(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Alumni news"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/alumninews1963fbost 



\ 1/ 7*W 

^. 4' " 




W' - 










FALL 1963 





Looking Back . . . 



Everyone is so busy these days coping with present problems 
and looking ahead to the future that there is relatively little 
time left to review the past. But once in a while, at least, 
it's a satisfying experience to scan the pages of history and 
evaluate the progress that, has been made. 

We know that the students, alumni and faculty of Boston 
College can reflect with pride upon the contributions that 
have been made to the social, educational, and economic 
development of the community, state and nation down 
through the years. 

All of us at A&P extend our heartiest congratulations and 
best wishes to this great university on the occasion of its 
100th Anniversary, and the beginning of its second century. 




1963 - WINTER SPORTS SCHEDULE - 1964 









HOCKEY 










BASKETBALL 






Dec. 


4 


'Brown 


Jan. 


8 


Harvard 


Dec. 


6 


Fairfield 


Feb. 


1 


'Holy Cross 


Dec. 
Dec. 


7 
10 


Providence 
'Northeastern 


Jan. 
Jan. 


11 
24 


'Boston Univ. 
Dartmouth 


Dec. 


12 


Massachusetts 


Feb. 


4 


'Providence 


Dec. 


14 


St. Lawrence 


Jan. 


28 


'Providence 


Dec. 


14 


*U. Conn. 


Feb. 


8 


Army 


Dec. 
Dec. 


17 
19/ 


Princeton 
'ECAC Tourn. 


Jan. 
Feb. 


30 

3 


Clarkson 
'Beanpot Tourn. 


Dec. 
Dec. 


19 
21 


'Colby 
Los Angeles St. 


Feb. 


11 


'Beanpot 




20 1 


at New York 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


5 

7 

10 


'Yale 
Colgate 
'Beanpot Final 


Dec. 


271 

28^ 
30 1 


*ECAC Tourn. 


Feb. 


15 


'Fordham 


Dec. 


) 
23 


'Boston Garden 
Tournament- 




at 
Philadelphia 
'Canisius 


Feb. 


17 


'Beanpot Final 




1 


Toronto 


Feb. 
Feb. 


15 
19 


'Colby 
Brown 


Jan. 


4 


Feb. 


21 


Georgetown 


Dec. 


27 


McGill Univ. 


Feb. 


22 


'Army 


Jan. 


7 


Brandeis 


Feb. 


25 


Holy Cross 


Dec. 
Jan. 


30 
3 


Loyola 
*St. Lawrence 


Feb. 
Feb. 


26 
29 


Boston Univ. 
Northeastern 


Jan. 


23 


'Dartmouth 


Feb. 


28 


Seton Hall 


Jan. 


4 


'Clarltson 


Mar. 


7 


Colby 


Jan. 


29 


'Northeastern 


Mar. 


4 


'Boston Univ. 












'Away Games 













ALUMNI EVENTS 

FAMILY DAY November 2 

Vanderbilt Game. Contests and Games for 
Youngsters. Children's Tickets, $1.00 

VICTORY FESTIVAL November 29 

Pre H. C. Game Dinner Dance, Main Dining 
Room, McElroy Commons, Reserved Tables. 
See Your Class Agent for Tickets. 
Watch for forthcoming detail. 



The 

BOSTON COLLEGE 
Alumni News 



VOL. XXVI NO. 1 



FALL 1963 



; OPEN HOUSE-ALUMNI HALL 

After All Home Football and Hockey Games. 



Contents 




*&gjjtt 



ALUMNI HALL 



Intellectual Excellence 2 



Alumni Centennial Activities 6 



Finances For College 11 



Development Report 13 



Carney Faculty Center 17 



ALUMNI OFFICERS 

President: William J. Sullivan, M.D., '3 

First Vice President: James M. Connolly, '3 3 

Second Vice President: Charles F. Murphy, '30 

Treasurer: Peter C. Quinn, '3 2 

Secretary: Thomas W. Crosby, '3 1 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
Rt. Rev. James H. Doyle, '22 John G. Patten, '3 2 
Daniel M. Driscoll, '28 
Thomas A. Hanna, '50 
Edward J. King, '48 
Cornelius W. Owens, '3 6 



William A. Ryan, '3 3 
Richard H. Stanton, M.D., '3i 
J. Daniel Walsh, '5 
John W. Warren, '3 3 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
Walter G. Boudreau, '43 



Alumni Officers 



18 



Editor's Memo 19 



Sports 



20 



Club News 23 



Class Notes 24 



Published by 

THE BOSTON COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Fall, Winter, Spring 



EDITOR AND DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
Thomas O'C. Murray, '43, CBA 

FACULTY ADVISOR 
Rev. Francis V. Sullivan, S.J., '21 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
Walter G. Boudreau, '43 Rev. John A. O'Callaghan, S.J. 

Albert J. Sullivan, '37 Thomas H. O'Connor, '49 

John F. Norton, '22 



STAFF REPORTER 
Robert Gunderson, '65 



PHOTOGRAPHY 
James Coyne 
John Murphy 



THE COVER 
B. C.'s golden eagle stands 
guarding the entrance to the 
Campus. Superbly pictured 
by the artistry of Jack Frost 
from his book "The Crown- 
ed Hilltop." 




A PURPOSE FOR EDUCATION 



INTELLECTUAL EXCELLENCE 



by 
REV. CHARLES F. DONOVAN, S. J. 
Academic Vice-President 



INTELLECTUAL EXCELLENCE 

IS THE CENTRAL AIM 

OF A HUMANIST EDUCATION" 



We have no records that reveal whether the founding facul- 
ty of Boston College was called together before the start of the 
first class on James Street in 1863. We can assume that there was 
some such meeting at which the first president, Father Bapst, 
may appropriately have discussed the reasons for starting a col- 
lege and the goals which the new institution hoped to achieve. 
Today, although it would be pleasant to reminisce about a cen- 
tury of accomplishment and faculty service, it seems fitting that 
we too should look forward and, rather than dwell upon the 
glories of the past, should re-examine our goals. 

Indeed such a re-examination is called for by circumstances 
more pressing than the inspiration of our centennial celebration. 
The movement of events in American higher education was so 
swift and complex in academic 1962-3 that it is prudent for in- 
stitutions to pause and ask themselves why they exist and where 
they are going. If colleges and universities are not asking them- 
selves these questions, they should be alerted to the fact that 
others, outside and inside the academic world, are asking them. 
Let me document this from recent personal experience. 

It was my privilege to spend the month of July in 1962 as a 
member of a team of twelve American educators who were 
guests of the West German government in a survey of the 
cultural and educational status of that country. Living in the 
same hotels, traveling in the same buses and planes, attending 
the same receptions and visiting the same offices and schools to- 
gether for that length of time, it is not surprising that we learned 
more about each other, our professional attitudes and personal 
busts, than we did about Germany. Ot our group ol twelve, all 
either presidents or deans in American universities and colleges, 
four represented private institutions — only one denominational, 



while the other eight are attached to 
public, more specifically, state institu- 
tions. I was surprised to discover what 
I can only call a mystique of the public 
university among those representing 
such institutions, an emotional loyalty 
that manifested itself not only in a 
somewhat chauvinistic praise of public 
universities, but in disparagement of 
and even hostility towards private insti- 
tutions. This hostility seems to focus on 
Harvard. 

One man asked me if Harvard is not 
over-rated; a second listed California, 
Michigan, and Harvard as the top 
American universities, with California 
already leading in Nobel prize winners; 
a third bade us wait twentv-five years 
and see what the relative strength of 
public and private universities would 
be; a fourth admitted excellence in 
some particular academic area at Har- 
vard but acknowledged that he did so 
grudgingly. These remarks were not 
part of one discussion but occurred at 
different times in different contexts. It 
was the repetition as much as the sub- 
stance of the remarks that struck me. 
I suddenly experienced a surge of con- 
cern for Harvard's welfare, not unself- 
ishly, I admit. I could appreciate the 
uneasiness of the smaller nations of the 
world who undoubtedly interpret the 
therat, "We will bury you," to mean: 
giants go last. 

It was disconcerting to listen as our 
German hosts were told by a member 
of our group that the key to United 
States' success as a democracy was the 
legislation establishing land grant col- 
leges and, at a meeting held only a few 
miles from the Soviet zone, to hear our 
state institutions described as the peo- 
ple's colleges. Finally, at our breakup 
dinner, in an atmosphere of good fellow- 
ship and jocularity, the intimation was 
made that private colleges are elite and 
so effete, with a dubious right to con- 
tinued existence. The fact that an apol- 
ogy of sorts was made the next day 
seemed to indicate that the suggestion 
was not altogether whimsical. 

Naturally I don't want to hang too 
heavy a burden of generalization upon 
this small sample of opinion, and I 
would hesitate to say that my colleagues' 
attitudes are typical of the opinions of 
state university people generally. But 
the experience served to call to mind 
some broader evidence regarding the 
relative roles of private and public 
higher education in America that de- 
serves more than casual notice today. 

In 1948, in one of the rare and there- 



fore presumably significant studies on 
education sponsored by the Federal 
Government, the President's Commis- 
sion on Higher Education, contemplat- 
ing a drastic expansion of college en- 
rollments, blandly recommended that 
enrollments in private institutions 
should hold to a 1948 level, while 
public institutions should absorb the 
increase. Whatever we may think of 
the Commission's Report as an educa- 
tional blueprint, it must be given high 
marks for prophesy. The percentage of 
students enrolled in private colleges and 
universities has sharply declined since 
World War II. In 1948, when the Presi- 
dent's Commission was making its 
recommendations and predictions, a 
majority of collegians were in attend- 
ance at privately controlled institutions, 
as had been the pattern since the start 
of higher education in America. Five 
years later, in 1953, the division was 
just about even between students en- 
rolled in public and private colleges. In 
one decade since then, public institu- 
tions have gained about 10 percent more 
of the college population. Between 1951 
and 1959 the enrollment at four-year 
public institutions increased 84 percent, 
while the enrollment in privately con- 
trolled colleges went up only 31 per 
cent. (Progress of Public Ed. in U.S. 
— Office of Ed. — 1960, p. 26) 

It would be unrealistic to think this 
trend will be stopped, much less re- 
versed. Indeed if federal funds enter 
the picture on a discriminatory basis, 
with privately controlled institutions ex- 
cluded from federal aid, then the gap 
between the resources, the size, and the 
influence of public and private institu- 
tions is likely to widen. We must face 
the possibility — a possibility explicitly 
mentioned by the Commission on 
Higher Education in 1948 — that dur- 
ing the remaining years of the twentieth 
century many private colleges will suffer 
the fate of the 19th century private 
academies, those privately conducted 
secondary schools that preceded public 
high schools and which were unable to 
survive when public high schools be- 
came generally available at no cost. 

In a world of such spectacular un- 
certainties as ours, it is hazardous to 
predict the future; but on the basis of 
history, it is fairly safe to say that in 
the years ahead the Catholic Church 
will make considerable adjustments to 
meet new educational situations that 
may emerge. Thus it is likely that dur- 
ing the next century so many Catholics 
will be attending public institutions of 

3 




Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J. 

higher education that the Church, 
through religious orders or perhaps 
through a new organization of lay 
scholars, will establish rather elaborate 
educational centers on or near secular 
campuses, so that even for the Catholic 
population the importance of the Cath- 
olic college and university, at least 
quantitatively, will decline. 

I am certainly not suggesting that 
Boston College's first century is also its 
last. But if the decades ahead seem 
destined to bring radical shifts in the 
structure of American higher education, 
then it is not merely a matter of aca- 
demic ritual that we ask ourselves what 
is our mission, what is our role on the 
New England scene and in America's 
future, what values and contributions 
do we offer that make us worthy of the 
sacrifice and allegiance that will be 
needed to insure our survival to the 
year 2063? 

These are basic questions, and of 
course they are not new. They are not 
unlike a question posed three and a 
half centuries ago by Father Pedro 
Ribadeneira, a Jesuit selected and 
guided by St. Ignatius himself. In an 
early treatise on the law and spirit of 
the Society of Jesus, Ribadeneira used as 
a title for a chapter on Jesuit education 
the provocative question, "Why Does 
the Society Teach Boys Grammar?" It 
may sound like the familiar lament of 
an upper class professor. Or, less prob- 
ably, it could be the question of a 
structural linguist. The fact is that in 
1605 Ribadeneira felt called upon to 
explain why the Church, why a re- 
ligious order should engage in running 
schools, since this is less obviously 
apostolic than other ministries of the 
Church. The answer to Ribadeneira s 
question had already been given by St. 



Ignatius in the Fourth Part of the Jesuit 
Constitutions where, speaking explicitly 
of higher studies, Ignatius wrote: "The 
Society's goal and the goal of its studies 
is to help our fellow man to \now and 
to love God!' 

We note that Ignatius and Ribade- 
neira are here talking about motiva- 
tions — why we do something — and 
motives inhere in persons rather than 
in institutions. To use a familiar distinc- 
tion, they are speaking of the finis 
operantis rather than the finis operis, 
the aim of the educator rather than the 
aim of education, though these are not 
always different. Not all faculty mem- 
bers of a modern Jesuit university share 
the motivations of Ignatius and the 
founding fathers, for not all share the 
same faith. Yet I am sure that many 
who do not profess that faith are 
associated with such a university be- 
cause they accept the broad imperatives 
of an education that is religiously mo- 
tivated. And certainly an understanding 
and support of these motivations by a 
faculty is what largely contributes to 
the corporate personality and family 
spirit of a Jesuit university. 

But what of the finis operis? What 
aims intrinsic to education did Ignatius 
see? He saw intellectual maturing and 
human culture as values, consonant 
with sanctity, and worthy of pursuit for 
the good of the individual and the good 
of society. This was no Nietzschean hu- 
manism nor misty belief in the absolute 
perfectibility of man. Rather it was the 
moderate optimism of the Christian 
humanist, one who, while recognizing 
the reality of evil and man's tendency 
to evil without supernatural aid, never- 
theless is devoted to the proposition that 
a union between human culture and 
holiness is both possible and worthy of 
earnest pursuit. It was natural that the 
Renaissance and Hellenic ideal of the 
fully developed intellect would be 
prominent among the early Jesuits' edu- 
cational goals; but from the start the 
moral and social dimensions were also 
in view, so that probitas, eruditio and 
officium were the three things Jesuit 
schools aimed to foster in their students. 

Top priority in a humanist educa- 
tional institution goes to the life of the 
mind. The word priority denies ex- 
clusiveness. Intellectual excellence is not 
the only aim in humanist education, 
but it is the central aim, the sine qua 
non. In the phrase 'Christian human- 
ism' the genu* is humanism and 
Christian .1 specific difference. Human- 
ism if both older and, unfortunately at 



this date, broader than Christianity. It 
is a conviction that cultivated rational- 
ity is a supreme human good. It is an 
enthusiasm for and joy in the fact and 
the act of learning. This conviction and 
this excitement span time and space, 
making Plato, St. Thomas, Newton, 
and Toynbee fellow citizens in the 
realm of learning. No provincialism of 
place or culture or ideology may set up 
barriers in this realm. Insofar as we and 
our students share this dedication to 
the life of the mind, we take our place 
in this select transnational and trans- 
millenial company. 

Has the intellectual's cause ever been 
stated more uncompromisingly than by 
St. Augustine? Says Augustine: "A 
young person who neglects the liberal 
arts may be pious and pure; but as 
long as he has to live as a man among 
men, I do not know how anyone can 
call him happy." By happy, Augustine 
clearly does not refer to the diversions 
of the aesthete. The happiness he in- 
vokes is not selfish or sensate experience. 
Rather it is the satisfaction, to use 
Ortega's phrase, of a person operating 
at the height of human potential — 
intellectually; being fully man, instead 
of infra-man. Surely this is what New- 
man intended when he said that the 
liberal arts are those which do not 
aim at some object beyond themselves 
but tend to enjoyment. It is this enjoy- 
ment of study, of search, of discovery, 
of contemplation and of rational dis- 
course — an enjoyment that is often 
ascetic, at times dogged, now and then 
exuberant — that makes a college or 
university truly a seat of learning. 

Applying Augustine's sentence to a 
Catholic University, we can say that 
such an institution must above all be 
a community of scholars and learners 
— the universitas docentium et discent- 
ium of the Middle Ages — not simply a 
collection of persons, however pious, 
living the life of faith. In a Catholic 
university as in any university worthy 
of the name, in Christian humanism 
as in any brand of genuine humanism, 
intelligence and learning are the pri- 
mary ends in view. 

Of course education always has multi- 
ple goals, though naturally individual 
practitioners and regional or cultural 
influences may stress certain objectives 
and scamp others. Thus, in our own 
American history, the aim of intellec- 
tual cultivation clearly dominated col- 
lege thinking and teaching until nearly 
tin 20th century. Then utility, which 
has always been one function of edu- 



cation, became more assertive, in some 
cases tyrannically so. And finally in 
recent years there has been increased 
emphasis upon the social outcomes of 
college education, upon the services 
that society, both in the local and global 
senses, should expect from university 
products and from universities them- 
selves. 

It may be indicative of a tradition of 
Ignatian adaptability that the latest 
leader of the Society of Jesus, our 
present Superior General, Father Jans- 
sens, has made what is probably the 
most eloquent statement concerning the 
social mission of the Jesuit college. He 
says of students in our colleges: 
. . . Let them learn to hunger and 
thirst after justice, the justice that 
sees to it that all men receive the 
due reward of their labors and that 
there be a more just distribution of 
temporal goods as well as a fuller 
and more universal sharing of spir- 
itual goods . . . 
Father Janssens expresses the hope that 
our graduates will be "ready to work 
in bettering the temporal and spiritual 
conditions of the greatest possible 
number of human beings." 

In the United States, individual insti- 
tutions tend to stress different goals for 
different publics. It has been said that 
when recruiting students some uni- 
versities give a great play to utility; 
once the students are matriculated, in- 
tellectual training emerges as the domi- 
nant concern; whereas when public 
support for the institution is sought, 
the impression is given that the primary 
commitment of the university is to the 
common weal. As far as the faculty is 
concerned, it is natural that as men 
and women of learning, they should be 
singleminded in seeing scholarship and 
intellectual growth as the central busi- 
ness of a college. Yet we should not be 
so rigid in our intellectualism that we 
disclaim the associated goals of the total 
enterprise. 

During the past hundred years, as 
the spectrum of collegiate purposes 
broadened in America, Boston College 
was neither aloof nor inflexible. While 
remaining faithful to a tradition of 
liberal arts teaching and learning that 
was mature among Jesuits before 
higher education of any kind existed 
on this continent, the College diversi- 
fied its curricula, assumed new and 
weightier academic obligations, and 
became a university. We can proudly 
say that this institution has professed, 
as we hope it always will profess and 



strive to fulfill, all the valid aims of a 
genuine university- What I am saying 
is that, through its own inner dynam- 
ism — that it, through the pressure of 
its stated purposes and through the in- 
sights and decisions of our predecessors 
on the faculty and administration — as 
well as through interplay with the com- 
munity of American higher education, 
Boston College has kept abreast of the 
times academically and today has the 
same commitments and aspirations as 
other serious institutions of higher learn- 
ing. According to these commitments 
we must draw to each of our schools 
and colleges students who are able, 
worthy, and responsive, young intellec- 
tuals who aspire to scholarliness, for 
whom the university is not an incident 
or an interlude but a genuine alma 
mater, fostering habits of rationality and 
inquiry that will be lifelong. It means 
that there must be a continued growth, 
qualitatively and quantitatively, of re- 
search findings, publications and other 
professional expressions by this faculty 
that will make colleagues on other 
campuses and in other climes — scien- 
tists, historians, linguists, scholars of 
law, public economy, social work and 
the other disciplines — look with grati- 
tude and expectation to Chestnut Hill. 
It means that the institution must find 
funds to support, in a generous sense 
of the word support, all of the academic 
ventures — scientific, social, philosophi- 
cal, literary and professional — that it 
seems prudent to undertake. It means 
we must work to establish here an ever 
more vital community of learning, 
where scholarly teaching is a proud 
profession, where students eagerly learn, 
where ideas and creative inquiry are 
the coin of the realm. 

These are our ideals and commit- 
ments. But they are not ours alone. We 
share them with progressive universities 
across the land. With satisfaction we 
can say, in the parlance of business, that 
in intent and in fact, we are — vis a vis 
American universities at large — com- 
petitive academically. 

But is it enough to be competitive? 
What of the earlier question? What is 
the future place of the private institu- 
tion in American higher education? To 
be sure, we will continue to bend every 
effort and all our resources to strengthen 
ourselves academically. But, with great- 
er resources and equal determination, 
so will public institutions. There will 
certainly be many topflight public uni- 
versities in this country fifty years from 
now. So we should not count on future 



favor or support on the grounds that 
we will simply be better academically 
than public institutions. We've got to 
shoot high and if we come close to our 
goal, it looks as though we'll only be 
keeping pace with the competition. 

What is it then that will be our claim 
to uniqueness? Certainly one claim will 
be our religious commitment and con- 
tribution. Recurring to the example of 
the decline of private secondary educa- 
tion, I am heartened by the fact that 
apart from a few select academies like 
Groton and St. Paul's, the private 
secondary schools that have prospered 
and are today showing increased vitality 
are our own Catholic high schools. And 
I think most Americans, even those 
with strong commitments to public 
education, feel that the religious school 
is a more genuine and perhaps needed 
alternative to public education than are 
the prestige private preparatory schools. 

The situation is parallel as regards 
higher eduaction. The college that is 
sincerely and unequivocally denomina- 
tional presumably has something to say 
that is in part different from and in 
addition to what the secular institution, 
public or private, says. There is pub- 
lished evidence that our secular col- 
leagues think we are spending our 
efforts in a dubiously valid cause if we 
merely duplicate, even in terms of com- 
parable excellence, what they are doing. 
They think of us as different, and un- 
less we are articulate and intellectually 
impressive about the difference, we are 
seen as not fulfilling our mission. They 
expect from us a clear and scholarly 
presentation of alternative perspectives 
and alternative options to those current 
in other academic centers. This means 
that the pressure is on us as never before 
— a pressure born not of a faculty 
resolution nor of an administrative fiat 
but of a sort of manifest destiny — to 
be more than a teaching institution, to 
have relations with a broader com- 
munity than that of this campus, to 
support a genuine dialogue with men 
of learning elsewhere, to be a respected 
center of scholars and scholarship show- 
ing the world the tradition of Catholic 
wisdom. The little college of 1863 
rightly focused on fostering the probitas, 
eruditio and officium of its students. 
The University of 1963 has the added 
mission of fostering and letting shine 
before men a probitas, eruditio, and 
officium of its own. Our associates at 
other universities have a right to hear 
from this campus not merely parallel 
affirmations or confirmations or echoes 



of themselves (though these of course 
we must provide) ; they have a right 
to hear some voices — like those of 
Dawson, D'Arcy, Gilson, Copleston, 
Taylor, and Lewis — expressing the 
insights of a religious tradition with a 
scholarliness and a grasp of present-day 
realities that cannot be ignored in other 
circles. I speak here about scholarship, 
not piety; about learned investigation 
and publication that conforms to the 
most rigorious canons of research. A 
cultural tradition and view of life that 
will soon be identified with one third 
of the population of this country surely 
needs academic interpreters, men and 
women whose open-minded learning 
commands the attention of the world of 
science and letters. Boston College must 
become a center of Catholic scholarship 
in a more real and impressive sense than 
it has to date. 

Of course, not every department or 
every faculty member will have the 
opportunity or even the inclination to 
be a contributor to the specifically 
Christian scholarship of the University. 
This does not make their work less 
important or the need for excellence in 
teaching and research in such fields less 
urgent. We are first a university and in 
every discipline, in every department 
and in every undertaking we must aim 
for the level of excellence that charac- 
terizes any excellent university. But we 
are, besides, a Catholic university; and 
as I have indicated, apart from deeper 
motivations that are present, the drift 
of the times would suggest that we be 
explicitly so. 

When I returned to the campus after 
conferences with professors and ad- 
ministrators of German universities, in- 
cluding Heidelberg, which is approach- 
ing its 600th birthday, and the Free 
University of Berlin, which will soon 
celebrate its 15th, I found — perhaps not 
without some small bias — that for me 
the experience served to locate Boston 
College as a vigorous and maturing 
member of the world family of univer- 
sities. To borrow phrases of a fellow- 
Bostonian, this university is moving 
forward, is sailing, not lying in a still 
harbor. I know that the faculty and ad- 
ministration are collectively determined 
that Boston College's future will be 
marked by progress in excellence. 

It is to the end of translating this de- 
termination into reality that we as aca- 
demic men and women will bend our 
energies in the coming years, as Boston 
College commences its second century 
— Ad Majorem Dei Gloruim. 



ALUMN 



CENTENNIAL 



EVENTS 



The 100th birthday of Boston Col- 
lege was celebrated in spectacular style 
last year. Events long to be remembered 
dotted the calendar, beginning with the 
Solemn Pontifical Mass at the Cathe- 
dral. The University hosted the Ecu- 
menical conference and the Knowledge 
Explosion seminar, attended by scholars 
from all over the world. The President 
of the United States was the Centen- 
nial Commencement speaker and thou- 
sands of alumni took part in these and 
many more centennial activities. 

Even with all these events going on 
at the Heights, the Alumni Association 
under President WILLIAM A. RYAN 
'33 also played its role in the festivities 
marking the first 100 years of growth 
of this great Jesuit University. 

Starting in May, the Alumni Home- 
coming Day ably chairmanncd by 
JOHN \V. WARREN '33, marked the 
beginning of the REV. FRANCIS V. 
SULLIVAN, S.J. award by the Boston 
College Varsity Club to the outstand 
ing stud< in .ithlete. 

On Sunday, June 2, the alumni hon- 
ored us most outstanding and generous 
alumnus. RICHARD CARDINAL 
CUSHING '17. Under chairman I A 




Alumni Homecoming: Left to right: Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J., B.C. President con- 
gratulating Charlie Carr '63, winner of the first Rev. Francis V. Sullivan, S.J. 
Award. Making introduction is Alumni President Bill Ryan while Varsity Club 
President Henry O'Brien looks on. 



MES M. CONNOLLY 3i the beau- 
tiful main dining room of McElroy 
Commons overflowed with loyal alum- 
ni who came to pay tribute to one ol 
their own. 

In the following week, activities con 
tinned unabated; the tilth annual alum- 
ni golf tournament led by chairman 
JAMES D. CASEY '38, hosted over 

175 players at the South Shore Coun 
try (Hub. 

On /Mumni Day hundreds ol old 
grads came back to the campus, took 



part in the anniversary lunches and, at 
the alumni dinner, saw JAMES F. 
STANTON '42 acclaimed the winner 
of the McKenney medal. General chair- 
man DR. RICHARD STANTON '38 
hosted the dinner which featured na- 
tionally syndicated columnist JOSEPH 
MCCARTHY '39 as the featured speak- 
er. 

On the following pages we have pic- 
tured some of the personalities and 
events involved in the alumni al fairs 
ol the Centennial Year. 




The Alumni Centennial Ban- 
quet, left to right: Rev. Michael 
P. Walsh, S.J., Richard Cardinal 
Cushing, Alumni President Wil- 
liam A. Ryan and Dinner Chair- 
man, James M. Connolly. 



State Treasurer John T. Driscoll, 
'49, Most Rev. Jeremiah Minihan, 
LL.D. '48, Auxiliary Bishop of 
Boston, Hon. John F. Collins, mayor 
of Boston. 





Head Table Guests: Most Rev. Eric 
F. McKenzie, '14, Auxiliary Bishop 
of Boston; Governor Endicott Pea- 
body and Congressman Thomas P. 
O'Neil, '36. 




Main Dining Room, McElroy Com- 
mons during Alumni Centennial 
Banquet. 



Centennial Dinner, Head Table 
Guests: John J. King, LL.D. '56, 
Christopher J. Duncan, M.D 
'24, Rev. Francis V. Sullivan, 
S.J. '21, John B. Atkinson '16, 
John J. Walsh '15 and Rt. Rev. 
Charles A. Finn, '99. 








Alumni Centennial Dinner Reception: Most Rev. Jere- 
miah F. Minihan, Most Rev. Eric F. McKenzie, Rev. John 
V. O'Connor, S.J., Jesuit Provincial and Rt. Rev. Charles 
Finn '99. 



Centennial Head Table: John W. Warren '33, Daniel 

M. Driscoll '28, Hon. Francis J. Good '35, Directors of 

the Alumni; Charles F. Murphy '30, 2nd Vice President 

and Ernest F. Williams, Board of Regents. 




■H • 





Alumni Day, 1963. James F. Stanton '42 left, congratulated on being 

named McKermey Medal winner by Alumni President William A. Ryan 

'33 while Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J. smiles approval. 



Representing the "Old Grads" John C. Riley, class 
of 1903 visits Fr. Rector at Alumni Day Reception. 



Members of the Golden Anniversary Class of 1913, with Fr. Walsh 
in President's Dining Room on Alumni Day 1963. 




The average high school senior or 
present college student has probably 
(and hopefully) saved $300.00 to $400.00, 
perhaps more toward college. Parents 
may have managed to put aside $500.00 
to $1000.00, towards tuition costs but 
that might have to be spread over pos- 
sibly three or four prospective students 
in the same family, within the next 
few years. It becomes apparent that 
some kind of financial assistance is 
going to be necessary, in order to insure 
a college education for any member of 
the family. 

In the last decade the volume and 
complexity of student financial prob- 
lems has become so great at Boston 
College, as it has at other colleges and 
universities, that a Financial Aids Of- 
fice was established in the Summer of 
1962, and John Madigan '50, was ap- 
pointed Financial Aids Officer, the first 
such full time position at the Heights. 
This office has responsibility for coor- 
dinating the financial resources of the 
college with respect to student assist- 
ance, for counseling students in the use 
of their funds and in compiling avail- 
able information concerning outside 
sources of aid. 

The forms of aid are many and 
varied. Basically, they fall into three 
general categories: Scholarships, Loans, 
and part-time employment. During its 
first year of operation, the office 
processed over 2,000 new applications 
for scholarships, plus another 800 or 
more renewal applications. Add to these 
the 800 applicants for loans, and another 
350 job applicants, and some of the 
reasons for thinking the task of a fi- 
nancial aid officer as a full-time job 
becomes quite apparent. 

Of course, all who apply do not re- 
ceive help. Many applicants are turned 
down after careful study because their 
need is not sufficiently great in com- 
parison to other requests. Others do not 
qualify for various academic reasons. 
Due to increased costs, old scholarship 
funds that once met all tuition costs, 
may now only meet a fraction of the 
New funds and endowments do 
not grow rapidly and most have had to 
be supplemented by funds taken out of 
current operating costs. 

In the 1962-63 academic year, schol- 
arship awards at Boston College 
amounted to approximately one million 



dollars. Only about 20% of that amount 
was derived from earned income on 
established scholarship funds. This year, 
it is expected that total scholarship 
awards will probably increase 10% as 
they have regularly over the last sev- 
eral years. 

There will also be several hundred 
thousand dollars in additional awards 
made to students through Boston Col- 
lege, but financed by outside organiza- 
tions such as National Merit, General 
Motors, and many other such National 
Awards. Local organizations, parishes, 
industries, and social organizations will 
make many more awards directly to 
students. 

What is the real purpose of a scholar- 
ship 5 The first purpose for any uni- 
versity is of course, a national one — to 
meet our obligation to society in gen- 
eral to see that deserving and qualified 
students without financial means will 
not waste their talents by staying away 
from college. An additional purpose is 
to permit students the freedom of 
choice to come to Boston College should 
they so desire, even though our costs 
may be higher than another college or 
university they could possibly more 
readily afford. 

These two purposes above suggest 
that perhaps the major criterion for 
selecting scholarship recipients will be 
financial need. The day when scholar- 
ships represented solely a prize for 
academic excellence is fast disappearing. 
Scholastic achievement is still a most 
important consideration and always will 
be, but it can never again be the only 
measure, in the complex society of the 
world today. 

Those who have a real need, but do 
not always measure up to the high 
academic standards required for strict 
"scholarship" will find their major 
source of assistance in long-term, low- 
cost loans. The Federal Government 
under the National Defense Education 
Act, provides a fund of $250,000.00 per 
year which can be made available to 
needy students on liberal terms. Boston 
College must add about $28,000.00 to 
this fund each year, and with present 
repayments running about $2(),0(X).00 
per year, a total loan Eund oi over 

5 100,000.00 is available to those needing 
help. About 600 students were actually 
awarded loans last year. 
12 



In awarding loan funds, need is again 
the major criterion, with academic re- 
quirements being somewhat lower than 
in the case of scholarships. Loans of up 
to $1,000.00 per year may be made to 
students with repayments not beginning 
until a year AFTER graduation and 
extending over as much as a ten year 
period. Interest charges which do not 
begin until the first payment, are at the 
rate of only 3% per year. To encourage 
study in the field of education, science, 
mathematics and foreign languages, the 
Defense Act provides that students in 
those major fields of study receive 
priority on loans. 

Many students, with the self-reliance 
that is typical of today's college youth, 
turn to part-time employment to see 
them through their years of higher ed- 
ucation. It would be impossible to es- 
timate how much students may earn in 
their many work activities, but the col- 
lege itself was able to provide work for 
over 125 undergraduates last year, and 
paid out nearly $75,000.00 in tuition 
credits for such activity. Jobs available, 
included part time work in the cafe- 
terias, libraries, offices, maintenance 
force, mailroom, laundries, skating rink, 
and a variety of sports activities through- 
out the campus. 

How does a student or prospective 
student get this information so that he 
may obtain assistance from these various 
sources? Incoming freshmen, of course, 
apply directly to the Admissions Office 
at the time their application is made. 
Fr. Edmond D. Walsh, S.J., Director 
of Admissions, will advise incoming 
students of their opportunities for schol- 
arship aid. Students requesting assist- 
ance of any sort at the time of admission 
are always required to file a Parents' 
Confidential Statement with the Col- 
lege Scholarship Service, so that the 
Financial Aid Office at Boston College 
as well as the majority ot other univer- 
sities in the country to- which the stu- 
dent might apply for admission, can be 
made aware of the financial problems. 
The requirements ol each case are in- 
dividually and most carefully assessed. 
The solutions to most problems are 
unique and often require the greatest 
ingenuity on the part of students, 
parents, and college officials. Some- 
times but rarely, the problem can't be 
solved. The will to find a way is the 
most important ingredient. 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Dear Alumnus: 

The year now drawing to a close has been an exciting one for Alma Mater. The 100th 
anniversary observance has brought increased honor and recognition to the University from 
eminent scholars and churchmen, and from the President of the United States, the chief 
speaker at our Centennial Convocation. 

Alumni participation has been particularly gratifying to all of us at Alma Mater. The 
Alumni should be very proud of the part they played in the success of every Centennial 
activity. Indeed it has been a wonderful demonstration of loyalty to the University. 

During the year our alumni have given of themselves in many other ways as well. Hun- 
dreds of volunteers have dedicated themselves to the arduous and self-sacrificing task of 
raising funds for our initial Centennial goal of $15, 000, 000 for the preservation and the 
strengthening of the University. These efforts have been most effective. We are now able 
to report that gifts and pledges totaling just under $11, 000, 000 have been made to Boston 
College to date. Some $6, 000, 000 -- well over half of all gifts -- have come from our 
generous alumni. 

It is the end of the beginning, but we must still seek out and find the additional 
$4, 000, 000 that will assure the success of our 100th Anniversary Development Program. 
We are confident that loyal and devoted alumni will continue to support the University effort. 
Some 7000 alumni have already made contributions, and there remain about 10, 000 others 
to be solicited. If you have not yet given, I hope we can have your help during the next few 
months in our drive for the development and advancement of Boston College. 

Academic excellence is costly. High standards have always been expensive to main- 
tain, and they will continue to be expensive. But I am quite sure that you, as an alumnus, 
will not permit us to settle for anything but the best educational standards and the best ed- 
ucational facilities. 

Your dedication to the future of your University will be our best assurance of success 
during the coming year. It will be largely your example which will stimulate and increase 
the flow of gifts to Alma Mater from corporations, foundations, and non-alumni friends of 
Boston College. I know we can count on you. 

I extend a warm invitation to you to visit the Campus so that you can observe some of 
the academic and physical changes taking place at Boston College. If you have not been 
back to the Heights recently, I think you will be pleased by what you see. 

With every best wish and kindest personal regards, I remain 

Sincerely yours, 



yiUU^UL -P. Ms+lJU.S J \ 



Michael P. Walsh, S. J. 




I I 



BOSTC 

:ONCIiP'l'ION OF 







VELSPMEIVHCu. ej^ogr a! 




•HHSTNUT HIL 



THE RACE FOR EXCELLENCE 

The college or university that stands still today in the development of its faculties and facilities in- 
vites rigor mortis, the medical examiner and the attendant graveside obsequies. 

Academic institutions in the Greater Boston area are not listening to the siren song of suicide; each of 
them is mightily involved not only in self-preservation but in meeting the challenging educational needs of 
the sixth decade of the twentieth century. 

As the magnet for students from cities and towns, from villages and hamlets in every corner of the 
nation and the world, Greater Boston universities have had thrust upon them even greater challenges than 
their brother and sister institutions in other parts of the nation. 

Besides Boston College, at least a dozen local institutions have been conducting capital fund campaigns 
in the race for academic excellence. Their combined goals total nearly half a billion dollars, which is very 
close to the total annual operating budget for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Here is a partial 
listing of local colleges and universities and their stated requirements: 

Boston College $40,000,000 

Boston University $60,000,000 

Brandeis University $65,100,000 

Emmanuel College $ 2,000,000 

Harvard College $82,500,000 

Harvard Medical School $58,000,000 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology $98,000,000 

Newton College of the Sacred Heart $10,000,000 

Northeastern University $40,000,000 

Radcliffe College $10,000,000 

Simmons College $ 8,000,000 

Tufts University $ 7,500,000 

Wellesley College $15,000,000 

And to be within a frame of reference with some other Catholic institutions, here are some additional 
development requirements: 

Fordham University : $60,000,000 

Loyola University (Chicago) $92,000,000 

Marquette University $45,000,000 

University of Notre Dame $66,000,000 

St. Louis University $46,000,000 

We are not alone. But the race is to the swift, the battle to the strong. In the face of this stiff com- 
petition, there is no choice but to work harder than ever for the future of our University. The obligation 
must be met if Boston College is to continue to improve its academic stature. 

While we feel that Boston College alumni are a special breed of men and women, the authorities of 
other local institutions, no less than Father Walsh, are proclaiming the loyalty and support of their alumni. 

And all of them are correct in their assumptions that alumni are the major forces in whatever suc- 
cess the development programs will have. 

Alumni are the heart-blood of these campaigns. They are a barometer of the strengths and weaknesses 
of an educational institution. And, if you are not aware of it, alumni giving is under the high-test prob- 
ings of many sensitive microscopes — the analysis made by corporations and foundations. 

It has always been the challenges, of course,that have brought out the best, in men and in institutions. 
And like the alumni of other universities in and around Greater Boston, the alumni of Boston College 
have been meeting the challenges of educational growth and greatness. They have been answering the call 
of Alma Mater for help. And they will continue to do so. 

Yes, we have faith in the Alumni of Boston College. And you can pardonably burst with pride when 
the master plan for increased "Strength in Excellence" becomes a reality. 

16 



G° 



$* 



\#- 



THE 



CARNEY FACULTY CENTER 



Another important phase of Boston College's 
Centennial Development Program became a reality 
early this Spring, when ground was broken for the 
construction of the new Carney Faculty Center. 
His Eminence, Richard Cardinal Cushing, the Very 
Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J. and Professor Joseph 
P. Maguire of the Classics department took part in 
the ceremonies near the Beacon Street side of the 
campus, at the site of the newest campus building. 

The building will honor the name of Andrew 
Carney, one of the early benefactors of the young 
and struggling Jesuit college, then located in the 
South End of Boston. A prominent merchant, 
Andrew Carney gave much of his own time and 
financial help to aid in the establishment of this 
first Catholic college in Boston. Ever willing to do 
all possible to insure the growth of the young col- 
lege, Carney bought the old Otis school from the 
City of Boston for Fr. John McElroy and shortly 
before his death gave $20,000, a princely amount 



"THE PROGRESS . 





"THE BEGINNING . 



in those days, to the trustees for future develop- 
ment. Always interested in the welfare of his 
fellow citizens, Carney who died in 1864, was also 
the founder of the great Carney Hospital. 

Located just below McElroy Commons — along 
what used to be the third base side of the old base- 
ball diamond — the building will rise four stories 
when completed. 

Designed in Modern Gothic, to blend with the 
other campus buildings, the Carney Faculty Center 
will provide many sorely needed faculty offices, 
plus additional seminar and class rooms. On the 
campus end of the ground floor, overlooking the 
Schools of Education and Nursing, there will be six 
seminar rooms and a modern student lounge. 

There will be fifteen additional classrooms be- 
tween the first and third floors in addition to over 
one hundred and forty five office and faculty con- 
sultation rooms. Construction is continuing at a 
rapid pace and it is expected that the entire build- 
ing will be complete and ready for occupancy in 
September of 1964. 



17 



7963-/964 






ALUMNI OFFICERS 



4 

( 



President: 

William J. Sullivan, M.D. 

'30 of Milton. 





1st Vice-President: 
James M. Connolly, '33 
of Belmont. Vice Presi- 
dent, John Donnelly & 
Sons, Boston. 




Director: 
Cornelius W. Owens, '36 
of New York. Vice Presi- 
dent, American Telephone 
& Telegraph Co., Inc. 




tic Board: 
John J. Sbeehan of Cam- 
bridge, '20 
Cambridge High and 

l.alin Schi 




2nd Vice-President: 
Charles F. Murphy, '30 
of Jamaica Plain. Presi- 
dent, Charles F. Murphy 
Insurance, Inc., Boston. 




Director: 

J. Daniel Walsh, '50 of 

Belmont. Vice President, 

N. E. Merchants National 

Bank. 




Athletic Board: 

Timothy X. Croriin, '45 

of \\ aban. Presidi i l & 

er, Cramei E •■ 

tronics, Inc. 





Treasurer: 
Peter C. Quinn, '32 of 
Westwood. Ass't Director 
of Industrial Relations 
First National Stores, Inc. 



Secretary: 
Thomas W. Crosby, '31 
of West Roxbury, LL.B., 
'41, Vice President, Lin- 
coln Savings Bank. Boston . 





Director: 
Thomas A. Hanna, 'SO 
of Rochester, N.Y. Presi- 
dent, Hanna Associates, 

Rochester. 



Director: 

John G. Patten, '32 of 

Riverside, Conn. Vice 

President New York 

Central Railroad. 



Thomas E. Gaquin '37, Chairman of the 
Nominating Committee, on Alumni Day 
announced the election of these officers 
and directors. Continuing to serve on the 
Board are: William A. Ryan '33, Rt. Rev. 
James H. Doyle '22, Daniel M. Driscoll 
'28, Edward J. King '48, Richard H. Stan- 
ton, M.D., '38, and John W. Warren '33. 



18 



4cUZ5%Ul- nrrwm&V* 




Rev. James F. Moynihan, S.J. 



Summer is not a time for rest and relaxation at University Heights. While many 
alumni are away at the beaches or the mountains, the college was bustling with activity. 
Summer school courses, special institutes and conferences attracted well over 3,000 people 
to the campus this past summer. 

Among the many activities was a special institute in Radiation Biology, directed by 
DR. WALTER J. FIMIAN, JR., of the faculty, co-sponsored by the National Science 
Foundation and the Atomic Energy Commission. . . . To assist high school physics teachers 
teaching the advances of electronics and radioactivity, over 40 teachers attended the Na- 
tional Science Foundation Physics Institute. . . . 
Under the direction of REV. JAMES DEVLIN, S.J., 
a large group of scientists took part in a special 
course of modern industrial spectrography. . . . The 
College also hosted the Jesuit Educational Associa- 
tion Guidance Institute, in which more than 120 
guidance counsellors from all Jesuit schools and col- 
leges of the United States and some from Canada, 
India, Ireland, and the Philippines were participants. 
REV. JAMES F. MOYNIHAN, S.J., Chairman of 
the Psychology Department, who pioneered the 
guidance and counselling programs at Boston College, 
was the Director of the Institute. 

Among the figures who attended the sessions 
were DR. ALEXANDER SCHNIEDERS of the 
School of Education who gave the keynote address; 
REV. PAUL FITZGERALD, S.J., Assistant to the 
President of the JEA; REV. RICHARD VAUGHAN, 
S.J., of the University of San Francisco; DR. P. 
ALBERT DUHAMEL, Director of Special Programs 
at Boston College, DANA L. FARNSWORTH, M.D. 
of Harvard University, REV. EDWARD DOYLE, 
S.J., of Loyola University, New Orleans and many 
other guidance personnel from other universities and 
schools. . . . Over 400 school administration personnel met on campus at the Institute for 
School Administrators, under the direction of SISTER M. JOSEPHINE, SSJ., Director 
of the Institute, who was one of the principal speakers. Others appearing at the sessions 
were DR. JOHN DAVIS, Superintendent of Schools in Worcester, DR. T. M. STINNETT 
of the National Education Association and REV. CHARLES F. DONOVAN, S.J., Dean 
of the School of Education. . . . During mid-August, the college played host to the Inter- 
national Congress of Medieval Canon Law, attended by church historians and scholars from 
Europe, Canada, Australia and the United States. The Congress, sponsored by the Institute 
of Research and Study in Medieval Canon Law, Washington and is devoted to the explora- 
tion and study of church law of the middle ages as it may have become part of the great 
legal systems of Western civilization. MONSIGNOR J. JOSEPH RYAN, '36, Professor of 
Medieval History at the Pontificial Institute of Medieval Studies, Toronto and a founder 
of the Institute was chairman of the Congress. 

The College also played host to the N. E. Regional Conference of the Confraternity 
of Christian Doctrine in August, when hundreds of lay teachers and religious discussed the 
Catholic training in the parish. . . . PROF. ROBERT M. COLEMAN of the Biology 
department recently received a $34,800 National Science Foundation grant. . . . REV. 
JAMES W. SKEHAN, S.J., Chairman of the Geology department has been elected Pres- 
ident N. E. Chapter of the National Association of Geology teachers. . . . Dr. WALTER 
J. FIMIAN of the Biology department received a $22,000 grant for radiation biology 
research from the Atomic Energy Commission. . . . PROF. JAMES E. SHAW, chairman 

of the Business Law department received the St. 
Xavier "Insignis" medal for excellence in professional, 
civic and family life. The award is only the 7th given 
in 30 years to an outstanding alumnus of St. Xavier 
High School, Cincinnati . . . EDWARD J. KING, '48, 
a member of the Board of Directors of the Alumni 
Association was recently named as Executive Director 
of the Massachusetts Port Authority . . . REV. 
ROBERT F. DRINAN, '42, Dean of the Law School 
has written a new volume entitled "Religion, The 
Courts and Public Policy," published by McGraw 
Hill Book Co. . . . EDWARD L. O'NEILL, '49, pro- 
fessor of physics at Boston University recently had 
published his new book, "Introduction to Statistical 
Optics." . . . .The Navy Department is planning to 
publish a volume on naval aviation. Families of men 
who were in the Navy air arm during World War I 
are requested to contact the Naval Aviation Register, 
2500 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Washington 7, D.C. . . . 
The appreciation of the Alumni Association is ex- 
tended to the Boston Envelope Co. for their fine 
"Salute to Boston College" on their large billboard 
Edward J. King, '48 in Dedham. 

19 





HOST 




FACULTY 



ALUMNI 










SPORTS 



by EDDIE MILLER 57 CBA 



It hardly seems possible, but we're 
about to kick off another college foot- 
ball season already! 

Just a few days ago — on September 
1st — 1963 Captain Joe Lukis led an 
eager and impressive squad of 73 young 
men of Boston College, on to the turf 
of Alumni Stadium, ready, willing and 
anxious to give head Coach Jim Miller 
and his excellent young staff, 100% 
plus. 

And that's just what they have been 
giving in their rugged, two-a-day prac- 
tice sessions. 

Boston College men far and near 
recall with glee the wonderful debut 
Jim Miller made at the Heights last 
season. He coached the Eagles to a sur- 



It's pretty difficult to improve on an 
8 and 2 record — 9 and 1 or 10 and 
seem to be the only answers. So we 
won't predict anything like this, but 
we'll certainly hope against hope for 
either. 

Jim Miller has lost 29 lettermen from 
the '62 team, at least half of them were 
outstanding football players, and most 
of them linemen. Therefore the biggest 
problem facing the coach for '63 is to 
rebuild a line pretty much depleted 
through graduation. Tackle was the 
position hit hardest and only one ex- 
perienced man — John Frechette, an 



outstanding junior — returns here. Be- 
hind him at left tackle are Bill Schoeck, 
a junior and veteran senior, Harry 
Kushigian. At right tackle, a fine look- 
ing young sophomore named Jim 
Chevilott has performed well enough 
to earn a starting role. Behind him are 
Emil Kleiner, a junior who lettered as 
a guard last season, and Ken Kiriaco- 
polous, a senior who has been plagued 
with injuries but who can really help 
if he stays healthy. 

The center position is another area 
of concern with the coaching staff. Bart 
Connelly, a seasoned veteran will be 

BOSTON COLLEG 




prising 8-2 record and the mythical 
New England championship. 

Can the likeable cigar -smoking Mid- 
westerner repeat in '63? — What can 
we B.C. men look for this season? 

Well, in our own (not necessarily 
expert) way we'll try to give you our 
outlooks for 1 ( >M. 







1963 




SCHEDULE 


September 


21 


at Syracuse 


September 


28 


Wichita 


October 


4 


at Detroit 


October 


12 


Villanova 


October 


26 


at Air Force 


November 


2 


Vanderbilt 


November 


9 


Buffalo 


November 


16 


Virginia 


November 


23 


at Boston Univ. 


November 


30 


at Holy Cross 



one of the best around if his knee holds 
up (Bart had a Spring operation for 
a torn cartilage.) Frank Fitzgibbons is 
an adequate replacement and needs only 
more game experience. Tom Tobin is 
the third unit center, and will also 
develop with experience. 

The situation at guard is brighter 
with Dick Cremin, an outstanding 
junior from Baltimore, first unit, 
backed up by John Leone and Bob 
Ryan, a pair of sophomores with real 
potential. At right guard a sophomore 
named Marty DiMezza, has, like Chevi- 
lott looked so good, he's won himself a 

DOTBALL SQUAD 



I^Jf 




EAGLE'S COACHING STAFF— Left to Right: Cliff Poirier, John McCauley, George Clemens, Head Coach 
Jim Miller, Tracy Mehr, Emerson Dickie and Loyal Park. 



starting role, but rugged Frank DeFeli- 
ce, who shone as a sophomore will push 
Marty hard for this honor. Number 
three right guard, at the moment is a 
tough "little" guy from Brockton named 
Eddie Butler, converted from fullback, 
has built himself up from 180 to 195 




(he's 5' 9") and has all the desire and 
hustle to do the job. 

Completing the Eagles front wall 
would be the ends, and again, the pic- 
ture here is a bright one. Captain Joe 
Lukis, (who should be an exceptional 
leader) is appropriately enough, the 
number one left end. Joe stands out de- 
fensively but is also a capable receiver. 
Behind him is junior Bill Cronin, a big 
rangy lad who excels at pass-receiving 
—we predict he'll be a real good one. 




Above is a reproduction of the cover of the 
1963 N.C.A.A. Football GUIDE, featuring our 
own Jack Concannon as the cover subject. This 
is the first time a Boston College football player 
has been chosen for this honor. Naturally, we're 
proud of Jack's selection . . . and grateful to 
the National Collegiate Athletic Board, which 
produced the GUIDE. 

Jack Concannon, a 6 ft. 3 in., 200 lb., three- 
sport star, overcame a serious back injury to 
lead Boston College to a splendid eight and two 
season in 1962. 




HALFBACK BOB SHANN 
Andover, Mass. 



Charlie Smith, a promising sophomore 
is the third unit left end. On the other 
end is junior Jim Whalen, who will be 
a great one, according to Jim Miller, 
followed by Juniors Frank Grywalski 
and Dick Capp, (Capp is also an ex- 
cellent basketball player and should fi- 
gure in Bob Cousy's hoop plans this 
coming basketball season.) 

Most of us like to save the best till 
the end, so now we'll get into the Eagle 
backfield. 

Jim Miller said recently that "the 
strength of this year's team lies in the 
experience, speed and depth of our 
backfield." "Jack Concannon of Boston 
College is certainly one of the best signal 
callers in the East if not in the nation," 




said Irving Marsh in the September 6th 
New York Herald Tribune. We've 
noted Jack's impressive statistics and 
accomplishments under his picture, so 
it will do simply to say -we think he's 
a bona-fide All-American already, and 
feel the nation will agree with us in a 
few short weeks. 

Behind Jack is senior Phil Carlino, 
an excellent quarterback in his own 
right. Phil will undoubtedly be the de- 
fensive quarterback with Steve Murray, 
a junior and sophomores Larry Marzetti 
and Eddie Foley, fighting for the num- 
ber two offensive job. Believe it or not, 
all three of these boys have outstanding 
ability, passing and running, and all 
have good size and speed. Incidentally, 
Steve Murray does the punting for Bos- 
ton College and does it well. In 1962 




END JIM WHALEN 
Cambridge, Matt. 



FULLBACK WALT DUBZINSKI 
Gardner, Mass. 

he averaged 38.5 yds. per kick and 
ranked 26th nationally. 

Senior Walt Dubzinski is the leading 
candidate for the top fullback spot at 
this stage of the season but the hard 
running son and namesake of the fa- 
mous Sugar Bowler is being hard 
pressed by Don Moran, a junior who 
we predict will be terrific. Junior John 
Walsh and sophomore Ron Gentili are 
also looking good and either or both 
could play a lot of football this Fall. 

Finally rounding out the backfield 
are the halfbacks. Bob Shann (The 
Mm) is the number one left halfback 
and we expect a tremendous year from 
this boy. Behind Bob are Johnny Bar- 
rett the Lawrence flash a senior and 
sophomore Hank Blaha. 

On the right side is veteran senior 
Pete Shaughnessy who does a terrific 

22 




HALFBACK PETE SHAUGHNESSY 
Rochester, N.Y. 



job in a quiet way, Jim McGowan who 
shone especially on pass defense last 
year and Bob Budzinski. He has been 
the most impressive sophomore back 
to date. 

Summing Up: 

Boston College may well have an- 
other fine season — we'll be exciting 
again, "we will score more" says Jim 
Miller — (last season we averaged 25.1 
points per game) because of our fine 
backs and receivers — and we'll throw 
more. The big questions are can our 
defensive line prevent the opposition 
from scoring more than we do and can 
our inexperienced line (which includes 
seven sophomores on the first 3 units) 
come along fast enough? 




GUARD DICK CREMIN 
Baltimore, Maryland 



B. C. CLUB NOTES 



Chicago : 

The Glenview Naval Air Station Officer's 
-lub was the scene of the Club's annual 
lusbands and wives meeting, held in late 
*Iay with an overflow crowd in attendance, 
'resident Herb Chernack, '39, reports an 
ncrease in membership of over 50% in the 
ast year, and is looking forward to greeting 
11 new Alumni arrivals in the Windy City. 
*he Club is preparing plans to work with 
he Serra organization in Chicago, a group 
f Catholic businessmen, whose objective is 
d select leaders in high school and provide 
tiem with some new means of Scholarship 
id for higher education. 



Syracuse 

Once again our Central New York alumni 
ill play host to the visitors who arrive for 
le opening game on September 21 at Arch- 
old Stadium. President PETER HOPKINS 
as arranged to hold a cocktail party at the 
[otel Syracuse COUNTRY HOUSE on 
luckley Road right at Exit 36 of the New 
'ork Thruway on Friday evening, Septem- 
er 20th. All B. C. alumni who are attending 
le opening game with Syracuse University 
re cordially invited to join the festivities. 

did Hudson 

The annual spring meeting of the Club, 
eld in Poughkeepsie, featured the showing 
F two of last season's fine football game 
lms. Following the films, the election of 
fficers was held with BOB CONNOR, 
16 CBA of Fishkill, N.Y. being named the 
ew president while JIM SWEENEY, '44 
f Poughkeepsie was elected Secretary, 
lans are underway to make a group trip 
> the opening game at Syracuse. 

Vashington 

The club in the nation's capitol will open 
s new season with a reception honoring 
oston College's president, The Very Rev. 
lichael P. Walsh, S.J. on October 3. Club 
resident TERRY GRIFFIN, assisted by 
EVIN FLANAGAN, announced that the 
lair will take place at the Touchdown 
lub, through the courtesy of AL FIOREN- 
INO '43, with the social hour beginning at 
:30 P.M. It is hoped that all residents of 
le area will attend this premiere event of 
le season. Further announcements will be 
>rthcoming to all club members and those 
terested in other details may contact Kevin 
lanagan at the General Services Adminis- 
ation. 



Denver 

With the prospective visit of the B. C. 
agles to the beautiful Air Force Academy 
i Colorado Springs to meet the A. F. Fal- 
>ns on October 26, club president ED 
LANCY is working on arrangements to 
ave a reception for visiting alumni and the 
sam on the night of the game. Tentative 
lans at press time are to have the affair at 
le Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, where 
le team will be quartered. 



A Communion Supper, under the Chairman- 
ship of JOHN RICHARD, was held on 
Saturday evening May 18th with many of 
the wives accompanying the members who 
attended. Both FATHER W. SEAVEY 
JOYCE, S.J. the principal speaker, and 
JAMES STANTON, representing the Alum- 
ni Fund, proved interesting and informative 
in their remarks. 

A family day outing was held on June 
29th at Club Director HUGH WARD'S 
fine Day Camp, Glenmere, in Norton. 
LLOYD McDONALD and DICK HOP- 
KINS were Co-Chairmen on this one. Swim- 
ming, sunshine and picnic lunches along 
with plenty of small talk were the order of 
the day. 

President JIM CONDON has named 
BOB KELLEHER to be Chairman of the 
3rd annual Monte Carlo Nite to be held on 
Saturday, November 9th at the Walkover 
Club in Brockton. Keep the date open and 
watch the newspapers and mails for further 
information on this popular event. 

DICK HOPKINS continues to work hard 
in his capacity as Chairman of the Member- 
ship Committee. Dick, along with the Of- 
ficers, Directors and Members, invites all 
interested Alumni to become ACTIVE 
members of the Club. DICK HOPKINS 
can be reached in Stoughton at FI 4-7555. 




ROBERT KELLEHER 
Old Colony Club 



Club Notice 

Laetare Sunday 1964 falls on March 8. 
Although the annual communion breakfast, 
sponsored by the Alumni Association, was 
superceded by the Centennial Mass of 
Thanksgiving last year, your Association is 
now planning to again sponsor this event in 
the coming year. It is hoped that our Alum- 
ni clubs will again join the Association 
in corporate communion on this date. You 
are urged to contact the alumni office for 
any assistance needed by your club and join 
the Association in this annual religious 
event. 



BOSTON COLLEGE CLUB DIRECTORY 



)ld Colony 



Since the last edition of the Alumni News, 
vo well attended events have taken place. 



BALTIMORE 

BERKSHIRES 

BUFFALO-ROCHESTER 

CAMBRIDGE 

CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS 

CENTRAL NEW YORK 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

CONNECTICUT 

DENVER, COLORADO 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 

EAST BOSTON 

EVERETT 

FLORIDA 

LAWRENCE 

LOS ANGELES 

LONG ISLAND 

LOWELL 

LOWER MERRIMACK VALLEY 

LYNN 

MAINE 

METROPOLITAN CLUB 

MID-HUDSON 

NEW BEDFORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NEW JERSEY 

NORTHEASTERN NEW YORK 

NORTH SHORE 

OLD COLONY 

OREGON 

PHILADELPHIA 

RHODE ISLAND 

ST. LOUIS 

SAN FRANCISCO 

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 

SPRINGFIELD 

TAUNTON 

VERMONT 

WASHINGTON 

WISCONSIN 

WORCESTER 



Robert M. Roche, '38, 1014 Overbrook Rd., Baltimore 12 

Rudolph Sacco, '51, 90 Turner Ave., Pittsfield 

Gordon Gannon, Jr., '54, 605 Brisbane Bldg., Buffalo 3, N. Y. 

Charles A. Watson, '43, 3 Granite Street 

Edward M. Clasby, '50, 35 Winter St., Framingham 

Peter J. Hopkins, L '50, 253 Genesee St., Chittenango, N. Y. 

Herbert L. Chernack, '39, 12200 South 69th St., Palos Heights 

Paul P. Kane, '49, 6615 Bantry Ave., Cincinnati 8, Ohio 

Albert W. Alessi, '50, 12 Trumbull Drive, Wallingford 

Edward B. Clancy, '37, 201 University Blvd., Denver, Colorado 

William H. Boodro, '48, CBA, 29514 Rosslyn, Garden City 

John E. Mangini, '51, 49 Bayswater Street 

Ciro R. Yannaco, '45, 40 Stuart Street 

John F. Beatty, '41, 218 Park Drive, Bal Harbour 

Victor L. Hatem, '50, CBA, 54 Conrad St., Methuen 

Daniel J. Finnegan, '50, 2811 West 129th St., Gardena, Calif. 

W. Harvey Reid, '47, CBA, 2760 So. Shelley Rd., No Bellmore, L.I. 

Lawrence R. Martin, '59, CBA, 195 Andover St., Lowell 

John Greeler, M.D., '45, 224 Ocean St., Lynn 

Philip J. Dawson, '56, 74 Commonwealth Drive, Portland, Maine 

Robert B. Halloran, '56, 320 Park Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 

Robert F. Connor, '56 CBA, Watch Hill Rd., Fishkill, N. Y. 

Joseph P. Harrington, '55, 396 Court Street, New Bedford 

Andrew A. Dominick, '37, 745 Chestnut St., Manchester 

Fremont L. Scott, '37, 2071 Wood Road, Scotch Plains, N. J. 

David J. Barry, '55, 6 Twighlight Terrace, Loudonville, N. Y. 

Joseph T. Hernon, '32, 12 Abbot St., Marblehead 

James Condon, '50, CBA, 161 No. Pearl St., Brockton 

Francis E. Harrington, LL.B., '35, University of Portland 

Paul K. Duffy, '40, 521 Argle Street, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

James E. Tiernan, '57, 55 Summit Ave., Providence 3 

Hon. Morris Rosenthal, LL.B., '36, 721 Chemical Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

James S. Fox, L'50, 3348 Los Prados, San Mateo 

John R. Gately, M.D., '35, 4719 Brooklyn Ave., N.E., Seattle 5 

Joseph A. Cancelliere, '45, 31 Federal St., Agawam 

Robert F. Mealy, M.D., '45, 68 Church Green, Taunton 

CDR. Terrence M. Griffin, '33, 505 Shadeland Dr., Falls Church, Va. 
John I. Vaughn, '35, S.C. Johnson Co., 1525 Howe Street, Racine, Wise. 
Robert W. Miller, '34, 48 Brown St., Cherry Valley, Mass. 



23 




'1 *X JOHN B. CASEY 
LD 62 Landsee St. W. Roxbury 32 

It was a great shock to learn of the death 
of MARTIN O'CONNOR, on July 15th, 
our highly respected classmate. He seemed 
so fit and buoyant on the occasion of our 
reunion on April 28th. He was considered 
an outstanding educator and his adminis- 
tration as President of the Framingham 
State Teachers College for twenty-five 
years stamped him as a superior leader in 
the field of teacher training. Our sympathy 
is extended to his family. May he rest in 
peace! 

The class wishes me to express its deep 
gratitude to Father Rector for the many 
courtesies shown to those in attendance on 
Alumni Day. It was a memorable occasion, 
and a fitting climax to the Golden Anni- 
versary of the class of 1913. In attendance 
were TOM GANNON, JOHN CURLEY, 
OWEN McGAFFIGAN, MONSIGNOR 
BENNETT O'BRIEN, JIM KELLEY, JOE 
FITZGERALD, FRANK MURPHY, JOE 
GILDEA, JIM MURRAY, TOM HAN- 
RON, PETER McMAHON, and JACK 
CASEY. 

On Alumni Day it was voted to send the 
S35.00 in our treasury, to the daughter of 
our late classmate LES HEATH, who is a 
Maryknoll nun in Hong Kong, China. This 
was done and here is an excerpt from her 
letter in reply: "Your check multiplied into 
over S200.00 in Hong Kong currency, 
which is enough for four one-hundred pound 
bags of rice, or enough for supporting two 
families for a month. So I am most grate- 
ful. Lucky me that Dad was B.C. 1913." 
Sincerely, Sister Maria Crucis Heath. 

'1zl JOHN S. KEOHANE 

J.T" 1147 Tremont St., Boston 

Bishop ERIC F. MacKENZIE our Class 
President gave an eloquent invocation at 
the Centennial Commencement of Boston 
College High School at the Heights on 
June 9. He also gave the invocation at the 
College Commencement on June 10. The 
Centennial Dinner in honor of His Eminence, 
Richard Cardinal Cushing held at McElroy 
Commons on June 2 was a great success. We 
were represented by the following: JOHN 
KAPPLES, BILL O'SULLIVAN, JOHN 
KEOHANE, Monsignors BOB BARRY and 
TIM GLEASON, Fathers JOE BUSAM, 
S.J., and FRED DEASY. 

JOHN HOGAN of Lawrence a retired 
school man had a session at the Bon Se- 
cours Hospital in June from which he 
emerged successfully. Read "DE SENEC- 
TUTE" JOHN! Dr. and Mrs. FRANK 
DEVLIN spent eight weeks on a tour of 
Europe last Summer which extended from 
Italy to Ireland. FRANK has retired from 
the practice of dentistry and resides in West 
Roxbury on the V.F.W. Parkway. 

Father JIM KELLEY, S.J., after a so- 
journ at St. Elizabeth's Hospital last May 
has been transferred from the Provincial 
House to Boston College High School of 
which he is a former Rector. 



C LASS 
NOTES 



Died May 9, Debora, widow of our late 
beloved classmate TOM O'HARE. May her 
soul rest in peace! 

Married August 3 at Sacred Heart Church 
Newton Centre, Monsignor BOB BARRY'S 
grandniece Carol Louise Barry to Stanley R. 
Hamilton both of Newton Highlands. Mon- 
signor BOB performed the ceremony. The 
Nuptial Mass was sung by the bride's uncle 
Father Gerard Barry. 

From the Boston Herald headlines "FRED 
DOYLE is a legend among Bench and Bar." 
That's our FRED who for thirty years was 
chief prosecutor for the Suffolk County 
District Attorney's Office. Combined with 
a vast knowledge of the law, a keen and 
retentive orderly mind made him a form- 
idable adversary of criminals. 

Father PAT HIGGINS, S.J., has just re- 
turned from St. Vincent's Hospital where 
he had a pin removed from his leg which 
was broken last year. We wish him smooth 
sailing from here on. 

Recently Father DAVID TWOMEY, 
O.S.B., celebrated the fiftieth anniversary 
of his entrance into the Benedictine Order. 
After Freshman year at the old College 
Father DAVE transferred to St. Anselm's 
College in New Hampshire and has re- 
mained there ever since. He has been a 
member of the Faculty since his Ordination 
and as the Manchester newspapers said "has 
grown up and was part of St. Anselm's and 
they both progressed together." AD MUL- 
TOS FELICISSIMOS ANNOS! Father 
DAVE. 



15 



JOHN J. WALSH 

15 Pond View Ave., Jamaica Plain 

Up to Alumni Day, our class had con- 
tributed $53,320 to the 100th Anniversary 
Development Program. The average gift 
was $5,919, which was the second largest 
of any class up to that time. The following 
members of the class had contributed the 
above sum: RT. REV. JOHN J. ALLSTON, 
PHILIP J. BOND, JOHN F. BRADLEY, 
REV. GEORGE S. BRENNAN, RT. REV. 
PHILIP COYNE, RT. REV. JAMES 
GRIMES, GEORGE S. HENNESSY, RT. 
REV. JOSEPH J. LEONARD, JOHN A. 
LAHIVE, JOSEPH A. MAHONEY, COR- 
NELIUS F. MERRIGAN, RT. REV. 
STEPHEN F. MORAN, (deceased), REV. 
DANIEL J. O'KEEFE, JOHN J. WALSH 
and REV. GEORGE F. WISEMAN. 

We are all most anxious to have every 
member of our class make a contribution 
of some sum so that we can finally report 
100% contribution from the Class of 1915. 

>1/1 JAMES L. O'BRIEN 

XO 41 Pond Circle, Jamaica Plain 

DR. JOHN HOPKINS is the class presi- 
dent for 1963-64. 

FATHER GERALD FITZGERALD has 
now opened missions in Bolivia and Argen- 
tina and a second retreat in England. 
FATHER FITZGERALD feels that his 
apostolate will eventually corner the whole 
world. 

ARTHUR GORMLEY, retired vice-presi- 
dent of the Des Moines Register and 



Tribune Company received a citation for 
service to the community and to the field 
of human relations. 

JIM COLLINS and CHARLES DE 
LORME retired in June. Our two classmates 
have been school principals for many years. 
Many of our classmates have retired but 
JACK ATKINSON and DR. HEFFERNAN 
are very active in many enterprises and are 
certainly retaining their youthful appear- 
ance. 

P.S. My son Richard '58 was recently 
elected Secretary, new Britain Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. He is also a Con- 
necticut State Director. 



17 



THOMAS D. CRAVEN 
107 Barrett St., Needham 

His Eminence, RICHARD CARDINAL 
CUSHING paid tribute to the members of 
the class of 1917 who were present at the 
Centennial Dinner given in his honor by 
the Alumni Association on June 2. Among 
those present with their wives were DAN 
DALEY, JACK DOYLE, JOHN FLYNN, 
MARTY HIGGINS, DR. CY LYDON, and 
TOM CRAVEN. Also present were MSGR. 
FRANK FLAHERTY, MSGR. BERT 
SHEA, FR. MAURICE DULLEA, S.J., 
WALTER DURNAN, FRANK HEANUE, 
CHARLEY SHARKEY and LES SHEA. 

BILL McCORMACK passed away in 
March after a long illness which followed 
an accident in which he was struck by an 
auto and suffered a broken hip. For years 
he was an attorney for one of the Boston 
banks. We regret we did not know of his 
illness and death until it was brought to 
our attention by his sister, Sister Theogene, 
who teaches in the elementary school of the 
Mission Church. The sympathy of the class 
is extended to his wife and the members 
of his family. May he rest in peace. 

PHIL DWYER has retired after 37 years 
of teaching in Revere High School. For 34 
of these years he was head of the history 
department. He is continuing his work as 
the director of adult civic education in 
Medford Evening School. 

BILL REID suffered the loss of his sister, 
Catherine, earlier this year. Again we regret 
that we did not know it until recently. The 
sympathy of the class is extended to the 
members of the family. May she rest in 
peace. 

FR. JOSEPH KEENAN, late member 
of the class was one of five of his family in 
religious life. Earlier this year his brother, 
Msgr. Francis L. Keenan, Parish Priest of 
St. Michael parish, Lowell, died. For many 
years he had been a member of the The- 
ology Faculty at St. John's Seminary. To 
the remaining members of this family, Sr. 
Angela Elizabeth, S.N.D. of Notre Dame 
Academy, Worcester and Sr. Margaret 
Elizabeth, C.S.J., St. Mary's, Milford, we 
extend the sympathy of the class. May he 
rest in peace. 

By the way — If the worker from the 
Development Office has not made contact 
with you to secure your pledge pick up the 
'phone and call the office. Let it be known 
that you want to observe your entrance to 
the college as a freshman in 1913 — 50 
years ago — by making a pledge. If, how- 
ever, you have made a pledge and now can 
see your way to increase it do not hesitate 
to call the office and tell them. They'll be 
delighted to hear from you. 



For Your Office or Den 

A 

BOSTON COLLEGE CHAIR 

$35.00 

Call or Write Alumni Office 



24 



The Alumni 



18 



V 



M. FRANCIS NOLAN 
17 South Normandy Ave., 
Cambridge 38 



Sincere sympathy and prayers of the 
class to the family of our late classmate, 
EDWARD M. SULLIVAN. 

Your correspondent enjoyed our 45th 
Alumni Day Anniversary in the company 
of JOHN HOBAN, BILL CASHIN, CLAR- 
ENCE PIKE, CHARLIE FITZGERALD, 
DAN HARKINS, FRANK FRAZIER, 
JOHN O'LOUGHLIN, JOHN CANAVAN 
and JIM DONOVAN. 

Regret that TOM REYNOLDS who had 
intended to join us, could not make it. Well 
Tom, there are other years to come. 

REV. JOSEPH F. KEANEY, S.J., native 
of Dorchester has been appointed Principal 
of B.C. High. The new principal earned 
masters degrees in arts and education at 
Boston College. 



19 



FRANCIS J. ROLAND 

10 Homewood Rd., 

West Roxbury 32 
The class was well represented at the 
various Centennial events and it is indeed 
to be regretted that some were unable to 
attend. 

On June 14, REV. VINCENT R. 
HUGHES, O.P., celebrated the fortieth 
anniversary of his ordination. Heartiest 
congratulations and best wishes for many 
more happy and fruitful years of labor in 
God's vineyard. 



'20 



J. ROBERT BRAWLEY 

33 Pomfret St., West Roxbury 32 

The class of the Forty Thieves congratu- 
lates the officers of the Alumni Association 
on their wonderful work of the past Spring 
on the Centennial Program. Seen at the 
various activities were: JACK SHEEHAN, 
PAUL TROY, JOHN McMORROW, 
ELIAS SHANNON, EDDIE HIGGINS, 
FRANK EARLS, BOB PYNE, DAN 
LUCY, CHARLIE McGILL, JOE CASEY, 
TOM GATELY, JOE JOYCE, MONSIG- 
NOR TOM McNAMARA and our class 
Chaplain, MONSIGNOR JOHN LANE. 

Congratulations to our JACK SHEEHAN 
on his election to the Graduate Board of 
Athletics. 

Alumni Day activities were curtailed by 
the sudden death of ANDY GEMMEL as 
the members left to pay their respects to 
their classmate. Our deepest sympathy to 
Mrs. Ethel Gemmel and the family. 

News was received of LEO AICARDI 
serious sickness at his home in Florida. Leo 
had a rough operation but reports a gradual 
return to health. 

RT. REV. THOMAS McNAMARA has 
been named a Pronotary Apostolic by Pope 
Paul VI. He will be invested in his new rank 
by Cardinal Cushing on September 15 at 
Our Lady of Mercy Church in Belmont of 
which he is pastor. 



'21 



GORDON F. IRONS 

9 Emmonsdale Rd., 

West Roxbury 32 
MSGR. WALTER J. FURLONG is a 
member of the advisory committee of the 
newly formed Catholic Mission Radio Asso- 
ciation which will establish a communication 
network of "ham" radio operators among 
missionaries working in this country. MSGR. 
FURLONG, pastor of Our Lady Help of 
Christians Church, Newton, has been a 
radio "ham" for many years. 

Congratulations to BILL CUNNING- 
HAM and Mrs. Cunningham on their mar- 
riage June 29 in St. Frances Gabrini Chapel, 
North Scituate. Mrs. Cunningham is the 
former Jeanne M. Crowley of Milton and 
North Scituate. Bill is Assistant Superin- 
tendent in the Boston school system. 



HENRY McINERNEY has been named 
president of the Boston High School Head 
Masters Association. Henry has also been 
a District I athletic committeeman of the 
Mass. Secondary Schools Principals Associa- 
tion for many years. 

Present at the Alumni Association Cen- 
tennial Dinner June 2 were MSGR. 
WALTER J. FURLONG, FATHER 
THOMAS J. BURNS, FATHER WIL- 
LIAM E. CULHANE, MSGR. JOHN E. 
MULLARKEY, JERRY MAHONEY, Mrs. 
Mahoney and son Jerry, JOE DOYLE, 
JOE FLYNN, GORDON IRONS and Mrs. 
Irons, and JUDGE JOHN J. SULLIVAN, 
all of whom were sponsors of the dinner. 
FATHER FRANCIS V. SULLIVAN, S.J., 
was among the guests at the Head Table. 
Other classmates who were sponsors but 
who were unable to attend were MSGR. 
JOHN A. YORK, FATHER JAMES E. 
SULLIVAN, ARTHUR F. McCARTHY, 
JACK MAHONY, and DAN COSTELLO. 

MARK RUSSO and Mrs. Russo spent 
several weeks in Italy and other countries 
in Europe last summer. 

FATHER DAVID H. McDONALD, 
former pastor of Sacred Heart Church, 
Manchester, passed away June 2 in Boston. 
Father Dave served from 1941 to 1953 
as a chaplain in the Navy, retiring with the 
rank of commander. The sympathy of the 
Class is extended to his family. 

FRANK McCAFFREY passed away July 
13 in Providence. Frank was a State 
Representative in Rhode Island. He was 
also a former newspaperman and writer for 
magazines. He served in both world wars. 
The sympathy of the Class is extended to 
his family. 

Another sad event was the death of 
ARTHUR MCCARTHY'S son, Arthur, Jr., 
in an automobile accident in Germany June 
17. Young Arthur, a serviceman, was in his 
early twenties. The sympathy of the Class 
is extended to Arthur and his family. 

J^)'") NATHANIEL J. HASENFUS 
ZdZd 15 Kirk St., West Roxbury 32 

Class congratulations to JIM COLLINS, 
whose marriage to Barbara May McAllister 
was solemnized at Longboat Key, Florida, 
in the late Spring. 

The class is truly saddened by the death 
of EDDIE BELL, best loved member of 
'22. Every man among us takes Ed's sudden 
passing as a personal loss. True Catholic 
gentleman, Ed was a member of CAV's 
1919 football squad, a New England shot 
put champion in his college days, and a 
member of both the JACK RYDEN 
TRACK CLUB and the Varsity Club. Ed 
is survived by his wife Helen. 

Sympathy is also extended to FR. 
THOMAS RAY, M.M., whose mother 
passed away in June. 

A happier note — FRANK DALY at- 
tended the ceremonies consequent to the 
election of Pope Paul VI and the ceremonies 
of his coronation. Frank is the most widely 
traveled member of the class. 

A note to FR. JOHN CONNORS, the 
Hasenfus now have twelve grandchildren. 

JOHN BARRY was recently the speaker 
at the testimonial dinner given to GERRY 
HAYES at the Statler Hilton. Other mem- 
bers of the Class of '22 attending the gala 
affair were the VERY REV. MICHAEL P. 
WALSH, S.J., and the MOST REV. 
THOMAS J. RILEY. 



'23 



MRS. FRANCIS L. FORD 
9 McKone St., Dorchester 



In connection with the Fortieth Anni- 
versary of the graduation of the Class of 
'23, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass was 
offered for the departed members of the 
Class, which was celebrated by Father ED. 

25 



CROKE at St. Mary's Chapel. Just prior to 
the Mass, CECE McGOLDRICK read off 
the list of 45 names of the deceased. Later a 
dinner was held at Alumni Hall, and the 
following classmates gathered to spend a 
most enjoyable evening: FATHER PAT 
COLLINS, FATHER ED. CROKE, FA- 
THER TOM LANE, FATHER ROBERT 
BUTLER and FATHER JERRY O'BRIEN, 
S.J., sons of our MAT BUTLER and 
JERRY O'BRIEN respectively, CECE 
McGOLDRICK, ED DULLEA, WALTER 
MAYO, JOE CRANE, GEORGE OLESEN, 
WALTER DIMMOCK, BILL DUFFY, 
JOE COMBER, AL LASHWAY, JACK 
GARRITY, BOB ALLEN, DR. ED. 
BURKE, BILL (Mike) DOLAN. FATHER 
BILL CARTY and FATHER NORBERT 
McINNIS enjoyed the luncheon with the 
gang the following day. 

At the dinner CECE McGOLDRICK, by 
unanimous vote, was named permanent 
PRESIDENT OF THE CLASS OF 1923. 
CECE is indeed to be complimented on the 
way he planned and executed the festivities 
for the Mass, the Class Dinner and the 
events of Alumni Day. It took a great deal 
of time and effort, and it was certainly ap- 
preciated by all who attended. 

We picked up a few items which will be 
of interest to all of us, i.e. MARK CROKER 
is Water Commissioner of the City of 
Newton, Mass. 

AL LASHWAY is parole officer and social 
worker at the Connecticut School for Boys 
in Meriden, Connecticut. He reports he is 
the proud grandfather of three grandchildren 
living in California. 

BILL DUFFY is Supt. of Public Works 
in North Andover. His son William B., Jr., 
is Assistant United States Attorney from 
Massachusetts. 

JOHN ROCHE has been associated with 
the Sibley Stores in Rochester, N.Y. 

WALTER MAYO, we believe is Grand- 
father of the year and the Class with 19 
Grandchildren. If I'm wrong, please correct 
me! 

We are very proud of JOE SWEENEY, 
— our Alma Mater bestowed an honorary 
degree of Doctor of Laws on him. Congratu- 
lations, Joe. 

AL RIPLEY, we have learned, has left 
New England and settled in Sarisota, Florida 
permanently. 

FRANK LONG is a very proud granddad, 
little Cynthia Jane is the daughter of 
Frank's son, Richard, B. C. '60. His son 
Francis graduated from N. U. this past June 
with a B.S. in E. Engineering. 

TED GARRITY's son George was 
recently married to Ann Dailey at the Holy 
Name Church, which was followed by a 
reception at the Winchester Country Club. 



THOMAS CARRIGG & SON 

MONUMENTS AND HEADSTONES 

ALL KINDS OF GRANITE 

JOHN J. CARRIGG, '51 

165 BROOK ROAD, QUINCY 
Tol. GRonite 2-3664 

41 NORTH CARY STREET, BROCKTON 
Tel. BRockton 6588 

772 LAGRANGE STREET, WEST ROXBURY 



Tel. FAirviow 3-2454 



Tn* Alumni 



*£ 



'■>. >.\* ,.-..- -■-.;■<■■. :;■■ ■ >. 

■■■ : -. f. '. .- -i '■>. :.~ ■■ ■<• **. 

ot HOWARD BUCKLEY, the -other of 
REV. JAMES MAGEXXIS, and the sister 
of JOE HOPKlMtCm. 

REV. JAMES XORM1LE. Air Torn 

■>.,>.-■ '.*>.*:■'.-. :■ .V.- i- .\>.-'. 

York, witt «om be efipble for 

■'--,- !■;-. .*- 4" - ■*■ ■ ■> ?>.--■ ■■-.' 

dree* » Box 1355, lafeBr Air Wort* Burnt, 

'.'-- Lv-. -.- '.-. 4-,4 V- 4 -.v"A- '-<" 



.4 '..■'■>." 



: : • - 



for (be 

(HA sag 

<• -> 4W4 4~-4- 

lhlnla.'. -. x.y;.;.y , ■-> v.- -.-• 
FRAXCIS X. KELLY '61 and BRERDA 

•■' .kllll-- -.'. 



% . -<- -.: >4- 4 =r>4- >--: 4 - fv- 

y '. /.-*• •.;*- % %-.- • - --. ..... 

FRAXK CAD1GAX as 
elected President is May 

i%-t af ^.z i; 

..v.- -* > A - .- v>- -.-• LV*--. - -.-- > 
-**-•: f-v- 7LW .'/-',.-*:H ».-.-: 7LLy 

restart yon for a (wtroni irtrdjj jf 

< > ---.- V4*- %—.%-- >-. v.. > v-i 



"28 



- - - % 
- ', %.. -y 



lll.-l .v. .-;..-. 
S Cam Are- 

ft-*.--** H j- <-'.-. 
;7H'. .'/ y.A.yyy 
40 Rkb a ood St- 

■■■ ■-:■ ?-:■*:.■. Vc 

7 4 V r --•- ' V* 
L~ -4 W"4' !"■.%'." ■■>.' 

V'. O.'.. '.'*. *.- -■'.■ 

■:■:. :*-. >. - ■■,■- 
'■'.■ V'. .-<-. ■ ■ '■-■' ■" --■:■■,■ <■'. 

:l i ■■'-■,■■. - - ■-■, \->.-, -.-, ■,■■-_ .v % -4- 
----- ; -^4 --4-L4-4-: --. --- :•;.- -.-• 

L'4 • '44 -. :. -• - y .-.-. - A-.- ,--, 

certified by Creil Service a* of October 

:•.. >---.- - 4 ~>.- 4 - 
i«C ear claesaeate* and tbeir 
CHARUE KELLEY and 1 

Mar 23, JOHN McGILVARY 

Bke the peefc-a-beo dance, wia>. etc? 

Atamoi Day Jtme 7. Head aaan, DICK 

'-".'^y. ,-' ;/v..'.-..i yy ■■• '.yy 4 - 

V% 4 J; 4 " r. - V ' -.' ■ -. -..-". • 4 

by eoMe of the boy* At cfaeck ont 

}-■,- £y>y. ^ -.'.?^:.y.: •...- - -. - 
■ --4- i 4- ^- ;-. : >v: .yy ., - 

•-.- 4- -,* ^r- ». ',- .--.- y -;, ■-.- '.', 
.... . ^ . ;>% . .__ 

-■■.-■>.: y .-- -.-" -4 >4. •.• h 
-,-f v.- - -.,■-■>. ^. -y.y y y.y.-.y 
- -- -4-4- • , yy . 4- -.^- -.-4< >■ ■■■, ?,. 




The Oaa is boao re d by the ' j. as 

.v.-«- - y-4 4 -%-. .. - -4 ■ - 4 y ,- y^ 

f-7 ?lv ;-.h:. ^ '.AL.-i.Hi.'. y- 
Brideefs, bfaynari KT. KEV. F. GKSARD 

•-v.- yy yy. ;y--y;\ -. y^j 



: 29 



JOE COXKELL S. J. 

.rv.-.v.- y- --- 

y. y 4.-4- y- y,- ■• «.:* 
'--*-.- -■ '. y ----- '/, 

•••- =-/--" - •". L--4 y ." -.2 -.2 "4 -,-4 .4- 

f. *..->*.--.. ^^ -4 - 4- .v.- "4 

^^ -4- - .-.-,'. 4- v.- •'- -- 4- 

»aU CoaMbr. in MEaeal Intetb- 
m W.W. IL Vic ■■■■■nl in Waofc- 
aad becaane Chief of 
of Defease Intefl i gnce Accaoea. An at- 
torney and Harvard Law cradnate Vic 
4-- L--4 -- 4- :>:> i.V-i-' l- .4 

>:■-'>.■'.■■■.. '. -i - 4 



'.yy/^LL f-"LL7:L> -%- 4 
ner at Ahjeani Hall on May 7. DK. ART 
MOKKJSveY ab o a wd soane fiat eiase oh> 
tares of his latest trip. DSL BOX FLYHM 
provided a m ri se of oar 25th Ahanai Day. A 
feed tiene was had by all of as: FR. LEO 
O-KEEFE, S.J, FR. ED HOGAJf, SuJ, 
FR. JOE COXXELL S-J^ HEXRY 
LEEX. MIKE DEE, TOM McGRATH 
PHIL STUART, FRAXK VOSS, ED SUL- 
LIVAJf , HUGH McXLXTY PAUL DOW- 
OVAlf, BILL MILLER, TED DUFFY. 
h?.}--'}':. :/.'.'. yyy hcl/ la.'. 
HEALY. BILL LaFAY KEX BROWX. 
BILL OXEARY. GEXE McLAUGHLIX 
JOHX MAHOHEY, LEO SHEA. JOE 
SHEEHAX CHARLIE McCAXX. BOB 
BUCK, LARRY FEXXELL BARR DO- 
LAX, BOB HUGHES, JOHX PARRELL 
ART DOUGHERTY, JIM REGAM, ED 
MURRAY. AL MOXAHAX. JERRY 

yyyy-'yyy ll wv.-.'H- :lv </- 

KAY BILL RYAM, VHf ROBERTS. 
CHARLIE BOWSER, JIM RILEY, ART 
MORRISSEY. FRAXK CADIGAX. This 

V. >4 4 -."-, 4 4 -V .4- * ■>. 
. -.--> > - =. 4 - -- - ■: 

y-44- 4 -4 - --4- -4 :.y ;•/ y.y. 
• y-y.yy-. -,-.- 4 4- •.-^- -> -,- .yy -.--.-, 

-4- ,4-.--4 4 :.4 i.V-.V 4 ' L4r" '.>.'. 4' 

* ?-*--■ '•-.--. .- y y y y - y ll 
y yy;y. l y> - -.-* a-- l- l: , -.-. %-.- 

- y.- -> .. '/%,- - % - -.- - «/.- 

<■ '-■ '■-': ■ ■ -4- -.■ :■ \~ 4- y-4-4- •'-.- 

%-" .4 ,-4'. 4- .' 4 

'-'-. 4-1- % 4 ?"-.- -4 L%4-4 ■ " 4 .'4. 

Donovan Jr. will do the sasse at Unrver- 

• - -. ; : - -. -. 
;:?. y;-'/y y.y- •/ ■ , - : , -,., 

44" y n L- - "4 - 4- - ..-4 4- L.4 

L- '.; -.-. s-4- -4- Mr'; •:«-.•« - I 4 
U--4, H...v^ - 4 -4-4- •'-.- . - ;..LL 
PELTIER'S aad BILL McCAKJTs 

•4 " : 4 " . - Vr; 4 " - 4 ' " ' Y. 4 ' 4*4' " 

ins. BILL is vice-president of 

L-.--4-. >.-. <."4-. -. -4 Hv . 

*..>.<■ ■>.->.;-- "44^4 '. 4" 4 ■;•*. 

- "4; — ...- 4 4 4- "> V." " 4-.-. "44 -J. 

-4 - LV-- L-- "4 -.- i- 4-V4- -: v- '.-^ 

y - ?A7HLyL '.LL HLLA'. L ' ' yL 

MacFARLAXE. S.J. ^Edstor, Qaeen * Work, 

St. Loaisl, JIM COXXOLLY SJ. rpm- 

fesssr at Holy Croat Coneeej), JTM FOLEY, 

- .' 4 Lv ,- L-. 4.4 H ,- V. --..-. ?* 

T.y.yy yy-.i •• 4- l y - =- -,%■.- y. ,44-; 
»::: ->4 paathj - t ^^> -^-% a-j^- :-.* 

General Resoarces Consultant. "Ad 

MSGR. FRAXK McELROY, St. PaaTs, 

^ .-- - ^ -^- •-. ->.-=. .^ -.- 1. 

4- -4 .'.>• .->. ^.. . 

H. :: , : -..< .r ii f-.- - ; 
v. Hv .. N5 
-. '. 4 . - ".- -. - .-: -. . 



1963- 1964 

HUMANITIES SBUE5 
LECTURES 

Oo. 3 T.tt White 
Ocl 10 Veri Mcfaca 
Fdb. 13 Frans Bcfnder* 

Mar. 12 Stephen Spender 

WRITERS CONFER? 
April 1* 

All Lectures Held In 
Rap* LnSranr 



4- hv 

y 4-4 -. 



HILL in 1 

- .4 .' 



•4 H jv 

4. H 1 
-. -4 ..-. 

4- 4 - 

v v-4- ; 



. 4 ■ . ' ' 4 



;y.y -y 



h y • - ^ . y . .-. • • - - y 

y- L-.-.-.- L4v Lv . 

y y - 4 - .44.4 

4- -• .:->.x 4- -^ -.-* v r v.r 
4- -^--t - x ;~*r-;\ ■-. 4 

LL' '/4-LL-.^;.L . - 4 --.-- .... 

-4--- :. ; - 4 l -4 - ;• > --- f . ■..■ /,- - ■-. 
4 4- % 44- 4 y y - > ...-.-;:.,. 
::; >- . --4 : '.-.-,> y -.: / if -4 

4 L^.i.4 L-. - 4" H-.-4- 4 V. 4 
-^4 ' r ' . ' 4 ' ' . -. • 4 - .'. '. ' 4 -' 4 ' }'■'.' 

: : -4 .4 4-: 4- L-4- -.-• L .V- L.o- . -. 
-- "i i y - ' L< 4-- =:•--.- 

DOM 1 laaaacal t 4 






-.-' v* L4-- 

hl ■• y • L.y -. •■ 

FRL MARK COAKLEY. FR. FRED 

HLyy. 'L.Lr ?:-!-.'.:< -/ -?....--.y 

MSGR BERXARD RATTIGAX. FR 
JOHX ORZECH. FR. JOHX CUXXIXG- 
HAM FR. LEO OTKEEFE 5 J - DRL BILL 
FLYXX. DR. BILL HAFFERTY. DR. 

;:m HL'.'.LL.yy l? ill ll-.^-.l 

COL. BILL OTLEARY. GEXE MCCAR- 
THY. JOHX LAXRIGAX LEO SHEA. 

y;yy ?:>•• .-all '/-yyy; ll.. 

LaFAY. PHIL STUART, ED LEE. ED 

LLVVfLLHTL'. 'LH'. LLLLLLY 
JOHX HURLEY. GEORGE DOXALD- 

-.'..'. 7- 1.4-4 ,■-,■ ■:■■■■, ■ 4 • -■: -. . : 



AL DOwTrS il najhli r Thame, 

-.2 t ' '-■■'.--■. •**■.**•:■ 4- T4--- 7--. 
•■- 4 .-4- - 4 : 4 L4-4- -. 



PAUL DOXOVAX is 
e Mary E. Carley Jr. 

LL ^LLLL L 



HJ a 

.v. nt 







3r The Alumni 

J-lfk JOHN F. DWYER 
J\J 45 Belvoir Rd., Milton 87 

Climaxing the Centennial Year activities 
was the Centennial Alumni Dinner at Mc- 
Elroy Commons in honor of his Eminence, 
Richard Cardinal Cushing on Sunday, June 
2. Bishop JOHN J. WRIGHT of Pittsburg 
reviewed the 100 year history of Boston 
College in his inimitable witty style. Par- 
ticipating in this gala event from the class 
of '30 were: REV. EDWARD E. HAR- 
RINGTON, MR. and MRS. JOHN F. 
DWYER, MR. and MRS. JOHN B. GIL- 
LOOLY, DR. and MRS. WILLIAM R. 
GREEN, MR. and MRS. JOHN W. HAV- 
ERTY, MR. and MRS. JOHN E. HUR- 
LEY, MR. and MRS. JOHN J. GRAND- 
FIELD, CHARLES F. MURPHY, MR. 
and MRS. PAUL A. MAHONEY, MR. and 
MRS. EDWARD J. O'NEIL, DR. and 
MRS. CHARLES E. ROONEY, DR. and 
MRS. WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN and MR. 
and MRS. FRANK B. TALLINO. 

Highlighting Alumni Day at the Heights 
on Friday, June 7, was the election of DR. 
WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN as President and 
CHARLES F. MURPHY as 2nd Vice Presi- 
dent of the Boston College Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

Coming from the most distant point for 
Alumni Day was NICHOLAS A. MAFFEO, 
successful attorney from Seattle, Washing- 
ton. En route Nick was admitted to prac- 
tice in the Supreme Court of the U. S., at 
Washington, D.C. Nick's son Paul Maffeo, 
graduated last June from the University of 
Washington. 

Also seen at Alumni Day were: BILL 
GRIFFIN, JOHN POWERS, JIM REA- 
GAN, JOHN GRANDFIELD, JOHN CON- 
NELLY, FRANK TALLINO, DR. BILL 
GREEN and JOE WHITEHEAD. 

BILL GRIFFIN has retired from the 
U.S. Postal Service and plans to study for 
his masters degree in Mathematics in order 
to teach this subject. 

JOHN POWERS is ticket agent for the 
Boston Terminal Corp. at the South Station. 

TOM CONNORS is foreman at Central 
Square Cambridge Post Office, LEW 
CAREY is foreman at South Postal Station 
and GEORGE SPILLANE is superintend- 
ent at the Back Bay Annex. 

Eagle get his "Eagles." Congratulations 
to DAVID E. HOCKMAN upon his promo- 
tion to the rank of Colonel, U.S. Air Force 
Reserves. 

JOHN E. HURLEY, chairman of the 
board, was committee head for the annual 
reunion of the Poland Springs House Cad- 
dies Assoc, on Sept. 21 at Poland Spring 
House. 



DR. BILL SULLIVAN spent the summer 
recuperating at his North Scituate summer 
home, is feeling fine and plans to resume 
his practice after Labor Day. 

We regret to report the death in May of 
JOSEPH B. McCABE. Requiem Mass was 
offered by classmate REV. JOHN M. CON- 
NOLLY at St. Joseph's Church in Somer- 
ville. JOE had a long and devoted career 
as teacher coach in the Somerville school 
system and was active in the U.S. Naval 
Reserve holding the rank of Commander. 

With sorrow we report the death of former 
classmate, RT. REV. DONALD A. Mc- 
GOWAN on Aug. 11 at St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital, Brighton. MSGR. McGOWAN 
had been an official of the NCWC, Health 
and Hospitals Department, in Washington, 
D.C. Cardinal Cushing preached the Eulogy 
and Auxiliary Bishop ERIC F. MacKEN- 
ZIE sang the Solemn Pontifical Mass at 
Most Precious Blood Church, Hyde Park, 
Mass. on Aug. 14. Present at the funeral 
services were: JOHN GRODEN, JOHN 
HAVERTY, FRANK TALLINO, DR. BILL 
GREEN, JOE WHITEHEAD, HAROLD 
KELLEY and JOHN DWYER. 

A reception at the Blue Hill Country 
Club in Canton followed the marriage on 
Aug. 17 of Miss Carole Noel to Mr. Paul R. 
Tallino, son of MR. and MRS. FRANK B. 
TALLINO. The Rev. James J. Kelley, S.J. 
officiated at the ceremony at St. Philip Neri 
Church in Waban. 

?'51 JOHN P. BARRY 

JX. 370 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brookline 

RICHARD and Marion FITZPATRICK 
returned from a visit to their son Richard, 
and his family, in Munich in time for their 
daughter Susan's wedding in Lexington on 
August 24. 

The sympathy of the class is extended 
to DR. FRANK ABATE on the loss of his 
mother. 

CHARLIE NOLAN's daughter Anne will 
be married in Arlington, Va., on Septem- 
ber 28. Among those present will be the 
JOHN BARRETTS. 

MIKE CURRAN is a Postal Inspector. 
Let's not have Scotland Yard beat us on 
our Plymouth case, Mike. 

Everyone else apparently is away: the 
class must be in velvet if no news is good 
news! 

Congratulations to TOM CROSBY, now 
secretary of the Alumni Association. 

FR. PETER HART was made Pastor of 
St. Jude's Parish in Norfolk. 

HO JOHN P. CONNOR 
*J jL* 24 Crestwood Circle, Norwood 

FR. FRED MINIGAN is now a "Ham" 




and recently helped form the Catholic 
Mission Radio Assoc. FR. FRED is sta- 
tioned at Our Lady of the Assumption, 
Green Harbor. 

DR. FRED MEIER was the guest pane- 
list on "Conversion Piece" recently on sta- 
tion WEEI. 

TOM CONNELLY'S son, Tom Jr. gradu- 
ated from B.C. last June and is now at the 
U.S. Air Force Academy. 

FR. FRANK CRUMP this year cele- 
brated his Silver Jubilee of his ordination 
and is now in the Philipines. 

STEVE O'MALLEY is an associate pro- 
fessor of Biology at St. Peter's College in 
Jersey City, N.J. STEVE and his family 
have been living in Staten Island for the 
past twenty years. 

Congratulations to PETE QUTNN who 
has been elected Vice-President of the Bos- 
ton College Alumni Association. 

JERRY MOORE is very busy these days 
trying to get the Boston Patriots rolling 
where he is doing their publicity. Occasion- 
ally Jerry can be heard over the Radio. 

ED DENSMORE represented the Quincy 
Elks at the Convention in California. 

J <2 1 PHILIP J. McNIFF 
J J 101 Waban Hill Ave. 
Chestnut Hill 67 

MSGR. CHRISTOPHER GRIFFIN, 
Chaplain of the State Senate and the Bos- 
ton City Council, celebrated his Silver 
Jubilee Mass with Cardinal Cushing and 
Bishops Thomas J. Riley, Thomas Wade, 
S.M., and Caesar Gatimu of Kenya in 
attendance. 

The Cardinal honored FATHER GER- 
ALD DESMOND, too, on the occasion of 
his Silver Jubilee Mass. Fr. Desmond is 
Chaplain of the Veterans' Administration 
Hospital. Dr. F. B. Carroll, Hospital Direc- 
tor and Dr. Herman Lawson, Chief of 
Staff were present at the Mass. 

VIN COSGROVE was in the news re- 
cently as lawyer for a twelve-year-old boy 
who was awarded one of the highest 
amounts ever allowed in the history of Suf- 
folk Superior Court for permanent injuries 
suffered in an automobile accident. 

MSGR. FRANCIS DESMOND, Rector 
of Cardinal O'Connell Seminary since 1957, 
was recently named parish priest of St. 
Charles', Waltham. 

PHIL McNIFF was dinner speaker at 
the Silver Jubilee Banquet of the Friedsam 
Memorial Library, St. Bonaventure's Col- 
lege, New York. 

JOE BRENNAN, professor at Barnard 
College, has completed a new book, Three 
Philosophical Novelists, which will be pub- 
lished by Macmillan this fall. Your prayers 
are asked for Joe's mother who died recent- 
ly. The same intention might be made for 
the deceased relatives of all of us. 

The Class of 1933 was well represented 
at the various Alumni gatherings during 
the Centennial Celebration. Among those 
attending were Fr. WILFRID BOU- 
VIER, S.J., JOHN BRENNAN, JOHN 
BROUGHAM, RAY CALLAN, JIM CON- 
NOLLY, Dr. CHRIS CONWAY, VIN 
COSGROVE, MSGR. FRANK DESMOND, 
JOHN DESMOND, Fr. CHARLES DON- 
OVAN, S.J., BOB GRANEY, JOHN HAN- 
RAHAN, BILL HOGAN, Dr. TOM 
JONES, AL LANDRIGAN, Fr. GEORGE 
LAWLOR, S.J., Dr. TOM McCARTHY, 
JOHN MORAN, CHARLIE O'BRIEN, 
JOHN QUINN, DINNY RYAN, BILL 
RYAN, Dr. JOHN SULLIVAN, and 
BUCKY WARREN. 

Eh-. TOM JONES, President-elect, Guild 
of St. Apollonia, heard an address by Mrs. 
Joseph P. Kennedy. The guild is composed 
of Catholic dentists. 



B 



The Alumni 



V 



1^2 A REV. JOHN A. SAUNDERS 
J*-\ St. Agatha's Rectory 

432 Adams St., Milton 

The sympathy of the class is extended 
to MONSIGNOR WALTER FLAHERTY 
on the death of his brother, WILLIAM. 
May he rest in peace. 

PAT FORD has been named manager of 
Factory Services for the B. F. Goodrich 
Co. at Watertown, Mass. His son Brian is 
entering Senior year in C.B.A. and is on the 
Dean's List. Son Robert will be a Sophomore 
at the School of Education. 

BOB TOLAND is now located in Hono- 
lulu, Hawaii, in charge of Veterans Ad- 
ministration Office, Hawaii. 

Met all our worshippers at the "poor 
man's Riviera" "L" St. this summer, FR. 
JACK FOGARTY, FR. BILL NOONAN, 
DAN O'KEEFE, JOHN O'LALOR, RALPH 
DI MATTIA, BILL CARR, JIM SULLI- 
VAN and all in excellent health. 

We offer congratulations to HERB KEN- 
NEY for the outstanding, excellent report- 
ing he did for the Boston Globe, covering 
:he death of Pope John XXIII — Ensuing 
Consistory, the election and coronation of 
Pope Paul VI. Every article was superb; 
;vell done HERBERT. 

At this writing DAN CRONIN is at the 
New England Baptist Hospital. He has 
undergone major surgery. We hope his re- 
:overy will be swift. 

Our class was well represented at all the 
;ommerative exercises of the Colleges 
Hundreth Anniversary. I dare not make a 
,ist of those who attended, fearing I might 
Dmit some of our most loyal members. We 
:an be proud of the support we gave to the 
:elebrations. 

The sympathy of the class is given to 
Robert J. Richards, Jr. on the death of his 
ather ROBERT J. RICHARDS who passed 
»way on July 27, 1963. 

I hate to mention it, but we are thirty 
'ears out of college this year. Getting old 
)oys. Hope we can make a few of the games 
j his Fall. 

1C EDWARD J. O'BRIEN 
! D _/ 64 Cedar St., Wollaston 

The sincere condolences of the class are 
\ xtended to MIKE COLLINS on the death 
I 'f his brother. 

DR. JIM McDONOUGH toured Europe 
his summer with Mrs. McDonough and 
heir children. 

DR. JOHN McIVER has been promoted 
o the status of Assistant Professor at the 
3. U. Medical School. 

MIKE GERSON's lobster business is 
igain booming after last year's disastrous 
ire. 

TOM KELLY spotted trying to pick win- 
ling nags at the Marshfield Fair. 

Class notes are particularly sparse in this 
ssue, what with vacations and such. What 
nay not in your opinion be newsworthy is 
levertheless most likely of prime interest 
:o your classmates. Please drop me a line 
;o that we can all keep in touch. 

\f JOSEPH P. KEATING 
DKj 24 High St., Natick 

JOE KERN was recently appointed pub- 
isher of Popular Mechanics. 

FRANK METZ has been appointed staff 
engineer in Aerospace Corporation's Satel- 
ite Control Systems Office, Systems Re- 
learch and Planning Division. Married and 
:he father of one child, Frank and his fa- 
-nily live at 19046 Schoenborn St., North- 
idge, Calif. 

CHARLIE RICHARDSON was recently 
sleeted a director of the Town Bank and 
Trust Co. of Brookline. Still very busy as 
President of the Waldorf System, Charlie 
also serves as a director of the Holy Ghost 
Hospital, the Volunteer Coop Bank and the 
Hotel Service, Inc. 




FURNITURE, CARPET, DRAPERIES 

at WHOLESALE 

for RECTORIES, HOTELS, CONVENTS, 

COLLEGES, HOSPITALS, OFFICES 



JOHN C. GILL, Inc. 

2201 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 

Boston 35, Mass. STadium 2-1974 

John C. Gill, '31 



SALES and INTERIOR DESIGN 



'37 



ANGELO A. DiMATTIA 
82 Perthshire Rd., Brighton 



TOM SAINT arranged a wonderful get- 
together at our Spring Reunion Dinner 
Dance on May 25 at the Charter House in 
Waltham. There were 25 couples and we 
all had a grand time. 

Audrey Patricia Gaquin, daughter of 
TOM GAQUIN, was awarded a four-year 
scholarship at the College of New Rochelle. 

Peter Murphy, Jr., was admitted to 
Harvard Law School come Sept. He gradu- 
ated from B.C. last June. 

Handsome CHARLIE FALLON of Milton 
was Ted Williams' opponent at a golf match 
at Wollaston. The final score was a military 
secret. 

FR. HUGO DURST, S.J., passed away 
after a brief illness in June. He was sta- 
tioned at Fairfield, Conn. 

TOM SAINT has a lovely photo of the 
late Holy Father Pope John taken on a 
tour he and his Mrs. took last year. Let him, 
sometime, relate the comments of Pope John 
when he heard he was meeting Mr. & Mrs. 
Saint. 

PRISCILLA DURKIN has just returned 
from a trip to Mexico this past summer 
while working for the lay-apostolate. 

GEORGE CURTIN'S oldest daughter 
Suzanne has returned from a trip abroad. 

CLEM ARCHER of Beverly was very 
busy collecting for the B.C. Fund Drive 
from the North Shore. 

LT. JOHN BONNER of the Boston 
Police Dept. has just returned from North- 
western. He also took several tours of 
various City Police Departments. Comm. 
McNamara better start taking notes of 
JOHN'S experience. 

Diane Phillips, daughter of ED PHILLIPS, 
was married on Sept. 21 in the church of 
Our Lady of the Presentation. A reception 
followed at the Chestnut Hill Country Club. 

We understand that the psychiatrist of 
our Class, DR. JIMMY BRAGAN has slides 
of our Anniversary that have not been shown 
as yet. I wonder if we can prevail on our 
own FR. JOHN QUIRK to arrange a private 
preview. We are indebted to FR. JOHN for 
his showing of the movies to our wives at 
our last reunion. BILL DOHERTY had 
made elaborate plans to show his slides to 
our wives, when he met technical difficulties 
with his projector. 

We hope BILL DOHERTY, JR., is com- 
pletely recovered from his recent stay at a 
local hospital. 

MONSIGNOR BOB SENNOTT has just 
returned from Rome with the Cardinal. He 
was in attendance at the (Recent Conclave) 
when Pope Paul was elected. 

We met AL FOLKARD and his Mrs. at 
the Cardinal's Banquet in June. Also in 

2<i 



attendance at the banquet was ERIC 
STEINHOLM and his Mrs.; ED PHIL- 
LIPS, FR. JOHN KEILTY, MONSIGNOR 
SENNOTT and your correspondent. 

FR. JOHN KEILTY was busy at the 
Holy Name Convention in Buffalo. 

We hope Mrs. Bill Meek is feeling much 
better by this time. 

Your correspondent had a busy summer 
as Principal of the Mary E. Curley Summer 
Review School in Jamaica Plain. Qn July 9, 
he was promoted from Assistant Principal 
of the Sherwin School in Roxbury to the 
Dearbon District, Roxbury as Principal. He 
has 4 buildings under his jurisdiction and 
an enrollment of 1600 pupils. He certainly 
needs all your extra prayers. 

FR. FRED ADELMAN was busy at B.C. 
Summer School this past summer. 

We sincerely hope that we can have a 
get-together this Fall. Drop a line to your 
correspondent on a "news" interest that 
may come your way. Hope to see yo" at 
some of the Football games. If you are 
interested in a Fall Reunion, please let me 
know. 

CHARLES IARROBINO will visit his 
native area of Natick, Mass., with his wife 
and family. CHARLIE is former command- 
ing officer of U.S.S. ORISKANY. The Iar- 
robinos are en route to Washington, D.C., 
where the Captain will assume new duties 
with the Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 
The Iarrobinos have three children. 

J^Q THOMAS F. TRUE, JR. 
JO 37 Pomfret St., W. Roxbury 32 

'38 certainly came to life for our 25th 
anniversary celebration. We might have 
been a little slow getting started but we 
certainly made up for this cs the year 
moved along. I don't think any other class 
can boast of more numerous or a greater 
variety of events, better attendance or more 
enthusiasm. It took a lot of hard work for 
a few but the response amazed everyone. 
To recap we kicked-off with our Class Din- 
ner last Fall. Followed by Family Day at 
the B.C. -Houston Game; reserved tables at 
the night before the Holy Cross Game Din- 
ner Dance. The next event was the Skating 
Party, then the Dance on St. Patrick's Day 
at Alumni Hall. Several members of the 
class ushered at the Pontifical Mass in the 
Cathedral and those who could attend were 
privileged to occupy seats in a special sec- 
tion of the church where we had an excel- 
lent view of the entire proceedings and 
"front row" tables at the luncheon follow- 
ing. Families again had a reunion on "Home- 
coming Day" at the Bean Supper after the 
inter-squad game. '38 again was placed in 
a position of prominence at the Cardinal's 
Dinner. 



tf 



The Alumni 



Golf - Tennis - Baseball - Football 



as as 

Welcome I 
OUR NEW QUARTERS NOW OPEN 



OS 



as 



w 



Bucky" Warren, Inc. 

149-151 PEARL ST., BOSTON 
HA 6-2187 



FAMOUS B.C. GOLF CAPS 
OUR SPECIALTY 

Athletic Supplies For All 

as as 

JOHN W. (BUCKY) WARREN, '33 

W. JOSEPH SWANSON 

as as 

Hockey - Basketball - Badminton 



As for the outing at the White Cliffs in 
Plymouth it suffices to say that most of 
those who attended were all for making it an 
annual affair. For those who couldn't attend 
we'll have more details in future notes. 

We were also well represented at the 
Alumni Golf Tournament. Again on Alumni 
Day we were provided "plush" treatment 
with rooms in the dorms provided for those 
who wished to stay over. Three of the 
clergymen in our class celebrated the Bac- 
calaureate Mass which was followed by 
breakfast at McElroy Commons. Commence- 
ment Day will be an unforgettable memory 
for those of us who acted as marshals and 
were invited by Father Rector to attend 
the lavish reception after the graduation 
ceremony. Our names appeared in the pro- 
gram and are recorded in the official record 
of the College. This we thought climaxed 
our 25th Celebration but we were pleasantly 
surprised to receive through the mail, the 
booklet containing the biographies of all 
who replied to the questionnaire. 

Names have intentionally been omitted 
from these notes but there is one person to 
whom the whole class is indebted and prob- 
ably will never receive the recognition he 
deserves. Those who had anything to do 
with the various arrangements know that 
JIM DAILEY assisted in lining up the 



The 

UNIVERSITY CHORALE 

Presents 

FOR BOSTON" 

AT THE BOOKSTORE 
$4.25 Delivered Anywhere 



whole program, was largely responsible for 
the success of the White Cliffs outing, 
and practically one-handed, produced our 
biographic booklet. Maybe we can do some- 
thing in the future to show him our appre- 
ciation. We also want to thank Wally 
Boudreau and Tom Murray and their staff 
at the Alumni Office for their assistance in 
making our 25th Anniversary year so suc- 
cessful. 



'39 



THOMAS F. TURNAN 

6 Johnson Rd., Arlington 74 



IOC 



ioe 



SILVER ANNIVERSARY 
1939- 1964 

FULL PROGRAM NEWS 
TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON H 

PLAN TO ATTEND 

YOUR 25th AFFAIRS 



30E30C 



301 



Thirty-seven good men and true attended 
the annual class meeting in June. After the 
clatter was calmed and the clutter cleaned 
up PHIL QUINN had been elected presi- 
dent of the 25th Anniversary Class. 

PETE RICCIUTI emerged as Vice- 
President: TOM TURNAN returned as 
secretary, treasurer. Plots and plans are 
bubbling in the committee. 

Class appointed thus far: ED HALL Sea- 
shore weekend. DR. FRANK W. SENNOTT 
special feature, President QUINN plans a 
class newsletter shortly to bring all '39ers 
up to date on this year's 25th anniversary 
class schedule. 

HAROLD BURR, associate professor of 
chemistry at Worcester Junior College, has 
been appointed chairman of the education 
committee of the Central Massachusetts 
Section, American Chemical Society. 



'40 



WILLIAM F. JOY 

44 Lincoln St., Melrose 



Congratulations to TOM CUDMORE 
who has done a remarkable job on Director 
of Development at the College. 

Fr. AMBROSE MAHONEY, S.J. left 
B. C. High after many years as Principal 
and assumed the duties of Director of Ad- 
missions at the College of the Holy Cross. 

Congratulations to JOE CRONIN who 
has been appointed Assistant General 
Counsel for the Howard Johnson enterprises. 

GRAFTON CORBETT has twins who 
entered the College last year: Grafton III 
at CBA and his twin sister at the School 
of Ed. 

PAUL DUFFEY is manager of the Fed- 
eral Sign and Signal Co. in Philadelphia. 
H3 has been active in B. C. affairs there as 
President of the B. C. club and representa- 
tive at half time presentation ceremonies at 
the Villanova-B.C. game when Art Donovan 
and Dick Lucas were honored. 

ED NAGLE is now living at 39 Downes 
Ave., Scarsdale, N.Y. Ed is now with the 
United Community Funds and Councils of 
America at 345 East 46th St., New York 
City. 

LEO REARDON's son David enter B. C. 
as a freshman this year after an outstand- 
ing career at Melrose High School. 

DAVE LUCEY, Jr. moves up to the 
varsity as tackle in this his Sophomore 
year. 

HENRY McMAHON's son Joseph, a na- 
tional merit scholar, entered B. C. from his 
Junior year at B. C. High. 

FRED DOW is now located in New 
York as Sales Manager of Dow Chemical 
International S.A. at 45 Rockefeller Plaza, 
New York City. 



Your correspondent had a pleasant visit 
with ED KENNEY in Chicago in August 
during the American Bar Association Con- 
vention. 

PAUL CAROSI is practicing law in 
Quincy. 

WALTER BRICKETT has been ap- 
pointed Assistant Secretary of the At- 
lantic Cement Co. with offices at 300 
Park Ave., New York City. Walter has a 
law degree from the N. Y. Law School. 

In anticipation of our 25th Anniversary 
two events for the class are being planned 
this year. In addition, committees are being 
formed looking forward to the planning for 
our 25th. You will be notified in due 
course and your cooperation is requested 
which I am sure will be forthcoming as 
usual in the spirit of 1940. 

The JOYS welcomed their ninth child 
sixth son, Richard Joseph, in July, with 
classmate DR. TOM DUNCAN attending. 
Also three sons, William, John and Robert 
at B. C. High as Junior, Sophomore, and 
Freshman. 

JOE WATERS is Administrative As- 
sistant to the Vice-President in charge of 
operations of the Crown Cork and Seal Co. 
in Pennsylvania. 

CORNELIUS McGRATH has been 
named director of sales, chemicals depart- 
ment, Atlas Chemical Industries, Inc. He 
resides with his wife and three children in 
Wilmington, Delaware. 



'42 



The 



PAUL J. MAGUIRE, A&S 
52 Buckingham Rd., Milton 
JAMES CRONIN, CBA 
21 Clover St., Belmont 
class is very proud to join the 
Alumni body in honoring JIM STANTON, 
the recipient of the McKenney Award, Cer- 
tainly no one has given more of himself 
for his Alma Mater as Jim and rewarding 
it is to see that his dedication has been 
recognized. It might be well for all of us 
to take a page from JIM'S book and make 
a pledge to the fund or if that has been 
done to call on others who have not yet 
done this. 

Our condolences are extended to ERNIE 
HANDY on the death of his father and to 
LEO STRUMSKI on the death of his 
mother. 

Congratulations are extended to ERNIE 
on the birth of his 6th child, Joanne, and 
also for his appointment as Vice-Consul of 
Lebanon. 

BILL BUGDEN has recently been ap- 
pointed Director of Research in the office 
of the Commissioner of Probation for the 
Commonwealth. Among the First Niters 
seen at the play at the Heights included: 
BOB MEUSE, JOE ELIOT, TOM HIN- 
CHEY, DICK STILES, BILL McLAUGH- 
LIN, JOHN BRENNAN and JOE LAVOIE. 

JOE LAVOIE reports that he is now 
associated with Schmid Bros, importers of 
Boston. 

JACK HART has been appointed Ass't 
Principal at Framingham High School. 

PAUL O'HARA is now the probation 
officer at the Dorchester District Court. 

ARTHUR DRINKWATER has been ap- 
pointed an Ass't Atty. Gen. for the Com- 
monwealth. 

At the Centennial Mass and reception 
were seen: FR. DWYER, FRANK COL- 
POYS, BOB MEUSE, DICK FERRITER, 
ERNIE HANDY, FRAN DOHERTY, 
RALPH KISSELL, ED McCORMACK, 
HUGH SHARKEY, JIM COLLINS, FRED 
SEELY, TOM LANE, JOE KELLY, PAUL 
MAGUIRE. 

Please excuse some of the news being 
so old but for the first time your editor 
missed a publication. To enhance this col- 
umn it would be appreciated if a phone 
call or a note could be forthcoming. 



30 



The Alumni 



V 



Again, a reminder that a few of the class 
are doing a great job helping JIM on the 
fund but there is still much to be done. 
Please help if you can. See you in Syracuse. 

Class grieves with WALTER COLBERT 
on the death of his mother. 

A reunion of sorts took place at Pop- 
ponenessett on the Cape where JOHN L. 
SULLIVAN, AMBROSE CLAUS, JIM 
RILEY and FRAN BRENNAN, brother of 
JOHN, found themselves in the compound. 
Their families made quite an impressive 
group. Your contributor was at Falmouth 
and got over for a visit. 

ED McCORMACK just moved to a new 
home on Hillsdale Road in Arlington. Fall 
plans are being formulated. Where is JOHN 
MITCHELL? 

J A -2 JOHN J. LARNER 
T 1 ^ 53 Aberdeen Rd., Squantum 

THOMAS O'C. MURRAY, CBA 
14 Churchill Rd., West Roxbury 

The 20th anniversary of the Class of '43 
saw a few men present at the various func- 
tions whom we have not seen in quite a 
while: CDR BOB CASEY, who flew up 
from his present station in San Juan. . . . 
BILL MCCARTHY, who flew in from a 
conference in the mid-west and JOHN 
SARJEANT, who drove up from Delaware 
to be with the class on Alumni Day. . . . 
Among some of the others who had a long 
trip to make the 20th activities were: BILL 
POWER (New Jersey), AL FIORENTINO 
(Washington), JOE REPKO (Rochester), 
JIM GRIMES (New Hampshire) and 
WALTER CASSELL (Springfield). . . . 
JACK BREEN, looking real tanned from 
those long afternoons at the pool, is still 
doing a lot of traveling in the "packing" 
business. . . . Boston Patriots' coach MIKE 
HOLOVAK was the winner of the special 
9 hole prize in conjunction with the fifth 
annual Alumni golf tournament. . . . Har- 
bridge House, a Boston management and 
research consultant at the firm announced 
recently the appointment of NICK FLYNN 
as Vice President. . . . JIM CONSIDINE, 
a resident of Old Greenwich, Conn., has 
been named Director of Public Relations 
for the United Cerebral Palsy Association, 
New York. . . ED MADDEN spent the 
summer touring the country for the Grey- 
hound Corp. 

Vacationing on the Cape were DR. JOHN 
MANNING, TOM KENNEDY, ED Mc- 
GILVERY and JACK REARDON. . . . 
Our class doctors were well represented at 
the '43 activities this year: DAVE FOLAN, 
JOHN MANNING, AL JANSEN, BOB 
BLUTE and TOM BEATTY, while the 
lawyers also made a fine showing: ED 
MYERS, HENRY O'CONNELL, JOHN 
ACTON, PAUL HEALY, CHARLIE WAT- 
SON, BILL SHEA, WALTER GREANY 
and DAN HEALY. ... We looked for 
TOM MEAGHER, who had indicated his 
arrival, but he must have been grounded. 
. . . FR. LEN MAHONEY and FR. BILL 
McDEVITT were also on hand. . . . We're 
glad to hear that WALLY BOUDREAU is 
progressing so well following a period in 
the hospital in the early summer. 

M C JOHN V. CURRY, '45 

i J 11 Stevens Terrace, Arlington 
DAVE and EVE CAREY and their 
growing family earlier this year moved to 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Several of our 
classmates and friends chartered a Grey- 
hound Bus and invaded Maine on a sur- 
prise visit to the Careys . . . the BILL 
SULLIVANS, ED FINIGANS, FRED 
LEONARDS and CHARLEY EARLEYS 
were among the guests. ED FINIGAN who 
is President of J. E. Finigan Inc. can now 
number the new Club House at the Oakley 
Country Club as one of his "monuments". 



BRYON GRAF and NANCY were seen at 
the Centennial Dinner honoring Cardinal 
Cushing. Among those attending were 
PAUL PAGET, AL TIERNEY, LOU SOR- 
GI, JACK CURRY, DR. JOHN BERRY, 
DAVE HERN, HENRY JANCSY, 
FATHER PAT KELLY, TOM LOFTUS 
and FATHER FRANK DUGGAN. HENRY 
JANCSY is now working for E. R. Squibb 
and Sons and the Jancsy's had their eight 
youngster this year. LOU SORGI is Re- 
gional Sales Manager for E. R. Squibb and 
Sons. PAUL DALLAS who has his own 
Insurance business and is a teacher of In- 
surance at Boston University was made a 
trustee of the Insurance Institute, a recent- 
ly established Boston Insurance School. 
Paul is living in Lexington. Congratulations 
to T. X. CRONIN, President of Cramer 
Electronics Inc. of Newton, for being the 
first member of our Class to be elected to 
an Alumni office. Tim's loyalty to the Col- 
lege is to be commended. DR. STEVE 
MEAGHER, Surgeon, is located at Ken- 
more Sq. and DR. STEVE FRAWLEY, 
Pediatrician, on Beacon St., Brookline. 

Attorney TOM McMANUS was vacation- 
ing at West Harwich this summer and 
breaking course records at Hyannisport 
during his stay. Tom is a Selectment in 
Norwood and has three children. Let us 
remember in our prayers EDWARD CUN- 
NINGHAM of Cambridge, one of the few 
graduates in our original '45 class who was 
one of the first Members of the Cross, who 
died a year ago leaving three children. 

The class extends its sympathy to DAVE 
HERN whose father passed away this year. 




NICHOLAS P. FLYNN, '43 
Vice President Harbridge House, Inc., Boston 

y AQ NICHOLAS PALUMBO 
T"0 86 Chandler Dr., Marshfield 

Our 15th Anniversary Class reunion was 
a joyous occasion. The two co-chairmen, 
PAUL WATERS and ROGER MYETTE 
did a fine job with our Alumni Day prepa- 
rations. We had about 30 "Class of 48ers" 
who attended and paraded with all the other 
Anniversary Classes. Luncheon was held at 
McElroy Commons with some dads taking 
their young boys along for the luncheon and 
parade of classes. Some of our class members 
in attendance throughout the day and eve- 
ning were: Class prexy, JOHN BEST, ED 
BLACK, JACK HART, PAUL LANE, 
JACK LYONS, ED McMORROW, ROGER 
MYETTE, BILL OLIVER, JACK O'NEILL, 
YOURS TRULY, PAUL RIORDAN, JOE 
VEANOR, HAROLD DREW, PAUL WA- 
TERS, DAVE WILLIAMS, JIM CALA- 
BRESE and many others. 

31 



«^ Wedding 
^Pg ^ Reception 

"Music Makes The Day" 

Aimmu 1 / Ic^rraie 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

Featured 1 2 years at the 
Hotel Vendome 

Playing for Reunions, 
Dinner-Dances, Parties 

KE 6-6020 



Congratulations to ED KING. Ed was 
just made Executive Director of the Massa- 
chusetts Port Authority which is the top 
position in the Authority. ED KING resides 
in Winthrop with his family. 

JiQ JOHN T. PRINCE 
^f y 64 Donnybrook Rd., Brighton 35 
WALTER J. McGAULEY, CBA 
47 Beverly Rd., Newton Highlands 

A hearty welcome home to CHARLEY 
HARVEY who has been living in Westport, 
Connecticut for the past two years. Charley 
is Public Relations Counsel to the New 
England Railroad Community Committee 
which encompasses the six major New 
England railroads. The proud father of three 
children, CHARLIE and his family are now 
living in Concord. 

Congratulations to the JOHN BRAD- 
LEYS on the recent arrival of a daughter, 
Anne Julie. JACK'S family now numbers 
three boys and two girls. An Assistant 
Principal of the Charles E. Mackey School 
in Boston, JACK and his family reside in 
Braintree. 

Living in Springfield, Massachusetts is 
ROBERT J. VanWART. Bob is married, 
has two children and is Assistant Executive 
Director for the Community Council for 
Health, Welfare and Recreation. A graduate 
of the Boston College School of Social 
Work, BOB lived in Cleveland, Ohio for 
eight years. He is a former Secretary for 
the Boston College Club of Western Massa- 
chusetts, is a visiting lecturer at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts and Springfield 
College and a Field Work Instructor at the 
University of Connecticut. Best of luck, 
BOB! 

Working for the Raytheon Manufacturing 
Company, we find RICHARD P. DEVLIN 
as a Sales Engineer in the Microwave Tube 
Division in Burlington and FRANCIS J. 
SCHELL as a Technical Director in the 
Systems Laboratory Division. 

EDWARD J. TEDESCO, a graduate of 
the Harvard University Graduate School of 
Design, is an architect. ED is married, the 
proud father of six children and lives in 
Woburn. Since 1956, he has had his own 
architectural firm with his office in Woburn 
and is also an instructor at the Boston 
Architectural Center along with being 
Chairman of the Woburn Planning Board. 

Don't forget to send those class news 
items along to your correspondent. 

This is the big 15th year for our class, 
and alumni class president JIM McET- 
TRICK wants to make it our most active 
to date. He asked PETE ROGERSON to 



V 



The Alumni 



head a class social committee along with 
JOHN PRINCE and JOHN HICKEY. 
Save Sept. 28, Saturday evening, the date 
for our first social at Motel 128 in Dedham. 
A cocktail hour, dinner, and dance is in 
order for that evening to kick off a year of 
social functions. It is also planned to make 
Homecoming Day, Nov. 2nd, another event 
on the calendar. 

Seen at Alumni Day in June were BILL 

harney, jim mcettrick, ed te- 
desco, pete rogerson, john 
hickey, ed ryan, alex scholtes, 
john Mcquillan, Walter m c - 

GAULEY, BILL ABLEY, among others. 
A special mention should be made of FR. 
WALTER SPILLANE, one of our most 
loyal alumni, who attended Alumni Day all 
the way from the midwest. 

BOB CURRAN has a hospital admini- 
strative post in New Jersey. JOHN CAR- 
NEY is a candidate for School Committee 
in Boston. JOHN BRADLEY is now an 
Assistant Director in the Dept. of Practice 
and Training in the Boston Public Schools. 

Former STYLUS Managing Editor JOHN 
BRENNAN'S latest magazine article will 
appear soon in Bill Buckley's "National 
Review." John lives in West Roxbury with 
his wife, Anne, and two children. 

JOE MALONEY has now become the 
president of Glazon Corporation in N.Y. 

REV. WALTER SPILLANE is in Cold 
Water Michigan and is serving as an area 
chairman for the Development Program. 

BOB McLOUD has been appointed assist- 
ant district sales manager of Ford Motor 
Company's Lincoln-Mercury Division dis- 
trict office at Memphis, Tennessee. He is 
married to the former Patricia McDermott 
and has three children. The family lives at 
1840 Parkway, Poplar Estates, Germantown, 
Tennessee. 

Let's make this our biggest year of all. 



THE 

NEWMAN 
PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL 

COMPLETE COLLEGE 
PREPARATORY HIGH 
SCHOOL PROGRAM 

Coeducational 
Days — Evenings 



Sessions begin September, 
Janucrry and June 



J. HARRY LYNCH, '40 

245 Marlboro Street 
Boston 16, Massachusetts CO 7-4530 




'50 



DAVID L. GODVIN, '51 CBA 
Named General Partner of Paine, Webber, 
Jackson & Curtis, New York Investment Firm 

How about some of you attending who 
haven't been around since graduation? It's 
always good to renew memories. See if we 
can make the dance on Sept. 28th our most 
successful to date. 

DANTE S. DeFAZIO 
9 Indian Spring Rd., Ashland 
CHARLES MURPHY has been appointed 
as Sales Manager of the Miami Carey Divi- 
sion, The Philip Carey Mfg. Co., Middle- 
town, Ohio. He and his family reside at 
4815 Holly Ave., Middletown, Ohio. 

ED HARRIGAN has been elected a 
member of the Boston Office Junior Board 
of the Kemper Insurance Companies. Ed 
makes his home on Noyes Road, George- 
town, Massachusetts with his wife Mary 
and their son Martin. 

RICHARD CLARKE has been appointed 
advertising display manager at U.S. Ply- 
wood Corporation's national headquarters 
here. 

ANDREW KELLY of West Roxbury has 
joined the Dewey and Almy Chemical Divi- 
sion, W. R. Grace & Co., as senior research 
chemist in the container and chemical 
specialties research laboratory, where he will 
specialize in the research and development 
of container sealing compounds. 

TOM O'CONNELL was assistant libra- 
rian for circulation in the Harvard College 
Library. He is now director of Libraries, 
York University, Toronto, Canada. 
J^-| FRED J. MAURIELLO, A&S 

31. Box 357 R.F.D. 4, Saugerties, N.Y. 
JAMES WATERS, A&S 
61 Stearns St., Newton Centre 59 
JOHN A. CASEY, CBA 
35 Aran Road, Westwood 

DICK GOGGIN is in the Special Pro- 
motion Department in Boston for the Nar- 
ragansett Brewing Company. He has two 
children and is living in Hingham. 

Good Luck to JOHN STAPLETON who 
is a partner in the Regan-Stapleton Lincoln 
Mercury Automobile Agency in Wellesley. 
John and his wife are living in Quincy 
with their three children. 

JOHN FAHEY has just returned from 
San Francisco to become New England 
Manager of The Instruments Publishing 
Company. 

JOHN PRENDERGAST managed a 
motel on the Cape this summer. John is 
married with three children and lives in 
Revena, New York, where he teaches in 
grammar school. 

ED QUIRK, ED WHITE, and JACK 
CASEY played golf together in the Alumni 
Week Tournament. They didn't win any 
prizes. Also seen on the links at South Shore 

32 



Country Club that day was JIM DERBA. 

PAUL LEIST is President of the Linden- 
meyer Paper Company in Boston. 

WARREN C. HAMILL has been ap- 
pointed as assistant director of special ses- 
sions in charge of extension programs and 
non-credit technical and management pro- 
grams. 

The Rev. GEORGE VALDEZ FAR- 
RELL, S.J. announced his ordination to 
the Sacred Priesthood which was conferred 
by His Eminence, Richard Cardinal Cushing. 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS has been ap- 
pointed a Vice President of the Hartford 
National Bank & Trust Company in charge 
of the bank's Municipal Finance Depart- 
ment. Bill is married and has a family of 
five children. Congratulations. DAVE GOD- 
VIN has become a general partner of Paine, 
Webber, Jackson & Curtis to head up the 
firm's expanded institutional sales depart- 
ment. JOE DOYLE was elected to the Of- 
fice of State- Vice-President of the Ohio 
Junior Chamber of Commerce. Joe is a 
salesman for Proctor and Gamble in 
Youngstown, Ohio. 

FRANCIS CUNNINGHAM, Attorney, 
and his family of seven children are living 
in Revere. He is Manager of Contracts, 
Systems Division of the ESPCO Co., Cam- 
bridge. 

CHARLIE NUGENT now holds an M.S. 
for Teachers in Mathematics from Univ. 
of N.H., 1963. 

PAUL LYDON now holds a Master of 
Science for Teachers in Chemistry from 
U.N.H., 1963. 

EDMUND BLONDIN elected Village 
President of Greendale, Wisconsin, a sub- 
urb of Milwaukee. His work was written up 
in a feature article in the Milwaukee Sen- 
tinel. 

FRANCIS E. BABINEAU, CDR. U.S. 
Navy, recently named commanding officer 
of attack squadron 64 aboard the U.S.S. 
Enterprise CVA (N) 65 in The Med. 

JjT^y WILLIAM J. FANDEL, A&S 
3.Z 218 Lowell St., Reading 

FRANK J. McGEE, CBA 

454 Plymouth Ave., Marshfield 

We expect all of those in the greater 
Boston area to attend the Biennial Class 
meeting this Fall. You'll receive details in 
a notice very shortly. 

Thanks to a note from CHARLIE CAR- 
ROLL'S mother, we've learned that he is 
taking a Neuro-Surgical residency at George 
Washington Hospital in Washington, D.C. 
after graduating from Georgetown. Nice to 
know that we have our own "Ben Casey." 

DICK McDERMOTT has joined Horn- 
blower and Weeks as a Securities Broker. 

DICK DRISCOLL and his wife have 
been blessed with their first, a daughter. 

AL DEVLIN has been appointed Assist- 
ant General Counsel of Edgerton, Eerme- 
shausen & Grier, Inc. Al graduated from the 
Law School in 1952. 

PAUL McPHERSON has been appointed 
advertising sales manager of "Chemical 
Week", a publication of McGraw Hill Corp. 
. . . The Agency for International Develop- 
ment announced the appointment of JAMES 
T. McMAHON as assistant executive offcer 
of the US foreign aid Mission to the Re- 
public of China . . . The firm of Whitman, 
Ransom and Coulson have made ROBERT 
C. O'BRIEN a member of the firm . . . 
JACK HUGHES was named Social Work 
Supervisor for the City of Fall River . . . 



THE PERFECT 
FOR OFFICE OR 

A 


GIFT 
HOME 


BOSTON 

$35.00 i 
Call Al 


COLLEGE 111 A III 

n Metropolitan Boston 
umni Office 314-5230 



^.fll 



The Alumni 



TONY LEMOS, an instructor in physics at 
Lake Forest College received a 2500 dollar 
grant from the Armour Research Founda- 
tion . . . PAUL WOODS was recently 
named Regional Finance Executive-Europe, 
for the Ford Motor Company's international 
staff. 

>£ A JOHN J. CURTIN, A&S 
J^ 49 Moulton St., 

Newton Lower Falls 

GERALD F. COUGHLIN, CBA 

77 Maryknoll St., Mattapan 

JOAN T. KENNEDY, N. 

10 Bodoin Park, Dorchester 
RUTH RYAN SWEENEY has adopted 
her third child. A daughter. 

KAY BURKE is an active member of 
the Carney Hospital Centennial Committee. 
JOAN KENNEDY traveled to Mexico 
this summer. 

BETH SULLIVAN is still stationed at 
the Carmelite Convent in Danvers. Don't 
forget to drop Beth, (Sr. Therese) a line. 

BOB HASENFUS, Madawaska, Maine, 
has been elected president of the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. His wife, Ellen has 
been elected president of the women's 
auxiliary. They have two sons and two 
daughters. 

)ES DAVID B. FINNEGAN 
JO 1623 So - 26th St - Arlington, Va. 

LEONARD CLARK, CBA 

256 Mountain Ave., Arlington 

EDWIN J. COOK 

22 Holiday St., Dorchester 
Word has reached your correspondents 
that BOB CULLEN and wife Anne are 
now residing in Bowie, Maryland. At the 
Harvard commencement this past June, 
BOB RENEHAN received his Ph.D. ROSE 
KARWOSKI has been appointed instructor 
in biology at Simmons College. ED NIE- 
MEYER has joined the faculty of MacMur- 
ray College in Illinois as assistant professor 
of foreign languages. Capt. JOHN C. 
DUFFY, MC, U.S. Air Force was awarded 
the Air Force Commendation Medal for 
meritorius service while attached to the 
31st Tactical Fighter Wing at Homestead 
Air Base, Florida and Okinawa. Dr. Duffy 
is now studying psychiatry under a fellow- 
ship at the Mayo Clinic. JACK CLUNAN 
joined the elect of the insurance world as a 
member of the Million Dollar Round Table 
in 1962. DR. EUGENE McCARTHY is 
presently residing in Asuncion, Paraguay, 
where he is the Chief U.S. Health Advisor 
and Director of the Paraguaian Health 
Service. Dr. McCarthy supervises the train- 
ing of the doctors and other medical person- 
nel who will staff the medical centers in the 
interior of Paraguay. All your correspond- 
ents are anxious to hear from the Class of 
'56; please drop us a line soon. 
>^*7 EUGENE P. SULLIVAN, A&S 
J / 103 Saybrook St., Brighton 

CATHERINE HARTNETT, Ed. 

1 Raeburn Terr., Newton Hghlds. 

LEO A. FLOYD, JR., CBA 

65 Elm St., Revere 
September marks the start of our seventh 
year as alumni. Many of the class enjoy this 
role as evidenced by their attendance at 
many qi the activities sponsored by the 
college — especially during the great Cen- 
tennial Year. Attendance at our own class 
activities is certainly on the upswing. The 
May get-together was the greatest yet. Con- 
gratulations to the committee for a job well 
done. Word has it that many 57ers have 
already reserved the third Sunday in May 
to insure their presence at next years annual 
cocktail party. A tip of the hat also to BILL 
HEAVEY, JOHN COYNE, PAUL SHIEL, 
MARTY CLANCY, PAUL SHEEHY, JIM 
TIERNAN and JACK DWYER for their 
fine performance at the recent golf tourna- 
ment. 



1888-1963 
OUR 75TH YEAR 

HOME FINANCING 
24-HOUR SERVICE 

ALL SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

NOW 

EARN 




4Vi* 



C0-0P£RATIV£ 

BflllK 



• QUARTERLY DIVIDENDS 

• INSURED IN FULL 



209 Washington Street, opposite State Street, Boston. Phone LA 3-4880 




Class dues for last year are still coming 
in quite well. Included among the latest 
returns (about five months ago!!) were the 
following news notes. 

G. PAUL McNULTY is associated with 
the Lincoln Mercury Division of Ford 
Motor Company. ROBERT BURNS taught 
in Weisbaden, Germany during the past 
school year. ANGI CELLI, his wife and 
two children are residing in Leominster 
where 'Chub' is the Production Manager at 
the Plastic Academy Corporation. CAP- 
TAIN ROBERT KLEBER is presently as- 
signed as Adjutant, 4th U.S. Army Medical 
Laboratory in San Antonio, Texas. The 
GEORGE HENNESSY family recently an- 
nounced the birth of their second child, a 
girl Susan Marie. George, who is employed 
by the Boston Gas Co., is also working 
toward his masters degree in Business Ad- 
ministration at Babson. 

ED HEGARTY writes that he received 
his LL.B. in June from the University of 
California Hastings College. JIM CANT- 
WELL who recently married the former 
Joann Ryan is already making extensive 
plans for a Post Holy Cross Game celebra- 
tion at their Worcester residence. Jim is 
currently teaching in Shrewsbury and should 
receive his M.ED, in June. Listed among 
the newest attorneys in the state is JOHN 
KRYSOVIC. With JOHN "OLLIE" 
DALY'S transfer to St. Louis by the Aetna 
Insurance Company, Boston College lost a 
very active Alumnus in this area. In addition 
to attendance practically every event spon- 
sored by the College, John did a tremendous 
job for the Development Fund Program 
during the past year. — speaking of the 
Fund PAUL BROWN, who is now calling 
Atlanta, Georgia his home, recently sent 
along a nice note and a very generous 
pledge on the Share Program which I for- 
warded to the Development Office. If you 
haven't been personally contacted concern- 
ing the Share Plan, would you like to be 
listed among the thousands of Boston Col- 
lege Alumni who are making a personal 
sacrifice for their Alma Mater? Drop me 
(E.P.S.) a note. 

DICK DESMOND marired the former 
Sarah Ellen Eisley of New Cumberland, Pa. 
and is currently working for the Federal 
Government in Washington. After a year at 
St. Philip Neri School, TOM AHEARN 
left for the Maryknoll Seminary in mid- 



July. Belated congratulations to PAUL and 
JOANNE SHEEHY on the birth of their 
daughter, Kathryn. Paul is presently a 
probation officer at Roxbury Municipal 
Court, attending Suffolk Law School nights, 
and has been the very successful coach of 
the Marion High hockey team for the past 
few years. ED AMARAL is a surgical 
resident at St. Vincent's Hospital, Worcester 
and the proud father of a son, Edward Jr. 
After leaving the University of Michigan 
clinical staff, FRANK GREELISH, D.V.M. 
has opened a private practice in Shrews- 
bury. PHIL RILEY is now associated with 
the Boston Law firm of Parker, Coulter, 
Daly and White. JIM McDERMOTT in- 
forms us that he is working as technical 
saleman for Shell Chemical Co. in St. Louis. 
JOE CONEYS who was in the Boston area 
recently is presently assigned to the U.S.S. 
Gondsborough which is still under con- 
struction at Seattle. The Coneys have one 
son, Christopher. Considered by many to 
be the most eligible bachelors on the cape 
this past summer were: JOE WALSH, JIM 
TIERNAN, DON HASKELL, HARRY 
CONNELL and TOM WHELLEN. In- 
cluded among the guests which witnessed 
the marriage of PAUL SHIEL to the 
former Jean Bralley at New Bedford in 
June were: CHUCK and MARLENE 
LYNCH, JACK KRYSOVIC, JIM and 
JOANN CANTWELL, JIM DEVLIN, and 
FRANK and MAUREEN FLAHERTY. 
After a successful summer session in Maine 
as a motel proprietor, PAUL is teaching at 
Arlington High School. 

Because our class activities will be in- 
creasing as we near our next anniversary 
year and the work and responsibilities could 
be too much for a small group. It has been 
suggested that a change be made in our 
board of directors to include more class 
members. This is a most welcome suggestion 
to those who have been guiding the class 
activities so successfully during the past six 
years. ANY IDEAS — ?? 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. DAVE 
DRINKWATER on their recent marriage. 
DAVE is now at the University of Michigan 
studying for his Ph.D. 

Received a letter recently from JOHN 
and Ella RUGGIERO, who are residing in 
Hauppauge, New York, with their 1 Vi year 
old daughter. JOHN has been named Con- 
troller for Sanders Associates, Inc. Geospace 



3 J 



> The Alumni 

Electronics Division, in Plainview, N.Y. He 
received his M.B.A. from B.C. Grad School 
in June '62. They send their best regards 
to all. 

The FRANK DIRKSMEIERS are now 
living in their new home in Hyde Park. 

Congratulations to FRANK HIGGINS 
and Ellen Daley on their recent engage- 
ment. A May wedding is planned. 

Congratulations on the recent marriage 
of BOB HILL YARD to Joanne Margaret 
Brown. 

WILLIAM A. FITZGERALD has been 
named director of libraries and professor 
of library science at Marquette University. 
He is now in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

ED THOMAS of Lowell, Mass., com- 
pleted a 35-week officer career course at 
the Infantry School, Fort Benning, Ga., late 
in May. 

JEROME SUPPLE received his Ph.D. 
in Chemistry at the University of New 
Hampshire and is now doing Post doctorate 
research in Chemistry at the University of 
California, in Berkley, Cal. 

AL BEDARD, JR., is living in Washing- 
ton, D.C., and is with the National Bureau 
of Standards. 

JOE GOLDING has won the highly 
coveted Arthur W. Tosh Award given an- 
nually to the "most outstanding salesman 
of the current year." JOE is living at 3457 
60th St. S.W., Seatttle, Washington. 

ED. CATALDO and BOB ROGERS were 
both awarded advanced degrees from the 
Graduate Schol of Arts and Sciences, from 
Tufts University on June 9. 

Four B. C. Alumni were graduated yester- 
day from the Financial Management De- 
velopment Program of Raytheon Co. The 
B. C. Grads in '57 were: ED BRICKLEY, 
ED McCABE and BOB ZIOMEK. BRICK- 
LEY and ZIOMEK belonged to the Gold 
Key Society. 

Recently Vinnie and NORMA (DeFEO) 
CACCIAMANI became the proud parents 
of daughter, Laura Jo. The Cacciamani's 
have another child, Michael. Best Wishes 
are in order to MARY DOHERTY and 
GERALDINE DUNNE on the occasion of 
their marriages. MARY DOHERTY is mar- 
ried to Capt. John Pipia and is living in 
Bad Tolz, Germany. GERRY DUNNE is 
married to David Toler and is living in 
Hyde Park. 

Congratulations to Jim and MARGIE 
(FIDALEO) DiMARE on the birth of 
their third son and fourth child. 



B. C. MAN COMMANDS "OLD IRONSIDES' 



For your new . . . 

LINCOLN - MERCURY - COMET 

and other fine used cars 
see 

REGAN and STAPLETON 

453 WASHINGTON ST. 
WELLESLEY CE 5-6000 

Stan Regan '43 Jack Stapleton '51 




(Official U.S. Navy Photo) 
Lt. (JG) John C. Kelleher, USNR, '58 recently took command of the nation's oldest commissioned 
ship, the USS Constitution at the Boston Naval Shipyard. Lt. Kelleher is the nephew of Rita 
C. Kelleher, Dean of the School of Nursing. 



J^Q DAVID RAFFERTY, A&S 
JA 6 Sycamore Lane, Hingham 
JOAN KEENAN, Ed. 
39 Trapelo St., Brighton 35 
ELIZ. (Leary) HORRIGAN, N. 
8 Scannell R., Randolph 
SHELDON DALY, CBA 
24 Harborview Dr., Hingham 

DR. DONALD SLIPP completed a year's 
internship at the Mary Hitchcock Memorial 
Hospital June 27. 

TOM FITZGERALD received his Doctor 
of Philosophy degree in Physics at Brown 
University's 195th annual Commencement 
this morning. 

STEVE WALSH completed two weeks 
of annual active duty training at Fort Lee, 
Va. STEVE is assigned as a platoon leader 
in the 751st Quartermaster Co. an Army 
Reserve unit in Boston. 

JIM MULDOON has been awarded a 
Fulbright Fellowship to study at Cambridge 
University, England, during the 1963-64 
school year. JIM is married to the former 
Teresa M. Daley and they make their home 
at 406 University Ave., Ithaca, N.Y. 

MOIRA FEELEY is engaged to TEDDY 
LYONS also class of '58. 

LOIS POWERS CONLEY has her fourth 
child, second son in December. She is living 
in Alexandria, Va. near GINNY LEWIS 
DONNELLEY who has a daughter Liza. 

EILEEN TEAHAN was married to Dr. 
David Quigley and is living in Texas. 

BARBARA TOTH is attending B.C. 
Grad. School and is working toward her 
Masters in Guidance and Counseling. 

PAT KING GARGONE had her second 
child, first son. 

PATTY McGUIRE TAUPIER had her 
first daughter, second child. 

LEO J. BARRETT has recently opened 
his own law firm at 77 Whitney Ave., New 
Haven, Conn. Leo is a graduate of the U. 
of Conn. Law School. 

Congratulations to PAT MICCICHE on 
winning a General Electric fellowship in 
Economics at Union College. 

Best wishes to DAN KEHOE and Sandra 

34 



Spandley on their recent engagement. 

DICK MANDILE's days as a bachelor 
are numbered, as wedding bells will toll 
for him and Lynn Hart on June 22, in 
Cranston, R. I. 

Word has reached us that TOBY CAS- 
SIDY has again directed another success- 
ful musical. 

DICK and MARY JO O'BRIEN proudly 
announce the birth of their first child, 
Richard John, Jr. 

ED KELLY is now associate executive 
director of the Waterbury, Conn. United 
Council and Fund. 

JOHN DOYLE will leave New England 
soil to be the assistant director of the 
Elkart, Indiana United Community Serv- 
ices, Inc. 

JOE and JANET GARIFOLE are now 
the proud parents of three children, the 
newest addition being a girl, Mary Jo. Joe 
recently completed another successful sea- 
son as coach of the West Boylston High 
School basketball team. 

FRED TOBIN is teaching in Arlington. 
DON SEAGER is teaching at Ayer, Mass. 
high school. BOB MISIEWICZ, now Dr. 
Bob (D.D.S. ), is studying for his degree 
in oral surgery at Loyola of Chicago. DICK 
MANDILE will spend the summer at St. 
Lawrence College, Canton, N. Y., studying 
French. ARCHIE HULL is now teaching 
at Walpole High. 

DAN CLANCY is in the Mortgage De- 
partment of the Boston Five. Dan has two 
children and is living in Holliston. 

Class Chairman JIM McCUSKER is a 
salesman for Shell Oil. Jim and Judy are 
living in Quincy. 

TOM MARTIN is a registered repre- 
sentative with Goodbody & Co. 

BOB JOHNSON'S wife Brenda is ex- 
pecting their first this summer. 

HARV FEDERMAN and Ruth have a 
son, Bruce. Now living in Brighton, they 
are building in Randolph. Harv is selling 
advertising for the Herald-Traveler. 

CARMEN ELIS who was recalled by 
the Air Force last fall is back with Wain- 
wright & Co. Carmen is still single, as is 



DON De SCENZA who is with the Invest- 
ment Department of New York Life. 

JOE FERNEY and PAUL MAJESKI 
are both with Jordan Marsh. 

Congratulations to MIKE FLYNN who 
was married earlier this year. Mike and his 
bride are living in North Carolina where 
he is serving with the Marine Corps. 

PAUL FOLAN has four children, three 
boys and a girl. Paul is with Hanlon Shoe 
i and is living in Norwood, as is his brother 
Pete. Pete is married and recently joined 
the Claims Department of the Firemen's 
Fund Ins. Co. 

MARTY BROOKS, with Arthur Young 
8k Co., is living in Hingham. The Brooks 
have a boy and a girl. 

DICK LINEHAN is living in Newington, 
Conn., where he is selling construction 
equipment. Dick and Bev have two chil- 
dren. 

PAT LYDON is single and is teaching 
in New Hampshire after having completed 
graduate work at BC. 

JOHN SULLIVAN is now in program- 
ming with Minneapolis Honeywell. John is 
married, has one child, and is living in 
West Newton. 

BOB QUINAN is with the Boston Safe 
Deposit and Trust Co. and is also attend- 
ing Suffolk Law. The Quinans are expecting 
in June. 

JOE HONAN has recently returned from 
three years in Germany with the Army and 
is working for Raytheon. Joe is studying 
for his M.B.A. at Babson. 

Another returnee to the Boston area is 
BILL O'ROURKE who spent 18 months 
in Mexico with Gillette. Bill is married and 
living in Hingham. 

FRANK and Sharon KEARNEY are 
living in West Roxbury and are expecting 
their first in August. Frank recently joined 
Xerox as a salesman. 

PAUL and Marge HANNIGAN are liv- 
ing in North Easton where Paul is teach- 
ing. The Hannigans have three children, 
including a set of twins. 

TOM MEEHAN is married and has a 
daughter. When last heard from, the Mee- 
hans were living in New York City. 

BRIAN O'RIORDAN and his wife Pat 
(School of Nursing '58) have three boys. 
Brian is teaching in Boston and living in 
Dorchester. 

BILL WALSH is also living in Dorches- 
ter. He and Helen have two daughters. 

BOOTS CONNELLY has three children, 
and is living in West Roxbury. Boots is a 
Probation Officer as are TOM JOE SULLI- 
VAN and LARRY PLENTY. 

JACK BARRY is a financial analyst with 
J. H. Goddard & Co. Now living in West 
Roxbury, he and Gerry have two boys. 

Congratulations to MIKE LAVEY who 
was recently promoted to Captain by the 
Army. Mike is stationed at the Watertown 
Arsenal. 

DICK and Peg SIMONS have two boys 
and are living in Canton. Dick is an invest- 
ment analyst with the Loyal Protective Life 
Ins. Co. 

BOB SHANNON is living in Long 
Island. The Shannons have four children, 
two sets of twins. 

FRED IGO is reported to be doing well 
with his restaurant in Cambridge. 

JACK KUDZMA, is an accountant with 
Hood Milk. Married and living in Salem, 
Jack is attending B.C. evenings. 

JOHN CROKE was married last July 
to Ann Sullivan, living in Roslindale and 
working for I.B.M. 

ANTHONY DELLO RUSSO is a de- 
partment manager at Honeywell. The Dello 
Russos are expecting their fourth child. 



The Alumni 



V 



'Please phone my agency for 
services by a businessman for 
alumni." 



J, 



ndurance - 

• Life Insurance 

• Estate Analysis and Planning 

• Homeowners Policies 

• Automobile Insurance 

• Professional Malpractice and 
equipment policies 



your insurance protection and personal 
college men and women; students and 
Sincerely yours, 

BILL KELLY, '40 

Other Services Include 

information regarding 

• Real estate mortage financing 

• Auto and equipment financing 

• Financial management 



WILLIAM C. KELLY, a b ll b. 

80 FEDERAL ST., BOSTON 10, MASS - Liberty 2-0555 



DAVE RAFFERTY bought a new home 
in Hingham and is now a salesman with 
Pitman Moore Co. of Indianapolis, division 
of Dow Chemical. 

TOM KUREY received his Ph.D. in 
physics from Penn. State in January. 

GEORGE "BO" STROM is taking the 
"big step" in August. BO is finally going 
out to pasture. 

KEN and RITA (MOORE) JOYCE are 
living in Washington, D. C. Ken, a lawyer, 
is working for the Circuit Court of Appeals. 

TOM and ANN MARIE CAIL are living 
in Tiverton, R. I. 

DR. TOM CONNOLLY and his wife 
PAT (DWYER) will be matriculating to 
Denver, Col. in July for a stint with the 
Air Force Medical Unit. 

LEO CONWAY is married to MARY 
SHANAHAN. Leo is teaching in Boston 
and living in Jamaica Plain. 

BILL KILROY is working for Kemper 
Insurance. The Kilroys are expecting their 
first baby in May. 

CHARLES HEGARTY, S.J. is teaching 
at Xavier High School, Concord, Mass. 

JOHN FELONEY is living in Milton 
and working for Gillette. 

JOHN SCANLON is working for the 
telephone Co. on the "Junior Executive 
Training Program." 

DON MANNING was elected for his 
second term in the Massachusetts House of 
Representatives. 

JOHN DONLAN is working as an ac- 
counting executive for Jerome O'Leary Ad- 
vertising Agency. 

VIN PALERMO is living in California 
and working for the Government. "Old" 
Vin finally took the big step. 

JAY GALLIGAN is married and living 
in Arlington. Jay is a probation officer for 
the Waltham Court. 

GERRY ROURKE has just received a 
promotion to senior scientist in geophysics 
at Auco Corp. 

FRANK FLANAGAN is a director of 
the Minuteman Missile Program at Syl- 
vania in Needham. 

Glad to announce that BOB DIOZZI has 
accomplished two major tasks — passing the 
Bar Exam and recently becoming engaged. 

FRANK CLARK is now director of 
teacher training at Amherst College. Fran 
is married and has one child, Lisa Ann. 

HARRY DUPUIS is sales coordinator 
for National Polychemicals, Inc. 

JOHN LYONS received his D.D.S. de- 
gree from Seton Hall College of Dentistry. 

LEO BARRETT has opened his own 
law office in New Haven, Conn. 

DICK SHEA is now manager of the 
purchasing department at Polychemical, Inc. 

35 



'CQ peter Mclaughlin, a&s 

J7 46 Gardner St., West Roxbury 
FRANK BOWDEN, JR., CBA 
27 Packard Ave., Dorchester 
NANCY V. DOLAN, N. 
1834 Beacon St., Brookline 

Classmates are reminded that the annual 
meeting of the board of governors will be 
held in October. All are invited to attend 
and anyone desiring further information 
should contact their respective class cor- 
respondent. On this, our fifth anniversary 
year, all are urged to keep their current 
address up to date to insure effective com- 
munication. 

RAYMOND STEBBINS now holds a 
Master of Science in Mathematics from 
U.N.H., 1963. 

JOHN DEMPSEY is teaching Chemistry 
at Maiden High School. 

PAUL SULLIVAN is now married and 
living in Mattapan and employed in the 
Research Dept. of Itek Corp. in Lexington. 
BILL SHEA is working in the family 
business . . . SPENCER TOBIN recently 
passed the Bar . . . DENNY MINAHAN 
recently was discharged from the Marines 
and is working for Thor Power tools . . . 
RICHARD ACCHIONE and FRED TOL- 
LAND are automobile underwriters with 
Liberty Mutual . . . JOHN MORAN is a 
special agent for Boston Mutual Life Ins. 
Co. . . . BILL MACK is with United Board 
and Carton Corp. and is living in Lockport, 
N.Y.... BILL FALLON is with Polland Ball 
and Roller Bearing Corp. is just outside the 
city of New York and has three children 
. . . BILL BERRIGAN is an Asst. Manager 
at Household Finance in Central Square in 
Cambridge . . . BOB CROWLEY is an 
agent with Liberty Mutual . . . GEORGE 
MORRIS is with Addressograph Multigraph 
in Boston . . . CHARLIE BATTAGLIA 
is a Lt. jg in the U.S. Navy serving on an 
LST . . . JOE F. CALLAHAN is with 
American Mutual . . . JOE P. CALLAHAN 
is with United Fruit . . . JOHN CRONIN 
is with the General Services Administration 
at the Custom House . . . JACK DENEEN 
is married and working for an accounting 
firm . . . TOM DOERR is an Area Man- 
ager with Firestone . . . TOM GILDER- 
SON is a Production Supervisor with Car- 
ters in Cambridge . . . JIM MAGENNIS 
is with Minneapolis-Honeywell . . . HARRY 
McCORMACK is with Walter Baker and is 
in Real Estate on the side . . . ELEANOR 
SULLIVAN has left her job in New York 
and after vacationing on the Cape for the 
summer will return to Boston where she has 
accepted a position as supervisor at Peter 
Bent Brigham. 

Saw JUNE KELLY SCANTON and 
MARY MULLINS MADDOT at WILMA 
FALLONS' wedding. June and Tommy are 



y&- 



^ Th^ \ I n in ii ■ 




REAL ESTATE 



15 India Sq. 

Boston 10 

Liberty 2-0165 

401 Lowell St. 

Lexington 73 

Volunteer 2-6450 

LEO F. LEARY, '52 

PRESIDENT 



now parents and will soon be residing in 
Andover. Mary and Konnie are making 
their home in Illinois. 

Congratulations to the new parents: 
BARBARA CARTNICK WIKLINSKI and 
Stash: BEA RAE LANE and Dana. 

MARY FENNELL MICHAUD was at 
home in Salem recently with her two chil- 
dren recuperating from a fractured ankle. 

MARY JANE GIBBONS WALDRON 
and Don will soon be returning from Ger- 
many. Don will be doing his residency at 
St. Margaret's. 

MARY CASKIN has accepted a position 
as a clinical instructor at Catherine Laboure. 
Good luck Mary. 

Congratulations are in order for JACK 
WISEMAN, on the birth of his son, John 
R. Ill, for FRANK MARTIN on the birth 
of his third daughter, Jessica; and to JOHN 
LANE on his forthcoming marriage to Jo 
Ann Dolles, of Euclid, Ohio. John is teach- 
ing at Collinwood High School, Cleveland, 
Ohio. JOE McGUILL, after graduating 
from Loyola Dental School is a lieutenant 
in the Navy, stationed at Davisville, R.I. 

JOHN O'CONNOR has forsaken the 
green grass at the Longwood Cricket Club 
and has moved to Rochester, N.Y. where he 
will practice dentistry. 

BARBARA C. McCANN, 194 Fellsway 
West, Medford, received an advanced de- 
gree from the Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences, Tufts University, on June 9. 

)ff\ ROBERT C. O'LEARY, A&S 
OU 7 Brook Rd., Milton 

BRENDA M. CROWLEY, Ed. 

19 Leahaven Rd., Mattapan 

LT. ROBERT F. X. HART, 

USAF, A&S 

Box 133 3320th USAF Hospital 

Amarillo A.F.B., Texas 

JOSEPH R. CARTY, CBA 

139 Dana Rd., Norwell, Mass. 

GRACE (McLaughlin) CARTY, N. 

139 Dana Rd., Norwell, Mass. 
Received a nice letter from TOM 
"SOUPY" CAMBELL who, after serving 
two years in Army Intelligence, is working 
for Sylvania in Waltham as a Project Ad- 
ministrator in the "Minuteman" Program 
Office. Also working at Sylvania is JACK 
DOHERTY who will be married this month 
to Rose Doherty of Dorchester. 

Congratulations to the TOM HUTCH- 
INSONS, who are the proud parents of a 
boy. TOM is due to be released from the 
Army in September. 

LOU MASSARO, now married to the 
former Vicky Woods of Woburn, was gradu- 
ated from B.U. Law School this past June. 
OLEY and Peggy FOLEY are raising ;i 
future B.C.'er, Christophei Michael, born 
June 26. The FOLEYS have a new address 



in Hawaii — 2262 Blain Drive, M.C.A.S. 
Navy 990-FPO San Francisco. 

Another future B.C.'er was born to BUB 
and Jackie (Cannella) CASHMAN on May 
25. BUB is a Sales Executive for the Keenen 
Cashman Co. in New Jersey and should be 
living in his new home in Manalapan Town- 
ship, N.J. by publication time. 

The Marine Corps and B.C. were well 
represented when the former Mary Ann 
Cole became Mrs. Allan McLean. JIM 
CUNNIFF was one of AL'S ushers, while 
BARRY MURPHY and ED KELLEY 
served as Honor Guards. FRED O'NEILL 
and BOB O'LEARY went as good old 
civilians. 

Returning to Boston in July after twenty 
months of active duty was F. PAUL QUA- 
TROMONI together with his wife Barbara 
and his daughter, Linda. Nice to have you 
back, PAUL! 

DICK DESROSIERS is working on his 
Ph.D. in the Classics and teaching Latin 
at the University of North Carolina. 

REV. MR. DAVID CLOONEY, studying 
at Catholic University for the Ukranian Rite 
in the Diocese of Stamford, Ct., assisted at 
an Oriental Mass celebrated at St. Stephen's 
Priory in Dover. Arrangements for the Mass 
were made by another member of the class, 
THOMAS MORE (JOE) GOUTHRO, 
O.P., who is in his final year of Philosophy 
at the Priory. 

FIRST LT. JACK McNEALY is sta- 
tioned at the Army's Language School in 
Monterey, Calif. Congratulations to LT. 
JACK McNEALY, U.S.A. on his June 15 
marriage to Miss Kathleen D. Galland of 
Sacramento, Calif. 

Also to FRANK ENNIS on his engage- 
ment to Miss Anne Marie Cavanaugh. 
FRANK is at Tufts Medical. 

Best regards to all in Beantown and on 
the Heights from the dusty Texas Pan- 
handle. 

Despite our frequent requests for in- 
formation about our classmates, there are 
still some from whom no one has heard. 
Perhaps the Governing Board Meeting in 
October will afford many a chance of getting 
together. 

FAITH CORCORAN spent a delightful 
summer touring the United States by auto- 
mobile. Meanwhile NORTON O'BRIEN 
joined many of his classmates on Cape Cod 
for the summer months. 

Our best wishes go to the newlyweds: 
RUTH McCARTY McINNIS and Bill; 
ANNA RECUPERO TRETTOR and 
charlie; Sue Rizzo and PETE D'ANGELO. 

The Governing Board of the Class of 1960 
will hold its annual meeting on Wednesday, 
October 16, in Alumni Hall at 8:00 P.M. 
Interested class members are invited to 
attend. 

Congratulations are extended to the fol- 
lowing who were recently married: JIM 
BEAUCHAMP and Joan Karslake and to 
BILL MELIA and Nancy O'Leary who 
were married in Germany. 

WALTER O'LEARY has been trans- 
ferred with the W. T. Grant firm to 
Weathersfield, Conn, as an assistant man- 
ager. 

PAUL HUGHES who is working for an 
advertising firm was recently transferred 
to Rhode Island. 

JIM BEAUCHAMP is with General 
Motors in Framingham in the Sales Distri- 
bution Dept. 

PAUL CUNNINGHAM is with the Bur- 
roughs people and has recently purchased 
a house in Shrewsbury. 

PAUL RIGAZIO recently received a gold 
medal for achieving the highest marks in 
tin- recent Mass. C.P.A. examinations. 

JACK and Joanne MULLEN were 
blessed with their second child, a daughter, 
Phyllis Kathleen, 



In graduating from the B. C. Law School 
MICHAEL DORNEY and CHARLIE 
TRETTER jointly received the Thomas 
Macken Joyce Award. 

FRAN CURRIE is associated with the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics as a Statatician. 

DICK COUTURE and BILL GORMLEY 
took the big step on the same day in nuptial 
ceremonies. 

Congratulations are in order to MARY 
(DONOVAN) GILLIGAN and DEX GIL- 
LIGAN upon the birth of their second child, 
a son. The GILLIGANS are living in 
Worcester where DEX is doing residency 
at St. Vincent's Hospital. 

PAUL and Maureen McCabe HUGHES 
also are proud parents of a new daughter. 
They have moved down Providence way as 
Paul recently received a transfer. 

JEANNE HOAR and hubby were visiting 
in Boston this past Spring with their little 
daughter. 

KATHIE GOODHUE has been on the 
staff of the Falmouth Hospital since its 
opening this Spring. Some life being on old 
salt on the Cape! 

HELEN CONNELY was married in May 
to Joe Perachi in a pretty wedding. They 
are living in Watertown. I hear HELEN 
joined the staff of Judge Baker Guidance 
Center after earning her masters at B.U. 

MARTY O'NEILL took the big step this 
Spring and is now Mrs. Christopher Lom- 
bard, Jr. MARTY is working on her masters 
at Salem State College Graduate School. 

Wedding bells rang in August for ROSE- 
MARY MAYNE and Sam Gualtieri. ROSE- 
MARY is on the faculty of the Maiden 
School System. The Gualtieri's have a new 
home. 

Folks, your class representatives would 
love to have you take a few minutes to 
send them any news items you may have 
about yourselves and/or classmates. 

See you for cocktails after the Virginia 
football game on November 16, at Alumni 
Hall. All class members and friends invited. 

J/^-l NANCY BONAZZOLI, Ed. 

Q± 48 Edinboro St., Marlboro 

RUTH COLAVECCHIO, N. 
4 Orchard Circle, Westwood 
EDWARD D. HURLEY, Jr., A&S 
1639 Clayton St., Cincinnati 6, Ohio 
From MARIANNE LYNCH BULLOCK, 
it was learned that the Misses RUTH E. 
SULLIVAN and JOAN HUNGERVILLE 
taught grade two in Washington, D.C. this 
past year. Also, that Mrs. James Slattery, 
nee PHYLLIS McCORMACK, is teaching 
first grade in Scituate. MARIANNE, the 
mother of Donald John, born February 22, 
is presently living in South Weymouth. 

PATRICIA JARAK was married on July 
6 to Nicholas Lambiase, Jr., Lt., U.S.A. F. 
and has moved to Las Vegas, Nevada. Prior 
to her marriage, Pat was employed by Tufts 
University as a research technician in bio- 
chemistry to Dr. Richard Wagner. With 
Pat working to protect us against radiation, 
MARY TURBINI laboring over the fuel 
container for the Gemini rocket, MARY 
POWERS employed as a member of the 
Computing Group at Arthur D. Little Co., 
Inc., and STEPHANIE GREGORY enter- 
ing her third year of Medical School at 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 
we're all set! STEPH is in the process of 
moving to Garwood Lane, Brookfield Gar- 
dens, Vineland, New Jersey. MARY POW- 
ERS is continuing to work towards her 
Master's at Northeastern University. MARY 
TURBINI spent two weeks away from the 
G. E. plant in Lynn to visit Jamaica, W.I.: 
while there, she returned to the school at 
Above Rocks where she taught as a lay 
apostle last year. 

KATHY McGOWAN CAVANAUGH 
writes that she and Hugh have moved to 



56 



The Alumni ^B 



69 Grove Street, Arlington: she taught a 
young trainable class in Newton this past 
year. MARY CASEY HENAGHAR bought 
a new home in Westwood, while CAROLE 
SULLIVAN just bought a car. The last two 
items were received from Joan Hines, but 
not necessarily in that order. JOAN inquired 
about MARY DILLON and I'm happy to 
report that she has made tremendous strides 
-oward recovery. 

Bill Jr. is now a part of the GAIL COL- 
LINS MAHONEY family and David Jr. of 
the JOAN ANGINO MELVILLE family. 

JEANNE DENYS of Wisconsin was in 
Boston during the last week in July to at- 
tend Tina Precourt's wedding in Wareham. 
MARY GRAY and JOAN BRESLIN were 
married in early August: JOAN is now 
Mrs. Leo Schofield. August was the month 
also chosen by MARIE DICKSON and 
Danny MacDonald, who will be residing at 
the Marine Base in Hawaii, where POLLY 
O'HARA and her husband are already sta- 
tioned. February is the date for the wedding 
of ANN LYNCH. 

PAULA HELEN FITZGERALD has 
just returned from the B. C. Centennial 
European Tour and plans to resume teach- 
ing at Natick in the fall. By the way, Paula, 
you got home before your cards did! and 
what's this about eating a hot dog at the 
summit of Mt. Pilatus in Lucerne (7,000 
feet)??? Also returning to the Natick School 
System is NANCY BONAZZOLI, who spent 
a very enjoyable summer on Cape Cod as 
Director of Swimming for the Town of 
Chatham. NANCY will continue M. A. 
courses at B. C. in the fall. PEGGY RYAN 
also took advantage of a job on the Cape 
at Bass River. SHEILA NUGENT served 
as Arts and Crafts Supervisor of the Wel- 
lesley Recreation Department's several 
summer playgrounds. 

Seen at the dance for the Alumni of '61 
last June were: BETTY WALLACE LOW- 
RY and Jim, SANDY and John HURLEY, 
Kevin and ELLEN TANGNEY DONOG- 
HUE, Paul and DOTTY DEVLIN, Tom 
and MRS. CROWLEY, and FRED and 
NANCY NOONE CRONIN. As of Septem- 
ber, WALLY SHIELDS will be teaching in 
Needham, where FRED resumes his third 
year. Germany is JUDY SCALZI'S destina- 
tion for teaching this fall. 

Sp 4 ROY and MRS. LE CLAIR are at 
Fort Huachuca in Arizona (Co. B 8612: 
#US 51462336). 

Your prayers are requested for the repose 
of the soul of PATRICIA FORRY, who 
succumbed last Spring to a long illness. 

BRENDAN MULKERN completed two 
weeks of annual active duty training at Fort 
Lee, Va., June 22. BRENDAN is assigned 
as a clerk in the 751st Quartermaster Co., 
an Army Reserve unit in Boston. 

EUGENE MULCAHY was one of 228 
students who received advanced degrees. 
EUGENE wrote a thesis on "Poe's adapta- 
tion of his Blackwood sources." 

JOE MULLIN received a Master of Arts 
degree at Ohio State in June. 

VERONICA McLEOD has joined the 
staff of the Harvard University Computing 
Center. 

TIM BRADY, living in Virginia, is the 
proud father of a son, Timothy Condon, Jr. 

JIM HEGARTY was discharged from the 
Navy in Sept. Will resume teaching. 

BOB KEARNS is stationed with the 
Army in Japan. 

DAVE WILSON is now in the advertising 
field, selling special effects billboard space. 
When not found at Alumni Hall, GERRY 
MILLER teaches in Boston. 

FRED CRONIN taught summer school 



in Needham and PAUL DEVLIN, in Salem. 
By the way, PAUL has two daughters. 

MAURICE CUNNINGHAM is his usual 
busy self, entering third year at Suffolk Law 
School, teaching in Saugus, and selling real 
estate and insurance. 

PAUL DEVLIN and his family have 
moved to 39 County St., Peabody. 

MAUREEN DONNELLAN, JOAN 
BRESLIN, and NEIL MURPHY are 
among the engaged. LOUISE ROTH is 
now married. No news from DOC GREG- 
ORY this time. 

JACK JOYCE is now assistant director 
at the Placement Bureau, B. C. — BOB 
DAIGNEAULT will work at the Framing- 
ham Union Hospital prior to returning for 
his third year of medical school. 

DICK HARRINGTON has received the 
call to first clerical tonsure at St. John's 
Seminary. BOB HARRINGTON, while en- 
joying B. U. Law School, is getting married 
in June. BOB KELLY represented the 
Attorney General of Mass. at the Centennial 
Convocation. Bob has served the former 
Attorney General and is currently serving 
the present as a legal assistant. FRANK 
KELLY is a Lieutenant in the Air Force, 
Communications. He is finishing a year's 
training at the A. F. School, Biloxi, Miss, 
and will be stationed Albuquerque, New 
Mexico after June of this year. 

EUGENE F. GALBAN will be attend- 
ing the University of Madrid next year on 
a scholarship from N.Y.U. 

ED DOLAN is serving out his tour of 
duty as a 1st Lt. and Club Officer at the 
Defense Supply Center in Philadelphia. He 
will be getting married to Anne Tierney on 
November 16. 

Where they are Dept.: ROBERT 
HAZORD, U. of Maine School of Law; 
RICHARD HAVES, U.S. Army, Germany; 
THOMAS GEAZA, Medical Student, Tufts; 
ARTHUR MULANO, U.S. Army, Korea; 
JOHN SUTTON, St. U.S. Army, Para- 
troops Instructor: FINNBAR O'CONNELL, 
B. C. Graduate School; JAMES O'BRIEN, 
U.S. Army, Bamberg, Germany; DONALD 
AIKEN, Math Program, Hanscom Air Force 
Base; V. CARNISTRAVO, Graduate Stu- 
dent at B.C.; RICHARD O'NEILL, Phys- 
icist, Technical Operations; PHILLIP EL- 
LEREN, Medical School, Tufts; ROBERT 
DALEY, Tufts Graduate School, A&S; 
EDWARD McPARTEN, B. C. Law; ROB- 
ERT MCCARTHY, U.S. Government; 
ANTHONY LATORELLA, B. C. Graduate 
School, Biology; JOHN WYROCKE, U.S. 
Air Force. 

WILLIAM MURPHY, Financial Analyst, 
Avco; PAUL O'DONNEL, Dell Publishing; 
ALDO ELICONE, Raytheon, Quality 
control; GEORGE McHUGH, Teacher, 
Danvers; WILLIAM CRONIN, Coast 
Guard; FRANK VACCA, Georgetown Uni- 
versity; JOHN BREEN, U.S. Army; JO- 
SEPH DRAZONETTI, Shell Oil, Chemist; 
PHILLIP DAVIS, Suffolk Law School; 
ARTHUR DEGEORGE, Sales; JAMES 
McNIFF, Lt. U.S. Army; DOUGLAS 
DUNN, U.C.L.A. student; PAUL DONLON, 
Sales, Jordan Marsh Co.; MARTIN 
KELLY, Tufts Medical; ROBERT MAS- 
SOTTA, U.S. Army, Germany; JOE 
WHALEN, B.U. Medical School; JAMES 
CONWAY, Tufts Medical School; JOSEPH 
TULIMIERI, B. C. Social Work; JOHN 
V. GAVIN, U.S. Navy, Maryland; KEVIN 
BURKE, U.S. Army, Colorado; MARIO 
GEANZRONDE, teaching, Stonehill Col- 
lege; RICHARD SPRINA, Tufts Dental; 
FRANCIS RUSSELL, U.S. Army; COR- 
NELIUS HOLLAND, teacher, Boston Tech. 

JOHN JOHNSON, Tufts Dental; THE- 
ODORE GEIS, Army, Edgewood Arsenal, 
Maryland; JOHN McCAIN, Underwriter, 
Insurance; ALEX ALEXAPAULOS, U.S. 

37 



ATTENTION 

CLASSES '59 - '63 

Plan Now 
To Attend 

VIRGINIA GAME 

NOV. 16 

VICTORY PARTY 

LYONS HALL 

Welch Dining Room 

Following the Game 

Meet Your Classmates 

For 

Great Reunion 



Army, Germany; JOHN MEADE, B.U. 
Grad. School; BERNARD SHEA, teacher, 
Maiden; RICHARD MOORE, Air Force 
School; HENRY QUINLAN, U.S. Army; 
JOHN KEANEY, Ft. Benney, Georgia; 
THOMAS MUNDY, B. C. Law; VIRGINIO 
DEVITA, Wisconsin Graduate School; 
ERNEST DIMATTEA, Monsanto Chem- 
ical; KENNETH HOLLAND, U.S. Army; 
JOE BURKE, Air Force, Ft. Worth, Texas; 
JOHN J. CECCONI, St. Louis University; 
PEGGY RYAN, Balch School, Norwood; 
MARIE MONAST, Mass. General Hospi- 
tal; PAUL DEVLIN, Salem Classical; 
MARY DEVANEY, Beth Israel; JAMES 
PRENDERGAST, T. C. Ashley, Sales; 
FRANCES McCAULEY, Harrington 
School, Cambridge; JOHN LONERGAN, 
Insurance, J. J. Lonergan Co. 

BARRY CONNELLY, B. C. Law; KEVIN 
FITZPATRICK, Boston Redevelopment 
Authority; ROBERT DERBA, Lowell 
Technical Research, Personnel Manager; 
JOHN LEARY, Information Office, Bos- 
ton; JOE SULLIVAN, E.D.P., Honeywell; 
RODDY CANNON, Engineer, N. E. Tel. 
& Tel.; HERBERT COUGHLAN, G. M. 
Fisher Body Dev.; LAWRENCE EISEN- 
HAUER, Boston Patriots; CAROLE SUL- 
LIVAN, Lafayette School, Everett; PAUL 
BRENNAN, Sales, Shaw Walker; JAMES 
ZYNTELL, Blue Cross / Blue Shield; 
CHRIS CANAVAN, C.P.A.; ROBERT 
FLAHERTY, First National Bank; ROB- 
ERT RITCHIE, Thermaplaster; GERALD 
HYNES, Underwriter, Aetna; DAVID ALI- 
PHANT, Liberty Mutual; PATRICIA 
HORRIGAN, B. C. School of Nursing, In- 
structor; MARGARET FRARCO, Visiting 
Nurse, Cambridge; WILLIAM DALY, Mu- 
tual of New York, Insurance; RUTH 
COLAVECCHEO, Boston City Hospital; 
RITA ARLINGER, Grad. Student B.U.; 
JUDITH BORDEN, Lasell J. College, in- 
structor; NANCY MAGNE, Private duty 
nurse; ROBERT WEST, Teacher, Wey- 
mouth; JOHN AMERAULT, American 
Casualty, Oklahoma; HAMMOND COL- 
LINS, U. of Maryland Medical School. 

PIERCE QUINLAN, Washington, U.S. 
Dept. of Labor; TIMOTHY GUINEY, 
Harvard Medical School; FREDERICK 
RYAN, Teacher, Rivier College, Nashua; 
MICHAEL AHERN, U. of Wisconsin, As- 
tronomy; CHARLES DUFFY, B. C. Grad. 
School; JAMES HENEHAGER, Medford 



or The Alumni 

School System; MARY POWER, Compute 
Program, Arthur D. Little; SHEILA NU- 
GENT, Newton School System; MAUREEN 
DONNELAN, Medford School; ANN FU- 
LEMIERI, Kingston School System; RON- 
ALD GOLDEN, B. C. School of Social 
Work; DAVE WILSON, Sales, Solar Ray 
Co.; ELIZABETH SHEEHAN, Long Is- 
land; HENRY QUILL, Suffolk Law School; 
JOHN COCHRAN, Teaching, Davin Jr. 
High; JEANNE McCARTHY, Teacher, 
Connecticut; JOHN AHERN, Peace Corp. 

PETE MULLEN, Civilian after Army; 
JOHN HANLON, U.S. Navy; DANIEL 
MACDONALD, Hawaii, Marines; FRED 
CRONIN, Teaching, Needham Jr. High; 
MARGARET RYAN, Norwood, Balch 
School; JOHN HURLEY, Randolph High 
School; REGENA FOLEY, Albuquerque, 
New Mexico; CLAIRE KELLY, Sayvill, 
L.I., Teacher; MAUREEN O'BRIEN, Ded- 
ham Junior High; CAROLE SULLIVAN, 
Lafayette School, Everett; RUTH SULLI- 
VAN, Teacher, Washington, D.C.; MARY 
GRAY, Hale School, Everett; MARY TUR- 
BINI, G.E., Lynn; MARY SHEA, Europe; 
JOAN SULLIVAN, Teacher, L.I.; JANICE 
PEZZELLA, Teaching, Everett; HENRY 
RAMETTE, Teaching, Wilmington; 
JEANNE DENYS, Teaching, Green Bay; 
MARGY LEIGH, Teaching, Canal Zone; 
PAT KENNY, Postulate, Nazareth Novi- 
tiate; DAVE WILSON, Salesman; ROB- 
ERT KEARNS, Japan, Service. 

BOB HARRINGTON, who will con- 
tinue his studies at B. U. Law School, was 
married in June. 

MIKE DUFFY will remain with the 
lay apostles in Jamaica until December. 

FRANCIS PISCAL is attending St. 
John's Law School in New York City and 
is scheduled to graduate in June of '64. 

KENNETH PRESKENIS is finishing up 
work for an M. A. Math degree from Brown. 
Starting this fall, KEN will be an instructor 
in Mathematics at Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart. 

KEVIN BYRNE is getting closer to his 
wedding date. 

PIERCE QUINLAN married Judy Rob- 
inson of Castlewood, Virginia this past 
April. Following a honeymoon in Bermuda, 
he returned to his job at the Office of 
Manpower, U.S. Dept. of Labor. 

ALBERT W. SULLIVAN is a Lt. J. G. 
stationed at the Naval Air Station at 
Quonset Point, R.I. Al is also working for 
a graduate degree in English at the Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island. 

BERNARD SHEA coached track and 
taught at Maiden Catholic this past year. 
During the summer, he spent six weeks at 
the University of Massachusetts Summer 
School and will teach junior high in Wil- 
mington this coming fall. 



LAWLER 

FUNERAL HOMES 



Completely air conditioned, decor- 
ated and furnished in exquisite 
taste. We offer you a competent 
staff with a reputation for fine 
service. 



363 South Huntington Avenue 
Jamaica Plain JA 2-9100 

43 Cummins Highway 
Roslindale FA 3-9100 



ROBERT J. LAWLER, '48 



JIM HARRINGTON is entering the Air 
Force in January of '64. 

RICHARD MOORE is completing lan- 
guage school at the Army's Praesidio of 
Monterey and will draw Alaska as his next 
assignment. 

ALLAN N. PEARSON is teaching Ger- 
man at the U. of California at Berkeley 
while working for a Ph.D. AL has been 
travelling all over the state at every op- 
portunity and managed to get home to 
Boston over Easter. 

JOHN SCALES has finished the first 
part of his General Electric training pro- 
gram in Cincinnati and is once more back 
in the East. 

ERNEST PETRUCCELLI is entering 
junior year at Tufts University School of 
Dental Medicine. He plans to marry Kath- 
leen Ford of Melrose in the summer of 
'64. 

ED RICUPERO is teaching mathematics 
at Everett High School this fall and will 
continue to coach football at Archbishop 
Williams. At night, he is continuing his 
education at the Northeastern Graduate 
School where he's working for a Master's 
Degree in Education. 

FRED RYAN got married last June and 
will be an Instructor in Psychology at 
Worcester Junior College for the coming 
fall term. 

JOHN FARRELL is working for a 
Ph.D. in experimental psychology at Cath- 
olic University of America in Washington, 
D.C. John also works part time for the 
Veterans Administration. 

HENRY QUINLAN, TONY BERTOLI- 
NO, KEVIN DONOGHUE, JOHN ZIR- 
KEL, DICK DOYLE, and PAT MULLEN 
were all stationed at Ft. Riley, Kansas the 
last we heard. Hank got out of the Army 
this past July, is married, and now has a 
son, Thomas. 

BOB SIMON has been working as an 
Analytical Chemist at the Texaco Research 
Center in Beacon, N.Y. Beginning in Sept. 
'61, he enrolled at Purdue seeking an M.S. 
degree and this fall plans to continue hit- 
ting the books, this time for a Ph.D. from 
either Maryland Univ or Tufts. 

BILL CRONIN is now assigned to 
Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, 
D.C. 

BILL MURPHY is a financial analyst 
with the Avco Corp. in Wilmington. Bill 
also got married this past July. 

TOM DORSEY is beginning his second 
year of law school at Syracuse University. 

Ann and JOHN McCORMACK have a 
son, Michael Thomas. DICK TRAUB 
studied in Spain this summer. BOB 
HAZARD is continuing his study of law 
at the U. of Maine, while BARRY CON- 
NELLY and KEVIN BYRNE return to 
the Law School at B. C. BARRY served on 
the Barnstable Police Force at Squaw 
Island during the summer months. 

Our sympathy to MINSIE SWEENEY 
whose father passed away this summer. 

Our congratulations to SARA WELCH 
HAINES whose father Dr. Norman Welch, 
was elected president of the American Med- 
ical Association. We also hear Sara who is 
expecting her second child and is home 
from Germany for a while. Fred being as- 
signed to a base where there are no facil- 
ities for families. 

NANY MAGRI has spent the summer 
visiting with CLAIRE LAWTON in San 
Francisco. 

Congratulations to RITA SILINGER who 
is finishing a post-grad course of study at 
B.U. 

MAUREEN NAGLE and RUTH COLA- 
VECCHIO are entering the September class 
at B.U. 

38 



Best of all to ANNE DUGAN COTTER 
and CAROLE HAINE KEATING who are 
new mothers of lovely sons — future B. C. 
football players? 

Hope all had a pleasant summer. 

JS'') ROBERT P. WHITTEN, CBA 
Q^ 210 Webster Ave., Chelsea 

PAUL MacNAMARA, A&S 
76 Prince St., Jamaica Plain 30 
BEATRICE HANLEY, Ed. 
292 Lexington St., Watertown 

Summer is over and once again we enter 
upon what we all hope will be a very suc- 
cessful football season for the Eagles. 

It is once again hoped that the class of 
'62 can get together after one of our home 
games as we did after Holy Cross last year. 
Any suggestions??? 

DAN COUGHLIN has changed jobs and 
is now with Flaherty Bliss & Co. in Boston. 
Good Luck, Dan. 

Present at the wedding of JOHN BUCK- 
LEY and Barbara Coneys were; DAN 
SULLIVAN, LOU KIROUAC, GEORGE 
VAN COTT and DAN COUGHLIN. 
DANNY is with the Pro Baltimore Colts 
and LOU is with the Philadelphia Eagles. 
GEORGE was present with his new bride. 

TOM HAGAN is with the army and is 
stationed in Korea while LARRY SAN- 
FORD is with the navy in Japan. LARRY 
and CHARLIE McCARTHY were over at 
the Esplanade and CHARLIE is still talk- 
ing about his trip through Europe with the 
U.S. hockey team. He is working for an 
insurance company in Boston and doing 
quite well. JIM O'CONNOR has returned 
home from the Swiss School of Economics 
and will return to his position with Arthur 
Anderson, Public Accountants. 

FRANK BRENNAN is engaged to a 
navy nurse and will be married next year. 
He is presently stationed with the U.S. 
Army in Germany. JERRY MELLO is also 
with the army in Germany and made the 
trip over with FRANK. LARRY O'CON- 
NOR is at Fort Bliss, Texas and is presently 
Adjutant of the HQ Battalion and Co. of 
the Headquarters Battery. Congratulations, 
LARRY. DICK LAWLESS is doing well 
and is presently the manager of the Thomp- 
sonville, N.J. office of Sealand Service. 
TOM McCARTHY has completed his first 
year at Georgetown Law School. MIKE 
BYRNES is still in New York with Price 
Waterhouse Accountants. 

The Class was pleased to hear of the 
presentation of the teacher of the year 
award to Professor FRED ZAPPALA. This 
is a well deserved tribute to a devoted 
teacher. 

A get-together was held at the O.G. re- 
cently and those present included: BILL 
NOVELLINE, DAN COUGHLIN, TOM 
ADAMS, JOHN HACKETT and BOB 
WHITTEN. TOM will be headed down the 
marriage trail in the near future with Pat 
Planchet. VIN DEFLUMER is with the 
semi pro Boston Sweepers and was rated 
an excellent lineman in an interview by his 
coach. JACK MANZE is a salesman with a 
business form company and is doing well. 
Good luck, JACK. Army 2nd Lt. PAUL 
B. S. NIEMIRO of 61 Woodbridge St., S. 
Hadley, Mass. is a member of the 1st 
Cavalry Division which this month com- 
memorates its 20th year of service in the 
Far East. Army 2nd Lts. EDWARD P. 
CASIERI, FRANCIS X. BRENNAN, JR., 
JEROME F. MELLO, completed an 11- 
week officer orientation course at The 
Armor Center, Fort Knox, Ky. 

A special thank you to all our class mem- 
bers who took time to drop us a line to 
tell us what they are doing. 

EUGENE GUIRRERA is in New York 
with the Public Health Dept. 



Our sympathy is extended to BERNIE 
GATELY and his family on the death of 
his brother, Robert. 

JACK GALLAGHER has been in 
Wyoming doing field work in Geology. He 
continues his graduate work this fall at the 
U. of Missouri. 

ENSIGN DAVE BUCKLY is attending 
Justice School at Newport. 

2ndSt. KEVIN BLANEY is stationed at 
Ft. Holabird, Maryland and expects to 
leave shortly for duty overseas. 

JOE FOLEY is also stationed at Ft. 
Holabird. 

Congratulations to JOE CHILLEMI who 
was married in June. He and his wife are 
living in Hyde Park, Mass. while JOE con- 
tinues at Suffolk Law. 

JOHN CELI is with the Itek Corp. in 
Lexington, Mass. 

JOE CUSHING is with General Electric 
in Lynn, Mass., having received his M.A. 
Math, degree at Fordham. 

PAUL COMEAU is a teacher-coach in 
Middleburg, Vermont and is in the process 
of building a champions football team. 

"MONTI" MONTALTO is finishing his 
home office training with the Travelers In- 
surance Co. and is anxiously awaiting his 
assignment which he hopes will be in 
Boston. 

Congratulations to BOB DELPRIORE 
on his engagement to Johann Lutz of New 
York. They will be married in April fol- 
lowing Bob's return from the Mediterranean 
with the U.S.S. Independence. 

LARY GABLER is doing graduate work 
in Urban. Planning at Michigan State. 

GERRY L'HEUREUX is continuing his 
graduate studies in Chemistry at Illinois 
Institute of Technology. 

STEVE TOBON is working towards his 
master's degree in Math, at N.Y.U. 

GEORGE McDONALD is at Lehigh 
Univ. for his M.A. in English. 

JOHN LEPOUTRE is doing graduate 
work in Foreign Trade at Columbia. 

BOB DEMERS was married to Margaret 
Spillane of Taunton, Mass. Bob is training 
to be a jet pilot. Bob is a 2nd Lt. They are 
living in Kingsville, Texas. 

PAUL ATKINSON will be teaching in 
the Stoneham Public School System follow- 
ing his marriage to SUSAN GREELY on 
August 24. 

PAUL DUFFY is at Naval Officers Can- 
didate School at Newport, R.I. 

Rom REILLY is stationed at Wartsmith 
Air Force Base in Michigan. Ron is engaged 
to POLLY RICHARDS of the Psychology 
Dept. at B. C. 

Congratulations to ALVIN BROWN and 
his wife, Patricia on the birth of their first 
child Maria Ann. Maria was born in Ger- 
many where her father is attending Mines 
and Demolition School at Gamisch. 2nd Lt. 
RONALD W. REILLY, has received a reg- 
ular United States Air Force commission. 

This report begins on a sad note — one 



'59 to '63 
VICTORY PARTY 

FOLLOWING 

VIRGINIA GAME 

NOVEMBER 16 

LYONS HALL 




(Official U.S. Navy Photo) 
B.C. goes Navy: Left to Right, Cdr George A. Lyons, '39 swears in B.C. Seniors Kenneth Dolan 
and Edward McGuire. Looking on is Burton M. Harris, Law School '64. 



of our classmates, DOROTHY CONBOY, 
was killed in an automible accident on 
July 21. Another classmate, ELLEN 
ROUSE was critically injured in the same 
accident. I know nothing more about her 
condition at this time but I am sure that 
Ellen and Dottie will be in all of our 
prayers. 

We have good reason to be proud of 
classmates who have distinguished them- 
selves in graduate studies. LEO MAHER 
has been studying at Saint Antony's Col- 
lege, Oxford University on a fellowship. 

JOYCE DEVEAU received her Master's 
Degree from the University of Delaware 
this June. She is returning to Delaware this 
fall to start work on her Doctorate. She 
will be a teaching fellow. 

MARY ANNE NALLY is continuing 
work on her Master's at Harvard Graduate 
School of Education. 

Congratulations to proud new parents — 
JOE and MARY ANNE [MORANIEC] 
FITZPATRICK, and DON and DOTTIE 
[Lee] KING and PAUL and NANCY 
[RESMINI] Keith. Mary Ann and Dottie 
have new daughters and Nancy a son. 

Wedding bells rang this summer for 
PEGGY BIRMINGHAM and Bob Ma- 
roney, JUDY BROX and Ray Maguire, 
CORNY COAKLEY and JUDY KNIGHT, 
JEANMARIE HANAGAN and Harold 
Case, ANNE MADIGAN and Neil Murphy 
and SUE GREELEY and Paul Atkinson. 

Congratulations to TERRY O'MALLEY 
who was married this summer — I am sorry 
that I do not know Terry's husband's name. 

Best wishes for the recently engaged 
MARIS SLIBERTI and Jim Savage and 
PAT CARAZZINI and Frank Faggiano. 

KATHY LORDEN will return to teach- 
ing in Wellesley this fall after spending the 
summer touring the U.S. I heard that 
HELEN STULE has gone to Europe and 
THEA FAULKNER spent her vacation in 
Hawaii. 

MARIE WALSH will be married this 
October. This fall will bring ROSANNE 
CONTARDO back in her native New 
Jersey. MARY SHEA will join the faculty 
at Medford High. 

ELLEN LALLY, MARIA COSCO and 

39 



ANNETTE CATANIA taught at Commack, 
L.I. last year. I don't know what their 
plans for fall are. 

Well that's about it for now. Once again 
we encourage classmates to contact us about 
their current activities. 



J^-2 KATHLEEN M. McALOON, N. 
|3») 69 Irving Street, Waltham 
THOMAS RYAN, CBA 
3 Capital St., W. Roxbury 
EDMOND CONNOLLY, A&S 
58 Avalon Rd., Milton 87 
MAUREEN HURFORD, ED 
7 Wildwood Rd., Medford 
In the few short months since graduation 
the great Centennial Class of B.C. S.N. has 
wasted no time in spreading their talents 
far and wide across the country. Those giv- 
ing the benefit of the extensive knowledge 
include: ENSIGNS, MARY BRADLEY, 
JUDY ANN GRODEN and KATHLEEN 
REARDON of the Navy, and HELEN 
PELOQUIN of the Army. Through its Lay 
Apostle Program Boston College has dis- 
patched six members of the Class of Nurs- 
ing, '63 to medical clinics in the North 
Central area of New Mexico. These regis- 
tered nurses are JUDY CREWS, LOUISE 
GALLAHUE, LEONA LEONARD, KATH- 
LEEN McALOON, JANET MULLEN, and 
MARY NOONAN. There are five girls 
with new names and occupations working in 
various parts of the country. They are: 
ANN DILORETO (Mrs. Edward Staffier), 
MARLEEN MATYZEWSKI (Mrs. John 
Babiec), JEANNE McCARTHY (Mrs. 
John Aucella), KATHLEEN ROYCROFT 
(Mrs. Willjam Murphy), and MARY 
CAROL SIVERD (Mrs. Dominic Sam- 
pogna). 

KATHY BUCKLEY returned in August 
from a month's tour of Europe. While there 
she visited eight countries. 

NANCY COTTER, NANCY FLAHER- 
TY and MARY DOHERTY will be teach- 
ing in the Los Angeles area for the coming 
year. 

BOBBY DE FELICE spent a week in 
July playing ball for the Typos in St. 
Louis. 



» 



<3> The Alumni 

HARRY CRUMP and ART GRAHAM 
are now playing football for the Patriots. 

JIM BULGER is attending the Uni- 
versity of Connecticut graduate school. 

JIM McGAHEY is doing graduate work 
at the University of Kansas. 

Those married since graduation are: 
BETSY REAGAN & Rony Zinzer (June), 
now living in Arlington; ANN AUDET and 
JOHN DONELLY (June); CAROL DE 
RENSIS and Tom Regan (62) (June), 
now living in Columbia, North Carolina; 
JOAN MANNING and Leo Brunnick (62) 
(June), living in Framingham; ROSANNE 
CICCALONE and Ensign J. Garry Dono- 
van (62) (July); PAULA RIVERS and 
Rony Berthiaune (August), they will make 
their home in Wichita, Kansas. 

JUDY MAGNER and R. EMMET 
(Bucky) McLOUGHLIN (A&S '63) final- 
ly became engaged in August. Well it's 
about time. 

JEFF SPENO is undertaking a course in 
Law at Cornell. FRANK McDERMOTT 
WILSON ROGERS and FRANK CATA- 
PANO are entering B. C. Law. 

TIP MURRAY, JIM McSWINEY and 
JIM McMAHON are setting up quarters 
in the Washington, D.C. -Georgetown Uni- 
versity area. 

BILL HOGAN is back East after a trip 
to California. He is now awaiting the open- 
ing tryout for the Olympics. 

LT. BOB CURRY is learning the inside 
and out of tanks at school in Kentucky. 

Married this summer were JOHN WEST 
in June and KEVIN O'BRIEN in July. 

The Navy notified GEORGE KAUP that 
he has been accepted for Officers Candidate 
School at Newport, R. I. beginning Sep- 
tember 21. 

LOU CIOCI is already in Dallas . . . 
JERRY WARD leaves shortly for St. Louis. 

Lts. TOM TIERNEY, CARL DIAS, and 
JACK McNAMARA are furthering their 
Marine schooling at Quanties . . . MIKE 
O'SULLIVAN, BILL CARMICHAEL, 
BILL REDGATE and BOB SMITH all 
report for the Marine PLC Program this 
fall. 

MARTY BRENNAN is going to U. 
Conn. Law . . . BOB PAUL starts graduate 
work at Harvard. 

BILL L'ECUYER begins his Coast 
Guard OCS appointment in September. 

MIKE HANNA spent most of his basic 
training in the Coast Guard traveling in 
an honor group promoting the C.G. At the 
end of his basic he starts work for Kodak. 

GEORGE BOURQUE is flying for the 
Air Force . . . SUDS COLGAN for the 
Marines. JOHN WALKER has been ap- 
pointed Company Commander of his train- 
ing group at Fort Dix . . . JOHN HIGGINS 
is working for a New York paper prior to 
a six month tour of duty with the Army. 

Lt. JACK DOYLE spent the summer at 
Fort Still, Okla. at the Army Artillery and 
Missile School. JERRY DALY reports 
there in November. 

TOM FEENEY and BRIAN CURTIS 
spent the month of July touring Europe. 

WILLIAM H. COOGAN, III, has been 
named an Eagleton Fellow. He is one of 
six students throughout the nation to be 
awarded an Eagleton Fellowship. Mr. 
Coogan will use this fellowship to study 
for a year toward a Master's degree in 
politics at the Eagleton Institute of 
Rutgers, New Jersey's State University. 

GERALD LeBLANC, is now working for 
Sanders Associates, Inc., Nashua, New 
Hampshire. 

2nd Lt. ROBERT N. VECCHIARELLO 
is receiving instruction in the duties and 
responsibilities of a newly commissioned 
officer in the U.S. Army Air Defense Com- 
mand. 

MICHAEL DENNIS PANARO is now 



employed by the General Scientific and 
Administrative Department at the Univer- 
sity of California Lawrence Radiation Lab- 
oratory in Livermore, California. 



Law School 



JOSEPH R. MUCCI, '37, WILLIAM F. 
JOY, '43, JOHN E. FENTON, JR., '54, 
were among the Alumni who attended the 
Annual Meeting of the American Bar Asso- 
ciation in Chicago, Illinois in August. 

HARRY GROSSMAN, '39, has recently 
written an article, "Adverse Actions and 
Appeals Therefrom — A New System for 
Federal Civil Servants" which has been 
published in the March 1963 issue of Labor 
Law. 

FRANCIS G. McGEE, '48, Town Mod- 
erator of Natick, Massachusetts, announces 
the opening of an office for the general 
practice of law at 15 West Central Street, 
Natick, Massachusetts. 

JOHN H. FITZGERALD, '50, argued 
orally before the United States Supreme 
Court in the case Namet v. The United 
States. In a 7-2 ruling handed down on 
May 13, 1953, the U.S. Supreme Court 
held that it was not reversable error for 
the trial judge to have permitted witnesses 
to be called even though they could be 
expected and did employ the Fifth Amend- 
ment. 

HENRY J. BATTLES, '54, has been 
appointed City Attorney for the City of 
Rutland. Mr. Battles is with the firm of 
Sullivan and Battles, Merchants Row, Rut- 
land, Vermont. 

ROBERT T. WALLACE, '54, of Silver 
Springs, Maryland, has been appointed 
Legislative Council for the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission. 

FRANK A. CARTER, '55, has recently 
been appointed as Director of Employment 
Security for the State of Rhode Island at 
24 Mason Street, Providence, Rhode Island. 

JOHN B. CLAYTON, '57, is on the legal 
staff dealing in Anti-Trust law with the 
General Motors Corporation, 3044 West 
Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan. 

JOHN J. MCCARTHY, '57, has become 
associated with the firm of Allen, Smith 
and Bonner, 31 State Street, Boston 9, 
Massachusetts. 

ALVIN H. MILLER, '58, announces the 
removal of his office to 73 Tremont Street, 
the Eleventh Floor, Boston 8, Massachusetts. 
Mr. Miller has also been appointed by the 
Twin City Corp., an organization engaged 
in real estate, mortgage and financing, as its 
representative in Massachusetts at the above 
address. 

ROBERT R. TIERNAN, '58, has become 
associated with the firm of Keller and 
Heckman in Washington, D.C. of which 
William Borghesani, '57, is one of the 
partners. 

JOHN H. TREANOR, JR., '58, has left 
his position in the U.S. Attorney's Office 
in the District of Columbia to become 
associated with the Anti-Trust Division of 
the Justice Department. 

JAMES F. WALDRON, '58, Assistant 
District Attorney of Middlesex County has 
been appointed Second Assistant Clerk of 
the Newton District Court. 

BRIAN T. CALLAHAN, '60, has been 
appointed Assistant Professor of Law at 
Suffolk University Law School for the 
academic year of 1963-1964 and will be 
teaching Commercial Law and Creditors 
Rights. 

ROBERT C. HARRINGTON, '61, a trial 
attorney for the Federal Trade Commission 
in Washington has just been awarded 
$250.00 for winning a case against the 
Westinghouse Electric Company. 

JOSEPH A. SESNOVICH, '61, an- 



nounces the opening of offices for the gen- 
eral practice of law at 84 State Street, 
Room 413, Boston, Massachusetts. 

JOHN E. SULLIVAN, '62, has become 
associated with the law office of Jack H. 
Werchick, 240 Second Street, San Francisco 
5, California. 

Graduate Schools 

DONALD J. LEARY, G'56, has been 
named Chairman of the Junior Board of 
the Kemper Insurance Co. . . . SHIRLEY 
J. GLESSNER, G'61 was appointed re- 
search scientist at Erie Resistor Corp., 
Pennsylvania . . . General Electric Corpo- 
ration announced the appointment of 
MICHAEL G. SULLIVAN, G'63 as nuclear 
engineer at the Knolls Atomic Power Lab- 
oratory . . . Manhattan College has an- 
nounced the appointment of BROTHER 
CASIMIR STEPHEN, F.S.C., G'55 as 
Academic Vice-President effective at the 
start of the current academic year . . . ROB- 
ERT H. McCARN, G'48 Superintendent of 
Schools in Fitchburg was given a honorary 
degree from St. Francis College, Biddeford, 
Maine, at the June Commencement . . . 
REV. WILLIAM M. J. DRISCOLL, S.J., 
G'41 formerly Maryland Province director 
of the Jesuit Seminary Guild, was appointed 
Rector of Georgetown Preparatory School, 
Garrett Park, Maryland . . . The Depart- 
ment of the Army recently conferred its 
Meritorious Civilian Service medal on 
SWEN A. LARSEN, G'48 for his teaching 
programs at various Army bases in Ger- 
many . . . WILLIAM F. CUNNINGHAM, 
JR., G'56 is now Assistant Professor of 
English at Le Moyne College in Syracuse. 

John J. Hartigan, 1913 -....September 3,1963 
Rt. Rev. John W. Churchward, 1911 

September 2, 1963 

Anthony J. Troy. 1950 August 23, 1963 

Roy E. Delaney, 1951 ...August 21. 1963 

Rt. Rev. Donald A. McGowan, 1930 

August 11,1963 
Leo R. Desmond, M.D., 1923 ... August 11, 1963 
Rev. John J. Carrigg, S.J., 1937. August 10, 1963 
Joseph D. Sweeney, M.D., 1926..August 9, 1963 

Thomas F. O'Brien. 1931 August 8,1963 

William H. Mahoney, 1926 August 4, 1963 

Gilbert L. Walker, Jr., 1948 August 3, 1963 

James V. Mullaney, 1937 July 30, 1963 

Robert J. Richards, 1924 July 27, 1963 

Martin F. O'Connor, 1913. July 15, 1963 

Edward M. Sullivan, 1919..... July IS, 1963 

Rev. James M. Harney, S.J. July 11, 1963 

Rt. Rev. Florence W. McCarthy, 1909 

Julv 10, 1963 

Joseph ). Adams, Jr., 1939 June 16, 1963 

Donald A. Clancy, Law 1941 June 9, 1963 

Rev. David H. McDonald, 192L...June 2,1963 
Cdr. Joseph B. McCabe, U.S.N.R, 1930 

May 25, 1963 

Patricia E. Forry, Ed. 1961 May 19, 1963 

Albert A. Terrio, 1920..... May 12, 1963 

Finest W. Anderson, 1911.. May 10, 1963 

Marie Shea, F.C., 1930 March 20, 1963 

William A. Laughlin, 1944 .. February 11, 1963 
Rev. John M. Groves, G.S., 1915 

February 2, 1963 
William I'. McLaughlin, 1920 .January 19, 1963 

Harold G. Daniels, 1934 January 5,1963 

William B. Stapleton, S.W., 1938 

November 26, 1962 
Romeo |. F. Labbe, CBA, 1959 

November 7, 1962 

(links R. Greene, 1925 ....October 20, 1962 

Edward F. Cunningham, 1945 May 28, 1962 

Bernard II. Moran, G.S., 1940 

February 17, 1962 
[ohn 'I'. Ryder, 1921 December 17, 1961 

William |. Keany, CBA, 1958 May 30, 1960 



40 



^Ar I u m n I 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



HANCOCK MONUMENT CO. 

James J. Ricciuti, '39 

295 Hancock St., North Quincy 

GRanite 2-3447 

970 Ashley Blvd., New Bedford 

WYman 5-0144 



PAUL A. REYNOLDS 

REAL ESTATE 

SCITUATE 
Tel.: Linden 5-1303 



PAUL F. FLAHERTY, '36 
OPTICIAN - HEARING AIDS 

42 HIGH STREET, MEDFORD 
EX 5-9861 

25 Richfield Street (Off 311 Columbia Rd.) 
DORCHESTER 25 Columbia 5-0112 

DEDHAM INSURANCE AGENCY, 
INC. 

EUGENE F. DONALDSON, '35, V. P. 

All Forms of Insurance 

394 WASHINGTON STREET, DEDHAM SQUARE 
DAvis 6-0109 

SCHOLASTIC JEWELERS, Inc. 

OFFICIAL B. C. RINGS 
Miniature and Large — All Classes 

JOHN F. LYNCH, '25 

5174 Washington Street, Boston 



BUSINESS 

BQIIPNENT 



S)CIRPOUTIH 
tMune*} aru) Office Sumliun • 



Edmund C. WESSlinG 50 



Est. 1896 

M 



BOSTON 



aUNN 



BOB DUNN, '42 
DAN DUNN, '42 



JAmaica 2-3300 



CHARLES F. MURPHY, '30 
CHARLES F. MURPHY, JR., '55 

Insurance & Bonding 

24 School Street Boston 

LAfayette 3-2076 

ELBERY MOTOR CO., INC. 

Greater Boston's No. 1 Ford Dealer in Sales 

360 River St., Cambridge 
(near Memorial Drive) Kl 7-3820 

JIM ELBERY '51 SALES REPRESENTATIVE 



New England's Fastest Growing 
Printing Establishment 

SULLIVAN BROS. 

PRINTERS 

Main Office and Plant at 
LOWELL 

Auxiliary Plants: 

BOSTON, OCEANPORT, N.J. 

PAWTUCKET, R. I. 

All BC'ers: 

JOSEPH E. SULLIVAN, LL.D., '51 

THOMAS R. SULLIVAN, A.B., '39 

JOSEPH E. SULLIVAN, JR., A.B., '43 

JAMES H. SULLIVAN, A.B., '45 

HELEN M. (SULLIVAN) McNAMEE, M.Ed., '57 

WALTER T. SULLIVAN, B.S., '61 



REID & HURLEY TRAVEL SERVICE 
60 Adams Street, Milton 

EDWARD F. HURLEY, '32 
OXford 6-1884 

LYNCH BROTHERS REALTY 

CAPE COD 



Jack Lynch, '57 

Box 831 

West Yarmouth 

Tel. 775-4306 



MIAMI 

Dave Lynch, '60 

Box 4328, Miami 41 

Tel. JE 8-5511 



E. D. ABBOTT COMPANY 
PRINTERS 

THOMAS F. TRUE, Jr., '38 
PAUL V. TRUE, '41 

181 Massachusetts Avenue 

Boston 15, Massachusetts 

COpley 7-5550 



Beef, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Poultry, Provisions 

JAMES J. DERBA CO., '51 

"Integrity is the Difference" 
Hotels, Institutions, Restaurants 

Business: CA 7-6766 CA 7-0916 Res: Ml 3-8699 
14 NORTH STREET BOSTON 13, MASS. 

T. EDMUND GARRITY & CO., Inc. 
INSURANCE SERVICE 

T. Edmund Garrity, '23 
Thomas E. Garrity, Jr., '50 

60 Congress Street, Boston 

FLORISTS Since 1896 

F. W. HOLBROW & SONS 

Telephone: GEneva 6-2095 
301 HARVARD STREET, DORCHESTER 

Holbrow's Parker House Florist 

Downtown in the PARKER HOUSE 
Telephone: CApitol 7-8057 

FREDERICK A. MEAGHER CO., Inc. 
INSURANCE 

FREDERICK A. MEAGHER, '25 

FREDERICK A. MEAGHER, JR., '52 

18 Oliver Street 

LI 2-4990 

1419 Industrial Bank Building 

Providence 3, R.I. 

GA 1-8510 

School Supplies School Furniture 

School Equipment Blackboards 

FRANCIS J. DALY, '29 

J. L. HAMMETT COMPANY 

KENDALL SQUARE CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

JOHN R. WISEMAN, '59 
INSURANCE 

See "Jack" For Your Insurance Needs On 
Auto, Home, Business or Life 

421 HIGHLAND AVE. 

W. SOMERVILLE, MASS. 

Bus.: 776-1454 Res.: 625-9363 



SHAW-WALKER CO. 

BOB O'HAYRE, '36 

BILL SHANNON, '52 

132 FEDERAL STREET, BOSTON 

Largest Exclusive Manufacturers 

of Office Equipment and Office 

Systems in the World 

LI 2-9410 




BOSTON COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

74 COMMONWEALTH AVE., CHESTNUT HILL 67, MASS. 



Non-Profit Org. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

LOWELL, MASS. 
Permit No. 54 




"I Get the Best in Foods 
... and I Save . . . Save Twice , in Fact" 

That's what more and more smart 
shoppers are saying. Because at First 
National they actually do save and 
save again — first on traditional low 
prices, again on valuable S&H Green 
Stamps that bring free gifts for home 
and family, with hundreds of nation- 
ally advertised products to choose from. 
All this, of course, without the slightest 
compromise in food quality. Nobody 
knows better than First National that 
there is no economy without quality. 
That's how it's been at First National 
for generations - fine foods at lowest 
possible prices every shopping day of 
the year. That's why: 

FIRST NATIONAL 
IS THE PLACE TO SHOP! 




M^HHiMi