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Full text of "Acta Victoriana, October 1908-June 1909"

M 



Sti'f X?518.1135-A»9 



METROPOLITAN 

TORONTO 

LIBRARY 




789 

YONGE 
TORONTO 
M4W 2G8 



<S^Z£_ /J^^ 




REV. GEORGE JACKSON, B.A. 



ACTA VICTORIANA 




I 



Published monthly duping- the Colleg-e year by the Union 
Litepapy Society of Victopia University, Toponto 

VOL. XXXII. TORONTO, OCTOBER, 1908. No. 1 



Wildflowers 

C. MONTROSE WRIGHT. 

N God's own gardens I liave found them 

Growing here and growing there, 
In unknown valleys I have found them, 
Arbutus, roses, violets rare. 

Only God's own eye had seen them. 
Growing here and growing there. 

In his garden no man labors, — 
They know only God's great care. 

In God's gardens, God's sublime thoughts 
Growing here and growing there, — • 

Each a flower pure and sinless. 

Unchanged thoughts of God, most fair. 

If our lives oould be but God's thoughts, 
Living here and living there. 

If unsoiled by sin and spotless, 
We could lay our beings bare, — 

Wild-flowers, — growing in God's garden, 
Growing here and growing there. 

Low arbutus, purest lilies, — 

God's own gardens : what's more fair ? 



12 



\ 5 ^ <^ \ 



^ACTA VICTORIANA. 



A Trip to Alaska by Boat 
Leaves from a Diary 

JESSIE E. DREW, '09. 




O narrow in many ways is our education 
here in this little college world of ours, so 
seldom do we realize the actuality of the 
various things we read about in our text- 
books, that a trip to what is usually consid- 
ered such a f ar-oif country as Alaska — asso- 
ciated in our minds as it is with ice-floes, 
polar bears and seals — is not only a novelty 
and a rare treat, but also an education. 

Several boats run up the coast to Ska- 
guay and other points every two weeks from 
Canadian and American ports, so that real- 
ly two weeks or ten days is not very far out of civilization after 
all. An American boat was chosen by our party in this instance 
for the express purpose of visiting more Alaskan ports than 
the Canadian ships generally touch, and we sailed from Seattle 
on a Monday noon, with a feeling of eager anticipation in our 
hearts which creeps in there when anything new and wonderful 
is expected. I really think that we must have looked very stately 
and majestic as we steamed out of the harbor. We passed Port 
Townsend at sunset, and saw a pleasing picture, for there were 
nineteen or twenty sailing vessels lying off there, some in the 
path of the sun, some in the golden haze, looking like phantom 
ships out of a fairy tale. All evening we sat up on deck watch- 
ing the darkness come down over the waters, and we went to 
rest with the peace of the ocean in our hearts. 

Tuesday Morning. — Nothing to do but bask in the sun like 
so many seals and watch the water and the mountains, — and 
dream. There was an expectant air on everybody's visage, for 
we were to cross Queen. Charlotte Sound shortly after dinner, 
and that is always an interesting part of the voyage, we heard. 
About seven o'clock the sky became overcast, the smiling blue 



A TRIP TO ALASKA. 



13 



waters changed to turbulent grey and green. The wind rose 
and the air grew full of a thousand mysteries. Our pretty boat 
began to heave and toss with the waves, and the mist to fall 
around us. We pa-ssed close by a '^more'n full" wreck upon which 
was painted large — '' Drink Yellowstone beer, I did." The pas- 
sengers smiled wanly and began to disperse. On the other side 
we discerned a lighthouse by following the sound of the fog- 
horn which was blowing for dear life. The picture was very 
weird and beautiful, with the breakers dashing up white on 
the ragged rocks, all dim through the misty greyness. Fog and 
rain drove the last of us below. 

Wednesday. — The first news was that we had been '' there " 
for seven hours on account of the fog, but no one knew where 
^^ there " was. However, after breakfast, the ship moved slowly 
ahead, tooting that old whistle every minute, while we drew 
imperceptibly nearer a fog-horn that was doing its very best 
to guide us to the right place in spite of echoes and things. We 
knew by the increased speed of the boat that the fog must be 
lifting, and presently, right beside us, appeared a wee spot of 
blue hill, no bigger than the ship. It grew and grew into an 
island with a lighthouse, and we sailed out of the bank of fog, 
leaving it entirely behind, like a cast-^off garment. Having once 
more saluted the friendly fog-horn, we sailed forth into the glad 
morning sunshine. Shortly after this sudden emersion from 
the white darkness of the fog, we came in sight of Bella Bella, 
a pretty little village on the side of a hill. We merely said 
'' hon jour/' and passed on, new scenes passing before our eyes 
in kaleidoscopic manner. 

Prince Rupert was our first stop, and most of us decided 
to wait up for it, but when we finally arrived, at 1.30 a.m., 
the rain was descending in huge boat-loads, which rather damp- 
ened our spirits as well as our clothing. However, we saw it 
in a favorable light on the return trip, when we found the air 
just clearing up after a long rain-storm, and all the surround- 
ing hills and islands were brought out into distinct relief 
against the sky and water. Hurrying off the boat we walked 
up the first street we could find to see what the place was like, 
and found a cable car service to the top of the incline, but unfor- 
tunately, passengers were not taken into consideration when 



14 



ACTA VICTORIANA, 



that plant was installed, and we had to use our natural method 
of progression. The city-to-be is in the embryo, so to speak, 
most of the buildings are half wood, half tent, though there are 
two or three very pretty houses, and a few respectable stores. A 
new '^ hotel '' had just been completed, with accommodation 
for five hundred people or more, counting twelve to a room. 
It was really quite interesting. The site of the city is very 




RESIDENTIAL STREET IN KETCHIKAN. 



picturesque, and docks built by the railway are finer than those 
in most seaport towns. 

Thursday. — We woke to find ourselves in Alaskan waters. 
Ketchikan was reached about ten o'clock. Everybody scrambled 
off and made for the falls, about ten minutes' walk from the 
wharf. It was lovely up along the gorge, and all the kodaks 
were busy taking pictures, while eager hands were picking 
bunches of blueberries, salmon berries, ferns and pretty wild 
flowers, of which there was an abundance. There is a rambling 



A TRIP TO ALASKA. 15 

sort of water-fall right in the town, and in season it is a won- 
derful sight to see the salmon " running " there. At the sound 
of the whistle we scurried back to the boat, snapping a few 
stray totem poles on the way. 

After dinner we came into Wrangle, and as it was too dark 
to see anything else, we busied ourselves with looking at Indian 
baskets. All these funny little places are brilliantly lighted 
by electricity, which seems to -intensify the blackness of the 
overshadowing mountains. 

Friday. — A stop was made at some place in the wee small 
hours of the morning, and at 9 o'clock a cannery settlement, 
Petersberg, was reached, at the upper end of Wrangle l^ar- 
rows. We turned a corner and got out into a large lake effect. 
Here, three glaciers put in an appearance, and a little later, the 
Devil's Thumb showed up. This is a shaft of mountain in the 
shape of a thumb, standing up above the surrounding mountains. 
The resemblance is quite noticeable. All day we were kept 
busy looking at glaciers, spouting whales, blackfish, and por- 
poises. We passed a couple of pretty, white lighthouses, threw 
some provisions to a man in a small boat, and sailed into Tread- 
well about 6.15 p.m. The three places, Treadwell, Douglas 
City and Juneau, looked so picturesque as we steamed towards 
them. The sun Avas shining full on Juneau, and peeking down 
over a mountain at the other two places. We got off to investi- 
gate the mines, and climbed up a steep hill to look down into 
the big hole in the mountain, where the men look like so many 
flies on a wall. Then we went into the stamp mill. IvTever go 
in there if you don't wish to be driven to madness. It's simply 
awful ! I mean the noise, you know, but since it is the largest 
of its kind in the world, that need not have surprised us. We 
walked over to Douglas, about a mile, and waited, there for the 
boat, which, much to our discomfort, — it was chilly — didn't 
come until 9.30 p.m. True, the sun didn't go down until 9.15, 
but the air was cold and the ground damp from a recent and 
very heavy rain. It was quite dark by the time we got 
across to Juneau, so we amused ourselves in the curio shops. 
Juneau is the capital city of Alaska, and one of the prettiest 
towns all along the coast, tucked in at the foot of a huge mossy 
mountain that has little silver streams falling down all over it. 



16 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Saturday was another fine daj with a stiff breeze blowing. 
About ten o'clock, we tied up at Fort Seward, of which we 
approved, the buildings were so nice and orderly and new. It 
is a newly stationed garrison, and is built on a gentle slope 
topped by a huge water tank. Haines is a funny little place 
about a mile along the beach, with a rickety wharf that won't 
allow boats to tie themselves to it. 

Just after lunch we steamed into Skaguay, the most north- 
ern point we were to visit. It is a scatterbrained-looking affair. 




GREEK CHURCH IN SITKA. 



spread out over the flats, in between two mountains that are 
backed up by many other mountains, and they seem to be 
pushing the poor little town off the earth into the sea. The 
houses are very humble in appearance, but the flower and vege- 
table gardens are the pride of the citizens and the surprise of 
visitors. The main street leads into the mountains and to the 



A TRIP TO ALASKA. 17 

rich land beyond, the yellow Yukon. Taking the special train 
provided for tourists, we went up as far as White Pass Summit. 
The train climbs up the mountains for twenty-six miles on a 
four per cent, grade. The old Yukon trail follows the valley 
up to the Pass, very much like the Cariboo trail in the Fraser 
Valley. We looked down on White Pass City, or the one or 
two log huts that remain, where once three thousand people 
rested on their weary way into the land of gold. Just there, the 
trail turns to the left up Dead Horse Gulch. Seventeen hun- 
dred horses are said to have lost their lives and their owner's 
packs during the rush. At the summit the first thing the 
Canadians did was to salute the Union Jack. It had become 
monotonous seeing nothing but stars and stripes. We climbed 
a small hill overlooking the Pass, and engaged in a friendly 
snowball fight until our fingers tingled and our heads grew 
light from the height of the battle-ground. 

Sunday. — The run from Skaguay to Sitka is full of danger 
and delight. Danger, because of the narrow channels in some 
places, and delight in the beauty of the little islands and reefs, 
and all green and living nature. We got into port at high noon. 
The Greek church is the most interesting of the sights, being 
a relic of the old Russian days on this side of the water. It 
was established in 1812, but the present church was built in 
the thirties. The exterior is very simple and the inside as 
plain, but the paintings and carvings are beautiful. We paid 
toll at the door to a lame girl, who also looks after parcels and 
gentlemen's hats, which are not allowed to enter. There are 
no seats in the church. Directly in front of the door is the 
altar, but behind a double carved door. The walls are lined 
with beautiful paintings, many of them brought over from 
Russia for the old church. In a room to the left is the most 
beautiful and best known of their paintings, a Madonna and 
Child. It was brought over in 1812* or 1814, and is still as 
well preserved andi delicately tinted as the day it was painted. 
Being but an ordinary creature with no idea of art, except a 
few original ones of my very own, I shall not attempt to picture 
to you its beauties, but will leave everything to your more vivid 
imaginations. 



18 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Unfortunately it was Sunday, and visitors were not allowed 
to enter the museum and Russian curio shops. Indians -were 
lined up along the street from the wharf selling their wares 
and making themselves as agreeable as possible. Some of 
them are the funniest-looking creatures, all wrinkles and tooth- 
less gums, but there are many fine-looking young girls. The bas- 
kets there were the finest, the prettiest, and the most reasonable 
in price, that I have ever seen. 

From Sitka we started on the homeward run, and were to 
call at Sitka Bay that evening, and next morning, to get as close 
as possible to Taku glacier. It was but seven o'clock when we 
first sighted it, and everyone was so anxious to see the sights 
that breakfast was delayed an hour or so. The cold, frosty morn- 
ing air was beautiful, but rather strenuous for July. Luckily, 
our eyes were so busy looking and wondering at the different 
icebergs as we sailed by, that all else was forgotten for the 
time being. I knew icebergs were blue to a certain extent, but 
I opened my eyes very wide at the intensity of color in these. 
It was as though all the blue of the skys were concentrated in 
one little bit of ice, and the dazzling white edges kept it within 
bounds. It was wonderful. I don't know the height of the 
face of the glacier, but think it to be about tw^enty or thirty 
feet. There is a pretty legend about this glacier, as there is 
about nearly everything in that northland, but ^' that," as 
Kipling says, " is another story." 



THE U. L. S. AND NEW STUDENT. 19 

The Union Literary Society and the New Student 

J. ARNUP^ '09. 

" 1 have no doubt that Students' Literary and Debating Societies have an 
immensely educative effect upon the student ... By freedom of 
discussion and the necessity of sincere, straightforward expression and 
thinking quickly and to the point, his mental and moral faculties have 
great scope of exercise. " — President Falconer. 

ATTENDAN^CE at college means not only a course, but 
a life, and one of the most important questions before 
the new student is that of his choice among the many 
activities of the college world. Upon that choice will depend, 
very largely, the meaning of college life to him and the dis- 
tinctive features of that impress which a University course is 
bound to leave upon his character and life. The purpose of 
this article is to show that among many and varied attractions 
the Union Literary Society has a strong claim upon the time 
and resources of every college man. 

What the President of our University thinks of such socie- 
ties can be seen in part in the quotation given above. Whether 
the Literary Society of Victoria has measured up to this stand- 
ard we may judge from the words of one of its charter mem- 
bers. Chancellor Burwash : ^' The Literary Society dates its 
commencement from the session of 1856-57, when a small society 
was formed of fifteen or twenty members, who met once a week 

for debate Since that time almost every man 

of note who has passed through our College halls has been a 
member of our Society, and hundreds have expressed to me 
their appreciation of the benefits derived from its work, . . . 
as a training school in public speaking and conduct of business 
meetings." These are strong words. They appear even stronger 
when we remember from whom they come and consider his 
fifty years' observation of the workings of the Lit. 

Professor Langford, than who no member of our Faculty 
is in closer touch with student life, has this to say of our Society : 
^' The interest most closely allied to the peculiarly college work 
is the Literary Society. In that each student may cultivate 
forensic talent, business ability and literary gifts, each one of 
which will help him in later life and may open to him his 
life's work. I do not think the students can prize their Literary 



20 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Society too highly.'^ As a senior, Professor Langford was 
President of Lit. So were several other members of the Faculty 
in their time. All these men have " made good " in their 
chosen work, and all claim that the Lit. contributed to their 
success. Judging from their experience the new student might 
do worse than to enter for '' that training which is worth more 
than any single course of lectures in the University." 

From the undergraduate point of view, the first object of 
our Society is still '^ to promote student fellowship." At the 
Lit. we meet as college men, without respect to the year or the 
course in which each is registered. That means an opportunity 
for the new student to extend his acquaintanceship among men 
whom he might otherwise seldom or never meet. Such an 
opportunity is equally valuable to the new student and to the 
college. For in the give-and-take exercises of the Lit. there 
is developed that sense of comradeship which is essential to 
the cultivation of a good college spirit. 

From the literary and business standpoint, mere attendance 
at Lit. is worth while, but by far the best use is to be made 
of the meetings by taking part at every suitable time. To 
quote President Falconer again, " as in all such matters, the 
man largely gets out of it what he puts into it." Besides inter- 
year debates and oratorical and literary competitions, there is 
the invaluable privilege of open debate on the ordinary business 
of the House. Here the Theolog. will find that mere dogmatic 
statement will not do; the future lawyer will learii that this 
jury of college men must have evidence and fair inference rather 
than fervid appeal; the man of business will be trained to 
expect results only from a strong, well-put business proposition. 
From this college forum men who were at first unable to piece 
together a dozen related sentences, have been sent out as finished 
platform and after-dinner speakers. 

In addition to its distinctly literary work the Lit., as at 
present constituted, includes the functions of the former Alma 
Mater Society, and is thus for male students our one central 
and representative college society. A Lit. franchise means a 
college franchise. In this capacity also the Society maintains 
certain common conveniences, of w^hich the men make daily use. 
Among these are the Common Kooms, the newspapers and 
magazines, the mail box and bulletin board, and Alumni Hall, 



ADVANTAGES OF THE W. L. S. 21 

the use of which is freely granted for class receptions and other 
college functions. It follows that every time a man (new 
student or old) gets his mail, reads the papers, lounges in 
the Commons or meets our fair co-eds. at a reception, the Lit. is 
ministering to his wants. On the evidence of a worthy record, 
opportunities for recreation and development aiforded to those 
taking part and the benefits conferred on the student body as 
a whole, the Lit. rests its case and bases its claim for student 
support. 

The Advantages of the Woman's Literary Society 

MISS I. A. WHITLAM. 

GLAIN'CING at the head-line of this article, I already 
see many shrug their shoulders and say : " That old 
hackneyed subject!" Still I do not think we can do 
better than present some of the benefits derived from our 
Women's Literary Society to the undergraduate students. It 
seems unfortunate that the true worth of the Society is seldom 
appreciated until several years after the student has passed 
out of our College halls, when its opportunities are beyond 
reach. 

The meetings of the Literary Society provide a field for 
self-improvement. Here we learn something of speaking, listen- 
ing, replying, and the methods of business procedure, which 
are useful to us every day of our lives. In no other phase of 
college life do we have this indispensable training. Certainly 
it is not in any course in the curriculum. The work of any 
college organization is to promote culture and to fit one to 
become a useful member of society. We claim that the Literary 
Society is a potent factor in the accomplishment of this purpose. 

The general impression with the student is, that the acquire- 
ment of facts is education, since the more she imbibes and 
absorbs the better will be her results. Perhaps her examination 
results will be the better. But do we want women graduates 
who perhaps have a great fund of knowledge safely stored in 
the recesses of their minds, but who cannot transmit their 
ideas to others ? Or who can do so only in a halting, confused 
manner ? Of what use are they to society ? They have perhaps 
the happy inward glow which the possessiion of knowledge 
brings, but the mission of life is not to one's self alone, but 



22 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

more largely to one's fellows. To make the most of ourselves 
we must have clearness of expression. In the lecture room 
we learn what to master, in our study we master it. In the 
Literary Society we learn to put our thoughts into words, 
clearly, logically and fearlessly. Thus the student acquires 
keenness of thought, alertness of repartee and ease of expres- 
sion. 

The value of this Association is becoming more clearly 
recognized of late ; in fact, some colleges have made it compul- 
sory for every student to participate in the work of the Literary 
Society. " Women's meetings " are too often the object of much 
merriment, — ^not to say contempt — among business men, ba- 
cause of their deplorable lack of system, of dignity, and of 
ordinary business-like methods of procedure. Here, there is the 
apprehension of what organization is in work, the discern- 
ment of what is duty and what is uncalled for in the sharing 
of responsibility — good discipline for the work in the school- 
room or in the home. The very atmosphere of this Society is 
conducive to a womanly dignity, which is the admiration of 
all and for the possession of which every true woman strives. 

In this Association the originality of the student is brought 
into play. The literary and musical programme frequently 
calls upon the individual for something from the line of work 
in which she is most at home. Moreover, the Society at large 
interests us in various topics which lead to further reading and 
consequently broadens our education. 

It is a recognized fact that women are now coming forward 
to occupy prominent positions. Let us not debate as to whether 
or not we approve of this fact, — merely let us a<?cept the matter 
as it stands. If they are to fill these positions, why not credit- 
ably and well ? To these girls, as well as to those who labor in 
the classroom, the training of the Women's Literary Society 
is invaluable. Graduates have repeatedly stated that if they 
had not received the discipline provided in this Society, teach- 
ing would be infinitely more difficult. 

By faithful attendance at our Society meetings we claim 
that all these benefits may be obtained. We hope to see them 
possessed by every undergraduate in our College, and we 
strongly urge every girl to avail herself of these privileges while 
they are within her reach. 



VACATION ECHOES. 23 

Vacation Echoes 
The Quebec Tercentenary 

QUAINT old Quebec! From her lofty height, overlook- 
ing the blue sweep of the St. Lawrence^ the ancient 
city gazes peacefully forth from her frowning ramparts. 
Age has not lessened the pride of her strength. On the con- 
trary, although three centuries have elapsed since the lilies of 
France were first planted upon her Soil, civilization has but 
emphasized her character as a veritable '^ Herculean Gate," for 
truly, Quebec stands as the gateway to a new world. 

Yet, as one writer has said, no city of the new world has 
kept so much of the charm of the old. And it was this inde- 
scribable charm, '^ this vague memory of an adventurous, glit- 
tering past, this placid contentment with the tranquil grayness 
of the present " that, in the visitor's opinion, accorded to the 
Tercentenary its peculiar grace. 

What a delight it was to wander along the narrow, winding 
streets of the lower town! This is the oldest part of Quebec, 
and here, in the cool of evening, women gossip with their neigh- 
bors on opposite doorsteps. Only a tiny strip of cracked stone 
pavement divides them, while each tall house seems to be per- 
petually bowing to its vis-a-vis across the street. Still it winds 
on, ever twisting and turning, finally ending in a long flight 
of ancient-looking steps, from which we step down to another 
and similar street. 

Everything seems tinged with historic interest. Here one 
is attracted to the ^^ House of the Golden Dog," made so justly 
famous by William Kirby's picturesque novel. In St. Louis 
street, one of the most ancient in the city, the house where 
Montcalm lived, is pointed out, a small and unpretentious build- 
ing of rough plaster. 

E'ow for the celebration — the military parade and the State 
pageants. The former was of such a nature as to stir up the 
patriotism of every British subject, while the latter were so 
varied and beautiful as to linger in the memory forever. They 
were enacted upon the world-famous Plains of Abraham, along 
the banks of the St. Lawrence and within the shelter of a mag- 
nificent forest. 



24 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

One of the most striking scenes of the panorama was the 
first pageant, which depicted the landing of Cartier and his 
welcome by the Indians. In the distance one caught a glimpse 
of the white tents of the historic village of Stadacona, clearly 
outlined against the exquisitely tinted green of the wooded 
background. At the doorway of one of these wig\vams an 
Indian was standing, gazing out over the serene river. He 
stood as a representative of a race that was doomed to pass 
away, and this striking feature of the tableau cannot easily 
be forgotten. Soon he saw the strange sail, and rushed to tell 
his comrades in the village. 

The second and third pageants were perhaps the most mag- 
nificent. The gardens of Fontainebleau rose before the eye; 
and there, riding up through the shadowy green vistas, attended 
by musicians, satyrs and flower maidens, came gay King 
Francis I. with his Queen and Court retinue. They were 
accosted by Cartier, with his sailors and the dusky chiefs 
from the far-away wilds of Canada. An elaborate greeting 
took place, including a speech by one of the chiefs in his native 
language. 

The scene of the third pageant was also at the French court, 
depicting Samuel de Champlain accepting the call of the West- 
ern world. As we beheld that fairy-like scene, the costumes 
a veritable flower garden of rainbow hues, courtiers and court 
ladies dressed in their quaint and elaborate seventeenth century 
garb, modem Canada seemed to recede into the dim past and we 
lived once more amid the grandeur and vivacity of the luminous 
French regimes. E. K. C '10. 

In Camp at Quebec 

As all our readers know, one feature of the Tercentenary 
celebration at Quebec, in July last, was the great military 
review of over 20,000 troops by H.RH. the Prince of Wales. 
!N'aturally, there had to be a short camp and some drilling to 
prepare the rural corps for this great event, for every Eastern 
Canada regiment was represented by at least one company. The 
city corps, as a rule, mustered over strength, and made a fine 
showing, those beyond the required number coming, of course, 
at their own expense. 



VACATION ECHOES. 



25 



I did not go to camp with an Infantry corps, but with the 
Cobonrg Garrison Artillery, the only garrison artillery in Onta- 
rio, and one of the best in Canada. Of the nineteen Canadian 
heavy batteries, only five were sent, two from Montreal, two 
from St. John, and one from Cobonrg. 

We entrained at Cobourg at 10 o'clock on Sunday morning, 
July 19th, and arrived at Levis, across the river from Quebec, 
about 6 a.m. Monday. So it was a rather ^' seedy " crowd that 
turned out to ferry across the river and march some four miles 
into camp, after a sleepless, noisy night in ordinary day 
coaches. Many complained that carriages should have been 




VIEW OF TENTED QUEBEC. 

sent down for such a distinguished corps as the Cobourg Bat- 
tery. They little knew what was in store for them. 

On Thursday, after two days' hard, preparatory drill, some 
12,000 troops were reviewed on the Plains of Abraham, by 
General Otter, as a rehearsal for the Royal Review on the mor- 
row. For those in the Savard camp, where we were, this 
meant a march of some seventeen or eighteen miles. It gave 
us some taste of what real campaigning would be like, and 
even then we were not in heavy marching order. Several men 
from some of the city regiments near us dropped out, overcome 
by heat and fatigue. Strange to say, it was not the long march 



26 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

that was killing, hard as it was, but the long Avait under the 
broiling sun, absolutely inactive, and practically without water. 

Every morning we were supposed to rise at 5.30, but in 
our tent, at least, it was all supposition. Some one would 
stir up the tent orderly to turn out and get the breakfast from 
the cook-tent at about 7.30, and we would eat what we could, 
any way we could. Then there was a scramble to get dressed, 
and the tent cleaned and rolled before morning parade, which 
lasted from 9 till 12; then dinner at 12.15, afternoon parade 
from 2 till 4.30, supper at 5, and the evening to ourselves. 
We had practically all Monday, and on Thursday and Friday, 
the review days, almost the whole afternoon for sight-seeing. 
Most of us managed to see all there was to be seen, from Wolfe's 
Cove and Sillery to Ste. Anne de Beaupre and Montmorency, 
and all Quebec city, from the lower town to the citadel and the 
Plains of Abraham. Some of us even sacrificed our supper to 
see the pageants. 

The food was good and the cooking was first-class. As^ I 
found out when " cook's divil " for two days, both were the best 
I have ever seen at a militia camp, but the way it was served np 
was simply disgusting. When you have good soup, prime beef, 
fine potatoes, and beans to match, sometimes even the bread, 
all dumped promiscuously into one tin pail, with lots of grease 
for dressing, only hungry soldiers can down it. Still the camp 
was a model one in some respects. For cleanliness it \vould 
have put many housewives to shame. And a clever scheme 
for destroying all garbage and refuse, not only made the camp 
a most healthy one, but got rid of the flies as well. ^ 

Although it meant much hard work, it was a very pleasant 
week, and passed all too soon for most of the 20,000 men under 
canvas.— J. E. H., '09. 

"Stung" in a Land Rush 

Land-hunger, — the desire to experience the kingly feeling 
associated with the ownership of land — is common to all mor- 
tals, but it is only in the Canadian West that this desire often be- 
comes intensified into a passion, seemingly insatiable. The vic- 
tim of land fever thinks and talks of nothing but land. To be 
able to stand in the centre of a large area, and pointing to the 



VACATION ECHOES. 27 

east, to the west, to the north and to the south, to say " All 
mine V' This is the great dream of his life. 

I know whereof I speak, for have I not experienced the 
sensation ? I need not stop to explain the circumstances 
whereby large areas of land, which had hitherto been withheld 
from settlement were thrown open. Suffice it to say that to 
one who had never owned a foot of soil in his life save what 
he carried about on his boots, it seemed a wonderful oppor- 
tunity. Even in my sleep, ^' free homestead," ^' pre-emptions," 
" purchased claims," and all the other technicalities of Oliver's 
famous amendments mingled themselves in one long, troublous 
but fascinating nightmare. 

Thus it was that I, on the eve of the day upon which the 
land was to be thrown open, found myself one of a crowd of 
^Ye hundred, a crowd motley in garb, in age, and in nationality, 
one such as may be met with nowhere save in this cosmopolitan 
West. The pile of beer bottles all along the line reminded me 
forcibly that I was indeed in the " dry " belt. 

We spent the night upon the cold pavement, unprotected 
against the chill night air save by a fraction of a blanket. At 
9 a.m. the land office opened, but our turn had not yet arrived 
when it closed at 5 p.m. Resignedly we were preparing to spend 
another night upon the sidewalk when the good and officious 
Samaritan arrived with tickets bearing the number of our 
place in the line. We unsophisticated ones gladly gave him 
a quarter, took the tickets, and for that night rested our weary 
limbs upon beds of down. When we presented our bits of paste- 
board next morning, however, we found an officer of the R.^.W. 
M.P. on duty, who refused to recognize their authenticity, and 
with heartless severity relegated the " easy marks " to the end 
of the line. 

From more than a literal point of view this was a serious 
set-back. Our dreams of becoming landed Moguls began to 
fade perceptibly. Rumours began to circulate that many who 
had attempted to make entry on the previous day had been 
compelled to make an inglorious and landless exit via the back 
door. We heard also of a ^' new interpretation " of the regula- 
tions, which had arrived at the eleventh hour from Ottawa, — 
an interpretation which ^' shut out " novitiates and left the 



28 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

old settler master of the situation. Some ingenious minds 
connected this new turn of affairs with an approaching general 
election, hut this seems to me an uncharitable construction to 
put upon it, and one worthy only of a disappointed Philistine. 
I held grimly on till noon. Then, when a burly Swede, with 
a locator's description in his hand, offered me five dollars for 
my place in the line, I snapped at the chance of beating an 
honorable retreat. Saddling my broncho, I pensively wound 
my way homeward along the snaky stretches of the trail. 

G. B., '09. 

Lagooning and Wriggling 

To many who cannot get far away from Toronto in the hot 
summer months, the Island makes an irresistible appeal. While 
it has nearly all the conveniences of the city, it is free from 
its roar and bustle; in fact, there is a charming air of remote- 
ness about it, especially on the southern shore. Boating, bathing, 
promenading along the breakwater, lighting bonfires on the 
beach on cool evenings, are all amusements indulged in by the 
cottagers. 

It is particularly delightful to step into a canoe in the 
evening and recline among cushions while someone paddles 
you around the lagoons. These glassy sheets of Avater are most 
beautiful, and by some witchery in the scene you are enticed 
on to follow their endless ramblings. Some evenings this sum- 
mer were really magnificent when the moon was just rising 
above the eastern gap, and casting its long beams into the dark 
recesses where the electric light could not penetrate. Floating 
down the lagoon and out towards the bay, the noise of the 
paddle almost imperceptible, and the lights from the city 
twinkling across the water, it seemed like a veritable fairy land. 
The beautiful crescent moon lit up the dark blue sky, and against 
it were clearly silhouetted the graceful branches of the many 
willows in the park. 

Perhaps a recital of my first efforts in learning to swim 
may be of some practical benefit to beginners. Having made 
a firm resolution to acquire this useful art, I sought the beach 
early one morning and gave myself my first lesson. Of course 
I knew how to swim — every beginner does. I was very inde- 
pendent; I would have no help from anyone, and scorned to 



VACATION ECHOES. 



29 



use water wings, of such assistance to beginners. Remaining 
quite near the shore I placed one hand on the sandy bottom, 
and allowing my body to rest on the water, gently wriggled 
my limbs in a graceful frog-like fashion. In this I was quite 
successful ; then, with one foot keeping me from sinking, I tried 
a similar movement with my arms. Quite pleased with my 
efforts, I ducked my head under water as a preliminary to 
the repeated duckings I was sure I would get when I should 
try the two movements together. I went back to the cottage 
quite happy, though I was deaf for about an hour, until some 
water, which had stubbornly stayed in my ear, trickled out. 

^ext morning I sought the beach again and plunged into 
the water with great courage. Alas ! my practised movements 
of the day before became sadly tangled. Becoming excited at 
the thought of the wonderful feat I was attempting to perform, 
I waved arms and legs wildly, only succeeding in churning 
up the water, and in sinking to the bottom. Having regained 
my feet I emerged puffing, panting and rubbing the water from 
my eyes and ears. I thereupon decreed my swimming lesson 
over for the day. However, not yet daunted, on the morrow 
I tried again more coolly and calmly, and this time, having 
ventured into somewhat deeper water, succeeded, much to my 
delight, in swimming several strokes. I almost wished to be 
on a sinking vessel that I might demonstrate how necessary it 
is to have mastered the art of swimming. 

R. C. H., '11. 

Mazeppa : A Horse Tale 

Once Mazeppa had been a horse, but that time was far, far 
away. Often as I have gazed into his eyes, he has lifted his 
head a little higher, as if stirred by the embers of an ancient 
fire; and I have imagined that if he could he would tell of 
carrying Il^apoleon over the Alps, or dra^jging the chariot of 
Hannibal. But to horses it is not given to boast of former 
glories. 

Poor old Mazeppa ! those who knew not of his early triumphs 
had assigned him the menial task of dragging a cart which 
transferred baggage up and down a long hill between the ferry 
and the depot. He was ashamed of his vocation, and when the 



30 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

boat would whistle I have seen him dodge behind a rock and 
hide; but the eagle eye of the driver knew where to look, and 
Mazeppa would be dragged forth, his bones creaking like a 
hot-box, his whole body swaying like a poorly erected house of 
blocks. His ribs extended like those of a Viking ship that had 
been buried for ages. His neck was peculiarly elastic, and 
could be stretched completely around a telegraph pole to reach 
a blade of grass, while at the sight of a ^^ forsaken oat " all 
work was abandoned. 

One day a lovely Southern girl and her papa arrived on 
the boat. She had those large soft blue eyes which seem to 
gaze in wonderment on everything. Especially did they do so 
when they rested on Mazeppa and his cart. The hill looked 
long and sandy, and after silently gazing at her tan slippers, 
and a long glance at the cart, she decided. With one quick 
leap she was seated, Jhe tan slippers dangling derision at deep 
hot sand. Mazeppa had an inw^ard impression that something 
was happening, and with one supreme creak his head swung 
around, one large sleepy eye gazing over the blinker. For one 
instant it remained sleepily fixed on the baggage, then it flashed 
fire, the head became erect, the old crooked legs straightened. 
'No more was he a transfer horse ; he was back in the K-eign of 
Terror. Marie Antoinette was taking her last ride. As he 
marched up the hill with stately tread I could hear the blood- 
curdling yells of the French mob, "' Vive la BepubliqueT One 
thing was lacking: Marie didn't take the situation quite seri- 
ously enough. Her happy smile made a difference of over one 
hundred years, but Mazeppa couldn't see that. 

C. M. W., '08. 



A HOMILY. 



31 



A Homily 



" K. C." '11. 



AS those who spent the whole of last year in receiving 
certain well-seasoned bits of advice are therefore com- 
petent to pass on the same, with, perhaps, a little more 
seasoning, there are a few points on which we would like to 
instruct the members of the incoming class of E^ine teen-twelve. 
You are starting upon your college course with varying ideas 
of what such a course means. To some the odor of the '' mid- 
night oil " and the vision of books, and learned treatises piled 
high in one memory-defying mass, may be the first thing sug- 
gested, while others, whose prevailing motto is, ^' Be a sport !" 
consider, perhaps, inter-oollegiate leagues and rugby trojDhies 
of prime importance. The more socially minded, no doubt, 
will enjoy the glamor of receptions and social functions which 
hangs over old Victoria, whereas a few benighted individuals, 
growing less in number each year, are deeply imbued with the 
notion that Victoria is more or less of a theological seminary, 
and that most of Our time is spent in attending religious meet- 
ings. We could do without none of these things, and anyone 
who will redeem our reputation in athletic circles, bring fresh 
interest to our receptions, or give new zest to our Association 
gatherings will be eagerly welcomed. But, of course, it becom- 
eth the superior wisdom of a senior year gently to urge burning 
perchance half a lamp of the evil-smelling oil and delving a 
little into the mysteries stored up in those uninviting tomes. 
For most of us shrink so from the bare insinuation of beins: 
styled a '' plug," that by May ^' when those who are good shall 
be happy," we have shrunk far enough from the required per 
cent, to necessitate our coming to college a little earlier in 
September than we had intended, or even to oblige us to join 
the ranks of the year we had hopefully aspired to ^' Bob." 

To descend to the more frivolous details of academic life, 
there are so many ways in which we would like you to profit 
by our experience. For instance, in the matter of receptions, 
it is very disconcerting to put down ^^b.t." opposite a name to 
indicate ''black tie" only to find, when the appointed moment 



32 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

arrives, that the number of promenaders wearing the afore- 
mentioned style of neck gear has greatly increased. The 
amount of cheerfulness with which a promenade card is yielded 
^P; yc>u will find, varies directly as the personal attractions of 
the proposed partner. When the last quantity diminishes 
indefinitely until it approaches as nearly as possible to zero, 
said card frequently neglects to change hands. Such circum- 
stances, however, are apt to lead to confusion if you find too 
soon afterwards that there are promenades left for some one 
else. 

The frequency of class-meetings is a particular character- 
istic of the first year. These are not, as you may have imagined, 
of the old-fashioned kind peculiar to Methodism. Experiences 
of a vastly different order, such as unexpected cab-rides, are 
related with great feeling and gusto. Freshmen class-meetings 
are distinguished by the unnecessary amount of " hubbub." It 
seems, as the President remarked, that they have not yet put 
away childish things. Oh, well, children will be children, but 
of course it is the duty of their natural guardians, the sopho- 
mores, to endeavor as best they may, to guide their infant foot- 
steps in the paths of rectitude. For that matter, if any doubt 
arises as to the correct method of procedure, one of the stale 
freshmen are quite willing to supply the necessary information 
and dilate upon what ^' we did " last year. Indeed, they would 
occupy the floor all the time were it not for the insistence of 
the newcomers who, w^hatever their private theories may be as 
to the golden sheen of silence, have no intention of letting their 
valuable opinions remain unknown for lack of the telling. 

There are many other suggestions we could throw out, as 
that every little inadvertence on the part of a professor does not 
merit the exercise of muscle which it usually seems to occasion, 
and that students' gowns are not a public convenience; but we 
know that they would fall on deaf ears, and that every succeed- 
ing year will be " greener, oh, greener than ever before,'' and 
will continue to repeat the mistakes of their predecessors, despite 
all and sundry the warnings that are given them. 



x^x^h Acta Victoriana. ^«' 



EDITORIAL STAFF, J908-J909. 

J. V. McKenzie, '09 - - ■ - Editor-in-Chief. 

Miss C. Dunnett, '09, ) j ii-„„„_^ Miss K. Lukes, '10, \ r ^^^.^ 

M. H. Staples, "09, | Literary. ^ j ^ Staples. 10, / Locals. 

Clyo Jackson, B. A., Missionary and Religious. J. E. Horning, '09, Scientific. 
A. L. Burt, '10, Personals and Exchanges. O. V. Jewett, '10, Athletics. 



Board of Management: 

F. C. Moyer, '09, Business Manager. 

W. Moorehouse, '11, Assistant Business Manager. W. A. Deacon, '11, Secretary 

Advisory Comivittee : 
Pelham Edgar, Ph.D. C. C. James, M.A., Deputy Minister of Agriculture. 



TERMS: $1.25 A YEAR; SINGLE COPIES. 15 CENTS. 

Contributions and exchanges should be senc to J. V, McKenzie, Editor-in-Chief 
Acta Victoriana; business communications to F. C. Mover, Business Manager 
Acta Victoriana, Victoria University, Toronto. 



Editorial 



ACTA welcomes all Victoria's old students back again, 
and also has a particularly warm welcome for the 
students of the incoming year. Another eight months 
of college life is before us, and it is up to us to make the best 
of it. It behooves the members of the Freshman class particu- 
larly, to start in right. You will never have cause to regret 
registering at Victoria, for there, more than at any other col- 
lege, a judicious mixture C'f intellectual, religious, physical and 
social life is obtained. 

Rev. George Jackson, B,A, 

An event in college life of more than local interest, and 
one which is by far the most important during the past few 
months, is Rev. George Jackson's acceptance of the chair in 
English Bible, at Victoria. The announcement of his appoint- 
ment was commented upon editorially, and at &ome length in 
the leading dailies of the city, and the current number of the 
Bfi'itisJt Weelcly expresses regret that he has decided to remain 
permanently in Canada. It is impossible, at this time, to esti- 
mate the significance to Canadian Methodism and to the Univer- 
sity life in general, of the addition of Mr. Jackson to the 
Faculty of Victoria : but this much may be said with certainty, 
that his aicceptance does credit to the Board of Regents, who 
3 



34 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

made the appointment, and brings them the gratitude of gradu- 
ate and undergraduate alike. For, to quote the Globe: "Al- 
most no man could be named in whom so many clciiiputs neces- 
sary to the task imposed on him are combined in ^uch just 
measure.'' 

Mr. Jackson is an Englishman. He was born in the town 
of Grimsby, Lincolnshire, in 1864, the second of eight children. 
When he was twelve years old his father died and his widowed 
mother, with her large fam'ily, was left in rather straightened 
circumstances. His early education was obtained at the i)nljlic 
schools of his native town, and matriculating at sixteen, he went 
the following year to Redruth, a small mining town in Corn- 
wall, to teach in a private school. Up to this time it had not 
occurred to him to preach, but while at Eedruth, his pastor, 
a far-seeing man, asked him to fill a vacant pulpit one Sunday, 
and later, "to go on the plan." 

He entered Eichmond Theological College and, while pur- 
suing his theological course, prepared himself by private study ,^ 
for the bachelor's degree from the University of London, gradu- 
ating in Arts in eighty-six. He offered for either home or 
foreign work, but did not qualify, physically, for the latter. 
After two years at Richmond, Mr. Jackson was taken from 
College to fill an appointment, Whalley, in the Clitheroe circuit, 
made vaicant by death; to be thus deprived of his final year 
brought him much regret. 

At that time, Edinburgh had but one Methodist Church, 
that in I^ioolson Square. The church, founded in 1814, had made 
repeated attempts to establish a mission, which should do for 
West Edinburgh what old Nicolson Square wais doing for the 
Methodists of the East side. But Methodism seems to have 
fared badly in Scotland and each attempt flickered out. Finally, 
in 1888, Rev. T. T. Lambert, then pastor of Nicolson Square, 
asked the British Conference to send him Rev. Mr. Jackson 
as assistant, and in the second year of his ministvv. wlieu bnrelv 
twenty-four, Mr. Jackson began his work in the city \\ iili wliich 
his name as yet is chiefly associated. 

His congregation numbered, at first, some sixty, meeting- 
in Albert Hall, a shabby building on an obscure street, rented 
for the occasion, and used during the Aveek as a second or third- 



EDITORIAL, 



35 



rate place of entertainment. Slowly the work grew. In June, 
1890, thanks to the visitors at the International Exhibition, his 
congregations so outgrew Albert Hall, that the United Presby- 
terian Synod Hall, seating two thousand, was engaged for the 
Sunday evening services, with the intention of returning to the 
old Albert Hall at the close of the Exhibition. Synod Hall was 
never left, until a decade later, the congregation wearied of 
rented rooms. 

In casting about for a home of their own, it became evident 
that Mr. Jackson had no patience with the practice which! 
locates the fashionable church's mission on a back street, and 
which sends thither the torn hymn-books and worn-out wheezy 
harmony to do service there. Churches there were in Edin- 
burgh, and good ones, with no need for more, but there was 
room for Mr. Jackson's mission, and if he was to father the 
scheme, the mission home they should build must be no common 
one. With the faith that removes mountains he persuaded his 
people to launjch upon a scheme, which if they had known the 
outcome at the outset, would have staggered them. The result 
was the erection of the Edinburgh Wesleyan Methodist Mis- 
sion Hall, Tollcross, at a cost of a quarter-million dollars. At 
the dedication in 1901, the British Monthly says: ^' l^o other 
church in the city is so thoroughly equipped. . . . It is 
no disparagement of the Wesleyan denomination to say that 
the success of this effort is due rather to the energy and per- 
sonal popularity of Mr. Jackson than to its connection with the 
particular religious body to which he belongs." 

Space forbids description of the mission. Suffice it to say 
that in the new commodious home with the consequent sense of 
permanence in the location, the work progressed more satisfac- 
torily, and soon the seating capacity of Tollcross, too, was taxed 
to the utmost. 

Having become so integral a part of the institution which 
had grown up about him, it is little wonder that Mr. Jackson 
broke down; he could find rest only away from Edinburgh. 
Two years ago, accepting the call to Sherbourne Street Church, 
he came to Toronto in the hope that the change would benefit 
his health, but with the explicit understanding that when his 
one pastorate should close he was to return, not to Edinburgh, for 



36 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

his ministry there was closed definitely, but to the British 
Gonference, to seek another appointment, overtures for settle- 
ment in which were not wanting. 

: In entering upon his work in Sherbourne Street Church, he 
undertook a difficult task; his reputation had preceded him, 
and it is not too much to say, now, that while there he has 
added to it. Both summers he has returned to the Old Land 
to be present at his Conference, coming back each time after, 
reiterated assurances to his British friends that he would surely 
return to his own first love. But with the call to Victoria a 
new element entered. Mr. Jackson had remarked that no pro- 
fessoriate appealed to him but the chair in English Bible. The 
call has come. Regretfully he turns, his back on the work to 
which he had hoped to return, renouncing the symapthy which, 
as pastor, he has, to give himself to college work. There is 
about his preaching a /certain virility and a power to relate 
religious truth to practical life that fit him pre-eminently for 
his task. The moral coward squirms under his unflinching 
analysis of motive and conduct, and when he reads Amos, the 
literary and historical facts only serve him to press home the 
prophet's message to us of to-day. This characteristic manli- 
ness and the peculiar touch of life, coupled with his intellelctual 
acumen and literary culture, qualify him as few men are, to 
give to the hundreds of students — arts and theological — who 
will sit in his classes, the much needed direction to their reli- 
gious thinking in these days of theological restatement. 

^^ ^^ ^^ 

Should the Bob be Abolished ? 

A good many people, including an increasingly large number 
of undergraduates, believe that it should. Those who have 
watched carefully the Bobs of the last three years, have seen 
the wisdom of the Faculty wlien they restricted the time for its 
preparation to two weeks, knowing that in a very few years it 
would, inevitably, die a natural death. The Bob is a custom 
as unique as it is historic, but its day, as it at present exists, is 
past. It is doomed — or doomed to reformation. 

There are several and cogent reasons for its reformation or 
decease. In the first place, the Bob fosters rather than prevents 
the hustles and scraps which it is supposed to replace. Three 



EDITORIAL. 37 

years ago, during the six weeks' preparation, the only thing 
that prevented scraps was the distinct understanding that any 
such conflict between the first and second years would kill the 
Bob. Two years ago the same feeling prevailed, but it was 
only by a vote of 21 to 20 that the Freshmen decided to remain 
quiescent, and this was more than made up for by a couple of 
good-sized scraps in the spring, inside the college halls. Last 
year the same thing occurred, and was only quelled by the pres- 
ence of the Chancellor himself. In this year, the senior classes 
also took part, it is regretable to state, but it is not the purpose 
of this article to discuss the ethics of ^^ tapping," and this fall 
there was a fair-sized scrap in the wee sma' hours of the morn- 
ing, in which about fifteen Freshmen and thirty Sophomores 
indulged. There is little doubt but that there will be fur- 
ther scraps next March if '12 elects a Bob committee. 

A second reason is the serious interference which the Bob 
has with lectures in the case of a majority of the first and second 
year students. When the Sophomores took six or seven weeks 
to prepare their Bob, a few lectures were missed, but the bulk 
of the Bob work could be done in the afternoon and evening. 
As it is now, lectures are sedulously avoided altogether by most 
of the members of the Bob and anti-Bob committees. Several 
do not even register till the third week of college, and to start 
so late in the Academic year is a serious handicap. 

Thirdly, the Bob has lost its original character. It is 
primarily an institution which will show off on the stage the 
foibles, weaknesses and idiosyncrasies of the verdant first year 
students, with the avowed purpose of doing it in such a manner 
that the Freshmen will be led to correct these faults. But no 
one can deny that no such purpose exists with the present Bob. 
It is brought on in such a short time that very little accurate 
impression of the weaknesses of any Freshman ' can be gathered 
from his sojourn at college. Nearly all the material reproduced 
on the stage is that which has been ' gathered from his life pre- 
vious to attending college, and as suich is likely to be seriously 
exaggerated and distorted. That is^not the purpose of the Bob, 
to rake up past memories, some of which should have been rele- 
gated to oblivion half a dozen years before. 

In the fourth place, it is a physical and mental impossi- 
bility to get up a good ^ Bob in the short space of two weeks. 



38 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The last three Bobs have been as good, we will admit, 
as can be gotten up in' a fortnight, but they fall far short of the 
majority of the Bobs from that of the Century Class to that 
given by '08. There has also been 'an unmistakable tendency 
during the last two years to fill in recognized weak places with 
a plethora of sentimentak slush, and this is a feature most cer- 
tainly not to be desired. It is but another proof of the degen- 
eracy of the Bob. 

Another important reason for the abolition of the Bob is 
the serious way in which rugby practice, and concomitantly our 
aspirations for the Mulock Cup, are interfered with. It puts 
the rugby team back seriously to have the first two weeks' prac- 
tice interfered^ with as it has been this year. By the third week 
we should have had several good practice games, whereas, this 
year, at the commencement of the third week rugby practices 
were really just commencing. 

The question of what shall be substituted for the Bob may 

be treated in a later issue, lack of space preventing it in this 

number. 

^^ .^^ ^^ 

Student Support 

Since 1899 Acta has held an unique place in Canadian col- 
lege journalism, and it will be the constant aim of the staff 
guiding the destinies of the monthly this year to maintain the 
reputation gained during the past decade. But to do this we 
need a great deal of assistance from the large body of graduates 
and undergraduates, more particularly the latter. It is the 
duty of the undergraduates of Victoria to help support their 
college magazine more than financially. Why be so bashful 
about your maiden efforts ? In the majority of American 
colleges the editors are afflicted with a plethora of soulful utter- 
ances from overflowing pens, and have a quantity and quality 
of material to choose from that make many of the college 
organs aicross the line a distinct credit to amateur journalism. 
Acta, so far, has been distinguished by the quality of its con- 
tents, but to get the majority of articles has been like trying 
to pull out an elephant's aching tooth with a piece of string 
attached to a swinging door. Whether or not you write any- 
thing yourself, help the Local and P. and E. editors in every 



EDITORIAL. 39 

way possible, for their task i*^ an onerous one and they need 
your assistanice. We don't want Locals to be a record of the 
sayings and doings of a limited circle, confined principally to 
the friends of the local editors, but to be broader and more com- 
prehensive than they have been heretofore. 



The change in our contemporary. Varsity, from a weekly 
to a semi-weekly, and from a magazine to a newspaper, is ,a 
noteworthy one. '' Varsity " is now issued every Tuesday and 
Friday morning, and each issue contains bright, up-to-date 
news in a crisp and interesting form. Once a month a literary 
supplement is issued. The new venture is worthy ,of the sup- 
port of the students of the whole University, and we do not 
hesitate in advising the students of Victoria to subscribe for 
what is so essentially a newspaper. 

This month's Acta is written entirely by students regis- 
tered at Victoria, and as such is more or less in the nature of 
an experiment. Any criticisms from graduates or undergradu- 
ates will be favorably received by any members of the Editorial 

Board. 

^^ ^ ^ 

Literary Competitions 

We wish to direct the attention, of our readers to the annual 
essay and short story competitions. The same conditions and 
requirements will obtain as last year, except that the final date 
on which articles will be received is January 10. 

The essay competition, for which , a prize of fifteen dollars is 
awarded by the Union Literary Society, is open to all under- 
graduates who are members of one of the Literary Societies and 
paid-up subscribers to Acta. 'No person having once taken the 
prize is eligible to compete again. All articles submitted be- 
come the property of Acta Board, and must be in the hands of 
the editor-in-chief by the end of the first week of the Easter 
term. 

A prize of ten dollars will also be given for the best short 
story. The same conditions will hold, except that this compe- 
titon is open to all. Further announcements will be made in 
November Acta. 




^- --t;:::.^ 



mSSIONARY ^ RELIGIOUS 



Silver Bay 

MISS C. E. HEWITT^ '09. 

TO the women students entering college in the fourth year, 
Silver Bay has become a familiar name, and to those 
fortunate enough to have enjoyed its privileges, a most 
delightful remembrance. Every year there gathers on the shores 
of Lake George at the particular indentation known as Silver 
Bay, a company, of college women who are interested in the 
work of the Young Women's Christian Association, and who 
consider it of sufEcient importance to claim ten days of their 
vacation for conference discussions and planning. The Con- 
vention is an American institution, but a hearty invitation and 
welcome is annually extended to delegates from Canadian 
universities. This summer, Toronto was represented by sixteen 
women students, ten of whom came from Victoria College. 

If space permitted, a description of the trip to Silver Bay, 
with its variations and historic points of interest, would be 
most charming. Still more fascinating would prove a word 
picture of Lake George, situated as it is, in the heart of the 
Adirondack Mountains, and reflecting the beauty of the forest- 
covered hills, from whose summits the mists rise in the morn-' 
ing sunshine like incense from some greenwood altar, while 
in the evening the creeping shadows bring promise of quiet 
and rest. 

Over five hundred delegates assembled at the Conference 
this summer. So carefully had provision been made for classes 
and meetings, that every one soon felt interested in the arrange- 
ments, and eager for work ; and let it not be doubted that work 
is an essential feature of such a gathering. Each morning was 
spent in attendance at various groups for Bible and Mission 



SILVER BAY. 41 

study, as well as for discussion on student problems. An open 
meeting held in the auditorium, and addressed by some Con- 
ference worker, ended the session for the first part of the day. 
In the evening the auditorium was again filled, and another 
address given. At its close the delegations met separately to 
talk over the day's work, and to sum up its important points. 
The afternoons were devoted to amusements and recreations, 
necessary to the pleasure and profit of the Convention. 

The most remarkable characteristic of the Silver Bay Con- 
ference is its missionary spirit. This year we had the privilege 
of listening to Mr. Ellis, a journalist, who was sent around the 
world some months ago to make a study of missions in the inter- 
ests of the press. In his address, Mr. Ellis carried his audience 
with him, in imagination, on his tour. In every country he 
pointed out a growing restlessness among the people, which has 
been termed democracy, or the ^'zeit geist,'' or ''the spirit of the 
age,'' but which Mr. Ellis called the " Spirit of the living God " 
working in men's hearts. " Individuals," he said, '' are reach- 
ing out for God, though they know it not, just as the starving 
people of India, so near death's door, knew not that food alone 
could save them. God is preparing a force to meet the needs 
of those lands which are groping after Him." One of Mr. Ellis' 
most striking statements was : '' The force of a consecrated 
womanhood is the maintaining strength of the missionary propa- 
ganda," and the elaboration of his subject went to prove the 
value of his words. 

On various occasions many phases of the missionary problem 
were discussed; its successes were recounted and its failures 
conscientiously admitted. Different fields of missionary enter- 
prise were brought to notice, and the presence of Miss Hill, on 
furlough from India, deepened the interest considerably in the 
work of that land. 

One of the most helpful addresses of the Conference was 
given by Mr. Mott, on " The Secrets of Success and Failure 
in the Association." Mr. Robert E. Speer, who was also present, 
spoke on '' Fear." His direct words will best convey an idea 
of his sincerity and earnestness : " Fear is our commonest sin, 
our dominant motive, our deepest shame." The appeal for 
moral courage through the victory of Love over Fear, which Mr. 



42 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Speer made in closing, was indeed thrilling to the audience 
whom he had held in undivided attention. The last address 
of the Conference was given by Bishop McDowell. "No speaker 
was so generally beloved as he, or given such a whole-hearted 
and enthusiastic welcome. He spoke on the Christ-like God 
from the texts : " Show us the Father," and '^ He that hath 
seen Me hath seen the Father." The words with which he 
parted from us were most heart-searching and long-to-be-remen> 
bered : '^ May the Christ-like person arise in me and may those 
who have seen me behold the Christ image." 



Niaga ra-on- the - Lake 

C. SIl^CLAIR APPLEGATH. 

WHILE six thousand Canadian soldiers in annual camp 
at historic old Niagara-on-the-Lake sought to increase 
their efficiency in the tactics of bloodshed, and hollow 
echoes of flying bullets at the rifle ranges mingled with distant 
murmurs of martial music, an international gathering of over 
two hundred men met to study the interests of a greater King- 
dom than Canada or the United States, and to swear allegiance 
to a greater man than Koosevelt and a greater King than 
Edward. 

From Manitoba, Ontario, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Indiana, 
Michigan, Western ]!^ew York, and Virginia, representatives 
of over fifty colleges and universities gathered for ten days 
from June 19 to 28, under the auspices of the International 
Student Y.M.C.A., to discuss the claims of Jesus Christ upon 
the college man, and incidentally to enjoy one of the best sum- 
mer outings imaginable. 

The keynote of the Conference was the question : ^' How 
can a College man invest his Life so as to obtain the greatest 
returns ?" and one of the best answers given was 'that by Bishop 
McDowell, of the M.E. Church : " To fit your own peculiarity 
into the world's need." 

Men of outstanding success in their own life investments 
were present to instruct and guide by information and exhorta- 
tion those who had not yet decided on their life work. 



AT NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE. 



43 



Some of these leaders were, our own beloved President Fal- 
coner; Robert E. Speer; Bishop McDowell; Rev. Dr. James 
Elliott, of Manitoba University; E. C. Mercer, of the Jerry 
McAuley Mission, in Xew York; Geo. Irving, editor of the 
Inter-Collegian-^ Dr. Garfield Williams, of London, Eng- 
land ; Frederick Almy, Secretary of the Buffalo Charity Organ- 
ization; Prof. J. E. McFadyen, of Knox College, and D. A. 
Budge, the father of Y.M.C.A. work in Canada, as well as 
several returned missionaries from the Orient. It would be 
impossible to give anything like an adequate account of the 
real work of the Conference; but a brief statement of how 
the hours of the day were spent may be of interest. 

Breakfast at 6.30 was preceded each day by the morning 
watch — private Bible reading and prayer. At 7 o'clock, imme- 
diately after breakfast. Rev. Prof. Elliott conducted what, in 
the writer's opinion, was the best class of the day. In a remark- 
ably clear, satisfying manner, he dealt with that greatest of 
all questions — the divinity of Jesus Christ. Free from all cant 
and prejudice, with an open mind and a love for the truth that 
was really contagious, by question and answer he brought us 
face to face with that matchless character in such a manner, 
that some who had been burdened by intellectual doubt, or 
saw " as through a glass darkly,'' had their feet planted 
firmly again upon the Church's one foundation, and from every 
heart there went up the homage, My Lord and My God. 

Dr. Elliott was the most sought after man upon the grounds. 
Scarcely a moment of the whole Conference, except while lec- 
tures and classes were in session, but he was to be seen arm in 
arm with one of the boys, speaking so simply and yet so convinc- 
ingly upon the ideal life. 

At 8 o'clock the Conference was divided into various mis- 
sion study classes, embracing all phases of mission work. A 
new feature this year was the study of the ^^Problem of the 
City," under the direction of Mr. R. S. Wallace, of the Buffalo 
Charity Organization. 

At 9 o'clock Bible study classes, and at 10 o'clock life work 
conferences were held. 

At 11 o'clock each day a platform meeting was held which 
was attended by all. At these meetings inspiring addresses 



44 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

were given by Eobt. E. Speer; Bishop McDowell; Kev. Eobt. 
Freeman, of Buffalo ; President Falconer and others. 

This meeting, held in a big tent among the pine trees arid 
overlooking the lake, concluded the morning's programme. 

The afternoons were given up to rest and recreation, includ- 
ing baseball, tennis, track events, bathing and boating. Many 
interesting sights were to be witnessed at the military camp 
just half a mile away. 

After supper the men were again rallied for the life work 
meeting. And who can ever forget those gatherings ? In the 
sunset hour each evening, over 200 men sat among the daisies 
which almost literally covered the ground upon the banks over- 
looking Lake Ontario's peaceful expanse. As we sat there half 
consciously watching the glorious golden sun being extinguished, 
as it were, in the bosom of the lake, and casting its dying' rays 
of amber light about us, we listened to some of the most impres- 
sive words of the whole Conference. Each branch of profes- 
sional Christian service found a noble advocate in these meet- 
ings. Mr. Speer appealed for meij to give themselves to Foreign 
Mission work, Mr. Budge for the Avork of the Y.M.C.A., and 
Bishop McDowell for the ministry. 

One of the speakers who made a profound impression upon 
the Conference was Mr. E. C. Mercer, late of the Jerry Mc- 
Auley Mission, in New York. Mr. Mercer is a nephew of 
Ex-President Arthur, of the United States, and was brought 
up in the White House. He is a college graduate who went out 
into life without his character decision made. He began to 
drink and in a very short time found himself cut off from all 
respectable associates, sleeping on park benches and in Bow- 
ery missions. He was rescued through the Jerry McAuley 
Mission. Mr. Mercer, in a series of '^ Plain Talks," gave 
some astounding facts. One out of every five men who come 
into the Bowery Mission as a drunkard is a college graduate. 
One-third of the men applying for work at the Bowery Y.M.C.A. 
are college graduates. Sing Sing penitentiary averages nine 
per cent, college men. 

Education does not make character. Unless a man has 
his life ideals definitely formed in the matter of character and 
decision for Christ before he leaves the college halls, the proba- 
bility is that his life investment will prove a failure. 




The Modern House 

FEW people imagined that Edison, the wizard in retire- 
ment, would re-enter the commercial world as a builder 
of houses; not ordinary houses, it is true, but remark- 
able structures of solid concrete, and created in a single day by 
the use of a wonderful system of iron moulds. The invention 
of the concrete house is likely to prove one of Edison's most 
valuable gifts to mankind, and it has only been made possible 
by his invention of iron moulds. These are of three-quarter 
inch cast-iron, planed, nickle-plated, and polished inside. The 
different parts vary in size, some of the interior parts being 
but two feet square. Early in the morning these castings are 
taken to a vacant lot and clamped together with bolts, thus 
forming a house of iron with hollow walls. 

The workmen now mix their concrete — one part cement, 
three parts sand, and three parts quarter-inch crushed stone — 
and a derrick raises the mixture to the top of the framework, 
which is complete from cellar to roof -tree, the various parts 
being held together by trusses and dowel-pins. The concrete 
is pumped into the top of the moulds continuously by com- 
pressed air, using two cylinders, and there must be no halt 
during this operation, or a disfiguring line will appear. 

These queerest of builders keep pouring in their ^' house " 
until it overflows at the top. In twelve hours your home has 
been poured inside the iron frame — rooms, floors, stairs, win- 
dow-casings, fire-places, mantels, and even the bath-tub, all 
moulded in one piece. In six. days the iron frame is unbolted 
and removed; in another eight days the concrete is completely 
hardened and the house is ready for occupation. 

Strips of wood around the edges of the floors to tack down 
the carpets, at the angles of the stairs for the stair carpets, and 
some more around the walls for the picture moulding, are put 
in place before the house is poured in. The tiling around the 



46 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

fire-places and in the chimneys, the gas and water-pipes are 
also placed in the same way in the concrete walls. Stove and 
heating pipes are also cast with the walls, so there will be no 
plumber's bills. 

Children may attack the banisters of a concrete house with 
an axe to their heart's content, and it won't hnrt the banister 
at all. The house is fire-proof, water-proof, and vermin-proof. 
To ensure great strength, twisted iron rods are set in the body 
of the material. 

The success of the moulded house w411 mark a revolution 
in American life and habits. It means that the man of moderate 
means will no longer have to pay rent. He will be able to pur- 
chase a small lot in the suburbs and put up a concrete house. 
'^ The poor man need no longer live in a box for a house,'' 
says Edison, '' he can own a palace. Before next summer I 
will build a three-storey indestructible concrete house that a 
laboring man earning only $1.50 a day can buy and run. It 
will be as artistic and comfortable as any Fifth Avenue man- 
sion, and will be built in half a day. I have done this for the 
working man who is doing his best to bring up a family. I 
won't make a cent on it — I am leaving the patent open to any- 
one. Competing companies will spring up, each making a 
different style of house. My only condition in disposing of 
the right to a builder to erect these houses is that he uses good 
concrete." 

Any type of architecture may be followed in making the 
original moulds, which cost from $25,000 to $30,000 the set. 
But then the plant is practically indestructible, and an infinite 
number of practically identical houses can be made from the 
same moulds, each house costing about $1,000, and being big 
enough to accommodate three ordinary families. Edison's first 
moulded house will be built in the style of Erancis I, and 
some of the cleverest architects in New York have contributed 
their ideas. It will be richly decorated with designs that would 
be prohibitive on account of their cost, were they in stone. It will 
have a cellar, and be three stories high, with nine rooms. It will 
have a frontage of twenty-five feet and be forty-five feet from 
front to rear. The walls will be twelve, ten and six inches thick. 
The interior will be handsomely ornamented, making no further 
decorative work necessary after the moulds are removed, but 



A CAMP DODGE. 



47 



tinting can be resorted to, if it be desired to heighten the inter- 
ior effect. There will be elaborate chimney-pieces, and the roof 
will be moulded to imitate tiling, and can be painted to suit 
the owner's taste. There will also be absolutely no trouble from 
leaky roofs. 

All the interior appliances will be cast with the house, and 
to clean the house all the housewife will have to do will be to 
remove the carpets and the furniture, and turn on the hose. 
The house will never need repair, and there will be no fire- 
insurance to pay, — for there will be nothing to burn. There 
will also, of course, be no danger from lightning. In certain 
districts almost enough sand will be taken from the excavation 
for the cellar to build the entire house. 

The quarter-size model which Edison has built is in the 
Queen Anne style, with a high peaked, tiled roof, and a bay 
front, very suggestive of the houses on Riverdale Drive, !New 
York. There are eleven rooms in this model, and its walls are 
simply frescoed. At his factory at Orange, X.J., Edison i> 
making cast-iron moulds which will build thousands of con- 
crete houses. The pipes for the steam-heating systems of these 
houses will be so well insulated that only one-quarter of the 
usual amount of coal will be necessary to heat the house thor- 
oughly. — The Technical World. 



A Camp Dodge 

One great difficulty in a military camp, as at others, has 
always been getting rid of the garbage and refuse from kitchens 
and stables. At Quebec this difficulty was overcome in a novel, 
but perfectly satisfactory, therefore perfectly simple way. As 
it may prove of value to some of our readers who are accus- 
tomed to go camping in the summer, we will describe it. 

First a couple of trenches were dug in the ground, about 
eight inches wide and ten deep, crossing each other in the 
centre at right angles, and each arm about four feet long. Right 
at the junction of these trenches, at the ground level, a large 
headless barrel was placed on end, a bottom being first formed 
of a dozen iron rods laid criss-cross. The barrel was then 
covered to the top by a mound of clay re-enforced with stones, 
at least ten inches thick at the top, and twenty at the bottom, 
the trenches being protected by flat stones, and a fire was lit 



48 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

under the barrel to bake the incinerator, as it was called. Of 
course the barrel burnt away, but the clay baked hard and kept 
its shape. In building one, do not use limestone in its construc- 
tion, or the stone will burn to lime, and crumble, ruining the 
structure. This actually happened to one at Kingston camp. 
Then the incinerator was filled with all sorts of garbage and a 
fire kindled underneath, the arrangement of four trenches secur- 
ing a draft no matter which way the wind was blowing. If 
more draft was i-equired, another barrel was set on top to act 
as a chimney. It was simply wonderful the way that simple 
contrivance, easily built in an hour, devoured all sorts of refuse. 
Bones, meat, scraps of all kinds, tin cans, bottles, even a large 
hound, everything disappeared. At Kingston they built one 
large enough to accommodate horses, and they disappeared also. 
It wasn't necessary to keep a fire under it after it got started ; 
a light smoke cilrled up from it day and night, and the garbage 
kept sinking. Isor was it necessary to dry the stuff, — a pail of 
water wouldn't even thicken the smoke ! 

When one has been at other camps where no such method 
was used, and the garbage was left to collect in open pits in 
the ground, or was left to be collected periodically, and has 
seen several cases of typhoid, and has been eaten by myriads 
of flies, one learns to appreciate such a method of expeditiously 
getting rid of all refuse, and the flies and disease at the same 

time. — 

Wolf 

The cry of '' wolf "has been so often raised, that when the 
real wolf comes, he finds no preparations, little belief, and no 
welcome. The newspapers have for years been heralding color 
photography as about to arrive, nearly here, or actually accom- 
plished, and in every case where there was any ground for 
the rumor, the process was found imperfect, difficult, expensive, 
or with some other objection which made it a process only for 
the scientist and the laboratory. When, therefore, it was stated 
that color photography had really arrived, by a process which 
anyone could control, with the camera used for ordinary work, 
and with materials which were to be bought in the open market ; 
a process which requires absolutely no special apparatus, save 
one yellow screen, which needed but one exposure on one plate 
in an ordinary camera with the usual lens, and which rendered 



WOLF. 49 

colors not merely '^ nearly jDerfect " or '' almost as good/' but 
absolutely and perfectly true to nature, and tbat all this marvel 
could be bought for a few dollars; naturally, perhaps, nobody 
believed it. J^evertheless, it is all true. The house of 
Lumiere, of France, has placed upon the market what they 
call their Autochrome plate. These plates render colors as 
colors, not as tones of monochrome. 

The plates contain the experience and the colors; all that 
is asked of the user is correct exposure, the use of the yellow 
screen, and care in the dark-room handling of the plates. There 
is no fake about this story, no " ifs '' and " buts," and there 
are absolutely no apologies to make for the results. But there 
are limitations to the process. From any given exposure but 
one result is obtained, as in the tintype process of long ago. 
This one result is a transparency on glass, to be viewed by 
looking through it, and as yet no prints on j)aper can be made 
from it — at least, not in colors, for the same process which 
produces the colors in the plate is not available. However, it 
is expected that this same company will soon place on the market 
paper to achieve this latter result as well. Yet, if there is only 
one result from any given exposure, it is a wonderful photo- 
graph, as beautiful as it is wonderful, and striking the unac- 
customed observer dumb with admiration and amazement. 

Of the possibilities of the new process, little need be said. 
Portraits made with this plate are so life-like that they seem 
to be stereoscopic. In every science, — ^of its value as a record 
of a thousand things that the present photography must miss 
because it misses color, — tin 'magination may run riot, and 
yet not overdo the matter. There is nothing which can be said 
too extravagant for the facts to bear out as to the beauty and 
the simplicity of the process, and. there can be no doubt of 
the fact that this time, not only has the wolf come and barked 
at the sheep, but has actually arrived in their midst. 

That it is but a step towards color photographs on paper is 
true enough, but colors in a transparency in one plate with 
one exposure, and with no complications, is a much bigger step 
from the usual monochrome photograph, than is the step from 
colored transparencies to colored paper prints. — Adapted from 
Technical World Magazine for March, 1908. 




ERSONALS 
EXCHANGES 



ACTA cordially extends greetings and her best wishes to 
all Victoria's graduates. We feel an interest in your 
success and hope that you may not entirely forget us, but 
lend an interest to these pages by co-operation as frequent as 
occasion aifords. By this means, perhaps, you may still be able 
to remain in touch with many old-time associations and friends. 
We require all your assistance but feel that with it these pages 
will be made a success. 

Personals 

W. ]^. Courtice, B.A., '08, has gone down to Pennsylvania 
to preach the better way of living. His address is 15 Pine 
Avenue, Kane, Pa. 

Carleton Stanley, formerly of '09, is travelling for the J. 
Henry Peters Company. 

In the Strathroy High School are to be found two of Vic- 
toria's graduates ; Miss Dafoe, B.A., '07, is teaching Moderns, 
while E. W. Hedley, B.A., '02, presides over the Mathematic-s. 

F. H. Langford, B.A., '08, though taking some B.D. work, 
is making his headquarters this year down town in the Mission 
Rooms. He is taking the place of Mr. T. E. E. Shore while 
he is away on his tour round the world, visiting all the Mission 
stations. 

Births 

We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Stapleford upon the 
advent into their home of a son. ^^ Ernie " will now have to 
administer to one more crying need and will study at first hand 
the primitive music of the human voice. 

One of the first recollections of life in Victoria of the editor 
is of a message of condolence sent to Vic. Odium, '02, on the 
arrival of twins. The editor is in receipt of a marked copy of 
the Nelson News, in which the following is underlined : ^^Born, 
on September 22, to the wife of V. W. Odium, a son." Acta 
congratulates Vic. 

^^ Bill " Connolly is to be congratulated on the birth of a 
winsome baby girl. 



MARRIAGES. 51 

Marriages 

It has been said that troubles never come singly, but it is 
surprising the number of Victoria graduates who have passed 
over in blissful ignorance this venerable theorum that dates 
from the time when the paths of Adam and Eve crossed. Per- 
haps the unusually high sustained temperature of this sum- 
mer had much to do in bringing some chronic cases to a 
head. Or it may be that Cupid finds his work much more 
congenial in warm weather and so has enlisted more than his 
usual number of recruits in the Ancient Order of Benedicts. 
To those who find their happiness thus duplicated Acta extends 
the heartiest congratulations and best wishes for a very happy 
future. 

Fear — Mason — On September 23 the first break was made 
in the ranks of the '08 girl graduates, when Miss Pansy Julia 
Mason was married at her home, 659 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, 
to Mr. Samuel Lome Fear, son of Kev. and Mrs. E. E. Fear, 
of Exeter. The ceremony was performed by Chancellor Bur- 
wash, assisted by the father of the groom. The bride, who was 
given away by her father. Dr. Wallace Mason, was attired in 
her graduation gown. The bridesmaid was Miss Lilian Mason, 
of Winnipeg, while Mr. J. P. Armer, of Toronto, assisted the 
groom. The Wedding March was played by Miss Beth McLean, 
of !N'orth Tonawonda, !N^.Y., and the wedding hymn, "Oh Per- 
fect Love," was simg by Miss Helen C. Parlow, B.A., '08, to 
the accompaniment of Mr. Elmer Ley, B.A., '08. After an 
informal reception Mr. and Mrs. Fear left for their future home 
near Detroit. 

Brecken — Overland — At the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. 
George Overland, Erin, Ont., on September 1st, their daughter. 
Miss Vida M., was united in marriage to Bev. Egerton R. M., 
Brecken, B.A., '04, B.D. The Rev. G. T. Watts officiated. Mr. 
and Mrs. Brecken spent a couple of weeks visiting their relatives 
in Ontario, and then about the middle of the month left for 
the West by the lake route. They spent a week in the Rockies, 
and then, joining the outgoing party of missionaries, sailed from 
Vancouver on October 7. 

Ball — Harris — On Wednesday, July 22, 1908, a pretty 
but quiet wedding took place at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. 



52 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

John Harris, Atha, Ont., when their only daughter, Miss Cora 
Mabel, became the wife of Mr. E. E. Ball, B.A., '06. The 
ceremony was performed by Rev. J. W. Totten, pastor of Clare- 
mont Methodist Church, in the presence of only the immediate 
friends of the bride and groom. The bride was attended by 
her cousin. Miss Luella Hobbs, of Pickering, and 3^r. Milton 
Harris, brother of the bride, was best man. After the honey- 
moon, the newly-married couple took up residence in Clinton, 
Ont., where Mr. Ball imparts knowledge in the Modern Lan- 
guages to the students of the Collegiate Institute. 

Auger — Smith — Our good lecturer, Mr. Auger, B.A., '02, 
now that his peregrinations are over, could not settle down 
alone. Early last month he was married to Miss Lillias 
Pearl Smith, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Smith, of Cowan 
Avenue. Rev. Professor A. H. Reynar performed the cere- 
mony. Miss Lola Smith, a sister of the bride, acted as brides- 
maid, while Mr. D. Armour, of Chicago, was groomsman. 

The marriage took place in Dunn Avenue Methodist Church, 
and both the church and the home of the bride's parents, where 
a reception was held afterwards, were decorated in crimson and 
gold, Victoria's colors. Later, Mr. and Mrs. Auger left by 
boat for a trip down through Montreal and Quebec. 

Ford — Scott — At the Methodist parsonage in Vesta, 
Minn., on September 9th, Miss May Scott was married to 
Arthur R. Ford, B.A., '03, of the staff of the Winnipeg Tele- 
gram. 

Allin" — Johns — A pretty wedding took place at the home 
of Mr. E. A. Banbury, Wolseley, Sask., on September 3, when 
his cousin. Rev. A. E. Allan, was married to Miss C. M. Johns, 
of Clinton, Ont. Rev. G. H. Bennell tied the happy knot. 
After a few days, Mr. and Mrs. Allin left for Lloydminster, 
where Mr. Allin has charge of a pastorate. 

Elson" — Hockey — A pleasant event took place on August 
6, at Silverbank, near Tillsonburg, the summer home of Rev. 
J. E. Hockey, pastor of Dunnville Methodist Church, and 
Chairman of the Welland District, when his eldest daughter, 
Evelyn A., was united in marriage to Rev. Albert J. Elson, 
B.A., B.D., pastor of Paisley Memorial Church, Guelph. The 
bride's father, assisted by Rev. S. W. Holden, of Cape Town, 
performed the ceremony. H. W. Avison, '09, posed as grooms- 



MARRIAGES. 53 

man, and Miss Muriel Hockey, '10, sister of the bride, was 
bridesmaid. Mr. and Mrs. Elson spent a couple of weeks in 
Muskoka, before going to Guelph. 

Tribble — Hill — At '^ Inglenook," Shelboume, Ont., the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. John Palmer, Miss Ermina E. Hill, their 
granddaughter, was united in marriage to Mr. J. ^N'orman 
Tribble, B.A., 'OY, of the Auditor-General's Department, 
Ottawa. Rev. B. R. Strangways performed the ceremony, 
while Miss Edna Hill, sister of the bride, was bridesmaid, and 
the office of groomsman was occupied by Mr. S. Beatty, M.A., 
of Newark, l^.J. After a wedding breakfast the happy couple 
left for Toronto and Rochester and a few other places before 
returning to their new home at 149 Eourth Avenue, Ottawa. 

Pearson — Colling — " Rugby Bob, '04,'' having safely 
concluded his college course without having been wounded by 
Cupid's arrow, returned to Victoria College in 1906-7 for a 
post-graduate course in Theology. But Cupid aimed at him this 
time, and his work was fatal. Mr. Pearson is to be congratu- 
lated on his success in carrying off one of Vic's fairest xm.der- 
graduates, Miss Beulah Colling, '09. 

At Drayton, Wednesday, September 16th, the marriage of 
Rev. Robert Pearson and Miss Beulah Colling, daughter of 
the Rev. and Mrs. Thomas Colling, was solemnized. Rev. 
Thomas Colling performed the ceremony, and the bride's uncle, 
Rev. Joseph Colling, gave her away. , 

Rev. Robert Pearson continues his work as assistant pastor 
with Mr. Kirby, First Methodist Church, Calgary, whither the 
bride and groom journey presently. Acta and their many 
friends at Toronto XTniversity join in wishing them happiness 
and success. 

Galloway — ^McKiis^non — At Singhampton, Ont., Rev. W. 
E. Galloway, B.A., '06, rounded out more fully his happy life 
when he married Isabella Mary, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
]Nreil McKinnon. We feel now that Rev. Mr. Galloway will 
be able to do more efficient work in Sedgewick, Alta., where 
he is now located as parson. 

HiLEs — Veale — Another member of the class of '07 has 
manifested his superior wisdom by joining the sacred order 
of the benedicts. Rev. William L. Hiles, B.A., '07, will be 
accompanied to his new circuit, Bayfield, by a fair and highly- 



54 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

accomplished daughter of the parsonage. At high noon, June 
18, he was married to Mary Isabelle, daughter of Eev. John 
Veale, of Kirkton. The bride's father performed the cere- 
mony. 

Brooks — Sherson — Who would have dreamed that Rev. 
p. G. Brooks was not immune to the swift darts of wary little 
Cupid ? Perhaps he did not know himself, but anyway he took 
unto himself a wife at the Methodist Mission House, White 
Whale Lake, when he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Sherson, of Proton Station, Ont., by the Rev. W. E. S. James, 
M.A., B.D. Mr. and Mrs. Brooks take up the work on one of 
the difficult mission fields. Their address is Mewassin, Alta. 

Oliver — Book — Last Easter, at St. Annes, George Oliver, 
one of 'lO's superannuated members, set a lofty example to 
all followers in getting married. Miss Ona Book was the for- 
tunate bride. At present George is very busy teaching the 
rising generation in Grimsby Park school house. 

Albertson — Weafer — A marriage was celebrated on Sat- 
urday, Sept. 5, at the home of Mrs. John Weafer, in Hamil- 
ton, between her daughter, Georgia, and the Rev. Wilford B. 
Albertson, missionary to West China. Miss Fern Wood, of 
Orillia, was ^bridesmaid. Mr. Clinton J. Ford acted as best 
man, and the Rev. Dr. I. Tovell performed the ceremony. 

QuiRMBACH — Harris — A quiet wedding took place at Cran- 
field House, Pape Avenue, the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Harris, on September 1, when their daughter, Caroline 
Winnifred, was married to the Rev. Albert Quirmbach. The 
Rev. F. W. Fallis, of Woodgreen Tabernacle, performed the 
eeremony, assisted by the Rev. S. E. Marshall, of Berlin. The 
bride was attended by her sister, Margaret, Miss Elizabeth 
Quirmbach, sister of the groom, and three small nieces, Caroline 
Fluery, Leone Harris and Ruth Harris, (while Mr. Paul Brecken 
was groomsman. Mr. and Mrs. Quirmbach left for China, 
where she and her husband will work under the Methodist Mis- 
sionary .Society. 

Moore — Morris — Teddy Moore, 'OY, has also joined the 
happy throng of benedicts, keeping to the letter the promise 
he made during the last year or so of his college life. The story 
of the event was told in one of the Stratford dailies, early in 
the summer, as follows: "On Thursday, Jime 18th, at the 



DEATHS. 55 

home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Morris, Avon- 
dale Avenue, their daughter, Clara Winniford, was joined in 
wedlock to Edward James Moore, editor of the Cdnadian 
Grocer, Toronto. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Geo. 
F. Solton, pastor Central Methodist Church, in the presence 
of only the immediate relatives. After a brief honeymoon trip, 
Mr. and Mrs. Moore will reside in Toronto." 



Deaths 

We all join in deeply sympathizing with Miss E. L. Hildred, 
B.A., '08, upon the death of her sister, on April 7th last, in 
Woodstock, Ont. 

Rev. David Wren, B.A., '07, has also our heartfelt sympathy 
in his sore bereavement. Ilis father, Mr. George Wren, an 
esteemed resident and loyal Methodist, of Hensall, was called 
home, August 29. 

The classmates and other personal friends of Mr. A. G. 
Stacey, M.A., will sincerely mourn the death of one of their 
most brilliant members. He graduated in 1902, with the high- 
est standing in that year. He immediately entered the Civil 
Service at Ottawa, in the Surveyor-General's department. After 
securing his D.L.S. certificate he was sent to Athabasca, where 
he remained two years. In the spring of this year he took a 
contract to survey twenty-four townships in Alberta. In June, 
however, he was taken sick with typhoid fever, which carried 
him off on June 4th. 

On September 1st the Rev. F. W. Thompson, B.A., crossed 
the bar. His death comes as a special loss to his wife and five 
children. The Hamilton Conference also, no doubt, will sadly 
miss such a promising young minister. He graduated in Arts 
and Theology from Victoria, in 1900, and has had charge of 
pastorates in Kenilworth, Perth, Bright, and Brantford, and 
was located in College Avenue Methodist Church, Woodstock, 
when he had to give up his work last March because of tuber- 
cular trouble. The funeral was held from his father's home at 
Ashgrove, where he passed away. 

We also wish to express our sincerest sympathy for Mr. L. L. 
Lawrence, B.A., '07, upon the death of his mother, the ^wife 
of Rev. John Lawrence, at Walpole Island, on August 22nd, 
last. 




Value of Athletics 



COLLEGE spirit rests to a great extent upon athletics, and 
through it finds its most spontaneous expression. And 
as the freshman stage in the development of the college 
mind is the most favorable for the inculcation of this very 
inspiring spirit, it is therefore particularly incumbent upon 
every freshman who aspires to be a unit in the college whole 
to turn out regularly upon the campus and participate enthusi- 
astically in the various sports. Of course,, the students of graver 
years have acquired, some little wisdom in their previous college 
life, and should require no admonition along this line. 

We owe it to ourselves to keep our bodies in the finest pos- 
sible condition, and college atheltics can work wonders for us 
here. But more, a hearty interest in athletics lends a zest to 
our studies that can be derived nowhere else, and which the 
best of us cannot aiford to be without. It is, as it were, the 
leaven of the whole lump of college life. 

^ ^£ ^^ 

We join heartily in congratulating E. G. Saunders, B.A., 
'08, on being chosen captain of the University lacrosse team. In 
the brilliant successes which have been won in previous years 
for the Blue and White, Eddie has ever been a prominent figure, 
and we confidently expect from his leadership during the year* 
another series of victories. We look on his election to this 
position with the more satisfaction, because, aside from his 
excellent record as a player, he has always stood for fair, clean, 
and honorable sport, and we have no doubt that the high reputa- 
tion of the University in athletics will be well upheld by him. 
Besides holding a strong place in all college sports, especially 
Association football, Eddie has taken a high stand in both Vic- 
toria and 'Varsity tennis. During the coming year Acta wishes 



ATHLETICS. 57 

the popular captain both victory in the field and success in man- 
agement. 

.^!^ .^. ^^ 

Vic's hope of winning the Mulock Cup promises to be ful- 
filled this year. The rugby players have already had some 
good practices, and the men are rapidly getting into shape. 
There are some valuable and experienced players among the 
Freshmen, who will greatly strenghten the team. In past years 
lack of team work has seriously handicapped Vic, and this fall, 
in view of this fact, a second team has been organized, which 
should give the first team some hard practice. A few practice 
games with other teams before the commencement of the regular 
series would undoubtedly aid in fitting the team for the more 
strenuous games to follow. 

^^ ^ ^^ 

Captain Vance is very enthusiastic over the prospects in 
Association football. There are several very promising candi- 
dates among the freshmen, and the team this year will be as 
strong, if not stronger, as ever before. But, as in other sports, 
practice is of infinite importance, and the men who are regu- 
larly at the practices are the only ones who can reasonably ex- 
pect to make good. The one team which Vic. will enter should 
retain the laurels gained last year by again bringing the cham- 
pionship to Victoria. 

^^ ^^ ^^ 

The interest which has been taken in tennis this fall, is proof 
of the popularity of that game at Vic. In previous years, the 
old courts have been found inadequate for the large number 
of players, a difiiculty which will be obviated to a great extent 
by the addition of the two new courts. The entries for the 
tennis tournament far exceed those of former years. G. Adams, 
the secretary of the club, has been very zealous in preparing 
the schedule, and in compelling all the players to run off the 
games as scheduled. There is also a decided impetus given to 
tennis by the gift of an inter-year tennis cup from C. F. Ward, 
'05. The aim of the inter-year competition is the creation of a 
strong college team to play University, Knox, and other col- 



58 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

leges. The regulations which have been suggested by the 
donor are as follows: 

I. Each year to have a team of four men (4 singles, 2 
doubles). 

II. Matches (1st year vs. 2nd year; 3rd year vs. 4th year, 
and winners vs. winners) to be played before October 31st. 

III. A match to be arranged, if possible, between Victoria 
and University College (6 men team) ; the team to be chosen 
from players showing good form in the inter-year competition ; 
a team committee to consist of (1) a member of the Faculty, 
(2) a graduate, (3) President of the Athletic Union, (4) Presi- 
dent of the Tennis Club, (5) Tennis rep. on Athletic Union 

Executive. 

^^ <^ <^ 

To alley enthusiasts the new alley board will be a welcome 
sight. For the last few years the old board has been in such 
a dilapidated condition that it was an impossibility to have a 
good game of alley. The increased size of the board also pro- 
vides room for two additional players, which will materially 
aid in overcoming the lack of accommodation which formerly 
was such a handicap. That Vic. has not had a winning team, 
has been attributed to the poor condition of the board, a reason 
A\hich no longer is a valid one. 

^4^ .:^^ .^^^ 

There were several entries in the recent tennis tournament 
at 'Varsity from Vic, most of whom acquitted themselves very 
creditably. Among those entered were Miss McLaren, Miss 
Spencer, Miss Dento,n, Miss Horning, Miss Graham and Messrs. 
McKenzie, Saunders, Hetherington, Willans, McCullough and 
Horning. Miss McLaren was very unfortunate in having to play 
the first game in the open event with Miss Lois Moyes, but she 
was more successful in the Lady Undergraduate series. 
McKenzie was defeated in the semi-finals of the open, while 
the rest were very successful. 

<^ ^^ ^^ 

Eeg. Gundy, '11, and Jack Birnie, '11, have been elected 
captains of the rugby and hockey teams respectively. 




The 36th Bob 

" Oh wad some power the giftie gie us 
^' To see oursil' as ithers see us, 
" 'T'wad frae mony a blunder free us, 
" And foolish notion." 

ON the evening of Friday, October 16th, Victoria's unique 
function, the '' Bob," was presented for the thirty-sixth 
time. If any criticism were to be offered regarding 
the entertainment as a whole, it would be in reference to the 

seeming spirit of levity 
which crept into the 
treatment of subjects 
which the general mind 
views more seriously. Of 
course the difficulty of 
bobbing theological stu- 
dents must be, borne in 
mind. But apart from 
this, the sharpness of 
wit, and, in some cases, 
the keenness of percep- 
tion shown in the por- 
trayal of the individual 
characters, could not fail 
to elicit the praise and 
admiration of a highly- 
appreciative audience. 

The Chairman, Rev. 

G. S. Faircloth, B.A., 

B.D., opened with a few 

pithy remarks. 

J. Beaton^ President, In the first scene, 




60 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



" Quo Vadis/' prospective Freshmen presented their qualifi- 
cations before a tribunal of justice^ incidentally answering sun- 
dry charges of past misconduct, and in some cases outlining 
their brilliant future career. 

The second scene, '' Les Miserables," the Freshmen class- 
meeting, though not original, was exceedingly iwell executed. 
The scene had a peculiar interest for the Freshmen, who saw 
in it a faithful reproduction of their first ^^meeting. 

The conventional fac- 
ulty scene introduced 
some new elements. The 
initiation of Prof. De- 
Witt, with the energetic 
assistance of a real live 
goat, was interesting not 
only from the standpoint 
of the goat and the pro- 
fessor, but from the 
audience as well. The 
canonization of the re- 
tiring Professors, Drs. 
Bain, Burwash, and 
Keynar, as St. Nicotine, 
St.' John and St. Mor- 
pheus, respectively, was 
another interesting feat- 
ure. 

The Restaurant scene 
afforded ample oppor- 
tunity for the character- 
istic Irish maid to dis- 
play her native wit ; and 
many good hits were worked off on the Freshmen attracted 
thither by the elaborate .menu. The close of the scene where 
the Freshmen President talked not only the individuals, but 
also the chajirs out of the room, was a dramatic climax to a 
good scene. 

The Freshettes, who hitherto had been merely onlookers, 
now began to " sit up and take notice," and blushed their 




B. H. Robinson, Secretary, 



LOCALS. 



61 



blushiest as the audience (through the medium of the Bob song) 
were taken into the confidence of their most cherished secrets. 
The song, which was sung in three sections, was the joint com- 
position of C. M. Wright, B.A., E. E. S. Taylor, and B. H. 
Robinson, '11. The choruses, by the Bob Committee, were 
bright and catchy, and the three divisions of the song pre- 
vented its being tedious. 

A new feature of the entertainment was the lantern-slides, 

snapshots of representa- 
tive Freshmen in their 
characteristic moods. 

The last scene, 
" Love's Labor Lost," 
was undoubtedly the 
strongest. Purgatorial 
regions were represented 
in a most realistic style, 
and the punishments 
meted out to the vari- 
ous offenders, were well 
adapted to their several 
necessities. Van Wyck as 
Mephisto, and Pike as 
second in command, did 
excellent work in giving 
unity and brightness to 
the scene. 

The programme was 
brought to a close with 
the presentation to Rob- 
ert, who made a short 
reply in his usual genial 
manner. 

At the close of the programme, a reception was tendered 
by the Sophomores to the newly-fledged undergraduates of the 
first year, in Alumni Hall, where a pleasant half -hour was spent 
in eradicating any unpleasant thoughts that might have been 
engendered by the previous entertainment. 




E. J. Peatt^ Treasurer. 



62 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The committee consisted of: President, K. J. Beaton; Sec- 
retary, B. H. Eobinson; Treasurer, E. J. Pratt; H. B. Van- 
Wyck, Reg. Gnndy, F. E. Hetherington, W. A. Deacon, Jack 
Birnie, C. S. Applegath, H. Purchase, Doug. Leach, W. Wilder, 
F. N. Stapleford, J. B. Hunter. 

Pointed Paragraphs Picked <jp at the Bob. 

Guy Bagnall — " I'm an officer in His Majesty's mounted 
infancy." 

Fleming (at restaurant) — ^^ Can I pay in car-tickets? I 
can get them easier than money.'' 

Ecclestone to Mephisto — ''I come from Hamilton. Do you 
know Hamilton?" 

Mephisto — ^^ Oh, yes, I spend most of my time there." 

Robert (speaking of his Western trip) — " I travelled 
through rocks and hills, and hon and hon and hon." 

Freshman — ^' Have you heard my father sing ?" 

Mephisto — " 'Not yet." 
Robert — " When I was at Winnipeg I was taken for Dr. 
Crummy. I think that is why he has a call to that city." 

Mephisto (referring to ^'Merry, Widow" hats) — '^ The idea 
of Freshmen criticising the very best production I ever sent 
out of here." 

Pictures O'n History^s Wall. 

(With due apologies.) 
First Year. 

'' HE." 

He was long and he was gawky, 

And with work his face was chalky, — 
William Greenback was the way he signed his name. 

He had prizes, he had medals, 

And the way he worked the pedals 
Of his brain, would surely lead to fame. 

With a steady chug-a-chug 

He had settled down to plug, 
For from High School triumphs darling Willie came. 



LOCALS. 



63 



" SHE." 

She was sweet and she was pretty, 
And the Freshettes called her Kitty, 

For deep books she didn't just exactly care. 
Of course she came for education, 
At least, — so read her registration: 

[That was so, her mother wouldn't get a scare.] 
Her eyes had no need of college, 
For there lurked a deeper knowledge, — 

Deep blue eyes ere this have proved a dang'rous snare. 



Fourth Yeab. 



HE." 



Willie has no chalk complexion, 
He is seized by an infection. 
And I believe by a dissection 
You could never find his heart. 

'^ SHE." 

Kitty, now sedately pretty. 
Enjoys drives about the city. 
^' Willie is so very witty," 
[Tells her confidantes at Ann'sley Hall]. 

Ad Infinitum — 

In deep-cut characters upon the Arch we read: 

'' The Truth shall make you free." 
But ah! of late it seems to me we need 
'New words for Freshies' eyes to see. 



For if upon the sands of time, they trace 
The footprints that before them be. 

That old stone arch should wear upon its face — 
" The Truth is that you wont be free." 



Clare.' 



64 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

M — J — r, '09, (two weeks before college opens) : ''I was 
the first man at the Hall this term." 

1st Freshman — '^ What course are you going to take ?" 
2nd Freshman — " Arts." 

1st Freshman — '^ I hear that's a good course, I believe I'll 
try it myself." 

The following notice, received at the Universiity Y.M.C.A., 
may prove. to be of value to some Freshman wishing to secure 
a room: 

" House middling clean, all daughters in good positions 
down town." 

Ask Mr. Edmison, '09, about the time he undertook to 
take a young lady out canoeing, and as he was , about to step 
into the frail barque, changed his mind, and instead, gracefully 
slid into the deep. 

One of our graduates of '08, upon being asked what she 
was expecting to do, replied, ^' Oh, I am going to be a confec- 
tioner's blacksmith." Her explanation was that she intended 
spending her summer ^' shooing flies." 

The Y.W.C.A. held their first meeting on Monday, October 
6th, at 5 p.m., an the Ladies' Study. As it was the opening 
meeting for the year, addresses of welcome Avere given by Miss 
Hill, '09, Miss Brewster, '10, and Miss Shorey, '11, to convey 
the greetings of their respective years to the students of 1912. 
Miss Findley very appropriately replied on behalf of '12. At 
the close of the literary part, fruit and candy was served, and 
a very enjoyable social half -hour spent. 

A. L. Smith, '11, while supplying for the pastor in the 

tovni of S , was obliged one evening to drive a few miles 

into the country. On the way, he heard a chug-chug behind 
him, and not knowing what his spirited livery horse might do 
when the automobile passed, he jumped out and held it by the 
head. After a patient wait of five minutes and still no auto, 
he turned for advice to his companion, a small boy of twelve. 

" Ah, jump in, it's only an old bull-frog," was all the satis- 
faction he received. 



LOCALS. 



65 



Teddy Moore, '07, (on the tennis court) — ^' Miss Whitlam's 
playing a rattling good game of tennis this year, but it's awfnlly 
mussy." 

B — ^^sh — d, C. T., (relating his trip to S. African War) — 
" I'm not sure, but I think our ship made about 310 knots 
an hour." 

H — -nt — r, '11, (registering) — " Halloa, Doc, glad to see 
you." 

Sophette — '' I was down at Eaton's to-day, and had a per- 
fectly delightful time." 

Junior — ^^ What were you doing there?" 
Sophette — " I was in the children's play-room." 
Junior — " Oh, renewing your freshette days ?" 

The following was overheard in one of the city churches : 
1st Sophette — " There is Pat Miller, back again." 
2nd Sophette (greatly excited) — '^ Where ? Oh, yes, I see 
his ears." 

Miss A — i — d, '10 — " I think the freshmen are the most 
innocent looking bunch this year, they look as if they had just 
kissed manuna and come away." 

Scene: — On a boat en route for Winnipeg. Albright, '08, 
(after securing two of the largest berths that were available) — 
" Well, Jack, this is not so bad, after all." 

Brownlee, '08 — '^ Yes, but I'm too darned long." 

Miss St — 1 — ^y, '10 — " All summer long I only saw two 
college people I knew, and for some strange reason, I didn't 
inhale them.'' 

It is a well-known fact that Miss B. used to object very 
much to any fond endearments, consequently, when she, of her 
own accord, greeted a lady of '09 with a hearty kiss, there was 
an exclamation, of surprise. " Ah," said Miss B., '^ You see what 
a summer will do for you." 

Wilder, '11, (pulling out Y.M.C.A. hand-book)— " Gee, 
I think I'll just look up here and see where I do live." 
5 



66 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Miss Mch — 1, '12. — ^' It is so nice being a freshie, because 
everybody is so ready to wait on you." 

Prof. R — y — r, in II. year Eng. — '^ Mr. Auger has typhoid 
fever." 

Miss Sh — r — y, '11 — " What ! Mr. Auger has typhoid fever t 
Well, marrying does not agree with him." 

W — h — g — n, '10 — '^ What were you doing this summer?" 

B 1, '10. — ^^ Well, I put in two weeks' hard work in 

our dining-room." 

Miss G — y — n, '10 — '^ I had my photo taken this summer, 
and it turned out double. It was good, too, there wasn't a flaw 
in it. If I had sent it to the Strand they would have given me 
a dollar for it." 

Miss Gh 1, '10 — ^^ W^hat would they give you the dollar 

for?" 

Miss G — y — n, '10 — ^' Oh, .they always do for freaks like 
that." 

O — k — y, '09, (on street car, to boy raising disturbance be- 
hind) — ^^ Say, you, look out kid, or I'll take you across my 
k:n^e." 

Boy — " Oh, you want to grow some whiskers first." 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



67 



C. E. GOODMAN 

270 YONGE ST. 

Phone Main 2018 



The place where you should buy your 
Furnishingrs. Everything new in Neck- 
w^ear and Shirts, and a full stock of 
Gloves, Hosiery and Underwear. 

^ Full Dress Requisites. ^ 

•^ Ribbons and Pennants. «^ 



Every Student 



Some time or other wants to buy Jewelery of some kind, or 
perhaps it is some repairs to watch or jewelery. Whichever 
it is, we are in a position to give the best satisfaction at the 
lowest possible cost. We are always pleased to have you call 
and look over our stock, and to quote you prices. 



AfulMineof L E. 
Waterman's Ideal 
Fountain Pens 
and Ink always 
in stock. 



W. W. MUNN 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN 

800 YONGR ST. 

1st Door North of Bloor Street 



An expert Opti- 
cian is in charge 
of our Optical 
Department. 



Students' Headquarters 

COLLEGE BOOKS 

NEW and SECOND HAND 



VANNEVAR & CO. 

438 YONGE STREET TORONTO 



THE OLDEST FIRM 

with THE LARGEST STOCK 

at THE LOWEST PRICES 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen. 
National Separate - Leaf Note Book 



G. A Lester 



l)amr and 
furnisber* 

622 Yonge St. 

Near St. Joseph 



464 SPi\DINA AVKfiJJK 

THE SHOP FOR 

Good Hair Cutting 
E. M. Kennedy (Si Co. 



Barbers 



6 Chairs 



6 Chairs 



For Fine Stationery 

Magazines, Souvenirs, Post Cards, Water- 
man's Fountain Pens and Fountain Pen Ink 
go to 

J. Willis' Bookstore 
Phone North -j-jQ Yongc Strcct 



08 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



COR. BLOOR AND YONGE 



PHONE N. 3535 



NortHern Wardrobe 

See our special contracts for Students' Cleaning and Pressing and doing 

all minor repairs. Also a full line of Men's Furnishings. 

Proprietor - - - - W. R. A.DA.MS 



WE WANT YOUR 
ORDER FOR FALL 

We know we can please you if 
you will give us a Trial Order, 
ur Goods are Up-tO'date in 
attern and Quality. We aim 
only at Good Workmanship. 
Prices Moderate. 

See our nobby school suits 
at $18.00 and $20.00. 

DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS 

BERKINSHAW & GAIN 

348 Yoiige Street 

You call us ! We do the rest. 

Toronto Shoe Repairing Co. 

Shoe Repairing, Cleats, etc., called 
for and delivered promptly. 

8-10 Cumberland St., Toronto 

Phone N. 5466 SKATES GROUND 




Ne-wrest Stales 
Lrar^e StocK 
of Ne'iv Goods 



PHone 

NortH 

3371 



MJiCEY 

TAILOR 

777 YONGE: street 
OAe blocK nortH of Bloor Street 

T. BRAKE 

Fine Boots and Shoes 

REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 

BOOTS MADE TO ORDER 

562 Yonge St., Toronto 



Cut Flowers 

Floral emblems of every description 
are most carefully executed by 




Q6 YONGE STREET 

Our Prices are Reasonable. Our Execution Perfect 

Phones Main 1424 and 4790 
Night and Sunday, Phone Park 792 

Park Bros. 

iTLur Pbotograpbers 

Specialty 323 Yonge Street 

Telephone Main 1269 r--»T-^TORONTO 

• FECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 

The L. S. Haynes Press 

Printers 
502 Yonge Street 



Phone North 3912 



College Work a Specialty 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF 
COMMERCE 



Capital Paid-up, 



$10,000,000 



Savings Bank Deposits received from $1.00 up 

BLOOR & YONGE BRANCH 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



CATERING 

For Banquets, Weddings, Parties, Social Teas, 

etc., a specialty. ( First-class service 

guaranteed. Estimates given.) 

ROBT. J. LLOYD & Company 
744-748 Yonge Street Toronto 

Phones North 3036, North 127 



Ellis Bros. 

JEWELERS 

I08 Yonge Street, TORONTO 

Rock bottom prices for 
year and "frat" pins. 

Finest Workmanship 

Original Designs 



0. HAWLEY WALKER 

nn)evcbant bailor 

126 YONGE STREET 
Phone Main 4544 TORONTO 

as^zw'e 3furni3bln00 




(Mim 



TOkO^^' 



Skates 

and 

Hockey 



Supplies 



SAMUEL YOUNG 

CARPENTER, BUILDER 
AND CONTRACTOR 

Cosmopolitan Carpenter Shop, 

4i HAZELTON AVENUE, TORONTO 

Orders Promptly Executed 



J. W.Johnson 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 
272 Yonge St. - Phone : M, 565 



Waterman's Ideal Fountain 
Pens, $2.50. 



WATCHES PROPERLY REPAIRED 



Phone, North 242-243 

M. RAWLINSON 

Cartage Agent and Warehouseman 

Offices: 612 YONGE SThEET 

FRONT ST., Four Doors East of Union Station 

Storage Warehouses : St. Joseph and Yonge Sts. 

Improved Vans and Trucks for Removing Furniture 

and Pianos, Storage for Furniture, Baggage transferred 

TORONTO, CANADA 

High-class Tailorins at Close Cash Prices 

S. CORRIGAN 

The Leading Tailor 

175 Yonge Street 

Three Doors North of Queen 
Established 38 years 

Special quotations to all Students 



P 



ROGRAMMES, 

PROFESSIONAL and 

CALLING CARDS, 

MENU LISTS 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS 



rrXllM 1 ILU of Typography. 



William Briggs, 

Wesley Buildings, 
TORONTO. ONT. 



70 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



CLASS 

PINS and 

Stationery 



Our factory on the premises enables 
us to quote exceptionally close prices on 
the above. Special designs on request. 

Our new Jewelry Catalog is ready 
for delivery. It is sent free on 
request. 



AMBROSE KENT 

& SONS, LIMITED 
156 YONGE ST. TORONTO 



ESTABLISHED 1868 



The Dining Hall 



556 YONGE STREET 



PHONE: 
North 4772. 



T. J. HEALEY, 

Proprietor. 



UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 

We purpose making this 

the students' diaing hall. 

We pride ourselves on 

cleanliness and good 

service- 

Separate tables for ladies. 

20 Balmuto Street, Toronto 



FOR CHOICE, PURE 

Confectionery 



•TRY- 



Mother's Candy Kitchen 
732K YONGE ST. near czar si. 



Hall's Dining Hall 

606 YONGE STREET 

The Students* Restaurant 

Rates $2.25 per week 



Phone North 3296. 



David Bell, fi 



702 and 704 YONGE 

Cor. St. Mary St. 



Choice Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery and Groceries. 



OUR GOODS ARE ALWAYS FRESH. 



Phone North 904 

Richard G. Kirby 



Carpenter and 537-539 YOHge St. 

Contractor for 

General Building XOR.ONTO 

and Jobbing 



DUNCAN BROS. 

ARTISTIC PICTURE 
FRAMING 

Special attention given to 
the Framing of COLLEGE 
GROUPS at Reasonable 
Rates 

434 Yonge St., TORONTO 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



71 



THE LEADING 

Ipreecription pbarmaci? 

OF THE NORTH END 

Discount to Students. Accuracy, Purity 
of ingredients, prompt delivery. 

WM. H. COX, 786 Yonge St., Toronto 



STOP! 



W.C. SENIOR 
& BRO. 

Tailors 

and 

Gown Makers 

717 
Yongc St. 
Toronto 



Do you realize that without our adver- 
tising we ::ould not publish two numbers 
of ACTA and that by not mentioning that 
yours is Victoria trade you are injuring your 
Alma Mater, the College paper, and thereby 
yourself? Let our advertisers know that 
they are getting our trade :: :: :: 



Our shop is 
up-to-date and 
we use you right 



Razors Honed 



T. A. FELSTEAD 

4 CHAIR BARBER SHOP 4 
760 YONGE STREET 



Electric 
Face Massage 
Head Rub I 



Shoe Shine 



72 ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Uictoria College 



QUEEN'S PARK. TORONTO. 



In Federation with the University of Toronto. 



The Federation System enables Victoria to offer the fol- 
lowing advantages : 

1. A compact college life in a commodious and beautiful 
modern building, provided with all the latest conveniences 
for healthful work. 

2. A large staff of College Professors, composed of men 
with thorough European training and ripe experience as 
teachers, and of earnest Christian character. 

3. Admission to all the lectures and laboratories of the 
University Staff of eighty-eight professors and lecturers, who, 
together with the fifty-eight professors and lecturers of the 
federated colleges, constitute the largest faculty of Arts in 
the Dominion, and one of the most efficient on the Continent. 
All University examinations, prizes, scholarships, honors and 
degrees are open to our students on equal terms with those 
of any other college. A large number of prizes, honors and 
scholarships are also offered to our students in our own 
College. 

4. Two commodious residences for women students afford 
every modern advantage for health and comfort and a refined 
social life. A course of physical training is also given under 
an accomplished directress and a women's gymnasium forms 
part of the new residences. 

5. Excellent facilities are afforded both in the University 
and College for post-graduates reading for the degree of 
Ph.D., and also a full course in the Faculty of Theology. 

Lectures in both faculties begin October 1st. 

N. BVR.'WASH, S.T.D., LL.D., 

President. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



73 




nMTADIQ AND ONTARIO CONSERVATORY OF 
I MUSIC AND ART, WHITBY, ONT. 

LA U I CO Ideal home litem a beautiful castle, 

QQI I [QC modelled after one of the palatial 
homes of English aristocracy. 
The latest and best equipment in every department, 
backed up bj' the largest and strongest staff of special- 
ists to be found in any similar college in Canada. 
Sufficiently near the city to enjoy its advantages in 
concerts, etc., and yet away from its distraction^, in an 
atmosphere and environment most conducive to men- 
tal, moral and physical stamina. Send for new illus- 
trated calendar to 
REV. J. J. HARE, Ph.D., Principal. 



Alma College 

Rev. Robert I. Warner, M.A., D.D., Principal 
Mrs. Jean Wylie Grey, - Lady-Principal 
Miss Alice F. Henwood, B.A., Acting Dean 



SENIOR SCHOOL makes efficient provision for studies for 
University Matriculation, University Curricula in Music, 
Teachers' Non-Professional Examinations, and for Alma 
College Diplomas in Liberal Arts ( M.L. A. and M.E.L.) ; 
Music (A. A. CM. for Pianoforte, Singing, Organ, Vio- 
lin ) ; Fine Art ; Elocution and Physical Culture ; Com- 
mercial Science ; Domestic Science. 

JUNIOR SCHOOL provides attractive school home, iu 
separate apartments, for girls under thirteen, and also 
prepares pupils for the High School entrance examinations. 
HEALTHY LOCALITY, Six Acre Campus, Superior 
Buildings, Competent Teachers, Successful Record. 
For Catalogue, address 

PRINCIPAL WARNER, 

Alma College, ST. THOMAS, ONT. 



Upper Canada College, Toronto 

H. W. AUDEN, M.A. (Cambridge), Principal. 

Regular Staff comprises 15 Graduates of English and Canadian Universities, with additional 
special instructors. Courses for University, Royal Military College and Business. Senior and 
Preparatory Schools in separate buildings. Every modern equipment. Fifty acres of ground 
in healthiest district. Four rinks, gymnasium, swimming bath, etc. 




ANNESLEY HALL "^:,T^r^^cXr 

RK-OPENS OCT. 1, 1908 

A beautiful Christian home is oflfered in the Hall to women students attending 
Victoria College, and special opportunities are given for their physical development by 
daily instruction in the gymnasium, by tennis and other out-of-door sports. Students not 
taking the full .\rts course in the College are admitted as far as room permits. For 
further information write to the 

DEAN OF RESIDENCE, Annesley Hall, Queen's Park, Toronto. 



74 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Cbe University of Coromo 



and 



(Intversity College 



FACULTIES OF ... 



Arts 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Household Science 

Education 

Forestry 



For information, apply to the Registrar of the University, 
or to the Secretaries of the respective Faculties. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



75 



ESTABLISHED l873 

The Most Convenient Bank for Victoria College 

THE STANDARD BANK OF CANADA 

At Yonge and Charles Streets 



Cheques on any Bank 
may be cashed here 



E. L. WILLIAMS. 



Manager. 





.^.<>..— p|.|ONE NORTH 698 


Dr. J. Frank Adams 

DENTIST 

Telephone College 243 
325 College Street. TORONTO 


Dr. S. L. Frawley 

DENTIST 

ITpiilafeilMr'' 2\ BloOf St. Wcst 




DR. FRED. N.BADGLEY 

Bentist 

110 AVENUE ROAD 
(Opposite St. Paul's Church) TORONTO 

Phone North 3514 


Phone North 354 Contract work a Specialty 

r. OLVER. 

TAILOR, 

707 Yonge Street, Toronto 

Ladies' and Gents* Clothing Cleaned, 
Pressed, Altered, and Repaired 




...BURN... 

McQll's Coal 

Qjr. Bathurst St. and Farley Ave. 
Phone Park 393. 


Alfrco W. Briqos. Harold R. Frost. 

BRIGGS & FROST 

BARRISTERS. ETC- 

TORONTO 

Wesley Buildings, 33 Richmond St. West 
Toronto 










MASTEN, STARR & SPENCE 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Canada Lifb Building 

Toronto 

solicitors for bank of nova SCOTIA 

C. A. Hasten, K.C, J. R. L. Starr 
J. H. Spencb 


GEO. A. EVANS, Phm.B. 

DISPENSING CHEMIST 

832 Yonge St. Toronto 

Liberal Discount to Students 

Telephones North 38 and North 3720. 
Telephone Orders a Specialty 




E.B. Ryckman, M.A., LL.B. K.C. 

Chas. W. Kerr, B. A. C. S. Maclnnes, B.A., K,C. 

Christopher C. Robinson, B.A. 

RYCKMAN, KERR & MaclNNES 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, etc. 
Canada Life Building, 46 King St. West, Toronto. 

Cobalt: 

RYOKMAN KERR, MacINNES & MAHON 


DYEING & CLEANING 
FOR MEN €) WOMEN 

We completely meet the needs of men and 
women in dyeing and cleaning articles of per- 
sonal wear. Phone head office or any branch. 

R. par.ke:r (XL CO. 

787-791 Yonge Street Toronto, Canada 
Branches in aU Leading Shoppins Centres 



76 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 









1856 1908 

• • • 1 nc • • • 

Union Literary 
Society 




CHAS. POTTER 

85 YONGE STREET 


C. B. PETRY, PROPRIETOR 


Getting Every Fraction of 
Value from One's Eyesight 


MAN'S GREATEST ASSET 

It's not enough that your eye- 
sight — the faculty of vision — is 
' ' pretty good. " 

Imperfect seeing is due to im- 
perfect testing — a failing at one 
or more points in the diagnosis. 

Testing eyes and furnishing 
glasses to conform with a com- 
plete and perfect testing is the 
distinctive business of this house. 

Why not be sure — not sorry — by 
a call on Potter ? 


AIMS : 

1. To promote student fellowship. 

2. To deal with questions of gen- 

eral interest to the student 
body. 

3. To cultivate Literature, Science 

and the orderly conduct of 
public business. 


You need the Lit. 
The Lit. needs You 


POTTER, THE RELIABLE OPTICIAN 









RESERVE FUNDS 

Are always needed by a student during his four years at 
College. 

Some form of Endowment Insurance will build up 
for you " a very present help in time of trouble " ; 

Or, any policy taken out to the benefit of a friend, 
will be good security for a loan of any size, not exceed- 
ing the amount of the policy. 

Make it a point to inquire about this matter from 

The Manufacturers' Life Insurance Company 

*'No better Life Company in Canada" 



I 



ACTA VICTORIANA, 



77 



Men s VICTOR Boot 

= Style V. P. $4.00 = 



If you ordered a pair 
of boots like the Victor 
V.P. from the New York 
Bootmaker who origin- 
ated the style, he would 
charge you from $5.00 
to $6.00 and then not 
give you footwear better 
in material detail than 
this VICTOR V.P. 
MODEL. The toe has 
a half-narrow shape and 
widens gracefully on the outside. The sole is medium 
weight with a custom extension. A Flexible and Brilliant 
Patent Colt, selected for its wearing qualities, is used in 
the vamp, dull matt calf Blucher top with rounded corners. 
Finest quality of duck linings, inside top stays, back-stays, 
and facings. Solid oak-bark-tanned sole leather and 
heel. C, D and E widths, all sizes from it A 00 




5 to I 



If >ou are interested in Toronto styles and prices send for 

our fall and Winter Catalogue, which will be sent 

free on receipt of address. 



THE 
ROBERT 



SIMPSON 

TORONTO 



COMPANY 
LIMITED 



78 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



C. A. DEERvS 

MERCHANT TAILOR 



13 Manning A.rca<le An.x\ex 
24 Kin^ S\. W. Tel. M. 6886 



Style and Quality 

Equal to the Best 

Let me he your Tailor 



Imperial Bank of Canada 



Head Office, 

Capital Authorized, $10,000,000 



Toronto 



Capital Paid Up, $5,000,000 
Rest Account, $5,000,000 

D. R. WILKIE, Pres. and Gen. Manager. E, HAY, Assistant General Manager. 

ROBT. JAFFRAY, Vice-Presiuent. . W, MOFFAT, Chief Inspector. 

Savings Barjk Department — Interest at current rates allowed on 
deposits of $ I. GO upwards from date of opening account, and interest 
credited four times a year. 

Letters of Credit and. Drafts issued, available in all parts of the 

wor . ^ General Banking Business Conducted. 

YONGE AND BLOOR STREET BRANCH 

C. H. Stanley Clarke, Man?ger 



. 



THE 

FREELAND 
STUDIO 

Finest of facilities for 

GROUP WORK 



Special Prices to Students 



436 YONGE STREET 

Opposite Carlton Street 
'Phone M. 6887 



FOLLETT'S 

''IDEAL SUIT" 

$20.00 

It is not necessary to pay 
extravagant prices in order 
to be well dressed. We will 
demonstrate this if you give 
us an opportunity. Enquire 
about our special discount 
arrangement. 



JOS. J. FOLLETT 

Ordered Tailormg' 
181 YONGE STREET 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



79 




MILK AND CREAM 

GOOD ENOUGH FOR BABIES 



Without a chemical analysis and bacteriological 
examination it is impossible to judge the quality of 
milk. Therefore buy rora Dairies of proved integi ity 
only. " Beware of being offered too much for your 
money,— some things are too cheap in quality to be 
anything but dear in price." 

CITY DAIRY CO., Limited 

Phone College 2040 Spadina Crescent 



RESERVED 



FOR 



WALTER BARR 



Webb's 



I7OR Weddings, Dinners, 
Receptions, large or 
small, simple or elaborate, 
there is no place like 
Webb's. CATALOGUE 
FREE 



Zhc- 



447 J^onge St, Q;oronto 



EDUCATION DKPARTMRNT CALENDAR 

FOR 1Q08 (ii\ part) 



October : 
1. Night Schools open (Session 1908-9). 

Notice by Trustees of cities, towns, incor- 
porated villages and township Boards to 
Municipal Clerks to hold Trustee elections 
on same day as Municipal elections, due. 
31. Inspectors' application for Legislative aid 

for free TextBooks to Rural Schools. 
November : 

9. King's Birthday (Monday). 
December : 
1. Last day for appointment of School 
Auditors by Public and Separate School 
Trustees. 

Municipal Clerks to transmit to County 
In>pec;ors statement showing whether or 
not any county rate for Public School pur- 
poses has been placed upon Collector's roll 
against any Separate School supporter. 

8. Returning Officers named by resolution of 
Public School Board. 

Legislative grant payable to Trustees of 

Rural Public and Separate Schools in 

D -tricts, second instalment. 

Last day for Public and Separate School 

Trustees to fix places for nomination of 

Trustees. 

9, CounLyModel Schools Examination begins. 

14. Local assessment to be paid Separate 
School Trustees. 

15. County Model Schools close. 
Municipal Councils to pay Secretary-Treas- 
urers of Public School Boards all sums 



30. 



31. 



levied and collected in township. 
County Councils to pay Treasurers of High 
Schools. 

Provincial Normal Schools close. (First 
Term.) 

High Schools (First Term), and Public and 
Separate Schools close. 
Last day for notice of formation of new 
School Sections to be posted by Township 
Clerks. 

Christmas Day (Friday). 
High School Treasurers to receive all 
moneys collected for permanent improve- 
ments. 

New Schools and alterations of School 
boundaries go into operation or take ettect. 
By-law for disestablishment of Township 
Boards takes effect. 

Annual meetings of supporters of Public 
and Separate Schools. 
Reports of Principals of County Model 
Schools to Departu. en t, due. 
Reports of Boards of Kxaminers on third 
Class Professional Examination, to De- 
partment, due. 

Protestant Separate School Trustees to 
transmit to County In'^pectors names and 
attendance during the last preceding six 
months. ^„ , 

Trustees' Reports to Truant Officer, due. 
Auditors' Reports of cities, towns and in- 
corporated villages to be published by 
Trustees. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS of the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT of ONTARIO 
can be ordered through loca.1 booksellers, or address orders direct to 

THe CARSMTELC CO., Limited 
30 Adelaide St. Eiast TORONTO 



80 ACTA VICTORIANA. 



WATCH FOR 



The Xmas Jicta 

For 1908 



We are expecting to make this of special interest by means 
of special graduate and undergraduate contributions. That the 
high literary standard of previous Xmas numbers will be fully 
maintained may be judged from the fcllowing from whom we 
expect contributions : 

Harvey J. O'Higgins, Norman Duncan, 
Jean Blewett, H. Isabel Graham, Helen 
E. Merrill, Frank Yeigh, Ethelyn Weth- 
erald, A. J. Bell, M.A.. Ph.D., Pelham 
Edgar, Ph.D., Wm. WiUred Campbell, 
Joanna Wood and others. 

A special effort is being made to make this issue a high- 

SOUVENIR NUMBER 



class 



A number of short stories, poems and interesting articles 
have already been submitted by leading writers of the day. 

The magazine will be a handsome Xmas gift representative 
of our college life and ideals. 

How many copies will you need ? 

Place your order early. Address, 

BUSINESS MANAGER, 

Acta Victoriana 




ACTA VICTORIANA. 



81 



COLLEGE GIRLS' TRUNKS 

When buying a Trunk from this store you may select from one of 
the largest assortments in Canada and, being Manufacturers, we save 
you the Middleman's Profit. 

Mail Orders filled anywhere. Write for Illustrated Booklet. 

EAST & CO., Limited, 300 Yonge St. 



WARDROBE 

where good work is 
done in Clean ing, 
Pressing and Repairing 
at reasonable prices. 



fORD'S 

742 YONGE STREET 
PHONE NORTH 4604 



HIGH CLASS 
FURNISHINGS 

Hats and Caps, Boots 
and Shoes. Agents in 
Ontario for Stanfield's 
Unshrinkable Under- 



YOUR TRADE WILL BE APPRECIATED 



AVERY'S DRUG STORE 

Yonge and St. Mary Sts.. TORONTO 

Pure Drugs, Economical Prices 
Special prices to students 

Phone N. 1747 

Goods delivered promptly 



cHu.RCH^.nd PRINTING 

Programmes, Booklets, Invitations, Reporls. 

The Armac Press 

Phone Main 2716 

1 70- 1 76 Victoria St., TORONTO 



The Reading Camp Association 

was organized eight years ago with a view to experimenting on 
the practicability of surrounding our frontier laborers in lumber- 
ing, mining, railway construction and fishing camps with a better 
environment by providing educational facilities during the week- 
day evenings, and undenominational services on Sundays. 
Successful experiments have been made in Manitoba, Ontario 
and Saskatchewan, and the governments of these provinces have 
aided the movement. Our object is to develop public opinion 
in this direction and induce the provincial departments of edu- 
cation to carry on the work on a large scale. In the meantime, 
the work is supported mainly by public contributions, and sub- 
scriptions should be addressed to the 

READING CAMP ASSOCIATION 

n23 Traders' Bank Building:, Toronto 



82 ACTA VICTORIANA. 




W. M. PERCY 

Optician 

705 YONGE STREET 

<Late of Chas. Potter's) 

Phone N. 2824. 



Oculist's Prescriptions filled 
promptly and accurately. 

Lens Grinding and Spectacle Repairing done on 
the premises. Discount to Students. 

Kodaks, Films and Supplies. Developing and Printing? for Amateurs. 

Waterman's Ideal P'ountain Pens, Magnifiers, Readers, etc. 

High (ylass Stationery. 



STOLLERY 

Men's Furnishings 
and Fine Hats : : 

772 YONGE STREET 

Kindlsr Mention '* Acta " -wHen PurcHasin^ 



acta victqriana. 83 

contjh:nts. 

LITERARY— page 

Beyond the Sunset - ...... 87 

The Moral Problem of the Theatre - ..... 88 

The Silent Places ....... . 91 

Pages from a Summer Sketch Book ..... 93 

A Camp Fire --....-.. 96 

"The 136th Annual Bob "—A Pipe Dream - - - - 100 

" The Tables Turned " ....... 103 

EDITORIAL- 

Notes - - - . . . ... - 107 

MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS- 

Job XXXVII: 1-38 - 112 

To Preachers - - - - - - - - 116 

SCIENTIFIC- 

The Modern House— Part 11. - - - - - - 117 

PERSONALS AND EXCHANGES- 

Personals - - - . - . . . . 122 

The Class of 1908 122 

Weddings - 123 

Deaths - - - - - - - - - 125 

Exchanges ......... 126 

ATHLETICS— 

Notes ......... 128 

LOCALS— 

Notes - - . ■ . - . . - - 133 



A FEW CHOICE BOOKS 

The Christian Minister and His Duties — 

Containing Chapters on "The Modern Minister," 
"The Minister as Preacher," "The Minister as 
Pastor." etc. By J. OSWALD DYKES, M.A $1.80 

The Resurrection of Jesus — 

By JAS. ORR, M.A $1.50 

The Christian Method of Ethics — 

By REV. HENRY W. CLARK, author of " Philosophy 

of Christian Experience " NET $1,25 

Gospel of St. Matthew — 

In Westminster New Testament Series. By DAVID 
SMITH, M.A NET $ ,70 

The Upper Canada Tract Society 

(James M. Robertson. Depositary) 102 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ont. 



84 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Hockey Boots, Skates, Hockey 
Sticks, Sweaters, Toques, Stock- 
ings, Sweater Coats, Snow Shoes 



HOCKEY BOOTS 
$1.75 $2.00 
$2.50 $3.00 
$3.50 $4.00 




SKATES 




$1.00, $1.50, $1.75, $2.00, $2.50 
$3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 

Sweaters, each $2.00 Sweater Coats, each $4.00 

HOCKEY STICKS 
Mic-Mac, 40c each. Practice, 25c, Spalding, 50c 

SNOW SHOES, Men's, $3.50 Ladies, $3.00 



J. BROTHERTON 

Sso YONGE STREET 

Phone N. 2092 




Yet a few sunny days, in which the bee 
Shall murmur by the hedge that skirts the way, 

The cricket chirps upon the russet lee 
And men delight to linger in thy ray. 



Yet one rich smile and we will try to bear 

The piercing winter frost, and winds, and darkened air. 

— W. C. BRYANT. 



ACTA VICTORIANA 




Published monthly dupingr the Colleg-e year by the Union 
Litepapy Society of Victopia Univepsity, Toponto 

VOL. XXXII. TORONTO, NOVEMBER, 1908. No. 2 



Beyond the Sunset 

A. L. BURT^ '10. 

SMOTHER, dear mother, what lie>s beyond 

The sunset's great golden sea? 
O mother, dear mother, the skies beyond 

Are smiling so pure at me. 



O 



mother, dear mother, the golden gates 

Are opening wide for me ; 
mother, dear mother, an angel waits 

Up there with a flaming key. 

'0 mother, dear mother, what music sweet 

Pours out from that mansion fair? 
mother, dear mother — the golden street! 
where does it lead, where ? 

'0 mother, dear mother, why weep you so, 

The place is so passing fair ? 
The glory is calling and I must go; 
You'll follow me, won't you, there?" 

The dear little maiden has flown away ; 

But when all the work is done, 
The mother, she sees at the close of day 

A smile in the setting sun. 



88 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The Moral Problem of the Theatre 

REV. E. R. CRUMMY, B.A., D.D. 

THE problem of theatre-going is one which cannot but 
challenge the earnest consideration of everyone who 
takes life at all seriously. On the one hand, it is not 
so simple a matter as it may seem to take a negative attitude 
toward any practice. One might somewhat naturally think, 
"Why, theatre-going has been objected to as unworthy of Chris- 
tians ; I can find plenty of ways of being entertained without it ; 
and so I shall not go, and there 's an end of it. ' ' But it is doubt- 
ful whether one can morally dismiss moral questions so lightly. 
Our negative attitude toward life and conduct should have a 
rational basis, as well as our positive attitude. And when we 
come to really give this phase of the subject our thought, the 
difficulty is enhanced by the fact that a great many good men in 
the past and present, the genuineness of whose Christianity we 
have no right to question, have patronized, or do now patronize, 
the theatre. One might mention here the names of Queen Vic- 
toria and Browning and Tennyson, besides many distinguished 
clergymen of undoubted piety. 

On the other hand, we have to face such facts as the rules 
of the Methodist Church. And here we may wholly omit any dis- 
cussion of the relative merit of the footnote as compared with 
the older portion of the Rules. It is well known that the older 
rule referring to amusements or ''diversions" was, and from 
the very beginning, univers.ally and consistently interpreted as 
condemning the theatre. Nor need we discuss whether the Rules 
are, in the nature of the case, mandatory or recommendatory. 
In either case they must be assigned the highest significance, not 
only by the members of the Methodist Church, but by all persons 
whose purpose is to live the best life possible to them; just as no 
one, of whatever church, seeking to practice the highest ethical 
conduct, can ignore the judgment of the Roman Catholic bishops 
on the subject of dancing. It is perhaps a misfortune that the 
Rules are not so stated that these discussions might be eliminated, 
as they serve too frequently, it is to be feared, to divert the 
attention from the real question at issue. It is well known, more- 



MORAL PROBLEM OF THE THEATRE. 89 

over, that the pulpit of the other Protestant churches — or most 
of them — is just about as pronounced as the Methodist pulpit in 
its attitude toward the theatre. The reasons for this attitude, 
when any are assigned, are various, and many of them of small 
validity, but the attitude itself is simply a matter of fact. 

I have now briefly stated the problem as it presents itself to 
us, and it needs only to be stated thus to show that the weight of 
the evidence of those whose duty it is to give special attention 
to the question of public and private morals, condemns the 
moral and spiritual influence of the theatre; and this condem- 
nation, if not altogether exclusive, is practically so. It embraces 
the theatre as it is generally known to the people at large, and 
that, too, not in its more obtrusively immoral aspects, but the 
theatre that solicits the patronage of people of decency and 
self-respect. 

But that this condemnation has not always been merited will 
be clearly shown by the history of the theatre itself. On the 
contrary, it was, at least in its earlier years, a great power for 
good. This suggests two conclusions; fir^t, that the evil is not 
inherent in the stage itself, and second, that we may discover 
that it is a loss greater than we are justified in suffering, to 
allow one of the historic agencies for good to be turned against 
the moral forces of the day. It may just be questioned whether 
we have any other that can exactly take its place. 

To discover the germ of disease that preys upon the stage may 
point in the direction of an effective treatment of the disease. 
We may note in passing the marked tendency to deterioration 
on the part of that which caters only to amusement. This 
seems equally true, both in the case of persons and institutions, 
and would suggest the necessity of associating amusement with 
some other and more serious purpose, or that it be engaged in 
only with a distinct view to the end to be served, and with a 
due sense of proportion. Otherwise, it is likely at once to degrade 
the entertainer, and to develop in those who are entertained a 
tendency to an unserious and trifling conception of life. 

But when the entertaining function of the stage is kept 
strictly subservient to its educative function, the difficulty under 
which it has struggled, and beneath which it has sunken, begins 
to be apparent. Certainly there can be no evil tendency in the 



90 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

acting' itself. If reading to a company of listeners is good, surely 
acting, which is simply better reading, is better. The evil must 
be sought for in the play or players, or both. And it is obvious 
that, in the player, you have both included. Given a worthy 
actor or set of actors, and it goes without the saying that they 
will present no play unworthy of them. Given, on the other 
hand, a set of actors morally or intellectually unfit to enter 
with sympathy into the serious problems of life, and even a 
Shakespeare, or the Bible itself, must be morally despoiled at 
their hands. This, it seems to me, is the seat of the disease. 
Even if the common actor did not see fit to parade his vulgarity 
in public places and public conveyances, as he so "frequently 
prefers to do, still we should demand some prior assurance of the 
fitness — not of one of the company, but of all^ — to interpret 
life to us before we risked having our own lives poisoned at the 
source. We require w^arrant of fitness on the part of a teacher 
before we entrust our children to his tuition and influence. 

And now I think the evil and the cure are increasingly 
obvious. When the stage takes itself seriously as an educational 
agency, it stands in precisely the same position as other agencies 
that cater to the higher education of the people. x\nd the mass 
of the people do not regard ideals of sufficienf worth to pay for 
them. This is the case alike Avith the pulpit, the press and the 
school. Just so far as they rise above the conception of common 
utilities, they must depend upon endowment in some form or 
other. The few of higher vision must make the sacrifice, and 
extend the privileges they provide to those who would not seek 
them for themselves. For reasons that are obvious, the state, as a 
w^hole, while it cannot keep pace with the more intelligent and 
aggressive of its citizens, can, and often does rise above what 
the average would dictate. To state endowments, therefore, to 
some degree, but to private endowments to a greater degree, 
must we look for the maintenance of all those activities that 
cater to the nation's ideals, and the theatre which can, upon its 
merit, claim a right to be, will find its place among these. Until 
this, with exceptions so rare that the very rareness adds pathetic 
emphasis to the general situation, seeking good in the theatre 
must closely resemble the proverbial "seeking a needle in a 
haystack. ' ' 



THE SILENT PLACES. 91 

The Silent Places 

MABEL E. CEEWS^ '10. 

ABOVE, around and about, brooding over the earth like 
a guardian angel, hovered the great all-pervading Spirit 
of Silence. The vast stillness of the night was unbroken 
save by the intermittent crackling of the logs as they burned 
brightly before the wigwam door, and threw a rosy glow upon 
the two copper-colored faces beside it. The night wind came 
whirling past, sending up tongues of flame from the ruddy fire, 
then, sweeping on to the forest, sighed away among the bare 
brown branches. All about lay a crisp carpet of autumn leaves, 
brought at last in all their splendor to the earth to perish. Above, 
in the high vault of heaven, twinkled myriads of tiny stars, 
which seemed to the Indian brave, as he looked up from the 
gun in his hand, like countless bright eyes through which the 
Great Spirit looked down upon the world and saw them both 
as they sat there alone. 

All at once the silence was broken by a piercing cry of pain. 
The Indian looked across to where his squaw sat with a trou- 
bled expression on her face, and he saw that some illness had 
suddenly come over the child which she held in her arms. Instead 
of abating, the little one's distress momentarily increased, until 
it became apparent that something must be done at once. The 
pale face Medicine-Man must be sent for, as he alone, they 
believed, could bring relief; so, thinking not of the terrors of 
the night, nor the dangers of the long journey, the Indian 
brave threw a few logs upon the fire, then passed silently beyond 
its ruddy glow — out into the night. 

Left alone, the squaw lifted her bronze face toward the 
starry heavens, reaching out dumbly for aid from that higher 
power, known only to her as the ''Great Spirit." Then, folding 
the babe closer to her breast, she sat there far iueto the night 
moaning and crooning sadly: 

The scudding winds bore the canoe lightly along the crests 
of the waves as they splashed over its bow. The chill night air 
fanned his swarthy cheek. His keen eye pierced the almost 
unfathomable blackness ahead, as, skillfully guiding his canoe 



92 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

with the swift powerful stroke peculiar to the red-man, he 
safely passed one dangerous spot after another. On, on, ever 
on, with always that great Spirit of Silence about him. 

As the Indian looked above into the vast infinitude of space, 
the stars had disappeared and there, with a magnificence such 
as only those who have been in the great northland can con- 
ceive, the Northern Lights spread their curtain of splendor 
over the heavens. Great creamy folds flashed and trembled 
across the sky, shifting and dissolving into fantastic shapes of 
ethereal beauty. 

On, on the canoe glided, till at length, trembling on the 
edge of the rapid which alone lay between the brave and his goal, 
it shot through the turbulent water under the careful guidance 
of an expert's hand. 

But alas for the fallibility of human skill! A sudden 
crash upon a hidden rock below the surface, a leap into the 
air, an ominous splash, — then the empty canoe dashes on over 
the rocks, borne away and beyond by the same chill dark flood 
which, with a gurgle and a murmur, triumphantly bears off its 
burden into the Happy Hunting-Ground. 

The fire still burns faintly before the wigwam. Its light 
still falls upon the bowed head of the Indian woman, who 
crouches there yet in the chill hours of the early dawn, await- 
ing the return of her husband. The tongues of flame leap up 
again, and now as they quiver and disappear, the little life, too, 
in that ragged bundle is burning low. Still the mother clutches 
to her breast the warm but almost lifeless form of her babe, 
and, swaying to and fro, croons a plaintive melody, whch is 
wafted on by the sighing wind and dies aw-ay in the forest 
beyond. 



Summer's Departure. 

Autumn winds once more returning, 
Chant the summer's solemn knell; 

Youthful hearts forever yearning, 
Throb a silent, sad farewell." 



Notre Dame Scholastic. 



PAGES FROM A SKETCH BOOK. 93 

Pages from a Summer Sketch Book 

F. H. LxVNGFORD^ '08. 

I. — Seen From the Window of a Railway Carriage. 

THE country where my trip began is something like my 
life has been of- late — monotonously level. (I had just 
finished the annual "grind" of May.) Tips and downs, 
both in a landscape and in life, give more than mere variety; 
they lend value. Flat lands produce little but willow shrubs and 
a coarse grass that must be sadly lacking in nutrition, and so, 1 
fancy, is it with the life that never varies from the dead level. 

The monotony in the landscape didn't last long, however, for 
soon the ground became hilly enough to suit the most jaded 
taste. One freshly-plowed knoll carried to my mind an irresist- 
ible impression of a huge fist, whose brown knuckles were seamed 
by constant toil, and another slope, wood-crowned, brought to 
me sweet, half -lonely memories of the dear old home I was 
leaving behind. 

As the train tore past gently sloping, wooded fields, suddenly 
I caught a refreshing glimpse of a ravine, which broke the level 
ground. A brook rippled along its bed, and a long, broad ribbon 
of marsh marigolds gladdened the eye, disappearing with their 
brook under an old red bridge, just before the ravine lost itself 
in a tangle of evergreens. 

I was immensely interested in a coquettish brook that ap- 
peared shortly after, and that I suspected to be the same stream 
that had parted company from the noisy train some time pre- 
viously. When I first saw it, it was bounding gaily, joyously 
along, paying no attention whatever to the course of the rushing 
engine, but yet never wandering far away. Now it would hide 
itself in the dark cedars, and again it would come racing back, 
scattering its spray in the bright sunlight. At one time it would 
half -conceal its charm behind a leafy screen, dimpling demurely 
in placid self-approval; at another, it would scold petulantly 
at the obduracy of some boulder that refused to make way. 
But slowly the train swerved to the left, and the brook was all 
but lost, when, with one final and supreme effort to display all 
2 



94 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

her charms in one moment, she turned and came fairly toward 
us, gleaming, sparkling, full of life and buoyancy. In the next 
instant she had rushed past and was losing herself in the recesses 
of the forest. 

1 was interrupted in my moralizing on this incident, by the 
sight of a piece of woodland almost literally covered with stones, 
ranging from those the size of a turkey's egg to great boulders 
that might have been the missiles of the gods in their warfare. 
Brown stones, grey stones, blue stones, white stones, stones of all 
colors and all combinations of color that could be imagined — 
here they were, just as they have been for immemorial ages. 
But the next field presented a marked contrast. It had no fewer 
stones than its neighbor, but they were arranged in neat piles 
here and there over the field, and meadow^ grass was showing 
dark and rich over the cleared places. Faithful the toil, faithful 
the toilers, that had accomplished such work. But not yet was 
I through with stones, for on a near-by hill I saw another cluster, 
shining white marble or polished red granite, which marked 
the last resting-places of the pioneers whose work I had been 
observing. But why call such the monuments of the dead ? Are 
not those great heaps of stone, gathered from the once cumbered 
ground, and those smooth, smiling fields, far truer monuments 
of those who worked, and suffered and died ? Noble men, these ! 
Men who did not grudge their lives to the welfare of their 
children, but so lived as to make a happier, richer, deeper life 
possible to those who should come after. (Ih, to be a pioneer! 
To remove the rocks and boulders from the way of one 's brother 
man! To make the desert rejoice and blossom as the rose! 
This is a monument more enduring than marble slab or granite 
tomb. 

II. — Among ^^the Tall Timbers.'^ 

We launched our canoe amidst the thousands of logs that were 
awaiting their fate at the mill, found the lowest log of the boom 
and slipped away from the world of activity. Rounding a point, 
we faced the '4ong glance," a straight stretch of a mile or more 
of *brown water silently but strongly opposing our progress. 



* It is a fact that the water in the rivers of this region is of a clear 
brown color. 



PAGES FROM A SKETCH BOOK. 95 

On either side lay the hills, silent, changeless, majestic, but their 
stern, nigged outlines were softened by the fresh verdure of the 
poplars which veiled their sides. In the midst of the poplars 
rose here and there a lordly pine, lifting his haughty head aibove 
his lowly neighbors, and thoroughly conscious of his sovereignty. 
Now and then the river encircled with protecting arm an island, 
beautiful enough with its myriad shades of green to merit the 
favor of the wandering waters, though in their course from the 
hills of Algoma they had passed by some of the noblest scenes 
on earth. 

After half an hour's steady paddling, there fell on our ears 
the sound of swiftly rushing waters, and as we swung around a 
bend in the river, we beheld a maze of white, seething rapids, 
where our river plunged between and over the relentless rocks 
that opposed its advance. So furious did the stream become at 
this check to its progress, that even after it had reached a level 
place below the fiall, it took a long time to recover its equanimity. 
It would break out in a vicious eddy, or would curl itself into 
dark, sullen rings, or snarl spitefully as it tossed up a fleck of 
foam from the midst of a peaceful pond. 

From a rock above the fall we saw it in all its glory. The 
smooth, oily surface above the rapid showed how every drop of 
water was reserving its force for the plunge against the rock 
whose brown shoulder rose defiantly from the very midst of 
the narrow channel. Then all in a moment the dark, placid cur- 
rent changed into that white mass of roaring, plunging, bounding 
waters, that made one's blood tingle with the joy of swift, fierce 
action. 

After a portage we launched our canoe once more, and paddled 
swiftly over a stretch of water so beautiful that we did not dare 
to make a sound. Even the tinkling of the water that dripped 
from the blades of our paddles sounded distinct in that silent 
wilderness. Through a narrow channel, between mighty over- 
hanging masses of grey rock, we glided, and then out into a 
wider stretch of placid water. Here the banks abounded in a 
wealth of color, and from above the clear blue sky laughed 
through the white bars of fleecy cloud that half-revealed and 
half-concealed the glory beyond. In the water all this rare 
beauty lay revealed in clear yet softened outline, while the 



96 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

ripple that stole shoreward from our canoe touched, as with a 
fairy's wand, all this slumbering loveliness, and made it move 
and live. Our spirits were soaring far on the wings of fancy, 
when suddenly we were recalled to earth with a thud by a low, 
tense ejaculation from the lad with the trolling line, "I've got 
a bite!" 

And now we came in sight of a rocky cliff known as Skull 
Point, where, my companion informed me, a battle had been 
fought in the far-off' days when the red man frequented these 
rocky shores. Nowadays the cliff had received its name from the 
grim memorials of that encounter that were to be dug up along 
the shore. Who can tell what tragedies were enacted there, where 
the life or death of a nation hung in the balance ? And yet now 
the passing traveller merely turns his inquisitive glance upon the 
spot with a momentary interest, and then dismisses it from his 
thoughts. Somewhere, though, on the eternal record, these tra- 
gedies are chronicled, and there the glory is given, not to the 
man who conquered, but to the man who did his duty, "as a 
man is bound to do." And though our lives, with their battle- 
grounds, should not be remembered by our successors even for 
a day, there is a record under the eye of God, and we may rest 
assured that He will never forget or overlook the hard-fought 
field where we did our duty, even though our hearts bled, and 
the marks of conflict were left upon our brow. 



A Camp Fire 

• E. H. L., '08. 

ON a summer night in '05, a group of fellows lay upon 
the red sands which line the Bay of Fundy, two miles 
from the village of St. Martins. A huge fire, kindled 
earlier in the evening, was just settling down into the redness 
succeeding the roaring and crackling of its first stages. Long 
red gleams shot out across the gently heaving surface of the sea, 
breaking and shifting as the waves moved. 

Three weeks previously, eighty boys, all from New Bruns- 
wick towns, had gathered there in a camp on the sea-shore. The 



A CAMP FIRE. 97 

camp-fire of this evening signalized the last night prior to their 
separation — a separation rendered the more painful by memories 
of the twenty-one days of close and congenial companionship 
which had preceded it. 

The tents of the camp were pitched on the red sandstone 
cliffs which overlooked the sea at this point. Pine and spruce 
woods lay behind, where material for fragrant and resilient 
couches was abundant. At the base of the cliffs, only thirty feet 
below, was a boulder-strewn beach, a few yards wide at high 
tide, but a quarter of a mile in width when the ebb was at its 
lowest. Here we had often disported ourselves in the salt water, 
or indulged in sun-baths, when sheer laziness deterred us from 
other pursuits. 

But on the afternoon of this final day the boys had not felt 
inclined to swim, or even to play the usual games in the field 
beyond the trees. Instead, we had toiled manfully, dragging 
heavy pieces of driftwood along the beach, or foraging in the 
woods for suitable bits of brushwood, until we had piled up 
enough fuel to burn for hours. Now we were gathered around 
the fire, wrapped in blankets, some stretched out on the sand 
in the lee of boulders, others perched upon the ledges of the 
crumbling cliff, the soft sandstone particles of which still ad- 
hered to their clothing. We were equipped for a pleasant 
evening, for was not our camp phonograph there, ready to pour 
forth the latest march or operatic favorite, as we might desire? 
Was not George Whittaker, of St. John, there, inimitable in the 
relation of droll yams? And Fred McNally, of Moncton, the 
greatest reader of Drummond's ''Habitant" selections in the 
Province? Moreover, our camp quartette was grouped in a 
prominent position, ready to run the gamut of its hastily 
acquired repertoire. 

As we sat around, waiting for the noise of the fire to subside 
sufficiently for our voices to be heard, I am sure that many of 
us w^ere thinking of Longfellow 's ' ' Fire of Driftwood, ' ' wherein 
he describes the various successive moods of those seated around 
the blaze. Nor was such an association of ideas inapt : 

' ' Oft died the words upon our lips 
As suddenly from out the fire, 
Built of the wrecks of stranded ships, * 

The flames would leap and then expire." 



98 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

But finally someone began to sing, and all joined in an old 
and familiar melody. Then we sang together many of the 
choruses which are wont to be sung by a group of healthy, care- 
free lads on such occasions, such as "My Bonnie Lies Over the 
Ocean," and ''My Old Kentucky Home." Then the phonograph 
was started, selections from which were interspersed with stories 
and readings, so that the rocks echoed with the unwonted sound 
of musical and literary classics. "The Stovepipe Hole," Mc- 
Nally's favorite recitation, never sounded more amusing than on 
this occasion, nor did we fail to appreciate some of the oft- 
repeated stories related by Whittaker. G-eorge had a pet yarn 
concerning a cave near the mouth of the St. John River, which 
he had explored thoroughly, discovering a second entrance, and 
finding various indications which led him to conclude that Cap- 
tain Kidd had made use of it on at least one occasion. This, 
when told to the accompaniment of the beating surf, Avas quite 
realistic and thrilling. 

But, to have closed our evening in this way would have been 
sacrilegious, in view of the solemnity of the surroundings. Ac- 
cordingly, our leading spirit, L. B. Wilson, of St. John, read, 
by the waning light of the fire, from the 107th Psalm that beau- 
tiful reference to the sea, which seemed peculiarly appropriate 
on this occasion. As he read in his manly, sonorous voice, all of 
us were deeply stirred. I believe that the impression of that 
hour lives in the memory of all of us to this day : 

*' These see the works of the Lord, and his wonders in the deep. 
For he commandeth, and raiseth the stormy wind, which lifteth up the 

waves thereof. 
They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths : their 

soul is melted because of trouble. 
They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their 

wits' end." 

We recalled majestic scenes that we had witnessed on stormy 
days, when the sea was in a fury, and we remembered nights 
when we had remained awake to listen to the thundering of the 
sea upon the beach. On such a night one could not help believ- 
ing in God, and looking to Him for protection. As the reading 
proceeded, we could understand the words of the Psalmist : — 



A CAMP FIRE. 99 

" . . . And he bringeth them out of their distresses. 
He maketh the scorm a calm, so that the waves thereof are still. 
Then are they glad because they be quiet ; so he bringeth them unto their 
desired haven." 

As Wilson closed his Bible amid an eloquent silence most 
of lis Avere occupied with serious thoughts, and there was little 
more conversation that night. Soon we broke up, to retire to our 
balsam-scented beds, there to listen to the measured breaking 
of the waves on the shore, and to recognize, as never before, the 
majestj' and the imminence of Grod. 




100 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

'' The 136th Annual Bob "—A Pipe Dream 

" somnlvtor/ ' '09. 

FROM the capacious depths of an easy-chair, I speculatively 
watched the greyish-blue fumes curling upwards from 
my pipe, and reviewed once more the various scenes of 
the ''Bob." Outside, the city's roar had given place to its 
nightly lull ; nothing was to be heard save the occasional wearied 
hum of a street-car, mingled with the approaching or receding 
step of some belated pedestrian. Briefly, indifferently, the 
great clocks announced the fact that the first hour of another day 
had become a part of the silent past. 

Whether it was due to the traditional witchery of the hour, 
or whether the cynical Mephisto of "Love's Labor Lost" had 
cast one of his weird spells upon me, I know not; but by some 
magic power the time was suddenly changed from the twentieth 
to the twenty-first century. Instead of the inexorable judges 
of "Quo Vadis" and the coy Irish waitress of "Vanity Fare," 
I now saw the presentation of the "One Hundred and Thirty- 
Sixth Bob in the History of Victoria College." 

Of the class of 2012, I need say little. As it was in. the begin- 
ning, and is now, so, I suppose, it ever shall be. In they trooped 
for all the world like their great-grandparents . of a century 
before, save in one respect. Thanks to 21st-century inventive 
genius, they were provided with a kind of particularly diabolical 
trumpet, by means of which they succeeded in creating a din 
which outclassed all the tumultuous achievements of past 
generations. 

Neither is it necessary to describe in detail the chairman's 
address. It was composed chiefly of reminiscences of the "larks" 
of his undergraduate days, "away back in the eighties," accom- 
panied by seasonable advice to the class of the hour. After a 
reference to the ancient and honorable origin of the "Bob," 
such as, perhaps, had been made on one hundred and thirty- 
four similar occasions, came the performance itself. 

In this part of the programme, however, I was surprised. I 
had expected to see merely a slightly varied repetition of ancient 
glories. But "ditt'erent times, different manners"; even such 



"THE 136th ANNUAL BOB" 101 

an historic institution as the ''Bob" must yield to the touch of 
time. The committee in charge of its production, with true 
twenty-first century independence, had consigned the logic in- 
volved in that one-time popular hymn, "The Old-Time Eeligion" 
to the limbo of exploded fallacies, and boldly asserted that the 
mere fact that a thing was good enough for their ancestors was 
no all-sufficient reason that it should be good enough for them. 

Instead of having seven or eight utterly disconnected acts, 
the "Bob," as presented in the year of grace 2008, consisted of 
a unified whole. It was in fact a kind of musical drama in three 
acts, cleverly written, artistically staged, and well acted. The 
play itself was an adaptation of "Pilgrim's Progress," and 
portrayed the adventures of one Freshman Green throughout 
the first year of his quest after higher education. A well-trained 
orchestra and several choruses supplied the necessary musical 
features of the production. 

Throughout the performance the rather odious personalities 
that we twentieth-century fossils had been accustomed to re- 
gard as "jokes" were entirely eliminated. Nor was any attempt 
made to personally caricature any particular freshman. Strange 
indeed to say, nothing seemed to be lost by this. Humor there 
was, and in abundance, but humor such as even the most sensi- 
tive freshman could enjoy. From the opening scene, depicting 
the principal character, as he left the paternal "City of Ob- 
structions," on his search for some charm which would relieve 
him of his burden of rusticity and ignorance, to the fall of the 
curtain, there was not one dull moment. 

Upon enquiry, I found that this method of "Bobbing" had 
been inaugurated about 1975. I was told that the old method, 
with which I had been familiar, had survived, "with slight 
improvements, " up to that time, when it was finally realized that 
the Bob, as then presented, had lost its usefulness. The old jokes 
had finally worn out. In fact, some of them had acquired such 
a perennial nature that a clever, but lazy, committee had had 
records made of them, and saved themselves the trouble of 
repeating them by running them off on a phonograph. The 
performance had continued to attract a fairly large audience, 
but this was due rather to the force of custom and tradition than 
to any other reason. 



102 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Realizing that the performance was degenerating into a farce, 
unworthy of Victoria, the entire undergraduate body had taken 
the matter in hand, and had transformed the "Bob" into the 
form of an amateur theatrical. In the spring of each year a 
prize was offered for the best play, to be presented by the middle 
of the next September. The committee having the performance 
in charge then decided as to which effort was the most suitable 
for their purposes, selected the performers from among those of 
the students who were known to have the best histrionic ability, 
and had everything ready to commence practice by the first of 
October. Semi-weekly rehearsals were then held during October, 
in conjunction with the orchestra and choruses, and the perform- 
ance itself was given about the first of November. It had now 
become a dramatic production, recognized by all competent critics 
as being one of the best amateur events of the year. 

But audience and performers had now departed. Whimsi- 
cally, I began to look about me and take note of the new features 
of the college — the new residence, just completed; the assembly 
hall, in which the performance had been given 

Crash ! A heavy box had fallen from a twentieth-century dray 
upon the pavement beneath. The sunlight was doing its best 
to penetrate the closed shutters. With the eager gladness of 
one arisen from the dead, I bounded to the window, sprung the 
blind to the top, threw open the casement, and, leaning out, 
welcomed again to my heart the life and interests of 1908 A.D. 



Past and Present. 
The years a golden halo weave 

Around long vanished forms ; 
And in their path a peace now leave. 

Where once were angry storms. 

The distant charm will soon gain ground 

To claim these ripening years. 
To brave a joy where pain is found 

And sw^eeten all these tears. 

Forget the present pain until 

A fuller music roll 
Down all the years and, growing, fill 

One grand harmonious whole. 

—A. L. B., '10. 



I 



"THE TABLES TURNED." 103 

'' The Tables Turned '' 

A. H., '10. 

ii ^ S THAT you, Mack?" asked the city editor through 
the telephone. 

''Yes, sir," responded the young reporter, whom 
the impatient ringing had awakened. 

"There's been a terrific explosion at Leighville, 60 miles north. 
Over twenty miners are reported killed, as well as three or more 
capitalists who happened to be visiting the mines. Hon. Thomas 
Davidson is one — said to have been blown to pieces. Now, then, 
this is the biggest thing for years. I've tried to get our more 
experienced reporters, but they are all out of reach, doing 
political meetings. It's up to you. Mack. If you make good to- 
night, you'll stay on T}ie Sun for sure. Here's the order: Take 
the first train for Beaufort. Get a good big story and telegraph 
right on the second. If you're ahead of the other papers — well, 
you'll not regret your hustling." 

With that, the city editor rang off, and Mack was alone with 
his anxiety. And reason enough for anxiety had he, a raw young 
immigrant from Scotland, not yet a month in Canada, "the new 
land of promise across the seas. ' ' A short story submitted to the 
editor had so pleased that worthy that the young man had been 
taken on the staff on a month's probation. Three uneventful 
weeks, during which he could gather scarcely a line of news along 
his beat — railway and marine — had caused his hopes of a per- 
manent position to "fade away and gradually die." 

"To-night's my last chance," he repeated to himself time 
and again. The very magnitude of the task nerved him to the 
highest tension. 

Rushing towards the station, he was accosted by Simpkins, a 
rival reporter, sauntering home from the theatre. 

"Where now, Mack?" 
• " To the big explosion up north, ' ' said Mack unguardedly. 

' ' Explosion ! What explosion ? ' ' 

Mack saw his mistake, but the slip was made, and he told the 
scene of the accident with Avhat grace he could summon. 



104 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

''Why, the first train leaves exactly midnight," stated Simp- 
kins, authoritatively. 

Accepting his statement, ]\Iack turned into a hotel waiting- 
room to rest for a couple of hours before train time. 

He was relieved when the wait was over, for there was no rest 
for him with the burden of his momentous work pressing on his 
mind. With no little complacency, he found himself the only 
passenger alighting at Beaufort. 

''I've scooped them all!" he exclaimed, gleefully rubbing his 
hands. In fact, it looks as if I'm the only newspaper fellow 
in sight." 

"What's the best way to Leighville?" he inquired of the 
dozing despatcher. 

"Humph! Another reporter," was the only response. 

"Another!" cried Mack excitedly. "Am I not the first?" 

The telegrapher laughed. "You're nearer the twenty-first, for 
I'll bet I've directed more than a dozen reporters to this 
explosion." 

Mack was crushed by this unexpected intelligence. 

"That settles my fate," he moaned inwardly. "No journalistic 
career for me." Before the operator, however, he maintained 
an appearance of unconcern. 

"Well, I'm late," he went on, with affected carelessness, "but 
how can I reach that wonderful explosion?" 

"I don't see any possible w^ay," slowiy returned the de- 
spatcher. ' ' It w^ould be easy if you had an auto. Three auto-loads 
of reporters have used me as a finger-post to-night. Then, on the 
earlier train came four Gazette men, who had a rig waiting to 
hurry them over to Leighville." 

Poor Mack! The Gazette' and the Sun were deadly rivals, each 
of whose be-all and end-all was to knife the other. All was reck- 
oned fair in their fierce warfare. For Mack to find himself pitted 
alone against four journalistic foes was overwhelming. 

"But let me see," he mused. "Simpkins is one of their clever- 
est men, and he didn 't know of this affair till I told him. Surely 
the telegrapher is mistaken." And, hoping against hope, Mack 
plucked courage from the possibility that the dreaded Gazette 
did not have a quartette on the spot after all. 

But the man at the key stuck to his story. 



THE TABLES TURNED." 



105 



"I should think I do remember those four fellows," he con- 
tinued. ''They bounced in here fairly splitting with laughter. 
One of them, Simpson, or some such name " 

"It was Simpkins," broke out Mack, in despair. 

"Yes, that's the name. He was crowing to me about the way 
he had scooped the Sun by telling their innocent 'ninny' that 
the midnight train was the very first, while he and three others 
of the Gazette staff managed to make the earlier train. The best 
part of the joke, in his estimation, was that he didn't know the 
first thing about any explosion until that new reporter blurted 
it out." 

"I'm that 'ninny/ " said Mack, controlling his emotions 
only by a supreme effort. "I'm down and out with a ven- 
geance. ' ' 

The operator was touched. 

"That was a beastly way to use a new hand," said he. "I 
wish I could do something to help you, but it's too late. It's too 
far to walk, and besides, the others will soon be back here to 
telegraph their stories to their different papers." 

Pacing the small, dimly-lighted waiting-room in a futile effort 
to control his emotions, Mack's feelings were anything but 
enviable. Disappointment, chagrin, anger — he knew not which 
was uppermost. Thoroughly fatigued at length, he flung himself 
into a chair and huddled close to the station stove. Mechanically 
taking out last evening's paper, he carelessly glanced from page 
to page. Suddenly he leaped to his feet. 

"I have it!" he fairly shouted. "I'll beat the whole brigade 
of them after all." 

"What's your idea?" eagerly asked the despatcher. 

"You'll soon see," laughed Mack. "I'll show them that I'm 
not a negligible quantity after all." 

"Hurry up, old chap !" demanded the spokesman of the party, 
as a dozen reporters filed into the telegrapher's office. "My stuff 
goes first, and get a move on." 

"Tick, tick, tick," continued the key, and neither the operator 
nor Mack at his side appeared to hear the peremptory press 
man. 

"Come on," he snapped. "We don't propose to poke around 
this cubby-hole all night." 



106 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Mack looked up. There stood Simpkins. 

' ' So you got here at last, ' ' he sneered. 

''I believe I did," replied Mack, briefly. 

''Must be a fine story you got," continued Simpkins, ''without 
leaving the station. But here's my telegraph stuff," he added, 
turning to the despatcher. "Get busy with it." 

"I'm already busy; don't you see?" he returned with exas- 
perating blandness. 

"Whose stuff are you sending?" persisted the nettled 
Simpkins. 

"My young friend's here," answered the operator, turning 
to Mack. 

"How long will you be?" 

"Can't say for sure, gentlemen. At present I'm telegraphing 
to the Sun the front page of their last issue verbatim. That 
will take me five or six hours, ' ' he laughed. 

"Well, Mack, that scheme beats the Old Nick by some odd 
miles," put in another reporter. 

' ' Yes, Simpkins, ' ' continued the despatcher. " ' He laughs best 
who laughs last.' " 

The others recognized in the incident a fitting example of 
Nemesis, and expressed themselves as willing to take their medi- 
cine. 

"We're licked, all right," ran the general confession, "and 
that by a novice. ' ' 

"You hold the trump card," admitted the crestfallen Simp- 
kins. "Name your terms. Better anything than that none of 
our stories should reach the city. ' ' 

Mack stipulated that, as he had first got wind of the catas- 
trophe, he should telegraph the first account to the Sun. 

"That's a mighty stiff dose," said Simpkins, "but it's up to 
me to get outside of it. I hang out the white flag." 

"Good boy," chimed in the squad of reporters. "That's a 
good square deal." 

Since that night Mack has never been regarded as a "cub" 
among the press fraternity. To this day, travellers at Beaufort 
are regaled with the telegrapher's pet yarn, which he calls 
"Mack's Recovered Scoop." 



VOL. 
XXXI L 



Acta Victoriana. 



No. 2. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, J908-J909. 

J. V. McKenzie, '09 • - - - Editor-in-Chief. 

Miss C. DuNNETT, '09, lTif^^o,.,r Miss K. Lukes, '10, )T,^,,ol^ 

M. H. Staples, '09, / literary. ^ j ^ g^^p^ ^g ,jq^ j i^ocaib. 

Cly o Jackson, B. A., Missionary and Religious. J. E. Horning, '09, Scientific. 
A. L. Burt, '10, Personals and Exchanges. O. V. Jewett, '10, Athletics. 



Board of Management: 

F. C. Moyer, '09, Business Manager. 

W. Moorehouse, '11, Assistant Business Manager. W, A. Deacon, 11. Secretary 

Advisory Committee : 
Pelham Edgar, Ph.D. C. C. James, M.A., Deputy Minister of Agriculture. 



TERMS: $1.25 A YEAR; SINGLE COPIES, 15 CENTS. 

Contributions and exchanges should be sent to J. V, McKemzie, Editor-in-Chief 
Acta Victoriana; business communications to F. C. Moyer, Business Manager 
Acta Victoriana, Victoria University, Toronto. 



Editorial 

^Yj|f|E EEGRET that, owing to the illness of our Editor-in- 
m Chief, Mr. J. Y. McKenzie, this issue has been somewhat 
'^'^ delayed in going to press. We also trust that our readers, 
bearing in mind the difficulties attending its publication, will be 
lenient in their criticisms of the number, and especially of its 
editorial pages. They will, doubtless, be greatly relieved to 
learn that Mr. McKenzie 's illness is of no more serious a nature 
than an attack of that puerile malady commonly known as 
"measles," and that he will in all probability be "on the job" 
in ample time to supervise the getting out of the Christmas 
Acta. 

Professor De Witt, B.A., Ph.D. 

Among the recent appointments upon which the college is 
to be congratulated is that of N. W. DeWitt, B.A., Ph.D., to the 
Chair of Latin and Ancient History. Professor DeWitt thus 
succeeds Dr. Bain, who retired last summer after fifty years 
of splendid service to his alma mater. 

N. W. DeWitt came to Victoria from the Hamilton Collegiate 
Institute, with the Prince of Wales Scholarship, in 1895. At 
the close of what was throughout a very successful course, he 
graduated in '99 with first-class honors in classics, winning the 
Edward Wilson gold medal. During his undergraduate career 



108 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

he also took a most active part in college life, and in his senior 
year was President of the Literary Society. 

After teaching for two years in an academy in Tennessee, Mr. 
DeWitt applied for a Fellowship in the University of Chicago. 
In accepting his application, the Board departed from their 
almost invariable rule of appointing to such positions only men 
who had taken work in that University. The two-fold reason 
assigned for this departure is interesting — the high estimate 
placed upon Mr. DeWitt 's undergraduate work by his instructors 
at Toronto, and the equally high standard of scholarship which 
the collegiate world had learned to expect in first-class honor 
graduates in the department of classics of the University of 
Toronto. 

In his second year as a Fellow at Chicago, Mr. DeWitt became 
the representative of the University in a competition for a 
Fellowship offered by the Archaeological Institute of America. 
By w^inning this, he was enabled to spend a year of study abroad, 
in Grermany, Greece, and especially Rome. Upon his return to 
America in 1904, he was appointed Professor of Latin and 
Greek in Lincoln College, 111., which position he resigned in 
1905 to join the staff in Classics at Washington University, St. 
Louis, Mo. Only a year ago another promotion came, when 
Prof. DeWitt was given charge of the Department of Greek in 
Miami University, Ohio, whence he now returns to his alma 
mater. 

Professor DeWitt obtained his Ph.D. degree at the University 
of Chicago, the subject of his thesis being "The Dido Episode in 
the Aeneid of Virgil." He is a member of the Archaeological 
Institute of America, and of the American Philological Associ- 
ation, to whose journal he is an occasional contributor. Profes- 
sor DeWitt 's splendid work since graduation is abundant proof 
of his ability to fill the position which he now holds, and we 
welcome this addition of one of our own graduates to a faculty 
of which Victoria men are justly proud. 

■^^ -T^ 'T^ 

The University Magazine 

Seven numbers of this excellent Canadian magazine have been 
published, and in spite of the fact that it is conducted by an 
editorial committee strongly represented in our own University, 
it is doubtful whether five per cent of our students are aware 



EDITORIAL. 109 

of its existence. Several numbers have come into our hands, 
and so striking have been the merits of the articles they contain, 
and so thoroughly national in the best sense of the word does 
the whole undertaking appear to us, that we make no apology 
for introducing the University Magazine to the attention of the 
readers of Acta. 

From Dr. Edgar, one of the editors, we have gathered certain 
facts as to the origin of the Magazine. The old McGill Quarterkj 
went out of existence to make way for a magazine of a more 
national character. Some Montreal writers asked for assistance 
from certain people here interested in the furtherance of Cana- 
dian literature. The Canadian Society of Authors seized the 
opportunity of practical usefulness, held a dinner, at which 
McGill and Toronto universities were strongly represented, and 
the present Vniversity Magazine was instituted. The Nineteenth 
Century and After ranks it with the great English monthlies. 
Acta Victoriana will not venture to improve upon the praise 
of a contemporary journal, but will simply say that it welcomes 
the ambition to publish in Canada a dignified national magazine, 
learned without pedantry, and witty without malice, and wishes 
it abundant success. 

^ <^ ^^ 

Death of Dr, Bain 

As we go to press the College is plunged into mourning by 
the news of the sudden death of our Registrar, Professor Abra- 
ham R. Bain, M.A., LL.D. We regret that at present we can 
do no more than tender our sympathy to his bereaved family. 
In our next issue we hope to dwell more at length upon the 
valuable services Dr. Bain has rendered to Victoria throughout 
his long and active professional life. 

Owing to this bereavement, the annual Conversat. of the Col- 
lege will not be held on December 4th, as had been arranged. 

<^ <^ ^^ 

Our Literary Competitions 

We trust that none of our readers will forget the annual 

essay and short-story competitions. We sincerely hope that the 

experience of last year in this connection will never again be 

repeated. We quote from an editorial of last February: ^'That 

3 



no ACTA VICTORIANA. 

there exists such a dearth of literary ability as the competitions 
this year would indicate, we do not believe. There are plenty 
who can write, and write well, and we believe it is the duty 
of such, both to Acta and to the College, to do what they can 
for their college organ. We hear a great deal about making 
Acta a paper by the students; yet few of these same "knockers" 
will make the slightest effort or sacrifice of time on its behalf. 
The success of any college enterprise must ultimately rest upon 
the loyalty of the students, and that loyalty should be shown 
in a practical way. The failure to award the prizes is not the 
most creditable advertisement for the College, and we hope that 
next year may have a different record. " It is unnecessary to 
make further comment. "Get busy," and remember the date, 
January 10. 

In this connection we beg to announce that the judges in the 
essay and short-story competitions will be : Professors Robertson 
and Edgar, Mr. M. H. Staples and the Editor-in-Chief, and Dr. 
Eeynar, the Literary Editors and the Editor-in-Chief, respec- 
tively. 

^i .^^ .^ 

The Poetry Competition 

We are also glad to announce that the Woman's Literary 
Society has placed at our disposal ten dollars, to be awarded 
as a prize for a poem. This competition is open to all under- 
graduates who are paid-up subscribers to Acta, and members 
of either of the literary societies. 

All contributions must be submitted in person to the Editor- 
in-Chief or one of the Literary Editors, without any signature. 
All contributions become the property of Acta Board, and must 
be handed in not later than January 15, 1909. 

There is no limitation as to the kind or length of poem, but 
it must reach a certain standard of excellence to be eligible for 
the prize, such standard to be determined by the judges, Pro- 
fessors Edgar and Reynar. 

^^ <^ ^5? 

Xmas Acta 

We wish to direct the attention of our readers to the an- 
nouncement regarding our Christmas number, which appears on 
another page. No effort is being spared to make this year's 



EDITORIAL. Ill 

Xmas Acta a high-class literary production, one in every way 
worthy of the high position it holds in the realm of college 
journalism. As in past years, the issue will contain contributions 
from the pens of some of Canada's best writers in prose and 
verse. At the same time, a number of articles by graduates and 
undergraduates will make the number representative of Vic- 
toria, and valuable as a souvenir. As a Xmas gift to your 
friends, nothing could be more suitable. What better way can 
there be of showing your appreciation of our efforts and your 
loyalty to your alma mater than by a generous support of 
Xmas Acta? 

<^ <^ <^ 
The opening of the new men's residences marks a new stage 
in the development of our University. While complimenting the 
authorities upon the successful completion of so important an 
undertaking, we feel that the undergraduate body is more to be 
congratulated upon the opportunity now afforded it of testing the 
benefits to be gained from life in residence. We sincerely trust 
that this newest feature of our university life will be an im- 
portant factor in making for the more complete federation and 
unification of the greater U. of T. In a later issue we hope 
to discuss the various aspects of the question at greater length. 

^5 ^^ <^ 

In conferring the degrees of LL.D., lionoris causa, upon 
Viscount Milner and Earl Roberts {in absentia), the University 
of Toronto truly did itself honor. An event of this nature is 
significant, both from a university and from a national stand- 
point. It is no small thing for the University to be able to 
number among its alumni such world-famous men ; while in this 
tribute from a Canadian seat of learning, we see an indication 
of the increasingly important part Canada is bound to play m 
the destiny of the British Empire. 

^^ ^^ ^2 

The announcement, on the 16th inst., of the publication of 
Mr. G. G. S. Lindsey's "Life of William Lyon Mackenzie" is 
of especial interest to Canadians. This volume is the twentieth 
and final number of the biographical "Makers of Canada" 
series, the first of which was published Nov. 16th, 1903. Its 
advent marks the completion of an important historical and 
literary landmark, of which, as a nation, we may well be proud. 



niSSIOIMRY 



Job xxxvii : 1-38 

REV. PROF. J. F. MCLAUGHLIN, M.A., B.D. 

THE following translation is of the nature of an experi- 
ment. An effort is made to imitate the rhythm of the 
Hebrew verse. Similar attempts have been made again 
and again, but, until recently, without any large measure of 
success. The laws of Hebrew metre were imperfectly understood 
and the difference in form and accentuation of our words, as 
well as in the structure of our sentences, was discouraging. 
Besides, there was a feeling that the metrical form did not 
matter, and that, in translation, all that was wanted was the 
meaning. Or the Bible, at least the Authorized Version, had 
come to be looked upon as an English classic, and any change, on 
the ground of literary form, was naturally looked upon with 
suspicion. I have much sympathy with such views and pre- 
judices, but I think that something may now be said on the 
other side. 

Recent investigations have thrown much new light on the 
form and structure of the Hebrew poem. A knowledge of 
metrical laws appears to help greatly in bringing out the true 
sense of many passages. And, moreover, it is often possible, 
with the aid of these laws, to restore a broken or corrupted text. 

The metre appears to be based upon an interchangeable use 
of iambic and anapaestic feet. For either, the spondee is some- 
times substituted, and, in the middle or at the end of a line, the 
amphibrach. Sometimes, too, the anapaest is followed by a short 
syllable, which is either lightly pronounced or actually combined 
in pronunciation with the preceding heavily accented syllable, 
The character and length of the foot is determined not so much 



JOB XXXVII: 1-38. 113 

by long and short syllables as by the recurrence of the heavy 
accents. 

The following passage consists of trimeter lines, arranged 
in four-lined stanzas, the only exception being the fourteenth 
stanza, which has six lines. It is possible that some alteration 
of the original text has caused this irregularity. 

The translation is as nearly literal as the English form will 
permit. There is no pretence of originality, and renderings of 
one or the other of the English versions are freelj^ used. I am 
indebted, also, for valuable help, to Duhm's translation and 
commentary and to Peake's commentary. 

' ' Then Jehovah answered Job out of the storm and said : 

'Who is he that darkeneth counsel 
By speech that is lacking in knowledge ? 
Gird now like a hero thy loins, 
And that which I ask do thou tell me. 

' Where wast thou when I built the earth ? 
Declare if thou hast true knowledge. 
Dost thou know who fixed its measure. 
Or who stretched upon it the line ? 

'Whereupon were sunk its foundations, 
Or who laid its corner-stone, 
When the morning stars sang together. 
And shouted all angels of God? 

'Who shut in the sea with doors, 
When it burst as a babe from the womb. 
When I made of the cloud its garment. 
And darkness its swaddling-band, 

'When I marked upon it its bound, 
And set for it bar and doors. 
And said, "Hitherto shalt thou come, 
And here thy proud waves be stayed"? 



114 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

'In thy time hast thou ordered the morning, 
Made the dawn to know its place, 
To lay hold on the ends of the earth,i 
Which is changed as the clay by the signet 1^ 

'Out of it the wicked are shaken, 
And stand as men ashamed; 
From the wicked their light is witholden, 
And the arm of pride is broken. 

'Hast thou entered the springs of the sea? 
Hast thou walked the range of the deep? 
Have the gates of death been revealed? 
Hast thou seen the warders of the night? 

' Comprehendest thou the breadth of the earth? 
Declare, if thou knowest it all. 
Thou knowest, for then thou wast born,^ 
And great is the number of thy days ! 

'Where is the road to the dwelling of light? 
And darkness, where is its place, 
That thou shouldst take it unto its bound, 
And bring it to the paths of its house ? 

'Hast thou entered the chambers of the snow^? 
Hast thou seen the guardians of the hail, 
Which I hold for the time of trouble, 
For the day of battle and war? 

' By what way is the storm-cloud parted. 
And the cold rain spread o'er the earth? 
Who hath cleft a channel for the flood, 
And a way for the lightning of the thunder? 



^The dawn lifts up the mantle of darkness which covers the Earth, and 
in the light the Earth stands forth revealed in sharp outlijies as the stamped 
clay when the seal is lifted. 

-v.v. 14a and 13b. are transposed. 

=^V. 21 should follow V. 18. The language is ironical. 



JOB XXXVII: 1-38. 



115 



'So that rain falls on tenantless lands, 
On the wilderness where none dwell. 
To satisfy the desolate waste, 
To make grass spring forth from the desert, 

■ Is there a father of the rain, 
Or who hath begotten the dewdrops? 
From whose womb came forth the ice? 
Who gave birth to the hoar-frost of heaven? 
So that water is frozen as a stone, 
And the face of the deep is hidden ? 

Canst thou bind the chain of Kimah,^ 
Or loose the bands of Kesil ?^ 
Bring forth Mazzaroth in his season,^ 
Or lead Ayish and her sons.?'^ 

Dost thou know the laws of the heavens ? 
Canst thou set their dominion upon earth? 
Canst thou lift up thy voice to the cloud. 
That plentiful waters may answer thee? 

Sendest thou the lightnings that they go. 
And say to thee, "Lo! we are here"? 
Who set wisdom in darkening mists. 
Gave discernment to the signs of the skies ?^ 

Who spreadeth the clouds in wisdom ? 
Who poureth out the bottles of heaven. 
When the dust runneth into a mass, 
And the clods cleave fast together?' " 



"Either the Pleiades or the constellation of Canis Major. In the latter 
case the chain is that by which the dog of Orion is held in leash. 

"Probably Orion, famous in Greek legend. 

^A constellation unknown, 

^Probably the constellation of the Bear. 

^Variously interpreted as meteors, comets or the Aurora Borealis and 
looked upon as signs of a change of weather or portents of coming events. 



116 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

To Preachers 

WE have come into a priceless heritage, last century's 
gift to this — the historic mind. Many stalwart men of 
the 19th century have labored hard, sometimes keeping 
the faith, sometimes losing, but ever striving, and we are entered 
into their labors. At no other time could men state their faith 
with more assurance than now. The scientific mind has made 
the historical and literary study of the Bible inevitable ; and we 
who stand at the transition between the old and the new must 
learn becoming reserve. It is only a method, after all, bringing 
afresh to us the same eternal and abiding truths that came to 
our fathers by another way. Even we have not come to our 
present point of view in a day. Quietly, patiently, we have been 
led, until now the old way is as impossible to us as the new is to 
others. But the truths remain quite unchanged. We, young 
preachers, need to tack up, where we shall often see, Marget 
Howe's conversation wdth her minister. Carmichael, ''an in- 
genuous lad, with the callow simplicity of a theological college 
still untouched," had begun a "course" in Biblical criticism, 
which was to place Drumtochy of the ''Bonnie Brier Bush'' on 
a level with Germany. But Lachlan Campbell had taken him to 
task, and in his distress he calls at Whinnie Knowe to tell ^Irs. 
Howe of his controversy w^ith Lachlan. Marget speaks : 

"It's a strange buik, the Bible, and no the buik Ave wud hae 
made, tae judge by oor bit creeds and confessions. It's like a 
head ' aits in the harvest time. There 's the ear that bauds the 
grain and keeps it safe, and that's the history, and there's often 
no mickle nutriment in it; then there's the corn lying in the 
ear, which is the Evangel frae Eden tae Revelation, and that is 
the bread o' the soul. But the corn maun be threshed first and 
the cauf (chaff) cleaned aff. It's a bonnie sicht tae see the pure 
grain fallin' like a rinnin' burn on the corn-room floor, and a 
glint o' the sun through the window turning it intae gold. But 
the stour (dust) o' the cauf room is mair than onybody can 
abide, and the cauf 's worth naethin' when the corn's awa." 

'"Ye mean," said the minister, "that my study is the threshin' 
mill, and that some of the chaff has got into the pulpit." 
"Yir no offended?" and Marget 's voice trembled. 




The Modern House 

PART II. 

IX OUR LAST ISSUE we discussed Edison's revolutionary 
method of building a house ; in this issue we propose to 
follow up that subject by a description of the interior fit- 
tings of the Modern House. This article will consist mainly of an 
account of three homes — ^one at Troyes, near Paris, France ; one 
at Carrollton, Illinois and one at Schenectady, New York. The 
first of these was that built by Mr. TI. W. Hillman, of Schenec- 
tady, in the spring of 1905, and is a long step towards the ideal 
house — without fire or chimney, without coal or ashes, with a 
minimum of domestic labor and discomfort ; yet well heated and 
lighted, and a great advance in convenience. 

This house is equipped with every conceivable manner of 
electric device for doing the work of the household, chopping 
the meat and vegetables, cooking them, boiling the kettle, running 
the sewing-machine, and numberless other contrivances. 

Mr. Hillman found, in building his house, that he could save 
more than enough money by having a cellar under part of the 
house only to more than pay for the extra wiring throughout, 
and to buy a complete line of attractive cooking, baking, and 
ironing devices, radiators, chafing dishes, and other miscel- 
laneous electric articles. On entering the house, in September, 
1905, the electric kitchen equipment was in operation within two 
minutes from the time the table was taken off the wagon. Ever 
since the family has cooked and baked by electricity alone. 

The cooking and baking outfit is very simple, consisting of 
a wooden table about four feet long and three feet wide, stand- 
ing at the same height as a coal or gas range. This table 
is equipped with seven regulating switches for turning the 
current off and on. Three of these switches have one "heat" 
onlv, and are used for controlling small dishes. The others are 



118 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



devised for three heats, known as "maximum," ''medium" and 
"minimum." The maid, in starting to bake, turns the switch 
for the maximum heat; in fifteen minutes the oven is ready, 
and at the proper time the switch is turned for securing medium 
or minimum heat. The three-heat switches are also used to 
regulate such devices as the four-combination cereal cooker, 
the meat broiler, and the vegetable kettle. To illustrate — 
the large frying-pan, having been used for frying the eggs and 
bacon, can be left with minimum heat for keeping the food 
w^arm. If the dish had only one heat, the food would either be 




COOKING AND BAKING OUTFIT. 

The seven regulnting switches are in a row at the 
back of the t »ble. 



over-cooked, or when the heat was turned off, would get cold. 
The gridiron cooks the most delicious brow^n cakes, and requires 
only two minutes' notice for maximum heat. The meat broiler 
is ready in about the same time. In his many years' experience 
with other systems for cooking and baking, Mr. Ilillman has 
never found any other system so quick, convenient, and effective 
as the electric. 

As regards cost, the best way to estimate it is by comparison 
with monthly cost of operating with coal and gas. Mr. Hillman 
calculated, after long and careful observations, that the average 
monthly cost for electricity for two years, was $6.69 a month, or 
only 10 per cent, higher than coal or gas. Then there are no 
fires to build, no ashes to cart away, and the electric system is 



THE MODERN HOUSE. 



119 



very much more expeditious and efficient, very muoh cleaner and 
healthier. 

There are many other electric devices besides the kitchen 
outfit. For example, in the dining-room, there is a small electric 
table in quarter-cut oak, wired for coffee percolator and chafing- 
dishes. On the verandah and in the den, electric cigar-lighters 
make matches an unknown quantity in the house. In the 
sewing-room, the sewing-machine motor and the three-pound 
electric iron are articles without which Mrs. Hillman could not 
now get along. The first cost of such articles is small, and the 
cost of operating is hardly noticed on one's monthly bills. The 
bathroom is complete with electric contrivances — a shaving mug 
supplies hot water for shaving in less than a minute, a radiator 
warms the room almost at once, a water heater ensures hot 
water for the bath at any time, and a massage motor is handy 
for quick service when one misses his daily exercise. 

The house we have mentioned at Carrollton, Illinois, ' is one 
more step in advance. Besides doing all their cooking by elec- 
tricity, the family heats the house by steam from a central sta- 
tion. It utilizes the exhaust steam which usually goes to waste 
around small electric plants, and dispenses with the furnace in 
the cellar, demanding constant care and attention. The steam is 
piped underground to the house, and utilized in the usual steam 
radiator. Apropos of this method, it has been stated to the 
editor of this column, by a prominent engineer, that, were the 
University of Toronto to build a central power station, and 
transmit live steam underground to the group of buildings in 
Queen's Park, it would not only cut down its coal bill one-third, 
but have a much more efficient service. The owner gives the 
cost of cooking by electricity as only $3.50 a month for a family 
of five. The difference in these figures is probably due to cheaper 
electricity. 

But by far the most interesting house in the variety of its 
applications of the simple fundamental principles of electricity 
is the residence of M. Knap, near Troyes, France. 

The villa stands in a beautiful park, planted with trees and 
shrubbery, and surrounded by a wall. On approaching the 
arched entrance gate, you press an ordinary electric door button, 
and step at once into a land of wonders, which are calculated 
to take the breath of even the most experienced. Almost at the 



120 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

instant you ring, there comes to you, from apparently nowhere 
in particular, the sound of a voice enquiring your name and the 
purpose of your visit. Instinctively you answer, speaking to 
the iron gate in your usual tone, that you have called with a 
note of introduction to M. Knap. The voice answers that the 
master of the villa is at home, and will be pleased to see you. 
Forthwith, apparently of its own volition, the great gate swings 
open for you, and you proceed along the curved walk that leads 
to the house. In the most mysterious way the voice w^hich 
greeted your ring seems to follow you as you walk through the 
park. It is the average normal voice of a gracious host bidding 
you welcome, and possibly calling your .attention to various rare 
and beautiful flowering plants that you may happen to be pass- 
ing at the time. And you notice that the plants are all of a 
very unusual size and brilliancy, which you later learn is due 
to electro-culture. It is difficult to realize, without actually 
experiencing it, the weird effect of holding a somewhat prolonged 
conversation with an absolutely invisible person, who seems to 
keep perfect pace with you, no matter whether you are walking 
slowly or at a rapid gait. 

As you mount the steps which lead to the front entrance to 
the villa, a curious carpet-shaped brush, which is set in the floor 
of the platform, starts to revolve, and instantly removes all 
traces of mud and dust from your shoes. At the same moment 
the front door opens, and the mysterious voice invites you to 
enter, precedes you to the reception-room, requests you to be 
seated, and informs you that your host will be down in a 
moment. 

Doubtless, if your introduction comes from one of M. Knap 's 
friends in Paris, you will be asked to stay to dinner, and in the 
dining-room your wonder will certainly be greatly increased. 
The table, of curious and yet extremely convenient shape, ijs 
laid for twelve, but you are puzzled to observe that there are 
no servants in the room. When you are seated, and just as you 
are beginning to admire the beautiful and brilliant decorations, 
which stretch around the table in an oval wreath of fleiy flowers, 
you are startled to see arise, apparently through the solid 
mahogany, a great silver soup tureen. As though it were 
endow^ed with life, this tureen starts to move slowly around the 
table, stopping just at the left hand of every guest, so that he 



THE MODERN HOUSE. 121 

may help himself. When each of the guests has been served, 
the tureen disappears. 

With the mysterious appearance of the fish, which is already 
carved and ready to be served, you are startled to observe a 
complete change in the table decorations. What was au instant 
before a great glowing wreath of roses has now apparently be- 
come incandescent molten metal, in which chrysanthemums are 
blooming. 

Eetuming to the upper floors of this wonderful house, one's 
wonder keeps increasing. In the bedrooms the temperature is 
kept absolutely constant at any desired degree, by an electric 
device controlling the hot and cold-air radiators, while the air 
is completely changed every half-hour. In place of hot-water 
bags, the guests are furnished with electric foot-warmers, which 
may be turned off or on at an instant's notice. 

In the sleeping apartment of the host a number of astonishing 
devices are installed. Nowhere in these rooms is the telephone 
visible, but by simply turning a button, and speaking in an 
ordinary low tone of voice, M. Knap can speak with anyone 
in the house, or even in the garage or stables outside. Or it is 
possible for him to hear with perfect distinctness anything that 
is said or any noise that is made anywhere in his establishment. 

Like all true artists, M. Knap, already the creator and owner 
of the most wonderful house in the world, is planning a yet 
more wonderful masterpiece. His next house is to have double 
walls, making it much easier to maintain the same temperature 
summer and winter, as well as affording space for running the 
necessary wires and piping. It will be possible, by pressing a but- 
ton, to raise or lower all the curtains in a room, or to open and 
close the windows. Sliding doors will be operated in a similar 
manner, and a great variety of other ingenious improvements are 
planned. 

All these wonders are accomplished, by a comparatively simple 
installation of electricity. All the more desirable of them are 
readily procurable by the average householder, and on the 
authority of M. Knap, the expense of operating is not much 
greater than that of conducting a household in the time-honored 
and unscientific way. 

(For the material in this article I wish to acknowledge my indebtedness 
to The Scientific AmericaUy The Technical Worlds The Engineering Age, and 
other periodicals. —cT. E. H.) 




ERSONALS 
EXCHANGES 



Personals 

THE next number of Acta is the Christmas number, and we 
are all concentrating our efforts towards its success. For 
this, however, we are relying upon the co-operation of the 
graduates. We trust that they will be kind enough to forward' 
any information that might add. an interest to these pages. It 
was like pumping water from a dry well, collecting material for 
this issue, but a mere suggestion is enough. 

J. W. Sifton, '98, is Superintendent of Education in Moose 
Jaw, and is on the Senate of the new University of Saskatchewan. 

J. H. Adams, '06, is teaching in the High School at Peterboro. 
His great interest in athletics has already inspired quite an 
enthusiasm for sports among his youthful proteges. 

W. L. Bradley, late of '09, is completing work for his degree 
in McGill. 

G. Buchanan, another ex-member of '09, is teaching at Hamar, 
Sask. 

A. E. Doan, another of '09 's late members, is preaching at 
Woodstock, Ont., and taking extra-mural work in the fourth year. 

D. W. Ganton, who was last with '09, has at last taken to his 
medicine and is now studying in the first year. 

Wilbert Hall, '07, is Science Master in Whitby Collegiate Insti- 
tute, and 'tis whispered that he sometimes lectures in the Ladies' 
College. 

The Class of 1908 

J. E. Brownlee is in business here in Toronto. 
F. S. AUbright is in Beamsville, assisting his father on the 
farm. 

E. T. Coatsworth, W. W. Davidson, R. P. Stockton and W. J. 
Cass are training their legal minds at Osgoode. 



WEDDINGS. 



123 



Elmer Ley is with the Wilcox Publishing Company, Toronto. 

W. A. McCubbin is demonstrating in the Biological Depart- 
ment of Toronto University. 

Eddie Halbert is demonstrating in the Chemistry and Mineral- 
ogy Department. 

C. B. Kelly is pursuing his course in medicine at Toronto 
University. 

G. A. Steele is preaching at Muna, Alta. ; W. N. Courtice at 
Kane, Penn. ; A. 0. W. Por'^man at Shallow Lake, Ont. ; P. N. 
Bowes at White River, Ont. ; A. N. Cooper at Conn, Ont., and 
C. E. Kenny at Earlton, Alta. 

Allan Bowles ds teaching at Magrath, Alta., while both R. A. 
Dow^ney and H. L. Dougan are teaching at River View, Sask. 

K. H. Smith is registered at S. P. S. in civil engineering. 

The Faculty of Education has received its usual consignment 
of ladies this year: Misses Baird, Pinel, Jamieson, Laird and 
Hildred. 

Mrs. Fear (nee Mason) is registered at Amherstburg, Ont. 

Miss Gibbard is teaching at the Evangelia Settlement, Toronto. 

Miss Bearman is at her home in Ottawa. 

Several others are registered at "Vic" in theology and post- 
graduate study. The addreses of all members would be gladly 
received by the permanent S'ccretary, C. Montrose Wright. 



Weddings 

<' (Continued from October). 

Madden — Wheaton. — One of the prettiest weddings of last 
June took place at 362 Oxford Street, North London, when Miss 
Bertha Wheaton was united in marriage to Rev. Morley Madden, 
B.A., '07. The ceremony was performed by Rev. P. E. Malott, 
pastor of Colborne Street Methodist Church, assisted by Rev. 
A. H. Birks, pastor of Askin Street Methodist Church, South 
London, and Rev. C. F. Logan, M.A., '07. 

The bride was attended by her sister. Miss Eva Wheaton, while 
the groom was assisted by his brother, Mr. Percy Madden. Acta 
extends congratulations. 

Kenney — Selkirk — Elmer Kenney, B.A., '08, was such a con- 
genial fellow that he could never be without company, so on 



124 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

September 24, at Leamington, he took unto himself a wife, when 
he was married to Miss Blanche, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. 
McR. Selkirk. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Jasper 
Wilson, M.A., Methodist pastor at Leamington, assisted by Revs. 
Hamilton and Hunter, also of Leamington, and Rev. Millson, of 
Kingsville. Only immediate friends were at the ceremony. The 
happy couple at once left for Detroit and points West. Acta 
joins wath all Elmer's large circle of personal friends in con- 
gratulations, and wishes him and his bride a very happy future. 
Down — Roantree. — In Thorold, on June 10 last, a happy 
event took place, when Rev. Charles Wesley Down, B.A., '08, 
was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Evelyn, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. R. B. Roantree. Rev. F. M. Mathers, B.D., the Metho- 
dist minister at Thorold, tied the blissful knot. The newly- 
married couple took a short trip to the "Highlands of Ontario," 
and in the first of July they turned their faces towards Port 
Lambton, where Mr. Down is now stationed. Acta joins in 
wishing them a most happy and useful future. 

Wren — Mallory. — Another ex-President of the ''Lit." set a 
nobl-e example, when Davy Wren, B.A., '07, was married to Miss 
Janet Louisa, daughter of Mr. Burnham Mallory, of Belleville, 
County Treasurer. The wedding took place in Belleville on 
September 23. It was a private affair, the bride and groom being 
unattended. Miss Edeline Rose acted as flower girl. The cere- 
mony was performed by Rev. A. S. Laidlaw, B.A., pastor of St. 
Andrew's Church, assisted by Rev. Dr. Dyer, principal of Albert 
College. Together with "Davy's" large circle of personal 
friends, Acta extends cordial congratulations and \vishes the 
happy couple a very happy and useful future. 

Logan — ^Waterhouse. — Everything was smiling on Sept. 1 at 
Lambton Mills, when Rev. Clark F. Logan, M.A. (B.A., '07), of 
Point Edward, was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Edith Water- 
house. The ceremony, which was performed by Rev. Johnston 
Mc(^ormack, M.A., of Maiden, assisted by the Rev. W. AV. Col- 
pitts, of Lambton Mills, was witnessed by a large number of 
friends. E. H. Toye, '10, stood up as groomsman, while Miss 
Jennie Waterhouse posed as bridesmaid. After a short recep- 
tion at the home of Mrs. James Anthony, sister of the bride, the 
happy couple left for a trip down the St. Lawrence. 



DEATHS. 



125 



Deaths 

Robert Lockey Biggs. 

It is a far cry from Newcastle-on-Tyne, in the north of Eni?- 
land, to Calgary, Alberta, Canada. At Newcastle Robert Lockey 
Biggs was born, at Calgary he departed this life. 

Only thirty years of age : so young to die, we say, and in that 
we say truly, though in some respects Robert Biggs was not 
young. If we counted time by deeds, by experience, I think he 
would be considered of mature years. 

Very early in years, at the age of twelve, he went to work, and 
from that time until his death he lived a strenuous life. He knew 
men by personal contact with them in the coal mine, as a railway 
employee, and as a farm hand. 

Five years ago he entered the ministry of the Methodist Church 
of Canada in Newfoundland, and for three years served her most 
faithfully on the Wesleyville circuit. The circuit is a large one, 
there is much walking to do, and the roads are bad. Many jour- 
neys have also to be taken in open boat, necessitating exposure 
to all kinds of weather. Mr. Biggs did not spare himself, but 
rather attempted too much, and, we fear, undermined his consti- 
tution. He rendered the circuit noble service. His memory w^ill 
be fragrant for years to come in many homes in Bonavista Bay. 
Even in busy college days, he remembered his old parishioners, 
writing sometimes twelve letters at a sitting, and humble hearts 
in lonely places were gladdened by a letter from the "passon" 
at college. 

He entered Victoria College in 1906, with high hopes, and 
there acquitted himself well, gaining the respect of the professors 
and the good-will of the boys. He was a well-read man, with a 
wide and accurate knowledge of the best theological and homi- 
letic writings. He was especially interested in sociological ques- 
tions. 

The days of his ministerial probation were almost over, and he 
was looking forward to ordination and to service for his Master 
in the North- West, when the blow came. He was stricken with a 
hemorrhage of the lung, and for several weeks lay dangerously 
ill. He gathered strength later on, and we were hopeful of his 
ultimate recovery, thinking that Calgary and the ministrations 
4 



126 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

of his capable and devoted wife would effect a cure. It was not 
to be, however, and on Friday, 23rd October, he passed quietly 
away. 

He bore his trying sickness with Christian patience, hoping to 
the last that he might be permitted to get well. There was a 
manifest deepening of spiritual life in the few months preceding 
his death. In one of the last of his letters to me he wrote, "I 
have to thank God for many friends in Calgary, but chiefly for 
the abiding sense of His presence." 

The Methodist Church lias lost one of the most promising of 
her young ministers; a laihev in the homeland has lost a soii 
whom he loved as the apple of his eye ; and many classmates will 
mourn the loss of a true friend. Our heartfelt sympathy goes 
out to the brave young English lady who bears his name. — Loch 
Rama. 

We deeply sympathize with E. J. Halbert, B.A., '08, in his 
recent bereavement. On October 20 his father, who had long 
been ailing, passed away at Shelburne, Ont. 

F. H. Barlow, '10, also has our heartfelt sympathy upon the 
loss of his mother, which occurred on October 30. 

Two years ago G. A. King, B.A., '07, was president of our 
Y.M.C.A. He was married upon graduation, but is how alone 
again. We all join in deeply sympathizing with him upon the 
death of his young wife on October 31st last. 

Exchanges 

The University of Ottawa Review contains an interesting 
article on the Lake of the Woods Massacre. The story illustrates 
some of the hardships and hazards the early missionaries fear- 
lessly faced in carrying Christianity to the heathen Indian. In 
1732, Sieur la Verandrye led an expedition to the West, and 
founded a fort on the Lake of the Woods, which he named St. 
Charles. The happiest of relations existed between these mis- 
sionaries and the surrounding Crees. But lack of supplies forced 
them to descend to Lake Superior for food, and they had to pass 
through the country of the Sioux, who were then at war with the 
Crees. The inevitable happened, and the whole party of twenty- 
one was massacred. The remains were interred in St. Charles. 
Soon the fort was abandoned and all traces of it lost. 



EXCHANGES. 127 

Though many expeditions were sent out, the remains of the un- 
fortunate party were never found until July of this year, when 
a number of men from St. Boniface finally discovered them. 

It is a healthy sign when we see a university publication, such 
as Queen's University Journal, not allowing its outlook to be 
cramped by the narrow horizon of the student world. AVe ought 
to manifest a lively interest in matters of importance in the 
world around us. In the October number of this magazine there 
is an exceedingly sane article upon the very unsatisfactory con- 
ditions that prevailed in the recent electoral campaign. It is 
excellent, and is well worth reading. 

The Notre Dame Scholastic, an interesting weekly, affords a 
pleasant surprise. Though published weekly, there is something 
of real worth in each issue ; matters in the world outside are 
freely introduced and handled very ably. Sound editorials 
upon such subjects as the American public school system, the 
Irish in America, the opposition to Governor Hughes, and the 
questionable character of many political campaigns, invest this 
publication with a pronounced strength of character. 

The October number of the 0. A. C. Review devotes much 
space to the claim of college organizations, and here it deals 
with a matter of vital import to the student just entering upon 
his college career. A very lucid and forceful article from the 
pen of Professor Keys of University College is quite capable of 
converting the most inveterate ''plug." Every college student 
should peruse this article. 

One of Toronto 's most prominent business men steadily affirms 
that a college education' is prejudicial to a success in business. 
While we do not swallow this statement whole, there are a few 
grains of truth in it, and the question is one that almost every 
college man will have to face at some time. One of the clearest 
and fullest articles on this question is found in the October 
number of the McMaster University Monthly, "The Call of the 
Business World." It is very convincing, and should be read by 
all who give any serious thought to the matter. 




T 



Mulock Cup Schedule 

HE following schedule was arranged for the first round 
of the inter-faculty Rugby competition for the Mulock 
Cup: 



A— Nov. 16.— Dentals vs. Junior S. P. S. 
B — Nov. 17. — Junior Meds vs. Senior Arts. 
C— Nov. 18.— Victoria vs. Senior S. P. S. 
D — Nov. 19. — Junior Arts vs. Senior Meds. 
<^ ^^ ^^ 

St. Michaels, 1 — Victoria, 

Such was the result of the first practice game in Eugby. As 
indicated by the score, the teams were very evenly matched, the 
outcome of the game being in doubt until the end. Our men 
were unfortunate several times, when, with' the ball in their pos- 
session near their opponents' line, they lost it on off-sides. The 
back division of the Vic. team played a very strong game, while 
the wings held their men well. The game was of a very friendly 
nature and devoid of any roughness, but by an unavoidable acci- 
dent the center half of the St. Michael's team had his ankle 
broken. The following men represented Vic. : Livingstone, 
Ecclestone, Gundy (captain), Wilder, Gerrie, Birnie, Graham, 
Swinerton, French, Kitt, Hemingway, McKenzie, Morrison, 
Miller and Oldham. 

^£ ^^ ^^ 

Varsity III., 9— Victoria, 

In the second practice game of the series, against Varsity III., 
Vic. was again defeated. It was a hard-fought game all the way 
through, but a few costly errors gave our opponents an advan- 
tage. During the first half the only score was one point, secured 
by Varsity on a kick to dead line. After half-time Varsity 



ATHLETICS. 129 

came with a rush, and quickly added the other eight points on a 
converted touch-down, a rouge and a kick to dead line. For 
the remainder of the game Vic. held their own, but were unable 
to score. Reg. Gundy 's centre rushes and bucks, and the tack- 
ling of Oerrie and Ecclestone were the features of the game. 
The result, although not highly gratifying to our pride, shows 
that our weaknesses are mostly such as may be overcome by 
practice. The Vic. team was composed of the same men as in 

the previous game. 

^^ ^« ^« 

O. A. C, 22— Victoria, 5 

On Saturday, October 31st, the Victoria Rugby Club took 
their annual trip to Guelph and played the 0. A. C. chasers of 
the pigskin. The Guelph team was composed of seven men from 
their first team and seven men who will probably help round out 
next year's fourteen, so it was virtually Vic. vs. 1909 Senior 
0. A. C. When to this is added the fact that the players on the 
Vic. team were considerably lighter than their opponents, and 
were lacking in experience, it is not surprising that they met 
defeat to the tuiie of 22 — 5. In the first half 0. A. C, kicking 
with the wind, scored 10 points to Vic's 0, and in the second 
half, kicking against a much lighter wind, they scored 12 — 5. 
Vic's only touch was scored by Ecclestone on a beautiful run 
after intercepting a pass between the 0. A. C. halves. The Vic. 
team was composed of the following: Livingstone, Ecclestone, 
Gundy (captain), Wilder, Gerrie, Guthrie, Shaver, French, 
Swinerton, Birnie, Graham, Jewitt, Morrison and Miller. 

^^ ^^ <^ 

Association 

The first game of Association football in the inter-faculty 
series was played on October 21st between Victoria and Knox. 
As Vance, the Vic. captain, had received no notice of the game 
until two hours before it was to be played, great difficulty was 
experienced in mustering a team. But rather than default, they 
played under protest. For the first half Vic. held their own suc- 
cessfully, but in the second half Knox, who this year have a 
strong and well-balanced team, were able to secure two goals. 
Their failure to add to this score was due largely to the brilliant 



130 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

playing of Gundy at centre half and of Wilder in goal for Vic. 
The rest of the team played well, but were seriously handicapped 
by lack of practice in team work. Vic's line-up: Goal, Wilder; 
backs, Smith, Jewitt; half-backs. Bright, Gundy, Newton; for- 
wards, Taylor, Willans, Hadden, Rumball, Livingstone. 

* ¥ ¥ 

Jottings 

It is with sincere regret that Vic. students learn that Jim 
Pearson has been forced to quit Rugby for this year. But this 
regret is somewhat tempered by the fact that Jim has thus been 
able this fall to devote more time to the coaching of the college 
team. This has materially aided the captain and players in their 
practices and games. 

Vic, however, is still represented on the University teams. 
On Varsity I. Jones has been ably filling a place in the scrim- 
mage, while J. E. Lovering held a position on the wing line of 
Varsity II. until forced by an injury to drop out. 

A very strenuous and evenly contested game of Rugby was 
played between the sophomores and freshmen, in which the 
former succeeded in obtaining 8 points to their opponents' 3. 

Another interesting game was that between the B.D.'s and 
C.T.'s, in which the former won by a score of 10 — 0. 

The first game in the inter-year Association series was be- 
tween '11 and '12. The sophomores, who played a much better 
game than the freshmen, won by a score of 4 — 0. 

The second inter-year game, played between the Seniors and 
Juniors, resulted in a win for the latter. Although '09 had 
much the better of the game, they were unable to secure a goal, 
while their opponents scored one under cover of the darkness. 

ir ¥ ¥ 

Alley 

The benefits of the new alley board have already been demon- 
strated by the better class of alley now being played at Victoria. 
This year Vic. accomplished a feat that has no precedent for 
many years past, by defeating St. Michael's on their own board. 
It was a close game throughout, the final score being 21 — 18. 
But in the two games with the Dentals Vic. was not as fortunate, 
being defeated each time. By these victories the Dentals retain 
the championship of Series A for another year. The team repre- 
senting Vic. was : Burt brothers, Jewitt, Richardson. 



ATHLETICS. 



131 



Tennis 

The interest which was manifested in the fall tournament of 
this popular game this year was the just reward of the efforts 
of the secretary. All the games were played with zeal and en- 
thusiasm, and were keenly contested. A new feature, in the 
form of a handicap series, was introduced this year in the ladies ' 
tournament. In the men's handicap event, the schedule was 
especially well drawn up, the handicap being arranged with 
equality and justice, according to the merits of the players. The 
lovers of this game have been very fortunate, with three new nets, 
two new courts, and the three old courts in perfect condition 
for fast playing. The schedules below indicate the results at 
the time of going to press, and also show the large field out of 
which the winners emerged victorious. 

COLLEGE CHAMPIONSHIP 



Manning \ Manning- 

McKenzie / College Champion 

Miller | Miller 

Adams / 6-2, 8-6 

Van Wyck \ McCulloch 

McCuUoch / default 

Horning \ VVillans 

Willans / 6-0, 10 8 

Hetherington. . . ) Fleming 

Fleming f default 

MacLaren \ MacLaren 

Conn f 6-0, 6-0 

Hemingway ) Hemingway 

Ockley / 6-0, 8-10, 6-4 

Stevenson \ Jones "| 

Jones j default | Wiegand . . 

Wiegand \ Wiegand j' default 

Clement / 6-0,8-6 J 



Manning. 
6-2,4-6, 



Willans. 



I MacLaren . 
r 6-2, 6-1 

I Wiegand.. , 
I 6-4, 7-5 



Willans 
5-7, 6-S 



Wiegand . 



Wiegand 

1-6, 6-3, 6-0, 
6 1 



HANDICAP CHAMPIONSHIP 



-2 I Willans 
.. r 6-1,6 

}Conn.. . 
6-2, 6 



-^15 Manning I Manning. . 

- 15 Horning I 6-8, 6-2, € 

-J 15 Willans ) Willans.... 

s Stevenson / 6-3, 6-2 

- 15 Hetherington j Conn 

-J 15 Conn / 6 4,9-7 

-il5 Wright ^Wright ... 

- 1 15 Richardson t 61, 6-1 

- 15 Wi^gand \ Wiegand "k 

8 Jewitt I 3-6, 6 2, 6-1 I Wiegand . 

- J 30 Rayraer 1 Hemingway . j 6-2, 6-3 

- 15 Hemingway / 6 2, 9-7 J 

8 Van Wyck 1 Miller 

-H5 Miller f 6-2,6-0 

-H5 Ockley \ Ockley 

-J 15 Adams / 7-5 6-0 

- 30 Saunders i Saut ders 

8 Jones r 8 6, 6-3 

8 Fleming ) MacLaren 

- 15 MacLaren ( 6-4, 6-2 

- i 15 McCulloch \ McKenzie ... 

-i 40 McKenzie / 7-5, 2-6, 6-3 

8 Burnett ) Burnett 

8 Clement / 7-5,7-5 



VVillans . . 
6-2, 6-3 



i, 6-2 J 



I Miller, 
j 4-6, 8- 



I Saunders 
f6-3, 5-7, 6 



Wiegand. 
6-2, 6-3 



Wiegand. 
4-6, 6-2, 



Wiegand. ..♦ 
'6-0, 7-9. 7-5, 



1 

McKenzie .. 
r5-7, 6-0, 7-5^ 



McKenzie . 



6-4, 6-4 



8-6 



132 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Manning and Ockle^' 

Saunders and Richardson 
Horning and Hetherington 
Willans and McCulIoch 
Hemingway and Miller. 
Raynior and Wright . 
MacLaren and Adams 
Clement and Wiegand 

McKenzie and Birnie. 



MEN'S DOUBLES 

\ Manning and Ockley ^ 

/ 6-1, 6-4 Manning 

\ Horning and Hetherington I and 

/ 7-5, 7-5 f Ockley 

\ Hemingway and Miller I 6-4, 3-6,8-6 

/ 6-4. 6-4 J 

\ Clement and Wiegand \ \ Clement 

r 6-0, 7-5 I Clement ar:d Wiegand I and 

^McKenzie and Birnie.. I 6-4,6-2 f Wiegand 

/ a bye } j 7-5,5-7,6-2; 



est- 



The fourth annual Intercollegiate tennis tournament for the 
girls of University College, St. Hilda's and Victoria was played 
on the Un/iversity courts on October 21, 22 and 23. The cup has 
twice been won by the Victoria girls and once by St. Hilda's. 
This year it goes to University College. The players for Vic- 
toria College were: Miss Maclaren, Miss Denton, Miss Spencer, 
Miss Hyland, Miss Jamieson, and Miss Crews. The result of 
the tournament was as follows: 

Single Championship — Miss Fairbairn, University College. 

Double Championship — Miss Maclaren and Miss Denton, Vic- 
toria College. 

Score: University College, 11 points; Victoria College, 3 
points; St. Hilda's, 3 points. 





T 



HE Freshman year is certainly starting off well. We sub- 
mit the following as a fair sample of its literary ability. 
What may we not predict for the future ? 



There is no violet in the wooded glade, 
No summer's sunshine 'neath the forest shade; 
The wild geese south are turning now, 
There ain't no pasture left for grandma's cow. 

The maple leaves have fallen one by one, 
Gone is their glory and their life-work done, 
They go a lowlier mission to fulfil. 
The man what rakes them grumbles fit to kill. 

Grone are the joys of summer and of fall. 

Gone the warm sunshine and the light flowers all ; 

About the door drift high the pure white snows, 

And where we put the shovel goodness gracious knows. 

In the dining room at the. Hall : 

Maid — "Why, Miss C — e, '09, I have been looking for you 
fifteen minutes ! Where have you been, behind the teapot ? ' ' 

Miss G — t — "What did Dr. Burwash mean when he said there 
was language before Eve was created? Did Adam say, 'I am 
lonely'?" 

Miss F — n — y, '12 — "I think it is so funny that every person 
at South Hall seems to have found their infinity but me. ' ' 

Mr. B — n — e, '11 — "Well, I am glad the 'Bob' is over, for I 
am so tired of being a professional ass, now I can be quite 
natural. ' ' 

Miss H — y, '10 — "I certainly would do it if my heart didn't 
fail me." 

Miss D — d — n, '10 — "You seem to be having a lot of trouble 
with your heart lately." 



134 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Miss H— y, 10— ''Yes, I do wish I could get rid of it, but it 
seems an impossibility." 

Miss G^y — u, '10 (on her way to a Latin lecture) — "Come 
along, girls ; the Philistines are upon us."' ' 

The* initiation of the freshettes by the sophettes at the Hall 
this year took a very different and very novel form. On the 
afternoon of October 14th every freshie received a summons to 
appear that night at eight o'clock in the court room. Needless 
to say, they all came, some in fear and trembling, others very 
bravely and, to outward appearance at least, very calm and 
collected. Miss Shorey, '11, made a very imposing judge; Miss 
Keagey, '11, acted as lawyer for the prosecution, and one of the 
juniors as lawyer for the defence. Miss Crawford, '11, made a 
very able clerk of the court, and Miss Dafoe, '11, an excellent 
crier. Seven prisoners appeared before the judge and answered 
to the charges of being too fresh, too familiar to their superiors, 
the worthy sophomores; lacking in discretion, and disturbers of 
the peace, other charges being vagrancy and self-consciousness. 

Notwithstanding the fact that they had a lawyer to plead for 
them, they were all found guilty and received such sentences as 
Her Worship thought most beneficial. The court was then ad- 
journed and all present invited to partake of a feast of good 
things provided by the sophomores. At the repast the two 
years joined in burying the hatchet forever, thus ending a very 
pleasant and profitable evening. 

The following is a gem gleaned from Robert's speech to the 
freshmen : 

"I hope that you freshmen will go home with the freshettes at 
night, for while thus doing" good to others you will be helping 
yourself. ' ' 

McN — V — n, '10 (above the din at the reception) — "Holloa, 
there, you old hairpin!" 

S — n — r — n, B.D. (at boarding house)-- 'Will you pass me 
the sweetness, please?" 

T — ^y — or, '09 — "No, she's out in the kitchen at present." 

B — m — e, '11 (after carefully examining the lock of his board- 
ing house door) — "Say, that's just the same as the lock on the 
front door of Annesley." 



LOCALS. 135 

Greer, '12 — ' ' I don 't want to go to the reception, but I suppose 
I had better go and get used to it." 

B — t, '10 — ' ' How are you this morning, Cass ? ' ' 

C — s — m — e, '10 — ' ' I feel as happy as a pig in a puddle. ' ' 

Dr. John Burwash (in Religious Knowledge lecture) — ''There 

are three heads and three applications." 

G. W. A— a— s, '10— ''You'd think this was a barber shop." 
Lyonde (photographer for Torontonensis) — "The secret of 

my success is that I make women look as pretty as I possibly 

can." 

Miss C— 1— k, '11 (at Eaton's)— "Can you tell me where I 
can get a mortar-board?" 

Clerk — "You will likely get it in the woodenware department, 
miss. ' ' 

Miss J — m — n, '10 — ' ' When you tell anything around Victoria 
it is like casting your bread upon the water — it never comes back 
void. 

Miss McC— 11, '11— "Isn't there a chapter in the Bible called 
St. Paul's? It seems to me I have heard the name some place." 

As a warning to students not to try and travel on pink tickets 
we would give the following illustration : The other day Miss 

, '11, when on her way to the Lillian Massey School, put a 

pink ticket in the box, whereupon the conductor said: "You're 
more than sixteen, and I got orders not to take pink tickets from 
ladies wearing veils, as altogether too many married women 
travel on them." 

Mr. E — s, '12 — "If a stranger saw a group of college men to- 
gether and was asked to pick out the professor, he would never 
pass over French for Owen." 

On the evening of October 23rd Alumna3 Hall was once more 
in gala attire, it being the occasion of the reception given by the 
Women's Literary and the Union Literary Societies. The whole 
upper floor of the College looked very inviting, with its decora- 
tions of autumn foliage and pumpkins, not to mention the col- 
lege banners and cushions. After a very entertaining pro- 
gramme the usual promenading was indulged in, and everyone 
claims to have passed a most enjoyable evening. 



136 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Jottings from tpie Reception. 
Freshette— "Well, I have heard of promenading, but I never 
before saw it made a business of like this. ' ' 

Miss G—d—y, ^12— "How is dt that only one of the ^Hall'' 
proctors has her stick here to-night? Don't they all have to 
carry them?" 

Miss McL — , '12 — ' ' I prefer to sit out my promenades, because 
then I have so much better opportunity for studying human 
nature. ' ' 

Dr. Eeynar (in third year English, explaining the different 
consonantal sounds) — ^"When the consonant R precedes a vowel 
it has a harsh sound, as tr-r-r-rumpet, but when it comes at the 
end of a word, as in beer, it becomes liquid and disappears." 

We are pleased to note that Smith, one of our '08 graduates, 
though taking "applied science" across the Park, has not for- 
gotten his old friends at Victoria. The other day he was talking 
to an acquaintance on the college grounds, when he happened to 
spy a party of students coming out of the East entrance. 

' ' Those must be f reshettes, ' ' said he, after a short pause. 

"Why?" 

"Because I don't know them," was the laconic but convincing 
reply. 

Gifford, '11, while passing through the exit at the Union 
Station, upon his first arrival in Toronto, was given the usual 
reception by the line-up of hotel porters as they saw him hove 
in sight, bearing a large grip in each hand. When opposite the 
King Edward porter that worthy gentleman, placing his hand 
on Clifford's shoulder, cried out: "King Edward!" Thoroughly 
astonished, Gifford turned and said, ' ' I beg your pardon, but you 
are mistaken; I'm Gifford from Stratford." 

The paper chase given by St. Hilda's College Saturday, 
October 30th, was even more interesting and exciting than usual. 
The three colleges, St. Hilda's, Varsity, and Victoria, were well 
represented at the meeting-place in High Park. 

Now, it so happened that a walking race, given by one of the 
newspapers, was held there at the same time. The crowd that 
had gathered for this thought the group of college girls were 
competitors in the race and surrounded them. It seemed almost 



LOCALS. 137 

impossible to make the truth known, so the only thing to do was 
to look pleasant and bear it and be properly grateful for being 
in the public eye even beyond the dreams of "Bobs" or "Carrie 
Nation." When finally the people did find out their mistake 
they gazed on the girls with an injured air, as if they had been 
cheated out of some treat. 

The hares were given eight minutes' start and the chase began. 
The trail was quite tangled and seemed to take a perverse delight 
in going through the thickest bushes and wettest streams pos- 
sible. Four girls succeeded in following it and arrived at the 
end soon after the hares. 

Afterwards refreshments were served at St. Hilda's and the 
gathering broke up after the various college and class songs had 
been sung. 

Dr. Edgar (to a fourth year class in English) — "You will see 
the subjects for your essay on the board, and will notice they 
fit in nicely with your English, so, you see, you can kill two birds 
with one stone." 

Miss D — n — te, '09 — "I suppose he means himself and us, 
too." 

The freshmen have evidently profited by the lesson they re- 
ceived at the ' ^ Bob, ' ' and carry on affairs in their class meeting 
in an expeditious and business-like way, as the following items 
taken from their minute book w411 show : 

Moved by H. W. Manning, seconded by F. C. Gill, That the 
President lead our yell to-night. Carried. 

Moved by G. C. Geerie, seconded by W. C. Graham, That the 
Treasurer pay Mr. Geerie 85c. for paint. Carried. 

Moral for Freshies. — Take care of the minutes and the locals 
will take care of themselves. 

Va — ce, '09 — "Why didn't you come home earlier, L — yd?" 

M — rr — s — n, '09 (whose locker had refused to open) — "Mod- 
esty forbade." 

B— shf— e— d, C. T. (after the first reception)— "May I have 
the pleasure of accompanying you home?" 

Freshette — "Oh, thank you, but we all go home together." 

President of A. U. (referring to recent losses from the ath- 
letic building) — "I think I'll have to see the Chancellor 
about it." 



138 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

McN— n, '10— ''Why, you don't think he took them, do you?" 

It is sometimes extremely difficult to follow the trend of 
thought of some people. Here is a sample : 

Lost. — Will the fellow who lifted my hat kindly return at 
once. The owner wears a No. 9 boot. — ^L. C. McR — b — rt. 

Dr. Bell (in third and fourth year pass Latin) — ''What kind 

of a genitive would you call that, Mr. Haynes ? " 

H — yn — s, '09 (with some effort) — "Epexegetical." 

Dr. Bell — "Well, if you haven't moved your jaws for a long 

time, that's a good answer." 

One evening last week Pete E , with his friend, Si H , 

were busily engaged in plugging Economics, when Pete sud- 
denly noticed that he had left the drawer of his dresser open. 
Getting up, he endeavored to shut it, but the drawer stuck and 
refused to close. Finally, when his store of patience was ex- 
hausted, he backed up and, with a thundering crash, came full 
broadside against the obstinate piece of furniture. Realizing 
what had happened, Si quietly remarked, "That's right, Pete; 
you know the Theory of Rent, Put the room on the hog. ' ' 

Pat M— 11— r, '09 (at Y.M.C.A., explaining group Bible study 
to new students) — "There's nothing more important in college 
life than Bible study. The group study is a very informal 
affair. A few of the boys gather in one of the fellow's rooms, 
some sitting on chairs, some lying on the bed, while others 
sprawl on the floor; everybody sticks in his gab any old time 
and says any old thing that comes into his head. That's the 
best way to study the Bible." 

W_dd— 1, C. T.— "I hear that Meredith, .'10, attended col- 
lege at New Westminster, B.C., then took his second year at 
Winnipeg, and now he is at Victoria. It seems to be a trans- 
continental course that he is taking." 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



139 



C. E. GOODMAN 

270 YONGE ST. 

Phone Main 2018 



The place where you should, buy your 
Furnisbiugs. Everything' new in Neek- 
w^ear and Shirts, and a full stock of 
Gloves, Hosiery and UiiderAvear. 

jj* Full Dress Requisites. ^ 

•^ Ribbons and Pennants. «^ 



Every Student 



Some time or other wants to buy Jewelery of some kind, or 
perhaps it is some repairs to watch or jewelery. Whichever 
it is, we are in a position to give the best satisfaction at the 
lowest possible cost. We are always pleased to have you call 
and look over our stock, and to quote you prices. 



A full line of L. E. 
Waterman's Ideal 
Eountain Pens 
and Ink always 
in stock. 



W. W. MUNN An expert Opti- 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN clan is in charge 

800 YONGE: ST. ^^ '^"'' ^P''^^' 

1st Door North of Bloor Street Department. 



students' Headquartei;;s 

COLLEGE BOOKS 

NEW and SECOND HAND 



VANNEVAR & CO. 

438 YONGE STREET TORONTO 



THE OLDEST FIRM 

with THK LARGEST STOCK 

at THE LOWEST PRICES 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen. 
National Separate - Leaf Note Book 



G. A, Lester 



Wm and 
Turnisbgr^ 

622 Yonge St. 

Near St. Joseph 



464 SPi%DINi%. 

THE S HO P 



AVENUE 

FOR 



Good Hair Cutting 
EI.. M. Kennedy CSl Co. 



Barbers 



6 Chairs 



6 Chairs 



For Fine Stationery 

Magazines. Souvenirs, Post Cards, Water- 
man's Fountain Pens and Fountain Pen Ink 
go to 

J. Willis' Bookstore 

Phone North ^^g YOHgC StrCCt 



140 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



COR. BLOOR AND YONGE 



PHONE N. 3535 



Northern Wardrobe 

See our special contracts for Students' Cleaning and Pressing and doing 

all minor repairs. Also a full line of Men's Furnishings. 

Proprietor - - - • \ir. R. ADAMS 



WE WANT YOUR 
ORDER FOR FALL 

We know we can please you if 
you will give us a Trial Order, 
Our Goods are Up-to-date in 
Pattern and Quality. We aim 
only at Good Workmanship. 
Prices Moderate. 

See our nobby school suits 
at $18.00 and $20.00. 

D1!^€01INT TO STUDENTS 

BERKINSHAW G GAIN 

348 Yonge Street 

You call us ! We do the rest. 

Toronto Shoe Repairing Co. 

Shoe Repairing, Cleats, etc., called 
for and delivered promptly. 

8-10 Cumberland St., Toronto 

Phone N. 5466 SKATES GROUND 




Ne-west St^'les 
Lar^e StocK 
of Ne-iv Ooods 



Phone 

NoT-tH 

3371 



MACEY 

TAILOR 

777 YONGE AFREET 
one blocK nortH oT Bloor iStreet 

T. BRAKE 

Fine Boots and Shoes 

REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 

BOOTS MADE TO ORDER 

562 Yonge St., Toronto 



Cut Flowers 

Floral emblems of every description 
are most carefully executed by 




96 YONGE STREET 

Our Prices are Reasonable. Our Execution Perfect 

Phones Main 1424 and 4790 
Night and Sunday, Phone Park 792 

• The Name of 

PARK BROS. 

On your photograph is a guarantee of the best 
workmanship; our FOUR DOLLAR cabinet is 
without an equal. 

STUDIO: 328i YongeSt. Phone Main 1269 

The L. S. Haynes Press 

Printers 
502 Yonge Street 



Phone North 3912 



College Work a Specialty 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF 
COMMERCE 



Capital Paid-up, 



$10,000,000 



Savings Bank Deposits received from $1.00 up 

BLOOR & YONGE BRANCH 



I 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



141 



CATERING 

For Banquets, Weddings, Parties, Social Teas, 

etc.. a specialty. (First-class service 

guaranteed. Estimates given.) 



ROBT. J. LLOYD & Company 
744-748 Yonge Street Toronto 

Phones Noi th 3036, North 127 



Ellis Bros. 

JEWELERS 

108 Yonge Street, TORONTO 

Rock bottom prices for 

year and " frat" pins. 

* 

Finest Workmanship 

Original Designs 



C. HAWLEY WALKER 

ni^evcbant bailor 

126 YONGE STREET 
Phone Main 4544 TORONTO 






7-OROH'^O- 



Skates 
and 
Hockey 
Supplies 



SAMUEL YOUNG 

CARPENTER, BUILDER 
AND CONTRACTOR 

Cosmopolitan Carpenter Shop, 

4i MAZELTON AVENUE, TORONTO 

Orders Promptly Executed 



J. W.Johnson 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 
272 Yonge St, - Phone : M. 565 



Waterman's Ideal Fountain 
Pens, $2.50. 



WATCHES PROPERLY REPAIRED 

Phone, North 242-243 

M. RAWLINSON 

Cartage Agent and Warehouseman 

Offices: 612 YONGE STREET 

FRONT ST., Four Doors East of Union Station 

Storage Warehouses : St. Joseph and Yonge Sts. 

Improved Vans and Trucks for Removing Furniture 

and Pianos, Storagefor Furniture, Baggage transferred 

TORONTO, CANADA 

High-class Tailoring at Close Cash Prices 

S. CORRIGAN 

The Leading Tailor 

175 Yonge Street 

Three Doors North of Queen 
Established 38 years 

Special quotations to all Students 



P 



ROGRAMMES, 
PROFESSIONAL and 
CALLING CARDS, 
MENU LISTS 
WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS 



PRINTED r'-iis.'S: 




William Briggs, 

Wesley Buildings, 
TORONTO. ONT. 



142 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



SOLID GOLD 

LINKS $2.75 




B 58H. Solid Gold Cuff 
Links, $2.75 

OUR NEW CATALOG OP JEWELRY POR 
THE ASKING. 



AMBROSE KENT 

& SONS, LIMITED 
156 YONGE ST. TORONTO 

ESTABLISHED 1868 



The Dining Hall 



556 YONGE STREET 



PHONE: 
North 4772. 



T. J. HEALEY, 

Proprietor. 



lalmuto ittttttg l|aU 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 

ji ■ 

i We purpose making this 
!( the students' dining hall. 
|; We pride ourselves on 
cleanliness and good 
service- 
Separate tables for ladies. 

20 Balmuto Street, Toronto 



FOR CHOICE, PURE 

Confectionery 



TRY 

Mother's Candy Kitchen 
732K YONGE ST. near czar st. 

Hall's Dining Hall 

606 YONGE STREET 

The students* Restaurant 

Rates $2.25 per week 

Phone North 3296. 



David Bell, fl 



702 and 704 YONGE 

Cor. St. Mary St. 



Choice Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery and Groceries. 



OUR GOODS ARE ALWAYS FRESH. 



Phone North 904 

Richard G. Kirby 



Carpenter and 537-539 YOHge St. 

Contractor for 

General Building TORONTO 

and Jobbing 



DUNCAN BROS. 

ARTISTIC PICTURE 
FRAMING 

Special attention given to 
the Framing of COLLEGE 
GROUPS at Reasonable 
Rates 

434 Yonge St., TORONTO 



I 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



143 



GEO. HARCOURT & SON 

CAPS 



COLLEGE GOWNS AND 
For Ladies and Men 



57 King Street West 



TORONTO 



SEE 
THE 
STAR 



51^ 

aiTAHOKS' 



IT 

LEADS 

TO 



I I GOGKBgim GO. 

HIGH-GRADE TAILORS 

COLLEGE llOtZ YONGE 
GOWNS Do 3 STREET 

Phone : North 1419 



S0LES HGEHTS WPTED 

$36.00 pep W^eek, op 400% 
Ppofit 

All samples, stationery and art 
catalogue free. We want one 
permanent agent in this locality 
for the Largest Picture and 
Frame House in America, 
Experience unnecessary. We 
instruct you how to sell our goods 
and furnish the capital. If you 
want a permanent, honorable 
and profitable position, write us 
to-day for particulars, catalogue 
and samples. 

FRANK W. WILLIAMS Co. 

121* •W. Taylor Street 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



THE STUDENTS' DRUG STORE 

We were Students ourselves not so very long 
ago, and we know the kind of treatment they 
appreciate. 

If you are a Student, mention this advertise- 
ment to us and we will try and make you feel 
at home, and allow you a special Student's 
discount on all your purchases. 

We have a well assorted stock of all kinds of 
Perfumes, Toilet Articles, Creams, Lotions, 
Powders and Sundries of every description. 

Huyler's and other high-class Chocolates, 
Creams and Bon-Bons. Our Soda Fountain is 
going Winter and Summer, and we serve 
dainty dishes and beverages in dainty fashion. 

Careful dispensing of prescriptions our 
specialty. 

W. J. A. & H. CARNAHAN, 

Traders Bank Bidg., Dispensing Chemists, 

Cor. Yonge & Bloor, Cor. Church & Carlton, 
Phone North 341 Phone Main 2196 

" 342 " " 2197 

Branch Tabard Inn Library. C.P.R. Tel. Office. 



THE lOTGH 8TU0IG 

318 YONGE STREET 

Toronto - Canada 



Phone Main 7027 



EVERYTHING IN 

High-Grade Photography 

skilfully and promptly executed 

NONE BUT THE MOST SKILFUL 
WORKMEN EMPLOYED 

Special Rates to Students 
G. B. C van dcr FEEN, 

Proprietor 



144 ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Uictoria College 



QUEEN'S PARK, TORONTO. 



In Federation with the University of Toronto. 



The Federation System enables Victoria to offer the fol- 
lowing advantages : 

1. A compact college life in a commodious and beautiful 
modern building, provided with all the latest conveniences 
for healthful work. 

2. A large staff of College Professors, composed of men 
with thorough European training and ripe . experience as 
teachers, and of earnest Christian character. 

3. Admission to all the lectures and laboratories of the 
University Staff of eighty-eight professors and lecturers, who, 
together with the fifty-eight professors and lecturers of the 
federated colleges, constitute the largest faculty of Arts in 
the Dominion, and one of the most efficient on the Continent. 
All University examinations, prizes, scholarships, honors and 
degrees are open to our students on equal terms with those 
of any other college. A large number of prizes, honors and 
scholarships are also offered to our students in our own 
College. 

4. Two commodious residences for women students afford 
every modern advantage for health and comfort and a refined 
social life. A course of physical training is also given under 
an accomplished directress and a women's gymnasium forms 
part of the new residences. 

5. Excellent facilities are afforded both in the University 
and College for post-graduates reading for the degree of 
Ph.D., and also a full course in the Faculty of Theology. 

Lectures in both faculties begin October 1st. 

N. BUR^WASH, S.T.D., LL.D., 

President. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



145 




niJTIIDIQ AND ONTARIO CONSERVATORY OF 

I ' MUSIC AND ART, WHITBY, ONT. 

LADIES Ideal home lite in a beautiful castle, 

QQI I CQB modelled after one of the palatial 
homes of English aristocracy. 
The latest and best equipment in every department, 
backed up by the largest and strongest staff of special- 
ists to be found in any similar college in Canada. 
Sufficiently near the city to enjoy its advantages in 
concerts, etc., and yet away from its distraction"*, in an 
atmosphere and environment most conducive to men- 
tal, moral and physical stamina. Send for new illus- 
trated calendar to 
REV. J. J. HARE, Ph.D., Principal. 



Alma College 

Rev. Robert I. Warner, M.A., D.D.. Principal 
Mrs. Jean Wylic Grey, - Lady-Principal 
Miss Alice F. Henwood, B.A., Acting Dean 



SENIOR SCHOOL makes efficient provision for studies for 
University Matriculation, University Curricula in Music, 
Teachers* Non-Professional Examinations, and for Alma 
College Diplomas in Liberal Arts ( M.L. A. and M.E.L.) ; 
Music (A.A.C.M.for f^ianoforte, Singing, Organ, Vio- 
lin ) ; Fine Art ; Elocution and Physical Culture ; Com- 
mercial Science ; Domestic Science. 

JUNIOR SCHOOL provides attractive school home, in 
separate apartments, for girls under thirteen, and alto 
prepares pupils for the High School entrance examinations. 
HEALTHY LOCALITY, Six Acre Campus. Superior 
Buildings, Competent Teachers, Successful Record. 
For Catalogue, address 

PRINCIPAL WARNER, 

Alma College, ST. THOMAS, ONT. 



Upper Canada College, Toronto 

H. W. AUDEN, M.A. (Cambridge), Principal. 

Regular Staff comprises 15 Graduates of English and Canadian Universities, with additional 
special instructors. Courses for University, Royal Military College and Business. Senior and 
Preparatory Schools in separate buildings. Every modern equipment. Fifty acres of ground 
in healthiest district. Four rinks, gymnasium, sw^imming bath, etc. 







1 n b. Lt AUi nsj 

preecription pbarmaQ 

OF THE NORTH END 

Discount to Students, Accuracy, Purity 


W.C. SENIOR 
&BRO. 


of ingredients, prompt delivery. 

WM. H. COX, 786 Vonge St., Toronto 


Tailors 

and 

Gown Makers 

717 
Yongc St. 
Toronto 


2^ Kindly Mention 

•^-"ACTA" 

^ When Purchasing 







Our shop is 
up-to-date and 
we use you right 



Razors Honed 



T. A. FELSTEAD 

4 CHAIR BARBER SHOP 4 
760 YONGE STREET 



Electric 

Face Massage 

Head Rub 



Shoe Shine 



146 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Cbe University of Coromo 

ana 

Univmitv College 



FACULTIES OF ... 



Arts 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Household Science 

Education 

Forestry 



For information, apply to the Registrar of the University, 
or to the Secretaries of the respective Faculties. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



147 



ESTABLISHED l873 

The Most Convenient Bank for Victoria College 

THE STANDARD BANK OF CANADA 

At Yonge and Charles Streets 

Cheques on any Bank E. L. WILLIAMS, 

may be cashed here. Manager. 



Dr. J. Frank Adams 

DENTIST 

Telephone College 243 
325 College Street. TORONTO 



DR. FRED. N. BADGLEY 

©etttlst 



110 AVENUE ROAD 

(Opposite St. Paul's Church) 

Phone North 35U 



TORONTO 



Alfrko W. Brigqs. 



Harold R. Frost. 



BRIGGS & FROST 

BARRISTERS, ETC. 

TORONTO 

Wesley Buildings, 33 Richmond St. West 
Toronto 



MASTEN, STARR & SPENCE 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Canada Lifb Building 

Toronto 

solicitors for bank of nova SCOTIA 

C. A. Masten, K.C, J. R. L. Starr 

J. H. Sl'ENCE 



E. B. Ryckman, M.A., LL.B. K.C. 

Chas. W. Kerr, B. A. C. S. Maclnnes, B.A., K,C. 

Christopher C. Robinson, B.A. 

RYCKMAN, KERR & MacINNES 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, etc. 
Canada Life Building, 46 King St. West, Toronto. 

Cobalt : 

RYOKMAN KERR, MacINNES & MAHON 



^.O.— PHONE NORTH 698 

Dr. S. L. Frawley 
DENTIST 

Qraduate of Toronto '>< xyi Cj. wr a 

and Philadelphia 11 OlOOf Ot. WCSt 



Phone North 354 



Contract work a Spjecialty 



r. OLVER, 

TAILOR, 

707 Yonge Street, Toronto 

Ladies' and Gents' Clothing Cleaned, 
Pressed, Altered, and Repaired 

...BURN... 

McGiirs Coal 

Cof. Bathufst St. and Farley Ave. 
Phone Park 393. 

GEO. A. EVANS, Phm.B. 

DISPENSING CHKMIST 

832 Yonge St. Toronto 

Liberal Discount to Students 

Telephones North 38 and North 3720. 
Telephone Orders a Specialty 

DYEING & CLEANING 
FOR MEN a WOMEN 

We completely meet the needs of men and 
women in dyeing and cleaning articles of per- 
sonal wear. Phone head office or any branch. 

R. par.ke:r (Sb CO. 

787-791 Yonge Street Toronto. Canad 

Branches in all Zieadiner Shopping Centres 



148 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



TKe 



Students^ 
Jew^elers 



Our Quality, Price and Service 
will be found all that could be 
desired. 

We have appropriate sugges- 
tions for Birthday, Wedding, 
or 'XMAS gifts. 

We are always pleased to show 
our display, and in no way 
force a sale. 



Stock & Bickle 

JEWELERS 

131 Yonge Street 

(Opp. Temperance St.) 



CHAS. POTTER 

85 YONGE STREET 

C. B. PETRY. PROPRIETOR 

Getting Every Fraction of 
Value from One's Eyesight 

MAN'S GREATEST ASSET 

It's not enough that your eye- 
sight — the faculty of vision — is 
"pretty good." 

Imperfect seeing is due to im- 
perfect testing — a failing at one 
or more points in the diagnosis. 

Testing eyes and furnishing 
glasses to conform with a com- 
plete and perfect testing is the 
distinctive business of this house. 

Why not be sure — not sorry — by 
a call on Potter ? 

POTTER, THE RELIABLE OPTICfAN 



Two Great Factors 

of Life Insurance which should appeal to all Uni- 
versity men are Protection and Investment. 

Any of our Endowment or Pay Life policies 
will give you the benefit of these two very important 

features. 

Secure yourself or your friends during these 
years of continuous expenditure by insuring in 

The Manufacturers Life Insurance Co. 

N.B. Excellent opportunities are given by this Company to men 
desiring employment in the months of vacation. 



1^ 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



149 



Men s VICTOR Boot 

= Style V. P. $4.00 = 



If you ordered a pair 
of boots like the Victor 
V.P. from the New York 
Bootmaker who origin- 
ated the style, he would 
charge you from $5.00 
to $6.00 and then not 
give you footwear better 
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this VICTOR V.P. 
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Finest quality of duck linings, inside top stays, back-stays, 
and facings. Solid oak-bark-tanned sole leather and 
heel. C, D and E widths, all sizes from 
5 to II 




$4.00 



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Capital Authorized, $10,000,000 Capital Paid Up, $5,000,000 

Rest Account, $5,000,000 

D. E. WILKIE, Pres. and Gen. Manager. E. HAY, Assistant General Manager. 

ROBT. JAFFRAY, Vice-President. W. MOFFAT, Chief Inspector. 

Savings Bank Department — Interest at current rates allowed on 
deposits of $ I. GO upwards from date of opening account, and interest 
credited four times a year. 

Letters of Credit and Drafts issued, available in all parts of the 

A General Banking Business Conducted. 

YONGE AND BLCXDR STREET BRANCH 

C H. Stanley Clarke, Manager 



THE 

FFIEELAND 
STUDIO 

Finest of facilities for 

GROUP WORK 



Special Prices to Students 



436 YONGE STREET 

Opposite Carlton Street 
'Phone M. 6887 



Follett's 

Ordered 

Tailoring 



Faultless style and tailor- 
ing in our Dress Suits. A 
good suit for $30.00. 
Get one of the smart col- 
lege ulsters. We have a 
nice lot of materials at 
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count arrangement. 



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181 YONGE STREET 



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Victoria College Rink, Charles west 

A.REA, 05,000 FEET 

We provide a large general Skating Rink 
and three Hockey Rinks. 



The best society in 
the city patronize our 
skating rink. 



Many of the fastest 
hockey teams in the 
City leagues practice 
and play their games 
here. 



Band on Friday nights and 
Saturday afternoon?. 

SEASON TICKETS: 

Gentleman's - $2.00 
Ladies' - - 1.75 



J. J. PEARSON. 

Sec.-Treas. 



Address : 

Victoria College 

PHoAe N. 3578 



H, L. Morrison, 

President 



THe Book Bureau 

Victoria U Diversity 



We Supply 



Every 



ARTS TEXT BOOK 

THEOLOGICAL BOOK 

at reasonable prices 

THE IDEAL WATERMAN PEN 
THE STERLING FOUNTAIN PEN 



Full lines of Note Books and Stationery, Crested Note Paper, etc. 

G. B. KING, B.A.., Mstnae'er. 



152 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



REA'S 



J\fEW STORE 

FOR WOMEM 




RECEPTION DRESSES 

DINNER FROCKS 

GRADUATION GOWNS 

We have tastefully provided for the college girl for her 
every college function as well as for her usual every- 
day wear. You'll find Rea's new store for women the 
final authority in evening gowns, demi-tailored costumes, 
cloaks, suits, coats, skirts, waists, underskirts, furs, 
millinery, neckwear, veilings and beltings. 

Rea's make their own garments and novelties — the 
store's stocks are constantly supplemented by the manu- 
factory — you have everything new and fresh, and values 
unsurpassed. In Rea's garments you'll find the most 
authentic of the new ideas combined With the original 
touches that Rea designers and workers weave into 
their work. Thus you have exclusive elegance with 
unusual values — a rare occurence. 

We illustrate with a few items in evening dresses : 



LACE AND POINT D'ESPRIT 
GOWNS — Brussels net, plain or 
embroidered, and dear little batiste 
frocks with the Directoire and Em- 
pire fashions ruling all with their 
inimitable grace. Skirts with long 
clinging lines, bodices slim and 
closely draped, long tight sleeves and 
high pointed collars — all one piece 
gowns. 

AN EXQUISITE LITTLE DRESS 
of spotted net is made beautiful with 
Irish Point Lace and touches of pale 
blue and white satin. 



ONE OF EMBROIDERED 
FILET NET of Empire cut has a 
panel front, from neck to hem, of 
heavy Cluny Lace. 

SATIN GOWNS are in favor this 
winter — satin conforms so gracefully 
to the styles. This Empire Gown 
is unusually charming. Of pale 
blue liberty satin, finished with 
tiny cream net yoke and panels of 
minutest tucking with large satin 
buttons. 



You may choose among maize, tuscan, taupe, canard, elephant's 
breath and varying shades of grsen in the satin gowns. 



A. E. REA Sr C°i 

168 Yonge Street, Toronto 



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money,— some things are too cheap in quality to be 
anything but dear in price." 

CITY DAIRY CO., Limited 

Phone College 2040 Spadina Crescent 



lalmuto Stmng If all 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 

We purpose makmgf this 
the students' dining hall. 
We pride ourselves on 
cleanliness and good 
service- 

Separate tables for ladies- 

S. W. PAISLEY, Proprietor 
20 BALMUTO STREET, TORONTO 



Webb 's 



prOR Weddings, Dinners, 
Receptions, large or 
small, simple or elaborate, 
there is no place like 
Webb's. CATALOGUE 
FREE 



■Zbc 



1barv^ Mebb Co»,xim(teD 

447 ^OWQC St., Toronto 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

FOR 1Q08 (in part) 

October : 
1. Night Schools open (Session 1908-9), 

Notice by Trustees of cities, towns, incor- 
porated villages and township Boards to 
Municipal Clerks to hold Trustee elections 
on same day as Municipal elections, due. 
31. Inspectors' application for Legislative aid 

for free Text Books to Rural Schools. 
November : 

9. King's Birthday (Monday). 
December : 



CALENDAR 



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Last day for appointment of School 
Auditors by Public and Separate School 
Trustees. 

Municipal Clerks to transmit to County 
Inspectors statement showing whether or 
not any county rate for Public School pur- 
poses has been placed upon Collector's roll 
against any Separate School supporter. 
Returning Offlcers named by resolution of 
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Legislative grant payable to Trustees of 
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Last day for Public and Separate School 
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CountyModel Schools Examination begins. 
Local assessment to be paid Separate 
School Trustees. 
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18, 



levied and collected in township. 
County Councils to pay Treasurers of High 
Schools. 

Provincial Normal Schools close. (First 
Term.) 
22. High Schools (First Term), and Public and 
Separate Schools close. 

24. Last day for notice of formation of new 
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25. Christmas Day (Friday). 
High School Treasurers to receive all 
moneys collected for permanent improve- 
ments. 

New Schools and alterations of School 
boundaries go into operation or take effect-. 
By-law for disestablishment of Township 
Boards takes effect. 

30. Annual meetings of supporters of Public 
and Separate Schools. 

Reports of Principals of County Model 
Schools to Department, due. 
Reports of Boards of Examiners on third 
Class Professional Examination, to De- 
partment, due. 

31. Protestant Separate School Trustees to 
transmit to County Inspectors names and 
attendance during the last preceding six 
months. 

Trustees' Reports to Truant Officer, due. 
Auditors' Reports of cities, towns and in- 
corporated villages to be published by 
Trustees. 



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154 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



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THE WEB OF TIME 

Cloth, $1.25. 
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Minister," His latest novel deals with this 
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A HISTORY OF CANADA 

Part I. (Historical New France, by 
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Part II. (Canada under British Rule, 
by Hugh E. Egerton, M.A., Bei: 
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AN ALABAMA STUDENT 

And Other Biographical Essays 

By Wll. OSLEK, N.D., F.R..«^. 

8vo, cloth, ^2.00. 
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The Christian Minister and His Duties — 

Containing Chapters on "The Modern Minister,'* 
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By JAS. ORR, M.A $1.50 

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By REV. HENRY W. CLARK, author of " Philosophy 
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ACTA VICTORIANA. 



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" Cive Soinetliiii;;> Useful" 

LEATHER GOODS FOR CHRISTMAS 

Special discount to Students buying Xmas Goods. Store open every evening. 
*' Buy of the JMaker " 

EAST & CO., LIMITED, 300 YONGE STREET 



WARDROBE 

where good work is 
done in Cleaning, 
Pressing and Repairing 
at reasonable prices. 



PORD'S 

742 YONGE STREET 
PHONE NORTH 4604 



HIGH CLASS 
FURNISHINGS 

Hats and Caps, Boots 
and Shoes. Agents in 
Ontario for Stanfield's 
Unshrinkable Under- 
wear. 



YOUR TRADE WILL BE APPRECIATED 



AVERY'S DRUG STORE 

Yonge and St. Mary Sts.. TORONTO 

Pure Drugs, Economical Prices 
Special prices to students 



Phone N. 1747 



Goods delivered promptly 



CHU,RCH^a„^d PRINTING 
Programmes, Booklets, Invitations, Reports. 

The Armac Press 

Phone .Main 27 1 6 

1 70- 1 76 Victoria St., TORONTO 



STOLLERY 

Men's Furnishings 
and Fine Hats : : 

772 YONGE STREET 

Kinaisr Mention "Acta" wHen PtircHasin^ 




156 ACT A VICTORIANA. 

W. M. PERCY 

Optician 

705 YONGE STREET 

(Late of Chas. Potter's) 

Phone N. 2824. 

Oculists' Prescriptions filled 
promptly and accurately. 

Lens Grinding and Spectacle Repairing done on 
the premises. Discount to Students. 

Kodaks, Films and Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amateurs. 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens, Magnifiers, Readers, etc. 

High Class Stationery. 



The Reading Camp Association 

was organized eight years ago with a view to experimenting on 
the practicability of surrounding our frontier laborers in lumber- 
ing, mining, railway construction and fishing camps with a better 
environment by providing educational facilities during the week- 
day evenings, and undenominational services on Sundays. 
Successful experiments have been made in Manitoba, Ontario 
and Saskatchewan, and the governments of these provinces have 
aided the movement. Our object is to develop public opinion 
in this direction and induce the provincial departments of edu- 
cation to carry on the work on a large scale. In the meantime, 
the work is supported mainly by public contributions, and sub- 
scriptions should be addressed to the 

READING CAMP ASSOCIATION 

1123 Traders' Bank Building:, Toronto 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



157 



CHRISTMAS, 1908 

Table of Contents 

Literary Page 

Christmas Greeting - - - - Rev. G. M. Milligan, D.D., LL. D. 159 

The King in His Beauty Annie M. Bowers, '10 160 

Hew o' the Harp [Poem) Marjorie L. C. Pickthall 163 

Women Students in a German University - - Mrs. A. P. Misener 164 

The Mystery {Poem) Wilfred Campbell 173 

An Idyl of the Gold Fields Adeline M. Teskey 174 

Some Christmas Musings John Lewis 185 

The Silver Birch {Poem) Ethelwyn Wetherald 187 

The Humor of Thackeray, Dickens and Jane Austen 

Helen C. Parlow, '08 188 

Shining Out and Shining In {Poem) - - - - H. Isabel Graham 196 

" Sssst Marco ! " Norman W. De Witt 199 

The Picture of Hate {Poem) . . . . Ethelwyn Wetherald 205 

A Philanthropic Failure S. Frances Harrison 206 

In England's Name {Poem) - - - - - Helen M. Merrill 221 

Victor Hugo in Exile ...... Frederick Landon 223 

' ' Cook's " and Baedeker - - - . ^ . Albert R. Carman 228 

The Higher Criticism (Poem) J. E. Middleton 232 

The Spirit of Canadian History 233 

The Past {Poem) Annie M. Bowers, '10 240 

Book Reviews Qonducted hy L. E. Horning 241 

Magazine Reviews Gonducted hy M. H. Staples 249 

Editorial— 

Notes ----.-....... 252 

Missionary and Religious — 

The Mes age of Christmas - . Rev. R. P. Bowles, M.A., B.D. 255 

The Education of Our Ministers .... L. E. Horning 258 
A Prayer for Christmas 

[Written originally by Prof. Blewett for Vox Wesleyana 264 

The Sz-Chuan Contingent 265 

Notes - - 266 

Scientific— 

Osteopathy . - . . - . . Robert B. Henderson 267 

Personals and Exchanges — 

The Class of 1903 274 

Personals - 276 

Obituaries - - - . . . . . . . . . 278 

Births 286 

Exchanges - 286 

Athletics — 

Notes -------...-.. 290 

Locals — 

Notes ------....... 296 

Terms: $1.25 per Year. Christmas Number, 25c. 



158 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Hockey Boots, Skates, Hockey 
Sticks, Sweaters, Toques, Stock- 
ings, Sweater Coats, Snow Shoes 



HOCKEY BOOTS 
$1.75 $2.00 
$2.50 $3.00 
$3.50 $4.00 




SKATES 




$1.00, $1.50, $1.75, $2.00, $2.50 
$3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 

Sweaters, each $2.00 Sweater Coats, each $4.00 

HOCKEY STICKS 
Mic'Mac, 40c each. Practice, 25c, Spalding, 50c 

SNOW SHOES, Men's, $3.50 Ladies, $3.00 



J. BROTHERTON 

Sso YONGE STREET 

Phone N. 2092 




-Taylor 



''OH! LITTLE TOWN OF BETHLEHEM 



ACTA VICTORIANA 




Published monthly during- the Colleg-e year by the Union 
Litepapy Society of Victopia University, Toponto 



VOL. XXXII. 



TORONTO, DECEMBER, 1908. 



No. 3 



Christmas Greeting 

REV. G. M. MILLIGAN, D.D., LL.D. 

GREAT gifts come to men through the medium of 
men. Steam was given the world through Watt, 
and America through Columbus. The greatest of all 
gifts, even newness of life eternal, and therefore beyond 
our conceiving in richness, comes to us through Jesus 
Christ, The channel through which man's highest 
blessings come to him is man, Christ came that men 
might have ' life, and have it in abundance. The one 
among many lessons taught us by Christmas is that a 
people are rich only as they are rich in character. 
What the world lacks to-day is rich personalities. 
The worst famine that can reach any land is a blight 
which attacks its religious and moral life. The spirit of 
Christmas I would express thus in brief and acrostic 
terms : 

Courage to redeem the bad, 
Hope to brighten all the sadf 
Rigor to rebuke the mad. 

In life, aims to set us free. 
Sightless eye-balls make to see. 
Trials bring to victory. 

Matters these for Christmas-tide 
All to think of far and wide. 
Seed thus sown good will abide. 

Ours is Christmas truly then. 
Unifying us as men. 
Rendering life a mount, not den. 
Safe thus not by sword but pen. 



160 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The King in His Beauty 

MISS A. M. BOWEES, '10. 

IT was night. Stillness deep and intense rested on the 
Judean plains, and the silent stars looked down with 
gentle friendliness on the little band of weary shepherds, 
reclining with their flocks on the grassy hillside below. 

All day long they had wandered over flowering meadows, 
and among green valleys, halting sometimes by sparkling 
streams to refresh their thirsty flocks, then pressing on again 
to some new stretch of verdant pasture, their ears ever on the 
alert for the least sound that might threaten danger to their 
beloved charges. With gentle patience they had pulled the 
thorns from their fleecy sides, stopping ever and anon to dis- 
entangle some stray lamb, fast-caught in an overhanging 
thicket. And at last, as the darkness was gathering, they had 
gladly turned their steps towards the secluded spot where the 
night's vigil was to be kept. 

At their feet the flocks slumbered peacefully. 'Eoi a sound 
disturbed the silence of the night, save the occasional subdued 
murmur of voices, as the shepherds spoke with each other con- 
cerning the day's wanderings, and formed fresh plans for the 
morrow, or the soft bleating of a wee lamb, as it woke for a 
moment to gaze upon the unfamiliar darkness, and then nestled 
closer to its mother's warm side. 

A little apart from the group sat one whose long, flowing 
locks and snowy beard proclaimed him to be older by many 
years than his companions. Ever since they could remember 
had old Michael shared with them their lonely vigils. Often 
he would sit the whole night through without uttering a word, 
his head resting on his hands, his staff at his side. Sometimes 
he would break the silence and tell them strange tales of the past, 
but oftener he would speak to them, his voice vibrating with 
anticipation and longing, of a King, their King, who was 
coming, coming soon. And then, as the shepherds would gaze 
at him, their faces full of wonder and awe, the light would die 
out of his eyes, and he would drop into a reverie, and they would 
hear him murmur sadly, " How long, oh Lord, how long ?" Then 
the shepherds would look at each other, and shake their heads, 
while they talked in low tones of this King. 



THE KING IN HIS BEAUTY. 



161 



To-night an unusual excitement seemed to possess him. He 
sat, not in his customary stooped fashion, but upright, gazing 
with rapt expression into the starry heights above him. ]^ow 
and then his lips moved, but the shepherds could hear no 
sound. '' Old Michael is praying," said one, softly. The 
night wore on. Suddenly a half-articulate cry broke upon 
the stillness. The shepherds, accustomed to wakening 
at the slightest sound, looked at each other in bewilder- 
ment. Then by one consent they sprang to their feet, their 
gaze directed towards old Michael. He was standing, his 
hands clasped upon his staff, his eyes fixed upon the far East. 
The shepherds followed the direction of his gaze. A soft 
radiance pervaded the distant sky. " The dawn is yet far 
off,'' said one. " Hark !'' — it was old Michael's voice, clear and 
imperative. His white head was bent as if to catch some 
distant sound. The shepherds listened intently. Ear-away 
strains of sweetest music were stealing forth upon the night. 
They stood as if entranced, while like a great billow of light 
the radiance rolled rapidly nearer. A strange trembling seized 
upon the rugged men, and they fell upon their knees, hiding 
their faces before the dazzling splendor. The whole sky 
around them had become filled with an innumerable white- 
winged host, the air resounded with celestial melody. Ear out 
upon the midnight floated the sound, " Peace, peace on earth ! 
Good-will, good-will, good-will to men!" Louder, clearer, 
sweeter grew the strains. The shepherds remained motion- 
less, their heads bowed. But what were they singing now, 
those heavenly choristers ? Hark ! the message, " Unto you is 
born a Saviour, Christ the Lord." 

The music died away as it had come, the radiance faded 
from the sky. Again all was stillness. The shepherds still 
knelt, gazing steadily towards the point where the last streak 
of glory had vanished. They were aroused by old Michael. 
The old man's eyes were flashing, his voice had the ring of 
youth. " Come," he cried, " and let us seek our King." 

Already he was half-way dowTi the hillside, and seizing their 
staffs, his wondering companions hastened after. But why did 
ho pause? In the excitement of the moment all thought of 
their helpless flocks stretched out on the plain below, looking 
in the slarlight like a soft, ill-defined w^hite blur, had left them. 



162 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Old Michael's ears alone had caught the gentle appealing cry 
of a restless lamb as it stirred uneasily in its slumbers. The 
old man hesitated, his eyes bent on the ground, his brows 
contracted as if in pain. When in all the years had he left 
his flock thus deserted ? But then he had waited so long. 
Could it be that the King had come, and he should not be the 
first to welcome Him? 

The fierce struggle was soon over. Slowly he retraced his 
steps and rejoined his waiting companions. His face was 
pale, but his voice was firm. ^' Go !" he said — " go ye and seek 
the King ! I will guard the flocks.'' Persuasions were useless. 
Old Michael had made his decision. Sadly his fellow-shep- 
herds turned away and left him alone with his sheep. 

He watched them till they had disappeared in the darkness, 
and then gave way to his overwhelming grief. I^ot for one 
moment did he doubt the success of their quest, and his feeble 
frame shook with sobs as the bitterness of his own disappoint- 
ment was borne in upon him. Long he sat, his white head 
bowed upon his shaking hands, his sore old heart breaking 
with longing. How dark it was and cold ; he shivered slightly 
and with trembling fingers drew his mantle closer about him. 
But hark! what sound was that, like distant voices singing? 
He strove to rise but fell back panting; a strange weakness 
seized upon him. He reached for his staff, that loved com- 
panion of so many long years, and drew it feebly to him. The 
music drew nearer, how sweet it was. Surely the angels must 
be coming back again. 

In the early dawn the shepherds returned, eager to pour 
into the ears of their old comrade the story of the night's 
journey. They approached the hillside with rapid strides. 
" We have seen Him, we have seen the King — we have wor- 
shipped the Christ-child !" they cried. But when they caught 
sight of the prostrate form on the grass a great fear came upon 
them, and their voices were hushed. Filled with awe they 
drew near, and looked down upon the old man, as he lay, a 
happy smile on his worn face. Then the shepherds knew that 
old Michael, too, had seen " the King in His beauty," and that 
he worshipped Him now " in the land that is very far off." 



HEW O' THE HARP. 



163 



Hew o' 



the Harp 



Marjorie L. C. Pickthall 

^\ I hae sang the yellow leaf 
And I hae sang the red, 
And I hae sang the white, white birk 
That grows abune the dead, 

O, I hae sang the laverock down 

Ayont the apple trees, 
O, I hae sang the heather bloom 

Burdened wi* gowden bees. 

Twined frae the rowning string, each note 

Sae softly fa's and light. 
It seems a winsome siller rose 

Loosing her leaves at night. 

But O, for me nae lassie binds 

Her locks wi' white and blue, 
Nae lightlier footstep wakes the hinds 

Deep V the early dew, 

O, aince three harpers passed me by 

Upon the Maybole road, 
Ain was crowned wi* plaited reed, 

Ain was crowned wi* gowd, 

O, aince upon the Maybole road 

Three harpers passed me by. 
The last was crowned wi* wool-white locks. 

And waly, that was I, 



164 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Women Students in a German University 

MRS. A. P. MISENEK. 

IT was at the beginning of an autumn " Semester " at 
Leipzig University that I first became acquainted with 
the academic life of German women. On Kegistration 
Day, I went with a woman graduate of Sydney, Australia, 
through the quaint, narrow streets, across the " 'Ring '' which 
marks what was once the ancient city wall, to the great square, 
upon one sic* ; of which the University fronts. As we entered 
the " Wandeihalle," and looked at the elaborate decorations 
and the busts of the distinguished sons Qf the University, I 
could not but wonder what the main halls of our Alma Mater 
will be like, when Toronto University is centuries old. Though 
so modern, Toronto has about the same number of students as 
Leipzig; but the first day had not passed before one realized 
in many ways that Leipzig is a university with a great past, 
with laws not in a state of flux and formation, as with us, but 
almost as unalterable as the laws of the Medes and Persians. 
And one soon became aware of sharper social distinctions than 
with us, maintained in the university as elsewhere in German 
life, for we in Canada have only an aristocracy of wealth, 
while in Germany there is an aristocracy of birth and educa- 
tion. So the university professor holds a position he does not 
here, and between him and the students there seems to be a 
gulf fixed. 

We entered the Registrar's office with some trepidation, for 
we had been in Germany long enough to learn the German 
fondness for statistical exactness in all departments of official 
life. There we met its academic side, for we were asked to 
fill in forms stating many details of family history, as well as 
our academic standing and the lectiires desired. We then dis- 
covered how recently the doors of this University had been 
opened to women, for not until the spring of 1906 were Ger- 
man women admitted to the Leipzig degree, and even yet no 
foreign women, even though they be university graduates, are 
given the standing of matriculated students. T later learned 



STUDENTS IN A GERMAN UNIVERSITY. 165 

that with the general movement for higher education of women, 
a few had tried to enter this old conservative imiversitj, at 
first attending the " public " and then the regular lectures. 
Though discouraged by the authorities, a statement of the lec- 
tures they attended was finally granted them. And even now, 
though they are admitted to the degree, some professors are 
antagonistic to them, while others are simply tolerant. 

When lectures began, I was surprised at the comparatively 
small number of German Avomen, for, to use their own term, 
they were " weisse Raben." There were in all about one hun- 




Universitat (VVandelhalle). 

Nach einer Original-Aufnahme vor Eugen Ravenstein, Verlag J. B. Klein's Kunsthandlung, 

Leipzig 

dred women registered, of whom sixty were foreigners. Many 
of the latter were of the races of Austria-Hungary. There 
were several Russians, a few chic, vivacious French maidens, 
and Australians, more English than the English. Two 
Jewesses from Poland were ostracized by the German women, 
because of race prejudice. There was one clever girl from 
Greece. Several American women were also studying there, 
but so far as I could ascertain, there were none from Great 
Britain. But we were most interested in the forty German 

2 



i66 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

women, most of whom were from the upper middle class — the 
daughters of professional men or of well-to-do ^^ Kaufleute." 
One or two were daughters of noblemen. One of 
these university women of noble birth was the handsomest 
German woman I saw, and she was the only one I heard 
openly express ideas regarding politics. In a toast she 
proposed to the Kaiser, at a gathering of university women, 
shortly before the last general election of Germany, she dis- 
cussed the colonial policy of the government amd the impending 
political crisis. The other German women seemed surprised 
at such an expression of opinion by a woman, though in 
private conversation, one had told me ^' the Kaiser talked and 
did nothing, while King Edward was silent and gained what 
he wished in Europe." In fact, the attitude of these women 
to the existing conditions in Germany is not unlike that of 
the women of other lands, when their claims for higher educa- 
tion were first being recognized. AVhile a few tend to go to 
extremes, and to break entirely from the wise as well as sense- 
less restraints of the past, others are seeking quietly to secure 
reforms that will really help their sex, many of whom are so 
down-trodden, in those densely peopled centres, where the 
female population so far exceeds the male. 

To compare their university work with ours is well-nigh 
impossible, because their secondary schools have a high.er 
standard than ours. As a consequence, the average German 
woman student is older and has a better general knowledge of 
literature and art than her American sister. The absence of 
examinations until the student deems herself ready for the 
degree, and the greater freedom allowed in the selection of 
courses of study, also render comparisons difficult. In their 
habits of work, I found the majority of these women very 
methodical. They avail themselves of every opportunity to 
master the languages which they are studying, and are always 
eager to exchange lessons with foreigners. In English, their 
detailed knowledge of Shakespeare's plays would be a revela- 
tion to some of our graduates. During lecture hours, they 
pay strictest attention, for to be inattentive or indulge in con- 
versation during a lecture is almost an unpardonable offence 
there. If there is the least disturbance the students express 



STUDENTS IN A GERMAN UNIVERSITY. 167 

their disapproval of the culprit by a shuffling of feet, while 
a more serious offence calls forth a stinging rebuke from the 
professor. 

As yet, the authorities have not provided rooms for these 
women, who have entered a university founded and maintained 
for men. There is no ladies' study, such as we have. A 
small general reading room is the only place where they 
can wait. When one remembers that lectures begin at 8 a.m. 
and continue until 9 p.m., the inconvenience of this can be 
imagined. There is not even the luxury of a separate cloak 
room. Rows upon rows of racks, in the corridors outside the 




Universitat (Augusteum). 



Nach einer Original-Aufnahme von Eugen Ravenstein, Verlag J. B. Klein' 

Leipzig. 



Kunsthandlung, 



lecture rooms, are the only provision made for the student 
belongings. The unpleasantness of waiting for even a half- 
hour in these halls thronged with men students smoking, or 
eating the ever-present lunch of ^^ Schwarz brot," has to be 
experienced to be understood. Naturally, there is as yet no 
residence for women, so a few of them band together, lease a 
house, hire a housekeeper and maid, and have what we would 
call a sorority house, 
rent rooms and do light housekeeping. 



But most of them are ^' en pension,'' or 



168 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

In a land where only a small proportion of the people 
regularly attend church, and where in many ways the moral 
and religious atmosphere is much like that of England at the 
time of the Wesleys, one need not be surprised to find no 
organization among these university women corresponding to 
our Y.W.C.A., for nowhere is national life better reflected than 
in a university centre. A student, who had learned the value 
of such an association when abroad, tried to organize one in 
Leipzig. But, though supported in her effort by Professor 
Ihmels, the most influential theological professor, the German 
women did not respond, and in fact, ever after nicknamed her 
"the Christian girl." 

The average German has not the love for athletics the Eng- 
lishman has, and again the national tendency is reflected in the 
university. Imagine a body of university students with no 
organized football teams, no baseball, lacrosse, tennis, golf or 
hockey. There are splendid athletic feats among the men each 
" Semester," if duelling may be termed athletics. But the 
only physical exercise of the women students is a walk in the 
beautiful parks of the city, and during the few weeks that the 
Pleisse is frozen over, they enjoy an occasional skate. 

But German students have their recreation. Their idea of 
a good time, as well as that of the man on the street, is at 
bottom a social one, and is still rather aptly expressed by a 
motto which I saw in a fifteenth century Gasthaus, in old 
Goslar, — 

" So lang das Deutsche Reiche steht, 
Der Deutscher auch zu Bierre geht." 

" Auerbachs Keller," which Goethe makes the scene of such 
merry-making on the part of Leipzig students, and where 
Faust and Mephistopheles added to their conviviality, still 
stands, but is now the haunt of tourists rather than of students. 
But it has worthy successors in the vicinity, where the different 
students' " Yerein " meet. These Verein vary as our fraterni- 
ties do. Some of them meet for a purely social time, others 
have features corresponding to a literary society. Somewhat 
after the model of the latter class of men's Verein, the women 
have formed their organization. Instead of meeting once a 
week, or oftener, as the men do, they have but four meetings 



STUDENTS IN A GERMAN UNIVERSITY. 169 

a year. As there are no rooms provided in the university for 
such social gatherings, they usually rent rooms. 

On a university holiday, in the early summer, this Women's 
Verein took a trip to Weimar, and judging from the many 
references I heard to the journey, they spent a happy time 
roaming about the homes and haunts of Goethe, Schiller, 
Herder and Wieland. In the autumn, the meeting was of a 
more social nature, as they invited friends for a week through 
the parks and fields, to the suburb of Connewitz, where, at a 
restaurant, they had refreshments and dancing. The next meet- 
ing was held a week before Christmas, while at the final meet- 
ing before Easter they had a masquerade. 

Early in the autumn, one of the German women, with whom 
I had become acquainted, had asked me to join the Yerein, 
so when the Christmas meeting drew near and I was again 
cordially invited, I decided to go. About seven o'clock of the 

evening of meeting, my friend, Fraulein H , called for 

me, laden with several mysterious parcels. When we reached 
the hotel where the meeting was to be held, and were ushered 
into a small dressing room, where girls were unwrapping 
similar parcels, amid outbursts of laughter, I then learned 
we were to have a Christmas tree, and many of the presents 
were " Spass-geschenke " — jokes upon some foibles of the re- 
cipients. Then we went into a brilliantly lighted room, in one 
corner of which was the great Christmas tree, reaching to the 
ceiling, ablaze with candles and gaily decorated. Beneath 
stood a weird, grey-haired and grey-bearded little figure, in a 
long mantle, with the left hand distributing the joke presents, 
from the table beneath the tree, and with the right, holding a 
bundle of switches, which were applied to the shoulders of 
each, as she bowed to receive her gift. Despite this disguise, 
I sgon recognized a little German student, whom hitherto I 
had known as " the funny girl, who wrote poetry and made 
the other girls listen to it." Just as I recognized her, she 
lifted from the table a hobby horse, whose mane was decorated 
with " wild feathers " — a gift for herself. Amid an outburst 
of laughter, she began riding her " hobby " at once. Many of 
the presents were quite original, as the signboard, bearing the 
English legend, " French spoken here," presented to a girl, 



170 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

who purposed teaching and who spoke atrocious French, though 
her English was fairly correct and fluent. After a half-hour 
of this merry-making about the Christmas tree, we repaired 
to the supper room, where no dainty refreshments such as our 
women serve were spread. Huge platters of various kinds of 
cold m^ats, decorated with slices of cheese and pickle, and 
large baskets of " Brotchen '^ graced the bare-looking table. 
The Honorary President, a teacher from one of the Leipzig 
schools, presided. How the meat and " Brotchen " disap- 
peared, for the merriment about the Christmas tree seemed to 
have whetted the normally good German appetite ! The waiters 
next served beer and " Selter-wasser,'' and a course of cakes 
and bon-bons. As the trays of chocolates and ^' Marzipan " 
were passed, a buzz of conversation recommenced, and soon all 
gathered about the tree again. The President then distributed 
the real presents. They were characteristic student gifts — 
books, pictures and boxes of bon-bons — and as each student 
was remembered, the English women then felt very much at 
home. 

But this was not to be the end of our evening, as I supposed, 
for we returned to the supper room, where, from a side table, 
the vapors of a steaming bowl of punch greeted us. Around 
the table we gathered, and with glasses of punch or lemonade 
we drank to the Kaiser, our University, and our Verein. The 
remaining minutes until midnight were spent in singing col- 
lege songs and Christmas ballads, while a few of the German 
women enjoyed cigarettes, much to the annoyance of others. 
For though some of them deemed it a part of a liberal educa- 
tion to thus break social traditions, the majority had decided 
smoking was not to be allowed in the Yerein. However, the 
rule has ever since been broken, I believe. Soon in twos and 
threes they bade the President a '^ Gute ^acht," and only my 
friend, the rest of the committee and myself were left to dis- 
mantle the tree, which was to be taken to one of the city hos- 
^tals in the morning, as a gift. And as these half-dozen girls 
Stripped it of its " Wurst " and '' Kuchen," its caudles and 
|ilded nuts, and wound the scintillating tinsel thread in each 
MJier^s hair, t saw the German college girl to be quite akin 
ih her Canadian sister in her enjoyment of a frolic. 



•p 

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THE MYSTERY. 



173 



The Mystery 

Wilfred Campbell 

\TL/HEN autumn* s silence tranced the skies. 

And all life held its breath. 
Unto Rosanna's lips and eyes 
Came the white moth of death,— 

That moth whose wings are feathered light. 

From out oblivion's deep. 
With magic pinions, petalled white. 

Of folded sleep on sleep, — 

And fluttered dim and vague and gray. 

Above her lips and brow : 
And other beauties gild life's day 

With other glories now. 

For earth's hushed pallor of the morn. 

And love's dim trance of night. 
From out the realms of sleep, reborn. 

Fell on her soft and white ; 

With those pale dreams of old, which tame 
The tide of the heart's wild will: 

And all that mask of love became 
A mystery white and still. 



174 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

An Idyl of the Gold Fields 

ADELINE M, TESKEY. 

SHE Avas a tall woman, yellow and sunken-cheeked; her 
dark hair was parted in the front and lay smoothly 
plastered down on each temple; her dark eyes had the 
expression of not seeing anything that was present ; while little 
over thirty, Maria Finlay looked fully ten years older. She 
was bending over a washtub which rested on a bench standing 
out at the west end of her home, and was rubbing with vigor 
on the zinc washboard a muddy-looking garment which at one 
time had been white. Once she straightened up, as if to rest 
her strained muscles, placed her hand to her side, and looked 
off at the sinking sun. 

It was a weird and impressive sight which at that moment 
smote her soul. Great fires had swept the forest country all 
around the small farm-place which she called home, and the 
tall, blackened trunks of tre^s, giants in height and girth, 
stretched like spectres of woe up towards heaven. The sun, 
wading through the smoke which seemed to envelop the uni- 
verse, looked like a scarlet ball of fire, and a tangle of cloud, 
or heavy smoke, had formed itself into an arch over it, curi- 
ously giving it the appearance of a great red eye looking down 
upon the things of earth. A less impressionable person than 
Maria Finlay might have thrilled, or shuddered, at the sight. 
She gazed a few seconds in silence at the dead black trees and 
surrounding desolation ; then her eyes lingered on the sun, and 
she whispered in awed tones: 

" The eye o' Gawd. What is it a-lookin' at me f er ? What 
did He mean by makin' me at all, an' puttin' me here in Burnt 
Lands?'' The mystery and pain of life touched her as never 
before. " 'Taint much of a place — this world," she continued, 
still looking at the red, smoky sun, '^ not much worth the 
trouble. Used to think when I wus younger that there wus 
somethin' — somethin' good in the world, but I've found out 
there ain't. . . Gettin' married looks well when yer seein' 
it ahead, ownin' children looks well when yer seein' it ahead, 
but none o' them comes up to what yer wantin'. The man 



AN IDYL OF THE GOLD FIELDS. 175 

ain't what ye tho't he'd be ; the children grows up from babies 
an' grows away from what ye want." 

She looked wildly, hungrily, this woman of the Burnt 
Lands, into the smoky distance, and challengingly at the great 
red eye in the sky, then turned again to her washtub. 

In a short time three boys came shouting out of the woods 
and gathered around her; strange, unkempt, rough little crea- 
tures they were, children who had grown away from babyhood 
and away from their mother. Their father, 'N&t Finlay, 
shortly followed, coming from somewhere out of the smoky 
distance. He was covered from head to foot with grey ashes, 
and something in his stealthy walk reminded Maria, as she 
glanced up from her work, of a great gray wolf. His conduct 
and appearance explained the children — the wolf's cubs were 
like the wolf. 

Although it was an hour before the usual supper time, they 
all clamored for their supper ; and the wife and mother wrung 
out the garment she had been washing, and proceeded to start 
the fire to boil the tea-kettle. 

After the early supper was over, the man lighted his cob 
pipe, stuffed his hands into his pockets, and loafed off into 
the smoke and ashes again; the wife proceeded to finish her 
washing. 

Maria Finlay had just wiped her hands out of the suds 
when out of the smoky distance walked another man, carrying 
a pack, which looked ^' like a great wen that had grown out 
of the nape of his neck." 

This man was a pedlar, and, pausing at the farmhouse door, 
he politely asked for something to eat. 

This was nothing peculiar in the sparsely settled country 
of the Burnt Lands, and Maria Finlay in a short time had set 
before the stranger, who had deposited his bundle on the 
kitchen floor, bread, butter, and cheese, and a pitcher of milk. 

When the pedlar had finished his meal, he proceeded to 
unpack his bundle, for the purpose of giving some of its con- 
tents to his hostess to pay for his supper. He spread out 
before her a tray of cheap jewellery and looked for her 
approval. She shook her head: He drew out some ends of 
flaming ribbon, but this peculiar woman again shook her head. 



176 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

He showed lace and buttons of startling design; the obdurate 
customer was still untouched. While tossing the bundle over 
in his vain search for something satisfying, there rolled out a 
small, worn, paper -bound book, a copy of Scott's Lady of the 
Lake. Immediately the woman picked it up, and said with 
a strange eagerness in her tone. 

" I uster read onct — afore I wus married. I brought two 
books here with me to the Burnt Lands when we first come; 
but one day Nat — he's my man — wus mad 'cause the wood 
wus wet, an' he could not get the fire to start, an' he up an' 
tuk my two books to start it ; we've never had no readin' 
'round here sence. If ye'll gimme, this book I'll call it square," 
she added, clasping her seamed, horny hand over the small 
volume. 

"Why, suttainly," returned the pedlar, well pleased with 
the bargain, and rolling up his bundle he proceeded on his 
way. 

Dropping down on the rough, unpainted floor, Maria 

Finlay opened the book and began to read where her eyes 

alighted : 

" All twinkling with the dewdrop's sheen, 
The briar-rose fell in streamers green; 
And creeping shrubs of thousand dies, 
Waved in the west-wind's summer sighs." 

" That's somethin' like it's 'round here, in Burnt Lands," 

she said, with an air of surprise, — " afore the fire struck the 

clearance it wus; dew a-shinin' on all the leaves, briar-bushes 

hangin' thick with posies, vines creepin', creepin' everywhere; 

I've seen it look jest like this book reads." She turned the 

leaves and continued to read : 

"Boon Nature scattered, free and -vrild, 
Each plant or flower, the mountain child. 
Here eglantine embalms the air; 
Hawthorne and hazel mingled there. 
The primrose pale, and violet flower, 
Found in each cliff a narrow bower; 
Fox-glove and night-shade, side by side — 

" Purty, wasn't it ?" she said aloud, looking off toward the 
black tree trunks standing among the smoke with unseeing 
eyes, or eyes seeing naught but a flower-decked landscape. 

She dropped her eyes to her book again: 



AN IDYL OF THE GOLD FIELDS. 



177 



" From underneath an aged oak, 
That slanted from the islet rock, 
A damsel, guider of its way, 
A little skiff shot out to bay. 

The maiden paused, as if again 

She thought to catch a distant strain. 

With hand upraised, and look intent. 

And eye and ear attentive bent. 

And locks flung back, and lips apart. 

Like monument of Grecian art, 

In listening mood she seemed to stand. 

The guardian Naiad of the strand. 

And ne'er did Grecian chisel trace 

A nymph, a naiad, or a grace 

Of finer form, or lovelier face." 

" Purtj, wasn't she ?" she said, wistfully, again looking off 
toward the black desolation without seeing it. She read on: 

"A chieftain's daughter seemed the maid; 
Her satin snood, her silken plaid. 
Her golden brooch, such birth betrayed. 
And seldom was a snood amid 
Such wild, luxuriant ringlets hid, 
Whose glossy black to shame might bring 
The plumage of the raven's wing." 

At this point Maria Finlay laid the book on her lap, face 
do^Ti, and drawing a great steel hairpin from which the black 
japan had for a long time been worn away, leaving it a shiny 
gray in color, from the knot of hair which crowned her head, 
she let fall over her shoulders a long coil. Shaking it loose, 
she looked at it (this woman was still young), and said: 

" My hair was onct as purty, an' shiny, an' black as the 
raven's wing — ^now they's white threads into it." In a few 
seconds she had picked up her book again, and read on and 
on. How she thrilled and glowed over that story of beauty 
and romance. She paused once and a great light flushed into 
her face, obliterating for the moment the seams and wrinkles, 
and said in an awed whisper: 

" The eye o' Gawd seen me, how lonesome I wus here, an' 
He sent the book." On and on she read, forgetful that the 
great red eye in the sky had sunk below the horizon. She 
was only brought to a consciousness of her surroundings and 
duties when the cow, which she had forgotten to milk, came 
and " mooed " discontentedly in through the open door. 

" I declare for it !" she cried, jumping to her feet, " I clean 
forgot to milk Spot." Shoving the book behind a pan on the 



178 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

pantry shelf, she hastily seized a pail and went out into the 
semi-darkness. 

An hour later Maria went to bed, placing the precious book 
under her pillow, for fear IsTat might again want some paper 
wherewith to start the fire. She left the outside door unbarred 
for her husband. For some months the surrounding country 
had been suffering from the depredations of thieves, who stole 
wheat from the farmers, and though he had never told her so^ 
Maria had every reason to believe [N'at was one of them. 

" He'll be stragglin' in about three or four o'clock," she 
thought aloud, in strange bewilderment, as if she had lived 
so long beside evil that the line between it and good had be- 
come well-nigh obliterated. 

A mouse was rattling some loose mortar in the wall, the cheap 
clock in the kitchen was harshly striking three, and the rooster 
in the barn was presenting his first challenge to the new day, 
when Maria heard l^nt pouring grain into a bin which he 
had constructed in an inner room under the home roof. She 
turned uneasily and put her hand on the book under her pillow. 

During the following winter Maria lived in a sort of heaven 
of her own; every spare minute she was reading The Lady of 
the Lake; and while her hands were busy in the washtub or 
bread-trough, her thoughts were far off in the Highlands of 
Scotland, following the fortunes of Roderick Dhu, Douglas^ 
Fitz-James, or, more than all, glorying in the beauty and 
grace of the Lady of the Lake. From constant reading she 
committed to memory a large portion of the poem; and the 
wondering squirrels and birds would listen to her, as she 
walked in the gloaming . in search of the cow, repeating in a 
high sing-song voice her favorite lines. 

More than one night Nat heard her softly murmuring in 
her sleep: 

"A chieftain's daughter seemed the maid; 
Her satin snood, her silken plaid, 
Her golden brooch, such birth betrayed." 

On such occasions he would rise on his elbow and gaze almost 
fearfully into her sleeping face, muttering nervously, " Satin- 
silken-golden, consarn it ! What put them into her head ?" 

As time went on this woman seemed in her absorption to 
forget the harshness of her life and iNTat's oaths. Her powers 



AN IDYL OF THE GOLD FIELDS. 179 

of observation increased, she '^ saw as with a microscope, she 
heard as with an ear-trumpet," the beauties and sounds which 
crowded around her common little home. She seemed to have 
gained admittance into the " inner and finer heaven of things." 
She heard the lisp of the trees, and saw the colors of the 
flowers as something that had never reached her before. Her 
brovni, calloused feet, as they trod the forest, hesitated as they 
had never done before about crushing the tiny flowers that 
grew in her pathway. 

About a year from the time she procured the book there 
came another claimant of love and care to Maria Finlay. 

" A gal, an' sech a purty one," whispered the woman, who 
Had washed and dressed the baby, into the ear of the half- 
conscious mother. 

" What air ye goin' to call the kid, Maria ?" said ISTat non- 
chalantly when the little daughter was some weeks old. 

" Lady-o'-the-Lake," returned Maria without hesitation. 

" She hasn't a relation in the world called by that name," 
said ISTat, looking bewildered. Then he dismissed the subject 
from his mind and never thought of it again. 

So ^' Lady-o'-the-Lake " the little girl was called, no one 
making further remark on the name, which was recorded no- 
where but in the mother's heart. 

" She's jest exactly like the Lady o' the Lake I read about 
in the po'try," said the proud mother in her secret soul, as 
she watched the child from day to day develop in beauty of 
face and form. 

After a while the beauty of the baby began to make an 
impression on even 'N^t. He would at times, when everyone 
else was out of the room, steal furtive glances at her, and 
whisper, ^^ 'Tain't like the other young uns wus." Then an 
awed expression would creep into his lank, weather-beaten 
countenance, as if he were looking at something supernatural, 
and he would steal out of the house on tip-toe. 

'Nat Finlay had never paid any attention to his boy babies, 
beyond yelling to the mother when they were crying, " Stuff 
something into that brat's mouth, Maria," but the little Lady 
did not purpose to remain unnoticed. As soon as she was able 
to toddle around the cabin floor she took it upon herself to 



180 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

wait on ^' Dah." When she saw him preparing to go out she 
would run and bring his hat from the corner where he was in 
the habit of throwing it. She would make such endeavors to 
climb on his knee (all the other children had been afraid to 
go near him) that he was simply compelled to take her up, 
though looking very much ashamed of the weakness. She 
presented him with posies of wild flowers which she was con- 
stantly gathering from among the weeds that grew around the 
small house. 

" She picked posies of wild flowers — the lady in the po'tiy,'' 
said the mother exultingly in her heart when she saw the 
pastimes of her little daughter. 

The little one would at times sit and stare at her fathef 
wonderingly with her round, baby eyes, in a way that made 
him feel uncomfortable. One day when she was thus staring 
at him he said to Maria, with something like trepidation in 
his voice, 

" What does she look at me that a- way f er ? She kin't see 
anythin' pertickler 'bout me other folks kin't see." 

" I dunno," returned Maria mysteriously, " mebbe she kin ; 
babies is kind o' witches, an' knows most all they's wuth 
knowin' 'bout folks, they say." 

IsTat stirred uneasily, as the baby still continued to stare, 
and in a few seconds he reached his long, sinewy arm over 
toward the corner where he kept his hat, picked it up and 
sped outdoors. 

As soon as he was alone he began to talk to himself : " Kin 
she know her ^ dah ' is a thief ? Kin that baby know by 
lookin' at me that I am stealin' wheat from the neighbors? 
Makes me powerful uneasy them eyes lookin' at me that 
a-way." 

N^one of the boys in the Finlay home could read ; the benefi- 
cent influences of church and school had not reached Burnt 
Lands, and the boys' mother never seemed to have time to 
teach them. But with Lady circumstances were not going to 
be allowed to control ; the mother determined that as far as 
lay in her power her girl should have every advantage which 
fell to the lot of the Lady in the book. So she began early 
to teach the child her alphabet out of the one book in her 



AN IDYL OF THE GOLD FIELDS. 181 

possession. In the course of time Lady could read the book 
fluently. 

When the girl was thirteen a mineralogist making a tour 
through the Burnt Lands in the interest of science sought 
lodging for a week at the Finlay homestead. As could readily 
be imagined, he was greatly surprised and impressed by the 
young girFs beauty and refinement. Owing to the gentlem^an's 
interest in Lady, the mother was led to tell him about the 
pedlar bringing the book, and that her young daughter was 
in mind and body like the heroine of the story as she had 
appeared in the mother's imagination. 

Before he left the learned man had talked wdth the little 
Lady's father about sending her away out of the Burnt Lands 
to obtain an education. 

It was a new idea to Xat ; he scratched his head and looked 
bewildered. He had given Lady brass rings and cotton-backed 
ribbons, but he had never even thought about giving her an 
education. The great man went on to impress him with the 
responsibility of being the father of such a beautiful girl. 

^at never heard such talk as that before, and the following 
night he lay long on his sleepless couch thinking about it. 

" The responsibility of being the father of sech a gal," he 
said to himself several times, " the responsibility (the large 
word filled him with awe), an' — ^an' I a thief. I ain't stole 
no wheat since Lady wus a little better than a year old ; didn't 
feel all-fired comfortable the way she looked at me, an' I give 
it up ; but I ain't ever give it back — the wheat I had stole." 

Xat Finlay was very proud of a crop of w^heat he had just 
reaped. His first thought w^hen the stranger was talking about 
sending Lady off was that the wheat would go a long way 
toward covering the expense. But, suddenly, after repeating 
that long word, '^ responsibility," and thinking about " that 
beautiful gal," Lady, it seemed to him as if he must take his 
big crop of wheat and carry it to the neighbors w^hom he had 
robbed. 

It took him nearly a week to go around to all the neighbors 
from Avhrim lie had stolen the wheat, choosing only the small 
hours of the night for his work. At the end of the week he 
came back to an almost empty bin, w^ith barely enough wheat 
to keep the fniiiily in flour during the winter. 
3 



182 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

After this ^at began to think seriously about sending Lady 
off to get that wonderful thing the great man talked about — 
nothing was too good or wonderful for Lady. But where was 
the money to come from? 

It was just before the ground was frozen that an inspira- 
tion came to him. The mineralogist had told him that the 
rocky Burnt Lands were rich in minerals, gold especially. He 
had even pointed to a spot on Nat's farm, a ^' washout," which, 
he said, had every appearance of being rich in the precious 
metal. Nat's inspiration, which came to him like spoken words 
right in the middle of the. night, was, "' Search in the wash- 
out for gold." 

Fearing that it might seem an utterly useless undertaking 
to the family, Nat said nothing about it, but every morning 
he shouldered his pick and shovel and went to the far corner 
of the farm, presumably to dig a drain. 

He dug industriously; he procured a little powder and 
blasted the rock. 

Maria, smelling the powder-smoke, said to Lady, " Your 
dah is diggin' a deep drain sure enough this time." 

One day when Nat was digging he really struck something 
peculiar-looking. Some mining expert, chancing to be in the 
locality, came at Nat's call to examine the " find." 

" Finlay," he said, " you have struck a vein of gold ; you're 
a rich man." 

' Nat stood stolid and silent, and the expert said to himself 
as he walked away, " That fellow has no more sensibility than 
an ox ; what good is it going to do Mm to be rich ?" 

When Nat was sure that the man who had told him the 
value of his find had walked well out of sight, he turned and 
tore madly back to his house, crying breathlessly, as soon as 
he came within Maria's hearing, " I've found the stufi^ — an' 
I kin buy Lady the edication, and the satin-silken-golden ye 
hev been talkin' about in yer dreams !" 

Maria made no reply, but turned quickly so Nat might not 
see the tears in her eyes, and looked off toward the point where 
she had seen the peculiar sunset so many years before. The 
old burnt trees were now replaced by a fresh growth, young 
and green; and she wondered vaguely whether they were a 
sort of prophecy of the new life that was opening up before her. 



4' 



•<V,' 



■ «=)^#*^. 



SOME CHRISTMAS MUSINGS. 185 

Some Christmas Musings 

John Lewis, 
Editorial Writer, Toronto Daily Star. 

" No war, nor battle's sound 

Was heard the world around; 
The idle spear and shield were high uphung. 

The hooked chariot stood. 

Unstained with hostile blood; 
The trumpet spake not to the armed throng." 

WIIEX these familiar lines are quoted by the writer 
of a Christmas article they -Qsually arouse some sad 
reflections in regard to the warlike state of the world 
nineteen hundred years after the first Christmas morning. 
The gigantic armies of Europe, the launching of battleships 
of greater and greater tonnage in the contest for nayal 
supremacy, the constantly recurring alarms of war, furnish 
abundant material for these pensive musings. 

But in our Christmas editorials we have all been working 
upon too narrow a base. We think too much of Europe and 
too little of the great new world that has arisen in the cen- 
tury since the Napoleonic wars. We speak mournfully of the 
mighty armies of France and Germany, and forget the un- 
guarded frontiers of the United States and Canada, which are 
destined to contain a far larger population than France and 
Germany, as great a population as all Europe. Europe is in 
a chronic state of nervous tension, and a disturbance in the 
Balkans may send a thrill of alarm through all that delicate 
organism. On this continent all our disorders are local. War, 
civil or international, in South America, arouses only a mild 
interest in Canada and in the United States. It may be that 
the European war germ will get into our blood, but it seems 
far more likely that the example of America will influence 
Europe. 

The main hope of peace lies not in the Hague Conference 
but in the lessening of the relative influence and power of 
Europe in the world's affairs. Compare the world of to-day 
with the world of the Napoleonic wars; then Europe was all- 
important. The situation has been profoundly changed by 
the expansion of the United States, by the growth of Canada 



186 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

and Australia, by the sudden rise of Japan, and by the build- 
ing of transcontinental railways connecting the Atlantic with 
the Pacific. Here is a veritable new world, in which the 
powers of continental Europe have very little to say. l^ot 
only is America free from European influence, but that in- 
fluence is likely to be excluded from the vast Pacific Ocean 
and all its coasts and islands. Japan and the United States 
have entered into an agreement not only for friendly rela- 
tions, but for maintaining the integrity of China. The only 
other power having large interests in the Pacific is the British 
Empire, represented in Canada, in Australia and in various 
dependencies and naval stations. Great Britain is the ally 
of Japan and the friend of the IJnited States. These three 
powers together possess a dominant influence in the Pacific, 
and are fully capable of protecting China until that sleeping 
giant has fully awakened and is able to protect himself. 

In all this vast new world we see a condition so essentially 
diiferent from that of the Continent of Europe that the maxims 
of European statecraft are unmeaning, or can be applied only 
with the utmost caution and with many modifications. Some 
prophets of woe have conjured up the idea of a yellow peril, 
from a China awakened and armed under Japanese influ- 
ence. '^ Conscience doth make cowards of us all," and our 
conscience with regard to China is naturally uneasy. There 
were days when we were not so bent upon maintaining the 
integrity of China as we are to-day. But all that we hear of 
the Chinese character warrants the belief that the Chinaman 
will not abuse his power. At the worst, the white man will 
be fully able to defeiid himself from any possible yellow 
combination. 

The new world — including in that term America, the 
Pacific Ocean and its coasts and islands — is likely to give as 
its contribution to civilization a new conception of inter- 
national relations. The relations that are possible between 
the United States and Canada are possible elsewhere. The 
European tradition has been broken. It has been demon- 
strated that two nations may dwell side by side with no other 
safeguards than exist between two adjacent counties in 
Ontario. That example, founded upon common-sense and 



THE SILVER BIRCH. 



187 



modern ideas, is more likely to be followed than the example 
of Europe, which is founded upon traditions a couple of 
thousand years old. 

That the progress of events is toward general disarmament 
is the conclusion to which anyone who examines the situation 
carefully must arrive. It must not be supposed that dis- 
armament will bring about the millennium. Many beasts will 
remain to be fought, many mean and sordid passions will sur- 
vive. One might almost prefer feudalism and militarism to the 
prevalence of a universal greed of gold and enthronement of 
the money power. But the abolition of war will not mean 
the abolition of the fighting spirit, implanted in man for wise 
purposes. When he ceases to regard the Frenchman or the 
German as his hereditary enemy, he will turn his attention 
to the real enemy, the social injustice that afflicts and oppresses 
all mankind. When international relations are readjusted in 
accordance with common-sense and humanity, the remaining 
work will be the reconstruction of the social and political sys- 
tems of the world. Peace will not mean stagnation. ^' Peace 
on earth to men of good-will.'' If that is the true rendering 
of the message, it is a promise of the reign of justice as well 
as of the reign of peace. 



The Silver Birch 

ETHELWYN WETHEEAI.D. 

THE silver birch, as slim and fine 
As princess of a royal line, 
Seen on a wintry day will show 
A double fairness through the snow. 



It sets the heart to wondering: 
Perhaps a blotched and sullied thing 
The fairest human life may be 
Against ideal purity. 



188 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The Humor of Thackeray, Dickens and 
Jane Austen 

HELEIS^ C. PARLOW, '08. 

"And if once the crowd has laughed with you, it will not object 
to cry a little — nay, it will make good resolves, and sometimes carry 
them out." — Gissing. 

SOMEON^E has said that the English democracy is the 
most humorous democracy in the world. Whether the 
literature which belongs peculiarly to that democracy 
is, of all literatures, the most humorous, might prove a divert- 
ing subject for investigation. One thing is clear, however; 
the world will never know how much it owes to the spirit which 
animates every living novel, the spirit that is called humor. 
To imagination we do not deny our worship, justly feeling 
that, in its flight, we are borne above the sordid and the com- 
monplace. But from humor, which is, in the last analysis, 
imagination, we withhold our meed of praise, and suspect it, 
rather, because it oft-times sparkles from beneath the common- 
place. ^^ It is the humor of Carlyle that keeps his writings 
fresh,'' says one critic. " His nicknames stick when his argu- 
ment is forgotten." For some, such as Dickens, it is only 
through the medium of humor that the sublime is attained. 
But there are those to whom the gift of humor has been denied. 
By them, the life of argimient, of pathos and of the sublime 
itself is oft-times only dimly felt. However, if we feel, with 
Jane Austen, that there may be a quiet mirth in life's routine ; 
if we possess Thackeray's genius to laugh at our own hypocrisy, 
and to smile kindly at the foibles of others; if our vision, 
piercing the sordid, can discover the interesting and the genuine, 
we know that to us has been given the magic sesame which 
opens to us the treasures of the world's great spirits. 

To use Carlyle's word, humor is a " genial sympathy with 
the under side," a " delicate sense of absurdity." One writer, 
referring to Mrs. Carlyle, says that " There may be Avit, but 
there cannot be humor, without love, and . . . (her 
humor) reveals not merely her genius, but her heart." To 
preserve a humor which is always kind, to avoid tomptHtious 



HUMOR OF POETS AND WRITERS. 



189 



to cynicism, is the task which tests the heart of an author, and 
ho stands or falls according as he loves or despises mankind. 
The wholesomeness of the humor which Jane Austen, Thack- 
eray and Dickens all employ is attested by the fact that they 
can all laugh at themselves. Jane Austen confesses, " I could 
not sit down to write a serious romance under any other motive 
than to save my life; and if it were indispensable for me to 
keep it up, and never relax into laughter at myself or at other 
people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the 
first chapter. '^ Thackeray is continually poking fun at him- 
self when he professes amusement at the eagerness which his 
characters frequently show in hob-nobbing with the great. 
And we have but to mention Skimpole, to be reminded that 
Dickens could always appreciate a joke at his own expense. 

The eternal variety of mankind appealed to Dickens. Humor 
fastened upon character and ran away with it, so that we are 
dazzled by the very incarnations of that spirit, as the figures 
flit hither and thither before our minds. The reader who is # 
not moved to delight except by the serious and the severe has ( 
small patience with the hilarity aroused in others by Dickens's 
humor. But with the great majority Dickens is a favorite. 
His purpose w^as not to portray the life and customs of his 
age. His finger was on the abuses, and his humor hit home 
with marvellous poignancy, where another's argument might 
well have missed the mark. 

To Thackeray, the vanities of life stood forth with amusing 
emptiness. His characters, every now and then, reflect some 
likeness to ourselves, which, tickling our fancy, yet sobers 
us. Life's grave realities are ever present beneath the surface- 
play of humor, the pathos always there, the smiles and tears! 

Jane Austen's characters we follow with interest throughout 
" The trivial round, the common task," enjoying the fresh- 
ness of the tale, but never pausing to laugh aloud, and rarely 
recognizing, fully, the humor of it all. Hers is the uncon- 
scious type, but none the less delightful because of its naivete. 

There is an illusion about humor which, transforming the 
disagreeable, charms away our prejudice. Mrs. Gamp, in 
the workaday world, is vulgar, but, as we turn the pages of 
" Martin Chuzzlewit," our interest in her is amazing. " Mrs. 



190 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Gamp was a lady of that happy temperament which can be 
ecstatic without any other stimulating cause than a general de- 
sire to establish a large and profitable connection. She added, 
daily, so many strings to her bow, that she made a perfect 
harp of it, and upon that instrument she now began to perform 
an extemporaneous concerto." Toots, in " Dombey and Son," 
furnishes another example of the same sort of metamorphosis. 
As Mr. Chesterson says, " We do not quarrel with Toots because 
he is not clever; we are more likely to quarrel with cleverness 
because it is not Toots." Such men as Micawber and Swiveller 
would surely be undesirable as business connections, but, under 
the spell of Dickens's magic, who can resist them? 

Thackeray's humor inspires an appreciation for the bonhomie 
of the rascal. His novels are rich with this type of humorous 
character. The painted old dowager in '^ Esmond " is delight- 
ful. '' She cared more for trumps than for most things in life ;" 
and, when Colonel Esmond returned after having won fame 
abroad, honors were showered upon the young officer and 
*' The dowager came forward in great state, with her grand 
tall head-dress of King James's reign, that she never forsook, 
and said, ^ Cousin Henry, all our family have met ; and we 
thank you. Cousin, for your noble conduct towards the head of 
our house;' and, pointing to her blushing cheek, she made 
Mr. Esmond aware that he was to enjoy the rapture of an em- 
brace there. Having saluted one cheek, she turned to him the 
other. . . . ' And I adopt you from this day,' says the 
dowager ; ' and I wish I Avas richer, for your sake, son 
Esmond,' she added, with a wave of her hand; and as Mr. 
Esmond dutifully went down on his knee before her ladyship, 
she cast her eyes up to the ceiling (the gilt chandelier, and 
the twelve wax candles in it, for the party was numerous), 
and invoked a blessing from that quarter upon the newly- 
adopted son." 

Jane Austen finds particular diversion in a certain type of 
fool. Mr. Collins's letters are irresistible, and the gentleman 
himself great fun, but we all hope to be preserved from such 
companions. Whenever his name is mentioned we are prepared 
for amusement. In Charlotte's house, '^ When Mr. Collins 
could be forgotten, there was really a great air of comfort 



HUMOR OF POETS AND WRITERS. 191 

throughout, and, by Charlotte's evident enjoyment of it, Eliza- 
beth supposed he must be often forgotten." Mr. Elton, in 
*^ Emma," might be included in this class ; the passage in 
which he makes his proposal is excellently done. Jane Austen 
transforms the bore into the most refreshing of companions. 

There are certain '^ devices " which an author brings to 
the service of humor. Tricks of spelling or mistaken quota- 
tions frequently assist in producing an astonishing effect. In 
" The Diary of George IV.," we find this lamentation : " O 
trumpery ! O Morris ! as Homer says. This is a higeous pictur 
of manners, such as I weap to think of, as every morl man 
must weap." Or turn to the pages where Mrs. Gamp's re- 
marks are recorded. Jane Austen rarely deserts the conven- 
tional. In fact, her very adherence to orthodox spelling and 
set conversational forms produces, occasionally, in our ears, ^n 
incongruity which is amusing. In '' Mansfield Park," " At 
last Sir Thomas cannot avoid perceiving in a grand and care- 
less way, that Mr. Crawford is somewhat distinguishing his 
niece." 

Both Dickens and Thackeray introduce, from time to time, 
supernumerary characters for comic purposes. Alcide de 
Mirabolant, the cook in '^ Pendennis," and Dick Steele, in 
^' Esmond," are not indispensable as far as the plots are con- 
cerned. In Dickens's tales, the name of such characters is 
legion. Miss Austen gives us a Miss Bates, who is certainly 
worth knowing; but, in the main, she finds her humor in the 
commonplace situations of everyday life, rather than in the 
absurdities of a character introduced for the express purpose 
of making us smile. 

There is a basis in human nature for the humor in our three 
novelists. The first time Harriet saw Mr. Elton, she and two 
other girls peeped through the blind, but Miss l^ash, the 
teacher, discovering them, scolded them away and remained 
herself to look. What character could be more truly and 
cleverly dra^vn than that of Mr. Woodhouse, who '^ liked his 
gruel thin, but not too thin " ? 

Becky Sharp, " when she was agitated, and alluded to her 
maternal relative, spoke with ever so slight a foreign accent, 
which gave a great charm to her clear, ringing voice. . . . 



192 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

And curious it is, that as she advanced in life, this young 
lady's ancestors increased in rank and splendor." Thackeray's 
asides often give an impression of truth to the absurd, and 
the addition of local color, by means of circumstantial evidence, 
lends an air of actuality. Thackeray is continually taking 
us into his confidence, and, on one of these occasions, in 
" Vanity Fair," urges us to b© patient, though the tale at first 
lack excitement, encouraging us with the promise that ^' There 
are some terrific chapters coming presently." The play upon 
a word is sufiicient to suggest the ridiculous ; Dick Steele thought 
that Lady Collingwood was '' ' double beautiful ' (and indeed 
poor Dick was only too apt to be in a condition to see double)." 

Dickens's villains always have a lurid intensity. They are 
past reclaiming. As one critic remarks : " This heartiness and 
vivacity in the villains of Dickens is w^orthy of note because 
it is directly connected with his own cheerfulness. 
He did not wish to imitate the reverent scepticism of Thack- 
eray." Quilp and Jonas Chuzzlewit have nothing to recom- 
mend them. 

Jane Austen removes humor as far as possible from her 
villains. Henry Crawford, Wickham, and Willoughby never 
provoke the least amusement. 

Thackeray has a genial love for a certain class of scoundrels, 
insisting upon calling them ^' honest," and pursuing them with 
a humor which inspires within us, in spite of ourselves, a 
kindliness toward them. Such as Lord Mohun and Lord 
Steyne, however, are looked upon with no degree of allowance. 
They are black and utterly repulsive. 

During the early part of his life, Dickens made free use of 
caricature ; his characters, frequently, were mere abstractions. 
Later, however, realism began to cast over his stage a more 
sober light, and the figures lost in interest. Someone has said 
that the more excited a Dickens character becomes, the more 
it becomes itself. Art does not always lose by exaggeration, 
and, after all, demands not more than an im])ression of truth. 
Dickens, in his vivid way, gives us somethinu; other than a 
photographic likeness in Mrs. Gamp, Dick Swiveller, Micawber 
and Toots. If we take exception to exaggeration in Dickens, 
we may have to question the existence of do ^Firabolant in 



HUMOR OF POETS AND WRITERS. 193 

" Pendennis/' Honeymoon in the '^ ]^ewcomes/' Dick Steele 
in " Esmond/' and Sir Pitt Crawley, in " Vanity Fair." Even 
Miss Bates may be called upon to explain herself occasionally. 
Undoubtedly, several of Dickens's characters are somewhat one- 
sided, but their humor is unmistakable, and the whole gallery 
of his creations unite in reminding us that mankind is " w^ildly 
varied and wildly interesting." 

The subjects touched by the humor of Dickens and Thack- 
eray are as various as the authors' own interests. Politics, the 
War Office, Court of Chancery, Public Executions, Parochial- 
ism and Debtors' Prisons, suggested to the mind of Dickens, 
especially, a humor which had in it something more poignant 
than a spirit of kindliness. His humor gave a vividness to 
abuses which might else have remained longer in existence. 
Both Thackeray and Dickens enjoyed an occasional thrust at 
the Government. '' England, for the last week, has been in an 
awful state. Lord Coodle would go out, Sir Thomas Doodle 
wouldn't come in, and, there being no people in England to 
speak of, except Coodle and Doodle, the country has been with- 
out a Government." 

IN'ever, by the slightest hint, does Jane Austen refer to the 
public institutions of her time. True, Parochialism received 
its deserts in the types of clergymen which she had drawn. The 
attentions of Mr. Collins and Mr. Grant to their flocks are 
greatly interrupted by their respective worship of the peerage 
and the green goose. When referring to the prevalent idea of 
matrimony, Jane Austen's humor sharpens into satire. The 
problems of the small town, where shines but rarely the strange 
light from Brighton or London, are sufficient to attract and 
enchant with life-like interest. 

But who can catalogue humor ? The joke is spoiled when 
accompanied by a chart. Humor is elusive. You grasp it, 
and it vanishes ; you strive to dissect or analyse it, and its life 
has fled. Humor, like the other best things in life, brooks no 
apology and needs no explanation. Happy are they whose daily 
burden is lightened by a sense of humor! 

To Dickens '' Life is laughable and livable." To Thack- 
eray life's tragedy is softened, for the follies of men are 
amusing, and almost all men are '^ honest," and deserve to be 



194 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

dealt with kindly. As Mr. Goldwin Smith expresses it, " Jane 
Austen's purpose is not to form your opinion, nor to reform 
your character, but to impart to you the pleasure she felt 
herself.'' 

One or two short selections will serve as examples of the 
humor of Dickens, Thackeray, and Jane Austen: 

"Have you been making that horrible noise?" said the Single Gen- 
tleman. 

"I have been helping, sir," returned Dick, keeping his eye upon 
him and waving the ruler gently in his right hand, as an indication 
of what the Single Gentleman had to expect if he attempted any 
violence. 

"How dare you, then?" said the lodger. "Eh?" 

To this Dick made no other reply than by enquiring whether the 
lodger held it to be consistent with the conduct and character of a 
gentleman to go to sleep for six-and-twenty hours at a stretch, and 
whether the peace of an amiable and virtuous family was to weigh as 
nothing in the balance. 

"Is my peace nothing?" said the Single Gentleman. 

"Is their peace nothing, sir?" returned Dick. "I don't wish to 
hold out any threats, sir — indeed, the law does not allow of threats, 
for to threaten is an indictable offence — but if ever you do that again, 
take care you're not sat upon by the coroner and buried in a cross- 
road before you wake. We have been distracted with fears that you 
were dead, sir," said Dick, gently sliding to the ground; "and the 
short and the long of it is that we cannot allow single gentlemen to 
come into this establishment and sleep like double gentlemen without 
paying extra for it." 

"Indeed!" cried the lodger. 

"Yes, sir, indeed," returned Dick, yielding to his destiny and saying 
whatever came uppermost; "an equal quantity of slumber was never 
got out of one bed and bedstead, and if you're going to sleep in that 
way, you must pay for a double-bedded room." — "The Old Curiosity 
Shop,'' Chap. XXXV. 

A very stout, puffy man, in buckskins and Hessian boots, with 
several immense neckcloths, that rose almost to his nose, with a red 
striped waistcoat and an apple-green coat with steel buttons almost as 
large as crown pieces (it was the morning costume of a dandy or blood 
of those days), was reading the paper by the fire, when the two girls 
entered, and bounced off his arm-chair, and blushed excessively, and 
hid his entire face almost in his neckcloth at this apparition. 

"It's only your sister, Joseph," said Amelia, laughing and shaking 
the two fingers which he held out. "I've come home for good, you 
know; and this is my friend, Miss Sharp, whom you have heard me 
mention." 

"No, never; upon my word!" said the head under the neckcloth, 
shaking very much; "that is, yes — what abominably cold weather, 
miss"— and herewith he fell to poking the fire with all his mighty 
although it was in the middle of June. 



HUMOR OF POETS AND WRITERS. 195 

"He's very handsome," whispered Rebecca to Amelia, rather loud. 

"Do you think so?" said the latter. "I'll tell him." 

" Darling! not for worlds!" said Miss Sharp, starting back as timid 
as a fawn. She had previously made a respectful, virgin-like curtsy 
to the gentleman, and her modest eyes gazed so perseveringly on the 
carpet that it was a wonder how she should have found an opportunity 
to see him. 

"Thank you for the beautiful shawls, brother," said Amelia to the 
fire poker. "Are they not beautiful, Rebecca?" 

"Oh, heavenly!" said Miss Sharp, and her eyes went from the carpet 
straight to the chandelier. — "Vanity Fair." 

The next extract might he pathetic if we did not know 
Becky Sharp: 

But old Tinker was not to be pumped by this little cross-questioner; 
and signifying to her that bed was a place for sleeping, not conversa- 
tion, set up in her corner of the bed such a snore as only the nose of 
innocence can produce. Rebecca lay awake for a long, long time, think- 
ing of the morrow, and of the new world into which she was going, 
and of her chances of success there. The rushlight flickered in the 
basin. The mantelpiece cast up a great black shadow, over half of a 
mouldy old sampler, which her defunct ladyship had worked, no 
doubt, and over two little family pictures of young lads, one in a 
college gown and the other in a red jacket like a soldier. When she 
went to sleep, Rebecca chose that one to dream about. — "Vanity Fair." 

(Mr. Collins and Mr. Bennet converse about Lady Catherine's 
daughter, Miss de Bourgh.) 

"Her indifferent state of health unhappily prevents her fceirg in 
town; and by that means, as I told Lady Catherine myself one day, 
has deprived the British court of its brightest ornament. Her ladyship 
seemed pleased with the idea; and you may imagine that I am happy 
on every occasion to offer those little delicate compliments which are 
always acceptable to ladies. I have more than once observed to Lady 
Catherine that her charming daughter seemed born to be a duchess, 
and that the most elevated rank, instead of giving her consequence,, 
would be adorned by her. These are the kind of little things which 
please her ladyship, and it is a sort of attention which I conceive 
myself peculiarly bound to pay." 

"You judge very properly," said Mr. Bennet, "and it is happy for 
you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask 
whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the 
moment or are the result of previous study?" 

"They arise chiefly from what is passing at the time, and though I 
sometimes amuse myself with suggesting and arranging such little 
elegant compliments as may be adapted to ordinary occasions, I always 
wish to give them as unstudied an air as possible." — "Pride and Preju- 
dice," „Chap. xiv. 



196 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Shining Out and Shining In 

H. Isabel Graham 

W IFE, at worst, is not all sighing 
^^ And repenting of our sin, 
There's a glory and a gladness 

Shining out and shining in ; 
There's a lifting of the burden 

And a lightening of the load. 
There's a song down in the valley 

And a turning in the road. 

There's a kind of holy calmness 

In the saddest o' the year. 
And a friendly flash of firelight 

When December days are drear ; 
No, this life is not all trouble. 

There's a joy for every pain 
And a promise of the sunshine 

In the patter of the rain. 







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"SSSST MARCO r 



199 



Sssst Marco ! *' 



NORMAN W. DE WITT. 



DELPHI received us in a modest inn. Very modest, 
for it was a one-story building, with the highway in 
front and a precipice in the rear, ^o one would have 
guessed its destination from its external appearance, nor did 
our host by any means look the landlord. He was, however, a 
man who would attract notice anywhere, and in America I 
feel sure he would draw a crowd. His symmetrical figure 
showed an oval contour whose minor axis was slightly less 
than the diameter of a doorway. His superficies gave no indi- 
cation that he lived within a few minutes' walk of the Cas- 
talian Spring, or any other running water. The fact is that* 
springs in Greece are not so much in honor as they appear to 
have been at one time, or it may be that they have become 
inviolable. Our hostess proved to be round like an orange 
and slightly elongated at the poles. They were a comely 
pair, but very deceiving. He might have taken the part of 
Caliban without a mask, but in the sequel, his kindness, 
promptness and intelligence demonstrated clearly that nature 
had combined a look of malice and dullness in his face merely 
for a jest. He was no mean waiter, either, and the meals that 
his better hemisphere cooked were served by him with more 
than the grace of Vulcan. When arrangements for our de- 
parture were being made, we discovered that he was also a 
sort of Pierpont Morgan in the village, and had it not been 
for the financial pressure he was able to exert we might not 
have been able to get transportation during the Easter holidays. 
Delphi, which has always been the name of a sanctuary and 
not a town, is perched on the side of Mt. Parnassus near the 
edge of a gorge through which flows a little stream whose 
ancient name almost everyone remembers for a few days after 
his visit; farther away to the south and west gleam the bright 
blue waters of the Gulf of Corinth, and all around rise the 
classic hills, full of stories of ancient valor and ancient mean- 
ness. At their foot, at the end of an inlet, stands the miser- 
able town of Itea, notorious for bad hotels and the cares that 
infest the night. There the Greek guests insist upon the 



200 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Americans occupying the beds, while thev themselves sleep 
upon the hard tables. They are worthy descendants of the 
crafty Ulysses. Our party had purposely avoided Itea, and 
with our rotund hosts we had no troubles but our own to 
disturb our slumbers. 

Delphi has recently been excavated by the French with rich 
results, and is one of the best places in the world for the 
pleasure of sentimentalizing, that cheapest of intellectual en- 
joyments. You may sit ".amid the ruins of Apollo's temple 
and dream of raving priestesses and learned priests ; of grave 
or quarrelsome Amphictyons ; of embassies from Croesus or 
from Egypt, bearing rich gifts for the prophet, inscribed in 
archaic letters with the donor's names, the first writing known 
to many of the Greeks; in fancy you may see groups of 
surly Spartans or smart Athenians come and go ; or handsome 
Chaerephon may arrive and ask who is the wisest of men. 
But a busy scholar, anxious to visualize the reading of years, 
preferring Pausanias to a Baedeker, will be found scurrying 
up to the little hippodrome at the top, or locating the treas- 
uries of the states, or reading with hungry eyes the fine inscrip- 
tions that decorate the narrow ways. As at all ancient sites 
of consequence, the government has erected a small museum 
where you may see the objects of value found on the spot, 
chief among which in this instance is the famous standing 
figure in bronze of a charioteer, a fine example of t^arlier 
Greek art. 

When the day has waned and the shadows are falling 
longer from the mountains, comes a last enjoyment, a sip of 
mastica beneath a spreading plane tree by the wayside, hard 
by the Castalian Spring where the Greek women are giving 
their clothes the last rinsing, and while you rest, weary A^dth 
climbing in the hot sun over ruins terraced on i\ stoej) in- 
cline, you may perhaps catch the tinkle of nearing bells and 
presently along the road will sound the ])5itter of innumer- 
able feet, closer and closer coming, until the goats hurry ner- 
vously past and the pattering is lost in the near distance 
again. The goatherd, with his long crook, trudges behind, 
eyeing you curiously and becoming more impatient tliaii ever 
to join his cousin in America. 



" SSSST MARCO !'' 



201 



By this time a Avaxing appetite will warn you too that It 
is necessary to move toward your hostelry, wJiere the hare 
killed on the mountain will be done to a turn; literally to a 
turn, for he is roasted at full length on a spit over a long pan 
of ooals that sends out a vicious spray of fat to polish the 
face and the front of our host. To those who like game, I 
recommend a Parnassus hare done to a turn. 

Our plan was to cross Parnassus, Phocis and Locris to Ther- 
mopylge, and we succeeded in carrying it out. In the cold 
gray dawn of Good Friday, according to the Greek calendar, 
we assembled before our caravansary, where nine mules, 
saddled but not bridled, for the passenger is freight, were 
flipping their ears to the cheerful accompaniment of many 
bells. The professor in charge of our party always took the 
best animal for himself, since he led the way and wished tQ 
set a good pace. The best of the remainder used to be assigned 
to the ladies in the order of their need and avoirdupois, in 
which thy diifered considerably, while I, who constituted the 
rear guard and had no need of speed and could walk if neces- 
sary, perforce remained content with any old thing that was 
left. The morning in question I scanned the herd to see 
which mount was poor enough to be my Pegasus, and soon 
espied a diminutive mule proudly and solicitously held in 
restraint by a stout old lady in a gown cut decollete both top 
and bottom. On drawing near I heard her say soothingly: 
'' Sssst Marco ! sssst Marco !" This I laiew to mean ivhoa or 
steady in horse Greek, and I inwardly began to speculate what 
wild act Marco might commit if not held in check. I also 
decided on the spot that he had been named, not for the gentle 
Avriter of the Gospel, but for that fiery patriot, Marco Bozzaris. 
It turned out as I divined, and soon, mounted on the little 
patriot, I was scooting up the hill of Apollo and all the time 
an old muleteer, husband of her of the decollete gown, was 
tearing along on foot after us and repeating the refrain, " Sssst 
Marco ! sssst Marco !'' 

That little mule was a very dynaiuo. Instead of walking 
contentedly at the end of the procession along the zigzag path, 
away he shot up the holy slope, and several times I could only 
check his ardor by lowering my feet. After climbing for 



202 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

several hours we crossed the summit in snow so deep that all 
had to dismount and allow the muleteers to help the animals 
through the drifts. As for me, I could Hardly be said to dis- 
mount; I simply dropped my colossal legs and Marco was 
free. Free ! Yes, and he knew it, for, wheeling about, in the 
twinkling of an eye he started back on the run towards 
Delphi. In an atom of time there were two of us on the 
run, but on that narrow path there was no heading him off, 
and all seemed hopeless until with a happy thought I mur- 
mured a prayer to Apollo. And, miracle of miracles ! Marco 
stopped so suddenly that I narrowly escaped a rear-end 
collision, which is especially dangerous with his breed, but 
with a presence of mind that seems wonderful to me now 
when I think it over, I leapt to one side, and Marco, after a 
moment of reflection, yielded to the god and soon was loping 
back along that selfsame path to rejoin his comrades. 

During the descent we met no one but an old woman, who 
asked us where we were from. This is a frequent greeting 
for the stranger in Grreece, and, having been so for three 
thousand years or more, it bores some people. Among these 
was our leader, who had been several years in the country and 
felt cynical about the custom. He told me that once he had 
adopted the plan of naming the last village he had passed 
through, and thereto hung a tale. One evening as it was grow- 
ing dark he entered a place where he expected to pass the night, 
and in answer to the usual question he named an adjacent vil- 
lage. Imagine how interested he became when the people began 
to scatter like a lot of New York insurance magnates before an 
investigation. Mischief, however, was afoot, and only Avith the 
greatest difficulty did he find mean quarters for the night. 
The smallpox was raging in the place he had named. 

The descent was gradual and dreary, through desolate 
places which the guides said were resorted to in the summer. 
It was probably during this season that the muses visited these 
parts; it would be no place for muses in the winter. We 
passed a couple of villages with much barking of dogs. My 
memory has by some perverse reaction recalled the names of 
these places, Ano- and Kato-agoriani, but I had no intention 
of remembering them. At the latter we stopped to eat. our 



SSSST MARCO !' 



203 



lunch of cold, hard-boiled eggs, which the canny Greek cooks 
as soon as gathered, and good brown bread. A poor old man, 
with generous hospitality, insisted on treating us to that un- 
speakable wine called resinata, which is so strong with resin 
that it makes a cold wave float down my spine. The last part 
of the descent was down a sort of natural stairs and here I 
suffered. It turned out that Marco, who was such a noble 
and ambitious climber, was equally ambitious but not so com- 
fortable on the descent. Rather than repeat that perform- 
ance I would willingly ride a saw-horse down the City Hall 
steps. 

We then journeyed for several weary hours along a beau- 
tiful government road and arrived cold, tired and hungry, in 
inky darkness, at Drachmanni, our stopping place for the 
night. As this town was strange to us, we inquired our way 
to the house of the demarch or mayor, who is bound by cus- 
tom to furnish or find lodging and food for strangers. After 
receiving a tardy answer to our knock, our leader said : " We 
are a party of Americans who desire shelter for the night," 
and presto ! there was a great commotion. The gates of the 
courtyard flew open, lights appeared on the veranda and we 
were taken in. The table was spread — ^beautiful bread, fresh 
cheese from goat's milk, pink Easter eggs, dried quinces as 
hard as hickory, and, greatest favor of all, Russian caviar 
appeared. The demarches wife apologized profusely because 
she was unprepared and promised something worth while in 
the morning. She made good her word, for by that time she 
had two chickens cooked and a good dinner prepared. For 
the night the men were furnished with a bed, while the 
women slept upon the floor, with plenty of rugs and blankets, 
which are the pride of the Greek housewife. We even had 
towels, soap, and, rarest of all, a wash-basin. For all of this 
they scornfully refused payment, and when our leader, who 
knew Greek ways, offered a little contribution to his daughter's 
dowry, the demarch said promptly, " When she marries, I 
will write to you," which was a polite refusal. Such is Greek 
hospitality where travellers rarely go. 

By noon we were well across the valley of the Cephissus 
and heading for Mt. Callidromus. During our ascent I re- 



204 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

member seeing a goat leap into the branches of an old reclin- 
ing tree, walk out on a limb, and, standing erect on his hind 
legs, eat all the leaves within reach. I also saw a flock of 
goats cross a sharp bridge of rock by splitting their toes upon 
it, and I found that the rock was worn smooth by this traffic. 
Arrived at the top of the pass, we were met with a view of 
the ^gean Sea, whence came a strong north-east wind from 
the Hellespont that made us draw our clothes tightly about 
us. We spent the night at an ordinary village, and paid dear 
enough for accommodation not so good as that which we 
had received for nothing. It was now the night before 
Easter, and in every yard the poor little lambs were being 
dressed for the Easter dinner. The G-reek fasts during Lent 
and celebrates the end of the season by a great feast, which 
is to him what Christmas-time is to us. 

The next day we were off early and as we went along our 
muleteers called to the country people : ^' Is Christ risen ?" 
and they cried again, '^ He is risen indeed." After a short 
time we came to the Pass of Thermopylae, now a pass no longer, 
for the River Spercheius has thrown so much silt upon the 
shores that the road is wide and level. The hot springs are 
still flowing in a tepid, abundant stream of a whitish-green 
color. This was nearly my undoing. Marco refused to cross, 
and you might have seen me, balked almost at the end of my 
journey, careering up and down on the edge of a stream three 
feet wide. At last the husband of the lady of the decollete gown 
came to my rescue, and, taking the halter to the opposite side, 
he landed me and my steed safely across at one jump. Cheap 
baths have been erected on the spot and people now resort 
thither to be cured of rheumatism. We lunched on the bank 
of the Spercheius under a torrid snn, with nothing that we 
dared to drink. The afternoon found us at last, this time 
dusty, hot and thirsty, in the toAvn of Lamia. There in the 
public square, where the people were celebrating the holiday 
with fire-crackers, I parted from Marco and sadly watched 
him ambling down the street on the way to her who was 
anxiously waiting for his return on the side of Mt. Parnassus. 

And here my paper ends, with the end of our journey by 
land. 



THE PICTURE OF HATE. 



205 



The Picture of Hate 

Ethelwyn Wetherald 

/SAID, I will paint me a picture— a picture of terrible 
Hate. 

The brow shall be scowling and rigid, the lips as unyield- 
ing as fate. 

The hair shall be braided with serpents, the eyes have a 
demon-like glow. 

The hands like the claws of a tiger, clutched hard at the 
throat of his foe. 

And always by day while I painted, and always at ehe 

while I mused. 
My friends and my neighbors forsook me, and even the 

children refused 
To come to my house with their playthings, or pause at 

my thistle-choked gate. 
For they said, 'Tis himself on the canvas, 'tis he is the 

picture of Hate, 

So when it was finished I leaned it outside on the fence 
near the road. 

And soon came the man that I hated, a child in his arms 
as he strode. 

His face was all smiling, uplifted, to list to a song- 
sparrow's call. 

So he saw not my terrible picture, and me he did not see 
at all! 



206 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

A Philanthropic Failure 

BY S. FRANCES HARRISOIS" (^' SERANUS ") . 

Author of " The Forest of Bourg-Marie," " Pine, Rose, and 
Fleur-de-Lis," etc, 

WE had arranged to meet one Saturday afternoon about 
the middle of December in Mrs. Simon Caufield'S 
pleasant parlors in Madison Avenue, at her request, 
to talk over certain matters referring to the ^.W.G.A.A., of 
which she is President, and I had better construe those letters at 
once into the National Working Girls' Amusement dissocia- 
tion. Mrs. Caufield was a dear woman, originally from IN'ew 
England, a placid, motherly soul, with great possessions and 
no children of her own, but with sympathy to spare for other 
people's children, pet animals, servants, poor relations, and the 
hard-working, needy, or unfortunate generally. The Guild for 
recreation among the working classes was largely her own hobby, 
and on this special Saturday we were to meet and exchange 
views with respect to a proposed entertainment at Christmas 
time. Miss Cynthia Cutting was Secretary, I the Treasurer, 
and the ^N'.W.G.A.A. comprised one hundred and thirty-five 
active members, being girls who were all engaged in what is 
known as " service." Then we had forty honorary members, 
directors and associates, and two Vice-Presidents, but I will 
admit that Mrs. Caufield and Miss Cutting did the work, with 
what assistance I could spare from a busy journalistic life to 
give them. 

" Well, ladies," began Mrs. Caufield, in her meek yet decided 
manner, glancing around at a quorum of fifteen, " I don't know 
as I have gone into the matter of our entertainment very thor- 
oughly yet myself, but I can at least listen to others, and shall 
be happy to hear any suggestions you may have to offer. You 
know the purposes of the N.W.G.A.A., how we aim at amusing 
our members and carrying them for a while out of themselves 
and away from their work, which at best — at hest, ladies — is 
monotonous and mechanical. You also know what steps we have 
taken in the past to effectually secure this end. We have had 



A PHILANTHROPIC FAILURE. 



207 



lectures and stereopticon views; musical and elocutionary 
recitals ; we even had a Greek play, you will remember, and then 
there was a conjurer, a ventriloquist, a Japanese family, and a 
revivalist. I really think we've had about everything. Seems 
to me as if we want to get at something fresh and new, so I 
am going to put it to the meeting what form our next entertain- 
ment shall take, l^ow, ladies, let us have some nice, up-to-date 
suggestions right away, and waste no time, if possible." 

There was the customary respectful silence for a moment, 
then a lady remarked, ^^ Perhaps, Madam President, you will 
lead oif and give us your own views first. We should also like 
to hear from Miss Cutting." 

" Well," resumed Mrs. Caufield, " as the Christmas season 
is so near, I think we had better make the affair of a particularly 
friendly and informal, but cheerful, character. We might have 
an oyster supper with a Christmas tree and gifts afterwards, 
or a chafing-dish party, or something of that kind, seasonable 
and hearty. Girls all like good things to eat. Last August, you 
may recollect that I wished them to have a peach social, but it 
was a bad year for the peach crop. I know these ideas sound 
old-fashioned, but I'm a homely body, you see, and speaking 
of fruit socials reminds me that berries were so scarce last 
spring that we did not have our annual strawberry social, and 
it bothered me a good deal, for I know how fond girls are of 
fruit, and a good many of them — our working girls, I mean — 
don't get half the fruit they ought to have to keep them in 
health." 

" That's so," murmured a parasitical member. 

" They see it, and smell it, and handle it, and arrange it, and 
cut it up, maybe, but they don't get a taste of it themselves," 
continued Mrs. Caufield, solemnly. 

^^ There's one thing they don't do with it, anyway," remarked 
Mrs. Homer-Blake, who was of a satirical turn, and had to be 
frequently suppressed, ^Hhey don't preserve it, for they don't 
know how. Years ago you could get a girl now and then who 
understood the making of jam, but to-day — well, T should think 
not!" 

" I don't know about a supper," said the Secretary, dubiously, 
"^or a Christmas-tree. I'm afraid they'd think it childish. 



208 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Besides, I think the class of girls we are discussing would like 
something different from either; they are not enough of a 
contrast." 

'^ To their work, you mean/' said the satirical lady. '^ You're 
right there; they get enough to eat, bless you! I keep three, 
and I can vouch for their share of the weekly bills, I can tell 
you. My servants always have fruits and delicacies in season, 
just the same as ourselves." 

"Well — but now, we want some ideas," said Mrs. Caufield, 
pleasantly. " Let us hear from the Secretary." 

"My idea is somewhat daring. I'd send them all to the 
theatre. Let them really see a good play, a whole play, and not 
little scraps and bits, all at once, for once in their lives !" 

" The whole hundred and thirty-five — in a mob ?" 

I think this was my unsympathetic remark. 

" That's no great number," said Miss Cutting, stoutly. " Let's 
see — we want it to come off in about a fortnight, don't we? 
What's at the theatres now ?" 

Mrs. Homer-Blake saw her chance and used it wickedly. 

" ' Sappho,' ' The Second Mrs. Tanqueray,' ' The Degener- 
ates,' ^ The Liars,' ^ The Telephone Girl,' " she said, grimly. 
" Then, if you prefer the legitimate, there is ' Cymbeline,' or 
^ Othello.' Besides which are fourteen houses doing vaudeville ; 
Anna Held, in ^ The French Maid ' ; quite suitable, you see ; 
^ Charmian,' and ^ The Girl with the Auburn Hair.' " 

But a chorus of dissent greeted the Secretary's proposal. It 
was not deemed wise to inculcate a taste for the theatre; also, 
there would be some difficulty in getting them there. Automo- 
biles would be expensive, vans ridiculous, and to walk two-and- 
two like a boarding-school or denizens of the ark, worst of all. 

" ;N'o other suggestion before the meeting ?" 

" How would an afternoon in the Metropolitan Loan Museum 
answer ?" said a member, timidly. Having a taste for art her- 
self, she saw things from that point. 

" No, I don't seem to see success in that direction, somehow," 
said our President, smiling, but shaking her wavy grey head. 
" Our members are not ripe for that ; of course, in our reading- 
rooms we have magazines of art, portfolios of etchings, and 
every help to a knowledge of these subjects that an intelligent 









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A PHILANTHROPIC FAILURE. 



211 



girl can possibly expect, but I am not sure whether they can 
enjoy pictures and bric-a-brac yet as fully as they may come to." 

"I'd be content if they knew how to keep my bric-a-brac 
dusted without breaking it/' said Mrs. Blake, but no one took 
any notice of her ; she always sees things in a wrong light. 

" I suppose a Sunday evening concert in the Metropolitan 
Opera House wouldn't do !" glibly remarked a musical member, 
who was promptly put right by the President. 

" No, no, ladies," she exclaimed, rather impatiently for her, 
for she is a sweet woman ordinarily ; " you make the mistake, 
many of you, of suggesting for these girls ivhat you would like 
to do yourselves. You must get away from all these ideas of 
self, all natural preferences, in short. Think of the girls as 
workers — what, in your opinion, would they like best, providing 
it is reasonable, expedient, good for them, and within the power 
of the Executive ?" 

Somewhat reluctantly, at this juncture I arose. 

" The President," I began, " has, with her usual calm wisdom 
and unfailing sagacity, put the thing in a nutshell. In this 
matter we are to be guided by the aims of the Association, by 
the rights and expectations of its members, and by our own 
powers of self and observation. JsTow I imagine that the great- 
est good of the greatest number is what we want to arrive at this 
afternoon, and with that in view, I venture to propose. Madam 
President, as the best mode of bringing our members together 
in a social and recreative sense, an evening dance on the 23rd 
of this month, the night before Christmas eve. We will not call 
it a ball — that would savor too much of feudal country-house 
festivities — but just a dance. An ' At-home,' if that sounds 
better. There are some advantages, I think, in my plan ; firstly, 
we haven't done it before, it is therefore new ; secondly, we can 
utilize our own rooms, the larger of which can be quickly con- 
verted into a dancing floor ; thirdly, it need not cost much, since 
the Executive will of course keep expenses down ; and, fourthly, 
as we shall ask each girl to bring a friend, it will enable them 
to enjoy themselves fully and freely and let them know that we 
are really sympathetic and human in our dealings with them 
and not always thinking of the school and platform side of life. 
Eor any who do not dance, we can have the reading-room thrown 
open, and then there is always the fun of looking on." 



212 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

And I sat down. 

" But very few of them knoAV how to dance !'' said somebody. 

" They know how in their own fashion/' said I, " as you will 
see if it comes oif." 

"Whom will they dance with?" thoughtfully inquired Miss 
Cutting. 

" I have suggested their inviting their friends. That," said 
I, " usually means young men with girls of this order." 

"Oh! — menr cried Mrs. Blake. "A nice affair it'll be! 
!N'ever, never do." 

A good many negatives met my ears, and a ripple of excite- 
ment ran through the meeting, but to my great delight Mrs. 
Caufield took up my idea and carried it through. 

" The Treasurer's suggestion was at first not altogether 
approved of by me, but on thinking it over I believe she is 
right. I'm not a dancing woman myself — never Avas — but T 
long ago discovered the impossibility, nay, the lui desirability, 
of converting all mankind to one type. I seem to realize that 
these precious girls of ours, whom w^e want to help and not to 
hinder, are human. A good many of them can dance and would 
like to; they've got young men friends, and they are none the 
worse for that. They must and will meet them sometime, some- 
how, somewhere. Ladies, we don't realize this. If service is 
ever to be what we want it to be, we must recognize the natural 
and social rights of our girls as individuals — no longer consider- 
ing them coldly as a class. We must meet the needs of their 
nature whenever we can, and so I strongly recommend you to 
adopt the idea put forth by the Treasurer, hoping you will 
carry it to a successful issue." 

I rose and bowed. The motion was put and carried, com- 
mittees appointed to work out details, and finally the " At- 
home " became an entity. 

We all agreed that simplicity must be the leading note, so 
that the members would be perfectly at ease,- and to this end 
we engaged a piano and fiddle instead of a small orchestra, and 
the refreshments were to be provided by the honorary members, 
who would furnish lemonade and cakes, while a cheap confec- 
tioner was found who promised to su])]ily tea, coffee, ice-cream,, 
and ham and chicken sandwiches. Then we also pledged our- 



A PHILANTHROPIC FAILURE. 



213 



selves to plainness of attire, still with a view to the feelings of 
the girls, who had been given small cards of invitation for their 
^^ friends." We also arranged for onr guests to arrive at 8.30, 
and trusted to be able to send them home by half-past twelve. 

The night came, and when the confectioner arrived we sud- 
denly found that the Reception and Refreshment Committees 
had not thought of getting waiters. We looked blank. The 
confectioner was sorry, but it was the busy Christmas season 
and he was wanted elsewhere, and the extra women we knew who 
did this sort of thing were invited to the " At-home." Clearly, 
we should have to do the waiting ourselves. However, we were 
nearly all in blouses and walking skirts, and, as Mrs. Homer- 
Blake satirically remarked, it really would be too edifying for 
anything ! At eight o'clock the musicians arrived, and we were 
ready, though somewhat tired, as the preparatory sweeping, 
dusting and general arrangement of things had been kept among 
ourselves. Naturally, as the instigator of the affair, I felt some 
twinges of responsibility, especially as when half-past eight 
came there was no sign of our guests. A quarter to nine — ^nine 
— and still not one. 

Mrs. Caufield, standing near the door to receive them, had to 
have a chair brought her. " For," said she, " if I'd known they 
were going to be so late I'd have asked them for half-past seven." 

'^ You'll find that, just like their mistresses," said Mrs. 
Homer-Blake, " they'll be about an hour after the time they are 
asked for." 

This proved true, for it was fully half-past nine before Miss 
Cutting, watching from the window, saw two large touring-cars 
drive up beneath. They were quickly followed by three han- 
soms, and these by several couples on foot, so that we knew there 
must be quite a number in the dressing-room. 

" You don't mean to say they're coming in autos ?" ejaculated 
Mrs. Caufield. 

" However they're coming, I wish they would make haste. 
I'm tired to death already," said the Secretary, yawning. 

In a few moments the advance guard of guests entered the 

rooms, and I never shall forget the expression on the faces of 

the Reception Committee. The men were all in correct evening 

dress, even to delicate buttonholes. The girls for the most part 

5 



214 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

dress, even to delicate buttonholes. The girls for the most part 
were wearing beautifully made low-cut gowns, with plenty of 
imitation jewellery and high coiffed hair. They shook hands 
and bowed and said polite nothings in almost the way their em- 
ployers might have done, and here and there one noticed charms 
of a superior character. One tall blonde, a nurse in an uptown 
family on Fifth Avenue, wore white organdy and pearls, and 
would have passed very well for the latest prima donna as Elsa 
or Elizabeth. I recognized my own parlormaid in pink silk, 
with a pearl dog-collar around her pretty throat. Mrs. Homer- 
Blake's cook, a sallow Frenchwoman, was magnificent in black 
velvet and yellow satin, eyeglasses and a bouquet. 

"I gave her the velvet myself," groaned Mrs. Blake. "It 
was a bargain remnant, and I thought it would make her a good, 
serviceable cape." 

" Look at Millicent, Aunt Lefroy's housemaid !" exclaimed 
Miss Cutting. " Where is my aunt ; she must see this ! Did you 
ever hear of anything so cool ! Her gown is an exact reproduc- 
tion of that Paris one I gave to my niece. Bertha. Of course, 
I know the materials are very different, but look at it all the 
same !" 

As the guests continued to arrive steadily we made out that 
in acting upon our advice, innocently and gratuitously given, 
they had gone to both trouble and expense to array themselves 
" in their best." Involuntarily we looked at ourselves and 
wished we had donned something a little better and more fitting 
than high shirt waists. There was not a low waist amongst 
us, and although the night was a cold December one, the rooms 
were excessively warm. .1 must add that in addition to elegant 
toilets, flowers and perfumes — the latter exploited far too gen- 
erously for pleasure — almost every girl was plentifully pow- 
dered and rouged, and a good many had their eyebrows done up. 

Our President, being very shortsighted, did not take in so 
many of these details as the rest of us, and she was about to 
suggest our joining in the opening Quadrille d'Honneur, when 
a magnificent individual with iron grey hair, dazzling shirt- 
front, diamond studs and a gardenia, approached and said 
severely : 

" Pardon me — but is there not some mistake about the floor? 
I mean — has it been waxed?" 



A PHILANTHROPIC FAILURE. 



215 



Miss Cutting looked helplessly around. 

" ^N"©/' said she. " We — we — we forgot it." 

With a reproachful shrug the grand creature glided away, but 
in a few moments he returned. 

" Beg pardon again — but if you would tell us where to find 
the programmes !'' 

The Secretary explained that the Committee had neglected to 
provide any. He glided away the second time, with contempt 
in every line of his superior back. 

" What did he want ? Who is he ?" we all inquired. 

" He is the Van Durens' butler/' said Mrs. Blake, shortly. 
" They say the entire family is afraid of him. I don't wonder." 

"Why don't they begin dancing?" said the President, ner- 
vously. " I want to see them beginning to enjoy themselves. 
Seems to me they look rather stiff. I do want them to enjoy it, ' 
and it's getting late. What are they standing about for ?" 

There did appear to be some kind of hitch between the musi- 
cians and the guests, headed by the gardenia gentleman.. 

"What is the matter?" said Miss Cutting, hastening to the 
spot. 

The pianist, a wild little German Jew, turned upon her 
fiercely : 

" He say we have no proper music ! He say we not play ze 
latest ting, ze twostep, ze valse ! He say I do not know noting 
about music! Mein Gottl I am brought here to play for ser- 
vants, ja, meine gnadige Frau, and he say I not know ze 
latest ting ! I vill go to my house, I vill not play at all !" 

The butler, aware that he had probably put things too strongly, 
condescended to apologize, the majestic nurse in the cheap pearls 
aiding as interpreter, and for a little while all appeared to go 
well. Presently another complaint was filed by a couple or two 
who passed out into the hall looking as if they had lost some- 
thing. 

Mrs. Blake came to us, half-laughing, half-angry. 

" Do you know what they want ?" she said. " They asked the 
way to the buffet, being under the impression that we would 
have claret-cup and ices running all through the Evening. Some- 
one will have to break it to them gently that supper was to have 
been ready at eleven, and that they were expected to be home 
again by half-past twelve." 



216 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

"Why, it's eleven now!" said Mrs. Caufield. ^^ I'm afraid 
we are not managing this dance just as it ought to be. I feel 
kind of distressed about it, somehow." 

" Well," said I, " it was all my idea, and I'm ready to take 
the blame, but the fact is, we didn't think we would have such 
swells to deal with as that butler and two or three of the other 
men. If we could get rid of them we might yet do very well." 

Fortunately at that point we were so busy getting the supper 
in shape that we no doubt missed a good many criticisms of our 
entertainment. We worked hard over the tables and did not 
spare ourselves nor omit a single touch which would help us to 
give satisfaction. We were on our mettle now and knew it. 

" We stand or fall by this spread, friends," said Miss Cutting, 
as she gave the last touches to the dishes. " I'm precious glad 
of one thing, and that is, that the ice-cream is hricJc. If it 
hadn't been I'd have gone right home." 

" Here they come now," said Mrs. Blake. " Oh — do you 
think we can ever hope to serve them properly ? Two hundred, 
are there not ?" 

" The men will pass the things, you know, just as they do at 
other parties ; not much difficulty about that. I suppose at this 
stage we could give the entire thing over to the men to manage, 
but that was hardly our original plan, was it ? We must do the 
best we can." 

Heading the procession came the Van Durens' butler with 
Mrs. Blake's French cook on his arm. They made a magnificent 
pair. Then followed the tall German girl with a footman upon 
whose cockney accent you could hang a winter overcoat. He 
no sooner reached the table than he demanded to know if there 
was any " haspic " ! Being answered in the negative he elevated 
his eyebrows in disgust. 

" In Hingland we was always accustomed to haspic — haspic 
jelly, I mean, don't you know, at a party supper !" 

" Was you, indeed ?" retorted the Secretary, who showed signs 
of shortness of temper. " It was a mistake to leave, then, wasn't 
it?" 

But this little'breeze was only a prologue to the scene that fol- 
lowed. The butler, disengaging himself from his lady, came 
and looked patronizingly at the collation. 



A PHILANTHROPIC PAILURE. 



217 



" Am I to understand that there is nothing to drink but tea 
and coffee ?" 

" And lemonade !" put in Mrs. Blake, tartly. 

The butler waved her aside. 

" Tea and coffee !" he repeated, slowly. '^ And what else ? 
Sandwiches. And what are they made out of ?" 

" Ham and chicken," I answered, as politely as I could, " and 
I believe you will find them very good, ^ow let the gentlemen 
make themselves useful, please, and pass the cups to the young 
ladies. Also the cake. The ice-cream will be ready in a 
moment." 

The butler, however, could not forget those unlucky sand- 
wiches. 

" Ham and chicken !" he repeated, looking at the English foot- 
man. " What do you say to that, Hoskin ? Me asked out to a, 
Sunday-school treat, eh?" 

" Yaas !" said Hoskin, " and me, too. I^o Tokye cup, no 
champine, not even a bloomin* glass of beer! At Christmas 
time, too !" 

It was impossible that these remarks could pass unnoticed. 
Several of the other men came up and wanted to know what 
was wrong. The German girl began to cry, and the French 
cook tossed her head in such an aggravating manner at Mrs. 
Homer-Blake, who was slicing the ice-cream, that the latter 
entirely forgot herself and actually noticed the independent 
behavior of her retainer. 

" I am surprised at you, Christine," said she, in a frowning 
whisper. " You must not side with this man — ^you, a member 
of the Association !" 

Christine laughed aloud and stared at her mistress through 
her glasses. 

" You think I come to dance and eat here, and see you ladies 
make one fool of yourselves ? ^o, no — I come to show my good 
dress, my French style. And soon I am promised to marier 
with M. le hutler. Madame understand ?" 

Mrs. Blake was furious. She dropped the knife with a bang 
and in vigorous language, not whispered this time, discharged 
her cook on the spot. Thus in a few seconds the whole situation 
was changed. Of course, some of the girls took their cake and 



218 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

other refreshments quietly, but the excitement and unpleasant- 
ness had spread till everyone looked and felt perturbed, while 
over all the weak sobs of Lena, the German girl, made themselves 
heard. 

^^ In Heaven's name," said I, " what is the matter with that 
girl ? If she is ill, let her go home." 

" Are you ill ?" said Miss Cutting, sharply. 

"No answer. 

" She says her uncle is hungry and has had nothing to eat," 
said another girl, who understood German. 

" Where is her uncle ?" I' said, sternly ; " I don't believe she 
has any uncle ; at least, not here." 

" It's the little man who played for us to dance to," said my 
parlormaid. 

" Oh, that man ! Well, he can have something by and by. 
Tell her to stop that noise at once." 

But the attentions of Hoskin were more potent than my 
threats, and I soon saw her busy with a plate of ice-cream. Mean- 
while, the butler was making the grand tour of the room and 
sowing disaffection, as far as I could make out, in the rankest 
manner. I noticed, however, that he did not disdain to partake 
very freely of the ice-cream and cake, and once I even detected 
him munching a sandwich. In fact, things were settling down 
a little, until something occurred which gave me the oppor- 
tunity I was looking for. Hoskin and another man lighted 
cigarettes, and Christine, the Frenchwoman, was just about fol- 
lowing suit, when I intervened. This was too much ! 

" May I address the room ?" I said hurriedly to the President. 
^' Members and friends of the National Working Girls' Amuse- 
ment Association, I beg your attention for a moment. I do 
not desire to keep you long, as the hour is already late and you 
want a dance or two after supper. I wish only to say that we 
£tre glad to welcome you to our rooms, glad to share with you 
in this pleasant evening, and to wish you all the compliments 
of the season. We have received you in the manner best suited 
to this purposes of the Association, but in some respects it seems 
We have failed." 

There was a deadly silence in the room. 

" Some of you have objected to certain features of our ^ At- 
home.' It is now," looking at my watch, ^' ton minutes to twelve. 



A PHILANTHROPIC FAILURE. 



219 



At twelve precisely those who care to do so may return to the 
dancing hall, where the remainder of the evening will be spent. 
Those who do not will leave this room at once — at once — ^without 
further trouble or notice. We will give those of you who wish 
to go just ten minutes to get ready and take your departure." 

Immediately there was an uproar. 

" You don't mean to sye you'll turn us hout ?" exclaimed the 
footman, with a wink at Jewett, the butler. " Oh, this 'ere is 
a free country, isn't it ! I sye — you won't dare turn us hout." 

The woman Christine was chattering away in French; the 
Germans, a number of them, equally voluble in their own lan- 
guage, while an absurd Irishwoman jumped on a chair and 
delivered an impromptu oration on the woes of her native land. 
All the more reasonable and decent girls were either crying or 
hurriedly preparing to leave. These had misunderstood me, and 
I had, with the assistance of the other officers of the society, to 
attempt to appease them. The noise and confusion were increas- 
ing every moment, and I was taking counsel of the President 
and Secretary, when heavy steps sounded in the hall, and in 
walked three policemen. 

^^ We've had instructions from the passers-by that there's 
something wrong here," said one, glancing instinctively at 
Jewett, who stood in the middle of the room with outraged 
dignity and years of authority swelling out his noble form. 
"What's all this, anyhow?" 

" It's a bloomin' ball with the hessentials left hout — ^ 'Amlet ' 
without the 'ero, so to speak," said Hoskin, amiably winking 
at the policemen. 

" Yes, but what is it ? What kind of a ball ?" 

" A servants' ball," replied the butler, loftily. 

Mrs. Caufield appeared stricken and speechless. Miss 
Cutting had collapsed into a chair. The rest of the officials 
were huddled together in a hot, untidy, apprehensive group, and 
as for myself, I know I must have presented the worst aspect of 
all, since upon my visage doubtless appeared the remorse and 
despair w^hich had long filled my suffering soul. Consequently 
none of us looked at our best. What was there then surprising 
in the fact that the policemen took their cue from the butler, 
our implacable enemy? What wonder that as they perceived, 
or thought they perceived, the situation, they should make a 



220 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

stupid and serious blunder, and end by actually taking us — us, 
the officials of the I^.W.G.A.A. — for the malcontents and evil- 
doers ! 

I tried to explain, the others tried to explain, but, as many 
know, when appearances are against us, that is just the time 
when the powers of coherent and convincing speech desert us. 
We were dishevelled, tired-out, cross, and nervous. We were 
in a kind of uniform of limp shirt waists and draggled skirts. 
They, now that the crisis was really come, showed brave and gay 
by comparison. Their bare necks, beads, fans and gloves entirely 
misled the policemen. They were doubtless the patronesses of 
the feast — we, the humble participators therein. We had lost 
our courage, they had regained theirs. The policemen were new 
on the beat and did not recognize us. 

I will not dwell on that which followed — it was very painful. 
Jewett and the footman, standing in the middle of the floor, 
must have exercised some base power over those policemen, for 
they would listen to nothing we would say, and although we vio- 
lently asserted our standing and gave our names and addresses, 
we were scornfully repudiated. The end came at length, and 
we were ordered to leave the rooms. At one o'clock in the 
morning were we — we, the officers of the N.W.G.A.A. — bundled 
out into the snowy streets, with the added insult of seeing cabs 
and motors draw up to the door for the use of our servants. The 
wonder was we were not regularly run in and haled to the 
nearest police station; but owing to the arguments of some of 
the more reasonable girls, among whom ws^ my pretty parlor- 
maid, we escaped that last indignity. One of the policemen, a 
towering Irishman, let us go with a word of warning. 

" Go quiet !" said he, .confidentially, " and whether yez are 
ladies or not, it'll be the better for yez." 

You may be sure we " went quietly." 

Thus ended, in humiliation and defeat, the famous ' At- 
home " of the IsT.W.G.A.A., the consequences of which were 
serious and far-reaching, including the total collapse of the 
society and the loss to many families of their leading domes- 
tics. Hoskin shortly returned to England, and I hope he took 
the butler with him. The conclusions I have drawn amount 
to this — that it is easier to elevate the masses than to amuse 
them in these degenerate days. 



. IN ENGLAND'S NAME. 



221 



In England's Name 

HELEN M. MERRILL 

WN England in an olden time, 
^ On stormy hills and wild seaways. 
On alien shore in other clime, 

The purple star of empire gleamed. 
And paled and gleamed with fickle rays ; 
Till war fulfilled the dreams men dreamed 
While heroes fought on land and main, — 
And would for England fight again. 

On alien shore in other clime, — 
Nor ever will the world forget 
How England, fearless in her prime. 
On daring quest across the sea 
A gathered fleet, intrepid, set 
To wrest from Canada her key. 
By frowning cliffs and heights to fare 
To fight where only Britons dare. 

Horizons blue, and happy skies. 

Spaces of vastness free and wide. 
Where Canada's dominion lies ; 

Where virgin winds, and stars, and sun 
By lake, and stream, and ocean tide. 
And strange auroral gleamings run ; 
For these they fought in England's name. 
And fighting won a deathless fame. 

On flowing tides their ships come in. 

Adventurers imperilled sore 
On every side where they would win. 

By plans which fail through lagging days ; 



222 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

By rain of lead where muskets pour. 
And fire-ships which bestrew the ways 
With flashing volts of levin flame, 
A garish scene in night's black frame. 

At intervals the peace of night, 

\^ hen lonely evening thrushes sing 
From shadows to the starry light ; 

Time when the last grave days begin. 
And ships in silence idly swing 

When tides go out, and tides come in 
A little space of quiet life, 
A moment free from din of strife. 

Then mists of morning on the hills. 

And silence, save a wood-stream song. 
And sound from summits gray which fills 
A hero's soul with hope renewed 
To follow where his soldiers throng 
The cliff -sides' dizzy solitude — 
New perils powers strange impart. 
Nor faltered here a warrior's heart. 

The battle-field, its savage stress ; 

The shock of carnage on the plains 
Where England's men like demons press ; 
The din of strife, the hill- guns' roar ; 
The living triumph which maintains 
The immortality of war — 
Like this they fought for England's way. 
Thus dauntless they would fight to-day. 



VICTOR HUGO IN EXILE. 



223 



Victor Hugo in Exile 

FREDERICK LANDON. 

ST. JOHN was sent to Patmos, and there to him was 
given a revelation of things that are to he. Victor Hugo 
was sent to the Channel Islands, and there to him was 
given a revelation of the things that are. And from the reve- 
lation that was given to him of things as they are, the old 
world has heen drawn nearer to the things that are to be. The 
years of exile spent by Victor Hugo, first on the little island 
of Jersey, and later on its neighbor, Guernsey, must be re- 
garded as among the most important of his life. There his 
troubled spirit was calmed and his stormy thoughts clarified 
before he entered upon the next part of his notable career. 

It was the Coup d'Etat of December 2, 1851, which drove 
Victor Hugo, with many more of his distinguished country- 
men, out of France. A reward of 25,000 francs was offered 
to anyone who would either kill or arrest him, and so great 
was the terror of the populace that no one could be found who 
would even give him an asylum. AVhen he fled into Belgium, 
the Government of that country, desirous of standing well with 
Napoleon III., decided that he must be expelled. It was at 
this juncture and under these circumstances that he came to 
the island of Jersey, landing at the little town of St. Helier 
on the fifth of August, 1852. 

That was nearly fifty-six years ago, so that of those who 
were residents of Jersey at the time, of sufiicient age to re- 
member the great exile, and whose lives, moreover, were in 
any way thrown into connection with his, there must be few 
alive to-day. It is therefore somewhat surprising to learn that 
there are two men living in Western Ontario who were neigh- 
bors of Victor Hugo during the period that he was on the 
island of Jersey, and whose personal recollections furnish the 
basis of this article. They are Mr, Thomas Brenton, a resi- 
dent of London, and Mr. James C. Le Touzel, of Goderich. 
Mr. Le Touzel is still an enthusiast on all that concerns Victor 
Hugo and retains distinct recollections of his great compatriot 



224 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

who, naturally, was the most conspicuous figure on the island 
at the time. His impressions cannot be better conveyed than 
in his own words: 

" Following the Coup dfJEtat of 1851," says Mr. Le Touzel, 
" a number of influential Frenchmen came over to Jersey to 
escape the persecution and probable imprisonment which would 
have been their fate had they remained in France during those 
troubled times. The island of Jersey, which is distant but a 
few miles from the French coast, was chosen by them because 
of the protection afforded by the British flag and because 
the use of French, the language spoken there, would render their 
exile less unhappy. At one time there were over 300 such 
refugees on the island, most of whom resided in the little 
town of St. Helier. They were, all of them, men of consider- 
able influence in their native land, and as such were welcomed 
by the islanders, who found in their presence a source of 
revenue. As a rule, however, there was but little intercourse 
between the islanders and the refugees, their manners and 
customs being different, and the refugees being looked upon 
as decidedly French. They kept much to themselves, having 
their own club-rooms, where they would be heard shouting 
their red-republican songs, La Marseillaise, Mourrir pour la 
Patrie and Ca Ira." 

Mr. Le Touzel remembers distinctly the coming of the 
Hugos to the island. 

" The family settled in a stuccoed, slate-roofed house with 
green shutters, knowm as The Baths. It stood on the low shore 
just outside the town of St. Helier and overlooking St. 
Clement's Bay. At the rear there was a little greenhouse and 
a garden. A sort of sand dune hid the sea from the lower 
rooms, but from the second floor there was a fine view of the 
waters, usually peaceful, but which in stormy weather became 
a whirling mass of frothy waves sweepina; around the capes 
and rocks of the little island. Madame Hugo, who had been 
ill in France, soon joined her husband and sons, and the Hugo 
home became a centre of social life both for the French colony 
and the leading families of the island. Hugo's relations with 
the islanders were of the most pleasing character. He found 
great pleasure in studying the politics and the peculiar !N'or- 



VICTOR HUGO IN EXILE. 



225 



man laws of the Channel Islands, all proceedings in the law 
courts and in the legislative assembly being carried on in the 
French language. He would also take long walks about the 
different parishes, mixing wdth the peasants as one of them- 
selves. He paid particular attention to their folk-lore and to 
the idioms of the patois spoken on the farms, and the 
knowledge thus gained he was constantly turning to account 
in the writing with which he busied himself. On his walking 
tours he was frequently accompanied by his son, Charles Hugo, 
also a writer of some note, who later published ^ La l^or- 
mandie Inconnue,' a work descriptive of the Channel Islands." 

Mr. Le Touzel remembers Victor Hugo as ^' a handsome and 
fairly tall man, always dressed in exquisite taste and with 
something about him that placed him above his fellow-exiles. 
His figure was compact and his dark hair crowned features 
not only intellectual but also sweetly gracious. He was always 
affable and approachable, with a polite and familiar courtesy. 
His hospitality had about it an air of simple affection, com- 
bined with almost royal dignity. Though often cast down by 
the involuntary separation from his native land, he wrote un- 
ceasingly, and in 1853 ^ Les Chatiments ' appeared. It was, 
indeed, a terrible chastisement of the misdeeds of E'apoleon 
Le Petit." 

For a little over three years Hugo remained undisturbed 
in Jersey and then was the victim of another Coup dfEtat, as 
Charles Hugo rather humorously termed it. The immediate 
cause of this was the publication in U Homme, the newspaper 
published by the exiles, of a letter which had been addressed 
by three London exiles to Queen Victoria, commenting in sar- 
castic but foolish terms upon her Majesty's visit to the 
emperor and empress of the French. 

'^ UHomme was a small quarto sheet of very humble pre- 
tensions," says Mr. Le Touzel. ^^ Its leading articles were 
written by the refugees, who were many of them journalists 
of note in Paris. I^Tobody on the island paid much attention 
to their newspaper so long as it confined its attacks to ISTapoleon 
or the powers in Paris. In fact, it was almost unnoticed until 
the obnoxious letter appeared on October 15, 1855. The 
islanders prided themselves on their loyalty, and it was too 



226 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

much to read in UHomme that their beloved Queen, ' avait 
perdu tout meme jusqiid son honneur ' (had lost everything, 
even her honor). On the day of publication groups of excited 
townsmen could be seen on the street corners discussing the 
outrage, and on the following evening a largely attended indig- 
nation meeting was held in the Queen's Assembly, a hall com- 
monly used for public entertainments. At this meeting a copy 
of the little newspaper was publicly burned on the platform, 
while " God Save the Queen " was sung with a right good- 
will. The town was in an uproar, and for a time the poor 
exiles were in such peril that Hugo was reported to have 
buried his manuscripts. An attack was even made upon the 
publishing office. On the morning after the meeting a procla- 
mation from the governor of the island was posted all over 
the town, notifying the editorial staff of UHomme, some 
thirty in number, to leave the island within twenty-four hours. 

" In response to this proclamation Hugo drew up a protest, 
in which he declared that Louis ISTapoleon wa^ guilty of 
treason, perjury, spoliation and murder, that England was 
allied with the ^ crime emperor,' and that it would shortly 
become an annex of the French Empire. ^ And now,' the pro- 
test ended, ' expel us.' " 

After a short period of uncertainty the English Government 
consented to the expulsion of the refugees. Thus it was that 
Victor Hugo, whose name had unnecessarily been connected 
with the affair, was forced to leave Jersey. He went to 
Gnernsey, about thirty miles distant, and there he made his 
home till the disaster at Sedan and the collapse of the Empire 
made France once more a republic. 

It was on October 27, 1855, that Hugo received notice that 
h) must quit the island by November 2. To the constable of 
St. Clement who served him with the notice, he said, ^^ I do 
not await the expiration of the respite that is given me. I 
hasten to quit a land where honor has no place and which 
burns my feet." ' 

" Whether the expulsion was legal," says Mr. Le Touzel, 
" I do not know. The exiles had certainly provoked no little 
hostility by going counter to the popular feeling of the island. 
This, however, was scarcely justification for the extreme action 



VICTOR HUGO IN EXILE. 



227 



taken, and even among the islanders it was afterwards re- 
garded as a great mistake. The little republican paper and 
its editors were doing no real harm to the islanders and might 
very reasonably have been simply ignored. While Victor 
Hugo's name appeared with the others as responsible for the 
obnoxious letter, it was never thought that he had anything 
personally to do with it. Unfortunately, no distinction could 
be made and he had to go Avith the others." 

The people of Jersey performed a pleasant act of reparation 
^ve years later when they once more welcomed Hugo to the 
island. He went over in response to a largely signed petition 
of the people of St. Helier, who invited him to speak on behalf 
of the subscription list which was then being raised to assist 
Garibaldi in his struggle for Italian liberty. The governor, 
who had signed the decree of exile, on this occasion freely, 
signed the document permitting him to return, and the lec- 
ture was delivered in the same hall in which UHomme had 
once been publicly burned. The mayor of St. Helier pre- 
sided and the hall was filled to overflowing. 

During the course of the evening enthusiasm ran bigh and a 
telegram of good cheer was sent direct to Garibaldi, who was 
then at Palermo. This was followed, a few days later, by a 
liberal subscription for the cause of freedom. 

" I remember well," says Mr. Le Touzel, " the closing 
words of the great lecturer as he stood beside the very table 
on which UHomme had been reduced to ashes a few years 
before. With one arm raised above his head came in impres- 
sive tones, ' Que la renommee de Garibaldi sera aussi 
imperissahle que les feux du Mont Yesuve ' (May the fame 
of Garibaldi be as lasting as the fires of Mount Vesuvius)." 

Surely the name and fame of both Hugo and Garibaldi 
might well be held in everlasting honor by any nation. Their 
lives are past, but their deeds have conferred upon them glory 
and immortality. 



228 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

'* Cook's '' and Baedeker 

Albert R. Carman^ Author of '' The Pensionnaires," etc, 

IT is doubtful if there is a candidate-tourist on the N^orth 
American continent to-day, looking forward to his or her 
first trip to Europe this coming summer, who is not in a 
supercilious mental attitude toward the two ^^ institutions " 
which form the title of these few frank paragraphs. " Are 
you going to be a ^ Cookie ' ? " someone will ask them — some- 
one who has read the word in a newspaper skit and has done 
his foreign travelling on a " day excursion boat." Of course, 
they are not. They .are not the material out of which ^^ Cook 
collects his droves.'' They are going to travel at leisure and 
independently. " The guides will know that you are a tourist 
by your Baedeker, and will bother you to death," another 
friend will tell them. But that friend does'nt know them. Does 
he think they intend to go about with a Baedeker in their hands 
and an enquiring look on their faces? Not much. They may 
have a Baedeker at the hotel to consult; but on the street — 
never ! 

Then they will take ship, learn " ship quoits," and shuffle- 
board, and meet the Old Traveller, who, in answer to every 
second question, will say, " Oh, you will find that in Baedeker " ; 
and in answer to every third — " Cook's will look after that for 
you." Finally they will fish out their Baedeker's " Great 
Britain " to see how much they ought to " tip " each particular 
steward, and what hotel they had better go to in Liverpool. 
They have had iowv different routes recommended to them as 
the best way to get from Liverpool to London ; and, as soon 
as they fix on a hotel, they will go around to Cook's office to 
secure some free literature on the subject. By the time they 
reach Bome, they will judge it worth while to get a hotel near 
Cook's office, and would as soon think of going anywhere with- 
out their hats as without their Baedekers. 

On the continent of Europe, neither " Cook's " nor Baedeker 
is a joke. They are serious institutions which the wise 
traveller uses according to his need. Baedeker's guide books 
are independent, usually well-informed, and more than usually 
up-to-date ; and it is difficult to use them too much. The peril 



COOK'S" AND BAEDEKER. 



229 



is that one may confine himself to Baedeker, with his dry, 
matter-of-fact details and his dull catalogues of art, when the 
subject calls for a fuller and more imaginative treatment. 
Baedeker will tell you, for example, where to find all the im- 
portant frescoes in Florence ; but the uninitiated will not see 
much in them unless he reads Something like Ruskin's l^ Morn- 
ings,'' or Grant Allen's dogmatic discussions of Morentine art. 
In fact, all such writers are irritatingly dogmatic, still they 
get one into the habit of looking at pictures with the " seeing 
eye." But for the prosaic business of finding things, Baedeker 
is unexcelled. He gives you a clear maj>iof each important 
place ; and the tourist should practice making his way about 
by means of the map. Persons who always drive or go with a 
guide, seldom have any working notion of the city as a whole. 
It will be a jumbled maze of churches and galleries to them; 
and at least half the pleasure that comes to the topographically 
informed from his after-reading will be missed by such. 

Baedeker's lists of hotels and " pensions," scales of cab 
fares, accounts of tramway routes, and practical travelling 
hints generally, are invaluable. I have never heard their good 
faith questioned, which is a rare thing with guide books. 
Almost invariably when a hotel is marked as good, it is good 
— even when it is also cheap. Considering the country covered 
by Baedeker's books, the information therein contained is 
always surprisingly up-to-date. As for the fear that the carry- 
ing of a Baedeker in the street will lead to the discovery of 
the embarrassing fact that one is a tourist, that will wear off. 
A placard around the neck would not lead to any such dis- 
covery. From the day the tourist leaves his steamer until he 
takes it again, no man, woman or child who sees him is in 
any doubt about the matter. He himself will be able to tell 
a tourist as far as he can see the length of his coat or the 
shape of her hat. 

The question of how to use " Cook's " is not so simple. 
'^ Cook's " will do anything for you from forwarding your 
letters to showing you Europe ; and it is merely a question of 
how much you want done. Some people buy their steamer 
tickets from Cook; and I have heard it said that they save 
money on it. This sounds improbable, but there is no reason 
why the candidate-tourist should not ask for quotations. He 



23a ACTA VICTORIANA. 

can also have his mail sent to Cook's while he is away, and my 
experience is that they treat it with care and you with courtesy. 
Some people use a London or Paris banker's address instead, 
but Cook has the advantage of possessing agents of his own in 
most European cities of importance. It is best, however, 
to get a list of these agencies, and not make the mistake, by no 
means uncommon, of having letters sent to "' Cook's " in a 
city where the firm is without a representative. Cook runs 
a sort of private post-office department for the use of the 
travelling public; and in such centres as London, Paris and 
Eome, you will find it established quite by itself with a neat 
system of alphabetical boxes, a registration book and some- 
times two or three clerks. 

This gratuitous post-office leads, I fancy, to some misun- 
derstandings with respect to '^ Cook's " mission in life. I do 
not know what the managers of the firm claim, but I hardly 
think that they are in business for philanthropic purposes 
solely. Yet the tourist comes in contact with them first on their 
" free " side. He gets his mail without any fee at Cook's 
wicket, from the clerk they pay. He buys a railway ticket 
from them to this or that point at precisely the same price he 
would pay at the railway station — still no charge to him. And, 
perhaps, for weeks he does only this sort of business with them, 
and he comes instinctively to think of '^ Cook's " as a place 
where he can get something for nothing. Then he asks them 
to ship his baggage for him, and stands aghast at the bill. They 
have not only charged him for cartage and for freight, and 
for cartage again at the destination point, but they have also 
charged him something for their trouble. And he had come to 
think that they worked for nothing. 

My theory is that Cook, like everybody else in the wide 
world, charges as much for his services as he can. A banker 
will handle your mail for nothing: except the chance ol' getting 
your patronac^e; so Cook does \hv sjiinc. You wnll not pay 
Cook, as a rule, more for your railway tickets than you can 
jret them for at ihe station; so lie (»luiroes station prices. "Rut 
if you want him to relieve you of the burden of shipplnii v<Mir 
bags^age, you must pay for it; and as he owns the onlv railway 
up Mount Vesuvius, that trip, too, costs more than " car fare.'^ 

Of course, this is only the beuiiniin'^ <»f CookV extraordinary 



COOK'S" AND BAEDEKER. 



231 



system of services. The timid traveller can practically put 
himself in Cook's hands in New York and never get out of 
them until he is safely home again; but if his purpose is to 
know anything of Europe, he might about as well look through 
a book of views or attend a few stereopticon lectures — and save 
his money. But it is not a case of taking the whole course 
or nothing. You can, for instance, buy Cook's hotel coupons, 
but have nothing to do with his guides, or his " three days' 
drives " to all the points of interest, or his " personally con- 
ducted excursions." Or you can look up your own hotel, and 
then take his " drives " in order to get your bearings. It is 
always a good rule to keep away from your fellow tourists. 
They are in many things the salt of the earth; they have seen 
the things that you have, they are interested in the subjects 
that you are, immersion in a foreign population has doubled 
their companionableness toward their kind. But they are not 
European. You did not cross the Atlantic to see them. Like 
the child who scorns bread at a party, you can get plenty of 
that at home. Generally speaking, you will enjoy the essence 
of Europe in an exact ratio to your success in avoiding the 
cheerful society of other sight-seers. When you can get them, 
purely native hotels are the best. In France, those of the cycle 
" Touring Club de France " are almost invariably excellent 
and thoroughly French. The man who takes the Loire trip, 
for instance, with a " Touring Club " membership ticket, sees 
another world from him who stops religiously at the " English 
Is Spoken Here " hotels. 

But some people need more aid to travel than others ; and 
the independent traveller who walks out of a railway station, 
takes his cab by the hour and sets off to find a " pension " or 
hotel, must not think scorn of him who travels with Cook's 
coupons and always telegraphs ahead. He may find the 
" Cookie " next day, idling ecstatically before a Botticelli in 
a gallery through which he — the erstwhile independent — is 
being walked by his impatient guide, " working by the job." 
Some are nervous lest they find the hotels full, while others 
must have a guide to show them what to see. But it is not 
for the one to " shoot out the lip " at the other. One of the 
secrets of successful touring^ is to know how to save 'one's 
strength for things of importance. 



232 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The Higher Criticism 

J. E. MIDDLETOS, Editor " On -the -Side " Column, " Toronto News 

{Dedicated with fear and trembling to the Incipient Sons of Thunder 
known as the First Year in Theology.) 

THE SUBJECT 

OLD Mother Hubbard 
She went to the cupboard 
To get her poor dog a bone. 
But when she got there 
The cupboard was bare 
And so the poor dog got none. 

THE ARGUMENT 
Here is a poem supposed to be ethical. 
This supposition may be hypothetical. 
So we examine it, scalpel in hand. 
Microscope near, ready-placed on its stand. 
Is it inherently true to the life ? 
— Here do we joyously brandish the knife. 

Taking it first as a whole we may find 
Some inconsistencies, lest we are blind. 
Who keeps in cupboards the bones for a pup ? 
Really this writer should straighten things up. 
Bones are cast out in the all y. That's right. 
There the dogs find them and gleefully fight. 

Was she a mother ? We fear she was not. 

Else were her children a delicate lot. 

For she would live with her daughter or son 

If she enjoyed the possession of one. 

She had a spirit exceedingly fine. 

Proof? Well, she worried about her canine. 

Was she a person or merely a fancy ? 
Was her name Hubbard, or Wiggins or Clancy ? 
There is no evidence elsewhere, we're certain 
Save in the Poem. So ring down the curtain, 
Put out the lights with a hurried apology. 
Old Mother Hubbard is merely Mythology. 



THE SPIRIT OF CANADIAN HISTORY. 233 

The Spirit of Canadian History 

WE are glad to have the opportunity of presenting to 
the readers of Acta Victoriana two speeches by 
distinguished Canadians — Dr. B. E. Walker and 
Chancellor Burwash — ^delivered recently on the occasion of a 
dinner in celebration of the completion of an historical series 
known somewhat widely under the title of " Makers of 
Canada." 

Dr. Burwash confined himself to narrow limits, but suc- 
ceeded in illustrating most happily the value of the personal 
and human element in historical records. Dr. Walker's speech 
vibrates with enthusiasm for his subject, and in the hope that 
his sane and vigorous conception of our country's past may 
stimulate in thinking minds a kindred enthusiasm, we print his 
words without curtailment. 

Dr. Byron Walker: 

Mr. Morang and Gentlemen, — I must first disclaim any 
of the fame Mr. Morang in his kindness has sought to give 
me in connection with the Advisory Committee. I assure 
you that I had practically nothing whatever to do with the 
production of the " Makers of Canada." I have been very 
much interested in the success of the work simply as a Cana- 
dian with a strong feeling that it is necessary to the develop- 
ment of this country on the intellectual side that we should 
know our own history. We all like to call ourselves Cana- 
dians. We, however, know perfectly well that the Canada 
which extends from the Atlantic to the Pacific is only forty 
years old, and for all practical purposes not over twenty, if 
we remember that it came into political being only in 1867, 
and finished its first transcontinental railroad only in 1885. 
It would be impossible for us at the end of this brief time, no 
matter how great we might be, to call ourselves a nation were 
it not for the long history, before Confederation, of the many 
parts now included in what is called Canada. A nation must 
have some kind of sentient being as one people, and practically 
it cannot have that without a history. We are building up 
the material side of Canada, and the reason why some of us 
think the historical side so important is that — as Mr. Black- 



234 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

stock [a previous speaker] has said, and as none of ns can 
saj too frequently ; indeed, we shall not make a mistake if we 
say it over and over again now and in the coming years — it 
is impossible to make a great nation on the material side alone, 
it may seem a trite thing to insist upon the value of the intel- 
lectual side, but unless we do remember it and keep remem- 
bering it, we shall not make a great nation. We shall not 
make a nation until we realize — I think we are beginning to 
realize it — that we have a history, and that we are fortunate 
enough to have one of the most wonderful and romantic 
histories of any of the new countries in the world. 

It has not occurred to Canadians until recently to feel that 
the history of old Quebec, of l^ova Scotia, of British Columbia, 
is part of the history of our Canada. England has a history 
of the early Britons; it has a Roman period, a Saxon period, 
a Danish period, a E'orman period, but there is no one who 
says to-day, " I am not interested in William the Conqueror be- 
cause I am a Saxon or a Briton." Men are bom and brought 
up in England to-day who are proud of the fact that in one 
battle there was one Saxon, Harold, who was a hero although 
he was vanquished, and another Norman hero, William, who 
w^s the Conqueror. They have reached a point where they 
are proud of all the history of all the people whose descend- 
ants are now known as Britons, l^ow we must thoroughly 
accomplish in Canada, beyond peradventure, what we tried hard 
to accomplish in part at Quebec. We must all, from one end 
of Canada to the other, claim that every part of the history 
of those detached colonies now joined in Canada is a part of 
the history of the Canadian people, as it certainly is. We 
must be proud of Wolfe and Montcalm together, not simply 
because it is a generous thing for an Englishman to be proud 
of Montcalm, but because Montcalm was a great Canadian. 
I think it is already an absolutely true thing among our in- 
telligent people that they do claim Champlain as a Canadian ; 
that they do say of him that he was a great Canadian — per- 
haps the greatest Canadian. Curiously enough, he and Mont- 
calm are almost the only two Frenchmen we have taken to 
ourselves as our own and as a product of our own country; 
but we must reach a condition where practically all of those 









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THE SPIRIT OF CANADIAN HISTORY 237 

who did anything worthy of record in any part of Canada, 
whether they were Frenchmen who wintered along the shores 
of J^ova Scotia, or who huilt their homes in Quebec, or who 
went to the foot of the Rocky Mountains in search of adven- 
ture and furs, or the Fathers of the Church who came to 
educate the few people in this country, or whether they be 
the later-coming Englishmen — ^they are all part of the history 
of Canada, and we can read of their deeds with pride or rever- 
ence or wonder, and remember them as men who helped to 
build the nation we now inherit. 

'Now, gentlemen, we are practically living in the time when 
we are encountering in our archives departments, in our publi- 
cations of local histories, and indeed in nearly all our his- 
torical productions, the material out of which an adequate 
history of Canada will some day be written. But what we 
need while this is being done is that somebody shall popularize 
hist-ory in a good sense, in such a way that the people of 
Canada who are not students, who have no time to burrow in 
the archives and in the by-paths of history, people who have 
no time to read the seventy-three volumes of the '^ Jesuit Re- 
lations,'' shall nevertheless be able amidst the hurry of their 
business life to grasp the main features in the history of their 
country, and it is doubtless true that the history of Canada in 
this sense is read mostly by men who are not deep students, 
but are only what are called citizens of average intelligence. 

For this reason the work Mr. Morang set out to do, at the 
particular time he set out to do it, seemed to me of tremendous 
national importance. I am not trying to flatter anybody. T 
am trying to say exactly what T thought, because the proposal 
came at a time when the building of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway was at last admitted to be a success, when we were 
projecting other transcontinental railways, when the people of 
Canada were first beginning to feel that we were after all 
really going to be a nation, and that in these proposed biogra- 
phies of the great Canadians there was something that the 
ordinary business man, the man in the street, and the 
ordinary reader, might have before him in easy shape 
which would make him feel what a great country he inherited ; 
and let me say that whatever Mr. Morang's reasons might 
have been, business reasons or otherwise, nothing could have 



238 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

been more opportune. I know personally of many young men 
who never heard of Joseph Howe until they had a chance to 
read about him in this series, and I know of many who knew^ 
nothing about the glorious and romantic history of British 
Columbia until they "had read the life of Sir James Douglas, 
the maker of that part of Canada. There is one feature of 
tremendous importance which should be borne in mind, and 
that is, that all these great men, disconnected as they were, 
separated both in time and space, working for most varied 
objects, unconscious that they were co-operating and only a 
part of them dreaming of a united Canada, have, after all, 
builded so much better than they knew that they have by the 
sum of all their efforts created the Dominion of Canada. 

Now that this natural pride in Canada is being developed, 
it is to be hoped that we shall be able to publish ourselves the 
books regarding our country Avritten by our own historians. 
To those who have always been interested in the history of 
Canada and who have gathered together such books as they 
could find bearing on the subject, it has seemed rather strik- 
ing that such a writer as Elliott Coues could come to Toronto 
and find neglected in our Crown Lands Department the price- 
less journal of Alexander Henry the Younger, and the still 
more priceless maps of David Thompson, and that he should 
upon this basis produce an almost invaluable book in connec- 
tion with the fur-trading of the West,* but which, being pub- 
lished in a numbered edition, is already too expensive for most 
Canadians to own. Again, while Ave owe a great deal of thank- 
fulness to Mr. Eeuben Thwaites and his associates for their 
translation of the '^ Jesuit Relations," and its production in 
seventy-three volumes, w^hich volumes relate much more to 
Canada than to any other part of N'orth America, we never- 
theless cannot help but regret that the translation and publi- 
cation did not take place in this country. 

Mr. Morang's series of the ^' Makers of Canada " has by 
some people been called popular, and in connection with these 
books many things might have been done that have not been 



♦New Light on the Early History of the Greater North-West: The 
Henry and Thompson Journals, 1799-1814. Edited by Elliott Cones, 
1897. 



THE SPIRIT OF CANADIAN HISTORY 239 

done, but Mr. Morang did not undertake to produce these 
books merely for students, and from a national point of view 
the series of the " Makers of Canada " is much more signifi- 
cant than many books regarding our history which may be more 
important from a scholar's point of view, but which the aver- 
age man may never read. 

And let us remember that Mr. Morang has by the books in 
question done his part, together with men in our universities 
and in the literary world elsewhere, towards making it possible 
in Canada to develop historical study on closer lines. 

He and others have also aided in building up a public 
sentiment which has caused us at last to take care of our 
archives and to provide the necessary buildings in which to 
house them, has made many of our counties proud of their 
local history, and has caused people generally to understand 
the value of old records. 

These are. some of the reasons why I think we should feel 
that Mr. Morang has done a great deal for the country. Even 
though he went into the matter as a mere business enterprise, 
he surely deserves the same credit as we accord to a great rail- 
way man who has carried out successfully an important enter- 
prise into which he entered for selfish reasons, but in the 
doing of which he has aided in the development of the country. 

Dr. Burwash: 

Mr. Morang and Gentlemen, — ^You have done me an 
honor in coupling my name in connection with this toast, as 
a member of the Advisory Committee, and to speak of the 
assistance the Committee was to you. After all, there was 
only a minimum of responsibility resting upon the Advisory 
Committee. All great thoughts must emanate from head- 
quarters, and the Advisory Committee very often had very 
little to do. All the worthy ideas originated in a certain 
office not very far from the place where we are assembled to- 
night. I must congratulate you upon the accomplishment of 
this work and especially upon its main idea, the union of his- 
tory with the personal story of its actors. So completely is 
this idea dominant in our age that our moralists will write a 
novel if they want to impress a great moral principle; and 
even when clergymen are translating the precepts and princi- 



240 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

pies of the Gospel they do so by writings that centre around a 
personality, it may be, but still a human personality, because 
that takes hold of the human heart as no other form of writing 
does take hold of it to-day; and in the Old Land and in the 
United States as well as in our own country, the great epoch- 
making men, makers of the country, great literary men — all 
these are the persons around whom the leading facts of the 
history of the Old World as well as of this ]^ew World are 
being written and being read by thousands of people who 
never take up a large folio to study the history of their 
country. We have lost, perhaps, the art of writing history 
after the old fashion. For the last few days I have been 
turning over the folio pages of Clarendon's "' History of the 
Great Rebellion," and the way in which that was presented 
struck me with very great force. The writer makes no attempt 
at a philosophy of history or to reduce history to a political 
science. But he tells the history of the events as a moving 
picture of the actions of living men, with all the freshness of 
human interest and emotion, and as you follow the pages you 
are as deeply interested in the men as in the great results to 
which they contribute. 

Once more, Mr. Morang, I thank you for inviting me to 
take part in this congenial work. 



The Past 

MISS A. M. BOWERS, '10. 



^T^IS dark within the room; 

A The dusky shades of eve, in garments dim. 
Come clustering round; 
And in the gloom 
I scarce can trace 
The outlines of the dear, familiar place. 

'Tis dark within my heart; 

The buried shadows of the days gone by 

Draw lingering near, 

And with a start 
T bow my bead 
And liold communion with the silent dead. 



BOOK REVIEWS. 



241 



Book Reviews 

Myths and Facts of the American Revolution. Bj Arthur 
• Johnston. Toronto : William Briggs. 1908. Pp. vi.- 
303. 

This book is written with the express purpose of proving 
certain, points in regard to Revolutionary history. Candid 
historians will agree that the British Government at that time 
was not a cruel persecutor and oppres-sor, and also that it was 
not a model of equity and statesmanship. Impartial minds 
will also admit that, with some few exceptions, the Eevolu- 
tionary heroes were for the most part very common men. Their 
fame rests on very slight foundations. There is also no real 
justification for the hatred of the English, which is fostered 
by "tail-twisting" politicians. Happily such feelings are 
passing away. 

But divorce, slavery down to 1865, disrespect of law and 
the worship of the almighty dollar are not the results of the 
War of Independence. That war might have been avoided 
had cooler heads been in control in America and less ignorant 
statesmen at the helm in England. And yet it is very prob- 
able that the separation would have com^e at a later date, and 
peacefully. The book is very interesting but is partisan, and, 
because it is so, cannot be taken as the final word on the subject. 



Nancy McVeigh of the Monk Road. By R. Henry Mainer. 

Toronto: William Briggs. 1908. 127 pp. ' 

Ten stories, very well told, of an original old woman who 

was nominally a tavernkeeper on the Monk Road, but the good 

angel of the neighborhood in reality. Her son, Cornelius, did 

not follow her example, but shows the characteristics of the 

money-loving financier without heart. 

* * -jf- **** * * 

Comrades Two. By Elizabeth Ereemantle. Toronto: Mus- 
son Book Co. 1908. 246 pp. 
Anyone who has read " Elizabeth and Her German Garden,'' 
knows the style of this readable work. The scene is laid in 
the Qu'Appelle Valley, in our own !N"orth-West, and some good 
illustrations are scattered through the book. 'No one is men- 



242 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

tioned by name, but The One, alias the Man of Wrath, is the 
main person in the eyes of the diary-keeper. 

« * ¥- * -jf * * ** 

The Red City: An Historical Novel of the Second Administra- 
tion of President Washington. By S. Weir Mitchell. 
Toronto: Copp, Clark Co. 1908. 421 pp. 
This charming novel, by an old friend, a sequel to " Hugh 
Wynne," is sure to be read and enjoyed by the many who care 
for grace and directness of style and for something else than 
the superficial sentimentalism of too much of present-day fic- 
tion. This book will stand a second reading. 

********** 

Christmas To-day. By Hamilton Wright Mabee. Toronto: 
The Musson Book Co. 1908. 73 pp. 
A charming book, by the well-known essayist, an answer to 
the question regarding Christmas : Is it the stillness of a dead 
faith or the silence that comes with expectation ? A delightful, 
uplifting booklet. 

The Political Annals of Canada. By A. P. Cockburn. To- 
ronto: Musson Book Co. 1905. 574 pp. 

These Annals cover the whole period of our history, give a 
lot of very useful information, the Dominion Act of 1867 and 
1871, in an Appendix, and a list of important dates. Mr. 
Cockburn was for years a member of the House of Commons 
of Canada, which fact gives added interest to his story. 

* * ^ * x- -x- *** 

The Weh of Time. By Egbert E. Knowles. Toronto: 
Henry Frowde. 415 pp. 
This is Mr. Knowles' fourth book, and will doubtless be popu- 
lar for a while, although it would seem to the reviewer advisable 
for the author to try a newer vein. His knowledge of Scotch 
character is good, and his descriptions of their faults and ex- 
cellencies read very well, even if they challenge comparison, 
often not favorable to the author, with Crockett, Ian Maclaren 
and others of the " Kailyard " schools. This particular book 
seems the most superficial of all his writings, nor does his ad- 
vertisement of its origin appeal to us any more than that of 



BOOK REVIEWS. 



243 



St. Cuthbert's. This latter, his first work, is in its tenth edi- 
tion, showing that the author has caught the popular taste. 

Uncle Jim's Canadian Nursery Rhymes. Illustrated. By 
C. W. Jefferys. Toronto: The Musson Book Co. 1908. 
^' Uncle Jim," said to be a well-known Toronto curator, has 
given evidence of his patriotic purpose to supply " Canadian '' 
rhymes. Mother Goose is hard to beat, and in only a few in- 
stances, such as in " The Squirrel " and ^^ Who ?" does our 
friend come near to the great model. Some others are very 
palpable, didactic versions of " Cock Robin," and other rhymes 
with other names inserted. Very many are halting in verse 
and rhythm. ^* Omemee " and the " Pretty Wabigoon " are 
brief Indian tales in prose. On the other hand, one must give 
unstinted praise to the illustrations by Mr. C. W. JefferyS, for 
he has most successfully caught their spirit and carries one 
back, sometimes unwillingly, to the days of the birch and '' the 
good old times." 

L. E. Horning. 



The Kingdom of Canada, Imperial Federation, The Colonial 
Conferences, The Alasha Boundary, and Other Essays. 
By John S. Ewart, K.C. Toronto: Morang. 1908. 
3Y0 pp. 

This collection of essays from the pen of one of Canada's 
leading lawyers is especially interesting, coming as it does 
when the question of our national future is one of the great 
problems with which we are confronted. The book shows most 
forcibly the value of the legally trained mind in the considera- 
tion of constitutional questions. With cool, sane logic, Mr. 
Ewart builds up his case, quoting authorities and searching 
out appropriate illustrations. Carefully avoiding all vain 
bombast and rhetorical tricks he appeals to our reason rather 
than to our emotions. Yet his work is singularly free from 
the technicalities with which we are wont to associate the 
writings of legal thinkers, and is couched in language which 
appeals especially to the ordinary " man on the street." 

Mr. Ewart cogently argues against the constitutional nomen- 
clature by which Canada is designated. To him the term 



244 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

" colony '' is especially opprobrious. We have long since out- 
grown that stage of our existence; having attained the dignity 
of a nation we should take a title niore befitting our dignity. 
As a nation, we should be absolutely independent of the Par- 
liament of Great Britain, both in f 6rm and in reality. There- 
fore, he objects to the use of the term Dominion of Canada, 
for the word implies subjection, and to Canada being called a 
^' British '' Dominion, because Canada belongs not to Britain, 
but to Canadian^, ^' saving, always, - allegiance to the King." 
He claims for Canada political equality with Great Britain, 
and points out«'that until we" have political equality we shall 
be regarded as,; 'and probably be, subordinate and colonial. The 
higher ideal towards which the British Empire must strive 
is that of an absolute and unreserved brotherhood, a veritable 
" galaxy of niations." 

Space does riot permit a more lengthy review of this book, 
but we would point out as especially worthy of attention the 
essays on " Canada and the Canadian Clubs," " The British 
Empire," " Colonial Disloyalty," " Imperial Defence," " Im- 
perial Preferential Tariffs," " The Alaska Boundary," and 
^* The Future of Canada." Many of these vital topics are 
treated in a new light, and all are characterized by sane and 
clear-headed reasoning. Whether one agrees with Mr. Ewart 
in all his conclusions or not, a perusal of his book will be found 
to be well worth while.- We welcome this addition to our 
national literature. m. h. s. 

Where the Buffalo Roamed. By E. L. Maksh. Toronto: 
William Briggs. . 1908. 242 pp. 
In the form of a series of short sketches. Miss Marsh here 
presents the romantic history of the Great !N'ew West of Can- 
ada. Although written primarily for children and young 
people, the book contains much that will appeal to "grown- 
ups." The heroism of such explorers as Radisson, Yerendrye, 
TTearne and Mackenzie, is well described. As an interesting 
description of life in an age which, though recent, is now 
past forever, it is extremely valuable. Reproductions of the 
pain tinges of the celebrated Paul Kane and others make not 
the least attractive feature of the book. 



BOOK REVIEWS. 



245 



Quiet Talks with World Win7iers. By S. D. Gordon. 
Toronto : William Briggs. 

A new book by S. D. Gordon scarcely needs review. Those 
vvho seek sympathetic, encouraging, np-building, mental and 
spiritual pabulum have largely made the acquaintance of this 
most lovable author, whose writings abound in farness of 
vision, keenness of insight, tenderness of sympathy, and a 
clinging faith, which seems to lead the reader into the very 
holy of holies. Let one short paragraph serve to give the 
character of the book: 

'^ The old home hearth-fire of God is lonely since men went 
away; the family circle is broken. God will not rest till that 
old home circle is complete again and every voice joining in 



the home songs." 



B. E. M. 
•X- * 



The Student's Handhooh of Physiology. By Clarksox and 
Fakquharson. E. & S. Livingstone, 15 Teviot Place, 
Edinburgh. $3.00. 
Presents the subject in the light of recent advancement made 

in physiology. It is interestingly written, clear and concise. 

The illustrations are numerous, well chosen and exceedingly 

well brought out, and the printing leaves nothing to be desired. 
We recommend the book to the student who wishes to avoid 

padding and too much detail, and to the general practitioner 

who wishes to keep abreast of the times. 



E. w. A. 

* * 



Husband's Practice of Medicine. By E. & S. Livingstone, 
Edinburgh. 
This is a concise, reliable, modern text-book on medicine ; 
the style is lucid yet terse. Even those who are not familiar 
with the exact significance of medical terms may read the 
work with satisfaction. Aiij layman who has a purpose to 
familiarize himself with the leading principles of medical 
science may find here a book both reliable and readable. 



B. E. ]\r. 



Lewis Rand. By Mary Johnston. Toronto : William Briggs. 
1908. 510 pp. 
In this book the author has established almost indisputably 
her rifijht to be hailed as the queen of historical novelists. The 

7 



246 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

time is the beginning of the eighteenth century, the scene of 
action, Virginia, the state so prominent in that epoch-making 
period of American history. Into her description of the social 
and political life of the ^' good old days " Miss Johnston has 
put her best work. Under the magic of her pen the distant 
past really lives again for us. Her analysis of the political 
philosophies of the two opposed parties, Federalist and Demo- 
crat-Kepublican, as well as her account of the attitude of the 
newly-born Kepublic towards its recently acquired Western 
possessions, with all their golden possibilities, is especially 
valuable. 

As a portrayal of the primary elements of human nature, the 
book must stand on a level attained by few of the recent works 
of fiction. Lewis Rand, by birth the son of a tobacco-roller, 
but in spirit a veritable Kapoleon, is a most striking character. 
The perils which beset selfish ambition are the more vividly 
sho^vn by placing in the background the unfaltering love of 
his beautiful young wife, Jacqueline, and the noble chivalry 
of his opponent, Ludwell Cary. To say that " Lewis Rand '^ 
is the best book that Mary Johnston has written is to say much ; 
not only do we say it without hesitation, but also that it is 
in many respects the novel of the year. m. h. s. 

Holy Orders. By Marie Corelili. Toronto: William Briggs. 
An extraordinarily sensational and realistic death scene, com- 
j>arable for vivid picturesqueness and weird consummation wi 
modern novels with that described by Victor Hugo, in " The 
Toilers of the Sea," and by Frank N"orris, in his cele- 
brated trilogy, dealing with the wheat speculation question, is 
described in one of the last chapters of Marie Corelli's latest 
novel, " Holy Orders." Jacynth Miller, a feminine villain, 
more shamelessly beautiful and wicked than any recent 
heroine that we can recall in late years, goes up in a 
balloon with Claude Ferrers, a gay and intellectual social roue. 
They lose control of the balloon, Ferrers drinks heavily, dies 
of heart failure and his body topples out into the Irish Sea. 
Jacynth, alone in the rarefied air, above the clouds, experiences 
a revulsion of feeling and becomes converted as the car gently 
dips into the Irish Sea, just at the setting of the sun. '' Then 



248 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

all is peace." The novel is a bitter denunciation of the drink 
evil, and tells of the struggle of Pastor Everton against the 
besotted and immoral conditions in a little village of the 
Cotswolds. It is written in Marie Corelli's characteristic, 
imaginative manner, and is uncompromising in its earnestness 
and intensity. It is of peculiar interest in connection with 
the present situation, both from a religious and temperance 
standpoint, in England. j. v. m. 

Further Experiences of an Irish B.M. By E. O. Sumerville 
AND Martin Koss. Toronto: The Musson Book Com- 
pany, Limited. Thirty-five illustrations. 

This book, by the authors of "Some Experiences of an Irish 
R.M.," is written in the same delightfully breezy style, and 
all who have read the first one will not be disappointed in its 
successor. A knowledge of the first book is not necessary for 
a thorough enjoyment of this one. It opens with a light and 
sketchy tale of a " Pug-nosed Fox-hunt,'' and contains through- 
out many delicious bits of Irish humor and other phases of life 
in the Emerald Isle. j. v. m. 

* * ^^ * * 4fr * ^- * 

Across the Suh- Arctics of Canada. By James W. Tyrrell, 
C.E., D.L.S. Toronto: William Briggs. 
This book should be in the hands of every Canadian in- 
terested in the development of his country. The author has 
given us a description of his trip through a portion of the great 
country lying to the north of the wheat fields of the West. 
Written in a racy style, his description of river, lake and forest, 
with their fish, timber and game, with here and there a glimpse 
at the Indians and Esquimaux, or a visit to some lone mis- 
sion station, cannot fail to interest and instruct. e. w. a. 

(Other Book Reviews held over till January.) 

-)f 4f -Jf -x- ^^ -X- -X- -Jf « 

The strongest features of the December number of Pearsons 
are Henry Reuterdal's article on " President Roosevelt and 
the !N"avy's Renascence," and James Creelman's, " Forty-three 
Years After Lincoln." The short stories and verse are of 
average quality. There are also interesting instalments of the 
serials by Louis Tracy, H. G. Wells, and Elliot Flower. 



MAGAZINE REVIEWS. 



249 



Magazine Reviews 

Qaisxdia^ Magazine. 

THE Christmas number is a credit to Canadian enter- 
prise and Canadian literature; it reaches high-water 
mark. Canadian authors, whose names are known and 
esteemed in every Canadian household, and in lands beyond 
the sea — Shear d, Carman, Graham, Drummond, Blewett, 
McKay, Acland — are here to enrich this festive number. Other 
names are here, not so widely known, but giving abundant evi- 
dence of marked literary ability and skill. 

Theodore Roberts comes of good stock, bearing the family 
name held in such high esteem in Fredericton, N.B., and 
presents the opening story, '' Outside the Law." 

Mr. Knowles, the Gait pastor, already favorably known as 
the author of '' St. Cuthbert's," '' The Undertow,'' and " The 
Web of Time," shows himself a clever humorist in his sketch, 
" Why I Bought a Horse." 

^Nature lovers will find delight in '^ Winter Rambles and 
Rambling," by S. T. Wood, of the Globe. As is shown every 
Saturday, Mr. Wood is not only an ardent lover of isTature's 
ways, but a keen observer who reveals to us her secrets. 

Augustus Bridle is another Canadian journalist who shows 
a vigorous and entertaining style in ^^ The Bunks of the Old 
Sleigh Bobs." 

Others who contribute here to the entertainment of the 
Canadian public are Archie P. McKishnie, the author of 
^^ Gaff Linkum " ; Miss L. M. Montgomery, of Prince Edward 
Island, and James P. Haverson, another newspaper man, who 
has published a tautophonically-titled volume, ^' Sour Sonnets 
of a Sore-Head." 

The excellent artistic work by Greene, Lapine, Kyle, James, 
Beatty and Butler, much of it in color, bears evidence of 
genius and keen observation. 

Outlook (New York). 
The Outlook (New York), while it gives rightly the lion's 
share of attention to matters pertaining to the United States, 
yet takes a broad and statesmanlike view of the " Great 
Events " everywhere. While it always evidences great liberality 
and gives unstinted scope to its contributors, yet so long as the 



250 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

venerable Dr. Lyman Abbott controls its policy the journal will 
stand for what is pure. Not only are Dr. Abbott's editorials 
scholarly and richly suggestive, but they are models of pure, 
terse English. 

Theodore Roosevelt, who has recently joined the Outlooh 
staff, has an article, " The Awakening of China," which pre- 
sents the problem of China in a succinct, yet comprehensive 
manner. 

'' Constantinople," by Edwin Grosvenor, is a highly in- 
structive and, at this juncture, a most interesting contribution. 

^^ The Greatest l^ewspaper in the World," and Book Re- 
views, complete an attractive Christmas number. 

Scribner's Magazine. 
The Christmas number of this popular and entertaining 
magazine has more than the ordinary number of strong 
articles and short stories. One of the most interesting of these 
is a resume of Abbey's latest mural painting, by Royal Cortis- 
soz, profusely illustrated with several fine cuts. James B. 
Connolly's story, '' The Christmas Handicap," is one of the 
really good, " real " Christmas stories that have appeared this 
year. " The Warning," by Josephine Bascom Bacon, is a 
strongly written story well worth reading. The leading article, 
" Robert Burns's Country," by George McLean Harper, should 
be read by every student of the Scotch poet's life and works. 

The Red Book. 
In the frenzied hunt for new authors and new material by 
the ever-multiplying magazines across the border, they occa- 
sionally unearth something good, but in years we have seen 
nothing more unique, and humanly and intensely interesting, 
than the first story in the Christmas number of the Red Book, 
entitled, " The Men Who Can't Come Back," by James de 
Conlay. It tells of the men whom Mr. Conlay has met during 
his fourteen years wandering along the Edge of Things, who, 
because of some penal offence, committed maybe a generation 
ago, cannot come back to the United States to live, and have 
the brand of Cain on their brows. It is peculiarly interesting 
at Christmas time, when our thoughts turn naturally to home, 
and the author tells of his experiences with these men in such 



MAGAZINE REVIEWS. 



251 



far-off countries as Mexico, the African Desert, Tahiti and the 
Society Islands, China, Japan, and Arabia. We are given 
unexpected " photographic flashes, as it were, of the sub- 
conscious emotion that stirs the exiles for the land that they 
have lost." Gertrude Atherton has a very interesting article 
on " Bridge Whist and Drink — My Gaming Sisters," which is 
of more interest across the border than in Canada. There are a 
number of other stories and sketches, nearly all of which are 
very interesting reading and complete what is, it seems, the 
high-water mark to date of this magazine de luxe. 

" A Child's Christmas Tree," an illustrated collection of verse 
by various authors, is the most distinctively ^^ Christmassy " 
feature of the December Everybody's. A delightfully droll 
story by Rowland Thomas, entitled '' The King's Preroga- 
tive," furnishes food for thought as well as entertainment. ' 
Other short stories by such writers as Olivia Howard Dunbar 
and O. Henry maintain Everybody's usual standard of ex- 
cellence in fiction. 

In his second instalment of " The Woman's Invasion," 
William Hard discusses the case of the industrial woman. His 
contribution is but one more noteworthy feature in the series 
of articles on popular economics for which Everybody's is 
famous. Other instructive features are '' The Sunday Lady 
of Possum Trot," by John L. Mathews; ''The Outlook for 
Plain Folk," by Professor E. A. Ross, and " Chronicles of a 
Chromatic Bear Hunt," by Rex Beach. 



" The Christmas Hunting," by Charles Livingston Ball, is, 
from an artistic as well as from a literary standpoint, the most 
noteworthy feature of the December Metropolitan. Helen 
Zimmem tells us some interesting things about '^ Some Famous 
Pictures and Their Romantic Stories." " The Real Panama 
and Its People," is the subject of an instructive article by 
Eleanor Yorke Bell. The department " The World at Large " 
is unusually good. Excellent short stories by Glen Ford Mott, 
Chas. F. Holder and Arthur Zimmem, combined with suitable 
poems, give the proper holiday tone. Supplemented as these 
features are by abundant and appropriate illustrations, the 
number is a most attractive one. 



cm. Acta Victoriana. 



No. 3. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, J908-J909. 
J. V. McKenzie, '09 - - - - Editor-in-Chief. 
Miss C. Dunnett, '09, It u^i-of^r Miss K. Lukes, '10, \ 

M. H. Staples, '09, |i-iterary. F. J. R. Staples, '10, / 

Clyo Jackson, B. A., Missionary and Religious. J. E. Horning, '09, Scientific. 
A. L. Burt, '10, Personals and Exchanges. O. V. Jewett, '10, Athletics. 



Locals 



Board op Management: 

F. C . Mover, '09, Business Manager. 

W. MOOREHOUSE, '11, Assistant Business Manager. W. A. Deacon, '11, Secretary 

Advisory Committee : 
Pelham Edgar, Ph.D. C. C. James, M.A., Deputy Minister of Agriculture. 



TERMS: $1.25 A YEAR; SINGLE COPIES, 15 CENTS. 

Contributions and exchanges should be sent to J. V. McKenzie, Editor-in-Chief 
Acta Victoriana; business communications to F. C. Mover, Business Manager 
Acta Victoriana, Victoria University, Toronto. 



Editorial 



ACTA extends wishes for the Merriest of Merry Christ- 
mases and the Happiest of Happy Xew Years to all 
its readers. To the undergraduates we extend hopes of 
a very enjoyable vacation. Just as a reminder, we think that 
it might help to make your holidays more profitable and enjoy- 
able to try one of the competitions, either short story, essay 
or poetry. Further particulars appeared in the l^ovember 
number. 

■^^ -T^ 'r^ 

The Over-Organization Cry 

The question, "Is the student body of Victoria College over- 
organized ? " is one that causes, and has caused, much discussion 
among at least the male members of the institution. This fact 
alone signifies that somewhere there is something radically 
wrong. The amalgamation of the Alma Mater Society and the 
Union Literary Society has done much to relieve the strain, but 
there yet remain among the men three important organizations, 
the ''Lit," the ''Y.M.C.A.," and the ''Athletic Union," respec- 



EDITORIAL. 



253 



lively representing the mental, the spiritual and the physical 
sides of our college life. 

Surely none of these can be abolished, if Victoria is to turn 
out graduates who are to be all-round men. The College, then, 
we must conclude, is not over-organized. Why, then, all this 
discussion? We believe it is because the work of the college 
societies is not evenly or justly divided. For instance, there 
comes to our mind one man of the senior year, who is on the 
executive of the three main organizations, is a delegate to the 
Undergraduates' Parliament, has been appointed to represent 
Victoria as the guest of one of the other colleges, is a member 
of the tennis executive and the rink committee, and that same 
man was also hounded to take part in one of the intercollege de- 
bates. ''Brethren, these things ought not so to be." 

There are plenty of men in this institution capable of filling 
the various offices, with little or no overlapping. Where, then, 
lies the fault ? We do not think it is office-grabbing on the part 
of a few, but rather a habit on the part of the many. As a 
remedy we can but urge the student body to do some hard 
thinking before they vote, the various nominating committees to 
keep their eyes wide open for new signs of ability, and hitherto 
backward men not to plead lack of time and experience when 
given the opportunity to do their duty. Let those who are voting 
and those modest nominees who think of resigning remember that 
a mediocre man, devoting a fair amount of time to his work, is 
much more effective than the more able man who can bestow on 
each of his many duties but a passing thought. 

4^ ^^ ^^ 

A Lady Undergraduate's View 

" The world is so full of a number of things,'^ said Robert 
Louis Stevenson. If we intensify the force of these quaint 
words we might apply them effectively to conditions at col- 
lege. College life may have been anticipated as something of 
a dream, but it proves to be a rather feverish one. We are 
urged to '^ take in everything,'' to become that crown of crea- 
tion, an " all-round student " ; to be '^ broad,'' which appar- 
ently means to keep up such a furor regarding every means 
of physical, mental, spiritual and social development, that we 
may not have time to realize how very little we know or care 
about anything in particular 



254 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Such statements are not as extravagant as they may appear. 
In our college, at least, some change is imperative. Simplifi- 
cation of academic work — desirable or otherwise — rests with 
higher powers, but what of college functions? We have four 
receptions in the year, the Conversazione, Senior Dinner, 
Y.M.C.A. Conventions, Missionary Conferences, Open Lits 
and Oration Contests by both the men and women students, 
Intercollegiate Debating Evenings, Band lights. Theatre 
!N^ights, and what not. All these functions are perfectly good 
in themselves, but, unquestionably, there may be too much 
even of a good thing. 

This view is not that of the " plug " alone. True, it may 
seem at times that a little more sound learning would detract 
neither from the dignity nor the usefulness of the college 
student; but there are other considerations. We might rea- 
sonably expect that our gatherings would be better attended 
and more heartily supported if they were fewer in number. 
Those who attended either of the Open Lits this term will 
agree that a decided change is needed along this line. More- 
over, there are many city functions of various kinds, educa- 
tional, literary and artistic, which the student needs and would 
enjoy. But pre-eminently he needs a saner mode of living. 
Men and women of to-day lack poise ; they lack the clear brain, 
the steady nerve and the repose of manner which might re- 
sult from a more systematic, less intense life, and which are 
indispensable to the attainment of real success in this twen- 
tieth century of ours. " Co-ed." 

<^ ^^ <^ 

Acta Board wishes to extend its sincere thanks to all those 
who have so kindly contributed to this number. 

-^ ^^ ^^ 

At a recent meeting of the ^' Lit." it was decided to offer a 
prize of ten dollars for the best new college song, to be sub- 
mitted before tbe end of the first week in February. It has been 
felt that, with all due respect to ^^ The Old Ontario Strand," 
the College can stand another. Further particulars in the 
January issue. 



.s^jnniiis;^ 




niSSIONARY ffiW RELIGIOUS 



(( 



T 



The Message of Christmas 

REV. PROF. R. P. BOWLES^ M.A.^ B.D. 

HE most fruitful theme in modern theology '^ — ^thus 
Principal Fairbairn has somewhere spoken of the 
doctrine of the Incarnation. Equally fruitful is the 
theme in practical living. It is twice blessed — ^blessing him 
who solves the high problem of the Divine nature, and him. 
who solves the lowlier but not less important problem of the 
true life in this world. ^^ In this world '' — the phrase is no 
useless appendage to the sentence. On it is the emphasis — to 
live the true life in this world — that is each man's problem. 
That man's ideal life lies outside and must in thought and in 
fact be separate from ftie world is a great heresy which has pre- 
vailed not in the church, only but in other religions and in great 
philosophies, a heresy which remains with us a pernicious in- 
fluence even unto this day. Such a nation is not Christian. 
It came partly as an inheritance from Greek philosophy, which 
taught the inherent evil of matter, partly as an importation from 
the mystic and ascetic religions of the East. A superficial and 
erroneous interpretation of certain familiar passages in the 
IN^ew Testament exposed the church to this distorted view of 
life — a view which has never been able at any period or under 
any conditions to justify itself. Vain and utterly disappoint- 
ing has been man's effort to live his true life by depreciating, 
ignoring or denying its natural and social relationships. 

Just here lies the distinct and peculiar message of Christmas. 
To the Greek, who said matter was inherently evil and the body 
the source of all man's troubles it says, ^^ The word was made 
flesh." To the anchorite, who in the interests of an ideal life 
has fled the world, it says, " He dwelt among us." To him who 
denies the possibility of living the true life in the sphere of 



256 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

natural and social relationships it ansAvers, '^ We beheld his 
glory." The Divine life lived on earth and among men is the 
great corrective of all tendencies to morbid, ascetic or other 
worldly religious ideals. Christmas is our warrant that re- 
ligion will be natural, wholesome and human. 

To this purpose this festival of the church keeps true. Its 
commemoration of the nativity of the Lord Jesus has invested 
one day of each year with altogether unique significance. Be- 
ginning as a celebration of the lowly and humiliating birth of 
Jesus it has become a eucharist among men — a sacrament of 
the simple, the homelike and the natural. On this day the 
Divine comes again to earth, is born once more into human- 
ity's lowly estate, and is recognized as a spirit of love moving 
among common and unregarded things. Christmas, as often 
as it returns, is an apotheosis of the simplest and most elemental 
sentiments of the human heart. One has but to recall the genius 
of the season, its cheerfulness and brotherliness, its homely and 
social sympathies, its overflowing kindness and helpfulness, to 
realize how, of all days it is the Day of Humanity. Perhaps 
the chief sentiment of Christmas is that w^iich gathers around 
childhood. It is the children's day. I^ie larger holdings are 
in their hands, and the grave wisdom of the fathers is clean 
outvoted. Where now is the scribe ? Where now is the wise 
man? Christmas hath confounded the wisdpm of the wise. 
Christmas hath given the grace of true faith to scribe and 
philosopher by the way of the child heart. On this day all 
they who love the children receive to their edification and com- 
fort the sacrament of simplicity. Akin to this also is the sen- 
timent of home. Already from the stranger's heart, in a shack 
on the lonely prairie or in a room in the lonelier city, go forth 
outreachings and yearnin,g,s toward kindred hearts beyond the 
sea, for Christmas is drawing near. The air is filled with 
messages of love. His Majesty's carrier of mail stoops beneath 
his burden of friendship at this season. A thousand lowly 
ministries to the poor and the sick and those in prison testify 
that a day of brotherhood has come. One touch of Christmas 
makes the whole world kin. Childhood, Home, Friendship, 
Brotherhood, these make the day, and these are human relations 
sanctified and glorified by a Divine presence. 



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258 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

If then one thinks that religion is getting ready for a distant 
heaven, let him behold and consider what Christmas makes 
manifest. If another believes that religion abstracts man from 
life's interests, pursuits and natural joys, let him receive the 
doctrine of Christmas. If still another considers religion a 
strange and unnatural imposition upon the hearts of men, let 
him give heed to this great day and its meanings. God came to 
this world. He came into the dreaming morning land of child- 
hood. He entered the closed mystic circle of friendship. Every 
relationship on the wide realm of brotherhood was hallowed by 
His presence. No poet has ever taught this world its own 
sacredness as has Christmas Day. Its celebration of the coming 
to earth and to us men of the Lord Jesus has sanctified all great 
human interests and sentiments. If Christ's Church had always 
been fully seized of its own Christmas message, from what 
grievous errors had some of her noblest sons been saved ? The 
mediaeval saint with emaciated and uncared-for body and eyes 
upturned to heaven is a sorry representative of the Christian 
religion. John Tauler pulled his cap over his eyes lest he see 
the primroses at his feet and so forget God. What a mistake! 
He should have looked and seen God among His flowers. For 
God is in His world as surely as in His heaven. Let the bells 
ring. Twine ye the wreath of the evergreen holly. 



The Education of Our Ministers 

PROF. L. E. HORNING, M.A., PH.D. 

I'N the Christian Guardian of September 25, 1908, there was 
issued an urgent appeal from the West for men for the 
numerous mission fields that should be occupied. And 
within the past few days there has come from the press an im- 
passioned appeal by that most serious and capable leader of 
young men, John R. Mott, for leaders for the Church. All 
over the world, with very slight exceptions, the problem is the 
same, the urgency equally great, the obstacles of a more 
or less similar nature. The solutions proposed differ very 
widely, but there is, on one point, a striking unanimity of 
opinion, viz., on the necessity, the absolute necessity, of a well- 
trained, carefully educated ministry. 



THE EDUCATION OF OUR MINISTERS. 259 



By request, whicli lias often been repeated in various forms 
by many of Victoria's graduates, the writer is about to attempt 
to outline what seems to him an improvement on the traditional 
training given our ministers and, incidentally it might be 
said, many others of our students. 

In self-defence, let it be said at the very outset that there is 
no desire to object to any study whatever, in and for itself. 
Any subject on the wide curriculum of the University is sus- 
ceptible of such treatment and such attention that it may be of 
absorbing interest, and have " culture " for an effect. But 
when an effort is made to make use of " constructive criticism '^ 
by proposing something new for something old, then regard 
can only be had to a course for the ordinary plodding student 
of average parts. The genius can and does look after himself 
to a large extent. There are few of the latter, there are many 
of the former. 

For long years, centuries we may say, it has been customary 
to require of the budding theologian three foreign languages^ 
Latin, Greek and Hebrew. In bygone days that was a correct 
curriculum, for many, indeed most learned works were, by a 
mistaken notion, written in Latin. Greek is the language of 
the 'New Testament, Hebrew of the Old Testament, and it was 
necessary to do a great deal of original and independent work. 
To-day that is all changed. The Latin has gone out, Greek is 
studied only by the few, and Hebrew by some of the theo- 
logians. There are all sorts of aids accessible in the most im- 
portant modern languages, and multitudes of scholars whose 
lives are devoted to increasing our store of knowledge. Upon 
these the great majority can, therefore, lean for aid in almost 
all cases of difficulty and doubt. Kot that every man should 
do so. By all means let us encourage the gifted few, who have 
had early and golden opportunity, to take their places in the 
ranks of the thorough scholars. 

But to-day it is not necessary to know a " little Latin and 
less Greek " to become an educated and cultured man. The 
English language has a history as interesting and instructive 
as the Greek ever possessed or does possess, and because we 
speak it we start with years of advantage in studying its laws. 
The English literature has its dramatist second to none in the 



260 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

world though he knew not the laws of Aristotle, and before and 
after him is a literature second to none of the Western worlds. 
Every student of our colleges and universities should be given 
a saturating course in his mother tongue and its literature, 
that is, a thorough survey from the origins. The beginnings 
should be made in the Public Schools and continued in inten- 
sive fashion in our High Schools. Experience teaches that the 
most uncultured audiences will be charmed, fascinated and 
uplifted by the " straight-flung words and few '' of inspired 
singers, and the minister who avoids the pointless anecdote but 
gives apt quotations from • Shakespeare or Milton, Tennyson 
or Browning, Kipling or Stevenson, can drive home his lessons 
to every member of his audience. First of all, therefore, let 
there be a broad, deep, thorough study of the mother tongue. 
There is no better. 

The second most important language for an English student 
of any .subject whatsoever is German. I^owhere is scientific 
study, for its own sake and for the sake of progress, given such 
untrammeled freedom as in the Eatherland. 'No modern 
language possesses so many inimitable translations of im- 
portant works in all departments, or such ideal renderings of 
the classics of other peoples, as does the German. The days, 
weeks and months spent by the average student in thumbing 
Latin, Greek and Hebrew dictionaries without attaining to 
perfect ease in reading and enjoying the works in these 
languages, if spent on German would open up immense stores 
of knowledge to the inquirer, and enable him to keep abreast 
of scientific development in his chosen line. After German 
would come French and then GrcH'k and HebrcAV, with Latin 
bringing up the rear. 

Let us make no mistake. The modern minister must be the 
equal of the man in the pew, and must be scientific in spirit. 
That does not mean that he must be a student of the natural 
sciences. The scientific spirit can be acquired in the study of a 
language just as well as in the study of chemistry. There 
must be no fixity of opinion, but a welcome to all new facts; 
there must be absolute candor and no mental reservations. 
Some of the " visitations of God " of former days might have 
been avoided by a plentiful use of soap and water; the earth 



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262 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

does move, and is not the centre of the universe. The ques- 
tioning or critical spirit is everywhere, and must be fairly and 
squarely met. Therefore the modern preacher should know 
modern history, that is, the history of our era, very thoroughly. 
The lessons from the past will prevent some mistakes of the 
present and of the future, broaden the outlook, and lead to 
charity of judgment. Without a clear knowledge of the 
sources, we shall surely misjudge the movements of the present, 
and be disturbed and worried by the ebb and flow of develop- 
ment, individual, national and international. 

l^ext to the languages and history we may place some of the 
natural sciences. First, geology, the history of our earth. 
What an outlook it gives ! How time and perspective are cor- 
rected and adjusted ! '^ These light afflictions which are but 
for a moment " assume their proper place, and our hearts 
are no longer troubled. Botany next, " the flowers of the 
field !" What lessons they teach ! What comfort they give ! 
And zoology, the story of the animal creation! What can be 
more important and more instructive for us ! We must know 
it or we cannot answer the hundreds of questions agitating 
men's minds to-day. And as a fourth subject let us study 
astronomy. " The heavens declare the glory of God." Who 
does not feel the inspiration and uplift of that wonderful 
psalm! Let us study the handiwork and learn through it to 
wonder, to love and praise the Maker ! 

After these four sciences, which seem to be of greater im- 
portance for the outlook of the minister and leader than those 
usually studied in his course, the future minister should be 
made acquainted with the elements of political science. The 
modern preacher must lead in the matter of moral reforms, 
and to do so he must not be ignorant of the well-established 
economic laws. He must also be a mediator among men, and, 
therefore, be prepared to deal with employer and employed, 
with the question of the right relations of capital and labor. 
We in Canada may be very thankful that no such traditions 
obtain here as in the old lands across the ocean, and that, 
therefore, the great body of workingmen are not actively hos- 
tile to the Church. But we must see to it that our corporations 
and unions recognize in the Church and in its ministers an 



THE EDUCATION OF OUR MINISTERS. 263 

institution and a body of men who stand for the truth that 
maketh free, and always stand for that unswervingly and un-^ 
touched by any sinister influence. Xot on the side of the 
mighty and the rich, not necessarily on the side of the poor, 
but always and ever for the right. 

And lastly the elements of philosophy and psychology must 
be acquired. Too many young and immature minds get lost 
in philosophical speculation. 

The course outlined above is the broad one which is to serve 
as a foundation for further study in special fields. These for 
a theologian mean missions, Scripture history, exegesis, com- 
parative religion, and the other specifically theological courses. 

It would be of immense advantage to our ministers if a. 
regular rotation could be devised by which each year a certain 
number could be given an opportunity of devoting a couple of 
months at least to a refreshing of old studies, or getting 
acquainted with the newer phases of thought in their various- 
departments. 

Briefly, in review. First, last and always, the mother 
tongue, its history and literature. Through it access is had 
to the hearts of millions of men, and its sway is rapidly in- 
creasing and will increase. Think of what a field our own 
l^orth-West will make when we assimilate the hosts of foreign- 
ers coming to our land. Let us study and follow after the 
masters, shunning ornateness, cultivating directness and sim- 
plicity — " the straight-flung word." Then of other tongues^ 
German, Greek and Hebrew in descending importance. By 
all means let us be thorough students of history as commonly 
thought of. Without a knowledge of the past, the present is a 
sealed book. For outlook and perspective the history of our 
planet, of the animal and vegetable kingdoms is very essential. 
Then '^ other worlds than ours,'' or astronomy. Man's relation 
to his fellows in society is an all-absorbing topic, and the 
preacher must lead in this, especially in this century of demo- 
cracy. Finally, the history of thought. 

The man who has compassed the subjects suggested can 
fairly claim to be cultured as well as thoroughly equipped to 
be a leader among men. Such the minister must be, such a 
minister is sought, and when found will be honored and trusted. 



264 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



A Prayer for Christmas 

^^ 

O Chrijt, when Thou wast ihe sharer of our mortal pain, 
Thou didst set Thy feet in the way of the Cross, making manifest 
unto us that only in the way of the Cross can we pass from the 
weakness of our mortal, nature to that true m;nhood which :'« in 
God. From the sins which hold us far from Thy Cross and from 
Thee, deliver us, we beseech Thee ; from all anger and idleness, 
and from the high conceit of ourselves ; from the sin and ruinous 
folly of pride ; fiom coldness of heart ; from cleverness without 
love; and from the selfish wisdom of the world. 

Grant us purity of heart ; let our eyes be clear toward 
Heaven ; and lest we go heavily and with depression about the 
works of life, give us in our hearts an inward wellspring of 
human joy. But if for any one of us Thou hast a dolorous 
way in store, impart to such an one the grace of fortitude ; not 
the fortitude alone of ancient men, who, with no strength save 
that of their own grave and sad hearts, faced the encompassing 
darkness and endured the pains of their mortality ; but fortitude 
enlightened with vision, looking across the darkness and having 
glimpses of the ultimate glory of God, but seeing also a Helper 
close at hand and a purpose of God working through all the 
night. 

Grant unto us practical spirits, and success in the affairs of 
life. But rather let us be called failures or visionaries than that we 
should succeed by wrong, or should give to the gifts wherewith 
Thou hast endowed us an inward heart of selfishness, living that 
others may nr.inister unto us while we minister not to others. 

Teach IS, we beseech Thee, to love goodness; and open 
our eyes to see the beauty that Thou dost make and dost set 
forth by day and night. But let us not bring heathen hearts to 
these Thy sanctities ; make us to know the goodness of beauty 
and the beauty of gcodnes;. 

Hear us when we pray to Thee for the blessing of friend- 
ship and for blessings upon our friends; and for the grace of that 
remembrance which makes the living present to us and brings to 
our side again our dead. But hear us most of all when we cry 
to Thee for those who need Thee nnost : for the poor and the 
sick ; for all who in heart or in home are desolate ; and for 
young children. 

And at this kindly season of the year, give us friendly minds, 
and hearts lilce children's hearts — hearts that can love easily and 
easily can forgive. For, being proud, we have sinned ; and all 
our sins have been sins against love. Forgive us th's our great sin ; 
and let us sin no more. Amen. 



THE SZ-CHUAN CONTINGENT. 



265 



The Sz-Chuan Contingent 

THE annual contingent of missionary workers from Can- 
ada to the Methodist province of Sz-Chnan has been sent 
out, and about the time that this issue of Acta is in the 
hands of its readers, the long six weeks' trip up the river will 
have been completed and their far-distant goal will have been 
reached. There were thirty in the " missionary gang " that left 
this fall, and although many of their names are more or less 
familiar to our readers, four of the men will be especially re- 
membered by the students of Victoria — Messrs. A. P. Quirm- 
bach, Dan Perley, W. B. Albertson, and E. K. Brecken. 

Quirmbach, whose romantic marriage was reported in a 
recent number of Acta^ spent his early life near Berlin, but 
a little over a dozen years ago offered himself as a missionary 
to China and worked for ten years in the province of Hunan. 
Two years ago he returned to Canada and spent two years at 
Victoria, where he became one of the best-liked and most 
popular of students. 

Brecken entered Victoria three or four years ago to take; 
work in Theology, after graduating from Mount Allison in 
Arts. He spent the past year at Oxford in the study of Orien- 
tal languages and literature, and upon his return married Miss- 
Vida Overland. 

W. B. Albertson graduated from Victoria in Arts with the 
class of 1907, coming to the college from the neighborhood of 
Oakville. He secured first class honors in Semitics, and then 
was stationed at Roblin, Manitoba, for a year. 

Dan Perley came to Vic. from Brockville, Morrisburg and 
several other places, graduating in honor philosophy with the 
class of 1904. He spent a year in theology at Vic. and later 
a year at Glasgow. He also devoted two or three years of his 
life to missionary work in British Columbia, where he had 
wonderful success. He will be supported by Colborne Street 
Church, Brantford. 

Others in the party that left this autumn were: H. H, 
Irish, Parker M. Bayne, M. A. Brillinger, T. E. Plewman, 
Ethel B. Plewman, Arthur Hockin, A. J. Barter, W. D. Fer- 
guson, A. T. Crutcher, Walter Small. 



266 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Before sailing the Vic. boys left the following messages 
which will be of interest to all their friends : 

" From the threshold of the Orient we send back this mes- 
sage, — that you will keep praying for us, that our faith may 
be increased and our courage strengthened, that with pure 
hearts and firm wills and broad human sympathy we may be 
fitted to bear the message of Him who came to give His life 
a ransom for many. 

^^ Egertot^ and Vida M. Breckex." 

" As we go forth to represent the newest West in the oldest 
East, we feel we are ambassadors of Him who belongs neither 
to one nor the other, but to us all, inasmuch as China is in- 
cluded in the words, ^ That ye all may be one.' 

" D. M. Perley." 

" As I approach the land of my former labors my heart is 
deeply moved. I pray that powers equal to the vast task 
may be given me. At Jesus' feet for His glory. In His ser- 
vice. A. P. QuiRMBACH." 

" We are grateful for God's protecting care on land and sea. 
Such mercies deepen the incentive for effort in the work we 
undertake. It increases our faith in Him who is our Leader 
and Guide. W. B. Albertsots^." 



Notes 

The Annual Missionary Conference, January 22-24, 
promises w^ell. Rev. J. L. Stewart, B.A., Mr. I^. W. Powell 
and Principal Gaudier are among the speakers already secured. 

<^ ^^ <^ 

The theological students are indebted to Prof. Kilpatrick, of 
Knox College, for his vigorous and convincing apology for the 
faith, delivered before the Theological Club, in reply to Prof 
McBride's article on the " Evolution of Religion," in the 
University Magazine for October. 



Sunset 

Behold the glory of the dying day, 

Ere night has fully won. 
As Hello's chariot hastes away 

For the goal of the rising svm! 

w. H., '10. 




Osteopathy 

ROBERT B. HENDERSON. 

'' A normal floiv of hlood is health/' 

I'N approaching this subject in a general way, it is inter- 
esting to note how, in almost every phase of life, the on- 
ward march of- progress in the way of discoveries and 
inventions has been and is being opposed at every turn. In 
practically every instance this opposition has been for purely 
selfish purposes, though some high sounding economic, moral, or 
religious excuse is often vaunted as the outward reason. The 
wage-earner has ever opposed the adoption of labor-saving de- 
vices, and yet with their adoption both wages and the demand 
for labor have increased. In early agriculture the sickle gave 
place to the cradle, the cradle to the reaper, and this in turn 
to the binder, which is able to take with ease the place of 
many men. Similarly, the flail was superseded by the horse- 
power thresher, and this in turn was forced to give place to 
the monster self-feeding thresher of our Western prairie 
provinces, and yet with all these devices the crops can scarcely 
be harvested in time to save them from the frosts. These in- 
ventions were looked upon with much disfavor in their day 
by the working class, and yet they have proved themselves of 
the greatest benefit to both employer and employee. These 
same conditions have developed along the lines of transporta- 
tion, communication, manufacturing, business systems and 
so on. 

Along the lines of healing art, progress has been made but 
slowly, owing to the fact that in many countries, for religious 
and other reasons, the study of the structure of the human 
body by dissection was forbidden, so that the votaries of this 



268 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

important branch of science in the early ages had to be content 
to attempt to combat disease by the administration of noxious 
weeds or weird incantations. Hence, one of our later medical 
writers facetiously remarked that " the practice of medicine 
was founded on ii^iorance and improved by conjecture/' 

Of true scientific work little was accomplished in the real 
understanding of disease until the latter part of the seven- 
teenth and the beginning of the eighteenth centuries, when 
Boerhaave, of Holland, revolutionized " clinical observation " ; 
Morgagni, of Italy, introduced " medical thinking into medi- 
cine " ; Virchow and Haller gave impetus to the study of 
pathology and physiology respectively; and William Cullen 
and John Brown — 1720-90 — of the University of Edinburgh, 
were the first, perhaps, to get away from the old theories of 
" Humors," and make the nervous system the seat of disease. 
It was in pursuing these discoveries of the wonderful ramifi- 
cations, actions, and reflexes of the nervous system, almost to 
their logical conclusion — which was reserved for Andrew 
Taylor Still, M.D., to do at a later date (1874)— that Dr. 
Hilton, the famous surgeon and diagnostician of Guy's Hos- 
pital, London, England, and author of the classic, " Best and 
Pain," engraved his name on the immortal tablets of fame 
(1858). 

It is not to be wondered at, then, that the latter part of the 
nineteenth century should be a most fitting time for the birth 
of a new science of healing. Anatomy, physiology, pathology, 
biology and neurology were being studied as they had never 
been studied before. The allopath and the homeopath had gone 
to the limit in their diametrically opposed theories ; the former 
in prescribing huge boluses and doses which were intended to 
counteract the poisons in the system produced by, or produc- 
ing, the disease; the latter with his infinitesimal dosage and 
opposite theory of '' Similia similihus curantur/' It was only 
natural that a man with a mex3hanical turn of mind, one who 
from experience knew the limitations of drug medication, 
should, in this revival of anatomical research and marvellous 
discoveries of the nervous system, have his eyes opened to the 
vast possibilities of healing or alleviating diseased conditions 
by correcting anatomi<;al irregularities, and thereby allowing 



OSTEOPATHY. 



269 



the nerves to control the life-giving, tissue-building stream of 
blood to and from the diseased parts. Pure arterial blood, 
under normal conditions, is the only thing that ever did or ever 
will produce a healthy human cell. 

The new school of drug medicine of our own day has swung 
far from the old moorings. Dr. William Osier, no less hon- 
ored by the osteopaths than by his fellow allopathic practi- 
tioners, has this to say in his article on ^^ Medicine," in the 
" Americana Encyclopedia " : ^' But the new school does not 
feel itself under obligation to give any medicines whatever, 
while a generation ago not only could few physicians have 
held their practice unless they did, but few w^ould have thought 
it safe or scientific. Of course, there are still many cases 
where the patient or patient's friends must be humored by 
administering medicine, or alleged medicine, where it is not 
really needed, and indeed often where the buoyancy of mind, 
which is the real curative agent, can only be created by making 
him w^ait hopefully for the expected action of medicine; and 
some physicians still cannot unlearn their old training. But 
the change is great. The modern treatment of disease relies 
very greatly on the old so-called ' natural ' methods, diet and 
exercise, bathing and massage ; in other words, giving the nat- 
ural forces the fullest scope by easy and thorough nutrition, 
increased flow 'of blood, and removal of obstructions to the 
excretory systems, or the circulation in the tissues. One 
notable example is typhoid fever. At the outset of the nine- 
teenth century, it was treated with ' remedies ' of the ex- 
tremest violence — bleeding and blistering, vomiting and purg- 
ing, and the administration of antimony and mercury, and 
plenty of other heroic remedies. ]S[ow the patient is bathed 
and nursed and carefully tended, but rarely given medicine. 
This is the result partly of the remarkable experiments of the 
Paris and Vienna schools into the action of drugs, which have 
shaken the stoutest faiths ; and partly by the constant and re- 
proachful object lessons of Homeopathy. 'No regular physi- 
cian would ever admit that the homeopathic preparations, 
^ infinitesimals,' could do any good as direct curative agents, 
and yet it was prefectly certain that homeopaths lost no more 
of their patients than others. There was but one conclusion to 



270 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

draw — that most drugs had no effect whatever on the diseases 
for which they were administered." (Vol. X.) 

Some fifteen or sixteen years ago, the knowledge of the exis- 
tence of the science of healing now called Osteopathy was lim- 
ited to a small territory within a radius of a few miles from 
Kirksville, Missouri, where Andrew Taylor Still, M.D., first 
began to give out the results of his experiments — ^continued 
for nearly twenty years — in healing disease by considering the 
human body as an Animated Mechanism (Descartes — 1596- 
1650). Since that time so rapid has been its growth, so re- 
markable its cures, and so reasonable and scientific its claims, 
that during the past year leading public magazines, such as 
the Ladies' Home Journal, Cosmopolitan, Metropolitan, and 
others, have given its consideration much valuable space in 
their columns. The fact that it is the business of these journals 
to know what the people want, and to supply that want, is an 
indication that there is a desire on the part of the people to 
know something of this new system of healing. 

[N'umerous definitions of Osteopathy are at hand, but the 
one furnished by J. Martin Littlejohn, Ph.D., M.D., LL.D., 
D.O., President of the American College of Osteopathic Medi- 
cine and Surgery, Chicago, 111., will be as readily understood 
as any : " Osteopathy is that science or system of healing which 
emphasizes {a) the diagnosis of diseases by physical methods, 
with the view of discovering, not the symptoms, but the cause 
of disease, in connection with misplacements of tissue, obstruc- 
tion of the fluids, and interference with the forces of the organ- 
ism; (h) the treatment of diseases by scientific manipulations, 
in connection with which .the operating physician mechanically 
uses and applies the inherent resources of the organism, to 
overcome the disease and establish health, either by removing 
or correcting mechanical disorders, and then permitting nature 
to recuperate the diseased parts, or by producing and estab- 
lishing antitoxic and antiseptic conditions to counteract toxic 
and septic conditions of the organism or its parts; (c) the 
application of mechanical and operative surgery in setting 
fractured or dislocated bones, repairing lacerations and remov- 
ing abnormal tissue dangerous to organic life." Tn short, 



OSTEOPATHY. 



271 



Osteopathy is anatomy and physiology applied, or put into 
application in every-day treating of disease. 

It has been said that the human body is an epitome in nature 
of all mechanics, all hydraulics, all architecture, all machinery 
of every kind. There are over 310 mechanical movements 
known to mechanics to-day, and all of these are modifications 
of those found in the human body. Here are found all the 
bars, levers, joints, pulleys, wedges, pumps, pipes, spirals, 
eccentrics, wheel-and-axle - and ball-and-socket movements, 
beams, girders, trusses, buffers, arches, columns, cables and 
supports known to science. At every point man's best mechani- 
cal work can be shown to be but adaptations of processes of 
the human body, a revelation of first principles used in nature. 

This wonderful mechanism, to be the perfect body the 
Creator intended it should be, must be normal in structure, 
and have perfect digestive, circulatory, and nervous systems. 
Pure, oxygenated blood in normal quantity maintains a healthy, 
vigorous nervous system, and the latter in turn automatically 
controls the circulation of the life-giving fluid to every tissue 
and cell of the body. Tenderness at the spinal centre or along 
the course of a nerve supplying nerve force to any organ is 
indicative of a lesion of that organ. This lesion may be 
temporary or permanent. Disease of the stomach, for example, 
may be due to eating unwholesome or improperly cooked food, 
improperly eating food of any kind, or eating at irregular 
periods. On the other hand, the patient may be most careful 
of his diet, and yet suffer serious digestive disturbances from 
the fact that the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh or eighth dorsal 
vertebrae have become slightly strained or rotated, impacted 
or spread, irritating the nerve supply to the stomach, thereby 
increasing or diminishing the blood supply to that organ; as 
a result, the gastric secretion may be increased or diminished, 
so that, instead of digestion, fermentation takes place. In 
cases of this kind. Osteopathy is wholly and essentially cor- 
rective. IN'a amount of rubbing — massage — could produce any- 
thing more than possibly temporary results. The osteopath 
never rubs ; he corrects or adjusts the abnormal bony structure, 
relaxes contracted muscles, stimulates or restrains diseased 
nerve centres, and leaves nature, Avith this improved condition, 



272 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

to restore her equilibrium, which is perfect health. What 
applies to the stomach applies equally to every other organ or 
part of the body. Appropriate treatment applied to the proper 
nerve centre will assist nature in repelling any disease, provided 
that it has not progressed beyond the point where nature is 
powerless, and where no help is to be hoped for from any 
quarter whatever. 

A simple illustration of the effect of abnormal pressure upon 
a nerve trunk is to press continually for a few seconds on the 
" funny-bone," the ulnar nerve, as it passes through the ulnar 
groove on the inner side of the arm at the elbow. Notice the 
numbness or prickling in the little finger and the outer half of 
the ring finger; this is- the distribution of the ulnar nerve. 
Dr. Hilton, of Guy's Hospital, was once called in consultation 
where the little finger and the ulnar side of the ring finger 
were sloughing off with dry gangrene. He at once, being a 
skilled anatomist, noted that it was the distribution of the 
ulnar nerve that was affected, searched along its course, and 
was rewarded by finding an ^' exostosis," a bony growth on the 
first rib. This was removed, normal circulation was restored, 
and the progress of decay stopped. 

It is unfair, however, to conclude that the examination of 
the spinal system is regarded as the whole basis of operation in 
the process of examination and treatment. The competent 
osteopath gives careful attention to every part of the body, and 
is particular not to overlook any symptom, however slight, that 
may have a bearing on the case. 

Though comparatively in its infancy, Osteopathy has made 
rapid strides in its scientific development. At the last meet- 
ing of the E'ational Association, held in Kirksville, Mo., fifty 
thousand dollars was subscribed in a fcAv hours as a nucleus 
for the establishment of a college of scientific research. Though 
the youngest of the three foremost schools of healing, its record 
is certainly one of which to be proud. 

There are at present seven recognized Colleges of Osteopathy, 
all giving a uniform course. Each college requires a term of 
study of three years of nine months each for graduation with- 
out surgery, or four years of nine months each with surgery. 
The uniformity of these colleges is maintained by being 



OSTEOPATHY. 



273 



inspected yearly by a physician who is appointed by the gradu- 
ated physicians in the field, members of the A.O.A., and who 
are jealons of the good name of Osteopathy, and most inter- 
ested in forcing, if necessary, the colleges to maintain a high 
standard. There are at present between five and six thousand 
graduated osteopaths in the field, and between 1,500 and 2,000 
students in the colleges, Kirksville alone having an attendance 
of between five and six hundred students. In 1902 the com- 
bined drug schools of the United States enrolled less than 
27,000 students in 154 schools: 123 regular schools had 24,447 ; 
20 homeopathic schools had 1,551 ; 9 eclectic schools had 946, 
and 2 physio-medical schools had 77. And the record shows 
a gain in 32 years of 33 per cent. 

In conclusion, it might be stated that Osteopathy has been 
recognized by statute in over forty States of the Union, and 
upheld by the courts in all other States, with perhaps one or 
two exceptions. In Canada, at the present time, we have no 
statutory recognition, which leaves plenty of scope for any un- 
principled person to practise fraud by holding himiself out as 
a fully accredited osteopath, while the only credential he may 
possess is a diploma from a correspondence school, or none at 
all. There are numbers of such practitioners in Canada, and 
several in Toronto, but until we have legislation, the people 
must themselves look to it that they are not imposed upon. 



Nocturne Automne 



THE daylight fades. Along the west 
The red blush dies away. The stars 
Appear, and quietness is over all. 
A gentle breeze hides in the tree-top. 
Slow up the sky the harvest moon 
Sweeps in her glory. 

A grey owl hoots. Far off a watch-dog bays, 
And night breathes on in peace. 

L. E. c, '11. 



^J^.-^. 




ER50NALS 
EXCHANGES 



The Class of 1903 

Graduates. 

MISS KOSE Y. BEATTY is in Japan. Her address is 
N^eda, Shinshu, Japan. 
Miss Sadie Bristol is at her home, 442 Gilmore Street, 
Ottawa, Ontario.. 

Miss Edith Campbell is teaching Moderns in East Toronto 
Collegiate Institute. 

Miss Hose Cullen was in Paris, until recently, at least. 

Miss E. Edna Dingwall holds the position of private secretary 
to Professor F. H. Sykes, of Columbia University, ^ew York. 

Miss F. M. Eby is teaching in the High School at George- 
town, Ontario. 

Miss E. Jackson is teaching in Drayton High School. 

Miss Ruby M. Jolliffe is taking post-graduate work in English 
at Bryn Mawr College. Her address is Pennington, ^N". J. 

Miss Olive Lindsay is teaching at Qu'Appelle. 

Mrs. C. E. Auger (nee Smith) is living at 66 Cowan Avenue, 
Toronto, for a short time. 

Mrs. R. H. Stewart (nee Miss A. A. Will) is living at Ross- 
land, B.C. 

R. C. Armstrong is at Hamamatsu, Japan, engaged in mis- 
sionary work. 

T. A. Bagshaw is engaged in newspaper work in Chicago. 

F. L. Barber is pastor of Paisley Memorial Church, Guelph, 
Ont. 

^N". E. Bowles is in China representing Toronto West Epworth 
Leagues. His address is Kiating, Sz-Chuan, China. 

J. F. Chapman is preaching at Pontypool, Ontario. 

J. H. Chown is -railroading with the C.P.R. He is chief 
clerk to the superintendent at Kenora, Ont. 

W. Conway is pastor of the Methodist Church at 'Nile, Ont. 

R. G. Dingman is in business in Toronto as a timber broker. 



THE CLASS OF 1903. 



275 



Ernest L. C. Forster lias recently joined the Government 
employ. He is located at Ottawa, being analyst in the Inland 
Revenue Department. 

A. E. Ford is City Editor of the Winnipeg Telegram. 

R. S. Glass is still in the Auditor-Generars Department at 
Ottawa. 'Tis whispered he is married, though we know not how 
— nor when. 

G. H. Grey is practising law in West Toronto, Ontario. One 
of Dolly's recent performances was to join the Orangemen. 

R. O. Jolliife is at Yuin Hsien, Sz-Chuan, China, engaged in 
missionary work. 

E. H. Jolliife is on the staff of the Technical School, Toronto. 

J. I. Hughes is stationed at Hatley, Quebec. 

E. C. Irvine is mathematical master of Sherbrooke High 
School, Quebec. 'Tis slyly rumored he is married, though in- 
quiry proves blind. 

D. B. Kennedy is preaching at Rouleau, Sask. 

P. McD. Kerr is taking post-graduate work in Classics at 
California University, Birkley, Cal. 

John McKenzie is preaching at Hornby, Ontario. 

W. E. C. Millar, whereabouts unknown to Secretary. 

W. P. E'ear is spending a short holiday at his home in St. 
Mary's after his return from the Yukon, where he spent the 
summer with the Inter-Provincial Survey party. 

D. P. Rees is in Montreal, engaged in newspaper advertising. 

D. A. Walker is pastor of the Methodist Church at Welland, 
Ont. 

J. H. Wallace is engaged in Y.M.C.A. work in China. His 
address is 120 Szechuen Road, Shanghai. 

Amos J. Thomas is pastor of Hill Street Methodist Church, 
London, Ontario. 

C. W. Webb is at his home in Ancaster, Ontario. 

C. J. Wilson is preaching at Forrest, Manitoba. 

T. E. Wilson is practising law at Vancouver, B.C., as a mem- 
ber of the firm. Deacon, Deacon & Wilson. 



Undergraduates and Specialists. 

Mrs. Jennings Hood (Miss W. Douglas) is living in Phila- 
delphia. 



276 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Misses Hazel Hedley, Edna Hutchings, Edna Paul, and 
Pearly Rutley are at their respective homes in Toronto. 

Miss Alice Eockwell is teacher of English in Duluth High 
School. 

Miss A. Grace Scott continues to practise her profession — 
nursing. Her address is 43, Yth Avenue, Brooklyn, l^.Y. She 
has recently returned from the Continent, where she spent the 
summer. 

Mrs. Biehm (Miss Rose Winter) is residing at Berlin, Ont. 

P. H. Brett is preaching, at Epsom, Ontario. 

E. S. Bishop is pastor of the Methodist Church, Okotoks, Alta. 

W. G. Gates ('04) (Chairman of "'03 Bob Committee") 
is engaged in journalistic work in Moose Jaw, Alta. 

A. Crux is practising medicine in Toronto, Recently joined 
the Ancient Order of Benedicts. 

E. W. S. Coates is stationed at Ormstown, Quebec. 

Charles Douglas is with the Auditor-General's Department 
at Ottawa. 

George E. Eakins is practising medicine in Port Arthur. 

W. W. McKee is pastor of Trinity Methodist Church, Grand 
Island, Nebraska. 

V. W. Odium is engaged in newspaper work at Nelson, B.C. 
Has recently started a new Liberal weekly. 

J. E. Rockwell is city editor of the Duluth Evening Herald, 

The Secretary of the Class, T. E. Wilson, Vancouver, B.C., 
would be pleased to have all members of the class communicate 
to him any change of address or other news items of interest 
to the class. 



Personals 



In London the Rutledge brothers have rounded up a corner 
in sports. Joe Rutledge, B.A., '07, is sporting editor of the 
London Advertiser, while Gordon, of '09, performs the same 
ministry upon the London Free Press. 

W. J. Salter, B.A., '05, is on the staff of the Collegiate Insti- 
tute, Woodstock. 

Miss Lillian Lloyd, '04, is taking work at Faculty of Educa- 
tion. Address, 16 Broadway Place, City. 



PERSONALS. 



277 



Dr. C. M. Hincks, B.A., '05, M.B., 07, is practising medicine 
at Campbellford. 

We congratulate E. H. Clark, B.A., '05, M.A., Ph.D., 
Leipzig, Germany, the winner of the 1851 Science Kesearch 
Scholarship in 1906, upon the extension of his scholarship to 
the third year. Such is done only in case of exceptional ability. 
The late Dr. Smale and Prof. Kerrick were the only two who 
had merited this extension. Mr. Clark will remain in Leipzig, 
devoting his attention to Chemistry and Mineralogy. In 
August of this year he received the degree of Ph.D. from the 
University of Leipzig. 

We are proud to be able to congratulate one of our most illus- 
trious graduates, George H. Locke, Professor of Pedagogy at 
Macdonald College, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, upon his appointment 
to the head librarianship of the Toronto Public Library — '^ the 
most responsible position of its kind in Canada," to quote 
Collier s. He has had a broad experience as an educationalist, 
having been lecturer in our own college. Instructor in the His- 
tory of Education at Harvard University, Professor and Dean 
of the Faculty of Education in Chicago University, and editor 
of The School Review, one of the leading journals of secondary 
education in the United States. In 1905 he entered the editorial 
department of the well-known publishers, Ginn & C<^mpany, of 
Boston, and left there to accept the position of Dean of Mac- 
donald College. 

Victoria College can boast of the fact that three of the repre- 
sentatives in the next House of Commons from the Prairie 
Provinces are Victoria graduates: Hon. Clifford Sifton, M.P. 
for Brandon; Alex. Haggart, K.C., Winnipeg, and Dr. E. L. 
Cash, of McKenzie constituency. Hon. Clifford Sifton gradu- 
ated in 1880, carrying off the Prince of Wales' Medal. Alex. 
Haggart is one of the older graduates. His home was in Peter- 
boro', and after receiving his preliminary education there he 
entered Victoria 1868, graduating in 1872. He studied law 
in his native town, and in Toronto with the late Hon. Hector 
Cameron, and was admitted to the bar 1877. In 1880 he settled 
in Winnipeg, where he has practised ever since. Dr. Cash is a 
graduate of Victoria's old medical school of 1871. Upon gradua- 
tion he drifted to the States, practising his profession in Michi- 



278 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

gan, Chicago and I^ebraska. Finally, in 1896, he drifted back 
into Canada, settling at Yorkton, where he has built up a large 
practice. " Jap " Fish, '87, contested Dufferin for the Liberals, 
unsuccessfully, however. 

W. Lacy Amy, who took specialist work with '02, is (with 
the assistance of his wife) editor of the Medicine Hat Times. 

Hal Woodsworth, 'OY, writes that he has returned from his 
vacation in the mountains of Japan and is back at work in Kobe. 

Rev. Forbes Rutherford, '05, has taken unto himself a wife, 
and is the Methodist parson in Greenwood, B.C. 

A. D. McFarlane, '07, is still editor of the Greenwood Bound- 
ary Times, B.C., but may leave any time to study law in Van- 
couver. 

C. R. Gundy, formerly of '09, is in business in Sarnia, Ont. 

" Bill " Zinkan, formerly of '09, is travelling for the Sterling 
Furniture Company, and his headquarters for a while will be 
Winnipeg. 

C. F. Connor, '06, is stationed at Prince Rupert, B.C. He 
aided substantially last August in raising a fund for the Fernie 
sufferers. 

Lester Green, formerly a prominent member of '09 and '10, 
has gone into business, and is working his way up into partner- 
ship of the firm of F. H. Deacon &; Co., brokers. Lester says 
he is'going to turn out with the new Victoria Hockey team, 
Senior O.H.A., this winter. 



Obituaries 

Abraham Robert Baiis^, M.A., LL.D. 

Victoria College Chapel, 
Friday, I^ovember 20th, 1908, 3 p.m. 
Sadly often, in recent years, have the professors and students 
of Victoria College met in a service such as this to pay the last 
tribute of respect and love to the departed. Prominent on all 
such occasions, in the manly dignity of his personal appearance 
and in the unaffected sincerity of his grief and sympathy, was 
our beloved Professor Bain. And now lies he there, and we are 
come to say to him in his turn our solemn '^ ave atque vale/' 
Take him for all in all, we shall not look upon his like again. 
Victoria College will not seem the same to us without him. 



OBITUARIES. 



279 

V 



At every turn we shall miss him, in the lecture room, in the 
Registrar's office, in the Faculty meeting, in the Senate. We 
shall miss his genial presence, we shall miss his kindly smile, 




THE LATE PROFESSOR A. R. BAIN, M.A , LL.D. 

we shall miss his wise instruction, we shall miss his shrewd 
and sane advice. We shall feel our lives to be impoverished by 
his absence. 



280 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

He was one of the few survivors of that '^ old guard " of Vic- 
toria who had toiled faithfully through the hard early years of 
her heroic history and had lived at last to see her prosperous 
and rich in the number of her students, in the size and quality 
of her faculty, in the generous affection of her friends. May 
God long spare to us those of that " old guard '' who still remain. 

Abraham Robert Bain, M.A., LL.D., was the son of John 
and Elizabeth Bain, of Cobourg, and was born in that town 
December 3rd, 1838. He was a Canadian of the Canadians, 
all through his life a broad-minded and enlightened patriot, 
uniting intense affection for his native land with profound 
loyalty to the Empire. 

In 1851 he entered the preparatory course of Victoria Uni- 
versity, and in 1854 he matriculated in Arts. Thus he was 
brought, very early in life, into ^ pollege atmosphere and sub- 
jected to the formative influg;»ce of that prince among men and 
teachers, the late Presidejg.t Ifelles, whose beautiful character 
and splendid abilities made so deep and abiding an impression 
upon so many generations of students. After a brilliant career 
in college, Mr. Bain graduated in 1858, only nineteen years of 
age. 

His first choice for a life-Avork was the profession of law. 
But while studying in the law office of the late Senator- Kerr in 
Cobourg, his health failed, and he was compelled to seek relief 
from very serious illness in a complete change of climate and 
occupation. After nearly a year spent in the bracing air of 
Colorado and in an out-of-doors occupation, he returned to 
his native tovni with a new lease of life. But now a new work 
opened to him. In the autumn of the year 1860 he entered upon 
the duties of a tutor in the preparatory department of his Alma 
Mater, to whose service he continued from that time onward for 
forty-eight years to devote all his time and energy with loyal 
enthusiasm. It was his high privilege to retain his power of 
work unimpaired to the last and at once to " cease to labor and 
to live." Last summer he was, as he had been for so many years, 
an ardent canoeist, and enjoyed to the full the free life of Go 
Home Bay. The day before he died he was in the college and 
about to deliver a lecture, when the cold hand of fatal seizure 
fell upon him. 

A few years after his appointment as tutor he became dean 
of the preparatory department. In 1868 he was appointed 



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282 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Professor of Mathematics in the University of Victoria College. 
His ideals of college work were high, and in order to thoroughly 
equip himself for the duties of his important chair he spent 
two years abroad in post-graduate studies. In 1868-9 he was 
at Harvard, and in 1869-YO in Paris. In both these great centres 
of learning he eagerly pursued mathematical studies under some 
of the best professors of the time, and returned to his work in 
the college thoroughly prepared. 

In 1869 he was married to Martha Dumble, of Cobourg, who 
now survives him. One son and one daughter died before him ; 
one daughter remains. Upon the sorrowing wife and daughter 
we all unite in invoking the divine blessing and consolation. 

Prom 1870 to 1892 Professor Bain gave himself with tireless 
assiduity and marked success to the teaching of the subjects of 
his department, specializing in astronomy, which had peculiar 
attraction for his own mind, and which he made so fascinating 
to his students that it was for many years one of the most popu- 
lar subjects in Victoria University. 

In all his work as teacher he was distinguished by thorough 
mastery, both of principles and of details, painstaking accuracy, 
clearness of definition and description, the happy art of making 
others see what he saw himself, great patience, courtesy, and 
sympathy with the sincere and candid student. Generation after 
generation of Victoria College men went from those old college 
halls in Cobourg to be life-long friends of a teacher who had so 
helped them and so endeared himself to them. His beautiful 
Cobourg home was the scene of much gracious hospitality, which 
can never be forgotten by those who enjoyed it. 

In recognition of his long and valuable services, the degree 
of LL.D. was most worthily bestowed upon him by Mt. Allison 
University. 

The federation of Victoria with the Provincial University 
meant great personal sacrifice to Dr. Bain. It meant the aban- 
donment of a beautiful home, the loss of the work which he 
loved and in which he had been eminently successful and happy, 
and the taking up of fresh and comparatively untried tasks. 
But he faced the new conditions bravely and adapted himself 
to them successfully. On the removal of Victoria to Toronto, 
in 1892, Dr. Bain was appointed Professor of Ancient History 
and Registrar of the University. With the same instinct for 



OBITUARIES. 



283 



thoroughness which in earlier years took him to Harvard and to 
Paris, he now spent the year 1893-4 in Oxford, studying ancient 
history, specially the Eoman Principate, on which subjects he 
continued to lecture until the day before he died. As Registrar 
he was eminently useful, sparing no expenditure of time, energy, 
care, which might be in the interest of the college in which and 
for which he literally spent his life. 

In personal appearance Dr. Bain was remarkably handsome 
and commanding ; in bearing, gentlemanly, dignified and easy ; 
in conversation, full of a genial flow of thought expressed with 
rare precision and rich amplitude ; in his studies and investiga- 
tions, rigorously thorough; in his relations with other men, in-, 
flexibly righteous, unfailingly generous and kind ; in discussion, 
in Faculty or Senate, calm and quiet in manner, though candid 
and courageous in the expression of his convictions; never a 
brawler, always a peace-maker ; as a friend, one among a thou- 
sand, fond of his friends and of their society, never too busy to 
welcome them, never counting anything too much that he could 
possibly do for them ; in times of trouble and sorrow ministering 
comfort by his winsome smile, the warm pressure of the hand, 
the simple, cordial words, the gracious offers of friendly assist- 
ance; closer, therefore, than most men to the hearts of his 
friends ; a splendid specimen, in short, of physical, intellectual 
and moral manhood, wearing the white flower of a blameless 
life; a man of whom, under all circumstances and in all rela- 
tions, we were all and always proud, whom we all and always 
respected, trusted, loved. Victoria College has never mourned 
a more faithful servant, a more loyal son, nor we as individuals 
a more beloved friend. 

And at last, in the ripe beauty of his years, with his honors 
still upon him and his work about him, " God's finger touched 
him and he slept." He is gone for his reward to that Heavenly 
Father whom throughout his life he humbly reverenced, wor- 
shipped and served. May that Heavenly Father now console, 
support and guide the stricken wife and daughter. May that 
Heavenly Father help us who remain in the work of this college 
to follow him in all fidelity to duty and in all generosity and 
sympathy toward those with whom we labor. -And may we all 
at last, whether that be soon or late, hear addressed to uS, each 
one, those words which he has heard already, ^' Well done, good 
and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord." 



284 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Rev. W. H. Withkow, M.A., D.D., F.R.S.C. 

" The grave of Dr. Withrow/' says Mr. Goldwin Smith, 
"closes over a distinguished writer, and one who did honor to 
this province in more lines than one. Dr. Withrow's name and 
works will not die." Dr. Withrow was indeed a man of genius. 

He graduated in 
1863 along with 
Chief Justice Sir 
William Mulock 
and His Honor 
Lieut. - Governor 
Gibson. After 

eleven years' pas- 
torate work he 
was chosen in 
1874 by the first 
General Confer- 
ence of the then 
uniting Methodist 
churches editor of 
the Magazine and 
Sunday School 
periodicals, a posi- 
tion which he held 
by unanimous re- 
election at nine 
succeeding general 
conferences, cover- 
ing a period of 
thirty-four years. 
As a student he 
had acquired a 
taste for research in the field of Christian antiquities, and his 
first important work was the " Catacombs of Rome and their 
Testimony to Primitive Christianity," issued from the press in 
1874, and pronounced by the Edinburgh Review at the time to 
be " the best English work on the subject extant." This work 
at once established his reputation in Europe as well as on this 
<;ontinent as a master in the field of historical research, as well 




REV. W. ir. WITHROW, M.A., F.R.S.C. 



OBITUARIES. 



285 



as a literary artist of unusual merit. In subsequent years lie 
has risen to be one of the foremost figures in Canadian litera- 
ture. He has left behind more than a dozen invaluable volumes 
in the various fields of history, biography and historical fiction. 
Some of his works have reached the sixth and seventh editions. 

Kev. a. C. Courtice, B.A., D.D. 

In the death of Dr. Courtice, N'ovember 10th, Canadian 
Methodism is particularly bereaved. He graduated in 1880 
from Toronto University with the gold medal in philosophy, and 

in 1885 in the- 
ology from Vic- 
toria Avith another 
gold medal. The 
'Chancellor says, 
'^ His thesis on 
that occasion was 
an exegetical and 
doctrinal study of 
Isaiah liii., and 
for clearness and 
thoroughness of 
treatment I do not 
know, that I have 
seen it surpassed 
in any w^ork, even 
of the most re- 
nowned scholars." 
Upon ordination, 
1885, he went to 
fill the pulpit of 
Parliament Street 
Church, Toronto. 
From there he was 
removed to Dun- 
EEV. A. c. COURTICE, B.A., D.D. das Street, Lon- 

don, and then in 
1892 was installed in Dominion Square Church, Montreal, 
whose pulpit has been distinguished by some of the most illus- 




286 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

trious of the Methodist fathers. From there he was called to 
Sydenham Street Church, Kingston, until his appointment to 
the Editorship of The Christian Guardian in 1894. With the 
exception of Dr. Ryerson, he was the youngest man ever elected 
to that important office. Though he labored under the shadow 
of a life-long suffering, his Avork did not in the slightest savor 
of bitterness, nor did his life betray the first symptoms of 
asperity. 

Professoe Shepard. 

The shadow of death resting across Victoria College was 
deepened when Professor Shepard passed away. Few, if any, 
of the students can fully realize the loss the college has sustained. 
The man who lives for others is scarcely seen. This is why 
only those nearest him knew how, for years, he taught a class 
in the Central Prison and himself supported a missionary in 
Liberia. A more beautiful memorial cannot be raised to his 
name than that which now lives in the many lives enriched by 
the touch of one of the purest souls of mortal life. 

Miss Gibson, '11, has our heartfelt sympathy in the death 
of her father, Mr. Stephen Gibson, the registrar of IN'apanee. 
Mr. Gibson was an old Victoria student. 

The friends of Frost John Williams, B.A., '02, M.A., 
LL.B., of Owen Sound, sincerely mourn his death at N'ew Lis- 
keard, September 13. 

We extend our sympathy to Lieut. -Governor and Mrs. 
Gibson in the loss of their eldest son, Gordon Gibson, at 
Colorado Springs, 15th inst. 



Births 

To Rev. and Mrs. Harry IL Cragg, on Wednesday, ^ovombei 
25th, 1908, a daughter. Congrats, Harry, from Acta. 



Exchanges 

Many students, perhaps, do not realize the peculiar value 
of exchanges, for they have a peculiar value. They remarkably 
extend the horizon of our student world which otherwise would 



EXCHANGES. 



287 



tend to become monotonously circumscribed. Larger interests 
loom into our ken, losing in their shadow many of the numerous, 
petty and tedious questions which exhaust our attention. The 
loftier the ideals the loftier the mind in which they dwell. 

But they serve another function. To enjoy a beautiful 
landscape we must view it from a distance. Most of us are too 
closely bound up in the college life around to obtain a true 
perspective of it. But through the exchanges we may withdraw 
to a point of vantage from which we look back and see in truer 
proportions our own college life with its varying phases. Many 
beauties are revealed to which we had been quite insensible, and 
many incongruities our innocent ignorance had failed to detect. 

The exchanges at hand which we reviewed with much in- 
terest are: The Martlet, The Harvard Monthly, The Queen's 
University Journal, McM aster University Monthly, The Col- 
umbia Monthly, Lux Columbia, Notre Dame Scholastic, Uni- 
versity of Ottaiua Review, The Student, Acadia Athenaeum, 
AUisonia, The 0. A. C. Review, The Mitre, The Argosy, The 
Hya Yalca, The Miami Student, Vox Wesley ana, and Oxford 
University Magazine. 

The Harvard Monthly, published by Harvard University, 
unreservedly adheres to the old model with the excellent result 
that it contains some literary gems which cannot fail to inspire. 
Here is one : 

KOMANCE. 

Ah, it is sweet to linger at the close 

Of some loved book before the unwilling page 
Is turned at last on all the love and rage, 

The tears and laughter! Ere the vision goes 

To glance back through the garden and to those 
Lately we walked with. How time flies ! Old age 
Or death hath caught them. But the pilgrimage — 

Ah, it was sweet ; yes, sad and sweet ! The rose 

Perhaps grows sweeter in these garden walks 
Because of roses that bloomed long ago, 

And heard sweet lovers at their faded talks* 
All in the mellow moonlight whisper low 

In these same alleys. The still row of stocks 
Trembled, methinks, as they passed to and fro. 



288 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

There are also some short stories of a very high order, as well 
as some dramatic productions that reveal much genius. 

But the secondary aim of this magazine is, to quote from its 
advertisement, '^ to furnish a field for the discussion of all 
questions relating to the policy and the condition of the uni- 
versity." There is an excellent editorial on '^ The Professor 
and the Student." Except, perhaps, in the smallest colleges 
there is a lamentable lack of human sympathy between the pro- 
fessor and the student. Neither can blame the other ; for while 
the student is so apt to regard the professor merely as a 
professor, is not the professor quite as inclined to view the 
student but as a taker of a certain course ? The communion of 
mind with mind is helpful, indeed, but the communion of soul 
with soul is infinitely more ennobling. 

We congratulate The Martlet upon its gracious bow to the 
circle of college journalism. At the outset of its career this 
weekly grapples with one of the greatest and most formidable 
questions that cast their shadow across the road to success. In 
The Martlet of N^ovember 5 the two outstanding types of college 
journalism are discussed, the new journal posing as a news- 
paper, relating mere incidents that all the readers witnessed 
many days before, the old journal aspiring to be a literary pro- 
duction and a means of presenting questions of vital import to 
the student body. The former being a chronicle of mere inci- 
dents is but a record of the outer and less real activity of the 
university, whereas the other is the expression of the inner and 
more real life of the university. 

The Queeris University Journal is always a very welcome 
visitor. The Journal of November 16 contains a very sound 
article, " The Solution of Labor Problems," by Professor Adam 
Shortt, which is a substantial reproduction of his speech de- 
livered at the Political Science dinner at our own University, 
November 18. There is also a short article, " The World One 
City," by Dr. Bonar, Master of the Mint, at Ottawa. 

" The Acta Victoriana for October is a very creditable 
number. The general appearance is attractive, and the literary 
and scientific articles it contains are especially worth reading." 
— Queen s University Journal. 



EXCHANGES. 



289 



The Charge of the One Hundred. 



Half a league, half a league, 
Half a league onward, 
Into the Freshman mob 
Rushed the one hundred. 
Forward the Sophomores, 
" Charge for the pole I" he said. 
Into the Freshman mob 
Eushed the one hundred. 



Tomatoes to right of them (the Freshmen), 

Cucumbers to left of them. 

Eggs, not quite fresh to them, 

Volley'd and thundered; 

Stormed at without that smell 

They might have stood it ^vell. 

But when eggs broke ; well, well ; 

Good English blundered. 



Tomatoes to right of them, 
Stale eggs to left of them. 
Molasses all over them. 
Burst, smelled and thundered. 
Stormed at with flour as well. 
So those poor Freshmen tell ; 
Soon down the pole then fell 
The flag they defended. 
Back from that awful smell. 
With all that covered them. 
Freshmen one hundred. 

When shall Soph's glory fade? 
O, that great fusilade, 
All the staff wondered ; 
Honor the fusilade, 
Honor the sport they made. 
Sophomore Hundred. 



0. A. C. Review. 




WsMiii 



Senior S. P, S,, 16— Victoria 5, 



BY the above score Vic's hopes of the Mulock Cup were 
crushed by the Senior S.P.S. on the afternoon of 
Wednesday, November 18th. Although beaten, the Vic. 
team played splendid ball, and only in the last ten minutes 
did the School asisume a lead which v^as rapidly increased. 

Vic. was early handicapped by the loss of Captain Gundy, 
who was seriously injured during the first five minutes of the 
play; and although Pearson, who replaced him, played an ex- 
cellent game, the half division did not work as smoothly as it 
otherwise would have done. However, the better team won. 

Early in the first half Vic. scored her only points on a 
touch-down, secured by Pearson bucking over the School line. 
For the rest of the half Vic. was mainly on the defensive ; but, 
due to the good work of her line, and of Ecclestone at centre 
half, the School secured only two tallies. 

For the first twenty minutes of the second half Vic. played 
a strong defensive game, breaking through repeatedly and 
blocking the kicks of Green. Then, in their anxiety to break 
through, the wings allowed the School halves to get away for 
a couple of good runs ; and, finally, on a long pass, Bolton, 
after a long run, went over for a try, which was converted. 
Just as the whistle blew, a kick of Ecclestone'® was blocked 
and the School scored another try which, together with two 
rouges, brought their score up to 16. The teams lined up 
as follows: 

Victoria — Back, Jewitt; half-backs, Ecclestone, Gundy 
(Pearson), Morrison; quarter, Graham; scrimmage, Morrison, 
Birnie, Bateall ; wings, Levering, French, Moorehouse, Swin- 
erton, Campbell, Miller. 

Senior S.P.S. — Back, Green; half-backs, Bolton, Ferguson, 
McArthur ; quarter, Cory ; scrimmage, Hopkins, Graham, 



ATHLETICS. 



291 



Gooderham; wings, Huether, Van Nostrand, Marshall, Hay, 

Davis, Dawson. 

^^ ^^ ^ 

O. A. C, 8— Victoria, 3 

On Saturday, November 14, the return match between Vic- 
toria and O.A.C. was played on the Vic. campus. Although 
the Guelph team, which was practically the same as opposed 
Vic. in the previous match, played an aggressive game through- 
out, it was only after a closely-contested game that they suc- 
ceeded in carrying off the laurels of victory. The Vic. team, 




RUGBY TEAM 



strengthened by coaching and practices, played a much superior 
game than heretofore, and kept the play in their opponents' 
territory throughout the greater part of the time. At half 
time the score stood 1-1, O.A.C. having scored one point on a 
rouge, and Vic. one on a kick to dead line. In the last half 
O.A.C. added the other seven points on a converted touch-down 
and a kick to dead line, while Vic. secured two on a touch in 
goal. 

The following was Vic's line-up: — Livingston, Eccleston, 
Gundy (captain), Morrison, Stockton, Birnie, Morrison, 
Batsall, Graham, Levering, Miller, French, Moorehouse, and 
Campbell. 



292 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

O A. C, 1— Victoria, 

On Saturday, November 21, the Victoria soccer team jour- 
neyed to Guelph on their annual tour, and there met the soccer 
aggregation of the O.A.C. A glance at the Victoria line-up 
will show that the ranks of the regular team were sadly broken 
through the illness of some and the unavoidable absence of 
others. Indeed, it was found necessary to press into service 
every Vic. man that made the trip. But in no wise daunted. 
Captain Vance lined up his men at 2.30 p.m. to face the " Ags." 
The game was played under ideal conditions, in the brightest 
of sunshine and on a splendid turf, and was g-enerally a fair 
exhibition of the game. The score "will show the keenness of 
the contest, the only goal being scored by the O.A.C. in the 
first half, from a mixup in front of the goal. Two goals were 
scored by our forwards, which, however, were disallowed, one 
being made on an oif-side, and the second after the ball was 
alleged to have passed over the touch-line out of play. In 
spite of aggressive play by both teams in the second half, no 
goals were scored by either side. For Victoria, Smith, on the 
defence, played a very eifective game ; Vance, as centre half, 
and Moorehouse, on his left, played their positions with all 
their old-time vigor, while Rumble and Livingston, on the for- 
ward line, frequently broke away with neat combination plays 
that carried the ball across the field. 

The line-up: — Goal, Wilder; backs, Jewitt, Smith; half- 
backs, Moorehouse, Vance (captain) , Pearson ; forwards, Allin, 
Trotter, Shaw, Rumble, Livingston. 

..^^ .^^ .^^ 
Further Tennis Results 

LADIES' SINGLES 

Miss McConnell . \ Miss Hyland ^ 

MissHyiand ( 6 3,6-4 l^iss Spencer.. ^ ,,.„ T\«„f/>„ ^ 

Miss Spencer. . . . \ Miss Spenoer f 6-4, 7-5 ^^•^'.^^"•^O" • • ^ 

Miss Dawson. ... / 6-0,6-1 } e-d, b-d »:«« m„,i„o„ 

Miss Horning ...\ Miss Horning ! ^ \ \ ^^''^ ^^^^^'^l^- 

Miss Topping . . . r 6-4, 6-8. 8-6 ^^ M„„,„-„n ^"^^ -^' ^■- 

Miss Jamieson . . \ Miss Jamieson ^i VMiss Oenton . . *^'^^ ^acjaren 

Miss Crews / 6-3, 6-3 J- Miss Denton 6-0, 7-5 J -' 

Miss Denton j 6-3, 6-2 J 

LADIES' DOUBLES 

Miss Topping & Miss Crews 1 Miss Topping & Miss Crews.. . . 'j 

Miss Hewitt & .Miss Dawson / 6 4, 6-4 I Miss Maclaren & Miss Horning 

Miss Maclaren & Miss Horning. . \ Miss Horning &, Miss Maclaren f 6-2, 6-0 

Miss Spencer & Miss Denton . . . . / 6-1, 9-7 J 






<3 ^^ 
■Q o o C^ 

f i pi 



50 

I 



» ft 

58 "O . ^ 






:^ 



PI R 

» -O hH "r 



S P 

n • OS 






^s jo; 










294 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



I Mi 



LADIES' HANDICAP 

- H5 Miss Whitlam ) Miss Whitlam. . 

s Miss McConnell . . / 4-6, 6-2, 6-3 

- i 15 Miss Topping \ Miss Spencer. . . 

- J 30 MiBs Spencer / 6-2, 6-4 

- 15 Miss Horning \ Miss Jamieson . 

- 15 Miss Jamieson / 6-3,6-1 

- J 15 Miss Crews \ Miss Maclaren. 

- 40 Miss Maclaren / 3-6, 8-6, 6-2 

- ^ 15 Miss Dawson \ Miss Denton . . . 

-^30 Miss Denton / 



Miss Spencer 

6-4, 6-8, 6-1 



Miss Maclaren. 



Miss Dawson.. . 

McKenzie 
Miss Jamieson . 

Saunders. . . 
Miss Horning. . 

Horning 

Miss Denton . . . 

Adams 

Miss Crews 

Wright 

Miss Maclaren. 

Maclaren. . . . 
Miss Whitlam . 

Ockley 

Miss Spencer . 

Manning 

Miss Topping . . 
Raymor 



}l» 



8-6, 6 
MIXED DOUBLES 



Miss Denton 



JMiss Denton . 
6-1, 14-16, 6-3 



Miss Dawson. 
McKenzie . 



6-1, 7-5 



I Miss Horning 
r Horning 



-8, 6 4, 8-6 



Miss Maclaren 
Maclaren . . . 



I ; 6--2, 6-0 

/ I Miss Spencer. 

\ r Manning \^Mif»s Spencer. 



-4, 6-4 



Manning. 



Miss Dawson... 
Hemingway . 



Miss Maclaren . . 
Maclaren 
2-6, 7-5, 6-3 



Miss Maclaren . 

Maclaren 

6-2, 7-5, 6-4 



^^ ^ ^^ 

Notes 

The customary landslide in the score during the last ten 
minutes in the recent Mulock Cup game again emphasizes the 
fact that no team can enter a gruelling contest and finish strong 
hy simply lining up in the practices against a team of imag- 
inary opponents, and going through signals. What Vic. needs 
is men who are loyal and enthusiastic enough about sport to 
turn out regularly to the practices, even if they do not make a 
place on the first team. Only when such a state of affairs is 
realized can Vic. hope to assume among the colleges the place 
she can take in every department of athletics 

As Vic's protest of the game of association against Knox 
was disallowed by the Executive of the University Football 
Association, Vic, for this year, was put out of the running 
for the championship. As no opportunity, save that of a couple 
of hours, was given to Vic. to muster a team for this game, 
this action came as a surprise to Vic students. The lack of 
University spirit in athletics at Victoria has often been cen- 
sured; but, if such is the case, is it to be wondered at when 
such an action as this is taken by the University authorities? 

Varsity has won the Intercollegiate Championship again, for 
the first time since 1905. The Varsity team this year proved 
much stronger than the other teams in the league, having been 



ATHLETICS. 295 

beaten only by Queen's at Kingston. But this defeat early 
in the season made it a hard, up-hill fight, and only by steady, 
consistent work did they win. They, however, clearly demon- 
strated their superiority by defeating Queen's both here and 
at Ottawa. In the game with the Hamilton Tigers for the 
Dominion Championship, Varsity, after one of the gamest 
fights ever put up against overwhelming odds, lost by the close 
score of 21-17. But it verily was a most glorious defeat. 

The rink opens this year under most auspicious circum- 
stances. The debt, which has been a burden during past 
years, has been completely wiped off, and the Athletic Asso- 
ciation had no monetary worries. On account of this, and also 
because the rink for the last few winters has been overcrowded, 
the Eink Committee are seriously considering the raising of 
the price of a season ticket to outsiders, and have raised admis- 
sion fee on band nights. Another welcome innovation is the 
exclusion of children from the rink except in the forenoons. 
They are also increasing the skating accommodation from the 
hours of four to six p.m., as two rinks are to be used for skat- 
ing, instead of one, as heretofore. The following are the 
members of the Eink Committee: J. J. Pearson (secretary), 
H. L. Morrison, J. E. Lovering, M. A. Miller, J. E. Gundy. 

The illness of J. V. McKenzie, the present holder of the 
Undergraduate Championship Tennis Cup, and inclement 
weather, prevented the playing of the challenge round this fall. 
However, it will probably take place in the spring. W. B. 
Wiegand has won the right to challenge for the trophy. 

It was found next to impossible to hold the Inter-year Tennis 
Championship this fall, and Mr. Ward's indulgence is asked. 
The series will be held in the spring, if the donor consents. 

The Inter-year Handball Series was played off late in the 
season, and resulted as follows: 



Team. 


Won. 


Lost. 


'11 


5 





'09 


4 


1 


E.D.'s 


3 


2 


C.T.'s 


2 


3 


' ^10 


1 


4 


'12 





5 




ON the evening of Friday, 'Nov. 27th, Annesley Hall re- 
sounded with the buzz of merry voices. The bazaar 
which the girls of Victoria College gave was a huge 
success socially and financially. The home-made candy, pen- 
nants, cushions, and posters were soon eagerly bought up, the 
latter show^ing particularly the artistic ability of the artists. 
The " ice-cream '' nooks, superintended by girls adorned 

with white dresses and smiles, 
were also very popular. One 
amusing feature of the even- 
ing was the auctioning of the 
" left-overs," w^hich went like 
hot-cakes, a n d occasioned 
much mirth and wit. 

The evening was pleasantly 
concluded by a short pro- 
gramme. The solos of Miss 
Philips, '09, and Miss Joy 
Denton were especially 
appreciated. On the whole, 
the evening was declared 
a success, and not a few 
were heard to say that the 
bazaar was quite as much fun as a college reception. 

P — J — e C T. (assuming an exceedingly serious expression 
on passing the hall) — '^ Well, I doubt the advisability of this 
residence. What kind of housekeepers will these girls make ; 
they won't be able to cook." 

Dr. Reynar in a 4th year English class — '^ With the ex- 
aminers before you, you feel as if the Philistines were upon 
you." 

A student was heard to say — " Oh, that we may be able to 
slay them with the jaw-bone of an ass." 




LOCALS. 297 

Freshette admiring a prize Avon by a Senior — '' My, they are 
lovely. I wish I hadn't so mnch to do, so I could win one, too." 

A Junior, addressing some ladies who found it inconvenient 
to go to a French lecture — '^ Well, girls, I don't think it is fair 
to starve French in order to stuff Latin." 

M — e, '09 (as Acta photo is being taken) — " I'm not used 
to sitting in the front row, I generally form the apex." 

" Sliver," '09, asks if the Freshettes who are henceforth to 
whisk the Seniors' gowns are to be known as '^ Whiskers." 

A — n — p, '09 (just as photographer is about to snap the 
Fourth Year Executive) — "Fritz! Look at the camera a 
minute." 

The Freshmen's reception, held on the evening of E'ovember 
the thirteenth, proved unique as well as enjoyable. The pre- 
sence of two sets of programme cards did not seem in any way 
to diminish the pleasure of the promenading which followed a 
short programme of speeches and music. The enterprising mem- 
bers of the first year provided not only the usual refreshments, 
but home-made candy as well, and so in every way the reception 
kept up the reputation gained in former years. 

On Wednesday afternoon, [N'ovember the eighteenth, the girls 
of L^niversity College gave their annual paper chase to the Vic- 
toria and Trinity girls. Although the day was somewhat bleak 
and it was damp under foot, a goodly and athletic representation 
appeared from each college. After the chase, which followed 
the customary route of " up hill and down dale," in a pleasant 
part of ^orth Toronto, the survivors gathered at the home of 
Mrs. Eamsay Wright, the President of the University Women's 
Athletic Club. Here a charming tea was served beside a grate 
fire, and after a most delightful hour spent in doing the usual 
college stunts, the girls took leave of their kind hostess, having 
had an exceedingly merry afternoon. 

Prof. Blewett — " Students of Philosophy are a perverse gen- 
eration." 



298 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

S — ^n — rt — ^n, B.D. — " Really, I -can't express my feelings." 
B — dg— m — ^n, '10 — " Well, if I were you, I would send them 
by freight." 

Echo from Open Lit. : 

Arnup, '09 — in Speaker's chair — ^^ The prospect for further 
speeches is not only bright, but is positively rosy. We'll now 
call on Mr. C. M. Wright." 

H — nt — r, '11 — " See here, old man, what about your Y. M. 
fee?" 

D — ac — n, '11 — " Well, I guess there's no excuse for me, you 
know I'm an officer." 

R — ^yn — r, B.D. — at debate — '^ Two men are up for Presi- 
dent of the Lit, and each probably has his principles." 

R. E. S. T — ^yl — r, '09 — on being questioned as to whether 
his intended would accompany him to China — " Oh, she'll have 
to go, for I told her there was no R. E. S. T. for the wicked if 
she did not go." 

Member of the Glee Club — " I hear Avison is going to sing, 
' If I had the wings of a sparrow.' " 

Voice near by — '^ He couldn't fly very high if he had." 

At the Women's Literary Society, on Xov. 11th, the first of 
the inter-year debates was given. The subject of the debate was, 
" Resolved, that great men are the product of their environ- 
ment." The affirmative side was taken by Miss Eindlay, '12, 
and Miss MclSTeil, '12, and the negative by Miss Cowan, '11, and 
Miss Dawson, '11. The debate, which was very interesting, was 
won by the girls of onety-one, and we surely think that the 
following point given by Miss Cowan must have influenced the 
judges : " If we depended for progress on environment we would 
never get ahead of our times and would still be eating acorns 
with our pre-supposed ancestors the apes." 

The meetings of the Women's Literary Society are always 
bright and interesting, but the open meeting held on Wednesday 
evening, E'ovember 25th, quite excelled any previous ones, yet 
was truly a typical meeting. The business of the evening was 
handled expeditiously, and considerable amusement was aroused 



LOCALS. 299 

by the discussion on a motion that the freshies, on being pro- 
vided mth whisks, should every morning make it their duty to 
brush the dust from the caps and gowns of the girls of the 
upper years. 

The programme had a distinctly Canadian flavor, and opened 
with a paper by Miss Lena Hill, '09, " A General Survey of 
Canadian Literature." Papers were also read by Miss Helen 
Dafoe, '11, on Henry Drummond, and Miss Euby Hewitt, '11, 
on Hobert Service, and a very sympathetic reading was given 
by Miss Mabel Jamieson, '10, on " Every Man for Himself," 
by Duncan. The musical part of the programme consisted of 
a piano solo by Miss F. Spencer ; vocal solo by Miss E. Stenton, 
'12, and the rendering of '' Canada " by an octette of young 
ladies. 

Mrs. Raff delighted her hearers by her reading from sev- 
eral Canadian poets, giving, among others, selections from Miss 
Coleman and Mrs. Blewett. A scene from ^' She Stoops to 
Conquer," acted by several of the College girls, was especially 
appreciated. 

W — sh — n, '10 — ''Isn't Miss J — n a nice little pocket 
edition ?" 

Applegate, C.T. (on being asked whether he was going to 
the bazaar) — '' ^o, I'm going to the reception at McMaster. I 
want to take in all the functions where the ladies attend, before 
I draw into my shell." 

B — ^1 — ck, '11: — " How do you like your Bob picture, Bert ?" 

R — b — ns — n, '11 — ^' I have only had one picture taken in 

my life that I liked, and that didn't look the least bit like me." 

Dr. Hincks (at inter-collegiate debate) — "Well, brethren, 
can we not have an octette, quintette, quartette or duet ?" 
Editor-in-Chief — " For my part, I would prefer a Freshette." 

Dr. J. Burwash (in Religious Knowledge, speaking of the 
authorship of the story of the ark) — " Did he make it up out 
of his own head ?" 

MacN — V — n, '10 — "He must have had a lot of timber in 
his block." 



300 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

M— y— r, '09 (thoughtfully) — ''I Avonder if the girls will 
show us how to use the cushions ?" 

Z — mm — r — n, '12 (having just received his Latin exercise) 
—" What did you get Miss Kelly, Z ?" 

Miss K — ^11 — y, '12 — " No, that's too much like Zimmerman) 
for me." 

Leaves from Miss C — w — n's, '11, diary: 

Monday night Thanksgiving dinner 

Tuesday night Feed 

Wednesday night , . . Feed 

Thursday night .Feed 

Friday night Freshmen's reception 

Saturday night Open Lit. 

Sunday night Eemorse 

Miss Addison to Miss B — w — s, '10, when she came in from 
the Rugby match — " Which won this time ?" 

Miss B — w — s, '10 (in great amazement) — ^' Which onet 
Why, it was Mr. — oh, I mean Hamilton." 

Miss S — v — s, '09 — " What kind of potatoes for lunch 
to-day?" 

Miss P — 1 — s, '09 — " Oh, just common taters." 

Misis S — s, '09 — "Well, then, I don't want any. I get 
enough commentators in lectures." 

Sophette (Saturday, 'Nov. 28th) — ''I was just dying to go- 
to that game. I would have gone even if the man had asked 
sixteen girls before me." 

Friend — '^ Yes, and I would even have been willing to swap 
turns with him at a knot-hole." 

Pratt, '11 — ''What do you think of my photo, Frank?" 
O — w — ns, C.T. — " It remind/s me of McConnell's dog." 

M — n — g — ^^m — y, '11 — ^' Did you hear that French was in 

the hospital?" 

" No. What's the matter with him ?" 

M — n — g — m — y, '11 — '' Insomnia and hay fever." 

Staples, '10 (ordering cushion from Miss L — s, '10) — " I 

would like this cushion delivered." 



LOCALS. 301 

Miss L — s — '^ Even though I am deaconess of the class, I 
don't go down to the Ward." 

In the general confusion which usually attends the serving 
of refreshments at receptions, mistakes are by no means an 
unusual occurrence. Such was the case at a recent reception, 
when one dish of ice cream with two spoons was given to our 
friend Jack Birnie. ]!*^o one knows exactly what was said, but 
we can at least surmise the subject of their conversation from 
the following remark which Jack addressed to G. Adams, who 
was sitting near by, ^' Say, Geoif, will you be best man ?" 

Dr. J. Burwash (to a third year Religious Knowledge class) 
— " Can't you find any Bibles ? Well, that is too bad, but 
you know I have just had a class of sophomores in here." 

Miss S — n — s, '09 — " I think that Mr. Watson who helped 
Dr. Bell put Dr. Edgar's pulpit out the window ought to be 
given the degree of D.B.P.A. (Dr. Bell's pulpit assistant)." 

Miss D — n — t, '09 — ^' I have been sporting my bulletin- 
board all morning. Oh, I mean my mortar-board." 

Miss D— f — e, '11 — " Well, that Mr. Butcher is a killing 
kind of man, isn't he ?" 

Miss Bar — y, '12 — " The critic at Men's Open Lit. looked 
like a man who has taken twelve courses and graduated in 
them all." 

Isn't it strange how memories of the past cling to one ? The 
other day a lady was heard to say that she never can think of 
Mr. Clement, '09, as a senior, as she remembers so well the 
time when he went to school hand-in-hand with his sister, and 
if anything went wrong, Billy always cried. 

Mr. Z — m — n, '12 (in a Religious Knowledge lecture) — ^' I 
don't think that phrase, Tead us not into temptation,' is right,, 
because the way it stands it seems to me that if we left it out,, 
the Lord would lead us into temptation." 

Dr. Burwash — ^^ Well, then, what is your amendment?" 

Miss K — y, '12 — '^ When I am studying in the library, I 
always sit with my baxjk to the men. It gives you such a sort 
of ^ Get thee behind me Satan ' feeling." 



302 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Miss B — ru — e, '09 (referring to the good-night salutation of 
two '09 ladies) — '^ Girls, don't make it so audible next time; 
it sounded just like a cow lifting its foot out of the mud." 

Miss S — V — ns, '09 — ^' There are some names around col- 
lege that I am always confusing. IN'ow there is Wordsworth 
and Woodsworth, Byron and Byrom, Niven and Mac^iven. I 
always say MacNiven's love-song when I mean ' ^iven's.' " 

Miss B, '12 — " Oh, yes, she is a very clever girl. Why, she 
came in on a General Deficiency Scholarship." 

The Athletic Building was the scene of a lively hustle on 
the morning of Saturday, N'ovember 14th, when the Fresh- 
men, stirred up to righteous indignation by the unwarranted 
appropriation of their programmes on the previous evening, 

took justice into their o\vn 
hands by applying the time- 
honored method of the water- 
cure. The ambush in the 
neighborhood of the Athletic 
Building proved very disas- 
trous to quite a number of 
unsuspecting Sophs. The 
Second Year finally rallied in 
sufficient numbers to carry 
the President of the First 
Year to the tap on the college 
lawn. But in vain — not even 
the magic key of the Athletic 
Association, with the Athletic 
President at the end of 
it, could prevail upon the water to flow, and the attempt had 
to be given up. Further complications were at this point in- 
terrupted by the appearance of the Chancellor, whose cane, we 
hear, played an important part in terminating the hustle. 
Score, 12—0. 

Miss H — t, '11 (during moonlight skate on rink) — " Isn't 
it perfectly dear to-night? I just feel as if I would like to 
embrace something." (Applications will be received at ladies' 
study between now and Christmas.) 




LOCALS. 



303 



The Freshies may be able to carry on class-meeting affairs 
in an expeditious and business-like way, but for sheer nobility 
and unselfish magnanimity, the following morsel from the 
Sophomore minute-book commends itself to us : " Moved by 
W. Moorehouse, seconded by B. H. Robinson, that the spirit 
of retaliation be dropped." Carried. 

S — p — s, '09 (referring to cuts in Xmas Acta) — ^' It's 
sort of a family album effect." 

C — ^m — e, '10 (giving impromptu quotation at Lit.) — 
" Man is like a sausage. 
Very smooth upon the skin. 
But you cannot tell exactly 
How much hog there is within." 

Pike, '10 (referring to Mrs. Massey's gift to the College) — 
" I only wish she would give me some." 

H — n, C.T. — " She's a business woman. She never makes 
a poor investment." 

Freshette — " Does tennis make a man's arm strong ?" 
Miss C , '11 — " Ob, yes. I should say it does. Why, 

it makes a man's arms so strong that — that — that one can 

scarcely breathe." 

Tutor in German (during a lull in Deak's lesson) — " Do 
you take Philosophy ?" 

Deacon — " Oh, sure, we've been taking it all year." 
Tutor— ^^ What do you think of Kant?" 
Deacon — " We aren't taking our lectures from Kant." 
Tutor—'' Oh! And Aristotle and Plato, are they well ?" 

Swinnerton, B.D. — " There are two places in Toronto that 
I have never been, Annesley Hall and Ryrie's." (We advise 
Swin to do them both up at once.) 

Eritz M , '09 (between furious fits of coughing one Sun- 
day afternoon) — '^ I think I'll have to go over to the Hall 
to-night and get some sympathy." 

Dr. John Burwash (in First Year Religious Knowledge 
Lecture, speaking of the failure of Bishop Taylor's Pauline 
Plan for missionary enterprise in South Sea Islands) — " The 
carpenters could get hardly any work to do among the heathen, 
and the tailors — they had even less to do." 



304 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The poetic muse refused to soil her snowy wings amid the 
sordid surroundings of every-day Jif e ; as she unfolded her 
wings and slowly faded from sight she uttered a few hoarse 
notes : — 

To you, it seemed a simple task, 
A very simple thing to ask, 
That I should write and send to you 
A poem, — anything would do. 
In vain you sue. 

The poet hears the sweet bird sing, 
And straightway has it rhyme with wing. 
The sight of bright and sparkling rills 
Fills him with sweet, poetic thrills, 
Which forth he trills. 

But I have seen the moonlight fair. 
Have gazed at sunset colors rare, 
Have watched the gently falling rain. 
And raked my crazed and weary brain. 
But all in vain. 

Why, when you have a Scott and Shelley, 
And all the classic keys of Kelley, 
A Browning, Keats and Tennyson, 
A Shakespeare, England's greatest sun, 
Why do you dun ? 

Go then, and choose from those old sages 
A passage to grace Acta^s pages; 
And choosing thus the very best. 
Leave thou in comfort all the rest '^ 

Of penny rhymsters. 

(For the above w^e are grateful to one of our '08 graduates.) 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



305 



C. E. GOODMAN 

270 YONGE ST. 

Phone Main 2018 



The place where you should buy your 
Furnishings. Everything new in Neck- 
wear and Shirts, and a full stock of 
Gloves, Hosiery and Underwear. 



Full Dress Requisites. 
Ribbons and Pennants. 



j» 



Every Student 



Some time or other wants to buy Jewelery of some kind, or 
perhaps it is some repairs to watch or jewelery. Whichever 
it is, we are in a position to give the best satisfaction at the 
lowest possible cost. We are always pleased to have you call 
and look over our stock, and to quote you prices. » 

ftSS'^/ie^i W. W. MUNN ^;^^^ 

Pountain Pens jeweler and optician cian is in cnargc 
and Ink always goO YONGE ST. ®^ ®"'' Optical 

in stock. 1st Door North of Biaor Street Department. 



students' Headquarters 

COLLEGE BOOKS 

NEW and SECOND HAND 



VANNEVAR & CO. 



438 YONGE STREET 



TORONTO 



THE OLDEST FIRM 

with THE LARGEST STOCK 

at THE LOWEST PRICES 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen. 
National Separate - Leaf Note Book 



G. A Lester 



l)atter and 
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Near St. Joseph 



464 SPADINA AVENUE 

T HE SHOP FO R 

Good Hair Cutting 
E:. M. Kennedy ^ Co. 



Barbers 



6 Chairs 



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For Fine Stationery 

Magazines. Souvenirs, Post Cards, Water- 
man's Fountain Pens and Fountain Pen Ink 
go to 

J. Willis' Bookstore 

Phom, North -J^Q YoHgC StrCCt 



306 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



COR. BLOOR AND YONGE 



PHONE N. 3535 



Northern Wardrobe 

See our special contracts for Students' Cleaning and Pressing and doing 
all minor repairs. Also a full line of Men's Furnishings. 

Proprietor - - - - ^W. R. ADAMS 



WE WANT YOUR 
ORDER FOR FALL 

We know we can please you if 
you will give us a Trial Order, 
Our Goods are Up-to-date in 
Pattern and Quality. We aim 
only at Good Workmanship. 
Prices Moderate. 

See our nobby school suits 
at $18.00 and $20.00. 

OISCOIINT TO STUDENTS 

BERKINSHAW G GAIN 

348 Yoxig'e Street 

You call us ! We do the rest. 

Toronto Shoe Repairing Co. 

Shoe Repairing, Cleats, etc., called 
for and delivered promptly. 

8-10 Cumberland St., Toronto 

Phone N. 5466 SKATES GROUND 




NeDirest Styles 
Lar^e StocK 
of Ne-w Goods 



PHone 

NortH 

3371 



MACEY 

TAILOR 

777 YONGC STREET 
ome blocK AortH of Bloor Street 

T. BRAKE 

Fine Boots and Shoes 

REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 

BOOTS MADE TO ORDER 

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Cut Flowers 

Floral emblems of every description 
are most carefully executed by 




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Our Prices are Reasonable. Our Execution Perfect 

Phones Main 1424 and 4790 
Night and Sunday, Phone Park 792 

The Name of 

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STUDIO: 328i Yonge St. Phone Main 1269 

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Printers 

502 Yonge Street 



Phone North 3912 



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Savings Bank Deposits received from $1 .00 up 

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ACTA VICTORIANA. 



307 



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Owlers Promptly Executed 



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272 Yonge St. - Phone : M, 565 



Waterman's Ideal Fountain 
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WATCHES PROPERLY REPAIRED 

Phone, North 242-243 

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Offices: 612 YONQE SThEET 

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PRINTED T'rlX^: 




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308 



ACTA VICTORIANA, 







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does it not stand to reason that we can 
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We carry in stock at all times a com- 
plete line of Fountain Pens, silver and 
gold-'nounted or plain— the prices are 
certainly attractive. 


FOR CHOICE, PURE 

Confectiornery 


Mother's Candy Kitchen 
732K YONGE ST. near czar st. 


Hall's Dining Hall 

606 YONGE STREET 

The Students' Restaurant 

Rates $2.25 per week 


AMBROSE KENT 

& SONS, LIMITED 
156 YONGE ST. TORONTO 

ESTABLISHED 1868 


Phone Nokth 3296. 
Pv^, • J D^ll 702 and 704 YONGE 

UaVld Oell, st.. Cor.St MarySt. 

Choice Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery and (Jrocerieis. 










A'NIXJirCkf VV i^ A T ¥ The Woman's Residence 

/\ IN IN ML^I^ML I n /\ 1^ L< of Victoria CoUege 

A beautiful Christian home is offered in the Hall to women students attending 
Victoria College, and special opportunities are given for their physical development by 
daily instruction in the gymnasium, by tennis and other out-of-door sports. Students not 
taking the full Arts course in the College are admitted as far as room permits. For 
further information write to the 

DEAN OF RESIDENCE, Annesley Hall, Queen's Park, Toronto. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



iod 



GEO. HARCOURT & SON 



COLLEGE GOWNS AND CAPS 
For Ladies and Men 



57 King Street West 



TORONTO 



r^A^ 




LEADS 



SEE 
THE 
STAR 



1 1 mum GO. 

HIGH-GRADE TAILORS 

COLLEGE £2QCi YONGE 
GOWNS D03 STREEf 

Phone: North 1419 

Phone North 904 

Richard G. Kirby 

Carpenter and 537-539 YongB St. 

Contractor for 

General Building TORONTO 

and Jobbing 



DUNCAN BROS. 

ARTISTIC PICTURE 
FRAMING 

Special attention given to 
the Framing of COLLEGE 
GROUPS at Reasonable 
Rates 

434 Yonge St., TORONTO 



THE STUDENTS' DRUG STORE 

We were Students ourselves not so very long 
ago, and we know the kind of treatment they 
appreciate. 

If you are a Student, mention this advertise- 
meni to us and we will try and make you feel 
at home, and allow you a special Student's 
discount on all your purchase^. 

We have a well assorted stock of all kinds of 
Perfumes, Toilet Articles, Creams, Lotions, 
Powders and Sundries of every description. 

Huyler's and other high-class Chocolates,* 
Creams and Bon-Bons. Our Soda Fountain is 
going Winter and Summer, and we serve 
dainty dishes and bev^erages in dainty fashion* 

Careful dispensing of prescriptions our 
specialty. 

W. J. A. & H. CARNAHAN, 

Traders Bank Bidg,, Dispensing Chemists, 

Cor. Yonge & Bloor, Cor. Church & Carlton, 
Phone North 341 Phone Main 2196 

" 342 " " 2197 

Branch Tabard Inn Library. C.P.R. Tel. Office 



THE OUTGH STUOIO 

318 YONGE STREET 

Toronto - Canada 



Phone Main 7027 



EVERYTHING IN 

High-Gradc Photography 

skilfully and promptly executed 

NONE BUT THE MOST SKILFUL 
WORKMEN EMPLOYED 

Special Rates to Students 
G. B. C. van dcr PEEN, 

Proprietor 



310 ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Uictoria College 



QUEEN'S PARK. TORONTO. 



In Fec/Brat/on with the University of Toronto > 



The Federation System enables Victoria to offer the fol- 
lowing advantages : 

1. A compact college life in a commodious and beautiful 
modern building, provided vrith all the latest conveniences 
for healthful work. 

2. A large staf¥ of College Professors, composed of men 
with thorough European training and ripe experience as 
teachers, and of earnest Christian character. 

3. Admission to all the lectures and laboratories of the 
University Staff of eighty-eight professors and lecturers, who, 
together with the fifty-eight professors and lecturers of the 
federated colleges, constitute the largest faculty of Arts in 
the Dominion, and one of the most efficient on the Continent, 
All University examinations, prizes, scholarships, honors and 
degrees are open to our students on equal terms with those 
of any other college. A large number of prizes, honors and 
scholarships are also offered to our students in our own 
College. 

4. Two commodious residences for women students afford 
every modern advantage for health and comfort and a refined 
social life. A course of physical training is also given under 
an accomplished directress and a women's gymnasium forms 
part of the new residences. 

5. Excellent facilities are afforded both in the University 
and College for post-graduates reading for the degree of 
Ph.D., and also a full course in the Faculty of Theology. 

Lectures in both faculties begin October 1st. 

N. BUR.^Wi\SH, S.T.D., LL.D., 

President. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



311 




||llTllD|n AND ONTARIO CONSERVATORY OF 

"' ■ MUSIC AND ART, WHITBY, ONT. 

LnU I CO Ideal home litem a beautiful castle, 

COLLEGE modelled after one of the palatial 
homes of English aristocracy. 
The latest and best equipment in every department, 
backed up by the largest and strongest staff of special- 
ists to be found in any similar college in Canada. 
Sufficiently near the city to enjoy its advantages in 
concerts, etc., and yet away from its distractions, in an 
atmosphere and environment most conducive to men- 
tal, moral and physical stamina. Send for new illus- 
trated calendar to 
REV. J. J. HARE, Ph.D., Principal. 



Alma College 

Rev. Robert I. Warrcr. M.A., D.D.. Principal 
Mrs. Jean Wylie Grey, - Lady-Principal 
Miss Alice F. Henwood, B.A., Acting Dcan 



SENIOR SCHOOL makes efficient provision for studies for 
University Matriculation, University Curricula in Music, 
Teachers' Non-Professional Examinations, and for Alma 
College Diplomas in Liberal Arts ( M.L.A. and M.E.L.) ; 
Music ( A.A.C.M. for Pianoforte, Singing, Organ, Vio- 
lin ) : Fine Art ; Elocution and Physical Culture ; Com- 
mercial Science ; Domestic Science. 

JUNIOR SCHOOL provides attractive school home, in 
separate apartments, for girls under thirteen, and also 
prepares pupils for the High School entrance examinations. 
HEALTHY LOCALITY, Six Acre Campus. Superior 
Buildings, Competent Teachers, Successful Record. 
For Catalogue, address 

PRINCIPAL WARNER, 

Alma College, ST. THOMAS, ONT. 



Upper Canada College, Toronto 

H. W. AUDEN, M.A. (Cambridge), Principal. 

Regular Staff comprises 15 Graduates of English and Canadian Universities, with additional 
special instructors. Courses for University, Royal Military College and Business. Senior and 
Preparatory Schools in separate buildings. Every modern equipment. Fifty acres of ground 
in healthiest district. Four rinks, gymnasium, swimming bath, etc. 



THE LEADING 

IPreecription pbarmaQ 

OF THE NORTH END 

Discount to Students. Accuracy, Purity 




W.C. SENIOR 
&BRO. 


WM. H. COX, 786 Yonge St.. Toronto 


Tailors 

and 

Gown Makers 

717 

Yongc St. 
Toronto 


The Dining Hall 


556 YONGE STREET 

PHONF: T. J. HEALEY, 

Nn.-tk> ATTO Dr•/-vnr•■£>t/^r 







Our shop is 
wp-to date and 
we use you right 



Razors Honed 



T. A. FELSTEAD 

4 CHAIR BARBER SHOP 4 
760 YONGE STREET 



Electric 

Face Massage 

Head Rub 



Shoe Shine 



312 



ACTA VICTORIANA, 



Cbe Unii)cr$ity of Coronto 



and 



Uttiversity College 



FACULTIES OF ... 



Arts 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Household Science 

Education 

Forestry 



For information, apply to the Registrar of the University, 
or to the Secretaries of the respective Faculties. 



# , 



ACTA VICTORIANA, 



313 



ESTABLISHED 1873 



The Most Convenient Bank for Victoria College 

THE STANDARD BANK OF CANADA 

At Yonge and Charles Streets 



Cheques on any Bank 
may be cashed here. 



E. L. WILLIAMS. 

Manager. 



Dr. J. Frank Adams 

DENTIST 

Telephone College 243 
325 College Street. TORONTO 



DR. FRED. N. BADGLEY 

©entist 



110 AVENUE ROAD 

(Opposite St. Paul's Church) 

Phone North 3514 



TORONTO 



Alfred W. 


Briggs. Harold R. 


Frost. 


BRIGGS & FROST 






BARRISTERS. ETC. 






TORONTO 




Wesley 


Buildings, 33 Richmond St. 
Toronto 


West 



MASTEN, STARR &, SPENCE 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 
Canada Lifb BtfiLDiNG 

TORO.NTO 
SOLICITORS FOR BANK OP NOVA SCOTIA 

C. A. Hasten, K.C, J. R. L. Starr 
J. H. Spencb 



E. B. Ryckman, M.A., LL.B. K.C. 

Chas. W. Kerr, B.A. C. S. Maclnnes, B.A., K,C. 

Christopher C. Robinson, B.A. 

RYCKMAN, KERR & MaclNNES 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, etc. 
Canada Life Building, 46 King St. West, Toronto. 

Cobalt: 

RYCKMAN KERR, MacINNES & MAHON 



•^•o— PHONE NORTH 698 

Dr. S. L. Frawley 
DENTIST 

Qraduate of Toronto ^^ T>t Cx \Tr a 

and Philadelphia l^ OlOOr Ot. West 



Phone North 354 



Contract work a Specialty 



F. OLVER, 

TAILOR, 

707 Yonge Street, Toronto 

Ladies' and Gents' Clothing Cleaned, 
Pressed, Altered, and Repaired 

...BURN... 

McGiirs Coal 

Cof. Bathufst St. and Farley Ave. 
Phone Park 393. 

GEO, A. EVANS, Phivi.B. 

DISPENSING CHEMIST 

832 Yonge St. Toronto 

Liberal Discount to Students 

Telephones North 38 and North 3720. 
Telephone Orders a Specialty 

DYEING © CLEANING 
FOR MEN © WOMEN 

We completely meet the needs of men and 
women in dyeing and cleaning articles of per- 
sonal wear. Phone head office or any branch. 

R. par.ke:r csb CO. 

787-791 Yonge Stkekt Toronto, Canada 

Branches in all Leading Shopping Centres 



314 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 







The 

Students' 
Jewelers 

Our Quality, Price and Service 
will be found all that could be 
desired. 

We have appropriate sugges- 
tions for Birthday, Wedding, 
or 'XMAS gifts. 

We are always pleased to show 
our display, and in no way 
force a sale. 


CHAS. POTTER 

85 YONGE STREET 


C. B. PETRY. PROPRIETOR 


Skilful 

Craftsmanship in 
Eye-testing at Potter's 

Many thousands of ociilists" prescrip- 
tions are on fyle at Potter's. 

AddeJ to these are prescriptions and 
records the result of eyi-testin^ by our 
own skilled opticians 0.1 the premises. 

This is what mav be termed concrete 
evidence of the fine character of the 
work done here. 

If your record is no^ here, let us h.avc 
it. If your eyes need testing now we 
will give you satisfactory service. 

Testing and glasses always guaran- 
teed. 


Stock Cf Bickle 

JEWELERS 

131 Yonge Street 

(Opp. Temperance St.) 


POTTER, THE RELIABLE OPTICIAN 



OWNERSHIP 

Is one of the STRONGEST AGENTS in encouraging a young 

man in early life. 

You may have this HELPFUL SECURITY at a LOW COST 

by laying aside each year a SMALL AMOUNT for LIFE 

INSURANCE. 

A $1,000.00 policy is OWNERSHIP to you, and more, it is 

OWNERSHIP WITH PROFITS. 

Abundant information will be given gladly at 

^e Manufacturers Life Ins. Co. 

**No Better Life Company in Canada," 

N.B.- Profitable Employment given to Men during the Summer Months 




ACTA VICTORIANA. 



315 



Men s VICTOR Boot 

^^ Style V.P. $4.00== 



If you ordered a pair 
of boots like the Victor 
V.P. from the New York 
Bootmaker who origin- 
ated the style, he would 
charge you from $5.00 
to $6.00 and then not 
give you footwear better 
in material detail than 
this VICTOR V.P. 
MODEL. The toe has 
a half-narrow shape and 
widens gracefully on the outside. The sole is medium 
weight with a custom extension. A Flexible and Brilliant 
Patent Colt, selected for its wearing qualities, is used in 
the vamp, dull matt calf Blucher top with rounded corners. 
Finest quality of duck linings, inside top stays, back-stays, 
and facings. Solid oak-bark-tanned sole leather and 
heel. C, D and E widths, all sizes from 




5 to I 



$4.00 



If you arc interested in Toronto styles and prices send for 

our Fall and Winter Catalogue, which will be sent 

free on receipt of address. 



THE 
ROBERT 



SIMPSON 

TORONTO 



COMPANY 
LIMITED 



316 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



C. A. DEERvS 

MERCHANT TAILOR 



13 Manning A.rcacle A.nnex 
24 Ki»if St. "W. Tel. M. 6886 



Style and Quality 

Equal to the Best 

Let me be your Tailor 



Imperial Bank of Canada 

Head Office, Toronto 

Capital Authorized, $10,000,000 Capital Paid Up, $5,000,000 

Rest Account, $5,000,000 

D. R. WILKIE, Pres. and Gen. Manager. E. HAY, Assistant General Manager. 

ROBT. J AFFRAY, Vice-President. W. MOFFAT, Chief Inspector. 

Savings Bank Departraent— Interest at current rates allowed on 
deposits of $ I. GO upwards from date of opening account, and interest 
credited four times a year. 

Letters of Credit ana Drafts issued, available in all parts of the 

A General Banking Business Conducted. 

YONGE AND BLCX)R STREET BRANCH 

C H. Stanley Clarke, Manager 



THE 

FREELAND 
STUDIO 

Finest of facilities for 

GROUP WORK 



Special Prices to Students 



430 YONGE STREET 

Opposite Cari.ton Street 
'Phone M. 6887 



Follett's 

Ordered 

Tailoring 



Faultless style and tailor- 
ing in our Uress Suits. A 
good suit for $30.00. 
Get one of the smart col- 
lege ulsters. We have a 
nice lot of materials at 
$20.00. Special Dis- 
count arrangement. 



JOS. J. FOLLETT 

181 YONGE STREET 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



317 



Victoria College Rink, charles west 

AREA, 05,000 FEET 

We provide a large general Skating Rink 
and three Hockey Rinks. 



The best society in 
the city patronize our 
skating rink. 



Many of the fastest ; ^^•^^ °" ^"^^y "^8^*^ »"^ 
hockey teams in the 



Saturday afternoon?. 



City leagues practice 

dl 1 . Gentleman's 

play their games Ladies' 

here. 



SEASON TICKETS: 

$2.00 
1.75 



J. J. PEARSON, 

Sec.-Treas. 



Address : 

Victoria College 

PHone N. 3578 



H, L. Morrison, 

President 



The Book Bureau 

Victoria U ni versity 



We Supply 



Every 



ARTS TEXT BOOK 

THEOLOGICAL BOOK 

at reasonable prices 

THE IDEAL WATERMAN PEN 
THE STERLING FOUNTAIN PEN 



Full lines of Note Books and Stationery, Crested Note Paper, etc. 

G. B. KING, B.A.., Manager. 



318 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



REA'S 



NEW STORE 

FOR WOMEN 




RECEPTION DRESSES 

DINNER FROCKS 

GRADUATION GOWNS 

We have tastefully provided for the college girl for her 
every college function as well as for her usual every- 
day wear. You'll find Rea's new store for women the 
final authority in evening gowps, demi-tailored costumes, 
cloaks, suits, coats, skirts, waists, underskirts, furs, 
millinery, neckwear, veilings and beltings. 

Rea's make their own garments and novelties — the 
store's stocks are constantly supplemented hy the manu- 
factory — you have everything new and fresh, and values 
unsurpasseH, In Rea's garments you'll find the most 
authentic of the new ideas combined with the original 
touches that Rea designers and workers weave into 
their work. Thus j'ou have exclusive elegance with 
unusual values — a rare occurence. 

We illustrate with a few items in evening dresses : 

ONE OF EMBROIDERED 
FILET NET of Empire cut has a 
panel front, from neck to hem, of 
heavy Cluny Lace. 

SATIN GOWNS are in favor this 
winter — satin conforms so gracefully 
to the styles. This Empire Gown 
is unusually charming. Of pale 
blue liberty satin, finished with 
tiny cream net yoke and panels of 
minutest tucking with large satin 
buttons. 



LACE AND POINT D' ESPRIT 
GOWNS — Brussels net, plain oc 
embroidered, and dear little batiste 
frocks with the Directoire and Em- 
pire fashions ruling all witli their 
inimitable grace. Skirts with long 
clinging lines, bodices slim and 
closely draped, long tight sleeves and 
high pointed collars — all one piece 
gowns. 

AN EXQUISITE LITTLE DRESS 
of spotted net is made beautiful with 
Irish Point Lace and touches of pale 
blue and white satin. 



You may choose among maize, tuscan, taupe, canard, elephant's 
breath and varying shades of green in the satin gowns. 



A. E. REA Sr C° 

168 Yonge Street, Toronto 



LIMITED 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



319 



ANNUAL SALE 
TRUNKS, BAGS, SUIT CASES 

This is the month for real snaps in travelling goods. Students 
will find it decidedly to their advantage to purchase for future 
need during this Sale. 

EAST & CO., Limited, 300 Yonge Street 




WARDROBE 

where good work is 
done in Cleanin g, 
Pressing and Repairing 
at reasonable prices. 



FORD'S 

742 YONGE STREET 
PHONE NORTH 4604 



HIGH CLASS 
FURNISHINGS 

Hats and Caps, Boots 
and Shoes. Agents in 
Ontario for Stanfield's 
Unshrinkable Under- 



YOUR TRADE WILL BE APPRECIATED 



AVERY'S DRUG STORE 

Yonge and St. Mary Sts., TORONTO 

Pure Drugs, Economical Prices 
Special prices to students 

Phone N. 1747 

Goods delivered promptly 



fS'i'iTr'Y' PRINTING- 

Programmes, Booklets, Invitations, Reports. 

The Armac Press 



Phone Main 2716 



1 70- 1 76 Victoria St., TORONTO 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

FOR 1909 (in patrt) 



CALENDAR 



January : 

1. New Year's Day (Friday). 

By-laws for establishing and withdrawal of 
union of municipalities for High School 
purposes to take etiect. 

i. Provincial Normal Schools open (Second 
Term). 

Clerks of Municipalities to be notified by 
Separate School supporters of their with- 
drawal. 
High, Public and Separate Schools open. 

5. Truant Officers' reports to Department, due. ' 

G. First meeting of rural School Trustees. 
Polling day for trustees in Public and 
Separate Schools. 

7. Principals of High Schools and Collegiate 
Institutes to forward list of teachers, etc. 
11. Appointment of High School Trustees by 
Municipal Councils. 

Annual Reports of Boards in cities and 
towns, to Department, due. 
Names and addresses of Public School 
Trustees and Teachers to be sent to Town- 
ship Clerks and Inspectors. 
Trustees' Annual Reports toInsoectors,due. 
Annual Reports of Kindergarten attend- 
ance, to Department, due. 
Annual Reports of Separate Schools, to 
Department, due. 

Application for Legislative apportionment 
for inspection of Public Schools in cities 
and towns separated from the county, to 
Department, due. 



U. 



15. 



20. 



26. 



First meeting of Public School Boards in 
cities, towns and incorporated villages 
Appointment of High School Trustees by 
County Councils. 

February : 
3. First meeting of High School Boards and 
Boards of Education. 

March : 

1. Inspectors' Annual Reports, to Depart- 
ment, due. 

Annual Reports from High School Boards, 

to Department, due. 

(This includes the Financial Statement.) 

Financial Statement of Teachers' A ssooia^ 

tions, to Department, due. 

Separate School Supporters to notify Muni' 

cipal Clerks. 
31. Night Schools close (Session 1908-9). 
April : 
1. Returns by Clerks of counties, cities, etc., 

of population, to Department, due. 

High Schools, second term, and Public 

and Separate Schools close. 

Goor> Friday. 

Easter Monday. 

Annual Meeting of the Ontario Educa' 

tional Association at Toronto. 

Reports on Night Schools, due (Session 

1908-9). 
19. High Schools (Third Term), and Public 

and Separate Schools open after Easter 

Holidays. 



8. 



15. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS of the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT of ONTARIO 
ca.n be ordered through local booksellers, or address orders direct to 

TKe CARSMTELL CO., I^imited 

30 Adelaiae St. E^ast XORONTO 



320 ACTA VICTORIANA. 




W. M. PERCY 

Optician 

705 YONGE STREET 

(Late of Chas. Potter's) 

Phone N. 2824. 



Oculists' Prescriptions filled 
promptly and accurately. 

Lens Grinding and Spectacle Repairing done on 
the premises. Discount to Students. 

Kodaks, Films and Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amateurs. 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens, Magnifiers, Readers, etc. 

High Class Stationer3\ 



— 








STOLLERY 






Men's Furnishings 






and Fine Hats : : 






772 YONGE STREET 






Kindlsr Mention **Acta»* wHen PurcHasin^ 




Li,i« 




1 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 321 
CONTENTS. 

LITERARY- Page 

A Visit to Orvieto 325 

Robert W. Service 333 

The King Moose - 337 

"Ring out the Old, Ring in the New" 339 

The Victoria Women's Residence and Educational Association - - 343 

Book Reviews ....-- 346 

EDITORIAL— 

Notes 348 

SCIENTIFIC- 

Yawning Craters of the Moon - - 353 

MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS- 

The Fulness of the Time 357 

PERSONALS AND EXCHANGES- 

Class of '06 3&5 

Personals 366 

Marriages - 367 

Exchanges 367 

LOCALS- 

Notes 371 



A FEW CHOICE BOOKS 

The Christian Minister and His Duties — 

Containing Chapters on "The Modern Minister,** 
" The Minister as Preacher," " The Minister as 
Pastor." etc. By J. OSWALD DYKES, M.A $1.80 

The Resurrection of Jesus — 

By JAS. ORR, M.A $LSO 

The Christian Method of Ethics — 

By REV. HENRY W. CLARK, author of " Philosophy 

of Christian Experience ** NET $1,25 

Gospel of St. Matthew — 

In Westminster New Testament Series. By DAVID 
SMITH, M.A NET $ .70 

The Upper Canada Tract Society 

(James M. Robertson, Depositary) 102 Yongc Street, Toronto, Ont. 




322 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Hockey Boots, Skates, Hockey 
Sticks, Sweaters, Toques, Stock- 
ings, Sweater Coats, Snow Shoes 



HOCKEY BOOTS 
$1.75 $2.00 
$2.50 $3.00 
$3.50 $4.00 




SKATES 




$1.00, $1.50, $1.75, $2.00, $2.50 
$3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 

Sweaters, each $2.00 Sweater Coats, each $4.00 

HOCKEY STICKS 
Mic-Mac, 40c each. Practice, 25c, Spalding, 50c 

SNOW SHOES, Men's, $3.50 Ladies, $3.00 



J. BROTHERTON 

Sso YONGE STREET 

Phone N. 2092 




FACADE OF DUOMO, ORVIETO 



ACTA VICTORIANA 




Published monthly during- the College year by the Union 
Literary Society of Victoria University, Toronto 



VOL. XXXII. 



TORONTO, JANUARY, 1909. 



No. 4 



A Visit to Orvieto 



DR. A. J. BELL. 



' ' T MPONENT montihus arces/' are the words of Virgil ^ 
/ which ever recurred to my mind, as during our stay 
in Eome we enjoyed the glorious view of the sur- 
rounding hills from San Pietro in Montorio, or made an ex- 
cursion to Tivoli or Rocca Giovane or Monte Cavo. In Italy 
the city of the plain is modern, and its mother town lies usually 
on a hill ahove it. Florence, the centre of art and literature 
for modern Italy, tries to trace its foundation to Julius Caesar. 
But it is not sure even of this limited antiquity, and the first 
mention we have of it is in the days of Tiberius, when we 
find its inhabitants protesting against a plan of turning the 
waters of the Clanis into the Arno lest thus there might be 
brought on them the destruction which it was sought to avert 
from Rome. The town in the lovely valley of the Arno was 
new and was a product of the Pax Eomana ; but on a lofty hill 
to northward there lay and still lie the veteris vestigia fraudis — 
the walls of Faesulae, its mother town. 

Rome itself was a union of the fortresses on the tops of a 
group of hills at a bend in the Tiber. On the steepest of these, 
outside the pomoerium, lay the Arx Romana, and the temple of 
the three deities, Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, which is thought to 
mark it as an Etruscan foundation. As we go northward into 
Tuscany, we see that here, even more than in Latium, they 
planted their citadels on the mountains. When we think of 
the debt which Livy acknowledges that the Romans owed to 
these Etruscans — the curule chair, the fasces, and the toga 
praetexta, the ensigns of Roman civic life — it seems likely that it 



326 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



was they also who taught the Latin farmer how to plant his 
citadels. It was to one of these citadels of these Etruscans, one 
of their oldest strongholds, that we set out from Rome on a fine 
June morning over five years ago. 

That the stronghold is very old its name seems to testify, for 
Orvieto is believed to be a corruption of Ut'hs Vetus, ''the old 
city/' Miiller believed, and Deecke is still of opinion that it is 
built on the site of the old city of Yolsinii, which the Romans 
destroyed when they captured it two thousand three hundred 
years ago. The new city of Volsinii, now Bolsena, so famed 




PALAZZO COMMUNALE^ ORVIETO. 



for its miracle, lies about eight miles eastward on the bank of 
what was once the great Volsinian mere, and Bunsen thinks this 
distance too great to allow us to identify Orvieto with the old 
Volsinii. He believes it to be Salpinum, the ally of Volsinii, 
whose walls were so strong that the Romans did not then ven- 
ture to assail it. The first definite mention of the town by its 
present name seems to be the account Procopius gives of its siege 
and capture from the Groths by Belisarius about nine hundred 
years later. Procopius calls it Urbiventus or 'TpftiftevTo^, 



A VISIT TO ORVIETO. 327 

writing f3 for the Latin V; It is true that the e of vetus is 
short, but in low Latin the binary law of accent prevails, by 
which every second syllable from the end of a word or phrase 
is accented. The Latin venire hahet, by elision venirahet, by 
this law becomes the French viendra, and two vowels, both short 
in Latin, are the only ones that remain of the old phrase. So 
in the phrase urhs vetus the vowels u and e took the accent, and 
the accented e seems at times to have been written like the long 
e in archaic Latin, i.e., as en (cf. the Plautine word, thensaurus) . 
But we have reached the station at the foot of the hill on 
which the '^old city" stands. On our right in the valley winds 
the Paglia to join the Chiante just below^, the ancient Clanis, 
previously mentioned ; and the valley down which their united 
waters flow to join the Tiber produces the famous vino di 
Chiante, one of the best of Italian wines. Very good is the wine* 
of Orvieto, and renowned in all the country round, though it 
was not through its wine that I first heard of the town. Perhaps 
the reader Avill remember how in ' ' Kenilvvorth " Wayland Smith 
seeks the mysterious drug needed to compound the true Orvietan, 
the sovereign remedy against poisons, and of the difficulty with 
which he procures it from the Jew Yoglan. But we have no 
time to dwell on this ; for our town lies yonder on the top of a 
rock rising nearly eight hundred feet above the valley, and here 
at our elbow is the cable car, which is to take us up to its north- 
eastern gate. We mount it, and after a rapid ascent find our- 
selves at the entrance of the Corso, or main street of the town. 
Here omnibuses are waiting, and we take that of the Aquila 
Bianca, where the host speaks German. A short drive along the 
Corso, for the town is necessarily small, having only eight 
thousand inhabitants, and we enter the central doorway of the 
municipal palace, or town hall, and find our hotel occupying the 
other side of the square in its rear. The town hall is plain, but 
stately; and we notice proclamations following the old Roman 
style, and headed S.P.Q.U. This is a general custom in modern 
Italy, and when we come to Siena we find the heading S.P.Q.S., 
and in Florence S.P.Q.F. In our hotel we are assigned a room 
comfortable and beautifully clean, as is the way with German 
hosts, and when we come down to the dining room the table is 
very satisfactory, and not merely in the wine offered. After 



328 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



lunch I have a short chat with our host, who has few guests at 
this season, but hopes that travellers will soon learn to appre- 
ciate the cool, pure air of his town. There are no frosts, however, 
he tells me, and for confirmation points to a number of ancient 
olive trees just outside the window. These would perish at once 
if exposed to severe frosts, and that is the reason they are sc 
seldom to be found north of the Apennines. 



^ 


1 


-v.-^*, .:^ 




' '. . . ..l'^' 





CLIFF NEAR PORTA MAGGINE, ORVIETO. 



As it draws towards evening we take the Corso westward to 
the Porta Maggine, and here we find tlie cliffs of red tufa de- 
scending perpendicularly 770 feet to the plain. The gate is a 
little to the right of the point presented in our view, and from it 
a narrow, winding road takes us down the face of the cliff to the 
valley of the Paglia. We are on the northern edge of the vol- 
canic part of Italy, and the Lake of Bolsena is the last of a 



A VISIT TO ORVIETO. 329 

series of ancient craters to which belong the Lakes of Nemi and 
Albano, the "pair of eyes" that meet our gaze as we look down 
from the summit of Monte Cavo. Very stately are the cliffs, 
festooned at the top with vines, and crowned with the towers of 
the old city. But there is an older city here below, the city of 
the dead of old Volsinii (or was it Salpinum?) — ^a necropolis of 
massive masonry of regular and perfect workmanship, but with- 
out cement. It lies just at the foot of the cliffs, but the tombs 
are not hollowed in the rock, as in most cemeteries of Southern 
Etruria. They are arranged like the houses of a town, and are 
divided by streets that cross each other at right angles. We 
take a path through a field of oats to the house of the guardian, 
and find there his wife and boy, who lead us to the tombs. We 
come to structures of neat masonry about nine feet high and 
nearly six feet wide at the base. The door terminates above in* 
a rude approximation to an arch, got by the projection of the 
successive courses of masonry on each side. In these tombs were 
found a few articles of pottery of a very archaic type, but no 
mirrors or articles in bronze except of the most primitive char- 
acter. The walls were not decorated within by paintings, as is 
the case with most Etruscan tombs. Everything seems to indi- 
cate their great antiquity, older than the invention of the arch 
in Etruria, says Dennis, and in all probability earlier than the 
foundations of Rome. On the slab that forms the lintel of the 
door is an inscription in letters that closely resemble our own, 
and I was struck with the resemblance of the whole arrangement 
to that of many vaults in the hillside of our own Necropolis. 
Each inscription begins with the letters mi, which Muller con- 
nects with the ending sijai — "I am." One is as follows: "Mima- 
markestriasnas, ' ' and the likeness of Mamarkes to the Latin 
Mamercus is striking. 

But the glory of Orvieto is its duomo or cathedral, built to 
commemorate the ''Miracle of Bolsena," to my mind one of the 
most repulsive of modern miracles — a miracle intended to rivet 
on the laity the fetters of priestly rule. In the year 1263 a Ger- 
man priest, living in Bolsena, who felt strong doubts about the 
Real Presence in the Host, found as he broke it that it was 
changed into flesh, from which the blood flowed on the napkin 
that wrapped it, and the flow was so copious as to reach even 



330 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



the footboard of the altar. Urban IV., who was then in Orvieto, 
sent for the Host and its wrappings and had them preserved 
there. Before long there was fashioned for them a silver reli- 
quary of wonderful workmanship, with beautiful enamelling, in 
which they are still kept, or rather the napkin is still kept in the 
Capella del Corporale, or Chapel of the Napkin, at the east end 
of the cathedral. For in 1290 Pope Nicholas IV. laid the founda- 
tion of a cathedral dedicated to the Virgin, and for centuries 
there were employed in its construction and decoration the best 
painters and craftsmen of the Renaissance. Especially striking 
is its facade, facing westwards, over 170 feet high and 130 feet 




POZZO DI $AN PATRICIO, ORVIETO. 



wide, on which about and above its triple arch and rose window 
we have pictured in glowing mosaics the world story from the 
Creation till the Last Judgment. ^Fuch of the work is Modern 
Restoi'ation ; but the effect is wonderfully bright, and Jacob 
Burckhardt calls it the greatest and richest polychromatic struc- 
ture in the world. It seemed to me far more imposing in its 
effect than the fagade of St. Mark's in Venice, which is dwarfed 
by the neighboring towers, and loses some of its effect from the 
glow of color that meets your eyes from every side of that won- 



A VISIT TO ORVIETO. 331 

derful square. But Orvieto's facade has nothing to dim its 
lustre, and the handful of beggars that sit before it imploring 
our pity by their squalor only enhance the brightness of its 
beauty. Especially fine is the rose window above the central 
arch with its setting of saints, apostles and prophets. The cathed- 
ral, like that of Siena, is built of alternate blocks of white and 
black marble, but can hardly be said to attain to the dignity of 
its magnificent facade. 

The interior has also its interest, though it is not so bright as 
the exterior, being lined with grey limestone, alternating with 
bands of dark basalt. For a moment the great interior seems 
almost empty, but our attention is soon attracted by pictures 
and statues of considerable interest. These are of little moment, 
however, compared w^ith the new chapel at the end of the right 
nave. Here Fra Angelico came in the year 1447 and worked for 
three months on the decoration of the ceiling above the altar. 
It is valued among the noblest of his works, but its interest is 
slighter than that of the pictures executed here about fifty years 
later by his pupil, Luca Signorelli, who completed the decoration 
of the chapel, depicting the Fall of Anti-Christ and the Last 
Judgment, with scenes from ancient mythology and from the 
Divine Comedy of Dante. His treatment of the human body in 
its various attitudes is far beyond Fra Angelico 's range, and the 
dramatic vigor shown by his work, especially by his Inferno, is 
very striking. This picture is of interest from its influence on 
Michael Angelo, who, Vasari says, derived from it many motives 
for his Last Judgment. 

But one grows weary of fonts and shrines and tombs, and 
even of the frescoes of Signorelli, and there is a magnificent 
view awaiting us from the site of the citadel near the spot where 
we entered the town. The place is now a promenade, with an 
amphitheatre for dramatic repres^entations in the open air. But 
we have come to see the valley of the Tiber and the Umbrian 
hills, and it is wonderful with what relief in the country which 
has most of art to display one turns to its still more magnificent 
display of natural beauty. But hard by there is a curiosity not 
to be matched elsewhere to my knowledge — the famous Avell of 
St. Patrick. It was after the sack of Rome, and Clement VII. 
had escaped from the hands of the Emperor's soldiers, and was 
2 



332 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

in Orvieto, where he hoped to defend himself. So to be sure of 
a supply of water, he sent for the great architect, San Gallo, and 
bade him cut a well in the rock. For over twelve years the work 
went on, and was finished only in 1540. The well, cut in the 
tufa, is 46 feet across, and goes down 180 feet before it finds a 
spring. About the well run two passages or inclined ways in 
spirals, so arranged that the doors lighting each front on op- 
posite sides of the well, so that as we came up from the spring 
we saw again and again another party descending. Down and 
up these inclined ways went teams of oxen, drawing loads of 
water to the citadel in which was the well-head. As the keeper 
opened the door to admit us, he started back before the leap of 
the largest green snake we had seen; but a couple of blows with 
his club disposed of the poor creature, which had betaken itself 
to the shelter of the structure from the heat of the sun. Re- 
freshed with our view from the citadel and our cool walk into 
the heart of the rock, we took train for Siena, hoping to see even 
greater wonders, as is always the case with the traveller whoso 
fancy always thinks of the coming wonders as clad in brightest 
colors. But it is needless to add that we found few places even 
in Italy to match this ancient hill town in variety of interest. 



B 



When the Child is King 

I ABE, so long as^o enshrined 
In a stable bare and gray, 
Something of Thy sweeter mind, 
Of Thy love for all Thy kind, 
Rules us on Thy natal day. 
And because a shepherd band — 

Sages, too, with gifts in train — 
Knelt and kissed a baby hand, 
Yearning for some wee command, 
So to-day a child shall reign. 
— From " A Child's Christmas Tree," in the December 
Everyhody's, 



ROBERT W. SERVICE. 333 

Robert W. Service 

RTJBY C. HEWITT, '11. 

ROBEET W. SERVICE, who has won fame with his 
first book of verse, " Songs of a Sourdough," is a 
young man with promise of even greater success before 
him; yet he is very modest about his work. He asserts that 
he was much surprised at the enthusiastic reception of his 
poems, which he wrote at first merely as a pastime, and be- 
cause he felt he must pour out the feelings inspired in him by 
Nature amidst the vastness and grandeur of the ISTorth. He 
says of himself, 

" It's the great, big, broad land 'way up yonder, 
It's the forests, where silence has lease; 
It's the beauty that thrills me with wonder, 
It's the stillness that fills me with peace." 

Service was born in England in 1874, but received his 
early education in Glasgow. He was a very precocious child, 
and started to write verses when almost an infant. There is 
an amusing anecdote told of a grace which came impromptu 
from his lips, when at dinner with his grandfather, at a very 
early age. He said: 

"Lord bless the meat and bless the pepper; 
Bless wee Harry when he writes a letter. 
Bless us all here, that is, us five. 
And keep the rest downstairs alive." 

It was an appeal from his young mind to his grandfather 
to occasionally change the form and wording of his grace before 
meals. 

He came to Canada about twelve years ago, and, seized with 
a " wanderlust," travelled for a couple of years as a common 
tramp, up and down from Victoria to Mexico, visiting the 
most important cities and towns on the Pacific coast. His 
feelings during these years of such varied experiences are 
admirably expressed in his poem, " The Tramps " : 



334 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

" Can you recall, dear comrade, when we tramped God's land together, 
And we sang the old, old Earth-song, for our youth was very sweet; 

When we drank and fought and lusted, as we mocked at tie and tether. 
Along the road to Anywhere, the wide world at our feet? 

•' Along the road to Anywhere, when each day had its story; 

When time was yet our vassal, and life's jest was still unstale; 
When peace unfathomed filled our hearts as, bathed in amber glory, 

Along the road to Anywhere we watched the sunsets pale. 

"Alas! the road to Anywhere is pitfalled with disaster; 

There's hunger, want, and weariness, yet Oh! we loved it so! 
As on we tramped exultantly, and no man was our master; 

And no man guessed what dreams were ours as, swinging heel and 
toe, 
We tramped the road to Anywhere, the magic road to Anywhere, 

The tragic road to Anywhere, such dear, dim years ago." 

About six years ago he became a clerk in the Bank of Com- 
merce and is now teller in the branch in Dawson City, his 
other positions having been Kamloops, Vancouver, Skagway 
and White Horse. 

Most of Service's poems deal with the free life of the 
frontier, mine and camp, as it is in this coimtry. Taken to- 
gether, they form an effective picture of che grandeur and 
lure of the great, strange country of the Yukon. But this 
writer paints men into his picture, men of flesh and blood, 
who toil, and sin, and accomplish, who dream and despair. 
Listen, as one of them speaks, in '^ The Spell of the Yukon " : 

"I wanted the gold, and I sought it; 

I scrabbled and mucked like a slave. 
Was it famine or scurvy — I fought it; 

I hurled my youth into a grave. 
I wanted the gold, and I got it — 

Came out with a fortune last fall; 
Yet somehow life's not what I thought it. 

And somehow the gold isn't all. 

" No! There's the land. (Have you seen it?) 

It's the cussedest land that I know; 
From the big, dizzy mountains that screen it. 

To the deep, death-like valleys below. 
Some say God was tired when He made it; 

Some say it's a fine land to shun. 
Maybe; but there's some as would trade it 

For no land on earth — and I'm one. 



ROBERT W. SERVICE. 335 

"You come to get rich (damned good reason), 

You feel like an exile at first; 
You hate it like hell for a season, 

And then you are worse than the worst. 
It grips you like some kinds of sinning; 

It twists you from foe to a friend. 
It seems it's been since the beginning; 

It seems it will be to the end." 

Mr. Service has ever found an attraction in the seamy side 
of life, and the majority of his poems deal with that stratum 
of humankind. Let me quote from his own words, in dis- 
cussion of his poems : " My poems," he says, " were published 
with the hope that the horny-handed miner might find in them 
something that comes Avithin the scope of his own experience 
and hug them to his rough heart on that account. . . . I ^ 
don't believe in pretty language and verbal felicities, but in 
getting down close as I can to the primal facts of life, getting 
down to the bed-rock of things. I get as close in touch with 
nature as possible,'' he continues, ^^ even if I have to touch it 
in the raw. I am rather a pessimist. The side of life that 
reflects disillusion and despair makes a strong impression on 
me." He loves the northland with its roughness and loneli- 
ness. He loathes society and conventionalities. In fact, he 
once remarked, of course somewhat jestingly, that his idea of 
eternal punishment is one everlasting society where life would 
be one long-continued pink tea. 

Service's volume of poems deserves and has received a 
hearty welcome, because, as has been shown, it marks a de- 
parture from the old lines taken by Canadian versifiers. The 
poems are, in general, written in the Kipling style of expres- 
sion, and he is often called " The Canadian Kipling." ITever- 
theless, they cannot be said to lack originality on that account. 
Many a would-be poet has attempted to copy Kipling's style, 
yet we know of none whose verses have ever attained the popu- 
larity of " The Songs of a Sourdough," over twenty-seven 
thousand copies of which have been published and sold within 
a year. They have a distinct quality of " Canadianism " and 
are striking and forceful. They deal with the primal instincts 
and passions of men in direct and virile language, with many 
a strain of humor or touch of pathos. 



333 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

" Say! you've struck a heap of trouble — 
Bust in business, lost your wife; 
No one cares a cent about you; 
You don't care a cent for life. 
Hard luck has of hope bereft you; 

Health is failing, wish you'd die — 
Why, you've still the sunshine left you, 
And the big blue sky." 

There are those that claim that the work of a rough man's 
hand, the workings of a rough man's mind and heart, and the 
speeches of a rough man's lips, are unfit subjects for poetic 
utterance. Yet in '^ Songs of a Sourdough " Eobert W. Service 
has thrilled more readers, and got nearer to the hearts of the 
old-time miners, than any other verse-maker in all the length 
and breadth of the great Dominion. In the " Call of the 
Wild," for example, which could never be left out of an 
anthology of Canadian verse, he certainly sees the l^orthem 
Wilderness through the eyes of a man into whose soul it has 
entered. 

"Have you gazed on naked grandeur, where there's nothing else to 
gaze on. 
Set-pieces and drop-curtain scenes galore; 
Big mountains heaved to heaven, which the blinding sunsets blazon. 

Black canyons where the rapids rip and roar? 
Have you swept the visioned valley, with the green stream streaking 
through it; 
Searched the Vastness' for a something you have lost? 
Have you strung your soul to silence? Then for God's sake go and 
do it; 
Hear the challenge, learn the lesson, pay the cost." 



Come where the ice-crystals crackle and crinkle! 

(Over the meadows, oho!) 

Haste where the flakes of the snow 
Spangle and sprinkle the fair periwinkle. 

Whirl where the piping winds blow! 

(Merrily, love, let us go!) 

— ^From " A Christmas Glee," by Clinton Scollard, in the 
December Metropolitan. 



THE KING MOOSE. 337 

The King Moose 

MISS E. STEWART. 

THE foreman of the shack, a burly Scotchman, turned sud- 
denly from the fire to the group of men at the table. 
"Who goes out first in the spring?" he asked. 
A few moments of excited conversation, and then Pierre Car- 
Ion, the little Frenchman, turned. ''Dan, I see in de forest de 
trail of de Moose King ; who keel heem go out de firs ', eh ? We 
tak it so, eh?" and the men nodded their assent. 

''King Moose, ugh!" grunted Adjo, "me shoot, ugh!" and 
the men roared. Adjo, the Indian, had wandered in on a cold 
fall night three months earlier ; he was a ' ' wee bit off, ' ' Dan had 
said, so they never left him alone in the shack, or trusted him 
on any expedition. Adjo kill the King Moose! Ha-ha! 

Adjo bent low over his moccasin-thong, and tugged hard at- 
it; his eyes were determined. It was the day after the conver- 
sation about the moose. He and Carlon were alone in the shack. 
The Frenichman had slipped on the ice and broken his leg, and 
the doctor must be brought. Adjo, after the manner of his 
race, was, in his childish way, kindness itself to his friend. 

He stroked Pierre's head. "De doctor come quick," he said, 
and turning abruptly, left the shack. 

Walking was heavy, and the nearest doctor ten miles off, but 
Adjo travelled quickly, the vision of Pierre's face, white and 
drawn with pain, goading him on. It was only when he had 
seen the doctor start back with a fresh guide that he rested. 
Then he turned into one of the stores and bought a little biscuit 
and bacon. This he divided, putting one part into his pocket, 
and carrying the other in his band as he started off on the long 
tramp home. The ' ' crunch, crunch ' ' of his snowshoes was music 
to the Indian, as, bending his head, he struck off across the 
snowy stretch with a long, even stride. 

He did not return the way he had come, but, turning to the 
right, skirted the hill, and went on through the forest. Half-way 
through, he ate his own little lunch, and, laying the other close 
by, knelt before it and chanted a little prayer in his own tongue. 
Then he loaded his gun and continued on his way. Ho had not 



338 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

gone far when he stopped suddenly and wheeled to his left. 
Only an Indian could have heard the snapping of the twig that 
caused Ad jo to circle as he did. Gradually, closer and closer he 
came, creeping, gliding and listening, till, rounding a clump 
of cedars, he uttered a satisfied ''Ugh!" 

Circling again, he came suddenly upon the browsing animal. 
He shot twice ; then crept closer, and kneeling before the head, 
cried aloud: "De King Moose! He is de King! 0, Manitou, 
say to Winawaa dat Adjo he shoot de King Moose! Ugh! Ugh!" 

Then taking a little moccasin from his pocket, he fitted it into 
the footmark of the moose, and cried again to the stars, "It is 
my Winawaa. 0, Manitou, it is her. She is lead me to de King 
Moose, to de Happy Hunting Ground!" 

It was night — a clear, starry Januarj^ night — when Adjo 
reached the shack. The men met him at the door, showing him 
a respect that nothing but his service to Carlon could have 
wrung from them. After the first volley of questions had been 
answered, Pierre, from where he sat propped up before the fire, 
said, ''Adjo, you haf de sense, eh?" 

"Ugh!" 

"Den pourquoi tak de bon grub and leaf it in de forest?" 
And one of the other men said, "Yes, Adjo, tell us why, and 
you'll have a chance at de King Moose." 

Adjo, kneeling, began, "My wife! you say? Ugh! Winiwaa 
she leave me. She go to de good Manitou. She live in de forest. 
She call me in one night to come here. I come. Her spirit it 
need food. I give it her. Dat is all." Adjo rose from his knees 
and ended as he turned to his bunk : 

"De King Moose, he is dead. I kill him. Winawaa lead me. 
You find him by de beeg pine. He haf de moccasin of Winawaa 
on hees neck. I put it there ; it show ! Ugh ! ' ' 

And Adjo was the first to go out in the spring; but the men 
never forgot it. Long years after Adjo had followed Winawaa 
to the Happy Hunting Ground, they told the story round the 
fire, and pointed to the place over the door where the head of 
the moose was mounted, with a little beaded moccasin dangling 
from one of its antlers. 

[Note. — In the lumber districts of the north-lands, the killing of the 
*' king " moose is regarded as a wonderful fp ^t by the hunters and especially 
by the Indians. -Ed.] j^V 



" RING OUT THE OLD, RING IN THE NEW." 339 
'' Ring out the Old, Ring in the New '' 

CARRIE B. DUNNETT, '09. 

O^ summer days Aunt Kitty usually sat on her 
veranda, as it was such an excellent vantage-ground 
from which to observe the neighborhood's activity. 
Moreover, it was very pleasant there, for a beautiful wood of 
elms and maples lay just at the foot of the slope, and at the 
left stood the little white church and the stone schoolhouse 
which represented to Aunt Kitty's mind the two sweetest 
things in life, Sabbath worship and the joys of childhood. 

Farmhouses and big red barns made bright touches of color 
amid the rolling hills and sunny meadows. Aunt Kitty's 
bright eyes saw beauty everywhere, but to her the best of it 
all was her cottage. It was small and white and covered with 
Virginia creeper ; it stood under the huge old maple which had 
been spared by her father when he was clearing the land in 
pioneer days of eighty years ago; it was her very own and 
contained all her earthly possessions. It was home. 

Aunt Kitty's cheery presence and sympathetic face were 
welcomed everywhere. Neighbors and relatives alike felt 
their family circles were never quite complete without her, and 
sometimes she would say, between a laugh and a sigh, that 
she ^^ had not time to go home." At midsummer, however, 
she was sure to be at home, for then her grandnieces from the 
city came to spend a few weeks at the cottage. You might have 
seen them every evening, seated on the veranda steps, gazing 
with tender, interested eyes on the white-haired old lady in the 
high-backed rocker. For Aunt Kitty had both a good memory 
and a fine vein of humor, and she heartily enjoyed " remin- 
iscencing," as the girls called it. She would tell of the 
anxious days and weary nights when fever had raged in the 
old home and when doctors had been too far away to be avail- 
able ; or of the cruel shock when word came that ^' poor 
William" had found a watery grave as he was coming out 
from the Old Land; and then tears would trickle down her 
wrinkled cheeks. But oftener the story was cheery, for Auntie 
laughed more readily than she wept. Then she would teU of 



340 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

the frolics of her girlhood, of the merry evenings that followed 
" bees " and " raisings " ; or she would relate many instances 
of the foibles and eccentricities ("notions," she called them) 
of her neighbors. Certainly Aunt Kitty's stories, unlike 
present-day productions, were not intended for one presenta- 
tion only; they were never abandoned on account of antiquity. 
In fact, if you knew the topic under discussion, you could be 
reasonably sure as to wbicb story Aunt Kitty would tell. But 
what of that! It was always appropriate and pleasing. The 
girls soon came to regard these anecdotes as familiar friends 
who emerged at intervals from the misty past to brighten the 
quiet twilight hours on the veranda. A favorite story was 
that of an old man of rather doubtful honesty who always 
ascribed his prosperity in life to the largeness of the sums 
which he paid to the minister's salary. " My wife said I paid 
too much last year," he told Aunt Kitty, " but the Lord made 
it up to me d'rectly, for before the week was out the butcher 
came along and paid me ^ve dollars for a calf that wasn't 
worth a hit more than three." 

But the time came when Aunt Kitty's cottage was opened 
to another occupant. An only sister in far-off Oregon wrote 
to tell of her husband's death and of her own impoverished 
condition. Auntie's kind heart was touched at once and 
although she sighed softly as she thought of the thus-far- 
undisturbed serenity of her life she gladly welcomed to her 
home the weary traveller from " over the line." 

Harriet was more sensitive than her sister, and more emo- 
tional. She spoke her mind impulsively and unreservedly, 
which Auntie never did, but she was the less reluctant of the 
two to retract her words. It was, perhaps, not strange that 
the two old ladies, fond sisters though they were, should " rub " 
one another almost constantly. Each had grown old in doing 
things in her own way. Neither felt it compatible with the 
dignity of gray hairs to yield to the other's " notions." 
Harriet had been cheered for forty years by the delicious 
flavor of green tea. Aunt Kitty could drink only black. 
Auntie's canary persisted in singing jubilantly just as Harriet 
was " dropping off " into her afternoon nap. A deep griev- 
ance was the placing of Harriet's huge old bureau, which she 



" RING OUT THE OLD, RING IN THE NEW." 341 

had brought all the way from Oregon. True, there was no room 
for it in Auntie's tiny cottage, but it seemed sacrilege to let it 
stand out in the woodhouse at the back. Auntie's face was 
becoming a trifle less sunny; Harriet's voice was taking a 
higher key; discord was doing its bitter work. Many a night 
two white heads in quaint, tight-fitting caps would seek their 
pillows in apparent peace, while two hearts were beating 
tumultuously over some disputed right. Aunt Kitty was less 
voluble about her annoyances than Harriet. " I did not say 
much," she told us afterward, ^' but I kept up a terrible 
thinking." 

Months passed by and winter came, bringing snow and 
ice to cover the bare, brown fields and leaf-strewn ditches. 
The windows of the cottage were frost-covered every morning 
until the fire asserted its strength, but there was a coldness in 
the air within the cosy " living-room " which could not be 
accounted for by the record of the thermometer. The old clock 
told its tale to an apparently attentive audience; except for a 
few remarks about household duties, dignified silence reigned 
in the cottage. 

Christmas was drawing near. The little folk who lived 
across the road were looking eagerly forward to that best day 
of all the year. But alas for their hopes. On the very day 
before Christmas the mother fell ill, very ill. Aunt Kitty 
ran the risk of having her dishes misplaced in the cupboard, 
or of seeing her tea towel hung unevenly on the line, and went 
across the road to be her old helpful self in the sickroom. All 
day she stayed, and all the evening, and still she could not 
leave. Other hands did their utmost, but only Aunt Kitty's 
possessed the magic touch which brought some measure of 
relief to the sufferer. Day after day she stayed, until a week 
had elapsed; then, the white horse and its dread rider 
seemed to have passed the doorway, and the awful boding fear 
gave way to an overwhelming sense of relief. Aunt Kitty was 
almost exhausted, and when the bunch of excited children had 
been soothed to sleep she felt she could be spared. Throw- 
ing her shawl around her, she stepped out into the night. The 
air was clear and cold; a deep, almost solemn, stillness, hung 
over the world, a pervasive silence, broken only by the crunch- 



342 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

ing of the snow as Auntie's tired feet made their way along 
the path. When the old lady had climbed carefully up the 
slippery steps of the veranda she turned and looked long upon 
the familiar scene. 'No sound; all was peace and purity and 
beauty; just then the moon escaped from behind a cloud and 
flooded the snowy fields with silvery light. Aunt Kitty looked 
up at the moon as at the face of a trusted friend. Within 
the cottage the slow old clock was counting out the midnight 
hour. New Year's Eve! And midnight! And then the church 
bell began to- ring; sweet and clear its song rang out on the 
frosty air. 

" Ring out the old, ring in the new, 
Eing, happy bells, across the snow." 

Could it be merely the bell? Aunt Kitty was not sure. It 
seemed to her the air was full of unearthly music which floated 
about her and then was slowly wafted upward toward the silent 
stars. 

" Ring out the darkness of the land. 
Ring in the Christ that is to be." 

Soon the ringing ceased and the melody died away in linger- 
ing echoes. Aunt Kitty turned the doorknob softly and went in. 
The lamp was not burning and the fire had died down to a few 
embers. Its dim light fell on the tall old clock in the corner, 
on the rows of fine blue plates behind the glass doors of the 
cupboard, but it seemed to rest with a peculiar softness on 
the rocker before the fire where Harriet sat, fast asleep. In 
her lap lay her Bible and a letter — the one she so often read — 
the last her boy had written before his death away in the 
wilds of Texas. On the floor lay a photo, as if it had just 
slipped from her hand. Her husband's face ! And thus she 
had watched the Old Year out! As Aunt Kitty crossed the 
room the cat arose and mewed its welcome, and Harriet awoke. 
The two women looked at each other in silence for a moment, 
then Harriet said, with a tender light in her eyes, " I waited 
for you, Kitty, and I have been thinking. This is New Year's 
Eve!" Auntie smiled in the old way as she hung the tea- 
kettle over the coals and said, " Let's have a cup of tea, 
Harriet," and she took down the can of green tea. 



VICTORIA WOMEN'S RESIDENCE ASS'N. 343 

The Victoria Women's Residence and Educa- 
tional Association 

MRS. BURWASH. 

THE history of the Victoria "Women's Residence and Edu- 
cational Association is a plain tale of the somewhat 
dreary experiences of women who undertook the unin- 
viting task of raising money for a cause which few cared for and 
in which many utterly disbelieved. 

Still it is a record of "Something attempted, something 
done," and, as the thing accomplished is a valuable addition to 
the training of college women, it is not out of place that the 
story should be told in a college paper. 

When Victoria College began its work in Toronto in October, 
1892, there were fourteen women in attendance. Seven of these 
were from outside of Toronto, and had to find such places to 
live in as they could among the householders who announced 
themselves willing to receive • students. Their quest was rarely 
a pleasant one, and at times distinctly disagreeable. It not sel- 
dom happened that the woman in search of a home would be 
kept standing on the doorstep until she had introduced herself 
and explained the reason of her visit, then answered a list of 
questions proposed by the lady at the carefully guarded door, 
who, after scanning her over with doubt and disapproval, would 
close the interview by saying, ''Yes, we take in students, but I 
don't care to take women; I would rather have men." To make 
humble application to five or six houses in succession before 
being admitted to a dingy room in an attic was not a cheerful 
beginning of college. Then the woes that followed afterward' 
were too many to be recounted. 

These facts deeply impressed all those who were closely 
enough connected with the college to be aware of them with 
the necessity of providing a home where women could have the 
ordinary comforts of life and the privilege of companionship 
with each other. 

This was talked about with baited breath; for where could 
money be found for such an undertaking? 



344 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The college was just finding its way into the life of the 
University of Toronto, and was still in need of many things that 
required money. It came about in the good providence of God 
that the subject was mentioned to Miss Massey (now Mrs. 
Massey-Treble). Her keen insight into the educational needs of 
women at once perceived how seriously young women were 
handicapped by the lack of college residence. 

Miss Massey 's sympathetic approval was the first gleam in 
darkness, which later burst into a glowing light of thankfulness 
when it was announced that the late Mr. Hart A. Massey had 
made a gift of fifty thousand dollars to Victoria College for the 
purpose of building a residence for women students. Then those 
who had longed without hope were indeed glad at heart and 
took courage to make the effort to fulfil their own desires. 

Ladies representing the various Methodist churches were 
invited by the President of the College and the Secretary of 
Education to meet in the college chapel to consider ways and 
means of securing land necessary for the building and grounds 
of the women's residence. This invitation met with an encour- 
aging response. Early in March, 1897, the first meeting was 
held. Dr. Carman, General Superintendent of the Methodist 
Church, was in the chair, and around him on the platform were 
ranged the President of the College, some members of the staff, 
and several representing the Board of Regents. The practical 
result of this meeting was the formation of the association now 
known as The Victoria Women's Residence and Educational 
Association, but which in the beginning was called The Barbara 
Heck Memorial Association. This association was officially recog- 
nized by the college and authorized to collect money to any 
amount it chose to assume." Accordingly, the campaign was be- 
gun through the press and by personal canvass. The amount 
asked for was thirty thousand dollars ($30,000). The associa- 
tion was rarely fortunate in its choice of a treasurer. The late 
Mrs. George A. Cox had most successfully helped forward many 
good causes, and now gave this new call her hearty support. She 
very soon realized, however, on the one hand, that interest in 
college residence was too languid to ensure financial help, while 
on the other there was positive and freely expressed antagonism. 
So deeply did she feel the discouragement of the case that in 



VICTORIA WOMEN'S RESIDENCE ASS'N. 345 

the first year she questioned whether it would not be better to 
drop the whole matter. Upon further consideration, the home- 
less girls so appealed to her that she resolved to champion this 
forlorn hope to the end. 

In spite of discouragement, the association had many mes- 
sages of cheer, showing that there were many who understood 
and sympathized. From Newfoundland to the Pacific coast 
and from the missionary homes- in Japan there came contri- 
butions and kindly words, wishing the work Godspeed. After 
three years of strenuous endeavor the association had five 
thousand dollars to its credit in the bank. When the twentieth 
century fund was inaugurated and an urgent appeal made to the 
church to raise a million dollars in one year, Mrs. Cox took 
advantage of the opportunity to help forward the women's 
residence. * 

Her subscription to this fund was given on condition that 
ten thousand dollars should be used for the immediate purchase 
of the block of land lying north of Czar Street. Thus it came 
to pass that the residence for Victoria women was soon an accom- 
plished fact, and the college men secured their long-wished-for 
campus. 

The building now went on apace, and brighter days dawned 
for The Victoria Women's Residence and Educational Associa- 
tion. Many new friends came forward willing and eager to 
take some part in the completion of the home. The furnishing 
of Annesley Hall was a joy and delight to those who had worked 
for it from the beginning. Most generous gifts poured in from 
the city of Toronto, from towns and cities east and west, and 
from quiet country districts. In October, 1903, the Hall was 
opened for students, and for nearly five years the association 
has felt increasing satisfaction in the result of the work that by 
the munificent generosity of friends they have been able to 
accomplish. 

What remains for the Association to do? Perhaps that is 
best answered by quoting the article in its constitution which 
defines its work: ''The object of this Association shall be to raise 
funds to equip and maintain a residence for women students 
for Victoria College, to provide endowment for the same, to 
promote the interests of Victoria College, and to advance the 



346 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

cause of women's education in connection with the Methodist 
Church." If the Association is to fulfil its ideal there will be 
work to do in the future. Already it has been necessary to 
provide a second residence for women students. The question 
of endowment is answered by the fact that both residences are 
fully self-sustaining. When the way opens for the Association 
to promote college interests in any other way than they are 
doing at present, we are confident it will be undertaken with 
heartiness. 

The cause of the education of women is one that will last 
through the ages, and to the solution of the many questions in- 
volved in this subject The Victoria Women's Residence and 
Educational Association is giving its best thought and atten- 
tion, hoping that through the coming years it may be counted 
worthy to serve the interests of our rapidly developing country. 



Book Reviews 

Poetical Tragedies. By Wilfred Campbell. Toronto : William 

Briggs. 1908. 319 pp. 

This is a companion volume to the collected poems published 
in 1905 by the same author, and is worthy of our careful atten- 
tion. Two of the four dramas in the volume were published in 
1895 in a small volume. These were " Mordred, " based on 
Malory's "Morte d' Arthur," a drama of no mean power, espe- 
cially successful in the characters of Mordred and Dagonet, and 
containing many very charming little lyrics with a genuine 
Elizabethan flavor, and ''Hildebrand," a dramatic sketch of the 
great Pope Gregory VII., who enforced the celibacy of the priests 
and humbled the great Henry of Germany. One must give a 
certain meed of praise to the unbending character of the great 
cleric, but there is too much inhumanity in the unwdfing of the 
priests to make the play interesting to the general reader. 
''Morning," a new efi:ort, is a very patent sermon on modern 
conditions with old-fashioned stock characters. Placing the 
scene in long ago days does not for a moment conceal the mod- 
ernity of the drama. ''Daulac" is the dramatization of one of 
the most heroic deeds in our early Canadian history, but there 
does not seem to be enough motivation of the character and 



BOOK REVIEWS. 347 

doings of the villainous attorney, Desjardins. On the whole, the 
book is very interesting, and for students especially ''Mordred" 
will well repay study and comparison with the original and w^th 
Tennyson's story. 

The Selected Poems of William Wye Smith. Toronto : William 

Briggs. 1908. 230 pp. 

The veteran poet has here collected and sifted the w^ork of 
earlier years, dividing the poems into "Miscellaneous and Cana- 
dian" and "Scottish Lyrics," sections of about equal length, 
and "Children's Pieces." We are glad to see such old favorites 
as "The Second Concession of Deer," "The Canadians on the 
Nile," "Wi' the Laverock i' the Lift," "She Likit Him Raal 
Weel," preserved in this final volume. 




English C/iurc/i Expansion in Western Canada. By Rev. 
^Norman L. Tucker, M.A., D.C.L. 

This little volume is one of a series of monographs dealing 
with the work of the Church of England in the several great 
fields of missionary enterprise. The volume makes no attempt 
to touch the work of the other denominations, nor does it 
attempt an exhaustive study of the work accomplished by the 
English Church, but makes its appeal to the layman by sketch- 
ing in a general way the difficulties confronting the missionary 
in the various sections of our Western Mission field, the success 
already achieved among the Indians and the whites, and by 
presenting short biographies of a few devoted heroes prominent 
in English Church missions. Of particular interest is the out- 
line of the plan of campaign carried on by the mission society, 
and the work of the catechist on the prairie, Avhile the many 
facts and figures set forth would be of great value to the student 
carrying on a comparative study of missions. 

An earnest appeal is made to the Church in the mother land 
for support of a national church in a young and growing nation. 

J. E. B. 

3 



VOL. 
XXXII 



Acta Victoriana. 



No. 4. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, J908-1909. 

J. V. McKenzie, '09 - - ■ - Editor-in-Chief. 
Miss C. Dunnett, '09, ) t si-p-j,-,. Miss K. Lukes, '10, \ j , 

M. H. Staples, '09, | Literary. F. J. R. Staples. 10, / ^oc^^s. 

Clyo Jacksox, B. a., Missionary and Religious*. J. E. Horning, '09, Scientific. 
A. L. Burt, '10, Personals and Exchanges. O. V. Jewett, '10, Athlelics. 



Board ok Management: 

F. C. Mover, '09, Business Manager. 

W. MooREHOUSE, '11, Assistant Business Manager. W. A. Deacon, '11. Secretary 

Advisory Committee : 
Peliiam Edgar, Ph.D. C. C. James, M. A., Deputy Minister of Agriculture. 



TERMS: $1.25 A YEAR; SINGLE COPIES, 15 CENTS. 

Contributions and exchanges should be sent to J. V. McKenzie, Editor-in-Chief 
Acta Victoriana : business communications to F. C. Mover, Business Manager 
Acta Victoriana, Victoria University, Toronto. 

Editorial 

"Resolutions " — A Quasi-Parable 

THERE was Once a Man who Posed as a Critic. He Ridi- 
culed Everything — whether Literature, Politics or 
Hockey. Most People Voted him a Bore, but his Friends 
continually Marvelled at his Wisdom and said ''How Clever! 
How Keen his Judgment!" So they came to Regard him as an 
Universal Authority. This Idea he did not Criticize. 

And Behold it came to pass that on a New Year's Eve the 
Critic sat in his Den Surrounded by a Circle of his Admirers. 
And in Course of Time they began to Talk about Resolutions, 
and Particularly those which are Wont to be Made at the Begin- 
ning of a New Year. And when his Friends had all Hesitatingly 
Expressed their Views and Told of their Good Intentions for the 
Coming. Year, they waited Eagerly for Avhat the Critic might 
have to Say. 

As soon as he had Paused Long Enough to give the Desired 
Impression of Deliberation, the Critic Solemnly Cleared his 
Throat, Tilted his Chair Backwards, and Began. "Why Be so 
Foolish as to Make Resolutions at alH How many of You have 
ever Kept One?" And he Glared Fiercely about the Room. 
His Admirers Glared at their Boots. Emboldened, he Went On : 



EDITORIAL. 349 

^'I'll bet Five Dollars against a Plugged Quarter that out of 
Every Thousand Resolutions Nine Hundred and Ninety-Nine 
fail to Survive the Year. I tell you it is Useless to Make Them. 
Our Present is Bound Down by our Past, and Determined in 
Spite of the Resolves of the Present. Then Why Waste Time 
Making Resolutions? And, anyway, Why Make them on the 
First of January rather than on Any Other Day of the Year? 
Is One Day Better than Another? Bah! You Folks Make me 
Tired. To Make Resolutions at all is Foolish; to Make them at 
the Beginning of the Year in Preference to Any Other Time is 
to Show Traces of the Barbarous Superstitions which Enthralled 
Primitive Man. Such a Practice is Wholly Out of Place in our 
Present Day Civilization." And the Critic Brought his Foot 
down with a Bang — on the Cat's Tail. 

His Admirers were Crushed. To Them his Arguments were 
Unanswerable. They Expressed themselves Accordingly. They 
even Ventured to Thank the Critic for so Ably Pointing out their 
Errors. They Declared they would Make no More Resolutions. 
Thus the Critic Nipped their Good Intentions in the Bud and 
Increased his Self-Esteem at the Same Time. 

Now, while this Tale has not Much of a Plot, it is Intended 
to have a Moral. In the First Place w^e Ought to Think for 
Ourselves. We Ought not to Accept the Dicta of any So-Called 
Critic as Unquestionable. And, Secondly, in Spite of what the 
Critic said, it is Well to Make Resolutions. It is only Human 
Nature to do so. Everybody does — from the German Emperor 
down to Buster Brown. After all the Critic only Succeeded in 
Inducing his Admirers to Drop their Good Resolutions in order 
to Resolve to Make no More Resolutions. Then if it is but 
Natural to Make Resolutions, why not Make Good Ones ? 

Of Course we all Fail to Live Up to our Good Resolutions, 
but then, as the Poet says, '''Tis Better to Have Tried and 
Failed, than Never to have Tried At All." (Perhaps the Poet 
Didn't say this, but he Ought to Have Said it Anyway.) Even 
if we only Succeed in Keeping a Good Resolve for Twenty-Four 
Hours, we are that much Farther Ahead than we Would Have 
Been had we Made no Resolution. Next time we may Keep it for 
Twenty-Five Hours. We are Told that Even Broken Resolutions 
are Put to Some Use. 



350 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The Critic was Wrong when he Said that we are Bound 
Down by our Past. On the Contrary, it is the Succession of 
Presents that Makes the Past. So it is the Present that Deter- 
mines what our Past Shall Be. If we can Always Keep the 
Present Good, our Past may Look Out for Itself. 

As for Making New Year's Resolutions, the Critic was only 
Partly Right. We Believe that a Good Resolution may be Made 
as Effectively on the First of July as on the First of January, 
but there is Something about Beginning the New Year with New 
Resolutions that Appeals to us. Perhaps this is not Logical, but 
we do not Care for That. Although we Passed an Exam, in 
Logic once, we Do Not Believe it is the Only Thing in the 
World. 

Our Advice then would be : Take the Comments of Pro- 
fessional Critics with a Generous 'Grain of Salt.' Make All the 
Good Resolutions you Can, i.e., All there is even a Remote Possi- 
bility of your Carrying Out. To us the First of the New Year 
seems to be about the Best Time for Putting them into Effect, 
but Any Old Time is Better than No Time at all. And, Above 
All, don't be Discouraged if you Fail to Keep Them. Just Buck 
Up and Try Again. Remember, Somebody who was Perhaps a 
Greater Authority on Such Subjects than we are has said that 
"Rome was not Built in a Day." But Rome Was Built, and 
This Old World has Been Transformed, and it was all Because 
Resolutions were put into Effect. To do Anything Worth While 
Good Resolutions are as Necessary as Energy. m. h. s. 

<^ ^ <^ 

The College Song 

As was announced . in our last issue, the Union Literary 
Society have decided to offer a prize of ten dollars for the best 
college song to be submitted before the end of the first week in 
February. In announcing the conditions governing the compe- 
tition, it will, perhaps, be well to state some of the motives im- 
pelling the society to take this step. 

The advantages to be gained by having a suitable college 
song are obvious. To cultivate anything like the nec^essary esprit 
(le corps, it is an essential. What the National Antlioni is to a 
country the college song is to a college. 

But someone may say, ''Why, we have a college song, one 
that has stood the test of time, one that is dear to grads. and 



EDITORIAL. 351 

imdergrads. Why give up ' The Old Ontario Strand ' ? " To 
such a person we would say that we do not propose to give up 
' ' The Old Ontario Strand. ' ' It is fraught with memories which 
make it dear to every true lover of Vic, and we hope that Vic's 
halls will ever remain attuned to its melody. Yet there has been 
much criticism of the old song. From almost every conceivable 
standpoint it has been attacked. Some have found fault with 
the air, others with the rhythm ; to some the literary form of the 
song is objectionable, while others see no good in it at all. Per- 
haps the most valid objection that has been filed against its use 
is that it is not distinctive enough. It is shown that other colleges 
have songs similar in sentiment and identical in melody, and 
that a college song which is to be worthy of Vic ought to have 
a distinctive character of its own. 

Of course, it may be pointed out that few popular songs are 
completely proof against criticism of this nature. Still, the 
Literary Society felt that if it was in its power to sc^cure a song 
which did not lend itself to so much criticism it was its duty to 
do so. Accordingly the present competition has been announced. 
It may be said that "The Old Ontario Strand" will not be laid 
on the shelf. The new song must compete with the old, even 
after it has been accepted. "Fair field and no favors" will be 
the motto. If the new survives, why then " Le Roi est mort; 
Vive le Roi/' 

The regulations governing the competition are as follows : 

1. Songs must not exceed 21 lines, exclusive of chorus. 

2. No prize shall be awarded until the accepted song has 
been successfully set to music. 

3. Although competitors are not required to furnish music, 
each author is invited to suggest a suitable tune for his song. 

4. All songs submitted shall become the property of the 
U. L. S. 

5. All graduates and undergraduates shall be eligible. 

6. In case no song reaches the standard required by the 
judges (a committee from the Faculty) no award will be made. 

Apropos of the college song. Mr. E. W. Wallace, '04, is 
teaching his boys in the school at Yuin Hsien to sing, along with 
other songs, "My Father Sent Me to Hwa Yin Tang." This is 
their yell : 



352 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

''Hwa yin. Hwa yin. 
Hay, hay, hay. 
Hwa yin. Hwa yin. 
Ray, ray, ray. 
Tiger." 
All this looks like preparation for transplanting (on foreign 
soil) our other cherished tradition, the "Bob Party." "The 
Hwa Yin Tang Bob" would sound well. 

<^ ^^ ^^ 

The College Glee Club 

Much of the halo of college tradition takes its rise in the songs 
w^hich find expression when a body of college men take a "rest 
from their labors." But whether it is that there has come a 
change in the spirit of our universities, or that in our college 
the men are suffering from the need of a closer residential life, 
certain it is that in this respect we are sadly deficient. Prac- 
tically the only place where typical college songs are heard is in 
the Glee Club car on one of their trips. Memories of such excur- 
sions are distinctive and bear no flavor of a sordid, financial, 
work-a-day world. 

Yet the practical and beneficial side of this organization 
has been often overlooked. Victoria College needs advertising, 
particularly among the prospective male students of the Pro- 
vince. Our success in athletics or in debate is hardly such as 
appeals to the ordinary man who is looking forward to a college 
career. Furthermore, we are handicapped by the reputation of 
being an entirely theological college. But when the Glee Club 
visits a town the youth of the place "sit up and take notice." 
A bit of college spirit and college fun, transplanted into their 
very midst, appeals to them, and every member of the club is an 
advertising agent to correct the idea that w^e are back numbers. 
More good work of the kind now needed by the college is done by 
one Glee Club trip than by years of ordinary advertising. 

Again, as a musical aggregation we have no need to be 
ashamed of them. Their record of concerts for three successive 
years in St. Catharines, Hamilton, Brantford, Guelph and simi- 
lar places speaks for itself. In addition to their efforts, the 
assistance of such talent as Miss Grace Merry, elocutionist, and 
Miss Maude Buschleu, violiniste, who appear at the concert in 
the College Chapel on January 25th, makes the Club well worthy 
of support. 




Yawning Craters of the Moon 



TO make a moon on a miniature scale, with a pot of paste 
and supply of gas, was the interesting experiment 
undertaken by M. Jules Bergeron, a member of the 
French Academy of Sciences, some years ago. 

In studying the effect of vapor, rising from beneath through 
a mass of the consistency of a thick starch, this scientist observ- 
ed that, when the surface of the mass became disturbed by the 
vapor, in passing through, a formation resembling a volcanic 
crater resulted. The similarity between these formations and the 
strange unexplained excrescences on the face of the moon, led 
him to begin a regular course of experiments. After many trials 
of various alloys, as mediums for his purpose, he found one con- 
sisting of seven parts of bismuth, two of cadmium, two of tin, 
and two of lead, which gave striking results when acted upon by 
a current of warm air. 

When the experiment was under way, one phenomenon noted 
was the formation of a large circular crater about the point from 
which the air-current escaped through the surface of the mass, 
around the edges of which rose that formation, resembling the 
edges of a cup, with which photographs have made all the world 
familiar as characteristic of volcanic craters. As the outer edges 
of the circular crater cooled, the air-current, no longer able to 
push the hardening mass farther out at the sides, formed a cone 
rising above the crater's lips, while the inner walls of the crater 
took more of a slope than the outer walls and the hollow within 
the circle deepened. Thus the mouths of the great volcanoes 
were closely imitated in small, and M. Bero^eron formed thereon 



354 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

a theory as to the composition of the moon's substance and the 
formation of its craters. 

M. Bergeron has his followers in the belief that the i craters 
of the moon were formed by a process similar to his, as carried 
out in this experiment, and that the mass of which the luminary 
is made up consists of elements not dissimilar from those he used. 
But there are other theories equally interesting and seemingly as 
well founded. One is that the surface or crust of the moon is of 
ice and not of earth or like substance. The belief that a cold 
atmosphere surrounds the planet is firmly held by some scientists, 
who put forth the idea that the craters, as we must call them, are 
the results of the rising of hot springs from the interior of the 
body. The idea held is that a boiling fluid, heated by inner fires, 
wells up to the surface periodically. It melts its way through the 
icy crust and overflows, then is sucked back and leaves a pit-like 
hole behind. Repetitions of this action gradually build up the 
edges of the crater and the cone, and so have much the same effect 
as the action of the gas upon a paste of molten lava and ashes. 

Those who oppose this latter theory, notably Monsieurs Loewy 
and Puiseux, argue that if the moon's surface were of ice, a spot 
of specially bright reflection would follow the position of the sun, 
a high-light, which would be visible from the earth. They hold 
that, as ice is a specially strong reflector of light there must 
necessarily be some sign of this '' bright spot" which some of the 
many observers who have watched for that very thing, would 
have found and recorded. The fact that nothing of the kind has 
been found, they claim, is incontrovertible evidence that the 
whole theory is wrong. As an added argument, the measure- 
ments taken by one observer, M. Landerer, give a value for the 
angle of polarization for the moon's surface, which is far nearer 
that of volcanic rocks than of ice. and this seems likewise to prove 
their contention. 

But the craters are there. That is the one indisputable fact 
and no explanation yet satisfies all observers. Powerful lenses 
have not yet enabled our eyes to recognize with certainty just 
w4iat sort of elements we have to deal with in the study and we 
cannot therefore be very sure that we are or are not upon the 
right track to solution of the problem. 



SCIENTIFIC. 355 

Professor X. S. Shaler, of Harvard University, states that the 
moon differs from the earth in that it lacks "the envelopes of air 
and water." He believes that there is no water on the lunar 
surface and supports his belief by citing the facts that no seas of 
discernible size have been discovered and that no rivers can exist 
where there is total lack of the reflection of the sun's rays which 
water would necessarily send out to prove its presence. The sur- 
face of the moon is as dark as would be our own world's rocks 
and plains and forests under such observation and lighting, and 
the presence of water against such a background, Professor 
Shaler believes, would be readily detected. For this reason he 
opposes the hot-spring theory of the formation of the craters, 
and those to whom his arguments appeal as conclusiye in regard 
to the surface water, accept his conclusion that another manner 
of accounting for the formation must be found. 

But Professor Shaler holds that craters are volcanoes, and 
this is the belief of many others. He writes that the pits are in 
many ways similar to the volcanic craters of the earth. He calls 
attention to the facts that they exist in many sizes, with no law" 
of equal distribution on the surface of the moon ; that in many 
instances they intersect each other, showing clearly that they 
were not all formed at the same time if by the same means, but in 
succession ; that the dark portions of the lunar surface, wiiich 
are rough and supposedly low, do not show as many or as large 
craters as the highlands, or light portions, which are believed to 
be the older parts of the surface ; and that the intersections show 
conclusive evidence that the larger of the craters are the older 
and the smaller ones the later formed. This proves, if it is en- 
tirely accepted, that whatever the - action which formed the 
craters or whatever the composition from which they were made, 
the energy of the action and the w^ideness of its effect have di- 
minished with time, until the crust has reached a degree of hard- 
ness which successfully resists the effort of a possibly weakened 
force to break it. 

Our largest volcanoes of earth are pigmies beside these for- 
mations on the moon. All our biggest fire-spouters together 
would not make one such crater as Tycho, w^hose lips reach up 
to the height of 17,000 feet above the plain which they enclose, 
and yawn in a fifty-four mile gap. Clavius, a southern neighbor 



356 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

of Tycho, opens her great maw till it measures one hundred and 
forty miles across, and there are yet larger ones among the 
craters. Ranyard suggests that the lunar ''Apennines" and 
other mountains, which form the shores or boundaries of what is 
called the Mare Imbrium, or ''Sea of Rains," now dead and 
dry, are the remains of a huge crater, and if so, it must have 
been over six hundred miles in extent. Our largest craters are 
not over sixteen miles in diameter. The crater in the island of 
Luzon, which is now filled up with the lake called Bombon, 
measures sixteen by fourteen miles in extent, and the crater of 
Assoan, Island of Kiushiu, Japan, is fifteen miles from lip to lip. 
Other craters of the earth measure from seven to nine and eleven 
miles in extent, but none approach in dimensions even those of 
middle size which our smaller neighbor can boast. 

Among other craters on the moon than those which have been 
already mentioned, are Cassini, more than fifty-seven miles in 
extent, and Helicon and Leverrier, twins, a thousand yards and 
more in depth. A pair of craters, named after Messier, stand in 
the midst of the Mare Foecundatis, or "Sea of Fertility," 
another of the great dead beds of what were once seas, and there- 
fore still so called. From these craters extends in an easterly 
direction a trail of white, forked, and looking like the tail of a 
comet. Observations taken in 1828 and 1837 recorded no dis- 
tinction between these two trails, which are now perfectly distinct 
and have different formation and dimensions. Even the untrain- 
ed and casual observer may distinguish between them. In a 
white spot called Linne, in the Mare Serenetatis, "Sea of 
Serenity," several of the older observers claimed to have plainly 
seen a crater or pit, but in 1866 Professor Schmidt recorded that 
it had disappeared, leaving even then only a very small opening. 

Changes are constantly taking place upon the moon's surface, 
"which are no less remarkable than the phenomena which have 
been manifested upon our earth. It is proved to the satisfaction 
of most scientists that w^ater and vegetation did exist at one time 
there, but that both have now disappeared, and that the whole of 
the great ball is now a desert waste. 



m^JUL 




niSSIONARY 



The Fulness of the Titne^ 

PROF. J. C. ROBERTSON^ M.A. 

THERE is a question of considerable interest which has 
never received adequate treatment; being, as it is, the 
sort of question that the historian leaves for the theo- 
logian and the theologian abandons to the historian. Why did' 
Jesus Christ come at just the period of the world's history that 
He did ? ^^ When the fulness of the time was come/' we read, 
*'God sent forth His Son." Just what was it that constituted 
this '^ fulness of the time"? Why might not the Messiah have 
<?ome just as well a thousand years earlier or later? 

This is a matter, be it observed, that is to be settled entirely 
apart from any theory that may be held of Christ's mediatorial 
office as Redeemer of the world. The at^Dnement, from its very 
nature, is timeless, in the sense that it is related to no particular 
epoch of history. To the theologian the Lamb has been slain 
from the foundation of the world. So that we have in this 
question I have raised a subject which in a singular way may be 
removed from the domain of theological controversy ; a question 
of pure history which involves no other theological assumption 
than this — that in the providence of God at that particular time 
Jesus Christ came to teach men the perfect way of life and to 
found the true and universal religion of mankind. 

One answer that many would have given in the days of 
St. Paul we may wholly disregard: it was then a widespread 
belief that the end of the world was at hand, and the coming 
of the Messiah was reofarded as the culmination of the world's 



♦ Part of a paper on St. Paul and Hellenism, read at the Theological 
Conference held in Victoria College in September, 1908. 



358 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

history. The lapse of 1900 years has left us less certain to-day 
that "the end of all things, is at hand." 

A second answer that has much more to commend it to us is 
that the events of history had paved the way for the rapid and 
effectual spread of the Gospel over the world to a degree and 
in a manner impossible at any previous period, and that the 
course of history in that ancient world will be found to have 
been in a very singular fashion preparing the way of the Lord 
and making His paths straight. Certainly no student of the 
expansion of Christianity can ignore the great significance of at 
least three co-operating factors w^hich I shall mention in the 
reverse order of their emergence in history : 

i. The universal dominion of the Roman emperors had 
broken down all narrow barriers of local or national jealousy 
and segregation, while at the same time a wise toleration of local 
usages (political, religious and social) left room for the develop- 
ment and spread of whatsoever could find soil for expansion. 
To the Mediterranean world from Persia to Britain, the Roman 
peace gave a settled government, a well-organized administra- 
tion of justice and a prosperity that many portions of that 
world have never since enjoyed. The great commercial high- 
ways of antiquity, which were now become also the main roads 
of communication between Rome and her outlying provinces, 
were thus the arteries through which flowed the surging currents 
of the vigorous and w^ell-ordered life of that vast empire. It 
is easy to see how greatly this unity and stability favored the 
propaganda of ^ a universal religion. 

ii. The conquest of the East by Alexander the Great and 
the policy of his successors had in. another direction furthered 
the unification of the ancient world. The Greek language — car- 
rying with it, as it did, Greek education and ideals, Greek 
literature and art and manners — was planted through the length 
and breadth of the regions conquered by Alexander, and so 
effectually that when Rome, in her turn, conquered the East she 
found Kgy])t, Palestine, Syria and Asia Minor practically Greek 
provinces. In this connection, two other facts should not be 
forgotten. Centuries before, Greece had already colonized ex- 
tensively in every part of the Mediterranean, with the result 
that, just as to-day the English tongue and Anglo-Saxon civil- 



MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS. 359 

ization are found scattered widely over all this planet, so after 
the sixth century B.C. one found Greek colonies everywhere in 
the known world from the Pillars of Hercules to the Euxine. 
And again, while the Romans, by their superior military skill 
and their more robust virtues, had conquered Greece, they had, 
as they themselves acknowledged, gone to school to the race they 
had just subdued. Whatever liberal education one found among 
the Romans, whatever tincture of refinement of life, whatever 
acquaintance with literature and the finer gifts of civilization, 
they owed directly to Greece. 

When Rome then in her turn conquered Asia Minor and 
Syria, she wisely made no effort to uproot Greek, but rather 
adopted the policy of spreading more widely than before that 
Western civilization that was now common to (J reeks and Rom- 
ans. The native Oriental civilization was pushed more and' 
more to the wall by the Grgeco-Roman civilization, which in 
St. Paul's time completely dominated the towns and cities, and 
was just beginning, but very slowly, to spread to the remote 
and primitive country districts. ''All who got any education,"' 
says Ramsay, speaking of Asia Minor, the scene of so much of 
the activity of the early Christian Church, "learned the Greek 
language and adopted Greek manners." 

The result of all this was that at the beginning of our era 
the civilized portion of mankind was becoming of one speech, 
the very name of which — the "common dialect" — is significant 
of its wide use. In every settled community from Spain to 
Persia Greek was understood, even where it had not actually 
quite displaced the use of the mother tongue. 

Thus in the first century the expansion of Christianity not 
only followed the great Roman roads of inter-communication, 
but also was directly related to, and dependent upon, the exten- 
sion of the Greek language. "Where the Greek spirit and edu- 
cation were completely dominant, the new religion spread with 
considerable rapidity; where the Greek education was unknown, 
the new religion seems to have made no progress at all," 
(Ramsay.) 

iii. A third factor contributing to the s])read of Christian- 
ity remains to be noticed — the dispersal of the Jews consequent, 
in part, upon the Babylonish captivity and, in part, upon the 



360 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

action of Alexander the Great in settling large numbers of Jews 
in his new city of Alexandria. How extensively the Jews had 
spread beyond Palestine over the Mediterranean world may l)e 
gathered from these figures given by Harnack for the first cen- 
tury A.D. : The Jews then numbered in all about four and a 
half millions (7 or 8% of the whole population of the Empire). 
Of these only 700,000 w^ere in Palestine — from one million to one 
and a half millions in Syria ; one million in Egypt, and one and 
a half millions in Asia Minor, Greece, Rome and other districts. 
To most of the Jew^s Greek was the language in common use, 
and the Greek version of their Scriptures, the Septuagint, was 
the familiar source of edification in their religion. Everywhere, 
too, these Jews of the Dispersal carried with them the institu- 
tion of the synagogue — the meeting place for religious instruc- 
tion and discussion — an institution which probably itself began 
in the Captivity, when they were deprived of the Temple service. 
To these synagogues, where Jewish monotheism and Jewish 
morality were inculcated (generally in the Greek tongue), and 
where the Greek version of their Scriptures was regularly read 
and expounded, there gathered also large numbers of Gentile 
adherents, who, without becoming complete pix)selytes, yet had 
their recognized part in the Jewish community. These are the 
God-fearing people — the devout men and women so often spoken 
of in Acts. Many a sincere seeker for salvation and peace of 
mind from among the pagan population of the cities of the 
Empire attached himself to the local synagogue; and not un- 
naturally (considering their receptive attitude and the fact 
that they were free from Jewish exclusiveness and pride) it was 
among these devout alien . adherents of the sj^nagogues that the 
new Gospel preached by Paul made its most rapid progress. 
In the Greek synagogues also, especially in Alexandria, was 
brought about that adjustment of vocabulary, that fitting of 
Greek terms to Hebrew conceptions (both being widened in the 
process), which was to furnish Paul with a terminology exactly 
fitted to his requirements. 

To sum up, the spread of the Gospel undoubtedly was largely 
conditioned and determined by these three factors — the dispersal 
of the Jews w4th their synagogues and alien adherents ; the wide- 
spread familiarity with Greek; and the universal dominion of 



MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS. 361 

Rome. And it is beyond a doubt also that no more favorable 
conjunction of circumstances had ever before existed for the 
spread of a new and universal religion. 

And yet, with all this, I cannot feel that we have here an 
adequate explanation of the problem raised at the beginning. 
Even if we grant that these favoring circumstances were 
(humanly speaking) indispensable to the success of the mission 
of Jesus, they have surely too much the character of externals 
— one might almost say of superficialities — to be the right answer 
to the question why in the eternal purpose of God was the 
Redeemer of the world to come at just this epoch. The phrase, 
"the fulness of the time," surely implies something more pro- 
found, something that touches more nearly the heart and soul 
of man whereby he lives, something that penetrates more deeply 
into that region of the mind and spirit where religious faith itself 
has its abode. 

There is another quarter in which it may be suggested we 
should look for a solution that seems to answer this last condi- 
tion — a solution, however, that, to my way of thinking, is more 
plausible than real. One of the commonplaces of the pulpit, 
from the days of the early apologists of the Church till now, is 
the denunciation of the corruption of ancient society in the age 
when Christianity appeared. The hideous picture so often drawn 
of an absolutely rotten moral condition in that Graico-Roman 
civilization w^ould suggest this explanation : that, inasmuch as 
the most brilliant and powerful civilization the world had known 
had issued in hopeless bankruptcy, it was now absolutely clear 
that man could not save himself, and that only divine grace 
could save the world. Man's extremity was God's opportunity. 
This view (which, I fancy, is widely held) I find thus expressed 
in Uhlhorn's '^ Conflict of Christianity with Paganism " : '' In 
Greece, in Rome, had been shown what the human spirit can 
accomplish in its own strength. It is capable of great things, 
and gloriously has it wrought, but all the greatness sank into 
ruin, all the glory paled, and one thing it could not do, it could 
not appease the longing of every human soul for the eternal; 
for God. The end of heathenism, as respects religion, is complete 
insufficiency, perfect despair of itself." Then, after a detailed 
review of the corruption manifest in various departments of 



362 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

life, the author reaches the conclusion 'Hhat the heathen world 
was ethically as well as relij^iously at the point of dissolution, 
and that there was no power at hand from which a restoration 
could proceed. . . . This power must come from anothei- 
source- — from above." 

Much the same view w^as doubtless in the mind of the writer 
of a recent article in the Christian Guardian , who somewhat 
rashly undertook to "sum up in two phrases" the characteristics 
of the Roman civilization in the time of the Empire — ''heartless 
cruelty and unfathomable corruption." 

Now^, one difficulty the candid and accurate historian finds 
in this line of argument is that it rests upon distortion and 
exaggeration. The evils portrayed undoubtedly existed just as 
depicted; every detail is correct, but the picture as a whole is 
false, because one-sided. What should we say of a similar 
sweeping condemnation of the Christendom of to-day by some 
high-minded and honorable Japanese, who, after viewing certain 
aspects of the life of our great cities and reading certain of our 
publications, were to pronounce the undiscriminating verdict, 
"Two phrases sum up Western eivilization — unbridled sensual- 
ity and unscrupulous self-seeking"? Uhlhorn himself acknow- 
ledges that "there is no poorer way of characterizing an age than 
that of sweeping all the dirt that can be found into one heap" 
and fixing our gaze exclusively upon that. The Christian his- 
torian and apologist should tell not only the truth, but also the 
whole truth. 

The evidence for this charge of exaggeration cannot possibly 
be given in this paper. For a more just view of the ancient 
world than the traditional one inherited from the caricatures of 
satirists and the denunciations of apologists, one should go to 
such an authoritative book as Dill's "Roman Society," where 
he will find the whole subject candidly and fully investigated, 
with due recognition both of the abnormal and monstrous de- 
pravity found in certain quarters and of the purity and sound- 
ness of morals that co-existed with that depravity. 

There, too, he will find that there is abundant ground for 
characterizing the age in which Christianity grew up as actually 
an age of moral reformation in the pagan world, and evidence 
of a movement towards a purer spiritual vision; and that, too, 



MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS 363 

quite apart from any influence emanating from the new religion 
just coming into life. 

As soon as doubt is cast upon the completeness of the bank- 
ruptcy of that ancient world, it becomes impossible to find the 
solution of our problem in the alleged desperate condition of 
paganism. We may still hold firmly to our belief that ultimately 
the pagan world would find peace and satisfaction only in the 
religion of Jesus, and we may yet be unable to accept the view 
that Christianity was planned to come just when it should have 
become clearly and finally evident that without it the world 
was helpless and hopeless. The Christian religion may well have 
been the only remedy that could save the world, but we are 
scarcely justified in saying that the remedy was administered 
when the patient was in the throes of dissolution, all .other 
treatment having conspicuously failed. The lines of Isaac 
Watts, '' Plunged in a ^'ulf of dark despair, Wo wretched sinners 
lay. Without one cheerful beam of hope. Or spark of glimmering 
day," we may accept as a description of the condition of the 
unregenerate world generally; but they furnish no clue to the 
question, Why did the Prince of Peace fly to our relief at just 
that epoch of the world's history and at no other? 

For myself, I prefer to look for the solution of the problem 
not on the dark side of ancient civilization but on the brighter 
side — to find it not in its monstrosities of evil but in its noblest 
aspirations and achievements. 

Let us go back for a moment to Uhlhorn's description of the 
situation. "In Greece," he says, ''in Rome, had been shown 
what the human spirit can accomplish in its own strength. It 
is capable of great things . . . but all the greatness sank 
into ruin," etc. 

I deprecate emphatically the view that in Greece and Rome — 
or in China and Japan — the human spirit has been accomplishing 
anything great in its own strength and apart from God. No 
sound theory of Inspiration needs to be bolstered up with the 
idea that the Divine Spirit has not abundantly manifested itself 
also in pagan lands. Surely, whatsoever is honest, just, lovely 
and of good report in any age or in any clime is but a mani- 
festation of that true Light that lighteth every man that cometh 
into the world. 



364 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

And so, in the philosophy and civilization of the pagan 
world, in its religious aspirations and in its efforts after a sound 
morality, I find not a race of men left absolutely to themselves, 
working apart from God in their own merely human strength, 
and as a result issuing in baffled futility and utter bankruptcy, 
but rather I find men made in the image of God, exercising God- 
given powers, and amid dimness and difficulty and disloyalty, 
yet under a divine guidance (whether it be termed Nature or 
Conscience or God), seeking the Lord if haply they might feel 
after Him and find Him. 

The true lines along which to work in solving the problem 
of the coming of Christianity at just that period of the world's 
history I believe to be a study of the preparation of the world 
to receive adequately the perfect revelation of truth made by 
Christ. And this preparation would have a two-fold aspect : 
first, the external preparation in the three ways sketched at the 
beginning of this paper; and second, an inner preparation of 
the spirit to enable the civilized world of that day to apprehend, 
to retain and to develop the new truths revealed. In short, if 
this view be correct, Christ came with His revelation when under 
the divine leading the Graeco-Roman world had been educated 
up to the point of appreciation. Upon such a study there is no 
space in this paper to enter, nor can I here even sketch the 
headings of the chapters under which the subject would be de- 
veloped. The purpose of what is here printed is achieved if 
those who have read thus far are stimulated to look with new 
interest and clearer vision upon that ancient world in which the 
seed of the Gospel was to be planted, and to find in "pagan" 
culture, thought and faith not mere human futilities and heathen 
blindness, but, equally with Jewish law, a schoolmaster to bring 
the world to Christ. 




ER50NALS 
EXCHANGES 



Class of '06 

JH. ADAMS is teaching in Peterborough High School. 
Miss F. M. Ashall is teaching mathematics in Trento.a 
High School. 
. E. E. Ball is the Moderns man in Clinton Collegiate Institute-. 
P. C. Bowman's address is care of Nichols Chemical Com- 
pany, Sulphide, Ont. 

H. G. Brown is engaged — in the teaching trade, Japan. 
W. G. Bull is preaching at Monticello, Ont. 
Miss E. L. Chubb is teaching in Westminster College, To- 
ronto. 

J. W. Cohoon is teaching in Leamington High School. 
Mrs. Connolly's address is 16 Tatsuoka Cho Hongo, Tokyo,. 
Japan. 

M. E. Conron is preaching at Walsh, in the Hamilton Con- 
ference. 

Miss K. E. Cullen is teaching in Ontario Ladies' College, 
Whitby. 

Miss A. E. Deacon is teaching in Alma College, St. Thomas, 

F. G. Farrill is pastor of the Kensington Avenue Methodist 
Church, Hamilton. 

A. B. Fennell presides over the Mathematics of Albert Col- 
lege, Belleville. 

W. E. Galloway is preaching at Sedgwick, Alta. 

A. M. Harley is with Watson, Smoke & Smith, 20 King 
Street East, Toronto. 

G. G. Harris is preaching at Wolseley, Sask. 

C. D. Henderson is with the National Trust Company. 

M. C. Lane is on the staff of the Commercial Appeal, Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 

E. L. Luck teaches English and History in Albert College, 
Edmonton. 

R. J. Manning is assistant in the Chemistry Department of 
the University. 




366 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

P. B. Macfarlaiie and S. G. ^Eills graduated from the Med- 
ical College last spring. The former is in the Provincial Health 
Office and the latter doing work at the General Hospital. 

H. S. Malwood is preaching in London, Ont. 

C. E. Mark is busy in the Faculty of Education. 

D. B. Nugent takes up his stand in the Dominion Observa- 
tory, Ottawa. 

Miss 0. G. Patterson is instructor in Household Science at 
the University. 

Miss M. A. Proctor is lecturing on dietetics in some hospital 
in New York City. 

Miss K. C. Rice is attending the Faculty of Education. 

Miss B. L. Scott is teaching at Drayton, Ont. 

A. W. Shaver is preaching in Pasedena, Cal. 

F. Sternberg's address is 155 Dunn Avenue, Toronto. 

G. E. Trueman is in Y.M.C.A. work in Japan. 
J. H. Wells is preaching at Lion's Head, Ont. 

Miss E. J. Williams is teaching Mathematics at Paris High 
School. 

J. M. Zurbrigg is imbibing knowledge at the Faculty of 
Education. 

The Secretary, Miss E. L. Chubb, Westminster College. To- 
ronto, would be glad to receive any corrections or the address 
of those ,whose names do not appear. 



Personals 



E. E. Craig, B.A., '96, has entered the ministry of the 
Congregational Church, and has recently been ordained to the 
pastorate of the Congregational Church at Edgartown, Mass. 

At Guelph, on Wednesday afternoon, October 21, a happy 
event took place. F. AV. IT. Jaoombe, B.A., '90, M.A., M.F., of 
the Forestry Branch of the Depai*tment of the Interior, Ottawa, 
found happiness at last in the person of Miss Maud Marianne, 
elder daughter of Aid. and Mrs. Geo. Pen fold. Rev. II. W. 
Crews tied the blissful knot, after which Mr. and Mrs. Jacombe 
left for Ottawa, where they will reside. Acta joins hands in 
their large circle of friends to bow smiling congratulations. 



PERSONALS AND EXCHANGES. 367 

A reunion of Victoria graduates in Japan was held in 
Karuizawa, August 13, for the purpose of organizing an Alumni^ 
Association. Those present were : Mrs. N'orman (nee Heal), '9G ; 
Mrs. Connolly (nee Thompson), '06; Miss Annie W. x\llen, '02, 
and Miss E. V. Beatty, '03. The new association begins with a 
small membership, but with much enthusiasm and college spirit, 
even though separated from ''Old Vic," both by miles and by 
years. 

After a short business session, at which Mrs. Norman was 
elected President, afternoon tea was served and a pleasant hour 
was spent in reminiscences of college days. Then all joined hands 
for "Auld Lang Syne" and the "Old Ontario Strand," which 
brought back memories of reception and ''Lit.," and with the 
old familiar call of "V.C, V.C." this first meeting came to a 
close. 

We are all delighted to again see Jack McCamus, late of '10, 

W. Sanford Evans, '91, was recently elected mayor of Win- 
nipeg by a handsome majority. 



Marriages 

Sharpe — ^Harrison — On December 30th last a very pretty 
wedding took place at Keene, Ont., when Miss Mary Mabel 
Gertrude Harrison, formerly of the class of '07, was united in 
marriage to Mr. Terence B. Sharpe. The ceremony was per- 
formed by the Rev. W. D. Harrison, Avhile the bride and groom 
Avere ably assisted fby Miss Willene Miller and Mr. Philip Boyd 
respectively. The happy couple, after spending some time vis- 
iting old friends in Quebec and Toronto, left for Winnipeg, 
where thev will reside. Acta extends best wishes. 



Exchanges 

To the following visitors we bow a cordial welcome: Yox 
Collegii, Western University Gazette, St. Hilda's Chronicle, The 
Magnet, Vox Wesley ana, Notre Dame Scholastic, The Martlet, 
The Hya Yaka, McMaster University Monthly, Acadia 
Athenaeum, Harvard Monthly, Queen's University Journal, 
Columbia Monthly, Lux Columbia, The Student, Echoes From 



368 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

the Pines, Oxford Magazine, The University Monthly, St. 
Andrew's College Review. 

About the finest Canadian exchange upon the desk is Queen's 
University Journal, a bi-monthly publication of no mean merit. 

''Four Cornerstones of Modern Thought and How we came 
by them," in the Journal of December 15, is a masterly sketch 
of the foundations of modern thought and how they were built 
up by the contributions of the Hebrew, the Greek, the Roman 
and the Teuton. From Hebrew morality, projected into the 
Roman Empire sprang up the Christian Church, rescuing and 
carrying along with it Roman imperialism and law. Greek 
philosophy and worship of religion, having found its culmina- 
tion in Aristotle, sank into a smouldering heap of grey ashes ; but 
the capture of Constantinople scattered the dying embers over 
all Europe and the fire of intellectualism burst out afresh. These 
three elements met and fused in Teutonic individualism to be- 
queath us our modern civilized thought. 

Another indispensable feature of the publication is its regular 
treatment of current events : the trouble centering about Bosnia, 
the Turkish revolution, the humiliation of the German Emperor, 
and the vetoing of the License Bill by the House of Lords, are all 
•set forth with exceptional intelligence and lucidity. Nor is the 
attention of the editors averted from college interests, as is 
attested by the timely editorial of December 1, upon ''Honor in 
College Sport," which will set many sporting enthusiasts think- 
ing somewhat seriously. 

"Acta Victoriana. — This is a very welcome paper. It is 
perhaps the best magazine we have on the exchange list." — St. 
Andrew's College Review. 

"Matthew Arnold and the Thought of the Nineteenth 
Century," from the pen of Wilfred Campbell in the Christmas 
University Magazine, is an excellent comment upon the great 
•scholar-poet and the thought of the nineteenth century, of which 
he is the finest exponent. A noble poem on Matthew Arnold is 
appended. 

Wilfred Campbell graduated from Toronto University in the 
early eighties. "Many competent English critics regard Mr. 
Campbell as the foremost Canadian poet. They find in his verse 
a freedom from conventional standards, that appears to them 



PERSONALS AND EXCHANGES. 369 

characteristic .of the country of his origin. He made his fame 
chiefly as a poet of nature; but, as the poem printed in this 
number shows, Mr. Campbell is also a thinker on the problems 
of human life and society." 

NoN Sequitur. 
Tommy, very sleepy, was saying his prayers. ''Now I lay me 
down to sleep," he began; "I pray the Lord my soul to keep." 
^'If," his mother prompted. "If he hollers, let him go; eny, 
meny, miny, mo." — Ex. 

^^ The Woman Suffrage in England " in the Martlet, of 
December 18, presents a very lucid view of the situation in 
Ensfland. It has the supreme advantage of being written by a 
woman. 

McGill is looking up to Toronto for an example. An extract 
from the Varsity upon souvenir thieving occupies the whole 
department of exchanges in the issue of December 18, while in 
the issue of December we can see our own genial convener of the 
Bible Study Committee elucidating the mysteries of his charge 
up in Jackson Hall. Funny the way things come back ! 

The Torch of Life. 
At the portals of existence 

Flares the torch of life. 
Gleaming out across the darkness 

Of unending strife. 

Always beckoning it lures us 

Whence w^e ne'er return. 
Yet fore'er the goal evades us 

And fore'er we yearn. 

— Acadia Athenaeum. 

The door is ever open for our next door neighbor to run in 
any time. The McMaster University Monthly is always interest- 
ing. "The Eomance of Mathematics" is the leading article of 
the Christmas issue, and will be eagerly devoured by all who 
possess any figurative inclinations. "A City of Dreams" is a 
delightful little piece, whose delicate play of fancy is beautiful 
indeed. Its freshette authorship perhaps makes it more 
charminof. 



370 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

'Tis Love! 

Toper (hanging on to a lamp post). — "An' yet they say it's 
love that makes the world go round. ' ' — Ex. 

"As a journal of vital interest to outsiders we do not exist, 
but as a means of developing those who may, in the future, 
operate such journals we do exist." — Vox Wesleyana. 

Though of not very extensive proportions for a monthly, the 
Vox Wesleyana contains some excellent material, among them 
two prize essays, " The Child First," and " A Plea for the 
Written Word." 

The Miama Student is proud. The son-in-law of the Presi- 
dent of Miami University is the President-elect of the United 
States. 

"The University Man in Music" in the Christmas number 
of Harvard Monthly is an excellent article, rife with suggestions 
for reform about Toronto — even though it is the musical centre 
of Canada. The literary genius of the Harvard undergraduate, 
as revealed in this magazine from time to time, is remarkable. 
The primary aim of this publication is to preserve as far as 
possible the best literary work produced in college by the under- 
graduates. Is it this aim w^hich makes it about the best exchange 
we have ? Every number is a treat from first to last. Read as a 
sample, "The Winds of Night" in the Christmas issue. 

More Lovely Grows the Earth. 
More lovely grows the earth as we grow old. 

More tenderness is in the dawning spring, 

More bronze upon the blackbird's burnished wing, 
And richer is the autumn's cloth-of-gold ; 
A deeper meaning, too, the years unfold, 

Until to waiting hearts each living thing 

For very love its bounty seems to bring, 
Entreating us with beauty to behold. 
Or is it that with years we grow more wise 

And reverend to the mystery profound — 
Withheld from careless or indifferent eyes — 

That broods in simple things the world around — 
More conscious of the Love that glorified 

The common ways and makes them holy ground? 

— Helena Coleman, in 0. A. C. Revieiv. 




ON Wednesday afternoon, December 9th, at the regular 
meeting of the Women's Literary Society, the first of the 
series of inter-college debates was held. The subject of . 
the debate was, ''Resolved, That conscription would be advisable 
for Great Britain and her colonies." 

Miss Kelly, '10, and Miss Hately, '11, of St. Hilda's, tooi^ 
the affirmative, and Miss Hockey, '10, and Miss Crews, '11, of 
Victoria, took the negative. The debate was an excellent one, 
both sides having excellent material and good debating style. 
The decision given by the judges was that victory belonged to 
the negative side. The next debate will be between Victoria and 
University College, and will take place in the near future. 

The last meeting of the Women's Literary Society for the 
Christmas term was held on Wednesday, December 16th. The 
entire programme was provided by the sophomores, and as it 
was so near Christmas their selections all referred to that happy 
season. Miss Dafoe, in picturesque Dutch costume, gave a paper 
on Christmas customs in Holland. Several other papers were 
given ; also some good piano and vocal solos. The closing num- 
ber on the programme was a scene taken from ''The Birds' 
Christmas Carol," which was very cleverly done by ten girls. 
The sophomores deserve great praise for the splendid programme 
they provided, and we are sure the members of the Literary 
Society are all very grateful to them for the good time they 
gave them. 

It has been suggested that some person around College play 
the part of professional jester, then sell the jokes to some of 
those people who never appear in the "Locals." This would 
certainly help the "Local" editors a great deal, and would also 
be an excellent way for some enterprising soul to make mis- 
sionary money. Won't somebody try it? 



372 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Miss G — y — n, '10 — "The part of a paper-chase that appeals 
to me the most is, after it is all over and you give your college 
yells and songs, and thus try to appear sporty, when in reality 
you feel like a theolog of thirty-five years' standing.'' 

M — y — r, '09 (on rink) — '^ Say, Mac, these gloves are no 
good for skating with a girl. They are absolutely non-con- 
ductors of sensation." 

C — m — e, '10 — "To-night was the first time I was ever 
thanked for taking a girl for a skate." 

M — r, '09 — "Did you ever see yourself skate?" 

Z — m — n, '12 — "Professor, is it ever possible to take the 
greater from the less?" 

Professor — "Well, you approximate very closely to it when 
you take the conceit out of a freshman." 

Jewett, '10 (asked to give an account of Swinnerton's call on 
the previous evening) — "Ask Swin. He can tell you better 
than I can." 

Swin., B.D. — "Oh, it's all a dream to me." 

McN — , '10 — "Say, Fritz, did I ever tell you of my experi- 
ence in a menagerie?" 

Avison, '09, proud in the possession of a glaringly white vest, 
rose in the pulpit recently, pulled back his coat, stuck his hands 
in his pockets, and announced as his text, "To what purpose is 
this great waste?" 

The Rink Committee recently advertised in McMaster 
Monthly, and thus received a copy of that issue. Robert, con- 
fusing it with the exchange number for Acta, gave it to Mis? 
Barker, who presented it to the Pres. of the A. IL, saying: "Is 
this for you, Mr. Morrison?" 

Morrison read the following address: "Victoria Athletic 
Ass." 

Bick, C.T. (to room-mate)— '' Say, Bill, I'll be mighty 
lucky if I ever get a real good wife !" 

McKenzie, '09 — "Are you going home for Christmas, Swin?" 
Swinnerton — "No, I'm going home in June to be — to — to 
have a vacation." 



LOCALS. 373 

Sophette (to friend) — '' Hasn't Mr. Pearson yards and yards 
of feet?" 

Miss S— m— h, '09 (Thursday, Jan. 7th)— ''Really it is awful 
around College now; there is nobody back but theologs and '09 
girls. ' ' 

Miss D — f — e, '11 — "Did I get any work done in the holi- 
days? Well, I should say not. We had a houseful of company 
and Local Option on the go — and you know how well they agree. ' ' 

McC — s, '12 (on the rink) — ^^Yes, I see many improve- 
ments; the new rink house, the old one enlarged, and best of 
all — the gum-slot." 

Miss D — n — t, '09 — "Look at the shorthand on the board!" 
Miss B— r— e, '09— "That isn't shorthand, it is Greek." 
Miss C — 1 — r, '09 — "You are both wrong, I tell you it is 
Hebrew." And so it was. 

Overheard in the halls — ''Why is H-m-w-y, '09, the best 
^bureau of information' regarding Annesley Hall?" 

Miss S — n — y, '10 (with a puzzled expression) — "Well, what 
is goose wheat any way ? Is it something you give geese?" 

M — 1 — r, '09 — ''Say, do you know that I have just read three 
books of really classic fiction — David Copperfield, Oliver Twist 
and Ivanhoe?" 

M— V— n, '10— "Well, you're ahead of me. The only bit of 
classic fiction I ever read was Caesar's Bellum Gallicum." 

Dr. J. Burwash, lecturing on Church Polity re Marriage — 
" I 'm only speaking for your sakes ; I don 't expect to be married 
much more. " 

Heard in a meeting of the U.L.S. programme committee: 
' ' What about talent for open Lit ? " " Oh, let 's get Mrs. Riff-Raff 
to contribute." 

Someone suggested securing a member of the Whitney Cabi- 
net. A voice, "Kenney tried for three or four nights last year 
to get Hanna." 

MacN — V — n (waking up suddenly) — "Hannah who?" 

Moore, '10 — "Isn't it too bad we haven't got better telephone 
connection with the Hall?" 



374 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

One of our most devout theologs, who preaches every Sunday, 
attended the ''Anti's" meeting in Massey Hall. Beside him sat 
a reputable citizen of the Anti persuasion. When F. S. Spence 
seemed at last about to get a hearing R. C. let out a yell that 
would have made the reputation of a freshman at a rugby 

match. "Shut up, you d fool!" shouted the Son of 

Thunder. R. C. answered by pulling off his coat ; theolog doffed 
his glasses, and only outside interference prevented a most 
interesting discussion. Oh, Archie! 

Enter J. V. M. (knocks on gate) — '^ Hullo, up there, pass 

Scene — The Pearly gates and golden. 
me in, will you ? ' ' 

St. Peter (looking over raniparts) — "Who seeks admission 
here?" 

J. V. M.— ^^ I'm J. Y. ^r., star specialist of the U. of T.'' 

St. P. (after looking up records) — "Sorry, friend; but we 
have a few stars against you here as well. We'll have to keep 
you out." 

St. M. — ' ' No use, Peter, I know Mac. You may as well admit 
him. Jimmy Brebner tried for four years to keep him out of 
U. of T. and had to sign his parchment at the last." 

W — sh — n, '10, to C — s — re, '10 — " Is it true that the third 
and fourth year fellows don't have to wait till Friday to go over 
to the Hall?" 

Outsider to McNiven, '10 — "You have a Jew in your year, 
have you not?" 

McNiven, '10— "No, but we have a Jewitt," 

Sunday School Teacher — "And now, children, can you tell 
me, when Balaam and his ass conversed, what language they 
spoke in?" 

Little Fritz — "Please, ma'am, Assyrian." — (Sel.) 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



375 



C. E. GOODMAN 

270 YONGE ST. 

Phone Main 2018 



The place where you should buy your 
Furnishings. Everything new in Neclc- 
wear and Shirts, and a full stock of 
Gloves, Hosiery and UnderAvear. 



^ 



Full Dress Requisites. 
Ribbons and Pennants. 



Every Student 



Some time or other wants to buy Jewelery of some kind, or 
perhaps it is some repairs to watch or jewelery. Whichever 
it is, we are in a position to give the best satisfaction at the 
lowest possible cost. We are always pleased to have you call 
and look over our stock, and to quote you prices. * 

^'Z'ZXhii W. W. MUNN A..xp.«op«- 

Pountain Pens Jeweler and optician cian is in charge 
and Ink always SOO YONGE- ST. ®^ ®"'' Optical 

in stock. 1st Door North of Bioor Street Department. 



students' Headquarters 

COLLEGE BOOKS 

NEW and SECOND HAND 

VANNEVAR & CO. 



438 YONGE STREET 



TORONTO 



THE OLDEST FIRM 

with THE LARGEST STOCK 

at THE LOWEST PRICES 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen. 
National Separate - Leaf Note Book 



G. A Lester 



l>amr and 
Tnrnisbgr* 

622 Yonge St. 

Near St. Joseph 



T H ?J SHOP 



AVENUE 

F h' 



Good Hair Cutting 
E,. M. Kennedy (Si Co, 



Barbers 



6 Chairs 



6 Chairs 



For Fine Stationery 

Magazines. Souvenirs, Post Cards, Water 
man's Fountain Pens and Fountain Pen Ink 
go to 

J. Willis' Bookstore " 
776 Yonge Street 



Phone North 
2875 



376 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



COR. BLOOR AND YONGC 



PHONE N. 3535 



NortHern Wardrobe 

See our special contracts for Students' Cleaning and Pressing and doing 
all minor repairs. Also a full line of Men's Furnishings. 

Proprietor - - - . "W. R. A.DA.MS 



WE WANT YOUR 
ORDER FOR FALL 

We know we can please you if 
you will give us a Trial Order, 
Our Goods are Up'to-date in 
Pattern and Quality. We aim 
only at Good \A/orkmanship. 
Prices Moderate. 

See our nobby school suits 
at $18.00 and $20.00. 

IHSt'OI XT TO STUDENTS 

BERKINSHAW © GAIN 

348 Yonge Street 

You call us ! We do the rest. 

Toronto Shoe Repairing Co. 

Shoe Repairing, Cleati, etc., called 
for and delivered promptly. 

8-10 Cumberland St., Toronto 

Phone N. 5466 SKATES GROUND 




Newest Styles 
Lar^e StocK 
of Ne-w Goods 



PHone 

NortH 

3371 



MACEY 

TAILOR 
777 yonge: street 

OK\e blocK nortH of Bloox* Street 

T. BRAKE 

Pine Boots and Shoes 

REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 

BOOTS MADE TO ORDER 

562 Yonge St.. Toronto 



Cut Flowers 

Floral emblems of every description 
are most carefully executed by 




QO YONGE STREET 

Our Prices are Reasonable. Our Execution Perfect 

Phones Main 1424 and 4790 
Night and Sunday, Phone Park 792 

The Nanie of 

PARK BROS. 

On your photograph is a giiai-antee of the best 
workmanship; our FOUR DOLLAR cabinet is 
without an equal. 

STUDIO: 328A Yonge St. Phone Main 1269 

The L. S. Haynes Press 

Printers 

502 Yonge Street 



Phone North 3912 



College Work a Specialty 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF 
COMMERCE 



Capital Paid-up, 



$10,000,000 



Savings Bank Deposits received from $1.00 up 

BLOOR & YONGE BRANCH 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



377 



CATERING 

For Banquets, Wedding.^. Parties, Social Teas, 

etc., a specialty. ( First-class service 

guaranteed. Estimates given.) 

ROBT. J, LLOYD & Company 
744-748 Yonge Street Toronto 

Phones No- th 3036. North 127 



Ellis Bros. 

JEWELERS 

I08 Yonge Street, TORONTO 

Rock bottom prices for 
year and "frat" pins. 

Finest Workmanship 

Original Designs 



G. HAWLEY WALKER 

flftercbant bailor 

126 YONGE STREET 
Phone Main 4544 TORONTO 

/IR;n'5 3furnl3bmg6 




SAMUEL YOUNG 

CARPENTER, BUILDER 
AND CONTRACTOR 

Cosmopolitan Carpenter Shop, 

4\ HAZELTON AVENUE, TORONTO 

Orders I'romptly Executed 



J. W. Johnson 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 
272 Yonge St. - Phone : M. 565 



Waterman's Ideal Fountain 
Pens, $2.50. 

WATCHES FROPFRLY REPAIRED 

Phone, xVorth 242-243 

M. RAWLINSON 

Cartage Agent and Warehouseman 

Offices: 612 YONGE STtEET 

FRONT ST., Four Doors East of Union Station 

Storage Warehouses : St. Joseph and Yonge Sts. 

Improved Vans and Trucks for Removing Furniture 

and Pianos, Storage for Furniture, Baggage transferred 

TORONTO, €Ai\AI»A 

High-class Tailoring at Close Cash Prices 

S. CORRIGAN 

The Leading Tailor 

175 Yonge Street 

Three Doors North of Queen 

Established 38 years 

Special quotations to all Students 



P 



ROGRAMMES, 
PROFESSIONAL and 
CALLING CARDS, 
MENU LISTS 
AVEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS 



P D 1 M T tr Pi in the latest styles 
rrXllM 1 LuiJ of Typography. 



William Briggs, 

Wesley Buildings, 

TORONTO, ONT. 



378 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 





FOR €II01DE, PURE 

Confectionery 


SALES jlfiEIITS WHNTED 

$36.00 pep Week, op 400% 

PPOflt 

All samples, stationery and art 
catalogue free. We want one 
permanent agent in this locality 
for the Largest Picture and 
Frame House in America. 
Experience unnecessary. We 
instruct you how to sell our goods 
and furnish the capital. If you 
want a permanent, honorable 
and profitable position, write us 
to-day for particulars, catalogue 
and samples. 

FRANK W. WILLIAMS Co. 

1214 \V. Taylop Street 

CHICAGO, ILL. 


Mother's Candy Kitchen 

732^ YONGE ST. near czar st. 


Hall's Dining Hall 

606 YONGE STREET 

The Students' Restaurant 

Rates $2.25 per week 


PnoNK North 3296. 
PV^, • 1 D^ll 702 and 704 YONGE 

LyaVlU Oeli, ST., Cor. St. Mary St. 

Choice Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery and (Jroceries. 


OUR GOODS ARE ALWAYS FRESH. 






lalmuto Sttttttg l|aU 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 


— Webb's 

pOR Weddings, Dinners, 
Receptions, large or 
small, simple or elaborate, 
there is no place like 
Webb's. CATALOGUE 
FREE 


^c purpose making: this 
the students' dining hall. 
We pride ourselves on 
cleanliness and good 
service- 
Separate tables for ladies. 

S. W. PAISLEY, Proprietor 
20 BALMUTO SIKEET. TORONTO 


■ VtDC 

IfDari^ Mebb (lo,,ximite^ 

447 ^OWQC St, a;oronto 




MILK AND CREAM 

GODD ENOUGH FOR BABIES 



Without a chemical analysis and bacteriological 
examination it is impossible to .iudge tlie quality of 
milk. Therefore bny from Dairies of proved integi ity 
only. " Beware of being offered too much for your 
money,— some things are too cheap in quality to be 
anything but dear in price." 



CITY DAIRY 

Phone College 2040 



CO., Limited 

Spadina Crescent 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



379 



GEO, HARCOURT & SON 



COLLEGE GOWNS AND CAPS 
For Ladies and Men 



57 King Street West 



TORONTO 




H. H. KeGKBUIill BO. 

HIGH-GRADE TAILORS 

685 



COLLEGE 

GOWNS 



YONGE 
STREET 



Phone: Nopth 1419 



Phone North 904 



Richard G. Kirby 



Carpenter and 537-539 YOHge St. 

Contractor for 

General Building XOR.ONTO 

and Jobbing 



A. H. YOUNG 



FINE PICTURES 

PICTURE FRAMING 

REGILDmC 



THE STUDENTS' DRUG STORE 

We were Students ourselves not so very long 
ago, and we know the kind of treatment they 
appreciate. 

If you are a Student, mention this advertise- 
ment to us and we will try and make yoTi feel 
at home, and allow you a special Student's 
discount on all your purchases. 

We have a well assorted stock of all kinds of 
Perfumes, Toilet Articles, Creams, Lotions, 
Powders and Sundries of every description. 

Huyler's and other high-class Chocolates, 
Creams and Eon-Bons. Our Soda Fountain is 
going Winter and Summer, and we serve 
dainty dishes and beverages in dainty fashion. 

Careful dispensing of prescriptions our 
specialty. 

W. J. A. & H. CARNAHAN, 

Traders Bank Bldg., Dispensing Chemists, 

Cor. Yonge & Bloor, Cor. Church & Carlton, 
Phone North 341 Phone Main 2196 

" 342 '* *' 2197 

Branch Tabard Inn Library. C.P.R. Tel. OfHce 



729 Yonge Street, 



Toronto 



T0E DUTGH STDBIO 

318 YONGE STREET 

Toronto - Canada 



Phone Main 7027 



EVERYTHING IN 

High-Grade Photography 

skilfully and promptly executed 

NONE BUT THE MOST SKILFUL 
WORKMEN EMPLOYED 

Special Rates to Students 
G. B. C. van dcr rEEN, 

Proprietor 



380 ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Uictoria College 



QUEEN'S PARK, TORONTO. 



In Federation with Me University of Toronto. 



The Federation System enables Victoria to offer the fol- 
lowing advantages : 

1. A compact college life in a commodious and beautiful 
modern building, provided with all the latest conveniences 
for healthful work. 

2. A large staff of College Professors, composed of men 
with thorough European training and ripe experience as 
teachers, and of earnest Christian character. 

3. Admission to all the lectures and laboratories of the 
University Staff of eighty-eight professors and lecturers, who, 
together with the fifty-eight professors and lecturers of the 
federated colleges, constitute the largest faculty of Arts in 
the Dominion, and one of the most efficient on the Continent. 
All University examinations, prizes, scholarships, honors and 
degrees are open to our students on equal terms with those 
of any other college. A large number of prizes, honors and 
scholarships are also offered to our students in our own 
College. 

4. Two commodious residences for women students afford 
every modern advantage for health and comfort and a refined 
social life. A course of physical training is also given under 
an accomplished directress and a women's gymnasium forms 
part of the new residences. 

5. Excellent facilities are afforded both in the University 
and College for post-graduates reading for the degree of 
Ph.D., and also a full course in the Faculty of Theology. 

Lectures in both faculties begin October 1st. 

N. BUR.WASH, S.T.D., LL.D., 

President. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



381 




QMTADIQ AND ONTARIO CONSERVATORY OF 
" MUSIC AND ART, WHITBY, ONT. 

L A D I cS Ideal home litem a beautiful castle, 

QQI I £r|C modelled after one of the palatial 
homes of English aristocracy. 
The latest and best equipment in every department, 
backed up by the largest and strongest staff of special- 
ists to be found in any similar college "in Canada. 
Sufficiently near the city to enjoy its advantages in 
concerts, etc., and yet away from its distraction <, in an 
atmosphere and environment most conducive to men- 
tal, moral and physical stamina. Send for new illus- 
trated calendar to 
REV. J. J. HARE, Ph.D., Principal. 



Alma College 

Rev. Robert I. Warner. M. A., D.D., Principal 
Mrs. Jean Wylic Grey, - Lady-Principal 
Miss Alice F. Henwood, B.A., Acting Dean 



SENIOR SCHOOL makes efficient provision for studies for 
University Matriculation, University Curricula in Music, 
Teachers' Non-Professional Examinations, and for Alma 
College Diplomas in Liberal Arts ( M.L.A. and M.E.L.) ; 
Music (A. A. CM. for Pianoforte, Singing, Organ, Vio- 
lin); Fine Art ; Elocution and Physical Culture; Com- 
mercial Science ; Domestic Science. 

JUNIOR SCHOOL provides attractive school home, in 
separate apartments, for girls under thirteen, and also 
prepares pupils for the High School entrance examinations. 
hEALTHY LOCALITY, Six Acre Campus, Superior 
Buildings, Competent Teachers, Successful Record. 
For Catabgue, address 

PRINCIPAL WARNER, 

Alma College, ST. THOMAS, ONT. 



Upper Canada College, Toronto 

H. W. AUDEN, M.A. (Cambridge), Principal. 

Regular Staff comprises 15 Graduates of English and. Canadian Universities, with additional 
special instructors. Courses for Univers ty, Royal Military College and Business. Senior and 
Preparatory Schools in separate buildings. Every modern equipment. Fifty acres of ground 
in healthiest district. Four rinks, gymnasium, swimming bath, etc. 







preecription pbarmaci? 

OF THE NORTH END 

Discount to Students. Accuracy, Purity 


W.C. SENIOR 
&BRO. 


WM. H. COX, 786 Yonge St., Toronto 


Tailors 

and. 

Gown Makers 

717 
Yonge St. 
Toronto 


The Dining Hall 


556 YONGE STREET 

PHONE: T. J. HEALEY, 
North 4772. Proprietor. 



Our shop is 
up-todaU and 
we use you right 



Razors Honed 



T. A. FELSTEAD 

4 CHAIR BARBER SHOP 4 
760 YONGE STREET 



Electric 

Face Massage 

Head Rub 



Shoe Shine 



382 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Cbe University of Coronto 



ana 



University College 



FACULTIES OF 



Arts 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Household Science 

Education 

Forestry 



For infotmation, apply to the Registrar of the University, 
or to the Secretaries of the respective Faculties. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



383 



ESTABLISHED l873 

The Most Convenient Bank for Victoria College 

THE STANDARD BANK OF CANADA 

At Yonge and Charles Streets 

Cheques on any Bank E. L. WILLIAMS. 



may be cashed here. 



Manag^er. 



Dr. J. Frank Adams 

DENTIST 

Telephone College 243 
325 College Street. TORONTO 



DR. FRED. N. BADGLEY 



110 AVENUE ROAD 

(Opposite St. Paul's Church) 

Phone North 3514 



TORONTO 



Alfrko W. BRiaas. 



Harold R. Frost. 



BRIGGS & FROST 

BARRISTERS, ETC. 

TORONTO 

Wesley Buildings, 33 Richmond St. West 
Toronto 



MASTEN, STARR & SPENCE 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Canada Lifb Building 

Toronto 

solicitors for bank of nova SCOTIA 

C. A. Hasten, K.C, J. R. L. Starr 
J. H. Spencb 



E. B. Ryckman, M.A., LL.B. K.C. 

Chas. W. Kerr, B.A. C. S. Maclnnes, B.A., K,C. 

Christopher C. Robinson, B.A. 

RYCKMAN, KERR & MaclNNES 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, etc. 
Canada Life Building, 46 King St. West, Toronto. 

Cobalt : 

RYOKMAN KERR, MacINNES & MAHQN 



^•O'— PHONE NORTH 698 

Dr. S. L. Frawley 

DENTIST 

Qraduate of Toronto '>< -Df Cj. WT x 

and Philadelphia l^ S5iOOt Ol* WCSt 



Phone North 354 



Contract work a Specialty 



r. OLVER, 

TAILOR, 

707 Yonge Street, Toronto 

Ladies' and Gents* Clothing Cleaned, 
Pressed, Altered, and Repaired 

...BURN... 

McGiirs Coal 

Cor. Bathufst St. and Fatlcy Ave. 
Phone Park 393. 

GEO. A. EVANS, Phm.B. 

DISPENSING CHEMIST 

832 Yonge St. Toronto 

Liberal Discount to Students 

Telephones North 38 and North 3720. 
Telephone Orders a Specialty 

DY£ING & CLEANING 
FOR MEN fi? WOMEN 

We completely meet the needs of men and 
women in dyeing and cleaning articles of per- 
sonal wear. Phone head office or any branch. 

R. PAR^KER (Eb CO. 

787-791 Yonge Street Toronto, Canada 

Branches in all Leading Shopping Centre* 



384 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 







The 

Students' 
Jew^elers 

Our Quality, Price and Service , 
will be found all that could be 
desired. 

We have appropriate sugges- 
tions for Birthday, Wedding, 
or 'XMAS gifts. 

We are always pleased to show 
our display, and in no way 
force a sale. 


CHAS. POTTER 

85 YONGE STREET 


C. B. PETRY, PROPRIETOR 


Skilful 

Craftsmanship in 
Eye-testing at Potter's 

Many thousands of oculists' prescrip- 
tions are on fyie at Potter's. 

Adde 1 to these are prescriptions and 
records the result of eye-testing by our 
own skilled opticians o;i the premises. 

This is what may be termed concrete 
evidence of the fine character of the 
work done here. 

If your record is not here, let us have 
it. If your eyes need testing now we 
will give you satisfactory service. 

Testing and glasses always guaran- 
teed. 


Stock & Bickle 

JEWELERS 

131 Yonge Street 

(0pp. Temperance St.) 


POTTER, THE RELIABLE OPTICFAN 




1 



OWNERSHIP 

Is one of the STRONGEST AGENTS in encouraging a young 

man in early life. 

You may have this HELPFUL SECURITY at a LOW COST 

by laying aside each year a SMALL AMOUNT for LIFE 

INSURANCE. 

A $1,000.00 policy is OWNERSHIP to you, and more, it is 

OWNERSHIP WITH PROFITS. 

Abundant information will be given gladly at 

^e Manufacturers Life Ins. Co. 



N.B. 



**No Better Life Company in Canada," 

Profitable Employment given to Men during the Summer Months 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



385 



4\qT©^ 




THE SIMPSON 
SHOE 

FOR MEN 

$4.00 A PAIR 



Here is a shoe at a popular price, which by 
rights, classes up with the $5,00 and $6,00 Shoes, 

' We own it and control it. No other store sells 
Victor Shoes, It's our own brand. 

No middle-men. 

No commercial travellers. 

No expensive round-about retailing. 

We sell it with only one profit added to the 
cost of its making. 

That's why you can get a good stylish, manly, 
up-to-date boot for $4.00 if you buy the Victor, 

All popular styles, widths^ and prices. 




THE 
ROBERT 



SIMPSON 

TORONTO • 



COMPANY 
LIMITED 



'86 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



c. A. de:er5 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

13 Manning A.rcade Annex 
24 Kin^ St. IV. Tel. M. 6886 



Style and Quality ' 

Equal to the Best 

Let me be your Tailor 



Imperial Bank of Canada 

Head Office, Toronto 

Capital Atithoiizcd, $10,000,000 Capital Paid Up, $5,000,000 

Rest Account, $5,000,000 

D. R. WILKIE, Pres. and Gen. Manager. E. HAY, Assistant General Manager. 

ROBT. JAFFRAY, Vice-President. W. MOFFAT, Chief Inspector. 

Savings Bank Department — Interest at current rates allowed on 
deposits of $ I. GO upwards from date of opening account, and interest 
credited four times a year. 

Letters of Credit and. Drafts issued, available in all parts of the 

wor . ^ General Banking Business Conducted. 

YONGE AND BLOOR STREET BRANCH 

C. H. Stanley Clarke, Manager 



THE 

FREELAND 
STUDIO 

■^■■■■■iHHaBmBaB i^^HiBirHi 
Finest of facilities for 

GROUP WORK 



Special Prices to Students 



430 YONGE STREET 

Opposite Carlton Street 

'Phone M. 6887 



Follett's 

Ordered 

Tailoring 

One dress suit looks like 
any other unless it has 
that distinctive shape and 
form imparted to our 
garments. Invest $30.00 
with us in one of these 
suits. 



JOS. J. FOLLETT 

The Merchant Tailor 
181 YONGE STREET 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



387 



Victoria College Rink, charles west 

AREA, 65.000 FEET 

We provide a large general Skating Rink 
and three Hockey Rinks. 



The best society in 
the city patronize our 
skating rink. * 



Many of the fastest 
hockey teams in the 
City leagues practice 
and play their games 
here. 



Band on Friday nights and 
Saturday aflernoon». 

SEASON TICKETS: 
Gentleman's - $2.00 
Ladies' - - 1.75 



J. J. PEARSON. 

Sec.-Treas. 



Address : 

Victoria College 

PHone N. 3578 



H, L. Morrison, 

President 



DO YOU KNOW 

that without financial support from outside sources we could 
not print two numbers of Acta ? The other six are printed 
by means of the generous support of our advertisers. Of 
course, they advertise to get the student trade, but do they 
get it, and do you let them know they get it ? Our 
advertisers can supply all students' needs, and often give you 
a handsome discount. It is a fair and square business pro- 
position. In all justice you must return their patronage, and 
don't forget to 



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388 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



REA'S 



MEW STORE 

FOR WOMEN 




RECEPTION DRESSES 

DINNER FROCKS 

GRADUATION GOWNS 

We have tastefully provided for the college girl for her 
every college function as well as for her usual every- 
day wear. You'll find Rea's new store for women the 
final authority in evening gowns, demi-tailored costumes, 
cloaks, suits, coats, skirts, waists, underskirts, furs, 
millinery, neckwear, veilings and beltings. 

Rea's make their own garments and novelties— the 
store's stocks are constantly supplemented by the manu- 
factory — you have everything new and fresh, and values 
unsurpassed. In Rea's garments you'll find the most 
authentic of the new ideas combined with the original 
touches that Rea designers and workers weave into 
their work. Thus you have exclusive elegance with 
unusual values — a rare occurence. 

We illustrate with a few items in evening dresses : 

ONE OF EMBROIDERED 
FILET NET of Empire cut has a 
panel front, from neck to hem, of 
heavy Cluny Lace, 

SATIN GOWNS are in favor this 
winter — satin conforms so gracefully 
to the styles. This Empire Gown 
is unusually charming. Of pale 
blue liberty satin, finished with 
tiny cream net yoke and panels of 
minutest tucking with large satin 
l)iitlons. 



LACE AND POINT D'ESPRIT 

(JOWNS — Brussels net, plain or 
embroidered, and dear little batiste 
frocks with the Directoire and Em- 
pire fashions ruling all with their 
inimitable grace. Skirts with long 
clinging lines, bodices sliui and 
closely draped, long tight sleeves and 
high pointed collars — all one piece 
gowns. 

AN EXQUISITE LITTLE DRESS 
of spotted net is made beautiful with 
Irish Point Lace and touches of pale 
bhie and white satin. 



. w» may choose among maize, tascan, taupe, canard, elephant's 
breath and varying shades of green in the satin gowns. 



You 



A. E. REA 8r C 

168 Yonge Street, Toronto 



LIMITED 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



389 




WARDROBE 

where good work is 
done in Clean in g, 
Pressing and Repairing 
at reasonable prices. 



ANNUAL SALE 
TRUNKS, BAGS, SUIT CASES 

This is the month lor real snapi^ in travelling goods. Students 
will find it decidedly to their advantage to purchase for future 
need during this Sale. 

EAST & CO., Limited, 300 Yonge Street 



FORD'S 

742 YONGE STREET 
PHONE NORTH 4604 



HIGH CLASS 

fUKNIStllNGS 

Hats and Caps, Boots 
and Shoes. Agents in 
Ontario for Stanfield's 
Un<>hKnkabfe Under- 



YOUR TRADE WILL BE APPRECIATED 



AVERY'S DRUG STORE 

Yonge and St. Mary Sts., TORONTO 

Pure Drugs, Economical Prices 
Special prices to students 



Phone N. 1747 



Goods delivered promptly 



CHURCH and 
SOCIETY 



PRINTING 

Programmes, Booklets, Invitations, Reports. 

The Armac Press 

Phone Main 2716 

1 70- 1 76 Victoria St., TORONTO 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT CALENDAR 



January : 
1. NEVvr Year's Day (Fridaj ). 

By-1 iws for establisliing an I withdrawal of 

xmion of municipalities for High Sch jol 

nurpoa 8 t ) take effect. 
i. Provincial Normal Schools open (Second 

Term). 

Clerks of Municipalities to be notified by 

Separate School supporters of their witli- 

drawal. 

High, Public and Separate Schools open. 

5. Truant Officers' reports to Department, due. 

6. First m eting of rural School Tru*^tees. 
Polling d-iy for trustees in Public and 
Separate Schools. 

7. Principals of High Schools and Collegiate 
Inst tu'es to forward list of teachers, etc. 

11. Appointment of High School Trustees by 
Municipal Councils. 

14 Annual Reports of Boards in cities and 
towns, to Department, due. 
Names and addresses of Public School 
Trustees and Teachers to be sent to Town- 
ship Clerks and Inspectors. 

15. Trustees' Annual Reports tolnsoectors, due. 
Annual Reports of Kindergarten attend- 
ance to Department, due. 
Annual Reports of Separate Schools, to 
Department, due. 

Application for Legislative apportionment 
for inspection of Public Schools in cities 
and towns separated from the county, to 
Department, due. 



FOR 190Q (in part) 

; 20. First meeting of Public School Boards in 
cities, towns and incorporated villages 
26. Appointment of High School Trustees by 

County Councils. 
February : 
3. First meeting of High School Boards and 
Boards of Educacion. 
March : 



Annual Reports, to Depart- 



1. Inspectoivs' 
ment, due. 

Annual Reports from High School Boards, 
to Department, due. 
(This includes the Financial Statement.) 
Financial Statement of Teachers' Associa- 
tions, to Department, due. 
Separate School Supporters to notify Muni- 
cipal Clerks. 
31. Night Schools close (Session 1908-9). 
April : 

1. Returns by Clerks of counties, cities, etc., 
of population, to Department, due. 

8. High Schools, second term, and Public 
and Separate Schools close. 

9. Good Friday. 

12. Easter Monday. 

i;{. Annual Meeting of the Ontario Educa- 
tional Association at Toronto. 

15. Reports on Night Schools, due (Session 
1908-9). 

19. High Schools (Third Term), and Public 
and Separate Schools open after Easter 
Holidays. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS of the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT of ONTARIO 
can be ordered through local booksellers, or address orders direct to 

THe CARSMTELL CO.. I^ixnited 

30 Aaelaide St. K,SkBt TORONTO 



390 ACTA VICTORIANA. 




W. M. PERCY 

Optician 

705 YONGE STREET 

(Late of Chas. Potter's) 

Phone N. 2824. 



Oculists' Prescriptions filled 
promptly and accurately. 

Lens Grinding and Spectacle Repairing done on 
the premises. Discount to Students. 

Kodaks, Films and Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amateurs. 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens, Magnifiers, Readers, etc. 

High Class Stationery. 



1 




1 




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and Fine Hats : : 






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ACTA VICTORIANA. 391 

CONTENTS. 

Literary — page 

Forever Thine A. L. Burt, '10 393 

A Summer in Westmoreland - - Miss M. E. T. Addison, B.A. 394 

Some Glimpses of John Ruskin - - - - Ethel G. Chadwick, '07 401 

The Cruel World— A Sketch .... Reta T. Babel, 'J 1 406 

On Hearing Melancholy Music C. W. S. 410 

The Joys of the Coon Hunt - - - - - C. E. Locke, '11 411 

Book Reviews Prof. L. E. Horning 413 

Editorial — 

Notes 415 

Scientific — 

Darwin -- 418 

Missionary and Religious — 

A Chance for Your Life .... Rev. J. L. Stewart, B.A. 420 

The Annual Missionary Conference C.J. 424 

Notes 424 

Personals and Exchanges — 

Class of 1905 - 426 

Personals 427 

Exchanges - - - - . -'- - - - -- 428 

Athletics — 

Basket Ball 431 

Hockey 432 

Locals — 

Notes ...-.....-.-- 436 



A FEW CHOICE BOOKS 

The Christian Minister and His Duties — 

Containing Chapters on "The Modern Minister,*' 
•• The Minister as Preacher," " The Minister as 
Pastor." etc. By J. OSWALD DYKES. M.A $1,80 

The Resurrection of Jesus — 

By JAS. ORR, M.A $1.50 

The Christian Method of Ethics — 

By REV. HENRY W. CLARK, author of " Philosophy 

of Christian Experience " NET $1,25 

Gospel of St, Matthew^ 

In Westminster New Testament Series. By DAVID 
SMITH. M.A NET $ .70 

The Upper Canada Tract Society 

(James M. Robertson, Depositary) 102 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ont. 



392 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Hockey Boots, Skates, Hockey 
Sticks, Sweaters, Toques, Stock- 
ings, Sweater Coats, Snow Shoes 



HOCKEY BOOTS 
$1.75 $2.00 
$2.50 $3.00 
$3.50 $4.00 




SKATES 




$1.00, $1.50, $1.75, $2.00, $2.50 
$3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 

Sweaters, each $2.00 Sweater Coats, each $4.00 

HOCKEY STICKS 
Mic'Mac, 40c each. Practice, 25c, Spalding, 50c 

SNOW SHOES, Men's, $3.50 Ladies, $3.00 



J. BROTHERTON 

S30 YONGE STREET 

Phone N. 2092 



ACTA VICTORIANA 




Published monthly during- the Colleg-e year by the Union 
Literary Society of Victoria University, Toronto 

VOL. XXXII. TORONTO, FEBRUARY, 1909. No. 5 



Forever Thine^ 

A. L. BURT, '10 

W J PON the shore I sit and dream of thee, 

^^ And dreaming, trace with loving, careful hand 
Thy tender name upon the happy sand. 

And hear thee in the murmur of the sea; 

The climbing tide creeps slowly up to me. 

Is, or sees thy name engraven on the strand— 
*Tis washed ! 'tis gone ! and vainly have I scanned 

Through all the fickle sand's light tracery ! 

But, Love, these sands are not my heart, for there. 
As though in steel, thy name is graven deep. 
And o'er it years may flow with heavy tide; 
The shifting sands play all around, but e'er. 

E'en when the sea of time o'er all will sweep. 
Deep in my heart, thy name will true abide, 

* Awarded first prize in the Poetry Contest. 



394 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

A Summer in Westmoreland 

MISS M. E. T. ADDISOT^, B.A. 

IT was after a short tour in Bonnie Scotland, through a long 
chain of lochs between purple hills and past picturesque 
glens, that we turned southward to spend some weeks in a 
tiny hamlet of Westmoreland. It does not belong to the ortho- 
dox tourist route, it is not mentioned in the guide-books nor is 
it to be found on the ordinary map. Even that inquisitive, 
ubiquitous monster, the automobile, scorned to stop there 
and whizzed past shaking off against it a cloud of dust and 
smoke. But if you will take a map, measure about ten miles 
due east of Lake Side, look for the Biver Kent and the Biver 
Gilpin, if you can find it, about two miles from where these 
meet you will see this charming, peaceful spot. Its post-office 
bears the name of Levens, but the name by which it goes among 
the inhabitants, " Beethwaite Green,'' is more expressive. 

Long ago the Biver Gilpin, when it approached the arm of 
the sea, spread itself out over a broad valley, which became in 
time a mossy plain, then a peat bog. Ingenious man, scorning 
such waste, limited the bed of the river, gathered most of the 
peat, still the cheapest fuel of the region, and transformed the 
barren land into green pastures and fair fields. On the far side 
there rises abruptly from the level plain stretching to the sands 
of Morecambe Bay a craggy fell, which slopes gently toward the 
west. On this side from the rivers' mouth a steady incline 
leads to a height on which is situated the church, only the spire 
of which is visible amid the surrounding trees. Behind it is 
the village. " The Hare and Hounds," a quaint little inn, 
stands on the slope below the church and looks out over the val- 
leys of both rivers to the sands of Grange, and on the other side 
away beyond the Scar to the hills of the Lake District proper. 

The proper way to see this country is to settle down for a few 
weeks in one place, and thence make excursions, preferably on 
foot. If time bs limited, the most central is Ambleside. But as 
our object was to shun the vulgar crowd of tourists and flee far 
from them, we chose to make our headquarters at Levens. It 
is an excellent place to loaf. If the day is bright and warm, 



A SUMMER IN WESTMORELAND. 395 

there is the old-fashioned triangular garden across the way, shut 
in by that wall of stone which the Englishman delights to put 
up between him and a too curious world, and you may watch 
the silver waters of the tide steal over the distant sands or gaze 
at the fleecy clouds as they chase each other past the Langdale 
Pikes, the Old Man, Seafell and Helvellyn, or revel in the 
glorious colors as the sun sinks down behind the hills, the still- 
ness broken only by the merry laughter of little children and 
the clatter of their wooden clogs on the stony pavement. 

One is not always lazy, however, and there are things to see 
even in this out-of-the-way spot. So let us begin our excursions 
and pay a visit to Levens Hall, which gives its name to the 




BOiniOWDALE, WESTMORELAND. 

village. It is an interesting old house, part of it, the strong, 
square tower, built as early as 1415. The rest is comparatively 
modern, with the gables, broad casemented windows and deep 
doorways of the Tudor period. As the house is occupied we 
must content ourselves with a view of the grounds and gardens. 
The sparkling stream, a few hundred yards before it, is the 
guardian of its good fortune. 

" Luck to Levens 

As loiiLT as the Kent flo-.vs " 



396 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

When this toast is proposed, the well-wishers must drink it 
standing on one foot. Behind the house is the old garden laid 
out in the days of James II., in the topiary style, " the best 
specimen in the country," we are told. Fantastic, indeed, is 
it — a host of gay flowers with no evident arrangement as to 
color or variety scattered among the weird shapes cut in yew 
and living box, here a representation of Queen Elizabetb and 
her maids, not very flattering; there a peacock, a huge B for 
Bagot, an umbrella and many others. Back of these lies a 
bowling green of the softest most velvety grass, surrounded by a 
high beech hedge so wide at the to]i that a man cannot reach 
half way across it. At the very end and across the estate ex- 
tends a long avenue of beautiful elm trees that give one the im- 
pression of being miles and miles away from human habitation. 
The ancient park, containing dark fallow-deer which figure fre- 
quently in the legends of the country, is on the other side of 
the road. 

I>ut I^evens Hall is not the only fine old place of note near 
the village. On the other side rises Sizergh Fell, over and be- 
yond which stands the castle. It, too, is of early times, built 
probably before the Hall. There is the same peel tower of 
masonry six feet through, and as old as the tower must be the 
floor of the great hall, of planks smoothed with some sharp in- 
strument, such as an axe or large chisel, and fastened with 
wooden pms. From the hall a winding stair in the tower leads 
to a balcony overlooking it, off which is the haunted chamber. 
There is the usual stain on the floor, and the caretaker, with a 
humorous smile, points out this and a lock of fair hair on the 
wall as proof of the validity, of the story of a maiden's flight, 
recapture and tragic death. The carving and panelling in the 
rooms are the most striking features of the interior of the house, 
which has been desjxviled of its choicest treasures. The view 
from the tower is magnificent over the undulating fields, grey 
stone villages nestling among the trees or clinging to the brow 
of a hill, large towns, winding canals — away to the far-off hills. 

Before returning to our inn, let us follow this branch of the 
road which will take us to the one bordering the valley of the 
Gilpin and leading to Brigsteer. A ix)cky fell is to the east 
with great screes, low bushes and scattered sprigs of white 



A SUMMER IN WESTMORELAND. 



397 



heather; on the west stretches the valley; l)c'yoii(l it the heights, 
peak above peak, bine, purple, golden against the white of the 
sky. In the spring-time the vale is abloom with plum and 
cherry blossoms; now it is clad in the yellow, brown and deep 
greens of late summer. All at once the view on either side is 
cut off and we enter a hazelwood. Ah ! if we might but see this 
in the springtime, when the carpet is of fragrant vioh^ts, a 
modest background for the delicacy of the lily of the \allpy, and 
the glory of the best of golden daffodils — ^^ tossing their heads 
in sprightly dance!" 

'Next morning we shall go on a longer tour, starting from 
Heversham station, stopping off at Furness Abbey, and then 




DERWENTWATEE, WESTMORELAND. 



going on to Coniston. There is an English saying, '* If it is not 
raining, take your umbrella ; if it is, please yourself," and this 
advice is particularly a propos in this land of smiles and tears. 
Nowhere except in the Highlands of Scotland does it seem to 
rain so easily, so suddenly and with such energy, as among the 
hills of Northern England. There is nothing of special interest 
on the journey until we find ourselves in a wood of great beauty 
in the very heart of which we alight at Furness Abbey station. 
The station and hotel are under the same roof, and they and 



398 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

the Abbey occupy the whole of a cup-shaped, wooded hollow 
known as the ^' Valley of Deadly Nightshade." 

When in 1124 a body of thirteen monks of the Savignian 
Order wished to establish a monastery in England, what lovelier 
spot could have been chosen than this narrow glen with its per- 
petual stream, well-wooded hills and rich building resources. 
It and the surrounding country with all rights and privileges 
pertaining thereto were deeded by Stephen, afterward King of 
England, to the abbot and monks of Eurness. Some thirty 
years later they adopted the Cistercian Order, and also the form 
of architecture peculiar to it. The Abbey was of immense size, 
second only to Fountains in England, and was built of red sand- 
stone which gives even to the ruins a warmth and life missed 
in the cold grey stone of Melrose. Its outside wall enclosed 
sixty-five acres. In its present condition it is not possible to 
identify the position of all the various buildings, much less to 
see the grandeur which made up such an imposing whole, but 
enough remains to fill the beholder with wonder and deepest 
admiration. The Cistercian monasteries were built usually 
around a central cloister with the church on the north. By a 
richly moulded Norman arch we enter the north transept, to the 
east of which are three fine, pointed arches, entrances to former 
chapels. Adjoining these is the chancel, belonging to the fif- 
teenth century, tho glory of which is the sedilia with richly 
carved canopies of singular beauty. The great central tower 
above the intersection of the trans-epts and nave was supported 
by four lofty arches, only the eastern of which remains, and 
these rested on huge clustered piers belonging to the first build- 
ing. Of the nave only the south wall and belfry tower, with 
broken piles of stones where onoe were massive pillars, remain 
to tell the extent of the great church. 

On the east and west of the cloister court there must have 
been long arcades, and above them the dormitories of the 
monastery ; beyond them the refectory, the great hall and other 
buildings. These are almost all gone. Behind the south 
transept is th'3 chapter house, the gem of the Abbey, and one of 
the most exquisite examples remaining of Early English archi- 
tecture. It is entered from the cloister by the central of three 
round-headed arches with concentric mouldings. The first and 



A SUMMER IN WESTMORELAND. 399 

third open into recesses which were used, it is thought, as 
libraries. The central one, with groined vaulting, is the vesti- 
bule of the chapter house. This was a room sixty by forty-five 
feet, around which ran an arcade, with four arches on the long 
side, three on the short one, and one on each side of the en- 
trance. Each arch ended in two lancet-windows, open or blind, 
combined under a large pointed arch, in the spandel of which 
was a finely carved medallion. The capitals of the columns 
were richly moulded with rare designs. It was here that Roger 
Pele, the last Abbot of Furness, signed the deed of surrender to 
King Henry VIII., by which he and his brethren were de- 
prived of their vast inheritance. 

" But all things have their end ; 
Churches and cities, which have diseases like to men, 
Must have like death that we have." 

The beauty of the chapter house lies bare " to the injuries 
of stormy weather,'' ivy-grown, ferns and mosses clinging to the 
roofless walls; around the stumps of the once graceful columns 
grass and flowers nestle lovingly, and a great tree with bending 
boughs seems to keep a sad and gentle watch over the tomb of 
vanished greatness. 

" T do love these auncient ruynes : 
We never tread upon them but we set 
Our foote upon some reverend historie," 

We must not linger longer in this '' Vale of Deadly Night- 
shade," but hasten on to Coniston. Nature is not less rich and 
varied in these hills and dales than in others, for are there not 
lovely Yewdale, the Old Man, whose '^ dells are deep and broad 
bald brow is high," the quaint village and " that long and nar- 
row sheet of water stretching its six miles of blue between the 
fells" ? Yet it is the human interest rather than the natural 
that attracts us most. Windermere, Grasmere, Keswick have 
their coterie of poets and scholars, and Coniston is not behind 
them. There is the genial country doctor, Craig Gibson, natur- 
alist, geologist, telling his stories in racy dialect; the learned 
young lady Elizabeth Smith, who was well acquainted with 
languages, ancient and modern, and who could bake and sew. 



400 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

too ; the '' Sister Ladies of the Thwaite/' friends of Euskin. 
At Tent House, on the lake, Tennyson and his bride spent 
their honeyinoon, and for the first time Mrs. Tennyson met 
Carlyle. ^' The meeting was characteristic,' ' we are told. " He 
slowly scanned her from head to foot, then gave her a hearty 
shake of the hand." Across the lake stands the stately Brant- 
wood. Long ago it was a modest house, the home of the brave, 
untaught poet, Gerald Massey ; then it became the abode of the 
ardent poet engraver, William J. Linton and his wife, Eliza 
Lynn, the ^' little dare-devil girl," who would write ; at last, it 
came to John Ruskin. Under his care it grew from the humble 
cottage to a mansion and a very charming one. Situated on an 
eminence facing the village, it commands a view of Yewdale 
and the Old Man. with its firs, quarries, fells, and ever-vary- 
ing colors. It rests against a background of moors and cliffs, 
green meadows on either side, before it a garden. Such a 
garden ! Shrubs, trees, flowers ! Sunset roses — roses every- 
where in such profusion! Irregular terraces lead down to the 
shore and the little semi-circular harbor guarding its boats. 

Just one place more — to the churchyard in the village, to a 
secluded spot under a fir tree, beside the ivy-clad wall, to a nar- 
row grass plot bordered by white marble, a simple, artistic 
cross at its head — here in sweet peace, without pomp or 
splendor sleeps " a meek man and a brave." 

" Thou takest not away, () Death 1 
Thou strik'st -and absence perisheth, 

Indifference is no more ; 
The future brightens on our sight ; 
For on the past hath fallen a light 
That tempts us to adore." 



Smile and the world smiles with you. 
Knock and you knock alone, 

For the cheerful grin 

Will let you in 
Where the knocker is never known. 

— University of Ottawa Review. 



SOME GLIMPSES OF JOHN RUSKIN. 401 
Some Glimpses of John Raskin 

ETHEL G. CHADWICK, '07. 

OF Scotch parentage and English environment, with 
Celtic fire, Gorman strength and English coolness, 
strangely combined, John Ruskin began life in the 
early part of the nineteenth century. Of his father's reflective 
nature and fine taste in reading, his utter devotion to the life 
and career of his only child, round whom his life revolved; of 
his mother's stern, evangelical faith and character, tempered 
-always with good sense; of the respect and obedience rendered 
unto both as their due, and the inability of either son or parents 
to live happily if long separated, of all this his personal memoirs 
are full. He was early taught the blessings of self-control, 
while it was a principle of his mother's not to allow him the 
use of toys if by any chance they should be given to him. Being 
always whipped if he cried or tumbled, he soon attained a 
serenity of manner and security of locomotion to us abnormal 
in so young a child. Yet this seeming self-control was but a 
false article, and served him only under the circumstances to 
which he was aceustomed. Had he been allowed to mingle more 
freely in his youth with those of his own age, he would not 
have shrunk so painfully in after years from public appear- 
ance. It is characteristic of his training that, when at Oxford, 
he felt in the chapel as though he had equal rights with the best, 
but always most hopelessly out of place in the great dining-hall. 
The blessings of his education to the age of seven he gives 
in his Prseterita. He ranks as first the entirely peaceful tenor 
of his childhood. I^ever had he seen an angry, hurt or offended 
look in the eyes of either parent. He had lived in the midst 
of order and quietness. Obedience he had instinctively acquired 
as a ship responds to her helm. The habit of fixed attention 
had become ingrained so that throughout his life he could 
abstract himself from his surroundings and fix his mind on 
whatever he wished. Also, he had an extreme perfection in 
palate and all other bodily senses, caused by the utter prohibi- 
tion of dainties. The calamities up to this time also number 



402 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

four. The first, and utterly most pathetic, was that he had 
nothing to love. Pitiful was the wail of this affectionate heart 
seeking someone on whom to lavish its abounding love. Respect 
and admiration for his parents he was taught, but never that 
childish abandonment of love. Again he had nothing to endure, 
either of danger or of pain, for his watchful parents shielded 
him as any hot-house plant from every breath of harm. He was 
not taught manners or etiquette, so that when shyness came 
with consciousness of his own deficiencies, he suffered unutter- 
able pain. Chief of the evils he considers to be that his judg- 
ment of right and wrong and his powers of independent action 
were left entirely undeveloped. Yet his respect for his 
mother's teaching remained till his death, while he counts as 
the one essential part of his education her daily Bible drill. 

In addition to these characteristics as given by himself, 
there are two or three worthy of mention. Most important, 
probably, was his extraordinary patience in looking and precision 
in feeling which afterwards developed into his analytic power. 
Perhaps his one promise of future greatness was his exceed- 
ingly eager and methodic thirst for visible fact. We notice 
also in his work a rapid glancing from subject to subject, 
each being left unfinished for the attack on the next. Another 
characteristic growing out of his solitary childhood was his 
habit of gazing at the sea, hour after hour, with no attempt 
to analyze. I^ot being allowed to row, or sail, or even walk 
near the harbor alone, he spent his time in aimless gazing at 
the forbidden — a fearful loss of time, he says. 

His connection with Turneresque ideas throughout his art- 
work has been so close that it would be well to trace the influ- 
ence of the great painter. His first glimpse of Turner was 
on his thirteenth birthday, when a copy of Roger's ^^ Italy,'' 
containing some Turner vignettes, was given to him. He 
immediately took them for his only masters and set himself 
to imitate them by fine pen-shading. Before this he had 
begun drawing lessons, and had learnt the essential principles 
of composition. But his early attempts were quite without 
originality, and were not felt by his father to be the least 
flattering to his vanity. It was during one of the yearly trips 
of the family that the first germs of architectural genius began 



SOME GLIMPSES OF JOHN RUSKIN. 403 

to develop in young Eiiskin. A year later Prouf s sketches 
in Flanders and Germany so delighted him and his father 
that a continental tour was planned to see the originals. This 
tour was productive of some one hundred and thirty drawings, 
not inelegant, all laborious, but quite characterless. Mean- 
while, his scholastic education was going forward under various 
tutors, he being fairly proficient in his work, but rather be- 
cause nothing occurred to distract him from it than because 
he loved it for its own sake. 

N'otice his first sight of the Alps and its effect upon 
him. They had reached Schaffhausen and towards sun- 
set were walking out of the town, when '' suddenly — behold — 
beyond. They were clear as crystal, sharp on the pure horizon 
sky, and already tinged with rose by the sinking sun. In- 
finitely beyond all that we had thought or dreamed — the seen 
walls of lost Eden could not have been more beautiful to us. 
It is not possible to imagine a more blessed entrance into life 
for a child of such a temperament as mine. ... To the 
terrace and the shore of the Lake of Geneva my heart and 
faith return to this day, in every impulse that is yet nobly 
alive in them, and every thought that has in it • of help or 
peace." 

It is strange that two of our foremost English writers, 
Ruskin and Carlyle, should both be so devoid of scholarship 
and common-sense. Of the former lack Ruskin gave eminent 
example when at Oxford. The refectory became to him a 
haunted room because of the examinations that took place 
within it. His strict ideas of honor forbade the use of a crib, 
but he tells us that he believes the Dean had rather he had 
used fifty of them than borae the puzzled and hopeless aspect 
he presented in the afternoon over whatever he had to do. 
His Latin writing was, he supposes, the worst in the Univer- 
sity. Yet he who could not distinguish a first from a second 
future, wrote in his first year a philosophical essay which 
outranked those of all the other students, and, after three 
attempts, he won the greatest of Oxford's honors — the Newdi- 
gate prize in poetry. Soon after he entered college, most for- 
tunately for him, he fell under the notice of Henry Acland, 
who, perceiving his helpless possibilities, took him affection- 



404 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

ately in hand. He quietly showed him the manner of an 
English youth of good sense and family, and gave him an 
insight into pure, wise and honorable manhood. Ruskin re- 
marks on the early completeness of his friend in judgment and 
powers, which, had they not been arrested by the interests of 
a beautiful home life, might have ripened into tropical 
splendor. From which are we to conclude that we owe the 
treasures Euskin himself has left us to his own private 
heart-aches and loneliness, and that, had fate ordained a more 
satisfying home life, the world would have been the poorer? 

With his lovie of art went a passion for science, in which 
his early-developed analytic power and patience and precision 
in examining specimens stood him in good stead. On their 
numerous trips he eagierly collected and examined everything 
that could be of use in a scientific way. His love for the Alps 
was based not merely on their artistic grandeur, but he looked 
deeper down into their structure. Science and art were with 
him indissolubly linked, for locality and romance could never 
be separated from his researches into mineralogy or geology. 

We have mentioned Ruskin's devotion to Turner, but it was 
not until he was seventeen years of age that he saw Turner's 
own pictures, and the impetus gained from the Roger's 
vignettes began to bear fruit. These pictures being severely 
criticized in Blackwood's Magazine, he felt moved to reply, 
and, though his defense was not in any way encouraged by 
the painter, it afterwards developed into " Modern Painters." 
It was not until he was twenty-three that he found, out of 
the variety of his youthful interests, what was his real mis- 
sion. He began one day when on a ramble to draw a spray 
of ivy in its natural aiTangement, when light suddenly broke 
on him, and he saw how much finer it w^as in its natural de- 
sign than any conventional rearrangement could be. ^' Be sin- 
cere with nature, study her with humbleness, rejecting noth- 
ing, selecting nothing and scorning nothing.'' Like Carlyle, he 
preached the Gospel of Sincerity. Renouncing henceforth his 
poetic aspirations, his capacities for art production, and hopes 
of being a man of science, he took upon him the task of telling 
the world, " that Art no less than other spheres of life had 



SOME GLIMPSES OF JOHN RUSKIN. 405 

its heroes; that the mainspring of their energy was Sincerity, 
and the burden of their utterance Truth." 

To this interest in modern living landscape Buskin added, 
shortly after, a devotion to religious art, thus combining 
sincerity and the moral purpose. This he also did in his 
architectural work. To the sincerity, harmony and perfection 
of Greece, he added the deeper seriousness, the sense of mys- 
tery and spiritual strife of the Gothic. From insisting upon 
the moral character of the individual artist as an essential 
condition of true art-work, Euskin came in later life to empha- 
size rather the character of a nation. " Let a nation be happy, 
healthy and pure, and art will spring about it as from a 
fountain.'' This clear and growing recognition of the organic 
relation between art and national character formed the bridge 
from Ruskin's art mission to his social mission. How to 
purify the English people so that a true national art could 
be possible, was the task he set before himi in his fortieth year, 
and formed the main work of his remaining years. From 
his study of nature, of the mountains and the sea, he 
passed through his period of art-work, and assumed his 
social and economic mission. His remedy for the social 
distress lay not in political agitation, but in education. " To 
see life steadily and to see it whole," was his solution of the 
enigma. With this purpose in view he gave several series of 
lectures to workingmen, which were later gathered into book 
form, and which contain his ideas of social reform. He feels 
called as a prophet to help alleviate the material distress 
around him by explaining what he can of its causes, and point- 
ing out some of the methods by which it might be relieved. 

Having followed Ruskin in a more or less disjointed fashion 
through the important periods of his life's work, we will take 
leave here, while he is yet busy in the prime of life, giving 
out his message to those who need it so keenly, laboring for 
his native land and fellow-man. We will only say that the 
one great characteristic of his early life remained with him 
to the end — he was sincere with himself first and ^ith the 
world always. 




406 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The Cruel World—A Sketch 

BETA T. BABEL^ '11. 

MISS HANJSTAH JAI^E MEGGS was a dumpy little 
spinster of uncertain age, with a round, placid face 
and gray, accordion-pleated hair. One day her father 
died, leaving Hannah to face the world alone with a tidy bank 
account and a large, backwoods farm. On this farm Hannah 
Jane had spent all her life, working hard day in and day out. 
After her father's death Hannah's future was a much discussed 
question. For her to stay on the farm alone was out of all 
question. About the only thing for her to do would be to live 
with her married brother on his farm a mile distant. But when 
Jabez proposed this, Hannah Jane looked at him mildly 
through her spectacles, and said : 

'' Thank ye, Jabez, but I've bed my fill of farm life. I 
ain't never been to the city, much, an' I'm calculatin' to go 
there an' live now. I want to see some of the world before I 
die." 

Jabez felt as if something had knocked all power of speech 
from him. He could not have looked more astonished if his 
sister had proposed climbing the church steeple. Finally he 
gasped : 

" You ain't meanin' thet, Han Jane ?" 

Hannah Jane went calmly on with her knitting. 

^^ Yes, I be," she said, clicking the knitting needles in a most 
exasperating manner. After allowing sufficient time for Jabez's 
feelings to record all degrees of temperature, she ventured a 
few more remarks: 

" I'm goin' to take Ebenezer with me — he's lots of comp'ny. 
And I know of a good boardin'-house, too. I read of it in the 
paper, and I writ for a room last night." 

" But ye're too old to go galavantin' off to the city when ye 
ain't never been off'n this farm overnight more'n three times in 
your hull life. x\nd ye won't know a livin' soul when you git 
thar." 

" IN'ot real well, p'rhaps," persisted Hannah Jane. " But 
Widow Burr over Sweethome way told me her husban' hed a 



THE CRUEL WORLD-A SKETCH. 407 

niece who married a butcher in the city, an' she's goin' to get 
me their address if she can. And I'll hev Ebenezer — he's 
almost like a close relation." 

Jabez saw that further argument was useless, and drove 
home to tell his wife. 

" Ye can't do nothin' with Han Jane. When she's sot, she's 
sot, an' there's an end to it." 

Two weeks later he drove Hannah Jane, Ebenezer and an old- 
fashioned hair-cloth trunk to the depot. 

'^ Kemember, when you're tired of city life, Han' Jane, 
there's always a place for ye with us on the farm," were his 
parting words. But Hannah Jane waved him a good-bye, 
which said very plainly that she was not intending to get tired 
of city life. 

Hannah Jane and Ebenezer had been a month in the big city 

of W , and though the days had dragged somewhat, they 

did not for a moment regret their coming. Hannah had become 
fairly well acquainted with the city's highways and byways; 
she could really venture now on a short daily walk, and she 
knew that a policeman was the proper person to appeal to if 
one got lost or found some mysterious difficulty in the way the 
streets tuouJd shift around. 

But Ebenezer began to get thin. He missed his daily allow- 
ance of cream — skim milk was a poor substitute, and the land- 
lady's broom was entirely too much in evidence when he was 
napping comfortably on a parlor chair and dreaming of the fat 
field mice he was once intimate with. His mistress became 
tired of the scorched beefsteak and stewed prune diet, and 
after much deliberating and counting of resources, decided to 
rent a tiny brick cottage, tucked in between two tall tenement 
buildings on a neighboring street. A few days later they took 
possession and lived happily, though Hannah Jane sometimes 
thought she would like to see a good-sized tree, and Ebenezer 
suffered greatly at the paws of city cats, who laughed at his 
countrified ways, and turned up their whiskers at his tales of 
abundance of mice and cream in the place where ho came from. 
Tf there was such a place surely no self-respecting cat would 
leave it. 



408 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

One night Hannah Jane read in her evening paper of the 
numerous burglaries and murders which were occurring all 
over the city. The next evening there were more, and the 
accounts increased in number and boldness until Hannah Jane 
suddenly felt very helpless and alone. Such daring she had 
never heard of. Men entered houses, murdered whoever they 
could find, helped themselves and departed. All sorts of en- 
trances were gained, locks were picked, doors burst in and win- 
doAv-panes daringly broken. She became sure the world was 
becoming a very wicked place, and dreaded going to bed at night 
for fear of whajt might happen before morning. She hit upon 
an ingenious way of piling the flatirons against her b?,]rooiii 
door where they would not only give warning if anyone 
attempted to enter, but also prove a weapon of defense. 

^' Of course, I don't see why any burglar'd want to break 
into this place," she argued with herself. '' There ain't nothin' 
worth stealin' — but then you never ken tell — an' they do say 
they choose the most onlikely_ places." 

After an evening spent in reading most harrowing and 
hair-raising accounts of burglaries, Hannah Jane, with outward 
and inward quakings prepared to retire. 

^' I b'leeve I'll let you sleep in my room to-night Eben- 
ezer," she i-emarked, picking him up. " You're only a cat but 
you're better 'n nothin' — in case any b — thing should happen." 

Ebenezer purred his agreement, and was deposited on the 
rug at the side of the big four-poster bed in which Hannah 
Jane was soon swallowed up to spend a restless night. About 
four o'clock in the morning, she awakened silddenly and 
thought of the tales in the paper. Tt seemed to her that her 
hair stood on end as she heard audible footsteps on the cement 
walk outside. 

^' It's a burglar," she gasped, " it must be — oh — " and as 
there came a sudden distinct crash of glass, Hannah Jane 
shrank to one-half her former size, and was nbs<^lutoly stiff witli 
fright. Would he come to her room and murder her ? She 
expected any second to hear the crash of falling flatirons. Her 
heart pounded so she thought it must burst, and she was sure 
her hair had turned snow-white. 

After a long silence Hannah Jane tried to calm herself. 



THE CRUEL WORLD-A SKETCH. 409 

'' Don't be sich a fool," she quavered. '^ At your age. Gtei 
up and light the lamp — that'll let the burglar know youVe got 
some spirit left, anyway." 

She put one trembling foot to the floor, landed it squarely 
on Ebenezer, whom she had entirely forgotten, shrieked with 
surprise and fright, and promptly drew it back into the bed 
again. Get up ? ^ot for worlds — there were probably more 
burglars under the bed, just waiting to seize her as she un- 
suspectingly lighted a lamp. She lay cold and trembling for 
what seemed ages. There were so many noises going on out- 
side. The burglar must have found out his mistake and was 
turning the house upside down for revenge. If only she had 
stayed on the farm with Jabez; there, at least, one could feel 
safe at night. 

At last streaks of dawn appeared, and when the room became 
light, Hannah Jane rose, dressed and crept with trembling 
knees to the door. She unpiled the flatirons, and with one in 
each hand, opened the door. A tidy room met her astonished 
gaze — everything was as it had been left the night before, not 
one thing was out of place, and Hannah Jane could scarcely 
believe her eyes. Graining courage she went over the whole 
cottage. ^NTothing had been touched ; moreover, every window- 
pane was intact. Surely her terror and sleepless night had not 
been merely a horrible nightmare. 

Finally, she opened the small front door, and stood in the 
doorway a moment to get some of the fresh morning air. On 
the pavement in front of her lay something which glittered in 
the sunlight. It was a milk-bottle, dropped by a careless milk- 
man on his early morning rounds, and shattered into a thousand 
pieces. 

TTannah Jane observed — then suddenly closed the door and 
appeared overcome by some inward emotion. Later, as she gave 
Ebenezer his saucer of cream, she remarked to him : 

"Ain't you gittin' kinda tired of the city, Ebenezer? Vm 

back." 



410 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

On Hearing Melancholy Music 

c. w. s. 

ELUSIVE melody, stay, oh stay ! 
Flit 'st thou like racky film away ? 
Breathing soft, crooning low, lower, — still, — 
Have thy will. 

What yearning thrilled me w^hen thou wert nigh ! 
— Or yearning, or boding, or phantasy — 
That caught and wTOught me as it would 
To every mood. 

I heard the wind in the rigging moan, 
And the spume high over the bows was thrown, 
The sea's salt breath I deeply drew, 
And watched the mew. 

I heard from a tower a city's hum, 
Saw its press; and o'er desert dumb 
The hoarse caracara wing its way 
In quest of prey. 

What a yearning I had when the strain was nigh ! 
— Or yearning, or boding, or phantasy — 
That caught and wrought me as it would 
To every mood. 

The peaceful bells of a Sabbath morn, 
By. a soft June air o'er the hills upborne, 
With happiness my soul did fill. 
And with good-will. 

In the dusky quiet of eve I stood 
By the shadowy river's reedy flood. 
And saw a maid ply her boat along 
To a vesper-song. 



THE JOYS OF THE COON HUNT. 411 

In the springing woods I was anon, 
Where a brook was splashing over a stone, 
And I brushed aside a leaf to get 
The first violet. 

In the springing woods, — and one was near 
Whose absence maketh all earth drear; 
And never more can spring be spring, 
Nor anything 

For me be perfect ; all my thought. 
Where'er it strays, however fraught 
With joy or other pain, will turn 
To him I mourn. 



The Joys of the Coon Hunt 

C. E. LOCKE, '11. 

IT was a typical fall evening early in November, clear and 
cool, and the brilliant moonshine flooded the landscape. I 
was just settling down for an evening's reading, and had 
ensconced myself in a large and comfortable Morris chair, with 
my feet to the fireplace (for ours was the true, old-fashioned 
farmhouse), when there came a thundering double knock at the 
door, and I heard the jolly, laughing voices of two neighbor 
friends. In they came, with a burst of cool fresh air, slinging 
their guns over their shoulders. ''Hurrah for the coons, 
Charlie !" cried Bob Allen. ''Glorious night, and just the time." 
In a moment I had decided to spend the night in the moonlit 
fields, and, tossing Hibben into a far corner, "Make yourselves 
at home, boys,, till I get ready," I cried, and hastened off up- 
stairs. Donning an old shooting jacket and cramming the pock- 
ets with shells, I picked up the old shotgun, and in a very few 
minutes was downstairs. 

Leaving the house we took along the two dogs. Nig and 
Tan, and with banter and jest strode off in the moon- 
shine. It was a glorious night. The moon, a burnished 
silver disk, was slowly passing across the heavens, and 
the fields were bright as day. There is a romantic charm about 
such a night, and those words of Shakespeare would fain occur 



412 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

to me, ''On such a night as this ." But hark! Far down 

in the cornfield we heard a faint, whickering cry. "Coons!'* 
shouted Bob and John in a whisper, and away we sped after the 
excited canines. In among the corn rushed the dogs, creating 
a great fuss and stirring things up a bit, while wily Mr. Coon 
made tracks for the open. 

Soon we saw a black body galloping across the stubble, 
and then, with vociferous cries, the trailing dogs appeared, to 
vanish in a patch of scrub oaks. Over the rough, uneven 
ground we rushed, crashing through the underbrush, and finally 
drew up panting, and well-nigh winded, at the foot of a high 
stub, at the base of which Nig and Tan were raising ' ' Cain 
in general. " " Can you see him ? " I cried, peering up to where 
the stub showed dark against the moonlit sky. " Not yet, 
but wait. Ah, there he is, the sly old beggar." " Why, that's 
only a knot," said John. Bang! The report of the old shotgun 
reverberated across the fields. "Number one," said Bob, as he 
tossed him into the bag. Meanwhile John had figured out that 
it was not a knot after all. 

Our success just served to enliven our blood, and back we 
trudged again to the corn patch, the dogs silent and far in 
advance. Suddenly a chorus of growls and barks bix)ke out 
far to the left, and away we rushed. This time we did not catch 
a glimpse of His Honor, who led the dogs a roundabout chase 
of it, but finally, guided by the noise created by the canines, we 
stood at the base of a dense pine. "Someone must climb," was 
the verdict, and hastily we tossed up for it in the moonlight. The 
lot fell to me. 

According to eminent naturalists, there is inherent in the 
human breast an awe or respect of the things of the wild 
which tends to induce timidity, and such I found to prevail 
to some small extent in. my case. Nevertheless, it was 
not with fear and trembling, but with a stout club, that I shinned 
up that gummy bole, on the lookout for two green eyes to glare 
in wrath upon me. Up and up I climbed, until I felt that the 
dogs must be playing false, when, just on the point of descending, 
I caught the glint of light and a little growl came from the 
limb below me. There he was, half-way out. Clearly I could 
see his wicked little teeth bared, for be it understood that Mr. 
John Coon is of a rather pugnacious disposition and can render 



THE JOYS OF THE COON HUNT. 413 

a fairly good account of himself to the average dog. ''Get 
ready, boys!" I cried. "Here he is." Steadily growling all 
the while, he backed out the limb, I on the offensive. When he 
was reaching precarious ground I began to shake the limb vio- 
lently, and finally ' ' handed him a clip ' ' that caused him to light 
on all fours, in good fighting trim, among the dogs. Away he 
went, putting up a good fight, and, indeed, succeeded in reaching 
a sapling, but, alas, his life's work was ended. He was a fine 
specimen, a sort of well-fed alderman of his tribe, as it were, but 
into the bag he went. "Number two," said Bob sadly. 

Finding an old '' Spy " tree, we lay down (although I confess 
it was rather chilly) and munched some red beauties, which we 
had discovered at the top. " Well, boys," said Bob. taking out his 

watch, "it's about ." Suddenly, in startling proximity, we 

heard the chuckle of a greedy feaster, and in a moment the dogs 
were off in full cry. "Wait!" I said, as Bob and John were 
following. "Let us see them come out." Evidently Tan and 
Nig had caught a Tartar, or, at least, were trying hard to do so, 
for the wise old chap, at the first alarm, had done some crafty 
circling and trail jumping and, leading a roundabout circuit, 
was bearing down our way. Suddenly, at a rolling gallop, a 
greyish black mass moved rapidly across the field. It was aston- 
ishing at what a speed this shambling gallop carried the animal, 
and in a very few seconds he had gained the scrub oaks. T^n 
minutes later the report of a shotgun bore to the sleeping farm- 
houses the news that ' ' number three ' ' would steal no more corn 
that fall. 

Forthwith we turned our steps homeward and sought to 
renew our exploits in the land of sleep. 



Book Reviews 

The Genius of Shakespeare and Other Essays. By W. F. 
Osborne, M.A. Toronto: William Briggs, 1908. 
149 ])p. 
It was with far more than the usual interest that I picked 
up Prof. Osborne's book. He was one of my earliest and 
brightest students. His career since graduation has been suc- 
cessful and his good name is well known. There are three 
essays in the booklet — " Tlic Geniu^i of Shakespeare," Ten- 



414 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

nyson's " In Memoriam/' and " The Idylls of the King." All 
of them are full of information, a sort of running commentary 
or biography to accompany the study of the text. From this 
point of view the '^ Tennyson " studies are the more success- 
ful. One mi^ht, however, with justice, object to the way in 
which Tennyson's teachings on IJniversalism and Evolution are 
summarily dismissed. Surely no apology is needed in this age 
for showing some faith in Evolution. Indeed, any other posi- 
tion is hardly conceivable. And very many would say the 
same of Universalism. But be this as it may, no poet aim- 
ing to discuss the deepest problems of interest to man and 
striving to discuss them, as he must, from the standpoint of his 
own day could possibly leave these questions untouched. In 
attempting their solution, in taking some sixteen years to give 
form to " In Memoriam," I cannot conceive of Tennyson 
^' flinging '' into verse " the shifting phases of his grief," etc. 
" In Memoriam " has been a favorite study for years, and to 
me every word appeals as the product of ripe thought and the 
sincerest effort to arrive at truth. 

The essay on Shakespeare suffers from over-condensation. 
Had it been expanded into a book it would have been possible 
for Prof. Osborne to dwell long enough upon his different 
points to make them clear to all readers. One old heresy seems 
to be favored, namely, that Shakespeare is unfriendly to the 
common people. He is, but only so far as he is a voic^e 
of his time which knew not the democracy as it is con- 
ceived of in this day. In all other respects we see that Shake- 
speare stands for the true man, and repeatedly does he empha- 
size the necessity of ^' humanity " in his kings, who with him, 
as with all others of his day, are the representatives of the race. 

One feature of these essays, and especially of the first, is the 
delight shown in striking phrases or unfamiliar words. Such 
doubtless, appeal to an audience when the lecturer, by vbice 
and gesture, is forcing them home to his hearers. But in a 
printed book they should have been either culled out or toned 
down. Eor instance, the speech of the grave-diggers in Hamlet 
is " pert,*' the dialogue between Horatio and the sailors " cute," 
and so with many others. Probably the unconventional West 
is largely to blame for some of these faults. 



VOL. 
XXXII. 



Acta Victoriana. 



No. 5. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, J 9084909. 

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Editorial 



Economy 

DESPITE their many virtues along pecuniary lines, 
there is one thing around this College which the stu- 
dents have not yet learned to economize, and that is 
Time. Life in this little College world of ours may seem 
very complex, but its complexities are mere nothings to the 
realities of the larger world in which most of us expect to 
play a part in the near future. It is not that there are too 
many things in Victoria to do that the main trouble lies, but 
in the fact that some things are done spasmodically, other 
things are lazed over, and an executive meeting which should 
be finished in ten minutes is protracted to an hour or two. 
Many hours a week are spent in profitless discussion, many 
more hours are spent in loafing, time is wasted in bootless be- 
moaning of some unfortunate event which has occurred or 
situation which has arisen, a large amount of time is spent 
in preparation for the accomplishment of some allotted task. 
Time is wasted in an infinite number of ways. Things should 
be done in an orderly way, but there is no necessity of spend- 
ing a whole evening making .out a time-table of the number of 
hours one hopes to study during the next few days or weeks. 



416 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

System is all right, but, like evervtliing' else, it may be, and 
is, run to extremes. Concentration is a co-ordinate need of a 
lot of persons around this College. Even now statements, 
which become prolific during April and May, are being made 
that such and such a person has studied eight, ten or twelve 
hours a day. But the real criterion should be, if it is neces- 
sary to make any boast at all, how many hours' work has 
been done, how much has actually been accomplished ^ In 
pretty nearly half the cases where a person states that a cer- 
tain number of liours have been put in in any one day, it 
signifies that that much time was spent with a book in front 
of him, and that the work accomplished should have been 
done in perhaps two-thirds, or even half, the time. Economy 
of time and Concentration of Energy — these are two of the most 
important factors in becoming an all-round man or an all- 
round woman. Grenius may be an infinite capacity for taking 
pains, but the two factors stated in the previous sentence are 
the main elements in attaining to pre-eminence in Scholastic, 
Literary, Athletic or any other ])hase of college activity. 

T^ ?^ ?^ 

The Competitions 

As competitions usually go at Victoria, this year's Short 
Story, and, in a lesser measure, the Essay and Poetry Con- 
tests, were disappointing. The Poetry Contest was the most 
encouraging, although there were less than a dozen entries. 
After careful perusal, the judges have awarded the first prize 
in this class to A. L. Burt, '10, whose poem, entitled ^' For- 
ever Thine," appears on the first page of this number. Tn 
the Essay Contest there were less than half a dozen entered, but 
they were all of an exceptionally high calibre, and the small 
number of the contestants does not in any way detract from the 
credit and praise due the winner. Miss Mabel Jamiesou, '10. 
There were three undergraduates who competed for the Short 
Story Prize, but the judges decided to make no award. The rea- 
sou is simple — they were not stories, but simply sketches. There 
was hardly the semblance of a plot in any one of the three, 
and that is one essential ingredient of a story. All three were 
very commenrlable sketches, but they were not stories in the 
accepted sense of the word. Prof. Peynar, one of the judges. 



EDITORIAL. 417 

remarked on the particular merit of each of the entries, and 
said that if any one of them had had a plot it would be well 
worth a prize. We hope that no student will be discouraged 
by our decision not to award a prize. In no other work of life 
than in that of short-story writing is the saying that " success 
comes after a long series of failures " so applicable. 

There isn't going to be the annual Editor's Lament this year, 
entitled, " Why Do ISTot More People Try the Competitions V 
For an answer to this question we beg to refer our readers 
to the files of Acta for the last decade. The editor is going 
to make only one remark, namely, that there are several scores 
of people in this institution who have the required ability and 
would have the time if it were only economized. 

<& ^^ ^£ 

One Blessing 

The Editor of Acta has one cause for thankfulness that hi3 
contemporary, the Editor of Varsity, does not seem to have. 
Last fall it v^as more or less of an open secret, around Uni- 
versity College a.t least, that the Editor-in-Chief and Sporting 
Editor practically wrote the whole issue twice every week, with 
almost imvarying regularity. This may be rather early in 
tlie year to thank the members of Acta Board for their assist- 
ance, but nevertheless it is a fact that one and all, from the Mis- 
sionary and Tteligious Editor down to the Business Manager, 
have worked exceedingly well and Avith great willingness, and 
the Editor-in-Chief has no cause for complaint such as 
Varsity's Editor has. About a month ago our esteemed con- 
temporary complained that about twenty out of his twenty- 
six assistants had died a natural and noiseless death. Around 
Victoria, the Editor's only cause for complaint is that the rest 
of the College seem to acquiesce in the idea that no writing 
should be done except by members of Acta Board. 

^£ ^^ ^£ 

Through an inadvertent error we neglected to mention the 
publishers of ^' English Church Expansion in Western Canada/' 
reviewed in our January issue. The book is published by the 
Musson Book Co., Limited, of this city. 




Darwin 

AS we celebrate the centenary of Darwin's birth on Feb- 
ruary 12, 1909, the readers of Acta will no doubt be 
interested in a brief account of the life and work of 
this great naturalist. 

Charles Robert Darwin was born at Shrewsbury, February 
12, 1809, the second son and fourth child of the successful 
medical practitioner, Dr. Robert Darwin. His early educa- 
tion was conducted at Shrewsbury. In 1825 he w^ent to Edin- 
burgh to prepare for the medical profession, but, finding him- 
self unfitted for it, he went to Cambridge to prepare for the 
ministry. He took his degree in 1831 from Christ's, but, having 
still some two terms to keep, studied geology imder Sedgewick 
and Henslow. He read Humboldt's ^' Personal ^N'arrative," 
which filled him with admiration for naturalists and travel, so 
when the opportunity of going as naturalist with the Beagle, 
which was bound on a surveying trip and a circumnavigation of 
the globe, destined to last for five years, offered itself, he natur- 
ally accepted. After visiting the Cape Verde Islands, they 
surveyed on the South American coasts and the adjacent 
islands, afterwards visiting Australia and various islands of 
the Pacific Archipelago. His work on the geology of the 
countries visited and that of coral islands became the subject 
of volumes published later. After his return the idea of en- 
tering the ministry was tacitly abandoned, not through hetero- 
doxy, for only gradually did he become an agnostic, but be- 
cause he had found his true vocation. He returned from this 
memorable voyage a successful collector, a brilliant and prac- 
tised geologist, and with a wide general knowledge of zoology. 
Above all, ho was full of thoughts on evolution, impressed on 
him by his observation of the relations between animals of 
islands and those of the nearest continental areas, near akin, 
and yet not the same; and between living animals and those 



SCIENTIFIC. 419 

recently extinct and found fossil in the same country, here 
again related, but not the same. These facts led him to reflect 
deeply on the modification of species, and, after twenty-three 
years' work, the epoch-making volume, the " Origin of 
Species," appeared in 1859. 

The theories of ^' Evolution,'' '^ Natural Selection," or 
" The Survival of the Fittest," elaborated in succeeding works, 
have gained since, in fact practically at once, almost universal 
acceptance. Charles Darwin's long life of patient, continuous 
work, the most fruitful, the most inspiring, in the annals of 
modern science, came to an end on April 19, 1882, and he was 
interred in Westminster Abbey. During the last forty years 
of his life he suifered continually from ill-health, and the mar- 
vellous results he achieved were made possible only by two 
conditions — the confidence of his father, who placed him in 
such a position that he did not have to struggle for a living, 
and the devoted care of his wife. " She shielded him from 
every avoidable annoyance, and omitted nothing that might 
save him trouble, or that might alleviate the many discomforts 
of ill-health. For nearly forty years he never knew one day 
of the health of ordinary men." ("Life and Letters.") 

Darwin considered his own success was due chiefly to " the 
love of science, unbounded patience in long reflection upon any 
subject, industry in observing and collecting facts, as well as 
a fair share of invention and common sense." He also says, 
" I have steadily endeavored to keep my mind free, so as to 
give up any hypothesis, however much beloved (and I can- 
not resist forming one upon every subject), as soon as the 
facts are shown to be opposed to it." The essential causes 
of his succesg are to be found in this latter sentence, the crea- 
tive genius ever inspired by existing knowledge to build 
hypotheses, by whose aid further knowledge could be won; the 
calm, unbiased mind; the transparent honesty and love of 
truth, which enabled him to abandon or to modify his own 
creations when they ceased to be supported by observation. 
The even balance betw^een these powers was as important as 
their remarkable development. The great naturalist appeared 
in the ripeness of time, when scientists were everywhere dis- 
ussing the problem of evolution, though only one other saw 
his way clearly to the solution. — J. E. H., '09. 




niSSIOIMRY 



A Chance for Your Life 

REV. J. L. STEWART, B.A. 

THERE are few more intense questions than this, '' What 
will I do with my life ? ' ' There are few who ask it more 
earnestly than our college men and women of to-day. One 
has passed or is passing through these highest seats of learning. 
He has received the best his generation affords in some depart- 
ment of life. Many others have labored and through the bitter- 
ness of a thousand defeats and the joys of some successes 
experiences of others have handed to him the guiding lines to the 
goal. Heir thus of all the ages, it is but natural that he should 
ask, ** How may I best repay this indebtedn'css ? Where may 
I invest my life that it will tell widest and longest in influence 
for truth, beauty, goodness among my race ? ' ' 

Let us look to China, or rather to Western China, as a field 
for such an investment. Here are three great provinces of fer- 
tile valleys, broad plains, rolling plateaus, giant mountain ranges 
leading up to the great Hermit nation stretching far eastward 
from the Himalayas, the Lama land of Thibet. Few, if any, parts 
of the earth 's surface have had bestowed upon them more bounti- 
ful gifts to the human family than this. The best accredited 
authority commercially, Sir A. Hosie, classifies and catalogues 
these natural resources as follows : 

A. Agricultural and Horticultural Products. 

1. Cereals and grain plants: Rice, wheat, millet, corn, buck- 
wheat, oats, peas, barley, etc., etc. — eleven in all. 

2. Pulse : Sixteen kinds of beans, also peas and peanuts. 

3. Starch-yielding plants: Sweet potatoes, yams, lotus, taro 
bracken, common potato, and five with no common name in Eng- 
lish. 

4. Vegetables and seasoning plants: Lucerne, tara, shallot, 
onion, garlic, leek, turnip, carrot, radish, seven varieties of cab- 



MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS. 421 

bage, rape, lettuce, brinjal, celery, spinaxjh, goosefoot, coriander, 
cayenne pepper, mustard, Chinese pepper, ginger, bamboo shoots, 
sedge, melon, gourds, watermelon, squash, cucumber, vegetable 
marrow, etc., etc., without English name. 

5. Finiits: Apples, crabapples, loquot, pear, quince, apricot, 
cherry, olive, peach, plum, grape, cumquot, lemon, mulberry, 
orange, persimmon, pomegranate, punelo, strawberry, bramble- 
berry, raspberry, acorn, chestnut, hazelnut, walnut, water chest- 
nut and others to the number of forty. 

6. Products of 1, 2 and 3 : Jellies, macaroni, vermicelli, soy, 
vinegar, wines, spirits. 

7. Sugar. 8. Tea. 9. Tobacco. 10. Opium. 11. Varnish, 
tallow, soap and oil plants. 12. Textile plants. 13. Paper-mak- 
ing materials. 14. Dyestuffs. 15. Medicines (vegetable, ani- 
mal and mineral, two hundred and twenty varieties). 

16. Woods used by carpenters : Bamboo, cedar, pine, cypress, 
oak, walnut, in all ; thirty varieties. 

B. Animal Products. 

1. Sericulture, silk and silk- weaving, to the value of over 
$12,000,000. 

2. Insect white wax, honey and beeswax. 

3. Hides, leather, glue. 

4. Horn, hoof and boneware. 

5. Hair, bristles, feathers. 

6. Wool. 7. Skins and furs. 8. Soap. 9. Musk. 

C. Minerals and Mineral Products. 

1. Gold. 2. Silver. 3. Copper. 4. Lead. 5. Zinc and spel-^ 
ter. 6. Antimony. 7. Iron. 8. Saltpetre. 9. Sulphur. 10, 
Sil. of soda. 11. Gypsum. 12. Soda. 13. Sul. of iron. 14. 
Coal and coke. 15. Lime. 16. Jade. 17. Mineral oil. 18. Salt 
to the extent of $5,000,000 worth annually. 

Where on earth else will you find such an inheritance ? Who 
are the heirs to such a possession? 

The population of Western China is made up as follows: 
Sz-Chuen, 60,000,000; Yunnan, 12,000,000; Knei Chow, 
8,000,000, and West China, 80,000,000. That is the usual esti- 
mate. Add to this the access to Thibet, included in the area of 
influence, and you have the population of the United States and 
Canada combined. 



422 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Of what sort of stuff are they made? They are by gtneral 
consent among the most patient, peace-loving, intensely prac- 
tical people in the world. Patient: They plod along from day 
to day, from dawn to dark and far into the night, scarce knowing 
a holiday. Peace-loving: Though overrun again and again by 
hoards of horsemen from the north, Huns, Mongols and Tartars, 
they have peacefully gone on with their labors till the conqueror 
became the conquered and the vanquisher proved vanquished. 
Practical : Though China has had her philosophers and political 
and social theorists, yet these have ever turned to the practical 
rather than the mystic side. With then such a population, such 
millions of people who possess the qualities which make for 
success, and with nature so prodigal in her gifts, why has China 
not made greater progress? 

If it can be expressed in one phrase, it is this, **My people 
perish for lack of knowledge." In agriculture alone have these 
people entered in any measure into their inheritance. By means 
of wonderful systems of irrigation, fertilization and terracing of 
their mountain slopes, they have succeeded in producing a food 
supply sufficient under ordinary circumstances for the majority 
of their multitudes. Yet even this could be largely improved by 
our selection of seeds, stock raising, dairying, more adequate 
machinery and methods. Turning to forestry, China to-day is 
robbed of vast areas now sand-swept through destruction of the 
timber and vegetation. The devastation still goes on in her moun- 
tain districts till, denuded, they are left bare, barren and wind- 
swept. Mining, despite her vast mineral wealth, is largely but 
a hole in the hill where coolies trot in and out with baskets. 
Her carrying trade in the west is still but pack cows and donkeys, 
wheelbarrows and baskets, or bundles and poles on men's backs 
and shoulders, while on the rivers thousands of crafts are wrecked 
yearly in the rapids, and men strain and tug a^ they trudge 
patiently on, trailing the flotilla of commerce up stream. Even 
with her dense population to-day China, in the estimate of many, 
could safely double her people were but the treasures hidden 
all about her revealed and released through the magic of 
"Western wisdom. 

The enabling of China to enter into this material inheritance 
will mean a new era for that ancient empire. But better to 
feed, clothe, shelter, assist it in its toil, is that enough ? That is 



MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS. 423 

largely but making a living. Is it not another and a higher thing 
to live? And do we not live in our freedom from fears, our 
harmony in home, social and national relationships, our visions 
of far-off divine events, our emotions of peace and love and joy? 
And where shall they find these save as they are found in the 
fullness of the Father as revealed in Jesus the Christ? To 
increase her riches and not her righteousness, her possessions and 
not her peace, would be but to sow more deeply the seeds of 
materialism, avarice, greed and the grinding of the faces of the 
poor, which reads desolation and death. 

To-day we of the West and of the Aryan races hold largely 
the world's history and destiny in our grasp. Twenty years 
from now and it will never again be wholly ours. Already Japan 
is a mighty agent. Another twice ten years and China, with her 
fourth of the human family, will be acting her part for weal or 
woe in the affairs of men. To-day China is in transition and 
convulsion. She has awakened to the fact of her weakness and 
is seeking strength. 

Naturally she is seeking the material things first. She is 
feverishly endeavoring of herself to build steamers, roads, rail- 
roads and public buildings. She is seeking to open mines, manu- 
factures and develop her industries. She aims to abolish opium, 
foot-binding and impure government. She has established arsen- 
als, mints, powder magazines, presses, a great educational system 
embracing all departments from kindergarten to post-graduat3 
courses, and recently has ordered it compulsory upon all classes. 
Should it seem strange that among her rulers, her scholars and 
her thoughtful middle classes many are found who seek in Chris- 
tianity the solution of some of China's sorrows? Such, at any 
rate, stand the facts of the present. 

To say the least, now is the tide in the affairs of our Aryan 
race. China is sending forth her students to Japan, the United 
States, Belgium, Britain, France, and Germany. She also wel- 
comes to her shores any who can truly teach and lead her people. 
In West China, among our fourteen millions, the responsibility of 
Canadian Methodism, we want architects, engineers, dentists, 
doctors, nurses, musicians, printers, writers, teachers, preachers, 
men who in all and through all these avenues will count it their 
chiefest joy to lead their fellows into fullness of life. 



424 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Again in our generation the Spirit of the Son of Man speaks, 
and is saying still, '' What shall it profit a man if he shall gain 
the whole world of wealth and fame and power and, doing so, 
awake at last to realize that he has lost the very meaning of his 
being, sei^ice to his brother and his Maker, and his own soul's 
fulfilment? " Our fathers in the past have written the history 
of the past, the children of the future will write theirs, to us is 
given the writing of the history of this generation. What can 
we write more eternal than the spread of Christian comfort, 
culture and the Christ spirit o'er all the nations of the earth. 
Write thus, and then. 

Thro' the endless coming ages earth shall be 

Something other than the wildest modern guess of you and me. 



The Annual Missionary Conference 

January 29-31. 

'' The Field is the World; the Good Seed are the Children 
of the Kingdom,'' 

THE Annual Missionary Conference which has just 
closed was one of the best for years. There were six 
sessions. On Friday evening, '^ China • ' was the 
topic. Mrs. W. E. Ross, President of the Woman's Mis- 
sionary Society, emphasized the need for women of ability as 
workers in educational and social spheres, and Rev. J. L. 
Stewart, B.A., spoke from first-hand knowledge of the call for 
men. The scribe forgot his notes, so winsomely and entertain- 
ingly did Mr. Stewart describe the life of the Chinese of Sz- 
Chuan, showing how many points of contact with these Oriental 
people the tactful missionary can obtain. 

The Home Work on Saturday was in two divisions. In the 
morning Mr. J. A¥. Hardy, B.A., '04, gave a comprehensive 
sketch of our Indian work, calling upon us to remove the sting 
of truth in the reproach of the songstress of this race: 

*' What have you brought but evil and curses since you came? 
How have you paid us for our game, how paid us for our land .' 
By a Book to save our souls from the sins you brought in your other hand, 
Go back with your new religion." 

Upon Mr. J. H. Arnup, '04, fell the task of presenting 
The Western Problem, and he measured up to his privilege. 



MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS. 425 

The West is past the broncho-busting stage; the men wanted 
now are those of large calibre, with the statesman's eye. 
In the evening the Laymen's Missionary Movement was 
handled by Mr. R. Osborne, B.xi., and by Lion. Mr. Morine 
for Mr. Rowell, who was kept away by ill-health. Mr. Morine 
regards this Movement as chiefly valuable for the reflex influ- 
ence it will have in creating deeper religious faith among those 
at home. And it will not be long before the laymen will see 
that what is also required will be what is dearer to them than 
their money or their time, — hone of their bone, and flesh of 
their flesh. 

The venerable Chancellor preached the sermon Sunday 
morning in the chapel. In the afternoon the appeal was 
made, Mr. Z. Ono, of Tokyo, repeating the prayer of the IMace- 
donian, on behalf of the students of that city. 

The closing session on Sunday evening excited greatest in- 
terest. The chapel was filled. Rev. Dr. Sutherland occupied 
the chair, and the five volunteers under appointment to 
sail in the fall told why they are going. Of the party. 
Dr. J. E. Thompson is a gTaduate of the College of 
Dental Surgeons, this year is at Wyclifle, and connects 
his interest in missions with Mr. E. W. Wallace's influ- 
ence; Miss ISTeata Markland is a graduate in philosophy 
in '04, coming to Victoria from Columbian College in 
her second year, and goes because she knows no reason 
why she should not ; Mr. J. H. Oldham, '08, honor graduate 
in political science, would have Christ come into a world that 
is His own, and has assumed the responsibility of being a 
Christian; Miss E. Campbell, President of the Y. W. C. A. in 
'03, goes, for there her influence will tell for most; and Mr. 
F. H. Langford, who is last year's Prince of Wales' gold 
medalist, has from a boy been interested in missions, puzzled 
as to who maketh liim to differ, and now duty must be done. 

In addition to the five mentioned above, and to ]\[r. Taylor, 
who goes into evangelistic Avork, the party consists now of Miss 
Barbara G. MclN'aughton, nurse, from the Province of Quebec ; 
Dr. E. C. Wilford, now in post-graduate work in Edinburgh; 
Dr. A J. Prentice, of Collingwood; Mr. G. G. Harris, B.A., 
who will be remembered as Vic's gold medalist in Philosophy 
in 1.904; and Mr. D. S. Kern, B.A., of Wesley College. 




ER50NALS 
EXCHANGES 



Class of 190S 

MISS Edith Dwight has charge of the library of the 
O. A. C, Giielph. 
Miss Margaret Hamilton is at home, Peter- 
borough, Out. 

Miss Carrie Jickling is teaching Classics in St. Mary's. 

Miss Ethel Patterson is on the staff of Havergal College, 
Toronto. 

Miss Edna Smith is at her home, 14 Park Eoad, Toronto. 

Mrs. Geo. Sparling (nee Switzer) is in Chentu, China. 

Miss Wenonah Spence is teaching at Jarvis Street Col- 
legiate, Toronto. 

Miss Marion McLaughlin has a position in the Civil Ser- 
vice, Ottawa. 

Miss Ethel Wallace is a missionary at Foo Chow, China. 

Miss Alice Wilson is attending the Faculty of Education. 

Miss Edna Walker is at home, Rosedale, Toronto. 

J. S. Bennett is Classical Master, Cobourg Collegiate Insti- 
tute. 

R. IT. Clarke is still in Leipsic, Germany. 

W. G. Connolly is a missionary in Japan (16 Tatsuoka Cho, 
Hongo, Tokyo). 

II. IT. Cragg is preaching in the Bay of Quinte Conference 
(Bloomfield, Ont.). 

J. A. M. Dawson is a member of the Faculty of Queen's Uni- 
versity, Kingston. 

.I. E. Davison, who is in business at Wetaskiwin, Alta., is 
in town for a few weeks. 

A. E. Elliott is preaching at Rae Street Methodist Church, 
Regina. 

A. L. Fullerton is with the Central Canada Loan and Sav- 
ings Co., 26 King Street East. 

W. F. Green is in the Mineralogical Department, Univer- 
sity of Toronto. 



PERSONALS AND EXCHANGES. 427 

J. H. Gain is in business with his father in the city. 

F. A. E. Hamilton is assistant to the General Superin- 
tendent of the Wm. Davies Co. 

C. M. Hincks is practising medicine in the city. 

C. P. Holmes is in Japan, a missionary. 

Clyo Jackson and J. A. Spenceley are taking theology at 
Vic. 

W. E. James is preaching at AVhite Whale Lake, Alta. 

J. E. Knight is stationed at Dawn Mills, London Confer- 
ence. 

E. W. Langford is preaching at Embro, Ont. 

A. D. Miller is on the staff of Mount Allison University. 

E. W. Morgan, H. D. Robertson and W. E. Sibley are en- 
gaged in missionary work, Chentu, China. (Address, care of 
Canadian Methodist Mission, Chentu, Chuen, China.) 

E. J. Rutherford is stationed at Greenwood, B.C. 

W. J. Salter is teaching Classics at Woodstock. 

E. W. Stapleford is preaching in Vancouver. (1598 Sixth 
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.) 

W. A. Walden is stationed at Camlachie, Ont. 

The present addresses of Miss S. VanAlstyne and Mr. E. 
V. Puddell are unknown to the Secretary. 



Personals 



E. Domm, B.A., '08, is attending the Evangelical Methodist 
College at !N"apierville, HI. 

J. E. BroAvnlee, B.A., '08, and E. S. Albright, B.A., '08, 
are both travelling for the London Lithographing Company. 

H. Plowman, ex-President of '10, is with the Howell Litho- 
graphing Company, Hamilton. He is their artist. 

Chas. W. Brown, B.A., '87, gold medalist of that year, is 
pastor of the Eirst Methodist Church, Regina. 

Geo. Cruise, B.A., '05, is a member of the law firm of Lan- 
caster and Campbell, St. Catharines. 

Harry Cragg, B.A., who is preaching at Chisholm, Ont., 
was blessed with a little girl, !N'ovember 29. 

Miss Sadie Bristol is teaching at Athens, Ont. 

Miss Edith Campbell is a deaconess in Toronto, but intends 
soon to leave for China. 



428 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

We much regret to say that Elmwood Bowerman, '10, is at 
his home in Bloomfield, Ont., suffering from cancer of the 
throat. He is in a very serious condition; no hopes are held 
out for his recovery. 

E. E. Snider, B.A., '90, has been appointed principal of 
the High School at Port Hope. 

The class of '03 always v^^ere so active that it is hard, at 
any given time, to locate them all accurately. The following 
corrections of the list that appeared in the Christmas issue 
have come to our hands : 

Miss Eose Cullcn is still teaching in Paris. 

Miss Puby M. Tolliffe was attending Bryn Mawr, '07-'08, 
but is now teaching at Pennington, ^.J. 

C. W. Webb is teaching in Stratford. 

Miss iMico. Rockwell, on July 7, was married to F. M. 
Warren, in Duluth, and is now living in Minnea}X)lis. 

V. W. Odium is running a new paper at Winnipeg. 

We are all glad to see H. J. Sheridan, B.A., '07, around 
the College again. 

J. L. Stewart, B.A., '01, who gave such an optimistic 
address at the ^fissionary Conference, and is now home on 
furlough, is a former Editor-in-Chief of Acta. 



Exchanges 



^^ Arts and Divinity. Is Separation Desirable?" is the 
subject of an editorial in the Trinity University Review. The 
discussion is elicited chiefly by a letter signed, " The Old Eile," 
published in the same issue. The editor is of the opinion that 
separation is desirable. This is a question sometimes mooted 
around our own halls, and merits worthy consideration. In 
separation, it is true, the ^' weaker ones will bi^ strengthened 
by closer association with those whose wills are stronger," and 
be shielded from '^ the shock of contact with forces not wholly 
good." The spirit breathing through their midst will be more 
unadulterated. But does it not hold that a one-sided growth 
is most often ]umy? Growth in spiritual wisdom and growth 
in worldly wisdom must keey) pace with each other; they are 
two complementary colors, and unless the balance is preserved 
our view of life will be through a colored glass. 



PERSONALS AND EXCHANGES. 429 

Unfortunately the problem is treated only from the side of 
the Divinity man; the influence upon the Arts man is too 
important to overlook. The weakness of an occasional 
Divinity man may have a demoralizing effect upon his Arts 
cousin. But, granting that this weak Arts man would not 
encounter this influence elsewhere, is not the evil, more often 
assumed than real, lost in the ennobling influence of the 
Divinity man of grander character? And these greatly out- 
number their dwarfed brethren. 

President Eliot, of Harvard University, is to be succeeded 
by Abbott Lawrence Lowell, professor, author and lawyer. Mr. 
Lowell is a relative of the poet, and has occupied the chair of 
" The Science of Government " in LTarvard since 1900. 

Acta Victoriana comes to us in a very excellent number. 
In bulk it exceeds many of our current magazines. — Argosy. 

Consider. 

Friend, have you heard of the town of 'No Good, 

On the banks of the River Slow, 
Where the Some-time-or-other scents the air. 

And the soft Go-easies grow? 

It lies in the valley of What's-the-use, 

In the province of Let-her-slide ; 
It's the home of the reckless I-don't-care, 

Where the Give-it-up's abide. 

The town is as old as the human race. 
And it grows with the flight of years, 

It is wrapped in the fog of the idler's dreams; 

Its streets are paved with discarded schemes, 
And sprinkled with useless tears. 

-—Ex, 

Of all the college magazines that reach us, Acta Victoriana 
is undoubtedly one of the best. It is well gotten up, well 
printed, and generally contains a fine selection of interesting 
articles. The editors are certainly not sparing in their energy 
in their endeavor to uphold the reputation of their univer- 
sity. — The Mitre, 



430 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

A college paper must aim at a higher standard than the 
gossip and cheap jests of a local newspaper. — The Mitre. 

We cannot expect success from our capable representatives 
on the athletic field or hockey rink, even though the material 
be worthy of winning the series, unless we, the rest of the 
student body, contribute our share to the victory, — and it is 
not an inconsiderable share. This is the spirit of a letter on 
the hockey club in the McGill University Martlet. It is not 
alone the absolute athletic merit of any team that wins the 
laurels. The vital force, the inspiration, is the enthusiastic 
interest of the rest of the college in their team; this impels 
on to victory. Is it too much for the students to give up the 
time spent at a few matches for the sake of their own repre- 
sentatives, who weekly sacrifice many precious hours? 

My Absolute. 

There is no near when I am far from thee; 
There is no far when I am near to thee: 
In thy sweet presence is infinity. 
Whence petty space must flee. 

There is no early when I am late to thee; 
There is no late when I must go from thee: 
In thy dear presence is eternity, 
Whence count of time must flee. 

I boast no true love like my love for thee; 
I seek no new love save more love from thee ; 
]n thy full love is all sufiiciency. 
Like timeless sky and spaceless sea. 

—Harvard University Monthly. 

We acknowledge this month the following exchanges: The 
Student, The Collegiate Outlook, The Hya Yalca, McMaster 
University Monthly, Vox Wesleyana, Harvard University 
Monthly, Queen's University Journal, The University Monthly, 
University of Ottawa Review, The Mitre, The Columbia 
Monthly, The Martlet, Notre Darne Scholastic, Trinity Uni- 
versity Review, Acadia Athenaeum, Oxford University Maga- 
zine, The Argosy, Lux Columbia, St. Hildas Chronicle, and 
0. A. C. Review. 




Basket Ball 

Pharmacy 29, Victoria 23. 

ON January 26th Victoria added one more to her already 
long list of defeats. As usual, no one Avas surprised. 
The game opened by Pharmacy getting in some easy 
team work while the Victoria men were waking up. Victoria 
made poor passes and were rather slow. Pharmacy, with weaker 
but better trained men, dropped in basket after basket. The 
many fouls which were called were due in nearly every case to 
ignorance of the rules, Victoria being the greater offender. At 
half-time the score stood 15 — 4 in favor of Pharmacy. 

The second half opened at a much faster pace, Victoria hav- 
ing found her feet at last. Her defence checked hard and fed 
the forwards well. The forwards broke away from their men and 
picked up greatly in their shooting. The score was nearly even 
when Livingstone had to leave the floor with a slight injury. 
Victoria was again on the defensive, and Pharmacy had piled 
up a neat score when Livingstone came on again. '' Livy " de- 
serves great praise for the way he rallied the team and the excel- 
lent work he did up to the end of the game. Pharmacy were 
forced to play the defensive under their basket for a lively ten 
minutes. " Ecc " and Gerrie played well together and dropped 
baskets at a good rate. ' ' Livy ' ' proved himself an able captain. 
He worked fast and cleverly with the forwards, and was usually 
able to get back to his defence when needed. In spite of Vic- 
toria's fast play in the second half. Pharmacy's lead proved too 
great, and the final score was 27-23. 

The team lined up : Defence, Livingstone (capt.) and Deacon; 
centre, Rumball ; forwards, Ecclestone and Gerrie. 

The Victoria team was organized just a week before the game. 
There were two regular practices. The five men were never 
together till the day of the game. If Victoria wants a winning 



432 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

team we would sug^g'est that a floor be laid on the present court. 
The team is composed of first and second year men, and with care 
could become inter-faculty champions, Imt a chaiiipionship team 
will never be trained on the slime of the present court. 



Hockey 

Victoria 6, Junior S. P. S. 5. 

Such was the score. The first game of Group B of the Jen- 
nings Cup series between Junior S. P. S. and Victoria was 
played on February 2. According to schedule, it should have 
taken place on Varsity rink; but, owing to the superior ice at 
Vic, the game was played here. 

The teams lined up about 4.30 and proceeded to strike a 
whirlwind pace. Some fears were entertained by the spectators 
as to how our men could stand it, but it was not long till Oldham 
scored from centre after neat combination work with McCamus. 
Then the School tried hard to even up, but the man and puck 
plays by Birnie and Jewitt relieved. During this half McCamus 
seemed to have a particular spite against the School goaltender 
and kept that gentleman about as much interested as the spec- 
tators, adding two more to Vic's credit. The School should have 
had one or two, but wild shooting prevailed and Vic took another 
score. Half-time, 4 — 0. 

The second half began with each team apparently as fresh 
as at the beginning. The School and Vic. alternately notched 
twice, Dobson and Maclaren doing the trick for us. One more 
goal, when Dobson had got through the whole line, should have 
been ours, but went to even up with the School for their loss 
in the first half. By this time darkness was coming on, and the 
lights seemed merely to make the shadows more deceptive for 
our boys, so that after the next score by the School they con- 
tented themselves with a defence game. The S. P. S. men were 
taking all chances, however, and two more were slipped in on 
long shots through our defence, no one being able to locate the 
puck. The referee's whistle ended the suspense with the score 
6 — 5 in Vic's favor. 

To the spectators the game seemed comparatively free from 
roughness, though many of the playei-s can testify to the con- 
trary. Three men, however, were penalized, two of whom wore 



ATHLETICS. 433 

the scarlet and gold, though to the onlookers it seemed the School 
excelled in those offences for which our men suffered, viz., trip- 
ping and chopping. 

In spite of our losses from last year's team, Victoria has some 
excellent players. The bright particular star on the ice was 
Mc Camus at left wing. He has even improved greatly over his 
form when with us before. His speed, stick handling, back 
checking and ability to shoot without a second's delay at times 
when it seemed almost impossible, made him the idol of the 
*' rooters." Oldham, at centre, had speed to burn, and could 
give them all pointers on purloining the puck. Of the new men, 
Maclaren, as rover, seemed to have more wind and " staying " 
power this year. His speed and stick handling are well known, 
and a little more vigor in checking for the puck would supplj^ 
all that is necessary. Capt. Birnie is playing cover point this 
year. Though he put up an excellent defence game, he is pre- 
eminently a forward, and it is a pity he has to learn a new style 
of game when he has all the qualities necessary for a first-class 
rover. In Campbell, the goal-tender, we have a distinct ' ' find, ' ' 
fully equal to his reputation, a trifle slow in clearing, but cool, 
quick-eyed and experienced. Owing to Gundy 's accident, his 
place at point was taken by Jewitt. Dobson, of the first year, 
made his initial appearance on the Vic. team. He comes to us 
with a high reputation, but his effectiveness was crippled by his 
being given the right boards, though he is a left-handed shooter. 

In this connection, we think mistakes have been made too 
frequently around Vic. A man with a reputation must be put 
on the team, though he has had no training whatever for the 
position he is asked to play. It is unfair to the man, but it is 
more unfair to the college. The different positions require dif- 
ferent styles of men and of playing. In the excitement of the 
game the men will naturally drift to the positions they are accus- 
tomed to, and at a critical time their opponents will not be 
covered by the proper checks. It is necessary to introduce into 
our athletics a few sound business principles. Team play is abso- 
lutely essential, and each man has his own duty. Neither a team 
composed entirely of forwards nor one of defence men can ever 
succeed; nor can players be shifted indiscriminately, however 
great their reputation. 



434 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

But we feel our team will greatly improve with practice^ 
whether altered or not. The college is rightly proud of the vic- 
tory and hopes it is but a preliminary to future successes. 

<^ ^^ ^^ 
University College, 2 — Victoria, 1. 

In the first game of the Intercollegiate League, which took 
place on Varsity rink, Monday, February 1, the University Col- 
lege Ladies' Team defeated that of Victoria by a score of 2 — 1. 
Owing to lack of practice neither team played a very strong 
game. Miss MacLaren and Miss Crane were the mainstays of 
the Victoria team. Miss Armstrong also playing well. The line- 
up of the Victoria team vras as follows: Goal, Miss Denne; 
point. Miss Grange ; cover-point. Miss Denton ; forwards. Misses 
MacLaren, Crane, McConnell and Armstrong. 

.^^ ^^ ^^ 

Victoria Ladies, 7 — St. Hilda's College, 3. 
The intercollegiate hockey match between St. Hilda's College 
and Victoria Ladies' hockey team was played on Victoria rink 
on Wednesday afternoon, February 3. The score was as indi- 
cated above. The Victoria Ladies have a strong team this year, 
and this match showed some brilliant playing; though, owing, 
no doubt, to lack of opportunity for practice, there was not a 
great deal of combination. The score at the end of the first half 
stood 2 — 1, but fast playing in the second half left it 7 — 3 in 
favor of Victoria. St. Hilda's College played a good game, but 
were perhaps even more lacking in combination than the Vic- 
toria Ladies. For Victoria, Miss Denton, at cover-point, put up 
an especially strong game, and Miss MacLaren by effective 
playing scored many of the goals. 

<^ ^^ <^ 
Victoria, 19 — ^Wycliffe, 1. 

In the second Jennings Cup game, Victoria showed her com- 
plete superiority over Wycliffe. The game on the whole was 
very slow, and developed into an uninteresting one-sided exhibi- 
tion. The Vic. players were not forced to extend themselves 
at all, scoring almost at will. In the first half the defence were 
forced to participate in the game to some extent, but in the last 



ATHLETICS. 435 

half the game was played almost entirely by the Vic. forwards. 

The half time score was 7 — 1. The team representing Vic. was 

the same as in the previous match, with the exception that 

Rumball played right wing. 

^^ ^^ .^M. 

Pickings from Puck. 

A most welcome and gratifying innovation has been intro- 
duced by the University Athletic Directorate in regard to the 
Jennings Cup series in hockey. In former years all the games 
in this series were sudden-death games, one defeat thus putting 
a team out of the running. But this year the teams entered have 
been divided into four-club groups, and each team plays home 
and home games with the other teams of the group. The group 
winners play off for the championship. Thus, whether a team 
wins or loses, it has at least the opportunity of playing a num- 
ber of games, and in this alone there is greater incentive for men 
to get out and train for the first team than there has been in 
previous years. By this new arrangement keener competition 
has resulted, and more interest and enthusiasm has been evi- 
denced in the games. The success of this alteration might well 
convince the Directorate of the advisability of a similar change 
in the rugby and association football series. 

A practice game of hockey was played by the Vic. team early 
in the season against Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. Although the 
Vic. players had not previously been able to obtain much prac- 
tice, they played a fast combination game, leading until near the 
end by 3 — 1. But they were unable to maintain the pace for 
the full time, and the final score stood 3 — 3. 

Although only one of last yearns championship Varsity team 
is on the present aggregation, the team this year is well uphold- 
ing the honor of the University, and bids fair to again carry 
oif the championship of the Intercollegiate Hockey Union. In 
their first game they walloped McGill by the score of 12 — 0. 
Queen's, which defeated Varsity at Kingston by the close score 
of 8 — 7, at present appears to be the only real contender for 
the championship. Varsity walloped Laval, 8 — 0, later. 




IN inverse ratio to the murkiness of the day were the spirits 
of the Glee Club as they started out on their annual trip last 
month. The iron horse snorted, tightened his traces and 
sped away over the steel ribbands which join our city with 
Hamilton. 

The trip this year was not quite so extensive as in former 
years, but what it lacked in extent was more than made up in 
excellence. Our violinist, Miss Maud Buschlen, whose reputation 
is too well known to need any comment, delighted the audience 
with a number of selections, the excellence of which proved her to 
be an artist of no mean merit. Miss Grace Merry, elocutionist, 
gave a number of well-chosen readings and was obliged to respond 
to repeated encores, while E. H. Ley, B.A., in his solo work 
called forth unstinted applause. Under the able direction of 
Mr. H. M. Fletcher, the chorus and octette work showed the 
result of their faithful practice. The Sunday services at St. 
Paul's Methodist Church, St. Catharines, were in charge of the 
Glee Club, which relieved the choir of its musical duties and the 
pastor of homiletic care. R. E. S. Taylor preached on missions 
in the morningj while the afternoon meeting at the Y. M. C. A. 
was in charge of W. Vance, who gave a very interesting talk to 
young men. In the evening H. W. Avison filled the pulpit and 
preached a powerful sermon to a large congregation. 

Nothing stirring took place on the trip except a slight dis- 
turbance on the train when a "fresh soph.," who is of a very 
taking disposition — he ran off with the treasurer's treasure the 
previous evening — was tapped gently but firmly. 

The following tid-bits speak for themselves: 

Hamilton, Saturday, 10 a.m. 

Pike — ' ' Say, boys, I 'm going up the mountain. ' ' 

Taylor—*' Oh, go long, that's a 'bluff.' " 

Todd (saluting Avison on the street) — " You are looking 
thin, 'Fat.'" 



LOCALS. 437 

Intoxicated Citizen — " Say, young man, what are those 
colors? " 

Conn — ''Red and yellow." 

Bdmison — **Are you acquainted with the * Todd boys ' ? " 

One of St. Kitts' Fair Belles—" Why, yes! All the girls 
here know them. ' ' 

Ha — n — s, '09 (in car on Glee Club trip) — *' Who is that 
other woman up there ? Oh, gee — no, it 's Rosy. ' ' 

Someone (on Glee Club trip) — " I'm not particular about 
going where there are girls. ' ' 

M— rr— s, C. T.— '* Here am I, send me." 

McQ — e, C. T. (looking at the front of a library book on 
which were the words ''Source, Purchase") — "Did old Pur- 
chase really give this book to the library? " 

Miss H — w — tt, '11 — "Acta has been in our home so long 
I feel as if I had grown up with it." Acta is now in its 36th 
edition. 

B — r — t, '10 — "Are you trying to avoid the holes?" 

B — rl — w, '10 — " No, I'm avoiding the girls that want to 
skate with me." 

Codling, C. T. (looking at University Directory) — " I say, 
there are quite a number of ladies taking medicine. ' ' 

Overheard at Morning Service, Convocation Hall: 

Lady — " There are quite a number of students out this 
morning. ' ' 

Husband — " Yes; these are only the pick of them though; 
the rest are in bed. ' ' 

South Hall, Sunday evening: 

Mrs. Sheffield (turning the lights higher in the reception 
room) — " It seems a little gloomy here." 

Miss Stitt, '12 (from the cosy comer) — " I hadn't no- 
ticed it." 

Seniorette — ^"The person who makes any remarks about Mr. 
Cassmore 's hair hasn 't got much to talk about. ' ' 

Third Year Ethics. — A ripple of laughter emanates from 
Washington, and soon pervades the whole class. 

Dr. Blewett — " I do not know the cause of this levity, but it 
evidently has originated from some unintellectual source." 



438 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

T — yl — r, '12 (after eating a huge dinner) — " I am a part of 
all that I have met." 

Talking of Whitby Conversat. : 

Sw— er— n, B.D.— '^ Only a dollar, boys! " 

M — nt — m — ry, 11 — " Can we take two for a dollar? " 

S— B.D.— ' ' .Yes, if you 're one. ' ' 

M— , '11—'' Well, we're not one yet." 

The oration contest for our lady undergraduates took place on 
the evening of Wednesday, Feb. 3, and Miss Mabel Jamieson, 
'10, was awarded the Bell prize. The subject for the evening was 
"The Value of an Ideal," and Miss Jamieson is to be especially 
complimented because of the excellence of the speeches made by 
the other competitors. Dr. Edgar, in awarding the prize, charac- 
terized the winner's oration as the best he had listened to on the 
topic in twenty-five years. 

The list of officers of the various years for the Spring term 
is as follows: 

Fourth Year — President, J. E. Todd; 1st Vice-President, Miss 
Margaret Phillips ; 2nd Vice-President, M. H. Staples ; Secretary, 
N. C. Sharpe; Treasurer, Miss Clara German. 

Third Year — President, W. E. McNiven; 1st Vice-President, 
Miss Jamieson; 2nd Vice-President, C. P. Brown; Secretary, 
Charles Robertson; Treasurer, Miss Jackson. 

Second Year — President, W. H. Moorehouse; 1st Vice-Presi- 
dent, Miss Rouse; 2nd Vice-President, E. J. Pratt; Secretary, 
Bert Eby ; Treasurer, Miss Laura Denton. 

First Year — President, W. Evans; 1st Vice-President, Miss 
Matthews; 2nd Vice-President, H. W. Manning; Secretary, G. 
Fleming; Treasurer, Miss Pettit. 

On Wednesday, January 13th, at the regular meeting of the 
Women's Literary Society, the debate between '09 and '10 was 
the prominent number on the programme. The subject of the 
debate was, '' Resolved, That women in the British Empire 
should not have the suffrage." Miss Jamieson, '10, and Miss 
Lukes, '10, upheld the affirmative, and Miss Delahaye, '09, and 
Miss Grange, '09, the negative. The debate was a very interest- 
ing one, and on both sides many good points were brought for- 
ward. The judges, however, decided that victory belonged to 



LOCALS. 439 

the negative. The next and final inter-year debate will, therefore, 
be between '09 and '11, and will take place as soon as it can be 
arranged. 

The Young Women's Christian Association held their first 
meeting for 1909 on Monday, January 11th, at 4 o'clock, in the 
Ladies ' Study. Miss Lena Hill, '09, gave a paper on ' ' The Aims 
of the Individual Student," and Miss Dunnet, '09, gave " The 
Aims of the Society." After the regular meeting the Social 
Committee took charge of the programme and served light 
refreshments. The social half-hour was very much enjoyed by 
all present, as it gave the members of the Society an opportunity 
to become better acquainted. 

Macklin, '10 — '' This is pretty good ice.'' 

Miss H — k — y, '10 — " Yes, we can't complain to-night." 

Macklin, '10 — ^^ It is pretty hard when you can't complain." 

Senior — '' Well, have you been to consult Prof. Edgar? " 
Miss K — X, '09 — ' ' No, I went to prayers instead. ' ' 

M — re, '10 (on the rink, to a young lady with whom he had 
just skated two bands, and who remarked that she must go in) — ■ 
" Oh, I am so sorry, as I am only just beginning to enjoy it." 

Miss C — w — n, '11 — " 1 used to think psychology had some- 
thing to do with the mind. ' ' 

Junior—'' Well, hasn't it? " 

Miss C — w — n, '11 — " Oh, no; all I can find in it is the eye, 
ear and nose." 

Miss S — V — s, '09 (in mission study class) — " The worst 
thing about the Indian women is that if their husbands die young 
they can't get married again." 

Miss McC — n — 1, '11 (commenting on her hockey playing) — 
'' There was one big, tall man who knocked me over every time 
I met him ; then once I met him in mid-air. and didn 't know what 
to do with him." 

Miss J — m — n, '10 — " Who is that playing goal? " 

Miss H— w — tt, '11 — " It is Mr. Wright without his hair; he 

must have it all under his toque." 

Miss J — m — n, '10 — " No wonder I didn't know him, there 

is so little of him left when his hair is gone." 



440 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

L — t — ch, '11 (on the rink) — '' My, this is fine; I could live 
on skates — and fruit cake." 

Miss M — t — s, '12 — '' I nuist go in; this is too soft for me. 
Oh! I mean the ice, not you." 

Miss H — w — t, '09 (upon hearing that Prof. Robertson was 
likely to go abroad this summer) — " I am so glad, because I have 
always heard that to go abroad broadens one." 

Miss C— k, '09—'^ What kind of a gift will '09 leave for the 
Ladies' Study? " 

Miss H — 1, '09 — ^' If I lose my year you can leave me." 

White, C. T. — ''I only know one freshette: I don't know what 
her name is, and I wouldn't know her if I met her, but I know 
the number of her house." 

Miss Mathews, '12 — " My, I felt queer when I was elected 
1st Vice-President. It seemed as if I was getting married." 

Applegath, C. T., to Deaconess in one of Dr. Chown's lec- 
tures — '' Pardon me, but where are you attached? " 

Jotting from the debate. 

"A fellow comes out of college with a string of stars and a 
comet, whereby hangs a tail." 

" This bread and butter question is one that is continually 
staring us in the face. ' ' 

Witticisms gleaned at the Senior Dinner Committee election : 
Mr. Waddell (on being called on to preach a sermon) — " I 
have many things to say unto you, but ye cannot bear them 
now." 

W — sh — ng — n, '10 — '' I move that Mr. Pratt strike a match 
— to light the gas." 

Pratt, '11 — '' I move that Mr. Washington be that match." 
Jewitt, '10 — "I move that Mr. Cassmore be asked to with- 
draw his feet." 

Br — dge — n — '' I fear these jokes are getting on too low a 
level." 

Junior — " In Acta Board picture Dr. Edgar looks as if he 
had the old l^ick behind him." 

Miss S— n— y, '10— '^ Well, who is he if he isn't? " 
Junior — ''Oh, it just happens to be Jamie Horning." 



LOCALS. 441 

The final inter-college debate, which was to have come off on 
Monday, February 1st, between University College and Victoria, 
has been called off on account of the illness of one of the Victoria 
debaters, consequently University College gets it by default, as it 
was too late in the term to make other arrangements. 

Miss H — ^y — s, '09 (on the rink) — " Oh, do you see that hole 
sticking right up out of the ice ! " 

Miss H — y, '10 (addressing C. G. Fr — ch, when he came up 
to her for the third band) — ''Why, where have you been, Charlie ; 
don't you know you have wasted two whole bands ? " 

The officers elected" for the U. L. S. Spring term are as fol- 
lows: Hon. President, Prof. Dewitt; President, H. G. Manning, 
'09 ; 1st Vice-President, M. H. Staples, '09 ; 2nd Vice-President, 
0. V. Jewitt, '10; Leader of Government, W. E. Honey, '09; 
Leader of Opposition, L. H. Kirby, '10; Treasurer, C. Robertson, 
'10; Secretary, J. R. Rumball, '11; Assistant Secretary, W. J. 
Morrison, '11; Marshal, F. J. Barlow, '10; Pianist, H. Holgate, 
'12 ; Assistant Pianist, A. W. Burt, '11 ; Critic, J. H. Arnup, '09 ; 
Assistant Critic, W. E. MacNiven, '10; Curator, W. Moorhouse, 
'11; Councillors, N. C. Sharpe, '09; H. L. Morrison, '09; H. 
Baker, '09. 

i( Tattle " Tales. 

The Supreme Grand Push of the Legion of Orpheus was in 
a stew. He had promised to assist in the musical programme of 
a session of the Missionary Conference. He had also been invited 
to a party on the same evening. At the time of which we are 
writing his social instincts were much stronger than his mission- 
ary spirit. He was accordingly doing his best to find a '' sub " 
who might minister to the musical ear of the missionaries — 
apparently without success. 

In this dilemma he came to the Critic for consolation. 
' * Gee ! ' ' said he, " I wish I had never had anything to do with 
this blamed Glee Club." 

''So do we all," replied the Critic sadly — and he is still 
wondering why the musical gentleman left so abruptly. 

Speaking about missionary work, we would suggest that as 
soon as they have solved the ' ' foreign work ' ' problem, the Mis- 
sionary Society commence operations among the students of 



442 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Victoria Callege. Shades of John Wesley ! If Dame Gossip 
informs us rightly, there is abundance of work for them to do in 
that quarter. You don't believe it? Well, listen: 

Some time ago a light beamed long and wearily upon four 
seniors in an upper chamber. And what were they doing ? Plug- 
ging? Ah, no, my children! They were playing a wonderful 
game, yclept King Pedro ! 

Well, yes, that's pretty bad, but just wait. As wc were going 
through the halls one day last term our attention was arrested 
by a scries of metallic tintinnabulations that spoke of the inter- 
mittent exchange of coins. Resolving ourselves into an investi- 
gation committee, we proceeded to ascertain the causes of this 
unwonted sound. Judge of our surprise when we found three of 
our local magnates, the President of Lit., a 4th Year member of 
Acta Board (alas, but we must publish the truth), and the 
President of the '^ Y, " respectively, engaged in the thrilling pas- 
time of '' matching " coppers. In justice to the gentleman last 
named, we must add that he was acting as referee — and, so far 
as we could see, was giving his decisions with great impartiality. 

And now we hear that " everybody " is going to take in the 
University theatre night ! Now, what d' ye think o' that? 

She (in a friendly tone) — '' By the way, are you going to take 
supper anywhere to-morrow evening?" 

He (eagerly) — " Why, no; not that I know of." 

She (serenely) — ''My! won't you be hungry the next morn- 
ing."— ^a^. 

The above, under the caption of ' ' Stung ! " is taken from one 
of our best-known contemporaries, and reminds us of a story. A 
certain deacon of this institution was attending a bazaar at a 
well-known Methodist young ladies' establishment one Friday 
night last term. On the Saturday following a certain Dominion 
championship Rugby match was scheduled. The hero of this 
story, finding the conversation waning, asked the young lady, 
"Are you going to the Rugby match to-morrow?" " No," was 
the disconcerting, albeit somewhat eager reply. The conversation 
again waned — for the hero had already " made his date." 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



445 



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446 



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Shoe Repairing, Cleats, etc., called 
for and delivered promptly. 

8-10 Cumberland St., Toronto 

Phone N. 5466 SKATES GROUND 



Newest Styles 
Large StocK 
of New Goods 



I^Hone 

NortK 

3371 



MACEY 

TAILOR 

777 YONGE, STREET 
OAe blocK nortH of Bloor Street 

T. BRAKE 

Fine Boots and Shoes 

REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 

BOOTS MADE TO ORDER 

562 Yon|(e St., Toronto 



Cut Flowers 

Floral emblems of every description 
are most carefully executed by 




96 YONGE STREET 

Our Prices are Reasonable Our Execution Perfect 

Phones Main 1424 and 4790 

Night and Sunday, Phone Park 792 

The Name of 

PARK BROS. 

On your photograph is a guarantee of the best 
workmanship; our FOUR DOLL-^R cabinet is 
without an equal. 
STUDIO: 3281 Yonge St. Phone Main 1269 

The L. S. Haynes Press 

Printers 
502 Yonge Street 



Phone North 3912 



College Work a Specialty 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF 
COMMERCE 



Capital Paid-up, 



$10,000,000 



Savings Bank Deposits received from $1 .00 up 

BLOOR & YONGE BRANCH 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



447 



CATERING 

For Banquets, Weddings, Parties, Social Teas, 

etc., a specialty. { First-class service 

guaranteed. Estimates given.) 

ROBT. J, LLOYD & Company 
744-748 Yonge Street Toronto 

Phones No th 3036, North 127 



Ellis Bros. 

JEWELERS 

I08 Yonge Street, TORONTO 

Rock bottom prices for 
year and "frat" pins. 

Finest Workmanship 

Original Designs 



G. HAWLEY WALKER 

fTDevcbant bailor 

126 YONGE STREET 
Phone Main 4544. TORONTO 




SAMUEL YOUNG 

CARPENTER, BUILDER 
AND CONTRACTOR 

Cosmopolitan Carpenter Shop, 

4i HAZELTON AVENUE, TORONTO 

Orders Promptly Executed 



J. W. Johnson 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 
272 Yonge St. - Phone : M. 565 



Waterman's Ideal Fountain 
P ens, $2.5 0. 

WATCHES PROPERLY REPAIRED 

Phone, North 242-243 

M. RAWLINSON 

Cartage Agent and Warehouseman 

Offices: 612 YONGE STf EET 

FRONT ST., Four Doors East of Union Station 

Storage Warehouses : St. Joseph and Yonge Sts. 

Improved Vans and Trucks for Remr ving Furniture 

and Pianos, Storage for Furniture, Baggage transferred 

TOUONTO, CA^AUA 

High-class Tailorirg at Close Cash Prices 

S. CORRIGAN 
The Leading Tailor 

175 Yonge Street 

Three Doors North of Queen 
Established 38 years 

Special quotations to all Students 



P 



ROGRAMMES, 
PROFESSIONAL and 
CALLING CARDS, 
MENU LISTS 
WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS 



PRINTED T'ryZi^. 



WaKam 

Wesley Buildings, 
TORONTO. ONT. 



448 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 







S0LES HGEIITS WflNTED 

$86.00 pep W^eek, op 400% 

PPOflt 

All samples, stationery and art 
catalogue free. We want one 
permanent agent in this locality 
for the Largest Picture and 
Frame House in America. 
Experience unnecessary. We 
instruct you how to sell our goods 
and furnish the capital. If you 
want a permanent, honorable 
and profitable position, write us 
to-day for particulars, catalogue 
and samples. 

FRANK W. WILLIAMS Co. 

1214 W^. Taylop Stpeet 

CHICAGO, ILL. 


FOR ^llOICii;, rUKE 

Confectionery 


Mother's Candy Kitchen 
732'2 YONGE ST. near czar st. 


Hall's Dining Hall 

606 YONGE STREET 

The Students' Restauremt 

Rates $2.25 per week 


Phone North 3296. 
r\^, • J D^ll 702 and 704 YONGE 

L^aVld Dell, Sr.. Cor.St MarySt 

Choice Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
Confectionery and (xroceries. 


Af'w n("»nr»<* a bit at.wavsi irwh'csH 







lalmutn iintng l|aU 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 


r^ Webb's— » 

pOR Weddings, Dinners, 
Receptions, large or 
small, simple or elaborate, 
there is no place like 
Webb's. (ATA LOG IT E 
FREE 


We purpose making this 
the students' diaing hall. 
We pride ourselves on 
cleanliness and good 
service- 


Separate tables for ladles. 

S. W. PAISLEY, Proprietor 
20 BALMUTO STREET. TORONTO 


Ibarra MebbCo.,ximite& 
447 l^onac St., n:oronto 








MILK AND CREAM 

GOOD ENOUGH FOR BABIES 



Witliout a chemical analysis and bacteriological 
examination it is impossible to judge the quality of 
milk. Therefore buy Irom Dairies of proved integrity 
only. " Beware of being offered too much for your 
money,— some things are too cheap in quality to be 
anything but dear in price. " 



CITY DAIRY 

Phone College 2040 



CO., Limited 

Spadina Crescent 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



449 



GEO. HARCOURT & SON 

CAPS 



COLLEGE GOWNS AND 
For Ladies and Men 



57 King Street West 



TORONTO 



SEE 
THE 
STAR 






IT 

LEADS 

TO 



1 1 mum GO. 

HIGH-GRADE TAILORS 

685 



COLLEGE 
GOWNS 



YONGE 
STREET 



Phone: Nopth 1419 



Phone North 904 



Richard G. Kirby 



Carpenter and 
Contractor for 
General Building 
and Jobbing 



537-539 Yonge St. 

TORONTO 



A. H. YOUNG 



FINE PICTURES 

PICTURE FRAMING 

REGILDIMG 



729 Yonge Street, 



Toronto 



THE STUDENTS' DRUG STORE 

We were Students ourselves not so very long 
ago, and we know the kind of treatment they 
appreciate. 

If you are a Student, mention this advertise- 
ment to us and we will try and make you feel 
at home, and allow you a special Student's 
discount on all your purchases. 

We have a well assorted stock of all kinds of 
Perfumes, Toilet Articles, Creams, Lotions, 
Powders and Sundries of every description. 

Huyler's and other high-class Chocolates, 
Creams and Hon-Bons, Our Soda Fountain is 
going Winter and Summer, and we serve 
dainty dishes and beveiagesin dainty fashion. 

Careful dispensing of prescriptions our 
specialty. 

W. J. A. & H. CARNAHAN, 

Traders Bank Bidg., Dispensing Chemists, 

Cor. Yonge & Bloor, Cor. Church & Carlton, 
Phone North 341 Phone Main 2196 

" 342 ♦' " 2197 

Branch Tabard Inn Library. C.P.R. Tel. Office 



THE DVTtH STUDIO 

318 YONGE STREET 

Toronto - Canada 



Phone Main 7027 



EVERYTHING IN 

High-Grade Photography 

skilfully and promptly executed 

NONE BUT THE MOST SKILEUL 
WORKMEN EMPLOYED 

Special Rates to Students 
G. B. C. van dcr FEEN, 

Proprietor 



450 ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Uictoria College 



QUEEN'S PARK, TORONTO, 



In Federation with the University of Toronto. 



The Federation System enables Victoria to offer the fol- 
lowing advantages : 

1. A compact college life in a commodious and beautiful 
modern building, provided with all the latest conveniences 
for healthful work. 

2. A large staff of College Professors, composed of men 
with thorough European training and ripe experience as 
teachers, and of earnest Christian character. 

3. Admission to all the lectures and laboratories of the 
University Staff of eighty-eight professors and lecturers, who, 
together with the fifty-eight professors and lecturers of the 
federated colleges, constitute the largest faculty of Arts in 
the Dominion, and one of the most efficient on the Continent. 
All University examinations, prizes, scholarships, honors and 
degrees are open to our students on equal terms with those 
of any other college. A large number of prizes, honors and 
scholarships are also offered to our students in our own 
College. 

4. Two commodious residences for women students afford 
every modern advantage for health and comfort and a refined 
social life. A course of physical training is also given under 
an accomplished directress and a women's gymnasium forms 
part of the new residences. 

5. Excellent facilities are afforded both in the University 
and College for post-graduates reading for the degree of 
Ph.D., and also a full course in the Faculty of Theology. 

Lectures in both faculties begin October 1st. 

N, BUB.\iri\SH, S.T.D., LL.D., 

President. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



451 




QIITJIDIQ AND ONTARIO CONSERVATORY OF 
I AniCO' MUSIC AND ART, WHITBY. ONT.fRfJ 

LA DIES Ideal home life in a beautiful castle, 

QQI I [QF modelled after one of the palatial 
homes of English aristocracy. 
The latest and best equipment in every department, 
backed up bj' the largest and strongest staff of special- 
ists to be found in any similar college in Canada. 
Sufficiently near the city to enjoy its advantages in 
concerts, etc., and yet away from its distractions, in an 
atmosphere and environment most conducive to men- 
tal, moral and physical stamina. Send for new illus- 
trated calendar to 
REV. J. J. HARE, Ph.D., Principal. 



Alma College 

Rev. Robert I. Warrer.'M.A., D.D.. Principal 
Mrs. Jean Wylie Grey, - Lady-Principal 
Miss Alice F. Menwood, B.A., Acting Dean 



SENIOR SCHOOL makes efficient provision for studies for 
University Matriculation, University Curricula in Music, 
Teachers* Non-Professional Examinations, and for Alma 
College Diplomas in Liberal Arts ( M.L.A. and M.E.L.) ; 
Music (A. A. CM. for Pianoforte, Singing, Organ, Vio- 
lin ) ; Fine Art ; Elocution and Physical Culture ; Com- 
mercial Science ; Domestic Science. 

JUNIOR SCHOOL provides attractive school home, in 
separate apartments, for girls under thirteen, and also 
prepares pupils for the High School entrance examinations. 
HEALTHY LOCALITY, Six Acre Campus. Superior 
Buildings, Competent Teachers, Successful Record. 
For Catalogue, address ' 

PRINCIPAL WARNER, 

Alma College, ST. THOMAS, ONT. 



Upper Canada College, Toronto 

H. W. AUDEN, M.A. (Cambridge), Principal. 

Regular Staff comprises 15 Graduates of English and Canadian Universities, with additional 
special instructors. Courses for University, Royal Military College and Business. Senior and 
Preparatory Schools in separate buildings. Every modern equipment. Fifty acres of ground 
in healthiest district. Four rinks, gymnasium, sw^imming bath, etc. 







preecrtptiou pharmacy 

OF THE NORTH END 

Discount to Students. Accuracy, Purity 


W.C. SENIOR 
&BRO. 


of ingredients, prompt delivery. 

WM. H. COX, 786 Yonge St.. Toronto 


Tailors 

and 

Gown Makers 

717 
Yonge St. 
Toronto 


The Dining Hall 


556 YONGE STREET 

PHONE: T. J. HEALEY, 
North 4772. Proprietor. 



Otir shop is 
op-to-datc and 
wc use you right 



Razors Honed 



T. A. FELSTEAD 

4 CHAIR BARBER SHOP 4 
760 YONGE STREET 



Electric 

Face Massage 

Head Rub 



Shoe Shine 



452 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Cbc University of Coromo 



and 



Unioersttv College 



FACULTIES OF ... 



Arts 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Household Science 

Education 

Forestry 



For information, apply to the Registrar of the University, 
or to the Secretaries of the respective Faculties. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



453 



ESTABLISHED l873 

The Most Convenient Bank for Victoria College 

THE STANDARD BANK OF CANADA 

At Yonge and Charles Streets 



Cheques on any Bank 
may be cashed here. 


E. L. WILLIAMS. 

Manager. 




^.0.— PHONE NORTH 698 

Dr» S. L. Frawley 
DENTIST 

Graduate of Toronto o< Df Ox WT x 
and PhiladelDhia 2 J l5IoOr St. WCSt 


Dr. J. Frank Adams 

DENTIST 

Telephone College 243 
325 College Street. TORONTO 






DR. FRED. N.BADGLEY 

110 AVENUE ROAD 
(Opposite St. Paul's Church) TORONTO 

Phone North 3514 


Phone North 354 Contract work a Specialty 

r. OLVER, 

TAILOR. 

707 Yonge Street, Toronto 

Ladies' and Gents' Clothing Cleaned, 
Pressed, Altered, and Repaired 




...BURN... 

McGill's Coal 

Cor. Bathurst St. and Farley Ave. 
Phone Park 393. 


Alfred W. Brioqs. Harold R. Frost. 

BRIGGS & FROST 

BARRISTERS. ETC. 

TORONTO 

Wesley Buildings, 33 Richmond St. West 
Toronto 










MASTEN, STARR & SPENCE 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Canada Life Building 

Toronto 

solicitors for bank of nova SCOTIA 

C. A. Hasten, K.C, J. R. L. Starr 
J. H. Spenck 


GEO. A. EVANS, Phm.B. 

DISP£N5riNG CHBMIST 

832 Yonge St. Toronto 

Liberal Discount to Students 

Telephones North 38 and North 3720. 
Telephone Orders a Specialty 




E. B. Ryckman, M.A., LL.B. K.C. 

Chas. W. Kerr, B.A. C. S. Maclnnes, B.A., K,C. 

Christopher C. Robinson, B.A. 

RYCKMAN, KERR & MaclNNES 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, etc. 
Canada Life Building, 48 King St. West, Toronto. 

Cobalt: 

RYCKMAN KERR, MacINNES & MAHON 


DYEING G CLEANING 
FOR MEN & WOMEN 

We completely meet the needs of men and 
women in dyeing and cleaning articles of per- 
sonal wear. Phone head office or any branch. 

R. par.ke:r <sl CO. 

787-791 Yonge Street Toronto. Canada 
Branches in aU Z-eading Shopping Centres 



454 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 







The 

Students* 
Jew^elers 

Watch Repairs 

Watches repaired by us " Keep 
Accurate Time. " 

Jewelry Repairs 

From the putting of a Pin in a 
Brooch at 10c. to the setting of 
the most expensive gems, are all 
handled by skilled workmen only. 


CHAS. POTTER 

85 YONGE STREET 


C. B. PETRY. PROPRIETOR 


Experts in Eye Testing 
and Making of 
Glasses 

The work of the expert is at your 
service when your eyes are ex- 
amined here. 

Likewise the work of the expert 
is applied to every pair of glasses 
made by us. 

What is also of interest, while 
the service is the best, charges are 
moderate. 


Stock & Bickle 

JEWELERS 

131 Yonge Street 

(Opp. Temperance St.) ■ 


POTTER, THE RELIABLE OPTICIAN 







EASY TO SELL 

The policies of the Manufacturers Life Insurance 
Company are easy to sell. 

The Special Rates and Terms for Total Ab- 
stainers, which no other Company under the super- 
vision of the Dominion Government offers, give the 
poh'cies of the Manufacturers Life a special prestige. 

Students, who want to find lucrative employment 
durinf^ vacation, are offered excellent opportunities 
in our field work. 

Call at the Head Office of 

^e Manufacturers Life Ins. Co. 



MELINDA STREET 



TORONTO 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



455 



4\CT@^ 




THE SIMPSON 
SHOE 

FOR MEN 

$4.00 A PAIR 



Here is a shoe at a popular price, which by 
rights, classes up with the $5.00 and $6.00 Shoes, 

We own it and control it. No other store sells 
Victor Shoes. It's our own brand. 

No middle-men. 

No commercial travellers. 

No expensive round-about retailing. 

We sell it with only one profit added to the 
cost of its making. 

That's why you can get a good stylish, manly, 
up-to-date boot for $4,00 if you buy the Victor. 

All popular styles, widths and prices. 



$4.00 A PAIR 



THE 
ROBERT 



SIMPSON 

TORONTO 



COMPANY 
LIMITED 



L 



456 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



C. A. DEERvS 

MERCHANT TAILOR 



13 Manning Arcade Annex 
24 Kin^ St. IV. Tel. M. 6886 



Style and Quality 

Equal to the Best 

Let me be your Tailor 



Imperial Bank of Canada 

Head Office, Toronto 

Capital Authorized, $10,000,000 Capital Paid Up, $5,000,000 

Rest Account, $5,000,000 

D. R. WILKIE, Pres. and Gen. Manager. E. HAY, Assistant General Manager. 

ROBT. J AFFRAY, Vice-President. W. MOFFAT, Chief Inspector. 

Savings Bank Department— Interest at current rates allowed on 
deposits of $ I. CO upwards from date of opening account, and interest 
credited four times a year. 

Letters of Credit ana Drafts issued, available in all parts of the 
wor . ^ General Banking Business Conducted. 

YONGE AND BLCX)R STREET BRANCH 

C H. Stanley Clarke, Manager 



THE 

FREELAND 
STUDIO 

Finest of facilities for 

GROUP WORK 



Special Prices to Students 



436 YONGE STREET 

Opposite Carlton Street 
•Phone M. 6887 



FoUett's 

Ordered 

Tailoring 

One dress suit looks like 
any other unless it has 
that distinctive shape and 
form imparted to our 
garments. Invest $30.00 
with us in one of these 
suits. 



JOS. J. FOLLETT 

The Merchant Tailor 
181 YONGE STREET 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



457 



Victoria College Rink, charles west 

i\R£A, 05,000 FEET 

We provide a large general Skating Rink 
and three Hockey Rinks. 



The best society in 
the city patronize our 
skating rink. 



Many of the fastest Band on Friday nights and 

hi • 1 Saturday aflernoons 

ockey teams m the 

City leagues practice 

and play their games 

here. 



SEASON TICKETS: 
Gentleman's - $2.00 
Ladies' - - 1.75 



J. J. PEARSON, 

Sec.-Treas. 



Address : 

Victoria College 

PKone N. 3578 



H, L. Morrison, 

President 



DO YOU KNOW 

that without financial support from outside sources we could 
not print two numbers of Acta ? The other six are printed 
by means of the generous support of our advertisers. Of 
course, they advertise to get the student trade, but do they 
get it, and do you let them know they get it 7 Our 
advertisers can supply all students' needs, and often give you 
a handsome discount. It is a fair and square business pro- 
position. In all justice you must return their patronage, and 
don't forget to 

Mention "ACTA" 



458 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



REA'S '^""^^^ 




FOR WOMEN 

THE NEW STYLES 

This store has clearly demonstrated its 
unique fitness to supply the dress require^ 
ments of the ladies in a better way than it 
was ever done before in Toronto. 

Now we're supremely ready with all the 
new things for Spring. 

And while Fashion's every mandate, to 
the last one, has been implicitly obeyed, 
you're always sure of the exclusiveness that 
precludes the possibility of your coming 
across garments exactly like yours else- 
where. 

Then again quality of workmanship, 
surely evidenced in all our creations, adds 
to the assurance of satisfaction, while the 
store's manufacturing organization enables 
us to save you all go-between profits, thus 
promising you value unique. 



The New Millinery 
New Suits 
New Waists 
New Dresses 



New Evening Gowns 
New Jackets 
New Neckwear 
New Veilings 



The whole an aggregation of dress excellence 
entitled to your earnest consideration. 



A. E. REA & CO., Limited 

168 Yonge Street, Toronto 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



459 




ANNUAL SALE 
TRUNKS, BAGS, SUIT CASES 

This is the month for real snaps in travelling goods. Students 
will find it decidedly to their advantage to purchase for future 
need during I his Sale. 

EAST & CO., Limited, 300 Yonge Street 



WARDROBE 

where good work is 
done in Clean in g, 
Pressing and Repairing 
at reasonable prices. 



FORD'S 

742 YONGE STREET 
PHONE NORFH 4604 



HIGH CLASS 
fURNISHINGS 

Hats and Caps, Boots 
and Shoes. Agents in 
Ontario for Stanfield's 
Unshrinkable Under- 



YOUR TRADE WILL BE APPRECIATED 



AVERY'S DRUG STORE 

Yonge and St. Mary Sts., TORONTO 

Pure Drugs, Economical Prices 
Special prices to students 

Phone N. 1747 

Goods delivered promptly 



CHURCH and 
SOCI ETY 



PRINTING 

Programmes, Booklets, Invitations, Reports. 

The Armac Press 

Phone Main 2716 

1 70- 1 76 Victoria St.. TORONTO 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

FOR 1909 (in part) 



CALENDAR 



January : 
1. New Year's Day (Friday). 

By-liws for est ablishing and withdrawal of 
\inion of municipalities for High School 
purpos' .s t) take ettect. 

4. Provincial Normal Schools open (Second 
Term). 

Clerks of Municipalities to be notified by 
Separate School supporters of their with- 
drawal. 
High, Public and Separate Schools open. 

5. Truant Officers' reports to Department, due. 

6. First mceling of I'ural School Tru'^tees. 
Polling d^y for trustees in Public and 
Separate Schools. 

7. Principals of High Schools and Colleg:iate 
InstituI es to forward list of teachers, etc. 

11. Appointment of High School Trustees by 
Municipal Councils. 

14. Annual Reports of Boards in cities and 
towns, to Department, due. 

Names and addresses of Public School 
Trustees and Teachers to be sent to Town- 
ship Clerks and Inspectors. 

15. Trustees'A nnual Reports tolnspectors.due. 
Annual Reports of Kindergarten attend- 
ance, to Department, due. 

Annual Reports of Separate Schools, to 
Department, due. 

Application for Legislative apportionment 
for inspection of Public Schools in cities 
and towns separated from the county, to 
Department, due. 



20. 



26. 



Fii'st meeting of Public School Boards in 
cities, towns and incorporated villages 
Appointment of High School Trustees by 
County Councils. 

February : 
3. First meeting of High School Boards and 
Boards of Education. 

March : 

1. Inspectors' Annual Reports, to Depart- 
ment, due. 

Annual Reports from High School Boards, 
to Department, due. 

(This includes the Financial Statement.) 
Financial Statement of Teachers' Associa- 
tions, to Department, due. 
Separate School Supporters to notify Muni- 
cipal Clerks. 
31. Night Schools close (Session 1908-9). 
April : 



Returns by Clerks of counties, cities, etc., 
of population, to Department, due. 
High Schools, second term, and Public 
and Separate Schools close. 
Good Friday. 
Easter Monday. 

Annual Meeting of the Ontario Educa- 
tional As.sociation at Toronto. 
Reports on Night Schools, due (Session 
1908-9). 

High Schools (Third Term), and Public 
and Separate Schools open after Easter 
Holidays. 



EXAMINATION PAPERS of the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT of ONTARIO 
C3.n be ordered through local booksellers, or address orders direct to 

TKe CARSMTELL CO., I^imited 



so Adelaide St. East 



TORONTO 



460 ACTA VICTORIANA. 




W. M. PERCY 

Optician 

705 YONGE STREET 

(Late of Chas. Potter's) 

Phone N. 2824. 



Oculists' Prescriptions filled 
promptly and accurately. 

Lens Grinding and Spectacle Repairing done on 
the premises. Discount to Students. 

Kodaks, Films and Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amateurs. 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens, Mac?nifiers, Readers, etc. 

High Class Stationery. 



STOLLERY 

Men's Furnishings 
and Fine Hats : : 



772 YONGE STREET 



Kindly Mention '*Acta" wHen PtircHasin^ 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 461 

CONXENTS. 

Literary — page 

The Canadian Art Club "Amanuensis" 465 

The Value of the Ideal Miss M. C. Jamieson, '10 472 

In Memoriam - - E. B. 478 

The Return C. E. Locke, '11 481 

William Wordsworth Olive M. Delahaye, '09 482 

Editorial — 

Notes 486 

Scientific — 

Goethe's Faust - - - - . - Prof. L. E. Horning 490 

Missionary and Religious — 

The Probationer's Course of Study - 495 

Convocation - 499 

Notes 500 

Personals and Exchanges — 

Graduate Sketches - . . - - 502 

Personals - - - 505 

Deaths 505 

Exchanges -.-._ - 506 

Athletics — 

Athletic Union Executive - - - - - - - - - 508 

Hockey 508 

Locals — 

The 65th Senior Dinner - - 512 

The Senior Reception - 514 

Notes ----.. 515 



A FEW CHOICE BOOKS 

The Christian Minister and His Duties — 

Containing Chapters on "The Modern Minister," 
"The Minister as Preacher/* "The Minister as 
Pastor." etc. By J. OSWALD DYKES, M.A $1.80 

The Resurrection of Jesus — 

By JAS. ORR, M.A $1.50 

The Christian Method of Ethics — 

By REV. HENRY W. CLARK, author of " Philosophy 

of Christian Experience " IS'ET $1.25 

Gospel of St. Matthew — 

In Westminster New Testament Series. By DAVID 
SMITH, M.A NET $ .70 

The Upper Canada Tract Society 

(James M. Robertson. Depositary) 1 02 Yongc Street, Toronto, Ont. 



462 



ACTA VICTORIANA, 



Hockey Boots, Skates, Hockey 
Sticks, Sweaters, Toques, Stock- 
ings. Sweater Coats, Snow Shoes 



HOCKEY BOOTS 
$1.75 $2.00 
$2.50 $3.00 
$3.50 $4.00 




SKATES 




$1.00, $1.50, $1.75, $2.00, $2.50 
$3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 

Sweaters, each $2.00 Sweater Coats, each $4.00 

HOCKEY STICKS 
Mic'Mac, 40c each. Practice, 25c, Spalding, 50c 

SNOW SHOES, Men's, $3.50 Ladies, $3.00 



J. BROTHERTON 

Sso YONGE STREET 

Phone N. 2092 



ACTA VICTORIANA 



VVICTORIAE 



so 



NIVERSIIAS 



Published monthly dupingr the Collegre yeap by the Union 
Litepapy Society of Victopia Univepsity, Toponto 



VOL. XXXII. 



TORONTO, MARCH, 1909. 



No. 6. 



The Canadian Art Club 



AMANUENSIS. 



(( 



N 



ATIONAL ignorance of decent Art is always criminal, 
unless in earliest conditions of society; and 
then it is brutal."* To us as Canadians 
Kuskin's dictum may seem somewhat unpalatable, for it is 
certain that we must plead guilty to the charge of na- 
tional ignorance of even the essentials o:^ the fine arts; 
yet if we can take it seriously to heart the process may 
prove wholesome. Of whatever extenuating circumstances there 
are we may take advantage : we may say that hitherto we have 
been in the formative stage of our existence, that we have been 
too busy with the necessary material problems of life to pay much 
attention to the cultivation of the aesthetic and the beautiful, 
but even then we are only proving that our ignorance is rather 
that of the brute than that of the criminal — a conclusion that is 
in some respects not entirely satisfactory. 

In all ages Philosophers have taught us that in order to live 
truly or nobly, people require the stimulus of beauty around 
them. The justice of Plato's identification of the beautiful with 
the good has been repeatedly vindicated in history. The de- 
velopment of the highest forms of art has ever been synchronous, 
and in no small degree conterminous, with that of the best civili- 
zations. 

It is in this light that the formation of the Canadian Art 
Club seems to have the greatest national significance. This 
Club, which at present is holding its second annual exhibition, 
consisted originally of eight painters, but this number has 



*John Ruskin, "Eagle's Nest," p. 16. 



466 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

been recently increased by the addition of three members, of 
whom two are sculptors. All of its members are Canadian 
born, men whose outlook has been broadened by close association 
^vith the art of the Old World, and who are all working together 
with the one common aim to produce something that shall 
be national in spirit, something that shall have the strength and 
vitality and bigness which we love to associate with things Cana- 
dian, and yet something that shall be true to art in every parti- 
cular rather than what is cheap and popular. 

The Club, it may be stated, is in no way opposed to either of 
the older Canadian Art organizations. Its members, it is true, 
have come out from an older association, but not from any 
desire to disrupt or to injure it. They have been actuated solely 
by the desire to break away from the bonds of conventionalism 
which naturally wind themselves about a conservative body, and 
to breathe the free air of their profession untrammelled by any 
personal considerations, and unrestricted by thc^ self-satisfied 
opinion of men set in judgment over their work. Thus they 
hold a position in Canadian Art circles similar to that held by 
the '^ Society of Twelve " in London, the '' Society of Ten 
iVmerican Painters " in N^ew York, and the ^^ Cercle Volnez " 
in Paris. 

In general we may say of the club that notwithstanding 
their common aim, and the fraternity of feeling essential to the 
welding together of the group into a forceful unit, strong stress 
is laid on preserving the individual outlook. That they are suc- 
cessful in this quest for individuality cannot be disputed. It is 
doubtful whether there has ever been a similar group that has 
produced work more diversified in its nature. Each artist in his 
own way deals with his subject, always approaching it from a 
personal standpoint. This may be best illustrated by a glance at 
the work of the various exhibitors. 

A canvas of Continental reputation, which has won for the 
artist gold medals at the Pan-American Exhibition of Buffalo 
and the Exposition of St. Louis, is Mr. Horatio Walker's "Plow- 
ing, the First Gleam," a reproduction of which appears as the 
frontispiece of this issue. We are struck most forcibly by the 
power and vigour of the whole interpretation, — the brute power 
of the oxen, and the virile strength of ploughman and driver. 
Though the arms of the driver are, perhaps, extended some- 



THE CANADIAN ART CLUB. 



467 



what romantically , they are also extended most effectively, sug- 
gesting most forcibly the whole spirit of muscular labor as ap- 
plied to pioneer agriculture. The glow of rosy dawn which 
suffuses the whole picture sympathetically reinforces this sug- 
gestion. The Avork of AValker has been comj^ared w^th that of 
Milletj but unnecessarily. The two artists have undoubtedly 




Homer Watson, li.C.A. 
NUT GATHEEEKS IN THE FOREST. 



chosen somewhat similar subjects, but Walker has not given to 
his work the same sentiment as has Millet, but rather a fresh per- 
sonal interpretation of the life around him. In dealing with 
the subjects interesting him most and his favorite type of 
humanity he distinctly has his own point of view. 



468 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

In '^ The Vaudeville Girl/' by Mr. Curtis Williamson, Ave 
have a masterly portrait that will live for years to come.'^ There 
is little to be gained by comparing it with the old masters, nor 
indeed with the modern. It is the work of a philosopher with 
a successful appreciation of life. One may not like the subject, 
but yet one must grant that the artist who painted the girl Avas in 
thorough sympathy Avith his model. He is frankly appreciative 




W. Edwin Atkimson, A.R.C.A. 
THE WILLOWS EVENING. 

rather than critical, one who not only studies life in its different 
phases, but who has a great love for nature in all its guises. 

Mr. J. Wilson Morrice, a Montrealer who at present lives in 
Paris, is one of the most prominent artists of to-day. His work 
is greatly appreciated and sought after in Paris and in London. 
He was a personal friend of Mr. Whistler and Mr. Prendergast, 
of Boston, and his work shows how greatly in sympathy he Avas 



THE CANADIAN ART CLUB. 



469 



with the work of both these artists. His '' Public Gardens, 
Venice/' is delightful in its subtle color and atmospheric quali- 
ties. In both this and the " Nocturne, Venice/' as well as in 
others of his, one must note the exquisite grace of the women, his 
sensitive touch when painting blacks, and his quaint hiimor in 
suggesting the characteristics of the N'ciictinii women in con- 
trast with those of the Parisiennes. 

Mr. John Russell is a Hamilton man, at present in Paris. 
His portrait group " Mother and Son " has great dignity and 
sym])athy and is peculiarly distinguished in coloring. In the ar- 




Archibald Browne. 



SLUMBERING WATERS. 



rangement of the wall on which this picture is hung, the hanging 
committee has been particularly successful in securing an effec- 
tive balance of the different canvases and in realizing most 
satisfactorily harmony and contrast of tones. The picture just 
referred to is balanced on the right by the large canvas of Mr. 
Williamson, the glowing red of which contrasts most delightfully 
with the quiet blacks of the Russell portrait. Between these 
two large canvases are some refreshing landscapes by Browne 



470 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



and Atkinson with the delicate coloring and poetic suggestive- 
ness characteristic of these two painters. 

Of the work of Mr. W. Edwin Atkinson, there are 
several representative examples. His picture, '' The Sub- 
siding Flood," is in some respects his best. His work 
shows a steady progress and has good luminous qualities. 
There is about it a kind of mysterious poetic qualit}^ which 




Franklin Broxvnell, R.C.A. 
THE WINNOWER. 



IS 



proclaims the true artist. We feel that the artist 
practising his calling in the true " art for art's sake " spirit, 
rather than with the purely mercenary aim of so adjusting his 
pigment that he who runs may read, approve, — and buy. It is 
interesting to compare Mr. Atkinson's landscapes with those of 
Mr. Archibald Browne, for each artist, Avhile aiuiing at poetic 
suggestion and the evocation of a mood of mystery, still retains 



THE CANADIAN ART CLUB. 



471 



his own distinctive note. The latter's '^ A Midsummer ^ight " 
i-: particularly charming and suggestive. 

A very rich canvas in Mr. Edmund Morris's older manner re- 
presents some Scotch landscape. It is particularly striking in its 
vivid yet true coloring and in its skilful arrangement. It is to 
be hoped that, now that his important but not altogether pleasing 
ethnological labor on the Indians is apparently completed, he 
will return with renewed vigor and insight to the interpretation 
of nature. 

Mr. Homer Watson's reputation is so secure in this country, 
that further comment is unnecessary than to say that the can- 
vases which he exhibits represent his finest qualities. 

Mr. BroAvnell's figure studies are more pleasing than his 
landscapes, which are somewhat garish. In ^^The Winnower" Ave 
have an example of his best work. 

Of portrait painting there is but one example on exhibi- 
tion. This is a large, full-length portrait of Mr. Justice 
Cassells, of Ottawa, by Mr. Harris. It has many points of excel- 
lence, but the general consensus of artistic opinion is that it is 
not at all in the artist's best vein. 

The statuettes of Mr. A. Phimister Proctor, one of the new 
members of the club, are full of power and vigor, and would 
not greatly suffer by contrast if placed in a museum beside those 
of Barye. His " Indian Warrior " bears two gold medals and 
is one of the most famous bronzes on the continent. Of his more 
recent work his " Dog With a Bone " is especially admired by 
critics as combining grace and symmetry of form with fidelity 
to nature. His water colors have the same big movement and 
generous appreciation of form. 

In conclusion, we may say that the high character and great 
individuality of the work now on exhibition, are most expres- 
sive of the spirit of independent action and give ample promise 
for the future. In holding an exhibition each year at which are 
shown not only the work of the members, but also that of distin- 
guished Canadian painters who are living abroad, the Canadian 
Art Club must certainly become a great educative factor. In thus 
calling the attention of the average man to a few of the beauties 
surrounding him, and in pointing out for him the flowers that 
grow by the wayside of life, their contribution to our highest 
national development is much greater thau ctui he iiM^'isnrod in 
mere dollars and cents. 



472 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The Value of the Ideal'' 

A Query and a Plea. 

MISS M. C. JAMIESOX^ '10. 

INVOLVED in the above subject are certain assumptions, 
commonly unquestioned, which must first be investigated, 
if we are to obtain any clear, adequate conception of its 
significance. If it be found that such assumptions are well 
grounded, we can then proceed to estimate, in what respects and 
to what extent the ideal is of value in huiuan life. 

First, it is assumed that in consciousness are to be found 
certain ideal conceptions. Second, that whatever the nature of 
these conceptions be, they are of unquestioned value. AVhether 
or not we are justified in granting these assumptions, will de- 
pend entirely upon how you define the word ''ideal." 

If the definition of the above term means that in the race or 
individual consciousness are to be found certain supreme con- 
ceptions, which embody completely, perfectly, all that consti- 
tutes truth, beauty, goodness, etc., the answer must be emphati- 
cally that we have no ideals. In a world of humanity mani- 
festly so imperfect, such conceptions are inconceivable. How- 
ever great perfection may be claimed by the word which 
designates them, they are, at least, as inperfect as the one who 
conceives them. For finite human beings, then, there is noth- 
ing absolutely ideal and in such a sense, it is useless, — nay, 
impossible — to discuss the question of value. 

Such, however, is not the ordinary meaning attaching to the 
term. Prof. James, of Harvard, voices perhaps, in the fol- 
lowing quotation, the generally accepted definition of the word.f 
" An ideal is something intellectually conceived, something of 
which we are not unconscious, if we have it at all, something 
which carries with it a certain outlook, unlift, brightness. 
Further, there must be novelty in the ideal, — novelty, at least for 
him whorfi the ideal grasps. Sodden routine is incompatible with 
ideality, tho'ugh what is sodden routine for one person may 
be ideal novelty for another. To keep out of th(^ gutter is, for 

*A warded first prize in Essay Competition, 
f Essay on "The Significance of Life." 



THE VALUE OP THE IDEAL. 



473 



most of us, no part of consciousness at all, yet, for many, 
it is the most legitimately engrossing of ideals." 

This definition clearly emphasizes the relativity of ideals to 
the lives which entertain them. Ideals are i>eculiarly personal 
things. ^^ Hence the stupidity and injustice of our opinions 
so far as they deal with the significance of alien lives. Hence 
the falsity of our judgments so far as they presume to decide 
in any absolute way on the value of other peoples' ideals." 
Further, ideals are not only relative to the lives which enter- 
tain them, but relative also to the stage of development in that 
life. To the child certain ideals are peculiarly significant 
which to the grown person have lost all significance whatever. 

But, is not the ideal, in this sense, a mere reflex of the indi- 
vidual's experience, the highest and best, it may be, that is in 
that experience, but, after all, a reflex ? Do we not find further 
proof of this in the fact that education — enlarging, as it does, 
our horizon and perspective — is a means of enlarging and 
modifying our ideals, so that what is ideal to-day is not ideal 
to-morrow ? 

To the first question raised then : Have we ideals ? Cer- 
tainly, if the word ^' ideal " is understood to indicate certain 
characteristic conceptions which, however far in advance of 
the individuals experience they may appear to be, are essentially 
a reflex of that experience. There are, in this sense of the 
^^•ord, as many ideal conceptions as there are individual thinking 
beings. Taken immediately, abstractly, one might almost say 
that they are the cheapest things in human life. Everybody has 
them in some shape or form, high or low, sound or mistaken, 
and the most worthless sentimentalists and dreamers, who never 
show one grain of effort, courage, or endurance, possibly have 
them in the greatest abundance. 

But, the mere possession of them is certainly of little value, 
for, the more ideals a man has, the more contemptible on the 
whole do you continue to deem him, if the matter ends there. Tf 
they are to become of value, they must fulfil the requirements of 
several conditions. First, however splendid they may appear 
in moments of clear vision and broad outlook, such ideals can 
only become of value as they become valueless. Such a paradoxi- 
cal statement may at first be questioned, but it is nevertheless 
true. If such ideals become w^ell defined, if thev become full of 



474 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

relatively unchanging content, there must necessarily result a 
tendency toward stunted, one sided or artificial growth, and 
according as they approximate to such a condition will they be- 
come, not only negative in value, but often positively harmful. 

It may be argued that ideals of this character are rarely 
to be met with, but a careful examination of the history of any 
national or individual experience will reveal many instances 
of conceptions which, for a longer or shorter period, have re- 
mained relatively constant ideals with more or less definite 
reflex content. For many years, the Longing for the ideal One, 
Avho was to be the Hope of Israel, the Glory of the nation, 
revealed itself in the lives of the Hebrew nation. Gradually 
this became more or less concrete with ideas of an earthlv kina* 
who was to come with earthly promp and splendour, these ideas 
being clearly the reflex of their own desires and ambitions. To 
this as an ideal, so tenaciously did they cling, so blinded did 
their eyes become to all else, and so blunted their sensibilities to 
truth, that when He came who was indeed King, they failed to 
recognize His true royal character. This same spirit of idealiza- 
tion showed itself in their ideals of conduct which were more or 
less positive and well defined, and strict conformity to these led 
to that spirit of pharisaical formalism which sapped the very 
life of the Hebrew nation. 

^or are ideals of a similar character confined alone to ancient 
days. Can we not all recall a certain type of teacher (more pro- 
minent, we are glad to say, a few years ago than at the present 
time), who came forth from the training school with certain 
well-defined pedagogical ideals, which at the time, no doubt, 
had certain value, but w^hich w^ere held too often as if final, 
and each individual child must conform to these, however inade- 
quately they met the requirements of each particular case. There 
followed on the part of teachers of this type, a narrow, arbi- 
trary spirit which could not make for true success and '^on 
the part of the rising generation, not a ncAV generation with new 
ideals — for they had not been allowed to form their own — but 
a generation of average men, with a suppression of all origin- 
ality, a continuously increasing tendency to think as little as 
possible, and to act only as a member of a ci*owd.""^ To a greater 



*Prof. A. Kirschmann, Ph.D., "Deception and Reality." 



THE VALUE OF THE IDEAL. 



475 



or less extent there is this tendency in the lives of all of us and 
for a longer or shorter period, ideals which have long outlived 
their usefulness, hold swaj over us. Just to that degree in 
which Ave are held in bondage to them, is the spirit of true free- 
dom and true progress violated. 

A first condition therefore, which must be fulfilled, if ideals 
are to become of value, is this : that with each new moment, 
the formulas which have been useful, it may be, in the past, 
should lose at least something of their force. Man should con- 
stantly outgrow his mental as well as his physical habiliments. 
A second condition, and equally essential, is an open heart — a 
spirit which involves facing fairly and squarely every question 
which has to do with moral responsibility (and that is, we be- 
lieve, every act of human life). By this Ave mean, not to look in 
one direction only, — and is not that what Ave are doing as long as 
AA^e keep before us positiA^e concrete ideals? — but to approach 
OA^ry situation untrammelled by couA^entionality or consistency, 
to look in every direction and, without hesitation, Avithout pre- 
judice, without fear, to consider, in its relation to our Avhole 
experience, oA-ery course open to us. A third condition, also 
equally important, is the element of responsiveness, that simple 
faithfulness to his light Avhich any common, unintellectual man 
may exhibit Avith the most cultured, that readiness to pursue 
AvhatcA^er course seems to be the only right course for us to 
pursue, and, therefore, as Tennyson expresses it, ^^because right 
is right, to folloAv right AA^ere Avisdom in the scorn of conse- 
quence." 

But if Ave fully grasp the significance of each of these condi- 
tions, haA^e Ave not reached a different conception of the ideal than 
that outlined above ? In the activities of the immediate present, 
here and noAv or noAvhere, must be found the ideal, and if such 
is to be found tenable from a moral point of vIoaa^, can it be 
anything less than that voice of duty or of truth Avhich, AA^e 
belicA^e, every man's experience contains ? Does it not embody 
that Avhich urges us to decide ancAV all questions Avhich inA'oh'e 
moral responsibility, not blindly copying our OAvn past deci- 
sions, or even those broader decisions Avhich haA^e become cry- 
stallized into the conA'entionalities, moral and social, of any 
age ? " Is it not to act ahvays according to our sense of truth, — 
that spark of divinity Avithin us AA^hich Ave call conscience ? " 



476 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The ideal thus ceases to be a transitory fleeting view of life. It 
ceases likewise to express or foreshadow a condition of life still 
in the remote future. '^ The ideal thou seekest is ever within 
thee." It becomes an ever present reality, because it is the prin- 
ciple according to which the constant struggles and changes of 
our everyday life are guided. 

The great significance of the ideal, therefore, will be found, 
not in rigid adherence even to an ever advancing ideal, but in 
unshaken loyalty to truth. It may be questioned whether you 
are not removing, in thus stripping the ideal of positive con- 
tent, the very element which makes it significant, and whether 
you are not introducing an element of uncertainty, of vagueness, 
of lack of direction and purpose, which will result in laxity of 
morals? Do we hesitate to commit ourselves to that voice of 
truth — yea, that voice of God — which speaks within us? Is 
there any conceivable situation in life which does not offer a 
man one right course to follow, Truth, — is it not written with 
ineffaceable character upon each heart as the fundamental, 
moral and intellectual law ? The solicitations of this spirit are 
never forborne. Tenderly, tenderly they woo and court us. 
If we would educate ourselves to truth and not allow the slight- 
est deviation from it, would it not mean that we would grow as 
God and nature intended that we should grow? Does anyone 
imagine that such a law is lax ? Let him keep its command- 
ments for one day. 

It is a plea to live in the present, with eyes wide open to the 
significance of every moment, instead of standing, heedless of 
the riches around one, on tiptoe to foresee the future. Life is 
shot through with values and relations which we often fail to re- 
cognize because of our circumscribed — one might almost say 
conventionalized — points of view. In such an attitude is the 
hope and spring of renewed activities. There will be in those 
moments of surrender that which will constrain one to ascribe 
more validity to those experiences than to all others. There will 
be communicated to him Avho surrenders to it, an 
eagerness, a zest which will make life genuinely significant. 
This is well illustrated in a certain fable which touches very near 
the quick of life. It is the fable of a monk who passed into the 
Avoods, heard a bird break into song, hearkened for a trill or 



THE VALUE OF THE IDEAL. 



477 



two, and returned to his convent gates — a stranger, for he had 
been absent fifty years, and of all his comrades there re- 
mained but one to recognize him. 

Further, it will conserve as well as develop, originality and 
individuality. That which each one can best do, none but 
Truth can teach him. It will not be by any known or accus- 
tomed way. It will not be by seeking to discern the footprints 
of any other. The way shall be wholly individual, and shall, 
therefore, exclude, as authoritative, example or experience. '' I 
must be myself." I must therefore believe in myself however 
inconsistent my conduct may appear. Emerson has expressed 
this in a motto which we might well adopt : — " Speak what you 
think to-day and let to-morrow speak what to-morrow thinks, 
though it contradict everything you said to-day." Such an atti- 
tude will thus add to the power of personality and to the 
dignity of human life. 

There must necessarily result a deeper, richer, truer life, for 
whenever a man cease to be an artisan, wdth skilful but imitative 
fingers, and seeks to express the best and truest that is in him, 
that which is original and characteristic, he has become an 
artist. The moment life is free to find full development, that 
which is true becomes its ideal, and this is not logical, or moral, 
or aesthetic truth, as opposed one to the other ; it is at once 
all three. 

Much more might be said to outline the value of the ideal in 
this latter sense of the word. It may, however, be best summed 
up in the following: If a man will exactly obey truth, it will 
adopt him so that he shall no longer separate it from himself. 
He shall seem to be the Truth. Indeed he shall be. Waaj 
it not because His life was the complete and perfect expres- 
sion of this principle that Jesus Christ proclaimed Himself as 
the Truth, and is not His life, therefore, the way which reveals 
to us the Ideal ? 

" Ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you 
free.' 



[Grateful acknowledgment is made of many valuable suirgestions given' 
by Prof. A. H. Abbott, Ph.D., in preparing the essay. — M. C. J.] 



478 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

In Memoriam 



E. B. 



WOE ! Woe is me, that it should be, 
As 'tis with many others. 

My ancient faith is done to death, 

My heart is full of troubles. 

Poor Jonah! They have thrown him up, 

And Job is sorely smitten, 

While Daniel in the lions' den 

Has been severely bitten. 

The Devil they have banished quite — 

There isn't no " sich person," 

And we are told when we are bold. 

Inclined to be uncivil. 

We needn't throw the blame below. 

Each one is his own Divil. 

Earewell ! The poor old Patriarchs, 

Old Abraham and Isaac, 

These fairies of my childish ways 

Have no place in my later days. 

They're all with N^oah in the Ark, 

Drifting out into the dark. 

And Jacob, with his twelve Semitics, 

Are buried by the Higher Critics. 

Past is their time of eulogy 

In modern theology. 

Tho' well I ween, with some there's been 

More sophistry than logic. 

Isaiah has been cut in two, 

King David's Psalms are very few. 

Solomon, too, has met the robbers 

Who pillaged more than half his Proverbs. 

But let us not begin to rave. 

We're told, " There's Hope beyond the Grave." 

But say — In all this mighty modem learning, 

Is there -any room for spiritual discerning? 



THE RETURN, 



479 



The Return 



C. E. LOCKE, '11. 



JOHX WALTEKS leaned back in his office chair. Evening 
was drawing on rather cold and windy, and clouds, por- 
tending snow flurries, drifted across the November sky. 
But inside it was comfortable indeed. A coal fire glowed in the 
grate, and the warmth penetrated to every part of the luxuri- 
ous office. He had always been regarded as a sharp man, from 
his youth up. Few were they, experience had taught, who 
could beat him in a financial transaction, and now, portly, and 
well-to-do, Avhen fifty-two summers had passed, he leaned back 
complacently. 

Yes, thought he, I have done well. A few more deals, and I 
shall be able to retire. But, all's me, I didn't get all I strove 
for, and Emma is gone now for good. I wonder if she ever 
cared for< me at all. People used to say that I was a smart 
man, while Johnson — ah, that Johnson — he was but a jolly 
good fellow. I never liked him at all, and it seemed to me, that he 
always scorned me, and my chances, and I was, easy enough to 
think that if he was out of the road she would grow to love 
me. No,- my boy, you've failed with the women. Let me see, 
Johnson got fifteen years, didn't he ? I remember how he look- 
ed when he heard the sentence, but that's nothing to me. That 
was in '92. Ninety-two and fifteen. That makes, by jove, it 
is 1907. Why, his time is up, I'll have to . 

"' Sit still ! " a calm voice said. Walters had partly risen, on 
hearing a footstep in the darkened room, but subsided weakly. 
^^ Fool that I am," cursed he, under his breath, as he thought 
of the revolver, locked in the right hand drawer of his desk. 
Only yesterday, had Bob Andrews said, that he ought always 
to have his '' barker " handy. As for him, he patted his hip- 
pocket knowlingly. He was no fool. The visitor seemed in no 
hurry. Well, thought Walters after a silence, what is he going 
to do? Money, he's after I suppose. He looked up. One 
glance he cast at the figure, standing half in shadow, and with 
ashy face and staring eyes, ^' Johnson ! " he ejaculated. " Yes 
Walters, its me. Johnson, Jim eTohnson," said this strange indi- 
2 



480 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

vidual, as his glittering eyes roved back and forth about the 
cosy office. ^' Say," he said as he drew up a chair, and sat down 
nervously fingering something which flashed in the light, '' you 
seem to know me. Never forget old friends, eh ? I didn't look 
like this fifteen years ago, did I Walters ? " He leaned forward, 
and the firelight flickered on the lean, sallow, hardened features 
and closely cropped iron grey hair. '^ Do you remember," as he 
leaned back into the shade again, ^^ a bright spring day in '92, 
when the bees were humming in the sunny fields, and birdsongs 
floated in at the open windows of the crowded court room ? The 
court was crowded that day, and a young man stood in the dock, 
charged with assault, with intent to kill. Do you remember, 
Walters, how his laAvyer pleaded the heat of youth, the first 
misstep, the blighting of the young man's prospects, and so on ? 
I remember it right well. I remember the hard, cold faces of 
the jury and that word ^Guilty.' It's a nasty word, AValters," 
lowering his voice, " and for fifteen years it has been boring 
into my brain. I shuddered when the Judge said ^fifteen 
years.' I simply couldn't help iit. To look far into the future, 
me, a young, happy, carefree fellow, with great ambitions, and 
never in trouble before. It was a long, long time for me. I'm 
forty-nine now, and all broken down, for my old malady attack- 
ed me again ; but little I cared, I, ." A violent burst of 

coughing interrupted him, and when he withdrew his handker- 
chief it was stained with blood. '^I had nothing to live for, be- 
cause when my time Avas up all would be changed. Sometimes I 
raved and cursed the bars and the man who had led me on 
and put me there. Some days I sat and Avatched the patch of 
sky. There was a spider in my cell, Walters, that daily strove 
to climb to the ceiling; but daily he failed and fell. Finally 
he succeeded, and sped into the sunlight, the free open air ; but 

I lay there." The convict leaned forward. ^^I often thought 

of what I would do when I could reach the man who had 

caused all this, I woul(f have ." With wildly beating 

heart the banker glanced at him. His eyes were glowing and 
his fingers clutched spasmodically at the glittering object. 
W^alters lay back and closed his eyes, waiting. But the voice 
rambled on. " I wanted to see Emma, but somehow I couldn't 
bear it. I felt sure that she didn't think me guilty." " ]N"o," 



THE RETURN. 481 

said Walters, who Avas regaining his composure, while his eyes 
squinted with cunning as he thought he saw a loophole of escape. 
'^ I felt quite sure of that," resumed Johnson, ^^ and somehow 
hopes would rise. But one day the gaoler came and said, ^ I 
have bad news for you, Jim." ^Don't,' I screamed in my terror 

and suspicion. ' Don't tell me she's ' ^ Dead,' he said 

solemnly, and went out. Man, in the fury of my grief, I raged 
lip and dowTi that cell. With herculean strength I rattled and 
shook the bars. I cursed everything, great and small ; but most 
of all, I cursed you. You, who had tempted me to slay you, 
Avith a view to m^ downfall ; you, who tried to take the dearest 
thing on earth from me, by the foulest method; you, who had 
done all within your power to cast one, poor sinner further 
doA\Ti on the way to perdition and to blight his hopes forever. 
Could I have reached you, I had strangled you, till your treach- 
erous face grew black. 'Now , now ." Walters was 

breathing in short, puffy jerks, like a hunted animal, and the 
mortal fear of death was in his eyes. He saw the gleaming 
eyes, the savage countenance, distorted by passion, and long 
balked revenge. The convict raised his hand as the banker 
strove to rise. There was a flash, a loud report, and smoke 
filled the room. 

The moon, between breaks of the drifting cloud, shot a ray 
into the private office of A. B. Walters, Banker. The grate fire 
was waning, but still cast flickering shadows across the massive, 
inert body of the dead financier sprawling in his chair. Half 
in shadow lay the figure of a stranger. A gush of blood on the 
carpet lay dark in the firelight. 



Europe has 125 universities, with a total attendance of 
228,721. ^ext to the universities of Paris and Berlin come 
in point of attendance: Budapest, with 6,551; Vienna, 6,205; 
Munich, 5,.943 ; Moscow, 5,860; Madrid, 5,196; :N'aples, 4,918; 
St. Petersburg, 4,652; Leipsic, 4,341, and Bonn, 3,209. 

In Elocution Class. — ^^ ^ow, Mr. B , be more spirited. 

Just open your mouth and throw yourself into it." — Ex. 



482 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

William Wordsworth 

OLIVE M. DELAHAYE^ '09. 

THERE are some people to whom the life of a great man 
is interesting only when it shows rebellion against 
human or divine authority, when it is the story of folly 
and repentance, of deep joy and deeper grief. Eor such as these 
the life of William Wordsworth has no interest, but it fascin- 
ates and charms those who understand its real meanino^ — tlie 
story of the growth of a poet's soul. 

Our interest in Wordsworth begins with his boyhood and 
his schooldays, of which he has given a beautiful description in 
the '' Prelude." Into all the pleasures of school-life Wordsworth 
entered with enthusiastic interest, so that, to those who knew 
him then, he must have seemed a boy of boys, whose heart was 
only in his play. But in the ^' Prelude " AVordsworth tells of 
the strange emotions which come to him, often in tne very 
.pauses of his sport. Once when he had yielded to temptation, 
and taken two birds caught in a trap which did not belong to 
him, he heard: 

" Among the silent hills 
Low breathings conung afuer me and sounds 
Of undistinguishable motion, steps 
Almost as silent as the turf they touch." 

Feelings and emotions such as these show Wordsworth to 
have been no ordinary boy. Love of nature was an element of 
his character; for him, even when a boy, E'ature had a deeper 
meaning than for most.; he felt, '^ and after retiectiou had made 
that feeling a conviction, that the thing we call Xature is not 
a dead machine, but a something all-pervaded hy a life." 
Later years added something to this conception, and he realized 
the relation which exists between Mature aud mankind, but it 
is to his boyhood days that we owe the close and intimate 
acquaintance with Nature, and the deep love for natural objects 
which so charms us in his poetry. 

At seventeen Wordsworth entered Cambridge, but university 
life did not prove fascinating to him. The conviction forced 
itself upon him, that he was '' N^either for that hour, nor for 



WILLIAM WORDSWORTH. 



483 



that place." The long vacations were for him a solace from 
the thraldom of college, and during the first one, which he spent 
at Ilawkshead, there came to him a sympathy with human 
nature which he had never felt before. He tells us that on one 
exquisite morning when he was returning from a night of 
pleasure, there swept over him the feeling of his mission; then, 
although he made no vows, " vows were made for him," that he 
should be, '^ Else sinning greatly, a dedicated spirit." In his 
second vacation Wordsworth enjoyed the companionship of his 
sister Dorothy, who had been so sedulously guarded from inter- 
course with him that they seemed to meet for the first time. 
The third vacation Wordsworth passed wandering on the Con- 
tinent. Although this was done much against the will of his 
friends, who foresaw the undistinguished degree which fol- 
lowed, these ten weeks brought more to Wordsworth than he 
could have gained from books. He passed through France, and 
felt within him faint stirrings of the spirit which agitated him 
so strangely a year later. lie saw the Alps, and their majesty 
moved his soul to its depths. Wherever he turned the universe 
was ^^ opening out its glories, and every day he realized more 
fully the value of nature's heritage." 

France was then at the height of her revolutionary en- 
thusiasm, and AVords worth was carried along with the flood of 
opinion. Always a democrat at heart, the theories of the revo- 
lutionists seemed to Wordsworth both reasonable and just, and 
he became so enthusiastic in the cause of " Liberty," that only 
a sudden recall to England prevented him from throwing in 
his lot with the Girondins. On the outbreak of war between 
France and England shortly after his return, his mind became 
a turmoil of hopes, doubts and fears. The old charm which 
INTature had for him seemed to lose its strength. He viewed 
everything from the standpoint of reason, and cast aside all 
beliefs which could not be justified on the basis of logic. The 
result was a despair and a weariness which, if it had endured, 
would have ruined his career, but which, as it did not endure, 
made him more sympathetic with the errors of others, more 
tolerant of faults, more loving in sorrow. 

Dorothy Wordsworth was the good angel who rescued her 
brother from the doubt and melancholv which had taken 



484 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

possession of his sioiil. She had read the poems Avhich Words- 
worth wrote in 1793, and she realized that happiness for him 
lay in a life devoted to poetry and to communion with ^Nature. 
With an appreciation for Nature's beauties almost equal to his 
own, with a sincerity and a simplicity of character w^hich could 
not fail to charm him from himself, Dorothy gradually won 
back her brother's faith; gradually his old joyousness returned 
and he stood again in Nature's presence, ^^ a sensitive being, a 
creative soul." 

When this redemption was almost complete, there came into 
Wordsworth's life one of the most important moulding influ- 
ences of his career, the friendship of Coleridge. The two poets 
and Dorothy Wordsworth spent two years of fruitful inter- 
course in the Lake Country. During this time the ^* Lyrical 
Ballads " appeared, which contained poems by Wordsworth, 
varying from the beautiful " Lines on Tintern Abbey " to the 
strange effusion, " The Idiot Boy " ; it also contained Cole- 
ridge's "Rime of the Ancient Mariner.'^ Wordsworth's preface 
to the book, containing a statement of his conception of true 
poetry, and his theories of the laws which governed it, probably 
aroused more criticism than the poems themselves, and cer- 
tainly exerted an incalculable influence over English thought. 

Wordsworth's married life was a happy one. Great griefs 
came to him as they must come to all, but he bore them with 
the fortitude which comes from a noble character, and they left 
their impress on his work in a deepening of its spirituality. 

And now appeared some of Wordsworth's best poetry, such 
as the " Ode to Duty " and " Intimations of Immortality." 
Later came the publication of the " Excursion," which 
prompted Jeffrey's famous remark, " This will never do." 
Then, " Laodamia," in which Wordsworth reveals the deep 
love of which his soul was capable; in it also he gives expression 
t© the belief which, more than any other, influenced his life, the 
.belief that man's duty was to moderate and control his passions 
for 

" The gods approve 
The depth, and not the tumult, of the soul." 

After the writing of the " Laodamia," Wordsworth's poetry 
lost much of its charm. Now and then there came touches of 



WILLIAM WORDSWORTH. 



485 



his old power. ^' To a Skylark " and ^' Yarrow Revisited " re- 
call the Wordsworth of the earlier years, but one cannot help 
feeling that he wrote more truly than he thought when he 
said, " I see by glimpses now, when age comes on may scarcely 
see at all,'^ and to those who love him most there is a deep 
pathos in those closing lines of his last great poem: 

" 'Tis past ; the visionary splendor fades, 
And night approaches with her shades." 

This period of decline, however, was also the time when the 
world began to acknowledge his genius and accept his teaching. 
In 1839 he received the degree of D.C.L. from Oxford; in 
1842 an annuity from the Civil List; finally, in 1843, the 
LauVeateship, 

So patient and brave in his sufferings, one could wish that 
Wordsworth might have been spared the great grief that came 
to him in 184Y when his daughter Dora died. Her bright, 
cheery character and her loving disposition had been able to 
comfort Wordsworth in these years of old age, as his sister 
had comforted him in the crucial period of his manhood, and 
he was not able to endure her loss. Under the grief which 
was ever present with him, his health failed, and three years 
after Dora's death, he followed her ^^ Into his Rest.'' 

The question of Wordsworth's greatness as a poet was 
answered during his lifetime. In the half century which has 
passed since his death, men have learned to understand the 
greatness of his character. Loving and tender, he desired 
more than wo can guess the praise of his fellow-men, but the 
great lessons he had learned, he felt it his duty to teach to 
others, and neither ridicule nor contempt, neither poverty nor 
privation, could move him from his purpose. Doubts he knew, 
and fighting them he " made a stronger faith his own." Great 
griefs came to him, and the passing of his friends made his 
communion with the unseen closer, his love and his sympathy 
deeper and more tender. A generous soul, seeing in others 
their virtues rather than their faults, Wordsworth won from 
those who knew him a deep and abiding love. From us, who 
know only his poetry and the story of his life, he wins a sin- 
cere admiration and a tender respect that will never fail. 



VOL. 
XXXII 



Acta Victoriana. 



No. 6. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, J908-I909. 

J. V. McKenzie, '09 - - - - Editor-in-Chief. 
Miss C. Dunnett, '09, ) y ,-<-„^„_^ Miss K. Lukes, '10, \ . ^^„, 

M. H. Staples, '09, ji-iterary. F. J. R. Staples. 10, | ^-ocale. 

Clyo Jackson, B.A., Missionary and Religious. J. E. Horning, '09, Scientific. 
A. L. Burt, '10, Personals and Exchanges. O. V. Jewett, '10, Athletics. 



Board of Management: 

F. C. Mover, '09, Business Manager. 

\V. MooREHOUSE, '11, Assistant Business Manager. W. A. Deacon, '11, Secretary. 

Advisory Committee : 
Pelham Edgar, Ph.D. C. C. James, M.A., Deputy Minister of Agriculture. 



TERMS: $1.25 A YEAR; SINGLE COPIES, 15 CENTS. 

Contributions and exchanges should be sent to J. V. McKenzie, Editor-in-Chief 
Acta Victoriana; business communications to F. C. Mover, Business Manager 
Acta Victoriana, Victoria University, Toronto. 



Editorial 



*' The Old Order Changeth, Yielding Place to New " 

WE are living in the midst of a great change. The wheel 
of time has turned another round and now has swung 
intellectualism into the span of our life. Entering 
at the beginning — the younger generation, — it w^ll onh' cover 
the whole as this younger generation advances and the older 
generation gradually shifts off the stage. The new force at- 
tracting the young mind draws it away from the sentimental 
religion of our fathers, the usefulness of which lies now in the 
past. Yet the old is very tenacious, it would fain stand still 
and stop the revolution. That is where the danger threatens. 
Thus the transition is a period of strain. It has been said that we 
are on the eve of a revulsion against Christianity, but this state- 
ment may be qualified. This is the gulf that w^ill gape open 
if the strain yields in a break of the old with the new — and 
dark will be the water before the further shore is reached. The 
stronger the resistance of the old, the more violent will be the 
shock and the greater the gulf. If it be insisted that the ^^ old- 
time religion " is the only true and unchangeable form, then the 
young mind of to-day, to whom it is quite uninviting, will in- 
evitably prefer no religion. Centuries ago, none but the impro- 
vident would put new wine in old bottles. If the religion of 
our ancestors will no longer thrive of itself, it has become a 
failure and something else must displace it. Anything w^orthy 



EDITORIAL. 



487 



of success cannot attain unto true success by reason of compul- 
sion, but only by reason of its own virtue. 

It may seem unfortunate that an extreme is soonest and best 
corrected by an extreme, yet the oscillations of the pendulum 
of events propel the hands of time. The ancient eye grows 
alarmed to see the religion of the age swing from the bright color 
of old sentimentalism to the greyness of modern material- 
ism, but does not recognize that the second depends upon the 
first displacement from the normal, and is the response evoked 
by it. After all, the extremes are but the outward flourishes, 
and we must seek the mean to find the true significance. That 
Ave are living in a dry atmosphere of materialism which is fatal 
to the humors of sentimentalism is only the shadow of the 
truth, ^one but the loftiest of souls — perhaps not one in a 
century — can subsist in a religion not in the least tinged with 
sentiment, and as we descend the scale of humanity, a growing 
proportion of sentiment is required. Thus the change of to-day 
in its inner and eternal meaning is a great stride upward in our 
development. 

There never was a way but it was beset by pitfalls. A blade 
may be too sharp for its office, or notches may destroy its use- 
fulness. A few there are of our latter-day apostles who are like 
the blade which is too sharp — but years always mollify. The 
second, however, being negative and not positive, is the grosser 
fault. As half a century or a century ago every man had to 
feel for himself, so now that we to a large extent have substituted 
i'l our religion thought for feeling, each must do his own think- 
ing. The noise of the world's workshop may distract our think- 
ing process, but the value of responsibilities lies in the bearing. 
Unless we firmly anchor ourselves to the solid rock of intel- 
lectualism, the first wave of sentiment will carry us out into the 
open sea beyond. The religion of sentiment would not be so 
unenviable if we always rode on the crest of the wave, but the 

A. L. B., '10. 
^M. ^^ ^^ 



trough was ever wider than the crest. 



"Bob" Committee Elected 

The attendance at the Union Literary Society meetings on 
the Saturday nights when elections are scheduled is never as 
large as it should be. This was convincingly exemplified at a 
recent meeting when the "Bob" Committee was elected. There 



488 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

were about seven or eight Seniors, four Juniors, half a dozen 
Sophomores, and the balance — a;bout thirty — Freshmen present. 
Thus, for all practical purposes, the Freshmen elected the ''Bob'^ 
Committee. This may not have been a bad thing in itself, but 
for the ^^Bob" Committee and every other election around the 
college, every member of the society should be given an oppor- 
tunity to vote and, if necessary, be persuaded to come out and 
vote. A full and representative vote cannot be obtained on a 
Saturday night, and therefore the vote should be taken in the 
daytime. Printed ballots should be made out, and the elections 
should be conducted on the same plan as those for the Athletic 
Union Executive. By this means almost twice as many — per- 
haps more — ^will cast their ballot, and the result Avill be so much 
the more representative of the college feeling. An amendment to 
the '^Lit." constitution recommending printed ballots for the 
Literary Society and Acta Board elections will be introduced on 
Saturday night, March 20th, and it ought to have the hearty 
support of the members. 

There is no reason why this shouldn't apply also to the elec- 
tion of the ^^Bob" Committee. A majority vote is not often of 
much more value than a plurality vote, as was seen Saturday 
night. Out of the fourteen leading on the first ballot, thirteen 
were finally elected by the majority method, and there was a 
particular reason why the fourteenth was dropped. By all 
means, let us have printed ballots and election in the day time — 
at least for the Athletic Union Executive, the Literary Society 
Executive, the Acta Board, and the "Bob" Committee. 

<^ <^ <^ 

Disposition of *' Varsity ** 

We hate to Avritc about anything that souie other people may 
know a lot more about than we, but we would like to make pass- 
ing mention of what should be the governing body of the Varsity. 
It is now controlled by the Undergraduate Union, but in order 
to be fully representative of all the faculties and colleges in 
the University, it should be controlled by the University's most 
representative institution — the Undergraduates' Parliament. 
Only then Avill the colleges take sufficient interest in the publica- 
tion and give it the support that is necessary if it is ever to be- 
come a daily. And only then will the news of each college be 
treated in a manner which Avill give due prominence to each 



EDITORIAL. . 489 

of the federated institutions. At present all the members of the 
editorial staff, with, perhaps one exception, are registered at 
University College, and it is only natural that undue prominence 
should be given to news of the University College Literary 
Society, of their class receptions, of their various dinners. This 
is to be deplored from the standpoint of the other faculties, but 
it is but natural. The representation of Victoria on the board 
of Varsity was undertaken very late in the year, and has been as 
satisfactory as we could expect. We are not complaining of any 
ill-treatment, but we think that the governing board of the 
paper must be more representative before the paper itself will be 
truly representative. 

7^ ?^ ?^ 
The Rink 

The rink this year will show a probable surplus of nearly fif- 
teen hundred dollars. Since the inception of this valuable co- 
educational institution, there has not been so poor a year from 
the standpoint of weather, and it is a matter, of congratulation 
for Secretary Pearson and his efficient rink committee that they 
have measured up so w^ell in their financial results. Complaints 
against the management and condition of the rink have been 
fairly prevalent this winter, but none of them is justified. 
There might have been improvements, of course, but "Little 
Vic." was open oftener and had better ice than any other open 
air rink in the city, with the exception of Aura Lee, which is 
situated in a sheltered valley and thus has exceptional natural 
advantages, l^ext year conditions Avil] be improved by the em- 
ployment of a professional ice-maker, and, also, the rules pro- 
hibiting children from the rink during afternoons and band 
nights will .be strictly enforced. 

55^ 5^ 5^ 

Vic. Represented on Varsity 

A couple of weeks ago those of the Victoria students who read 
Varsity were pleased to notice that Victoria College is now 
getting its share of representation in that University news- 
paper. That we have not been represented hitherto has been 
the fault both of the people on the other side of the Park and 
of ourselves. Hereafter, events of importance will be chronicled 
in Varsity, and we hope that this will lead to an increased 
number of readers, as well as subscribers, for this publication. 




Goethe's Faust 

PKOF. L. E. HORNING. 

THE student of literature can scarcely desire more com- 
plete material for the study of the evolution of an 
author than he will find at hand when he begins the 
study of Goethe's Faust. The problem or theme of the work 
is one of universal and lasting importance : What is the proper 
evolution of the individual, what is the relation of good and 
evilj what is the aim and end of life ? The answer that the 
poem gives to these questions is of absorbing interest. But 
taking up the drama as published in 1808 one finds textual 
difficulties which must be dealt with and seeming contradic- 
tions which must be explained, if possible. Therefore the 
study of the genesis and of the composition of the text of 
Faust must really precede the literary study of the work, or 
at least go hand in hand with it. 

For this textual study we have Goethe's letters to his numer- 
ous friends, his Conversations with Eckermann, the Urfaust, 
discovered in 1887 by Prof. Erich Schmidt, the Fragment 
(1790), Faust, Part I. (1808), and the numerous Parlipomena 
or first drafts of all kinds which make a great mine of informa- 
tion. The references to Faust have been collected by Pniower 
(1899) and Graf (1901).. The latter editor also published a 
tabular comparison of the three forms of Part I. 

For the convenience of my students and as an aid to all 
interested in the subject, I herewith republish my own tabular 
comparison made in 1895 and published in the Transactions of 
the Canadian Institute in 1901. Two slight additions have been 
made, viz., 7a and Sa under Part I. 

The numbering of the lines is according to Schmidt's Edi- 
tion of the Urfaust, Seufiert's reprint of the Fragment and the 
Weimar Edition of Part I. ; where advisable totals of lines in 
the corresponding scenes are indicated. 



SCIENTIFIC. 



491 



Urfaust, 1773-1775? 


Fragmext, 1790. 


Part I., 1808. 






1. 


Zueignung, 1-32. 






2. 


Vorspiel auf dem 
Theater, 33-242. 






3. 


Prolog im Himmel, 
243-353. 


1. Xacht, 1-248. 


1. Naeht, 1-248. 


4. 


Nacht. 
a 354-605 (252 




Urf. 122, 123=122. 




lines). 




" 194, 195 replaced 




Urf. 122, 123=475. 




bv 195. 




" 194, 195 replaced 




155, 194 are 




by 548. 




added. 




507, 547, 598- 
601 are added. 








6 606-807. 






5. 


Vor dem Thor, 808- 








1177. 






6. 


Studierzimmer I., 
1178-1529. 


2. 


2. 


7. 


Studierzimmer II. 




a 249-346 (98 lines). 




a 1530-1769. 


Scliiilerscene, 249-444 


h 347-529 (183 lines). 




h 1770-1867 (98 


(196 lines). 


Schiilerscene, 




lines). 


249-262—1868-81 Pt I. 


....347-360. 




G 1868-2050-Schuler- 


263-266=1882-95 


....361-374. 




scene (183 lines). 


267-332 






Result=70 lines omit- 


S33-340=:1896-1903Pt. I. 


....375-382. 




ted. 


1904-1909 " 


383-388. 




57 lines added 


341-394=1910-1963 " 


....389-442. 




22 lines added 


1964-2000 " 


....443-479. 




as d. 


395-444=2001-2050 " 


....480-529. 




Changes ? 




e Faust tritt aiif, 530- 




d Faust tritt auf, 




551. 




2051-2072. 






7 


a. Auditorium — Dis- 








putation, cf. Para- 
lipomenon 11. 
13 verses known, 
r/ Paralp. 12. 


3. Aiieibacli's Keller. 


3. Auerbach's Keller. 


8. 


Auerbach's Keller. 


a 445-452. 


552-815 (264 lines). 




2073-2336 (264 lines) 


h 25 lines of prose. 








c Rattenlied. 








d 48 lines of prose. 








e Flohlied. 








f 83 lines of prose. 


Changes? 




Changes ? 


(In all 210 lines). 









492 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Urfaust, 1773-1775? 


Fragment, 1790. 


Part L, 1808. 


4. Landstrasse, 453-456. 










8 a. Transition scene. 

cf. Paralipomenon 
22. 




4. Hexenkiiche, 816- 
1067. 

(252 lines). 


9. Hexenkiiche, 2337- 
2604 (268 lines). 

2390-93 =additions. 


5. Strasse, 457-529. 

526-29 differs 


5. Strasse, 1068-1136. 
1137-1140. 


10. Strasse, 2605-2673. 
2674-77. 






6. Abend, 530-656. 


6. Abend, 1141-1267. 
Ballad revised. 


11. Abend, 2678-2804. 
Ballad revised. 


7. AUee, 657-718 

(62 lines). 


7. Spaziergang, 1267- 
1327. 

(60 lines). 
Note.— Between 1277 
and 1278 two lines 
omitted— 667-068 of 
Urfaust. 


12. Spaziergang, 2805- 
2864 (60 lines). 
2V^o*e.— Between 2814 
and 2815 two lines 
omitted=667-668 of 
Urfaust. 


8. Nachbarinn Haus, 
719-878. 
Note.—72Q and 727 
blank. 


8. Der Nachbarinn 
Haus, 1328-1487. 
Note. — Two lines in- 
serted=:1356-7 = be- 
tween 748 and 749 
of Urfaust. 


13. Der Nachbarin- 
Haus. 2866-3024. 
Note. — Two lines in- 
serted = 2893-94=1 
between 748 and 
749 of Urfaust. 


9. Faust and Mephisto- 
pheles, 879-924 (46). 
Wie ist's? 


9. Faust and Meph., 
1488-1535 (48). 

Note.— hines 1509-10 
added=between 899 
and 900 of Urfaust. 

Changes ? 


14. Faust and Meph., 
3025-3072. (48). 

Note. — Lines 3046 
and 3047 added= 

between 899 .and 900 
of the Urfaust. 

Changes ? 


10. Garten, 925-1053. 
(129). 


10. Garten, 1536-1664. 
(129). 


15. Garten, 3073-3204. 
(132). 

Note L— "Er liebt 
mieh" of line 3184 
is counted as one 
line in Fragment= 
1643. Is this a 
printer's error? 

Note 2.— Lines 3149- 
52 added=between 
1611 and 1612 of 
Fragment. 



SCIENTIFIC. 



493 



Ubpaust, 1773-1775? 


Fragment, 1790. 


Part I., 1808. 


11. Ein Gartenhauschen, 
1054-1065. 


11. Bin Gartenhauschen, 
1665-1676. 


16. Ein Gartenhauschen. 
3205-3216. 


See 18 6. 


See 15. 


17. Wald und Hohle. 
a 3217-3341 (125 

lines). 
6 3342-3369 (28 

lines). 
c 3370-3373 (4 
lines). 
Note 1.— 6=Urfaust 

18 6 
Note 2.— This scene 
^Fragment 15. 
Changes? Espec. 11 

3346-48. 

3363. 

3366. 


12. Gretchens Stube, 
1066-1105. 


12. Gretchens Stube, 
1677-1716. 


18. Gretchens Stube, 
3374-3413. 


13. Marthens Garten, 
1106-1235. 


13. Marthens Garten, 
1717-1846. 


19. Marthens Garten, 
3414-3543. 


14. Am Brunnen, 

1236-1277 (42 lines) 


14. Am Brunnen, 1847- 
1889. 
(43 lines). 
A^o^e.— Ach, 1853, 
counted as one 
line. 


20. Am Brunnen, 3544- 
3586. 

Note. — Ach, 3550, 
counted as one line. 


See IS 6. 


15. Wald and Hohle, 
a 1890-2014 (125 

lines). 
6 2015-2042 (28 

lines). 
c 2043-2046 (4 

lines). 
Ao#e. — 6=Urfaust 
18 6. 
A^ofe position of 
scene in Part I. 


See 17. 


15. Zwinger, 1278-1310. 


16. Zwinger, 2047-79. 


21. Zwinger, 3587-3619. 


See 17 for Part I. a. 
See 18 a for Parti, c. 


Dropped. 


22. Nacht— Strasse vor 

Gretchens Thiir. 
a 3620-45. (26 

lines) cf. Ur- 

faust 17. 
h 3646-49 (4 lines) 
c 3650-59 (10 

lines) cf. Ur- 

faust 18 a. 
d 3660-3775 (116 

lines). 



494 



ACTA VICTORIANA, 



Urfaust, 1773-1775? 



16. Dom, 1311-71 



Fragment, 1790. 



(<31 lines). 



17. Nacht — Vor Gret- 
chens Haus, 1372- 
97 (26 lines) cf. 
Part I. 22 a. 



18. Faust and Mephisto- 
pheles (vor Gret- 
chens Haus). 

a 1398-1407 (10 

lines) cf. Part I. 

22 c. 
6 1408-1435 (^8 

lines) cf. Part I. 

17 h. 



19. Faust and Mephisto- 
plieles. 
Prose 



20. Nacht, 1436-1441. 



21. Kerker. 

Prose, 



lines). 

'SfotG 1.— After 2094 

line omitted=Ur- 

faust 1326. 
'Sate 2.-2124-27= 

5 lines in Urfaust 
=1356-60. 

'Note 3.-2131-35= 

6 lines in Urfaust 
=1364-69. 



Part I., 1808. 



17. Dom, 2080-2137 (58 23. Dom, 3776-3834 (59 



Dropped 



Dropped 
See 15 6. 



Dropped. 



Dropped. 



Dropped. 



lines). 

Note 1. — ^Line 3789 
added after 1323 of 
Urfaust. 

Note 2.— After 3791 
a line omitted=: 
Urfaust 1326. 

Note 3.— Lines 3821- 
24=5 lines in Ur- 
faust, 1356-60. 

Note 4. — Lines 3828- 
32=6 lines in Ur- 
faust, 1364-69. ' 



See 22 a. 



See 22 c. 
See 17 h. 



24. Walpurgisnaeht, 
3835-4222. 



25. Walpurgisnacht- 

straum, 4223-4398. 



26. Triiber Tag. 
Prose 



27. Nacht, 4399-4404. 



88. Kerker, 4405-4612. 

Verse. 

Other Changes? 



mi,.'' '-efff 




wmm 



The Probationer's Course of Study^ 

KEY. DEAX F. IF. WALLACE^ M.A.^ D.D. 

THE objects to be kept in view in planning or amending 
the probationer's course of study are, in the main, two — 
general culture and special equipment. 
In respect to general culture, there is among us now almost 
absolute unanimity. The men who are being prepared to lead 
the Church must first of all be taught to think; and, when 
once awakened intellectually, they have still to learn such ade- 
quate facility in organizing and expressing thought, and such 
finish and attractiveness of style, as shall merit and command 
attention, making a w^ay in the minds of their hearers for the 
transcendently important message of the pulpit. We must 
liave no mere sentimental exhorters, playing on transient emo- 
tions; no lazy dogmatists, snoring in their orthodox slumbers, 

" The Sabbath drawlers of old saws 
Distilled from some worm-cankered homily ;" 

no crude, superficial innovators, flippantly flouting the faith 
of our fathers, but men, trained to grapple manfully with the 
perplexing problems of our time, and able by their own hard 
wrestling to sympathize with their fellows, and to help them 
to the firmer faith. 

For such awakening, stimulus and development, a full Arts 
course is, if not imperative, at least invaluable. The matricu- 
lant enters college a callow youth, who has hardly begun to 
think for himself, and whose hope often is that his instructors 
will give him full and ready-made answers to all his vexing 



■^Abstract of a paper read before the Victoria College Theological Con- 
ference, September, 1908. 



496 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

questions. He leaves at the end of the four years, intellectu- 
ally, as well as physically, a man, alert, sympathetic, modest — 
for he has gained an ideal — with many problems still un- 
solved, but wdth right methods for their solution, — a man now 
to take his place among men. 

Such a man, however, is not yet prepared for pulpit or 
pastorate. There must be special training besides this general 
culture, in the ministry no less than in other vocations, as 
medicine or law. 

Assuming a certain rudimentary culture, such as junior 
matriculation represents, I should say it is more vitally im- 
portant, if the hard choice must be made, that a man be w^ell 
trained in his own subjects for his particular work, than that 
he have an Arts course, and be forced to forego his special 
equipment. An Arts course alone, even with a little theology 
interjected at college or added on circuit, is totally inade- 
quate. A cultured mind is not enough. The preacher must 
have religious convictions. For such convictions he may have 
to agonize, but w^ithout them he is helpless ; unless a mighty 
message is the burden of his heart, he has little right to his 
place in the pulpit, and will be of little service there. The 
candidate for the ministry should know his Bible thoroughly 
in the light of all modern scholarship, that he may make it 
real and influential to his people; and he should also know 
thoroughly those departments of theology which come close to 
its Gospel. The preacher need not be technical, but he must 
be positive, for it is not his to unsettle men, but to establish 
them in the faith; it is his to so understand and preach Christ 
and Christianity as to commend them both to an age of doubt 
and to a world of sin. 

In the case of no men does all this so need to be insisted 
upon as in the case of graduates. A young man, fresh from 
the plough or the factoiT, with the glow of a recent conver- 
sion on him, may more effectively preach the Gospel than a 
freshly laureated youth, with the bloom upon him of a con- 
ceit of learning, and of an amazing confidence in his view of 
the universe, or even Avith an all-pervading sense of the un- 
certainty of all knowledge. And a considerable proportion of 
our graduates do fall into one or other of these classes. An 



MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS, 



497 



ignorant preacher who at least knoAvs, and knows that he 
Iviiow^s, Christ and Him crucified, may do more good than a 
well-read man whose sermons consist of scraps of religious 
sentimentalism, sandwiched in betw^een thick slices of current 
news and views. The effective preacher grapples with the 
great themes, teaches positive truth, and so interests, stimu- 
lates and saves his hearers.^ 

How far do our present methods accomplish these results ? 
I am no pessimist. Our ministry in the Methodist Church in 
Canada will bear comparison very favorably with that of any 
other church. All our candidates must now take at least 
three years in college in a mixed course in Arts and Theology. 
A very large proportion take the fuller Arts course of four 
years and then one year in Theology. In addition, all candi- 
dates spend two years on circuit, combining preaching and 
pastoral work Avith study and examinations. The nominal 
literary standard for entrance u}X)n probation is Arts matricu- 
lation. 

This last statement leads me to the first salient abuse of 
our present system. Special provisions'^ were made by the Gen- 
eral Conference of 1902, and continued by that of 1906, to 
meet the special exig-encies of our work in New Ontario and 
the West. Yet men have been taken out under these as evange- 
listic workers, not by ^^ the Local Superintendent for JSTew 
Ontario," nor by " the General Secretary of Missions, who is 
in charge of the Home Department," but by the Chairmen of 
Districts, and even by Chairmen of older Districts. 

This is a breach of the letter and the spirit of the Discipline, 
and, moreover, has the practical effect of loading the Confer- 
ence with a number of ill-prepared men, for whom later on 
it will be a difficulty to find places. I look with some dis- 
quietude on the future of any Conference that has an appreci- 
able proportion of such ministers. 

Another provisionf of the Discipline, made at the very last 
moment of the General Conference of 1906, places a premium 
on rash matrimony wdth a vengeance. Why should the fact 
that a man is married exempt him from college ? The only 



♦Discipline, pp. 382-3 ; cf., p. 103. 
tDiscipline, p. 94. 



498 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

excuse is that married probationers find it harder to pay their 
way through college. But it has been done elsewhere, and in 
at least a few cases with us. It would better pay the Church 
to have some special fund, or some elasticity in the use of the 
Educational Fund, to meet such special cases, than to trifle 
with the best interests of the Church by thus lowering the 
standard of education. 

Another defect in our present methods is this, that a grad- 
uate who has spent four years in the study of the compara- 
tively secular subjects of his Arts course, is then allowed to 
proceed to ordination on only one year's attendance at college 
in the supremely important subjects which are to bo the life 
of his thinking for all the years to come. True, he passes 
examination in much more than that one year's course, but 
this he may do by hasty and superficial study in the midst of 
the absorbing practical duties of a modern pastorate. The 
result is hasty cramming, stunted development, and a conse- 
quent failure to impress and help the best minds of the com- 
mmiity. 'Need we wonder at the prevalent complaint that our 
methods are not producing leaders ? 

What do I advocate? A radical change. I would imitate 
our Mother Church in England, and send our candidates first 
to college to complete their studies there ; then to circuit work 
to complete their probation, without the embarrassment of 
obligatory studies and written examinations. 

Many great advantages would follow. We should not be 
sending out untrained boys to grapple with the problems of 
the modern world and the modern church. 

Moreover, we should secure much more satisfactory results 
in the matter of study. -Young men wlio preach before attend- 
ing college have too often crude methods of preparation for 
examination, methods which permanently cripple their powers. 
In another way many men are grievously, sometimes perman- 
ently, injured by premature circuit work. If at all successful 
as public speakers, they are flattered, courted and spoiled by 
the very kindness of the people. Many such men have been hurt, 
but helped, by the Victoria " Bob." But in some cases the 
" Bob " was not applied, or applied too late ! " The big 
head " is a dangerous disease. And our method fosters it. 



MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS. 499 

Moreover, we make almost a fetish of written examinations. 
We seem to think that if we lay down a good course of study 
(as we have), and insist on an examination on every suhject of 
that course (as we do), all is well, and our candidates well 
educated, forgetting that good methods of study and time for 
assimilation of the truth and the inspiration of college life 
are of the very essence of good modern education. Men must 
take their Arts work comparatively slowly. But the Church 
encourages them, almost forces them by her methods, to make 
undue haste in their theology. Four years in literature, sci- 
ence and philosophy, and one short year in direct college work 
on the subjects of our lifelong teaching! What is that but the 
worst kind of cram ? The two 3'ears' study on circuit are of 
necessity hurried and unsatisfactory. ''■ Cram ^' is Avrit large 
upon our methods, destroying depth of thought and solidity of 
character. Hence our comparative failure to impress the 
world intellectually. The more thoroughly a man has been 
awakened to the profound philosophical and theological prob- 
lems, the more thorough should be his training in the Chris- 
tian verities. ^^ Time is of the essence of the contract." 

If such a radical change as above outlined be at present 
impossible, then let us at least abolish abuses, rigidly main- 
tain present standards, insist upon at least two years in The- 
ology at college for graduates, and in order to do this demand 
of gTaduatcs only one year's probation on circuit. This would 
be at least a step in the right direction. 



Convocation 



THE arrangements for the Baccalaureate Sunday, April 
25, are announced. The preacher will be President 
Little, of Garnett Biblical Institute, Northwestern 
University Evanston, Chicago, who will also address the Con- 
vocation in the chapel on the Monday evening following. Kev. 
Dean Wallace has, moreover, drawn the attention of all theo- 
logical students to the paragraph in the Calendar which reads : 
" Diplomas and certificates in Theology are given out at the 
Convocation in Divinity, and all theological students, unle-s 
excused by the Dean of the Theological Faculty, are expected 
to be present." 



500 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

All too often, as students, we have treated Convocation, and 
Charter Day exercises, too, as negligible appointments; if they 
chanced to suit our convenience — very well; and if not — very 
Avell. After the College has done all that was possible with 
us and for us, we hurry oif, without so much as a decent fare- 
well, and our unseemly haste to get away must bring keen dis- 
appointment to those peculiarly interested in the closing exer- 
cises of the academic year. 

It remains for us to invest these occasions with a meaning 
they have not now. Our absence heretofore has made Con- 
vocation in Divinity at Victoria a very sober affair. Solemn 
it must always be ; but surely the proceedings may be enlivened 
by some college song or jest, to let our guests know that this 
is a college function, and that we are students still, wearing 
our new-found dignity lightly, and to keep the young doctors 
from taking their honors too seriously. If attendance at Con- 
vocation became general this year, we would do much to start 
the tradition that would make these now dull proceedings an 
integral part of our College life. 

And we owe this much at least to the JMother that has fos- 
tered us all these years. Noblesse oblige. c. J. 



Notes 

On Easter Sunday, April 11, Dr. Grenfell, of Labrador, will 
preach the College Sermon. 

•^^ 'T^ -r^ 

Mr. R. E. S. Taylor is under apjx)intment for China, to 
sail in the fall. The party now numbers eleven. 

^i ^^ ^^ 

From March 31 to April 4 a Congress of Missions will 
convene in Massey Ilall, Toronto, under the Laymen's Mis- 
sionary Movement in Canada, to formulate a national mis- 
sionary policy. His Excellency Earl Grey will be present as 
honorary president of the Conference, and such men as Mr. 
Eobt. E. Speer, Eishop Thoburn, Dr. Zwemer, Mr. IST. W. 
Eowell, Canon Cody and Mr. J. A. ^lacdonald, are among 
the speakers. 



MISSIONARY AND RELIGIOUS. 501 

On February 2ord Professor Hume, of the University of 
Toronto, delivered a lecture to the Theological Club on " Doubt 
and Faith/' in the course of which he took occasion to state his 
firm belief in the essential truths of Christianity. In philos- 
ophy an idealist, in religion he is a Christian, — to which one 
cannot forbear to add — gentleman. Prof. Hume does good 
service to the religious life of the University in stating his faith 
so frankly. Many of us have felt the wrench which 
comes when first we meet scientific, historical and philosophic 
thought, only to discover that our traditional interpretations are 
called in question. The homely truths of ^^God" and the ^Svorld" 
which we learned in our boyhood days at Sunday School 
seem to be treated with much the same deference unchivalrous 
youth pays to old age; and it must be added further that grave 
doubts do disturb the student's former faith. For one of 
eminence to step in at this gap and assure us that the faith of 
our fathers suffices in our new conditions even better than before, 
is most steadying. We begin to see difficulties rising ahead ; 
here one, intellectually honest, who has seen all our problems 
and has worked his way through, comes with his simple con- 
fession. And we welcome one Avho says, in words that cannot 
be misunderstood : '' I believe in God, the Father Almighty, 
Maker of Heaven and Earth; And in Jesus Christ, His only 
Son, our Lord." 

c. s. 



The Victory 



To try — to fail — and then begin again 

The fight of life; 
To fail — but aye, through tears of blood, perceive 

The flag — dazed, heed the bugle call ; 
To scom each fresh defeat and, staggering, leave 

The field, resolved not yet to fall ; 
To stanch the flow of blood, forget the strife 
Has been in vain, ignore the dust and pain ; 
To lose thus nobly is to gain 
Life's crowning victory. 

r. c. A., '11, 




EBSONALS 
EXCHANGES 



Graduate Sketches 

I. 

MU. C. I. CURKELLY^ B.A. 

H^WI]^G spent two years in ]:)Ost-graduate work^ 
])artly at Victoria and partly under Professor Mavor, 
Mr. Cnrrelly went to England along with several 
other Victoria men, on the way to France to Avork on a 
social problem. Being in the British Mnesum one day, 
he happened to get into conversation with an old gentle- 
man, a stranger, and the conversation drifted to Egypt 
and excavation there. It chanced that this old gentleman wa& 
one of the representatives of the British Government on the 
Egyptian Exploration Commission, of which he was treasurer. 
The outcome wa^ that llr. Cnrrelly was not only introduced to 
Elinders Petrie, the chief officer of the Commission, but also 
joined the Commission. 

After a few months' trial he was placed on the permanent 
staff. Owing to the cholera scare and terrific death-rate in 
Egypt, he was recommended to do some work in Crete, and 
started for Greece, where he spent some months travelling. 
Late in the autumn came orders from London to proceed to 
Egypt at once and commence operations. After sundry experi- 
ences with storms and with fickle Greek teuiperament, they 
succeeded in reaching Cairo in time. His duty as chief of the 
junior staff was to have the huts ready when the whole staff 
should arrive, which they did ten days later. ^Een came from 
their villages, and excavation was begun. After a month's 
training with Prof. Petrie he was given 100 men and sent 
south, where things seemed to tumble out of the ground of them- 
selves. The last big lucky accident Avas the finding of the tomb 
of Aahmes L, who must be the Pharaoh who knew not Joseph of 
the Bible. During the winter a considerable number of anti- 
quities were brought up by the peasants for sale, and more than 
one-third of his pay was thus invest<^d. They were shipped home 
to Toronto, to Victoria. 



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Photo by Venwn Royle. 



From picture owned by Cambridge Prest, CamJrridge, Mats. 



HOGBACK FALLS, GREENWOOD LAKE, N.J. 



PERSONALS AND EXCHANGES. 



503 



As soon as work was completed there ho sailed to join the other 
members of the British school at the excavations in Eastern 
Crete. Soon he was snmmoned to England, where he worked a 
few months in London. In the winter he again returned to Egypt, 
but serious trouble with the Egyptian government had deprived 
Prof. Petrie of a concession in which to dig. Consequently Mr. 
Currelly had to give up his concession to Prof. Petrie and 
apply for another. Just as the first year's work was all good 
luck, the second year's was all failure, their tireless search 
bringing no results. A little later he took his men away north, 
near the Mediterranean, to dig over the ancient city of Buto. 
Even here ill success pursued him and pressed him to leave. 
A serious feud with the natives impeded the work, and every- 
thing was under water, which came up to the fourth century 
level. 

He soon joined his friend McAllister, in Palestine, who had 
just found a long series of Philistine tombs. Later in the 
summer the two accepted a challenge to see if any Phoenician 
traces were to be found, but though they remained a considerable 
time in Sidon and then in Tyre, they failed to discover any 
objects that may truly be called Phoenician. 

Receiving instructions to prepare for an expedition to Sinai, 
he repaired to upper Egypt to collect men. Crossing the Arabian 
Desert and the Red Sea, they entered Sinai from the south,, 
joining the rest of the expedition at the Valley of the Mines, 
There they copied manuscripts and worked over mine-heaps- 
where the Egyptians had sent turquoise-mining expeditions 
about 5000 B.C. Eroni there they proceeded to Serabit el 
Khadem, where there were more mines and the remains of a 
very curious temple. It had been erected by the miners to 
Hathor, the goddess of love, who was said to love the turquoise. 
Turning south, they went to the Monastery of St. Catharine to 
dig over some rubbish heaps outside the walls in search of manu- 
scripts. The large library of the Monastery is quite w^onderful. 
It was complete before the Xorman Conquest and has not been 
added to since. The monks were still grumbling vigorously over 
the theft of the Codex Siniaticus. The rubbish heaps revealed 
nothing, everything was decayed by the dampness. Having-^ 
finished there, they went up to the land of Goshen where they 
had a concession to dig the city of Pithon, built bj 



504 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

the Hebrews for Pharaoh. Rameses II. built this very strong 
fortress, no doubt, as a base for his Syrian campaign. He 
ordered out the Hebrews, the nearest of his subjects, to do oor- 
vey labor. This the Hebrews, being a nomadic tribe, and 
never having done any work from the beginning of time, found 
a great hardship— though they had little more to do than the 
Egyptians of the neighboring districts. 

By this time the sculpture which had been cut from the Valley 
of the Mines with great difficulty by reason of its enormous 
height on the cliff, arrived in Cairo safely. It so pleased the 
government that the English ministry recommended Mr. 
Currelly to the Khedive for a knighthood. The latter recom- 
mended him to the Sultan of Turkey, with the result that he was 
made an officer in the Knights of the Medjiedieh. 

The next two years Mr. Currelly was mostly in charge of the 
work at Deir el Bahiri. This was a big excavation, there be- 
ing seA^eral hundred men and a double line of tracks employed. 
The first year they discovered the famous statue of Hathor, one 
of the greatest in the world, and the next year the tomb of King 
Meatuhotep which was GOO feet underground. 

During all this time he had been sending home all the anti- 
quities he could secure, and two years ago the University of 
Toronto took up the matter, sending him sums of money. He 
then resigned from the excavations to devote himself entirely to 
the building up of the Archaeological section of the Museum. 
This last year the Ontario Government became interested, mak- 
ing it possible to do things on a grander scale. There was also 
an old agreement that he should write one of the series of books 
on the archaeology of Egypt (the book is now being published 
by the Egyptian government very much regardless of cost). So 
returning to Egypt he ran a small expedition out into the 
Sahara, where he secured a large amount of material for the 
Museum as well as for the book in hand. Then he went to 
Spain in seaix^h of antiquities, and met with considerable suc- 
cess. But the strain had been too much, and on his arrival in 
Paris he was threatened with a serious nervous breakdown. 
Thence he returned to England, where there was much work to 
be done and where an enormous amount of material was 
obtained for the museum before he should return home. 



PERSONALS AND EXCHANGES. 505 

Personals 

A Ilaggart, B.A., '72 LL.B., K.C., will represent Winnipeg 
in the Dominion Honse of Commons. 

Hon. Clifford Sifton, B.A., '80, has been elected to represent 
Brandon in the Dominion Ilonse of Commons. 

Rev. M. W. Leigh, B.A., '93, has removed from Tamworth to 
Eldorado. 

Dr. W. r. Adams recently returned to China to take charge 
of the hospital at Yo Chow, Honan, China. Dr. Adams was 
formerly connected with the Canadian Methodist Mission at 
Kiating. 

The Sim smiled sweetly on January 21, on Toronto, where 
W. P. ^N'ear, B.A.,'03, B.A. Sc. of Toronto, was married to Miss 
L. B. Manning, of Toronto. 

November 4, 1908, opened the doors to happiness for A. B. 
Bankin, B.A., '04, M.B., when he entered in w4th ^Fiss A. M. 
Bennett, of Toronto. 

Onety taught is peculiar in one repect at least, it has relin- 
quished its third member to the bonds of matrimony. On 
Wednesday, February 17, 1909, at the residence of the bride's 
parents, Elmbank, Out., Miss Florence Edna Aliddlebrook, late 
of '10, was married to Joseph W. Marshall, of Yellowgrass, 
Sask. 

E. J. Moore, B.A., '07, who was editing the Canadian Grocer, 
has now taken up work in connection with the Ontario Branch 
of the Dominion Alliance, and his experience and ability will 
doubtless make The Pioneer, the well kno^vn temperance w^eekly, 
still more successful. 

^' Perpetiuum mobile " must be the motto of the class of '03, 
a report of which we endeavored to ])ublish in Christmas Acta. 
;Miss Eby is teaching in Rockland, Out., and not at George- 
town. D. B. Kennedy is not preaching in Rouleau Qutin, 
Melford, Sask. 



Deaths 

AVe sincerely mourn the death of Donald Gillespie, M.D., '60, 
(V) at Canning-ton, December 22, 1908. 
We all mourn the loss of Rev Wm. Galbraith, M.A., 



506 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

LL.D., (V) Ph.D., who passed away December 11, 190S. 
From his ordination in 1865, until his snperannnation in 1S08, 
he was one of the first preachers. He was six times a delegate 
to the General Conference, many times chairman of his dis- 
trict and twice president of his Conference. 

We join in heart-felt sympathy w^ith the friends and rela- 
tives of Mrs. E. M. Flagg, B.A., '00, the wife of Eev. E. L. 
Flagg, B.D., who passed away January 19, 1909, at the 
Methodist parsonage at Sonthampton, Ont. 

Acta extends its heart-felt sympathy to the family of Mr. 
Elwood Bowcrman, late of '10, who died of cancer of the head, 
February 23, in the Bloomfield hospital. 



Exchanges 

The February University Monthly contains a trite article on 
^^The Place of the Study of Law in a University," from the pen 
of Sir William Anson, member of the Imperial Parliament for 
the University of Oxford, and author of ^^ The Law and the 
Custom of the Constitution." 

The Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition is to be held on the 
campus of the University of Washington. It will take place 
during the summer vacation. The buildings which are to be 
erected, costing six hundred thousand dollars, will be tui-ncil 
over to the University after the Exposition is ended, and will 
be used for the enlarging of the school. 

Lady accosting J. A. K — ^Is — : — ^' You are the mysterious 
Mr. Eaffles," etc. 

J. A. K — ^Is — , taken by surprise: — How Avould you like to 
be Mrs. Eaffles ?" 

Exit lady immediately. — Ex. 

We gratefully acknowledge the following exchanges: — 
Varsity J McMaster University Monthly, 0. /I. C. Review, Hya 
Yaha, Vox Wesley ana. Queen's University Journal, Allisonia, 
Stanstead College Magazine, Lux Columbia, Acadia Athenaeum, 
The Martlet, Manitoba College Journal, University of Ottawa 
Review, Harvard Monthly, Western University Gazette, Uni- 
versity Monthly, Notre Dame Scholastic, The Student and The 
Oxford Magazine. 



PERSONALS AND EXCHANGES. 507 

Beyo:v"d. 

Beyond the sand, where wild sea birds are homing, 

A curving reach of sand that lines the bay ; 
Beyond the sand, Avhere wild sea birds are homing 

The breakers' thundering roar — the reef-tossed spray. 
Beyond the breakers, where no eye can measure, 

A smiling rainbow and its pot of gold ; 
Beyond the rainbow and its faery treasure. 

The Happy Isles are gleaming as of old. 
Beyond the islands, as the darkness closes. 

One tiny twinkling star shines bravely down — 
A gem that in the night's black hair reposes 

Above the filmy sable of her gOAvn. 
Beyond the star, beyond the night — ah me ! 

What would the longing heart not give to see ! 

— Harvard TJniversitij Monthly. 

Dream Ships. 

'*As ships at night they come and go, 
As bubbles in the eddy's flow, 

The dreams we meet in field or street, 
Filled with the sunset glow. 

**A few from El Dorado come, 
With freight of gold they pass, but some, 

With rigging torn and all forlorn. 
Lag through the waters dumb : 

** Let's hail a craft whose freight is song, 
Whose decks the golden fancies throng, 
Of dreamy mirth there is no dearth, 
As fast she booms along. 

*' Aboard that craft I'd rather be 
Where thought is always fancy free, 
The gale behind, care out of mind. 
Over a sunlit sea." 

— Notre Dame Scholastic. 




Athletic Union Executive, 1909-10 

Hon. Pres., Eev. J. W. Graham; Pres. O. Y. Jewett, '10; 
1st Vice-Pres., E. Gundy, '11; 2nd Vice-Pres., K. McLaren, 
'12; Secretary, J. Bimie, '11; Treasurer, G. Adams, '10. 

^& ^^ <^ 

Hockey 

ViCTOKiA^ 2 — JuA'ioii Arts, 2. 

ONE of the most strenuous games of the Jennings* Cup 
series was played on Victoria rink, February 11th, 
Avhen Junior Arts met Victoria in the third game of 
Group B. The Victoria supporters had many misgivings on 
account of the crippled conditioii of the team. Jack Rumball 
was unable to play, and the team, as a whole, was in poor con- 
dition. Morrison replaced Rumball at right wing. 

The game commenced with a rush by the Vic. forwards on 
the Arts' goal. For ten minutes the play was very even, the 
puck being carried back and forth from one end of the rink to 
the other ; but finally Arts scored a very lucky goal. Vic. now 
got busy, and shot after shot was stopped by the Arts' goal 
tender, but there was no more scoring in this half. In the 
second half Vic. showed their ability to finish strong. After 
a few minutes' play. Arts scored again from a scrimmage in 
front of the goal. Morrison secured the first goal for Vic. 
after fifteen minutes' play. Oldham and MacLaren combined 
for Vic's second goal. Although both teams worked hard to 
break the tie, neither was able to score. The game was marked 
by hard checking, and many penalties were given for minor 
offences. It is hard to pick any particular star on the Victoria 
team. Oldham and MacLaren's combined rushes, and the back 
checking of McCamus, were conspicuous. Birnie at cover 
point played a steady and strong game, breaking up rush after 
rush of the opposing forwards ; while Campbell in goal stopped 
many shots that appeared to be billeted for goals. The Vic. 
team : Goal, Campbell ; point, Jewitt ; cover point, Birnie 



ATHLETICS. 509 

(capt. ) ; rover, MacLaren ; centre, Oldham ; right wing, Mor- 
rison; left wing, McCamiis. 

Victoria^ 9 — Albert College^ 1. 

On Saturday, February 13th, Vic. played Albert College 
a friendly game of hockey on the Vic. rink. The ice was 
rather rough, and this prevented anything like accuracy in 
passing or shooting. Albert put up a plucky game, but were 
clearly outclassed in all departments of the game. The score 
at half-time was 4 — in favor of Vic, and at full time 9 — 1, 
Alberts' only goal being scored on a nice shot by Copp, their 
left wing, who has plenty of speed and with coaching and 
experience will develop into an excellent player. 

The Vic. line-up was as follows : — Goal, Campbell ; point, 
Jewitt; cover point, Birnie (capt); centre, Oldham; rover, 
MacLaren ; right wing, Rumball ; left wing, McCamus. 

Reg. Gundy made a capital referee. 

Vic, 4 — Arts, 2. 
This was the game which decided the group championship 
for Victoria, and our men proved their undoubted supremacy 
over the L^niversity College bunch. Both teams ^vorked liked 
Trojans from the start, Campbell in gx)al and Rumball playing 
particularly well. The regular men played their usual strong 
game, although ''Oldy" and McLaren were closely watched. The 
half time score was 3 — 1, and in the last period each team scored 
another, making the final score 4 — 2, in our favor. The line-up 
for Victoria was : — Goal, Campbell ; point, Jewett ; cover, 
Bernie ; centre, Oldham ; right, McLaren ; left, McCamus ; 
rover, Rumball. 

Victoria, 8 — Albert College, 2. 

On Saturday, February 20th, the Victoria hockey team 
journeyed to Belleville to play the return game Avith Albert 
College. Although on the previous Saturday the Albert team 
had been beaten by Vic. on the Vic. rink, they confidently 
expected to demonstrate their superiority on their o^vn ice. 
However, the score fairly indicates the play. The referee lost 
control of the game from the start, and had it not been for the 
greater experience of the Victoria team the match would have 
developed into an old-time " shinny " game. The ice was very 
heavy, making combination work almost impossible. 



510 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

It must be said for the Albert team that they worked hard 
and were always in the game, bnt the superior knowledge of 
the game and the advantage in the weight of the Victoria team 
made the odds against them too great, and had it not been for 
the brilliant work of their goal-tender the score would have 
been much larger. Each man on the Vic. team played hockey, 
and their gentlemanly playing was commended by all. The 
Vic. line-up — Goal, Campbell; point, Jewitt; cover point, 
r)irnie; rover, MacLaren; centre, Morrison; right wing, Rum- 
l>all; left wing, ^IcCamus. 

Victoria^ 4 — Univehsity College^ 0. 

On Saturday, February 13th, the return game between 
Varsity and Victoria ladies' hockey teams was played on Vic- 
toria rink. The ^^ictoria ladies more than repaid their oppon- 
ents for their former defeat by defeating them to the tune of 
4 — 0. The Victoria ladies set the pace from the start, and the 
result was never in doubt. The first half was all Victoria, and 
by half time they had secured a safe lead of three goals. In 
the second half the play was much closer and the game more 
strenuously contested. But the defence of the Victoria team 
^vas too strong for the Varsity ladies, while the forwards added 
another goal to the score. The ladies on the Victoria team all 
played an excellent game, the playing of Miss MacLaren and 
Miss Crane on the forward line, and of Miss Grange on the 
defence, being especially noteworthy. The line-up of the Vic- 
toria team — Goal, Miss Denne; point. Miss Grange; cover 
point, Miss Denton; forwards. Misses MacLaren, Crane, Mc- 
Connell and Armstrong. 

Vic. Ladies^ 2 — St. Hilda's^ 5. 

The final game in the Ladies' Hockey League was played on 
Saturday, February 27th, between Victoria and St. Hilda's, on 
the latter's ice. 

St. Hilda's showed a complete reversal of form and defeated 
Victoria by 5 to 2. Miss Harston starred for the winners, while 
]\liss McConnell played well for the losers. By this win for St. 
Hilda's, University College has won the cup, given by Miss 
Addison, with three victories; Victoria second with two, 
and St. Hilda's third with one. 



ATHLETICS. 511 

Victoria^ 12 — Forestry^ 0. 
Victoria defeated the Faculty of Forestry at the T. A. A. C. 
Rink on Wednesday, March 3rd, and thereby went into the 
finals for the Jenning's Cup. An enthusiastic crowd of nine 
was on hand to cheer the team on to victory. 

Dwight played in goal for Forestry as the regular goal tender 
did not show up. As he is a point player, he frequently rambled 
up the ice leaving the nets ungarded, with the result that some 
of Vies, goals were secured in a ridiculously easy manner. This 
in some measure accounts for the large score ; but Alexander and 
Andrews worked hard for Forestry, and it was only the 
phenomenal work of Campbell in goal for Victoria which kept 
Forestry from scoring. This player put up the game of his 
life, stopping time after time Avhen a score seemed inevitable. 
McCamus was the shining light of the Vic. line. His back 
checking was easily the feature of the game. Captain Birnie was 
always in the limelight, seeming to be right at home in the heavy 
going. It took just two minutes for Oldham to batt in Victorians 
first goal from a scrimmage. ^McLaren took the next on an 
individual rush in four minutes. McCamus followed with two 
and Oldham and McLaren each took one more, making the half 
time score 6 — 0. 

In the second half six more were added, Birnie and Jewitt 
each scoring on rushes. McCamus's three and Oldham's one ac- 
count for the remaining goals. A little rough work was in 
evidence near the end of this half resulting in McLaren, of Vic, 
and Chamberlain, of Forestry, being benched. Bii-nio was also 
ruled oft* for continuing to play with his feet after breaking his 
stick. The game was played six men to a side, Forestry being 
shy their goal tender. Jack Bumball was dropped by Vic. to 
even up. 

Vic. Line-up : — Goal, Campbell ; point, Jewitt ; cover, Birnie 
(Captain); centre, Oldham; ri^'ht, McLaren; left, McCamus. 
Spares: — Rumball, Morrison. Booters: — McKenzie, Saunders, 
Lovering, Jones, Fcclestone, Geary, ]\Ianniiig, Backham, and 
Zimmerman. 

Dents., 11 — Victoria. 3. 

As we go to press, our hopes for the possession of the 
Jenning's Cu]) are cruelly crushed by the above score. We 
could easily give excuses to show why, but what's the use ? We 
put up a good scrap anyway. 




The 65th Senior Dinner 



THE present graduatijig year's gav romul of college func- 
tions was brought to a fitting climax by the sixty-fifth 
Annual Senior J3inner *given to the graduating class 
of '09 on the evening of February 26th. That the dinner Avas 
a great success is proved by the fact that many of the Seniors 
have been heard to say that they had a better time at this year's 
dinner than at any of the preceding ones. 

The number at this year's dinner surpassed any previous 
records^ and it required careful planning to provide room for 
all present, yet in spite of the limited size of the hall every- 
one was comfortably seated. " The gay display of pennants and 
bunting only served to enhance the splendor of the tastily decor- 
ated tables. The Seniors, of course, were all present. The 
eluniors, as the hosts of the evening, acquitted themselves in an 
able manner. The Sophs turned out well, though the Fresh- 
men's numbers were scarcely as large as in former years. As 
is usual on such occasions, the time elapsing between the courses 
was deprived of its monotony by the brilliant snatches of songs 
which came from the tables of the lower years, while even at 
times the dignified theologs deigned to let their voices be 
heard in sonorous tones. 

The dinner this year was upon a somewhat different basis 
from that of former years, the honors being extended to the 
graduates in Theology as well as to those in Arts. The under- 
graduates in Theology turned out well and added much to the 
general enjoyment by their choruses and hymns. 

Chancellor ]]urwash was chairman as- well as guest of 
honor, it being the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of his 
graduation. In his own inimitable way he gave a brief resume 
of the past fifty years, Avhich was very entertaining and much 
enjoyed by all present. President Falconer was also able to 
be with us, and by his presence added much to the general 
interest of the dinnei*. 



LOCALS. 513 

The Senior Dinner Song, composed by a committee, was 
divided in three parts. The verses for the ladies were sung by 
Miss Stent on, *11, and those for the gentlemen of the Arts class^ 
by Messrs. VanWyck, '11, and F. J. E. Staples, '10, while Mr. 
Tot en very ably rendered those to the Theological graduates. 

The speeches of the evening, though somewhat longer than 
usual, were much enjoyed, and we are sorry that space does 
not permit a detailed account of some of them. We can, hoAv- 
ever, express the feelings of the class of '00 according to Mr. 
j\Io3"er. 

Mr. Moyer, '00 (proposing a toast to Victoria College) — 
^' '00 feels like a bursting bubble on a rolling sea." 

Below we give a copy of the song composed by A. L Burr. 
'10, in honor of our Chancellor and sung by all present at the 
dinner: 

Long live our Chancellor, 
Loved friend, wise counsellor. 

All hail to thee! 
For all the coming years. 
Thy name the more endears 
Old Vic, as each now cheers 
Thy jubilee. 

The strength of life was his. 
And now the peace that is 

The croAvn of age; 
Time's roughness grew more fair, 
Touched by a life so rare: 
May he outlive all care 

In ripe old age. 

Bepartee at the Senior Dinner (Tune, '" Old Hundred) : 

C. T.'s.— ^'' We'd like to hear the faculty sing." 

Sophs. — " They have no faculty to sing." 

Freshies — " Professor Bowles is beating time." 

Sophs. — '^ He could not help it when Ave sang." 

Dr. Biggar — '^ The late speaker said he would like to see 

this turned into a love-feast; from Avhat I see I think it is 

one." 

Avison, '00 (proposing toast to the ladies) — Woman is an 

accomplished fact. Woman is here; she has come and we must 

accept her." 



514 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Gems from the Senior Song (Tune, '^ Tlie Blacksmith '') : 
To ''Si" Hemingway. 

A farmer brave onr Si will make; 

In the wide, wide AVest you'll find him, 
With a spade and a hoe and a second-hand rake, 
And a bunch of cows behind him. 

To Gordon Manning, President of the Lit. 

To mould bright youth's ambitious mind 

At present is his suggestion; 
And his practice at Lit., in the President's chair 
Will hel]) when he puts the question. 

(Tune, '' Just Someone.") 
To George Gullen. 

Under his convincing argument 
You can only sit and squirm ; 
AVe w^onder, when he ''pops " the question, 

Will he then define his term? ; 

To " Pat " Miller. 

When he pleads before his jury, 

You may bet they'll sit and stare ; 
They'll ope their eyes when Patrick cries, 
Things must go with a " rip and a tare." 
<^ <^ ^^ 

The Senior Reception 

The reception which the Seniors gave on the evening of 
February 19, '09, was one of the most successful in the history 
of the College, and '09 will long be remembered for this last 
annual function. In addition the occasion was noteworthy 
because of the fact that Chancellor Burwash celebrated the 
Golden Jubilee of his graduation. The college was tastily 
decorated, while cosy corners were very much in evidence, — a 
characteristic feature of '09 receptions. After the usual pre- 
liminaries in Alunmi Hall, the guests descended to the chapel, 
which was not sufficiently commodious to accommodate all who 
were desirous to hear the programme. 

The programme, while following precedent, was not a repro- 
duction of former years. J. E. Todd, President of the vear, 



LOCALS. 515 

ablj acted as chairman. He first called upon Chancellor Bur- 
wash, Hon. President of the year, for an address. The Chanr 
cellor gaA^e one of his appropriate addresses, which met with 
hearty applause. The " History " of the class, written by Miss 
C. M. Birnie and M. A. Miller, was read by the latter. The 
virtues and brilliancies of the class '09, from freshmanhood to 
their present days of maturity, were extolled in a manner which 
could not fail to please those who heard it. Miss C. B. Dun- 
nett and J. H. Arnup each read a poem which did credit to the 
celebrated class, while W. P. Clement pleased the audience 
with one of his instrumental solos. The Prophecies contained 
the usual amount of dreary forebodings and happy prognostica- 
tion, interspersed with humor. These were written by Miss 
M. ^. Stephens and H. L. Morrison, and were neither of an 
imitative nature, nor did they hold a secondary place to the 
prophecies of other years. 

At the conclusion of the programme the guests returned to 
their rendezvous to prepare for the promenades which followed. 
When the last of the eight promenades was finished the singing 
of the college song was followed by the college and year yells. 
The Seniors then formed themselves into a circle and joined 
hands while they sang '' Auld Lang Syne," and their last 
reception was over. 



Dr. J. Burwash (to Oldham, '08, laboring through a Greek 
translation) — " That version, I fear, will hardly do." 

Oldy — " I just turned it around to make it sound better." 
Dr. B. — " What would jow look like if you were turned 
upside down?" 

Scene — Eaton's store; Miss Kelley, '12, standing before a 
counter. 

Clerk — " Well, my little girl, what can I do for you?" 

K. O— b— r— e, '08 (on ice)—'' Say, I fell down so quickly 
I went right out from under my hat." 

Junior — " What is that noise that I hear upstairs?" 
William — '' Oh, the ^vomen are having a prayer-meeting 

upstairs, and it's the noise of their prayers going through the 

shingles." 



516 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

R — b — ^n — on, '11 (speaking of the recent greeting between 
King Edward and the German Emperor) — "Huh! Wouldn't 
I like to root my nose around in King Teddy's old whiskers !" 

Dougan, '08 (at Prof. Mayor's post-graduate class) — 
The Professor, bemoaning the tremendous dearth of mental 
activity in America, suddenly gave vent to his spleen on 
Dougan. " In reference to the French Kevolution," he said, 
^' have you read Payson ?" 

" :n'o." 

'' Have you read' Balzac ?" 

" No, sir." 

" My ! my ! Every schoolboy in Europe would have read 
those books. It's terrible ! it's awful ! it's tragic ! it would 
almost make one weep !" 

Overcome with an inward craving to partake of the good 
things that the Seniors had prepared for their own party in 
the college, four daring spirits of the Freshman year attempted 
to break through the line of defence which was vigilantly guard- 
ing the precious dainties. Failing in this first attack, the 
baffled Freshmen, like the Dog in the Manger, unable them- 
selves to secure the edibles, attempted to keep the Seniors from 
enjoying their feast by injecting into the room a very strong 
spray of carbon Bi-sulphide. Though this attempt failed in its 
purpose it sufficed to arouse the ire of the Seniors, and at once a 
dreadful form of punishment was decided upon. Having 
seized upon the unsuspecting culprits the next morning, the 
Seniors, believing that to " spare the rod is to spoil the child," 
vigorously applied the shingle to pleading victims, after which 
the tears of the Freshmen were washed away by a deluge of 
water from the tap. " The way of the transgressor is hard." 

Spike (after the scrap) — " McLaren had a good average 
on his legs. Fat was on one and I was on the other." 

" Come to the greatest concert Weston ever had," was the 
moderate exhortation that caused window curtains to retreat 
rapidly, doors to open quickly, inquiring individuals to appear 
from numerous doorways, and the electric lights to shine with 
increased brilliancy in the streets' of Weston on the evening 
of February 16th. Those who hearkened and " rushed " the 
Methodist church found the elect class of Onety Xought in the 



LOCALS. 517 

chief seats, trained to the minute for the promised Sangerfest. 
Two hours earlier, to the goodly number of forty or more, they 
had left Queen's Park and the rest of Toronto behind them. 
However, " a feast of reason and a flow of soul " had shortened 
the road and robbed the persistent wind of its sting. 

The chairman, C. P. Brown, asked for a chorus by the class, 
and the concert was on. An able speech by the Honorary 
President, Dr. Graham, followed, but this was brought to an 
abrupt and tumultuous conclusion by applause given the appear- 
ance of the sexton's assistant, carrying an armful of neces- 
saries for the supper yet to come. Vocal solos, instrumental 
duets, readings of the noble thoughts of noble minds, consti- 
tuted a famous programme that was crowned by a superb ren- 
dering of the ^^Old Ontario Strand," the ^^ College yell" for 
the audience, and the serving of an abundant and delicious 
supper for the visiting artists. Leaving Weston as soon as 
supper was over, Toronto was reached at an early hour. 

Senior (at post graduate class in Prof. Mavor's study, while 
examining a Japanese clock, incidentally remarked) — " It's 
quite a novelty." 

^' ^o, indeed, it's not," replied the Professor; ^^ it's very 
ancient." 

Freshmen Tales — " All on a Sunday morning." 
Whiting and Allan went walking one day 

Across a toboggan slide. 
Alas! oh, alas! what a Freshman's way! 

They ne'er reached the other side. 
The descent was so quick, so unkind, 
It bereft them of something behind. 
Of what it bereft them they're backward to say, • 
But perhaps you'll find out if you try it some day." 

Bridgeman, '10 (at sleigh party) — " There is room for a 
couple more up here; Barlow is just after removing his feet." 

Jewitt, '10 — " Speak a little louder, we didn't hear that." 

Moore, '10—'' I haven't said it yet." 
Miss Dr — w, '09, (wondering how she could put in the 
afternoon) — ''Well, I think T shall write some letters; then 
it won't be long until it is time to go out on the rink, and in 
fhe meantime I can do a little studying." 



518 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Dr. Edgar (in a 4th year French class, observing Mr. 
H— n— g, '09, with his '09 cushion)— ^^ Well, Mr. H— n— g, 
are you doing a little fancy work?" 

Mr. II — n — g, '09 — " Oh, no! just getting some ready iV.r 
my sister to do.'^ 

Miss C — w — n, '11 — *' I am so glad the Senior reception 
was such a success, because it is so nice to think of '09 going 
out leaving a good taste in our mouths." 

Freshette — " I do hoj^e I can go through my college course 
starless !" 

Miss B — r— e, '09 — " Yes, and do try also to get through 
B.D.-less." 

Prof. DeWitt — '^ George Washington's motto was : Let us 
all hang together, or we will hang separately." 

Miss C — k, '09 (on her way to college one morning) — " If 
I only had a satchel and a piece of Vic. colors I would make a 
theolog too." 

Mr. VanW — k, '11 (after hearing the male quartette at 
Mendelssohn concert) — ^^ Gee! they are almost as good as our 
Glee Club." 

Miss C — 1 — k, '09 (upon being told who the poet was for 
the 1910 class) — '^ Well, he won't have any trouble getting feet 
for his poetry, that's certain." 

The final inter-year debate took place Wednesday, February 
10th, between '09 and '11. The subject of the debate was, 
'' Resolved, That the present British administration in India 
is the best calculated to further India's own interests." Miss 
Lulu •Collver, '11, and Miss Elva Lochlin, '11, upheld the 
affirmative, while Miss Alice Chubb, '09, and Miss Margaret 
Phillips, '09, made a strong defence for the negative. The 
judge's decision, however, favored the affirmative. To 1911, 
who have won out for this year, we extend hearty congratu- 
lations. 

Saturday, February 20th, the '08 girls decided to have a 
reunion and to all enjoy hmcheon together at the St. Charles. 
As some of the party neared their destination, one young lady 
remarked : '^ Oh, girls, I am not sure where to go !" whereupon 



LOCALS. 519 

Miss B— i— d, 'OS, cheerfully called out: " Follow me; I have 
been here before; I know the way." Strange to say, she 
landed her followers in the bar-room. The girls are still wait- 
ing for Jean's explanation. 

^otes from the Prophecy: 

H. Butcher (as Signor Yolanski) — '' I am going to publish 
this book on MVhy a Man should Use Tobacco.' I've had 
ninety-nine reasons for a long time, and I've been racking my 
brains to make it an even hundred. I've just hit on it now. 
Best one of them all: The W.C.T.TJ. doesn't want a man to 
smoke." 

Judge Clement had a large tank built in the court and 
filled with w^ater, and when any witness became confused and 
muddled by a lawyer's cross-examination, Bill had them thrown 
into the tank, because he said he knew from- experience the 
best way for a man to locate himself when he did not know 
where he was is to fall into cold water. 

Walter Howlett has charge of the largest church in Prince 
Rupert. Walter got so tired seeing services of special interest 
to young men only, and nothing about young ladies, that he 
decided he wT)uld preach a few sermons especially to young 
Avomen, and noAv they have filled his church so that a man can't 
get a seat at 6.30. 

Fritz — '' Good-bye. Alley practice at 4.15. Got the 
world's championship here, and by Whimple, I'm a-tellin' of 
you, we can SAvat the ball some !" 

Peba Fleming — '' Much precious time is wasted in the Avay 
you travel about. Dear girls, if you expect the world to be 
evangelized in this generation you must have street-cars." 

'Note from History: 

^'Even at this first informal meeting, Avhere nobody knew 
anybody, and everybody introduced everybody to everybody 
else," there Avas displayed a strategic ability Avhich augured well 
for the future.'^ 

Prof. Misener (in IlebreAV Lecture) — " ' Her lips.' Mr. 
StcAvart, this is Avhere you Avent astray, and it's easy to under- 
stand Avhy you did." 



520 ACTA VICTORIAN A. 

At Lit. (ill discnissioii on the College Pin question) : 

Ar — p, '09 — ^' Sir, I protest against this measure. Should 

this carry, the ladies could have no other resource than to rush 

at once to arms." 

M — J — r, '09 — " Then, Mr. Speaker, I am strongly in 

favor of rushing this motion through." 

At Inter- Year Debate on the Suffragette Question, Miss 
Lukes, '10 — ^' When we get the franchise men^will no longer 
look up to women, they will just look at them." 

" It's not the hand that juggles the ballot-box that rules the 
world." 

el — 11 — s, B.D. (coming in from rink at 0.30) — '" This be- 
ing in love is hard on a man. I've been late for dinner every 
night for two weeks." 

Overheard at the hockey match — '^ I admire Mr. Je\\itt 
because he sometimes loses his temper." 

Doesn't Mr. Birnie fall down the nicest you ever saw ?" 

Miss B — r — ie, '09, (To all senior with whom she is pro- 
menading) — " If you do that again, I'll get a stepladder and 
slap you." 

The men of '09 were At-Home Tuesday night, February 23, 
to the ladies of the year, and an enjoyable evening was spent 
playing carpet balls, pit, crokinole, etc. A peanut race proved 
a \';ery unique attraction. - After the games were concluded a 
supper was held in the Common Roloms, ending on the stroke of 
midnight. 

'09 has again proved their invincibility in debate by winning 
the final debate of the inter-year series. The subject was, ^Tie- 
solved that the final court of appeal for Canada should be a 
Canadian court." The affirmative was taken by W. Green, '11, 
and G. C. Gifford, '11, while J. II. Arnup, '09, and his collea- 
gue, G. E. Gullen, '09, upheld the negative. The speeches on both 
sides were very interesting and it was only by a few points that 
the seniors succeeded in carrying off the laurels of victory. 

"Women haven't time for new duties : they are so hurried now 
that they plaster their tables with baker's trash instead of good 
homemade food." 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



521 



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Students' Headquarters 

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PHONE N. 3535 



NortKern Wardrobe 

See our special contracts for Students' Cleaning and Pressing and doing 
all minor repairs. Also a full line of Men's Furnishings. 

- Mr. R, 



Proprietor 



ADAMS 




We Want Your 
Order for One 

of our nobby School 
Suits in Tweed or 
Worsted, which we 
make to order for 

$18.00 and $20.00 

DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS 

Edwin T. Berkinshaw 

348 Yonge St., Toronto 

You call us ! We do the rest. 

Toronto Shoe Repairing Co. 

Shoe Repairing, Cleats, etc., called 
for and delivered promptly. 

8-10 Cumberland St., Toronto 

Phone N. 5466 SKATES GROUND 



Neivest Styles 
Lrargfe StocK 
of Ne-w Goods 



PHone 

NortH 

3371 



MACEY 



TAILOR 

777 YONGE, .STREET 
OAe blocK nortH of Bloor Street 

T. BRAKE 

Fine Boots and Shoes 

REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 

BOOTS MADE TO ORDER 

562 Yonge St., Toronto 



Cut Flowers 

Floral emblems of every description 
are most carefully executed by 




90 YONGE STREET 

Our Prices are Reasonable Our Execution Perfect 

Phones Main 1424 and 4790 
Night and Sunday. Phone Park 792 

The Name of 

PARK BROS. 

On your photograph is a guarantee of the beet 
workmanship; our FOUR DOLLAR cabinet if* 
without an equal. 



STUDIO: 328.i Yonge St. 



Phone Main 1269 



The L. S. Haynes Press 

Printers 
502 Yonge Street 



Phone North 3912 College Work a Specialty 

THE CANADIAN BANK OF 
COMMERCE 



Capital Paid-up, 



$10,000,000 



Savings Bank Deposits received from $1.00 up 

BLOOR & YONGE BRANCH 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



523 



CATERING 

For Banquets, Weddings, Parties, Social Teas, 

etc., a specialty. (First-class service 

guaranteed. Estimates given.) 

ROBT. J. LLOYD & Company 
744-748 Yonge Street Toronto 

Phones Noith 3036, North 127 



Ellis Bros. 

JEWELERS 

I08 Yonge Street, TORONTO 

Rock bottom prices for 
year and "frat" pins. 

Finest Workmanship 

Original Designs 



G. HAWLEY WALKER 

iTDevcbant XTailov 

126 YONGE STREET 
Phone Main 4544 TORONTO 

/IReii'6 3f»riH3bi!ici3 




5AMUEL YOUNG 

CARPENTER, BUILDER 
AND CONTRACTOR 

Cosmopolitan Carpenter Shop. 

Ai HAZELTON AVENUE, TORONTO 

Ordep.s I'roniptly Kxeontod 



J. W.Johnson 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 
272 Yonge St. - Phone : M. S6S 



Waterman's Ideal Fountain 
Pens, $2.50. 

WATCHES PROPERLY REPAIRED 

Phone, iVorth 242-243 

M. RAWLINSON 

Cartage Agent and Warehouseman 

Offices: 612 YONQE ST FEET 

FRONT ST., Four Doors East of Union Station 

Storage Warehouses : St. Joseph and Yonge Sts. 

Improved Vans and Trucks for Removing Furniture 

and Pianos, Storag'e for Furniture, Baggage transferred 

TOKOXTO, CANADA 

High class Tailoring at Close Cash Prices 

S. CORRIGAN 
The Leading Tailor 

175 Yonge Street 

Three Doors North of Queen 
Established 38 years 

Special quotations to all Students 



P 



ROGRAMMES, 
PROFESSIONAL and 
CALLING CARDS, 
MENU LISTS 
WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS 



PRINTED 'T'tI'X& 




William Briggs, 

Wesley Buildings, 
TORONTO. ONT. 



524 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 







SjILES mm WPNTED 

$36.00 pep ^Veek, op 400% 

PPOfit 

All samples, stationery and art 
catalogue FREE. We want one 
permanent agent in this locality 
for the Largest Picture and 
Frame House in" America. 
Experience unnecessary. We 
instruct you how to seU our goods 
and furnish the capital. If you 
want a permanent, honorable 
and profitable position, write us 
to-day for particulars, catalogue 
and samples. 

FRANK W. WILLIAVIS Co. 

1214 AV. Taylop Stpeet 

CHICAGO, IX.L. 


FOR CHOICE, PURE 

Confectionery 


Mother's Candy Kitchen 
732K YONGE ST. near czar st. 


Hall's Dining Hall 

606 YONGE STREET 

The Students' Restaurant 

Rates $2.25 per week 


Phone North 3296. 

David Bell, sTl*°Jr^t!^Ma^,^^ 

Choice Foreign and Domestic Fruits-!, 
Confectionery and Groceries. 








lalmuto Sintng l|aU 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 


Webb's ~-i 

pOR Wedding>j, Dinners, 
Receptions, large or 
small, simple or elaborate, 
there is no place like 
Webb's. CATALOGUE 
FREE 


We purpose making this 
the students* di.iing hall. 
We pride ourselves on 
cleanliness and good 
service. 


Separate tables for Iad:es. 

S. W. PAISLEY. Proprietor 
20 BALMUTO STREET. TORONTO 


447 ll)onac St., Toronto 




MILK AND CREAM 

GODD ENOUGH FOR BABIES 



Without a chemical analysis and bacteriological 
examination it is impossible to judge the quality of 
milk. Therefore buy I rom Dairies of proved integrity 
only. *' Beware of being offered too much for your 
money,— some things are too cheap in quality to be 
anything but dear in price." 

CITY DAIRY CO., Limited 

Phone College 2040 Spadina Crescent 



ACTA VICTORIANA 



525 



GEO. HARCOURT & SON 

CAPS 



COLLEGE GOWNS AND 
For Ladies and Men 



57 King Street West 



TORONTO 



SEE 
THE 
STAR 



mtmjOR 



IT 

LEADS 

TO 



1 1 umm GO 

HIGH-GRADE TAILORS 



COLLEGE 
GOWNS 



685 



YONGf 
STREET 



Phone: North 1419 



Phone North 904 



Richard G. Kirby 



Carpenter and 
Contractor for 
General Building 
and Jobbing 



537-539 Yonge St. 



XORONTO 



A. H. YOUNG 



FIXE PICTURES 

PICTUHE FHAMING 

REGILDIMG 



THE STUDENTS' DRUG STORE 

We were Students ourselves not so very long 
ago, and we know the kind of treatment they 
appreciate. 

If you are a Student, mention this advertise- 
ment to us and we will try and make you feel 
at home, and allow you a special Student's 
discount on all your purchases. 

We have a well assorted stock of all kinds of 
Perfumes, Toilet Articles, Creams, Lotions, 
Powders and Sundries of every description. 

Huyler's and other high-class Chocolates, 
Creams and Bon-Bons. Our Soda Fountain is 
going Winter and Summer, and we serve 
dainty dis les and bevetages in dainty fashion. 

Careful dispensing of prescriptions our 
specialty. 

W. J. A. & H. CARNAHAN, 

Traders Bank Bldg., Dispensing Chemists, 

Cor. Yonge & Bloor, Cor. Church & Carlton, 
Phone North 341 Phone M .in 2196 

.. 3^2 " " 2197 

Branch Tabard Inn Library. C.P.R. Tel. OfHce 



729 Yonjre Street, 



Toronto 



THE OUTCn STUDIO 

318 YONGE STREET 

Toronto - Canada 



Phone Main 7027 



EVERYTHING IN 

High-Grade Photography 

skilfully and promptly executed 

NONE BUT THE MOST SKILFUL 
WORKMEN EMPLOYED 

Special Rates to Students 
G. B. C. van der EEEN, 

Proprietor 



526 ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Uictoria College 



QUEEN'S PARK, TORONTO. 



In Federation with the University of Toronto. 



The Federation System enables Victoria to offer the fol- 
lowing advantages : 

1. A compact college life in a commodious and beautiful 
modern building, provided with all the latest conveniences 
for healthful work. 

2. A large staff of College Professors, composed of men 
with thorough European training and ripe experience as 
teachers, and of earnest Christian character. 

3. Admission to all the lectures and laboratories of the 
University Staff of eighty-eight professors and lecturers, who, 
together with the fifty-eight professors and lecturers of the 
federated colleges, constitute the largest faculty of Arts in 
the Dominion, and one of the most efficient on the Continent. 
All University examinations, prizes, scholarships, honors and 
degrees are open to our students on equal terms with those 
of any other college. A large number of prizes, honors and 
scholarships are also offered to our students in our own 
College. 

4. Two commodious residences for women students afford 
every modern advantage for health and comfort and a refined 
social life. A course of physical training is also given under 
an accomplished directress and a women's gymnasium forms 
part of the new residences. 

5. Excellent facilities"are afforded both in the University 
and College for post-graduates reading for the degree of 
Ph.D., and also a full course in the Faculty of Theology. 

Lectures in both faculties begin October 1st. 

N. BURMrASH, S.T.D., I.L.D.. 

Presiaent. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



527 




QliTllDIQ AND ONTARIO CONSERVATORY OF 
I MUSIC AND ART, WHITBY, ONT. 

L A U I CO Ideal home lif ein a. beautiful castle, 

COLLEGE modelled after one of the palatial 
homes of English aristocracy. 
The latest and best equipment in every department, 
backed up bj' the largest and strongest staff of special- 
ists to be found in any similar college "in Canada. 
Sufficiently near the city to enjoy its advantages in 
concerts, etc., and yet away from its distractions, in an 
atmosphere and environment most conducive to men- 
tal fhioral and physical stam,ina. Send for new illus- 
trated calendar to 
REV. J. J. HARE, Ph.D., Principal. 



Alma College 

Rev. Robert I. Warner, M.A., D.D., Principal 
Mrs. Jean Wylic Grey, - Lady-Principal 
Miss Alice F. Henwood, B.A., Acting Dean 



SENIOR SCHOOL makes efficient provision for studies for 
University Matriculation, University Curricula in Music, 
Teachers' Non-Professional Examinations, and for Alma 
College Diplomas in Liberal Arts ( M.L. A. and M.E.L.) ; 
Music (A. A. CM. for Pianoforte, Singing, Organ, Vio- 
lin ) ; Fine Art ; Elocution and Physical Culture ; Com- 
mercial Science ; Domestic Science. 

JUNIOR SCHOOL provides attractive school home, in 
separate apartments, for girls under thirteen, and aUo 
prepares pupils for the High School entrance examinations. 
HEALTHY LOCALITY, Six Acre Campus. Superior 
Buildings, Competent Teachers, Successful Record. 
For Catalogue, address 

PRINCIPAL WARNER. 

Afma College, ST. THOMAS, ONT. 



Upper Canada College, Toronto 

H. W. AUDEN, M.A. (Cambridge), Principal. 

Regular Staff comprises 15 Graduates of English and Canadian Universities, with additional 
special instructors. Courses for University, Royal Military College and Business. Senior and 
Preparatory Schools in separate buildings. Every modern equipment. Fifty acres of ground 
in healthiest district. Four rinks, gymnasium, swimming bath, etc. 



THE LEADING 

ff^reecrtptiou pbarmac? 

OF THE NORTH END 

Discount to Sttcdents. Accuracy, Purity 
of ingredients, prompt delivery. 

WM. H. COX, 786 Yonge St., Toronto 



The Dining Hall 

556 YONGE STREET 



PHONE: 
North 4772. 



T. J. HEALEY, 

Proprietor. 



W.C. SENIOR 
&BRO. 

Tailors 

and 

Gown Makers 

717 
Yongc St. 
Toronto 



Our shop is 
up-to-date and 
we use you right 



Razors Honed 



T, A. FELSTEAD 

4 CHAIR BARBER SHOP 4 
760 YONGE STREET 



Electric 

Face Massage 

Head Rub 



Shoe Shine 



528 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



the Univ^^^ity of Coromo 

ana 

(litivmity College 



FACULTIES OF ... 



Arts 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Household Science 

Education 

Forestry 



Ji* 



For information, apply to the Registrar of the University, 
or to the Secretaries of the respective Faculties. 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



529 



ESTABLISHED l873 

The Most Convenient Bank for Victoria College 

THE STANDARD BANK OF CANADA 

At Yonge and Charles Streets 

Cheques on any Bank E. L. WILLIAMS, 

may be cashed here. Manager. 





•^•O*^ PHONE NORTH 698 

Dr. S. L. Frawley 

DENTIST 

Graduate of Toronto '>< T>i Cj. TY7 x 
and Philadelphia 21 JDlOOf M. WCSt 


Dr. J. Frank Adams 

DENtlST 

Telephone College 243 
325 College Street. TORONTO 






DR. FRED. N. BADGLEY 

110 AVENUE ROAD 
{Opposite St. Paul's Church) TORONTO 

Phone North 3514 


Phone North 354 Contract work a Specialty 

r. OLVER, 

TAII.OR, 

707 Yonge Street. Toronto 

Ladies' and Gents* Clothing Cleaned, 
Pressed, Altered, and Repaired 




...BURN... 

McGiirs Coal 

G>f. Bathufst St. and Farley Ave. 
Phone Park 393. 


ALFRKo W. Brioos. Harold R. Frost. 

BRIGGS & FROST 

BARRISTERS. ETC. 

TORONTO 

Wesley Buildings, 33 Richmond St. West 
Toronto 










MASTEN, STARR & SPENCE 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Canada Life BuiLoma 

Toronto 

SOLICITORS for BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA 

C. A. Hasten, K.C, J. R. L. Starr 
J. H. Spence! 


GEO, A, EVANS, Phm.B. 

DISPENSING CHEMIST 

832 Yonge St. Toronto 

Liberal Discount to Students 

Telephones North 38 and North 3720. 
Telephone Orders a Specialty 




E. B. Ryckman, M.A., LL.B. K.C. 

Chas. W. Kerr, B.A. C. S. Maclnnes, B.A., K,C. 

Christopher C. Robinson, B.A. 

RYCKMAN, KERR & MacINNES 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, etc. 
Canada Life Building, 48 King St. West, Toronto- 
Cobalt : 
RYCKMAN KERR, MacINNES & MAHON 


DYEING & CLEANING 
FOR MEN €i WOMEN 

We completely meet the needs of men and 
women in dyeing and cleaning articles of per- 
sonal wear. Phone head office or any branch. 

R. PAR^KER (Sb CO. 

787-791 Yonge Street Toronto, Canada 
Branches in aU Leading Shopping Centres 



530 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Watch 

Repairing: 



Wedding: 
Requisites 



Presentation 
Sug:g:estions 



STOCK & BICKLE | 




JEWELERS 


131 


YONGE STREET 


(OPP. 


TEMPERANCE STREEt) 



CHAS. POTTER 

85 YoAge St. 

C. B. PETRY, Proprietor 

Guard Well 
Your Eyes 

Line upon line is necessary when con- 
sulting one's eyesight. 

Do not let trouble go unheeded. 

Consult the trained optician promptly 
—and consult only the optician who is 
an expert. 

This is your safety in coming here— 
a house whose record for reliable work 
is established. 

-Correct eye-testing-. 
— Coppect glasses. 

POTTER (OPTICIAN) TORONTO 



MONEY TO BE MADE 

The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company is 
offering good positions in connection with field 
work to students who wish employment during 
the months of vacation. 

The reputed strength and enterprise of this 
Company, together with the main feature of its 
business, — Special Terms and Rates to Total 
Abstainers — give our salesmen great advantages 
over those of other Companies. 

There is certainly money in store for the man 
who is willing to follow this work for a summer. 

All particulars may be had at 

Hfe Manufacturers Life Ins. Co. 



MELINDA STREET 



TORONTO 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



531 



<4^^I%> 




THE SIMPSON 

SHOE 

FOR MEN 

$4.00 A PAIR 



Here is a shoe at a popular price, which by 
rights, classes up with the $5.00 and $6.00 Shoes. 

We own it and control it. No other store sells 
Victor Shoes. It's our own brand. 

No middle-men. 

No commercial travellers. 

No expensive round-about retailing. 

We sell it with only one profit added to the 
cost of its making. 

That's why you can get a good stylish, manly, 
up-to-date boot for $4.00 if you buy the Victor. 

All popular styles, widths and prices. 



$4.00 A PAI R 



THE 
ROBERT 



SIMPSON 

TORONTO 



COMPANY 
LIMITED 



532 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



C. A. DEERvS 

MERCHANT TAILOR 



13 Mannini^ A.rca<le Annex 
24 Kintf St. "W. Tel. M. 6886 



Style and Quality 

Equal to the Best 

(^ ^ 

Let me be your Tailor 



Imperial Bank of Canada 

Head Office, Toronto 

Capital Authorized, $ J 0,000,000 Capital Paid Up, $5,000,000 

Rest Account, $5,000,000 

D. R. WILKIE, Pres. and Gen. Manager. E. HAY, Assistant General Manager. 

ROBT. JAFFRAY, Vice-President. W. MOFFAT, Chief Inspector. 

Savings Bank Department— Interest at current rates allowed on 
deposits of $ I. GO upwards from date of opening account, and interest 
credited four times a year. 

Letters of Credit and Drafts issued, available in all parts of the 
world. ^ General Banking Btisiness Conducted. 

YONGE AND BLCX)R STREET BRANCH 

C. H. Stanley Clarke, Manager 



THE 

FREELAND 
STUDIO 

Finest of facilities for 

GROUP WORK 



Special Prices to Students 



436 YONGE STREET 

Opposite Cart.ton Street 
'Phone M. 6887 



The next time you 
need a suit consult 
us and prove thefact 
that it is not neces- 
sary to pay extrava- 
gant prices in order 
to be well dressed. 
Our clothes give 
evidence of good 
tailoring :: :: :: 



JOS. J. FOLLETT 

Ordered Tailoring 
161 YONGE STREET 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



533 



Victoria College Rink, charles west 

AREA, 05,000 FEET 

We provide a large general Skating Rink 
and three Hockey Rinks. 



The best society in 
the city patronize our 
skating rink. 



Many of the fastest 
hockey teams in the 
City leagues practice 
and play their games 
here. 



Band on Friday nights and 
Saturday afternoon-'. 

SEASON TICKETS: 
Gentleman's - $2.00 
Ladies' - - 1.75 



J. J. PEARSON. 

Sec.-Treas. 



Address : 

Victoria College 

PHone N. 3578 



H, L. Morrison, 

President 



DO YOU KNOW 

that without financial support from outside sources we could 
not print two numbers of Acta ? The other six are printed 
by means of the generous support of our advertisers. Of 
course, they advertise to get the student trade, but do they 
get it, and do you let them know they get it ? Our 
advertisers can supply all students' needs, and often give you 
a handsome discount. It is a fair and square business pro- 
position. In all justice you must return their patronage, and 
don't forget to 

Mention "ACTA" 



x'S^'iXVXS^V.'^*" 



534 ACTA VICTORIANA, 



RPA'C STORE 
^^^^-^^ ^ FOR WOMEN 

THE NEW STYLES 

This store has clearly demonstrated its 
unique fitness to supply the dress require- 
ments of the ladies in a better way than it 
was ever done before in Toronto. 

Now we're supremely ready with all the 
new things for Spring. 

And while Fashion's every mandate, to 
the last one, has been implicitly obeyed, 
you're always sure of the exclusiveness that 
precludes the possibility of your coming 
across garments exactly like yours else- 
where. 

Then again quality of workmanship, 
surely evidenced in all our creations, adds 
to the assurance of satisfaction, while the 
store's manufacturing organization enables 
us to save you all go-between profits, thus 
promising you value unique. 

The New Millinery New Evening Gowns 

New Suits New Jackets 

New Waists New Neckwear 

New Dresses New Veilings 

The whole an aggregation of dress excellence 
entitled to your earnest consideration. 

A. E. REA & CO., Limited 

168 Yonge Street, Toronto 




J 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



535 



ANNUAL SALE 
TRUNKS, BAGS, SUIT CASES 

This is the month for real snap«! in traA'elling goods. Students 
will find it decidedly to their advantage to purchase for future 
need during this Sale. 

EAST& CO., Limited, 300 Yonge Street 




WARDROBE 

where good work is 
done in Cleaning, 
Pressing and Repairing 
at reasonable prices. 



PORD'S 

742 YONGE STREET 
PHONE NORTH 4604 



HIGH CLASS 
fURNISHINGS 

Hats and Caps, Boots 
and Shoes. Agents in 
Ontario for Stanfield's 
Unshrinkable Under- 



YOUR TRADE WILL BE APPRECIATED 



AVERY'S DRUG STORE 

Yonge and St. Mary Sis., TORONTO 

Pure Drugs, Economical Prices 
Special prices to students 



Phone N. 1747 



Goods delivered promptly 



foc'TTY PRINTING • 

Programmes, Booklets, Invitations, Reports. 

The Armac Press 

Phone Main 2716 

1 70- 1 76 Victoria St.. TORONTO 



EDUCATION DE:PARTME.NT CALENDAR 

FOR 1Q09 (in part) 

20. First meeting of Public School Boards in 

cities, towns and incorporated villages. 
26. Appointment of High School Trustees by 

County Councils. 
February : 
3. First meeting of High School Boards and 
Boards of Education. 
March : 



January : 
1. New Year's Day (Friday). 

By-laws for establishing and withdrawal of 
union of municipalities for High School 
purposes t j take effect. 

4. Provincial Normal Schools open (Second 
Term). 

Clerks of Municipalities to be notified by 
Separate School supporters of their with- 
drawal. 

High, Public and Separate Schools open. 

5. Truant Officers' reports to Department,due. 

6. First m eting of rural School Trustees. 
Polling diy for trustees in Public and 
Separate Schools. 

7. Principals of High Schools and Collegiate 
Institutes to forward list of teach -rs, etc. 

11. Appointment of High School Trustees by 
Municipal Councils. 

Annual Reports of Boards in cities and 
towns, to Department, due. 
Names and addresses of Public School 
Trustees and Teachers to be sent to "Town- 
ship Clerks and Inspectors. 
Trustees'Annual Reports toInspectors,due. 
Annual Reports of Kindergarten attend- 
ance to Department, due. 
Annual Reports of Separate Schools, to 
Department, due. 

Application for Legislative apportionment 
for inspection of Public Schools in cities 
and towns separated from the county, to 
Department, due. 



14. 



15. 



Annual Reports, to Depart- 



1. Inspectors' 
ment, due. 

Annual Reports from High School Boards, 
to Department, due. 
(This includes the Financial Statement.) 
Financial Statement of Teachers' Associa- 
tions, to Department, due. 
Separate School Supporters to notify Muni- 
cipal Clerks, 
31. Night Schools close (Session 1908-9). 
April : 

1. Returi s by Clerks of counties, cities, etc., 
of population, to Department, due. 

8. High Schools, second term, and Public 
and Separate Schools close. 

9. Good Friday. 

12. Easter Monday. 

13. Annual Meeting of the Ontario Educa- 
tional Association at Toronto. 

15. Reports on Night Schools, due (Session 

1908-9). 
19. High Schools (Third Term), and Public 

and Separate Schools open after Easter 

Holidays, 



EXAMINATION PAPERS of the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT of ONTARIO 
cjLTi be ordered through Ioc3lI booksellers, or address orders direct to 

THe CARSMTELC CO., Limited 
30 Adelaiae St. Bast TORONTO 



536 ACTA VICTORIANA. 




W. M. PERCY 

Optician 

705 YONGE STREET 

(Late of Chas. Potter's) 

Phone N. 2824. 



Oculists' Prescriptions filled 
promptly and accurately. 

Lens Grinding and Spectacle Repairing done on 
the premises. Discount^to Students. 

Kodaks, Films and Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amateurs. 

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens, Magnifiers, Readers, etc. 

High Class Stationery. 







1 




STOLLERY 






Men's Furnishings 






and Fine Hats : : 






772 YONGE STREET 






Kindlx Mention " Actit *' wKen PurcHasin^ 








^^^^ 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 537 

CONTENTS. 

Literary — page 

A Summons - - W. A. Deacon, '11 539 

The Social Tasks That Are Not Yet Done - - Herbert N. Casson 541 

Resignation Alice B. Chubb 546 

The Taming of the Shrew - - - - W. S. Harrington, B.A., K.C. 547 

Life W. A. D., 552 

*' Be Still and Know That I Am God " C. W. S. 553 

The Flesh-Pots of Egypt B. Mabel Dunham, '08 554 

A Poem on the May Examinations - - - - E. J. Pratt, '11 561 

Editorial — 

Interesting Elections 565 

Defeats and Excuses 566 

Acta Board, 1909 10 .567 

Scientific — 

A Clock of Many Accomplishments - 568 

Missionary and Religious — 

Peace with Progress - 573 

Notes 575 

Personals and Exchanges — 

Graduate Sketches II. - - 577 

Personals - 578 

Exchanges - 579 

Athletics — 

Athletic Union Annual Meeting - 583 

Notes — Mainly Elections - 588 

V. C. A. C. Elections .......... 589 

Locals — 

Notes - 590 



A FEW CHOICE BOOKS 

The Christian Minister and His Duties — 

Containing Chapters on "The Modern Minister," 
"The Minister as Preacher," "The Minister as 
Pastor," etc. By J. OSWALD DYKES, M.A $1,80 

The Resurrection of Jesus — 

By JAS. ORR, M.A $1.50 

The Christian Method of Ethics — 

By REV. HENRY W. CLARK, author of " Philosophy 

of Christian Experience " NET $1,25 

Gospel of St. Matthew — 

In Westminster New Testament Series. By DAVID 
SMITH. M.A NET $ .70 

The Upper Canada Tract Society 

(James M. Robertson, Depositary) 102 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ont. 



538 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 




^> 



Men's 
Spring Shoes 

It will be well worth the journey for any man to 
come to see our Spring Shoes. 

We've the best of Shoes — the sort of Shoes that 
have made our Shoe business so successful. 

Moderate priced Shoes at $2.00, $2.50 or $3.00, 
or Shoe luxury at $4.00, $4.50 or $5.00. We are 
showing — 

The Best Shoes Made 

We buy our Men's Shoes from makers who have 
a reputation for making the best of Men's Shoes. 
We never offer our trade uncertain Shoes — or Shoes 
we cannot guarantee. 

The Man who has bought shoes here will be sure 
to come again. 

The Man who has never bought Shoes here can 
learn something about Shoes if he will only step in 
"just for a look." 



J. Brotherton 

THE HOME OF GOOD SHOES 

Phone N. 2092. 550 Yonge St. 



ACTA VICTORIANA 




Published monthly during- the Colleg-e year by the Union 
Literapy Society of Victoria University, Toronto 



VOL. XXXII. 



TORONTO, APRIL, 1909. 



No. 7. 



A Summons 

W. A. DEACON, *11 



JPURPLE the mountains stand, 
•* Untrod and free; 
Long yellow strips of sand. 
Beckon to me. 



Trees that in winters past 

Ragged and hoar. 
Conquered the stormy blast. 

Call me once more. 

Lakes that my paddle know. 

Quiet and still ; 
Waterfalls' foaming flow 

Plead with my will. 

Rocks that for ages long 

Marvelled by men, 
Join in the common song — 

''Dwell here again." 



540 ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Dark forest paths there are 

Silent and wild. 
That in their depths afar 

I am a child. 

Islands rise from the blue, 

Covered with green. 
To such an one as you 

What does that mean ? 

So fires my weary heart, 

Loaded with care. 
This cruel, burning dart, 

''Oh to be there! " 

Oh, South Wind, bear my word. 

Back to the North- 
Swift as migrating bird 

Will I go forth. 

There in some rocky glen 

Shall be my home; 
Ne'er in the haunts of men 

More will I roam. 

Farewell old friends and true. 
Must I depart. 

And my old life renew- 
Now for the start ! 




SOCIAL TASKS THAT ARE NOT YET DONE. 541 
The Social Tasks That Are Not Yet Done 

HERBERT N. CASSON.^ 

I^NTCE the earliest days of human history, there 
K . has never been a time when there were so many 
great things to do, or when there was such need 
of heroism and intelligence, dedicated to the 
service of humanity, as now, in these basic 
years of the twentieth century. 

These are tlie marvellous days, of which we may well say, 
in the language of Wordsworth, " 'Tis bliss to be alive, and 
glorious to be young." And none of the young men who are 
soon to step from the life of the college into the life of the 
business Avorld, can have any reason to regret that they were 
born too late, or that there remain no great, heroic tasks to be 
accomplished. 

The nineteenth century, inventive and productive as it was, 
was only the first act in the drama of modern progress. It 
was preparatory. It was the clearing away of obstacles. It 
was the building of a foundation upon which the towering 
superstructure is to rest. It was not the accomplishment of 
the real vital work for which this little planet of ours exists, 
but merely the making ready to do that work. ^' Others have 
labored, and we have entered into their labors.'^ 

The nineteenth century gave us the railroad and steamboat, 
by mean< of v.'hich a man can now go from Toronto to Jeru- 
salem, if he wishes, for forty dollars. It gave us the self- 
binder, which has cut down the cost of wheat from three hours 
of a man's labor to ten minutes; the Hoe press, that can whirl 
out a hundred thousand eight-page ])apers in an hour ; the 
Bessemer converter, that gives us steel for less than a cent a 
pound ; the telegraph and telephone and cable, and sewing- 



*Mr. Casson attended Victoria College durini? the years 1889-90-91, 
being a contemporary of George H. Locke, now lil)rarian of the Toronto 
library. He is a recognized authority on So( ialisni and Sociological subjects, 
having written half a dozen books and a number of magazine articles on 
these topics in recent years. 



542 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

machine, and all the innumerable devices for the saving of 
time and labor. 

But, when you come to think of it, the nineteenth century 
has given us very little but THINGS. AYhether these 
THINGS are to be a help to the human race, or not, depends 
upon the use that is made of them. And the tragic struggle 
of to-day is the conflict between Man himself and the THINGS 
that he has made. 

The main purpose of life to-day is just what it was in the 
days of the stage-coach, and. tallow candle and tinder-box. It 
is the making of higher, nobler and kindlier men and women. 
It is the development of character. And all else, no matter 
how grand and glittering, is no more than scaffolding. 

Consequently, the supreme Task of the twentieth century, 
to speak of it in a comprehensive way, is to conquer, in the 
name of humanity, all the THINGS — all the science and in- 
vention and discovery, and to make the new powers and agen- 
cies work together for the good of all mankind. 

Perhaps the most urgent task that awaits the young men 
and w^omen of our time, is, to he more specific, THE 
ESTABLISHING OE A TEMPLE OF PEACE, in 
which a World Parliament shall convene. There is now 
a building at The Hague which has been erected by 
Mr. Carnegie for this purpose, but as yet there has been 
formed no permanent Parliament, nor even an efficient 
Committee of Arbitration. What with the monstrous guns 
that can hurl a projectile twenty miles in advance of an 
army, what with the floating forts of steel and deadly sub- 
marines, war has now become an imthinkable horror. Also, 
now that commerce has rendered all nations dependent upon 
each other, there can be no war in any part of the world that 
does not bring disaster, more or less, to the saner and more 
self-restrained nations that have remained at peace. Whether 
we consider it from the point of view of mind or morals or 
money, it is evident that war, like duelling and slavery, must 
be abolished. 

The second great task that must be done is to effect A CO- 
PAETNEKSHIP BETWEEN LABOE AND CAPITAL. 
The enlightened common sense of civilized nations is demand- 



SOCIAL TASKS THAT ARE NOT YET DONE. 543 

ing that there shall come an end to industrial warfare. We 
have become too humane for the strike and the lockout and the 
boycott and the blacklist, and our social system has become too 
finely organized to permit these insurrections on the part of 
labor and these arbitrary edicts on the part of capital. How- 
ever we arrange it, there must come some sort of tribunal that 




HERBERT K. CASSON". 

both labor and capital will trust. Or failing this, there must 
come some new method of organization, under which both the 
laborer and the capitalist shall work harmoniously as the hired 
servants of the whole nation. The welfare of us all is of far 
more importance than either the trade union or the trust, and 
both must be taught to keep their places and to agree. 



544 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The third task, and which ai)parently will be the firsi one 
to be accomplished, is the PKEVENTION OF DHUXKEN- 
NESS. The liquors that intoxicate must be put hioii up on 
the poison shelf, where they have always belonged. Whether 
alcohol is a food or not, is no matter. The lack of alcohol will 
starve nobody, and the use of alcohol is now starving a great 
many people. To-day nobody believes, and nobody dare de- 
clare upon any public platform, that drunkenness exalteth a 
nation. And it is also true that the work which the coming 
generation is about to do is so difficult and so perplexing that 
none but sober men and women dare attempt it. 

The fourth task is to ELIMIA^ATE GAMBLING. This 
Avork, too, is well under way. We have abolished lotteries in 
both Canada and the United States. We have wiped out race- 
track gambling to a very large extent. We have even made it 
a crime to keep a bucket-shop or to be found in one. But as 
yet we stand baffled and helpless in the presence of the larger 
gambling of the wheat pit and the stock exchange. "No one up 
to the present time has been able to frame a law that would 
permit the lawful speculation of the pioneering capitalist, but 
prohibit the demoralizing speculation of the Wall Street 
gambler. This is a work that calls for all the wisdom of both 
moral teachers and financiers — to draw a straight-edge for the 
business man, so that he may clearly see the point at which 
business ends and gambling begins. 

The fifth task is to establish SEX EQUALITY. This 
does not mean that women are to become blacksmiths and 
motormen. It does not mean that they are to escape the respon- 
sibilities that wives and mothers ought to bear. But it does 
mean that when they do the same work as men, they shall re- 
ceive the same payment; that they shall have a right to help 
make the laws that they are compelled to obey; and that the 
work of making a home shall be better appreciated and better 
rewarded. The human race is now, and always will be, half 
men and half women. Women have carried their half of the 
burdens. They have dared their half of the dangers. They 
have done their half of the thinking and the suffering. And 
there is no good reason why they should not have one-half of 
the influence. 



SOCIAL TASKS THAT ARE NOT YET DONE. 545 

The sixth task is to ABOLISH DISEASE. We must find 
a cure for cancer, for tuberculosis, and for pneumonia. How 
far we can go in this direction, no one knows. So much has 
already been done in the prevention of smallpox, cholera, 
fevers and malaria, that we have reason to hope for the aboli- 
tion of other diseases which are now regarded as inevitable. 
We do believe to-day in the right to health. We believe that 
whatever endangers health is socially wrong, no matter how 
popular it may be, nor how profitable. And we need in the 
coming century to establish this as a basic principle — that the 
first duty of life is to live, to live the fullest life, in body and 
brain, in length of years and completeness of character. 

The seventh task, which calls for a larger wisdom than that 
of Blackstone or Justinian, is the SIMPLIFICATI0:N' OF 
THE LAW. The master lawyer, whoever he may be, who 
will distill the essence of justice from the vast accumulation, 
of law, who will separate the essential from the non-essential, 
will be one of the most useful men of the coming age. ^N^ow 
that the nations of the world have become so highly organized 
and so interdepenedent, there have come higher standards of 
right conduct and wider views of social obligation. From this 
loftier standpoint, therefore, we must survey the basic prin- 
ciples of the law, and prevent the justice of to-day from being 
thwarted by what was once the justice of past centuries. 

These seven tasks are not the only ones that remain undone. 
But they will serve as instances to show the sort of social 
work which, in my opinion, will call for as much heroism and 
fortitude as any of the great tasks of the past. And the young 
man who is about to take up the responsibilities of a career, 
whether he be minister or layman, will do well to connect him- 
self with one or more of these new world-movements, whose 
aim is to produce a nobler and wiser human race. 



546 ACTA VICTORIANA. 



Resignation 

ALICE B. CHUBB, '09 

IkJfAJESTIC night had laid the earth to rest, 
I VM Prom out the far blue mystic depths of heaven 
The stars looked forth in dazzling beauty drest 
Like heavenly beacons unto mortals given. 

The pain of loneliness was in my heart. 
And as I gazed a wild desire possessed 

My soul, to rend that beauteous veil apart. 
To see that far-off land of spirit blest, 

A kind of frenzy seized my soul with might, 
And to my raptured mortal sight it seemed 

The starry curtain opened, and a light. 
Shone forth more fair than ever sunshine gleamed 

And in the glory of that radiance wide, 
The form appeared of one long lost to me. 

With out-stretched hands and passionate voice, I cried, 
" Oh, take me, take me up in heaven with thee/* 

I spoke, and lo ! again I saw above 

Only the sky of midnight, calm and clear. 

But from the silence came in tones of love, 

A voice that said, "My child, thy work is here," 



THE TAMING OF THE SHREW. 547 

The Taming of the Shrew 



IN passing judgment upon Petruchio, his love-making and his 
ingenious and rather ludicrous treatment of his wife, we 
must not overlook the induction to the play. Some critics 
have gone so far as to characterize this play as an extravagant 
farce. While in some respects it may appear unworthy to be 
styled "a pleasant comedy," yet it is well calculated to " frame 
your mind to mirth and merriment." If we were to measure it 
by the standard of the auditor for whose especial benefit it is 
supposed, according to the induction, to have been represented, it 
is indeed "a very excellent piece of work." We do not, how- 
ever, deena it necessary to reduce ourselves to the level of Chris- 
topher Sly in order to find some merit in " The Taming of the 
Shrew." Petruchio might not prove a successful wooer in the 
present age, but he was not quite so inconsistent as he appears 
at first sight, if we are to accept the other characters in the play 
as showing an indication of the prevailing method of seeking a 
wife in those days. Baptista seems to have but one standard 
for a husband for the fair Bianca. He auctions her off to the 

highest bidder. 

" He of both 
That can assure my daughter greatest dower 
Shall have Bianca's love." 

If we are disposed then to examine seriously the motives that 
prompted Petruchio to seek a wife in Padua, we must not be 
surprised to hear him declare that wealth is the burden of his 
wooing dance. We are not, however, to take these characters 
too seriously or seek to measure the methods of match-making 
in N^orthem Italy by what we witness in this play. The maids 
of that district have been immortalized by Juliet, Desdemona 
and Portia, and the swains will never suffer in reputation so 
long as Romeo and Bassanio are remembered. 

Shakespeare never intended that we should moralize with 
much nicety upon the ethics of this play. If the touches of 
humor and the flashes of wit give us pleasure, his chief object is 
attained. 
2 



548 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Petrucliij frankly confesses that he came 

" to wive it wealthily in Padua, 
And if wealthily, then happ ly in Padua." 

Before meeting Katherina, he was informed that she was 
shrewd and ill-favored, but rich, very rich. Although his 
friend told him he " would not Aved her for a mine of gold," 
Petruchio is quite content to take his chances with her scold- 
ing tongue. That appears to be his forte, for Grumio, who ought 
to know him well, has no fears of her outdoing him in this 
respect, for he says : '' An she knew him as well as I do, she 
would think scolding would do little good upon him. She may, 
perhaps, call him a half score knaves or so, why, that's nothing ; 
and he begin once he'll nail in his ropetricks." This is not a 
very good character for a servant to give his master, yet Ave must 
discount Grumio's account for his ear was still smarting from 
the wringing it received at the gate. Petruchio was not a surly 
clown, nor Avas he 

" a frantic fool 
Hiding his bitter jest in blunt behaviour." 

Tranio better describes him : 

" Though he be blunt, 1 know him passing wise ; 
Though he be merry, yet withal he's honest." 

" 'Tis some odd humor pricks him to this fashion." 

He set about to accomplish his end in his OAvn peculiar way. He 
concluded to play a part, feeling quite certain that he could OA^er- 
come the shrcAvish nature of Katherina. He Avas not so ill- 
lompered and impulsiA^e as his acts AA^ould indicate. It is quite 
clear that his strange and apparent 'rash and rude behaviour 
Avas not the sudden impulse of the moment, but Avas studied out 
beforehand. 

AVe leam this from the soliloquy in the first scene of Act 
lY., Avhere he carefully maps out his programme and concludes 
Avith: "And thus I'll curb her mad and headstrong humor." 
Was ever Avoman wooed as Katherina? Petruchio Avastes no 
time in formal introductions, but at the first sight of her he 
begins in his brusque manner Avith: "Good-morix)Av, Kate, for 
that's your name I hear." This is folloAved by a Avitty duel in 



THE TAMING OF THE SHREW. 549 

which each contestant scores the other rather roughly. Katherina 
is not content to use her tongue alone, but emphasizes her re- 
marks by boxing his ears. This, however, does not disconcert 
him. By his witty retorts, scolding and extravagant flattery, 
he persists in his amorous attentions, and although when her 
father appears she rebukes him for wishing her wed to '' a half 
lunatic, a madcap ruffian and a swearing Jack," Petruchio ex- 
tends to him the filial greeting and announces the wedding for 
the following Sunday. She declares that she will see him hanged 
first, but he is not to be so easily turned aside. He very 
cleverly explains that this opposition of her's is assumed for 
the occasion, that she dearly loves him, and without giving her 
a further chance to reply he carries her away, reiterating as 
he goes the announcement formerly made. 

On the wedding morn the expectant guests assemble, and 
Katherina, among the rest, shows her impatience at the tardiness 
of the groom. She declares that she is forced to give her hand 
opposed against her heart, yet does not seem pleased at her 
probable escape from this unwilling alliance. From all which 
we naturally deduce that she was not so much annoyed at the 
prospect of a marriage as she would have us believe. 
Katherina's disposition had become soured, and scold she must 
whether she had cause or not. Finally the groom appears, and 
such a groom, ridiculously arrayed in a grotesque costume. 
His friends endeavor to prevail upon him to change his habit, 
but he stoutly refuses. He is married, and if correctly re- 
ported by Grumio, the ceremony was interrupted in a rather 
unseemly manner. Then comes Katherina' s first lesson. 
Petruchio, while affecting to study her pleasure and comfort, 
makes it plain that he is master. 'Not an unkind word does he 
utter to her, but fumes and blusters, defies and threatens all 
who dare to intervene when no one has intimated such an in- 
tention. He talks so rapidly and storms so furiously that poor 
Katherina has little chance to protest. She has no intention of 
being swept away so summarily, but before she knows it, he 
carries her away bodily, brandishing his sword and swearing 
that he will buckler her against a million. Their arrival at 
his home is marked by a similar scene. The servants are scat- 
tered right and left, and in fear and trembling they do their 
best to allay the fury of their master. Poor Kate, who has 



550 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

won for herself the reputation of an inveterate shrew, finds 
herself confronted with a man so easily nettled, and so furious 
and unreasonable when aroused, that she realizes that any efforts 
upon her part to match him would be like opposing the zephyr 
to the whirlwind. If these imaginary offences of the servants 
raise such a storm, what sort of a tornado would be produced 
if he were actually opposed? She dare not make the experi- 
ment, but on the contrary seeks to quiet him. Little did 
Katherina suppose that so soon after her marriage she would be 
so humbled that she would be begging one of her husband's 
servants to clandestinely bring her some food to stay the pangs 
of hunger. 

Petruchio all the while addresses her as " my sweet Kate,'' 
" my honey love," and leaves little opportunity for her to 
charge him with harshness or lack of attention if she had dared 
to do so. 

** And that which spites me more than all these wants, 
He does it under name of perfect love." 

She has the will to rebel, but fears to do so. She fancies the 
pretty cap and the gown ordered for her, and as she sees that 
they, too, are likely to be withheld from her as was the food, her 
old spirit is roused for the moment, but Petruchio quickly finds 
a remedy. The haberdasher and tailor are scolded roundly and 
ejected from the house, and Katherina has little chance to say a 
word. By this time she is pretty thoroughly convinced that he 
proposes to do as he pleases, and that he will not tolerate any in- 
terference. She now is ready to go one step further. She must 
not only allow him to have his own way, but must acquiesce in 
all he says, whether he be right or wrong. She quite innocently 
was betrayed into correcting him as to the hour of the day just 
as they were about to depart upon the visit to her father. This 
little slip was the occasion for postponing the trip. Petruchio 
did not read her any long lecture, nor did he pretend that this 
was done out of respect and consideration for her, as he had con- 
trived in the former instance. He evidently considered his pupil 
sufficiently advanced to be now able to have the rebuke directed 
against herself. 

" I will not go to-day, and e'er I do 
It shall be what o'clock I say it is." 



THE TAMING OF THE SHREW. 551 

The taming process goes merrily on, and so far advanced is 
Katherina in the lessons she has received, that with very little 
tnore ado, she is prepared to grant that the moon is shining 
brightly at mid-day, and to admire the fresh bloom upon the 
rosy cheek of a wrinkled old gentleman and greet him as the 
fairest maiden of the land. So submissive is she to every whim 
of Petruchio that she voluntarily declares 

" What you will have it named, even that it is, 
And so it shall be so for Katherine." 

She has completed her course, and needs no more of the 
harsh schooling that she had been subjected to. It may be 
asserted by some that this play is a libel upon the good name of 
the fair sex. I do not think that the sex will ever raise such a 
cry against the author. Even if the picture of Katherina be 
somewhat distorted, we must remember she is an exception. We 
cannot so soon forget the many sweet and loving female 
characters in Shakespeare's plays. Was Katherina such a 
shrew after all ? Was she not the natural product of her sur- 
roundings ? We have no mention of her mother. So far as the 
play informs us, old Baptista, the grasping old father, was in 
sole charge of the bringing up of his daughters. He lavished 
all his attention upon Bianca, and seems to regard Katherina 
as an incumbrance that he would gladly get rid of. He was 
willing to pay a fabulous sum to any man who would marry her, 
while he exacted as great a marriage settlement from the man 
who received Bianca at his hands. It is just such treatment 
that will sour the sweetest disposition. So if we find Katherina 
given to sudden displays of an evil temper, it is not to be won- 
dered at, and instead of holding her up as an example of a 
shrewish woman, we should rather pity her as being the very 
natural result of the treatment she received at the hands of a 
selfish and unnatural father. She has just cause of complaint 
when she addresses her father. 

" I pray you, sir, is it your will 
To make a stale of me amongst these mates ?" 

Would a mother have showu such preference for a younger 
daughter ? On the contrary, does our observation not teach us 



552 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

that under such circumstances a mother's love is as strong for 
her plain and homely daughter as it is for the fair and graceful 
one ? A mother would never give one daughter occasion to re- 
mark as Katherina quite truthfully did, "She is your treasure.'' 
So instead of this play being a libel upon women, are we not 
quite justified in regarding it as a fair exposition of the unfitness 
of men to care for their own daughters. Well might we inscribe 
over the portals of Baptista's house the old motto, " What is 
home without a mother ? " In the end Katherina proves that 
she was capable of realizing the duties of a wife, and to her are 
we indebted for the following: 

'* Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper, 
Thy head, thy sovereign ; one that cares for thee 
And for thy maintenance. Commits his body 
To painful labor both by sea and land, 
To watch the night in storms, the day in cold, 
Whils't thou liest warm at home, secure and safe, 
And craves no other tribute at thy hands 
But love, fair looks and true obedience, 
Too little payment for so great a debt." 



Life 

NOW Fortune stacks the deck, deals out the hands, 
Then grins to see the novice player writhe, 
Throws chip on chip to swell the growing pot, 
Tempts him with hope to venture all his gx)ld; 
For man is but a fool in Fortime's thrall, 
And takes the bait like some dull-witted carp. 
The game is done I The grand show down is called ; 
While Fate smiles at the man's discomfiture. 
With sunken, wearied eye he views his loss, 
And, sick at heart, resumes his daily toil. 

W. A. D. 



" BE STILL AND KNOW THAT I AM GOD." 553 
"Be Still and Know That I Am God" 

C. W. S. 

*^ Et les etoiles d'or, legions infinies, 
A voix haute, a voix basse, avec mille harmonies, 
Disaient, en inclinant leurs couronnes de feu; 
Et les flots bleus, que rien ne gouverne et n^arrete, 
Disaient en recourbant I'ecume de leur crete! 
C'est le Seigneur, le Seigneur Dieu!'' 



''Be still and know that I am Grod.'' Be still? 

Who can be still ? Our flinty i:>avements mock 

Each meditative thought with discord shrill ; 

Our human frame but ill sustains the shock 

Of noise and buffets in this human whirl ; 

The boom of midnight, even, scarce can sound 

Above the city's din, — we so confound 

The night with day, shattering the pearl 

Of sleep. But chief in our own hearts there swell 

Doubt's feverous strife, contrary wars of Will; 

Be still ? Thus ? Here ? — But aye in caverned cell 

Sea-worn, sea-resounding, on the lone hill 

Wind-bitten; yea, far on the mute plain, there dwell 

Whispers: '' O know that I am God, be still.'V 



554 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

The Flesh'Pota of Egypt 

A Story of the Old Mennonites. 

B. MABEL DUNHAM^ '08. 

^t^^^OME, Melindy, daba! schwind! Can't you make the 

B . dishes off and help your mom get ready for meetin' ? 

^"^ Ban, he's gone already. Somehow you don't be like 
you was till you went to Sam's. I won't be for letting you go 
again onct." 

As Benj. Baumann hurled this reproof at his daughter, he 
was engaged in adding the finishing touches to his toilet on 
the back porch. The well-greased top-boots, which stood near 
'the door, a monument to his wife Bevy's diligence and devo- 
tion, were substituted for the less pretentious-looking chore- 
boots, the broad-rimmed hat was donned with some care, and 
Benj, betook himself to the barn to hitch up. 

The Baumann homestead was situated in the heart of a 
Pennsylvania Dutch settlement, twelve miles distant from the 
world in any direction. Benj. had known no other home. As 
a boy, he had spent a fair proportion of his winters at the 
schoolhouse on the corner, but, since a superfluous amount of 
erudition seemed to the Mennonite mind to have an unhallowed 
connection with the world, the flesh, and the devil, whereas 
the practice of agriculture was favored by the "family tradi- 
tions, any scholastic ability he may have evinced in those ten- 
der years was ruthlessly nipped in the bud, and the thoughts 
of the young hopeful were directed to the farm. As a farmer, 
none outside the settlement could equal him. He had the 
latest improvements in farm machinery, kept a large stock of 
cattle, and was building his third bank barn. The bank clerks 
in the nearest town dubbed him familiarly '^ Old Croesus," yet, 
with all his wealth, the cardinal virtues of his religion, sim- 
plicity in dress and manner, a cordial hospitality, daily thrift, 
and a thorough-going honesty, would serve as a catalogue of 
his personal characteristics. 

Melinda, the chastened daughter, had, in the meantime, 
obediently set to work, and by the time Benj. appeared at the 



THE FLESH-POTS OF EGYPT. 555 

back door wtih the team, the family were bonneted and ready 
for " meetin'." 

" You'd best shut the pantry door, so the cat don't come 
in," said Bevy, and, with this sole precaution taken in regard 
to the safety of the house and its belongings, the family de- 
parted. In a minute they had all climbed over the wheels into 
the democrat, each one working out his own salvation with fear 
and trembling, while Benj. sat in state and held the team. 

The journey to the " meetin'-house," two miles distant, was 
uneventful. There . was little conversation. Occasionally 
Benj. would jerk his thumb to the right or to the left, 
and ejaculate, '^Look a-there mom. Isaiah KolVll make 
a-plenty on that there field," or, ^^ Christ Bingeman, he ought 
to be getting a new fence soon." Bevy s'posed so. The chil- 
dren in the back seat chatted about the teacher, and traded gum 
at pleasure. Melinda sat and looked far, far away, and, judg- 
ing from her face, the prospect away off yonder was none too 
pleasing. 

Once a closed gate barred the way. Melinda sighed audibly 
as she clambered over the wheel to open it. 

"What ails Melindy?" said Benj. to his wife. "She un- 
usual quiet, not ?" 

" Ach, Melindy's hankering after the world. She ain't just 
like always since she's come back from Sam Baumann's. She 
wants to have dinner in three parts like Sam's does, and says 
you kin hire to carry the victuals every time. When Melindy 
was by Sam's she done that for them, and et in the kitchen 
yet." 

Benj. shrugged his shoulders. " Ach, I'll get them dumm 
notions out of her head onct. Ain't we as good as Sam's folks ? 
Ain't me and Sam played together so long we don't mind no 
more? But Sam's woman she was tony, and got Sam away 
from meetin', and says she's Mrs. S. MacPherson Bowman, 
and asks for Melindy when she can't get nobody else to hire. 
Melindy she can't hire out no more by Sam's yet." 

]^or did the " meetin' " tend to improve Melinda's state of 
mind. The young fry of the neighborhood came forward and 
greeted her cordially even before she had alighted from the 
democrat. 



556 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

'' Well, Melindy Baumann, when did you come back ? with 
your pop from market, not? You hain't been to meetin' for 
four Sundays already.'' 

The girls helped her remove the dusty, black bonnet, and 
smooth down the rebellious locks under the white, gauzy head- 
dress beneath. Then, slowly and sedately, Melinda and the 
admiring throng entered the " meetin'-house " and took a seat 
well to the front. 

Everything was quiet and orderly. The preachers, one by 
one, entered the long, box-like pulpit, and greeted each other 
with the Pauline salutation. How happy they all looked as 
they sat in the seat of honor, rejoicing in the belief that, as 
in the choice of the seven deacons for the early church, the 
lots had fallen upon men of honest report, full of the Holy 
Ghost and wisdom. Benj. and the boys were in evidence on 
the other side of the partition which separated the men from the 
women. A certain Josiah Shantz sat in one of the elevated 
seats at the back among the " unregenerate," and gazed wist- 
fully at Melinda. This circumstance was noted by Selina 
Bingeman, and duly reported to Melinda in a stage whisper 
between giggles, whereupon the latter smiled weakly. 

There was nothing unusual al>out the service. The singing 
was in German, under the musical direction of Isaiah Kolb, 
armed with a tuning-fork. Eli Weber — pious old soul — read 
the Scriptures by heart, with occasional promptings from the 
clerical body in the rear.. The prayers were mostly in the 
hit-and-miss Pennsylvania Dutch dialect, informal and quiet, 
and yet brimful of religious fervor. Bishop Snyder preached 
his sermon, entitled, " The Flesh-pots of Egypt," and, if he 
had prefaced the remarks of the hour with the intimation that 
what he was about to say would have particular application to 
one, Melinda Baumann, who had recently returned from that 
land of mummies, the dramatic effect of the situation could 
not have been enhanced. 

Melinda sat with a look of stoic indifference throughout the 
sermon and the discussion that followed. She was far from 
convinced. " What do them preachers know about the world' 
yet ?" she asked herself. " They never spoke to a milliner 
already unless to sell her some eggs by the market, and they 



THE FLESH-POTS OF EGYPT. 557 

don't know what for handy things Sam Baumann's has yet. 
'No pump or windmills or tallow candles there onct/' 

AVhen the service was over and the congregation was indulg- 
ing in the weekly gossip on the porch, a tall, stalwart, awkward 
youth made his way up to Melinda. With a Ibashful grin that 
showed off his store teeth to perfection, he whispered so that 
only the girl could hear: 

" Can I go mit ?" 

'^ No, Josiah, I don't feel for settin' up to-night.'' 

'' Ach you, Melindy." 

Just then Eenj. drove up with the team, and the Baumann 
family started for home, followed by a score of the ^' Freund- 
schaft " who had accepted Benj.'s invitation to ^^ come and eat 
along." 

That night, when all the company had left, instead of sitting 
" side by each " with Josiah in the front room, Melinda re- 
tired to the back doorstep to have it all out with herself. 

^^ Why wasn't I Sam Baumann's girl instead of Benj.'s? 
Sam, he's got such nice things to home and he's got such nice 
ways, and pop he's so plain and he don't care yet how he acts. 
Ach, I wish we could be tony onct." 

With a heavy heart she went to bed. 

Monday was a busy day at the Baumann's. Tuesday was 
threshing day, and, be it known unto you, Dutchmen have 
good appetites. 

Late in the afternoon, as Melinda sat on the back porch 
making ^^ schnitz " for pies, a young man drove up the lane 
and, courteously lifting his hat, inquired for Mr. Baumann. 

^^ Mr. Baumann ? You mean Benj. Baumann, not ? We 
Mennonites ain't much for calling each other mister. You 
durst tie your horse up and I'll go call pop." 

Melinda's heart thumped. ISTever before had a man lifted 
his hat to her, and this one had a collar and a tie, and " such 
a moustache yet." To add to her embarrassment, she enter- 
tained a lurking suspicion that her hair was somewhat 
" strubbly." 

Bevy was already preparing for supper. " Mom, there's a 
man come. Can I ]uit on them sugar pies?" 

Melinda knew only too well what answer to expect. 



558 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

" Well, if there's a man come, you can set another place 
alongside Dan, (but the pies was made for the threshers, and 
the threshers is going to have them. He's welcome to all we've 
got, and we've got plenty, but we ain't going to make no fuss 
for nobody." 

Poor satisfaction for Melinda. 

Benj. had joined the stranger on the back porch. Melinda 
caught snatches of the conversation through the open window, 
and peeked out whenever she passed the door. 

" You can throw that water away and pump some more," 
she heard her father say as he drcAv the family comb down the 
middle of his head with great dexterity. '^ Here's the towel." 
And the stranger did as he was bidden, nothing wavering. 

Supper was served in the kitchen. Everything about the 
room was spotlessly clean, and the table was well loaded with 
the choicest of fare; nevertheless, Melinda maintained an in- 
jured silence throughout the meal. She did not know who 
the stranger might be, for Mennonite etiquette is not con- 
cerned with introductions, but she noticed that he smiled audi 
bit his lip when the girls covered their heads with their hand- 
kerchiefs during grace. '^ What Avill he think of us and of 
our ways," thought Melinda, with her eyes fixed on her plate. 
She wanted to pass the " schmierkase," but she knew the family 
would disapprove. " What have we got two dishes of each on 
the table for if it's not so as we can all reach," her mother 
had said when Melinda had begged for change in the method 
of serving meals. 

When supper was over, the men returned to the field, re- 
joicing in the unexpected acquisition of a man to help load, 
and they did not return till dark. 

Melinda stole out of the house to meet the stranger. 

^' Please, sir, I brought you a candle. I thought you might 
be for settin' up a while yet. Town folks does that, I know." 

The stranger thanked her, and took a box from his " satchell." 

" This is for you, Melindy. It's only bon-bons — candies, 
you know." 

'" Oh ! conversation lozenges, not ? Josiah Shantz generally 
always brings some for sittin' up nights yet, but he ain't 



THE FLESH-FOTS OF EGYPT. 559 

brought none in a box already. What for a stylish box it is 
just for conversation lozenges !" 

Next morning at daybreak, as Benj. was making his morn- 
ing ablutions at the pump, Mose Shantz drove up. 

^' Wie geht's, Mose. You're out early this morning." 

^' Yes, kind of early-like,'' assented Mose. " Did you have 
what for a fine-dressed man by your place yet yesterday ?" 

^' Yes, but he ain't stood up yet. I'll just holler up and 
wake him." 

" Don't be so dumm, Benj. Christ. Bingeman told me as 
Eli Weber told him that he was such a schwindler. Don't you 
make your apples off for him. Let. them rot first." 

" Well, we hain't talked much about the apples yet. We're 
so busy getting all hauled in for the threshing. But I'll watch 
out to-day so he don't schwindle me." 

(Mose Shantz had scarcely gone before Dan, running in from 
the barn, announced that Benj.'s best driver was nowhere to 
be seen, and the dog had been found dead at the gate. Soon 
Bevy discovered that the stranger was not in his room, and, 
moreover, the bed gave no evidence of his ever having been 
there. 

" Ach, his horse is here yet," said Benj., unable to under- 
stand the mystery. 

^' I guess he left that old blind shimmel of his'n for you a 
present," suggested Dan. ^' His fine top^uggy ain't here 
neither." 

The truth was beginning to da\\Ti upon the honest Dutch- 
man. '' Ach, I didn't think there was such bad folks in the 
world already." 

Melinda was indignant when she heard the story. " What 
for a man is that — a thief and a schwindler? And he gave 
me such a box of conversation lozengers last night. I ain't 
opened them already, for Josiah's ain't all yet. Noav they 
can go right away in the stove." 

Benj. rescued them in time. " What for a wasteful girl 
you are, Melindy. If I was Josiah Shantz I'd have afraid to 
take you. I'll just keep these till Dan asks for his pay onct. 
He can use them for settin' up with Selina Bingeman. 

Poor Melinda ! She weighed her father and the stranger 



560 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

in the balance, and, behold, they were both found wanting. 
" Pop, he's so plain and so saving and don't care what he says, 
but he don't steal horses yet. And that fellow had such nice 
eyes yet. Ach, we don't know who all we can trust." The 
flesh-pots of Egypt were beginning to lose their savor. 

Months rolled by, and Benj. Baumann came home from 
market one Saturday with the news of his brother Sam's 
failure in business. 

" Sam, he lived too high," began Benj., after his brother's 
situation had. been explained to the family. " Them boys of 
his'n, they had to go to such a college way off somewheres to 
get their education, and then the girls had to learn to play 
the piano. And then they was always havin' folks to eat along 
and making things extray for them yet. If Sam would of 
married Nancy Brubacher where is a member, and not kept 
hankering after the world, he'd be leaving twenty thousand to 
each of his children." Then, with lowered voice and in a tone 
suited to the enormity of the disgrace, he continued, '" Sam, 
he's had to go to court, and they wouldn't believe him his word 
yet till he swore — ." 

" Swore, pop !" said Melinda, aghast. Her uncle's financial 
embarrassment seemed bad enough, without this intimation of 
his moral deterioration. 

" Ach, not bad words Melindy. Only they wouldn't believe 
him till he kissed the Bible onct. That's the way they have 
to do with people of the world." 

The last straw for Melinda! That night as she sat on the 
back doorstep in the twilight she said to herself, ^^ Ach, I'm 
glad I'm Benj. Baumann's girl and not Sam's yet for all." 

Another month has rolled by. Mose Shantz and his wife 
have retired to the " Daddy-house," and left the farm to 
Josiah. Whether the increased responsibility which the care 
of the farm entails has brought Josiah to a realization of the 
seriousness of life, we do not know, but we arc told that 
Josiah is now " a member of the meetin'." On Easter Sunday 
the banns for the marriage of elosiah Shantz to Melinda 
Baumann were called and, in a few weeks, there will be a 
half -holiday at the schoolhouse on the corner, and Melinda will 
enter into her Promised Land " over bv Josiah Shantz's." 



A POEM ON THE MAY EXAMINATIONS 561 
A Poem on the May Examinations 

E. J. PRATT, '11. 

np HE year was just about to close, the Arts' Exams, were on, 

^ The faces of the students had become so pale and wan, 

The ordeal was upon them ; how they wished that it was past ! 

For strength was quickly sinking, and the nerves were breaking 

fast. 

A year of mental strain had gone, its fruit was being gauged 
By quantitative tests; a great array of doctors aged 
In wisdom as in years, Avere chosen arbiters of Fate — 
Reverend, hoary sages, Heaven-born to Educate. 

All preparations were completed, open wide were thrown 
The doors ; the old gray tower in solitude from his high throne 
Looked down in wonder, mixed with pity, that again the rack 
And slaughter of the Innocents had to this land come back. 

Into the halls the students poured, each clamoring for a seat, 
All wise directions lost amid the uproar of the feet. 
But that excitement had a cause, for they were well aware 
That failures oft resulted from a noisy, creaking chair. 

But soon the boisterous clamor ceased, the papers were passed 

round. 
Deep silence fell. Within those walls, the ear heard not a 

sound. 
Except the sighing of a student here and there whose brain 
!N^ot formed for such surprises, now was softening 'neath the 

strain. 



562 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

Thus recommenced the Annual Test; for three short weeks it 

ran, 
But mighty revolutions lived and died within that span; 
Indeed, the world in generations never brought about 
Such eras as came in within those weeks, and then passed out 

Vast strides were made in Science — ^new discoveries every hour, 
Ideas brilliant were advanced on Energy and Power, 
Examined were the Laws of Motion, Newton's long-held claim 
To greatness was disproved by minds as yet unknown to fame. 

Amazing views were held on Electricity and Light, 
Amongst the spectrum's rays was classed an element of White ; 
In Heat and Hydrostatics fundamental Laws were changed, 
ISTew compounds formed in Chemistry through atoms re- 
arranged. 

Geometry and Algebra as humble suppliants came, 
To have their range of application broadened was their aim. 
Full conscious of the charge that oft against them is preferred, 
That they were only meant for children, but for men absurd. 

Their humble claims were granted — a revision going deep 
Into the subject carefully was made; such was the sweep 
Of criticism that beat on the paper like a storm, 
One could identify no more the science by its form. 

Those things that are deductions termed, — not easily defined. 
Because they proved disastrous to the students' peace of mind 
And caused bad use of language, were considered Darkness-born, 
Therefore in pious negligence, they were passed by in scorn. 

Next Greek and Latin stood before the bar, and both received 
Tremendous punishment: Their modern relatives bereaved, 
And stricken by the blow, suffered in turn, heart-pained to see 
Their parents gray insulted by a young examinee. 



A POEM ON THE MAY EXAMINATIONS. 563 

For centuries there had been instilled within the youthful brain 
The fallacy of History; a solid, age-wrought chain 
Of eras, crises, causes and results, and tempered well 
In a millenium's furnace, now was shattered like a shell. 

The Greek Chronology w^as altered ; dates which long had 'been 
Established, were proved false, and aeons were shown t-o 

intervene 
Between events once thought to be consecutive; such acts 
Destructive of the Past were made, but one must face the facts. 

At Cann£e Alexander fought — a fearful, bloody fight, 
And forced the Spanish rebels back in wild, disordered flight. 
He drove old Ca?sar's veterans from the frontier to their home, 
Then pushed right on, until he battered at the gates of Rome. 

The fiery Plato, when a boy, was by his father sworn 

That he would sober be, until the standards which were torn 

From Carthage by proud Rome recovered were, • which pledge 

he kept. 
Until Italia's power had died, unhonored, and unwept. 

The noble poet Phidias for writing verse which stung 
The Spartan tyrant into fury, was condemned and hung, 
Together with his brave and fearless cousin, Xenophon, 
Who won fo^ Greece her freedom on the plains of Marathon. 

The base of operations changed; the critic's hand was seen 
Xext in the realm of English, the analysis was keen 
And justified the spirit of the age in its attempt 
To treat the laws of Spelling with derision and contempt. 

A radical departure from poetic thought was made 

When on Macaulay, Goldsmith, Scott and Keats was gravely 

laid 
The charge, that they with Browning made their meaning so 

obscure 
That the decay of Time would overtake them, slow but sure. 
3 



564 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

But still the storm of Change increased and louder roared the 

blast, 
As if it would uproot the strong foundations of the past, 
Another victim it required its wrath to satisfy, 
One more and that the greatest one must now prepare to die. 

Predestined was the fate to which this sinner was consigned 
For all the patient, gentle temper he had undermined 
With Jewish tricks; notorious Hebrew answered to his name 
And to his doom, full-merited, with trembling footsteps came. 

Dire was the punishment imposed for conduct mean and base, 
J^eghadkhephaths and Dagheshes were thrown right in his face, 
Around his neck the Athnak yoke was tied secure and fast. 
The paper with the crimes was read before he breathed his last. 

^o tear was shed, no sigh was raised, save only of relief; 
A^o pitying theologue gazed on with tear-stained handkerchief, 
'No groans came forth, but from the prisoner crouching in full 

dread 
As Pe Nun ver^bs and gutturals were aimed straight at his head. 

More threatening still became the anger of the mob, the cry 
Was raised, " Destroy him, root and branch, change not, nor 

modify 
The system which reveals him, but let Justice take its course, 
And hence of students' many sins blot out so vile a source.'' 

Across the scene let fall the curtain, spare the cultured eye 
The sight of such destruction, with this blast the storm will die, 
Then glad Reform will reign, and to the mind give welcomed 

rest. 
Inspiring cheer, renewing hope within the student breast. 



x^x^n Acta Victoriana. ^«^ 



EDITORIAL STAFF, I908-J909. 
J. V. McKenzie, '09 - - - - Editor-in-Chief. 

MiesC. DUNNETT, '09, Iritorirv MiSS K. LUKES, '10, 1 t nr-.lQ 

M. H. Staples, '09, jl^itcrarj . p j ^ Staples. 10, / l^o^''*^- 

Clyo Jackson, B.A., Missionary and Religious. J. E. Horning, '09, Scientific. 
A. L. Burt, '10, Personals and Exchanges. O. V. Jewett, '10, Athletics. 

Board of Management: 

F. C . Moyer, '09, Business Manager. 

W. Moorehouse, '11, Assistant Business Manager. W. A. Deacon, '11, Secretary. 

Advisory Committee : 
Pelham Edgar, Ph.D. C. C. James, M.A., Deputy Minister of Agriculture. 

TERMS: $1.25 A YEAR; SINGLE COPIES, 15 CENTS. 

Contributions and exchanges should be sent to J. V. McKenzie, Editor-in-Chief 
Acta Victoriana: business communications to F. C. Mover, Business Manager 
Acta Victoriana, Victoria University, Toronto. 



Editorial 



Interesting Elections 

OPEE^ elections, active canvassiiig, and printed ballots, 
are just what we needed around this College, and 
thesp innovations will do more to create an interest 
in the societies than anything else tried during the last few 
years. One hundred and seventy-two votes were polled at the 
Acta Board elections, and we cannot recall any election dur- 
ing the last few years when half that number of voters exer- 
cised their franchise. 

Several grads. were around the College during the day of 
voting, and were unanimous in their approval of the new 
method. '^ I'm glad to see that there's some life around the 
old College," said one naughty-three man. From the success 
of the scheme we cannot see why it was not introduced a 
decade ago. From the standpoint of the Lit. it was most suc- 
cessful, as between thirty and forty dollars was gathered in 
in fees which would otherwise not have been paid. The merits 
of the candidates for each office were thoroughly threshed out, 
and hardly a raan could say that he didn't know for whom he 
was voting. The influence of complete organization was seen, 
and any man who didn't exercise his franchise may be called 
a failure as a loyal College man. There is the danger in this 
system that some time or other a man popular with the stu- 
dents may be elected over a man less known, but better quali- 



566 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

fied otherwise for the office. But the friends of a candidate in 
such a case have the opportunity to get out and work for their 
nominee, and see to it that he becomes generally known. 

At date of writing the Lit. elections are still in the future. 
The fact that all the offices except seven will go by acclamation 
will undoubtedly detract somewhat from the interest taken, 
but the remaining contests promise to be exciting. In a 
society like the Literary Society there are nearly always two 
or more men qualified for each job, and it might not be a bad 
plan to follow the example of University College, and have 
two parties and two tickets run. This would make the gov- 
ernment and opposition differ in policy and in fact, instead of 
merely in name as at present. 

Defeats and Excuses 

Whatever may be the verdict of posterity as to the relative 
importance of the present college term, it is certain that the 
writing of that chapter of its history which deals with our 
achievements in competitions with outside colleges will be a 
rather unenviable task. To call to mind the vaunting ambi- 
tions with which we were filled last fall, and then to face the 
results, defeat in everything, might well turn the most youthful 
enthusiast into a cynical dyspeptic. To make matters worse, 
we are tormented by the somewhat puerile but persistent, 
" Why ? ", or the more promising, " What's the matter ? " 

The making of excuses is a science, and in this respect we 
are great scientists. In many respects we do seem to have 
been '^ hoodooed.'' In football Ave received but two hours' 
notice befoi^e our game was called ; in hockey we " cleaned 
up " on everything until the last game, when we were 
forced to play on bad ice, and with some of our best 
men off. But such fatalistic ideas of ill-luck are not sup- 
ported by modern science. In place of the primitive notions 
of such maladies as " evil-eye," we have the modern theories 
of active and virulent bacteria. Fetishism and predestination 
vanish before the microscope and higher criticism. 

From a sentimental standpoint it is pleasant to admire the 
beauty of the spirit that rises above defeats, and that takes set- 
backs with the philosophic stoicism of the be-novelled Indian. It 
is quite comforting for us to reflect that to sustain a defeat with 



EDITORIAL. 567 

dignity is better than to win a victory, but we must remember 
that when it comes to the fine thing, outsiders have more re- 
spect for the man that takes a city, than they have for the 
chap that confines his conquests to his own spirit. 

If we wish Victoria to take her proper place in the college 
world, we must not only go into such competitions, but we 
must win. This does not mean that we must play the game 
unfairly, but that we must play it scientifically. This means 
that we must specialize, each man according to his individual 
bent. It is only when we have a strong organization on such 
a basis that we can hope to cope with competitors who have 
adopted modern ideas. As a great general once remarked, 
^' Providence favors the strongest battalions " — and efficiency is 
strength. 

The Library 

Victoria's new seventy-five thousand dollar library will soon 
be a thing of the present instead of the future. The ground is 
being cleared on the north-west corner of the property south 
of Charles Street West, and the building will not long be de- 
layed. The daily papers have taken notice of the new build- 
ing, and commented very favorably thereon. Contrary to the 
expectation of some undergraduates, and of one recent grad- 
uate to whom we were speaking, the new building will not be 
connected with the present library. It will be an entirely 
separate building, and of an entirely different style of archi- 
tecture. 

Acta Board, 1909-10 
Editor-in-Chief — C. C. Washington, '10. 
Literary Editors — ^Miss Alice M. Bowers, '10. 

C. G. French, '10. 
Scientific Editor — W. T. Moore, '10. 
Missionary and Religious Editor — Percy Edge, '09. 
Personal and Exchange Editor — C. E. Locke, '11. 
Athletic Editor — J. R. Rumble, '11. 
Local Editors — Miss Mary Shorey, '11. 

E. J. Pratt, '11. 
Business Maiiager — ^W. H. Cook, '10. 
Assistant Business Managers — AY. H. Moorehouse, '11. 

W. E. Evans, '12. 




A Clock of Many Accomplishments 

FAR out on the prairie, in the southwestern part of Chi- 
cago, hidden by the rude boarding of a frame house, 
stands a clock so intricate that it ranks among the most 
remarkable achievements of the clock-maker's art in the world. 
It is one of the most accomplished clocks in existence, a lineal 
descendant of the famous old-world clocks of the fourteenth 
and fifteenth centuries. It is a bit of mediaeval romanticism, 
a survival of the days when the workmen created for the love 
of the creature, and not merely for the practical value of the 
article which he made. 

Thousands of travellers have made a pilgrimage to see the 
famous clock of Strassburg, which, set in a commanding posi- 
tion and beautifully decorated, represents the passage of time 
in minutes, hours, seconds, months, days, weeks, and years, 
and has wonderful automata, which bow and open doors, and 
bells that ring, and a cock that crows. 

Few know of the remarkable achievement of a simple 
peasant, Franz Bohacek, one time clock-maker of Patzau, in 
Bohemia, now for almost fifty years a citizen of Chicago. 

The famous clocks of Europe are each one set in as fine sur- 
roundings as the pride of the citizens can devise, but the clock 
of Franz Bohacek, comparable to them in many respects for 
the number and variety of its accomplishments, rears its won- 
derful mechanism in the semi-twilight of a tiny shed-like room, 
and goes through its diurnal wonders before few worshippers. 

Twenty years he was in building it — twenty years during 
which most of his possible income as an expert watchmaker 
and clock repairer must be sacrificed, twenty years during 
which the intricate calculations must be made, often at night 
after a hard day's work, and the hundreds of parts be fitted 



SCIENTIFIC. 569 

by hands that had already earned the day's bread for the 
family. 

Long ago, in Patzau, Bohacek had grown impatient of or- 
dinary ways of measuring time. He was told how a real year 
consists of 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 46 seconds; that 
the 3'ear as measured by ordinary clocks is so much shorter 
than this; that the time they lose must be swallowed back in 
a big gulp once every four years as " leap year." The thought 
of that lost time became an obsession to him. He determined 
to build a clock which should be the most accurate clock that 
he could devise, and at the same time should rival the won- 
ders of the clocks built in the old days, when the clock-makers 
were craftsmen, and something more than mere mechanics. 

Accordingly, when he had established himself and his family 
in his Chicago cottage, he set to work* . As the clock grew in 
size, Bohacek's own ideas grew, and diak after dial was added, 
with all the additional mechanism n^essary to its operation. 

It is two stories high, with weights that -reach down another 
story, weights so heavy that they are wound up by two -wind- 
lasses. There are more than a thousand parts in the great net- 
work of cogs and wheels and leading wires through which 
swdng the two systems of pendulums with an unceasing crack- 
ling sound. Elaborate as its skeleton seems as one looks up 
into it, every cog in every wheel is justified by the various 
accomplishments which are s;hown when one studies its face. 

Instead of the gentle moon face of the ordinary clock, one 
is confronted with a majestic visage, eighteen feet high, :\vhose 
eyebrow^s are two dials, each three feet in diameter, and set so 
high that one has to crane one's neck to see them. One of 
these dials is a concession to the popular taste for a twelve- 
hour timepiece. From it one learns only the time of day. 
The other is a complete diurnal circuit of twenty-four hours, 
so that here one sees at at glance how many hours have passed 
since midnight last. A third dial has three series of numbers, 
and three hands. From it one may know the day of the week, 
the day of the month, and the month of the year. So that one 
has in these dials alone both calendar and timepiece. 

But Bohacek was not satisfied with this. Earth's time, to 
his soaring imagination, is but a part of the great celestial 



570 



ACTA VICTORIANA. 



time in which each planet plays its part. Accordingly, he 
built in the centre of the clock face a larger dial, over six feet 
in diameter. This dial represents the solar system. Around 




PART OF FACE OF CLOCK. 
The Presidents appear in the niche where Uncle Sam is now stanclini;. 

its face run the signs of the Zodiac. In the centre is the sun, 
a ball of flame-colored crystal. About it swing the planets, each 
upon an axis of brass, each represented apportionately to its 



SCIENTIFIC. 571 

size, each accompanied by its satellites. The figured globe which 
represents the earth revolves aboiU^ the sun in exact proportion 
to the actual year, and the moon turns a^bout the earth exactly 
in accordance with its actual various phases. 

This planetarium is a touch of medisevalism in the clock 
built upon the western prairie of to-day. A still more inter- 
esting middle-age reminiscence is found when the bells toll for 
noon, and a little door at the top opens. Then, where in the 
old clocks of Europe the Emperor Charlemagne nods, here there 
passes in review the pageant of American history. Eirst an 
Indian appears; he gives way to Columbus, Columbus to the 
Liberty Bell, which strikes three times, and is followed by 
Benjamin Eranklin, holding in his hand the Declaration of 
Independence. Eranklin ushers in the procession of the Presi- 
dents, from Washington to Roosevelt. And hidden in its place, 
waiting to appear at the door, salute and* pass stiffly on, Bohacek 
cherishes a little figure of William Jennings Bryan, hopes 
which have been cruelly disappointed at the recent election. 
Eor the present, at least. Admiral Dewey salutes, and closes 
the door. 

But while you are watching the solemn march, ]3ohacek, 
pipe in hand, is watching you from his shrewd old eyes. He 
w^ill not let you overlook that fifth dial, which in his mind is 
the true brains of the clock. This represents his days of toil, 
and his nights of concentration. He is proud of his hour dials, 
proud of his planetarium, and proud of his Presidents. But 
he is proudest of the fact that here he has devised — he, the 
simple clock-maker, without any help from learned men, or 
much from books — he who has lived so many years upon the 
lonely prairie, has here taken one step at least a little nearer 
toward that ideal he made for himself so long ago in Patzau 
in Bohemia. 

Here is a dial which recognizes thirteen months instead of 
twelve in each year. Each month has twenty-eight days, and 
each day consists of twenty-four hours, four minutes, and fifty- 
four seconds. " It is not perfect," the clock-maker says, " but 
it is much better than that one," and he points to the t\velve- 
hour dial above his head. " It is not perfect, but it is for- 
ward ! It still loses eighty-five one-hundredths of a second of 



572 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

real time every day. A second, as measured by my clock, is 
.00341275 of a second longer than the seconds of other clocks. 
Yet it is not perfectly with the solar second. It is still eighty- 
five one-hundredths of a second wrong in each solar day. Ah, 
no, it is not perfect — but it is better." E'ot quite perfect still 
— the sigh of an artist! 

Simple enough to calculate, and simple enough to arrange 
once you have thought it out? There are great solar clocks 
which are marvels of accuracy, devised by marvellous men out 
of marvellous books. And they are kept in special rooms, 
specially built to ensure freedom from every interfering motion. 
There are clocks with many dials — a few in Europe, a few 
in America — and they are the objects of great care. They 
have their audiences to hear their roosters crow, and to see 
their Apostles walk their rounds each day at noon. But this 
clock is just the lifework of a quiet man, built at great sacri- 
fice, perhaps to stand forever unknown until its timbers fall 
away and its brass is rusted, and the gaily-painted Presidents 
are dim, in that little weather-beaten house upon the prairie. 

And so you leave it there, ticking with a sound like many 
pebbles falling; you leave the planets circling slowdy, and the 
martial parade of the Presidents swinging stiffly out at noon, 
and as you go you feel that this clock is wonderful not alone 
because it answers so many questions at a glance, nor because 
of its great size and numerous accomplishments, but because 
it is, somehow, one more embodiment of the desire for perfec- 
tion, one more expression of the romance of the technical. — 
Adapted by J. E. H., from an article by A^^ne Hard^ in The 
TecJinical World, 




riI5SI0IWRY.Bl RELIGIOUS 



Peace With Progress 

THE tension is relieved and once more we breathe easy. 
Xothing now stands in tlie way to prevent Kev. George 
Jackson, when College re-opens, from taking the pro- 
fessorial chair to which he was appointed last September. As 
students, we have looked forward to the event with anticipation, 
and when the recent controversy arose, our anxious thought 
was not so much for the welfare of the church from sea to sea 
as it was of the deprivation it might mean for us. I^ow the air 
is cleared again, and real progress has been made. 

The heated discussion which has ended so amicably seems to 
have been inevitable. Most men have profound convictions 
upon two things, politics and religion. Many have laid down 
their lives for the Church and for the State. So blind does the 
passion become that men have sacrificed the innocent to the 
cause so dear. To the leaders of the Jews Jesus was a -menace 
to the religion of the day and must be got out of the way ; the 
only appeal to reach Pilate was that He was threatening 
Caesar's State. Upon matters touching the Church or State 
most men feel deeply. 

And this is rightly so. For in these so much is at stake. 
Our commonest coins which daily pass through our nands teach 
us what we are indebted to for the peace and order of our civil 
life ; and the same coins tacitly imply that we too bear an image, 
and have engraved upon us a superscription which are not to be 
disregarded though they are divine. When so much is at stake 
it is not to be wondered that men think passionately. 

The point in dispute was not evaded. The Board of Regents 
could not go on its way as if nothing had happened ; the mem- 
bers faced the difficulty unflinchingly. The time had come to 
speak, and an authoritative pronouncement upon the issue was 



574 ACTA VICTORIANA. 

given so that Church might know what the attitude of the Col- 
lege in the matter was: