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Full text of "Announcements/Hinds Junior College"

378.1543 



1965-66 







f McLENDON LIBRARY 

Hinds Junior College 
RAYMOND, MISS. 39154 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



48th Annual Session 

Hinds Junior College 

Raymond, Mississippi 

1965-66 



Accredited by State Department of 

Education 

Member of State Junior College Literary 
and Athletic Association 

Member of Mississippi Association of 

Colleges 

Member of and Accredited by Southern 
Association of Colleges 

Member of American Association of Jun- 
ior Colleges 



McLEMDOfV U8RARY 

Hln&s Junior Coliec 
RAYMOND, MISS. 39154 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

Summer Session 1965 



June 7 First Term Begins 
July 12 Second Term Begins 
August 13 Summer School Ends 



1965-66 Session 



First Semester 



June & August 

September 2—2:00 P. M. 

September 6-8 

September 9— 8:15 A. M. 
September 20 



November 1-5 

November 24—3:30 P. M. 

November 29— 8:15 A. M. 

December 17—3:30 P. M. 

January 3 — 8:15 A. M. 

January 17-21 

January 21 



Guidance Test for Freshmen 
Faculty Meeting 

Freshman Orientation and Registra- 
tion for all students 
Classes Begin 

Last day for registration of new 
students; for changing schedules; 
and dropping courses without a 
record of performance 
Mid-Semester Tests 
Thanksgiving Holidays Begin 
Classwork Resumed 
Christmas Holidays Begin 
Classwork Resumed 
Semester Examinations 
First Semester Ends 



Second Semester 



January 24 
February 7 



March 21-25 

May 22 

May 23-27 

May 27 

May 27 



Second .Semester Begins 

Last day for registration of new 

students; for changing schedules; 

and dropping courses without a 

record of performance 

Mid-Semester Tests 

Commencement Sunday 

Semester Examinations 

Second Semester Ends 

Final Commencement Exercises 



Page 2 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



CONTENTS 



COLLEGE — faculty, general information 



STUDENTS — entrance, services, requirements 23 



INSTRUCTION— suggested curricula 



COURSES — description of all courses 







VOCATIONAL— training, courses 



DIRECTORY- 1964-65 students 







ADMINISTRATION 

Administrative Officers 

GEORGE M. McLENDON President 

ROBERT M. MAYO Vice President 

FLOYD S. ELKINS Academic Dean 

MARIS D. HANSEN Dean of Students 

FAY MARSHALL Dean of Women 

E. ROSSER WALL Dean of Men 

MILDERD L. HERRIN Registrar 

A. L. DENTON Director of Guidance 

WALTER H. GIBBES Coordinator of Vocational- 
Technical Education 

GRADY L. SHEFFIELD Financial Secretary 

VIRGINIA M. RIGGS Librarian 

JACK C. TRELOAR Superintendent of Farm and 

Physical Plant 

J. RALPH SOWELL, JR. Director of Public Relations 

Board of Trustees 

F. M. GREAVES, President, Bolton 
J. W McKEWEN— Jackson H. H. DAVIS— Utica 
W. D. LOWE— Jackson L. L. AUTRY— Pearl 
JOE E. ALDRIDGE, Sec— Jackson J. E. BLACKBURN— Vicksburg 
G. W. MORGAN— Terry MAJ$ ALMAN— Pelahatchie 
SHARP BANKS— Vicksburg R. A. SEGREST— Port Gibson 
E. A. PORTER— Port Gibson 

Board of Supervisors 

HINDS COUNTY 

TOM VIRDEN, 1st District, President 
MALCOLM WARREN— 2nd District JOHNNY S. TAYLOR-^tth District 
S. M. HUBBARD— 3rd District L. J. BEASLEY— 5th District 

RANKIN COUNTY 
MILTON SINGLETARY, 1st District, President 
WOODROW W. SWILLEY— 2nd Dist. T. A. RIVES— 4th District 
R. L. CROSS— 3rd District GAY GILL— 5th District 
WARREN COUNTY 
PAUL A. PRIDE, 4th District, President 
A. H. HALL-lst District PETE T. HULLUM— 3rd District 
ROBERT DOWE— 2nd District J. L. McCASKILL— 5th District 
CLAIBORNE COUNTY 
T. H. TEVILION, 2nd District, President 
A. H. EATON— 1st District J. J. MlLLSAPS-4th District 
F. G. PEYTON— 3rd District S. E STARNES— 5th District 

Pag« 4 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 







• .o ,<i£ Jf> *T^ HtV^ 










B.:.a 



aY/» 







Home Economics Building 



College Entrance From Highway 18 




The College 

FACULTY 
1964-65 



GEORGE M. McLENDON President 

B.S., M.A., Peabody College; Ad- 
vanced Study, University of Chicago 

ROBERT M. MAYO Vice President 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., Pea- 
body College; L.L.D., Millsaps Col- 
lege 

FLOYD S. ELKINS Academic Dean 

B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., The University 
of Texas 

MARIS DUANE HANSEN Dean of Students 

B.A., Northwestern College; M.A., 
Baylor University; Ph.D., University 
of Texas 

C. RICHARD ADKINS Chemistry 

A.B., M.A., Marshall College 

M. SELBY ALSWORTH Bible 

B.A., Millsaps College; B.D., Emory 
University 

HAROLD E. ANDERSON Biology 

B.S., Gustavus Adolphus College; 
M.Ed., Mississippi State University 

CHARLES E. BANES Agriculture 

B.S., Mississippi State University 

ANNA BEE Director of Hi-Steppers 

B.A., Howard College; Additional 
Training, Calif School of Dancing, 
New York 

T. T. BEEMON Biology 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College; 
M.A., University of Texas; Advanced 
Study, Arizona State University 

EMMA FANCHER BEEMON Mathematics 

B.A., Mississippi Womans College; 
M.A., University of Alabama; Ad- 
vancd Study, Arizona State Univer- 
sity 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 5 



The College. 



PEGGY ANN BRENT 



FRED L. BROOKS, JR, 

T. C. BROWN 
K. BRYANT 



BETTY BURNETT 



E. H. BUSH 



JUANITA CANTERBURY 



L. KENNETH CLARK 



JOHN W. COCROFT 



MARY A. BENNETT CONLEE 



H. M. COOK 



English 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.Ed., Mis- 
sissippi College; Advanced Study, 
University of Arkansas 



Speech 
B.S., M.A. 

Mississippi 



University of Southern 



Machine Shop 

Airplane and Engine Mechanics 
John Brown University; Parks Air 
College; B.S., Mississippi State Uni- 
versity 

Home Economics 

B.S., University of Southern Missis- 
sippi; Advanced Study, University of 
Southern Mississippi 



Machine Shop 

T. I. Case Training Center, 

Aircraft, Temco Aircraft 



Nash 



English ' 

B.A., M.A., Baylor University; M.R. 

E., Southwestern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 

Business Education 

B.S., Pittsburgh Teachers College; 

M.A., University of Iowa 



Electronics 

B.S., Mississippi College; 

Study, Mississippi College 



Graduate 



English 

B.A., Tulane University; M.A., 

George Peabody College for Teach- 

ers 

FM and Television 
Graduate of eight Radio and Tele- 
vision Schools, holds First Class Ra- 
dio and Telephone License, Amateur 
Operator No. W5ML5 



Page 6 



HINDS JUNIOR. COLLEGE 



The College 



BOBBYE DAVIS 
HILDA REE DAVIS 



A. L. DENTON 



KATHERINE A. DENTON 



RUFUS T. DICKERSON 



WILLIAM T. DOUGLAS 



ROBBIE DUKES 



R. J. DYER 



JAMES FURLOW, JR. 



Psychology 

B.A., M.A., University of Mississippi 

Modern Languages 
B.A., Blue Mountain College; B.M., 
Memphis DeShazo College of Music; 
M.A., University of Mississippi; Ad- 
vanced Study, Institute Tecnologico, 
Monterrey, Mexico and Memphis 
State University 

Psychology 

A.B., Mississippi College; M.A., Mis- 
sissippi College 

Art 

B.A., Mississippi State College for 
Women; M.A., Mississippi College; 
Advanced Study, University of Ala- 
bama and Peabody College 

Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 
B.S., Panhandle A & M, Goodwell, 
Oklahoma 

Mathematics 

B.A., M.Ed., Mississippi College; Ad- 
vanced Study, Mississippi State and 
University of Alabama 

Home Economics 

B.S., Mississippi State College for 
Women; Advanced Study, Mississippi 
State University, Texas Women's 
University, and University of Sou- 
thern Mississippi 

English 

B.S., Delta State College; M.Ed., 
Mississippi College; Graduate Study, 
University of Arkansas 

Music 

Hinds Junior College; B.M., M.M., 

Louisiana State University 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 7 



The College, 



MAYBELLE A. FURNESS 



WALTER H. GIBBES 



REGINA W. GOODWIN 



WILLIAM W. GRIFFIN 



JIM EL BYRD HARRIS 



JOE R. HARRIS 



GEORGE HENNE 



MILDRED HERRIN 



Business Education 
B.A., Millsaps College; M.B.E. Uni- 
versity of Mississippi; Study with 
Stenographic Machines, Inc., and In- 
ternational Business Machines Co. 

Co-ordinator, Vocational - Technical 

Program 

B.S., Mississippi State University; 

M.E., Mississippi College; Advanced 

Study, University of Mississippi and 

Louisiana State University 

Library 

B.A., Mississippi State College for 
Women; M.S. in Library Science, 
Louisiana State University 

Chemistry 

B.S., Delta State College; M.Ed., 
Mississippi State University; M.S., 
University of Mississippi; Advanced 
Study, Emory University and Uni- 
versity of Mississippi 

English 

A.B., Mississippi State College for 
Women; M. A., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity 

Social Science 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Alabama 

General Electricity and Wiring 
Hinds Junior College; Power and 
Communications, US Navy 

Business Education 
Hinds Junior College; A.B., Bowling 
Green College of Commerce; M.S., 
University of Denver; Advanced 
Study, Peabody College, Columbia 
University, and University of Mis- 
sissippi 



Page 8 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The College 



ORVEL E. HOOKER 



BYRLE A. KYNERD 



C. E. KYNERD 



CECIL LANDRUM 

LOREN LANE 
BOB L. LASTER 

ANN A. LASTER 

D. W. LEWIS 



LAURA BELL UNDSEY 



W. M. McKENZIE 



Speech 

B.A., Ouaehita Baptist College; S.T. 
B., S.T.M., Temple University; Ad- 
vanced Study, Temple University 

History 

B.S., Mississippi College; Advanced 

Stu<$y, Mississippi College 

Office Machine Repair 
Remington Rand Service School; 
Mississippi State University; Under- 
wood Service School, Hartford, Conn. 

Refrigeration and Air Conditioning, 
Mississippi College; Coleman Heat- 
ing Institute, Kansas 

Machine Shop 

Western Michigan University 

Machine Shop 

Hinds Junior College; B.S., Missis- 
sippi State University 

English 

B.A., Mississippi College; Advanced 

Study, University of Mississippi 

Auto Mechanics 

Mississippi State University; Fisher 

Body Technical School; Sun Electric, 

Chicago 

English 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., Pea- 
body College; Advanced Study, Pea- 
body College and University of Cal- 
ifornia at Los Angeles 

Agriculture 

B.S., Mississippi State; M.A., Pea- 
body College; Advanced Study, Mis- 
sissippi State University and the 
University of Southern Mississippi 



RRAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 9 



The College. 



EARLINE V. MAGERS Library 

B.S., M.A., Mississippi Southern Col- 
lege; M.S. in Library Science, Louis- 
iana State University 

FAY MARSHALL Psychology 

B.A., Mississippi State College for 
Women; M.Ed., Mississippi College; 
Advanced Study, University of Chi- 
cago 

LESTER FRANK MARTIN IBM 

B.S., Millsaps College; IBM Com- 
puter School 

JEANIE MUSE English 

B.A., M.A., Mississippi College 

WILLIAM C. OAKES Health, Physical Education and 

Recreation 

B.S., M.A.,~ University of Southern 
Mississippi 

J. B. PATRICK Social Science 

A.B., Millsaps College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Alabama 

HARRY J. PARTIN Electronics 

U.S. Army Radio School, Ross Col- 
lins Vocational School, Vanderbilt 
University; N:C. State College, Mis- 
sissippi College, University of Hous- 
ton 

NELL A. PICKETT English 

B.A., VAxw Mountain College; M.E., 
Mississippi College 

MICHAEL J. RABALAIS Psychology 

B.A., University of Southwestern 
Louisiana; M.S., University of Sou- 
thern Mississippi; NSF Summer In- 
stitute in Psychology 1962, University 
of Mississippi 

Page 10 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The College 



POLLY H. RABALAIS 



AARON M. RANKIN 



J FRANK RAYBURN 



T. F. RAYBURN 



GENEVA D. REEVES 



JAMES LESLIE REEVES 



JOE RENFROE 



SARA M. RICHARDSON 



T. A. RICKS 



MARVIN A. RIGGS 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Girls' Physical Education 
B.S., Mississippi State College for 
Women; M.Ed., University of Missis- 
sippi 

Mathematics 

B.S., M.Ed., Mississippi State Uni- 
versity 

Electric Motor Repair 
B.S., M.A., M.E., Mississippi Sou- 
thern 

Industrial Arts 

A.A., Perkinston Junior College; B. 
S., and Graduate Study, University 
of Southern Mississippi 

Music 

B.A., Mississippi College; B.M., and 

M.S.M., Southwestern Theological 

Seminary 

Music 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University 

Health, Physical Education, and 
Coach 

B.E., in Physical Education, Tulane 
University; M.A., Mississippi Sou- 
thern College 

Chemistry 

B.A., Mississippi Woman's College; 
M.S., University of Mississippi; Ad- 
vanced Study, University of Missis- 
sippi 

Physical Education 

B.S., Delta State Teachers College; 

M.A., Mississippi Southern College 

Social Science 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Alabama; M.A., in Ed., Uni- 
versity of Denver; Advanced Study, 
University of Mississippi and Uni- 
versity of Denver 

Page 11 



The College. 



VIRGINIA MAYFIELD RIGGS 



MARTHA S. ROBINSON 



ROBERT LOUIS ROBINSON 



IVAN P. ROSAMOND 



ALBERT B. ROWAN 



RALPH SOWELL 



B. D. SPRABERRY 



NEVA W. SPRABERRY 



F. J. STEPHENSON 



W. J. STEPHENSON 



Library 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., in Li- 

brarianship, University of Denver 

Business Education 
B.S., M.B.Ed., University of Missis- 
sippi 

Accounting and Economics 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern 
Mississippi; Advanced Study, Univer- 
sity of Missouri 

Physical Education 
B.S., M.A., Mississippi Southern Col- 
lege 

instrumental Music 

B.A., University of Mississiopi; M. 

E., University of Mississippi 

Journalism 

E.A. , Millsaps College; Advanced 

Study, Mississippi College 

Science and Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., Mississippi College; M. 

S., University of Mississippi 

Business Education 
B.A., Mississippi College; M.B.E.. 
University of Mississippi; Advanced 
Study, University of Mississippi: 
Study with Stenographic Machines, 
Inc., and International Business Ma- 
chines Company 

Physics 

B.S., Mississippi College; Advanced 
Study, Mississippi College and Uni- 
versity of Alabama 

Machine Shop 

General Motors Diesel School, Lc 

Grange, Illinois 



Page 12 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The College 



LURLINE STEWART Mathematics 

B.A M Mississippi State College for 
Women; M.A., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity; Advanced Study, University 
of Mississippi and Montana State 
University 

MARJORIE M. STRICKLIN Music 

B.M., Murray State College; M.M., 
Louisiana State University; Ad- 
vanced Study, Aspen Institute of 
Music, Aspen, Colorado 

THOMAS E. STRICKLIN Social Science 

B.S., Mississippi College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Alabama; Advanced Study, 
Mississippi State University 

CALVINIA SWITZER Reading 

A.A., Gulf Park College; B.S., M.E., 
Mississippi Southern College 

REX M. TATUM Music 

B.M., M.M., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity; Advanced Study, Indiana Uni- 
versity, Manhattan School of Music, 
Boston University, Santa Cecilia Ac* 
cademia, Rome 

THOMAS V. TRAXLER Barbering 

Hinds Junior College 

JACK C. TRELOAR, JR. Agriculture 

B,S., Mississippi State University: 
M.E., Mississippi Stale University 

E. ROSSER WALL Biology 

B.A., M.A.. University of Mississippi 

WALLACE M. WALL Engineering Graphics 

B.S., M.E., Mississippi State Uni- 
versity 

LOUIS R. WALSH Art 

B.S., University of Southern Missis- 
sippi; M.E., Mississippi College 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 13 



The College. 



D. C. WARE Body and Fender 

Fisher Body Technical School; Mis- 
sissippi State University 

MARY A. WARDLAW Sociology 

B.A., M.S.S., University of Missis- 
sippi 

CLAUDE WILLIAMS Spanish and English 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of New Mexico; Advanced 
Study, Mississippi College; Interna- 
tional Academy of Spanish, Saltillo, 
Mexico 



Page 14 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



.The College 



OTHER STAFF MEMBERS 



LOLA I. ALLEN 

MARY SUE McNAIR 

ELLA M. GOODWIN 

BETTYE W. ROBINSON 

ALMA DEAN EAVES 

MARIAN J. WELCH 

WILLIAM C. OAKES 

MARGARET A. KIMBALL 

RACHEL M. ROBINSON 

CAROLYN BOWEN 

ANNIE VERNON LIDDELL 

GRACE HODGES 

TALMADGE McNAIR 

JENNIE LEE BANKSTON 

B. J. FREW 

ADA DEE STEPHENSON 

JEANETTE BARRON 

MARGARET L. MORRIS 

MARGARiET BONNEY 

OTTO MAXWELL 



Secretary and Bookkeeper 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Assistant Registrar 

Dietitian 

Recreation Director 

Secretary to President, Grill Mgr. 

Nurse 

Head Resident, Main Dormitory 

Head Resident, Northside Dormitory 

Head Resident, Westside Dormitory 

Manager, Frozen Food Locker Plant 

Postmaster 

Director, B.S.U. 

Secretary, Vocational-Technical Dept. 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Engineer 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 15 



The College 

GENERAL 
PURPOSE 



The general purpose of Hinds Junior College is to provide a two-year 
college program to serve the educational needs of its area. These needs 
presently include the teaching and guiding of students who intend to transfer 
to senior colleges to study for an academic degree and the teaching and 
guiding of terminal students in academic, vocational and technical fields. 
These needs also include serving the adult community by providing oppor- 
tunities for study in academic, technical and vocational fields of learning as 
well as providing leadership in civic, economic and cultural growth. 

SPECIFIC AIMS 

The specific aims of Hinds Junior College arc: 

1. To provide an atmosphere conducive to serious study, one in which 
the students are encouraged to learn to think, to discriminate, to reason, and 
to develop the power to express themselves. 

2. To provide intellectual leadership that is willing and able to search 
out and develop the native abilities and talents of students. 

3. To inculcate a sense of responsibility in students for moral, physical, 
and spiritual development. 

4. To provide instruction and experiences which will enable students to 
develop the ability to be producers of goods or services for their own economic 
independence and cultural enjoyment, to use their leisure time wisely and to 
serve their fellow man willingly. 

5. To provide instruction that will help students to develop a sense of 
pride in and a responsibility for preserving a free society within our Ameri- 
can system of democratic government. 

6. To provide group and individual guidance and counseling for students 
in order to enable them to discover their own abilities and interests. 

7. To provide technical and vocational courses designed to prepare stu- 
dents to achieve competence in their chosen field of work, whether in business, 
industry or agriculture. 

8. To provide opportunities for adult education in academic, technical 
and vocational courses. 

9. To provide facilities conducive to maximum efficiency by all students 
and other personnel. 

P*g» U HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The College 

GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



Hinds Junior College is an outgrowth of the Hinds County Agricultural 
High School which opened its doors in the fall of 1917, with an enrollment of 
117 and a faculty consisting of eight members. In 1922-23 the first year of 
college was added with thirty freshman college students enrolled, and the 
freshman year of the high school was discontinued. In the year 1926-27 the 
second year of college work was added with an enrollment of seventy-four 
students. 

From year to year the attendance has increased until the present en- 
rollment is over 2200; new, modernly equipped departments have been 
added; courses have been made richer and fuller; the faculty has been in- 
creased; and the facilities have been made more adequate. The enrollment for 
the 1964-65 session shows 1896 for the regular session and 395 for the summer 
school, or a total of 2291. 

During the first year of its existence, the school was admitted to mem- 
bership in the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 
In December, 1928, the College Department was admitted to membership 
in the Southern Association. This membership means that graduates may 
enter the leading senior colleges and universities of the South and have 
their work fully recognized. 

LOCATION 

Raymond is a town with a population of slightly over one thousand. 
It is one of the oldest towns in the state and is one of the county seats 
of Hinds County. It is located very near the geographical center of the 
county, on the Jackson-Natchez branch of the I. C. Railroad and on State 
Highway 18. Raymond is only sixteen miles from Jackson— near enough for 
students to enjoy the many advantages of the capitol city. Students have 
the opportunity to secure low-cost tickets to music concerts, outstanding 
dramatic productions, and other events that come to Jackson during the 
school term. The location from the standpoint of health is remarkably good. 

THE CAMPUS AND THE BUILDINGS 

The campus of Hinds Junior College is one of the most beautiful to be 
found among Southern Colleges. Terraces, flowering shrubs, trees, and green 
sod, all combine to form a picture of rare beauty and charm. 

A short distance from the campus is Raymond Lake of 35 acres, around 
which are picturesque grounds for picnics and other recreational activities. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 17 



The College 

The buildings on the campus have grown from the original three to 
more than twenty-five, most of which are of brick structure. The principal 
buildings include: 

Library Building. The George M. McLendon Library Building was occu- 
pied for the first time in January, 1962. It is a completely modern, fire-proof 
structure, with the cost of the building and equipment exceeding $300,000. 

The circulation desk, the card catalog, a browsing collection and lounge- 
type seating are located in a large central lobby. The main reading room seats 
over a hundred readers comfortably. The general collection is arranged on 
open shelves in this room, where the students have free access to books. 

The reference room, seating over eighty students, contains the most 
important general and special reference books for junior colleges. Both cur- 
rent and bound periodicals are located here. 

A microfilm room, two audio rooms, and a typing room adjoin the ref- 
erence room. Also provided in the building are a faculty reading room, a 
classroom, conference room, and library work room. On the ground level 
there is a book receiving room and a large area for future expansion. 

Auditorium Building. This building houses the college auditorium with a 
seating capacity of approximately 1200 people; and the lecture rooms, offices, 
and laboratory space for the English, Reading, and Dramatic Departments. 
The building is of classic architecture, and is one of the most beautiful build- 
ings on the campus. It was erected in 1926 at a cost of $100,000. 

Administration Building. This building houses the offices of the Presi- 
dent, Vice President, Academic Dean, Registrar, the business staff, and the 
student personnel service. In it are located the Graphics, Psychology, and 
Mathematics Departments. 

Student Center Building. Here students are served by a cafeteria with 
a seating capacity of 500, a large grill, a bookstore, the campus postoffice, 
and student recreation rooms. A private dining room designed for small group 
meetings is also included. 

Music Building. This well-equipped building provides the facilities neces- 
sary for instruction in voice, piano, organ, instrumental music, music theory, 
and music history. It contains a small auditorium for programs and recitals, 
studios, offices, practice rooms, classrooms, music lockers, record library 
with listening facilities, and a band rehearsal room. 

Main Gymnasium. This building houses the boys' Physical Education 
Department. It has a large main floor with an up-to-date basketball court. 
It is well equipped with modern apparatus for boxing and other gymnasium 
exercises, offices, rooms for visiting teams, locker, shower, and club rooms, 
The seating capacity of the main gymnasium floor is approximately 1200. 

Page 18 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The College 

Girls' Physical Education Building. This ultramodern brick structure 
is located on the northwest side of the college campus. In addition to its 
regulation court designed for the various indoor individual and team sports, 
outstanding features include the correctives room with stall bars, bicycle 
exercisers, row-trims, infra red lamps, and other corrective equipment. Of- 
fices, classrooms, a dance studio for the teaching of choreography, a profes- 
sional library, individual lockers, laundry, lounge, and storage space are a 
part of the facility. 

Science Building. The Science Building is constructed along modern lines 
with an over-all floor space of approximately 21,000 sq. ft. The building houses 
the Biological and Physical Science Departments. Lecture rooms are built 
especially for various kinds of visual aids. One of the most modern and best 
equipped observatories in its area is housed on the upper floor. 

The Biology Department, located on the south end of the main floor, has 
separate facilities for botany and zoology. A Greenhouse connected with the 
main building is shared by the Biology and Agriculture Departments. There 
is also a photographic dark room. 

The Chemistry Department, on the north end of the main floor, consists 
of lecture rooms, laboratories, storerooms, an instrument room, and a bal- 
ance room. Laboratories are equipped with double and single hoods. A water 
distillation apparatus furnishes distilled water for laboratories. 

The Physics Department comprises the entire second floor. In addition 
to lecture rooms, laboratories, and store rooms there is a special dark room. 

The observatory, located on the third floor, houses a twelve-inch reflector 
telescope with accessories. There is also an outside classroom space on the 
roof. 

Home Economics Building. This building contains a living suite com- 
posed of a living room, a dining room, a bedroom, and bath; a foods labora- 
tory equipped with six unit kitchens; a clothing laboratory; and two class- 
rooms with an accordion wall that can be pushed back to give a large room 
for lectures and assemblies. 

Academic Building. The Academic Building is used primarily for in- 
structional purposes and is one of the principal teaching centers on the cam- 
pus. In addition to large, modernly equipped lecture and laboratory rooms 
and faculty offices, a visual education room, seating approximately 100 peo- 
ple, is provided. 

Vocational Building. The new Vocational-Technical building is the first 
unit of the Hinds Vocational-Technical center. This "E" type building has 
been designed under careful guidance from both industry and engineering 
groups so that 700 to 750 students may be conveniently served. 

To provide proper working conditions, adequate space, lighting, and ven- 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 19 



The College 

tilation have been strong factors of consideration in the planning of this 
structure. The cost will be approximately $1,250,000 upon completion and 
equipping. 

The front part of the building, or the base of the "E", houses the admin- 
istration division, conference area, teacher planning area, technical library, 
classrooms, and the barber shop for the center. 

The top of the "E", or left side wing, houses the Mechanical Technology, 
Machine Shop, Welding, and general storage for the center. 

The center wing houses the Drafting and Design Technology and the 
Electric Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Departments. The lower wing 
houses the Electronics Technology Division, Electric Radio and T. V. Repair, 
Office Machine Riepair, Electric Motor Repairs, and General Electricity 
and Wiring Departments. Each of the wings is 120' x 60'. The total square feet 
of floor space in the first unit is approximately 26,100. Approximately 
$500,000 worth of equipment in these departments makes Hinds Junior College 
one of the best equipped facilities in the Vocational-Technical fields. 

Main Dormitory. This dormitory for girls is a large two-story brick 
building. It contains a spacious drawing room, a TV set, a large game and 
activities room, 38 bedrooms for students, and three apartments for faculty 
women. In it are also a Coke room and modern facilities for laundry includ- 
ing washing and drying machines, and metal ironing boards. Across the 
front of this building extends a long white-columned veranda furnished with 
comfortable chairs. 

Northside Dormitory. Completed in the spring of 1960, this dormitory 
offers accommodations for 95 sophomore girls and two faculty members. It 
is a two-story structure in modernistic design of reinforced concrete and 
masonry. The building is fronted by porches, the length of the building, en- 
closed with solar screens of ceramic tile. 

The interior is unique and modern in arrangement of four-bedroom units, 
each complete with a small foyer, large fan, ceramic-tiled baths, spacious 
cabinets and closets, circulating hot water heating, and fluorescent lights. 

Each room has Venetian blinds, built-in study and dressing tables, book 
shelves, cabinets, bulletin boards, and closets. The rooms are furnished with 
single beds and inner-spring mattresses, bedside tables, lounge chairs, and 
waste-paper cans. For the convenience and comfort of the girls, a lounge is 
provided. 

There is an inter-communication system in the building. A laundry equip- 
ped with washing machines, dryers, and ironing boards is located on the 
first floor. 

Westside Dormitory. This is a brick apartment building for college girls. 
In addition to a large general lobby equipped with modernistic furniture 
and a TV room, this building comprehends 32 single and double apart- 

Page 20 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The College 

ments, each with private bath. It has tiled floors throughout all rooms and 
corridors, and the walls are finished in pastel. Bedrooms are furnished with 
study tables, chairs, chest of drawers, Venetian blinds, fluorescent lights, 
and Simmons bunk beds with innerspring mattresses. 

Central Dormitory. This dormitory houses primarily sophomore boys. 
Rooms are equipped with beds, dressers, study tables and chairs. There 
are central baths on each floor. 

Shangri-La Dormitory. This dormitory was the first to be erected for 
men students. It is conveniently located because of its nearness to the library, 
academic, and administration bulidings. It is finished with tile baths, pastel 
shade colorings in the bedrooms and hardwood floors. There are central 
baths on each floor with individual lavatories in each room. Rooms are fur- 
nished with beds, dressers, study tables, and chairs. 

Eastside Dormitory. This dormitory is equipped with private baths, beds, 
dressers, study tables, and chairs. In addition to the lobby and living quar- 
ters for students, there are also apartments for married instructors on each 
floor. 

Southside Dormitory. The new dormitory for sophomore boys offers 
accommodations for 65 students. The interior is an arrangement of four-bed- 
room units, each complete with a small foyer, a large fan, ceramic-tiled bath, 
spacious cabinets and closets, circulating hot water heating, and fluorescent 
lights. Rooms have two windows, Venetian blinds, built-in study and dress- 
ing tables, book shelves, cabinets, and closets. Furnishings include single 
beds and inner-spring mattresses, bedside tables, desks, lounge chairs, and 
waste-paper baskets. 

Sophomore students assigned to this dormitory are carefully selected on 
the basis of scholarship and citizenship, as recorded in their freshman year. 

Stadium Dormitory. This dormitory houses primarily vocational students. 
The building, motel style, provides for sixty-four students. It is a one-story 
brick veneer structure. 

The Hospital. The hospital, a fourteen-bed facility, is under the super- 
vision of a full-time employed registered nurse. The local physician is called 
when his services are needed. It is fully equipped to take care of minor 
illnesses of students. 

Frozen Food Locker Plant. A complete service frozen food locker plant 
is operated as a regular part of the Agriculture Department. An approved 
abattoir is operated in connection with the plant. This makes it possible 
for farmers to deliver their animals to the plant and have them dressed, 
chilled and processed for their lockers. The plant's 575 lockers are all rented 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 21 



The College . 

and several hundred owners of home freezers use the facilities of the plant 
to have their meats processed for storage in their frozen food cabinets. 

The plant ranks as one of the most modern in the South. The entire 
plant is operated as a service to farmers of this area. 



THE FARM 

The college farm at Hinds Junior College is used for training students 
of agriculture and providing food for the college cafeteria. Special attention 
is given to the production of crops and livestock. 

The farm occupies two sites. One, adjacent to the campus, contains the 
dairy, poultry, swine and beef feeding units. The other, located four miles 
north of the college on the John Bell Williams Airport, provides the cattle 
feeds and maintains 100 registered Herefords that make up the beef-cattle 
herd. 

The dairy unit of the farm is a most modern one. The milk used by the 
cafeteria is produced and processed there. The dairy herd is made up of 
Holsteins and Jerseys, most of them registered. The facilities of the dairy 
are such that training in specialized dairy fields can be given. 

The beef cattle unit provides excellent opportunities for training agri- 
cultural students. Students can observe all phases in the production, selection, 
feeding, fitting, showing and marketing of beef cattle. Registered cattle are 
prepared and shown at local shows. They are also prepared and sold in 
Breed Association Sales. Feeder animals are fed-out, processed, and con- 
sumed in the cafeteria. 

In connection with the swine unit, modern farrowing and finishing barns 
have recently been completed. Students are able to observe modern swine 
practices. Hogs produced in this unit are used by the cafeteria as needed. 

All of the eggs used by the school cafeteria are produced by the poultry 
unit, and broilers are produced when practical. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

Hinds Junior College operates a summer school which begins in the 
early part of June. It consists of two five-week terms. All summer school 
work is accredited. Extensive course offerings are provided in the various 
departments as well as in technical and vocational training. 

A special bulletin giving details regarding expenses and course offerings 
may be obtained by writing or calling the Office of the Registrar. 

Page 22 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 

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The Students 



ADMISSION 



A student is admitted as an entering freshman by one of the following 
methods: Graduating from an approved high school, or (for students over 20 
years of age) satisfactorily passing the General Education Development test 
at the high school level. Every freshman admitted is required to have on file 
by September 1, 1965, results of the American College Test and an official copy 
of the transcript from the high school from which he graduated. 

A student, other than an entering freshman, may be admitted on the basis 
of a careful study of his past record and performance at the college from 
which he wishes to transfer. 

Students must have good moral character. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

Students wishing to enter Hinds Junior College should request an AD- 
MISSION PACKET. This packet consists of an Application for Admission 
blank, a Health Examination Record form, and a Dormitory Application form 
— all essential in the admission procedure. Also, students must see that 
transcripts of their academic records in the high school or college from 
which they are transferring are on file by September 1. No student can be 
enrolled without an official transcript of his previous schooling. To be official, 
the record must be mailed directly from the school attended to Hinds Junior 
College. Entering freshmen must have American College Test scores on file. 

LIVING 
ARRANGEMENTS 

Because of the shortage of dormitory space, preference will be given to 
room applications as follows: 

1. Applications from residents of the District (Hinds, Rankin, Warren, 
and Claiborne counties) and from non-resident vocational and techni- 
cal students will be processed upon receipt. 

2. Applications from out-of -district state residents will not be processed 
until July 15. 

3. Applications from out-of-state residents will not be processed until 
August 1. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI p age 23 



The Students. 



Dormitory applications must be accompanied by a room reservation 
deposit of $10. It is only with this deposit that room reservations can be 
made. If, after making an application and depositing $10, the student decides 
not to enter Hinds Junior College, the deposit will be returned PROVIDED 
proper notice is given before August 15. The room deposit, for students who 
occupy rooms for one or both semesters, is subject to refund at the close of 
the semester or session provided the room and furnishings have not been 
abused. The room deposit will be forfeited if the student leaves the dormitory 
prior to the end of the current semester. 



FOR GIRLS 

All girls attending Hinds Junior College, except those who reside in 
their own homes, are expected to live in the dormitories. Proper application 
should be made for reserving a room by filling out the Admission Packet 
for the 1965-66 session. 

The girls' dormitories will be open and ready for occupancy Sunday after- 
noon, Sept. 5. Rooms that have been assigned but not claimed by Sept. 10 
will be forfeited, unless a letter stating the cause of the student's delay and 
the time of her expected arrival has been received by the Dean of Women. 

Rooms in the dormitories are furnished with beds, dressers, tables, 
chairs, and Venetian blinds. Students supply their bed linen, covering, 
pillows, towels, and toilet articles. The expenses for girls living in dormi- 
tories is shown under EXPENSES on page 25. Room and board are payable 
in advance according to the board calendar shown on page 25. 

FOR BOYS 

Hinds Junior College provides housing accommodations on the campus 
for approximately 450 men students. 

Students desiring to reserve living facilities on the campus must make 
application for such. Application is made by properly filling out an Admis- 
sion Packet for the 1965-66 session. All residences for men will be open and 
ready for occupancy on Sunday afternoon, Sept. 5. Rooms that have been 
assigned but not claimed by Sept. 10 will be forfeited unless a letter stating 
the cause of the student's delay and the time of his expected arrival has been 
received by the Dean of Men. 

Dormitory rooms for boys are furnished with single beds, dressers, 
tables, chairs, and window shades. Students supply their bed linen, covering, 
pillows, towels and toilet articles. The expenses for a student living in the 
dormitory is shown under EXPENSES on page 25. Room and board are pay- 
able in advance according to the beard calendar on page 25. 

Page 24 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



__T/ie Sfudents 

EXPENSES 



All students pay upon entering school: 

Matriculation Fee (non-fundable) $ 5.00 

Fees (for first semester) 35.00 $40.00 

Additional Fee for all boys: 

Physical Education 3.00 

Due January 24 Fees (for second semester) 40.00 



TOTAL $80.00 

NON-RESIDENT TUITION 

The following refund policy regarding non-resident tuition has been adopt- 
ed for all students including veterans training under Public Law 550 : Students 
attending for one week or less will be refunded 75% or the listed rate; 
students attending longer than one week will receive no refund. 
All students whose parents are legal residents of Mississippi but are not 
legal residents of Claiborne, Hinds, Rankin, or Warren counties pay tuition 
as follows: 

Upon entrance . .$15.00 

October 18 , __, 10.00 

November 15 . 10.00 

December 13 _ 10.00 

January 24 15.00 

March 7 10.00 

April 4 . _.. 10.00 

May 2 10.00 



TOTAL $90.00 

All students whose parents are not legal residents of the state of Mississippi 
will pay an out-of-state tuition fee in lieu of the out-of-district tuition as out- 
lined above. Schedule of payment: 

Upon entrance $150.00 

January 24 (second semester) 150.00 



TOTAL $300.00 

BOARDING STUDENTS 

Room and board in dormitory (see schedule of payments below) 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Upon entrance (Room and Board) $ 52.50* 

October 18 (Room and Board) 35.00 

November 15 (Room and Board) _ 35.00 

December 13 (Room and Board) 35.00 



TOTAL $157 .50 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 25 



The Students. 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Upon entrance (Room and Board) $ 52.50* 

March 7 (Room and Board) : ~~ : 35.00 

April 4 (Room and Board) 35.00 

May 2 (Room and Board) 35.00 



TOTAL $157.50 

* This payment is for Wi school months. It is necessary because each 
semester of 4Ms school months will be considered a separate entity under 
the IBM registration procedure which will be in use for the first time 
in the 1965-66 school year. 

NOTE: The charge for board may be adjusted at any time because of in- 
creased costs of commodities. 

The amounts given do not include books, laundry, and other items 
of personal expense. Neither do they include the room deposit 
required of all students living in campus dormitories. The physi- 
cal education fee of $3.00 (which is not refundable) entitles a boy 
to the use of a gym suit for his physical education class. 
Students taking diplomas will pay a graduation fee of $10. 

The following refund policy regarding fees has been adopted for all 
students, including veterans training under Public Law 550. The matricula- 
tion fee of $5 is non-refundable. (This matriculation fee is paid only once 
during a regular session; however, it constitutes a part of the $40 entrance 
fee paid by a student entering during either the first or second semester.) 
The balance of the entrance fee (other than matriculation) is refundable as 
follows: Students attending for one week or less will be refunded 75% of 
listed rate; students attending longer than one week will receive no refund. 
Tuition, payable monthly and in advance, is not refundable. 

The following refund policy regarding non-resident tuition has been 
adopted for all students including veterans training under Public Law 550: 
Students attending for one week or less will be refunded 75% of the listed 
rate; students attending longer than one week will receive no refund. 

MEAL TICKETS AND BOARD REFUNDS 

Each student upon payment of his board will be issued a meal ticket 
good for the current boarding period. Students will need to present this 
at each meal or pay cash for the meal. Tickets are not redeemable if they 
are lost. Meal tickets are not transferrable. 

No deduction can be made for board for an absence of less than two weeks 

Page 26 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Students 



in succession, and then only when the student presents to the office the 
first day after his return a statement approved by the manager of the 
student's dormitory specifying the period of his absence. 

BOOKS 

The cost of books is dependent upon the course that a student takes 
and whether or not he is able to secure secondhand books. Texts are sold 
from the campus bookstore. 

At the end of each session, students may resell to the bookstore texts 
usable again the next session. They may be sold for 40 per cent of the 
purchase price. 

LAUNDRY 

The college does not operate a general laundry, but the girls have access 
to modern washing machines and ironing facilities for doing their own laundry 
and pressing. Students may patronize the local dry cleaning establishment or 
use the facilities of the modern laundromat located in Raymond. Jackson 
laundries also offer pick-up and delivery service on the campus. 



STUDENT 
SERVICES 



COUNSELING 

Hinds Junior College endeavors to make available to all students during 
their college career the most modern aids to a wise vocational choice; to aid 
them in the improvement of work, study, and reading habits; and to con- 
tribute to the development of efficient and wholesome personalities. 

Each student is assigned to a faculty adviser at the time of registration 
to assist him with the selection of courses. After the student has started 
his class schedule, he is encouraged to consult with his adviser concerning 
school problems that confront him. Also, there is available to him at all 
times through the Student Personnel Offices a program of guidance which 
calls into service the resources of faculty personnel, vocational interest and 
aptitude tests, educational and occupational information. Other guidance 
materials are provided through the offices and the library facilities. 

Students are encouraged at all times to seek counsel, not only in the face 
of specific problems, but, also in an effort to discern, through the aid of 
friendly faculty and student assistance, ways of constantly improving the 
skills required for effective living. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 27 



The Students. 



ORIENTATION 

At the time of registration and at prescribed intervals during their first 
semester, all freshman and transfer students are given information concern- 
ing general school regulations, use of the library, student services, etc. 

GUIDANCE TESTING PROGRAM 

The guidance tests required of all entering freshmen are not given for 
admission purposes. They are designed to measure academic ability, voca- 
tional interest, personality, intelligence, and achievement. They also assist 
in the proper placement of students in specific courses and furnish valuable 
information for use by the counseling staff in aiding students to select occupa- 
tions in keeping with their interests and abilities. The series is required of all 
entering students. 

As an aid to both student and counseling staff, the series of guidance tests 
on the Hinds Junior College campus has been scheduled for eight different 
dates. Students are urged to participate in tests at the earliest scheduled 
date to allow time for scoring and for the required pre-registration counsel- 
ing. All sessions are held in the college auditorium. The dates are: 



June 18 (Friday) 8:30 A. M. 
June 25 
July 9 
July 16 
July 23 



July 30 (Friday) 8:30 A. M. 
August 6 " 
August 13 " " 

August 20 " " 



The time of the tests indicates the starting time. Students should be 
at the place of the test at least ten minutes prior to the starting time. No one 
can be admitted to a test after it has started. Tests should be completed by 
late afternoon of the day on which they are taken. 

Freshmen who fail to take advantage of one of the sessions scheduled 
above will be charged a fee of $5. 

The series of guidance tests administered by Hinds Junior College on the 
dates shown above should not be confused with the American College Test 
given throughout the United States at published times. The ACT test is re- 
quired also for admission to Hinds Junior College. Details about this nation- 
wide program can be had from high school principals and counselors. 

HEALTH 

Hinds Junior College, realizing the importance of good health to a stu- 
dent's educational progress and future welfare, offers every advantage pos- 
sible to preserve and promote physical well-being. A 14-bed campus infirmary 



Page 28 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Students 



is a part of the facilities available to students. A registered nurse is employed 
full time and the local physician makes a regular visit each weekday. The 
nearness of Jackson with its specialists and hospital facilities is another safe- 
guard for students of Hinds. Fees paid upon entrance take care of routine 
medical care and simple remedies. 

As a part of the admissions requirement, each student is required to have 
a Health Examination Record form completed by his physician. This form 
is a part of the Application for Admission packet that the student receives. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

Banquets, formal and informal entertainments, and other opportunities 
for social contact are planned by students and faculty members cooperating 
throughout the year. Adequate occasions are thus provided for the normal 
development of the social graces in student life. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Believing that spiritual values together with suitable and adequate ex- 
periences for developing them should be a major concern of educational 
institutions, the college administration maintains a number of channels for 
enriching the religious life of the college community. Church functions 
honoring students during orientation week, and at intervals through the 
year, together with credit courses in Bible, taught by local pastors, have 
more closely related the local churches to life on the campus, and have 
made students more aware of opportunities for useful community services. 

Students hold a weekly vesper service, and annually sponsor an inter- 
denominational Religious Emphasis Week. Students of Hinds Junior College 
are expected to follow a definite schedule on Sundays. This schedule includes 
attendance at Sunday School and Sunday morning worship services at the 
churches in Raymond. Attendance of students at the evening worship service 
in town is encouraged. Youth meetings representative of various churches 
are held weekly on the campus. 

MOTOR VEHICLES 

Students who wish to keep any type of motor vehicle on the campus 
must register it with the Campus Security Office. This is done in the regular 
channel of student registration at the opening of the school term. 

PLACEMENT 

Hinds Junior College feels a keen responsibility in the placement of its 
students. It makes a sincere effort to help those wishing to continue their 
education, and needing financial aid, to find work opportunities in the col- 
lege of their choice. Also, every effort is made to assist terminal students 
in finding full-time employment. These services are coordinated through the 
Office of the Dean of Students. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 29 



The Students. 



SELF-HELP JOBS 



Every possible effort is made to provide self-help jobs for students who 
need financial help and who have time for and will do such work. The chief 
factors in assigning student work are: first, need of the student; second, 
dependability of the student; third, amount of funds available for work 
scholarships. 

All student work assignments are handled through the Dean of Students' 
office. Special blanks are used in making applications. These may be secured 
upon request from the Dean of Students. Preference is given to dormitory 
students who live in the local taxing area. 

VETERANS 

Hinds Junior College works closely with the Veterans Administration in 
providing an effective training program for ex-servicemen. All college courses, 
as well as vocational-technical courses, are open to return veterans and every 
effort is made to facilitate their admission under all training programs. 

Educational work done by veterans while in active service is evaluated 
and high school or college credit given when possible. The recommendation 
of the American Council on Education in their handbook, GUIDE TO THE 
EVALUATION OF EDUCATION EXPERIENCES IN THE ARMED SERV- 
ICES, is used as a guide for the evaluation of all military credit. 

Designated faculty and administration personnel serve as veteran's ad- 
visers and assist them with special problems arising under their respective 
training programs. 



Student Conduct 



Students at Hinds Junior College are encouraged to assume responsi- 
bilities for their personal conduct appropriate to their age and maturity. 
However, in promoting the tradition of friendship and democracy on the 
campus, in preserving some of the basic values and qualities of our heritage, 
and in the training of good citizenship responsibilities, students are expected 
to observe the following general principles: conform to acceptable standards 
of decency, morality, and courtesy; be truthful; respect the rights of others; 
be punctual and regular in attendance at classes and assemblies; have re- 
gard for college property. 

Guides for routine campus and dormitory life are given students in 
the form of handbooks, bulletins, announcements, and informal meetings. 
Hinds Junior College reserves the right to exclude students at any time 
where there are serious deviations from acceptable campus conduct. 

Page 30 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Students 



STUDENT 
ACTIVITIES 



In addition to the regular schedule for the intellectual and physical 
development of students as set forth in the college curriculum, an exten- 
sive program of extra-curricular activities is observed on the campus in 
which religious, academic, musical, dramatic, athletic, and social interests 
are emphasized. Campus organizations, managed by students under faculty 
guidance, afford ample opportunities for growth in character, citizenship, 
leadership, and social poise. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

The Baptist Student Union, Wesley Foundation, Canterbury Club, West- 
minster Fellowship, Christian Foundation, and Newman Club, cooperating 
with the local churches, carry on a regular program of work on the campus 
and enlist the interest of the majority of students. These groups plan social 
service, representation at various conferences, and regular weekly devotional 
programs at the college. 

ASSOCIATED STUDENT BODY 

Student action at Hinds is centered in representation and activities of 
the Associated Student Body. Its goal is to help co-ordinate student and 
faculty views and actions so as to insure a harmonious atmosphere of co- 
operation. 

The ASB is divided into the Executive. Judicial, and Legislative branches, 
and serves the student body as a valid expression of its opinion. Incoming 
students are encouraged to actively participate in it, so as to render the 
governing body more effective. 

PHI THETA KAPPA 

A Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, a non-secret national scholastic society 
for junior colleges, is composed of those students whose grades rank in the 
uooer ten per crot of the college enrollment and who receive the unqualified 
nomination of the faculty committee appointed to study their records in 
character and citizenship and of the active members. Each year groups of 
students attend the National Convention of this organization. 

CIRCLE "K" CLUB 

The Circle "K" Club is a civic organization sponsored by the North 
Jackson Kiwanis Club. The objectives of the club are to promote for its mem- 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Pag* 31 



The Students =__ 

bers good fellowship and high scholarship; to serve the college, the comrnuiv 
ity, and the state; to give primacy to the human and spiritual rather than to 
the material values of life; and to develop within its members a high degree 
of serviceable citizenship. Membership in the club is based on scholarship 
and citizenship and approval of the Board of Directors. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

The IRC is sponsored by the Social Science Department. Its purpose is 
to give an opportunity to students who have a special interest in international 
subjects to study and express themselves in this field. Its membership is open 
to those students who show a special interest and capacity for such. Oppor- 
tunity is afforded for expression and exchange of student opinion with other 
colleges through affiliation with the Association of International Relations 
Clubs sponsored by the Foreign Policy Association, 

BAND 

The Eagle Concert and Show Band fills numerous engagements during 
the school year and participates hi various athletic and social events on 
and off the campus. Many trips are made by the organization, including out- 
of-town football games, Christmas parades in surrounding cities, and Mardi 
Gras in New Orleans. Honor trips have been made to the Sugar Bowl, Gator 
Bowl, St. Louis, Buffalo, Colorado Springs and Pasadena. In addition, the 
concert band gives concerts at the high schools in the Hinds Junior College 
locality. Students interested in this outstanding organization are urged to 
contact the director regarding participation. 

HE-STEPPERS 

A precision dance and drill team, the Hi-Steppers, a companion group to 
the Hinds Parade Band, has won acclaim at such events as New Orleans' 
Mardi Gras parades and balls; the National American Legion and Forty 
and Eight convention in St. Louis; the Junior Rose Bowl in Pasadena, 
California; the National Junior Chamber of Commerce Convention in Colorado 
Springs; the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, Florida, with network television 
coverage; and numerous parades, state conventions, and civic programs. 
It won the national championship trophy as the outstanding group in the 
1957 Mardi Gras parade. Also, it won a national trophy at the Junior Chamber 
of Commerce Convention in Buffalo, New York. The group has performed 
for Congress in Washington, D. C. An outstanding performance at the Sugar 
Bowl Game in January, 1961, delighted approximately 82,000 football and 
60 million TV fans. The Hi-Steppers also participated in the Miss America 
Parade in Atlantic City in September, 1962. The team was the feature at- 
traction at the Blue-Gray Football Game in Montgomery, Alabama, Decem- 
ber, 1963. Along with its dancing ability has grown a set of professional 
props and costumes. 

Page 32 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



_7f»e Students 

MODERN LANGUAGE CLUB 

Membership in the Modern Language Club is open to all students who 
are interested in Spanish and French. The purpose of the club is to acquaint 
members with the customs and history of the foreign countries and especial- 
ly to promote good will through correspondence with students of foreign 
lands. 

THE LENDON PLAYERS 

The Lendon Players is an organization created for students who are in- 
terested in dramatics and the theatre. Membership is open to anyone who 
wishes to join and abide by the constitution and by-laws. According to the 
constitution, "the purpose of The Lendon Players shall be to foster and de- 
velop better skills, relations and interests in the field of drama." Club mem- 
bers take part in staging of plays. 

STUDENT EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 

Membership in this club is open to all prospective teachers. Its purpose 
is to acquaint members with the opportunities in the teaching field, to 
present problems to be faced, to propose ethical aspects of the profession, 
and to study other important aspects of the teaching career. Students ma- 
joring in both elementary and secondary education are encouraged to affili- 
ate with the organization. 

LAMPLIGHTERS CLUB 

Membership is open to college home, economics students and to others 
interested in this field. Its purpose is to further the interest of home eco- 
nomics in the personal and community relationships of everyday life. The 
club sends representatives to state and regional conferences. It is affiliated 
with both state and national organizations. 

HINDSONIAN 

Weekly newspaper, published by student staff, offers positions in reporting, 
feature writing, editorializing, business managing, circulation, and layout 
work. One evening a week is required to prepare the paper for the printers. 
Positions as editors and managers are open after experience has been gained. 

THE PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 

The Psychology Club is open to all students interested in psychology 
who maintain an overall "C" average. Enrollment in a psychology course 
is not a prerequisite for membership. Activities include field trips and spe- 
cial programs with distinguished guest speakers. 

PHI BETA LAMBDA 

Phi Beta Lambda, a collegiate chapter of the Future Business Leaders of 
America, is a national organization, sponsored by the National Education 
Association, for students in business education. Any student enrolled in one 
or more business subjects may become a member. Through membership in 
the chapter, students have experiences that will help prepare them to take 
their places as employees or administrators. 

fcAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 33 



The Students. 



DEBATING CLUB 



The Debating Club is sponsored by the Speech Department. The club 
gives students an opportunity to take part in inter-class and inter-collegiate 
debating. The debating teams are chosen from the club and represent this 
institution in inter-collegiate debating. 

DELTA PSI OMEGA 

Delta Psi Omega is a national honorary dramatics fraternity. The local 
chapter, Cast Number 178, was chartered in 1961. Membership is by invitation. 
Only students who have experience in dramatics are eligible. 

THE EAGLE 

The Eagle, a record of the students and their activities, is published 
by students who win places on the staff by demonstrating their interest 
and ability. No previous experience is necessary, but originality is a great 
asset. ' ' 

ENGINEERING CLUB 

Membership in the engineering club is open to all pre-engineering stu- 
dents, science majors, mathematics majors, and technical students. Its pur- 
pose is to stimulate and maintain interest of present day trends in scientific 
and industrial development. Its monthly meetings consist of demonstrations, 
talks by leaders in the field of industry, and field trips to nearby points 
of interest. 

ART CLUB 

The Art Department sponsors Alpha Rho Tau, local honorary art club. 
The membership is made up of art majors and others making valuable con- 
tributions to the school and community by rendering valuable service in the 
field of art. The club sponsors trips to local museums, participation in 
school programs, and many social activities. 

PRE-MED CLUB 

The Pre-Med Club is an organization of students majoring in medicine, 
related fields to medicine, and other students with a sincere interest. The 
purpose is to better create within the student a true understanding of what 
his proposed profession is to be. Interesting films on related topics are 
shown at least twice a month. Also, visiting speakers are invited to talk to 
the club. 

AGRICULTURE CLUB 

Membership in this club is open to college boys preparing for the various 
phases of agriculture or boys interested in this field. At the regular weekly 
meetings, members have an opportunity to hear local and present-day lead- 
ers in the field of agriculture. 

Pag* 34 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Students 

RECREATION CENTER 

The recreation center is a specious room available to students for recre- 
ational activities such as table games; singing; square, folk, and social 
dancing; parties and other socials. 

THE EAGLES' NEST 

The campus grill is one of the most popular gathering places for Hinds 
Junior College students and faculty. Here one can relax and visit with friends 
between classes and after school. Located in the Student Center Building, the 
Eagles' Nest offers a wide variety of candies, cold drinks, ice cream, pies, 
sandwiches, T shirts, gym suits, and pennants, along with a full line of 
novelties all in college colors and decorated with school insignias. 

A branch store is located in the basement where engineering and art 
supplies are sold along with other supplies usually found in college stores. 

ASSEMBLIES 

General assemblies, planned by an assembly committee, provide varied 
programs consisting of professional entertainers, inspirational speakers, and 
student and community talent. The 40-minute period is scheduled approxi- 
mately five times a semester. 

ATHLETICS 

Realizing the benefits to be gained from wholesome exercises in athletic 
sports, this institution encourages all students to take some part in these 
activities. Besides the gymnasium for indoor sports, two athletic fields are 
provided for football, baseball, and track. Also, space is provided for soccer, 
volley ball, croquet, golf, and other sports. Concrete tennis courts are pro- 
vided for students. Along with the benefits of scientific exercises, students 
are taught the value of clean sportsmanship and self-denial in their habits 
and desires. 

INTRAMURALS 

Competitive intramural activities are conducted on a voluntary basis. 
Emphasis is placed on both individual and team games and sports. Popular 
activities include basketball, volley ball, Softball, tennis, touch football, ping 
pong, badminton, and other minor sports. 

WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

The objective of the Women's Atheltic Association is to organize and 
stimulate a wholesome program of athletic activities for the girls of Hinds 
Junior College. Competition, along with the enjoyment and development of 
sportsmanship and character, are stressed in the various activities. 

Any college girl, passing her academic subjects, is eligible for mem- 
bership in WAA. Each member pays annual dues of $1. Regular meetings 
are held for the official council. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI p age 35 



The Students — 

Through a point system a member may earn an athletic award. The first 
50 points earn a College Letter and the next 50 points earn an Association 
pin. Calendar of events include: 

October Volleyball Tournament 

November, December Eadminton and Ping Pong 

Tournaments 

January, February Basketball Tournament 

March, April Archery Tournament, Soft ball 

May Tennis Tournament 

Points may also be earned for participation in bowling, roller skating, 
playdays, workshops, health activities, band, Y.W.C.A., cheerleading, and 
Hi-Steppers. 

A handbook is published for all members explaining the constitution of 
the Women's Athletic Association. 



Page 36 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Students 



ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 



GRADING SYSTEM 

Grades are indicated by letters as follows: 

A^Excellent; B— Good; C— Average; D— Poor; F— Failure; 
I— Incomplete; WP— Withdrawn, Passing; WF— Withdrawn, 
Failing; AU— Audit. 

An incomplete grade is assigned a student if, upon completion of a 
report period, he has been ill or some unavoidable circumstance has kept 
him from taking his examination or meeting other requirements of the 
course. An incomplete grade is not allowable on the basis of course de- 
ficiencies not caused by unavoidable circumstance. If an incomplete grade 
is not removed during the succeeding nine weeks period, the grade auto- 
matically becomes an "F." 

REPORTS 

Progress reports are mailed to parents or guardians at the end of the 
ninth week of each semester. Final semester grades are mailed at the 
end of each semester. The Academic Dean or faculty members may issue 
deficiency reports for students who are failing or who are not working to 
capacity at any given time during a semester. 

QUALITY POINTS Quality Points 

Per Sem. Hour 

A minimum of sixty-four quality A— 3 

points is required of college stu- B— 2 

dents receiving diplomas from C — 1 

Hinds Junior College. Quality points D — 

are figured from semester aver- F — 

ags and the method of determining WF— 
them is: 

A student may repeat a course already completed and in which credit 
has been earned in order to better the quality of his work. In computing 
scholastic averages in these cases, all attempts will be considered. 

DROPPING A COURSE 

If a student wishes to drop a course at any time, he should make appli- 
cation to do so in the Office of the Registrar. To drop a course after the date 
specified in the academic calendar of the college catalog requires, in addition, 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 37 



The Students. 



the consent of the instructor involved and the approval of the Academic Dean. 

Courses dropped within the academic calendar date carry no record of 
performance on the student's permanent record. Classes dropped after the 
catalog date through the sixth week of the semester carry a record of 
performance— a WP (withdrawn passing) or WF (withdrawn failing) which- 
ever is applicable at the time of dropping. Classes dropped after the sixth 
week of the semester automatically carry a grade of WF unless unusual 
circumstances are involved. Failure to officially withdraw from a course 
results in an F grade. 

All courses with grades of WF and F are counted in computing quality 
point averages at the end of the semester. 

AUDITING A COURSE 

To audit a course means to enroll in the course and attend in the usual 
manner, but without credit or a grade. A student may, in special cases, be 
permitted to audit courses for review purposes and not for the purpose of 
raising a grade where college credit has already been earned. Students may 
NOT audit for preview purposes. A grade of AU (no grade, no credit, no 
quality points) will be recorded on the student's permanent record. Audit 
courses must be counted as a part of the total maximum load taken by 
regularly enrolled students. 

The auditing of a course should not be confused with repeating a course 
to raise a grade. In computing scholastic averages (as explained under 
QUALITY POINTS), the credit carried by a course will be considered if a 
course is being repeated to better a grade where credit has already been 
earned. 

STUDENT LOAD 

The normal load for a student during a regular semester is five academic 
courses or a total of from 15 to 17 semester hours of college credit plus 
physical education. In special cases and where a student's past record war- 
rants it. a maximum load of from 18 to 19 academic hours (normally six 
academic courses) plus physical education may be carried. The minimum 
load for a full-time student is 12 semester hours. Students taking less than 
12 semester hours are classed as "Part-Time" students. 

A full-time student who finds it necessary to decrease his load to less 
than 12 semester hours because of employment or other unusual circumstances, 
should petition the Dean of Students in writing to have his student status 
changed from full time to part time. A student who fails to do this and who 
unofficially decreases his load to less than 12 semester hours of credit is in 
the position of having cut himself out of school for the semester. 

Pag* 38 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Students 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Classification of students at Hinds Junior College is as follows: 

Freshman— a student who has earned fewer than 24 semester hours of 
college credit. 

Sophomore— a student who has earned 24 or more semester hours of 
college credit. 

Part-time Student— a student who is enrolled in less than 12 semester 
hours of work in a given semester. 

HONOR STUDENTS 

Any student graduating from Hinds Junior College with a quality point 
average of 2.2 is graduated with "Honors." Students graduating with a 
quality point average of 2.6 (or above) are graduated with "Special Honors." 
The quality point average is determined by dividing the total number of 
quality points earned by the semester hours of credit attempted. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Any student who has fulfilled his financial obligations to the college will 
be furnished two transcripts of his credits without charge. A fee of fifty cents 
will be charged for each additional copy. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SUSPENSION 

At the end of any given semester a student who has failed to progress 
in his field of work may be olaced on academic probation or asked to with- 
draw from Hinds Junior College. Probationary status is designed to warn 
the student of his scholarship deficiency and to attempt to help him improve 
by making suggestions which should result in better college achievement. 
Academic discipline is designed to impress upon the student that colleges, at 
the present time, are extremely crowded and that priority MUST BE given 
the student who can and will satisfactorily pursue his college program. 

A regularly enrolled student who fails to achieve a quality point average 
of at least .5 on the work attempted and who fails to earn a minimum of 
nine semester hours at the end of a given semester will be placed on pro- 
bation for the succeeding semester. A student on probation who fails to abide 
by the suggestions given him for the improvement of his work may be asked 
to withdraw from Hinds Junior College. A student who does not achieve 
a quality point average of .5 or more and earn a minimum of 9 semester 
hours succeeding his probation (provided he is enrolled for as long as 
four weeks of that semester) will be ineligible for re-admission to Hinds 
Junior College until the lapse of one regular semester. A student achieving 
a quality point average of .5 or more and earning a minimum of 9 semester 
hours of credit during the succeeding semester will no longer be on probation. 
Students having served an Academic Suspension period from any college, 
if approved for admission to Hinds Junior College, will be admitted on 
Academic Probation. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 39 



The Students _ 

A student approved for transfer from another school will be admitted in 
the same status as he left his college. 

One on academic suspension cannot be admitted before his suspension 
period has elapsed unless by approval of his special petition showing most 
unusual circumstances, made in writing, to the Committee on Admissions. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM SCHOOL 

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from school for any reason 
should secure a Withdrawal Permit from the registrar's office. It is most 
desirable for a student to leave with a clear record. Honorable dismissal is, 
generally speaking, a requirement for admission to any other college; and 
it is only when clear records are left that good recommendations can be 
given prospective employers. 

If a student leaves school before the completion of a semester and fails 
to properly withdraw or to notify college officials (within two weeks after 
the last class attendance), grades of F will be assigned on all courses carried. 

ABSENCES AND TARDIES 

Absenteeism is strongly discouraged at Hinds Junior College— there is 
no system of "cuts." A student absent from a previously assigned test, report, 
examination or written classroom work will NOT be allowed to make up the 
work unless he is given permission by the Attendance Committee. Within 
three days after his return to class the student must file in the office of 
the Academic Dean a petition to make up his work. 

Faculty members will report to the Academic Dean a student whose 
excessive absences are endangering his progress in any given course. Three 
tardies are equivalent to one absence. Upon receipt of such notice, the Dean 
shall take whatever action he sees fit, but such action shall include in each 
case sending a notice to the student, the student's parents, and the student's 
instructor. A student will be dropped from the class roll with a grade of F 
when the Academic Dean receives a second "excessive absence notice" unless 
the student can furnish evidence to the Attendance Committee that his ex- 
cessive absences were for valid reasons. 

A student will be dropped from a class or classes with a grade of F 
for the following reasons: 

1. When the Academic Dean receives a second "excessive ab- 
sence notice" from an instructor. 

2. Any circumstance that would cause the student's attend- 
ance to fall below 80% during the semester. This policy 
also applies to absences incurred when students are offi- 
cially representing the college. 

3. English and physical education are required courses for 
Freshmen. Physical education is required of Sophomores. 
Full-time students who are dropped from these courses are 
dropped from school. A student will also be dropped from 
school if he has two absences from chapel without valid 
reason. 

P«9« 40 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Students 

The minimum load for a full-time student is 12 semester hours. A full- 
time student whose load falls below the 12 hour minimum because of being 
dropped from his classes for excessive absences automatically terminates 
his attendance at Hinds Junior College. 

Cumulative absences in each class are recorded as a permanent part 
of a student's record in the office of the registrar. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 
AND AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE 

In order to graduate and receive a diploma signifying graduation and 
an Associate Degree, the candidate in a specialized field should enter the 
college as a regular student and complete a particular course of study as 
outlined on pages 43-64. General college majors should meet the following 
requirements: 

♦English 12 sem. hours 
(Composition, 6 semester hours; ad- 
ditional composition and/or litera- 
ture, exclusive of Bible Literature, 
6 semester hours) 

History 6 sem. hours 
Physical Education 4 sem. hours 
Mathematics and/or Science 6 sem. hours 
Approved Electives 36 sem. hours 
TOTAL 64 sem. hours 

♦Applicable also to specialized programs of study (pages 43-64). 

Sixty-four quality points are required. Participation in commencement 
exercises is also required for the receiving of a degree. 

A graduating sophomore— one actually taking a diploma and degree— is 
eligible for exemption from the final examination in a subject in which a 
grade of "B" or better is achieved during the semester preceding graduation. 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI p age 41 



The Stvdents 

LIBRARY 
SERVICES 

The library is a vital part of the educational program of the college. 

The library collection contains approximately 16,000 volumes of books 
and bound periodicals and hundreds of pamphlets and clippings. More than 
140 periodicals and 10 newspapers are regularly received. These vary in type 
from the recreational to the professional and technical and cover a wide 
range of interests. All library materials are carefully selected with the 
academic and leisure reading interests of students and faculty in view. 

The library is staffed by well-trained professional librarians. Student 
assistants aid in the mechanical and clerical processes of the library. 

The library is open from eight o'clock in the morning until nine o'clock at 
night, Monday through Thursday; from eight o'clock until five o'clock on 
Friday; and from nine o'clock until eleven-thirty o'clock on Saturday, The, 
library observes the regular school holidays such as Thanksgiving, Christmas, 
and between sessions. 



Page 42 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 





u 



The Instruction 



EDUCATIONAL 
PROGRAM 

COURSE Sem. 

Hrs. 

Agriculture 51 (Soils) 4 

Agriculture 52 (Plant Science) 3 

Agriculture 65 (Farm Machinery) 3 

Agriculture 70 (Animal Husbandry) 3 

Agriculture 80 (Poultry Production) 3 

Agriculture 90 (Feeds and Feeding) 3 

Agriculture 101 (Elements of Dairying) 3 

Agriculture 102 (Meat Processing) 3 

Agriculture 104 (Meat Animal Evaluation) 2 

Art 12 (Elementary Design) 3 

Art 13 (Intermediate Design) 3 

Art 20 (Art History) 3 

Art 21 (Art History) 3 

Art 30 (Lettering and Advertising Layout) 2 

Art 50 (Beginning Drawing) 3 

Art 51 (Intermediate Drawing) 3 

Art 70, 71 (Composition and Painting) 6 

Art 80 (Art Appreciation) 3 

Art 90 (Ceramics) 3 

Art 95 (Handi Crafts) 3 

Biology 60, 61 (General Botany) 6 

Biology 70, 71 (General Zoology) 6 

Biology 80, 81 (Elementary Human Anatomy and 

Physiology) 6 

Biology 90, (Elementary Microbiology ^ 3 

Business 55 (Business Communications) 3 

Business 90, 91 (Principles of Accounting) 8 

Business 100, 101 (Principles of Business Law) 6 

Business 103 (Machine Calculation) 3 

Business 110 (Principles of Insurance) 3 

Business 200-216 (IBM Data Processing) 27 

Business 217 (Business Statistics) 3 

Business 220 (Intermediate Accounting) 3 

Business 230 (Elem. Cost Accounting) 3 

Chemistry 90, 91 (General) 8 

Chemistry 100, 101 (General) 8 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 43 



The Instruction. 



Chemistry 102 (Introduction Organic and Biologica 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 103 (Introductory Organic Chemistry 

Chemistry 105, 106 (Analytical Chemistry 

Chemistry 107, 108 (Organic 

Dramatics 50, 51 (Play Production 

Dramatics 100, 101 (Play Production 

Drawing 55, 56 (Engineering Drawing 

Drawing 100 (Descriptive Geometry 

Drawing 175 (Architectural Drafting 

Economics 90 (American Economic System 

Economics 100, 101 (Principles 

Engineering Graphics 75, 76 

English 40, 41 (Essentials of Composition 

English 50, 51 (Freshman Composition 

English 60 (Bible Literature, Old Testament 

English 90, 91 (Introduction to Literature 

English 92 (Technical Writing 

English 100, 101 (English Literature 

English 110 (Bible Literature, New Testament 

French 50, 51 (Elementary 

French 100, 101 (Intermediate 

Geography 60 (Introduction to Geography 

Geography 65 (Economic 

History 70, 71 (Western Civilization 

History 100, 101 (U.S. 

Home Economics 40 (Elementary Nutrition 

Home Economics 41 (Elementary Clothing 

Home Economics 50, 100 (Clothing 

Home Economics 51, 101 (Foods 

Home Economics 90 (Marriage and Family Living 

Hygiene 50 (Personal and Community 

Industrial Arts 40, 41 (Crafts 

Industrial Arts 50, 51 (Woodwork 

Journalism 80 (Principles of Journalism and Reporting 

Journalism 81 (Practical Journalism 

Journalism 85 (Press Photography 

Journalism 86 (History of American Journalism 

Machine Shop 70 (Machine Tool Practice 

Machine Shop 75 (Machine Shop Practice 

Mathematics 40 (Introductory Algebra 

Mathematics 45 (Mathematics for Teachers 

Mathematics 50 (College Algebra 

Mathematics 51 (Trigonometry 

Mathematics 57 (Algebra for Engineering Students 



4 
4 
8 

10 

4 

4 

4 

3 

3 

3 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3 

6 

3 

6 

3 

6 

6 

3 

3 

6 

6 

2 

2 

6 

6 

3 

3 

2 

6 

3 

3 

3 

3 

1 

2 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 



P«9« 44 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



Mathematics 75 (Finite Mathematics) 3 

Mathematics 91 (Analytical Geometry and Calculus) 5 

Mathematics 111 (Integral Calculus I) 5 

Mathematics 112 (Integral Calculus II) 3 

Mathematics 113 (Differential Equations) 3 

Music: 

Band (two years) 4 

Choir (two years) 4 

Music 50, 51 (Freshman Music Theory) 8 

Music 100, 101 (Sophomore Music Theory) 8 

Instrumental Music (two years) 2-12 

Piano (two years) 2-12 

Music 90, 91, 92 (Music History) 9 

Music 40 (Survey of Music Literature) 3 

Voice (two years) 2-12 

Organ (two years) 2-12 

Physical Education (two years) 4 
Physical Education 110 (Athletic Training and 

Treatment of Injuries) 3 

Physical Education 70 (Recreational Leadership) 3 

Physical Education 80 (Football Theory) 3 

Physical Education 90 (Basketball Theory) 3 

Physics 50, 51 (General) 8 

Physics 55, 56 (General Astronomy) 6 

Physics 60, 61 (General) 6 

Political Science 50 (National Government) 3 

Political Science 60 (State and County Government) 3 

Psychology 105, 107 (General) 6 

Psychology 110 (Child) 3 

Reading 50 (Improvement of Reading) 1 

Science 70, 71 (Physical Science Survey) 6 

Secretarial Science 50, 51 (Elementary and 

Intermediate Shorthand) 6 

Secretarial Science 60 (Beginning Typewriting) 3 

Secretarial Science 65 (Intermediate Typewriting) 3 

Secretarial Science 70 (Advanced Typewriting) 3 

Secretarial Science 75 (Dictation and Transcription) 3 

Secretarial Science 100 (Secretarial Procedures) 3 

Secretarial Science 102 (Advanced Shorthand) 3 

Secretarial Science 106 (Office Appliances) 3 

Secretarial Science 130 (Filing) 3 

Sociology 60 (Introduction) 3 

Sociology 70 (Marriage and Family Living) 3 

Sociology 100 (Social Problems) 3 

Spanish 50, 51 (Elementary) 6 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 45 



The In st tuition 



Spanish 100. 101 (Intermediate) 6 
Spanish 110, 111 (Conversation and Composition) 6 
Speech 55 (Fundamentals of Speech) 3 
Speech 56 (Voice and Diction) 3 
Speech 60 (Parliamentary Procedure) 1 
Speech 70 (Oral Interpretation) 3 
Speech 110 (Debating) 3 
Speech 111 (Debating) 3 
Vocational-Technical : 
See Two- Year Technical Courses 
NOTE: 

1. Maximum academic load per semester 18-19 semester hours; minimum 
load for full-time students, 12 semester hours. Student taking less than 
12 semester hours are classed as Part-time Students. 

2. Students are advised to study carefully the course of study of the Senior 
College which they expect to enter from here. 

3. Physical Education is required of all students except veterans. A veteran 
is defined as a person having served extended active duty for a continu- 
ous period of six months or more, including the completion of basic train- 
ing. Unless, however, a student has completed more than one year of 

military training, he is not allowed credit in physical education for his 
training. This procedure is in line with the recommendation of the Com- 
mission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council 
on Education. 



SUGGESTED 
PROGRAMS 
OF STUDY 



The outlines which follow have 
been worked out for the special in- 
terest of those students who are 
scheduling work with the expecta- 
tion of meeting requirements for 
graduation at Hinds Junior College 
and (upon completion of junior col- 
lege work) are expecting to enter 
a senior college or to enter a spec- 
ialized field of work. 



Lower Division Four- Year 
College Curricula 

The lower division four-year college curricula are designed for students 
who desire later to transfer with junior standing to one of the four-year 
colleges in Mississippi. It should be clearly understood by the student that 
different institutions have their own requirements, and students should con- 
sult the latest catalog of the college in which they are interested. 

p age 46 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 .... ^___ 6 

Biology 60 __.< . 3 

History 100, 101 6 

Math 50, 51 „.„ 6 

Physical Education 2 

Agriculture 9 

Hygiene 50 3 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 : .'_■ 6 

Speech 55 3 

Chemistry 90, 91 ..... 8 

Biology 70 3 

Physical Education 2 

Agriculture '___. 15 

Economics 100 3 



35 



40 



GENERAL AGRICULTURE 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 . 6 

Physical Education 2 

Biology 60 3 

History 100 or 101 3 

Chemistry 90, 91 or 100, 101 8 

Math 50, 51 6 

Agriculture -~ _ 6 

Elective ,. 3 



Sophomore 

Physical Education 2 

Speech 55 , 3 

P. Science 50 . 3 

Biology 70 3 

Agriculture 19 

Economics 100 3 

Elective 3 



37 36 

(Recommended electives: 
Business 90, Law 100 or 101.) 



ART 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

History 6 

Physical Education 2 

Language or 

Laboratory Science *6 

Art 50, 51 6 

Art 12, 13 ....... 6 

Electives , 3 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 

Psychology 105 

Speech 55 

Hygiene 50 

Art 70, 71 



Art 20 or 21 3 

Physical Education 2 

Electives 6 



32 



♦French is strongly recom- 
mended. 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 47 






The Instruction 



GENERAL BUSINESS 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

Physical Education 2 

History 70, 71 or 

100, 101 6 

Political Science 50 3 

Mathematics 50, 75 _. 6 

Typewriting (if needed) .... 3 
Electives 6 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 6 

Physical Education 2 

Economics 100, 101 6 

Business 100, 101 6 

Business 90, 91 . 8 

Psychology 105 or 

Sociology 60 - T 3 

Speech ' 55 _._ __ 3 



32 



34 



(Recommended electives: Psychology 107 (six semester hours of Psy- 
chology required for University of Mississippi), Political Science 60 (required 
for University of Mississippi), Science (at least six semester hours required 
except for University of Mississippi). NOTE: Students expecting to transfer 
to the University of Southern Mississippi should leave Business 100, 101 
until after they transfer and take one semester of Fine Arts. 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

Physical Education „ 2 

Chemistry 100, 101 8 

Biology 60, 70, 71 9 

Math 50, 51 6 

Electives 3 



PRE-DENTAL 

Sophomore 

English 100, 101 6 

Physical Education 2 

Chemistry 107, 108 10 

Physics 50, 51 8 

Electives 9 



34 



35 



(Recommended electives: 
Language, English, Govern- 
ment, Economics, Psychol- 
ogy, Sociology, Mechanical 
Drawing.) 



Page 48 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



ELEMENTARY TEACHING 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

Physical Education 2 

History 6 

Science _L_ *6 

Psychology 105 3 

Speech 55 3 

Electives _ 6 



32 
(Recommended electives: 
Music, Home Economics, 
Math, Art, Bible.) 
* Six semesters hours of 
science should be in the bio- 
logical sciences and six 
should be in the physical 
sciences. 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 6 

Physical Education 2 

Science *6 

Psychology 110 3 

Hygiene 50 3 

Social Science chosen 
from the fields of Eco- 
nomics, Sociology, His- 
tory, Geography, Politi- 
cal Science _ 6 

Mathematics 45 ~~ -3 

Electives „_ __£- _3 



32 



ENGINEERING 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

Physical Education 2 

Math 57 *3 

Math 51 *3 

Math 91 _. _. .5 

Chem. 100, 101 _ 8 

Engr. Graph 75, 76 6 

Social Studies or 
Electives .: 6 



Sophomore 

English 100 or 101 3 

Physics 50, 51 8 

Physical Education 2 

Social Studies or 

Electives ._ - 12 

Math 111, 112, 113 11 



36 



39 

If a student plans to transfer to Mississippi State University, nine se- 
mester hours of social studies are required — 3 in U.S. Government, 3 in 
U.S. History; and 3 in Western Civilization. The six hours of electives must 
come from additional history, additional English literature, principles of 
economics, psychology, or sociology. Students who plan to transfer to the 
University of Mississippi must take sequential courses in humanities and in 
the social sciences as nontechnical electives. A second six semester hours 
of advanced work in either field is also required as a part of degree require- 
ments at the University of Mississippi. These may be taken at the junior 
or senior college. Students majoring in Chemical Engineering should substi- 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 49 






The Instruction 



tute the second year of chemistry for some of the social studies or electives 
in the pre-engineering curriculum. 

* Schools of Engineering begin the freshman engineering student with ana- 
lytical geometry and calculus, presuming that high school algebra and trig- 
onometry have given him the necessary background for these courses. Math 
51 and 57 are designed for the student who does not show sufficient proficiency 
in algebra and trigonometry to do the more advanced courses (Math Si—Ana- 
lytical Geometry and Calculus). Credit earned in Math 51 and 57 (Algebra 
and Trigonometry) cannot be applied toward a degree in Schools of Engineer- 
ing; students who show sufficient proficiency will be excused from taking 
them. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Freshman Sophomore 

English 50, 51 6 English 100, 101 6 

Physical Education 2 Physical Education 2 

Speech 55 3 Psychology 105 3 

Hygiene 50 3 Biology or Chemistry _. 6 or 8 

History 70, 71 6 Government and/or 

Home Economics 50, 51 6 Economics 6 

Chemistry 90, 91 or 100, 101 8 Home Ec. 100, 101 6 

Electives 3 



34 



32 or 34 



(Recommended electives: 
Math 50, Art 50 or 12, 
Sociology 60). 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 ... 6 

Journalism 80, 81 6 

Physical Education 2 

History 70, 71 6 

Math or Science 6 

Typing 3 

Electives 3 

32 



JOURNALISM 

Sophomore 

English 100, 101 6 

Journalism 85, 86 6 

History 100, 101 „„_ 6 

Physical Education 2 

Economics 100 _ .-3 

Political Science 50 3 

Electives 6 or 9 



32 or 35 



(Hecommended electives: 
Language, Psychology, Short- 
hand, Typing, English, Soci- 
ology, Humanities, Bible.) 



Page 50 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



PRELAW 

Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

Physical Education 2 

History 70, 71 6 

Political Science 50, 60 6 

Speech 55 3 

Sociology 60 or 

Psychology 105 3 

Math or Science 6 



32 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 

Physical Education 

History 100, 101 

Economics 100 

Accounting 90, 91 __ 
Electives 



6 

2 

6 

3 

8 

.9 or 12 



(Foreign 
mended.) 



34 or 37 
Language recom- 



MED1CAL TECHNOLOGY 

Freshman Sophomore 

English 50, 51 6 English 100, 101 . 6 

Physical Education 2 Physical Education 2 

Chemistry 100, 101 8 Chemistry 107, 108 or 

Biology 70, 71 6 105, 106 8 or 10 

Social Science 6 Physics 50, 51 8 

Math 50, 51 6 Psychology 6 

Biology 60 3 



34 



PRE-MEDICINE 



33 or 35 



Freshman 
English 50, 51 

Physical Education _ 

Chemistry 100, 101 

Math 50, 51 

Biology 60, 70, 71 

Electives 



34 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 _ 
Physical Education 
Chemistry 107, 108 _ 

Physics 50, 51 

Electives ■— 



—.6 
.„2 
_10 
_8 
__9 



35 
(Recommended electives: 
Language, Mathematics, Ec- 
onomics, Psychology, Sociol- 
ogy, Speech, Government.) 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 51 



The Instruction 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 _ 6 

Physical Education 2 

Music 50, 51 8 

Applied Music 4-6 

Choir or Band 2 

History 70, 71 6 

Music 40, 90 6 



MUSIC 

Sophomore 

English 100, 101 „.„6 

Physical Education „„ — 2 

Music 100, 101 8 

Applied Music -4 - 6 

Music 91, 92 _ 6 

Choir or Band 2 

Electives .. 6 



34-36 34 - 36 

For voice, organ, and band majors, piano is required for two years. For 
piano and organ majors, accompanying and participation in band or choir is 
required for two years. For voice majors, choir is required for two years. 
For band majors, band is required for two years. 

PRE-NURSING 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

Physical Education 2 

Chemistry 100, 101 .8 

Biology 70, 71 „ 6 

Hygiene 50 _ 3 

Sociology 60 3 

Math 50, 51 6 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 6 

Physical Education _ __„..2 

Chemistry 107, 108 or 

105, 106 8 or 10 

Physics 50, 51 _ _8 

Psychology 6 

Biology 60 3 

Electives „ .3 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 

Physical Education 
Chemistry 100, 101 
Biology 70, 71 ... 
Math 50, 51 
Business 90, 91 



34 36 or 38 

(Recommended electives: 
Home Economics, History, 
Mathematics, Speech, Eco- 
nomics, Government.) 

PRE-PHARMACY 

Sophomore 

6 English 100, 101 6 

2 Physical Education 2 

8 Chemistry 107, 108 _____ 10 

6 Physics 50, 51 8 

6 Economics 100, 101 6 

8 Biology 60, 61 6 



36 38 

(Recommended electives: 
Biology, Lanugage, Mechan- 
ical Drawing, Government, 
Sociology, History, Speech.) 



Page 52 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 ..... 6 

Physical Education 2 

Hygiene 50 3 

Science 6 

History 70, 71 6 

Electives 9 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 6 

Physical Education 2 

Psychology 105, 107 6 

Science '. 6 

Speech 55 3 

Social Science 

(two fields) 6 

Electives 3 



32 32 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Freshman Sophomore 

English 50, 51 . .._. 6 English 100, 101 6 

Physical Education 2 Physical Education 2 

*Math 51, 57, 91 11 Language or Social Studies..6 

Language or Social Studies .6 Chemistry 105, 106 or 

Chemistry 100, 101 8 107, 108 8 or 10 

Physics 50, 51 8 

Math 111, 112 8 



33 



38 or 40 



*Math 51, 57 regarded as deficiency courses in some colleges. 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

(Two- Year Terminal) 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

Physical Education ....... 2 

History „ _... . 6 

Shorthand 6 

Typewriting 3 

Mathematics or Science 6 

Electives , 6 

35 
(Recommended Electives: 
Psychology, Sociology, 
Speech, Business Communi- 
cations, Office Practice, Ma- 
chine Calculation, IBM Data 
Processing, Business 110.) 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 6 

Physical Education 2 

Shorthand _....... 3 

Typewriting 3 

Secretarial Procedure 3 

Office Appliances 3 

Filing „_ 3 . 

Economics 100 _.....__3 

Electives .... ......... 6 



32 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 53 



the Instruction 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 7 6 

Physical Education 2 

History 6 

Shorthand , 6 

Typewriting 3 

Electives . 9 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

(Two-Year Transfer) 

Sophomore 

English 100, 101 6 

Physical Education 2 

Economics 6 

Accounting 8 

Shorthand 3 

Science 6 

Electives 3 



32 34 

(Recommended electives: 
Psychology, Speech, Math, 
Hygiene, IBM Data Process- 
ing, Business 110.) 

INTENSIVE SECRETARIAL SCIENCE TRAINING 
(One-Year Terminal) 



First Semester 

English 3 

Shorthand 3 

Accounting 4 

Typewriting 3 

Office Appliances 3 

Physical Education . 1 



Second Semester 

English 3 

Shorthand 3 

Machine Calculation 3 

Typewriting 3 

Secretarial Procedure 3 

Filing . 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 

SPECIAL COURT-REPORTING COURSE 
(Two-Year Terminal) 



19 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 



Physical Education 

History 



2 
_.6 

Machine Shorthand 6 

Typewriting 3 

Mathematics or Science 6 

Electives 3 

32 
(Recommended electives: 
Psychology, Sociology, 
Speech, Accounting, Business 
110.) 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 _„_ 6 

Physical Education ._2 

Machine Shorthand 6 

Typewriting 3 

Filing 3 

Political Science or 

Economics 3 

Business Law _6 

Electives 3 

32 



Page 54 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



DATA PROCESSING 

(Two- Year Terminal) 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 . 

Business 200 

Business 202 . 

Business 90, 91 .... 

Math 50 _*_._.__ ..___. 

Math 75 

Business 201 ... 

Business 203 ._ 

Physical Education 



35 



Sophomore 

Business 211 

Economics 100 

Business 213 

Business 214 

Business 215 

English .. .... 

Business 220 

Business 230 

Business 217 



Physical Education 



GENERAL COURSE 
Freshman 

English 6 

Physical Education 2 

History 6 

Math and/or Science 6 

Electives 12 



Sophomore 

English 

Physical Education 
Electives 



.5 
..3 
_.3 
...3 
_3 
_3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
_2 

31 



„6 
_2 

24 



32 



32 



Course Of Study Leading 
To Bachelor's Degree 

The following program is recommended for the student who wishes to 
continue work leading to a Bachelor's Degree in a four-year college. Elec- 
tives will be selected according to the particular needs of the student and 
the requirements of the college to which he expects to transfer. The pro- 
gram is also recommended for the student who has not yet decided on his 
field of future work. 

Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

History 6 

Science and/or Math 6 



Physical Education . 2 

Approved Electives 12 



Sophomore 

English 6 

Social Science 6 

Hygiene 3 

Psychology 105 3 

Physical Education 2 

Approved Electives 12 



32 32 

Approved Electives: Social Science, Language, Physical Education. English, 

Speech, Math, Science, Music, Art, Dramatics. Business, 
Secretarial Science, Psychology, Drawing, Agriculture. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 55 



The Instruction 



Industrial 
Education 

The course of study in Industrial Education is for the purpose of pre- 
paring students to be teachers or coordinators in the field of Industrial Arts, 
Trade and Industrial Education, or Diversified Occupations. The first two 
years of training in any of the above mentioned professions are the same. 
Those who do not elect to teach will find themselves well prepared for in- 
dustrial employment which should lead to supervisory and administrative 
positions in the training and production areas of industry. 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 ......... 6 

Physical Education 2 

Drawing 55, 56 . ...4 

Hygiene 50 _ 3 

Physical Science 70 3 

Math 3 

History 70, 71 6 

Political Science 50 3 

Electives 3 



Sophomore 

English 100, 101 _ :._6 

Machine Shop 75 .' 2 

Industrial Arts 50, 51 _..„.„_6 

Biology 60, 61 „. „ 6 

Speech 55 _ 3 

Psychology 105 ......3 

Electives . 6 



33 32 

Recommended Electives: Drawing, Accounting, Law, Sociology, Typing and 

Electricity or Shop. 
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 
This curriculum is proposed for students who are interested in being pre- 
pared to accept industrial employment which will lead to supervisory, 
administrative and other types of leadership positions in the production areas 
of manufacturing, Successful completion of this four-year curriculum should 
result in the student's having an excellent background in mathematics, science, 
and human relations, together with a degree of skill in the use of machines 
and tools and a knowledge of industrial process and materials. Such indi- 
viduals should rapidly become capable of coping with the technical aspects 
of supervision and administration, and of dealing successfully with personnel.. 



Freshman 

English 50, 51 6 

Physical Education 2 

Drawing 55, 56 .4 

History 70, 71 6 

Math ...6 

Industrial Arts 50, 51 .6 

Political Science 50 .3 



Sophomore 

Biology 60 , 3 

Psychology 105 r . 3 

Machine Shop ..,,._.. 2 

Drawing 100 3 

Economics 100 3 

Speech 55 ._ .3 

Math 91 ■__ 5 

Science 70, 71 „.6 

Electives 3 



33 31 

(Recommended Electives: Drawing, Law, Math, Shop, Accounting.) 



Page 56 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



General Education Requirements 
For Teacher's Certificates 

English 12 sem. hours 
Fine Arts 3 sem. hours 
(Any course (s) in art or music) 

Personal Hygiene 3 sem. hours 
Science 12 sem. hours 
(6 in Biological; 6 in Physical) 
t Mathematics 3 sem. hours 

History 6 sem. hours 
(American or Western Civilization) 

Additional Social Studies 6 sem. hours 
(One or more of these: geography, 
political science, sociology, econom- 
ics, or history) 

Speech 3 sem. hours 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI P ag « 57 



The Instruction 



Engi 



For every professional engineer, 
industry needs approximately five 
lf*tv»»it)o fco twent y-five engineering tech- 

llCc^l I ^ oicians. The technician is the man 

TPchniCcll holding the key spot between the 

engineer and the craftsman in in- 
PrOffrBUl iustry. He uses drawing instru- 

ments, gauges, applied sciences, 
mathematics, common sense and 
good judgment to turn the en- 
gineer's ideas into products. 
Mississippi is rapidly becoming industrialized. Technicians are needed 
desperately to help build, operate, maintain, service, and sell today's com- 
plicated products — air-conditioners, electronic calculators, supersonic aircraft, 
electric wrist watches, atomic engines, etc. 

Under the technical programs offered at Hinds Junior College, a student 
can, through the outlines that follow, earn a junior college diploma. He can, 
at the same time, meet reauirements for a technical certificate. In order to 
care for individual differences in backgrounds of students, substitutions may 
be recommended for Tech. Rel. Studies 40, Tech. Mach. Shop 40, Tech. Rel. 
Studies 50, and Tech. Bel. Studies 30. The programs are intended to strike a 
balance between training in a chosen technical field and providing suffcient 
academic work to equip gradutes to deal effectively with their professional 
duties, people, and ideas. 

FIELD OF TRAINING 
The technical areas offered at Hinds are: Agricultural Management, Air- 
craft Maintenance, Drafting and Design, Electric Data Processing, Electrical, 
Electronics, Mechanical, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning, and Secretarial 
Training. 

Extensive planning has been given to the arrangement and emphasis on 
subject matter and its application in the technical fields. The suggested 
sequence of the courses in these curricular is recommended so that the stu- 
dents will be able to cope with the concepts presented as they progress 
through their programs. As new concepts or areas of knowledge are formally 
presented, they are given practical application of increasing depth. 

Programs have been designed by college officials, industrial groups, and 
advisory committees. This same group forms a continuous evaluation team 
to see that the technical area offers to the student the needed education and 
experiences for successful adjustment in the industrial fields of our area. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
Applicants must have a high school diploma or its equivalent to enter the 
technical program. 

COST FOR TECHNICAL TRAINING 

Technician trainees pay only the regular college entrance fee. Total fees 
for students from the tax-supported area amount to $80 for the entire nine 
months. Room and board in the dormitories, if desired, cost only $35 per 

Page 58 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



school month. Students can commute daily by college-owned buses at no cost. 

ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY OR 

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY 

This curriculum is designed to provide the background necessary for 
people employed in electricity and electronics, to improve their knowledge 
and skill as they prepare for better positions, and to give the student who 
has no previous experience in the field the foundation, knowledge, and skill 
to secure employment as a technician. The major courses cover the principles 
of electricity and electronics and the use of related equipment in such a way 
that they may be applied to any appropriate industry or electrical process. 
Technicians trained in electrical and electronic technologies are employed 
in many industries considered necessary for national defense, such as: air- 
craft, ship-building, missile research and production, automated machinery 
and equipment, power plants, and ordnance. Many of these are found in 
laboratories engaged in developmental, experimental, analytical, or testing 
work on equipment whose functional principles are primarily dependent upon 
phenomena associated with magnetism, electricity, and electrons. 

Freshman 
First Semester Second Semester 

English 40 or 50 3 English 41 or 51 3 

Math 40 or 50 3 Math 50 or 51 3 

Tech Rel Studies 40 3 Tech Drawing 56 2 

Tech Drawing 55 2 *Special Field 6 

♦Special Field 6 P E 51 1 

P E 50 _.„ 1 — 

— 15 

18 

Sophomore 
First Semester Second Semester 
Physics 60 3 English 92 3 



Tech Mach Shop 40 or Social Studies 3 

Tech Rel Studies 50 3 Tech Rel Studies 30 3 

Tech Rel Studies 20 3 *Special Field 6 

♦Special Field __ -6 P E 101 1 

P E 100 1 Physics 61 3 

16 19 

*A student's special field may be chosen from Electronics, Electricity, or 
Riadio & Television—with appropriate catalog courses for each semester. 
Where Electronics is the special field chosen, higher mathematics may be 
used to meet requirements for graduation instead of the specified general 
education work with the exception of English. 

MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 
This curriculum is designed to train mechanical technicians. This curricu- 
lum offers training in basic courses such as mathematics, English, physics, 
and shop laboratory training. Classroom theory is correlated with laboratory 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 59 



The Instruction. 



work in which the student becomes familiar with the basic tools and ma- 
chines used in the mechanical field. 

Training in this field offers job opportunities in nearly every line of 
business throughout the world. In a broad sense mechanical technology is the 
creation, utilization, and up-keep of mechanical power. Some specific job 
opportunities are: industrial inspection, maintenance engineer's assistant, 
foreman and assistant foreman in various fields, metal fabrication, and sales 
of mechanical devices. 



Freshman 

First Semester 

English 40 or 50 3 

Math 40 or 50 3 

Tech Rel Studies 40 3 

Tech Drawing 55 2 

Tech Mach Shop 61 6 

P E 50 ..1 

18 
Sophomore 

Physics 60 3 

Tech Mach Shop 65 _3 

Tech Rel Studies 20 ._.., 3 

Tech Mach Shop 63 .6 

P E 100 1 

Tech Mach Shop 66 3 



Second Semester 

English 41 or 51 3 

Math 50 or 51 _. 3 

Tech Rel Studies 30 3 

Tech Drawing 56 2 

Tech Mach Shop 62 ._ 6 

P E 51 1 

18 

English 92 _. 3 

Social Studies 3 

Tech Mach Shop 67 3 

Tech Mach Shop 64 .......6 

P E 101 1 

Physics 61 3 



19 



19 



REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING 
TECHNOLOGY 

The Technical Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Curriculum is designed 
to meet the needs of students who expect to be employed in the refrigeration 
industry and those students who are seeking advancement in the refrigeration 
and air conditioning field. Instruction covers five branches of the refrigeration 
industry: domestic equipment, commercial equipment, industrial equipment, 
unit air conditioners, and special problems in heating. The course is set up so 
that each student will have experience in the technical field to qualify him 
for jobs in several categories of the refrigeration industry. Some of the jobs 
are as follows: Air Conditioning Technician. Assistant Refrigeration Engineer, 
Cooling System Operator, Dealer, Heating and Ventilation Technician, Re- 
frigeration Installer, Refrigeration Tester. Sales Representative, System De- 
signer and Compressor Engine Technician. 



Pago 60 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



Freshman 

First Semester 

English 40 or 50 3 

Math 40 or 50 3 

Tech Rel Studies 40 3 

Tech Drawing 55 2 

Tech Ref & A/C 51 6 

P E 50 1 

18 

Sophomore 

First Semester 

Physics 60 ... ... 3 

Tech Mach Shop 40 3 

Tech Rel Studies 20 3 

Tech Ref & A/C 53 6 

P E 100 1 



Second Semester 

English 41 or 51 3 

Math 50 or 51 3 

Tech Drawing 56 2 

Tech Rief & A/C 52 6 

P E 51 .1 



15 



Second Semester 

English 92 3 

Social Studies 3 

Tech Rel Studies 30 3 

Tech Ref & A/C 54 6 

P E 101 1 

Physics 61 3 



16 



19 



Aircraft 

Maintenance 

Technology 



The Aircraft Maintenance Tech- 
nology Course is divided into two 
main parts: Powerplant Mainten- 
ance and Airframe Maintenance. 
The Powerplant Maintenance course 
covers theoretical, technical and 
practical training in the operation, 
maintenance and repair of internal 
combustion aircraft engines and the 
theory of gas turbine engines; fuel 

and lubrication systems; carburetion; ignition and electrical systems; pro- 
pellers and engine accessories. In addition, students receive the necessary 
training on theory of flight; welding; technical drawing; use of hand tools: 
machine shop practices; aircraft weight and balance; Magnaflux and Dy-chek 
inspection of aircraft parts; and the alteration of aircraft engines, propellers 
and accessories. 

The Airframe Maintenance training includes the technical theory and 
practices pertaining to aircraft structures made of steel tubing, aluminum 
and wood; their repair, maintenance and alteration; dope and fabric work; 
hydraulic systems; electrical systems; theory of flight; instruments and 
radio equipment; assembly and rigging; fuel systems; line maintenance; 
inspection of certified aircraft; welding and heat treating and pertinent 
Civil Air Regulations. 

The courses include ethics, labor relations, technical language, aviation 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 61 



The Instruction 



mathematics, cost estimates and 
professional training of an aircr 
available include: 

Maintenance Technician 

Airframe and Powerplant 

Airplane Crew Chief 

Aviation Lead Mechanics 

Aviation Maintenance 

Inspector 

Airframe and Powerplant 

Instructor 

First Semester 

English 40 or 50 .... 3 

Math 40 or 50 ....... 3 

Tech Rel Studies 40 ....... 3 

Tech Drawing 55 2 

Tech A & E Mech 131 6 

P E 50 ...... 1 



18 



First Semester 

Physics 60 3 

Tech Mach Shop 40 ..... 3 

Tech Rel Studies 20 ...... ...... 3 

Tech A & E Mech 133 6 

P E 100 1 



shop practices in order to round up the 
aft maintenance technician. Types of jobs 

Line Service Technician 

Shop Foreman 

Weight and Balance 

Inspector 

Aviation Maintenance 

Supervisor 



Freshman 

Second Semester 

English 41 or 51 3 

Math 50 or 51 3 

Tech Drawing 56 . 2 

Tech A & E Mech 132 ..... 6 
P E 51 1 



15 



Sophomore 

Second Semester 

English 92 3 

Social Studies ... , 3 

Tech Rel Studies 30 3 

Tech A & E Mech 134 6 

P E 101 ....... -1 

Physics 61 3 



16 



19 



Agricultural 
Management 



This program is provided for young men who, after finishing high school, 
wish to train as managers in various fields of agriculture. The fields for 
which training is provided are managers of meat processing plants, live- 
stock, poultry, dairy, and general farming. 

The curriculum for agricultural management is planned to give the stu- 



P«9* 42 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Instruction 



dent academic training in addition to his specialized agriculture courses. 
The program is also planned to allow the student to spend four hours daily 
in actual practice in his chosen field. To complete all laboratory projects 
necessitates spending a summer in campus laboratories or other fields rec- 
ommended by the instructor. This will be without formal classroom assign- 
ment. The student will, however, receive remuneration that can be applied 
toward college expenses. The amount earned will depend upon the individual 
student. (THIS PROGRAM DOES NOT LEAD TO A JUNIOR COLLEGE 
DIPLOMA.) 

Freshman Sophomore 

English -3 Economics 100 _ 3 

Math 40 or 50 3 Tech Mach Shop 40 _ _ 3 

Science 3 Agriculture 80, 101, 90 _ 9 

Agriculture 52, 70, 65 9 Electives 8 

Agriculture 40, 41 12 Agriculture 110, 111 12 

30 30 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 63 



The Instruction. 



Drafting 
Technology 



The Drafting Technology Curriculum is designed to meet the needs of 
students who wish to gain a broad experience in the drafting field. Courses 
are offered in mechanical, architectural, structural, and topographic drafting. 
The curriculum also provides an opportunity for the student to learn the 
basic operating principles of construction in electrical and mechanical 
technologies. 

Technicians trained in drafting technology are employed in ordnance 
production and maintenance operations, steel and nonferrous metals produc- 
tion, aircraft and missile production, electrical and electronics appliances 
and devices, including computers, and testing equipment, heating and air 
conditioning equipment, reproduction equipment, industrial machinery, gen- 
eral drafting, structural and architectural fields. 



First Semester 

English 40 or 50 3 

Math 40 or 50 3 

Tech Rel Studies 40 3 

Tech Drawing 55 2 

Technical (Special Field)— 6 
P E 50 1 



Freshman 

Second Semester 

English 41 or 51 __ _... 3 

Math 51 _.-, 3 

Tech Drawing 56 2 

Tech Rel Studies 50 3 

Technical (Special Field) 6 
P E 51 1 



18 

Sophomore 

First Semester 

Physics 60 or Chemistry _. 3 

Tech Drawing 175 3 

Tech Rel Studies 20 3 

Tech Drawing 100 3 

Electives 3 

P IT 100 1 



16 



18 



Second Semester 

English 92 __ 

Social Studies _ 

Tech Rel Studies 30 

Tech Drawing 176 

Physics 61 or Chemistry 
P E 101 - 



3 

-3 

3 

_.. 3 
__3 
__1 

ie 



Page 64 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 




T 

h 

e 

C 

o 
u 
r 

s 
e 

s 



„ The Courses 

W. M. McKENZIE, B.S., M.A. Jif*DlS*lll T1IDET 

JACK C. TRELOAR, B.S., M.E. MUlIIVUt'l UlllL 

CHARLES E. BANES, B.S. 

Agriculture 51— Agronomy — Soils. This course deals with the formation 
of soils, analysis of soils, correction of soil problems; and the study of fer- 
tilizers. Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Second 
semester. Credit, four semester hours. 

Agriculture 52— Plant Science. Introductory course in plant life found 
on the farm. Special emphasis on structure of plants, how they grow, plant 
improvement, types of propagation, planting, cultivating, fertilizing, and har- 
vesting. Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

Agriculture 65 — Farm Machinery. This course is intended to teach the 
students the proper care, principles of operation, adjustments, and repair 
of the different types of farm machinery; the proper selection of farm ma- 
chinery to meet the definite needs of the individuals; and the selection and 
use of machines for the various soil types. Two hours recitation and two 
hours laboratory per week. First semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

Agriculture 70— Elements of Animal Husbandry. A study of the origin, 
history, characteristics, and the market classes and grades of the major 
breeds of farm animals. A study of the relation of livestock to general 
farming is made. Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. 
First semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

Agriculture 80— Poultry Production. Fundamental Principles of Poultry 
Production and their practical application to general farm conditions, includ- 
ing breeding, feeding, housing, disease, and culling. Two hours recitation 
and two hours laboratory per week. Second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

Agriculture 90— Feeds and Feeding. A study of the digestion and as- 
similation of the nutrients fed to the various kinds of farm livestock, how 
to balance a ration, and recommendations for preparing and feeding live- 
stock the year round. Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory per 
week. Second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

Agriculture 101— Elements of Dairying. This course is an introductory 
rather than an intensive study of the dairy industry. It treats dairying 
from three phases— Dairy cattle, dairy products, and dairy farming. Two 
hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Agriculture 102 —Meats Processing. A survey of the meat industry— kill- 
ing, cutting, curing, cooling, care and storage of meat products. Detailed 
study of meat, animal carcasses, and wholesale and retail meat products. 
One hour recitation and four hours laboratory per week. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 65 



The Courses . 

Agriculture 104 — Meat Animal Evaluation. Estimation of the value of 
live animals subsequently related to actual cut out values of the carcasses. 
Four hours laboratory per week. Credit, two semester hours. 

Agriculture 40 — Vocational-Technical Farm Management Lab. The lab- 
oratory will be planned by instructors according to the field of management 
the student chooses. This work will cover livestock management such as 
feeding, breeding, housing, and fitting livestock. Milking and care of milk- 
ers, cleaning utensils, and pasteurization of milk; meat plant management 
such as butchering, chilling, cutting, wrapping, and freezing meat products; 
poultry management jobs such as feeding and growing the baby chicks, 
feeding and care of the laying flock, sanitation, and health of the flock. This 
course is limited to students pursuing the technical farm management pro- 
gram. 15 hours of laboratory per week. Credit, 6 semester hours of terminal 
credit. 

Agriculture 41 — Vocational-Technical Farm Management Lab. The lab- 
oratory will be planned by instructors according to the field of management 
the student chooses. This work will include farm management, production of 
crops and feeds, building maintenance, and feed preparation. 15 hours of 
laboratory per week. Credit, 6 semester hours of terminal credit. 

Agriculture 110— Vocational-Technical Farm Management Lab. The lab- 
oratory will be worked out by instructors according to the field of management 
the student chooses. This work will include swine management, farm ma- 
chinery operation and maintenance. 15 hours of laboratory per week. Credit, 
6 semester hours of terminal credit. 

Agriculture 111 — Vocational-Technical Farm Management Lab. The lab- 
oratory will be worked out by instructors according to the field of management 
the student chooses. This will include labor management, buying, farm rec- 
ords and accounts, estimating cost, and milk testing. 15 hours of laboratory 
per week. Credit, 6 semester hours of terminal credit. 

ADT KATHERINE A. DENTON, B.A., M.A. 

"" ■ LOUIS R. WALSH, B.S., M.E. 

Art 12— Elementary Design. Emphasis on principles and materials in 
visual design. Introduction to theory and terms. Use of color theory and 
elementary lettering. Six hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. Required of art majors. 

Art 13— Intermediate Design (Prerequisite: Art 12 or special permission 
of the instructor). Continuation of use of basic principles in design, color, and 
texture. Use of watercolor, tempera, and fluid media. Further study in cre- 
ative approach to design. Six hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. Required of art majors. 

Art 20— Art History. Survey course of historical background of art forms 
from Prehistoric to Renaissance. Emphasis placed on painting, architecture, 

Page 66 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 

and sculpture as related to history. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, 
three semester hours. Open to all students. 

Art 21— Art History. Renaissance to Twentieth Century. Special emphasis 
on modern expressions in fields of art. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. Open to all students. 

Art 30— Lettering and Advertising Layout. Emphasis on construction and 
precision in basic alphabets. Use of various media used in advertising lay- 
out. Two hours recitation per week. Credit, two semester hours. Repeated 
second semester. 

Art 50— Beginning Drawing. Study of basic principles of construction of 
visual forms. Emphasis on line, perspective, and shading. Use of black and 
white— media, pencil, charcoal. Required of art majors. Six hours laboratory 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Art 51 — Intermediate Drawing. (Prerequisite: Art 50). Introduction to color 
dynamics and precision drawing as used in creative expression. Emphasis on 
composition. Required of art majors. Six hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

Art 70 — Composition and Painting. (Prerequisite: Art 50, 51 or consent of 
instructor.) Introduction to painting principles and techniques. Representation 
and non-objective design. Six hours laboratory per week. Credit, three 
semester hours. Required of art majors. 

Art 71 — Composition and Painting. (Prerequisite: Art 70 or consent of 
instructor). Emphasis on use of water color and oil in creative drawing. 
Continuation of basic principles of composition. Six hours laboratory per 
week. Credit, three semester hours. Required of art majors. 

Art 80— Art Appreciation. Introduction to art forms from various art 
fields. Emphasis on origin and functional design. Broad survey of architec- 
ture, and sculpture, painting and minor arts. Stress on contributions of other 
civilizations. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 
Open to all students. Designed to aid students in requirements in teacher 
certification. 

Art 90— Ceramics. The study of the basic principles and methods in pot- 
tery making form the content of this course. Students will be expected to 
complete projects using the slab, coil, hump, mold, and potters wheel meth- 
ods. Six hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Art 95— Handi Crafts. Crafts such as leather tooling, basket weaving, 
aluminum etching, seasonal crafts, flower arranging, and others will be 
studied in this course. Students who plan to study elementary education or 
work as a camp counselor will find this course very helpful. Six hours labora- 
tory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Art 300— Beginning Drawing. Study of basic principles of drawing with 
emphasis on line and perspective. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, 
three semester hours. OPEN TO EVENING STUDENTS ONLY. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI p age 6 7 



The Courses — 

Art 301 — Drawing and Painting. Emphasis on construction of visual forms. 
Study of composition and painting. No prerequisite required. OPEN TO 
EVENING STUDENTS ONLY. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

Art 302— Ceramics. The study of the basic principles and methods of 
pottery making form the contents of this course. Emphasis is placed on the 
following methods of formation: slab, coil, hump-mold, and the potter's 
wheel. OPEN TO EVENING STUDENTS ONLY. Three hours recitation per 
week. Credit, three semester hours. 

T. T. BEEMON, B.S., M.A. 
DIAI m*V E - ROS8ER WALL, B.A., M.A. 

D,V *"WU I HAROLD E. ANDERSON, B.S., M.Ed. 

Biology 60 — General Botany. An introduction to the study of plant life. 
The physiology and anatomy of the seed plants are studied, including life 
processes common to all plants. Two hours recitation and two hours lab- 
oratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. First semester. 

Biology 61— General Botany. (Prerequisite: Biology 60 or consent of in- 
structor). A continuation of Biology 60. Phyla other than the seed plants are 
studied. Attention is given to inheritance and the evolution of plants. Two 
hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. Second semester. 

Biology 70 — General Zoology. An introductory course in College Zoology. 
The course includes a study of general biological principles and a survey of 
invertebrate animals. Typical examples are studied and dissected in the lab- 
oratory. Designed for general or pre-professional majors. Two hours recitation 
and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. First 
semester. 

Biology 71— General Zoology. (Prerequisite: Biology 70). A continuation 
of Biology 70. A study of the Chordates with emphasis on the vertebrates. 
Typical vertebrates are dissected in the laboratory. Two hours recitation 
and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. Second 
semester. 

Biology 80— Elementary Human Anatomy and Physiology. An introductory 
course in the general principles of anatomy and physiology and their appli- 
cation to life and health situations. Emphasis is placed on the nature of the 
human body in order to help the student to better understand himself and 
others. Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

Biology 81— Elementary Human Anatomy and Physiology. A continuation 
of Biology 80. Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Biology 90— Elementary Microbiology. A course in general basic princi- 
ples of microbiology. Special emphasis is devoted to cell structure, metabo- 
lism, nutrition, sterilization techniques, and pathogenic forms of bacteria, 
fungi, rickettsiae and viruses. Two hours recitation and two hours labora- 
tory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

P«9e 68 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 

L. KENNETH CLARK, B.S., M.A. «>■ i#*«*i^^#* 

MILDRED HERRIN, B.A., M.S. BUSINESS. 

MAYBELLE FURNESS, B.A, M.B.E. «■»■■— - -*. .. 
NEVA W. SPRABERRY, B.A., M.B.E.§|?C|f fc T AR IAL 
R. L. ROBINSON, B.S., M.S. 

LESTER FRANK MARTIN, B.S. QPIFNPF' 

MARTHA S. ROBINSON, B.S., M.B.Ed. ^VltllVt 

Business 55— Business Communications. (Prerequisite: one semester of 
typewriting.) Oral and written business communications with emphasis upon 
correspondence, reports, correctness of composition and form, psychological 
approach, arrangement and presentation of data, and system. Three hours 
recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. First semester. 

Business 90— Principles of Accounting. A semester course in the funda- 
mentals of accounting theory and practice. Accounting for single proprie- 
torship is covered. Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, four semester hours. 

Business 91 — Principles of Accounting. A second semester course in 
the fundamentals of accounting practice for partnerships and corporations. 
Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, four se- 
mester hours. 

Business 100— Principles of Business Law. (Prerequisite: Sophomore 
standing.) This course is designed to develop a greater respect for and 
understanding of law and to acquaint students with a knowledge of funda- 
mental legal principles that apply to everyday problems. The topics covered 
are contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, real and personal property. 
Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Business 101— Principles of Business Law. (Prerequisite: Sophomore 
standing.) This course is a continuation of Business 100. It includes such 
units as partnerships, corporations, bailments, insurance, wills, and the 
relationship of government to business. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Business 103— Machine Calculation. The aim of this course is to give 
students knowledge and skill in the use of various types and makes of cal- 
culating machines, adding-listing machines, and posting machines. Three 
hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Business 110— Principles of Insurance. A basic survey of the field of 
insurance. The purpose of this course is to give the student a working 
knowledge in the field of insurance in property, life, and casualty. Three 
hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Business 200— IBM Data Processing. Electro-Mechanical Machines. A 
basic course in utilizing machines to process data which is in the form of 
punched cards. These machines are the only necessity for a small business 
and are supporting equipment for large businesses with computers. Theory, 
terminology, and actual machine operation are integral parts of this course. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI p age 6 9 



The Courses ___ 

Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. No prerequisite. 
Credit, four semester hours. 

Business 201— IBM Data Processing. Data Processing Applications. (Pre- 
requisite: Business 200.) This course acquaints the student with actual business 
world applications using data processing equipment. Some of the systems or 
case studies covered are: accounts receivable r accounts payable, payroll, 
and inventory control. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. 

Business 202 — IBM Data Processing. Basic Computing Machines. A basic 
course introducing the student to the concepts, terminology, and theory of 
modern computers. While not covering any particular computer system, it 
will give the student a sufficiently broad background to move into the de- 
tailed study of an individual computer with a minimum amount of instruc- 
tion. Three hours recitation per week. No prerequisite. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. 

Business 203— IBM Data Processing. Introduction to Programming Sys- 
tems. (Prerequisite: Business 202). Each computer has its own language. To 
simplify this language, programming systems have been devised. This general 
programming course introduces some of the "Automatic Programming" 
systems and acquaints the student with some of their uses. Three hours reci- 
tation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Business 211 — IBM Data Processing. Computer Programming I. (Pre- 
requisite: Business 200, 201, 202, 203.) Basic Computing Machines provide 
the concepts and, therefore, the foundation for the detail study of data pro- 
cessing machines. The student will engage in discussion of functions and 
capabilities of a specific data processing machine and will be presented with 
a portion of the programming drills, exercises, and case studies which will 
serve to bridge the gap from the academic to the real world of data process- 
ing. Three hours recitation and four hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
five semester hours. 

Business 213— IBM Data Processing. Systems Development and Design 

I. (Prerequisite: Business 200, 201, 202, 203.) The effective use of data pro- 
cessing equipment and management sciences in meeting the information 
needs of business requires that much skill and knowledge be applied to the 
development and design of data processing systems. The course is designed 
to guide the student through the three stages in the evolution of a system, 
the analysis of present information flow, systems specifications and equip- 
ment selections, and implementation of the system. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Business 214— IBM Data Processing. Systems Development and Design 

II. (Prerequisite: Business 200, 201, 202, 203, 211, 213). A continuation of 
Business 213. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Business 215— IBM Data Processing. Advanced Computing & Program- 
ming Systems. (Prerequisite: Business 200, 201, 202, 203, 211, 213). The ob- 

Page 70 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 

jective of the course is to provide the student with sufficient knowledge of 
programming system concepts so that he may easily master any specific 
system with a minimum of instruction. Furthermore, he will be qualified 
to analyze, evaluate, and make minor modifications to such systems. Indi- 
vidual phases of certain selected systems are treated in detail in order that 
the student may learn advanced programming and logic decision techniques 
as applied in sophisticated systems. The course is so designed that the stu- 
dent may gain an insight into the various functions of advanced programming 
systems and the manner in which they perform their tasks without learning 
the actual programming language of the various systems. Three hours recita- 
tion per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Business 217— Business Statistics. (Prerequisite: Math 50, 75). A study of 
statistical series, frequency distribution, measures of central tendency; dis- 
persion and skewness, trend, seasonal and cyclical variations, linear corre- 
lation, the normal curve, index numbers, presentation of data, collection of 
data, and sampling. This course is designed primarily for terminal students. 
Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Business 220— Intermediate Accounting. (Prerequisite: Business 90, 91). 
A more thorough study of some of the accounting problems introduced in 
Business 90 and 91. It also includes a detailed study of the working papers 
of the accountant, single entry records, asset valuation, perpetual inventory 
records, sinking funds and reserves, installment sales, and statement prepara- 
tion and analysis. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

Business 230— Elementary Cost Accounting. (Prerequisite: Business 90, 91). 
A study of the basic principles of all cost accounting procedure. It will treat the 
three elements of cost production including materials, labor, and overhead. 
The study of material and labor accounting will contain recent federal legisla- 
tion and tax features. The determination of unit costs and the preparation 
of cost reports will be emphasized. The principles applied in a Job Order 
Cost Set will provide for payroll work which conforms to requirements of 
wages and hour legislation. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three 
semester hours. 

Business 301 — Data Processing — Basic Machines. An introductory course 
in Data Processing. Includes operation of keypunch, verifier, sorter, repro- 
ducer, and tab equipment. Students learn program card preparation and con- 
trol panel wiring. Practical exercises stress importance of Data Processing 
by doing all operations from source document to finished report. Six hours 
recitation per week. Credit, six semester hours. Taught only in the EVEN- 
ING SCHOOL. 

Business 302— Data Processing— Computer Programming. A course stress- 
ing business applications on the IBM 1620 Computer. The student learns how 
to tell the computer to perform operations of a business nature. Practical 
applications assure proficiercy in operation and programming. (Prerequisite: 
Business 301 or actual experience with Data Processing equipment.) Six hours 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 71 



The Courses 

recitation per week. Credit, six semester hours. Taught only in the EVEN- 
ING SCHOOL. 

Secretarial Science 50— Elementary Shorthand. Mastery of the principles 
of Gregg Shorthand. No previous instruction in shorthand required. Three 
hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Secefarial Science 51— Intermediate Shorthand. (Prerequisite: Secretarial 
Science 50 or its equivalent). Review of the principles of Gregg Shorthand 
with emphasis upon accuracy and speed. Dictation and transcription work 
on easy material. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

Secretarial Science 60— Beginning Typewriting. This course is designed 
for students with no previous instruction in tvpewriting. It includes princi- 
ples of the use and care of the typewriter, drills for speed and accuracy, 
and an introduction to letter writing and business forms. Three hours recita- 
tion per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Secretarial Science 65 — Intermediate Tvpewriting. (Prerequisite: Secre- 
tarial Science 60 or its equivalent). A continuation of beginning typewriting. 
Detailed study of letter writing, tabulation, business forms, reports, and 
legal documents. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

Secretarial Science 70— Advanced Typewriting. (Prerequisite: Secretarial 
Science 65 or its equivalent). This course is designed as a terminal course 
in typewriting with the major emphasis on developing the student's produc- 
tion rate. Practice in planning and tvpewriting advanced jobs under office 
conditions is provided. Three hours recitation per week. Credit: three semester 
hours. 

Secretarial Science 75 — Dictation and Transcription. (Prerequisite: one 
semester of shorthand and typewriting). The aims of this course is to de- 
velop transcription skil T s. Accuracy and speed of transcription are correlated 
with English, punctuation, spelling, division of words, and vocabulary build- 
ing. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. Second 
semester. 

Secretarial Science 100 — Secretarial Procedures. (Prerequisite: Secretarial 
Science 130 and one semester of shorthand and typewriting). This course is 
designed to acquaint the student with modern secretarial practices and to 
give him an understanding of office situations so that he may readily adjust 
himself in the actual business office. It includes a study of the many secre- 
tarial duties and practice in the performance of them. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Secretarial Science 102— Advanced Shorthand. A rapid review in the 
theory and practice of Gregg Shorthand and an intensive course in t.tir 
building of rapid and skilled dictation and transcription. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Secretarial Science 106 — Office Appliances. Theory and practice in the op- 
eration of duplicating machines, dictating, transcribing, and addressing ma- 
Page 72 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



, The Courses 

chines, electric typewriters, and others. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Secretarial Science 110— Stenograph Machine Shorthand. The Stenograph 
is a word writing machine. Mastery of the principles of machine shorthand 
are covered. The beginner learns to write sounds in terms of keyboard and 
theory. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. Limit- 
ed to those selected by the business staff. 

Secretarial Science Ill—Stenograph Machine Shorthand. A continuation 
of Secretarial Science 110, including a review of the principles and beginning 
speed development. Timed dictation on easy material. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Secretarial Science 120 — Stenograph Machine Shorthand. A continuation 
of Secretarial Science 111 for intermediate and advanced speed development. 
Carefully graded and timed practice material. Writing vocabulary is de- 
veloped along with speed. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three 
semester hours. 

Secretarial Science 121 — Stenograph Machine Shorthand. A continuation 
of Secretarial Science 120. Practice for court reporters. Reporting abbrevia- 
tions and phrases for the Court Room and well graded extracts from actual 
court cases. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Secretarial Science 130 — Filing. This course includes indexing and vari- 
ous systems of filing correspondence. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, 
three semester hours. 



WILLIAM W. GRIFFIN, B S., M.Ed., M.S. 
C. RICHARD ADKINS, A.R., M.A. 
SARA M. RICHARDSON, B.A., M.S. 



C. RICHARD ADKINS, A.R., M.A. CHEMISTRY 



Chemistry 90, 91— General Chemistry. Lecture, demonstrations, films, 
quizzes, and laboratory work. The second semester laboratory work (Chem. 
91) deals entirely with the qualitative analysis of thirteen common anions 
and twenty-three common cations by the semi-micro method. Three hours 
recitation and three hours laboratory per week. Designed especially for 
students who are pre-nursing, home economics., agriculture and physical edu- 
cation majors. . Chemistry 90 is pre-requisite to 91. Credit, eight semester 
hours. l ! -! w |*T"'j 

Chemistry 100, 101— General Chemistry. (Prerequisite: credit in or con- 
current enrollment in Mathematics 50 or its equivalent). Lectures, demonstra- 
tions, films, quizzes, and laboratory work. The second semester laboratory 
work (Chem. 101) deals entirely with the qualitative analysis of thirteen 
common anions and twenty-three common cations by the semi-micro method. 
Three hours recitation and three hours of laboratory ner week. Chemistry 100 
is prerequisite to 101. Credit, eight semester hours. 

Chemistry 102— Introductory Organic and Biological Chemistry. (Prerequi- 
site: Credit in Chemistry 90 or its equivalent). A brief course in the funda- 
mentals of organic and biological chemistry. This course is designed to 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 73 



The Courses >— . . , 

assist students in a study of organic compounds of biological importance and of 
some fundamental chemical processes associated with human bio-chemistry. 
Three hours recitation and three hours laboratory per week. Credit, four 
semester hours. 

Chemistry 103 — Introductory Organic Chemistry. (Prerequisite: Credit in 
Chemistry 90, 95 or its equivalent). A brief course in the fundamentals of 
organic chemistry. Designed for students of agriculture, home economics, and 
others in programs requiring only one semester of organic chemistry. Three 
hours of recitation and three hours laboratory per week. Credit, four 
semester hours. 

Chemistry 105, 106 — Analytical Chemistry. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 100, 
101). A course in the fundamental principles and procedures of inorganic analy- 
sis. Approximately nine weeks are devoted to qualitative procedures, ac- 
cording to the semi-micro method, involving both cation and anion identifica- 
tion. 

The remainder of. the time is devoted to quantitative theory and practice. 
Primary emphasis is on volumetric and gravimetric analysis, with som^ 
attention being given to instrumental methods. Two hours recitation and 
six hours laboratory per week. Chemistry 105 is pre-requisite to 106. Credit, 
eight semester hours. 

Chemistry 107, 108 — Organic Chemistry. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 100, 
101). An introductory course which includes a study of nomenclature, struc- 
ture, properties, synthesis, and general applications of the fundamental types 
of organic compounds. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory 
per week. Chemistry 107 is pre-requisite to 108. Credit, ten semester hours. 

JIM EL BYRD HARRIS, A.B., M.A. 

LAURA BELL LINDSEY, B.A, M.A. 

MARY ALICE CONLEE, B.A., M.A. 

NELL PICKETT, B.A., M.E. 

JTTANTTA CANTERBURY, B.A., M.A.. M.R.E. 

CLAUDE WILLIAMS. B.A., M.A. 

PEGGY ANN BRENT, A.B., M. Ed. 

ANN A. LASTER, B.A. 

REUBEN DYER. B.S.. M. Ed. r-Mfl ICU 

JEANNIE LIPSEY MUSE, B.A., M.A. tRULljn 

The aims of this department are to prepare students for the intelligent 
enjoyment of good literature and to enable them to express themselves effec- 
tively in oral and written English. Creative writing is encouraged through 
special writing groups for those who show special writing talent. 

In order to meet the needs of the students both the freshman composition 
program and the sophomore literature program are planned on various 
levels. Students in freshman composition are ?iven placement tests in order 
that their individual needs may be more easilv met. The course in which a 
student should enroll will depend upon his knowledge of the fundamental 

Page 74 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 



principles of English grammar and English composition and upon his read- 
ing background. 

English 40— Essentials of Composition. This course is designed for the 
student who needs extensive basic instruction in the fundamentals of grammar, 
spelling, word meaning, simple composition, and reading. Credit in this 
course may be used to meet the freshman English requirements for gradua- 
tion at Hinds Junior College. Five hours recitation per week. Credit, three 
semester hours. This course may be followed by English 41 or English 50, 
according to the student's progress and according to his performance on a 
proficiency test. 
NOTE: English 40 and English 41 are not open for credit to students with 

sufficient preparation for English 50, except upon the recommendation 

and approval of the English staff. 

English 41— Essentials of Composition. (Prerequisite: Credit in English 
40). This course is designed to follow English '40. It provides for more ex- 
tensive and intensive study of vocabulary, grammar, outlining, and theme 
writing. Five hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. Credit 
in this course may be used to meet freshman English requirements for 
graduation at Hinds Junior College. 

NOTE: English 40 and English 41 are not the standard freshman composition 
required for graduation from senior colleges and universities and 
are not offered to meet these requirements. Students taking English 
40 and English 41 and planning to continue their study in senior 
college should follow these courses with English 50 and English 51. 

English 50, 51 — Freshman Composition. (Prerequisite: English 50, accept- 
able score on qualifying test or credit in English 40, 41; English 51, credit in 
English 50). This course includes a rapid review of grammar, a study of 
effective sentence patterns, grammar as a basis for style, principles of exposi- 
tory outlining, vocabulary development, and analysis of modern essays. Short 
and long expository themes, with emphasis on the principles of logical thinking 
and effectiveness of expression, are required. 

Wide reading from recommended lists of books, acquaintance with the 
techniques of research, preparation of bibliographies and frequent con- 
ferences with instructors are also required of students in freshman com- 
position. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

English 90, 91— Introduction to Literature. (Prerequisite: six hours credit 
in English 40, 41, or in English 40 and 50. Not open as a credit course to stu- 
dents who have completed English 50, 51, except to those completing re- 
quirements in technical programs). This course is designed to introduce 
the student to the themes and patterns of development recurrent in certain 
types of literature, such as the drama, novel, essay, and narrative poetry, 
and to develop his desire to read i(. It is based upon the text and assigned 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI p age 75 



The Courses 

library readings, and it is intended to acquaint the student with some of the 
great literature of the past and the present. Oral and written reports are 
required in the course. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, six semester 
hours. 

English 92— Technical Writing. (Prerequisite: Six hours credit in Fresh- 
man Composition). A course for students pursuing a technical program. The 
course is designed to aid the student in developing proficiency in letter 
writing, report writing, technical descriptions and with other forms of writing 
related to his special field. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three 
semester hours. 

English 100, 101 — A General Survey of English Literature from Beowulf 
to the Twentieth Century. (Prerequisite: Credit in English 51). This course 
is designed to acquaint the student with the great movements affecting Eng- 
lish literary development and philosophies and to develop his appreciation 
and understanding of the great authors and their writings. Library readings, 
memorization of great passages, and the writing of both short and long papers 
are required in the course. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, six 
semester hours. 

English 60 — Bible Literature. A survey study of the Old Testament with 
emphasis upon its historical and literary value. The aim of the course is 
to acquaint the student with the origins, the religious values, and the his- 
torical content of the three divisions of the Old Testament. Three hours 
recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

English 1 10-— Bible Literature. A survey study of the New Testament 
with primary emphasis upon the Gospels and the Pauline letters. Three 
hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

FRENCH HILDA REE DAVIS, B.A., M.A. 

French 50, 51— Elementary Course. For beginning students and those with 
not more than one year of high school. Pronunciation, grammar, conversation, 
reading and composition. Three hours recitation per week and a minimum oi 
one hour per week in the language laboratory. Credit, six semester hours. 
A unit course; credit not allowed toward graduation for first semester without 
second semester credit. 

French 100, 101— Intermediate Course. (Prerequisite: French 50, 51, or two 
units of high school French). A review of French grammar, with readings 
and exercises designed to increase the student's vocabulary, contribute to 
his mastery of idiomatic constructions., and introduce him to French litera- 
ture. Three hours recitation per week and a minimum of one hour per week 
in the language laboratory. Credit, six semester hours. 

Page 76 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 



ROBBIE DUKES, B.S. 
BETTY BURNETT, B.S. 



HOME ECONOMICS 



The purpose of this department is to equip people to live democratically 
with satisfaction to themselves and profit to society as home members, work- 
ers, and citizens; and to provide training which is broad and sufficiently 
flexible to meet the needs of both majors and non-majors. 

Home Economics 40 — Elementary Nutrition. This course is planned for 
non-home economics majors, and chemistry is not a requirement. Its purpose 
is to acquaint the student with nutritional standards and to instruct them in 
the selection of foods to meet their requirements. Two hours recitation per 
week and laboratory to meet the needs of the individual student. Credit, 
two semester hours. 

Home Economics 41 — Elementary Clothing. This course is planned for non- 
home economics majors. It is also valuable for art students who are interested 
in costume designing. It offers a study of individual clothing problems, the 
selection and care of materials and ready-made garments. 

The basic techniques of the Bishop method of clothing instruction is 
taught. One hour recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, two 
semester hours. 

Home Economics 50 — Clothing. This course includes a study of the ward- 
robe — selection, construction, care and renovation of natural and synthetic 
fabrics. It teaches the use and care of the new slant-o-matic machine, the 
alteration of commercial patterns, and selection of materials. It affords 
practice in fashion presentation of the garments which are constructed in 
the laboratory. It provides demonstrations from various sources in modeling 
and accessorizing of costumes. One hour recitation and four hours laboratory 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. First semester. 

Home Economics 51— Foods. A study of the principles of cookery, 
methods of preparation, composition, and combination of food materials. 
Practical work in the preparation of foods most commonly used in the home. 
The application of this work in the planning and serving of properly balanced 
meals, the study and practice of the different forms of table service as 
applied to different types of meals and occasions. A study of costs of food 
and marketing, food production and manufacture. Required of majors in 
home economics; elective for other students. One hour recitation and four 
hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. Second semester. 

Home Economics 100— Clothing. (Prerequisite: Home Economics 50). This 
course includes the construction of more difficult garments of wool and 
synthetic fabrics; a study of fabrics and labeling from the consumer's stand- 
point; the study of line and color in relation to individual types; and presenta- 
tion of the garments which are constructed in the laboratory. It also provides 
a study and construction of children's clothing. Special assignments and 
references are used to supplement textbook assignments. One hour lecture 
and four hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. First 
semester. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 77 



The Courses 



Home Economics 101— Foods. (Prerequisite: Home Economics 51 or 
recommendation of instructor). Making of well-balanced menus, prepara- 
tion of more elaborate dishes, serving family meals, a study of the composition 
of foods; the principles of nutrition; digestion and metabolism of foods; the 
need of the body in health of all ages and under varying conditions of health; 
the measurement of the energy value of foods; food preservation. One hour 
recitation and four hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 
Second semester. 

Home Economics 90 — Marriage and Family Living. The purpose of 
this course is to give a better understanding of the factors that contribute 
to success and happiness in family relationships. It includes preparation for 
marriage, development and functions of modern homes, and social and com- 
munity influences, with emphasis on adjustment for family living. Open to 
both men and women. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. First or second semester. (Same as Sociology 70). 

INDUSTRIAL w. m. wall, b.s., m.e. 

T. F. RAYBURN, B.S. 
EDUCATION K. BRYANT, B.S. 

Industrial Arts 40, 41 — Crafts. This course provides for practice in various 
handicrafts. Useful projects in wood turning, wood carving, and leather 
are made. It provides an opportunity for significant creative experience. 
Two hours laboratory per week. Credit, one semester hour each semester. 

Industrial Arts 50, 51 — Woodwork. This course is planned to develop 
skills and to increase the knowledge and appreciation of wood and wood 
finishes. Useful articles are made in the laboratory, involving the use of 
hand and machine tools. Study is also made of related materials and sub- 
ject matter. One hour recitation and five hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
three semester hours per semester. 

Machine Shop 70— Machine Tool Practice. This course includes practice 
in use of machine tools including lathe, shaper, milling machine, drill press 
and grinder. Three hours laboratory per week. Credit, one semester hour. 

Machine Shop 75— Machine Shop Practice. This course includes practice 
in use of machine tools and welding. Four hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
two semester hours. 

Drawing 55— Engineering Drawing. This course consists of instruction 
in the use of instruments; geometric constructions; orthographic projections; 
dimensioning; work in lettering and practice in technical sketching. Six 
hours laboratory per week. Credit, two semester hours. 

Drawing 56. Engineering Drawing. (Prerequisite: Drawing 55). A con- 
tinuation of Drawing 55 consisting of sectioning, fasteners, conventions, detail- 
ed layout, assemblies and tracings— emphasizing engineering standards, prac- 
tices, and procedures. The last five weeks are spent on a complete set of 
working drawings. Six hours laboratory per week. Credit, two semester hours. 

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The Courses 

Graphics 75— Engineering Graphics. Theory and practice in engineering 
drawing adequate to enable the student to visualize and produce acceptable 
freehand and mechanical drawings as required in his course of study. One 
hour recitation and five hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

Graphics 76— Engineering Graphics. (Prerequisite: Graphics 75 or its 
equivalent). Theory and problems designed to develop the ability to visualize 
points, lines and surfaces in space, relate them to each other and to apply 
these relationships in the solution of engineering problems. (Descriptive 
geometry). Two hours recitation and three hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Drawing 100 — Descriptive Geometry. (Prerequisite: Drawing 55). Basic 
theory of drafting; lectures and work on general and specific engineering 
problems. Practice on developing the ability to visualize the point, line, plane, 
and object under varying conditions. Practical applications. Two hours reci- 
tation and three hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Drawing 175— Architectural Drafting. (Prerequisite: Drawing 55). This 
course is designed for students preparing to work in architectural offices, 
for trainees and junior draftsmen in architectural offices, for foremen and 
tradesmen who know how 7 to read blueprints and who wish to learn the prep- 
aration of simple drawings for everyday jobs, and for estimators who want 
to learn the technical phases of modern building practice. One hour recitation 
and five hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

RALPH SOWELL, B.A. JOURNALISM 

Journalism 80 — Principles of Journalism and Reporting. A course in the 
fundamentals of newspaper writing, combined with actual working experience 
on the staff of the HINDSONIAN, weekly student publication. The course 
offers basic training in simple and complex news writing, society and sports 
writing, feature writing, editing, and editorial writing. Three hours reciation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Journalism 81 — Practical Journalism. (Prerequisite: Journalism 80 or 
consent of instructor). A laboratory course devoted to practical journalistic 
methods as exemplified in the student newspaper, yearbook, and off-campus 
publications. The course offers experience in make-up, headlining, copyread- 
ing, proof-reading, page proof-reading, and news evaluation. Two hours reci- 
tation and two hours of laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Journalism 85 — Press Photography. Practice in using cameras, develop- 
ing, enlarging, and printing photographs for publication. Two hours recitation 
and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Journalism 86— History of American Journalism. Special emphasis on 
the study of American newspapers being published today, including com- 
parisons in purpose, mechanics, and layouts. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 79 



The Courses — __ — 

LURLINE STEWART, B.A., M.A. 

EMMA FANCHER BEEMON, B.A., M.A. 

B. D. SPRABERRY, B.A., M.S. uiTUPMATIAC 

W. T. DOUGLAS, B.A., M.Ed. KVlAl HEWflATICS 

A. M. RANKIN, B.S., M.Ed. 

Mathematics 40— Introductory Algebra. (Prerequisite: 1 unit of high 
school algebra or permission of Math Staff). This course is designed for stu- 
dents whose preparation in algebra is inadequate for regular college algebra. 
It consists of a review of the fundamental operations, fractions, exponents, 
linear equations, quadratic equations, systems of equations, and ratio and 
proportion. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 
This course is not open to students with credit in Mathematics 50 or to stu- 
dents who have had more than one unit in high school algebra unless recom- 
mended by the Mathematics Staff. Math. 40 is considered as a deficiency sub- 
ject, and frequently credit for the course will not transfer to senior colleges. 
This course is offered each semester. 

Mathematics 45— Mathematics for Teachers. (Prerequisite: 1 unit of high 
school algebra). This course deals with the nature of mathematics, the funda- 
mental concepts of logic, and the structure and development of the number 
system. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. This 
course is intended for sophomore education majors exclusive of those planning 
to teach secondary mathematics or science. This course is offered the second 
semester. 

Mathematics 50— College Algebra. (Prerequisite: at least IV2 units of high 
school algebra). This course consists of a rapid review of fundamentals, linear 
and quadratic functions, variation, permutations, combinations, the binomial 
theorem, progressions, inequalities, complex numbers, and an introduction 
to sets, matrices, and mathematical structures. Three hours recitation per 
week. Credit, three semester hours. This course is offered each semester. 

Mathematics 51 — Plane Trigonometry. The topics treated are trigono- 
metric functions, logarithms, radian measure, solution of right triangles, 
solution of obliquie triangles, and complex numbers. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. This course is offered each semester. 

Mathematics 57— Algebra for Engineering Students. (Prerequisite: at 
least Wi units of high school algebra). This course consists of the material 
covered in Mathematics 50 in addition to inverse functions, exponential and 
logarithmic functions, and mathematical induction. Five hours recitation per 
week. Credit, three semester hours. Students majoring in mathematics or 
science should take Mathematics 57 instead of Mathematics 50. This course 
is offered each semester. 

Mathematics 75 — Finite Mathematics. (Prerequisite: Mathematics 50). 
This course is designed primarily for business majors. The course consists 
of a study of the nature and language of mathematics including introductory 
logic, introductory probability, and vectors and matrices. Three hours reci- 

Page 80 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 

tation per week. Credit, three semester hours. This course is offered the second 
semester. 

Mathematics 91— Analytical Geometry and Calculus. (Prerequisite: credit 
for, or registration in, Mathematics 50 or 57 and 51). This course is designed 
to integrate analytical geometry and calculus rather than to teach the two 
as separate courses. The topics studied include the coordinate systems, the 
equations of lines and conies, functions, limits, differentiation of algebraic 
and transcendental functions with an introduction to integration of these 
functions, and applications to geometry and physics. Five hours recitation 
per week. Credit, five semester hours. This course is offered each semester. 

Mathematics 111— Integral Calculus I. (Prerequisite: Mathematics 91). ThTs 
course includes formal integration, definite integrals and their applications, 
and solid analytical geometry. It is intended as the second course in the usual 
nine hour course of differential and integral calculus. Five hours recitation 
per week. Credit, five semester hours. This course is offered each semester. 

Mathematics 112 — Integral Calculus II. (Prerequisite: Mathematics 111). 
This course includes partial differentiation, multiple integrals, infinite series, 
hyperbolic functions, and differential equations. It is intended as the third 
course in the usual nine hour course of differential and integral calculus. 
Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. This course 
is offered each semester. 

Mathematics 113 — Elementary Differential Equations. (Prerequisite: credit 
for or registration in Mathematics 112). This course includes equations of 
the first and higher order, linear equations with constant coefficients, solution 
in series, and applications to geometry and physics. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. This course is offered the second 
semester. 

J. LESLIE REEVES, B.A., M.A. 

GENEVA REEVES, B.A., B.M, M.S.M. 

ALBERT B. ROWAN, B.A., M.E. 

MARJORIE STRICKLIN, B.M., M.M. 

REX M. TATUM, B.M., M.M. HJBildtf* 

JAMES FURLOW B.M., M.M. IfiU^IV 

An excellent faculty and good equipment make the college Music De- 
partment outstanding in its contribution to the musical development and 
growth of the student. The department encourages attendance and participa- 
tion in the musical organizations and activities in Jackson and the surround- 
ing area. 

Students transfer to senior college with no loss of credit toward their 
degrees in music. No special or additional fees are charged for any of the 
courses given in the Music Department. Expenses, as outlined on page 22 of 
the catalog, cover all costs of this department. Students enrolling in applied 
music courses must audition prior to completing registration so that proper 
course number can be assigned. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 81 



The Courses 

Music 50, 51— Freshman Music Theory. (Prerequisite: concurrent enroll- 
ment in piano and choir or band). The vocabulary and techniques of tradi- 
tional diatomic and chromatic harmony, with direct keyboard application, 
and correlated aural dictation and sight-singing. Required of music majors. 
Five hours recitation per week. Credit, four hours each semester. 

Music 100, 101 — Sophomore Music Theory. (Prerequisite: Music 50, 51 
and concurrent enrollment in piano and choir or band). A continuation of 
Music Theory 50, 51. Five hours recitation per week. Credit, four hours each 
semester. 

Music 40 — Survey of Music Literature. A listening course designed to 
give the student a better understanding of the music through the ages. It of- 
fers the non-music major, as well as the music major, an opportunity to 
explore music as an. art. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. 

Music 90 — Music History. (Prerequisite: Music 40 or consent of instructor). 
A study of occidental music before 1790. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Music 91 — Music History. (Prerequisite: Music 90). A continuation of 
Music 90 concerning music from 1750-1850. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Music 92 — Music History. (Prerequisite: Music 91). A continuation of 
Music 91 concerning music from 1850-present. Three hours recitation per 
week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Band 50, 51 (freshman) 100, 101 (sophomore)— (Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor). Organized to serve the college at games, concerts, and other 
public and special functions. Five hours laboratory per week. Credit, one 
semester hour each semester for those who participate in all public per- 
formances. 

Choir 50, 51 (freshman), 100, 101 (sophomore) — Members of the choir are 
chosen through audition. It is the performing group of the vocal department, 
and makes numerous appearances during the year, both on the campus 
and throughout the state. Three hours laboratory per week. Credit, one 
semester hour each semester. 

Piano 50, 51— Class Piano. Intended for students other than music majors 
who have no previous keyboard experience. Two hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, one semester hour each semester. 

Voice 50 — Semi-Private Voice. Lessons in voice for students who have 
need of instruction in the more fundamental aspects of the vocal arts. Limited 
to two or three students in each class period. Two hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, one semester hours. 

APPLIED MUSIC— PRIVATE INSTRUCTION 

NOTE: All students taking private lessons may be required to perform in 
lab recitals at the instructor's discretion. 
Brass, Woodwind, Percussion 55a, 56a (freshman), 90a, 91a (sophomore) 

—Instrumental music majors in brass, woodwind, percussion. Two half-hour 

Page 82 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 

lessons per week and three hours practice daily. Credit, three semester hours 
each semester. ; ;;' i ! 

Brass, Woodwind, Percussion 55b, 56b (freshman), 90b, 91b (sophomore) 
—Music education majors and non-music majors who meet instructor's re- 
quirements. Two half-hour lessons per week and two hours practice daily. 
Credit, two semester hours each semester. 

Brass, Woodwind, Percussion 55c, 56c (freshman), 90c, 91c (sophomore) 
Elective instrumental music. Open to students who are interested in partici- 
pating in band or orchestra. Two half-hour lessons per week and one hour 
practice daily. Credit, one semester hour each semester. 

Organ 55a, 56a (freshman), 90a, 91a (sophomore) — (Prerequisite: satis- 
factory audition on piano or organ, and concurrent enrollment in piano). 
Organ majors. Gleason: "Method of Organ Playing." Repertoire equivalent 
to Bach: Cathedral Prelude and Fugue; Dupre: Station of the Cross XI; 
with emphasis on memorization, and introduction to service playing in the 
second year. Presentation of a full length public recital is required of sopho- 
mores. Two half-hour lessons each week and three hours practice daily. 
Credit, three semester hours each semester. 

Organ 55b, 56b (freshman), 90b, 91b (sophomore) — Music education 
majors and non-music majors who meet instructor's requirements. Two half- 
hour lessons each week and two hours practice m daily. Credit, two semester 
hours each semester. 

Organ 55c, 56c (freshman), 90c, 91c (sophomore)— Elective organ. Two 
half-hour lessons per week and one hour practice daily. Credit, one semester 
hour each semester. 

Piano 55a, 56a (freshmen), 90a, 91a (sophomore) — (Prerequiste: consent 
of music faculty). Piano majors. Material for development of technique, and 
study of style and interpretation of representative compositions from these 
periods of music history: Pre-Baroque or Baroque; Classical; Romantic; 
Impressionist, or Contemporary. A full length public recital is required of all 
piano majors for credit in Piano 101a. Two half -hour lessons per week and 
three hours practice daily. Credit, three semester hours each semester. 

Piano 55b, 56b (freshman), 90b, 91b (sophomore)— Music education 
majors; required of music majors other than piano majors; open to non-music 
majors upon nomination by instructor, and with approval of the entire music 
faculty. Two half-hour lessons per week and two hours practice daily. Credit, 
two semester hours each semester. 

Piano 55c, 56c (freshman), 90c, 91c (sophomore)— Elective piano. In- 
tended for non-music majors advanced beyond the level of Piano 50, 51. but 
may, at instructor's discretion, be used as a substitute for Piano 50, 51. Two 
half-hour lessons per week and one hour practice daily. Credit, one semester 
hour each semester. 

Voice 55a, 56a (freshman), 90a, 91a (sophomore) — (Prerequisite: satis- 
factory audition). — Voice majors. Technique in the study of voice. Students are 
taught the principles of relaxation, breathing, distinct enunciation and inter- 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 83 



The Courses 

pretation. Participation in Choir required. Two half-hour lessons per week 
and two hours practice daily. Credit, three semester hours each semester. 

Voice 55b, 56b (freshman), 90b, 91b (sophomore) — Music education ma- 
jors and non-music majors who meet instructor's requirements. Participation 
in Choir required. Two half-hour lessons per week and one hour practice 
daily. Credit, two semester hours each semester. 

Voice 55c, 56c (freshman), 90c, 91c (sophomore)— Elective voice. Stu- 
dents who are advanced beyond the level of Voice 50. Two half -hour lessons 
per week and one hour practice daily. Credit, one semester hour each semester. 

HEALTH J0E RENFROE, B.E.P.E., M.A. 

!*riw*li*J I m ARLIS RICKS, B.S., M.A. 

PHYSICAL WILLIAM C. OAKES, R.S., M.A 

mi irATIAM POLLY H. RABALAIS, B.S, M.Ed. 

tUUwAI HUN; IVAN P. ROSAMOND, B.S., M.A. 

RECREATION ANNA BEE > BA - 

Hygiene 50 — Personal and Community Hygiene. The purpose of this 
course is to familiarize the student with the functions of the body and its 
relation to the health and mental well-being of the individual. Nutrition, 
posture, exercise and community hygiene are studied. Stress is laid on 
those activities which will carry over and which throughout life may mean 
continuing health and vitality. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three 
semester hours. 

Physical Education 40, 41— Health and Physical Education for Women. 
This course includes individual and team sports, health, rhythms and recrea- 
tional activities. It is divided into units that coincide with the regular nine- 
weeks school term according to the season, and each unit is complete within 
itself. The units included in the various sections are: beginning and intermedi- 
ate tennis; field hockey; soccer; archery; basketball; volleyball; badminton; 
golf; softball; corrective and posture exercises; fundamentals; tumbling and 
stunts; contemporary, folk, and square dance; health and personal care. 
Recreational sports such as ping pong, shuffleboard, table games, and social 
dancing are also taught. The required uniform for physical education classes 
is white socks and tennis shoes, maroon shorts and white shirts, available 
in the campus store. Two hours laboratory per week. Credit, one semester 
hour each semester. 

Physical Education 45, 46 — Hi-Steppers, Training Group (Prerequisite: 
approval of instructor and a physical examination). This is a course in ele- 
mentary dance technique and is designed to prepare students for the regular 
performing Hi-Stepper group. Dance training includes classical ballet exer- 
cises, modern jazz rudiments, and precision marching. Emphasis is placed 
on self -improvement of individual students, including posture correction 
make-up, modeling and figure control. Five hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, one semester hour each semester. 

Page 84 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 

Physical Education 60- 61— Health and Physical Education for Women. 
A continuation of Physical Education 40, 41. Graduates of Hinds Junior Col- 
lege are expected to have completed successfully in the two-year program, 
two team sports, one individual sport, cne rhythms unit, and one fundamentals 
unit plus three activities of their own choice. Two hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, one semester hour each semester. 

Physical Education 65, 66 — Hi-Steppers. (Prerequisite: approval of in- 
structor). This is the regular performing Hi-Stepper group. Participation in 
this group includes satisfactory mastering of advanced dance routines and 
precision drills. This group participates in county, state, and national pro- 
grams of a civic nature. With the school band, it performs at football games, 
parades, and conventions. Continued course in self-improvement and chore- 
ography. Required uniform: white shorts, white, long-sleeved T-shirts, and 
white boots. Five hours laboratory per week. Credit, one semester hour each 
semester. 

Physical Education 50, 51— Physical Training (Men). This course is 
designed to give the individual the basic understanding and a participating 
knowledge of team sports in physical education. Two hours laboratory per 
week. Credit, one semester hour each semester. 

Physical Education 100, 101— Physical Training (Men). Advanced work 
in general physical education program with emphasis on and encouragement 
of participation in individual sports. Two hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
one semester hour each semester. 

Physical Education 110— Athletic Training and Treatment of Injuries. 
A practical study of safety and first aid, taping, bandaging, and use of mas- 
sage, and the uses of heat, light, and water in the treatment and prevention 
of injuries; conditioning of athletes as to diet, rest, work, and proper meth- 
ods of procedure in training for sports. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Physical Education 70— Recreational Leadership. This is a study de- 
signed to teach the techniques and methods of playground and recreational 
leadership with attention given to both the functioning of the group and 
the role of the leader. Special emphasis is placed on student organizations 
and participation in the recreational programs on the campus. The course 
is recommended especially to physical education majors, elementary educa- 
tion majors, and those interested in city recreation, camp, and social group 
work. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Physical Education 80^— Football Theory. (Prerequisite: practice with in- 
tercollegiate football squad). Theoretical study of football from an offensive 
and defensive standpoint including the fundamentals of blocking, passing, 
tackling, charging, punting, generalship, rules and team play. Three hours 
recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Physical Education 90— Basketball Theory. (Prerequisite: practice with 
intercollegiate basketball squad). A theoretical study of basketball from an 
offensive and defensive standpoint, including the study and teaching of the 
fundamentals and team organization. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI p -0t 85 



The Courses . , . . , . . 

PHYSICAL 
SCIENCE 

SURVEY B. D. SPRABERRY, B.A., M.A., M.S. 

Science 70, 71— A survey course in the physical sciences. Designed for 
non-science majors, this course is an introduction to the physical sciences. 
It is taught from the descriptive viewpoint and the use of mathematics is 
kept to a minimum. The work of the first semester is in the fields of physics 
and chemistry; and the work of the second semester is in the fields of 
meteorology, geology, and astronomy. The course may be taken either 
semester or both semesters. Thr^e hours recitation per week. Credit, three 
semester hours each semester. 

PHYSICS F. J. STEPHENSON, B.S. 

Physics 50, 51 — General. (Prerequisite: Mathematics 50 and 51 or equiva- 
lent). This is a two semester course with four hours credit for each semes- 
ter. Emphasis is placed upon fundamental principles in mechanics, light, 
heat, sound, magnetism and electricity. Three hours recitation and two hours 
of laboratory per week. Credit, four semester hours each semester. 

Physics 55, 56 — General Astronomy. This is a two-semester course with 
emphasis placed on the solar system, the stars, the galaxy, and the extra- 
galactic universe. Three hours recitation per week accompanied by occasional 
observations of the heavenly bodies. Credit, three semester hours each 
semester. 

Physics 60, 61 — Principles. This is a two semester course emphasizing the 
basic principles of mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, optics, and electricity. 
Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours each semester. NOTE: This course is designed primarily for Tech- 
nical students; it will not count toward a major or minor in Physics. 

MICHAEL J. RABALAIS, B.S., M.S. 
PQYOM ft I AAV A - L - BENTON, A.B., M.A. 

r& i vnuLUU ■ FAY Marshall, b.a., M.Ed. 

BOBBYE DAVIS, B.A., M.A. 

Psychology 105— General Psychology. An introduction to the scientific 
study of human behavior. Topics included in this course are history and 
methods of psychology; growth and development; principles of learning; 
sensation and perception; thinking; statistics; personality; and intelligence. 
Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Psychology 107— General Psychology. (Prerequisite: Psychology 105). A 
continuation of Psychology 105 emphasizing applied psychological methods 
and principles. Topics included in this course are motivation and emotion: 

Page 86 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



. Tfie Courses 

abnormal behavior; mental health and therapy; group processes; mass com- 
munication and persuasion; and industrial psychology. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Psychology 110— Child Psychology. (Prerequisite: Psychology 105 and 
sophomore standing). This course considers development from the prenatal 
period through the primary years of puberty. Emphasis is given to physical, 
mental, social, and emotional growth as influenced by both maturation and 
learning. The implications of these stages of development to education are 
emphasized. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 



READING 



CALVINIA SWITZER, A.A., B.S., ME 



Reading 50 — Improvement of Reading. The intent of this course is to 
provide an opportunity for students to gain reading skills that are necessary 
for success in college. Diagnostic testing, followed by directed practice 
in those skills shown to be deficient, constitute the major part of the course. 
Special attention is given to vocabulary, speed of reading, comprehension, 
study habits and attitude. The class is required of all freshmen who fail to 
meet reading proficiency standards of the college. Three hours recitation per 
week. Credit, one semester hour. This course is offered each semester. 

J. R. HARRIS, B.S., M.A. 

J. B. PATRICK, B.A,. M.A. 

MARVIN A. RIGGS, B.A., M.A. 

THOMAS E. STRICKLIN, B.S., M.A. SOCIAL 

R. L. ROBINSON, B.S., M.S. SXiS-m#!Ip" 

BYRLE KYNERD, B.S. SCIENCE 

History 70 — Western Civilization. A survey of the history of man— his 
government, economic, social, religious, intellectual, and esthetic activities 
from the earliest time to the middle of the seventeenth century. Three hours 
recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

History 71— Western Civilization. A continuation of History 70, including 
European colonizations and imperialism in Asia, in Africa and in the Ameri- 
cas; revolutionary movements of the 18th and 19th centuries; the movements 
leading to World War I, the aftermath of the war, the global events pre- 
ceding the second World conflict; the Second World War; and recent inter- 
national developments. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Taught second semester only. For a better comprehension 
and continuity of the progress of civilization, it is strongly suggested by the 
faculty of the department that this course be preceded by History 70. 

History 100— United States to 1865. This is a course in general United 
States History, beginning v/ith the Colonial background of the American 
Revolution and following the development of the United States through the 
War between the States. Emphasis is placed on the forces leading to the 
creation of a union, built around an agricultural economy, and the forces of 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 87 



The Courses 

disunion culminating in the War between the States. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

History 101— United States since 1865. History of the United States since 
the War between the States. Emphasis is placed upon the Restoration and 
Reconstruction. Political and Economic readjustments from an agricultural 
economy to an industrial economy, expansion of the United States into a 
World Power, World War and postwar problems. Three hours recitation per 
week. Credit, three semester hours. Second semester. 

Economics 90— American Economic System. A survey course dealing 
with practical phases of our economic system. Background to our economic 
order; production; national income: standard of living: personal and public 
finance; money, credit, and banking: and consumer economic problems are 
among the topics studied. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three 
semester hours. 

Economics 100 — Principles of Economics. (Prerequisite: sophomore stand- 
ing). This course in college economics places emphasis on fundamentals, 
theories, and doctrines which underlie the present economic order. Three 
hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Economics 101 — Principles of Economics. (Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 
its equivalent). This course is a continuation of Economics 100 with special 
emphasis on modern Economic problems. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Political Science 50 — United States Government. Particular emphasis is 
given to the fundamental principles on which our government has been built 
and developed since its earliest beginning and their present day applications. 
Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Political Science 60 — This course contains a general study of the or- 
ganization, functioning, and the problems of the state, county, and city 
government with special emphasis on those units of government which are 
of special interest to individual students. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Sociology 60— Introduction to Sociology. This course deals with the person 
and his world, the social process within this world, and the integration of 
these processes to produce a more satisfied mode of living. It is hoped that 
through this course the student will receive a realization of the social world 
into which he must fit. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Preference given sophomore students. 

Sociology 70— Marriage and Family Living. The purpose of this course 
is to give a better understanding of the factors that contribute to success and 
happiness in family relationships. It includes preparation for marriage, de- 
velopment and functions of modern homes, and social and community in- 
fluences, with emphasis on adjustment for family living. Open to both men 
and women. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 
(Same as Home Economies 90). 

Sociology 100— Social Problems. (Prerequisite: Sociology 60). This course 
is designed to orient students to the major social forces operating in modern 

Page 88 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 

society and to show how they affect individual adjustment and social prob- 
lems. Emphasis is placed on problems of our time, not for the purpose of 
describing symptoms of maladjustment, but in order to present the social 
forces that have caused them to emerge in their present form and to point 
out ways in which these forces may be used to ease adjustment. Plans in- 
clude basic field trips to more fully acquaint students with society's answer to 
social problems. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. Second semester. 

Geography 60 — Introduction to Geoeranhy. This course deals with the 
global world, the relationship of countries and regions with respect to 
climate, soil, resources, natural vegetation, distribution of population, and 
the use and interpretation of maps. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

Geography 65 — Economic Geography. This is a survey course of the 
economic geography of the major countries of the world. The occupations 
of the people, industries, products, and the trade relations of the various 
countries are studied. Particular attention is placed upon the economic geog- 
raphy of the United States with special emphasis upon the South. Three hours 
recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

CLAUDE WILLIAMS, B.A., M.A. SPANISH 

Spanish 50, 51 — Elementary Course. For beginning students and those 
with not more than one year of high school Spanish. Basic Soanish er-mmar, 
pronunciation, vocabulary, conversation, readin? and composition. Three hours 
recitation and a minimum of one hour per week in the language laboratory. 
Credit, six semester hours. A unit course; credit not allowed toward gradu- 
ation for first semester without second semester. 

Spanish 100, 101— Intermediate Course. (Prerequisite: Spanish 50, 51 or two 
units of high school Spanish V A review of Spanish grammar, followed by the 
reading of suitable modern Spanish literature. Three hours recitation and 
a minimum of one hour per week in the language laboratory. Credit, six 
semester hours. 

Spanish 110. Ill — Conversation and Composition. (Prerequisite: Spanish 
50, 51 or equivalent). Three hours recitation and a minimum of one hour per 
week in the language laboratory. Credit, three semester hours each semester. 
May be taken concurrently with 100, 101 but not before 100, 101 except with 
special permission from the instructor. 

FRED L. BROOKS. B.S., M.A. CPETPdl 

ORVEL E. HOOKER. B.A., S.T.B.. S.T.M. «rttVn 

Speech 55— Fundamentals of Speech. This is a basic course in the funda- 
mentals of speaking and listening. Methods and techniques of speech prepara- 
tion and presentation are studied and practiced. Emphasis is on research, 
organization, and presentation of ideas. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hour3. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI p age 89 



The Courjses- _ — _ — _ _ — — — 

Speech 56— Voice and Diction. ( Prerequisite: Speech 55). The International 
Phonetic Alphabet is taught for the purpose of helping each individual student 
to better his voice. Oral reading and speech making are practiced. Three 
hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Speech 60— Parliamentary Procedure. This course includes study and 
practice on the general rules of properly conducting a meeting; putting 
motions, presiding, making a constitution, and the like. Robert's Rules of 
Order is followed. Credit, one semester hour. 

Speech 70— Oral Interpretation. (Prerequisite: Speech 55 or consent of in- 
structor). A study of methods and procedures of reading for interpretation 
before an audience. Emphasis is placed on oral class work. Three hours reci- 
tation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Speech 110— Debate. A study of the principles of debating and argumen- 
tative discourse and the practice of the art of debating. Open to any student 
interested in inter-class or inter-collegiate debating. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Speech 111 — Debate. Second year continuation of debate. Open only to 
sophomores who have completed Speech 110. Three hours recitation per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Dramatics 50, 51 — Fundamentals of Theatre. Essentials of play produc- 
tion, including examinations of performance crafts, directing, and technical 
production. Basic survey of highlights of history of the Western theatre 
and major works of dramatic literature. Two hours recitation and five lab- 
oratory hours per week. Credit, two semester hours. 

Dramatics 100, 101 — Play Production. (Prerequisite: consent of instructor). 
Continuation of Dramatics 50, 51, emphasizing technical production, and includ- 
ing performance and directing crafts. Two hours recitation and five hours 
laboratory per week. Credit, two semester hours per semester. 

TECHNICAL 

(2-Year Terminal) 

W. H. GIBBES, Co-Ordinator 

K. BRYANT CECIL LANDRUM 

E. H. BUSH LOREN LANE 

JOHN W. COCROFT BOB L. LASTER 

H. M. COOK D. W. LEWIS 

ELDON DAVIS H. J. PARTIN 

RUFUS T. DICKERSON J. F. RAYBURN 

GEORGE HENNE T. F. RAYBURN 

C. E. KYNERD F. J. STEPHENSON 

W. M. WALL 
D. C. WARE 
NOTE: The courses on the following pages— those designated as technical- 
are designed for terminal credit and NOT for transfer to senior 
colleges. Credit, however, can be applied toward junior college grad- 
uation from Hinds Junior College. 
Page 90 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 



RELATED STUDIES 

Technical Related Studies 20— Industrial Psychology. An introduction to 
the scientific study of human behavior and experiences related to human 
relations in industry. A study of individual differences, selection, and place- 
ment of employees. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

Technical Related Studies 30— Industrial Safety. A basic study of industrial 
accident prevention considering the nature and extent of the accident prob- 
lem. A practical study is given the techniques for control of industrial hazards 
together with the fundamentals of good organization. Three hours recitation 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Technical Related Studies 40— Basic Electricity. This course is designed 
to teach the basic theory of the structure of matter, electron flow, conductor 
and insulator. Ohm's law, voltage drop, temperature coefficiency of copper, 
etc. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Technical Related Studies 50 — Woodwork. This course is planned to develop 
skills and to increase knowledge and appreciation of wood and wood finishes. 
Useful articles are made in the laboratory, involving the use of hand and 
machine tools. Study is also made of related materials and subject matter. 
One hour recitation and four hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

Technical Related Studies 51— Advanced Woodwork. (Prerequisite: TRS 
50). A continuation of Technical Related Studies 50. This course also offers 
creative design in woodwork. One hour recitation and four hours laboratory 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

ELECTRONICS 

Technical Electronics 30— Electronics Mathematics. A coverage of 
arithmetic operations, algebra, and trigonometry with electronic applications. 
Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Technical Electronics 31 — Electronics Mathematics. (Prerequisite: TEL 
30). A continuation of Technical Electronics 30 with the introduction of 
logarithms and calculus. Three hours recitation per week. Credit, three 
semester hours. 

Technical Electronics 35— Electricity for Electronics. A basic study of 
direct and alternating current circuits, magnetism, resistance, inductance, 
capacitance, and resonance. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory 
per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Electronics 36 — Vacuum Tubes and Transistors. (Prerequisite: 
TEL 35 or equivalent). Fundamentals of vacuum tube principles, tube types, 
characteristic curves and load lines. Also includes an introduction to semi- 
conductors and the transistor. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory 
per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

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The Courses— — — 

Technical Electronics 37— Television Circuits and Troubleshooting. (Pre- 
requisite: TEL 35 and TEL 36 or equivalent). A survey of the basic circuits 
used in television transmissions and reception including tuners, sweep circuits, 
broad-band amplifiers, and antennas. This course emphasizes the use of 
test equipment in diagnosing and locating troubles in electronic apparatus. 
The correct use of hand tools and good soldering practices will be taught. 
Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six 
semester hours. 

Technical Electronics 38— Television Testing Equipment. (Prerequisite: 
TEL 37). The advanced theory, principles and operations of television testing 
equipment; laboratory testing of each phase and method of proper operation 
of television circuits; and practical laboratory problems in the television 
industry. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
six semester hours. 

Technical Electronics 41 — Electronic Communication Circuit. (Prerequi- 
site: TEL 35 and TEL 36 or equivalent). A survey of basic communication 
units including reception, transmission, modulation, demodulation, transmis- 
sion lines and associated equipment. Three hours recitation and six hours 
laboratory per week. Credit six semester hours. 

Technical Electronics 42 — Microwave and Comouter Fundamentals. (Pre 
requisite: TEL 35 and TEL 36). Principles of microwave transmission and 
reception with related circuiting. Basic computer circuiting and pro- 
gramming fundamentals. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per 
week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Electronics 43— Industrial Electronics and Instrumentation. (Pre- 
requisite: TEL 35 and TEL 36 or equivalent). Principles of motor control, 
resistance weeding, thyratrons and other industrial devices and circuits. Trans- 
ducers of various types and other industrial measurement techniques will be 
covered. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six 
semester hours. 

Technical Electronics 44 — Pulse Circuits. (Prerequisite: TEL 35 and TEL 
36 or equivalent). Fundamentals of non sinusodial oscillators, triggering 
and gating circuits, transients and wave-shaping circuits. Three hours reci- 
tation. Credit, three semester hours. 

Technical Electronics 45 — Advanced Transistors. (Prerequisite: TEL 35 
and TEL 36 or equivalent). Principles of transistor circuit design, load 
lines, characteristic curves, heat sinks, and advanced circuiting. The zener 
diode, tunnel diode, and terode transistor will be discussed. Three hours 
recitation per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

DRAFTING 

Technical Drafting 55— Engineering Drawing. This course consists of in- 
struction in the use of instruments, geometric constructions, orthographic 
projections, dimensioning, work in letter and practice in technical sketching. 
Six hours laboratory per week. Credit, two semester hours. 

Technical Drafting 56 — Engineering Drawing. (Prerequisite: TDR 55). 
A continuation of Technical Drafting 55 consisting of sectioning, fasteners, 
conversions, gears and cams, and pictorial drawings. The last six weeks are 
Pagt 92 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 

spent on a complete set of working drawings. Six hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, two semester hours. 

Technical Drawing 100 — Descriptive Geometry. (Prerequisite: TDR 55). 
Basic theory of drafting, lectures and work on general and specific engineer- 
ing problems. Practice on developing the ability to visualize the point, line, 
plane, and object under varying conditions. Two hours reciation and three 
hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Technical Drawing 175 — Architectural Drafting. (Prerequisite: TDR 55). 
This course is designed for students preparing to work in architectural 
offices, for trainees and junior draftsmen in architectural offices, for foremen 
and tradesmen who know how to read blueprints and who wish to learn 
the preparation of simple drawings for everyday jobs, and for estimators 
who want to learn the technical phases of modern building practice. One hour 
recitation and four hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Technical Drawing 176 — Design and Estimating. (Prerequisite: TDRi 175). 
This course deals with the study of theory, design, principles, use of modern 
construction materials, the needs of the modern American family, and details 
concerned with the design of a contemporary home. It also deals with pre- 
liminary, detail, and quantity estimating in building construction, covering 
aspects of the field from land purchase through turnover of completed struc- 
tures to the owner. One hour recitation and five hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

Technical Drawing 200-^Topographic Drawing. (Prerequisite: TDR 55). 
Interpretation reduction, and recording of field notes for topographic maps; 
lettering, symbols, procedure for the production of maps; study of production 
and reproduction. One hour recitation and four hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

MACHINE SHOP 

Technical Machine Shop 40— Fundamentals of Machine Shop. This course 
includes instruction and practice in use of machine tools and welding. Two 
hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

Technical Machine Shop 61— Introduction to Machine Shop. Basic theory 
and techniques of the machinist trade; the mastery of measuring tools, the 
fundamentals of bench work, the construction and the simple operations of 
the drill press, and practical laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and 
six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Machine Shop 62— Operation of Machine Tools. (Prerequisite: 
TMS 61). The more intricate operations of the drill press; the construction 
and operation of the lathe and lathe tool grinding, the mastery of the pro- 
cesses of chucking, facing, turning, centering, tapering, angle turning, thread 
cutting, and face plate work; a knowledge of the methods of soldering, braz- 
ing, babbitting, and hand forging; and practical laboratory projects. Three 
hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 93 



The Courses 

Technical Machine Shop 63— Machine Tool Design. (Prer equate: TMS 62). 
A thorough knowledge of *the construction and operation of a shaper, the 
planer, the milling machine, the theory and practice of cutting speeds and 
feeds of each oi these machines; and practical laboratory projects. Three 
hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester 
hours. § 4 

Technical Machine Shop 64 — Machine Shop, Manufacturing Processes. 
(Prerequisite: TMS 63). A thorough knowledge of the principles, construction 
and operations of the grinding machines, metal band saws, hydraulic power 
transmissions; metallurgy; uses of non-ferrous metals and alloys; heat treat- 
ments of steel; cutting fluids; and practical laboratory projects. Three hours 
recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Machine Shop 65 — Metallurgy. (Prerequisite: sophomore stand- 
ing). This course provides a basic study of ferrous and non-ferrous metals. 
Major subject areas include properties of metals, alloys, iron and steel, 
shaping and forming metals, heat treatment and surface treatments. Practical 
experience is gained by the student through performing heat treating opera- 
tions in the laboratory. Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory per 
week. Credit, three semester hours. 

Technical Machine Shop 66 — Motion and Time. (Prerequisite: sophomore 
standing). The student is introduced to the techniques used in determining 
the most economical way of doing a specific piece of work through a sys- 
tematic study of methods, materials, tools, and equipment. Laboratory ac- 
tivities include the analysis of the fundamental and physical motions, the 
practice of dividing operations into elements, and time study observations. 
Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, three 
semester hours. 

Technical Machine Shop 67— Hydraulics. (Prerequisite: sophomore stand- 
ing). This course consists of the principle of hydraulic power. It is a study 
of the basic principles and applications of hydraulic power, its adaptability 
to modern machine tools, and its advantages over conventional methods. Two 
hours recitation and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

AUTOMOBILE MECHANICS AND REPAIRS 

Technical Auto Mechanics 71— Auto Mechanics I. An introduction to the 
theory and techniques of repairing springs, ride control, front end and steering 
systems of the automobile; a history of the development and manufacture of 
the parts of the above automotive systems; and practical, related laboratory 
projects. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
six semester hours. 

Technical Auto Mechanics 72— Auto Mechanics II. The theory and tech- 
niques of repairing the clutch, transmission, propeller shaft, universal joint, 
differential, and rear axle of the automobile; the history of the development 
and manufacture of the parts of the above assemblies; and practical and re- 
Page 94 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Courses 



lated laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per 
week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Auto Mechanics 73— Auto Mechanics III. Theory and techniques 
of repairing the automobile engine and its accessories; fuel oil, cooling, 
starting, ignition, and generating system; the history and development of 
the internal combustion engine; and practical, related laboratory projects. 
Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester 
hours. 

Technical Auto Mechanics 74— Auto Troubleshooting and Shop Manage- 
ment. (Prerequisite: TAM 73). A thorough study of the tune-up of engines of 
all makes and models of automobiles; the use of the distributor tester, motor 
analyzer, generator and regulator systems, and starter testing; and practical, 
related laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory 
per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Body and Fender Repair 76— Basic Automotive Body Repairing. 
The basic theory, assortment, and use of hand tools in the automotive recon- 
ditioning trade; the study and types of body-panel aligning; the use of 
hydraulic jacks; and practical, related laboratory projects. Three hours 
recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Body and Fender Repair 77 — Automotive Body Repairing and 
Finishing. (Prerequisite: TBF 76). A thorough knowledge of the construction, 
removal and replacement of body rocker and truck panels; the techniques 
of applying fender patches, and radiator saddles; and practical, related 
laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Body and Fender Repair 78 — Automotive Body Section Replace- 
ment. (Prerequisite: TBF 76). The theory and techniques of automobile paint- 
ing; a thorough knowledge of the construction and operation of the necessary 
equipment, including air requirements, types of spray patterns, spray gun 
care and operation, sanding, masking, removing paint, painting over bare 
metal, painting lacquer over lacquer, spot painting, and the off spot mixing 
colors; and the related laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and six 
hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Body and Fender Repair 79 — Automotive Upholstering and Fin- 
ishing. (Prerequisite: TBF 76, TBF 77, and TBF 78). The theory, techniques 
and problems of automobile upholstering; knowledge of fabrics used in the 
trade; removing, measuring, cutting, and installing head linings, seat covers, 
and floor mats; methods of installing wind lace, removing and installing 
body hardware; and related laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and 
six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Auto Mechanics 80 — Automotive Specialized Tools I. A study 
and application in the specialized area of tools, equipment, and materials 
required in brake drum refinishing, valve and seat grinding, block boring, 
and brake cylinder repairing. Two hours recitation and two hours laboratory 
per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 95 



The Courses 

Technical Auto Mechanics 81— Automotive Specialized Tools II. (Prerequi- 
site: TAM 80). A continuation in studying the principles and theory of Tech- 
nical Auto Mechanics 80 with special emphasis on head and block repairs, 
crank shaft grinding, bearing sizing, etc. Two hours recitation and two hours 
laboratory per week. Credit, three semester hours. 

GENERAL ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRIC MOTOR REPAIR 

Technical General Electricity and Wiring 91 — Principles in General Elec- 
tricity. Basic theory and techniques of electricity; a thorough working knowl- 
edge of the hazards, safety devices, and emergency regulations of electrical 
mechanisms; types of wiring and wiring methods used in buildings; types 
of insulation, electrical fittings, service entrances; distribution centers, and 
branch circuit layouts; a knowledge of the national electric code; and prac- 
tical laboratory problems. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per 
week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical General Electricity and Wiring 92— Electrical Planning and In- 
stallation. (Prerequisite: TEW 91). Theory techniques, and practice in the 
fundamentals of alternating and direct current No. 1 as applied to single 
phase circuits; a thorough knowledge of Ohms' and Watt's laws and of 
series and parallel circuits, resonant and anti-resonant circuits; complex 
notations, metering, and instrumentation; and practical, related laboratory 
projects. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
six semester hours. 

Technical General Electricity and Wiring 93 — Advanced Electricity. (Pre- 
requisite TEW 92). Advanced A.C. and D.C. theory and practice No. II as 
applied to single phase and three phase circuits; further analysis of series 
and parallel circuits using complex notation; theory of the coupled circuit 
and transformer; and practical, related laboratory projects. Three hours 
recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical General Electricity and Wiring 94 — Industrial Electricity. (Pre- 
requisite: TEW 93). Advanced fundamentals of industrial electricity; theory 
and techniques of plant installations and blue print reading; circuit controls 
and analysis; electrical machinery and industrial appliances of electrical 
equipment; and related laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and six 
hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Electric Motor Repair 11— Basic Electric Motor Repair. An 
introduction to the theory, construction, and basic techniques of repairing 
electric motors; a study of the fundamentals of electricity, blue print reading, 
safety and care of tools in the trade; and practical, related laboratory prob- 
lems. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six 
semester hours. 

Technical Electric Motor Repair 12— Advanced Principles of Electric 
Motor Repair. (Prerequisite: TEM 11). A thorough study of the kinds and 
characteristics of the materials used in electric motor repair; the theory and 

Page 96 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



. Tfa Courses 

techniques of direct current motors and generators ; and laboratory projects on 
such motors and generators. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory 
per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Electric Motor Repair 13 — Repairs and Service of Electric 
Motors. (Prerequisite: TEM 12). The theory, techniques, and practice of re- 
winding all types of single phase motor. The recording of data observed; and 
practical, related laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and six hours 
laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Electric Motor Repair 14— Testing and Service Procedures of 
Electric Motors. (Prerequisite: TEM 13). The theory, techniques, and 
methods of repair of the poly phase motor; magnetic controls; overload pro- 
tective devices; alternating current equipment and controls; and practical 
laboratory problems. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per 
week. Credit, six semester hours. 

REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING 

Technical Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 51 — Principles of Refrigera- 
tion. The theory, principles and techniques of physics as used in refrigeration 
and air-conditioning; practice in welding, brazing, flaring, swedging, and in 
handling copper tubing; safety precautions and regulations in the field and 
practical, related laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and six hours 
laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 52— Refrigeration and Air 
Conditioning Operating Principles. (Prerequisite: TRA 51). The theory, prin- 
ciples, and techniques of the different types of compressors, the principles 
and problems of physics applicable to this phase of refrigeration; and prac- 
tical laboratory projects. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory 
per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 53 — Refrigeration and Air 
Conditioning Service Procedures. (Prerequisite: TRA 52). The theory, princi- 
ples, and techniques of all condensing units, feed devices and evaporators; 
the principles and problems of physics, applicable to these phases of the 
trade, and practical, related laboratory projects in the shop. Three hours reci- 
tation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 54 — Applied Refrigeration 
and Management. (Prerequisite: TRA 53). Theory, principles and techniques 
of all types of electrical and press controls; the principles and problems of 
physics applicable to this phase of the trade; a thorough acquaintance with 
modern, technical advances in the field; and practical, related laboratory 
projects in the shop. Heat loss and heat load, calculations, duct design and 
distribution systems. Controls and control systems. Three hours recitation 
and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

OFFICE MACHINE REPAIR 

Technical Office Machine Repair 121 — Basic Principles in Servicing Office 
Machines. Theory, principles, and basic operations of the various mechanisms 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 97 



The Courses 

of standard and electrical typewriters; the techniques of dismantling, assemb- 
ling, and adjusting of these machines; and practical laboratory problems based 
on the theory. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. 
Credit, six semster hours. 

Technical Office Machine Repair 122— Advanced Office Machine Main- 
tenance. (Prerequisite: TOM 121). The theory, principles, and techniques of 
cleaning, adjusting, and inspecting typewriters; and practical laboratory 
problems based on the theory- Three hours recitation and six hours labora- 
tory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Office Machine Repair 123 — Electrical Office Machines. (Pre- 
requisite: TOM 122). The theory, principles and the mechanics of hand and 
electric adding machines and practical laboratory problems based on the 
theory. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
six semester hours. 

Technical Office Machine Repair 124 — Office Machine, Service and Man- 
agement. (Prerequisite: TOM 123). Problems, principles, and techniques of 
servicing machines in offices; customer relationships; and technical procedure 
of field service and practical experience in the service field. Three hours 
recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester hours. 

AIRPLANE AND ENGINE MECHANICS 

Technical Airplane and Engine Mechanics 131 — Basic Engine Repair. 
Theory, techniques, and methods of repair of "dead" engines of all types of 
aircraft; disassembling and reassembling of engines; cleaning and inspecting 
engine parts; timing and adjusting valves and magnetos; repairing carbure- 
tors and magnetos; installing engine accessories; and practical, related 
laboratory problems. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per 
week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Airplane and Engine Mechanics 132 — Advanced Engine Repair. 
Theory, techniques, and methods of repair of all airplane parts; final assembly 
and rigging of an airplane; and practical, related laboratory problems. Three 
hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, six semester 
hours. 

Technical Airplane and Engine Mechanics 133 — Installation and Inspec- 
tion of Engines. Theory, techniques and methods of repair of "live" engines 
of all types of aircraft; techniques of routine inspections; techniques and 
methods of removal and installations of aircraft engines; and practical and 
related laboratory work. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per 
week. Credit, six semester hours. 

Technical Airplane and Engine Mechanics 134 — Aircraft Repairs. Theory, 
techniques, and methods of repairing the whole airplane, including installa- 
tions of windows, windshields, the new tires, techniques of refinishing aircraft 
and servicing wheel bearings; techniques and problems of annual inspection 
of aircraft. Three hours recitation and six hours laboratory per week. Credit, 
six semester hours. 

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)>n. 



The Vocational Division 



VOCATIONAL 
EDUCATION 

EXPANDED VOCATIONAL TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES 

As an integral part of its educational program, Hinds Junior College 
offers vocational training to students who are interested in either full-time 
vocational or trades training work. 

The vocational courses now offered are radio and television theory; re- 
pair and code; barbering; automotive mechanics; body and fender repairs; 
woodworking; mechanical drawing or engineering drafting; machine shop; 
refrigeration and air conditioning; electric motor repairs; general elec- 
tricity and wiring; office machines repair; airplane engine mechanics; and 
automotive machinist. 

Since the Vocational Department is rapidly expanding to meet the de- 
mand for this type of training, present courses will be expanded and new 
courses will be added as seen appropriate. The Department is under the 
direction of a coordinator and ten instructors who have had both formal 
and practical training. 

Vocational students pay the same fees and tuition as regular college 
students (see EXPENSES— page 25).- The same refund policy is also 
applicable to them. 

The course of study in the Vocational Department is set up so that 
trainees may enter on any Monday and take a normal load. Entrance is de- 
pendent in no way upon previous schooling or education. 

Students interested in enrolling in this phase of training at Hinds Junior 
College should contact the Co-ordinator, Vocational Training, Hinds Junior 
College, Raymond, Mississippi, phone 857-4011. 



COURSES 



Machine Shop 60 — The objective of this course is to train students in 
the fundamental operations of machine tools and to equip them to enter 
production as efficiently trained machine operators. Classroom work includes 
mechanical drawing, mathematical problems, and studies related to the 
various phases of machine shop work. Laboratory work, or actual shop prac- 
tice, consists of training in bench work, lathe work, milling machine operations, 
drill presses, metal planers, dole saws, instrument reading, tool making, 
etc. This course runs for 18 calendar months meeting six clock hours a day 
for five school days per week (30 hours a week). 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Pago 99 



The Vocational Division 



Auto Mechanics 70 — The many problems and techniques related to the 
various types of automotive equipment and tools are stressed through lecture 
and recitation. Actual shop work is required. This work gives students much 
practical experience in overhauling engines, transmissions, clutches, rear 
ends; replacing and adjusting brakes; and other practices that are encounter- 
ed in the repairing of various makes and models of automotive equipment. 
This course runs for 18 calendar months, meeting six clock hours a day for 
five school days per week (30 hours a week). 

Auto Body and Fender Repair 75 — The objective of the Auto Body and 
Fender Repair Course is to give a student knowledge needed in diagnosing 
a problem and to help him to develop skill to meet the needs of a body and 
fender repairman. 

This course consists of both theory and shop exercises in straightening 
fenders and body, lining up the body, and learning the use of each individual 
tool or piece of equipment. The student learns how to install glass and how 
to make up and install upholstery; how to assemble and disassemble auto 
bodies. He is taught he technique of welding— both gas and electric; the 
theory of paints and painting and how to mix colors; the theory of lead burn- 
ing of welded joints; and the theory of owning and operating a shop and of 
maintaining equipment. This course runs for 18 calendar months, meeting 
six clock hours a day for five school days per week (30 hours a week). 

Frequency Modulation and Television 85 — This course is outlined to 
give a combined study of Basic Radio Frequency Modulation, Transmitting 
and Receving Equipment, each from the theoretical and practical standpoints. 
A comprehensive study of circuit construction and operation is made by 
each student in the classroom. Also laboratory facilities afford the actual 
building and testing procedures of each type of equipment. 

The last phase of this course is outlined to give a study of special equip- 
ment used in Television and a new association of principles previously 
studied. Both theory and shop practice work are done in this term of study. 
The laboratory facilities afford the student every opportunity in construction 
and maintenance of equipment This course runs for 24 calendar months, 
meeting six clock hours a day for five school days per week (30 hours a week). 

General Electricity and Wiring 90 — In this course, the fundamental theory 
of both alternating and direct current is studied. This includes such studies 
as electrical laws and interpretations, wiring diagrams for practically all 
types of appliances, and the study of the Electrical Code and its application. 

Field work, either in the Electricity Shop or on the campus, constitutes 
an important part of the course. Actual wiring of homes and buildings is 
done; line work is practiced; and various types of switches, controls and 
other electrical devices are studied and wired. Both generation and distribution- 
tion of electricity, including transformer work, are accomplished, as well 

Page 100 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Vocational Division 



as numerous items under the heading of General Electricity and Wiring. 
This course runs for 18 calendar months, meeting six clock hours a day 
for five school days per week (30 hours a week). 

Electric Motor Repair 95— Lecture and recitation in this course stress 
the fundamental theory of general electricity— both A.C. and D.C. The stu- 
dent is thus equipped for an understanding of motor and generator char- 
acteristics, wiring diagrams and connections, and other essentials of elec- 
trical rotating equipment. 

Actual laboratory work, in the form of supervised shop practice, supple- 
ments the classroom studies. In the shop, electric motors and generators are 
completely reconditioned. This process includes such practices as complete 
rewinding, replacing worn bearings, replacing starting switches and brushes, 
and the reconditioning of motors and electrical machinery for proper working 
order. This course runs for 18 calendar months, meeting six clock hours a 
day for five school days per week (30 hours a week). 

Electric Refrigeration and 1 Air Conditioning 100— Principles of refrigera- 
tion, refrigerant chemicals. Types of refrigeration units and systems, com- 
pressors, evaporators, condensers. Overhaul and repair of compressors, 
controls, valves, motors, seals, thermostats, etc. Refrigerator troubles and 
symptoms. Service tests and methods. Installation methods. Safety rules 
and equipment. Principles, operation and care of air conditioning units an^ 
systems. Pnom coolers and central plants. Laboratory tests on air condi- 
tioning system. Ducts, air flow, air filtering, washing, dehumidifying, cool- 
ing. Heat loss and heat load calculations; duct design and airduct distribution 
systems. This course runs for 18 calendar months, meeting six clock hours a 
day for five school days per week (30 hours a week). 

Advanced Refrigeration 105 — A study of special phases of heavy refrig- 
erators, installing of cooling towers, water circulating pumps, and coring. 
This course runs for 12 months meeting six clock hours daily for five school 
days per week (30 hours a week). Prerequisite: Basic Electric Refrigeration. 

Related Subjects — A program is planned whereby students in all phases 
of vocational work have the opportunity, and in many cases are required, to 
spend a certain proportion of their time on related subjects of work. The 
related courses, such as welding, general electricity, mathematics, etc., are 
separate courses set up to meet the needs of individual trainees. The program 
is inaugurated for the purpose of advancing. a student's knowledge of his 
own skill, as well as making him versatile in many respects. 

Barbering 110— This course, initiated by a joint committee representing 
the State Barbering Board, the Veterans' Administration, and authorities of 
Hinds Junior College, offers excellent training for students entering this 
field of work. 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 101 



The Vocational Division 



Classroom work includes the varied studies related to the .barbering 
profession. In addition, each student is assigned a complete barbering unit, 
and since the Barber Shop is located on the College campus, extensive prac- 
tice work is provided. This course runs for nine calendar months, meeting 
eight clock hours a day for five days a week (40 hours a week). 

A personal interview with the instructor is required before an application 
is accepted for this course. 

Office Machine Repair 120 — This course covers a study of the functions 
and adjustments of the standard makes of typewriters, electric typewriters, 
hand and electric adding machines. The cleaning, adjusting, and estimating 
cost of service to office machines. This course runs for 26 calendar months, 
meeting six clock hours a day for five school days per week (30 hours a week). 

Airplane and Engine Mechanics 130 — The aviation course includes the 
overhauling of all types of aircraft engines from 65 horsepower to 2,00C 
horsepower, also the jet engine; complete aircraft overhaul, both metal and 
fabric covered; aircraft assembling and rigging of all types of planes; service 
of the hydraulic systems; repair and overhaul of props; airport management 
and airport maintenance. Flying may also be had with the cost On a mini- 
mum hourly basis. Upon the completion of the mechanics course the student 
will be eligible to take the CAA examination for the A&E mechanic's license. 
This course runs for 18 calendar months meeting six clock hours a day for 
five school days per week (30 hours a week). 

Automotive Machinist 170 — This course is designed for the mechanic 
who wants to better qualify himself in the field of repairing automobile 
engines. He is taught through theory and practice how to do the following: 
bore cylinder blocks, sleeve cylinder blocks, repair cracks in cylinder blocks, 
repair and install valve seats, size pistons, fit piston pins, size rod and main 
bearings, re-size connecting rods, grind crankshafts, and assemble motors. 
Prerequisite: Auto Mechanics 70 or its equivalent. This course runs for 12 
months, meeting six clock hours a day for five school days per week (30 
hours per week. 



Page 102 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 




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The Student Directory 



SCHOOL ROSTER 

1964-1965 



COLLEGE SOPHOMORES 

First Semester Sharon Louise Brown, Jackson 

Hugh Fairman Acuff, Jr., Vicksburg Mary Faith Bryant, Brookhaven 

James Hermon Adams, Jr., Bay- Hugh Thomas Bufkin, Jackson 

mond John Scott Burke, Jackson 

Oren Ralph Ainsworth, Mendenhall Kathy Dianne Burney, Jackson 

Jackie Lynn Alexander, Jackson Bonnie Burns, Brookhaven 

Kathy Priscilla Allen, Mize Lynda Fay Busby, Jackson 

Robert Leon Alliston, Florence Glenda Nell Calhoun, Forest 

Sandra Jane Ammons, Jackson Bobbie Carol Caldwell, Jackson 

Gladys P. Anderson, Jackson William Hilden Callahan, Jr., Jack- 
Merrell Edwin Anderson, Jackson son 

Taffy Leigh Anderson, Jackson Charlie Griffin Carlisle, Jr., Utica 

John Dewey Andrews, Natchez Wallie Reid Carpenter, McCarley 

Janis Arinder, Jackson Charles Sampson Carroll, Jackson 

Richard Milton Banks, Jr., Vicks- Carolyn Jean Keeshan Carter, 

burg Jackson 

Angelia Huckaby Baker, Jackson Champion Lemul Alvin, Vicksburg 

Carol Marie Barlow, Vicksburg Dwayne Edmund Chapman, Tay- 
John Noble Barlow, Vicksburg lorsville 

Joann Beasley, Raymond Steve S. Cheatham, Bentonia 

John Wayne Belknap, Edwards Ronald Francis Clements, Jackson 

Michael Clark Bennett, Clarksdale James Ray Coleman, Jr., Georgia 

Lloyd Douglas Berrong, Raymond William Stanley Collins, Utica 

Wilburn Wayne Best, Jackson James Harris Conerly, Jackson 

Mary Kathleen Bias, Jackson Allien Day Cook, Jackson 

Warner Edsol Biedenharn, Jr., Michael Paul Cottingham, Jackson 

Vicksburg Elizabeth Ann Cox, Jackson 

Barbara Leah Biggs, Jackson Shelia Elaine Cox, Florence 
Mary Charlotte Bleakney, Brandon Billlie Jean Craft, Magee 

Percy Lee Boell, Vicksburg Jerry Gordon Crow, Liberty 

Floyd Paxton Bond, Jackson Ivan Hamilton Cunningham, Jr., 
Clifford Debs Boyce, Jackson Jackson 

Linna Cecilia Boykin, Louin John Lee Cunningham, Vicksburg 
Wallace Emmett Bradley, Raymond j u dieth Ann Davidson, Arkansas 

Sharon Lee Brague Ohio Jameg Andrew Dayi Yaz0Q cit 

Adrian Gary Brantley, Jackson _ , _ * . 

Gerald David Brewer, Vicksburg John J ' Davls ' Yaz0 ° Clt ^ 

Peggy Dorough Brewer, Jackson Lewis Ernest Davis, Jr., Terry 

Thomas Edwin Brinson, Jackson Walter Dell Davis, Jackson 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 103 



The Student Directory. 



Marsha Lucille Demeranville, 

Clinton 
Newell A. Dennison, Jr., Jackson 
Janie Elizabeth Denson, Jackson 
William Albert Dickens, Jr., Jack 

son 
William Barney Dickson, Jackson 
Vincent King DiRago, Vicksburg 
Diana Kay Dixon, Vicksburg 
Ora Elizabeth Doddridge, Jackson 
Marie Antoinette Donnell, Vicks- 
burg 
Rodney Brown Dooley, Woodville 
Charles William Dorman, Vicksburg 
Sandra Jon Dougherty, Oxford 
Harvey Arthur Downs, Vicksburg 
James Earl Downs, Jackson 
Judy Grace Drew, Jackson 
James Lee Dukes, Jackson 
Steve Wendell Duncan, Jackson 
Connie Deweese Dunn, Jackson 
Robert Donald Eady, Jackson 
Marilyn Ruth Dunn, Jackson 
James Smith Easterwood, Jackson 
Diane Kaye Eddy, Jackson 
Janna MargeryAnna Edmondson, 

Jackson 
Martha Sharon Edwards, Jackson 
William Arthur Edwards, Jackson 
Sharon Gail Ellis, Port Gibson 
Brenda Charlotte Erwin, Jackson 
Norman Stanley Etheridge, Jr., 

Jackson 
Luana Ethridge, Brandon 
William Wyatt Farrior, Raymond 
Carol Glenn Ferguson, Louisiana 
Helen Judith Ferguson, Utica 
Marjorie Ann Ferguson, Jackson 
Peggy Irene Flanagan, Learned 
Harold Glen Ford, Vicksburg 
Lonnie Gray Ford, Vicksburg 
Marvin Hubert Foster, Jackson 
Edward Matthew Fowler, Vicksburg 
Mary E. Melsheimer Fowler, 

Vicksburg 
Mary Elizabeth Frankinson, Jack- 
son 



Johnny Alex Franklin, Redwood 
Harold Ray Freeman, Jackson 
Thomas Edward Freeman, Jackson 
Ann Caro Freret, Bentonia 
Norman Creighton Gannon, Jackson 
Bob Edward Garner, Jackson 
Houston Charles Gascon, Louisiana 
Clifton Donald Geter, Vicksburg 
Claude Carter Gholson, Jackson 
James Robert Giles, Vicksburg 
James Gordon Goodwill, Jr., Jack- 
son 
Linda Anne Gordon, Vicksburg 
John Clifford Grant, Jackson 
Thomas Rdchard Grantham, Jack- 
son 
Gary Arnold Greenough, Jackson 
Margaret Pamela Guice, Jackson 
Carla Faye Haas, Jackson 
Carolyn Frances Hagerman, Jack- 
son 
Doris Faye Hall, Vicksburg 
Frederick Kistner Hall, Jr., Jack- 
son 
James Kavanaugh Hand, Jackson 
Janice Hand, Raymond 
Danny Fred Hankins, Jackson 
George Edgar Hardage, Jackson 
Sue Loraine Hardy, Jackson 
Rickey Coleman Harrell, Pelahat- 

chie 
Linda Susan Harrielson, Bolton 
Delores Blount Harris, Decatur 
John Rjexal Harris, Jackson 
John Rjobert Harris, Vicksburg 
Patrick Charles Harris, Vicksburg 
Robert Hilton Harris, Jackson 
Edgar Thomas Harrison, Jr., Nat- 
chez 
Cary Hartfield, Jackson 
Anthony Joe Hartman, Jacskson 
Linda Kay Hartzog, Jackson 
Ronald Turner Havard, Jackson 
Diana Marie Hays, Jackson 
Patricia Adelle Hearn, Vicksburg 
Jean Anne Heimann, Vicksburg 



Page 104 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Student Directory 



Sylvia Kathleen Herrington, Vicks- 

burg 
Susan Kay Herron, Jackson 
Jamie Lynn Hilderbrand, Redwood 
Lu Alice Hill, Brandon 
Robert Edward Hodges, Forest 
Sara Lynn Hodo, McComb 
Thomas Hester Holcomb, Jackson 
Don K. Holder, Jackson 
Sidney Clyde Holliday, Raymond 
Carl Dillon Hollingsworth, Terry 
Charles Manley Hood, Florence 
James Riley Hood, III, Jackson 
John Marcus Horn, Jackson 
William Howell Horn, Jackson 
Henry Fielding Hossley, Vicksburg 
Mary Elizabeth Hothan, Jackson 
Wilson Comer Hudson, Jackson 
Sylvia Ann Huff, Pelahatchie 
Martha Elizabeth Hunter, Biloxi 
Jerry Husky, Vicksburg 
Sylvia Ann Ingram, Jackson 
William Baxter Inman, Jr., Jackson 
Nairn Habeeb Issa, Lebanon 
Virginia Ann Ivy, Forest 
Paulette Margaret Jabour, Vicks- 
burg 
Tommy Edward Jackson, Jackson 
James Spencer Jenkins, Jackson 
Troy Lee Jenkins, Utica 
William O'Brien Jenkins, Jr., Jack- 
son 
Lewis A. Jernigan, Jackson 
David Butler Johnson, Jackson 
Frederick Anderson Johnson, 

Jackson 
Lyda Ann Johnston, Clinton 
Barbara Sue Jones, Crystal Springs 
Bobby Lee Jones, Vicksburg 
Cheryl Ann Jones, Vicksburg 
Freddie Wayne Jones, Vicksburg 
Ronald Eugene Jones, Brandon 
John Randell Juarez, Jackson 
Nancy Lou Kaiser, Jackson 
Melvin Ladale Keen, Vicksburg 
Frank Lee Keenum, Jackson 



John Allan Keith, Utica 
\llen Forest Kelly, Jackson 
Lawrence Woodrow Kern, Jackson 
Glen Allan Killough, Centreville 
Empress Gloria Kilpatrick, Jack- 
son 
Ronald K. Kimbro, Natchez 
Larry Ellzey Kirton, Terry 
Edward Carl Kitchens, Jackson 
Ralph Maurice Knighton, Green- 
ville 
James Patrick Knouse, Jackson 
Joy Rjuth Kreger, Clinton 
Larry Kent Lambert, Jackson 
Arthur David Lane, Vicksburg 
Jo Ann Lawry, Vicksburg 
Dorothy Annette Lear, Tylertown 
Hollis Eugene Lee, Edwards 
Bettye Jane Lewis, Terry 
Joan Evelyn Lewis, Jackson 
Suzette Ann Lewis, Terry 
Jesse James Lilley, Jr., Crystal 

Springs 
Lyda Lindigrin, Vicksburg 
Charles Wesley Lindsey, Jackson 
Stanley John Litwin, Yazoo City 
Margaret Sue Lloyd, Jackson 
Michael Kenneth Lloyd, Vicksburg 
Beverly Jean Loftin, Jackson 
John William Logan, Jackson 
Aubrey Victor Loper, Jackson 
Leonard James Luft, Jackson 
Robert Shepherd Lumsden, Brook- 
haven 
Vernon Tullos McAlpin, Jackson 
Jo Lynn McArthur, Jackson 
Patricia Ann McClendon, Jackson 
Mariann McClurg, Vicksburg 
Joseph Charles McCullough, Jr., 

Jackson 
Smith Prentiss McDonald, Jackson 
Betty Iwana McGee, Brandon 
Allie Patricia McGraw, Jackson 
Russell Wise McGuffee, Jr., Parch- 

man 
Wayne Rivers Mclntyre, Jackson 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 105 



The Student Directory 



O'Lynda Lee McLelland, Jackson 
Durward Lee McMillan, Jackson 
Bill McMurtray, Jackson 
John Henry McNair, Clinton 
James Philip McNeece, Raymond 
John Phillip McRae, Jr., Jackson 
Don Carey Magee, Jackson 
Elizabeth Diane Mahaffey, Jackson 
Jimmie Clyde Mangum, Jackson 
Loyd Drake Marbury, Jackson 
Diane Gayle Marler, Jackson 
Anna Maria Martin, Puckett 
Guy Paul Martin, Clinton 
Barbara Sue May, Jackson 
Dickie Monroe May, Brandon 
Robert Murrah Mayo, Raymond 
Edwin Samuel Melsheimer, Jr., 

Vicksburg 
Everett Morris Meriedeth, Jackson 
Frances Irene Messina, Jackson 
John Robert Middleton, Vicksburg 
Jo K. Miller, Collins 
Thomas Fletcher Miller, Florence 
Glenda Gail Milner, Jackson 
Elisa Elena Minor, Jackson 
Helen Kay Mockbee, Jackson 
Harvey Charles Mooer, Jackson 
Delton Montie Moore, Terry 
Oscar Ray Moore, Brandon 
Wendon Preston Moore, Jackson 
Alton Frederic Morgan, Jackson 
Burney Wade Morgan, Jackson 
James T. Morgan, Florence 
Joseph Guy Morgan, Jackson 
Winston Thomas Morgan, Crystal 

Springs 
William Aubrey Morrow, Jackson 
Bayless Fisher Morton, Jackson 
William Andrew Moser, Jackson 
Linda Jane Mullins, Brandon 
John Percy Murphy, Jackson 
Cary Gilbert Neal, Jackson 
Emily Sue Neal, Jayess 
Lucy Jane Neal, Florence 
Danny Dale Neely, Jackson 
Donald Walter Neisler, Brandon 
William Riley Nelson, Vicksburg 



Sandra Ann Nicola, Vicksburg 
Brooks Troy Noble, Jackson 
Robert Earl Northern, Jackson 
Fauzi Afif Nosser, Lebanon 
Roger H. Nunley, Fayette 
Robert Erwin Oakman, Florenme 
Virginia Lou Orr, Jackson 
James Henry Packer, III, Jackson 
David Franklin Park, Vicksburg 
Gale Larry Parker, Yazoo City 
Deborah Elizabeth Patterson, Jack- 
son 
John Phillip Patrick, Jackson 
Pamela Faye Paul, Arkansas 
Doris Paxton, Brookhaven 
William Edwin Payne, Clinton 
Michael W. Perry, Grenada 
William Anthony Perry, Jr., Jack- 
son 
Patricia Kaye Pettway, Vicksburg 
Marjorie A. Peusch, Jackson 
James Berry Pevey, Natchez 
Nan Davis Phillips, Clinton 
William Thomas Phillips, Jackson 
Robert John Pickenpaugh, Jackson 
Tommy Lynn Pittman, Utica 
John Dennis Plemons, Florence 
Billy Gordon Polk, Mt. Olive 
James David Polk, Raymond 
Marvin Howard Ponder, Vicksburg 
Harry LaDonn Powell, Jackson 
Guy Alva Pressgrove, Jackson 
Kendall Roy Puckett, Jackson 
Victor Bruce Puckett, Utica 
Arthur Charles Rankin, Jackson 
Danie Ann Reaves, Jackson 
Gary Arthur Reed, Jackson 
Ellis Whitten Rieid, Jackson 
Jack Halsey Rhodes, Pelahatchie 
Earl Eugene Robbins, Pelahatchie 
Earle Buford Rochester, Jr., Ray- 
mond 
Pamela Elizabeth Rodgers, Pachuta 
Robert Lowell Roe, Vicksburg 
Patrica Lynn Rogers, Jackson 
Cheryl Lynn Rogillio, Port Gibson 
Charley Ann Ross, Jackson 



Page 106 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Student Directory 



Cathleen Alberta Ruebsamen, 

Vicksburg 
Martin Gary Russell, Yazoo City- 
Larry Orville Ryals, Jackson 
James David Schaeffer. Vicksburg 
Mary Eli^e Schultz. Vicksburg 
William Harris Scoggins. Florence 
Larry Donald Sebren. Florence 
Dnn Sellari, Jr., Clinton 
Clifford Alan Seyler, Jackson 
Nixi Ftta Shaw, Crystal Snrings 
Billy Glynn Shearer, Jackson 
Thom^e F-Ward Shelton, Jr., 

Starkvill'i 
Marleen Carol Shoemake, Jackson 
Donal Travis Shook. Jackson 
Salvia T^lbert Shntts. Mendenhall 
Charles Richard Shuff, "Ravmond 
Carmel Josenh Stena, Vicksburg 
Joe c *~nley Simpson, Jr., Vicks- 
burg 
George Barrv Skeltnn, Jackson 
Billy Leon Smith. Natchez 
Harold Kenneth Smith, Brookhaven 
Philip McLean Smith, Brandon 
Vera Frances Smith, Jackson 
Richard Kelly Speight, Jackson 
Teresa Ann Speir. Jackson 
Charles Tolliver Squires, Jackson 
Danipl Jackson Steadham, Jack- 
son 
Mary Frances Stennett, Magee 
Martha Anderson Stewart, Yazoo 

City 
David Earl Stockstill, Brandon 
Vincent Joseph Strieker, Jackson 
Jacqueline Sue Strickland, Yazoo 

City 
Roy Lee Summers, Vicksburg 
Mildred Dianne Sutherland, Jack- 
son 
Vivian Sharelle Tait, Jackson 
William Brown Tanner, Jr., Vicks- 
burg 



John W. Taylor, Jr., Jackson 
Sandra Anita Terry, Jackson 
Robert Dean Thomas, Jackson 
Wavmon Dudley Tigrett, Brandon 
Polly McHann Tillman, Edwards 
James Truman Townsend. Pattison 
Rebecca Joyce Tucker, Ridgeland 
Charlotte Ann Tyler, Vicksburg 
Vivian E. Usrv, Jackson 
Carolyn Ann Vallado, Jackson 
Ercie Howard Vickers, Jr., Jack- 
son 
Jill Whitlock Walden, Jackson 
Jerrv Raymond Walker, Crystal 

Springs 
Virginia Dare Wallace, Jackson 
Alfred Earl Walters, Jackson 
Fjob^rt Franklin Ward, French 

Camp 
Nona Kav Ware, Raymond 
James Connie Warren. Vicksburg 
Thomas Cabe Weathersby, Florence 
David Case Weeks, Jackson 
Roy H. Weindel, Columbia 
Darryl Scott Wesson, Vicksbur? 
Albert Brown Westbrook, Jr., Lib- 
erty 
Melvin Lewis Westerfield, Jackson 
Homer Alexander Whittington, Nat- 
chez 
Joyce Allenne Wilkinson, Jackson 
Patricia Ann Williams. Natchez 
Seth Ward Williams, Jackson 
Danny Isom Williamson, Jackson 
William Douglas Williamson, III, 

Clinton 
James R. Wilson, Hollandale 
Marcy Lynn Wilson, Jackson 
Henry Loyd Wiltshire, Jackson 
Billy Tyree Womack, Mendenhall 
Jimmy Dale Wood, Pelahatchie 
Mary Linda Worley r Jackson 
Larry Huston Young, Jackson 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Pag* 107 



The Student Directory. 



COLLEGE FRESHMEN 



Lawrence Elmer Abernathy, Jack- 
son 
Linda Doris Abies, Madison 
William Spere Abraham, Port Gib- 
son 
Carolyn Ann Adcock, Jackson 
Anita Louise Ainsworth, Jackson 
Martin Dale Ainsworth, Jackson 
Patricia Sue Ainsworth, Jackson 
Stephen Warren Alderman, Jackson 
Jerry Wayne Alexander, Jackson 
Marvin Noel Alford, Jackson 
Dennis Spedale Allen, Louisiana 
Robert Newton Allen, Jackson 
William Curtis Allen, Jackson 
Julius Wayne Alsobrooks, Jackson 
Linda Elaine Ammons, Jackson 
Cathy Susan Anderson, Vicksburg 
Donald Walter Anderson, Bolton 
JoAnn Louise Anderson, Vicksburg 
Patricia Marie Anderson, Jackson 
Ronald Louis Anderson, Bolton 
Alvin John Andrews, Jackson 
Robert Wilson Andrews, Vicksburg 
Alfred Ray Armour, Jackson 
Vicki Ann Armstrong, Raymond 
Elige Edd Arnold, Clinton 
Frank Madison Ashley, Vicksburg 
Richard H. Ashley, Florida 
James Edward Bagby, Vicksburg 
Hubert Frank Bailey, Jackson 
Carolyn Ann B airfield, Mendenhall 
Cecil Lamar Baker, Jackson 
Ellenor Shannon Baker, Jackson 
Leon Burnis Baker, Jr., Clinton 
Mary Louise Balfanz, Minnesota 
Valerie Ann Ballard, Clinton 
Carolyn Teresa Banchetti, Vicks- 
burg 
Marilyn Darnell Banes, Raymond 
Charles Thomas Barnes, Braxton 
Mary Ellen Barrett, Brandon 
Ned Terry Barrett, Jackson 
Willie June Barron, Raymond 
Janice Elena Bass, Jackson 



Lillian Diane Bates, Jackson 
Lynda Martha Bates, Germany 
Mable Bates, Jackson 
Elizabeth Jane Batterman, Madison 
Terry Oliver Baumann, Natchez 
Douglas Beard, Jr., Bolton 
Sidney H. Beasley, Jackson 
Michael Terry Beauehamp, Jackson 
Lila Suzette Beckner, Tylertown 
Linda Carol Becton, Jackson 
Woody Barney Bell, Jackson 
Mary F. Bellar, Jackson 
Angela Rue Bennett, Natchez 
James Hobson Bennett, Jackson 
Patsy Gwen Berch, Crystal Springs 
John Alexis Bergman, Jackson 
Ella Kay Berry, Jackson 
Linda Sue Berry, Jackson 
Mary Jo Berryhill. Learned 
Alton Bo Biggs, Jr., Jackson 
Leon Theodore Bivens, Vicskburg 
Frank Woodrow Black, Jackson 
William Elwood Black, Natchez 
Denny Alan Blaylock, Jackson 
James Hugh Blaylock, Jackson 
Billy Joe Boell, Vicksburg 
Donna Lynn Boggan, Braxton 
Larry Eugene Boggs, Jackson 
Glenna Mae Boling. Jackson 
Raymond Edward Bonner, Natchez 
Jimmy Lionel Bos well, Jackson 
G. Kenneth Boutwell, Jackson 
John Paul Bowman, Pelahatchie 
Claude C. Boyd, Florence 
Dennis Gordon Boyd, Jackson 
Paul Wilbur Boyd, Jr., Vicksburg 
Robert Kendrick Boyd, Jackson 
David Lawrence Boyer, Jackson 
James Richard Boyette, Jackson 
Clifton Curtis Boykin, Jackson 
Edward Wayne Boykin, Jackson 
Paul Leland Bradshaw, Morton 
Cleve Daniel Brady, Jackson 
Thurman Louis Branning, Vicks- 
burg 



P»go 108 



HINDS -JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Student Directory 



Roger Chapman Brashear, Jackson 
William Carlos Breed en, Jackson 
Linda Gale Brent, Vicksburg 
Olen Brewer, IT, Clinton 
Ira Montgomery Brister, Jackson 
George Collins Brock, Raymond 
Claude Ray Brooks, Vicksburg 
John Staley Brookshire, Jackson 
Hubert Perry Brown, Jackson 
Joyce Marie Brown, Florence 
Robert Douglas Brown, Jackson 
Carol Yvonne Broyles, Magnolia 
Janet Bryant, Crystal Springs 
Rebecca Helen Bryant, Jackson 
Linda Anne Bryant, Vicksburg 
Herbert Ray Bufkin, Utica 
Marjorie Marie Bufkin, Utica 
James Everett Bumgarner, Jackson 
Johnny Alan Burch, Jackson 
Robert Lee Burkett, Virginia 
Laura Jane Burlingame, Jackson 
George Scott Burnet, Jackson 
Paul T. Burnham, Brandon 
Gary Allen Burns, Jackson 
Patricia Dianne Burns, Vicksburg 
Richard Lamar Burns, Jackson 
Elizabeth Anne Butler, Jackson 
Donnie Ray Butler, Vicksburg 
Jewel King Butler, Jr., Natchez 
Linda Sue Burgeis, Jackson 
John Fremon Byrd, Jr., Pearl 
Sandra Kay Cage, Edwards 
Edward Prentiss Cammack, Terry 
Charles Cotten Campbell, Jackson 
Edward Lamar Campbell, Jackson 
Kathy Ann Campbell, Vicksburg 
Thomas Houston Campbell, Vicks- 
burg 
Paul V. Carollo, Vicksburg 
Toni Lee Carr, Bentonia 
Joe Larry Carter, Jackson 
Ruth Ann Carter, Raymond 
Samuel Gene Carter, Jackson 
Davis Boyd Case, Raymond 
Thomas Wilburn Case, Jackson 
Alice Ann Caston, Jackson 



Jackie Cauthen, Madison 
Vernon Anthony Cavin, Natchez 
James Allen Champion, Jr., Jack- 
son 
Charles Thomas Champion, Jackson 
Jack Byrnes Chance, Natchez 
William Lee Chancellor, Jackson 
Harry Terrell Chandler, Jr., Jack- 
son 
Henry Allen Chandler, Carthage 
Henry Bailey Chandler, Jackson 
Ronnie Lee Chandler, Jackson 
Carla Ann Chapman, Jackson 
Larry Lane Chapman, Jackson 
Sharon Ann Chapman, Terry 
Thomas Alfred Chapman, Utica 
Lora N. Chappell, Jackson 
James Gunter Cheatham, Jackson 
Habel Darlene Christenberry, 

Vicksburg 
Evelyn Christor>her, Greenwood 
Kenneth Ray Churchill, Jackson 
Cecilia Gwynn Clark, Jackson 
Jerry Lynn Clark, Pelahatchie 
Marjorie Lynn Clark, Jackson 
Terry Glynn Clark, Pelahatchie 
James W. Cliburn, Raymond 
Phillip Glen Cliburn, Alabama 
Susan Dianne Cliburn, Raymond 
Shirley Payne Clontz, Jackson 
James Isom Cockrell, Jackson 
Johnnv Paul Coghlan, Clinton 
John William Coleman, Mendenhall 
Vera Louise Coleman, Jackson 
Wallace Van Coleman, Jackson 
Chester Leland Collier. Jackson 
James David Collins, Utica 
Michael Don Colvert, Natchez 
Stanley Eugene Comfort, Jackson 
Charles Edwin Conniff, Jackson 
Beverly Gayle Conrad, Natchez 
Patricia Anne Conwav, Vicksburg 
Paul Denton Cook, Vicksburg 
Shirley Rebecca Cook, Utica 
Samuel Rex Cooksey, Jackson 
Linda Faye Cooper, Pelahatchie 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Pifl# 199 



The Student Directory. 



Ronald Woodrow Cooper, Jackson Arlin Keith Dease, Louisiana 
Richard Beard Copeland, Jackson Mary Elizabeth Derryberry, Brook- 



David Neil Corbin, Vicksburg 
Randolph Foster Core, Jackson 
Linda Dianne Corley, Jackson 
Larry Douglas Courtney, Jackson 
Pat Henry Courtney, Jackson 
Sarah Ann Courtney, Jackson 
Waymon Nevitte Covington, Ray- 
mond 
Donald Eugene Cowart, Magee 
Vicki Dallas Cowsert, Jackson 
Norman Houston Cox, Bolton 
Rjobert Elton Coy, Brandon 
Phillip Murray Craft, Jackson 
Mary Jane Crain, Jackson 



haven 
Eugene Everett Dick, Jr., Vicks- 
burg 
Virginia Sue Dorr, Jackson 
Linda Fay Dorris, Jackson 
Russell Edwin Dorris, Jackson 
Joan Carol Douglas, Jackson 
John Phillip Dove, Jackson 
Joe David Dowe, Utica 
Albert Dalier Downing, Jackson 
Claude Donald Downing, Jackson 
James Russell Downing, Jackson 
Larry Eugene Downing, Natchez 
Larry Gayle Downs, Vicksburg 



Burnell Thomas Crawford, Jackson Sara Lynn Downs, Jackson 

Jim J. Cronin, Clinton Ronald Blackburn Dungan, Vicks- 

John Thomas Cullom, Jackson burg 

Royce Bridges Culpepper, Jackson Edward Ray Dunnaway, Jackson 

Hugh Eldridge Cummings, Vicks- 
burg 

Elizabeth Ann Cunningham, Jack- 
son 

Robert Daniel Cupit, Jackson 

Paula Maria Curry, Vicksburg 

Beatrice Gordon Curtis, Jackson 

Thelbert J. Curtis, Vicksburg 

Donald Eugene Dahly, Jr., Texas 

Anita Jan Dale, Prentiss 

Linda Faye Dale, Jackson 

James Edwin Daley, Jackson 

Dennis Jerome Damico, Jackson 

Harold Bishop Dampeer. Jackson 

Lydia Jo Daniel, Sand Hill 

Roy Cecil Daniels, Jackson 

Bruce Ellsworth Davis, Jackson 

Charlotte Sue Davis, Edwards 

Edith Kay Davis, Jackson 

Flournoy Thomas Davis, Jackson 

Paul Edward Davis, Jackson 

Paul Sidnev Davis. Jackson 

Raymond Thomas Davis, Jackson 

Shirley Anne Davis, Natchez 



son 
Robert Lyerly Duval, Vicksburg 
Brian Patrick Durst, Jr., Louisiana 
Maydris Mildred Dyess, Moss Point 
Peggy Ann Echols, Jackson 
James Robert Edwards, Jackson- 
John Robert Elliott, Jackson 
David Ray Ellis, Pattison 
Dorothy Jean Ellis, Jackson 
Charles Clayton Ely, Pascagoula 
James Marcus Ely, Pascagoula 
Earl Evan Emerick, Natchez 
Truus Louise Engels, Jackson 
William N. Ernest, Jr., Newton 
James Edward Ertle, Jackson 
John Raymond Ertle, Jackson 
Leroy Bruce Eschete, Louisiana 
Buford Bernard Evans, Jr., Vicks- 
burg 
Cheryl Marie Evans, Vicksburg 
James Henry Evans, Jackson 
Bonnie Lynn Everett, Jackson 
Thomas Harrison Everett, Jackson 
Charolene Everitt, Pelahatchie 



Elizabeth Jane Day, Crystal Springs Robert Martin Everitt, Jackson 
Lora Anne Dean, Jackson Herbert McArthur Ewing, Jackson 



P«p« 110 



MINPS 4UNIOR CPkkieS 



The Student Directory 



Wayne Joseph Farris, Vicksburg 
Lana Ferguson, Utica 
Larry Hamel Ferguson, Jackson 
Robert Cecil Ferguson, Jackson 
Pedro Greer Filotis, Venezuela 
Gerald Wayne Findley, Vicksburg 
Jesse John Fineran, Louisiana 
Pamela Denise Fisher, Jackson 
Jerry Keith Fite, Lexington 
Robert Clay Flanagan, Jackson 
Daniel George Flohr, III, Vicksburg 
Bryan Lancaster Fournoy, Vicks- 
burg 
Charles Gordon Floyd, Edwards 
Donald Franklin Floyd, Vicksburg 
Elmer Talmadge Flurry, Canton 
James Robert Fondren, Jackson 
Sandra Lynn Forsmark, Jackson 
Godfrey Ballard Forrester, Natchez 
Carrie Ann Fortenberry, Tylertown 
James Elliott Foster, Vicksburg 
Eleanor Ann Frasier, Jackson 
Anna Frank, Vicksburg 
Helen Suzanne Frankinson, Jackson 
Carolyn Joyce Franklin, Jackson 
Henrietta Frazier. Tinsley 
Dianne French, Pearl 
Linda Carol French, Canton 
Mary Kay Freutel, Vicksburg 
Ronald Kent Frith, Terry 
Harold Claude Frost, Jr., Natchez 
Gordon Allen Gammill, Fayette 
Martha Jo Gary, Hattiesburg 
Omah Randall Gatewood, Jackson 
Michael Edward Geary, Vicksburg 
Robert Brabson Geoghegan, Jr., 

Fayette 
Ghasson George Ghantous, Lebanon 
Carter Hill Gibson, Vicksburg 
Helen Rose Gibson, Lorman 
Jon Boler Gibson, Jackson 
Phyllis Anne Gibson, Jackson 
Albert Lee Gilbert, Brandon 
Margaret Evelyn Gilbert. Jackson 
Clarence Alfred Giles, Vicksburg 
Leo Dell Gill, Jackson 
Mary Charlene Gilliland, Macon 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



William Rhodes Gilmore, II, 

Jackson 
Sandra Jane Gipson, Jackson 
Beverly Elizabeth Glisson, Natchez 
Riobert Hood Godwin, Jackson 
Barbara Lynn Goff, Lucedale 
Joseph Samuel Gonce, Bolton 
Earl Bryant Goolsby, Canton 
Beverly Kaye Gordon, Vicksburg 
Kenneth Lee Gordon, Jackson 
Virginia Ruth Gorum, Jackson 
Samuel Wood Graham, Jackson 
William Larry Graham, Longbeach 
Ruth Ann Grames, Jackson 
Jimmy Lloyd Graves, Jackson 
Harold Gene Gray, Vicksburg 
Walter Edwin Gray, Jackson 
Billy Thomas Greer, Jackson 
Judy Ann Gregg, Jackson 
Robert Elliott Gregory, Jackson 
Ruth Neal Gribble, Jackson 
Wanda Diane Guica, Tylertown 
Benny Ray Gullette, Vicksburg 
Edward Guthrie. Vicksburg 
Edwin Guthrie, Vicksburg 
Johnnie Arthur Hadad, Vicksburg 
David Ross Haddock, Vicksburg. 
Robert Preston Haden. Jackson 
Doric De Hakes, Jackson 
PhilliD Edward Hale. Natchez 
Archie McDonnell Haley, Jr., 

Jackson 
Roy Dewitt Halford, Jackson 
Errol Keith Hall, Jackson 
Thomas Mitchell Hall, Jackson 
Charles Robert Hames. Jackson 
I inda Faye Hampton. Vicksburg 
Harvey Harwood Hanks. Vicksburg 
Richard Louis Hanks, Vicksburg 
Brenda R*ose Hannaford. Oxford 
James Larry Hannon, Raymond 
Bobby Joe Hardy, Bolton 
James Clayton Hardy, Jackson 
Thomas Hardy, Jackson 
Cheryl Kay Harlan, Hattiesburg 
Tommy Jerrell Harmon, Jackson 

P09* 111 



The Student Directory. 



Cecelia Jo Harper, Yazoo City Robert Addie Hinson, Tylertown 
Jack Gregory Harper, Florence Leland Stanford Hitt, Jackson 
Kenneth Edward Harrell, Vicksburg Betty Jean Hitt, Jackson 
Craig Miller Harris, Jackson Wendell Raymond Hodge, Clinton 

Dennis Mobley Harris, Vicksburg William Campbell Hoge, Jackson 
James Alman Harris, Raymond Milton Sayre Holcombe, Jackson 
Jerry Alan Harris, Jackson Ernest R. Holliday, Jackson 

Lynn Louise Harris, Vicksburg Margery Anneta Holliday, Raymond 

William Daniel Harris, Yazoo City Joseph Kendall Hollingsworth, 
William Don Harris, Jackson Crystal Springs 

Bettv Jane Harrison, Jackson Bill Holman, Bolton 

David Lee Harrison, Jackson Mary Edith Holt, Crystal Springs 

Elizabeth Ann Harrison, Florence Judy Helen Hood, Jackson 
Lanny Newton Harrison, Clinton Paul Rogers Hoover, Jackson 
Pamela Harrison, Jackson James Grover Horn, Vicksburg 

Sidney James Hartsfield, II, Richard Anthony Home, Jackson 

Jackson Augustus William Horrell, Jr., 

Allen LeRiay Hasie, Jackson Jackson 

Michael Willis Hataway, Jackson Melba Lynn Horton, Wesson 
Robert Phillip Hatchette, Vicksburg Royce Allen Housley, Florence 
Tommy Quitman Hathorn, Jr., James Floyd Howard, 

Jackson Crystal Springs 

Nellie Rose Havens. Crystal Springs John Robert Howard. Louisiana 
Richard Lee Hawthorne, Jackson Elder Howell, Carlisle 
Sandra Faye Hayes, Meridian Sally Huddleston, Jackson 

Dennis Earl Havward, Jackson Carl Terry Hudson. Vicksburg 
Robert Lewis Heard, Jackson Johnnv Lamar Hudson. Jackson 

Sheron Lyn Heath, Jackson Gary Ennis Hudsoeth, Jackson 

Martin Terence Hebler, Jackson Judy Sanders Hutson, Jackson 
Thomas Michael Hebler. Vicksburg Lowry Hall Ingram, Clinton 
Norma Sandra Hedgepeth, Franklin Wayne Irwin, Vicksburg 

Silver Creek Naeeeb Abdou Jabour. Lebanon 

Barbara Currin Heilbroner, Jackson John Tvler Jacks, Jackson 
Darwin Eugene Hemba, Jackson Peggy Sue Jacks, Vicksburg 
Gary Wilburn Henderson, Ridgeland Eugene Edgar Jackson, Jackson 
Richard Eric Henderson, Jackson Green Albert Jackson, Vicksburg 
Mary Michele Hendricks, Madison Jack Parkes Jackson, Jackson 
Charles Emmett Hendrix, Vicksburg LaWanda Carol Jackson. Jackson 
Dan James Henley, Jackson Bob Purvis James, Puckett 

Donald Glen Henry, Jackson Jimmy Michael James, Canton 

Mary Elizabeth Hickman, Edwards Ina Marie Jenkins, Terry 
John Mixon Higdon, Louisiana Marshall Gilbert Jenkins, Jackson 

Nancy Elizabeth Hilbun, Florence James Phillip Johns, Jackson 
Ima Lois Hill, Jackson Glenda Faye Johnson, Jackson 

Mary Augusta Hill, Jackson Lewis Stephen Johnson, Canton 

Thomas Martin Hilton, Jackson Lyle Charles Johnson, Jackson 



.The Student Directory 



Martha Lynn Johnson, Pelahatchie 
Patricia Dianne Johnson, Jackson 
Raymond Ward Johnson, Jackson 
Sudie Faith Johnson, Jackson 
Webb Charles Johnson, Jackson 
Betty Ruth Jones, Ma gee 
Helen Cecelia Jones, Jackson 
Mary Frances Jones, Louisville 
Myra Dale Jones, Jackson 
Richard Hollis Jones, Jackson 
Robert Terry Jones, Vicksburg 
Sidney Franklin Jones, Sand Hill 
Patricia Ann Jordan, Jackson 
Susan Faye Jordan, Jackson 
Ellis Ellisa Joyner, Jackson 
Sophia Kahl, Brookhaven 
Richard B. Kea, Raymond 
Jordan Whitfield Keathley, 

Yazoo City 
Norma Jean Keel, Southaven 
Charles Brister Keeler, Clinton 
Karen Keifer, Jackson 
Judy Margaret Keith, Jackson 
Joseph Edward Kelly, Jackson 
Mary Sue Kenmore, Jackson 
Virginia Sue Kenmore, Jackson 
Rjichard Lewis King, Jackson 
Sandra Nell Kinzey, Jackson 
Donald Anthony Kirby, Jackson 
Gretchen Louise Kirk, Jackson 
Kate Little, Cleveland 
Emilie Victoria Kizer, Terry 
Albert McGee Kleinman, Jr., 

Vicksburg 
Sandra Lynn Knauss, Jackson 
Bob Knott, Jr., Yazoo City 
Glenn Wayne Kuykendall, Magnolia 
Patrick B. Kyle, Jackson 
Carole Christine Lack, Jackson 
James H. LaCook, Jr., Jackson 
Cecil W. Landrum, Jr., Clinton 
Daniel Joseph Lasky, Jackson 
Michael Wayne Lasseter, Jackson 
Leonard Louis Lauderdale, Madison 
James Lawrence, Jackson 
Vivian Violet Leach, Puckett 



Wayne Carlton Leach, Terry 
Clarence Edward Lee, Jackson 
Dixie Jo Lee, Jackson 
George S. Lee, Vicksburg 
Robert E. Lee, Jackson 
Sandra Kay Lee, Jackson 
William Eckford Lee, Jackson 
Thomas Albert Leggett, Jackson 
Vera Nell Leggett, Jackson 
Charles Marvin Leon, Canton 
Rufus Allen Lewis, Jackson 
Thomas Edward Lewis, Raymond 
Louis Edward Licata, Natchez 
James Alford Lilly, Jackson 
Clara Jo Lingenfelder, Yazoo City 
Annette Elizabeth Little, Jackson 
Margaret Sue Little, Mendenhall 
Juan LLerena, Jackson 
Betty Kate Logan, Lorman 
Elizabeth Ann Logan, Fayette 
India Lourie Logan, Jackson 
Trudy May Logan, Fayette 
Lola Carol Longmire, Utica 
Charles Thomas Loper, Jackson 
Elizabeth OMvia Loper, Jackson 
Malcolm Leland Loper, Jackson 
Annette Mavis Lopez, Jackson 
Richard Kenneth Loving, 

Brookhaven 
Jessie Mae Lovorn, Carthage 
Robert Madison Lowe, Clinton 
Billy Hamilton Luft, Jackson 
Ruby Ann Lynch, Raymond 
Linda Jean Lyons, Learned 
Carolyn Ferguson McAlister, 

Vicksburg 
Sherry McAlilly, Jackson 
Dianne Roberta McCartney, 

Jackson 

James Lamar McCarty, Pearl 

Ronald Webb McClendon, Brandon 

Johnnie Alexander McCollum, 
Jackson 

Mary Pauline McCoy, Terry 

Neil Smith McCoy, Brookhaven 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Pap* 113 



The Student Directory. 



Richard Eugene McDaniel, 

Raymond 
Anne Ezzelle McDonald, Florence 
Jimmy Lenn McFarland, Terry 
Donald Hugh McGaugh, Jackson 
Sandra Earline McGhee, Jackson 
Charles Ray McGuire, Jackson 
Bettie Jean McHenry, 

Crystal Springs 
Robert Louis Mclnnis, Yazoo City 
Cheryl Rai Mclntyre, Vicksburg 
Thomas Raymond McKay. Liberty 
Linda Kaye McKee, Florence 
Brenda Kay McLemore, Jackson 
Donald Paul McMinn, Jackson 
James Ronald McMinn, Clinton 
Tommy Ray McNamara, Vicksburg 
Donald Lynn McNamee, Florida 
Jack Anderson McNeil. J^okson 
Betty Jo McPhail, Winona 
James Edward McWhirter, Jackson 
Kenneth Lee Madden, Jackson 
Newton Merrill Maddox, Clinton 
Charles Vernon Magee, Jackson 
Judith Merle Mahnken, Columbus 
Joe Robert Mallard, Jackson 
Virgil William Malley, Florence 
Patricia Ann Man?um, Jackson 
Tommv Carroll Mann, Jackson 
John Arthur Mansell, Jackson 
Carolyn Maples. Greenville 
Doris Marcell Mapp, Jackson 
Eugene Austin Marble. Jackson 
Tanis Idella Marble, Vicksburg 
Christine Marsalis, Vicksburg 
Louis Stenhen Marsh. Florida 
James Mitchell Martin, Redwood 
Judy Caroline Martin, Jackson 
Nelda Jo Martin, Canton 
Thomas Henry Martin. Jackson 
Eva Ann Mashburn, Jackson 
Barbara Ann Masters. Jackson 
Barbara Margaret Matlock, Jackson 
Michael Lloyd Matthews, Jackson 
Sandra Kaye Matthews, Florence 
Miriam Ann Maugans, Georgia 



Marilyn Lorree Maxwell, Raymond 
Bennie Joel May, Jackson 
Steven Wayne May, Vicksburg 
Lynda Melton, Jackson 
Christopher Gerard Miller, 

Vicksburg 
Michael B. Miller, Yazoo City 
William Henry Miller, Louisiana 
John Flippin Mills, Jackson 
Prentis Norris Ming, Jackson 
Charles Roy Minyard, Jackson 
Joseph Vernon Mitcham, 

Pelahatchie 
PhiJip Wayne Mitchell, Jackson 
Charles Amos Mitchim, Jackson 
James Marion Moak, Jackson 
Billy Paul Modjeski, Jackson 
Pamela Ann Molaison, Louisiana 
Nara Luiza C. Monteiro, Whitfield 
Roland Gene Moody, Natchez 
Joseph Alan Moon, Ridgeland 
Sandra Gayle Mooney, Jackson 
James Oliver Moore, Woodville 
Peggy Elaine Moorehead, Jackson 
John Calvin Morgan. Madison 
Mary Delene Morgan, 

Mississippi City 
Tommy Lester Morgan, Jackson 
Robert Greene Morris, Jackson 
William Currie Morrison, Jackson 
Rita Karen Mouchett, Anguilla 
Henry Elliott Moudy, Jackson 
Vincent Samuel Muffuletto, 

Vicksburg 
Melvin Hollis Mullins, Jackson 
Robert Louis Mullins, Jackson 
Robert Allen Murin, Vicksburg 
Michael Wesley Murphy, Natchez 
Edward Lee Murray. Natchez 
Hal Prine Myers, Jackson 
Mary Dalene Myers, Jackson 
Louis Clayton Nail, Jr., Lorman 
Lynn Loretta Neal, Monticello 
David Parker Neely, Yazoo City 
Dennis Allen Neely, Jackson 
Shirley Jean Neely, Jackson 



Ptge 114 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLiOl 



The Student Directory 



John Lowrey Nelson, Vicksburg 
Robert Leroy Nelson, Learned 
Charles Harmon Newell, Jackson 
George Wilburn Newman, 

Vicksburg 
John Earl Newman, Jackson 
Robert Wayne Newman, Carpenter 
Gloria Jean Newton, Jackson 
Carol Elizabeth Nicholson, Jackson 
Frances Nicholson, Philadelphia 
Shelby Glen Noble, Jackson 
Bahig Said Nohaile, Lebanon 
Gerald Roderick Noone, Jackson 
Dianne Louise Nordon, Jackson 
Betty Lou Norris, Jackson 
Jim Nathan Norris, Jackson 
Mary Janette Nowell, Kosciusko 
Douglas Jack Nyman, Vicksburg 
Martha Lynne O'Bannon, Jackson 
Francis Gary Ogle, Natchez 
Michael Alton O'Kelly, Jackson 
Betty Lou O'Quinn, McComb 
Kay Lynn Orman, Vicksburg 
Cynthia Sue Overbey, Virginia 
Billy Walter Stevens Overby, 

Jackson 
Linda Jean Owen, Jackson 
Cornelia Owens, Jackson 
Kenneth Samuel Pace, Jr., Jackson 
Virginia Augusta Padgett, Petal 
Elio Jose Paez, Jackson 
Connie Beth Palmer, 

Crystal Springs 
Sonja Lorraine Palmer, Fayette 
Albert Prentiss Palmieri, Louisville 
Dianna Sue Panepinto, Louisiana 
Diane Blackmon Panetta, Jackson 
Alvie Randall Parker, Jackson 
Emily Anne Parker, Jackson 
Robert Victor Parker, Vicksburg 
Floyd Capers Patrick, Jackson 
Wallace Walter Patrick, Pelahatchie 
Mary Jean Patterson, Monticello 
William Orman Pearson, Star 
Howard Sidney Peavy, Jackson 
James Michael Peden, Jackson 



Rebecca Anne Peoples, Jackson 
Douglas Michael Perkins, Jackson 
James Allen Perkins, Gloster 
Margaret Judith Perkins, Jackson 
Michael Eugene Perry, Crystal 

Springs 
Evette Shirley Peters, Natchez 
James Dinton Phillips, Utica 
John Thomas Phillips, Jackson 
Judy Merle Phillips, Crystal Springs 
Patti Sue Pickett, Clinton 
George Brice Pickle, Jackson 
Patricia Ann Pierce, Jackson 
Joe Dayton Pinion, Jackson 
Linda Jo Pittman, Columbia 
William Henry Pittman, Jr., Jack- 
son 
Susan Carolyn Pitts, Jackson 
Patricia Ann Place, Jackson 
Barbara Louise Porch, Jackson 
Minnie Marie Porch, Jackson 
Charles Richard Porter, Vicksburg 
Joseph Howell Porter, Fayette 
Joseph Gorman Powell, Jackson 
Jon Michael Powers, Jackson 
Lucian Roy Price, Raymond 
Walter William Price, Jackson 
William Allen Price, Florence 
Connie Marie Primos, Jackson 
Gerald Wayne Puckett, Vicksburg 
Harold Glenn Puckett, Jackson 
Rialph Keith Purvis, Brandon 
Sherman Eugene Purvis, Jackson 
Julya Carole Pyron, Jackson 
Virginia Lee Ragsdale, Jackson 
Richard Kimberly Raines, Edwards 
Michael Neal Rainey, Jackson 
Douglas Judson Randall, Jr., Jack- 
son 
Sharon Lee Randel, Pickens 
James Milton Ray, III, Jackson 
William Ray, Jackson 
Elizabeth Elene Redd, Cleveland 
Martha Carlene Reese, Philadelphia 
Ginger Lou Redd, Jackson 
James Edward Reihle, Jackson 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 115 



The Student Directory. 



Carolos Justiniano Rengifo, San 

Salvador 
Clarence Willie Rhodes, Brandon 
Pamela Louise Rials, Jackson 
Thomas Patrick Ravers, Union 
Bayless Blakeney Ritter, Clinton 
Rebecca Ann Rivers, Union 
Evelyn Robertson, Louisville 
Fred Dixon Robertson, Jr., Gloster 
Robert Edward Robinson, Jackson 
Roy Rodgers, Jackson 
Wanda Lee Rogers, Carthage 
Will Cannon Rogers, Monticello 
John Clyde Roper, Jr., Jackson 
Gloria Ross, Jackson 
Ronald Dean Ross, Jackson 
William Marvin Ross, Jackson 
John Michael Rountree, Jackson 
Donald Winston Rowland, Jr., 

Vicksburg 
Sidney Russell Rowland, Jr., Vicks- 
burg 
Rose Marie Rozier, Jackson 
Paul Wilbur Rummel, Madison 
Belinda Joy Rjush, Jackson 
Ina Claire Russell, Bolton 
Lester Everett Russell, Jackson 
Miachel Ray Russell, Hillsboro 
Steve J. Sanders, Crystal Springs 
Donald Carlton Sandidge, Natchez 
Lloyd Wendle Sartin, Jr., Jackson 
Charles Daniel Saunders, Jackson 
Norma Carol Sawaya, Jackson 
Francis Bruce Scarborough, Bran- 
don 
Wilbur Kay Scarborough, 

New Hebron 
Edward Eugene Schilling, Jackson 
Robert William Schmidt, Madison 
Roy Thomas Schooler, Brandon 
Douglas Lee Schuetzle, Jackson 
Eula Schultz, Sanatorium 
Herman Joseph Schultz, Vicksburg 
William Herbert Schultz, Vicksburg 
Douglas Lynn Scoggin, Jackson 
Celia Elizabeth Scott, Jackson 
Brenda Ann Seale, Gloster 



Jerry Lynn Seawright, Port Gibson 
Robert William Service, Jackson 
Arthur Alexander Sexton, Jackson 
Connie Lorraine Seymour, Jackson 
Linda Carol Seymour, Vicksburg 
Austin Vernon Shaddix, Jackson 
Joyce Ann Shaffer, Newton 
Danny Lee Shearer, Jackson 
Kay Pauline Sheffield, Vicksburg 
Patricia Ann Sheffield, Raymond 
Marjorie Ann Sides, Jackson 
James Lucian Siera, Jackson 
Charles Sherman Shive, Vicksburg 
Woodrow Wilson Shivers, Jr., Flor- 
ence 
JoAnn Shoemaker, Jackson 
Charles Essex Shores, Jr., Jackson 
John Robert Showman, Vicksburg 
Thomas Harry Snuff, Raymond 
John Everett Shumate, Jackson 
Carmelita Shurden, McCool 
Rdckey Joe Simmons, Jackson 
Stephen Dean Simmons, Jackson 
Donald Ruben Simpson, Jackson 
Ronald Earl Simpson, Jackson 
Terry C. Simpson, Jackson 
Rosemary Sims, Jackson 
Mary Edwina Slaughter, Jackson 
Lanny Joe Smart, Jackson 
Beverly Anne Smith, Florence 
Carolyn Sue Smith, Jackson 
Charles Pope Smith, Jackson 
Cheri Jean Smith, Jackson 
Clarence Alvin Smith, Jackson 
Ernest Smith, Jackson 
George Daniel Smith, Jackson 
Jack Clinton Smith, Jackson 
Kenneth Wayne Smith, Bolton 
Nicholas Randolph Smith, Learned 
Robert Elgin Smith, Jackson 
Frances Lee Solomon, Vicksburg 
John Dennis Solomon, Jr., Jackson 
Linda Katherine Solomon, Vicksburg 
Jacquetta Sorrell, Jackson 
Jonnelle Spann, Brandon 
Betty Sue Speaks, Jackson 
Thomas David Springer, Jackson 



Pag* lit 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



J he Student Directory 



James N. Squires, Jackson 
Robert Douglas Starkey, Jackson 
Sara Jane Staten, Jackson 
William Clyde Staton, Jr., Jackson 
Martha Anne Steadham, Jackson 
Sydna Alica Steele, Jackson 
Frances Eloise Steen, Florence 
Sylvia Diann Stevens, Jackson 
Franklin Donnie Stewart, Jackscon 
Hilda Rayburn Stewart, Raymond 
William Wade Stewart, Jr., Jackson 
Orville Frederick Scott Still, Jr., 

Vicksburg 
Sarah Ann Stockman, Jackson 
Virginia Lynne Stockstill, Meridian 
Donna Stockwell, Jackson 
Timothy Monroe Stogner, Terry 
Gary Allen Stone, Jackson 
Robert Francis Stout, Jr., Jackson 
Judith Elisabeth Stratton, Liberty 
Charlotte Ann Stringer, Jackson 
Laney Cecil Stringer, Jackson 
Mary Marquerite Strong, Raymond 
Leroy J. Stuart, Jr., Pelahatchie 
Joyce Elaine Stubbs, Jackson 
Belinda Elizabeth Sturgis, Vicks- 
burg 
Donald Wayne Sullivan, Jackson 
Harold Wayne Sullivan, Jackson 
Doyle Frazier Sumrall, Jackson 
Sybil Marie Swan, Jackson 
James Alfred Sweeney, Jackson 
Bobby Joe Swilley, Brandon 
Charlotte Aneta Tabb, Jackson 
Sherry Ann Talley, Columbus 
Willie Lyle Tate, Jackson 
Maureen Taylor, Jackson 
Peggy Lou Taylor, Jackson 
Perry Arthur Taylor, Yazoo City 
Shirley Riuth Taylor, Jackson 
Lewis Leyman Tedford, Jackson 
Ronald Michael Tedford, Jackson 
Elizabeth Templeton, Centreville 
James Harvey Terry, Vicksburg 
Sherry Ann Terry, Raymond 
Billy Howard Thames, Magee 
Marian Elizabeth Thomas, Jackson 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Gwendolyn Thomas, Columbia 
Mary Frances Thomas, Jackson 
Robert Dale Thomas, Jackson 
Rose Marie Thomas, Yazoo City 
Claire Dianne Thompson, Crystal 

Springs 
Curtis Copes Thompson, Jackson 
Edward Eugene Thompson, Vicks- 
burg 
Elizabeth Ann Thompson, Purvis 
James Nelson Thompson, Jackson 
Larry Alan Thompson, Jackson 
Sue Ann Thompson, Hazlehurst 
Tommy Wayne Thompson, Jackson 
Shirley Ann Thornton, Hazlehurst 
Martha Anne Tidwell, Jackson 
Evelyn Delores Tierce, Jackson 
James Donald Tolleson, Pearl 
Ronald Gee Tomlinson, Jackson 
John Mahlon Tompkins, Jackson 
Cindy Claire Toole, Terry 
Patricia Alice Towler, Natchez 
Henry Eugene Townsend, Pelahat- 
chie 
Betty Louvenia Tramel, Jackson 
Richard Lee Traylor, Florence 
Jane Latitia Trimble, Macon 
Judy Elaine Truesdale, Carthage 
Hugh David Trussell, Jackson 
Dorothy Jean Tuccio, Vicksburg 
Richard Albert Tucker, Jackson 
Steve Stratton Tucker, Jackson 
Catherine Chennault Turner, Vicks- 
burg 
Cecilia Dianne Turner, Jackson 
Douglas Dwight Turner, Vicksburg 
Jo Evelyn Turner, Florence 
Wiley Joe Twiner, Port Gibson 
Charlotte Louise Tyler, Jackson 
Esther Ruth Tyler, Vicksburg 
David Marvin Upton, Jackson 
Linda Gail Upton, Jackson 
Glenda Kathryn Vallery, Louisiana 
Billy Vance, Jackson 
Travis Wayne Vance, Vicksburg 
William Jerome Vanderberry, Ed- 
wards 

P«9« 117 



The Student Directory. 



Howard Ray Varnado, Jackson 
Henry Thomas Vaughn, Jr., Jackson 
Jose Leonard Vieira, Venezuela 
Thomas Jefferson Vinson, III, Jack- 
son 
William Richard Waddell, Natchez 
Barbara Ann Waldrup, Madison 
James Larry Waldrup, Jackson 
Altha LaVern Walker, Florence 
Ben Neil Walker, Raymond 
Catherine Ann Walker, Yazoo City 
Fred Mitchell Walker, Jackson 
Hiram Madison Walker, Jackson 
John Thomas Walker, Jackson 
Oscar Thomas Walker, Meridian 
Rosemary Frances Walker, New 

Jersey 
Cecil Rhodes Walley, Jr., Jackson 
Elvin David Walley, Vicksburg 
Diane Walls, Jackson 
Cecilia Clair Walsh, Jackson 
Robert Bernard Ward, Georgia 
Dorothy Faye Warren, Yazoo City 
George Vaughan Warren, Jackson 
Ginger Kaye Warren, Yazoo City 
Phyllis Jane Warren, Puckett 
Cecil Lealon Watkins, Jackson 
Janice Ruth Watkins, Vicksburg 
Paul Dixon Watkins, Jackson 
Charle Lynn Weathersby, Florence 
Lawrence Elmore Weaver, Jr., 

Jackson 
Paulette Weaver, Lena 
William Hayden Webber, 

Brookhaven 
Norman Leon Weber, Jackson 
Stanley Lee Wedel, Jackson 
Robert Hilton Weems, Florence 
George Horace Welch, Mendenhall 
Clifford Landon Wells, Terry 
James Halbert West, Jr., Hazlehurst 
Ted Lawrence West, Jr., Clinton 
William LaVerne West, Jackson 
George David Westbrook, Jackson 
Rosann Elizabeth Whalen, Jackson 
David Allen White, Brandon 
Howard Bradley White, Brandon 



Hubert D. White, Puckett 
Minnie Ruth White, Morton 
Alice Jean Whitehead, Vicksburg 
Carolyn Delores Whittington, 

Jackson 
Margaret Carol Whittington, 

Jackson 
Hendon Jerone Whitworth, Jackson 
Charles Everett Wilber, Jr., 

Crystal Springs 
Charles Ray Wiley, Jackson 
George Thomas Wilkerson, Jr. 

Jackson 
Richard Lowlry Wilkinson, 

Florence 
George Alvin Willey, Pelahatchie 
George Leonard Williams, Learned 
James Gordon Williams, Jackson 
John K. Williams, Jackson 
Kenneth Fay Williams, Mendenhall 
Peggy Joyce Williams, Learned 
Rosa Elizabeth Williams, Learned 
Sammie Lorraine Williams, 

Jackson 
William Charles Williams, Jackson 
John Phelan Williamson, Edwards 
Marcia LaDell Williamson, Jackson 
David Michael Willoughby, Clinton 
Inza Faye Willoughby, Vicksburg 
Julie Ann Wilson, Jackson 
Steve L. Wilson, Vicksburg 
Karen Louise Windham, Edwards 
Kenneth Eugene Windham, Jackson 
Connie Faye Wingert, Jackson 
Ruth Elizabeth Witherspoon, 

Greenville 
Rodney Earl Wilverton, Jackson 
Clyde Douglas Womack, Utica 
Sam Turner Womack, Jackson 
William Warren Womack, Utica 
Sandy Faye Wood, Jackson 
Charles Ronald Woodfield, 

Vicksburg 
Judith Pearl Woods, Lexington 
Robert Thomas Wootan, Jackson 
Woodrow Carl Wooten, Jackson 
James Harold Worley, Jackson 



Page 118 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Student Directory 



Linda Dianne Worley, Jackson 
Lawrence McNair Worrell, Utica 
Nancy Jane Worrell, Utica 
Van Cliton Worsham, Jackson 
George Lamar Wright, Vicksburg 
Lilly Bea Wright, Vicksburg 



Donald Coleman Wynne, Florence 
Jeff Milton Yarborough, Raymond 
Stanley Edwin Yeagley, Jackson 
David Warren Young, Pearl 

Marcia Gwynne Zorn, Vicksburg 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Richard Bernard Boler, Jackson Elsie Moore, Edwards 
Mary Jean Bryant, Raymond Emile Archer Morrison, Jackson 

George Carter, Raymond Wyatt Dee Newman, Clinton 

Richard M. Casler, D'Lo Harry Johnson Partin, Raymond 

Clifford Charles Davidson, Jackson Sue Magee Pitts, Terry 
James Eugene Dunaway, Jackson Carl Victria Seago, Vicksburg 



Marybelle Furness, Riaymond 
Leona Jane Gray, Jackson 
George Carlisle Hand, Terry 
George W. Haynes, Utica 
Linda Morrison Haynes, Utica 
Jesse Daniel Hardy, Bolton 
George Quinn Henne, Clinton 
James E. Jones, Jackson 
Kenneth Ray Jones, Jackson 
Barbara Ann Lewis, Jackson 
Kenneth Marvin Lewis, Jackson 
Edwin Little, Crystal Springs 
Mary McKenzie, Raymond 
Georgia Jean Mashburn, Bolton 



Ronald Dee Shaw, Jackson 
Billy Ogden Shearer, Clinton 
Mary Alice Stevenson, Raymond 
Seth Dwight Stewart, Raymond 
Frances Horton Thorne, Jackson 
Nolan Stewart Vaughan, Jackson 
James William Walker, Raymond 
Jimmy Russell Williamson, Jackson 

Audrey Darlene Whittington, 
Jackson 

Joe Russell Wilkinson, Utica 

William Pingree Wilson, Jackson 

Marion J. Welch, Raymond 



EVENING 



Billie J. Adkins, Jackson 
Richard B. Ahlvin, Vicksburg 
Carole Ainsworth, Jackson 
Jerry Ainsworth, Jackson 
Dorothy Anderson, Jackson 
William Anderson, Vicksburg 
Ronald Anglin, Vicksburg 
Sharon Anglin, Vicksburg 
Carol Ann Arrington, Vicksburg 
Martha Ashford, Clinton 
Alton W. Ball, Port Gibson 
Katherine Ballard, Vicksburg 
Lovejoy Beesley, Vicksburg 
Russell B. Barnes, Vicksburg 
Lila Suzette Beckener, Jackson 
Richard Belding, Crystal Springs 
Barbara Best, Jackson 
Betty S. Benton, Jackson 



Rosemary, Blakey, Raymond 
Joe Blythe, Jackson 
Lindell Boling, Jackson 
William Bolls, Jackson 
Robin Borden, Jackson 
George Borst, Crystal Springs 
Gloria Borst, Crystal Springs 
Linda Bounds, Jackson 
Charles Bowman, Jackson 
Cecil Bozeman, Crystal Springs 
Gladys Bridgers, Raymond 
John Brown, Crystal Springs 
Harley Brown, Jackson 
Bobby Buckeley, Plain 
Ben Burney, Crystal Springs 
Catherine Burney, Crystal Springs 
Ace Burns, Jackson 
James Burns, Jackson 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page lit 



The Student Directory. 



Richard Callaway, Clinton 
Richard Casler, D'Lo 
Vincent Cassino, Vicksburg 
Ernest Chappell, Jackson 
James Clarke, Jackson 
Judith Clarke, Jackson 
Louis Cornelia, Crystal Springs 
Russell Cook, Utica 
George M. Cornett, Jackson 
Larry Craft, Utica 
James Creekmore, Jackson 
George Crist, Jackson 
Gerald Critelli, Vicksburg 
Milloree Cronin, Vicksburg 
Riay Daniels, Jackson 
Jimmy L. Davis, Jackson 
David Dinkins, Jackson 
Carol Dixon, Utica 
Mildred Duddleston, Jackson 
Jay Dowe, Utica 
Denzel Dudley, Crystal Springs 
Roy Duggan, Belzoni 
Cleveland Dyess, Jackson 
Alma D. Eaves, Raymond 
Woodrow Edens, Clinton 
Henry Ferguson, Vicksburg 
Dan Evans, Jackson 
Jeffery Felts, Jackson 
Robert Fisher, Jackson „ 
Bewie Floyd, Jackson 
Charles Ford, Vicksburg 
Carol Frazier, Jackson 
Maybell Furness, Raymond 
Charles Garner, Jackson 
James Goodwill, Jr., Jackson 
Jean Grayson, Jackson 
James Griffin, Jackson 
Charles Grove, Crystal Springs 
Jimmy Gunter, Jackson 
Eleanor Hale, Vicksburg 
Robert Hall, Vicksburg 
Robert Hammack, Florence 
Walter Hastings, Jackson 
Lamar Hendrix, Madison 
Dorothy Herring, Raymond 
Maury Hill, Jackson 



Kathryn Holcombe, Clinton 

Jimmy Hancock, Jackson 

Sammie Haney, Vicksburg 

Ivor Hargon, Jackson 

Charley Harris, Jackson 

Willis Harvey, Jackson 

Van Hawthorne, Florence 

Hardie Hays, Jackson 

Elizabeth Henderson, Jackson 

Edna Henry, Vicksburg 

James Hill, Jackson 

Charles Hood, Florence 

Wm. Horn, Jackson 

Harold Horton, Jackson 

Martha Hutton, Vicksburg 

Robert Jackson, Jackson 

Eugene Jackson, Jackson 

Robert Jines, Jackson 

Gloria Johns, Jackson 

Janice Johns, Jackson 

Dennis Johnson, Crystal Springs 

Shirley Jones, Jackson 

Robert Jordan, Jackson 

John Juarez, Jackson 

Alice Kessler, Vickburg 

Willis Kessler, Vicksburg 

Thomas Keyes, Jackson 

Joseph Keywood, Hazlehurst 

Madeleine Kidney, Jackson 

Floyd Kirk, Jackson 

Albert Kleinman, Vicksburg 

Margie Kirk, Jackson 

Billy Knight, Jackson 

Barney Lane, Jackson 

Linda Lane, Jackson 

Bob Laster, Raymond 

Grady Lawrence, Jackson 

Huston Leach, Jackson 

Paul Lee, Jackson 

Edward Lent, Crystal Springs 

Margaret Lewis, Jackson 

John Liggett, Raymond 

Mary Liggett, Raymond 

James Lindsey, Jackson 

Ralph Lingenfelter, Yazoo City 

Freddie Dale Little, Crystal Springs 



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HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Student Directory 



Wm. Little, Jackson 

Aubrey Loper, Jackson 

Myrtle Elizabeth Loviza, Jackson 

Paul MacNeil, Jackson 

Luisa McNeeley, Jackson 

James McWhirfer, Jackson 

James McMillan, Jackson 

Sue McNamara, Vicksburg 

Henry McCormic, Clinton 

Peter McGovern. Crystal Springs 

Floyd McHenry. Crystal Springs 

Joel McNeil, Jackson 

Peggy Madden, Jackson 

Joe Man gum, Jackson 

R. E. Manning. Crystal Springs 

Carol Marble, Jackson 

Robert Marrs, Jackson 

Wm. Marter, Clinton 

Carolyn Martin, Jackson 

James Matthews. Vicksburg 

Marie Maxwell, Raymond 

Wm. Mpeks, Jackson 

James Meli, Rankin County 

Robert Melton, Bolton 

Alton Morgan, Jackson 

Wm. Mixson, Jackson 

Greta Morgan, Jackson 

Robert Morgan. Jackson 

Robby Morris, Edwards 

James Mullen, Jackson 

Charles Murray, Jackson 

Wavne Neal, Flora 

Sally Necaise, Jackson 

Samuel Nichols, Jackson 

Herbert Odom, Canton 

Donald Olsen, Crystal Springs 

Wilton Owens, Jackson 

Vincent Palermo, Vicksburg 

Donald Parker, Jackson 

Rnbert Parker, Vicksburg 

Billy Palmer, Jackson 

Charles 0. Patrick, Jackson 

Dolores Peterson, Jackson 

George Patterson, Jackson 

Paul Pickel, Jackson 

Ruth Prassel, Raymond 

Ronney Post, Jackson 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Norman Prisson, Jackson 
Peggy Purvis, Jackson 
Jerry Rachal, Vicksburg 
Jerry Randall, Crystal Springs 
Ida Sue Ray, Jackson 
Bobby Reed, Vicksburg 
Sammie Reed, Jackson 
Charles Rimes, Florence 
Wm. 0. Robertson, Jackson 
Winford Rioebuck, Jackson 
Jack Robinson, Jackson 
Winford Robinson, Jackson 
Frederick Roland, Jackson 
Brenda Rowell, Jackson 
H. B. Powell, Jackson 
Tommy Sanders, Jackson 
James Sampley, Jackson 
James Sanderford, Jackson 
Leonard Sanford, Jackson 
Doris Shirley, Jackson 
Allie M. Seal, Jackson 
Robert Sessums, Jackson 
Freddie Shirley, Jackson 
Nina Shows, Jackson 
Stephen Simmons, Jackson 
Gurgan Sills, Jackson 
Jane Sinclair, Jackson 
John Singleton, Jackson 
Nancy Sistrunk, Jackson 
Eugene Slade, Jackson 
Brenda Smith, Vicksburg 
Charles Smith, Whitfield 
Teddy Smith, Vicksburg 
Virgil Smith, Jackson 
James Snow, Florence 
Frances Soloman, Vicksburg 
Michael Spears, Jackson 
Jane Staten, Jackson 
Alfred Stubblefield, Jackson 
Thirsten Stephens, Jackson 
Charlotte Sullivan, Jackson 
James T. Strickland, Jackson 
James Stringer, Clinton 
Wm. Taylor, III, Jackson 
Leona Stepan, Vicksburg 
Sara Corley Terry, Jackson 
Audrey Thomas, Jackson 

Page 121 



The Student Directory. 



David Thomas, Raymond 

Geraldine Thomas, Jackson 

Sara Thompson, Jackson 

Wm. Thomas, Jackson 

Larry Thornton, Ridgeland 

Polly Tillman, Edwards 

Vivian Usry, Jackson 

Sammy Valentine, Jackson 

Wm. Vandiver, Terry 

H. Paul Varnado, Jackson 

Mary Elizabeth Vaughan, Vicksburg 

Dianne S. Vaughan, Jackson 

Ira C. Vernon, Jackson 

Raymon Vernon, Jackson 



Russell Walker, Vicksburg 

Everett Wallace, Vicksburg 

Alton Ware, Raymond 

Barbara Elizabeth Weaver, Jackson 

Robert Weaver, Jackson 

Julie Wells, Raymond 

Edna White, Raymond 

Thomas White, Jackson 

Jerry Whittington, Crystal Springs 
Medora Wiese, Hazlehurst 
Linda Wiggins, Crystal Springs 
Hal Wilson, Carlisle 
Virginia Woods, Jackson 



VOCATIONAL 



Alva Houston Abel, Jackson 
Joseph Christopher Abies, Vicksburg 
James Raiford Abernathy, Jackson 
Claude Holly Adams, Jackson 
Frank Alexander Ainsworth, 

Jackson 
Martin Dale Ainsworth, Jackson 
Jerry Wayne Alexander, Jackson 
George Dewey Allen, Louisiana 
Robert Cecil Allen, New Hampshire 
George Randall Anderson, 

Lumberton 
Larry D. Ashley, Jackson 
Aubrey A. Bailey, Vicksburg 
Billy Joe Bailey, Jackson 
Jackie E. Baker, Jackson 
Gerald Lynn Barnes, Purvis 
Louie Sam Barnes, Florence 
William Earl Basye, Jackson 
Horace Edwin Beavers, Vicksburg 
Neal Eugene Beckham, Pascagoula 
James Paul Bell, Jackson 
Percy Lee Boell, Vicksburg 
William Earl Bond, Jackson 
William Thomas Borden. Clarksdale 
Adrian Louis Brady, Jackson 
Russell Alver Breedlove, Purvis 
Joe Keith Breland, Kreole 
Lynn Clansey Bryant, Florence 
Thomas Calvin Butts, Raymond 



John Alford Byars, Maben 
James William Cade, Brooksville 
John P. Cadwallader, Jackson 
Melvin Merle Carlson, Vicksburg 
Eddie Causey, Benoit 
Thomas Lee Chilton, Jackson 
Medford Ray Clark, Jackson 
Robert Lathell Clark, Jackson 
William Ted Clark, Madison 
James I. Cockrell, Jackson 
Walter Fred Corbin, Vicksburg 
Reggie Earl Creel, Hattiesburg 
Phillip Rieb Criddle, Vicksburg 
Ronnie Excell Crist, Vicksburg 
Bill Davis, Foxworth 
John Vincent Davis, Jackson 
Edwin F. Dietrich, Mathiston 
Glenn Harold Dillion, Tylertown 
James Sidney Dinsmore, Macon 
Walter A. Dobson, Lumberton 
Fred Hamilton Donaldson, Raymond 
Charles Virgil Dunn, Vicksburg 
Earl Evan Emerick, Natchez 
Robert Kelly Evans, Jackson 
Sammie Morris Evans, Jackson 
David G. Fewell, Columbia 
Larry Hamel Ferguson. Jackson 
Ron Franklin Fleming, Jackson 
James Walter Fuller, Potts Camp 
John Bennett Gammill, Jackson 



Page 122 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



.-The Student Directory 



Dennis Earl Garrard, Florence 
Charles Benedict Giametta, 

Bay St. Louis 
Cecil Allen Goodwill, Ecru 
Thomas Walter Gorman, Jackson 
Terry Bennie Goza, Jackson 
James Edward Grantham, Vance 
Jimmy Lloyd Graves, Jackson 
Robert Elliott Gregory, Jackson 
Johnny Neil Grubbs, Ma gee 
Douglas Leamon Haden, Louin 
James Eugene Hamilton, Jackson 
Eugene Hancock, Jackson 
James Hanna, Jackson 
Frank Joseph Harris, Florence 
John Robert Harris, Vicksburg 
Jerry Ray Hawthorne. Madison 
Charles Arliss Heidelberg, 

Vicksburg 
Ray Henderson, Vicksburg 
Tommy Houston Henson. Brandon 
Wallace Bernice Hilderbrand, 

Bentonia 
Mary Devon Hill. Tylertown 
Thomas Martin Hilton, Jackson 
Joseph Robert Hobbs, Jayess 
Robert Ellery Hollingsworth, 

Jackson 
James Oliver Hodd, Tupelo 
Willis Brown Hornsby, Columbia 
Arnold Howell, Jackson 
Danny Rsay Howington, Jackson 
Clyde Thomas Hubbard, Edwards 
Herman Lee Hunt, Jackson 
Thomas Earvin Hutchinson, Forest 
Robert Burnett Irby, Columbus 
Andrew O'Neal Irby, Columbus 
Robert Burnett Irby, Columbus 
Charles Curtis Ivy, West Point 
James David Ivy, Jackson 
Herschell Reese James, Harris ville 
Virgil Eugene Jarnagin, Gulfport 
Harold Richard Johns, Jackson 
Gerl James Johnson, Jackson 
Denver Lee Johnson, Bogue Chitto 
Jerry Wayne Johnson. Hattiesburg 
Dwight Cecil Jones, Jackson 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Ronald Gary Jones, Carlisle 
Billy Morris Kellum, Jackson 
Thomas Jerald Kelly, Jackson 
James William Klein, Jackson 
Matthew Henry Lack, 

Crystal Springs 
William B. Langston, Clinton 
Hermon Hugh Lansdell. Saltillo 
Jime Cole Leachman. Natchez 
Douglas Harold Lee, Carriere 
Eddie L. Lee, Lake 
John Davis Lefler, III, Jackson 
Jerry George Lewis, Jackson 
Kenneth Lamar Locke, Batesville 
Charles Rayford Lowery, Seminary 
Harvey Garrison Lowery, Seminary 
Smith Prentiss McDonald, Jackson 
William Kelly McKay, Vicksburg 
Harry Daniel McLain, Mendenhall 
Jerry Lamond McLendon. Florence 
Johnny Curtis McManus, Terry 
Dwight Henry Matthews, Jackson 
Thomas William Mayfield. Mize 
Lewis Mobrev Miller, Redwood 
Albert E. Mitchell, Jackson 
Henry A. Moore, Picayune 
William Lawrence Moore. Jaokson 
Meredith Don Moree, Columbia 
Robert Francis Muha, Jackson 
Thomas Burden Nash, Kosciusko 
Robert Leroy Nelson, Learned 
Robert Wayne Newman. Carpenter 
Tom Earley Newton, Charleston 
James Hilton Orsborn, Yazoo 
Marion Dewaine Overbey, Jackson 
Michael Ray Pavolini, 

Ocean Sorings 
Troy Gene Pennington, Clinton 
William Riush Person, Columbia 
Billy H. Pettway, Vicksburg 
James Dinton Phillips, Utira 
Leo Braxton Phillips, Jackson 
Bobby Leroy Philpot, Vicksburg 
Terry Wavne Posey, Jackson 
Clayton Lee Powder, Jackson 
Danny LaRonne Prewitt. Florence 
Clyde Pritchard, Jackson 

P#9* 123 



The Student Directory. 



Jimmy Henry Purvis, Hattiesburg John Gray Stubblefield, Raymond 

Arthur Charles Rankin, Jackson Thomas Smith Summers, Forest 

Charles Wilber Renfrow, Jackson Eldrage Toxey Sumrall, Jackson 

Conrad Joseph Richard, Jackson Donald Lester Sylvester, Jackson 

Paul Duncan Robbins, Jackson Jerry Patterson Taylor, Jackson 

Johnny Rankin Robinson, Jackson James Monroe Terry, Raymond 

Rex William Robinson, Raymond Dudley Wayne Thompson, Jackson 

James Cooper Ross, Jackson Edwin Earl Thompson, D'Lo 

Bobby Glenn Rushing, Vicksburg Jack Reed Tidwell, Rosedale 

Charles Curtis Rushing, Jackson Lester Louis Townsend, Jackson 

Boyd H. Sanders, Jackson Michael Earvin Turner, 
Gordon Arlie Sandifer, Raymond Mississippi City 

Nathan Sidney Sandifer, Jackson Joe Wiley Valentine, Mendenhall 

Fredrick Warren Satterfield, Benoit Billy Vance, Jackson 

Charles Daniel Saunders, Jackson Jodie Slyde Varnell, Jackson 

Geoffrey George Schilhad, Jackson Jimmy Allen Wade, State Line 

Frederick Abernathy Schneider, James Randall Wallace, Jackson 

Jackson Kenneth Edward Wann, Jackson 

Charles Paul Schultz, Jackson James Russel Ward, Sallis 

Charles A. Scott, Terry Oscar Keith Ward, Pascagoula 

Danny Dale Sebren, Jackson Holmes R. Warner, Jackson 

Lanny Ray Shackelford, Ripley Danny Lamar Warren, Jackson 

Thomas Edward Shelton, Starkville David Wayne Warren, Jackson 

Douglas Nathenial Shepherd, Marion Ronnie Weed, Jackson 

Hattiesburg Ronald Melton Wheeler, Vicksburg 

Bryant Isaiah Smith, Jackson Jimmy Wiggins, Port Gibson 

Eugene R. Smith, Jackson Hiarles W. Wilburn, Michigan City 

Paul Wallace Smith, Jackson Norman Wilkinson, Florence 

William Beautell Smith, Vicksburg Charles Raynor Wilks, Columbia 

Shural Quay Sneed, Jackson Homer Williams, Learned 

Jerry W. Sparrow, Jackson James Richard Williams, Clinton 

Richard Kelly Speight, Jackson James Rutledge Williams, Aberdeen 

Delma Byron Starling, Jackson John Lawrence Williams, Raymond 

Daniel Jackson Steadham, Jackson John Claud Willis, Calhoun City 

Fred Raymond Stickler, Jackson Robert Thomas Wootan, Jackson 

Robert Lynn Still, Columbus Edgard A. Zuniga, Nicarauga 

VOCATIONAL— EVENING 

Robert Wade Anderson, Jackson James Lee Cravens, Jackson 

James Clifton Breazeale, Jackson Herbert Winfield Davidson, Jackson 

Thomas Harvey Bridges, Forest Johnny Lee Engle, Jackson 

Everett Ray Bullock, Jackson John Laverett Gallagher, Jackson 

William Gary Cahill, Jackson George Gus Girard, Vicksburg 

Edward Lamar Campbell, Jackson Harold William Glasscock, Purvis 

Wayne Newel Cole, Jackson Carl Webb Harris, Jackson 

Harvey Roberts Collins, Jackson Samuel Benjamin Harris, Jackson 

Pag* 124 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Student Directory 



Jimmy Bruce Hollowell, Coffeeville 
Bobby E. James, Jackson 
Hubert Ford James, Jackson 
Vernon J. Kittrell, Jackson 
Wesley McFarland, Jackson 
Jeff David Monk, Vicksburg 
John P. Monroe, Jackson 
Dale Nichols, Jackson 
Charles D. Parker, Jackson 
Cecil Dwight Pate, Jackson 
Johnnie Ray Perry, Jackson 
Benjamin King Pullen, Terry 
Shelby Purser, Jackson 
Coley Sampson Richardson, 
Jackson 



Dale G. Russell, Brookhaven 
Billy Randall Sellers, Raymond 
Billy Joe Spears, Jackson 
Huey Allen Stroud, Lake 
Jack Carl Sutterfield, Raymond 
C. Frank Turnage, Jackson 
Billy Franklin Walker, Jackson 
Ira Windell Watkins, Forest 
Harold Weeks, Shaw 
Johnny Lee Westerfield, Florence 
Johnny Lee Westerfield, Florence 
Albert Ross Winstead, Jackson 
Jack K. Winstead, Jackson 



SUMMER 
SOPOHOMORES 



Laraine Anne Abraham, Vicksburg 
Mary Jo Abraham, Vicksburg 
James Hermon Adams, Raymond 
Mary Lynn Adams, Natchez 
Fred William Adsit, Jackson 
Jackie Lynn Alexander, Bentonia 
Patrick Lucian Allred, Jackson 
Taffy Leigh Anderson, Jackson 
Sara Linda Angelo, Edwards 
Lynda Faye Arender, Jackson 
Harry R. Austin, Vicksburg 
Billy Ralph Barefoot, Columbia 
Linda Sharon Barr, Raymond 
Iva Suzanne Beall, Clinton 
Joann Beasley, Raymond 
Dorothy Jane Boswell, Jackson 
Rebecca Ann Boswell, Jackson 
Linna Cecelia Boykin, Louin 
Wallace Emmett Bradley, Raymond 
James Fulton Brown, Jackson 
Natalie Briscoe Brown, Jackson 
Rebecca Ann Brown, Jackson 
Sharon Louise Brown, Jackson 
Shiela Kay Brunton, Vicksburg 
Betty S. Bryant, Natchez 
James Donald Cain, Jackson 
Bobbie Carol Caldwell, Jackson 



Glenda Nell Calhoun, Forest 
Charlie Griffin Carlisle, Utica 
Carolyn Marie Chance, Natchez 
Sarah Lorraine Chandler, Jackson 
Marilyn Lea Cole, Jackson 
Jon Benny Crosby, Kosciusko 
Bob Lee Currie, Utica 
Karen Eileen Curtin, Laurel 
Montie Alius Davis, Union 
Janie Elizabeth Denson, Jackson 
David Lane Dinkins, Jackson 
James Patrick Donnell, Clinton 
Marie Antoinette Donnell, Vicksburg 
Charles William Dor man, Vicksburg 
Mary Sue Douglas, Bogue Chitto 
Don Franklin Douglass, Jackson 
Harvey Arthur Downs, Vicksburg 
Barbara Ellen Durham, Jackson 
Homer Gene Edgeworth, Jackson 
Anna Catherine Edmonds, Jackson 
Janna Margery A. Edmondson, 

Jackson 
Martha Sharon Edwards, Jackson 
Sharon Gail Ellis, Port Gibson 
Robert Lee Everett, Vicksburg 
Carl Glenn Ferguson, Louisiana 
Helen Judith Ferguson, Utica 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Page 125 



The Student Directory. 



Martha Gayle Fitzgerald, Jackson Liller Belle Markel, Clinton 

William Woodward Fulgham, Rita Jamis Mashburn, Morton 

Mendenhall Sarah Ann Middleton, Vicksburg 

Virginia Ann Garrett, Meridian Ruth Carolyn Miller, Belzoni 

Houston Charles Gascon, Louisiana Willie M. Miller, Yazoo City 

J. T. Giambrone, Bolton June Yasmine Mitchell, Jackson 

Linda Sue Gilmore, Jackson Nancy Louvenia Moak, Jackson 

CarolAnne Goldsmith, Jackson Melody Louise Moncrief, Jackson 

Thomas Richard Grantham, Charles Michael Moses, Vicksburg 

Jackson Jennifer Kay Moss, Laurel 

Anita Glyn Griffin, Jackson Cordis David Myrick, Jackson 

Carla Faye Haas, Jackson Lucy Jane Neal, Florence 

Carolyn Frances Hagerman, Margaret Ann Nicholson, Merigold 

Jackson Eleanor Lynne Overby, Brandon 

Harold Fred Halstead, Alabama Betty Jo Parrish, Jackson 

Sue Loraine Hardy, Jackson John Phillip Patrick, Jackson 

Patrick Charles Harris, Vicksburg Lou Ellen Pendergrass, Jackson 

Ronald Turner Havard, Jackson Glenda Gayle Perry, Jackson 

Faye Anne Hayden, Jackson Elizabeth Ann Pettigrew, Jackson 

Carolyn Berry Hayes, Bolton Marjorie Ann Peusch, Jackson 

George William Haynes, Utica Tommy Lynn Pittman, Utica 

Diana Marie Hays, Jackson Mary Lynn Porter, Jackson 

Conley Hatsell Heaberlin, Jackson Lesley Regina Belle Powell, 
Sandra Kay Heard, Jackson Jackson 

Mary Ann Hennington, Port Gibson Alta Faye Prisock, Jackson 

Lucy Lott Herring, Jackson Sallie Jean Pullin, Jackson 

Lloyd Gordon Hill, Crystal Springs Patricia Irene Register, Laurel 

Patricia Ann Howell, Harrisville Linda Jo Rester, Jackson 

Martha Elizabeth Hunter, Biloxi Arthur Jude Richard, Louisiana 

Sylvia Ann Ingram, Jackson Connie Marie Riley, Vicksburg 

Mary Ruth Jacobs, Meridian Betty Jane Rotstein, Vicksburg 

Ella Katherine Jarvis, New Hebron Janet Ann Seale, Jackson 

Marietta Jenkins, Yazoo City James Keith Smith, Jackson 

Bobby Lee Jones, Vicksburg Joe Edwin Smith, Jackson 

Mary Jones Kavanaugh, Vicksburg Ellen Hart Sojourner, Natchez 

Bettye Lea King, Jackson Beverly Ann Spillman, Gloster 

William Vollie Lack, Jackson Charlotte Ann Steelman, Jackson 

Barbara Gail Lewis, Lena Betty Lou Stephens, Union 

Mary Louise Lewis, Bogue Chitto Billie Olivia Stewart, Gulf port 

Roland Clovis Lewis, Jackson Sally Eldridge Stewart, Jackson 

Sandra Lewis, Pascagoula Sara Margaret Stodard, Meridian 

Lynda F. Lindigrin, Vicksburg Barbara Lynn Stoves,. Meridian 

Jack Mallory McCaskill, Vicksburg Vincent Joseph Strieker, Jackson 

Virgil Howard McDaniel, Jackson Robert Dean Thomas, Jackson 

Wanda LaFrance McKnight, Edna Earl Thompson, Jackson 

Jackson Hazel Katherine Towne, Vicksburg 

Lynda Lee McLelland, Jackson Mittie Anne Towne, Vicksburg 

Page 126 HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Student Directory 



Charlotte) Ann Tyler, Vicksburg James Connie Warren, Vicksburg 

Nolan Stewart Vaughan, Jackson William Wesley Whatley, Vicksburg 

Thomas Barnes Virden, Jackson Patricia Ann Williams, Natchez 

Nona Kay Ware, Raymond Nancy Carol Williamson, Jackson 

FRESHMEN 

Carol Clark Adams, Jackson James Kavanaugh Hand, Jackson 

Joanna Lynn Alford, Vicksburg Cheryl Kay Harlan, Hattiesburg 
Robert Michael Angelo, Vicksburg Jacquelyn Louise Harris, Jackson 

Vicki Ann Armstrong, Raymond William Don Harris, Jackson 

Carolyn Ann Bairfield, Plain Elizabeth Ann Harrison, Florence 

Angelia Baker, Raymond Nellie Rose Havens, Crystal Springs 

Ned Terry Barrett, Raymond James Edward Herring, Clinton 

Mable Bates, Jackson Nancy Elizabeth Hilbun, Florence 

Mary Faye Bellar, Jackson Ima Lois Hill, Jackson 

Nelda Ann Bennett, Jackson John Marcus Horn, Jackson 

Paul L. Bradshaw, Morton Bob Purvis James, Puckett 

Thurman L. Branning, Vicksburg Betty Ruth Jones, Magee 

George Henry Brunson, Jackson Helen Cecelia Jones, Jackson 

Gary Allen Burns, Jackson Valerie Ann Katzenmier, 
Sandra Kay Cage, Edwards Port Gibson 

Martha Elizabeth Carlisle, Jackson Patrick Humphreys Kavanaugh, 
Davis Boyd Case, Raymond Vicksburg 

Phillis Joy Causey, Jackson Richard B. Kea, Raymond 

Harry Terrell Chandler, Jackson Mary Sue Kenmore, Jackson 

Evelyn Christopher, Greenwood James H. LaCook, Jackson 

Phillip Glen Cliburn, Alabama Vera Nell Leggett, Jackson 

James Ray Coleman, Georgia Joan Evelyn Lewis, Jackson 

John William Coleman, Mendenhall India Lourie Logan, Jackson 

Louis Phillip Cornelia, William Earl Matthews, Jackson 

Crystal Springs Marilyn Lorree Maxwell, Raymond 

Mary Jane Crain, Jackson Robert Clark Mellon, Bolton 

Elizabeth Jane Day, Crystal Springs Helen Kay Mockbee, Jackson 

Sara Lynn Downs, Jackson Nara Chaves Monteiro, Brandon 

Denzel Dudley, Crystal Springs Brenda Elizabeth Morrison, Utica 

Jimmy Dwight Edwards, Carthage Betty Ruth Mullins, Jackson 

Joseph Gordon Ellis, Port Gibson Louis Clayton Nail, Lorman 

William R. Ernest, Jackson Betty Lou Norris, Jackson 

Charolene Everitt, Pelahatchie David Franklin Park, Vicksburg 

Sandra Lynn Forsmark, Jackson Mary Jean Patterson, Monticello 

Carrie Ann Fortenberry, Tylertown Rebecca Anne Peoples, Jackson 

Clifton Alan George, Jackson Jimmy Allen Perkins, 
William Rhodes Gilmore, Jackson Crystal Springs 

Linda Anne Gordon, Vicksburg Nan Davis Phillips, Clinton 

John Clifford Grant, Jackson Donald Hayse Pickens, Lorman 

Beverly Inez Hall, Bolton James Milton Ray, Jackson 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Page 127 



The Student Directory 



Robert Neil Ray, Columbus 
Hilda Faye Rayburn, Raymond 
Ellis Whitten Reid, Jackson 
James Noel Rice, Belzoni 
Ina Claire Russell, Bolton 
Laburn DeWayne Russell, 
Vicksburg 

Lester Everett Russell, Jackson 
William Dever Seale, Jackson 
Nancy B. Sessums, Raymond 
Linda Carol Seymour, Vicksburg 
Kay Pauline Sheffield, Vicksburg 
Carolyn Ann M. Simmons, Terry 
Bryant Isaiah Smith, Jackson 
Claudia Kay Spearman, Jackson 
Doris Etta Speed, Jackson 
Fritzie Spruill, Tchula 
Charles Tolliver Squires, Jackson 

James N. Squires, Jackson 

Veronica Jo Strickland, Yazoo City 



Mary Marqueritta Strong, 

Raymond 
Walter Raleigh Sullivan, Lexington 
John Willis Taylor, Jackson 
Ronald Michael Tedford, Raymond 
Sheila Ann Thompson, Jackson 
Polly McHann Tillman, Edwards 
Mary Nell Tomlinson, Jackson 
Belinda Sue Twiss, Jackson 
Vivian E. Usry, Jackson 
Glenda Kathryn Vallery, Louisiana 
Neil Segrest Wailes, Jackson 
Elvin David Walley, Vicksburg 
Phyllis Jane Warren, Puckett 
Julian Beall Watson, Lexington 
Darryl Scott Wesson, Vicksburg 
Martha Elizabeth West, Vicksburg 
Hubert D. White, Mendenhall 
William Pingree Wilson, Jackson 
Connie Faye Wingert, Jackson 
Judith Pearl Woods, Lexington 



EVENING 



Cherry M. Ainsworth, Vicksburg 
Howard D. Andrews, Jackson 
James T. Baggett, Jackson 
Archie Bass, Jackson 
Johnny N. Barlow, Vicksburg 
Vernon Bridges, Jackson 
John M. Brown, Crystal Springs 
Jimmy D. Brown, Jackson 
Cathy M. Bryant, Crystal Springs 
Ace F. Burns, Jackson 
Richard R. Caraway, 

Crystal Springs 
William G. Chamblee, Raymond 
Riobert E. Childress, Jackson 
David C. Conrad, Vicksburg 
Linda Day Cummings, Jackson 
Ronald V. Cummings, Jackson 
Claude C. Gholson, Jackson 
Jewell A. Griffith, Vicksburg 
Jimmy W. Hancock, Jackson 
Charley C. Harris, Jackson 
Craig M. Harris, Jackson 
Anita Head, Vicksburg 



William H. Horn, Jackson 
Judy S. Hutson, Jackson 
Carol J. Katzenmeyer, Vicksburg 
Mary J. Liggett, Raymond 
Harry D. McBroom, Vicksburg 
Collette V. McGovern, Jackson 
Peter J. McGovern, Crystal Springs 
Walter B. McGuffee, Clinton 
Clarence E. McRaney, Jackson 
James R. Matthews, Vicksburg 
William C. Morrison, Vicksburg 
Linda A. Muffuletto, Vicksburg 
Carolyn H. Perkins, Crystal Springs 
Meredith A. Pierce, Florence 
John Lester Posey, Bentonia 
Ida S. Roy, Jackson 
William P. Reed, Jackson 
Sammee F. Reid, Jackson 
Charles J. Rimes, Florence 
Billy P. Simpson, Jackson 
Charles E. Smith, Whitfield 
Eugene J. Steed, Jackson 
Polly E. Torrence, Brandon 



Page 128 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Student Directory 



John M. Vandersliee, Jackson 
William H. Vandiver, Terry 
Eula D. Vaughan, Jackson 
Douglas A. Walters, Jackson 



Robert E. Weaver, Jackson 
Jerry L. Wilson, Vicksburg 
James H. Worley, Jackson 
Linda D. Worley, Jackson 



VOCATIONAL— DAY 



James R. Abernathy, Tomnolen 
George D. Allen, Louisiana 
William E. Bayse, Jackson 
Neal E. Beckham, Pascagoula 
Billy W. Bell, Clarksdale 
James P. Bell, Jackson 
Reed Berry, Jr., Jackson 
William E. Bond, Jackson 
Adrian L. Brady, Jackson 
Joe Keith Breland, Kreole 
Leslie G. Carter, Raymond 
Eddie Causey, Jr., Benoit 
Thomas L. Chilton, Jackson 
Van B. Cook, Hattiesburg 
Glenn H. Dillon, Tylertown 
Walter A. Dobson, Lumberton 
Fred H. Donaldson, Raymond 
Joseph D. Edwards, Summit 
Sammie M. Evans, Jackson 
Ron F. Fleming, Jackson 
James E. Hamilton, Jackson 
Byron C. Harrell, Jackson 
Maxy D. Hill, Tylertown 
John Woodson Hite, Lucedale 
Willis B. Hornsby, Columbus 
Arnold Howell, Jackson 
Andrew 0. Irby, Jackson 
Charles C. Ivy, West Point 
Herschel R. James, Harrisville 
Kenneth A. Kent, Meadville 
James W. Klein, Jackson 
Matthew H. Lack, Crystal Springs 
George J. Lewis, Jackson 
Jack W. Lott, Jackson 



Thomas A. Lovell, Jackson 
Charles R. Lowery, Seminary 
Harvey G. Lowery, Seminary 
Karon F. Lumpkin, Raymond 
Dwight H. Matthews, Jackson 
Thomas W. Mayfield, Mize 
Albert E. Mitchell, Jackson 
Henry A. Moore, Picayune 
William L. Moore, Canton 
David M. Morris, Raymond 
Thomas B. Nash, Jackson 
Michael R. Pavolini, Ocean Springs 
Terry W. Posey, Jackson 
Clyde Pritchard, Jackson 
Conrad J. Richard, Jackson 
Rex W. Robinson, Raymond 
Roger D. Roebuck, Jackson 
Boyd H. Sanders, Jackson 
Gordon A. Sandifer, Tylertown 
Frederick W. Satterfield, Benoit 
Earl V. Sauls, Jackson 
Geoffrey S. Schilhab, Jackson 
Frederick A. Schneider, Jackson 
Charles P. Schultz, Jackson 
David E. Sharp, Yazoo City 
Douglas N. Shepherd, Hattiesburg 
Fred R. Stickler, Jackson 
Eldrage T. Sumrall, Jackson 

Dudley W. Thompson, Jackson 
Lester L. Townsend, Jackson 
Corby L. Usry, Jr., Jackson 
Joe W. Valentine, Mendenhall 
Holmes R. Warner, Jackson 



VOCATIONAL— NIGHT 

Vernon Briges, Jackson Clarence E. McRaney, Jackson 

Douglas M. Brown, Jackson Morrison K. May, Jr., Jackson 

David C. Conrad, Vicksburg John L. Posey, Jr., Jackson 

Vernon J. Kittrell, Jackson Edward L. Robinson, Jackson 

Harry D. McBroom, Jr., Vicksburg Jerry L. Wilson, Jackson 



RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Pag* 129 



ENROLLMENT 
SUMMARY 



Regular 

Session 

1964-65 



COLLEGE 
Sophomores 393 
Freshmen 957 
Special 38 
Evening 249 
VOCATIONAL— Day 
VOCATIONAL— Evening 
TOTAL 



1639 

214 

43 

1896 



Summer 

Session 

1964 



Sophomores 1 50 

Freshmen 115 

Evening 53 

Vocational 77 
TOTAL 
GRAND TOTAL 



395 
2291 



1964 

Honor 

Graduates 



SPECIAL HONORS 



HONORS 



Margaret Ruth Bonney 
Charles Theodore Boswell 
John Francis Bove' 
Eva Jean Farris 
John M. Hathorn 
Mary Louise Lewis 
Willie Miller 
Carol Puckett 
Connie Kay Roediger 



Elizabeth Ann Seitz 
Hartman Harlan Stanley, Jr. 
Judy Elois Statham 
Mary Ann Stewart 
Marion Peek Taylor, Jr- 
Ginny Lou Terry . 
Patricia Anne Thorne 
William Earl Willoughby 



Page 130 



HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGE 



INDEX 



Absences 40 

Academic Regulations 37 

Accreditation - 1 

Accounting, Courses in 69 

Activities, Student 31 

Admission 

Requirements 23 

Procedure 23 

Administrative Staff 4 

Agriculture 

Club 34 

Courses in 65 

Curriculum 47, 62 

Aims 16 

Aircraft Technology 

Curriculum 61 

Courses 98 

Art 

Club 34 

Courses in 66 

Curriculum 47 

Assembly 35 

Associated Student Body 31 

Athletics 35 

Auditing a Course 38 

Auto Mechanics, Courses in 94, 100 
Auto Body Repair 

Courses in 95, 100 

Bachelor's Degree, 
Course of Study leading to .... 55 

Band 32, 82 

Barbering, Courses in 101 

Bible, Courses in 76 

Biology, Courses in 68 

Board of Education 4 

Board of Supervisors 4 

Board of Trustees 4 

Board Refunds 26 

Books 27 

Buildings 17 

Business 

Club 33 

Courses in 69 

Curriculum 48 

Business Law. Courses in 69 

Calendar, Academic 2 

Campus ...... 17 

Chemistry, Courses in 73 

Circle K 31 

College Courses 65 

Conduct. Student ?n 

Counseling 27 

Data Processing 

Courses in 69 

Curriculum 55 

RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI 



Debating Club 34 

Delta Psi Omega 34 

Dentistry 

Pre-Dental Curriculum 48 

Dormitory Arrangements 

For Girls 24 

For Boys 24 

Drafting Technology 64 

Drafting, Courses in 92 

Drama, Courses in 90 

Drawing, Engineering 

Courses in 78 

Dropping Courses 37 

Eagle's Nest, The 35 

Economics, Courses in 88 

Educational Program 43 

Electric Motor Repair 

Courses in 96 

Electricity. Courses in 96, 100 

Electrical Technology 

Curriculum 59 

Electronics Technology 

Curriculum 59 

Engineering 

Club 34 

Curriculum 49 

Engineering, Technical Program 

Entrance Requirements I 58 

Cost 58 

Curriculum 58 

English, Courses in 75 

Enrollment, Summary of 130 

Expenses 

Upon Entrance 25 

Schedule of Pavment 25 

Out-of-County Tuition 25 

Out-of-State Tuition 25 

Graduating Fee 26 

Faculty 5 

Farm, The 22 

French, Courses in 76 

Frozen Food Locker 21 

Geography, Courses in 89 

General Course Requirements 55 

Government, Courses in 88 

Grading System 37 

Graduates, Honor 130 

Graduation Requirements 41 

Graphics, Engineering, 

Courses in 79 

Guidance Testing Program ...... 28 

Health 28 

Hindsonian, The 33 

Hi-Steppers 32 

History, Courses in 87 

Page 131 



Home Economics 

Club _ 33 

Courses in T „._. 77 

Curriculum I 50 

Honor Students 39 

Hospital, The 21 

Hygiene, Courses in 84 

Industrial Education 56 

Industrial Education, Courses in 78 
Industrial Technology 

Curriculum 56 

International Relations Club 32 

Intra murals 35 

Jobs, Self -Help 30 

Journalism, Curriculum 50 

Journalism, Courses in 79 

Laundry _ 27 

Law, Pre-Law Curriculum 51 

Lendon Players 33 

Library Services 42 

Location 17 

Machine Shop, Courses in 93, 99 

Mathematics, Courses in 80 

Mechnical Technology ._ 59 

Medicine, Pre-Medical 

Curriculum 51 

Club 34 

Medical Technology 

Curriculum 51 

Modern Language Club 33 

Motor Vehicles 29 

Music 

Courses in 81 

Curriculum 52 

Nursing, Pre-Nursing 

Curriculum 52 

Office Machines, Courses in .97, 102 

Orientation ___ 28 

Pharmacy Curriculum 52 

Phi Theta Kappa 31 

Psychology 

Courses in 86 

Club 33 

Physical Education 

Courses in .. 84 

Curriculum 53 

Physical Science, Curriculum .... 53 



Physical Science Survey, 

Courses in 86 

Physics, Courses in 86 

Piano, Courses in _ 83 

Placement 29 

Probation and Suspension 39 

Purpose 16 

Quality Points 37 

Radio, Courses in 91, 100 

Reading, Courses in 87 

Recreational Center .. 35 

Refrigeration 

Courses in 97, 101 

Curriculum 61 

Religious Life 29 

Religious Organizations 31 

Reports 37 

Secretarial Science 

Courses in 72 

Curriculum 53 

Intensive Training 54 

Special Court-Reporting 54 

Shorthand, Courses in 72 

Social Life 29 

Sociology, Courses in 88 

Spanish, Courses in 89 

Speech, Courses in 89 

Student Activities 31 

Student Education Association... 33 

Student Load 38 

Student Services 27 

Student Directory 103 

Summer School 22 

Suspension . 39 

Tardies 40 

Teachers' Certificates 57 

Teaching, Elementary, 

Curriculum 49 

Television, Courses in 91, 100 

Transcripts 39 

Typing, Courses in 72 

Veterans ~ 30 

Vocational Courses 99 

Voice, Courses in 83 

Withdrawal .._... 40 

Women's Athletic Association .... 35 
Woodwork, Courses in 78 



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