club 

II 30a.m. 
I 3) Face the Nation 
(13) Make a Wish 

Noon 
( 3) To Be Announced 
(13) Roller Derby 
!27) Encounter 

12 isp.m. 
(10) Kiplinger Report 

12 30 p.m. 
(10) Garper Ted Armstrong 



Saturday TV 

DEC. 9, 1972 

(13) Funky Phantom 
l2-.30p.m. 
( 3} Fat Albert 
(10) Rollar Game 
(13) LIdsville- 

iP'i*' 

l,l\ S-^""'*"'* P"*" Fwtival 
(10) Football Cleveland 

M?w1' *J Clncfnn«tl Bengals 
(13) Monkees 

i;Mp.m. 
(13) NFL HighlMMit* 

2pjli. 
!.?l^**'* "Eh»i9n Pwlver" " 
(13) NCAA Football A 

regional college bowl game will 
be telecast, teams to be an- 
nounced 
(27) Time for Timothy 

2:30p.m. 
(27) Brave Stallion 

3 p.m. 
(27) Earth Lab 

4 B n 

( 3) Perry Mason 

(10) Wild, Wild West 

(27) Movie To be announced 



Sp.m. 

( 3) Victory at Sea 

(10) Wrestling 

(13) Wide world of Sports 

S 30 p.m. 
( 3) Lassie 
(27; i^owling 

6p.m. 
( 3) (10) News 

t 30 p.m. 
( 3) CBS News 

f 10) Movie "Giant From fl» 
Unknown" 
(13) Lawrence Welk 
(27) Hunting and Fishing 




. DEC. 10, 1972 

1 p.m. 

( 3) Sonny Allen Show 

(10) Football Miami Dolphins 

at New York Giants 

(13) Conversation 

(27) Waters Family ;i 

1 l$p.m. 
( 3) Sunday Sports 

i-30p.m. 
( 3) Football Green Bay 

Packers at Minnesota Vikings 
(13) Issues and Answers 
(27) Update 

2 p.m. 
(13) NBA Preview 
(27) The Answer 

2 30 p.m. 
(13) USGA Highlights 
(27) Rex Humbard 

3 p.m. 
(13) The Explorers 

3 30 p.m. 
(13) Wagon Train 
(27) Charisma 

4 p.m. 

(10) Football Baltimore Colts 
at Kansas City Chiefs 
(15) Drama Walls" 

(27) Reaching Out 

4 30p.m. 
(27) Kathryn Kuhlman 

Sp.m. 
( 3) To Be Announced 
(13) It Takes a Thief 
(15) People Puzzle 
(27) Chapel Cottage 

5 30 p.m. 
(27) Jerry Falwell 

tp.m. 

( 3) 60 Minutes 

(13) Wtovie If Happened to 

Jane" 

(IS) Report Card 

i 15p.m. 
(15) Animals and Such 



7 p.m. 

( 3) Hee Haw 
(27) Right <^ 

7:3tp.m. 
(13) Lefs Make a Deal 
(27) Tl»a Monroes 
• p.m. 
( 3) All in the Family 
(10) Emergency! 
(13) Alias Smith and Jones 

•:30p.m. 
( 3) Bridget Loves Bernie 
(27) Warren Roberts 

9 p.m. 

( 3) Mary Tyler Moore 

(10) NBC /Movie "Love Is a 

Ball" 

(13) Streets of San Francisco 

9 Mp.m. 
( 3) Bob Newhart 
(27) Tomorrow's Lesson 

10 p.m. 

( 3) Mission: Impossible 
(13) Sixth Sense 
(27) 700 Club 

11p.m. 
( 3) (13) News 
(27) 700 Club 

11 1Sp.m. 
(10) News 

11 '30 p.m. 
( 3) Movies "The Day the 
Fish Came Out," "Return to 
Peyton Place," "Man in the 
Middle," "Palm Springs 
Weekend" 

(13) Movie "Count Three and 
Pray" 

11 4Sp.m. 
(10) Movies "Murder in the 
Blue Room," "The Crosby 
Case" 




i-30p.m. ^ 

(15) Efeetric Company 
(27) The Deaf Hear 

7 p.m. 
( 3) News 
(10) Wild Kingdom 
(15) Zoom 
(27) The Ministers 

7 30 p.m. 
( 3) Anna and the King 
(10) The Little Drummer Boy 
(15) The Just Generation 
(27) 700 Club 

• p.m. 
( 3) M^ A- S^ H 
(10) Christmas With the Bing 
Crosbys 
(13) The FBI 
(15) Family Game 

• 30 p.m. 
( 3) Sandy Duncan 
(IS) French Chef 
(27) 700 Club 

9pjn. 
( 3) Dick Van Dyke 
(10) Bob Hope Special 
(13) ABC Movie "The World 
of Suzie Wong" 
(15) Masterpiece Theatre 

9 30 p.m. 
( 3) Mannix 

10p.m. 
(10) Night Gallery 
(15) Firing Line 

10 30p.m. 
( 3) Newsmakers 
(10) The Protectors 

11 p.m. 
( 3) (10) News 

11 30 p.m. 

( 3) Norfolk State Highlights 
(10) Tonight Show 
(13) News 

MiiNiight 
( 3) Secret Agent 
!13) Movie "These Wilder 
years" 



Touringchoir prepares series of Yule concerts 



Virginia Wesleyan Collet's 
first touring choir, under the 
direction of Anistant Professor 
of Music David Claytofi. will 
make its first series of puWic 
performam^s in early 
December at the Chrtatmas 
seas(Hi ^ts imderway. Musical^ 
^sdectiont by ttie 36-wtee choir 
infill ran^ tnm ttie classical 
"Gloria," by Antonte VlvaWI, to . 
the contemporary "An Answer 
PwObr Tlm^' wlA rock combo 
accMnpairimefM. 

ChrMiun season concerts 
will be held at Virginia 
WedijNm M D«e. 7 at 8 pftt- 



and the Military Circle Shop- 
ping Center Mall at 8 p.m. on 
Dec 8. The Choir will also 
participate in the regular 
Sunday service at Baylake 
United Methodist Church on 
Dec. 10. 

The planned sdections, which 
include traditional Chrlstnws 
carols from England and 
France as well as an Ap- 
palachian carol, will featore 
several solotots, Including Mis. 
Louise Hagens. Pam HMm, 
Yvonne HlMtard. Lou SticWw, 
aancw JwAUMi Smiiser and 



fhitist Suzaime Timm«Tnan. 
aayton, Virginia Wesleyan's 
first full-time musk instructor, 
is in his first year at the colle^. 
Priw to coming to Virginia 
Wesleyan, he taught .it CXim- 
berland Cdlege in. William- 
sburg. KenbM*y. A native at 
llniim City, Tennessee, he is 
carraitly workii^ on a doctoral 
degree at Florida SUte 
Umversity. 

Curreirt pteis, accordiiig to 
Clayton, inchii* a t«r far the 
choir in tliB spriflg. 



Bt^WING BUBBLES— Deriece Mclfe«imB as tke in- 
nocent heroine and R<^rt Gravel as the hanrtsonw hero 
luim it up in "llumbui{ and H^Iy," an original iMUday 
luiiKical melodrama new at tte Tidenrater Duuier 
The-atre. 

Tidewater Theatre opens 
original holiday musical 



"Humbug and Holly" (or 
"The Evib of E^ Nog"), an 
original musical melodrama 
with a htriiday flavor, is now 
open at the Tidewator Dinner 
Theatre in Norfolk. 

The show is directed by its 
author. Jay Huguely. who 
directed and pei^R-med as Don 
Quixote in the new theatre's 
first prodw:tiott, "Man of La 
Mancha". 

"Humbug and Ho^" offers 
audience participation with 
sing-alongs and the opportunify 
to boo and \ass the villains and 
chew the hwo. 

Hngnely has adapted tte 



show from an ei^y 1990s 
melodrama, "Ten Nights in a 
Bar Room". The production 
includes 14 original songs 
composed by Hngnely and 
Ridnrd Foshiqr and several oW 
stendards such as "Lrt Me Call 
You Sweetheart" and "Smiles" . 

An ei gh t- membe r 
pr<rfes8ional cart accompanied 
by piano, banjo and dhrums will 
perform the show nghtly ex- 
cept Mwdays. throng Dec. 31. 

Group rates are availaUe for 
parties of 12 or nwre. For 
reservations call 460-0934 
(Nwfob) or 2««M (Hamp- 
ton). 




FAMILY PORTRAIT-a 
Donna 1^ B«lz as "Little" Mwy 
Mrs. Mor^n are one Mf^ happy fai^ i» 
11iMlr« proin ct i on ai "" 



UuH^as 
TMrwater 
Hatty." 



■ir 



fm^-^ 



Eft. DEC. 7, %9n 




I^<DASEMH£9 



Th^tre BaUet presents 
ftiflJenglh 'Nutttaeker' 



Linda Seuies of -Vir^nia 
Beach wiU alternate in the lead 
role of the Sugar Phim Fairy 
with Cristina Stirlii« Munro. in 
the ftilMenga production of 
Tchaikovaky's "Nutcraclasr" 
presented by the Old Dominion 
Uiivmily Th^tin Ballel at 



ODU's Tech Theatre. 

Public performances of 
"Nutcracker" wiU be at 8 p.m„ 
December 7, 9. ii, and 12; 
matinees at 2 p.m., December 9 
and 10. Admission is $i lor 
(Mkb%n under 12 and $2 for 
iMnager* and adults. 




opens thriller 



■f 



rattier and dauKhter in ttie Little Thwiire af Norfott 

productam of 'Speaking of Munler," opening Friday 

Dec. 8. (Phato by Bob Phelps) "i^»"'8 'rway. 






' ViiT-^ TVk,H«{ ?-S*>\ 



The Little Theatre of Norfolk 
will present the English 
mystery-thriller "Speakii« of 
Murder" beginning Friday, 
Dec. 8. Curtain is at 8:30 p.m. 
and performances continue 
nightly through Saturday, Dec. 
16th, witti ttie exception of the 
nth and I2th. No performances 
are scheduled for those 
evenings. 

Originally produced at 
London's St Martin's Theater, 
the show opened on June 4tfa 
1958. Audrey and William Roos 
were the authors <rf this three- 
act drama. 

The country hwne (rf the 
Ashton family provides the 
setting. Charles Ashton (Nelson 
P. Williams) a widower for over 
a year, has recoitly ronarried 
and the family is adjusting to 
the new Mrs. Ashton (Kathy 
Bowen-Woodward). AnnabeUe 
Logan, (Vi Ragen) who has 
designs on Charles, plots the 
elimination <rf the new Mre. 
Ashton. The audience is kqrt in 
suspense as her plan is carried 
out 

R(*ert Callahan and Jennifer 
Raye Williams portray the 
Ashton chiWren, Ricky and 
Janie. Vera Moore jrfays the 
blackmailer, Mre. Walsworth; 
Suzanne McDaniel a|H)eare as 
Mildred; Ronald J, Murphy 
appeare as Police Sergeant 
Mitdiell; anl Misty is Joe tfie 
*«- , 

Chi Ou Lively directs this 
show for the Little Theatre of 
Norfolk. 

^servations are accqited by 
calling the box office, (827-8551). 
Ticket disownts are availabde 
im studoits, enlisted military 
personnel and groups. 

The theatre is at mi 
Claremont Avenw. 

•M .t ^•{''^ ii :« -..V.-, i 



Monday TV 



Aa.m. 

( 3) These Things We Share, 
Agri-Business, Sunrise 
Semester, Lift Up Mine Eyes 

t:30a.m. 
(10) Garner Ted Armstrong- 

7 a.m. 
( 3) CBS News 
(10) Today Show 
(13) Tennessee Tuxedo 

7 30 a.m. 
(13) Tidewater A.M. 

• a.m. 
( 3) Captain Kangaroo 

9a.m. 
( 3) Dick Lamb 
(10) Romper Room 
(13) Jeff's Collie 

9:30a.m. 
(10) Petticoat Junction 
(13) 'Movie- "Legend of the 
Lost" 

10a.m. 
( 3) Joker's WNd 
(10) Dinah's Place 

10 30a.m. 
( 3) Price Is Right 
(10) Concentration 

11a.m. 
( 3) Gambit 
(10) Sale of the Century 

11 30 a.m. 
( 3) Love of Life 
(10) Hollywood Squares 
(13) Bewitched 

Noon 
( 3) Where the Heart Is 
(10) Jeopardy 
(13) Password 
(27) Of Lands and Seas 

» :30 p.m. 

I 3) Search for Tomorrow 
no» Who. What, Where Game 
(13) Split Second 

1p.m. 
( 3) Mildred Alexander 
(10) liiews Maaazlne 
(13) All My Children 
(27) 700 Club ' 

1:30p.m. 
{ 3) As ttie WorW Turns 
(13) Let's Make a Deal 

2 p.m. 
(27) 700 Club 

If «!• Apaito 17 missioii is on 
schMhite, Ciiamials 3, 10 and 13 



Norfolk ITieatre 



DEC. 11, 1972 

will start coverage of the 
descent and lunar landing 
(scheduled for 2:S9 p.m.) at 
approximately 3 p.m 

2:30p.m. 
( 3) Edge of Night 
(10) The Doctors 
(13) Dating Game 
3 p.m. 
( 3) Love Is a Many Spiendored 
Thing 

(10) Another World 
(13) General Hospital 
(27) Insight 

3- 30 p.m. 
( 3) Secret Storm 
(l6) I Love Lucy 
(13) One Life to Live 
(27) What Every Woman Wants 
to Know 

4 p.m. 
( 3) Family Affair 
(10) Superman 

(13) I Dream of Jeannie 
(15) Sesame Street 
(27) New Zoo Revue 
4-30p.m. 
( 3) Andy Griffith 
(10) Munsters 
(13) Ponderosa 
(27) Brave Stallion 

5 p.m. 
( 3)Merv Griffin 
(10) Lost in Space 

(15)Misterogers' Neighborhood 
(27) Leave It to Beaver 

5-30p.m. 

(13) News 

(15) Electric Company 

(27) Bugs Bunny 

«p.m. 
( 3) News -- 
(10) News 
(13) ABC News 
(15) Sesame Street 
(27)'Jim and Tammy 
« 30p.«. . 
( 3) CBS News 
(10) NBC Ne«n 

(13) Movie--"Ouel on the 
Mississippi" 



7 p.m. 
( 3) Troth or Consequences 
(10) What's My Line? 
(15) Electric Company 
(27) Daktari *, 

7:3«p.m. 
If the Apollo 17 mission is on 
schedule. Channels 3, 10 and 13 
will begin coverage of the first 
lunar walk at approximately 
7-30 p.m. Any of the following 
programs may be delayed or 
pre-empted. 
( 3) Death Valley Days 
(10) Sports Special 
(15) Animals and Such 

7:4Sp.m. 
(15) Report Card 

• p.m. 
( 3) Gunsmoke 
(10) Laugh In 
(13) The Rookies 
(15) Special of the Week 
(27) Teach in 

9p.m. 
( 3) Here's Lucy 

(10) NBC Movie--"A Shot in the 

Dark" 

(13) Football New York Jets at 

Oakland Raiders 

(15) The Plot to Overthrow 

Christmas 

(27) 700 Club 

9-30p.m.. 
( 3) Doris Day 

10 p.m. 
( 3) Bill Co$by 
(15) The Advocates 
(27) 700 Club 

|lp.m. 
< 3) (10) News 

IIMp.m. 
•f me Apelle 17 misston is oa 
schedule. Channels 3, is and 13 
will cover the cenclasien of tbc 
fartt Ivnar walk af as- 
proximately 11 sa p.m. 

Midnight 
.( 31 CBS Movie"Otoly" 




SOPHISTICATED DINING 
FOOD FOR THE EPICURIAN 

OCEANScb>T&wlNTc¥LL^ 
BANQUET & DINING ROOMS 

1^ SEAroOD & PRIME BEEF 
OUR SPECIALTY 



DAILY LUNCHEON 

SPECIALS 

$1^5 



Opcntedb^ 



r" 



'^*°^,^;**'" ' MANAGEMEKT CO. 
OoMaFioBt*7di 

nmH42»6836 



lit 'i' 
■-u.'i Xh. 






^^ 



/ 



^xhibi 



it of American paintings 
on display at Chrysler Museum 



The Chrysler Museum at 
Ijorfolk is currently exhibiting a 
(Section of Amaican paint- 
ir^reseitfing our country's 
_^ i ral develofmient from the 
^Bi century tm*ough the early 
|Dth century. 

The exhibit will be at the 
museum through Dec. 31. 

The exhibit contains exam- 
1^ of portraiture, landscape, 
history, American im- 
pressiwiisnf and 20th century 

dty life. 

Portraiture is the first 
medium encountered in an 
exploration ct the Am«-ican 
past Eighteenth century 
Americans viewed portraiture 
m the only acceptable art form 
because it had highly practical 
social application. 

Gilbert Stuart's portrait of 
C^pt. Skefftngton Lutwidge, «i 
exhibit at the museum, was 
rompleted in 1788 and 
represented the American 
technique of painting an exact, 
realistic likeness. It also 
represented the English por- 
trait tradition which he had 
todied wbOe living in L4ndon. 

Also found in the «chibit are 
three portraits by Charles 
Wilson Peak, all of which 
developed more directly from 
American ideate. The group 
inclades likenesses of Mrs. 
niomas Elliot, her dau^ter 
Mrs. John O'Donnell and her 
panddaughter. 

Like Stuart, P«ile was 
concerned witti the personality'^ 
of the individual. Instead of 
concei^rating on tte face. Peale 
used fKMture. i^^re and ex- 
> lernal dementi, such m a piece 
•f jewelry, as. descriptive 
devicA. 



Aajn. 
( 3) These TMnt* We Share. 
Agri Business, Sunrise 
Semnter, Lift Up Mine feyes 

«-Ms.in. 
(i0> Garnur ?««' Armstronf 

( 3) CBS News 

(10) Today SHOW 

(13) Temienee Tuxedo 

: 7Ma.iii. 
(13) TidewMer A.M. 

•a.m. 
( 3) Captain Kanaaroo 

ta.m. 
( 3) Dick Lamb 
(Id) Romper Room 
(13) Jeff's Collie 

f-Ma.m. 
(10) Petticoat Junction 
(13) Movie "Alexander tlie 
Great," Part One 

10 a.m. 
( 3) Joker's Wild 
(10) Dinah's Place 

II 3«a.nl. 
( 3) Price Is Right 
(10) Concentration 

na.m. 
( 3) Gambtt 
)b( 10b Sal* (4. the Century 
V T • litMa.m. 
■( 3) Lova of Life 
(10) Hollywood Squares 
(13) BewH<»ed 

Neon 
( 3) Wkare the Heart Is 
(10) Jeopardy 
(13) PsMvMrd 
(37) Of Land* and Seas 

I3:3tp.m. 
( 3) Search for Tomorrow 
(10) Who, What, Where Game 
(13) Spm S«<»nd 

1p.«. 
( 3) MHdrod Alexandar 

■■\mmmi 

(37) 70t eiwb 

1:M|Mn. 
( 3) As the WorW Tt^ns 
(13) Let's Make a OmI 



f J r J J J J J fffff 



It was during the 19th cen- 
tury, when westward expansion 
was the American rage, that 
landscape painting became a 
maj(H- form of artistic express- 
i(m in this country. 

Frederick Church's 
"Cotopaxi," painted around 
1863, is one of the best examples 
of this period The painting is a 
large, romantic work reflecting 
the teachings of the Hudson 
River School. 

The Hudson River School is 
represented in a more 
traditional sense by Jasper 
Cropsey and his painting of the 
"Old Red MiU" from 1876. His 
landscape is naturalistic, 
showing his interest in trees, 
water and the reflecti(m of light. 

Albert Pinkham Ryder, 
another artist who <rftai painted 
landscapes, has been called a 
non-realist because he was 
frustrated by his attempts to 
paint the details of nature. To 
compensate for this he began 
seeing objects as basic forms. 

"Diana" is typical of Ryder's 
work after 1880, when he began 
painting poetic or literary 
subject matter. Painting on 
wood, be coMtantly reworiced 
the (rils, giving "Diana" a 
muddy, cracked, brownish 
quality characteristic of 
Rj^ler's technique. 

' By the late 19tti centurj^ 
American artists became in- 
terested in the works of the 
French impressionists. 
Americana were ateo influenced 
by poat-imprcssionisin and the 
art nonvenu Rwvement. 

Hassam's "Chet la Fleoriste" 
was paiirted in IMS, Uvea years 
after Ms visit to Paris. The 



Tuesday TV 

DEC. 12,1972 



2a.m. 
( 3) GuMlna Vm 
(10) Days of Our Lives 
(13) Newlywed Game 
(27) 700 Club 

asoa-m. 
( 3) edfl* of Might 
(10) The Doctors 
(13) DatNao Game 
9p.m. 
( 3) Love Is a Many Splendored 
Thing 

(10) Another World 
(13) General Hospital 
(27) Insight 

3 Mp.m. 
( 3) Secret Storm ' 

(10) I' Love Lucy 
(13) One Life to Live 
(27) What Every Woman Wants 

to Know- 

4 p.m. 
-( 3) Family Affair 
(10) Superman 
(13) I Dream of Jeannle 
(15) Sesame Street 
(27) New Zoo Revue 
4fl0p.m. 
( 3) Andy Griffith 
(10) Munsters 
(13) Ponderosa 
(27) Brave stallion 

la.m. 
( 3) Merv Griffin 
(10) Lost in Space 
(15) Electric Company 
(27) Leave It to Beaver 

S:30p.m. 

HtlieAartlai7«issljal»»" 
schedvie, Ctiannels 3, iO and 13 
will baahi coverat* •» •"• 
tecoad lanar wath at ap- 
Bfoximately S:3i a.m. *«f ^ 
Hie fellawlag pretramt may be 
delays er pre-^a^sd. 



background rf tiie Paris street 
scene was painted in subdued 
grey tones while the flowers 
were in vibrant pastels. 

Until the 20th Century, 
Americans were floundering 
between the formation <rf their 
new cultural heritage and their 
European backgrounds. By 
1900, a small group of artists 
known as Oie Eight began to 
focus on those things that were 
uniquely American. 

Many kA these painters also 
worked as newspaper 
iQustrators, and their reporting 
of scenes and events reflect this 
fact Their honest, cool ob- 
servations disturbed the public 
and the critics dubbed this 
grmip the Ash Can School. 

"The Shippers" by William 
Slackens was painte din 1907. In 
it, the artist records the actions 
of several wmnen ixsing sub- 
dued tones. His observations 
seem to be the predecessors of 
the ph(^raphic image. 

George Bellows, a fdlower of 
the Eight, is generally known as 
a painter of prize fights, 
religious revivals and city 
streets. His "Emma at the 
Piano" was painted in 1914 and 
is a portrait of his wife. It is (me 
of his most sensitive and in- 
timate WMtS. 

The Chrysler Museum's 
samfding of the period rein- 
forces the fact that the 
collection provides an op- 
portuiufy for experioicing uid 
understanding tlie spirit of 
American art devrfofunent 



«-30a.ai. 
( 3) CfiS News 
(10) NIC News 
(13) Movie - "Girl on the Ron" 

7 p.m. 
( i) Truth or, consequences 
(10) What's My Line? 
(15) Electric Company 
(27).Oaktari 

7;3tp.m. 
K 3) The Adventurer 
(10) Anything You Can Do 
(15) Making Things Grow 

ip.m. 
( 3) A Charlie Brown Christmas 
(10) Hallmark Hall of Fame - 
"The Snow Goose" 
(13) Temperatures Rising 
(15) French Chef 
(27) To Be Announced 

I Mp.m. 
( 3) Once Upon a Mattress 
(13) Movie of the Week 
"Pursuit" 
(15) People PuMie 
(27) Oral Roberts 

9 p.m. 
Bold Ones 
Behind the Lines 

(27) 700 Club 

9;30p.m. 
Camera Three 

10 p.m. 
Don Rickies Alive and 

Kicking 

(10) America 

Marcus Welby. MD 
Southern Perspective 

(27) 700 Club 

11p.m. 

( 3) (W) (13) News 



(10) 
(15) 



( 3) 
( 3) 



(13) 
(15) 



WINDJAMMER. DEC 7, 1»72-P«ip7 

Wednesday TV 

DEC. 13, 1972 



Sa.m. 

( 3) These Things We Share, 
Agri-Business, Sunrise 
Semester, Lift Up Mine Eyes 

i:30a.m. 
,(10) Garner Ted Armstrong 

7a.m. 
(3) CBS News 
(10) Today Show 
(13) Tennessee Tuxedo 

7:3ea.m. 
(13> Tidewater A.M. 

• a.m. 
( 3) Captain Kangaroo 

9a.m. 
( 3) Dick Lamb 
(10) Romper Room 
(13) Jeff's Collie 

9:30a.m. 
(10) Petticoat Junction 
(13) Movie "Alexander the 
Great," Part Two 

10a.m. 
{ 3) Joker's Wild 
(10) Dinah's Place 

10:30a.m. 
(3) Price Is Right 
(10) Concentration 
11a.m. 
( 3) Gambit 
(10) Sale of the Century 

11-30a.m. 
( 3) Love of Life 
(10) Hollywood Squares 
(13) Bewitched 

Noon 
( 3) Where the Heart Is 
(10) Jeopardy 
(13) Password 
(27) Of Lands and Seas 

12:30 p.m. 
( 3) Search for Tomorrow 
j(10) Who, What, Where Game 
(13) Split Second 

1 p.m.. 

( 3) Mildred Alexander 
(10) News Magazine 
(13) Ail My Children 
(27) 700 Club 

1:30p.m. 
( 3) As the World Turns 
(13) Let's Make a Deal 

2 p.m. 
( 3) Guiding Light 
(10) Days of Our Lives 
(13) Newlywed Game 
(27) 700 Club 

2;Mp.m. 
( 3) Edge of Night 
(10) The Doctors 
(13) Dating Gam* 
•p4a. 
( 3) Love Is a Many Splendored 
Thing 
(10) Another World 

(13) Genorat HospHai 
<27) insight 

3;3tp.m. 
t 3) Secret Storm 
(U) I Lovt LUCY , 
(13) One LIf* to Live 
(27) What Every Woman Wants 
lo Know 

4p;m. 
{ 3) Family Affair 
(10) Superman 
(13) I Dream of Jeannie 



rrj'jer^ 



SB.m. 

I 3) (10) (W» NWS 
(15) Sesame Street 
(2f) Jim and Tammy 



I1:30p.m. 

If tfte Apell* 17 missioa Is ea 
KlMtoia* CbamMis 3, lO m« 13 
wiu eaver tn* caaelasiaa *l Mio 
secaad tanar mtM. at ap- 
praximaiefy it: si pJa. 

O) CBS Movie - "The 
SivafodHaad" 



(15) Sesame Street 
(27) New Zoo Revue 

4:30 p.m. 
( 3) Andy Griffith 
(10) Munsters 
(13) Ponderosa 
(27) Brave Stallion 

sp.m. 

( 3) Merv Griffin 
(10) Lost in Space 
Misterogers' Neighborhood 
(27) Leave It to Beaver 

5:30p.m. 
If the Apollo 17 mission is on 
schedule. Channels 3, lo and 13 
will cover the third lunar walk 
at approximately 5:30 p.m. Any 
of the following programs may 
be pre-empted or delayed. 
(15) Electric Company 
(27) Bugs Bunny 

Sp.m. 

( 3) (10) (13) News 
(15) Sesame Street 
(27) Jim and Tammy 

t:30p.m. 
( 3) CBS News 
(10) NBC News 
(13) Movie "Mad Doctor" 

7 p.m. 
{ 3) Truth or Consequences 
(10) What's My Line? 
(15) Electric Company 
(27) Daktari 

7:30p.m. 

( 3) Stand Up and Cheer 
(10) Hollywood Squares 
(15) Project Encounter 

• p.m. 
( 3) Harlem Globetrotters 
Popcorn Machine 
(10) Adam 12 
(13) Paul Lunde 
(15) Koltanowski on Chess 
(27) Charisma 

\ •:30p.m. 

(10V Mystery Movie 

(13) Movie of the Week --"Every 

Man Needs One" 

(15) Playhouse New York 

(27) Kathryn Kuhtman 

fp.m. 
( 3) Medical Center 
(27) 700 Club 

IOp.«l. 
( 3) Cannon 
(10) Search 
(13) Julie Andrews 
(IS) Soul 
(27) 700 Club 

Ilp4a. '■% 

( 3) «0) 113) Maw* i I 

11 • 30 p.m. 
Iff tka ApaNa i' misstaa is sa 
sdMdal*. diaaaato 3, 10 aad 13 
will cavor «»* caaelasiaa at the 
third laaar walk a« ap- 
pmimafaly ii:30p.M. 

Midaiiht 
( 3) CBS Movie -"Lola" 




SEAFOOD 

QUA 
SPEaALTY 

Cattleman's Room 

PiMODORE MMWY HQTEL 

(»ANBY ST. AT FREEMASON 
Opm fof BieakfMt-LaadhDinaaf 
6 Days a wedt fcom 7 a.BL to 9 pjfc 
OpMi Snadiirs - 9 a:ni.'ie Spja. 

Week Dm lincheM Buffrt 

BUDGET RENTTMAR IN USBY 

2 SHORT BLOCKS FROM SCOPE 



^PW 



Phone 464-9863 3139 Show Drive. 

WE SPECIALIZE IN CRAB SOUP 

dharSes Seafood 
Restaurant 




VirpmeBMcKVa. 

Akdm King Crab 
Sei^bod ' Steaks - Chops 

IVE CATER TO PRIVATE PARTIsJ 
fflou DMVE jKrwEEH LVNmivmnaKe A tT^wonr 



8-WINDMMMER. DEC. 7, 1972 




%■ 
>' 



■■•■V 



mmmmmm 



m^mmmr'^^'^^'^ 



t^m 



> ^ w^ "^ ^ 



F'^^i^->w^^l^^ ; 





City's share 
big surprise 



BySonJaHillgren 
Sun Washington Bureau 

Tlie first check of the five- 
year revenue sharing venture, 
mailed last wedc by the U.S. 
Treasury, shows that Virginia 
Beach is getting $1.3 million 
more than city (rfficials had 
been led to expect. 

And the other Tidewater 
cities are getting a little less 

Virginia Beach was told by 
ttie Treasury Department in 
September ttie city's revraiue 
sharing intake for calendar 
1972 would be $2,435,676. But 
last we^'s check, retroac- 
tively covmng the first sixth 
months of they year, is based 
on a total 1972 payment of 
13,765,440. 

The second half (rf the 1972 
payment will be mailed next 
month. 

Norfolk's payment is lower 
than the figure projected in 
September. It receives 
$6,737,540 for 1972, about 
$2,5000 below the earlier 
figure. Portsmouth receives 
$2,427,716, about $1,000 less. 
Chesapeake receives 
$1,959,M6, also about a $1,000 




The disparities result from 
thefiguring of "tax effort," one 
of the major elements of the 
revenue sharing formula. Tax 

effort is defined as all general 
purpose taxes collected by the 
unit of government except 
taxes raised for education. 

In the September com- 
putation, six and seven-year- 
old information was used to 
det^-mine tax effort. But last 
wedc's checks are based on 
fiscal 1971 figures, collected 
recently in a special Census 
Bureau survey of the 38,000- 
plus recipients of revenue 
sharing money. 

Despite their effort to make 
today's checks accurate. 
Treasury (rfficials have left 
the door open for adjustmoits 
which mi^t be necessary if 
tax effort and other factors in 
the formula, such as 
population, later prove 
erroneous for a specific unit of 
goverranent. 

Early next year the 
department will publish the 
formula data used for each 
unit and $et up an appeals 
process through which 
grievances can be filed. 





u 



% 




47th YEAR NO. 48 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1972 



15CEN1 



In today's issue: 



4ySSj:ftJ;^^§Sg^S888ffig»SB5!W«^^ 



:*:ft%:i:!%:::«s:ftS:55*5$:SSSSa86gK 



Students bring cheer to the 
elderly (page 8) 








A story on the lovely Chrismon 
Tree (page 6) 





The talented Liveleys are 
featured in The Wind- 
jammer 



City Council stiil ttruggm 
wrfth go-go (page 5) f 



Letters to Santa 






Dear Snata Glaus, 

Well, Its Christmas again. 1 am lodung forward to waking up 
and seeing ail tlie pretty things you have brought me 

How is Mrs. Claus? I hope she is taking good care of you. 
Would you please bring these things? 
Tudor Bowi-$5.44 
Thrills of Flying-414.88 
Tonka Loader-48.33 
Train Set~$49.65 
Trencher Tonka-46.50 
Total-$88.19 
Thank you, Mdvin 

+++ 



Dear Santa. 

Our ipMnes are Jeffery aB4 Michael. 

We have been good boys most of the time. Sometimes we get 
to trwWe. Bat we try to be good most (rf the time. 
-'- rvt^trtma^ v^wm* «««» i^s if yofr'MMbay of these 
thinf(8. Jeffery wants cowboy rifle set, swivtinflHIbt, tool chest 
and tools. Michael wants a guitar, a prelector, a erector set. 
...Ttiank you ^nta. 
Jeffery and Midiael 



Dear Santa. 

. How are all your raindeer attd elves? I hope they are Hne. 
And how is your wife? I hope she is fine to. Does Rud<riph still 
have his red nose? I hope he dose. 

Well we better be getting to work on the things I would like 
for Chrtmas. I want a bike. And a Madame Alexandria Doll. And 
a twister gane. And show-in-teli. 

i hope you have a Mearry Chrismas. 
I.,ove, 
Laurie 



Dear Santa: 

1 want a baby crib, a baby swing, a baby stroller, a liMe baby 
that talks, a big Barbie, a Barbie case. Barbie clothes, and a lot 
of baby clothes. 

I also want a rocking chafar so I can rock my baby to sleep, 

"^oiafejiaiBj^,. . .«^.,.. -■-;.- 

yea ! I «rMC%ome dbhes too and some roller skates and 
iron and ironing beard. 

That's all I want. 
Love. • 



Tanva 



^ 



Dear Santa Claus, 

I hope you brhig the right toys for me. Next Christmas I 
want a wooden dolly and a wooden man d<dy. I want the hair 
made of yam and 1 want the arms and legs nailed to the body 
and the bead too. So the head, arms and tegs could move. 

And you don't have to buy it if you want, you can let your elfi 
make it. And I want the eyes painted blue and Hw nose iMinted 
brown and the month painted red. And I want ttie hah- of yam 
colored red too. 

And I aren't telling you to do it but please try to make it. And 
put a neck nailed to the head the body. 
l.«ve. Van 
Make the wood brown. 

Dear Santa Claus, 

All I want for Cbriitmas is Toirfnl Bal^ TfttterlMo. My 
motter and 1 were dfaKasii^ wetlia- there raA]^ WM • ^m^ 
etawl«Wr4»rei3N«rlK VrngUagfrn MdMH. (CUm* 
present No body ever gaveymm pf«Mii«. 1%H |^ Ckm ui 
Rudauf hello. Merry Christaas? 
Love. 
Robin 
P.S. I will be in Winchester at Nawaoe's liouse for Christmas. 






Giner Nicholas, gave her best for the Cavaliers -and it 
wOTked. The princess Anne Ba^etball team defeated the 
Kempsville Chiefs. For game details see the Suns sport section 
pages 10-12. 






Before Supreme Court 



City fights apportionment 






h 




'Community interests sacrificed' 



By SONJA HILLGREN 
Sun Washington Bureau 

WASHINGTON-A counsel 
representing Virginia Beach 
told the Supreme Court 
Tuesday that tlK legislative 
reapportionmoit plan drawn 
up last year by the United 
States District Court 
"sacrificed the community 
interests of Virginia Beach." 

The counsel, Harry Frazier 
III, a Richmond attorney 
representing the City At- 
torney's office, told the high 
court that the District Court's 
reapportionment plan set 
forth In July, 1971, ignored 
political subdivisions to 
achieve pure mathematical 
equality in the size of General 
Assembly districts. 

Frazier said the plan 
disregards "quality of 
representation." He added, 
"All we've ffA. to do is be a 



slave to numbers, a slave to 
computers" with reap- 
portionment based solely on 
mathematical equality. 

Vii^fa Beach supports an 
earlier reapportionment plan 
adopted by the General 
A^embly in March, 1971. 
Subsequent suits filed against 
the General AssemUy plan 
resulted in the District Court's 
handing down of a newly- 
cb^wn plan. 

The General Assembly plan 
gave Virginia Beach three 
delegates and part of a floater 
del^ate in the 42nd District. 
The District Court plan 
transferred that fioato* to 
Northern Virginia. 

Further, instead (rf trans- 
ferring to the 40th District 
14,000 Norfolk citizens 
necessary to give Virginia 
Beach its fourth del^ate, the 
District Court transferred 
29.000 citizens from Virginia 



Beach to the 39th Distoict in 
Norfolk. Those Virginia Beach 
voters now elect Norfolk's 
seven at-large delegates. 

Frazier argued that 
mathematical equality in 
representation is a valid basis 
for congressional reap- 
portionment because the 
C(Migress determine Jiational 
policy. 

States, however, deal with 
legislation which applies 
directly to local areas, so 
those areas should be 
represented directly in the 



he 



state legislative bodies, 
said. 

Frazier argued furtiia- that 
the District Court never gave 
the General Assembly a 
chance to correct the 
inadMjuacies in the Goieral 
Assembly's plan, but, "ar- 
bitrarily lock the bit in its 
teeth and said This is your 
plan.' " 

Attorney General Andrew 
P. Miller, arguing in support 
of Virgiraa Beadi's stand, 
said, states can give "political 
subdi visions equal 



\i 



representation in at least o^ 
house of the stsHQ^ 
legislature." ' 

Lt. Gov. Henry E. Ho 
Jr. argued against t 
General Assembly's pi 
becaiee he said part of die 
reapp<Mtionment was based 
on Bureau of Census figurw 
which counted Naval p^- 
umntl at the Naval Bas^ 
rather than at their hom^l j 

Arlington House Delegi 
Clive L. DuVal II also ari 
against the General Ai 
Uy's plan. 



H 




Holiday m^t an exception 



Money, not time, 
is most important 




City Council may be setting 
a precedent in holiday holiday 
meeting when it convenes at 2 
pirt. Thursday, December 2B. 
Council agreed to that 
nrjeeting Monday in view of the 
regularly scheduled meetings 
of December 25 and Jauai^ 1 
being cancelled due to 
Christmas Day and New 
Year's Day holidays. 

This will marie the first 
lime, at least in the memory of 
most, that Cit\' Council vrted 



to convene during the 
traditiwiaj wedc-l«ig holiday 
period. 

City Manger Rogo* M, Scott 
reminded Councilmen that 
three wedts would elai^e 
between their regularly 
scheduled meetings of 
December 18 and January 8, 
and Council decided this was 
too long without consitkring'*^ 
city business which might 
ne^ attentitm. 



Address changes need repcMting 



Thi- Division of Motor 
Vt'licles urges all motor 
v<hu 1«' owners to notify the 
Division immediately erf any 
address dwnge not frevioisly 
reported since purchasing 
1972 Virginia liceme plates. 

rbangp of addrcM 
iMiUfiratimi kHouW include all 
1972 li**iBe ptaite rumbcrs 



ar^ both tM and new ad- 
dresses, inclining zip cod^. 

Notification may be ac- 
complished by contacting 
local licerse agencies, branch 
(rff ices, or the Central Office of 
the Division of Motor 
Vehiefes. P.O Box 27412, 
Rirhmrinrt Vlr^nta 



The length of a contract 
reportedly is no Icmger as 
important as guaranteed 
amount ot revenue in watec 
conb^ct negotiations Between 
Virginia Beach andj^orfolk. 

Reliable reports indicate 
this point evolved from a 
Virginia Beach City Council 
meeting Monday on the 
controversial water contract 
negotiations. A new resort city 
contract proposal was 
discussed during the private 
meeting. 

The new offer repwtedly 
would guaif ntee Norfolk up to 
^7 millicmf dollars in gross 
recei|A reveraie frwn their 
water sides to Virginia Beach. 
When ttis firmncial return is 
realized by Norfolk, no matt«- 
what the time span, the 
CMitr^ct would end 

OtN"" provpi«is rep<rtedly 
contained In the propMal 



would assure Virginia Beach 
some $9 miUim in'revenue 
frmn wato* it purchases in 
iHilk from Norfolk and then 
sdls to customa:^ in the 
Beach Borou^. Proviskms 
also were made for Virgiraa 
Beach to purchase from 
Norfolk all water Ui^ in- 
stalled prior to 1970 ^a t<^l 
cost of $4.5 miUion, with the 
resort city paying for all lines 
installed after that date. 
Options were also proviited to 
renegotiate a watar coofaract 
between ttie two citi« if a 
regional authority is not 
Ktablished by the end of ttte 
above ap*em«nt. 

Several Councilmen 
allegedly were niA in favw of 
ttie latest cwtract proposal 
for fear it might ^pardfce 
current (riam to devd«^ a 
Regional Water Authority, 
which has gained strong 
support among Virginia 
BemA City Cmmcil 



MaycK- Robert B. Cromvf 
Jr., has denied reports tfaii^t 
drafted the latest proposal: 
said, "Th^e reports arfr, 
coBTect City Manager Re 
M. Scott is still Virgit^ 
Beach's representative in '^' 
negotiations witti Norfo 
Cromwell added couc 
serves to answer Sec 
requ^t on whether pre 
are in the best inter^t of^t 




ublic. 


:•! 


f/r^^ 


4 




allftS 


Vw^JKq 


18 : 


^?>c!l 






wall ■■Uins.^b 

QIFT 1^ 






IStreetcar' an escjipe 
;from holiday chaos 



; I^cal tt^itar has it rw^ 
iu» time ti ywr. QirMnua 
^^ping, decorating the 
ikmt ami Uee, addr^sing the 
itlMi« jQ«rds...it's all ititt 
4l»^p^ittn to a qai^ evenit^ 
<y ^ater. 

'Bit &m Utde T!ie«ti% of 
%|^ia fksuA fMi it hNid m 
iMtkcidM wA to cater to Oie 
i^Qil (temand for light en- 
^^^rinmait titot to <^er in- 
ijcfa a fare of b^vy drama 
ib^ «mid take the awfience 
^^ out of the holiday limo^. 
iNgraip dMse, insteadof a 
^1^ Simon fluff, die Tor- 
wuee Williams classic 
TftNrt^r Named Desire" to 
^9le the seasonal com- 
f^tlBon. It apparoitly was a 
^m dedsioi. 

l(S c<mrse, the (Hvductton 
tftelgrwip has staged at 24th 
Sr^ sM Barbaten Drive is 
tpt just a thrown-ti^diar 
^ort. It is a very pdish^ bit 
4 theatre. Proving ttiat 
<|Mftity wiQ {vevail, (tespte 
mti. obvious holiday 
ftaftrbwte. 

•Ite stKC^s of the ^ow 
must start with the playwrite 
limself, for Williams created 
iB tMs work three monorable 
(Jhft^acters trapped in an 
^^ional |dot of hdpless 
^pi^ratim. There are few who 
(fo not know Blanche, Stanley 
sact Stella. And thwe are even 
fi«%r who cannot rdate to the 
Awal waste these three make 
(( ttieir lives. 

'EAanche, the aging ante- 
i^llinn b^uty who cannot 
ferity with youth, is a dioice 
m^ in theatre. It is loigthy 
#4 donanding but Peggy 
&>jfcin does an excellent job 
<f rt in this (xtKhictim. There 
^ times wiien she does not 
wite have the emotional 
ange needed init she pldcs up 
^ohientum as the show 
flh^e^es and brings it to a 
H^rcii^ climax. Sbe grabs the 
^idiaK^'s sympathy... they 
tepe dei^ratdy Blandie can 
woape from the "poor 
Nilations" trap that binds her 
ft the low income flat, and the 
IM^ Hie, Ai^Ni'by^er 
^sber, Stella, and bn^her^in- 
Ipw, ^anley. Mrs. Boykin is 
Kifectly cast In this nde and 
f|>e6 a beautiful jcb. 



And equal to her per- 
formanoe is that of Rebecca 
Rt^Il as Stella wh) gave iq) 
the «MAheni {dantation life to 
mMry a crude, um^uth clod 
wtMse only notable ac- 
com|rii^m«its are in sex, 
bowlii^ or pok^. Miss Russell 
^ves Just oioi^ dignity to 
the role to make her 
believable as a woman who 
has fwsaken a reflned^amily 
background for a life of 
hardship to be with the man 
she loves. Yet fAta never quite 
loses, the fire that lets the 
audioice know that Stella is a 
real woman. Miss Russell has 
done some excellent ww* with 
this group... everything from 

an old woman in "I 

Nevw Sang for My Father" to 

'he fiery prostitute in "Front 

age"... but Uus is surely ho* 

St performance to date. 

Stanley is clumsy and cruel 
and almost pos^ssed with his 
own masculine image, fearing 
that tenderness will lessen his 
manly strength. Bentley 
Aiula^on turn in some fine 
acting in this role but he is 
never quite the Stanley the 
character demands. He is at 
times adequately crude and 
cruel but Oiere is mostly 
sympathy fw him, a feeling 
that a different man would 
exist if Blanche's unwanted 
persense in the apartment 
had not interferred with his 
relationship with Stella. 
Anderson's characterization 
is not true to the script. But his 
performance is still com- 
mendflHe. 

Alan Barber, as a friend 
who wants to marry Blanche 
until he learns of her shady 
past, heads a fine supportii^ 
cast. 

And the set, designed by 
And«-»m, is an outstanding 
framework fw this production 
directed by Liz Sills. 

"Streetcar" will continue 
tonight through Saturday and 
promises to be an escape frwn 
the holiday chaos. It is a good 
productiMi of this classical 
"drama? - ^* v 



-Kuby Jean Phillips 



Foreign students visit 



'A total <rf «ght area chur- 
(Aies are sponsoring the 
Virginia Beach Christmas 
OitatiBtieial House program 
l^om Dec^nber tStfa, ttiroi^ 
^tstfa to provide a place toe 

international students at- 
teuttng American umvasities 
and collie to sp«id ^mr 

Givic cacheslra 
jpiesaits oono^ 

:■ TTie Virginia B»di Civic 
Orchestra and Concert 
Singers will present a 
Christmas concert at Vir^nia 
^^esleyan CoU^e wi Simday, 
t>ec. 16. 

: This will be the fifdi y«ir 
^ese two grau{» have JoiiKd 
|o present a concert at 
Virginia Wesleyan. The 
prt^ram will be held at 8:15 
^m. in ttie main reading room 
St the Hairy day Hofheimer, 
II Library. Albert Aserci<Ni 
%iU conduct. Admission is 
li«e. 



Qiristmas Iralidays. 

Approximatdy 80 studoits 
will be staying at the Marines 
Motor Hotel as guests of the 
ho^. They will tour the 
Vii^inia Beach, Norfolk and 
Williamsburg areas. Area 
reaidflBts m^ wish may invite 
onero- mmt stn^nts to visit in 
their hom^ durta^ their stay 
at the Beadi. 

Tlie diurdies involved in 
Him program anci die po^mis 
to oMtacA for additional in- 
formatim are the First 
Bai^t, Mrs. Virginia Tarrall 
at 428-^3; Galilee Episcopal, 
Doug Hubard at 428-4198; 
Temple Emanud, Mrs. Dot 
Kahn at 428-2656; First 
Presbyterian, Mrs. Jeanne 
AI^O at 4^3276; Good Sh- 
epherd Lutheran, Mrs. Mary 
i^ice Ambum at 428-<^4; 
United Methodist Church, 
Herb Cassidy at 428-5127 or 
Harry Yerby at 425-9270; 
Friends Meeting House, Mrs. 
Mary Warren at 428-2610 and 
Star of the Sea Catholic 
Church, Mrs. Virginia 
Meredity at 428-^73. 




TW£ SUN 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1972 



Officer Stanley F. Bennett received the F.O.P.A/s 
Meritorious Service Award daring Monday's City 
Council meeUng. Lodge representative R.L. Rtggs 
made the presentation also citing Bennett as the city's 
most outstanding ptriice officer of the year. 

Outstanding officer named 



Patrolman Stanley F. 
Bennett was named Virginia 
Beach's "Outstanding Young 
Police Officer" for 1972 and 
was presented the L. Travis 
Branch Memorial Award at a 
Jaycee Award Banquet 
Tuesday night held at the 
White Heron Motel. 

Bennett, a police officer 
assigned to the 2nd Precinct 
K-9 Corpus, will represent the 
community at a state-wide 
"Outstanding Young Police 
Officer" program in Rich- 
mond, Virginia in June 1973. 

Ron Cundiff, Chairman of 
the Jaycee sponsored 
program said, "The 
pres^tation of this award 
honors not only patrolmen 
Bennett, but all the 
professional and dedicated 
police officers of our city. "By 
giving this award the Jaycees 
are saying thank you to the 
«itire Va. Beach police force 



for keeping our city a safe 
friace in which to live." 

Bennett attended the 
Central Police Training 
School and joined the force in 
1966. As a member of the K-9 
corps he conducts many 
public K-9 demonstrations. 

In August of this year, 
Bennett observed a robbery 
taking place in Virginia Beach 
and apprehended the two 
subjects. The two were also 
charged "with murder and 
robbery in Norfolk. 

In October, while off duty, 
Bennett apprehended three 
subjects who had murdered a 
taxi driver, stolen his car and 
robbed a banlc. In both in- 
stances the subjects were 
armed. 

It is these acts "of" 
professionalism and 
dedication that truly show 
Patrolman Bennett is an 
"Outstandii^ Police Officer". 



Chamber appoints Dunn 



The Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce has 
ann<Hinced the appointment of 
Levon Dunn to the post of 
director of twirism and public 
r^t^. .^ wiU^essume the 
post on .^uary 2. 

Dimn edines to the Virginia 
Beach Chamber following 
Uiree years in a similar 
position with the Chesapeake 
Bay Bridge-Tunnel. While 
with the CBBT, Dunn made 
travel promotion calls on AAA 
offices and major attraction 
up and down the East Coast 
and in Canada. He has 
arranged tours to the 
lidewater area amoi^ travel 
industry sales people and 
travel writers. 

Walkers join for 
C^iebral Palsy 

Walkers from all over 
Tidewater will unite at 8 a.m. 
Sunday at Lakewood Park in 
Norfolk to join the Christmas 
walk for United Cerebral 
Palsy. 

Money pledged to the 
walkers will go toward 
research, a better equipped 
Developmental Center, a pre- 
school program, a referral 
system, and proper em- 
lioyment of therapists for 
these handicapped in- 
dividuals. 

Mor information can be 
obtained by callii^ 853-4329. 



"We are happy to add a 
personof Dunn's background to 
our staff," Albin R. Mailhes, 
the Chamber's chief 
executive, stated. "He brings 
1^ the Chamber f vast 
knowledge in tourist 
^iMttititHi and s^ld ez^Ke > 
the chamber's "^lan w in- 
crease its efforts in this area," 
Mailhes atkied. 

In addition to supervising 
the Chamber's current 
program in tourism, Dunn is 
expected to work closely with 
leaders in the motel field and 
the City of Virginia Beach in 
developir^ new promotional 
effort, particularly during the 
spring and fall months 




l^von Dunn 




UNFINISHED FURNITURE 
or WALLPAPER 

OFF 





Council rumors plague Santa 

ByKIRTM.BABUDER 

Rumors are dangerous. ^. , majority back on counciL.even Santa would have a 

Take the rumor about Mrs. O'Leary's cow. They rough time figuring out an 11-11 vote. 

Robert Callis seems to want the cart before the 
horse-according to rumor-it seems he wants a 
boat dock on Rudee Inlet. 

Mayor Robert Cromwell should probably see a 
doctor before he ships off his Christmas list-slings 
If that original statement had been the truth, all for proclamation arms might not be abundent at 
the mess that followed for years to come would the North Pole. 

have been avoided. And if all the rumors are right somebody on the 

As it was, only after many years was the truth Council is thinking of someone else, because 
discovered-a bull had kicked over the lantern. somebody sent in a request for a new toy city for 



said it kicked over the lantern in the bam and 
started the Great Chicago Fire. 

They found out later it wasn't true, but tlie first 
perscm on the scene said it was a cow-the rumor 
was started and the rumor stuck. 



rumor. 



PIOflELU 10 SPEEDS 

BIKE SALE 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 



But the first reporter on the scene that night someguynamedSidney to play with... according to 

heard it was a cow-and a cow it stayed-in the 

newspapers. 

A little known fact, however, has been 
discovered: a reported several days later did find 
out the truth-did find out it was a bull that kicked 
the lantern over. 

But how could he write the headline: "Mrs. 
O'Leary says it's Bull"? 

Maybe he couldn't-but I can..."rr'S BULL" 

And to prevent such a incident from taking place 
in the fair City of Virginia Beach, I will expose all 
the news. If the story is Bull, it will read Bull in the 
newspaper. 

Rumors tend to hamper the operation of any 
smooth running organization and I refuse to let it 
happen to Virginia Beach govemment-especially at 
Christmastime. What if someone like Santa Qaus 
beheved the rumors-he might dare to grant our 
officials their rumored wishes. 

1/ the following are rumors, loud 6ries of anguish 

and denial will be heard throughout the city-if all is 
quiet, well.. .they might not be rumors. 

Some of the loudest rumors circulating around 
the local men's room at City Hall concern our city 
fathers. 

I really can't believe Reid Ervin wants a crown 
and sceptor from jolly old Saint Nick-but that's 
what popular rumor says. 

Charles Gardener's rumored Christmas wish is a 
little fishy too-I can't figure out what he would do 
With two dozen bikini tops. 

Roger Scott's and Clarence Holland's wishes 
seem to be pretty much the same (I think)-they 
both want sfome kind of authority.. water or 
something like that-it was hard to hear the whisper 
over the bubbling drinking fcHintain. 

George Ferrell is thinking of a rough one-if you 
can trust rumors-it seems he wants the old 




ANY BIKE 



IN OUR 



STORE 




MASTER CHARGE a B 

All bi|(es come assembled 
and have a 30 day warranty 

"We S^rv/ce Whof We Self" 

FREE WHEELER 

IRANSPORTATION CO. 

] 5211 CoUey Ave, Norfolk 
At foot of the Co&yAve. Bridge 
489-2662 Hours: u( to 6 



>! 



The Colonel has a hdida/ message for yoij^ 






POOFF 

on a Barrel of Kentucky 
Fried Qridcen* 

Tok« thii coupon lo your particip<tfing K*n- 
twdty FrhM CMckcn ttor* 
^nAd gel $1.00 off on a 
2l-pi*c« Barrd of 
hot, t«nd«r, 
"fingar lickin' 
good" K •Mucky 
jFriad Chickan, airttar 
/Originol lacipa or 
f l«»ro Critpy. Offer 
(good through Oa- 
/cambar 22, 1972. liMit 
/oM Borral put co«pwi. 




And your Kentucky Friecl 
Qikksn store has a 
hoKcb^present for you. 




on a Bucket of Kentucky 
Fried Oiicken* 

Toka rt»i« coupon lo your porticipoling 
Kantucky friad Chickan 
^•tora and gal Ihi off 
k ono 15-piaceBuc- 
jkat ol hoi, tan- 
'dar, "ftngar lickin 
good" Kaniwcky 
fried Chicken, 
either Original 
recipe or l«tra 
' Cri^y, pbt folh ond 
/grovy Offer good 
/through Dacambar 22, 
1972. Umit one Bucket 
per coi^oa 




SO<OFFn 

on two Dimer Boxes of 
Kentud<y Fried C3ildcen» 

Toke fhii coupon to your porticipoling Ken- 
tucky Fried Chicken tlore ond gel iO# off 
on the purchoie of two Dinner Boxet. €och 
^dinner Includes 
^Ihrae pieces of 
Lhol, lender. 




finger lickifl' 

good" Ken- 

— ", >f ■ hieky '"•<< 

mSr I Chicken, 

JJfc^-P either Orig- 

^^^^" inol lecipe 

or Extro Crispy, 

cole slow, moshed 

pototoet, gravy OTd warei 

Offer good Ihrovgh Decem- 

1^2. limii one purdiMe 



\ 



CUP THESE COUPONShJ 

Offer good at nearest participating Kentucky Fried Ctiick^n stores 



warei ■ 
ice«- I 



mmtm 



mmmmmm^^^^m^ 



r^^^^^r^^^^mm ■L^pu^l^^^^ 



■ -■ - — =p ^ 






1 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 14, 1972 



THE SUN 




There . . . here. 

Just in time for Christmas shopping — 

our new traffic lights. 

Now, zip in and out of Hilltop/North 

Shopping Center. 

No congestion — and there's ample 

parking to permit you to pull up near 

your favorite store. 

Forget traffic problems here. Friendly 

poUcemen ,are at the entrances to 

guarantee that you spend your time 



shopping — not waiting at entrances or 

circling for a parking space. 

Bring the kiddies. Santa will be at 

his Hilltop workshop 3 p.m. to 6 

p.m., and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday 

through Friday. And from noon 

till 6p.m. on Saturdays. 

Best of all — Santa has a gift 

for every child. 

Make Hilltop North Shopping 

Center your "Christmas City." 




t a 




0|MiiEv(»u)NigktUiiti(tOP.M. 



hilltop north 
shopping center 

Laskin Road at Hilltop 



Andrea's 

Arlene's Uniforrm & Tuxedo Shop 

Beach Sail and Ski 

Beacon Book Shop 

Carol Lee Oonut Shop 

Carpetown 



Carvel Ice Cream Supermarket 
Chapman's Jewelers 

Oara's 

Egerton & Lea. Ltd. 

First National Bank 

Food Fair Quality Discount 



Gilbert Optical Company 

Health Food Store 

Hose & Clothes Outlet 

Jorgee's Petit Cafe 

LaVogue 

Maternity Nook 

Peoples Drug 



Radio Shack 

Roses^tores, Inc. 

RusselPand Holmes 

:lt Fibrics 

Shoney's 

Somethin £lse 



Stitches 

Taylor Burgess Hairstyling 

The End 

The Nanny Shop 

Travel House 

Wornom's Arts and Crafts 




\ 



F/^4 



THE SUN 



m»<aA^a^aamjninniinnmnnnnni ^ , ^ i^im ^ 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1972 




Men must admit equality of womenH 



litis 
>S| Wo i wwuHl Md^ xnrviNta ftMCli, VlK^iya 2MS2 

^wHiwwHwry i«iwii«4«».a«M 

^IMMMyl^Dcv tevid I^MMt, Qwwvl Managtr 

^f^Ham n t RMlto Inc Rifty Jwn Phitlips. Mantging Editor 

i^wttlMctntitw 
nftirthi^niltebpy 
.acMtsibKniiH.f9 



To the Editor 

Wttti r^rd to the letter 
from AT 1 John Sumney l^N, 
<H-»-ini) «^ is deflnildy 
againt the "Ekiual Rights 
Amendm^r, I wmdd Uto to 
make the following com- 
ments. He bases his argument 
on "what God says about 
equal r^ls" in the Bible. 



First, T must say that I, though 
I may be in the minority but 
c«-tainly not alme, do not 
believe in the authenticity <rf 
the Bible. The Bible is the 
word of men, mrt ttie ward of 
God. written by men for the 
benefit of men and used by 
very clever men to frightm 
uneducated and sup«^titiaus 



SUttUftBAN 
NEWSNM>EIC£ 
or AMIERICA 



U SenxM* dtizens are very grateful 



VlrHMa itaH AMQ^Mon 



Honestly, fellas! 

: . Hits go-go tMJsin^ is making Vii^inia Beacli 
'^ok ri<fiadoiis. One minute the city is in the 
'^^Mentietti <%ntury with big mo(teni motds and 
.^^rtainment desigm to a^act the tourist cbUar. 
.the nect minute it's bac^ in the days of GtBce 
^IlK-wood ami the right^M^ are on a witch hunt. 

that's the Ug deal anyway? Forbid or resbict 
i^p^ss dancing and you "drive the Uttle boys 
*rM". Take away the conbtwersy and what have 
you g<A? Boredom. And nothiiig dampens en- 
IhiBiasm like the boredom of routine. "If you've 
se«i one, you've seem 'em all!" It's as simple as 

l^eadline nears 



To ttte Editor: 

Thank you for the article on 
FYed and Ruth Brecht. Your 
artide focusing on the fine 
things they are doing will 
cei^iinly help to bring dignity 
and respect back to being over 
sfacty. 

So many of our seniois wiff 
not admit to b«ng over sixty 



b^ause in the last few years 
yre have trodked to put them 
low on the totem pole. 

Now wifli the h^p of won- 
derfid people like you, we will 
be abte to turn the tide. 

Gratefully, 
Mrs. nulip Lee Russo 



hordes into believing as tlwy 
did. How echicafed, intdligent 
people today (especially 
wwnen) can believe it as 
being ttw word of God is un- 
believable. Surely, anyone can 
write or say something and 
claim it is the inspired w(ntl of 
God— Charles Manson is proof 



UTTrtS 
to the 
EDITOR 




Please get aD the facts 






».< 31ie time tot giving is upon us. And because it is 
|Vtfe time for giving Amds run short; it is all most 
I » BmOies can do to meet the demands of those gaily 
iVMa'apped packages that go to friends and loVed 
• fdAes. 



• It is also the time for asking. Itie mails are filled 

• witti i^]iKste for d«iati(»is to various charitable 

I ^ '^anizatioiK, bes^ching the reacter to give s(»ne 

*f2^d or s<»ne group a happy Omstmas. Eadi has 

; moit. in its own right, and deserves consideration. 



To the Editor: 

I read your article on Mr. 
J(dH) Olsen and roller skatii^ 
with absohite amazement and 
my inunediate reaction was 
Qiat you would do wdl to 
emulate Sgt. Joe Friday and 
get "Just the facts, sir, just 
the facts." 

Tlie statonent made was 
that priM- to Mr. Olsen's 
arrival there was no com- 
petethre skatii^ in the area. 
HOGWASH! The facts are 
that long before Mr. Olsen 
appeared in Virginia Beach 
there were competetive 
skatov representing the old 
Mercury Skating Rink In 
Norfolk and The Plaza Rollo- 
lUflk on Lynnhaven Road in 
Virginia Beadi. 

In 1949 and 1950 Claude 
Whitefatffst was the Juvenile 
Boys National Champion. In 
1965 Dd>bie Dutch was a 
national finalist and in 1967 



JoAnne Young was a National 
finalist (bef(R« she skated for 
Mr. (Msen) all representing the 
Merciffy. 

In 1968 my two children 
Pamela and Douglas were 
National Finalists in both a 
pairs event and singles ev^t. 
They r^aresoited the Plaza. 

In 1970 JoAime Youi% was 
a^in a flmlist representing 
the Mercury and in 1972 my 
daughter was again National 
finaUst in the Senior In- 
ternational Division. There 
are probably more that I do 
not know about, but as you can 
see the statement was absurd. 
The other ^ring error was 
that JoAnne Young was in- 
vited to dcate the work! meet 
ttiis year. Only the three top 
places in the Senior In- 
ternational Division are 
digiUe to skate a world meet 
Miss Young is net yet eligible 
for this event fw two reasixis 



1 ) Age, and 2) she has m^ yet 
earned her way intd it. 

You have stq>ped on a lot of 
capable skater's toes because 
of ttiis article and I think ret- 
raction should be printed. 
Howevo-, I fed the blame 
should be {daced where it 
belongs, at Mr. Olsens feet. He 
knew the statements he made 
were false as he tau^t my 
children for 2 years before 
they changed to another 
teadier, and I'm tired of Mr. 
Olsen tooting his horn at otter 
peo|des expense. 

Skaters appreciate the 
publicity, but please in ttie 
future, try to verify 
statements by calling otho* 
rinks teachers or skaters in 
the area. 

Sinco'dy, 

Mrs. Del Schloemer 

P.S. There are (^hos in the 

area who have achieved G<dd 

Medal proficiency status in 

skating besides Mr. Olsen 



^ llier^ are some needs, however, that stand above 
' others, ja^ as some nee<i^ family is more deser- 
l vii^ than othra's, simply because they are trying 
: very hard to hdp themsdves without assistance. 
* But just can't quite make it. 



of that There wen even 
people willing to believe him. 
The Bible has been writtoi 
and rewritten, translated and 
retranslated so many times 
not ev«i your major religiora 
can agree completely on its 
content. 

How God must look at us 
with dis^ist— the iidiumanity 
of the human race. All ttu-ou^ 
time— nation against nation, 
human against human— 
murderit^, raping, fa>rturing, 
demwalizing and only God 
knows what else. But (or man 
even that is n^ enou^i— he 
has to S(d)jugate his mcrther, 
wife, daughto-, etc. to himself 
and other men solely b«»use 
she is female and then has the 
audacity to say it is God's 
word. 

I think we've all been tai^ht 
that God is just and merciful— 
where is Oie justice and mo^ 
when one human is subject to 
another. This idea is a male 
egocentricity not the law of 
the Supreme Being who is 
certainly above such human 
nonsense. 

The passages from the 
Bible, quoted by Mr. Sumney, 
are probably the most well 
known of all— self righteous 
men have seen to that. How 
comforting it must be to these 
men to know that regardless 
(rf how low they may sirk they 
are still superior to all women. 
One by one the man-made 
myths concerning the in- 
feriority of women are being 
disproved. It has been 
uneducation, subtle brain- 
washing and conditioning 
(and in some case man's old 
faithful— brute force) that 
lave kept women subservient 
Perhaps when men are 
willing to admit that women 
are their equals they will be 
able to abandon the egotistic 
nvale hang-ups that they have 
been conditioned to. TOien- 
maybe we will airbe^e to 
live in harmony ttie way God 
intended it 
Sincerely yours, 

M.L. Page 




■^mf$^ 



Mind Your 

MoTtey By feier Wener 



'Scriptures have been twisted 



• 

4 



^ it is with the Easter^ Virginia Medical Sdiool. 

lUs badly neected facility has Kefen dialtenged to 
raise some seven hundred thousand ^Oars by'ftie 
&ad (rf this y^r in order to qualify for a multi- 
million (tollar contribution. As of early this week it 
will take n^rly twenty-eight thousand dollars 
DAILY in order to m^t this goal. 

Gtizen particii»tion is tte key to the sirccess k 
^ fliis schod. If the prople show that th^r truly 
I support it, then the generious donation of a Rich- 

• mood coiqde will be gained. And it will open the 
I (kKN- to <^er grants that d^>«id on citiz^ par- 

• ticipation. 

: The Eastern Virginia Medical Schod, finding its 
'* iH-eUminary roote at Lei^ Memorial H(»|»tal, wiU 

• be kx:ated in NcM*foik but will provide invaluable 
: sCTvice to the entire Tictewater community. It wiU 
: ho\j^se tonorrow's medical prof^sitmals. It will 

• save tomorrow's lives. 

* 

I A staff hai^ already been obtained. A very 
: capable ami knowle<^eable staff. Plans fcH* the 
: facility are in readiness. And securii^ the present 

• donation, which dqiends on community su|^>ort to 

• the tw^ of seven hundred thmisand dollars, will at 
: least launch the projects so that it might grow 
I tfaroi^ tbe y^trs by qualifying for additional 
' @^nts. 

: * 

I It is a very w<athwhile endeavor. Consider it in 

I your spirit of Christmas giving. What better way 

than to give life? Send your check, no matter wbai 

the amount, to Porter Hanfy Jr., CoUey Av^uie, 

Norfolk. Befcre Decmnber 31-please. The lights on 

• your tree will shine brighter. And the glow in your 

• heart will be warmer. 



Response slow 



Response to the oirrent Sun 
^irvey question has beoi 
vnry, very li^t tWs past 
week. ^Mpfiog and partks 
and cOtet dnristmat activities 
Ittve uodoiiNaMy distracted 
m«ny readen «^ wouM have 
olhmvMe respMded. 

The ciBTH^q^iMtin! con- 

f^nii^ the need for more 

: State cMitroi on the Hampton 

i Roads Sani^tim Duitrict as 



wdl as otto- private utilities, 
however has merit We hope to 
see more interest and eoocem 
over the problem in ttie 
coming week. 

As evident in the Letters to 
the Editor section above, 
many readers are still in- 
volve] with the &]ual Ri^ts 
AmdoKiment ^islatim and 
we welcome any mwe 
tlmights on the amendment 



SUN SURVEY 

OUKTKM; SiioiM VifsMt Baach lagMaton ba 
urgid to pfMi tht Garaial AmmUy for mora 
otMi co^frob OMf tfw Himpton Roatb Ssiiltation 
Oniric m mtU m tfw pnim» utility aoiiipaniii? 
Yow iiimh i iii ii Ii mm! tj^td ^ters wmiU be aj ^eci atod lUa. 

IfES D MOD 

^ Mi Hhm Ik mm\k KMH SM, 
Ik 1137, MgM liaA, ta. fSm 



To the Editor: 

Hardly a day goes by that I 
don't omie across a person, 
letter, or article that twists the 
scriptures. However it is 
Nghly unusual to see almost a 
half page of sudi in one paper 
as we were treated to in '"The 
Sun" on December 7, 1972. It 
will be my purpose to answo- 
only the highlights of abuse set 
forth therein as a fiill answer 
would require «]ua} space. 

(1) TomakeNum. 27: 1-11 Oe 
equivalent with modern 
"wMnen's rights" is to miss 
the whole point This provision 
had to he made to insure 
wnnen of JUSTICE, because 
they DID NOT SHARE 
EQUAL RIGHTS with men. 

(2) I Cor. 14:34 was not 
written becaise "women were 
generally uneducated, and 
thereby unable to comprehend 
all of the matters of which 
their husbands spoke in 
church" Some folks don't 
care what words they put into 
Paul's mouth. Let's listen to 
Paul's reason for ttiis com- 
mand as stated in the same 
verse as the command, "but 
thQT <women jg) are com- 
manded to be under 
obedience, as also saith the 
law." 

(3) I would say to Mr. 
Burdick that I agree with his 
summation, indeed there is no 
basis on which tt> deny women 
rightful and just com- 
pensation for services ren- 
dered; but to attempt to ex- 
plain away such a plain 
command as I Cor. 14:34 is to 
attempt to explain away the 
Lord's commands. See I Cor. 
14:37. 

(4) The next writer 
ASSERTS that Jesus broi«ht 
a "RESTORATION OF THE 
EQUALITY OF THE 

SEXES," but makes no at- 
tempt to prove it. That 
salvation was brought to all, 
Jew and Greek, male and 
female, bond and free, (Gal. 
3:28) no one woukl deny, but to 
make this cmitaidict other 
passages is to do ^t iHiat 
Mrs. KilUngswmlh sa^ we 
must not do.. ."Befcne we biBld 
an entire style of life on these 
verses we should corskla' 
what the Bible as a wh<rie has 
to say on ttiis subject" In- 
deed, let's do ttiatlet's har- 
monize the scriptures, lefs 
ranember tiiat there is also a 
wrse that says (like it or not) 
"I suffer not a woman to 
teach, nw to usui? auttMrity 
ova- ttie man, but to be in 
sitam^" (I Tim. 2:12) Tlie 
truth m that while ttw w«t! 
"ClM-k*ian" u iwuta-. ap- 
plytng totwtti nmi and women 
m CHRKT, at the sanw ttane 
Vhmt are dstinctive rda to 



be played by each. (Eph. 5:^- 
33) 

(5) I was amaMd tin learn 
ttiat I^ul had bN^ "entirely 
at«ine when Ly<tti took over 
leadership in the first 
congregation in Europe." Ap- 
parently Mrs. Killings- 
worth's Bible has some 
passages that mine has 
ommitted. I have found Lydia 
in only two v«-ses in mine, 
Acts 16:14,40. In UiataccounCI 
read where she heard the 
\i?ord. believed the word, 
obeyed tiie word and that lata- 
ttie church met in her home. 
I'm still lookii^ for something 
ttiat says, or even hints that 
she "took over leaden^p" of 
any congr^ation. Is it 
possible ttiat Paul said to the 
woman, "Don't usurp 
authority over the man," and 
ttien turned ri^it around and 
let a woman do that voy ttiir^ 
with his knowledge? If he <fid, 
then he was as fickle and 
hypocritical as those who 
twist his words today. 

(6) Then it is stated, ttiat if 
all of this is true, a woman 
could never occupy a position 
of authority such as a 
"teacher, minister, editor, 
etc." Well I'd never say Oiey 
"couldn't," wonen. like moi 
have beoi dang pretty well 
what th^ want to do ever 
since ttie garden of Edoi. But 
I would say that if Paul wrote 
by irispiratimi of the Spirit no 
God fearing wcmian who is 
sedcir^ to please God ratho- 
than sdf couM evo* becmne a 
preacher of ttie g(»pel or allow 
hersdf to be placed in a 
portion, teaching «- other- 
i^ise, wherein she usurped 
authcrity ova- the maa Of 
course, if you reprd ttie 
writings of Paul as does the 
next scribe I shall 
review. wdl then, you are 
going to have your own way, 
no matto- what God and His 
little book have to say. 

(7) It would see that Paul 
was a "cranky old batchelor 
who as anxious to see the 
rabbinc customs of Jest» 
time carried out in the new 
churches." Obvimisly Mrs. 
D^olt doesn't r^ard ttie 
writings of Paul as impired of 
God. Either that or she Nis 
never seen what Paul had to 
8^ in sudi pasamec as Rm. 
10:1-3. II Cor. 3:1-18, Gal 
4:1-11. 5:4. Phil, 3:1-8, all of 
wMch need believing, mrt 
twisting and ^nning. 

But let's coMMler the in* 
spiratioi ot Paul for a nMme^ 
Mn, DeBolt Paul said he mm 
insured. I Cor. 14:37, 2:12 and 
E|^. 3: 1-4 was he a Mar? Wtet 
dMit P^er, ma he taaptoed? 
f^ter saM PmiI w»m ini|Mred 
n Pet 3:IS-1«, <M he Iw? Mn. 



D^dt seems to have some 
r^ard for John, but let's see 
whs^ John said^^ abMt the 
in^liiration (rf 1^ jostles 
(Peter bang mte of these 
iBider coRBkleratimi), in Jn. 

14:26 he says ttiat the Fattier 
would send the Holy Ghost to 
theaposties to teach them "all 
things, and bring all things to 
your remembrance, what- 
soever 1 have said unto you." 
You might also consider Jn. 
15:26. 16:13 and if you ttiink 
Matthew was inspired look at 

Matt 16:19. 18:18-19. 

The summaUm of this is 
q^ite simple, if John and 
Matthew were inspiroi, so 



was Peter because ttiese in- 
spired men said he was. If 
Peter was inspired, so was 
Paul, because Peter said he 
was. And if Paul was inspired 
ttien st(^ accusing him of that 
for which there is no proof. If 
you cwisider Paul's i|vriUngs 
as uninspired, simply say so 
and let your readers know you 
have no intention of sub- 
mitting yourself to what he 
says even if they do prove he 
taught that women were to be 
in subjectioi to men. 

Yours truly. 

Jade Gibbo-t 

Preacher 

Haygood Church of Christ 



Ihe hoUday season te also called ttie "fire season. " 
CoM weattier. extra heating, parties, drinking, cafeleas 
smoUng, eduustion-aU lead to more danger from firia In 
homes. Iliis year some 6,000 pe<vde have died in tlMb* hwHM > 
victims of fire and smoke. Fires have aim burnt up or danu^d 
nearly |1 billion wolfa of hones and fumiridi^. 

Ihe bidk of deaths and dollar dami^e, acconUng to Rktard 
Bri^t, fire ocpert at ttw National Bureau of Iftandnr^, '*#rid 
have been prevented if ttie victims' hmnes have been prt^icled 
by an early warning smdce-detection system." UiAil recentfy, 
however, these smoke-detection qrstems wa% quite cdafly 
because ttiey were installed ttirou^ regular, electrical wiring. 

Now you can get good protection ft-om smoke detectors ttifit 
cort as little as 135 to 145 and are M easy to install as a pictine on 
die wall. Iliey operate from house current thnMigb a pli^in 
wall cord or tturou^i batteries. One type detecte smoke iHtti a 
photodectric cdl. When nnoke readus a critical pcrint, it 
farealn a droiit in the cell and an alarm is sounded. 

Anottio: type woits ttiroi^ an ionization proceas wfakA pteks 
up combustion partides (ions) coming from a fire. Mamifac- 
turers of eadi type daim theirs is siqierior to the ottier. In 
general, the ion type seems to pick tqi qi^ flame flre^ (stH^ as 
drapes ignited from a fireplace spark) a bit quidter ttim the 
phc^odectric type. 

Hie i^Nrtodectric detector seems to pick up long-smoklering 
fires (such as cigarette butts on carpets or ciuhiom) stmwiriiat 
faster than the ion detector. Actually, dther type of (tetectmr can 
give the avera^ homeowner or apartment dweller more (ban 
adequate protection. 

According to governmoit fire exgeri Bright, the only kind of 
detection device that really isn't suited for hone use is the kind 
that's activated by heat. Smoke usually gives a quicker warning 
than heat. 

To be moat effective, smoke detectors should be installed on or 
near ttie ceiling in strategic spc^ where smoke is most likdy to 
pass. "You should install a detector," says Bright, "some place 
between your living room and bedroom areas fa* miidmum 
prelection." 

An apartment, molnle home or one-floor house, Bright nd- 
vises, should have detectws in the hall as nrar the bedrooms as 
possiUe. A two-floor house diould have a detector at the head of 
^e stairs to intercept smdce before it gets to the beidorooaa. If 
you have a basement, it's wise to {Hit a second d^ector near the 
head of the basement ^irs. Your local fire department sfaoidd , 
be able to hdp select Uie best IocbHoos. | 

Sometimes the right spot for a d^ector is rait near enough U»| 
an dectric outlet to plug it ia llien, you might try a battery-? 
ofxrated detector. Spedal four-volt batteries last about a year ' 
and a warning is sounded when they begin to run tow. 

Detectors with plug-in cords are mme rdiable because yoa 
don't have to wary about the batter^ running low. The 
ph<Aodecb-ic-type detectors, have bulbs ttiat have to be 
replaced. Bulhs usually last from one to two years and Ittve a 
warning ttiat sounds when ttiey bum out. Ion-type detectors witti 
idug-in dectiic cords require no bulb or battoy chan^ng. 

The government has instalted 16,000 smoke detectors in ttie 
mobile hones used as temporary housing for Hurricane Agnes 
victims, and an increasing number of dty and state bailiUi« 
codes are now requiring smoke detectors UistaOed in all newly 
itructed Imising. 

I 

ieach man helps 



To ttie Editor: 

If Rdwrt W. Smitti of 2337 
Great Neck Curie, Virginia 
Beach is represcntetive (rf the 
peop]e in yoto- city, it must be 
a nice place to live. 

Smith storied to hdp us on 
Hif^way 95 near Ehnoit afto- 
we'd been stranded in our 
camper for nearly three 
hotffs. 

We figured 10,000 cars and 
truda must have passed our 
rig in ttiat time, whizzing 1^ 
ttie sign we put up asking 
"Hdp, Need SmaD Jack" 
afto- our Uowout; ignorii^ 
flares, frantic arm wavings 
and all. 



Our. Jackhad bnakesvit was, 
atarttog to get daik, and 
every truck that wait by 
rocked our small canqxr- 
pickup, and ttiings bagan to 
kwk hopdess. 

&nith not only stopped; he 
lent us his jack, two concrete 
blodcs wiuch crumbled at last 
under the buck's wd^ and 
(Mfaer equipment to h^w get 
back on the road agafaL 

We wondered where your 
l^bway patrd was diuing 
thoise hopden three hours, 
but we were awfulty glad 
Smith was there. 
Jim and Sally Swaik 
Porttand, Otegim 




Lsii4/i^fg^m^^^^ i} . 




^^"*«^WWP»W^tWl 



East crisis. The key to his plan "Harvanl Lampoon's" full- 
is to work out a deal with the length, fold-out picture tA 
Kronlin to reduce tensions what looks like Henry IQaa* 
and encourage both sides to mger— in the nude. "Hie pic- 
negotiate. President Nixon ture is not of Kissfaiga-, of 
will take up the plan with course, but the resemblance is 
Soviet party chief Leonid so cloee it has turned an 
Brezhnev nMt year— at a othowise no-hum parody into 
White Hbuse summit meetmg. a spectacular best sdla. 

It «rill take Soviet interval- Harvard's undergraduate 
tion, in Kissinger's view, to editors expect to ralu in hun- 
keep the Syrians from setting dreds of thousands of dtdlars 
off the powder k^. Secret on the issue. The trouble is; 
reports from Damascus have The Harvard Lampoon is non- 
warned for many months that profit. The studoits can't 
enUy will never be presented Syria's president, Hafez pocket the money they make, 
as evidence to a military jury. al-Assad, has been militant in It's Harvard Univasity that's 
Dr. Eugene Stammeyer of his private omversations. One cashing in on "Kissinger's" 
Washington, D.C., found, CIA account says that Assad naked body, 
after testing Calley, that the told his subordinates that Uie EYES RIGHT— The Ma- 
lieutenant had "a potential for Syrians will fight no matter rine's top 'brass have sf^ead 



-Spedal Report from Waahhigton - 
MURDERDER OR MADMAN? 

By Jack Anderson 

1972 Pulitzer Prize Winner for National Reporting 
(Coprriglit, l»7t, kjr United FMtiira Sjmdieatc, Inc.) 



WASHINGTON - Nearly 
five years after the tragic My 
Lai massacre, our military 
judicial syston is still agoniz- 
ing over tiie fate of Lt. William 

Cal^. He is the only man the 

military has convicted for the anxiety attacks of near panic whethw Egypt or Israd starts the word'thaiifc they"want^^ 
slaughta of viUagas at My proportions when unda limit- it. pictures of women in \ha 

^J^jf^" TheSyrianarmychirf, Gen. ranks. A recent directive 

Dr. Stammeyer wrote that it Mustafa Tales, is also quoted makes it mandatory for mo- 
would be difficult to dracribe in the secret reporte as telUng men NCX)8 to submit pictures 
Calley s exact condition on the his miUtary colleagues tosdy, with each promotion from 
day of the massacre, but add- "There is no other choice. We lance corporal to master sor- 
ed: "it IS unprobable that Lt. must fight and we will fight." geant. The pictures will be 
CaUey was able to main- General Tales acknowledged, used to hdp determine which 
tam...objective, rational con- "All the Arabs combined are young lady gete a top secre- 
trol, being surrounded with weakw than Israel." But he terial job. Tile Marines explain 
horror, cnidty and violent vowed the Syrians would fight hastfly that then- top brass are 
°^r!- anyway, "if not to gain a not looking for ksotdroute as 

Professor Arthur Wdder of victory, at least to keep the secretaries. The brass, we're 
Nctt York also tested Calley war case hot between Syria told, just want to give the 
and c«iduded: "The possi- and Israd." more hrfty womai NCOs an 

bUity of a psychoUc or pre- General Talas contended incentive to trim thdr waist- 
psyclKitu; conditkm must be that, if the Arat» had am- lines 



Lai in March of 1968 

Lieutoiant Galley's sen- 
tence to life imprisonment has 
already been r«luced to 20 
years and his defense attor- 
neys are now arguing in court 
that the conviction should be 
ovotumed entirdy. They are 
saying that the Vietnamese 
villaipers slain were "fair 
game," that Calley did not 
blow th^ woe noncombat- 
anto. 

Lost in all the legal maneu- 
vering is the possibility that 
CaUey may have beoi 
mentally disturbed on the day 
of the killings. Calley has 
steadf asUy refused to consMo- 
an ituanity i^a and govern- 
moit psychiatriste who ez- 



<»n^aed....This patient's 
test remdte are oiggestive of a 
seriois p^Mtk a>ndition." 
Confrwited with these find- 
ings, Galley's chief couisd, 
amirwd him have calkd him d^^ufied fM George Latimo-, 



normal. 

Yet two ysyzhaV^^iM, 
HKwkii^ ind^iendently, have 
testol Calley. Their find- 
ii^— irtuch are ranolcalrfy 
stoOar- raise seriois ques- 
tions about Oe stete of 
Ca^'s miMl M the (Uy (rf tte 

We \akye obtained the otm- 



conddered an insanity de- 
feMe. Would Calhy mmt to 
risk bong Iwanded a murdao- 
or a mi^nan? The Imtaiant 
ami Latins- dented irrevo- 
cably af^inst dainUng in- 
sani^. 

KISSINGER'S PLAN 

Hawry Kiasinga-. the White 



tinned to fight Israd after ILLEGAL DRAFH-Dis- 
thdr defeate in 1948, 1956 and turbing- re|>ots frtim Bethd, 
1967, rathor than turn thdr Ala^, indicate that the 
backs, many woM toados National Guard may be 
might have chan^ tiidr iU^^y draftli^ Eska»M into 
polkies toward tte Arab- ite ranks. Load reemtters, 
Israeli disimte. we've tooned, have a)n4rfled a 

The Soviete, momwhite, Hst of young EsUmos 
have extoided t^mt influoice "digibfe" for the GuaitL The 
wiUi Syria by increasing mill- recruitirs, wt're told, have 
taiy shipmente. Kissingo- is flown several Edchnos to 
counting on U^n to chedc-rdn Bethd. ocamined tiian ud 



the Syrians. But foU Kak 
fi^tii^; is still v«y much a 
posdbUity in the Middle EaA. 



Sdential resulte <rf Ci^^'s Home fc»dpi pf^iy e^mi, 

psfOtfAf^^ teste. TiMse l»s seraffly started iwwk on a 

Jai^yp^wd tfocumrate a^w^- jrfan for settii^ the MkMb 



s^Md tJwm into tte QumI 
withoit first Uru^ te 
recniite iiiat tte Guard em 
(mty Mx^t >«hinte«s. ^1 
davito have beoi fiM «Ah 
NUDE KISSINGER-WiOi- Alaska Le^ ServioB pRrtaM- 
ii^ton u all aflutta ov«- ^ tltt pmctka. 



-AROUND TBEUS.- 



m^^^^. 



^m^s^^!^^^^^^ 



ar-* «w. SB. m^w^vv' ^'F-m^ 



?w g%^ i fttf,^f'M )iiaM f;TO ' fniftT tr»i^iii.t. 



MWMWMIWl' 




THURSDAY. DECEMBER 14. 1972 




THE SUN 



PAGES 



Another deferral 
qn topless decision 



Newly elected officers ot Princess Anne F.O.P. Lodge 
No. 8 gather rwind incoming Lodge President Dtt. 
E.R. Wliite (Ift. ctr.) as iie recieves tlie symbolic gavel 



of office from S.E. Cherry during iiHtallatiwi of of- 
ficer. 



City employee proposal received 



Those attending Monday 
night's F.O.P. Lodge No. 8 
officer installation dinner 
were told a proposal for the 
Cify of Virginia Beach to pay 
city employee's retirement 
berwfits to the State Sup- 
plemental System has been 
favorably recieved. 
PoliceChief Col. W.W. Davis 
made the comment while 
addressing those attending the 
affair. He however cautioned 
the proposal is facing dif- 



ficulty in being passed in the 
next General Assembly 
session. 

Davis explained the plan 
was drafted by Traffic Bureau 
CO. Capt. G.K. Bryan 
following a request from City 
Manager Roger M. Scott for 
any suggested legislative 
changes. 

The proposal was one of five 
which were accepted by City 



Council and forwarded to the 
city's state legislators. 

Davis quoted Del. B.R. 
"Bev" Middleton with saying 
employees would expect cities 
and municipalities to comply, 
and this may present some 
difficuluty in getting the 
proposal passed. "It may be 
impossible," he pointed out, 
"for some cities to give pay 
increases by assuming the 
employees contribution to the 



Apartments approved over 
objections from the Navy 



A use permit for the con- 
struction of 208 apartment 
units in what has been 
classified as Oceana NAS's 
high noise zone three received 
City Council's approval 
Monday, over vigorous db- 
jections fr«n the Navy. 
The living units will be 
comtruted 1^ Paul Wilson and 
Douglas Thrasher in the 
tt LiMidon Bridge area, near the 
^ intersection of Old Great Neck 
' V- Road and Reagan Avenue. 

Capt. Robert C . Mandeville, 
' Oceana CO., reminded 
^Cnmcil, '*Tbe Na«iy>4oM not 
omslder'a rcsidentilil bulM-Up 
in this area compatible with 
Oceana operations. There are 
300 flints daily, taking off and 
landing, which pass 300 feet 
above existing apartments 

Legislative 
hearing set 

Delegate BR. (Bev) 
Mivklleton, oi Virginia Beach, 
has called for a public hearing 
to be held Monday December 
18. 

In a letter addressed to 
other Delegates who have any 
portion of Virginia Beach in 
their district, Middleton ex- 
plains the purpose of the 
meetii^ is to "afford the 
^neral public an opportunity 
to express their views on 
pending or desired legislation 
to considered in January, 
1973." 

' The Virginia Beach City 
Council has already expr^sed 
their desires to the Delegates 
in the form of a 12 page letter 
prepared by the city 
managers office and the city 
attorney. 

The City Coi^il's proposed 
legislation is that which 
council feels will benefit the 
city directly or indirectly. The 
legislation from the city 
deparbnents; recomendations 
enabling local government 
more options to solve local 
(M-oblems; Bills carried over 
from the 1972 session which 
are of special interest <rf the 
city; and a sdective review of 
pemling legislation that would 
have an impact on the city. 
The lata- is chiefly revenue 
l^islation which would ha ve a 
lower piorily in the off- 
budget sessim of the Graa>af 
AssemUy. 

Included in the 12-page 
letter by the City Council are 
two changes in the City 
Charter. These change must 
be ammended through the. 
General Ass«nbly. 

The two changes council 
hopes to be |»ssed through the 
General Assembly are 
procedureal: council wants 
the right to adoft its own rules 
and procedures; and a. 
resolution bringing the 
electiMi ot the mayor and vice 
nm}kr into line wiOi Uie 
dung^ made in Uie terms of 
Uie eouiKilmaj. 

"ftie public meetine will be 
held in City Council clbmbCTS 
Monday at 7:M pm The 
public IMS ben urged to at- 
tend this meeting by mwnbrrs 
ot Citv Cwmcil. 



daily. It won't take to many 
apartments on the upwind or 
downwind end of runways 
before we're asked to cease 
operations, and we can 
foresee this." 

Mayor Robert B. Cromwell, 
Jr. reminded Mandeville the 
~City sympathized with the 
Navy's position but the area 
was already zoned for multi- 
family use, and the Council 
was faced only with the 
qu^tion of granting a use 
permit 

Vice MaycH- F. Reid Ervin 
said. "Tliis is a testimwiy to 
our lack of zoning in the city in 
ttie past." His motion to ap- 
prove the application, 
seconded by Councilman D. 




Murray Malbon, was ap- 
proved. Councilman Robert. H. 
Callis, Jr., cast the lone 
(fissenting vote, on grounds of 
involving the health and 
welfare of residents in the 
area. 

Other applications for use 
permits forwarded by the 
Planning Commission for 
Council's consideration, and 
there disposition, were: 

-l-Herbert Cashvan, to 
stable a total of 20 houses in 
the Lagomar area ; denied. 

-I-Damiel R. Pulley, Jr., 
construct 36 apartments in the 
Hadowlawn Heights area; 
deferred until the December 
28 Council meeting. 

-f- Celeste J. Smith, operate 
a day care center kt South 
Lynnhaven and Pritchard 
Roads; aii^roved. 

+City School Board, con- 
struct a junior high school 
near interesection of In- 
■ dqKndenc^ Boulevard and 
proposed Wak^ield Drive; 
•pixoved. 

-I-Dr. Richard S. Dailey, 
operate a veterinary medical 
clinic in Pembroke Meadows 
Shopping Center; approved. 

-I- Virginia Beach Imported 
Automobiles, Ltd., opeate a 
new and used motor vehicle 
sales and service at in- 
tersection of 21st and Lee 
Stieets; apin-oved. 



system. I wouldn't be over 
optomistic about it." 

Davis commended all 
members of the police 
department for their work 
during the last year. He said, 
"Virginia Beach has the finest 
police agency in Tidewater 
and the State, if not the nation. 
You have gained the respect of 
everyone. There is nothing 
more precious than the image 
you have gained with the 
public and the city's ad- 
ministration." 

State F.O.P. Lodge Past 
President Didney E. Cherry 
administered the oaths of 
office the newly elected of- 
ficers of Princess Anne F.O.P. 
Lodge No. 8. They include Det. 
E.R. White, President; Jack 
Pallett, Vice Pros.; Officer J. 
Mobley, Sec; R. Phillips, 
Treas : Officer K. Paul, 
Guard; Officer McAlea, 
Conductor; Maurice Ealy, 
Chaplain; and Officer S.F. 
Bennet, Trustee. 



City Council Monday again 
postponed any decision on 
whether to permit a con- 
tinuation of topless go-go as 
live entertainment in several 
Virginia Beach locations. 

The move came during a 
rehearii^ of the Jamaica 
Inn's application for a live 
enterainment use permit, 
Mrlier denied by Council, to 
continue featuring topless go- 
go for patrons of the Diamond 
Spring Road establishment. 

Attorney Owen Pickett, 
representing the Jamaica, 
said his research of State and 
City statutes "...leaves a 
question as to whether the City 
can ask for a use permit..." 
for such an activititity. 
Pickett added, "TTiis activity 
is r^ulated by the State ABC 
Board, the Board is aware of 
activities (in the Jamica 
Inn), and has made no com- 
plaint." He also pointed out 
the City's Health Department, 
which issued a permit for the 
selling of food, has filed no 
complaint against the 
Jamaica. Reiterating the lack 
of any other opposition, 
Pickett told Council there 
were "justifiable reasons to 
aj:|>rove the request," and he 
" . . .does not know of one fact to 
deny the application." 

Attorney Grover Wright, 
ret>resenting the Innkeepers 
Association, told Council, "I 
think it's about time you face 
the issue squarely and ask the 
question, do we want nudity in 
public places in Virginia 
Beach when used soley for the 
sale of alcholic beverages?" 

Sam Houston of the Council 
of Civic Organizations con- 
tended, "Council has the 
responsibility to define live 
ent^tainment." In regards to 



(irover Wright for the Inn Keepers 



HRSD outlines pollution safeguard 



Capt. Mandeville 

Michael Mosely 
earns hi^ honors 

Cadet Micl»le A. Mosely, 
son. of Mr. and Mre. C.R. 
Mosely, llOl Cedar Pt. Drive, 
has earned academic honors 
for the second six weeks 
grading period of the first 
semester at Wentworth 
Military Academy. He has 
earned superior grades to 
qualify for the; dean's Special 
Distinction List. 

Cadets who earn academic 
honors during the sp«:ified 
gradii^ p«-iods at Wentworth 
are accorded extra privil^es 
and are permitted to wear the 
Scholastic Bar on their 
uniform. 



"Die break in a line of the 
Hampton Roads Sanitation 
District treatment plant at 
Little Creek two weeks ago 
has been attributed to con- 
struction work in the area. 

City Manager Roger M. 
Scott, quoting from an HRSD 
rq)ort on the incident, in- 
formed Council the cracking 
of the lines apparently 
resulted from the earth set- 
tling as a result of nearly pile 
driving operations. 

Scott also quoted HRSD as 
saying a cost study has be«i 
undertaken to deto-mine the 
fcdsibility of constriicting 
parallel lines in the sewage 
treatment plant as a 

safeguard against any future 
iHeakage ot original lines, and 
thus preventing any 
recurrence of polftition in 
(hesapeake Bay. 

The report was reqtKsted by 



Council last week when a 
break in the plants line 
resulted in a shell fish ban on 



waters from Cape Henrv to 
Old Point Comfort, including 
the Lynnhaven Kiver. > 



PRESENTS 



Jaycees s6ek young 

man of 72 



AT 
MONEY 

SAVING 
PRICES 

PRE 






M(»4.-FRI. 



SAT. 



SUN. 



10 a.m. - 10 p.m. 
9 a.m.- 6p.ni. 
12 - 6 pjn. 



The Virginia Beach Jayc^s 
are seeing nominations tar 
the "{^tstanding Young Man 
of the Year" for 1972. 

I^arry B. Lowwn, chair- 
man trf the Jaycee selecUw] 
ccMnmittee, said the recipient 
mist be i)etween the agra of 21 
and m. 

The award will be based on 
"distir^uished contributions 
lo his profession and ti>c 
general welfare of the citizens 
(t( Virginia Beach and the 
State of Vir^nia" 



Nomination forms may be 
obtained by writing I-arry B. 
Lovvorn, chairman. Out- 
standing Young Man Com- 
mittee, Virginia Reach 
Jayeees, ffl40 Custom Circle, 
Virginia Bnch, 234.S4. 

All nominations shmild list 
the specific contritMitim^ of 
the person nominated. 
I>eadline for reviving the 
mimination forms i.s January 
9. 117.1 Tiw recipcnl will he 
announced al Ihe January 23, 
1873 Jaycee merling. 



GRAND 
OPENING SALE 



Fri.. Sat., Sun., Mon. 

424-2238 
NOW 
OPEN 



COME BY AND! 
SEE US 

OR 
CALL US 

326 South 
Milit«7 Highvwy 
Acrc^ From 
WAYSIDE PARK 



topless go-go he said, "Morals 
come into focus wiUi respect 
to family life," and requested 
a deferral on the apDlic*it«"n 
until the City defines live en- 
tertainment. He also 
suggested a procedure 
similiar to recent action 
outlining what constitutes a 
townhouse. 

Pickett countered by 
pointing to 18 months 
operatiwi of the Jamaica Inn 
resulting in no adverse af- 
fects. He asked, "Can those 
who have not seen what is 
going on act on this matter? If 
the ABC Board determines it 
is not proper they will stop it. 
It is not pn^r fw Council to 
decide what the ABC Board 
will permit." 

Councilman Charles W. 
Gardner questioned whether 
the ABC Board has preempted 
council's right to decide on the 
matter. He pointed to currant 
efforts by the City to define 
live entertainment, in order 
that all such applications 
would receive uniform 
treatment. 

A motion to defw cwi- 
sideration of the application, 
as well as others of this type 
was passed by council. 
Councilman Robert H. Callis, 
Jr., cast the lone dissenting 
vote. 




i 



Sam Houston speaks on go-go issue. 



OJFPS REPAIR, INC 



The Traffic Safety Council 
of New York offers this tip 
for parents : After^your teen- 
ager has been driving the 
family car, be sure to adjust 
the rear view mirror and the 
seat position, the span of the 
seat belt, and the radio sta- 
tion ; then head for the near- 
est gus station. 




— Specializing In — 

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS 

• Leaky faucets oPaintiiv 

e Carpentry tqiairs • Floor ttte 

• Broken windows and doors 

• Hotted out gutters 
NO JOB TOO SMALL! 



FREE ESTIMATtS 



PHONE 
497-7349 



4920 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 



EMERGENCY ' 
NIQHTSi 499-33«9 



Planning a party? 




• • * • 



Invite Sandler Foods first 



A Complete Selection of PARTY FOODS 



APPETIZERS 

Delicate Patty Shells 
Assorted Hors d'oeuvres 
Assorted Cold Canapes 
Wing Ding Drumettes 
Barney Egg Rolls 
Swedish Cocktail Meatballs 
Franks in Blanket 
Variety of small party Pizzas and 

Pizza Rolls 
Full Assortment of Crackers and 

Potato Chips 

SEAFOOD 

Crab Fingers 
King Crab Legs 
King Crab Meat 
Fresh Backfin Crabmeat 
Fresh Special Crabmeat 
Peeled & Deveined Shrimp 

(asst. sizes) 
Jumbo Cooked Shrimp 
Frozen Jumbo Shrimp 
Variety of Fresh Fish 
Fresh Oysters & Clams 

MEATS 

Cooked Smithfield Ham 
Cooked Turkey Breast 
Cooked Roast Beef 
Boned & Rolled Turkey 



BEVERAGE MIXES 

Frozen Daqueri Mix 
Frozen Whiskey Sour Mix 
Mrs.J'T" Bloody Mary Mix 

CHEESE SPREADS 

Sharp or Blue Cheese Spreads 

RELISHES, PICKLES, OLIVES 

Sweet Mixed Fancy Pickles 
Cocktail Olives 
Tomato Pieces 
Pickled Corn 
Hot Cherry Peppers 
Fancy Relishes 

DESSERTS 

Assorted Frozen Pastries 
Cream Puffs and Eclairs 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Plastic Glasses for Parties 
Fancy Peanuts of All Kinds 
Delicious Party Rolls 

ENTREES 

Full line of Convenience Foods 
Ready to Heat and Serve 



All Items Available In Assorted Sizes 
Many other gala holiday party foods too numerous to mention 

SANDLER FOODS 

1224 DJamond Springs Rd- 



Si^cialty Foods Division 

Off Northampton Blvd. Bridge Tunnel Bd. 
«t Route Y snd 13 Y Intersection 



nMmr464-3554 Open Weeki^ T4 6 PM and Satwdays \m Noon. 




hurch displays Chrismon Tree 



THE SUN 



An opnteuse win be hiM at 
rest Rn^Q^ortei CfaunA, 
IM i^ ftcMk AveiiK, fw 
pamm to view the Chmimin 
11^», from BOW to 2 p.m. 
^aday, 10 a.iii. to n(K» 

?' TOead«y . and 7 to 9 p.m. 

*ira^iaAy and Tliurstfeiy. 

;^ijte C^rismms, which 
t^B^dain Jous Qirtst through 
ij%^tf symbob, wo^ made 
^^ bMie (rf te diurch and 
J^^i «n the tne. Eadi 
l^tewB is made of wire, 
•^^wMte and gold beads and 
^^i^nm. Some of them indude 
^a^^M^ of red. 

Snne W Oie ^rmbols usoi 
•^^Mtet Oiret's historical life, 
^mmt! tlSxsr% WK used by 
0ftHm. Mnradf ami His con- 
NlMpararies to descrftje hte 
i'MtMre and mi^on. M(^ 
combine sev»al 
» qaMB and i^teres to 



presat a mess^e, althou^ 
swne utiliie only «« or two. 
Ite biek sigtt and symb^ 
do not change but each 
Onianon giv« its uitique 
mesage dep«iding on the 
way Uie various danents 
Ittve be«j united. 

Tl» colors wed are wttte, 
^^wch is Ok Litm^ical color 
fcH* Christmas and M^^sts 
the imoc«ice, pinity and 
p^ection <d the Saviw; goW, 
wMch symbolizes thej^ory 
md maje!^ of God jrlSd His 
»n and is derived from 
BiUioU usa^. The tmdi of 
red appearing on some of ttie 
Chramons ffi to remind peo^ 
of the blood (rf Ovist by whkA 
Ihqr wa« saved. 

Mrs. Lee Richardi, 
chairman (rf the project, 
explamed ttet die^Chrfanans 
predaiming ttw Tame God, 



one God in three persons, were 
placed clockwise in an 
im^nwy loop, or the top part 
of a figure ei^t, on the upper 
lalf erf the tree. TTie symbols 
iBed were: the hand (rf God 
desipiating the Father, the 
chalice on a Six-point star 
representing the Lord's 
Supper and attributes of 
Christ, the shell on an eight- 
point star denoting Holy 
baptism and regeneratim, the 
lamb represoiting Christ and 
a dove, the Holy Spirit. 

The Chrism<») representir^ 
tte Trinity employs three 
symbols — the shamrock 
w^ch was used by Patrick, 
according to l^end, to explain 
the myst«y of One God in 
three persons, and the triangle 
oitwined with a circle ot glory 
to suggest die etoiial natore 
oi the Triune God. 

A largw h>op, or bOtUm 



part of the eight, running 
counterclockwise on the lo^^" 
half of the tree shows God's 
revdation of Himsdf in Jesus 
Christ. Chrismons include the 
scroll with the prophecy of 
Christ's coming; the nwe 
representing Christmas; 
Pelican-in-her-Piety, Lent; 
Phoenix, Easter and the 
r^urection; the charicrt, the 
ascension <rf Christ and the 
flame, Paitecost, the gift M 
the Holy Spirit. 

Numerous other symbols 
and signs are utiKzed in the 
making oi the Chrismons. 

This is the third year tlw 
women of the churdi have 
made the ornaments and 
decorated the Chrismon Tree, 
according to Mrs. Richards. 
Even the smallest (rf the 
Chrismons takes several 
hours to make. 





IVIi-s. James Alexander Kridel 

Miss Sandra Chalmers 
weds James A. Kridel, Jr. 



ICHRISMON TREE — Mrs. Eleanore Jackson adjusts 
-Mx af Unt Inndmate omanueQte^an |ftji^^pi§. Hie «f- 
napeirts are carefully plac^^B^nsvenl ane from 
""" " tiaif a person's view of anotter oiifc. 



teagui 



ITS PRETTY. KrisUe Lynn Cttrllng. 4. seems to be 
thinking as she examines the ornaments decanting 
the lowere braifches of the tree. She's the daughter ttf 
Mr. and .VIrs. Frank Curlim; of the Beach. * ^ 



ttiftm Equal Rights Amend- 
fnmt drew the most 
d^ssion during a hin^emi 
'find&y at which The Norfolk- 
Jfiq^nia Beach Leagiw of 
lUanen Vote? ocpr^sed its 
.ideiits (m current is«i« to 19 
fna l^slatm^. The luncheon 
KTBs h^ at Shore Drive Inn. 
a'^he League favors the 
ratification of ERA, Mrs. 
Alfred Wood, who presented 
^» 4jNigae's view <m the 
^idle, told the Tidewater 
Knat(Mi5 ami del^ates. When 
in&of ttie legislatns brought 
^ the fact that die Virginia 
federation of Womoi's Chito 
Vf^xmes the admendment, 
lint Wood exidained that 
Ufei^ie members fed the club 
fPtthen are msguid^ and do 
aot- really understand the 
euMents (rf ERA. "We h<^)e 
you will lst«i to us." 
r»4ft answer to a que^on 
$Bi^Kt^Bg alimtny, ^ sakl 
^(•the financial situation of 
^MlttK man arui woman in a 
Mcvce case should be taken 
Mfconside.-ation before the 
|M|i^ dedd«s who stoiki pay 
^ The man should not 
aitomatkally be required to 
fliiy'^the alimony. 
Sol Thomas R. McNamara 
*i>M<»f(A noted Uiat ttie 
Virginia state constitution 
prohibits discrimination 
lecause of sex and inc^irMi 
irhat Virginia won^n had to 
t^ die rattfkatiflo of 



ERA. Mrs. Wood pointed Uiat 
a number of areas are 
governed by the federal 
government rather that state 
and cited the need for better 
social security benefits for 
hcHisewives as one example. 
%e also explained that the 
L^gue is inta-ested in the 
ri^ts of all women and not 
just Virginians. 

The Lea^ie's stond on the 
admoidmeit was presented to 
Governor Linwood Holton and 
Us cabinet at the Governor's 
Conference at Scope 
November 21. The statement 
says the League "feels that it 
is urgent that this final 
historic step removing all 
legal obstacles to the full 
equality of women, and 
removing many unfair 
distinctions that work to the 
disadvantage of men as well, 
be ratified by the State of 
Virginia." The stotement 
w^es Governw Holtm and his 
caUnet to use their influence 
with the General Assembfy in 
ways appropriate to thdr 
position, to help assure 
favorable action m ERA. 

The League supports the 
estoblishm^it of day care 
centers and training 
programs for disadvaittaged 
adults, Mrs. A. A. Flynn, 
spcAesman on the Human 
Resource issue, told the 
kgislators. Manbers ateo fed 




AMJS - Haaiaade 

^tth wreatte. ropiag and fresh greens 
Pay Cataiy Gardea Onb Anaul 
.m. to § p.m. FrMay at ttie A4P 
mt^^^^m^m-^ww •■ l*«Wn Road and at Food Fair 
ta^^^^HM. tl«. A.C. Th o m p so n (I).). Mrs. 
^mn D. Thaiiias aad M«. ^rry A. FraxM (toplay 
^me «r ^ ««aBMBto which will be availaMe. Ad- 
«iMe t^n «ay «e ^aMd with Mrs. Ttemas at 4» 



that busing must be available 
as a tool to assure that "every 
child have the opportunity for 
equality education". Mrs. 
Flynn commented that 
m«nb«^ did not fed busing 
was necessarily the only tod 
or the best tool but that it 
should be used when and if 
other tools fail to provide 
equality in education. 

Mrs. Patrick Rollins, 
speaking on education, said 
the League was pleased with 
change in the formula for 
state funding in the school. 
The state now reimburses the 
schods according to average 
daily membership rather than 
average daily attendance as in 
the past. State-wide kin- 
dergartens are favored by the 
women. Mrs. Rollins stated 
die Lease's position on the 
use of public funds for 
educatim. "Use public funds 
fw public schools. Do not use 
public funds for private 
schooling." 

W^duieses in the Wetlands 
Act were pdnted out by Mrs. 
Robert Racine, environmental 
chairman. The League 
believes "a clearer (fefmition 
of altematiai (rf wetlands for 
necessary economic 
devdopment and necessary 
private development" is 
n^ded. It feels persons ap- 
pcrinted to the Wetlands 
Boauds should have some 
knowledge of the subject. 
Projects set up prior to the 
passage of die Act but not 
acted upon widiin a specified 
teigth of time shouM k»e their 
exemption under die Grand- 
father clause. All boards 
shMM be totally indepemlait 
of any Inanch cify or coimty 
government except City 
Coundl or Board of Supo-- 
visors. 

" The position on the justice 
system included the support of 
bringing Justices of the Peace 
undo- the court structure Iq^ 
making them salaried om- 
ployees of the State; 
rewgaiuzing C(Hirts Nd of 
Record into districted 
statewide system with full- 
time ^d^s; unification and 
smplifioition of the Courts of 
R«»rd and adding an in- 
temwdiate Court of Appals 
below tte Supreme Coinl to 
exp»MtelMndling of increased 
(^selowb. 

"(^pm space must be an 
int^nil f»rl of daily lift- and 
Uw environment," Mrs. A. H. 



Gordon, land use chairman, 
remarked, "...we must think 
ahead, on a regional and 
statewide basis — the time is 
now and the responsibility for 
adoption and implementation 
of an open space {»*ogram and 
direction must be bom by the 
Commonwealth with positive 
guidlines..." 

The League also supported 
the establishment of a 
regional government if it 
would provide better service 
economically and would not 
become "just another layer of 
government", an improved 
juvenile court system, and a 
regimial mass transportatim 
syston. 



Miss Sandra Frances 
Chalmers, daughto- d Capt. 
Norman Edward Chalmo:^, 
U.S. Nav (Ret.) and Mrs. 
Chalmers d the Beadi, was 
wed to James Alexander 
Kridel Jr. at noon Satorday at 
the Little Creek Amphibious 
Base Chapel. Chaplain George 
Truett Boyd officiated. 

The groom is die son of Mrs. 
Leonard Brown of Englewood, 
N.J. and James A. Kridd of 
Choral Gables, Fla. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her father. She 
wore a Fabiani designed gown 
of white velvet. It was 
fashioned with a pearl 
neckline and full-length 
sleeves accented with pearl 
trim at the wrists. The skirt, 
which was gathered in the 
front widi a flared back end- 
ing in a slight train, fdl from 
a highwaisted bodice. A 
cathedral-tength veil of im- 
ported silk illusion cascaded 
from a cap d white velvet 
mitlined with pearls. She 
carried a bouquet d white 
mist, white roses, miniature 
carnations, star flowers and 
lily d the valley. 

Miss Frances Dea Clialmo^ 
of the Beach, sister of the 
bride, was the maid d honor. 
She wore a periwinkle bluei 
velvet gown and carried white 



mums widi blue star flowos. 
Her bridesmaids y/ere Miss 
Susan Harrison Zix d the 
Beach and Miss Mary Levis 
Crump d Richmond, Mrs. 
Charles Edward Westernuui 
Jr. d Fairfax, Mrs. John 
Francis O'Donnell of the 
Beach and Mrs. Robert H. 
Ro|^ d La Spezia, Italy, 
cousin of die groom. Thdr 
gowns were st^ed identical to 
that of die honor attendant 
Russdl W.H. Kridd of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, brother of 
the groom, served as best 
man. The ushers were Capt 
Robert H. lUipp d La ^»^, 
Italy, cousin d the groom, Jon 
Chandler Day d Ft Lee, N.J., 
cousin of the bride, Sam 
Crowther of ColumUa, Md., 
lliomas F. Kdley d Jersey 
City, N.J. and Mark A. 
Sullivan of Jersey City, N.J. 
The reception was held at 
Little Creek Officers' Club. 
The couple will reside in Fort 
Lee, N.J. 

The bride is a graduate d 
Princess Anne High School 
and Longwood CoU^e. She 
was a member of Alpha Sigma 
Tau Sorwity. The groom is a 
graduate d Marietta College, 
Marietta, Ohio and is 
presenUy studying law at 
Rutgers Law School in 
Newark, N.J. 



Miss Ruth Robeson weds 
Robert Guild Crouch 

Mr. and Mrs. Lacy McNair Robeson d the Beach announce 
the manias d Oieir daughter. Miss Rutti Weeks Robeson, to 
Robert Guild Crouch on November, 10 in San Francisco, CaUf. 

The uiide attended North Carolina Wesleyan College and is 
|M-esently employed with Atlantic Richfield Ccmipany d San 
Francisco. She also is attending the University of San Fran- 
cisco. 

The groom is a graduate of Harvard University and is em- 
ployed by Pacific Telei^ne Ctanpai^. Ilie coufde reside in Corte 
Modera, Calif. 



GRAND 




FRL t SAT- DEC 15 and 16 



Edie Adams 

Ci]i«CiH» 



&39 HBtop nasa Sbapp't Center 
Lasktai Road N«xt toNew Sesrs 

AiiMrici^slMduvbeaalyadaadiata. NrtioiuOy 
fmoos for pwsoniliMd quality sarvks^ &un 
ki (he hdr care Mcreto of the sttt^ 




Widi written 



% 



SstUMlCM 



III ApprtMMl Aff Nnhmt 

3UWr COMETH 
HOURS: DAILY 94; TVUBS. M 



REGULAR EVERYDAY PRICES 

COIDWAVE 

PERMANENT 
SHAMPOO 

"HAIR TRIM 100 

TOUCH-UP fnhiiSO 

FROSmiG > 1^ 



695 

$2« 



PtC 13 and 16 i»».«« 



99' 



NcwSdoa: ^HLLTOT PLAZA ^OPmCCStm 

LAMON ROiA&^XEIONNrSAitt- «Mtr7 

l734E.LMkGnritiyL SIMVa. 

NattoZqnw NarttoZ^M 



m 



m 



UM 



PAGEr 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, Igjfz. 



Miss Shelia Kay FrandsT 
weds Bucky Mandaleris^ 



Miss Sheila Kay Francis 
and Ensign Bucky Man- 
dalms, U.S. Navy, s<m d Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Paul Mandaleris 
d the Beach, were married 
November 18 in Baltimore, 
Md. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Emrys Harry 
Francis d Baltimore, Md. 

Sam Dean Mandaleris of the 
BeMh, brother d the groom, 



served as best man. 

Followii^ a recej^iqn at dw 
Tail of the Fox, the couple left 
for a wedding trip to Florida. 
They will tonporarily reskie 
in Glynce, Ga. 

The bride attended \ Mary 
Washington College in 
Fredericksburg, Va. , The 
groom is a graduate d Granfay 
High School and the 
University d Vii^nia. 




Mrs. Backy Mandaleris 



Quilts of Beach woman exhibitedi 



Mrs. WL. Boxley d ttie 
Beach has three original, 
hand-made quilts and a pillow 
on exhiUt at the Penninsula 
Art Gallery in Newport News 
dirough December 31. 

One quilt, which is rever- 
sible and is bordered with 
heavy hand-made lace and 
fringe, is considered rare 
since the entire design is 
formed by the quilting. 



Tidewater birds, cattails and 
marsh flowers make up the 
center motif. The quilt wiUi 
the matehing pillow features 
crewel type embrddoy and is 
quilted in a heart design. 

Mrs. Boxley, who is a native 
of Virginia, has taught 
quilting for ttiree years f ot die 
Virginia Beach Recreation 
Department. 



CANDIES 

T>€ FINEST OF 




A550RTEiM!HOCOLATEi 
Always a Christnws f«vOri« . . . cretmj, nuti, 
fruits, carnnds, nougats, toffeescotch, 
cruiKhes and cl^wy centers, dipped in finest 
dark ai»i milk chocolate. 

1 lb. 12.00 2 IK $3.95 3 lb. |5.90 5 lb. 19.75 

8 Ot box 11.00 

INGRAM'S PHARMACY 

34th&AttantKAW 
Phone 42»«ie7 



207-2SthSt 
Phona 428-6^3 



MEHCM. CENTER 

IIOOFirttColonMRd 
Phorw 425-8344 



lfl^^^^^^^^^(P^F^^F^^P^^F» 



^ 



^ 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 14. 1972 



THE SUN 



it 



Weight Watchers provides holiday 
menu for calorie-conscious persons 



Persons watching their 
waistlines may enjoy 
Christmas dinner without 
worrying about the extra 
calories in all of those 
deluctaUe dishes by usit^ the 
special recipes for the holiday 
menu from Wei^t Watchers 
International Inc. 

Cresson veloute, roast 
capon with sage onion 
dressing, stuffed tomatoes, 
season salad bowl with I'onon 
dressing and rice ambrosia 
make up the bulk of the menu. 
Recipes for extra holiday 
treats including Latkes and 
holiday fruit pudding also 
follow. 

Cresson Veloute 

IVi cups cooked broccoli 

2 tablespoons chopped 
celery 

2 teaspoons dehydrated 
(Miion flakes 

\^k c\jp& water 

2 chicken bouillon cubes 

3 tablespoons chopped wat^ 
cress 

^k cup evaporated dcimmed 
milk 

Salt and pen>er to taste 

Place broccoli, celery and 
onion flakes in blender, add 
water. Blend until smooth; 
pour into saucepan. Place 
over low heat. Crumble 
bouillon cubes and add to 
mixture. Add chopped 
watercress and simmo* for 10 
minpites. Add milk; r^ieat. 
DO NOT BOIL. Season with 
salt and pei^ier. Divide evenly 
iirto 4 soup bowls. Makes 4 
servings. 

Roast Capon with 
Sage Onion Dressing 

2 CI4M diidcen bouillon 

Ml cn) cdery, diced 

1 tablespoon dehydrated 
<mian flakes 

Capon 

Sage Onion Dressing (recipe 
firilows) 

Combine first three 
ingredients and use for 
basting the capon. Roast 
capon at 350 degrees F., 
altowing 25 minutes per pound 
mr until tender, basting 
frequently. Weigh portions 
ma serve with Sage Onion 
Dressing. 

Sage Onion Dressbv 

f oancea findy cmpped 
onions 

1 tablespoon chqqied cdery 

1 teaspoon chopped parsley 

2 traspoons rubbed sage 

1 cq) chicken bouillon 
Vt cup tomato juice 

IVi cups cooked cauliflower 

2 teaspoons imitation butter 
flavoring 

Salt and peeper to taste 
Place onions in non-stick 
skillet; bromi lightly over low 
heat. Add cdery, parstey, 
sage, bouillon and tomato 
juice; sinmia- until onions 
be?ome transparent. Add 
cauliflower and butter 
flavoring; mix thoroughly. 
Season with salt and pepper. 
Place in medium bakii^ dish 
and bake at 400 d^rees F. for 
IS minutes. Makes 4 servii^s. 
Staffed tomatoes 
4 medium tomatoes 
1 cup cooked mushrooms, 
findy chopped 

1 tMispoon dehydrated oni(Hi 
flakes 

1 tablespoon finely chopped 
cdery 
V4 ci4> chick«i bouillon 
Dash nutm^ 
Salt and pepper to taste 
1 teaspom chopped paraley 
Uandi ami peA ttnnatoes; 
remove stem eml and scoop 
out. Set diell aside. Oiop 
tomato pulp fine. Place 
chopped pulp, mushrooms, 
onim flakes, celery, bouillon 
and nutmeg in non-stick 
skiUet; simmer until mixture 
ttiidcens. Seasm with salt and 
pepper. Fill tonuitoes witti 
mixtii«; place om baking 
ibeet. Bake at 375 degrees F. 
for 30 minutes. Garnish with 
parsley. Makes 4 servings. 

SMison Salad Bowl 
witti Lemon Dressing 
1 head lettuce 
1 bunch watercress 
Vi cv|> slicol radishes 
1 tablespoon chopped chives 
Cut base off lettuce; break 
off teaves. Wash well and 
drain. Wash watercress and 
pat dry with towel. Tnr 
^uce and wateroess into 
Mte-size pieces. Combine in a 
bowl; add radishes and 
i^ives. Toss lightly and sen^ 
with Lonon Drttsing. Makes 
4 sendngB. 

, Lemon Dressi^ 
1 tabteqioon mayoimaise 
3 tablespooM vegdable oil 
1 teaqxxm lemm jidce 
1 teaspom vim^ar 
l^ahdsalt 

IvtHspoon pimento, di<^ 
Combine all ingredients 
OEeqrt iHmento in a btaidtf . 
Blend until smooth. Add 
pinMto. DivMte into 4 eqial 
portions and pmr ova* each 
portten of sabKl. Makes 4 



Rice Ambrosia 

2'^^ c\sp& water 

2 ci^s instant non-fat dry 
milk 

M( teaspoon nutmeg 

Artificial sweetner to equal 
8 teaspoons sugar 

'A teaspom imitation butta* 
flavoring 

2 cups cod(ed enriched rice 

Dash cinnamon 

Place water in saucepan. 
Add milk, stir until dissdved. 
Add nutmeg, sweetener, 
butto* flavoring and rice. 
Place over low heat and 
simmer, stirring frequently 
with wooden spoon until 
mixture thickois (about 15 
minutes). Divide evenly into 4 
dessert bowls. Sprinkle each 
bowl with cinnamon and diill. 
Makes 4 sowings. 
Latkes 

2 medium potatoes (3 
ounces each), peeled and 
grated 

2 ounces onion, grated 

Medium apple, peeled and 
grated 

2 eggs- 

^h teaspoon cinnamon 

2 teaspoons freshly chopped 
parsley 

Salt and pepper to taste 
Place potatoes, onion and 
apple in mixing bowl. MA 
eggs, cinnamon and parsley; 
mix well and season with salt 
and pen)^'. Spoon 6 equal 
portions into a heated non- 
stick skillet. Cod( over low 
heat until done (about 15 
mimites), turning frequoitly 
with spatula. Makes 2 ser- 
vings. 

Holiday Fruit Pudding 

3 medium apples, peeled 
and diced 

4 slices bread, diced in 1- 
inch pieces 

1 teaspoon cinnamon 

1 teaspoon lemon juice 

2 taUespooh^ grated oranige 
peel 

1 c\xp blueberries 

3 tablespoms ' trown sugar 
replacement 

1 cup water 

Combine all ingredients in a 
mixing bowl. Mix well. Turn 
into a 1-quart casserole. Bake 
at 400 degrees F. for 45 
mimtes. i Makes 4 servings. 
Spiced Fish in 
Tomato Sauce 

2 ounces onion, thinly sliced 
V4 medium greai pepper, 

diced 
Vn teaspoon chili powder 
Dash garlic powder 
Vi« teaspoon cinnamon 
Dash ground cumin 
V4 c\xp chicken bouillon 
1 cup tomato juice, reduced 
to ^ ci^ Artificial sweetoier 
to equal l teaspoon sugar. 
Salt and pei^r totaste 
6-ounce cooked fish fillet 



Combine onion, pepper, chili 
powder, garlic powder, cin- 
nammi, cumin and bouillon in 
a saucepan. Code until onions 
are toider. Add tomato juice 
and sweetener; season with 
salt and pepper. Place fish in 
sauce and heat thoroughly. 
Makes 1 serving. 

Gelatin Carrot Mold 

2 ounces carrots, grated 

1^ medium allele, peeled 
and diced 

2 tablespoons chopped 
celery 

2 radishes, sliced 

1 teaspoon chopped pimento 

1 teaspoon chives 

1'4 cups orange flavored 
dietetic carbonated beverage 

1 envelope (1 tablespoon) 
unflavored gelatin 

Ldtuce leaves (optional) 

Mix carrots, apple, celery, 
radishes, [rimentos and chives 
together; place in 3-cup ring 
mold. Place 1 cup carbcmated 
beverage in sauc^)an over 
low heat. Sprinkle gelatin over 
remaining carbonated 
beverage to soften. Stir until 
dissolved, pour into mold, 
over mixture, and refrigerate 
until firm. Unmold and so^e 



on lettuce leaves if desired. 
Makes 1 sowing. 

League sells 
cookbooks 

The selling of a cookbook 
entitled "Gems from the 
Diamond" is being sponsored 
by the Plaza Little League 
Ladies Auxiliary to raise 
funds for the boys in the area 
to play Little league baseball. 

Edited by Mrs. Janet Gray, 
the codcbook includes ap- 
petizers, dips, desserts, 
breads, candies, cakes, 
vegetables, meats, sauces, 
main dishes and pages to 
write in favorite recipes. It 
sdls for ^. 

The Plaza Little League was 
organized in 1964 and played 
on school fields. At present the 
league has three playing fields 
and 49 different teams with a 
total of over 800 l)oys. 

Anyone interested in pur- 
chasing a cookbook rtiay 
contact Mrs. Janet Gray at 
486-5324. 



Council landscapes gotf 
clubhouse for project 



The landscaping of the 
Virginia Beach Municipal Golf 
Course Clubhouse at Redwing 
Park is the HANDS (Home 
and Neighborhood 
Development Sponsors) 
project this year for the 
Virginia Beach Council of 
Garden Clubs. 

Shrubs, flowers, ground- 
covers and trees, including 
crape myrtle and dogwoods, 
will be planted by a local 
nursery. The landscaping 
design was prepared by the 
Department of Genera! 
Services, City of Virginia 
Beach. The planting should be 
completed by the first week of 
^his rn6ntK.' weathei;. per- 
mitting, according to Mrs. 
John H. Costenbader III, 
HANDS chairman. 

A total d 20 individual 
garden clubs are participating 
in HANDS projects this year 
including the landscaping of 
the Virginia Beach S.P.C.A., 
Old Cape Henry Lighthouse, 
Plaza Fire Station, the 
National Wildlife Refuge 
Headquarters Building in 
Back Bay, city libraries, 
schools, churches and en- 



trances to area housing 
developments. Some of the 

projects were initiated la.st 
year. ; » 

The objectives of the 
HANDS program are to prom- 
ote conservation and main- 
tenance of good neigh- 
Iwrhoods and communities, to 
rehabilitate sub-standard 
neighborhoods, to encourage 
and assist in beautifying 
unsightly areas, both public 
and (M-ivate and to stimulate 
public interest in 

heautification. cleanliness, 
health and safety. 

The Counnl's hXnDS 
project w on first place in the 
Southeastern District 
K<^ional HANDS competition 
last year. The funds from the 
award are being used to 
finance the landscaping of the 
Clubhouse at Redwing Park. 

"To be effective HANDS 
must be a cooperative com- 
munity-wide effort with the 
hacking of civic-minded 
businesses and 
organizations," Mrs. 
Costenbader said. 



Plaza students present operetta 



"The Trouble With 
Christmas", an operetta by 
Lois Gurske, will be {»*es«ited 
by tiie sixth grade classes at 
Plaza Elementary School at 
7:% p.m. Friday in the school 
cafetorium. 

The operetta takes place in 
Middleville, a typical 
American community, durir^ 
the Christmas season. Citizen 
groups complain about the 
monotony and expense of 
Christmas to the mayor of the 
town. He calls a special town 
meeting to discuss the ad- 
visability of eliminating the 
day and season in the first act 

The second act incliKtes a 
flashback to an early pioneer 
Christmas and a glimpse of a 
future Cluistmas which helps 
settle the matter. 

William Gibson portrays the 
niayor. Monbers of the ladies 



auxiliary are Darlene Cutter, 
Geneva Evans, Amy Flagg, 
Kathy Moye, Karen Stevens, 
Lea Ann Paul and Phyllis 
Smith. 

David Bell, Brett Cohen, 
Leon Collins, Billy Frizzell, 
John Smith and Ken Wierman 
play the merchants of the 
town. Housewives are Paula 
Boley, Joan DriscoU, Michelle 
Gilbert, Karen Herring, Beth 
Pool, Wanita Stewart, Susan 
Tullio and Janet Williams. 

Karl Foreman, John Rowehl 
and Nathan Wannall are the 
couhcilmen. 

In the second act, the 
fronder people are Dorothy 
Shelton, Tern Fockler, Cindy 
Shoberg, Ronald Adams, 
BoU)y Fagan, Gene Roberts, 
Melissa Lusk, Barbara 
Williamson, Michell Smith, 
Rhonda Gillum, Jennifer 



McDuffie, Linda Peterson, 
Tracy Bizzell, Mi^te Payton, 
Mike Zebrowski, Jeff Barnard 
and Lea Brown. 

Housewives are Muthu 
Arunachalam, Carol Dalton, 
Barbara Gustatis, Diane 
Hoppe, Karyn Morris, Johnnie 
Oxendine, Vicky Shoemaker, 
Cathy Videll and Kay Win- 
slow. 

The people of the future are 
Terri Dallman, Jackie 
Granby, Tina Grimshaw, 
Karen Rhodes, Mary Spicer, 
Cynthia Snow, Beth Cardini, 
Mary Cardini, Sally Osbourne, 
D%wn Shirley, Samm Abood, 
Donnie Becherer, David 
Didier and Mike Perrwie. 

Mike Denam is the stage 
manager and John Rowehl, 
accompanist. 

Mrs. Diane Homer is the 
muskal director. 





PACE? 



Vickie Lynn Harrison 
weds William C, Smith 



Mrs. William C. Smith 



Chapel in the Pines, Little 
Creek Amphibious Base, was 
the setting for th#marriage of 
Miss Vickie Lynn Harrison, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Dennis A. Harrison of the 
Reach, to William C. Smith at 
2 p.m. November 25. Chaplin 
James Rittenhouse officiated. 

The groom is the son of Mrs. 
Mary F. Morgan of the Beach 
and the late Emphraim W 
Smith. 

Given in marriage by her 
father, the bride wore a gown 
of Belgium satin-trimmed 
with old-fashioned lace. Her 
veil of illusion and old- 
fashioned lace fell from a 
satin and lace headpiece. She 
carried a bouquet of can- 
dlelight sweetheart roses, 
stephanotis and tasman roses. 

Miss Karen Ann Harrison of 
the Reach, sister of the bride, 
was the maid <rf honor. She 
wore an empire-waisted gown 
of orange polyester knit with a 
matching headpiece. She 
carried a bouquet of autumn 
flowers. 

Her bridesmaids were Miss 



Pam Harksen. Miss Ann 
Rittenhouse, Mist Sherry 
Albertson and Miss Kathy 
Pflueger, all of the Beach. 
Their green polyester taiit 
gowns were styled simlbrir' to 
that of ttie honor attoidaht 

Miss Shelia Bohr <rf Chefry 
Hill, N.J., was the flower girl. 
Her orange gown was styled 
identical to those 'bf 
bridesmaids. She carrwd- a 
basket (A autumn flowo-s, 

Tony Matzen of the Beach 
served as best man. The 
ushers were David Harrison, 
brother of the bride, Richard 
Stuart, Peter Osterhous and 
Tom Kerschmeyer, all of.Uw 
Beach. 

The reception was held at 
the Chiefs Club at Utile 
Creek Amphibious Base. 
Following a wedding trip to 
the mountains, the couple will 
reside in Virginia Beach. 

The bride is a graduate of 
Cox High School and attended 
OW Dominion University. The 
groom is a graduate of Cox 
High School and served with 
the U.S. Marines. 



Christmas tree traditions once resisted 



BLACKSBUR(J-The use of 
deicorated trees at Christmas 
time is a tradition which 
started several centuries ago. 
Prior to this time, plants of 
various sorts were grown in 
the home, but without special 
ornamentation. Small trees 
like the Norfolk Island Pine 
were grown in tubs to help 
dispel the gloom of dark 
winter days. 

Martin Luther, the great 
German reformer, is credited 
as being the first to add 
holiday decorations to an 
indoor tree As he walked 
home through the forest one 
clear winter night, he ob- 
served the beauty of the 



stately evergreens, and the 
stars sparkling above and 
through ttie branches. This 
was about 1515. 

When Luther arrived home 
and tried to describe the 
beautiful experience to his 
wife and children, he was not 
satisfied. So, to dramatically 
illustrate the scene, he went to 
the woods and returned with a 
small fir tree. This was 
erected in the home and 
decorated with lighted can- 
dles. 

Christmas during early 
colonial days in America was 
a rather drab affair. The 
Puritans from England did not 
condone gay and frivolous 



behavior. In contrast, 
the settlers of German and 
Dutch descent in Penn- 
sylvania and New York, 
celebrated Christmas in the 
gay manner of their ancestors 
in the old country. The same 
was true of the French sutlers 
in the New Orleans area. 

Although the records are not 
too clear, the first decorated 
Christmas tree may have beoi 
set up by the homesick 
Hessian soldiers during the 
American Revolution. In fact, 
a Christmas Eve celebration 
by them may have provided 
Washington with the op- 
portunity to turn the tide of pie 
colonial forces in 1776. 




.\FTERNOON TEA— Mrs. Stanley S. Howard (r.). hostess for the annual tea of the 
Linkhorn Park Garden Club, chats with Mrs. Henry Lam (1.) and Mrs. E. Walter 
Elver. Approximately 100 members and guests attended the tea which was held 
from :Mo."> p.m. Friday in Mrs. Howard's home. A variety of codiies. crackers with 
cheese balls aiMl other apetizing homemade tidbits were 
available for guests to munch as they visited. Christmas arrangements created by 
membeis and placed throughout the home added to the pleasant, festive at- 
mosphere. 



The Garden Club of 
Gloucester, a member of the 
Garden Club (rf Virginia, is 
sponsoring tours of four 
homes in Glouc^ter county 
from noon at 5 p.m. Sunday at 
$1.50 per hours. The homes 
will be marked from the high- 
ways in the County. 

The homes are Toddsbury, 
build in 1690 of Dutch Colonial 
design and owned by Mrs. 



Club sponsors 

Charles Beatty Moore; Kit- 
tery Point, home of Mr. and 
Mrs. James Bland Martin and 
built at turn of century; 
Airville, home of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Grover, an 18th 
century home furnished with 
E relish and American an- 
tiques and oriental rugs and 
Cheddleton, home of Mr. and 
Mrs. John L. Finney, one- 
story home complete with 



swimming pool and tennis 
courts. 

Proceeds will go toward the 
Garden Club of Virginia 
daffodil show to be held in the 
County this spring. 



OPERETTA— WiUiani GiMoa (1.) as Um mayar af MiMevUte tfsoMMt tlM com- 
^iata of eitfsens c<m:eralag the drudgery art expend at Christaias mWk Cms- 
cilmen portrayed by John Rowehl. Karl Foreman and NaUun WannH in a scene 
from "lie IVouble with Ctaistmas" ^ L^ Gurske. 



CLUB NOTES 



THE LAKE JOYCE GARDEN CLUB - The annual green's 
sale will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday at Bayside 
Hardware StM-e, Bayside Shopping Coitw. Fresh greais to be 
used for decorations, wreaths, swags and table arrangemaits 
will be on display. 

LIGHTHOUSE CHAPTER OF AMERICAN BUSINESS 
WOMAN'S ASSOCIATION - Boss night and Christmas party 
will be held at 8 p.m. Friday in the Medic Caito- ai First 
Colonial Road. Activities include the installation of a new 
member, honoring the Woman (rf the Month, dinner and dan- 
cing. Anyone inta'^ted in Uie organization may call 497-6156 or 
499-0845. 



THE WOMEN'S COMMfrTEE-TIDEWATER CHAPTER 
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF BANKING - The annual 
Christmas breakfast will b^in at 10 a.m. Saturday at the 
Harbor R^taurant on Laskin Road. 



XI BETA LAMBDA CHAPTER OF BETA SIGMA PHI - 
Cluistmas )»rty will be hdd at 8 p.m. Saturday at ttie htmie of 
Mrs. MlltoB Harrdl. 412 Se^nan Road. 



On that fateful day, 
WasWngton's mm had little, 
for whidi to be thankful. TT^ 
wo% cold, hun^, and powlf 
clothed, llie Hessians were 
confident of victory and seem 
to have begun their festivities 
with the drinking of gr<^ Uie 
previois evening. Hie a^ifk 
by Washington found th^^ 
(xepared for the rig<»*'<rf 
battle. > 

Holiday trera did not oon^ 
into general use in the Uiited 
State until several dec^Rles 
after the Revolutimary fi^ar. 
The first recorded account of a 
Christmas tree seems to be 
that of Charles FoUoi in 1832. 
He was a political reftqgn 
fxaca Germany who was:^ 
teacher at Harvard.*^ 
decorated a tree as a paii^^ 
Christmas party for his small 
son, as a remembrance" of 
similar events in ,.Uie 
latherland. ,i „" 

Another political rej^^me 
from Germany, Charles 
Minnegerode, made the 
Christmas tree famous In 
Williamsburg. In 1842.1^ 
became a teacher of Greek 
and Latin at the Collegifei of 
William and Mary. He became 
friendly with a jiKlgiy 
Nathaniel Tucker, and 
decorated a tree in his bon^ 
that Christmas. From ttiis 
beginnii^ also developed the 
Gustcnn of limiting a eom.^ 
muiity tree each year.toe 
Christmas Eve near >Ae 
Tudcer residence in the town 
of Williamsburg. 

Hie first Christmas tree inia 
diurch seems to have been 
installed in 1851 l^ Pfflter 
Henry Schwan in Clevdand, 
Ohio. His parishioners > olb 
jected to Uiis pagan pra^toe; 
and some members. <A .tibte 
congretation were threatened 
with harm. The minister 
convinced his flock that 
Christmas trees were,,' a 
Christian rite, and opposition 
sow stqqjed. 

And so, new custwns, ev»i 
ttiose as fine as the decora^og 
of Christmas trees, ofteji 
receive strong resistance 
when first introduced. But hot 
tempers cool, enthusiasR) 
grows, and new practi^e^ 
become old traditions. (% 
Wesley P. Judkins, Virginia 
Tech Extension hor* 
ticulturist.) 

mmmmmmmmmm^mmmfmm 




WANTED 

Houses To Sel 

AnywhMV in Va. Beach 

For quick results and more cash in your pocket . . . 
let us sell your property. A competent staff of F^ofes- 
sional experts on duty and always available. 

CALL 4974851 

STOHL REALTY 

4920 Virginia Baach Blvd. at Aragona Bhfd. 



>& 




TAXES 



CHRISTMAS MONEY •: 
PHONE 4272100 - 



VIRGINM KACH FNMMX CORP. 

MI3 NMtTH LANDDKi RO^ 



JMil. 



THE SUN 



ChMrm tidtdders 



THURSDAY. PECEMBEfi 14; 1t72 



It's the giving that counts' 



By HELEN CRIST 

•ifs so great - It's b^er 
ttw Christmas... it's the 
#rtBg dtat oniMb, not the 
r«c^vir«," saM 12-yrar-<M 
Mkhael I^mleavy, one of a 
dMn 7th ffnders of Star of 
tteSet %6bioo\ last Prittay as 
(bey vtrited dw ^lore Mve 
€MivaleMent Home, laden 
wi^ gifts for the rrakiente. 

tlie children have adof^ed 
those at the Hmne. Uncka* the 
grid^KX of Mary Barraco, 
they cmne, usually six at a 
time, ^ch week to diea* the 
fMa* people. 

n»y hadn't yet arrived 
whm we walked through the 
bids. 

U^t there, at the foot of the 
s^ita^wdl to the second flocur, is 

a ftoMmas tree, sperklii« 
inth tinsd ami ornaments. 

Umch is ova*, and there's 
activity in the kitdioi as the 
dHhes are wasted and the 
dinning \sp is firashed. 

%'s qui^ upstain where a 
hatriful are gatha«d to watch 
a tdevision {Hxigram. 

there's an air of hearty 
ta()^tality as Mrs. Ada Main 
nMomies us to h«- room. 

Jovial and ddightfUl. she's 



busy assembling a jigsaw 
puole. 

"Come in, come in," she 
smiles. 

Directly in view on the waU 
of hor roinn is an oil painting 
<rf a handsome man, who 
resembles, incidentally, 
Ronald Reagon. "My 
husband," she says. "He 
passed away many years 
ago." 

In the lower right-hand 
corner d the painting is a 
ph(ko Qi him in his World War 
I soMier's uniform, his arm 
around Ada, his pretty young 
teide. 

"He was a golf pro," Ada 
says. "We travded all ova- 

ttw East Coast togetho-. We 
had a ^xA life." 

And Ada was pretty ^mxI at 
ttie game herself. It was 
nothing for her, in the past, to 
{day 18 hdes every day. .."and 
you know I still have my 
clubs." 

Ma's an artist - studied in 
New York. "I didn't sell my 
woric, gave it all away," she 
says... all, that is, but a fine 
painting of an English country 
sceie, which brightens her 
room now. 



TTiere's, a picture of a 
Japanese woman in native 
*ess <Mi her bureau. "Milo 
Byrd, downstairs, wants me to 
paint that," she says. And 
maybe she will. 

She told us that Milo Byrd a 
resident' of the home, is an 
extraordinary man. 

We discovered later, that he 
had been a (Hisoner of war 
(hiring World War II, when he 
walked in the infamous March 
of Death with General 
Jonathan Wainwright on 
Bataan Island, which the 
Americans surrendered to the 
Japanese. 

But the memories are 
painftil, and Milo pr^ere not 
to talk of these. 

He was having, at the 
moment, a lively card game 
with Jim Mays, Old Dominion 
student. "He's beating me," 
Jim said wryly. 

TTiai Uiere was a Sniffling 
of feet in the hall and a 
"sshing" of voices with 
fingers to the lips, as the 
sdiool childr«i arrived. 

First came Mary Barraco, 



full of smiles and pretty in 
pii^k. 

Mary's been a wekly visitor 
at the Home for five years. 
TTiey adore her. Their qres 
sparkle when she enters the 
romn and takes their hands in 
hers and talks lovingly to 
them. 

Ada Main says, "Oh, she is 
wonderful. You just don't 
know all the good things she 



lliediildrendigdeep into tiie 
brown bags they're carryii^. 
Out come the homemade 
fudge and codties, diagdk: 
sweets, Christmas gifts, 
cigarettes and cigars. 



J 



Miss Mabel Spry 
immediatdy lights one of hw 
cigarette. "We love to see the 
children come," shte says, and 
they gather around her to talk. 

Seventh grader Adele 
Berney says, "You can see 




that the oMer 
little shy at first, 
talk to them am 
the gifts, they n 
and start telling 
themselves." 

The children incl' 
tJnrue, Rebecca 
Michael Dunlea 
Castellat, Alison 
Moffett, 



are a. 

when we 

nd Uiem 

enjoy it 

s all about 



tut 



Uy 



ided Card 

Neubert, 

y, Giselle 

avis, Diana 

Berney, 




UP THE STAIRS — Star of the Sea students bring Ji^ apd cheer as they visit Share 
Drive Conveiescent Home. 



OEAUNG THE CAHP^-MMiOwBl^iaB tiMtoirt Jia Mayf deals the canb as he and 
MO* B3rrd have a frim«|3r gsMc at the Show Drive Convalescent Home. 




Willjsm-lfitey/Roger Nonni, 

lyDozey, John McLoughlin, 
f/ictor DiCentio, Jr., and John 
Burns. 

Mrs. Marlene Wilson, LPN, 
supervisor, says that the 
residaits are always happv to 
receive gifts to clothing, 
nightgowns, bedroom slip- 
pers, etc. Most of them are 
sponsored by Medicaid. 

Mrs. Martha Sims is ad- 
ministrator; Mrs. Michele 
Leonard, her assistant. 
Presoitly, there there are 11 
men and 12 women at the 
Home. 

Before the children ended 
their visit, they gathered, with 
Mary Barraco, in the hall and 
sang: "Peace I Leave With 
You My Ftiends", and then 
some Christmas carols. 

Mike Dunleavy ran upstairs^ 
again. "Wait for me", he' 
called out to the^others.' 
He wrait back to Ada Mate's 
room. "Remember God loves 
vou," he said as he toW her 
'ood-bye. 




WE LOVE THE CHILDREN-Glselle Castellat and Diana Moffett visit with Miss 
IVIable Spry. 



New financial aid for kidney patients 



Annual 
16-10 at 
in New 



A GIFT— Card Umme and Alison Davis have a gift for WM>th Williams, a resident of 
the Home and native of Elizalieth City. 

Bill of rights included in veterans' law 



A woman veterans' "bill of 
lis" is included in the new 
veterans' education law, 
siBied by the Preskient Oct 
2C 1972. 

To recave the additional 
ahiounts of VA education 
luowance, compensaticm, and 
fjpnsion money that men 
kr^CTans are allowed for their 
wives, wmn^i veterans no 
onger will have to prove their 
wsbands are disabled and. 
jermahently incapable of self- 
support, the Roanoke VA 
Regional Office announced 
kxlay. 

^is provisi<m an^liK to GI 
m, vocational rehabilitaUmi, 
ienstm, compensation, and 
Ifp3ndency and indemnity 
tpspemation (DIC), which m 
wid for service-connected 
IsatlK 

'ne new law also liberalize 

hp criterta for laying ad- 

Htioml anwuirts for cMUrm 

v^ are in the ctstocfy of a 

veteran awaiting adi^ition. 

Wiert Uie chiW hm been 

*'*'•'•'' f^""- ^^(^fm with tte 

- an agreement 

^'im M autlMMized aikifrtion 

|U^wy. aMttami bmrtili 

Ey be paid iar flie eUM 
im *• imt te cMU 
_^ uitai m cmtaif and prtor 



to the court decree of adop- 
tion. Prior to this change 
increased benefits were paid 
from the date of the in- 
ta-locutwry decree. If no in- 
terlocutory decree was en- 
tered, benefits began the 
effective date of the final 
decree. 



The Veterans Administrtion 
said the new law says that for 
all VA benefit purposes, a 
"yife" shall include the 
husband of a female veteran 
aiwl the term "widow" shall 
include tl« widower of a 
female veteran. 



The costs of kidney disease 
and who pays the bill were 
major topics considered by 
medical and lay participants 
at the National Kidney 
Foundation's 22nd 
Meeting. November 
the Roosevelt Hotel 
Orleans, Louisiana. 

The most spectacular news 
for individual patiaits is the 
passage last month- of a $6 
billion Social Security and 
Medicare bill that classified 
kidney disease as a disability, 
making end-stage kidney 
patients wlio are covwed by 
social security ehgiUe for 
federal funds for artificial 
kidney treatments and kichey 
transplants. 

It is estimated that at least 
10-11,000 people will be 
covered the first year of the 
(x-ogram, whidi b^ins in 
June, 1973; the number may 
go as high as 60,000 for the 
first 12 months. TTie total jM-ice 
tage is expected to be in ex- 
cess of $160 million. Eligibility 
on the basis of kidney failure 
will begin in the fourth mmth 
a patioit receives artificial 
kidney treatments, a 
transplantatioi is covered for 
the cost of the surgical 
[Tocedure and twelve months 
-of follow-iq) care under the 
new law. 



State Voca tiona 1 
Rehabilitation agencies are 
currently the target of a 
concerted effort to gain more 
financial support for patients. 
The 1972 Rehabilitation Act 
authorizing ^ million for the 
next three years for direct aid 
to patients was vetoed by 
President Nixon, but it is 
believed that the ap- 
propriation will be auUiorized 
early in the next 
Congressional session. 
Physicians and Rehabilitation 
officials estimate that 75 per 
cent of end-stage kidney 
patients are in need of 
vocational retraining. The 
Rehabilitation organization 
iscurrently Supporting over 120 
patients on the kidney 
machine and has assisted with 
the transplantatimi cc^ts for 
otho's. 

Forty-one states now have 
their own statutes supporting 
kidney disease research, 
delivery of care, and facilities. 
It is frojected that Federal 
and State funding for ki^ey 
disease will probably exceed 
$100 milliwi ia Fiscal Year 



Jones, Assistance Director of 
Research for the Health In- 
surance Association of 
America, speaking Friday 
morning, November 14, 
summed up a recent policy 
statement by the Association, 
which he believes many major 
companies will follow. For the 
first time, the Association 
endorsed the position that 
kidney donation by a live 
donor should be considered a 
valid disease or disability of 
the donor, making expoises 
coverable under major 
medical policy provisions. 
HIAA also recommended that 
when a donated kidney is 
secured from a cadaver, the 
recipient's insurer should 
cover those costs as a valid 
lK>spital charge. When the 
organ is secured from a Uve 



donor, the donor's insurance 
carrier ^ould pick up most 
costs, but the recipient's 
carrier should assume 
responsibility for any 
remaining expenses. "We are 
trying to get all transfdant 
costs picked up by one carrier 
or the other," Jones ex- 
plained. 

"Other covered expenses are 
training costs to learn to 
operate the machine, travel 
costs during the initial 
training period, and charges 
for supplies and main- 
tenance." About 78.5 million 
persons in this country are 
protected against the heavy 
medical expenses such as in- 
hospital kidney machine^ 
treatements that can result 
from prolonged, catastrophic 
illnesses. 



Insurance carriers, the 
second major ,^)urce of funds 
for patients, are moving 
toward full«- responsibility 
for kidnQT patiaits. Donald D. 



Firemen * 
elect; officers 

The London Bridge 
Volunteer Fire DTMrhneni 
recaitly held electim of of- 
ficers for 1973 at thnr regular 
nuMiQily businem meeting. 

I.B. George ni was elected 
president; Charles Spence, 
vice-fH'esident; Q.J. Zeller, 
secretary; diaries Patdusi 
treasurer; I.B. George Jr., 
diief; Ted Hayunga, deputy 
diief; James Dameron, 1st 
asst. chief; and L.J. (Red) 
Harris, 2nd arat. diief. Tliese 
moi will be installed at an 
installation banquet in 
January. 

The London Bridge 
Department has also had two 
honors bestowed upon it in the 
past week. L.J. (Red) Harris 
has been dected President of 
the Fraternal Order of 
Firemen of the City of 
Virginia Beadi. 

Ilie other honor for ttils 
department was to have 
James Humptu-eys Jr., a two 
year member, chosen as 
"Fireman of the Year" for the 
City of Virginia Beadi. The 
man that receives this hcxuM* is 
in competition with over 500 
firemen. All firemen, paid or 
volunteer are eligible in- 
cluding firemen on all 
military bases within tlie City. 
The qualifications are based 
m devotion to duty, excelling 
in ti*aining and being a moral 
booster among bis fellow 
fireman. In addition to 
meeting these qualificati<His 
James Rumphr^r was in- 
strumoital in saving; tiie life of 
a victim trapped in a house 
fire in February 1872. 



Joslin now 
incomn^uid 

Ivan L. Joslin, 832 ^organ 
Trail has assumed command 
of one of Tidewat^'s newest 
Naval Reserve imits. 

A veteran of 12 years active 
duty in the Navy, Joslin, a 
lieutenant commanckr in the 
resoles, has taken command 
(rf Submarine Support Unit 5- « 
18 F. ^ 

The new unit, tiie area's 
first submarine reserve unit, 
will drill monthly aboard the 
submarine tender, i L. Y. 
Spflfr, ba^ at fta m»\i^er- 
Submarine Piers in Norfolk. 

Joslin, who is a vice 
{x-esident of Cardinal Sign 
Corp. in civilian life, noted 
that his new unit has openings 
for recently released 
Navymen who have eitiier 
military or civilian experience 
in submarine skills. Positions 
are available for men in all 
rates normally found aboard a 
tender, he said. 

Service news 

Navy Seaman Recruit 
Calvin S. Moiris, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Rob«'t D. Ross of 
4512 Hessian Court, has, 
graduated from rocruit 
ti-aining at ttie Naval Itainii^ 
Center in Great Lakes. 

Navy Fireman Recruit 
Donald K. Vau^n, son of 
James F. Vauf^n of 405 S. 
Military Highway has 
raduated from recruit 
^training at the Naval 
Training Center in Great 
^ ^es. He is »jieduled to 
repta-t to Boilermaa "A" 
Scl»ibl, Great Lakes. 




Beach Ford's 



Speaker^ are available 



Sixty Old Dominion 
Unversity facnilty memba>s 
have offered to be guest 
speakers for area clubs, 
groups and organizations. 
Usted in the 1972-73 l^jeaka^' 
^reau Rost«-, the speakei^ 
sedt to iHii^ the University's 
educatknal services closer to 
die people of Tidewater. 

^ ctf ttie persons listed in 
toe bureau's roster are 
cairying fidl-time wwk loa<k 
at ODU and are offerii^ to fill 
speaking engagements 
witiiout disie as a MTvice to 
die (immunity. 

Topics which cover a 
variety of cultural, 
^IlKatMnal, and urban topia 
iMlu^ "Old Dominion 
Uaiveraity, Its R<rie la 
^r^nia Hi^ier ^hication." 



"Tidewater's Taste in 
Theatre," "Government 
Public Relations," "Sleep and 
Dreaming," "Cervantes' Don 
Quixote" and "Reproduction 
in Ticks." 

Specialized [u^rams in the 
fields of d^rtmental em- 
phasis such as music, 
speech, hist<s7, and political 
science are fi^eKA, and mcst 

academic areas of the 
Univa-slty are repr^atted. 
Approximatdy 200 topics are 
listed in tl% rosto*. 

Tte ^eaka^ are availaMe 
to groips of 15 or more. 
Requests for sp^kers shmihl 
be made at iMst a wedi in 
advance and tentative 
arrangemeits may be matfe 
by caUing 4^«00, extemion 
JI3 «r 315. 



« nOK YOUR B^ST 

pSr THE HOLIDAYS 

WITH OUR MENS 



TUESDAY NIGHT 

DON JUAN'S 

HOUSi OF BIAUTY 

CAU 497-3370 

$2M F PRINCES ANNE ED. 
CAROLANNE ai(miN6 CENTER 

(hmplete Bmuty Care 



CHANGE OIL 
CHANGE P.CV. 




GOOD THRU DECEMBER, 1972 



CHANGE FILTER 
CHECK HOSES 



OiECK AND ANTI-FREEZE TO ZERO 

Inspect and adjust brakes. Inspect exhaust 
system and advise. Scope engine and advise. 
Inspect tires and advise. All for only... 





ser IMC DimmsNd at . 

Beach Ford 

m? vh^ 1..* B^ . vhghi. ■•«* , n^i, 4as.«iT 
KALntopDet 



^n^^^^tw^^^^f^^w^im 



PJ»IU 



■I 



^"S^^ ^ *• -w. i iM-^ii l U'l 



^■^•^••^^^^IF"*' "•'■■"'" 









^ 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 14. 1972 



THE SUN 



'% 



PA6E1 



Virginia Wesleyan College 
will launch a "bold new ex- 
perimwit" in its educational 
program next month, ac- 
coi^ng to Dr. William M. 
Wilson, academic dean 
of the College. For two 
we^s, beginning January 15, 
students, faculty and ad- 
ministrators will be engaged 
in a "Common Learning 
Experience" as part of a 
major program of curriculum 
devel{H>ment that began last 
fall. 

"Many colleges have 
adopted a January interim 



Wesleyan to launch bold learninj? experimenl 

fn or .short spmpsrtor " ™..„u., / » .._ . ^ .. ;»...» „ ^-^ •*• 



fM-ogram or short semester," 
explains Dean Wilson. 
"However, Virginia Wesleyan 
may well be the only one 
which is seeking to discover 
the impact of what \\ means to 
have the entire campus focus 
its attention on one basic 
t(H)ic." 

The topic chosen for the 
January Experience is 
"Reaching Out". This topic. 
Dean Wilson notes, "points to 
our concern to explore 
questions relating to com- 
munity. The problems of 
discovering creative com- 



munity confront us on every 
hand: how do we as often 
insecure individuals establish 
meaningful relationships 
within our families, with our 
fellow students, or with 
colleagues on the faculty? 
How can the college ef- 
fectively express itself in 
terms of its commitment to 
beii^ a community of learn- 
ers? In an age of.ICBM's and 
other incredibly destructive 
weapons, how can mankind 
find creative world com- 
munity?" 
During the two week em- 




tt 



CHRISTMAS GIFTS — The Ladies Auxiliary of tlie Fraternal Order of Police. 
Princess Anne Lodge No. 8 purchased clothing to give to 25 indigent children for 
Christmas. The members also are going to select used clothing from the Clothes 
CloseJ to give to the children. Clotties are donated to the Clothes Closet by ar"ea^ 
residents. The money was earned by selling handmade items at the Pembroke Mall 
Charity Bazaar in Octobei . Mrs. April Sciortino (I.) and Mrs. Judy Spellman check 
over the gayly wrapped packages. 

Slavy families send g 



phasis on "community", a 
mixed-media approach 
coupled with strong group 
participation will be used. 
Films, plays, essays and 
readings will be studied, as 
well as group discussions and 
work on group and individual 
projects. 

"This is an exciting time in 
the life (rf the College," the 
Dean says. "This program in 
January should be the 
first in a significant 
series of curricular 
innovation. 

Cookie sales 
benefit camps 

Since last June, Camp 
Dard«i has s^^ed 68 girls in 
the Day Camp Day and Away 
program, 289 summer camp- 
ers, and over lOOO troop 
campers from all over the 
Council. 

Profits from the Girl Scout 
cookie sales help to make 
Darden a better place to 
camp. 

$3,938.66 was spent on tents, 
$5,895.60 on platforms; 
$40,451.08 on new kitchen and 
dining hall renovations; 
$5,895.60 on platforms; 
$40,451.08 on new kitchen and 
dining hall renovations; $5,975 
on new latrines and sinks; 
$4,974 on a new central 
shower; $780 on more elec- 
tricity; $6,049.10 on pool and 
fence $2,098.59 on equipment 
and repair; and $1,475 on a 
truck. A total of $71 ,637.03 was 
spent. 

It took years of saving and 
the 1972 cookie sale to realize a 
dream at Camp Darden of a 
multi-purpose environmental 
center designed for all ages to 
enjoy. 

This year's cookie sale 
money will go toward buyir^ 
new tents, platforms, and 
latrines at Arapaho; repairing 
buildings at Matoaka; 
providing a new parking area 
at Camp Linkhom; rewiring 
and new wiring at the scout 
camps- 




The' families of moi in 
deployed squadrons aboard 
the USS Forrestal, now in the 

Mediterranean, and the USS 
Saratoga, now in Vietnam, 

made video tape Uuistmas 
mossagca to send to their 



husbands recently. 

Participating squadrons 
included VF 11 and VA 85 on 

the Forrestal and VF 31 and 
VF 103 on the Saratoga. The 
families of approximately 97- 
men were involved. 
The T.V. Divisioa im Guided 



Missile School. Dam Neck, 
volunteered their time, 
talents, and facility in order to 
make the Christmas taping 
program possible. They 
received the heart felt 
gratitude of all the wives and 
mm in the squadrons. 
The messages were as 




unique and individual as ^ch 
family. One little boy said he 
was going to tell his father 
that the dog had eaten the top 
off of his dog house. Another 
family brought along their two 
golden retrievers to be a part ' 
(rf their unit. 

The tape to the USS 
Saratoga is on its way and the 
film for the USS Forrestal will 
be hand carried via one of the 
wives taking the Christmas 
Charter Flight to Athens. Both 
tapes will help to raise the 
holiday spirits for the men 
aboard the carriers. 



Viilfni-'^'^f **" ^*'"''*'y ^'■*'"P« '»«* *'» take place at 
Virgmia Wesleyan College and the instructors in charge 

"Isaiah. Meet The Press": 

Imaginative, written dialogues with prophets (Biblical or 
otherwise) about life together today and tomorrow. 

"People Sharing Walls"- Charles Kessler 

Thl™...„ ML . Harvey SImsohn 

The purpose of this project is to attempt to determine the 
attitudes of apartment dwellers toward their neighbors and 
toward this mode of living. The activity of the group will 
involve the design of a questionnaire, interviews with 
residents of a complex, and drawing of tentative conclusions 
and suggestions about how to improve the quality of life will 
be disaissed. 
"A Moveable Feats; or the Kitchen and the Table, the 

BoardinghouseReachTowardsCommuiiity" : LAnderson 
Orr 

Readings ^ill be taken from Horace. Ben Jonson, Matthew 
Prior, Bnllat-Savarin, Escoffier, M.F.K. Fisher, Alice B 
Toklas and M.X. Boulestin. The practical portion will in- 
clude four introductory lessons on a few fundamental 
culinary techniques and preparations 
"The Different Drummer": Gordon Magnuson 

A study of the role of the arUst and rebel in the search for 
community. 

"OperationTransplant": DannyWhite 

Let us transplant flora from areas on campus which are to 
be cleared as the college's building program progresses. The 
group would identify those plants to be moved, plan their new 
location, learn fundamental transplanting procedures and 
then carry out the operation. The planning and completion of 
such a project would provide a working example of 
"reaching out" not only to fellow members of the group, but 
also to the college community at large. 
"On Being A Long Way From Home With Everywhere To 
^•"- W.R. Shealy 

A discussion of the possibility of making meaningful 
choices and exercising freedom when the landmarks and 
guideposts all vanish. 
Opera UonLoneliness": WayneArtis 

This group will seek to "reach out" to a part of our society 
for the most part overlooked by students: the aged. We will 
visit some of the homes for the aged in this area and see for 
ourselves their isolation. We will work with the program 
"Meals On Wheels" which brings one hot meal a day to the 
elda-ly. We will search out and visit some home-bound per- 
sons in an effort to give college students an opportunity to see 
beyond their own immediate style of life. 
"Personal Reflections And Projects": Bob Hufstedler 

This group will discuss the films and readings and out of 
this discussion each will develop his own project within the 
guidlines for the college experience. Each student will be 
expected to keep a personal journal of experiences, relating 
them, where possible, to the issues raised in the films and 
readings, and this will be submitted at the end of the project. 

"Utopia Creating 101 : Building Our Own Cloud- 
Cuckooiand" Dan Graf 

The group will undertake the cooperative venture of 
devising a Utopian society. It is anticipated that the group 
may wish to go beyond the mode of written projects to create 
a model physical environment for the community, compose 
an anthem, or whatever. 

"Alienation In The Classroom": HankHeiberg 

Selected magazine articles and personal experiences will 
form a basis of discussion focused on the problem of 
. alleviating alientation in the classroom by creating a co- 
operative spirit (rf learning. Participants will give a written 
reaction to the discussion. 

"Alienation? Community? Reconciliation?": David Clayton 

An attempt to reconcile the themes of alienation and 
community by the creation of an original musical com- 
position interwoven with the text of the mass. The con- 
temporary creation could reflect alienation; the mass, 
ultimate community. Gregorian chant will be the musical 
vehicle for the mass text. Instrumentalists and singiers will 
be needed, especially people who are accustomed to setting 
words to music. 

'■•Let's Think Big": Barry Lipscomb 

Preparation of a prq)osal to estabhsh a campus-limited 
radio station as a means to improve communications, 
awareness, and community spirit. Contacts might be made 



Tbe|rainily of Cdr. William Flalely. now aboard the USS Sarat<«a. assemble before 
the ChrisUnas tree to send their hdiday message. 

Pack celebrates scouting years 




Mrs. Herbert Stone appears to be in cmisaltatioa with her smi before sending their 
Christmas greeting to "Buddy" Stone who is aboard the USS Saratoga. 



Stephen Hayes of Den 4, Cub 
Scout Pack 411, won first place 
in a tPinewood Derby held 
&xx\va, the November meeting 
at Thalia Trinity Preslqrterlan 
Church. 

Each b(9 whittled a car 
fr«n a pinewood block to aiQr 
shape he desired which 
adhered to racing 

specificatitms. The cars were 
run on an official 31-foot track, 
with Hugh Wood, Walter 
Gresham and Joe Weiner as 
judges. 

Other winners were Richard 
Jones of Webelo Den I , secwid 
and David Arris, Den 1, tWrt. 
The project was a fatl«r-«m 
^ndcflvcff 

IXrii^ the meeting, Scirtt 
Ward was elected assistant 
dewttr of Den 1 ami awards 
were preswted. Mark Snellcr 
and Neal Conan received 



bobcat badges and David 
Weiner, wolf badge. 

Mark Mann and Robbie 
Rice were awarded silver 
arrows. One year pins were 
given to Brady Flax, Tony 
Frye, Robin Nunley. Marty 
Klock, Mike Thornton and 
John Wagner. Scouts 
receiving one-year pins along 
with perfect attendance pins 
went to Don Gresham, Mark 
Fields, Todd Davis and 
Robbie Rice. 

Lynwood Spencer and Greg 
Pawlouski receivMJ two-year 
pits. Gr^, along with Martin 
Kloc, grackiated into Webelos. 
Webelt^ receiving athlete 
awards w«^ Pat TetterUm, 
Jimmy Wood, Paul Garriswi. 
Keith Hartman, Mark 
Wagner, Paul Durfee, 
Richaiti Jai«, Reed Davis, 
Rarely Little. Richy Bish and 



Jeffrey Mitchell. 

Two-year pins were 
awarded to Pat Tetterton. 
Jimmy Driver. Paul Garrison, 
Britt McCoy, Ralph Holloman, 
Mark Wagner. Paul Durfee, 
Richard Jones and Doug 
McNeil. Two-year pirs with 
perfect attendance were 
earned by Jimmy Wood, Nidc 
Hopkins and Reed Davis. 
KeiUi Hartman received a 
one-year pin and Gene 
Terrerton was presented the 
Webelos Den Chiefs Cord 

The Arrow of Light was 
given to Ralph Holloman as he 
graduated into Boy Scouts. 
Walter Gresham showed 
sliites of the Oysta- Bowl 
Para<te in which the Pack w«i 
a first place trq>hy. Mrs. 
P^q?y Harrell renvoi a 
bracelet charm for help with 
pi^ianitim fm- t)w ev«tt 




SPECIAL PRE-CHRISTMAS SALE 

AU Hansen and Hawaii 

SURF BOARDS 



ORIGINAaV 
$159.00 

NOW- 





1701 

Baltic Avt. 

(Attlwilvd.) 





428-2331 

Formerly 
VA. BEACM 
HARDWARE 



with those able to provide necessary equipment. Submissions 
(rf proposal to appropriate foundation or government agancy 
would be goal. 

Group to (ksign a child-care day program capable of 
beir^ staffed by VWC students as a learning and community ■, , 
service project. Utilization of Smith House m^ht be con-,,, 
sidered. Sources of funding would be researched. 

"Hell Hall: Can A Dormitory Be A Decent Place To , ' 

•^'7' J W.A. Storm,,' 

Is a dormitory an inherently inhumane way to assemble ^' 
people? Or could it be a place to live compassionately 
t<«ether? What would an ideal dormitwy life be like? What „ 
forces threaten it, and what forces can restore it? This group' 
will face these questions by discussing the films and, 
readings, reflecting on their own experience, and talkiin, ' 
with students in the dormitories at length. A few proposals 1 
might even emerge. ''' 

"Presidential Inaugurals: Our National Pageant": Stev*-*'' 
Mansfield 

What are the symbolic and community implications of a ' 
Presidential Inaugural Address? The 1973 Inaugural would- 
be studied, and we will consider in more general terms the 
national role <rf such an event, perhaps ourselves drafting an 
"Inaugural Address" to see whether it is possible for such a ^ 
statement, by itself, to accomplish the purposes which the ' 
group believes an Inaugural should fulfill. 

^•You Name It": jGewge Churukian. , 

Students in this group will discuss the common films and. 
readings, and develop their own projects out of the 
discussion. They will continue to meet to exchange ideas an4< 
comment on one another's emerging projects. 

"Why Always These Same Walls?": Larry Hultgreo , 

A preliminary attempt to identify and to suggest 
responses to the pressing needs of a pluralistic worid 
Discussion will focus upon the possibilities of educationaUy 
relevant experiences off of the VWC campus. 

"Discovery Through Film": . RIckHlte 

A group working to produce a super 8mm fUm exploring 
the problems of alienaUon, reconciliation, and restoration ( 
community. Initial group discussions would determine tl 
more specific approach to the film. Editing would have to I 
something of a follow-up project a few weeks later in ft 
semester. The entire process of film production is, in itset 
an undertaking in participatory or community creation. 

"AlienaUon And Self-Concept": Don Wolfgang 

The subject of the group meetings will be alienation and 
reconciliation from a personal, self-oriented viewpoint The 
group meetings will focus on understanding and woriting 
through personal and social alientation. Activities will 
consist of discussion, role-playing, and group experiences. 

"Alone Together-A Photographic Essay" :" WiliiamA. Wycolff 

The goal is to create a visual sensitivity to the poses by 
which we betray alienation and community, and to capture 
them as iistants of mortality. The method will involve. • 
discussion of the means by which the eye can see and in- 
terpret the moods of man; developing a suggestive list of 
formats and scenes that may effectively and artistically 
express the January experience theme; shooting 2B-40 pic- 
tures each, proofs to be developed commercially; and 
exhibiting the collection. Necessary equipment: your own 
35mm or 120420 camera. j At- 

"Hell Is Other People" :. Pat Sullivan 

A discussion on the works and films (to be read and seenf^^' 
from an "existentialist" (Sartre or Camus) point of view. M 

"Improvlzations On Tha Theme Of Alienation" : Bentley . » 
Anderson ., '._^i 

An experiment in role playing and improvization during" P 
the January session. Readings and films wijl serve as a point-f 
of departure. The group may resemble, at times, group* 
therapy, psychodrama, or encounter groups, but the iiktUi 
tention is to create drama. No previous acting experience ilfi 
necessary. 




"An Experimental Group Novella" : J H Harii^ 

The group wiU deal with themes of two weeks ("alienatit^-^ 
ete.), to be developed out of discussions. Participants need%- 
not be fiction writers, as there wiU be many roles (inchidinff^:* 
that of typist) needed for projects. Considerations will beW 
political, psychological, and social, as well as literary 



Barclay Shraks a 




"Reaching In: A Farewell ToF<Hins' 
Bruce Guernsey 

The purpose of this project i§ to discover the .-.,1™ 
alienation plays in the life of an artist: Is alienati(<^ 
necessary and perhaps inevitable in artistic creation? The I? 
project is in three parts: 1. the definition (rf artistic*^ 
movement through a discussion «rf three sucH movem«its,»t*; 
their origins and intentions; 2. the separate creation by two *■* 
groups of students <rf a new movement and the representation: * I 
(rf both movements in painting and poetry; 3. the presen-;"» 
tation of the creative work of each group to the other and>; 
discission of what one group believes the other's new - • 
movement to be. The final goal is for the student to ex- > 
perience firsthand the alienation of the artist as he tries to "- 
experiment and invent and is inevitably misunderstood by 

his contemporaries. 

1 

"Tactile and Olfactory Experience": Verne M. Keefer 

A graip stijdy and experiment in tactile and olfactory 
ratperience as a form <rf communication. 
"Foraging for Playground Supplies" Hagens 

"Basketball-Is It a woman's game" Mast 




A SPECIAL 



CAN BE YOURS 





CADILLACS 

1971 DevHte4dr H.T S49W.0O 

1971 Coupe DcVIII* $4995.00 

1949Devme4DrH.T $2995.00 

1967 Coupe DeVllle $1995.00 

CONTINENTALS 

1972 AAark IV like brand new $7m.00 
1972 Continental Cogpe 13000 

mile* $Sa9S.OO 

1971 Mark III 2lochooMrrem extra 
nice »495.ae 

1970 Mark 1 1 1 toadatf N4n 

mile* $4795.00 

l9«9Mark III extra nice S37H.00 

19M Continental 2 drH.T. $1195.00 

JAVSLINS 
Oiriy 1 L«l« Syadal erica 

1972 Javelins SST 1300 miles. Fully 
toadad new tires, Vl awtomatlc, 

Full power, Fact. air. Buckat 
laattier, M. vinyl top and 

n99S.OO 

PORDS 

1971 Ford ceunlry square sw. Lllia 

new Loaded JJWS.OO 

1971 Calaxle4 Dr H T loaded »9S.OO 
l97lGalaxle4drHT.ieadad 2m.0O 



1967 Mustang V4 Automatic Ittft 
New t995J)h 

1967 Faican4 Dr. Radio Automatic air 
cond. one owner $1095.60 

cHRYSLea eaooucTS 

1971 Plymootti Fury ill 

loaded $19H.00 

19M PlynoouNi Fury toadad $19H.ee 
19M Oadge4 dr. Sad $195,011 

VOLKSWAGENS 

1971 Camper tully loaded, like new; 



174100 miles 



3t9S.OO^ 



19*9 StatOn Wagon Radio and 
heater $1195 JB 

1964 bm lop Cond wm.m 

OTNIRS 

1970 Olds 90 1..S.Iullyioadaa.W9Sja' 
I9«9 op^ Sta-wag pariect cond. 

wmm 

19MOi«m»«t truck pick-up WHM 
19« Oievrolet S.S. COBv. . $MSJe 
1943 Ptymoirft) rwnsgood $m.«)> 

I9440lds2dr Runs good $m.n 

I9MI Pontiac ■amwvlUa Qpa futly 
$119S.0I 



BAYSIDE MOTORS 

4747SHoraDr. Hn"* of Ww A«fc»<*fcs yM^um—mtk 
4(4^5^3 OmO DMtPr Va. U<«n« No. SMI 



i£m 



E10 



THE SUN 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1972 



o 




P.A.'s Leo Anthony named Beach 
Sports Club's "Coach of the Year" 



'-*«*.^ 
f,*^ i 



or . 

310i 



BILL SPAM 



^Cox's Bill Span signs 
with North Carolina 



931 



of the most heavily 
uited football players in 
ginia Beach this year 
ned a grant-in-aid with the 

|versity of Nwth Carolina 
Sunday evening. Bill 
in, both an offoisive and 
ensive standout at Cox 

I Schod ftt* the past three 

IS, inked his name on the 

ed line and committed 

ptelf to four years of Tar 

football. 

larlie Carr, an assistant 
at Carolina, was at the 
|n home for the Sunday 
'it signing. Carr is one of 
^most popular recruiters in 
rea, larg^ bes^l^^^^ 
deputation as a jJ^ctm 
eess Amje Hi^ School 
I later at Carolina. 



Span said that he signed mth 
Carolina because "Charlie 
Carr is head freshman football 
coach at Carolina next year. I 
got to know the man well and 
liked him. Also, I feel that 
Carolina combined the best of 
football with the best of 
acadonics of any school in the 
region." 

The 6'3", 215-pound of- 
fensive and defensive tackle 
has been a Falcon letterman 
for the past three seasons. He 
was contacted by twenty-one 
colleges, all trying to per- 
suade Bill to don their unf irom 

for his collegiate career. 
Although UNC was his final 
pick, Bill said that the 
University jof Virginia and 
Virginia Te<Si r«^ved a lot of 
consi<toati(Hi right until the 
Old. 



He's 32 years old. He's 
(fynamic. He's a winner. He's 
Virginia Beach Sports Club's 
Coach of the Year. Bob 
Whitley, President of the 
Beach Sports Club, announced 
that Leo Anthony of Princess 
Anne High School would be the 
recipient of the Virginia 
Beach Coach <rf the Year 
Award at the Sports Club 
Jamboree on January l6th. 
In addition to coaching a 
consistent Eastern District 
contender on the basketball 
court, Anthony is a fiigWy 
successful golf coach at 
Princess Anne. Last year his 
team won the State cham- 
pionship. 

For Anthony, basketball is 
his game and Princess Anne is 
his product. And the head 
Cavalier had molded his 
product into a pece of art — 
and for Cavalier fans that 
means a winning program. 

A native of New Yoric City, 
Anthony joined the Cavalier 
staff as head basketball coach 
in 1968. The basketball 
program soon gained the 
rqNitation as one of the finest 
disciplined teams in high 
school circles. 

For Anthony, winning is 
everything. The signs which 
hang from the wall in.4»8. of- 
fice — "Make Good pr Make 
Room" and "The only game 
we want to win is the next 
one" gives an indication that 
what type an individual An- . 
thony is. 

Anthony's coaching debut at 
Princess Anne was a success 
as the Cavaliers defeated 
Kempsville by a score of 72-56. 
They went on to compile a 13-5 
record and proved to be one of 
the leading contenders for the 

District title. j 

During the 1969-70 cam- 
paign| the Cavaliers rewrote 
the rcKiord bo(*s by breaking 
nearly every record in the 
school's history. They tinished 
the season with a 16-4 record 
and were regarded as one of 
the most powerful teams in 
the state. 

The Cavaliers improved 
upon their record by posting 
an impressive 18-4 record 
during the 1970-71 season and ^ 



were the Eastern Regional 
Runner - Ups. The Cavaliers 
reached the finals by 
defeating an unbeaten J. F. 
Kennedy (21-0) before a 
Virginia High School record 
crowd rf 11,000 jammed fans 
in the Hampton Roads 
CoUseum. 

Last year the Cavaliers 
ended their regular campaign 
with another super season of 
15-3. Speed, disciplined con- 
sistency, sharp passing, and 
good shooting are the 
trademarks of teams under 
the guidance of Coach Leo^ 
Anthony. This is evident as the 
Cavaliers won their fourfii 
consecutive Virginia Beach 
City Championship. 

A pleasant, young man, 
Anthony was a guard and 
floor-general at Old Dominion 
University (Norfolk, W&M). 
Anthony has the distinction of 
beii^ the third highest scorer 
in Virginia college history. He 
scored 2,181 points in his four- 
year career. On the way to AU- 
American honors, he set ten 
school records for season 
(621), single game (60), 
averaging (3l.o) per game his 
senior year and a (26.6) 
average for his four-year 
career. 

This is Anthony's second 
head coaching job. He brought 
Norfolk Academy its first 
winning season in she years. 
He served as an assistant 
coach at Granby High School 
for three years. Anthony 
compiled a remarkable 60-10 
record and won three Junior 
Varsity Championships. Also, 
he served as an assistant at 
Maury High School where his 
Junior Varsity won 16 straight 
gimes and extended their 
winning streak to 34 games. 
Coach Anthony had the 
opportunity to play high 
school basketball under the 
coaching of "Lrfty" Dftesell, 
who is now the Head 
Basketball Coach at the 
University of Maryland. 
Anthony, also, played for Bud 
Metheny at Old Dominicm 
University. Anthony At- 
tributes all his success and. 
philosophy to these two great 
coaches, whom he's worked so 



closely with during his (daying 
and coaching career. His 
disciplined offense was 



recently published in a 
national magazine, "The 
Coaching Clinic" 




In his cage coaching career, 
Anthony has a very enviable 
148 wins and only 31 losses 
through the end of last season. 
No other tasketball coach in 
Virginia Beach can boast of 
sirch a record. 

He are! his wife, the former 
Trish Harris, have two 
children, Greg who is 9 years 
old. and Michael, who was 



born in September of 1972. 

Coach Anthony also holds a 
Masters Degree from Old 
Dominion University. 

Last year's Sports Club 
Coach of the Year Award went 
to Cox's Billy Gutet-muth, a 
wrestling coach who has 
produced a mat record 
comparable to Anthony's cage 
record 



David Maxwell 
Memorial Trophy 
to be given yearly 



Coach Leo Anthony is seen talking to his players 
during a time out last season. Much of Anthony's 
success is attributed to his ability to adjust his team in 
order to lake advantage of his opponent's weaknesses 
durint; (he uame. 

mssssa 



><>OOOO0Q0Cawa6 ft > WWWg B P B9P«W^?V<-»W00W^ 




.■....■.^■.1^:^^^^^^ 



SflK)RTf 






\ 



iBy Ti'Jaf BnimW^ ^rts Edhor 



., 



^^wg^ ■^^^^^^ ' ■^^^^v.^^ 'y^ :^^..^^ ■ ^^^^ ' .v.^ '^ W ' .^^ '^ J^ w^v.^^^^^^;^^^^^^^v^.■..^v<r?.vgp9W^ ^ ... , , ,^ ,^ 




rincess Anne honors atheletes 



Thanks to the generosity of 
Mr. and Mrs. Hubert C. 
Maxwell, the outstanding 
defensive lineman in Virginia 
Beach will be honored each 
year with the David N. 
Maxwell Memorial Award. 
The award consists of a 
gleaming silver and walnut 
trophy, which will be placed in 
the school of the winner each 
year on a rotating basis, and a 
smaller trc^y, which will be 
the winner's to keep. 

TTie award will be made by 
the SUN l^rts Department 
each year in memory of David 
Maxwell, a former defensive 
tackle at Princess Anne High 
School. David attended 
Princess Anne from 1967 
throu^ his graduation in 1970. 
He played on the junior 
varsity football team ami thai 
on the varsity during his 
junior and seniw years. 

After graduating in June of 
1970, David entered the Army 
in October.' He won the 
Scholarship Award during his 
basic training at Ft. Camp- 
bell, Kentucky, and was 
transfered to helicopter 
training school at Ft. Eustis. 
While at Eustis, he was 
IM'omoted to Specialist Four 
and sent to leadership school 
Tot fourteen' weeks. 

Upon completion of his 
leadership training, he was 
advanced to Specialist Five 



and sent to South Korea with 
the 271st Aviation Unit as a 
flight engineer. On March 22, 
1972, David Maxwell was 
killed while serving his 
country. Fw his service in 
Korea, he was awarded the 
Army CtHnmendation Medal 




David Maxwdl 

fOT "exceptionally meritMius 
service." 

In June of 1971, he married 
his high school sweetheart, the 
former Pam Northcraft. He 
has two brothers and a sister. 
,His 13 'year-old" T)r6ther, 1 
(diaries, i^ns to fbBow in his 



$ 



(taaHwiiioapspH) 



»? 



»W*f 




piRL'S FIELD HOCKEY — Fran Badonsky 
f left). Best Offensive Player, and Judy Nicklas 
fright). Best Defensive Plaver. 



FOOTBALL — Danny Allen (left). Athletic Department Award for the Most 
Valuable Player; Dick Early (middle). Most Outstanding ^Defensive 
Lineman: and'Allan Evans (right). Mike Collins Award for the^osfDut- 
standing Offensive Lineman. | 




In football, girl's fiifeld 
hockey, (3X)ss-coun 



Nl^ALL — KAert Hi^s (^>. Mort OiMtanding Defensive Back: 
ikr Ange (1^ CMt«r). M«st Ctatstanding Offensive Badi; Carl Makley 

It renter), Mwta OariM Ammt4 im the M<^ Improved Playo-; and 
b. L u ii„„ / -i-fc« » r^. Tt^ito Award for tte Kbst OoUtoi^g Blocker. 





Princess Anne's Richard Tucker (32) has the grimace ni ^^ r%n , 
weight-lifter beginning a press. Actually, he is brSg to t^l ?!^f'' 
Mike Crabtree (21) of Kempsville. ^ ^^^^ crashing 

Princess Anne wins first 
two games of the season 



CROSS COUNTRY— Most Valuable Runner 
Robert Walker (left) and Most Improved Runnn* 
Ki'vin Bargv < right). 



Princess Anne picked up a 
|Mir of wins in their first two 
outtnp of the srason by 
(towning Kempsville T^S and 
Kellam 96-64. It appeare that 
tim Cavaliers are off to an 
early start in their Wd to 
defend ttieir City cham- 
\iotmhip. 

In their i^iening game Of Ok 
season last Friday flight, tiM 



Cavaliers were led in s<»rii^ 
l^ Mike Alva's 31 talH^. 
Ange is one of just two seniors 
(Ml the team, which is 
(feminated by a p'omisti^ 
^oup at juniOTS. 

PritM^^s Anne's two ^wior 
forwards won runner-up 
scoring honors for the 
Oa^hers. Gewge Purdin Wt 
tar S points, and J(^ PiKtai 



<^mped in 12 more. Otte- 
scorers for the Cavaliers were 
Robert Hughes wltti one point, 

Tom Calhm with two, Qirtis 
Strange with two. Rjchaitl 
T}»cker with two. and' Tim 
Daily Witt) four urtnte. 



^ 



mmmmmm 



^^^^^^^^^m 



AS«^iW*^%%%- 



1 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER ia 1010 



THE SUN 



Bob Devaney will be head speaker 
at Beach Sports Club's Jamboree 



PAGE ti 



Bob Devaney, head football 
coach ot Nebraska's Orange 
Bowl bound Cornhuskers, will 
be the main speaker at the 
Virginia Beach Sport Club's 
21st Annual Jamboree. The 
Jamboree will be held in the 
Cavalier Hotel on January 
16th. The Tuwday evening 
affair will begin with a 
cocktail party at 6 p.m., 
foUmved by the banquet and 
awards ceremonies at 7 p.m. 
Devaney will end his final 
season, as head coach of the 
University of Nebraska 
Cornhuskers in Miami's 
Orange Bowl on January 1st 
The New Year's Day clash 
will pit his 8-2-1 team against 
8-2-0 Notre Dame. 

Considered by mar^r to be 
the premier collegiate coach 
in the nation, Devaney ap- 
parently missed his chance 
this season to become the only 
man in history to skin}er a 
college team to three con- 
secutive national cham- 
pionships. Under Devaney's 
brilliant leadership, the 
Cornhuskers began this 
season with two consecutive 
number one rankings undo- 
their belts and with a streak of 
23 consecutive victories and 32 
consecutive games without a 
defeat 

Already homnvd for years 
as the "winningest coach in 
the nation" fw his sparkling 
careo* percentage of .819, 
based on a record of 127 vic- 
UfTiea, 28 defeats and sue ties, 
Devaney was named "Coach 
of the Year" by the Walter 
Camp Foundation, the 
Washington Touchdown Club 
and the Football Writers 
Association of America 
following the 1971 campaign. 
Earlier, he had been named 
"Coadi of the Year" for 1970 
by the Footi}all News. 

Honor has piled upon h(mor 
for Devaney, his staff and 
players ttie last two years — 
the AP and UPI tropMes, 
Grantlarid Rice Trophy, and 
MacArthur Bowl, Big Eight 
and Orange Bowl cham- 
pionships. All America honcHis 
and many others — but the 
greatest hon<»- came after the 



1970 srason when President 
Richard M. Nixon visited 
Lincoln to speak to a 
University of Nebraska 
convocation and presented 
Devaney and the Husker co- 
captains with a plaque 
proclaiming the Cornhuskov 
the "No. 1 Team in the 
Nation." 

The Preskient didn't have 
time in his busy election-year 
schedule to congratulate the 

1971 champions in parson, Iwt 
did send coach Devaney a 
letter calling the Cornhuskers 
"the greatest team in college 
football history." On 
February 1, coach Devan^ 
and a group of players payed a 
visit to the President at the 
White House. 

There's been no break in the 
spotlight for Devaney for the 
past three years — guiding the 
No. 1 team in the nation in 
flawless fashion. Devaney, 
with the aid of his veteran and 
highly effective assistants, 
kept the Buskers r(riling with a 
high-powered offense and 
massive defense by utilizing 
humor, hard wortc', fun and 
outstanding planning and 
teaching. Nebrai^a was ex- 
pertly prqiared for every 
game and the Huskers won 13 
straight — including two 
Games of the Decade, 35-31 
over Oklahoma and 38-6 over 
Alabama in the Orange Bowl 
— to maintain their No. 1 
randing. 

In 1971, Nebraska won Qie 
Big 8 Tor the third straight 
year and the sevoitfa time in 
Devaney's 10 years at Uie 
helm. Devaney was voted 
NCAA Distnct 6 Coadi of the 
Year for the sucth time, but 
the nation was astounded for 
the second straight year when 
he failed to receive the 
national honor. Again, the 
winner was the coach 
Devaney had beatoi in the 
Orange Bowl — Charlie 
McClendon shared the honor 
with Texas' Darrell Royal 
after his Louisiana State team 
lost to Devaney's Husker 17-12 
in the 1971 OB, then 
Alabama's Paul "Bear" 
Bryant took the honor after 





mruimh 



By T. Jay Brumbfey 
I^Hfrts Eiiitor 



The afBiual Charity Bowl football game is set for a 2 p.m. kickof f 
<m Sunday, December I7th, in Union - Kemjwville Stadium. The 
stadium is located on Witchdudc Road, just behind GEX. Two 
Virginia Beach coaches will be helping direct the (^posing 
teams in the charity dai^. Bob Hicks of Bayside will join Ken 
Barefoot and Billy O'Brioi in guiding the Tidewater team. First 
Colonial's Frank Webster will team up with Bob Tata to lead the 
N(n4olk Team. The teams have beoi sdected from over a 
hundred collie, high s(diool, and professional players. -Some 
other Biach coaches will be playing in the game, including 
Kdlam's Joidi Darden and Joe Peccia and KempsviUe's Larry 
Creekmore. 

■I--I--I- 

Tbe Chesapeake College Cougars got aif to their best start ever 
this seiQon in basketball. Coach Jdin Meyerhoffs charges 
swept Uieir first five games without a loss. Wesley College, of 
Dover, Delaware, handed them their first defeat of the seas(m 
when they edged the Cougars 101-99 in a thriller until the final 
buzzer. Wesley is my junior college alma mater. I attended 
Wesley before going on to Hi^ Point and William and Mary. 

Kdlam's Dickie Wopd made the team at Elizabeth City State 
College, accordii^ to his former coach Ken Stallings. Wood was 
one of the leading scorers Jn the City last season with 401 points, 
an average of 22.28 points per game. Hie 6' guard could have a 
good four years at Elizabeth aty if he keeps his grades up. 

+++ 

Hie t<^ professional and celebrity golfers will play in the finals 
of ttie S5nd Annual Bing Crosby National Pro-Am Golf Tour- 
nament on Saturday and Sunday, January 27th and 28tii, at 
PeW>le Beach. The famed "Clambake" will be televised on 
ABC-TV, and it is considered tltt grandaddy of aU pro-am 
tourmys wiUi a 1973 purse of $2(3,000. Crraby's weatfa^ is in- 
famous. In 1952 while playii^ in a heavy squall, golfers had to 
putt from a kneeling position, to 1964, Arnold Palmer, who has 
never wtm the tourney, waited twoity minutes at the I7th hole 
while waves washed his ball out to sea and back. Two-time 
winner Jack Nic kJaus took the 1972 event by sinkii^ an eighteai 
foot putt in a sudden-death playoff with John Miller. Each year 
the tourney proceeds go the tiie Crosby YouUi Fund, and the 
premier charity sports event has raised miUims of ddlars to 
date. 

+++ 

Virginia Beadi's Ricky Michaelsen te leading OM D<Mniniai 
scfvon and rebounders this season. The 6'4" juniw forward is 
avatigii^ 26.6 points par game with a fantastic 67 percoit 
dwoting average. He has hit «i 58 of 87 field goal tries. Throu^ 
the first five games, Ricky has & reboiOMk, 10 aimd of his 
neamt challenger, Jod CopeUnd. 

+++ 

Kids have a way <rf putting thii«s in their pr(^r perspective. 
This leter was written to God ^ eight year-old Dolph Hellman 
tor hto LittletMi, Colorado, religion class: 
"Dear God, 

Thank you tar my Wke and my himanwid and my tri<*-«"- 
treat camly. And thai* you fw me, and all Ufe, and for ttie 
moiMain, a^ fcr Saturday, and far l^ws, and for food, ukI fa- 
Monday Night Football 
Deiph" 



being humiliated by 
Nebraska, 38-6, in the latest 
Miami classic. 

After tile seas<m, Devaney 
went to Honohilu where he 



fast becoming old hat for 
Devaney as he's coached 
teams in such post-season 
games as the Coaches All 
America Gam^, All Amo-ica 




Bob Devaney 



coadied the North squad to a 
24-7 win. Husker quarterback 
Jerry Tagge guided ttie North 
attack in that game and was 
named the Outstanding 
Player. All Star games are 



Bowl, Blue-Gray Game, Hula 
Bowl and Shrine East- West 
Game. Actually, Devaney's 
win string is 26 and his un- 
beaten string 35 if wins in the 
All America Bowl in Tampa, 



the Coaches All America 
Game in Ljibbock, and ttie 
Hula Bowl are included. Last 
summer he had the honor of 
coaching the College All Stars 
against the NFL Champion 
Dallas Cowboys in Chicago. 

At Nebraska, Devaney's 
teams have won 100, lost only 
20, and tied two in eleven 
years, following his 35-10-5 
record at Wyoming. He's 
never had a losing season at 
Nebraska and he has directed 
three undefeated teams — 
1965, 1970 and 1971. Here is 
Devaney's year-by-year 
record at Nebraska, starting 
with 1962: 9-2-0, 10-1-0, 9-2-0, 
10-1-0, 9-2-0, 6-4-0, 6-4-0, 9-2-0, 
lf-0-1, 13-0-0, and 8-2-1. 

In addition to his great 
coaching record, Devaney has 
made Nebraska one of the 
most sought-after bowl teams 
in the nation. In 10 years, his 
teams have gone to eight post 
season games, winnii^ five 
and losing three, while 
thousands of Nebraska fans 
follow the CoriAuskers in 
bright red costumes. The 
Huskers have played in the 
Gotham Bowl, Cotton Bowl, 
Sugar Bowl, Sun Bowl and 
foup^jmes in the Orange Bowl. 

Under Devaney's out- 
standing leadership, too, the 
Cornhuskers have (n-oduced 15 

(continued on p^e 12) 




One of Kempfiville's outstanding players tibis 
season has been scoring and rebounding stan- 
dout Jim Roberts. Here we see Roberts (40) 
^oing up for two points over the outstretched of 
Wilson diefender Calvin Brown (25). 



Drop two 

K«npsville has not yet beoi 
able to find the winning totKfa. 
After ImIi^ their opeiMr to 
overtime to Wilson, the CM^s 
irogped two more, Friday 
night to Princos Aime, 7»-53, 
Mid Tuesday nl^ to Bayride, 
66-56. 

Against Prin^M Anne, Jim 
Robots paced tiie CMefo widi 
21 points. Sorely missed fnxn 
the Kemi^ville line-up was 
Britt Glissoi, who had mjured 
his 1^ against Wilson Vxm 
days before. ' 

Doug Boone captured 
rimner-up scoring honow for 
the Chiefs witti his nine potots. 
Other KempsviUe scorers 
wa% Oliver Mayfidd with 
■evoi potots, Yito Traino wiOi 
six, J(^ Gilchrist witii twff, 
Charles Langley with two, and 
Mike Crabtree wltti four. 

The, Chiefs led In the first 
quarter of the game by a two- 
point margin, 17-15, but 
Princess Anne dominated the 
scoring after that. 

Kempsville got off to a slow 
start with Bayside. Bayside 
romped in the first quarter, 
Kempsville the last. The 
middle two quarters were 
pretty even, but the early 

MarUn lead was just too much 
for the cniets to overcome. 

Jim Roberts led the 
Chief sccHrers again with 16 
points. Other Chief scorers 
were Doug Boone, Vito 
Traino, and Mike Brock with 
four points each, Charles 
Lai^ley and Mike Toirech 
witti six each, Ricky ni«ge 
and Mike Crabtree . 



Maxwell 



(continued from p^ 10) 





Keeping their eyes mi the ball are Kdlam't Do^: 
Renham (43) and Terry Tyler (21) and Ffarsf 
Colonial's Burt Lewis (33) and Cleveland 
Spellman (20). 



Mr. and Mrs. Hubert C. Maxwell 



brother's footsteps and 
become a defensive tackle so 
that he may win the trophy in 
a few years. He will be on the 
Bayside Jiaiior Hi^ School 
team next year and will go on 
to Princess Anne if school 
district boundaries remain the 
same. 

His father, Mr. Maxwell 
takes game films of all of 
Princess Anne's games and 
las been associated with the 



Virginia Beach hi^ school 
fooU)all program for many 
years. It is with the help of 
Jim Holley, athletic coor- 
dinator at Princess Anne, that 
the award was (riginated. 

Everyone who remembers 
David says that "he was a fine 
boy." It will be a fine award 
this year and for many years 
to come for Virginia Beach's 
outstanding defensive 
lineman. 



Although the action at this moment looks as 
though the heavens are aglow with some 
miraculous vision, it's just that these four Beach 
players are following one of basketball's fun- 
damental rules—keep your eye on the round ball. 

Patriots win last two starts 



After losing their first two 
starts, First Colonial picked 
up an 87-63 win over Kellam 
last Friday night and a 66-52 

win over Cox Tuesday night to 
balance their record at 2-2. 
It was only a matter of time 



before First Colonial's two big 
guns. Burt Lewis and Speedy 
Gainer, came to life. They 
found the touch Friday night, 
and it now looks as though the 
Patriots will have a for- 
midable team this season. 
Lewis led all scorers^ith 23 



points, and Gainer was just a 
point behind with i^ 
Cleveland Spellman hit 
doubles figures with 10 pomts. 

Almost all the Patriots scored. 
Bill Harris had sa points, 
Sterling Johnsai, 5; Mike 



Cowell, Marvin Green, and 
Bob Channon, 4 each; Steve 
Butts and Larry Bowman, 3; 
John Galloway, 2; and RoUiie 
Robinson, 1 potot. 

Tuesday night. First 
Colonial suiprised Cox 1^ 
downing the Falcons 66-52. 



SAY MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM LEN'Sl 

(NOW - FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE - A FULL SERVICE DEALER) 






$28995 

OUD STATE 
STERH) 



SPECIALI BUY THIS AND GET A DROP-IN 
8 TRACK PLAYER FOR ONLY $20.00 




Iiidiid«2YMaOaTiilM, 
1 YMr ObPk«^ M ItaQTS 
OdL^a 



PHONE: 
340-1575 



Len's T.V. Sales & Service 

4113 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. ACROSS FROM WILLIS MA YSIDE r\ 

"We offer the best in T.V. & Stereo Service: Prices - Workmanstup - QuaBfy** 



ZENITH 
4 SONIC 

Solid state 

PorWMe nonof^mih 

FMtoitaf 

Uniqus ^>eak« S;itMa;| 



THf aiNTON 

•359" 

COLOR. REMOTE 
OOlSfTROUVlMRRANrY 




aiMJ1YLEAD»MP 



iAOilZ 



THE SUN 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 14, 1972 



5!!!!;^.., Bayside spKt gives Marlins 2-1 mark 



^, Devaney 



[fte, 



iFgi 



(OHitmiMd AtMB ftge 11) 

,Ml Amerk« j^yeiii and 73 All 
4iMg S 8<jwtia}s in the past 10 

yeani. 
..n i|)ev«)ey has also sermi as 
li^vtetic Director since 1S67. 
•MdM'aMca's athletic pre^m 
TffMitiiwes to grow ami pr«p«' 
. yi^ter his direction, with a new 
jiTrartan track set for 
Indication in the sprii^, aloi% 
.,«^ a new basalt park. 
•Devaney has also 

^pearheacted the drive fn- a 
^sp AtMetic Ctdisum which 
,nj^ approral (rf the 1971 
iH^raska Legislature and a 
,A|einorial Stadium expansion 
. of some 9,400 s«its before the 
^,^2 season, raising the 
^f^pacity to more than 76.000. 
,^J^ns are ateo being made to 
jpMikI a new Athletic Depart- 
m«it office building under the 
i,,sputh stadium expansion. 
3,QJiher Memorial Stadium 
..^illiprovements since Devaney 
, :^^med the AD post include a 
„l^^s«utiful new press box and 
AstroTurf. 

. After starting bis coaching 
*«re«- at Big Beavra-, Mich., 
High Devaney moved to 
Ke^o Hartxr and Saginaw 
^^kore spendir^ seven years 
^ Alpena High where his 
ms had a 52-9-0 record He 
joined Biggie Munn, and 
:«• Duffy Daugherty, at 
Michigan State before 
becoming head coach at 
Wyoming in 1957. 

is married to Yas 
e sweetheart, the for- 
Phyllis Wiley. His son, 
and daughter, Patricia, 
both ^^duates of the 
University of Nebraska. He's 
grandfather, too, with ' 
:e's family inchiding a 
i^ter and a soa 

r guests at the Jam- 
will include Bill Dootey 
tte University of North 
na and many other area 
te coaches. The Sports 
will award trophies to 
inia's Outstanding 
iegiate Player, 
to^s Most Outstanding 
te, Outstamling Coach in 
inia Beach, Virginia 
Sportsman of the Year, 
tt^ Most Outstanding 
r-Athlete in Virginia 
h 
Hdland to in charge of 
tll(^ sales to the annual 
imrtB «ik. Tidtels 9iid ticket 
itifwmation can be (Gained 
^r^ BiU HoUand at 428- 
tidkets are limited by 
seating capacity of the 
0^ banquet facilities, so 
ito«sted sportsmen are 
to buy ttieir tickets 



new 
i, shotgun 

fRA instructo 

ilnia<!teeC. Blackburn Jr., 
fyirginia Beach, President 
the Virgnia Beach Rifle 
Pistol aub has been. 
^^_ ntal a Certified Rifle 
^9^ a»otgun imtriKUR-, in 
«> J^ition to the appointment he 
t Mm l«Ms as a Certif i^ Pistol 

* ii^ructor. 

* Instructor appointments are 
fctt^lde (HI the basis of ex- 
jperience and the successful 
^ completion of extensive 
t examinatims, given by the 
i National Rifle Assodation of 
{America. 

] He is now qualified to 
^ c<mduct classes in Rifle and 

* Siotgun markmanship and 
t safe gim handling, in addition 
I to' his Certified Pistol 
Iqutilificatio'K. 

^dcbum joins the ranks of ■ 
selected volunteer instructws 
ttineughout the country who 
donate many hours in the NRA 
small arms education 
program. TIm pr<^p-am has 
been in operatioi since un%; 
since that time many millions 
ti people have beoi taught to 
hande and enjoy flrearms 
safdy and effectively. 



£ox has 
1-1 record 

Cox's Mason recmd stands 
It one win and one toss just 
»o pima Mo the ^s<m. 
.■act Prfaiay night against 
taysMe, Cm ^inped to an 
sarify 30-1$ flnt quarto- lead 
uiri nevOT traiM for the rest 
If the gune. BaysMk's com- 
ktv»-Miod Mmt in be final 
aro qaartat M\ short as the 
^atoms mm n^. 

Randy M^auo powfated 
be weai^ and rrtowiMag 
MKte for ttw FabMiB. He M 
^M worert with M pomto. 
w^ «.i.«^ startM's hid 
rC«L Brocks 
Vilhdi.ia. *%,n ran^r-yp 
mIi^ hMors witti M pokMi; 
kiw finite tad 14 psMs, 
BiBv ttiB#r put In IS 



Sports Club will hold party 



-*fi 



Witti TUe»lay's ni^t 66-56 
win over Kempsville, Bayside 
upped its record to t^*'o wins in 
ttiree starts. The Marlins loiw 
toss came at the hands of Cox 
last Friday night 



Jim Gofflgan led Marlin 
scorers both nights. Against 

Cox. he dumped in % tallies, 
and he put 18 points on the 
scoreboard against Kemps- 
ville. 



In Tuesday ni>;ht's gitme, 
Kiton Cross earned runner-tip 
scoring honors with 16 poins. 
Other Bayside seoren; were 
Cecil Duke. 11 points; Vernon 
Hyman, 7; Don Harold, 6; and 
Donnie Dugger, 2. 



I^st Friday night Vernon 
Hyman and Donnie Dugger hit 
double figures. Hyman had 12 
points; Dugger, 10; Elton 
Cross. 8; Don Harold. 7; 
Tommy Foskey. 6; and Ricky 
Fletcher, 3 points. 



The Virginia Beach Sports 
Club will hold their Annual 
Christmas Party at their 
regular Tuesday luncheon* 
meeting next week. Tlw party 
1^11 be held at the Virginia 
lieach Civic Center (Dome) at 
12:30 p.m. on Tuesday, 



December 19th. 
During last Tuesday's 

meeting, the Club voted to 
moie their meetings to the 
Oceipn Hearth in the Mariner 
Motel. The meetings will still 
be at 12:30 p.m. each Tuesday. 
FoUciving next week's 



Christmas Parly, the Sports 
Club will suspend their 
meetings through the holiday 

season,, and their 1973 
meetings will resume on 
January 9th at the Ocean 
Hearth. 




MOORE'S 




Year - End 
Clearance Sale 

Some One Of A Kind - Some Soiled - Some Damaged. 
But Every tiling At Fantastic Uw Prices 



Close-Out Sale On All 1972 Steel 
Utility Building Models 



lO'xlC 139^5-14935 
6'xr 89.95 



99.00 
55j00 



Clearance On Fencing 

r* X 4" Mwk X 36" HIgb 
lli«Hlar11.e»l SO* Roll 
r'MMhPoulfryNMtini 
ItaiHtar 6.161 BtTlloll 

ar' X eir Ra*. 7.10 

48" X sir Rtt. e-iB 

er aiMl FwiM Pott. ... .Rat. 1.38. 

■nrmmtfmm^ML R«9- lea. 



9.49 
4.20 
4.89 
7.49 
1.1s 
1^ 
1.29 



Wrought Iron Columns And Railings 

Rag- Sala 

4.96 4.40 

8.59 7.75 

4.39 3.75 



&we MowrOn Jhew Hems During 

Itam 
DuetadafRaniahaadt 
OiMyl 30^ R an g ^ i oo d i 
DttCQMi 3CK Ran^MOodi 
OHettHt 38^ Ranfahoocb (Stainla« StMl) 
^w6«Ml 3v nanfsnoooi 
3B»No.80Hoa(l8Mlt 
3irNo.80HoodSlialli 

BMlt-ln Gm Ovan GOC 3-8 
■HHt-in Elactrie Ovan H.P. 
RangrtuMid Q81O HD-30-0 

flaetrie Surf aaa Unit ET-34-S 
Oaa Siirfaaa Unit QaB-2»-8 
Oas Surteea Unh aT-34-8 

DWmraahar 8PJ4AXW 
Diitiwatliar 8C2WLXQ 
Mfhwadwr SC400LXA 
SFK20WIV 
8FMBXA 
DWnwaitiar SCK8AXW k SCK6AXE 
a^ w a a hai 8FK3CXW ft 8C29SLXW 
OWMMritar 8U600L 
DMiw aahar SUKSA 
DWiwaAM SUlOO Undaoovate 
Rama NFK38XE » NFK»XW 
Ranci NFKXXE ft NFK3CXA 
Raiiia NTK3CXA ft NTK3CXE 
Ranfa NTK3DHXE 
Ranta KFKSEXW 
Ranfa KFK%HE & KFK3EHW 
Ranfa FC180I.XW 
Ranga KF43aMXA 

KFSOMXW 

KFiamfXM 3(r Avocado 

KF130iIXW3<r 
_ K8234RXW3(r 
Rai^ KS430LXA Avocado 

RaMfaralor RT174LRW 
itofriiaratar RT 194I.Ra 
RaMfararar RSZOeLW 
Rafriftrator RT178L1IA 
Rafrifarator RT173LRW 81 RT173LRQ 
Ra«rifmtor RS214I.SA 
RaMfarator RT17»IRA 
Rafrifwator RT144MRW 
RdFrifvator RJKWRW 
ftofrifarator RJKSSRW 
RafrifarMor R8K0OW 
RcfrteBnlot RTI20/12tLRA 
RC130W 
FUOeOLXW 
Fraatar FUiaOLXW 



Dryar 
fcyar 

Oryar 
Diyec 



DE17nim.8i DE17PMA 
DE57aMXMr & OE570MXA 
DESTOMXE 
DE27<MXW 
DE17PMA Avocado 
LAZTOMXW 

LMTiMXO 
LA220I¥ 



WitoLMifiOl^ 



Our Clearance 

RM.Frtoa 
36.98 
21.96 
M.96 
42.96 
36.96 

ia9e 

10.98 

146.95 
96.97 
64.96 

76.76 
54.50 
63.56 

207.70 

208.95 

249.96 

179.W 

229.60 

229.96 

209.95 

259.96 

279.96 

18S.00 

199.96 

189.95 

199.M 

349.95 

238J6 

329.M '^ ^ 

229.96 * 

229.96 

219.96 

189.95 

189.95 

199.95 

219.95 

349.96 

384.W 

388.95 

329.95 

544.W 

349.95 

329.96 

389.96 

419J6 ^ 

449.96 

219.W ♦ 

198.00 

189.95 

224.W 

219.95 

179.96 
129.96 
219.95 
189.96 
229.i6 
:M8.95 

2moo 



W/l Cokimnt Flat 4 SctHli 
W/l Column* Cornar 4Scollt 
W/l RiMkm Standard 4 Ft. 

Flint & Walling Submersi 
Fron Sump Pump 1/3 H.P. 
Ragular 
.MM 



U 



le 



4388 



Sri* 

2a.oo 

18.00 
19.95 
32.95 
27.95 
7.m 
7.98 

r 110.00 
BOM 

6i:75 
39.00 
49.95 

188.00 
189.00 
199.00 
145.00 
179.00 
230.00 
169.00 
209.00 
199.00 
179.00 
149.00 
139.00 
149.00 

;m.oo 

189.00 
265.00 
179.00 
189.00 
178.P0 
145.00 
145.00 
165.00 
185.00 
269.00 
319.00 
449.00 
319.00 
269.00 
446.00 
279.00 
2S0JXI 
275.00 
319.00 
379.00 
199.00 
189.00 
155M 
.175.90 

1M.00 

1^.95 

iiaoo 

199.95 
168.00 
196JW 
17SjOO 

nsM 

2MlOO 




All Lawn Hloweri 



Rag. ia4S 



Ceiling Fan] Wall 8i Ceiling Fan 

9H ."« 109S 




Discontinued 
Evans Antique 
Kits 



Quart Size 
Rag. $5.49 
Whila Thay Last 



OmITb Sliag Caiiet 
Tiles 

Regular 69^ 49 

Excello Tiles 90 ^ 

Regular 99^ iib9 

Vinyl Asbestos Tiles Jj SQ 
Reg. 7.96 40Sq.Ft. HT 



Discounts On Clearance 

Itam 
Vanity BSBW - 36" 
Vanity Whita Provincial 24" 
Vanity Whita Empran 24" 
Vanity Whit* Emprasi 30" > 
Vanity Whita Empr*« 36" 
Vanity Whit* Empratt 42" 
Vanity Whita Empraai 48" 
Vanity BDBW - 18" Whita 
Vanity LAV - 3622 Whita 

Vanity BSB Emprea 42" 
Vaiilly BSB Empien 24" 
Va^ty BSB Empress 48" 
Vanity BSB Empress 36" 



Rag.^iGa 

29.00 

29.95 

62.95 

68.79 

77.M 

82.59 

95.89 

58.79 

75.75 

8159 

6159 

95.89 

77.89 




numlNng &rgMns 

lien 

Salt a 3r Avocado 

Siika32"Copr«rtOM 

aUc a 3r GoidM Huvaat 

PlakTolatSaM 

OntfiM Adi. 9pny aower Head 

3^ X ir Ai^ W/Stop Uvataiy Supirty 

3^ X30r tea^tStor Uvaloty Sappiy 

^ X 1/2 MnlgU »op NO V07 

TaxMTrfi^ mi^ftCtato'l^Ptihi 



Rct.Me« 

39.50 

35.95 

39^ 

195 

5.95 
3.35 
5.95 
L49 

7.29 



Saiehice 

3U88 
28.88 

31J8 
4.98 
198 
199 
430 
1.19 
488 



Odds And End! 

Itan 
RabenU SU^a 240 Biaek 



DMiMek 1/3 Off Stock 



Rfj^Mee 

11.97 

3J5 

6.98 
4a95 



SakMce 

9.75 

199 

4.99 

3M0 



Savings On Borg-Warner Bath 

Itam 
Pink Closet TaiA 
Pink Closet Bowl 
Wheatland 19 x 16 Lavatory 
White 20 X 18 Lavatory 
Whita 20 X 16 Lavatory 
Pink Lavatory 19 x 17 
Pink Lavatory 18 x 18 
Pink Tub 5' L.H. & R.H. 
Lavatory Fitting 8" Spread 
Tub FiN Pitting. Singta Lavar 
Tub a Mowar Single Lever 
Single Lever Shower Fitting 
Tub a Shower Fitting 
Fitting-Trip Lever Tub Drain 
Sink 24" White 
Sinli 32" Avocado 
Sink 32" C«vperto«M 
Sink 32" GoMen Harvest 

Texas Tuhular 
IK" Phig a Chain Tub Drain 
Merit Brerr 

Vr'K 12" ChMet Supply 
3/8" x 20" CkMet Supply 
1H" X 21" Contiwious Weste 
Centerout 
Wrenn 

20 X 18 Sink Rim ^ 

24 X 21 Sink Rim 
42 X 21 Sink Rim 
CXvens^Ioming 
3r' White Shower Cove Fiber 
48" White Shower W/Seet R.H.. L.H 



Fixtures 

Reg. Price 

23.70 

15.75 

44.95 

16.96 

27.96 

17.96 

21.95 

79.95 

24.98 

16.95 

21.95 

24.95 

24.95 

11.95 

24.95 

39.50 

39.50 

7.29 

1.76 
^69 
4.95 



3.95 
3.95 
4.96 

149.96 
.159.00 



Great Deduction On Ligiit Fixtures . . , 
1/3 % Off Of Ail Retail Values 

Listed Below 

405AM4 243-1CH6 468AC8 

576BR4 444CH2 1465CP2 

667WH16 576BR 

905SM 407CH Ceil Ceramic 8" 

Swag Lights (All) 969-5 BR Chandelier 21" 

10% Off On All Other Light Fixtures 



Electrical Appliances At Low Prices 



Washer 
Wesher 
Wesher 
Wawief 



Washer 
Wesher 
Washar 
Waaher 



Item 
LAJ210 
LAJ2S0 
LA480LW 
LA480LW 
LA660LE 
LA660LE 
LTH100 
LTJ110W 
LT480LXA 
LA500MXW 



2J8 

2ja 

3J8 



Clearance on Wax 

Item Ref.nnce 

Twwax Vinyl Floor Pintah 1 fU .74 

Traww Vinyl Float Finofa 27 PL Oz. .98 

TieinKVfaqr|PloorFiniili46PLOz. 121 

Tiewn Vhvl Ploer PUA 1 (M. 5.85 

TiewnWoodOeannlQt , 1.23 

Tmnx U^vid Float Wax 27 PL Oz. .77 

'nemxUtirid Floor Wax 46 FLOz. 1.69 

ItewnlJqidd Floor Wax IGaL 3.34 



97 J8 



&ie Price 

.45 

.65 
LOO 
100 

.89 

.65 

.98 
100 



Dryer 
Dryer 
Dryer 
Dryer 
I>yer 
Dryer 
Dryer 
Dryer 
Dryer 



DES70MXE 

DE460LW 

DE560LXW 

OE660LA 

DE560LE 

0ES60LE 

DE480LE 

0ES60LQ 

DE760LG 



Paneling Bargains 

Item 

Auburn Oak 4X8 

Rowdi Sawn Parchment 4X8 
MaibfeElKmy4X8 



Reg. Price 


SelePriee 


179 JS 


148.00 


189.96 


159.00 


219.96 


166.00 


239.96 


179.00 


259.95 


209.00 


299.96 


266.00 


229.96 


179.00 


269.95 


219iW 


249.96 


209.00 


229.96 


196.00 


179.96 


148J6 


149.00 


116.00 


199.96 


156.00 


199.96 


169.00 


199.95 


159.00 


199.96 


1HI.00 


179.W 


146.00 


199.95 


isexw 


209.96 


175.00 



Reprice 

5.60 

7.21 

2a37 



SA Price 

430 

5.00 

13.00 



Aluminum Windows 

Itan 

AtNri^««idowl^24 
Awalag«^itowNa33 
A«^«tadowNa22 
Ataminmi SMe 5030 



Ref. Price 

2ail 
H87 
27.32 
17.06 
f7.24 



Sde Price 

17.00 
2L00 
S.00 
1430 
1430 



Carpet Clearence 

Itm R4.Moe 

ShagTIes 12X12 A9 

EmefcT&a 12X12 .49 

MialnAvoiaitoPoaffl XW 

Aimtrong Oupet Fom Back (Rut) 3.49 

VlqiAib^ocTMe 12X12 Hi. eta. 7.98 

VtaytAAeMxIVeUXnNam &M 



FlmmGliig AvaHaMe or Use 
Your Banff Cfiarge Card. 
Your Satlaf action 
Guarantood or 
Monoy Refundod 






CORE'S 



Supermarket of Lumbw 



&le Price 

.45 
.29 
249 
179 
450 
7.50 



BuHding Materials 



CHESAPEAKE 3224 Attontic Ave. 

.MMeii- eeiici>« OreNIION..PRI.7:30A,ll.lo8P.II. 
MME S43-^l nn&,WEa,T1IUR&, 7:30 AJL to 5:30 P.lf. 
SATURmY5te4PJI. 



• VIRGINIA BEACH Va. Baac^ Blvd. 

1 MILE WEST OF PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 
OPENOA0LY7:3«to8PJL 



PHONE 340-6772 
SATURDAYS! to 4 P.M. 



^^PP^^^^^^^^PW^'P^^^^ 



^ 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 14. 1972 



THE SUN 



PAGE 13 




Four centuries of Christmas 



The Adam Thoroughgood House, one of the oldest brick homes in America, sym- 
b^izes the Seventeentii Century Christmas and will be open to the public during tiK 
holidays. 

Recreation center to be built 



Lemoin B. Cree, general 
maiiager, Womble Realty 
Investment Corporation, and 
J&ck S. Blout, presidait of ttie 
newly organized Haygood. 
Skating Center, Inc., an- 
nounced recently the signing 
of c^^cts to build the largest 
skating and family recreation 
cenj^r in the Tidewater area. 

Se specially designed, air 
cc^tioned facility will be 
buQt adjacent to the Haygood 
9i^ii« Center on a 2>/^ acre 
site {Hirdiased from Lee A. 
Guifford, President, Haygood 
Shopping Cento*, Inc. Cree 
said that Worth M. Womble 
Associates, Ltd., a Virginia 
Limited Partnership, will owe 
the bicility which it will lease 
to Haygood Seating Cento*, 
Inc. d-ee said that the real 
estate syndicate was 
prganized and underwritten 
by Womble Realty Investment 
Corporation during 1972. 

According to Cree, Norfolk 
Iron ami Steel Works will 
provide the pre-engineered 
steel building which wiU be 
erected by George Jensen 
Inc., General Contractor for 
the project. Cree stated that 
every effort has been made to 
provide a modem buildii% 
specifically suited to the rollo* 
dcateg sport. It is to have a 
maple dcating floor 180 feet 
long and 80 feet wide. In ad- 
dition to Uie planned snack 
bars and skate roital areas. 



future plans call for expansion 
which will provide for shops 
featuring youth-oriented 
sports apparel and a full range 
of sports equipment. 

Blount organized the 
College Park Skating Center 
and for the past two years has 
served as its operating part- 
ner. In announcing the plans 
.for the new Haygood Center, 
Blout said that although 
100,000 posons are expected 
to use die Center during the 
first year of operation, em- 
phasis will be placed on 
quality managemoit and a 
in'ofessional teaching staff, 
offering a full rai^e of in- 
dividual and group in- 
struction. Blount said that 
Raymond Chaput, who will 
serve as the center's senior 
instructor, is an example of 
the professional teaching 
emphasis. Chaput, a 
nationally prominent roller 
skating instructor, is Ucensed 
by the Society of Roller 
Skating Teachers of America. 
A unique technique employed 
by Chaput is the use of institnt 
replay T.V. vidteo tapes which 
permit instant review by the 
student ol his performance. 
One of Chaput's students is the 
past U.S. Ladies Singles 
Champion. 

Blount said that he feels that 
there is a definite need for this 
new faciUty which will ac- 
commodate the high levd of 



interest in roller skating that 
currently exists today. He 
commented that the large 
scale indoor exercise sport 
has the advantage of com- 
bining health with pleasure. 
For those interested in 
competition, Blount said there 
are tremendous opportunities 
in the sport for both team and 
singles competition. 

In addition to the regular 
evening and weekend 
sessions, the new facility will 
be available for private 
parties. Also, church and civic 
groups will be permitted to 
rojt the center at special rates 
in conjunction with their fuMl 
raising drives. Commenting 
on how such facilities can be 
used effectively in fund 
raising drives, Blount cited 
the National Association of 
Roller Skating Associates 
which adopted the Muscular 
Dystrophy Drive as their 
special project and gave over 
$65,000 to this cause in a recent 
drive. Blount is an active 
member of the national 
association. The recreation 
center will offer free skating 
to all area scouts once a month 
as a puWic service. 

The Haygood Recreation 
Colter is expected to be ready 
to receive the first skaters in 
March, 1973. 




Citizens and visitors to the 
Tidewater area will again 
have the opportunity to 
celebrate four centuries of 
Christmas. The traditions of 
Christmas datii^ to the 17th 
century will be the at- 
mosphere of the historic 
homes along the Norfolk Tour 
at Christmastime. 

In fact, there will be 
something for everyone on the 
tmir. Brightly decorated ships 
and submarines of the 
Atlantic Fleet, priceless art 
treasured and traditional 
religious services at oiie of the 
nation's most historic chur- 
dies await the visitor. There is 
even a 2200 pound yule candle 
burning Ix-illiantly to hail ttie 
season. 

The three homes along the 
tour have done extensive 
research into the traditions of 
early American Christmas. 
Visitors will be able to see the 
homes exactly as they were 
decorated centuries ago- 
diaring the surroundings, the 
beauty and even the emotions 
of our ancest(H*s. 

ADAM THOROUGHGOOD 

The Adam Thorou^good 
House, built in the late I600's, 
is one of America's oldest 
brick homes. Named for its 
adventuresome owner who 
came to Virginia in 1621, this 
faithfully restored structure 
symbolizes the seventeenth 
century Christmas with 
completely natural 
decOTations. 

Alice Pfmgst, curator of the 
Thoroughgood House, has 
crafted the greenery just asjts 
former inhabitants would 
have done. The tastefully 
assembled greenery is 
highlighted by the Yule Log, 
one of the most memorable of 
early American traditions. 

On December 15, city of- 
ficials and special guests will 
observe the Yule Log being 
placed into the fireplace along 
with a piece of the log used the ' 
year before. Tlie new log will 
be draped with ivy, holly, 
mistletoe and pine garlands. 
TTie holly has long represented 
male, the ivy female, and 
mistletoe fertility. Such 
greoiery was always sacred 
to our ancestors, Mrs. Pfmgst 
explains, and it was always ' 
burned and never allowed to 
decay. Yet, she notes; "they" 
would never bum mistletoe. 

After a prayer, Susan 
Condrey, portraying the 
youngest member of the 
Thoroughgood family, will 
pour wine on the Yule Log. 
Then Norrie Martin, por- 



traying Adam Thoroughgood, 
will light the fire-symbolizing 
the b^inning of the yuletide 
season. From December 15 
until die end of the yuletide 
holidays, the traditional Yule 
L(% will bum brightly. 

In all the past four cen- 
turies, candlelight has 
represented Uie welcoming of 
theChrist Child, and has held 
a special place in the celeb- 
ratiCHi of Christmas. All the 
candle in the Thoroughgood 
House will be lit from the 
flame of the Yule Log. The 
Thoroughgood House will be 
open from 12-5 p.m. December 
15-January 2, with the ex- 
ception of Christmas Day and 
New Year's Day, when it will 
be closed. 

WILLOUGHBY-BAYLOR 

Chronologically, the next 
century is represented by two 
beautiful homes. The 
Willoughby-Baylor House, 
within walking distance of the 
Moses Myers House, is one of 
the most elegant townhouses 
in the South. 

The hand made natural 
decorations at the Willoughby- 
Baylor House were crafted by 
Mrs. James McNeal. Mrs. 
McNeal explains that this 
house is especially unique in 
that the furnishings, 
memorabilia and decorations 
in this 1794 townhouse show 
fascinating details of the way 
our ancestors lived. 

SMurday, December 23 will 
be Children's Day at the 
Willoughby-Baylor House. The 
St. Paul's Church Boy's Choir 
will be at the home to sing 
carols and Christmas music 
from 2-5 p.m. on that af- 
ternoon. A Christmas reading 
by well known eloqutionist 
Florine Harriton and others 
will be a part of the af- 
ternoon's activities. The 
display of iron toys will be on 
hand again this year, as well 
as cakes and candies of the 
children-just as it was done 
centuries ago. 

MOSES MYERS 

The Moses Myers House is 
considered to be one of the 
most el^ant townhouses in 
America. Built in 1792 by the 
wealthy merfchant whose 
name it bears, the house 
remained in the Myers family 
for nearly a century and a 
hair. " • " ' 

A shipping giant of his era, 
Moses Myers assembled 
treasures from many lands. 
His cosmopolitan interests are 
beautifully reflected in the 
array of art objects and 
collections of silver, china and 



glassware throughout the 
house. 

De<»rated much in the same 
manner as the Willoughby- 
Baylor House, the hand- 
wrought decorations include 
an especially beautiful 
Christmas tree this year. 
Through painstaking 
research, Mrs. Joseph James 
has decorated this home just 
as it was done in eighteoith 
century America. T^e Moses 
Myers House will be (q)en 
December 16-31 from 12-5 p.m. 
The House will be closed on 
Christmas Day and January i- 
3 for undecorating. 

GARDENS-BY-THESEA 

Nineteenth century flavor is 
present everywhere at the 
internationally known dar- 
dens-by-the-Sea. 

It was the last century in the 
South and in America during 
which Christmas was 
celebrated under the soft glow 
of candlelight. And so, the 
largest yule candle in the 
world stands in the Ad- 
ministration Building of the 
Gardens to punctuate the oa. 
I^e candle stands almost 13 
feet high, weighs over 2200 
pounds and is 2 feet across. 
For added beauty, 300 poin- 
settia surround the homing 
candle. 

The candle will be lighted oa 
December 14 at 7:30 p.m. at a 
public ceremony. TTie Gar- 
dens will be apesn and the 
candle buming from 10 a.m. to 
9 p.m. until Christmas. From 
December 26-31, the Gardens 
will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. It will be closed on 
Christmas Day and New 
Year's Day. 

NORFOLK NAVAL 
STATION 

Expressing the 20th century 
emphasis on sleekness and 
power, the Naval Base with its 
formidable array of military 
might provides an unusual 
attraction during the holidays. 

Many vessels resting at 
anchor from December 12 to 
the end of the season nightly 
will come alive with countless 
brilliant lights outlining ships 
and superstmctures. 

This decorama annually 
excites the spirit of the Season 
both among the decorators 
and the thousands of visitors 
who. thrill at this fantasy of 
'c6t6r. Sp^etatOrsrare afforded" 
a view of these ships from 
numerous vantage points in 
the city and in the harbor area 
during the evening hours. 
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH 

Also on the Christmas 
Nwfolk Tour is St. Paul's 



Kidney Foundation Awards 



F&M WINNERS — Nancy Honey (Left), Michele Galea, and Sally IVice, Firat k 
MeKhanto Natl^l B«^ "Anytime" hostess draw the winning names for tht 
nwte^tmkm. which was d^igiwd to promote interest in the Anytime Bank serviM. 
Rnhy L. Rock. 4M 16th Street, won a tape player in tlw cwlest. For the firat eight 
weeks «l the pr^'am, approved applicati^ were up about ^ per cent over nor* 
man activity. 



The ' National Kidney 
Foundation has presented 
awards to eight individuals 
and groups that have made 
significant contributions in the 
fight against kidney disease in 
the past year. E. Lovell 
Becker, M.D., Professor of 
Medicine at Cornell Medical 
'ollege and Presidoit of the 
Organization, conducted the 
award ceremony at the 
Foundation's National Award 
Banquet, held November 18 at 
the Roosevelt Hotel in New 
Orleans, Louisiana. 

Senator Warren G. 
Magnuson of Washington 
received the 1972 President's 
Award for his support of 
national legislation to benefit 
kidney patients, particularly 
the recently passed Social 
Security amendmoit covering 
kidney treatment. Mr. Harley 
Dirks, Magnuson's Assistant, 
accepted the award for the 
Senator. 

The 1972 Trustees' Award 
went to General Mills, Inc., fwr 
the company's provisiwi of 
over 300 artificial kidney 
machines through the Betty 
Crocker Coupon Program. 
Mr. William R. Humphry, 
Vice Presidoit of the Civic 
and Community Affairs tot 
Genoal Mills, accepted the 
|:riaque. 

NBC's Today Program, 
cited for its valuaUe work in 
bringing into puUic focus die 
need for artificial kidney 
machines and donated of ans, 
received the 1972 Public 
Service Award. Mr. William 
Monroe, NBC's Washington 
Editrar, rqwesented the Today 
F^p-am. 

The 1972 Volunteo" Service 
Award woit to Dr. Frank 
Fields Staff Mete«t>k)gi^ and 
Scioice E(htM- fn- WNBC 
Television IftatRm in New 
Yo-k aty. Dr. Fidd's special 
program on kidney disuse 

lave tetu^t the plteht of 
ki<taiey patients to the at- 
toition of milliMS of viewers. 
The Regional Medical 
Programs Serlvce, 
represented by Harold 
Margulies, M.D., Director, 
received the IfTt Health 
Advancement Award. The 



Regional Molical Program's 
primary responsibilities are 
training and demonstration in 
1he kiiiey field, particularly 
through the Kidney Disease 
Control Program based in 
Rockville, Maryland. 

Distinguished Service 
Award were given to three 
national organizations: Sigma 
Beta Sorority, Inc., for its 
support of the Organ Donor 
Program that seeks to secure 
more donated kidneys for 
transplant; the Ladies' 
Auxiliary to the National 



Rural Letter Carriers'" 
Association for it support of 
children's kidney disease 
research; and to the Rockette 
Alumnae Association, Inc., for 
it fund raising efforts on 
behalf of the National Kidney 
Foundatioi. 

The National Kidney 
Foundation, organized in 1950, 
has 49 affiliated divisions 
across the country. It is the 
only national vohintary health 
agency working toward the 
|M-evention, treatment, and 
cure of Kidney Disease. 



FOOD GIFT PARS... 
TASTEFUL GIFT GIVING 



THE ARISTOCRAT $14.98 

The Aristocrat has one of the best selections 
of tasty foods in the Hickory Farms of Ohio gift 
line. This impressive selection futures a 1 lb. 
BEEF STICK Summer Sausage in addition to 
14 other delicious cheese and snack items . . . plus 
imported candies for decorative purposes. 

One of the Great Gift Paks from 

UltlMiy t««|». 

MILITARY emeu SHOPPING MAU 

OPQtlOAJLMIOP.M. 
IKXWAY- SATURDAY 

AMERICA'S LEADING CHEESE STORES 
Take with you— or w«'U mail 



Church, one of the cAdest in the 
country still in use. 
Traditional religious services 
are held in this stately church 
which was built in 1739 on the 
»te ct an earlier chapel which 
was constructed in 1641. 

On Christmas Eve at 11 
a.m., the Festival Service of 
Nine Lessons and Carols will 
be held, and an 11:30 p.m. 
Holy Communion. Com- 
mtoiion will also be held at 8 
a.m. and 11 a.m. on Christmas 
Day. On January 7, the 
Epifriiany Feast of Lights 
Service will be held. 

The church is open to the 
public for tours Tuesday 
throu^ Saturday 10 a.m. to 
4:30p.m. and on Sundays from 
2-4:30 p.m. It is closed Mon- 
days. . 

CHRYSLER MUSEUM 
AT NORFOLK 

Tlie Chrydea- Museum at 
Norfolk will be opo) to the 
public during the holiday 



season from 12-S p.m. It'iHll 
be clMed on Christmas Day 
and New Year's Day. 

One of the leading muswms 
in the natim, the Chr^W 
Museum's collections M'e 
fascinating. Tho'e are Ihi- 
portant and cdefarated 'Art 
objects of every civilization 
frwn the Shang Dynasty in 
China and the Egyptian 
Fourth Dynasty (2600 B.O'to 
art of contemporary Ameri^. 

MACARTHUR MEMORt^ 

During the holi^y seMin, 
the MacArthur MemwiaA is 
open to the public Momlay 
through Saturday from 10 
! a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundiays 
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.^e 
manorial will be cl(»ed on 
Christmas Day and New 
Year's Day. 

The extaisive coUectiiw'of 
exhibits and memorabilia 
trace General Dou^s 
MacArthur's colorful ^ajid 
conhroversial life and milittiry 
ourwr. 




The famous Ynlf Log. draped wltti ivy, koOy. aM 
mistletfe, sod pine girlands, will hum to tito flreptalit 

of the liam tltfi-"o|ighgood,H««se on Friday. :*, 




Definitely not. Hammomi knows ttiat organs don't ptay them-, 
selves by flipping a switch. People play them. People need . 
instant satisfaction for playing success. That's why Haiwnond's 
new Cadette is much more than handsome furniture with superb, 
Hammond sound. It satisfies you instantly with new Hammond, 
Instant Play-a complete, new, way to play and enjoy Hammond; 
ROW while developing skills for a lifetime. M)Solutely free! Skills ' 
that add fun ami meaning to your leisure hours. Pl^ 10 po|Milar< 
tunes in 10 days or less, tek for the new Hammond Caitett*'' 
with Instant Play. Two 44-note keyb(ar<b, 13 pe^ls, v«ce trt$*u 
completely electronic. E«y crwlit terms. Play Instant ^ 
today. 




ONLY 

499 

Reg.$Se5 
YOU SAVE $961 1 



• 24 P^e Play Along Booklet 
Gwiwii^ 10 PoiMilv Sonp) 

• C«iette Warranty Certificate 

• Keyboard MKl Pedal Glides 




TEMPLE OF MUSIC 



• PEMBROKE MALL 
4994)551 



• JANAF CENTER* 
86^4536 



(»D4 IQ AM TO le ni • imi THRU SAT. TB. (nWIIIAI 



mmsjt 



THE SUN 




THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14. i9»2 . 1. 



News of our servicemen Planners hear requests 

Airman Stpvpn B rrooir. Airman First riass Harrv and Mrs. Melvin Owpns nf btt ,^ ,^^ ..^^ ^ ^, ^ ... A 



.EMPLOYEE AWARD— WibM Green. Jr. of 5811 

; .'t JBurton Road, is presented his hramed employee of 

j. the month certificate award by Capt Richard A. Bihr, 

Commahdint; Officer of the Naval Amphibious Base, 

;<'-■ '-.'Littte Creelc. Wilsmi, who was selected by his fellow 

,,^,_ employees for the November 1972 award, has been 

;,'s, "with the Exchange at Little Creek since 1962. He is- a 

^ ^ native of Virginia Beach and presenUy works in the 

p i# ixLCxchange's Vending Machine Department. 

School Board is elected 



•tm h-. 

"^i\'*=City Council msttSe its four 

School Board appoititmraits at 

Monday's meeting. Two 

Micancies for at-lai^e Board 

"o^teanbers and one each from 

„^.Jlw Lynnhaven and Black- 

wata- Boroughs needed to be 

. . «led. 

?^ ^ Hobert H. DeFord, Jr., 

^' '^*);^ently serving as chairman 

rflo^fof the Board, and Dr. Charles 

luqiP. Fletcher were' both 

■Ro'' nominated for reappointm«it 

»p"^)'« the Board at-lar«e seats. 

g ,^r. John A. Mapp was also 

»# 9«ominated for one of the seats. 

9Ub D^ord recei^^ 11 votes and 

** "l^etcher was replaced by 

,^,n.j|iapp in a 8 to 3 vote. Flet- 

iPDdier's defeat came as a 

fft&!«urprize to many. 

^^ Mapp later said that he feels 

nwo^ Schod Board has done a 

§ft6tfine jd) with the Virginia 

unps 

gtBte '- 

'fttti c 

.lea^r MRS.C0RDIACUST1S 
"fl vilra. Cordia B«inett Custis, 
|4; a native of Hades Neck on 
the Eastern Shore, died 
Satairday in Lakeskle Con- 
vMesc«tt Home. 
J ^e was the widow of Cobie 
'' n. Oustis and a dau^iter of 
'Qiomas Henry and ftfrs. 
fGeorgiaima Scott Bainett. 
! was a former (h^ anist of 



Beach educational system. 
"I'm a novice," he stated "I'll 
have to find out where I can 
add to the School Board." 

Fletcher was nominated 
again — this time to fill the 
Lynnhaven Borough seat. He 
'was def^ted again — 6-5 — by 
former State Senator Edward 
T. (Ned) Caton. 

The popular 6-5 split in 
council's voting was 
predictable as Caton has been 
aligned with the anti- 
organizational faction since 
iia creation in 1967. 

Ralph Lee Frost was 
unanimously reappointed to 
the Blackwater Borough 
School Board seat 

Spencer Lott, a member of 
the Board since 1966, did not 
sedt re-appointment. 



Airman Steven B. Creek- 
more, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Bland U. Creekmore (rf 817 
Silvererest Lane, has been 
assigned to Boiling AFB, 
Washington, D.C., after 
completing Air Force 
Basic Training. 

During his six weeks at the 
Air Training Command's 
Lackland AFB, Tev., he 
studied the Air Force 
mission, organization and 
customs aral received special 
instruction in human 
relations. 

The airman has been 
assigned to a unit ot 
the Headquarters Command 
for further training and duty 
in the transportation field. He 
is a 1972 graduate of Kemps- 
ville High School. 

Navy Aviation Structural 
Mechanic Third Class Robert 
P. Hopson, son of Mr. aiid 
Mrs. G&sxe W. Hopson of 660 
Bottino Ugrtp, was promoted to 
his present rank while sg^ving 
with Helicopter Mine Coun- 
termeasures Squadron 12 
homeported in Norfolk. 

Navy Seaman A{^rentice 
James E. McLane, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul W. Utterback of 
1416 S. Twain Lake Road, 
graduated from recruit 
training at the Naval Training 
Center in Great Lakes. 

Navy Fireman Recruit 
James D. Moore, son of Mrs. 
Lucy N. Pettis of 484 Garrison 

Place, graduated from recruit 
training at the Naval Training 
Center in Great Lakes. 

Navy Seaman Recruit 
Roger D. Preece Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger D. Preece 
Sr. of 304 Eastwood Circle, 
graduated from recruit 
training at the Naval Training 
Center in Great Lakes. 



Airman First Class Harry 
L. Detar, son of Mrs. Der^hy 
Detar, 725 I^implight Lane, 
has graduated at Sheppard 
AFB. Tex., from the U.S. Air 
Force aircraft loadmaster 
course conducted by the Air 
Training Command. 

Airman Detar, who was 
trained to compute aircraft 
loads and deliver material and 
supplies by parachute, is 
returning to his Air Fwce . 
Reserve unit at Greater 
Pittsburgh International 
Airport. 

U.S. Air Force Sergeant 
Marvin 0. Owens, son of Mr. 



and Mrs. Melvin Owens of 677 
Barberton Drive, is on duty at 
Takhli Royal Thai AFB 
Thailand 

Sergeant Owens, a 
packaging and crating 
specialist, is assigned to a unit 
<rf the Pacific Air Forces 
(PACAF) which provides 
tactical air power suf^rting 
the U.S. and its allies in 
Southeast Asia and the Far 
East. 

Before his arrival in 
Thailand, he served at Davis 
Monthan FB, Ariz. He is a 1967 
graduate ot Union Kempsville 
High School. 



Christmas at the libraries 



The Virginia Beach 
Department of Public 
Libraries will have special 
Christmas features for the 
children this week. 

On December 18th, the 
Windsor Woods Branch will 
have_ a special Monday 
Bedtime Story Hour for 
children ages 4-8 at 7 p.m. 

The Virginia Beach Branch 
will hold their regular 
Nightime Story Hour for all 
ages at 7:30 p.m. with 
Christmas stories and trrats. 

On Tuesday, December 19, 
the Kempsville Junior Pup- 
peteers^ will present Charles 
Deckens "A Christmas Carol" 
for children in grades 3 and up 
at 8 p.m. 

There will be no Christmas 
activities on Wednesday, 
December 20th. Thursday, 
December 21, at the Bayside 
Branch will have a special 
bedtime story for the children 
aged 3-7 at 7 p.m. Kempsville 



will have their story hour at 
their branch library for 4-8 
year-olds at 6:30 p.m. The 
regular story hours 
for 3-5 year olds 
will be held at Windsor 
Woods at 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 
a.m.; and Virginia Beach 
&t 10 a.m. featuring 
Christmas stories. On 

December 22, the Bayside and 
Kempsville Branch will hold 
special Christmas doings at 10 
and 11 a.m. 
Saturday morning at 10:30 

in the Virginia Beach 
branch, there will be a pinata 
filled with Christmas surprises 
for the children, age 3-6. 

There will be no film series 
at either Windsor Woodg. or 
Virginia Beach Branches on 
Saturday, December 23 and 
.30, nor will there be afternoon 
stories at the Kempsville 
Branch on Thursdays, 
December 21 and 28th. 



(Bhitnuviti 



UH 



fev 



m 



10 

HarixHlm Baptist Oiurch. 

f^33; Surviving are three sisters, 

y* Brs. Phleta E. Stegar of 

[ewport News, Mrs. Kenny 

1(* of Onley, and Mrs. 

Ann I. Budd of Hacks Nedc; 

.. aWd a brotha*, Harmson P. 

'^'^Bfemettrtr Painter. 

A funeral s^vice will be 

^ii h^d TueKiay at 2 p.m. in St. 

, ^/Gewge's Episcopal Church 

m '!M»«^taT. Pungoteague, Iqr 

3g ;^ Rev. W. Guy Webb <rf First 

•= ^Baptist Church, Newport 

"-^News. 

r.J"- ThefamUy will be at Jennell 

funeral Home, News, tonight 

-s, .ftwi 7 to 9. lliey lata- will be 

'•5^ at the home (rf Mrs. St^ar of 

- -W 32nd Street, Newport News. 

.„,^^IIRS. JUDITH BERNARD 
.r.nMrs. Judth Ella Spenee 
^^&«Bemard, 97, of 246 Raintree 
l^^m^ad died in a hospital 
^:^^t)ecember 6. 

'StioShe was the widow of 
(♦Bslliomton Stith Bernard and a 
*p cjiu^ter of Jam^T. and 
"' ' Mrs. Cbristiany«theridge 

^ence. ^,^ 
^.^A native of Pasquotank 
J"'fl©ounty. N.C., she lived h&e 85 

years. 
iij ^ was a member of Ghent 

United Methodist Church 

- ^otfolk. 

,m '^^^ is survived by four 

4 4 dau^tere, Mns. William W. 
Gayle o( Vii^inia Beach. Mrs. 

^» #Mward T. Caton Jr. of 
"' 0^peake, Mrs. Donald E. 
^^lett of Richmond, and 
Mrs. ItaTy L. Nicholas Jr. of 
NmfoUt; two SOTS, Robert S. 

i.i.^nard of Chesapeake and 
TOwnton S. Bernard Jr. of 

.#9^i^nia Beach; four grand- 
children; seven great- 

^' ♦gpfendchlkiren; and a great- 

v,t#^3t-graiKidau0ita-. 

'!««.. MRS. FRANCES B. FOX 
''^ ' ^rs. France Eliza Barnes 
g^.^x. 79, of 5017 Paine Lane 
,^fi0§;d in a hMpital D^ember 5. 
H fo45hewMttw widow ^Archie 
'• Mf F« and a (tau^ter of 
*^fy&«r r. Barnes Sr. and Mrs. 
4ttetee JiAnsoo. 
A lifelong rnident of 
•'•Ifoifolk, the wm a monba- of 
♦*^-*^ First Church al Ae 



Portsmoiith hospital 
December 5. 

He was die husband of Mrs. 
Ruth Allen Ives Boltz and a 
son of Michael and Mrs. 
Wilma Boltz. 

A na^tiye of Buffalo. N.Y., he 
lived ID tiiis area 50 years. 

He retired in 1961 as a chief 
of the Norfolk Naval Shipyard 
Police Department. 

He was a member of 
Pemh-oke Manor Churdi of 
Christ. 

He was a vetwan of the 
Mexican Campaign, and a 
Navy vetwan (rf World Wars I 
and II. 

Besides his widow, he is 
survived by two daughters, 
Mrs. Jean I. Cox and Mrs. 
Catherine I. Griffin, and a son. 
EUis H. Ives, all of Virgiraa 
Beach; a sister, Mrs. Dorothy 
Anwrfd, of KejTwrt. N.J.; and 
nine grandchil(ta%n. 



,i9 



ob^AtHwi^ are a M^Mon, 

»i Avrtie M. Foa Jr.. of Las 

'♦U* V^t, Nev.; - 

st^A^ter, Mrs. Ctoo C. 

tvii^m flC FiBtairiMi; Ave 

p» ndehD^ta ; ndtm>p«at- 

*^^n detm ^ w , 

iRwrcRici^'ra 

i^wt Whe B^ta. ti, of SN 
m ^MMi IMve cBed hi a 



F.L. BAYDUSH 

Frederick Lawrence 
Baydush, 30, <rf 4564 Bob Jones 
Drive, Larkspur, former 
Nwfolk restauranteur, died in 
a Washington hospital Sunday 
morning. 

He was a lifdong resident of 
the area and was em{doyed as 
food and beverage director by 
the Sheraton Motor Inn at 
Mihtary arcle. 

He formerly owned ami 
operated the Ranch House on 
Granby Street in Norfolk. 

He was a member of T»nple 
Israel. 

He was a graduate of 
Norfolk Academy and 
received a degree from Old 
Dmninion University. 

He was the s<m of Junius and 
Mrs. Mari(Hi Cq}lon Baydush 
and the husband <rf Mrs. 
Rochelle Posner Baydush. 

Besides his widow and 
parents, he is airvived by two 
daughters, Misses Amy 
Denise Bay<faish and Berri 
Renee Baydush, a son, Joel 
Scott BayAish of die home; a 
SBter, Mrs. Libl^ B. Furst, 
ami a broUier, Jerry David 
BayAffih. both of Norfolk. 

MIM MARGARET C. 
1HARDBARGER 

Miss Margaret Chesley 
Hardbarger, 83, died 
Dec«Biber 7 in a nursii^ 
hwne. 

A native of Alleghany 
County, she was a dai^hta- of 
Henry I. and Mrs. Mollie 
Brown Hantt»r^r. 

She was a member of 
Galilee EpiscqjBl Church. 

She is »irvi\%d by two 
tteere. Mrs. Floyd Qwwta- <rf 
Oivi^OT and Un. Mary 
Own of Narrows. 

MRS. PEGGY A. BELL 
M». l^gy Ann Bell, S, <d 

•12 Avaton Drive died in a 

hoi^tal D«»nb«- 7. 
A native of ainton. N.C. she 

M^l htft 12 years 



She was the wife of Robert 
E, Bell and a daughter of John 
and Mrs. Bonnie Gallagher 
Jordan of Clinton. 

She was employed at 
Maritime Terminals, Inc.. and 
was a member of Armstrong 
Memorial Presbyterian 
Chiffch. 

Surviving, besides her 
husband and parents, are 
three daughters, Debbie L. 
Bell, Donna Jean Bell, and 
Vickie Ann Bell, and a son, 
Robo-t E. Bell Jr., all of 
Virginia Beach; tWo brotha^, 
Paul M. Jordan and John 
E. Jordan of Clinton; arid two 
sisto^, Mrs. Alma G. Stanley 
of Richipond and 

Mrs. Wanda F. Strick- 
land of ainton. 

CHARLES EARNEST 

Commander Charles "M" 
Earnest, Commanding Officer 
of Attack Squadrcil Seventy 
Five based at Naval, Air 
Station Oceana, lost his life on 
28 November 1972 during 
flight operations onboard USS 
Saratoga in the Gulf of Tonkin. 
He was 38 years old and a 
nativg of Opelika, Alabama. 

During his career. Com- 
mander Earnest flew over 
three hundred combat 
missions and was awarded Uie 
silver star, the distinguished 
flying cross, thirty air medals, 
the meritorious service 
medal, three Navy com- 
mendation medals, the Navy 
achievement medal and tlie 
Vietnamese Cross of 
Gallantry with gold star. 

Commander Earnest is 
survived by his wife, the 
former Minna Laney Helms, 
of Daytona Beach, Florkla; 
Ws two sons, Brad and Bryan, 
now residing in Virginia 
Beach, Virginia; his father 
and mother, Mr. and Mrs. 
Milligan Earnest; his 
brothers, Glenn Earnest and 
Joseph Earnest; and his 
sister, Mrs. Molly Miller. 

In lieu of flowers for 
Commander Earnest, ex- 
pressions of sympathy may be 
donated to the POW-MIA 
Scholarship Fund, Red Rivs- 
Valley Fighter Pilots' 
AssodatiOT, P.O. Box 9736, 
Neliis Air Force Base, Nevatta 
89110. 



MRS.LYDIAE.LUPTON 

Mrs. Ly<Ba E. Lupton 53, of 
5432 Providence Road died 
December u in a hMpital. 

A native <rf Fairview, Okia., 
she lived here a yeare. 

aie was tte wife of WflUam 
H. Luptoo and a dai^ta- of 
Fr«J ami Mrs. Lydyi E 
Warburg. ♦ 

^ was a Baptist and a 
veto^n of WorW War 11. 

Surviving, besides her 
hiiaband. are two sons 
Fraiyde C, Linton and Ronald 
R, Lupton. ami a dMJghter, 
Urn Pmla S. Lupton. aO of 



Virginia Beach; a brother. 
Jack Warhurst of Santa Ana, 
Calif.; and a sister, Mrs. Betty 
J. Valin of Fort Lauderdale 
Fla. 

WILLIAM E. KELLEY 

William Earl Kelley, 52, of 

ZTf Convention Drive, the 

t husband of Mrs. Mary 

Zuidwna Kelly, died in a 

Norfolk hospital December 11. 

A native of Roanoke, he 
lived in the Norfolk area 51 
years. He was a son of Mrs. 
Lila Denton Kelly of Norfolk 
and the late WilUam Dunn 
Kelly. 

He was a member of 
Tabernacle Chupch. 

He was" an assistant 
weightmaster with Norfolk & 
Western Railway and a 
manber (rf Nomad Lodge 500. 

Surviving, besides his. 
widow and mother, are a 
daughter, Mrs. Mary Kelly 
Biernot of Chesapeake; a son, 
William Robert Kelly of 
Tempe, Ariz.; a sister, Mrs. 
Jean Kelly, Hludzinski; and a 
grandson. 

BIAGIO J. FECUNDIO 

Biagio J, Fecundio, 56. of 236 
Doctors Drive died ^nday in 
3 hospital. 

A native of Sharon. Pa., he 
lived here five years. 

He was the husband (rf Mrs. 
Joan Gulliver Fecundio and a 
son of the late Louis and Mrs. 
Mary Vendemia Fecundio. 

He was a Postal Service 
clerk, a member of St. 
Nicholas Catholic Church, 
Hdy Name Soci^ of New 
Y(b1(. Ara^na Moose Lodge. 
He was an Army veteran of 
World War R. 

Surviving, besides, his 
widow, are two daugiiters, 
Misses Veronica Marie 
Fecusdio and Patricia Louise 
Fecundio of Virginia Beadi; 
three sisters, Mrs. Terry 
Fusco of Fort Lauderdale, 
Mrs. Catherine Est(»ito of 
BrofAlyn, and Mra. Tho'esa 
MillUdn of Gnrtcm, Conn. ; and 
two brothers, Josqih Mest^ 
of HoQydale, CaUf . and J«Ty 
CanKo of Que«is, N.Y. 
. > — 

MRS. FRIEDA M. FBHER 
Mre. FVieda M. Fisher, 92, 
(rf 47 Bahhvin St. died in a 
bot^tal Decanb«' 5. 

A native of Chicago, she 
lived here three years. 

She was the widow of 
George J. Fisher and a 
^^iar of G^x^e and Mrs. 
Elizabeth Becker Rom. 

She was a mradber of St. 
Nich(^s Catbirite Chwchy 

She is survived. Jby a 

(bu0iter, Mrs. Elizat»eth M. 

Ftanzm of Vir^nia Bea(di; 

two sua, Jo^ph J. Fi$ii» of 

Oelwein, lowan. ami P^h- A. 

Fishar of D-^Mal Lake, n.; 

Mid a p«nddM0Aar, 1^. 

A.C. Cvrd of Virginia B^idi 

J MRS. VMW.ET B. WARftICK 

Mn. Vl^ Butt War^ of 

tm Simpkins Court died in a 



Norfolk hospital Sunday. 

A native of Pocahontas, she 
lived in Tidewater 41 years. 

She was the widow of 
Millard F. Warrick and a 
daughter of the late Charles 
W. and Mrs. F'izabeth Lawson 
Butti 

She was a member of 
Bayview Baptist Church, 
Norfolk, and a past chief of 
Norfolk Pythian Temjrfe 3. 

Surviving are a son, Donald 
N. Burnett of Virginia Beach« 
a daughter, Mrs. Bette Costis 
of Houston, Tex.; her step- 
mother, Mrs. Mary Butt of 
Pocahontas; three sisters, 
Mrs. L.V. Hedrick and Btos. 
EC. Pearmart of Norfolk, ^nd 
Mrs. George Fisher of 
Chesapeake; a brother, 
Charles A. Butt of 
Chesapeake; two half 
brothers. Geoi^e W. Butt of 
the Air Force in Maine and 
William W. Butt (rf the Air 
Force in Mississippi; and 
three grandchildren. 

MRS. SHIRLEY SHRIEVES 

Mrs. Shirley Gladden 
Shrieves, 56, of 2205 Dinwiddy 
Road, the wife of Gerald 
Thomas Shrieves and a 
daughter of Mrs. Bessie 
Bloxom Gladden of Norfolk 
and the late Harry S. Gladden, 
died in a Norfolk hospital 
Sunday. 

A native of Cheriton, on the 
Eastern Shore. Sie lived here 
18 years. 

Besides her husband and 
mother, she is survived by two 
daughters, Mrs. Elsie Russdl 
of Cheriton and Mrs. Bessie 
Bull of Virginia Beadh; three 
sons, Gerald T. Su-ieves Jr. of 
Portsmouth, William Floyd 
Sirieves of Tampa, Fla., and 
Harry Shrieves of Virginia 
Beach; a sister, Mrs. Mary 
Louise Austin of Virginia 
Beach; and 11 grandchildren. 

E.H.OVERBAY 

Elbert Howard Ova-bay, 76, 
of 1372 St^hens Road, retired 
chief appraiser (rf the CtBtoms 
Service, died in a hospital 
December 7. 

He was the husband of the 
late Mrs. Sophie SlaugMo- 
Overbay and a s(hi of James 
Walter and Mrs. Virginia 
Francis Hagy Ova1»iy. 

A native of CMlhowie, he 
lived in the Norfolk-Vlrpnia 
Beach ai^s 52 years. 

He was a member of 
Eastern Shore Episcopal 
Chapd, and Khe<Uve Shrine 
Temple and was a Ma»m. 

He was a graduate of EUMMy 
& Hairy CoD^e. 

He is strvived by sn smUrs, 
Mrs. Annie May Bmtim of 
^ewartrtown. Pa., Mrs. Mai^ 
U^ (rf Oiilhowie, Mra. Lakie 
Pniner and Miss Ethel 
Ovobay of GkMie %nrta%, Mn. 
J(»ephine Wolener of 
Richland, and Mrs. Eva 
Gallomiy of BalcUwi^; am! 
three brottiov. Jam Overbay 
of ma^aid, Md Jete H. 
OvaHlMy of CMlhowia. 



In its last meeting of the 
year, the Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission 
Tuesday considered use 
permit applications for 10 
separate apartment com- 
plexes to be built in the city. Of 
the 10 applications, six were 
approved with modifcations, 
two were denied, one was 
deferred for 60 days and one 
was withdrawn. 

The Commission also 
elected officers for 1973 durii^ 
the briefing session before the 
f(Hinal public meeting. Of- 
ficers elected were die same 
as those who served this year. 
They.ar,{ 

Chariman, J. Harry Mote 
Jr.;' vfce chairman Charles 
Beard; and secretary Walto- 
permit to build single-family 
(hvelUngs ami the permit was 
granted "witlTThe stipu]ati(m 
that the builder would not 
request a use permit for the 
apartments for some years. 

".Your permit has been, 
denied" said Chairman Mote, 
"because your original request 
made to diis body stated diat 
it would be from two to three 
yeai|fe b^(p you rehu-ned to 
us fbir pgrmits for the apart- 
ments. 

"It'nas been les& than a 
year," Mote said. . 

The comniissioners ex- 
pressed cOTcern about densitv 
in theu* consideration of mai^ 
(rf the apartment use permit 
applications and reduced the 
number of apartments 
allowed in some (»ses. 

The application of Kay 
Fancis Reid to construct 14 
apartments was approved 
with the stipulation that onlv 

10 one-bedroom units be built. 
The apartments are to be 
constructed in the Bradford 
Terrace-Chesapeake Beach 
area of Bayside Borough, near 
Brigadoon Drive and Pleasure 
Housa Road. 

The commissiOTers also cut 
down on the number of units 
allowed Nonni, Cohen, Clark 
and Weisberg, who requested 
453 apartments units and were 
allowed 335 units, basecf on 

available usable acreage. This 
complex will be built in the 
Windsor Oaks West area of 
Kempsville Borough, near 
Holland Road, S. Plaza Trail 
and Windsor Oaks Blvd. 
The Commission reduced to 
six the numbo* of units allowed 
Harlis E. Powers, who had 
requested 12 apartments. The 
units will be built near Holly 
Road and 33rd Street in die 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

Apartment construction use 
permits were granted with no 
change to Franklin 'E. 
Weigand Jr. for eight units 
near Birdneck Road and Old 



Virginia Beach Road and to 
Idlewhyle Inn for 12 units to 
rq)lace an existing struchire 
containii^ 19 units on 27th 
Street and Atlantic Avenue. 

(X the remaining apartment 
use permit applications, 
Joseph Haskel withdraw his 
applicatiOT to convert a house 
to a tri-plex (near 33rd Street 
and Holly Road), and the 
application of Whitt G. 
Sessoms Jr. to construct two 
additional apartment units 
onto an existing duplex 
(Arctic Avenue and 34th 
Street) was denied. The 
Commission deferred for 60 
days the applicatioa of 
Th(Mnas E. Hurley to build 12 
efficiency units on Baltic 
Avenue and 2^nd Street. 

In other business, the 
Planning Commission ap- 
proved use permits for: 

-h Tidewater Montessori 
School to operate a day care 
nursay at Pembroke Manor 



United Clwreh of Christ. i v 
-I- Harold D. Pugh for the! 3 
sale ani rental of campers ftt^T 
Arrowhead Industrial Park.,;^ 
-fR(*a-t J. Eigen for a^, 
tires, batteries and ac-ii 
cessories shop in Robwt Hall'^ ' 
Village across from Pemrcke 
Mall. The Commission also 
approved a change of zcming 
for die store. 

-t- Vernon and Rachel James 

to operate a 92-unit camp site ' 

and travel park on Tabernactie ' ; 

Creek in Princess Ann« ^ 

Borough. , M 

-f Roll R. Way Rinks, Inc. toF'"; 

opo-ate a roller skating rU^',^^ 

near victory and Pleasure, f. 

House Roads. : 

llie Commission denied a ^ 

use permit for Howarti^^" 

Johnson's Restaurant fofi," 

dancing and live en-^ , 

tertainment (Atlantic Avenue ■ ' 

and 37th Street) because no^ • 

(merepresentingUierestaurant; "'[ 

attended the meeting. • ,. 



Jaycees rally lunch cause 



. The Virginia Jaycees are 
organizing a massive drive to 
bolster and expand the federal 
School Lunch Program, Tyler 
H. Strout, President of the 
state oi^anization said today. 

"It seems incredible," 
Strout said, "that four million 
djaadvantaged American 
chldren are the victims of 
mamutrition-this despite our 
government's expenditures of 
$36 billion in farm subsidies in 
less than a decade, $150 billion 
in f(x-eign aid since 1945 and 
$160 billion to assure the 
future of Vieh)amese children 
since 1954." 

Strout went (mi to say the 
state's Jaycees have decided 
to do something about a 
recommendation made by 
leaders (rf the national Jaycee 
organization last June to 
strengthen the federal scho(d 
lunch program. He said the 
Jaycees are preparing to blitz 
President Nixon and 
the state's Congressional 
delegation with messages 
urging extensiM»-of the free 
lunch program to the nation's 
23,000 schools presently 
denied access to it. ^ 

Special emphasis ' of the 
write-in campaign, Strout 
said, will be to urge federal 
leaders to scrap the 
requirement that the federal 
lunch m(niey be matehed with 
25 per cent local funds. "This 
is what's kept so many 
poverty schools off the 
jprogram," Strout said. 
A United States Department 



of Agriculture survey d(Mie : 
last February indicated smaH'. " 
schools are getjpg short r, 
changed on the pn^ram. The ',: 
shidy showed tiat 80 per c«it'>' 
of American schools with ,V 
more than 500 pupils had 4";: 
subsidized food program. 

On the other hand, only 55 
percent (rf those schools with 
less than 250 pupls were- 
participating in the School ;] 
Lunch Program. 'The irony of J^ 
the sihiation is that the USDA > v; 
turned away $17 million';' 
during fiscal year 1972,'* ', 
Strout charged. "This money ,. , 
should have gone to sctHxils .-< 
that couldn't alford the 25' 
percent matching funds." ^^^^ 

He said that acc(»-ding, tOr.v 
another recent study ^^' a 
malnutrition now costs ~th^^>''' 
counfay more than $30 billion,; .5 
annually in terms of health^' 
care, loss of wages and ineo^t 
creased welfare. "Thafg^''" 
about six times what it would ';^ 
cost to feed all of our nation's^ ',; 
children in school foodJ^ 
programs," Strout wid, citing -'^ 
other inequities as well. ' -/.] 

He said Jaycees fav(K' ex-' ' 
tending the school lunch 
benefits to all children^"" 
regardless of e^Qomje,',^ 
background. ' . \. 

League will hold ; 
Chnsfmas party 



Kellam EOi^ in regional concert 



Thirty students from 
Kellam High School were 
selected for the annual All 
Regional High School Band 
Concert 

This was an all-time high for 
Kellam, whose shidents will 
occupy more chairs in the 
com^rt than any other school. 
The Kellam students are 
under the direction (rf Jack 
Sperry. 

Those qualifying for die 
concert are Jim Bain, Kim 
Sullivan, Charlotte Lusk, 
Walter Ingram, Bob Day, 
Kerwin Baker, Charlene 
Falconer, Debbie Englert, 
Carolyn Cooney, Robbie 



White, Robert Hurley, Shirii 
Jackson, Heidi Hicks, Chris 
Graf, Ron Cidlwicz, and Don 
Schnarr. 

■ Vicki Mcatte, Roland 
Calsin, Steve Sharp, Keith 
Adkins, Chuck Ferguson, Bob 
Davis, Steve Baird, Chris 
Thorne, Joe Kasmark, George 
Gray, Dennis Stewart, Ste>^ 
Carpenter, Alan Sharps, and 
Hayes Hajil were also sdected. 

The Kellam High School 
Band will present their 
Christmas Concert in the 
school auditorium tonight at 
7:30 p.m. Tickets may be 
purchased at the door. 



The Arag(ma Civic League 
will hold a Christmas party at'^ 
7:30 p.m. Monday at the,.., 
Aragona Recreation Civic ij 
Center for all members. Santa' a 
Claus is scheduled to arrive 
sometime during the evening,,''! 
wifli gifts for all children under, h' 
12 years of age. . i' 

Virginia Beach^ Com- '■ 
missioner of Revenue, Ivaii ,^ 
Mapp is scheduled to be the> ; 
guest speaker at the Januaryn 
meeting. "«' 

A White Elephant Auction.:^ 
held at the November meeting,,]^, 
was a success and netted $75 tot' 
the dhrishrias party fund. ' '" 



Vepoo pays »206,405 



H.S. Fraiyc, Norfolk disMct 
manager of the Virginia 
Electric and Power Company-, 
las presented checks totaling 
$3,117,520 to the city and 
county treasurers in Vepco's 
Norfolk District in payment of 
1972 real estate and personal 
property taxes. 

The largest che(dc (rf $832,103 
went to Chesapeake City 
Treasurer, N.D. Flora, being 
the final instollment of the 
1972 tax of $1,^,^6 payable 
to the City. 

Other cities receiving 
checks included: Norfolk, 
$415,2%, bang die final in- 
stallment (rf the 1972 tax of 



$907,531; Virginia/ Beach, 
$206,4<K, being die final in- 
stallment (rf the 1972 tax of 
$377,251; Nansemond, 
$119,919; Suffolk, $19,649; and 
Portsmouth. $116,418, 
representing a p(Mtion of die 
1972 tax of CW.877. The final 
installment of $23,852 wiU be 
paid on December 31. 1972.- 

The largest county check (rf 
$70,762 went to Isle of Wright 
County. Southampton County 
received a check for $31,^. 

Vepco's Viifinia state and 
local taxes for 1972 are 
estimated to t(rfal ^,093,000 
including $13,790,000 for 
pr(^rty tax^ and $15,152,000 
fotr tax <m gross receipts. 



BIRTHS 



Mr. & Mrs. Larry Thomas 
Dozler. girl. 

Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Stephen 
Gilpin, boy. 



Mr. & Mrs. John 
Nevins, Jr., girl. 



William 



Mr. A Mrs. 
V/afum, boy. 

Mr. «. Mrs. 
Woodit, girl. 



Thomas Arnoia 
Bernard AUvn 



Mr. & Mrs. Beverly SeW^ 
Martin, Jr., I»y. 
Mr. A Mrs. Victor 

Glancy, toy. 



,4wph 



Mr. & Mrs. Loren Keith Reid, 
boy. 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Tyrus 
Manley, Jr., girl. 

Mr. & Mrs. George •SIdor 
Plassman, boy. 

Mr. & Mrs. Lester 
Norrls, boy. 

Mr. A Mrs. Aubrey Pollard 
PrWdv, bov. 

Mr. ft Mrs. Robert William 
DeMille, girl. 

Mr. * Mrs. James 
Brown, girl. 



Andrew 



Francis 



Beadi studeits 
in cdlege dioir . 

Three Longwood College 
^dents from Virginia Beach, 
are toking part in Ouistmas 
season events on campus. 

Participtmg in die events 
are: Gail Leslie Paxton, ' 
dau0iter of Mr. ami Mn: . 
James L. Paxton; Bevo-ly 
Ann Bibb, darter (rf Blr. and 
Mrs. Irvin R. Bibb; and Carol, 
Eileen Rooney, dau^ter of 
Mr. and Mrs. George M. 
Rooney. 

The College's pre^tdhiay 
ceiefaratton, ending Friday, 
December is, when students , 
leave fm home, is feahuii^ 
two performances of the 
Concert Choir's annual ' 
Chi^mas C(Hicert and two, 
concerts by the Madrigal 
tigers, an U-member ptM^i , 
(rf outstanding a cappella 
shigers. 

Gail is a second sqnno; 
Beyerfy a first alto, and Carol 
a second alto in te 62- 
membo- CmKtrt OKrfr wbwa 
program includes such 
cwnpositiom as: Boijamtai 
ftritten's "A Ceremoiv <^. 
Carols," "To Us a ChUd is ■ 

f^"SS,^*"%fiWiofOur 
Loni,"Martmu; "Untne v^ 

First Christmas Morring," an 

American folk car(rf arrai^ed ' 

by Ehr^; and torn carohi 

from "Folk Songs of die Four: 

Seasims," by VaughanV 
WiUianis. -• •» 

In acMidon to thdr h>cal< 
concerts, music by the ' 
Ma<taigtf «ngH« and Comsat 
C3iofr hM been ti^ed for use 
m rado statata aromd the « 
rtate. 






I - 



ililp 



mmmmm 



^FWW^^^^^^^^W^^ 



^^ww 



^f^^^-^-w^ 1 




\ 



TH URSDAY. DECEMBER 14, 1972 




iiCAU ( ^Aj 



Lioas 







THE SUN 



~%r 




i^dcig 




IVIRGINIA; IN THE 
IcHrlCUlT COURT OF 
|TH# CITY OF VIRGINIA 
IBEACH ON THE 11th 
IdAY of DECEMBER, 

JRE) FRED W. AAc 
|cq|}AAlCK. JR.. Deceased 

;. Chy fttP. No. 1742 
^ SH6W CAUSE 
W ORDER 

li^ appearing that » 
Irep^t of the accounts of 
I United Virginia Beach- 
Seaboard National, 
[Executor of Fred w. 
JMcCormick, Jr., 
Ideq^ased, and of the debts 
|and|,demands against the 
estate has been filed in the 
Clerk's Office, and that 
six months has elapsed 
sin^e the qualification, on 
moj^on of the personal 
representative, it is 
ORbEREO that the 
I creditors of, and all others 
intwested in, the estate do 
jsho,^ cause, if any they 
jcaOf on the 5th day of 
Janiiary, Wl, at 10:;00 
I A.M., before this court at 
its courtroom, against the 
1 payment and delivery of 
[the estate to the legatees 
[without requiring 

{refunding bonds. 
lENTERED: 
[a <fppy Teste; 
'john V. Fentress, Clerk 
By' J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
[Mai* B, Perry 
508!,Norttf BIrdneck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

12-t4,21,28-1 4 4T 

'PUBLIC NOTICE 

P4)blic Notice is hereon 
given that the City Council 
of Jhe City of Virginia 
Beach will hold a public 
hearing at 2;00 p.m. on 
MoBday, December 18, 
1972 in the City Council 
Chambers, City Ad 
ministration Building, 
Priacess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, for the 
purpose of discussintf; 
, 1. A proposed Regional 
Wafer Plan for the supply 
and transmission of 
potftble water 

2. A proposed Regional 
Sewer Plan 

Both items having been 
prepared for and sub ' 
miffed by ' the 

Southeastern Regional 
Planning District Com- 
mission and subsequently 
si^uhitted to City Council 
foffjts approval. 
Richard J. Webbon, 
City Clerk 

12-141T 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
VI RO INI A, 

In the Clerk's of t^e 

Circuit of the City of 

Virginia Beach, on the 
11th day of December, 
1972. 



ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 

•t 
El^jne Leonard Johnson, 
Plaintiff, 
agiflnst 

Cl^ence Eugene John- 
soit. Defendant. 

T^e object of this suit is 
to ^obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
theisaid defendant, upon 
the grounds of two year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
thcC' defendant Is not a 
resMent of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being : 
920 Sycamore Street, 
Springfield, Illinois. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK ' 

BY Sandra Hargrove, D. 
Clerk 

A (fopy -'Teste: 
Rotort Lee Simpson 
3500 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
12 14,21,28-1 4 4T 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
Citf' of Virginia Beach, on 
the.6th day of December, 
1972. 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Alton B. Biggs, Jr., 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Betty M. Biggs, Defen- 
dant. 

T^he object of this suit is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrlmcmii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 

ae- defendant is not a 
sMent of the State of 
Virginia, ttie last known 
ppst office address being 
71 Ferndale Lane, 
Brdokside Manor, Lans- 
dale. Pa. 19446. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within 10 
(ten) days after due 
publlcatton hereof, and do 
whit may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
su(L 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
CLiRK. 

BY: Phyllis N. Styfon. 
Deputy, Clerk 
A copy-T«ste: 
Mr, A.J. Kalfus, Attorney 
1200 United Virginia Bank 
Bundifw, 
NoHolk. Virginia 23510 



VIRGINIA: In the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 4th 
day of December, 1972 

IN CHANCERY 
DOCKET NO 16815 

LAURALEE CHANDLER 
DUNN, Plaintiff 
vs. 

WILLIE THOMAS 
GARRISON, ALICE 
ESTELLE CHANDLER 
MACCUBBIN,'^ GUY 
GARRISON CflANDLER, 
et als.. Defendants. 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to effect partition among 
the owners, bV sale or 
otherwise, of certain real 
property, containing fifty 
(50) acres more or less, 
located in Pungo Borough 
in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and 
known as Route No. 3 Box 
3006 A Mill Landing Road, 
(fronting 1,600 feet more 
or less thereon), which is 
more fully 'described In a 
deed dated March 24, 1915, 
from W.A. Capps and 
Alice V. Capps, husband 
and wife, to William Lee 
Garrison and recorded in 
the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Deed Book 97, page 204, 
of which William Lee 
Garrison died seized and 
possessed. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Guy Garrison Chandler is 
not a resident of this State 
and that his last known 
post office address is 527 
North 98th Street, Mesa, 
Arizona 85201. 

It is, therefore, OR- 
DERED that the said 
nonresident defendant, 
namely Guy Garrison 
Chandler do appear within 
ten days after due 
publication of this order 
and do what is necessary 
to protect his interests. 

rt is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this order be published 
once a week for four 
successive weeks In The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper published in 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

I ask for this: Robert 
Lee Simpson 

A copy Teste: J0hn v. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
Robert Lee Simpson ,. 
404 Mallbu Towers 
Va. Beach, Va. 

12 7,14,21,28-4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA. (■ 

In the Clerk's Office of " 
the Circuit courtXof the 
City of Virginia Bea^, diS 
the 4th day of December, 
1972. \ 

ORDER OP \ 
PUBLICATION 
Donna P. Iconomou 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Panagiotis Iconomou 
Defendant. 

The object of this w» is 
to obtain a divorce a 
Mensa et Thoro to be later 
Merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonnii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
L: Skouroliakou 49, 
Amfkleia, Lokridos, 
Greece. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within 10 days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

Osie H. Gay, Jr. 
2871 River Road, Va. 
Beach, Va. 
A copy Teste: 
JOHN V. FENTRESS- 
Clerk 

By Linda Noel Hill, 
Deputy, Clerk 

12 7,14,21,28-4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 5th day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 
David A. Sousa, Plaintiff, 
against 

Kathleen Sousa, Defen 
dant. 

Theobjectof this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
t>een made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post address being 
Apartment 11K, 100 
Riverdale Avenue, 
Yonkers, New York 10701. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this swit. 
Norman Hecht 
North Mall, Military 
Circle 

Norfolk, VA 23502 
A copy Teste. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove 
Deputy Clerk. 

12 7,14,21,28 4T 

VIRGINIA In the Clerk's 
office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach w» the 29th day of 
November, 1972. 

IN CHANCERY 

Nwillber !7«f7 



ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH Sole Sur 
viving Executrix of the 
Eftate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased. 
Complainant, 

V. 

S.J. MCALLISTER Ad 
dress Unknown and the 
heirs at* law, next of kin, 
deyisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of s.j. 

McAllister, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proce^ing by the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is 
to quiet title to property 
whicti is more par 
ticularly described as 
follows: that certain lot, 
piece or parcel of land 
situated in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lot 19, Block 31, as shown 
on the certain plat of 
Euclid Place which is duly 
of record in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, in Map 
Book 4 at pages 62 and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
S.J. McAllister is a non 
resident of this State and 
that his last known post 
office address is unknown 
except for the fact that the 
original deed from 
Elizabeth Park and Land 
Company to S.J. 

McAllister dated May 31, 
1913, states after his name 
" Bluet led. West 
Virginia," but that upon 
information and belief he 
has not been a resident of 
Bluefield, West Virginia 
for many years «nd at no 
time under consideration 
has he been a resident of 
the State of Virginia. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that 
there are or may be other 
persons interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to wit: The 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of S.J. 

McAllister, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office address- 
esareunknown, allot whom 
are made parties to the 
proceeding by ttte general 
description of Parties 
Unknown; it is OR 
DERED that the above 
name0 .persons appear' 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what may be 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and it is 

FURTHERED OR 
DERED that the 
foregoing portion of this 
Order be published once a 
week for four (4) sue 
cessive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
and having circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beacfh, 
Virginia. 

Teste John V. Fentress, 
Clerk 

By. Phyllis N. Styron 
Deputy 

Peter A. Agelasto, III 
1000 United Virginia Bank 
Building, 
Norfolk, Virginia 
12 7,14,21,28 4T 

VIRGINIA; IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE IN 
THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
IN CHANCERY Number 
17114 

ELI-ZABETH T. 
OVERCASH, 

Sole Surviving Executrix 
of the Estate of Robert 
Easton Townsend, 
deceased, complainant, 

V. 

JOHN H. BURDIN 
Address Unknown 
NELLIE A. PRITCHARD 

Address Unknown 
And the heirs at law, next 
of kin, devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of John H. 
Burdin and Nellie A. 
Pritchard, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office adresses 
are unknown, all of whom 
are made parties to the 
proceeding by the denegal 
description of Parties 
Unknown, Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to quiet title to property 
which is more par 
ticularly described as 
follows: those certain lots, 
pieces or parcels of land 
situated in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
Known and numbered as 
Lots 5 and 6, Block 31, as 
shown on the certain plat 
of Euclid Place which is 
duly of record in the 

Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Map Book 4 at pages 62 
and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed tha^ 
John H. Burdin is a non 
resident of this State and 
that his last known post 
office address Is unknown 
except for the fact that the 
original deed from The 
Home Realty Company to 
John H. Burdin, dated 
July 7, 1910, states after 
his name "Windsor, North 
faroHna," Iwt tha^ upon 



information and belief he 
died- in Windsor, North 
Carolina in 1915. At no 
time under consideration 
has he been a resident of 
the State of Virginia. He 
devised his real estate to 
his niece Nellie A. Prit- 
chard whose whereabouts 
are unknown. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that 
there are or may be other 
persons interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to wit; The 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of John H. 
Burdin and Nellie A. 
Pritchard, all of- whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown; it is 
ORDERED that the above 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what is 
necessary to protect their 
interests and it is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published 
once a week for four (4) 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and having 
circulation in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 

Teste John V. Fentress, 

Clerk 

By Sandra Hargrove DC. 

Peter A, Agelasto, III 

1300 United Virginia Bank 

BIdg. 

Norfolk, Virginia 

12 7,14,21,284t 

VIRGINIA In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach on the 29th day of 
November, 1972 

IN CHANCERY 
Number 17095 
ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH, Sole Sur 
ving Executrix of the 
Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased. 
Complainant, 
V. > \ 

RC. GARRETT, AddresT" 
Unknown and the heirs at 
law, next of kin, devisees, 
legatees, creditors and 
lien creditors of any heirs 
or devisees of R.C. 
Garrett, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whost post office ad 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
gerneral descrlpton of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is 
to quiet title to property 
which is more par 
ticularly described as 
follows: those certain lots, 
pieces or parcels of land 
situated in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lots 23 and 24, Block 31, as 
shown on the certain plat 
of Euclid Place which is 
duly of record in the 
Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in/Aap Book 4 at pages 62 
and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
R.C. Garrett is a non 
resident of this State and 
that his last known post 
office address is unknown 
except for the fact that the 
original deed from The 
Home Realty Company to 
R.C. Garrett dated July 
26, 1910, refers to the 
grantee as "R.C. Garrett, 
Graham, North 
Carolina," but that upon 
information and belief he 
has not geen a resident of 
Graham, North Carolina 
for many years and at no 
4ime under consideration 
has he been a resident of 
the State of Virginia. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that 
there are or may be other 
persond interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to wit; The 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of R.C. Garrett, 
all of whose names are 
unknown and whose post 
office addresses are 
unknown, all of whom are 
made parties to the 
proceeding by the general 
description of Parties 
Unknown; it is OR 
DERED that the above 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what is 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and it is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published 
once a week for four (4) 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
and having circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

Teste John V. Fentress, 
Clerk 

By Phyllis N, Stryon 
Deputy 

Peter A. Agelasto, III 
13(K) United Virginia Bank 
BIdg , 
Norfolk, Virginia 

12 7,14,21,2t 4T 



VIRGINIA In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach on the 29th day of 
November, 1972. 

IN CHANCERY 
Number 17096 

ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH, Sole Sur 
viving Executrix of the 
Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased. 
Complainant, 

V. 

. C.B. RICHARDSON 
Address Unknown and the 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of C.B. 
Richardson, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by tfie 
general description of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is 
to' quiet title to property 
which is more particuarly 
described as follows; that 
certain lot, piece or parcel 
of land situated in the City 
of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, known and 
numbered as Lot 41, Block 
31, as shown on the certain 
plant of Euclid Place 
which is duly of record in 
.the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Map Book 4 at pages 62 
and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
C.B. Richardson is not 
known to have been in 
Roanoke, Virginia, after 
1920 and that his 
whereabouts and last 
known address are 
unknown, and that if he be 
living he would be in 
excess of seventy two (72) 
years of age. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that 
there are or may be other 
persons interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and who last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to wit; 

The heirs at law, next of 
kin, devisees, legatees, 
ju^editors and lien 
"creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of GiB. 

Richardson, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
who ppitoffice addresses 
are unktunwn, all of whom 
are ma«Jle-\Barties to the 
proceeding by the general 
descri|)tiein of Parties, 
Unknown; it is OR 
DERED that the above 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what Is 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and it is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published 
once a week for four (4) 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
nespaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
and having circulation in 
theCity of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

Teste: John V. Fentress, 
Clerk 

By. Phyllis N. Styron, 
Deputy 

Peter A. Agelasto, III 
1300 United Virginia Bank 
BIdg. 
Norfolk, Virginia 

12 7,14,21,28 4T 

VIRGINIA: In the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 29th 
day of November, 1972. 
In Re THE ESTATE OF 
WILLIAM V. H. 

WILLIAMS, DECEASED 

SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

It appearing to the 
Court that a report of the 
accounts of Betty C. 
Ghent, Executrix of the 
Estate of William V. H. 
Williams, deceased, and 
of the debts and demands 
against her estae, has 
been filed in the Clerk's 
Office of this Court, and 
that six months has 
elapsed since the 
qualification, on motion of 
the said Betty C. Ghent, 
Executrix of the Estate of 
William V. H. Williams, 
deceased, it is. 

ORDERED that the 
creditors of, and all others 
interested in the Esate, do 
show cause, if any they 
can, on the 29th day of 
December, 1972, at 10:00 
a.m. before this Court, in 
its Courtroom, against the 
payment and delivery of 
the Estate of William V. 
H. Williams, deceased, to 
the devisees and legatees 
without requiring 
refunding bonds. It is 
further 

ORDERED that 
forgoing portion of this 
show cause order be 
published once a week for 
two successive weeks in 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper having general 
circulation In the city of 
Virginia Beach. 
PLR 
Judge 

Calvin H. Childress, p.q. 
807 Plaza One, 
Norfolk,. Virginia 23510 
A copy Test 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By Phyllis N.Styrw», D.C. 
124,142T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 29th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 



William Morgan\ Burse, 

Jr., Plaintiff, 

against 

Elaine Caria Tierheimer 

Burse, Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a Decree qf 
Divorce A Vinculff' 
Matrimonii from the said 
Defendant on the grounds 
of desertion on or about 
the 25th day of April, 1971 
which dersertion has 
continued uninterruptedly 
until the present. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, her last known 
address being 4602 North 
ridge Drive Los 
Angeles, California, 90043. 

Not resident of the State, 
of Virginia, it is ordercl 
that she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof,' 
and do what may 1>e 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy Teste; 
Larry Wise 
P.O. Box 15142 
Chesapeake, Va. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
Clerk 
Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 

12 7,14,21,28-4T 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA. 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 28th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Elizabeth Lurix Sparkes, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Peter Alan Sparkes, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii or in 
the alternative A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later 
merged into a decree of 
divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds' of adultery and 
or wilfull desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, tbe last known 
post office address being ; 
D'Iberville Apts. B 6, 265 
Front Beach Drive, Ocean 
Springs, Mississippi. 

Not resident Of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be' 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
Henry M. Schwan 
1600 Virginia National 
Bank BIdg. 
Norfolk, Virginia. 
A copy Teste k, 
JOHN V FENTRESS: 
Clerk 

By Sandra Hargrove, 
D.C. . . 

12 7,14,21, 28 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 1st day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION p 

Kenneth W. Rose, 
RIaintiff, 
against 

Gladys Hunter Rose, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a. 
mensa et thoro from the 
said defendant upon> the' 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
unknown. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

Harry N. Gustin 
Virginia National Bank 
Building 

Norfolk Virginia 
A copy Teste; ^ 
John V. Fentress, iCIerk 
By: J. Curtis Frulf, D.C. 
12 7,14,21,28 4T 

VIRGINIA In the Circuit 
Court of the City of * 
Virginia Beach on the 21st 
day of November, 1972 
ALPHEUS F. STAF 
FORD, 

Compiafnaift 
In Chancery Noi 16609 
vs. 

WILLIAM HOLL.Y, also 
known as WILLIAM 
HOLLIE, 1565 Eagleton 
Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and 
JAMES HENRY WIL 
LIAMS, Address 
unknown, and 
MAGDALENE JEF 
PERSON, 1525 Eagletmi 
Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and 
MOSES WILLIAMS. 
Address unknown, and 
CHAUDIUS HOLLY, also 
known as CHAUDIUS 
HOLLIE. 1553 Eagleton 
Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and 
QUEEN I E HOLLY 
MORRIS. also known as 
VIRGINIA HOLLY 
MORRIS, Union Road, 
Fruitland, Maryland, and 
OLLIE HOLLY, also 
known as OLLIE 

HOLLIE Address 
unknown, and 
HERMAN FENTRESS 
Address unknown, and 
MILTON FENTRESS, 
Address unknown, and 
ALBERT BARNES, JR., 
Address unknown, and 
BEULAH BARNES. 
Address unknown, and 
LAURA BARNES 
BRIGGS Address 



unknown, and 
EARLINE BARNES. 
Address uhknown, and 
HOLLIS BRIGGS, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
BETTY BRIGGS Ad 
dress unknown, and 
EVELYN BRIGGS, 
Address unknown, and 
BARBARA BRIGGS. 
Address unknown, and 
VICTOR BARNES, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
MCCARTHY BARNES, 
Address unknown, and 
MYRON BARNES, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
PEACHES FENTRESS. 
Address unknown, and 
PEARL MAE HOLLY, 
1565 Eagleton Lane, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 

Defendants 
and if any of the aforesaid 
defendants are dead, their 
surviving consorts, if any 
there by, their heirs at 
law, next of kin, devisees, 
legatees, personal 
representatives, lien 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees, all of whose 
names are unknown, and 
whose Post Office ad 
dresses are unknown and 
who are joined herein as 
parties unknown. 
Defendants 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is 
to effect partition 
amongst the owners by 
sale or otherwise of the 
real property in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
known as 

PARCEL ONE (1) 

All that certain parcel of 
land located on the plat of 
C.H. Fentress property 
(also known as 

'Gracetown") and which 
-vis, a ISO located on the 
horfheast side of In 
dependence Boulevard 
(formerly Bayshore 
IToad) in the Bayside 
Borough in the City of 
Virginia. Be^ch, Virginia, 
and which is more par- 
ticularly described as 
follows 

Lot Eight (8) in Block 1, 
as shown oi\ Plat of the 
C.H Fentress property 
aforesaid, which plat is 
recorded in the Office of 
the ClWk of the Circuit 
Court V)f the City of 
Virginia\Beach, Virginia, 
in Map BMk 6 at page 264. 

SAVE AND EXCEPT 
that portion of the above 
property taken by the City 
of Virginia'' Beach, 
Virginia by Certificate 
Number 47, recorded in 
Deed Book 1026 at Page 
549 in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

PARCEL TWO (2): 

All of that certain lot, 
piece or parcel of land, 
together with the 
buildings and im- 
provements thereon, and 
the appurtenances 
thereunto belonging, 
situate and located on 
11 the northeast side of In- 
dependence Boulevard 
(formerly Bayshore 
Road) in the Bayside 
Borough (formerly, 
Kempsville Magisterial 
District) in. the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and more particularly 
described as Lot 21, in 
Block 1, as shown on the 
plat of the C.H. Fentress 
Property, which plat is 
recorded in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City ofVir,ginia 
Beach. Virginia in Map 
Book 6 at Page 264. 
of which said property 
Moses Land, also known 
as Moses Williams, died 
siezed and passed. 

And an affidavit having 
been made that due 
diligence has been used to 
ascertain what county or 
city the defendants James 
Henry Williams, Moses 
Williams, OIlie Hotly, also 
known as Ollle Hollie, 
Herman Fentress, Milton 
Fentress, Albert Barnes, 
Jr., Beulah Barnes, Laura 
Barnes Briggs, Earline 
Barnes, Hollls Barnes, 
Betty Briggs, Evelyn 
Briggs, Barbara Briggs, 
Victor Barnes, McCarthy 
Barnes, Myron Barnes 
and Peaches Fentress 
reside and that the 
present location or ad 
dress of such defendants 
is unknown. The last 
known address of Ollle 
Holly is Lynnhaven, 
Virginia. There is no last 
known address of the 
defendant James Henry 
Williams. Ail of the above 
described defendants, 
other than James Henry 
Williams and OIlie Holly 
have no last known ad 
dress although it is 
possible that some of said 
defendants may have 
resided with OIlie Holly at 
Lynnhaven, Virginia. 

And an affidavit having 
been made that the 
defendant Queenie Holly 
Morris, also known as 
Virginia Holly Morris, is 
not a resident of the State 
of Virginia, and that her 
last known address it 
Union Road, Fruitland, 
Maryland; 

And the Bill of Com 
plaint stating that there 
are or may be persons 
interested in the sublet 
property to be divided 
whose names are 
unk^wn and making 
them parties defendant by 
the general description of 
"Parties Unknown"; 

It is ORDERED that the 
said defendants whose 
addresses are unknown 
and the defendant Queenie 
Holly Morris, also known 
as Virginia Holly Morris, 
who is a n<Mi resident of 
the State of Virginia and 
the persons fnade 
defendant by tlie general 



description of "Parties 
Unknown" do appear here 
within ten days after due 
publication o1 this Order 
and do what is necessary 
to protect their Interests. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published 
once a week for four 
seccesslve weeks In the 
Virginia Beach Sun. 

Enter; Judge 
I ASK FOR THIS: 
Frank E. Butler, III 
4336 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Va. Beach, Va. 

A Copy Teste; John V. 

Fentress, Clerk 

By J. Curtis Fruit, DC. 



Plaintiff, 

against 

Thomas Charles Rowan, 

Defendant. 

The(M»|ectof thisMiltlt 
to obtain f divorce a 
mensa et ttioro (from bed 
and board) from the said 
defendant upon the 
grounds of desertlofC ■ 

And an affidavit having 
been made and file<£that 
the defendant is a noi^- 
resldent of the Stab of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address bilng : 
Post Office Box 18,-ftOQ 
Room 301, ResMrch 
Center, Submarine Base, 
Groton, Connecticut il340. 

It is ordered that he do 



3 



appear here withliiten 
11 30,12 7,14,21-4t'*>— 110) dayv afttr due 
" pvtH4c9JH6n hi 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

VIRGINIA. 

in the Clerk's Office of the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach, on the 

27th day of November, 

1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Kathryn Newing Hess, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Alvin A. Hess, Jr., 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Mensa Et Thoro to be 
later merged Into a 
divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of constructive 
desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence having been 
used by or on behalf of 
complainant to ascertain 
in which county or cor- 
poration the defendant is, 
without effect; the last 
known post office address 
being; 328 Detroiter 
Drive, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 

Brydges, Broyles 8. 

McKenry 

1369 Laskin Rd. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 



A copy 
Fentress 



Teste ; 
Clerk 



John V. 



11 30,12 7,14,21 4t 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

VIRGINIA, 

in the Clerk's Office of the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach, on the 

27th day of November, 

1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Ruth Anne Tye, Plaintiff, 

against 

James Aaron Tye, 

Defendant. 
The object of this suit is 

to obtain a divorce A 
Mensa Et Thoro to be 
later merged into a decree 
of divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
after due diligence 
complainant has been 
unable to ascertain 
respondent's where- 
abouts, the last 
known post office address 
being: 6319 Adair Street, 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. 

Brydges, Broyles 8. 

McKenry 

1369 Laskin Rd. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

A copy Teste: John V. 

Fentress; Clerk 

By; Sandra Hargrove, 

Clerk. 

11 30,127,14,21-4t 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 21st day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
publication 
Kenneth Robert Drew, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Rosemarie Pamela Allen 
Drew, Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State .of 
Virginia, the last known 
Post office being 231 
Railroad Ave. Norwood, 
Massachusetts. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear, here 
within Ten (10) days after 
due publlcatton hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. 
A copy— Teste: 
Bernard G. Barrow 
951 Laskin Rod 

Virginia Beach, Va. 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 

11 30,12 7,14,21 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA. 

In the Clerk's OffliM of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, en 
the 24th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 

PUHLICATtON 

Wincel Ann Rowan, 



hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his Interest in this 
suit. 

A copy Teste: 
George H. Heiltg, Jr. 
Bank of Virginia Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Jrult, 
Deputy, Clerk - 

11-30,12 7.14,21-41- 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, .- 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 24th day of Novfmbcr, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
John Edward Brltion, 
Plaintiff, against 
Jane Mary Britton, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof this iuit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro, to be later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. ■ 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia and that due 
diligence has been uH<t by 
the Complainant, to 
ascertain in what cpunty, 
municipality or cor- 
poration the defendant 
resides in without effect, 
as the complainant herein 
deposes, the last known 
post office address: Jane 
Mary Britton, 356 North 
9th St., Lebaon Penn- 
sylvania. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, It Is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within 10 (ten) days after 
due pubtication hereof, 
and do what< m«y be 
necessary to protef) hii 

interest in this sulf. ; 

A copy - Teste: 

Boyce 8i Spanoulls 

105 N. Plaza TralJ- V«. 

Beach> Va. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 

Clerk 

Linda Noel Hill, D.C 

11-30,12-7,14,21 4t 

COMMONWEALTH ttR 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
tt)e 22nd day of November, 

1972. 

ORDtROF 
PUBLICATION 

Carol Ann Davis, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

ATC Arthur D. Davta No. 

450 50 5993, Defendatlt. 

the object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro later to bi 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii frorrt 
the said defendant upon 
the grounds of desfrtloh 
on November 2, 1972. 

And an affidavit having 
bem made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last Known 
Post Office address being 
107. Scenic Drive, 
Long view, Texas )F$«J1. 

Not resident of the. State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within Ten (10) Days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what ma^, be 
necessary to proted his 
Interest in this suit. " 
A copy -Teste; 
Richard Swope 
1700 Va. National Bank 
Building 

Norfolk, Virginia 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
Clerk. 

By: Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 
11-30,12 7,14,21 4T 

COMMONWEALTH ' OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's OffjQe of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 21st day of November, 
197f. ' 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Lloyd C. Hayes, Plaiatlff, 
against 

Beverly Jean Haves* 
Defendant. 

The object of this stMt is 
to obtain a divorct a 
Mensa et thoro to be Ater 
merged Into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant upm 
the grounds of desertion 
and abadonment. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the Stat* of 
Virginia, last known 4X»i 
office address baing P.O. 
Box 3662, SarMota 
Florida. 

Not resident of tha^ata 
of Virginia, It Is «■«»>•« 
that he do appaar l^ere 
within (10) Ten days iftaf 
due publication ftw-wf, 
and do wliat may- bf 
necMsary »b pPOta«lihls 
mtarost in ttils suit. 
A copy— Ta»ta: 
Mowc & Bryi^at M«ifle 
Ave. i 

2413 Pacific Ava. Va. 
BMch, va. 

J^m V. Fairtraw, ci^li. 
Llnte Nod nm. D.C. 

1H».U7,1^JMT 



1 



JHt 




THE SUN 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1 



Am ClQ/zified 486-S4SS 

486-S4S4 




PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
NIA, 

• CltrK<$ Office of 

ircult Coort of ft»e 

of Virginia Beach, on 

24th day of Novenriber, 




Jr. 




ORDER OF 
'l>UBI.ICATION 

Eugene Flick, 
Plalftiff, 
agaiftst 

Iris Lynn Flick, Defen- 
dant. 

The («|ect of this suit is 

to obtain a divorce a 

vinculo matrimonii from 

the said defendant upon 

'the*ground5 of Adultery, 

in the alternative a 

ce a mensa et toro 

itA the said defendant 

upM the grounds of 

desiMlon. 

4^ an affidavit having 

been made and filed that 

the defendant is a non- 

5 resident of the State of 

i_^irainia, the last known 

post off ice address being ; 

4025 A Pleasant Street, St. 

Lours, Missouri. 

""** TT Is ordered that she do 

f >|ipia r here within ten 

llH'il days after due 

I publication hereof, and do 

* what may be necessary to 

I pr§t*ct her interest in this 

I suit. 

I A copy Teste : 
I Kelberg & Childress 
£207 P laza One Building 
•HWIolk, Virginia 

Fentress, Clerk 
Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk. 
11 30,12 7,14,21 4T 



By: 



V. 
J. 



Deputy, 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

nit the Clerk's Office of 

tt»e Circuit Court of the 

pfii^of Virginia Beach, on 

■albfuJOth day of November 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

Doq^na Annette Farley 

_Bftf**' Plaintiff, 

lOlbMnst 

Willard Ray Reese, 
Defendant. 

h^-oJO^ object of this suit Is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
ttte saitf defendant, ' upon 

:• -^le <# rounds of adultery. 

P-Xmd an affidavit having 

Pjteeo made ant' filed that 
me defendant due 
diligence has been used by 
I ai^ on behalf of the 
I plaintiff to ascertain in 
I what county or cor- , 
t poration the defendant is, J 
I wWiout effect, the last 
•■ tamwn post office address 
being: 332 Dillon Drive, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
^ Not resident of the State 
0^ Virginia^ it is ordered 

L|^*tnat he do appear here 
I wHAin ten (10) days affer 
I due publicatidn hereof, 
1 .apd do what may be 
I netessary to protect his 
I lAlerest in this suit. 
I A copy -Teste: 
Tidewater Legal Aid 
700 Duke Street 
fTorfolk, Virginia 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 
• -BY: Sandra Hargrove, D. 

Clerk 
p--- 11,30,12 7,14,21.4T 

I VIRGINIA IN THE 
I CIRCUIT COURT OF 
I THE CITY OF VIRgFniA 
I BEACH on the 10th day of 
I November, 1972. 

IN CHANCERY 

NUMBER 1JU] 






Com 



BILL HEPKO 

plainant, 

vs. 
"""B'lLL A REPKO et al, 
I ■••wpondents. 

ORDER 
Upon the petition of Bill 

Repko for the ap 

pvirrtment of Lucian B. 

Cox, Jr. as Administrator 

of the Estate of Vera B. 

Ripko, presumed to be 

dwd, which said petition 
' ts" ■filled; and it appearing 

to the Court that Vera B. 

Repko resided in the City 
"""df Virginia Beach, 

rVicflinia, and that she 
went there from aiid has 
I not returned to the state 
I ^-n^ seven years sue 
I cesslvely and has not been 
I h'eflrd of since, and the 
I Court being satisfied that 
! the peittoner, Bill Repko, 
I woMd be entitled to ad 
fayailTster the Estate of 
Vera B. Repko were she in 
fact dead, it is, 

• ••.^ORDERED that notice 

of said application of 

IP — ^M »»lan B. COK, Jr. shall be 

published once a week for 

four successive weeks in 

ItMVirginia Beach Sun, a 

tiMWspaper published in 

«>Wrginia Beach, Virginia, 

rtd that notice be given 

that on the 4th day of 

J«»ary, if 73, which is 

weeks after final 

advertisement of said 

notice in said newspaper, 

the Court will hear 

•"tffctence CMcerning the 

|wHt^Bd absence of the 

• MM«Md dMedMt and the 
I circumstances and 
( duration fhertol. and the 

in^rk i» directed to 
►Ith a certified ct^y ot 
wder as ttie notice 
IwWu <f>d in the Virginia 
iiwch Sun. 

y t«»t 
Mttf " «»ntre»». Clerk 
i* 5 fruit, DC. 

in 17 7 Ii4T 



Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 15th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Dorothy Shuey, Plaintiff, 
against 

WiHia T. Shuey, Defen 
daht. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Mensa Et Thoro to be 
later merged into a decree 
of divorce A Vinculo 
Mfttrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being 5958 F. Willard 
Street, Hananan, South 

Carolina. 
Not resident of the State 

of Virginia, it is ordered 

that he do appear here 

within ten (10) days after 

due publication hereof, 

and do what may be 

necessary to protect his 

interest in this suit. 

Rexford R. Cherryman, 

Atty. 

524 Independence Blvd. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

A copy Teste 

JOHN V FENTRESS 

CLERK 

BY Sandra Hargrove D. 

Clerk. 

11 23,30 12,7,14 4T 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 16th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Carol Valerie, 
Rickenbaker Lawter, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Zeb Vance Lawter, Jr., 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro from the 
said Defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of Va. the last 
known post office address 
being P.O. Box 251, 
Columbus, North 
Carolina. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it Is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. 
A copy Teste 
Reril M. Abraham 
407 Bank of Va. Building 
Norfolk, Va. 
Linda Noel Hill, Clerk 

11 23,30 12 7,14 4T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Qfflce of 
the Circuit Courl of the 
City of Virginia Biach, on 
the 8th day of November, 
1972. 

Darryl J. Zacher, Plaintiff 
against 

Carol Anne (Cupp) 
Zacher, Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of wilful 
desertlbn. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
4 C Jefferson Drive, 
McKees Rocks, Penn 
sylvanla, 15136. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

JOHN V FENTRESS 
CLERK 

BY Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk 

Sacks, Sacks K Tavss 
First & Merchants 
National Bank BIdg. 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

11 16,23,30,12 7 4T 



SISTER TINA 

Reader and MuBori 

AdHnoatfRraUcMorj 
life 



riekofhiMidonH^, 
Al 




RATES: "Person to 
Parson" ads for in- 
dividuals buying, selling, 
renting, or offering a 
service. Up to 12 words, 
only SI. per issue, add SO 
cents for each additional 4 
words. 

Classified display $2.80 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge of SS.60 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: First It 
words in straight 
classified arc S2.00 Lower 
rates may be earned. 

DEADLINE for 
classified A classified 
display is Noon on the 
Tuesday prior to 
publication date. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Roscmont 
Rd., Va. Beach, Va. 234S2, 
or mail to Classified 
Desk; or phone 486-3433 or 
486-3434. Classifieds are 
priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 




-PERSONAL NOTICES S-SPBCIAL SERVICES 1 •— HILF WANTID. M/P 



REDUCE - Safe & fast 
with GoBese Tablets and 
E Vap "water pills" 
from Barr's Drug. 



SHAKLEE POOD 
SUPPI^MENTS 

AH natural Yitamin E. 
Money-back guarantee. 
Martha SwiAa, 340-71 59. 



ap. Bell 



3M BRAND INTRUDER 
ALARM HELPS SCARE 
BURGLARS AWAY SIM- 
PLY AND ECONOMICAL 
LY. CALL 857-5400- 
NIGHTWATCH SECURITY 
SYSTEMS 



a>ECL^UZING IN HOUSE- 
JAOCING, REPLAaNG 
FLOOR JOISTS AND SILLS 
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE 
ARE YOUR FLOORS SHAK- 
ING OR SAGGING? 



622-8396 622-1771 



BUSINESS is buzzing and 
we need help. Want a good 
career in real estate? 
Apply today. Call Tom 
Kane 497 4851. Nights 340- 
1760. Grow with Realtors. 
Stohl Realty Corp. 

FULL AND PART TIME 
Sales Personnel needed 
in advertising. No ex 
perience necessary. 499 
0919 or 499 3343. 

TUTOR Wanted for 

Shorthand. Evenings. Call 
Patti, 486 3430. 



!i-SCHOOU » INSTRUCTIONS 



PIANO LESSONS 
Expert instruction on all 
levels. Contact Janice 
Feld, College Professor,' 
543 1822 after 5. 

VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. 
James Morrisson, 428- 
0587. 




mm 



^TrW I^^^^J 




H 51 



50-PlTS* SUPPLIES iO_rtTS » SUPPlUr 



rrrrr 



M-IUMIMiMi Aoi 



Congradulations, 
Employees on your 
Ribbon award. 



Sun 
Blue 



Captian Jose What 

would I do without you and 
your bottle? Thank you. 

P.P. Hope I made up for 
last week; sorry about 
that. I'll try harder. 

Jeanne Welcome back to 
the state. Mary. 

MOM AND Da6 Hope you 
hear from us soon, 
GMSDM. 

Katy Wash dem clothes, 
clean dem floors, lift dat 
bale and tote dat barge 
Mom a. 

Bradford ■ Don't sit on the 
dishwasher door. Mom a. 



Olga Edwards ■ W,e 
ypu're great. Too* 



think 



Ron, Thanks for the use of 
your office last week. 
You're a Prince, Sister 
Diane. 

Ann $. Haupy ?nd week 6n 
your new job LIZ 

RMB Jr. Be seeing you on 
Christmas, Uncle Kjrt. 

Capt. Magnificent is 
buying Capt. Jose his own 
telephone booth for 
Christmas. 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY 
MAMA Hope it wll be one 
of your best ever. We love 
you. MWMAGREMT and 
W. 

HI E.R. Sure hope to see 
you on the 22nd. W.P. 

Tiger, You really do trust 
me, don't you. Kitten. 




3 -PERSONAL NOTMCES 

CANDY THE CLOwft 
Now Arranging Santas 
snd Clowns for Dec, Call 
early to obtain date. 587- 
3697. 

MAGIC SHOWS Par 

ties, Club meetings, 
luncheons, etc. 
Reasonable. Call 340 0297, 
after 5 p.m. 



Td Someone 
YouCareWHha 
Sun Newspaper 

Sunshme Ad 




• Widi MMneone ■ 
lian>y Urtkday 

• Conpaduiate Crimdi on 
theu Q^sfement 

> Send anah n ma ry grcetiiy 

• Ctmgntulite new pazenti 

• Bon VoytfB wtetot 

• CoQintuhtions on 
ipedaladiievemCTtj 

• Or ^t My "HELLO" 
faiatpecWway 

Look for SunAliie Ads 

•veryirackin 
the OiMiflMl Secttra 
ofTteVtatfniiBMteb 
Sun. 

CHOasHied 
4S6-3433 
486-3434 

3 4^ in Mmci 

of PMMicirtioR OA 

ToFbca Yoyr 

ShhsMmM 



J 



4 TRANSPORTATION 

GUY, age 27, seeks 
companion to share 
driving and expenses of 
extended U.S. trip soon. 
Especially cities, 
beaches and California. 
Dependable and honest 
only; no heads or wierdos. 
Complete resume and 
photo to Boxholder, Box 
3542, Laureldale, Pa. 
19605. 

5-SPECIAL SERVICES 

CANE AND RUSH Chair 
SEATS R epiaced. 
Reasonable prices. 486 
5094. 

CUSTOM DRAPERIES 
Fabrics at discount 
prices. Reasonable. 486 
1295. 

HANDCRAFTED" 
LEATHER ITEMS - 
Made to order. Handbags, 
billfolds, etc. Customized 
wth name 6r Initial. 340- 
77i6. 

HAULING For con 

tractors or individuals. 
Need help ^ Call 623 3937. 

IT'S CHRISTMAS TIM€ 
And THE PEMBROKE 
PUPPetS Are, available 
for your Christmas party 
entertainment. Also birth 
days, special events, etc. 
Call 497 4141, 497 0982. 

PIANO TUNING Also 
lessons. Piano ani brass. 
Ken Vining, 464 6166. 

PERSONAL HORO 
SCOPES Com 

puted based on the 
Science of Astrology. 
Natal Chart and 6 
questions $15. For in 
formation write Science of 
Astrology, 420 W, 
Freemason St., 622 8342. 

REINDEER Hand 

made, candy filled ' 
ideal for gifts and 
decorations. Order now 
for Christmas. 486-4855. 



HAS YOUR AUTOMOBILE 

INSURANCE BEEN 
CANCELLED? REFUSED? 

CUD Al Vincent 
Sav»-Wty Inauance Agency 

WE FINANCE 

627-9096; anytime nights 
499-1080 



VELVEnZE 
Your walla, car, bike, etc. 
Economical A luxurious.. 
Stops rust & mildew. 
Cu«t(Mn 24 he. leivice; 
VEL-TEX of Tidewater 

623-0098 
10% diacount with this ad. 






R\ 



8— LOST & FOUND 

ENGLISH SETTER 
Black and white, some 
orange marking on face, 
last seen Windsor Woods 
area. Answers to Poppins. 
Call 499 3015. 



JOB MM 

3320 Va. Beach Blvd. 
486-3403 

Extra Low Fee Easy Terms 
Ask about our 12 month 
Job Placement Guarantee 

CASHIER$32$ mo. girl witti off. 

exp. 

DELIVERY DRIVER J12S wk. age 

2$ up. 

PAINTER Experlenced-to SS. Iir. 
int. ext. 

MJR. TRAINEE S4M mo. mgmnt 
experience. / 

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR- 
experienced, good company. 
FIELD CASHIER $150. -l((k..,8C- 
counting experience. 
PORTER $112 wk. age 21 up. 
JANITOR $1.90 tir. Day vyork. 
SERVICE MJR$150 wk.&comm. 
Foreign car experience. 
WAREHOUSEMAN Good start, 
good company. 

CLERK $150 wk. Good company. 
STATISTICAL CLERK $150 wk. 
accounting experience. 
HELPER Home maintenance. $2.00 



GRIMES MUSIC SCHOOL 

GUITAR CLASSES 
In Pembroke Area 

Students Ta^t In Small 
Groups Acconiing to Ages 

499-1428 



''■• ' ^■: '? ii '! ; 



23— ROOMS FOR RENT 

ARAGONA VILLAGE 
Nice room, kitchen 
privileges. 499 4712. 

CHATEAU 21-3 
bedroom, 2 bath 

townhouse, -carpeting ;$22S 
month. 486 5616. 



ALASKAN MALAMUTE 
PUPS 2 females, both 
show prospects. 
Guaranteed against Hip 
Dysplasia. Interested 
parties only. 420-8067. 

BASENJI PUPPIES - 
Rare, barkless, orderless, 
non-allergenic, very 
clean; short sleek hair, 
wonderful with children, 
house pets, hunters, super 
intelligentl excellent as 
watchdog. 2 adult dogs, all 
lovely disposition, AKC 
registered, heavy 
champion background, 
shots, worm free, 
guaranteed healthy, show 
quality, taking reser- 
vations, will hold for 
Xmas. Terms available. 
Call 499 2517. 



BOXER PUPS 
Champion breeding, AKC 
registered, 6 weeks, fawn 
with white markings. $150. 
each. 423-6504. 



GREAT DANES 
Brindled; shots; worm^; 
ears cropped; 48^^m4. 

. . /.(\C1L. 

ITALIAN GREYHOdfliD 
PUPS - Choseh brelj^j^f 
royalty. Lovable pets'. '^- 
6764. 

— -- :^;*»— ■ 

KITTENS Free. y»|r 
box trained. Mottiur 
registered Siamese.<Call 
497 7384 "'♦•^3^P.m.^,_jj_ 

KITTENS - Free7ii«l»r 
box trained. Moftt*r 
registered Siamese. ''Call 
499^384 after 3_Pj^m.^:i*_ 

NORWEIGAN EJ-K 
HOUND MfJe, 

AKC reg., wish to n)»\a. 
Only fee pick of titter. 
Harry Marshall, 42€'$m. 



YORKSHIRE TERRIER 
Female, small tan and 
black, lost North End. Call 
after 3 30 p.m. Reward. 
428 5536. 




16— HILP WANTED • HMALI 



TELEPHONE SOL 

icitoR - ; Ex 

perienced. For irtterview, 
call499 8576, 8 30tio5p.m. 
week days. 



EMPLOYMENT 
TRAINEES 

Pull and Put Timc^ Neat 
arpeannce, no experience 
necesniy.' To aiHit manager 
in public relations iHogram 
calling on home owneiL 
Proven method brings you 
$20a and up to start. 
Apply 5047 Oeveland St, 
Va. Beach, or caU MB*^ 
Iltonitat499h8537 



ACTIVE WELCOME WAGON 
Expansion provides (^nii^ 
foe hostess in Norfoil^ Va. 
Beach, and Chenpeake. 
Active community back- 
ground, no pre-acho(rf 
chiMien, must type, have 
use of car, flexible houn 
Attractive inccmie. CaB 
34»2131, or 340-1234. 




"OWORTUNITY" 

Four Ladies Needed im- 
mediately For Several Job 
Openings. $«10 00 AAonttily. Call 
4»9270 for an Appointment. 



SEWING ~ 
Alterations. 



MENDING, 
Call 425 1939 




SEWING in my home; 
for ladies and children; 
reasonable, also in 
Structions, 340 1192. 

THE PEMBROKE 

PUPPETS - Are now 
available for Birthday 
•Parties, Special Events, 
etc. Children and Adult 
entertainment. 497-4141, 
4970982. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
MAI NTENANCE 
Specializing in Painting, 
Interior and Exterior; 
Repair Work and New 
Additions. Call 428-7350. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
CHIMNEY Sweep and 
fireplace repair, 
"ireplaces designed, built 
and rebuilt. Dampers 
installed and repaired. 
Guaranteed to stop 
smoking. Call 428 7350 
night or day. 



II— HILP WANTID. M/y 



SALESPEOPLE 

Fon or part time, no 'experience 
necessary. High commissions. For a 
confidential interview, contact Mr. 
Strickland, 499 7B50. 



HANMCAPPEDORHS- 
ABLED MEN AND WO- 
MEN - Extra income. F<» 
tafocmation Phone 497- 
8575. 



I»-^I0W WAWTJD 

BABYSITTING In my 
home for working mother. 
1 child. S25. 420 3650. 

BABYSITTING Large 
play area, fenced yard, 
hot meals. Winsor Woods 
area. Licensed. 340-4456. 

•BABYSITTING LIcen 
sed; lots of love, 
reasonable. Dial 428 0081. 

BABYSITTING In my 
home, Windsor Oaks. 
References on request. 
4863960. 

BABYSITTING Ex • 

perienced Mother of 3, day 
and nights. 486-4371. 

BABYSITTING In my 
home; fenced yard; 
Windsor Wood area, 486 
3469. 

BABYSITTING In my 
home; hour, week or day; 
Aragona Village; fenced 
yard, 497 6847. 

OFFICE CLEANING 
Night time. Aragona 
Village preferred. Call 
499 2154, after 6 p.m. 



GREEN RUN Lovely 4 
bedroom townhouse in 
The Oaks. Air con 
ditloned, carpeting, 
recreation privileges. 
Immediate occupancy, 
rent or sale. 486-3518 after 
6 p.m. and week-ends. 

FORREST PARK - 3 
bedrooms, nice yard, 
fenced, off Little Creek 
Rd. $.55. 499 4712. 

31— OFFICE 
DB5K SPACE 

PRIME OFFICE SPACE 
New space available in 
modern. SUN building at 
138 S. Rosemont Rd. next 
to Expressway. Large and 
small unit for several 
office use, ready for you 
Call 486 3430. 

:}4-A— MOVING 

AND STORAGE 

HAROLDS TRANSFER 

622-4793 or 497-8088 

Mastercharge 



CHINESE PUGS - 3 
months fawn, black mask, 
AKC reg. 855 7914. 

DACHSHUND - Ready 
for Xmas. Champion 
sired, long hair. 340-2649. 

DACHSUNDS R«ady 

for Xmas; champion sired 
long haired 340-2649. 

DACHSHUN 
Champion, sm 
wks. AKC reg. 
pets. 464-5804. 

DOBERMAN ffUP - 6 
month red male, earis 
standing; wormei), shots, 
$100. 623 1356. 

DOBERMAN^ PTN-^ 
SCHERS 3mortthS, $150 
each. Ears cropped and 
shots 



PARAKEETS - Babies, 
assorted colors, EnelKh 
and American stock. Brtd 
locally, healthy. AfM 
Parakeets. 497-0218, 1186- 
3461. 

PERSIAN KITTENS..— 
CFA registered, ador«(}b». 
Call 427 1259 after 6 p.m. 



POODLES 
Silver. AKC 
497-0987. 



Tiny 4p)(s, 
reglsterj(d. 




POODLES AKC, v^hjt* 
Tpy females, 12 wec^s. 
Shots, groomed. $85-. & 
$125. 587 8453. i 

vPUPPIES j^ii'rt 

Chihuahua, ]A'f - 
fenpinscher; lovableil!40- 
6690. 



PUPPIES - Part/c**fi#. 
Free to good home.'CilH'bt 
seen after 3 p.m. v#Mk> 
days. Call 486 2349. -t 

fj£__ 

SCOTTISH TErT^fT 
PUPS AKC regi$f*fkl. 



'"■*.*»3^- ^' 6 weeks, $80. 486-43^.' 

ENGLISH SPRINGER 



gm- 



m0biMttmmi_, 



SPANIELS AKC 

registered. Five females, 
8 weeks. Wormed arid 
shots; $65. 464 597S. 

ENGLISH BULLDOGS .■ 
"Adorable", 6 weeks, AK- 
C registered, perfect for 
Santa. 489 '8570^ 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPPIES - AKC 

females, black 8, tan, 2 
mos., shots, wormed, $55, 
487 5652, 



ST. BERNARD nrtdri, 10 
mos. AKC Beauflful 
wMwtel ng a i a—d » m r tk t m, 

St. BERNARb PUPPY 
(SHAGG aARK> obild 
atlergie, $300. 487-89M.< 



35 — HOUSES F'ok 1&ALE GB.RMAN SHEPHERD 

' ' /PtlPSv AKC registered; 

/6 weeKs;' male, $75, 
Female, $60. 487.7390. 



PRINCESS Anne Plaza, 
$17,500, 3 bedroom Ranch. 
Cozy, immaculate home. 
Call ANCHOR REALTY 
428 7421. 



NEWTOWN SOUTH 

2-bedraom deluxe townlwuse, ex- 
cellent condition, wall-to-wall 
carpet, refrigerator, dishwaslier, 
disposal, range, central air, fenced 
yard, many ottier extras.- Assume 
witli low eqi^ or re-finance. Call 
owner, 499-2a3, after 5 p.m. NO 
AGENTS PLEASE- 



GERMAN' SHEPHERDS 
White,'^v weeks,' AKC 
registered; 3 females, $85. 
583 2011. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD - . 
Hold f6r Christmas, 9 
weeks, registered, shots, 
wormed. 588-4679. 



STUD SERVICE 
Shetland Sheepdoj^"} 
Champion; proveA; 
lovely; 340 8Wr. 

STUD SERVICE 
Poodle, Silver tea cup t^y. 
497 0987. 

STUD SERvTce"— Tirl A 
Setter Stud., AKC trfc. 
Champion pedigrili. 
Beautiful color -^d 
feathering. $50. pick of 
litter. 4275121. •^'^ 



'■' 'w j 

PUf- 
•-Wd, 



&^i 



ftMEit«alor|ati 



GfiEAT DANE PUPiS - 
AKC registered; quality 
blues; ears cropped; 
shots; $^50-up; terms; 
857 1118. " 



WEIMERANER PI 
PIES • 6 weeks' 
wormed and •»hbt»:««»0. 
,427-5190. \ c> 

, -1 ., — j},a_ 

S2--HORSES, l*EEO^ 

- — -- -... Ul » ._ 

APPALOOSA - GelASg; 
Registered; 14.1 hafidi5 J 
y/s. old; wy flentlei^'^. 



SALES TRAINEES 
Regardless of your past work 
background, we may be able to 
train you for local full time sale* 
$41000 Montlily to start. Call 
499.27«3. 



The Air Force Now 

GUARANTEES 

Your Choice 

of Choice Jobs 

Before You EnlisL 
CHOOSE YOURS! 

CONTACT 
M^T. BEN SPEARS 

^07 lb audi BM. P|mii#6-»71 




OFFICE CLEANING 
Will clean offices and 
shops. Call 486 3032 after 4 
p.m. 

TYPING My home, 

. Virginia Beach area. Fast 
accurate, reasonable. 464- 
6895. 

20- -.DAY NUKSWY 

HAPPY DAYS KIN 
DERGARTEN - And 
Day Care Center. State 
Licensed for 2, 3, 4, and H 
year olds. Open 7 a.m. - 6, 
p.m. year around. Call 
428 6565 to enroll. Located ^ 
at 612 Fremac Drive (off 
Laskin Road between 
Hilltop and oceanfront). 



Hr-OUT OF TOWN 

SPACES fOr Mobile 
Homes. Large, wooded 
lots. Approx. 15 mi. Jrom 
Va. Line, 15 mi. from E. 
City, N.C. and 25 mi. from 
Nags Head. $25 8. $30 per 
month. Call (919) 453 3232 
after 6. 

42-REAL ESTATE 
WANTED 

WE Have Buyers and 
tenants waiting for 
property in all areas of 
Virginia Beach. Call us 
to sell (H- rent yours. 
Stohl Realty 
497-4851 



MEN NEEDED 

SEMHNilVERS 

AND 

: HEAVY ^IPMENT 

0PERA10RS 

Bfokn for i^Empio^Mnt 



WANTED 

HOUSE FROM OWNER 

By carii, aaame Iom, at mit 
with option. 

WINDSOR WOODS, 
VKINITY 
OU) FORGE COURT. 

Oecopancy nMottaUe. 
4«6-4989,uytteie. 



■wi SanrTndof 

Avn«iN» 



SULOOOpw 



12M 



WartVi^Wa 



So— PETS* SUPPLirf 



ALASKAN MALAMUTE 
Registered puppies, 10 
weeks, shots, wormed, 
$175. Call 3404299, 340 
4»)2. 

AFGHANS Tullys Big 
John line bred pups. Fully 
guaranteed. $275. up. 
Creams. Terms. 4991829. 

AFGHAN PUPS AKC 

registered out of Crown 
Crest; will hold til Xmas 
Eve. 420 2945. 




/> 



mmm 



m^m 



wm^^mm 



V 



u. 



lURSDA Y.DECEMBER 14, 1972 



re 




THE SUN 



PAGE 17 



/Wk Clo/zified 4a6-S4» 




PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



or 



tOO"J^J^ 



i 



i 



)N BOTTLES Very 
al$o j$bme antiques. 
lOtal 499 388S. 

>BY CARRIAGE - 
[Converts to stroller and 
l[. bed. Playpen and 
"int dressing table. 497- 




n 



-MISCeULAMKOUS •J-^llJlCAi t>ll^KUM»m 



BICYCLE - Girls with 
Ittotket, $15. 420-6592. 

j*f!T 

rl^YS SCREAMER 
JJilce for 12 yr. old; por- 
|4»bt# Corona typewriter ; 
• ijif ' conditioner window 
iMkit; artifical Christmas 
tree?'. 497 6532 after 6 30. 



:H, R IStAAAS SUG 
jfeSTION - Baby Tend 
fl^ve doll clothes, 
reasonable prices. 499- 

■ •'Hospital bed and chair, 
|t4ncludes mattress and 
pt^ils. Latest model, 
Almost new. 487-8009. 

HUNTING BOW - And 
irrows. Quiver, glotve, 

435. 340 3865. 

■ Ti-^ . - 

OLYMPIC STAINS 
'wsorted colors, cost 
>t».$0, sacrifice $3.50. 
Clwner, 499 1080. 

|»*J*URPLE MARtiN 
^rfCfUSES - 14 rooms, $35. 
I K^e«ch. Call 340-8812. 



r »■ 



SWORD 



Spanish 
^i;igN\al, mounted in 

, Antique frame. 464-2781. 

n' 

TYPEWRITER - IBM 
,l|\«ctric 18" carriage, very 
,jj(io<l condition. 464-9355, 
:'j#;»179. 

.Mhgaiions waxless floor 
'^ui^sh and 50 gallons 
' cdiinmercial stripper. 
' Must move immediately 

at $1 per gallon, which is 
„ fraction of cost. Contact 

,ii,y Brumblay at 486-3430. 



vwa***- 



•*■<• 



WOODEN 
. MAIL BOXES 

tti Cyttom made, for pott or 
hOOMi Cho«>M from 3 avail- 
«• MylM, or wNI build to 
your dMiga 340-3S30 after 
6,. 



AN11QUE8,G1PTS, 
UBEDPURNmjRE 
l>- •' Boy.Siaudltade 
OpeadalylOloS:30 
rtf'^IIw Bowl ud Pttdiet 
8 •3103HolyR4.,Va.litMli 



!?^ 




60-A- 
f AT 



-GOOD THINGS TO 



CHRISTMAS 

Tray pack 

box. Bulk 



••"•«^€CIAL 

\Wmt%, $5 

iJipples, $3.50 Oranges or 

BKrtgorlnes, 3 doz. for $1. M 

9b. bag oranges, $2. 

fejikhristmas Candy, 3 lb. 

^ox, $1.25 Open nigtits til 9 

iy.m. and Sundays. F.G.^ 

pton, at ttie Virginia 

each F=armers Market, 

357 Diamond Springs Rd. 



ILWIARlNQ ArPAML 



Raincoat - Man's blue 

fleer, large $5. 499 1127. 

:ar COATS - Woman's, 
Mze 12, »5. each. 499 1127. 



la— BUILDING SUPPt-liS 

tOME Buildei's & Cmi 
ractors ■ Let us help 
Hth that new' holne- 
iiiMany or rep^s. W4 
ti?r fur^rtsft — rffaterials 
rom basement to attic 
Ind aid you in financing. 
>hone KELLAM «. 
•ATON 427 3200. 



ii-^mCAL IMlTBUMi^TS. 

Il-ABINET conn; 

lelvet lined carrying 
ise, excellent conditiwi, 
45. 583 3274. 

^ARINET . - LeBlanc, 
jod condition, includes 
lattfer carrying case. $80. 
P7-4811. 

IRUM Ludwig snare, 
)or best offer. Excellent 
Nditton^ Call 340 0299. 

i,«#ITAR Martin Dli 
.^ joustic 12 string, with 
\^, $350. Call 464 1765. 

tfUITAR - Including new 
itr'ap, 2 \bokt and 2 
.^wristas. •428 9205. 

,OR«AN "Piper" 

'Hammond, excellent 
<»ndithNt. 340 1739 

ORGAN Portable with 
music. GMd condition, 

$is. at-fm. 



PIANO Steinway 

console, built in 1948, ex 
cellent condiHon, $900. 
Call 428 9354. ' 

PIANO Upright. 

Lonesome, wants 
^ someone to play with. 
Good cgndition, $125. 428- 
9336. 



64 OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

Interested in telephone 
answering equipment for 
office or car? Call 497- 
6411. 



65A FlltEWOOD 

FIREWOOD By cord or 
' cord delivered, $40. 
cord. 427 2857. 



VACUUM CLEANER 
Kirby, excellent con 
dition, used very little, 
with extras. Call 497 5059. 

WASHER DRYER 3 

years old $125 both or $75 
each. 428 1519. 




^1 ■ / 




«7—H0USiH0LP GOODS 

AIR CONDITIONER 
Window unit, like new, 
$100. 499 1080. 

BAR - L*either 

upholstered armrests, 
panelled for speakers. 6 
ft., $75. 464 2781. 

BEDROOM FURkl.TURE 
, 4 poster pine bed, 
complete, matching 
dresser; 5 pc. twin bed 
suite; large oak dresser 
with mirror. 428-3260. 

BEDS 2 full size, 

complete. Dial 499-9265. 

DINETTE TABLE 
Maple, round with for- 
, mica top, 2 matching 
maple chairs. All In ex- 
cellent condition. Too 
large for my small kit- 
chen. $20. for all. Call 499 
3385 after 7 p.m. or week- 
ends. 

DISHWASHER - Port 
able, Montgomery Ward, 
Harvest gold, wood cut- 
ting board top. 2 years old, 
hardly used. 486 4510 after 
6 p.m. or weekends. 

DOLL MUSEUM Dolls 
from every era. Ad- 
mission free. 11-5 daily, 1- 
6 Sunday. Melton's An- 
tiques, 4201 Indian River 
Rd. 420 8911, 420 5117. 

dryer" ~i 'yeVTrV old; 
Gas, white, excellent 
condition. 855 9437. 

qSfYER Gas, fair 

cohdftion, $20. Dial 428 
9205. 

.ELECTRIC RANGE 
30"; yellow, tiered, good 
condition. $95. 340 0297. 

END TABLES And 

cocktail table. Very heavy 
walnut, new, $50. 499-1127. 

FREEZER Coldspot 

upright, very good con- 
dition. $125. 499-4712. . 

FURNITURE - 

BUY AND SELL 
623 3937 

HOLLYWOOD BED 
'Complete, perfect con- 
dition, used 1 year, $50. 
428 19?3.' 

-■• " t" ■"„ " ■ 

Kenmore washer, 
Frigidaire dryer, 
Westinghouse "dish 
washer, Kingsize bed and 
headboard, double bed, 
Xmas tree 6 ft. scotch 
pine. Drapes (varieties of 
sizes). 425 1694. 



KELVINATOR FOOD 
ARAMA 40" wide. 

209 lb. freezer, good 
condition, $155. 587-2118. 

LIVING ROOM COUCH 
4 pieces In teal blue; 3 
tables,- 2 lamps, wrappers 
still on uhi.dcs; 1 bunk bed 
needs mattress, after 6:30 
497 6532. 

Maytag washer, new 
pump, fair condition, also 
electric dryer, needs new 
motor, $55. for both. 587- 
2118. 

RANGE GE 30" 

electric; oven timer, push 
button controls, excellent 
condition. 340 9864. 

REFRIGERATOR 
FREEZER com 

bination $30. 428 1519. 

RUGS (2) 12' X 15' 

allwool sapphire blue with 
pad, velvet plush. 13'6*'x 
10'6" ivory wool, 
sculptured design with 12' 
runner. 464 6011. 

SCATTER RUGS (3) 

Karastan blue wool. Two 
3x5, one 4x6. Call 497 2647. 

T A BL E Coppertone and 
white, marblelzcd top, 
with 8 chairs. «7 1522. 

2 arm chairs. Colonial 
sofa, cocktail table, wig, 
bottles, camea, ^apcs, 
Msetbali hoop. Call 499- 
0407 



<t— »ADIO-TV.STiMO 

COLOR TV 25" 

Magnovo'x Mediterranean 
remote control, $275. 
STEREO Magnovox 
Mediterranean AM-FM 6 
speakers, modified for 
external speakers, $225. 
Both for $450. or make 
offer. 486-4189. 

PORTABLE TELE 
VISION 19" black 

and white Motorola 
with stand. Needs no 
repairs. $30. 497 0982 after 
5.30 p.m. or weekends. 

STEREO - French 
Provincial cabinet, like 
new, all attachments. 
$250. 464 2781. 

TELEVISION Sears 

console color, RCA 
chassis, new picture tube. 
497 2189. 

TELEVISION 1972 

Sylvania color console, 
23", good condition. 545 
6210. 

TV PORTABLE black 
A white also 2 tv consoles, 
after 6 30 497 6532. 

TV STEREO RADIO 
combination, AM FM 
radio, S95, 428 1519. 




«»— WANT TO BUY 

ANTIQUES — and any old 
furniture 

CASH-CASH-CASH 
430-0706 






75--AMTKHHI 

ANTIQUES 3 floors of 
furniture in the rougt\ and 
also re-finished. Brass 
beds, marble top Vic- 
torian furniture, round 
oak tables, $65 and up. 
Round front China closets, 
wash stands, roll top 
desks, cut glass.*^ R.S. 
Prussia, trains, music 
boxes, nautical and other 
unusual items. Jewelry, 
watches, clocks, mirrors, 
lamps, paint remover. 
Low, low price. Melton's 
Antique, 4201 Indian River 
Rd., 420 8911, 420 5117. 

BEDSPREADS Hand 

crocheted; call 489 3716. 

BRASS BEDS 3 floors 
to browse. Oak, pine, 
walnut, Victorian fur 
niture of all kinds. Cut 
glass, Bisque head dolls. 
Nautical and other 
unusual items. Melton's 
Antiques, 4201 Indian 
River R«l. 420 5117, 420- 
8911. 



SUIfOASmED 

ADS GET RESULTS! 
HMfESCNNE 
PUPPIES 10 SELL 

COCKER VANIEL- 
AadTwteNMin, 

liis.ll.LMUil6^9- 
pits Oe fat wade hat 
•dna! nvflMtecoM- 



itoNmM" 
a'tkel 
Owil43,tBlii 

wkMyMkawto 
offsL <M4»-3433 
ar4»-3434t«bv. 



FOR CHRISTMAS 
Personal collection. 2 pie 
cupboards. Oak dining 
room furniture, 2 game 
tables, Martha 
Washington sewing stand, 
lamp tables, record 
cabinet, pine blanket 
chest. Tiffany type lamps, 
tea cart, etc. 340 3324. 

Silver Candelabra, coffee 
pot, butter dlstn^ and 
spreader. By appointment 
only 423 2886. 

TABLE Round oak, 6 
chairs and 2 leaves. $250. 
Dial 424 3843. 

syrr— 




14— AUCTIONS, PUBLIC 
SALES 

CALVIN 2EDD 

Auctioneer Appraiser 
499 5567 



ABANIX»(ED VEHICLE 
AUCnON 
Decembet 28, 1972, 10 \m.^ 
^loes Ave. and Soathem 
UkL, at Ifae coma itonfe 
lot AppraKimat^ 48 ve- 
hiclei, removed from die 
city streets of the Qty of 
VMiua Beach, to be 
aoM at public aucticML 



g). 



CUT GLASS, Old jewelry 
and watches, old fur 
niture, antiques of all 
kinds. 4208911, 4205117. 

DOLLS Old timey dolls, 
$30. up. Any condition. 
Also doll parts. Call 420 
8911, 420 5117. 

ELECTRIC TRAINS ^ 

American Flyer or Lionel. 
5456242. 

FURNITURE WANTED 

Couch, Early 

American, blue or green, 

in good condition. Will pay 

S^p to $100. Call 425 6485. 

GIRL SCOUT UNIFORM 
Size 12 X 14. Also other 
Girl Scout equipment. Call 
497-4141 after 6, anytime 
week-ends. 

WANTED - Old or 06 
longer needed clothing. 
Call me, 623 3937. 



12— lOATS, MAHINC SUy^LIR 

BOAT for Sale 26 ft. 
sloop; converted navy 
whaler; sleeps 4; head 
and galley; no engine; 
stainless steel standing 
rigging; dacron sails; 
dacron running rigging; 
$1500 firm. Call 340 5648 
before 11 a.m. 



M— CAMMBS, TMimiS 

TRAVEL TRAILER 13' 
Layton, '.63i7excellent 
condition, ^e^ns, water, 
electricity hookup, 
refrigerator, stove, sleeps 
3 plus child. Dial 427 3273. 



8S-BKACW lUPPLmS 

RAFT 6' inflatable, 

maintenance kit, 1 paddle, 
S20. 340 3865. 

-, * 

'SURF BOARD ., 4'6" 
American, no dings, no 
fractures, $50. 340 3865. 




88— MOBILE HOMES 

AMERICAN 12'X60', 

applicances, washer, 
utility shed, air con 
ditioner. Near Oceana. 
.j:ali 425 1796. 



CO BURN 1970, 12'x60', 
3 bedrooms, carpet, 
furnished, washer, dryer, 
dishwasher, air con- 
ditioned, on fenced lot. 
Call 499 6596. 

GREAT LAKES 1970, 

12'x64', lots Of extras. 499- 
4408 after 4 p.m. 

FRONTIER 1970, 12 x 
60; 3 bedrooms; fur 
nished, on lot; $500; 
assume payments; 497- 
9279. 




90--MOTO»CYCI1$. S«)OTt>S 



GOCART ENGINE 7 

h.p. BriggsSi Straton, like 
new, $35. 340 3865. 

HONDA 50 on 90 frame. 
Speed to 45 MPH, $80. 340 
3865. 

HONDA 1972; CB350; 

$650 or take over 
payments; excellent 
condition. 625-8880. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 
1972 Super glide 2100, 
weber' carburetor with a 
Cheetah sissy bar. 425 
8403. 

YAMAHA 1971, DT 1. 

$375. Dial 464 0875 after 6 
p.m. 



92— AUTO ACCISS„ RIPAIRS 



WHEELS (4) CROGER 

Slotted disc; fit. 14" 
Chevy's with locks. Used 2 
weeks. $80. 340-2254. 



95— THUCKS.-TMiimS. JilW 

CHEVROLET. 1969V8, 
3 speed stick, new short 
block, 47,000 miles. New 
tires, custom cab. $1,550- 
Call 420 2063. 



HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUIDE 



120— AUTOMOIliiS 



AUSTIN AMERICAN 
1971, must sell, like new, 
24,000 miles, front wheel 
drive $1,000. 460 0991. 

AUSTIN HEALEY 1967 
Sprite, good condition. 
Must sell. 428 1711, ext. 
220. 



CADILLAC 1961, white, 
4 door; good condition. 
$275. 420 1352. 

CADILLAC - .1969 
Fleetwood, like new 
condition, all optional 
equipment. $3700. 855- 
3575. 

CAPRI 1971 Ford Capri, 
2000 CC engine. Brown 
with white interior. Best 
offer. Call 499 1845. 

COMET 1967 Cyclone 
390, 4 speed, new tires and 
<ew engine, tape deck. 
Excellent condition. 857 
4165. 

DUSTER 1970 needs 

some body work, runs 
good. $1475. 425 0235. / 

FORD 1923 T model, 

street roadster, 97 per 
cent complete. $1495. 547 
8279. 

JAGUAR XK 120, 1952, 
70 percent restored. $1500. 
Dial 625 0785., 

MG 1969 Midget, fine 
body, needs repair. $100. 
or best oHer. Call 588-8378. 

PACKARD 1947 

Limousine, restorable 
condition, new tires, $300. 
623 1188, or 489 8488. 

PONTIAC 1971 LeMans 
V 8, autpmatic, power 
steering and brakes. "Air 
conditioned. Excellent 
condition. $2550. or make 
offer. 499 0603. 



PONTIAC — 1967 Bon 
neville, 2 door. Call after 6 
p.m., 499 9936. 

PONTIAC 1966 

Catalina, good condition, 
S600. 425 4630 days. 

PORSCHE 1969, 9MT, 5 
speed, air conditioned, 
alloy wheels, many extras 
and options, excellent 
condition inside and out. 
Call 499 8844. 

RENAULT 1967 

Caravelle; to sell or 
trade; new tires; motor 
overhauled, 464-0031. 

ROVER 1969 TC 2000, 
Arden green, brown 
leather interior, air 
conditioned, FM stereo 
radio, mag wheels, stick 
shift. Lucas driving lights, 
66,000 miles, $2,000. Call 
587-1591 days. 

TORINO 1970, Air 

conditioned, radio, power 
steering, automatic 
transmission, 8 cycllnder. 
Take over payments. 464 
9395, or 428-9179. 

VEGA 1971, one owner, 
low mileage. 588-3151, 9 to 
5. 

VOLKSWAGEN - 1965 
Sedan, low mileage, 
sunroof, good mechanical 
condition, radio, $585. 340- 
2966. -** 

VOLKSWAGEN 1971, 

Orange sunroof, header 
system. Perfect condition. 
Extras. $15M. Call 460 
1085. 

VOLKSWAGEN 1970 

Bug; new tires, lust in 
spected, $1100. 427 5190. 



OFFICE SPACE 

SUH BUILDING 



StMet avMtaMt now. LocMfed it 138 Rom 
mofit Road (juat off Expmtway). All 

utilHiM • JanHorW SirviM - Parfcini. Cay 
now 340-3030. 



LARASAN 



REALTY 



COI9. 




THIS HANDY UP TO DAH ALPHABETICAUY USTED 
GUIDE FOR AU YOUR SERVia NEEDSI 



Appliance Repair 



Ceramic Tile 



Appiance Repah 

Rcgi^n^Mofs, neenn, ab 
condmoMti. wadian, dw- 
eni, ranges, ul major appuan- 

^"** Gas and Electric 
REASONABLE 



TILE WOftK 
MUD sncK-up 

REASONABLE PRICE 

623-3937 



Electrical Contractor 



Asphalt-Concrete 



ASPHALT PAVING 

;IMtcfi Kne patching, dnve- 
ways a nedalty. No job 
toomaO. 

CALL 
487-6061 



ELECmiCM. WORK 

Electric hett lad dryns; 
houses rewind. 
Fn« Ertimates 
Can Mike LerinilEy 



5«M227 



CONCRETE WORK 
ntlos-Sldewalks-Drlvaways 
Slabs-Curb and Guttsr 
ALL TYPES CONCRETE 
FREE ESTIMATES 
Wm. M. Bemaa, it. 
General Contnctoc 
399-2268 



QlflCX UGHT 

bLEcnucco. 

EiNtrWal Contractort 
New and CM Work 
ISS^IU, 4W-73S7 

mgMi isi-f IS* 




Bicycle Repairs 



BICYCLE REPAIRS 

Wdding and Ommoitd 

InnRuiinni 
VA. BEACH LAWN 
MOWER ft WELDING 

428-9IKI9 




EUCTRICAL 

coimtAcroR 

RBUdentW 

'Com m er c ial 

Indutrial 

D.E. MITCHELL 

427-1146 



BectiiealCoatiMtot 

SarviM IncrMiM a (paditty. 
Maw and Old Work. 
Elactrlc Haat ConMrslon. 
Raatonabla 
ROBERT L. MILLS 
S47-S712 
Day or night 



Carpet Ctaming 



_ Ej^rminating 



Cash A Carry 
SAVE 20% 

Bring your rugs in, than pIcK 
tham up at th« Scott plant, 
vMakdays 8 to S, Sat. 8 to 1 
and sava a whopping 20%. 
SCOTT RUG CLEANERS 
Tidawatar's l-argast. 
1554 Juniper St. Norfolk 
855-3037. 



BURTON PEST 
CONTROL CO. 

Spaclatlzing In roach and 
Insact control. Ratldantlal 
& Commarclal. 

497-9182, anytime. 



Bob Roberls 
OeaniigSeniice 

Cupet and Uphotaieiy Ghtti- 
kig - Hardwood and tie Oooc 
cleaning FREE ESTOfAIES 

857-61B8 



Garages 

«• *• •• ■• «■» aaaB ^m ^m ^» "^ a^ •■• ■■• 




BAMBI CARPET 
CLEANERS 

Wa will shampoo any aiza liv- 
ing, dining room, and hall ca^ 
p«L..all thraa for only t2S. 
This special price Is good any- 
time. 



jsmi 



GARAGES 

CUSTOM BUILT 

BANK FINANCING 
STANDARDS CAR 
GARAGES 
$1,050 

HARDISON 
GONTRMTMG 

420-1716 



Heating 



Carpentry 



R.O.aFIVEYCO. 

"ReOdenMA Commerced" 
Alt CoMUftMdng-Refiken- 
tia» andHeatii^ Ice M^- 
em Hunddifiat-Electionic 
aitdeasen. 

486-1273. 



CARPENTRY 

Is Our BusinessI 
Repairs, Our Specialtyt 
Quality workmanship 
Raesonable rata* 

464-4663 

CQNSTItilCTJM* 

SERviceito. 



RftM 
IffiAIINGA 

COOLING ca 

HEiL 
Authorized Dealer 

489-7364 



5!r!?2?Lli^-.. Home Improvements 



CERAMIC A FLOOR TILE 
Expixt work at a wy good 
pike. G^ your floon, w^ 
aad oeiMnp te food am- 
(StkHi now. Free ^tfanates. 

S87-17M 



CERAMiiflLI.- 

Old and new work. 
Remodeling »nd patch 
work. Quarry title and 
slate. 

Free Estim«t»« 

J. IM. i.t.HWE TIUE CO. 

428-2451 atter^M 



HOME REPAIRS 
ANY TYPE 

stop Aat le*kig hnoM! 
n^tooe *at taoheR doof ! 
CUFFS RETAIRS 
4974851 



^eURad^ 
4920V^iria 



Jjomelmprovements Locksmiths 



Atlantic Buidhg Co. 

Home Unprovementi 
OfAOfy^ 

Alao Coiiuneicial BulUii^ 

BONDED AND LICENSED 

622-5834 






LOCKSMITH (boiMtoi^.' 

Jim's Key Shofji 



2316 Va. Beach BM: 
London BftdoB ' 
J.«i.Dnrte 
340-2490 



.ftiwSlQH ^iiU. 



Gorman ktA Son 

Nojob too lane or imul 
FREE ESTIMATES 
GUARANTEED WORK 
Ucenaed and Bonded. 
24 HOUR ANSWERING 
SERVICE -61.mm 



PAINTING AND ROOFMG 

Interior and Exterior. iv 
Quality Wori<mansli|p^,- 

Estimates . ,^ 

Reasonable 

^421-3488 • 



"f 



HANDY SERVICES 



All Home 
Repair Services 

855-4919 




PAINTIWS :] 

Licenied • Inwred * Rjefair- 

encea • Free EatimaMc. ^ 

Interior and exteriai ■ -, 

426-7615 

BOND'S PAINTING v 
SERVICE 



CLEAN UP LOTS, 
HAUL DIRT, 

[TOP SOIL FOR SAL^ 
CALL 628-3937. 



INTERIORaEJCICRiOH 
PAINTDiG 
RMaooabieRMa* 
20YeanEgif«iiBnce: i 

ALL WORK GUARAKI^D 

688.1841 .■ 



ADDITIONS a REMODELING 

Family rooms, new addltlOQV 
battreoms, kitchens remodeled, 
carports, garages enclosed for 
extra bedrooms, etc. Free plans: 
drawn free estimates, une 
year written buaranne. 
ROV ALDERMAN CO. 

428-0484 



Papw Han(^ng^ 



-Pi 



_ .30YeaaExpeiieag»,_ 

REFERENCES 
CaB Charlie, 

499-4281 or 499-3496 




Roofing 



All Types Remodeling 
Ceramic Tile, floor tile, 
panelling, aluminum siding, 
~$Qfterlng A painting. 
FREE ESTIMATES 

34(M)423 



STEVENS ROOFING., 
AND REPAIR , 

Also Asphalt paving, Com- 
mercial A RasMentWi; " '' 
FREE ESTIMATIS' 

587-244X 



Septic Tenks 



autify your home with dec- 
orative piaster molding and 
cellii[ig centers^ Decorative c*^- 
ramic tile for wail and floor 
also avallBl>la. Free estimate, 
call 

ORNAMENTAL 
INDUSTRIES, Inc 



SEPTIC a SEWAGE 
AOOENBROOK 

Sapttc Tanit Co., Inc. , 

C«ntlnuous Service . 

Since 1164. 

Fast Sadio Dispatched 

Service 

Call 499-6897 



Tree Service 



Over-AI JMaJntenance 

and Repair Ca 

Roofing, guttering, carpen- 
try and hilnor repairs. We 
fix all those hard to find 
' leaks. Free Estimates. 
OWNER, W.J. OllverliM 

587^38 



irm humming 
iree removal ^ 
reasonabUrates" 

547.853a 
LARRY WILUAliis:;' 



TV Service 



home IMPROVEMENTS 



All types of repair, remod- 
eling, painting, rooting, con- 
crete work. Foundation, 
brick and Mock work. Gut- 
tering. Aluminum siding. 
Driveways aitd parking 
area, plastering. No Money 
Down. 
SM^Ing Entire Tidewater. 

Free Estimates. 
Call 627-8553. Nights and 
holidays, 4K-130«. 



BASCONSTRUCTKm 
CfflffANV 



SAVE ME! 

rmwcrthoneFRiK 
caOwiflittiacoBaa, 
FREE ettiaMes te IfcHM 
Same Da y Sanrice 

CALL43Me95 . 

American T V ' 



Upholstery 



htouse^king 



UPHOLSiEKY ' " 
ANDERSON'S UPlUMJTBfV 

If your furniture Is stck.-ikAig 
itto And«^on's UpheMeivftra 
fao-iifWig. AN work firsi |EMp. 

Call 464-4637 



B.F. BELL 

Houselacking 
Replacing Floor JoMS 
wid Sills 

25 Years Experlenn 
Are your floors shaking? 
622-1771, 622-i3»6 



^^ASInle^ 




THURSDAY. DECEMBER 14. 197JL 




mpnd 

SHAPE IS IN 

IWE DO THE NEWEST 
lAND MOST CREATIVE 
fHAIROOS 





VIRGINIA BEACH 

r07VA.8EiW;HBLVD. 
i232 \ 



IN NORFOLK 
127 W. FREEMASON 
622.9066 



LAMPS 

BLOW WAVING 
IRON CURLING 



-f^iiUyp.nffrt YOU I 

Ii\ A i#W hairdo] 



(Sve Her a New Look 
this Christnias! 

SPECIAL GIFT PACKAGE - $19.00 
Coo^leto 4-iii6nth progrim 
UMl Van KtMte Bo^ Suite. 
$24. Vdue 

Ehbenywers 

fisutSakms Pembroke mall 

^ Ik SHOPPING CENTER 

W ^9-1266 




f)9RDllD 




CAR STEREO 



TIRES 



A' ••• Ho • • • 




ONLY $69 ! 

Portable TV 



iriHackAWMto 
. Modal AR 122 

YANT APPUANa CO. 

4818 VIRGINU BEACH BLVD. (Angcm Sioppiiig Cmter) 
1278 N. MIUTARY HGWY. 543 E. LHTU CREEK RD. 
497-8939 622>9771 583-4S31 



BLUE MOUNTAIN GLASS 

Made ouluslvdy in Canada 



JT' 



FURNITURi SALES. INC. 

MON.-TUES.-THURS.-PRL IM 
SAT. IM CLOSED WEa 

S643 Raby Rd, Norfolk 853-7270 




PJNASONIA HIGH FIDEi/TY SPEAKER SYSTEMS 



J $199.95 



V 




iji^ wooTw, two 5" iBidai«M, two 2" hom tweet- 
80 wi^ tweelH and nidnnfe oontNlk Wal- 
wood. Limited Qoaat^. 

lies 






V_!^ Stoie boon 1*9 daily, 10-5 Sat 

|»)UniERN manWO CENTOI 583-2651 




Na 1 IN TIDEWATER 

€YCm 

SANTA'S HONIM HEADQUAinERS 



\m 



Smdl Mini'Trafl Hondas avaliMe now. 
\ AU i^w, ctHuplate line of'lO ^ aad a , 



4872 Vs. Beech Blvd. 
<N«AmoM) 4994146 



BANK AMERICARD 
MASTER CHARGE 






^%o TAPE SHOP 



488-2M6 



(ttm/ik&aiat'Aj 



8 TRACK TAPE DECK 



One of ew bett ntam ia 8 
toaekcairtMMM. 

^ifOnly 



ALL 

8 TRACK 
TAPES 



each 



$29.99 






Mini Cycles 

%«iihl 



NATIONA. 
CYCLE SM£S 

2437 Va. Beach Bhd. 34(^5265 



FLOOR COVERING 



GOLF CLUBS, BAG 
NEW CLOTHES 
WATCH 
SKILSAW 
CALCULATOR 

ffloRMOM 

DIAMOND RING 
NEW BIBLE 
FAMaV PORTRAIT 
VACUUM CLEANER 
GOLF SHOES, CLUBS 
NEW FIGURE 
ANTIQUES 

MINI BIKE 

BICYCLE 

RADIO 

ROLLER SKATES 

MAG WHEELS 
BOOKS 

HOBBY GIFT 



fOtiOHMl 






(FORMERLY CURIOSITY SHOP i, HIRTZ BAZAAR) 



• ANTIQUES • GIFTS 

• Christmes Boutique 

e Celico Shop 

e Complete Decoreting Service 

• Custom Christmas Arrangements 

222 First Colonial Rd. 
(At Oceana) 
428-7088 



Looking for 



nicy cm f 

Come See Ours! 





™te-,;j Weddings 

1^3*" OIL PORTRAYS 

FRAMES, 
iV«^! PASSPORTS, 







We have all types for all agesl 

Sidewalk Bikes 12", 16", 20''*^ 
Standard 20", 24" and 26" ^ 
3Speed26" 
5Speed26",27" 
10 Speed 26", 27" 
Wagons, Scooters, Tricycles, 
Mini-Bikes. Western F 



issmife store 



600 VA. BEACH BLVD. 4284351 

Wf appreciate the opportunity to serve you. 





HAYWOOD 
HOUSE OF PORTRAITS 
|4634 HAYGOOD ROADe VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 

460-1003 



■-^^"Perfect Place for 
Gift Items for Gentlemen 

VELOUR KNIT HEADQUARTERS 

Laige MlectioB (rf niidi Jb stiipci, 
aUcolon. 
MON.-FRL 9:30>9, SAT. 9:30-6 



21st t MartJc kit. 42M051 



A Qudinal G^ & FTora t 

99 NewAccowitnetapIm- -— •"^"»-- 
# nMdlataly.CaDtoQidcf 

Now! 

POINSETTIAS (4 - $6 

CHRISTMAS FLORAL ARRANGEMENTSj 

$7.50 ap 

Complete line of gifts, Christmas 
decorations and floral services. 

486^3383 

485 S. LYNNHAVEN RD. (Mini Mall) 




O' 



/.» 




Dayton Tires - Raised 
White LettMS 

P 60-14 — |a.41|>tePET 

^>0-14 $31.06 plat PET 

l|35 NMtni MILITARY 

HOIWAY 867-1201 



I 



Appliance Chrome 8t 
Meg Wheels~ln Stock 

Fjr Fold, Oievroiet, Maaen 
A Pkk Up Tkacks 

Smooth Chrome Wheels 

14-lSiA >..».... $17.50 ea. 
14-7 «.......>. — $1940 ea. 

15-8 $26.00 ea. 

15-10 «.«.. SmOOei. 

PHILUPS 
DISCOUNT THS 
CENTER 




Give her a 

Kirby 

for Christmas 



Kirby 



lasst 



Call49«-27*3 
Kirby Cmnfmr 
of NorM^ 



N 



GET HAIR DONE 
ORDER FOOD FOR PARTY 
GET FIFI GROOMED 
RENTTUXEDO 



CHRISTMAS SPECIAU 

ctad paintiagi ^crfiMrioa 

$15 • $35 

paiating(ofyowcli 



ImUvidaalfy Miectad palatini ^c rf wi ioii i lly natted,gla«ed 
aadfnpned. 

Rfl^itn fwa bee paiating (of yow choice) dnwiaf Dec. 
23fd. 




THE PERFECT GIFT 

A PERSONALIZED WAfOH 

Pabidov* SwiiMnade watch hat a 36 
fooe, (weep lecoad hand and 17 
movement YeBow (Old Of 
iHlh fhnhie Alfptof band. 

Panonalized at no additional diaqie. 

Wm $59.95. Onia by nMI, S d^ 

deUveiy (port, paid) wMi check or 
money oner to: 

R. B. BRICKERS 4 Cd. 

1400 C3IURCH ST., NORFOLK, VA. 23504 




J 



3 Mnoea Aane Plaza Sioppiag Ceatet 
^MXttoPtonvrt) 



4864210 



496-611$ 



MAKE YOUR CHRISTMAS 
SHOPPING EASY! 

GET HER A 
BLOCKING BOARD 

(ADEUCMTRMITIK 
IKMIE-^WER) 

Lommim gmdm^ • JMkM ?W Gtft Shop 





cflw/ta Carpel ' (Drapery Shop 

ana 




CUSTOM REUPHOLSTERING 

On decoatai «■ faifaig fiMc 
— ^ee to yoa, wiaiia, Mid 
^fe bee Bitimitafc We Inte Oie 
naMt wuihiuiaa ia TMawatac^. 



Christmas is about Christ 

A LONG'S 

*fcii Religious Supply 



Your Ckrittian Supply Headquartm 
ka the gfft you need far that 
tomeone that't tpeciA 




4760 VA. BEACH BLVD. 



497-1885 



-^* 



fOwhnltaieiookWB 
4141 Va. Beach Bhrd, Va. BMeh 340-6421 




RRMANENT8 *^ 

(yanaUi ii4Ji 



1 



^^OTHER RVERYDAY LOW PRICES 

^ ♦<, a«jp« )2» ^- 11211 

Edie Adams Afm^tiwr 

r% i f% ^ Beayty MKEaAKt 




wm 



^^ 



■^^^▼^^•^^^^^^ 



- -#^'^'^^ 



^ 



lURSDAY. DECEMBER 14, 1972 



THE SU^ CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



PAGE 




,,, 



V.VAVA 






SOUND WORLD Ltd. 

The World of Sound 

I 4574 Pnnlnoke Meadows Shipping Center 

; 1 nBe ten Sean on Independence l^d. 499-8555 

i SOLID STATE AM/FM MuHipiex 

iRadn, 8 Track Stereo Tape Player 
iwjth 6 Speakeis FINE TUNING 
I '''■ '^^^ now $OQ95 




LARGE SELECTION 

PALAZZO 

*00% POLYESTER 

BODY SHIRTS $3.50 

Open 10-10 until Chriitmu 

724 HILLTOP NORTH - 428-6213 




iJ\FAYEnE 



9 SANYO 

\' Verfonuum engbieeied to 
CoeilMtyoaicai. 

ktg, full fidelity sound. Yet 
^mall enough to fit your carf 
Move compartment. Featuret 
^ repeat, puiDbutton to instant- 
*4y replay any channel, and fast 
.forward for easy music selec- 
'jton. 



liADK) 
1 CI khnu s 




$59.95 



With 
Spea Iters 



MS. 



MERRY CHRISTMAS VALUES 
FOR MEN ONLY! 

Double Kutjit Dren Slacks, all first quality and all Ameikan 
made. Sizes 29-60 waist, $20 to $31 Values 



ONLY $14.95 TO $2Z95 
FIRST IN TIDEWATER 



1200 E.UTTLE CREEK Rfil 587-0609 



I 




6Va.BeKkBl¥d. 
ttoZm|^l499446i 




l730E.UttieQeekRd. I 
Natt to Zayre's 583-26691 




DIstioctive and Origiiid Airanfe- 
nMnt& FraA Plants- PoinaattUa 



BJ. SCHWARTZ 3404422 

300 UONDON BRIDOE CENTER 




THE PURPLE POODLE 



ALL BREED GROOMING 

POODLE PUPPIES 

DOG SUPPLIES 

^Open M Moa, Tf «i,.Fri, Sat 
12 to 10 p.m. wdL and tbur& 



481 S. Lynnhaven Rd. (Mini MaU) 486-2374 
.Mariene Gallager, Own» 




I 



ROLLER SKATES 

,-— BOY'S & GIRL'S 
SKATES & ACCESSOR I ES 




• SKATING DRESSES 

• LEOTAIUIS 

• SKATE CASES 

• POMPOMS 



GIFT CERTIFICATES 



COUEGE PARK SKATING CENTER 

420-0187 



jenji s Jb^uarium, JiU. 

COMPLETE LINE OP TROPICAL 
nSH, PLANTS, ETC 

We quaiantine all incoming shipments 
to insuie top quality, disease-free fish 
and stffi offer low prices. 

We have 3,350 gallons of Water in 

Our Aquariums! 



1315 Hatpm Road, 1 Block South of NAS Oceana 

PHONE 425-6944 




IN TIME FDR CHRISTMAS. 
^mstrong ^ 

CushiofMd Vinyl Floor! 



^ 




rJJinlia Carpel ^^J CDraperyShop 
4141 Va. Beach Blvd.. Va. Beach 340-6421 



Modern Maid DISHWASHER 

Avocado, Coppertone, White ft 
Hwest Gold. 3 pushbutton for L 
Rinse-N-HcM, Z Wash-N-Hold 3. Ful- 
ly Cyde (2 wash, 4 rinse), 16 place 
setting with two qiray arm and two^ 
loH out bukets ... soft food 
ser...''<m'' indicator light 




•YOUX ONt STOP BUILDINC 
UATtniALSCtNTtR 



^^^^ UATfHIALSCtKTfll 



BUIiDINC 
MATlHIAlt 



kfodeiNaLOW460 

$159.95 

497-3547 
104 N. Witchduck Rd. 




SANTA SPECIALS 

Golf lolb - GHt Boxod 

oAouiuetlltleist 
oDnriopltea 
BpiMii^ Top nttn 

iMIMCI»ll.M4«., •Oawtopbniida. 
|U«Hte.,3te$3.2S 

OGEM mi m SltMPY IME 

GOLF COURSE GOLF SHOre 
mWUMkJm^ STf-mi Indian Rim RA 420-9834 




Pa-PUM-RUM-Pa-PUM'PUM-RUM 

BOX CARDS 

PRINTED ON PREMISES 
UNTIL DEC. 1& 
Open Every Nite 'Til 9. 

9xiMEy\ gift Ji^i^ 

riRST IN Oirre and Ibook» 

2 2202 ATLANTIC AVENUE 428-6^51 




fbRMD 




CAR STEREO 

TIRES 

FLOOR COVERING 

GOLF CLUBS, BAG 

NEW CLOTHES 

WATCH 

SiflLSAW 

CALCULATOR 

PORMOM 

DIAMOND' RING 
NEW BIBLE 
FAMILY PORTRAIT 
VACUUM CLEANER 
GOLF SHOES, CLUBS 
NEW FIGURE 
ANTIQUES 

MINI BIKE 

BICYCLE 

RADIO 



ROLLER SKATES 

MAG WHEELS 
BOOKS 

HOBBY GIFT 



FORDIOItfN 



JEWELRY 



HEALTH POODS 



PET 



%ATINGI»ESS 



DOLLCRADU 



(%T HAIR DONE 
(HIDER FOOD FOR PARTY 
GET FIFI QtOOMED 
RENT TUXEDO 



artwy yew <i»im» uirtHiHtad IWj|iW«l dl»iiio«e» 




New fashions in dittncmd 
bridal sets, siri>tly styled 
fai many ttriking, dra- 
matic designs. 



Your Choice 



( 



300. 



W^ve got the whole world woriting for you. 
LAYAWAY NOW FOR CHRISTMAS 

Jewelers • Norfolk •Portsmouth eVA. beach 



^ 



GOLF LteSONS FREEl 

^ FROM DORSEY MEADE 

mth PurcM^ of any Golf Equipment. 
Ladle's, Men's, Junior complete Pro 
Line. 20% Off Set of Golf Clubs Through 
Christmas Plus fhrofessional Assistance 
Free. 



Golf School 





IP5-9674 

1577 S. MDitaiy Hgwy, 

Chesapealie, Va. 



CANNED 
HEAT 





NOW APPEARING ' - 
A One Man Showli^ of ttif Spirited ' 
Worid of fiUZI DEAN for Kldt of ALL | 
Afea 



^iftm iaingnrtffmt f jtf I 



Original Wdrka of Atf - Cnaioai Frnfe^^ |^ 

8471 CHESAPEAKE BLVD.. NORFOLK, n« 

FUbanana'a Rd - Op«i 9-S daly, IM ^tudw- 
687.7767 •^-—r- 




THEOSOPHICAL 



raPi 



CLOSE-OUT SALE ON ALL GIFT 
ITEMS AND GREETING CARDS. 
ALSO CHANUKAH CARDS. 

4630 Heygood Rd.. Va. Beach 464-0105 





1^ PLANNING A CHRISTMAS PARTY? 
f YOU NEED USI 

WAGNER'S 

CATERING 

SERVICE 
o^-^^ Roast Beef crop round) 

^Assorted Par^ Sandwich Tray 

Bacon Wrapped Ojisteis ' 

JOHNNY WAGNER 





4971149 



/lSSSSSSIiSS@Slslg|g[glsIils^ 
[|C| Christmas Gifb for that Unique Home from j| 

I Spanish Casa | 



"tHiE GRdN THUMB" '<r. 

Plants and Peopk •> ;• 

Belong Togeth» »> 

TERRARIUMS 

Poinsettio 5 : 

Norfolk Isbnd Pine : 
Chriftmos Cactus 

425-8128 

20th. & Pacific. Acrow From The Dome "* 




IS 

ii 



Wal plaques, vaaes, paintings, chain, i^asawaie, IRI 

jewelry, 10% off with this ad. S 

Special! Onyx Chess Set and « 

Table, Reg. $129. Now $100. U 



im I aoie, neg. 91 ^. now $1 00. as 

y PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER M 
g' (Behind Rices) 340-8994 



(Bdiind Rices) 

en 10 a.in. to 9 p.m. Moa • Sat 



Bi (Men 10 a.in. to 9p.m. Moa • sat. 

iiilSSS§l9ilSSi|61ililililglil^ 




'JSStSSS^ 




^RMBET 






^« <itot j^nfiqitt jSlpw^ 



UNIR)RMS^5. 

Large group, aaaoted coimt. 
Ufidlyaoldfoi$8to$lS. 

lANWEBSAR l/NIR)RM 

3707 Vfc Beach B?4 340-9647 
^^ewtPenJgoke Mall ft PrincMi Anne MMa 




THE SHOP FOR COLLECTORS 

18th CENTURY AND FINE VICTORIANA, 

17th CENTURY DUTCH OAK 
DRAW TABLE, CIRCA 1640 

1361 C.a Military Hgwy. 
Chesapeake, Va. 420-9855 





FOR HIM - FOR HER 

SCHICK STYIER DRYER 

S^e% pooms ud dries h^ 
pKtfeadonaUy^hooM. 
NOWONLt jjy» 




66UVA.BEACaM.Va. 



4 * ^4 # ^j| #|^^^^^p^^^^^^^^ ^1 fip f f ^ II I I 4 J I 



• ■ ^f^y^^mwmw III" 



» • ^ f T"* T • "^ ^^ 



"TT'TT *■■■ 



f fT^^'^f^TT^^^' 



P^ » f y f 



moeao 



THE SUN CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14. If 



▼IRGinifl B6IICII. Where The Liyino 1/ Loyel 



mn 




SKATING AND FAMILY RECREATION ttNTER 
TO BE BUILT HAYGOOD SHOPPING UNTER 



^pV- 



.«*%" 







t'Even folks who live in 
^ifinia's great, year-round 
qiiort city-Virginia Beach- 
1^ just beginning to 
Pto^ze what uisurpassed 
Mnte await ttion off thdr 
d^h-fiUed coastline, which 
^re^ches for 28 miles along 
% Atlantic Oce%i ami 10 
If to of the Chesapeake 

>IAnd the salt water fishing 
t^eu^ developed to a nure 
nwardBr^ d^^ree almost 
#eiy day. New ttungs are 
iappening at Virginia 

' In the past year anglers in 
^iTrginia Beach waters 
^raed state reconte fen* five 
<jf the most popular game 
f)sh, A Sll-pound blue 
i|iar4in. A 17>^-pound 



flounder. A 62-pound 
dolphin. A 9-pound, 3-ounce 
speckled trout. And a 23- 
poimd,4-ounce bluefish. 

That blueHish is one of the 
largest ever taken 
anywhere-fortifying the, 
claim Ihat Virginia Beach is 
"The Bluefish Capital of the 
WorW." 

Among a group of 
fishermen at Virginia 
Beach, (me doesn't even 
start brag{png about his 
bluefish unless it weighs at 
> least 15 pounds. There were 
1,194 of the citation-size 
choppers registered during 
1971! 

Back in 1957, fewer than a 
dozen charter boats and 
very few private craft made 
the run past the historic 



lighthbuss at Cape Hairy 
and into the Atlantic. In 
1971, there were many days 
during the bluefish peak 
when as many as 400 boats 
were searching the same 
waters for a school of the 
brawny battlers. 

The opening three years 
ago of the city-owned 
Virginia Capes Marina in 
Rudee Inlet, at the south 
end of the city's main resort 
strip, really began the new 
era in Virginia Beach 
fishing. It provided strai^t- 
shot access to the famed 
Gulf Stream and some of the 
most productive fishing 
waters of the Atlantic. 

No^ a fast, modern fleet 
of charts- craft is based in 
the inlet, «hile others sail 



frMn several marinas just 
inside the Chesapeake Bay. 

Virginia Beach has 
something for everyone 
interested in fishing. From 
strategically 'located boat 
ramps for the do-it-yourself 
angler to complete and 
comfortable headboats for 
the wreck and reef en- 
thusiasts. 

Yes, new things are 
happening " at Virginia 
Beach, and it is fast 
becoming the most im- 
portant sportfishing center 
on the Atlantic Coast. Share 
in the fun and challenges. 
To make arrangements 
write: Department SW, 
Virginia Beach Chamber of 
Commer of Commerce, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



Lemoin B. Cree, General 
Manager, Womble Realty 
InvestmentCorporation, and 
Jack S. Blount, President of 
the newly organized 
Haygood Skating Center, 
Inc., aniwunced today the 
signing of contracts to build 
the largest skating and 
family recreation center in 
tile Tidewater area. 

Thespecially designed, air 
conditioned facility will be 
built adjacent to the 
Haygood Shop|»ng Center in 
Virginia Beach ona 2VJ acre 
site purchased from Lee A. 
Gifford, President, 
Haygood Shelving Center, 
Inc. Mr. Cree said that 
Worth M. Womble 
Associates, Ltd., a Virginia 
Limited Partnership, will 
own the facility which it will 
lease to Haygood Skating 
Center, Inc. Mr. Cree said 
that the real estate syn- 
dicate was organized and 
underwritten by Womble 
Realty Investment Cor- 
poration during 1972. 

According to Mr. Cree, 
Norfolk Iron and Steel 
WSrks will provide the pre- 
engineered steel building 
which will be erected by 
George Jensen Inc., 
General ContractoFYor the 
project. Mrs. Cree stated 
that every effort hasNSeen 
made to provide a momrn 
building specifically suitelj 
to the roller skating sport. 
is to have a maple skaiiiig 
floor 180 feet long and 80 feet 
wide. In addition to 
planned snack bars 
skate rental areas, future 
plans call for expansion 
whith will provide for shops 
featuring youth-oriented 




METRO MLS DIRECTORS ELECT OFFICERS 
FOR 1973 



The M«tro MLS Board of 
Directors, at its annual 
im^ii^ held on Deconber 
3, 1972 at The Tides Inn, 
Irvington, Virginia, elected 
tile following officers for 
1973: 

President-Worth M. 
Womble, Jr., President of 
Womble Realty, Inc. — 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Vice-PresWent— (Mrs.L 
Joan D. Gifford, Presidellf 
<rf Gifford Realty, Inc. - 
Norfolk, Virginia. 



Secretary-Treasurer— 
William E. Glover, 
President <rf Glover Realty, 
Inc. - Norfolk, Virginia 



Other directors, in ad- 
dition to tl$ above named, 
are: Joseph L. Walker, 
President, Walker Realty 
Corporation — Norfolk, 
Virginia, ThomasLawrence, 
President, Home Realty 
Company, Inc. - Norfolk, 
Virginia Wilbur F. Thorn- 
ton, Jr., Presictent, Virginia 
Realty Company - Norfolk, 
Virginia, Kenneth W. 



Duncan, Partner, Duncan 
Realty Company - Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

Metro MLS^ Inc. con- 
tinues as the iergest dollar 
volume real esate multiple 
listing service in the 
Tidewater Area. Its 
membership is comprised 
of fifty-one top-rated real 
estate firms with over 900' 
sales agents. Sales volume 
for 1972 will exceed 
$110,000,000, an increase of 
over $13,000,000 or about 14 
per cent over 1971, 



•lllrth M. Womble, Jr. 
Metro MLS President 




Hope Your Christmas is a 

HUGE SUCCESS! 

We're asking Santa to 

SOCK IT TO YOU! 



WEU. t WSm REALTY, INC 

RMlton 
Memben, METRO MLS * 
Phone 340-9761 



i*e]*i*aptti Jitll 



t, 



M 



owtnnouaes 




5 BLOOlpi FRUM UUKAN 

$178"* PER MONTH 

Hnt and wstn indiMM, now raitfaig... jnodd open 
447 Baiberton Drive, Vlqinia Bach. 

F(M( YOUR KEY TO THE GOOD UFE 
dMckwMh. 




303 30th STREET 



428-7421 



APARTMENT 
LOCATORS 

€FtlOaiDER 
CALL4W4XI2S 

tmif, FRK mr to 



nnt Floor, Ainbrc^ 



^"^ 



p*" 



4pImi M, 



MNGHTREM.TY 

vummmtoBBJLYfMt 



mMttiuM 





T 



Live on the water 



M, KR Via %OU ARK 






You'f. looking for an apmnwK? And you're tfwppmg for 
|»«o*N« prk». locMkm and «i«Mt goodta th« mm thnmt 
«?H«ng It ill up and »rt h out P«i*fWcourt» Apvt- 
nrnna irMdm th« bM and |o« on f rom there. Click it off 
youreiff: 111 utJIitiw inducM . &>mpl«t«ly aquipfMd kitdMn 
W»v ctrpMd, piM tt(M tounc^roofing b^da and out 
■ Sup* corwwiiam locMion tar milHary, huiimM 
mmltgj ' 



APAMTMINT* 




in Virginici Beach 



1.2 m 






• ©■S 






GETTING THERE 




VI HOINIA KACH EXWeSSWAV 



M ItaiM OffiM «»-W44 or 3«l-^»0 




sports apparel and a full 
range of sports equipment. 

Mr. Blount organized the 
College Park Skating 
Center and for the past two 
years has served as its 
operating partner. In an- 
nouncing the plans for the 
t«w Haygood Center, Mr. 
Blount said that although 
100,000 persons are ex- 
pected to use the Center 
during the first year (tf 
qjeration, emphasis will be 
placed on quality 
management and a 
professional teacliing staff, 
offering a full range of in- 
dividual and group in- 
struction. Mr. Blount said 
that Raymond Chaput, who 
will serve as the center's 
senior instructor, is an 
example of the professional 
teaching emphasis. Mr. 
Chaput, a nationally 
prominent roller skating 
instructor, is licensed by the 
Society of Roller Skating 
Teachers <rf America. A 
unique technique employed 
by Mr. Chaput is the use of 
instant replay T.V. video 
tapes which permit instant 
review by the student <rf his 
performance. One of Mr. 
Chaput's students is the 
past U.S. Ladies Singles 
Champion. 

Mr. Blount said that he 
feels that there is a definite 
need for this new facility 
which will accommodate 



the high level rf interest in 
roller skating that currently 
exists today. He commwited 
that the large scale indoor 
exercise sport has the ad- 
vantage of combining 
health with pleasure. For 
those interested in com- 
petition, Mr. Blount said 
there are tremendous op- 
portunities in the sport lox 
both teaip and singles 
competition. -^ 

In addition to the regular 
evening and weekend 
stesion, the new facility will 
be available for private 
parties. Also, church and 
civic groups will be per- 
mitted to rent the center at 
special rates in conjunction 
with their fund raising 
drives. Commenting on how 
such facilities can be used 
effectively in fund raising 
drives, Mr. Blount cited the 
National Association of 
Roller Skating Associates 
which adopted the Muscular 
Dystrophy Drive as their 
special project and gave 
over $65,000 to this cause in 
a recent drive. Mr. Blount is 
an active member ctf the 
national association. The 
recreation center will offer 
free skating to all area., 
scouts once a month as a 
public service. 

The Haygood Recreation 
Center is expected to be 
ready to receive the first 
skaters in March, 1973. 




Penney is a memt 
tte NorftAc Ucm Gib 
Norfok Sports Clid)i 
Fraternal Ord»' of 
Associates. He is 
and Shriner of the 
Temple. 



Denney is a nati^ 
Princess Anne Cout 
and his wife, LcHiise, 
in RoNn HoodF(»«st j 
are members of Park ] 
Baptist Church in Nc 
The Denney s have 
married daughtl 



EDWARD a KNNEY 

Edward H. Denney has 
been appointed manager of 
the commercial sales 
department of Hilltop 
Realty and Insurance 
Company, Inc. The an- 
nouncement was made by 
Tom Ellis, general manager 
of the firm. 

From AiMTl 1962 until 
June 1971, Denney was 
president of Birtcherd 
Dairy, Inc., with whom he 
had been associated for 37 
years. He held various 
offices with the State Dairy 
Association, including that 
of president of the Virginia 
Dairy Products Associatioa 
Denney was on the board of 
the Soutiiern Association of 
Dairy Product Processors, 
which serves all states east 
of the Mississippi and south 
of Washington, D.C. 



SANTA'S 
HELPER 



PAGES 
18 & 1^ 




p- 



Old "Doiiatioq, 

GARDEN APARTMENTS 

New and Lovely In Park-Like Surroundings 
1 & 2 BEDROOMS NOW LEASING 
Beautiful spacious roomSt fuUy 
carpeted, with ample closets 
big eat-in-kitchens with outside windows 
large storage area in eM;h apartment 
indhridual entrances 
front doM paricing 
cl<Me to shopping 

Off Indqiendence Bhrd. on Hoi^ Grove Rd. 
Across from Haygood Shopping Centa in 
Beautiful Old Donation Manor 

CALL 4600921 



new 



C/Fi 



APARTMENTS 



LIVE FREE 

Uom household drudjery 

160 Newtown Road South 

499-8888 or 340-3030 

Managed by UARASAN 



UcKtaMi Rm/ Ettatt S»h* 



II 



We'H pay you $1; 
if you plan your next 90 days 

with us. 



11 




•1* 



If you are newly licensed or have 
been selling real estatis with another 
company and cannot get the proper 
start. We Want You! 

Our 90 day Weekly Sales Planner 
is a sure fire success to selling real 
estate. It is an Intensive training pro- 
gram coupled with the tost work 
plan organizer in the business . . . 
What's more we guarantee you 
$1,500 if you use it. 



If you want to be successful . . . 
Join one of Tidewaters Largest 
Realtors. 
$33,000,000 in Sales -1972 
15|000 homes sold since 1960 
100 professional specialists 
and growing 

. . . will you be one of our NEWn . 

4 BRANCH MANAGERS 
4 ASSISTANT MANAGERS 

1 TRAINING MANAGER 

30 RESALE HOME SPECIALISTS 
8 NEW HOME »>EClALiSTS 

2 CONDOMINIUM SPECIALISTS 



Call Z40-d030 for Confidential Interview 
Only a limited number of qualified candidates accepted. 



i 



LARASAN RMHy Corp. 

3401 Virginia Beach Bhrd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 



DEpEMBfR 14, 1972 



THE^N 



PAGE IB 





Mail rush expected 



Postal workers ready 



Tfm Virginia Beach P<iet ^>ffi€« is prq»ariBf: fi»^ 
the heavy load of mafi, packages and gifeiSng 
i^rds, expected durii^ the filial week before 
Oiristmas Day. It is anticipated this will begin 
materializing next Monday. 

Asst. Postmaster Joe Miller advises there are 
several steps residents can take which will a^ist 
the post office in rapid delivery of holiday mail.y' 

Miller says, "We can't emphasize to strongly the 
use of proper addresses. Secure wrapiring of 
packages is also important, to guard' against 
breakage. Also, be sure. use zip codes in addi^esses, 

since all parcel post and cards are smted by zip 
code." 

Another move which will be helpftil, according to 
Miller, is depc^ting mail ajt post office buildings as 
early as possible in the nioming to assist in rapid 
handling of mail. The separation of cards bdng 
mailed mit of town from thqse for (telivery in the 
>ni^inia Beach will also aid in e^q^editing mail. 



%BC^^ marked wrl^^ for this pvpose may 
be obtained at aU post office locaticms. 

i^^new holiday jpostal serivce is being offered for 
the nrst time this year in especially designed 
shipping bags. They will prove very useful in 
shipping small objects sudi as jewelry, candy, and 
bodes. The bags are available at post ctff ice stations 
in tliree siz^ at prices of W, 25, and 30 cents each. 
Staplers for secure seaUng of ttie bags and si»cial 
markers for addressing are furnished with each 
bag. The medium sized bag is decorated with 
holiday (»lora. 

A final suggestion from Bfiller concerns 
packages which caq't be delivered when residents 
are aoi at home, aiul tttotice is left at the residence 
saying a package is being held at the post (rffice. 
Miller says it is important these packages be 
picked up as quickly as possiUe to clear holding 
spaces for (^her packages which must be tem- 
porarily hd^. 



/ 




•\ 



1^^^^^ 



,1% i»"Uiiiit » tH^l 



^^w^w^ i <i » m 



l«iFWIi^BIV^I^«(iV«PV^n9^P^"^^^^F^i^"^^^'^^^«> V ip ■ « 1 



■^ 



AGE2-B 



THE SUN 




Quist, Gurley named 
district tire Chiefs 



L. WIRT WALKER 



Walker is promoted 



J. Burton Harrison, Jr., 
President of People's Bank of 
Virginia Beach announced 
today several promotions, 
including the appointment of 
L. Wirt Walker to the office of 
Bank Vice-President 

Walker. currently a 
Marketing officer and 
^sstant Vice-Prraident; has 
been with Pei^le's Bank since 
June, 1969: he has more than 
18 y^rs banking experience 
ami will grachiate in June 
fron the BaiA Marketii^ 
School in Boulder, Colm^do. 

Walker has also been named 
Virginia State Chairman of 
the 1973 National Membership 
Development Committee of 
the Bank Marketing 
Association. He will direct the 
^wts of district chairm«i 
and other BMA-member 
bankers in bringing the 
association's story to 
prospective members 
throughout the state. 

The Bank Marketing 
Association is a national trade 
association ot nearly 4,500 
professionals engaged in the 
marketing and public 
relatims function of their 
banks. Founded in 1915, the 
^sodation maintaii» central 
office headquarters in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Harrison- 
following J 

E. 
27, Brand} Manal 
Bayside Office 
to the Office rtF Assisl 
President; Thompso^ joined 
People's Bank two yMirs ago 
as a CbanT'lMfieer and 



(rt^f***^*': 



Management Trainee. | ' -^ 

Carol Jean Goodell, an 
Administration Officer in the 
Bank's Credit Department, 
was promoted to Operations 
Manager: she has 5 yeare 
banking experience, including 
two y^rs with People's Bai*. 

Mrs, Joan Boswell was 
prwnoted to Branch Officer 
and Manager of the office on 
I^skin Road. She was for- 
merly Operations Officer and 
has more than 16 years 
linking experience, including 
two years with People's Bank. 

Jeff Dyckman, Ronald 
Andresen, and Gregory 
Williams were all promoted as 
Loan Officers. Dyckman 
attended O.D.U. and is 
currently enrolled in the 
American Institute of 
Banking. Cmdr. Andresen, 
U.S.N, retired, is a Naval 
Academy graduate with a 
distinguished flyii^ record as 
a fighter pilot in Korea and 
Vietnam and has made his 
home in Virginia Beach since 
1965. Gregory Williams was 
formerly a Branch Manager 
of the Lynnhaven Office. All 
have been with the Bank fw a 
year and a half. 

J. Burton Harrison. Jr. 
President of People's Bank 
said in making the ap- 
POMite.«itf.S^ "The rapid 
iilsfiafikiAtbe 
*^s b€*rt In 
itable to the con- 
trifautiots ci ti^se fine in- 
dividuals: The Bank is jwoud 
to honor their hard worit with 
an increase in respon- 
sibilities." 




Another key move was ac- 
complished this w(H>R in the 
cenlralizalion of Iho city's firo 
|>rn(e<'lion service through Iho 
appnintmrnt of two district 
»'hi<>fs. 

.Fire Chief K.B. Bayno 
announced Fred K. Quist, Jr., 
and William K. Giirlcy. Rr., 
will assumelhese duties as of 
Saturday, December 16. Both 
men are veterans of many, 
years 'serVice in fire protec- 
tion, and enjoy a close 
relationship with all firemen 
(4 the city. 

Quist,. 45, has served with 
the Chesapeake Beach 
Volunteer Fire Department 
for 21 years, and has held the 
office of chief of the depart- 
ment for the past 13 years. He 
has also served in the city's 
Fire Ptjevention Bureau for 
the past 10 years, where he 
held theyirffice of assistant 
(j-hief of the bureau. Quist 
resides with his wife Joyce 
«tid their two sons on Powells 
Point Road. 

Gurley. 43, is a veteran of 25 
years service with the Beach 
Borough Fire Department, 
holding the rank (rf captain in 
the department for the past 14 
vears. GUrlev resides with his 
wife Dorsey Mae and' 
their three sons on 
Pinewood Drive. 

Bayne' pointed out the ap- 
pointments created a more 
direct supervision of fire 
protection operations by 
dividing the city into two . 
districts, and fuller coor- 
dinatitm of the various fire 
departments irt each of the 
districts. ' 

Quist and Gurley will be 
required to respond to every 
structural fire alarm in their. 

Local Students 
in concerts 

Two students from the 
Virginia Beach area will 
be participating in 
■the annual Christmas 
clioir and chorus concerts at 
the College of William and 
Mary next week. 

Under the direction of Dr. 
Carl A. Fehr, the singers will . 
present Christmas carols 
from around the world and , 
will open their program with a 
procession of lights. 

Singers will include Linn 
Dorat. a member of the choir, 
and Frances Ferguson, a^^ 
member of the chorus, both 
frwTl Virginia Beach. 



Particular His«>ict, and 
assume rliar>',c of operations 
at the scene. They will' 
also be responsible 
for regularly 
scheduled inspections 
of each of the fire 
department stations 
and fire fighting 

equipment. an 5 
assuring needs of any 
department are 
fulfilled. They will also 
be responsible for obtaining 
all information at the scenevf 
fire alarms required for city 
records, and supervise 
periodic training of firemen at 
the individual fire depart- 
ments. , , 

Kach district chief, ac- 
cording to Bayne, will 
operate from offices 
in the Plaza fire depart- 
ments. 

Each distwct Qhief , ac- 
cording to Bayne, will operate 
from offices in the Plaza ^re 
Department and Beach ; 
Borough Fire Department 
headquarters buildings. 
Bayne also indicated present 
plans call for the rotation pf „ 
iQuist and Gurley froift 
"^tone district to a nother every«0 
days. 

As of this writing no official 
word has been released as to 
who will fill the vacancies 
created by the promotion qf 
Quist and Gurley. These 
appointments are exoectcd 
shortly pending the outcome of 
examinations and interviews. 
The office of chief of the 
Chesapeake Beach Volunteers 
will be filled through S> 
election by the men t)f the 
department. ) 




DECEMBER 14, 1972 



Agriculture dinner planned 



S.\ll.(m<)F mv: MONTH— 

Nnval Air Station Oceana's 
Sailor of the Month for 
December is Aviation Fire 



Elaborate plans for the 
second annual Virginia 
Agriculture Appreciation 
Dinner to be held in Rich- 
mond," January *17. were 
revealed recently at a meeting 
of area leaders oS the industi7 
of agriculture. 

A highlight erf the event will 
he the premier showing of the 
film. "Career Of^ortunities in 
the Industry of Agriculture," 
Clarite Fleming, a Council 
official reported. He said this, 
theme will be carried out in ail 
of the decorations at Hotel 
John Marshall, and emphasis 
will be on youth throughout 
the festive affair at which a 
variety of Virginia-produced 
foods will be' served buffet 
style. 

Tickets for the dinner may 



Miss Virginia, Dona Marie 
Pillow of Lynchburg, will join 
a number (rf st|ite agricultural 
queens who will assist Council 
directors and wives in playing 
ho^ to the more than 1,000 
persons expected to par- 
ticipate in the celebration. 
Fleming said dress for the 
occasion will be optional 
except for the hosts and 
iK^esses, vyho will be in 
formal attire! 

President David Laird of 
Richmond reviewed first-year 
accomplishments and future 
objectives of the AgriBusiness 



r 



council, formed in 
November 1972 to represent 
all segments of the state's four 
billion dollar industry of 
agriculture from production to 
marketing. He said mem- 
bership in the Council has 
grown to more than three 
times that of the 43r-yen^old 
Agricultural Conference 
board ^of Virginia, 
which ^ the council 

_ including 38 

agricultural- com- 
modity and business 
organizations, who 
total memb.ershiD 
exceeds 325, OOt^ 

\ 



Control Technician Second be obtained by contacting a 

Class {\Q2) James M. " 

Tucker of the Aircraft In- 

teniiediute .Maintenance 

Department. 

Miss Groman 
at Montessori 

Officials of L'Aeademie 
Montessori of Virginia Beach. 
Inc announced thatas a result 
of continuing enrollment an 
additional classroom has been 
npemxl The Directress for the 
new clas.srqom is Klizaheth 
( ; roma n 

Miss (Jroman came to 
Virginia Beach fronr' Los 
Angel<«?. She is a graduate of 
the Tniversity of the Pacific 
uJMMe she received n R.A. 
(I^ree in 1970 in religion. She 
received her Montessori 
training in the Los Angeles 
area Miss Ciroman has spent 
extensive time abroad and 
studied French at the l-niv- 
ei-sitv of (;eneva 



member of the area ticket 
committee headed by Clarke 
Fleming of William E. Wood 
and Associates. 

Other members of the 
committee who have tickets 
are A.M. McKay, Bayville 
farms: E. Bruton Peacock, 
Smith-Douglass; Belmont 
Williams, Southern States; 
Ralph Frost, Virginia Beach; 
Bill Winn, Winn Nurseries; 
Gay Battaglia, Battaglia 
Produce; Ben Hamilton, 
Continental Grain; Billy 
Malbon. Jr., Virginia Beach 
and Dick Cockrell, Virginia 
Beach Extension Agent. 

More than half of the 
members of the Virginia 
General Assembly have 
already accepted invitations 
to join agricultural leaders at 
the gala celebration, which 
will feature entertainment bv 
The New Virginians, 
latest version of 

Virginia Tech's Varsity Glee 
Club and a galazy of beauty 
queens. Fleming, reported^ 



; Fed'coTwitl! 
Mlk tkermostat sBttngs? 
Humiififl 




\. 



Dry air in your home brings discomfort 
(colds, high fuef* bills, static electricity). 
The answer? Climatrol whole-home, auto- 
matic, economical humidif ication! Call today 
for details! 

ClmatooontroltoourlhlnB 

CliinsKlinol 

ADAMS SERVia COMPANY 

614 20th Street 
Vir^nia Beach, Virginia 
23451 • (703) 428^731 



Advisory Conumttee elected at Wesleyan 



Eleven new members have ' 
been elected to the Parents' 
Advisory Committee at 
Virginia Wed^an CoU^e, 
according to Committee 
President Arthur C. 
Marquess, 1618 Duke of 
Windsor Road. The new 
members, elected by the 

New motel 

- i 

owna^ship 

A transaction has ^si ,been 
completed by Inlet /Cor- 
poratim of Virginia to pur- i 
chase THE INLET HOUSE 
MOTE^L at Third Street and 
Atlantic Avenue. The $700,000 
acquisition include a 40,000 
l^are foot parcel of land 
across Atlantic Avenue and 
Iwrdering on Rudee Inlet 

The new corporation is 
cmibtriled and owned by a 
^oup of local b^ch business- 
men with Samuel W. Scott, 
Jr. as President 
- PresenUy the unique m<Hel 
jZhas a, inodern six story 
^'bulMing with fiftyJtwo rooms, 
•l^ swimming pod.^ sundeck and 
;* private t»]c<mi@ av&r lodcing 
:*tBe ocean with a view ex- 
^tendir^ as far smith as False 
»• Cape. The nMtel ii ttir^ years 
S M and twenty-sbc of the fifty- 
Stwo units are equipped witti 
^kitchen facilities. All romns 
^ feabire new modern furniture, 
t*wall to wall shag carpetlr^, 
r* color television, room 
,« phones and inteniAl 
',0 music system. 
^ On ttie adjacOTt lot, tl^new 
J owners ^n to constnict • 
^ modern seafood restaurart fw 
> iMse ami rea^ fw ttte iffn 
Ssumnner mason. The eating 

# e«tabliirtimeiM witti mating 
J ratNmwillfeabireapBnaromk: 
,$ v%e^ of Rwlee f ntet and Uie 
Ijrapidty developing, sport 
J fishing ffiarinas. A ho p^uxA 

# n\{ seasm rates will he 

# available for weekly and 
S immthly fMnti, cM^ai wMi 
S^cka^ sedate f«> #or^ 
Jfiatermen, hunters, and 

f iMitfai ■ 



• f^ ^tLfm^km was han- 
Nwitt C. K%f^ k 

'•-"- Inc. 



Virginia Wesleyan Paroits' 
Association at their annual 
meeting, bring to 20 the 
number of parents serving on 
the Advisory Committee. , 

Newly elected to two-year 
terms are the Reverend Harry 
T. Broome, 4901 Lincoln 
Avoiue, Alexandria; Robert 
S. Dorsey, 3829 Edgefield 
Avenue, Norfolk; Charles H. 
Gaudreau, 2004 English Cedar 
Circle, Virginia Beach; F. 
Freeman Jones, Jr., 1022 
Ridgemont Drive, Staunton; 
Rear Admiral Charles D. 
Nace, 2217 Kendall Street, 
Virginia Beach; Japes Jay 
Sects-, Jr., 76 Maple ^treet, 
Perrysburg, Ohio; Mrs. 
J<»^h M. Straughan, Wise; 
W. R. Taylw, Jr., 1459 Har- 
mott A\«nue, Ncrfolk; E^rl B. 
Terwilliger, 5940 First Street, 
North, Arlington; Mrs. I^mald 
M. Wilson, mz Curling Road, 
Virginia Beach; and Mrs. 
Mary W. Wrom, 6601 Mayfair 
Ehive, Falls Churdi. 

In ackiition to Pr»id«it 
Marqil^ss, other officers 
electai at tte annual ne^ing 
are vice-presidents Leonaa*d 
W. BiKklin, 36 East Main 
^reet, CiuitiNi, New Ywk; 



and Mrs. Byron S. Hallstead, 
4?^t Thoroughgood Drive, 
Virginia Beach. Mrs. Nicholas 
W. Paxson, 4830 Providence 
Road, Chesapeake, was 
elected secretary. 

Beach student 
pledged sorority 

Sandra Jeanne Rice, a 
Longwood College junior from 
Virginia Beach, was.pledge^ 
into Alpha Sigma Alpha in a 
recent rush sponsored by the 
11 sororities on campus. 

Miss Rice, daughter of Mrs. 
JeanneS. VanKirk of 720 South 
Atlantic Avenue, is a 1970 
^aduate, of First Colonial 
High SpmwI. She is a speech 
pathology major working 
toward the bachelor of science 
degree. 

Alpha Sigma Alpha, a 
mtional sQr«ity, was founded 
in 1901 at' Longwood 




) 



It is the season for lists. In this issue you will see numerous advertisements from many mercharfte 
Of course we hope you will give gifts to son^e of the people on your own list Most of this page, 
. however, consists of another list we believe oversKw^ws ail others-a partial list of the names of 
Americans now being held captive more than 10,000 miles from home. 

As( these words are written, peace has been promised. By the tirye you read them it may have come. 
Meanwhile the talks continue. And as long as they continue there are 1,695 men missing, captured, 
or interned in Southeast Asia. They were all captured while serving their country, and whether we 
accept or utterly reject the politics of this war; none of us can send gifts-or anything else-to an/ 
single one of them. 

Below are some of their names. They come from all over the USA, but we are nbt allowea to reveal 
their addresses. We can only ask that you take a moment pick a name, and on his behalf make a 
gift to your community or a contribution to a charity. Aftw all, it's only one more name on your list 



:U 



I 



Wrotbn 
named 



^n Wr<4on was awarded 
t)K distin0iMied hmor of 
Ruritan of the Year at ttieir 
annual noting held recently 
1at the Cavalier Hotel. 
Outgoing president Owen 
l^ictett presented the av^ard, 

Hk meeting was Iwld in 
celebration of the Princess 
Anne Ruritan's 25th an- 
nivosary. 

f*fi<»rs fw 1973 were in- 
cited \fi Dsbict Govo-mx- 
Mac HoMjs. R. (Bucky) Ash- 
wnrth was installed as 
president; Charles Kirk- 
l^trkt. vice-president; Dan 
Kahn. secretary; and Dan 
Twiner, treaairw. 

CarroH . Williams. Brc 
Sawder. Harty Virty. and 
Ewrett Wikan were installed 
» directare. 




TIIK HUB— John S. 
I*lckerel of Vlri(inia Beach 
has been appointed the new 
!»eneral manager of The 
ilHbat IVincess .Anne Plaza. 
He has been involved in all 
aspects of the men's wear 
indiistrf' as a desii^ner and 
lailoi' with Klorr's-Schaefer 
iif Cincinuti. as sales 
ii'piesentalive of Carribean 
Textiles, as president erf 
Aiisi^i-Pickerel of IVIarion, 
Ohio, and as general 



as 

manager of Sluarl's of 
^ItMrtphis. 



Name 

ABBOTT JOHN 
ADAMS SAMUEL 
ALBRIGHT JOHN SCOTT II 
ANGSTADT RALPH HAROLD 
BABULA ROBERT LEO 
BARNETT ROBERT WARREN 
BOGARD LONNIE PAT 
BRADX ALLEN COLBY 
CALLAGHSN PETER ALFRED 
, CAREY DAVID JAY 
CLARK JOHN CLAV'IN II 
COCHRANE DEVERTON C 
DALY JAMES ALEXANDER JR 
DEXTER RONALD J 
DOWNING DONALD WILLIAM 
DUTTON RICHARD ALLEN 
EADS DENNIS KEITH 
EATON NORMAN DALE 
ELLIS LEON FRANCIS JR 
EVANS JAMES JOSEPH 
FALLON PATRICK MARTIN 
FINCH MELVIN WAYNE 
FORD RANDOLPH WRIGHT 
FULLER ROBERT BRYON 
GAGE ROBERT HUGH 
GOFF KENNETH B JR 
GRAHAM DENNIS LEE 
GRUBB PETER ARTHUR 
GUNN ALAN WENDELL 
HALLBERG ROGER C 
HAMMOND DENNIS WAYNE 
HUNT JAMES D 
IBANEZ Dl REYES 
INNES ROGER BURNS 
IVAN ANDREW JR 
JACKSON CHARLES ALLEN 
JENKINS HARRY TARLETON JR 
JOURDENAIS GEORGE HENRY 
KANE RICHARD RAYMOND 
KENNEDY JAMES EDWARD 
KRYSZAK THEODORE EUGENE 



Rank 
J CAPT 
' SMS 
CAPT 
LTC 
SGT 
LTC 
CAPT 
CAPT 
ILT 
LT 

CAPT 
SSGT 
SSGT 
SMAJ 
MAJ 
MAJ 
CWO 
COk 
CAPT 
COR 
COL 

CAPT 

CDR 

CAPT 

SGT 

CAPT 

CAPT 

CAPT 

CWO 

SSGT 

SGT 

LT 

'^LT 
CAPT 
ILT 
CAI»T 
CAPT 
CAPT 
SPS 
LTC 



Date Of 

Birth 

20 AUG 27 

2 AUG 35 

7 NOV 45 

3 SEPT 32 
7 MAR 47 
12 OCT 28 

11 MAY 42 
15jAUG 29 

23 APR 46' 
9AFR 42 

30 JAN 43 

15 DEC 48 

6 DEC 47 

23 JUL 33 

17 MAR 34 

24 APR 30 

4 MAY 47 

11 AUG 25 
90CT43 

9 AV^Y 30 

12 NOV 21 
lONOv'ik 
19 JUL 35 \ 

23 NOV 27 
17 MAR 45 ' 

9 MAR 43 
11 MAY 41 

27 SEP 42 

28 MAY 48 
18 SEP 44 
2«APR 46 

1DEC34 
19 JUN41 

29 MAI? 43 
23 SEP 44 

3APfL46 
34JUW97 

13 API 
15 DEC 4] 

2 JAN 
23 SEP 32) 



Name 

LAFAYETTE JOHN WAYNE 
LEWIS EARL GARDNER JR 
LORD ARTHUR JAMES 
MADDOX NOTLEY GWYNN 
MASUDA ROBERT SUSUMU 
MAYHEW WILLIAM JOHN 
MYERS GLENN LEO 
NASMYTH JOHN HEBER JR 
NEWMAN LARRY JEROME 
NOPP ROBERT GRAHAM 
O'BRIAN KEVIN 
OTT WILLIAM AUGUST 
OWENS JOY LEONARD 
PAGE GORDON LEE 
PLATT. RQBERT LENWOOD JR 
PRICE BUNYAN DURANT JR 
QUAMO GEORGE 
QUINN MICHAEL EDWARD 
RAMDER DONALD J 
REED JAMES WILSON 
RYDER JOHN LESLIE 
.SADLER MITCHELL JR 
SIMMONS ROBERT EUGENE 
SULLIVAN TIMOTHY BERNARD 
THOMAS JAMES RICHARD 
TRENT ALAN ROBERT 
TYLER GEORGE EDWARD 
UNDERWOOD PAUL GERARD 
UYEYAMA TERRY JUN 
VANIJEN EYKEL MARTIN D II 
VISCONTI FRANCIS EDWARD 
VOHDEN RAYMOND ARTHUR 
WALKER MICHAEL STEPHEN 
WELCH ROBERT JOHN 
WYNNE PATRICK EDWARD 
YONAN KENNETH JOSEPH 
YOUNG JOHN ARTHUR 
YOUNG fiOBERT MILTON 
ZAWTOCKI JOSEPH S JR 
ZICH LARRY ALFRED 
ZUKOWSKI ROBERT JOHN 



Date Of 

Birth 

1AUG» 

13SEP40 

6 JAN 41 

10 NOV 24 

190CT47 

23 Jun 42 

13FEB41 

14 Ndv 40 
19 JUL 39 
19SEP34 

CAPT 30^UG46 
MAJ 23 SEP 34 
6 JUL 29 

15 AUG 32 
1 SEP 47 

9FEBS0 
10 JUN 40 



RanK 

MAJ 

LT 

MAJ 

COL. 

SGT 

•-T 

CAPT 

CAPT 

SSGT 

MAJ 



COL 
LTC 
SSGT 
SP5 
MAJ 

LCDR 21 AUG 
SFC 4 JUN 38 
CAPT 22 JUL 43 
CAPT 5 JUL 46 
CAPT 20OCT43 
SGT 25 NOV 51 
LT 2 OCT 43 

TSGT 5 JUL 43 
CAPT 22 MAY 40 
LTC 31 JAN 30 
COL 7 jg| 27 

MAJ 16 JUL 35 
CWO 4 OCT 43 
CAPT 16 OCT 34 
CDR 30NOV30 
CAPT 29 AUG 41 
MAJ '23 MAR 26 
CAPT 8 0CT^n 
CAPT !tJUL47 
SSGT 9SEP45 
CAPT 17iAN45 
SGT 16WAY 46 
CWO 3 A PR 48 
CAPT 30 OCT 43 







33 



n 




rwu^ 



THE VIKINIA KAOI SUN 






J 



^*wi 




Ma 




THE SUN 



PAGE M 



Trailing behind the 750 Triumph motocycle was a 
Cessna airplane, a model airplane with a seven foot 
wmg span, two engines and a radio flight control. 
Dennis Miller from Oceana arrived at the 
Tidewater Radio Control Club's airfield for the 
maiden flight of his plane that took two years to 

u C ^^^ ^^**®^ ^^"^ through the last minute 
check up and tests, other members, out enjoying 
the warm afternoon, stopped their flying to 
exartiine the Cessna. 

The club, eighty plus members, meets once a 
month to discuss evints, shows and model planes. 



Practice and testing take place at the field, located 
under Oceana air space. Besides regular get 
togethers and the many informal aftemooi^, the 
club has an annual Spring show to exhibit new and 
custom models made by the members and a 
regional meet. The regional meet, drawing from 
several states is sanctioned by the national 
organization-Academy of Model Aeronautics. 
Competition includes pylon racing, longest glide 
time, how many times the plane will spin while free 
falling before you have to pull it out of a dive, stunt 
flying and others. 



These planes average about a five-foot wing span 
and \yeigh around six pounds. The purists choose 
wood but some are made of plastic. After an initial 
outlay of $450 most of which is ior the radio 
equipment, the hobby is relatively inexpensive. Of 
course there are exotic models, almost as complete 
as the^avy fighter jets, costing' over $1000. The 
contrbl ratjio is operaoie up lo one quarter of a mile 
and farthd" some days while the plane stays aloft 
for ten to twenty m inutes on one tank of fuel . 

Well, time to launch Miller's Cessna. A couple of 
taxi trips around therunway, a test hop, a few more 



checks and then she heads out. Lifting off the 
ground, soaring into the sun-Gasp! -the Cettna 
flopped over and plunged into the ground from 
thirty feet up. Two years of preparation ruined. 
Miller looked at it in dismay. Others sui^ested 
repairs, but Miller said, "I can't face repairing it 
now." ' 

As the others returned to flying, the Cessna was 
brought back to the motocycle (or analysis. Maiden 
flights in this hebby are risky ^t best, and although 
he lost a lot, Miller said he w^Uld be back with his 
old plane next week. 



J 



I - 



Dennis Miller (right) and friend 

Terry WOcox had high hopes 
for the Cessna model 



\ / 



.•% 





J' 




At first it soawd . . . 
',; then it plummeted 



tr 





/■ 



A maiden flight ends 
in disappointn\ent 
and disbelief 



SAY^ MERRY CHRISTMAS 




MiliL 



Distinctive Fl(x-al 

Arrangements ¥ac 

All Oa»sions. Qioice 

Mooming Plantt And 

A Fine Selection 

Of Permanent Arrangement 



(^mi 10 a.i&.-9 p.in. 
thraCturUBiM 



m' 



7m'^. 



t 



k:^ 



COLONY BEACH FLORISTt 

PEMBROKE mmm mnm cenier 




^ 



li umijiini^ny^i 1 1 1 1 1 MM I II 



w^ 



•m 



mm^ 



w^^W 



^ 



I, 

r 







INDEPENDENCE BLVD. AT HAYGOOD RD. 



^^oiig CbWf^^CltAffA 






^«^l 



s 






««• 




Oiir Christmas shop is now opea 
Visit us for aii your Christmas 
decorating ne^s. 



BOWS WREATHSlmD 
DOOR PIECES 
MADE TO ORDER 




■ MNE PARKER UGHT 

FRUITCAKES 

51&CAKE 

'4.59 



FOR THE HOU^% 

A& P 



Hay9eod Center 
464-0090 



AMID GIFT SHOPI 



OPEN NIGHTLY TlUf* 
SUNDAYS 1-6 




Jbra touch of 

Elegance 
'Wstinction 



And for the home we have a magnificent 
wlection of decorative accessories. Mirrors, 
knicic knacks, wall decorations and lamps. 

Original oil paintings by Marj Teaque. 

Famous art reproductions 
Carolyn B(ish Andrew Wyeth 



Gifts can be giftwrapped free of charge to 
suit any occasion. 



Th«e is still time to select a fine Christ 
m» gift for that special someone. 
Gifts ioT everyone in the femily from 
bdiy to GrMMlma and Grandpa. Even 
for the pets. 




*9i^e»<» 




FREE GIFT WRAPPING SERVICE! 
HAYGOOD SHOPPING CENTER 
1065 INDEPENDENCE BLVD. 464.1288 



P/.3 



-WyrrrrTtTrrr- 



liEDUCEP PRICES ON BROCADES 

AND POLYESTER SPARKLE 
IKNiTS FOR HOLIDAY FASHIONS 

WE HAVE A COMPLETE LINE OF 
PATTHNS, THREADS, ZIPPERS, 
TRIMS, AND OTHER NOTIONS. 

[SEWING CIRCLE FABRICS 




A & P 

FACIAL TISSUE 

5 PKS. OF 20 

95* 



CHARMIN TISSUE 

4 500 SHEET ROLLS 



EIGHT O'CLOCK 

COFFEE 

3 POUND BAG 

^2.29 



OUR(WVN 

TEA BAGS 

PKG. OF 100 

89* 



CRiSCO 

SHORTENING 

48 W % 

88* 



FREE DROP OFF SERVICE 

DROP OFF YOUR LAUNDRY AND 

OUR ATTENDANT WILL DO IT 

AT NO CHARGE WHILE YOU SHOP 

AT HAYGOOD SHOPPING CENTER 

HAYGOOD LAUNDROMAT 

LOOK YOUR BEST FOR THE HOLIDAYS 
RAZOR CUTS-HAIR STYLING 
OPENDAILY- 

HAYGOOD BARBER SHOP 

PHONE 464-9041 



TtfTTT.. 




VIRGINIA 



BRI6HTEN TTIEIR HOLIDAYc 









HAYGOOD HAIR STYLES "' 

ZELDA SEYMOUR, OWNER-PHONE 4600719 



LEAVING THE CITY? 
LET US MANAGE YOUR HOME 

GENE ETHERIDGE REALTY 

SALES • RENTALS • APPRAISALS , 
4645G HAYGOOD ROAD PHONE 464€244 

mm 






GARDEN APARTMENTS 

Ntw aiMl Lovaly in Nrk-Like Surroundings 

1 & 2 Bedrooms How Leosii^ 

ACROSS FROM HAYGOOD SHOPPING CENTER 
BEAUTIFUL CitD DONATION MANOR , 

CALL 4600921 



Christmas coming 

and me short of 

money,.. where to 

find an angel? 



WtMhouKht 

youd never 

ask. 



i€^^^< 



Old^TkM^dofL 



NATIONAL 
BANK 

HAYGOOD OFFICE 

CONVENIENT BANKING 
HOURS FOR SHOPPING 

PHONE 46S3565 

LOOK YOUR BEST, ALL THE TIME! MAKE 

SURE CLOTHES REFLECT GOOD TASTE BY BEING 

CLEAN AND LOOKING FRESH. WE'LL HELP KEER 

,YOUR WARDROBE APPEALING. NO ADDED CHARGE 

PHONE 464-9662 

Be wure to Wslf these Hoygood fnerchqpfs 



PEOPLES DRUG STORE • CAPRIO DANa 

STUDIO 
HOUSE OF PIZZA . „k,„s ,CE CREAM 



Yourself 
WithQean 
Fashions 



1 1 1 1 P*«««««ww«as«M 



»i*j»^ 




OSES 




H-H 



Hi 



1069 INDEPENDfiNCE BLVa 
HAYGOOD SHOPPING 
CENTER STORE ONLY 

PRICES IN THIS AD GOOD 
1HURSDKY-FRUMy-»TUIiD«V 



MAKE US YOUR 

CHRISTMAS 
HEADQUARTERS 



OSES 



.^ 



• • 



• • 



ri^,:. 



• • 



• • 



m 



• • 



• • 



'\ / 






'01 



Donner and Blitzen and that crew 

have just arrived with a fantastic 
assortment. Buzz in and see 'enni 



BOVS OR GIRLS 
1« INCH SIDEWMK 

BIKE 
'28.97 



L*!.*^" 



^W^" 



POPULAR BRAND POP(X)RN 

TOASTERS ^^^k POPPERS 
JO 77 B1M» *3.44 



i^-6 



► / 



f ■ o 



POPULAR BRAND 

COFFEE 
MAKER 

U8.77 



BLENDERS 

49.96 



TOASTER 
OVEN 

45.72 






«20. 



m^m 



Msm 



/^ 



x^ 



¥5 



PERFEa GIF FOR DAD^'3«^; 

HASSOCKS 



.^' 



A.* 



OPEN 
NIGHTS 

UNTIL 
9 P.M. 



EfWk?^ 



/ 



I' 



^ 1l^ # <w^ 



w 



BOYS 10 SPEED 

BIKE WITH ALL 

THE MOST WANTED 

FEATURES 



^i^ 



n 



Tlgt? 



' Vj*. '^'^^* 'X^-^^ ^ 



■ -v^-et^^^-x. * 



THE WILD RIDER 
ATV RIDE IT 
EASY-RIDE IT^WILD 



BOYS^R GIRLS f 
20 INCH SIDEWALI^ 

BIKE i 



0$\'" 



% 



% 



i. 



^. 



% 



SCOTCH PINE 

TREES 

6F00T 

WITHSTAND 



*. 









SHOP 
ROSES FOR «# 

ALL YOUR 
CHRISTMAS GIFTS 



SCOTCH PINE 

TREES 

7F00T 
WITHSTAND 



V t 



/' 



'^•'^^^•^^r^^^^^t^^m^^^^^^^WWW^ W w m ^ ^ » ^ 



r^iM 



W' Record 

irollment 
at Old 




inion 



, *A rec<M tall oirdlmoit at 
^10^ s^btoits takii^ credit 
{covra^ at Old Dwninion 
• ikdMrsMy h«i b^n b^M^ 
1 1^ the State Council of High ir 
^fSffacation, Jotoi R, Tab>, 
!^i»ctor of institutions 
^il^ies at th« Universit/ 
Imnounced today. y 

•^ The official mroUment is m 
^ increase of 622 students from 
^fall. 1971. TTie 1972 figures 
^ include %jWI fre^unen, 1,950 
^^ sophomores, 1,721 juniors, 
1^^ l,S2l seniors, 1,481 graduate 
-^•' stuctents, and 487 students who 
are unclassified. 



IR The number of sophomores, 
^juniors, seniors and graduate 
;^^staHhmU has increased with 
w«^ graduate students sliowing the 
'I' biggest jump with 4W more 
0< than last year. Charles E. Bell 
^^ Jr., acting dean of graduate 
^: studies, attributed this 
*»', iHimarily to the lifting of the 
«< moratorium on graduate 




THE SUN 



DECEMBER 14, 1972 



Psychiatric institutes plan expansions 



Dr. Stuart Ashman recently 
announced plans for the future 
expansion and extended 
community services of the 
Tidewater Psychiatric In- 
stitutes. 

The Institaites at Norfolk 
and Virginia Beach are 
designed to become true 
comprehensive mental health 
centers, offering .all five- 
essential services: irtpatient 
care, outpatient care, partial 
hos{Ntalization, emergency 
care, and community .con- 
sultation and education. 

Among the sp^iffc plans 
that Dr. Ashman mitlined fm- 
the future are the devel(^ 
ment of: 

-l-i^ Children's Unit to 
{»-ovide residential treatment 
for patients aged 5 through 12. 



+A private school, licensed 
by the State of Virginia, which 
will offer special programs to 
meet a variety of 
psychoeducational problems. 

-(-Additional constructive 
alternatives to hospitalization, 
including halfway houses aiKi 
sheltered woricshops 

+Proe^ms of community 
consultation and education, 
serving the needs of public 
and private schools, the 
courts, the police depart- 
ments, probation depart- 
ments, departments of social 
services, local governmental 
planning agencies, and other 
public and private agencies 
requiring mental health ex- 
pertise. 

Finally, it is tiie hope and 
intention of the Tidewater 



OCEANA ~ Santa Glaus lands at NAS Oceana to visit 
the wives and chHdren of the men of VA — 35 now 
stationed in the Gulf of Tonkin. 



Beorane a Boy Scout 



Oceana 



^*Sducation. 



I* 



enrdlment in the School of 
Increasing 
IKipularity in the 

oceanography course and the 
establishment tA a satellite 
pro^tim at Ft. Monroe for 
students working towards 
ttieir master's degree in 
business administration were 
cited as other probable 
reastMB fnr the overall in- 
crease. 



f 
t\ 
I, 

t. 



' Enr(d|ed from out-of-state 
, are l,m stuctents, and 9,125 
~ are resMents of Virginia. 

A U^l of 6,500 students are 
if^poBkiered full-time, taking 12 
i Jm more credit hours as un- 
* dergraduates or nine or more 
*„^credit houts as graduate 
;^M3«ients. Tlie ronainii^ 4,025 
€ studrats are considered part- 
M time. 



The official fall enrollment 

in M^i«n or imtinit 

thai 2,000 perions wi| have 
«iroUed in extension courses 
offered off-campus at botii the 
graihjate and under-^aduate 
levds and approximately 
6,400 will have «)r<d]ed in 
short, non-credit courses 
bef(He ttie end of tiw semester. 



Santa Claus flew in to NAS 
Oceana last Sunday to in- 
tra^iew the wives and children 
of Oie men of VA-35, currentiy 
stationed aboard the USS 
AMERICA in tile Gulf of 
TMikin 

As Santa descended 
from his 'A-e and walked 
into the VA-42 hangar, he was 
flocked by tiie childrep who 
each sat on Ms' knee and 
conveyed their <1iristmas 
greetings to their fathers 

The events of the aft«*noon 
were recorded on tape and 
fihn by a crew from Atiantic 
Fleet Combat Camera Group, 
Naval Air Station Norfolk, and 
will be sent to members of VA- 
35 in hq)es of bringing a little 
bit of home' and happiness to 
them on Christmas. 

After Santa, expertly 
portrayed by LT Mike Mun- 
son, gave tiie children 
stockings filled with can(fy, 
thqr were ti-eated to cookies 
and punch provided by tiie 
squadron wives. 



Cox PT A meets 



Through tiie effwts of Lt 
Cdr. E. Stack, liaison officer; 
Mrs. Sarah Beach, wife of tiie 
commanding officer (rf VA-35; 
and Mrs. Pat Marrinucci, 
president of the Enlisted 
Wives Club, ttie men of VA-35 
will see their wives and 
children on Christinas. 

PTA Store 

The Plaza Elementary 
School P.T.A. is sponsoring a 
"Christmas Store", feahiring 
hand-made and donated items 
for Christmas. The "store" is 
outside the Hodge-Podge, in 
the South Lynnhaven 
MiniMall, every business day 
until Christmas. Proceeds go 
to the Plaza PTA. 



The Boy Scouts of America 
PAVAB (Princess Anne Va. 
Beach) has 53 Cub Packs and 
61 troops. 

Each Pack and Troop has an 
Institiitional Representative. 
Each month he attends & 
District Committee Meetii^ 
which is held at Thila 
Metiiodist Church in Virginia 
Beach. He brings back all ttie 
irtformation to his committee 
Chairman of the up and 
coming events for the boys. 

The PAVAB Disti-ict 
Executive Ccmimittee consists 
of all volunteer scouters, who 
give of their time and efforts 
to keep the Scouting program 
going. They are R. Dean Lee, 
District Chairman; Paul 
Hoffman, Vice Chairman; 
James Oglesby and H. Keith 
Hall. 

The Operating Chairmen 
are ta-aining: Kent Weber and 



School band 







Ths 

the 

meeting^Aursc 

7:30 p.m., in ttie school 

audittMium. Refrrahments of 

Christmas rooisies will be 

served by home economics 

stiidents. 



OPEM^ 



ronger Gkitt CcMiipoi 
HILLIOPAREA 

624 FIRST COLONIAL RD. 

TELEPHONE: 425-19227 
m mnmi n M iimm hlectkw in ths im^ 

•CaiWlrf^iinfortoMi, wiMfanraft laU»|ar* 

• Tl» BiCLaRntfiS • n,H>ING MOUUHl DOpKS 

• AiTTO GLAtUmtHtaA ia yoiir t»hf pppoainiat 



Noiiolk, VkHiria 
•S74i01 



00. 



Va.BMdi 
42S-9227 





MAHBSIT 

EHfl ■■■■ 

TO OPERATE THIS 

M€yr€HK>LA 

PORTABLE COLOR TV 

Remote Control 




pIkMtd oolor wtHMMM buttm from Ht tranwiMw. A« you 
t^^J?^ •*" ** ''««-M«e Color Tunino Mp« ONLY ♦ 




m 



Sifflul«t«d TV 

Raciption 

Mo<M TKS05JW.1S" pictur* 

(mMturod diagonally). 

High Impact plactic cablnat 

with Walnut grain flnWi. 



Cart Ineludad ]$^' 



> MSTMIAIKf COLOR lUNMO 

ft*«» tij*» to autaiiaileallr Wanoa color hga. 
W»nrty.ooBiyi.brtghinaaa...awl^canawr 
tiaautowaSclnaiBnlBa. 



90 



DATS 



lyn 



PARTS 
WARRANTY 



PICTURE TUBE 
WARRANTY 



JOHN'S TV 



mtKH'-Mty ^Mtfrn^ 



TiinMionc ftniiHitiylinrlfifo 



m 



OPt '. -,'' 



i 1 IL CHRISTMAS 



OPEN CHRISTMAS 
4:30 TO 12:00 P.M. 




Christmas Time 
Is Caroling Time 
At SHAKEY'S 
Merry Christmas 



& E David Ecichart; 
Finance: H. Keith Hall; 
Camping: Fred Cook; Ac^ 
tivities: Edward Leon; 
District Commissiimer: J. A. 
Richendollar; Publicity: 
Bettie G. Mosley. 

The next District Meeting 
^vill be held the 3rd Monday in 
January. If you have any 
questions concerning scouting 
or if you know of any boys that 
are old enough for Boy Scouts, 
{dease come to the meeting. 
The goal is 150 boys for boys 
Scout's. 

Those interested should 
contact Gomer Jones at 622- 
1801. 



Psychiatric Institutes to enter 
into collaborative efforts with 
the Mental Health and Mental 
Retardation Services Plan- 
ning Boards in the various 
Tidewator cities and counties, 
so as to participate with Uiem 
in the creation of mental 
health facilities and (H-ograms 
Dr. Ashman is expected to 
[Jay a key rde in these 
collaborative efforts. He is 
President and Medical 
Director of the Tidewater 
Psychiatric Institutes, as well 
as Hospital Director of the 
Virginia Beach Institute. He is 
a member of the Mental 
Health and Mental Retar- 
dation Committee of the 
Tidewater Regional Health 
Planning Council, and is also a 
member of the Advisory 
Board of the Atlantic Mental 
Hygiene Center, of the Joint 
Planning Committee of the 
Advisory Board (rf the same 
center, and of the Mental 
Health and Mental Retar- 
dation Services Planning 
Board of Virginia Beach. 
Through his leadership, the 
Tidewater Psychiatric In- 
stitutes are expected to 
contribute to community 
programs of preventive 
mental healtti, as well as to 
provide treatment services. 
The first Tidewater 
Psychiatric Institute opened 
in Norfolk in June 1971, under 
the direction of Dr. Julian W. 
Selig, Jr. The second, a 72-bed 
facility, will open at 1701 Will- 
0-Wisp Drive, Virginia Beach, 
late this month. With two 
additional building phases, the 
Virginia Beach Institute will 
eventually accomodate 186 



patients, witti a total ot 84,940 
feet (rf treatment space. The 
two Institutes base their 
programs on the concepts of 
therapeutic community and 
psychiatric team treatment 
Tidewato" Treatment Center, 
a separate unit of the Virginia 
Beach facility, (rffere this 
area's first private alccrfiol 
and drug treatment pr^^ram. 
In addition to Dr. Ashman, 
who is Chairman (rf the Board 
of the Ti(iewater Psychiatric 
Institutes, the Board of 
Directors includes: Dr. Julian 
W. Selig Jr., Hospital Director 
of the Norfolk Institute; 
Thomas C. Broyles, a local 
attorney; Dr. R. Cecil 
Chapman, Norfolk internist; 
and five local psychiatrists: 
Dr. Lawrence A. Bernert, Jr., 
Dr. John H. Furr, Dr. Davtd 
B. Kruger,'Dr. R(*ert F. 
Scott, and Dr. Robert H. 
Thrasher. David C. Butler is 
Hospital AdministratcH*. and 
Mrs. Teddy Mikkelsen, B.SJi. 
is Clinical Services Coor- 
dinator. 



k-tittl«f»R 
udqiiis 

REAl ESTATE CO... 

»»lMirinM.42S-00M 



atmm 




If ihfepe^ Q 
VIbdiIfipgirp 



GiUdM 




8h« i»tt<lMiv« lovriy gifti 
and halpfHl JnftirnMUhw 
ferfl»brid»aatf|RMiB' 
t»4w. 

moNEaio-isM 



PREGNANT? 

NEED HELP? 

Adoptton ServicM, Pragnancv Tatting, Etc 

CALL: TOLL FREE (800) 523-3430 

NatiorMi Family Planning 
Council, Ltd. 



%d^t> SCHOOL OP 

300 WONG LEE 

Master Instructa^ 
7th Degree Black Belt 

• SELF DEFENSE AND YOGA 
and BODY CONDITIONING 

• SHOWERS - SAUNA BATHS 

Day & Nite Ckaes far Men, 

Women & Children 
612 E. Uttle Creek Road Stt-6262 
223 Va. Beach Blvd. 42S-1246 




USA 
JAPAN 

MAKE MANY RADIOS, STEREOS, RECORDERS 
HOME AND AUTO 8 TRACK AND CASSETTE 
UNITS-WE SELL PARTS AND REPAIR THEM 

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES OF RECORD CHANGERS 

C B RADIO REPAIRS 

AUDIO CENTER 

SALES • SERVICE • PARTS 
HOME SERVICE CALLS-PICK UP & DELIVERY 

169 E. Little Creek Rd. (Wards Comer) 
587-1903 Nest to IVain IVacks 588-8403 

WE. RENT PUBUC ADDRESS SYSTEMS 



3 



7/ 






Color 



WKA 



ssriMAMrt 

COLOR 



• Giant 25 inch diagonal picture 
' Chromatrir i/ picture tube 
combines brightness with 
contrast for tne sharpest 
Sylvania color picture ever 
Gilbraltar90«/ chasisfor 
solid-state performance 
and reliability 
AFC push button locks in 
fine tuning — a perfect 
picture even when you 
change channels 
Perma-Lock • — the anti- 
goof color tuning system 
that never foifets 
Instant Color • provides 
perfect color picture in 
seconds — no warm-up 
time required 



CL225&P 



Classic style cabinet of Pecan veneers 



syumNMf 

COLOR 



YOUR 
CHOICE 

waap 



sifumNjA 

COLOR 



p«MMHI 



kdiolt'l 



MODEL CL22S3K 
Early American cabii^t (tf oyqrie vraeoa. 



CL22S1W 
Contemporary style cabinet crfWaUiut vomers 



ADAM'S TV 

3M LWDON BRIDGE SHWPING CENTER - VIRGINIA BEACH. VA. - WONE 3404J661 

mS&me AU TVs & Rm^ 



"•"•"^^^w^ 



^^mmmmmmmmmm 



DECEMBER 14, 1972 



Are you a safe driver ? 



THE SUN 



PAGE 7-B 



Do yon Miink yon are a good driver? 

I'. \™«*'\^f '"^ ""* alflBe-most drivm do. 

«„rf m^^li^l L^"^T^ '*'*'^ W'* »•«» Americans dying 
and more titen two milhon injured in highway accidents k^ 

J^n/'^ft!^ "^""ulf ^'*"'' " P""^** ««* fast ap. 
pr^ng, so this might be a good time to check your drivii« 

.Jr^nJ^Tr^S "^^ WHS developed by Liberty Mutual In- 

~fi»r;'S"^- ""^ "^ *** '^**°"'« '««'*''« automobile in- 
siffWsJtshaiWgive you a pretty good idea of just how much of 
a driving ^pert you really are and at the same time provide a 
few valuable safe driving tips. 

1. A' Hashing red light means: ^ 

A. ttow down. 

B. stop. 

C. yield right of way. . 

D. caution. 

2. The most frequent cause <rf head on collisions is: 

A. improper passing. 

B. tire blowouts. 

C. steering cwitrol failure. 

D. intoxication. 

3. Alcohol and the Automobile too often equal an Accident. What 
percentage of automobile fatalities result from accidents in- 
volving this deadly combinatim? 

A. approximately lo per cent. 

B. approximately 25 per cent. 

C. apinmimately 50 per cent 

D. approximately 75 per cent. 

4. At 40 miles per hour on v wet road how many car lei^ths 
should be kept between your car and the vehicle In fronf 

A. four. 

B. sue 

C. eight. 

D. twdve. 

5. In any type of vehicle skid, the skidding wheels tend to: 

A. move sideways 

B. lead 

C. trail 

D. none of the above 

6. During a snowstwm, it is advisable to use low beams as snow 
reflecte Ught and makes it difficult to see the roadahead. 

A. true 

B. false 

7. Stopping distance consists of: 

A. reactiwi speed and braking distanoe 



^B. po-ception and braking distance. 

C. perception and reaction speed. ^' , 

D. perception, reaction speed and braking distance. 

8. Tlw average motorist makes how many driving decisitM^' 
each mile? 

A. two. • 

B. ten. 

C. twenty. 
0. fifty. 

9. In 1972 there were more than 10,000 pedestrian fatalities. The 
majority of these occured durir^ what time of day? 

A. night. 

B. mid day. 
*'.,C. dusk. 

n. sunrise. 
20. Driver error is responsible for what percentage of 
automobile accidents? 

A. 25 per cent. 

B. 50 per cent. 

C. 75 per cent. 

D. 90 per cent. 

U. A good indication that a parked car is about to pull out in 
front of you, can be: 

A. wheels turned toward the road. 

B. exhaust emission. 

C. signal blinker. 

D. all of the above. 

12. Average reaction time from gas pedal to brake pedal is: 

A. 'i. second 

B. ^'4 second. 

C. one second. 

D. v/i seconds. 

13. At night, when in the glare ot approaching vehicle 
'^ headlights, you should direct your vision; 

A. to the left of the roadway. 

B. directly ahead. 

C. to the right edge of your traffic lane. 

D. none of the above. 

14. If your automobile starts to skid out of control, never: 

A. take your foot off the gas. 

B. countersteer. 

C. stab brake. 

D. stamp your foot on the brake. 

Answers: i)b; 2)a; 3)c; 4)c; 5)b; 6)a; 7)d; 8)c>9)a; 10)d; 
11 )d; 12)b; 13)c; 14)d. 

How do you rate? If you got 13 or 14 correct you are an ex- 
cellent driver; 10-12, a good driver; 7-9, a fair driver; six or less, 
study up or use public transportation. 



Watch hoKday 
driving hazards 



KELLAM- EATON INSURANCE 
& REAL ESTATE COMPANY 



?40AP 



"When making your 
Christmas shopping plans, 
remember to include safe 
driving practices for the 
special holiday driving 
hazards," said J<rfin T. Hanna, 
Director, Virginia Highway 
Safety Division. 

In 197 L the 78-hour 
Christmas Vedcend saw 13 
fatalities on Virginia high- 
ways, two of which occurred 
on Christmas Day. 

"Unless drivers and 
pedestrians exei'cise more 
care in watching out for each 
other and the other guy, the 
fatality toll this Christmas 
may be higher," Hanna 
continued. 

Darkness, weather con- 
ditions, distracted shoppers 
and holiday travelers con- 
tribute to the Christmas 
confusion for the pedestrian 
and the driver alike. 

There are more hours of 
darkness at this time of year, 
lessening visibility for the 
pedestrian and the driver. 
Vision also may be impaired 
by numerous - packages 
carried by sho{^rs or pileS^ 
too high in the car. 

Poor walking and driving 
conditions such as snow or 
rain demand extra alertness 



on the part of the pedestrian 
and the motorist. 

"Remember also," Hanna 
said, "that Christmas means a 
vacation for school children — 
chil^n who become so ex- 
cited they may foi^get the rul«i 
(rf good pedestrian safety." 

Seat belts are one of the 
most Important ways to 
prevent fatal crashes durii% 
this holiday period and 
throughout the year, Hann 
continued. Seat belts not only 
mhtimlze ttie chances of the 
passoiger belr% thrown into 
Uie car's windshield, thqr abio 
aid in helpii^ him keep a 
proper riding posture and be 
more alert 

Hanna also warned of wrong 
way driving on ex|H%ssways. 
He stressed ttie importance of 
motorists using rest ar«is for 
stopping places, not the 
emergency lane of the hi^ 
way unless for car trouble. 

"A final reminder," ttie 
safety official said, "Is to obey 
posted speed Ifmits. Three out 
of four fatal crashes at 
Christmas inv^ye speed too 
'^ist^ for condltimis' or above 
the postal limit Alcohol also 
figures in at least half of all 
fatal crashes 



Vira'mia Bea 



"..'''-'.'■^Ws*'^ 



TO 

PROTECT 
YOUR 
BUSINESS 



/. 



X 



y/r 



You stand to lot« moro with in- 
odoquato insuranco than through 
thoft. Chock ouf Workman's Com- 
pensation; Fidelity Surety Bonds; 
Health and Accident Policies, and 
protect yourself. 



I; iiillkiri 




'Bb dwald be tliapptd— 
the poor bird* beve to bathe 
Muae wator.** 



THE ORIGINAL AND BEST TASTING 

EGGNOG 




"HAYGOOD" 

church of Christ 

Utoeting at'the corner 
of Ha^iood and Ferry 
Plantation Roads, Vir- 

S'nia Beach, Va. Mall 
ig Address: P.O. Box 
5036, Virginia Beach, 
Va. 23455. 



THEOPHILU 



HAPPINESS 
19 
KN0MIN6 ABOUT GOP j 








Christians rfiould always fed the way lliefqthlus to «► 
{nreased in ttie above cartooa "Rejoice in the Loid dwigrK 
and again I say, rejoice!" (PhL 4:4) 

Another thing that gives Christians great joy is to find that 
others are also walking in God's wiy. 11 Ja 4 "I Njoked great- 
ly that I found of thy chldien walkii^ in truth, as we have ie> 






cefarfld a commandBWt from the Fafli«^'* aad ID Jd. 3 "#6r 
I rejoiced greafly, when (hetarattnuieame and lipttfiMl of the 
- truth that h in thee^ even at thou wdksit tai the truth." 

But keep fai orind. dl this x^kinf ia done "IN IHE 
LORD," which iswtlhhitheeonfiiietofHi>wll,orinaccoi» 
ance with His auihixity. 



How to find a life insurance ogent 
otiier agents speolc of with respect; 



Look to the 'Blue Chip' ogent. 



VWGINIA BEM» 

Roger E. Clairk, Jr., CLU 
]dm H. Costenbader m 
CharteN. Fuller, CLU 
R. Kobert Larmore 
D. Conrad Little. CLU 

ComeKus D.Scully 

NORFQIK 

Fred H. Forsbcfg 
jdm B. Hudson, Jr. 
H. Gilbert Leigh 




PORTSMOUIH 

£. Gordcm Rawk, CLU 
John R. bt Geoife, Jr., C 



i^^ • r 



Clmton (j. Carbon 

NEWTORT NEMS - HMMP 

WiBoughby Newton D 
Stdla F. Stj^hens 
Leroy £. Thompscm 



iohn T. Httris, Jr. 



FRANK K. FEREBEE. CLU, Qmvil AfMI 
1320 ViriMa KMoMl BMik BiMdIiii 
Norfolc\nr|Mi23iie 

Comectibit Mutmd Ufe 

mm 



■^ 



ITOTB IT PONiMMUW TRIHE VAIQE ALUmNWI SIMIifi OfFH fROM 

WUHffACIUKIS MSmMfOn HC NOiroik'StAMBT SIDW»COHnKr«H - 




CREDIT 

TERMS 

ARRANGED 

BUY DIRECT AND 
TAKE ADVANTAGE 
OF LOW FACTORY 
PRICEa BUY WITH 
CONFIDENCE! OUT- 
STANDING REPUTA- 
TION FOR DEPENDA- 
BILITY GUARANTEES 
SATISFACTION! 




FIBERGLAS 
INSULATB) ALUMUiUMI SIDING 

$ 



nb^u a perhqis ttie b^ known 
badator to man. Ihisdiummin 
iridta^ actually wfl {My for itelf out 
of mataitenance Mvtafd Yob|^ 
tq» to twke the teriattagniue 
oloiha^infa F(nrl,MOfq. 
(teovo^i. 



244I0M 

mtomwma 



699 

ANYNOUSe 






' 'U^ 



THE FMBTI 

THERMO/ELASnCIZai SIDING 

iUbKrintaiy flre-pnK< ntaOthptoai 
md weathcr^mifi Apij^iedwttfa 
ipeeid hrea*h« ttoBtaun luds 
nd fol to iBcreMe hMiathM 
qurilly iqi to 8 tiBMi beMir ttiB 
eMventimiil iidtafik Farl,OM 
^.fieOTvafik 



889 

Airrmi^ 



For No OUigotai 
Shop-At-ltomo Swvko 




»n 



Va. 2340 I 



Col (703) 49M537 



.MBm^fmrn^^tM^^ . . . I . I I 1 1 . POI - .■ .. 1 1 '^•^"^mf^gtf^^^^. 



wmmmmm^mi 



iHPH 



^^mmn^f>^^^^^m9m^^99mmmm9m9m 



P^3£M 



DECEMBER 14, 197? 




* 



■PMH 



^ 



Pi9a2-WINDJAMMER, DEC. 14, 1972 



New Arts Center gaUery opens 



In ite continuing ^orts to 
expose mwe people toartand to 
give local artists a chance to be 
se«i and known, the Vii^nia 
Beach Arts Center has opened a 
new puUk art gaUery. 

The gallery, which opened 
Dec. 9, is located at the Arts 
Center headquarters, 1916 
Arctic Avenue, behind the Civic 
Centeii It is housed in a portion 
of a city efifee balding and has 
be«i reiiHMieled froii former 
munic^l ofHces. 

The Virginia Beach Arts 
Center, formerly the Vii^nia 
Beach Art Association, sp(m- 
sors the highly-successful 
Bonthi4]k Art Show each year. 

Tlie Arts Center is an 
educational, cultural, rioi>-|»-(rfit 

lanization dedicated to 
promoting the arts in the 
Tiltewater area, particularly In 
the cihr of Virginia Beach. 

TheUrts Cen^ is also a 
chapter^ the Virginia Museum 
and spoi^ors traveling shows 
which a^ provided through the 
mvaewh. including all types at 
shows in the fine arts, per- 
king arts and humanities. 

For example, the Arts Center 
^ recently brought the American 
* Folklife Society, a combinatirai 
of musicians and singers who 
concentrate on traditional 
Anierican music, to Virginia 
Beach in co-operation with the 
Virginia Museum. 

All work at the Arts Center is 
carried on by volunteer 
members, headed by Mrs. Carol 
Doyle, executive co-or^nator of 
the Caiter. 

According to Mrs. Doyle, the 
new art galloy will |vovide the 
public with a chance to learn 
about good art withwt being, 
underpressure to buy the works' 
on disfday. 

"In commercial galleries, 
even the best ones, browsers 
are <rften hard-pressured into 
buying paintings," Mrs. Doyle 
said.^"H«% the public is invited 



to come in, look around and 
enj(9 the paintings wittMut any 
pressure to buy. Of cowse, we 
are pi«aed if ttiQr do d«:ide to 
buy sonetfaing," she said 

The gaHery opened with a 
one-man show featuring the 




CARLTON ABBOTT 

works of Carlton S. Abbott, a 
Williamsburg architect and 
artist who won the Boardwalk 
Art Show's 1973 Best in Show 
Award. He also recently won 
the Best in Show Award at the 
Pembroke Mall Invitational Art 
Show. 

Abbott's exhibit contains both 
paintings and scu^rture. The 
paintings are graphic pieces, 
very modernistic, all framed in 
chrome. The sculpture pieces 
are also modernistic, using 
abstract forms and materials. 

exhibit of woiks by 33- 
rold Abbott will be 
lyed at the galloy ttroiigh 
Jan. 7. A new one-man show will 
be featured each month. 




Also contained in the curreirt 

gaOerv eidiibit is the Bowrdwab 

Art Show PurchaM Priie 

CoUectioa These woriu are 

ownedlqr.teArts Center and are 

not for sale. 

A separate room in the 
gallery houses the Own-Loan 
Exhibition of Arts Center 
monbers' works. The works 
are very re«onaM|y priced and 
are available dther for ade m* 
rat Reirtal fees on flie paint- 
higs (payable by ttie moi^ 
may be applied toward por- 
diaae. 

The members' wevfcs arv 
contained in a rotating galloy, 

which win also be chan^ eaiA " 
month 

A fliird invitational gallery 
will exhibit travding shows 
from ttie Virgima Museum and 
other institutiMB. 

The office space in whidi the 
new gallery is housed is on loan 
from the dty at no charge. The 
Arts Center is currentty looking 
forward to expanding its galla7 
program to include another 
permanent gallery in a sepante 
part of the city. 

The Center's buikling plans 
also can fmr future expansion to 
include a classroom for art in- 
sfructioa 

The new gallery bus been 
opened with tt)e help of many 
v(riunteers. Mrs. Doyle, 
espedalfy eHed the work of the 
Gallery Committee, which 
inchdes Betqr Agdasto. SMtoy 
BaMeraea, Jo HiHsman, Helea 
Jeffersm, Emma Meehan and 
Wanda Vaaa. 

The Virginia. ^each Arte 
Center gallery is open from 1 to 
5 p.m. m Fridajm, Saturdajw 
and Sundays dBriag the winter. 
&mmer horn wiU be an- 
nouncedsoon. 



Daytime TV 

(Weekday schedide, Dec. 14-20) 



6a.m. 

( 3) These Things We Share, 
Agri Business, Sunrise 
Semester, Lift Up Mine Eyes 

« 30 a.m. 
(10) Garner Ted Armstrono 

7a.m, 
( 3) CBS News 
(10) Today Show 
(13) Tennessee Tuxedo 

7 30a.m. 
flS) Tidewater A.M. 

8a.m. 
( 3) Captain Kangaroo 

9a.m. 
( 3) Dkk Lamb 
(W Romper Room 
/ (13) Jeff's Collie 

9 3«a.m. 
IW) Petticoat lunction 
(13) Mcwie (Th) "Until They 
Sail"; (Fri) "Flirtation Walk"; 
(Mon) "Come to the Stable", 
(Tue) "Athena"; (Wed) 
"Jupiter's Darling" 



(13) Bewitched 




Fr's Wild 
im Otaah's Place 

It Ma.m. 
( 3» Price Is Right 
4101 Concentration 
na.m. 
( S^tSamblt 

( lor'Sal»'(rf' the Ceotory. 
' •• ■•HJfra.m.. .-. 
( 3) Love of Life 
( 10) Hollywood Squares 



( i) Where the Heart Is *=^- 

(10) Je^iardy 

(13) Password 

(27) Of Lands and Seas 

12 30 p.m. 
{ 3) Search for Tomorrow 
(10) Who, What, Where Game 
(13) Split Second 

tp.m. 
( 3) Mildred Alexander 
(10) News Magazine 
(13) All My Children 
(27) 700 Club 

( 3) As the World Turns 
(13) Let's Make a Deal 

2 p.m. 
If fUe Apollo 17 mission is on 
schedvie. Channels 3, lO and 13 
will cover the splashdown the 
recovery starting at ap- 
proximately 2 p.m. on Tuesday, 
Doc. 19. 

( 3) Guiding Light 
(10) Days of Our Lives 
(13) Newlywed Game 
(27) 700 Chib 

2 30 p.m. 
( 3) Edge of Night 
(10) The Doctors 
(13) Dating Game 
3p.ni. 
• '(■3)'Lovt-is»Moftr Sptondoretf 
Thii^ . 
(10) Another World 



(13) General Hospital 
(27) Insight 
Wm 3 Mpm. 
r 3) Secret Storm 
(10) I Love Lucy 
(13) One Life to Live 
(27) Patterns for Living 

4p.m. 
( 3) Family Affair 
(10) Superman 
(13) I l^eom of Joannie 
(IS) Sesame Street 
(27) New Zoo Revue 
4 Mp.m. 
( 3) Andy Griffith 
(10) Munsters 
(13) PonderMa 
(27) Brave Stallion 
5 P*fll. 
( 3) Merv Griffin 
(10) Lost in Space 
(15) Misterogers' Neighborhood 
(27) Leave It to Beaver 
s 30 p.m. 
If tHe Apollo 17 mission is m 
schediHo, Chamiels 3, lo and 13 
wHI cover the liftoff of tiM Ivnar 
fflodolc frwn the moon's sur- 
face starting at approximately 
S 30 p.m. on Thorsday, Ooc. 14. 
(13) News 

(IS) Electric Company 
(27) Bugs Bunny . 
4 p.m. 
( 3) (10) News 
(13) ABC News •'• 
(IS) Sesame Street 
(27) Jim and Tammy 




'Sytlenuitk Reach' hy GMrH«iAM«tl 

Nijrfolk TTieatre Carter 
sets final perfcxinanoes 




Ihe fiaal performances of 
"Macbeth," an ava«t-garde 
version, of Shakeainare's 
tragedy, will he Resented 
Thursday, Dec. M.^t 7:» p.m. 
and Fridiy and SMH<d»y. Dec. 
IS and M. at t p.M. ul the 
NorfiA Theatre Crater. 

Thecenter JatefteidatSIS W. 
FreemMan Street, where 
"Macbeth" has been performed 
^nce early Deceasber. 

"TheWiainfs Chrtetmas," a 
holiday ^lecial. wiH also be 
p«-formed at ike Th«itre 
Cmtn- on Satwdi^. Dee. 16, at 



11 a.m. and 2 pem., and on 
" ' f, Dec. 17, at 3 p.m. 



per th e V 



WftwQaninier, ea> 
lor VhrgMa 



far the next 
every 
hy Ifcc Virglela 
ni)|ih thw. 
M^IAHENDMCK. EDITOR 

AVVratlMOIG MANAGER 



ij 

4k| 




mmmmm. 



Thursday 



A review 



WINDJAMMER, DEC. 14, 1972M»igs 3 



Dec. 14, 1972 



( ^) CBS News 

(10) NBC News 

(13) Movie "Knute Rockne, 

All American" 

7p,ni. 

i« L?*!*. **•■ Consequences 
(10) What's My Line' 

IIV. |l«ctric Company 
(27) Daktari 

7 30 
( 3) This Is Your Life 
(10) Parent Game 
(15) Pigs or Protectors? 

• p.m. 
{ 3) The Waltons 
(10) Flip Wilson 
(13) Mod Squad 
(15) The Advocates 
(27) Right On- 

t'SOp.m. 
(27) Say It Lood 

»p.in. 
(3) CBS Movie "How to 
Murder Your Wife" 



(15) 



Ironside 

The Men 

International Performance 
"A Tribute to Beethoven" 
(27) 700 Club 

10p.m. 
(10) Dean Martin 
(13) Owen Marshall, Counselor 
at Law 

(15) World Press 
(27) 700 Club 

10 30 p.m. 
(15) Project Encounter 

11p.m. 
(10) in) News 

1) 20 p.m. 
( 3) News 

11 30p.m. 

(10) Tonight Show 

(13) Movie "My Gun Is 

Quick" 

II sop.m. 
( 3) CBS Movie 
Logan, DA" 



"Travis 



Friday TV 



Dec. 15, 1972 



i 30 p.m. 
( 3) CBS News 
jm NBC News 
(13) Movie "Pacific 

Blackout" 

7p.m. 
( 3) Truth or Consequences 
(10) What's My Line' 
(15) Electric Company 
(27) Family Classic 

7 Mp.m. 
( 3) Tackle Box 
(10) Hockey Virginia Red 
Wings at Cincinnati Swords 
(15) Wall Street Week 
(27) Time Life Special "The 
Jesus trip" 

• p.m. 
{ 3) Sonny and Cher 
(13) The Night the Animals 
Talked 

(15) Washington Week in 
Review 

• 30 p.m. 
(13) A Christmas Carol 



(IS) About the White Bus 
(27) Chaplain of Bourbon Street 

9 p.m. 

( 3) CBS Movie 'The Am 

bushers" 

(13) Love Is... Barbara Eden 

(27) 700 Club 

10 p.m. 
(10) Banyon 

(13) John Lennon and Yoko Ono 
Present the OnetoOne Concert 
(27) 700 Club 

11 p.m. 
( 3) (10) (13) News 

II 30 p.m. 
( 3) CBS Movie "Tiger Bay" 
(10) Tonight Show 
(13) Movie "Many Rivers to 
Cross" 

la.m. 
( 3) News 

I isa.m. 
( 3) Movies "Sergeant 

Ryker," "The Jokers," 'He 
Rides Tall" 



Saturday TV 



Dec. 16, 1972 



ta.m. 
( 3) Agriculture, U.S.A. 

i 36a.m. 
( 3) Sunrise Semester 
(10) Farm Show 

7p.m. 
( 3) Connie's Magic Cottage 
(10) Cheyenne 
(13) Patterns for Living 

7 30a.m. 
( 3) Animal Fair 

la.m. 
( 3) Bugs Bunny ^ 

(10) Underdog 
(13) H R Pufnstuf 

• 30 a.m. 
( 3) Sabrina 
(10) Jetsons 
(W) Jackson S 

9a.m. 
( 3) Chan Clan 
(10) Pink Panther 
(13) The Osmonds 

9 30a.m. 

( 3) New Scooby Doo Movies 

(IQ) Houndcats 

(13) Saturday Superstar Movie 

lOa.m. 
(10) Roman Holidays 

10 30a.m. 

( 3) Josie and the Pussycats 
(10) The Barkleys 
(13) Brady Kids 

I) a.m. 
( 3) Flintstones 
(10) Seaiab 2020 
(13) 



Bungles 

11 30a.m. 
(10) Runaround 
(13) Kid Power 

Noon 
( 3) Archie's TV Funnies 
(10) Pride 
(13) Funky Phantom 

12 30p.m. 
( 3) Fat Albert 

(10) That Good Ole Nashville 
Music 
(13) LIdsville 

1p.m. 
( 3) Children's Film Festival 
(10) Football Baltimore Colts 
at Miami Dolphins 
(13) Monkees 

I 30 p.m. 
(13) NFL Highlights 

2 p.m. ^ 
( 3) Movie "All Hands on 
Deck" 

(13) Movies "HaHiday Brand/' 
"■'"Sii^K^ ^e Corner'* ___„_ . , ,,^ . 



2' 30 p.m. 
(27) Brave Stallion 

3p.m. 

(27) Earth Lab 

3 45 p.m. 

(3) Football- Minnesota 
VIkinfls at San Francisco 49ers 

4p.m. 

(10) Wild, Wild West 
-(27) Movie "Miracle on 34th 
Street" 

Sp.m. 
(10) Wrestling 
(13) Wide World of Sports 

5 30 p.m. 
(27) Championship Bowling 

6 p.m. 
( 3) (10) News 

t 30 p.m. 
( 3) CBS News 

(10) Movie "Night Monster" 
(13) Lawrence Welk 
(27) Hunting and Fishing 

7 p.m. 
( 3) Hee Haw 
(27) Right On 

7 30 p.m. 
(13) Let's Make a Deal 
(27) The Monroes 
• p.m. 
( 3) All in the Family 
(10) Emergency- 
(13) Alias Smith and Jones 

• -30 p.m. 
( 3) Bridget Loves Bernie 
(27) Warren Roberts 

9 p.m. 
( 3) Mary Tyler Moore 
(10) NBC Movie "Viva Maria" 
(13) Streets of San Francisco 

9 30p.m. 
( 3) Bob Newhart 
(27) The Lesson 

lOp.m. 
( 3) Carol Burnett -On new day 
(13) Sixth Sense 
(27) 700 Club 

II p.m. 
( 3) (13) News 
(27) 700 Club 

114$ p.m. 
(10) News 

II 30p.m. 
( 3) Movies- "Boom," "The 
Curse of the Fly," "A Distant 

Trumpet," "Desire in the Dust" 
( IJI Movie--"Executive Suite" 

f1 4Sp.m. 
*"" *^ p»»%:'-T! *^ Brute Man," 



thini 



the CavaKer Dinner Playhouse 



The cast of "A Funny Thing 
Happened on the Way to the 
Forum" put on a good, 
exub«:ant show last Tuesday 
night at the Cavalier Dinner 
Playhouse despite the fact that 
some of the actors were just 
recovering from Ulness and 
some were still battUi^ the bug. 

Phil Uhler, who stars in the 
musical comedy as Pseudolus, 
a Roman slave, was in good 
voice, showing no signs of his 
recent bout with laryngitis. 

Uhler is wi stage almost 
constantly throughout the two- 
act show which contains 16 
musical numb«:sand numerous 
encwes and reprises. He is 
involved in nine of the songs, 
some of which are extremely 
difficult 

But Uhler showed no strain 
with the music and seemed to 
thrive on his difficidt part He 
danced and pranced and 
laughed and mugged his way 
through the show and seemed to 
be having a high M time as he 
directed the flow of the story. 

The plot is not that important, 
witti so many twists and tan», 
climaxes and anti-dimaxes that 
the duracters almost literally 
meet themselves comii^ and 
going on stage. 

Suffice it to say that the story 
is set in ancient Rome and in- 
volves a crafty, sly slave who is 
intent wi winning his freectom. 
To do 80. he must unite the 
young rpaster of the house 
(Hero ^yed by Gary Wills) 
with his lady love (PWlia, 
jAiyed by Luanne Nelson). 

But ifs not all as easy as it 



seems. Involved in the plot and 
counter-plots are some sexy 
courtesans, a vainglorious 
Roman captain, a prociver <A 
lovely ladies, a hysterical 
master slave, an aging 
C!asanova, the aging Casanova's 
suspicious wife, some long-lost 
children, a few ghosts and three 
hysterical "proteans," who 
play everything from free 
citizens to slaves to Roman 
soldiers. 

Thore is also some business 
about a fake "deaUi," mistaken 
identities and a few other 
schtic^s that keep the laughs 
roiling in until the expected 
happily-ever-afto- ending. 

Stephen Sondheim's songs 
and the book fay Burt Shevelove 
and Larry Gelbart are packed 
with built-in lau|^. The lyrics 
are especially clever but, un- 
fortunately, the funiqr lines 
were sometimes lost when the 
singers were overpowered by 
the heavy-hamled music. 
^ Musical director Jane 
Gallatin might do well to tone 
down the musical ac- 
companiment. 

The problem was especially 
noticeable durii^ Gary Wills' 
solo number, "Love I hear." 
Wills was quite ill during the 
performance and was not 
singing at his best His voice 
was overpowored in sp(^ by the 
music and he was off-key in 
0010- parts of the soiq^ 

Wills is j^rfecQy-cast in the 
part though, and looks every 
inch the young, virginial 
aristocrat smitten by love for 
the first time. 



A revieu) 



Luanne Nelson as his young 
love Philia was in fine vwce. 
"Lovely," her prettiest num- 
ber, describes her voice per- 
fectly. And she was also cast 
just right and entirely con- 
vincing as the young maiden in 
love with one man but beb-othed 
to another. 

Bob Beard is good as the 
ivsterical Hysterium, but the 
histrionics involved in his 
characterization tended to start 
wearing thin by the end of the 
show. 

Danny Gunn as Senex is just 
perfect Comedy timing is 
obviously Gunn's forte and he 
uses every geshire and grimace 
in the bo<* to milk his lines for 
all they're wo-th. Sylvia Ncff to 
atoo good in a fair^ small part 
as hto wife. 

Atoo desaring nods among 
tile lai^ cast are Joe Mooiwy 
as the very weird-looking 
MarciB Lycus, Toby St^hens 
as Erronhis, Jack Blo(»n as the 
stuck-on-himself Miles 
Gloriosus and Gary Pate, Butch 
Clough and Km Little as the 
Proteans. 

There was a bit too much flab 
around Uie edges of the cour^ 
tesans to make them conviodi^ 
as desiraUe ladies of love, but 
tile girb were enttiusiastic and 
decorative, anyway. 

As usual, the food and service 
at the Cavalier Dioneit 
Playhouse was above avcoBj^ 
"A Funny Thii« Happened on 
tile Way to the Fonim" to 
scheduled to run through 
January. -Donna Hendrick 



■ f-A«W..^"* 



'Godspell' an experience 



Yvcm the moment it qiens 
wttii the great phil<Mophers 
mouthing nonsensical words 
iBttil tiie moment it closes with 
the body of Jesus Christ being 
held aloft on the shoulders of his 
followers, "Godspell" is an 
experience. 

In its three-^ow nm at 
Chrysler Hall last wedc-end, the 
rock musical based an the 
gospel of St. Matthew was 
technically challenged by the 
enonnify of tiie auditcMrium. But 
tile beauty (tf tiie draw ai^ the 
julMlation of its youttiftil cast 
overcame some crif the staging 
drawbacks. 

There is a very delicate line in 
"Godspell" as it unfolds tiie life 
(rf Clvist in a carnival mood 
witii the actors colorfully clad in 
a hodge-podge of clown 
costumes. TTie slightest move to 
eittier side of tiial line and the 
rfww w(MiId be offaisive. But it 
rranains so delicately balanced 
that even the most devout can 
accq>t its sincerity, a real 
tribute to its 22-year-okl creator 
and director. John-Michael 
Tebelak. 

Much (rf the rraponsibility 
rests, too. wiUi the cast for they 

must carefully blend the bi{)lical 
with the modern at an un- 
believably exhausting pace. 
This is especially triM <rf the 
actor who portrays Oirist. But 
ttiis ttiey do. And it is a beautiful 
and exciting tiling to see. 
Despite the outlandish 



siiAidy done. Its set constots <* a 
tall fence, two'sawhorses and 
a few boards. Yet it very con- 
vincingly takes the audience 
into ttie garden of Gettisemane 
as well as to tiie sc«je of the 
- crucifixion. 

. TTie musk, of course, is 
anytiiing but simple and though 
"Day by Day" is its most 
popular piece, all of it is a credit 
to its 23-year-old comfyiser, 
Stephen Schwartz. 

So careftiUy does tills show 
handle that delicate rdigim- 
modem balance that even the 
east remains nameless in the 
program, appamitiy offering 
themsdves to the show and to 
thar audience as (me talent 
created to the life and love (rf 
Christ. 



It's a lovely and unselfish 
gesture but one wonders who 
tiiese talented young people are. 
Neva- have I seen 10 more 
accomplished performers. 
Each is expected to sing and 
dance and cavort at a frantic 
pace. And each does exactly 
tiiat <»1tiiout even a breather 
during intermission when they 
serve wine to their jpudience. 

There are many things about 
"Godspell" that will never be 
forgotten. But the most 
memorable will be the "last 
supper", done in abstract, and 
the crucifixion, created wMth 
limiting and "Christ" clinging 
to tiie chain fence. "Godspell" 
is an experience, both 
theatrically and emotionally. 
Ruby Jean Phillips 



RAMADAINN 

OCEANFRONT AND 7th 



Featuring 

Entwtiinnitnt 
OiM and Danes 



DAN TATUM 

Altok) tounge 

MIKE McCLOUD. 

SiM to SiSO P.M. 



N^htly 

NoCoi^ 
NoMinifiMMi 



SopMitkM9dSbigkiMmlmemUmi^ 



*^ 



/ 



■f " 




Pl«e4|^WINDJAMMER, DEC. 14, 1972 



Love surrounds the Lee Lively family 






By DONNA HENDRICK 

"Everybody owes an 
obligatiMi to himself to find out 
what his thing is and then do it 
well" 

These few words by Lee 
Lively sum up the entire 
lifestyle of Lee and Chi Chi 
Lively and their talented 
family. 

The Livelys live in a com- 
fortable, lovely home in Thalia 
in a woodsy settii^ on a tNranch 
of the Lynnhaven River. Lee, 
Chi Chi and their son David 
faused in Uieir busy Christmas 
' sdiedules recently to rdax in 
. their den and "describe their 
lives. The youngest son, Peter, 
wap busy with his own activities 
and not available for a chat 

The homey setting was 
completed by the d(^ Sandy 
relaxing on the shag caipet and 
the cat Petunia curled up in Chi 
Chi's lap. 

It's difficult to know where to 
begin in describing this ex- 
traordinary family. Each 
member does have a thing that 
he or she does well, and most 
have many things that they do 
equally well, whether it's 
painting a portrait or iKMihing a 
rug. 

Love is all around in the 
Lively home. The Livelys all 
obviously love each other, their 
home and their work. This 
feeling radiates from the 
family, surrounding friends and 
acquaintance!? alike with its 
warmth. 
To hegin, it's ladies first: 
Chi Chi Lively is, a vivacious, 
attractive \^londe. One doesn't 
notice that ^ has only one leg 
and has toXget around on 
crutches. SheWver lets her 
Jiandicap inteijfere with her 
busy schedule. ; 

That schedtm recently in- 
cluded a few days hostii^ the 
Mildred Alexander show 'on 
WTAR-TV. Chi Chi will repeat, 
the favor for her good friend 
Millieafter Christmas when she 
w ill host the show on Dec. 26, 27 
and 28. 

*€hi Chi is also very involved 
in theatre work and com- 
mercials. .Sh" recently directed 
the Norfolk Little Theatre 
production of "Speaking of 
Murder" and will direct the 
Little Theatre of Virginia Beach 
production of "Busy Body" in 
the spring. 

She also works part-time at 
the Cavalier Dinner Playhouse 
as office manager and was the 
first woman director .at th? 
Cavalier. 

She does freelance radio and 
TV commercials through Studio 
Center in Norfolk and recently 
completed three spots for a 
bank. 

"I just do voices on the 
commercials," Chi Chi ex- 
l^ained, "and stnnetimes Lee 
and I do commercials together. 
"We did the Fred and AHce' 
spots for a bank in 
Chesapeidie." - 

Chi Ohi is also a fwrno* ac- 
tress but has now turned her 
talents to directir^ As she 
explained it: 

"1 chm't act anymme becaiKe 
there aren't many parte written 
for a one-tegged gaL I get the 
itch to art. and I scratch it by 
di retting. " 

Chi CM .is proudest of her 
woric with tne American Caocer 
s<K*ic4,v. a prf^c0shettBderlask 
mfr^ttr aid^ttftil openUdi.' 



Chi Chi lost her left leg after it 
was discovered that she had a 
malignant mdanoma. 

"It came from an enlarged 
mole," she explained, "which is 
one ol the seven dai^r signal 
of cancer. Both my mother and 
father died of cancer. 

"By the time I noticed it and 
got to the doctor, it had come to 
the cancerous stage. The case I 
had hnjRfiens about once in 
every 200,000 pei^le. 

"After I had the malanomas 
removed, I was sent to 
MemcHial Hospital for Cancer 
and Allied Diseases in New 
York, where they removed my 
left leg, my left hip bone and 
pelvic bone. 

"It will be five years in May 
since my (^ration, which will 
be a great cause for celebration 
in my family. They say that if 
no more signs of the disease 
appear in five yean, then you 
are cured." 

Chi Chi's bout with cancer led 

to her woiic with the Cancer 

Society. She is recording 

secretary of the Virgiraa Beach 

chapter of the Society and was 

just elected to the state division. 

"This is my favorite 

charitable project," she said. 

"I'm not one (rf those women 

who beliMig to all those things, 

but I do work with this. I have 

spoken to local units ci the 

Society in the Tidewater area 

and I've been a guest speaker in 

Silver Spring Md., and the 



Maryland state dfvisioa" 

Chi Clu's wori( wiOi the 
Society has led her and her 
husband to give up smoking am] 
to encourage others to do the 
same. 

"I have inM people who have 
to admit they're hancficapped 
right now because of their 
smoking," she said, "so we 
encourage no smoking, even in 
my plays." 

Unless it is absolutely crucial 
to the st(H7, Chi Chi will aOow 
no smoking on stage in tfie |teys 
she directs. 

"And I was even still smddng 
right up to the time of my 
operation," she lau^ied. „ 

Chi Chi pointed out that she 
does have a prosthesis (ar 
tificial limb) but that she 
prefers her crutches since ^k 
feels she can get around faster 
and easier on them. 

"I just hope," she said, "that 
my experience will help 
someone else. Knowing I can do 
all ttiese things and can get 
around well might inspire 
others." 

Another at the many things 
Chi Chi does is rug hocricing, and 
she proudly pointed out the 
abstract rug h^ndii^ on the 
wall over the flrqilace and the 
rug which she had made into a 
giant pillow. 

Is there anything she can't 
do? 

"Well, Fm not a singer, am I, 
Lee?" she asked her husl>and. 




LEEUVELY 
CM Uvely'i 



lilbeiMifMi 

n^ McnH wttt Mick 



wal ever the 



Lee lat^hingly agreed that she 
is not. 



Lee is a sii^r, though, 
amoi^ his many other taleirts. 
He just ccHnpleted a stint with 
the Virginia Beach Civic 
Chorus, singing bass in their 
annual Christmas pn^ram. He 
also sings in the durir at Thalia 
Trinity Presl^erian Church. 

Lee is a tall, bearded man 
with a strikii^ presence. He 
looks like an artist, wMcb is 
Exactly what he is. He is a 
portrait artist, although Chi Chi 
^id he does do a few land^ 
scapes and srascapes. 

But he is best known for his 
portrait work and is now busily 
finishing Mptt^f^rtpils he had 
commissioned fo 

Besides being involved in his 
portrait work, Lee also does 
charcoal sketches of every show 
at the Cavalier Dinner 
Playhouse (Aetdies of former 
shows are dis|riayed in the 
lobby) and is involved in a new 
innovation in TV news art, 
porta-rikira of famous fi^uvs. 

Accnding to Lee, the porta- 
slide business is l)ooming and he 
is still prochicing six portraits a 
week to be made into color 
slides by Studio Center. 

Lee paints full color ptntraits 
of famous newsmakers (anyone 
from Shirley Chisholm to Billy 
Graham), which are ttten made 
into slides to be used on TV 
stations to illustrate their 
newscasts. 

"The porta-slide idea is very 

pular with the statiors," Lee 

id. "I have done over 150 

porta-slides which have been 

sold to over 2S TV stations in 

major markets." 

Besides being a portrait 
artist, Lee is also a 
photographer and uses the 
camera to help him choose a 
pose fm* hs p(Mtraits. 

"I shoot candids of the sub- 
ject, expecially young 
chikiren," he explained. "I 
mi^t shoot 90 or so pictures, 
out of which I get a dozen 
repetitions of gesture. If I shoot 
enough pictures, I get a 
characto'istic pose, which I 
then use for the sitting." 

Lee B also invdved in berth 
radio and TV conrnierdate, 
both on and off camera. 

"But," he said, "if you do too 
much (m-camera wnic, you 
may become identified with the 
sptnsor, wMch Is not a good 
thing." 

He recently com|rieted 
ccmmerciab for a bank ip 
North Canriina and anotiier 
bank in Ohio. 

Lee is also an actor, althot^ 
he hasn't had the time re^tly 
to devote to the iMi^iessifln. 
"And rd really love to rind the 
time," he said. 

Fm- liie pwt four ycMt, he 
has alM beoi ttie namtor far 
tte Anka Festiva) <»Mtination. 



Both Lee and Chi dii are what 
they call "charter monben" of 
the Thalia Trinity church. "The 
first meetii^^ were h^ right 
here in oar Imve," Oii Chi sakl. 
At that time, 16 years a^o, ttds 
was real country out here and 
we had^ght parties on the 
phone." 

Son Davkl, an IS-yearoM 
senior at Princess Anne High 
School, is also very involved in 
the arts, in addition to his sdHwl 
wotk. 

David is currently playing 
percussion in the Cavalier 
Dinner Playhouse prddhictiwi of 
"A Funny Thing Hai^ned on 
the Way to ttie Forum." 

"I had played for them 
before," David said, "and tfiey 
just called me up for this tium 
and asked me to play for them." 

Before David had to rush off 
fm- an appoiirtment he talked • 
about some of Ms many other 
activities. 

"I just finished 'A Thousand 
Clowns' at the school," he said, 
and his mother added. "He 
played the lead." 

Last year, David played in 
"The Lion in Winter" at the 
school, a production whh^ was 
also performed two nights at the 

Little Theatre of Virginia 
Beach. 

He is currently reading the 
scriptfora drama on WTAR-TV 
in which he will play a youth 
involved in drugs. The play will 
be presented for the United 
Drug Abuse Council. 

David is presklent of his 
school's drama club, will 
represent his school a visual 
and performing arts program at 
the Civic Center in May, i^ys 
drums in the school banid, for a 
furniture store commercial, 
ami for "Cabaret" at the oM 
Lake Wright Theati-e, is a 
membw of the Key Club, the 
Modern Music Masto-s and ateo 
manages to sqaeeie in time to 
give drum lessmis. 

Peter, the youngest, is a IS- 
year-<dd freshman at Princess 
Anne Peter's two great loves 
are wrestling and motOKToss 
racii^. He is on the junior 
varsity^vrestiing team at school 
and has a Yamaha 12S wMch is 
used only for trade racing. 

Peter hsa also walked the 
sound at both the Vii^ima 
Brach and Norfolk Little 
Theab^ and dkl the sound for 
his nxrther when she directed 
"Desk Set" at tiie Norfolk Little 
Th«itre. 

All of which mwt make the 
Lee Lively family the busiest in 
town. 

How do they aU find the 
time? 

Lee explained it wiUi a 
diuckle: 

"It's easy to find the time for 
it all. eipeeially if it'a 
som^iog yoi rea^y want to 
do. You jut do^t pay a^r t^ 
leyflitrteB^." 



■IP 



■■■ 



■■■■■I 



Charles Sibley works 
at Imperial Gallery 



WINDJAMMER, DEC. 14, 1972-Pagi 5 

Sunday TV 



Oiartes Sibl^r, profeuor of 
painting at Old Dominion 
Univereity and one <rf the best- 
known local artists, is currently 
exMbitii^ a one-man show at 
the Imperial Gallery, through 
jbe end of the iDiUth. 

The gallery, at S40 Taldon 
Avenue, Viii;inia Beach (op- 
posite Aragona Shopping 
Center), is (^n from9 a.m. to6 
p.m. daily ami from 1 to 6 p.m. 
on Sundays. 

Sibley works in almost every 
medium and is exhibitii^ many 
oils, including landscapes, 
seascapes and a few portraits. 
The eidi&it also includes numy 
watotdors, a few acrylics, 
some oils combined with 
cdlages, and a few pen and ink 
and pencil and watercolor 
works. 

The abstract influence is very 
evideirt in many of Sibil's 
works; whidi range fir<mi totaOy 
abstract to purtiaUy. 

For example, "Yellow Drift." 
a large abstract woik, inchides 



lots of color wiUi big, b<dd Inrush 
sbrokes. ^'Siffimier Fi^s," in 
which tte abstract, infhience is 
not as ^xof^ contains fa^ht 
bhies, 0reens and yellows in 
free flowing forms, suggesting a 
green field in the hot summer 
sun. 

Many of his w<nks cwitain 
muted human figures, 
as in "Remembering," 
"Mi^nt Workers" and "The 
Rehearsal." 

The current exhibit is a large 
one, containing about 60 new 
woiks. Many of the paintings 
have abwdy beo) sdd, in- 
cluding Sibky's sdf-portrait, 
"Eastern Shore Artist" 

Although some of Sibley's 
large oils are as high as $1,200, 
many of his wmks are very 
reasonably priced, including 
some small unframed water- 
c<dor8 for less than $S0. 

The next exhiMt at tiie Im- 
perial Gallery will feature the 
works of James Kirby, January 
14 tlu-ough February 3. 



A review 



'Speaking of Murder' 
is a jolly good show 



The Little Theatre of Norfolk 
opened a jdly good Elfish 
mystery last Friday night 
fcalled "Speaking of Murder." 
It had a twist in diat the 
audience -knew "whodunit" 
hetore it was even done. The ftin 
came in tryingio gaess how the 
would-be mwderer woukl be 
foiled at the a\tX. as murd««rs 
always are in British thrillers. 
The iriot entailed a woman 
scorned and her evil {rian to get 
rid of a love rival. And we all 
know what hath no firy Uke a 
woman scorned. 

Vi Ragan was most 
professional and believable as 
Annabelle iMgan. the deter- 
mined murderess. Mrs. Ragan, 
a I jiuren Bacall look-alike, was 
appropriately cold-Uooded and 
nithlras in her determination to 
get rid of her rival, a film 
staAet. 

Kathy Bowen as Connie 
Ashton. the actress, was a little 
stiff and unbelievable as the 
woqld-be victim. She is a 
newcomer to theatre and 'it 
shows, but she is a lovely blonde * 
and Uxks exactly right for the 
parti 

Ndson P. Williams as Charl«3 
Aston, the inadvertent cause of 
all the<skullduggery,on rtage, 
allv seem to be into 
Ms part. Heywas a little too c<rid 
to be bdii^yable as a man 
capable of ^iuw»ing enough 
passkm in a woman to make her 
kill to get him. ,.. 

Iliere are two children in ^ 
cast, both of whom are 
adequate in their parts. Jen- 
rafor Ray Williams, Nelson 
Williams' real-life daughter, 
l^ajrs his dau^ter in the show 
ami isa cute little scene-steitor. 
Robert Callahan, as little 
Ridty Astton, is m stage 
thrw^HMMt the play. He's a Ut 
hysterical in his emotional 
sceiies, birt docs a fine Job for a 
child. 

Vera M. Moore, as tht booce- 
lovii^, frumpy blackmailer, 
Mrs. t^»9Ktli. ate^tailMr • 



steals ttie show. She had the 
juiciest part as the provider ol 
an all-improtant alibi and is just 
perfect in the role. Mrs. Moore 
is a theatre veto-an and the 
most professional of the 
•famateir" cast. 

Her comic lines are delivered 
with just the right flair and her 
every guesture and movement 
are totally convincing. 

There were a few blown lines 
and missed cues on opening 
night, but the cast overcame 
these difficulties with ease. In 
just a few pmnts in the play, the 
action gets so hysterically 
strident, with over-acting all 
over the place, that it is almost 
comical instead of dramatic. 

Director Chi Chi Lively has 
added many nice touches to the 
(riay, though, and Uie lightning 
and thunder during the crucial 
miffder attempt was most ef- 
fective. 

The players are supposed to be 
Er^lish and it was a welcimie 
relief to not have to sit through 
three acts of phony fttish ac- 
cents. Since the nationality of 
the cast is irrelevent to the 
sUNfy, it seemed appro|Hiate to 
have ttie parts played in plain 
old American-ese. 

The entire play is acted out in 
only one setting, the living room 
of the Ashton country home. A 
special nod should go to Morton 
Hecht, who designed the set, 
which indudes a huge, walk-in 
safe. The set is nicdy elaborate 
and not as bare as smn^mes 
seen in Little Theatre 
productiora. 

If you like a good mystery, do 
go tee "Sp^ldi^ at Murder." 
It's good hin trying to i^iess the 
outctwne and watching the 
myrtcry unfirid. 

"Speaking of Murder" wiD be 
piaytag at the Little 11ieati!« of 
Norfdk through Dec. 16. - 
' Doow.llcodrick. .', .v.^ 



Dec. 17, 1972 



7 a.m. 
(3) Connie's Magic Cottage 
(10) Bible Storytime 
(13) The Christophers 

7 30 a.m. 
(10) Live and Learn 
(13) did Time Gospel Hour 

• a.m. 
( 3) The Archies 
(10) Rex Humbard 
(13) Treehouse Club 

■ 30 a.m. 
( 3) Day of Discovery 
(13) Streams of Faith 
(27) Jimmy Swaggart 

9a.m. 
( 3) Oral Roberts 
(10) Rock Church 
(13) Revival Fires 
(27) Jim and Tammy 

« 30a.m. 
( 3) This Is the Life 
(10) Gospel Sing 
(13) Bungles 

10a.m. 
( 3) Lamp Unto My Feet 
(10) Eyewitness Report 
(13) Curiosity Shop 
(27) 700 Club 

1130 a.m. 
( 3) Look Up and Live 
(10) Movie "Because They're 
Young" 

11a.m. 
( 3) House of Worship 
(13) Bullwtnkle 
(27) 700 Club 

11 30a.m. 
( 3) Face the Nation 
(13) Make a Wish 

Neon 

( 3) Sonny Allen Show 
(13) Roller Derby 
(27) Encounter 



12 isp.m. 

( 3) Sunday Sports 

12 Mp.m. 
( 3) Football Green Bay 

Packers at New Orleans Saints 
(10) Garner Ted Armstrong 
(27) This Is the Life 

1p.m. 
(10) Football Cleveland 

Browns at New York Jets 
(13) Conversation 
(27) Waters Family 

1 30 p.m. 
(13) Issues and Answers 
(27) Update 

2p.m. 
(13) College Bowl Preview 
(27) The Answer 

2-30p.m. 
(13) Pro Skilng's Richest Race 
(27) Rex Humbard 

3 p.m. 
(13) The Explorers 

3 3tp.m. 

( 3) Football Detroit Lions at 
Los Angeles Rams 
(13) Wagon Train 
(27) Charisma 

4 p.m. 
(10) KIplinger Report 
(15) About the White Bus 

4 isp.m. 

(10) Movie "A Kind of 

Loving" 

4 30 p.m. 
(27) Kathryn Kuhtman 

5p.m. 
(13) Imagination Folk Heroes 
and Tall Tales 
(27) Chapel Cottage 

5-30p.m. 
(15) People Puzzle 
(27) Jerry Falwell 
4 p.m. 
(10) News 



(13) Movie "The Brigand" 
(15) Sporting Safety 

«-30p.m. 
(10) Police Surgeon 
(15) Electric Company 
(27) The Deaf Hear 
7 p.m. 
( 31 Basketball Virginia 
Squires at New York Nets 
(10) Wild Kingdom 
(15) Sleeping Beauty 
(27) The Ministers 

7-30p.m. 
(10) Wonderful World of Disney 
(27) 700 Club 

• p.m. 
(13) The FBI 

• -30 p.m. 
(10) Mystery Movie: Hec 
Ramsey 

(15) French Chef 
(27) 700 Club 

9p.m. 
(13) Portrait: The Woman I 
Love 
(IS) Masterpiece Theatre 

9 '30 p.m. 
(3) Mannix 

lOp.m. 
(10) Night Gallery 
(13) Of Men and Women 
(IS) Firing Line 

10 30 p.m. 
( 3) Newsmakers 
(10) The Protectors 

11p.m. 
( 3) (10) (13) News 

11 30 p.m. 

( 3) Norfolk State Highlights 

(10) Tonight Show 

(13) Movie 'Strangers at 

Sunrise" 

Midnight 

( 3) Secret Agent 



Virginia Beach Civic Orchestra, 
Norfolk Savoyards in 'Pinafore' 



The Virginia Beach Civic 
Orchestra and the Norfolk 
Savoyards, Ltd., are jmning for 
a production of "HMS 
Pinafore,',' on WHRO-TV 
(Channd 15), which will be 
presented Friday, Dec. 22 at 
9:30 p.m. 

The 90-minute {roducticm is 
the fir^t program of its kind 
ever done in the studios of 
WHRO. The Gilbert and 
Sullivan operetta about 
separated couples who finally 
get together joins the efforts 
and talents of many Tidewater 
citizens who dcmated their time 
and talents fm* the enjoyment of 
the community. 

Producer Laura Hayes ap- 
proached the general manager 
of WHRO. Randolph Brnit, witii 
the idea of televising "HMS 
Pinaf(H%." He saw it as an 
immediate challenge to the 
production facilities of the 
station. 

"I also saw the opportunity to 
put on local TV an effort of a 
magnitude that has never been 
attempted before," he said. 

He added that viewer 
response to surveys has in- 
dicated that a vast number at 
Channel 15's viewers are 
theatre ori«ited. The station 
decided that this production 
would be especially enjoyatde 
durli^ the hdiday seas(m. 

The pro(i^tion is tuA only a 
firikfor Channel 15, but is also 
the -first jant effcrts of the 
Virginia Beach Civic Orchestra 
and the Nwfdk Savoya^^, Ltd. 
Both groups have ^en in 
existence for nearly ^ decade, 
but this is the first time tbQr 
have appeared togetiia*. 

The Norfolk Savoyards, Ltd. 
was formed specifically to 
perform Gittiert and Sullivan 
operettas. Tlie organizati<Mi was 
b^n in 1964 and took its name 
from tte Savoy Theatre in 
London which housed the 
^iginal productions of f6e 
opo^tas. 



All of the members love to 
sing and perform and most have 
some background in voice 
training or experience. Many 
are married cotq>les with a 
common interest in singing. 

Sandra Holoman and. her 
iwsband Ridiard both have 
leading roles in "HMS 
Pinafore." Sandra . plays 
Josephine and Richard is Dick 
Deadeye. 

Not everyone working on the 
production is a member of the 
Norfolk Sav(^ards, however. 
Toby Stephens, who plays the 
part of Sir Joseph, has done 
musical comedy in the 
Tidewater area for years. He is 
the stage director of "Pinafore" 
and his job is to "stage musical 
mimt>ers to give a feeling of 
flo*ii^." 

One of the most cdorful 
characters in "HMS Pinafore" 
IS Littie BOttercup. [dayed by 
Ingrk! H(dland Maura She has 
done dinner theatre and USO in 
the area. 



The Virginia Beach Civic 
Orchestra provides the musical 
background under conductor 
Alberto Asercion. 

In order to produce the 
massive performance for 
television, production manager 
Andy Maxey had to work with 
rfemote equipment. "Because 
we couMn't bring a 3S-piece 
orchestra and a 20- voice chorus 
into the studio, we pre-recorded 
the music and solos. Then we 
brought the people into the 
studio and lip-synched it, except 
for the spoken lines which were 
recorded in the studio," he 
explaiiKd. 

The production of "HMS 
Pinafore" is a landmark for 
WHRO-TV and represents the 
successful marriage of two 
groups and the blendii^ of 
theabvand television. But most 
of all, it reflects the reason for 
any kind of success — the 
people involved are having fun. 



Plaza Jr^rffi^ students 
perform Christmas music 



students at Plaza Junio- High 
Schod will pof orm two holiday - 
programs ot musK on Dec. 17 
and 19. 

The schocd's band, chcntis, 
madrigal singers, wind en- 
semble, symphonic band, brass 
ensemble and mixed ch«vs will 
combine for a Christmas 
concert on Sunday. Dec. 17, at 3 
p.m. in die scho(4 awUtorium. 
The program will inchide in- 
(H-national holiday miak:. 

The concert will be directed 
by Martin Sunderland, chonis 
director, and Thimtu HarreU, 
band drectmr. TkAetswiU be 
available at the door. Ad- 
m^onnll. 

Abo. the l^za Junior High 
Clma^, wm s|d( ChriMiii^' 



rarois at Princess Araie Plaza 
Shopping Center on Tu«^y, 
Dec. 19, from 7:15 to 8 p.m. " 



Madrigal Smgeis 
I»esent ocMioert 

The Old Dominioi: University 
Madr^l Sii^rs will present a 
concert for the Triai^le Chib of 
Vii^nia Beach on Tuesday, 
Dec 19. 

The 14-member Madrigal 
Sti«ns. wder tte dhrection of 
EHot Brewiier. wffl perform 
musie fr«n. the Renaissance 
•adf^eefltary. 



Pags 6-WINDJAMMER, DEC. 14, 1972 

Monday TV 



A review 



Dec. 18, 1972 



isop.m. 


9 p.m. 


( 3) CBS News 


( 3) Here's Lucy 


(10) NBC News 


(10) NBC Movie "The Snoop 


(13) Movie ■ "Invisible 


Sisters" 


Stripes" 


(13) Liberty Bowl Georgia 


7p.ni. 


Tech vs. Iowa State from 


( 3) Truth or Consequences 


Memphis 


(10) What's My Line? 


(27) 700 Club 


(15) Electric Company 


9:30p.m.- 


(27) Daktari 


( 3) Doris Day 


7:30 p.m. 


10p.m. 


( 3) Death Valley Days 


( 3) Bill Cosby 


(10) Sports Special 


(15) The Advocates 


(15) Who Is Man? 


(27) 700 Club 


Sp.m. 


11p.m. 


( 3) Gunsmoke ' 


( 3) (10) News 


(10) Laugh In 


\l :30 p.m. 


(13) The Rookies 


( 3) CBS Movie Michael 


(IS) Special of the Week 


Kohlhaas" / 


"Tales of Hoffman" 


(10) Tonight Sttow 


(27) Oral Roberts Christmas 


Midnight 


Special 


(13) News 



A delightful gift 



Tuesday TV 



Dec. 19, 1972 



6-30p.m. 


tlie Band" 


( 3) CBS News 


(15) Your Right to Say It 


.(10) NBC News 


(27) Oral Roberts 


(13) Movie "Phfft" 


^ 9p.m. 


7p.m. 


(10) Bold Ones 


( 3) Truth or Consequences 


(15) Behind the Lines 


(10) What's My Line? 


(27) 700 Club 


(15) Making Things Grow 


9 30 p.m. 


(27) Daktari 


( syCBSMovie "Your Money 


7 -30 p.m. 


or Your Wife" 


( 3) The Adventurer 


10 p.m. 


(10) Anything You Can Do 


(10) NBC Reports 


• p.m. 


(13) Marcus Welby, MO 


( 3) Maude 


(15) Southern Perspective 


(10) Bonanza 


(27) 700 Club 


(13) Temperatures Rising 


11p.m. 


(15) Freoch Chef 


( 3) (10) (13) News 


(27) GooirlfMVS 


11 30 p.m. 


•:30 p.m. 


( 3) CBS Movie "The Picasso 


( 3) Hawaii Five 


Summer" 


(13) ABC Theatre "If You 


(10) Tonight Show 


Give a Dance, You Gotta Pay 


(13) Movit "Niagara" 



Onet)f the nicest gifts offered 
the peofde of Virginia Beadi 
each C^istmas is the Civic 
tAorus's annual Christmas 
concert. It has become as much 
of a holiday treat as the 
gathering of family and friends 
Ijefore a tinsel draped tree. 

And so it was Sunday af- 
ternoon at Princess Anne High 
School when the chorus once 
again unwrapped its offering to 
a standing room only audience. 

It continues to amaze 
foUowers of this group how each 
concert always outdoes the 
previous one.. .just when you 
think the chorus is perfect, they 
seem to perfect the perfection. 

Certainly this year's concert 
will be difficult to top, both in 
musical selection and 
execution. It was something for 
evoyone. No one went away 
disappoitrted. WhitA is me (if 
the reasons the audences for 
Uiese concerts have grown to 
the point ttiat high school 
auditoriums no loi^c 

Surprise is one d the ( 
oi this Christmas gift. Direct 
Walter Noona always sees t& i 
that there are a few little hidklen 
goodies for pe<^le to enjoy. A 
spedal kiddie chorus, unan- 
nounced in the program, was 
this year's treatAnd what a 
treat it was! The children, 
ivobably ranging in age from 
four to 10, came uriexpec^ly 
down the aide with Santa ^us 




Virginia Museum Loan Gallery 
exhibits 'Two Sculptors' show 



An Qchibition of nenrly 60 
sculptures, ranging in size from 
four inches to monumental 
proportions, is currently on 
view in the Loan Gallery of the 
Virginia Museum in Richmond. 

The display "Two .Sculptors: 
l-ipfon arvd Ljichaise." features 
ilio work of a pair of artists 
H.'nerally rocn^nized as two of 
the most important and 
dynamic sciilr nrs in the 20th 
century. Seyir. ur Lipton and 
Gaston I^achaise. 

A native of New York, Lipton 
has achieved a considerable 
reputation during his career 
and the last 20 years have been 
marked with numerous national 
and international awards, 
commissions and acquisition 
prizes. 

I.,achaise, who died in 1935, 
did most of his important work 
in America after emigrating 
from his native France at the 
age of 24 to rejoin tire woman he 
loved. 

"Two Sculptors" has- been 
assembled by the Virginia 
Museum with the assistance of 
Marlborough Gallerj, Inc., the 
l,achaise Foundation, the Felix 
Landau Gallery in Los Angeles 
and the Robert Schoelkopf 
Gallery in New York. 

Lipton is represented in the 
exhibition by 20 sculptures and 
!«u'hai.se's works include some 
:iH small bronzes and 20 
drawings. 

The styles (rf the two artists, 
while complementary to one 
another in an exhibition of this 
type, are shar|riy contrasting in 
imiurc. Lachaise is renowned 
for his vc4uptuous sculptures 
iilorifvinff fnmAlp. msthiritM. 



while Lipton is far mm'e ab- 
stract in his style. 

E.E. Cummings wrote of his 
frie^ilAdbaisc, "The solitude 
caJU sculpture, of Lachaise, 
(jhOT'lMil date; never desdribes; 
cannot pretend. Once within its 
clutch, we.... find a vitality so 
unmitigated as to Im^e in- 
visible, an almost imphinent 
fulfillments the supreme luxury 
of fruition" 

Lipton, in his abstract style, 
notes that all of his worit is 
directed toward a single theme, 
a theme ttiat he feels represents 
man's most basic drive. 

"There is cme cWve in men," 
the sculptm* wrote, "more basic 
and stronger than their pen- 



chant f<M- making tools and 
techn<dogy. That one drive is 
the quest fcnr unravelling the 
mystery of their own existence. 
Man's self-consciousness 
provides the wherewithal for 
the ironies (tf self-ex(rioration. 

"No matter how keen the 
interest in machines, com- 
munications systems and the 
pulse of esthetics, there is 
ahvays the gnawing question— 
what is man, his history and 
destiny both as an individual 
and as a race?" 

"Two Sculptors: Lipton and 
Lachaise" will remain in view 
at the Virginia Museum through 
December 25. 



Art teachers show worjka^ 



Works by art faculty mem- 
bers of EUabetb City State 



Univo^ity are curreirtly teing 
displayed at the Village 
Gallery, through Jan. 8. The 
public is invited to view the 
paintings, many <rf which are 
being offered for sale. 



The Village Gallery e in ttie^ 
College Park Information 
Center, ^26 Providence Road, 
Virginia Beach. The galloy is 
open weekdays frnn 11 a. tnTfo 5 

p.m. and on Saturdays and 
Sundays from noon to 6 p.m. 
There is no admissi(Mi charge. 



Seii. ! pity at First Colonial 



The First v.,oloniaI High 
School senior class and In- 
ternational Th^piaie troupe 
3178 will present "Inherit the 
Wind" by Lawrence and Lee, a 
dramatization of the famous 



s "monkey trial," 
y,i>ec 14. and Friday, 



' • J "A.t 




Dec. 15 at the school aud- 
liwium. 

The play starts at 8 p.m. both 
nights. The school is at 1272 
First Colonial Road, Virginia 
Beach. Acknissim is $l.2S for 
adults and .75 for cUldrai and 
students. Tickets will be 
avAitoWe «t tve Amx. 

.•.-• ,,11% %*.i' 

;■-— -f-HrtiH^i.'."' 



(Ed Finch) and a prancing 
Rudolph, the Red Nose Rdn- 
deer. Backed by the chorus, the 
wee ones sang Rudolph's s(mg 
like littte professionals. The 
audioice loved it. 

Anottier humorous touch was 
feathers drifting down from the 
ceiling at the end of "The 
Twelve Days of Christmas", all 
that remained of the "partridge 
in a pear tree", "fljis took most 
of the chorus by surprise, which 
made it even more fiin for the 
audience. 

Humor and surprises are the 
idng on the cake. The real 
success oi the civic chorus 
concerts is, of course, the ex- 
cellent Moid of voke and 
musK. 

Following his familiar for- 
mat, Noona devoted the first 
part of the program to the 
heavier, classical selections 
and the second porlicm to the 
lifter T^odxam numbers, in 
keeping witti the concert's 
theme, "Christmas, Anicent, 
Traditional and Con- 
tanporary". 

It opened with "In Dulci 
Jubilo", made even more 
beautiful with brass ac- 
companiment, and moved into 
the extremely difficult "In 
Natiyitatem Domini Nostrt Jesu 
Chrlsti Canticum", sfriced with 
excellent solos and strii^ ac- 



^»w««i89B®»(««afe;7;A'Br4PSW«dii»ss*«^ 




companimeirt. 

A medley <rf traditional carols 
was injected this year, ob- 
viously to the delight of 
everyone, bringing a mdlow 
glow oi nostalgia to Uie 
program. Of the nine cards in 
this medley "0 Come, All Ye 
Faithful" was ttie most roising 
and inspiring and will hopefully 
be included again. The "Twelve 
Days of Christmas" selection 
was an extremely intricate 
arrangement with ttiree solo 
quartets leading the chorus. 

Fun broke loose in tiie second 
half with m(»t of the selecticms 
bouncing to the accompaniment 
of drums and base. Part of the 
fun was watching the chorus 
swdl forth with gusto ami en- 
thusiasm in such modem carols 
as "I Saw A Stable", 
"Strangers in flie Streets", 
"Jazz Glwia" and the finale, 
"The Prince of Peace". The 
real grabber in the this part ol 
the concert, however, was the 
deeply empdonal "'The Little 
Drummer^oy". The ch<mis has 
never beat better tlnn it was on 
that selection. 

Two standing ovations ex- 
pressed ttie audience's ap- 
preciation for their gift fr(Hn the 
Virginia Beach Civic Chorus 
and Director Walter Noona.. 4i 
gift to be treasured. 

-Ruby Jean Phillips 



Virgnnia BmcJi's N0vmt Fun Spot 

ME "O" MY 
RESTAURANT 

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 
EVERY tttgHT OF THE WEEK 

SlTSlSVEOALNIGiniY $W 
I iSItAigDSHimg O 



DAaYLUNOffiWi 
SPEOALS 



l7lliAPAaFK: 
425-9646 



■ 'i ;Hiji-;;M ' 'r^' 



VA.BEiU:H 
ABCUCENSE 

i' ' iWi--- ' 3^1 :v:s: ' >t'■!^ ' i;!{;^; ^ .■; -.mMfr ■•:. j.. v.; "■ 





SOPHISTICATED DINING 
FOOD FOR THE EPICUREAN 

dcEANSoPE&WNi FeTlAR 
BANQUET & DINING ROOMS 

^ SEAFOOD & PRIME BEEF 
OUR SPECIALTY 



DAILY LUNCHEON 

SPECIALS 

$1.25 



PO(^E RESTAURANT IIANA(XMENT O). 

OmmFhnM*?* 

PhoM42ft«8M 



wmmmmmmm 



•iHU^^kid 



^SM 



i-Var. 









Wednesday TV 



Dec. 20, 1972 



\ 

3) CBS >IW« 
NBC News 
IMovie - "The Gonf Ighter" 

7p.ni. 
IS) Truth or Cor^sequences 

m What'* My Line? 
0) Electric Company 
m Daktarl 

7:Mp.lll. 

J 3) Stand Up aiM* Cheer 
no) Hollywood Sqtwres 
05) Sporttefl Safety 

ipJii. 

{ 3) Sonny and Cher ~ Mew day 
(M» Adam-13 

(13) Paul Lynda ^ ^^ , ^ 
(15) A New England CI»rlMma» 
(27) Charisma 



K,y 



(YO) Mystery Movie 

(13) Movie of the Week - "The 

Weekend Nun" 

(15) PiaytH>use New York 

(27) Say It Loud 

tp.m. 
( 3) Medical Center 
(27) 700 Club 

lOpJM. 

( 3) Cannon 
(10) Search 
(13) Julie Andrews 
(15) Soul! 
(27) 700 Chil) 

I1p.iii. 
( 3) (10) (13) News 
I1:30p.ni. 
( 3) MoSne "Violwit Road 
(10) Tonight Show 
(13) Movie - "Paths <rf Glory 



Old DcHnkrion University 
establishes faculty trio 



Three performing faculty 
nembert in Old Dominion 
University's DefMrtment of 
Italic have dedded to flU a 
ygid J^net Kriner, visiting 
lecturer of cdlo; Margaret 
Hamidi, instructor of violin; 
and Harold Protsman, In- 
MroctM* of piano, have formed 
dwfirst ODU Faculty Trio in an 
attempt to expose student;* |it 
the univorsity and the com- 
mnntty as a wbde to diamber 
nuiic. 

"Most music departments 
hsve a group like tMs," Prots- 
man said, "and so we're 
starting The ^oup has become 
apo^lity thanks to the htaing 
of the first fuO-tiroe violin 
teciwr (Miss Harraah) in 1971. 

"It's good music and we Mk 
to play it. We're all performers 
as w^l as teachers and we want 
more students and more of the 
community to hear it," he 
added. 

Chamber musk has one in- 
itniment for each musical part 
pkiying ensemUe music. The 
word "chamber" is derived 
from the fact that it was 
original^ writtra to be per- 
formed in a small romn rather 
ttttn a lar^ church or theater. 

Each member of the trio 
brinp musical credeiAials from 
^ther die Tidewater area «* 
odier parts ol the country. 

Mrs. Kriner dkl her degree 
wwl at the Philadel^ia 
Afttany of Muiic. She plays 



with the Feldman String 
Quartet and is prin^Ml cdUst 
for the Norfolk Symphony 
Orchestra. 

Mias Hand^ attended tiie 
Eastman School of Music, 
Utdversity of Rochester, and 
l«S pbiyed in a quints with the 
famed Eugene List She has 
beena guest performer widi the 
continuing Southern Vermont 
Musical Festival and die 
Blossum Summer Musical 
Festival 

Protsman received his 
deg^ from the CoUege - 
Conservatory of Music of the 
University of Cincinnati. He has 
played widi die Cindnatti Civic 
Orchestra and die ODU Com- 
munity Ordiestra, and » an 
annual guest of the FeHman 
String Quartet 

The repertwre of die trio 
inchideft chamber nMsi^ using 
piano from die late lith century 
tiirough die present Most of the 
material is taken from the 
works ^ Beethoven, Moiart 
Brahma. Ravel. S«hi*ert and 
Hindemith. 

Although the group has 
performed in public this fall, 
diey have yet to give their first 
full concert Such a c«¥»rt is 
tenlativdyiteanedforJan. tiin 
ODU's Technology Theater. 
Protsman emphasizes, 
however, ttiat the group will not 
be limited to performing on the 
univenityeampos. 




tlR ASRTON FAMay ii ptaiyci ^ Rakwi Cdaluw. KailjF^aweiHWMdwMd. M 
WiittaiM Md Jenifer Raye WiUbuna to the Ltttte Tteatre •»«««•»'■ ^j^^C, 
•«8peiikii« «f M«Mer," with perf trmaaecs alghtiy throi«h Satwday. Dec. If. jf hata fcy 

BobPheipa) 



A review 



Tidewater Dinner Theatre 
imveiled its holiday fare last 
week wldi a sort of eggnog 
{lavtM^ (dd timey melodrama 
seasonally titled "Humbug aid 
Holly". 

Unfortunately Uw spirits 
flavor overpowers die dramatic 

intent to sudi a point die show 
(fieolves into a mMunadi of 
utter chaoa. 

1^ riww was written imd 
directed by Jay Huguely. based 
on die tenqwance rado*ama 
"Ten Ni^ in a Bar Room" by 



~'^ 



funny 



Ttie extremtt were rather 
interesting and oijoyaUe at 
flrst..die stalk, tom^ smile 
and breast-beating of Young 
WHUe White (Robert Gravri); 
die sinister hanky-panky of the 
villains (Logan .Pope and 
Dennis Percy), thi lisping in- 
nooense cS Lilly Violet (Deriece 
McKemman); the hillarious 
antics of lovable Yoimg Frank, 
Boy Wonder (Jade O'Brioi); 
the ^kunken patter of Joe 
Morgan (Joshua Sosaman); the 
atariy-eyed baby dell stare of 



William S. Pratt. It's a slapstick y^ iteryfpoma £ie B^) 
takeoff m the "evils of drink»1r--SeTT '"^ _^^_^ 
^h the audience is en- ltstdt«louta*apr«ttygood 
ceuraged to hiss die villain and eateg/romp wift some clever 

*•"" O^ . ^« _• '» >,>ui <.a#>lKu timAB Kilt 



cheer d>e hero, a revival of 
America's favorite theater 
term ol the lest century. 

Enggeration was one of the 
secrets of success of tiiese 
(kramas of yesteryear. But the 
downfall of Tidewater's 
••Humbug" is exaggerated 
exaggeration... just too, too 
much <rf everythtag. 



aedoM and catdiy tunes. JM 
before the first act was over it 
was wearii« ddn. The audience 
kept apecting a chM^ of 
pace. It didn't come. And the 
second act completelj^ diain- 
tegrated under U» monotngr of 
tWssamenew. 



The cast gave it a good try— 
Gravd ai^ Pope were par- 
ticularly good and O'Brien was 
a scream as a drunken Boy 
Wonder-but tiiey just couldn't 
cope witii die nonsense ex- 
pected of them. 

And to further arnipUcate 
their lot, the cast was faced widi 
a set that wouldn't w«*. It was 
supposed to transform fr<Mn a 
tavern into Little Mary's 
bedhroom widi the greatest of 
ease. Birt it di<hi't And it won't 
unless it's reinforced suf- 
ficiently to tdte the strain of all 
flie maneuverii^. 

'•Humbug and Holly" sknj^y. 
isn't put together {Nroperly. But 
even if it were, we question 
whedier pte-durowii« or a little 
girl dying of a glass in her 
forehead is what peofrfe want to 
Imigh at. 

-Rtdiy Jean Phillips. 





SEAFOOD 

OUR 
SKC3M^LTY 

^ ^fCattteman'sRoonl 

A/\ X GRANlYSr.AXraiEMASON 

*^ \/ Ope«fofBieakfcrti««fc-D««* 

$ DlW* ■ "••^ *''**'••"■ *® ' ^^^ 
' Opaa Sm^ • 9 ajn-jb 3 Ml. 

«M DKlJiMAaeR Buffet 

BUDGET RBffMAR IN UKBY 

2 SHORT BLOCKS FROM SCOPE 



THE GIKLS <W ^'A rwMiy TlriM# 

Ctarlotte C«oper •■« OaMaw rtwl Hilli 
Plax. 



Phons 464-9653 3139 Short Drw«,W«t 

WE SPECIALIZE IN CRAB SOUP 

Charlies Seafood 
Resmaunt 

Vkgnii Bmdi, Va. 

King Cmb 
- ^sJes • Chops 

VVE CATI^TaPltf\^I^PARTIES 

:*.FT,snP0RY 









-mtmmism^t 



(it riw 



Pa 



Page B-VtINDJAMMER, DEC. 14, 1972 



.1 



Ob) 
wh 
we 
7 
Li 

m 

Li 
fai 

foi 
in; : 
of I 
Cb 

UV 
wi 

ao 
'. 

C6 

re 
th 
CI 

bi' 

tf 

rt 

hi 

hfl 

4* 

I* 

rt 

L' 
oi 

iK 
ff 
f& 

a< 
w 



a. 
n 
a 
<h 
h 
b 

c 

V 

V 

a 

i 

I, 
\ 
I 

1 

t 




>.'■ *• *^wmm^mmm^m^^f'v^wm9:iKK.m'>mKM9fmwmmlm-^■m*la i ^ j i i >ij u^ivwBi^w-^^^vp^a^lRpvmBpipp^pSfPippppi^f^OTHPP^MiVMPiniwiriipv^ 



»«»>"^i« # .f". 



,i,flBi*viaaaaa«iaxaa«« 



A 



<;?.■• 





approves 
trail in Seashore Park 



I 



The State has approved a 
long-awaited bike trail 
through Seashore State 
Park. ..providing it doesn't 
have ah adverse effect on the 
natural feabires of the park. 

Word of the decision came 
Friday from Governor Lin- 
wood Holton in a letter to 
Ddegate Owen Pickett and 
from State Parks C6m- 
missioner Ben Bolen in a 
letter to Senator AX Canada 
Jr. '"""'"•' ' ii 

Both the governor and Bolen 
stressed the point ttiat the' 
project, though approved, 
would be experimoital for the 
time being. 

"I understand that cabin 
guests and cdmpers at the 
park last year were permftted 
to rkle bicycles on the main 
trait," Holton wrote, "and 
after a careful study of the 
^ects this activity wiU have 

on the natural enviraQm«;t, 
the Divuion d Parks has 
decided to permit bicycle 
riders to use this 3.5 mile main 
trail as a part of the 6ike trail 
being developed by the City of 
Vii^inia Beach." 



perimoit; and if the use of this 
But the governor warned 
"Thiis is the nature <rf an ex- 
periment* and if the use of this 
trail by bicycle riders does not 
have 4ny detrimental effect on 
the iiatural features <rf the 
park, the Division of Parks 
will have to discontinue the 
trail's use as a bike trail." 

Bol«n said basically the 
same thing: "Afto- a cai^ful 
evaluation of the possible 
rffects ai the bike b^il, we 
have decided to work with the 
City in permitting bike riders 
to use the 3.5 mile main trail 
Uirough Seash(M% State Park, 
with the Understanding that if 
this does have an adverse 
effect on the natural features, ' 

we will discontinue its use." 
The Seashore Park bike 
trail is but me portion of a 
trail proposed by the Virginia 
Beach Jaycees and the city's 
Department of Parks and 
Recreation. 

The State decision, 
however, was termed "a real 
breakttirough" in the overall 
plan by H. Japk Jennings Jr., 
past presklent of the Jaycees 



and sparkplug in the project. 
"Now all that remaiis is for 
the City of Virginia Beach to 
make available the necespry 
funds for the preparatiOT of 
the already city-owned oM 
railroad right-of-way ex- 
tending from Lynnhaven Inlet 
to Seashore State Park," 
Jennings said. 

The Community Bike Trail, 
which has been wi Uie plan- 
ning hoards since last 
January, would start at 
Lynnhaven Inlet and continue 
for about 10 to 12 miles, in- 
cluding the portion through 
the park, to terminate in the 
Cavalier Hotel area. It would 
only cross one major 
thoroughfare. Great Neck 
Road. • • / 

^ Kventually, the Jaycees and 
Department of Park and 
Recreation hope to extend the 
^il west through Bayside 
ttorough to connect with a 
proposed trail svstem in 
Norfolk's Azal^ Gardens and 
sou* through the Beach 
Borough, along ttje boardwalk 

jnd parallel to General Booth 
Boulevard, J6 Red Wing Park 

j^nd the^ndbridge area. 



WcJler seeks Rudee permit 



The Amy Cenw of 

CBMMga ttaB a rapiMt trma 
M.J. Wdio- for • ptfmit to 
eoMlnict hto pof^M of tte 



Wdl«r, of Vii^inia Beach, 
WW te wBCOMft il design 
Mto- flar fltt oMnmercial 
de^k^mcnt of ^ dty-owned 
land beritered by inston 
Salom, Mediterranean and 

▲ufMyae 



Hie Cm^ has pvei notic of 
the permit application ami is 
requesting public opinions 
regarding the . propw^ 
proj^rt. n^ v^mam AmM 
be mmitted to tte Carps at 
ttieir l^wMk ^hx ao lata-, 
tiban January 12, 1S?3. 



He'll 



4iyllp|pn Crist 

No matter wlsit other six 
year-old boys find under Uieir 
trees Christmas morning, 
Michael Raymond Velasco of 
Pembroke Shor^i knows that 
he already has the finest gift 
of all. 

On Dec. 6. at the United 
States Oistrict Court in 
Norfolk. Michael became an 
American citizen. And for 
Michael, that was the thir^ he 
wanted njost. 

There were 103 adults and 12 
children of many nationalities 
naturalized that (toy. There 
were B from Uie Beach; 
Midiael was the only child. 

His parents, Ted Velasco, 
chief personnel man stationed 



never forget Christmas gif 



I 



and his wife Alita, attemled 
the ceremony with their other 
son Gerard. 9. 

Michael's father said, 
"Gerard Is an American 
citizen because he was born in 
California. So Michael kept 
after us all tlw time because 

hewanted toheonetoo. Sowe ^ 

made the application and It^l — o^cor tii ni tV 
you he was one prjKKTHoy 
when he got that (%rtificate." 

Both Ted and Alita Velasco 
are Phillipine natives; he is a 
naturalized citizen, she has 
not yet received her citiz«i- 
ship. 

They said that the cerenony 
was both solemn and moving 
as .Judge Richard B. Kellam 
^ntroduced the speaker, Lt 



with the Navy at Dam Neck, ^*'' f^ekxrt E. Ayws, a West 



Point graduate and District 
Engineer for Water-Ways, 
Army Corp, Engineers, 
Dt^rtment of th^ Army. 

Avers said: "Men and 
women around the world 
would glacUy give all they 
pos^s to be .where you are 
today - to live in a land of 
freedom, 
equalTtv, democracy, and 
progress 

He tohithem that one of the 
greatest privileges of 
.American citizeiship and we 
of its deepest (4)ligations is to 
participeie in our democratic 
governmont under law. 

Cautiomr^ tiiem to respect 
and dbey the laws fA our 
nation, liie said, "You must 
study tt)e issues, thiiic tf6out 



them, and tne your support 
and your vote to improve this 
country." 

He stressed the great deeds 
of our forefathers, but he 
added... "we are equally 
proud of the deeds of 
naturalized citizens like 
yourselves who have hirip^ to 
defend and strengthen our 
country and its institutions." 

The four words: "Kjf" ^" 
American," wWch theliwly 
naturalizeid citizeiis are now 
privil^ed to say, are charged 
with importance, Ayers said, 
"You must speak them 
humbly, thankfully, and 
reverently... you will have 
upon your shoulders a share in 
the preso-vation of the great 
gift of freedom and op- 



portunity for wMch other! 
have paw dearly." 

And if Michael VelascO 
wasn't qttfte able to conl> 
prehend all of thi? cerranony, ^ 
made a deep im{M^sion,i^ 
him and his parents qn^ 
othoti presoit 

A prc^ram was givoi by the 
Borough of Norfolk Chapter 
' and the Princess Anne County 
Chapter of the Daughters ot 
the American Revolution. 
Chikta-en of the American 
Revolution distributed 
welcome carcta and flags. 

It was tipped off by & 
stirring performance of th4i 
Cdor Guard frrnn the Marine 
Cwps Naval Base, Norfolk. 

And It's not likely that suc^ 
year-old Michael Velasoo wiO 
ever foi^t that special da^. 





45-15 'On time' Brickell reports 



» RvKIRK RABUDER 

^perintendent of Schools 
E.E. Brickell informed City 
Council Monday that the 45-15 
pilot school project. wWch will 
begin in June, is , "on 
schedule." 

The 45-15 schod schedule is * 

similar to the quarter system 

used in most cdleges. The 

elementary school students in 

four |Hlot schools iM attend 

classes for 45 dlr^s and 

vacation for 15. School 

holidays will, be 

to the college 



vacation 

similar 

sdtedute. 



sIlHrfkell ftlso in^ortned 
incil of the plans i6 
measure the effectiveiKss of 
the pilot project. The 
Supefintendent stated that the 



School Bo£^-d has tried to find 
unbiased witnesses to judge if 
the program will continue 

alter its two-year trial. Both 
Columbia and Princeton 
Universities have been 
engaged to study the cost and 
'effectiveness of the program, 
Brickel told Council. 

The par«its of the students 
participating in the two-year 
test of the program should all 
be contacted by Jaoiary 12, 
1973 Brickeil informed 
Council. 

In an interview aft* tt»e 
Council meeting BrfckeB 

Hie t&>w pregmAWH being 
K^epted as he had hoped by 
Oie parents of tte studoits. 
'*^""They are wiWi« to par- 



ticipate in the program," 
stated Brickell, "that is very 
important." 

Brickell feels the parents 
"will evaluate the program on 
their terms." 

"Their acceptance o^ 
rejection of it will be the key to 
its continuance." 

Asked how the students feel 
about the new prograai 
Brickell steted "The childrMi 
are very much a^lvare of 
what's happenir^. 

"Children are extrem^y 
adapta^e. -J 

"If there are ^Bg to be 

»r ^rentf. resist ^tan 
nusre tlwn the sliideiti do. 

"It is almost impossible to 
predict immunity attitude." 

BridwU pointed to the 



Prince William County 
project, tile only other school 
systen in Virginia to try the 
45-15 program, saying that 
"according tp them it has been 
accepted bf everyone oon- 
cwned." 

According to Brickell tHe 
curriculum for the elementory 
stodents wi^ be the same, but 
it wiU be tate in a diffenpt 



Legisktive d^ng^ sou^it 

Racing, Land developmrait, 
taxes, of concern to the jHiblic 



City Councilman Donald H. 
Rhodes lead a delegation 
urging legislation permitting 
pari-mutual betting in 
Virginia, and the location of a 
racing facility Tn Virginia 
Beach, during Moflday- night's 




Hearings set 

Public hearini»i for ihe 
i<rt;ional Water and 
Keiiional Sewer projects 
were set by Ciiy Council 
Monday. 

Koth hearings will be heM 
during Uie regularly 
schedule! meeting of 
January 12. I»73. The 
liteeiing starts at 2 p.m. 

Both regional projects 
have been approved in 
content by all the 
municipalities Evolved In 
Ihe Southeastern Planning 
District. 

It is hoped that each 
municipalities will gain an 
i^>ut from its citizens and 
cmncil. 

For information con- 
cerning eitlwr the r^lonal 
Sewer or Water plan contact 
Sam Clay at the Virginb 
Reach public InfM-matiOB 
mnce. ohone 427-4^1. 



public hearing on legislation 
prcqjQied for the next General 
Assembly session. 

es said such an activity 
"i.. critical importance to 
us frow the staix^int of the 
res(Nrt Miented aspects "of 
Virginil Beach." Rhodes 
%(4i^aut the City was n(rt as 
coi^rned over the amount of 
revenue defived from the 
trade's q)eration as 0{^>06ed 
to revenue from filling 
everyday needs of th«se 
patronizing the track. He said, 
"I think these indirect 
ecoiwmic benefits from the 
track would be very beneficial 
to the City." 

Reninding legislators that 
pari-niutuel proponents have 
suggested northern Virginia 
(H* ttie Tidewater area as 
pc^ible locations for the track 
Rhodes said, "I hope our 
desire to have it would affect 
the State's decision as to 
where to locate the track." 
State Senator A. Joseph 
Canada said, "It would hdp us 
to have a resolutim firon your 
City Council favoring pari- 
mutual betting." Rhodes 
assured Canada he woidd 
introduce tfie resohitimi for 
Council's e^Ueratiim. 

AlthM^ the heari^ at- 
tndam^ wm hmU a number 
{rf legislative^^ttati ^mte 



presented by r^klente on a 
wide range of sid>jects. 

John Moss criticized ttie 
policy ^appointing local 
school, board members as 
of^pe^ to being elected, be 
coi^aded ttiis was in contrast 
to 'irovisiohs of the State 
Cttistitution. He kid, "The 
appointment of school boards 
dMs nothing to promote 
Democratic ' government," 
' and requited t^lslation to 
permit localities ttie option of 
appointing or electing scluxri 
board members. 

Issac Snyder, Treasury-, 
Aragora Recreation Centa*, 
requested legalizing of Ungo 
for non-proflt organizations. 
Snyder panted to the arrest 
last Mardi - of a group of 

(CoMmed O^p^ 5) 




thf 

1 



'^hi 
^Pke 




■RKnCELL 



time frame. The diffwen) 
subjects win be chopped 'in^ 
units d time. • 

"Cost (A the program isiam 
of the things we liave toifini 
out. ; 

"^ou have to weigh th$ 
obirfous increase in 
operation costs against 
construction coste. . , 

'j^This is part of thl 

lation," according ti 

ften. 1 

JBrickell w«rt on to »p 
ttiat the i^aake is 
building n«#«iM«te or.. 
bttie»"4*^rQ^m. "ttfcj^ 
eMctfvaUe b mattf ^t^m 
flfttiebeadi."' f 

Pointing t« Credb as aft 
«Mmple of a sdKMl ttiat is not 
overcrowded, Brickell fur* 
ttered Ns expUinatoi b^ 
Mgring "Oie first ttang you' 
need is 33 per cent mor^ 
students than you can han^ 
die." Creeds, he stated, would 
need to Nive students brought 
into the area to make tin 
program neccessary. 

TheSdM^ Board recdved ^ 
$75,000 grant from tlte Stat^* 
for ttie planning of Uie 45-15 
program-but the 
opotitional cMts wiU be 
by the City. During 
Cmncil meeting Brickell 
nioitioned that the pro} 
.eoidd use anottiOT $100,000. % 
Tite schoote that will par-f 
tkipate in ttie new program; 
are: Windsor Wootte, WindsO^ 
Oaks, Holland Roadand Ptez^l 
Elonoitary Schools. ;¥ 



Scott oatlines 
varied revenue use 




A 19 

ForGrMt 
OifKtmat 

GIFT 
IDEAS 



City Manager Rt^er M. 
Scott has (xitlined the 
proposed use of Federal 
Revenue Sharing Funds whi^ 
Virginia Beach will receive. 

TI^ outtine as present^} to 
City Council Monday indicates 
the lion's share of the 
$l,882.50« representir« tt» 
first hiilf of the allocatton, 
recent' ' recdved would be 
used ii. new highway |M-ojects. 
Totalling $1,171,000 these 
funds would be used in 
rdocating existtng roadways, 
and-or improving (h- extending 
existing thcrouKhfarfs. 

Of the remaining $711,500, 
Scott praposm use of ^,000 
to construct a new buiMlqg to 
replace tlw ^(tttli^ 
Vohinte«- Fi« 




In todays issue: 





VMii^ SMM is HI 



(MilMip^h|i& 







i 



headquarters. Another 
$178,500 is proposed to financg 
future sewer installationf^ 
projects in varioiB parts of ttii 
Ci|y. ^ 

Tl» major p«tion of ttif 
secanA half of the al]ocatidni| 
another $1 ,882,500, is propo^ 
to finance additional n^w| 
sewer installations in ttfcA 
amount of ^12,000. New hig>|*~^ 
way projects wouM ab^l^ 
$492,000 of this portion ol\ttie. 
funds, Witt) $^7,000 to finale: 
a new fire station in 
College Part; area. 

Fdlowit^i a review of ttie 
propMab by City Coumrfl, and 
any recommended changes, 
the outlined uses irf the fun<is 
will be subjected to s public 
hearing before any ' ex- 
penditure are approved. 



■^^£2 



THE SUN 



So much for lust 



; ByKtRTMRABUOER 

I My big chan<% hM come. I was gmng to imoyver 
l^taB^^fo <tencing— at l^ist what ha^'t been 
♦nw^^red already. 

I Qty Council is Jiaving a problem deciding what 
M^ go^o eitatls. I took it up<Hi myself to check 
Jut ttie i^timi and report back. 

j The windows were covered with white cloth, 
Inctaibtedly to cover alleged nasty actions from 
tWe inrtocait public. 

ft 

1^ Yells and icr^ms escaped into Oie stre^ as I 
IKtog open the chwr of my grand expose'. 

Vfeiws of men frantically climbing onto the 
Kge, girls being thrown down to the grcmnd, and 
lust open to {Niblic view danced in my mind. 

I Reality. The eight-blall had been sunk out of 
pffiB, Shoute of damnation accompanied the 
maiter far the next game of po6l. : ; ' 

l . So much for lust. 

i ; But ^re she was. Volcanic gyrati(»is attracted 

^ five of some twenty customers at the tor. 

f So much for lust. 

I My ring side seat afforded me ttie chance to 
l^)eak to the bartender. "Have rapes in the areai 
I^Mne up since you started the topless act?" I 
luiered. 



f "Nqjed/decreased." 

% So mu^ for lust. 

5 Tlie magnetism of the pool table in the back 

jwner k^t attracting me, too. The nasty action of 

is to|ri^s go-go scene just didn't seem worthy d 

pfe white window cloth. 

;• So mwh for lust. 

m 

:] Our topless lady must have left the stage with 
4ixed emoti(His. As th« crowd turned from the pool 
^He, a round (tf applause met her... as well as 
#*te of ''Less, l^s. .." But less what..? 

' So much for lust. 



> :"What is a n«se ymmg girl lite y6U doing with a 
►biike this?" ! ask e d g ti i i-faotMig ^»ve myjreat 
#£p(»e'. Ap lilcdbo^c father, a sicra^i^, eb^en 
#)Udren tosupp^t rtnind grapdinM^.. any one 
JF these noble cai^es was enot^ to wring my 
^rt. 




THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1972 




"N(^, mwiey." 

So much for lust. 

Diverting the bartender from the pool table, I 
qiKstioned him about wi^ly publicized rumors of 
faarassmait from the i^ighbcring establishments 
and the police. **They give you much trouble?" 

"Nope. Just the Baptists." 



CANDIES 

THERNESTOF 




Always « Chritan«s hvortte . . . creams, out^ 
frura, attain^ MHijats, to^esa>tdi, 
cnui^s umI dwwy centers, dipped in finest 
<kffc Md miJJc dwa^R. 

1 lb two 2 lb. 13.95 3 Ih. |5.5>0 5 ll>. #.75 

« 8 OS. bat $IJB0 

INGRMU'S PHARMACY 



mi-mmm. 



3Mi A Atentfc Awt. 
nMNW 4284407 



fWTfiiMCotanMIU. 
42M3M 



•••■ 



Employee protection 



Delegate Glenn B. Mc- 
aanan plans to introduce 
legislation in the General 
Assembly session opening 
next month to offer employee 
(M-otectiOT under the State's 
Blue Law. 

McClanan has requested the 
drafting of legislation which 
would prevent the dismissal of 
any employee refusing to 



work on Sunday when bis 
business firm opens for 
Sunday sales, if Uiat tnainess 
firm was not operating wi 
Sunday at the time (rf the 
employee being hired. 

McClanan is also |»t)pcBiQ0 
that any employer who 
dismisses any em|doyee undw 
the above conditions be guilty 
of a misdemeanor. 




Together^ t^t pm^fulness and warmth, Gigi and her puppy find a special kind 
of security belonging only to the young. (Photo by Tom Linehan) 



USA 
JAPAN 

MAKE MANY RADIOS, STEREOS, RECORDERS 
HOME AND AUTO 8 TRACK AND CASSETTE 
UNITS-WE SELL PARTS AND REPAIR THEM 

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES OF RECORD CHANGERS 

C B RADIO REPAIRS 

AUDIO CENTER 

SALES • SERVICE • PARTS 
HOME SERVICE CALLS-PICK UP & DELIVERY 



159 E. Litde Creek Rd. (WudsCcnmer) 
587-1903 Next to l^tin TriKks 688-8408 

VfE RENT PUBUC ADDRESS SYSTEMS 



.J 



S :. 



There Is Still Time 

For Last Minute 

Holiday Shopping 

* ■ '' 
Shop at your leisure in beautiful, new 
Hilltop North Shopping Center. Over 
31 stores chock full with gifts of every 
description. 

New traffic lights make entering and 
leaving a breeze and there's, always 
plenty of free parking near your favor- 
: jt^ store or rifestaurant. \ 
And don't forget the kiddles— Santa's 
standing by in his North Pole work- 
shop every weekday 3 pm to 6 pm, and 
J^m to 9 pm. Saturdays Noon to 6 pm. 

OPEN NIGHTS TIL 10 PM 



. -H • 




I 



31 Great Stores to serve you. 



M 



Miks HMbp Nortfi SlK»pim Center 
YiMrOiralmasC^ 

Laskin Road at Hilltop 



Andreas 
Ar1«i#'i Uiifonni 4 T«»«te m*^ 

BMchSirilandW 

B««jft Book Shop 

Carol Lm Donut Silop 

»^ tetCTMin 8Mp«„mrtwi 



CMra't 

^}»rton A Lm. LM. 

mn» NtMon^ Bank 

^od F^r ChMlity Oia^wnt 

GUtert <^lc^ Company 



HMltti Food ^>r« . 

HOM 4 ClothM (^JtlA 

.torgM's F^tt CiM 

LaVogiM 

MaMmityMM 

PaopiMOrufl 



Radio ShMk 
ffetM Stof»«. l«5. 

^'SKwing CJrcIt Fabric 
' Shonvy't 

S<Mn«ttiin ElM 



T«yler eufg«M iMralyMnt 

Th»M«»^8hop 
wjmomi All* iiid ^rtto 



4 J I ;> J J Ji I III li^m J mm^^^mmmmmmsmmf^mmmmmm^iff 



r^^- ^^^.^ ' 



■l^ 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 21, 197^ 




THE SUN 



M, 



pfimr 



1 



Whitehurst moves into Beach office 



V 



Thp rxpccled last nliiiHte delttt{p of Chrhitmas i^ail materialized this weelc. TIUs is 
<«l.v a samplinitlof tlie mail awaiting delivery, after being processed, at the Virginia 
s^iif^ MM llandUnu Annex last Sunday aftei-noon. 

a Beach Association 



executive committee 





'" Election of a four-man 
< executive committee from the 
;'rtewlx^,-*(ormed 19-meBiber 
\ advisory board of the Virginia 

,< Beach Association, a nonprofit, 
* nonpartisan group of business 
land professional men, was 
} announced recently. 
\ The association's first 
Jr^ular chairman is William 
•J, Vaughan, president of 
«Albic, Inc., developer, builder 
*and operator of the new 
Sheraton Beach Hotel in 

Sunday sales 
ienter court 

Commonwealth's Attorney 
lAndre Evans last Friday 
iiought a permanent injunction 
against further Sunday sales 
by five resort city department 
stores. 

Evans identified the stores 
as Millers, Zayres, J.M. 
Fields, G.E.X., and Kings. 

Evans contends the stores 
have violated the Virginia 
Blue Law by remaining open 
on Sundays, as well as 
violating recent provisions 
permitting Sunday sales of 
prontDited items proviaing net 
■profits from such sales are 
aonated from ctiaritable 
activities. This results, ac- 
cording to Evans, from stores 
failii^ to rendor a proper 
accounting of their net profits 
frmi these Sunday sales. 

Friday's Circuit Court 
proceedings concluded with 
Judge Rd9ert S. Wahab, Jr., 
continuing the proceedings 
until January 18. This will 
permit such sales to continue 
at least until that date. 

Bankoffidals 

Three (tfficials of People's 
Bank of Virginia Beach at- 
tended the President's 
Association Management 
briefing last week in Ft 
Lauderdale, Fla. 

The group included K. 
James Crouch Jr., executive 
vice president; Joseph 
Kyofski, comptroller; and L. 
Wirt Walker, vice preskloit 







H»lp prcvtnt wiltifV plants, 
iktftic shocks, irritatirv colds, 
•nd high fuel bills... with 
C Wn i atrfl l* floononwcal. 
Mlomatic humidificatibni 
Can today! 



Cinwivol 

ADAMS 



OOMPANT 

t1420lli8lHMt 
aMf1«(7Q9)4»«731 



Virginia Beach, and of Paul H. 
Rose Corporation, a locally- 
headquartered retail chain 
with nine outlets in Virginia 
and North Carolina. 

Elected vice chairman was 
R. Bradshaw Pulley, an in- 
dependent agent for the 
Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of America, with of- 
fices in Virginia Beach. 

Lawrence A. Sancilio, 
president of Larasan Realty 
Corporation and several 
related companies in the real 
estate, insurance and in- 
vestments field was elected 
secretary, and J. Burton 
Harrison, president of Peoples 
Bank of Virginia Beach was 
chosen as treasurer. 

The officers will serve one- 
year terms commencing Jan 
i. 1973. The permanent 
committee replaces a tem- 
porary executive group which 
had served since the group 
was formed in August. 

Establishment o^ the ad- 
visory board ~ or board of 
directors - was also an- 
nounced. In addition to the 
four members (rf the executive 
committee, the advisory 
board includes: 

Thomas C. Broyles, a 
the law firm of 
Broyles and 



J. Fanney, 
of Life Federal 
and Loan 



partner m 

Brydges, 

McKenry; 

William 
president 
Savings 
Association; 

Oscar B. Ferebee, Jr., 
president of Green Run 
Corporation, devel(^rs of the 
planned community of the 
same name; 

Charles H. Forbes, 
president of F<»i>es Candies, 
witii manufacturing facilities 
in Virginia Beach, and sales 
outlets throughout the East 
Coast; 

John E. Fordi retired Naval 
captain who served as com- 
maiMler of Oceana Naval Air 
Statim iM-ior to taking his 
present position with Bush 
Construction Company; 

W. Wright Harrison, 
chairman of the board of 
Virginia National Bankshares 
Corporation; i 

George H. Leary, vice 
president and a major 
stockhoMer of Triton Towers, 



a beachfront hotel: 

Harry B. Price, president of 
Price's, a locally based chain 
of appliance stores; 

James P. Sadler, president 
of Sadler Materials Cor- 
poration, a major producer of 
concrete and concrete 
products recently acquired bv 
Baltimore — headquartered 
Arundel Corporation: 

.1. Wesley Snow, president of 
Snfw, .Junior & King, Inc.. one 
of the largest masonr\' con- 
tractors in the area; 

William G. Thompson, .Jr., 
president of Thompson Royal 
Dodge, a major Virginia 
Beach auto dealer; 

Richard F. Wilton III, 
president of Smith & Weltop, a 
leading department store 
chain: 

N.G. Wilson III. president of 
Door Engineering, an 
engineering and contracting 
firm serving the construction 
indu.stry; 

J.W. Wood, Sr.. a former 
high-ranking executive with 
Colonial Stores, a well-known 
food store chain, and former 
chairman of the Virginia 
Beach planning commission. 

The advisory board will 
meet quarterly, providing 
broad policy guickince 

Boston promoted 

Glen 0. Boston. Jr.. 
assistant manager of. Ford 
Motor Company's Norfolk 
Assembly Plant, has been 
promoted to manager of the 
company's Fairfax (Ohio) 
Transmission Plant. 

Bostmi JOTned Ford in 1951 
as a project construction 
engineer in the Aircraft 
Engine Division and 
progressed through a series of 
management posts to 
assistant manager of the 
Norfolk Assembly Plant in 
1970. 

A native of Canton, Ohio, he 
holds a bachelor of science 
degree in mechanical 
engineering from Illinois 
Institute of Technology and a 
master's degree from Case 
Institute of Technol(^y. He 
also attended Kent State 
University. Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, and 
the University of Wisconsin. 



KyNONJAIIILLtiltEN 

Sun Washington Bureau 
Rpp. G. William Whitehursl. 
R-Norfolk. is waiting for 
furniture to be moved in and 
(rfioncs to be installed in a 
district office to bo opened in 
Virginia Beach. 

Ropinning next month, the 
fourth floor office in the 
Ponibroko One Building at the 
intersection of Virginia Beach 
and Independence boulevards 
will be open Monday-Friday 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Whitehurst also announced 
the hiring of two new staff 
members, but would not 
release their .salaries, which 
are a matter of public record 
but will not be publicly 
(niblisbed until the middle of 
next year. 

Whitdiurst is closing his 
district office in Portsmouth, 
which he no longer represents 
because of redistricting. . 
Rep. -elect Robert W. Daniel 
Jr., R-Spring Grove, has 
announced he will open a 
district office there. Daniel 
will represent the Fourth 
( ongressional District, part of 
which now includes Ports- 
mouth and a portion of 
Virginia Beach. 

Whitehurst and his wife 
Janie plan to spend every 
other Saturday meeting with 
constituents at the Virginia 
Reach office, a spokesman 
said. Mrs. Whitehurst does 
volunteer work in the 
Washington office during the 
week. Remaining Saturdays 
will be spent at Whitehurst's 
other district office located in 
the Federal Building on 
Granby Street in Norfolk' 

During the ■ week, the 
Virginia Beach office will be 
stafifed by Mrs. Blanche M. 



I. 



-LittTctaii 

udqins 



REM ESTATE CO. 

»Sll«UiM.42t.004« 




Peace ON EartN 

Our wish is that this 
season bestow on 
you all it*s blessings. 

CUFF'S 

Repair, Inc. 

4920 Va. Beach Bhrd. 
Phone 497-7349 




1972 Pfymouth Qkket 4 di. Mdan, Am-Pm RacUo, RadM Tiiec, 4 
tnamlMion, 11,000 milet. Htoe Book Price ^|(ht:i>educe(l to.. 



^leed 



1972 Plymouth Cricket, PactOfy Ak Condilkmii«, 4 dt., 6,000 actual 
miiea. Radio, RaiM Tins, Uha new. Blue Book Price OMCreduced to. 



1399 
1699 



BOTH CRICKETS FOR *3000 



1970 Amoican Gtemlin, 6 cyl. Automatic TnmamiMkm, Ata conditioned. 
Radio, exG^rat tiiei, 2S,000 mfaau..(Mify 

1971 Audi too LS, 4 di. Sedan, Automatic TranmiiHion, Ali Con- 
^tiam^ Tinted Glaai^ Sumoof, R^Ttaei, itil under 2 yr/24,000 
Rile wannty. Hue Book frice llMf iiiiiiiii! to.. 



1%7 Ponche 912 Coi^e, 4 ipeed, Radki, Good^^t, No nut, exccfent 
Ifaea, co w pl ei a iy reconditkned..R0diiced from 



dp^ 

P^^^^^" 



.now. 



1970 POiachc 914, Mid-engine ConvertMe Haidtop, Electiomc Pud In- 
jectktOipeed TianmiHkm, RaiUsI Thea, Miht Alt^ Wheeia, Reduced 
Cram f^^4SLMiow.M. 

1970 AwU, 2 di., 4 veed, Ak CoaAtkmed, Am-Fm Radto, New Radiri 
w/w tiiM, 34,000 mam. Mne BotA Mce flN^iedttced lou. 



1969 tonckt 912 Co^pe, 5 ^eed Tn 
tn^Qt ExlMWft Sfmm, Radlri "nm, 



iHkm, An-Pm Radk>, Ex- 



*1499 
•2999 

•2500 
•2400 

•2450 
•3800 



PUfCK IN fPFCCT THRU DEC 31, 1972 ONLYI 



HILLTOP 

PORStZHE AUDI 



noylcs. »r,i3 Paul Hevcre 
Hoad. 

Mrs. Boyles, 4fi, has five 
years experience working 
with constituent requests and 
problems in oonf»ressional 
offices on (apitol Hill. She 
most recently worked in 
Whitehurst's Washington 
office in ltr.ft-70. 

She moved to Virginia beach 
from Okinavvri in October with 
her husband. Dixon R. Koyles, 
a recently retired Air Force 
colonel. 

Another addition to 
Whitehurst's .staff is Kenneth 
(.0. Ilagerly. Springfield, 
who will be Whitehurst's chief 
legislative aide. 

Hagerty, 28, who has 
worked for the last.two years 
as a It^islative aide to Rep. 
Victor V. Veysey, R-Calif. is a 
native Californian. 

A 1970 graduate of the 
Georgetown University law 
school in Washington, he 
drafted legislation during the 
92nd Congress to initiate 
federal supervision of blood 
banks. 

He also drafted amend- 
ments to "determine 
specifically what actual 
results" come from social 
welfare programs such as 
Head Start "to get as much 



bang for our buck as 
possible." Hagerty told the 
Sun. 

The amendments call for 
quanitified and published 
evaluations of die impact of 
programs according to goals 
set by prc^ram directors, 
Hagerty said. 

By spending federal funds on 
programs that may not 
produce anticipated r^ults, 
he said, "wc are depriving 
mirselves of the opportunity 
perhaps of putting the same 
dougl^/ into programs that 
might work." 

He said he did not know, if 
he would continue similar 
legislative work when he 
switches to Whitdiurst's staff 
next month. 



NOW OPEN 

Binfmii^pr Gkiii Coinpoiiy*r 

NEWEST IX)CATKIN 
IN THE 

HHIIOI^ A«A 

624 Fimn- COLONIAL RD. 
TELEPHONE: 425-M27 

• miUtORS-LARGEST SELECTICVf IN THE AREA 

• OLAH A rLAihCMor doon, wiMtom A Mil iSlM 
•TUHENCLOSimES •«LJI»>KilinUI(Mlll09R» 

. • AUIO GtA WiMttB e d ta you eit*y fffdmlmM' 



■l" 



BiniwingBi 

ICO. 



• 624 Pint ColoairfRd. 
Va.lMeli 
42S.9227 



• M«MdaiPari( 
Norfelk, Vkfiirin 
«57-eMl ^^ 



4 



PEACE 




JUST IN TIME FOR 
CHRISTMAS 

SPECIALS! 



-*• 



PRICES GOOD AT ATLANTIC AVE. AND LASKIN fiD. STORES ONLYI 



Ifs a season 

rich in brotbtrly love. 

Lefs share its 

joys mtb one and all. 

STOHL 

REALTY 

4920 Va. Beach Bhrd. 
Phone 497-4851 




I 



COME MJVE 

DRUM 
SET 

ROUND 
HASSOCKS 



REa 

ass ONLY' 




-COUPON- 

RIGHT GUARD 

REG. m 3 OZ. SIZE 

(UMIT 2 PER CUSTOMER) 



witiithis 
coupon 



REG. PRICE 5.99 

KIWMaMaHIK 

7 -COUPON- 

oesE-up 

ItiOlHPASrE 

Re» 88^ PamHy Siie 
aiMIT 2 PER CUSTOMER) 




-COUPCm- tm f^M, 

UDIES* I W' 

PANTY HOSE K^i'w *..?«. 

(UMIT 2 PER CUSTOMER) ooivon 




ONLY 



33 



-COUfON- 
LADfES* POLYESTER 

SUCKS REa5.99 A ^ 

(UMIT 2 PER CUSTOM^ coupo„ 



PRICES GOOD AT ATLANTIC AVE. AND LASKIN BP. STORES ONLY ij 



masief charge 




j>\f 



• 1904 AtLANtlC AVE. PHONE 4213-1963 



USE YOUR BANKAUERICARD - MASTER CHAROE 



i I 



It's a time 
when the 

family comes 

together agi 



Christmas always reminds us of all the 
people close to lis. . .when old friends enjoy 
reunion. 

This year, when you want to get close to 
the people you're close to but far away 
from, call Long Distance. 

You can still feel close with Long 
Distance. . .remembering, laughing, sharing. 
Recalling happy Christmases past. 
We'll be working hard to make sure you con 
have the pleasures of telephoning your 
Christmas greetings anywhere in the 
world. And remember that by calling 
in the evening and on weekends, you ' 
you save money and time. 

Hove a Merry Christmas, and this year 
shore your happiness with a long distance 
coll. We're working hard to improve your 
telephone service because we believe 
w e're o por t o f you. 



I 




* 

i 



Rrst Colony Isleptione Company 

A Mwwbf of Continanfol T«ta|rfi«M SyMwn 



187b LASKIN 



VA BEACH 



i2&0531 



^jgSL. 



THE SUN 



THURSDAY. DB»i^ 21. WI2 






I 




unEK 

kllw 
EHTM 




Planning Commission 
charge is ridiculous 



Yew filarial in tke 
W wu ultu 30fli MM if Ike 
SNtB entitled "CMunissiai 
Dovbted" eharged tke 
Vir^Bia Beach 



paniMe reasmi for tte 




Have yma caasi^red Ow 

pwiln't laat BMpR be waived 
tke pn^eaed ar- 
^f On tte oew mapa 
Ittve 



■rtatMBri aad 

bdnviar. Tk» -ckarge ia 

ridicalflaa aad compietely 



// is Christmas 

emdg «» tte store, cakes bakiiig and 




> MWittiV ^ito oi tlK tree, iddes wafiBg genibr 

liy; 



pHCB% do Bet 
jvar dMrges. Thef kave 
recended tkeur dliective nat 
keariags be rcaoaid aa 
D ecemb er n0L Ttej kave 
agreed t» tte caaMrionBa 
dene la retiev pertteoi off 
fte led and mapa. Tkqr ob-^ 
vian^ are aware Ae Mjr ef 
■la k« a ted or 



shBUBf in the windows, Gidorftil cards of 



qmom fr«n frieods. 



K 



itlrtvaayaa 
Yen 



tf cuieeUng 



^vcB a 
flad Ike avaen cwdd not 
heretefore obtain becanae af 
pubVe ebjectioBB. 
Yea staled tkat tbe prqiend 
n better Iten 
TlBi is not a vriid 
for enacting it inte law 
rcr aaxituB haste. Tins 
ei^ liiD has a zomng er- 
in effect; maiQr parts 
are better than the 
prapoaeo rqaacemcni. 

The liaiaimr conuniniaB 
aa an ab e ra m ttnr ananMiB 
action have taken a wse rtep 
Id protect the property tuntn 
of av dlsr . 

! qoile aware that a 



can teve adverse 
aa weO tA beneficial effects. 
They wish to donmile as 
mai^ of the poffifljle inverse 
effects as they can before 
recoinm«iding passage by 
dfycaaBciL 

Tke propoaed ordbMBce wil 
aflKt approKontriy S0.O0t 
parcds of tend Iqr dtaai^ 
These Ganges wifl involve 
land valaes, tax changes, 
hemes, businesses and 
poniile Rnancial losses for 
tkaewncrs. ne grnt nia ja% 
of these property owoCTS have 
not seen tte nnpB or the text of 
flw ordnance. Hie cnnidex 
«f oar city haD area is not 
casity ae^tsaUe to onr 
woritng dtmns and is not 
opfn en weekends. 

Tke son conU perfom a 
ptddk service bf pnMshing 
maps of tte dty showii« tke 
proposed xoning. The text of 



Yea wpe cuiecl m 
floit VfigBta Bench 




Everyone is aet 
ftat the trvpmei^ 



limdelaetiM devices at NBS^ says 

hy 

devices placed sinlcgiea^r IB a 



sllii 



Saeerdy, 

Flekkcr B. l^cUeld 
tBhd. 



YoB CBB fiad BBidLc^ddactkB devieea in 
tlranifi datea Irted hi the 
"fiieahnnrai 
krad of device AoaU yen gel? In a 



Bat what 



daodi and frested teeafli, leafless trees 
^wiaiersly; 

fteaklftaa fire in tbe fireplace, crackfing its 
la qveMi ivanntt; 



Editorial needs all the facts 



to tte nianfle, scarcdy movBig 
fte line hwi^Mi flbere; 

'Agps Sid cMdrcB and pets onderfost, d o o r bells 
fce r aldfe g the arrival of guests; 



ItoiheEdHBr: 

TWa is ki ropoMe to an 
artfde ftat iqipBued ia a 
taeeat laaBe tf tte VirglBia 
BcBch Smm News, wkidi 




gtfis oBder Hie tree, Iniiday 
from looped ones ater; 



back memories, the isinffiar strains 



ofOtt 



dd people sttttig bgf the Ore, rdivhig the ex- 
of flie difldinen; 



taerth c i around the heavily laden tidbie. 



a tte wisdom and nnderrtimisi^ 

OS through o u t the year flie love and 

have ftis ihiy far our feOowman. 



of Ike Viigbda 
Biag CwamJartaa for its 
teadliag of Am prapoacd 
re ZiMta^ Or- 
I naHK we are 
l«ii« ia aa age atea dhaeat 
criticiBa ef tke 
It" is a 
rflfe. 
1 aafeBcribfr to tke idea of 
oratoPreiir'aad 
hapersoa's ri^ te 
piMic olfidab aad 
1 



witkoot tke beaefit 
ef aaaad edtt. Tbis type of 
artide acconqdishes oaty sae 

iaito aad reaped ia teir 
dceted aad ai^oiated ef- 
Uriali, Ike wtter ef flds 
arude i^^Mreatly dhl aot 



readOy apce that flie dndl of 
this ordmaace needs ftirther 



Haa te property 
aO 9ie 
in 
of this 




ttw ckotee ef 
disparaging laagaage 
rvHecting oa Ike 
aad iatogvity af Ike 1 
afttto keity. l^i^ Hk to 
h^eve flirt ttis arlieie was 
kasUly coBapoaad aad 



Vj^ ■■■I I III lift mm t\ t 

iSB muu waaoiiw oat 
wctfe de^ig«lfliimlliais of 
<Uters worfli of real 
aad flK rtwaifiralton 
lesb telh aa ptoced oB flito 
property wSaffcd the lives ef 
of onr dtiiffns. 

_ COB^ 

inayi 
beatpraoedne ra 
Ok hHty pamnigp of thk 
vohaaieas onkaaace. But I 
■B sare ym wil ftai diat 
kaowledgable peniaaa win 




TkePhnmng Conaniarioa is 
weO aware of ttie urgent need 
for ttis CZO. and also of Oe 
vast nuadiei (|f man kmrs 
fliat kas been ekpended Ity tke 
Flunnig Staff in prepariag 
tkis ordinaBce. Tke Ceai- 
nrissioB has aho qiert con- 
sideradbie tnne working wifli 
tke staff and the puUic in the 
prqparaliflB of ttiis ordbiance, 
and it is of most concern that 
ttiis ordinance be legalty, 
practical and wwhable 
otherwise we will have 
created more problems ttnn 
we teve solved. 

In tte futaflrer it is si^gested 
flnt you get aO the facts then 
Idl it like it is. 

J. Roy AlpUn 

Member, Virginia Beach 
Co 



Wake up! 



1^ fte EdMsr: 

Tke "wintfair' Virginia 
Beadi is about to receive from 
the Federal GoverameBt 
ooBies to us witti Ike stoled 
purpose of r^eviqg tte real 
estate tax burden. Usiag it for 
ttw ewBstnictioB of lemus 
courts and faicyde tiaih at a 
time wbm real estate lazes 
sure riraig defied ite pnrpoae 
and wifl aho defeat certara 
polilidaas v^ hope to profit 
from revenue sharing. 

Wake op^ Virginia Bcaek! 
Our bonded i n ddd e ^ ieas is as 
great m oar aanaal budgd. 
Use this Federal mmttf^ 
which win be paid for m 
evcntuaDy hi^er FEI^KAL 
taxes, to reduce our local 
indebtedness. The United 
States Gevemmeat «ditaas 
much of its epera tia g ex- 
penses from bortewed BMny 
and i^ns to borrow money for 
this proposed reveirae 
sharing. 

A recent editorial m ike 
WaD Sired Journal oonqaured 
Fednal leveuue sharing wifli 
a baduvpt ptaager wke 
"grabs for the ckeck at a 
hmcheoB d tycoeas." 

Ctncemed (Stinns 
Henry C Sivft IHIS 
John B. Gravatt 



type 



devices. In geaend. Ihey bolk give 
prolcdka but fliey coaae wifli dilfercat 



! ■. - . - •■ 

HerewesoaedevicesfliatbavebecalestedbyNBS: 
SEARS CATALOGUE IsiB two SBMkedelBclBcs. Oae BMdd 
wifli catatopK nambcr 3I«-7S»6 opefatea Ihra^ a 
photoelectric ceil and seik for ISUB. It gives gMd preladiaa for 
the money but docs aot have a wwatag devke to alert I 
wilun lis pIsilwhiliM iMJilaniB 
insid wiflia ptag^todedriecerd. if 8^ 
^xtra bidbBwkh year pntdHse. Balialada year hat are hud to 



The otter raodd ia caDed "SBMfce^anf' aad ■ 
catokgse nmiber 34-H^7SM far fCJB. It is aa ii 
flree special aftaMae (Malhay) tetteriea wkkh 
15 J5 and naat be (teaged about oace a year. A 
whea flie tellery mas low. 

Wilkui a few moatts. Sens wfl kave newer 
detectors wMck wil give a 
wnck wil reipare bo batteries. 



^PYROTRONKStesa 
wdfr^oBfletaBd 

"PyreGuaniaar aad sdb for vattri m 
w h o lesa ler s fltot carry "Pyro-A-iArar hraad 



type witt 





off 



Smile for your children's sake 



toa seeoed detector. Whea 
ttie oae upstavs, 



FYROIECTOR nuifces a 
that is darned to test fi ve y e M ». 
••Smoke Seatmer'tbroag kehUika lsappty 
aa.3MK-l) farfWldpifce: Y( 
dawB to|B or sa 



ELB CTROS IGIiAL LABS tow a 
Nntsae, Edwaiib aad 



it 



witka 
d 

(I 



bait lasto two yean kirt flte 







anta 



*lighl hrigl^ a crane, a 
a hnel aid hoeler. R goes to 
ArwBB Gnis. I tove yn, Santa! llarfc. 



+++++ 



A 



l|y#spaperlte 

aa tftiete oa Mrs. 
IflBBigaa 's pi^kt It eai- 
liiaslie s ker datenMnta oa 
ker new ceafideace that aa 
cad to flK VIetaam war wil be 
ireadHd hgr ChvislaHs. 
As a faraaer Biember 01 lae 
C Party USA, a oae 

ofoto-i 

rommanisto aad Miti- 

emsaikiriato for Ike tev 

decades dace my Party 

aMBbersUp^ I wisk toflOer to 

lln.1 



to 



WsiMandllwantisa 
PJS. Ife, nqr MoBimy 
hraOiers wiB have cookies 
Meny Christmas. 



TbdetMal 



noerty. 

"Yon Can Trust The 
ConmHnartsltodBexactty as 
fltoy say)** by Dr. Fred Sch- 
wane, cmaader against ttem 
tar BHugy yens, is A-^ade. 
Ikereare "Escape from 
by Rabei't Loh 
(native ef Red Ckina k 
mallrealed busiBessauiB 
tkeie); daoTferistiaBigy and 
OnmrnmBim Today" by John 
C. IWaaelt, widety reco0aied 
critic aad autkority, phis 
oikefs I kave read, toe very 
idonaative rvaiing. New we 
wil proceed towhat you need 

In 190 Ihqr were ahcady 
dl the worid tti^ 
aOefitfor 




1 cooaad so as to hdp yon, 
fliat you stop rising to the bait 
Retoin a hdpAil amoud d 
hope, but ignore aO flieir 
ploys. and all tte govcrn- 
me^al domgs which from 
time to time appear to be 
ofr«riBg a promise. Hepe 
nederalefyi be happy, aad 
watt tar however tang yon 
may need to ws^ Tkat may 
bequMeawhfle; ttea^ may 
be brid. Yen canad farmg 
ttoae lowed oaes hnne sooner 
by yovbdqg victims to the 
enemies' hichs. 

I can offd- you at lead this 
oae droog cause for dn^ag 
to a reasonable; a mederato 
hope rattier than snmndertog 
to despair: The Nodh l^el- 
w am e s e need naieb money for 
rebuilding war-smashed 
bailiff dcetera; far setttog 



vp a healthy eeononiy. 4 for 
hatter eonstructian to tke 
interest d heal% coalmual 
propness. Nixon is offeriog 
them that ODoaey. Tkefr public 
wmr andaaelHve aeed d'a 
respite's dtonee to 
Moreover onr 

Sedh Vietnam conU prove to 
be thdr big break for td^ 
aA Vietaam if Ak Soafll Vtet 
nd 0ua BBBch 



it 



Yoai 



THOMAS UGHnNG 
ladaalries, the 



cuiy a 



Ok 



« '^M M 



ma 
For tfMBe I 
Bdbedal 
Nina&aides to 
end to that war by 
Itopeaioderaldyfdrthat; jud 
mederatety. Aad snde for 
ckiUrca's sakcs! I kope 
I am sacceedngto 



BBX ELECTRONICS kas aa 




Ute battel y raaa low. 
wflseonkavea 



iSATDETECrm 



Ames P. Palmer 



aad 



Diclflgiapk aad Evcf^aad 
Otifn 



JACK ANDERSON'S 

WEEKLY 
SPECIAL 




PREaSUREPODm 



lyWP dteer Prise Wi 



Deerfidd. Haas. Bemmt has e ou a try s i de. His ova c^bcs, 
oaly 121 students fromTkiea conplaiaed. are 
&aulies which nod be wdl- analeBrs^ciMOBpared to the 
to-do in order to afford tkeOaimiBiiili 
$4.10O-a-year tniUoa. Lad WILL CAIRO NEGOTIATE? 
year, tke Bodat Sckod eel- - Every reeeal attea^t Ity 
lectcd $2jlf7J5 wertt of ted 1iadrii«ten torcopcB aesdia 
relief da cod of oatynM tor tieaa over a Middle Ead ad 
ito d^very. t fcieat kas beca ickaOdi bf 

F. Dowaiag, the bud- CairoL NMiilkikM, the dacT 
ef the Nalieaal Aotoricaa negidator. Jaaei - 
ef ladep«MicatStoea^ to gMH ahead vnlktte 
Schools, says ke's nd sare arradgemeito for aaotkcr 
Jad kov BMBy ef tke aatioa's diptonal^^dcrtBR alter the 



WAaONGTON - White the 
worhl qntl^d has beea oa 
Vietnam, the United SUAm 
has quictty rudwd military 
supplies into neighboring 
LansiMd Caadiodia. 

The sidden shqxne^ are 
iatended to mate sure the 
a nti -Communist elements'' 
have fdcaty d arms and imi- 
muaitioa to defend tb«ai- 
seh^ alter tte A^ertoaas 
puO-oatefladM^kia. 

The acttoa nay atoe ia- 

OYue the presaw c ea the 

to ndadeLaaa 

totke^etaaai 

TkeltoitedStoftos 

tt wyiteg to haM tts aeoct 

OA 

exao^e, to 

ag reeaieat frt^ Ha^ to 
witkdraw all Nortk Vlet- 
maaeae troops 6«n the eaaa- 

FrwB "nailaad 



tified Ikeir read coastractMa 
witk soBK mjmt mea. 
aiM7all nau and radar. 



is igBorii^ lAiger's caUes. 
One official aasores us tke 
road curreatty preaeate im 
■jflUuy threat toTiailaad. 
BecaUed the OuKae aki« 
the road "a bineveteat aad ia- 



ia the free food. Bat heUaited l^tcs expects the 
docaatUnwIhcBL ThqrVeEgyptiaas to'respoad 
merety tiytog.heaays.'lofft cwdj i a i lj bat fneraUty. Oae 
evciythiag the^caa." 

of the 




THREE- YEAR-DELAY - --ii^MtoattA- 
Secret White Hoaae papers IS FAMINE POSSIBLE? 
iadicate that the Uaitcd Geverameat experts are 
Stales emM have ohlaiaed a ipietly nq^enii^ Macera 
hijackii« agreeaieat with that the Itailed Stales any 



tttte 

with the La^iaa viUagers 
ado^ the read, ew aenccs 
tell as. Tke Imild-ap of 



regarded io Waskiagtoa 
M a C^acae aeenrity 





teadiag tke aatioa's 



^mtea is turn MgatiMiag, 

were flfiered bgr Cite earty to aarphte gr«B ttMt the 

tke NiMa AdauantratMa. faaiae my 

Dietoler PIdd CMraawd he 

vaaU letara skyja c kers to awd 

the Uaited States if the - have caaw to rdy aa Ok 

UaMed States would return l^ted Stoto tar ther pruL 

boat hijackers to Cuba. Tbe e^ectMl na oa VS. 

tte deal, bat aow baa coald leave this caaatry 



e^ teve dhm- 
HBlhshata 
laipafas, bed to in 



MILITANT THIEU - ttMi,lhe 
Pi laiili i d Tktoa haaadaattad dart to toriag milliMs 

privatoty ttat he to 

. Ilia>HB TA3L DAY - 

A 




Dap toMML 



"^-■-^-#-j -■ ^iw V wq 



-" ' -■ puig^^w^w^^^w^p^p^igpiwwiwpipppi— ^^MlpilUPMPWW 



I THURSDAY. DECEMBER 21. 1972 



THE SUN 



PAGES 



Disability 
benefits 
may be filed 

after death 

Applicatim for disid)iUty 
benefits may be filed after a 
wotkw's death undw- new 
provisions of the social 
security law becoming ef- 
fective in January 1973, ac- 
cording to Charles E. Teets, 
social security district 
manager in Norfolk, Virginia. 

"This change won't affect 
many people, but it can be 
important to some families," 
Mr, Teets said. 

The provision will only 
apply in cases oi deaths oc- 
curing after Decemba- 31, 
1969, Mr. Teets said. 

"But there is a deadline for 
filii^ such a{^lications," Mr. 
Teets said. 

In the future, survivors wiU 
h^veS months after a disabled 
w(»ica-'s death to file an 
application for his retroactive 
disability insurance benefits, 
he explained. 

"But an a{q>lication must be 
filed beforeFebruary 1, 1973, if 
the woricer died in October 
1972 or earlier," Mr. Teets 
said. 




PROUD FAMILY— Mr. and Mr*. Ted Velasco, their wm Gerard (I) gather aroitnd 
six-year-dd Michael Velasco, as he proudly shows his certificate of American 
° citizenship. 



Proposed legislation 



people attending a bingo 
game, and the discontinuance 
of the activity has forced the 
group to cancel two college 
scholarships previously 
financed by the activity. 

Snyder also sought 
legislation permitting persons 
arrested for a vicdation of the 
law, but acquitted of the 
charge, to have their arrest 
records expunged from police 
files. 

Robert McGoo- requested 
reintroduction of legislation 
against continued use of non- 
returnable bottles, as an 
ecological preservation 
factor. 

Sam Houston, newly elected 
Council of Civic Organizations 
President, requested 
legislation placing greater 
cesponsibiUty on develi^rs 
as onioMMi to the present 
dedication of land by ijuilders 
for schools, parks, and 
recreational facilities. 

Houston cited the 
tremendous growth of 
Virginia Beach in the past 
year resulting in a pr(4)lem in 
purdiasing the land by the 
City. Houston pointed out the 
City has the right to purchase 
the land, at raw land costs. 



within five years of 
dedication, or it reverts back 
to developer ownership. He 
said. "The problem is knowing 
when schools will be con- 
structed with the City only 
having the right to purchase 
the landVithin five years." 

Houston\aIso called for 
legislation 4o protect long- 
lime residents of the City, who 
through increasing taxes must 
retire the debt incurred in 
building new roads and 
schools to accomodate new 
resklents. He asked if ste|» 
couldn't be taken to formulate 
a plan whereby new residents 
would assume a greater 
responsibility in retiring these 
public service debte. 

Other requested legislation 
would require developers to 
uiclude housing for mintH-ify 
and low income fToapi in 
future communities of middle 
and upper income brackets, as 
a method to offset busing of 
students to achieve school 
integration. 

A request was also made to 
expand the State Corporation 
Commission beyond its 
present membership, and to 
establish greater conb-ol over 
fees any city could charge for 



Pumping station o.k.'d 
despite residents f eaiS 



Residoits of the Diamond 
Lakes Estate area voice 
mixed emotions during 
Monday's City Council 
meeting over the fdacing of a 
sewage pumping station in 
thdr area. 

The pdnt of contention was 
the possible pollution by any 
ovoinow from the pumping 
station of a large lake which is 
used by residents for swim- 
ming, boating, water-skiing, 
and fishing. 

One ddegation of opponents 
UM Council that while 70 per- 
cent of residents have agreed 
to the City placing sewerage 
lines in the community and 
connectii^ to the lines, they 
were not aware this would 
require a pumping station. 

Another delegation ,of 
reskients produced a petition 
reportedly signed by 75 per- 
c«it of Uk residents opposing 
locating the station within 85 
feet of the lake. They iitf ormed 
Council they purchased the 28 
acre lake for recreational 
purposes, and were unable to 
dbtain any asairance from the 
City to accq>t responsibility 
for cleaning the lake in the 
event (rf p<dlution. They added 
they, "...were not against tl» 
ittation only the propcmed 
location of it." 



Council's discussion of the 
matter raised the point it 
would cost the City ap- 
proximately $70,000 to 
rdocate the station. 

Council approved the 
pumpii^ stations locaticwi on a 
motion froni Councilman 
George R. Ferrell, seconded 
by Councilman Charles W. 
Gardner. 



Funds 
received 



4City Councilmen were in- 
formed during Monday's 
informal sessi<m that Virginia 
Beech has received a Federal 
grant of $765,750 to upgrade 
the City's sewerage treatment 
system. 

Scott said the funds will be 
used in the construction of 
force mains and sewage 
pumping stations in sections 
<rf the city which require these 
so-vices due to the large 
amount of new sewage lines 
installed 

Scott also gave an indication 
that the City had hoped to 
receive in excess of $1 millimi 
from Federal sources for this 
project. 



^aee on Earth 




«CjN ttt foffow 
mt CMi^na$ Slor 

. . fe feoffc«rf»odl 
raONl 499-2461 

EMPIRE tODY & PAINT SHOP 



fCbntinued from page 1) 



public utilities furnished 
another city. 

A legislative safeguard was 
also requested to protect City 
Councils from having their 
denial of use permits, on the 
grounds of protecting citizens 
health and welfare, from 
being overturned to court 
proceedings. 

Virginia Beach legislators 
attending the hearing included 
State Senator A. Joseph 
Canada, and Delegates B.R. 
"Bev" Middleton, Glenn 
McCIanan. and Owen B. 
F*ickett. Other legislators, who 
share representation with 
Virginia Beach and neigh- 
boring cities, included George 
Heileg, Robert Washington, 
Dr. William Robertson, Tom 
Moss, and Thomas Mc- 
Namara of Norfolk; and 
, Rusaell Townsend of 
Chesapeake. ' 

Virginia Beach w-as also 
represented by City Manager 
Roger M. Scott, and his 
assistants George Hanbury 
and George Tinness, as well as 



City Councilmen George R. 
Ferrell, Charles W. Gardner, 
John A. Baum, D. Murray 
Melton, and Donald H. 
Rhodes. 

File now for 
summer jobs 

Individuals interested in 
being considered for summer 
jobs with the Federal 
government must apply by 
January 26. 1973. Full in- 
formation and application 
forms are provided in an- 
nouncement number^ 414 - 
Summer Jobs in Federal 
Agencies. 

The annmmcement may be 
obtained by visiting- your 
nearest Federal Job In- 
formation Cent* or b\' calling 
Toll-Free from anywhere in 
Virginia: 1-800-582-8171 (In 
Norfolk: 62.'>-fi51!)- in Rich- . 
mond; 782-27^2). 



Suspects 
apprehended 

Three .suspects were ap- 
prehended and charged wiUi 
the burglarizing (rf homes 
within hours of the allied 
incidents Tuesday afternoon. 

The apprehensions resulted 
from the witnessing of a 
vehicle fitting the descriptiwi 
oS a car seen in the crime 
areas by Officer J.T. Suddeth, 
and his stopping the auto, and 
detaining- occupants, in the 
4500 i)lock Holland Road, until 
other police units arrived. 

Officials said ap- 
proximately $1,500 worth of 
tv. and stereo sets, watches, 
and firearms, allegedly taken 
from homes in the Lagomar 
and Thalia areas was 
recovered from the vehicle. 

Authorities identified the 
suspects as Benjamin Lamb, 
22. Sykes Avenue; Thomas M. 
Doxie, Jr.,22, Williams Court; 
and Tyrone Cooper, 22, 
Gimbert Road. 

Approval of 
use permits 

City Council's action 
Monday on use permit ap- 
plications forwarded from the 
Planning Commission was 
unique, in that each of the 
applications was approved. 

Applications which were 
approved consisted of those of 
Oscar E. Northen, Jr., to 
construct 14 apartment units 
near the intersection of Baltic 
. and Norfolk Avenups; Martha 
Washington Hotel Corp.,, to 
stage dancing and en- 
tertainment on property at the 
intersection of Atlantic 
Avenue and 8th Street: E. G. 
Harris to construct 30 motel 
efficiency units at the in- 
tersection of 37th Street and 
Pacific Avenue: Tar Heel 
Corporation to construct 8 
additional motel units at 27th 
Street and Pacific Avenue; 
Mary L. .J ones for dancing at.a 
Newtown Road facility op- 
posite Muth I.ane: and Ed- 
mund C. Ruffin and Nabil D. 
Kassir to operate a footsball 
parlor in the Princess Anne 
, Plaza Shopping Center. 




INillce seaixh vehicle suspected as being connected wHh rwldenttnl bnrgtartes. 



Miirder 
Charge 



/ 



Police say William T. Green 
is facing murder charges in 
connection with last Thurs- 
day's fatal shooting of 
William Stanchez Hoge. 

According to officials Hoge, 
42, Elaine Avenue, Norfolk, 
died' ufi several gunshot 
wounds following a con- 
frontation between him and 
Green, 28, West Minister 
Lane, in the hallways of a 
building at 32nd Street and 
Pacific Avenue. 

As yet no exact motive has 
been established for the 
shooting. 



mm 

^Id our friends and^^ 
neighbjors, dl best 
wishes for holiday" 
happiness.,^ 




L 



LYNNHAVEN 
MOTOR COMPANY 

3711BONNEYiia 340-1661 



^rmfi 



Sizeupa 

Sylvanici 




^ 



& 





SYLVANIA PORTABLE BLACK & WHITE TV 
MODEL MW1043 

« color cabinet of hi^- impact plastic .-; ^ 

* Personal size 12 inch diagonal picture ^'j 
^ Telncoping monopole VHF, loop UHF antennas 

* Earphone jack for private listening 

* Earphone available as optional extra 

Only $89.95 ; 



SYLVANU PORTABLE BLACK & WHITE TV 
MODEL MU2062GD 

* Gokl color cabinet of hi^-impact plastic 

* Personal iiie 16 inch diagonal picture 

* Telescojrfi^ monopole VHF, lopp UHF antennas 

* Molded-in handle for convenient carrjring 

* Stand available as optional extra .? 



Only $109.95 



A.S we celebrate this joyous occasion of the birth 

of the Christ Child, let us remember,especially the 

hope that was born anew and the love that filled the world 

on that first Christmas. May their light shine today, 

so that peace and understanding wiU prevail among men. 

» g ^ PHARMACY 

[PHARMACY 7.*.™o'" 

9'Mp.m. • 
Sunctay 9 «.(». to 7 (^m. 



PHARMACY 
PHONES 
464-2711 
464-1463 



s 



Bk^msMkmtwrm^ <»rnR 



SYLVANIA PORTABLE BLACK ft 
WHITE TV MODEL MT103BBK 

* Choice of Black or White color 
cabinet of hi^ impu;t plastic 

* Personal size 9 im^h diagonal picture 

• Ntemon' VHF Fine Tuning contrcd 
lets tuner remember fine tune 
setting on each chaniMd 

• Completdy solki-rtate for hi^ pefforman<», 
ieiiid>iltty 

• TekKoping monopole VHF, loop UHF antmnas 

• Inchides bbu:k ran acteea, ear^mie jadt 
ami earphone 

• DC power coitl and DC battey paxk araiUtle as 
opttonal extras 




Cabinet of Walnut grain 
finish on high impact plastic- 
Memory VHF fine tuning 
Liglited channel indicators 
Telescoping dipole VHF., 
bowtie UHF. antennas 
5" oval speaker 
Earphone jack 
Earphone available as 
optional extra 



*129 



95^ 



On ly $99.95 

ADAM'S TV 

308 London Bridge ^wppH^ Centar > Viry nia Beach, V& - Phone M0-QS6% 
We S&vice AR TV's & Radios 



I 






I 



^_ 





imss 01. llh YEAR - Dr. Sterling Deeke. listens as his medical assistant. Mrs. 
M 1. Haicl 1)11^.401 leads lier composition telling why she thinks he should be boss of 
ilir vea. Dr. Docker, a urologist for U years, has had his office in the Vircinia 
Beicl. ^"fdical (enter since I1MMJ He and his wife. Terry, have three chllA-en, 
.1 imillc. «.. Sterlmu HI. 5 and Dani'elle. three months. Dr. Decker was presented a 
plaque by Mrs. Virginia Hardv. 



ISTAIJ,ATION — Mrs. Mace! Wisecarver (I.) 
'a(ch(*s as Miss Charlene Baumeister is installed as 
president-elect of the American Association of 
Mi*dical Assistants at the annual meeting and 

.x;hrisimas Cocktail party. Mi-s. Wisecarver took over 
ihr president's duties of the chapter which was 
tjiaiicred in May, 1972. Other 

-.Wficei-s installed were Mrs. Nadine C'onr9d, vice- 

^jf resident; Mrs. Lucy Loescne, recording secretary 

' -iiid :\lis. Marian Hartman. treasnrer. 



tUcWc 



MKDICAI. ASSISTANT OF THE YEAR. Mrs. Myrtte Inffvaldsen (r.) and Mrs. Lucy 

i'ocschc. honni able mention, chat with their bosses. Dr. John P. Clarke (1.) andt Dr. 
( hnles M. Kariey Jr. at the Christmas party. Mrs. Ingvaldsen, a medical assifltant 
lor I", years has been with Drs. Clarke and Earley for Vk years. Mrsj, Loesche. an 
K.N., has worked in their office for four years. The Association, which held its first 
iii('('(in>4 December, 1!)7I, is the largest in the state even though one of the newest. 

Romantic love reflectsnormaKty 



PAGE 6 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 21, 1972 




WILLIAMSBURG-Falling 
in love romantically is a 
reflsction of normality rather 
than a type of in.sanity,, 
believes Dr. Wayne Kernodle, 
sociology professor at the 
Crtllege of William and Mary. 

Kernodle believes that 
^^ falling in love rcHTiantieally is 
largely a result of the 
socialization process in our 
society. "People fall in love 
because it is expected of them 
at a certain age," he 



Dyer fills new role at Hospital 



> 
< 



PRINCESS ANNE HIGH SCHOOL JUNIOR CIVITAN CLUB sponsored individual 
Cliristmas parties for the younger and the older mentally retarded children in the 
Tidewater area Sunday at Pithian Hall Castle in Norfolk. A dance was held for the 
(tider ones and Kash. a local band provided the music. Approximately 1.50 persons 
enjoyed the music a^d dancing. Bobby Stokes, a graduate of Kempsville High School 
and Ann Miller, a senior at Lake Taylor High, led the younger children in carols to 
the accompaniment of guitai*s. Joe Johnson Jr. of the club represented Santa Claus 
and handed out filled^ stockings and other gifts to the young people attending both 
parties. Larry Aldrich as Tatters the clown kept the children guessing with a magic 
sImw aai 14. j-g. HaroM Cummiags entertained at iioUi parties with bag^pe music. 




I 



MRS. JOYCE Gaw (L> Mi Min DiaM Meaii poM with Clyie (L) and fUage 
foUowing the Christmas idioir Resented at the regular meeUng of Weight Watchers 
Inc. December 14. The two jNippets and friends dem^trated what happens when 
•IVeight Watehera eat illegal foods. Santa Claus atooappmiml m the scene to find out 
•what some of Weight Watchers want fw Christmas. By the end of the humorous 
show, even Santa had decfi£^ to tttiik "tirin" by joining the wganizatioa. Hie two 
ladies, both of the Beach, have perfiM-med puppet shmrs in the community for seven 
vears. 



Mrs. Ola Dyer of the Beach 
will officially begin her duties 
as the Director of Patient 
Affairs, a newly 'created 
position at the General 
Hospital of Virginia Be^lch 
.Inmiary 1, 1973. 

Mrs. Dyer, who haS been the 
director of nursing since 1%:?, 
will act as liason between the 
patient and the hospital and" 
the patient's family and the 
ho.spital in her new position. 
She will bring a personal touch 
to the -hospital as she visitB 
jxitients and helps families. 

, "I will assist patients and 
families in any way possible. 
When a family needs help I'll 
help them find the resources 
which are available." 

The job of patient 
representative is a new 
concept which is becoming 
popular in hospitals 
throughout the country. 

Since the position is new, 
Mre. Dyer said it will be what 
she can make it and what the 
hospital can do to help with 
patient services. "I will not be 
following anyone so I will find 
out what is best by doing," she 
noted. 

However, in order to learn 
what has already been hap- 
pening in the field she has 
been talking and 

corresponding with others in a 
similar position. 

Having worked as a nurse 
since 1949, Mrs. Dyer feels her 
experience and knowledge of 
the hospital and its services 
will be beneficial in the job. "I 
don't feel it will be difficult to 
get into and I'm lodking for- 
ward to it" 

Mrs. Dyer's ' husband, 
Richard, is a iN'ofessional 
photographer. They have 
three children, Sharon, 20, 
attending Bravard Collie in 
Coco Beach, Fla. and Richard, 
18 and Courtney, 17, both 
students atPirst Colonial Hi^ 
School 




Miss Nortoin 
to wed 
S. J. Collins 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. 
Norton of the Beach announce 
the engagement of their 
daughter. Miss Margaret 
Anne Norton, to Samuel J. 
Collins, the son of Mr. and Ms. 
Harrv I-. CoUins of Kittery, 
Me. 

Miss Norton is a graduate of 
Cox High School and is 
jM-esaitly attending Norfolk 
Gaieral Hospital School of 
Nursing. Mr. CoDins is a 1970 
graduate of Maine Maritime 
Academy and is currently 
employed at Newport News 
Shipbuildir^ & Drydock Co. 

An early fall wedding is 
planned. 



theorizes. All sorts of cultural 
rewards and attention are 
given to lovers, he added. 
Almost no movie, television 
drams, play, or magazine 
article is without its lover. 

In the past many have 
regarded marriage as an 
iastitiition which meant the 
end of such high romance, 
ascouples grew to know one 
another. "On the contrary," 
says Kernodle, "today people 
who marry increasingly look 
for romance in marriage 
rather "than merly practical 
benefits." If, indeed, an in- 
creased awareness of another 
person does mean the end of 
romantic love, then marriage 
ought to go out to style 
because all evidence pomts to 
couples getting to know each 
other better befoe they marry, 
he said. However, Kernodle's 
stodies concernii^ love and 
marriage indicate that a great 

deal of knowledge about 
another person can be 
beneficial if it leads to a more 
Tealistic relationship, 
culminating in an increased 
amounijit c^tebness, warmth, 
. affection, aAd loife. 

Marriage as an Institution is 
not declining, his studies in- 
dicate, but variations are 
hecoming evident. There is a 
trend, among some people to 
marty late and ^ore have 
childless marriages. "In 
gl^neral, a wider diversify of 
intimate life styles inside and 
outekle of marriage is more 
acceptable today," Kernodle 
states. This flexibility is 
healthy, since it allows more 
•people (^ different fypes to be 
involved with other persons, 
he added. In addition, 
marriages or affiliations 
which cross cultural barriers 
'ar% made possible. 

To Kernodle, the form of 
marriage is not of supreme 
importance. He dtjcs believe, 
however, that experiments in 
living styles, are often 
designed to fulfill in- 
dividualistic criteria, "Some 
oiie who is .'concerned only 
with how a relatJCTiship will 



benefit him is missing the 
very important element of 
tuman reciprocity," he said. 

Kernodle feels that it is 
difficult to defme rmnantic 
love. "Traditionally, ronrantic 
love is associated with such 
Uiings as increased cardiac 
and respiratory rates, which 
produce dizziness, swooning, 
and cloud-floating feelii^," 
he said. "In addition, 
romantic love is often looked 
upon as a temporary love 
involving unmarried pe<^le. 
By definition, it also differs 
from mature or conjugal love 
and from the love of 
humanity." 

"Research indicates that 
explanations of love often 
reflect the explainer's bias," 
notes Kernodle. Some regard 
romantic love as functional to 
the stability of society. "What 
they mean is that society is 
put together in a neat little 
package of mother, father and 
child roles and many producer 
and consumer rcHes which 
revolve about these. No man 
in lus 'riipit mind' wcum afr^ 
to take-over all ^K^iWpJfa- 
sibilities of a husband and 
father when he can oMain 
food, sex, and everything else 
he wants without getting 
married. According to ttiis 
view, the cultural pattern of 
romantic love was developed 
to trap man into these 
responsibilities while he is in a 
confused state," said, Ker- 
nodle. The opposing* view 
r^ards romantic love as a 
threat to society, sniee it 
breaks down social baftim, 
such as those of social class, 
race, and age, he added. 

Kernodle notes that the 
concept of romantic love had 
its b^innings in the feudal 
period, when a woman otho* 
than one's wife was the ob- 
ject (rf love. At this time, love 
was held separate from s&aial 
gratification. The cMijunction 
of love with s^ual 
gratification occurred .tfridi 
the coming of the Industrial 
Revolution- 



f SWEDISH CROWN OF CANDLES 

^ iln Sweden, tiie Christnias seawm traditionally begins on 
5 fiiecember 13, when a yt^ing glri in each house assume the 
S tme (^ St. Lucia, wmriB^ a «1iite robe and a crown <tf 

oes back to ViUng tln^ 
e night of December 12-13 



ucia, vMmrim a ^ 

les. Hie cvmom Kc 
n wiicu, uuuci the old calendaTjihic ^ubuv w* i.r%^^iuuci ia-i< 
I wu ttu! longest of the year. Tl» Lucia girl symbolises rt 
I tutalng light. 






St. Lv 
t^ candles, 
en, under i 



tlMt ^paoe is doiiilsd Mch wwl( to my dvic, 
ChwtaMt or pubfe Mrvioe group - to promotB 
your dtrii cm^ mv projMt. 

Wt do not aoo^ anything of a 
contrwmw i, or poittk^ twrtura. 



THE ORIGINAL AND BEST TASTING 

EGGNOG 

IS MADE WITH . . . 



SIMIELE FUNERAL HOME 





'OUR FAMILY 




RENAULT 12 SEDAN 



RENAULT 17 
SPORTS COUPE 



^i-'^N!.. 



RENAULT 12 WAGON 




FROM: 
OUR FAMILY 




PEUGEOT 504 WAGON 




PEUGEOT »)4 SEDAN 




RENAULT 16 




ri^JP « V V ^'9 ¥■ ■>■ ^'"^^F^^^ 



..,,v„,., , i_u<fmmm>mimmfmmiim'^rmmmmmmmmmmmmimmim9l999lfKI9999tllf9lf^fM 



_THURSDAY.DECgMBi=R 21. 1972 



THE SUN 



PAGE? 




M W OKFICKHS of London Bridge Extension Homemakers aub. Mr«. W. K. 
•I'lnioi (I.), |)i-esidenl. IMis. Hilton Gray, vice-president. Mrs. Iluntfer Harris, 
MHuMary ;uid Mrs. Dorotli.Y Burroughs, treasurer, cliat during the annual Christ- 
m.is liiiKlicon held December 14 at London Bridge Baptist Church. The officers were 
insialled at Ihe luncheon by Mr. R. P. Johnson, district president. Appetizing 
l«)iu(>inad(> main dishes, vegetables, salads, breads and desserts were enjoyed by 
iiuMnlH>i s and guests. Members exchanged gifts, all homemade, and guests received 
l»»n.vaniia -4ifts. Mrs. Carol Gay brou^t tears to many eyes with a moving in- 
u'lpi oiativc performance to the hymn "Fill My Cup Lord." The club, formed in 1949, 
his i(i icUve members. 

Fig confections set holiday mood 
and provide appetizing snack 




Sten-Boelte wedding vows said 



.njAR 



Here are two exciting 

., holiday recipes, one of them a 

r holiday candy roll, filled with 

Uiscioiis cho{^)ed California 

dried figs and walnuts, ami the 

other wine glazed stuffed figs 

.<' that won't last the holiday 

, season if yOu put them out 

where family or guests can 

, see and reach them! . 



This is the season to be jolly 

and these two confections help 

set the mood and still provide 

** a snack, containing as they do 

figs with their high content of 

* valuable minerals and natural 

'; fruit sugar and walmits. 



FIG NUT SLICES 
3 cups sugar 

1 cup light cream 

i' cup chopptJ California 
Drfed Figs 
';; teaspoon salt 

2 teaspoons vanilla 



'•_. cup finely chopped 
walnuts 

Combine sugar, cream, 
California Dried Figs and salt. 
Bring to a boil and simmer to 
soft ball stage (238 degrees). 
Cool to lukewarm. Add 
vanilla. Beat until stiff enough 
to knead. Knead until smooth. 
Shape into a roll; cover out- 
side with nuts. Chill; Slice. 
Makes approximately 2 dozen 
slices. 

-I- + + -I- + 

WINE-GLAZl 
STUFFED FIGS 
one-third cup sweet wine 
1 pound California Dried 
Figs 
' :• cup water 
<.. cup sugar 
15 - 20 walnut halves 
Pour wine over California 
Dried Figs; let stand while 
preparing sauce. Bring water 
and sugar to boil, simmer 10 
minutes. Add wine and figs. 




Miss Jacqueline Ann Hoskias 



Miss Jacqueline Hoskins 
engaged to Charles Pitts 

cart- Ralph E. Hoskins, U.S. Navy (Ret), and Mrs. Hoskins 
of tbe Beach announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss 
Jacifteline Ann Hoskins, to Capt Charles deGastile Pltte U.S. 
AirForce, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Alfred PitlS oT 
Widiita Falls, Tex. 

Miss Hoskins is a graduate of the College of William and 
Mary She is currently teaching at Frank W. Cox High School. 
Capt. Pitts is a graduate of the University of Kansas at 
Lawrence, Ks. He is stationed at Loring Air Force Base, Maine. 

/(^n afternoon wedding is pianned on February 3, 1973, at First 
Pr&il^terJan Church in Virginia Beach. 

Mte Hoskins is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Vincent 
Wyatt (^Norfolk and the late Mrs. Elizabeth M. WyatL 




Merry 

Christinas 

to All! 



0* happy 

dhd full of 

good choor now and thrawghout rii« holiday MOtoa. 



|4ta ^ i»K9W IM. 2 M 10^ A.M. 



WHW^ tUk I. 



Simmer; turning figs 
frequently, until well glazed. 
Cool, split -and stuff with 
walnuts. 



\1.H. <'. W. .lernigan (I.; and Mrs. Hilton Gray place 
more delicacies on a table already laden with a 
V n iety of homemade dishes at the 21th annual lun- 
cheon ■ 



CLUB NOTES 



PICKETT - BUCHANAN 
CHAPTER. UNITED 
DAUGHTERS OF THE 
CONFEDERACY - Mrs. 
Russell B. ,F«" ..strict 
director, „o ine guest of 
hone- at ttie Christmas party 
held at the home of Mrs. J.O. 
Welch Jr. Mrs. Claude E. 
.lordan .?r. presented the 
.program and Mrs. A.B. 
Pritchard gave a Christmas 
reading. Mrs. .lohn G. 
Williams, president, con- 
ducted the meeting, 

LYNNHAVFN COLONY 
GARDEN CLUB- The 
December meeting was 
highlighted with the ex- 
changing of pollyanna 
packages and plans were 



made to help an indigent 
family of a mother and three 
children for Christmas. A 
Christmas skit was pres«ited 
by Mrs. B.L. Snead and Mrs. 
F.V. Bridges. 

KEMPSVILLE SENIOR 
CITIZENS~A group recently 
chartered a Ihis and toured 
Richmond. Members have 
been visiting shut-ins and 
personis in nursing homes. 
They attended a dance held 
for the first meeting of the 
Franklin Senior Citizens 
group. Franklin and the 
Virginia Beach band provided 
the music. Band members 
were Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Brecht, Betty Winder, Ada 
Beall and Marv Mitchell. 



Misg Elizabeth R. Elder 



^^m 



KINGSTON GARDEN 
CLUB-Mrs. H.O. Freeman 
demonstrated the making of 
wreaths from fruit at the 
November meeting. She also 
gave the history of the Delia 
Robbia wreath as she gave 
instructions. She explained 
that the authenic wreath is 
fashioned with blue ribbon 
without a bow. Members are 
making gifts for Ifi children in 
the Headstart Program at St 
Aidan's Episcopal Church. 
Miss Margie King, a fourth- 
grader at Kingston 
Elememtary was announced 
an the club's annual anti-litter 
poster contest. 

LAKE SMITH TERRACE 
GARDEN CLUB-Wayne 
.lones spoke on^ "Christmas 
Ideas" and demoastrated the 
making of a how for a wreath 
at the November meeting. 



Trinity Lutheran Church in 
Richmond was the setting for 
the Wedding of Miss Lynette 
Boelte, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. L, Boelte of the Beach, 
and Gary Sten. The double- 
ring ceremony took place at 
2:30 p.m. Sunday with the 
Rev. James Roseman of- 
ficiating. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her father. She 
wore a Victorian-styled ivory 
satin gown witti an empire 
waist and leg-of-mutton 
sleeves. Deep ivory lace ac- 
coited the neckline, yoke, 
sleeves and hemline of ttie 
ricirt A veil of illusion bo^ 
dered with lace fell from a 
Juliet Crown of matching lace. 
She carried a long cascade of 
white sweetheart roses, 
gardenias, mini-carnations, 
springerie and holly. 

Miss Laura Alvis of Rich- 
mond was the maid of honw. 
Her Victorian-styled gown 
was of Christmas red taffeta. 
A matching veil of tulle 
completed her outfit. She 
carried a nosegay of holly widi 
red and white carnations and 
velvet streamers. 

Mrs. Robert Porter, cousin 
of the bride, was the matron of 
honor and Miss Linda Tucker 
was the bridesmaid. Their 
gowns were styled identical to 
that of Miss Alvis. Mrs. Porter 
carried a nosegay (rf holly wiOi 
white mini-carnations and 
Miss Tucker's nosegay was 
holly with red mini-carnations 
and ribbons. 

John Velebir of Richmond 
served as best man. Ushers 
were Marie W. Boelte of the 
Beach, brother of the bride 
and Wayne King of Richmond. 

The reception was held in 
the social hall of the church. 
Following a wedding trip to 
the mountains; the couple will 
reside in Alexandria. 

The bride attended Virginia 
Commonwealth University 
and the groom is pregentlj 
attending the university. 



weds Crorald G. Pe^wes 



Miss Elizabeth Roxanne 
Elder, the dau^ter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence Josei^ Elder of 
the Beach, was married to 
Gerald Carlton Peebles, the 
son of George Clinton Peebles 
of the Beach, at 7 p.m. 
Saturday at Bayside Baptist 
Church. The Rev. David 
Henry officiated at the can- 
dleli^t ceremony. 

Given in marriage by her 
father, the bride wore an 
empire gown of ivory silk 
organza fashioned with a 
Victorian neckline and long 
fitted sleeves. "Hie bodice and 
Aline skirt with a full train 
was appliqued in re- 
epibroidered Alencon lace and 
seed pearls with crystals. Her 
chapel-length veil of silk 
illusion fell from a profile 
headpiece of Alencon lace. She 
carried a cascade arranged 
with a large orchid, miniature 
white carnations and 
stephanotis. 

Mrs. Ronald Lee Williams of 
the Beach was her matron of 
honor. 9ie wore coistume- 
ivory blouse styled with a 
Vict(H'ian neckline and long 
sleeves and an emerald green 
velvet skirt. Her headpiece 
was fashioned with a green 
velvet bow and illusion. She 
carried a nosegay (d red 
carnations and holly. 

Her bridesmaids were Miss 
Bonnie Elder of Petersburg, 



Miss ^ 



cousin of the bride; 
Melinda ' Robinson 
Fredericksburg, Miss Katl^ 
Boyd of the Beach and Mrs. 
John S. Turner of Jacksonville, 
Fla.t They wore ivory crepe 
blouses and red velvet skirts 
styled identical to that of the 
honor attendant. Their 
headpieces were of red velvet 
and Illusion. They carried 
n6s^ays of red carnations 
and holly. 

Miss Jeannie Wheby of 
Charlottesville and Miss 
Jenny Barger of Ronandce, 
both cousins of the bride, were 
the flower girls. 

Roanld Lee Williams of the 
Beach served as the best man. 
The ushers were Clarence 
Joseph Elder Jr. of the Beach, 
brother ^ the bride; John 
Turner <rf Jacksonville, N.C., 
and Jim Turner (rf the Brach, 
brothers of the groom and Bob 
Schoolar of Alexandria. 

Bryan Barger <rf Roanoke, 
cousin of the bride, was the 
rii^ bearer. 

The recpetion was held at 
Bayside Baptist Church. The 
couple will reside in Norfdk. 

The bride is a graduate of 
FrankW. Cox High School and 
attended Mary Washington 
College and Old Dominion 
University. The groom is also 
a graduate oJF Frank W. Cox 
High Sdiod and is presently 
attending Old Dominion 
University. 



Mrs. Gerald Carlton Pebbles 




Our Noli^ioiy 
Known mm 
6uaranto«d 

CURLY CUT 



t^% WtttcBtandiet 
A> Atoo 8.95-11.95-14.95. 

Shampoo and Set Reg. Z9S 



IMrciit, Shon^ee ii Set 

Mon., Tues. and Wed. Only 




Edie Adams 

XjUtb^C^vA^ l««ityS«lom 

Ito AppehHnwnts . . . Jwl Wall In any tbna. 
IWW Hyfcis at your •wvfet at your cowvonlenea. 

K^ Our Only IfdawciHNr locations * 



5IIIV«.aMCkMPi.. |734E.UM>Cmkl 

nmmmfh9m nmmsttmtn 



Loodslif 

Good 

Wishes 

^ at . 

ante is taking 
Sif/' stock of our 
season's wishes 
to our many 
oppreciated customers. 



-«"-». 



FARMER SAVVYER'S IMARKET 

724 FIRST COLONIAL RD. (HILLTOP) 




Mrs. Gary &WI 



Make It for a Party: Eat It Latcjr 




Doesn't the Marshnudloiv 
Wreath look good enough 
to eat? It really is! 

Make a Marshmallow 
Gumdrop Wreath like our 
photo to use as a center- 
piece on a holiday table. It 
would be very attractive 
encircling a big candle. 

The base of the wreath is 



a large styrofoam ring, 
which you can buy at the 
dime store, or glue togett^er 
from smaller pieces of foam 
(often ised as packing rirn- 
terial). Or substitute 9m 

Eorous material— foam Tw» 
er, leftover plasterboi 
etc. Cut marshmallows 
half with scissors, wlpl 
scissors with damp cic__ 
after each marshmalloi^ 
cut, to keep blades cleaw* 

Cut off '/^ the length*' 
each toothpick, and use /" 
longer piece, inserting It 
to marshmallow. Plu^. 
marshmallow on foam t9$ 
and push toothpick throuig^ 
marshmallow and into rl^. 

Leave about V4 inch <H- 
posed. Now place sq|^I 
gumdrop on the exp^^ 
toothpick. Use red "^" 
green gumdrops for a 
colorful effect. 





The Joy of Christmas 

hUxf It ffll your heart and brk^itea your life 
In fliie l^aeed MOMO and duough the year. 

THE LANTERN, INC. 

FLOWERS AND GIFTS 
2859 Vi. 8MCh Bhrd., Vi. Betch, Vi. 




tSmmi 




PAINT 

DEGORATHKl: 
CENTER 

VA.BtAmKVD.* BALTIC AVE. ^14331 
JTwik You M^vmdtr^ year 

RANDY, BUXBOB&SiME 



«■ 



<*, 



J' 



r^oes 



THE^N 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1972 



Balla(^s highlight Golden Years' party 




MARTY STRAIT shiKs for nembers of the Golden 
^mn CIvb at Virgiiria Beach Methodist Clnrch last 
muk whM tkty lieM th^ Cteistmas |Mity. 




: CX>NFiDENTIALr-Mr8. UtUce Garrtoon and Mrs. 
I EtM GtU have a little cenveraatton at the Christmas 




KvliKLKNCKIST 

His warmth of personality 
came through, did Marty 
Strait's, as he perched upon a 
small pine table, took his 
guitar in hand, and in a wistful 
voice sang Cliristmas songs 
and ballads with obvious 
affectimi for his audiraice, the 
G(riden Years Club. 

It was last Thursday — 
raining... no day to be out- 
doors, which made the club's 
Christmas party inside the 
Virginia Beach Methodist 
Church all the more ap- 
pealing. 

Ttiere was only candlelight; 
the red napkins contrasting 
against white tablecloths, the 
Christmas centerpieces 
setting the seascmal mood, as 
Marty coaxed the 57 present to 
sing such popular favorites as 
"Jingle BeUs." 

Ttiere was quietness, too, 
and tte remembering of othor 
Christmas times, as he sang 
the most nostalgic of all 
carols, "Silent Night." 

Marty's the grandson of 
Mrs. Emily Hoek, and a more 
proud grandmother would be 
hard to find, as she watdied 
him sing. He left afterwards, 
for the Oceanfront Holiday 
Inn, where he's appearing 
nightly at their Turtle Trap. 

Funds donated to 
Cerebral Paby 

southland Corporation (7- 
11) employees of the Norfolk. 
Virginia Beach, Chesapeake 
and Portsmouth, recently 
donated $7fi(K) to the United 
Cerebral Palsy Develop 
mental Center in Virginia 
Beach, located at the in- 
tersection of Independence 
Blvd. and Ewell Rd^ 

Representatives of the 
employees acknowledged that 
the money would be used to 
best implement and aid the 
program- at the school. 

During the past week, 
Christmas parties gave the 
employes the opportunity to 
present these needed 
funds. 



The age span at the 
Christmas party was wide 
indeed- - from 93-yMr-old 
Mrs. Lrttice Garrison, to four- 
year-old Christopher Hall. 
Chris snuggled up to his 
p-andmothor, Mrs. Gertrude 
Hayman, much of the time. 

Mrs. Garrison's liv«l in 
Sandbridgc all of her life and 
has been a member of the 
Virginia Beach Methodist 
Church for some 50 years. 

Keen and independent, she 
had the f(As at her taUe 



laughing when she said, "I 
can't hear a Uiing when I get 
there in church, but I go 
anyway just so they'll know 
whose side I'm on." 

She insisted on getting her 
own plate of goodies that the 
members prepared for the 
buffet luncheon... the sand- 
wiches, punch, all manner of 
desserts. 

Club president Fred Brecht 
was the indispensable man; 
leading the singing about the 
pane, acting as mast«- of 



ceremonies. Flo and Tom 
Mancini, always capable, 
headed up the f»rty, carrying 
(Nit the details. 

They exchanged gifts af- 
terwards. TTiat's where little 
Chris Hall made out pretty 

well. As he tore (rff the 
wriappings from his grand- 
mother's present, what ^uld 

he find but a knitted beret that 
was just his size as he put it 
at(q) his soft reddi^-brown 
hair. 






Sleigh bM$. CaroU. 
« ■» Holly wre(aha. &u»wflakei. 
And goodwiU to men. 




Don Juan House of Beauty 




wiusa 

ilMmCMNS 





UfU/fXyUj/l^ Sana-, «. 

f 'die job relaying 

good wishes and thanks to our friends. 

BEAUTITQNLDey CLEANERS 

401 LASKIN RD. CALL 428-1704 






.lUST FITS— ('hris Hall, four-year-old grandson of Mrs. Gertrude Hayman opeM hit 

i;randmo(her's Christmas present at the party for the Golden Years Club, and 
discovers tha t the knitted beret is Just right for little boys. 



JC^llamhas installation 



mSP OF PUNCH for Mrs. OUve Downing from Tom 
Mancini at Um Clvistmas party. 



The Ramada Inn aisevCTth 
and Atlantic Avenue was the 
location for a recent officer 
instalation and member 
Initiation breakfast of the 
Distributive Education Club of 
Floyd E. Kellam High School. 

The following officers were 
installed: president: Tommy 
Davis; vice president; Anna 
Wins; secretary: Janice 
Green; treasurer: Karen 
Gephart; reporter-historian: 
Kenny Roebuck; Diane 
Smith; Collen Radcliffe; 
parliamentarians: Bill 
Ballance and Dan Terry; and 
chaplain: Kevin Schloemp. 



Council approves high-rise 
dver residents objections 



^ns to construct a hi^ 
rise, condominium apartmoit 
complex on Atlantic Avoiue 
wMi a{^roved l^ City Council 
Monday, over resident ob- 
jectims (he project wotdd 
result in an ovei^Mdii^ of 
sewo^ge, water, and traffic 
services. 

Oceans Condominium 
Corporation was granted a use 
permit to omstruct 215 am- 
dominium apartments on ttie 
triangte fA land (q^Msite the 
CavaUo* Hotel near the in- 
tersecticm of 4(Mi Sbreet, in 
addition to 16 studio apart- 
ments and 5 m(^ units on Hie 
East si<te <rf Atlantic Avenue. 

The planned overall hdgbt 
(rf the structure is 21 sto-ies. 
with a oxuiecti^ pedestrim 
walkway over Atlantic 
Avoiue OMUKctti^ tt»f two 
buiMii^. 

Pr^oit plans, acoHtl^ to 
Attorney Thcnnu C. Broyles 
who represented Uie ap- 
plicant, ciffl uitfvldytal sale of 
ifl a^rUi»nt umts, witih ttw 
meld unite to be l^ued to 
i{^itors of apartment 
roMMts. 

' Bn^tes ako said ^ana call 
for the purchase oi tlM 
^i^ Capn did} property, 
1^ rMMd^i fMJUty for 
l^ine uae M a private <Aib f«r 
nntaibi €i (he deveks|Hnait. 

Current plan call for 
eiiMvrttoo on tte com|te( to 
§[rt tt^M^ay next Sep- 



He said a similiar inquiry 
failed to bring assurance 
from the Hampton Roads 
Sanitation District that it 
would be able to offer ample 
sewo-age service to this area 
upon completion of curroit 
expansion programs, and 
requested deferral on this 
ground. 

Traffic was another basis 
for Agelesto requesting 
deferment of the matter. He 
poutfed to recent plans to 



create a one-way north and 
smith bound traffic pattern by 
use (rf Atlantic ami Pacific 
Averiues, and requited a 
deferral pending completion 
of a study qn how the complex 
would affect traffic. 

Vice-Mayor F. Reid Ervin 
si^ested a one week deferral 
on the matter pending out- 
cmne of the studies Agelesto 
referred to. 

The application was 
unanimously approved ' 



Miss Barbara Young 
presided over the meetir^. 
The new officers were in- 
stalled by Colleen Radcliffe. 
Special guests for the event 
were J.M. Fletcher, Manager 
of Sears Roebuck Company at 
Pembroke Mall, and Mr. J. 
Cecil, also of the Sears 
Pembroke store. Breakfast 
was served to Kfi members 
and guests. 

Singers 
program 

The Ba^side High School 
Madrigal Singers presented a 
Christmas musical program 
at the December meeting of 
The Woman's Club of 
Chesapeake Beach held at the 
Ocean Hearth Restaurant 

"Toir^Is Born Immanuel", 
"E La Don Don". "Mv Sheeo 
Were Grazing", "What Child 
Is This?" and "The Christmas 
Waltz" were among the 
numbers presetted by the 
Singers under the direction of 
Mrs. Faye Whitlock. 




In this very special 
lime of the year, we 
extend to our Many 
friends, our sincere 
best wishes for good 
health, happiness^ 
and prosperity in the 
year ahead, and at 
the same time, ex- 
press our sincere grat- 
Uudefor the hytdty 
shown us during the 
past year. 







E. Ray Holl owell - 
Bernard H. McNamara 

Prescription Opticians 



974 LASKIN ROAD 



OtKiStifai Giuetli^ 



Fill 'er up . . . the season that isi 
with our good cheer and appreciation. 




>LAZA ESSO CAR CARE CENTER 

3653 Virginia Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, Va ^ 

486^161 

STEVE RHODES, Manager 
Gsorgs Maso, Ssrvl<» Manager • John Blanton, Front Managtr 



rovcmeat League. 
§t Vim Ae devth ii ^ Mat 



^(Mik 




MmnROLA 

HHKESIT 
ERSY... 



TO OPERATE THIS 




PORTABLi COLOR TV 

^Remote (Control 

MMMOta mam wnoto cortrol Mty by alMiMMng ttM com- 
pHcaM color tdHiMnwm Dudont bom K* imntmitMr. AH you 
do to mm Mt on/oir . , dmo* VHF ^Mnntlt . . . a^iM 
«olMn« from ywir ••ty <*rtr. hwMMMe Cotor TunlnQ Im^m 
hwtdto ttw color balinclng M 0m tM. 

• N«TA4MTICf OHjOR TUIMIQ 

PmD eiM Mton 10 wlomrtcMy btlanM oolor (MM, 
MwiMy, ooMTM. bri^NnMt . . . Md y«u Mn wwi adNili 



»DATS 
rHEsantvKE 




PARTS 
WABRANTY 



' INSURANCI 






[S 




JOHN'S TV 



Packasie ^ 
Policy: 
Total 
Coverage 

Our OHnplete, comprefaensiye 
hoina>wners' policy covers Ion 
diu «> fire, tli^ft, ^orm damage, 
more. Oie premiimi. Check widi 
us for tk^uls. 



KELLAM -EATON INSURANCE 
& REAL ESTATE COMPANY 






-^ ^^^ 



■»■ 



••^^m^W^ • B LP J W M i» 



■ ->i9m<. I immmtfm^^^^^^^mmmmmmmmmmmmsmBmUftgltffgM 



THURSDAY. DECEMBER 21, 1972 



THE SUN 



PA(»9 




Transportation authority posed 



Officers elected 



l*.\CK 1M — The Cub Scouts and Wcl»elM of Pack 364 collecled 775 canned goods to 
Ik* uiveii to the Union Mission as their good will project for distribution to the needy. 
The Ihj.vs hud a one-hour time limit to go from door to door for donations in 
nioi oughgood and Laite Smith Terrace. Den I collecled the most cans and members 
were treated to a lunch at Burger King. The winning den collected 144 cans. 
Displaying their goods are Joel Straight (I.). Robert Clatty. Mark Alveraez. Bill 
Uiile (in lying position) and Gregory Arnold. 



Virginia Beach City Cmmcil 
has approved a plan to join the 
formation of a regional 
transportation authority. 

The transportation coni- 
niission. proposed by the 
Southeastern Planning 
Commission, will include 
Virginia Bef ch, Norfolk, 
Chesapeake, and Portsmouth. 

Cmmcil acted Monday on 
three of the four pieces of 
legislation necessary to form 
the Transportation Com- 
mission. 

Passed unanimously by the 
Coimcil were: creation of the 
district: agreement of 
payments; and establishment 
of membership. Still un- 
decided are the individual 
representives to the Tran- 
sportation Commission. 

Controversy siirramds the 
choice of members to the 
Commi.ssion. State legislators 
want the Commission to be 
made up of citizens of each 
city, while the SPVD wants 
members from each city 
coimcil. At Monday's meeting 
Virgini'i Beach City Council 
passed a remlution asking the 



Per student cost 
among state's lowest 



Wta] cost per student in 
average daily attendance in 
the city public schools is $652 
and local funds make up only 
36 per cent of the total 
operating budget E.E. 
Brickell, superintendent, told 
the Virginia Beach School 
Board Tuesday. 

The figures were taken from 
reports compiled by the State 
Department of Edpcation 
[M^senting the informatim on 
all cities and counties in the 
state. Brickell explained that 
the city has one of the very 
lowest operational costs per 
stodent in the state. 

Board membo^ expressed 
ttteir approval of the repct 
but felt the fact should be 
brought out that the low figure 
did not indicate less than 
quality education as some 
persons might toid to assume. 

Approximately 3,000 
sty|efit$' arg^pected^be 
eligible tor Kindergarten 
attendance in 1974 accordit^ 
to a general statement 
presented by Brickell on the 
implementation of a kin- 
dergarten program in the city. 

He pointed out that kin- 
dergarten classroom con- 
struction requirements are 
more demanding and with 



that in mind, the Board has 
made provisions for each of 
the new elementary schoote 
and additioas constructed in 
the past four years to have 
several rooms which meet the 
standarcb;. 

"All in all. it will not be an 
easy or an inexpensive 
program to put into effect: but 
not much that is worthwhile 
comes easily or cheaply......" 

he commented. The Board 
gave its approval for the 
continuance of plans for 
kindergartens in the system 
by 1974 if possible and by 1976 
at the latest. 

The requirements of the 
Standards of Quality program 
passed into law by the General 
Assembly in 1972 make it 
necessary for all school 
systems in the state to adopt a 
kindergarten program an 1976. 

iThe PrinccM Anne Band 
Parents*" reqwiMSbw^i p»f- 
missi(»i for the high school's 
drill team and band to attend 
the second annual In- 
ternational Band Festival 
from July 6-16, 1973 in Vienna, 
Austria. Permission was 
granted. Approximately 150 
students and 20 to 25 official 
chaperones are expected to 
attend. 



Elected to Court 



Pack 434 presents awards 



MissJudithDugger.daughto-ofMr. and Mrs. M.Y. Duggerof 
Virginia Beach, was recently elected to the Homecoming Court 
at Louisburg College in North Carolina. 

A 1970 graduate of First Colonial High School, Ju(fy is a 
sophomore at Louisburg and has been a cheerleader there for 
the past two years. 

She was escwted at the Homecoming festivities by Bill Ash- 
burn of Virginia Beach. 



Cub Scout Pack 434 hdd its 
December pack meeting at 
the Windsor Woods 
Elementary School. 

After opening exercises by 
the Webelos, the following 
presentations were made: 
Page Knoke and Donald 
Collision-Bobcat; David Ware 
and Kenneth Grissom-One 
year service pins; Derek 
Gould, Eric Rasmussen, and 
David Herrlng-Denner Cords; 
Bernard Bersano and Brian 
Garrabrant-Asst. Denner 
Cords; Kevin Weissman-Wolf 
Amw Points; Robert Ware- 
Aquanaut and Artist Badges; 
Christ Watson; Artist, 
Athlete, and Geologist 
Badges; Daniel Grimes-Artist 
and Geologist Badges; 
Richard Branson-Artist and 
Athlete Badges; Keigh 
Kephart-Athl€te Badge; 
David Johnson-Sportsman 
Badge; Craig Chapman- 
Spcrtsman Badge; Michael 
CJiapman-Sportsman Badge; 

and Kenneth Grissom Jr.- 
Outdoorsman Badge. 

Additimially, awards were 
presented to retiring cub- 
master James Dawson and 
retiring den mcMho- Mary 

Moes. 

Cubmaster James Cornish, 
then welcomed the following 
i«w adult leaders: Florence 
Cdilison-den mother: Joyce 
^nano ast. den mother; 
XJury Lambertaon-Webekw 
leader and Paige Knoke- 



C<»nmittee Member. 

Santa Claus took time off 
from his busy schedule to visit 
the pack and present candy 
canes and bookmark-letter 
openers to all the Cubs and 
WebelcK. Santa commented wi 
the original and distinctive 
decorations that were placed 
on a Christmas tree that will 
be presented to the Medic- 
Hone Health Center. He said 
Uie scouting spirit makes his 
j(* easier during Christmas. 



Where to go fw d the in- 
formatioii you need tbout 
youi new ccoinittnily. 

Phone 340-1234 




Please stay tuned. We're 
'^channeled to transmit wishes to 
you for the happiest Yule, yetl For 
patronage you've shown . . . thanks. 

Len's T.V. Sales & Service 



FULL SERVICE DEALER 



city's state legislators not to 
support the bill banning 
members of city councih from 
being members of this type of 
commission. 

The transportation 
authority will be called the 
Tidewater Transportation 
District Commission. 

The purpose of the Tran- 
sportation Commission will be 
to coordinate and plan the 
lutiire growth in the field of 
transportation The Com- 
mission's responsibilities 
include transit facilities, 
public highways and other 
modes of transportation. 



*HAYOOOD" 
churdi off Chritt 

WMMwgljn 

qI Haygood and Farry 
^ntttkNi Roadi, Vir- 
g^ BMeh, Va. Mail- 
N10 Addran: P.O. Box 
^Btm, ViifinM Baach, 
^.23466. 



THKOPHILUO 





i GOOP MORNING. 
WE'P LIKE 
FORVCXJTDCOME 
Al^ WORSHIP eOJ; 
WITH US. 




One of the four pieces of 
legislation passed by the City 
Cmmcil include agreement for 
payment of the administrative 
costs of the project. It is not 
known at this time what the 
actual cost will be to each of 
the cities, hut it will be shared 
{•qually by the four. 

The budget legislation for 
the commission limits the 
budget to the operation of the 
authority and prohibits the 
.inclusion of construction, 
HCquisition or operation of 
transportation service or 
lacilities costs. 



The Virgnia ^«Bch du^a- 
of the N. A.A,C.P. held Ws first 
full two-year electicm recaitly. 

Rev. H.L. Camper was 
elected prraident; Rev. H.H. 
Grieri first vice pr^kJent; 
Rev. E.E. Morgan, second 
vice president; Mrs. A.J. 
Walton, recording secretary; 



Mrs. B.W. Gr^cNy, flnaocial 
secretary; Mra. Vwizetta 
Bartley, asst. financial 
• secretary; and A.L. Ric 
treasura*. 

The chapter is plan| 
their second annual tonqui 
be kicked-off in April cMf 
M(M-e will be anm»BK:«i 
later date. 




PREGNANT? 

NEED HELP? 
Adoption Sn'vicM. Pre^pumcy Teitina, Etc 

CALL: TOLL FREE (800) 523-3430 

Netional Family Planning 



I 



G.B. Pass named 
TCC president 



HIGH RISE FOR THE ELDERLr^ 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH 





Dr. George B. Pa.ss, 37, now 
with the Florida Junior 
College at Jacksonville, has 
been named President of 
Tidewater Community 
College, effective January 15, 
1973. 

In announcing the ap- 
pointment, George K. 
Eberwine, Jr., Chairman of 
the College Board, said Dr. 
Pass was selected by the 
Board after interviews with a 
number of candidates. 

Dr. Pass, who has been with 
Florida .Innior College since 
1969, currently is Executive 
Vice-President. Central 
Administration. Previously, 
he was Provost and Dean of 
Instruction at the college's 
Cumberland Campus: and 
Dean of .Academic and Prc- 



Professional Services, Central 
Administration.' 

A native of Alabama, he 
received his Ed. D. degree in 
Adm inis tra ti on and 
Curriculum Development, as 
well as his M.A. and B.S. 
degrees, from the University 
of Alabama. , 

Dr. Pass has had varied 
experience at the community 
college level including Dean of 
Instruction at Jefferson State 
.(unior College, Birmingham. 
Ala.: Director of College 
Activities, Director of Student 
Activities, and instructor of 
biological science at Brevard 
.lunior Colleges, Cocoa, 
Florida. He also has taught 

inior high school science in 
the Tuscaloosa, Alabama 
public schools. 



A 12 story apartment building exclusively for the 
elderly is proposed in the Rosemont Road area near Prin- 
Anne Plaza to be erected pursuant to HUD standards. It 
contain community and recreation rooms, cafeteria, sp 
equipment for the comfort of the elderly and minibus ser 
to churches, shopping centers, etc. Only Virginia Be 
residents can be considered who are over 62 years of age, ami 
whose income meets Federal standards for subsidized 
housing, and who are not bedridden. 

For further information without obligation, please com- 
plete the blanks below and mail immediately to: 



i 



HIGH RISE FOR THE ELDERLY 

^ 2406 Windward Shord Drive i 

t Virginia Beach. Virginia 234S1 I 

% Name ~ ■ jj; 

« Address — — ••■• — •••" -« 'A 

% ^ ^^ 

;.j »...•..••• • ......~ ~ ^g .;.; 

;$ Number of Persorts In Femlly .,...,.».......t..«......«....^ft ;;;; 

?' S •••• 

;•:; Average Annual Income $ ............-,........•"..••"•—• «..~...~......"^ :♦ 

iv Source of Income (Salary /Pension) \ »—....•.—.•■- "aK :•!■ 



:«iSSS:«SSS;5:::«¥?fa5^:::swSft%%%WS!:S8i!®:^SSfaa%WSft^ 



aggiJ^/ 



6 




l#* OPEN CHRI^MAS DAY 
4:30 TO 12:00 P.M.. 

Christmas Time 
Is Caroling Time 
At SHAKEY'S 
Merry Christmas 



11 



Don't forget it's fun 
at 81131(0/$, New 
Yean.Eve, 9lso - 




SHAKEY'S PIZZA 3269 VA. BEACH BLVD. VA. BEACH, VA. 340-1205 



% 



Hhve yoa ever p^d<n4 over the teachlag of I Car. 13? If Ihta 
pasutgp leaches anything it surely teaches ttat actloe b worth 
^Methtng only if It has U>VE for a m<Aivatfag factor. 

Fw iostawe. the ^eat thi^ abmt Jn. 3:11 hn't that "GmI 
l»re." hat ndm- tfiat He LOVED OMagh to gim. Again, IN^ 
llivil thing in ^h. S:2S isn't that C^ht "g>»t Mwelf ' fwr tte 



eharch. h«t Itat H« LO VED it HM^ to glw Uautf r«r it. 

Unlet* ^nr ta^tee to C«d is %a^A %fm a lav* far Him. it's a 
ttsdMs service that wiU ava. von nettihi||- ^^r^^nnl tove to ttie 
type aflevetlMt OBEYS the c^ inaads ani wMms af On! object 
lovMl (God). Gal. 5:f H yon U>VE GOD, CMie aat aat wan^ 
with IIS, yM'll be impR' yon M! 




Ccmmctknit Mutual life 

the'Hue Oiqi*Coim>any 



FRANK K. FEREBEE, CXU, Geaenl Afnit 
1320 Viri^tt ^htioMri ftnk iattdii^ 
Norfolk, Vk^Bti23S10 
Tdephone 622-1 3$1 



J' 




^^ 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21. 1972 



1— ^wthem ^Hftmtw 
S-»Mrasla 

K ^ ■ Pw n State 



FliSTAMnMU 



IQ. 



The Hamioii Football Forecast 

THE TOP 40 MAJOR C0liE6E FOOTBALL, TEAMS 



ll-<mio State 
12— Notre Dime 
13-U.C.L.A. 
14-Colorado 
U-Florida 
16-Arizona Stete 
17— O0Of|«i 
18-Missouri 
l»-Nortti Carolina 
aMJktehofM Stete 

Saturday, 
Mum State 



2l-'\am Stete 
22--f>urcliw 
2^-Misstoippi 
24-4Bor|hi Tech 
25-S.M.O. 
26--W«st Virginia 
27— No. OiroTina Steta 
a— Washington Stete 
29— Stenfor^ 
30— Washington 

Dteambar 23 
a 



31— Taxas Tach 
32— Louisville 
33-Houston 
34-V.P.I. 

35— Michigan Stete 
36— Tulane 
37-ll«ianii, Fla. 
^— San Diego Stete 
3&-Air Force 
40-Uteh Stete 



Missouri 






, ^^tlEBONNET BOWL: 
^ipTOR BOWL: 
fuN BOWL 

SUaARBOWU 

l^pTTONBOWb 
^ANBEBOWU 
il^E BOWL- 



Friday, Dtcamlitr 29 

TainiM tl 

Wast Virginia 14 

Saturday, Decembar 30 

Tannessea 17 

Colomlo M 

North Carolina 21 

Sunday, Decembar 31 

Ofclalioma 33 

Monday, January 1 

Alabama n 

NabrasKa 3S 

Smitham Cal tt 

HIGHLIGHTS 



Kant Stete 13 

No. Caraiina State 23 



LS.U 

Auburn .... 
Texas Tach 



11 



Pann Stete 14 

Texas 13 

Notre Dame 14 

Ohio Stete 11 



our 



both 



_ Jonal ehainpion for 1172, but it was iust 
nishsd wiUi a power quottent of 122.3 while 
an undefeated soason while Oktehoma lost 
n, teur pointe back. 

Michinn and Nebraska while the Com- 
um lumped from 11th to 7th after up- 
Tennessee and L.S.U., finished Ith and 



rti Ifi no surprise ttwt SoutfNm California 

a a noM over second-pteM Oklahoma. The Tn 
I .teeners' p/q ms 121.1. SwiOiem Cal irawerei 
onv te Cetoraite. Atobama finished in the No. 3 
^^' Texas mevod to fourth after the demise of _ 
iNtelnrs and Wolverines followed in fifth and sixth. 
MMm Atetama. The Astre-Bluebonnet Bowl opponent^ 
mn wm Nan State rated tN number 10 team. 

Eadi year we foal we should put in our reminMr note about the ratings of the tep tertf 

. Keep te mind Mat a team's rating is based on the AVERAGE of ite performance unlnst 
Ml. rapMitian Mrou^imit the entire season ... one pme, such as Ohio Steto's win over Miehl* 
no, Mas n«t mate a soMon. Also, a team's won and lost record has no bearing on ite national 
^itiBn. . .calHifii of competition is a major tector in determining a team's rating. 

B etwe e n the CMnpuiar and tiie cnrstel ball, we were finally abto to come up willi the sea* 
Ife's tereoHthig average. Based on 1,119 correct pieitt out of 2,1« pmes, (there «raro 40 ties), 
Hiat final average is .VS3. 

''i"' On IN stiengHi of season newer quottente, which we've found dont always mean too mudi 
i niest-a ea s en boon gamM. Ofctenoma, Nebraska, and SouMem Cal would look te have rather 
jpnr ttnes h Hw Sinr, Ormge, and Rose Bowls. However, we arant that nahre . . . bowl pmes 
an semMfiing elsel lliey'll Im gnat games, and vw'ra looking tor at least one upset Fourteenth- 
ranked Cetondo wiN be a toupie tor 7th-rated Auburn . . . Colorado by tour pointe. 

The B^ E^t Contorance strangthoned Ite posKion as the Number One contoranoe In the 
ceuntiy. LaM year, fiw B^ I but out the Southeast Contorance by Just one point Thisvear tN 
dlflMMice is abiNMt five pointe. The Big Ten dropped anottier notch, slipping from 4m te,||h 
flaOe as M NuBweA Contorance bMame the tourtt contorance to move ahead of ttie im 
powerful mMwM^Mners. ConfOranoe ratings, era based on each league's power quotient avenge 
Meminwi from the ntii^ of all teams in every contorance. Of the mora than OS feoUiall con- 
toiWMs, hera era the twenty strongest in the nation: 

67.41 
66.79 
64.17 
60.S3 
60.87 
60.20 
58.56 
58.48 
56.90 
52.77 



1-^ig €i^t Conference 102.12 

2— Southeast Conference 97.38 

3— ftcific Eight Contorance 93.41 

i—Souttwest Contorence 92.10 

l^^ig T«i Contorence 90.73 

6-Attentic Coast Confsfence 80.% 

7— ^Mastem Athletic Conference 76.19 

8— Mid-American Conference 73.40 

niMiNiKOuri Vall^ Contorence ....... n.2B 

yrftff Leasue 68.94 



11— Pacific Coast Athletic Conferenra 

12— Southland Conference 

13— Southern Conference 

14— Big Sky Conference 

15— Ohio Valley Conference 

16— Lone Ster Conference 

17— Nortti Central Conference 

18— Mid-South Conference 

19— Southwestern Athletic Conference 
20— Yankee Conference 




From all of us at WNOR to 
all of you, we extend the 
w a rm ett of holiday greetings. 






.iveStereoPV 




This week in wrestKng 



Wrestling action Oils week 
was highlighted by Princess 
Anne and Cox remaining 
unbeaten. Princess Anne's 
very strong mat team beat 
First Colonial ^-15 Saturday 
night to stretch the Cavalier 
record to 3-0. Cox picked up its 
Sfcond win in as many 
outings with a whopping 54-0 
win over Norfolk Academy. 

Burt Spry, 126 pounds, and 
John Barnes, 132 pounds, 
registered pins for the 
Cavaliers. Jerry Pontes, 145 
pounds, had the only pin for 
the Patriots. 



First Colonial got back m 
the winning track Tuesday 
night with a 31-15 win over 
Lake Taylor. John Tliemides, 
155 pounds, and Scott Davison, 
unlimited, both won pins fM" 
the Patriots. Davison's win 
was his fourth in as many 
starts, a great beginning fw a 
first year varsity 

heavyweight. The Patriot 
matmen have a 3-1 mark. 

On Saturday night, Kellam 
blitzed Maury 44-8, and Cox 
shutout Norfolk Academy 54-0. 
Five Cox wrestlers recorded 
pins. Getting pins for the 
Falcons were Timnjy 



l*i incpss .\niir's (iary Passage tries to take down Paul 
llii '.h«>H of First Colonial in one of the Weeit's top 
scholaKtic wrestling inrcts. 




SSfflSS^SS 



^s^ffi 







SPORTS 



By T. Jay Brumbley Sports Editor 



fr-fFwrwas 



Davidson, 98 poimds, Chris 
Yerk«, 105 pounds, Mike 
Battalio, 126 pomAs, Mike 
Newbem, \3S pounds, and 
James Gaudreau, 185 poumls. 
The victOTy kept C^ unbeaten 
intwo matchra. 

Thfe^Kettam matmen 
earned pins in the Maury 

victory. Bob Teachout had a 
pin at 112 pounds, Aldolphus 
Haynes at 138 pounds, and 
Brad Greenberg at 167 
pounds. 

A good Kempsville team 
was edged 29-21 by Ncrview 
Tuesday night. Norview is still 
unbeaten this season, but the 
Chiefs gave them their biggest 
scare of the season. B(ri} Tate, 
112 pounds, and Mark 
Rimarski, unlimited, had (rins 
for the Chiefs. 

NEXT WEEK 

SUN All-City Football Team 
announced 

First SUN wrestling 
rankings of the season 



SUN Basketball scoring 
stetistics 



to last minute changes in production scheduling, two tab pa^es were 

hWiW to fh6 reguiki* SUN sports pages. Since the team wi*fte-ups vc^e 

{alphabetized by their school's name, Princess Anne was the sixth in the 

isequence. TTie Princess Anne analysis is tab-sized to that you can cut it out and 

I insert it in the tab for the complete Virginia Beach basketball and wrestling 

analysis. 




PRINCESS ANNE HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 

Young, but a title contender 



MIKE ANGE-«'7", 185 
pound senior center. A 
starter and a genuine All- 
American candidate, 
Ange is one of the finest 
blue-chip college 
prospects in the Beach. 
As a junior, he made the 
SUN All-aty Basketball 
First Team, averaged 
18.89 points per game, 
and was the fiftb leading 
scorer in the City. Ttiis is 
Ange's third year on the 
varsity, and he has set 
the school field goal 
percentage record. He is 
a consistent high-double 
figure scorer and an 
excellent free throw 
shod;er. Ange can clear 
the boards on rebounds 

TOM CALLAN-5'r', 1« 
pound junior guard. Tom 
is a p-eat ball-handler 
and has the knack to spot 
the open man, drives 
well and is a ^adly 
i^KK^er from close range. 
He hmtles well, is a good 
ball-hawk on defence, 
and has the ability to run 
the offense wdl. 

MWE CASEY-6'2", 150 
pound Junior forward. 
Mike plays a good 
(tefosive game, with 100 
peri^nt omtinumis effort 
atx) baU4)awking ability. 



is quick and will see a lot 
of action 

TIM DAILY-«'0", 160 
pound sophomore guard. 
Tim is a good dribbler, a 
floor leader, and can 
score consistently on 
offense. On defense, his 
b-emendous quickness, 
hustle, and baU-hawking 
ability will make him one 
of the City's top guards 
with a litUe more ex- 
-^rien<». 

RITCHIE GRUBER- 
6'0", 150 pound junior 
forward. Ritchie has the 
potential to become a fine 
forward. He knows his 
fiindamoitals and is a 
steady performer. He can 
run tiie (rff«ise and is 
considered an excellent 
ball-handler. He is a 
dangerous shooter from 
ttie baseline area. 

FRANK HOLLEY-6'3", 
180 pound junior center. 
A reserve this year 
behind Ange, Frank will 
probably step into the 
starting role next year 
He will see a lot (rf action 
this season because o( his 
ov«*all versatility. He is 
a tremendous fighter 
under the boards for 
rebounds, is strong, 
a^ressive, and a good 
in^de shoots. 



6'0", 160 pound junior An excellent ball- ROSS PATE-6'6", 185 
guard. He won a varsity handler, his quickness pound junior forward, 
letter last year as a and defensive ability .Ross has excellent 
sophomore and could win a lot of games- Jun^ping ability and adds 
established himself as a ^ great strragth to tl^ 

fine pressure player. He JOHN PADEN— 6'4", 165 Cavalier rebounding 
has great quickness, and Pound junior forward, capability. He has a good 
he is regarded as a good 
floor man. A good 
dribbler, he can bring the 
ball up the court against 
the press. He is an overall 

Coach Leo Anthony shot from the foul lane 

regards John as one of area, drives to the basket 

the f mest shooters ever to 

play for Princess Anne! 

He makes good moves 

under the basket and can 

drive to the basket from 

outside. His height plus 

his tremendous jumping 

the 
the 



PrincessAnne 



fine defensive player and 
has a good eye from the 
foul line area. 



STEVE MANUEL-5'8", 

140 pound sophomore 

guard. Steve will see 

quite a bit of action this ability Rives him 

season as one of the finest ability to clear 



wdl, and has good mov^ 
under the basket. He is a 
real hustler, a good toll- 
hawk, and is quick for his 
size. 



sophomore guards in the boards. He averaged 15 
City. He has a great eye points a game on the 
from the outside and can junior varsity last 
(hive well on the basket. seas<m. 



He works hard to im- 
provid himself, ai^ his 
^mpt^ ability mak^ 
him a ^od rebountter. He ROBERT HUGHES- 1 



Friday. Dec. 8 K«mpsviUe, Hone 

Tu«<tay, Dec. 12 Kellam, Home 

Friday, Dec. 15 Bayside,Away 

Tuesday. Dec. 19 ^......Q^Away 

Friday, Dec. 22 ^ ,. First Cdonal, Home 

Friday, Jan. 5 Bayside, Home 

Tuesday, Jan. 9 Cox, Hom^ 

Friday, Jan. 12 B.T.Washington. Home 

Tuesday, Jan. 16 LakeTaylw, Home 

Friday, Jan. 19 Kempsville, Away 

Friday, Jan. 28 ....*... ^ Kellam, Away 

Tuesday, Jan. m Grariiy, Home 

Friday, Feb. 2 Norview, Away 

■ni^ay. Fdj. 6 Great Bridge, Away 

FrWay, Feb. 9 Maury, Away 

TXiesday, Feb. 13 First Cdlaual, Away 

Friday, Feb. 16 CradoA, Hone 

Note: Tl^CavaUa? willljo8ta™i jwrtJcipate in their Cavator 
Chrstaus Cla«K BaskettMll Toumamnt on I^<»nbe- atti, 
73th, awl 30tti. 

All punier varsi^ ^mes start at 6:15. 

Vanity ^nus t^n at 8 p.m. 



GEORGE PURDIN— 
6'6", 175 pound junior" 
forward. His 17 pdints- 
per-game average led the 
junior varsity in scoring 
last year. He also was the 
team's top rebounder. He 
is an occellent jumper 
and rebounder and 

possesses surprising 
quickness for a man his 
size. He has the poteitial 
to become a groat fw- 
ward. He is an excelleit 
outside shooter, can 
score near the basket 
with a good variety of 
shote, and his moves 
undff tl» basket mate 
him a tremendous 
scoring threat every tixm 
1% ^ts his han(te m the 

RUSTY RUSSELL-€'0", 
150 pound sophomore 



nHMMH 



mmmm 



.")' f y Tf TTTTmvamn'ifmf^mmmmmmmmm 



iv««a«BBV«a««i 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1972 



THE SUN 



PAG^ 



& 



Scott Davison 
signs with UNC 



Much to the disappointment 
of a host of a host of college 
foothpll recfuiters' from all 
overl the country, one of 
Virginia's finest centers ever 
made his choice Mondav 
night. First Colonial's Scott 
Davison signed a grant-in-aid 
to attend the University of 
North Carolina. 

On hand for the signing were 
UNC head coach Bill Dooley 
and assistant coach Charlie 
Carr. A week earlier. Carr 
signed another Beach player, 
Bill Span of Cox. 

Davison, a 6'3", 225 pound 
area standout, was a two-way 
player for ,the Patriots. 
Although he won hjs 
reputation as a center during 
the past few seasons, he also 
was a defensive standout in 
one of the linebacker and 
tackle slots. 

During his scholastic 
career, Davison made vir- 
tually every all-star team in 
the area. He has been named 
to the first team of the SUN 
All-City Team, the All- 
Tidewater Team, and the 
Associated Press's All-Group 
AAA (AlkState) Team. 

Davison's selection of the 



Tar Heels was a big disap- 
pointment especially to 
Virginia Tech and the 
University of Virginia. Both 
hnd recruited him heavily, 
hoping that he would choose to 
play his collegiate football in 
Virginia. 



^ i^^#^&*.'*® 





Three holiday tournaments 
in Beach schools next week 



F.O.P. table tennis awards 

I'rincess ,\nne F.O.P. Lodue No. 8 awarded three trophies to winner's of last week's 
Anniial Table Tennis Tournament. FOPA President Nick Cohen (left) presided over 
rhe ceremonv and is pictured prestntinu Captain R. C. Davis, who is commandinii 
officer of the Detective Bureau, with the divisional trophy. Detective D. H. Kappers, 
in addition to winning the singles trophy, shared the doubles trophy with Detective 
K.W. Harris. 



guard. Rusty is an out- 
standing guard for a 
sq;)homore. He has great 
speed and quickness, 
knows his fundamentals, 
is a good dribbler, and 
makes a good floor 
leader. He iS a very good 
defensive player. 

CURTIS STRANGE- 
6'0", 150 pound senior 
guard. A two-year let- 
terman and a starter as a 
junior, he knows how to 
run the offense. He is 
capable of coming up 



with the big play and is at 
his best under pressure. 
145 pounds... ..CRAIG 
VOSLER, a sophomore, 
is just starting his first 
from the outside. He is 
very aggressive, and he 
gets more rebounds than 
most m«i his size. 
RICHARD TUCKER- 
6'0", 170 pound 
sophomore guard. Coach 
Anthony feels that he is 
an outstanding guard 
prospect and considers 
him one of the finest 
young guards to ever 



play for him. Richard is 
well -versed in all aspects 
of the game. He is a good 
ball-handler who drives 
toward the basket ex- 
ceptionally well. He is a 
good scorer, averaged 15 
points for the junior 
varsity last year 

BOBBY ZINNO-6'0", 
160 pound junior guard. 
Bobby had anj^ out- 
standing junior varsity 
season last year, 
averaging 16 points per 
game, but is coming off 



slow him up somewhat. 
He is a very con- 
scientious, dedicated 
player, and his jumping 
ability and 
aggressiveness gives him 
good rebounding ability 
for his height. He has fine 
speed and is very quick. 

SEASON OUTLOOK 
FOR TEAM-The 
Cavaliers are coming off 
a fine 15-3 season overall 
and R-2 rr^^'.fTn District 
record. This year's team 
"is immature at this 



■ES^sr, 



point," according to 
coach Leo Anthony. "We 
lack varsity experience, 
so mistakes are going to 
come. If we can cut down 
on the mistakes a young 
team naturally makes, 
.we will have a fine ball 
cltib later in the season. 
"We have never had 
sophomores like this 
before. So while some 
may consider this to be a 
rebuilding year, our 
sophomores are good 
enough to make us a 
strong contender." 



Thanks to the relaxing of 
Virginia fligh School League 
rbles, state .schools will now be 
able to host holiday tour- 
naments in various sports. 
Virginia Beach, long a leader 
in area-wide sports, jumped 
into the thick of the holiday 
tournament action, scheduling 
two hasketbair and one 
wrestling tournament. 

Unfortunately, all three 
tournaments arc being held at 
the same time, so fans will 
have to be somewhat selective 
in their viewing. 

, First Colonial 
Invitational 
Basketball Tourney 

First Colonial will host their 
own basketball tournament on 
December 29th and HOth. 
Nimied the First Colonial 
Invitational Bftsketball 
Tournament, play will feature 
c;reat Bridge and Indian 
Hiver of the Southeastern 
District and Kellam and First 
Colonial of the Eastern 
District 

The four teams will begin 
plav iit 7 p m. each evening. 
The opening games will be 
played at 7 and 9 p.m. on 
DecemN'r 29th. First night 
losers "^11 meet in the 7 p.m. 
g.ure/on December 30th, 
which will be followed by the 
tournament championship 
game at 9 p.n\ 



Fakon Invitational Wrestling Tourney 






Cox will h(wt tteir first 
Falcon Invitational Wrestling 
Tournament on December 
2«th and 29th. The Falcons, 
last year's state champions, 
have invited the best Eastern 
District, Southeastern 
District, Peninsula District, 
and Independent teams to 
compete. 

"Cox and Princess Anne will 
represwit the best of the 
Fastern District." Bill 
(Uitermuth stated. Gutermuth 
is the head wrestling coach at 
Cox. "Chtirchland and Great 
Bridge are probably the best 



teams in the Southeastern 
District. The Peninsiila 
District will he represcntedkjl 
Hanjpton, and NorfWK 
Academy will be the in| 
dependent entry." ,. *, 

The six schools will gel thk 
match underway .f4 
December 21 at 12:.W Ahi^ 
with the quarter-flnals. Saft^ 
final bouts begin at 7:30 p.nr. 
Consolation semi-flnals NgM 
at Noon on December ^^j 
with the consolatim fiml4 
following at 6:30 p.m. an^jl^ 
champimship finals at 8 p.nij 




PRINCESS ANNE HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING TEAM 

Looks like a winning combination 



98 pounds KEN 

NOWLIN, has had three 
years of wrestling ex- 
perience. He has a lot of 
determination and should 
have a good year. 

105 pounds GARY 

POSSAGE is up from last 
year's junior varsity. 

112 pounds TIM 

ROGERS is back from a 
very good varsity season 
last year that saw him 
ranked number one in the 
aty at 98 pounds. Last 
year, he finished sea)nd 
in both the District and 
EegimsA tournaments. 

119 pounds... .CARLOS 
BENJUMEA was ranked 
second in the City at 112 
pMDMto last season as a 
varsity wrestler. He 
finished fifth in both the 
District and Regional 
tMU*n^s, and l» l»s the 



possibility of winning the 
District this season. 

126 pounds BURT 

SPRY was on last year's 
varsity team, and 1» 
finished fifth in both the 
District and Regional 
tourneys. He wrestled at 
119 pounds last season, is 
a very hard man to beat. 

132 pounds JOHN 

BARNES is up from last 
year's junior varsity. He 
had a good year last 
seastm and shtmld do 
pretty well this time 

138 pounds BILL 

FARMER is back from 
last year's varsity. With 
his experience, he should 
have an edjge on a lot of 
his competition. 

Qirtis. is a consistent 
(toublc-f igure sca«r witti 
a 9%at eye f<N- Vt^e tsucksA 



year of wrestling. He is 
aggressive and has a lot 
of determination, and 
those two qualiti^ could 
make him a hard man to 
defeat. 

155 pounds DANNY 

ALLEN was one of the 
top ranked wrestlers in 
the City last year, second 
at 167 pounds. He finished 
fourth in the District and 
fifth in the Regional 
tournaments. Danny is 
strong, aggressive, very 
toi^h, a real competitor, 
and he has a good shot at 
the District title. 



167 pounds ED SMITH 

has looked good in early 
matches. He a»uld be 
very tough by tour- 
nament time. 

\m pouwfe RICHARD 

EAm.Y has h^ three 



years of wrestling ex- 
perience. He had a good 
season last year and 
could very easily place in 
District competition. 

Unlimited DAVID 

JONES is up from last 
year's junior varsity 
team. He is strong aiMl 
should be a real winner 



SEASON OUTLOOK team to taste defeat. 



Thursday, Dec. 7 Cradock. Homt 

Wednesday, Dec. 13 Bayside, Away 

Saturday.Dec. 16 First Colonial, Home 

Wednesday, Dec. 20 B.T. Washington, Away 

Saturday, Jan. 6 Norview. Away 

Wednescby, Jan. 10 KemfKviUe, Home 

Friday. Jan. 12 Maury, Away 

W«inesdav, Jan. 17 Kellam, Away 

Wednesday, Jan. 24 Lake Taylor, Away 

Sahirday. Jan. 27 n ^ff • ui^l 

Wednesday. Jan. 31 Granby.Home 

Note: The Cavali^s will be in the Holiday Wresluii« Tour- 
naroeit at Cox H^ School on Decmeber 28th and »li. 

Junior Varsity matches start at 6:M p m. 
Varsity nutdi^ bepn at 8 p.m. 

EiK^aia: The Jan»fy 12th Maury junior varsity match 
beitfM at 3 p.iB. wi* the varmty mat<* b^iim>n« at 4 p.m . 



Cavalier Christmas Basketball Classic jg 




Princess Anne High School 
will host the Cavalier 
Christmas Classic, an eight- 
team round-robin basketball 
tournament featuring the best 
of regional cage talent on 
December 2«th, 29th, and 30th. 
All participants will be from 
Virginia, wiUi the exception of 
Gonzaga of Washington, DC. 

Gonzaga could be the 
number two team in the 
country in high school rardcs. 
"They are usually ranked in 
the nation's top twenty teams 
and have two or three 
potential scholastic All- 
Americans on their roster," 
according to Leo Anthony, 
Princess Anne's head 
basketball coach. 

Four of the tean]s will be 
from Virginia Beach. In ad- 
dition to Princess Anne, Cox, 
Bayside, and Kempsville will 



also participate. The otte^ 
three teams are from -^tM 
Northern Region, led by )m 
ranked J.E.B. Stutrt; 
Groveton usually fields-^ a 
strong tram, and Hayfield 
handed powerhouse T. C» 
Williams their rnily loss of (^ 
.season last year in 
r^ional playoffs. 

The tournament is stjrj^ 
after the old Dixie Cla^ 
Each team will play thiMM 
games — all with a differ«i 
opponent— and Oie team «W 
the best won-lost record w!l 
he declared the toumai^i 
champion. 1 

Admission will be $1.50 ^q 
session or $7.00 for a pasajAff 
the entire six-session tour^ 
nament. There will be a 2 p.lh.i 
afternoon and a 7 p.m. eveltfflg 
session each day. 



31 C 
SI 



Tournament Schedules ^gj 



lavalier Christmas Basketball Classic 
December 28th - 30th 






Participating Schools: Princess Anne, Kempsvill^, 
Bayside, Cox, Groveton, JEB Stuart, Hayfield, an^ 
Gonzaga. ^ 

Times: Four games per day, Afternoon sessitm 
games start at 2:00 p.m. and 3:45 p.m. and evenii^ 
session games start at 7:00 and 8:45 p.m. __l^ 



Ro K lllen r *''^* Colonlal invitational Basketball Toumamfe 

Starts for 
Wofford 



"One of the early surprises 
this season has been the play 
of first-year starter Bo 
Killen." Coach Gene 
Alexander of Wofford College 
stated last week. Bo is a 
Virginia Beach player who 
has landed a starting role in 
the Terrier line-up as a 
sophomore. 

The 6'5" forward is second 
on the team in rebounds, 
averaging seven per game. He 
also has been scoring at a 7.6 
points-per-game clip. Bo has 
hit 48 percent of his shots in 
the first seven games. He also 
has nine assists to his credit 
Bo has a low turn-over ratio, 
averaging just one turn-over 
per game. 

The Terriers began their 
holiday break with three wins 
in seven starts. After an 
opening win, they dro^jcd 
four straight before coming 
hack with two successive wins 
just before the Christmas 
break. 



December 29th - 30th 



articipating Schools: First Colonial, Grea^ 
Bridge, Indian River, and KeUpm. *" 

Kmes: Play b^ns 7 p.m. each evening 



i'alcon Invitational Wrestling Tournament 
December 28th -29th 

Participating Schools: Cox, Princess Anne, 
ChurchUuid, Great Bridge, Hampton, and Norfolk 
Acadei^y 

Times: Thursday, December 28th 12:30 p.m. 
Quarter-finals b^gin and 7:30 p.m. Semi-finals 
begin 

Friday, December 29th 12:00 Noon Con- 
solation Semi-Finals, 6:30 p.m. Consolation Finals 
an^^O^jn^iampifflishij^M 



FOR TEAM— Princess 
Anne has a good mix of 
returning men with 
varsity experience and^ 
good, young men up from 
last year's junior varsity 
team. The combination 
should give them a good 
season. The team looks 
good, and they will have 
meet a really strong 




Ue 



SCHOOt OF 




SOO WONG LEE 

Mate' Instructor 
7di Dq^«e BiMk Bdt 

• SELF DEFENSE AND YOGA 
and BODY CONDITIONING 

• SHOWERS - SAUNA BATHS 

Day 4k Nile Oattet for Men, 
Women A OtMren 
612 E. Uttto QTMk Road SS«-6262 
223 Vs. BMCh Blvd. 42t-1246 




lfito(yRell]r 



O'ReiUy 
to Tech 

Mike O'Reilly signed a 
grant-in-aid Satui^ay to at- 
tend Virginia Tech. Tech 
recruiter Bill Clay was m 
hand for the signing, and Mike 
became the third Virginia 
Beach player to sign with a 
majw college this week. 

R'2", 175 pounds. O'Reilly 
was H two-way performer for 
the Patri^ He played tight 
end «i offeree and defwisive 
ond when the other team had 
IN' hall He was a standout in 
both positions at First 
rAftmliil 




h Our warmest wish that your hoMsy 
1^ flWed with peoce of mind. 
good hBoHh. and much lay. 




MALL 



4M^1144 



wm 



■^■v^r^w-^ -'% 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 






f^^rwf 



.,-•».•» 



12 



THE SUN 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, t972 



I 



Basketball this week 




First (olonbK kept its 
record unbeatart in Virginia 
Beach basfcetball play 
Tuesday by Mging Bayside 72- 
65. The Patriots piled up a ten 
point lead midway throu^ the 
first quarter, but a deter- 
mined Marlin effort closed the 
gap to just three points with 
two minutes to play. Ball 
control by the Patriots forced 
Bayside fouls in the closir^ 
minutes, and accurate First 
Colwiial foul shooting clinched 
the game. 

Bayside was led in scorii^ 
by Jim Gdfigan's 32 points. 
Don Harold and Elton Gross 
Mtdouble-figureswithlSand 12 
points respectively. Great 
defensive play by Bayside, led 
by the' sh44-Uocking ol Don 
Harold. Elton Gross, and Jim 
Gc^igan. thriUed the crowd 
during the comeback attempt. 

Fi.i:;st Colonial was paced bj 
Speedy Gainer's 18 tallies. 
Three other starters hits 
double-figures, Steve Butts 
with 15. Burt Lewis with 12, 
and Clevdand Spellman with 
11. The win gave the Patriots a 
5-2 record. Bayside is now 2-3. 
Kempsville picked up its 
first win of the season 
Tuesday night by defeating 



Kellam 67-47. TTic game was 
highli^ted by the scoring ami 
rd>ouiKling of Jim Roberts 
and the r^um of big-man 
Britt Glisson. 

R(4)erts was the only Chkif 
sewer to hit double figures as 
he burned the hoop for 2S 
points. Glist'on saw just 
limited action in his retion 
after a five-game absence due 
to an ardcle injury. 

JHo Knight hit double-figures 
in the Kellam loss. Kainy 
Bazemore was their top p^t 
man with eight tallies. Hm 
Knights are now winless in 
five games, and the win gave 
Kempsville a 1-5 mark. 

Princess Anne stretched 
their undefeated record to 
fmir games by edging Cox 59- 
as Tuesday night. The 
Cavalio^ and First Ctdonial 
are both undef«ited in Beach 
{4ay, and they will meet 
Friday night in what promises 
to be a hard-nosed battle for 
^e Beach championship in 
the first round. 

Hie Cavaliers placed three 
starterit in double figures. 
Gewge Purdin was top point- 
man with 21 tallies, and Mike 
Ange and Jrfin Paden were 
closed bdiind with 18 points 
each. 



Cox also had three men to 
hit double figures. Brooks 
Williams was t(^ scorer iar 
Cox and the game with 23 



points. Randy Robinson hit for 
IB points, and Mike Jewell had 
10. Cox now has a 2-2 recent, 
aad PriiMxss Ame is 4-0. 




First t'oloniars Buit l>cwis CM) makes his move on 
Uickv Klleso (II) of Kempsville. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Mntire is hereon given that TRi City Council of the City of 
wir„^nia Beach Virginia, in session, assembled at City Halt, 
Pln«ss Anne Station, Municipal Complex, Virginia Beact.,: 
Tt 2 M^.m.? on Thursday, December 28, 1972, will hold a 
public hearing on the mi'If,"" 0-*^__ rpANTiNG RFAf 

.T.'tpTa$ Jxem?tiSn' fS'r'c#R AT.n 'E^DllC5r 

^^I'^T.wc TO PROVIDE MORE LIBERAL TERMS 
''fn''/c°c?rdancewrth Virginia State Law, the City Council is 
oroposing to amend the existing Real Estate Tax Exemption 
ordinance for certain qualified property owners who are not 
less than sixty five (65) years of age, and who are eligible, 
according to other terms of the Act. ^ » ^ 

The basic changes from the existing Ordinance adopted 
May 1, 1972 are the following sections which have been 
amended to read 

(4) The total combined income of the owner or owners and 
the owners' relatives living in the household during the year 
mmediately preceing the taxable year shall be determined 
bv the Administrator to be an amount not to exceed $4,000.00 
excluding $i,50«^0 of the total combined income of each 
relative living in ithe household. 

m The net combined financial worth of the owner as of 
DecimEer "Vof tlTeW immediately preceding the taxable 
year shall be determihed by the Administrator to be an 
amount not to exceed) $20,000,00. 

(d) Annually, and rtot later than May 1, or such earlier 
date after the first day of February of the taxable year, the 
person or persons claiming an exemption must file a real 
estate tax exemption affidavit with the Administrator. 

Citizens interested in filing for tax exemption should, 
contact the following persons Mrs. Ormsby and Miss Mary 
DeGruche, both in the Department of Social Services, 427- 
4451 These persons have been designated by the City, 
Manager, Mr. Roger Scott, as his representatives. 

By mail requests copies of the Ordinance Number 427 may 
be obtained from the Office of the City Clerk, Room 311, City 
Administration Building, Princess Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 234S6. 



Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 



i 



<fr bowids! The bii{ round ball slips away from 
UPC plaveis and heads toward the SUN 
Jiotourapher. Fl^htin^ for the ball were Robert 
inches CU) and John Paden (51) of Princess Anne 

Do|i llurold (il> of Bayside. 



ir TOOK SKU AND sjnnnr 

AND YEARS or HARD WORKTO COME UP 
¥fini A HEAHNG SYSTEM IMS SIMPIE. 



jndy Rtribinson (13) of Cox leaps high over Kellam's 
r^len defender. Steve Strasbaugh (24). for his shot. 

>DU Classic next week 



I 



?iHi the Kiwanis-Old 
Dininion University Classic 
Bj skett)all Tournament just a 
w Jk away, tickete are being 
se 1 ate fast clip Rated as the 
be t basketball tournament in 
Vi ginia. this year's classic 
wi 1 get underway next 
Tl irsday. 

*■» Naval Academy will 



:<neet Stanford University at 7 
p.m. on opening night, 
Thursday, December 28th, 
ODU and Virginia Tech will 
clash at 9 p m. 

The following night. Friday, 
D«ember 29th, the cham- 
pionship game will be played 
at9 a.m. The first night losers 
will meet in Uie consolation 
game at 7 p m 



I 



A SPECIAL 




CAN BE YOURS *-• 



CADILLACS 

• iv;i D»vill«4drM T 
' IfJI Coup* D«VIII» 
I IMf Devill«4DrHT 
»tft;C0«9tD*VIII* 

' CONTINfNTAI.S 

•iff} Msrti I V Ilk* Br»nd ntw 
' o'tConHiwntalCMpclMee 

n 

l^fwc* 

I l»mM*r« Mi iMdMMjn 

'mtitt 

l»»AA«fklli«<tr«(Me« 
'wtCsrillnentWJaf H T 



$4*H.W 
UtHM 

tiw$.» ' 
%Tni.96 

tsmM 

•xtra 
umw 

t13*S« 



.lAVSLINt 
OlMv ) LM tpKlM INm 

J*v«lln» ^ST l]M mllM. Fully 

j^M fWfflW M. yj M^emaflc, 

' pM»«r, ftit. air^ Suektl 

'*»H, iMIfiM', M vinyl Mt »M 

tflr« , .nfHJS 

PWIDS 



oMM imm 



\H7 MhitlM9 VI Automatic UK* 
N«W WW.flS 

iM7F«lcon40f. Radio Automatic (Ir 
cond,en«o«yn*r ttOM.SO 

CNIlyil.il rRODUCTI 

WlWymoutl) Fury III 

iMdcM tiWS.OO 

•Ma mymeiifh Fury loMM SlOKOO 
l«MOMg«ci^.SM MHOS 

VOLKtWAOSNt 
mt Campar tuily loMad, iiM n*w, 
174)00 mllat unoB 

%Wi StalMA Wa^n Radio and 

haattr , in»s» 

<M«a*Mtopcand mum 

OTMSRt 

ifTOOldtML t Mfyloadad %vnm 
iNif Opal Sta «yao parlact tand 

.^^ mum 

l*M O«avrolal truck pick yp tW 00 
IM7a<avf«iatlSt:ony MHJf 
KM PlytneiiMi nm vaod SlfMt 
lfM0M2dr RMMiMd itfMI 
IM ^ntiac ienAM^iUa c^ Miy 



BAYSIDE MOTORS 




Electric Baseboard Heat is 
simply woniierful. 

With as few as three items for 
each room in your home (normally 
one trim baseboard miit for each 
outside wall, one thermostat, and 
some wiring) you 
get even, depend- 
able, trouble-free 
comfort all through 
the house. 

But it's what you 
don t get that makes 
this system so great. 

There's no filter 
to change. No pilot 
to light. No fuel to 
reorder. No bulky 
equipment to take 
up valuable space. 
No furnace. No fuel tank. No 
moving parts to wear out or break 
down and need repairs . 

And that's not sdl. 

There are no drafts or hot spots. 
Just comfortable, even warmth. 

There s no "roar" no "clank" no 
sound at all, except for the occa- years of perfect comfort. Nothing 
sional quiet click of the thermostat, could be more simple. 




irwowMrTH 



There's no reason for family argu- 
ments over temperature, either. 
Because Electric Baseboard Heat 
offers the one thing that guarantees 
everyone's comfort: a thermostat 
in every room. 

So if you're plan- 
ning to buy or build a 
new house, check 
into this great heat- 
ing system. Or call 
your local Vepco 
office and ask to talk 
to a Vepco represent- 
ative. He'll be happy 
to give you all the 
facts about Electric 
Baseboard Heat. 

By using electricity 
in the winter when 
there's plenty to spare, you'll be help- 
ing us balance the demand for power 
year 'round. Which means you'll be 
helping us hold down your rates. 
And by treating your family to 
Electric Baseboard Heat, you'll be 
providing them with years and 



VSepco 



^,«AiMi 



^^"ftrnmrnf 



<• 



THE SUN 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1972 



PAGE 13 



I 

t 

I 



ki 

» 

» 



i t':. ' II iivJ A » 







m 



p. 






i 

i 



I 



^ 






1HE WARMEST Of HOLIDAY GREEnNGS PROM IHE STAFF OF THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



mmmmmmmmmmmmm 



jm&M, 



JHiWN 



THORSDAY. DECEMBER 21, 1972 




omatic self control studied 



R:r TIIEI.MA BARRETT 

The occupational title of 
KImw Green. Ph. D. might 
verv well stump ttie panel of 
-What's My Line". Affiliated 
Vilh the famed Wenninger 
'^^ndation. Dr. Green's 
.working title is Director of 
Vftluntory Controls PropTims. 



And though it .«!Ounds like a 
government program to curb 
•tpencing. Dr. Green said, "It 
actually has to do witti how to 
gain contrd of involuntary 
states of cwwciousness." 

If this sounds heavy it's 
really ample-flo simile that 
aln)(»t myone, according to 
Dr. Green, can do it All he 
needs is a littie device called 



ill *• ^ 'li l_ I J biofeedba<*, some Autogoiic 
|Sja{HlSIS will nOld training, and a problem he 

hdklay s^oes 



L- 



!l 



*!M 



-.ifiayside Baptist Church on 
Pteasure Hotee Road will 
haye two special holiday 

s^vlces. 

, - On Christmas Eve at 7 p. m. , 
Mf-llw church will have a can- 
' ' ^'flf41i0it sw^ice which will 
t;!;,. . ififlture Uie lighting of the 
• 'l-j./jiirist ChiW Candle by the 
9'5i-^tor. Rev. David L. Henry 
'^'l M6 the passing of this light to 
' JM^h person present to sipify 
Jkifi coming into human lives 
> tive light of the workL 
' ' The service will include the 
^''jj^^ijii^of Christmas carols, the 
^rpiellir^ of the Christmas 
•story, ami special music of the 
'^son. 

' ' lT>e second holiday service 

wjjl be on New Year's Eve at 

5 t ! '*i -lli30 p.m. This swvice will be 

! '■^•'^ 'ttie annual New Year's ob- 

*'^'" s^vanceirf the Lord's Supper. 

„^.^ Xl^e service will include a time 

"^••i otprayer, meditation, singing, 

' Mid scripture and will be 

cltmaxed by starting the new 

jear with the Communion 

Service. 

."'('oH "nie public is cordially in- 

"^l' 'iritied to both of Oiese services. 



♦(. 






wishes to oontnd. 

"My wife Alyce (his 
laborot(ry asdstant) and I 
were interested in con- 
sciousness and vdition for 
many years." Dr. Greai said, 
before we decided in 1965 to 
test Autogenic Training." 
Autogenic Tramii^, he ex- 
plained, is a mind-body 
training system developed by 
Dr. Johannes Schultz of 
Germany. "We tried it first on 
a group of housewives." And 
the results, Dr. Green 



recalled, were far from im- 
pressive. "But a couple of the 
experiments were fruitful 
enough that we felt en- 
couraged to continue the 
study." 

If psychos(Hnatic disease 
really existed, Dr. Green 
reasMied, then substantiating 
Ute existence of psy- 
chosomatic health would 
follow as a logical thing to do. 
"In other wwds, if we can 
make ourselves sick then we 
mist also be able tc^make 
oursdves well." 

Commenting that a number 
of physicians claim that about 
80 per cent of human ailments 
are psychosomatic in origin, 
Dr. Green added, "It seems 
reasonable to assume that 
about 80 per cent of our 
disabilities can be cured, or at 
least ameliorated by the use of 
special training programs for 
psychosomatic health. 

"Diseases are nothing but 
bad habits," he said flatly. 



Christmas Eve candle service 



. yfw 



The annual Christmas Eve 
Candlelight service at 
Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Church will be this 
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Special 
music will be presoited by the 
Charles Wesley Choir with 
Mrs. Joyce Clarke as soloist. 

On New Year's Eve the 
church will have a watchnight 
service beginning at 11 p.m. 
John Wesley's Covenant 
Service witti communion will 
be used. The Convenant 
Service has Methodist origins. 
On December 26, 1747 John 



Wesley, founder of the 
denomination, urged the 
Methodists to renew their 
convenant with God. He later 
circulated the service which 
seeks to ratify a (contract 
between God and' a person. 
Although Christian. Uie ser- 
vice refers back to the con- 
tractural arrangements in the 
Old Testament between God 
and IsPdo' The New Year will 
be ushered in as the wor- 
receive the 
of the Lord's 



shippers 

sacrament 

Supper. 



Marriage Licenses 



IjTi.-iiene Kelly Stevenson, 1109 
4,^,*wJ»thern Blvd., and Shelld 
^,tf t^tt Holsey, 1073 Brooklyn 
'i '^ve. 

jii, „ Jteven Waldon Ackiss, Rt 3, 
f^ Sp% 3052 A, and Vi;ky Lynn 
B,,;^,lArjferfleld, Knott$ i*,l3id, N.C. 
j^-il Warren Harding Beck, Jr., 
♦fh'^ Jacquelyn Ave., and Linda 
^^< Diane Miller, 612 Jacquelyn 

1^1'; David Arlen Daigneault, 3617 
jij", ^tjSrlighter Drive, and Deborah 
Hw^V\e Tokarz, 4604 Bradston 
^i;. -^«(»d, 

mJ Edward Arthur Mann, 402 A 
'. jSth Street, and Linda Kaye 
L. ihelley, 402 35th Street. , 
I'fr John Vernon Dickons, 
j^*', rCuipepper, and Betty Annette 

" Svder, 314 Tomohawk Trail. 
u j p Howard Worrell Brbd, 814 
fiii*1l4ke Edward Dr., and Sara 
I tjl^H^tpl"'* O'Naal. 524 Carnation 

Marcus Wayne Seymour, 3621 
. / ^jiina Drive, and Olivia Ann 

■ .Hdwardi 208 Lynn River Rd. 
.7 " JamesWalfer Pretzman, 3612 
V, .Atlantic Ave., and Bonita Joette 



Bickhart, 3612 Atlantic Ave. 

Patrick Thomas Henson, 1868 
Colonial Arms Circle, and lla 
May McClellen, 1868 Colonial 
Arms Circle. 

Bruce Eric Sonn, Norfolk, 
and Rhonda Lee ^Hamilton, 
1201 Five Forks Rd. 

Patrick Freeman Bunch, 
Route 2, Box 2694, and Patricia 
Ann Hall, 436 East Bethune 
Drive. 

Peter Brlttln Thornton, 
Oceana, and Linda Gall Var 
nadore, Baxley, Ga. 

Richard Francis Paul, 1604 
Medlterr>ean Ave., and 
Kattifcrinr Jean Cerutti^ 519 I6th. 
Street. 

Lloyd Herman Jones, Jr., 224 
Fighter Drive, and Azalee 
Myers, 224 Fighter Drive. 

Donnle Oscar Mitchell, 5028 
Bonney Rd., and Debra 
Charlean Price, Rt-S, Box 3053 
A. 

Donald Keith Vaughan, 405 S. 
Military Highway, and Joy Ann 
Stadler, 525 Williamsburg Rd. 

Robert Allan McKnight, 305 



Ann 



21st Street, and Shirley 
Vunkberq, 305 21st Street. 

John Michael Anto, Norfolk, 
and Maureen Elaine Byrtus, 
3512 Alcott Rd. 

John William Lucas, Fort 
Story, ahd Le thi Phu Lucas, 
3108 Atlantic Ave. 

Edmund Fanning Tuthill, Jr., 
325 Rosemont Rd., and Carolyn 
Joanne Moeller, 325 Rosemont 
Rd. 

George Michael Williams, 
Jr., 617 Piney Branch Dr., and 
Patricia' Florence Bishops ''BOS 
Hampstead ct. 

Charles Edwin Peebles, 3Tai 
Manatee Drive, and Marilyn 
Nelson, 3141 Manattee Drive. 

Joseph Allen Parker, Rt 2, 
Box 2230, and Deborah Lynn 
Flintoff, Rt 2, Box 2230. 

David William Hilborn, 
Chesapeake, and Margaret 
Vivian Zapata, 428 E. Bethune 
Drive. 

Leon Alfred Kelly, 4544 James 
Ct., and Donna Marie Beasley, 
5169 Allyne Rd. 



"We can have genetic or 
inherit«l illnesses -but how 
we react to these charac- 
teristics will determine 
whether we get the actml 
illness or not." 

At the suggestion of Gard- 
ner Mu.-phy, then Director of 
Menninger Foundation, 
biofeedback was included in 
this husband-wife team's 
research methodol<^y. "What 
Gardner wa(s suggesting," Dr. 
Green said, "was that if a 
person could "see" his ten- 
sion, could.look at a meto* and 
observe its fluctuaticm, then 
perhaps he could learn to 
manipulate the underlying 
psychophysiological pro- 
blem." He could practice 
"making the meter go down" 
and its bdiavior would tell 
him immediately if he was 
succeeding. 

How does this work in 
layman's terms? "It's like 
this," Dr. Green said, "The 
self-suggestion formula of 
Autogenic Training -such as 
"I feel quite quiet" -tells the 
unconsciousness section of 
mind or brain the goal toward 
which the person wi^es to 
move, and the |diysiological 
feedback device immediately 
tells him the extent to which 
he is succeeding." 

Here in Virginia Beach to 
lecture on biofeedback at the 
A.R.E., Dr. Green observed 
that blood pressure, blood 
flow, heart rate, lymph flow, 
muscle tension, brain waves- 
all these had already been self 
regulated through training in 
one laboratory or another. 
"We can literally tell organs 
what to do. What is visualized 
and held in the mind comes 
about in the body." One of the 
more exciting breakthroughs, 
Dr. Green confessed, was the 

Christmas Eve 
lecture program 

A Christmas Eve program 
will be presented on 
December 24 at the 
Association lor Research and 
Enlightenment on 67th Street 
and Atlantic'Avemife. 

A lecture on "Jesus, the 
Christ" will be given at 3 p.m. 
by Mark Vieweg. Vieweg is a 
Bible scholar specializing .in 
. the Gospel of St. John. 

At 4 p.m. Joel Andrews 
witl give a harp reci^l. An- 
drews, one of America's 
leading harpists, is now 
Musician-in-Residence in 
Tidewater, serving several 
educational organizatioas. lie 
is especially interested in 
demonstrating music as 
a heaJing force. 



' r; A dMfiS. MARION S. ROBERTS 
'" "Mrs. Marion ShultsTloberts, 
' 531 of 772 Glasgow Court, 
... IpgsGrant, died in a hospital 

December 12 after a long 

Illness. 

'^A natiw of Chambersburg, 
-,; 1 i^., she was daughta" of Mrs. 
^>: < itary Brumbaugh of 
""? WiBhingtim and the late Clark 
^ ,',;Shults and the wife of Dou^s 
i^ ,,jrtl Roberts. 

■j>jr^ irJBesides her husband and 
^'j'- mother, surviving are a 
^°^;^MHghter, Miss Susan Nye 
^to^WH'is, and a scm, Steven 
aa>ltek:olm Roberts, both ^ 

Virginia Beach; and a sister, 

Mrs. Joan Taylor ot New 

MRS. ROLANDS. 
ANDERSON 

Mrs. RolaiMi Simom An- 
^iHfson, 80, of a08 27th St died 
D^ember 15 in a hospitel. 
V AnativeofBethel, N.C, she 
was a daughter of Alexander 
sM Mrs, Betty Manning 
h. te^BMNS and the widow of J.J. 
•^ "Anderson. 
- ' 9ie wtt a m«nb«- d First, 



9 r 



W 



, Presbyterian Church and 
' liv^ here 30 years. 

She is survivetL by a 
' 'dAughter, Mrs. eface A. 

P^er of Vii^nia ||each; a 

isteter, Mrs. N96ine S. 
'Wn^ie. of Raleigh; e^ht 

grand-children; and three 

0r«at-^ mkhildi^. 

WILLIEFTTOWEN 

VIRGINIA BEACW - Willie 
Murii (BiU) Bowen,61, ol 1049 
mt^ ftweant Aed Friday at 
l!90 ta • tMqrftel. 

4 Mttv« or riwAUn Comfy, 
fern, he Uved hm » ymn. 

kM Un. H«M» (Ma Bmm. 
'^e was • m-^^ut wttwi 
l^y vMifM Mi B mM' 

-^ mm a ¥*«■• af W«rW 

^ II Mtf *• Kmm m^. 

Survivkii m9 tm iltfiMi. 

^^C IMMMtfMMMl 
A T^ ti Vh^to •«•*' 
f^ •toton. Mm ••» 

Dfliitfy tf r 



and Mrs. Nannie Hope and 
Mrs. L««ne Hall of Hunt- 
svilie, Ala.; three brothers, 
Carl Bowen and Gordon 
Bowen of Huntsyille and Fred 
B«^iipen of Gadsdien, Ala.; and 
two step-pmndteom. 

JACK K.ROCKWELL 

VIRGINIA BEACH - Jack 
K. Rockwell, 54, of 2217 
Harbor Lane, ttie husband of 
Mrs. Elsie Thomas Rockwell, 
(tted in a hospital Friday at 
4:Sp.m. • 

A native of Danville, 111., he 
liwd here IS years. He was a. 
son of Mrs. Lulu Fre^nd 
RodtuwiU of Soutti B6nd, Ind., 
and tte late Hershell^ Rock- 
well. 

He was a past service of- 
ficer for American Legicm 
Post 327 and retired from the 
Navy in 1963 after 20 years. 

He was a veteran of World 
War II, the Korean War, and 
the Vietnam War. Since his 
retirement he had t>een em- 
|doy^ as a dietary supervisor 
for Oak Hill Convalescent 
Home. 

Besides his wife' and 
mottia*, he s survivod by a 
son, Michael L. Rockwell of 
Norfolk; a dau^ter, Mrs. Ann 
(tebom of Danville, III,; and a 
brotha*; Thomas L. Rodiwdl 
of Soiith Bend. 

MRS. MAMIE BOONE 

Mrs. Mamie Boone, 77, of 
1507 Oceana Blvd. died 
^mlav in a iMspital. »' 

A native of Virginia Beach, 
she was ttie widow ol Allen 
BoMie and a daughter of 
Cmtielius and Mrs. Annie M. 
Wright ->' 

&m was a member of ML 
Zton AME Church. 
Surviving are two sons, 
Alton Boone and ShelUn S. 
Bmm of Vii^nia Beach; 10 
fnndeMklren: and a grMt 




itnmti 




control of migraine 
headaches -without ttie use of 
drugs. "And it's interesting," 
he interjected, "how much of 
the Edgar Cayce material wi 
health does not have to do with 
the dwallowing of drugs." 

What is the limit to this 
capacity for psychosomatic 
self regulation? "Nobody 
knows for sure," Dr. Green 
smiled. "But research in- 
dicates that the limits lie 
much farther out than was at 
first suspected ty most of 
those interested in biofeed- 
back." 



LEGALS 

NOTICE 

Virginia 

The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be 
held in the Council 
Chambers of the Ad 
ministration Building, 
City Hall, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, on Monday, 
January 8, 1973, at 2 00 
p.m. at which time the 
following applications will 
be heard 

REFERRED BACK TO 
CITY COUNCIL BY 
COURT ACTION 
LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH 

1. Application of London 
Bridge Estates by Owen 
B. Pickett, Attorney, for a 
USE PERMIT to con 
struct 320 townhouses on 
certain property located 
on the South side of 
Reagan Avenue and East 
and West sides of 
Wayman Lane, running a 
distance of 1668 feet more 
or less along the South 
side of Reagan Avenue of 
which 938 feet is East of 
Wayman Lane and 740 
feet is West of Wayman 
Lane, running a distance 
of 835 feet along the 
western property line, and 
running a distance of 1458 
feet more or less along the 
eastern property line. 
Said property is 

triangular in shape. Plats 
with mqre detailed In 
formation^e available in 
the Office o>-4h«. Depart 
ment of City Pfanning. 
Said property contains 
24.96 acres. (Londonr 
Bridge Area). LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 
READVERTISED BY 
DIRECTION OF CITY 
MANAGER 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

2. Application ,ol 
Acquisition, Inc., for a 
USE PERMIT to con 
struct 600 motel efficiency 
condominiums on certain 
property extending be 
fween Hd^ly Road and 
Pacific Avenue across 
from 40th Street, running 
a distance of 406.50 feet 
along the West side of 
Pacific Avenue, running a 
distance of 908.03 feet 
along the Northern 
-property line, running a 
distance of 376.50 feet 



along the East side of 
Holly Road, and running a 
distance of 852.79 feet 
along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 7.647 acres. 
(Cavalier Hotel Galilee 
Episcopal Church Area). 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
REGULAR AGENDA 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

3. Application of 
Tidewater Montessori 
School for a USE PER 
MIT to operate a day care 
center nursery on certain 
property l,ocated at' the 
Northeast corner of In 
dependence Boulevard 
and Hinsdale Street ex 
tending Easterly to 
Constitution Drive, and 
running a distance of 175 
feet along the West side of 
Constitution Drive. Said 
request is to be conducted 
in a portion of the parcel 
now known as the 
property of Pembroke 
Manor United Church of 
Christ. (Pembroke Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

4. Application of Kay 
Francis Reid for a USE 
PERMIT to construct 14 
apartment units on cer 
tain property beginning at 
a point 200 feet North of 
Brigadoon Drive running 
a distance of 100 feet along 
the West side of Pleasure 
House Road, running a 
distance of 220 feet along 
the Northern property 
line, running a distance of 
100 feet along the Western 
property line and runnipg 
a distance of 223 feet along 
the Southern property 
line. Said parcel is known 
as Lot 4, Plat of Property 
Owned by Bayside Cor 
poration and contains 
22,150 square feet more or 
less. (Bradford Terrace- 
Chesapeake Beach Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH 

5. Application of Harold 
D. Pugh for a USE 
PERMIT for the sale and 
rental of recreational 
vehicles on certain 
property located on the 
Southeast corner of 
Princess Anne Road and 
Arrowhead Drive, run 
ning a distance of 214 feet 
along the East side of 
Arrowhead Drive, run 
ning a distance of 212 feet 
along the Southern 
property line and running 
a distance of 160.62 feet 
along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
cont^iVis 3J,496.9 square 
feet. (Arrowhead In 
dustriat Park , Area). 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

6. Application of Nonni, 
Cohen, Clark and 
Weisberg for a USE 
PERMIT to construct 453 
apartment units on cer- 
tain' property located , 
North of Holland Road, 
East of South PlBia Traih 
and West of Windsor Oaks ' 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 2305 feet more 
or less along the Southern 
property line, of which 320 
feet is the North side of 
Holland Rtmd, running a 
distance of 650 feet more 
or less along the Western 
property line and running , 
a distance of 2320 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
1000 feet more or less 
along .the West side of 



Windsor Oaks Boulevard 
(proposed). Said parcel 
contains 28.3 acres. 
(Windsor Oaks West 
Area). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

7. Application of Gert- 
land. Inc., for a USE 
PERMIT to construct 555 
apartments on certain 
property located on the 
North side of False Cape 
Parkway (proposed) and 
the East side of Indian 
Lakes Boulevard 
(proposed). Said parcel is 
known as Section Ml of 
Indian Lakes Planned 
Unit Development as 
shown on the Plat by 
Talbot, Wermers 8. 
Associates, Ltd., dated 
November 9, 1972. Plats 
with more detailed in 
formation are available in 
the Department of City 
Planning. (Indian Lakes 
Area). KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH 

8. Application of 
Franklin E. Weigand, Jr., 
for a USE PERMIT to 
construct 8 apartment 
units on certain property 
beginning at a point 1130 
feet more or less West of 
Birdneck Road, running a 
distance of 75.70 feet along 
the South side of Old 
Virginia Beach Road, 
running a distance of 390 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 119.90 feet 
along the Southern 
property line and running 
a distance of 316.90 feet 
along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1734 acres and is 
known as Tract "G" of the 
James Ben Davis Estate. 
LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

9. Application of 
Howard Johnson's 
Restaurant for a USE 
PERMIT for dancing and 
live entertainment on 
certain property located 
at the Northeast corner of 
Atlantic Avenue and 37th 
Street, running a distance 
of 150 feet along the North 
side of 37th Street, run 
ning a distance of 325 feet 
along the East side of 
Atlantic Avenue, running 
a distance of 150 feet along 
the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
325 feet along the Eastern 
profJerty line. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

10. Application of 
Idiewhyie Inn and Motel, 
Inc., for a USE PERMIT 
to xonstroct 12 efficiency 
motel units to replace 
existing 19 unit structure 
totaling 35 units on certain 
property . beginning at a 
point 50 feet North of 27th 
Street, and running a 
distance of 100 feet along 
the East side of Atlantic 
Avenuft, 'MMinlng^^ a 
distance of 158.65 feet 
along the Northern 
property llne^ running a 
distance of 100.74 feet 
arlong the Eastern 
property line and running 
a distance of 162 feet along 
the Southern property 
line^ Said parcel contains 
16,000 square feet more or 
less. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. • ' 
Richard J. Webbon 

City Clerk 

12 21,28 2T 



• ■ ■ • ■ ? 
VIRGINIA; 

IN THE CIPCUIT 
COURTOFTHECttYOF 
VJJ«»INIA BEACH Qn the 
'-T5th day of December," 
1972 
IN RE ,^ 

ESTATE OF ANTHONY^ 
J. CROONENLERGHS,0 
DECEASED 

FILE NO 1746 0< 

SHOW CAUSE -n 

ORDER m 

It appearing that 8v 
report of the accounts of<* 
United Virginia frank ^^ 
Seaboard Natlonal^^ 
Executor of the Estate of 
Anthony J. Croonen-'-' 
berghs, deceased, and of^' 
the debts and demands'^ 
against his estate hasV 
been filed in the Clerk's-i 
Office of the aforesaid'-' 
Court, and that more than'* 
six months have elapsed 
since the qualification, on- 
motion of said Executor;* 
ITISORDEREDthatthe'^ 
creditors of, and all others'^ 
interested in said estate,-' 
do show cause, if they can,'- 
on the 9th day of January,^ 
1973, at 9 30 a.m. before a '^ 
Judge of this Court in hIsV 
chambers in the Courts. ^ 
Building, Princess Anne^' 
Station, Virginia Beach,*? 
Virginia, against the^ 
payment and delivery of 
the Estate of Anthony J. -- 
Croonenberghs, deceased, 
to the legatees and - or 
distributees entitled ' 
therto without requiring' 
refunding bonds. 

IT IS FURTHER OR-^ 
DERED the the foregoing ^ 
portion of this order by"** 
published once a week for '^ 
two successive weeks in ^ 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a » 
newspaper published and "f 
having general circulation '' 
in the City of Virginia'' 
Beach, Virginia. .... ♦' 

A COPY Teste ~ ;' 

John V. Fentress, Oerk ' 
By Phyllis N. Styron D.C. '' 

Hofheimer, Nusbauhi & 

McPhaul, p.q. t 

1010 Plaza One '<> 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 ^ 



Counsel for 
Virginia Bank- 



United 



it 



Seaboard 
Executor of 
of Anthony 
en berghs 



National,'* 
the Estata'3 

J. Croon- -^ 

12 21,28-2?^" 
EXECUTOR'S NOTICE' 1 • 

The undersigned having, 
qualified as Executor of? 
the Estate of A. Preston^ 
Breeden, deceased/a 
requests that all 
payments due the.; 
decedent, aid all claimso 
against the decedent, duly ^ 
certified, be presented to^ 
the Trust Department, j 
United Virginia Bank-"-- 
Seaboard National, P.O.^ 
Box 3127, Norfolk, X 
Virginia 23514. , 

United Virginia Bank- 
Seaboard National '■ .', 
Executor ofrth^'Ettat*,^ 
A. Preston Breeden* ^^ i^ 
deceased 

12 21,28;l-4i3T- 

Commonwealth of5 

Virginia, j 

In the Clerk's Office «f 

Ihe Circuit Court of thet 

Lity of Virginia Beach, on; 

the 14th day of December, , 

1972. r 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

Donna Marlene Fraker, > 

inft., etc.. Plaintiff, » 



A native <rf Nbrthwest, he 
was a son of the late Alfred 
and Mrs. Lucy Askew and the 
husband of Mrs. Edith Askew. 
He was a member of First 
Baptist Church, Lynnhaven, 
and Oceana Masonic Lodge 69. 



He was 
longshoreman. 



a retired 



Besides his 
viving are six 
Askew of 
Clarence 



widow, sur- 
sons, Boii^ 

Cleveland, Ohio, 
E. Askew Jr., 



Kenneth Askew, Alfred 
Askew, Alton Askew and 
Forrest Askew of New Voric; 
four dau^ters, Mrs. Lucille 
Freeman, Mrs. Erma Beale, 
and Mrs. Shirely Palmer of 
Virginia Beach, and Mrs. 
Virgie Lwig oi Norfolk; a 
sister Miss Mary Askew of 
Virginia Beach; 37 grand- 
children; and 10 great- 
grandchildren. 



imnmm K. AA«w of sit 
pm^K^mut «M8iMday 
MalwiWiil 



MISS DIANE TRUEDEL 

Miss Diane Frances 
Truedel, 28, of 5210>/>. Atlantic 
Ave., died December 13 in a 
hospital. 

A native of N(»f oik, she was 
.a.daughter of Mrs. Doris Diehl 
Truedel and ttie late Ralph L. 
Simmons 

Also surviving are her 
foster-father, Gaston E. 
Truedel, and a smto', Mrs. 
JacqudiM Trudel Lane, b<^ 
of Virginia Beach; maternal 
grandmother, Mrs. Robert L. 
Simmons of Norfolk; and 
paternal grandfather, K.W. 
Diehl. 

MRS. MARY H. RHODES 

Mrs. Mary Hubbard Rhodes 
ol 201 2llth St. died in a 
Hosi^tal Deconber IS. 

She wm the widow of Ed- 
ward A. Rhodes and a 
(teu^ter of the late Artero 
and Mm CMntance Simt^MNi 
Hubbard 

A lative at Marylami she 
lived in Tidewato- IS years. 



She is 
dauiibler. 



survived by a 
Mrs. Marion 



Sprinkle of Washii^ton; three 
sisters, Mrs. Herbert Shinn of 
Myrtle Beach, S.C, Mrs. Ruth 
Miles of Virginia Beach, and 
Mrs. Hadley Harbur of 
Washington; and a brother, 
Stanley Crockett of Virginia 
Beach. 

PAULW. NOBLETTSR. 

PauU William Noblett Sr.. 
64. of 5321 Count Turf Road 
died in a Norfolk hospital 
December 12. 

He was the husband of Mrs. 
Carolyn Rowland Noblett arri 
a son of Clayton D. and Mrs. 
Clara Roberta Gentry Noblett 

A native of Fries, he lived in 
Tidewater ,37 years. 

He was a member of 
Suburban Christian Church 
and a Veteran pf World War 
11. ^ ■ 

He was the retired owner of 
Noblett Shopping Center. 

Besides his widow, he is 
survived by two daughters, 
Mrs. Katherine Noblett Jmes 
of Norfolk and Miss Elizabeth 
Ann Noblett of Virginia 
Beach; two sons. Army Capt 
Paul W Ndblett, Jr. of Ft 
Mea<fe, Md., and John Clayton 
Noblett of Virginia B^ch; 
three sbters, Mrs. Editfi N. 
Eay of Asheville, N.C, and 
Mrs. Thelma N. Dziura and 
Mrs. Heten N. Bdl of Rodt- 
ville, Md.; and two grand- 
chiMren. 



MR,S. ROSA J. NIXON 

Mre. Rosa Jmes Nixon, 78, 
of 2253 Pmer Road died 
Saturday in a hospital. 

She was the widow of 
Matthew Cleaton Nixm and a 
(tauf^ter (^ Miles and Mi^. 
Mary Franc^Stallii^ Jones. 

A native of Pai^uotarA 
County. N,C., she lived in 
Vii^inia B^di ^ yeai^. She 
mm a member of Wesley 
Monmial MeMxIst Church. 

She m wrvived by tiree 
dauf^lwa. Mrs. Jam^ Mc- 
DiMiald of Vir^nia B^ch and 
Mrs, Gemie Stui^ and Mrs. 
William Wicks ^ Norfolk; 



thr^ sons, M.K. Nixon and 
MC. Nixon of Norfolk and 
James O. Nixon of Virginia 

Reach: 16 grandchildren; 21 
greatgrandchildren; and a' 
, greal-great-grandchild. 

MRS. MARTHA D. SCHMrTT 

Mrs. Martha Dosch Schmitt 
80. of 2212 Great Neck Road 
died Saturday in a hospital. 

She was the widow of John 
Schmitt and ' a daughter of 
Michael ahd Mrs. Babette 
Dosch^ 

A native (rf New York, she 
lived in Virginia Beach eight 
months. 

She is survived by two sons. 
John Scmitt of Staten Island, 
N.Y., and a daughter Mrs. 
Jane Cooke of Pemberton, 
N.J. 

MRS. HATTIE W. S. LOVE 

Mrs. Hattie Woodhouse 
Stone Ixwe of 1924 Wolfsnare 
Road died December 15 in a 
hospital. 

She was the wife of Clarence 
Alton Love and a daughter of 
Mrs. Stenie H. Stone and the 
late John W. Humplries n. 

A lifelong resklent of this 
area, she was a member of 
Eastern Shore Episcopal 
Church, Ladies Auxiliary of 
Virginia Beach General 
Ho6|Mtal, and Princess AniK 
Cirde of King's Daughters 
Hospital. 

Surviving, besides her 
husband ami mtrther, are a 
daughter. Miss Ellen 
Chrstine Love of Virginia 
Beach; five sistms, Mrs. Alice 
Hayes Vdiva, Mrs. Fannie 
Kedii^Owoe, and Mrs. Kate 
Virginia Joinette of Virgina 
Beach, Mrs. Betty WooAoum 
Neitz of MiddletMi. Pa., and 
Mrs. Virginia Mae Jotasoo d 
Shelton, Wash.; and two 
brothers. John Woodhouse 
Stone III and Ri4>erl 
Woodhouse Stone of Vii^nia 
BeadL 



GERALD L. i,AVENSTEiN 

Gerald Leslie Lavenstein, 
re'aitor and developer in- 
volved in the ownership of 23 
Holiday Inn franchises 
nationwide, was found dead at 
^s home at 1428 Laurel View 
Drive, Linlier, Saturday 
■ mornii^. 

Police said Lavenstein, 47, 
had been shot once in the 
head. A .38-caliber pistol was 
found with the body. 

Uivenstein, cofounder and 
chairman of Alsage 
Management Corp., was one 
of three owners of the newly 
refurnished Holiday Inn Scope 
in Norfolk, formerly the 
Gddoi "Triangle. 

He started in real estate in 
Tidewater in 1961 with 
Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, 
develq3ed Rosemont Shopping 
Center, and leased much of 
Pembroke Mall. 

He was known widely as a 
sportsmaa His home has a 
hrophy room that is ^ feet 
. loi^ with a massive stone 
fireplace, a 22-foot ceiling, a 
fountain, a mounted moose 
head and a giant stoffed bear, 

A civic project which 
recently had been consumii^ 
much of his time, an associate ' 
said, is die March of Dimes 
campa iga He was biKiness and 
industrial finance chairman. 

Lawnstan was a director of 
Junior Achievement of 
Tidewater and was active in 
the United Jewish Fund. 

He was a member of Temple 
Emanud. 

The hisband of Mrs. Betty 
Har^ Lavenstein, he was a 
son of the late ACLavenstein 
and Mrs. Sadie Kantor 
Lavenstein. 

He is survived by his wife; 
two sons, GeraM Lavenstein 
Jr. of Richmond ami Lance 
LaveiBtan <rf Virgioia Bwch; 
and fwir daughters, Miss 
Lamte Lanvontnn and him 
4»nH LaveiMtan, botti of 
Richaoad, Miss Terry 
IjvNBtein and Mm Windy 
LavMilKn, b^ of Vhr^tM 



What you own 
ownsyou. 



You worked a lot and 
&pent a lot to get the loti\ 

It's all either 
necessary or nice. And 
it's all vulnerable. 

Call the Listeiwr 

Jell him what 
youVe got to lose. To a 
blaze or burglar, 
collision or court suit. 

He'll tell you 
about possession 
protection with Integon's 
many forms and uses 
of insurance and related 
financial services. 

iD INTEGON 

\^ FHiANOAlStdVICIS 




TalktothelisteDo; 





LOWERY 



GOODWIN 



RUSSELL 



REGISTERED REPRESENTATIVES OF 

Inttgon Lift Iiuurai»t Cc»poratk)n 

InMf^ G«i^il Innnranot CorjKsratkita 

Inttgmi Equity Siki Corpontk» 

TlOA.I0IVEItV,|IL 
WAYNE R.RMKLL ORALO N. GOOONW 

Call TIM LMMMn M 4lt.7Ml . Nmbroto 1 Mte 
VIMNilAMAai ^^ 



^^^^^Pi^i 



^'^^^•^^^^9^'^mmmtmmm999m99m 



mmmm 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1972 



THE SUN 




PAGE 15 




Praker, 



A I n z o 

formerly 

Modesto 

Nerona, 



against 
Gary Leon 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is 
to obtarin a divorce a 
mensa et fhoro to be later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant upon 
the grounds of desertion 
as of January 21, 1972. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is a non 
resident of the state of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
Route 2, Racoon Valley, 
Road, Powell, Tennessee 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten 
(01) days after dv/e 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

Boyce & Spanoulis 
105 Plaza Trail 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
A copy Teste 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By; J. Curtis Fruit, 
Deputy Clerk. 
12 21,28-I4,t2-4T 

ORDER OF- 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 13th day of December, 
1972. 

Jacinto 
Tumaliuan, 
known as 
Tumaliuan 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Ligaya Rosacia 
Tumaliuan, f-k-a Ligaya 
Rosacia Nerona, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a divorce from the 
Bond of Matrimony from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of two year 
separation without any 
cohabitation and without 
Interruption. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being, 
»9B Oangay Street, 
Project 7, Quezon City, 
Philippines, 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within 10 (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may 
be necessary to protect 
her interest In this »'»it. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS. 
CLERK 

A copy Teste Phyllis N. 
Styron, Deputy Clerk 

Mr. S. Beryl Adier, Atty. 
ro« Plat* One, 

Norfolk', Virginia 23510 

12 21,28, 14,11 4t 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 14th day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 
Chester Arnold Baker, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

;^oan Carolyn Baker, 
|)efendant. 

4 The object of this suit is 
lo obtain a divorce A 
NMensa Et Thoro- to be 
Safer merged into a 
'Hivorce A Vinculo 
patrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
iirounds of desertion. 
I And an affidavit having 
seen made and filed that 
^e defendant Is not a 
J-esident of the State of 
.Virginia, the last known 
3wst address being. 29 
•Mortin Hill Avenue, Lynn, 
jMassachusetts. 
* Not resident of the State 
h* Virginia, it is ordered 
4hat she do appear here 
Iwithin ten (10) days after 
llue publication hereof, 
knd do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit, 
ilames & Consolvo 
)512 E. Little Creek Rd. 
Norfolk, Virginia. 
% copy Teste JOHN v. 
PENTRESS; CLERK 
^Y Sandra Hargrove, D. 
Clerk 
: 12 21.2a 1 4.124T 

: ORDtROF 

PUBLICATION 
Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

? In the Clerk's Office of 
««e Circuit Court of the 
tity of Virginia Beach, on 
Ihe 13th day of December, 
1972. 

Cherry Lynn Walters, 
flalntlff, 
Igalnst 

John Oliver Walters, 
efendant. 
^ Theobject of this suit is 
lor the said plaintiff to 

rtain a divorce a vinculo 
atrimonii, including 
{revisions for custody, 
llmony and support 
Jiyments horn the said 
efendant, upon the 
|rounds of desertion, 
« And an affidavit having 
fecen made and filed thatr 
pe defendant is not a 
esldent of the State of 
irginia, the last -known 
est office address being, 
ioute No, 2, Fairmont, 
lerth Carolina, 
It Is ortftred that hie do 
ppear here within 10 
ten) days after due 
ublicatimi hereof, and do 
rhat may be necessary to 
rotect his Interest In this 
vlt. 
OHN V. FENTRESS. 

iCiN>v Tnte Phyllis N. 
ffron, D^vtr Clerk 

%r. Constantine A. 
pawMto, Atty,\ 
BS North Plaza Trail 
rglnia Beach, Virginia 



12 21,21, t 4,11 4t 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Board of Zoning Appeals 
wilt conduct a Public 
hearing on Wednesday, 
January 3, 1973, at 7 30 
p.m. in the Municipal 
Court Building, upstairs 
court room. City Hall, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda. 

I. J. W. Holsinger 
requests a variance of 30 
feet to a 20 foot front yard 
setback instead of 50 feet 
as required of Lot 26, 
Block 1, Sandbridge, 
Sanfiddler Road. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

II. Atlantic Richfield 
Co. by Lawrence J. 
Osterhoudt requests a 
variance of 3 feet to a 4 
foot setback instead of 7 
foot setback from the 
public right of way for the 
placement of a free 
standing sign at 3300 
Holland Road across from 
Green Run. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

III. Humble Oil and 
Refining Co. by R. L. 
Bryant requests a 
variance of 20 square feet 
to 145 square feet per face 
instead of 125 square feet 
per face as allowed and a 
variance of 6' 4" to 3' 4" in 
height for the free 
standing sign instead of 24 
feet as allowed at 4554 
Wishart Road on the 
northeast corner of In- 
dependence Boulevard 
and Wishart Road. 
Bayside Borough. 

IV. R. H. Kline by 
Cardinal Sign Corporation 
requests a variance of 72 
square feet in addition to 
230 square feet as 
previously granted by the 
Board of Zoning Appeals 
for a total of 1214 square 
feet of sign area instead of 
912 square feet as allowed 
and a variance of one sign 
for a total of six signs 
instead of five signs as 
allowed at 2661 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. Lynn 
haven Borough. 

' V. City of Virginia 
Beach, School Board 
Board requests a variance 
of 50.5 square feet of sign 
area for a total of 82.5 
square feet instead of 32 
square feet as allowed for 
an educational institution 
at F. W. Cox High School, 
1848 Great Neck Road. 
Lynnhaven Borouah. 

ALL APPLICANTS 
MUST APPEAR 
BEFORE THIS BOARD. 
W. L. Towers 
Secretary 

12 21,28 2T 

Commonwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 14th day of Decembe, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Donald E. Bernholtz, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Dorothy Ayscue Bern- 
holtz, Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Mensa Et Thoro to be 
latter merged into a 
divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence having been 
used or on behalf of 
Complainant to ascertain 
in which county or cor 
poration the defendant is, 
without effect, the last 
known post address 
being 4048 B. Harpers 
Road, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest In this suit. 
Brydges, Broyles & 
McKeney 
1369 Laskin Rd. 
Va., Beach, Va. 
A copy Teste. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS 
CLERK 

BY Sandra Hargrove D. 
Clerk. 

12 21,28 1-4,12 4T 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Co.m monwealth of 
Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 13th day of December, 
1972. 

John C. Speight, Plaintiff, 
against 

Dolores Schucker Speight, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a divorce a mensa 
et thoro from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being, 
218 Rush Valley Road, 
Monroeville, Penn 
sylvania, 

It is ordered that she do 
appeap here within 10 
(ten) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her Interest in this^ 
suH. 
JOif* V. FENTRESS 

cleSk^ 

A copW'Twte Phyllis N. 
Styron, Depdty Clerk. 

Mr. Barry Kantor, At 

torney 

706 Plaza One, 

NWfolk, Virginia 23S10 

12 21,28, 14,11 4t. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

^ CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

The following aban 
doned vehicle was 
removed from the streets 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach 

1959, Green Ford 
Fairlane, Identification 
Number H9FT250786 

This vehicle has been 
removed to Wilson's Auto 
Service, 635 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23451. The owner or any 
person having security 
interest may claim this 
vehicle within three (3) 
weeks of the date of this 
notice by paying all 
towing, preservation, and 
storage charges. Failure 
by the owner or persons 
having security interest to 
exercise their right to 
reclaim the vehicle within 
the time provided shall be 
deemed a waiver and 
shall be construed as 
consent to the sale of the 
abandoned motor vehicle 
at a public auction. 

WW. Davis, Colonel 
Chief of Police 
G.K. Bryan, Captain 

Commanding Officer 

Traffic Bureau 

1221 IT 



VIRGINIA; IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH ON THE 11th 
DAY OF DEC-EMBER- 
1972 

RE; FRED W. Mc 
CORMICK, JR., Deceased 
ChyC.P.No. 1742 
SHOW CAUSE 
ORDER 
It appearing that a 
report of the accounts of 
United Virginia Beach- 
Seaboard National, 
Executor of Fred W. 
McCormick, Jr., 
deceased, and of the debts 
and demands against the 
estate has been filed in the 
Clerk's Office, and that 
six months has elapsed 
since the qualification, on 
motion of the personal 
representartive, it is 
ORDERED that the 
creditorsof, and all others 
interested in, the estate do 
show cause. If any they 
can, on the 5th day of 
January, 1972, at 10 ;00 
A.M., before this court at 
its courtroom, against the 
payment and delivery of 
the estatei to the legatees 
without requiring 

refunding bonds. 
ENTERED 
A Copy Teste 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
Mark B. Perry 
508 North Birdneck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23451 
12 14,21,28 14 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk*s of the 
Circifit oif the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
11th day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Elaine Leonard Johnson, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Clarence Eugene John 
son. Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the- said defendant, upon 
the grounds of two year 
separation. . 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being; 
920 Sycamore Street, 
Springfield, Illinois. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY Sandra Hargrove, D. 
Clerk 

A copy -'Teste: 
Robert Lee Simpson 
3500 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
12 14,21,28 14 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA. 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 6th day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Alton B. Biggs, Jr., 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Betty M. Biggs, Defen- 
dant. 

Theobjectof this suit is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
71 Ferndale Lane, 
Brookside Manor, Lans- 
dale. Pa. 19446. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within 10 
(ten) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
CLERK. 

BY: PhylHs N. Styfon, 
Deputy, Clerk 
A copy -Teste 
Mr. A.J. Kalfus, Attorney 
12W United Virginia Bank 
Building, 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

12 14.21,?« 1 i ^T 



VIRGINIA In the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 4th 
day of December, 1972 

IN CHANCERY 
DOCKET NO 16815 

LAURALEE CHANDLER 
DUNN, Plaintiff 
vs. 

WILLIE THOMAS 
GARRISON, ALICE 
ESTELLE CHANDLER 
MACCUBBIN, GUY 
GARRISON CHANDLER, 
et als.. Defendants. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to effect partition among 
the owners, by sale or 
otherwise, of certain real 
property, containing fifty 
(50) acres more or less, 
located in Pungo Borough 
in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and 
known as Route No. 3 Box 
3006 A Mill Landing Road, 
(fronting 1,600 feet more 
or less thereon), which is 
more fully described in a 
deed dated March 24, 1915, 
from W.A. Capps and 
Alice V. Capps, husband 
and wife, to William Lee 
Garrison and recorded In 
the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Cou.-t of the City of 
Virginia Beech, Virginia, 
in Deed Book 97, page 204, 
of which William Lee 
Garrison died seized and 
possessed. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Guy Garrison Chandler is 
not a resident of this State 
and that his last known 
post office address is 527 
North 98th Street, Mesa, 
Arizona 85201. 

It is, therefore, OR 
DERED that the said 
nonresident defendant, 
namely Guy Garrison 
Chandler do appear within 
ten days after due 
publication of this order 
and do what is necessary 
to protect his interests. 

It is further ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this order be published 
once a week for four 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper published in 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

I ask for this Robert 
Lee Simpson 

A copy Teste; John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
Robert Lee Simpson 
404 Malibu Towers 
Va. Beach, Va. 

12 7,14,21,28 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 4th day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Donna P. Iconomou 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Panagiotis Iconomou 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
Mensa et Thoro to be later 
Merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonnii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 
And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 
L. Skouroliakou 49, 
Amfkleia, Lokridos, 
Greece. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within 10 days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

Osie H. Gay, Jr. 
2871 River Road, Va. 
Beach, Va. 
A copy Teste; 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
Clerk 

By Linda Noel Hill, 
Deputy, Clerk 

12 7,14,21,28 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 5th day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
David A. Sousa, Plaintiff, 
against 

Kathleen Sousa, Defen 
dant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
t)een made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post address being; 
Apartment 11K, 100 
Riverdale Avenue, 
Yonkers, New York 10701. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
Norman Hecht 
North Mall, Military 
Circle 

Norfolk, VA 23502 
A copy Teste 
JOHN V. FENTRESS; 
CLERK 

BY Sandra Hargrove 
Deputy Clerk. 
12 7.14,21,28 4T 

VIRGINIA In the Clerk's 
office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach on the 29th day of 
November, 1972. 

IN CHANCERY 
Number 17097 



ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH Sole Sur 
viving Executrix of the 
Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased. 
Complainant, 
v. 

S.J. MCALLISTER Ad 
dress Unknown and the 
heirs a1»law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of S.J. 

McAllister, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad- 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobjectof this suit is 
to quiet title to property 
which is more par- 
ticularly described as 
follows; that certain lot, 
piece or parcel of land 
situated in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lot 19, Block 31, as shown 
on the certain plat of 
Euclid Place which is duly 
of record in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, in Map 
Book 4 at pages 62 and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
S.J. McAllister is a non 
resident of this State and 
that his last known post 
office address is unknown 
except for the fact that the 
original deed from 
Elizabeth Park and Land 
Company to S.J. 

McAllister dated May 31, 
1913, states after his name 
"Bluefied, West 
Virginia," but that upon 
information and belief he 
has not been a resident of 
Bluefield, West Virginia 
for many years «nd at no 
time under consideration 
has he been a resident of 
the State of Virginia. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that 
there are or may be other 
persons interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to wit; The 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of S.J. 

McAllister, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office address- 
esareunknown,allofwhom 
are made parties to the 
proceeding by the general 
description of Parties 
Unknown; it is OR 
DERED that the above 
named .persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what may be 
necessary to protect their 
Interests; and it is 

FURTHERED OR 
DERED -tha* the 

foregoing portion of this 
Order be published once a 
week for four (4) sue 
cessive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
and having circulation In 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

Teste John V. Fentress, 
Clerk 

By Phyllis N. Styron 
Deputy 

Peter A, Agelasto, III 
1300 United Virginia Bank 
Building, 
Norfolk, Virginia 
12 7,14,21,28 4T 

VIRGINIA; IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE IN 
THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
IN CHANCERY Number 
17114 

ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH, 

Sole Surviving Executrix 
of the Estate of Robert 
Easton Townsend, 
deceased, complainant, 

V. 

JOHN H. BURDIN 
Address Unknown 
NELLIE A. PRITCHARD 

Address Unknown 
And the heirs at law, next 
of kin, devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of John H. 
Burdin and Nellie A. 
Pritchard, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office adresses 
are unknown, ail of whom 
are made parties to the 
proceeding by the denegal 
description of Parties 
Unknown, Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to quiet title to property 
which is more par 
ticularly described as 
follows; those certain lots, 
pieces or parcels of land 
situated In the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
Known and numbered as 
Lots 5 and 6, Block 31, as 
shown on the certain plat 
of Euclid Place which is 
duly of record in the 
Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Map Book 4 at pages 62 
and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
John H. Burdin Is a non 
resident of this State and 
that his las.t knwwn post 
office address is unknown 
except for the fact that the 
original deed from The 
Home Realty Company to 
John H. Burdin, dated 
July 7, 1910, states after 
hfs name "Windsor, North 
Carolina," but that upon 



information and belief he 
died in Windsor, North 
Carolina in 1915. At no 
time under consideration 
has he been a resident of 
the State of Virginia. He 
devised his real estate to 
his niece Nellie A. Prit 
chard whose whereabouts 
are unknown. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that 
there are or may be other 
persons Interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to wit; The 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of John H. 
Burdin and Nellie A. 
Pritchard, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown; it is 
OR DER Eb that the above 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what Is 
necessary to protect their 
interests and It is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published 
once a week for four (4) 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and having 
circulation in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 

Teste; John V. Fentress, 

Clerk 

By Sandra Hargrove DC. 

Peter A. Agelasto, III 

1300 United Virginia Bank 

BIdg. 

Norfolk, Virginia 

12 7,14,21,2841 

VIRGINIA In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach on the 29th day of 
November, 1972 

IN CHANCERY 
Number 17095 
ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH, Sole Sur 
ving Executrix of the 
Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased. 
Complainant, 
v. 

R C. GARRETT, Address 
Unknown and the heirs at 
law, next of kin, devisees, 
legatees, creditors and 
lien creditors of any heirs 
or devisees of R.C. 
Garrett, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad- 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
gerneral descripton of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is 
to quiet title to property 
which is more par 
ticularly described as 
follows; those certain lots, 
pieces or parcels of land 
situated in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
known and numbered as 
Lots 23 and 24, Block 31, as 
shown on the certain plat 
of Euclid Place which is 
duly of record in the 
Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in Map Book 4 at pages 62 
and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
R.C. Garrett is a non 
resident of this State and 
that his last known post 
office address is unknown 
except for the fact that the 
original deed from The 
Home Realty Company to 
R.C. Garrett dated July 
26, 1910, refers to the 
grantee as "R.C. Garrett, 
Graham, North 
Carolina," but that upon 
information and belief he 
has not geen a resident of 
Graham, North Carolina 
for many years and at no 
time under consideration 
has he been a resident of 
the State of Virginia. 

And an affidavit having 
been fifed stating that 
there are or may be other 

persond interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and whose last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to wit; The 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of R.C. Garrett, 
all of whose names are 
unknown and whose post 
office addresses are 
unknown, all of whom are 
made parties to the 
proceeding by the general 
description of Parties 
Unknown; it is OR 
DERED that the above 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what Is 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and it Is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published 
once a week for four (4) 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper printed in the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
and having circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

Teste John V. Fentress, 
Clerk 

By Phyllis N. Stry«» 
Deputy 

Peter A. Agelasto. Ill 
1300 United Virginia Bank 
BIdg., 
Norfolk, Virginia 

12 7,14,21,21 4T 



VIRGINIA; In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia 
Beach on the 29th day of 
November, 1972. 

IN CHANCERY 
Number 17096 
ELIZABETH T. 
OVERCASH, Sole Sur 
vIvIng Executrix of the 
Estate of Robert Easton 
Townsend, deceased, 
Complainant, 

V. 

C.B. RICHARDSON 
Address Unknown and the 
heirs at law, next of kin, 
devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees of C.B. 
Richardson, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
whose post office ad- 
dresses are unknown, all 
of whom are made parties 
to the proceeding by the 
general description of 
Parties Unknown, 
Respondents. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
to quiet title to property 
which Is more partlcuarly 
described as follows; that 
certain lot, piece or parcel 
of land situated In the City 
of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, known and 
numbered as Lot 41, Block 
31, as shown on the certain 
plant of Euclid Place 
which Is duly of record in 
the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
in. Map Book 4 at pages 62 
and 63. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
C.B. Richardson Is not 
known to have been in 
Roanoke, Virginia, after 
1920 and that his 
whereabouts and last 
known Address are 
unknown, and that If he be 
living he would be In 
excess of seventy two (72) 
years of age. 

And an affidavit having 
been filed stating that 
there are or may be other 
persons Interested in the 
subject matter to be 
disposed of in this suit 
whose names are 
unknown and who last 
post office addresses are 
unknown, to wit; 

The heirs at law, next of 
kin, devisees, legatees, 
creditors and lien 
creditors. of any heirs or 
devisees of C.B. 
Richardson, all of whose 
names are unknown and 
who post office addresses 
are unknown, all of whom 
are made parties to the 
proceeding by the general 
description of Parties 
Unknown; it is OR 
DERED that the above 
named persons appear 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication of this 
Order and do what is 
necessary to protect their 
interests; and it is 

FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published, 
once a week for four (4)' 
successive weeks in The 
Virginia Beach Sun, a 
nespaper printed In the 
City of Virginia Beach, 
and having circulation in 
the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

Teste; John V. Fentress, 
Clerk 

By. Phyllis N. Styron, 
Deputy 

Peter A. Agelasto, III 
1300 United Virginia Bank 
BIdg. 
Norfolk, Virginia 

12 7,14,21,28 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 29th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
William Morgan Burse, 
Jr., Plaintiff, 
against 

Elaine Caria Tierheimer 
Burse, Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a Decree 'o'f 
Divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
Defendant on the grounds 
of desertion on or about 
the 25th day of April, 1971 
which dersertion has 
continued uninterruptedly 
until the present. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is a non 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, her last known 
address being 4602 North 
ridge Drive Los 

Angeles, California, 90043. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that she do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest In this suit. 
A copy Teste; 
Larry Wise 
P.O. Box 15142 
Chesapeake, Va. 
JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
Clerk 
Linda Noel HiU, DC. 

12-7,14,21,28 4T 

COMMONWEALTH .OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 28th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Elizabeth Lurix Sperkes, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Peter Alan Sparkes, 
Defendant. 

The objecf of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii or in 
the alternative A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later 
merged Into a decree of 
divorce A Vinculo 




Matrimonii from ff»e seW 
defendant,, upon the 
grounds of adultery and- 
or wilfull desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, tbe last known 
post office address being : 
D'Ibervllle Apts. B 6, 265 
Front Beach Drive, Ocean 
Springs, Mississippi. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, It Is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days aHw 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 
Henry M. Schwan 
1600 Virginia National 
Bank BIdg. 
Norfolk, Virginia. 
A copy Teste; 
JOHN V. FENTRESS; 
Clerk 

By; Sandra Hargrove, 
D.C. 

12 7,14,21, 28 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIR3INIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 1st day of December, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Kenneth W. Rose, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Gladys Hunter Rose, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is 
to obtain a divor,;e a, 
mensa et thoro fror^ the 
said defendant upon> the' 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last k'nown 
post office address being 
unknown. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten 
(10) d/ys after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what niiay be necessary to 
protecf her interest in this 
suit. 

Harry NTUBstin 
Virginia National Bank 
Building 

Norfolk Virginia 
A copy Teste: 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By; J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
12 7,14,21,28 4T 

VIRGINIA; In the Circuit 
Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 21st 
day of November, 1972 
ALPHEUS F. STAF 
FORD, 

Complainant 
In Chancery No. 16609 
vs. 

WILLIAM HOLLY, also 
known as WILLIAM 
HOLUIE. ,1565 Eagietbn 
Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and 
JAMES HENRY WIL 
LIAMS, Address 
unknown, and 
MAGDALENE JEF 
PERSON, 1525 Eagleton 
Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and 
MOSES WILLIAMS, 
Address unknown, and 
CHAUDIUS HOLLY, also 
known as CHAUDIUS 
HOLCIE, 1553 Eagleton 
Lane, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and 
QUEENIE HOLLY 
MORRIS, also known as 
VIRGINIA HOLLY 
MORRIS, Union Road, 
Frultland, Maryland, and 
OLLIE HOLLY, also 
known as OLLIE 
HOLLI E , Address 
unknown, and 
HERMAN FENTRESS, 
Address unknown, and 
MILTON FENTRESS, 
Address unknown, and 
ALBERT BARNES, JR., 
Address unknown, and 
BEULAH BARNES, 
Address unknown, and 
LAURA BARNES 
BR IGG S, Address 
unknown, and 
EARLINE BARNES, 
Address unknown, and 
HOLLIS BRIGGS, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
BETTY BRIGGS, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
EVELYN BR IGGS, 
Address unknown, and 
BARBARA BRIGGS, 
Address unknown, and 
VICTOR BARNES, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
MCCARTHY BARNES, 
Address unknown, and 
MYRON BARNES, Ad 
dress unknown, and 
PEACHES FENTRESS, 
Address unknown, and 
PEARL MAE HOLLY, 
1565 Eagleton Lane, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 

Defendants 
and if any of the aforesaid 
defendants are dead, their 
surviving consorts, if any 
there by, their heirs at 
law, next of kin, devisees, 
legatees, personal 
representatives, lien 
creditors and lien 
creditors of any heirs or 
devisees, all of whose 
names are unknown, and 
whose Post Office ad 
dresses are unknown and 
who are joined herein as 
parties unknown. 
Defendants 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
The object of th'is suit is 
to effect partition 
amongst the owners by 
sale or otherwise of the 
real property In the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
known as 

PARCEL ONE (D 
Alt that certftirt'parcel of 
land located on the plat of 
C.H. Fentress property 
(also known as 

'Gracetown") and which 
is also located on the 
northeast side of in- 
dependence Boulevard 
(formerly Bayshore 
Road) in the Bayside 
Borough In tt»e City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and which Is m<^« par 



ticularly described as 
follows; 

Lot Eight (8) In Block 1, 
as shown on Plat of tht 
C.H. Fentress property 
aforesaid, which p|at It 
recorded in the Office of 
•the Clerk of the Circuit 
Court of the CVty of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
In Map Book 6 at page 264. 

SAVE AND EXCEPT 
that portion of the'above 
property taken by the City 
of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia by Certificate 
Number 47, j-ecoided In 
Deed Book 1026 I^Page 
549 In the Clerk's office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Vlrglnla.j^each, 
.Virginia. '••^ 

PARCEL TWO (2); 

All Of that certain lot, 
piece or parcel ofilandt 
together witli,^ the 
buildings and , im- 
provements thereOrf; and 
the appurtenances 
thereunto belonging, 
situate and locatf^d on 
the northeast sldf ^f in- 
dependence Bool;fevard 
(formerly B*ys*hore 
Road) In the Rcyside 
Borough (formerly, 
Kempsvllle Magkterlal 
District) in the Cjly of 
Virginia Beach, VfiTbinia, 
and more partiriflarly 
described as Lot 21, In 
Block 1, as shown on the 
plat of the C.H. Fffhtress 
Property, which 'plat is 
recorded in the iOerk's 
Office of the CircuHCourt 
of the City ofVJrglnia 
Beach. Virginia In Map 
Book 6 at Page 3^/ 
of which said pfiperty 
Moses Land, also, known 
as Moses Williams,, died 
slezed and passed'.' 

And an affidavit' Kay Ing 
been made thRlr< duO' 
diligence has beeniuse'd to 
ascertain what coMOty or 
city the defendant*' James 
Henry Williams, Moses 
Williams, OIlie HoHy, also 
known as Ollle' Hollle, 
Herman Fentress, Milton 
Fentress, Albert Barnes, 
Jr., Beulah Barnes, Laura 
Barnes Briggs, Earline 
Barnes, Hollls Barnes, 
Betty Briggs, Evelyrt 
Briggs, Barbara Briggs, 
Victor Barnes, McCarthy 
Barnes, Myron Barnes 
and Peaches Fentress 
reside and that the 
present location 'or ad- 
dress of such defendants 
is unknown. The , last 
known address Of" OIlie 
Holly is LynKhaven, 
Virginia. There is r^ last 
known address 'of the 
defendant James iHlenry 
Williams. All of th^ above 
described defenj^lants, 
other than James; Benry 
Williams and OIlie Holly 
have no last kno^n ad- 
dress although ^tt Is 
possible that som^'of said 
defendants may have 
resided with OIlie fit^Hy at 
Lynnhaven, Virginia. 

And an affidavit, having 
been made that the 
defendant Queenly Holly 
Morris, also kno^n as' 
Virginia Holly M<irr\s, is 
not a resident of th^ State 
of Virginia, and that her 
last known address Is 
Union Road, Frut>land, 
Maryland; 

And the Bill of Com- 
plaint stating that there 
are or may be persons 
interested in the subject 
property to be divided 
whose names are 
unknown and hfaking 
them parties defendant by 
the general description of 
"Parties Unknown"; 

ItisORDEREDttfttthe 
said defendants wlhose 
addresses are unknown 
and the defendant Queen le 
Holly Morris, also Known 
as Virginia Holly 'AA>ri-ls, 
who is a non-resltfi6nt of 
the State of Virg^M and 
the persons , 'jnade 
defendant by the g#ieral 
description of "l^arties 
Unknown" do app^r here 
within ten days aff»r due 
publication of this Order 
and do what is nocfssary 
to protect their irffn-ests. 
tt is further ORDBREO 
that the foregoing. pdrtlort 
of this Order be pstK^shed 
once a week fQf ," foul* 
seccessive weeks' ih th« 
Virginia Beach Sun. 

Enter; Judge 
I ASK FOR THIS; 
Frank E. Butler,, III 
4336 Va. Beach Bi«id. 
Va. Beach, Va. ;, 

A Copy Teste: John V. 

Fentress, Clerk .," 

By J. Curtis FruJ^. DCs 

11 30,12-7', ^4,214* 
■ Ji. * 
COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Offiieof the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
27th day of NoverabCI-, 
1972. "^ 

ORDER OF' 
PUBLIC AT lOM 

Kathryn Newli^;Hns, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Alvln A. Hess,; Jr.,. 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Mensa Et Thoro to be 
later merged iirio • 
divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from Me said 
defendant, upon tht 
grounds of consfructlvo 
desertion. '' ^( 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence having Iiwni 
used by or on behalf of 
complainant to ascertain 
in which county <» cor- 
porati<m the defwidant Is, 
without effect; thf, last 
known post office Mdress 
being 328 Dttroiter 
Drive, Virginia Mach, 
Virginia ^ 

Net rwWent of the State 
of Vlrglnitf, It is i^ilerotf 
that he di aiHMat' hero 
within tw) ()«} MiyC after 



(W^FWWWWWWf^ 



rfmrfwvrwmr% 



f^ffWffffVffWr^^^ff^fffff^f^^^^^^^f^V^^^^^^'^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



IT 



16 



« ( « « i J » « < t < « 



.<««<<< 




THE SUN 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, 



x.s\s < <".;<■ 



r r< < '<"<■<■ <■<•<■<■ rj.j.j<' (<<<<<<< ».<_> <_ 



/^ ClQ//ified 486-MIS 



PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



w. 



i i ( < i i ( ( « i r < i < r < i < < 




f < < < < r 



,<■ f ,r <■ f 



,<•,:.:,: J 



J- j_j-j- <: <<<«<«< 




publication hereof, 
do what may be 
iSary to protect his 
tifest in this suit. 

iges, Broytes 8. 

Cenry 
136» Laskin Rd. 
ViMinia Beach, Virginia 



'«' 



A copy Teste: John V. 
Fentress; Clerk 

11 30,i;-7,14,21 4t 

commonweailTh of 
virginia, 

' in the Clerk's Office of the 
uit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 
27th day of November, 

ORDER OP 

PUBLICATION 

Ruth AfWie Tye, Plaintiff, 

^wmes Aaeon Tye, 
^fcndant. 
e obiect of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
-i^^Hlpsa Et Thoro to be 
^Cmr merged into a decree 
'W^divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant,- upon the 
-^ grSvnds of desertion. 
S3»riffnd an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
after due diligence 
MhAUPPtainant has been 
unable to ascertain 
respondent's where- 
abouts, the last 
known post office address 
» —^tf iDfl- 6319 Adair Street, 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Not resident of the State 
ff Virginia, it is ordered 
— he do api^ear here 
mnMpiin ten (10) days aHer 
I due publication hereof, 
I and do what may be 
I iWcessary to proiect his 
I interest in this suit. 

\ Brydges, Broyles & 

1 MiKMry 

^" ^IfW Laskin Rd. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

A copy- Teste; John V.; 
Fentress; Cl«rjiv . f^ 

^„ Sandri HargroveJ 
Clerk: i 

11-30,12-7,14,21-4t 



S01MMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 

"V^t. Circuit Court of the 

fi^ of Virginia Beach, on 

ffie 21st day of November, 

1972. 

ORDIROF 

-*— pwbllcatioii 
Kenneth Robert Drew, 
Plaintiff, 
•gainst 

Rosvmarle Pamela Allen 
•Oraw, Defendant. 
' The object of this suit is 

.dObtaln a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
b^en made and filed that 
thlT defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virblnia, the last known 
office being 231 
Railroad Ave. Norwood, 
MasMchusetts. 

Not resident of the State 
ol Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
in Ten (10) days after 
ieit publication hereof, 
agd do what may be 
.Mcessary to protect his 
<1nt^est In this suit. 
A copy— Teste: 
Bernard G. Barrow 

Laskin Rod 



m 



inia Beach, Va. 
Jolm V. Fentress, Clerk 
Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 
^^ 11.30,12-7,14,21-4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

VIRGINIA, 
.. I to ttie Clerk's Office of 

thej Circuit Court of the 
^ City of Virginia Beach, on 
''m^4tf» day of November, 

^"^ ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Wificel Ann Rowan, 
P^^lntlff, 

WMl nsf 
Tfiemas Charles Rowan, 
Deftndant. 

The obiect of ttils suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
m«isa et thoro (from bed 

' 'alTd' board > from the said 
defendant upon the 

- grou nds of desertion. 
TSid an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 

Jljtflilwtf of the State of 

f^WBlnia, t»»e last known 
post office address being : 
Post OHice Box IS, BOQ 
RMm 30S, Research 

^m»r. Submarine Base, 

"SrpMi, Connecticut OtMi. 
It it ordwed that he do 
appMr here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publicatlim hereof, am) do 
wiMt may be necessary to 
t his tntwttt In this 



cn 




-ST' 



A copy 


Testa: 




O^aa 


H. Hellig, 


Jr. 


Wmjl Virginia BulMif« 


WHiMk, 


Virginia 




.Mk y 


Fanfrett 


, Clerk 


Mi •> 


Curtis 


Jrult, 


Kity. 


Clerk 




El 


n ».12 7,14J1-4T 



OF 



MMMMWIWEALTH 
VIROIHIA. 
mmm IM CNHllI OHICe el 

wm Cif««W tt^* 9* *• 
City ^ virf inia BeaA, an 
ft* ^ day M MMWib^, 



1972. 

ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 

John Edward Britton, 
Plaintiff, against 
Jane Mary Britton, 
Defendant. 

The obiect of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce a 
mensa et thoro, to be later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia and that due 
diligence has been ysed by 
the Complainant to 
ascertain in what county, 
municipality or cor- 
poration the defendant 
resides in without effect, 
as the complainant herein 
deposes, the last known 
post office address: Jane 
Mary Britton, 356 North 
9th St., Lebaon Penn- 
sylvania. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within 10 (ten) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy Teste ; 
Boyce & Spanoulls 
105 N. Plaza Trail Va. 
Beach, Va. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 
Clerk 
Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 

n 30,12-7,14,21-4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court df the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
tlje 22nd day of November, 
.1912. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Carol Ann Davis, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

ATC ArthuirO. D«vls No. 
450 50 5993, Defendant. 

the obiect of this suit is 
to obtalh a divorce a 
mensa et thoro later to be 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant upon 
the grounds of desertion 
on November 2, 1972. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last Known 
Post Office address being 
107 Scenic Drive, 
Long view, Texas 75601. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within Ten (10) Days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 
A copy Teste; 
Richard Swope 
1700 Va. National Bank 
Building 

Norfolk, Virginia 
JOHN V. FENTRESS. 
Clerk. 

By: Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 
11-30,12 7,14,21-4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 21st day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Lloyd C. Hayes, Plaintiff, 
against 

Beverly Jean Hayes, 
Defendant. 

The obiect of this suit Is 
to obtain a divorce a 
MensA et thoro to be later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant upon 
the grounds of desertion 
and abadonment. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resldwit of the State of 
Virginia, last known post 
office address being P.O. 
Box 3662, Sarasota 
Florida. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within (10) Ten days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Merest in this suit. 
A »py— Teste: 
Moore & Brydges Pacific 
Ave. 

2413 Pacific Ave. Va. 
Beach, va. 

John v. Fentress, Clerk. 
Linda Noel Hill, D.C. 

11-30,12 7,14,21 4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, «i 
the 24th day of November, 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Eugene Flick, Jr., 
Plaintiff, 
gainst 

trto Lynn Flick, Deftn- 
dent. 

The obiect of mis suit is 
to Obtain a div^c* a 
vinciite matrimonii from 
tlie said defendant u{^i 
the gretmds of Adultery, 



or in the alternative a 
divorce a mensa et toro 
from the said defendant 
upon the grounds of 
desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being ; 
4025-A Pleasant Street, St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect her interest in this 
suit. 

A copy Teste; 
Kelberg & Childress 
207 Piaza One Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 
John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Deputy, Clerk. 

11- 30,127,14,21-4T 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the 
City of Virginia Beach, on 
the 20th day of November 
1972. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
Donna Annette Farley 
Reese, Plaintiff, 
against 

Wlllard Ray Reese, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
to obtain a divorce A 
Vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon 
the grounds of adultery. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant due 
diligence has been used by 
and on behalf of the 
plaintiff to ascertain in 
what county or cor- 
poration the defendant lis, 
without effect, the last 
known post office address 
being: 332 Dillon Drive, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 

Not resident of the State 
of Virginia, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) days after 
due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 
A copy -Teste: 
Tidewater Legal Aid ' 
700 Duke Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 
JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove, D. 
Clerk 

1 1, -30,12 7,14,21 -4T 



TeH Someone 
You Care Wrth a 
Sun Newspaper 

Sunshine Ad 




a W^ someone a 

happy Urthday 
e Cooftadulate friends on 

their engaienient 
# Sand amihaiaty greetingi 
e Cmtgratulste new pannts 
a Bon Voyafe wishM 
e ComntaktknM on 

qwdil adiievenients 
e Or ^tny "HELLO" 

inaipedalway 

Look tot SunahiM Ads 

evny weekin 
ihe Oairifiecl Set^ion 
Of The Vtafiiite Beach 
Sua 

CdOassiiled 
4S&3433 
486-3434 

3 days in Mwici 

of PubKcatiM Ml 

To PlatA Your 

Sunshine M 






SISTER TINA 

Rea(^and Mwsor 

Advinr oe sBftoblenHi 



irip.alcahalattfym'n 
ri^ortaaoadorhi^ 
iMaaaefiMKllaa. AM 



Cid for ^lolntnMBt: 
42M818 

lilZVaBeichHi^ 
NeirOMHM 

■■■elLlMockeartar 



RATES: "Person to 
Person" ads for in- 
dividuals buying, selling, 
renting, or offering a 
service. Up to 12 words, 
only SI. per issue, add SO 
fonts for each additional 4 
words. 

Classified display S2.I0 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge of ss.tO 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: First 16 
words in straight 
classified are $2.00 Lower 
rates may be earned. 

DEADLINE for 
classified & classified 
display is Noon on the 
Tuesday prior to 
publication date. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont 
Rd., Va. Be<>ch, Va. 23452, 
or mail to Classified 
Desk ; or phone 486-3433 or 
486-3434. Classifieds are 
priced on cash basis; 
payment is diie upon 
receipt of statement. 

■1-8UHiMiki Aoi 



LOU I Love You 
Godfather 



The 



Bradford May the Tooth 
Fairy leave Captain 
Jose's phone booth long 
enough to bring you 
something nice. 

p.p. Just knowing you 
makes this Christmas one 
of my happiest ever. 
Thanks and Merry 
Christmas, sweet person. 

' Welcome into the 
Newspaper business. Clay 
and Lou. 



Captain Magnificent 
wishes everyone a very 
Merry Christmas 

Happy Birthday Annette 

15 makes the ring dance. 
We love you much. 
MWSGREMT & W 



"My Brother" Ernie 
Wednesday night just 
wasn't the same without 
you, but remember, all 
your friends love you, and 
wish you good health for 
Christmas and the New 
Year. 



Mon & Dad, Grandma & 
Grandpa, Sybil & John, 
Robin, Ailyson, Mark, 
Martha See you 

Christmas. The God 
father. 



Kathy I wish that gift in 
the BIG package was for 
me' Diane 



Captain Jose hopes all his 
friends have a 

"Magnificent" holiday. 



FUNNY FACE Merry 
Christmas to a great guy' 



BEST OF CHRISTMAS 
WISHES TO OUR 
FELLOW EMPLOYEES 
AT THE SUN ' ' OLGA 
WE MISS YOU. THE 
"CLASSY" GIRLS. 




'3— PERSONAL NOTICES 



CANDY THE CLOWN 
Now Arranging Santas 
"(nd Clowns for Dec. Call 
early to obtain date. 587 
3697. 



MAGIC SHOWS Par 

ties. Club meetings, 
luncheons, etc. 
Reasonable. Call 3400297, 
after 5 p.m. 



9MMUND ALARMS 
OtyeataMwity 
midtmdyott bmlfet 
Ctf»7-S400 

MK8IWATCH SECURITY 

svnem 



4 TRANSPORTATION 

GUY, age 27, seeks 

companion to share 
driving and expenses of 
extended U.S. trip soon. 
Especially cities, 
beaches and California. 
Dependable and honest 
only; no heads or wierdos. 
Complete resume and 
photo to Boxholder, Box 
3542, Laureldale, Pa. 
19«0S. 



iS-SPECIAL 



SERVICES* 



CUSTOM DRAPERIES 
Fabrics at discount 
prices. Reas«iable. 486 
1295. 






y-SPECIAL SERVICES 

HANDCRAFTED* 
LEATHER ItemI"-' 
Made to order. Handbags, 
billfolds, etc. Customized 
with name or initial. 340- 

77^6. 

HAULING For con 

tractors or individuals. 
Need help ? Call 623 3937. 

IT'S CHRISTMAS TIME 
And THE PEMBROKE 
PUPPETS Are^avaiiable 
for your Christmas party 
entertainment. Also birth- 
days, special events, etc. 
Call 497-4141, 497 0982. 

PIANO TUNING Also 
lessons. Piano an-i brass. 
Ken Vining, 464 6166. 

PERSONAL HORO 
SCOPES Com. 

puted based on the 
Science of Astrology. 
Natal Chart and 6 
questions $15. For in 
formation write Science of 
Astrology, 420 W. 
Freemason St., 622-8342. 

REINDEER Hand 

made, candy filled 
ideal for gifts and 
decorations. Order now 
for Christmas. 486 4855. 



tJti;||l|''fiiD«ilif''' 




SEWING 
Alterations. 



MENDifJG, 
Call 425 1959 



SEWING in my home; 
for ladies and children; 
reasonably, also in 
structions, 340 1192. ' 

THE PEMBROKE 

PUPPETS - Are now 
available for Birthday 
•Parties, Special Events, 
etc. Children and Adult 
entertainment. 497-4141, 
497 0982. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
MAINTENANCE 
Specializing In Painting, 
Interior and Exterior; 
Repair Work and New 
Additions. Call 428 7350. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
CHIMNEY Sweep and 
fireplace repair, 
"ireplaces designed, built 
and rebuilt. Dampers 
installed and repaired. 
Guaranteed to s^op 
smoking Call 428 7350 
night or day. 



&F. BeH 



SPEOAUZING IN HOUSE- 
JAC3CING, REPLAQNG 
FLOOR JOISTS AND SILLS 
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE 
ARE YOUR FLOORS SHAK- 
ING OR SAGGING? 



622-8396 622-1771 



HAS YOUR AUTOMOBILE 

INSURANCE BEEN 
CANCELLED? REFUSED? 

CaUAlVincrat 
Save-Way Inmrance Agency 

WE FINANCE 

627-9096; anytime n«hts 
499-1080 



VELVETIZE 
Your walls, cu, bike, etc 
Economkal A luxarioui.. 
Stops rust 8. mildew. 
Custom 24 hL leivice. 
VEI^TEXofTidewatn 

623-0098 
10% dJKOunt wifli this ad 






miUmtiHitm 



9. 



I— UHT » POjWHP 



ENGLISH SETTER - 
Black and white, some 
orange marking on face, 
last seen Windsor Woods 
area. Answers to Poppins. 
Call 499 3015. 



8— LOST & FOUND 

YORKSHIRE TERRIER 
Female, small tan and 
black, lost North End. Call 
after 330 p.m. Reward. 
4285536. 




1«— HIL» WANTID ■ HMALI 



TELEPHONE SOL 
ICITOR - Ex 

perienced. For interview, 
cail499-8576, 8 :30to5p.m. 
week days. 



ACnVE WELCOME WAGON 
^pandon imnrides (Mwniia 
for hoateas in Norfolk, Va 
Beach, and Chesapeake. 
Active communitv back- 
9»and, no pre-ichod 
chfldien, must type, have 
use of car, flexible hours. 
Attractive income. Call 
340-2131, or 340-1234. 



"OWORTUNITY" 

Four Ladies Needed (m 
mediately For Several Job 
Openings. S610.00 /Monthly. Call 
4» 2743 for an Appointment. 




It—HILP WANTED, M/P 



BUSINESS is buzzing and 
we need help. Want a good 
career in real estate? 
Apply today. Call Tom 
Kane 497 4851. Nights 340 
1760. Grow with Realtors. 
Stohl Realty Cor|i. 

FULL AND PART TIME 
Sales Personnel needed 
in advertising. No ex 
perience necessary. 499 
0919 or 499 3343. 

Need Men and Women to 
work full or part time in 
sales. High income, great 
future. Call 499 8722. 



TUTOR Wanted for 

Shorthand. Evenings. Call 
Patti, 486 3430. 



SALESPEOPLE 



Full or part-time, no experience 
necessary. High commissions. For a 
confidential interview, contact Mr. 
Strickland, 499 7850. 



J 



HANNCAPPED OR DIS- 
ABLED MEN AND WO- 
MEN - Extra inconw. F<w 
inframation Phone 497- 
8575. 



SALES TRAINEES 
Regardless of your past wiork 
background, we may be able to 
tram you for local full time sales 
$410.00 /Woothly to start. Caij 
4992743. 




JL 



19— JOn WANTW 



BABYSITTING Large 
play area, fenced yard, 
hot meals. Winsor Woods 
area. Licensed. 340-4456. 

BABYSITTING - Licen- 
sed; lots of love, 
reasonable. Dial 428 0081. 



BABYSITTING -In my 
home, Windsor Oaks. 
References on request. 
486 3960. 

BABYSITTING Ex 

perienced Mother of 3, day 
and nights. 486 4371. 



The Air Force Now 

GUARANTEES 

Your Choice 

of Choice Jobs 

Before You Enlist 
CHOOSE YOURS! 

CONTACT 
MSGT. BEN SPEARS 

3707 Va B^di BML PIiom 431-3071 



19— JOM WANTIO 



BABYSITTING In my 
hotne; fenced yard; 
Windsor Wood area, 486 
3469. 

BABYSITTING In my 
home; hour, week or day; 
Aragona Village; fenced 
yard, 497 6847. 

OFFICE CLEANING - 
Night time. Aragona 
Village preferred. Call 
499 2154, after 6 p.m. 

OFFICE CLEANING 
Will clean offices and 
shops. Call 486 3032 after 4 
p.m. 



TYPING My home, 

Virginia Beach area. Fast 
accurate, reasonable. 464 
6895. 



20— DAY NURSERY J 

HAPPY DAYS KIN- 
DERGARTEN - And 
Day Care Center. State 
Licensed for 2, 3, 4, and 5 
year olds. Open 7 a.m. 6, 
p.m. year around. Call 
428-6565 to enroll. Located 
at 612 Fremac Drive (off 
Laskin Road between 
Hilltop and oceanfront). 

^ B 

2Z-«CH0OLS » INSTRUCTIONS 



^Mmtk 




34-A- MOVING, 

AND STORAGE 

HAROLDS TRANSFER 

622-4793 or 497-8068 

Mastarcharge 



1 1, 1 1 I. I I HHMJ ^J. I ,Ji l j;.[jj^^.,| l j 



35— 



HOUSES FOR SALk 



50— PETS a suf pyjff 



ALASKAN MALAMPTE 
PUPS - 2 females, tv»th 
show prosp e>('<t s , 
Guaranteed against Hip 
Dysplasia. interefs«ed 
parties only. 420-8067^: 

BASENJI PUPS Ready 
for Christmas, barklass, 
odorless, AKC registers ; 
wormed; 587-1638. T^ 



PRINCESS Anne Plaza, 
$17,500,3 bedroom Ranch. 
Cozy, immaculate home. 
Call ANCHOR REALTY 
428-7421. 



BASSET 

registered; 
Christmas; 



PUPS-A.KC 
Will hold. until 
486 3058., :; 



NEVVTOWN SOUTH 

2-l>edroom deluxe to«ynhous«, ex- 
cellent condition, wall-to-wall 
carpet, refrigerator, dishwasher, 
disposal, range, central air, fenced 
yard, many other extras. Assume 
with low equity or re-finance. Call 
owner, 499 2263, after 5 p.m. NO 
AGENTS PLEASE. 



iMlMatolM'lili 




PIANO LESSONS 
Expert instruction on all 
levels. Contact Janice 
Feld, College Professor,' 
543 1822 after 5. 

VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. 
James Morrisson, 428- 
0587. 



Dr-CilT OF TOWN 

SPACES for Mobile 
Homes. Large, wooded 
lots. Approx. 15 mi. from 
Va. Line, 15 mi. frofn E. 
City, N.C. and 25 mi. from 
Nags Head. $25 & $30 per 
month. Call (919) 453-3232 
after 6. 

42-REAL ESTATE 
WANTED 

WE Have Buyers and 
tenants waiting for 
property In all areas of 
Virginia Beach. Call us 
to sell or rent yours. 
Stohl Realty 
497-4851 



CHINESE PUGS t- 3 
months fawn, black rhask, 
AKC reg. 855 7914. 



DACHSHUND - IJeady 
for Xmas. Champion 
sired, long hair. 340-!tA49. 

- - r^r -:■■ 
D A C H S H U J*l D S - ; 
Champion, small r^, 9 
wks, AKC reg. Chiidr'en's 
pets. 464-5804. 

DOBERMAN PUP '*- 6 
month red male, ears 
standing; wormed, s6ots, 
$100. 623 1356. '' 



ENGLISH BULLDO&S - 
"Adorable", 6 weeks, AK- 
C registered, perfect for 
Santa. 489 8570. 'm 



L 



MEN-WOMEN 1»«0 
TRAIN NOW FOR 

CIVIL SERVICE 

EXAMS 
No exp., iM> h^ school 

POSTAL CLERKS 

STARTING PAY RATE IS: 

S4.02 Hr. 

U.S. Clerks F& Clerks 

Plus loo's of other types 
of jobi 

We finance your training. 
Keep present job whUe 
training. 

General Training Service 

Applications bdng accepted 
now 

CALL NOW, 24 HOUR 
49»3708 



WANTED 

HOUSE FROM OmtER 

By caA, asaune loan, or rent 
witiioptioa 

WINDSOR VVOODS, 
ViCINITY 
OLD FORGE COURT. 



OcctHMncy neoirtiaible, 
4864989, anytime^ 



CaD 



GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPPIES . - AKC 

females, black & tan, 2 
mos., shots, wormed,' $55, 
4875652. ~ 

......... -.'.. ^.M 

GERMAN SHEPtlERD 
PUPS AKC registi&'ed; 
6 weeks; male, '$75, 
Female, $60. 487-73^ 

GERMAN SHEPHEWD^- 
Hoid for Christma#, 9 
weekr, faoJsttrjMl, JHots, 



^jVormed. 



-4*; 



GREAT DANE PUfSfS - 
AKC registered; quality 
blues; ears cropped; 
shots; $250-up; tefms; 
857 1118. ' 



mm 






fH. 



50— PETS & 



SUPPLIER 



GRIMES MUSIC SCHOCX, 

GUITAR CLASSES 
In Pembroke Area 
Students Tsught In Small 
Groups According to A^t 

499-1428 



ALASKAN MALAMUTE 
Registered puppies, 10 
weeks, shots, wormed, 
$175. Call 340 4299, 340- 
4202. 

AFGHANS - Tullys Big 
John line bred pups. Fully 
guaranteed. $275. up. 
Creams. Terms. 499-8829. 

AFGHAN PUPS - AKC 
registered out of Crown 
Crest; will hold 'til Xmas 
Eve. 420 2945. 



NORWEIGAN" EL K' 
HOUND . Male, 

AKC reg., wish to rhate. 
Only fee pick of Iftter, 
Harry Marshall, 425'5518. 



ITALIAN GREYHOUND 
PUPS - Chosen bre«d of 
royalty. Lovable petSi.464- 
6764. ; • 



KITTENS Free. Lttter 
box trained. Mother 
registered Siamese. Call 
497-7384 after 3 p.m.*- 

•^•s-- 

KITTENS - Free. Litter 
box trained. Mother 
registered Siamese... Call 
499 7384 after 3 p.mc' 

LHASA APSO pUP 
PIES House dog ■;from 
Tibet; AKC regKt^red; 
$125 up; 588-2383. ; 



23- ROOMS FOR RENT 

ARAGONA VILLAGE 
Nice room, kitchen 
privileges. 499 4712. 

a— Mouiii.uNfgfcmiiMD 

CHATEAU 21 - 3 
bedroom, 2 bath 

townhouse;carpeting;$225 
month. 486 5616. 

GREEN RUN Lovely 4 
bedroom townhouse in 
The Oaks. Air con- 
ditioned, carpeting, 
recreation privileges. 
Immediate occupancy, 
rent or sale. 486-3518 after 
6 p.m. and week-ends. 

31— OFFICB _ . 
DE5K.SPAC'B 

PRIME OFFICE SPACE 
' New space available in 
modern. SUN building at 
138 S. Rosemont Rd. next 
to Expressway. Large and 
small unit for several 
office use, ready for you. 
Call 486 3430. 



No 
AvMwNa. 

^lAna 
3W"343.77Mof 



121C 



2SML 




MEN NEEDED 

^MHNtlVERS 

AND 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT 

OPERATORS 

for hv^apl^iMat 



WartVI^Wa 



I m II i.^v,tmj%.n.^ 



^i^^*VWliNP< 



^Y,DECBiBEII21,1972 




Am Ola^/Med 4M-S4SS 

XlfF 

486-S4I4 



PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



^mmm 



b^KEETS - Babies. 
CDlers, Enelisli 
I Amcrlcin stock. Bred 
flkslly. heslfKy. AftM 

IparskMis. in-nni. 4m- 

M«. 

I^RSIAN KITTENS - 

I CFA ragistercd, adoraW*. 

Call 4a7-1»9 after « p.m. 

|r^«ODLES Thy toys. 

AKC regMarcd. 

4I7-Wt7. 

^KIODLES AKC. white 
Tt^ famalas, 12 weetu. 
Skats, graomcd. StS A 
$12S. SI7-C453. 

PUPPIES - Part /collie. 
'F're* to good heme.' Can be 
seen affler 3 p.m. wceli- 
Ays. Call 4M- 234*. 

,l',it. BERHABD male It 

«|iM>s. AKC Beautiful 

marttiii0Sf Boa d lor snow* 

. ^. BERNARD PUPPY 
"- ' (SHAGG BARK) child 
aNcVBic, sate. 4t7-tfS«. 

STUD SERVICE - 
^bShetland Sheepdog - 
.(^Champion; proven; 




HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUI 



STUD SERVICE - 
Peadle. SHver tea cop toy. 

\\0* -A.J 



WEIMERANER PUP- 
PIES « weetts oM. 
wormed and shots. Sit. 
iir-sift. 

>S>-MmiSES. FEED 



^APPALOOSA - GeldinB, 



Q!i 




AVON BOTTLES Very 
some antiques. 
499-3t^ 

.'!r^,iABY CARRIAGE - 
CoRverta to stroller and 
car bed. Playpen and 
Mant dressing table. 0n- 

' -^ ^%m. ^_^__- 

l;r, BIKE -Girl's Spyder; 3 
nqjiS p e ed ; excellent con- 
;(^«ttM;34Bant. 

BOYS SCREAMER 
f]»4llico f«r^ n yr. oM; por 
)A tiBble Corona typew r i t er; 
t-ehtir conditioner window 
untt; artNical Christmas 
. tree 7'. 4y7-«532 after *.3t. 

'•-"tloopital bed and chair, 

: F-:4ncliid«s mattress and 

rail*, tatoot model, 

almoot new. 4^-Mt9. 

^^'' HUNTING BOW - And 
'' arrows. Quiver, glove, 
S35.34B3liS. 

^„' dLYWlPIC STAINS - 
. '"Assorted colors, cost 
" ■U.S». sacrifice $3.5t. 
Owner, 4yy-1ttt. 

^^'^■r ^- — 

TYPEWRITER - IBM 

eloctric ir* carnage, very 

>good condit l o B. 4«4-ffUS. 

%y, '9t gallans waxleaa floor 

•V< finish and St gallans 

^4 commercial stripper. 

immetfiatoly 

at SI per gallon, which is 

traction of coot. Contact 

^ Jay BrttmMay at «t< 3q t . 




S4 a be«, 3 

SMB.- orMges; 2t 

',fb. bag SS; S3 a Imk; 3 

t1; 
[7 fto. St; 

small, Christmas 
mbied, 3 Ri. host 
[n.U; ciMr raw or 
|p»stciiriic#; apples. 



elicioos. Unlimitod 

,, F.G. 

' ''K^rc af VkvMe 
VFarman Martiet, %%3a 

Eve day' 




HCMME Builders & Con 
tractors - Let us help you 
with that new home- 
add»iens or repairs. We 
can furnish materials 
from basement to attic 
and aid you in financing. 
Phone K ELL AM B 
EATON 427 3210. 



VACUUM CLEANER 
kirby, excellent con 
dHion, used very mtle, 
with exh-as. Call 4*7 StSV. 





CLARINET - 

good condition, indiides 

leotlier cwrying case. Stt. 

317.4111. 

— — — —.. ~ _ — __ . _^__^___ 

DRUM - Ludwig snare, 
STtor best offer. ExccNeirt 
condition. Call 34t«*y. 

GUITAR Mart^ D-U- 
35 Acoustic 12 string, wHIi 
case, $3St. Call 4«4-17«5. 



GUITAR - bichiding new 
sb^i, 2 books and 2 
records. S2S. 4»«ns. 

ORGAN Estey electric 
chord, small spinet, 
walnut; bench; A-1; $13t; 
4M-53SI. 

ORGAN "Piper" 

Hammond, excellent 
condHion. 34t-173y. 

(MIGAN - Portable with 
music. Good condition, 
S15. 



COLOR TV 25" 

' Atogno vo x AAediterranean 
remote control, $275. 
STEREO Magnovox 
Mediterranean AM FM A 
speakers, modified for 
external speakers, $225. 
Both for Stft. or make 
offer. 4t«-4lt9. 

PORTABLE TELE 
VISION 19" black 

and white Mtrtorola 
with stand. Needs no 
repairs. $3t. 497 0ft2 after 
S:3t p.m. or week-ends. 

TELEVISION Sears 

console color. RCA 
chassis, new picture tube. 
4972109. 

TELEVISION 1972 

Sylvania color console, 
23". good condition. Stf- 
«31t. 

TV PORTABLE Mack 
ft white also 2 tv consoles, 
after «:30 497^32. 




PIANO - Stelnway 
console, biMtt in 1«4t, ex- 
cellent condition. $9Bt. 
CaH42t-93S4. 



W—WAMTtOBIIt 

ANTIQUES — and any oM 
fwnlturc . 

CASH-CASH-CASH 



«4 OFFICE EQUIPMENT 



Intoiresiod in ti 



office or car? Call 497- 
M11. 

*5A FIREWWOP 

FIREWOOD Bycordor 
• cord deihrered, S4t. 
cord. 427 2t57. 



CUT GLASS. OM iewelry 
and watches, old for- 
niture, antiqaes of all 
4»«9t1, 420-5117. 




A never used waslier S15t 
and dryer $125; 499 1449 

AIR CONDITIONER 
Window unit. Uko new. 
Sitt. 499 loot. 

BEDROOM FURNITURE 
, 4 poster pine bed. 
cfmplete, matching 
dresser; 5 pc. twin bed 
strife; large oak dresser 
wWi mirror. 420-33M. 

DINETTE TABLE - 
Maple, round with for- 
mica top, 2 matching 
maple chairs. Ail in ex 
cellent condition. Too 
large for my small kit- 
chen. S2t. for all. Call 499- 
TOa after 7 p.m. or week- 



m^^. Any ctadlNon. 
Ateo dolt parts. Call 420- 
0911, 430-5117. 

ELECTRIC TRAINS Any 
make or condition. 545- 
4242 

FURNITURE WANTED 
' Couch. Early 

American, Moe or green, 
M good commion. WHI pay 
up to SNt. Call «54«5. 

GIRL SCOUT UNIFORM 

Size 12 X 14. Also other 

Girl Scout equipment. Call 

497-4141 after 4, anytime 




DISHWASHER — Port- 
ablo, Montgomery Ward. 
Harvest gold, wood cut- 
ting boMrd top. 3 years aid. 
hardly used. 40MS1t aft«- 
* p.m. or week wds. 

DOLL MUSEUM - Dolls 
from every era. Ad- 
mtosion free. 11 5 daily. 1- 
4 Swnday. Melten's An 
tiqMS. 4»1 ln«an River 
Rd. 4aBt»11. 43B5117. 



ANTIQUES - 3 floors of 
furniture hi ttie rough and 
also re-ftaisheil. Brass 
beds, marlrfe top Vic 
torian furniture, round 
oak tables, $45 and up. 
Round front China closeis. 
wash stands, roll top 
desks, cut glass. R.S. 
Prussia, trains, music 
boxes, nautical and ottier 
umnual itenn. Jewelry, 
umtehes, clacks, mirrors, 
lamps, paint remover, 
LOW prices. Melton's 
Antiques, 42t1 Indian 
River Rd., 420^0911. 420 
5117. 



DRYER Gas, fair 

condition, Sat. Dial 4M- 
92t5. 

ELECTRIC RANGE - 
ST'; yeUaw, tiered, good 
cenditian. SOS. 34^0097. 



Epergne, napkin rings, 
footed silver tray; 433- 
2«n. 

FOR CHRISTMAS 
Person^ collection. 2 pie 
cupboards. Oak dining 
room furniture, 2 game 
tables, Martha 
Washinglon sewing stand, 
lamp tables, record 
cabinet, pine blanket 
iliesi. Tiffany type lamps, 
tea cart, etc. 340-3»4. 



END TABLES 
cocldaH tablK \^ry heavy 
wahHit, new, »t. 499-1137. 



FREEZER 
upri^it, very 
Mien. $12S. 4994712. 



HOLLYWOOD BED - 
Complete, perfect con- 
dition, uoe«l 1 yoar, Mt. 

LIVING ROCMO COUCH - 
4 pieces in tort btae,- 3 

nsMes;1l 

I math en, aller 4:3t 

m-tS3a. 



RANGE 
electric; 





SCATTER Rl^ <» 
Kara^M Mao woal. Twa 
3KS.one «i«. CM tnwo. 



TAM.E 

whMe. marMcizcd tap, 

«Mii ciMirs: 4I9-1^. 



CARdMTS 
MattrM. 



SMCUSU 111 
HBWKSUUS 



rwmsiDSBL 




iB-AUCnONS, PUBLIC 
SALES 

CALVIN ZEDD 
Auctioneer Appraiser 
499 5547 



E 



i^-~BaAT1^ MABRH SUWtW 

BOAT far Sale: 24 ft. 
Sloop; converted navy 
whaler; sleeps 4; head 
and galley; no engine; 
stainless «teel standhig 
rigging; oicron sails; 
dacron runn:ng rigging; 
SISOO fh-m. Call 34B5440 
tiefore 11 a.m. 



TRAVEL TRAILER ^ 13* 
Layton, '43, excellent 
condition, extras, water, 
electricity hoakup, 
refrigeralor, stove. Sleeps 
3 ptos chiM. Dtal «7-3373. 

Winnebago and Superior 
Motor ttomes for Rent. 
Holiday Special $395 in 
chides 7 weeks and 2,000 
miles. 3 day weekend S100 
including mileage. Daily, 
Weekly, Monthly and 
Long Distance rates 
mailable. 427 4119. 

tt-BEACM''SHgrLIES 

RAFT 6' inftatable. 

' maintenance kit, 1 paddle. 
$20. 34B3045. 

SURF BOARD 4*4" 

American, no dings, no 
fractures. $50. 340^3045. 




00-MOBILE HOMES 

AMERICAN 12^4^, 

applicances, washer, 
utiltty shed, air con 
ditioncr. Near Oceana. 
Calt4as-139«. ' 

CO BURN 1970, irx40', 
3 bedrooms, carpet, 
fumislietb washer, dryer, 
dishwasher, air con- 
ditioned, on fenced lot. 
Call 499^94. 



GOCART ENGINE - 7 
h.p. Briggs & Straton, like 
9, $35. lit TOJg 



H(MIDA - 50 on 90 frame. 
Speed to 45 MPH. $00. 340^ 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 
1972 Super glide 2100, 
weber carburetor with a 
Cheetah sissy bar. 4K- 



Y AMAH A 1971. DT 1. 

S375. Dial 444 0O75 after « 
pjn. 



92— AUTO 



327 Chevrolet Engine; 10.5 
compression ratio; 1*47 Z 
34 cam. lifters and 
springs; 300 H.P. heads. 
NKludes starter, clutch, 
flywheel, excellent con 
dHion, $3S. Call 424 1154 
after 5 30 p.m. 

WHEELS (4) CROGER 
slotted disc; fit 14" 
Chevy^ with tocks. Used 2 
weeks. SOO. 340-2M4. 

95— TWOO. TBAUJtSw Jwi 



CADILLAC - 1949 
Fleetwood, like new 
condition, all optional 
equipment. $3700. tSS- 
3575. 

CAPRI 1971 Ford Capri, 
2000 CC engine. Brown 
with white interior. Best 
oHer. Call 499 1045. 



1944 



CHEVROLET 
Belair, V 0, good 
dition, 420 0074. 



COMET GT, 1972. 
automatic, tape deck, air 
conditionmg, $2,200; 055^ 
1414. 




COMET 1942; good 
mechanical condition; 
make offer. J20^ 1175. 

COMET - 1947 Cyctane 
390, 4 speed, new tires and 
lew engine, tape deck. 
Excellent condition. OKT- 
4145. 

DUSTER 197t needs 

some body wortt, runs 
good. $1^5. 42541235. 

DUSTER 1970 2 door 
sedan, runs good. $1475. 
425 0235. 

FORD 1944 Fahrtane SOO 
2 door hardtop; 390 
engine; atrtomatic; $475; 
424-2tS9. 

FORD 1944 Gataxie 500; 

V power steering; very 
good running condition. 

"SS50; 340 2054. 

JAGUAR XK 120, 1952, 
70 percent restored. S1SQ0. 
Dial 425^0705. 

MG 1949 Midget, fine 
body, needs repair. $1,000 
or best offer. Call 500 0370. 

PACKARD 1947 

Limousine, restorable 
c on di ti on , new tires. $300. 
433^110i. or 409 BMO. 

PONTIAC 1971 LeMans 

V 0, automatic, power 
steering and brakes. Air 
conditioned. Excellent 
condition. $3550. or make 
oHer. 4990t«3. 

PONTIAC 1940 LeMans; 
outstanding buy; ex 
cellent condition; $250 
plus 9 payments, snnta. 

PONTIAC 1944 

Catalina, good condition, 
$400. 435 4430 days. 

PORSCHE 1949, 911T, 5 
speed, air conditioned, 
alloy wheels, many nclras 
and options, excellent 
condition inside and out. 
Call 499 0044. 

RENAULT 1947 

Caravelle; to sell or 
trade; new tires; motor 
overhauled, 444-0031. 

TORINO 1970, Air 

comfitioned. radio, power 
steering. automatic 
tran»nission, cyclinder. 
Take over payments. 444- 
9395. or 420^9179. 



VEGA 1W1. ( 

low mileage. 50t-3151. 9 to 

5. 



VOLKSWAGEN 1970 

Bug; new tires; iust in- 
spected; $1,100; 427 5190. 

VOLKSWAGEN 1971. 

Orange sunroof, header 
system. Perfect amdition. 
Extras. $1550. Call 440^ 
1005. 

VOLKSWAGEN 1970 

hig.V new tires, iust in- 
spectod, SlltOl 4275190. 




.."^AZf 



USE naS HANDY UP IP DA1E AIPHABETICAIIY VSOO 
GUIDE FOR AIL YOUR SERVKE IIIIMI 



.-'•j-^ 






-' I .' 





nUNTHiGl 









aecfMCAL 
ooNnucraR 




D.E.IMTGI^U 
4Z7-1146 



CONCRETE WORK 



ALL. TV9ES CONCRTTE 
FIKE^rmATES 






BURTON PEST 
CONTROL CO. 



497-9182, anytbiiB. 



GUANDPLOn; 
HAUL DOT, 

iroFsoaroRSALd 

CALLil»S987. 



-,•■^'^- 




CHEVROLET 1949 V^. 
3 speed stk:k. new shmrf 
block, 47,000 mites. New 
tires, custom alb. %\J5M. 
Call «B2043. 




BANK FINANCING 
STANDAIDmCAK 
GAIAfiS 
»#S9 



42^1716 





K.aaBPivEYca T 




=21 


MACimmmtW 


rirc 




'^mJm. 









i»-AUtO<iM>BlUES I7WBmIiS[1SZlTjio 



AUSTIN HEALEY 1947 
Sprite, good condition. 
Must sell. 420-1711, exL 
220. 

BMW 3002 1971 AM FM 
radio; sun roof; low 
mileage. 444-1*40; 444 




THE SUN CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



BRYANT APPLIANCE GO. 

4848 VIR(HNIA BEACH BLVD. (Ai^onaSioppi^Ceiita) 
1278 N. MILITARY IKWY. S43 E. LTITLE CREEK RIX 
497-8939 622^771 583-4531 




THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, II 




CHRISTMAS SPECIAU. 

Indhidnally i^cted putatia^ piofaMkHtaUy imtled,glHM/ 

•""^ $15 -$35 

Rcsiatei for a fiee ptintiiig (of foof choice) dnwliy Dec. 
23id. 



486-6210 





a|sl]|^ii|^ great 1^ 

EUTTON-DOWN SHIRTS 
Sto^ASoUdt 

$8 to $14 
'nES-|5to|8.50 
Moil - Pri. 9:30-9, Sat 9:30-6 

LTD 

(FORMERLY CURIOSITY SHOP * HIRTZ BAZAAR) 



• ANTIQUES* GIFTS 
VfitirlMiMt BoutiqiM 

• CaliQo'Shcip 4,, 

• Complttt D0coratiil| Service 

• Ctattmi Chrlstmai Airrangementl 

223nntColoniiaRd. 
(AtOcMoa) 



3 Princew Anne Plaza Shoppfa^ Centn 
Owxt to Pompri) 







4.^ 



S^ttntsici' 



NORDIC TOURING 

The Freedom Of Winter 

SPORTS RETURNS 

Ei^oy ^ter ootdoon wiflUHit the crowds, the tn- 
velbig and the coat A cohiplete outfit of skis, p<^ei, 
boota, bindima, clothea, waxM and acceuoriei 
ooata under $100, 

I104W. UTTLE 
CREEK Ra 

423-7395 



mu^ 



The Omvleie Si4>|riier of WUnneaa Gear 



v-t'^' 



LAFAYEnE 



^SIARCHMASTER •680' 

*Joln Am«rle«'s exciting new 
hobby— TrMiure Finding. 
Worw through dirt, sand, 
wool, water, and even rock 
wHh no Ion of power. 
'tSQHTWEIQHTi 3 Ibi. FM 
Year Quarantea. 

4wl<Va.BM3n 

ct<a2m>'a^»5463 





Model 
QTOSSO 

$6^95 



j 1730 E Little QedERd. 
|Nwtto^f>'i583-266S 



^ m^ ^SWER For a Ust-Minute Gift! 

Don't walk your lepa ofL.. A PlITT 

.. CERTIFICATE ^ 

OCEAN VIEW AND STUMPY UWE 

OOLP C0UB8ES GOLF SHOPS 
»10NorfaifcAw,,S87.«3a I«diMiRlmRd.420.9«u 




CLARINETS 

Reg. $180. Special Price 

*130 
TRUMPETS 

Reg. $190. Special Price 

•140 
FLUTES 

Reg.0 $180. Special Price ^| 30 

JACOBS MUSIC CO. 

33 SOUTHERN SHOPPING CENTER 583-5934 

Abo Newmarket Shoppiiig Center, Hampton, Va. 
24S4702 



CAR STEREO 

TIRES 

FLOOR COVERING 

GOLF CLUBS, BAG 

NEWCLOTHES 

WATCH 

SKILSAW 

CALCULATOR 

DIAMOND RING 
NEW BIBLE 
FAMILY PORTRAIT 
VACUUM CI^ANER 
GOLF SHOES, CLUBS 
NEW FIGURE ' 

ANTIQUES 

MINI BIKE 



PIANO MART 

436 GRANBY ST. —One Mock in front of Scope 

GOOD QUALITY, NEW PIANOS 

SPINET PIANO. ; Reg. $650 459 

CONSOLE PIANO.. .m.m~..~. Reg. $895 588 

BABY GRAND, uaed. Waa $2,000 600 

PRICES VALID IF YOU BRING IHIS AD 




MAG WHEELS 
BOOKS 

HOBBY GIFT 



fORDIiWN 



Give Her a New Look 
this Christmas! 

SPECIAL GIFT PACKAGE - $19.00 
Con^te 4Hnonih program 
nd Van Rulte Body Suite. 
$24VdiM 

..fifllfSakm PEMBROKE MALL 



POPPING CENTER 
499-1^6 




STUFF HER STOCKING 

WITH 

SEWING GOODIES! 

• GIFT CERT1FICA11S 

• SEWING NOnONS 

• FASHim JEWELRY 

WE'LL HELP YOU CHOOSE 



55 Princess Anne Plua 
Loaited in the Arcade - Behind The Gift Shop 



mm; \!> 



^ 8 nUCK STEREO TAPES 



STEREO 
CENTERS 



L* 





Give her a 

Kirby 




for Christmas 

Call 499-2763 
Kirby Center 
of Norfolk 



(XT HAIR DONE 

WDER POOD P(A PARTY 

GETHFIGROCniED 

RENTTUXQW 





AiHilimoe Chrome & 
Mag Wheels-ln Stock. 

For Ftwd, Chevrol^ ttm 
ftPlckl^Tracfea 

Smooth Chrome Wheeb 

I4-I5rt $I7.50m.- 

Dtyton Tirei - Raiwd 14-7 : — HfcSi 

White Letters ts-ilZZZT $ML00en. 

F 60.14 $38.41 plM PET i»u„ , ,«* 

C 60-14 $31.06 plH PET PHIUm 

3535 NORTH MILITARY DISCOUNT TNK 

HIGHWAY 8Sr-1201 CENTBl 



CHRffiTMAS CARDS 
f<y MtDERFLOWERS 

cmt^niAsiniEATB 

FSHPOOD 




NO. 1 IN TIDEWATER 

cycle: w^ld 

SANTA'S HONDA HEADQUARTERS 



Small Mini-Tnul Hondas araflable now. 
I All new, complete line of 10 qieeda. 




4972 Va. Beach Blvd. 

(NearAiagona) 499^1146 



BANKAM^UCARD 
MASTER CaiARGE 




^Mini Cycles 




3f^^^ NATIONAL 
r CYCLE SALES 

2437 Va. Beach BM. 340-5265 



Looking for 

Bicycles 1 

Come See Ours! 

We have all types for all ages. 

Sidewalk Bikes 12". 16", 20" 
Standard 20", 24" and 26" * 
3Speed26" ^ I 

5 Speed 26", 27" 
10 Speed 26", 27' 
Wagons, Scooters, Tricyf||es, 
I Aflf APB ^ Mini-Bikes. Western Flyers. 

[nlo^issMate store 

/Sl6e 4^iiri//af ^A^ 

600 VA.BEAai BLVD. 42»4351 

We appreciate the opportunity to serve you. 

GIVE COMFORT & BEAUTY 

BRAND NAME 

RECLINERS 
FROM $99.00 

Mam. Snartad RettI $150, ap 

t 

FURNimHi SALiS, INC 

M0It-TUES.-THUR8L4W. 10-9 
SAT. 10« CLOSED WEa 
5643 RriyRiL, Norfolk 853-7270 





CTpppn 

CARTIJNES ENTERS 






From 

CARTUNESi 

STEREO CENITIRS .^ 




Vau Beadi ■Norfolk 

404 LaaUn Rd. iLtttle -Cre^k Rd. 

4 Bhwka bom Ocsanfront ' iRooaeviBlt ai(q>ping Caatn 

225-8608 ■583<64I 



MTCHELLS 
surra YOUR 

HOUDAY AFFAIR 

Cp FORMAL 

C TUXIDO RENTALS 
AND SAIES 



|lK 

RINTAL8 AND SALE ^ 

or MDrS FORMAL WEAlF 

'ANDACCnSORIBS 

6489Va.BaadianL 
(NsttolQmMckPot^ 
4M.S89S 

COMING 80(m 
-TO HILLTOP! 



THE PERFECT GIFT 

A PERSONALIZED 

Pabakma Swiaamade wat^ haa a 36 
laoe, iweep aecoad hand aad IJ 
al nMvemeat, YeBow fold 0( if 
with fnndiie ABiBtoc band^ 
PawmaHsed at no addHioiiai cbaqa^ 
Waa $59.95. (Mar by mal, 5 day 

delimy(poat.paid)«Uhdieckot ^ 
nonejr Older t(K • 

R. B. BRiaCERS 4 CO. 

1400 CHURCH ST., NORFOLK. VA. 23504 




CanSnal G^ & FTonst 

New Accounta aet up Im- 

Now! 

pdlHSETTWS $4 - $6 _ _, 

CHRISTMAS FLORAL ARRANGEM^m] 

$750 up „^ 

Complete Una of gifts. Christmas M\* 
decorations and floral services. \^) 

48&-3383 ^C 

485 s. LYNNHAVEN RD. (Mini Mall) 








^ Weddings 

^^ OIL PORTRAITSr 

FRAMES, / 
PASSPORTa 




HAYWOOD 

HOUSE OF PORTRAITS 
4634 HAYGOOD ROAD a VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 

460-1003 




ofhalia C^arpel 



ant 



JOrapery on 



op 



Christmas is atx)ut Lhnst 

LONG'S 

ReHgbtis Supply 

Your OuiMan &q>ply Headqumm 
hoithegffiyou need far that 
tomeone that't ipedal 




4760 VA. BEACH BLVa 



497.1886 ,. 



CUSTOM REUPH0L5TERING 

Oat daconte iHilKli« iArie 

gratoaa^matea.Wel 
■Mat woikiDoai inl 
oai «M caflnea «■ aul 
yoai taatan kM^ Ub Mv, 

4141 Va. BMdi VM., Vfc BeMh 340-6421 





OtiLl 

MHB.UM 
$14.94 




RMNO 



itean] 




StoaelwaKa I09«aejr. IMgal. 




GUITAR MUHMR 

Rat. Ratal VahM$I4a00 



GUITARS 

Rif.R^ValM 165.00 
AUraCHUZED DKALEBr 



0«i 



^ •39.9S 



rtiTfr limramr nanMimrifirMaidr Chmgt 

JACOBS MUSIC CO.I 



nmaurmtm nonmOcsNin 



.VftMMTtI 



' 9 V ^ w <9 i n i m i i 4 ■ m i^^"^^^^^^^^^^^ 



■ «'w u « «v^aivwvwv9VW««««ipp««*ppV9WM| 



■P 




ivaav 



URSDAY. DECEMBER 21, 1972 




THE SUN CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 






THEOSOPHICAL 



ALL SOLID STATE 
AM/FM/FM - MULTIPLEX RECEIVER 

WITH 
8 Track Stereo Player. Reg. $149.95 




Model Na DAr400A 




Nocfolk 

litdeQwkRd. 
Roowvelt Stopping Center 
583-8641 




Mpi 



CLOSE-OUT SALE ON ALL GIFT 
ITEMS AND GREETING CARDS. 
ALSO CHANUKAH CARDS. 

4630 Haygood Rd., Va. Beach 464-0105 



SINGLE SPEED V4" DRIU. 

Has W geared chuck. 
Powerful 2.3 amp motor 
■ arKi 2,000 rpm speed. 
4 lbs. 



ROCKWELL 
MODEL 70 



■YOUH ONt STOf BUILDING 
UATCRIALSCeNTflf 



•9.99 

104 N. Witchduck Rd. 




idJiq 



BUILDING 
MATERIALf 



497-3547 





.- 



if 



w 



Planning A New Year's Parly? 

YOU NEED US! 

WAGNER'S CATERING 
SERVICE 

stuffed Party Puffs Italian SausagM (Bite Size) 
Party Punch Party Fav<nrt - Noise makers 

JOHNNY WAGNER 497-1149 



&". OUTLET 



TOPS BLOUSES 

LAYERED LQOK SWEATER VEST 

CO-ORDINATING SLACKS TO MATCH 
(Many otiier seiectioiu for that fecial U 
Someone) ' 

Open 10-10 until Christmu 

724 HILLTOP NORTH - 428-6213 




Flowering wi«he« for tiie 
moat beautiful Yule ever. 
One duf • budding with 
Uendlh^M. 



ruffiOM 




CANNED 
HEAT 



ADVIMl KK 



CLOIHINC; 



BJ. SCHWARTZ 3404422 

B. J.'.« ■Po.u.e of P 

r, -. • 300 UONDON am DOE CENTER _ 



( 



ROLLER SKATES 

BOY'S & GIRL'S 
SKATES & ACCESSORIES 




• BATING DRESSES 
•LEOTARDS 

• SKATE CASES 

• POMPOMS 



GIFT CERTIFICATES 



COLLEGE PARK SKATING CENTER 

4204)187 



Jo^t In Time For Chrbtmas 

^^ FIRST IN TIDEWATER 



SUITS. 
SLACKS. 
SPORT 
COATS 



Victory Outlet 



TIES. 
SHIRTS, 
SOCKS, 
BELTS 



SAVE UP TO 40% ON FIRST 
QUALITY AMERICAN MADE MDSE. 

1300 E. LITTLE CREEK HO. 
tOppealW MlHtvy HI|hMwy) 

Noifeik, Va. aacia 



I vahiM imamlMd In bfMal dtomond* 




New fadiions in diamond 
bridal Mti, mbtlyityled 
in many ttriidng, dn- 
inatic dedgm. 



Yotti Choice 



% 



m. 



We've got th« idiole world working f <» you. 
_____^ LAYAWAYNOWFORdlRlSimS 
' JtW»lef» •NORFOLK •PORTSMOUTH •VA. BEACH 



LAFAYEHE 



9ANYO 

cat ttweft 

Pnf (»maace ei^ineaed to 
outiait youi cat. 

Big, full fidelity sound. Yet 
small enough to fit your car's 
glove compartment. Features 
a repeat pustibutton to instant- 
ly replay any channel, and fast 
forward for easy music selec- 
tion. 



■IKONU S 




With 
Speakers 



516Va.BeacliHvd. 
Next to Zayie'i49»5463 




1730 E. Little Oe^Rd. 
NexttoZayie'»S83-M69| 



CHRISTMAS SALE! 
* DRUM SET 

OltPrice '149* 

Rcf. Ratal V«iBe....22&00 

Tnv wtotactade Snaie, Boi, 
TonitCjmM holdR, Smn 
itndi^ loot pedd. Stocks A 



DRUM SPECIAL 

SfAREMtUMffiT 

Petri Mih, indades (bum, 
i^ki^ 

89.98 




Away Now 



Ob Price 

Rct.Rettf Vi 

AudMriad D^w-LodirirPlbe^PmniN^^teh^ingaUnd 
a^r Accoml^nk/bMricaid-k^ler Onige 



DAILY SPECIAL 

Save np to 1/3 on 

Dnm accesMMka, 

cymbol, ittnd„intt, 

iticki, heada, etc 



J 



M :c 



MUSIC CO. 



33 SMttea ^o^tag Ont^ 

S83-S934 
t Sbop^m CenleHtaiploB, Va. 24S4702 



pa • PUM • RUM • pa • PUM • PUM • RUM 

DEC 26 SALE \ 

Chri^mas card% Wrqipii^s, ^ 
T^s^ Rbbons, Nipkin% etc. ci 

FtRMT IN Oirr* AND BOOK* : 

2 2202 ATLANTIC AVH^UE 428-6351 - 





WATCH 

SKILSAW 

CALCULATOR 




PORMOM 



DIAMOND RING 



NEW BIBLE 
FAMILY PORTRAIT 
VACUUM CLEANER 
GOLF SHOES, CLUBS 
NEW FIGURE^ 
ANTIQUES 



FROM DORSEY MEADE 

With Purchase of any Golf Equipment 
Ladie's, Men's, Junior complete Pro 
Une. 20% Off Set of Golf Clubs Through 
Christmas Plus Professional Assistance 
Free. 



1KI1I!I^EY*S 

Golf School 



KI5-9674 

1577 S. Military Hgwy. 

Chesapeake, Va 



:jr 



UNIR)RMS-$5. 



Laif e group, asswted colora 
U8Udlys(4dfor$8to$15. 





lANWEBSAR UNIFORM SHOP 



3707 Va. Beach Blvd. 340-9647 
Between Pembroke Mall & Princess Anne Plaza 



NOW APPEARING 
A One Man Showing of UiaSphttid I 
World of SUZI DEAN for IQda of ALL 
Afaa 

Original Works of Art- Coatom Franlair^ 

8471 CHESAPBAKE BLVDi, NORFOLK. iw« 
Riiinnan's R& - Open 9>5 dafly, lt>8 8iteid»^ 
5874767 





AM) 



MINI BIKE 

BICYCLE 

RADIO 

ROLLER SKATES 

MAG WHEELS 
BOOKS ' ' 

HOBBY (HFT 



FOROMNTN 

JEWELRY 
HEALTH FOODS 

rer 

aCATING DRESS 
DOLLOtADLE 



I gSSl9l9lsl9lg@lsSSSIgS|g@|gIg( 
ig Christmas Gifts for that Unique Home from 

I Spanish Gasa 



Wall plaquei, vaaes, paintingi, chain, ^asnme, 
jewehy, Onyx dien set 



IS 
IS 
IS 

jl 10% OFF WITH THIS AD 

S PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER 
■sj (Behind Rices) 340-8994 

bJ ^n 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mon. • Sat 
ISB|B|g|B|B|E|BIglB|B|GIEIB|i|BIE|G]E]l 




Our NatioMHy KiMnni k Guuantnd 

RESIiANENT8 ^ 

IacM*< iNMnt. ■•(. **^ 

ptmuncRt and writ- m% 

ten fuirantN tuje 

OTHER KVKRYDAY LOW PRICES 
\ Shuipoo |2» Frort- II9SI 



■a Un mtfti. 



42* 



Edie Adams 

diOftCirU Salons 



ffULU IiCiMlijM 

■attvaoA SMffws 
BIMMtVfMI 



NO 

APPOINTMENT 

NECESSARY 

MUIS-»4Mk ni»«.*»M. 
SmVaiHAIM. 



"THE GREEN THUMB" 

Plants and People 
Belong Together 

POINSETTA 
NORFOLK ISLAND 

PINE 
CHRISTMAS CACTUS 

42M128 

Open Thursday A Friday Nidits 
Ttt 9 P.M. 

20th. & Pacific, Across From The Dome 






,vJ" 



IH) 



n> 



THE PURPLE POODLE 




ALL BREED GROOMING :^:, 

POODLE PUPPIES I 

DOG SUPPLIES I 



Jerr^ s Aquarium, J?ri. 

COMPLETE UNE OF TROPICAL 
FISH, PLANTS, ETC. 

We quwantine all incoming du]nnenti 
to insure top quality, disease-free fUi 
and stiO oXta low prices, 

We ham 3,350 gallons <^ Watei in 
Our Aquarinms! 



1315 Hvpeis Road, 1 Block Sontfi of NAS Oceana 
PHONE 42S-6S44 




Open 9-5 Moa, Tue&, Fri, Sat 
12 to 10 p.ni. Wed. and 1%ursw 



481 S. Lynnhaven Rd. (MiniMaU) 486-2374 
.Mariene GaUmer; Owner , 



CREATIVE NEEUfS & THINGS l 

7552 A. VIRGINIAN OR. 



GETHAIRDONE 
ORDER FOOD FOR PARTY 
GET FIFI QIOOMED 
RENT TUXEDO 



pOI^RlRBn 



SHAVERS 

Lodfos' ofid Mtfn's 

from 

REAAINGTOfSl 




WIDE SELECTION OF KIT| 
IDEAL FOR CHRISTMAS 
GIVING! 1-- 

If you'd like to own ymur 
own Creative Needles k 
Tliii^Shcqi 



<)%lo TAPE SHOP 

3M lONDOM iMDOf UtOntm CMIBI 
486-2848 T"*^ ^ ^^*^ V 




/ 



$Lffl«p 



irafliiALMft 1 



6612 Va. Beach Bh^ 497-6:^1 
(Next to Boaaiga) 



Say Meny Chrisbmis 

WithA 

CjSfCTB Oar ^^80 

$5a95 




(AixHiptt 



THE SHOP FOR COLLECTORS 

18th CENTURY AND FINE VICTORIANA , 

17th CENTURY DUTCH OAK 
DRAW TABLE. CIRCA 1640 

1361 C.a Military Hgwy. 
Chet^ieeke. Va. 420-9^5 




CALL 588-1992 



CARTUNES Ss 



m 



. _ BHMnn 

URvioa anc 




8 TRACK STERiO 
TAPE PLAYER 

C(»IPLETE WITH 2 DO^UXE 
EASY TO MOUNT SPEAK^S 




>m 



iiiMatnT t yi 



l*p*Mjm.JLJ!,MP*^#J J< J .' M JW^^f^^ffUPPPPPPP^^V*^ 



III f W1 







THE SUN CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



IRCIAIfl BCACII. Where The Livin9 1/ Lorel 



SANTA'S 
HELPER 



I 



, 



ALLl 



OFFEREO 



"CONDOMINiUM IN- 
VESTMENTS - A New 
Way Of Life" is a booklet 
being offered by Larasan 
Realty. If you would like a 
copy of the booklet and-or 
an invitation to attend a 
seminar on condominiums, 
please call Newt Morgan at 
340-3030, ext. 33 or write 
Larasan Realty "Con- 
dominiums", 3401 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia 
Beach. Va. 234S2. 




REAL ESTATE BOARD 
MEMBER ADMnTED 
TO INTERNATIONAL 
GROUP 



Cecil M. Harrison, 
President of Higgins 
Realty, Inc. has been ad- 
mitted t6 membership in the 
International Real Estate 
Federation, through its 
American Chapter, an 
affiliate of the National 
Association of Real Estate 
Boards, it was announced 
today by President Ed 
Mendenhall, High Point, 
North Carcdina. 



The organization lists 
among its objectives the 
promotion of high 
professional standards and 
good relations among in- 
dividuals engaged in the 
real estate profession in all 
nations and the en- 
couragement of the private 
ownership Of teal property 
and understanding of its 
obligations. 



The International Real 
Estate Federation was 
formed over 20 years ago, 
and today has members in 
most of the developed Free 



World countries, 
Headquartered in Paris, the 
IREF holds its congre^ 
(convention) in a different 
eountry each year. In 1972 
tte Congress was held in 
London. The 1973 In- 
tR-national Congress will 
meet in Sydney; in 1974 in 
Madrid. 



Members of the Chapter, 
through their participation 
in the annual Congress, 
develop international 
friendships and valuable 
business contacts with 
colleagues in other coun- 
tries, and exchange ideas on 
business methods and 
techniques. 

The more than l,fOO 
memt)ers of the American 
Chapter receive a quartet ly 
bulletin direct frwn the 
Federation's international 
headquarters office in 
Paris. The bulletin contains 
items about current real 
estate developments in each 
of the member countries. 



-' REHLTU 

4847yiRGINIA 
BE/KHBLVa 

499-5971 






II 



J 




Hfisfc 



Ho|^« th« candlo'i glow 
lighti th« way of the 
brightest. Yul* ovtrl 
Warm thanks to all. 



43$4702 



JOHN M. WRIGHT 

REALTY, INC. 

IffiMBERMtS 



1964 LASKIN RD. 



NAPPY NPUDAY 




Seasonal greetings 
to our friends and 
neighbors. Good 
wishes ... the best 
of everythingl 



T>aue OIQlIer 9iealiy ,9nc. 

REALTOR 

428-3822 
1789 Viigiiija Beach Mvd., Viigiiiia Beach 



Git4iSM' u^mlSrt^ 



Hope this holiday meas- 
ures up to fun. To all 
gobd pattons, specibi 
words of thanks. 

^y^ RMltyCo. ^ 




Rethon 

CALL 464-6205 
1510 PLEASURE HOUSS RD. 
ROBBINS CORNER, VIRGINIA BEACH 




HELLO 



Saata't frttiaf a b<f dwfB out or 
gneHnf friends evwywiMie. Aadhc^s 
n OMMIB for Ae mnriett, 



i^«EW OFFICE NOW OPEN! 







REALTY INC. 

3700 a PLRZN im 
4864041 





CHd ^Doi^atioi)^ 



GARIttN APARTMENTS 

Htm m»i t09^ In PtrkUk* ^maundbv 
1 I. 2 BEDROOMS NOW LEASING 
Be a utlfti l ipedoM ioobm, ftiUy 

b^ t^ifrUteheat wttbovWde wiadowt 




4^o(bc(oij 6fieettn^ 




We'ie bn^ng out good wUws on tfie 
mande with caie. "Thanks" fw youi 
loyal pationsge can alto be found flwie. 



Pembroke Realty & Insurance Agency, Inc. 

281 independence BM. 49M535 



Peace 



Miy the Ueuings of Christ- 
mas fHI hearts everywhere 
wiili love, joy, inna peace 
ind the wish for brotfae^ 
hood Let* s pny for fU- 
fUment 



Robert WilsonRealtyJnc. 

REALTOR 

1673-B Laskin Rd 
425-1000 





AfMtdooriMikkv 



Off 



■rA M HmmV Gnm RA 

iB 






Ml 

C«i46MI21 




People's 
Really 

Opens New 
Office 



People's Realty of 
Virginia Beach has opened 
it's Vir^nia Beach office at 
224 Groveland Road, in the 
Princess Anne Plaza 
Executive Center. 



James R. Stanley, a Real 
Estate Broker and graduate 
(rf Ei9st Carolina University, 
is President of the firm. 



Stanley has served in 
executive positions in sales 
and community 
organizations in Tidewater, 
for the past 17 years. 

Mr. Stanley says that the 



people associated with the 
Company will be its 
primary owners. He feete 
that this type of employee 
owned company maintains 
the most personal and 
conscientious attitude 
possible. This structure also 
tends to instill a relationship 
of trust between clients and 
agents for better service to 



fM-operty owi^rs and) 
community. 

People's Realty 
primarily engaged 
Residoitial — Comm^ 
sales and Rentals, t^^ 
participates in laq 
develi^ment, Construc^i 
and assists in Real Ea' 
investment 




REALTOR MIS W 
425^)955 




We Wirii you a meny 
Chrbtmas and a hqqyy 
.M«yc«r! 

pot, 
427-6000 

Fams * Hones • ActaaiB 



Jlohn M. 

WRIGHT REALTY 

RANNING TO SELL YOUR 
HOME? 
(Price It Rji^t) 

MM provide a written cdhven- 
tlonal Apprtltal on all our 
residential listings at no ad- 
ditional axpenM to the seller. 
Call us for the PROFESSION- 
AL SERVICE VOU ARE 
{.OOKINa FOR. 

425^02 Member MLS 
1964LASiaNRD. 



APARfMENT 
LOCATORS 

OF nOEWATER 
CALL 4994X125 

Tidewatat*! laifBrt apart- 
meat idactar aanrice . . , 
theeaqr.FREEwqrto 
fiwIhoMii* 

¥iM How, Pamfarote 
FemteolBalUaUy 




{torn 0%' 

TgAAf 



IWEU. & AUSTIN REALTY, If 

[Ul Realtors 

Membera, METRO MLS 
Phone 840.9761 




Happy Holiday 



It's beginning to look a lot like Christma*. 
Our good cheer is on its way. We're wish- 
ing folks out there happiness and good 
health for this season . . . and all the time. 
For your patronage, our heartfelt grcrtitude. 



■peof 



PEOPLES REALTY 

of Virginia Beach, Inc. 



Aiita 2C, 224 Grovalaiid Rd. 



486-1431 



'^^jimjm^^^^^m^F^^^y^' ^''^1 




UOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS? 

"Hom^' with your famly ia a good pla^ 
to be dnrii^ the holidqra , 



PoiriUy this ia (he ttac for you to eoMi- 
der a hmne purcha8ei..new airroundioga 
..m<nfe ^ace for the wfa<4e fanly. 

Let as explain how wa can be of rati aar- 
vice to you...if a our bu^MSi and our 
pieaauraL 






Three Locatiais to Serve You 
Call 464-9333, 42&6506; 5834)101 

HENRY-HANSON-TUCKER 

REALTY CORPORATION 

MEMBER INTER-CITY RELOCAnmSERVICE, INC . 

996 First Colonial Road Va. Bea«^ Va. 

OUR "ICSr HEADQUAR'TORS 



1 



LtemtM Hf'i entit StfM 



Well pay you $1,500 

if you plan your next 90 days 

with us. 




H you are iweriy llcenaed or have 
been aMing raal Mala wWi another 
company Md oarniot gel the proper 
atari. WaWaiMYeut 

Our 90 ^ WeMy Salea Planner 
la a aure Are aueoess to s«Mllng real 
eaMe. tt to an IMn^ve mining pro- 
ywn ooi^tod wHh tie beat work 
Irian oi^ganfcwr ki ttie tettineaa . . . 
What'a more wa guarantee you 
ttMOtfyouuaaH. 



n you want to be aucoeaaftil . . 
Join one of TIdewatera Largeat 
r^Mltora. 
133.000,000 lnSMa-1972 
iSjpOO homea aoW ainee 1960 
100 protoMtonal ^)eelaiMa 
and growing 

. . . wIN.you be one of our NEW . . . 

4 afMNCH MANAWm 
4 AMaTAMTMANAIKnS 

1 TKAmMQIIANAOM 

! !ffiKi!««»<ECiAuaw 

2 CONDOMMIUMaKCtMJSra 



0i^9l^nm^ntm^(^qu^maemauemmmp*ea. 



i 



LARASAN llM% eon. 

MOIVMi^niaBaaohBMr 
VligMa Beecd. Va. »4S2 



City Officials' New Year's Resolutions concern welfare 



IKl^ 



nn W '^^^ 



01 the citizens 



In keeping with custom 
Uie SUN posed the qu^tion 
<rf New Year's resolutions to 
tiiose who play key roles in 
the operation of Virginia 
Beach. 

Withmit exception those 
who were available for 
comment indicated their 
Iffimary concern was fw the 
future welfare of the citizens 
<rf the resort city. 



City Manager Roger M. 
Scott: "I'll just try to do a 




Scott 



better jdb for the citizens of 
Virginia Beach." 

Mayor Robert B. 
Ciomwell. Jr.: "My only 
resolution wcHild be to solve 
in the best possible manner 
the current water situation 
in Virginia Beach, and see 
the Comprehensive Zoning 
Ordinance concluded and 
adopted by the City Cwin- 
cil." 




Cromwell 



Police Chief Col. W.W. 
David: "Intensify and 
continue our efforts to 
provide a superior police 
service to the community, 
and promote an increased 
understanding and ap- 
preciation among our 
citizens of our goals and 
objectives." 




Davis 



Fire Chief E.B. Bayne: "1 
don't make resolutions. 
Resolutions are made to be 
brdcen; if we don't make 
them we can't break them. 
We expect to do our best in 

fire fighting and fire 

protection for the City <rf 
Virginia Beach." 




Bayne 



Air bus will hurt Beach tourism 



Virginia Beach's tourist 
director has returned frmn 
Europe feeling that more 
Europeans would visit the 
Uriited States than any other 
country if they could just 
af f(Hrd to get here. 

Still, says Robert E. 
Whitley, the U.S. must start 
doing a t>etter sdling job to get 
European visitors, even jf air 
travel is made so,ch€ap the 
average European can afford 
the trip. 

For Whiti^ says he found 
Europeans have a bad image 
Ot Uie U.S., that hotds and 
other places dealing with 
tourists don't answer 
Europeans' cpieriM; and that 
die U.S. Travel Service is not 
as effective as he feels it 
should tie. 

The olijection to the cost of 
getting here may be overcome 
when a new sky train (or sky 
bus) shuttle plane service 
between New York and 
London may start April 1. The 
round trip fare will t>e about 
$85. 

But this cheap air travel, 
says Whitley, could badly hurt 
the tourist business (A Virginia 
and Virginia Beach in par- 
ticular since people who 
usually come here can go to 
Eurqw instead. 

"We're going to have to 

*^ work to get the European 

business to make up for what 

we'll lose," says Whitley. 

"When the air bus starts, it's 

vlng to hurt Virf^nla Beach 



't«:^~'='.».^-- V 



WMtley. director of toorist 



development for Virginia 
Beach, went to London, 
Copenhagen, Frankfurt, 
Amsterdam and Paris with 
travel promoters from 11 
Southern states. Mrs. Cynthia 
Newman, secretary of the 
Commonwealth, was one of 
the seyen going from Virginia. 

The group held seminars 
and made presentations to air 
line and travel agency 
representatives and others 
interested in tourism. 

He said his trip was unique 
in that it was not paid for by 
his city, but by Virginia 
Beach's Chamber of Com- 
ma-ce and Restaurant and 
Innkeepers Associations. 

Whitley says 99 per cent of 
the people he talked to such as 
cab dirvers and others said if 
cost were no dbject they'd 
prefer to vacation in the U.S. 
over any other place. 

When it comes to the U.S. 
image abroad, says Whitley, 
"the average European thinks 
of America as New Yorit City ; 
die 'Godfather' thing - and 
that you can't safely walk the 
streets at night." 

He thinks Europeans should 
be convinced there's more to 
the U.S. than New York City 
and other well-publicized 
places. 

He says he wants to con- 
vince Europeans to rent cars 
and drive, say, frcmi New 
Y<Hk to Washington and tour 
Virginia rather than flying so 
they can see the country. 
Jdi i^s c<ffnments about tbf 
U.S. Travel Serviw, Whitley 



says that offices frequently 
are not on street level and thus 
iiQt conducive to visits from 
Europeans interested in 
visiting the U.S. 

Whitley, too, says he heard 
complaints from many people 
who say they call the agency 
for information, but were told 
what they wanted was not 
available. The agency ap- 
parently made no attempt to 
get what was requested, he 
says. 

"It may be bogged down inf 
entertaining VIPs and that 
sort of thing," says WhiUey. 
Hesays, too, he understands it 
does not have the money it 
needs to operate. 

Whitley says when the group 
started its b-ip "We all thought 
we were goii% on a sales 
missimi, but it actually turned 
out to be a fact finding 
mission." 

The sky train shutUe to 
which Whitley referred has 
already been approved by 
British air authorities on an 
experimental t>asis. It will 
operate between Stansted 
Airport near London and 
Kennedy International Air- 
port 

The summer rate on the 346- 
passoigers E)C-10s will be 
even cheaper than the winter, 
ranging from $75 to $78, 
depending on the value of the 
British pound. Iliere will be no 
frills on the planes and no 
passenger can buy a ticket 
more than ttx tAfarii b^qce, 
flights. 





47th YEAR NO. 50 



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1972 



15 CENTS 



Army denies dredging permit 



^^ 




By LES LEHIGH 

The bitter controversy over 
the City's plans to dredge 
Pleasure House and Crab 
creeks has ended nearly seven 
months to the day a f to- the 
City proposed the project. 

The Army Corps of 
Engineers has denied a permit 
for the {H-oject on grounds it 
would cause extensive 
damage to wetlands near the 
mouth of the Western Branch 
of the Lynnhaven River. 

A puMic upheaval followed 
the City's announced in- 
tention; to dredge a navigable 
channel from Lynnhaven to 
the Ocean Park area near 
Shore Drive, and remove 
1.100,000 cubic yards of 
imRfPw. 1 jNf apjiucvnuiranD 
noted, the dispdfcal area was 
privately owned by developer 
F. Wayne McLeskey, who 
planned to lete it for fubire 
development of residential 
housing. 

In notifying City Manager 
Roger M. Scott of the permit's 
denial, the Army said the 
decision was based on the U.S. 
Department of Interior's 

Church 
burglarized 

Police continue their search 
for thieves who reportedly 
celebrated the holiday by 
burglarizing two safes at the 
United MeUiodist Church, 18th 
Street, Beach Borough. 

Authorities said the safes 
were broken into sometime 
between 9 p.m. Christmas Eve 
and 11 p.m. Christmas Night. 
No report has l)een made as 
yet conco-ning the^rpount of 
the loss. 

The building reportedly was 
entered by breaking a win- 
dow. 



unfavorable reaction to the 
project. 

The USDI Bureau of Sport 
Fisheries and Wildlife said 
"ConstructifHi of the proposed 
project will have significant 
adverse effects on the public 
fish and wildlife resources of 
the project area. Additiwial 
filling of viable wetlands will 
drastically lower the 
production, of organic 
nutrients. Shallow nursery 
and feeding areas for finfish 
will be lost, established 
estuarine soils removed. 



Truman 



Fort Story is conducting two 
day^of memorial services in 
honor of former Presidwit 
Harry S. Truman. 

The services commenced at 
10 a.m. Wednesday with the 
assembling of all troops (m the 
po^ parade field, for the 
reading of the official 
notification of Truman's 
death. The Wednesday sw- 
vices also included the firing 
of a single cannon every half 
hour. 

Services will conclude today 
with military honors for tiM 
former armed services 
Commander In Chief, by the 
79th Transportation Battalim 
Honor Guard Truman's day 
of internment will be com- 
merated by the firinc of a ?i 
gun salute at noon, and a SO gun 
salute at the 5 p.m. retreat 
service. 

Truman's passing was 
witnessed by other military 
installaticms, and public of- 
fices, in Virginia Beach by the 
lowering of the American flag 
to half mast throughout the 
city. 



wildlife habitat destroyed, and 
water quality degraded. 

"In view of the anticipated 
detrimental environmental 
impact and resource 
destruction of the proposed 
project and the precedent it 
sets, the Bureau of Sport 
Fisheries and Wildlife 
recommends this permit 
application be denied." 

The USDI added. "Since the 
City of Virginia Beach is the 
applioint, the public notice 
alludi^ that the proposed 
chann^ and boat basins 
excavamRHs totally a public 
project for the public interest. 
However, with the disposition 
of 1,100,000 cubic yards of 
material being placed in 
wewnw aieii, Mf^'npHWRi*^ 
owner is obtaining upland real 
estate at the expense (rf public 
resources." 

In concluding the USDI said, 
"The Bureau objects to the 



filling of productive wetiands 
where there is no donon- 
strated public need and where 
significant environmental 

damages will occur This 

Bureau is concerned about the 
precedent tills application will 
set, if ttie permit is issued." 
In reviewing the application 
the USDI commented on a 
previous dredging operation 
in this area and the deposition 
of removed material by 
saying, "An onsite field in- 
spection of tlie proposed 
project area by a Bureau 
biologist and a representative 
of the Environmental 
Protection Agency revealed 
approximately aS to 30 acres 
of wetland habitat have 
iilMady ■ been fiWwh" "fliis* 
apparent violation of the 
River and Harbw Act of 
March 3, 1899 was reported by 
this Bureau to the Norfolk 
District, Corps of EngineenI, 



in a November 15, 1972, letter. 
Further investigation 
disclosed the owner of the 
proposed disposal area is 
responsible fw this an>arent 
illegal fill of valuable 
wetiands." 

Regarding this activity the 
USDI said, "We also 
recommend that actiirn by tUe 
Corps of Engineers be taken 
against the owner of the 
'proposed disposal area' to 
have all fill materials 
removed from the marshes 
and restore die wetlands to 
their original configut^tian 
and elevatioa If the cmnet 
will not accept this reconv 
mendation. we strongly 
reeomni^ that the Oar|i»^« 
Engineers enforce Section 17 
of the Act of March, 1899, and 
refer ttiis matto- to ttie U.S. 
Attorney's office for ap- 
pro|N-iate legal action." 



Whitehurst refuses 
to reveal salaries 



House fire claims woman 



A 62 year old woman died in 
a fire in her Wellington Woods 
home shorfly after midnight 
Tuesday. 

Officials identified her as 
Amber G. McClary, of Lord 
Seaton Circle. 

Investigatm? said the fire 
was apparentiy caused by 
careless smoking in the up- 
stairs bedroom (rf the home. 
She apparently was alone at 



Uie time of the fire. 

Authorities said Oie bed was 
consumed by fire, indicatii^ 
the fire broke out some time 

before the alarm was sounded 
at 12:22 a.m. The alarm was 
sounded by neighbors who saw 
sm(Ae escaping through the 
eaves of the building. 

This was the second fire 
rdated fatality in Virginia 
Beach this year. 



By Sonja Hillgren 
Sun Washington Bureau 

When Rep. G. William 
Whitehurst, R-Norfolk, 
recently released the named 
of two new staff members, he 
instructed his administrative 
assistant, R. Biirentt Thomp- 
son, not to divvige tne 
amounts^crf their salaries. 

In following his boss's in- 
structions, Thompson also 
refused to give "ball park 
estimates" oi the salaries, 
which are public infcmation 
and paid with taxpayers' 
manor. 

A rqwrtera' calls to other 
Virginia congressi<mal offices 
tn-ougbt similar responses. 

Public records in the office 
(d the Clerk (rf tte House show 
that Charles G. (Buddy) 
Drago, the predecessor to 
newly -hired le^dative aide 
Kenneth CO. Hagerty, was 
paid $19,631 in fLKal 1972. 

Ha«erty was paid $15,183 by 
his presoit boss. Rep. Victor 
V. Veysey, R-Calif., the 
Clerk's records show. 

Blanche M. Boyles, recaiUy 
hired to run Whitdiurat's n^ 
NTirglnia Beadi district office. 



was paid at a rate (rf $10,600 at 
die time she left Whit^urat's 
Washii^toii office two and 
lalf yeare ago. 

In denying a request for 
current salary figures, 
Thompson said: "There 
s^ms to be no point in 
singling out one individual and 
putting him in the papa*. It 
doesn't prove anything and it 
crates problons." 

PnMems crated, he said, 
mi^t be jalousies among 
staff members or among 
Whitdiurst's staff and staffs 
of oiher congressmoi. 

Also, constitutents don't 
undo^tand how mudi it costs 
to hire good secretaries in 
Wa^ington, he added. 

Staff memba^, he said, are 
paid according to un- 
controllable variables such as 
available fimds, a po^txi's 
experience and past salary, 
and the job market at the time 
a persm is hired. 

Thompson said: "Ottier 
people's salaries are not in the 
paper. When Harry Bvrd hirw 
someoiK, it's wA. in we paper. 
When William Spoog hires 
someone, it's not in the paper. 



Bob Dani^' staff has beoi 
chosen and their salaries 
haven't beoi in the pipar.'' 
HMHnpsoD is \^t^urit't 
highest paid aide. In fiseal 
1972 he was paid ^.M0, ae- 
oxding to public reptrte in die 

office of tiieCl^ <d d>e Honse. 

Unlike salaries in tiiv^ 
executive brandi «^idi are 
set acmrding to a unifoftn 
gradii^ s^rton, salaries for 
OHigrenional staff memb^v 
are left ahnost oitirely to ^ 
discreticm of ^ Member ;;4f 
Ctxigress C€ an administrates^ 
assistant, as is Um case-l^ 
WWtdiurst's office. *-:' 

A member ot die Hoise'uC 
allocated $157,092 a y^r tat 
salariffi of up to 16 aides. Hie 
cmling for an individual's 
salary is ^,600. 

The Clodc's reovda tkxm 
Whitdiiffst paid out $141,006 to 
fiscal 1972, less than his 
allowance. The remainder 
stayed in die U.S. Treestry. 

Tlie 0erk*s record for fiscal 
1972 diow Victor D. Powdl, 
Whitehurst's pnss aide, mm 
paid $19,631, the same utary 
as I^go. 

OUier staff membera wme 
f ContimMd on Pt^ 2) 



In todays issue: 



f^M} by Rod Mann 

REACHING —Forever reachiMg, higher toward fte beaveu, th»e pln^ cmM w^^ 
stand an inspiraUM to Man to rise above his adversities, to emtinue searcMax, 
reacMa^. for truth ami knowMge. And peace. 




A brave artist 

is featured in 
The Windjammer 




A 'tvinged' player. 

Page 4 



Opposuion to the ERA. 
I^e2 







Tit J 



OCR 



r 'W^ m w * 



'^^^^^^^^^^^■^^^•^^i^^^^^^^Pi^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



' V « W ^* • • ^W ^ * 1 



THE SUN 



THURS