(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual Report and Minutes"

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



Report and minutes 

north India Conference 

meflMdist episcopal Cburcb 







mttbodisi PiiMi$Ni0 Some, Cackiow. 



Z^«^^> 




REPORT OF THE FORTIETH SESSION 



OF THTC 



NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE. 



OF THR 



iBetbodfet £piscopal Cburcb • Csv^^r^uc^.^. 



HRT.D AT 



BAREILLY, JANUARY 7-rl2, 1904 









-> . J 



Jt^ 



LUCKNOW : 
THE METHODIST PUBLISHINQ HOUSE- 



n 



f 



'*,■ •*■ 



M * m 



■w^^BB^iva 



I TtiL I;EV/ YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 
{ ( V, O t J: 

AoTOR, LLNOX AND 

t: Lb I.N K-...!':; PAT ION • 



R 



13^8 



• % 



• ••• 






* • 






• • 



• • • 



• _ » 



..i: • 



•• • 



• m 



• • • • •. 



• • 



• •• 

• • • 

• • • 



• • • . » 



• ' I 






• • • • •« 



'■■% 



^ 



X 



OFFICERS OF THE CONFERENCE. 



Secretary 

Assistant Secretary 
Vernacular Secretary 
Statistical Secretary 
Conference Treasurer 
Oorreeponding Secretary 
Mission Treasurer ... 



...{ 



BISHOP H. W. WARREN. 

BISHOP J. M. THOBURN. 

B. T. BADLEY. 

P. S. HYDE. 

D. A. CHOWFIN. 

GANGA NATH. 

R. I. FAUCETT. 

J. C. BUTCHER. 

N. L. ROCKEY. 



Finance Committee. 



Bishop J. M. Thobubn, President; J. C. Butcher, Secretary 
N. L. RoCKEY, Treasurer; L. A. Cobe, 6. B. Frey, F. L. Neeld, 

J. H. GlLL^ J. H. MESSMOBE, 8. TUPPEB, WILLIAM PETERS, 

J. W. Robinson, Ez-Officio : C. L. Babe, W. A. Man- 
sell, S. 6. Dease, H L. Mukebjee, H. a. 
. CUTTiNO, Ganga Nath ; Alternates, R. I. 
Faucbtt, G. C. Hewes, S. B. 
FiNOH, H. J. Adams. 



Auditing Committee. 

G. C. Hewbs, Chairman ; John Blaokstogk, H. L. Muiosbjee, R. I. 
Faucett, Mbs. Rockey, Miss Scott, Ganga Nath, 
P. S. Hyde, G. W, Bbiggs. 

Board of Education. 
J. H. Messmobe, President ; B. T. 'Badley, Secretary and Treasurer. 

WiLUAM PETEBS, H. L. MXTKEBJEE, W. A. MANSELL, MISS 

A. Means, Miss Sellebs, Mbs. Rockey, Miss Singh. 

Board of Examiners. 

W. A. Mansell, Ohaiirman ; N. p Rocket, Registrar; 8. Knowlbs, 
J. C. Butcheb, C. L. Babe, S. S. Dease, W. R, Bowen, 
H. L. MCTKEBJEE, D. A. Chowfin, Jawala Singh,^ 
James Thompkxnson, 8. B. Finch. 



4 OONF£RENCE OFFIOBBS. 

^ Standing Committees. 

tv 8tatisti€8.—GANQA Nath, 3. B. Finch, 6. D. Presobatk, Prabhu 

* i* Dayal. 

' .V State of Churck,'-C. L. Babe, Matthew Stephen, Wabben Scott, 
" • A ♦ Yaqub Shah. 

jfi^Tcmperance.—W. A. Mansell, H. A. Cutting, S. B. Finch, Nizam 

Si^fday SchooU.-'F. L. Neeld, Ma2Hab-ul-Haqq, W. R. Bowen, 
.^.-». ChhoteLal. 

P(i62iMRi(jr^3£mute6.^SEOBBT ABIES and Agent of the Methodist 

"^ ■ PUBIJSHING HODSE, LUCKNOW. 

• ' • ■ f • . 

Public' H^f«^»p. -?BBSIDING ELDEB AND PBEAOHEB IN CHABGB. 

LUCKNOW. 

^* " '^-•*«'''€l^tiimittee on Conference Relations. 



C. L. Babe, John Blackstock, H. K. List, S. B. Finch. 

Epworth League— Board of Control. 

B. T.^^Badley, p. S. Hyde, Miss Sellebs, R. I. Faucett. 

Conference Board of Stewards. 

J. H. Messmobb, U. a. Cutting, W. U. Bowen. 

Deaconess Work— Conference Deaconess Board. 

J. C. Butcheb, Pruidtnt; Mbs. Pabkeb, Secretary; Samuel Tufpkb, 
Matthew Stephen, W. K. Bowen, Mbs. Neeld, Miss 

Sullivan, Miss Obgan. 

Triers of Appeals. 

F. L. Nebld, John Blackstock, W. R. Bowen, N. L. Rogkey, 
O. H. Fbey, Matthew Stephen, L. A. Cobe. 

Sunday School Union. 

R. I. Fadcett, President ; Miss Boge, Vice-President ; G. W. Bbiggs, 

Secretary and Treasurer* 

Conference Historical Society. 

N. L. ROGKEY, President and Chivnicler ; F^, B. Hyde, Secretary. 

Conference Litef ary 



B. T. Badley, President ; Mbs. Neeld, FteaPreaieUrU ; J. C. 

• Butcher, Secretary. ^ 






K^ 



»• ^ 

%; 



CONFERENCE OFFICERS. 5 

Trustees of the Theological Seminary. 

N, L. BooKEY, F. L. Nbeld, T. T. Bond, Esq^ 1904 : J. H. Gill, 
D. M. Butler, Mr. Geo. Luke, 1905 ; L. A. Core, S. S. Deasb, 
T. L. Ingram, Esq., 1006 ; J. B. Thomas, 1904 ; O. C. 
Clanoy, 1905, North- West India Cooference; T. S* 
Johnson, Bombay ConfereDce ; J. E. RoBinson, 
Bengal Conference ; Bishop J. M. Thoburn, 
Bishop F. W. Warne, Ex-Offieio ;■ 
W. A. Mansell, EX'Officio, 
Secretary. 

Trustees of Reid Christian College. 

R. Clancy, P. M. Buck, F. l. Neeld, 1906; W. E. Crawshaw, 

Esq., T. J. Scott, Wiluam Peters, l»ci6; J. w. Robinson, 

J. C. Butcher, L. A. Core, 19o7 ; Bishop J. M. 

Thoburn, Bishop F. W. Warne, Ex-Officio ; 

C. L. Bare, Ex-Officio Secretary, 

Committee on Management of Naini Tal Schools, 

Bishop F. W. Warne, Samuel Knowles, J. H. Messmore, N. L. 

RocKEY, F. L. Nebld, R. I. Faucstt, p. 8. Hyde, J. Anderson, 

Esq., Col. J. Burton Forster, J. C. Butcher, Mrs. 

Butcher, miss Easton, Miss Sellers, Miss 

English. 

Executive Committee of Oak Openings High School. 

Bishop F. W. Warne, F. L. Neeld, Samuel Knowles, J. H. 
Messmore, P. S. Hyde, J. Anderson, Esq., Col. Burton 

FORSTER, J. C. Butcher. 

Trustees of Bishop Parker Memorial High School. 

W. A. Mansell, H. A. Cutting, 1905 ; F. L. Neeld, N. L. Rockey, 

Wm. Peters, 1906 ; Ex-OfficiOi The Presiding Elder of the 

District and the Principal of the school. 

To Preach the Annual Conference Sermon. 
J. H. Messmore ; Alternate^ R. I. Faucett. 

Visitors to Theological Seminary. 
William Peters, R. I. Faucett. 

Licensed Deaconesses. 

Miss Bogb, Miss Scott, Miss Hardie, Miss Mary Means, Miss 

Browne, Miss Sullivan, Miss Ingram, Miss A. Means. 

Associates. -Mrs. Tucker, Mrs. Caroline Richards. 

Probationers.— Miss E. McLeavy. 

Examining Committee,'-Miss Sullivan, Miss A, Means, Mrs* 

Neeld. 



CONFERENCE ROLL. 



GLASS A.— Elders in loll oonneotlon wbo hive oomploted 






the conrae of study. 




Adams, Horace J. 


1874 


Lawrence, ShaduUa 


1803 


Bahadur Singh 


1896 


Lazar Shah 


1904 


Baldeo Pershad 


18»3 


List, Henry K, 


1889 


Bansi Dhar 


J 895 


Mohammed Hasan Jan 


1895 


Bare, Charles L. 


1880 


Mansell, Sabine 


1892 


Basant Ram 


1894 


Mansell, William A. 


1889 


Bihari Lai I. 


1892 


McArthur, A. G. 


1893 


Bihari Lai II. 


1889 


Mazhar-ul-Haqq 


1893 


Bhikki Lai 


1891 


Messmoi'e, James H. 


1861 


Blackstock, John 


1875 


Mukerjee, H. L. 


1886 


Bowen, W. R. 


1882 


Mitcbell, H. B. 


1886 


Butcher, John C. 


1885 


Neeld, Frank L. 


1881 


Butler, David M. 


1893 


Nizam Ali 


1896 


Chhote Lai 


1894 


Patras, Benjamin 


1887 


Childs, Nathaniel R. 


1904 


Paul, Chiddu S, 


1889 


Chowfin, David A. 


1892 


Peters, William 


1879 


Cocker, Benj. F. 


1884 


Phillip, B. S. 


1893 


Core, Lewis A. 


1889 


Phillip, Samuel 


1891 


Craven, Thomas 


1870 


Prabbhu Dayal 


1897 


Cutting, Hiram A. 


lf<U 


Prem Singh 


1898 


Dease, Stephen S. 


1881 


Presgrave, Grafton D. 


1894 


Dysell Joseph 


1898 


Robinson, John W. 


lb92 


Falls, Seneca 


1886 


Hockey, Noble L. 


1884 


Fauoett, Robert I. 


1899 


Samuel, John F. 


1893 


Fazl Masih 


1893 


Samuel, Joshua S. 


1896 


Finch, Super! an B. 


1894 


Scott, Thomas J. 


1863 


Franklin, R. S. 


1893 


Scott, Warren M. 


18x8 


Frey, Geo. H. 


1889 


Shipley, Charles 


1885 


Ganga Nath 


1896 


Smart, Joseph H. 


1897 


Gill, Joseph H. 


1871 


Speake, William T. 


1890 


Greenwold, F. W. 


1879 


Stephen, Matthew 


1882 


Hancock, C. 


1886 


Solomon, Joshua 


18^6 


Harris, Mangal L. 


1904 


Thobum, David L. 


1894 


Hewes, George C. 


1891 


Tbompkinson, James 


1898 


Humphrey, James L. 


1857 


Tupper, Samuel 


1889 


Jawala Singh 


1894 


Waugh, James W. 


1859 


Jhukkan Lai 


1898 


West, John N. 


18»3 


Jordan, James 


1»<93 


Wheeler, Samuel 


1889 


Eanhai Singh 


1887 


Wilson, Haikua 


1887 


Kidder, D. P. 


1885 


Yaqub Shah 


1882 


E^nowles, Samuel 


1868 







CONFERENCE ROLL. 




GLASS B. - Hemben in full oonnectioB in studios of tho f oirlh yotr. 

Badley, Brenton T. £ 

Bulaqi Siogh 

Kay Silas .... 

Walter, John H. 

Wosley, Arthur S. 

Yaqub All 



Bkcon 




1901 


M 




1888 


M 




1890 


n 




1897 


>» 




1901 


»j 




1899 



CLASS C- Members in fnll connection in studies of the third year. 



Guthrie, George W. 
Hyde, Preston S. 
Misri Charan 
Prem Masih 
Yaqub Singh 



Deacon 

Elder 

Deacon 



It 



1904 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1900 



CLASS D.— Proaohers on Trial. 



Budden, Bhola S. 
Hukill, Devi S. 
Roberts, John 
Sfgler, Henry C 
Briggs, George W. 
Ishwari Dass 
Wilson, Dhappan 
Wittke, Ferris 



Elder 



Elder 



T Year 


1903 


5) 


1903 


n 


1903 


j» 


1903 


I Year 


1904 


n 


1904 


>» 


1904 


>» 


1904 



SUflHART. 

Missionaries in full connection 
Hindustani members in full connection . . • . 



Missionaries on Trial 
Hindustani preachers on Trial 



.... 

on .... 


• • • • 

• • • • 

• • . « 
. • • » 

• • • • 

• 

a • • • 


23 

69 


Total 

.... 

• • • • 


02 

1 

7 


Grand Total 


100 



f 



8 



CONFERENCE ROLL. 



MISSIOH ARIES PRBSBHT-CONFBRSRCB, 1904, 

Bishop James M. Thoburn, D.D., LL.D. \ h^^^az^^ 
Bishop H. W. Warren, DD., LL.D. J i'reaidtnfif. 



Badley, B. T. * 
Bare, C. L. * 
Blaokstook, J. * 
Briggs, G. W. * 
Brouse, Miss. 
Budden, Miss. 
Butcher, J. C* 
Cartwright, Miss. 
Chew, Mrs. 
Core, L. A.* 
English, Miss. 
Faucett, R. I. 
Gill, J. H.* 
Guthrie, G. W ♦ 
Hoge, Miss. 
Hyde, P. S. 
Ingram, Miss. 
Knowles, S. 
Kyle, Misa. 
Lewis, Miss. 
Loper, Miss. 



Mansell W. A.* 
Means, Miss. 
Means, Miss A. 
Messmore, J. H.* 
Neeld, F. L.* 
Northrup, Miss. 
Organ, Miss. 
Parker, Mrs. 
Hobinson. Miss. 
Hockey. N. L,* 
Ruddick, Miss. 
Scott, T. J.» 
Scott, Miss. 
Sellers, Miss. 
Siddall, Miss. 
Singh, Mies. 
Sullivan, Miss. 
Thoburn, D. L.* 
West, J. N. 
Wilson, Miss. 
Wright, Miss. 



LIST OF VISITORS. 



Buck, P. M., 'Nori\'Wt»i India Conference. 

Mansell, H. ,, ,, ,, ,, 

Calkins, H. R.,* liomhmj Conference, 

Craven, Miss J. W., Evanston, III, 

Carnahan, Miss, Pittahurgh^ Pcu 

Rev. T. S. Wynkoop,* NoHh-India Bible Society. 

* And Wife, 



\ 



DISCIPLINARY QUESTIONS. 



1. W]io hiVa been Rooaived by Transfer, and from wbat Gonfarenoes T 

Choree W. Quthri$, Des Moines; Jhandu ISvigh, South 
India. 

2. Who haye boon Ro-admlttod Y 

None. \ 

3. Who hoYO boon ReooiTOd on Grodentials, and from what Chnrches T 

None. 

4. Who have boon ReooiTOd on Trial T 

(a) In Studies of First Tear. 

Ferris WiUkCj Dkappan Wilson^ Ishwari Das, OtorQe W. 
Brings. 

(b) In Studios of Third Tear. 
None. 

5. Who haTO been Oontinned on Trial T 

(a) In Studies of First Tear. 

None. 
{b) In Studies of Second Tear. 

Bkola 8. Badden^ John BobertSf Devi S» Eukillf Henry 
C. Sigler, 

( c) In Studies of Third Tear. 
None. 

(d) In Studies of Fourth Tear. 
None. 

6. Who haTO been Discontinned T 

Jhandu Singh. 

7. Who haTO been Admitted into Full Membership ? 

(a) Bleoted and Ordained Deacons this year. 

Qeorge W, Guthrie, 
{b) Bleoted and Ordained Deacons proTiously* 

Misri Charan, Prem Masih^ Preston IS. Hyde^ Yaqub Singh. 

8. What Members are in Studies of Third Tear 7 

(a) Admitted into Full Membership this year. 

Misri Charan, Prem Masih^ Preston 8. Ilyde^ George 
W' Guthne, Yaquh SingJu 

{b) Admitted into Full Membership proYiously. 
None. 

9. What Mombers are in Studies of Fourth Tear ? 

Jolvfk H' Walter^ Brenton 2\ Badley, YaqaJj Ali^ Kay Silast 
Arthur S- Wesley, Bulaqi Simjh. 



10 DifSaPUNABY QUESTIONS. 

10. What Hembert htve Oompletoi the (hmiareiiM CkrarM of Btaiy t 

(a) Eleoted and Ordained Elden tfala year. 

Nathaniel R. Ckildsj Lazar Mo^, Mangal L. Harris* 
(6) Elected and Ordained Elden preTfooily. 

Bobert L FaucelU 

11. What othen liave been Elected and Ordained Deaeonit 

(a) As Local Preaohera. 

Albert Outab^ Fatraa Singh, Joshua Todd, Ram ChpdL 

( b) Under Hisaionary Rnle. 

George W* Briggs. 

12. What others have been Elected and Ordained Eldera T 

(a) Aa Local Deacons. 

Sohan Lai, Ohungar Money, Kvcatikin, 

( b) Under Missionary Rnle. 

Oeorgt W» Bi-iggs, Yaqub Ali. 

13. Was the Character of each Preacher examined T 

This was strictly done as the name of each preacher was 
called in open Conference. 

14. Who haYO been Transferred, and to what Ckmferences T 

Walter B. Empey, North-West Iowa. 

15. Who hsTO Died T 

Abraham Solomon, Joseph Jacob. 

16. Who have been Located at their own Reqnest t 

None. 

17. Who haye been Located t 

None. 

18. Who haye Withdrawn T 

Joseph Wabid-ud-Din. 

19. Who haye been permitted to withdraw nnder Oharges or Oomplaints t 

None. 

20. Who haye been Expelled ? 

None. 

21. What other personal Rotation should be made ? 

Noce. 

22. Who are the Snpemnmerary Preachers T 

None. 

23. Who are the Snperannnated Preachers T 

J. L. Humphrey,^ J. W. Waugb, Thomas Craven, Samue 
Knowles. 

24. Who are the Triers of Appeals t 

F. L. Neeld, John Blackstock, W. R. Bowen, N.L. Rockey 
O. H. Prey, Matthew Stephen, L. A. Core. 

25. What is tiie Btatistical Report for this year T 

(See Statistics.) 



DISaPUNARY QUESTIONS. 11 

Wfctt It the Aggregtte of the BenaTOknt CoUeottons ordered by tba 
Oraonl CoBlereneo, ti reported by the Conference Tretivrer T 

Rs. 2,487-lMO. 

S7. Vktt are tile Oltimi on the Oonferenoe Fnnd T 

Rs. 1,116. 

28. WlMt hti been ReceiTOd on these CUimi, and how has It been Apiilled t 

Full amount was received and applied. 

29. Where are the Preachers Stationed ? 

(See Appoiottnents.) 

30. Where ahall the Next Conference be held ? 

Lucknow. 

Note.— iVafiiM oi Conferenee U)\dergraduatcs are printed in italics. 




t 






CONFERENCE APPOINTMENTS. 



N. I. COHFEREHOE APPOIHTHEHTS, 11»04. 

BAREILLY-KUMAON DISTRICT. 
F. L. Neeld, Presiding Elder (P. O. Shahjahanpur). 

ShahjahaDpur East, John Blackstock, Prabbhu Dayal. 

Shahjahanpur West, G. D. Presgrave. 

Dilawarganj, Dhappan Wilson, Local Deacon. 

Panahpur, John Blackstock. 

Powayan, Prem Singh. 

Mahamdi, John Blackstock, Joseph Dysell. 

Jalalabad, Misri Charan. 

Tilhar, H K. List. 

Miranpur Katra, B. F. Cocker. 

Khera Bajhera, to be supplied. 

Paridpur, C. S. Paul. 

Bareilly, S. S. Dease. 

,, Hindustani Church, W. R. Bowen. 

,, Sadar Bazar, A.G. McArthur. 

,, Theological Seminary, |W. A. Mansell, Principal; 
S. S. Devise, Vice-Principal; H. L. Mukerji, Jwala 
Singh, J R Cbitambar, T. J. Scott, Profeaaor Emeritus 
of iSystematic Theoloay, 
Naini Tal, P. S. Hyde, Benjamin Patras. 

,, English Church, P. S. Hyde. 

,, Hindustani Church, J. R. Chitambar. 

,, Kaladungi, Shadulla Lawrence. 

„ Boys' High School, J. C. Butcher, Principal. 
Pithoragarh, Devi S Hukill. 
Dwarahat, to be supplied. 

,, Lohba. Harkua Wilson. 
Superannuates, J. W. Waugh, J. L. Humphrey, Samuel Knowles. 
On leave to America, T. J. Scott. 

BUD AON DISTRICT. 

W. Peters, Presiding Elder (P. O. Budaon). 

Aonla, Basant Ram. 

Bhamora, John Roberts. 

Bilsi, Nizam All. 

Binawar, Mangal Singh II., Local Deacon. 

Bisauli, W. T. Speake. 

Budaon, W. Peters, James Thompklnson. 

Dataganj, Bihar I Lall II. 

Kakrala, Joshua Solomon. 

Ujhani, B. S. Budden. 

BIJNOR DISTRICT. 

J. H. Gill, Presiding Elder (P. O. Bijnor). 

Basta, H. B. Mitchell. 
Bijnor, Warren Scott. 
Dhampur, Fazl Masih. 



CONFERENCE APPOINTMENTS. 13 

Kiratpnr, 6 an si Dhar. 

Mandawar, Peter vierrlll, Local Elder. 

Na^ioa, Charles Shipley. 

Najibabad, N. R. ChilHg. 

Nurpur, Oulab SiDgh, Local Elder. 

Seohara, Jhabbu Lall, Local Elder. 

GARHWAL DISTRICT. 

J. H. Messmore, Presiding Elder (P. O. Pauri, Garhwal). 

Dekhwall, F. W. Green wold. 
Kainur, Kwankin, Local Elder. 
Laosdowne, (^hungar Money, Local Elder. 
Pauri, J. H Mes^^more, •). A. Chowfin. 
Ramnee, Sabine viandell. 

HARDOI DISTRICT. 

Samuel Tapper, Presiding Elder (P. O. Hardoi). 

Bilgram, Jbukkan Lall. 

Hardoi, Samuel Tupper. 

Mallawan, Harun Andrew, Local Deacon. 

Pihani, Sadal Masih, Local Deacon. 

Safipur, Kanhai Singh. 

Sandi, Robert Turner, Local Elder. 

Sandila, Crawford Hancock. 

Shahabad, Yaqub Shah. 

Unao, Bibarl Lall. 

MORADABAD DISTRICT. 

L A. Core, Prediding Elder (P. O. Moradabad). 

Amroha, D. M. Butier. 
Babukhera, Bulaqi Singh. 
Bahjoi, James Jordan. 
Chandausi, H. A. Cutting. 
Dhanaura, Mohammad Bassan Jan. 
Gunnaur, Seneca Falls. 
Hasanpur, B. S Phillip. 
Kantb, M. L. Harris. 
Kuodarki, Bahadur Singh. 
Moradabad, R. I. Faucett, Mazhar-ul-Haqq. 
,, Parker Memorial High School, 

R. I. Faucett, Nathaniel Jordan. 
Naraioya, Buddha Wilson, Local Deacon. 
Rajpura, Lachman Singh, Local Deacon. 
Rasulpur, viathra Persbad. 
Sambhal, Lazar sh^h. 
Sbahpur, Vlauladad Khan, Local Elder. 
Sharif pur, Nirmal Singh, Local Elder. 
Thakurdwara, Mohan Singh, Local Elder. 

GUDH DISTRICT. 

J. W. Robinson, Presiding Elder (P. O. Lucknow). 

Bahraich, A. S. Wesley. 

Balrampur, J. S. Samuel. 

Barabanki, Yaqub All. 

Bbinga, J. F Samuel. 

Ellenpur, John Higginbotham, Local Deacon. 

Gonda, G. C. Hewes, Ferris Wittke. 



14 CONFERENCE APPOINTMENTS. 

Karnalgaoj, Samuel Wheeler, Baldeo Pershad. 

Lakhiropur, H. J. AdaniB. 

Lucknow Circuit, B. T Badley, H. C. Sigler. 

,, Hindustani Church, Matthew Stephen. 

,, English Church, G. W. Briggs. 

,, Reid Christian College, C. L. Bare, Prttic»pa2: B. T. 
Badley, G. W. Briggs. J. G. Martin, Samuel Phillip. 

„ Methodist Publishing House, G. W. Guthrie, Ganga 
Nath. 
Malihabad, F'rem Masih. 
Nanpara, L. J. MoGee, Local Deacon. 
Nawabganj, Yaqub Singh 
Uae Bare)!, Chhote Lall. 
SidhauJi, J H. Smart. 
Sitapur Circuit, N. L. Rockcy, S. B Finch. 

,, Boarding School, N. L. Hockey, Kay Silas. 
Tikaitnagar. Mangal Sin^h, Local Deacon. 
Editor, KaukabiSimh W. A. Mansell. 

Secretary, Bishop Thoburn Special Fund for India, N. L. Rockey. 
On leave to America, D. L. Thoburn, J. N. West. 
Superannuate, Thomas Craven. 

PILIBHIT DISTRICT. 

G. H. Frcy, Presiding Elder (P. O. Fatohganj West). 

Bhojipura, Motl Lall, Local Dcaroo. 
Bisaipur, Oirdhari Lall, i^iocal Deacon. 
Fatehganj West, G. H. Frey, i; S.FrankHn. 
Mirganj, Ghasa Sinsfh, Local Deacon. 
Nawabganj, John AValt^r. 
Pilibhit, D. P. Kidder. 
Pur an pur. Jhabbu Lall, Local Deacon 
Rampur, Kaliyan Singh, Local Deacon. 
Shahi, Sohan Lalla, Local Elder. 
Sirauli, Bhikki Lall. 



WOHAH'S COHFERENGE, 1904. 

BAREILLY-KUMAON DISTRICT. 

Bareilly Orphanage and Boarding School, to be supplied. 

,, City Work, Mrs. Dease, M.O., Mrs. Tucker. 

,, Medical Work, Miss 'Lewis, M.D. 

,, Woman's School, Mrs. Mansell, Mrs. Mukerji. 
Shahjahanpur Girls' Boarding School, Miss Organ. 

,, City Work, Mrs. Blackotock. 

Bhot, Miss Bowne. 

Dwarahat, supplied by the Misses Seymour. 
Pithoragarh station, Miss Sullivan. 

,, Evangelistic Work, Miss Budden. 

Naini Tal, Hindustani Work, Mrs. Neeld. 

,, Boys' High School, Mrs. Butcher. 

,, English work, Mrs. Butcher. 

,, Girls' High School, Miss Easton, Principal ; MUt 

Sellers, Vice- Principal. 
District Work, Mrs. Neeld. 
On le9kTt to America, Miss English, 



CX)NF£JIENC£ APPOINTMENTS. 15 

BIJNOR DISTRIOr. 
Disiriot Work and Girls' Boarding School, Mrs. Gill. 

BUDAON DISTRICT. 

Rudaon Girls' Boarding School, Miss Wright, one to be sup- 
plied. 
„ City and District Work, Miss Wright. 

GARHWAL DISTRICT. 

Pauri Girls' Orphanage and Boarding School, Miss Wilson. 

,, Village Schools and District Work, Mrs. Messmore. 

,, Editor, BaJfqiNUwanf Mrs. Messmore. 
On leave to America, Miss Kyle 

HARDOI DISTRICT. 

District and School Work, Mrs. Tupper. 
Evangelistic Work, Mrs. Parker. 

MORADABAD DISTRICT. 

Moradabad City and Circuit Work, Mrs Parker, 

„ Girls' High School, Miss A. Means. 

District Work> Mrs. Core. 
,, Evangelist, Miss Means. 

OUDH DISTRICT. 

Lucknow, Isabella Tboburn College and Girls' High School, 

Miss Hoge, Princival: , College, Miss Siogh, Kiiss 
Robinson, Miss Siddall ; High School, Miss Jirouse, 
Ml8S Cartwright, Miss Nortbrup. 
,1 Deaconess Home and Home for Homeless Women, Miss 

Ingram, Miss Hardie. 
,, Circuit and City Work, Mrs. Badley. 

„ Zenana Work and City s:chools, Mrs. Chew. 

„ Reid Christian College, Mr^. Bare. 

,, English Church, Mrs. Briegs. 

„ Associate Editor, Raiiq % riiswwn, Mrs. Guthrie. 

Sitapur Girls' Boarding Schiol, Miss Loper 
,, City and Zenana Work, Mrs. Hockey. 
Bahraich, Mrs. Kaymon 
Gonda Girls' Boarding School, Miss Scott. 
,, City Work. Mrs. Hewes. 
,, Evangelistic Work, Miss Ruddick. 
District Work, Mrs. Robinson. 
On leave to America, Miss Newton, Miss C. Easton, Miss Nichols* 

PILIBHIT DISTRICT. 
District Work, Mrs. Mansell, Mrs. Frey. 



CONFERENCE JOURNAL. 



first Day. 

Bareilly, 1th January 1904. 
Opening BzoroisM. 

The North India CoDference met for its fortieth annual 
session in the Methodist Bpidcopal Church, Bareilly, on Thursday, 
7th January 1 94, at 11 am., uoder the presidency of Bishop 
H. W. Warren, D D., LL.0 , and Bishop J. M Thoburn, O. D., 
LL.D. After an opening hymn Bishop Warren read the Scrip- 
ture lesson in Enf^lish, and Bishop Thoburn read the same in 
Hindustani. The Bishop<i offered prayer in both languages. 
After brief remarks by Bishop Warren, the Sacrament of tne Lord's 
Supper was administered. 

RoU CaU. 

The Secretary of the last Conference called the roll, to which 
seventy-six members responded. 

Eleotiona : Secretaries and Treaanrera. 

Od* motion of ^m. Peters, B. T* Badley wes re-elected Secre- 
tary, and on his nomination, P. S. Hyde was re-elecied Assistant 
Secretary, and D. A. Chowfin, Vernacular Secretary. On motion 
of J. N. West, R. I. Paucett was elected Conference Treasurer. 

Electioni : Standing Oommittees. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld, Ganga Nath was appointed Chair- 
man of the Committee on Statistics in place of J. Jacob, deceased. 
On motion of J. N. West, G. (J. He wes was elected Chairman of 
the Auditing Committee. 

Introdnctioni. 

The following new members were introduced :- Mr. and Mrs. 
G, W, Briggs, fciev. G. W Guthrie, transferred to this Conference 
from the Des Moines Conference, Mrs Guthrie, Mi«s Siddall, Miss 
Cartwrigbt and Mrs. Chowfin. 

The following visitors were introduced : Rev H. Mansell, of 
the North- West India Conference, Kev and Mrs. Q. R. Callcins, 
of the Bombay Conference, and Rev. T. S. Wynkoop, Secretary 
of the North India Bible Society. On motion of J. C. Butcher, 
Brothers Wynkoop, Calkins and Mansell were invited to seats 
within the bar and given the privilege of participating in the dis- 
cussions of the sessions. 

Oonference Programaie. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld, the Conference programme was 
adopted as already printed. 



MINUTB8 OF CX)NFER£NC£. l7 

Bow of AdJonmmoBi 

On motion of J. C. Butcher, the hour of adjournment was fixed 
for 2 o'clook. 

Lotten Read. 

The Secretary read letters from J. L. Humphrey, J. W. 
Waugh, J. W. Robinson, Thos. Craven, and G. C. Hewee, and on 
motion of C. L. Bare, the Secretary was instructed to reply to 
each. 

Oonferoneo Treasurer's Report. 

J. N. West gave the Conference Treasurer's Report for 1902- 
1903, which was adopted on motion of Wm. Peters. 

Oonf erence Bounds. 

On motion of B. V. Badley, the Conference Bounds were fixed 
80 as to include the two winga and the main aisle within the arches. 
Britlsli and ForeigB BlUe Society. 

The following resolution concerning the one hundredth anni- 
versary of the British and Foreign Bible Society was read by 
T. J. Scott :— 

Whereas the great British and Foi>eign Bible Society is soon 
to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of its founding ; and 
whereas we recognize the importance of fully estimating the great 
work the Society has done, and especially in Foreign Mission 
work, therefore 

Besdved:—!. That we heartily join in the world-wide congra- 
tulation being tendered to the British and Foreign Bible Society in 
this centenary celebration. 

2. That we recognise with profound gratitude the great pro- 
vidential work the Society has done in the world, in promoting 
the translation and circulation of God's Word, in many lands and 
languages- 

3. That we will join the many friends of the Society in seek- 
ing to sustain its great work in all lands, by giving it our renewed 
sympathies, prayers, and general co-operation in such way as to 
facilitate its work and make the second century of )U exietence a 
still greater triumph in the spread of the Bible and in its transla- 
tion intc^all remaining languages of the earth. 

4. That we earnebtly recommend all our people to take a 
still deeper interest in the work of this Socicity, and to sustain by 
every possible means its efforts in the translation and circulation 
of the Scriptures. 

5. That this Conference set apart a time during the session 
for a suitable recognition of this memorable centennial, and that 
we recommend our people to remember the 7tb of March proximo, 
and by some form of commemoration, pre enting tbe subject in 
our congregations on Sunday, March the 6th ; and that collections 
be taken up in aid of the Society's Centenary Fund. 

0. That a copy of these resolutions be presented to Rev. T. 
S. Wynkoop, Secretary of the North India Bible Society, whom 



18 MINUTES OF CONFERENCE. 

we greet with pleasure in our midst to-day, in tlie intereata of this 
great celebration, said resolutions to be forwarded to the Presi- 
dent of the British and Foreign Bible Society, with assurances of 
our prayerful co-operation in its great work. 
In behalf of the Conference. 

J. C. Butcher. T. J. Scott, 

W. K. Mansbll. F. L. NBBLa 

Wm. Peters. C. L. Bare. 

W, R. BowBN. J. H. Gill. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld, one hour on Saturday morning im- 
mediately after the opening exercise 9 was put at the disposal of 
Rev. T. S. Wynkoop for a meeting in the interests of the British 
and Foreign Bible Society. 

nirteentli Qneitioii : Pilibhit District. 

Tlie Thirtecnlh Question was taken up. The name of H. J. 
Adams was called, his character passed, and he read the rei)ort of 
the Pilibhit District. 

Jhtnin Singh. 

Bishop Warren announced the transfer of Jhandu Singh to 
this Conference from the South India Conference, and on motion 
of Wm. Peters his request to be discontinued was granted. 

Resolntioiui. 

The Secretary read the following resolution, which was adopt- 
ed by rising vote :— 

Besolved :— That we, the members of the North India Conference, 
hereby put on record our devout thankfulness to God Almighty for 
bringing into our midst Bishop H. W. Warren, O.O., LL.D. As 
a man of God, great in heart and mind, and greatly used in the 
work of God, we welcome him to our Conference, to our homes, 
and to our hearts. Wo know that God*s blessing comes with 
him. The presence of such a man in our midst is a cause of great 
rejoicing and a means of inspiration. 

We regret that ill-health has prevented Bishop Warren from 
being present in all our District Conferences, and regret, too, 
that Mrs. Warren and .Miss lliff were not able to be present at this 
annual session. 

We pray that God's blessing may rest upon His servants, 
that He may speedily give them entirely renewed strength of body, 
and make them a greatly increasing blessing to the work of God 
in India. 

B. T. Badlsy. 
T. J. Scott. 
F. L. Neeld. 
P. S. Hyde. 
Wm. Peters. 
The Bishop briefly responded. 



MINDTES OF CONFERENCE. 19 

BifVllIy-liiBiOB Diitriot. 

The name of F. L. Neeld was called, his character passed, and 
he read the report of the Bareilly-Kumaon District. 
«tBit DiitHct. 

The name of Wm. Peters was called, his character passed, and 
he read the report of the Gonda District. 

On motion of L. A. Core, H. A. Cutting, and on motion of F. 
L. Neeld, T. J. Scott were appointed a Committee on Memoirs. 
AiJovnuneHt. 

After announcements, Bishop Warren pronounced the Bene- 
diction and a'1j.>urnod the Conference. 



Second Day. 

Bareilly, Sth January 1904. 

Opeilag Exercises. 

The session opened with Bishop Thoburn in the chair. After 
the devotional exercises, conducted by O. W. Briggs^ the Miniutee 
of the previous day were read in English and Vernacular and 
approved. 

latroAuotioiis. 

Miss Carnahan, of Pittsburg, and Miss Northrup were intro- 
duced. 

Thaolof ieal Semiiiary- 

T. J. Scott read the report of the Theological Seminary, which 
was accepted. [See Reports of Committees.] On motion of W. A. 
Mansell, it was ordered that the Report be published along with the 
Minutes of the Conference, and on motion of N. L Rockey several 
thousand copies of the Report were ordered to be printed separately 
for distribution. 

Eisoliitioii:-T. J. Seott. 

L. A. Core presented the following resolution which was 
adopted : — 

It is with great regret that we, the Board of Trusteed of the 
Bareilly Theological Seminary, have received the resignation of its 
honored principal, the Rev. T. J. Scott, D. D. 

We wish here to record our sincere appreciation of the great 
worlc done by him during an almost continuous connection with 
the institution since 1872. It is not possible here to recount even 
briefly his achievements during those years of consecrated service. 
The best years of his long missionary service have been devoted 
to the work of building an institution which should, through the 
ages to come, be a stronghold in Indian Methodism. 

Under the guidance of Dr. Scott, the ! present splendid line of 
buildings, and the tastefully 1 aid-out grounds and gardens h^ve 



20 MINUTES OP CX)NF£BENCE. 

sprung up from a saudy waste. A. magnifloeni endowment bat 
been raised, whioh is io no small measure the fruit of his untiring 
zeal through the years of his service. 

In all the work of the institution Mrs. Scott has been closely 
associated with her husband, loyally bearing her share of the 
burden alike In heat and cold. The training of the wives of the 
students for their future work as co-workers with their husbands 
in the work of preaching the Gospel, has been her care. 

We wish Dr. and Mrs. Scott a safe voyage home with God's 
richest blessings during their sojourn there, and that, as soon as 
consideration of health will permit, they return to India. 

It is aldo requested that the Bishop and Cabinet give him 
the relation of Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology. 
In behalf of the Conference. 

L. A. Cork. 
D. M. Butler. 

Reports of Seminary Visitors. 

J. Blockstook and Wm. Peters gave the report of the Commit- 
tee to visit the Theological Seminary. [See Report of Committees. ] 

Seminary Treasurer's Report. 

J. H. Gill read the Report of the Treasurer of the Theological 
Seminary, which, on motion of H. A. Cutting, was accepted. 

Seventh Qnestlon. 

The Seventh Question was taken up. The names of Prem 
Masih, Preston S. Hyde, Yaqub Singh were called, and, on mo- 
tion of W. A. Mansell, they were received into Full Connection. 
The name of Misri Charan was called, and, on motion of F. L. 
Nee)d, he was received into Fall Connection. The name of George 
W. Guthrie was called, and on moUon of W. A. Mansell he was 
received into Full Connection, elected to Deacon's orders, and re- 
commended for ordination. 

BtOTOBth QnestloB. 

The Eleventh Question was taken up. The names of Albert 
Gulab, Patras Singh, Joshua Todd, Ram Gopal were called, and, 
on motion of their respective Presiding Elders, they were elected to 
the office of Local Deacon and reconunended for ordination. The 
name of George W. Briggs was called, and, on motion of L. A. 
Core, he was elected to Deacon's orders, under the Missionary 
Rule, and recommended for ordination. 

fwelfth QnestloB. 

The Twelfth Question was taken up. The names of Sohan Lai 
Ghungar Money, Kwankin and MangalL. Harris were called, and, 
on the motion of their respective Prcbiding Elders, they were elect- 
ed to Elders' Orders and recommended for ordination* 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCE. 21 

Fonrtli Qvastloa. 

The Fourth Que«itioD was tak(>n up. Tne Dames of Ferris 
Wittk«*, Ishwari Das, Dhappnii Wilson and George W. Briggs 
were called, aad, on the motion of their respective Fresiding 
Elders, they were received on trial. 

Time for Blectioiui. 

On motion of J. H. Gill It was ordered that at the close of the 
hour set apart for the Centenary Anniversary of the British and 
Foreign Bible Society, thie order of the day be the election of dele- 
gates to the Central and General Conferences. 

Marriage Qnestton. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld it was ordered that a committee of 
three be appointed to prepare a memorial regarding the quefttion. 
of Marriage Laws and present the same to the Central ConfereDce 
The committee to be appointed by the Bishop, and to confer with 
the Bishop in the preparation of the memorial. 

ReT. Dr. Hoskins. 

T. J. Scott presented the following resolution regarding the 
late' B. Hoskins, which was adopted by a rising vote : 

Whereas it has pleased our Heavenly Fatbe^' to call from his 
ea»thly worlc our belovfd brother Rev. Dr Robert Host^ins, who 
had formerly laboured many years in this North India Confer- 
ence ; therefore 

Re»olv€d : — i. That we hereby express our sense of great loss 
in the lamented death of Dr. Hoslcins, who althougb more recently 
connected with another Confeience, still belonged to us by bro- 
therly ties 

2. We hereby record our appreciation of our departed 
brother*s varied and eminent qualific tions as a missionary in 
many forms of work, evangelistic, educational, Sunda.v-school and 
lite ary ; and of his extraordinary success in rHising up and 
training workers, in all of whch be was a leader in North India. 

3 We hereby extend our deepe8t sympathy to Mr8. Hoskins 
and the bereaved cbildren, in this great affliction, and pray that 
the loving Heavenly Father may comfort and sustain them with 
His grace. 
In behalf of the Conference. 

T. J. Scott. 

Addiiioa to Anditors. 

On motion of J. N. West the name of G. W. Briggs was added 
to the Auditing Committee. 

Adiounment. 

After the reading of notices, the time having expired. Bishop 
Thoburn adjourned the Conference with the pronouncing of the 
Benediction. 



22 MINUTES OP CONFERENCE. 

Cbira Day* 

Barexlly, 9th January 1904. 
Opeaing EzerolMS. 

The session opened with Bishop Warren in the chair. After 
the devotional exercises, conducted hy Wm. Peters, the Minutes 
of the previous day were read in Eu^lish and Vernacular and 
approved. 

Bible Society. 

The order of iho day was then taken up. The Rev. T. S. 
Wynkoop, Secretary of the North India Bible Society, gave au 
eloquent address regarding the work of the British and Forei^fn 
Bible Society, and its centennial anniversary, falling on March 
7th of this year. After the address, brief speeches were made 
by the following brethren :— Wm. Peters, D. L. Thoburn, Jwala 
Singh, D. M. Butler, N. L. Hockey and S. Rnowles. 

Eleotioiui : General Oonferenoe. 

Next in order of the day was the election of delegates to the 
General and Central Conferences. The ballot resulted in electing 
T. J. Scott and J. W. Robinson as delegates to General Con- 
ference and J. N. West as reserve. 

Lay Delegates. 

The Secretary received the result of the ballot of the Laj 
Electoral Conference, and announced to the Conference the elec- 
tion of Mrs. E. W. Parker and Mrs. F. L. Neeld as lay delegates 
to General Conference, and of Miss T. J. Kyle and Miss F. L. 
Nichols as reserves. 

Tenth Qnestion. 

Pending the counting of the ballot for delegates to Central 
Conference, the Tenth Question was taken up. The name of John 
H. Walter was called, his character was passed, and, on motion 
of S. B. Pinch, he was granted one more year on condition that 
he brinflr up all his studies by next conference. The names of 
Nathaniel R. Child s and Lazar Shah were called, their charac- 
ters were passed, the Board of Examiners reported that they had 
p^issed examinations on all back studies, and on the motion of 
N. L. Rockey for the Board, they were put on the effective list, 
and recommended for ordination to the offise of Elder. The name 
of Robert I. Faucett was called, his character was passed, and on 
motion of N. L Rockey for the Board of Examiners, he was ad- 
vanced to the class of Effective Elders on condition that he bring 
up the remaining studies in the vernacular. The name of Bulaqi 
Singh was called, his character waa passed, and on motion of N. 
L. Rockey for the Board of Examiners, he was continued in the 
studies of the fourth year. 

Fifth Qneition. 

The Fifth Question was taken up. The names of Bhola S, 
Budden and Devi S. Hukill were called, and on motion of N. L, 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCE. 28 

Rookey for the Board of ESxaminers, they were advanced to the 
studies of the Second Year. The names of John Roberts and 
Henry C. Sigler were called, and on motion of N. L. Rockey for 
the Board of Examiners ,they were advanced to the studies of the 
second year on condition that remaining back studies be brought 
up by next conference. 

BliliUi Qveatlon. 

The Eighth Question was taken up. The name of Brenton T. 
Badley was called, his character was passed, and on motion of 
N. L. Rockey for the Board of Examiners, he was advanced to the 
studies of the Fourth Year on condition that the back studies be 
brought up The names of Yaqub Ally, Kay Silas and Arthur 
S. Wesley were called, their characters were passed, and, on mo- 
tion of N. L. Rockey for the Board of Examiaers, tbey were ad- 
vanced to the studies of the Fourth Year. 

Talegraa. 

The Secretary read the following telegram from the Burma 
Mission Conference in annual session assembled :— 

*^ Burma MisHon Conference greets North India Conference, Read 
Second Corintkians, Nine, Eigkt. *' [And God is able to make all 
grace abound toward you ; that ye, always having all sufficiency 
in all things, may abound to every good work. ] 

On motion of T. J. Scott the Secretary was instructed to re- 
turn greetings. The following message ^as sent :— 

** Greetings lovingly reciprocated by North India Conference, The 
little one shall become a thousand, " 

0. W. Briggs. 

On motion of L. A. Core, G. W. Briggs was elected to the 
office of Elder under the Missionary rule. 

TUrtooBth QnestiOB. 

The Thirteenth Question was resumed. The names of the fol- 
lowing were called, their characters were pas^^ed, and they reported 
their collections :— W. R. Bowen, A. G. McArthur, C. S. Paul, 
Joseph Dysell, B. F. Cocker, Benjamin Patras, J. C. Butcher, 
John Blackstock, Prem Singh, Prabhu Dayal, G. D. Presgrave, 
Jwala Singh, H. J^. List, Harkua Wilson, H. L. Mukerjee, S. S. 
Dease (absent), T. J. Scott. The name of Joseph Wahid-ud-din was 
called ; his withdrawal from the Mission to join the S. P. G. was 
announced by F. L. Neeld and the returned parchments handed in 
to the Secretary. On motion of F. L. Neeld the request to withdraw 
was granted. 

The name of ShaduUa Lawrence was called. Pending discus- 
sion, the time expired. On motion of F. L. Neeld ihe time of the 
session was extended. After further discussion, on motion of 
B. T. Badley, the matter was laid on the table until time for fur- 
ther eonslderation. 



24 MINUTES OF OONF£RENCE. 

T«41lb AU. 

On motion of W. A. Mansell, Yaqub Ali was elected to the 
office of Elder under the Missionary rule. 

Adjonniiiieiit. 

After the notices had been read, Bishop Thoburn adjourned 
the Conference with the pronouncing of the Benediction. 



f otirtb Day. 

Bareilly, nth January 1904. 

Opening Exercises. 

rhe session opened with Bishop Thoburn in the chair. 
After the dev >tional exercises, conducted by the Bishop, the 
MinutPS of the previous day were read in Englirb, and approved. 
On motion of B. T. Badley, the reading of the Minutes in verna- 
cular was dispensed with. 

Certificate. 

This Is to certify that on January l^th, 1904, I ordained as Dea- 
cons Albert Gulab, Patras Singh, Joshua Todd, Ram Gopal, 
George We^tOQ Btiggs and George vvallace Gutbriu; and that 
on the 9ame day I ordained as Elders Sohao Lai, Ghungar Money, 
Kwankin, Nathaniel R. Childs, Lazar Shah, George Weston 
Briggs, Mangal Xi. Ban is and Vaqub Ali. 

Bareilly : \ Henry White Warren, 

,wi. ,r.Aj f Presiding Bishop, 

January Vlh, 1904. ) " ^ 

Oentral Conference Delegates. 

The tellers announced the election of the following as delegates 
to the Centrnl Conference : Wm. Peters, F. L. Nt-eld, S. Tupper, 
L. A. Core, N. L. Rockey, J. H. Messmore, H L. Mukerjee, W. 
A, Mansell. A second ballot was ordered to elect four more dele- 
gates. 

Resoliitioii. 

I'he followinsf resolution, forwarded to Anoual Conference 
from the Bareilly District Conference, was presisnted by F. L. 
Neeld :— 

('•hiSnki Lokal wa'izon ke pahle aur dilsre s&l men jo kitdb ba- 
n6,^ Badley*s Taw&rll^h lDgli>td.o hai, so aknar l-'rfcharon ke sa- 
majhne aur ydd karne ke liye nihdyat mushkil hai, Uhdzd Bareilly 
Kumddn pis^rik^ Kdnfarans kf Bishop sdhib&n, aur Central Con- 
ference se 'arz hai, ki is Idtdb ko tabdil karke kof aur kitdb is ke 
bilMwaz muqarrar karen, aur yih 'arz Annual Conference kf ma'ri- 

f at bhejf jiwe. 

'N. K. Mukerjee. 
C. H. Greenwold. 
Kamini { W . R. Bowen. 

G. D. PBBflOBAVE. 

8. Lawbencs. 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCE. 25 

On motion of Wm. Peters the resolution, together with the 
question of revising the entire Conference course of studies, were 
referred to the Central Conference. 

Resolnttoii. 

The following resolution was presented by J. H. Messmore, 
and, on his motion, was adopted : — 

Besolved :— That this Conference request the Central Conference 
to so change its rules, that the editors of all vernacular publications 
and the agents of the publishing houses may be nominated by the 
Local Press committees of the Annual Conferences particularly 
concerned, and that these local committees be chosen by their own 
conferences. 

This request is presented for the following reasons :— 

1. It accords with actual practice. The Central Conference 
elects those whose names are suggested by persons from the local- 
ities concerned. If the desired change is made, these nominations 
will be made in a regular manner by responsible parties : at pre- 
sent the nominations are made by irresponsible persons, represent- 
ing only themselves. 

2. Some arrangemeot of this sort is necessary to keep alive 

in the annual conferences that iaterest in their publishing and 

editorial work which is necessary. Now the annual conferences 

have no direct voice in the matter, and they lose interest in the 

press and its publications. The press and the papers suffer in 

consequence, for they are left to drift along any way they can. 

The Central Conference which controls these matters, has very little 

knowledge of press or publications, and takes vary little practical 

interest in them. The annual conferences have the knowledge, 

but have no authority. The proposed arrangement supplies the 

needed bond between the annual conferences and this part of 

their work. 

J. H. Messmore. 
Suday School Oommlttee. 

J. N. West read the report of the committee on Sunday-schools 

which, on motion of Wm. Peters, was adopted. [ See Reports of 

Committees. ] 

Dologttes to Central Conferenoe. 

The second ballot for delegates to Central Conference resulted 
in electing T. J. Scott and J. C. Butcher. A third ballot was 
ordered for the election of two more. On motion of N. L. Rockey 
it was ordered that those receiving the three next highest number 
of votes after the election of the required two be elected as 
alternates. 
ProtMiio Elders' Reports. 

On motion of J. H. Messmore it was ordered that since the 
P^siding Elders' Reports had been printed and were in the hands 
of the members of Conference, these reports be not read in Confer- 
ence session. 



26 MINUSES OF CONB'ERENCE. 

PrlntiBg Presiiing Blden' Reports. 

Oq motloa of Wm. Peters it was ordered that, hereafter, Pre- 
siding Elders* L-Ceports be not printed until afcer the sessioa of 
the Annual Conference. 

Oontral Conlerenoe Delegates. 

The third ballot for deleg^ales to the Central Conference re- 
sulted in the election of C. L. Bare. A fourth ballot was ordered 
for the election of one more. 

Ooronation Oongratvlttions. 

The Secretary read the following acknowledgment from 

Government of the congratulations on the occasion of His 

Ma}08ty'i» Coronation sent as ordered by the last Conference :— 

From 

H. T. MOliGAN, Esq. LC.S., 

Under-Secretary to Government, 

United Provinces of Agra and Oudht 



To 



Sir, 



The secretary of the N. I. CONFEaENCE 

of the Methodist Episcopal church, 

Lucknow, 
Dated Allahabad^ the lOth Ftbrwii-y 19i)3. 



I AM directed to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, dated 
the 26th January 1»03, conveying a congratulatory resolut.ion 
upon the occasion of the Corouiition if His Majesty the King- 
Emperor, and to <«ay tliat the reso-uti >n w .1 be forwirded to the 
Government of India for iransmlAHion t'> His Majesty. 

I have the honour to be. 
Sir, 
Your n^ost obedient servant, 
H. T, Morgan, 

Under- Secretary. 
Gentrtl Conlerence Delegates. 

The fourth ballot for Central Conference delegates resulted 
in the election of J. H. Gill. The following were elected alter- 
nates:— >V. R. Bowen, D. M. Butler, H. A. Cutting. 

State of Clmroli. 

J. H. Messmora read the report of the committee on the State 
of the Church, which, on motion of T. J. Scott, was accepted. 
[See Reports of Committees.] 

Reioliitioii : District Oonlerenoe Minutes. 

The following resolution was read by James Thompkinson, 

and, on motion of J. H. Gill, was adopted. 

Chtinki Mishan ke kdrkun hamesha badalte rahte hain, aur 
chtinkl pis^rikt K&nfarans ki rlpor^ kam chh&pf jdtf hai, aur un ke na 
chh&pne k& kuchh lih&z nahfn kiy4 j4t4 hai, aur jo k&rkun ek Edn- 
larans se dtisri K&nfarans men bheje jiite hain, we apne imtihAn ke 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCE 27 

bat&ae men galaif karte hain, aur yuii aao Pi'eaiding Eldaron ko 

bapl diqqaten pesh Ati hain. 

Lih&zd Badaon Dis^rikt K&afarans S&lly&na K&nfarans se dar- 

^hw^st kartf hai, ki wuh har Distrik^ Kd.nf arans ke Presiding Eldar 

ko hukm dewe, ki we apne Dls^ri <( Kdnfarans kf Tahrfr^t i Y&ld&aht 

ohhapwdyi karen. 

J. H. GILL. 
OUimints on Penaion Fund. 

J. H. Mesdmore read the report of the Conference Stewards 
on the question as to who should ba recognized as claimants on 
the Pension Fund. [See Reports of Committee a.] Oa motion of 
Wm. Peters it was accepted. 
IntrodaotiOB. 

Rev. P. M- Buck, of the North- West India Conference, was 
introduced, and, on motion of Wm. Peters, he was invited to a 
seat within the bar aad given the privilege of participating in the 
discussions of the sesaion. 

Statifttos 

Qanga Nath read the Report of the Committee on Statistics, 
which was accepted. [See Report-) of Committees.] 

Ifombers Exonsed. 

Ganga Nath and Yaqub Shah were excused for the remainder 
of the session. 

Oonnes o! Studies. 

The Secretary read the following resolution which was 
adopted :— 

Resolved—il) that this Conference appoint a standing commit- 
tee on revision of the District and Annual Conference courses of 
study, and 

Besolved^2) that this Confereoce petition the Central Conference 
to appoint a standing committee which will confer with similar 
conmiittees from other annual Conferences, and after agreeing upon 
uniform courses of study and receiving the approval of the Bishop 
in charge, these shall become the courses of study. 

C. L. Bare. 
L. A. Core. 

D. L. Thoburn, 
Hnttra Training School. 

On motion of B. T. Badley, the Report of the Muttra Mission 
Training School for the year 1903 was accepted, and Mrs. E. W* 
Parker and Miss E. Hoge appointed as the representatives of the 
North India Conference on the Board of Trustees of the Training 
School. [See Reports of Committees.] 

DoBOitte Hiasionary Soeiety. 

T. J. Scott presented the report of the Conference Committee 
on our Domestic Missionary Society, which, on motion of Wm* 
Peters, was accepted. [See Reports of Committees.] 



28 MINUTJflS OF CONPEKENCE. 

Anditors' Report. 

J. N. West read the report of the Auditing Committee which 
was accepted. [See Reports of Committees. ] 

Board of Ezamlneni : Report. 

N. L. Rockey presented the report of the Board of Examiners 
which, on motion of Wm. Peters, was accepted. [See Reports of 
Committees.] 

Oliloial Record. 

On motion of B. T. Badley the Conference Minutes for the 
quadrennium were recognized as the o£Bcial record for the quad- 
rennium. 

Seminary Visitors. 

On the nomination of T. J. Scott, R. I. Faucett was appointed 
Conference Visitor to the Theological Seminary. 

Gonlerenoe Hinntes. 

On motion of B.T. Badley the Secretary was authorized to get 
a complete file of the North India Conference Minutes and to have 
them bound ; the same to be kept by him for the use of the Con- 
ference. The Secretary was further instructed for the future to have 
the Conference Minutes bound each quadrennium, so as to have 
on hand perpetually a complete set of our records ; and to make 
arrangements with the Finance Committee for the expenses incurred 
thereby. 

Tmstees : Reid Christian College. 

On nomination of J. N. Wetft, the following were re-elected 
members of the Board of J rustees of Reid Christian College:— J. W. 
Robinson, J. C. Butcher, L. A. Core. The name of Rockwel] 
Clancy was sub^tltued for that of Robert Hoskins, deceased, for the 
Noith- West India Conference. The name of T. J. Scott was con- 
tinued on the ]i>t. [See Conference Officers.] 

Thirtieth Question. 

On motion of J. H. Gill, the Thirtieth Question was taken u^J 
The vote resulted in choosing Luck now us the seat of the next 
Conference. 

Adjoornment. 

After notices, the time having expired. Bishop Thoburn 
adjourned the Conference with the Benediction . 



Tiftb m 

BAREILX.Y, 12^^ January 1904. 
Opening Exercises. 

The session opened at 8 a.m. with Bishop Warren in the chair 
After the devotional exercises, conducted by the Bishop, the 
Minutes of the previous day were read in English and approved. On 



MIKUTKS OF CONFERENCE. 29 

motion of Wm. Peters the reading^ of the Minutes in vernacular 
was dispensed with. 

Doneatic Hlaaionary Society. 

On nomination of T. J. Scott, the following were elected the 
Conference Committee on the Conference Domestic Missionary Socie. 
ty :- J. H. Gill, J. W. Robinson, S. Tupper, Wm. Peters, H. L, 
Mulcerjee. 

liabeUa nobim College— Conatitntioii. 

On motion of W. A. Mansell the draft constitution of the 
Isabella Thoburn College for women adopted at a preliminary 
meeting of the Trustees, held on Thursday, February 26th, 1903, 
was presented to the Conference, and in accordance with the sug- 
gestion of the preliminary meeting it was formally adopted by 
the Conference, and the Secretary instructed to insert it in the 
published report of the Conference, [^ee Report of Committees.] 

On motion of W. A. Mansell, the following twleve persons 
duly nominated according to the provisions of the above constitu- 
tion were duly elected the first Board of Governors of the Isabella 
Thoburn College for women, four of whom shall retire annually 

in the order here printed : 

To retire in 

1. J. E. Robinson ... ... 1905 

2. L. A. Core ... ... ... 1905 

3. Mrs. L. S. Parker ... ... 1905 

4. T. L. Ingram, Esq. ... ... 1905 

5. R. Clancy ... ... ... 1906 

6. C Li* Bare ... .•« ... 1806 

7. Sir Harnam Singh ... ... 1906 

8. Mrs. D. O. Pox ... ^ 1906 

9. J. H. Me.^smore ... 1907 

10. M. B. Cameron, Esq. ... 1807 

11. Hon. Mr. Belgrami ... ... 1907 

12. Miss E. L. Knowles ... ... 1907 

nirteeiitii Qvostton. 

The Thirteenth Question was resumed. The names of the fol- 
lowing were called, their characters passed, and they reported their 
collections :— 

Bijnor. 

W. A. Mansell, H. B. Mitchell, Warren Scott, Fazl Masih, 

Bansi Dhar, Chas. Shipley. 

Bndaon. 

J. H. Gill, Basant Ram, Nizam Ali, W. T. Speake, Jas. 
Thompkinson, G. C. Bewes (absent), Bihari Lai II., Joshua 
Solomon. 

Oarhwal. 

J. H. Messmore, W. F. Greenwold, D. A. Chowfin, Sabine 

ManselL 



80 MINUTES OP <X)NFJBRENCE. 

Oondt. 

J. S Samuel, J. F. Samuel, 9. B. Fiach, Samuel Wheeler, 
Baldeo^Pershad, C. Hancock. 

HardoL 

S. Tupper, Jhukkaa Lai (absent), Kanhal Singh, Jas. Jordan, 
Yakub Shah (absent), Bihari Lai I. 

MoradtlMid. 

L. A. Core, D. M. Butler, H. A. Gutting, M. H. John, Seneca 
Falls, B. S. Phillip (absent), Mazhar-ul-Haqq (absent), Bahadur 
Singh. 

Ovdli. 

J. W. Robinson (absent), J. N. West (absent), M. Stephen, D. 
L. Thoburn, Gaoga Nath (absent), 6. H. Frey, J. H. Smart, N. L. 
Rockey, Chhote Lai, Samuel Phillip. 

PlUbhli 

H. J. Adams, R. S. Franklin, D. P. Kidder, Bhlkki Lai. 

Twaity-tUrd QneatUm. 

The Tweoty-third Question was called. The names of S. 
Knowles, J. W. Waugh, Thos. Craven, J. L. Humphrey were called, 
their characters passed, and they were continued in the super- 
annuate relation. 

Twonty-lonrtli Question. 

The Twenty-fourth Question was taken up The following were 
appointed Triers of Appeals:— F. L. Neeld, J. Blackstock, W. R. 
Bowen, N. L. Rockey, G. H. Frey, Matthew Stephen, L A. Core. 

DiieipUne ReTision. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld it was ordered that the Conference 
request the Presiding Elders to appoint a sub-committee to see 
that the changes made by the next General Conference in the 
discipline find a proper place in the Hindustani discipline. On 
motion of N. L. Rockey this sub-committee was instructed to 
co-operate with similar committees from the Nortb-West India and 
the Bombay Conferences. The Cabinet appointed J. H. Messmore 
and Wm. Peters, with W. A. Mansell and S. Tupper as alternates- 

Rltnal. 

On motion of N. L. Rockey the delegates to Central Con- 
ference were requested to a^k the delegates to General Conference, 
to peition the General Conference to make provisions for a 
simpler alternate form of the Ritual for the use of village 
Christians in the Indian Conferences. 

Sbadiilli Lawrence. 

On motion of J. B. Messmore, the character of Shadulla 
Lawrence was passed and his letter to the Conference ordered to 
be placed on file with the Secretary for future reference. 



MINUTES OF GONFERENCB. 31 

D. L. Thobnrn. 

The followiog resolution of thanks was read by N. L. Rockey 

and adopted by rising vote :— 

Wfiereas Brother D. L. Thoburn is soon to go to America on 

furlough after a loog service as Mission Treasurer and as Agent 

of the Methodist Publishing House, we commend his faithful, able 

and self-sacrificing administration of the duties of these two 

difficult offices, and express our appreciation of the kind and 

patient spirit he has shown in all his dealings with us. 

In behalf of the Conference. N. L Rockey. 

F L. Neeld. 

H. L. MUKERJEE. 

L. A. Core. 
Theologioal Seminary Trustees. 

On nomination of T J. Scott, L. A. Core and T. L Ingram, 

Esq., were reelected as members of the Board of Trustees of the 

Theological Seminary, and S. S. Dease was elected in place of C. 

L. Bare. [ ?ee Conference Officers.] 

Haini Tal Schools. 

J. C. Butcher nominated the committee on management of 
Naini Tal schools, which was elected. [See Officers of the Confer- 
ence.] 

Oorrespondlng Seoretary. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld, the Secretary was instructed to cast 
the ballot of the Conference for J. C. Butcher for Corresponding 
Secretary. 

Bishop Parker Hemorlal High School. 

li. A. Core nominated the Trustees of the Bishop Parker 
Memorial High School, who were elected. [See Officers of the 
Conference.] 

Ooaferenee Stewards. 

J. n. Messmore read the Report of the Board of Conference 
Stewards which, on motion of Wm. Peters, was accepted. [See Re- 
ports of Committees.] 

Tobaooo Smoking. 

Wm. Peters presented the report of the committee appointed 
last year to inquire into the question of tobacco-smoking by Con- 
ference members. Pending discussion, on motion of T. J. Scott, the 
Conference adjourned to meet at 12 noon. 

SECOND SBS8I0H. 
Opening Exercises. 

The session opened at 12 noon with Bishop Thoburn in the 
chair. After prayer by H. Mansell, the Minutes of the morning 
Session were read in English and approved. 

Thanks to non-Ghrlstlan Offlcltls. 

On motion of N. L. Rockey, the Presiding Elders concerned 
were authorized to write, in the name of the Conference, our thanks 
to the officials who had buried our dead and cared for the widows 



32 MINUTES OF OONFifiRENCK. 

and orphans of those who became victims of that droad scourge, 
bubonic plague, in Sitapur and Gonda districts. 

UBiform Gonlereiioa Miniitas. 

On motion of D. L. Thobum, W. A. Mansell was appointed to 
bring before the Central Conference the question of adopting a 
uniform style for Conference Minutes. 

Yot« of ThtilM : Otngt Hath. 

On motion of Wm. Peters a vote of thanks was tendered to 
Ganga Natb, the Statistical Secretary, for efficient work. 

Tobacco Smoking. 

The report of the committee on tobacco-smoking was again 
considered. An objection having been made, the report was with- 
drawn by the committee. 
Board of Doaconessoi . 

J. C. Butcher presented the Report of the Board of Deaconesses 
and nominated the Board of Deaconess Work for the ensuing 
year. The report was accepted and the Board elected. [See 
Reports of Committees and Conference OtBcers.] 

BiilMp Warroa. 

Wm. Peters read the following resolution which was adopted 
by rising vote: — 

Resolution rkgardinu Bishop Warren. 

We, the members of the North India Conference, hereby give ex- 
pression to our gratitude to God that we have had the pleasure of the 
ministration and administration of Bishop H. W. Warren,D.D., LXi.D. 
Ever since his appointment from the General Conference to visit India, 
we have been looking foward to his rich counsels, and a season of great 
spiritual uplift under his ministration. The missionaries among us 
who had an acquaintance with the Bishop and also the Church papers, 
had given us high hopes about him, but we rejoice that we were privileg- 
ed to find in our experience much more than what we had heard. His 
counsels and sermons have been great blessings to us, and the fruit of 
these blessings will be seen in our zealous service for the Master, for the 
Divine love of Christ constraineth us, and will constrain us more and 
more. 

We can never forget the excellent teachings and inspiring sermons 
of our Bishop. We hope that the Bishop will not forget us Indians, 
and will ever have the redemption of India at his heart. 

We pray that God may abundantly bless Bishop and Mrs. Warren 
and their family, and be with them in all their journeys, and safely 
lead them home. 

In behalf of the Conference. 

Wm. Peters. 

H. L. MUKERJEE, 

S. TUPPER. 

H. A. CUTTI Q. 

D. A. Chowfin. 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCE. 83 

A second resolutioQ regvkrding Bishop Warren was read by 
the Secretary. 

Beaolved :— That we, the members of the North India Confer* 
ence, express our heart-felt appreciation of the presence and work 
of Bishop Henry White Warren, D.D., LL.D., duriog this session 
of Annual Conference. His leadership in the devotional services, 
his judgment and interest in the sessions of conference, and his 
large genial spirit in personal conversation have been a great 
help and uplift in our work. We feel assured that the influence 
of Bishop Warren's luminous mind and warm heart will long be 
f^lt among us. Indian Methodism rejoiced on learning that Bishop 
Warren had been chosen to pay the official quadrennial visit, and 
no part of our great Church in this great empire appreciates more 
the value, or feels in a greater measure the influence for good, of 
his visit than the North India Conference. We rest with hope in 
the thought that the heart ties established during this conference 
between Bishop Warren and the workers for the Master on this 
distant field, will bind together the home-land and the foreign 
field as never before. 

Signed in behalf of the Conference. 

B. T. Badley. 
J. H. GiiiL. 
P. S. Hyde. 
T. J. Scott. 

Blflbop Thobnm. 

The following resolution was read by Wm. Peters and adopted 
by rising vote :— 

Resolution Regarding Bishop Thoburn. 

We thank God that by His grace we find once more in our 
midst our beloved Bishop J. M. Thoburn. His rich counsels have 
been a source of unfailing help and great joy and freshness to us. 
We give expression to our gratitude to our Heavenly Father that 
by His grace we rejoice to see our Bishop stronger physically and 
spirtually. Our continued prayer at the Throne of Grace is that our 
dear Bishop may long be spared among us, and be blessed with 
physical strength so that he may live to see thousands saved who 
are yet in darkness. We pray that wherever he goes, the Divine 
presence may continually cheer him, and that God may abundantly 
bless him and his dear children, and keep them under His care 
and keeping. 

Signed in behalf of the Conference. 

Wm. Peters. 
H. L. Mukkrjee. 

S. TUPPER. 

H. A. Cutting. 
D. A. Chowpin* 



84 MINUTES OF CX)KF£RENCa. 

Jtar. and Kn. T. J. Soott. 

The foUowia^ resolution regarding Dr. and Mrs. T. J. Scott 
was read by Wm. Peters and adopted by rising vote :— 

Resolution Rbqarding Dr. and Mrs. Scott. 

We are sorry that now the day has come that our beloved Dr 
and Mrs. Scott are going away from our midst to their native 
country. We feel their departure very much. We had thought 
that India had become their home -and we thinic it so— but still 
family ties are so strong at times as to necessitate persons going 
to see their children, and also to recruit their health. We will 
miss Dr. Scott very much In his counsels, for senior missionaries 
are getting very scarce, and they show great love and care for the 
tender plant planted by them. 

In addition to a lot of other work for the Lord, Dr. Scott's 
chief labour was in connexion with the Theological Seminary, the 
graduates of which are found in almost all parts of Southern 
Asia shining as lights for Jesus, and by their faithful services 
rendered for the Lord they have won a lasting name in the hearts 
of the people. 

Our prayer to God is that He may safeiy conduct Dr. and Mrs. 

Scott to America, and cheer them with the pleasure and company 

of their dear ones, and, if God so wills, that they may return to us 

again. And if we do not again meet on earth, we will meet in 

heaven. '* And those that have turned many to righteousness 

shall shine as the stars for ever and ever.'* 

Signed in behalf of the Conference. 

Wm. Peters. 

H. L MUKERJEE. 
S. TUPPER 
W. R. BOWEN. 

BasoliitioB on Entortalamaat 

The following resolution was read by the Secretary and was 
adopted :— 

i^^ok'ed;— That we express our hearty appreciation to the 
Icind friends of Bareilly for the careful arrangements made for the 
entertainment of the Conference, 

Signed in behalf of the Conference 

B. T. Badlby. 
R. I. Paucett, 
n. l. rockey. 
Wm. Peters. 

S, TUPPESR. 

Finance Committee : Elootion. 

On motion of J. H- Messmore, the C onference proceeded to 
elect the Finance Committee. 

Time of Adjonmment. 

On motion of J. H. Messmore, it was ordered that when the 
Conference adjourn, it adjourn to meet immediately after the lee* 
ture by Bishop Warren. 



MINUTES OF OONFEBENCE. 



85 



BlaiostiBl Hinvtei. 

On motion of N. L. Rockey it was ordered that the Hindustani 
Minutes be published in a condensed form along with the English. 

BMTi of Bztminen. 

The Board of Examiners was appointed for the ensalng year. 
(See Conference Officers. ) 

PtaaBoe Oommittee : Bleotions. 

The ballot for electing the Finance Com nittee resulted in the 
election of the following : — 

C. L. Bare. H. L. Mukerjee. 

W. A. Mansell. H, A. Cutting. 

S. 8. Dease. 

On motion of J. H. Oill the Secretary was instructed to cast 
the ballot for Ganga Nath as the sixth mamber, he having receiv- 
ed the next highest number of votes. On motion of S. Tupper the 
two next highest both of Hindustani and European brethren, were 
elected as alternates. The alternates thus elected were, R. I. Fau • 
oett, 6. C. Hewea, S. B. Finch and B. J. Adass. 

Adjoinment. 

On motion of N. L. Rockey the Conference, after hearing and 
approving the minutes, adjourned to m9et at the close of the lec- 
ture by Bishop Warren. 

Third Session. 

Bareilly, IWi January 1(K>4« 
The Conference opened at 6-30 p.m., after an able lecture by 
Bishop Warren, on ** The Forces of a Sunbeam. " 

The Standing Committees nominated by the Cabinet were duly 
elected. ( See Conferenoe Officers. ) 

After brief addresses to the Conference by the two Bishops, the 
appointments were read by Bishop Tboburn and Conferenoe ad- 
journed sine die with the pronouncing of the Benediction. 




'{,^U^. 



Frt9id$nU 



H. W. Warren, 
Preiident. 




Secretary. 



CONFERENCE JOURNAL. 



IN HINDUSTANI. 

Bareilly, 1th January 1904. 

Hamdrl North India k&nfarans k& 40wdn jalsa, roz i Jum'ardt 
7 win January 1904 ko, Methodist Episcopal girje ghar Bareilly men 
fardbam hild. 

Jandb Bishop H. W. Warren D. D., L.L.D., aur Bishop J. M. 
Thoburn, D. D. L L. D., sdhib^n kursf-nisblnh\ie. Ba'd git g&ne ke 
Bifehop Warren s^hib ne Pdk Kal^m Angrezi men pa^b^, aur Bishop 
Thoburn 8&hibneHindustdnf men, Bishop sdhib^n ne donon zuMnon 
mendu'd kf. Bishop Warren sdbib ne 'Asbd-i-Rabb^nf kf rasm add kf. 

Guzashta sdl ke secretary pdhib ne fihrist i shurakd pukdrf, aur 76 
skurakd tdzir the. William Peters Edhib kl 'arz se, B. T. Badley sdhib 
Secretary chune gae, aur Secretary sdbib k{ 'arz se P. S. Hyde sdhib 
Asbietant Sccretaiy, aur D. A. Chowfin sdbib Vernacular Secretary 
chune gae. 

J. N. West sdhib kf 'arz se li. I. Faucctt sdhib, Kdnfarans Treal 
surer chune gae. 

F. L. Neeld sihib kf 'arz SQ Gangd Ndth sdhib ta'dddf kami^tf ke 
chairman, bajde J. Jacob sdhib marhilm ke muqarrar bile. 

J. N. West sdhib ki 'arz se G. C. Hewes sdhib auditing kamitt 
ke chairman chune gae. 

Zail ke nae shurakd kf kdnfarans se muldqdt karwdf gaf. Mr. aur 
Mrs. G. W. Briggs, Pddrl G. W, Guthrf sdhib jo kf Des Moines kdn- 
farans se is kdnfarans ko tabdfl kf gaf, Mrs. Guthrf, Miss Siddall, 
Mibs Cartwright, aur Mrs, D. A. Chowfin. 

Zail ke sdhlbdn kf bhf muldqdt hiif. Rev, H. Mansell, Rev, aur 
Mrs. Calkins, Rev, T. S. Wynkoop. 

J. C. Butcher sdbib kl 'arz se Wynkoop, Calkins, aur Mansel 
sdhibdn 'izzat-ddr sharfk htle. 

F. L. Neeld &dhib kf 'arz se chhapd hdd kdnfarans kd programme 
maqbiil hiid. 

J. C. Butcher sdhib kf 'arz se kdnfarans ke barkhdst hone kd 
waqt do baje muqarrar hiid. 

Secretary sdhib ne zail ke sdhibdn ke khatt paphe :~J. L. Hum- 
phrey, J W. Waugh, J. W, Robinson, T. Craven, aurG. C- Hewes, 
aur C. L. Bare sdhib ne 'arz kf, ki secretary sdhib in ^hatton kd jawdb 
bhej den, manztirhdf. 

J, N. West sdhib ne kdnfarans khazdncbf kf 1902-1903 kf riport 
df, aur William Peters sdhib kf 'arz se maqbdl hdf. 



MINUTES OF OONFERENCB. 37 

R. T. Badley sdblb ne 'arz kf, kl kdnfarans ke shurakdl sdmhne ke 
chha benchon ke andar aur donon pahM men baithen, manz\ir 
hdl. 

Baibal Society kl sad-sdla s&l-girdh ki nisbat ek resolution pesh 
kiydl gfij&f aur maqbdl hdd. 

F. L. Neeld sdhib ne 'arz kf, ki k&nfarans ke sburii' hone ke ba'd 
sanfchar ke roz Pddri T, S. Wynkoop sdhlb ke ik:htiydr men, Baibal 
Society ke jalse ke w&ste ek ghan(a dlyd jiwe, maqbdl hdf. 

Terahvven suw&l k& k&m pesh hd4, H, J. Adams sdhib k& ndm 
puk&ra gay4, un k4 cbdl chalan pass hd&, aur unhon ne PfUbhft Dis- 
(rik^ ke kdlm kf rlpor^ df. 

Bishop Warren sdhib ne Jhandu Singh kd ndm pesh kiyd. Wil- 
liam Peters sdhib kf ' arz se unkf kdnfarans se 'aldhida hone kf dar- 
J^hwdat manzdr hdf. 

Secretary sdhib ne zail kd resolution paphd : — 

Ham North India kdnfarans ke shurakd tah i dil se Khudd ke 

shukrguzdr hain, ki us ne apnf barf rahmat se apne bande aur hamdre 

buzurg Bishop Warren sdhib ko hamdre bfch sahfh saldmatf se pa* 

hunchdyd, aur ham ko dp kf dmad se barf khushf hai, un ko mubdrak- 

bdd detf hai. Ham jdnte hain ki ^hudd kf barakat un ke sdth hai, 

un kf maujddagf hamdre liye ek barf barakat aur khushf kd bd'is hai. 

Ham afsos karte hain, ki dp hamdrf sab dis^rikf kdnfaranson men 

tabf 'at 'alfl hone ke sabab hdzir na ho sake, aur ham afsos karte hain, 

ki jandb Mrs, Warren sdhiba aur Miss Iliff sdhiba is sdldna jalse 

men raunaq afroz na ho sakfn. Ham du'd karte hain, ki Khudd apne 

Ichddimon ko kasrat ke sdth barakat babihshe, aur un ko pdre taur se 

jismdnf qdwat de, ki un ke zarf^e se Hindustdn ke kdm par barf bara. 

kat howe. 

B. T. Badley, 

T. J. Scott, 

F. L. Neeld, 

P. S. Hyde, 

William Peters. 

. Bishop sdhib ne mufa:hta8ar taur se apnf shukrguzdrf zdhir ki. 

F. L. Neeld sdhib kd ndm pukdrd gayd, chdl chalan pass hdd* 
Barelf-Kumddn pis^rik^ ke kdm kf ripor( df. 

William Peters sdhib kd ndm pukdrd gayd, chdi chalan pass hdd. 
-Oonda pis^rik} ke kdm kf riporf df . 

Ij. a. Core sdhib kf 'arz se zaii kf marhum kf kami^tf muqarrar 
hdf. H. A. Cutting, T. J. Scott. 

Ishtihdr dene ke ba'd Bishop Warren sdhib ke kalamdt i barakdt 
«e jalsa barl^hdst hdd. 



88 MINUTES OF CONFERENCE. 

Rm I DcyNtt. 

Babeilly, Stoir^ January, 1004. 

K&nfarans k& jalsa waqt muqarrara par far&ham hdd. Bishop 
Thoburn s&hib kursf-nishin hUe. G. W. Biiggn s&bib ke PAk Kal&m 
parhDe aur du'd mingoe se jalae k& k&m shurd' hM. 

Guzre din k( k&rraw&{ Angrezf aur HinduB^^&ni men parbf gaf, 
aur manzi!ir htif . 

Miss Carnahan aur Miss Nortbup kl mul&q&t k&nfarans se btif. 

T. J. Scott s&bib ne Theological Seminary kl ripor( pa^hf. W. 
A. Mansell s&hib ne 'arz kf, ki yih riporf s&l&na rlporf ke s&th chbape 
aurN. L. Rockey sdhib ne 'arz kl ki kam se kamt,000 jild is riport kf 
alag b&n|Deke liye chhdpl ]&wen, manztir hUl. 

L. A. Core s&hib ne zail k& rezoltishan pesh kiyd aur maqbdl 

*'Ham bare afsos ke s&th Bev. T. J. Scott D. D., s&hib Bareilly 
Theological Seminary ke Principal s&hib aur Mrs. Scott k&, isti'M lete 
haln. Ham sabhon ko ma' Itim hai ki unhon ne san 187 2 se aur ab tak is 
madrasemen kais& 'umda k&m kiy&, aur is keban&oemen apn& waqt 
aur mihnat sarf kiy&, aur mumkin nahln ki un ke sab k&mon k& zikr 
kar saken. Un kl zlndagl k& sab se 'umda aur ziy&da hissa is madrase 
kf bihtarl aur bihbtidl ke liye l^harch hti&, aur un k& k&m ham&rl 
Hindust&ol kallsiy^ men muddaton bataur qila ke q&im rahegd. Un 
ke sab k&mon men Mrs. Scott sharfk thin, aur unhon ne Theological 
tulab& kl bfblon ki taMlm o tarbiyat men hamesha apne ^b&wind kl 
madad kf, ki we apne lj:h&windon kl ^bud&wand ke k&m men haqlqf 
madadgdr ban gain. Ham sabhon kf yih du'4 hai, kl we sal&matf se 
apne manzll i maqsiSd ko pahunchen, aur ]^hud& un ke s&th ho." 

L. A. Core, 
D. M. Butler. 

J. Blackstock aur William Peters sdhib^n ne Theological Semi- 
nary visit kf riport dl. J. H. Gill sdhib ne Theological Semi- 
nary ke kbazAnchf kf riport paphf, jo H. A. Cutting s&hiba kl *arz se 
maqbiil h\\i, 

S^twen suw&l kd k4m pesh hild, Prem M asf h, Preston 8. Hyde aur 
Ya'qdb Siogh sdhlbdn ke n&m pukdre gae, aur W. A. Mansell s&hib 
kl 'arz se we pt!irf shar&kat men liye gae. Misrl Charan k& ndm pukd- 
rd gayd, aur P. L Neeld sdhib kl 'arz se pUrf shardkat men liye gae. 
George W. Guthrie sdhib kd ndm pukdrd gayd, aur Bishop Warren 
sdhib ne baydn kiyd, ki we Des Moines kdnfarans se tabdll kiye gaye 
aur uobon ne sab imtihdn pass kiye, is liye ptirf shardkat men shdmil 
kiye gae. 

Gydrahwen suwdl kd kdm pesh hdd, Albert Guldb, Patras SiDgh, 
Joshua Todd, Rdm Gopdl ke ndm pukdre gae, aur un ke apne apne 
Prfzdidfng Eldaron kf 'arz se Local Deacon ke 'ahde ke liye chune 
gae, aur Ordination pdne kl sifdrish hdf. 



BilNUTES OF OONFERENCB. 89 

George W. Bri^rffs s&hlb k& nto peah Ay4, aur L. A. Core sdhib 
k£ 'ars se wah Deacon chune gae, aur Missionary rule se Ordination 
ki 8if Arish hti. 

B^rahw^Q ■aw&l pesli h^i^, Sohan La'], GhiiQgar Money, Kwan* 
kin, aur Mangal L. Harris ke n&m pukdre gae, aur ua ke Priz&iding 
EldaroQ kl 'ar2 se we Bl^ar ke *ulide ke live chune gae, aur Ordina- 
tion p&ue ke w&ste sif^rish p&(. 

Chauthe suwAl k& k&m pesh bd&, Ferris Wittke, Ishwarf DAss, 
Dhappan Wilton, aur Oeroge W. Briggs ke n&m puk^re gae, aur un 
tee Priz^ding El^aron ki 'arz se imtihdn-bard&ri mea liye gae. 

J. H. Gill 8&hib ne *arz kf, ki Baibal Society ke jaUe ke ba'd 
Central aur General Kdnfarans ke elchf chune jdwea, manzdr hdf. 

F. L. Neeld s&hib ne *arz ki, ki 3 &dmfon ki kami^fi muqarrar 
howe, ki we sh&di ke qawdnin ki nisbat ek darl^hw&st Central Kte- 
farans k( khidmat men irs&l karen, manzdr hdf. 

T. J. Scott s&hib ne ek rezolushan ham&re *aziz R. Hoskin siUiib 
marhdm ki nisbat paph^ aur khare httne ke *' Vote" se maqbdl hdd. 

J. N. West s&hib ki 'arz se G. W. Briggs siLhib kA n&m Auditing 
Kami^^i par rakh4 gay&. Ba'd ishtih&r dene ke Bishop Thoburn 
e&hib ke kalam^t i barakat se jalsa bar^h^st hti&. 

Bareillyf Otoiai, January san 1904. 

Waqt muqarrara par K&nfarans far&ham hdi. Bishop Warren 
B^hib kursi-nishin bUe. William Peters s&hib ke Pdk Kaldm parhne aur 
du'd mdngne ke ba'd jalse k£ kdm shurd' hd^ Guzre din ki rdddd 
Angrezi aur Hindustani men pafhi gai, aur manzdr hdi. 

Baibal Society ke jalse k& k&m shurd' hd&. Wynkoop sdhib ne 
dil-chasp baydn kiyd, ba'd ko zall ke s&hibdn ne kuchh kuchh baydn 
kiyA. William Peters, D. L. Thoburn, JawdU Singh, S. Knowles, 
D. M. Butler, aur L. N. Rockey. 

Phir General Conference ke liye zail ke elchf chune gae. -T. J. 
Scott, J. W. Robinson; aur J. N. West sdhib 'iwaz chune gae. 

Das wen suwdl k& k&m pesh hd&.—John H. Walter sdhib kd ndm 
pukdrd gayd, aur S. B. Finch sdhib kf 'arz se wuh us hi darje men 
rahe, basharte ki wuh apne pahle sdl ki khwandagi men taiydrf karke 
apne sab imtihdn du»>re sdl p&s karen. 

N. R. Childs aur La'azar Sh&hke ndm puk&re gae, un k& chdl 
chalan p&s hdd, aur chdnki unhon ne imtihdn pds kiy^, Eldar ke 'uhde 
ke liye chune gae aur Effective Elder kiye gae. 

R. I. Faucett s&hib effective Elder kiye gae. Buldqi Singh sAhib 
us hi darje men rahe. 

P&nchw^Q suw&l pdchb& gayd. B. S. Budden sdhib aur D. S. 
Hukill sdhib imtibdn-barddri men rahe. John Robert sdhib aur H. 
C. Sigler sAhib kd ndm pukdrd gayd, aur ddsre s&\ ke darje men 
shartia charhde gae. 



40 MINUTES OF OONFBRENCF. 

Athwi^ snwil pesh Ay&, B. T, Badley s&hib kA n^m puk&rd gayd, 
unhon ne Hindustani ^w&ndagl men tfsre s&l k& imtih&n p&ss kiyi, 
lekin apni Angrezf khwdndagl k& imtihdn dtisre s&l deqge, aur chauthe 
8&1 ke darje men chaph^e gae. Ya'qiib 'All s^hib k& n&m puk&r& g^J^t 
chauthe 8^1 ke darje men charh&e gae. K. Silds aur A- S. Wesley 
sdhibdn bhf chauthe sdl ke darje men charhde gae. 

T. J. Scott sdhib ne 'arz kf, ki us t&r k& jawdb jo Burma Mishan 
K&nf arans f*e &y& hai, Secretary s&hib bhej dewen, manziir htif. 

L. A. Core 8&hib ne ' arz kf , ki G. W. Briggs s&hib ko Eldar k& 
'uhda mile, aur Missionary rule ke muw&fiq Ordination pdwen, 'arz 
manztir hiil. 

Zail ke s&hib&n ne apne apne chande ki riport di, aur un k& 
ch&l chalan pass htl&. W. R. Bowen, A. G. McArthur, H. K. List, 
Joseph Dysel, B. F. Cocker, Benjamin Patras, J. C. Butcher, John 
Blackstock, Prem Siugh, Prabhii Dydl, G. D. Presgrave, Harkud 
Wilson, H. Li. Mukerjee, Jaw&ld Singh, S. S. Dease, (gair-hdzir) T. J 
Scott. * 

Joseph Wahid-ud-din s&hib ne darkhw&st ki, ki kdnfarans se 'ald- 
hida ho j&wen. Un ki darkhw&st manztir htii. 

S. Lawrence s&hib k& n&m puk&r& gayd. B. T. Badley sdhib ki 
'arz se un k& ndm multawi rah4. F. L. Neeld sdhib ke 'arz se Kdn- 
farans k4 waqt baphiyd gay&. 

W. A. Mansell s&hib ne'arz ki, ki Ya'qdb 'AH s&hib Missionary 
rule se E)dar k& 'uhda p&wen, 'azr manztir htii. 

Ba'd isbtih&r dene ke Bishop Warren s&hib ke kalim&t i barakiit 
se jalsa barkh&st htid. 

Bareilly, lltHti January, 1904. 

Waqt i muqarrara par kdnf arans f ardham htii. Bishop Thoburn 
sdhib kursi-nisbin htie. Bishop sdhib ke du*d mdngue se kdm shurti' 
htid. 

Guzre din ki k&rraw&i Angrezi men pa^hi gai, aur mauztir htii. 
B. T. Badley sdhib ki 'arz se Hindustdoi kdrrawdi kd parbnd mauqiif 
htid. 

Sanad. 
Main ne dj lOwin January ko zail ke bhdionko Deacon kd 'uhda 
diyd :— Albert Guldb, Patras Singh, Joshua Todd, RdmGopdl, George 
Weston Briggs aur George Wallace Guthrie aur usi roz zail ke bhdion 
ko main ne Eldar kd 'uhda diyd : — Sohan Ldl, Ghtinghar Money, Kwdn. 
kin, Nathauiel, R. Child8,'La'azar Shdh, George Preston Briggs, Man- 
gal L, Harris aur Ya'qdb 'Ali, 

(DastkhaU)'-RESBY White Warren, 

Presiding Bishop. 

Zail ke sdbibdn Central Kdnfarans ke liye delegate chune gae :— 
William Peters, F. L. Neeld, S. Tupper, L. A. Core, N. L. Rockeyt 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCB. il 

J. H. Messmore, H. L.*Mukerjee, W. A. Mansell, T. J. Scott, J. C. 
Batcher, C. L. Bare, J. H. Gill. 

Zail kA rezoMshan, Bareli pis^rikt Kdnlarans se s&l&Da kdnfarans 
ko F. L. Neeld s^hib ne pesh kiy&. 

Chdnki Lokal W&'izon ke pahle aur diisre sal men jo kitub ba-Dum 
Badley't Tawarf^h Ingrlistto bai, so aksar prfcharofi ke samajbne aur 
yid kame ke Dye nih&yat mushkil hai, lihAzd BareH-Kumddn pU(rik( 
Kdnfarans ke Bishop s^hib^n aur Central Conference se 'ars hai, ki 
is kitAb ko tabdil karke kof aur kit&b is ke bil-*iwaz muqarrar karen, 
aur yih 'arz Annual K&nfarans klma'rifat bheji j&wen. 

f N. K. MUKERJKE, 

I C B. Green WOLD, 
KamitlL ^ W. R Bowbn, 

I G. D. Presgrave, 
( s. Lawrence, 

William Peters s^hlb neV'arz k{, ki mundarja 1 b&l& rezoldshan 
aur K^nfarans Course of Studies ko phir se tarmfm kame k& suwdl 
Central Kdnfarans ke simhne pesh kiy& jawe. 

JfB. Messmore sdhib ne zail k& rezolushan pesh kiyd, (Dekho 
Angrezi kdrrawdi). 

J. N. West sihib ne Sande Iskiil kf riport pai'hf. William Peters 
s&bib kf 'arz semaqbdl hiif. 

J. H. Messmore s^hib ne 'arz kf, ki chdnki PrfzdidiDg El^ar sd- 
hibon kf ripo'*ten chhap chukf hain, aur shurak4 ke hdth men maujud 
bain, lib&zd yih ripor{en kdnfarans men na pafhf j&wen, manzdr hdf. 

William Peters ne^'arz kf, kl E^fzdiding El^ar sdhibon kf ripor^ 
kdofarans keba'dtak na chhapen, manzdr huf. 

Secretary sdhlb ne us tdj-poshf ke mubdrakb^df ke l^hatt jo ki 
guzre s&l kf kdnfarsns ne Bddshdh kf tdj-poshf ke waqt bhejf thf, us 
kf rasfd paf bf, ki wuh l^hatt Viceroy kf ma'rifat Shahanshah ke pus 
bhejd gay&. 

J H Messmore sahib ne kalfsiyd ke rdb&of hdl kf riport parhi, 
jo ki T. J. Scott s&hibkf 'arz se maqbdl hdf. 

Zail k& rezoldshan James Thomklnson sdhib ne paphd, aur J. H. 
OiU sdhib ki 'arz se maqbdl hdd. 

** Chdnki mishan ke kdrkun hameshabadalterahtehain, aurcbdn- 
ki Distrik^ KAnfarans kf ripor) kam cbh&pf jdtf bai, aur un ke na 
ohhapne kA kuchh llh&z nahfs kiy& jdtd hai, aur jo kdrkun ek kdn- 
farana se ddsrf k&nfarans men bheje jdte hain, we apne imtihdn ke 
bat&ne meg galatf karte hain, aur ydn nae Prfzdiding Eldaron kobarf 
diqqaten pesh dtf hain ; libdzd Badddn pistrikf Kdnfarans, Sdldna 
Kdnfarans se darl^hwdst kartf hsi, ki wuh bar Distrik^ Kdnfarans ke 
Prfzdi^ing El^ar ko hukm dewe, ki we apnf Distrikf Kdnfarans kl 
Tahrfrdt i Yddddsht chhapwdyd karen,— J. B. Gill. 

J. H. Messmore sdhib ne Kdnfarans Istuardoq kf ripor^ paphf, 
aur William'Peters sdhIb kf 'arz se maqbdl hdf. (Dekbo riporton ko. ) 

Pddrf P. M. Buck sdhib kf rouldqdt hdf, aur Uzzatddr sharfk kiye 

gae. 



42 MINUTES Oi* CONt'ERENOE. 

Oangd N&th 6&hib ne ta'ddd kt riporf parhl, jo maqbtil hii£. Gan- 
gA Ndih aur Ya'qdb Sh^h chhu(({ leke gbar chale gae. 

Secretary s&bib ne zail k& rezoldsban pa^bA, jo maqbtil hu6. 
(Dekbo Angrezf kdrrawdf.) 

B. T. Badley sdbib kf 'arz se Muttra Mission Training Scbool k( 
1903 k{ riport maqbtil btii, aur Nortb India Rdnfarans ki taraf se, 
Mrs. K W. Parker aur Miss E. Hoga us scbool k( Trudtees muqar- 
rar bii(n. 

T. J. Scott s&bib ne Domestic Missionary society ki ripor( pesh 
kf, aur William Peters s&bib kl 'arz se muqbdl bill. 

J. N. West s&bib ne Auditing kami^^f ki ripor( papbi, aur maqbtil 
htlif. 

N. li. Rockey s&bib ne Board of Examiners ki ripor^ pesb k(, 
maqbtil btif. 

B. T. Badley sdbib kf 'arz se manziir biii ki k&nf arans ki k&rraw&i 
cbahdr-sdla k&nfarans ke liye pu^bta daftar samjbd j&e, (Official 
Record). 

T. J Scott s&bib kf 'arz se, R I. Faucett s&bib Tbeological Semi- 
nary ke liye k&nfarans visitor muqarrar h^e, 

B. T. Badley sdbib kf 'arz se Secretary ko ikbtly^r mild, ki Nortb 
India Kdnfarans kf k&rraw&f kf ripor^onkd ek piird. file rakbe, aur 
un ko ek jild men bdndbe, aur k&nfarans ke isti'm&l ke liye rakbf 
rabe. 

J. N. West sdbib kf 'arz se, Reid Christian College ke live zail ke 

sburakd Board of Trustees cbune gae. (Dekbo Kdnfarans ke af sarin, 

J. H. Gill sdbib kf 'arz se 30wdn suwdl pesb dyd, dyanda kdnfar- 

ans ke liye Lucknow muqarrar btid Ba'd isbtibdr dene ke, Bishop 

Tbobum sdbib ke kalamdt i barakdt se jalsa barkbdst biid. 



Km i PaNimM. 

PAHLA JALSA. 

Bareilly, Mvin Javvai-y, 1904. 

Kdnfarans 8 baje subb fardbam biif. Bisbop Warren sdbib kursf- 
nisbfn btie. Angrezf rtiddd papbf gaf, aur maqbtil btif. William Pe- 
ters sdbib ke 'arz se Vernacular niddd pafbnd mauqtif btif. 

T, J. Scott sdbib ki 'arz se zail ke asblpbdss Kdnfarans Kami^f 
Domestic Missionary Society ke liye cbune gae. J. H. Gill, J. W. 
Robinson, S. Tupper, William Peters, H. L. Mukerjee. 

Terabwdn sawdl pesb dyd ; zail ke sdbibon ke ndm pukdre gae, 
un kdcbdl cbalan pass btid, aur unbon ne chande kf riport df. 

Biinor.—W. A. Mansell, H. . B. Mitcbell, Warren Scott, Fazl 
Masfb, Bansf Dbar, Cbas. Sbipley. 

BaMiifi.-J. H. Gill, Basant Rdm, Nizdm 'Alf, W. T. Speake, 
Jas. Tbompkinson, G, C. Howes, (gair-hdzir) Bibdrf La'l diisrd, Josbtid 
Solomon. 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCE. 43 

Oafhtodl.^J. H. Messmore, F. W. Greeawold, D. A. Chowfin, 
Sabine Mansell. 

G'oada.— J. S. Samuel, J. P. Samuel, S. B. Finch, Samuel 
Wheeler, Baldeo Parsh&d, C. Hankok. 

HardoL—S Tupper, Jhukan La*l, (gilr-hAzir,) Kaohaf Singh, 
James Fordao, Ya'qiib Shdh, (gairh&zir, ) Bihdri La*l I. 

Murdddbdd.'-lj. A. Core, D. M. Butler, H. A. Cutting, M. H. 
John, Seneca Falls, B. S. Phillip (gair-h&zir) Mazhar-ul-baqq, (gair- 
h^ir,) Bah&dur Singh. 

Oud^— J. W. Robinson, (gaip-hdzir,) J. N. West, M. Stephen, D. 
L. Thoburn, Oang& Ndth, (gair-h&zir) 6. E. Frey, J. H. Smart, N. 
L. Rockey, Chhote La'l, Samuel Phillip. 

PllibhU.- H. J. Adams, R, S. Franklin, D. P. Kidder, Bhikkf 
L'al, 

Telsw^n suwdl pesh &yd~S. Knowles, J. W. Waugh, Thos. Cra- 
yen, J. L. Humphrey ke n&m puk^re gae, cb&l-chalao pass htle, aur 
Superrannuate relation men qiim rahe. 

Chaubisw&n suw&l pesh hd&, zail ke ash^hdss Triers of appeals 
mnqarrar hde. F. L. Neeld, J. Blackstock, W. R. Bowen, N. I^ 
Rockey, 3. H. Frey, M. Stephen, L, A. Core. 

F. li. Neeld s&hib ne 'arz kf, ki Presiding Elders ek Sub-Kami(|f 
ko muqarrar karen, ki ]o tarmfm General K^nfarans Discipline men 
klye j&ven we dekhen, ki Hindustani Discipline men durustl se rakhf 
]&we, aur N. L. Rockey s&hib ne 'arz kl, ki yih kami^tf North-West 
India aur Bombay K&nfarans ki kamlt^ion ke s^thk&mkare, *arz man. 
zdr htif. 

N. L. Rockey s&hib ne ' arz kf , ki Central Kinf arans ke elchf , 
General K&nfarans ke elchfon se 'arz karen, ki we General K&nfarans 
ke s&mhne pesh karen, ki kalfsiy^ kf rasm dfh&t kf Masfh f kalfsiy^ 
ke w&ste Hindust&n men ek dsdn 'ib&rat men taiy&r kar&we. Manzdr 
htif. 

J. H. Messmore s&hib ke 'arz se S. Lawrence s&hib k& ch&l- 
chalan pass hM, aur un kf chit^hf Secretary ke p&s daftar men rakhf 
gaf, ki &yanda sdl wuh ham&re s&mhne dwe. 

Zail k& ek resolution D. L. Thoburn sdhib kf shukr-guzdrf, un ke 
achchhe kdm ke liye, jo unhon ne cbh&pe-kbdne men kiyd, pesh htid, 
( Dekho Angrezf kdrrawdf . ) 

T .J. Scott s&hib ke' arz se Theological Seminary ke Trustees ^ail ke 
ashl^&ss chune gae. (Dekho Kdnfarans ke afsardn.) 

J. C. Butcher s&hio ne Nainf TAX ke Isktilon ke intizdm kf kami^^f 
ke'n&m pesh kiye. (Oekho K&nfarans ke afsardn.) 

F. L. Neeld s&hib kf 'arz se J. C. Butcher sdhib Corresponding 
Secretary chune gae. 

L. A. Cores&hib kf 'arz se Bishop Parker Memorial High School 
ke Trustees chune gae. (Dekho Kdnfarans ke afsar&n.) 

J. H. Messmore s&hib ne K&nfarans Sunward kf riporf parhf, aur 
William Peters s&hib kf 'arz se maqbtil hdf. (Dekho ripor^.) 



4i MINUTES OF CONFERENCE. 

DU'SRA' JALSA. 

Bareilly, l?toin January 1904. 

Waqt muqarrar pari Bishop Thoburn s&hib ke kurgf-nishln hone 
aiir H. AlansoU sahib ke du'd karne se k&m shurti* htl&. Subh ki kdr- 
rawdf Angrezl men pafhi'gaf, aur muqbill htif. 

N. L. Rockeyts&hib ne 'arz kf, ki k&nfarans k( taraf se Sft4pdr 
aur Oonda pisfrik^ ke Priz&idiog El^ar un afsaroQ kf shukrguaULri 
likh kar bhej dewen, jinhon ne hamdre *azfzon ko jo T&'tln k( bfm&rf 
men guzar gae the, dafndy&, mdnzdr hdl. 

D. L. Thoburn s^hib ki 'arz se W. A. Mansell sdhib ek kamiH^ 
muqarrar hde, ki Central Conference ke s^mhne pesh karen, ki k&r- 
raw&{ k& tarfqa eks&n ho we. 

William Peters s^hib k( 'arz se taM^f Secretary ke achchhe k&m 
ke 11 ye un ki shukrguzdrf ki gai. 

Tamb&kd pine k( kami((f ne apnf riport df, kuchh i'tiriz hone 
ke b&'is kamifti ne riport wdpas ki. 

J. C. Butcher s&hib ne Board of Deaconesses ki riport pesh kl, 
aur Board of Deaconess work ke liye ndm pesh kiye gae. Riport 
maqbdl hiii, aur Board chunA srayA* 

William Peters s&hib ne zail k& resolution pa|;*h&, jo khare hone 
ke '* vote " se maqbdl hd&. 

Ham sab shurakd i k&nfarans apni khushf aur shukrguz&rf ko 
z&hir karnA chdhte hain, ki Bishop Warren s^hib ham&re darmiy&n 
maujdd hain. Jis waqt se General Conference ne unhen hamdre mulk 
ki, k&m dekhne ke liye muqarrar fariDi&y4, tabhi se ham un kf a'lA 
nasihaton aur d&n& hid&yaton aur rdhdoi roshni Masih ki yag&nagat 
aur ziy&da pahch&n men baphne ke liye hdsil karne ke ummedw&rthe, 
kydnki wal&yati a^hb&r aur mishanari sdhlb jo un se wdqftyat) 
rakhte the, un ki a*l& khiibi ke bay^n karke is mutk men un k& hamdre 
darmiy&n &n& bari ^hush-qismati samajhte the, lih&zi yih b&t tahqfq 
aur apne tajruba men hamne kahne aur sunne se ziy^a afzal pdf. Chun- 
&nchi is barakat p&ne k& izbir hamdre Ayanda k&m aur barakat se 
z&hir hogd, ki Masih k& I]&bidn& piy&r hamen apni taraf khfochtA 
hai, aur khinchtA rahe. 

Ab 'aziz Bishop s&hlb, aur un kl mem sAbiba, aur ^b^nd&n ke 
liye yih du*d hai, ki unhen saldmat aur b4-kar&mat un ke watan ko 
w&pas pahunch&we. Bishop s^ib ki yid sur ta'limi naqsh ham&re 
dilon se }& nahin saktA, ummed hai, ki is mulk ki najdt k4 ^hiy^ un 
ke dil men bhi ban& rahegd ; dar|ghw&st hai, ki ham Hindust&nfon 
kl bihtarl aur logon kl najdt k& khiy&l dp ke madd nasar rahe* 

William Peters, 
h. l. mukbrjkf^ 

8. TUFPBR. 

H. A. Cutting. 
D, A. Chowfin. 



MINUTES OF OONFERBNCR 45 

£k dtisri resolution Bishop Warren s&hib ke hsrqq men B.,T. Bad. 
ley sAhlb ne Angrezon kl taraf se parM. ( Dekho Angrezf k&rraw^f. ) 

William Peters sdhib ne zail k& resolution parbd jo khare hone se 
maqbdl hti^ :— 

Jpiud^wand karlm k& shukr ho, ki us kl mihrb&nf ee ham apne 
bar-dil 'axis Bishop J. M. Thoburn s&hib ko apne darml y&n phir 
dekhte haia, aur un kl naslhat hamesba ham&re liye taqwiyat aur 
l^husbl kd bi'is aur hid^yaten babut k&r-&niad halo. Aur is b&t men 
apnl ^bushf aur shukrguzdrl ko Khudd ke R&mhne z&hir karod. ch&bte 
hain, ki us ne apnl peshbfnl aur rahnum&C ke s&th ab tak sal&matl ke 
a^h rakh^ aur Jlsm&niyat aur rtih&aiyat men ziydda mazbdt ma*ldm 
bote hain. Du'^ dill darg4h Il&hl men hai, ki un kl 'umr dar&z ho, 
aur sty&da qdwat h&sil karke bam&re darmiy&n k&m kar saken, 
aur is mulk ke haz&roa aur l&khon khoe hiion kl najdt ke sh&hid hon. 
Dtt'A hai, ki jah&n we rahen aur kdm dekhen ^bud& un k& h&dl rahe, 
unhen aur un ke 'azlz bachchon ko apnl hlfdzat men rakhe. 

William Petrbs. 

H. L. MUKERJEE. 
S. TUPPEB. 

H. A. Cutting. 
D. A. Chowfin. 
Kdnfarana ki taraf se, 

William Peters sdhib ne zail k& resolution parhd, aur khare hone 
se maqbdl hd&. 

Aj wuh din hai, jab ki hamdre 'azlz Dr. T. J. Scott aur un 

kl mem sdhiba hamdre blch se judd hokar apne watan ko tashrlf le jd« 

to hain. Un Id juddl hamen ndgawdr maMilm hotl hai, kytinki ham ne yih 

jdnd thd, ki ab yibl mulk un kd mulk ho gayd hai, aur aisd hai bhf, par 

tau bhl qardbatl bandhan aise hain, ki jin kl wajh se un kd jdod Idziml 

bdt aurtandurufitl kd bd'is hogd. Un ke tashrlf le jdne se is liye 

ranj hai, ki un kl Idiq isidh ham kaise pd sakenge, aur yih 'ki abhl 

aise buzurg Maslbl sdhibdn ganlmat hain, kyi\nki unhen apnl lagdl 

hdl phulwdrl kl fikr, muhabbat aur dard hai. Sdhib ne aur lldhl ^hid- 

maton ke 'aldwa sab se bbdrl kdm apnl a'ld ta*llm madrasa i 'Ilm i 

lldhl men dene se ki jin ke tulabd aksar jagah hash zurdrat Southern 

Asia men mdnind chirdg ke Maslh kl roshnl zdhir kar rahe hain, apnd 

ndm paidd kiyd, be-shakk un kd ndm is madrase aur logon ke dilon 

m^ zurdr qdim rabegd. ^hudd se dill-du'd hai, kl inhen m'amem 8d« 

hiba ke saldmatl ke sdth in ke mulk men pahunchdwe, aur 'azlzon se 

mildwe, agar marzl lldhl ho, to phir in ko ham kisl waqt apne darmi- 

ydn dekh sakeg, agar yahdn milnd na ho, to dsmdn men ham sab mil« 

kar khushl karenge. We jin kl ki koshish bahut sddiq {hahrl, sitdron 

kl mdnind abad ul dbdd ehamkegge. 

Wm. Peters. 

H. L. MUKERJEB. 
S. TUPPEB. 
W. B. BOWEN. 



46 MINUTES OF CX)NFERENCE. 

Zail k4 resolution Secretary s4hib ne parbd., aur maqbiil ht!i&. 
Ham apne Bareilly ke doston ke dil se shukr-guz&r hain, ki un- 
hon ne apnf bari mihrbdnf se ham&re drdm o asdisb kd 'umda intizdm 
kiyd. Kbudd un ko kasrat se barakat dewe. 
Daskhatt Kdnfarans kf taraf se. 

B- T. Badley. 
R. I. Faucett. 
n. l. rockey. 
William Peters. 
s. Tupper. 

J. H. Messmore sdhibne 'arz kf, ki EHnance Kamittf ke liye ndm 
ohune jdwen, aur zail ke a^b^hdss chune grae. C. L. Bare, W. A 
Mansell, 8. S. Dease, H. L. Mukerjee, H. A. Cuttiug, Gaugd Ndth^* 
aur 'iwazi R. I. Faucett, G. G. Hewes, B. J. Adams aur S. B. 
Finch. 

N. L. Rockey sdhib ne 'arz kf, ki Hindustdnf rtlddd mu^htasar 
taur se Angrezf riporf ke sdth chhape, manziir hiif . 

Zail ke ashkbdss Board of Examiners sdl dyanda ke liye chune 
gae. ( Dekho Kdnfarans Officers. ) 

J. H. Messmore sdbib kf 'arz se Kdnfarans bar^bdst hoke Lec- 
ture ke ba'd sdf>he 6 bajefardham htif. 

TrSRA JALSA. 

Bareilly, 12tD^n Januai-yt 19()4. 

Sdfbe pdnch baje Kdnfarans, ba'd Bishop Warren sdhib ke 

lecture ke fardham btlf. 

Standing Gommittees chunf gafn. (Dekho Kdnfarans ke afsardn.) 
Mu^htasar bdt chit donon Bishop sdhibon se htif aur taqarrurdt 

pa^hf gaf. Bishop Thoburn edhib ke kalamdt i barakdt se jalsa bar. 

^^st hiid. 



I 



COKFlBRENCE SESSIONS. 



47 



SESSIONS OF THE NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE. 



No. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 

8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
21 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
33 
33 

34 

35 
36 
37 
38 

39 
40 



Place. 



Lucknow 

Moradabad 

ShahJahaDpur 

Bijnor 

Hareilly 

Bareilly 

LucWnow 

Moradabad 

Bareilly 

Lucknow 

Shabjahanpiir 

Cawnpore 

Moraaabad 

Bareilly 

Lucknow 

Cawnpore 

Bareilly 

Moradabad 

Lucknow 

Cawnpore 

Bareilly 

Lucknow 

Moradabad 

Cawnpore 

Bareilly 

Lucknow 

iMoradabad 

Cawnpore 

Bareilly 

Lucknow 

Moradabad 

Bareilly 

Lucknow 

Bareilly 

Shah] ahan pur 
Lucknow 
Bareilly 
Moradabad 

Lucknow 
Bareilly 



Time. 



I 



Dec. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
J»n. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 

Jan. 



8-14, 

1-7, 

10-17, 

16-21, 

14-23, 

20-27, 

31-18, 

18-24, 

18 -32, 

7-13, 

6-31, 

13-18, 

3-9, 

9-15, 

9-14, 

7-13, 

5-11, 

11-17, 

10-16, 

9-15, 

7-12, 

7-12, 

5-10, 

4-9, 

9-15, 

2-7, 

7-12, 

0-11, 

11-16, 

3-8, 

3-7, 

8-13, 

7-12, 

5-11, 

4-10, 

10-15, 

9-14, 

9-14, 

2-7, 



1864 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1883 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

18U0 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 1 

1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 



President. 



1903 1 
Jan. 7-12, 1904 1 



Secretary. 



Bishop E Thompson J. T. Gracey. 



Rev. J Baume 
Rev. J T Gracey 
Rev. J M Thoburn 
Rev. C W Judd 
Bishop C Kingsley 
Rev. J W Wauffh 
Rev. J L Humphrey 
Rev. T S Johnson 



T. J. Scott. 

Do. 

Do. 
J. D. Brown, 

Do. 

*r.H. Messmoro, 
S. S. Wether by. 

Do. 



Bishop W L Harris J. D. Brown. 



Rev. T J Scott 
Rev. D W Thomas 
Bishop E G Andrews 
Rev. J H Messmore 
Bishop T Bowman 
Rev. E W Parker 
Bishop S M Merrill 
Rev. 8 Knowles 
Bishop R S Foster 
Rev. T J Scott 
Bishop J F Hurst 
Rev. H Manse II 
Bishop W X Ninde 
Rev. J H Gill 
Bishop J M Thoburn 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Bishop Cyrus D Foss 
BishopJM Thoburn 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Bishop F W Warne 

Do. do. 

BishopJM Thoburn 
Bishop F W Warne 
Bishop H W Warren 
Bishop JM Thoburn 



Do. 

B. H. Badley. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

C. L. Bare. 
B. H. Badley. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
J. H. Gill. 

Do. 
W. A. Mansell. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

J.W. Robinson. 

Do. 

Do. 

J. C. Butcher. 
B.T. Badley. 

[ Do. 
[ Do. 



PROGRAMME OF SERVICE* 



Morning Devotional Mcotings, '8 a.m., Bishop J. M. Thoburn. 
Conference Sessions Daily, 11 A m.— 2 p.m. 
Sacrament of the Lord^s Supper at 11 a.m., January 7th. 
Sabbath Services, January 10th. 

8-0 A.M. . . Love Feast, Chairfnan, Rev. S. Knowles. Report of Com- 
mittee on Memoirs. 

11-0 „ .. Sermon by Bishop J. M. Thoburn, followed by ordination 

of Deacons. 

2-30 P.M. .. Sermon Sudr Bazar Chapel, Rev. li. A. Cutting. 

2-30 „ .. Sermon at Beharlpore, Rev. Yaqub Shah. 

3- „ . . Sermon, at City School Chapel, Rev. W. Peters. Alternate, 

Rev. S. Tupper. 

5-30 „ .. Sermon in English by Bishop U. W. Warren, followed by 

ordination of Elders. 

AuiiTerstrleg. 

1. CoNFEBiNCB LiTBRART SociKTT- January 7th, .5-30 P.M. Chtiirmaii, 

Miss Organ. 
Lecture by Rev. B. T. Badley : Subject :— " The New American- 
Indian." 

Confehence Historical Socibty— January 7th, 6-30 p.m. Chairman, 
Rev. P. S. Hyde ; Chronicler, Rev. N. L. Rockey. 

8. Sunday School Aknivbrbabt— January 8th, 2^30 p.m. Chainnan, 
Mrs. Rockey. 

Address, Rev. Prem Singh and Rev. T. J. Scott, D.D. 
6-15 P.M. .. Epworth League Anniversary. Chairman, Rev. F. L. 

Neeld, D.D. 
Address, Rev. W. A. Mansell and Rev. J. Thompkinson. 

3. Cbrtbhiiial A miivBRSABT, British AND Fobbign BiBLBSocinr, 

11 A.M.—Address by Rev. T. S. Wynkoop. 

4. Annual Mibbionart Sbrmon— January 9th, 5-30 p.m., Rev. Nizam 

AH. 

5. Missionary Mebtikq— January Uth, 5-30 p.m., Rev. C. L. Bare, 

Chairman. 
Address on Education— Rev. J. N. West and Rev. J. H. Messmort. 
" Industrial Training"— Rev. J. Blackstock. 
" Self-support"— Rev. H. K. List and Rev. L. A. Core. 
January 10th, 4 p.M.-Lecture by Bishop H. W. Warren, D.D., LL.D. 

** The Forces of a Sunbeam." 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 



Statistical Keport. 



The statistical forms with details will be found at the end of this book', 
in which totals for 190:2 and 11K)3 have been compared, increase and decrease 
shown. Only a few items will be noticed here. There has been a steady 
increase, with a few exceptions, nearly in every branch, and if all of our 
workers are faithful and obodient to our Master, there will be no occasion 
ever to report a decrease. 

MenibefBhiih 1903. 190:?. Iiwredse. Decrease. 

Probationers .. 17,330 16,523 807 

Members .. 13,796 13,806 .. 8 

Baptized Child- 
ren .. 14,13<) 14,075 01 



Total . . 45,361 44,404 868 8 



Last year a decrease of 1,112 was reported, while this year there is an in- 
crease of 868 ill the number of our Christian community. 

UaptUsnu*, 1903. 1908. Increase, 

Children, Christian born .. 1,042 906 im 
Children, non-Christian 

born .. ..321 296 25 

Adults, Christian sa*) 631 174 

Total .. 2,168 1,833 335 

In 1902 a decrease of 268 baptisms was reported, while this year there Is 
an increase of ;i:J5. 

The numlKjr of Sunday-schools has risen from 971 to 993, an increase of 
32, the number of scholars has gone up to 45,920 as against 43,436, an increase 
of 2.484. 

It looks as if the Ep worth League work is not pushed as enthusiastically 
as it ought to bo, the number of senior members having decreaed by 91. 

CHURCH FINANCES. 

Ulnduxtanl Church CoVectlon for PoHtm*. 

Rs. 

1903 5,263 

1902 .... .... 5,328 

Increase .... .... .*.. 

Decrease .... (Vi 

Last year a decrease of Us. 181 was report^jd, and this year there is 
another decrease of Rs. 65. The Christian community having increased by 
868. the decrease in the collection cannot be accounted fur. Gurhwal district 
has raised Rs. 85 more this year, Oudh district has increased its amount by 
Rs. 67, Hardoi by Rs. 29, (fonda and Bljnor by Rs. 22 each. In these five dis- 
tricts there is a total increase of Ks. 22.5. Bareilly-Kumaon district reports a 
decrease of Rs. 17i, Moradabiid Rs. 72, lUidaon 'district Rs. 44, and Plllbhlt 
Rs. 7. Total decrease in these four districts, Rs. 295. If there were no de- 
crease in these four districts there would Ik* an Increase of Rs. 520. Last year 
only Rs. 384 were raised for the supjiort of Conference claimants, while this 
year there Is an increase of Rs. 184. This rei»ord ought to be kept up. For 
the Missionary Society the collections for 1903 were Rs. 1,001 ; for 1902, 
Rs. 1,183 ; decrease Rs. 181. For the Bible Society the amount was Rs. 186, 
an increase of Rs. SO : for Creneral Conference expenses Rs. 68, an increase of 
Rs. 7. Total benevolent collection Rs. 4,340, an increase of Rs, 1,216. Current 
expenses for Churches Rs. 1,269, a dei^rease of Rs. 7tW. Government aid to 



50 RfiPORTS OF CX)MMITTEES. 

schools, decrease of Bs. 3,850 ; tuitional fees, decrease of Bs. 4,951. Industrial 
institutions sbdw an increase of Rs. 714. 

The total increase in all collections amounts to Rs. 6.206. There is all 
along a decrease in the educational line, and this can be easily accounted for 
by lack of funds. In the vernacular schools the number of boys has fallen by 
310 and girls by 46. in the Anglo-Vernacular and European Boys* schools there 
is an increase of Bs. 168, while the number of girls has decreased by 38. The 
number of missionaries has been reduced by 3, and the number of local 
preachers has decreased by 18. 

Ganga Nath. 

S. B. ¥lNCK, 

G. D. Pbbsgrave. 
BTATE OF THE CHURCH. 

In order that this report on the state of the Church might give to the 
Confereuce correct and specific information, instead of mere generalities, 
the chairman of the Committee early in September prepared a list of over 
fifty questions, and sent a copy of these questions to oacn presiding elder in 
the Conference, with the request that the questions be made the basis 
of the report of the Committee on '' the state of the Church " in each 
District Conference ; and that a copy of each district report be forwarded 
to the Chairman of this Committee to be used in preparing the report on the 
state of tbe Church in the North India Conference. All the presiding elders 
heartily accepted the suggestion of the Chairman of this Committee, and 
co-operated in the attempt to collect a mass or correct.and specific informa- 
tion which would make the Conference report on the state of the Church a 
valuable record of the condition of our work In the year 1903. 

Unfortunately, some of the district committees, wedded to tbe indolent 
custom of making general statements Instead of giving specific information, 
or being practicaliy ignorant concerning the matters on which they were 
called to report, prepared reports which largely failed to give the desired 
information. On the other hand, some of the reports are valuable and 
evince the InduHtry, carefulness and intelligence with which they were 
prepared. The reports from the Hardoi. Gonda and Pilibhit districts 
deserve special commendation. The report from tbe Oudh district deals 
with only five of the ten subjects under which the questions were ar- 
ranged 4 and, as already intimated, the general character of the state- 
ments made In the reports from several of the districts, made It impossible 
for the committee to carry out the original plan of giving specific informa- 
tion concerning the condition of all the work in tbe conference. Hut the com- 
mittee were unwilling to come before the conference with a report which 
failed to give the specific information which they believed ought to be 
found in a paper claiming to be a record of the state of the Church. And 
as they could not give such an account of tbe state of the Church throughout 
the entire conference, they decided to give a report of one district of the 
conference, concerning which they had received the specific information they 
wished to give in their own report. The report of the Harellly-Kumaon 
district is the one which has been selected for this purpose. It Is a larse 
district, lying territorially in the centre of the conference and may fairly 
be considered an average district. The account of the condition of the 
Church and of thA work on this district mav fairly be taken as a report of 
the state of tbe Church throughout the conference. This district report aims 
to answer some fifty questions which were placed under the following 
heads * " 

1. The Christian community. 2. Public worship and Christian ordin- 
ances. 3. The Knowledge and use of the Bible. 4. Christian morality. 5. 
Non-Christian customs and ideas. 6. Spirituality. 7. Self-support. 8. The 
spread of the Gospel. 9. Ekiucatlon. 10. Material prosperity. 

The Conference Statistical Secretary has given the committee tbe numeri- 
cal returns for the whole conference, viz., members 13,798, probationers 
17,330, baptize children 14,136, making a total Christian community of 45.264, 
being an increase of 868 persons for the year. The total number 01 baptisms 
for the year is 2,168, which is 335 in advance of the year 1902. 

2. Fnblio worship and Chnrch Ordinaneei.— In seventeen centres on the 
Bareilly-Kumaon District, the full ritual Is observed. In about 58 small 
circuits services, like a prayer meeting, are held by pastors appointed to such 
places. Out of a Christian community of 6,448 there are 4,441 Christians who 
are too far from a place of worship, or are too busy with their daily labour to 
attend the regular services. This leaves 2,007 persons who attend public 



tUBPORTS OF COMMITTEES. St 

worship regularly. There are on this district 31 churches, all buflt b7 the 
MiasiOD. About 13 are well built^ some of stone, others of burnt brick. 
The remaining 18 are built with mud walls and have generally flat mud 
roofs. The leaders hold prayer meetings in the people's dwellings, and 
whenever the local pastor visits them, he also holds prayer servicest. Compara- 
tively few of the Christians talce the Lord's Supper. All are baptized, but 
often without usin>c the' full ritual of the discipline. Except in centres were 
there are regular Church se-vices the sabbatii is not commonly kept as a 
day of rest anl worship. There are 9,530 in the Sunday-schools, an increase 
of 701 since last year. In the large centres the Sunday-schools are well 
taught : In the scattered villages this is not the case. Wherever it is possible 
to supply the Sunday-school oapars th^^y are greatly appreciated by the 
pupils, and such schools generally prosper. 

The flareilly-Kumaon District appears to be better provided with houses 
of worship than most other districts of the Conference. On the other hand, 
the reports from the Gk>nda and Hardoi districts give a more favourable ac- 
count of Sabbath observance than is given above. 

3. Knowledge and Uie of the Bible.— The numl)er of persons on this 
district who can read the Bible is about 1,300 which Is about twenty uer cent. 
of the entire Christian community, and more than 33 per cent, of tne adult 
Christians. Among the village Christians very few have Bibles or are able 
to read. Bible instruction reaches the people in the villages about once a weetc 
through the visits of the pastor. In the Sadr stations where there are good 
Sunday-schools, the children learn by heirt verses of the Bible ; the village 
children can learn only when the pastor visits them. 

The percentage of literate Christians is much higher on this district than 
on most other districts, on account of the number of educational institu- 
tions in the district. In all the districts the Sunday-schools are the chief 
agency for giving Scripture Instruction to children and adults. 

4. Ohrittian Morality. —There is some Improvement on this district In 
regard to truthfulness ; the practice of giving foul abuse is stilt prevalent; 
there is less quarrelling ; fewer lawsuits and some improvement regarding 
honesty in business affairs. Among the village Christians the women exercise 

Sreat Influence in holding the family customs steady to the old Idolatrous tra- 
itions, and the marriage customs differ but little from the old heathen rites. 
The reports from the other districts agree in the main with the report from 
the Bareilly-Rumaon district. The truth is, the Christian community ** has 
not yet found Itself.'' Its different classes are yet strangers to one another or 
are not yet adjusted to working in concert. It Is a time of transition. Moral 
and social standards are not yet clearly formulated or firmly established, and 
the community lacks power to enforce its best ideals. The absence of all refer- 
ence to drunkenness In the reports from the various districts, indicates that 
the Christian community is generally free from this vice. 

5. If on- Christian Onitomi and Ideas.— Very much of the old leaven of 
Hinduism remains among the peoule who live away from Church centres. 
As the majority of them must get their living from non-Christians, they are 
in a measure lield In servitude to non-Christian customs and duties. Naaman 
still hows with his master in the house of Elmmon. 

From some other districts more favourable reports have be^n received 
about this matter. In Hardoi the people are breaking away from this form 
of bondage. Considerable progress in destruction of heathen shrines is report- 
ed from BIJnor and Moradabad. But nearly everywhere there Is steady pres- 
sure advf^rse to Christianity which often ripens into real oppression. It would 
be Incorrect to affirm that full religious liberty Is enjoyed by our people. 

6. Spiritnality.— There is growth In the people's conception of the Lord 
Jesus, and those who can read the Bible or get good Bible teaching develop 
the devotional spirit, and have heart experience of the spiritual life The 
people themselves recoiiTnlze a difference l)et ween those who have a spiritual 
experience and those who have not (N&m ke Ts&i aur k^m ke Fs^ioQ ke bich 
men kuchh faro samajhte hain ) When the truth, as it Is in Jesus, is presented 
to our people, tiiey confess their sins and acknowledge the need of Divine help 
and desire spiritual blessings, and many do receive Gk>d's spirit as witnessing 
to their being children of God. Even our weakest Christians do not deny the 
possibility of the spiritual birth, and when carefully led they enter Into this 
experience. B it much of this work of loading them into this experience re- 
mains to be done. 

That which is thus affirmed of the Christians of the Bareilly-Kumaon dis- 
irlct may truly be said of the people everywhere. The Pilibhit district Christ- 



83 



HGPORTS OF COMMITTEES* 



fans have profited much from numerous special services. The summer schools 
and the Lucknow Dasehra meetings were occartfons of much spiritual quicken- 
tnflrtomany. The PrcMding Elder of the Gonda district aiHrms that ninety 
percent, of the Christians on that district are real ones. 

7. 8elf-inpport. -The vi II af;e Christians givt^ very little thought to this 
subject, and regard the Mission as a sort of agency for furnishing tliem with 
free teaching. The idea of membership in an organization wiilch brings 
financial obligations upon them has not been developed to any groat extent. 
The Naini Tal English Church is almost self-sup|)orting and all other circuits 
of the Bareilly-Kumaon district give a small portion of the funds needed and 
the Mission makes up the remainder. In most circuits some one worker 
receives his small salary from the contributions of the people throughout the 
circuit, and the salary of such men Is above the average income of the village 
Christians. Many give a plco por family per mensem. Paid Mission workers 
give the usual two pice per rupee of salary. There is yet no very deep sense 
of their privileges and duties In regard to tho maintenance of Christian ordin- 
ances In their midst ; and It appears to us that they do not give as much for 
their religious privileges as the non-Christian people alxmt them. 

Other districts of the Conference are like th<^ IJarellly-Kumaon district In 
regard to self-support. The people gonorally arev^ry poor. In one or two 
districts a**o well-to-do ChrlsfcUn laniowners who do not given as they ought. 
The Presiding Elder of the Gonda district affirms that the Christians of that 
district give much more for religious purposes than Hindus and Mohamedans 
in like circumstances. 

8. The Spread of the Ootpel.—/\mong the villages tho non-Chrlstlan and 
often antl-Chrlstlan influence is dominant, and It Is very dlfilcult for the 
Christian life to assert Itself aggressively. Strong and faithful pastors are 
much needed to help in toning up the Christian life and making Christian 
influence felt In the small centre's. The uneducated Christians in the villages 
are not an influential class in their own localities. The well-Instructed 
Christians, however, whether Mission agents or not. show commendable zeal 
In pushing the kingdom of Christ. And this same class of Christians is held 
in respect, and their lives are regarded as better on thn whol« than the lives 
of non-Chrlstlans. It Is very unusual to hear from the mouths of non-Chrls- 
tlans any remarks derogatory to the Christian faith. Nearly all the work 
of selling or distributing the Scriptures is left to the paid colporteurs. If 
more emphasis were placed on the duty of giving the Word of God to the 
people, much more would be done than Is now accomplished. In this matter 
the Barellly-Kumaon district fairly represents the condition of things 
throughout the conference. In the Garhwal district are no paid colpor* 
teurs, and this work is done by the preachers and teachers. 

9. Ednoation. Those Christians who are educated themselves, and those 
who live at school centres, show great desire to have their children educated; 
but the village Christians are very indifferent about education. They can- 
not spare their children from the duties of the home,!where they are a source 
of income and must do their share of the family work. Intelligent Christians 
in large centres are willing to make personal sacrifices for tiie sake of the 
education of their children. Village Christians will not give anything, and 
the maiority of them will not send their children to the boardlng-scnools 
where they would be kept without any cost to the parents. The people 
really need their children's help in earning the family -support, and the only 
hope for their education is in the teachers or pastors who will teach them 
In their homes when they have r(»spite from other duties. 

The above is a fair exhibit of the state of affairs generally In the con- 
ference. The Hardol district reports more favourably of educational pro- 
gress In rural districts. The Christians wish to have their children educated, 
but think the Mission should bear all the expense. The number of education- 
al Institutions In the Bareilly-Kumaon district enables the Presiding Rider 
toreport that one-sixth of the entire Christian community attends school. 
In this one particular the condition of that district Is exceptional. 

10. Material Proiperity.— In the rural district, the Christians follow 
their ancestral callings; in the cities professional life. Government or railway, 
or domestic service attract the majority. The l)est opportunities or openings 
are for carpenters, blacksmiths, shoemakers, tailors, doctors and clerks, m 
the order given. The Christians generally are not given to extravagance in 
living : marriages, funerals and festivals are not such occasions of excessive 

-expenditure as among non-Christiana. Widows and orphans are sometimes 
supported by relatives, and many by the Mission. One nundred and seventy* 



Rtt£*ORTS OF COMMITTBES. 58 

five persons, exclusive of foreign missionaries, are in Mission service. 
These, with their families and relatives dependent upon them, make an ag- 
gregate of about nine hundred souls ; numerically an insisnfieant fraction 
of the Christian community, but in all other respects the dominant factor 
among the Christians of the district. 

The extreme* poverty of tho majority of the Christians in the rural dis- 
tricts and mohullas throughout the conference can only be apprehended by 
those who know the facts. This should be kept in mind in all wc say or 
do concerning self-support. In the Gonda district no less than seventy-four 
Christians perished in the floods of 0(*.tober. 

It Is evident from this report that the Christian community is made up 
of two distinct and very different classes. There are, first, the educated 
Christians in the Sadr stations, many of whom are Christians of the second 
or third generation. And, second, there are the illiterate and partially 
evangelized Christians in the villages and mohullas, who are comparatively 
recent converts from heathenism, and who need constant and careful 
shepherding, or they will revert to their ancestral faith, as indeed thousands 
have done. This report every where makes special reference to this class 
because of its great numerical preponderance. Cut off this class, and oar 
thousands would shrink to hundreds. This report not only shows that these 
two classes exist, but it^ statements unint^^ntionally yet necessarily empha- 
sises the diflPerenco between them. This difference may possibly work ruin 
in our churches. The educated class receive ninety-live per cent of the 
financial help given i)y the Mission. This class furnishes the preachers, 
pastors and teachers whose duty it is to lead the other class to Christ and 
keep them from wandering. And those whoso duty it is to direct the 
worlc of the mission, must face the fact of the great difference between 
the two classes, and should consider whether it is possible to shepherd 
one class through the agency of the other. Certainly in all our plana and 
In all appointments of men to work, it should always be rememrx^red that 
our only hope of success lies in the union of these two classes, and that it is 
our imperative duty to ceaselessly strive in every possible way to bring the 
diverse communities nearer and nearer together, until at last they become 
a united homogeneous Christian community. 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 
Pkincipal's Repokt to the North India Confebbkce. 

{Printed by order of the Conference,) 

« 

This being the last Report on the Seminary I will make to this Con- 
ference, I may be indulged in a little more formality in making it. I have 
offered my resignation to the Seminary Board of Trustees, who, by the 
Seminary constitution, have a duty in this matter ; and in taking the pre- 
sent furlough it is not at all likely that I will he reauired again to take up 
duty In this institution. I desire by this report to leave on permanent re- 
cord for the conferences represented on our Board, and for my successor, 
some facts and opinions, that may aid in maintaining the efficiency of 
the Institution, to which I have given the best years of my life, and 
in shaping its future. Our enrolment for the year was sixty-nine in 
the regular Seminary course, fifty-one in the VVoman^s School, and sixteen 
in the Normal Department, making a total of one hundred and thirty- 
six under instruction and drawing on the funds of the Institution. Tne 
graduating class was smaller than usual, because in forming the class three 
years ago, regard was had to reducing expenses in keeping within in- 
come. As you have learned by circular and printed notice, we revived 
the Normal Department as a tentative experiment with a shorter course of 
study. Ten of those taken in were sufficiently advanced to pass the Upper 
Primary standard. These Normal students have had special instruction in 
the Bible and Sunday-school work, and the art of teaching, at the Seminary. 
They are now available for service. The keeping up of this Normal Depart- 
ment was a question before our Baord. We tried to work the secular part 
of the training in connection with our City Mission School, but the Govern- 
ment Inspector raised objections because our Normal students were taking 
only vernacular studies. As our income is limited, it was a question for the 
Board of entertaining Normal students with a smaller number of theolog- 
ical students, or of abandoning again this Normal School work, giving 
preference to the training of preachers. The number of candidates offering, 



S4 REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

qualified to pass our entrance test In the Seminary, Is not largre. hence It 
was thonffht It would be well to take all suitable candidates offered, and 
form a good preparatory class each year, of those not ready for the Seminary 
course, and do this preparatory work. Facilities outside for this seem small, 
and besides, often our best students in the regular class have been those 
whom wo have prepared here. In consideration of all this our Board at 
Its recent meeting voted to again suspend the Normal Department, and give 
attention also to work preparatory for the Seminary course. This, too, In 
view of the fact that the demand for preachers is far beyond what tne Semi- 
nary can snpply. By training more men in a preparatory department, a 
mnch larger turnout of better graduates could be made. The constant de- 
mand for men from this and otiier missions would Justify this. 

Our want of adequate endowment and funds for building and repairs Is 
deplorable. Additional buildings are now needed The scholarships In part 
are too small now. The pay of some teachers is inadequate, and others are 
needed. The salaries of two foreign missionaries required should be assured 
by the endowment This would guarantee their appointment as needed. I 
have often discussed this subject arid now leave on record the statement 
that any one who fntis to see this, only reveals his want of appreciation of 
need and opportunity. The tonic and breadth and impression of the Euro- 
pean Is needed in our work here, if anywhere. This Is the opinion of the 
ablest management of Theological Schools in India. Our Board and patron- 
izing Conferences, with the nnpoiuting power, should make this a matter 
of careful study and effort. We have but just touched the hem of possibili- 
ties with an adequate endowment. Bishop Malallieu was quite right when he 
wrote. ** ask for $100,000 for the Seminary." Every cent of this could be put 
to work with power at once. The inadequacy of our foreign general mission- 
ary force for years, has made the appointment in the Seminarv perplexing, 
but It should never be forgotten that whatever must suffer from want of 
support, this nerve centre of our work, this West Point of our ministerial 
training, should nevor be left in any way weak. Weakness here is weakness 
all alonsr the linA. A member of your visiting committee once wrote, ** Our 
Theological Seminary is the key to the situation. We can use numbers of 
humble workm<^n In our villasre stations, but there must be trained minds to 
guide them." In suggesting men for the Seminary, it is no secret that it la 
sometimes hinted that a certain possible appointee is a good evangelist or a 
good preachpr iu charge or good presiding elder, or a good preacher, Ac, 
and cannot be spared. But the good evangelist Is just the man needed in 
the Seminary to secure the thorough heart conversion of the students, and 
their df^velopment in spiritual life, and training in revival work. It may 
be considered a misfortune to have auy missionary appointed to the Semi- 
nary who Is not a thorough workman as an evanselist. A moment's reflec- 
tion will 9how how much in the training of men here In India depends on 
the example and effort of their teacher. If their teacher be a good preacher 
In charge, or effective presiding elder, so much the better, where he is 
teaching men who are to be evangelists and preachers in charge, and presi- 
ding elders. If any one Is a poor preacher, or presiding elder, or preacher 
In charge, send him anywhere else rather than to. this Seminary. Here, 
then, is the very place where a missionary having these important qualifica- 
tions, can multiply himself a hundred- fold. Max MQIler, a great student of 
r Uglons, and a close observer of India for many years, wrote: **The Hindus 
are rii>er for Christianity, than any other nation which has ever accepted 
the Gospel." Let us remember that we are preparing a ministry to go out 
among these people. Wo cannot do the work, but we can aid much In 
preparing men to do It. Let it he done in no superficial way. I hope 
the upcessity and temptation to leave only one foreign missionary on 
the staff, may never airain occur. Two missionaries are needed. The 
Tnanagemput of a Theological Institution in India and teaching in it. Is 
doubly burdensome. The moral discipline of the school, In the nature of 
things, is a great tax ; endle.«ts oetty cares and financial demands burden 
those in charge unknown in the home-land. They have, as you well know, to 
play the rOle of doctor, lawyer, financier, architect, builder, accountant, and 
what not, besides the work of teaching, and all under the strain a large part 
of the time rtf an unfriendly climute. And as to the teaching, if thoroughly 
done, who can tell of Its demand ? With Inquisitive and very needy mlndis 
before him, elementary In knowledge, and sometimes to be provoked Into 
thinking, and unsupplied with appliances for study and reference, what a 
demand on the teacher to meet the case, jaded with many cares. Hence the 



REPORTS OF COMMITTBEd. 65 

bluiMler, one mieht well write, the crime of leaving the foreign staff inade- 
quate, and of failure to keep this Seminary up to the highest possible point 
of efficiency. I must not omit to emphasise with all tiie force lean put into 
it, that the Woman's Department of the Seminary should have the constant 
best attention of missionary ladies. An Indian preacher can be only half a 
pastor and evangelist. His wife must, in the social nature of things, do the 
rest for Christian and non-Christian. Keep this department in the best of 
hands. In her India life, Mrs. Scott has given her heart to this work. 

We should encourage post-graduate study here at the Seminary. Worthy 
men inclined to review and push their studies after some few years of pastor- 
al and evangelistic work, should be encouraged to come back, brush up and 
push their studies in advanced classes that could be formed. The climate 
and habits of the country are not favourable to sustained study and mental 
growth. Hebrew and Greek could be made more of a specialty In such 
an addendum course. We have already done something In this post-graduate 
line, and calls are now m^de for the privilege ol such liclp. With increased 
families, and consequent enlnrged expenditure, including books, such return- 
ed students would need an enlarged wazlfa. In passing on the administration 
of this institution to my successor, I plead for a liberal policy of expansion. 
To hint at some immediate material needs, at least two more teachers' houses 
should be now built. It is due the men employed in the Seminary that a fairly 
comfortable house be furnished them, in keeping with the standing of the 
institution, which now has an Indian and even a foreign reputation. The 
line of rude buildings, immediately behind Butler Hall,' should be removed to 
complete a compus entirely surrounding the central group of buildings. 
Without this, the place is cramped and wanting in symmetry. A continual 
run of visitors to our institution from India and from abroad, suggests such 
matters of taste and oropriety. And there is also an education to our 
students in ample well kept grounds. Besides, we desire them to remember 
the place, during after years of service, with affection, as a charming, moral 
educational home. Further, the line of dormitories on the north side of our 
grounds can be rendered more healthy by making a good masonry drain 
behind the building, to prevent the drainase water In the rainy season from 
filtering under the foundation and flours of this line. The place is low at any 
rate, and causes some anxiety for the health of the students. The front 
courtyards of these houses should be supplied with doors at once for proper 
privacy to married students. Other improvements demand money, but these 
are immediate needs, that will cost some Rs. 6,000. Our Board should have 
no hesitancy in ordering all this work done. If need be, incur temporary 
debt, and meantime lessen other expenses. 

Two little periodicals. The BulLetin and the QaMd, have been kept up at 
the Seminary lor years ; the first to l<eep in touch with patrons in America. 
The constant stream of money coming in, amounting to more than a thousand 
rupees a month, depends largely on this. The little Ofi^tci or Seminary Mes- 
senger, is intended to keep the institution in touch with the old students and 
perpetuate its memory and influence over them. Through this little paper 
the teacher can continue to speak to the men and prompt them to aspu'a- 
tlon for greater usefulness and continue study. Keep the papers up. 

Experience in loaning our endowment money, prompts the suggestion 
that great care in reouiring proper security should be used, and semi-annual 
payment of interest snould be required. Applicants for money should be re- 
minded that current expenses of the Seminary require this reasonable return 
of Incomoi otherwise we sometimes suffer loss by overdraught. The Treasur- 
er's report will show the exact condition of the endowment. The order of 
our Board that ten per cent, of the income of endowment be set aside annu- 
ally as a reserve fund, should be rigidly adhered to. This aloie will prevent 
shrinkage in the endowment, coming from fires, depreciation of endowment 
houses, fall in stocks, shares, and possible loss of Investments. Our constitu- 
tion requires that a copy of the Treasurer's report be sent to each patronizing 
conference represented on our Board. Our Treasurer should sec that this be 
done. We need to promote an interest In our finances, and not merely in 
obtaining preachers from the institution. 

And now with a sense of relief, and yet with a pensive feeling in separat- 
ing finally from a loved work, long the chief labour of my India life, and to 
which Mrs. Scott has given her life, I wish formally to lay my resignation of 
the Principalship of the institution before this Conference also, which, by the 
memorandum of our legally registered organization, is the ultimate authority 
in the management of the institution. This will indicate also to the appointing 



i 



56 REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

power, that other arraugement must be made for the Seminary. During most 
of the time In a period of thirty-two years since this Seminary was founded, 
excepting when on furlough, I have been giving the institution the best ser- 
vice of my life. From the day of small things, we have grown up to be au 
institution of large usefulness in India. Tbe little tiled hut of unburned 
bricks, in which we began thirty-two years ago, has been gradually replaced 
by ample structures, universally admired. Our buildings and grounds and 
endowment are w(»rth at least Ks. :i,:j(),Ouo. The class of 16 men with which we 
began, 11 of whom graduated, has grown into quite an evangelistic army of 
028 men and women, trainiKl in ihcse Halls, I.e., 475 preachers, 73 teachers, 
and 380 women. These woricers are scattered over a large part of India, and, 
touching their work, I quote the words of one who has otiserved their career 
clost^ly : ** It has been said of J^isliop Wm. Taylor that he let Methodism loose 
on the millions of India ; how little, however, would have been accomplished 
if we had not a body of thoroughly trained men, natives of the country, who 
have manned station aft<'r station, circuit after circuit, till now they are 
foand in all the Important centres of our worK. In places so remote from 
Barellly, as 'Lahore, Calcutta, Bombay, IIyd«'ral)ad, our graduates are found. 
In the SHcred cities of Muttra, Bindruban, Hardwar they are preaching the 
simple story of»the Cross to bigotted priests of the temples. In the strongholds 
of Mohammediinism, the Innighty moulvi finds himself obliged to defend his 
faith against the uativ<M;hrlstian preacher, to whoso words the jieople are 
giving cnnlence. In the ranks of other missions as in the London Mission, 
the Scotch Presbyterian, the Wesleyan, tlie Salvation Armv our graduat<>s 
are found, and they are highly prized. Time would fall to ti»ll all that has 
been accomplished through their agency in tlie last twenty-live years, but 
this Is only the prelude of what is to come. *' To (Jod 1m» all the glory ! 

T. J. Scott. 

PB0P08ED MEMORANDUM OF ASSOCIATION OF THE BOABD OF 
GOVEBNOBB OF THE ISABELLA THOBUBN COLLEGE FOB 

WOMEN, LUCKNOW. 

(Begistered under Act XXI of 1860. ) 

I. —Name. 

The name of the Society shall ht\ "The Board of Govmiors of tin? l.sa- 
bella Thoburn College for Women. Lucknow." 

IL— Objkct. 

The object of the Board of Governors shall be to maintain the Isabella 
Thoburn College, Lucknow, as an institution for the education of women, 
together with such allillated schools and departments as may be considered 
necessary and advisable. 

III.— Board of (JovKRNou^<. 

The Board of (Governors * shall consist of twHvo f members to Ije elpcted 

ler 

the 
_ __ (^|jy 

College is situated, all of whom shall be members e.r oj^iclo. The Board shall 
include in its membership at least three women. After the Urst election of 
twelve members by the Worth India Conference, four shall retire annually, 
their places being tilled by the said Conf<Tenco at Its annual session. Re- 
tiring members shall be eligible for re-election. Vacancies through any 
cause shall be tilled by the Confeience. All persons to bo elected members 
of the lioard of Oovernors shall be nominatecl by the Presiding Elder of the 
District and the Principal of the College. 

IV.— Duties of thk Boaih) of GovEitxojcr*. 

It shall be the duty of the Board of Governors to direct as to tho invest- 
ment of the endowment and schoiprshlp funds of tho College, and to devise 
measures for the increase of the same ; to sanction all purchases of property 

* Under Section of Act 21 of ISOO, the Memo, of Association should em- 
body tho names, addresses and occupations of tho Governors. 

t Some of whom arc intended to represent the several Conferences. 




ftSPORtS OP COMMITTEES. 



67 



aiMl extensive additions to, and alterations of, existing buildings; to advise In 
regard to the scope and status of the College as circumstances require, and to 
indicate to the President of the Conference their wishes rospecung the ap- 
pointment of the Principal and other Missionary members of the staff; to 
connsel the Principal regarding such matters as she may bring before them 
from time to time ; and In general to foster and develop the College in har- 
mony with the requirement of the times, the Interests of the Mission, and 
the regulations of the Educational Code. 

v.— Secret ABY. 

The Presiding Elder of the District In which the College is situated shall 
be Secretary ex ojf^lo of the Board of Governors and of the Executive Com- 
mitteei and shall represent the Board in all legal matters. 

VI.— An^'ual Meeting. 

The Board of Governors shall hold an annual meeting at such time and 
place as the Secretary and the Priueipal may appoint. One of the Bishops 
If present shall preside. In the absenca of the Bishop the members present 
shall elect one of their number to preside. At the annual meeting the Prin- 
cipal shall submit to the Board a report of the College for the previous year, 
ivlth an audited statement of the tinancos, showing current receipts and 
expenditure and particulars of endowment aud scholarship funds Invested. 
Nine members of the Board shall form a quorum for the transaction of 
business. Notice of the time and place of the aouual meeting shall be circu- 
lated by post to the members of Board by the Secretary ten days before the 
date fixed for the meeting. 

VII.—ExECUTiVE Committee. 

At their annual meeting the Hoard of Governors shall api>oInt three 
members, together with the Secretary aud Principal, who shall be an Ex- 
ecutive Committee to act for the Board in the intervals of the aunnal meet- 
ings. 

VIII.— Amendment or Constitution. 

This Constitution can bo amended only by the North India Conference 
convened In annual session, on the recommendation In writing of all the 
members of the Execntive Committee, or of two-thirds ol the members of the 
Board of Governors present at an annual meeting. 

REPORT OF OOHHITTEE ON 8UHDAT-8CH00L8. 

In the report on Sunday-schools last year. It was stated that there were 
54fewer schools and 2,951 fewer pupils in our Sunday-schools than during 
the previous year. The cause of this decrease was attributed to the cut in 
onr appropriations that occurred during a period of several years. The 
eorrectness of that Judgment Is upheld by the fact that during the past 
year when we were not compelled to cut the work, but, on the contrary, 
were enabled to strengthen it, we have an Increase to report In every Item of 
the statistical tables concerning Sunday-schools. 

Scholars of all ages. 





CTiristians. 


-yon-C/irtetiaTW. 




Year. 


Males. 


B^emales. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


1903 


12,413 


8,244 


16,009 


9,254 


45,920 


1908 .. 


11,011 


7,781 


14,557 


9,087 


43,436 


Increase 


1,402 


403 


1,452 


107 


2,481 



This gratifying Increase Will be followed by similar reports of progress 
from year to year if the Church at home will uphold our hands by sending us 
men and mon^. 



68 REPORTS O^ COMMITTEES. 

We are also glad to be able to report an Improvement in the qnality of 
oar Sunday-schools. We note that in many schools more attention is being 
paid to periodical examinations. We would commend this, and suggest that 
at least four examinations be hold each year, and tliat the results be recorded 
and preserved. Wherever practicable, let classes be prepared for the annual 
examinations of the Indian Sunday School Union. 

We need a better class of teachers, and we urge our superintendents to 
seek to raise the standard of preparation for teaching. An aid in teaching 
and in the general effectiveness of the school will be found in the various 
lesson helps and among them many bo named the ** Children's Friend " pub- 
lished both in Hindi and in Urdu for use in our village schools. Where more 
advanced helps can be secured, it is also advisable to use them. 

Every teacher should see to it that each pupil memorizes the Golden Text 
and Memory Verses, and also that each pupil gives something in the collec- 
tion each Sunday. Even though it be but a single cowrie, let it be given. 

We would call upon all those In charge of Sunday-schools in our Educa- 
tional Centres where boys and girls, young men and young women, are study- 
ing, to endeavour to make their Sunday-schools as nearly as possible model 
Sunday-schools, so that the young people as they go out Into smaller places 
and into villages to engage in worK will ever carry with them an ideal of 
how this work should be carried on. 

Our Sunday-school work is most hopeful, and we expect that in all the 
future it will continue to bo a pillar of strength In our missionary labours. 

J. N. West. 

J. C. BUTCHEB. 
W. R. BOWEN. 

Nizam Ali. 

THE COHFEREHCE TISITORS' REPORT OF THE THEOLOGICAL 

SEMIHilRT, BAREILLT. 

We were present at the closing oxercises of tho Seminary, and are pleased 
to report progress in all that maUe^ for tlio betterment ot fallen human 
nature. 

The students seem to be growing in intolllgonce and spirituality, and we 
trust with higher ideals not only of life but of the increased obligations under 
which they are placed, to live and maintain before their fellow-men a pure 
and unselfish Christian life. 

Through the labours of the Principal and the liberality of its friends, 
the institution has secured a mngnliicent plant. 

At the late meeting of the Board of Trustees permission was given for 
the erection of two more masters* buildings. This brings the total valut) of 
the property up to the sum of Ks. 2,2(5,0(X). The students* houses also seem 
to be properly looked after. 

We do not feel like presenting our report without offering a word of 
praise and gratitude to the retiring Principal. Dr. T. J. Scott, to whose un- 
tiring energy, devotion and perseverance the Church and Mission owe so 
much. Dr. Scott has literally put the best of his life into the institution, who, 
even if not again permitted to put foot on Indian soil, has erected a monu- 
ment that shall perpetuate his name and labours to future generations , 
whether in the home- land or India. 

We wish for our brother and his dear wife many days of usefulness in 
the Church until invited up to higher service. 

J. Blac?K8tock. 
Wm. Peters. 

REPORT OF AUDITIRG COMMITTEE. 

The Auditing Committee reports that it has audited and found correct 
the following books : — 

The accounts of all the Presiding Elders. The Presiding Elders report, 
the books on their districts are audited in some cases to the end of the year ; 
in most cases to the end of the third quarter. 

The books of the W. F. M. S. workers have been audited by the Presiding 
Elders, and by the Auditing Committee. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 59 « 

The booVs of the Ck)nfereQce Treasurer aad of the Treasurer of the Sun- 
day School Union. 

The books of Oak Openings, and Wellesley to the end of the second quar- 
ter. 

The accounts of the Mission Treasurer, the W. F. M. S. Treasurer, 
the Reid Christiin College and the Isabella Thoburn College are ready, and 
are in process of beinv audited. 

The treasurer of the Bishop Thoburn's special fund. The Committee beg 
to state after this, that unless books are kept monthly and itemiied, they 
will not be audited. 

The Committee recommends that it be authorized to prepare a set of 
books to be printed by the Press for adoption in the Conference when new 
books may be needed. 

J. N. West. G. W. BBieGS. 

John Bulckstock. Mbs. Rocket. 

H. L. MuKEBJEE. Miss Scott 

R. L Faucett. Gakoa Nath. • 

P. S. Hyb*:. 

REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

The Board of Examiners submits the following report of Its work for 
the year 1903 :— 

IV Year. J. H. Walter did not appear for examination. He is back in 
all subjects except FclsI Char. 

IV Year. N. R. Chi Ids passed in Maaih kd Namiina, thus completing 
his full course of study. 

IV Year. Lazar Shah passed in Fasl Char, thus completing the full 
course of study. 

IV Year. Bailaqi Singh passed in written sermons and all subjects 
of the fourth year except Fasl Tin, Foal Punch, Wealey Sdhib hi 
SaroiU^zaBht and llmi Mazmun. 

HI Year. Arthur S. Wesley passed in all the subjects of the third 
year. 

Ill Tear. Yaqub All has completed all the subjects of the third year. 
Ill Year. K. Silas has completed all the subjects of the third year. 
II Year. Yaqub Singh passed in MaH Ibn Ullah, thus completing the 
second year's studies. 

II Year. MIsri Charao passed in all the subjects of the second year. 
II Year. Prem Masih passed in all tlie subjects of the second year. 
I Year. D. S. Hukill passed in all the subjec*» of the first year. 
I Year. H. C. Sigler pas^sod in all the subjects of the first year, except 
Qcidim Tawarikh and Kawaif-us-Saha^f, 

I Year. B. S. Budden passed in all the subjects of the first year. 
I Year. John Robert passed in all the subjects of the first year, ex- 
cept in Qadim Tawarikh. 

B. T. Badley passed in all the subjects of the Hindi course of the third 
year. There remains all the English studies of the third year to be brought 
up. 

R. I. Faucett has passed all the sublocta of the Urdu-Persian course for 
the fourth year, except Oiiliatan and (Jrdu-Bnglisb translation. 

P. S. Hydpi has completed all the back studies of the first year both 
Bnglish and Vernacular, and also all the English and Vernacular of the 
second year. 



60 



HEJPORTS OF COMMTTTRBS. 



O0HPBRB1IOE STEWARDS' REPORT. 
ApproprlatloiiB for 1904. 

Conftrtnce Clfuhmitits and Pf.naion Fund. 

Conference: CLAiMANTi*- Amount. 

Name. R». 



A. Sweet 


• • • • 


.... 10 


Mrs. Cutler 


• ■ • • 


10 


Mrs. Gray 


• • • • 


. • . ■ ■ 


Mrs. Haqq 


• • • • 


.... lit 


Mrs. J. Jacob 


• • • • 


• • • • 1«) 


Mrs. B. Paul 


• • • 


.... 10 


Rev. A. C. Paul 


• • • • 


.... 15 


Frank Children 


• • • 


.... 18 




Total 


.... 93 


Pension Fund— 






Name. 




Rs 


Mrs. Ooblnd Ram 


• • V • 


.... o 


.. Pophl Singh 


• ■ • • 


• . . . w 


Mohan Singh 


• • • • 


.... <v 


Mrs. Gulab Singh 


• • • * 


9 

.... >y 


M Dulla Singh 


■ • • • 


.... ii 


M Ciopal Das 


• • • • 


.... !S 


„ B. McGreggor 


• • • • 


10 

• • • • *^ 


., Isa Das 


• • • • 


• • • • J. 


Sakh Doo 


• • • 


• • • • A^ 


Mrs. Mitthu f.al 


• • • • 


2 

• • • • ^ 


Bola Das 


• • • • 





Phobe 


• • • • 


.... r> 


Nancy 

Mrs. Kailu Das 


• • • • 


... 1 •■ 


• • • • 


• . * . t^ 


Ltkha Singh 


• • • • 


... B 


Sadiq Maslh 


• • • 


1 . . . A 


Nathiya 


• • • • 


.... i* 


Mrs. Mctiee 


• • • 


• a . . 4 


Mrs. AJudhya Pershad 


.... ^ 


lk)ndbu 


• • • • 


3 



per mensem. 



Total 



76 per mensem Rs. 913. 



Pemion Pnad Collootioiii for 1004. 



From Circuits — 

Supplementary from Districts 
Collected at Conference 
Interest on Ehidowmcnt 

Total 



Rs. 
560 
133 
48 
175 

912 



J. U. MRSSlfORK, 

OMirman, 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 61 

OOHPBRBMOB STEWARDS 

At the last session of this ConfereDce, the Board of Stewards was 
Instructed ** to prepare and present to Conference rules showing who should 
be recognized as clalmpnts on the Pension Fund." The Board of Stewards 
In performing the duty assigned them have deviated a little from the line 
laid down by the Conference resolution, and have prepared a few rules 
for the administration of the Conference Claimants^ Fund and for the 
Pension Fund which are hereby presented to Conference. 

1. No payments shall be made to claimants from either of these 
funds which have not been ordered by vote of Conference. 

3. The Conference refuses to allow either the Conference Claimants* 
Fund or the Pension Fund to run Into debt ; and forbids the Board of 
Stewards appropriating more money at any time than there is in hand 
for the purpose. 

8. The Interest only of invested moneys belonging to these funds shall 
be applied to payment of claims. 

4. Neither the Finance Committee nor the Conference shall make any 
agreement with a claimant on either of these funds, promising a fixed 
amountyear by year. 

5. Tne appropriations shall be made year by year : the receipt of a 
certain amount bv any claimant In one year does not give that person a 
right to get a similar amount the next year. The amounts granted must 
be adjusted according to the number of claimants and condition of the funds. 

6. At each session of the annual conference the Finance Committee 
shall estimate the amount of Pension fund collections to be raised the 
coming year ; and at the name time the Presiding Elders shall apportion 
the amount to be raised by the districts severally. 

Who are proper claimants upon the Pension Fund? 

All Mission employes are not eligible for sharing In the benefits of 
this fund. Mission servants who are members of other churches are not 
eligible. Teachers in the schools of the Mission whose pay Is about on a 
level with that given to teachers In other schools shall not be eligible. 

If aid is given to any one who has served less than ten years, that per 
son's claim snail cease when aid has been received as many years as service 
had been given. 

Local ministers, local oreachers. exhorters and teachers or their 
families, with the exception above-mentioned, are the parties for whose 
benefit the Pension Fund is raised. 

The amount granted to any claimant for any year shall be fixed ac- 
cording to the comparative urgency of the case and the funds that are 
available for the purpose. 

Appropriations can be made only at conference. On the Second Day of 
Conference, Presiding Elders shall present names, etc., of claimants on their 
districts severally mentioning which, if any, are new claimants. Help is not 
like pensions graded according to pay, but according to necessity. 

J. H. Mrssmobb. 
H. A. Cutting. 
W. B. BowKK. 

REPORT OF THE OOHIITTEB ON THE GONFEREHGE DOMESTIC 

mSSIONART SOCIETT. 

1. Contributions received by the Domestic Missionary Society In 1903 
amount to Rs. 63, which has been spent In support of a.preacher In the Pilibhit 
district. 

2. The Presiding Elders and the Prcachers-ln- charge are requested to 
recommend the Society In their districts and circuits to establish branch 
societies in their circuits so that the Mission workers and the Church 
members may know more about It and feel an luterest In it, and gladly con- 
tribute for the Master's work. 

A little effort of the kind can accomitlish a great deal. 

For the Committee. 

T. J. Scott, Chairman, 



62 REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

REPORT OF THE HUTTRi nSSlON TRAININO SCHOOL FOR THE TEAR 

1903. 

Forty students have studied in the school during the past year, nine in 
the English liopartment, and thirty-one in the Vornacuiar Di^partment. Of 
these, seven have completed the course. Reports of them show great satis- 
faction ^^ith their work by those with whom they libour. Fifteen of the 
students have como to us from other missions, thus showing their appre- 
ciation of the work of the school. 

The Board of Trustees proposes the names of Mrs. Parker and Miss 
Hoge, of the North India Conference, as its representatives, and asks you to 
confirm the nomination by vote of your conference. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Mabt Eva Gbbqg, 
Secretary, Board of Trustees* 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DEACONESSES. 

The Board reports thnt they have passed the characters and renewed 
the licenses of the following :~ 

Deaconesses,— hisses Hoge, Scott, Hardie, Browne, M. Means, A. Means, 
Sullivan, Ingram. 
Associate Deaconesses, -Mrs. Tucker, Mrs. Caroline Richards. 
ProbatUnuiry D&icoiuxs. — Miss E. McLeavy. 
The Board recommends the followins^ be the Board for Deaconess Work 
for the ensuing year :— J. C. Butcher, President ; Mrs. Parker, SecreUtry ; 
S. Tupper, M. Stephen, W.R.;Bowen, Mrs. Neeld, Miss Sullivan, Miss Organ. 
The Board appoints as the Examining Committee : —Miss Sullivan, Miss 
A. Means, Mrs. Neeid. 

J. C. Butcher, President. 



menoirs. 

Rev. Robert Hoskins, Ph.D. 

On the morning of September 23nd, 1903, in the death of Rev. Robert Hos- 
kins, Ph.D., India was bereaved of one of the most successful missionaries 
who have entered this field. Dr. Uoskins died of heat-apoplexy at his home 
in Cawnpore. Although not in good health, his death was sudden and un- 
expectecT. He had spent a few weeks in Mussoorie, but, as was his habit, 
retnrned to his ioved work in the heat, contrary to the Judgment of his 
brethren at the sanitarium. He had planned to have his Distrlci (inference 
and Summer School with special revival meetings, beginning with Septem- 
ber 25th. Mrs. Uoskins was to join him in all, but on the morning of the 2l8t 
Dr. Uoskins felt so poorly that he determined to postpone the meetings and 
wired Mrs. Uoskins to delay coming, as he hud planned to go up. That wire 
found Mrs. Uoskins Just leaving for the plains; and as she awaited his arriv- 
ftl the next day she received the sad news that he had gone to the heavenly 
home. The premonition of our brother was realised, for he had said to the 
native pastor, ** I may go to my heavenlv home to-day. If it be God's will 
I am ready I" Ue was talking with the helpers about the work until within 
a very short time of his death. Mrs. Uoskins was unable to reach Cawn- 
pore in time for the funeral, and was thus denied the privilege of being ore- 
sent at the last sad rites. But the heavenly Father knows ; it may be. that 
there is compensation in one's last thoughts and image of dear ones being 
of them in the activity of life and duty, rather than that of the silent face 
and the solemnities o( death. 

Dr. Uoskins was born at Bennington, Vt., May. the 7th, 1843. Ue was 
converted In 1859, and Joined the Methodist Church He graduated from 
Williams' College, Vt , In the spring of 186(5, and then studied for a year in 
Union Theological Seminary, N. Y. 

Ue was admitted on trial in the Troy Conference in April 1867. In the 
following April he was ordained and appointed missionary to India. July 25th, 
1867, he was married to Miss Charlotte Lewis Roundey, and sailed for India, 
with other missionaries, September 10th, of the same year, arriving in India 
February 1st. 1868. At the time of his death he had given over thirty -five 
years of faithful and successful labour to India. Uis fields of work were 
Bijnor, Budaon, Shahjahanpore and Cawnporf*. Uis longest terms were in 
Budaon and Cawnpore, which fields consequently bear the greatest impress of 
bis fruitful efforts. Ue was Presiding Elder of the Cawnpore District since 
1898, till the time of his death. In forming nn estimate of the character of 
such a man, one needs an intimate acquaintance with the motive power of 
life, and an appreciative familiarity with work done. Perhaps no one in India, 
outside of his family, had a better acquaintance with Dr. Uoskins than the 
writer of these lines ; and it is a pleasure to recall the life of the man and his 
work. When the angel of death seals the earthly record, and the contest and 
rivalry of varying opinions, and the conflict of divergent views and methods 
of work is no longer heard, then one is better prepared to estimate the lifn and 
work of a friend at its true value. The real current of Dr. Uoskins* life 
was quiet and unobtrusive. Ue was affectionate and confiding with his 
frienas. Ue seemed to ignore, if he knew, the arts that appear to enable 
many men to figure on the platform, and keep before the public. Solid, fer- 
tile, earnest, honest work made up the life of the man. His far-reaching 
views and thought for work tliat were real and lasting, often came as a 
stimulating surprise. 

Dr. Uoskins was a many-sided, enterprising, aggressive missionary, and 
always absorbed in this *' one thing." Ue was bold in some of his thoughts 
and original plans, but waslisualiy Justified in the outcome. Intercourse 
with him was always stimulating to me. Our departed Brother was literarv 
in his tastes, touching the vernacular. He was a constant student of Hindi 
and Urdu, had studied considerable Sanskrit, Persian and Arabic, and spoke 



64 REPORTS OF OOMMITTBES. 

the Vernacular idiomatically and well. His literary work was considerable. 
His **Urda Concordance *' is a monumental work of immense labour. He was 
the author of a small Urdu dictionary, a Commentary on 8t. John's Gospel, a 
transkktion of ^' Fisher's Evidences of Christianity," a translation of Walker's 
** Doctrine of the Holy Spirit, " and many useful minor productions. He was 
also for a time editor of the Kauknb i Hind. He was a useful member of the 
Committee on the revised translation of the Urdu New Testament. At the 
time of his death he was at work on something for publication, on Kabir and 
his teaching, and also on Mohammedanism. 

Dr. Hoskins was an educational roan, and felt the value to missionary 
work of so-called *' secular education." His schools were always good. He 
was a leader in ** Summer School " work, and a great Sundav-school man ; 
his efforts on these lines being always the best His work in nelping to form 
the annual conference course of vp.rnacular study was always most valuable. 
His endeavours to help the Christians by industrial education, are well 
known. This was prompted by his habitually kind interest in the material- 
well-being of Indian-Christians. With thousands of these there will linger 
memories of the man and his benevolent deeds. 

I have no hesitancy in saying, from my personal knowledge of his work 
and methods, that Dr. Hoskins' most marked charact4*ristic was in his spirit 
of evangelism. There was no more careful observer of Wm. Taylor's method 
in India. He wab always seeking the conversion of souls rather than mere 
baptism. I have many interesting reminiscences illustrating this fact. 
Early In his appointment at Bijnor he wrote to Budaou for really converted 
workers. Some years after when he had charge of Hudaon I joined in evan- 
gelistic tours among the villages with his '* praying band." He was 
always seeking the heart conversion of the baptised and was ever planning 
for revival meetings. He led many into true spiritual life. He was himself 
a roan of prayer and faith. We were associated at Delhi in the revision 
committee and spent several evenings at his special suggestion among the 
Christians of the mohullas in revival work. My last memories of our depart- 
ed Brother are meetings in the little Christian congregation in theMussoorie 
bazar. When he preached in the ordinary Sunday service, ho closed with an 
after-meeting for the conversion of souls and there was testimony to saving 
power. Dr. Hoskins had eminent success, in calling out and developing work- 
ers. He had remarkable discernment of character, and encouraged the 
worthy. When stationed at Budaon he kept a constant stream of candidates 
coming to the Seminary, and among the best that ever entered the Institu- 
tion. The man will live in his work and the workmen called into service. 
Blessed are the dead whose workers do follow them. And what more 
desirable death than to pass to reward surrounded by loving workers con- 
versing about the work, and suddenly ** cease at once to work and live"— 
'* Servant of God, well done I " 

T. J. Scott. 



Mrs. N. M. Mansell, M.D. 

While we are here this morning speaking of God's loving kindneas 
and tender mercy manifested to us ai missionaries, we hold in loving re- 
membrance the many who have gone from us, who to-day worship God fa 
the Upper Sanctury. The last one of those who in former days was with 
us, to enter within the gtitts, was Mrs. N. M. Mansell, M.D., who passed 
away in Rajpore, Sabbath morning, December 13th, 19^;3. 

When she returned from the iiome-lund a little more than a year ago, 
80 bright and cheery, and apparently so well, we little thought her service 
on earth was so soon to end. She waited eagerly for the time to come 
when she could return to her mountain home and meet again the workers 
and the Native Christians with whom she was to labour. A few months of 
faithful service, and she entered into rest. 

She arrived in India at the close of 1873 as Miss N- Monelle, M.D., be- 
ing the second lady doctor sent by the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society to 
the Missions of the Methodist Church in Asia. She was appointed to Lucknow 
where she remained one year. Wishing for a wider lield of influence as lady 
doctor than was then open to her then;, she accepted an offer from the Court 
of Hyderabad, being the flrst lady to receive such an appointment in a native 
court. She spent three years there and was successful In establishing a 
dispensary and hospital, and also in treating many private patients. 



kBl>ORTS OF COM4S1ITTEES. 66 

On the 8rd of November 1877 she became the wife of Rev. Henry 
Mftnsell and thronghout her married life her devotion to her husband was 
strong and beantifal. After her marriage she practised medicine as a 
missionary wherever thev were located. In Gonda and Moradabad she 
treated many patients. She worked in the Dufferin Hospital in Naini Tal 
one year, and two years in Cawnporp. At a durbar In Cawnpore she was 
pnbliciv thanked bv the Lieutenant-Govcruor for the services she had render- 
ed. When her husband had charge of the work in Rbera Bajhera, and was 
unable to find a house for the native pastor, she went there and worked for 
the sick and sufferlog, giving them medicine and loving svmpatby, with 
the resnit that a bouse was soon found for the pastor. She was always 
ready to help the poor, and every year gave out blankets and warm clothing 
to the needy. 

When her husband was made Principal of the Philander Smith Institute 
in Mnssoorie, her special care was in looking after the health and other needs 
of the boys. She threw all her energies into helping to establish the institu- 
tfoo on a basis in which work she was very successful. 

She took a leading part in many reforms. She was not one who was 
satisfied with knowing and regretting that there was wrong, without doing 
what she could to make it right. She it was who prepared a strong petition 
to Government regarding the evils of child-marriage which exercised a 
strong influence in the passing of the law which made it illegal to marry a 
child under twelve years of age. She was an active worker in the temperance 
cause, and for some time was President of the Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance union. 

Of her reliffious life she said but little. All who heard her first testi- 
mony given in India will be reminded of it whenever they hear that sweet 
hymn : " When peace like a river attendeth my way— whatever my lot, 
thou hast tanghtme to say, * It is well, It is well with my soul.* " Like most 
of God's children there were for her times when all was not bright and joy- 
ous, but these times onlv drew her nearer to her Heavenly Father and led her 
to pour out her heart in prayer as these lines, found in her Bible after her 
death, testify :— 

** I am tired Lord and tearful. 
My courage well nigh gone. 
And the soul in me is fearful, 
For lo 1 the night comes on.'* 

" And dark the shadows gather, 
And thick they rest upon 
The way before me, Father, 
And lo I the night comes on.*' 

** O clasp me, Christ, and hold me. 
For 10 ! the night comes oa ; 
Let Thv kind arms enfold me 
Till the blessed morning dawn." 

Her trust in the Saviour never failed her, and during the last three days 
of Illness she sang over and over again her favourite hvmns, such as 
** O the cleansing blood has washed my soul," *' My sins are all taken away," 
*' Leaning on the everlasting Arms," and others. Many of us remember 
bearing her sing last year, *' Lord, plant my feet on higher gronnd." This 
praywnas been answered, and her love of the beautiful nas been satisfied as 
she nas gazed on the beauties of the glory land. 

L. S. Pabksb. 



Pimsr ABBAHim 80L0M0V SiTHIB KT WAFiTT KT YiCDOKU. 

*Azfz aur buzurg bb&f Solomon jo ki oanm I Yahfid se the, mulk I Fallstin 
men pald& hiie, aur sin I ba16giyat ico pahuQchkar pesha saud&garf k& i\j:hti- 
y&rKly&. 8&hib I maqdiir the, aur ba-garaz til&rat safar Ikhtiyar kiy&. 

Jaolnkftq&filaR6s koj&rah&th&, bh&( sahib ne janab F&drf Loewen- 
thal sihib se jo ek Yahiidf Masfhf the, us Masfh k&, jla ke &ne kf intiz&rf men 
bhil the. duny& men &kar naj&t k& k&m ptri, kar chukne ki khush^khabarf p&L 
Yih pahU mauqa* tn&, kl kal&m k&bf j ail mes boy& gay&. Dara i ]$halbar mea 



»> 



66 REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

wuh k&rw&nla^ ^ay&, magar ky& j&ne, kl aslat j&ne hfne bh&f ko bar& amir 
baD&y&,.ky6nki is ke ba*d Hind men w&rid bokar san 1861 meg ba-dast bazure 
BIsbop Parker sdhib Mor&d4b&d meQistib^s p&y&, aur ziy&da taMfm p&ne kl 
garaz se P&drl T. J. Scott s&bib ko pd» Bua46n ko bheje gae, jab&n no kf 
sh&d{ Pddrf Joseph Angelo s&hib kf betf se h^f. Phlr apne ^husar kg sith 
kucbh 'arsa Rher& Bajber& meg rabkar FatbganJ ko, Jah&fi se bihisht ko 
tabdfl h6e, bheje gae. 

San 1879 meQ imtib&n-bard&rf men liye gae, aur san 1881 meQ Deacon aur 
san 1883 men El^lar k& *uhda p&yd, an? apnf Masfbi gairat anr mihnat ke an- 
j&m se usf Dis^rik^ Pilfbhft ke Prfzdl^infc El^ar muoarrar b6e, aur qarfb das 
baras tak nlb&yat sargarinlaur diy&natd&rl se k&m ko chaKkar Jismaof kam- 
zorf Ice b&Ms san 1900 men Superannuate h6e. 

Usf s&l wub pistrikt mere h&tb moQ &f, aor ch(inki bh&l k& bbf wahfn 
qay&m th&, aur Jab kabnf pis^rik^ ko kAm kk zikr &ya, us se ma'16m h6&, ki 
bh&l ns pis^rlk^ se afse w&qif the. Jaise kis&n apne kbet y& gararty& apne gal- 
le se ho. Do baras k& 'arsa h6&, ki bf m&r h6e, aur us hal men mannat manf, 
ki agar ^hud&sbi(& bakbsbe, to us ke wdste ek ghar banana. J^had& ne 
suniaur bb&f ne 25 rupae nazr guzr&ne, Jin men kuchb aur Butlers Chapel 
Fund se mil&kar main ne ek girj&-gbar P6ranpur men ta'rofr kar&y&. 

Kucbh 'arsa bfmar rahue ke ba'd 24wfy July 1903 kf sh&m ko yih 'azfz ap- 
nf l^bidmat ko ptird karke sal&matf ke s^t^i Musfb meg so gae. Piy&ro, bhaf 
Solomon aur on ke baptisma denew&le Bisbop Parker s&hib zur&r ek s&th 
hofiffe, aur ch&Qki donon k&m ke sbauqfn aur bare mudabbir the, agar mam- 
kin hot&, to &kar K&nfarans ke k^moQ men salah dete, lekin ij&zat nahfn. 
Jai8& Masfh ne farm&y& hai, ** Rfit &tf bai, aur us men kof knchh k&m nabiQ 
kar sakt^** Pas ai mere ply&ro, Jo is ko sunte ho, vaa karo, ki r4t &tl hai, Jis 
men knchh na kar sakoge, pas Jo knchh karn& hai kar chalo. 



PinDSr JOSEPH JACOB 8 JTHIB LF WAF^T KT YKDOKBX. 

'Azfz Jacob s&hib buzurg dfnd&r Rbuajfi s&hib ke farzand the, f btid&f ta'- 
Ifm Sh&b jab&npfir meg h6f, phir Bareilly College mpQ a'I& darje kf ta*lfm p&- 
kar kucch *arse tak Bareilly Middle School ke Head Master rahkar Morad- 
kbid Higb School men ta'lfm dene ko bheJe gae, Jah&Q pahunchkar unhog ne 
na sirf lsk61, balkl bar ek kim ko is taur par sambb&l&, kf ^h&ss khambA 
samjhe J&te tbe. Maio klsf d6sre ko MetbodiS6 kalfsiyi men nabfg Jftnti, JIs 
ke zarf'e se itne Masfhf larke Sark&rf imtih&nop meQ kamv&b hiie hon, 
bh&f Jacob s&bib ke bav&n men ek achcbhf kitAb tasnff ho sakti hai, kyfiQkf 
jispahliipar niff&h<l&lfJAwe, lTy&qatnam6dhai, Jo k&m bb&f ko diyi J&tA, 
nih&yat 'umdagi se anJ6m ko pabuQcht& tb&, ma\^btasar men yih kaht& hiiQ, 
ki nam6ne ke wa*z aur namfine ke ust^d the, aur aise ki kalfsiy& kf ftakh^Q 
aise &dmfon kf intiz&rf men khulf h6f halQ. 

Knchh^arse bfm&r rahkar lOwfn April, 1903 ko 'ain Jaw&n&f men Is *azfz ne 
Mor&d&b&d se bihisht ko tabdflf pdi, aur bfbf aur 5 bacbchoQ ko pi^bhe chho- 

{&, nn kf zindafffaur maut k&asar Tsdf aur gair-Ts&foa par aisa thi, kl ek 
aw&n sb&ista Hindti un kf maut ke waqt kf sb&dm&nf o l^hush-h&U ko dekh- 
:ar Ts&f mazhab kf fazflat o sach&f k& q&il h66, aur ham ummed rakhte 
bain, ki wuh zur&r kisf waat din i 'fswf koqnbtil kareg&. P&drf marhfim ke 
chihre par Masfhf tabf'at ka naqsha s&f s&f likhft htk thA, ham&rf samajh men 
ab tak an kf jagah IgihkM parf hai, un ke tilib MlmoQ mea se kaon as Jagah ko 
bharegA. 

Karmt, { t i^SSro. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



FOB FOREION MISSIONARIES. 

SH0LI8H STUDIES. 

I Tear. 1. Introduction to the Holy Scriptures (Old Testament, 

pp. 1-447). Barman, [Examiner— N. L. Rockey.l 

2. Systematic Theology, Vol. I. Miley. [Examiner— S. 

Knowles.l 
B. Christian Purity, or the Heritage of Faith. Foster, 

[Examiuer--T. J. Scott. 1 
4. Discipline of the M. E. Church, 1900 (Parts I-V). [Ex- 
aminer —J. C. Butcher.] 
To be read : Sermons (Vol. I), i— xxxill. Wesley, [T, 
J. Scott.] 
II Year. 1. Introduction to the Holy Scriptures (New Testament, 

pp. 448-770). Ha/rman. [Examiner -N. L. Rockey.j 

3. Systematic Theology, Vol. II. Miley. [Examiner— S. 

Elnowles ] 

3. Discipline of the M. E. Church, 1900 (Part VI to end). 

[Examiner— N. L. Bockev.] 
To be read : Sermons (Vol. I), xxxiv— Iviil. Wesley. 
[T.J. Scott. 1 

4. Digest of Methodist Law. (Edition of 1900.) MerriU. 

Examiner— T. J. Scott.] 

III Year. 1. Biblical Hermeneutics. Terry. [Examiner— J. C. But- 

cher.] 

2. History of the Christian Church, Vol. I. Hurst. 

[Examiner— S. Knowles.] 

3. Exegetical Studies in the Pentateuch. (The Penta- 

teuch and Isaiah). Warren, [Examiner- J. G. But- 
cher.] 
To be read : The Supernatural Book. Foster. [3. 
!K.nowl6S 1 

IV Year. 1. History of the Christian Church, Vol. U. Hurst. 

[Examiner— S. Knowles.] 

2. The Foundations of the Christian Faith. RisThell. 

[Examiner-T. J. Scott.) 

3. Exegetical Studies In Isaiah. (The Pentateuch and 

Isaiah.) Warren. [Exarainer-J. C. Butcher.) 
lo be read : Life and Epistles of St. Paul. Conybeare 
andHowson, [J. C. Butcher.] 

VESNACULAS STUDIES. 

I.— This course shall consist of three standards of two sections each, viz.. 
Lower, Middle, and Proficiency Standards, In both the Urdu and Hindi 
languages. 

11.— The Urdu and Hindi of the Lower Standard shall be compulsory, 
and one section, either the Urdu or the Hindi, of the Middle and Profi- 
ciency Standards respectively. 

III.— The candidate will be expected to pass the first section of the 
Lower Standard examination within, or at the close of, his first year's 
residence, and he may be allowed to complete both sections in that time : 
bat must pass in both within two years from the time of Joining his con- 
ference in India. 

IV.—AU conference examinations shall take place under the direction 
of a board of six or more examiners appointed by the Bishop, which board 
shftll. aa far as possible, remain unchanged from year to year. 

v.— The annual conference examination Shan begin on the morning of 



68 COURSES OP STUDY. 

the day preceding the day fixed for the opening of the conference, a majority 
of the board being present. 

VL— The following course of study, in accordance with Rule I, Is pro- 
posed : 

LOWER 8TARDARD. 
A.-URDU : FIRST YEAR. 

1. GRAMMAR. Piatt's, omitting chapters on Arabic and Per- 

Bian Constructions, and Derivations and Syntax .. 100 

9. READING. (Roman, Lithograph and Type) : 
Matthew and Mark's Gospels 
Haqaiq ul Maujudat .. .. .. ..100 

3. TRANSLATION .. ..150 

(1) Urdu-English : 10 lines from Urdu Sec. Blc. C. L. S .. SO 

(2) English-Urdu : 10 lines from Eng. Sec. Bk. C. L. S., half 

written in Persian and half written in Roman .. 60 

(3) Definition .. .. .. .. 40 

4. PRONDNCIATION .. .. ..100 

5. CONVERSATION .. .. .. .. ..100 

Read : Bishop Thpburn's India and Malaysia. 

B.-HINDI : SECOND YEAR. 

1. GRAMMAR, Kellogg's .. .. ..100 

2. READING. (Nagri) Matthew and Mark's Gospels and 

Dharm Tula 

3. TRANSLATION 

(1) Hindi-English ; 10 lines from Hindi Sec. Bk. C. L. S., 

(2) English- Hindi : 10 lines from Eng. Sec. Bk. C. L. S., 

half written in Nagri and half written In Roman .. 
(3> Definition 

4. PRONUNCIATION 

5. CONVERSATION 

Read : Hunter's Brief History of the Indian People. 

KIDBLS 8TAHDABD.-THIBD TBAB. 

(Urdu or Hindi Optional.) 
A.-URDU. 

1. GRAMMAR : Piatt's, the whole, Eempson's Syntax and Idioms. 

Forbes' Persian 

2. READING (Litho, and Type): 

Luke and John's Gospels. 
Din-I-Haqq ki tahqig. 
Taubat un Nasih. 
Mark and John in Persian 

3. TRANSLATION 

(1) Urdu-English : 10 lines from Urdu Third Bk. C. L. S. 

(2) English-Urdu : 10 lines from Entr. Third Bk. C. L. S., 

half written In Persian and half in Roman 

(3) Definition 

4. PRONUNCIATION 

5. CONVERSATION 

Read : Muir's Life of Mohammad. 

B.-HINDL 

1. GRAMMAR : Review 

Baliantyn's Elementary Sanskrit. 

2. READING : Luke and Jobn^s Gospels 

Shakuntala (edited by Raja Lakshman Singh). 

3. TRANSLATION 

(1) Hindi-English : 10 lines from Hindi Third Bk. 0. L. S. 

(2) English-Hindi : 10 lines from English Third Bk. C. L. 

S., half written In Nugri and half lu Roman 

(3) Definition 

4. PRONUNCIATION 

5. CONVERSATION 

Read : Wilkius' Hindn Mythology. 



so 


100 


60 




4U 


100 
100 



. . 


100 


50 


150 


60 




40 




. . 


100 


. . 


100 


• . 


100 


. . 


100 


. . 


150 


50 




60 




40 




. . 


100 


»• 


100 



OOURSBS OF STUDY. 69 

PBOnOlSNGT BTANDABD.-FOTTBTH TBAB. 

(Urdu or Hindi Optional.) 

A.-UBDU. 

1. GRAMMAR : Palmer's Arabic. (Optional.) 

2. READING : Mizan-al-Haqq. 

Gallstan. 

Forbes' Arabic Reader, (Optional.) 
8. TRANSLATION 

(1) Urdu-Enfflish : 20 lines from Urdu Fourth Bk. C. L. S., 

(2) English-Urdu : 20 lines from English Fourth Bk. C. L. 8., 

half written In Persian and half in Roman 
Short Sermon In Persian character. 
O) Definition 

4, PRONUNCIATION 

5. CONVERSATION 

Read : Sell's Faith of Islam. 

B.-HINDI. 

1. GRAMMAR : Hindi Review 

Monler WiUlams' Sanskrit. (Optional.) 

2. READING : Sat Mat Nirupan 

Prem Sagar. 

Hithopadesha. First Book. (Optional.) 
8. TRANSLATION 

(1) Hindi-English : 20 lines from Hindi Fourth Bk. C. L. 8. 

(2) EnBlish-Hindi : 20 lines from English Fourth Bk. C. L. 8., 

half written In Negri and half in Roman 
Short Sermon in Nagri character. 

(3) Definition 

4. PRONUNCIATION 

5. CONVERSATION 

Read : Monler Williams' Religious Life and Thought in India. 

VII.— The candidate, In order to pass, must obtain at least one half the 
aggregate marks in each subject. 

VIII.— Tlie Board of Examiners, through the Registrar, shall at the 
close of the examination, Inform the candidate and the Secretary of the 
Conference of the result. 

FOR HINDUSTANI MINISTERS. 

nXLKVA KAHFAEAHf KF fHWiTfiDAOr J^MlfBlLA XS LITS. 

1. Urd6 y& Hindi bal^hfibf likhn& aur pafhni. 

2. His&b, Jugr&flya aur Qaw&'ld Unna. 

3. Kempson s&hib kf Taw6rf^h I Hind, y& Tamaddan i Hind, MacMillan 
A Co., Bombay. 

4. Scripture Geography kof ky&Q na ho. 

5. Discipline. 

PAHL^ S^L. 

1. FiUsaff dar b&b Tadbfr i NaJ&t. Walker's Philosophy of the Plan 
of Salvation. 

2. Qadfm Taw&r(V:h k& Ikhtis&r, ji Pr&dfn Sanshep IttlhA8.-LaDd 
marks of Ancient History. 

8. Kaw&if us Sah&if Iclsf harf men, 1 se 97 safhe tak. 

4. Tll&f Shama'd&n, (MissRowesAbibak^.) 

5. Poplyat kk Ahwdl, Urd6 y& Hindi moQ. 

6. Duff sihib ki Sarguzasht 

7. Judson s&hib ki Sarguzasat. 

8. TahHriWa'z. 

9. 'Ilmi MazAmin. 

la Tam&m M kf nazar sinU 



. « 
• * 

50 


100 
150 


60 




40 


100 
100 


• • 


100 


. . 


100 


50 


150 


60 




40 


100 
100 



70 C0UR8BS OP STUDY. 

DirSRIi SA'L. 

_ 1. Hill's Physical (>oography.-^ugr4flya Taba'f, Angrezf, Urdfi y4 
HlDdl moQ. 

3. Hunter's Short History, of the Indian people, Angrezf, Urdfi y& 
HIndf. 

3. Vaughan's "What Think Ye of Christ." Masfh Ibn Ullah yd 
Balbal kk E&lplatika (Allahabad). Kaw&if us Sah&if, 98 se 160 safhe tak. 

4. Bfih ul Quds kf Ta'lfm.— Walker's Doctrine of the Holy Spirit. 
Y& Hikmat ul Ilh&m, (N. I. Tract Society, Allahabad). 

5. DfniTsurfk&subfit.— Dr. Alden's Outlines of Christian Evidences, 
tr. by Mrs. McGrew (Locknow). 

6. Tahrfrf Wa'z, 'Ilmf Mazmfin. 

7. Tam&m s&l kf nazar sdnf. 

TrSRA SA'L. 

1. Fisher's Manual of Christian Evidences. Tswf Subfit 

2. The Spirit-Filled Life. Dr. J. McNeil. 

3. Rfih se Bbarpfir Zi ndagf . 

4. Kaw&If us Sah&if Tatlmma 1 se 11 b&b tak. 

5. Baffot*s Brief Church History, Kalfsiyd kf Taw&rfkh k& Ikhtisdr. 
(Allahabad). 

6. Once a Hindoo now a Christian. Ek Hindfi k& Masfhf hon&. 
(Allahabad). 

7. Tahrfrf Wa't. Ilmf Mazmfin. 

8. Tam&m s&l ki nazar sdnf. 

CHAUTHA' SA'L. 

1. Fasl 2, Balbal k& Imtihdu. Dr. Stalker's Imago Christi.— Masfh k& 
Namfina, Urdfi y& Hindf. 

2. Fasl 4, Baibal kf Ta'lfnj&t. Pafho Wesley siihib kf Sarguzasht. 

3. Fasl 3, 5, Kalfsiy& k& Intlz&m aur TArfkh i Kaifsiyd *Ahd I 'Atfq. 

4. Fasl 1, Dfnd&rf aur Auq&t-guzdrf ke bay&n mea. 

5. Tahrfrf Wa'z. *llmf Mazmfin. 

6. Tam&m s61 kf nazar s&nf. 

CHAUTBE SlOi KBIMTIBAN KE SUWA'LAT. 

Fabl 1. 

1. Bfih&nf zindagf ky& hai ? Us kf asllyat bavAn karo. 

2. Kyfinkar ma'Tfim hot& hai kl ham meg rfih&nf zindagf hal ? 

3. Wa'iz ko kis tirah ma*lfim hotd hai ki ^jThudi ne mujh ko wa'z ke 
k&m ke w&ste talab kiy& hai. 

DFNDARr AUR AUQAT-GUZA'ar KB BAYAN MElj --4. £:h&dlm 
ud dfn ke kh&ss kam haydn karo, aur yih batdo ki is |j:hidinat ke wdste 
kaun kann se wasf chdhiyeQ. 

5. We kaun se tarfqe ualQ Jin se ylh ausdf barhte Jdte hain ? 

6. Batldo ki logoo ke gharog par ahwdl-pursi ke live Jdna kalsd zurfir 
hal, aur yih kaho ki tumharf is kdm mAn kis qadr tawajjuh hai ? 

7. Yih batdo ki kis tarah parhte lifiFhte ho ? 

8. Jab se turn kdnfarans kf imtihdn-barddrf men ho, tab se turn ne jltnf 
kltdben bar sdl dekhf halQ. un sab ke ndm batldo ? 

9. Kutub I Muqaddasa ke parhne men tumhdrd kitnd waqt sarf hotd 
hal ? aur kis tarfqe se parhte ho ? 

FA8L 2. 

BAIBAL KA IMTIHAN.~1. Kis I'tibdr se tum Baibal ko Kaldm 1 
Ildhf Jdnte ho, aur kin daldil se tum ylh rde rakhte ho? 

2. Kis dalfl se Majmfi'a 1 *Ahd P Atfq ko, jo ham mea muranwij hal, 
mn'tabar jdnte ho ? ^huldsa baydn karo. 

3. Kis dalfl se we sab kltdben Jo Is Majmfi'a I 'Ahd i Jadfd mea dd)^hil 
hala, mu'tabar o sahfh jdnte ho ? Mu^htasar baydn karo. 

4. Kis tarah Mohammadfoa ke is da' we ko ki Kutub i Muqaddasa man - 
sfij^h ho gaf hala, gal at sdbit karte ho ? 

5. ^hurfij i Misr se Yashfi'a kf maut tak, Isrdelfoa kf tdrf |^h kd t^huldsa 
batdo. 

6. Das flrqoa kf bagdwat ko muta'alliq jo V^^s wdqi'dt hala, unheg 
baydn karo. 



CbURl^ES OF STUDY. tl 

7. YahfidfoQ kf 8&l6na 'fdea aur nfz ylh ki kis bftt ke wAste mnqarrar 
h6f thfn, aor kls tarah par ad& kf J&U thfo, bat&o. 

8. Kh^Lss kh&88 nabfon ke n&m aur Jit waqt meo unhon ne nnbtiwateQ 
kfQ, wnii zamane aur nfz yih, kl we nab&wateQ kis b&re mea thffi, bay&D 
karo. 

9. Khad&wand Masfh kf bitoa se kachh alsf mls&Iea do. ]In se zanfr 
hotft half ki wahPar&ne 'Ahd ke nawishtOQ ko mu'thbar 8amajht&th&. 

10. Kaun sf pesh-l^habarf&Q Masfh se muta*alliq hain, khasftsan us kf 
toad aur sfrat aur k&m aur maut se ? 

11. Masfh kf zlndasf ke h&14t kis kis waqt ke ina*16m haifi, aur muddat, 
*ahd risilat kis qadar thf ? 

13. Us kf rlsalat ke kh&ss w&qi'&t aur }ah&n Jah&a kl we guzre halQ 
batl&o. 

13. KhAss Vh&ss b&tea mnndarlj i A*ain&l i Basfil batl&o. 

14. Mu'Jiza ky4 hat aur mu'jizoQ se kyiinkar maMtiin hot& hat ki Eutab 
Mnqaddas mia Jiuib AlUh haig ? 

BAIBAL SrTA'LrMAT KB BAYA'N MEH.-l. KhudA k& woJAd 
Balbal se kis tarah s&bit hot& hai ? 

2. Baibal se Tasifs k& ky&sub(it hai, ya'ne ki ek Khud& mea tin aqnAm 
halQ? 

3. KhudA kf sif&t batlio aur har sif&t k& snb&t P&k Nawishtoji se do. 

4. i^hud& ke mujassam bone k& masia Jo Kutub i Muqaddas men p&y& 
jit4 hai, use bay6n karo, aur yih batl&o ki us ta'lfm ko najat ke bandobast se 
ky& Mlftoa hai ? 

5. Masfh kf Ul&hiyat Kutub i Muqaddasa se s&bit karo. 

0. Baibai kf kaun kaun sf &y&t Uluhiyat i Masfh ke muj^h&ltf Musalmto 
pesh karte haia, aur turn un ke ky& ma'ne lete ho? 

7. Rtih i Qnds kf aqndmiyat k&, aur UKihiyat k& aur us ke k&m kk P4k 
NawlshtoQ se subtit do. 

8. Aidain ke ffun&h k& natf Ja us kf aul&d ke hftqq men ky6 htii ? 

9. Masfh ke kaf&re aur gun&hon kf mu*iff mea ky& 'Tl&qa hai ? 
la Masfh ke Jf uthne ka subfit do. 

11. Masfh kf shaii'at kf asllyat aur f&ida, Jaisf Kutub Muqaddasa mea 
ta*lfm hai, bay&n karo. 

13. Btil ui Quds kf gaw&hf kf nisbat kY& taMfm o dalfl hai ? 

13. Masfh kf k&miliyat k& masla Jo Wesley s&hib ne sikhl6y& hai use 
mn)^htasaran bay6n karo aur Babal se us kk subdtdo. 

14. Naf Paid&ish aur k&mil p4kfzagf ke darmiy&n Jo farq hai, usesamJhA 
do. 

15. Is da' we ke b&re men ki '* Jo kof az sar i nau paid^ hot& hai is taur 
se nahfn gireg&, ki 6khir i kir hal&k ho J&e." Ham&rf kalfsiyft kf ky& rAe 
hai ? sabit karo ki yih r&e kal&m i Il&hf ke ba-m6Jib hai. 

16. BatlAo ki baptisma kaisf rasm hai, aur kis garaz se hai, aur kytia fan 
hai ? har bit k& subot do. 

17. S&bit karo, ki bachchoa ko baptisma den& mun&sib hai ? 

18. Baibal mea' Ash&e Rabb&nf kf nisbat kaun kaun se muh6ware 6e 
haiaj aur wuh kis garaz se haia aur Masfhfoa par us k& m&nn& ky6a ^^^^ 
hai? 

19. Hindtioa ke masla i tan&sukh, ya'ne k&y6-palat ko kyfiakar galat di- 
bit karte ho? 

30. Jism ke jf uthne ke b&b mea Kutub i Muqaddasa mea ky& taMfm 
hai ? haw&la do. 

Fasl 4. 

KALFSIY^ KE INTIZATM O TABTrB KE BAYATN ME^.-L Kalfsi- 
yk ke tarah tarah ke intiz&m&t bay&n karo. 3. Methodist Episkopal K&lfsl- 
yk mea General Kinf arans aur Annual Kinfarans aur Kw&rtarlf k&nfarana 
ke MuU'alliq kyi ky& k4m haia ? 

3. Kaifsiyft ke 'uhd&d&ron mea " Bishop " ** Prfziiding Bldar " aur '* BI« 
4ar," aur *' plkan " aur " Khadim-ud-df n " aur '* liOkal Wa'iz ^' aur ** Mukh- 
t&rk&r" aur **AmAnatd&r^*aurkil&ske U&df Jo haiai un mea har ek kk 
kWuk Ikhtiy&r hai, aur ky& kkm muta'alliq hai, aur kis ke s&mhne JawAb* 
dlhf hai ? 

Fasl 5. 

TAWATBrKH I KALrsi YA'.-1. Yah6dfoa ke Ifhkas firqe Masfh ke waqt 
mea kitne the? un kk bay&n karo. 



79 CX)URSES OF StUDY. 

2. A w&ll sam&noQ men Jo 'azlyaten MasIhfoQ ne athftf b&la, un k6 kachh 
bay&n karo. 

3. Uo waaail k& bay&n karo, jin ke sabab se Ibtidi men Masfhf mazhab 
bahut phaili, (Mather s&hib kf Taw&rfj^ h i Kalisiy& tisri l)2lb daf'.a 1, 2, 3, 5, 
ko dekbo.) 

4. Gnostikon kf kyft ta'Ifm thf aur ns se aadfm kalfsiyi par kyi t^harib 
asar par& ; (Mether s&bib kf Taw&rflj: ! KaUslyft tfsrft b&b daf*a 85.) 

5. Lather s&hib se *afii qabl Dfn i Tswf kft ky& h&l hai? 

6. Barf IsIAh i mazhabf Jo Luther s&hib ke waqt meo h(if, us k& h&l bat- 
Uo, kfs sabab se wuh isl&h hdf thf, aur kaun kaun log us mea sharfk t hAl 
the? 

7. Bri tftniya f *Uzama men Methodist Kalfsiy& ke muqarrar hone k& aa- 
bab batl&o aur Wesley s&hib ki t4rf^h men ^h&ss log kaun the? 

8. Methodist Episkopal Ealfsfyd kis sabab se aur kis waqt mefi au- 
wal kah&n banf ? (Dfscipllne k& b&b I auwal dekho.) 

0. Hm6d ke mukhtalif firqe aur yih kt we kahaa se nikle aur an k& b&ni 
aur an ke kh&ss ^aofde batl&o. 

10. Mohammaafon ke dfn kf Ibtldd aur Mohammed sdhlb k4 kuchh ba- 
ydn karo aur mu\^htalTf flrqon k& aur un ke h&dfoQ k& kuchh zlkr karo? 

11. Slkhon ke mazhab Kribtid& kah&Q se hai aur use HinCid o Isl&m ke 
mazhab se kva M16qa hai? 

13. Brabmo mazhab k6&g&zotaraqqfaurh&1&tmaa]Cida aur kh&ss'aqfd* 
OB k& b&y&n karo. 



EXAMINATIONS' 



BXAinATIOR SCHEME FOR HI8SI0HARIBS. 

Bngliili CoarM :— 

(a) Harmao^s lDtroduction,~N. L. RocUey. 

(2>) Exegesis,— W. A. Mansell. 

c) Systematic Theology,— S. Knowles. 

(d) Wesley's Christian PerfectioD,— W. A. Mansell. 

Yonuenlar Oonne :— 

First Year Urdu (Lower Staudtrd).-8. S. Dease, W. R. liowcn. 
Second Year Hindi (Lower Staijdard),-^. L. Rockey. D. A. Chowfin. 
Third Year Urdu (Middle Stand8rd),-C. L. Bare, J. Thomkinson. 
Iblrd Year Hindi (Middle Standard),-^. Knowles, S. 8. Dease, 8. B. 

Finch. 

Fourth Year Urdu (ProlicifMiey Standard),— W. A. Mansell, Jwala Singh 
Fourth Year Hindi (Proficiency Standard),— S. Knowles, D. A. ChowBn*. 

EZAMIHATIOH SCHEME FOR RATI¥E CARDIDATE8. 

For Loeal Deaeoni* Ordination (Local pikan ke Liye) :— 

(a) Local Preacher ki khw^ndagi ki nazar i sanf,-H. L. Mukerjee. 

(b) Haqfuati gunah,— U. L. Mukerjee. 

(c) Uidayat ul Wd'izin,-\V. A. Mansell. 

(d) Millat i Tashblhi,— W. A. Mansell. 

(e) Tahrirf wa'z,— H. L. Mukerjee. 

EXAMINATION SCHEME. 

For Loeal Elders* OrdiDation (Local Elders ke liye). 

Lokal Dikan kf kbw&ndag{ ki nazar I s&nf,— H. L. Mukerjee. 

FIlAsafiDarb&dTadblr 1 JNaj6t,-H. 1^. Mukerjee. 

EAh I Zindagi,— H. L. Mukerjee. 

Tsd kf Sfrat, W. A. M ausell. 

Teg o Slpar,- W. A. Mansell. 

Rfih ul Quds kl Ta'lfm.-D. A. Chowfin. 
For Admission To Conforeneo : — 

(Imtih&n-bard^roQ ke liye.) 

Qawft'id i Urd6 (y& Hindi), Jugr&tia, Hisdb, D. A. Chowtin, S. B. Finch. 
Qadfm Taw&ri^h ke HihtisAr,— J. C. Butcher. 
Jugr&fia Pahlf kit^b,- J. C Butcher. 
Di8cipllne,-J. C. Butcher. 



■m TEAR BZAKNATION SCHBIE FOR 1904. 

IHISH-MirHr IMTIHinr XK HAOBHA WASTS BAV 1904. 



Subject 
(Mazimfn.) 



Examinera. 
(Imtihin lenewile.) 



FXBtTTBAS. 

(PAHLA: SiTL.) 

(a) FiUMff Dsrb&b Tadbfr 

f NajAt :- 

(Walker's Philotiopby 
of Plan of Salvation.) 

(b) Qadfm TawArl^h k& 

Ikhtlsir :— 
(Landmarks of Ancient 
nistory.) 



J. C. Butcher. 



W. R. Bowen. 



(c) KawAlf u8Sah6lf,8afha 

1-07:- 

(Introdnctlon to Bible 
Study, p|k 1-97.) 

(d) TlUi Shama*di(n :— 
(Story of MiM Bowe'f 

Life.) 

8BC0ND TIAE. 

(DirSRi^ SA'L.) 

(a) JugrAflya Taba*f :— 
(Uni'8 Physical (itoog- 

raphy.) 

(b) Taw&H^h i HtndosUn, 

Hunter sihib kf :— 
(Hunter's Short History 
of Indian People.) 

(e) Masfh Ibn UllAh :- 
(Vauffhan's ** What 

Think ye of Christ?") 

id) KawiitfusSahAif.safha 
96-ieO:~ 

(Introduction to Bible 
Study, pp. 08-160.) 

THIftD TIAB. 

(TrSR^ S^L.) 



(a) Dfn I Tswf ki subi^t :- 
(Fisher's Manual of 

Christian Evidences.) 

(b) R6h se Bbarpfir Zinda- 

(ScNeir8**Spirlt-Fllled 
Life.") 



W. R. Bowen. 



S. B. Finch. 



S. Knowles. 



S. Knowles. 



D. A. Chowfln. 



D. A. Chowfin. 



Candidates. 
(Imtihin denewila.) 



J. Thomklnson. 



S. S. Dease. 



F. Wittke, Ishwarf Dis, 
Dhappan Wilson. 



F. Wittke, Ishwarf Dis, 
Dhappan Wilson, John 
Rol>ert, H. C. Sigler. 



F. Wittke, Ishwarf Dis, 
Dhappan Wilson, H. C. 
Sigler. 

F. Wittke, Ishwarf Dfts, 
Dhappan Wilson. 



D. S. Huklll, H. C. Sigler, 
B. S. Bndden, John Ro- 
bert. 

D. S. Huklll, H. C. Sigler, 
B. S. Budden, John Ro- 
bert. 



D. S. Huklll. H. C. Sigler, 
B. S. Budden, John Ro- 
berts. 

D. a Huklll. H. C. Sigler, 
B. S. Budden, John Ro- 
bert. 



Prem Masfh, MIsrf Charan, 
Ya'qtib Singh. 



Prem Maslh, MIsrf Charan, 
Ta'qAb Singh. 



MID- YEAR EXAMINATION SCHSMI. 



75 



Subject. 
(Mazimfo.) 



Examiners. 
(Imtih&n lene w61e.) 



(c) KawAif 08 Sah&lf, Ta- . 

ilmma:- I J. Thomkinion. 

(Introduction to Bible 
Study .Supplement.) 



fOVBTH TXAB. 

(CHAUTHA SA'L.) 

(a) Fasl PaliK, Dfndirf aur 
auQit-goxirf :— 
(Questions on Personal 
Gall. 

Cb) Fasl Dftsrf, Baibal kf 
nisbat :- 

(Questions about the 
Bible.) 

(c)Fmsl Tfsrf, Baibal kf 
TAMfmitt-^ ^. 
(Questions on Teachings 
of the Bible.) 

(d) Masf h kA Namfina :- 
(Dr. Stalker's " Imago 
Christi.'*) 



C. L. Bare. 



JwAU Singh. 



JwiU Singh. 



JwAU Singh. 



Candidates. 
(ImtihAn denewAle.) 



Prem Masf h, Mlsrf Charan, 
Ya*qiib Singh. 



K. Sil&s. Ya'qfib *Alf, A. 
S. Wesley, J. H. Walter. 



K. SilAs, Ya'Q6b 'Alf, A. 8. 
Wesley, J. H. Walter. 



K. Silis, Ya'Qtib 'Alf, A. a 
Wesley, J. H. Walter. 
BuUqf Singh. 

E. Silis, Ya'qfib *Alf. A. S. 
Wesley, J. H. Walter. 



BZAHHAnON SCHEn DAT BEFORE GONFESENCB, 

JANUARY 1905. 
Sin. Ki ITKHIB Kir irniHicir Kir nAosHir, wiriTX jakvabt isos. 



Subject. 


Examiners. 


Candidates. 




(tfaz&mfn.) 


(ImtlhAnlenew&le.) 


(Iratlh&n denewftle.) 


FIB8T YSAB. 








(PAHLA' SA'L.) 








{€) Popiyat k& ahw&l : - 
(Popery.) 


W. R. Bowen. 


F. WIttke, Ishwarf 
Dhappan Wilson. 


Ms, 


if) Dair SAhlb kf Sarga- 
zasht :— 
(Story of Dr. Duff.) 


W. R. Bowon 


F. Wittke, Ishwarf 
Dhappan Wilson. 


D&s, 


ig) Judson Siihib kf Sargu 
xasht:— 
(Story of Dr. Jndson.) 


S. Bi Finch. 


F. Wittke, Ishwarf 
Dhappan Wilson. 


Das, 


ih) Tahrlrf Wa'z :- 
(Written Sermon) 


S. B. Finch. 


F. Wittke, Ishwarf 
Dhappan Wilson. 


DiB, 


(1) llmf mazmfin :— 
(An Essay.) 


VV. R. Bowen. 


F. Wittke, Ishwarf 
Dhappan Wilson. 


D&s, 



8SC0VD TSAB 

(DCSRA' SA'L.) 

(e) Hlkmat ul IlhAm, ya*ne 
R6hul Qiids kf ta'- 
11m :- 
(Walker*s Doctrine of the 
Holy Spirit.) 

if) Dfn 1 Tswf k&Subfit :- 
(Alden'8 Outline of Chris- 
tian Evidences.) 

((/) Tahrfrf Wa'z. 



{h) llmf mazmfin. 

THIBD TBAB. 

TrSRA' SA'L. 

id) Kalf8ly& kf Taw&rfl^h 
k& H^htlsAr :- 
(Baffot's Brief Church 
History.) 

(e) Ek Hlnd6 k& Masfbf 
hon& :— 
Once a Hlndfi Now a 
Christian.) 



8. Knowles. 



D. A. Clinwrm. 



D. A. Chowfin. 



S. Knowles. 



S. S. Dcase. 



J. Thomklnson. 



D. S Huklll. H. C. Slffler, 
B. S. Budden, John Ro- 
bert. 

D. S. Huklll, H. C. Slgler, 
B. S. Budden, John Ro- 
bert. 

D. 8. Huklll, H. C. Slgler, 
B. 8. Budden, John Ro- 
Iwrt. 

D. 8. nuklll, H. C. Slgler, 
B. 8. Budden, John Ro- 
bert. 



Prom Masf h, M Isrf Charan, 
Ya'qab Singh. 



Prero Maslh, M isrf Charan 
Ya*qab Singh. 



BXAMINATrON SCHBMB DAY BGFORE OONPGREDiCB. 77 



Subject. 
(MazAmfn.) 



Ex ao) fliers 
(ImtfhftnlenowAle.) 



Candidates. 
(Imtiliiln denowftle. ) 



CD Tabrfrf Wa'z : - 
(g) Ilmf MazmAn :— 

POVBTH YSAB. 

CHAUTHi^S^L. 

(e) Faal cbaathf, Kalfsfyft 
k& Intiz&m : - 
(Melbodlst Economy.) 

if) Fasi P&Qcbwfn Taw&- 
rf^b I kaUsiy^: - 
(Questions on Cbnrcb His- 
tory.) 

ig) Tabrfrf Wa'z. 
(h) Ilmf Mazmiin. 



(J) Weslev S&bib kf Sargfi 
zasbt 



J. Thomkinsoii. Prom Mnsfh. Misri Cbaran, 

Yu'qfib Singh. 



S. S. Dease. 



C. L. Bare. 



Jwala Singb. 



Jwala Singb. 



W. A. Mansell. 



C. L. Bare. 



Prem Masfh, Misrf Cbaran, 
Ya'qfib Singh. 



K. SflAs, Ya'qftb'Alf, A. 8 
Wesley. 

K. SflAs, Ya'qtib 'All. A. S. 
Wesley, J. H. Walter, 
Bol&qf Singb. 

K. SflAs, Ya'qfib»Alf, A. 8. 
Wesley, J. H. Walter. 

K. Sfl&s, Ya'qfib 'AH, A, S. 
Wesley, J. H. Walter, 
Bul&qf Singb. 

K. Sflds, Ya'qfib 'AH, A. S. 
Wesley, J. H. Walter, 
Bul&qf Singb. 



UST OF LOCAL PREACHERS. 



Name. 



Orders. 



BtreUly-XMUOii Diitrioi 



J. W. Todd 

A. Sweet 
Sadal Slogh 
Daniel SIgler 
Kondan La] 
W. Pamuchai 
C. Wilson 

K. Wilkinson 
Kallu Porter 
Laljl Mai 
Lakhan Singh 
Sadal Maslh 

B. M. Dass 
Fazi DUah 
Prem Singh 
Sewa Ram 
Rahn Singh 
Baldeo Parshad 
W. Newton 

A. Peter 
Motl Lai 
Gnr Bakhsh 
Jai Lai 
Balmnkand 
Danlat Maslh 
Oatra Lai 
Devi Din 
Gopl Charan 
Ram Parshad 
Bhnp Singh 
Thamman Das 
RIsall 
T. B. Kirk 
Chhidda Singh 
J. Abraham 
YusQf 

Dungar Singh 
Tara Ghana 
Bhawanl Dat 
Jawahir Singh 
Santosh Ram 
Chander Singh 
A. Miller 
Ynhanna 
Bljai Singh 
Gulam Maslh 
Thakurl Kesri 
Jal Singh 
Hell Jacob 
John Frederick 
Thomas John 
S. L. Harris 
Dr. J. Barker 



Elder, 1901 

„ 1896 

Deacon, 1890 

1896 



••• 
*•* 

••• 



t« 
II 
•I 
i» 
II 
>i 
II 
II 
II 



1896 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1902 
1894 
1903 
f. 1898 

Elder. 1895 
Local Preacher, 



^ i 






••• 
••• 



••• 
••• 



qpw 



»i 

II 

II 

II 

fi 

II 

II 

•I 

II 

II 

I* 

II 

11 

II 

II 

II 

If 

II 

II 

fi 

If 

II 

II 

It 

It 

If 

ti 

ft 

ft 

It 

II 

II 

II 

If 

II 

II 

If 



II 

11 

If 

It 

It 

It 

II 

If 

ti 

If 

It 

If 

If 

It 

It 

If 

II 

It 

It 

It 

It 

It 

ff 

It 

It 

It 

II 

If 

It 

It 

It 

ft 

It 

It 

It 



ft^ 



Deacon, 



1890 



Appointment. 



Umerf. 

Powayan. 

KasganJ. 

Panahpor. 

Bareilly. 

Askot. 

Bblm Tal. 

Raunstok. 

KhudaganJ. 

Madnapur. 

Ramapur. 

Lodhipur. 

Raniknet. 

Shahjahanpar. 

Shahpiir. 

Jaitlpur. 

Miranpur Katra. 

FatebganJ. 

Panabpur. 

Ranmastpur. 

Nigohi. 

Kaudbarpnr. 

Ganntlya. 

Sanba. 

Powayan. 

Kanth, Kamarlainpar. 

Lodhipnr. 

Faridpnr. 

Akbarpur. 

Nahil. 

Khotar. 

Manpnr. 

Chandag. 

Rani Bagh. 

Dwarahat. 

If 
ft 
It 

Pogaur. 
Gnnji Biyas. 
Gangollhat. 
Pithoragarh. 

Lobba. 
Jem a. 

Bbains Sarae. 
Lodhipnr. 
Shabjahanpnr. 
Khera Bajenu 
Bareilly. 
Pasgawan. 
Nalnl Tal. 



LIST OF LOCAL PREACHERS. 



79 



Namss. 



S. Bowen 
W. T. Gowao 
C. H. Greenwold 
J. C. Smith 
Samae) Da 88 
Mangal Sain 
FazlMasih 
Wazlr RhaD 
Baldeo Daa 
N. K. Makerjee 
J. R. ChltomW 
Bam Bakhsh 
Isaac David 

A. Broce 
DiDa Nath 
Daniel Boddeo 
Daya Ram 
Gajja Lai 
Isaac Samuel 
Simon Lai 

S. S. David 
Itwarl Silas 
Bhola Natb 

BuNOB District. 

B. McGregor 
Peter Merrill 
Galab Singh 
Jhabbu Lall 
Kallyan Siofh 
Nadir Shah 
Kboshali Ronyan 
Albert Gulab 
Baddba Singh 
Chidda Singh 
Sadhn Singh 

B Cutler 
Bahal Singh 
Hiram Barrow 
M. Johnson 

B. Johnson 
Kewal Ram 
Samuel Falls 
Maqbul Singh 

C. S. Walter 

BuDAON District. 

Baldeo Dass 
Bahal Singh 
Mangkl Singh 
C. M. Parmanand 
Parbbu Dass 
Jhandu Singh 
Chetram 
Sobran Singh 
Taqub Stngh 
Cornelius Singh 
Nanhe Mall 
Itwari Lall 
Ookul Pershad 
Munna Lall 



Obdkbs. 



AppoiKTMKirrs. 



Local Preacher. 



••• 
••• 






»» 
«t 
«« 
t» 
•t 
«t 
ft 
It 
tt 
tt 
•I 
tt 
tt 
ti 
t* 
ti 
II 
ft 
tt 
tt 
tt 
•t 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
It 
It 
«t 
ft 
It 
It 
tt 
ti 
•t 
ti 
II 
ti 
It 
tt 
It 
t* 
It 



tt 
t» 



tt 
11 















Elder, 1887 
1803 
1894 
n 1894 
Deacon, 1896 
1890 
1895 
1904 
Local Preacher 

ft 
tt 
tt 
ti 
tt 
If 
It 
ft 
•t 
It 
It 



Deacon 



tt 
1 1 
tt 



1804 



Local Preacher 



tt 
ti 

tt 
ft 
It 
It 
tt 
tt 
It 



Bareiilv. 
Naini Tal. 
Bareiilv. 
Naini tal. 

Raksha. 
Bareiilv. 
Shahjahanpur. 
BareiUy. 

tt 
It 
It 
It 
tt 
»i 
tt 
tt 
ti 
tt 
It 
It 
tt 
t» 



Najibabad. 

Mandawar. 

Kurpur. 

Seohara. 

Afzalgarh. 

Kiratpur. 

D»ranagar. 

Nurpur. 

Bijnor. 

Nurpur. 

Dbampur. 

Barhapur. 

Sabispur. 

Najibabad. 

Puralni. 

Kothqadir. 

Nehtor. 

Jbalu. 

Najibabad. 

Bijnor. 



AllganJ. 

RadirChauk. 

Binawar. 

Budaon. 

Budaon. 

Isiamnagar. 

Kakrala. 

DataganJ. 

Bisauli. 

Budaon. 

UJhani. 

Binawar. 

Bisauli. 

Bllsi. 



7705 LI 



80 



LIST OF LOCAL PREACHERS. 



Names. 



Puran Mai] 
Kanhai Lall 
Bundhir Singh 
Allan Jan 
Khamani 
Gulab Singh 
Jai Mai 
Cbbfddu Mall 
Baldeo Forshad 
Jukkhan Lall 
Robert Benjamin 

GaRHWAL DlSTIUCT. 

E. Thomson 
Kwankin 
Ghnngar Money 
C. Khiyali 
Sangrani Maui 
Andrlyas 
Bhajni 

Dban Singh 

Patras 

Dand 

GoNDA District. 

Lewis J. Mc(irt:e 
0. C. Richards 
Bud jha Singh 
John Hi^ginhothani 
Hbupal Singh 
Prom Drs 
Khandhari Singh. 
Lai Karan 
J. J. Todd 
NatthaMasih 
Frank A. Peters 
Isaac A. Birkett 
James Paul 

Hardoi Distbict. 

R. Turner 
Abdul Wahid 
Sadal Masih 
Chhote Lall 

C. L. Samuel 
Baldeo Pershad 
H, Andrew 

D. S. Paul 
B. Cornelius 
Gtirdiyal Singh 
Ram Gopal 
Nand Ram 
Misri Lall 
Mohan Nathan 

F. M. Lawrie 
J. Jonothan 
S. J. Shaw 
Chandan Dass 
VV. Peter Singh. 
J. W. McGregor 



Obdkbs. 



Local Preacher 



11 
II 

It 
It 
tt 
t« 
tt 
t» 
tt 



Elder, 1896 
1004 
1904 
1902 

Deacon, 1899 
Local Preacher 



•I 
tt 



t« 



tt 
ff 
tt 
tt 



Deacon, 1893 

1899 

189S 

1895 

Local Preacher 



tt 

tt 
tt 



It 

ti 

tt 



Deacon, 1904 



tt 
tt 
II 
i» 

tt 



II 
II 
•I 

tt 



Deacon, 1895 

1893 
1894 
1897 
1900 
„ 1900 

Local Preacher 

It 

Deacon, 1904 
Local Preacher 

It 
It 
tt 
tt 
tt 
t« 

Elder, 1889 



Appouttments. 



Dataganj. 

Bllsl. 

Dataganj. 

Bisauli. 

Bhamora. 

Bilst. 

Aonla. 

Binawar. 

Budaon. 

UJhani. 

UJhani. 



Paurl. 

Bungedhar. 

Lansdowne. 

Gadolt. 

Mandakhal. 

Bhawani. 

Kotdwara. 

Pauri. 

Dhekwall. 

Nandprlyag. 



Nanpara. 

Lachmanpur.Bahralch. 
Kauria, Gonda. 
Ellenpur „ 
Ikona, Bahraicb. 
Birpur „ 

Rupaidiha „ 
Gonda. 

Fakharpur, Bahraicb. 
Pachperwa. Gooda 
Bahraicb. 

ColonelganJ, Gonda, 
Mankapur ,| 



Sandi. 

Uardoi. 

Pibani. 

Ran jit Purwa. 

Tandiyaon. 

Unsangunj. 

Mallawan. 

Pibani. 

Sandila. 

Uardoi. 

Todarpur. 

Bawan. 

Manjbla. 

Bangarmau, 

Kudamau. 

Hardoi. 

Unao. 

Para. 

Rudamau. 

Rudaman. 



LIST OF LOCAL PRBACflEBS. 



81 



Names. 



Kpsrl Sinffh 
MalchaDd 

MOBADABAD DiSTBICT. 

Bala Dass 
Mauladad Khan 
Mohan Singh 
Nirmal Singh 
Manphul Singh 
Prabuu Dass 
Dalla Singh 
Lachman Singh 
Mathra Prashad 

C. S. Hunter 
B. Milton 
R. White 

P. S. Maurice 
Patras Singh 
S. Hastings 
Baldeo Prashad 
Thomas Jacob 
John Little 
Attah Ullah 
Buddha Singh 

D. C. Robinson 
William Gulab 
P. M. Dass 
John Net Ram 
Kashi Nath 
Samuel Smith 
Narain Dass 
Chirag Masih 
Munna Lai 
M. G. Hermit 
William Alexander 
S. S. Maurice 
Sukha Singh 
Ishrl Prashad 

B. Benjamin 
Mowashi Singh 
Marie Cutting 
Lllcha Singh 
Charan Snkh 
Ram Daval 
A. H. John 
Simon Lai 

OUDH DiSTBICT. 

W. A. Comfort 
Mangal Singh 
Qaisar 
Jiya Lai 
Jawahar Lai 
Ajndhja Pershad 
J. W. Norton 
Din Diyal 
N. Hamilton 
Boaz 

Kesho Lall 
Sharafuddin 
Sunder Lai 



Obders. 



Deacon, 1890 
Local Preacher 



Elder, 1893 

„ 1890 

1894 

1895 

Deacon, 1891 
1895 
1893 
1897 
1895 



t» 
I* 
II 
fi 
ft 
It 
n 



1901 
1902 
1902 



Local Preactor 



i« 
t» 
•» 
»» 

It 
•t 
tt 
tt 
ti 
tt 
tf 
«t 
t. 
»* 
tt 
•♦ 
It 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
It 
ti 
It 
tt 



It 
ti 
tt 
It 
II 



Deacon, 1893 
1894 
1894 
1807 
1899 
1899 
1894 
Local Preacher 

tt 

i» 

»» 

»t 

ft 



Appoibtmbnts. 



Pali. 
AchalgunJ. 



Moradabad. 

Shahpnr. 

Thakurdwara. 

Sharif pur. 

Pithkhera. 

Moradabad. 

Rajpnra. 

Rasulpur. 

Bahjoi. 

Rajubpnr. 

Babrala. 

Ainchola. 

Saundala. 

Moradabad. 

ti 
It 

Kashi pur. 

Gunnaur. 

Sambhal. 

Bilari. 

Chandausl. 

Machkhera. 
Bahjoi. 
Kundarki. 
Moradabad. 
tt 

Sam{)*hal. 

Gawan. 

Moradabad. 

Saindrl. 

Bairampur. 

Chandausi. 

Moghulpur. 
Moradabad. 
Babukhera. 
Hayat Nagar. 



Lucknow. 

Ataria. 

Lucknow. 

fhiri. 
atganj. 
Sitapur. 
Salon. 
Lucknow. 
It 

Lai dfanj. 

Dalmau. 

Laharpur. 



82 



.LIST OF LOCAL PREACHERS. 



Names. 



E. J. Joel 
H. O. Jacob 
W. E. Crawshaw 
Moti Lai 
P. L. Smart 
NanheLal 
Gur Sahae 
I. K. Mayal 
J. David 
C. L. Lambert 
G. Mayal 
B.:Todd 
J.Todd 
W. Gunsalvis 
Baldeo Singh 
Lazar (hir Dayal 
H. L. Matthews 
Dwarka Parshad 
Hhola Nath 
J. Barrow 
C. Robin 
Nand Lall 
Tika Ram 
Kiddu Singh 
Lachlmao Singh 
A. Briscoe 



••• 
••• 



PiLiBHiT District. 



Ase Ram. 
Kallu Singh 
Kaliyan Singh 
Girdhari Lall 
Motl Lall 
Qhasa Singh 
Ghasi Bam 
Jbabbu Lall 
P. John 
Sohan Lall 
A. Lincoln 
Bahadur Shah 
Baldeo Pershad 
Baljit 
Barnabas 
D. R. Rodgers 
Harsahae 
James Morgan 
Jhau Lall 
Karhc Mai 
Karhe Ram 
Khiyall Ram 
Rundan 
LachhmanI 
Moti Lall 
Munna Mahtab 
Narayan Singh 
S. A. Judson 
Mohan Singh 
Ram Sukh 
Emanuel Sukh 
7. William 



^■M 



Orders. 




APFOmTMENTS. 


Local Preacher 


Tllokpur. 


t* 




Harchandpur. 


}f 




Lucknow. 


ft 




Bahramghat. 


ti 




Sitapur. 


ti 




Naurangabad. 


• f 




FursatganJ. 


t • 




Lucknow. 


If 




Rae Baroill. 


tt 




SaadatganJ. 
Khalrabad. 


f 1 




) 1 




Jhakrasi. 


tf 




Khanmau Saralon. 


Deacon 




SataoQ. 


Local Preacher 


Ban. 


•* 

If 




• • 

Biswan. 


If 




Khalrabad. 


If 




Gola. 






Lucknow. 






Ma'rlaon. 


It 




Sidhauli. 


l« 




Muliamau. 


II 




Malihabad. 


»l 




Barabauki. 


Elder, 


1896 


Baherf. 


11 


1895 


Jahanabad. 


It 


1903 


Ram pur. 


»» 


1896 


Bisalpur. 


ft 


1894 


Bhojipura. 


Deacon 1 


1895 


Mlrganj. 


If 


1897 


Neoriya. 


If 


1897 


Puranpur. 


Elder, 


1893 


FatehganJ. 


1904 


Shahi. 


Local Preacher 


Pillbhit. 


fl 




B»irkhera. 


fl 




Sagalpur. 


If 




Siroull. 


If 




Ram pur. 


ff 




Nawabganj 


1* 




Stroull. 


If 




Shtshgarh. 


II 




Said pur. 


II 




Bilaspur. 


II 




Barkbera. 


II 




Bisalpur. 


II 




Nawabganj. 


II 




Dalelnagar. 


fl 




Basdharan. 


If 




Ram pur. 


II 




Miraupur. 


ti 




Pardboull. 


If 




MirganJ. 
Pillbhit. 


ff 




ft 




ft 


ft 




fl 



PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 



Bareilly-Ktiiiiaoii Diitrict. 

Rev. P.L. NeeLtD, Presiding Elder.— The progress of the kingdom of 
Christ on tbis part of the territory of th« earth among the z,Ot'0,000 
people has been marked by a decided strengthening of the stakes. 
The cords have not been lengthened, but there haa been a very pot- 
iceable extension among iwu-ClirUtians^ of spiritual Christian influ- 
ence. 

Several important castes or social circles have been inclined 
towards the Lord Jesus. There is a movement among the ThaJcurs. 
One was baptized and others are thinking and being visited. At the 
District Conference love-feast the one who was baptized said, ** I was 
in the fold of sin, Jesus took me out and put me in His own fold." 

The Chamars are being drawn steadily, and in one part of the 
district the Kurmia show signs of yielding. Hopeful signs are mani- 
fest among some Mohammedans in Shahjahnnpur. We continue our 
efforts on behalf of the Bliotias and the Tibetans, and although no 
fruit can be recorded in the statistical tables, yet much is being done 
towards changing their thoughts towards Christ, by conversation, 
preaching, and the sending of gospels amon^ them. 

I can notice that our work among the homes of the people is pro- 
ducing a marked effect. Families who were long very exclusive are 
beginning to welcome our women who go with the gospel. The increas- 
ing number of educated Christian girls who go out from our board- 
ing schools are proving a great power in dissolving old ideas of 
family-life. These girln often become the wives of native ministers 
and thus have an opportunity for wide usefulness among the back- 
ward women of the villages. This year I find that of the sixty -seven 
students of the Theological Seminary, there are tweuty-seven who are 
married to girls from our boarding schools. The spiritual influences 
are being felt and opposition is giving way. Much of this change 
is due to the direct efforts of our workers and much to the outpouring 
of God's .Spirit upon all His servants in all paru> of the world, 
giving them visions of the better age that is dawning. 

1. Development of Workers— Vcr those uow eugaged in village 
work we have held meetings in three centres, 8hahjanHt put , Dwara- 
hath i^nd Pithoragarh. The study of the Bible is the chief feature 
of these meetings. This • year we concentrated our thought upon the 
epistles to Titus and Philemon, and received mauy inspiring thoughts 
from Paul, that great Master-builder in the Church of God. 

It has been a jpleasure to see that some men have grown in apos- 
tolic spirit and m a willingness to grapple with the difficulties 
confronting us in the development of the Cnurch. This pleasure 
more than compensates for the grief at the dismal f^iilure of one of 
our men to measure up to expectations. 

2. Development of CArtsttan«.— The spiritual growth of our large 
Christian community of six thousand four hundred and forty-six 
people is a subject to which we gave much attention. The major- 
ity of these are from among the most depressed people of these 



ii PRESIDING ELDERS* REPORTS. 

upper provinces. They had from time immemorial regarded them- 
selves as without the rights and privileges of ordinary people, and 
they had settled down to their fate. More than one-half or our 
Christian community are from these people and without constant 
watch, care and fitimulus from the Mission worlsers, they lapse into their 
old condition of life. They do not live together in lar^e groups where 
they can be assembled for regular preaching, but live in over five 
hundred widely scattered villages in groups of from seven to eight 
persons, or an average of two families to each village centre. This 
isolated condition requires us to solve two difficulties. (I) To coun- 
teract the overwhelming deteriorating influences of the community in the 
midst of which their circumstances compel them to live, (v!) To develop 
in them the idea of a Christian Society or (Jhurch of which they may 
be a part. The laclc of this idea maizes it difficult, under the circum- 
stances, to organize them into self-governing churches. We must 
determine to stand by them until these ideas are developed. There 
are two effective lines on which we are working at this two-fo)d problem. 
(I) Through the small circuit system, and (2) through our melaa at Dis- 
trict Conferences. 

Our village Christians are gradually becoming accustomed to 
look for the regular visit of the Mission preacher, and thus their ideas 
of a group of Christians in a circle of villages under a pastor is 
•lowlv being developed- 

The visits of the villagers to our larger gatherings at camp meet- 
ings or rntHas are helping them to apprehend the larger idea of a 
Christian community with a cult or life of its own. Their faith is 
greatly strengthened by participation in the ' Move-feast " at tnela 
time. 

3. Institutions*— The schools within this district are a tower of 
strength to our whole work, not only within the North India Conference 
but throughout nearly all of India. 

The Ideological ^'emi/'ary at Bareilly with its three departments 
of men's school, women's school and kindergarten, under Doctor 
and Mrs. Scott, has furni-^hed nearly all of the most successful native 
ministers in our various conferences in lodia. Men who have been 
held steadily to higher standards of ethics, to profound systematic 
Biblical thought for three years, as a rule, exert a much stronger in- 
fluence in their circuits — manage their work better, and grow in 
spiritual understanding more rapidly than men who have not had 
such advantages. 

Our Oak Opening^s High School at Naini Tal for English and Anglo- 
Indian boys and young men has had a prosperous year. Eighty stu- 
dents have been in attendance. The educational results have been bet- 
ter than ever. In the special services held by Mr. R. T. Archibald, a 
number were converted, and a deep interest in spiritual things is notice- 
able among the boys. The floancial condition is stesdily improving. 
We have a splendid property and location. Dr. Butcher and Mrs. 
Butcher are throwing themselves into this work in a way that will in 
a few years make this a strong institution. $50,000 put into this 
■cbool now would yield, to the one investing it, a most abundant har- 
vest in the future. 

The WeUesley High School for girls at Naini Tal, under Miss Easton 
and Miss Sellers, has also had a good year of work, and the religious 
tone of the school is noticeably good. 

The large Oirls^ Orphanage in Bareilly^ under the care of Miss 
English, continues to do excellent work, and has two hundred and 
sixty-five Christian ^irls under training 

The Woman^s Dispensary ^ under Miss Dr. Lewis, has treated more 
than twenty-two thousand patients, and Miss Lewis feels the need of 
more help to meet the increasing demands for medical aid. 



BARBILLY-KDMAON DISTRICT. HI 

The Baya^ Orphdruige at Shaf^ahanpury under Brother Blackstock, 
has one hundred and twenty boys who are being trained in book- 
learning, and many are taught iDdustries. In the Industrial Depart- 
ment we have weaving, shoe-making, carpeoteriog, blaoksmithing, 
tailoring, building^, farming, and gardening. 

The Bidwell Memorial tScJujol fur girls at Shahjahanpur, under Miss 
Organ, has ninety Christian girls who are getting most excellent 
teaching and preparation for life. About forty of these girls come 
from the Christian farming village of Panahpur, and through these 
girls much is being done to hold these people steady in their allegi- 
ance to the Ijord Jesus. 

The Lower Middle School for Boys at Dwarahath has eighty boys, 
of which number twenty-five are Christians ; through tMs and the 
Lower Middle Qirls' School^ witb twenty-five Christian girls under the 
Misses Seymour, we are holding a doaiinating Christian influence in 
a centre of a population of probably not less than forty thousand 
people. 

At Pithoragarli Miss Sullivan has chaige of the OirU* School ^ 
Woman^s Home^ and she also looks after the Uoys^ Boarding School. 

Miss Budden bus the Evangelistic Work and the I' raining Sdiool 
for Bible-women with twenty-one women under excellent training. 

The above institution are all well located in the five large strate- 
gic centres of work in the districr, viz., Baieilly, Shahjahanpur, 
Naini Tal, Dwarahath and Pitborrgarh. We have two thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-ci^ht pupils in our schools, of which number one 
thousand and twenty-six aie Christians, and if we add the sixty-even 
Theological btudents with the forty-nine women in the Woman's 
School and the twenty in the Kindergarten with Miss Budden's 
twenty-one women in ihe Training School, we have a total of ooe 
thousand one hundred and eighty-three Christian young people under 
instruction, which is more than one- fifth of the number of Christians 
in the district. I'his leaves one thousand seven hundred and fifteen 
non-Christians who are in our schools and more or less under the 
influence of their Chrihtian teachers and Christian schoolmates. 

The numerical growth is not large, doubtless owing to conservative 
feelings begotten by the recent financial shrinkage. The District has 
lost two missionaries from the list of active workers, and the native 
work has to be run on Rs 5,070 a year less than it was receiving in 
the year 1900. Steady courage on the part of all our workers and 
the assumption of personal responsibility during these trying times 
has enabled us thus far to hold our centres in the hope of soon being 
reinforced. 

We have had two hundred and fifty-eight baptisms, which is an 
increase of thirty -eight over last year. 

Our Christian community now numbers six thousand four hundred 
and forty- eight, which is an increai^e of one hundred and forty-eigkt 
over last year. 

The number of Sunday School scholars last year was eight thous* 
and eight hundred and twenty-nine ; this year nine thousand five hund* 
red and thirty, which is an increase of seven hundred and one scholars. 

We have fifty more pupils in our schools than we had a year ago« 

The Outlook, — My faith in the Lord Jesus, my hope that the revi« 
val of missionary interest in the home churches may bring us reinforce- 
ments of foreign missionaries, the manifest purpose of my comrades 
and colleagues to remain faithful to the work of making Jesus known 
to the world, all conspire to help me to a vision of the time when this 
whole district shall be filled with Christian life and teaching as Jeru- 
salem was filled with His life and teaching by the preaching of tbo 
Apostles after Pentecost. 



iV PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

Bijnor District. 

Rev. W. a. Manskll, PnmHiuj Elder. -Aoothor yearof patient 
toil for the Ma-terin Bijnor district ha^ closed ; the year's record is an 
encouraging ooe. The workers in the nine circuits of this district 
have been, on the whole, faithful and earnest in their labours. There is 
an encouraging increase along all lines, except that of schools. It 
is impossible to make much advance in school work as such uotil we 
can have some funds to be expanded for education. There is at the 
present time no money at all apeat fo- schools as such by the Mis- 
sionary Society in this district. The forty boys* schools reported 
in the statistics, are with one exceution elementary classes in villages 
where Christians live, which are taught for tw«) or three days a week 
bv pastor-teachers who have pastoral oversight of from six to twelve 
Villages apiece. The one exception ii^ a primary school at Bijnor, 
which we have recently est.ihlished and which has two teachers who 
devote their whole tlmo to teaching. But this sch<»ol is partly sup- 
ported by 1 "cal sabscriptioD-* from the oHieijils of Bijnor, and partly 
by a (special gift from Kcv. J. VV. Mason of [udcpondence, Kansas 

We are continually impressed with the importance of good 
schools us a part of mi^sionury wo.-k when w< meet with intelligent 
Government oflioials who are uciuaed by Christian principles and a 
sympathetic courtesy in their dealings with cases thut concern us, 
and learn in almost every instauce tttat tbev have been students of 
Mission schools. The old Mission School in Kijnor has exerted a 
deep and lasting influence on the character of many who are now 
holding responsible positions about us, and it is a source of constant 
grief to pass the splendid building, once the Mission Church and 
school, and to know that in its crowded class-rooms as a Govercment 
school, the teaching of religion is rigorously excluded. We 
sincerely hope that the future may yet see a strong and flourishing 
school undei' Christian control in Bijnor, for we believe that it would 
be a real blessing to the community at large as well as to our own 
Christian congregation. 

The Girls' Boardin? School at Bijnor, under the superintendence 
of Mrs. Mansell, has had another successful year, winning a commenda- 
tory rer>ort from tlie t^ovornment Inspectress aud earning a slight 
increase in Govornmont grant-in-aid. 

There have been two hundred and thirty-three baptisms during the 
year, a considerable advance over last year, for which we are very 
thankful. There have been no marked openings in any particular 
class, but the indications are still very promising for a large inga- 
thering in the near future from among the Chamars. Much faitmul 
work has been done among these people in the years that are past. 
Again and again a few have been gathered in, but the work has not 
been permanent. There are scores of villages where the Chamars 
seem all but ready to embrace Christianity in a body. These would 
not be ** hasty baptisms " if they were to be received now, for they 
have long been under instruction. This condition prevails not only 
in this district but in neighbouring districts as well. Our workers are 
hopeful and watchful, and confidently expecting the harvest. 

But we must not base our hopes of success on any single class of 
tiie population. Our efforts must be directed to all castes and classes, 
and this we have tried to do in Bijnor. Basaar preaching has been 
systematically carried on, and many hopeful signs have followed our 
preaching. Two large mtlas or fairs occur annually at Daranaggar* 
a village on the banks ut the Ganges, seven miles from Bijnor. At 
both of these the gospel has been preached and the scriptures aad 
tracts distributed. 



BIJNOR DISTRICT. V 

One of these melas is nominally a (gathering of low-caste people, 
although large numbers of caste, Hindus and Mohammedans also 
attend. The occasion for the mela is the gathering of a few low-caste 
religious devotees who by a species of whirling dance throw them- 
selyes into a sort of frenzy, and in this semi -unconscious state which 
succeeds, they claim to possess powers of divination. They are called 
lihagats and surrounded by a class of faithful attendants^, usually 
carrying a coloured standard on a tali pole surmounted with peacock 
feathers ; they move from place to place, always followed by crowds 
who come to get special aid in sickness, or as^^istance in the recoverv 
of lodt property, and similar cases of need. There are scores of such 
hhagats in the mela^ each holding his own particular court. Sometimes 
even high-caste Hindus may be seen paying homage to these men, 
receiving on their bared shoulders the stroke of the scourge of iron 
chains which the attendants of the bhagat wield. Formerly large num- 
bers of our baptized Cht istians used to attend this fair and miogle 
with the crowds of sightseers and worshippers, and not a few would 
join the fiiUowers of the hhagatH 

We Wore especially pleased this year to note a marked decrease 
in the number of Christians at the mela ; indeed, as a class, they were 
practically absent. 

We visited Hardwar in company with Brother Core and a band 
of workers, on the occasion of tbie great Coomb mela. In spite of the 
bigotry and active opposition of the priests we were able tu do con- 
siderable preaching, and disposed of a good number of tracts and 
gospels. 

The work among the baptized Christians, which is still our first 
care, occupied much of our time during the year. We spent fully 
three months out in the villages, teaching, preaching, and holding 
special services utnigh . That the work has paid is evidenced by the 
improvement in the spititual life of our Chri-tians already noticeable, 
but which, we believe, is only a beginning. We have stated in previ- 
ous reports that several years of continuous labor along these definite 
lines will be needed before any marked difference may be apparent. 
But already in a number of ways definite improvement may be noted. 
We have already mentioned one— the small number of Christians 
attending the Daraoaggar mela. Two or three other illustrations 
may be given as showing a trend in the right direction. 

At Mandawar we were much pleased with the earnest spirit which 
prevailed in a mohalla of sweeper Christians. These Christians 
nave for their pastor-teacher a young man from their own number 
who devotes himself faithfullv to their interests. They show the 
results of faithful pastoral work by the fact that there is no idolatrous 
altar or symbol in their mohalla. Early this year some young men 
who had come under the influence of non-Christian sweepers in another 
mohalla, banded together and decided to erect an altar to Lai Beg. 
The Christians in Purra heard of it, however, and immediately call^ 
a council, and said to the young men : '* We have been so long free 
from all idolatry here that we will not brook your proposing any- 
thing of the sort.'' They fined the young men, and, after a public 
reproof, dismissed the council. It is needless to say the altar was not 
erected. 

These same Christians have now for two years refused to beat the 
drums for the Holi festival, although this is one of the hereditary 
occupations of the sweepers, and for this service they get annually an 
allowance of country sugar and the cast-off winter clothing of their 
employers. We have tried to get our Christians to voluntarily give 
up this practice, but with poor success, as the people in their extreme 
poverty are unwilling to give up this addition to their slender means 
of subsistence. The Purra people, however, have made the standi a^il 



PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

this year they were surprised to find that their Hindu employers and 
landlords noting their absence sent a liberal allowaoce of sugar by 
their own servants with the message, ** You did not come for your per- 
quisite?:, we are therefore sending them to you.'' Thus does God 
honour faithfulness. 

In Kiratpur, the Preacher-in-charge had for several years, in 
noting the condition of the Christians, reported that there was still 
considerable iutemperance among them, but that he was unremitting 
in his elTorts to effect an improvement in this particular. It was 
therefore a distinct encouragement this year to learn that when the 
Government excise oHio«rs were planning to open a liquor shop in the 
vicinity of this niohalla^ the Christians entered a vigorous protest, 
«and when a vote wab taken to finally decide whether the shop should 
be opened, a large majority voted again^t it, and the shop was not 
opened. Three or four years ago sued an outcome would have been 
an impossibility. 

The progress in the line of self-support has been very encourag- 
ing IMiis di-'trict is popu'arly known a^ the *' hunorry zillah," becaus<e 
of the poverty of the people, and the Christians being fpcra the 

foorest of the poor, it, is not surprising that progres'i should be slow, 
t is only a hhort tiik!«- that stress has been l:iid (>n contributions from 
all, rich and poor. We still hear the excuse from those who are 
urged t> contribute ** Why, in former days, we used to receive aid from 
the Mission, and now do you ask us for collections V We are too poor 
to give." But our workers are not turned aside, uast year we received 
about fifty rupees for pastoral support from non-employds, this year 
seventy-five. A half doz«3n years a(?o nothing was realized on this 
account. All the collections sho^r a healthy increase. Apart from 
the Parker Memorial Fund the benevolent collections were one 
hundred rupees last year ; this year they were one hundred and thir- 
teen rupees. 

The En<2:lidh service referred to in our last report has been held 
this year as occasion offer d, and the local contributions from the 
English residents have been generous. Kuw-^r Har Bans Singh (has 
again sent a donation of one hundred rupees for the poor of the 
district. vVe desire to thank all these friends for their practical in- 
terest in our work, and also the friends in America who have continued 
toeir special gifts to help us to carry on ih«3 work as well as those who 
have this year begun to contribute. But f>>r this timely help mlich 
of the work now carried on would have had to be abandoned, and the 
new workers added to our force would not have been a possibility. 

The District. Conference and Workers' Institute lasting in all three 
and a half weeks was held this year at Bijuor during October and 
November, and was an occasion of great blessing and profit to all. 
The daily evening services wore largely attended by non-Christians in 
Government and official services, and at a public temperance meeting 
the head Maulvi of the Mohammedan community of Bijnor tooic part, 
reading a forcible address on total abstinence. An atmosphere of faith 
and hope pervaded all the meetings, and our workers left for their 
varioiis stations in good spirit, and looking forward to still greater 
blessing and a more definite advance in the year to come. 



BttdaHit District* 

Rev. Joseph U. Gill, PveRidin<j JSWer.— Budaun, which last 
year was connected with Moradabad, was, during 1903, again made 
into a district bv itself, but not exactly with the civil district boun- 
daries, it contains (9) nine separate circuits, namely, Budaun, Bilsi, 



BUDAUN DISTRICT. vii 

Bisauli, Bhamora, Binawar, Dataganj, Kakrala, Ujhani and Aonla. 
The population exceeds one million. Each circuit has an ordained 
native preacher-in-charge, all but two of whom are elders. 

The residence of the Presiding Elder was, owing to the great 
scarcity of missionaries, fixed in Bareilly, where additional duties 
were assigned him. He has tried his best to fulfil the duties belong- 
ing to both places and (except during the excessive heat of June) 
has visited Budaun every month in the year, spending ninety-five 
days out of the year in the Budaun district. 

Access to Budaun city is, from Bareilly, partly by rail and 
partly by ordinary country road. The railroad takes one for 19 
miles to Aonla, and thence a beautiful road well shaded by an avenue 
of trees leads to Budaun city 19 miles more. A more direct route is 
now surveyed and work has begun on a railroad direct from Bareillv 
to Budaun. In a couple of years more travelling will be much 
easier and cheaper. The several circuits lie on all sides of the city 
and are reached by roads which branch away like the spokes of a 
wheel, the distances to a circuit head-quarters varying from 8 to 24 
miles. Each circuit head-quarters is again the centre of a group of 
smaller sub-circuits. 

The country is largely agricultural, with some jungle intersperf^ed. 
The land is well under cultivation. Rice, wheat, barley, millet, pulse, 
with hemp and cotton are raised. There are no manufacturing centres. 
A little country cloth is made. Ordinary unglazed pottery suitable for 
home consumption is plenty. Bricks are manufactured, but the mass 
of the people live in huts made of mud and thatched with straw. Tile 
roofs are also common. 

We have nine thousand nine hundred and thirty-eight Christians. 
During the year one hundred and twenty-six deaths occurred. In 
the same period three hundred and ninety-five baptisms took place. 
The Christians are scattered over eight hundred and eleven villages. 
Preachers and pastor-teachers keep moving among them with more or 
less faithfulness, and a diary is furnished each worker in which he 
records his work. These diaries are occasionally inspected, and 
during District Conference thoroughly examined by a committee. 

Both preachers and people are poor in this world's ^oods. I 
have an ordained man who with his wife receiveB only rupees eleven per 
mensem, and they have seven children. This man is a most energetic 
and useful minister. If he would work at his trade (making shoes), 
be could earn one rupee every day of the month. This man can cer- 
tainly not be charged with embracing the Christian religion simply 
for worldly gain. Our workers receive small pay, and several of 
them know the meaning of the word *' self-sacrifice.'' 

The gospel among us has not yet gained many converts among 
wealthy people. So the material out of which to make a strong self- 
supporting church has not been acquired. There is no doubt that 
the people whom we have gathered are in God's sight as good as 
any other, and the classes from which they come are as moral as 
those of greater pretensions, but the lack of early training and the 
lack of worldly comfort make them less forward than they ought to 
be. 

Our God Jehovah who created order where there had been confu- 
sion before, and who made beautiful the earth which before had been 
without form and void, has taken in hand these depressed classes, 
and under His Divine touch they have in signal instances become 
true and beautiful and good While there are among our people a 
multitude who have no acquaintance with books, there are some who 
show a love for and a decided attachment to the Bible. In our 
love-feasts it is very common to see them rise in their places with an 
open Bible in hand and read a chosen verse of Scripture illustrating 



Viii PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

their experience or their desires. Many have learned that it is a 
treasare. 

A licensed native preacher, during our recent District Conference, 
failed to satisfy the Committee of Examination. He had never had 
school advantages. I doubt whether he can read at all, and yet he 
was there to give examination in the four larger prophets— Isaiah, 
Ezekiel, Jeremiah and Daniel. He is well Icnown as a most devout 
man and very useful, having a custom of accompanying hispreacher- 
in-charge in his tours. When the announcement was made that Uie 
committee would not pass him, there was a short sileoce which was 
broken by a brother who rose and stated that this man could repeat 
from memory large portions of the Bible. The presidents of the 
Conferenceput him to the test, and he began to repeat John's Gospel 
by heart. We listened, greatly surprised and pleased, while he went on 
and on till we really had no time to spend longer, aud he 
only stopped when we asked him to do so. At many a humble fire- 
side this village pastor in the accent of his own people entertains 
and profits his humble hearers with the more than golden words of 
the disciple whom Jesus loved. When told he must appear for 
examination again next year, he meekly and readily said he would 

do BO. 

One preacher was expelled during the year. Four workers were 
lost to us by his fall. One preacher-in-charge, Govind Ram, of 
venerable appearance, holy life and sweet disposition, was transferred 
to the Church triumphant. With tears streaming down his face he 
testifled to his faith in Jesus and his readiness to exchange earth for 
heaven. He was a true itinerant and had been instrumental in the 
baptism, during his labours, of ^reat numbers of people. 

Aggressive work is only possible between the months of September 
and ^lay, the four hottest months being a time to endure the climate, 
and yet at no time has the work ceased. The preachers-in-charge are 
all trained men who have a fair conception of the duties and responsi- 
bilities of a pastor and preacher. 

At our District Conference we met together in the Church four 
times daily for a week, that is, at sunrise, at 10 a.m., at 3 p.m., and 
at 6-30 P.M., and had committee meetings and enquiry meetings 
occasionally between times ; and sometimes meetings were coniinued 
in private after the larger congregation was dismissed. Some profess- 
ed conversion and many were blessed with a spiritual uplift. Several 
heathen altars were reported to have been oroken down during the 
year. 

It was reported that there are as many as nineteen Christian men 
among our village Christians who have more than one wife, which of 
course is a state of things which we greatly deplore; but the same was 'not 
unknown in apostolic times ; and we pray for light and guidance to deal 
with these cases so that the sin may be put away and the sinner saved. 
As many as eighty -four marriages are reported among our village 
Christians without Christian rites, and fifteen marriages were solem- 
nized with Christian rites. This subject, too, demands patient study and 
line-upon-line teaching. We have left Egypt, but some of the old 
customs cling to us. Both at funeral and marriage ceremonies our 
more enlightened people recognize their Christian pastors and call for 
their presence, but many converts find it hard to break away from the 
influence of their heathen relatives. However, we are making progress. 

Our preachers and exhorters numbered fifty-eight at District 
Conference. The Woman's Conference had about as many, and they 
met for business separately, but joined with us in public services, 
where our large congregation numbered two hundred and fifty in- 
cluding other Christians. Including the several simultaneous services 
in the city on Sunday we had about five hundred in the congregations 



finl>AttN DISTRICT. 

that day. At this writlnt^we are completiogr a church at Datagan] 
which will cost over five hundred rupees. We have Immediate need of 
four similar churches, where there is noDe now. Plealizln^ this need 
the matter was stated to one of our congregations in Budaun, when 
a humhle brother rose aud said, *' I wtll give one rupee to- 
wards building one of the needed churches.'' ^obr dy had any plan 
to talce up a collection just then ; but this generous offer from a poor 
man brought rupees forty before the meeting was over. In this sum 
a ffreat number of small sums are represented. At once a church 
bunding society was proposed and formed with president, secretary 
and treasurer. Starting with this forty rupees as a beginning, they 
propose to keep up subscribing and building till the four needed 
churches are completed. The first was voted to the village of Ujhani. 
There are one thousand one hundred and seven Christians in that cir- 
cuit and no church building. The collections of the year have been 
as follows : — 

Rs. 

Self-support (pastoral ministerial) ... ... ... 614 

Missions ..• .*• ... ... ... 44 

Woman's Foreign Missionary Society ... ... 29 

Bible Society ... ... ... ... 13 

Tract Society ••. ... ... ... ... 5 

Sunday School Union ... ... ... ... 17 

Children's Day ... ... ... ... 20 

Government Grant to Schools ... ... ... 1,029 

New Church Building ... ... ... ... 40 

Every circuit is represented in the sum of rupees six hundred and 
fourteen raised for pastoral support, and frr m this sum one man is 
supported in whole or in part by the funds of each circuit itself. 

The appropriations of the Missionary Society were insufficient to 
meet the pay of the worlcers needed to shepherd the people. Either 
a number of men had to be dismissed or funds for their support 
raised privately. The former presiding elder handed me a sum of 
money to partly meet this need and other sums have come in during 
theyear making what we call a supplementary fund, and thus avoiding 
the necessity of dismissing anybody. Were it not for this, the 
work would have suffered. As it is even now several of <'Ur workers 
have two sub-circuits to care for, although one is all they can uo 
well. 

The rain-storm of October 8th and 9th did great damage to our 
property in several places, and extra funds are urgently needed to 

Jirevent hardship to our workers in furnishing them shelter for their 
ami lies. 

The boys' school in Budaun has done well during the year. 
Among the larger Christian youths a restlessness exhibited itself a 
short time ago. They are well taught and well housed, and well fed 
and had no known cause for leaving, and yet three of the biggest boys 
in a spirit of adventure ran away, giving notice that they would do 
so. Seeing they are sons of preachers and ought to have known 
better, we refused to take them back though urged to do so, else we 
could keep no discipline in the school. My opinion is that the remedy 
for this is putting the entire body of Christian youth to industrial 
work ; otherwise they cannot appreciate the value of the money spent 
on them. How to combine instruction in books and satisfy Government 
rules as to hours in school, and at the same time to find funds and 
teachers for our industrial department, is a problem yet to be solved. 
We have at present a good spirit and good conduct to report among 
our remaining boys. 



It PRESIDING ELDEBS' REPORTS. 

I omit mention of the woman's work, for it will be reported 
separately. Miss Wilson oame and left during^ the year. Ber work is 
ffreatly appreciated. Miss Wright came and stayea, and is doing well 
for the girls' school and building additional dormitories for the girls. 
In the funds for this we are indebted to Mr. Siller, of Los Angeles, 
who meets the expense of these extra and needed ouildings. 

In conclusion, the work in Budaun district is full of interest. [ 
have not spoken of the Epwurth Leagues, of which one chapter is 
reported in each circuit with a grand total of over three hundred mem- 
berships. We have in our Sunday-schools four thousand and fifty -two 
pupils. The different circuits report a total of four hundred and 
eignty-four inquirers. 

An open door is before us. I preached in a mohalla in Sahiswan, 
where the preacher said, tbe entire rtwlialla is Christian. When i 
compare this with the time Dr. T. J. Scott laboured in Budaun and 
hear from him of his expectation and prayer that he might live to 
see two hundrted Christians converted and now that tbe number has 
reached ten thousand, surely we ought totbanic God and take courage 



earbwal District. 

Rkv. J.H. Messmore, Presiding Elder.^The editor of the Mission- 
ary Society's report has asked for general vie^s of our work. If he will 
climb to the top of the hill behind the Mission House at Pauri, the 
head- quarters of the district, he will be more than seven thousand feet 
above the sea, and in a good position to get a general view of the 
Oarhwal district, though ratner a superficial view of the work. 
Southward the view is bounded by an oak-covered ridge, three marches 
distant. Phis is Lansdowne, a military cantonment for native troops, 
and the head-quarters of the Lansdowne circuit, which reports fifty -two 
probationers, forty full members, and seventy-six baptized children, 
with a mission staff of eight persons, men and women, working in 
three different stations. Sastward the view is bounded by a range of 
hills eight thousand feet high, on the further side of this ridge, thirty 
miles from Pauri, lies Kainur, the head-quarters of the Kainur circuit, 
which reports five probationers, twelve full members and ten baptized 
children, with a mission staff of eleven persons, working in four differ- 
ent stations. A number of small stations are in the valleys between 
Kainur and Pauri, forming the Dhikwali circuit, which reports 
eighty-nine probationers, sixty-three full members, one hundrea and 
twenty-seven baptized children and a mission staff of thirty-two per- 
sons, working in nine different stations. Northward the Himalaya, 
more than fifty miles distant in an air-line, and one hundred and twenty 
by road, bound the vision : and somewhere among the mighty furrows 
which lead down to the valley of the Upper Ganges, lies Ramnee, the 
head-quarters of that circuit, which reports twelve probationers, seven 
full members, fourteen baptized children and a mission staff of nine 
persons, working in two stations. 

Ramnee is far up the side of a great mountain, and is seven mar- 
ches from Pauri. If flying machines were as common and as cheap 
as hill ponies, it would be a simple matter to supervise the 
work of the district. But we are of the earth earthly, tied down to 
earth ; and the presiding elder must spend many days on the road 
1/ ha would visit the circuits of his district. It is impossible to do 



OARHWAL DISTRICT. zi 

the work without a large expenditure of time and money. The presid- 
ing elder cannot move rapidly, for his daily progress is measured by 
the locomotive powers of the coolies who carry his tent, his bed and 
bedding, his food, his kitchen and the other et ceteraSf whieh habits of 
civilization make necessary. As the presiding elder has neither time 
nor money for travelling over his district, his work of supervision 
is mainly done bv correspondence and in the quarterly conferences 
and annual district conference. 

At the District Conference, held at Pauri, October 20th— 26th, 1903, 
thirty-f our men and forty-four women were appointed to work in the 
twenty stations which form the five circuits composing the district. 
These seventy-eight persons represent the present mission staff em- 
ployed on the district. Thirty -eight baptisms are reported for the 
year, fifteen being of non-Christian adults. The number of inquirers 
reported, is above fifty. The Viceroy's visit to the region about Ram- 
nee brought hundreds of people to the place ; and for many days the 
zealouH and efficient brother stationed there, improved the opportunity 
for evangelistic work. The Lansdowne Circuit staff carried on a 
successful campaign in the cold season among the villages at the 
foot of the mountains which brought in several converts. The pre- 
valence of cholera in many parts of the district interfered with our 
work very much, for at such times strict quarantioe is enforced. At 
Kainur the person who had received from Government medicines for 
cholera patients, fled in terror, and his duties were performed by the 
native minister there. Such incidents leave an impression which is 
a preparation for receiving the gospel with an open mind. 

Unfortunately the lack of the open mind is evident everv where. 
There is so much difference between the ideals of Christian civilization 
and the customs of the people here, that at times their acceptance of 
Christianity seems hopeless. At the District Conference, a native 
minister, speaking of certain persons who had been for a lon^ time in 
contact with Christian teaching, remarked that they would never 
become Christians, '* Why do you say this ? *' a^ked the presiding elder. 
The reply came : ** Because they are unwilling to give up the practice 
of selling their daughters." As three-fourths of the farmwork in this 
purely agricultural country is done by the women, a stout girl is 
a valuable industrial a<iset, aud her pureDts expect a good round 
sum of money in payment for their daughter when they give her in 
marriage. There is nothing essentially immoral in the custom ; but 
it is not accordiog to the ^tandards of v^^estern Christian civilization; 
and as missionaries have nut yet learned to properly distinguish 
between Christianity and Western Christian civilization, the differ- 
ence of social ideas in East and West becomes an insuperable barrier 
to the progress of the gospel. 

Within the past five years there has been a decrease of more 
than twenty per cent, in the missionary appropriations to the Garh- 
wal district. A reduction of nearly one-fourth of the income involves 
other reductions ; the result is seen in the reduced number of workers, 
in fewer schools, a smaller number of Christian boys in the orphan- 
age and in a smaller Christian commuoity. In spite of all theories 
of Mission work, the undeoiable fact remains that much of our work 
is propped up by Missionary Society money, and when the prop 
is removed, the inevitable follows. The local collections on the dis- 
trict are three times larger than they were five years ago ; but as 
nearly every penny of this money comes from Mission employes, 
Native and European, this progress is oot to be interpreted as an 
advance in the direction of self-support. The first step towards that 
goal has not yet been takeu. 

During the year the Pauri Anglo-vernacular school has received 
conditional high school recognition from the £;ducational Depart- 



3di PRESIDING ELDBRS' REPORTS. 

ment, and in March 1904 a class will be sent up for the Matriculation 
examination of the Allahabad University, ^he only male mission- 
ary OD the district gives a large part of bis time to teaching in this 
school, which is at present our chief agency for reaching Uie Hindus 
of Garnwal. 



eonaa Dl$(rict. 

Rev. Wm. Psters, Presiding Elder.— Another year of the 
Lord's service has passed. I commenced touring in the month of 
February, and within two and a half months I travelled over two 
hundred and sixty miles, visiting the preachers and the Christians of 
different places, helping and advising them, besides holding revival 
meetings among them. These meetings proved very refreshing to the 
Christians and along with them the non-Christians of those villages 
learned something of the Christian religion. 

The Workers' meetings and the Summer School were held during 
April and proved very beneficial, spiritually and intellectually ; and 
women as well as men learned in these meetings. 

The plague has been a great hindrance in our work this year, as 
many of our workers had to leave their stations and those who re- 
mained at their posts found the towns and villages quite deserted, 
and thus had none left whom they might teach. It is a mercy that 
none of our Christians have died of this disease yet. We pray that 
Providence may Iceep Bis workers free from this malady, so that His 
work may be carried on better afterwards. 

Besides this we had such severe rains this year, that thousands 
of houses were destroyed and cattle washed away. Many villages 
that were situated near the banks of rivers have been entirely wiped 
out of existence, nod along with these our poor Christians near the 
borders of Nepaul have been the greatest sufferers. 

In every circuit there have been some baptisms and a number 
of people have received new life. There are numerous enquirers in 
nearly all the placet*, and it is hoped they will soon come to the fold of 
Christ. 

On looking into the progress of the last four years, I find an 
addition of five hundred and sixty-four to our Christian community, 
but there has been a decrease of nine preachers, seven schools and 
seven teachers, and one hundred and sixty-three deaths have occurred 
amongst us. Contributions for benevolent purposes and collections 
for pastoral support have increased five per cent, per annum, while 
the Sunday Schools acd the Epworth League have nearly doubled in 
numbers. 

We hope and pray the Lord to glorify His work in this district 
and grant us His grace to work more zealously for Him in future. 



l)araol District. 

Rev. Samuel Tuppsr, Presiding Elder.—Though the plague was 
exceedingly severe for several months in half of my district, during 
which period the worlsers changed from one place to another and lived 
in mango groves for several weeks, still it was a year of quiet work 
and of steady progress. With here and there an exception, tiie men 
and women who compose the staff of workers have been faithful to 
their work. 



HARDOI DISTRICT. zUi 

I have visited every circuit, and most of the sub circuits twice, 
thrice, four aud five times this year, and held meetings in conjunction 
with quarterly conferences, and all who attended were c^reatly blessed. 

The numerical strength of our Church is four hundred and seven- 
teen full members, seven hundred and sixty-four probationers and 
four hundred and nine children, making a total of one thousand five 
hundred and ninety. The number of baptisms this year is one hun- 
dred and forty-nine. 

This year we collected five hundred and fifteen rupees from the 
churches for pastors, and the total amount collected in this district 
was nine hundred and thirty-six rupees. 

There are seventy-seven Sunday-schools, where four thousand 
eight hundred and thirty-seven scholars receive religious instruction. 
Christian and non-Christian scholars of all ages attend these Sabbath 
schools willingly. In some Sunday-Schools we give tickets and 
pictures, in some Children's papers, and in some '* reories *' (pieces 
of sweets). 

In Hardoi district there are thirty-three day-schools, with eight 
hundred and twcDty-three pupilt^. Most of these schools are Holmes' 
schools, supported by Mr. John G. Holmes, of Pittsburg, Pa., U. S. A. 
There are about three lakbs of Chamars in this district, and most of 
the schools are among Chamars, and these non-Christians appreciate 
the schools v^ry much. In some schools the non-Chrisiian pupils 
recite the Lord's Prayer, the Ten Commandments and the Apostles' 
Creed so well, and sinsr our '* Bhajans " so heartily, that it almost 
seems as if all of them were Christians. Great good is being done in 
the district by these Holmes' schools. 

The summer school could not be held owing to severe plague. 
There are seven chapters of the Epworth League in the district and 
the number of members is two hundred and fifty-six. These chapters 
are very helpful to all the workers, for the ready workers' bands 
connected with the Epworth League go out in villages with Hindu- 
stani music and help the preachers. 

A new church, under the name of Butler's Chapel, has been built 
in Sandi circuit this year. 

The Christian zamindar, Mr. William Peter Sing, son of the late 
Mr. Wazir Sing (Khair-kbwah Sarkar), of Kudamao, has made over 
a big hall to the Mission for a chapel. This hall was consecrated 
as a chapel in October last. 

The Hardoi Girls' School has made excellent progress. There 
are sixty girls in school and four day-scholars, with eight women in 
the training school. It is in conjunction with the Holmes' school. 
Ten girls are being supported by their fund. 

Most of our Christians observe the Sabbath. In two places the 
day-labourers lay by the preacher ooe pice a day, every one of 
them, for six days, to use the amount for Sunday. 

The last flood tumbled down some Mission houses and walls in 
this district, and great damage was done. The Lord will provide. 

There was mda preaching also in most places, and thus thou- 
sands heard the gospel and believed in heart. 

There are two great needs of this district, one is a mela tent, and 
the other a good oig churdi-building for Hardoi itself. Rupees one 
thousand five hundred f<)r Anielatent and rupees six thousand or a little 
more for the new church are greatly needed. Bishop F. W. Warne, 
D. D., was with us for two days in our District Conference and Isai 
melaj and he saw our needs. His presence was a season of great 
blessing to every soul. Mrs. Bishop Parker is an evangelist for the 
district, and she made three visit» this year. She was present for 
nine days in our District Conference and held meetings lor women 
f4kd school girlsy and the^ were greatly benefited by her help. 



Ziv PRESIDING ELDERS* REPORTS. 

The week of special prayer was a season of great blessing, and 
in Hardoi itself it seemed as if we had Hardol Dasher a meetings 
instead of Lucknow Dashera meetings. 

May the Almighty God still help us abundantly in the future. 



moraaabad District. 

Rev. L. a. Core, Presiding Elder.— The Moradabad district, as 
constituted at the last session of the conference, comprises the whole of 
the Moradabad civil district and about one-fifth of the Budaun dis- 
trict, together with thirty villages from the Terai country at the foot of 
the mountains and some ten villages from the native State of Hampur. 
The population of the enire district la which we work is aboat 
1,350,000 souls. Taere is no other mi as ion in this district save the 
Salvation Army, and they occupy on ly parts of it and could hardly 
be called a mission. In other words, the >dethodi8t Mission is re- 
sponsible for the spread of the Gospel among this large population. 

The following is a brief summary of the statistics of the district : — 
Christian community, 12,()25 ; baptisms, 538; deaths, 2H2 : missionaries 
(mpn and women), 6 ; Hindustani members of Conference, 10; local 

? Teachers, 46; exhorters, 33 ; other workers (including unpaid workers), 
6; women, 126: total of men and women, 301 ; villages in which 
Christians live, 1,045 ; villages in which we work regularly, 1,395. These 
villages are divided into 17 circuits ; these circuits are again divided 
into 84 sub-circuits. The total collection from the Hindustani people 
is Ks. l,6i)0, or about two and one-seventh annas per individual. The 
village Christians -mission employees omitted — ha recontributed for 
the support of the work Rs. 380. Girls' schools. £2, with a t( tal At- 
tendance of 932. Boys* small schools, 62; attendance, 729. In the 
girls' Anglo-vernacular school there are 127 pupils and in the two 
boys* schools, 390; Sunday-schools, 177 ; pupils, '7,553. 

There are ttiree Antrlo-vernacular sshools in the district. One 
of these is in Moradabad for girls. The enrolment has been larger 
this year than usual, and the work done has been characterized by the 
usual thoroughness. There was a 8liii:hti increase made in the grant- 
in-aid in July. One of the two boys* schools i s in Sambhal. Two 
years ago the Municipality turned their school over to the Mission, 
together with buildings and furniture, for the use of the school, so 
long as the Mission should retain charge of the united schools. The 
attendance in this school has greatly increased this year. It is a 
school mostly for non-Christians, as there is no boarding-house for 
Christian boyn in connection with it. The condition of the Bishop 
Parker Memorial Hisrh School is probably the best in ten years. The 
enrolment is over 300, of which only about 100 are Christians. The 
fees realised from non-Christians have, during the past year, averaged 
about 140 rupees a month. The grant has also been increased this 
year. 

It is fitting here to pay a tribute to the late Rev. J. Jacob who 
spent the last fifteen years of his lif<3 in this school, ably discharging 
every trust committed to him, whether in the school proper, in the 
Sunday-dchool, in the Sabbath ministrations of the church, or in the 
evangelistic work of the circuit. There was no form of Christian work 
carried on in the circuit with which he was not in some way or other 
identified. No m%n was ever more faithful or conscientious. No 
man ever more ardently loved righteousness and hated iniquity. The 



MORADABAD DISTRICT. XV 

Christiaa community of Moradabad is still filled with the fragrance 
of his beautiful life and character. Through these ** he being dead 
yet sjpeaketh/' 

The great need of the school is a permanent endowment for 
scholarships for Christian boys. Most of the boys who come to us 
are the sons of poor parents, who can do almost nothing toward their 
food and clothes while they are being educated. We have buildings 
sufficient to accommodate one hundred and fifty boys and a paid 
teaching staff which must be kept on, be the number of Christian pupils 
few or many, while we have funds for only about eighty boys and most 
of them of a very temporary character. More than two vears ago we 
set out to collect $3o.lH)0 tO'found one hundred scholarships in the me- 
mory of the late Bishop Parker. Funds sufficient for some ten or 
twelve scholarships have been collected. The remaining ninety are 
urgently needed. The income of $30.0o() will support a boy while he is 
getting his education. India needs educated Chris£)ian men. The 
demand far exceeds the supply. Promising boys are constantly being 
turned away for want of funds. Statistics show that from the Mora- 
dabad and adjoining districts in which there are 9,000 Christian boys, 
not more than one hundred and fifty are in any school where they can 
be taught beyond the third reader. That is, one in every sixty has 
a chance to learn something more than the merest rudiments. We 
should like to invite the attention of those seeking for safe and pay- 
ing investments for their money to this fact, as well as to the neeos of 
this old and most important in&titution, and urge that nowhere will 
investments bring larger and quicker returns than money put into the 
cause of Christian educatiou in India. 

In every mission field the problem of self-support must of necessity 
be ever to the front. Our field is no exception. No efforts have been 
spared to bring home to the last man in tne remotest village the fact 
that it is one of the privileges as well as one of the duties of every 
convert to give all he can as well as do all he can for the spread of 
the Gospel. Slowly but surely the people are coming to realise that 
a Christian must give for Christ as well as live for dim. The road 
to progress in this line is encumbered witb many obstacles, but none 
of them insurmountable. Although all our people are pr>or, yet while 
still heathen they were accustomed to give m the way of sacrifices to 
evil-spirits and other imaginary powers for evil anywhere from 2 to 
15 rupees a year. A few of the weaker of them still on occasion keep 
up this practice. If they could only be induced to give to the Master's 
cause that which they were wont in their old faith to give to the devil, 
there would be ^* no lack of food" in the Lord's house, and the solution 
of this much- vexed problem of self-support would be brought near. 
In no other department of work are the fruits of devoted, loving 
pastoral work more richly and quickly manifest than in the matter of 
self-support. Figures of last year are not available for purposes of 
comparison, but there is no doubt but that we are progressing. The 
contributions from the people this year will average about two pies 
per head. As most of our people are small cultivators, we are trying 
to' get each of them to set apart a small corner of land, the entire pro- 
ceeds of which in each of the two harvests shall be given to the Lord. 

A careful inquiry from the workers has elicited the fact, that there 
has been in the Christian community as a whole, spiritual sfrowth 
during the year. A large number of village Christians attended the 
Christian mela at Amroha bearing all their own expenses. The 
quarterlies at almost all the circuits are well attended by the people, 
in addition to these there have been held in Amroha two meetings in 
which seventy five or more of the leaders of the people have come 
together to discuss means and measures for the suppressing of all 
idolatry and child-marriage and other of the more common evils. 



XVi PRESIDING elders' REPORTS. 

Whatever is decided on is done by the people, and the decisions are 
carried out by them. Not a few of the *^ sons of Belial" among' these 
Sikh Christians have this year felt the heavy hand of this panchayat 
and have promised to cease to do evil and to learn to do well. 

In one of ihe quarterlies this year the fact came out that there is 
a lack of definiteness a,^ to wnat is included in the usual question 
asked of every candidate for baptism,*' Will you give up idolatry ?*' 
They readily give the proper answer to this general question ; but if 
ajiked, '* When your child falls sick, will you offer the usual sacrifice 
of a goat or chicken for his recovery ? '* The answer cornea as readily, 
** Certainly. Would you have me see my child die, and I do nothing 
to save him ? ' ' 

Idolatry in all its manifold bearings should be simply and clearly 
explained, and he should know what he has to give up and what he is 
to begin to do before the candidate is baptized. This cannot be done 
in general terms. The same should be done as regards to child* 
marriage and the giving of his means for the support of the gospel. 
We cannot be too definite at this point. 

A constant warfare is waged against this insidious and all-per- 
vasive evil of idolatry. Shrines have been destroyed this year, mostly 
by the people themselves, in thirty-four villai?es. One will have to go 
far now to find a shrine in a villac^ where all the people are Christians, 
while in more than half of the villages where both non-Christians and 
Christians live together, no shrine will be found. 

At our District Conference at Amroha, in November, great crowds 
of Hindus and Mohammedans were present, while the better class of 
both of these peoples vied with each other in pressing on us every 
thing wexsould possibly need in the way of tables and chairs and tents. 
They seemed to regard the conference as their guests and acted ac- 
cordingly. One could not wish for more courteous treatment from 
the leaders of the two abovenamed communities than was accorded t<i 
as there Bishops Phoburn and Warne were with us for a few days 
and rendered valuable service. 

A Workers' meeting was held for three weeks in June in Morada- 
bad, at which all the men and women employed in the Mission were 
present, i hese meetini?s are designed to stimulate the intellectual and 
spiritual life of the workers Experience shows that unless the worker 
himself is profrreesive in these lines there will be no progress in the 
mental and spiritual nature of his people. The Bible wa^ studied and 
taufifht an hour or two every day. Pilgrim's Progress was also 
studied and lectured upon. The religious meetings were full of interest, 
and there was not a meeting when there were not a dozen or more en- 
quirers at the altar. At thia meeting a prize was announced to be given 
at the District Conference in November for the greatest number of 
verses recited from memory with perfect accuracy from the Gospel of 
St. John. One blind girl reciteu the first ten chapters with only a 
very few trifling mistakes. One of the men recited 297 verses with 
only two or three mistakes. The result of the contest was most 
gratlfving 

Of the one and a third million of people in this district three 
hundred thousand may be said to be open to the Gospel of Christ. Of 
these two hundred thousand are Chamars or leather- workers who as 
a caste may be characterized as enquirers. S'jores, if not hundreds of 
villages could be named where the Chamars, influenced by our prea- 
ching, have in part or wholly given up idolatry. Of the depressed 
class from which the greater part of our Christians have come, theie 
are yet about eighteen thousand un baptized. Then there is another 
caste who are interested hearers, the Jats. These are a thrifty, in- 
dependent class of cultivators. The fields are truly white unto the 
harvest. But with our Christians scattered through more than one 



OUDH DISTRICT. XVil 

thousand villages, and each worker visiting from ten to twenty-five 
villages each, it is impossible with the present force to r^acb more 
than one-fiftieth part of this great ripening field. 

Meanwhile the enemy in the person of the Arya Somaj is not 
unmindful of the condition and is sending his harvesters into the field. 
They are carrving on a vigorous work among all classes, with 
the exception of the lowest one of all, and no one can tell ho^ soon 
they may begin to proselyte them too. Only recently have they 
opened work among the Cbamars. Their emissaries are everywhere 
and tireless in their zeal. They have adopted our methods and have 
taken to village and mohalla, and have open printing presses and 
schools and orphanages, and have their services modelled on ours and 
even have their prear*.bers in charge, though they do not call them by 
that name. One thing they have not copied however. Their work 
is not supported from abroad, but by collections taken from among 
themselves. Their activity and zeal may well fill us with anxiety, for 
if once these hundreds of thousands who are now** not far from 
the kingdom " pass into the fold of Aryanisro, the Master's work will 
have b^n turned back a score of years. 



ONOb Diitrict. 

Hev. W. a. Mansell, Presiding Blder.—Oudh district has had 
to contend against unusual difficulties in the work this year. The ab- 
sence of the presiding elder on furlough, and the appointment of a 
missionary who already had a district of his own to superintend, has 
made it impossible for the acting presiding elder to exercise more 
than an administrative oversight over the work. An evangelistic 
tour in the villages with the workers was out of the question. The 
first round of quarterly conferences begun by Brother Robinson were 
finished by Brother Rockey for the northern half of the district and 
by Brother West for the rest. Both of these brethren have given 
help in carrying on the work of the district willingly and efficiently 
whenever desired to do so. 

The prevalence of plague in a number of the circuits continuing 
in some cases for fully athird of the year, has also considerably 
crippled the work. In many places all aggressive work had to be 
entirely abandoned. The attitude of the average non-Christian to- 
ward the plague U pitiful in the extreme. Credulous to the last 
degree, he cannot understand that the greater cleanliness which 
prevails, as a rule among Christians, the Police, and Government 
servants and Government buildings, is a measure of protection to 
these three classes of persons. He only sees that the dread disease 
rarely attacks these favoured classes, and hence concludes that it is 
a special device of the Government to kill off the defenceless non- 
Christian and non-official population. Hence it often happens that 
during a scourge of plague in any community the approach of a 
Christian is the signal for violent treatment, so that not only is 
aggressive Christian work practically impossible, but even the possibili- 
ty of friendly visits for sympathy and prayer with afflicted households 
is precluded. 

In spite of these difficulties the number of baptisms recorded is 
but one short of the number last year. The preachers in charge 
generally five encouraging reports as to the state of the church. 

In LcJchimpur one of our workers, supported through the gene- 
rosity of a friend in America, was set apart for work among the 



XViii PRESIDING ELDERS* REPORTS. 

Tharus on the Nepal border. He had a year with vary Id? vicisBitudes. 
The work was entirely new ; he had first of all to try to pick up enoug^h 
of their special dialect to enable him to give them a message. At tbe 
beginning the inhabitants fled from him supposinp^ him to be a Gov- 
ernment officer sent to inoculate them with some disease. He changed 
his attire and gradually won their confidence, so that he was permitted 
to put up a thatched hut in their midst. Tbe house was soon burned 
down, however. Still he continued to dwell among them, and we 
believe that in time a permanent work can be established here. The 
noxious climate makes it impossible to work there for more than 
half the year. During the unseasonable months tbe inhabitants all 
leave the plains and wander in the mountains, while our worker 
returns to a centre of work at Gola Gokarn-nath. 

The work in ISitapur has some encouraging features. Brother 
Rockey repot ts that he has in all his experience never seen such will- 
ing and generous contribution to the benevolent and Church collec- 
tions as have been given tbis year at Sitapur. Every man, woman 
and child in the entire congregation seemed eager to have his or her 
share in the giving, and many of thoee whose income does not amount 
to a dollar a month, gave with enthusiasm a half month's pay for 
the kingdom of Christ. This is giving indeed ! 

There is at Sitapur a very successful girls* boarding school in 
chargd of Miss Loper, which has had another good year tuitionally and 
spiritually. As we write these words, however, the dreaded plague is 
casting its black shadow over our work at Sitapur. All who could, have 
fled from the city. Our own people are brave and courageous amid 
this terrifying visitation, and doing what they can to succour and 
protect. 

Brother Rockey, in addition to his onerous duties as Secretary of 
the Bishop Thoburn Special Fhind for India, has during the year 
been preacher-in charge of the circuit, and Chaplain of tbe British 
Weslevan soldiers at Sitapur. The English services for the soldiers 
have oeen well attended, and there has be> n a marked increase in re- 
ligious interest among those attending. 

A summer school for all tbe workers on the district was held at 
Sitapur during the month of May, which was in every way a decided 
success, and the brethren unanimously voted that it be held annually 
if possible. The daily exercises consisted of devotional services, 
concert study of a catechism of Christian d* ctrine, Bunyan's Pilgrims* 
Progress, studies in the Pentateuch, and in ivietbodist polity and 
discipline, practice sermons by tbe local preachers and daily evange- 
listic services. We believe that it was a permanent, spiritual and 
intellectual blessing and profit to all the workers on the district. 

Sidhauli reports a good year in every way, showing an increase 
of twenty-one in Christian community, seventy-five in Sunday-school 
scholars and thirteen rupees in collections. 

In Bae Bareliihe work has been well carried on ; quite a number 
of Chamars had been baptized some years ago during the hard times 
consequent on the famine. Although they were plainly given to 
understand that they should expect no help from the Mission beyond 
what was extended to all classes alike, and that after tbe famine 
they should receive no aid, they became dissatisfied with the hard- 
ships they had to endure on account of becoming Christians, and 
have tried to get re-admitted to their old caste. Their former caste- 
fellows, however, called a council and imposed such heavy conditions 
upon them, including large fines, and an expensive pilgrimage toOrissa, 
the shrine of Jaggannath, that it was practically a prohibition. The 
action of the Chamars has considerably strengthened the hands of our 
workers, and they hope that the faint-hearted Christians will event- 
ually come in to live and be willing to endure all hardships for the 



OUDH DISTRICT. xix 

Bi^ke of their faittu There is growing up in Bae Bardi hopeful 
oommunity of independent Christians, and Brother Fiey has been 
especially successful in developing workers from the orphans and 
dependent boys, three of themnaving been recommended for the 
Bareilly Theological andNormal schools this year. 

In liara Banki we have also an encouraging work. There is a boys' 
school, with a small number of Christian boys who live in the com- 
pound of the preacher's house. Afield adjoins the house which the 
boys have tilled themselves during the year, and from which they have 
earned enough money to clothe themselves very comfortably, and 
have had vegetables in season to eat as well A « ollection of sixty 
rupees has also been raised by the efforts of Brother Prem Masih for 
the erection of a Mission chapel at Fatehpur. Owing to land not 
being available, however, nothing has yet been done and the money is 
in hand. 

Itaunja and 2\kaitna'jar are our two small circuits in which the 
year's record is an average one with nothing especial to report. 

In Lucknow the work on the circuit has suffered much on account 
of the plague. The Lucknow churches and the institutions, in Lucknow, 
all report a pro-perous year. Th<) Hindustaui Church U again under 
the pastorate of Matthew Stephen, who has given many years of faith- 
ful work to this charge before. This is perhaps the best example of a 
self-supporting church which we have in India. It has a member- 
ship including probationers of three hundred and fifty, and has raised 
for pastoral support during the year over eight hundred rupees, of 
which less than two hundred rupees were given by Europeans, and 
this amount was not given to help the church as a Mission Institution, 
but was regularly contributed by those foreigners (missionaries and 
teachers) whose membership is regularly in this church. Two hund- 
red rupees were contributed for local church expenses, and rupees 
three hundred and sixty-eight for benevolent collections, of wnich 
rupees two hundred and twenty-five was for the regular Missionary 
collection. The rec )rding stewards and collecting stewards are ail 
Hindustani brethren, and all the accounts are in their hands who make 
their reports to the quarterly conference in the regular manner. 

The English Church has had a good year spiritually. The con* 
gregation- keep up excellen'ly under Brother Hyde's preaching and 
faithful pastoral work. The Sunday-school under the supericten- 
deney of Brother W. Crawshaw, a local preacher, is a wideawake and 
flourishing school and doing a vaiuable, and, we believe, permanent 
work. Financially the Church has also done well in addition to meet- 
ing its obligations ; it has put extensive repairs on the Church and 
begins the new year with good prospects. 

The institutions of Lucknow have a wide field of usefulness, and 
accordicglto our custom we icclude their reports. 

Beid Christian Colle^je. - Brother West writes :— A retrospect of 
our college work for the past year enables us to report the tame 
steady progress that has characterized the college for several years 
past. As yet we are a young college, and we cannot boast of great 
numt)ers, but in methods of instruction, in the quality of our teach^ 
ing, and in the results of examinations we aim to be un a par with 
the very best. And if our institution with its allied departments 
be taken as a whole, the number of our students is not inconsider- 
able. Since the beginning of the year the attendance has been as 
follows :~Co]lege, 42 ; Business Department, 144 ; High School, 170 ; 
Nakbas Branch School, 171 : Total 527. The prevalence of plague in 
the city during March and April reduced our numbers very largelyj 
but we are glad to say that our old students have all returned and 
we have now oonsiderably more enrolled than this time last year. 
The results of the examin at! ops hit ve been good, We sent up sevea 



ZX PRESIDING GLDERS' RB^RTS, 

candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree and all of them passed. 
The results of the Intermediate Examination were uot so satisfactory, 
but even there the perceotage of passes was up to the average of 
passes throughout the University. The Science Department has been 
furnished with some needed apparatus which will increase its efficiency, 
but much more is needed. The system of monthly examinations which 
we have for several years used, is proving to be a great help to our 
students, keeping them up to the mark in regular recitation, and thus 
minimizing that greatest evil in the Indian system of education- 
cramming for University examinations. The directness of contact that 
professors and students have in our college, is acknowledged by all 
our students to be very beneficial. We seek not simply to give in- 
struction, we seek to impart our standards, our ideals, ourselves to 
those whom we day by day meet in the class-room. 

The Business department has had a sucjessful year. Aside from 
our regular students in that depai*tment, the Government deputed 74 
clerks tj us for special training. These young men completed their 
work and have gone back to their respective offices. That the experi- 
ment was a f»uccess, is attested by several things. We have not heard 
a single complaint made by any official as to the character of the work 
being done by any student trained by us. Another evidence is, that 
Government has asked us to take another deputation of clerks from 
another branch of Government. And last but by no means least the 
Government has put a sanciion upon our work by giving us a grant 
of Rs. 1,500 for further equipment and Rs. 100 per mensem to increase 
our teaching staff. 

The usual athletic sports, cricket, football, tennis and gymnastics 
are carried on by our students, and due attention is paid to physical 
culture. A grant from the Mission has enabled us to put water-works 
into our Boarding Department and to otherwise improve the sanitation 
of our school The health of our boarders has been very good. 
There have been no deaths, only one or two cases of serious illness. 
While plague was raging all around us we were mercifully preserved. 
For all this we desire to utter our profound thanksgiving to Almighty 
God- In all our work we emphasise the superiority of the moral and 
spiritual over the physical and intellectual. Ours is a missionary 
college, and while in the regular work of the college there is no effort 
made to foist Christianity upon any student, yet the Bible is regularly 
taught and the moral and spiritual ideals of the same are held up as 
those which if adopted would benefit the whole human race. And we 
have the satisfaction of knowing that there is not only growth in 
manly Christian character among our Christian students who in their 
Young Men*s Christian At^sociation have such opportunities of spirit- 
ual help, but we also believe that every student of whatever creed 
goes from us not only wiser but also bett««r. 

In closing, I desire to thank Dr. Ram Lai Chakravarti who with 
such fidelity attends our students, and the Civil Surgeon, Colonel 
Anderson, and the Assistant Burgeon, Dr. Tandon, who are always 
ready to help us in times of need. 

IsabeUa Thobum College,— The past year has been the most success- 
ful o^e in the history of the institution. There are eighteen students 
enrolled in the College and one hundred and seventy-nine in the Bigh 
School. In the Government examinations both college and high 
school did exceptionally well. Three were sent up for the B.A. ex- 
amination, all of whom passed ; five for the Intermediate, all but one 
of whom passed ; six were sent up for the Entrance and five for the 
Middle examinations, all of whom passed ; making in all a total of 
nineteen candidates sent up with only one failure in all The Govern- 
ment has recognized the college as an aided institution and sanctioned 
a grant of Rs. 150 per mensem* It baa also given a grapt of Rs. 8QQ 



OUDH DISTRICT. ZXl 

for the better equipment of the Science Department. Miss Sidall 
arrived in November from America to take charge of tbie department. 
The College greatly needa a number more scholarships of $50 and $60 
each to enable it to carry on its work. 

l^he High School has also earned a slight increase In Government 
grant-in-aid, and rejoices in the fact that the Normal Depart- 
ment has been officially recognized There are fourteen students 
enrolled, smd almost d<iily applications for admission, but no more 
applicants can be received on account of lack of room. Extensive 
additions should be made to the school and college buildings, but 
funds are not available 

ThrciUgh the generosity of a friend in America the buildings have 
been supplied with pipes for city water -a very needed precaution in 
this city so subject to epidemics of cholera or plague. We are 
glad to state that during the past year with plague all about the city 
Uie school has been kept free from all serious sickness. 

Deaconess Home and Home for Friendless Women -That this is one 
of the busiest and most useful departments of (;ur mission work in 
Luck now, the following extracts from Miss Ingram* ti report will 
readily show. 

At present we have nineteen women and eight babies and children 
in the Home. We ha7e been obliged to refuse several cases owing to 
want of funds 

Early in the year a kind friend taught two of our girls point lace, 
and now we have five who can do it fairly well. For the last few 
weeks Mrs. Gutbrie^has most kindly taken charge of the lace class, 
and under her efficient care we feel sure we shall do well and make 
money for our Home Others of our women hemstitch and embroider 
handkerchiefs in a native design, but still many of them can never 
learn to do more than the plainest sewing and knitting, and some can- 
not even be taught to hold a needle. It Is almost impossible to make 
a Home like ours, which contains the blind, the halt and the lame 
entirely self-supporting. Local help is not easy to get. Our women 
live in very simple fashion -wear plain clothes and eat coarse food, 
and do all their own sewing and cooking ; but still even these things 
cost money, though we are as economical as possible. 

The future of our women is a great problem. It is exceedingly 
difficult tomarty a womaniwith a pastor, when young, bright girls can 
be had for the asking in every Mission School in the land. Perhaps 
later on some of our women who have learnt to make lace may be 
able to get situations as teachers in schools, and in other places 
marriages might be made for them, for men are always glad to get a 
wife who can earn for herself. 

We are often asked to take in all sorts of women, but we have felt 
for some time that our work would be much more successful if the in- 
mates of our Home were only youDg women who were not hardened in 
sin It ie not at all wise to mix all classes and ages. 

Our good matron, Mrs. Collins, went for her holiday in October, 
and while she was away she whs suddenlv killed by a wall falling on 
her. It is impossible to tell all that her loss means to the women and 
the Home. She had spent five and a half years as matron here, and 
her infiuence for go d was wonderful. As i^liss Thoburn truly said of 
her ** she loved the bad out of people.'' 

We feel that our present matron, Mrs LeMaitre, is sent of God, 
and we are sure that she will make her a blessing to us. 

Our work has been as varied and interesting as ever. We never 
have to complain of ennui in the Deaconess Home It is a joy to 
know t.hat people are learning to turn to us more than ever in their 
various wants. 

Out of our scanty Poor Fund we arranged for three free funerals. 



XXii PRESIDING SLDERS' KEPORTS. 

We also paid for a woman who was three weeks in the Lady Klnnaird 
Hospital. We owe a ^reat debt of gratitude to the doctors and matron 
of that splendid hospital, not only for their goodness to our poor 
but for ail their loving sisterliness in our work and needs. 

We were able to shelter a young Eurasian or han who was in 
great trouble. After keeping her for three weeks the Salvation Armv 
Home in Calcutta kindly took the girl. She is doing well with 
them. 

Owing to Miss McLeavy leaving us for the Muttra, Traiuing 
School, our Hindustani Chri«>tian work U unprovided for. There are 
so many needy people of this sort in Lucknow, that we trust we shall 
soon have a worker sent to us who will be able to devote her whole 
time to them. 

Mrs. Chew has done e^ood work amongst the children, and has 
helped us in more ways than we can tell. 

Six English and Hindustani societies hold their monthly meetings 
in the Deaconess' Home, and two separate prayer bands for boys and 
girl? meet here every week. 

We keep up our Sunday evening gathering after church with the 
people, and are touched to find how some of them enjoy coming. 

Two public temperance meetings, and a medal contest have been 
arranged for. The W. C. T. U. box at the station has been regularly 
suppliei with interesting and helpful literature. About a thousand 
papers and tracts have been given away nuring the vear 

Our ideal is to get our English-speaking young people to work for 
India. We are glad to say that we have two girls learning nursing in 
the Ludhiana Medical School, and that they are giving satisfaction. 
They will do mission work when they have completed their course. 

We have during the year made 1,874 calls, spent 9d • hours in work, 
received 8U0 callers and spent many hours with tbem, for in most cases 
they have come for help and advice. We hardly ever give money, but 
freely give nouribhment and clothing to those in need. Besides ihis 
we have given simple entertainment in the Home to SOit people. 

We are most grateful to the Minneapolis Branch for the gift of a 
horse and carriage, and also for the nice Christmas box they sent ma. 

Our work is supported by the New York, Ci'clnnati, North- West- 
ern and Minneapolis Branches. 

Closely associated with this is the regular zenana work and city 
girls* schools under the charge of Mrs. Chew. Concerning the former, 
she writes. We visit more or less regularly In twenty-five Hindu and 
one hundred and seventy -eight Mohammedan homes. 'Ihere is not a 
house in all this great city, we*believe, closed to us. We are welcomed 
and at liberty, in old and new houses alike, to read, pray and sing. 
There are some twenty-four women who read for themselves the Urdu 
Bible One hundred and forty-three women are under more secular 
instruction, and we hope may sooie day be able to read the word of 
God. 

With the advice of the Inspectress of Schools the five city girls* 
schools have been reduced to two, which have an enrolment of sixty- 
five and an average attendance of fifty. Secular and Christian instruc- 
tion is regularly given in these schools, and we hope for good results. 
A Sunday-school is also connect-ed with each school. 

The Methodist Publishing House. —Bvother Thoburn, the Agent, 
reports:— The Methodist Publishing House at Lucknow has had 
another year of prosperity. The greater part of the heavy debt 
carried for many years has been paid oif, and Ks. 4,000 added to 
the invested funds. Rupees 6,000 of free religions literature has been 
distributed in North India during the year. Two new volumes of 
the Old Testament Commentary have been translated and printed, 
and the remaining volumes of the series are well in hand. The 



BUDAUN DISTRICT. XXiii 

effort to build up a local trade has met with encouraging results, and 
the income of the Press largely increased from this source. 

The work of the Press may be seen from the following items:— 

Number of men employed . . . . . . 160 

Languages printed . . . . . . 5 

Job work during the year . . . . Rs. 50,000 

Mission Periodicals printed .. .. .. lo 

Number of Sunday School papers printed weekly 20,OuO 

Do. do. Lessons .. .. .. 10,OjO 

Free literature distributed . . . . . Rs. 6,<»00 

Sales of Books and Tracts . . . . . . Rs. 25,000 

The general superinteudenoe of the zenana work of the 
district has been under Mrs. Rockey who has had charge of this 
in addition to the re^rular zenana work of Sitapur. There is much 
need for additional Missionary work in this direction. If a district 
evangelist could be set apart tor the Oudh district, she would find 
a large and needy field at hand, but one which, we believe, would 
richly repay all her efforts. 

In closing the report we can say that in spite of the paucity of 
workers in the field, God has been with us, ana the close of the year 
finds us with hearts full of faith and courage for the future. 



Pillbbit Dlitrict. 

Rev. H. J. Adams, Presiding Elder.^I amexceedingly thankful to 
my dear Redeemer my Lord Je^us Christ that He in His great love 
and mercy greatly helped me in the work of the Pilibhit district, 
although this work was new for me since I was appointed to this 
district last year. 

Pilibhit is a large district and presents ample opportunities 
for the spread of the gospel. It is situated at the foot of the moun- 
tains, and although the climate of certain places is not very 
healthful, still there is a wide field for the spread of the Christ- 
ian religion. During my rounds I found that there were hundreds 
of villages and townd where the gospel of the true Saviour has 
never reached, and where the true religion is unknown. Preachers 
are very ur^'eniiy needed for such places. We cannot expect our 
preachers of other circuits to visit all such places since some of 
them are very far from the places where they are stationed ; hence 
the pressing necessity of having more preachers, so that the 
gospel may be preached to the heathen that they may believe on the 
Lord Jesus Christ ; for, as it is written, how can they believe unless 
they hear. Our continual prayer to the Lord Jesus is, that He may 
send more workers into Bis vineyard, so that every tribe and nation 
may hear the gospel and ** believe on the Lord Jesus Christ," and 
believing ma^ have life through His name. 

The Pilibhit dintrict consists of ten big circuits where the 
preachers-in-charge reside, and of fifty sub-circuits where the helpers 
reside. Our Christians are found in six hundred and thirty-three 
villages, and our work is carried on in seven hundred and sixteen 
villages. We thank God that we can report progress in our work. 
The full communicants in these churches number two thousand two 
hundred and twelve ; probationers, one thousand eight hundred and 
ninety-six ; minors, one thousand six hundred and ninety-six, thus 
making a total of five thousand eight hundred and four. We baptized 
three hundred and tw&persoDs this year. We did not lay muon em- 



XXiv PRESIDING ELDERS* REPORTS. 

phasis this year on gaining new converts, but we concentrated our 
attention on strengthening our Christians in the faith, but still we can 
report an increase in the number of baptisms this year, and the 
work is progressing. 

This year we specially aimed at making our churches more 
spiritual Revival and prayer meetings were held in Avery place, 
and In each circuit so far as practicable ; each preacher held regular 
services and gave reliffious instruction. Most of our village Christ- 
ians, on account of their poverty, are forced by the non-Christians 
around them to continue in their former labour, as their different 
callings are considered hereditary. They have to yield to the 
pressure of the non-Christians, as it is mostly through them that 
our Christians get their support. In many places these men have 
not a chance to attend divine worship, &c. , but still we have tried 
to suit their convenience and give them religious instructions when- 
ever they are free. 

I have often talked to my preachers-in -charge while holding 
quarterly conferences, and on other occasions as well, to impress 
upon them the importance of our village Christians becoming 
^* strong in the Lord " and doing away with all the old weaknesses 
and heathenish customs that may still be clinging to them. We 
insist that they should adopt the Christian rites of marriage and 
burial. A new Chaudhari convert died in the Rampur State on 
4th November last, and he was buried with Christian rites. It was 
a great pleasure for our Christians to note this. Most of the 
marriages are also solemnized according to the Christian religion. 

In all the meetings and quarterly conferences I have over and 
over again emphasised the supreme importance of our Christian 
Church becoming pure and holy, without blemish, and of giving up 
all the old customs and shameful practices of dark heathenism. By 
the grace of God a great change is noticeable in the Christian homes 
of the Pilibhit district. People are getting converted, and are 
giving up their old practices of heithenism, and are expressing a 
craving for spiritual things which is noticed in a more regular 
study of the Bible and mor3 regular attendance in services. 

Pilibhit district! had twenty-seven day-schools this year, with an 
attendance of seven hundred and seventy-one scholars. These are 
generally small schools, and Christian and non-Christian students 
study side by side in them. In the Fatehgunj West school there are 
fifteen Christian and fifteen non-Christian students. The school 
runs up to the fourth standard. The students learn Urdu, Hindi 
and English, and are progressing. This school is a great means 
lor good, as it is a means of more union among the non-Christians 
and Christians, and at the same time it affords an opportunity of 
teaching them about the Christian religion. 

Pilibhit district had a record of ninety-three Sunday-school this 
year, with an attendance of one thousand six hundred and thirty-four 
men and boys, nine hundred and forty-three women and girls, seven 
hundred and seventy-four non-Christian men, seven hundred and 
ninety-seven non-Christian women and girls, making a total of four 
thousand one hundred and eight. Our students show great interest 
in the Sundav-schools, as is seen in the fact they prepare and 
learn their lessons very carefully. The students learn their 
catechisms, and also learn how to sing. We realise that the 
Sunday-school is a great factor in the spread of the Christian 
religion. Many an inquirer has become so by means of the 
Sunday-school, and the converts of the Sunday-school are decided- 
ly more rooted and grounded in the faith. Our continual prayer to 
God is that the Christian leaven may spread, and all the people may 
believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and be saved. 



PILIBHIT DISTRICT. XXV 

This district has t*^n chapters of the Epworth League, with three 
hundred and fifty full members. The League is a miphty force for good 
among the young. It imparts a good knowledge of the Bible, develops 
the power of public speaking, inculcates a love for spiritual au'l higher 
things, files trie young with a zeal to preach the gospel, saves souls 
for the Master, sharpens their- intellect, and is a great bond of unity. 

The total amount of collection raised this year in this district was 
Rs. 830, out of which Rs 60u was given towards the support of pas- 
tors. Excluding the Bishop Parker Memorial Fund, there has been 
an increase in the amount of collection. The Christians of this dis- 
trict are very poor. There are very few of them that are cultivators. 
They are mostly servants of the non-Christians from whom they derive 
their support. Still wo thank God that out of their poverty they "give 
what tl.ey can, and so we are not disccui a^ed. '1 he L(>rd will suiely 
blesH them, and we hope nur collectlonn will incre; se year by year. 

The Pilibhlt District Workers' meeting was in session fn.m the 
4th August till the llth August. There was a full attendance of the 
workers aod our Christians. There were daily lessons from the Gospel 
acco'ding to St. Luke, and we finished that book. Daily mornint; and 
evening services were seasons of great spiritual uplift. Ef^says and 
speeches were well delivered. We are greatly indebted to the Revs T. 
J Scott, H. L Mukerjee, H. A. Cutting, Juwala J^ingh, and Pandit 
Brahma Nand for the very kind help they rendeied during these 
&e' vices. All our brethren were greatly spiritually ref.eshed, and they 
returned to their work with retjCAed strength, and ihe result of this 
was manifest in the successful labour of our workers. 

Oir District Conferenoe assembled at Paridpore with the Barellly- 
Kumaon District Conference from the 19th— 24th Nov. 1903. Every- 
thing was well finished, and the excellent speeches and sermons there 
proved seasons of great spiritual refreshing from the Lord. Bishops 
J. M. Thoburn, F. W. Warne and H. W. Warren were present at 
our conference, and greatly benefited us by their excellent sermons, 
for which we are greatly indebted to them and pray that the Lord 
may bless them with blessings temporal and spiritual. Hev. T. J. Scott 
gave excellent addresses from the Gospel of St- John every morning 
from 8 to 9. which were greatly helpful. We are very thankful to him. 
We must not omit to mention our great thankfulness to the Rev. Dr. 
Neeld for the excellent and comfortable arrangements he provided for 
us at Faridpore. 

I am exceedingly thankful to my Lord for Bis presence with us all 
through the year, and for the help that He pave us in all our labours 
and for the guidance He always gave us through His Spirit. Our 
prayer is that He may ereatly bless this district and all other diftricts 
so that all the nations may know oar Lord Jesus Christ and have 
eternal life. Amen. 



statistics* 



N. B.- For explanations, apparent errors and remarks, see Statistical 
Report. 

Many reports of collections contained annas. These cannot be shown 
here. They are represented in the columns by an x. The totals contain 
the sums of all these omitted fractional parts of a rupee. 

The total income from all sources is for the most part the income of fees 
in schools, and is used in the running expenses. These schools are practi- 
cally self-supporting. The real income is shown in the regular collections 
which are disposed of according to disciplinary usage. 



NORTH INDIA CONFEUENOE STATISTICS 

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 





CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY. 


BAPTISMS. 






Church 




, 


OB 1 I 1 f 


• 


1 




Membrr- 




Deaths 


•5 c 

C '0 






•2 

0^ 






SH 


IP. 

00 

B 


• 

c 

2 
2 


s 

a 

o 

• 

o 


1 


ildron of Christian Pare 

lldreii' from~among~N 
)hristians. 


• 
on 

9 


• 

00 

a 

0. 
08 


s 

.a 

GO 

t 

>% 

08 

a 

3} 

s 

B 


mber of Officers and '1 
hors. 


NAMES OF CIRCUITS. 


• 
CA 

u 
o 
a 
o 

06 


3ra among Members 
>nd Probatiouers. 


3m among Haptlzcd 
Children. 




2 


3 


c3 


jD ^>i«:C^ 


^ JS'-' 


-o 





3 


a 




CU 


^ 


PQ 


H £ PK^ 


.0 


< 


H 


'^ 


K 


MOBADABAD DISTRICT. 


■ 








1 
1 ■ 


1 

i 

1 


j 


1 




Amroha 


209 


435 


314 


1.048| 3| 41 Hi .. 


1 15 


12 


18 


Babukhera 


1.59 


143 


206 


508l 2 


6 18 5j 121 35 


6 


10 


Bahjol 


94 


350 


173 


517 


4 


8! 10: 8' 9 


27 


5 


5 


Chandausl 


317 


122 


243 


682 


81 lOi 29; .. 


13 


42 


11 


13 


Dhanaura 


1.54 


241 


169 


564j 13| 111 27 .. ! 24 


51 


8 


8 


Gunnanr 


427 


175 


273 


875 8 9 8 7| 4 l9 


8 


8 


Hasan pur 


2.5.") 


340 


229 


824 3 7 19, lOi 3 32 


10 


10 


Kanth 


580 


249 


91 


920. 2 5 8 3! 9 20 


12 


12 


Knndarki 


374 


313 


397 


1,084' 8 5 7 


17 


30! .54 


12 


11 


Moradabad 


747 


439 


84-2 


2,028i 4i 31 30 


17 


21 


68 


36 


.501 


Narainlya 


204 


142 


180 


526 4; 5 13 


• . . . 


13 


7 6: 


Raj para 


284 


1.50 


243 


677 


541 10! 20 


9; 29 


7 8} 


Rasulpur 
Sambnal 


158 


90 


90 


3.38 


2; .. ! 81 4i 5! 17 


7 7; 


97 


61 


68 


236i 11 .. 4i 5 10 


19 


16 14' 


Shahpur 


16fi 


65 


84 


31,5; 23 8| 17; 1 3 


21 


6 7 


Sharif pnr 


122 


139 


150 


411 4 


1 171 .. = 1, 18 


4 3 


Thakurdwara 


211 


132 


139 


482 13 61 5 


14 


29! 48 


10 


10 


Total 


4,648 


3,486 


3,891 


12,025 


156! 126 25* 

, 1 


91 




183 




528 


177 


200 

1 


PiLiBHiT District. 






, j i ! 


Baheri 


161 


132 


146 


439 5i . ' 21: 13 15 49 


9 


9 


Bisalpur 


263 


197 


163 


622 8: 6, 8! 4 5 17 


7 


8; 


Fatehganj West 


105 


3.59 


109 


573 


4 3 23' .. .. 23! 


10 151 


Mirgan j 


122 


200 


lOi) 


431 


6; 1 12, 1 6 19 


11 


8 


NawabganJ 


ir.7 


85 


135 


377 8 4; 2! 2 


16 20 


4 


4 


Pnibliit 


260 


163 


in 


616 5i 7 13| 2 


10 24 


23 


20 


Puranpur 


63 


96 


104 


263 


7! 6 jO' 1' I4i 25' 


5 


5 


Ram pur 


108 


107 


136 


411 


2 5 24 


2 81 


34 


7 


8 


SIrauli 


311 


468 


495 


1,274 


8! 13 25 


16 22 


63 


9 


9 


Shahl 


347 


345 


im 


798 


2t 10, 17, 5! 61 28 

1 1 


8 


12 


Total 


1,896 


2,212 


1.096 


5,804 .55' .55! 154 
. 1 


46 


102' 302 


93 


98 


Bui) AON District. 








' 1 

■ 1 








i 


Aonia 


419 


449 


526 


1,394 


.. ! 12; 31' 19| 


47 


97 


8 13; 


Bilsi 


785 


1.54 


514 


1.453 


9 


4 14 .. 





16 


13 12i 
8 7! 


Khamora 


287 


94 


213 


591 


41 


3, Ti 7 14 


93 


Bisaull 


538 


72.5 


748: 


2,011 10 


20 


• • 


• • 


20 


12 


12 


Binawar 


138 


280 


240 


058 4 


11 2i 


• • 


• • 


22 


9 


•'^i 


DataganJ 


565 


vn 


251 


937 4 


81 11 


4 


3 18' 


11 


11! 


Kakrala 


272 


180 


253 


7051 9 3! 25 


11 18 .54i 


12 


^i| 


UJhani 


.527 


132 


44S 


1,1(J7I 13 12| 20 


5i 


26! 511 


9 


7! 


Biidaon 


375 


1% 


.503 


l,07ir 


9 


2 20' .. 

1 


4 24i 


37 
109 


33 

109 

I 


Total 


3.906 


2,331 


3,701 

1 


9.938 


63 


64 


2.15 


46 

1 


114 


3a5 



FOB THE YEAR BSDIVQ WITH SOtk NOVEMBER, 1903. 
AND WORK. 



1 


1 


1 

B 


1 


P 




1 


S 
1 




S 
§ 


1 


1 


i 


-3 


1 




< 



< 


1 


■» 


170 


300 


70 600 


475 ll .13,. 








..!,,' 1 


1 


7 


n 


11 


36 


1ST 


143 


40 


30 372 


300 ll 15.. 










1 


1 


1 


6 




w 


VA 


« 


70 


sol 388 


380 1 10.. 














2 


1 




: 


,2 


V» 


SO 


63 


48| 3sn 


3io: 1 .v>.. 










■■ 


i 







3 


1 


n 


173 


f» 


84 


70l 413 


3.39 1 01 . 












1 










13 


1164 


71 


W 


3»i 500 


44.1 1. 35.. 






" 






1 1 


3 


2 


i 


9 


3» 


iir 


103 


58 071 


53r,| ]l 25. .1 .. ■■ 








11 3 




4 


8 


IS 


no 




30 


30 15: 


ISol 1! 13 


" 






i| 3 






A 


1.5 


laa 


14! 


1% 


lU)! 501 


438' 1! 42. 








]. 3 


"3 


11 


10 


38 


S!0 


37: 


15( 


305i 1.110 


WW 1 133 1. ^\ i 






'4 


1 14 


7 


lu 


. 3! 


77 


lOU 


K 


15 


IB 335 


315 1' 12; 








..1 1 








11 


anr 


150 


100 


100 550 


48.', 1 l.'>.. 












3 


i 
3 


8 


71 


ra 


A) 


33 345 


IWl 1: 3.-(l.. 








'■'■ 




5 


10 


tou 


IQ 


150 


156 VM 


441^ 1 


30.. 












'i^ 4 




3 




19 


SW 


ItM 


40 


■-'11 503 


490; 1 


loL. 




.':... 










3 




>« 


9 


5' 


*r 


30 \9f, 


it& 1 


15:.. 














1 


1 




147 


00 


no 


-JiL'^ 


sii; 1 


18.. 








■■:fi ' 


3 


3 


6 


13 


3jon 


1011 


1,430 


1.4.5fl| 7,fi5.1 


0.354' r 


645 


I 


8~ 


3 


3 


1 4|lO| 40 


33 


75 


:^ 


~~3M 


135 


no 


5* 


4.V y-A 


330 1 35 










..-..' 3 


4 


1 


8 


1« 


48 


a 


30 


13 119 


89, 1, 30 


■ ■ 








.. .. 4 . 


I 




10 


275 


l!>3 


3IU 


70 


749 


647; 1 50 














2 :i 3 




I 


81 


200 


105 


GO 


SO 


385 


300 l: 2.-> 














.. ! 3 


4 




IE 


144 
115 


47 
05 


S 


48 
300 


3(« 
543 


3IS l; 10 
4S3 1' 33 






;; 




'■'■ 






\ ^ 


1 

3 




^ 


IK) 


01 


51 


43 


349 


■iW. 1 31 


















3 


13 


2M 


88 


43 


33; 387 


3(W] 1 flO 
















ll -^ 


3 


'. 


14 


133 


80 


183 


nnl 5flo 


302 1 47 
















3 ■; 




17 


16n 


185 


33 


S3' m. 


S*bI 1 80.. 














4] -A 


1 


8 


16 








1 




















— 




LKH 


_!*? 


774 


757 4.108 


3.M2j 10 .350 


■■ 




J 




- 


- 


- 


'aii'«3 


•a 


_» 


141 


317 


200 


S94 


143 959 


"~j" ^, 


1 : 




J. 


Ti 


4 




\k 


)3l> 


130 


IfiO 


75| 4S.1 


448| t; 4« 






3! 4 


5 




M 


ni 


W 


87 


43 380 




4-; 




'"' 1 *■ 4 




1 


19 


KS 


81 


7.1 


10 301 


3HU 1 


33 




••I- ^i % * 


1 






101 


M 


3? 


31 1 371 






31 











11 
1* 


!S!t 


55 


05 


.55 461 






25 




::]::-'i: sj ;i 


3 


.' 


100 


(P 


3U 


lo! 308 






S5 1| 301 








18 


31.1 


37 


1.V 


5)1 450 






Ifl . .. 1.. .. 


■■■■■ '' ll : 




s 


» 


178 


ll» 


90 


99! 533 




1 0.3; i: .54: I .. 


3;.. 1 3' 4 


4 SI 


















l,.VIl 


£in 


1,078 


"^'H^ 


3.803| 9 300Js: 74; \ .. 


■>'..] » 37; 3'. 


"1 " 


155 



NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE STATISTICS 

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 



NAMES OF CIRCUITS. 



GoNDA District. 

Rahraich 

Bhinga 

Balrampur 

ColoiielffanJ <& Ktiisarfiraiij 

EllAnniir 

Nawabfi^anJ 

Nanuara Sc Rupaldiha 

Uonaa 



Totftl 

OUDH DiSTUICT. 

Luck now, Hind. 

Luck now, Rng. 

Rai Barollly 

Barabankl 

Lakhfmpore 

Sidhaulf 

Itaunja 

Tikaiatnnflrar 

Sitapur 

Total 

HATiryoi DiSTUICT. 

nilffram 

Hardoi 

Mall a wan 

Plhanl 

Haflpur 

Khnnabad 

Sandi 

Sandlla 

Unau 

Total 

GAUnWAL DlSTRrOT. 

Gadoll 
Kalniir 
Lansidowno 
Pauri 
Rani nee 

Totul 



CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY. 



Ciiuncn 
Memhkr- 

SHIP. 





• 




en 


en 


ki 


M 
o 


S 


o 


B 


08 


7^ 


Ji 


^m 


s 


a 


cu 


PZ4 



270 
12 
78 

121 
54 
73 

lOD 
31 

173 



911 



37 
122 
?^ 
W 
4« 
18()j 

30, 
100. 

I 

704 1 



a 

ki 
•3 






4^ 



.£3 



o 
'A 

s 

o 
H 



Deaths 



lis. 



c8 

AM 

to 

c . 
o c 



g§Jp 



75 


120 


80 


132 


71 


32 


102 


75 


38 


158 


or, 


86| 


48 


40 


30 


18 


10 


11 


55 


35 


48 


58: 


40. 


7S 



I 

-. — J 

I j 
i 



^P 



BAPTISMS. 



2 

c 

u 

M 
O 

o 

c 

2 
o 



s 
o 

o 
B 

P X 

-I 

5^ 



;3 



a 

s 

o 

EH 



s 

>» 

eS 
9 
gO O 



eS 
H 

c 

C 

E 



5 
s 



o 

it 

25 



275 

2r, 

215 
340 
118 
X) 
138 
185 



tMO: 40r,i 403 1,545 



108 
101 

81 
32, 

13i 

i8i 

120 



59S> 



8^ 


400 


54 


lfl7 


&-, 


253 


83 


285 


23 


lOJ) 


44 


:53 


• 1 


122 


1ft 


5-> 


137 


430 



524 2,o:M 



80 
5 
52 
27 
12 



40| 

03; 

28' 
17' 
S5. 
45, 

12, 

80 

417 

I 

I 

03 

12i 

40; 

.5:,: 

I • 



20 
12t5 
15 
12 
15 
115 
00 

in. 

30 



18 
17 
10 
10 

3 



14- 
13 

8! 
lOj 

5; 

1 



48. 21 







1 



14 

O 

3 

r\ 

1 

4 
4 



4 

0! 

5 

8 

1 

1 

4 

2. 



127; 70 33i 31 



I 

24; n 21 

4 12: 7 10 

6, 141 9I (>i 

12: 24' 10! 12 

2 4 4 4 

3 5 3 3 
U 19; 4 5. 

7 13: 10; 1« 

51! 115" "jCs: 82; 



31 
o 



1 
4 



4; 

I 

■ • I 

lOl 

3i 
3: 

4 
o. 

M 

]i 
5' 



5 



Si 

o! 



4 
10: 



0' 

I 

I 

4 

1 

■ 

4 

3 



7' 211 



131 

5i 
I4i 
14, 

5: 



•««'i «j»w «HJ 



I 

■ —I 



19 



< ii 



« 

9. 
21 i 
18; 
11 

341 

150 



I r- 



27 
10 
25 
24 
20 
13. 
13 

8. 
20 



• 57 



14 
24 
U 
13. 

25 



103 

341 

?|0 

130; 

7S' 
HSiV 
200 

52: 

210- 



1 
o 



o 

I" 
I 



5 



01 
5 

I 

I. 
•) 

8 
o 



4 

I 

4 
1 

17 
3! 
1 

4i 



1: 
o 



ii 

10: 

3; 



3 
18 
11. 
12i 

4 
19 

Si 

10 



8i 
2<^i 
I? 
17 



40 

10; 
10 

13' 



1 

4a> \.:m 17 22 39; 20 9*)! i49i 77 



100; i»^*» 



10 
5 
5 
5 

10 

61 
8- 
11 



81 
10 

17! 

I 



76! 



127 
10 
70 
21 
14 



279 
27 

las 

103 

33 



3 - 

3; 



185 1 



< I 



248 010 



1, 



5 

1 

1 

4r 

1 







11 
1 2 



1 
4 

12i 11 



10 



15 



4i 
9 



6 111 

4- 41 

«: 

0! 14 

3. 3 



38' 25: 41' 



mS THE TEAS SlfDJltQ WITB SOA NOVEXBES, ISOS. 
AND WOBE. 



NORTH INDIA CONFEUENCE STATISTICS 
CnUBCU HEHBBB8BIP 



BaTRlllr Section Tutal . 

Kumnon fierHnn. 

Ehnt 

nwnrahat- Lobhft 

NalDlTal-Ualdwuul 

NrtiiilTal.Kiig. 

VilhorKtigarb 

Kumfton Section Total . 



i,r.ni| s,ios| i,80i: a,m 



,g 


.SI 


130: 


.SJ| 


"si 


■, , 


4 . 
U 


BUS 


384; 


278; 


OSS 


13 


•! < 


-' 



JOB THE YSAU ENDING WITH SOlk NOrEMBEIl, 1903. 
AND WOBE. 



1,040 677 

'SOO "40 
161 45 

150 70 
19J 4S 

eo 30 

IB Vi 
13'i 60 

eo. so 
an re 

03 160 

»)l 31 
373 150 

Ta»7|T*50 

"i 

is' .5 
43 37 

KIT 143 
70 81 

101 1B4 

343 470 
3.030 1,92U 

88! 75 

mi i5i 

1931 135 
05; 30 
63 13 

160 100 

9y 3- 

I4ul a 

-5S|— 3 


1.350 

'ioH 

SO 

sua 

65 
101 
113 

'm 

70 
50 

50 
134 

100 

lis 

155 
291 
058 

3.17A 

40 

50 
40 
32 
15 
CO 
8 
35 


337 

"20 
34 
X!5 
13 
30 
7( 

"97 
101 
60 

SB 
84 

l,tW5 


3.374 

■300 
280 
843 

a43 

351 
103 

103 
301 
453 

suit 

IM 
747 

7,701 


3,100 

'300' 
144 
335 

a<i5 

175 
103 
160 

389 
114 

5.1231 

95 

164 
3.-.0 

Ml ' 

1,S05| 

0,437.1 

190 

. 41li» 

413 

ms. 
75: 

280 

7.1 

147 

275j 

...111 


305 

"30 

21 
44 
40 
20 
» 
25 
20 
CO 
48 

or 

715 

38 
24 

30 

"70 
1.12 

807 

1 30 
1 0(1 

I 2.- 

'■' 

■ It 
3» 

239 


.; 

1 
1 

3 

i 

*i 

3 

*i 


120 

210 

'20 
'50 

70 
280 

'40 
40 


1 

'i 

1 

"3 

2 
5 


1 

3 

"i 

1 
1 


2 
3 

! 
3 
■i 
6 
9 


S 

'3 

'5 
'3 


3 

IS 

11 

1 
1 

:; 


8 
6 

3 

1 
3 

a 

1 
3 

■ 7 

\ 

48 


J 

1 

3 

3 

19 


2 

3t 

1 
3 
1 
2 
3 
2 

1 

1 

GO 

i 

80 

2 

5 
1 
4 

1 

"1 

1 

19 


3 

1 

; 

"1 

5 

1 

"1 


I 

4 
3 

3 
8 


66 

44 

B 
10 
13 
7 
S 
8 
1 
IS 
18 
13 

5 
IS 


23 

i 
( 
"3 
12 
34 

3 
t 

! 
37 


82 

■33 
99 
141 

S 
16 
10 

10 
70 


24U 


BO 
13 

80 

'iso 

299 

35 
53 
4S 
It 

9C 

"30 
50 

339 


178 
204 

48.-. 

74s 

1.7fi9 
0,530 

33ft 
4H5 

4m 

115 

Wt 

4'ii: 

3lf 

2,373 


1J> 
36 
41 

"S7 
374 

IS 
33 
33 
8 

IN 
19 
11 
IS 
31 

151 



NOHTH INDIA CONFERENCE STATISTICS 

CHUBOH MEMBERSHIP AND 





CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY. 


BAPTISMS. 






Chitbcd 








a 


• 


1 




. ■•- 1 




Membbb- 






Dkaths 


a 




1 
1 




GO 


CB 





BlIIP. 


2 


• 




1 

1 


to 

§ 

B 

a 

B 




1 

6 


1 

■a 

s 

1 

•§ 






NAMES OF DISTRICTS. 


• 


• 

2 


Members 
Lloners. 


'1 

X 




s 


« 


2 




?9B 


to 


u 


On* 




91 


«} 







9 

a 
o 

e8 


a 


1 


. 
o 

5 


3 9 


)m amon 
Ihildren. 


*-4 

o 

2 
2 


Idren fr 
hristlan 


2 




.8 

s 




Is! 




& 


1 


OS 


^ 




.a 
O 




< 


^ 




2i 




Bureilly-Kumaon District 


1,883 2,486 

i 


2,070 


6,448 


81 


58 


140 


30 


88 


258 


199 


331 


Bijnor District 


2,401 


1,594 


1,185 


5,270 


49 


47 


125 23 


&5 


233 


89 


87 


BudaoD District 


1 
3,gOO- 2,331 

1 


3,701 


9,938 


62 


64 


235 


40 


114 


395 


109 


109 


Garhwal District 


185 177 


248 


610 


6 


5 


12! 11 


15 


38 


25 


41 


Gouda District 


640 


496 


4a3 


1,545 


127 


70 


33 


31 


51 


115 


58 


82 


Hardoi District 


764 


417 


409 


1,590 


17 


22 


39 


20 


90 


149 


77 


75 



Moradabad District .. | 4,048 3,480. 3,891 1 12,025| 156. 126; 254 91 



Oudh District 



Pllibhit District 



911 590 
1,896 2,212 



524 2,034: 29' 32 



Grand Total 1903 .. 17.330 



1,096 5,804 




Total 1902 .. .16,523 13,806 14,075 44,404 






Increase 



Decrease 



807: .. 



61 



55 



55 



582 485 



596 



499 



860 .. 



s: 



10 



50' 23 



154 



46 



1042, 321 



906 296 



136: 25 



14 



183' 528i 177 200 



105 



77 150! 106 



102! 303 93 



805 



2168 



993 



98 



1168 



6311833 



971 



174 335 22 



1212 



24 



FOR THX YEAR SNDIHQ WITH SOlk SOVEMBER, 1903. 
WOBK.-80MUARY. 



NOBTU INDIA CONFBEENOE STATISTICS 

CHUBGH 







Church Property. 




Ministerial 
Support. 


NAMES OF 
DISTRICT. 


• 
Or 


Value of Churches. 


c 


Value of Parsonages 


• 

2 

u 

9 

O 

"3 


lue of all Property. 


"3 




w 
9 

a 

9 

73 . 
a >. 


• 

« c 
9 

•fit! 
-8 


ii 

a. 

•a 
a 
a 

S 

u, 
a 

m 


•9.5 

20 


a 
2 

9 
> 

e9 

'A 


Support from £uro- 

1 


• 

"5 

u 

c 

t 

9 

C 


u 


i 


• 


o 
B 

S3 


9 

2 


1.1 


2 


a 


> 

O 


«3 9 

c a. 

^2 


Sua 

to 


2g 

«8 » 


9 


Is 


IS 

la 




|i 


tr 

^ 




£ 7i 


Oi 


> 


H £!< a, 

1 


^ 


< 


(4 


(u 


C4 


H 


MOIULDADAD DlSTRlCTT. 




Rs. 




Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Ks. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 

1 


Ks. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Amroba 


3 


8.V) 





1,3.50 


30 


2,2,30 


1 

• • 




48 


1 
eO!77x 


• • 


5 


*?x 


Babukhcra 


t 


72 


2 


100 


• • 


172 


• • 




13 


30 24 


• • 





26 


Bahjoi 


1 


<30 2 


400 


00 


f»sn 


• • 




lOT 


40 39 


• • 


4 


43 


Ghandausi 


4 


772 2 


1..500 


100 


2,372 


C7 


67 


400 


60 00 


• • 





00 


Dhanaura 


1 


5(10. 5 


.500 


■ • 


1,000: .. 




40 


40 


43x 


• • 


4x 


4i$x 


Gannaar 


2 


CO 


3 


200 


• • 


320| .. 




75 


00 


00 


• • 


4 


04 


Hasanpur 


2 


400 


3 


580 


• • 


1*801 .. 




180 


60 


07 


■ • 


7x 


74x 


Kanth 


2 


20 


•» 

-* 


20 


• • 


40 .. 




30 


50 


34x 


• • 


2 30x1 


Kundarki 


1 


rA) 


1 


550 


■ • 


(MK); .. 




15 


60 


48 


• • 


3 


51 


Morudaliad 


4 


3.5,00;) 


10 


lo.eyo 


10,UX) 


.5.5,ri90: .. 




230 


280 


380 


250! 5J) 


,580 


Narutniya 


1 


20 


1 


12 


• ■ 


32i .. 




10 


40 


33x 


• • 


4 


37x 


Rajpura 


1 


IftO 


• • 


• ■ 


• • 


15()| .. 




20 


40 


30 


• • 


4x 40x 


Rasulpur 
Sambnal 




14:) 


1 


20 


• • 


ItiS! .. 




15 


30: m 


• • 


-*x :«x 


1 


1.100 


3 


1,250 


330 


2.O80! .. 




400 


))0 m 


• • 


r» 71 


Shahpur 


3 


400 


1 


30 


• • 


430! .. 




109 


ou m 




8 03 


Sharif pur 


• • 


• • 


• > 

-0 


130 


• • 


130 .. 




10 


.30 3<'> 


• • 


3! :w 


Thakurdwara 


• • 

30 


• ■ 


1 
4.5 


300 


■ ■ 


3iX)! .. 
07.8*1 07 


07 


12 
18<V) 


30: 23x 
1078 »•«»« 


• • 


'^ 25x 

■ 


Total 


:Ki,rm 


17,09-2 


10,550 


2,50 112! »»» 


Piunmr District. 












! 




Rahcri 


1 


1.50 


1 


5(K) 


• • 


6.50 


• ■ 




108 


00 00 




5 


05 


Bisalpur 


1 


1.50 


2 


300 


100 


.5.50 


• • 




24 


48 48 




3 


51 


Fatehganl West 


1 


7.'J0 


4 


1,«J30 


2<M) 


2,.5IW 


• • 




177 


90 


90 




5 


101 


MtrganJ 


1 


100 


1 


.50 


• • 


150 


• • 




12 


48 


48 




4 


.52 


NawabganJ 


1 


7(» 


1 


80 


• ■ 


1.50 


• • 




12 


2* 


25 




2 


27 


Pilibhit 




500 


4 


.500 


211 


1,211 


141 




48 


120 


84 


30 10 


130 


Puranpnr 


1 


.'m 


1 


175 


• • 


230 


• • 




12 


24 


24 




20 


Ram pur 


• • 


• • 


1 


310 


■ • 


310 


• • 







48 


48 


2, r,oi 


Siraiiil 


1 


ino 


•> 


380 


• ■ 


.530 


• • 




34 


84 


81 




5 89 


Shahl 


1 

10 


30 


•> 
ID 


150 


• • 


180 


• • 

144 


• • 


3i-> 
529 


48 
000 


48 
.505 


.30 


4 

42 


52 
043 


Total 


1,93.5 


4,075 


.511 


0,.521 


Bud AON District. 










Aonia 


1 


r>oo 


4 


700 


50 


1,250 






40 


60 


00 




3x 


03x 


Bllsl 


1 


500 


3 


.525 


50 


1,075 






85x 


■ • 


84 




3x 


87X 


Hhamora 


1 


.5(K) 


•> 


KJO 


■ • 


000 






• • 


48 


40x 




2 


48x 


Bidault 


1 


.50 


3 


1200 


40 


1,290 






72 


72| 72 




5 


77 


Binawar 




2»» 


3 


451 


• • 


mx 






42x 


1.5X 


19x 






•0 


21x 


DataganJ 


1 


.5U) 


3 


200 


.50 


750 






535 


30 


28x 




3 


3!x 


Kakrala 


1 


120 


4 


rm 


40 


(V'lO 






48 


48 


48 




3 


51 


UJhanl 


.. 


• • 


• 1 


200 


• ■ 


2(K) .. 




73 


• ■ 


49 




3 


.52 


Budaon 


10 


19,000 


3 


7.150 


10,.50O 


45,(r»(» 


• • 


• ■ 


• • 

902X 


89 
302X 


89 

1 

49()X 


k)\ 25 


18:i 
01.5\ 


Total 


21,400 


27 


l^UW 


19,730 


52.222 


09 


49x 



FOB THE YEAR ENDING WITH SOth NOVEMBER, 290). 
FINANCES. 



BsirsyoLBNT Collkctions. 


Otiirr Col- 

LECTIONR. 


Otal of Ministorfal Support and 
all Collections. 


Income rarnkd in 
Southern Asia. 


•2 

a 


Fob 

MUWION- 
ARY 

Society. 


a 
o 

U 

eS 


• 

a- 

o 

1.1 

,0 


• 

1 


o 
o 

1 
>» 

c 
C 

S:3 


• 

o 

X 

o 

1.1 

o 


• 

o 

c 

-S 
> 

n 

.a 

O 


au 

P 
O 

1 

> 

G 

C 

i 

o 


to 

a- 


c 

y ? 

X* 

r t 
so 


• 
X 

s 

In 


99 

8 

A 

s 

S3 

si 


1 

o 

♦3 

o 

■% 

"5 

o « 


eo * 


S 

c 

-g 

C 

u 

w 

o 


1. 
=1 

"a 
o| 

25 


i 

A 
Q 

1 


>» 
a 

s 


U o 


\h 


(14 


Pm 


(^ 


< 


H 


;i4 


u 


1X4 


H 


wm 


H 


H 


o 


Rs. 


I&. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 




Rs. 


6 


• • 


ix 


2 




X 


4x 


Ix 


1.5X 






1 


g8x 


• • 


• ■ 


• • 




96x 


3 


1 


X 


1 




X 


2 


■ « 


8 






• • 


34 


• • 


1 






1 


a^s 


2 


x- x 


• • 




• • 


1 


a . 


4 






• ■ 


47 


• • 










47 


2. .. i 1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


8 


r.0 




1 


1-2.') 


• • 








1 


1?.'S 


3x; 1 


1 


1 




1 


2x 


• • 


lOx 






1 


5IIX 


• • 










50x 


*i •• 


IX: .. 




1 


Ix 


• • 


7x 




■ ■ • ■ 


71 X 


• • 










71x 


4! .. 


1 


• • 




1 


3x 


• • 


«x 


27 


• • •. 


111 


■ • 










111 


Ix .. 


X 


• • 


x 


X 


X 


• • 


3x 




1 
■ . 1 • . 


39x 


• • 








" 


3Qx 




1 


1; . 


1 


Ix 


• • 


Ox 




1 

• . 1 . a 


.'>7x 


• • 










57x 


ar» 12 


47 


10 


5 


!& 


33 


2r»o 


427 


. • 1 . . 


• • 


1,007 


3,952 


2,300 






6,2.VJ 


7,259 


3 1 


1 


X 


1 


X 


2x 


• • 


yx 






• ■ 


47x 


• • 










47x 


IX X 


1 


1 




t • 


2 


• • 


Hx 






40x 


• • 










46x 


2: 1 


X 


■ • 




• • 


Ix 


• • 


5 






43x 


• • 










43x 


12 3 4x 


1 




• • 


Ix 


• • 


22x 






9HX 


301 


462 






820 


919X 




• • 




1 


o 


• • 


.'* 






(i8 


• • 










08 


2i 1 


X 


• • 




1 *> 


• ■ 


5x 






44X 


• ■ 


■ • 








44X 


2x 


1 


X 

<y2x 


• • 

18x 


Gx 


X .. 


• • 


4x 






• • 

"1 


30x 
2,024x 


• ■ 


2,703 






1 


BOX 


118X 


13x 


63x 


i 


4,310 


• • 


7,07J)-9,103x 


4 


• • 


1 




• • 


1 


3 


4 


14 


1 


1 


80 


• • 




. . 




80 


4 


X 


1 




• • 


1 


2x 


r> 


]5 






1 


07 


• • 










07 


I* 
1 


o 2 


o 

«l.. 


1 


o 

far 


K) 


32 






1 


134 












134 


3 


.. 1 1 


■ • 


1. O 


4 


11 






1 


(V4 


• • 










i <^ 


3 


.. 1 X 




• • 


1 


1 


3 1) 






• • 


35 


• • 


• ■ 








1 30 


r> 


2' 1 


1.. 


1 


3 


5 


18 






1 


149 


■ ■ 










149 


3 


Iz 1 


x|.. 


1 


2 


4 


13 






1 


40 


• • 








• * 


40 


3 


•> 1 


1:.. 1 


4 


4 


10 


.. 1 .. 


o 


08 


• ■ 










RS 


4 


• • , A 


~ • • 


li 4 


18 


o2 


.-[ - 


12.-. 


• • 










12:» 


4 
4^ 


1 

6 lOx 




• • 


10 20x 


4 

• • 


14 
174 

9 


• • 





1 
11 


07 
830 

72x 


• • 

• 


• • 


• • 

• • 






• • 


07 


«.. 


• • 


830 


4 


• • 


1 


ix 


• • 


1 


Ix 


72x 


2x 


Ix 


X 


A • • 


X Ix 


• ■ 


7x 






1 


j»r>x 


100 






100 


19r)X 


1 


• ■ 


1 


X ■ • • 


1 


1 


• • 


f) 








53x 


• ■ 




• • 




53x 


C 


• • 


1 


A t ■ • 


1 


Ix 


• • 


lOx 








87x 


• • 




• • 




87x 


2 


• • 


X 




• ■ 


X 


X 


• • 


4 








2l>x 


• • 




• • 




2.'>x 


2 


■ • 


1 




• • 


1 


1 


.. 











37x 


■ • 




• • 




37x 


2x 


X 


1 




• • 


1 1 


« • 


1 








."vS 


• • 








58 


2 


• • 


1 1... 


1 Ix 


• • 


ex 








.'Wx 


• • 




• • 




r»8x 


2() 


• ■ 


12x 


8 5 


4 

13x 


20 
21>x 


27 Wx 


44 
44 


mmmm 


•> 
3 


3?8x 

'810x 


trj9x 
i.oeyx 




• « 


929x 
1.029X| 


l,2.'>Sx 


4S 


ix 


19X 


IGx 


6 

1 


27 


1.VIX 


1 
! 


• • 

i 


184.5X 



NOBTH INDIA CONFEBESTCE STATISTICS 

CHURCH 



NAMES OF 
DISTRICT. 



Church Pboperty. 



— 






« 






1 








o 
to 

c3 

c 


• 


m 


'5 








• 


o 

X 


a 

o 

M 

.a 
o 

"5 


luo of all Propi 


o 


SS'^ 


• 

o 

a 


,4 

O 

o 
o 


% 

s 

kl 

3 


Value of Par 


Indebtedness 
rty. 


a. o 
a; 




o 


o 




o 


«^ 


ee 


.s i~ 


s 


3 
2 


o 


o 
IS 


> 

'a 

o 


♦a a- 

2:^ 


♦3 c^ifc 


^ 


PU 


>?5 


CU 


> 


H 


^ 


•* 





Ministerial 
Support. 



as 

-as 
est 

OLrr 



as 



O 

o 

In 

o 

> 

Xa 

e3 
>k . 

^ cn 






6 

hi 

o 

«•- 

o 
p. 
a 

o 

e9 « 



a 



c 

C 

o 

u 

M 

O 

"Si 






»4 

o 






OoxDA District. 

Bahraich 

Bhinga 

Balrampnr 

Colotiolganj and Kaisar- 

ffan j 
EUenpur 
Nawabganj 

Nanpara «& Rupaldiha . 
Gonda 

Total 

OuDii District. 

Lncknow 

Luck now. En?. 

Ral BaroiDy 

Barabankl 

Lukhimpore 

Sidhaull 

Itaunja 

Tikaiatnagar 

Sltapur 

Total 

Hardoi District. 

Bllgrain 

Ilardoi 

Mallawan 

PlhanI 

Safiuur 

Sh:in;ibad 

Saridi 

S.indlla 

Unao 

Total 

(lARUWAL DlflTKIOT. 

Uaduli 

Kainiir 

Lansdownc 

P.iuri 

Ka.nnee 

Total 



Rs. 



20<) 
2,140 
350 3 



Rs. 



1 
3 



Rs. 



500 



300 
5,300 



400 2,000 

140 

80 200 



3(X) 
300 



2.')0 



Rs. 

2,<W0 

2,880 

030 

300 
1,050 



7 8,7il012 



2 24,000 7 
1;22,0:X) 1 

2 i,iuo; 3 

1 4,5801 1 
1 3,000' 3 
1 
1 



2r)0 
8,500 12.000 



KKI 



Rs. 



9,970 



1 
I 3 

I 

I— 
11 



.ryo 

1,330 



:A.{m 



19 



3.%0| 1 

4'^): 3 







1.5(Kl 
150 



50,000 

10,000 

2,.%0 

59i 

650 

80 

60 

9,975 



2' 



14,4.')0 



390000 
2,000 



r3,915 



170 
1,3,50 



50 
75w 



9,975 



1,800 



33,210 



401975 



700. 1 9.'»1» 

I I 



3, Hi) 



: 1 



9 

I - 



50 
8.9(.K) 



2iO 
50 



451000 

5,000 

5,176 

3,650 

80 

60 

50 

21.280 

4860,'iG 



.•iTO 
10,»?50' 



2,4;V.> 
1,700 



250 



250 



3.:i70 9,:00 15..'.70 



.300! 2, 2<K) 
.. ! II 250! 



.'i(M) 

:ir»() 



3! 2.7(,'<): l.cm ?, 7(R» 

8,.^»:i( » 7 1 0, .*>• 0| .^ 1 ,8iJ0: r,o, ^."M) 

4t«): 3! l.'iO' .. i :,:>(. 



Bs. Rs. 



200 
502 
1.50 

m 

80 
20 
25 



Rs. 

185 
40 
35 

66 
38 
18 
20 
196 



Rs. 

159 
36 
46 

89 
57 
21 
35 
108 



Rs. 



598 .551 



431 



40 
40 



224 
1500 



42 



1043 



10 



18 
44 



GO 

— I 
132' 



73 
69 
28 
29! 
18 
13 
128: 720 

793'2186 



38i 
98 
2ll 

•>«»y' 

28j 
6'.! 
20x 
28 
42 



Rs. 

9 
4 

4 

3x 
3 
2 
1 

10 

36x 



Rs 

168 
40 
50 

928 
60 
23 
36 

158 



628 



imix 






— I — 



9,:}.-|0 10 I3,S(X)'3i.80J 55,85 

I ' I 

II I ! 



«.K)| 
10. 



I 



100 



l:i 
18! .. 
.50 150 
15 



■ • 

6 
.5x 
4x 
5x 

3 

• • 

lOlx 



4x 

8x 
2x 
3x 
3x 
5x 
2X 
3 
5 



708 

ifm. 

79j 

74! 
741 
34! 
21, 
13| 
676 

3379 



421 
Wt>' 

231 
25x1 

311 

65! 
29x 

31 

_...;-i J! 

35\ awK 






18 
28 
28 
19S 398- 

\:^\ 43; 



i 
17H' 

40; 

4r>i 



lOO: .. i 155 250 31.0 705 



I^B THE YSAR ENDING WITH 30ih NOVSMDEli, im. 
FINANCES. 



NOBTH INDIA CONFERENCE STATISTICS 

CHURCH 



NAMES OF 
DISTRICT. 



Church Propkbty. 









en 




CO 




o 




a 




bo 




^ 




eS 




o 




a 




a 


en 
a; 


s 


• 

en 




&4 


.a 


o 




V4 


o 




n 


o 




o 

:3 


ea 


Value 


.d 




o 


o 


c; 


t^ 


o 



h^l Cue 



B 

a 

'A 



o 
u 



>% 

a 

o 

u 

In 

-♦a 
O 






I I 



&4 

p. 
o 
In 

Pu 



® 

s 



a 
o 

so 

09 






a ' 
to 

C % 

2 S X 

C c8 



e9 



Ministerial 
Support. 



.b' jS 



y. 



♦* .'^ a 



> 

o 
H 



*» a;| 

; oo h, 






c3Qm 
efi! P. > 

9u 



.a 






u 

O 

.a 
.a 

eS 
>« . 

(^ X 

a; 



O 

a 



o 
p. 

a 

C9 09 



I 

o 

o 



o 



I 



In 

o 



^ D. 






BARKnJ.Y-KUMAON 

District. 

Bnrellly SectUm, 

Barollly , ^ 

Bareilly Sadar Bazar . . 

Farldpur 

Jiilalubad 

Khera Bajehra 

Mlrunpur Katra 

Mohamdi 

Panahpur 

Powayan 

ShahJubanpur East .. 

ijhah: alianpur West . . 

Shahjahanpur-Dllawar 

ganj 
Tllhar 

Bareilly Section Total 

Kumaon Section. 



Bhot 

Dwnrnhnt-Lobha 
Nainl Tal-llaldwanl 
Naini Tal, Eug:. 
Pithorahgarh 

Kumaon Section Total 



1 
3 

18 



4 
3 
2 
1 
3 

13 



BarclUy-Kumaon Tot:il,31 



BuNOR District. 

Basta 

Bljuor 

D ham pur 

Kirathpur 

Mandawar 

Na^^lna 

Najibabad 

Niirpur 

Scobara 

Total' 



1 



4 
12 



Rs. 



15.073 

4<)0 

4()0 

50 

13,oIo 
100 



Rs. 



Rs. Rs 



Rs. iRs. 



5 35 000 



500 

100 

6.500, 

3,700 

500 
1,.')00 



1 

3 
o 

1 

t' 

3 



103700 



300 
360 
450 
lO*)! 
200: 
100 
200 
34U 



1,000 



41.823 



2,000 
4,1(KJ 
6.800 
25,000 
3,r)<J0 



5,2()0 12,(KX) 
8,200 



2 800 

3 1.500 

34 52,810 



153773! 

1,700' 

760; 

5(X)! 

13,100 
300 
100 
700 
405 

23,700 
27,325 3U,225 



25 



60! 



1,300: 
3,(XiO 



144110 238713 



4 1,500 .. S.-VX) 
5i l,2r)0 2,800| 8,16«)j 
3; 2.500 20. iO(» -,'9,500 . 

3!28,(KiO'2ii4r)00-.\'i7500j . 
U; 4,900 :2,0(K) iO,400! '. 



41,400 24 38,160 249500 32^1060 



tiOf^tfO 



100 
930 
50 
25 



58 00,970 393010 567803 



3 1,100 



1,200' 



4 6,280; 2,.525; 9,735 



1 1,200! .. 



200i 



4,000 1; 450 



360 



5,915 



580 



1,7U) 

25. 

200' 

.. i 
4.450 

OK) 



12 9,810 2,52.". 18,250 .. 



1 



Rs. 



350 

200 

60 

72 



88 
535 



30 



1335 



161 

1:77 



438 



1773 



35 
33 

■ ■ 

30 

■ • 

36 



Rs. Rs. Rs. 



540 
24 

.. I 
42: 
36i 



300 
25: 

32i 
36 
36< 
27 

13: 

18 

51 1 

100 

79' 



180 



379 
60 



6O: 



18; .. 

51' .. 



702 



786 619 



251 9 



.57 



30 
25 



180! H.'-J 

.. i .. 1675 

164: 63: 76 



341. 247 1815 



1046 10:i3 2434 



2.5x .. 
.52X 224x 

i 45x . 

23x. . 

29x1 . 

28; . 

; 27: . 

26x1 . 

25x; . 



134 

I 



>83xj224x 



Rs. Rs 



37x 

1 

2 

3 

3 

2 
o 

2 

3 

10 

5 

1 
3 



74x 



517x 

•a6 

34 
39 
39 
29 
15 
20 
54 
489 
144 

19i 
54 



147 z 



16 
5i 



14 

103 
132X 
HJ75 

13SI 



21y aMs 



96x 3.'V(U| 



3x 



29x 



28x 305 

4x: 50x 

2x! 25x 

2 31X 



31 
28 
29.\ 
2x 28X 



.'SOxS.'kSx 



\ 



FOB TBS TEAS ENDING WITB SOtk NOVEMBEB, 1903. 
FDIANCB9. 



NOBTH INDIA CONFEBENCE STATISTICS 

CHURCH FINANCES 



NAMES OF 
DISTRICT. 



Church Pbopbrty. 



en 



B 



u 

u 

O 

« 

> 

o 



90 

0/ 

e8 
C 
O 






bO 

08 

O 

£ 

08 
Oi 

o 

3 
"3 
> 

o 

09 

.O 

O 



••a 

o 

« 

o 






8 

"3 

o 

"3 

o 
H 



o 



a p. 



s 



OS 5 



ce 
-. C 
0) o 

a 08 



9 
08 

oo 

a; 

o 



Ministerial 
Support. 



CO, -5 

0Ui iCU 



as 2 

■— CO 

^^ 

■92 



00 






»4 

o 

hi 

.a 

Q 

> 
c8 

zs 

"S 2 

oo o8 

*5P- 



i95 



6 

U 

a 

o 

u 

•M 

o 

Q. 

Q. 

'3 CO 

^1 

eS » 



Bareiny-Komaon DIst. 



Btjnor District 



Budfton District 



Garhwal District 



Gonda District 



Hardot District 



Moradabad District 



Oudh District 



Pilibhlt District 



Rs. 

31 83,223 58 

12 5.91512 
10 21,400 27 



7 9,25010 



8,790 



6 



\% 



3,100! 9 



30 39,5a>:45 



a 



9 

a 
« 

o 

%-« 

fl 
o 

o 

u 
o 

Ii 

08 



Rs. 



Rs. 



W,ii70 3.«s.6io 



9,810 2,525 



11,092 19,730 52,222 



Rs. |rs. 

B.07,«0S 

18,250 



113,800 32,800 



9,970 



3,270 



17,092 



11 5G,0C.O 19 73,913 



. 1 10 1,935 19 



Grand Total 190Q .. !i« 2.29.*7h217 



Total. 1902 



Increasft 



Decrease 




4,075 



4 ^ 'lOA 



14,450 



9.200 



10,550 



4.U1.97.''> 



511 



55,850 



33,210 



15,570 



M7,841 07 



8.A^3r>l 



6.S1.M0: 050 



6,521 144 



13.«.22S| 4^1 



'5..'M.935 8,71.r^-. U43.l.'W HWaun 



14.020 



4,08* 



341 



lii'>7S» 



s 

"2 



o 



1;- 

o ^ 



Rs. 



Rs. 

1773 

134 



Rs. 

1046 



Rs 



Rs. 



69 



1033 2434 



902x362x 



100 



69 



132 



1860 



1043 



529 



6473 



598 



283x 



496K 



1,55 



1078 



551 



363 



1024 



.. 792 



OOOJ 



565 



3684,5263 



J*8o0 40025328 



.. 3377| 378' 65 



I I 



22ix 



69 



250 



Rs. 



RSw 



96x3.'i63 



50x 



49x 



300 



40 36x 



250 



2486 



36 



35x 



112 



101 X 



,%789 



5807 



18 



558 



615 



705 



628 



396 



138GI 



3379 



4^ 643 



823 



384 



11,875 



I1.S19 



439 356i 



FOR THE YEAR EXDISn WITH SOth NOVEMBER. 190.1. 
AND-SDMMARY. 



Brkrvolknt Collrctions 



Othkr Col- 
lkctionh. 



For 
M18S10N- 

SOGIRTY I 9 



i 

O 

B 



o 

IS 



« 






,2 

5 

o 






§ 

ja 
u 

I 



09 ' y 

:= I S 



11 I'l 

B ' B \ ^ 

GC'E I ^ 



/. 

e3 



O 



ht3 



o --« 



- l"? I— 
.lis "3 



S.ee 






*^ — ^ ,*a 



73 

e 

4 



IXCOMR RARNKI) IN 

SoiTHERX Asia. 



9} 



4= 






c " 



S I 5 
> 5 

o * 



2x 
c2 



'^ Si «* — 



o 
o 

72 

hi 



•;3 
c . 



CD U I 



1 '^ 

i W 

i -o 

c 

St 



"3^4 


C 


5,r 


s 




« £ 





9^ 


B 


•05 . 


M 




"8 

3 


>» 


h 


■^ ►?'^ 


es 




» 


i c 


■■" 


§SS5 


Tota 






S6ds 

30s 

42 

?.0 

19x 

47x 

118x 

ssu 

43 



Rb. 

8x 



Rs. iRs 



219X 
X: 27x 

Ix- 19x 



848 



l,Of» 



60x 

I7x 

.. ! iKx' 3() 

I 
I 

i I 

2, 22x 4x 

I 

l| 13x 8x 
3i;tWx ISx 



«^:R8.iRs. ;K«i Rs. R8 Rs. !Rs.| R». 
i 15x ti2 1 > W«\ ' ^-'^ »"•»•* , 34 ! ft -59 



I 



Rs. ; R8. i Ra 



14,971114, , 4,SM>5 



r. i3x. Idx 



113.\ 



Six 



91 x! L*2x 



I 



8: 1 X 

i 



75 



1S3 



311 



48 



4851 18H 



5 13x291 27:ir»4x 44 .. 

.' I i • j 

r* 3Ux'2W-x3r)4x .. .. 

' ' i J 

' i ! 

lOx I7x' 19x; 118 . 



20x' r> 705" 477 .. 

■ i .' 

3 810 i,o?9: .. 



Rs. 
33,733 



^4« 



8 20x 



«3x'2:>3x .V>8x 77; 



1,0«) 
8.%5 
516 
3 ^V«4 



Rs. 

58,ft23 

1.183 



1,340 1,122 

1 

I 

i.ftii; 4SS 

I 

159 202I 
4,316, 2,763 



1,029 1,845 

I 

1 2.4"^2; 3,531 



165x'324k!9 r.x 75 904 14 



10! 2!'x| 07, 174, .. 



I 



I 



40i 



166 



i!3 30 



30 



90i 6^16 2022 



I 

I 

434<)'"-»w 



13 ! 348'3404 5f>56 3441 



11 



13 



258 ..■ 



1209 



2037 



48 



i.\»i» 



41 .. .1382 121C| .. 




5,387l 5.144 8,614 



830 



1.999 



• ."wrt 



42! 937 



7,079 



I 

58 ()00!72.558 



86,802 2<K747 •27,7(1002,305 

I • 



33,597 33,468 



9,103 

77,845 
830 



l.lf,7o«; l.r.«.6S0 



61,591 



1,».M6 



1.«1.376 



14 



5,274 



3,8.50 5,76? .. 8 8<J8, .. 



HORTn IKDIA (.VA'FEIiESCE STATISTICS 
SCHOOL 









VERNACULAR SCHOOLS 




















-SSK^SW. 




KAMKS 01'' 








n 










CIECUITS. 


















MORADABAl* DiflTKICT. 




j 








i 








Amroha 






S8 


T2 


ISl ! 


■f,^i 


7 


7* 


23 


Bftbiihhera 




13 


12 




91 I 


-.1 


.. 


" 




Ch&odaiMl 


I 


.",! 


11 


M 


s ■■; 


" 8 


"10 


'« 


"23 


Dhsnau» 


^ 


311 










-■ 






Qannaur 


1 


ii: 






'5 ■■ , 


■■ 1 


■■,.. 






Haaanpiir 


1 


10. 






-^ 


■■ J 


1; 


13 

U 





Kanlh 










.." 1 








Kiiiulorki 


4 


44 




4:. 


3:. 3 


It 


31 


31 


1U 


Moradftbad 


1( 


no 


M 


]«U 


i;i,> 31 




37s 




3MII 


Namlnlya 


4 


3S 






S!4 










RaJpurH 


! 

4 


24 


J- 


34 

37 


1 I 


4i 


W 


1' 
11: 


"i 


Hhahjiur 


3 


»l 




35 


'i ? 


111 




31< 




Sharitpiir 
Thahiirdwara 


! 


ST 

31 


"18 


:.a 


J ; 


4 


"13 


37 


3 

10 


ToUl 


03 


Bis; 


311 


7-.".i 


ktI k; 


'"" 


"^' 


u:^ 


77S 


PlI.IIIlIIT nrSTIIKT. 










: 


1 





Rahfrl 




w 




01 


mil 1 


9, 




9 


n 


l)l8nlt>L>r 




34- 




21 






U 


s 


Fftt.,l.Ba,.3 Wftst 


1 




"13 


13 


m: s; s; 


11 


31 


'^ 


MlTRanl 




'V. 


HI 


41} 


-•■' "■ «; 




,« 


s 


N»w»bBa.iJ 


i 


4.-. 


« 


r.i 


1? 1 *! 




H 




Plllbhll 






41 


im 


SI 1 .. 


31 




18 


Pur»npiir 

Rftiupiir 

SIraiKi 




1 


4 
ft 


U3 

m 

7ij 


Si i a 


S 


! 


111 

« 

31* 


Shnhl 


4 




•• 


no 


4«' 3 12| 


11 


K 


n 


Toliil 


45 


461 


IKi 


!HJ» 


433: 20 lis; 


BH 


171 


13"J 


RvnxoN DiRTKicT. 










- |- - !- 








AoniB 




40 





4« 


3tl: I 3 


17 


30 


13 


BnSl 


i I 


U 


m 


7S 


M 1. IK 




19 


13 


Ithamora 


\ 2 


sn 




S5 


S3, 2; 1(1, 






(1 


K)iiau1l 


1 ■■ 


■-■2 


"in 


37 


so, 1 1(^ 


S 




10 


Blnawar 


1 5 


31 




31 


a) 


1 15 






10 


nataaanj 
Kakralu 




"ail 




"a 


"3« 


3 30. 


" 4 


9 

■a 


3 
30 


UJhAIll 


1 " ; 


47' 




47 


38 




]5; 


.. 


16 


10 


Biidaon 




ii«; 


"38 


134 


73 


7 


U3| 


.1^ 


1C3 


115 
SOU 


ToUl 


S3 


333; 


loy 


431 


~30J 


17 


"H 


10!l 


"SM 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING WITH SOh SOYEMltER, I9i>3. 
STATISTICS. 



GBAND TOTALS. 



BOTB' KCHOOLH. 



i 



I?. 



Ill llill, 3IjO irM 



Girls' Schools. 



No. AS Boll at 

_ KSD OF YEAR. 

* , 



ir 



«l sn on 



.=|_JL'f:. 



^ 



liOBTH INDIA a)NFEBENCE STATISTICS 

SCHOOL 





VERNACULAR SCHOOLS. 




Boys' Schools. 


(fiRLs' Scnooi.s. 






v. 

'o 


No. ON Roi 


XAT ^ 
CAR. c 


en 

c 


No. ON Roi 


rj, AT 


•r^ 






KNI> OK Yl 


c 

43 


END OF YKAB. 


** 


NAMES OF 




. . ! c 












QQ 






'J. 




■ 




DISTRICT. 


O 


f 


cc 

C 










so 

a 








m 




eA 




•5>» 


o 




^ 




•s*^ 




o 


CO 

a 

e8 






geD 
e for 


c 


• 

on 

a 

oS 


■•a 
tn 

•p.4 

In 




geD 

e for 




'*j 

S, 

M 










-»3 




• 

5 


u c 







A 


o 


o 


> 


a 


ja 


o 


o 


> 




S5 


O 


^ 


H 


< 


f5 


O 


525 


H 


< 


GONDA DTSTBICT. 


















1 


Bahraich 


t0 


G5 


149 


214 


176 


1 5 


30 


35 


25 


Rhinga 


1 


7| 53 


601 53 


• ft 


ft • 


ft • 


• • 


1 

• • 


Balrampiir 


1 


9 


71 


80! 73 


• • 


ft • 


ft ft 


• ■ 


• ■ 


Coloiielganj and Kaisar- 






















EllPnpur 


• • 


■ • 


• • 


• ■ 


ft • 


• ft 


ft ft 


• • 


• ■ 


1 


• • 


• • 


■ • 


• • 


ft ft 


ft • 


ft ft 


• ft 


• • 


1 .. 


Nawabgani 

Nanpara & Rupaldlba 

Cionda 


1 


• • 


50 


50 


41 


1 


4 


13 


J7 


12 


1 


10 


30 


40.; 36 


1 


5 


10 


15 


13 


2 


4 


135 


139 


125 


I 

1 •• 

3 


ft ft 


■ • 


• ■ 


• ■ 


Total 


1 

8 


95 


488 


583 


504 


14 


53 


67 


50 


OuDH District. 


1 
















Lucknow 


o 


7 


.^ 


62; 51 


7 


ft ft 


200 


200 


123 


Lucknow, Eng. 
BafBareilly 


1 .. 


• • 


■ ■ 


• • 1 • ft 


ft ft 


• • 


■ • 


ft • 


• • 


1 o 


30 


50 


80; 5n 


1 


5 


• • 


5 


5 


Barabankl 


G 


11 


78 


89! 70 


1 


3 


16 


19 


13 


Lakblmpore 


1 


5 


19 


24: 20 


1 




20 


20 


10 


Sidhauli 


• • 


• • 


ft • 


1 
• ft • • 


ft ft 




ft ft 


ft • 


• • 


Itaunja 


1 


7 


22 


29 


25 


ft ft 




ft • 


ft • 


• • 


Tikaiatnagar 


2 


10 


12 


22 


8 


« ft 




ft ft 


ft ft 


• ft 


Sttapur 


1 





20 


20 . 21 


ft • 




ft • 


244 


• • 


Total 


15 


76 


1 
1 


332 


:i51 


10 


8 


236 


151 


IIardoi District. 






1 


1 
1 






Bllgram 


3 


Jfl 


14 


40 


3:. 


.. .. 1 


i 

ft ft 


• • 


■ • 


nardol 


f) 


43 


123 


166 


142 


2 


72 


ft • 


72 


67 


Mallawan 


3 


8 4ii: 


50 45 


■ • 


ft ft 


ft • 


* * 




Plhani 


1 


5 


14! 


191 16 


ft • 


ft ft 


• ft 


ft ft 




Saflpur 
ShRiiAbad 


:\ 


6 


29 


35| 30' 


ft ft 


ft ft 


ft ■ 


ft ft 




4i 


70 


35 


111' 90 


O 


45 


35 


80 


78 


Saudi 


4 


r>5 25 


S*)' 75 


• • 


• ft 


• ft 


• ft 




Sandlla 




3 45 


48: 36 


• ft 


ft ■ 


■ ft 






Unao 


3 


11 


43 


5. 


45. 


ft ft 

4 


ft • 


ft • 


ft ■ 

152 


• • 


Total 


28 


231 


370 


601 


514- 


117 


35 


189 


Qariiwal District. 








1 












Gadoll 


3 


23 20 


43| 34 


ft • 


1 

1 
• • 


ft ft 


• • 




Kaliiur 




2' 15 


1 1 , 9: 


ft ■ 


• • i 


ft • 


ft • 




Lansdowne 




fl! 6 


12: 10 


ft ft 


■ ft 


ft ft 


ft a 


ft • 


Paurl 




4! 28 


32; 20 


2 


4 


9 


13 


11 


Ram nee 




3l 9 

1 1 


121 6' 


ft ft 


• • 1 


ft ft 


•• 1 


• • 


Total 

1 


8 


38 


78" 


116 


79 


2 4 


9 


13 

1 


11 



FOE THE YEAR ENDING WITH SOth NOVEMIIEB, 1903. 
STATISTICS. 



EUROPEAN AND ANOLO-VERNACULAR 

SCHOOLS. 


GRAND TOTALS. 




Boys' {schools. 


OIR1.8* Schools. 






« 
•0 


~'/. 


_ 


* -r ^ 


■ - 


CO ' 5 ^ 


£ 


o 


No ON Roll at ■ 

RND OF YKAK. fl 

0* 


^ ■ No. ON Roll at 

^ END OF YKAR. 

y . — . — 

7J 1 




■g : g « 

X H 2 


*9 
< 


•5 


*3 




<^ 


1 . 


< 

m 


c . 1 





o 

O 

u 


* "^ 5 »^ ii 


5 S : 

r H -Of 




S B 


. as 

3 >. 

1 ® 
11 


d 
u 

> 

< . 

1 ^ "? 


a 


S C 3 > :« 


= ^ ■ 


> « 


c 


of 3 a 


r< 


» 1 ■ : ' : 


< 


H H H : H 
1 1 


■ • 


• • 


I 

1 

1 1 
• • •• ••■•• «■ ■■■•• 


• • 


1 1 

1 

3, '.» 24'.» 201 


• ■ 


• • 


1 

*• •• •• •• •• ••■•• 


• ■ 


1. 2 (JO .'i3 


• • 


• • 




• • •• •• 1 •• •• 

1 


• • 


■ • 


1 


2 S:) 73 


• • 

• • 
■ « 


• • 

1 


• • 

• • 


• • •• ■• •• •• 
■ ■ •■ •• ■• ■■ 

• ■ •• •• >• •• 


• • 

• • 

• • 


■ • 

• • 

• • 


• • 


• • • • • ■ 

• • • ■ ■ • 

2 07 5:1 


• ■ 


• • 


• • ■■ •• •• •■ •• 


• • 


• • 


•J 


2 55 4U 


• « 


• • 


1 7-^" 


72 


m) 


W 


14; 211 \\A 


1 • • 


1 
1 


1 7'>' 

•• •• •• I f-w*« 


7:> 


m 


12 


31 7:>2! 023 


3 


123 


\'X\ 


1 

547 IS:* 2 ITS 24 


202 


1 
1 

185 


14 


1 
1 

70 1.011' gll 

■ 


• • 


• • 


• • ' ■* "• "• ■■ •« 




• • 


• • 


• • • • • 


1 


10! H r,o :>..!.. 


1 


i 


4 


145; 111 


• • 


• ■ 


I 

•• •• •• ••'.. .. 






1* 
1 


7 108. 83 


• • 


• • 


1 

• • . . . . 




• • 


•> 


4 44; 30 


■ ■ 
• • 


I •• ! •- •• •• 1 .. •• 




1 

• • 


1 


• • i • • 

li 2ft 2ft 












•> 


'»*» K 


■ • 


• ■ 


• • 1 •• •■ •■ a« a« 




• • 


■• 


1 


31 


l-^x.) \m l.V* 1 73 .. 


"73 


f»3 


3 


20 2591 242 


5 


170 


r»97 TtiTJ r,lN 3 251 _ 24 *.*7:> 


24S. 


33 


110: 1.018; 1,340 


• B 


• • 


1 
•• "• •• •• ••,.. 




• • 


3 


3 40 


35 


• • 


• • 




■ i»» •• ■• ■• 






• • 


< 


12 238 


20i) 


• • 


• • 




1 •• 1 •• 1 ■• •• 








3 


3, .50 


45 


• • 


■ • 




' • • • > • • 1 • • 






1 


■ • 1 


1 


1; 19 


16 


• • 


• • 






• • • • 


1 




1 


• • 


3 


31 35 


30 


• • 


• • 




1 • • • • 


r 
• . 1 . . 






• • 1 


• ■ 





191 


liV2 


• • 


• • 




1 .. 1 .. 


• • . • 1 






• • 


4 


4 80 


75 


.. 


• • 




• • • • 


1 

• • • • ■ 






• • 


•> 


2 48i 3« 


1 

1 


5 


"(>r>: 70| GO .. ! .. 

-1 ! 

m 70 »w .. 1 .. j 

• • • • • • 1 X ' «n) 


• 






1 

« • 

51 


4 

4 


8 


122 


105 


• • 


1 
• • 


42i 823 


713 


• • 


« • 





1 1 
13! lOS 85 


• ■ 


• • 


*• •■ •• •• •• •• 


• • 


• ■ 




2. 17 9 


• ■ 


• ■ 


1 
• • •■ ■•,«■ •• •• 


■ • 


• • 


1 


2 12 10 


1 


31 


107; 138 H«! .. .. i .. 


• • 1 


• ■ 1 


4 


17 183 134 


• • 


• • 


• • 1 •• 1 •• j •• •• ' •• 


1 


! 


1 


1 12; 


1 


31 


107 


i:w! lo:^ i 38 2 

1 


(V), 


'"iii,' 

1 

1 


12 


35 .3271 244 

1 



JNOIiTH JMJIA CX)NFEUENCE STATISTICS 

SCHOOL 





— — 




VERNACULAR SCHOOLS. 








Bovi 


9" SCIIOOI.8. 







Girls' Schoolb. 








No. ON Roll at 




2^0. ON Roi.i 


. AT 


1 




c 


K>'I> OF YEAR. 





KND OF YEAR. 


NAMES OF 




. . 





- ■ — 







1 




2 


DISTRICT. 


'A 




'i 






• 




eri 
C 










^k«« 




•^ 




*^ i^- 


r *m 




V 






— >, 




^^ 




• w^ 




1 ** 


^^ 










ti 




•»4 

c 

l-l 

Si 

B 


c 


93 

1 9 

i S 


• 

*-> 


OS 

k c 




1 


• 

a 

1 


! 5 

9 

s 




• 


u* a 




p 


f* 


£ 


o 


> 


3 


JS 


c 




c 


> 




Yi 


o 


I ^ 


H 


< 


^ 





» 




H 


< 


Baretli.y-Kumaon 


r 












1 

1 






DiRTRICT. 














1 






BarelUu Seel if m. 




















BarMlly 


3 m 


20 


100 


<•> 


17 


70 


347; 


317 


250 


Barellly Sadar Bazar . 


1. 12 


1 ^S 


30 


20 


• • 




1 

• • 


• • 


■«i#^' 


Farldpur 


1- 9 


1 17 


20 


4 


• • 




• • 


• • 




Jalalabad 


• • j • • 


1 * * 


• • 


• • 


1 




15 


15 


10 


Khera Bajehra 


1 .. 


33 


33 


24 


1 




18; 


18 


14 


Mlranpiir Katra 


■ • • • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


, , 


•• 1 


• • 


. m 


Mohamdi 


• • J • • 


. . 


. . 


• • 


• ■ 


• • 


• • 


• ■ 




Panahpar 


ll 15 


• • 


15 


10 


1 


11 


• • 




11 


" 6 


Powayan 


• • 1 • • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 








12 


6 


Shah, ahanpur East 


• ■ • • 


• • 


• • 




4 


• • 


80, 

■ 


80 


76 


Shah; ahanpur West 


• • • • 


■ • 


p- .. 


• • 


• • 








• • 


• 9 


Shahjahanpnr-DIlawar- 






















KanJ 


1| 12 


s 


20 


15 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 




Tllhar 


li « 


8 





• • 1 


• • 


• • 


• • 1 

1 


• • 


• • 




9, 130 

• 

t 


90 




154' 

1 


25 


87 


3G0| 

■ 


453 




Barellly Section Total . . 


363 


£ttT?iao7i Section, 


















Bhot 


r .. 


30^ 


30 




■ ■ 


• • 


• • 




■ ■ 




Dwarahat-Lobha 


1 


21 


21 


10 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


9 g 


Nalnt Tal-Haldwaiil 


1 • • • 


> ■ 


• • 


• • 


3 


4 


111 


115 


63 


Nalnl Tal, Eng. 


• • . • • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 




• • 




Plthorahgarh 


11 

13 


17 


4S1 

- 

532 
028 


4US 
540 

781 ' 


320 

1 

304 

518 

1 


7 
10 
35 


• • 

4 


238 
349 




238 
353 
806 


185 
248 


Kumaon Section Total .. 


17 


Barellly-Kumaon Total . . 


23 


133 


715 


610 


BuxoR District. 






1 






! 






Basta 


2 31 


8 


39 


25 


1 


10 


5 




15 


12 


Bljnor 


1* 
< 


71 


22 


9.^ 


IW 


4 


50 


24 




74 


63 


Dhampur 


10 


78 


21 


99 


90 


5 


31 


5: 


36 


34 


Kirathpur 


3' 17 


33 


.W 


42 


2 


12 


6 


18' 


13 


Mandawar 


1; 40 


11 


51 


40 


1 


5 


2 


t 


5 


Naglna 
Najibabad 


5i 50 


25 


75 


.V). 


2 


20 


6 


26 


21 


31 28 


10 


38 


29 1 


2 


21 


3 


2i 


20 


Nurpur 


4| 22 


4 


20 


23! 


2 


18 


• • 




18 


14 


Seohara 


5; 48 


7 
141 


.55! 


40 

1 

404 


1 
20 


3 


3 


6 
234 


4 


Total 


40 


385 


170 


M 




184 



FOB THE YEAR ENDING WITH SOth NOVEMUER, 1903, 
STATISTICS. 



EUROPEAN AND ANGLO-VERNACULAU 

SCHOOLS. 



(JRANI) TOTALS. 



Boyb' School b. 



o 
o 

X 

O 



S 

9 



No ON Roll at 

KND OF YEAR. 



^3 
C 

<; 



C 



0) 



JO 

o 
o 



(fIRLS' SCHOOLR. 



No. ON Roll at ^ 

K.VIi OP YKAK. = 



X 

C 



x« 


•J. 


B 


im 


Co 


Xi 


♦* 


•^ 




I 


&4 


c 


d 


o 


::> 


^ 



• 




o 

a 


ristians 


X 


5 


o 


> 08 


s 


^ 


O 


o 


H 


< 


:<!; 


o 


» 


Eh 



or 



o 

o 



J* 

g 

o 
H 



a- 



c8 

i2 

OS 



i5 



55 



35 



u 
c> . 

B c 

ca i la's 

O ■ O « 

I 



« 



< 



OS 

hi 

> 
< . 

Eh 



00 



OOi 133 



• • I • • 



3 145 168 



(H 



205 



265 2fK 



•• I • 



223 



195 



• I 



SS 



89 



• I 



80 



00 


42. 


772 


054 


1 


1; 


30 


20 


1 


li 


26 


4 


1 


1 


15 


10 


2 

• • 


3 

• • 


51 


38 

• ■ 


• • 

2 


•2 


• • 
26 


•• 
16 


1 


1; 


12 


6 


6 


19! 


303 


261 


1 


8' 


89| 


90 


1 


1 


20 


15 


1 

1 


1; 


8' 


ft 



313: ^49 



3.53 



1, 354 345 39' 80 1,352 



1 

2! 
1 = 



32 


56 


78 


8 


34)3 


311 


80 


■ • 


80' 



1,110 



70 

r.6 

7iJ 



110 3.'i9 



7i 255 527 



1 

40) 3i2 3 

782 571 5 



20 

80 
68^ 



"7 



SO 



5r>7.' 



1 
o 



I""*; 



20 

8rir 
01 



1 
3 
5; 

19! 
30; 



1 

13: 

15! 

25 



30 
126; 
426 
100 
804 



22 
112 
239 
155 
57:? 



1,546 1,100 



529 a\\ 69! 173' 2,899' 2,210 



.. I 1 

• • I ■ • 



4<, 



1 48 4S 



I 



3 
T» 
l.-i 

5 

I 

5 
(') 




3 
30 
15: 

51 

«i 

i 



*>' 

I 

3 



54 

215 

135 

08 

58 

101 

62 

44 

61; 



37 
173 
124 
51 
45 
71 
49 
36 
41 



1 47 



48 



45 



01 



ro 



798i 633 



NORTJI INDIA CVNFEBENCE STATISTICS 

SCHOOL STATISTICS 



NAMKS or 
DISTRICT. 



VERNACL'LAR SCHOOLS. 



o 






c 






Hoys' Schools. 
No. ox Roll at 

KXI) OF YKAR. 



Baroilly-Kiimaon District 
BIj nor District 
Biidaon District 
(Jarhwal District 











T. 






aa 






^0 






• «« 






• ^4 






*« 




X 


'iJ 






•«« 




•* 


fc" 




dS 


^ 










•>< 

X 


1 V 


• 


••« 


*^ 


Ti 


1^ 




*^ 


A 
U 


1 >' 


H 



I 

c 



(}iRLH* Schools. 



- M 



.22 

o 

o 

.c 

^; 

X 



.- I 



> 



C^ I •r 



£ 



H < I ;^ 



No. 


ON Roi 


.L 


AT 


i 


E? 


ID <»F 


YJ 


P.AU. 


- ■ 






W 












«.» 












*** .• 




, 








^ k 




eCi 








^ * 




1 a 












J2. 








■^ 


• 

X 


1 ♦i 
X 








as 


■a 


1 ^ 








&» 


X 


! V 






• 

"5 


gg 


Ih 


"• 






♦A 


C 98 


ji 


— 






0^ 


> 


y 


y. 






Eh 


< 



'.-.» i:»:j o-.'s tsi .-.is, :jr> 9i Tir>i inuw oio 



40 IW.'i 111 .V.»('» I'M 20. 170 54. 2?4. 181 



23, rj*^* loy 4aj :»ii it. 123 hk» -.nri aui 



(Jonda District 



Hardol District 



Moradiibud District 



Oiidh District 



Pilllihlt District 



8 3S TS lU". 7«» 



<«.')', 488 r^3 r>(>4 



28 231 370 <MH .M4 



tS'i 518 211 7*.»1» 577 

j I ' I 

ir> 7rt| 25(> X32' 251, 

i ; , ^ ' i 

45 401 105. 5»"i«; 4:{J 



21 4 13 11 

ill 

3 14| r.3; 07' 50 

I ' I 

I 117 35 152! 13U 



.52' 180 74i;' 1133 
10 8' 23Cl 244 



2') 11*.' 58' 170 



Ciraiid Total 1«>3 



Total 10(r2 



251 1 2,27i)' 2,380| 4,0(w| 3,.584 
I 

250 2,371, 2,0(H 4,075' 3.705 



1031 



I 
8.'5, L>.073' 2/JOO 

I 



175 <tt5 2,021 



775 
151 
129 



«Pf IwOv 



2,im 3.319 

I 



Incn^ase 



Decrease 



1 



'.»2 218i 310 121 



04 . . 



12' HX)' .. 



40 01 



FOE THE YEAB ENDING WITH SOth AOVEMBEB, 190.1. 
AND-^ SUMMARY. 



EUROPEAN AND ANGLO-VERNACULAR 

SCHOOLS. 



GRAND TOTALS. 



Boys' Schools. 



S 

OB 






No ON Roll at = • 

END OF YEAR. c 

■ S 



I 



P 



iS 

o 

I 

p 






(hRLS' SCUOOLP. 



c ' No. ox Roll at j- 



c 
c 



END OF YEAR. 



■ ^ 



X 

P 



Z . 525 



•5 ! 

O 

H ! 









3^ 


c. p 


S 


>c9 


z 


<5 


^/; 



p 

X 



9 :: 






o 



c 



>- 1^ I 

It 
■ si 

> * 



o 
o 

J3 

o 



1^ 

is 

6 



o 



OS 

ha 
c 

,P 
a 

Eh 



OS 

p 
o 



5 ; 

P. i 


sg 


*iit 


3 >t 


;i ' 


^ O 


"3 


'5'S 


«A 


«a P 


^ 


c o> 


H 


H 



I 

p 



«s 

> 
< . 

«p 
c «• 



I 



255 527 782, 571 
I I 



li 



30! 85 1211 10(> 



31. 107 138 103 

I 



1' 



2 



:> 



65 



ro 



(iO 



115; 27.". 310 320 



5i 527 

i 

I 

1 47: 

1 75 

1. 5S 

1 72 



•^. tin J 

I 



511 



1. 48 45 



t.r fi5 



m 



m" 



4*J 



173. 2,898 



ro 



-' 55' 



•> 



tjO 51 



i 72i 00 



5] no' 5tt7 707 WO 

r I 

1" 15' 15i 30 24 



1; 
3 



12<> 
251 



1: 127 l(/7 



12 35 



12 31 



33 421 



i^-i 



24! 






5 



248 

4! 



071 06 



18 637 



18: 664 






I 



1,671| 2.2271 1.874 



1,395| 2.a7J. 1,744 



270 UW 130 



13; 1,191 28; l,2Ul. 1.134 

i I 



•^ 



Xi 



37 



30 



2t*; 34 



10 



706 



910 



2,210 



633 



675 



327 .»44 



700 



823 



117; 145! 2,107 



33 110 1,618 






14, 1,101 30, 1,191, 1,100, 440i 727 10,983 



45(>' 1)94 11.199 



iv;3 

713 
1,785 
1.340 

.'►on 



8.813 



8,W»2 



•> 



2UV SO 



t . 



•f •« •« 



ift«* 



THE VTr ' 






BISHOP F. \V. WARNE. D.I). 



■ t • 



r. 



*€ 



I 



^; <^ 



..& 



n 















:i 









*\ .* ■ " 



i: 



■St'. -• 



If 
I 



• .• » 






4 '. 






■•'7r^ 



.*; 



7vV> 



"» i' 



■•'■ -isV-'A- ' '■^" ■^■*! 



REPORT 



or TNC 



FORTY-FIRST SESSION 



or TNC 



North India Conference 



or Tiic 



MethodisL Episcopal Church 



MCLD AT 



LUCiCNOW, JANUARY 5tli-l Ith, 1905. 



LUCKNO W : 
THE METHODIST PUBUSMNC HOUSE. 



RULES OP ORDER. 



Qawanin i Tortib. 



[4Df araDs kf har ek k&rrawdl, siw&e us ke, k jis ko Mfr i Maj- 
kare, 'arz karae se shurii' hogi: aur kUi k4 haqq nahifi, ki 
), jtib ftak ki Mfr i Majlis ns ko nam lekar ijdzat Da de. Jab 



1. KdnfaraDi 
lis peab kare, 
wuh bole, j*ib 

tak K&Dfarans ke B^mbae kol 'arz pesh oa ki jilwe, kisi b&t par 
babs cabin bo sakti. 

2. Koi Dai * arz y& rezolusban nabin peab bo saktA, jab tak us k&, 
ki jis par euitog^ bo rabi bai, faisalaoa bo j&we ; ya'ne l^bw&b wub 
qubiil kiya j&we y& nd-maDztir. 

3. Har sbarik k4 baqq bai, ki jis 'arz par wub bolni cb&be, bole, 
lekin p^ncb miDat se ziy&da ek bi waqt nabin bol sakt^, na kisi k 
mazmdD par ekbdr se ziy^da, jab tak ki kull 8burak&,jo bolnA cb&bte 
bain, ua bol cbuken ; siw^ is ke, ki K&nfarans Ifh&sa ij&zat de. 

4. Bar ek sbarik k& baqq bai, ki kisi waat, jab mubdbisa bo rabd 
bai, zail ki 'arzon men se, jis ko cbdbe, pesb kare :— (1) Multawi kiyd 
j4n&. (2) Muqarrar waqt tak multawi rakbnd. (3) Mez par rakbn^ 
yd (4) Tarmimkarn^; in 'arzon k^, jis silsile par darj bain, lib&z 
KiyA j&weg&. 

5. Har ek sbarik jab bolD& ob&be, apni jasab par kbapd bo 
aur ba-tabzib Mir i Majlis se ijdzat mdnge ; aur kisi b&lat mefi, kiai ki 
bad-goi y& nd-mundsib b&ten na kare. 

6. Jab koi sbarik ij^zat p&kar bol rabil bai, wub rok& nabin j& 
saktd, td-waqte ki wub bol na cbuke, siw&e 3re aurSwen qdniiirke 
bamiijib. 

7. Bar ek Kdnfarans ke sbarik ko maz&j bai, ki jab us ki samajb 
men kisi ek bdt par k&fi babs bo cbuki bai, 'arz kare, ki bagair aur 
zly&da babs ke us amr par rote liyd jdwe, agar vote kamew&le sburakd 
men sedo tibii is 'arz ko qubiil karen, to bild-babs pable-wdli 'arz 
pesb ki j&we. 

8. Jab kisi ki samajb men qdniin ke ^bildf guftog^ bo rabi 
bai, us ko iidzat bai, ki rauran is h&t ko pesb kare, aur agar Mir 
Majlis us ki bdt ko qubt!il kare, us bi waqt sens 'uzr ke mut&biq gufto- 
gili roki jdwegi. 

9. Mir i Majlis kii]] q&niini suw&l k& f aisala karegd, bar bdl men 
us kefaisale par 'amal bog&, siw&e is ke, ki agar jam&'at Kdnfarans 
ko apil kare. Tin sburaka, jo Mir i Majlis ke faisale ke ]^bil4f bon, 
K&niarans ko apil kar sakie bain. 

10. Mir i Majlis kull kamittidn muqarrar karegd, eiw&e un l^bdss ke, 
jin ko ki K&nfarans muqarrar karni cb&be. 

11. Kull 'arzen yd rezolusban, jin ko koi K&nfarans k& sbarik 

Sesb kare, likbkar pesb karnd bongi, agar koi K4nf arans k& sbarik y& 
lir i Munsbi darl^bw&st kare. 

12. Kbape bokar vote liyd jdwegd, agar tin sburak& kisi waqt aisi 
darkbw&st karen. 

13, Hdn aur nabin se vote ho %d^Xk ha\, ^f^^iT vV^^ ^\i>^\^^k ^^\ 
dar^h wdat ^aren . 



OFFICERS OF TH£ CONFERENCE. 



PRESIDENT ... ... BISHOP P. W, WARNE, D.D* 

SECRETARY ... ... B. T. BADLEY. 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY ... P.S.HYDE. 

VERNACULAR SECRETARY ... D. A. CHOW PIN. 

STATISTICAL SECRETARY ... GANG A NATH. 

CONFERENCE TREASURER ... R. I. PAUCETT. 

CORRESPONDING SECY. .. W. A. MANSELL. 

MISSION TREASURER ... N. L. ROCKEY. 

Finance Committee. 

Bishop P. W. Warne, President; W. A. Mansell, Secretary; 
N. L. RooKEY, Treasurer; L. A. Core, G. H. Prey, P. L. 
Nebld, J. H. Gill, J. H Messmore, S. Tupper, Wil- 
liam Peters, J. W. Robinson, Sx Offldo : C. L. 
Bare, W. A Mansell, S. S. Dease, H. L. 
Mukerjee, H. a. Cutting, Gang a Nath ; 
Alternates, John Blackstock, G. C. 
Hewes, S. B. Finch, 
Yaqub Shah. 

Auditing Committee. 

G. C. Bewes, Chairman; John Blackstock, H. L. Mukerjce, 
R I. Paucett, Miss Organ, Miss Scott, Ganga Nath, 

P. S. Hyde, G. W. Briggs. 

Board of Education. 

J. H. MxsSMORE, President; W.A. Mansell, Secretary and Treasurer; 

William Peters, H. L. Mukerjee, C. E. Simpson, Miss 

Sellers, Miss Nichols, Mrs. Parker, Miss Scott. 

Board of Examiners. 
W. A. Mansell, Chairman; N. L. Rocksy, Registrar; S. Knowlss, 

6 7 /3a^ ^' ^' ^^"PQ°™ ^» ^* ^ Bare, S. S. Dease, W. R. Bowbn, 
- ^^^*^ H. L. Mukerjee, D. a. Chowpin, Jawala Singh, 

jABfES THOMPKINSON, S. B. FINCH, 

Prabhu Dayal. 



6 CONFERENCE OFFICERS. 

Standing Committees. 

Statistics.— Gaijq A Nath, Prabhu Dayal, J. R Chitambar. 
State of Church.— J, H. Gill, Matthew Stephen, G. C. HewbS) 

Y AQUB Shah. 

Temperance.^ J, C. Botchbr, H. A. Ccttinq, S. B. Finch, Nizam All 
Sunday Schools. — R. I. Faucett, M azhar-ul-Haqq, W. R. Bowen, 

Kanhai Singh. 

Publishing Minutes, "SEcnKTARiES and Aqent of the Methodist 

Publishing Bouse, Lucknow. 

Public fror«/iip.— Presiding Elder and Preacher in Charge, 

MORADABAD. 

Committee on Conference Relations. 

W. A. Mansell, G. L. Bare, John Blackstogk, B. K. List, 

Yaqub Ali, H. a. Cutting. 

Epworth League — Board of Control. 

J. W. Robinson, P. 8. Hyde, Miss Sellers, K. I. Pauoett. 

Conference Board of Stewards. 
J. H. Messmore, H. a. Cutting, J. F. Samuel. 

Deaconess Work— Conference Deaconess Board. 

J. C. Butcher, President; Mrs. Parker, /Secretary; Samuel Tupper, 

Matthew Stephen, w. r. Bowen, Mrs. Neeld, Miss 

Sullivan, Miss Organ, Miss Hardie. 

Triers of Appeals. 

W. A. Mansell, John Blackstogk, Yaqub Shah, N^Xt^^Rof^a ^sy _ 
Warren Scott, Matthew Stephen, C. L. Bare. 

Sunday School Union. 

R I. Faucett, President; Miss Boge, Vice-President ;Q, W. Briogs, 

Secretary and Treasurer, 

Conference Historical Society. 
N, L. BOCKEY, President and Chronicler ; P. S. Hyde, Secretary, 

Conference Literary Society. 

G. W, Guthrie, President; Mrs. Babe, Vice-President; R. I. 

Faucett, Secretary. 



CONPERBNCE OFFICERS. 7 

Trustees of the Theological Seminary. 

J. H. Gill, D. M. Butler, Mr. Qbo. Luke, I906; L. a. Core, S. 8. 

Dbasb, T. L. Ingram, Esq., 1907 ; N. L. Rock by. P. L. Nbeld, 

F. Welsh, Esq., 1908; Daniel Buck, 1906, J. B. Tbomas, 

1907, Rockwell Cl/^ncy, I9o8, North- West India 

Conference ; T. S. Johnson, Central India Mission 

Conference; Bishop J. M. Thoburn, Bishop 

F. W. Warne, Bishop J. E. Robinson, 

Bishop W. Oldham, Ex Officio; W. 

A. Mansell, Ex Officio 

Secretainf. 

Isabella Thoburn College Board of Governors. 

L. A. Core, Mrs. L. S. Parker, T. L. Ingram, Esq., to retire in 1906 ; 
R Clancy, C. L. Bare, Sm Harnam Singh, Mrs. D O. Fox 
to retire in 1907 ; J. H. Mbssmorb, M. B. Cameron, Esq., 
Hon. Mb. Bblgrami, Miss E. L. Knowles to retire 
in 1908; Bishops J. M. Thoburn, F. W. Warne, 
W. F. Oldham, J. E. Robinson, the Principal 
of the College and the Presiding Elder of the 
District, members ex officio^ the Presid- 
ing Elder of the District being 
Secretary of the Board. 

Trustees of Reid Christian College. 

William Peters, N^Lu Rqckcy, P. M. Buck, 1906 ;'J. W. Robinson, 

J. C. Butcher, J. B. Thomas, 19u7 ; F. L. Nesld, L. A. Core, 

Rockwell Clancy, 1908 ; Bishop J. M. Thoburn, Bishop 

F. W. Warne, Ex Officio ; C. L. Bare, Ex Officio Secretary. 

Committee on Management of Naini Tal Schools. 

Bishop F. W. Warne, Samuel Enowles, J. H. Messmore, L. A. 

Core, £LJL-Kqckey, F. L. Neeld, R, I. Faucett, P. S. Hyde, 

J. ANDERSON, Esq., Col. J. Burton Forster, J. C. 

Butcher, Mrs. Butcher, Miss Easton, Miss 

Sellers, Miss Organ. 

Executive Committee of Oak Openings High School. 

Bishop F. W. Warne, F. L. Neeld, Samuel Knowles, J. H. 
Messmore, P. S. Hyde, J. Anderson, Esq., Col. Burton 

Forster, J. C. Butcher. 

Trustees of Bishop Parker Memorial High School. 

F. L. Neeld, _N. L. RQ Ckey. Wm. Peters, 1906 ; W. A. Mansell, 
H. A. Cutting, 1907 : Ex Officio The Presiding Elder op the 
District and the Principal of the School, 



8 CONFERENCE OFFICERS. 

To Preach the Annual Conference Sermon. 
J. n. Smart ; AlterncUe, Yaqub Shah. 

Visitors to Theological Seminary. 
C L. Bars, S. B. Finch. 

Licensed Deaconesses. 

Miss Hoge, Miss Scott, Miss Hardie, Miss Mary Means, Miss 
Browne, Miss Sullivan, Miss Inqbam, Miss A. Means, 

Miss Sheldon, Miss Ruddick. 
Associates,- Mbs. Tucker, Mrs. Caroline Richards. 
Probationer.— Miss E. McLeavy. 

Examining Oommittee.—Miss Sullivan, Miss A. Means, Mrs. 

Nebld. 

Special Committee on <^ Privileges." 

I^wth India Oonference.—L. A. Core, F. L. Neeld, J. W. Robinson, 
S. Knowles, W. a. Mansell: Consulting members^ H. A. Cutt- 
ing, Wm, Pst&rs. North West India Confereince»— 
J. B. Thomas, O. E. Stokes, J. E. Scott, Rockwell 
Clancy, P. M. Buck : ConsvXting members^ M. 
Khan, Daniel Buck. 



CONFERENCE ROLL. 



CLASS A.— Elders in fiiD connection who have completed 






the cotirse 


of study. 




Adams, Horace J. 


1874 


Lazar Shah 


1904 


Badley, BrentOD T. 


1899 


List, Henry K. 


1889 


Bahadur Singh 


1896 


Mohammed Hasan Jan 


1895 


Baldeo Parshad 


1893 


Mansell, Sabine 


1892 


Bans! Dhar 


1895 


Mansell, William A. 


1889 


Bare, Charles L. 


1880 


McArthur, A. G. 


1893 


Basant Ram 


1894 


Mazhar-ul-Haqq 


1893 


Bihari Lai I. 


1892 


Messmore, James H, 


1861 


Bihari Lai 11. 


1889 


Mukerjee, H. L. 


1886 


Bhikkl Lai 


1891 


Mitchell, H. B. 


1886 


Blaokstock, John 


1875 


Neeld, Frank L. 


1881 


Bowen, W. R. 


1882 


Nizam All 


1896 


Bulaql Singh 


1905 


Patras, Benjamin 


1887 


Butcher, John C. 


1885 


Paul, Chiddu S. 


1889 


Butler, David M. 


1893 


Peters, William 


1879 


Childs, Nathaniel R 


1904 


Phillip, B. 8. 


1893 


Chowfln, David A. 


1892 


Phillip, Samuel 


1891 


Cocker, Beoj. F. 


1884 


Prabbhu Oayal 


1897 


Core, Lewis A. 


1889 


Prem Singh 


1898 


Craven, Thomas 


1870 


Presgrave, Grafton D. 


1894 


Cutting, airam A. 


1874 


Robinson, John W. 


1892 


Dease, Stephen S. 


1881 


Rockey, Noble L. 


1884 


Djsell, Joseph 


1896 


Samuel, John F. 


1893 


Falls, Seneca 


1886 


Samuel, Joshua S. 


1896 


Faucett, Robert I. 


1899 


Scott, Thomas J. 


1863 


Fazl Masih 


1893 


Scott, Warren M. 


18^8 


Finch, Saperian 8. 


1894 


Shipley, Charles 


1885 


Pranklin, R. 8. 


1893 


Smart, Joseph H. 


1897 


Frey, Geo. H. 


1889 


Speake, William T. 


1890 


Ganga Nath 


1896 


Stephen, Matthew 


1862 


Gill, Joseph H. 


1871 


Solomon, Joshua 


1896 


Greenwold, F. W. 


1879 


Thobum, David L. 


1894 


Hancock, C. 


1886 


Thompkinson, James 


1898 


Harris, Mangal L 


1904 


Tupper, Samuel 


1889 


Hewes,' Geo. C. 


1891 


Walter, John H. 


1905 


Humphrey, James L. 


1857 


Waugb, James W. 


1859 


Jawala Singh 


1894 


Wesley, Arthur S. 


1905 


Jhukkan Lai 


1898 


West, John N. 


1893 


Jordan, James 


1883 


Wheeler, Samuel 


1889 


Kanhai Singh 


1887 


Wilson, Harkua 


1887 


Kay Silas 


1905 


Yaqub All 


1905 


Kidder, D. P. . 


1885 


Yaqub Shah 


1882 


Knowles, Samuel 


1858 







10 CONFERENCE ROLL. 



CLASS B.— Members in foD conneclkm in slndies of tlie Iburth year. 

•^ Guthrie, Georjje W. Elder ..., ]904 

Mieri Charan Elder ••.. 1002 

Prem Masih Deacon .... 1902 



CLASS C-Members in loD ocmnection in stodies of tbe third year. 

Hukill, Devi S. Elder .... 1903 

Hyde, Prestoa S, Elder ... 1002 

Roberts, John Elder .... 1903 

Sigler, Henry 0. Deacon .... 1903 

Yaqub Singh Deacon .... 1900 



CLASS D.— Preadiers on TriaL 

f Briggs, George W. Elder II Year .... 1904 

Ishwari Dass ,, .... 19U4 

f Ozanne, .Herbert G. Deacon ,, .... 1905 

f- Simpson, Chas. E. Deacon ,, .... 1905 

Wittke, Ferris Deacon ,, .... 1904 

1 Badley, Theodoi^e C. I Year .... 1905 

Chitambar, Jashwant R. , , .... 1905 

Nirmal Singh „ .... 1905 

Norton, John W. , , .... 1905 

-f Revis, Wm. A. ,, .... 1906 

Prabhu Dass , « — 1905 

Wilson, Dhappan ,, ... 1904 



SUMMARY. 

Missionaries in full connection .... .... 23 

Hindustani Ministers in full connection .... .... 70 



Missionaries on Trial 
Hindustani Preachers on Trial 



Total 


t0 
.... 


93 


.... 


.... 


5 


. . . < 


.... 

< 

.... 


7 


Grand Total 


195 



CON^ERfiNCB ROLL. 



NISSIONAIUES PRESENT-CONrERENCB. 1905. 



Bishop P. W. 

Bad ley, B. T. • 
Badley, T. C. • 
Bare, C. L. • 
Blackstock, J. * 
Brlggs, G. W. 
B rouse, Miss. 
Browne, Miss. 
Budden, Miss. 
Butcher, J. C. • 
Chew, Mrs. 
Core, L. A. • 
Oease, S. S. * 
Faucett, R. I. * 
Gill, J. H. • 
Guthrie, G. W. * 
Bardie, Miss. 
Benry, Miss. 
Hoge, Miss. 
Byde, P. 8.* 
Kuowles, S. 
Lewis, Miss. 
Loper, Miss. 



Warne, D.D., Presiding. 

Mansell, W. A. * 
Messmore, J. H. * 
Mudge, Miss. 
Neeld, F. L. • 
Nichols, Miss. 
Northrup, Miss. 
Organ, Miss. 
Ozanne, H. G. * 
Parker, Mrs. 
Revis, W. A. 
Robinson, J. W. • 
Robinson, Miss. 
Rockey. N. L. 
Ruddick, Miss. 
Saze, Miss. 
Scott, Miss. 
Sheldon, Miss. 
Simpson, C. E 
Singh, Miss. 
Waugh, Miss. 
Wilson, Miss. 
Wright, Miss. 



LIST OP VISITORS. 

Miss Pool, Narthtoest Indta Conference. 

Mrs. Wilson ,, 

Robertson, J. T. „ 

Roberts, P. V. South ,, ,, 

Prof. 0. M. Lacey Sites, Ph.D., Skanghai^ China. 

Mr. Benjamin Aitken, Lucknow. 

Rev. T. 8. Wynkoop, Allahabad. 



If 






•And wife. 



DISCIPLINARY QUESTIONS. 



1. Who have been Received by Transfer, and from what Oonference t 

Charles E, Simpson, from Central Swedish Conference ; Herbert 
0, Ozanne, from South India Conference. 

2. Who have been Re-admitted t 

NODB. 

3. Who hare been Reoeived on Credentiali and from vhat Oharohes t 

None. 

4. Who have been Received on Trial T 

(a) In Studies of First Tear. 

J- John W. Norton, Theodore C. Badleyt William A. Bevis, 

Prabhu Doss, Nirmal Singh, Jashwant B, Chitamhar. 
(6) In Studies of Third Tear. 
None. 

5. Who have been Oontinned on Trial ? 

(a) In Studies of First Tear. 

Dhappan Wilson, 
{b) In Studies of Second Tear. 

Ferris Witlke, Ishwari Doss, Qeorge W. Briggs, Charles E. 
Simpson. 
{0 In Studies of Third Tear. 

None, 
(d) In Studies of Fourth Tear. 

Nooe. 

6. Who have been Discontinued T 

None. 

7. Who have been admitted into Full Membership ? 

(a) Elected and Ordained Deacons this year. 

None. 

(6) Elected and Ordained Deacons previously. 

John Roberts, Devi S. IfukUl, Henry C Siglen 

8. What Members are in Studies of Third Tear t 

(a) Admitted into Full Membership this year. 

John Roberts, Devi S, Hukill, Henry C, Sigler, 

[b] Admitted into Full Membership previously. 

Preston S. Hyde, Yaqub Singh. 

9. What Members are in Studies of Fourth Tear. V 

George W. Outhrie, Misri Charan^ Prem Masih. 

10. What Members have Completed the Conference Course of Study T 
(a) Elected and Ordained Elders this year. 

BrentonT. Badley, Bulaqi Singh, Kay Silas, John H.Walter, 
Arthur S. Wesley. 



DISaPLlNARY QU£STI0N8. 18 

(6) BeeM ai4 OrdalBod mdars previovsly. 

Yaqub All. 

11. Wliat ofhanhtTO been Qeotod and Ordained Dmoobi T 

(a) Ai Looal Protohon. 

Benjamin OorneliuSt Dhanni B. BodgerSf John Frederick 
Abel Briscoe, Hirain Barrow, Nand Bam, Bira L, Mai- 
thswB, Jhandu Singh. 

(h) Undtr Hiisloniry Rnla. 
None. 

12. Wluit oUien htve been Deeted aid Ordained Dders ? 

(a) Aa Local Deaoona. 

Lakhan Singh. 

(h) Under liaaionarj Rnlo. 

Oeorge W. Quthrie, Misri Charan, John Boberts. 

18. Waa fhe Oharaotor of eaob Preaeher examined T 

This was striotly done as the name of each preacher was called 
in open Conference. 

14. Wbo have been franaferred, and to vhat Oonlerenoea T 

None. 

15. Who have Died ? 

Cbhote Lai. 

16. Who have been Located at their own Reqneat T 

None. 

17. Who have been Located T 

ShaduUa Lawrence. 

18. Who haTO Wiflidrawn T 

None. 

18. Who have been permitted to withdrav nnder Ohargoa or Oomplainta T 

None. 

80. Who haTO been Bzpelled T 

None. 

81. What other peraonal Rotation ahonld be made ? 

The credentials of Joseph Wahid-ud-Din were restored. 

88. Who are the Snpemnmerary Preaohera ? 
None. 

88. Who are the Snperannnatod Preaohera ? 

J. L. Humphrey, J. W. Waugh, Thomas Craven, Samuel 
Knowles. 

84. Who are the Triera of Appeala ? 

W. A. Mansell, John Blackstock, Yaqub Shah, N. L. 
Rockey, Warren Scott, Matthew Stephen, C. L. Bare. 

85. What ia the Statiatioal Report for thia year ? 

(See Statistics.) 



14 DISCIPLINARY QUESTIONS. 

26. What is the Aggregtte of tiie Banevolant OoUootioiii is reported by 

the Oonferenoe Treasurer ? 

Bs. 2,553-9-6. 

27. What are tho Olalms on the Oonferenoe Fnnd ? 

Rs. 1,248. 

28. What has been ReceiYOd on these Olaims, and hov has it been Applied ? 

Full amount was received and applied. 

29. Where are the Preachers Stationed ? 

(See AppointmeDtsj 

80. Where shall the Hezt Oonferenoe be held ? 

Moradabad. 



CONPERJDNCE APPOINTMENTS. 



•I 



Norbh India Conference Appointments, 1905. 

BAREILLY-KUMAON DISTRICT. 

F. L. Neeld, Presiding Elder (P. O., Sbabjahanpur). 

Shahjahanpur East, John Blackstock, Prabhu Dayal. 

Shahjahanpur West, G. D. Presgrave. 

Dilawarganj, Dhappan Wilson, Local Deacon, 

Panahpur, John Blackstock. 

Powayan, Prem Singh. 

Mahamdl, John Blackstock, B. S. Franklin. 

Jalalabad, Mlsrl Charan. 

Tllhar, fl. K. List. 

Mlranpnr Eatra, B. F. Cocker. 

Ehera Bajhera, to be supplied. 
Faridpur, C. S. Paul. 

Barellly, S. S. Dease. 

Hindustani Church, W. R. Bowen. 

Sadar Bazar, A. G. Mc Arthur. 

Theological Seminary, W. A. Mansell, Principal ; S. S. Dease, 

Vice-Principal : H. L. Mukerjl, Jawala Singh, J. R. 

Chltambar, T. J. Scott, Professor EmerUiLS of SystemaMc 

Tficology, 

Nalnl Tal, Supplied by J. C. Butcher, Benjamin Patras. 

„ English Church, P. S. Hyde. 

„ Boys* High School, F. S. Ditto, Principal ; H. G. Ozanue. 

PIthoragarh, Devi S. Huklll. 

Dwarahat and Lobha, F. L. Neeld and Harkua Wilson. 

Superannuates. J. W, Waugh, J. L. Humphrey, Samuel Enowles. 

On leave to America, T« J. Scott. 

Transferred to North- West India Conference, J. C. Butcher. 

BUDAON DISTRICT . 

Wm. Peters, Presiding Elder (P. 0., Budaon). 
Aonla, Basant Ram. 
Bhamora, Prabhu Dass. 
BUsl, Nizam All. 
Bisauli, W. T. Speake. 
Budaon, Wm. Peters, James Thompklnson. 
Dataganj, N. R. Chllds. 
Eakrala, Joshua Solomon. 
UJhani, Blharl Lai IL 

BIJNOR DISTRICT. 

J. H. Gill, Presiding Elder (P. O., Bljnor). 
Bashta, H. B. Mitchell. 
Bljnor, Warren Scott. 
Dhampur, Fazl Maslh. 
Klratpnr, John Roberts. 



16 CONFERENCE APPOINTMENTS. 

Mandawar, Peter Merrill, Local Elder, 
Nagina, Charles Shipley. 
Najibabad, Bansi Dhar. 
Nurpur, Albert Gulab, Local Deacon, 
Seohara, Jhabba Lai, Local Elder. 

QAKHWAL DISTRICT. 

J. H. Messmore, Presiding Elder (P. C, Pauri, Garhwal). 
Dokhwali, F. W. Greenwold. 
Kainur, Kwankin, Local Elder. 
Lansdowne, Ghungar Money, Local Elder, 
Pauri, J. H. Messmore, D. A. Chowfln. 
Ramnee, Sabine Mansell. 

HARDOI DISTRICT. 

Samuel Topper, Presiding Elder (P. O., Hardoi) 
Bllgram, Jhukkan Lai, 
Hardoi, Samuel Tupper. 
Mai la wan, Harun Andrew, Local Deacon, 
Pihani, Yaqub Singh. 
Safipur, Eanhai Singh. 
Sandi, Robert Turner, Local Elder. 
Sandila, Crawford Hancock. 
Shahabad, iTaqub Shah. 
Unao, Bihari Lall. 

MORADABAD DISTRICT. 

L. A. Core, Presiding Elder (P. O., Moradabad) 
Amroha, D. M. Butler. 
Babukhera, Lachman Singh, Local Deacon. 
Bahjoi, James Jordan. 
ChandausI, H. A. Cutting. 
Dhanaura, Mohammad Hasan Jan. 
Gunnaur, Seneca Falls. 
Hasanpur, B. S. Phillip. 
Kanth, M. L. Harris. 
Kundarki, Bahadur Singh, Ishwari Dass. 
Moradabad, R. I. Faucett, Mazhar-ul-Haqq. 

„ Parker Memorial High School, C. E. Simpson 

Narainiya, Nirmal Singh. 
Bajpura, B. Milton, Local Deacon. 
Rasulpur, Mathra Parshad, Local Deacon, 
Sambhal, Lazar Shah. 
Shahpur, Mauladad Khan, Local Elder. 
Sharif pur, Bulaqi Singh. 
Thakurdwara, Mohan Singh, Local Elder. 

OODH DISTRICT. 

J. W. Robinson, Presiding Elder (P. O., Lucknow) 
Bahralch, A. S. Wesley. 
Balrampur, J. S. Samuel. 
Barabanki, Taqub All. 
Bhinga, J. F. Samuel. 
Gonda, G. C. Hewes, Ferris Wlttke. 



»> 
«• 



OONFERENCE APPOINTMENTS. 17 

KarnalgaD], Samuel Wboeler, J. W. Norton. 

Lakhimpur, H. J. 'Adams. 

Laeknow Circalt/.N. L. Bockey, H. C. Sigler, W. A. Bevls. 

,» Hindastanl Church, Matthew Stephen. 

n English Church, G. W. Briggs. 

„ Methodist Publishing. House, D. L. Thoburn, Ganga Nath. 
City .Schools, B. T. Badley. 

Beld Christian College and High School, C. L. Bare, B. T. 
Badley, S. Phillip, T. C. Badley. 
Itaunja, Prem.Masih. 
NawabganJ, to be supplied. 
Bae Bareilly, J. S. Smart. 
SIdhauli. Baldeo Parshad. 
SlUpar Circuit, G. W. Guthrie, S. B. Finch. 

„ Boys' Boarding School, G. W. Guthrie, Kay Silas. 
Editor, SdufcoZ) i Hind, W. A. Mansell. 

Secretary, Bishop Thoburn Special Fund, N. L. Bockey, W. A. Bevis. 
Sdperannuate, Thomas Craven. 
On leave to America, J. N. West. 

PILIBHIT DISTBICT. 

G. H. Frey, Presiding Elder (P. O., FatehganJ West). 
Bhojipora, Moti Lai, Local Deacon, 
Bitalpnr, Girdhari Lai, Looal Deacon. 
FatehganJ West, G. H. Frey. 
MlrganJ, Joseph Dysell. 
NawabganJ, John Walter. 
Pilibblt, D. P. Kidder. 
Puranpur, Jhabbu Lai, Local Deaeon. 
Bampur, Kaliyan Singh, Xocal Deacon* 
Shahi, Sohan Lai, Local Elder. 
Siranli, Bhlkki Lai. 



WOMAN*S CONFERENCE APPOINT^fENTS, 1905. 

BABEILLY-KUMAON DISTBICT. 

Bareilly Orphanage and Boarding School, Mrs. Chew. 

„ City and Village Work, Mrs. Dease, M.D., Mrs. Tucker. 

„ Medical Work, Miss Lewis, M.D., Miss Gimson, M.D., 

„ Woman's School, Mrs. Mansell, Mrs. Mukerjl, Mrs. Ohi- 
tambar. 
Bhoi, Miss Browne. 
Bhahjahanpur, Girls* Boarding School, Miss Organ. 

„ Circuit Work, Mrs. Blackstock. 

Dwarahat, supplied by the Misses Seymour. 
Pithoragarh, Miss Sullivan. 

„ Evangelistic Work, Miss Budden. 

Naini Tal, Hindustani Work, supplied by Mrs. Butcher. 

„ Boys* High School, Mrs. Ditto, Mrs. Ozanne. 

„ English Work, Mrs. Hyde. 

„ Girls* High School, Miss Easton, Principal ; Miss Sellers 
Vice-Prlmcipal ; Miss Waugh. 



18 (X)NFERENCE APPOINTMENTS. 

District Work, Mrs. Neeld. 

On leave to America, Miss English, Miss Sheldon, M.D. 

BIJNOR DISTRICT. 
District Work and Girls* Boarding School, Mrs. Gill. 

BUDAON DISTRICT. 

Budaon Girls* Boarding School, Miss Wright. 
„ City and District Work, Miss Ruddick. 

GARHWAL DISTRICT. 

Pauri Girls' Orphanage and Boarding School, Miss Wilson. 

„ Village Schools and District Work, Mrs. Messmore. 

„ Editor, Ra/Ui i Niswan, Mrs. Messmore. 
On leave to America, Miss Kyle. 

HARDOI DISTRICT. 

District and School Work, Mrs. Tupper. 
Evangelistic Work, Mrs. Parker. 

MORADABAD DISTRICT. 

Moradabad Girls' High School, Mrs. Parker, Miss Henry. 

„ City Work, Mrs. Parker. 

„ Village Work, Mrs. Faucett. 
District Work, Mrs. Core. 
Evangelistic Work, Miss Buck. 
On leave to America, Miss A. Means, Miss M. Means. 

OUDH DISTRICT. 

Bahraich, Mrs. Raymon. 

Gonda, Girls' Boarding School, Miss Scott. 

„ City and Village Work, Mrs. Bewes. 
Lucknow, Isabella Thoburn College, High School and Normal School, 
Miss Nichols, Principal ; Miss Singh, Miss Brouse, Miss 
Robinson, Miss Northrup, Miss Mudge. 

„ Deaconess Home and Home for Homeless Women, Miss 

Hardie, Miss Ingram. 

„ City Schools, Mrs. B. T. Badley. 

„ Circuit Work, Mrs. Thoburn. 

„ Zenana Work, Mrs. T. C. Badley, Miss Hoge. 

„ English Work, Miss Hardie. 

„ Reld Christian College, Mrs. Bare. 

Sitapur Girls' Boarding School, Mrs. Guthrie. 

„ City and Zenana Work, Mrs. Guthrie. 

District Evangelistic Work, Miss Hoge. 
District Work, Mrs. Robinson. 
On leave to America, Miss Newton, Miss 0. Easton, Miss Loper. 

PILIBHIT DISTRICT. 

District Work, Mrs. Frey. 
Evangelistic Work, Mrs. Mansell, 



CONP£R£NCE JOURNAL. 



First Day. 

LUCKNOW, 5th January 19M. 
Opening Bzerciies. 

The North India Conference met for its forty-first annual 

session in the Lai Bagh Methodist Episcopal Church, Lucknow, 

on Thursday, 5th January 1905, at 11a.m., Bishop Frank W. 

Warne, D.D., in the chair. After an opening hymn, 8. Knowles 

read the Scripture lesson and offered prayer. 

RidlGaU. 

The Secretary of the last Conference called the roll» to which 
eighty-four members responded. 

Bleotion of Seeretariei . 

On motion of W. R. Bovren, B. T. Badley was re-elected 
Secretary, and on his nomination, P. S. Hyde was re-elected 
Assistant Secretary, and D. A. Cbowfin, Vernacular Secretary. 
On motion of J. C. Butcher, Ganga Nath was re-elected Statistical 
Secretary. On motion of J. W. Robinson, R. I. Fauoett was 
re-elected Conference Treasurer. 

Hoar of Adionrnment. 

On motion of J. C. Butcher, the hour of adjournment was fixed 
for 2 o'clock. 

Oonforinee Programme. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, the Conference programme was 
accepted as printed. 

Oonfereneo Bonnds. 

On motion of C. L. Bare, the Conference Bounds were fixed so 
as to include the two wings and the main aisle back to the second 
window. 

mtrodnctions. 

The following new members were introduced :— Mrs. Warne, 
Miss Waugh, Mrs. Hyde, Mrs. Faucett, Rev, and Mrs. H. G. 
Ozanne, Miss Henry, Miss Mudge, Mr. Revis, Miss Saxe, Mr, and 
Mrs. T. C. Badley, and Rev. Chas. £. Simpson transferred to this 
Conference from the Central Swedish Confereuce. Mr. C. M. Lacey 
Sites, Ph.D., Professor in the Go vernme at College at Shanghai, 
China, was also introduced. 

Standing Committees. 

On motion of N. L. Rockey, the Standing Committees as 
appointed last year were approved. On motion of J. W. Robin- 
son, Miss Robinson was appointed in place of Miss Sellers on the 



20 OONFBRENCB JOUBNAL. 

Epworth League Board of Control, and Mies Organ in place of 
Mrs. Rookey on the Auditing Committee. 

Hemoin. 

On motion of Wm. Petera, the following were appointed a 
committee on memoirs :—J. W. Robinson, J. H. Smart, J. Thomp- 
kinson, Bahadur Singh. 

Letten Bead. 

The Secretary read letters from J. N. West and T. J. Scott, 
and on motion of Wm. Peters, the Secretary was instructed to 
reply to each. 

Oreettagt. 

On motion of B. T. Badley it was ordered that greetings be 
sent to the Bombay Conference in session; The following tele- 
gram was sent to the Secretary of the Bombay Conference :^ 
* < Oreetings from North India. See DetU. SI : ^. ' * (The Lord, he it is 
that doth go before thee ; he will be with thee, he will not fail 
thee.) 

JnbUee OolebratioB. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, a committee was appointed to 
make plans for our part in the Jubilee Celebration, and the Wo- 
man's Conference was requested to appoint a similar committee, 
to confer with ours. The following were appointed :— J • W. 
Robinsion, W. A.. Mansell, L. A. Core, S. S. Dease, Wm. Peters, 
S. Tupper. 

Use of Yemaenltr. 

On motion of Jawala Singh it was ordered that all business 
be transacted in the Vernacular. 

Transfer. 

The Bishop read the transfer certificate of Charles E. Simpson 
from the Central Swedish Conference to this Conference. 

Thlrtoenfli Qneatlon. 

The Thirteenth Question was called. On motion of J. H. Mess- 
more it was ordered that the Presiding Elders be excused from 
reading their reports, but be requested to give the gist of the same 
in the vernacular. The name of F. L. Neeld was called, his 
character passed, and he gave the report of the Bareilly-Eumaon 
District. The name of the following were called, their characters 
passed, and they reported their collections :— J. Blackstook, 
Prabhu Dayal, Prem Singh, O. D. Presgrave, Joseph Dysell, H. 
K. List, B. F. Cocker, C. S. Paul, S. S. Dease, W. R. Bowen, 
A. G. McArthur, W. A. Mansell, H. L. Mukerjee, Jawala Singh, 
T. J. Scott (absent), Benjamin Patras, J. C. Butcher, Harkua 
Wilson, J. L. Humphrey (absent), 8. Knowles, J. W, Waugh 
(absent), S, Lawrence (absent), 
ShadnlU Lawrence. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, Sbadull a Lawrence was located. 



dONFERENCE JOUl^NAL. il 

8vi«nuuitttt08. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld, J. W. Waugh, J. L. Bumphrey aod 
8. Koowles were coatinued in the Superannuate Relation. S. 
Enowles was called on to addre38 the Conference, and briefly 
responded. 

H. 0, Oianne. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld, the matter of receiving the name of 
H. G, Ozanne was referred to the Committee on Conference Re- 
lations, 

J, WaUd-vd-Diii. 

It was moved by F. L. Neeld that the credentials of Joseph 
Wahid-ud-Din be restored ia accordance with his request and 
Para, 161 of the Discipline. J. B, Gill moved as a substitute 
that the case be referred to the committee on Conference Rela« 
tions. After considerable debate the Previous Question was mov- 
ed by J. W, Robinson. The vote resulted in ordering the 
credentials to be restored. 

Riehartlion Orty. 

It was moved by B, T, Badley that the request of the Newark 
Conference for the restoration of the credentials of Richsrdson 
Gray be referred to the co(nmlit<)e on Conference Relations. The 
motion Was carried as amended by J. W. Robinson that the case 
be referred to the Cabinet. 

Tiirteeafh Qneatlcm 

The Thirteenth Question was resumed. The name of Wm. 
Paters was called, his character passed, and he gave the report of 
the BudaoD district. 

After annouQcemeats and Doxology, the Conference adjourn- 
ed on expiration of time. 



Second Day. 

LncKNOW, Qth January 190ft. 

Opealag Bzereisas. 

The session opened with Bishop Warne in the chair. After 
the devotional exercises, conducted by Dr. Sites, the Minutes of the 
previous day were read in English and Vernacular and, after 
corrections, were approved. 

Stttiflloil Tear. 

It was moved by F. L. Neeld that hereafter tbe statistical year 
close on the 31st of October and the'motion was carried, as amended 
by N. L. Rockey, that we request all the other Conferences to adopt 
the same rule. 



22 CX)NFER£NCE JOUHNAL. 

Presidiag Elders' Beporti . 

On motion of J. W* Roblason it was ordered that the Ck)rre8* 
ponding Secretary be hereafter the responsible person for collect- 
ing Presiding Elders' reports and sending them home for publica- 
tion in the Annual Export, and that he be instructed to give due 
notice to each Preaiding Elder when the reports are required 

AislsUuit Treasurer. 

On motion of R. I. Faucett, O. W. Guthrie was appoi nted 
Assistant Conference Treasurer. 

Introdnotloii. 

Hey. T. S. Wynkoop, Secretary of the North India Bible So- 
ciety, was introduced and addressed the Conference on the woric of 
the North India Bible Society. 

Bible Svaiay. 

On motion of Wm. Peters it was ordered that the first Sunday 
of March be observed throughout our Conference as Bible Sunday, 
that a special sermon be preached on that day on the Bible and 
the worlc of the Bible Society. 

Ohlliren's Day. 

On motion of B. T. Badley it was ordered that Children's Day 
be observed throughout our Conference on the first Sunday of 
April, and that the special issue of the Children's Papers be pub- 
lished with this date in view, it being understood that where im- 
practicable, the Children's Day celebration may be held on a sub- 
sequent date. 

Tkirttenfh Question. 

The Thirteenth Question was resumed. The names of the 
following of the Budaon district were called, their characters 
passed, and they reported their collections: — Basant Ram, Nizam 
All, W.T. Speake, Bihar! Lall li., Joshua Solomon, Jas. Thomp- 
kinson. 

Bilnor Distrlot. 

The name of J. H. Gill was called, his character passed, and 
he gave the report of the Bijnor district. The names of the follow- 
ing were called, their characters passed, and they reported their 
collections :— H. B. Mitchell, Warren Scott, Bansi Dhar, Charles 
Shipley, N. R. Childs, Fazl Masih. 

Garliwal District. 

The name of J. H. Messmore was called, his character passed, 
and he gave the report of the Garhwal district. The names of 
the following were called, their characters passed, and they re- 
ported their collections : -F. W. Greenwold, D. A. Chowfin, 
Sabine Mansell. 

Hardot District. 

The name of S. Tupper was called, his character passed, 
«nd he gave the report of the Hardoi district. The names of the 
following were called, their characters passed, and they reported 



CONFERENCE JOURNAL. 28 

their collections :— Crawford Hancock, Yaqub Shah, Bihilri Lai I., 
Kanhai Singh, Jhukkhan Lai. 

■•raiabtd Dittriet. 

The name of L. A. Core was called, his character passed, and 
he gave the report of the Moradabad district. The names of the 
following were called, their characters passed, and they reported 
their collections :-D. M, Butler, Jas. Jordan, H, A. Cutting 
Mohammed Basan Jan, Seneca Falls, B. S. Phillip, M. L. Harris* 
Bahadur Singh, Mazhar-ul-Haqq, Lazar Shah, R. I. Fauoett. 

OUh Dlstrlot. 

The name of J. W. Robinson was called, his character 
passed, and he gave the report of the Oudh district. 

Adjonmmeat. 

On expiration of time the Conference adjourned after announce- 
ments and Doxology. 



Third Day. 

LUCKN0W» 1th January 1005. 

Opeiiai BxtrolMi . 

The session opened with Bishop Warne in the chair. After 
the devotional exercises conducted by Chas. E. Simpson, the 
Minutes of the previous day were read and approved. 

AteiBCM Bxcnaed. 

On motion of B. T. Badley, Bhikki La), and on motion of 
J. W. Robinson, Yaqub Singh, were excused from attendance at 
the Conference because of illness in their families. 

JmWee Gdebratton. 

On motion of W. A. Mansell, N. L. Rockey was appointed an 
additional member on the Jubilee Celebration Committee. 

Letter Read. 

The Secretary read a letter from J. W. Waugh, and on motion 
of Wm. Peters was instructed to reply. 

Iitrodmotioa. 

Ben]. Aitken, Esq., was introduced to the Conference, 

Af petl : P. 1. Daia. 

The appeal of P. M. Dass from the decision given in his case 
by the Moradabad District Conference, was referred by the Bishop 
to the following Committee :—W. A. Mansell, Chairman ; Q. C* 
Hewes, J. Blackstock, M. Stephen, F. W. Greenwold, J. Solomon, 
3. B. Pinch, Yaqub bhah, H. L. Mukerjee. The Secretary of the 
Conference appointed Prem Singh Secretary of the Committee on 
the appeal. 



24 OONFEBENCB JOURNAL. 

■trritgesi 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, the whole question relating to 
the performlDg of marriage oeremonies by mlDisters of our Con- 
fereoce was referred to the Cabinet. 

Thirteenfh Question : Ondh. 

The Thirteenth Question was resumed. The names of the 
following were called, their characters passed, and they reported 
their collections :— J. F. Samuel, J. 8. Samuel, G. C. Hewes, 
S. Wheeler, Baldeo Pershad, H. J. Adams, C. L. Bare, S. Phillip, 
J. H. Smart, N. L. Kockey, S. B. Finch, D. L. Thoburn (absent), 
J. N. West (abseot), T. Craven (absent), M. Stephen, Qanga Nath. 

T. Ort?en. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, T. Craven was cootinued in the 
Superannuate Relation. 

niibhii 

The name of G. H. Frey was called, his character passed, and 
he reported the work of the Pilibhit district. The names of the 
following were called, their characters passed, and they reported 
their collections:— R. S. Franklin, Bhikki Lai (absent), D. P. 
Kidder. 

HinUi QnestloB. 

The Ninth Question was taken up. The name of John H. 
Walter was called, his character was passed, aod on motion of G. 
H. Frey he was elected to Elders* Orders, recommended for ordin- 
ation and advanced to the class of Effective Elders. The names of 
Brenton T. Badley, Kay Silas and Arthur S. Wesley were called, 
their characters were passed, and on motion of J. W. Robinson 
they were elected to Elders' Orders, recommended for ordination 
and advanced to the class of Effective Elders. The name of 
Yaqub All was called, his character was passed, and on motion of 
J. W. Robinson he was advanced to the class of Effective Elders 
The name of Bulaqi Singh was called, his character was passed* 
and on motion of L. A. Core he was elected to Elders' Orders, 
recommended for ordination and advanced to the class of Effective 
Elders. 

Flltb QneaUon. 

The Fifth Question was taken up. The name of Ferris Wittke 
was called, his character passed, and on motion of J. W. Robinson 
he was advanced to the studies of the second year. The name of 
Dhappan Wilson was called, his character passed, and on motion 
of F. L. Neeld he was continued in the first year The name of 
Ishwari Das was called, his character passed, and on motion of L. 
A. Core he was advanced to the studies of the second year, on 
condition that his back studies be brought up. The name of 
George W. Briggs was called, his character passed, and on motion 
of J. W. Robinson he was advanced to the studies of the second 
year. The name of John Roberts was called, his character passed 



OONFSRBNOE JOURNAL. 26 

and on motion of W. M. Peters he was advanced to the studies of 
the third year, received into full membership, elected to Elders' 
Orders under the Missionary Rule, and recommended for ordin- 
ation. The name of Devi S. Hukill was called, his character passed, 
and on motion of F. L. Neeld he was received into full member- 
ship and advanced to the studies of the third year. The name 
of Heory C. Sigler was called, his character passed, and on motion 
of J. W. Robinson he was received into full membership and 
advanced to the studies of the third year. 

SoYoatii QneitioB. 

The Seventh Question was taken up. The name of O. W. 
Guthrie was called, his character passed, and on motion of J. W. 
Robinson he was advanced to the studies of the fourth year, and 
recommended for ordination to the office of an Elder under the 
Missionary Rule. The name of Misri Charan was called, his 
character passed, and on motion of F. L. Neeld he was advanced 
to the studies of the fourth year, and recommended for ordination 
to the office of an Elder under the Missionary Rule. The name of 
Frem Masih was called, his character passed, and on motion of J. 
W. Robinson he was advanced to the studies of the fourth year, 
on condition that the back studies be brought up. The name of 
P. S. Hyde was called, his character passed, and on motion of F. 
L. Neeld he was continued in the studies of the third year. The 
name of Yaqub Singh was called, his character passed, and on 
motion of J. W. Robinson he was continued in the studies of the 
third year. 

Be? eatli Qneitien. 

The Eleventh Question was taken up. The names of the 
following Local Preachers were called, and on motion of their 
respective Presiding Elders they were recommended for ordination 
to the office of Deacon : -Benjamin Cornelius, Dhanni Ram 
Rodgers, John Frederick, Abel Briscoe, Hiram Barrow, Nand 
Ram, Hira Lai Matthews, Jhandu Siugh. 

Gbaaitag of lamea. 

On motion of N« L. Rockey it was ordered that this Ck)nference 
do not recognize the name of Jhandu Singh as changed to Jai 
Singh, but that his name remain on all our records as Jhandu 
Singh. 

It was moved by B. T. Badley that it be established as a rule 
of Uiis Conference, that hereafter no name given at baptism be 
accepted as altered which has not been altered in accordance with 
the legal procedure recognized by the Government of this country. 
After some discussiou, on motion of N. L« Rockey, the question 
was deferred until Monday. 

■ember Bxonaed. 

On motion of Samuel Tupper leave of absence, for the re- 
mainder of the Conference session, was granted to Kanhai Singh, 



26 OONFERENCB JOURNAL. 

TIOM Bzteiided. 

Oa motion of H. A. Cutting the time of the session was 
extended. 

TweUtb Qvettloii. 

The Twelfth Question was taken up. On motion of F. L. 
Neeld, Lakhan Singh was recommended as a Local Preacher for 
ordination to the office of Elder. 

Telegram. 

The Secretary read the following telegram sent by the Bombay 
Conference, assembled in annual session, in response to our 
message of greeting : -- 

** Bombay responds.— Faalm 1S3.** 

Member Ezonaed. 

On motion of S. S. Dease, W. R. Bowen was excused for the 
remainder of the Conference session. 

ikdJOVBBieit. 

On motion of H. L. Mukerjee, after announcements and the 
Doxology the Conference adjourned. 



Fourth Day. 

LUOKNOW, 9th January 1906. 

Oponlng Bxerelies. 

The session opened with Bishop Warne in the chair. After 
the devotional exercises, conducted by Benjamin Aitken, Esq. , 
the MiDUtes of the previous day's session were read in English 
and Vernacular and approved as corrected. 

RioliardiOB Gray. 

The Secretary of the Cabioet presented the following, which, 
on the motion of Wm. Peters, was adopted. 

In the matter of the request of Richardson Gray for the re- 
storation of parchments referred to the Cabinet for consideration, 
the following is recommended :-• 

That Bishop Warne be requested to inform the applicant, 
and through him the Newark Cooferenoe, that the North India 
Conference is willing that Bro. Gray should be granted ordination 
by any Conference in the United States, provided it be definitely 
understood that he do not thereafter return to India ; but it is 
deemed inexpedient, on account of existing conditions on this 
field, that his request should be granted and his parchments re- 
stored. 

Sinday Sohotl. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld, J. C. Butcher and Prabhu Dayal 
were appointed on the Committee on Sunday-schools, 



CONFERENCE JOURNAL. 27 

TrMumrer's Boport : ThMlogloal Semlntry. 

8. 8. Dease read the report of the Treasurer of the Theolog- 
ical Seminary, which, on motion of F. L Neeld, was accepted and 
ordered to be placed on file. 

TUrtM&th Qneitton. 

On motion of L. A. Core the Thirteenth Question was called. 
Go motion of J. W. Robinson, Moradabad was chosen as the 
seat of the next Conference. 

Tines of Holdiag Uie Oonlerence. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson it was ordered that a committee, 
consisting of two missionaries and two Hindustani members be 
appointed to cons ider the advisability of changing the time of 
holding the annual Conference, that the Woman's Conference be 
requested to appoint a committee of two to confer with ours, and 
that the report be presented at the next Conference The follow- 
ing were appointed :— J. W. Robinson, F. L. Neeld, Wm. Peters, 
and 8. Tupper. 

Domestio Misilonary Society. 

J. H. Gill read the following resolution, which, on motion of 
L. A. Core, was adopted. 

Eeaolvedf that this Conference requests the Presidicg Elders 
of each district to see that a collection be taken annually in 
behalf of the '* Conference Domestic Missionary Society.*' 

J. H. Gill. 

J. W. Robinson. 

Loiter. 

The Secretar^^ read a letter from Thomas Craven, and, on 
motion of J. W. Robinson, was instructed to reply. 

Oluaglng Hames. 

B. T. Badley read the following resolution, which, on his mo- 
tion, was adopted :— 

Whereas the custom of changing names at pleasure is preva- 
lent among our Hindustani people ; and 

Whereas this is a fruitful source of confusion and trouble to 
us as a Church and people, 

Besolved ;— 

(1) That, as a Conference, we advise our people not to indulge 
in this in future ; and (2) that, as a Conference, we adopt a rule 
that hereafter no name be recognized by us as changed which has 
not been changed in accordance with the legal procedure recogniz- 
ed by the Government of this country. 

B. T. Badlet. 
n. l, rockry. 
8. Tupper. 
P. S. Hyde. 



28 CONFERENCE JOCRNAL. 

Member EzoueC 

On motion of J W. Robinson, Kay Silas was excused from 
the rest of the session on account of illness. 

Ohnreli Letters. 

S. B. Finch read the following resolution, which, on motion of 
N. L. Rockey, was adopted :— 

BezoluUcfn No. L 

Chdnki ham&re Ts&l abhi tak kalfsiyi kl chi^hf kf sardrat 
se n&-w4qif hokar, ddsrf jagah ko tabdfl bote waqt us ko nahfn lete 
hain : aur chdnki is amr ki durustf kf ummed us waqt tak nahfn ho 
salctf, jab tak kl ham&re taH{m-y4fta Masfhf is amr men be-parw&h 
hain, 

Is w&ste ham S4]y&na K&nfarans se dar^hw^st k arte hain, ki 
wuh is k& ma'qdl intis&m kare, ai8& ki koi jaw&n mard y & 'aurat, la^k^i 
y4 larki bam&re College aur Boarding school men qubdl na kiye 
j&wen, jab tak ki we apnf s&biq k( kalfsiya ke p&s(ar se apol kalfsiya 
kf chi^^hf na l&kar pesh karen. 

N. L. ROOKEY. 
G. C. Hewes. 
S. Phillips. 

On motion J. W. Robinson, the Secretary was instructed to send 
notice of the action above to our Boarding Schools. 

OertUlotte. 

This is to certify that, on January 8th, 1905, 1 ordained as Deacons 
Benjamin Cornelius, Dhani Ram Rod gers, John Frederick, Abel 
Briscoe, Hiram Barrow, Nand Ram, Hira Lai Matthews, Jhandu 
Singh, and that on the same day I ordained as Elders Brenton Thoburn 
Badley, Bulaqi Singh, Kay Silas, John H. Walter, Arthur S. Wesley, 
George W. Guthrie, Misri Charan, John Roberts, Lakhan Singh. 



Frank W. Warns, 
Presiding Bishop* 

^th January 1906, 



LuoKNOW : \ 



Fourth Question. 

The Fourth Question was called. The names of the following 

were called, and on motion of their respective Presiding Elders 

they were received on trial: -John W. Norton, Theodore C. Badley, 

William A, E^vis, Prabhu Dass, Nirmal Singh, Jashwant Rao 

Chitambar. 

H. G. Oianne. 

The Committee on Conference relations reported the Trans fer 
Certificate of S. G. Ozanne from the South India Conference to 
this Conference. On motion of F- Ii. Neeld his character was 
passed, and he was continued in the studies of the second year. 



CONB^ERBNCE JOURl^AL. id 

MMri of Stewards. 

J. H. MesBmore presented a partial report of the Confercjpce 
Board of Stewards. 

■ealien Ezcnaed. 

On motion of Wm. Peters, J. Q. Walter and BasaHt Ram 
were excused for the rest of the session. 

Adlounmeat. 

After announcements and Doxology, the Conference adjourned 
on expiration of time. 



Fifth Day. 

LUCKNOW, lOth January 1905. 

Oyeniiig iSzercisei. 

The session opened with Bishop Warne in the chair. After 
the devotional exercises, conducted by Bahadur Singh, the 
Minutes of the previous day's session were read in English and 
Vernacular, and approved. 

Introdnotlon. 

Rev. D. C. Monroe of the S. P. G. was introduced, and briefly 
addressed the Conference. On motion of J. W. Robinson, Mr. 
Monroe was asked to return the greetings of the Conference to 
Dr. H. Mansell and to Mrs. Monroe. 

Seid Ghriatlaii College. 

C. L. Bare read the new constitution of the Reid Christian 
College, approved by the Board of Trustees of the College, and 
on his motion it was adopted. 

Hew Union Ghnreh, Simla. 

The Secretary read a letter from Rev. J, O. Potter, Secretary of 
the New Union Church, Simla, requesting us as a Conference to 
nominate the Secretary of this Conference and his lucoessors 
in office a Trustee of the New Union Church to hold the property, 
together with similar Trustees to be nominated by other Missions, 
and a Local Committee of Management. On motion of F. L. Neeld 
the matter was referred to the Finance Committee with power to 
act 

Bold Ohrlitlan Oollege. 

C. L. Bare nominated the following members of this Con- 
ference on the Board of Trustees of the Reid Christian College, 
and on motion of Wm. Peters they were elected :— 

For 1908 .^ Wm. Peters, N. L. Rookey. 
„ 190T ... J. W. Robinson, J. C. Butcher. 
„ 1908 ... F. L. Neeld, L. A« Core. 

Oonferenoo Board of Stewards. 

J. H. Messmore read the remainder of the report of the Con- 
ference Board of Stewards, and on motion of Wm. Peters, the 
whole report wns accepted. On motion of J. H. Messmore, D, M. 



do OONFEIRENCE iOVRfiAL, 

Butler's request that separate collections be taken for the Con- 
. ferenoe Claimants and Pension Fund was referred to the mid -year 
meetings of the Finance Committee, their report to be presented to 
the next Conference. 

StatlBliiMil Seorettry's Beport 

Ganga Nath presented the report of the Statistical Secretary, 
which, on motion of Wm. Peters, was accepted. (See SiatiUtical 
Heport ) 

Theologiotl Seminary. 

W. A. Mansell presented the report of the Theological Semin- 
ary which, on motion of F. L. Neeld, was accepted and ordered to 
be placed on file. 

Theologiotl Semintry Tmstees. 

On motion of W. A. Mansell, N. L. Hockey and F. L, Neeld 
were re-elected as members of the Board of Trustees of the Theol- 
ogical Seminary and F. Welsh, Esq., was elected in place of T. T, 
Bond, Esq. 

Theologiotl Semintry Oonrio. 

W. A. Mansell presented the following resolution which, on 
motion of Wm. Peters, was adopted :— 

Whereas there is a tendency among our young men who are 
candidates for admission to the Conference to look with disfavor 
upon taking a course in the Theological Seminary as interfering 
with their advancement (both in time and salary), and since by so 
doing they impair their efficiency as preachers in our Conference, 
Besolved that it be the sense of this Conference that in future 
all candidates for admission to Conference should pursue a course 
of study in the Seminary before being recommended for admis- 
sion. 

P. H. Dtii- 

W. A. Mansell read the following report of the Committee 
appointed to consider the appeal of P. M. Dass against the deci- 
sion of the Committee of the Moradabad District Conference in 
the trial of the charges brought against him by N. R. Williams 
which, on motion of J. W. Robinson, was ordered to be placed on 

file. 

In accordance with the provisions of Para. 272 of the Dis- 
cipline, and after a careful consideration of the records of the 
trial, we hereby reverse in part the decision of the Moradabad 
District Conference, and find that the first three charges were sus- 
tained and the fourth charge not sustained. In fixing the penalty, 
adhering to the provisions of the Discipline for such case, we 
decide that P. M. Dass should be expelled from the Ministry and 
Membership of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Board of Dotoonouot. 

J. C. Butcher presented the report of the Board^of Deaconesses, 
which was accepted. (See Reports of Committees.) 



CONFERENCE JOURNAL. 81 

Staiilai taDnltteei. 

J. W. Robinson, on behalf of the Cabinet, nominated the Board 
of Education, the Auditing Committee and the Standing Com- 
mittees, and tbey were elected. (See Conference OffloerB. ) 

The Bishop announced the Committee on Conference Relations, 
Board of Examiners and the Triers of Appeals. (See Conference 
OfBcers ) 

OMmdisIoB on Hill Sekools. 

The Bishop announced the following as a special Commission 
on our Hill Schools, with power to act in co-operation with a 
similar Commission to be appointed from the members of the 
North- West India Conference :-F. L. Neeld, J. C. Butcher,?J. W. 
Robinson, L. A. Core, W. A. Mansell. 

flailon to Thoeloglotl Seminary. 

Wm. Peters presented the report of the Conference visitors to 
the Theological Seminary, which, on motion of S. Tupper, was 
accepted. (See Eleports of Committees.) 

manoo Oommitteo Election . 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, the Conference proceeded to 
elect the Finance Committee. 

Soiolntiim. 

D. M. Butler presented the following resolution :— 

Bczolushan :-Ch^nki ham sab Icf bafi koshish jo ^hud& ke Ka. 

1dm ke 'ain maw&fiq hai, yih hai, ki but-parastl k& qabih gun&h aur 

pudLneburedastdr&t, jo hanoz Maslhfon men rdij hain, bilkull j&te 

rahen, aur Masfhf dastdrdt qdim hon, lekin haqfqat yib hai, ki :— 

1. Ins&n koi na kol mauqa' khusbf k& chdhtd hai. 

2. Aise mauq*on ya'ne teohdron se maz&hib men dlnf josh aur 
gairat paid&hoti hai. 

3. Jab nsf aur achchhi chiz wa'z men de df j&we, to pur&ni 
&s&n( se chhuf ]&ti hai, lekin afsos, ki auwal to Maslhfon men 
teoh&r kam hain, aur jo do ek hain, un ko Maslbl aur Ifh&sskar 
dihdti Masfhf nahfn j&ote, aur ydn dfnf gairat wg. k{ kamf hsi, 
LihAzd 'arz hai, ki k&nfarans se ek kami^^f muqarrar ho. 

1. Easter Sunday k& ma'qdl tarjuma kare. 

£• ChdQki April se December tak ya'ne nau mahfne tak 
llaslhlon ke pds kof teoh&r nahfn, pas mundsib hog&, ki is darmi- 
ydn men ek j& do teoh&r q&im kiye jd>wen. 

3. Wuhkamittf ais& intizdm kare, ki Maslhfon meg ^hdsskar 
dlh&tlon men teob&r mine j&wen, teohir ke ine se pahle logon ko 
un ke mat&lib batlie jiwen, aur log us ke m&nne ke w&dte uskie 
jiwen. 

On motion of J. H. Messmore the resolution was adopted, and 
ihe following Committee appointed to consider the matter and 
take action :-H. A. Cutting, S. Tupper, G. B. Frey, B. Patras, 
L. A. Core, D. M. Butler, G. D. Presgrave, Jawala Singh^ F. L. 
N^eld, Nizam Ali. 



82 CONFERENCE JOURNAL. 

Jabilea Oelebratton. 

N. L. Rockey presented the report of the Committee on the 
Jubilee Celebration, and on motion of J. W. Robinson he was 
requested to get it translated and present it at a joint session of 
the two Conferences. 

Time of Hex! Seislon. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson it was ordered that when we 
adjourn, we adjourn to meet at 5 p.m., and that at 60'clook there 
be a joint session of the two Conferences. 

Bssolntloii. 

D. M. Butler presented the following resolution, which, on 
motion of 8. S. Dease, was referred to the Finance Committee :— 

Bezolu8han:—Ja,hikn tak ma'Mm htid, ham^rl North-India Con- 
ference ke hudiid ke aksar maq&m&t men h&l yih rBh4,aur ab bhl 
hai, ki kamzor Masfhl nau-murfd ke siw& jo Masfh kl b4bat bahut 
kam j&nte hain, g&nwon ke*gair-qaum Naj&t-dihande k( b&hat y& 
to mutlaq nahfn j&nte, aur agar jAnte ham, to mahz khwdb kl si 
bdt. Lihdz& 'arz hai, ki bar district men ai8& intiz&m ho, ki ek 
y& ziy&da bands j in men chaod chuninda mann&d mun&db b&je 
leke s41 men ek daf a y& ziy&da niklen, aur g&n won ko M asfhf 
manddf se bhar den. Chdnkiismen kuchh ^harch dark&r hogd, 
*arz hai, kl us k& intiz&m Finance Commttiee kare, y& kisf aur 
taur se howe, aur ytin ham Maslh ke hukm ko, ki sab qaumon ko 
sh&girdkaro, pdr& karenge, aur haqq haqqd&ron ko pahuncheg^. 

S. B. Finch. H. a. Cutting. 

D. M. Butler. W. Peters. 

State of Ghvroh. 

Matthew Stephen read the report of the Committee on the 
State of the Church, which, on motion of H. A. Cutting, was 
adopted, (See Reports of Committee.) 

FiBtnoo Oommittee. 

The first ballot resulted in electing C. L. Bare, W. A Mansell, 
S. S. Dease, and H. L Mukerjee. On motion of J. B. Messmore 
J. Blackstock and G. C. Hewes, having the next highest vote, 
among the Missionary members, were elected alternates, A second 
ballot was ordered. On motion of J. W. Robinaon it was ordered 
that of the Bindustani members the two receiving the next highest 
votes should be elected alternates. The second ballot resulted in 
electing Ganga Nath and H. A. Cutting as members, and S. B. 
Finch and Yaqub Shah as alternates. 

Opium md Tobtoeo. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson the matter of raising opium, 
tobacco, etc., by members of our Church, was referred to the Tem- 
perance Committee^to be reported on at the next Annual Confer- 
ence Session. 



(X)NF£BENCE JOURNAL. 88 

Ttto«f Tkiiiks. 

J. H. Oill read the following resolution, whioh was adopted 
by rising vote : — 

Eesolved.'—ThVktwef the members of the North India Annual 

Conference, hereby express our sincere and hearty thanks to the 

friends In Lucknow for the very excellent arrangements made for 

our entertainment. 

J. H. QjlIh 

L. A. Core. 

W. A Mansell. 

F.h, Neeld. 
BztwuUm of Time. 

On motion of B. T. Badley the time was extended. 

Retoliition. 

G. D. Presgrave presented the following resolution, whioh, on 
motion of Jas. Thompklnson, was adopted :— 

Besolu^han .--Chdnkl Ufz ** Native "jo ham logon kf nlsbat 
musta'mll hal, bam logon ko tahqfr-&mez maMtim hot& hal, is llye 
ham dar]chw&6t karte hain, ki kuU k&nfaranson kl yildddsht o 
'&mra guftogd men ylh lafz bilkull isti'm&l na ho, aur us ke badle 
lafz '' Indian'' y& Hindust&of istl'm&l ho, jo ziy&da mauzd' hal. 
aur jls ko ham Hlndustdnf Maslhlon ne apnf apnf asaociation men 
pasand karke riw&j diy& hal. 

Pbem Sinqh. H. a. Cutting. 

Pbabhu Dayal. 6. D Presgrave. 

P. W. Greenwold. S. Tupper. 

S. B. Finch. D. M. Bctlbr. 

W. Peters. H. L. Mukerjee. 

TniTelliiifl Bzpeases. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson the matter of travelling expenses 
to District Conference referred to us by the Woman's Conference 
was referred to the Finance Committee. 

AiKnimment 

On motion of Wm. Peters, the Conference adjourned. 

Second Session. 

Lucknow, \Oth January 1905. 

The Conference met at 5 p.m. The devotional exercises were 
conducted by J. H. Gill. The Minutes In English were read and 
approved, and on motion of J. H. QUI the reading of the vernacu- 
lar Minutes was dispensed with, except the portion referring to the 
taking of a theological course by all candidates for admission on 
trial. 

Report of Bztminen. 

N. L. Rockey presented the report of the Board of Elxamlners 
which, on his motion, was ordered to be printed In the Minutes as 
usual. (See Reports of Committees.) 



84 OONFERENOE JOURNAL. 

Domeitio Mlulonary Society. 

H. L. Mukerjee presented the Report of the Committee on the 
Conference Domestic Missionary Society, which, on motion of G. H. 
Frey, was accepted. (See Reports of Committees ) On motion of 
W. A. Mansell the Committee on the Domestic Missionary Society 
was continued. 

iBtrodnctloB. 

P. V. Roberts of the South India Conference, was introduced 
and addressed the Conference. 

Gcnrespondlag Secretary. 

On motion of C. L. Bare the Secretary was instructed to cast 
the ballot for J. C. Butcher as Corresponding Secretary. 

Haini Tal School! 

J. C. Butcher nominated the Committee of Vfanagementon 
Naini Tal schools and the Executive Committee of <* Oak Open- 
ings," which were accepted. (See Conference Officers.) 

Auditor'! Report. 

G. C. Hewes presented the report of the Auditing Committee. 
The part referring to the work done by the Committee was accepted, 
but on motion of C. L. Bare the part comprising new rules for 
the Auditing Committee was referred back for reconsideration and 
presentation at the next Annual Conference Session. 

Hatter! referred. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, the Secretary was instructed 
to present to the Cabinet and the Finance Committee all matters 
referred to them by the Conference. 

fUlton to Semlntry. 

On motion of J. H. Messmore, C. L. Bare and S. B. Finch 
were elected Conference Visitors to the Theological Seminary. 

■vttra Training School. 

The Bishop presented the report of the Muttra Mission Train- 
ing School for 1004, which was accepted. (See Reports of Com- 
mittees.) 

Blndnstanl Hlnnto!. 

On motion of B. T. Bad ley it was ordered that the Hindustani 
journal be not printed this year in the Conference Minutes. 

Jnbllee Gelehratlon. 

The Conference then proceeded to the business before the joint 
session of the two Conferences. N. L. Rockey read the Report of 
the Committee on the Jubilee Celebration. (See Reports of Com- 
mittees) After a long and very interesting and inspiring discus- 
sion, the report was adopted by a rising vote of both Conferences. 

Adjonmment. 

Conference adjourned on expiration of time to meet at 8 a.m, 

the next day. 



dONFSRBNOB JOURNAL. 86 

Sixth Day. 

LuoKNOW, IMh January 1905. 

Opralig Bxerolses. 

The session opened with Bishop Warne in the chair. The 
devotional exercises were cooducted by Samuel Tupper. 

UMloa TretBnrer. 

On motion of J. H Gill, N. L. Elockey was nominated Mission 
Treasurer for the Conferenca 

PlroTlBeltl BpworOi League. 

On motion of B. T. Badley the Special Commission on hill 
Schools was authorized to co-operate with the North- West India 
Conference and form an organization of the Epworth League for 
the United Provinces, and to elect the officers for the year 1905. 

Reioliition. 

Tbe following resolution regarding Bishop Warne was read 
by Wm. Peters and carried by a rising vote. 

Resolution. 

Resolvedt that we, the members of the North India Conference, 
express our gratitude to God for sending us Bishop F. W. Warne, 
D.D.f whose example has been a constant source of inspiration to 
us, and whose eminently practical counsels will, we are sure, be a great 
help to us in furthering the Kingdom of God. We greatly rejoice to 
think that Bishop and Mrs. Warne have come to live among us, and 
pray that God may grant them a great measure of spiritual and 
phyftical strength to carry on with us the glorious worl£ to which we 
have been called. 

We would also welcome the other Bishops that have been elected 
for work in Southern Asia, and trust that they may long be spared 
to work for God. 

H. A. Cutting. Wm. Peters. 

D. A. Chowpin. S. Tupper. 

H. L. MUKERJSE. 

Jubilee Oelebratlon. 

On motion of J. W. R ^binson, W. A. Mansell was appointed 
Field Secretary for the Jubilee Celebration, and tbe following a 
committee to co-operate with him :~L. A. Core, G. C. Hewes, 
Wm. Peters, Ganga Nath ; G. C. Hewes to be Treasurer. 

Trustees : Parker Memorial School. 

On nomination of R. I. Faucett, W. A. Mansell and H. A. 
Cutting were re-elected Trustees of the Bishop Parker Memorial 
High School. (See Conference Officers.) 

Rulei of Order. 

On motion of B. T. Badley the Secretary was instructed to 
prepare a set of rules of order for the transaction of business 



86 OONf^ERBNCB JOURNAL. 

in the Conferenoe, based on Robert's Rules of Order, and to have 
the same published in the Conference Minutes. W. A. Mansel^ 
was instructed to have the same printed separately for the use of 
our Epworth Leagues. 

Harritge Reglttrttioii. 

The Secretary of the Cabinet reported that the matter of 
Marriage Registrars and registration be referred to the Joint 
Commission of this and the North- West India Conference on Hill 
Schools, with power to act. On motion of J W. Robinson the 
same was accepted. 

District Oonference Reports. 

On motion of B. T. Badley the Presiding Elders were instruct- 
ed to file each year with the Secretary of the Conference a copy of 
the report of their District Conferences for preservation and future 
reference ; also to put into the hands of the Secretary, so far as pos- 
sible, back numbers of each year of this century. 

Expelled Workers. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson the matter of devising means 
for keeping track of expelled workers, was referred to the Joint 
Commission of this and the North-West India Conference on Hill 
Schools. 

Bnnity Seliool Boport. 

On motion of F. L. Neeld the report of the Sunday School 
Committee was accepted. (See Reports of Committees.) 

Bishop Thobim. 

On motion of Wm. Peters the Secretary was instructed to 
write a letter of greeting to Bishop Thobum in behalf of the 
Conference, assuring him of our continued prayers and the hope 
of seeing him again. 

Adlonmmeiit. 

On motion of J. H. Gill, after the reading and approval of the 
Minutes and the reading of the appointments, the Conference ad- 
journed sine die with the Doxology and Benediction. 



^yi^i^€^.^.yi4/ft/0^i^^i.jc^ 



(SM*^u^- 



President. 




Secretary, 



CONFERENCE SESSIONS. 



87 



SESSIONS OF THE NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE. 



No. 


Place. 




1 


Locknow 


Dec. 


% 


' Moradabad 


Feb. 


3 


Shahjahanpur 


Jan. 


4 


BIjTior 


Jan. 


5 


Barellly 


Jan. 


6 


BareiUy 


Jan. 


7 


Lacknow 


Jan. 


8 


Moradabad 


Jan. 





Barellly 


Jan. 


10 


LnckDOW 


Jan. 


11 


Shahjahanpur 


Jan. 


12 


CawDpore 


Jan. 


13 


Moradabad 


Jan. 


14 


Barellly 


Jan. 


15 


Lacknow 


Jan. 


16 


Caw n pore 


Jan. 


17 


Barellly 


Jan. 


18 


Moradabad 


Jan. 


19 


Lacknow 


Jan. 


20 


Cawnpore 


Jan. 


21 


Barellly 


Jan. 


23 


Lacknow 


Jan. 


23 


Moradabad 


Jan. 


24 


Cawnpore 


Jan. 


25 


Barellly 


Jan. 


20 


Lacknow 


Jan 


27 


Moradabad 


Jan. 


28 


Cawnpore 


Jan. 


29 


Barellly 


Jan. 


80 


Lacknow 


Jan. 


81 


Moradabad 


Jan. 


32 


Barellly 


Jan. 


83 


Lacknow 


Jan. 


34 


Barellly 


Jan. 


85 


Shahjahanpnr 


Jan. 


86 


Lacknow 


Jan. 


37 


Barellly 


Jan. 


38 


Moradabad 


Jan. 


30 


Lacknow 


Jan. 


40 


Barellly 


Jan. 


41 


Lacknow 


Jan. 



Time. 



8-14, 

1-7, 

10-17, 

16-21, 

l4-i2. 

20-27, 

21-18, 

18-23, 

18-22, 

7-13, 

6-21, 

13-18, 

3-9. 

9- 15, 

9-14, 

7-12, 

5-11, 

11-17, 

10-16, 

9-15, 

7-12, 

7-12, 

5-10, 

4-9, 

9-15, 

2-7. 

7-12, 

6-11. 

11-16, 

3-8, 

3-7, 

8-13, 

7-12, 

5-11, 

4-10, 

10-15, 

9-14. 

9- 14, 

2-7, 

7-12, 
5-11, 



1864 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 

1898 1 

1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 

1903] 

1904] 
1905 



President. 



Bishop E. Thompson 
Rev. J. Baumo 
Rev. J. T. Gracey 
Rev. J. M. Thobarn 
Rev. C. W. Judd 
Bishop C. KIngsley 
Rev. J. W. VVaiigh 
Rev. J.L Humphrey 
Re^. T. S. Johnson- 
Bishop W. L. Harris 
Rev. T J. Scott 
Rev. D. W. Thomas 
Bishop E. G. Andrews 
Rev. J. H. Mossmore 
Bishop T. Bowman 
Rev. E W. Parker 
Bishop S.M. Merrill 
Rev. S. Knowles 
Bishop R. S. Foster 
Rev. T. J. Scott 
Bishop J. F. Hurst 
Rev. n. Manscll 
Bishop W.X. NInde 
Rev J. n. Gill 
Bishop J. M.Thoburn 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Bishop Cyrus D. Foss 
Bishop J. M.Thoburn 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 

Bishop F.W. Warne 

Do. do. 

Bishop J. M.Thoburn 
Bishop F. W. Warne 

Bishop H. W. Warren 
Bishop J. M. Thoburn 

BLshop F. W. Warne 



Secretary. 

J. T. Gracey. 
T. J. Scott 

Do. 

Do. 
J. D. Brown. 

Do. 

J.U.Messmore. 
S.S.Wetherby. 

Do. 
J. D. BroM^n. 

Do. 

B. H. Badley. 

Do! 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

C. L. Bare. 

B. H. Badley. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
J. H. Gill. 

Do. 
W. A. Mansell. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

J.W.Robinson 

Do. 

Do. 

J. C. Batcher. 
B. T. Badley. 

i Do. 



I 



Do. 
Do. 



PROGRAMME Or SERVICES. 



^KDNBSDAT, 5-0 P.M. 

TltVBSDAT, 8-0 A.M. 

11-0 „ 
5-0 P.M. 



FeroAY, 



Satubday, 



SUKDAT, 



MOKDAY, 



8-0 A.M. 
5-0 P.M. 
5-30 „ 

8-0 A.M. 
5-0 P.M. 



.. Lecture in the Isabella Thoburn College Hall: 

"Fiji and its People,** Mr. Benjamin Aitken. 
.. Opening Service, conducted by Bishop Warne, 

followed by the Sacrament. 
. . Conference Session. 

.. Missionary Society Anniversary, W. A. Mansell, 
Chairman. 
•• Training of Village Converts," L. A. Core. 
** Aggressive Work among Non-Christians," J. C. 
Butcher. 
.. Devotional Meeting. 
.. Conference Historical Society Report- 
.. Annual Conference Sermon : *' Working together 

with God," J. H. Messmore. 
.. Devotional Meeting. 

.. Epworth League Anniversary, B. T. Badley, 
Chairman. 
** Impressions of Detroit Convention," 
G. C. Hewes, Miss Bardie, C. L. Bare, S. 8. 
Dease. 
. . Sermon by Bishop Warne. 
.. Conference Love Feast, led by Samuel Knowles. 
.. Sermon by William Peters, followed by Ordin- 
ation of Deacons and Eiders. 
. . Sermon by Bishop Warne. 
.. Memorial Service : J. Blackstock, Presiding, 
.. Sunday School Anniversary: B. I. Fancett 
Chairman, 
**What Constitutes a Sunday School ? " J. H. 

Gill, D. M. Butler. 
** System of Lessons for Village Schools," N. L. 
Rockey. 
.. Conference Literary Society, B. T. Badley, 
Chairman. 
Lecture : *' Effect of Alcohol on the Human 
System," J. C. Butcher. 
.. D<^votional Meeting, conducted by Bishop 

Warne. 
. . Conference Session, followed by a joint session for 

the consideration of the Jubilee Celebration. 
.. Conference Session, followed by the reading of 
the] Appointments. 
In connection with the Hindustani members of the Conference, the fol. 
lowing services are announced :— 

Thursday Evening, 7-0 .. Reception to Bishop and Mrs. Warne. 
Friday „ 7-0.. Magic Lantern Lecture, Rev. W. A. Mansell. 

Saturday ,, 7-0 .. Conference on use of old costumes. 

Sunday „ 7-0 .. Consecration Meeting, Bishop Warne. 

Monday „ 7-0 . . Conference on efforts for future. 



8-0 A.M. 


11-30 „ 


4-0 P.M. 


6-0 „ 


8-0 A. M. 


5-0 P.M. 



5-45 



II 



TlTBSDAY, 8-0 A. M. 

5-0 P. M. 

Wednesday, 80a m. 



REPORTS OP COMMITTEES. 



1903. 


Increase. 


1,042 


185 


321 


408 


805 


705 



Statistical Report. 

Another year has passed, and your Committee has the pleasure to 
report progress tn nearly every branch of oar work. Only a few items .will 
be noticed here; for further details and comparisons, see statistics at the end 
of this volume. 

Chriittan Commiuity. 

1004. 1903. Increase. 

Probationers .. 18,859 17,330 1,529 

Members .. 14,295 13,798 407 

Baptized Children .. 14,465 14,136 329 

Total .. 47,619 45,264 2,355 

For 1903, an increase of 868 was reported, while in 1904 there Is an increase 
of 22355. This increase is as- follows :— 

jBareilly-Eumaun 67, Bijnor 150, Budaon 529, Garhwal 86, Hardoi 84, 
Moradabad 1,268, Pilibhlt 383. 

Oudh reports a decrease of 214. (Bahralch 113, Itaunja 50, and a slight 
decrease In several other places.) Number of deaths reported in Oudh is 
91, so Oudh has to account for only 23. 

Baptiims. 

1904. 
Christian-born Children .. 1,227 
Non- Christian born 729 

Do. Adults .. 1,510 

Total .. 3,466 2,168 1,298 

Last year an Increase of only 335 was reported, while this year there Is 

an increase of 1,298. 

DecUhs.—Tfie number of deaths is less by 200. Total deaths reported 8,67a 
Sunday Schools.— The number of scholars has increased by 697. The 

number of scholars under instruction was 45,717. 

(Read the number of scholars for 1903 as 45,020, instead of 45,920. 

Bareilly having reported the number of Christian boys 1,040, Instead of 140.) 

Ohnrcli Pinanoeg. 

Hindustani Church Collection for Pastor. 

Rs. 
1904 .. .. 5,530 

1903 .. .. 5,263 

Increase . . 267 

In 1903, a decrease of Rs. 65 was reported ; the'Increase according to dli- 
tricts is as follows : — 

Bareilly-Kumaon Rs. 337, BIJnor Rs. 25, Budaun Rs. 74, Hardoi Rs. 16, 
Moradabad Ks. 176. 

Three districts report a decrease. —Oudh Rs. 273, Garhwal Rs. 47, and 
Pilibhlt Rs. 17. 

In Oudh. Bahralch reports a decrease of Rs. 90, Bulrampur Rs. 22, 
Bhlnga Rs. 7, Colonelganj and KaisarganJ Rs. 10, Ellenpur Rs. 73, Nanpara 
and Rupaedhia Rs. 35. NawabganJ, Rae Barelllv and SItapur each report a 
decrease of Rs. 12, and Gonda Rs. 47 ; a total decrease in these stations of 



10 REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Ba. 330. In Lncknow &□ Increase of Es 4S Is reportnd. Labhlmpur, Hark 
b&Dkl and Sldhautl also report smaller increasea. 

Id Qarhnal, with the eieeptlou of Ramaee, decreaaa Is reported br all 
the itations. 

In PlllbUt Dhiitrict, Ptllbhlt reports a decreMe ef Ba. ee, Fatebgan] 
Bs. 3. All the other stations report small [ncreases. 

Conference CialmaiUf.— Aa Increase oF Bs. BS Is reported over lost year. 
Total collection Ba. 066. 

For MiMiojiary Sociel)/.— The collection for 1904 amouDlS to Be. t,07S, 
aa Increase of Ra. 1S2 over 19(». 

Fi/r IVomen'n Sovietii!».—A decrease of Bs. 331 Is reported. Total decrease 
In other coltecttona amount to Bs, 1,873 

Then la-an Increase In the collections for Children'* Dajr, Bible Socletjr, 
Tract Society, and Indian Sunday School Qnlon. 



There Is an Increase of Rs 9.353 In the amount given by QoverDmeat 
tor the lid of schools and bulldlags, A o increase of Bs. 37,391 Is reported In 
tntloaal and other achoiil fees. In Industrial Inatltutlons an Increase o( 
Bs. 10,985 Is reported. 

Total Increase . . 39,(36 

An Increase of 300 students i* reported In our Bdac&tlanal Inttltutlons ; 
the total number on the rolls being 11,283. 

On the irhole. there has been a steady progress In our work, and It all 
onr workers make up their minds, that the; will be more faithful and pains* 
taking In the work entrusted to their care, the Committee will have no oppor- 
tonltreverto mentloo the word decreom. We are thankful tor whatnas 
been accomplished, but let us remember that there la ample room tnr Im- 
provement. May Christ help us. 

Qanqa Nath. 

a. B. jnncH. 

O. D. PltESeBATB. 



KaHsiya ka Ruhani Hal. 

Haslb be sbiibrgatir hatn, kl 

burakaten gnzre sfil menjinti' 

) nahtn Eio aaktfi hal. TahqIqAt se 



barakaten gnzre sfil menjlntiyat farmilQ 

~ lahtn Eio aaktfi hal. TahqloAt se ba- 

r&hftnt bil bahut achchhi hal, din ba- 



i karti JAtf bal, aur Masfhf ta'ltm men 
aurabilyidaeniirsedn iagbke Ealfiml 
Bdnbaur ta'zfm se auntf hal. 'IbidatoQ 



hotr iikil bal. Dii'i mi^gne met), tajrlba- 

^.j- ,.. ...,- ..u.j-..^^ — — „A^ ^^^^ 

, jfisht- 

kir bht apnedunyawl klimog ho Itwdr kedln band karte lite halo. But- 
parastf sedlll nafrat kerke butoQ ke astbinoB ko mlsm&r Karte J Ate halg. 
anr but-parasti ke rus&m. teoh&ron, aur tarlqoQ se bbi Judt bote lite halo, 
but-parastoQ ke hith se sbidi leni, yi niurdoa ke nflm par Jo khine bote 
faaln, us meo sharfk hoo&, ;i buton ke fipar kA charbiwi khani HIndbo 
Hnsalminoa ke teohiron mog shimll boni, aur un ke sAth t«oh£r ke ba-mfi- 
jlb kbnahf m&nini In sa^ kimon se apne talQjtidi karte JitehalQ, aur kalfai- 

Ji ke darmlyiu jo mltfogen hfia karti halQ, un men waqtan fa-waqtan hizir 
64 karte haln. Itwir k( Tbidat men, Sar.^e IskQl men. Prayer mltlngou 
men, KIlisMfUDgoQ meu, nur Epwortb LIg, aur Parhezgirl ke Jalae men 
hftur faobar r&ninf qAwathiall harte Jite haiQ, Ba'i In meuse alae bain. Jo 
bagalr tanVhwib ke bar! kbushlse Mlsb^n ke kfimon men madad kiyi karte 
haFn, anr we kalUIyi ke kim chatine meu ham&re achcbbe madadgir bain, 
]lo par bam pfiri bharosa rakht« balg. we to bare ahauq se mfvliiKOi) k& ktm 
anr chanda jama' karne ki kim karte haig, kaHsiji kl alsf nilat dekh- 
nesebakbUbfma'ltim hotibal. ki rQbint tarsqqf baf, Bahut halo.Jo Masth 
ke Dili ke sabab ae dukh kl bharl hdt asllb uthine ke qibll haln, aur Masfh 
Id mnhabbat aur 'Irfin aur fazl meQ barhte lite halQ, aur bhif nahin kahfQ 
kam aur kahfQ liyidabaln. Is walh se kallsiyi kedarmlyin kahln kam aur 
kahffl alyida tara^ql nazai itf hal, par alsl kof Jagah nahlu hal, Jahin mutlu 
taraqqf na btl ho. Ab cband biteg pesh 1 If hldmat halo, Jin ae kallslyi kf 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 41 

aar si/Ada taraaqf ho saktf hal. HindiisUnf bh&f bahin Mb&dat-^h&ne ke 
diH halat-mand Dalo, aur bagafr Mb&dat-kh&ne ke an ke dll 'fbAdatoQ men 
nahfn lagte hain, is wajh se jab&n par but-kb^ne mism&r kfye J&weji, wahiQ 
par ki8f na kisf nikmat se zartr kisi qism k4 Masfbf Mb&dat-kh&na hasb l- 
([hareh ke bao^e Jiwen, tiki wahip se but-kh&ne k& nisbdn jdt& rahe, aur 
phir iyanda ko na ban&ne piwen. aur un ko dil meu Mbidat-khine kf Jinib 
se taskfn ho. Ch6nkl muddatOQ se teoh&roQ ke 'ddf haig, aur baglar 
teoh&r ko dll ud&s rahle hain, agar un ke darmiy&n dh&m d h6m se Masf hf teo- 
h&r maniie Jiweo, to an k& ail khush bogA, aur we in teoh&roQ ke zarf*e se 
masibf ta'Ifm p&ne k6 kbiy&l kareoge, baiki waqtun fa-waqtan bar sarkH 
men chhote cbhoto mele b(i& kareo, to ziy&da kamzor aur be-Mlm Ts&foQ ke 
f41a» hoga. 

Kalisiya ka Dnnyawi Hal. 

Jals4 kl ham r6h&nf barkaton ke llyo ^hud& ke shukrguzir haiQ, dnn 
y4w( barakaton ke liye bbf <*bnkrguz&r halo, us ne bam&re liye apne Vkk 
ICalim mefl wa*da kiyi hai, ki '' Pahle Khud& ki bfidsb&hat aur us kf nekf 
tal&sh karo, toy ih sab chfzen turn ko y6n bf df j^eQgf. Kalfsly^ dunyawf 
hil men har taur se taraqqf kartf i&tf hat, aur un ki garfbf d^r hot! j&tf hal. 
Jo garf the. ab Masfh men daulat-mand bote jAte haln, Jo be-Mlm the r6h£nl 




- ip. - 

kihil*wajiidf ke sabab se muht&j hain, aur ba*z haiq, Jo majbfin amr se 

maht&J halQ, aur bahut haiQ,io nau-murfd bain, we apnf pablf h&lat men 

pAe J&te bain, lekin Jitne Masfli ke fazi men taraqqi karte Jate haio, we sab 

rdhani aur Jlsm&ni barakaton meo bhi taraqqi karte bain. 

Self-Snpport. 

Methodist Ealisiyft har amr men taraqqi-pizir nazar &ti hal, iJ kal wuh 
self-support kf nisbat kh6b soch rahi bai, aur r&t din is ke liye du'a kartf hai, 
ki ]B[hua& wuh din Jald l&wo, ki Hind kf Methogiist Kalisiv& apnf q6watse 
apne pairoa par khari ho J&we, aur Hindusttin ke liye Walayat se r^pija&ne 
kl mmtlao zarfirat na rakhen, yih us kf dilf lj:hwibisn hai, Jis ko l^hudawand 
Masfh Jald p6ri kareff&. Uam&re darmiyin cbanda denew&le do qism ke 
haifi,ek we naio, Jo Mishan ke mul&zim bain, we sab se ziv&da cbanda dete 
balfii do ^hiy&l se, ek to un k& Ij^hiyil yib hal, ki Mishan ka k&m |^h6b taraq- 

af pawe ; aur d6sr& khiy&l un k& yih bhi hal, ki ham apnf apnf Jam&'at ke 
ye namtina hon, is sabab se we apni imadani ki qarib bisw&n hissa sab 
cnande mes dete bain, par un ke chaiida dene se kalfsiyi kabhi apne pair 
par khaff na bogf. D6sre qism ke cbanda denewile gair-mul&zim haifi. 
kaUstyi kf mazb6tf in hi se hai, lekin in meo se ba*z haio, Jo apni imadani 
k& bfswin hissa dete hain. aksar bahut kam cbanda dete nalQ, tau bhf ham 
Khudi ki shiikr karte hain, ki we deni sikh gao, aur bahut un mefi se chan- 
da deni apne 6par farzjinle bain. Ilamiro dihitf bhif aur nau-murfd bhf 
ab Ij^hushf se cbanda deni pasand karte hain, aur jo chfz un ke gharoa meo 

JifrhetonmeQ hal, chande men dete hain, aur ham ko un se bafi ummed 
at, ki Jab we r6hin{ aur dunyiwi ni*matoQ men taraoqf piwenge, zardr 
apnf imadanf ki kof khiss hissa apne dil sa dene ke live toftbr^^nge, us waqt 
meo kalfsiyi apnf Q6watKe sith apne pair par khari bogf, chuninchi ba'z 

iagahoo men cnana logon ne daswan hissa dcno ke liye thabriyi bhf hat, par 
lamiredarmlyin kof jagah aisf nahfn hai, ki Jahig cbanda na Jama' htii 
ho, $hud&wand un ko is kim par baralcat de. 

Parhezgar ke Bayan Hen. 

Kalfslvihar amr men Khudiwand Masfh ki pik badan bantf Jitf hal, 
aur makrdh, nipik, aur miinashshf chfzon ko phenkti Jitf hai, in dinoa mofl 
har Jagah zor kesitb taMfm df jitf hai, ii sharab, hh<ing, afytin, charaa, 
chindut madak. cigarette, tambikft wg. in chizoo ko bilkufl chhor deg, aur 
ta'lim ki asar is sil men bahut logoQ ke dilon par b^i bai, aur bahut logoQ 
ne apne tain kull munashshi cbfzon se hilkulfjudi kiyi hai, balkl dihiti aur 
nau-murfdoQ ne bhf in chizon ko chhor diyi hai. Sbabri Locknow men 
parhezffirf ki ek bari jalsa fariham hfii.jis meo tin mishan ke shuraka 
maaJ6a the. us Jalse se bahut Hindustinf Tsiioo ko kasir fiida h6i haf, 
iodfgar mishan ke sharik hain, Khudiwand Masih kf mihrbinfse hamirf 
aalfsiyiaur kalisiyioQ ke liye namtina hai, aur bam ko wijib hat, kl is 
oamt^ne ko safif se dikhiweg. Kahf^ kahf^ dfbit mep ham^re logoi) no 



42 REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

sharib-^horf kf th(. aur un ko fauran tambfh df gaf, &^hir men ham yih pesh 
karte haiQ, ki Khud^wand Masih ke fazl se Methodist Ea)fsTy& parhezg&rf 
meQ sabqat let! j&tf hai. 

C. L. Babs. 
Matthew Stephen. 
Wabben Scott. 
Ya'qub Shah. 

RqK>rt of ComnuLLee on Sunday Schools. 

S&l 1 guzasbta ya^ne san 19a3 me^ ham dekhte hafn, kl Sande Isk&Ion ke 
tam&m kim mefi har tarah par taraoof nazar &tf hai, Jis se maMtim hotft oal, 
kl is kiim kekarne meQziyada koshfsh ki gaf, afsar&n aur ust&don ne mil- 



kar is k&m men h&th lag&y&. aar bibtar hilat meg Une kf koshisnkf. Um 

med thf, ki is hf sfirat mea s&l ba-s&l yih k&m taraaqf-pizfr hot& J&eg&j chn- 

ninchi us( ummed ke mut&bia ham ma'l&m karte nain, ki ausat h&zirf kf ta*- 



did meo 1,664 kf taraqqf hai, is se z&hir bot& hai, ki ims&l ta'lf m dene ke 
k&m meu taraqqf h&f, aur ba-nisbat pichhle barson ke bapf ta'dAd i tulab& 
ko taUfm df gal, beshakk yih amr ham&re w&ste tasallf-bakhsh hai, jfskf 
b&bat kamlUf I^hushf ke sAth rlport detf hai. M& siw& is ke yih bhf ma*lfim 
hot&hai, ki ims&135 Isk&I ziy&aa haiQ, Masfhf tulabi mard kf h&zirf meg 
taraqqf hai, jin kf ta'd&d 991 hai, ba-muq&bale s&l 1 guzashta ke shum&r men 
ziy&da hai, par bar'aks is ke gair-aqw&m tulab& mard kf ta'd&d meg 15 kl 
tanazzulf hai. 

Lekin zanina Sancjle Isktiloa meg Masfhf aur gair-Masfbf tulab& men 361 
aur 818 kf tanazzulf hai« ya*ne kull 1,197 kf tanazzulf hai. 

Ham nih&yat khushf se riport dete hala, ki chah&r taraf se yih ^habar 
miltf hai, ki San^e Iskfil ke aisar&n haftew&r Sant^e Isk6I ke sabao parh&- 
ne ke llye barf taiy&rf ke s&th tfcharon k(> Jama' karice sikh&te hain, jiske 
b&'is ust&d kh6b waoflyat aur 6g&hf h&sil karte hain, aur musta'iddf aur 
dllerf kes&th ta'Iim dete hain. Yih bhf sunne meo &ya hai, ki San<ie Isktil 
ke tulab&s&l ba-s&l imtlh&ndete hain, chun&nchi ims&l bhf kaf maq&moQ 
mefi tulabi pass hte aur sanad ko hasil kiy&. 

Ai 'azfzo yih b&t gaur-talabhai, kl Sande IsktiloQ kf ta'lfm k& kftm nih&- 
yat zarfirf hai, is hf ke zarf*e se Ij[hud& k& Kal&m bacbchofi, Jaw6noa, bu<jl- 
dhoQ tak pahuncht& hai. Is k&m ko bihtar h&lat meg Une kf garaz se chand 
b&tqn par gaurlcarn& bihtar hai. 

Har ek ust&d aur Sande Iskdl k& Superintendent piirf taiy&rf ke s&th is 
k&m mea h&th lag&wen, Kfialr-khwah Atfal har ek San<j[e Isk(ii moQ zar^r 
taqsfm hM karen, ky'^nkl yih ek ^h6ss zari'a Masfhf taMfm ko qaumop ke 
darmiyftn pahuocn&oe ka hai, ky^^ki tulab& in ko ghar le J&te haig, is tarah 
par aur log bhf in ke parhne k& mauoa* p&te halQ. 

Mumkin hal,ki ba*zk&m karnewftle Jo sbahr meQ rahte bal^, Itvi^&r ke 
roz dfh&t men J&kar San<jle Isktil nabfn kar sakte, un ke liye vih bihtar hai, 
ki hafte ke darmiy&n kisf kh&ss din Sande I8k61 sabao ko sikb&y& kareg. 

Ta*Ifm ko Is tadbfr se dewen, ki tulao& ke zihn-nisnfn ho Jawe, t4ki we 
us ko nabh61en, aur ba-taur qisse ke barzab&n y&d rakheQ. 

R&r-kun l^hud chanda dene men namtina howe^, aur tulabft ko chanda 
dene k& shauq dil&te rahen, ici har ek ko kuchh na kuchh den& zartir hai. 
Agar mumkin ho to taswfroa ko Jo sabaq se ta'alluq rakhtf haifl,pesh karke 
sabaq ko V^&b samjh&weg. 

F. L. Neeld. 
J. C. Butcher. 

W. R. BOWEN. 

M AZHAR UL HAQQ. 

Prabhu Dayal. 

Report of the Committee on the Jubilee Celebration. 

The Committee appointed to co-operate with a special committee of the 
Executive Board in regard to the Jubilee of our work in India, beg leave to 
submit the following recommendations for consideration :— 

(1) We heartily approve the suggestion to have a general celebration of 
the Jubilee at Bareilly In the cold season of 1906-07. We would recommend 
that in all plans for the Jubilee, spiritual interests should be paramount, and 
we make the following suggestions : — 

(a) That special efforts be made for the reclaiming of all neglected fields 
and classes in our Christian community. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 48 

(Jb) That special effarts be raade for the reaching of other classes Dot yet 
Christian who are now especially accessible. 

(c) That we endeavour to erect as many new churches and organize as 
many new congregations as is deemed reasonable. 

(a) That we agree with the suggestion that an effort be made to raise 
a special Jubilee collection in India amounting to at least one rupee per 
member of the Christian community, and that wo will do what we can to 
attain this. 

(e) We learn with pleasure the action of the Bengal Conference by which 
its workers pledged themselves to contribute one month's salary for this fund 
within the next three years, and we would recommend our Conference to do 
the same. With reference to the celebration at Bareiliy and in North India, 
we would recommend that, if possible, the place of meeting of the Central 
Conference be changed from Kangoon to Bareiliy ; also that the Epworth 
League hold its celebration at that time. We recommend also that an 
endeavour be made to have an industrial exposition showing the products of 
our orphan work and other enterprises. We also recommend the time as an 
opportune one in which to endeavour to have a numb^'r of prominent 
Methodists in America visit India during that season to unite with us in 
the celebration. We suggest also that endeavour be made to hold ai least 
two large gatherings of Uindnstani-Christians at Central places within the 
borders of our Conference, and that every effort be put forth to impress upon 
our people the fact that they are part of a great community, that they may 
know that in numbers there is not only union but spiritual strength. 

<f) We recommend to the whole Church that an endeavour be made to 
endow what shall be known as Bishop Thoburn Missionary Endowments of 
130,000 in each Conference. That the one for North India shall be for the 
missionary in Pauri where Bishop Thoburn served a most interesting part of 
bis apprenticeship, and that this endowment be put in some secure bonds, 
that the interest of it may sustain a missionary in* perpetuity. For the 
benefit of those in the Home Church who desire to unite with, us in the 
celebration of success of fifty yearsjpast, wo recommend special aid be given 
to the educational institutions. We recommend within our borders the 
following :— 

The Bareiliy Theological Seminary, the Reid Christian College, the 
Isabella Thoburn College, the Bishop Parker Memorial High School. We 
trust also that the Press may bo so helped, that its usefulness shall bo 
largely increased. 

The experiences that have been related at this Conference lead us to 
believe that there are many persons, sincere inquirers after truth, among all 
classes of the Hindustani community. Within the territory of the Morth 
India Conference, there are almost no other agencies through which these 
may learn of Christ except through the workers of our Church— other 
missions having left this field to us. In view of these experiences and the 
responsibility upon us, we recognize the need of a forward movement all 
along the line, and we therefore call upon our brethren everywhere to plan 
for strenuous campaigns, having in view not only accessible castes but the 
effective opening of new doors in all castes. Work of grace always has 
begun through individuals, and we must earnestly search for the individuals 
who will lead us into all classes. 



Report* of Conference Examiners. 

H. G. Ozanne has passed in Discipline of first and second vear, Miley*s 

Theology of first year, and Harman's Introauction of first 
year, also sermon and essay of first year. 

G. W. Briggs passed in all subjects in English of first year and all the 

Uindostani of first year. 

G. W. Guthrie passed in all the English studies of third year, and the 

History of Christian Church of fourth year and read the 
course to be read for fourth year. He also passed all the 
Vernacular studies of first year. 



4^ Rl^ORtS OF COM MITTEltiS. 

ft. I. Faiieett has Mfziin-al-HaQQ and Urda-Engllsh Translation to brfntf np. 
B. T. Badley has completed tbe English course of the third and fourth year. 

He has the fourth year of Vernacular to bring up. 

J. N. West has still the fourth year and Taubat-uI-NIs&h and Persian 

Gospels of tbe third year to bring np. 

P. 8. Hyde has passed in Eempson's Syntax, Urdu Gospels and Tanbat- 

ul-Nlsfih of third year's Vernacular course. 

Class IV.— J. H. Walter has passed In all subjects of fourth year. 
BulaqiSingh has pft/sed in all subjects of fourth year. 
A. S. Wesley has padsed In all subjects of fourth year. 
R. Silas has passomin all subjects of fourth year. 
Yagub All has pa^^ in all subjects of fourth year. 

Class III.— Taqub Singh was absent from Conference, excused, because of sick- 
ness. He is back in (1) R(ih se Bharp6r Zindagf, Kaw&if-us, 
Sahiif, Ralfsiy& ki Taw&rikh, Ek waqt Hlndft ab Ts&l 
and 'Ilmf Mazmfin. 
iV — MisrI Charan passed In all subjects of third year, excent Tswl 

Subdt 
IV. -^ Prem Maslh passed in all subjects of third year, except Rfih se 
Bbarpftr ZIndagi and Raw&if-ul-Sah&lf. 

Class II.— D. 8. Hukill passed in all subjects of second year. 
ffl ^ ^^ H. C. Sigler passed in all subjects of second year. 

John Robert passed in all subjects of second year. 

Class I.^Ferrts Wittke passed in all subjects of first year. 

jr Ishwari Dass passed in all subjects of first year, except FiUsaff 
Darb&b Tadbfr 1 Naj&t, Tll&'( Shama'd&n, and Poplyat kf 
Ahw&l. 
r Dhappan Wilson failed in four subjects, and remains in the same 
class to briDg up all subjects. 

N. L. RocKBT, Registrar, 



Report of the Auditing Committee. 

The Committee report the audit by the Presiding Elders of the circnit 
for two*quarters or more In Barellly-Kumaon and Moradabad districts, and 
all the others for threepr four quarters, except theGonda girls' school account 
not audited. 

Oak Openings and Wellpslcy School books have been audited to the end of 
the secondquarter. The accounts of the Theological Seminary, Conference 
Treasurer, and the Pilibhlt and Hardoi districts. W. F. M. S. accounts for the 
entire year. The Presiding Elders' accounts for Plllbhlt, Oudh, Budaon, 
Hardot, Bareilly-Kumaon, Bljnor and Moradabad districts. 

G. C. Hewks, Chairman, 



Report of Conference Vbtftors to the Seminary. 

We visited the Theological Seminary this year, and were glad to notice 
progress. The new Principal has made several improvements which will very 
much add to the efficiency of the work done. 

A new house for teachers has been built and arrangements are being made 
for building another this year. The sanitary arrangements are satisfactory. 

One thing to bd specially noted Is, the readiness of the graduates of tne 
Seminary to go and serve the cause of Christ in places far off. This year 
some of them were sent out to the Punjab, the Central Provinces and Hyder- 
abad, and they cheerfully went. This Is a very hopeful sign of the times, and 
we congratulate the Principal, teachers and students upon this. 

Wm. Petebs. B. I. Faucett. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 



45 



Conference Stewards' Report. 

Oonleronoe Glalmaiiti. 



Name. 



ti 






Appro2)rlatlon8 for 1905. 



A. Sweet 
Mra. Cutler 

Gray 

Haqq 

J. Jacob 
„ B. Paul 
A. C. Paul 
Prank Children 
Mrs. B. S. Buddon 
A. Solomon 



«• 



Rs. 

10 
10 

4 
13 
15 
10 
15 
16 

6 

5 



Mrs. J. Jacob due from 1003 



Total 



104 = 1,248 
= 00 



Pension Fund. 



Appropriatioiia for 1905. 



Name. 



It 

•> 



Mrs. Gobind Ram 
PophI Singh 
Gnlab Singh 
Dnlla Singh 
Gopal Das 
„ Isa Das 

Mr. B. McGreggor 

Mohan Singh 

Snkh Deo 

Mrs. Mltthu Lai 

B61& Das 

Pbebe 

Nancy 

Mrs. Eallu Das 

Likha Singh 

Sadiq Maslh 

Natblya 

Mrs. McGee 
,. AJudhya Parshad 

Dhomfur 

Mrs. Andreyas 



Collections from Circuits . 
Interest from Endowment 



Supplementary from Districts 



Total 



Rs. 
3 

2 
2 
2 
2 
1 

12 
2 
2 
2 
9 
5 
5 
2 
8 
3 
3 
4 
4 
2 
2 

81 
670 
105 

874 
100 

074 



= 072 



J. B. Mkssmoke. 
H. A. Cutting. 
W. R. BowEX. 



Bs. 


a. 


p. 


.. 15 








.. 47 








.. 9 


8 





.. 11 


8 





.. 11 


8 





.. 25 








.. 119 


8 






46 KBPORTS OP CXDMMITTEES. 

Report of t»he Domestic Missionary SodeLy. 

1. Contributions received by the Domestic Missionary Society in 1904 
amount to Rs. 119-8-0 which has been spent in support of a preacher, Brother 
Dharm Singh, in the Pilibhit district. 

2. Brother Dharm Singh works at Sirauli, and his Presiding Elder 
gives a good report of his work. 

3. The following Is the amount received from the following districts ;— 

Hardoi 

Pilibhit 

Bijnor 

Oudh 

Moradabad 

Barellly 

Total 



Budaon has appropriated for the year 1905, Rs. lOS. 

4. The Presiding Elders and tlie Peachers-in-Charge are requested to 
recommend this Society in their districts and circuits to establisn Branch 
Societies in their circuits, so that the Mission workers and the Church mem- 
bers mav know more about it and feel an interest in it and gladly contribute 
for the Master's work. 

H. L. MuKEBJEE, Secretary* 

Report of the Mut^Lra Mission School 
for t»he year 1904. 

This has been one of the most successful years in the history of the 
school. 

The total enrolment during the year has been fifty-nine, of which 
forty-seven have been In the Vernacular department and twelve in the 
English. These represent ten different missions and fifteen boarding-schools 
and orphanages. The educational standards in both departments have been 
higher and the interest taken in all kinds of practical evangelistic work 
greater than any time since I have been here. 

Seven of the students have previously worked as teachers or Bible 
readers and have come to us for further preparation. 

The Board of Trustees met as usual in Luck now during the Dasehra 
meetings for the transaction of business. The Missionary Bishops of India 
were made ex omofo members of the Board, and Miss Hoge was nominated as 
the representative from your Conference for another term of two years. Will 
the North India Conference therefore kindly vote on the nomination, thus 
electing your member of the Board of Trustees. 

Maby Eva Gbkgo, 
Secretary, Board of Trustees. 

Reports of the Board of Deaconesses. 

The Board reports that they have passed the characters and renewed 
the licenses of the following :— 

Deax!07iesse8.—tAiss Hoge, Miss Scott, Miss Hardie, Miss Mary Means, 
Miss Browne, Miss Sullivan, Miss Ingram, Miss A. Means, Miss Sheldon, Miss 
Ruddick. 

Associate Deaconesses.— Mrs. Tucker, Mrs. Caroline Richards. 

Examining Committee.— Miss Sullivan. Miss A. Means, Mrs, Neeld. 

The Board suggests that the Bishop should nominate the members of 
the Board for next year. 

J C. Butcher, Pres^ldent 



MEMOmS. 



Padri Chhote Lal Sahib ki wafat ki Yadgari. 

W&h rf maut ! it ne apn& kilm kh6b hf anj&m diyfi, aur apne m&lik ke 
hakm ko bal&yii, aur *azfz Ghho(e Lill Jo is k&nfaraDs ke silk mes gnndhft 
h6&thil. torkar &sm&Q{ mazb6t rcsharaf t&ge raeo j& piroyd, JahAc ter& pan- 
japhlr kabbf na pahuQf^hegd, us I&l kf chaniak odamak Isdunyd men 'arse 
iakrahegf. 'Azfz P&drf Cbbotc Ldl sahib zila' Bud&6Q kerabnewaie the, 
marh&m P&rdf Hoskins sahib ue san 1867 meo dp ko baptlsma dlyd th&. Jab 
bArah baraskPumr th(, tab Bud&6n Mishan Isk61 men taMfra Ice wdste &e, 
chand barason wahio ta*lfm p&f. tab &p kf sif&rish Bareilly Normal School ko 
hfif, us raeo cn&r baras ta*lim p&(, phlr wab&Q hf se &p kf sifdrish Theological 
School ko h6f. y6g &pnes&t baras men donon madrason kf taMfrn ko ^hatm 
karke auwal darje kf sanadeo h&sll kfn, aur san 1888 men Lokal Prfchar h6e, 
anr san 1894 men North India Kdnfarans meo ddlchil n6e, aur Dfkan aur 
Bl^ar kft &rdlneshan Bishop Thoburn sfihib se p&v& A'p kf zindagf k& zf/ftda 
hissa Sft&pdr kf Bindu^t&nf kalfsiyd kf ntgahbanf meQ guzr&, &p auwal darje 
ke w&Mz bare sAbirthe, dfisron ke ^halr-l^hw&h the. Masfhf khidmat 
men galrat-mand the, nih&yat. dfnd&r the, Dr.* Sco^t s&hib ne akhb&r mep 
likh&, ki bhftf Chote Lftl s&hib d&nlsh-mand &dmf the, ek Hindti Police afsar 
kf gaw&hf al^hb&rmensh&ya' haf, ki P&drf Chhote L&i s&hib kdakhl&q Masfh 
mazhab kf sach&f k& snbiit thft; &p kf zindagf bar taur se nam^ne kf zindagf 
tbf, terah baras ke baM kp kf tabdflf Sft&p^r se B&e Bareilly ko hfif, par 
M&Iik 'arz osam&n ko un kf tabdflf Bihisht kf taraf karn& manz6r hfif, so kp 
defh mahfne bfm^ rahe, bar chand Ml&J kiyd, par marz alsd d&man-gfr h(ia, 
Kl Jald qabr ke darw&ze par uahuQch&yd, bf m&rf kf h&lat meg &pne bar tanr 
86 Masfh kf god men j&ne kl talyirf z&hirkf. Sach to ylh hal, ki un k& 
chihra m&nind firisHtoQ ke ntirdnf hocrayft th&, aur yfin we apnf talyftrf ke 
8&th 12 March san 1904 ba-roz Sanfchar giy&rah baje ritko k^nshf (^hnshf 
plv&re Masfh kf god men so gae, aur apnf marfz bfbf aur tfn betfoQ aur bi^rhf 
mao ko gam men chhor&. Fiy&ro bam sab bar waot taiy&r raheQ, kytiQkl 
kof nahfn Jdnt&, lei kab J&n& hog&, k&sh ki ham sab dsm&nf Kan'&n mep 
d&k^il hone ke llye bar waqt taiy&r p&e J&wen. A'mfn. 

MBS. Chhote Lal Sahiba ki wafat ki Yadqari. 

Mrs. Phtilmanf L&l P&drf Chunnf L&l s&hib kf be^f thfg. &p san 1868 moQ 
paid& b(ifn, aur Bud&6n Girls' School men ta'lfm pk{, baM az&Q we apne 
wAIidaln kes&th rahfn, Jo Sh&h&b&d men Masfh kf khldmat karte the Jab 
Mrs. Chhote L&l apne w&lidain ke sdth thfn, tab In kf sbfidf marb(im p&drf 
Chhote Lil s&hib ke s&th san 1886 men htif, us waqt p&drf mausAf Bareilly 'Ilm 
1 Il&hl ke Madrase men t&lib ul Mlm the. Is bahin ne sb&df ke ba*d Bareilly 
mea Baibal-rfdar k& Ic&m kiyfi, do baras tak w ah &o hah uteri gair-qaum 
*auraton ko Masfh kf khush-kbabarf sun&f, Jab in ke shauhar marh^m 
Bareilly se LakhfmpCir t'abdfl ho &e, wab&Q bhf Is bahin ne Masfh kf khldmat 
l&iq taur se kf. Tab P&drf Chhote L&l s&hib Sft&p6r kf Masfhf Kaif8iy& ke 
P&st&r h6e. Jah&Q terah baras Is bab<n ne apne shauhar ke s&th bar taur se 
Masfh kf knidmat mep s&th dfy&. Wuh ek l&lq dfnd&r aur sachchf Masfhf 
thf, Kh&nagf Intiz&m men namtine ke l&iq thfQ. Sf t&p(ir men ylh bahin 
aksar bfm&r rabfo, Jab in ke shauhar &sm&n par bul&e sae, tab In ko un kf 
Jud&f n&gaw&r guzrf, bfm&rtothfQ, par Is gam ne aur ohf gir& diy&, aur 
apne shauhar ke tfn mahfne ba^d bfm&rf aur gam kf taklff se 28 June san 
1004 ko rih&f p&f, y6n apne shauhar k& s&th diy&, aur apnf tfn betfop ko la 
duny& men gam karte chhor&. ^hud& In tfnoy larkfop ko sambh&le, Jin ke 
*azfz w&lidain tfn hf mahfne ke 'arse men in se Jud& h(ie; k&sh ki ham sab 
bar waqt maut ke w&ste taly&r rahen. 



48 MEMOIRS. 

Mrs. Annie Montgomery Brigos. 



Annie M . Brifirgs was born In Aurora, Illtnofs, the 11th of March 1875. 
When she was quite a child she gave her heart to Jesus and even then felt 
that God wanted her to be a missionary. This thought was always with 
her, and her life was a continual preparation for this chosen work. She 
entered the North Western University In 1897 and after four years of faith- 
ful work, graduated in the class of 1901 ; after this she taught in Lanark, 
Illinois, for a year, and from there went to teach in the fligh school In Ash • 
land, Wisconsin. 

For some time to her great disappointment the wav to the foreign field 
seem^ quite closed, but afterwards It became clear again that the Lora want- 
ed her to come, and on July 22nd she was mai^ried to Rev. G. W. Briggs who 
was under appointment to India. It was with Joy and hope she came with 
her husband to engage In the work which nad long been her heart's 
desire. 

Their first station was Moradabad, and the memory of her lovelv un- 
selfish life is yet fresh and beautiful in the hearts of all who knew her there. 
She showed from the first a great interest In all departments of the work, and 
although there but three months acquired a grasp of the work and an in- 
fluence that have seldom been attained by so new a missionary. 

At the Conference in the beginning of 1904 they were transferred to the 
English Church at Lucknow. Here again bv her unvarying kindness and 
tactful ways she endeared herself tu all. ohe began the work of Church 
visiting with energy and in all departments of Church work showed an active 
and nnselfish interest. When It was thought best that she and her husband 
should go to NainI Tal for a change she left this work with reluctance. 
In a letter written from Naini Tal only a few days before her death, she 
wrote : ** It is cool and lovely here, but I miss my work in Lucknow more 
than I can tell. I have never enjoyed any work so much, and I pray that the 
Father will make it possible for me to return to It before very long. I ask 
nothing better for myself than that I may live and work in India for many 
years." 

On her arrival at Naini Tal the little band of missionaries were much 
cheered by her presence. The recent death of Miss Cartwr.'ght had left sad- 
ness and depression in the hearts of all, but Mrs. Uriggs by her sunniness 
and cheerfulness brought gladness and cheerfulness. One of them said 
afterwards, ** She brought the sunshine with her." 

The sunshine remained for only a few weeks. God*s summons came 
suddenly and unexpectedly, and she who had found her greatest jov in life in 
loving services in India went to love and serve In a far more beautiful country I 

Many of us here to-day remember the little talk she made at our Woman's 
Conference last year. She spoke of her life-long hope that she might be a 
missionary, and of her great joy of the realization of that hope. At the close 
she spoke of her strong desire for many years of service In;ludla. As we look- 
ed at her that day In her youth and freshness, we little thought that in a 
few short months her work In India would be over. Nor can we to-day un- 
derstand why one so unusually fitted for the work, and who gave promise of 
doing so mucn for the Master here should be called a wav ! But God does not 
want us to understand. He only wants us to trust and believe and know that 
He doeth all things well. 



Ida May Cartwriqht. 



Among the new missionaries who joined us last year was Miss 
Cartwright who had been sent out by the Cincinnati Branch of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society to have charge of the Kindergarten and Kinder- 

Sarten Training in the Normal Department of the Isabella Thoburn College, 
he had just completed four years of preparation In the Ohio Wesleyan 
University, and brought to her work not only a trained mind, but unusual 
devotion. Yet she took up her task only to lay It down after four short 
months. 



MEMOIRS. 49 

Born in August 1875, her childhood was a very happ\ one. Her father, 
Rev. EUsha Cartwrigbt, was a member of the East Ohio Conference. Re- 
llgtons influences were strong in the home, for two of the daughters became 
^vangelistB and another a missionary In whose life evangelistic effort was 
truly a passion. Although never robust as a child, she was never ill. After 
eonpleting her school education she spent three years in securing training as 
a Kindergartener, and at that time wanted to come to India to do the work for 
which she had been so earnestly fitting herself. But Miss Thoburn persuaded 
her to remain at homo for four years of College training. This she did and 
received her B.A. degree from Ohio Wesleyan University in June of 1903. 
She was at the time an accepted candidate of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society, under appolntmenl to Lucknow. She sailed In October 
and took up her work upon her arrival. 

Her four months of service were characterized by an intense devotion to 
her Master and the bringing of His Kingdom. Her quiet sweetness of 
spirit was felt by all whose lives touched hers. She never lost sight of her 
commission to preach Christ wherever she went by word and life. The girls 
in her classes were especially upon her heart as she sought to lead them closer 
to Bim whom having not seen, she yet loved. One of these girls said In a 
letter, ** I thank God even for the short time He allowed her to be with us." and 
all bear testimony to her wonderful patience and loving svmpathy. Those 
who knew her bc»t loved her most, and will always bear with them memories 
of her quiet life of devotion. 

She was taken ill the Sunday before Easter. It was thought best to 
remove her to Naini Tal, as there seemed little chance of a winning battle 
with disease In the increasing heat of the plains. At Ramsay Hospitafshe re- 
ceived everv ministration that love and the medical service could provide; 
but it was from the first an uneven contest, for her reserve force was very 
small with which to battle with enteric fever, and early in the morning of the 
ninth of April she gently fell asleep to waken to life eternal I Her term of 
service was short, but it was the willing service of one who loved much. 

Mrs. S. B. Finch. 

Mrs. Finch was born in Bisauli, district Budaon, in the year 1861. She 
was educated in the Mission Oir is* School at Budaon, and taught there for 
two years. 

She was married to Mr. S. B. Finch In June 19th, 1888. For some years 
she worked In Shahjahanpur with her husband, after which they were trans 
f erred to Fatehganj-East. where they laboured for three years. She proved a 
great help her to husband in this iield, and within the three years fifty-five 
persons were baptized As Mr Rockey needed Mr. Finch in Shahjahanpur, 
they were again sent there where they remained for five years. 

in 1897 they were transferred to Gonda and worked there till the end of 
1908. 

Mrs. Finch was a real helper, both to her husband and in the work of 
the Church. If she heard any one was ill she was always ready to minister 
to him ; if one was in trouble her heart was full of sympathy for him ; so bry 
her loving deeds and gentle ways she was able to help many. 

In January 1904 they were transferred to Sitapur, but because of the 
Illness of Mrs. Finch, remained in Gonda till the first of April, when it seem- 
ed best for them to make the change. Because of Mrs. Finch's great weakness 
Miss Scott accompanied her to Sitapur, doing all she could to make the Journ- 
ev as easy for her as possible; but even then it proved too hard for her, and 
she soon became worse. She lived Just fourteen days after reaching Sitapur 
and passed to her Heavenly home on the 38th of April 1904, leaving a husband 
and three children to mourn her loss. 

Before her death her husband asked her if she was ready to go to Jesus. 
Sbevery happily said she was not only ready, but glad to be with Jesus and 
the angels. 

We remember many things about her, and when we think of her we 
feel the loss very great, and wonder why such persons are taken from us ! 
But Ood*s ways are not our ways, nor His thoughts our thoughts. We humb- 
ly submit and say, " Thy will be done." 

We are sore that as her husband says she is with Jesus. " Blessed are 
the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth : Yea, saith the Spirit, that 
they may rest from their labours.** 



50 ' MEMOIRS. 

Padri B. S. Buddden Sahib Ki Wafat Ei Yadgari. 

*Azlz Pftdrf Budden Mor&d&b&d kf tar&f kiaf g&Qw men paid& h6e, nau 
baraa tak Mor&d&b&d ke Mission School meo ta'Km p&te rane. San 1888 meo 
Bareilly Theological Seminary ko bheje sae. Tin s6I tak seminary meg 
parhkar san 1891 men auwal darje ki sanad h&sil kf, aur Munjf ki khidmat 
ke liye taiyfir hiie. Is madrase men we kabhi kisf kit&b mep n&-k6my&b na 
rabe. aur apne ust&don aur dfffardmi h&kimon ke farmdnbardftr rahe. 

San 1891 men BlI&sT pistrik( )ilor6d&b6d men Masfh kf kbidmat karneke 
live bheje ft ab. Yah&otin baras tak Masfh k&Jal&l z&htr kiv6, aur bahat 
rnhoQ ko Masfh ke liye h&sll kiyA, aur babuton ko naj^t dii&ne kk sabab 
thahre, aur in men sebahut ab Masfh k& jal&l zihir kar rahe haiQ. 

San 1896 men Lokal pfkan ke *uhde par sarfar&z h6e, aur K&nth pistrikt 
Mor&dAbid ke Prfchar-in-ch&rJ muqarrar h6e. Is sarki^ meo Ip ne kam&l 
shauq, mihnat aur f m&nd&rf ke s&th Masfh ke Jal&l ko sihir kiy&, aur haz&r- 
OQ rfinoQ ko Masfh ke liye h&sil kiy&. Is sarki^ men 6p ne bar firqe ke logOQ 
mefi Masfh kf Injfl kf mani^df kf, aur hamesha nek-chalan rabe. 

San 1901 men Sarkit UJh&nf pistrlkt Bud&6Q ke Prfchar-in-ch&rJ qardr 
diye gae. Yahaii bhf &p ne barf mihnat se logon ko Masfh ko dlkh^te rahe, 
aur sad& rfihon ko Masih ke liye h&sii kiy&. A'p hamesha nek-chalan rahe, 
aur hamesha Masfli kf Injfl ke gairatmand bane rahe, miz&j aur muhabbat 
se apne ko Asm&n k& b&sf z&bir karte rahe. A'p apne madaagdroQ par baf& 
bharosa rakht^ the. 

Alp k& intiq&i pur malAl san 1904 pahlf November subh ke cbha baje htiA. 
Ab ip Masfh kf ffod mefi 6rAm p&te haln. Wah&n ftp ko kisf tarah k& ranj 
aur gam na hoga, aur na phir maut ke ftrishte kf maj&l hai. ki &p ko phir 
Masfh se jud& kare. A'p apnf zindagf meo in do giton ko nihayat *azfz jante 
the. Qfmatf wa*da Biip ne diyi. 'rs& kaisA dost pivarA, wg. 

Alse kh&dimoQ ke liye D&niel Nabi kd qaul kaisA sAdiq &t& hai. *' Par 
ahl i dAnish, falak kf chamak kf mfinind chamkesge ; aur we, liu kf koshish 
se bahutere sAdio ho gae, sit&roQ kf mAnlnd abad ui &b&d tak.'*^ Ap ne apne 
pfchhe Masfh kf Vhidmat ke liye apnf 'azfz bfbf aur do bacbchoo ko cbhofi 
hai. 



LIST OF LOCAL PREACHERS. 



52 



LIST OF LOCAL PRISACHSRS. 



Name. 



Ordbrs. 



Appointmsnt. 



Hell Jacob 
John Frederick 
S. L. Harris 
Umrao Singh 
W. T. Oowan 
C. H. Greeawold 
J. C. Smith 
RaDjit Singh 
Sir Singh 
Isaac Samael 
Mangal Sain 
Wazfr Khan 
Fazal Masih 
Baldeo Das 
Ranhai Singh 
7aqub Singh 
Gokal Prasad 
Chhiddu Mai 
Alfred Nelson 
Bihari Lall 
Birbal Das 
Dharam Das 
Gar lb Das 
Gaahar Masih 
H. S. Thomas 
Heta Singh 
Hulasi Ram 
Ishwari Dayai 
James Rose 
Ji Snkh Lall 
John William 
Laltu Singh 
Jng Mohan Singh 
Mohan Lall 
Mnlla Singh 
Masih Charan 
Nihal Singh 
Puran Das 
Ply are Lall 
Shiv Dayal 
Udai Singh 

Bijnor Dlitriot. 

B. MacGregor 
Peter Merrill 
Gulab Singh 
Jhabba Lall 
Kalyan Singh 
Nadir Shaw 
Ehsuhali Runyan 
Albert Gulab 
Hiram Barrow 
Buddha Singh 
Chldda Singh 
Sadha Singh 
B. Cutler 
Bahal Singh 
M. Johnson 
B. Johnson 
Samuel Falls 
Maqbnl Singh 



Local Preacher 

Local Deacon 

Local Preacher 



Sbabjahanpur. 

Khera Bajhera. 

Pasgawan. 

Dhar Chula.Chaundana 

Naini Tal. 

Bareilly. 

Naini Tal 

Ganrlyat. 

Debi Dhnra. 

Naini Tal. 

Raksha. 

Sbabjahanpur. 

Bareilly. 

»» 

n 
tf 
tt 
n 
ft 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
It 



!• 
It 
It 
If 
II 
If 
If 
It 
It 
ft 
It 
tt 
ft 
I* 



Local Elder, 1887 
1893 



If 

It 



ft 
ft 
If 



NaJIbabad. 
M and a war. 

1894 I Nurpore. 
,, 1894 Seohara. 

Local Deacon 1896 Nehtor. 

1896 KIratpore. 

1895 Sahispore. 
1904 Nurpore. 

„ 1905 Nagal. 

Local Preacher Bijnor. 

Nurpore. 
Dhamporo. 
Barahpore. 
Ganj. 
Puralni. 
Kothqadir. 
Jhalu. 
Najibabad. 



UST OP LOCAL PREACHERS. 



58 



Namb. 




Obdkrs. 


Appoihtmk}«t. 


C. S. Walter 


• • • • 


Local Preacher 


Bijnor . 


Daniel 


• • • • 


(1 


Dh am pore. 


Hasih Gharan 


• • • 


ft 


Daranagar. 


James Rose 


• • • • 


tf 


Taj pore. 


Bndioa Digtrot. 


1 

1 
1 




Baldeo Dass 


• • • ■ 


Local Deacon 1903 


Aliganj. 
Kachbla. 


Bahal Singh 
Manga! Singh 


• • • « 


1902 


• • ■ 


.. 1894 


Binawar. 


C. M. Parmanand 


• • • « If XcRIO 


Budaon. 


Jbandn Singh 


• • • • tt Xtftlw 


Islamnagar. 


Cheiram I. 


• • • • 


1 Local Preacher 


Bhamora. 


Sobran Singh 


• • • 


ti 


DataganJ. 


Taqnb SInffh 
Cornelias^Sfiiffh 
Mnnna Lall I. 


• • • • 1 i» 


Sahaswan. 


1 ■ 
• • • • ' 9| 


Aonla. 


• • • • II 


Bisauli. 


BIharl Lall 


• • • • 1 It 


Kakrala. 


Randhlr Sinnh 


• • • • 


tf 


Kadar Chauk. 


Paran Mall 


• • • • 


ft 


DataganJ. 


Kanhal Lall 


• • • • 


tt 


Bllsl. 


Allan Jan 


i 
• • • • 1 »» 


VasirganJ. 


Khamanl 


1 ' ' 

• • • • ! «« 


Bhamora. 


Gnlab Singh 


• • • • 


ft 


Sahaswan. 


Jal Mai 


• • • • 


ft 


Aonla. 


Baldeo Pen»had 


• • • • 


1 1 


Rhamora. 


Daya Bam I. 


• • • • 


»» 


Bisauli. 


Oarliwtl Dlstrloi 








E. Thomson 


• • • • 


Local Bldert 1896 


Paurl. 


Kwankln 


• • • • 


1904 


Bungedhar. 


Ghungar Money 
C. Khlyall 


• • • • 


1904 


Lansdowne. 


• • • • 


,, 1902 
Local Deacon, 1899 


Gadoli. 


Sangram Man! 
Bhajnl 


• • • • 


MandakhaU 


• > • • 


Local Preacher 


Kotdwara. 


Dhan Singh 


• • • 


ft 


Paurl. 


Band 


• • • • 


t» 


Nand pry ag. 


Bum DUMoi 








E. Turner 


• • • • 


Local Eldert 1895 


Sandi. 


Abdul Wahid 


• • • • 


Local Deacon 1892 


Hardoi. 


Sadal Maslh 


• • • • 


1893 


Pihani. 


Chhote Lai 


• • • 


ft lov4 


Rajltpurwa. 
Tandfyaon. 


C. L. Samuel 


• • • a 


1897 


Baldeo Prasad. 


• • • • 


1900 


Hasangunj, 


H. Andrew 


• • • • 


,. 1900 


Mallawan. 


D. S. Paul 


t • • • 


Local Preacher 


Pihani. 


B. Cornelius 


• • • • 


Local Deacon 1905 


Balamau. 


Gnrdlyal Singh 
Bam Gopal 


• • • • 


Local Preacher 


Hordoi. 


• • • 


Local Deacon 1904 


Todarpur. 


Nand Ram 


• • • 


1905 


Bawan. 


MIsri Lai 


• • • • 


Local Preacher 


Manjhla. 


Mohan Nathan 


• • • • 


ft 


Achalgunj. 


F. M. Lawrie 


t • • • 


It 


Rudamau. 


J. Jonothan 


• • • • 


ft 


Hardoi. 


S. J. Shaw 


• • • • 


tf 


Unao. 


Chandan Dass 


• • • • 


It 


Para. 


W. Peter Singh * 


• • a • 


ft 


Rudamau. 


J. W. McGregor 


• • • • 


Local Elder 1889 


Rudamau. 


Kesri Singh 


• • • • 


Local Deacon 1896 


Pali. 



54 



LIST Ot LOCAL t>RBACtiBB8. 




Mulchand 
Garlb Dass 
Maqbul Singh 

Moradtbtd Difltrlot. 

fiala Dass 
Maoladad Khan 
Mohan Singh 
Manphul Singh 
Prabhu Dass 
Dulla Singh 
Lachman Singh 
Mathra Prashad 
B. Milton 
B. White 
P. 8. Maurico 
Patras Singh 
S. Hastings 
Baldeo Prashad 
Thomas Jacob 
John Littio 
Attah UUah 
Buddha Singh 
D. C. Robinson 
William Oulab 
Net Ram William 
Kashi Nath 
Narain Dass 
Chirag Masih 
MunnaLal 
M. G. Hermit 
S. S. Maurice 
Sukha Singh 
Ishri Parshad 
B. Benjamin 
Mowashi Singh 
Mark Cutting 
Likha Singh 
Charan Suich 
Ram Daval 
A. H. Jonn 
Simon Lai 
Fazl Masih 
Ram Bux 
Gatru Lai 
Dharm Dass 
M. L. Harrison 
Zalfi Singh 

Ondh Difltriet. 

W. A. Comfort 
Mangal Singh 
Qaisar 
Jlya Lai 
Jawahar Lai 
Din Dayal 
Boaz 

Kesho Lall 
Sharafuddin 
Sunder Lai 



Local Preacher 



•I 



Local Elder, 1893 

1690 

Local Deacon, 1891 

1895 
1893 
1897 
1895 
1901 
1902 
1902 



»» 
t» 

n 
ft 



Ijoca^ Preacher 



ti 

»» 
»» 
It 
It 
ti 
II 
It 
It 
It 
It 
It 
It 
II 
It 
11 
II 
«t 
ti 
It 

!l 
II 
II 
It 
II 
It 
It 
It 
It 
II 



Local Deacon, 1893 
1894 
1894 
1897 
,, 1899 

Local Preacher 



11 
It 
It 



It 
11 
It 
It 



ApponmiEKT. 



Bangarmau. 
Bhagaull. 
« Saudi. 



Moradabad. 
Shahpur. 
Thakurdwara. 
Sambhal. 
Moradabad. 

Rajapur. 

Rasuipur. 

Rajpura. 

Chandausi. 

Ainchola. 

Narauli. 

Moradabad. 

II 

It 

Rashipur. 
Gunnaur. 
Sambhal. 
Bilari. 
Moradabad. 
Machkhera. 
Kundarki. 
Moradabad. 
11 

Sambhal. 

Gawan. 

Moradabad. 

Saindri 

Bairampur. 

Chandausi. 

Sehora. 

Moradabad. 

Babukbera. 

Hay at Nagar. 

Sayud Nagli. 

Babrala. 

Chandausi. 

Dhanaura. 

Moradabad. 

Pithkhera. 



Sitapur. 

Sidhauli. 

Lucknow. 

Khirl. 

Sitapur. 

LUCKUOW. 

It 



Lai Gahj. 
Dai man. 
Laharpur. 



LIST OF LOCAL PRBACHBBS. 



55 



Navi. 


Ordibs. 




Appointmint. 


K I. Joel 


Local Preacher 


TIJokpur. 
Harcbandpur. 


H. D.Jacob 


t* 




W. GLCrawsbaw 


t« 




Lucknow. 


Moti Lai 


»« 




Bahramghat. 


P. L. Smart 


»« 




SItapur. 


Nanhe Lai 


«t 




Naurangabad. 


Gar Shae 


t» 




Fursatganj. 


LB.Mayal 


♦» 




Lucknow. 


J. David 


11 




Rae-Barell. 


G. L. Lambert 
G. Mayal 
B;Todd 


It 




SaadatganJ. 
Kbalraoad. 


ti 




Jbakrasi. 


J.Todd 


f« 




Bhanmal Saralon. 


W. GuDsalvls 


Local Deacon, 1903 


Sataon. 


Baldeo Singb 
Lazar Gur Dayal 


Local Preacher 


Barl. 


tt 




II 


H.L. Matthews 


Local Deacon, 1905 


Blswan. 


Dwarka Parshad 


Local Preacher 


Kbalrabad. 


Bhola Nath 


f 1 




Gola. 


J. Barrow 


If 




Lucknow. 


Nand Lai 


ti 




Tlkaltnagar. 


TlkaRam 


tt 




Sldhaull. 


KiddoSlDgh 


If 




Muliamau. 


Laeblman Singh 


t« 




Mallhabad. 


A. Briscoe 


Local Deacon, 


,1905 


Barabankl. 


Lewis J. McGoe 


Local Deacon, 


,1893 


Nan para. 


D.C. Richards 


1* 


1899 


Lachmanpur, Bahralch. 
Kauria, uonda. 


Boddha Singh 
John Hlffglnbotham 
Bhupal Singh 


W 9 
• • 


1898 


r W 


1895 


Ellenpur „ 


Local Preacher 


Ikona, Bahralch. 


Prem Das 


}i 




Blrpur ,1 


Khandharl Singh 


ti 




Rupaidtha „ 


Lai Karan 


«f 




Oonda. 


J. J. Todd 


Local Deacon, 1904 


Fakharpur, Bahralch. 


Hatha Masih 


,1 




Pachplrwa, Gonda. 


Frank A. Peters 


«t 




Bahralch. 


Isaac A. Blrkett 






Colonelganj. 


James Paul 


It 




Bahralch. 


PUlMiit Dittriet. 








Ase Ram 


Local Elder, 


1896 


Baherl. 


Kallu Singh 


It 


1895 


Jahanabad. 


Kallyan Singh 
Glrdbarl Lall 


II 


1902 


Rampur. 
Blsalpur. 
Bhojfpura. 


f 1 


1896 


MoU Lall 


t« 


1894 


QhaslRam 


Local Deacon 


,1897 


Neorlya. 


JhabbuLall 


«« 


1897 


Puranpur. 


SohanLall 


Local Elder, 


1904 


Shahl. 


A. Lincoln 


Local Preacher 


Pillbhlt. 


Bahadar Shah 


II 




Barkhera. 


Baldeo Pervhad 
Baljit 


ft 
•1 




Sagalpur. 
Slroufl. 


Barnabas 


If 




Rampur. 


D. R. Rodgers 


Local Deacon, 1905 


Nawabganj. 


Harsahae 


Local Preacher 


SIroull. 


Jame> Morgan 


If 




Sblshgarb. 


Jhau Lall 


ii 




Said pur. 


Karhe Mai 


II 




Kllaspur. 
Barkhera. 


Karhe Ram 


,1 




Khlyall Ram 


• • 
II 




Blsalpur. 


Knndan 


t» 




Nawabganj. 



56 



LIST OF UK!AL PREACHBR3 



Nami. 


Ordbrs. 


Apfoimtmemt. 


Lachman I. 


Loi'al Preachtr 


Dalelnagar. 


MotI Lall 


11 


Basdharan. 


Munna Mabtab 


• • 


Ram pur. 


NarayanSlDgb 




Miranpur. 


S. A. Judson 




Pardbouli. 


Mohan Siogh 




MirganJ. 


RamSukb 




Pilibbit. 


Emanuel Sukb 




It 


J. William 






R S. Simpson 
HarriLall 




Fat^eganJ. 




ff 


Nannih 




MIrganj. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



For Fordgn Missionaries. 

ENGLISH STUDIES. 

^_^ 1 Year. 1. Introduction to the Holy Scriptures (Old Testament, pp. 

1-447). Barman. 

^ — -2. Systematic Theology, Vol. I. Miley. . 

^ 3. Lectures on Homiletles. Ktm, \ v-.-^---*-^^ 

4. Discipline of the M. E. Church. 1904 (Parts I- V). 

To be read : Sermons (Vol. I), l—xxxlil. Wesley. 

II Year. 1. Introduction to the Uo]y#criptures(New Testament, pp. 

448-770;. Barman. 
8. Systematic Theology, Vol. II. Mlley. 

3. Discipline of the M. E. Church, 1904 (Part VI to end). 
To be read : Sermons (Vol. I), xxxiv— Ivili. Wesley. 

4. Digest of Methodist Law. (Edition of 1900).) MerrllL 

III Year. I. Biblical Her meneutlcs. Terry. N-^i*/-' 

2. History of the Christian Church, Vol. I. Burst. 

3. Analogy of Religion. Butler. 

To be read : The Supernatural Book. Foster. 

IV Year. 1. History of the Christian Church, Vol. II. Burst. 

3. Qrounds of Theisticland Religious Belief. Fisher. 
3. Christian Ethics. Smyth. 

To be read : Life and Epistles of St. Paul. Conyheare 
and Bowson. 

VSBNAGULAB STUDIES. 

I.— This course shall consist of three standards of two sections each, viz 
Lower, Middle, and Proticicncy Standards, in both the Urdu and Hindi 
langnagea. 

II.— The Urdu and Hindi of the Lower Standard shall be compulsory, 
and one section, either the Urdu or the Hindi, of the Middle and Proficiency 
Standards respectively. 

III.~The candidate will be expected to pass the first section of the 
Lower Standard examination within, or at the close of, his first year's 
residence, and he may be allowed to complete both sections in that time : 
but must pass in both within two years from the time of Joining bis con- 
ference in India. 

IV.— All conference examinations shall take place under the direction of 
a board of six or more examiners appointed by the Bishop, which board shall, 
as far as possible, remain unchanged from year to year. 

v.— The annual conference examination shall oogin on the morning of 
the day preceding the day fixed for the opening of the conference, a majority 
of the board being present. 

VI.— The following course of study, in accordance with Rule I, is pro- 
posed : 



2. 



58 COURSES OF STODY. 

* 

LOWEB STAKDABD. 

A. -URDU : FIRST YEAR. 

1. GRAMMAR. Piatt's, omittingcbapters on Arabic and Per- 
sian Constructions, and Derivations and Syntax .... lOO 
READING (Roman, Lithograph and Type) : 
Matthew and Mark^GospoIs 
Haqalq ul Maujudat — 100 

3. TRANSLATION ... 150 

(1) Urdu-Enslish : 10 lines from Urdn Sec. Bk. C. L. S .V) 

(2) English- Urdu : 10 lines from Bng. Sec. Bk. C. L. S., half 

written in PersiaVi and half written in Roman .... 60 

(3) Definition .... .... .... .... .... 40 

4. PRONUNCIATION 100 

5. CONVERSATION 100 

Read : Bishop Thoburn's India and Malaysia. 

B.- HINDI : SECOND YEAR. 

1. GRAMMAR, Kellogg's .... — — ... 100 

2. READING. (Nagri) Matthew and Mark's Gospels and Dharm 

XUln .... «••• •«.. .... .... •.■• x\^3 

3. TRANSLATION 100 

(1) Hindi-English : 10 lines from Hindi Sec. Bk. C. L. S., 50 

(2) English-Hindi : 10 lines from Eng. Sec. Bk. C. L. 8., 

half written In Nagri and half written In Roman 60 

(3) Definition .... .... .... .... .... 40 

4. PRONUNCIATION 100 

5. CONVERSATION 100 

Read : Hunter's Brief History of the Indian People. 

MIDDLE STAHDARD.— THIRD TXAB. 

(Urdu or Hindi Optional.) 

A.-URDU. 

1. GRAMMAR : Piatt's, the whole, Eempson's Syntax and Idioms, 

Forbes' Persian .... .... ... 

2. READING (Lltho, and Type) : 

Luke and John's GospeU). 

Din-i-Haqq ki tahqiq. 

Taubat un Nasih. 

Mark and John in Persian .... lOo 

3. TRANSLATION 150 

(1) Urdn-English : 10 lines from Urdu Third Bk. C. L. S. 50 

(2) English-Urdu : 10 lines from Eng. Third Bk. C. L. S., 

half written in Persian and half in Roman 60 

(3) Definition ... .... .... .... ... 40 

4. PRONUNCIATION 100 

5. CONVERSATION 100 

Read : Muir's Life of Mohammad. 

B. -HINDI. 

1. GRAMMAR : Review .... .... .... .... loo 

Ballantyn's Elementary Sanskrit. 

2. READING: Luke and John's Gospels ... .... 100 

Shakantala (edited by Raja Lakshman Singh). 

3. TRANSLATION 150 

(1) Hindi-English : 10 lines from Hindi Third Bk. C. L. S. 50 

(8) Bnfflish-Hlndi: 10 lines from English Third Bk. C. L. S., 

naif written in Nagri and half in Roman .... 60 

(3) Definition — •.... .... .... ... 40 

4. PRONUNCIATION 100 

6. CONVERSATION 100 

Read : Wilklns' Hindu Mythology. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 59 

PBOFICIEVCT 8TAHDABD.-F0UBTH TSAB. 

(Urdu or Hindi Optiooal.) 

A.-URDU. 

1. GRAMMAR : Palmer's Arabic. (Optiooal.) 
8. READING : Mizao-al-Haqq 

Gulistan. 

Forbes* A rabic Reader. (Optional.) 

3. TRANSLATION 

(1) Urdu-English : 20 lines from Urdu Fourth Bic. C. L. S., 

(2) Bofflish-Urdu: 20 lines from English Fourth Bk. G. L. 8., 

naif written in Persian and half in Roman .... 

Short Sermon in Persian character. 

(3) Definition — ... ... 

4. PRONUNCIATION 

5. CONVERSATION 

Read : Sell's Faith of Islam. 

B.-HINDI. 

1. GRAMMAR : Hindi Review 

Monier Williams' Sanskrit. (Optional.) 

2. READING : Sat Mat Nirupan 

Prem Sasar. 

Hithopaoesha. First Book. (Optional.) 
8. TRANSLATION 

(1) Hindi-English : 20 lines from Hindi Fourth Bk. C. L. S., 

(2) English-Hindi : 20 lines from Enj^iish Fourth Bk. C. L. 

S., half written in Nagri and half In Roman 

Short Sermon in Nagri character. 
(8) Definition .... .... .... .... .... 

4. PRONUNCIATION 

5. CONVERSATION 

Read : Monier Williams' Religious Life and Thought in India. 

VII.— The candidate, in order to pass, must obta'n at least one half the 
aggregate marks in each subject. 

VlIL— The Board of Examiners, throui^h the Registrar, shall, at the 
close of the examination, inform the candidate and tne Secretary of the 
Conference of the result. 



• • 

• • 

50 


100 
150 


80 




40 

1 • • 

• • • 


100 
100 


• • 


100 


• • 


100 


• • 

SO 


150 


60 




40 


100 
100 



Solana Kanfarans Id Khwandagi. 

Dakhile K£ liye. 

1. Ummedw&r Middle pass shuda, yd us ke bardbar ho. 

2. Masf bl K&mlli vat ( Wesley. ) 

3. General Knowledge of Eoglisb History, Inglistda kf Tawdrilph se 

>dmm wdqifiyat ( Badley y& kof aur.) 

4. Discipline. 

5. Scripture History. 

6. Man&hi Isti'm&l Tambdkii. 

Pahla Sal. 

1. FllAsaff dar bdb Tadbfr i Naj&t, or Walker's Pbilosopby of the 

plan of Salvation. 
8. iQti^Ab i KaHsiyd., (Caleb.) 

3. Moral Science in English or in Lltbograpb-Urdd, (Way land yd 

aur kof.) 

4. Baibal Bar Haqq. 

5. YdhannA kA Pahld Khatt m'a Or. T. J. Scott s&hib kl Tafsir. 

6. Madbi Ta'Hmdt kd Khuldsa, (Buck, ) First Half. 

7. Qadf m Tawdrf^h kd l^htisdr 

8. Tahrfri Wa*z. 



60 COURSES OP STUDY. 

MuidWa ke liye, 

1. Sbobart's Isl&m or Taw&rfkh Mohammadf, or Xw^gB,w&n Bichir. 

2. Din i (sldm aur us k{ tarJfd in Roman-Urdd or ia Lltbograph- 

Urdd. 

3. Poplyat k4 Ahw&l, (Ullman.) 

DusRA Sal 

1. Blnney's Compend, or Makhzao 'Ilm i Ildhf. 

2. What think ye of Christ.' (Vaughan's) or Masfh Ibn Ull&h, or 

Dbaram Pustak se &dh4 bh&g^men fjlhrist k& Sam&ohdr. 
^ 3. Masfbl TaMlm&t kd Khul&sa, (Buck) Seoond half. 
^ 4. Paid&ish aur ^hunij par Suw&l o Jaw&b, (Lucas.) 
' 5. Hld&vat ul WA'izin, (T. J. Scott.) 

6. Riimfon k& Khatt m'a Tafsfr. 

7. TahrfrfWa'z. 

Mutdla^a ke liye. 

1. Aryd Samdj, (Clark yd Formao yd kol aur.) 

2. Asmdr i Shfrfo, (Sweet First Fruits). 

3. Tawdri^b 1 Kalfsiyd, (Wherry.) 

TiSBA Sal. 

^1. Bushneirs Character of Jesus or T^d kf Sfrat. 
2. Butler's Analogy yd Millat « TashWhf, 

^3. Fisher's Manual of Cbristlan Esridences In English, or Tswf Subiit, 
Roman-Urdti men, (Qoslcins). 

4. Ildhiydt i Batbal, Hlssa Auwal, (T. J. Scott.) 

5. Teg o Si par 

^6. 'Ibrdnlon kd ^hatt, m'a Tafafr. 
7. Tahriri Wa'z. 

Mutdla^a ke liye. 

1. Murdoch's Popular Hiduisn or Liaknshmi Shankar's Primer or 

Biology in tlrdd or inHindf. 

2. With Christ in the School of Prayer, (Murray.) Maktab 1 Masfh 

men Du'd kf Ta'lfm 

3. A'fna i Oil. 

SUWA'LAT CHAUTHE SAL KE LIYE, 

1. Rdhdnf zindagi kyd hai ? Us kf asliyat baydn karo. 

2. Ky^nkar ma'ldm hotd hai, ki ham men rdhdnf zindagf hai ? 

3. Wd'fz ko kis tarah ma'Mm hotd hai, ki ^hudd ne mujh ko wa'z 
ke kdm ke wdste talab kiyd hai. 

Pasl 1. 

DrNDA'Rr AUR AUQAT-QUZARrKE BAYA'N MEN :-4. ?hd. 
dim ud din ke khdss kdm baydn karo, aur yih batdo, ki is khidmatke 
wdste kaun kaun se wasf chdhiyen ? 

5. We kaun se tarfqe hain, jin se yih ausdf barhte jdte bain ? 

6. Batldo, ki logon ke gharon par ahwdl-pursi ke liye jdnd'kafsd 
znrdr hai, aur yih kaho ki tumhdrf is kdm men kis qadr tawajjuh hai ? 

7. Yih batdo ki kis tarah pa^bte liichte ho ? 

8. Jab se tum kdnfarans ki imtihdn-barddrf men ho, tab se tum 
ne jitnf kitdben bar sdl dekhf hain, un sab ke ndm batdo ? 

9. Kutdb i Muqaddasa ke parhnemen tumhdrd kitnd waqt sarf 
hotd hai ? aur kis tarfqe se parhte ho ? 



COURSES OF STUDY. 61 

FaSL 2. 

BAIBAL KX IMTIHA'N-1. Kis i'tib&r se turn Baibal ko 
Kal&m i I14hi j4nte ho, aur kio daUil ee turn yih r&erakbte bo ? 

2. Kis dalfl se Majmd'a i 'Abd i 'Atlqko, jo bam men murauwij 
hal, mu'tabar jdnte bo ? Kbul&sa bay&n karo. 

3. Kis dalfl se we sab kitdb^n, jo is Majmii'a i 'Abd i Jadid meg 
d^^hil bain, mu'tabar o sabfb j&nte bo ? Mukbbasar bay&n karo. 

4. Kis tarab Mobammadion ke is da'weko ki Kutub i Muqaddasa 
mansd^b bo ffaf bain, gal at edbit karte bo ? . 

5. J^buruj i Misr se Yasbd' ki maut tak, isrdelfon kf tdrf^b U 
l^huldsa batdo. 

6. Das firqon kl bagdwat ke muta'alliq jo ^bdss wdqi'dt bain, 
unbeQ baydn karo. 

7. Yabddfon kf sdldna 'iden aur n(z yib ki kis bdt ke wdste 
muqarrar bdl tbfn, aur kis tarab par add k( jdtf tbfa, batdo. 

8. ]B[bdss Ikbdss nabfon ke Ddm aur jis zamdne men unbon ne 
nubdwaten kfn,'wub zamdne aur nlz yib, ki we nubdwaten kis "bdre 
men thin, bayln karo. 

~9. ^uddwand Masfb kf bdton se kucbb aisf misdlen do, jin se 
zdbir botd bai, ki wub Purdue 'Abd ke nawisbtog ko mu'tabar samajh- 
tdtbd. 

10. Kaun sf pesb-kbabsrfdn Masfb se muta'alliq bain, l^husdsan as 
kf dmad aur sfrat aur kdm aur maut se ? 

11. Ma^fb kf zindagf ke bdldt kis kis waqt ke ma'ldm bain, aur 
muddat, ' abd risdlat kis qadr tbf ? 

12. Us kf risdlat ke ^bdss wdqi*dt aur jabdn jabdn ki we guzre 
bain, batdo. 

13 Kbdss kbdss bdten mundarija i A'amdl i Rasdl batldo. 
U. Mu'jiza* kyd bai aur mu' jizon se kydnkar ma'ldm botd bai, ki 
Kutub Muqaddasa min-jdnib Alldh bain ? 

Fasl 3. 

BAIBAL Kr TA'LrMA'r KE BAYAN MEN :-l. iJKbudd kd wujdd 
Baibal se kis tarab sdbit botd bai ? 

2. Baibal se Taslfs kd kyd subdt bai, ya'ne kl ek ^budd men tfn 
aqndm bain ? 

3. ^budd kf sifat batldo aur bar sifat kd subdt Pdk Nawisbton se 
do. 

4. I^lbudd kemujassam bone kdmasslajo Kutub i Muqaddasa 
men pdvd jdtd bai, use baydn karo, aur yib batldo ki us ta'lfm Konajdt 
ke bandobast se kyd 'ildqa bai ? 

5. Masfb kf Uldbiyat Kutub i Muqaddasa se sdbit karo. 

6. Baibal kf kaun kaun sf dyat Uldbiyat i Masfb ke mu^bdlif 
Musalmdn pesb karte bain, aur tum un ke kyd ma'ne lete bo ? 

7 Rdb i Quds kf aqndmiyat kd, aur Uldbiyat kd aur us ke kdm 
kd Pdk Nawifiton. se subdt do. 

H. Adam ke gundb kd natfja us kf auldd ke baaq men kyd bdd ? 

9. Masfb ke kafdre aur gundbon kf mu'dff men kyd 'fldqabai ? 

10. Masfb ke jf utbne ka subdt do. 

11. Mssfb kf sbaf'd'at kf asliyat aur fdlda, jaisf Kutub i Muqad- 
dasa men ta'lfm bai, baydn karo. 

12. Rdb ul Quds kf gawdbf kf nisbat kyd ta'lfm o dalfl bai ? 

13. Masfbf kdmiliyatkd masala jo Wesley sdbib ne sikbldydbai, 
use mul^btasaran baydn karo aur Baibal se us kd subdt do. 

14. Naf Paiddisb aur kdmil pdkfzagf ke dsrmiydn, jo farq bai, 
use samjbd do. 

15. Is da' we ke bdre men kl '* Jo kof az sar i nau paiddbotd bai, 
is taur se nabfn giregd, ki dkbir i kdr baldk bo jde." Hamdrf kalfsi- 
ydkf kyd rde bai? sdbit karo ki yib rde Kaldm i Ildbf ke ba-mdjib 
bai. 



62 COURSES OF STUDY. 

16. Batldo ki baptisma kaUlrasm hai, aurkis garaz Be hai, ajr 
kyiin farz hal ? bar bat kd subdt do. 

17. S&bit karo, ki bacbchon ko baptisma deed muD&sib bai ? 

18. Baibal men * Asbd 1 Rabbdni kf oisbat kaun kaun se mubd- 
ware &e hain, aurwubkis garaz se bain aur MaslMon par us k& 
mdDD& kytin farz bai ? 

19. Hindtion ke masala i tandsukb, ya'Dek&y&-pla( ko kjdnkar 
galat sdbit karte bo ? 

20. Jism ke if utbne ke bdb men Eutub i Muqaddasa men ky& 
ta*l{m bai ? Hawala do. 

Fasl. 4. 

KALFSIYA' KE INTIZA'M O TAHTTB KE BAYAN MEN:~I. 
Kallsiyd ke tarab tarab ke intiz&mdt bay&n karo. 2. Metbodiet 
Epiakopal KaHsijd men General K&nfarans aur Anual K^nfarans aur 
Kaw&r^arll K&nfarans ke muta'alHq ky& ky& k&m bain ? 

3. Kalfsiyd ke 'uhdaddron men ** Bishop'' *' Prfzdiding Eldar" 
aur **Eldar,»' aur *» Dfkan" aur ** Khddim-uddin" aur '* Lokal 
W&'iz'* aur ** Mu^ht&rk&r" aur *' Am&oatd&r" aur kilds ke HAdi jo 
bain, un men bar ek k& kitnd ikbtiy&r bai, aur kyd k&m muta'alliq 
bai, aur kis ke sdmbue jawdbdibi bai ? 

Fasl 5. 

TAWARF^fH I KALTSIYA :-l, Yabddfon ke kbdss firqe Maefb 
ke waqt men kitne tbe ? un kd baydn karo. 

2. Awdil zamdnon men jo azlyaten Masihfon ne u^bdi bain, un kd 
kucbb baydn karo. 

3. Un wasdil kd baydn karo, jiu ke sabab se ibtidd men Manfbf 
mazbab babut pbaild, (Matber sdhib kf Tawdrfkb 1 Kalfsiyd, tlsrd 
bdb, daf'a 1, 2, 3, 5. ko dekho.) 

4. Gnoslikon kf kyd taMf m tbf aur us se qadf m kalfsiyd par kyd 
^bardb asar pa^d. (Matber sdhib kf Tawdrfkb i Kalfsiyd, tfsrd bdb 
daf'aSS.) 

5. Luther sdhib se 'ain qabl Dfn i Tswf kd kyd hdl bai P 

6. Bai^f Isldb i Mazhabf jo Luther sdhib ke waqt men bdf, us kd 
bdl batldo, kis sabab se wuh isldb hiif tbf, aur kaunkaun~lo^ us men 
sbarf k i bdl the ? 

7. Britdniya i 'Uzmd men Methodist Kalfsijd ke muqarrar bone 
kd sabab batldo aur Wesley sdhib kf TdrfKb men kbdss log kaun tbe ? 

8. Methodist Epi^kopal Kalfsivd kis 'eabab se aur kis waqt men 
auwal kabdn bauf ?(Dibcipline kd bdb 1 auwal dekho.) 

9. Hiniid ke mukhtalif firqe aur ylb ki we kabdn se nikle aur un 
kd bdnf aur un ke ^h'dss 'aqfde batldo. 

10. Mobammadfon ke dfn kf ibtidd aur Mohammad sdhib kd 
kucbb baydn karo aur mul^talif firqon kd aur un ke hddfon kd kucbb 
zikr karo ? 

11. Sikbon ke mazbab kf ibtidd kabdn se hal aur use Hintid o 
Isldm ke mazbab se kyd 'ildqa bai ? 

12. Brahmo mazbab kd igiz o taraqqf aur hdlat maujiida aur 
I^hdss 'aqfdon kd baydn karo. 

^tdd]^at.--Chdhiye ki Chauthe sdl kf khwdndagf ke suwdldt ke jawdb 
ek kitdb men sabfb taur se likbe jden, aur imtihan ki kamittf ko diye 
jden. Kamittf is kitdb ko jdnche, aur agar mundsib jdne, 'amwa in ke 
aur bbf suwdl kar saktf bai. 

V> mm Middyat.—i B ar ^dl ke liye- ) Ear ek mutdla' a kf kitdbou kd 
^buldsa tabrfr karke kamittf ko deud cbdhiye. 



PRESIDING ELD£RS* REPORTS. 



Bardtty-Kumaon IHstrict. 

Rbv. F. li. Neeld, Presiding Elder,— The District will be found 
about Lat. 28^ N. and Long. 80^ E. It embraces an area of about 
10,221 sQuare miles. It would require 4,8l8 such districts to cover 
tbe lana surface of the earth. 

Within this 10,221 square miles there is a population of 2,153,170 
sonls. Included in this number are 6,5'5 Methodist Christiana of all 
ages and degrees of intelligence, living in over five hundred separate 
centres. These Christians are environed by a population of 2,000,000 
people, 1.600,000 of them beiug Hindu idolaters of various castes, and 
100,000 of them Mussalmans. 

The earth is the Lord^s and the fulness thereof. ** Ak of me, 
and I will give thee the nations for thine inheritance, and the utter- 
most parts of the earth for thy poseession,'* was written long ago for 
our encouragement, and it is a pleasure to see the promise being 
fulfilled and a Christian church growing up in the midst of these 
people in the '* uttermost parts. " 

This year we have had four hundred and ninety-eight baptisms, 
two of these were Tibetans, and one hundred and twenty-six of them 
were Ha6uras, a class of people who wish to give up their custom of 
roving and plundering and earn their living by honest labour in culti- 
vating fields. They are now living in the Christian village of Pan ah- 
Sur, eleven of their bright boys have been brought Into our school 
lere, and two girls in Bidwell Memorial School, and are all making 
rapid improvement in learning. 

One old man, aged seventy years, was baptized a few days ago. Qe 
had been a notorious idolater and had taught the people to hold on to 
their idol-worship. It will now be noised abroad that old Khushali, 
the idolater, has become a Christian, and we hope many may be in- 
fiuenoed by him to come to Christ. 

We have all along had much anxiety about our weak Christian 
people who do not fully ^ive up their old idolatroiis (mstoms This year 
one Christian man sued in Court to obtain possession of a Christian 
girl whom he claimed was his wife, basiug his claim on the fact that 
they had been married according to an idolatrous rite. He lost his 
case and the Court decision has done much to awaken our people to 
the fact that there is a legal status for Christians which idolaters 
cannot claim. One old man who had been living with a woman for 
thirty years without being married to her waked up and was married 
properly, now if he should die, the woman will not lose her share in 
the inheritance. 

There is a marked change in the attitude of BindiLS towards Christ- 
ianity ; they seem to be much more desirous of understanding the 
teachings of our religion, and there is less of a disposition to 
regard the Christian religion as only for the lower castes. If our 
]>eople from the lower castes could more rapidly develop after baptism, 
this diange in attitude would be more rapid among the higher 
castes. 



64 PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

The castes which seem to be awaking, are the Chamars, ThakurSf 
Kunnia and Pasiyas. There are about 100,000 Chamars within this 
district. There are 1 ,646 Arya Samaj people in the Shabjahanpur 
zila, and there must be over 2,000 within the bounds of the district, 
and I think it a fair inference that these people have been brought 
thus far away from their old life by the preaching and teaching of the 
Gospel. In my opinion the people of the Arya Samaj are booming 
convinced of the fact that the Vedas are devoid of any plan by which 
sin can be forgiven, and hence of the emptiness of the Vedas as com- 
pared with the Bible. 

The pla(/tie has to some extent paralyzed our work in seven of 
the circuits. In accordance with the advice of the Magistrates the 
people leave their houses when the rats begin to die and the fever 
attacks the members of their households. Very few of our Christian 
people have been attacked by this dread disease. 

in order to help our workers I have held five workers* meetings or 
Bummer SchooU in four different centres. We make much of devotion- 
al Bible study in these meetings, and all have been refreshed and 
inspired for work. 

Our educational work hss received much attention. Through the 
efforts of Dr. Butcher the debt on the Oak Openings School has been 
paid off, and now we can give more attention to the building of endow- 
ment. 

Bro. Blackstock has succeeded in raising our Shabjahanpur 
School to the grade of a High School, and obtained the recognition 
of the Government. 

The Naini Tal Middle School has improved, and there is a good 

Srospect of having It raised to the status of a Bigh School. Bro. 
[yde is wisely directing affairs in this direction. 

The Middle School in Bareilly under Dr. Dease holds its own 
although the competition from other schools is very strong. 

The Dwarahath Lower Middle School has improved and our 
Grant-in-aid increased. 

The Bareilly Theological Seminary under Bro Mansell and Dr. 
Dease has done a year of good work in spite of the plague which 
came very near them. Twenty-three men came out as graduates and 
went to various parts of India to reinforce the work 

Bro, Blackstock has thirty-one boys in the Industrial Department 
of the Orphanage in Shabjahanpur. 

(?iW/iS'c^ools. — Miss Easton and Miss Sellers have had a good 
year of work in VSTellesley, and have just been reinforced by the 
arrival of Miss Nora Waugh from America. 

Mrs. Chew, in charge of the Orphanage in Bareilly, was also 
reinforced by the arrival of Miss Saxe towards the end of the year. 

The Bidwell Memorial School under Miss Organ has had a 
prosperous year and done good work. 

The Dwarahath School under Miss Seymour and the Pithora&farh 
School under Miss Sullivan have done good steady work, and the 
influence of these schools in the hills is extending our work there. 

In our schools we have 372 Christian boys, 584 Christian girls. 
Add to this 76 men in the Seminary, 47 women in the Woman's School 
and 26 children in the Kindergarten, and we have a total of 1,105 
Christians under training. 

We have also 1,342 non-Christian boys and 816 non- Christian 

girls, making a total of 2,158 non-Christians. Thus the total of 
hristians and non-Christians is 3,263, which is an iocrease of 2^4. 
The Bible is taught and Sunday Schools are conducted in the schools, 
and by means of them the Christian boys, girls and teachers are in 
vital touch with the most influential centres of Indian life. This is 
especially true in the case of our boys' schools. 



BIJNOR DISTRICT. 65 

Sabbath Preaching Services^ —We have sixty-seven centres where re- 
l^lar Sabbath services are held, and 2,948 is the average number of 
attendants at these meetings. 

The preachers report about 294 inquirers in all the circuits. 

Oar Christian community has grown from 6,448 to 6,515, an in- 
crease of sixty-seven. 

The increase in the collections for ministerial support is Rs. 782. 
Last year it was Rs. 3,563, this year it is Rs. 4,345. 

The most difficult work immediately before us is the development 
of the illiterate Christian groups among the widely scattered villages. 
I have gone among these people as mucn as time would permit, and 
am convinced that our circuit system worked by earnest itinerants 
will develop these people in time. 

The Lord Jesus has greatly blessed our workers during the year, 
and we enter a new year with hearts full of hope and faith. 



Bijnor District. 

Rev. Joseph H.*Gill, Presiding Elder.—The work on the Bijnor 
District was begun by Bishop E. W. Parker, D D., in September 1859, 
now forty-five years ago. During that space of time the men in charge 
have been changed eighteen times ; their average stav has been thus 
only two and a half years each. Of these workers thirteen have been 
European and five Hindustani members of Conference. 

As the District is only a small part of the great territory within 
the bounds of the North India Annual Cooference, it is reasonable to 
infer that the exigencies of the general work demanded these changes. 
It is also reasonable to infer that the work here would have been better 
served had the term of each Missionary been longer. Among the 
Europeans still in the field who have laboured here, are Dr.H. Mansell, 
J.fl. Messmore, N. L. Hockey, S. S. Dease, J. B. Thomas, J.C. Butcher, 
W. A. Mansell 

There are three brethren now in the retired list in America who 
once lived here. Then Dr. R. Hoskins having completed a long and 
successful career has joined the Church triumphant. Dr. P. T. 
Wilson has also finished a long and successful missionary career. It 
was his lot to superintend Bijnor as Presiding Elder while living 
elsewhere. Bros. iCnowles and Core while living in Moradabad also 
superintended the Bijnor work. It was only in 1901 that Bijnor was 
made an independent district, and placed in charge of Rev. W. A. 
Mansell with a staff of native ministers to help him. U is probable 
that the policy as to supervision now adopted will be continued in 
future. 

A gfreat deal of good work has been done by these men. We can 
poini to the existence of (i) a native church numbering considerably 
more than five thousand souls including children : to (2) an excellent 
Qirls' boarding-school : to (3) a numerous group of out stations 
(8 bout forty in number) : to (4) the propc^rty accumulated (worth more 
than eighteen thousand rupees) : to (o) the excellent staff of preachers 
of all grades prepared by years of training and now at work : to 
(6) the women worlcers, wives and daughters of these men. 

We own a large property in Bijnor City which consists of a bungalow 
for the missionary, a school-house and dormitories for the Girls' 
boarding-schools ( we still need a bungalow for the European ausist- 
ants of this school); numerous houses for native preachers and 
mission servants ; an orchard and vegetable garden plot, besides 
fields adjoining and under cultivation. 



66 PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

We regret we have at present no church building in this city. 

Besides the above, the Mission owns real estate in the following 
centres:— (I) Najibabad, (2) Dhampur, (3) Seohara, (4) S ah is pur (which 
are railway towns), (5) Chandpur, (6) Bashta, (7) Mandawar, and (8 
Ganj. 

we rent property in Jhalu (Bijnor Circuit) and in parts of Najiba- 
bad Circuit, and in Nihtaur, Sherkot, Afzalgarh and Hehar (Dham- 
pur Circuit), in Mandawar and Nagal (Mandawar Circuit), in Nag) a 
(Bashta Circuit), in Kiratpore, Bahrampore and Lad pore (Kiratpore 
Circuit). Our working force consists of sixty-two men and sixty -nine 
women. Of the men six are members of Annual Conference, thirty- seven 
are Local preachers (eight of them are ordained) and exhorters, besides 
nineteen pastors and teachers. Of the women two are European lady- 
assistants, the rest are Bible- women, zenana visitors and teachers. 

Great credit is due to the good men and women who hitherto laboured 
here, and selected and trained for service so excellent a working force. 
Nor would I forget to mention that not a few raised up here are now 
at work in important places in other districts. 

Each of our circuits has a branch of the Epworth League. The 
attendance at the District League Anniversary was over two hundred 
and fifty, and the interest in the exercises was very great. 

In our Sunday Schools we report an attendance of two thousand 
three hundred and eleven, of this number seven hundred and fifty- 
seven are non-Christians. 

In our Day Schools the pupils of both sexes and of all grades 
number seven hundred and seven. If we except the Girls* boarding- 
school in Bijnor, I may say that the rest are mere beginners. They 
learn to read at irregular times, in time snatched from manual labour- 
Sixty-six read the Bible and sixty-two the 2nd book, forty-eight the 
3rd book, all in the vernacular. 

We have not yet succeeded in replacing the large school for boys 
which once flourished here, but which was abolished in hopes of build- 
ing up the Moradabad School. A boys' Middle or High School seems 
to be a necessity in each District Head-quarters. 

We report eighty-four deaths during 1904. In twenty-nine in- 
stances burials were conducted with Christian rites. Ministers often 
live at a distance, and in India burials are so hurried that the pastor 
or minister cannot always be present. In some places we are in need 
of grave-yards- burials taking place now quite hap-hazardly as to the 
grave lot. 

Only five marriages by Christian ceremonials are reported this year. 

A total of many hundred inquirers (878) is reported. 

Bijoor District is divided into nine large circuits scattered among 
apopulation numbering 779,951. We have thirty -eight sub-circuits. 
Work is carried on in 580 villages : in this number of villages are in- 
cluded 398 in which Christians live. 

Sabbath services are conducted in forty-three different places, and 
the united congregations number 1,299 persons in attendance each 
Sabbath. This does not include bazar-preachiog where we have large 
audiences in several places. We preach pretty regularly in the Bijnor 
market-place in Bijnor City. Very few outsiders will take the trouble 
to come to the Chapel services in the Mission compound. 

Our people are slowly learning to keep the Sabbath. In some vil- 
lages the only market of the week is held on Sunday : at that time only 
can certain necessities be purchased. Still we urge our people to take 
the trouble to visit a neighbouring market rather than break the Sab- 
bath. When India Is Christianized, no market day will fall on Sunday 

The twj Colporteurs belonging to the North India Bible Society 
and others, have during the year sold 27 Bibles, 97 New Testaments, 
3,595 portions of Scripture. 



BIJNOR DISTRICT. 67 

iDcludiDg all kinds of religious books, tracts and leaflets, a total of 
22,422 have been sold or distributed during the year. 

In Seohara Bro. Jhabbu Lall, the Preacher-i n-Charge, made a can- 
vass of the number of copies of Scripture which are in the hands of 
non-Christians, and the result showed that there were sixty copies. 
Tbia would indicate that at least some people are reading the Bible 
and stadyinsr its teachings, and this is a healthy sign. 

The entire amount of funds raised (including a grant-in-aid of 
Rs. 480) has been Rs. 1,074-4-0, of this sum Rs. 140-4-0 were raised for 
Annual Conference collections for all purposes. Besides this sum the 
collections for pastoral support total Rs. 308, and of this amount 
Rs. 69 were given by unsalaried Christians. The subject of pastoral 
snpport is constantly before us in all Quarterly Conferences. The 
non-official membership are slowly learning their duty in this matter, 
but we never weary talking about it. 

In order to have statistics accurate, a good deal of attention has 
been given to re-writing Church Registers. 

The Circuit account-books have been audited to the close of the 
third quarter. 

We subscribe for a total of fourteen copies of the Kaukab-i" 
Hind. In one circuit none is taken, A Christian weekly paper is 
necessary for every wide-awake minister, for it not only keeps him in 
touch with the Chuich in general and his own brethren, but is a constant 
reminder of the duties and privileges of the Christian life. 

A plan exists for the pastoral care of all the people. Teachers, 
exhorters and helpers of every grside unite in this work of visiting the 
village Christians. 

Sickness and deuth have been busy during the year. Those who 
have been afflicted have had our sincere sympathy. Medicine has been 
freely distributed. The plague has been severe in Najibabad especial- 
ly, and in other places to some extent. Up till this writing over seven 
hundred deaths from plague alone have taken place, of these a little 
less than one-third the number took place in the past fortnight of 
December, and it seems to be on the increase. I have no news of any 
Christian dying of plague in our district ; for this we thank God I 

We have greatly grieved over the fact that one of our local preach- 
ers had to be tried and expelled, because of debt, and the consequences 
of debt. Many others have not yet learned to live within their means. 

It is true that the salary is small, but while it comes regularly, 
there seems to be no excuse for living in a style beyond one's income. 
The truth is, that the reputation of our people is so c^ood that shop- 
keepers and money-lenders like to have them in their debt. It is also 
true that a man in debt is greatly crippled in his work. 

Our recent District Conference was a time of enjoyment and great 

?rofit. Most of our workers, men and wc men, were in attendance, 
he sermons were on fundamental Gospel themes. The Prayer Meet- 
ings, opened with Bible expositirns, were times of real refreshing with 
the manifested presence of the Holy Spirit resting on the people. 

The anniversaries of several societies and philanthropies oc- 
cupied our wiogs with very profitable discussions and exhortations. 
One evening was given wholly to the discussion of Roman Catholicism, 
for our District has a small Roman Catholic Mission recently begun, 

Satronised by a Bajab who used to be one of our stanch Protestants, 
ne evening was given to the subject of Idolatry ; one to Education ; 
one to Temperance ; one to Domestic Missions ; one to the Bible and Christ' 
ian Bible Literature^ one to Self-aupport. At least a half dozen differ- 
ent speakers took part in each theme, and the hour and half allotted 
to each meeting was fully and profitably spent. 

The work of our sisters in schools and zenanas is full of interest 
and will be represented in a separate report by Mrs. Gill. 
We thank God and take courage. 



68 PRESIDING ELDEKS' REPORTS. 

Budaon District. 

Rev. Wiluam Peters, Presiding Elder. —l have been only one 
year In this new district, and therefore I cannot give a full report of my 
work in this new field. Budaon is a very old field of our Mission 
and many old and experienced members of the North India Conference 
have laboured here. In addition to many Presiding Elders this place 
has been the head-quarters of thirteen missionaries. The fruit of this 
labour is evident. They laboured with devoted zeal and enthusiasm for 
the glory of God. They endured hardship and affliction, but they were 
faithful in the discharge of their several duties. To-day we see the 
result and thank God for it. Several men have been educated and 
trained here, and now they are working in different churches of our 
Mission in Southern Asia. On enquiry it will be found that many 
members of the North India Conference had their education in Budaon. 
It seems rather surprising that efficient workers have been taken away 
from here, but Budaon itself has been neglected. But other people's 
necessities are to be regarded as greater than ours 

When first I came here I felt I would not be able to do much. In 
fact I still feel it bo Although much has been done here in years gone 
by sothat there are thousands of Christians, yet a reformation is need- 
ed in many things among Christians themselves Realizing this I, with 
my fellow-workers, waited before God for His guidance, and thank God, 
He heard us and His presence was with us as it was with Moses. He 
gave us wisdom to carry on this arduous work. We were shown these 
things very clearly in which our Christians needed reform. We prayer- 
fully thought over everything, and although so little a time as one 
year is altogether too little to eradicate these things, yet we are sure 
that with the help of the Lord Jesus we shall before long be con- 
querors. 

I desire to mention a few of the things which we have seen and 
experienced thus far. In this District we have converts largely from 
two classes, but those from among one class are predominant over those 
of the other class. We thank God that those who are converts from 
among the Chamars mostly follow Christian rites and ceremoDies, still 
there are a few weaknesses that have to be removed. But converts 
from the other class are yet slaves to their old idolatrous customs and 
practices, so much so that a line of demarcation between Christians 
and non-Christians can hardly be drawn. This does not have the 
required wholesome effect on others. I am sorry to own that in some 
cases our workers also are to blame for this. We shall have to be 
very careful in this. 

With such a small number of workers as we have it is hard to 
satisfactorilv arrange for the secular and religious training of this 
vast multituae. For some years Mission schools have been closed, 
and paid workers removed for lack of funds, and unpaid leaders from 
among the converts themselves have been appointed instead, but in fact 
these leaders themselves know very little of Christian doctrines and 
are yet slaves to their old idolatrous practices. How can these leaders 
train those committed to their charge ? Caste-feeling is so strong 
among them that they canoot do contrary to it. There is another 
drawback, and it is that people from among the converts have been 

fJaced among them as examples, while the leaders themselves have so 
ittle of Christian experience that those in their charge have little 
regard for them. In fact they exercise their influence on the leaders 
themselves, so much so that they make them do just as they desire. 
The leaders being inexperienced, stealthily participate in their 
idolatrous customs, and, tnen, they depend for their maintenance on 
these people. This is the reason why so little of real Christian life is 



BUDAOt^ DISTRICT. 6d 

found amoDg the people. We have to remove these things, beoause so 
long as thej are not obliterated, there will be no real success. 

It is worthv of note that out of about 158 marriages only neven 
were solemnizea after the Christian rite. I and my preacbers-in-charge 
tried our best to check this evil, but in most places we met with little 
success. I then gave a public notice that becoming Christians with 
a mercenary motive is crininal, for such men as do this can be 

f prosecuted to the full extent of law for slighting and disobeying it. 
f this be exercised in a few places it will improve the present 
condition, I am sure. The most reprehensible customs are those 
of marriage and holding feasts for the dead-^ther customs are 
of a subordinate rank. 

This is a very difficult problem we have to face- Although such 
weaknesses are found in many places, yet we do not despair. In some 
places we have met with remarkable success, so much so that a few 
marriages were stopped. If some one of steady and sincere disposi- 
tion go among them he is sure to be successful, but if he himself were 
to participate in their idolatrous practices the problem would become 
still more difficult. It is a mistake, and a glaring one too, to say 
that these men will never reform, altbough very little effort has been 
made to reform them If we try to do our duty with sincerity and the 
fear of God, much will be accomplished in this direction. 

The time has now come when old customs should be removed and 
all evils be obliterated, and Christians be Christians at heart and not 
merely in name. We praise God for the great hope we have for ultimate 
triumph. We hope in the near future to give a much better report. 

This year we had openings in several new places. Whenever 
the trite question of m ney arose I stopped it, because I dare not start 
any work depending on money. I am sure that sincere enquirers of 
the truth will find the true Saviour, but not so much by means of money. 
Everywhere I taught my people to first seek the Kingdom of God 
and Bis righteousness, and that then all these things should be added 
unto then ; but people in some places have become so corrupt that this 
preooept will be hard for them to understand, at least for some time. 

There are nine circuits in this District, and in each circuit we had 
baptisms. The entire number of baptisms, as will be known by the 
statistics, is 481 for this year, and there are many places where there 
are many ready to be baptized, if only they are allowed to stick to 
their old customs. From this it is evident that the Gospel of the 
Lord Jesus Christ does not hold its proper place in the nearts of 
inch people. There is a great deal to accomplish. Wherever people 
were baptized thev were made to promise that they would follow 
Christian rites and ceremonies. I every now and then enquire from 
their preachers-in-charge whether they are still true to their word. 

Our itinerating work was successful. We visited the chief villages 
and stations, and to the bebt of our ability we worked eatisfactorfly. 
We are sorry to find several incapable men in some places, but perhaps 
our successors will call us also incapable. 

Our Boys' School has improved much. At the commencement 
of the year we were afraid lest the Government grant-in-aid should 
be discontinued, but by God's grace the grant is now twice as much 
as it was before. In addition to this we have been able to secure 
Rs. Z% per mensem from the Municipal Board. The teachers are all oap« 
able and the work is in every way satisfactory. There are 56 Christian 
boys ID the school. The Inspector of Schools has advised us to raise 
the school to a High School. A little more money will be nee^d for 
this purpose and tnen we are sure there will be no difficulty. 

The work of the Epworth League has been very good. There have 
been two leagues opened for the villages in the vicinity of Budaon 
where religious and moral instruction is imparted to the village 



10 PRESIDING BLDERS* REPORtS. 

Cbristiane. People take a great interest in this, so much so that 

< there is do circuit where there is do league for our ChristiaDS. 

We had our District Couf ere Dce towards the close of November, 

..Bev4.W« A. MaDsell and N L Hockey came to help us. Many 

^ were oonyerted, aud all were greatly blessed Id these meetings. The 

. temperance meetiDg especially made a great impression od all those 

thab attended it. Such organizations as these are greatly needed 

< in our midst. 

v . With all our faults and shortcomings we try our best to glorify 
God. If we lead pure lives, and then make united efforts, we are sure 
that these evils will very soon be removed, as with the coming in of 
the refulgent beams of the sun the darkness fleeth. 

Zenana work as well as the Girls' Boarding School is progressing 
under Mies Wright's superintendence, and every effort is made to im- 
prove it. 

May God's grace be with us all, so that everything be done with 
decency for the glory of the Cruci^ed One ! 



Garhwal District. 

Rev. J. H. Messmore, Presiding Elder, -The work of the Mission- 
ary Society is carried on in Garhwal through the agency of one 
foreign missionary and his wife, assisted by eight ordained native 
ministers and thirty-two preachers and teachers. The Woman's 
Societv also supports one missionary and thirty -four other agents, 
including assistants and Bible-readers. There are five circuits in the 
district, naving an aggregate of 476 members and probationers. There 
have been fourteen adult baptisms and forty-two baptisms of children 
under twelve years of age. There are eight buildings for public wor- 
ship which are also used as school-houses. There are Mission build- 
ings at fifteen places in the district, where Mission agents are located 
and where Christian worship, more or less public in character, is 
maintained. The total number of persons, voung and old, who in 
church or Sunday School participate in CbrisMan worship, is about 
seven hundred. Ordinarily few non-Christians attend these services ; 
but on special occasions they attend in large numbers Not much 
aggressive force is manifested by the Mission agencies anywhere. 
I^arly all the Mission agents are from classes having little local in- 
fluence, and not many of them have that moral and intelleotval 
equipment which would enable them to rise superior to their disad- 
vantages. Were all these persons better prepared spiritually and 
intell^ually, they could, no doubt, do much, not only among people 
of their own class, but among others also. Friendly relations are 
generally preserved between the Christian minority and the great 
mass of non-Christians ; but the preponderating influence is with the 
larger body, so that it is often aifficult and sometimes apparently 
impossible to prevent converts from reverting to their former faith. 
We are yet in the Abrahamic day in Garhwal ; the day of Joshua 
deems yet distant. 

Compared with the year 1903, the returns for 1904 show some 
ipcrease under each head reported, with two exceptions ; the number 
of agents is four less than last year, and the collections reported are 
just naif the amount reported in 1903. But ihe amount contributed by 
the people Is reallv more this year than last ; the apparent decrease 
is due to the fact that special donations made by the Missionary-in- 
Charge have not been entered this year; last year they were. The 
number of pupils in Sunday Schools has risen from 931 to 968 ; and 



GARHWAL DISTRICT. 71 

« 

in the week-day schools from 327 to 408. The Boys' High School at 
Pauri has risen from 116 to 1 50; and the success of the school in the 
University Matriculation examination is attracting a number of new 
pupils. 

If it should be aslsed, *' what are the agents of the Mission doing' 
to carry out the purpose of the Missionary Society ? " The answer is 
this: 

1, By maintainiog the public ordinances of the church and by" 
pastoral work among the Christians they are trying to preserve and 
instruct and edify those who are professed Christians ; and also to 
reclaim a number who have lapsed from the faith. 

S« By evangelistic work in villages, by the roadside, at fairs and 
along the pilgrim routes they are trylog to teach and preach Christ to 
the non-Christian people 

3. By selling and distributing Christian books and tracts they 
are trying to reach the reading portion of the community. 

4. By day schools, in which non-Christians as well as Christians 
receive secular and religious ins ruction, and which are a means of 
bringing the agents of Mission into friendly and educating ioterconrse 
witii all classes of the community. 

As the work suiTers more or less from the comparative inefSciency 
of some of the Mission agents, so also is the difficulty of raising up 
effective workers a source of great perplexity. Inefficient help can be 
had in abundance ; hut such help always perpetuates itself and is worse 
than none at all. Where there are efficient evangelists, inefficient men 
can be trained up in work and made effective- Better facilities for 
developing good workers are much needed. Men from the plains are 
useless for evangelistic work here. We must raise up our own supply 
or remain destitute. Within the past three years seven men from the 
Mission staff have died, and their places are only partially filled. 
These seven men left twenty-seven children all, with two exceptions,' 
voung and unprovided for; and everybody expects the Missionary- 
in-Charge to assume the responsibility of supporting them. 



Hardoi IHstrict. 

Rbv. Samuel Tupper, Presiding ^2der.— Thank Qod, another 
year of His service has been passed. As I was a delegate to the 
Central Conference at Madras, 1 could not begin my touring in the 
District before the 25th of February, after which I visited every 
circuit and many sub circuits and held several meetings in conjunction 
with first quarterlies of the District, and my tpur was over by the end 

of April* 

The prevalence of plague in a number of circuits, has again been 
a great hindrance in our work, as many of our workers had to leave 
their stations, and those who remained at their places, found the 
towns and villages quite empt^, and thus had few left whom they 
might teach. In every circuit there have been some baptisms and a 
number of people have received new life. T.iere are about thr«e 
hundred real enquirers in nearly all the places, and it is hoped they 
will soon come to the fold of the True Shepherd. 

I have visited every circuit several times this vear. Our work is 
especiallv among three classes :— ^Chamars,' ' Pasis ' and *Lal Begis.' 

The following is a brief summary of the statistics of the District : 
—Baptisms 113, Christian community 1,674, Hindustani members of 
Conference 6, Local Preacher i 22, Exhorters 24, other workers (includ- 
ing unpaid workers) 35, women 59, total of men and women 146 ; villages 
la which Christians live 115, villages in which we work regularly 397. 



72 PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

The work of the District is divided into nine circuits. There is no 
missionary in the District ; girls' schools four, with a total attendance 
of 120 ; Boys' schools 29, attendance 703 ; Sunday Schools 80, pupils 
6,650. 

This year we collected six hundred and twelve rupees from the 
churched for pastors, and tlie total amount, collected in the District, 
was one thousand one hundred and sixteen rupees. 

Twenty-one Day Schools, out of thirty-three, are helnfp supported 
by Mr. John G. Holmes of Pittsburg, Pa., U. S. A , and ten famine 
girls of 1897 are being supported by the Holmes' Fund. The sad news 
of Mr. Holmes' sudden death has reached us, for which the Christians 
of the District are very sorry. We do not know whether any arrange- 
ment has been made by him for his work in the District, if not. all his 
schools and the ten famine girls will be thrown back on Mission 
Funds, the monthly expense is rupees one hundred and ninety. 

The Sabbath is observed by our Christians; the day-labourers also 
observe the Sabbath. In four places day-labourers give to the 
preachers one pice a day, every one of them, for six days, to use the 
amount for Sun .ay. 

The Mohalla, Bazar and \fela preaching has been done through- 
out the year, and thus thousands heard the Gospel and believed in 

heart. 

There are sixty girls in the Hardoi Girls' School and seven day- 
scholars, with eight women in the Training School 

Mrs. Bishop Parker and Mids E. Eoge attended our District 
Conference and Isai Mela for several days ; during the time they 
examined our Girls' School also, nearly all the girU did verv well in 
their examinations, and the highest class had four pupils ; all of them 
passed the Upper Primary examination, and both the ladies arranged 
that those four girls should be sent up to the Moradabad Girls' High 
School, so they will go there by the end of the year. And they held 
meetings for girls and village women, and all were greatly benefited 
by their help. 

No other Mission works in the District but the American Methodist 

Episcopal Mission, but for a year and a half two members of the 

** Brethren" have been coming to our Para, Manjhla tkud Digiya 

Christians to induce them to join them, but they have not succeeded 

with the exception of a turned-out family of four souls. 

It is a very grf-at pleasure to the Hardoi Church to hear that our 
beloved Bishop F. W. Warne, D.D., has raised a good sum of money 
to build a new large Church at Hardoi ; the Hardoi Church also has 
Gontributed Rs. 400 towards it. 

There are eight chapters of the Epworth League: the Ready Workers' 
bands have been very helpful in the work. 

A careful inquiry from the workers has elicited the fact, that there 
has been in the Christian community, as a whole, spiritual growth 
during the year. 

I am exoeedinefly thankful to my Heavenly Father for all the help 
and guidance in His glorious work throughout the year. Our prayer 
is that He may greatly bless all the workers of the District, that every 
one of them may win scores of souls for Christ Jesua.—Amen, 



Moradabad District. 

Rev. L. a. Corb, Presiding Elder. -The District, in shape and 
conveniences of travel, is an ideal one. A railway runs in a north- 
westerly direction through the entire District while two branches go 
out from Moradabad— one to Chandausi and Aligarh to the south, 
and the other directly west to Delhi. Another will soon be built from 



MORADABAD DISTRICT, 73 

MorftdabAd to Kashipur, and the Terai country, thus opening up the 
part most difficult of access. In addition to this, four metalled roads 
ran out from the central city to the different parts of the District thus 
bringing wUhin easy reach not only the larger places and heads of 
circuit , but making it possible for the Presiding Elder to reach with 
little diflSculty the more remote villages. 

The area of the District is 2,703 square miles or about half the size 
of Connecticut and Rhode Island, while the population is 1, 500,0o0, 
or about equal to the combined population of the two above 
named States, together with Delaware. The three leading religious 
seots are Hindus, Mohammedans and Christians, ranking in the 
O'der named. The Hindus are to the Mohammedans as two to one, 
while the two combined are one hundred times as many as the Christ- 
ians. The latter number 13,293. There have been 1,322 baptisms of 
which about half are in the Moradabad Circuit. Brother Faucett, 
who has charge, has been active in caring for the village work, aod 
one result of this has been the larger number of baptisms in the circuit. 
It has been the policy to restrain the work of baptizing, save in those 
places where they can look carefully after the new converts Had it 
not been for the lack of men to teach and care for the new recruits the 
number of baptisms might easily have been three thousand. 

The District contains six cities with a population each of more 
than 10,000. Of these Moradabad with 75,000 is the largest. After 
these come 161 towns with a population each of from 1,000 to 10,000, 
while there are no less than 2,500 villages with a population lesis than 
1,000 each. Our Christian community is distributed through more 
than 1,000 villages, towns and cities. Inquirers are reported in 275 
other villages in which as yet no Christians are found. 

This is one of the oldest districts in this mission field. By 
common consent of other mis^^ion bodies we are left, in entire posses- 
sion. No other orgaoized Mission has any representative within our 
borders if we except the Salvation Army which, by the way, works 
lareely among our converts. This old field is commonly supposed to 
be Fully ** occupied '' by us. Let us see how the case stands. Out of 
a' total of 3,674 cities, towns and villages, we work regularly In only 
1,275. It should not be inferred that our people never visit any of the 
places other than those mentioned. They do occasional y go Into other 

S laces, but only into few of them and at Irregular Intervals. But we 
o not have anything like regular work outside of the number men- 
tioned. Again, in most of the places visited, our workers rarely go to 
any, save the iwo or three lower classes of the village who do not in 
most cases coni^tltute more than one-fourth of the population of the 
village. The working staff who are paid by the Mission or supported 
by the native church, so that being thus freed from other care, they 
may devote their entire time to the work of the Lord, number 132 men. 
Dividing the entire number of people amon^^ these workers we have to 
each man 11,500 souls to whom be is the only messenger of salvation. 
But from this number must be eliminated those who are tied down to 
Institutional work and those who by reason of humble educational 
attainments or caste relation are unfitted for work, save among the 
lowest classes The force capable of effective evangelistic work, 
becomes reduced to about 85 This gives to each man nearly 20,000 
non*CbriBtians to whom he is to preach the Gospel if all the inhabit- 
ants of this so-called '^occupied '* territory are to hear it at all. It is 
manifestly impossible for one man to make but a small part of this 
number to hear and to intelligently understand the message. But it 
must be still further remembered that each of these men is engaged 
most of his time in caring for and building up our great and ever- 
increasing Christian community which must ever remain our first 
concern. So that no one can give more than a small fraction of his 



74, PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

( ■ ■ ' . 

time to work among non-Cbristians. Making the best possible distri- 
bulioQ of men and time, I do not believe it is possible for us with our 
present force to reach more than one-fourth of the non-Christian 
element in the District. These facts are to me appalling ! We are 
practically saying to all other Missions that we occupy this field and 
are ready to hold ourselves responsible for the salvation of all th«N9e 
souls, only one-fourth of whom have any chance of getting from us 
an intelligent understanding of the way of life. In view of these 
conditions, and this is not the only District where this state of things 
prevails, would it not be well for us to look carefully and see whether 
ft is the voice of the Spirit or of human ambition that inspires us lo 
join in the cry '* on to Thibet ? " We need*to beware lest the daszle of 
the newer fields blind us to the condition and needs of the millions 
?^om Ood has put in our care. 

The baptisms reported above have been with few exceptions from 
among the sweepers. The Mazhdbi Sikh clan are all Christianized. 
There are many inquirers in the different circuits from the better 
classes of Hindus and Mohammedans who are ready to be baptized if 
we could arrange for their protection and support when their people 
cast them out. 1 have not made a careful estimate of the o umber who 
on these terms would be ready to come to us and receive baptism, and 
I should say it will easily reach two hundred. Although I am con- 
vinced that a larg^ proportion of these are real seekers after the truth, 
I am not yet convinced that this is the best way to deal with them 
even were the funds uecessarv at hand. Converts from the better 
classes must suffer the loss of all things—home, family, lands, friends; 
all must be sacrificed for Christ's sake. Whether it is better to provide 
a refuee to which such may flee and find food and clothAs, or say to 
them." *This is your cross; bear it for J sus' sake,'' is one of the 
unsolved problems of missionary effort. 

This year we set out to push the work especially among the 
Chamars and Jats. The former of these twt> classes numbers about 
200,000 and the latter 60,00<). The Chamars, though tbey derive their 
name from tanning leather, are, as a matter of fact, mostly small 
cultivators. Only a few here and there have become Christians. But 
the whole class is open to Gospel effort, while almost half the whole 
number might fairly be couT)ted as inquirers. The preacher will 
always find an audience of interested listeners among them. Many 
Chamar villages could be pointed out where they are in every thing 
but in name Christians. In many others they obey much of our 
Christian doctrine, and it would be hard to detect the difference 
between them and some villagers who have received Christian baptism. 
But tliey are not yet ready to come out openly. They are so near and 
yet are not willing to take the final step. Much the same might be 
said of many of the Jat people. They are an industrious thrifty class 
of land-holders and cultivators. We have earnestly longed and 
prayed and laboured this year, as not in other years, that there might 
be a break among these two classes. All indications point to a break 
in the near future, but so far it has not t>egun. When the time does 
come tbey will fiock into the Kingdom by whole villages Our efforts 
to win them must not eprow lax for the attention of the Arya Samajists 
is being attracted to these people and they are beginning an active, 
aggressive work among them. We cannot afford to let a people who 
have been the subjects of so much labour and prayer go into the hands 
of the Samajists. 

Idolatrous practices among our people are gradually disappearing. 
Progress in this direction is slow, but definite and steady. Nor is it 
Strang^ considering the tremendous hold it has laid on all things that 
concern the lives of the people. Hardly a social custom or act in 
ordinary life but has soipe idolatrous character. In the sowings, and 



MORADABAD DISTRICT. t5 

reapings, the comiDgs and goings, the pleasure of some one of the 
ioDumerable deiiies must be consulted. At our District Conference 
filly-two shrines were reported as having been destroyed for the most 
part by their former devotees. In odc village recently one of the 
weaker brethren on a special occasion had prepared a goat to be saori- 
fioedon the shrine of the Lai Guru. When all was ready (or the final 
act in the sacrificial rite, while the man's attention was attracted else- 
where, a wolf seized tbe sacrifice and made away to the jungle with it. 
Great consternation followed. The pastor-teacher was attracted to 
the scene by the uproar and promptly used the incident as a text for 
a sermon against idolatry and showed them that if the Lai Guru was 
unable to defend the offering they had made to him what could they 
expect from him in the time of their own need. The incident made a 
deep, and I trust, lasting impression on the minds of the people in that 
ana near-by villages. 

After finishing the first round of Quarterlies, in company with Mrs. 
Core and Miss Means and a band of preachers, we spent the greater 
part of March and April in an evangelistic tour through several of 
the circuits. For the work of the day we divided our force into a 
number of bands for village to village work. For bazar-preaching 
we usnally united our forces. In this way the Gospel was preached 
in a hundred or more villages and, as a rule, to ail classes. At night 
we showed the Magic lantern in some public place in the town or 
village where we were encamped. Men and some times women too, of 
all castes and creeds, came out in great crowds to see the pictures. In 
many of these services there were as many as 1,200 people present to 
whom we preached Christ through both eye and ear as long as voice 
and strength remained. The people listened attentively and did not 
tire. It has been my experience that a properly conducted magic- 
lantern service which does not degenerate into a tamaahaj is one of tbe 
most effective possible ways of presenting Christ to the average non- 
Christian audience. 

In the course of this tour we caused a good many shrines to be 
broken down. One in particular deserves special mention. In the 
village of Ritari, near Sambbal, is a shrine built to an evil spirit, 
which some years ago gained some notoriety in connection with the 
deatbs of Miss Kowe and Rev. Bhola Sin^h. The shrine was by the 

germission of the people torn down by the Tatter. It so happened that 
e fell ill and died the same day. Tbis strange coincidence was con- 
strued by the ignorant people to be the work of the outraged spirit 
whose shrine had been violated. When six weeks later Miss Howe who 
was present at the time when the shrine was destroyed, after a short 
illness died, then there were no doubts left as to the power of this 
spirit to do evil among men and the shrine was re-built much larger 
than ever and surmounted with a hideous nondescript image and 
decorated with peacock feathers. At the close of our service in this 
village one of the Christians of tbe village boldly advanced and 
demolished the shrine. Many were aghast at his temerity, but so far 
no death has occurred that could by any amount of ingenuity be 
connected with the destruction of the altar. The charm has been 
broken and the prestige of the evil spirit has suffered a blow from 
which it will never recover. 

In a village near Amroha recently the leading Christian man 
of the place gave us notice that on a certain date he proposed giving 
a feast to some of his friends and relatives, and asked a number of us 
preachers to be present to read the Injil (Gospel) after the manner 
of the Pandits on similar occasions. The Gospel of Matthew was read 
that night till near daylight to about fifty listeners. Other meetings 
of a similar nature have been held in other places. I was surprised 
and delighted, in September, to see the progress that had been made 



^6 PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

in 8 mnhalla in Kanth. The last time I was there some two years 
ago, my heart was pained and saddened at the utter indififerenoe and 
lack of any sigrns of spiritual hunger. I came away feeling very 
discouraged. This time it was different. All the people joined 
heartily in the singing. Two or three led in prayer ; a dozen recited 
Scripture verses, and all were deeplv interested In the service. The 
preacher had interested himself in the people and they in turn had 
become interested in the welfare of their own souls. The same chanees 
have been noted in other circuits. Notably in the Dang mohaUa, 
in Moradabad, in some parts of the Chandausi work, and in the 
Sambhal and Rasulpur circuits, and in one or two villages of the 
Thakurdwara work. These are the signs along the way that cheer the 
heart of the worker. 

The problem of self-support must come in for a lar&fe share of 
time and thought, for it is oue the foundation-stones of the future 
church. There has been slow but substantial progress In this line 
of work. We are pushinsr this to the front in every village. The people 
are learning to give. In the Kundarki Circuit two non-employds 
are sowing about one-eighth of an acre each, and giving all the pro- 
duce to the Lord's cause- We hope this year to persuade many more 
to do the same. The contributions from the people themselves has 
been Ks 308. This will average about 4 pies per head for the entire 
Christian community : or 20 pies per wage-earner. This seems like 
'* much ado about notning,'* and is in fact dealing with small matters. 
But we feel that we are working for the future, and if the work now be 
done properly, it will mean thousands of rupees to the future church 
for each pie to the present one. Foundations must be laid with great 
care, though they do not make much outward show 

There nave been an unusual number Df hindrances to our work 
this year. Some disaffected leaders have been active in tryiog to 
turn the hearts of the people back to the gods of their fathers and 
have met with a small degree of success in a few places. But Satan 
always over-reaches himself, and this work has had a good effect in 
binding more closely the Christians and showing them the necessity 
of personal effort. Persecution and false Court cases have abounded 
this year as in no other year in my experience- Some of our 
people have been publicly beaten and many more imprisoned 
on what I am sure were false charges. In several cases the land- 
owners have compelled the Christians to either re- build the 
old shrine or leave their land and village homes. Some few 
have complied, but by far the larger number have refused and taken 
the conseiouence. Some have been deprived of their lands and sent 
adrift, while many have been unjustly placed under special police 
surveillance. In hundreds of villages the water question is troubling 
us. Since t>ecoming Christians the people are no longer eiYen water 
from the village wells and must now drink from fetid tanks. I have 
seen them getting water from pools where it was unspeakably vile. In 
a few places we have helped them to dig wells, but the limitation of our 
resources makes it impossible to relieve but a very few special cases. 

Of the institutions in Moradabad, Bro. Faucett writes : — 

The Bif>hop Parker Memorial High School is one of the oldest in 
India, having oeen founded by the late Bishop Parker, in about 1862. 
It was his umbition to make in North India a place where the sons of 
the converts to Christianity could get an education that would be at 
once Christian, and of as high educational standard as that afforded 
by the schools of Government. With that good generalship that 
characterized all his actions, he selected Mortuiabad as the atrateffic 
centre at which to locate such a school. Later events amply justified 
the wisdom of this move, for Moradabad is not only the centre of 
the Christian population of North India, but the centre as well as of 



MORADABAD DISTRICT, 77 

Ihemost promising work of all this field of Hindustani-speftkiog 
people. 

In addition to 100 Christian boys there are enrolled over 240 
Hindu and Mohamedan pupils from every class and caste in the city. 
The school is opened each day with the reading of the Bible and 

S raver, then there is a regular course of Bible study for each class 
ally. At the end of the term an examination is held in which Christ- 
ians and non-Christians alike participate. 

Our Christian boys and young men live in what we call the 
'^.Boarding'' about half a mile distant from the day school building. The 
Pastor of the Church is in charge of the boarding quarters and lives 
in the same compound with the hoys. About one-third of the boys 
are supplied with clothes from the Mission, while the remainder get 
them from home, and as many as can pay any fees whatever, do so 
according to a fixed scale or rate of fees as per income of parent. 

We have funds for the support of about 100 boys, while we have 
the plant and teaching staff for at least fifty more. Boys are applying 
every day for admittance. We have to say, ** No, we have no money.'" 
The school is their only hope of rising. We are compelled to stand 
by helplessly and see many a bright hopeful boy sink back into the 
intellectual and spiritual darkness from which he was trying to rise. 
The place is ready for the boys and the boys are ready for the place, 
but the money is lacking with which to do this work for God ana 
humanity. 

It requires only $150 to support a boy a year in our school, 
while for $300 'a permanent sholarship may be endowed. 

Who will lend to the Lord by giving to his poor We wish to thank 
our coworkers in the home-land who have stood by us so nobly and 
helped on the cause of the Master by their money and prayers. A 
goodly number of patrons have come forward and taken scholarships 
in the Christian Boys* Boarding-School, and thus we have been able 
nut only to keep it going as it nas been in the past two years, but 
even to increase the number of scholarship holders. The same may 
be said of the work of the District. Mission funds have hardly been 
sttiBcient to maintain the work as it already exists. Friends in the 
home-land have made a generous response to our appeals, and thus 
by their kindness we have been able to put on some new workers and 
to re-mata some old stations which for want of funds have had to 
be practically abandoned in the past few years. We v^sh to take 
this opportunity of expressing our high appreciation of the work 
these faithful fellow-workers are doing in our midst. 

The year under review has not brought the full realization of all 
the high hopes and aspirations with which we began it. Our hearts 
were set on seeing a very definite and marked improvement in 
the spiritual condition of the workers and common people. As I 'look 
over the field I cannot escape the conviction that the progress of our 
people in spiritual things has not been wholly satisfactory. The 
enemy has sowed tares in more thsn one fair and promising field. 
Demases who have *' loved the things of this present world" and 
Alexander the Coppersmith have been too much in evidence. 

But, on the other hand, there is a band of as faithful men 
and women in this District as ever followed any leader in this land. 
The outlook is always brightest, not when I sit in my study and 
meditate on the weaknesses and defections of some from .whom I had 
reason to hope better things, but when in the midst of the work, in 
closest touch with my fellow- workers and with the common people. 
Close sympathetic contact with the people, seeing their humble lives 
and struggles and marking their progress a6 they<struggle feebly it may 
be, against the old life of sin and degredation and strive to rise in- 
to the new life in Christ, witnessing their persecutions and losses for 



t8 PRESIDING ELDERS* REPORl^S. 

/ 

Hif Bake— this is not only one'of the best tonlos for one's own spiritual 
life, but it gives one a larger optimism as to the future of the Ohureh 
of Christ in India. 



Oodh Dbtrict 

Rbv. J. W. Robinson, Presiding Elder.'-^The boundaries of the 
Oadh District were changed st the last annual conference by the 
addition of the entire work on the east and north of the Gogra river, 
formerly known as the Gonda district. This leaves us at present with 
all of the political province of Oudh except two zillas, and so far as tiie 
Methodist Episcopal Church is concerned makes us responsible for the 
enlightenment ana final conversion of tea millions of people, occupying 
•bout twenty-one thousand square miles of territorv. In the eastern 
part of the district the Church Missionary Society nas an extensive 
work, and also in the centre of the province worlc is being done in 
places by both the Cburch and the Wesley an Missionary societies. But 
the entire northern and western, and parts of the central portion are 
left enUrely to us and our care. 

The present Presidiog Elder did not return from America until 
about the middle of August, and until that time the district had been 
under the care of Rev. C. L, Bare, the Principal of the Reid Christian 
College, and much of the success of the year has been due to his 
efforts. The diificulties we have met have been more than usual. 
Death has been busy among us, claiming workers and people alike. 
At the District Confereoce, held in November, it was reported that we 
had lost in this way a total of fourteen workers, two missionaries, 
two preachers-in-charge and ten others. Two hundred of our lay 
members have also died, many of them from the black plague. We 
have also had that worse affliction, the failure of character, in a 
number of our lower grade workers, and four men have had to be 
dismissed from the service and three disciplined. But the great 
hindrance to the work has been the prevalence of the black plague 
in almost all parts of the district and the prejudice it has created 
against us. It is firmly believed by the poorer people, and often by 
the more educated also, that the Christians, for certain reasons, have 
propagated the plague and are responsible for its virulence. The 
reasons assiffned^or the Christians doing such things vary widely, and 
often the only reason assigned is mere vindictiveness. One story, 
evidently basisd on the feeling in many parts of the east that when the 
great die others must accompany them to the Beyond, is to the effect 
that when the Queen died the Government decided that so many hund- 
red thousand people must be slain so that her spirit might have 
proper attendants in entering the future world, and that after careful 
consideration it was decided that these lives should be taken in such 
a way as not to arouse the suspicion and anger of the people, so 
this dread disease was inaugurated for the purpose. Because 
of their more cleanly habits oar people have largely escaped, and 
this has only added to the conviction that the Christians are re- 
sponsible. However, our preachers are careful and as often as possible 
helpful, and as a consequence the animosity of the people is passing 
away. But the fact remains that this attitude of the people has reduced 
our Bunday School attendance and also the number of baptisms, and 
time after time hss subjected our workers to persecution. 

A brief review of the statistics shows that we have in the district 
a Christian community of three thousand three hundred and fifty-five, 
and that during the year two hundred and forty-eight persons, mostly 
from Hinduism, were baptized on confession of faith after instruction 



OUDH DISTRICT. 79 

Mid testing. We have twenty-seven League chapters with eleven hundred 
members, two hundred and eight Sunday schools with ten thousand 
one hundred attendants, and thirty-nine schools of various grades 
witli an attendance of two thousand. For ministerial support on Uie 
district a total of almost three thousand five hundred rupees was 
raised, and the total collections from all the circuits amounted to about 
six thousand rupees, three thousaad of which was from the Hindustani 
people. 

Toe work on the seventeen circuits of the district has been prose- 
oiited with varying success. The death of Rev. Chhote Lall early in 
the vear left the important circuit of Rae Bareilly ifrithout a preacher- 
in^narge, and circumstances made it seem necessary to leave the 
plaee vacant for the remainder of the year. Rev. M. Stephen, pastor 
of IheLucknow Hindustani Church, acted as preacher- io -charge, and 
in spite of the situation comes up to conference with a ffood report. 
The preacher-in-charge of the Tikaitnagar circuit also died early in 
the year, and the work was added to the burdens of the Harabankt 
preacher and has been well looked after by him. As a rule, all our 
preaohers-in-charge have felt the responsibility of their position and' 
have striven to meet the difficulties and remove the obstacles that 
eonfronted the work. In what was formerly the Gonda district the 
work is very much undermanned, and the wonder is that so much has 
been accomplished under such unfavourable circumstances It is 
homed that this year every circuit on that side of the river may be 
motoroed. 

There are two or three movements on the district that are especial* 

aenconraging. In September in the Lakhimpur and Sitapur circuits a 
an of Thalnir traders, comprising about thirty persons, accepted 
Christianity, and the outlook is that a number of similar clans, 
iwlated to this, will take the same step, as the matter has been under 
eonsideration among them for some time. The chief difficulty in the 
fray of the development of this work is the nomadio habit of the 
people. 

A second encouraging point is the work among a criminal class 
called the Sainsivas, segregated by the Government in the Lakhimpur 
eircuit. At first the English official in charge refused to allow us 
nccess to this people, but persistent effort has at last gained us access, 
and we are beginning work hopefully. The people would almost to a 
man to-day accept Christian baptism, but it would be with the lurking 
hope that the missionary would be able to rid them of the strict 
Government supervision they so dislike, but we believe that this 
worldly motive may be so used that along with it will arise a desire to 
be free from the sin that causes the punishment as well as from the 
punishment. The work is in experienced hands, and we hope before 
many years to be able to report that the criminal class has been 
broken up and its members made over into upright Christians. 

A third most interesting work is along tne border of Nepaul, the 
closed land, and while it is directed chiefly with the aim of reaching 
the Taru people, it is in reality rAaching the real Nepalese as well. 
Three stations are located near the border line, one at Sonarlpur, one 
at Nepaul ganj and one at Ch and an pur and Tulsipur. Each of these 
stations is supported by special gifts, and would have to be closed, 

Srobably, but for these gifts. At Sonaripur the work is new, but the 
rst -fruits have this year been gathered in two baptisms. At Nepaul- 
gan] the work is prosperous, and in spite of the order to the contrary 
our workers carry the Gospel into Nepaul, and we have living across 
the line two or three scores of Nepalese and Pahari Christians. It is 
hoped soon to somewhat strengthen this work. The work at Chandan- 
pnr is carried on from Tulsipur on account of the almost impossibility 
of our plains people living in the former place for the larger part of 



80 PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

the year. The ultimate Bolution of the problem is to raise up a worker 
from the people themselves. This was attempted a short time ago and 
a youDg man sent to Oonda and taught. He returned to his work, but 
disappeared from sight soon after, and has never been heard of since. 
Wbetner he was slain bv the wild animals, so numerous there, or 
killed by the people in their opposition to the Gospel, will probably 
never be known. Formerly there were a number of converts at Chan- 
danpur, but one of the financial cuts left us without the funds to carry 
on the work and most of the people drifted away during the famine of 
1897. Recently our worker at Tulsipur seized the opportunity of 
crossing the border that was offered him and went as far as a valley 
called Oeokar, and was surprised to find a number of our Christian 
families settled down in tnat part of Nepaul. They greeted him 
warmly, confesssed themselves Christians from Chandanpur and told 
him that in the valley there were perhaps a hundred of them altogether. 
Napaul is closed to us. but we are hoping that by some means or other 
we may be able to send a teacher to these people of the disper^-^ion. 

In speaking of the evangelistic work of the district, it would be 
impostible to omit mention of the work among women without doing a 
great injustice to one of the most efficient arms of our service. In 
almost every case the quiet wife goes along with her husband and 
with her enters a ray of light and of hope into many a dark home and 
grief-burdened heart. Almost without exception these Christ! an women 
are given cordial welcome into the homes of the people, and while few 
baptisms result, still it is known that in the homes and the zenanas 
there are literally hundreds of women who, having given up idolatry 
and its evils, are really Christians at heart, and as soon as the time 
comes when they can openly accept Christ without thereby losing 
home and kindred ; great numbers of these women will accept Christian 
baptism. 

While our statistics show that we have a full two thousand boys 
and girls in our various institutions of learning, they also show that 
of this number only four hundred and eighty-seven are Christians, and 
as a good number of these are from other districts the disturbing fact 
is evident that arather small percentage of our youug people are learn- 
ing anything outside the ordinary routine of their lives. As the 
elevation of the Christian community so much depends on the educa- 
tion of our people, we should endeavour to improve present conditions. 
If we had more small schools, no doubt, we could get more of the boys 
and girls to begin studying, though the extreme poverty of the people 
and the fact that even small children have a part in earning the family 
income makes the problem a difficult one. 

Aside from our small schools we have a number of educational 
institutions within the district, and these to a very large extent absorb 
the time and energy of almost the entire missionary body. The 
statistics show eight missionaries within the district and eleven Wo- 
man's Foreign Missionary Society missionaries, but the reality is 
that during the past year just one of all this number was not tied 
down by institutional work, and in most cases work that has to do not 
merely with the district and conference but with all Hindi and Hindu- 
stani-speaking India. 

The English Church at Lucknow has had a good year, and there 
is a fine band of young people growing up into our work. The Dasehra 
meetings under Bishop Oldham resulted in great good to this congre- 
gation and added a good number to the list of probationers. The 
aeath of the pastor's wife early in the .vear was a great loss to our 
community and also to our working force. 

The Hindustani Church in Lucknow has had a good year, with 
splendid congregations and an entirely self-supporting administration. 
7%e Hindustani part of the Dasehra meetings were exceptionally 



OUDH DISTRICT. 81 

profiiable, and ibis Church seems to be destined to become to our 
fiUodustftni work in this part of India what the Eofflish-speaking 
Churoh has been for over a generation, a seed-sowing place of greatest 
importance. 

The reports of the various schools and other institutions will be 
given by the principals in charge, with the exception of the boys' 
schools in Sitapur and Bahraich. The former of these is very 
soooeasful, and in spite of the fact that it has to compete with a well- 
equipped Government school nearby, maintains a splendid attendance 
of non-Christians. There are tbirty-four Christian ooys in the board- 
ing department here. At Rae Bareilly we also have a small Anglo- 
Vernacular school with a doa^n Christian lads and three times that 
many non-Christians attending. The school at Bahraich is vernacu- 
lar, but has an attendance of forty Christian bovs and over a hundred 
non-Cliristians. There are also small schools in Barabankl and 
Lakhimpur, and the Oonda Boys' school, while attended by but few 
Christians, is doing a splendid work among its nearly one hundred 
day •scholars. 

The Home for Homeless Women, the Deaconess Home and the Zena- 
na work in Lucknow have all prospered. Miss Ingram alone carried 
the heavy burden of the first two mentioned almost all the year and an 
mggressive work was done. Thirty-eight forsaken women found a 
friendly shelter in the Home during the year, and a larger number 
than usual were found places in life where they would be cared for. 
In connection with the Deaconess Home, work was done among both 
the English and Hindustani-speaking Christians of the station. This 
work is a most important one, and the ladies in charge deserve the 
highest praise for the innumerable and tactful ways in which they seek 
to get hold of and rescue the fallen and to save the younff people 
from snares that beset tbem in this large city. We hope the time will 
never come when this great work need again be stopped for lack of 
workers. 

Formerly connected with the Home, but this year in the charge of 
Mrs* Guthrie, is the Zenana work and the city schools for girls. 
The ravages of the plague have made it almost impossible to keep 
the schools going, but the end of the year finds three of them going 
splendidly. The Zenana work is limited only by the number of our 
workers, and while the women are received kindly, even gladly, by 
the Hindus and Mohammedans whom they visit, they have to be 
content with the knowledge that many of their learners are at heart 
Christians without expecting many baptisms, for the social conditions 
in India are such that a woman is entirely under the control of her 
husband in home affairs, and an open confession of Christ by accept- 
ing Christian baptism means immediate expulsion from the family 
and loss of home and children. We do not blame these women for 
hesitating, and as we have no place in which we could care for them 
if they did come out, the question is a most difficult one to solve. 

The two colleges and three high schools in Lucknow have had a 
splendid year, notwithstanding the fact that once the plague got with- 
in our boys' dormitories. 'Hie examinations have given splendid 
results and botJh the boys' college and that for girls now stand very 
near the top of the list of successful schools in these provinces. The 
religious atmosphere of the schools has also been gooa, and the boys 
and girls thus being trained in mind, and character, are the hope of 
our Church for the future. 

Isabella Thoburn Hiqh School. 

Of the Isabella Thoburn College, Miss Nichols writes as follows :^ 
I arrived in Lucknow in October, and as Miss Hoge wan needed for 



82 PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

distriot work I at once took charge of the College and High Sohooi. 
The missiooaries at present in the Colleflre are Miss Robinaon and 
Miss Siogh. Miss Slddal was in the College for a few months, but 
returned to America. Miss Mudge has just arrived and now, with 
Miss Sircar's help, the college will be well manned Miss Northrup 
has given all her time to the Normal department, and this department 
is booming of great importance. Miss Cartwright had charge of the 
Kindergarten, and it was with great sorrow thai we lost her, through 
death, early in the year. Miss Brouse had to take both the Hiirh 
School and Normal work, and on the death of Miss Cartwright she 
also took over the Kindergarten work. 

The number of girls in the High School has averaged from one 
hundred and eighty to one hundr^ and ninety, over a hundred of 
whom were boarders. Eleven girls were sent up for the Government 
examinations, of whom all but one passed, and two passed with 
honors. From all colleges one thousand and forty-five students took 
the Government Entrance examination, and one of our girls passed 
the highest of all that number. 

The number of small ch^dren in the Kindergarten has been large, 
and as usual there has been a mixture of all races and classes in 
study and play. 

8pe«^iai attention is ffiven to the physical training of the girls, 
every grade having a class in calisthenics daily, and the older girls 
play games at evenings with the teachers. The interest in exercise is 
increasing yearly, and as a consequence the health of the school ia 
better. Singing lessons are given every day and some of the girls 
are learning to play the organ, an accomplishment that proves most 
helpful when they get out into mission work. Miss Hart has begun a 
course of weekly lectures on astronomy, and aside from the general 
information thus gained the girls can already distinguish some 
twenty constellations. 

The junior Y. W. C. A. have kept the girls in touch with 
missionary needs and the current news of the day. The Sunday 
prayer meetings have been very helpful and a real Improvement in 
spiritual intelligence as well as in ubristian living is clearly seen. 

In 1903 the Government officially recognised our Normal Course 
of study and provided for certificates to m given on the completion of 
a two years' course of study. Oar first candidate passed the examina- 
tion creditably and is now teaching Three are being prepared for 
this year's examination and seven for the next. These students are 
almost without exception girls and young women of force and character 
and they have before them unusual opportunities for scattering the 
blessings of rbristian education. 

In the College proper, as we look back over the year, we realize 
that in spite of vicissitudes the good hand of our God has been upon 
us for good. The number in the classes has increased from eighteen 
to twenty -three, and this increase with those in the Normal department 
makes us very crowded. Teachers have had to give up their rooms to 
girls and the hospital has been converted into a dormitory. This 
shows the need of adding a second storey to the old part of our home. 
Two new portraits have been added to our picture gallery, one of Mr. 
Hazzard, of California, a friend and benefactor, and the other of 
Mrs Crandon, who has done so much for us. 

The result of the Government examinations were vnry good 
indeed. We sent up only one student for the B A., b t out of the whole 
number of two hundred and twenty who went up for this examination 
she stood second in merit. Five were sent up for the F. A and all pass- 
ed, one receiving honors. Nearly twenty years ago MissTboburn wrote : 
" If India is to be saved, its women must be emancipated, and the 
hope of this emancipation for all, the key to it, is in the hand of those 



OtJt>H DISTRICT. B8 

who are already free— the Christians. As we are sent by the home socie- 
Uee so we again send theee as fellow-labourers in every department. 
The need of India is leadership from its own people, not of impnlsive 
enthusiasm nor of prejudice, but of matured judgment and conscien- 
tious convictions. Part of the work of missionaries is to accomplish 
this by training and educating character that can lead, and it is to ac- 
complish this that we have formed the first Woman's College in the 
eastern world.'' That in some measure the ideals of Miss Thoburn are 
being realized, is proved by the fact that seventy of the graduates of 
tbe Isabella Thoburn College and High School are working as assist- 
ant missionaries in dlfPerent parts of India and Burma. 

Beid Christian Coixioqe. 

Concerning tbe Reid Christian College, Bro Bare, the Principal, 
writes :—'* Our report of the year will be Tittle more than a summary of 
results. The attendance was aa follows: Nakhas High School, 105 ; 
Collegiate High School, 182 ; Business Department, 121 ; Liberal 
Arts, 59— a total of 557, This is an increase of thirty over last year, 
and of 203 in the last seven years There has also been a very gratify- 
ing increase in fees and grant-in-aid from the Government and the 
Municipality of Lucknow. 

The Business Department has continued to maintain its popularity 
and efficiency. Government sends in its clerks to be trained for 
typewriting for office work, and the monthly grant-in-aid of Rs. 100 a 
month haa been continued until the middle of next year. Graduates 
continue to go out and hold good remunerative posts all over 
NorUiem India. The loss sustained through Mr. west's leave to 
America has been fully met by Mr. T. C. Badley's coming as Manager 
of the department. Be has been a great relief to an already overwork- 
ed staff, and the department has in every way prospered under him- 

The Boarding has been taxed as never oefore to provide 
accommodation. It has been full to overflowing most of the time since 
school opened last July. Increased dormitory room is one of our 
most pressing needs at present. In the main the health of the boys has 
been good. Plague raged in the city the early part of the year and 
came into the compound and carried off two persons, but no boy in the 
Boarding Department was effected by it. But with the return of the 
plague to the city recently, it found entrance and claimed one of our 
best boys. Every precaution has been taken, and it is hoped no 
further oases will appear. 

The results in the Government examinations in the Collegiate 
School were most gratify log, seven appearing for the entrance and 
all, or the full hundred per cent , passing. All of these were Christ- 
ians. In the Liberal Arts Department fifty percent, in the Interme- 
diate and sixty-six and two-thirds in the B.A. Examination passed. 
These are all good averages. 

As to the spiritual work of the year it is our belief that Christ 
has been so taught in our daily Bible classes that many of the non- 
Chris tian students have been Idd to revere Him, if not love Him. We 
praise God for His many blessings during the year. 

Girls' Middle Schools. 

At Sitapur, under the Prlncipalship of Miss Loper, and at Gonda 
under Miss Scott, are our two eirls' middle schools and the year has 
been a good one in both. In the former there are now between eighty 
and ninety on the roll, and a good class is going up for the Govern- 
ment examiuation. In the Gonda school there has been some trouble 
in maintaining the number in the middle class so that the Government 
would continue to recognize it as a middle school and continue Ite 
grant-in-aid. The field from which this school draws its girls is 



84 PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

somewhat reatrlcted, but we hope the new year will bring larger class- 
es. In Gonda a new home has been built in connection with Uie 
school and the property otherwise improved, and the spiritual and 
moral condition of the girls is good. The Sitapur girls and their 
teachers passed through the trying ordeal early m the year of havinsf 
to leave their school buildings on account el an invasion of black 
plague. Several trying weelcs were speot in tents and grass-huts at a 
distance from the city, and great heroism was shown by the principal 
and ber helpers in Iceeping the school together under most trying 
circumstances. Here too the spiritual condition of the girls is encour- 
aging. During the year a revival was held in connection with the 
school and a good number were converted and united with the Church. 

Methodist Publishinq House. 

At the beginning of the year when Mr. Thoburn went to America 
on leave Mr. Guthrie, just arrived, assumed the agency of the Me- 
thodist Publishing House. The task is a very heavy one, especially 
for one unused to India, but the new Agent has had a successful 
year and ha^ done a good worlr. Improvements in the property to 
the extent of R9. 5,000 have been completed and the efficiency of the 
plant has been enhanced by the addition of a considerable amount of 
new material to the working department. The press has paid the 
agent's salary and in addition had a profit of Rs. 11,230. The selling 
department has had a successful year and netted also something of a 
profit. All of this is used in the publication of our religions books 
and periodicals. Outside of our own Mission there is a steady de- 
mand for the periodicals the press issues and almost all of the mis- 
sions working in Upper India are helping us distribute this literature. 
Eleven different periodicals in five languages are put out, the entire 
expense of which is derived from other sources than Missionary 
Society money. The hope is that we may ultimately secure such an 
endowment for the ^^ublishing House that it will not need to do any- 
thing whatever in the way of commercial work to meet expenses. 



POibhit Dfetrict. 

G. H. Frey, Presiding Elder,— I am exceedingly thankful to 
God who ha« greatly helped me in carrying on His work in this 
district. Although the work is quite a new one to me, since I was 
appointed to it in the beginning of this year, yet I see it wonderfully 
improving. Pilibhit District comprises ten circuits, in each one of 
which a preacher-in-charge is located. 

There are sixty sub-circuits, in which there are helpers to the 
preachers- in-charge. There are six hundred and eighteen villages 
where Christians are found. 1 am thankful to God that our Christians 
live in their own houses, and being in the midst of Hindus and 
Mohammedans, spread the light of Christianity among them. We 
have two thousand and fourteen probationers, two thousand two 
hundred and eighty -three full members and one thousand eight hund- 
red and sixty-three boys— making a Christian community of six 
thousand one hundred and eighty-seven. I have advised the workers 
in this district to lay a strong foundation of the doctrines of Christ- 
ianity in the hearts of the old converts that they may entirely abandon 
their old rites and ceremonies. There were four hundred and eighty- 
seven baptisms this year. Although there were many more who were 
willing to be baptized, they were prevented from doing so for the 
fo. lowing reasons :^ 

1. The workers cannot pay regular visits to those houses where 
Qhristians live. 



PILIBHIT DISTRICT. 85 

8. That there are many workers who have other duties to per- 
form than the evanirelistio one. 

There is no doubt the workers of this district would be very much 
ezperieooed in this work if they were free from all other duties and 
ooold direct their whole attention to the spreadingr of the Gospel. 

We oould not hold the workers' meeting this year as sickness had 
rendered many of the workers unable to attend them. It visited every 
plaoe In the district from Mav to November. 

All the nreachers-in-charire held revival meetingrs in their respective 
stations. Ourine my tour I held meetiofrs for the Christians who 
had irathered from different villag^es. In the quarterly conferences I 
asked thA ministers to see that the spiritual growth of our people 
inoreased. 

In the Baheri Circuit a body of men called a Panchayat has 
been organized, which excommunicates every man who will not observe 
Christian ceremonies in the marriage of his son or daughter. 

The District Conference, which was to be held at Faridnur, could 
not take place there on account of plague. It t'>ok place at Fatehganj : 
and although it was a sudden change in what had been decided, yet 
the Conference work was carried on with accuracy and at the proper 
time. The Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Mansell of the Bareilly Theological 
Seminary were with us for two days, and rendered great help, for 
which we are thankful to them. 

There are forty-nine boys' and twenty girU' day schools in the 
Pilibhit District. The boys numbering six hundred, and the girls, 
one hundred and eighty, receive their education daily. There are 
some teaehers who have been teaching the first book for many years. 
Now I have ordered them to study the book by themselves and then 
teach their boys,— which is intended to hasten the progress of the 
students. There is a Teachers' Training School in Fatehganj where 
there are four men who are receiving their education with their wives 
to become teachers in villages. 

There are ninety-one Sunday Schools in this district, two thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-eight Christians, and one thousand four hun> 
dred and thirty-six non-Christan pupils, a total number of four thou- 
sand three hundred and twenty -four students. The Sunday School tea- 
chers study their lessons first by tbem^'elves at home and then having 
their diflBculties solved by the preacher-in-cbarge. teach the Sunday 
School children- The boys of this station sing with their teachers and 
join in the Lord's Prayer, and those who are Christians learn the ten 
commandments and the Apostles' Creed very gladly. There are two 
Leagues in this district, which are held once a month. The members 
are three hundred and ten These members are a source of help to the 
sick both physically and spiritually ; they do all they can to spread the 
glorv of Jesus Christ. 

This year we realized Rs. 814 in collections. We have a standing 
Missionary Society in the district for which we raised a collection of 
rupees forty-seven, which was paid to Dharam Sinsrh who has been 
appointed by the Society to take up the work at Sirauli. The Mis- 
sionary collection amounts to tbirty-seven rupees twelve annas; Child- 
ren's bay collection to nine rupees eight annan: Bible Society, twelve 
rupees: Sunday-School Union, eleven rupees eight annss; Pastor Fund, 
five hundred and sixty-eight; Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, 
twenty-five rupees four aonas; Miscellaneous, one hundred and three 
rupees eight annas. 

The end of this year beheld us with the presence of the Lord 
Who poured out his strength upon the workers, thereby girding them all 
to work with faith and activity in His vineyard. 




■.VH^ • ■ "»•• »v 



Tt". . - a. 
ir slihhj. . mr.z isaB»^ :r Ttt.* nmiHii^ »^.w.^->-v 



NOBTH ISDIA COHFEHENCS STATIHTICS 
CUUBCU UEMRBRSUIP 





CHRISTIAN COHHDNITV. BAPTI8US. 






Church 




1 |.!i il 

I mi 














Ukubbb- 

BHIP^ 


1 


1 






i 
1 

1 


i 


NAHBS OP CIRCUITS. 








;j 


8 
1 




3 


m 


i 


o 

II 




i_ 


1 


1 ^w 


I! 


1 


1 


i 


a'' 


HotUDABAD DlSTBICT. 








j 














Amrohk 


i m 


410 


307 


1,013 7 10 


14 




3 


17 


SO 


ao 


Babubben 


las 


154 


167 


500, 2 4 


27 




4 


31 





6 


Bihjol 


1 IK 


S87 


243 


O-.O 4 4 


66 


"s 


M 


90 


5 


9 


Cbandaasi 




SS& 


soe 


939. 13 7 


42 


9 


33 


74 


16 


16. 


Dbanaura 


171 


230 


171 


5B1 


3l 7 


SB 


11 


7 


47 


11 


18! 


GuDDSur 


932 


183 




BTO 


13: 10 




10 


9 


32 


9 


91 


Hasanpar 


871 


3B0 




801 


91 B 


13 




4 


n 


9 


9 


Eanth 


443 


£49 




1,0(M 


4 


4 


43 


37 


84 






KundarkI 


394 


313 




1,131 






12 


16 


2S 


53 


13 


Moiadabad 


l.lSl 


BOB 




8.848 


si 




131 


lOS 


816 


6S1 


45 


Naralntya 


234 


\Ai 




M4 


8 




19 


1 


i 


2S 


B 




Rajpura 


271 


140 


211 


632 


1 




SI 






25 


ir: 


8. 


&*.' ;: 


170 


80 




877 






28 


"l 


13 


42 


8 


8 


BI 


86 




811 


S 




7 


2 




9 


11 


11 


Sbahpur 


SG8 


SO 










6 








6 




Shsrltpur 


161 


m 


141 






"a 


19 


"e 


9 


34 


9 


5 


Thakurdwara 


£46 


133 




827 


5| 1 


3 


14 


24 


41 


10 


10 



FiJR TBS TEAB £^1)1^6 WITH SOtk NOVUMBETi 1904 



AND WORK. 



SUNDAT-SCUOOLH. 



, EPWORTH 
1 L.EAOUBS. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS. 



ScaOLAXB OF AIX AffiEB. 



Chjubtiahs 

♦ 

1 


Nov- = 

C^VnSTIAJIS * 

o 



1 «• 



O * 
J; 30 

cS = 






6 



f 

#8 ^ 









9 I 

S 



C 



> 9 



a 
X 



I - 



o c 

9 S 

90 "^ 



00 






B 

9 

o 



H 





^\ 




w ' 




Ci 




0. , 




%m 1 




«, 






^a 


^ 






« 


V- 



<: 



'2 






B 



' ff I 

a. I 



CO 

i 



I 9C> 



P 






se 



c 






I « 
I »< 



o 



« i 



t 



305, 
!»' 
190 

119: 

173 
lU 
291 

65 
>S2 
300 
115. 
290 

80 
112 
244 
300 
147 



I 
130' 

90 
110 

50 

86 
119 

95. 

60 
103 



911 
105 
75 
80 
25 
140 
60 



185 
95 
70 
87 

184' 
69 

132 
37 

lOS 

438 
19 
55 
59 

203 

• » 

130 
116 



45! 

75 
50 

48! 
731 
55i 
62* 

37, 
KJ5! 



665 

S75 

420 

304 

516! 

368 

580 

199 

562 



300' 1,307 

22! 255 



98 

26 

150 

214 

123 

43 



3,133 1.786 1«981 1,526 



140 

255 

1981 

145| 

280 

151 

213 

170 

240 



95j 
32 

145j 
63 
45! 

195| 
87 
97 

190, 
98 



54 

28 

106 

53 

58; 

198! 
53^ 
53 
90. 
52 



46 
22 
80 
45 
45 
80 
286 
17 
42 
30 



l,84i 1,0471 744 692 



983; 
445! 
21(» 
200 

2a> 

180 

2m, 

120J 
218 

2,852 



152. 

lot; 

190 
150 
40 
166 
60 
75 
30 



50 
170 

loo; 

150 

20 

90 

69 

150 

156 



64 

00 

120 

100 

19 

100 

60 

30 

60 



967; l,015i 619 



548 

240 

515 

4»»3 

693. 

366. 



550 
280 
320 
885 
430 
330 
510 
148 
498 
1.360 
210 
425 
201 ! 
4851 
410 
580 
315 



I 



8,426! 7,227 



3351 

131| 

585' 

359 

293 

753' 

578' 

3801 

492' 

420! 



280 
88 
300 
S90 
220 
6t)5 
5)1 
397 
400 
380 



4,324> 3.431 



1.249 
77\» 
680 
600 
279 
536 
485 
381 
464 



963 
680 
612 
560 
209 
480 
411 
335 
420 



35 . 
15 . 

9 . 
62. 
63 
25. 

30,. 
12'. 

22 ..t .• 
90 i 222 

19'. .1 .. . 

15.. 

18... 

21 ..I .. _.., 

18,.. .. |..l 



i o <> 



I 



I 

I ,1 



1 



i: 
1' 

1..* 2 



2: 5 I 






l! 

il 

1 
1 
I 
1 



494| 1, 222 2 

I 

t I 
J I 



10 



20 

15 

98 
<>•> 

13 

401 
351 
23. 
141 
30| 

310. 



4: go 



1 120: 

1 80 

1 80 
li 30 
l! 25 

2 120' 1 00 
1 26|.. ,. 

3 05' 1 
I 20 . . 



25 



5,453' 4,070, 12, 578 6 175... 



1 



ml •> 



12 



1' 
2 

♦I 

11 
2. 
V 

1. 

3 

ll 

21 
o' 

4 

o 

•« 

II 
o 



8' 

■ll 



I 
4 

4; 
5 

7, 



2 
2 

k 

1' 

6 
1 

li 



3 
5 
1 
5 

8 

3 4 

3' 8 

5l 5 

5 7 

11' 20 

3 5 



1 
2 



2 
3 

1! 

41 
2 
4 



4, 

fm : 

I 

5! 
6 



45 






28' 68 no. 



3 



13 



3 

3: 

I' 



7 
s 


4 
5 
9 
10 
5 
8 
4 



s 

o 

1 



20 
12 

9 
16 
17 
12 
15 
12 
17 
63 
10 

9 
11 
13 
12 
11 
15 



274 



15 
10 
2^1 
U 
12 
21 
21 
14 
10 
14 



31 ; 24 28! (MV 154 



2 
3 
3 
4 

1| 
3| 

2 

I 

• • I 



22 34 




8 


5 
21 



5 



13 
*20 
21 
17 
10 
44 
17 
12 
13 



31 07; 167 



NOBTB INDIA CONFERENCE STATISTICS 

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 



CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY. BAPTISMS. 





Cbubcb 
Member- 

BBIP. 


1 Idren. 


« 

a 

M 


Dkatbs 


a 

4 

1-2 


a 


a 


a 

is 




a 


• 

1 

i 
S3 


f 

CI 


NAMES OF DISTRICTS. 


I 


1 


Members 
onerst 

Baptized 


'"2 ' 

OB 



S 




i 1 


s 




^ PIS^ '"3 




«3 


» 10 




a 


» 


^ :o^lo ^ ^ 


*-rt 




Q. 







S 

o 


o 


a 

fa 


Total N( 

From am 
and Pro 

From am 
Childrei 

Children 
1 rents. 


Children 
Christl 


• 

-a 
< 


e8 


J 

s 


li' 


OUDH DiBTBICT. 
























' 


Bahralch 


45 


65 


52 


162 


89 


24 


6 .. 


4 


10 


8 18 


Balrampur 


115 


75 


40 


230 


• • 


1 


2; 2 


9 


13 


6 


10 


Barabankl 


144 


100 


99 


343 


3 


1 


9' 2 


9 


20 


32 


21 


Bhinga 


138 


68 


41 


247 


7 


3 


5 7 


10 


22 


7 


10 


Colonelgan] 


120 


32 


7 


159 


4 


4 


1 


• ft 


5 


6 


2 


61 


Ellenpur 


17 


18 


12 


47 


• • 


• • 


ft ft 


ft • 


3 


3 


5 


6 


Gonda 


33 


51 


95 


179 


2 


1 


■ • 


8 


7 


15 


10 


20 


Itaunja 


41 


13 


18 


72 


• • 


4 


2 


ft ft 


2 


4 


12 


10 


Kalsargan] 


96 


32 


43 


171 


1 


3 


3 


1 


8 


12 


6 


6 


Lakblmpar 


52 


41 


26 


119 


• 


• ft 


3 


2 


13 


18 


22 


I4I 


Lucknow, Eng. 


11 


89 


67 


167 


2 


« ft 


5 


ft ft 


• ft 


5 


1 


13: 


Lucknow, Hind. 


123 


137 


193 


4.53 


8 


3 


8 


1 


9 


18 


16 


39 


Nan para 


58 


42 


36 


136 


8 


5 


1 


• • 


10 


11 


16 


6 


NawabganJ 


• • 


4 


6 


10 


• « 


ft ft 


ft ft 


• ft 


ft ft 


• ft 


3 


3 


RalBareiiry 


140 


52 


70 


262 


4 


1 


4 


3 


30 


37 


24 


25 


Sid haul! 


91 


37 


45 


173 


4 


2 


8 


1 


15 


24 


14 


9| 


Sitapur 


172 


141 


122 


435 


4 
136 


3 
55 


9 
66 


10 
37 


11 
145 


30 
248 


24 


24 


Total 


1,496 


997 


972 


3,365 


208 240! 

1 


Hardoi District. 














1 








1 

1 


Bilgram 


38 


44 


32 


114 


1 


1 


4 


• • 


3 


* 


9 


i 


Hardo! 


125 


98 


129 


352 


1 


5 


7 


1 


4 


12 


14 l'> 


Mallawan 


62 


17 


12 


91 


1 


2 


2. 1 


6 


9 


6 4 


PlhanI 


95 


28 


27 


150 


• • 


1 


7 2 


5 


14 


5 5 


Safipur 
Shahabad 


54 


16 


15 


85 


1 


4 


3! 1 


7 


10, 


61 6 


195 


88 


120 


403 


• • 


17 


19! 6 


9 


34 


17 IT 


Sandi 


89 


55 


61 


205 


ft • 


6 . . i 5 


6 


11 


8' 6 


Sandila 


25 


12 


13 


50 


5 


2 4 


• ft 


1 


5 


8 8 


Unao 


106 


85 


33 


224 


1 


_3 


3 


• V 


8 


11 


9 11 


Total 


799 


443 


442 


1.074 


10 


40 


48 


16 


49 


113 


82"*^r> 


Gabbwal District. 




1 


1 


Dikhwali 


93 


59 


43 


195 


1 


■ • 


9 


2 


5 


16 


' 1 

9 n 


Kainur 


10 


14 


15 


39 


• • 


« I 


4 


1 


• • 


5 


41 4 


Lansdowne 


75 


62 


43 


180 


• • 


ft • 


8 


2 


2 


12 


4 5 


Paurl 


40 


96 


102 


238 


* • 


li 12 


• • 


3 


15 


12: 21 


Ramnee 


18 


9 

— — — — ^ 


17 


44 


• • 


• ft 


1 


3 


4 


8 


4' 4 


Total 


236 


240 


220 


696 


1 


1 


34 


8 


14 


56 


33= 45 

1 






/•c 



•> «: :r ;::i 



li ^* 



'i. it .*.'? r.. - • . I -' k' ». I • •: 



or Aix. .uii 



J5 
4 



yimr-^ - 



3 



r. 



« 



^ ' 



-TV - - - 



«t 



-fV* 



J-- 



.)^'' 


.*• 


:£5" 


«. 


te • 






!»• 


129* 


-««• 


-¥V 


• ■ ■* 


-.-^W 




lij^i 


,3* 




» 


A' 


¥* 


- 


I 


»• 


^o- 


5 


• 


"■ 


£ 


-yt 




5) 


:4 


^» 


• 




1:5. 


-fT 


163 


• 


'>.* 




4- 


15. 


•:5* 


:w> 


*> 


_^^ ■ 




^ 


2SJ 


•<» 


-4 


1. 


■- 


* 


• 


31 


irt 


f«ii 


t£l 




-. >> 


w» 


3X 


» 


. 


. 




^« 


• • 


Mi 


131 


:jgrr 


.U- 


#^. 


#• 


* > 


I4S« 


U) 


::i. 


•V 




jvy 


^ 


l: 


4 


Ti 


i^ 


♦■• 






T9« 


»!!•• 


^1 


•T* 


-/" 


••fr^ 


• ' 


«)l 


i«i 


::•♦ 


4 


' 


i. 


*r 


3S4i 


Itf» 


CCl. 


• ^ 


-J>* 


-/-- . 


U 


UiT- 


•WT 




«|i^ #^^V 


• t 


-ax. i. 


r~ 



• « « 



o . 



i- 4c - 



. 1 



• M 











1 






t 








- 


'4 


'. 


. t > 


O 






• 




-1 


1 


N 


O 






■ 




• 


• 
• ■ 


ti 


<« 


• 


*. 


•* 


1 


wt 


.:.' 


t 1 


'OU 



«X 


»• 


r5f» 


•^/ 


/;• 


/M 


I^SS' 


2*1' 


*:.; 


2.- 


t'.. 


^— 


<»!< 


■:«' 


iftt 


'7<« 


»• 


.iJ( 


«;• 


41- 


•- 


1^ 


.•*• 


i?'. 


I-V 


3». 


iftj 


ri 


»JS^ 


:.'-. 


li* 


*:• 


^HSf 


'.*^' 


♦'TH 


W*>' 


yii- 


T • -» 


Sis 


j(»- 


M 


¥¥y 


1*S. 


IJ- 


-yw. 


.•*♦• 


iT^ 


4?.' 


u: 




J*K. 




«« ^ 


sic- 


7W. 


» 7^' 


I %^ 


i-fTi* 






iC- 



e 


9& 


SS 


44 


13 


!«• 


37 


* • 


90 


yv 


Zlt 


1 


66 


91 


m 


5.» 


18. 

1 


23 


40 


30 


349 


219, 

* 
* 


383 


117 



:-» 


ie4 


Tr 


4M 


33S» 


»K» 


3S6 


lau 


Ul 


a) 



A« 



1 »> 



<• :'*J« : >,i 



V, 



* 



968 






644) i )M I 4i 



I 



\ 



\ I 



ft 






I ' 



^ 



1 4A . ! 



M 



M 
♦I 
M 
•I 
S 



\ 



hi i( 



M 

'J 

• I 

II 

''I 









U 



.Hi 



:0 

t ; 
I*: 

I » 
. I 

'A) 



1 



NOHTH IJSfVlA COIUFBHENOB STATlHTliS 

CHURCH MEMBEBSHIP 





CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY. 


BAPnSMS. 






Chubcu 








1 


• 






« 


1 
1 




MfiMBBU- 






DiCATHB ^ 


a 













BHIP. 


1 


• 




^ 








«4 


H 


NAMB8 OF DISTRICTS. 


1 


• 

82 


lidren. 


Christian] 


Members 
oners 

Baptized 


c 


c 


a 




• 

ee 

a 


as u 

a S 




Probationers 




Baptized Ch 


Total No. of 

From amoug 
and Probati 


From among 
Children 


Children of 
rents. 


Children froi 
Christians 


Adults. 


9 

a. 


Number of 8 


>^ 

a 

JC c 

2« 


Babbillt-Kumaon Dibt. 














* 

1 






BareUly Section. 
























Barellly 


364 


516 


180 


1,060 


23 


8 


48 


7 13 


68 


52 


106 


Barellly Theological Seml- 
























narv 
Rareilly Sadar Bazar 


• • 


• • 


■ • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


* . ' • • 


• • 


• * 


• 


94 


146 


130 


370 3 


2 


18 


. 4. 19 41 


16 7 


Faridpnr 


117 


208 


113 


438' 3 


3 


11 


2 


5: 18 


7 5 


Jalalabad 


166 


178 


139 


481 5 


7 


22 .. 


14 36 


7 


4 


Rhera Kajebra 
Bl Iran pur Katra 


88 


120 


1C3 


311 


1 .. 


4 2 


3 9 


8 


8 


185 


143 


132 


460 


3! .. 


5 


3: 4; 12 


7 


7 


Mohamdl 


50 


38 


35 


123 .. 


1 


3 


2 .. 1 5 


5 


8 


Panahpur 


163 


252 


164 


579 


2 


9 


18 18 


9; 45 


2 





Powa van 


151 


156 


114 


421 


6 


5 


4 


1 


11 > 16 


9 


9 


Shah; ahunpur East 


112 


107 


77 


296 4 


3 


4 


41 


61, 106 


Hi 18 


Shah] ah anpur West 


66 


85 


121 


27^ 


5 


2 


5 


2 


7 14 


101 15 


ShahJahanpur-DIlawar- 










' 




^ 1 1 


1 


ganj 
Tllhar 


85 


36 


46 


167 


9 


3 


4 


4 8 


5 


5 


127 


274 
2,257 


235 
1,589 


636 
5,614 

^ _ 


6 
70 


• • 

43 


12 
158 


6| 16 31 

'sdlloel 412 


14 
153 


14 


Bareilly Section Total .. 


1,768 


In 


Kumaon Section. 


























Bhot 


11 


16 


19 


46 


2 


• • 


4 


S 5. 11 


7I 9 


Dwarahat-Lobha 


18 


Mi 


44 


117 


2 


2 


5 


« 9 


• ■ 


5 


6 16 


NainlTal-Haldwani 


67 


99 


53 


219 li 


m • 


8 


a 


4 


12 


5' 16 


Naini Tal, Eng. 


• • 


24 


13 


37 


• • 


1 


2 


• • 


• • 


2 


2i 15 


Pithoragarh 


160 


182 


140 


482 


4 


« 


11 


6 


39 


56 


18 


39' 


Kumaon Section Total . . 


256 


376 
2,633 


269 
1,858 


901 


9 


3 
46 


30 

188 


8 48; 86 


38! 105 

1 ' 


Bareilly-Kumaon Total .. 


2,024 


6,515 79 


96' 214 


498 


191 


316; 


BiJNOR District. 








] 


Basta 


180 


207 


141 


528 


• • 


3 


10 


5 20 


35 


12 


1 
1? 


BIJnjr 


467 


404 


113 


984' 2 


3 


7 


16 


23 


14 


23 


Dnampur 


479 


U2 


201 


803; 17 


3 


12 


4 8 


24 


16, 17 


Kirathpur 


218 


81 


97 


396' 41 6 


19 


6 9 


34 


51 5' 


Mandawara 


232 


207 


197 


6361 4 8 


29 


..1 2 


31 


lOl 1? 


Nagina 
Najibabad 


337 


192 


152 


681 


7i i» 


6 


.. I 10 


16 


S' 9 


110 


54 


103 


267 


4' 6 


7; 10 20 


37 


6» 7 


Nurpur 


190 


107 


1(J6 


412 


9 1 


19: 2 9 30 


8' 8 


Seohara 


361 


245 


110 


716 


1 •• : *• 


7 


2: 16 25 


11 8 


Total 


2683 


1.010 


1.220 


5.422| 47 


34 


116 


29. 110 255 

1 


90i 101 



j^^#j; Tiu rivii; ifA//yN' ii/'/;' *W" ^'" ^v'f 



'O/i 



A3fJ' 1^'tilL 



irrjf i*A^ -«a#< H ii-> 






f ■•V .' '^ 



TM P T-v* .V " ' ».' 1 « 'I'v 



01 



N .',-».- ~ 



5 

^ 



.- "v- 






'I -. *: 



S 



rtc 



.T< ij.tK:. 



7^' 






4V 



■V 



'N. 



1^ 


J^' 


r^ 


:• 


■^ * * 


->i 


4 


*u 












1 


» 




« 


1 


!*«• 


■ 


«k> 


* 


3r 


M» 




*» 












. 


r 


■ 




■. 


— J. 


■'{i 


Set- 


r»ii 


«*r* 


t>*. 


J 


4: 












1 


I 


r 




« 


^:>' 


4:. 


7*» 


:»' 


-.V 


-'i*« 


1 


> 
















1 




» 


• 
< • 


j-»' 


:<■ 


i?-' 


♦v*. 


«» • 


1 


% t 












« 


• 






« 


«* 


■_•-. 


.V 


70 


- •'• 


i » . 


t 


-N- 












I 


• 






I 


^*" 


?•■ 




, 


e «• 


!•• 




^\ 














4 


1 




• 


Ti* 


4: 


3«»' 


7»« 


:s:» 


> 


I 


> 












1 
1 


\ 




1 


k 


i4fr 




Jkt 


]ii. 


:*:" 


4tin 


I 


■»i 


1 


^■ 


t 


1 






N 


V 






*^ 


rv 


ift* 


?C. 


4,^' 


a:. 


1 


s: 


4 

1 


<>, 


I 


1 


1 


t « 




* 


1 


■ \ 


3«» 




*f» 


J7 


eau 


'7^ 


I 


« 1 














•t 


1 


\ 


<t 


>3 


ItH 


iu:» 


lit' 


?<l«h 


Ki^') 


1 


4»N 












^ 


4 


^ 


A 


V 


2,«je7 


1 447 


::.334 


l.SM 


7.1i?-J 


: ..vv* 


u 


«^.N 


.^ 


♦■^1«\ 


4 


4 


.^ 


>\ ^«\ 


•\> 


0\ 


vN.% 


s* 






•^•1 



>« * 1 



1:^ 


14 


iir. 


¥\ 


1>4 


i"\ 


\ 


w 






»> 








,\ 


\ 


w 


4 


41 


41 


m 


w 


ni» 


IM 


\ 


^VN \ 


^n '^ \ 


w 


\ 


\ 


M 


' \ 


21 


19 


im 


\^ 


?fc« 


;'?*i» 


\ 


•VN . 


4 -^ !* '^ 


1 


1 


\ 


w 


\\ 


TO 


U3 


• • 


« « 


KVI 


le; 


\ » 




I 


1 


1 






\ 


115 


19M 
36fi 




.»50 
37.» 


l.7»W 


- - 1 
1.341 


1' 

4 




1 


10 


1 

1 






»M 


2G2 

1 


1'MI 


2,28y 


1,813 


3,025 


1.7031 


H,H30 


n iNio 


ift 


(140 n 


•MM i< i 10. U 


in 


tHI 


m 


11 


tl'. 


l'4'» 


^^m ^m^ 


1 


1 


1 


■ 






1 




1 








i 


1 






M 


441 


73' 


•rJ 
•III 


1 
'.'Mi 


IMI 




1 

70 . 










1 




ii 


1 

'1 


:• 


u 


176 


170 


00 


70, 


470 


«n,l 


1 1 


r.M 1 


<i 1 

* 


II ''11 


1 


1 





h 


,11 


*JU6 


lOU 


TiO 


44j 


400 


;mh 








{ 


1 


» 


'.1 


III 


>N 


(W 


31 


34 


lU 


VM 


!• J 




w 




i 


( 




'! 




M 


uT, 


31 


yz 


10 


ll^i 


MO 




. ''» 


, , 


. 


( 


) 


r. 




V, 


!:¥» 


loot 


m 


Wi 


♦Ml 


,f'«> 




\r, 


' 1 


. .1 


'1 


'» 


' 1 


70 


Tii 


1»f 


•r» 


M7 


•40 




. '0 


t 


1 


i 


t , 


• 


VI 


-jr» 


'^t 


u 


ii 


70 


'^» 




ir, . . 


J 


t 


» 


/ 


• 
• 


11 


Iffl 


*V« 


Hi 


.v» 


r;3 


}^'/l 




'M 




•1 


•• 


'f 


'( 


f f 

1 


__- 


«_ « - 


^— 


— — 


> 






' 














>*7 


M/r 


¥r. 


v^ 


ii^il 


\yfA 


*fi 


' Vir 1 


1 


!) 


t'l 


fi 


/'» 


1*.'. 



SOBTB INDIA COSUFSRKSCE 8TATLiTICS 
SDHUART OP CHIJBCEI 



CHRISTIAN COHMONITT. HAPTI8U& 



Chubcb 
Mbmbeb- 



NAMES OF DISTBICTS. | 



'Dil*TH8!|^ 



Is 



f (-2 



o I 



Bftreil1;-EaiDBon District 
BIJDorDlBtrtct 
Budfton District 
Qarhwftt District 
Hardol District 
Hor&dtbad District 
Ondb Dlstrct 
Plllbhlt District 

Orana Total 19D4 

Tutsi luoa 

Increaso 
Decrease 






k« 



••» 



.;r >.f* 



a^ 



• « 



f J ^B 



'X ^iH 1 .11' n4< iT*^ •.'»*.- N » 






• • 



44 



,i.4:Li t« ^11 



Ttjtm 7J83l3,flW ft.«V45.T17iT;.^A «1^^^] » , ••.<'»..••'' >' » .i m 



I I I 



t I 



1£.413 83M loom* Q;BM 4!» ff»n J|i».rt«l ^" '♦^l'' M l'^**'' ' ' ' » » 



< I 



I I 



Wl 



1 rtR4 10- 1 n« ^ ' 1 



. . 361 ISi 41 A ^^ 



t t 



I 1 1 



NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE STATISTICS 
CBDECH 





Cbubcu PBupebtt. 


MINISTERIAL 
iJUPPOBT. 


NAMES OF 


1 

S 1 


|1 


■ Properly. 

1 Property. 

ncss on all 


■|!:2 


1 


1 _ 

S v 

2 \a 


1 ' 

■5 . 


DisTRicra 

1 


1! 

i 1 


1 1 

■s ' > 

III 




111 1 


Ir 
mi 


111 
1= 


MOBADABAD DiaXHICT. 


Rs. 


Re. 


B». 


Ri. 


Es. Bs. 


Rs. Bs 


Rs 


Ba 


Rs.j Ha 


Amroha 


1 850 


9 


1.3S0 


30 


2,230 .. 


48 


M 




6! 90 


Babukbera 


3 100 


2 


150 




250 .. 


M 


34 




3; 36 


B>b]ol 


1 (to 


3 


400 


550 


1,010 .. 


43 


33 




3 36 


ChaudftDSl 


4 773 


a 


1,500 


100 


3.3TJ .. 


.. 200 


84 




7 91. 


Dhaoaura 


1 SOO 


6 


500 




I.on0 .. 


.. 50 


48 




41 52' 




2 75 


3 


soa 




575 .. 


80 


61 




SU 6S1; 


Uaganpur 


3 *10 


3 


600 




1,010 .. 


48 


72 






Kaolb 


2 SO 


2 


20 




40 .. 


15 


48 




3 511 


KuDdarkl 


1 SO 


3 


flSO 




700 .. 


30 


05 




4, 69' 


Horadabad 


4 3S.000 


10 


iOflw 


10.000 


»,6»0 .. 


.. 75 


370 


230 


100 720, 


Naralnlya 


1 13 








12 .. 


.. la 


35 




5i 401 


Rajpura 


1 150 








150 .. 


22 


46 




4x1 501 


Easiilpur 
Bambbal 


2 145 


"1 


"20 






x 


38 




31 39! 


3 i,a» 


3 


330 


1.350 


2,780 " 


.. 56 






8 68[ 


Sbabpur 
Sharllpur 


3 400 


1 


30 




430 .. 


.. 30 


SO 




4 641 




1 


130 






5 


36 




*ji\ m 


Tbakurdwara I 


3O0 




31W '.'. 


20 


« 




4li| 39x 


ToUl 1 


17.170 


Tl^ 


<!e,m~ 


.. 788 


>^ 


£50 


17Sx!i.623j; 


PlLIBHIT DXBTBICT. 














i " 


Baberl .. I 


500 




650 .. 


60 


flO 




5| 65 


Blsalpur ! 
SIraull ! 


SO-i 


ioo 


550 .. 


24 


48 




3i 51i 


387 




435 .. 


80 


84 




41 88 


Puraopar I 


isa 




236 .. 


.. 42 


94 




3i| 261. 


Nawabsan] . ■ 1 


m 




150 .. 


60 


30 




e; lool 


Mr'-'-" :: 1 


1,630 


'aoo 


2,590 .. 


.. 180 


»4 




Sin 


500 


1,500 .. 


60 


04 


'33 


10| 1' 7 


Si-X" :: \ 


50 




150 .. 


23 


46 




4X SSi; 


ISO 




180 .. 


.. ST 






4ll( 52\ 


Eampur 1 


30" 




300 .. 


36 


49 


"1 2\. SIX 


Total . . t 


4,033 


BOO 


'«^1~ 


. 631 


548 


34 


45H 027x1 


Bud A ON DisTBicT. 














" 1 1 


AonIa I 


700 


50 


1,250 .. 


.. 77 


66 




4 70l 


BIUI . . t 


S2.'> 


su 


1,075 .. 


in 


08 




5! T3| 


Bbamora . . ! 


100 




(wn .. 


.. 53 






31 531' 


BUbuH ., 1 


1,200 


"w 


1.390 .. 


.. 9S 


78 




5, 33' 


Blnawar .. ! 


451 




C8I .. 




33 




3 35^ 


Budaon 1 


7,150 


ibIsoii 


4.1,950 .. 


1: 393 


135 


'« 


36 203' 


nataganj . . i 


300 


50 


■rao .. 


■ . 141 


s- 




4 54 


Kakralft .. i 


500 


40 


(160 .. 


.. 100 


48 




3; 51. 


Ujbaul ! 


300 




200 .. 


.. 70 


S3 




*, ^' 


Total .. 1 


0:21,400 


z 


11,092 


19,730 


53,22 J ~. 


.. 1093 


570 


52 


56l[ HTBs 



ruj 3 



, ..T.T.T' 



> * 



>i 



i^- 



».^ 



V'x 



1 • 1 



V 



s *S 



^V 






••^v 



»i. 



1451 


4» ^ 


• 4 . 


• • -. * 


li'- 


T*. 


»K 


3im> 








• V 


4 


NV 


♦. ^ 




• 


hi 


w • 


• 


1 
• * 


• 


:?v 




1-H 




■\ 








ax 


. 


] 


. 


« 


V « 




14 




K-V 








* 


, 


« 


-• * 


u 


«i 


1 


U\ 




'1 ".>\ 








•» 


1 


> 


. 


J 


•■> 


tl 


*.»\ 




H-v 








I 




1 


X 


1 


1 


3\ 


^ 




■1 '\ 








5 


1 


1^ 


*■ 


1 


2\ 




^ V 




'•^'A 








4 


Tx 


1 

J 


*♦ . 


1 


3 




;'\ 




l*''>\ 






y \ 


3 




1 


« 


1 


u 


4 


v: 




4 ♦'>\ 








4 


. 


3 


1 . 


1 


.1 


4 


w 




«M\ 






, 


3 


1 


1 


•4 

•0 


♦» 


:i 


4 


u\ 




»^\ 






1 


37x 


J Ox 


t»s 


U» .^ 


Il\ 


•,'5\ 


u\\ 


i:<»> 




^ ' MO'»\ 




1 
1 


1 




1 4 


* 
* « 


1 


1 . 


1 
1 

1 


iv 




>»>' 






'.M 








1 


3 


1 


X 


3' . 


K 


U 


1 > 1 


'.»v 






(1 > 




lll'l 




jl>M 


2 


•• 1 


1 


1 I 


^\ 


1 


. 1 


i\\ 


1 




IV 1 












3 


• 


X 


U .. 


%\ 


1^ 


1 


1 1 


I) 




M' 












1 




X 


1|.. 


\, 


I 


.. 1 


i% 


h) 






IV » 












15 
2 


6 


17x 


s; :> 


2; 


•M 


J 


70^ 


1 






"M 


1 


•'• • 1 


1 '»"' 


>'!' 


1 / 1 


« • I 


1 


r . 


r 


1, 


•• 1 


t\ 


1 


I 


IV » 












2 


1, 


1 


1... 


1 


»' 


1 


"1 






'»•' 






1'' 




1 


2 


-LI 


1 


2| . 


». 


tl 

1 


1 
. 1 


1 




. 


r.i 












31 


8 


24X 


I4t n 


♦ii" 


W» 




!>/., 


1 1 




U>/ 


f 


:■'. M 


1 





\ < 



I 

\ U 

1', 



•ni 



Is- 

l,M 

M 

"I 

• n I 



'I 



♦ » > 



NORTH INDIA CONFEBMNCM STATISTICS 

CHUBCH 



NAMES OF 
DISTRICTS. 



Chcbch Pbopebtt. 



o 



a 



3 

U3 


i 


9 




• 

OB ! 


a 
o 


ji 


& 


C 


o 


M 


«a 


«4 




a« 


o 




«4 

o 


^ 


|i* 


9 




i" ' 


9 


4 
> 


0* 


> 


9 


ber 




.o 


8 


2 


2 





2 


0. 


% 


£ 



OUDH DUTBXOT. 

Bahraich 

Balrampar 

Barabanki 

Bblnga 

Colooelffanj 

Ellenpor 

Itaunja 

KaisargaoJ 

Lakblmpar 

Lucknow, £ng. 

Lacknow, Hind. 

Nan para 

Nawabganj 

Bal Bareltfy 

iitidbaQU 

Sltapur 

Qooda 

Total 



Habdoi Dibtrict. 

Bllgram 

Hardol 

Mallawan 

PI ban! 

Saflpar 

Shahabad 

Sandl 

Sandlla 

Unao 

Total 



Garhwal District. 



Dlkhwall 

Kalntir 

Lansdowne 

Paurl 

Bamnee 



Total 



3 

a 

3 
17 



Bs. 

300 

350 

4,995 

1»TOO| 



500 



3.000 

3:^,000 

34.f)00 

300 



1.100 

9^000 
5,300 



71,945 



850 
400 



1,500 
150 



700 



3,100 



700 



6,550 
400 

9.650 



Bs.. Ba. 



400 

40 
596 
170 



300 
80 
300 
660 
1.10,000 
6:5Oj00O 
1; 300 



Q* 
P 






O 
9 

> 
Bs. 



9 

o 






o 



a 
o 

« 

9 

a 



I 



t 
. as »• 

gS a 



MlHIBTEBlAL 

Support. 



u 

O 



So. S 

fl a a ^'^ 
S:?5 2 









CO ' >« . 



£0 



o — * 



Pk IC4 





• 

a 


9 


ea 


C4 


5 





« 


o 


o 


»• 


a 


^rt 


o 


•*> 


ft« 


u 


« 


o 


«i« 


Q, 


a 


A 


o 


3 


'^ 


22 


u 


'Sod 


o 


Btor 


'is 

B a 


tfCA 


tf iS 


04 


33 



iS 

c 

i 

u 
O 

9 O. , 
ZIP. 

09 , 
O30 






3.000 
50 

• ■ 

30 
"350 



3> 3,560 
1= 100 
4,10375 
3 8,500 

34 84371 



1 170 
3 1,350 



I 



3 

11 



50 
450 
750 



1,060 
3,830 



400 

500 

3,70r) 

10,000 

300 



131 13,900 



391550 
100 



2,000 

36.406 
35300 

458176 



60 
8,900 



300 



31 
9,181 



1,300 
31,800 



33.000 



B8. 

3,600 

340 

5491 

1,890 



1.050 

80 

300 

3.650 

33.000 

465560 » 

700 



5,660 

100 

45.781 

49,600 

614493 



570 
ia650 



50 

450 

3,450 

150 



1,781 



16401 



1,100 
500 

3,900 

50,350 

700 

56,550 



Bs. 



».on 



350 



350 



Bs. 



350 



Bs. 

150 



81 
34 



701 
38 
150 
30 
83 
65 



50 
400 

10^000 

u.m 



25 
300 



15 

363 
138 



80 
350 810 



100 



150 
100 

350 



B9. 

09 

24 

73x 

39 

18 

16x 

nx 

18 
43 

• ■ 

483 

■ • 

9X 

6 

31x 

I16x 

61x 



umx 



34 
106 
18 
33 
39 
60 
36 
35 
57 

379 



40 
10 
10 
38 
30 

108 



Bs. 


Bs. 




6 




3 




1(» 




4 




3 




1 




3 




Ix 


45 


7 


ism) 


• • 


310 


38x 


.. 


2 


• • 


1 


. . 


8 


« . 


6 


371 


39 


96X 


6x 


tmx 


138X 



60 



60 



4 

15 

3x 

3 

3 

5 

3x 

3 

8 



46x 



6 
3 
3 
35 
3 

50 



Bs. 

75 

37 

83x 

33 

30! 
17x' 
30x1 
19x 
94 
1.500 
730X 
3x 
lOx 
69 
37x 
516z 
163X 

3.419X 



38 

123 

30 

25 

3? 

65 

39x 

38 

05x 

435 



46 
13 
13 
123 
23 

218 






■y f ■ ■ 






.1^ *• ^ ^ Aa 



«. t. ». •.« • X *^ 



«^v 



■»_ 






^t 



n 






J«1I 4? iW :W. 



t. 



> 
«» 






.\K 






3 .. 


•* 


%k 


« 


« 


ii 


9 


V' .. 


1. 


4. 


« > 


♦• 


1 


a 


3 .. 


1 




• 


IV 


V 


Vv 


3 .. 


1:. 


• 1 


1^ 


«> 


Iv 


ItJv 


3 .. 


1 


4 . 


i 


i 


1 


1 1 


3 .. 


1 


:u 




u 


5 


» 

t 1 


5 .. 


* 

a 


:\ 


u 


^v 




ii 


3 ., 


1 


a 


1 


I 


, , 


M 


4 .. 


1 


4Jl . 




i\ 


1 


M 


42 .. 

1 


15x 

— I. 


73\ 


lU 


ItU 


J?sv 


is\v 



4 
1 *> 

2 

1 2 

1 


• * 


1 

15 
1 

. SO 


1 . 
1 .. 

1 ..< 
ao.. 


1 


5 U' P4 1 
1 4 M 

1 4' tO( 

1 41 10, 

1 


: 30 


« • 








om* 1 



M t 

.. ., 
•1 » 



•>» 



I i| 



•• ."1, \ 



#••♦ t I ', •( I 



It 
t 

I \ 

» 



I « I 



Mill 



.1 



statistics. 



M^.-For explanations, apparent errors and remarks, see Statistical 
Report. 

Many reports of collections contained annas. These cannot be shown 
here. They are represented In the columns by an x. The totals contain 
the sums of all these omitted fractional parts of a rupee. 

The total income from all sources is for the most part the Income of fees 
in schools, and is used in the running expenses. These schools are practi- 
cally self-supporting. The real income is shown in the regular collections 
which are disposed of according to disciplinary usage. 



SOBTB INDIA COUFBHBNOE STATISTICS 
CUUBCU UBMBBBSHIP 



I 

S 



FOR THE YSAB SUDIHa WITJI SOtk NO V EMBER I90i- 
AND WORE. 



NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE STATISTICS 

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 





CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY, i BAPTISMS. 






Chubcu I 


i J. ' • 




1 


• 


I 




Member- , 

SHIP. 


iDkatbs^ 


rom among Non 
ns 




ms. 


1 

I 

>» 

08 

8 

B 


4 
9 

•g 

2 

OB 

S 

s 


NAMES OF DISTRICTS. 


1 

• 


rs. 
I Idren. 


Christian! 

Members 
oners* 


Baptized 
Christian 




I § 


9 ■ Xi 

.0 






JO 


X 




a 


Full Mem 
Baptized < 


. 0^ 


^. 


"^ €d 




o> 







Probatioi 


Total Nc 

From am 
and Pro 


From am 
Childrei 

Children 
rents. 


Children 
ChristI 


i 

< 


Total Ba 


Number 


£ 9 

V\ 

1 



OUDH DiBTBICT. 



Bahraich 

Balrampur 

Barabanki 

Bbinga 

ColonelganJ 

Ellenpur 

Oonda 

Itaunja 

KaisarganJ 

Lakhlmpur 

Lucknow, Eng. 

Lucknow, Hind. 

Nanpara 

NawabganJ 

Ral Bareilfy 

Sldhaull 

Sitapur 



Total 



Habdoi District. 



45 

115 

144 

138 

IdO 

17 

33 

41 

96 

52 

11 

123 

58 

140 

91 

172 



1,496 



65 
75 

10() 
68 
32 
18 
51 
13 
32 
41 
89 

137 

42 

4 

52 

37 

141 



997 



Bilgram 

Hardoi 

Mallawan 

Pihani 

Safipur 

Shanabad 

Sandi 

Sandila 

Unao 



Total 



38 

125 

62 

95 

54 

195 

89 

25 

106 



789 



44 
98 
17 
28 
16 
88 
55 
12 
85i 



Qabbwal District. 

Dlkhwali 

Kainur 

Lansdowne 

Pauri 

Ramnee 

Total 



93 
10 
75 
40 
18 



59 
14 
62 
96 
9 



52 
40 
99 
41 
7 
12 
95 
18 
43 
26 
67 

193 

36 

6 

70 

45 

122 



972 



32 
129 
12 
27 
15 
120 
61 
13 
33 



162 
230 
343 
247 
159 

47 
179 

72 
171 
119 
167 
4.53 
136 

10 
262 
173 
435 



3,365 



443; 442 



114 
352 

91 
150 

85 
403 
205 

50 
224 



1,674 



43 
15 
43 
102 
17 



236i 240 220 



195 

39 

180 

238 

44 



89 

■ • 

3 

7 
4 



4 
4 
4 

136 



24 
1 
1 
3 
4 



55 



6' 

•>i 

9| 
5 



66 



10 



1 

5 

2 

1 

4 

17 

6 

2 
o 



3 

1 

10 

37 



40 



4 
7 
2' 

I 

19' 

4 
3 



48 



4 

9 
9 

10 
5 
3 
7 
2 
8 

13 

9 

10 



30 
15 
11 

145 



16 



10 
13 
20 
22 

6 

3 
15 

4 
12 
18 

5 
18 
11 



37 
24 
30 

^48 



8 


18 


6 


10 


32 


21 


7 


10 


2 


6 


5 


6 


10 


20 


12 


10 


6 


6 


22 


14 


1 


13 


10 


39 


16 


6 


3 


3 


24 


25 


14 


9 


24 

mo 


24 



49 



696 



9 
4 
8 
12 
I 



34 



< 
12 


14 
10 
34 
11 

5 
11 



113 



9 
14 
6 
5 
6 
17 
8 
8< 
9 

82 



7. 

12 
4 
5 
6i 

17. 

6; 

8 
11 

76 



14 



16 
5 

12 
15 

8 



56 



9 11 

4I 4' 

4; 5: 

12: 21 



33 45; 



JTOB TBS TBAS ESDINQ WITH SOtk SOVBUBER 190*. 
MBHBBBSHrP AND WOBK. 



NORTH INMA OONFBHEHOB STATIUTICS 
CHUBCH MBMBBB8HIP 



WOa TUM YEAS MXIUSS WITH Mth XOl EMBKIt inot. 
ABO WORK. 



NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE STATISTICS 

SUMMARY OF CUUBCH 





CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY. 


BAPTISM a 






Chubch 
Mbmbbb- 

BHIP. 


• 

9 

U 

i 
1 

Gk 
e8 

pa 


• 
09 

a 

JS 
"u 

Xi 

O 

o 

• 

o 
Szi 

1 


Dkaths 


Children of Christian Pa- 
rents. 


Children from among Non- 
Cl^ristians. 


< 


• 

a 

09 

o. 
PQ 

1 


• 
09 

1 

• 
>% 

08 

"O 

O 

a 
m 

o 

u 

a 

s 

5z; 


N u m ber of Officers and Tea- 
chers. 


NAMES OF DISTEICTS. 

• 


t 

i 

o 

i 


• 

S 

S 

B 

9 


From among Members 
and Probationers 


From among Baptized 
Children. 


Barellly-Eumaon District 
Bi] nor District 
Budaon District 
Qarhwal District 
Hardoi District 
Moradabad District 
Oudh Distrct 
Pill bhlt District 

Grand Total 1904 


2,024 
2,583 
4,175 
236 
789 
5,515 
1,496 
2,041 

18.859 

17,330 

1,529 

• • 


2,633 

1,619 

2,534 

240 

443 

3,746 

997 

2,283 

14,295 


1,858 

1,220 

3,758 

220 

442 

4,032 

972 

1,863 

14,465 


6,515 
5,422 

10,467 

696 

1,674 

13,293 
3,365 
6,187 

47,619 
45,264 


79 

47 

84 

1 

10 

113 

136 

49 

519 
582 

• • 

63 


46 
84 
55 
1 
40 
87 
55 
30 

348 
485 

• • 

137 


188 

116 

190 

34 

48 

454 

66 

131 

1327 

1042 

185 

• ■ 


96 

29 

101 

8 

16 
326 

37 
116 

729 
321 
408 

• • 


214 
110 
196 
14 
49 
542 
145 
240 

1510 
805 
705 


498 
255 
487 
56 
113 
1322 
248 
487 

3466 
2168 
1298 

• • 


191 
90 

108 
33 
82 

204 

208 
80 

996 

993 

3 

• • 


316 

101 

113 

45 

76 

218 

240 

91 

1200 

11S8 

12 

• • 


Total 1903 


13,798 


14,136 
329 

• • 


Increase 
Decrease 


497 

• • 


2,355 

• • 



FOR THE YEAR ENDIlfO WITH SOth NOVEMBER, 1904. 
STATISTICS. 



EUROPEAN AND ANGLO- VERNACULAR 

SCHOOLS. 

1 


GRAND TOTALS. 




BOTB' SCHOOLB. 






GiBLS* Schools. 










t 


■ 














• 

8 


GO 
9 


«9 

e8 


a 


9) 

o 


No. OH ROLI. AT 


1 
■a 


1 


No. OK Roll at 


1 


Si 


o 


BITDOFYSAB. 


a 


SND of tbar. 




ja 




"o 


. » 




^ 

*» 


o 
3!> 






5 


^ 


^ 


en 


^ 














mC 


o 

1 « 




i 




ally A 
year. 


5 




i 




ally A 
ear. 


o 

J8 


o 


a 
o 

^ .' 


O 

o 
to 


berof 


09 

a 


5 
6 


• 


ase 
ce for 


o 

u 


s 


■4» 


• 


1-^ 


a 

a 
55 


a 

s 


Num 
of yei 


> 


' a 


S 


a 


••a 


u a 


a 




5 


s 


0) a 


s 


s 


5a 


ig 





ji 


o 


o 


► 


a 


M 


o 


o 


>« 


o 


o 




o 


! ^ 


Q 


^ 


H 


< 


< 


O 


» 


H 


< 


H 


H 




H 


i 

• • 


• • 




• • 


m • 








• • 




4 


s 


186 


164 


• • 


• • 


• • • • 


» ■ 


, , 




. . 




1 


2 


53 


46 


• • 


■ « 


.. .. 


• • 






.. 1 .. 




G 


6 


no 


8<) 


• • 


• • 


.. I .. 


• » 






1 




1 


1 


36 


25 


• • 


• « 




• • 


• • 


■ « 












































• • 


1 
i 


1 


• • 


• • 


1 


62 




62 


61 


• • 

3 


• • 

15 


'2a> 


166 




' • 


• • 


• • 


• m 






■ • 






1 


1 


3() 


21 


• • 

• • 


• • 

• • 


• • 1 • • 


• • 












• • 

S 


« • 

4 


• • 

48 


• • 

44 


4 


113 


418 


561 


459 


2 


165 


29 


194 


182 


10 


• • 

80 


* • 

824 


697 


' 


• « 


« ■ 


• » 


• • 












1 


1 


24 


15 


1 


13 39 


51 


45 












4 


6 


187 


1.55 


1 


• • 
34 


95 


129 


• • 

80 


1 


83 




83 


**79 


• ft 

3 


■ V 

20 


237 


• • 
179 


« • 


• « 


• 


• • 


• • 


• * 


• • 




• ■ 


• • 


*0 


2 


6:> 


44 





159. 582 


741 


584 

~ rr — 


4 


310 


29 


339 


322 


39 


147 


2,n0() 


1,642 




» • 


















3 


3 


45 


35 




• • 










• • 




• • 


« • 


1 


15i 


244 


210 


1 \ [ 


» • 










• • 








3 

1 


3 

1 


38 
22 


36 
18 




• • 


















3 


3 


32 


28 


1 


• ■ 








.. 










1 


7 


185 


163 




1 














4 


4 


79 


68 




• • ■ • ' . • 




.. 










2 


2 


42 


32 


1 


5! 75| 80 


65 


.. 


' 








4 


\u 


134 


107 


1 


Sj 75| 80 


65 


• • 


•• 


• • 


• • 


• • 


34 


45 


831 


697 


• • 


• • 


» • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 
« • 


» » 


• . 


• • 


5 


5 


52 


45 


• « 


• • 


• • 


■ • 


• • 


« • 


.. 


■ * 


• • 


• • 


3 


3 


32 


20 


• • 




• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


.. 


• • 


• • 


> • 


1 


1 


IS 


15 


1 


32 118 


150 


116 


1 


64 




M 


66 


54 


., 6 


26 


294 


232 


1 • • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• « 


64 

I 

» 


• • 


m 9 


• • 


1 


1 


12 


6 


1 


39 


118 


150 


116 


1 


3 


66 

1 


54 


16 


3C 


4(« 


318 



SOBTH INDIA CONFSBBSOB aTATBTICS 
CBURCH. 



WOa TOM rJMJt SSDISO WITH Mh XOVgMBER IMU. 

nsABCBa 



S£ :^ !i.R 



NOBTH INDIA OONFBBKNCB STATISTIC 
CHDBCH 



FOB TRE TXAB SNDINQ TTITB Xth NOrSMBBR ISO*. 

nNANCBa 



NOSIU INDIA VOUFEREHCB STATISTim 
CHDRCH 



POR THE TBAB SNDINO WITH SOtk NO VEMBER im. 
nSANCBS. 



NOaiU INDIA COSFXRBNOB STATISTI08 
SUUM&RY OF 



FOR TBJB YJBAH XNDINO WITHSeth NOFEMBSB 1904. 
CBUBOH FINANCES. 



NOBTH INDIA CONFEhENCB STATISTICS 

SCHOOL 





VERNACULAR SCHOOLS. 






Boys 


* Schools. 






Oirls' Schools. 




CO 

1 
1 


No. ON Roll at 


1 


i 

St 

* 


No.< 


[>N Roll at 


• 


NAMES OF 
DISTRICTS. 


END OF TBAB. 


a 

s 


BND OF YEAB. 


ly Atten 
ar. 




• 

s 






• 

en 

a 






0^ 




£ 






5 




« 




5£ 




•5 


• 

a 




• 


-1 


o 


• 

OD 

C 

43 


Si 
o 


• 






B 




M 

a 


13 


&s 


a 


2 

i: 


• 




a 


9 B 




s 


xt 


o 


o 


► 


d 


Si 


o 


o 


> « 




525 


o 


525 


H 


< 


» 


O 


^ 


H 


< 


MORADABAD DiBTBIOT. 






















Amroha 


6 


47 


39 


86 


73 


4 


17 


8 


25 


21 


Babukhera 


3 


37 


13 


140 


30 


1 


6 


• • 


6 


5 


Bahjoi 


3 


13 


18 


34 


15 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


Chandausl 


9 


49 


54 


103 


80 


3 


18 


10 


38 


20 


Dhanaura 


4 


33 


3 


34 


35 


1 


8 


• • 


8 


5 


Oannaur 


1 


10 


5 


15 


13 


3 


30 


6 


26 


18 


Hasanpur 


5 


20 


40 


60 


46 


1 


5 


15 


20 


12 


Eanth 


3 


19 


6 


35 


31 


3 


13 


I 


14 


12 


Kundarki 


4 


13 


18 


31 


36 


. • 


• . 


• • 


• • 


• • 


Moradabad 


10 


144 


72 


316 


165 


26 


60 


443 


503 


435 


Narainlya 


4 


32 


a • 


38 


19 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


Rajpura 


3 


81 


7 


38 


30 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


Basulpur 
Sambbal 


4 


39 


3 


43 


36 


3 


9 


4 


13 


11 


4 


17 


33 


49 


43 


4 


7 


70 


77 


62 


Shahpur 
Sharlipur 


)i 


30 


5 


35 


18 


8 


10 


300 


310 


185 


4 


38 


• • 


38 


30 


3 


6 


• • 


6 


5 


Thakurdwara 


4 


37 


33 


59 


43 


4 


83 


10 


33 


23 


Total 


72 


577 


330 


907 


711 


56 


803 


766 


968 


814 


Pujbhit Distbict. 
















Raherl 


7 


54 


30 


74 


57 


1 


18 


3 


14 


9 


Bisalpur 
Sirauli 


2 


34 


• • 


34 


14 


1 


8 


4 


12 


8 


6 


77 


3 


80 


48 


5 


40 


• • 


40 


28 


Puraupur 


6 


65 


6 


71 


32 


3 


18 


3 


30 


9 


NawabgauJ 


3 


36 


4 


30 


37 


1 


8 


3 


10 


6 


Fatehganj West 
PlllbhTt 


2 


15 


8 


33 


16 


3 


10 


5 


15 


12 


8 


64 


33 


96 


71 


1 


• • 


35 


35 


26 


Mlrganj 
Shahi 


5 


63 


3 


64 


45 


3 


10 


• • 


.10 


7 


4 


55 


6 


61 


48 


3 


14 


6 


20 


12 


Rampur 


6 


73 


13 


85 


59 


1 


6 


• • 


6 


4 


Total 


40 


515 


93 


606 


407 


30 


1J6 


56 


183 


121 


BuDAON District. 






















Aonla 


1 


38 


13 


41 


38 


1 


5 


15 


30 


15 


Bilsf 


3 


17 


10 


37 


80 


1 


13 


4 


17 


13 


Bbamora 


4 


40 


5 


45 


35 


3 


80 


• • 


20 


18 


Blsaull 


1 


10 


30 


80 


35 


1 


13 


8 


20 


15 


Btnawar 


4 


30 


• • 


80 


80 


3 


15 


• • 


15 


13 


Budaon 


7 


106 


38 


134 


93 


10 


32 


170 


203 


138 


DataganJ 


1 


13 


4 


16 


12 


1 


9 


6 


15 


11 


Kakrala 


3 


16 


14 


30 


35 


3 


13 


16 


28 


34 


UJbaDi 


3 


48 


• • 


48 


40 


1 


18 


3 


30 


15 


Total 


86 


307 


94 


401 


306 


82 


136 


821 


357 


360 



JTOft rSTB YEAR ENDING WITH SOth NOVEMBER, 1904. 
STATISTICS. 



EUROPEAN AND ANULOVBENACULAR 

SCHOOLS. 


GRAND TOTALS. 


BoTB* Schools. 


Girls' Schools. 


• 
BID 


• 


Total Number on Rolls at 
ei.d of year. 


1 

c; 

^"1 


JO 

o 
ja 

>* 

& 

o 

1 

a 


No. ON Roll at 

END OF YEAR. 


Average Dally Attend- 
ance for year. 


8 

3 

«>« 

o 

E 

B 

a 


No. ON Roll at 

END OF YEAR. 


Average Dally Atteiid- 
ane for year. 


•5 ^ 

1 s 


5 
< 


• 

a 

• 

TZ 
JA 


• 

c 
«B 

ja 

o 

• 

a 
o 


5 


• 

on 

G 

Q 


• 

c 

i£ 

u 

JO 

O 

c 
o 

?5 


• 

o 


c 

hi 

i 


B 

at 




• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• ■ 

• • 

1 

• • 

• • 

• • 

1 

« • 

• • 


• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• t 

• • 

• • 

116 

• • 

• • 

6 

• • 

• • 

• • 


• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

224 

• • 

• • 

69 

• • 

• • 

• • 

293 

• • 

m » 

• • 

• • 

• • 

8 

• • 

• • 

m • 

8 

• • 

• • 

• • 

'ii4 

• • 

• • 

• • 


• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• ■ 

• • 

• • 

• • 

340 

• • 

• • 

75 

• • 

• • 
» • 


275 
"68 




' 1 


• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 
« • 

• • 

• ■ 

'i28 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

■ 


1 , , 

1 • • 

t 


130 

• • 


1 ** 

1 

'i20 

1 

i 120 

1 

1 

1 , , 


10 

4 


12 

r> 
3 

6 
6 
4 

3 
7 
9 
4 
6 
8 

131 

8 
1 3 
11 
9 
4 
5 
9 

1 

7 

1 7 


10 
4 

12 
9 
5 
3 
6 
3 
4 

62 
4 
3 
7 

16 
4 
6 
8 


Ill 
46 
24 

131 
42 
41 
80 
39 
31 
1,188 
if2 
38 
55 

201 

235 
44 
92 


93 
35 
15 

100 
30 
30 
58 
33 
26 

995 
19 
30 
47 

173 

203 
35 
66 


2 


122 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

22 

• ■ 

• • 

• • 

• • 

22 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

54 

• • 

• • 

• • 


415 

• • 

• • 

• ■ 

• • 

• • 

30 

• • 

• • 

• • 

30 

• ■ 

• • 

• • 

'i68 

• • 

• • 

• • 


343 

*25 
~ 25 

■ • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

'i40 

• • 

• • 

• • 

140 


1 


128 2 


130 


166 

8 
3 
11 
9 
4 
4 


« 
1 

8 


2,420 

88 
36 

120 
91 
40 
68 

131 
74 
81 
91 


1,988 


■ • 

■ • 

• • 

• • 

1 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 




• 


^ 






• • 


66 
22 
7« 
31 
33 
53 
97 
52 
60 
63 


1 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

1 

• • 

• • 

• ■ 


• • 


• • , • • 


• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

1 •• 

1 


70 

2 
3 

2 
6 
19 
2 
4 
4 

49 


70 

2 
3 

< 

4 

30 
2 
4 
4 


820 


553 


• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

1 

• • 

• • 


• • ■ 
1 

• > * 

. • i 

• • • 

• • 1 

t * * * 




1 
i 

• • 

• • 

1 

"71 

• ■ 
1 • 


61 
44 
65 
50 
45 
575 
31 
58 
68 

997 


53 
32 
53 
40 
33 
429 
23 
49 
55 


1 

• 


54 


114 


168 




1 


i 


71 


• 


• 


71 


58 

1 


58 


766 



HOJRTH INDIA CONFBhENCB 87'ATI8TIC8 

SCHOOL 









VERNACULAB SCHOOLS. 










Bore 


(* Schools. 






UiBLs* Schools. 






1 

CD 


No. ON Boll at 


1 


CO 

o 


No.( 


ON Boll at 


• 

•o 


NAMES OF 
DISTRICTS. 


END OF TBAB. 


[lily Atten< 
year. 


e 

5 


BND OF YBAB. 


a 
< 




1 

• 

s 






• 
CO 
B 
H 

9mm 






1 

a 


• 

« 

B 

i 


4>* 

« 

xi 

O 

» 


• 

4 


erage Di 
ance for 


V4 

o 
u 

£ 




t 
i 

% 


• 

3 


9 C 




s 


XI 


e 


o 


> 


a 


jS 


o 


o 


> C0 






s 


^ 


H 


< 


» 


o 


» 


H 


< 


OuDH District. 




















f 

1 


Bahraich 


2 


43 


118 


160 


143 


3 


3 


33 


36 


21 


fialrampur 


1 


1 


63 


63 


46 


• • 


• • 


« . 


• • 





Barabanki 


5 


10 


80 


90 


73 


1 


3 


18 


30 


14 


Bbinga 


1 


6 


30 


36 


35 


• • 




* . 


• • 


• 


Colonelgan j 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


ff t 




. . 


• » 





Ellenpur 


• t 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• f 




. . 


• • 


• 


Gonda 


2 


• • 


138 


138 


105 


• • 




. . 


• t 


• • 


Itaunja 


1 


4 


36 


30 


31 


t • 




. * 


• • 


• ■ 


Kaisarganj 


• t 


. . 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 




. . 


• fl 


« • 


Lakhimpar 


1 


5 


34 


39 


36 


3 


" 7 


13 


19 


18 


Lucknow, Eng. 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• « 


• • 




. . 


• • 





Luoknow, Hind. 


1 


• • 


33 


33 


33 


3 




37 


37 


33 


Nanpara 
Bal Barellly 


1 


3 


21 


34 


15 


. . 




. . 


• • 





3 


41 


95 


136 


110 


. . 




* . 


• • 





Sidhaull 


• • 


• • 


• • 


t • 


• • 


. * 




• . 


• • 





Sitapnr 


1 


6 


19 


25 


30 


« a 




* . 


• « 





KawabganJ 


1 


* • 


60 


60 


33 


1 




15 
106 


15 


12 


Total 


20 


118 


""cm 


803 


688 


9 


12 


117 


98 


Habdoi District. 




Bllgram 


3 


20 


35 


46 


35 


• • 


• • 


• 


• • 


• 


Hardol 


5 


45 


134 


169 


143 


3 


75 


1 • 


76 


60 


Mallawan 


3 


5 


83 


87 


36 


• • 


t • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


Pibani 


1 


4 


18 


33 


18 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• 


• 


Saflpnr 
Sbahabad 


3 


4 


38 


33 


28 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• 


• • 


5 


105 


35 


140 


138 


3 


30 


16 


45 


35 


Sandi 


4 


67 


23 


79 


68 


• • 


• • 


• • 





• 


Sandila 


2 


4 


38 


42 


33 


• • 


« • 


• 








Onao 


3 


10 


44 


64 


43 


• • 

4 


• • 


• ■ 


• 


• 


Total 


29 


854 


366 


620 


530 


105 


16 


120 


104 


1 

Gabbwal District. 










Dlkbwali 


5 


85 


37 


53 


45 


t 


• • 


« • 


• 


• • 


Kainur 


3 


12 


30 


33 


30 


• ■ 


• • 


• • 


• • 





LanRdowne 


1 


6 


13 


18 


16 


• • 


« « 


• • 


• 


• 


Paurl 


3 


13 


49 


63 


60 


1 


7 


9 


16 


13 


Bam nee 


1 


3 


9 


13 


6 


• • 


. . 


• • 


• 


. * 


Total 


13 


59 


117 


176 


136 


1 


7 


9 


16 


IS 

• 



FOB THX YEAB XSDINB WITH 30th SOVEMBER, 190*. 
STATISTICS. 



NOBTB INDIA CONFBItBSCS STATISTIOS 
SCHOOI. 



FOB THX TSAB ENDING WITH saik M^VBMHEB. tm. 
STATISTICS. 



RUROPBAN AND ANGLO VERNACULAR 

SCBOOLS. 



B0T8' Schools. 



o 
o 

& 

o 

s 

a 

a 






8 



No. OH Roll at 

BHD OP TKAB. 



oS 



4^ 



s 









a 



o 



i 






GiBi^* Schools. 



X 

3 

o 

u 

E 

a 
2 



No. oh Roll at • 
RHD op year. 



9 

e 
o 



CO 



< 



ORANI) T()TAI.H. 



3 



it 



> « 



© 

I 

a 

9 

'A 

a 



e! 




4? 




U3 


;si 


1 


s 





s 


a 

9 


1^ 

s "^ 


1/5 


'^.•s 


3 


3^ 


,0 


so 


H 


H 



34 



t • 



1*39 



103 



16 

5 

58 



79 



56 



261 



90 



390 



317 



S43 



70 
240 



310 



637 



480 



66 



192 



86 

845 

58 



389 
869 



258 



71 
196 

48 



315 



573 



23C 



84 



320 



23 

ioo 

Gl 
181 
504 



6 
10 



240 240 



84 



324 



82 



322 



29! 

m 

19oj 
514; 



29 

84 
51 

im 

48H 



20 

I 

1 
•I 

nt 

o 



1 
1 



38 



2 
4 
9 

24 

41 

79 



42 

1 
•» 



1 

20 
10 



88 



715 

2H 
51 



m\ 



* t 



10 
16 
32 



36 20 

II 6 

490; 207 

95 90 



20 

H 



16 



1.472 I.K4 



* 

14 

2V 
4:» 

103 

191' 



70 fH 
141) l^f) 

15H; 132 
W^*' 7</9 

1.6«2"ui5 

8,114 2,439 



511 



2i 



5r. 



45, 



11 



M, 



54 



4r, 



M 

4 



> 



9 
5 



4 



10. 



145 
51 



71 

45 



7'M r/» 



NORTH INDIA CONFEhBNCB STA T2STIC8 

SCHOOL 









VERNACULAR SCHOOLS. 








BOYE 


I' Schools. 




Girls' Schools. 




Number of Boys' Schools 


No. ON Roll at 


• 


CO 

O 


No. 


ON Roll at 


• 


NAMES OF 
DISTRICTS. 


END OP YEAR. 


Average Daily Attend 
ance for year. 


Number Of Girls' Scho 


KKD OF YEAR. 


Average Daily Atten 
ance for year. 


• 

CO 

c 

Xi 
o 


Non-Christians. 


Total. 


• 

oo 

a 

on 

■c 
o 


Non-Christians. 


Total. 


Bareilly-Kumaon Dist. 


27 


130 


715 


845 


602 


39 


80 


806 


886 


776 


Bijnor District 


41 


338 


122 


560 


349 


16 


107 


81 


18S 


135 


Budaon District 


25 


307 


94 


401 


308 


22 


136 


221 


357 


260 


Qarhwal District 


13 


59 


117 


176 


136 


1 


7 


9 


16 


12 


Hardol District 


29 


254 


366 


620 


530 


4 


105 


15 


120 


lOi 


Moradabad District 


72 


577 


330 


907 


711 


56 


202 


766 


968 


814 


Oudh District 


20 


118 


685 


803 


638 


9 


12 


105 


117 


98 


Pillbhlt District 


49 


515 


93 


608 


407 


20 


126 


56 


182 


121 


Grand Total 1904 


276 
251 


2.298 
2.279 


2,522 
2,386 


4,820 
4,665 


4,683 
3.584 


167 
163 


775 
825 


2,059 
2.075 


2.854 


2,330 

2,2.55 

65 

• • 


Total 1903 


2,900 


Increase 


25 


19 


136 


155 


1.099 


4 


• • 


• • 


• • 

66 


Docrease 


• • 


• . 


■ ■ 


• • 


• • 


• • 


50 


16 



WVB THS YEAH ENDING WITH SOOi NOVEMBER, 1904. 
STATISTIOa. 






RUaOPBAN AND A NOLO- VERNACULAR 

SCHOOLS. 



Boys' Schooub. 



o 
o 

« 
O 

o 

s 

a 



No. ON Roll at 

KND OP TBAB. 



2 

at 






a 



O 

I 

a 
o 



o 
H 



a 
-Ac 

iS 

«•- 
-I 

9 SB 

> 

< 



GiBfjB* Schools. 



s 

.a 
o 
99 



o 

u 

0) 

a 

25 



No. ON Roll at 


END OP TEAR. 




• 

00 

a 

00 




• 


«3 




00 


90 




a 

9d 


u 




43 


1 


• 

"3 


^ M 


«3 


^ o 


o 


o 


? 


f 
k 



I 

z: oB 

> flS 

<3 



GRAND TOTALS. 









• 

oo 


• 
00 

kl 


43 

08 




c> 




O 

o 




oo 


^ 


a 


O 


^ 


V 


tf 


« 


H 




«-« 


«H 


a 


o 


o 


o 


M 


»4 


^ . 


Ci 


a; 


a; u 


jo 


J3 


-C 08 


a 


a 




3 


9 


25 


'A 


»'S 


li 


'3 


-•^ 


<*a 


43 


"5 5 


o 


o 


o o 


H 


H 


H 



a 






a 

9 

> 

Si 

o 



8 



243 



SA 



32 



627 861) 



114 16S 



2 128 



159 



22 



20 



18 



118 



75 



2»3 



582 



8 



150 



573 



140 



116 



80 65 



630 



627 



9 



1,817 



1,671 



146 



415 



741 



30 



2,453 



2,227 



226 



343 



584 



25 



1,846 



5041 



54 



10 



71 



64 



o" 



514 



56 



71 



Cy) 



488 



79 



191 



45 ",8 Hi 64 



58; 49 



54 



13 



1,874 14 



28 



128 



310 



3 130 



29 



339 



1,131 



1,161 



45 



30 



15 



1.176 



1,191 



30 



16 



34 



121) 131 



322 



39 



70 



58 



36 



45 



106 



147 



70 



1,087 476 



1,1 W 



446 



30 



777 



727 



50 



15 13 



3,114 



704 



997 



40S 



820 



2,420 



2,000 



8^ 



11,283 



10,983 



300 



2,439 



5>9 



766 



318 



6V7 



1.9S8 



1,642 



553 



9,932 



8,813 



1,119 



ANNUAL REPORT 

NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH 



BCNOLD, I HAVE SET lEFOIIE THEE 
AN OPEN DOOR. 




DuP EXCh 
DRSW [tmoL St 



JUBILEE NUA/VBER 



1856 ^-^i]— ^ 1906 IK^ 



* * 



• X 



■ % 



INDIA 



rwing tlie territory occfXfki }g 
e North India Conicremce. 



SM «M 



Scale Of Miles. 



r 



\ ..■•,' 



\ 



I 

r 



-*^. 



t 




lalcuttaO 



< ; i £.^=2 3L s- ) > 



UNITED PROVINCES OF AORA AND OUDH 
The sMtign Eui of tk lUver QuigM 
is occupied by tbe 
NoKh India Confereno«. 



Rev. B. T. Badley, 
LucKNow. India. 



REPORT 



OF TUB 



FORTY -SECOND SESSION 



OF THE 



north India Conferctte 



»s.. . , 



OF THR 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 



HBLD AT 



Moradmbad, January ^-9^ 1 906, 



t^ 



Xucltnow : 

METHODIST PDBLISflINO HOUSE 

1906, 



■ V 






PREFACE. 



A Few Words about the Maps. 

The maps at the beginDiDg of this Keport are iDtended to illus- 
trate the work of the North India Couference. It will be seen that 
the Conference occupies all that sectioD of the United Provinces of 
Agra and Oudh which lies east of the river Ganges, and in the 
extreme north'.includes also a portion which lies on the west side of the 
stream. On .the north-east it borders on the forbidden lands of 
Tibet and Nepal, and will, doubtless, in God's own time, become the 
natural highway for that Gospel which the Lord sends alike to 
those who ask for it and those who oppose its coming. The portion 
of the United Provinces not included in the territory of the North 
India Conference, forms apart of the North- West India Conference 
of our Church. 

The area of this tract of land, roughly estimated, is about 50,000 
square miles. It has a population of nearly 31,noo,000 people, 
or one-tenth of the total population of India. Of these people the 
work of the North India Conference touches about 17,000,000, the 
south-eastern part of the territory not yet being really occupied by 
us. In the greater part of this whole region our Church is the only 
one which has any work. The Church Missionary Society and the Wes- 
leyan Methodist Mission occupy the south-east as far up as Lucknow, 
and the London Missionary Society has work in parts of the mountain 
tracts, but otherwise the work of evangelization in this vast section of 
India is in the hands of our Church. The cities and towns marked on 
the map are the chief centres of our work , eight of them being the 
headquarters of the Presiding Elders. They do not represent al^ 
the stations which we occupy. The appointments as they appear in 
this Report, show that 87 centres are occupied by 105 members of our 
Conference. This, of course, leaves out of account the hundreds of 
villages in which our work is found. 

Our total Christian community within the bounds of the North 
India Conference, is just about 50,000 or one person to each square 
mile. In other words, there is one member of our Church to every 
■iz hundred and twenty non-Christians in the United Provinces. 
This is not a very high proportion, but it is remarkable when it is 
remembered that only fifty years ago we had not a single representative 



in all India. The average rate of growth of our Conference has, there- 
fore, been 1,000 members per year. Moreover, from this one Conference 
have sprung five others in India proper, each occupying vast tracts 
of land and, all put together, taking in nearly the whole of India. A 
sixth Conference has been added in Burma, and still another in 
Malaysia with the Philippine Islands as a separate field. These ad- 
ditional Conferences have among them a membership of almost 
150,000. The North India Conference, therefore, has within its bounds 
somewhat over one-fourth of the total Methodist population of the 
Southern Asia field, or one-twentieth of the whole Protestant popula- 
tion of India. 

CtoBoeraing the Jubilee. 

The Jubilee of the Methodist Episcopal Mission in India will 
be celebrated this year. The celebration will be held during the 
latter part of the year in Bareilly, for it was in that city Dr. 
William Butler opened our work in 1856. Naini Tal, however, has 
the honor of having opened the first regular place of worship atid 
of having started the first school. To Lucknow goes the honor of 
being the place where the North India Annual Conference was 
organized by Bishop Thomson in 1864. Hence it is that these thred 
cities are given prominence on the map. 

Would that the news of this Jubi lee could penetrate to ever^ 
home in Methodism ! Please do your share in giving publicity to 
the good news. We seek a larger interest in the thought and gifts, an4 
especially in the prayers of the Church st large. Should those com0 
across this Report who are interested to know more about our work, 
they will find much valuable information in the Presiding Elders^ 
Reports, to which, and the statistics at the end of this book, they ara 
referred for details and a summary of our work for the year 1905. 

In concluding this preface, it is desired to put on record our 
gratitude to the Lord our God for the marvellous blessing which has 
rested upon our Church during its fifty years in India. We praise 
Qod for the victories with which He has crowned the work com- 
mitted to our Church in this great land, and with an ever-inoreasing 
faith look confidently forward to the mightier triumphs of the future. 

B T. B. 



MSTORJC SUMMARY. 



856 September 23rd, Dr. William Butler laDded in Calcutta; reached 

LuckDOw November 29th and Bareilly io December ; Mission 
established. 

857 May 18th, outbreak of the Mutiny in Bareilly, work closed; Naini- 

Tal occupied. 

858 September IHh, Lucknow occupied. 

859 First Annual Meeting^ held at Lucknow in August ; Bareilly re- 

occupied ; Moradabad, Shahjahanpur and Bijnor occupied. 

860 Budaon occupied. 

861 Sitapur and Lakhimpur occupied ; Press established at Bareilly. 

864 December 8th, India Mission Conference orgfanized at Lucknow 

by Bishop Thomson ; Rae-Bareli and Gonda occupied. 

865 P«uri (Oarhwal) and Sambhal occupied. 

866 Mission College projected, to be located at Lucknow ; Barabanki 

occupied ; Press removed to Lucknow. 

868 Bahraich occupied ; Moradabad High School projected. 

869 Panabpur occupied. 

870 Lai Bagh Girls' School founded ; Bishop Kiogsley's visit ; 

Bishop (then Mr.) William Taylor landed in Bombay, Novem- 
ber 20th. 

871 Cawnpore and Hardoi occupied. 

872 Bareilly Theological Seminary established. 

873 Allahabad occupied ; India Mission Conference became an 

Annual Conference. 

874 Bishop Harris' visit ; Pithoragarh and Dwarahat occupied ; 

Cawopore ** Memorial School " opened. 

875 Agra occupied. 

876 Bishop Andrews' visit ; November 9th, South India Conference 

organized at Bombay by Bishop Andrews. 

877 Centennial School opened at Lucknow. 
879 Bishop Bowman's visit. 

8dO Boys* High School at Naini-Tal opened (Now Philander Smith 
College. ) 

1881 Bishop Merrill's visit ; '' Delegated Conference " or Central Com- 
mittee held in July at Allahabad. 



1882 GirW High School, " Wellesley, '' NainiTal, estahliahed. 

1883 Bishop Foster's visit. 

1885 Bishop Hurst's visit. First session of Central Conference at 
Bareilly ; Bishop (then Mr.) W. F. Oldham opened the 
work at Sing^apore, Straits Settlements. 

1887 Bishop Ninde'a visit : Beng^al Conference orgfanized by Bishop 

Ninde. 

1888 Rev. J. M. Thoburn elected Missionary Bishop for India ; Reid 

Christian College and Isabella Thoburn College established 
and affiliated to the Allahabad University. 

1889 Malaysia Mission work organized. Bishop Fowler's visit. 

1891 Visit of Bishop A. W. Wilson of the M. E. Church, South. 

1892 Bombay Conference organized. 

1893 North- West India Conference organized ; Bengal-Burma Con- 

ference organized ; Malaysia Mission Conference organized : 

Visit of Bishop Mallilieu. 
18»6 Bishop Walden's visit 
1898 Bishop Foss' and Dr. Goucher's visit. Work opened in the 

Philippine Islands. 

1900 Rev. E. W. Parker and Rev. F. W. Waroe elected Missionary 

Bishops for Southern Asia. 

1901 Burma Mission Conference organized by Bishop Warne. 

1904 Rev. J. E. Robinson and Rev. W. F. Oldham elected Missionary 

Bishopn for Southern Asia ; Bishop H. W. Warren's visit. 

1905 Central Provinces Mission Conference organized by Bishop 

Warne; Philander Smith Institute and '*Oak Openings" 
High School amalgamated under the name of the ** Philander 
Smith College" ; The beginning of the great Revival in India 
and the work of our Church. 



Contents. 



RuuBS OF Order — — .... .... Pag^e 4 



Officers and Committees of Conference .... „ 5 



Conference Boll .... .... ... „ lo 



Disciplinary Questions .... ... ,, 13 



Appointments ... .... .... .... ,, 16 



Conference Journal .... .... .... .... ,, 20 



List of Conference Sessions . « • . .... .... ,, 39 



Reports OF COMfifiTTEEs ••• — ,, 41 



memoirs .... .... ... .••• .*.« I) Oo 



Courses OF Study ..., .... .... ,, 62 



List OF LOCAL Preachers .... ... .... ,, 68 



Presiding Elders' Reports .... ,, 73 



Statistics 



•••• •••• •••■ •••• 



*t 



RULES OP ORDER. 

Qawanin i Tartiib. 



1. Kiofarana k( har ek kirraw&l, siwde us ke, ki lis ko Mfr i 
Majlis pesh kare, 'arz karne se shurii* hogf : aur kisf ka haqq nahfn, 
ki wuh bole, jab tak ki Mfr i &iajlis us ko nam lekar ij&zatnaae. Jab 
tak Kdnfarans ke sdmhne kof ' arz pesh na kf j&we, kisf b^t par babs 
nahfn ho sakti. 

2. Kof naf 'arz yd re^olushan nahfn pesh ho saktd, jab tak us 
k^, ki jis par guftogu ho rahf hai, faisala na ho j&we ; ya'ne ^w&h 
wuh qubiif kiyd. jdwe y& nd-manztir. 

3. Ear sharfk kd haqq hai, ki jis 'arz par wuh bolnd ohdhe, bole, 
lekin pdnch minat se ziyada ek hf waat nahfn bol saktd, na kisf 
mazmun par ek b&r se ziy&da, jab tak ki kull shurakd, jo boln& ch&hte 
hain, na bol chuken ; siw& is ke, ki K&nfarans kh&ss ij&zat de. 

4. Har ek sharfk ka haqq hai, ki kisf waqt, jab mub&hisa ho 
rahd hai. zail kf 'arzon men se, jis ko ch&he pesn kare :— (M Multawf 
kiyd jdna. (2) Muqarrar waqt tak multawf rakhn&. (3) Mez par 
rakhni y& (4) Tarmfm karnd; in 'arzon k&, jis silsile par darj hain, 
lihdz kiyd jdweg&. 

5. Har ek sharfk jab bolnd. ch&he, apnf jagah par khapA ho, aur 
ba-tahzfb Mfr i Majlis se ijdzat m&nge ; aur kisf halat men, kisf kf 
badgof y& n&-mun&sib bdten na kare. 

6. Jab kof sharfk ij&zat p&kar bol rah& hai, wuh rok& nahfn 14 
saktd, td-waqte ki wuh bol na chuke, siw&e 3re aur 8wen q&ndn kg 
bamiljlb. 

7. Har ek K&nfarans ke sharfk ko mazdj hai, ki jab us kf samajh 
men kisf ek b&t par k&ff bahs ho chukf hai, 'arz kare, ki bagair aur 
ziyada bahs ke us amr par vote livd j&we, agar vote karnewdle ^huraki 
men se do tih&f is 'arz ko qubdl k%ren, to bil^-bahs pahle-w&lf 'arz 
pesh kf j&we. 

8. Jab kisf kf samajh men qdnun ke khi14f guftogd ho rahf hai 
us ko ij&zat hai, ki fauran is b&t ko pesh kare, aur agur Mfr i Majlis 
us kf bdt ko qubdl kare, us hf waqt se us 'uzr ke mutdbiq guftogd 
rokf jdwegf. 

9. Mfr i Majlis kull q&ndnf suwdl kd faisala karegd, har hil men 
us ke faisale par 'amal ho&fd, siwde is ke, ki arar jam&'at Kdnfarans 
ko apil kare. Tfn shuraka, jo Mfr i Majlis ke faisale ke khil&f hon, 
K&niarans ko apfl kar sakte hain. ' 

10. Mfr i Majlis kull kamittfdn muqarrar karegd, siw&e un l^h&ss 
ke, jin ko ki Kdnfarans muqarrar karnd chdhe. 

11. Kull 'arzen yd rezolushan, jin ko kof Kdnfarans kd sharfk 
pesh kare, likhkar pesh karnd hongf, agar kof Kdnfarans kd sharfk 
yd Mfr i Munshf darkhwdst kare. 

12. Khare hoke vote liyd jdwegd, agar tfn shurakd kisf waqt aisf 
darkhwdst karen. 

13. Hdn aur nahfn se rote ho saktd hal^ agar pdnch shurakd aisf 
darkhw&at ^aran . 



OFFICERS OF THE CONFERENCE 

BISHOP P. W. WARNE, d a 
Secretary 

B. T. BADLEY, P.O., LUCKNOW, 



AsaistanC* SecreLary 

P. 8, Hyde. 

Statistical Secretary 

Gang A Nath. 

MlMkMi Treasurer 

J. N. West. 



Vemaodar Secretary 

D. A. CHOWFIN. 

Correspondli^ Secretory 

W. A. Mansbll. 
Conferenoe Treasurer 

R. I. Pauoett. 



Finance Committee 



^ — *-• — ■*■ 

rresKieiib 

Bishop P, W. Warne. 

Treasurer 



Ix Officio 

J. H. Messmorr 

p. L. Nbeld 
J H. Gill 
William Peters 

S. TUPPER 

L. A. Core 

J. W. Robinson 

G. H. Prey 



J. N. West. 



W. A. Mansell. 



Elected Members 

C. L. Bare 
S. S. DeaSe 
G. C. Hewes 
H A. Cutting 

H. L. MUKRRJEE 

D. M. Butler 

Alternates 

B, T. Badley 
J. Black stock 
S. b. Pinch 
Gang A Nath. 



Auditing Committee 

Ciunni^afi 
G. C. Hewes. 



J. Blackstock, p. S. Hyde 

T. C. Badley, Kay Silas 

G. W. Briggs. 



R. I. Paucett, W, A. Revis 

Miss Wright, Miss Mudge 

H. L. Mukerjee. 



6 CX)NF£BENCE OFFICfiB8 

Board of Education 

Preddent 

L« A. Core. 

SeoreCftry and TVeosurw 

W. A. Mansell. 



WiLUAM Peters 

H. L. MUKERJEB 

C. E Simpson. 



Miss Sellers 
Miss Nichols 
Mrs. Parker. 



J. H. MSSSMORB. 



Board of Examiners 

Rcji^Mtrar 

C. L. Bare. W. A. Maitsktu 

S. KNOWLBS I H. L. MUKERJSB 



B. T* Badlby 

C. L. Bare 
8. S. Dease 

W. R. BOWEN. 



D. A. Chowfin 

JWALA blNQB 
J. THOMPKINSON 
S. B. FiNCB. 



Prabhu Dayal. 



Standing Committees 
Statistlos.— Ganqa Nath, J. R. Chitabibar, 

State o! Ohveli.— S. S. Dease, H. J. Adams, G, W. Briggs, 

Bahadur Singh. 

TemperaBoa.— P. 8. Hyde, J. Thompkinson, J. 8. Samdbl, 

Joshua Solomon. 

Sunday Schools. —J. N. West, J. H. Smart. Lazar ShaB| 

Yaqub Singb. 

Deal Hiaiionary Soeioty.— T. C. Badley, President; H. L. 

MUKERJEE, Secretary ; J. R. Chitambar, Treasurer ; 

Wm. Peters, J. W. Robinson, G. H. Frey. 

Pabllsliliig Hinatoa.— The Secretaries and Agent of the 
Methodist E^busbing House, Lucknow. 

Pablio Woralilp.— Presiding Elder and E^eacber in Cbaroe, 

Bareilly. 



CONFERENCE OFFICERS 

Cofnmittee on Conference Relations 

W. A. Mansbll, C. L; Babe, H. K. List, 
Yaqub au, John Rlagk- 
took, h. a. cottino 



Bpworth LeaflTue— Board of Control 
P. S. Htdb, J. W. Robinson, Miss Waugh, Mrs. Cobb. 

Conference Board of Stewvda 
J H. HaBBMOSB, H. A. ODTXDiO, J. F. Samuel. 



Deaconess Work— Conference Deaconess Board 



8. 8. Oeasb. Mbs. Pabkeb, 



SamublTuppeb 
Matthew Stephen 

W. R. BOWEN. 



Mbs. Neeud 
Miss Ruddiok 
Miss Habdie. 



Triers of Appeals 

W. A. Mansell, J. Blaokstock, p. S, Hyde, S. B. Finch, 

Yaqub Shah, Matthew Stephen, 

C. L. Babe. 



Sunday School Union 

R. I. Pauoett, President; Miss Hoge, Vice'Fresideixt ; 
G. W. Bbiqos, Secretary and Treasurer, 



Conference Historical Society 

L. A, Cobb, President ; G. C. HeWes, Chronicler ; 
Miss Habdie, Secretary. 



Conference Literary Society 
S. B. Dease, President ; L« A. Core Secretary. 



8 CONFERENCE OFFICERS 



Trustees of the Theological Seminary- 

L. A. Core, S. S. Dease, T. L. Ingram, Esq., 1907 - N. L. Hockey, 
P. L. Neeld, F. Welsh, Esq., 1908 ; J. H. Gill, D. M. Butler, 
G. L. Barb, 1900 ; J. B. Thomas, 1907 ; Rookwbll 
Clancy, 1908, North- West India Confereoce ; T. 8. John- 
son, Central Provinces Mission Conference ; Bishop 
J. M. Thoburn, Bishop F. w. Wari^s, Bishop 
J. E. Robinson, Bishop W. P. Oldham, 
Ex Officio ; W. A. Mansbll, Ex 
Officio Secretary, 



Isabella Thoburn College Board of Governors. 

To retire in 1907 :— Rockwell Clancy, C L. Bare, Sir Harnam 

Singh, Miss L. Singh. To retire In 1908:— J. H. Messmore, M. B. 

Cameron, Esq., Hon. MRi Bilgrami, Miss E. L. Knowles. 

To retire in 1909 :-L. A. Core, Mrs. L. S. Parker, T. L. 

Ingram, Esq., A. W. U. Pope, Esq., o. l sv Ex Oficio, 

Bishops J. M. Thoburn, F. w. Warne, J. E. 

Robinson, Miss F. L. Nichols, 

J. W. Robinson. 



Trustees of Reid Christian College 

William Peters, W. A. Mansell, P. M. Buck, 1906; 
J. w. Robinson, J. N. West, J. C. Butcher, 
1907 ; F. L. Neeld, L A. Core, Rock- 
well Clancy, 1908; Bishop 
J. M. Thoburn, and Bishop 
F. W. Warne, Ex Officio; 
C. L. Bare, Secretary ^ 
Ex Offinio. 



Trustees of Bishop Parker Memorial High School 

W. A. Mansell, H, A. Cutting, 1907; F. L. Neeld, 
N. L. RocKEY, Wm. Peters, 1908 ; Ex 

Officio The Presiding Elder op the 

District and the Principal 
OF THE School. 



Committee on Management of Naini Tal Schools 

Bishop F. W. Warne, F. L. Nerlo, P. S. Hyde, J. W. 
EiOBiNsoN, W. A, Mansell, s. s. Deasb, C l. B.ar^. 



OONFBRENCB OFFICCRS 

Bzecotive Committee of Oak <* Openings/' High School 

Bishop F.« W, Warns, F. L. Neeld, Samuel Knowles, J. H. 
Messmobe, p. S. Qydrl s. s. Dease, W. a. mansell, 

J. Wk HBBIKBON. 



OEBcial Visitors for Nattii Tal Schools 
O. L. Bare, L. a. Core. 



To Preach the Annual Conference Sermon 
L. A. Core; AUemaU P. 8. Hyde. 



Visitors to Theological Seminary 
J W. RoBiNSOM, B. S. Finch. 

Licensed Deaconesses 

Miss HOQB, MlSSS00TT« MlSS BARDIE, MiSS A. MEANS, 

Miss Browne, Miss Suluvan, Miss Ingram, 
Miss Sheux^n, miss Hoddick. 



Mrs. Tuokbr, Mrs. C. Richards. 



CONtERENCE ROLL 

CLASS A.— Uders in fuO comieclioii who liave 0OB4ileUed 



Adams, BoraoeJ. 
Bsdley, Brenton T. 
Bahadur Singh 
Baldeo Parshad 
Baosi Dhar 
Bare, Charles L. 
Baa ant Ram 
Rihari Lai I. 
Blhari Lai II. 
Bbikki Lai 
Blackstock, Joha 
Bowen, W. R. 
Bulaqi Singh 
Butler, David M . 
Childs, Nathaniel R 
Chowfin, David A. 
Cocker, Benj. F, 
Core, Lewis A. 
Craven, Thomas 
Cutting, Hiram A. 
Dease, Stephen S. 
Ditto, Frank S. 
Dysell, Joseph 
Falls, Seneca 
Faucett, Robert I. 
Fazl Masih 
Finch, Superian B. 
Franklin, R. S. 
Frey, Geo. H. 
Ganga Nath 
Gill, Joseph H. 
Green wold, F. W. 
Hancock, C. 
Harris, Mangal L. 
Hewes, Geo. C. 
Humphrey, James L. 
Jawala Sineh 
Jhukkan Lai 
Jordan, James 
Kanhai Singh 
Kay Silas 
Kidder, D. P. 
Knowles, Samuel 



1874 Lazar Shah 
1899 List, Henry K. 

1898 Mohammed Hasan Jan 
i893 Mansell, Sabine 

1895 Mansell, William A. 

1880 MoArtbur, A. G. 

1891 Mazhar-ul- Haqq 

1892 Messmore, James H 
18*^9 Misri Char an 

1894 Mukerjee, H. L. 

1875 Mitchell, H. B. 

1882 Neeld, Frank L. 
1905 Nisam All 

1893 Patras, Benjamin 
1904 Paul, Chidu S. 

1892 Peters, William 

1884 Phillip, B. S 
1889 Phillip, Samuel 

1870 Prabhu Dayal 
1874 Prem Masih 

1881 Prem Singh 

1901 Presgrave, Grafton D. 

1896 Robinson, John W. 
3886 Rockey, Noble L. 

1899 Samuel, John F. 

1893 Samuel, Joshua S. 

1894 Scott, Thomas J. 

1893 Scott, Warren M. 
1889 Shiply, Chales 
1896 Smart, Joseph H. 

1871 Speake, William T. 
1879 Stephen, Matthew 

1886 Solomon, Joshua 
19U4 Thompkinson, James 
1891 Tupper, Samuel 
1857 Walter, John H. 

1894 Waugh, James W. 
1898 Wesley, Arthur S. 

1883 West, John N. 

1887 Wheeler, Samuel 
19(>5 Yaqub All 

1885 Yaqub Shah 
1858 



1904 
1889 
1895 
1892 
1889 
18»3 
1893 
1861 
1906 
1886 
1886 
1881 
1806 
1887 
1889 
1879 
1893 
1891 
1897 
1906 
1898 
1894 
1892 
1884 
1893 
1896 
1863 
1888 
1885 
1897 
1890 
1882 
1896 
1898 
1889 
1905 
1859 
1905 
1893 
1889 
1905 
1882 



CONFERENCE ROLL 



11 



GLASS B. T-M«aAm III fiiH coineclion in tlv^iet of Ike foiirtli year. 



Guthrie, George W. 


Elder 


Yaqub Singh 


Elder 


Devi 8. HukiU 


Elder 


Hyde, PrestQU S. 


Elder 


Roberto, John 


Elder 


Sigler, HMtfy 0. 


Deacon 


* 

CLASS C-^Men^bert in fidl coimecCioii ii 


Briggs, G^. .W. 
Ozanne^ .Hubert 0. 


Elder 


Deacon 


SimpsoiiitGhas.^ B. 


Deacon 


Uhwari Dae 


Deacon 


FerrU Wi^tke 


Deacon 



• • • • 



• • ■ • 



1004 
1900 
1903 
1002 
1903 
1903 



>f 



»f 



:: '; GLASS D.-Preadiers on TriaL 

Badley, iMbdot^O. Deacon II Year 

Chiiambar^ lashwaht R. 

Revis, Wnu A. Deacon 

Prabhu Dae- - Elder 

WiUoD, Dhappan 

Norton, John W. 

Briscoe, Abel 

Fredriclr, Jokn 

Makkhan L al 



ti ' 
I Year 

.■ »» 

n 
fi 
tl 



• • • • 



1004 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1904 



* 4 • ' 



• • t 



• • • • 



• • • • 



1905 
1905 

1905 
1906 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1906 



; SUMMARY. 

> . . . . ._^ 

Missionaries in full connection 
Hindus*^ani Ministers in full connection 



• • • • 



Missionaries on Trial 
Hindustani Preachers on Trial 



Total 



• • • • 

• • • 



Grand Total 



25 
71 



96 
2 
7 



105 



12 



CONFERENCE ROLL 



MttSKMAMtS ntKSEin'-CX)MhCMCN6l/l9(A. 

BiBhop F. W. Warne, D D., Pruidin^^ 



Badley, B. T. 
Badley, T. C. * 
Bare. C. L. * 
BlaoUtook, J. * 
Blackgtook, Hiss. 
Briggs, O. W. 
Browne, Miss. 
Ctew, Urm •> 
Core, L. A. * 
Deaae, 8. 8. * 
Ditto, F. 8. • 
EDglish, Miss. 
Fauoett, R. I. * 
OIU, J. H. ♦ 
OimsoD, Miss. 
Hardie, Miss. 
Henry, Miss. 
HUl, Miss. 
Hoge, Miss. 
Byde, P. S. ♦ 
Knowles, S. * 
Lewis, Miss. 
Hewes, G. C. * 
Means, Miss A. 



Mansell, W. A. * 
Messmore, J'. H. * 
Mudge; MUi. 
Need, F. L. • 
Nichols, Misa^ 
Northrup, Miss. 
Organ, Miss 
OasHMM^H.-^/*. 
Parker, Mrs. 
Reed, Miss, 
Revis, W. A. 
Hob&sdtt, 7. W. 
Robi&aoo^ Miss^ 
Ruddick, Nitffs. 
Soott, Miss. 
Sellers, MlM. 
Simpson, C E. 
SiAgh, Miss. 
Sttflivan, Miss. 
Thobunii Hw% 

Wilson, Miss. 
Wright, Miss. 



LIST OF VISITORS. 

Mrs. J. Ellen Foster, Washington, D.C., U. 8. A. 
Mrs. P. T. Wilson, North' West India Conftrenm. 
Mansell, Henry „ „ „ 

Buok, P. Mt If »t If 

Roberts, E., Norik indkma (^/erence, V. 8. A, 
RoberU, J. „ „ „ „ 

I rick, T. 



If 



II 
II 



If 



•I 



* And wife. 



Rev. TILLIAM BUTLER, D.D., 

The Fouader of the Methodiil Episcopal Mlsdon In IndU. 

Born 1818. Ditd 1899. 



"I! •»• " 






USOPUNARY aUSSnONS 



I. Wig>af>t» ■mini iyftiMiir,aii frf Wirt Ctihttaotgf 

Ffjok a. OttMH /n»i ^ort*- IFert iiiitt^ 
Xoi, /ram fienyoi Cfei^ereiice. 



Nods. 



I. Vfei iMm iMi iMiiftl M OrtlntUt, 
None. 



4. Vto tai« feMB iMtifti « Mai t 

(a) fti IteilM •! Flrtt Tmt. 

Aba BriMooe, /(Am Fndrick. 

WlB MMtot •! fhM Tmt. 

None. 



I. Wit iATt iMB Cfitla«t« mi Trial t 

(a) la Iteilaa ai PinI Taar. 

Jok^ W. Notion, Dhappan Wilton, Mokkkan LaL 

(6) teltailaa af Saoaaa Taav. 

Theodora O. BadUy, Jaakwant H. VhUambar, WiUiam A. Nenit, 
Frabhu Da$. 

(«) la Mailaa of nir4 Taar . 
None, 

(d) la Stailaa af Foarii Taar. 
None. 

•• Wia iava iaaa MaeaatiaaaA t 

Nirmal Singh 

T. Wia iaTa baaa MaUttai fata PaU HaaAtrailp ? 
(a) BiaaM aai Oriafaai Daaaaaa tila yaar. 

iMhwaTi Dob, Ferris WiUl^, 

(6) BiaaM aai Oriafaai Daaaaaa praffaaalj. 

George W. Drigge, Herbert 0, Oeanne, Charke B. 8imp§on. 

t tniJIIiiaianiaratikfaifaaaiTifiiTaarf 

(a) Aiatftlai fala PaU laaiiaraifi lifa yaar. 

Oeorgo W. Briggs, BetbeH O. Oumm, Ohmrke M, aimpem. 
lakwaH Dae, Ferrie Wiltke. 

(6) Ualllai fata Fan WaaiiaraUf frarlaaslT 

None. 



14 



Oe^TTt W. Gmikrie, Tmjiib Sm^ Dai S. BmkaU, 




la) Mm 

(Mrag MatSk, CkSdOa SirngfL - i.:.^ : 

16) taiir Wwlwiffy Bid». 

Frabhu Ikm. fFOtem A. ifcvtty Aioibffs a JMf^* 
(e) Oiiir iMfanrT Bito. 
None. 



• ^— — w* !■ 



tl 

(a) IsUmI 

^odir Shakt LaekmoM SimgfL 

Albert Qulab, Frahhu Das, Yaq^b Singh 

{€) Vm§m twmUnwn Ivto* 
Hone* 



- . I 



• I- 



13 W«f Ifct Ouur aetor 0f eadi PMusher ezaatMi ? 

Tbts WM strictly dooe as the aame ofeadi preaoher wa^ 
oftlled Id open Conrereoce, 

14« Wto k«TS bsra Traitierrsd, ani la what CoafsrsBoaa ? 

H, O. Ozaone to America ; J. C. Botcher to NortH-Wel^ti?dkai a 
CoDfereoce ; HarkuA Wilson to Central Proirfooes. 

IS. WhahafsDlai? 

D. L. Thoburn. 

It. Who kSTS hsen Looatsd at their own Bequest ? 

None. 

17. Wko have heen Looatst ? 

None. 

18. Wko hate Wlthfrawa ? 

None* 

19. Who have heea paralttal to Wtthlraw naier ObarflfB ar Cpfi|jUla|s? 

None. 



« I 



M Wh0 havo heoa BipelM V 

' None. 

II. What other peraoaal Botatloa tfiooM be made ? 
None. 



biSCiPUkARY QUESTIONS l5 

tS. Wkt m fh« Svptnmttiry PrMektrtV 

None. 

S3. Vte tfi ttt S^vauiaM ftMWktn ? 

J. L. Humphrey, J. W. WAugh, Tbomas Craven, Samuel 
feowlee, T. J. ScoU. 

84. Wto ait tta Trtet ef Apptala "^ 

W. A. Mansell, John Blackstock, Yaqub Shah, P. 3. Hyde, 
a B. Ftoch, Matthew Stephen, G, L. Uare, 

85. Vkal ia tta Stattatleal Btfarl far ttla year? 

(SeeSfciHtfte.) 

M. Wlat la tta Aggrtcato af tlia BraeYtfaat O^Uaetloaa ordarai by tM 
Oaaaral Oaafartttoa «a rapartai by tha Coaf araaea Tr«asanr ? 
Rs« 2,560 

17. Wkat an tlia Clalas n tk« Coafaranoe Piii4? 
Ra. 1,20(1. 

88. Wlat kaa baaa Baeaiyai aa tbaaa Glalma, aa4 bow baa it baaa Applied 
Pull amouni waa received and applied. 

29. Whara ara tha Praaeliani Statloaed ? 
( 8ee AppoinlmeniB, ) 

M. WiMra ahall tha Next Caalaraaea ba bald ? 
Bareilly. 



CONFERENCE APPOINTMENTS 

• ■ . ••• 



North India Conferenoe AfipohttnieiitSt 1906. 

BARETLLY DISTRICT. 

Pretiding Elder, Tb be BuppVed, 

ShabjahaApur, East, John Blackstook, Pretn Siogh. 

,, West, G. D. Presgrave. 

Dilawarganj, (Oist. Shahjahaapur.) Warrea Soott« 
Paoahpur, John Blackstook. 
Powayan, R. 8. Praoklin. 
Mohamdl. John Blaokstock. 
Jalalabad, Misri Cbaran. 
Tilbar, H. K. LUt. 
Miranpur-Katra, B. F. Cooker. 
Kbera Bajera, John Fredrick. 
Faridpur, C, 8. Paul. 
Barellly, 8. S. Dease. 

„ Hindustani Church, W. R Bowen. 

,, Sadar Bazar, A. 6. Mo Arthur. 

„ Theological Seminary, W. A. Mansell, Principal ; 8. 8. 
Dease, Vice- Principal ; H. L. Mukerjee, Jawala Singh, T. 
J. Scott, Professor Smeritus of Systematic Theology. 
Superannuate, T. J. Scott. 

BUDAON DISTRICT. 

Wm. Peters, Presiding Elder (P. O. Budaon). 

Aonla, Basant Ram. 

Bhamora, Prabhu Das. 

Bilsi, Nizam Ali. 

Binauli, W. T. Speake. 

Budaon, Wm. Peters, Makkhan Lai, 

Dataganj, N. R. Childs. 

Kakrala, Joshua Solomon. 

UJhani, BibariLalH. 

BIJNOR DISTRICT. 

J. H. Gill, Presiding Elder (P. O. Bijnor). 

Bashta, H. B. Mitchell. 

Bijnor, J. H. Gill, Dhappan Wilson. 

Dhampur, Fazal Masih. 

Jhalu-Nihtor, Peter Merrill, Local Elder. 

Eiratpur, John Etobert. 

Mandawar, Bansi Dhar. 

Najibabad, Charles Shipley. 

Nagina, John Netram, Local Elder, 

Nurpur, Albert Gulab, Local Elder. 

Seobara, Jhabbhu Lai, Local Elder* 



doNPEEUBNOE APPOINTMENTS 17 

GARHWAL DISTRICT. 

J. H. Messmore, Presiding Elder (P. O. Pauri, Garhwal). 

Dekhwali, F. W. Greenwold. 
Eainur, Ehwankin, local Elder. 
Lanidowne, Gbungar Mooney, Local Elder. 
Pauri, J. M. Messmore. D. A. Ohowfin. 
Ramni, Sabine Mansell. 

flARDOI DISTRICT. 

Samael Tupper, Presiding Elder (P. 0. Hardoi), 

Bilgram, Jhukkan Lai. 

Hardoi, Samuel Tapper. 

Malawan, Harun Andrew, Local Deacon. 

Pihani, Yaqub Sinffb. 

Safipur, Kanbai Sfngbt 

Sandi, Robert Turner, Local Elder. 

Sandila, Crawford Hanoocic 

Sbababad, Yaqub Sbab. 

Unao, Blhari Lai. I. 

KUMAON DISTRICT. 
F. L. Neeld, Presiding Elder ( P. O. Naini Tal). 

Naini Tal, F. L. Neeld, J. Thompkioton. 

„ Enfflish Cburob. P. S. Hyde. 

„ Philander Smith Collef?e, F. 8. Ditto, Principal. 

Pithoragarb, Devi S. Hukill. 

Dwarabat andLobha, 8. S. Dease, Prabbu Dayal, Benjamin Patras. 
Superannuates, J. W. Waugh, J. L. Humphrey, Samuel Knowlee. 
Financial Agent Philander Smith College, F. L. Neeld. 
Transferred to Central Provinces, Harkua Wilson. 
„ to America, H. G. Ozanne. 

MORADABAD DISTRICT. 

L. A. Core, Presiding Elder (P. O. Moradabad). 

Amroha, D. M. Butler. 

Babukhera, Lachman Singh, Local Elder. 

Babjoi, James Jordan. 

Chandansi, H; A. Gutting. 

Dhanaura, M. H. John. 

Gunnaur, Seneca Falls. 

Hasanpur, M, L. Harris. 

Kanth, Mohan 8ingh. Local Elder. 

Kundarki, Masar-ul Haqq, Ishwsri Das. 

Moradabad, R. I. Fanoett, Bahadur Singh. 

,, Bishop Parker Memorial High School^ C. E. Simpson. 

Raiabpur, Nirmal Singh, Local Elder. 
Rajpura, B. Milton, Ijocdl Deacon. 
Rasulpur, Mathra Prashad, Local Deacon, 
Samboal, Lasar Shah. 
Sharifpur, B. 8. Phillip. 
Sirs!, Mauladad Khsm. Local Elder. 
Thakurdwara, Bulaqi Singh. 

GUDH DISTRICT. 

J. W. Robinson, Presiding Elder (P. O. Lucknow). 

Bahraich, A. S. Weeley. 
Balrampur, J. S. Samuel 



%9 CX)NFJDIIEINCE APPQlNVMfiN tS 

Barsbanki, Yaqub All. 

Bhinga,, J.. Raanme). 

Gonda, 6, C. Hewes, Ferris Wittke. ' 

Kaisarganj, J. W. Norton. 

Kamalgfan], Samuel Wheeler. 

Lakhimpur, H. J. Adams. 

Lucknow Girouit, T. G. Badley, Abel Briseoe. 

,1 Hindustani Ghurchi Matthew Stephen. • 

,, English Ghurch, G, W^ Briggs, . : 

,, Methodist Publishing House, J. N. West., Ganga Nath. 

„ Reid Christian College, C. L Bttre, PHndhM ; B.T. 
Badley, S. Phillip, T. C. Badley, J. R. Ohitamb«r. 
Itaunja, Prem Masih. 
Kae*Bareli, J. H. Smart. 
Sidhauli, Baldeo Pershad. 
Sitapur Circuit, S. B. Finch, W. A. Revis. 

,, Boarding School, Kay Silas. 

„ English Church, W. A. Revis. 
Editor, Kaukab % Hind^ J. W. Robinson. 
Secretaries, Bishop Thoburn Special Fund, J. W. RobinsoD, 

W. A. Revis. 
Superannuate, Thomas Craven. 
On leave to America, N. L. Roekey and G. W. Guthrie. 

PILIBHfT DISTRICT. 

G. H. Frey, Presiding SUUr (P. O. Faitehganj-West). 

Bhojipura, Moti Lai, Local Deacon. 
Bisalpiir, Girdharl Lai, Xoca£ Deacon* 
Fatehganj»West, G. H. Frey* 
Mirganj, H. C. Sigler. 
Nawabganj, John H. Walter* 
Pilibhit, D. P. Kidder, 
Puranpur, Joseph DyselL 
Rampur, Kaliyan Singh, Local Blder^ 
Shahi, Sohan LaL Local Elder. 
Sirauli, Bhikki Lai. 



Woman's Conference AppoinLments, f(M)6. 

BAREILLY DISTRICT, 

Bareilly Orphana|ge and Boarding School, Mrs. Chew. 

„ City and Village Work, Mrs. Dease, M.D., Mrs. 

Tucker. 
,, Medical Work, Miss Lewis, M.D., Miss Glmsoai 

M.D. 
., Woman's School, Mrs. Mansell, Mrs. MukerjM. 
Shahjahanpur, Girls' Boarding School, Miss English. 

,, Circuit Work, Mrs. Blaokstodc. 

District Work, Mrs. Mansell. 
On leave to America, Miss Organ. 

BIJNOR DISTRICT. 
District Work and Girls' Boarding School, Mrs. Gill. 

BUDAON DISTRICT. 

Budaon, Girls' Boarding School, Miss WrighU 
,, City and District Work, MissRuddiok. 



CONPERBNOE APPOINTMENTS 19 

GARHWAL DISTRICT. 

Pauri, Girls' Orphanag:e and Boardingr School, Miss Wilson. 
,, Village Sohools and District Work, Mrs. Messmore. 
Editor, Rafiqi NiM&Mj¥ Messtnokf. ! *^ .^: "O > 

HARDOI DISTRICT. 

District and School Work, MrsXTupper. 
Evaogelistio Work, Mrs. Parker, 

KDMAON DISTRICT. 

Bhot, Miss Sheldon, Miss Browne. 

Kbela, Bhot, Miss Reed. ^ ji .1. 

Owavahal, Sohool and Village Work» Miss Cyle. 

»i Cirouit Work, Mrs. Dease. 
Pithoritf arh, Miss Sullivan. 

,, Birangelistic Work, Miss Biidden. 

Naini TSal, Hindustani Work, Mrs. Worthington. 

„ Circuit Work, Mrp. Neeld. 

„ Philander Smith College, Mrs. Thohurn, Mrs. Ditto. 

„ English Work, Mrs. Hvde. 

„ Girls* High School, Miss Easton, PrinfcifHtl; Miss 
Sellers, Vice-Principal ; Miss Waugh. 
District Work, Mrs. Neeld. 
Transferred to America, Mrs. Ozanne. 

MORADABAD DISTRICT, 

Moradabad, Girls*. High Sohool, Miss A. Means. 

„ Citv School and Mohalla Work, Mrs. Parker. 

,, Village Work, Mrs. Faucett. ' 

District and Evangelistic Work, Mrs. Core. 
On leave to America, Miss M. Means. . . .« 

Ob Ifitve, Miss Buck. ^ "* 

Trantlerred to America, Miss Henry. 

ODDH DISTRICT. 

Babraidit Mrs. Raymon. 

Oonda, Girls' Boarding School, Miss C. Easton, 

,. City and Village Work, Mfs. Herwes. 
Lucknow, Isabella Thoburn College, High School and Nor« 
mal School, Miss Nichols, Principal ; Miss Singh. Miss 
Northrup, Miss Mudge, Miss Blackstock, MissHiil ' 
Lucknow, Deaconess Home and Home for Homeless Wo- 
men, Miss Hardle, Miss Ingram. 
„ City Sohools, Mrs. B. T. Badley. 

,1 Circuit Work, Mrs. T. C. Badley, - ' 

,/ Zenana Work, Miss HaHfe. 
„ English Work, Miss Ingram* 

„ Reia Christian College, Mrs. Bar^ 

,, City Evangelistic Work, Mrs. Wesi. 

Sitapur, Girls' Bos rding School, Miss Loper. ■•' ■ f- .ukc 

^i City and Zenana Work, Miss Hoge; 
,, Vernacular Normal School, Miss Hoge. 
District Work, Mrs. Robinson. 
On leave to America, Miss Scottt, Miss Robinson. • ' '^ ^ ; ..tf 

PIUBHIT D(ISTRiCT. 

Distriol Woi^ Mrs. Frey. 
Svangelistic work, Miss Lewis, M.D. 



• 1 



' ■ 'V 



CONFERENCE JOURNAL 



First Day. 

MORADABAD, itk January 1906. 

OpMftAi BstroiMi. 

The North India Oonferenoe met for ite forty-seoond aonaal 
session in the Girls' School, Moradabad, on Thursday, the 4th 
January 1906, at II a.m., Bishop Frank W. Warhe, D.D., in the 
chair. After an opening hymn, S. Knowles read the Scripture 
lesson and offered prayer. 

RoU OalL 

The Secretary of the last Conference called the roll, to which 
eighty-five members responded. 

Bleetlon of Beoretiries. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, B. T. Badley was re-elected 
Secretary, and on his nomination, P. S. Hyde was re-elected 
Assistant Secretary, and D. A. Ohowfin, Vernacular Secretary. 
On motion of J. W. Robinson, R. L Faucett was re-elected Con. 
ference Treasurer. 

Member Bxeuaed. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, M. Stephen was excused from 
attendance at the Conference on account of illness in his family. 

fkiilereaee Rules Adopted. 

On motion of Wm. Peters, the rules printed in Roman-Urdu in 
the last Conference Minutes were adopted as the Conference Rules 
of Order. 

■liSloB Treaasrer. 

On motion of J. H. Gill, the nomination of the Mission 
Treasurer was referred to the Cabinet. 

Btatlitioal Seoretary. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, the election of the Statistical 
Secretary was deferred until the arrival of Oanga Nath, the present 
Statistical Secretary. 

Boun of Soialoa. 

On motion of Wm. Peters, the hours of session were fixed 
from II A.M. to 2 P.M. 

■m. J. Bllea Fostor. 

Mrs. J. Ellen Foster, of Washington, D.C., was introduced, and 
addressed the Conference, C. L. Bare read the following resolu. 
tion, which, on his motion, was adopted with a rising vote ;•— 



CONFEBBNOB JOURNAL 21 

Btaolvedt that it gives us great pleasure to have a visit from 
Mrs. J. Ellen Foster, and to hear such inspiring words from her 
as she has spoken to us at this time. We extend to her a hearty 
welcome, and pray that her life may be spared to complete her 
Joorneys round this earth, and be able to reach the home*land and 
tell the people of the United States of America what she has seen 
and heard in these great lands of the Orient, We pray her to give 
the greetings of this North India Conference to the great Church 
at home, and ask the people to remember India in their prayers. 



The following new members were introduced:— Miss Hill, 
Miss Oimson, M D., and F. 8. Ditto, transferred to this Con. 
lerence from the North- West India Conference, who spolce con. 

oeming the Philander Smith College. Dr. H. Mansell and Mrs. 

P. T. Wilson were also introduced. 

Utters Reii. 

The Secretary read letters from N. L. Rockey and T, J. Scott. 
On motion of Wm. Peters, J. H. Messmore was instructed to 
reply to each. 

■rtetfags. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, the Secretary was instructed 
to send the greetings of the Conference to the Bombay Conference 
in session. The Secretary sent t^e following telegram :^** Gtvet- 
ing$ from North India Oonfereiioe. Jiead Fnalm 126. " 

OeiitreMe Beoadi. 

On motion of C L. Bare, the Conference bounds were fixed so 
as to include the entire room, except the row of benches on the 
right, all but the first two rows. 

AiiitlBg Oemmittee. 

On motion of G. C. Hewes, T. C. Badley and W. A. Revis 
were added to the Auditing Committee. 

iislstamt ta Geaferenoe Treasurer. 

On motion of R. I. Faucett, C. E. Simpson was elected as an 
assistant to the Conference Treasurer. 

Oeaiareiee Pregramae. 

On motion of B. T. Badley, the Conference programme was 
adopted as printed and amended. 

Hlatailail HIamtei. 

On motion of W. A. Mansell, it was ordered that the Minutes 
be printed in Roman-Urdu and published in this year's report. 
On amendment of L. A. Core, It was ordered that the Minutes in 
Roman-Urdu be included only in the reports intended for circula- 
tion in India. 

Preiiilaf mien' Reports. 

It was moved by J, H. Messmore that the Presiding Elders' 



22 CXDNFBEENCB JOURNAL 

reports be not read Id Eoglish. The motion wat amended by 
H. L. Mukerjee that the reports be read in HlndustaoL On the 
substitute motion of J. W. Robinson, it was ordered that, as last 
year, brief oral reports be given in Hindustani. 

F. L. Neeld moved that a committee of three be appoinMl to 
consider the whole subject * and report to the Confer<Ki09. On 
motion of J. H. Gill this motion was put on the table. 

thirteenth Qntition. 

The Thirteenth Question was taken up. The name df F. L. 
Neeld was called, his character was passed, and he i^vipfioiied/ltte 
work of the Bareilly-Kumaon District. The names of the follow- 
lag Effective Elders were called, their characters were^passed, 
and they reported their collections :S, 8. Dease^ W. R. Bowen, 
A. O. McArthur, Harkua Wilson, O, 8. Paul, John Blackstock, 
R. S. Franklin, B. F. Cocker, Benjamin Patras, F. 3. Ditto, 
Prabhu Dayal, G. D. Presgrave, H. K. List, W. . A- MasNell, 
H. L. Mukerjee, Jawala Singh, T. J. Scott (absent), Prem Singh. 
The name of J- H. Gill was called, his character was passed, 
and he reported the work of the Bijnor District. Xbo names of 
the following Effective Elders were called, their character . jmp 
passed, and they reported their collections :-Wf^rren 8c6tt, Fail 
Masih, Charles Shipley, H. B. Mitchell, Banal Oh|ir. 

Aileanuneni 

On expiration of time, the Conference adiooraed with the sing- 
ing of the Doxology . / ; :j. a • i: *t v 



Second Day. 

lii'" ■' . ■ ' I J 

MOBAOABAD, 6tft /anufiry ItMS. ' 

Opening Bzereties. 

The session opened with Bishop Warxie .ia>he C|^^% .M^^ 
the devotional exercises, conducted by 0. L, Bare, the Minutes of 
the previous day were read in Eoglish and Vernaculp^r||, and were 
approved as read. 

Oreetlaoa. 

The Secretary read the foUowiog telegram sent by t|ie Bom- 
bay Conference, assembled in annual session '^y PrQifrifiX* gr^ 
ings to the Mother Conference. Deuteronomy S3 : lif^if.'*''''^'^*^ 
ttembera Bzcnsei. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, Baldeo PerahiR4t Md on 
motion of S. Tupper, C. Hancock and Ranhai Singh wercj excused 
from the Conference. On motion of J. H. Gill, H. B, Mitchell, 
and on motion of C. L. Bare, Samuel Phillip were excused'. 
■lislOB Treasurer. ^ y.i^- /« 

The Cabinet reported tbat J. N. West had been UQSfnimously 



OONFfiRENGB JOURNAL ^ 

nominaled at Mission Treasurer. On motion of J. H. Gill the 
nomination was confirmed. 

Oamalttea t» Hemoin. 

On motion of L A. Core, 0. L. Bare, J. W, Robinson and 
Gan^ Nath were appointed as the committee on memoirs. 

StaillBQ Oemmittses. 

On motion of B. T. Badley, the Standing Committees as ap- 
pointed last year were approved, and on motion of J. W. Robinson, 
the following changes were made :- On the Committee on th» 
State of the Church, the name of Wm. Peters was substituted for 
that of Matthew Stephen ; on the Committee on Temperance, thi^, 
name of F. 8. Ditto as Chairman in place of J O. Butcher, and 
cm the Sunday-School Committee, the name of Yaqub Shah in 
place of that of Kanhai Singh. 

thA nndoiary Society. 

On motion of J. H. Gill, T. C. Badley was elected Chairman 
of the Desi Missionary Society. 

nirtieBttlQMatiiMi. 

The Thirteenth Question was resumed. The name of Wm. 
Peters was called, his character passed, and he gave the report of 
the Budaon District. The names of the following Effective Elders 
were called, their characters passed, and they reported their 
collections :— Basant Ram, Nizam All, W. T. Speake, Jas. 
Thompkinson, N. R. Childs, Bihari Lai II. and Joshua Solomon. 

The name of J H. Messmore was called, his character passed, 
and he gave the report of the Garhwal District. The names 
of the following Effective Elders were called, their characters 
passed, and they reported their collections :—F. W. Greenwold, 
D. A. Chowfln, Sabine Mansell. 

The name of S. Tupper was called, his character passed, and 
he gave the report of the Hardoi District. The names of the 
following Effective Elders were called, their characters passed, 
and they reported their collections :~Jhukkan Lai, Kanhai Singh 
(absent)^ Crawford Hancock, Yaqub Shah, Bihari Lai I. 

The name of L. A. Core was called, his character passed, 
and he gave the report of the Moradabad District. The names of 
the following Effective Elders were called, their characters passed, 
and they reported their collections :— D. M. Butler, James 
Jordan, H. A. Cutting, Mohammad Hassan Jan, Seneca Falls, 
B. &. Phillip, M. L. Harris, R, I. Faucett, Mazhar-ul-Haqq, 
Lasar Shah, Bahadur Singh, Bulaqi Singh. 

■arriaoa Cereuoaiea. 

The Bishop having introduced the question of our relation as 
a Conference to Government in regard to the solemnisation of 
9i»frlage8 by our ministers, it was ordered, on motion of J. W* 



24 CONFERENCB JOURNaL 

Robinson, that the orddr'of Bishop* Wame, issued during the 
year, regarding 'tlie'authorization'reqiiired for the solemnisation 
of marriages, be' accepted by this Conference. It was further 
ordered, on motion of J."W. Robinson, that the Bou^ of Ex- 
aminers be requested to so arrange'that each person TT joining this 
Conference be required to pass an examination on the question 
involved in the solemnisation of marriages under the Indian 
Christian Marriage Act. 

Tine BxteaAed. 

On motion of Wm. Feters the time was extended, 

Orier re Harriafea. 

On motion of W. A. Mansell, it was ordered that the Bishop's 
order, relative to the authorization required for the solemniza* 
tion of marriages by ministers of this Conferenoei be printed in 
both English and Roman-Urdu in this year's report. (See 
B^porta 0/ Committees.) 

AdJoummeBt. 

On motion of J. H. Gill, the Conference adjourned with the 
singing of the Doxology and the pronouncing of the Benediction. 



Third Day. 

MORADABAD, m January 1006. 

OpeniBf Bzereiaes. 

The session opened with Bishop Warne in the chair. After 
the*devotional exercises, conducted by G. W. Briggs, thCiMinutea 
of the previous day were read in English and Vernacular, and ap- 
proved. 

Statistioal Booretary. 

On motion of J. tN. West, Ganga Nath was re-elected Statis- 
tical Secretary. 

Letter Read. 

The Secretary read a letter from Rev. T. S. Wynicoop, Secre- 
tary of the North India Auxiliary of the British and Foreign Bible 
Society, and on motion of S. Tupper, the Secretary was instruct- 
ed to reply. 

Tbeologioal Seminary. 

S. S. Dease gave the report of the Barellly Theological Semin- 
ary, and on motion of F. L. Neeld the report was accepted and 
ordered to be placed on file- 
Joint Beard of Bxamlaers. 

The Secretary presented a communication from the Baptist 
Mission relative to the formation of a Joint Board of Examiners 
for missionary probationers of all the missions engaged in work 



Opilt*BRBNCB JOURNAL 25 

wlttiiii tbe Hindi-Urdu languafire area, and oq his motion it was 
Mierred io the Board of Examiners for oonsf deration and report. 

(M fnUUMit RtTiiUm. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, a committee of three was ap- 
pointed to consider whether or not the time has come for an Urdu 
retislon of the Old Testament, in order that we might send a reply 
to this question to the Rev. T. S. Wynkoop, Secretary of the North 
India Bible Society, at whose request the matter had been brought 
b^ore the Ckinference. The following were appointed i-S. 8. 
Dease, Wm. Peters and Jawala Singh. 

ileoitlsial Oemdifloi. 

B. T. Badley presented a resolution touching the appointing 
of an Bdttcational Commission, to take into consideration the 
ezlsitiiig tyetem of scholarships as it obtains in our'eduoationai 
institutions. 

The resolution, at the request of the Chairman, was held 
over till the last day for action. (See Fifth Day, Second Seuion.) 

fidrleiilli OiiitteB. 

The ' Thirteenth Question was resumed. The name of 
J. W. Robinson was called, his character passed, and he gave' the 
report of the Oudh District. The names of the following Effective 
Eiders were called, their characters passed, and they reported their 
cplleotions :— A. 8. Wesley, J. S. Samuel, Yaqub Ally, 
J. F. damuel, G. C. Hewes, Samuel Wheeler, H. J. Adams, 
B*. T. Badley, Matthew Stephen (absent), S. B. Finch, D. L. 
Thobum (deceased), Ganga Nath, C. L. Bare, Samuel Phillip, 
it. L. Rockey (absent), J. H. Smart, Baldeo Pershad, Kay Silas, 
J. N. West, Thomas Craven (absent). 

The name of G. H. Frey was called, his character passed, and 
he gave the report of the Pilibhit District. The names of the 
following Effective Elders were called, their characters passed, and 
they reported their collections : -Joseph Dysell, J. H. Walter, 
D. P. Kidder,.Bhikki Lai. 

tilfiliotlii. 

Rev. P. M. Buck was introduced to the Conference, asked to 
a seat within the Conference bar, and invited to participate in the 
discussions- 

The Fifth Question was taken up.^The names of Ishwari 
Das and Ferris Wittke were called, their characters were passed, 
and on motion of their respective Presiding Elders, they were ad- 
vanced to the studies of the third year, received into full member, 
ship, elected to Deacons* orders and recommended for ordination, 
with' the understanding that they satisfactorily answer the Dis- 
ciplinary questions. The names of G. W. Briggs, C. B. Simpson 



26 CONFERENCE JOURNAL 

EDd H. G. Ozanne were called, their characters were paBsed, and, 
on motion of their reipective Presiding Elders, they were advanced 
to the studies of the third year, and received into full member- 
ship. The name of Prabhu Das was called, his character was 
passed, and, on motion of William Peters, he was advanced to the 
studies of the second year, elected to Deacons' and Elders* 
orders under the Missionary Rule, and recommended for ordin- 
ation. The names of W. A. Revis and T. C. Badley were called, 
their characters were passed, and« oo motion of J. W. Elobinson, 
they were advanced to the studies of the second year, elected to 
Descons' orders under >he Missiooary Rule, and recommended 
for ordination. 

KlBtli QneittOB. 

The Ninth Question was taken up. The name of Prem Masih wae 
called, his character was passed, and, on motion of J, W. Robinson, 
he was electei to Elders' orders, recommended for ordination and 
advanced to the class of Effective Elders. The name of Misrl 
Charan was called, his character was passed, and, on motion 
of F. L. Neeld, he was advanced to the class of Efteetfve llidere. 

ItrenUi Qnestleii. 

The Seventh Question was taken up. The name of Yaqub 
Singh was called, his character was passed, aud, on motion of 
S. Tupper, he was advanced to the studies of the fourth year, 
elected to Elders' orders under the Missionary Rule, and re- 
commended for ordination. 

Blffveilh QneiUea. 

The Eleventh Question was taken up. The names of the 
following Local Preachers were called, and, on motion of 
their respective Presiding Eiders, they were recommended for 
ordination to the office of Deacon :— Chirag Masih, Chidda 
Singh, 

Twelflli QieitlOB 

The Twelfth Question was taken up. The names of Alberf 
Gulab, Nadir Shah and Lachman Singh were called, and, on 
motion of J. H. QUI, they were recommended for ordination to 
the office of Elder (Albert Gulab under the Missionary Rule.) 

Peartti QnesttoiL 

The Fourth Question was taken up. The nam^ of John 
Fredrick and Abel Briscoe were called, and, on motion ot their 
respective Presiding Elders, they were received on trial. 

Slate of Okirok. 

J. H. Gill read the report of the Committee on the State of the 
Church, which, on motion of William Peters, was accepted. On 
motion of L, A. Core, a vote of thanks was given to J. H. Gill 
and the Committee for the very carefully prepared and interesting 
report. 



CX)NFH:RENCE JOtjRNAL 2? 

MilmaeMmimX. 

On expiration of time, the Ck)nference adjourned with the 
Dozology and Benediction. 



Fourth Day. 

MORADABAD, Bth January 1900. 
QfoBiaf Bzeroiies. 

The eession opened with Bishop Wame In the chair. After 
the devotional exercises, conducted by W. A. Revis, the Minutes 
of the previous day were read in English and Vernacular, and 
approved as corrected. 

Jttit Boihl of BzanftBen. 

B. T. Badley presented the following resolution which, on his 
niotion« waa adopted :— 

Whfre&i, a oommunication has been laid before this Ck>nfereiioe by the Baptist 
Mission, moposing the formation of a Joint Examining Board for missionary 
probationers of all the Missions engaged in work in the areas where Hindi. Urdu 
and Panjabi are spoken, and 

Wh4r0(u, the Board of Examiners of this CSonference, having considered the 
matter, is heartily in faror of such a scheme. 

Beiolved, that we as a Conference favor the general plan and appoint three 
of oar missionaries to acton our behalf In the preliminary arrangements: that, 
after the plan has been perfected, the matter be laid before us at our next annual 
session for final action, at which time, if we give our approval, the whole subject 
be referred by us to Central Conference with a request that the needed steps be 
taken to put the plan into effect. 

Setolved^ further, that we refer this to the Woman's Conference, and also that 
we ask the North-West India Conference and the Central Provinces Mission Con- 
ference, together with their Woman's Conferences, to take similar action if deemed 
wise by them. 

The Bishop appointed the following on the above :— W. A, 
Mansell, J. N. West and Miss Singh. 

Certifieato of Ordlnatloii. 

This is to certify that, on January 7th, 1906, I ordained as 
Deacons Ishwari Dae, Ferris Wittke, Prabhu Das, Wm. A. Revis, 
Theodore C. Badley, Chirag Masih and Chidda Singh, and that 
on the same day I ordained as Elders Prem Masih, Prabhu DaSf 
Yaqub Singh, Albert Gulab, Nadir Shah and Lachman Singh. 

Frank W. Warne, 

FreMiTng Bishop. 

SUtUtiotl Beport. 

Ganga Nath. presented the report of the Statistical Secretal^ 



2d CX)Ifft'BBBNck iotjRNAL 

which, on motion of Wm. Peters, was accepted and a vote ollhaiiki 
was given tlie Secretary lor his valuable report. 

Theelogietl Bemlairy. 

S. B. Finch read the report of the visitors to the Theological 
Seminary, which, on motion of B. T. Badley, was accepted as 

amended. (See Beports of Oommitees.) 

Deti Kisslimary Soeiety, 

H. L. Maker j AC presented the report of the Desi Missionary 
Society, which, on motion of Wm. Peters, was accepted. On 
motion of A. O. Mc Arthur, it was ordered that hereafter the sta- 
tistics of the Desi Missionary Society be regularly Inelodtd ia 
our Conference Statistical Report, and that we request Central 
Ckmferenoe to make provision for such statistici from each CSQn- 
ferenoe having such a society. 

TrtYeUlag Expenses. 

J. W. Robinson read a communication fromttie Wpn^n'p 
Cooferencei giving a list of rules for guidance in estimating the 
amount of help to be given towards the travelling expenaea of 
zenana workers for District Conference. ( See Eeporis of Com" 
mittees. ] On motion of L. A. Core, the matter was referred to the 
Finance Committee with power to act. 

Reseltttioi on Debii. 

D. M. Butler read the following resolution which, on motion 
of Bahadur Singh, was adopted :— 

Sibibto qanscULrf bar ek ke w^te burf liai. lekin Mission mulAzimfo k( qsrz- 
dirf kim meo barA nuqsAn pahuaobAtf hal, ham ^hush taaifl ki hamAri kalfeijrA men 
' is balA ke rokne kf koshish hot! rahtf hai, lekin af sos ki rokne ke sAtli lit sith u a 
ko taraqqf dene kf bhf koshish JArf hai, hamAii kallsiyA meg Itne jalse ho gme aur 
bote JAte haia. ki qarfb qarfb sab ke. lekin l^hAsskar thorf talab wiUofi ke wAste go 
kuohh tiida to hai, lekin bal^ *azfm ki simni hai. Quarterly men knchh 
^haroh sartUr hoti hai. magar as ki honi to Usimf hai« is ke ba*d biwl beehohon ko. 
io ghar the aur un ko bhf Jo madarson se ta*tQ manine Ae, wApas lekar Summer 
School ko ek mih ke wiste jine ki hil jine wiloQ ke diloQ se pfichhlye. 

Yih bojh halki hone lagi thi ki District Ck>nferenoe ki waqt i gayi. Jis me q 
ma* l^ndin hizir honi zariir hai. is ki lx>jh halki hone lagi thi ki Silina CJon- 
ferenoe ki waqt i gayi. yaqfnan ghar chhopne men bari sarfa hoti hal» aur agar 
garfboQ ke sith kuchh hamdardf kami munisib hai to ham *arz karte halQ ki sirf 
lizimf jalse htli kareQ aur agar kof aur nae kiye Jiwen to is ki bir (hahij^evilon 
ke zimme. "• :'•■■■' 

S. KWOWLES. W. M. SOOTT. 

J. A. SOIiOMOV. YAQVB AXJLT, 

YAQUB SHAH. G. H. FBBT. 

B. Sdtgh. W. T. Spbaks. 

S. TuppBB. William Pstxbs. 

D. M. BUTLXK. S. B. FXHGX. 

G. D. Pbbsgbave J. H. Smabt. 

J. H. Mbssmobe. Jwala SnroH. 

MAEHAB-UIi Haqq. 

Bdioatlon e! Boys. 

S. B. Finch presented the following resolution whlob« on 
motion of Wm. E*eler«, \«a« tQtettQdL\A^A'9V^^i)R%C^RttBD&»AAA>- 







Oammium wilh poii«r lo %ct 

On moiioB of Wn. E^ilwt, QMf% Hilki Md M imUm (4 
J. H. 6111, Ful Uasih wm eioaMd ffrooi lh« rMM(i4»r ti Uit 




Oq moHoB oi W. A. MmmU, lh« conniUtt on lh« IHil 
MlMionary Sooietj wm oonUnued. 

f tli ff TkaidUk 

On motion of J. W. RobiniODt Uit Ck>ntf r«oc« pMltd h voli 
of thanks to Lady MoBaa for her genarout gift of Bviaday lohool 
literature for free distribution. 

Bfaaitlitlie GaaHlflB* 

B. T. Badley presented the following resolution whiphi OD hll 
motlpn, was adopted :— 

Wh€rM$ the preaent revlral hM not yet oome lo sny msrkod (totfrmi uihui (Mir 
Eagiish-epeaking churohes and communities, and 

Whereat this seems to be an indication that God is dsslrotas Of moni itrarsr Alil 
special effort in Isehalf of this work, and 

Whereat Oodhasl^een leading many to realise the neofiiMltyof softMftsfinUA 
and spisedy action which He may use for the extension of His glory In ill Is iMmimu< 
aity also : therefore, without in any way overlooking the efToris r>f ihn liast. tMii 
aeknowledgtaig the need of some more aggressive measttffNi, and esfNMilalty ihs 
need o< some united action, 

Setolved, that we put ourselves on record as hsartlly approf Ing ihs Idsa uf a 
united aggressive movement in behalf of this very ImporUnt smttlofl tff mtr f fidtaff 
Church. It gives us great pleasure to acknowledge the sdf aeesd sisp ietWHI Hy ssf 
own Omreh at the ttane of the meeting of the Pastors of our Itogllsh (/hMriilt#sai 
AWihaliaA last year, and we are glad that through the effoftf of th« l^ati^rrs at 
Iticknsw aadOaleotta. somewhat has already been done in this sfMMlaf wmfi, 
Neverthelees, we tee! that an teterdenomlnatlonal and united aMtfofiai ihln iittm 
would be moot beBefld al, We are partfealsfly roMeed to keow their akmg wlll» 
tkoae hi oar Church and other Chorehes npso whose hear te It hse been lafd Ut pttkf 
aadpiaa for thia part of our Lord's work In India, the fl«v, W, ii, fftmUrf, M IM 
C. M. S. at Uttrax. Yam been led to vropom ae aggraselv^! i;ampalgi» all ftfttf IMIa 
aawng Kngllsh ibf aWng people. Therefore, be It Inritmf 

JKssefMtf. that we aeeept all these Indleailone ae a IV^IdeAtlai Mill U* m, 
anddohssvhf agree aaaCoolsreiiee to g»o p < ^raMr wHh fepf«r#eM«f Ivee ^ ^iMf 
lOMoaa hi ft a— im i ee sseh plaee aa wmt m>m wise la earyyfNr ^ a vlg4f<ii»# 
caavafgaoftfeiskiadL JVO^, that ae aoibfag deHaliA iwM r^t beeeM4 Mfvre 
«s br Kr. Pnetor, we. to order to be pfep«r>e>l lw<» fel >a M Ut lake tmf pitft lA iM 
wmvoMait, appoint a fii — i Hkw ; of Ave wfta iwe bo p Ws/vm ee ^&/l^ f >h e> r / 
■■■. tonepRaeat ot Ct m Mnm^ wbea ifce ikae livr a dee^lM step u^fm Ufltm 
mm l— e mttmtdz chaathle ttmmffrm kuHnO^ fie Tm^n <vf /yirr If^Ml^ 



80 OONPfiRENCE JOtJRNAL 

Resolved, farther, that if there should, on looking o^er the whole Held, he &. 
desire to'inolude in this campaign the work as related also to the non-Christian and 
Indian Christian oommunlties, we delegate to this committee the power to act on 
our behalf In this matter also. 

Resolved, also, that we reqaest the North-West India ConfArenoe to take simi- 
lar action at their coming annual session. 

The committee appointed on the aborv ie«s followg :— ISk 
Oillcio, Bishop Warne, (J^ivmoLn ; P. S. Hyde, O. W« Btigf^ ; 
additional members, J. W. RoUnson, 8. 8. Dease, R. I. FattMtt. 

Adienmment. 

On motion of J. H. Messmore the Conference adjourned. 



Fifth Dtty. 

MOBADABAD, OM January 1906. 

Opening BzereiiM. 

The session opened with Bishop Warne in the chair. After the 
devotional exercises, conducted by G. D. PresgraTc, the Minutes 
of the previous day were read in English and Vernacu]aF| and 
approved. 

Reid Ohrlstttn Oollegs. 

C L Bare gave the report of the Reid Christian College, and 
on his nomination the Trustees were elected for the ensuing year. 
[See ConftrtncB Qfllcfra.] 

Philander Smith College. 

P. L. Neeld nominated the new Board of Trustees of Philander 
Smith College and the Executive Committee of the Oak Openings 
High School, Naini Tal, which on his motion, wereelected f See 
Oou/terncee Ojpcers. ) On motion of P. L. Neeld, C. L. Bare an*? 
L. A. Core wereelected as a Conference Board of Visitors i« 
Philander Smith College. ^ 



Isabella ThoMum Oollege. 

J. W. Robinson nominated the Trustees of the Isabella 
Thoburn College which, on his motion, were elected. (See Con 
ference Officers.) J. W. Robinson presented the Anally accented' 
draft of the memorandum of the Board of Governors of the IsalnSla 
Thoburn College, which, on the motion of Wm. Peters waa ^^^ 
ed. (See BeparU of CommiUeea.) ' ^^^^ 

Theologioal Seminary. 

W. A. Mansell noininated the Trustees of the Theological 
Seminary which, on his motion, were elected. (See Oon/wnce 
Officers ) 

Jnbilee Pond. 

G. C. Hewes presented the report of the Treasurer of the 
Jubilee Fund. 



OONFBSRENOE JOURNAL 81 

OMlMtMt Stewtrii. 

J. H. Meaamore presented the report of the Board of Con- 
ferenoe Stewards which, on motion of Wm. Peters, was adopted. 
(See Reports oj Cammitieea. ) 

Piflk QatitiMU 

The Fifth Question was resumed. The name of Nirmal Singh 
was called, but his name was withdrawn at his own request by 
his Presiding Elder. The name of J. R. Chitambar was called, 
his character was passed, and, on motion of J. W. Robinson, he 
was adTanced to the studies of the second year. The names of 
J. W. Morton and Dhappan Wilson were called, their characters 
were passed, and, on motion of their respective Presiding 
Blders, they were continued in the studies of the first year. 

Mrtifh QiesttoB. 

The Seventh Question was resumed. The names of 'John 
Roberts and D. S. Hukill were called, their characters were 
passed, and, on motion of their respective Presiding Elders, they 
were advanced to the studies of the fourth year. The names of 
a C. Sigler and P. 8. Hyde were called, their characters were 
passed, and, on motion of their respective Presiding Elders, they 
were advanced to the studies of the fourth year, on condition that 
the remaining studies be brought up. The name of G. W. Guthrie 
was called, his character was passed, and, on motion of J. w. 
Robinson, he was continued in the studies of the fourth year. 



W. A. Mansell, on behalf of the Cabinet, nominated Mrs. 
Parker and Mrs. Dea^e as our representatives on the Board of 
Trustees of the Agra Medical Home, and, on his motion, they were 
elected. 

Siptnuuiitlea. 

The names of J. L. Humphrey, J. W. Waugh and S. Knowles 
were called, and, on motion of F. L. Neeld, they were continued 
in the Superannuate Relation. The name of T. Craven was 
called, and, on motion of J. W. Robinson, he was continued in 
the Superannuate Relation. 

ff. J. Scilt. 

The name of T. J. Scott was called, his character was passedi 
and, on motion of F. L. Neeld, he was granted a Superannuate 
Relation. 

S. Citwlea. 

W. A. Mansell presented the following resolution, which was 
adopted by a rising vote :— 

WKiTMi, the lit of January 1006 was the Golden Wedding annivenary of oar 
helored and reyered Bjrother and Sister Knowles. 

SMOlved, that we. the members of the North India Conference and of the North 
India Woman's Ckmferenoe. place on record our gradtude to God la srantlng them 
thns a loos and happy and useful life together. Their united life makes a round 
peotiury of serrioe for the Jtfaster, which has heoa aisnaU^ X^VqawA Va^Xid^ ^^^^« 



82 ooNFBRBmn: journal 

sion of many souls, and in helping to establish the Bilssioa Irom* lii«<vfS]r Hfii* 
ning. Our afleotionate regards and prayers will follow Brother and Sister Knowles, 
that the Lord may yet xnore abundantly bless them, and, granting them yet many 
years of fellowship and serrioe with us, crown their Itwta with a golden soDBet 

J. H. MS88MOBB. FRAHK W. WABHK 

J. W. ROBimOV. S. S. DBA8S. 

J. N. Wist. W. A. Mamsill. 

0. ti. BABS. F. L. nrnmuD, 

L. A. Cobb. J, Blaok8Tocb. 

H. A. CUTTIHO. J. H. QUJL, 

WM. Pbtkbs. B. T. BADLKT. 

The OoDference then sanfir togeiher *' Blest be the Tie that 
Bind!,*' and Bishop Warne led in prajer for God*s continued 
bleating upon these His venerable servants. 

On motion of S. Tapper, the Secretary was instructed too send 
a letter of greeting, along with the resolution, to Brother and 
Sister Knowles. 



J.H. 

L. A. Gore read the following resolution, which was adopted 

bj arising vote:— 

WfUriot in the good providenoe of Qod. our Brother J. H. Mesttiote is about 
to oOlebrate his serentieth birth day, 

B€iol9id, that we extend to our Brother our heartiest colig^tlilitions 
on this oooasion. It is a cause of sincere gratitude that the Lom has granted 
him this long and useful life, forty-flve years of which have been spent In our 
midst. His dear insight into Mission problems, his feariOM defenoe of principles 
he believes to be right : his valuable literary work and his constant endeavour to 
secure Ithe best development of our Christian community, have allMaiahIm ette 
of our most valued misslonariee. 

We rejoice that he is still permitted to live and labor in our midst, and pray 
that he may be spared many years to be an inspiration and help to us all. 

L. A. Ck>BB, Fbank W. Wabhb. 

H. It, Mukxbjbb. W. a. Uaxbmlu 

D. A. CHOWnN. J. W. ROBINBOB. 

F. li. Nbbld. 8. S. DBiBB. 

Mabhab4Ji:< HAqq. 0. L. Babb. 

WlU^AM PBTEBS. D. M. BPTLBB , 

H. A. CU'ITIBO. 

Bishop nebnm. 

B. T. Badley presented the following resolution, which was 
adopted at a joint session of both Conferences by a rising Tolie :^ 

Seidtedrthakt as a Conference we express our great sorrow at hearing of Bishop 
Thobum*s recent illness: that we send to him assurances of our hea^felt 
sympathy and prayers, convey to him the greetings of this Conferenoe, and ta^ress 
our hope that this illness will not prevent his being present at our India Mission 
Jubilee. ' , , , 

B. T. BABLBT. 
H. MABBBLL. 
J. H. MlSSKOBB. 
J. W. ROBIRSOB. 
D. A. CHOWrZN. 

IMtira to laperanMatei. 

On motion of 8. Tupper, the Secretary was instructed to send 
letters of greeting from the Conference to all our Superaaniuites, 



d6NF£RifiNCE JOURNAL 38 

Plaaioe GomBittao. 

On motion of J. H. Gill, the Conference proceeded to the elec- 
tion of the Finance Committee. The first ballot resulted in elect- 
ing the following :-C. L. Bare, 8. 8. Dease, H. A. Cutting and 
H. L. Mukerjee. A second ballot was ordered, which resulted in 
electing G. C. Hewes and D. M. Butler as members and B. T. 
Badley, J. Blackstock, 8. B. Finch and Ganga Nath as alternates* 

0. k R. Bailway. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson the Conference passed a vote 
of thanks to the O. & R. Railway for its kindness in granting 
special concessions, and the Becretary was instructed to convey to 
the Traffic Superintendent our hearty thanks. 

Speolal Ckwne of Stndies. 

Wm. Peters presented the following resolution which, on 
motion of J. W, Robinson, was referred to the Board of Examin- 
ers :— 

ChAnlrtisbAt kl baft zarfirat maUtUn hotf. ki hamdre missionary SlUyina 
K&nlarans Local Deacon aur Klder. aur we Preacher aur Exharter jo chAr sAl ke 
^ imtihdn se f&rig haiQ. kuchh *ilmf taraqqf karte JAwcq, lih&zA 'arz karte haiQ, kl ek 
kamitV^ muqarrar kf j&we. kl ek khi&ss khw^Qdairf alse lotron ke liye t«iyAr kiireii. 

WUiMAM Pbtbbs. 
S. TUPPBB. 

J. Thompkinson. 

Deil ■iMtonary Sooioty. 

On motion of H, L. Mukerjee, J. R. Chitambar was added to 
the Committee on the Desi Missionary Society, and elected to act 
as Treasurer. 

Hattoitl Hlsaionary Society. 

B. T. Badley presented the following resolution which, on 
motion of Wm. Peters, was adopted :— 

Whereas, the National Missionary Society of India has now been thoroughly 
organized for work in India, and 

Wiereae, a member of our own Conference has been appointed its Secretary 
for the United Provinces, and whereas throuirh him has come to us a request that 
we. as a Conference. Join in the work of the Society. 

Besolved, therefore, that we. reootfnizinff the similarity of the aims of this 

Society and our own Desi Missionary Society, and seeing the advantages of a 
unified action in this field, and realizing that the constitution and modus operandi 
of the National Society makes both feasible and desirable our hearty co-operation, 
we do hereby Appoint our Committee on the Desi Missionary Society as a special 
Committee, to enquire carefully into this matter and to confer with the officers of 
the National Missionary Society of India with an affiliation in view : that they 
report to us at our next annual session the result of their Conference, at which 
time, if we deem advisable and desirous, we take the necessary steps toward such 
an afllliation. 

A second resolution was read by P. S. Byde which, on motion 
of Wm. Peters, was adopted :^ 

Whereas one of our members has told us of the National Missionary Society 
for India recently organised at Serampore, and has explained to us its plan and 
object, and whereas, wo believe that it is of the Lord. 



34 CX)NFBRBNCE JOUBNAL 

Rtsolttd, that' we express "our hearty*$ymi)athy with this tiolile oaase per 
taininif to the EvaDgelisation of India by her owd sons and dauirhters, and that we 
pledire ourselves to do all we can to promote its interest in our midst. 

Wm. Pstbbs. 
W. A. Manskll. 
B. T. Badlkt. 

S. TUPPSR. 

J. W. BOBIFSOK. 

latrodnetioo. 

£. T. FarnoD, of the North- West TDdia Ck>DfereDce, was iDiro* 
duced to the Conference. 

Simmer School. 

On motion of W. A. Mansell, J. W. Robinson, B. T. Badley, 
P. S. Hyde and F. L. Neeld were appointed to take necessary steps 
to institute a Summer School for missionaries deslrova of im* 
proving their knowledge and use of the yemaoular. 

TomporaBoo Boport. 

F. S. Ditto read the report of the Temperance Committee, 
which, on motion of W. A. Mansell, was adopted. (See Reports 
of (JomnvUtees*) 

Andltlail Rep«rt. 

G. C. Hewes read the report of the Auditing Committee, which, 
on motion of J. H. Gill, was adopted. ( See Htporis of CommUtees.) 

Adionnimettt. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, the Conference adjourned to 
meet for its final session at 5 p.m. 

SECOND SESSION. 

MoRADABAD, 9ih January 1906. 
The Conference met for its second session at 5 p if. The 
Minutes of the previous session were read in English and 
approved. 

Thirliefh Quostton. 

The Thirtieth Question was called, and Bareilly was chosen 
as the seat of the next Annual Conference. 

■akkhanUL 

The Bishop announced the transfer of Makkhan Lai, a Pro- 
bationer of the Bengal Conference, to this Conference. 
Boar4 e! Doaeonossoi. 

The Secretary read the report of the Conference Board of 
Deaconesses which, on his motion, was accepted. (See Reports of 
CommiUees.) 

Smiday School Report. 

R. I. Faucett read the report of the Committee on Sunday 
Schools which, on motion of P. S, Hyde, was accepted, (See 
Reports of^Oommittees.) 



CONFERBNOB JQURNAL 85 

■■ttri nsiloa Traiaiafl SoliooL 

The Secretary presented the report of the Muttra Mission 
TrainlDiT School which, on his motion, was accepted. (See Reports 
of Cammittees.) 

On motion of B. T. Badiey, Miss Hoge was elected to represenl 
the North India Conference on the Board of Trustees of the 
Muttra Mission Training School, 

SItiilaf OoMBlttees. 

On behalf of the Cabinet, J. W. Robinson read the nomina- 
tions for the Standing Committees, and the nominees were duly 
elected. (See Oon/erence Officers.) 

Desl Mtiriftiiary Society. 

On motion of H. L. Mukerjee, thCaOesi Missionary Society of 

the Conference was made a Standing Committee. 

Blali0p Parker High Sehool. 

C. £. Simpson nominated the Board of Trustees of the Bishop 
Parker Memorial High School, which, on his motion, were elected. 
(See Conference Officers.) 

BUkn Yame— RMolntioii. 

Wm. Peters read the following resolution, which was adopted 
by a rising vote of both Conferences :— 

1. * It is with great pleasure and gratitude that we present this resolution. 
Etery member of our Conference is aware of the great spiritual blessings which 
haye this year been upon us and upon all our workers. In aooounting for this. 
we cannot but say that it was in large measure due to our dear Bishop Warne. 
who, by his presence in our midst, became a channel of divine blessing to our hearts. 
We can now say with Joy that, through the mercy of Qod. we have experienced the 
outpouring of heavenly power, by reason of which spiritual infilling our hearts 
seem now to be abundantly full. 

t. The present Annual Ck>nferenoe. in our opinion, has been an extraordinary 
one. and onr hearts assure us that all have greatly refreshed their souls. 

8. The North India Conference of our Church has. as a whole, been enriched 
by heavenly grace. From the boys and girls of our schools the wonderful news 
has come that many have received new hearts, and that a number of the young men 
have consecrated themselves for the service of Christ. 

Is not all this a wonderful, historical event ? For these blessings and gifts we 
are thankful with all our hearts to the Lord Jesus : and at the same time we are 
beartily thankful to Bishop Warne. who has In every way possible helped us in 
things both physical and spiritual. May Qod grant that Bishop and Mrs. Wame's 
lives may abound in all blessings, that wo may through them continue to receive 
yet greater blessings. 

S. B. FmcH. Wm. Pbtbbs. 

J. H. Smabt. S. Tuppsb. 

J. F. Samukl. H. L. Mukbbjbb. 

D. A. Chowun. D. M. Butlbb. 

Prufitait Find. 

On motion of J. W. Robinson, it was ordered that the Finance 
Committee be instructed to arrange for the establishment of a 
Provident Fund to be used as an aid in the support of superannu- 
ated workers other than Conference members, and of the widows 
and orphans of this class of workers. 

* Literal translation from the Hindustani. 



36 CONFERENCE JOURNAL 

Corresponding BooraUry 

Oq motion of B. T. Badley, it was ordered that the Secretary 
be instruoted to cast the ballot for W. A. MaDsell for CorreepoDd- 
iDg Secretary. 

Vole of Thanlui. 

Wm. Peters read the following resolution, which was adopted 
by a rising vote of both Conferences : — 

* We are sincerely thankful to the Moradabad friends for the very kind entertain- 
ment afforded to us. We have spent these days during which Conference has con- 
* tinned in irreat comfort. Especially are we irrateful to Brother Core who. althouirh 
he suffered with a broken arm. omitted nothingr and forgrot nothing which was for 
our comfort. In this respect he is an example to all. May Gtod abundantly bless 
these our friends, and may they continue to be highly spoken of Ifor their hospit- 
ality. 

S. B. FufCH. Wm. Pbtbbs. 

J. H. Smart. H. L. Mukbbjsi. 

J. F. Samubl. S. Tuppbb. 

B. T. Badley. D. M. Butlbb. 

Old Toitamont RoYision. 

The Special Committee, appointed to consider the matter of 
the desirability of a revision of the Urdu Old Testament, having 
made no report, it was ordered, on motion of J. H. Messmore, that 
the Conference record itself as being in favor of such a revision. 

Phllandor Smith OoUege. 

F. L. Neeld presented the financial statement of Philander 
Smith College which, on motion of J. W. Robinson, was accepted 
and ordered to be put on file. 

Bdnottioitl Oommission. 

B. T. Badley presented the following resolution which, on his 
motion, was adopted :— 

Wheretu the thoughts of many are these days turning to our policy reirardinff 
the education of our Christian young men. and particularly retrarding the system 
of scholarships, as it has obtained in our schools from the beginning and still 
exists, and 

Whereas there is a growing sentiment that some changes in our policy have 
been rendered necessary, because of conditions which are somewhat altered from 
what they werelwhen we began this work ; therefore be it 

Resolved, that an Eklucational Commission be appointed by us to inquire car^ 
fully into the whole matter and formulate a plan of action : that the Commission 
number thirteen persons, including the Principals of all our High Schools, the 
Principals of our College and Theological Seminary, and the Christian Headmasters 
of our High Schools, together with such others as the Bishop may appoint to serve 
on it : that we ask this Commission to report to the mid-year meeting of the Finance 
Committee, which shall have power to adopt or reject the report. 

JmunaB Lai. 

With reference to the request of the Muttra District Confer- 
ence that the parchments of Jumman Lai be returned to him, the 
Committee on Conference Elelations reported that they did not see 
fit to grant the request. 
Ohristlaii Literatiire Sooiety. 

On motion of B. T. Badley, it was ordered that the communi- 
cation from the Christian Literature Society, requesting a wider 
■■ -- . ■ ■ — ■ .1 .^ 

* . Literal translation from the Hindustani. 



CONFERENCE JOURNAL 87 

ackoowled^ment and use of their books ia our educational in- 
stitutions, be referred to. the Board of Education. 

Bzkortfrt' Uetaati. 

On motion of B. T. Badley, the Agent of the Methodist Pub- 
lishing House, Lucknow, was requested to make arrangements for 
the printing of a new set of license forms for Exhorters, and to 
put them on sale for the use of our various Conferences. 

T. J. Beett—BeiolntioB. 

Wm. Peters read the following resolution, which was adopted 
by a rising vote :— 

* It Is with great sorrow and a feeling of deep sjrmpathy that we present this 
resolution. Our honoured Dr. T. J. Scott and Mrs. Scott hare done much for the 
Methodist Ohuroh In India by their labors and the consecration of their lives. It 
was the desire of our hearts that they might be permitted to do much more. But it 
has seemed best on account of the adranoed years of Dr. Scott, and especially since 
it is not possible for Mrs. Scott to return, that a Superannuate Relation be granted. 
It almost breaks our hearts to think that they may never be able to eome again Into 
our midst. Our heart-felt prayer for Dr. and Mrs. Scott is. therefOte. that God may 
in their own land give them health and spiritual blessinga. If a| any time an 
opportunity is afforded, may they return to us and bless us with their presence. 

W. R. BowsN. Wm. Pstkbs. 

H. A. CUTTINO. H. Ii. MUKBBJSB. 

D. M. BUTLSB. S. TUPPKB. 

■n J. BUeQ Foster -Refolntlon. 

Wm. Peters read the following resolution regarding Mrs. J» 
Ellen Foster, which was adopted by a rising vote of both Con. 
ferences :— 

* We are grateful with all our hearts to the gracious and honor-worthy Mrs. 
J. Ellen Foster, of Washington. D. C. that with her affectionate and marvellous 
words she has drawn our hearts to herself. She has. even in so short a time as 
she has been with us. shown that she has the mind and the influence of Christ in 
her own life. She has regarded and made us all one. Her thoughts are such as no 
one could have who had not the spirit of Christ. Our prayer is. that this gracious 
lady will not forget us. but will make us known to the people of America, and de- 
clare there the needs of our Methodist Church in India. May Qod grant that she 
may. with His peace and blessing, reach safely her home-land, and that wherever 
she may go. the God of Peace may guard and keep her. 

D. M. BUTLMB. Wm. PBTXB8. 

D. A. CHOWTIlf . S. TUPPKB. 

S. B. FmCH. H. L. MUKBBJBB. 

H. 0. Oianne-ReiolntioD. 

B. T. Badley presented the following resolution, which was 
adopted by a rising vote of both Conferences :« 

Retolted, that we. as a Conference, put on record our great regret at the cause 
which so suddenly takes our Brother H. Q. Ozanne from our midst : that we trust 
his residence at home will result in speedily restoring him to perfect health. We 
assure him of our sympathy in what must be to him a great sorrow, and promise to 
remember him at the Throne of Grace. We pray for him and Mrs. Ozanne a safe 
journey to the home-land, and very rich blessings in whatever work it may be their 
lot to enter upon when they reach America. 

* I^iteral translation from the Hindustani. 



88 CONFERENCE JOimNAL 

AifOVUMli 

After the readlog and approval of the Minates, and the reading 
of the AppointmeotB, the Bishop pronouooed the Beoediotion, and 
the Conference adjourned sine die. 






FreMing Bishop. 




Secretary, 



Rev. JOEL JANVIER, 
Metbodbin's First ladUn PrMchn. 



Rev. ZAHUR \SL HKqQ, 
Mclbodiun'a Fkrt Cuavcil Vu \n^. 



THE NEW YO^fTf 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AMDr 
TfLOEN FOUNDATIONS. 



I 



OONFERENCE SESSIONS 
SESSIONS OF THE NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE 



No. 
1 


Place. 

1 




Time. 


President. 


Secretary. 


Lncknow 


Dec. 


8-14, 1864 


Bishop E. Thomnson 


J. T. Gracey. 


2 


lloradabad 


Feb. 


1-7. 1806 


Rev. J. Banme 


T.J. Scott. 


8 


Shahjabtnpur 


Jan. 


10-17, 1867 


Rev. J. T. Gracey 


Do. 


4 


BIJnor 


Jan. 


16-21, 1868 


Rev. J. M. Thoburn 


Do. 


5 


Barellly 


Jan. 


14-22, 1869 


Rev. C. W. Judd 


J. D. Brown. 


e 


BarelUy 


Jan. 


20-27, 1870 


Bishop C. Kingsley 


Do. 


7 


Lnckoow 


Jab. 


21-18, 1871 


Rev. J. W. Waugh 


J. H. Messmore. 


8 


Iforadabad 


Jan. 


18-83, 1872 


Rev. J. L. Humphrey 


S.S.Wetherby. 





Baretlly 


Jan. 


18-22, 1873 


Rev. T. S. Johnson 


Do. 


10 


Ladmaw 


Jan. 


7-13, 1874 


Bishop W. L. Harris 


J. D. Brown. 


11 


ShaUahanpur 


Jan. 


6-21, 1875 


Rev. T. J. ScoU 


Do. 


IS 


Cawnpore 


Jan. 


13-18, 1876 


Rev. D. W. Thomas 


B. H. Badley 


13 


Moradabad 


Jan. 


3-9, 18n 


Bishop E. G. Andrews 


Do. 


14 


fiartiny 


Jan. 


9-15, 1878 


Rev. J. H. Messmore 


Do. 


15 


Lncknow 


Jan. 


9-14, 1879 


Bishop T. Bowman 


Do. 


16 


Cawnpore 


Jan. 


7-12, 1880 


Rev. E. W. Parker 


Do. 


17 


Bareilly 


Jan. 


6-11, 1881 


Bishop S. M. Merrill 


Do. 


18 


lloradal>ad 


Jan. 


U-17, 1882 


Rev. S. Knowles 


Do. 


19 


Liiek«iow 


Jan. 


10-16, 1883 


Bishop R. S. Foster 


Do. 


20 


Cawnpore 


Jan. 


9-15, 1884 


Rev. T.J. Scott 


C. L. Bare. 


21 


Bareilly 


Jan. 


7-12, 1886 


Bishop J. F. Burst 


B. H. Badley 


28 


LnckDow 


Jan. 


7-12, 1886 


Rev. H. Mansell 


Do. 


88 


MeradalNid 


Jan. 


5-10, 1887 


Bishop W. X. Ninde 


Do. 


24 


Cawnpore 


Jan. 


4-9, 1888 


Rev. J. H. Gill 


Do. 


25 


Bareilly 


Jan. 


9-15, 1889 


BishopJ.M. Thoburn 


Do. 


26 


Lncknow 


Jan. 


2-7, 1890 


Do. do. 


Da 


87 


Moradabad 


Jan. 


7-12, 1891 


Do. do. 


J. B. Gill. 


88 


Cawnpore 


Jan. 


6-11, 1892 


Do. do. 


Do. 


29 


Bareilly 


Jan. 


11-16, 1893 


Do. do. 


W. A. Mansell. 


80 


Lucknow 


Jan. 


3-8, 1894 


Do. do. 


Do. 


31 


Moradabad 


Jan. 


8-7, 1895 


Do. do. 


Do. 


32 


Bareilly 


Jan. 


8-13, 1896 


Do. do. 


Do. 


33 


Lucknow 


Jan. 


7-12, 1897 


Do. do. 


Do. 


34 


Bareilly 


Jan. 


5-11, 1898 1 


Bishop Cyrus D. Foss 
Bishop J. M. Thoburn 


J.W. Robinson 


35 


Shabjahanpur 


Jan. 


4-10, 1899 


Do. do. 


Do. 


36 


Lucknow 


Jan. 


10-15, 1900 


Do. do. 


Do. 


37 


Bareilly 


Jan. 


9-14, 1901 


Bishop F. W. Warne 


J. C. Butcher. 


88 


Mtiiadabad 


Jan. 


9-14, 1902 


Do. do. 


B.T. Badley. 


89 


Lucknow 


Jan. 


2-7, 1908 1 


Bishop J. M. Thoburn 
Bishop F. W. Warne 


Do. 


40 


Bareilly 


Jan. 


7-12, 1904] 


Bishop H.W. Warren 
BishopJ.M. Thoburn 


[ Do. 


41 


Lucknow 


Jan. 


5-11, 1906 


Bishop F. W. Warne 


Do. 


i/ 


MotMdMbMd I 


Jan. 


4-9, 1006 


Do. 6lO. 


\^ \yi 



PROGRAMME OF S£RVICBS 

JAIUART 3rd to 9tli, 1906. 



Friday, 



Sunday* 



Monday, 



TUBBDJLYt 



Conference Session daily from 11 am*— 2 p.m. 
Devotional Meeting daily at 8 a.m. 



Wbdnssday, 50 P.M. 



Thubsday, 5^ P.M. 



5-0 P.M. 



Saturday, 5-0 p.m. 



8-0 A.M. 



11-30 A.M. 

4-0 P.M. 
6-0 „ 



5-0 P.M. 



M) P.M. 



Anniversary of the Missionary Society-* 

J. H. Gill, Chairmaiu 
Our Progress in Self -Support in the past five 

years -G. C. Hewes. 
Best Solution of the Problem of Self-Support— 

P. L Neeld, W. Peters. 
The Best Use of the Summer School— 

W. A. Mansell. 
Noteworthy Features of the present Bevlval— 

B. T. Bad ley. 
How to bring this Revival home to our Now 

Converts—J. W. Robinson. 

Anniversary of the Historical Society— 

P. S. Hyde, Chairman. 
How I spent my first Ten years in India— 

S. KTnowles, Mrs. Parker, J. H. Messmore, 
H. Mansell. 
Anniversary of the Sunday School Union— 

R. I. Faucett, Chairman, 
Better Organization and Method in the Village 

Sunday Schools -Nizam All, S. Tupper. 
How to get the Young People to love the 

Word— C. L. Bare. 

Lecture—** Ood*8 Providence^Mine Inherit' 



anee. 



t> 



Mrs. J. Ellen Foster, of Washington, D.C. 

Anniversary of the Literary Society- 
Mrs. Bare, Chairman, 

Lecture : Subject-ul ViHt to the Winqjidd 
Parks. S. Dease. 

Anniversarv of the Epworth League— 
H. L. Mulcerjee, Chairman, 

The League in the Village — 
D. M. Butler. 

The Spiritual Worlc of the League- 
J. R. Chi tarn bar. 

Hindustani Sermon (Girls' School) - 

J. H. Messmore. Followed by ordination 
of Deacons. 
Love Feast and Reading of Memoirs— 

S. Knowles, Chairmjan. 
Sermon (City Church)— Bishop Warne. 
Sermon in English (Girls' School) - 

J. N. West. Followed by ordination of 
Elders. 

Annual Sermon— J. H. Smart. 
Jubilee Meeting.— Speakers : — H. A. Cutting 
W. A. Mansell, Bishop Warne. 



R£PORTS OP COMMITTEES 




Statistical Report. 

It bavlDg beeo ordered at the last Conference that our statistical year 
close on the 31st of October, instead of the 90th of November as heretofore, 
the present report sobmltted to you is for eleven montbs only. Still your 
Committee has the pleasure to report an Increase* with a few slight excep- 
tions, in nearly every branch of our work. Only a few important items are 
notiodd here ; for further details and comparison see statistics at the end of 
this volume. 

Chriittan ComnMnrfty 

1905. 1901. 

Probationers .. 20,489 18 859 

Members .. 14,148 14,295 

Baptized Children .. 15,161 14.465 

Total .. 49,798 47,619 

Our Christian community has increased by 2,179, though the number of 
full members has gone down by 147. (Loss of members in comparison with 
last year :- Bare! ily-Rumaon 172. BIJnor 28, Budaon 158, Moradabad 56 
and Oudh 38. Total decrease 452. While Garhwal, Hardol and Pllibhit each 
report a slight increase.) 

Last year an increase of 1,298 was reported, while this year the number 
of bapttams is less by 12. Total number of baptisms being 3,454. (Increase of 
153 in the number of non-Christtan children buptlzed, wnlle the number of 
adults baptized Is less by 158 and Christian children 6.) The report being for 
eleven months onlv, this decrease can easily be accounted for. 

Death9,—NxLmher of deaths last year 867, this year 1,034. Increase 167. 

Swiday Sdiools 

Increase in scholars 2,878. Total number under instruction being 48,595. 
(The number of Christian boys under Instruction is less by 158, while an 
increase is renorted, as follows, in the number of Christian girls 189, non- 
Christian children 1,942.) 

Chrtotfain ClifMr«ii in Sdioola 

Vernacular Schools 

Christian boys .. 2,380 
„ girls .. 720 



Total .. 3,109 

AnglO'Vemacular Schools 

Christian boys .. 766 
M girls .. 1,205 

Total .. 1,971 

Thus the total number of Christian chUdten «etiUw<^ ^dwfiAM!^^\& ^twVi 
8,0S0: while the number of Chriatlau chVldteu Vu owt cx^mT&^QL^iVV} xsl'qss^cj^t^ 

J5,16L 



42 REPORTS OF CX)MMITTB£S 

Thus, 10,081 receive no education at all. This is a matter worth our 
attention. How can the Indian Christian community expect to rise when 
10,081 are let loose to wander about without any arrangement for their better- 
ment. 

The number of Christian girls in Anglo- Vernacular schools is 1,306, 
while the number of boys is only 766. At this ratio, there Is not a very 
bright outlook for our Christian boys. This needs our careful study and 
attention, otherwise after ten or fifteen years our boys will be far behind 
their sisters. Please take note of this. 

Chnrcb Flnaiioei 

Hindustani Church Collection /or Pastor 

1904 . . In 12 months, Rs. 5,550. Monthly Rs. 462-8 
1005 ..In 11 „ „ 5.358 „ „ 486-8 

Less Rs. 102 Increase „ 24 monthly. 

Increase in 11 months, Rs. 264. 

Conference Claimants,— An increase of Rs. 128. Total amount collected. 
Rs. 794-lOK). 

' For Missionary Society. -The collection for 1905 amounts to Rs. 1,378-15-0— 
an increase of Rs. 310 over last year. 

For'Women^s Socfelie«.— Collection Rs. 390, increase of Rs. 8. 

Slight decrease is reported in the collection for Children's Day, Bible 
Society, Tract Society and Sunday School Union. 

In all the collection reported for ministerial support, an increase of 
Rs. 521 is to be found. Taking the other collections into account, total 
increase amounts to Rs. 37,773. 

Ganga Natu. 
Pbabhu Dayal. 
J. R. Chitambab. 

Report of the Coiiimit»t»ee on the Statue of tJie 

Church 

Your Committee has tried to find out some facts for jprosentation in this 
report concerning the state of the membership of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church within the bounds of tbe North India Annual Conference. The 
matter collected has been grouped under throe headings, namely,— 

L— The family-life of the membership. 

II.— The zeal among our people for the institutions of the Church. 
III.— The efficiency of the agents of the Church in the pastoral care of the 
people and the propagation of the Gospel. 

In the first place, it must be remembered that we labor in a heathen land 
and that (with the exception of tho little Syrian Church of Malabar) «he 
Christian Church of India is comparatively new, and that at present when 
Christians are compared with non-Christians as to numbers, tney are out- 
numbered by 200 to 1. Thus outnumbered and overshadowed and surrounded 
the atmosphere In which the infant Church breathes. Is largely impregnated 
with influences that are unfavourable to its healthy growth. 

The founders of our Mission here, In the United Provinces, had to begin 
the work, and in doinv so to accept both as converts and as helpers such 
materials as they could get, not always Just what they would have preferred. 
However poor the material they took, they In bored for its transformation 
and regeneration. We have always to take humanity as we find it. Our 
converts may be only half-hearted when tbey join us and their earnestness 
in the service of their new Master, Jesus Christ, may last only half the time, 
nevertheless we accept them as tbey come and daily labor with them in the 
hope that, amid new associations and under purer instruction, these same 
converts may become whole-hearted Christians, willing to serve their Lord 
and Saviour all the time. In many cases our hopes have been justified and 
bright Jewel? for the Master's Crown have been won. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 43 

Two years ago, the Methodist Episcopal Charch of Southern Asia re- 
ported a ChristiaD commanity of 146,000 souls. Out of this number the 
North India Conference reports 45,000. And this is the Mother Conference, 
and she rejoices to-day in the family of seven daughter conferences scattered 
far and wide In those dioceses. 

Jesus Christ has come and called India. He has called, and India has 
responded. John the Baptist cried, ** Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make 
His paths straight**; so far oar work for the fifty years just closing, has 
been a preparation for tbe Mighty coming of India's Redeemer and Eman- 
cipator. We seem to arrive now at a new period in our history. As in Elijah's 
time,* " there is a sound of abundance of rain.** Drops of the coming 
showers have fallen. Jast now a gentle shower is refreshing the Churches. 
It behoves us to get ready. ** Prepare thy chariot and get thee down that 
the rain stoo thee not.** Let us all expect a sweeping revival and pray for it. 
Something nas been attempted and something has been accomplished. 

When we compare the young Church with the hishest standards of New 
Testament piety, we must acknowledge that imperfection still clings to us, 
but we are not discouraged— thel very Churches the Apostle to the Gentiles 
wrote his epistles to, were not very different from our own. We re- 
joice to-day that multitudes among us have voluntarily broken down 
their heathen altars and cast away their idols. Other multitudes have tried 
to do so; they have purposed doing so, and in this hope they were baptized, 
but hinarances appears. In many cases ties of blood that bind thorn to their 
relatives have been too strong to break, and they still halt on tbe border-land 
that divides Christianity from heathenism. In the vllUge Christian popula- 
tion more than half have triumphel over the temptation to idolatry. The 
Christians of our cities in a much larger proportion have similarly gained a 
victory over it. So have all the people who nave had faithful pastoral care. 
. Ton will not wonder under these circumstances, when we state that 
one-half of our people still lack that truly Christian experience which Jesus 
nrged on Nicodemus, namely, '' the new birth *' ; but in this It Is some com- 
fort to know that they compare favourably with Churches in older Christian 
lands. Nevertheless we decline to be satisfied with any standard of piety 
leas than the highest, and for this we labor. What an opportunity is here 
presented to the earnest Evangelist. Multitudes, multitudes within the 
sound of the Gospel. Let us expect " multitudes in the valley of decision.*' 
The Methodist Church Is not satisfied with the formality of baptism. She 
recognizes that the typical Christian is he who has enshrined Christ in his 
heart of hearts-been^* converted,** '* born from above.** 

It is probably the utmost encouragement we have to say that one- 
half of our people have been *' born again.'* The other half are amid influences 
that draw them toward Christ. They are not free as yet from the enthral- 
ment of old associations, rites and ceremonies Old customs still hold them 
as if bound. Although every such heart be as strong as Jericho, tbe faithful. 

f»atient, ploddins, daily efforts of a truly converted ministry must succeed 
n winning the citadel. If we as shepherds are persistently faithful, under 
the power of the Holy Ghost, even these hearts will yield to Christ and in 
them new life will spring up— **old things will pass away and all things be- 
come new.*' 

Our people, on the whole, are better than the classes they have left. The 
yonng Church Is chaste, truthful and faithful In a manner not excelled by any 
caste or class of her non-Christian neighbours. She Is specially a total-ab- 
stinence Church, whose membership and young people iceep themselves free 
from all intoxicants. 

In one large district, for example, about one-half the families are report- 
ed to faithfully observe the custom of having family prayers. A good pro- 
portion of the children of school-going age are learning in schools. This 
speaks well for tbe future. 

Mannal labor is a blessing to any community, but with many of our people 
it is not popular. They need repeated instruction on this point. It is the 
exception to find skilled Christian workmen. Where they are found their 
support is assured. Our people, however, in general are believed to be im- 
proving in their earning power. The facts are that the Sikhs, the Chamars. 
the Lai Etogls from whom the bulk of our converts come, are seldom skilled 
workmen. It still remains that the great artisan castes be reached and con- 
verted, but we need more schools for our people and better trained teachers 
In the villages. 

♦ I Kinfirs. 18th Chapter. 



41 RBPORTS OF COMMITTEES 

The youth In our boarding schools are being built up In Christian charac- 
ter and this U eminently essential, but outside these ravonred institutfons 
the young people of the Church must depend for ethical training on their 

fiastorsana ministers, if they are ever to be strong and spiritually -minded, 
f this be true what manner of men ought these village preachers and pas- 
tors to be 

The gifts of the people for Church purposes are increasing and Improving, 
but not at all what they ought to be. Many of the reported collectfons are 
simply so many rupees deducted from the saUries of employees. 

Tne mass of the converts are 8tili unwilling to repair their own chapels. 
We can only continue teaching on this subject, and hope for fruit by and by. 
This leads to the remark that tbe Mission is now in a transition state and 
from being few and small we are growing to be numerous, and the methods 
pursued when we were small, cannot be followed much longer. More and 
more the Home Church expects us to cut off little helps that were given In 
the beginning. It would seem wise also that many men on very small pay 
should be discontinued and the work entrusted to men of better talent on 
better pay. A minimum ought to be fixed below which no man ought to be 
employed, and that minimum ought to be a living nllowance for all men who 
are liable to transfer. Tuose who cannot be transferred ought not to be 
reckoned In the force of workers on whom responsibility rests, and any little 
service these non-transfemble men do, may bb reckoned ss extra. As a mini- 
mum It would seem that Rs 6 a month for a man (aside from his wife's pay) 
Is the lowest pay any roan ought to get. With less than that he Is only a 
burden to himself and to his employers 

Some of our good men get comijaratively small pay and with children to 
educate and fees to pay. tbny find difficulty In the support of their families. 
In some instances they have had to borrow at high rates of Interest which 
In itself Is ruinous It Is common to find men paying 13 annas a year for 
the loan of 16 annas -75 per cent We have no hesitancy In saying that a man 
so handicapped cannot have the peace of m nd necessary to dosuccessfnl work. 
This state of things onghtto beremt-dlei, for It affects an t hinders God's work. 
It Is sad to relate that In a certain district in our Conference a spirit of 
disaffection crept In, and some few thousands of the membership seemed on 
tbe point of leaving us. Persecution from outsiders, fear of losing their 
landTand livelihood : (for this threat was held over them.) the close ties of 
friendship with heathen relatives, and alas I the weakness of pastoral 
oversight and Instruction must be given as the cause. Notwithstanding all 
this, these disaffected ones have not left us. and a nid all discouragements 
many have braved both danger and loss and been loyal to the Church. 

One thing Is clear, that care must be take*> In future that unwise servants 
of the Mission be probibit'-d from holding out inducements to Inquirers which 
the Mission can never fulfil. It Is sad to think that such Inducements have 
probably been held out to candidates for baptism and the failure to realize 
them after baptism has resulted In disaffection. 

After writing the above we have many encouragements to speak of. 
'* Idolatry Is going, the Christian community Is becoming more Influential, 
there are more voluntary workers who receive no pay. Collections Increase, 
the influence of Christianity Is penetrating the non-Cnrlstian world '* Even 
Hindus and Mohamedans are seeking for Christian teachers for their 
children. Applications for such are common. Christian mothers trained 
in our Boarding-schools are training their children In trne accord with the 
Spirit of the (jkispel. Home Influences are often pure and good Our people 
are more teachable, great numbers have had a genuine conversion and have 
begun a new life. A wave of revival has spread over the Mission. Meetings 
of special power have been held, where proof was furnished that the 
Qospel of Pentecostal day is still the Gospel of the Church, and It9 effect Is still 
the same as In New Testament times. As one experienced worker writes, we 
have '* heaps '* of encouragements. 

Concerning institutions of the Church, we may say that the Sabbath-day 
becomes more and more a Holy day to the people. Not all the people so 
esteem It, but the number who do keep it holy Is on the Increase. 

That the Sabbath Is a day for worship is recognized specially In cities, 
and wherever possible the people generally assemble for worship. Tonr 
Committee would recommend that an effort be made to have a class leader 
invariably hold a Sabbath service of singing, prayer and reading of a por- 
t/on ot Scripture wherever no preacher can reach the scattered groups. 

The Ep worth Leai^ue \a vet 3 i^o^^Vai ^\\Xi ^wt ^^^\\^« \5& VMcififita tn 



REPORTS OF GOMMITTTSBS ri5 

calling ovt the t^enis of the young are very great. Thus unpaid workers 
are enlisted In Christian serviee. They hold prayer-mvetings and meetincs 
for religious culture which hulld up the youth in general information aud 
In character. A field is open for the * Mercy and Help department ** of the 
Cjesgne which ought to be more cultivated than it now is, for great are the 
neeoB of the eommunitv where sickness and suffering is so plentiful. 

The subject of Christian Marriage calls for attention, Qreat numbers 
still neglect to Invite Jesus Christ to the marriage ceremony. Tbey have 
failed to see that the Church has a special duty In blessing the marriage 
bond, and that the presence of the ordained Pastor Is a proper and disolp- 
narf requirement. The age of the parties married, the ceremony itself 
and the tendency to exceMfve erpciues, all need careful thought and the 
people need constant teaching on these points. 

We are glad to state that as regards funerals also, Christian burial 
rites ara more observed than in ibe beginning of our work, thus displacing 
heathen eeremouies 

It appears to your Committee concerning the Agents of the Church, that 
greater care Is needed in their setectirm If we are ever to make our people 
strong and good. There Is the fear of admitting men too htisUly and of 
advancing them too rapidly. And yet these same ine£Qcient men have in 
good faith taken up Mission woiir as an employment, it will be a delicate 
matter to get rid of them without doing tliem injustice. The Conference 
assemblies, such HS Summer Schools, District Conferences and Camp meet- 
ing* and even Quarterly Conferences, need to be all turned Into agencies for 
spiritual uplift and this thought ought to be kept prominent. 

To revert to the subject of debts of Preachers, we would say that this 
thought needs to be Impressed on our older men who have faml^^ea to 
educate, that it is unwise for them to keep their children too long at school 
where fees must be pa'd and other expenses incurred Of the boys of a 
family, a selection must be made between those who may attend school and 
those who ought at once to begin to earn their bread, and to thus relieve th^ir 
parents. It ought to be an axiom that all the boys in a large family cannot 
complete a college course. 

Besides we need a rule making It a punishable offence for any asont of 
the Mission to borrow money for his private expenses from bis own subordin: 
ates. But the matter of excessive debt is thoroughly recognized In tM 
Discipline, para. 146, " Are you In debt so as to emiiarrass von In the work of 
the ministry ?*' 1.4 asked of each candidate as he stands at tne door of ihe Com 
ference asking admission. If he be, of course he cannot enter So ought 
It be understood after he has entered If debt embarrasses him and hinders 
his usefulness. It Is time to consider the question of his severing his relation 
with the Conference. 

To a large extent the state of the Church and of its institutions and the 

Esstoral care of the flock and the propagation of the Gospel, Rli^denend on the 
eatthy condition of the Christian Ministry of the Church. Th^reforp, 
brethren, we must ourselves heed the Exhortation of Paul the Apostle In his 
letter to the PhilllplHns (Chap. II. 15-10), 'thutyo may be blameless and 
harmless children of God without blemlsn In the midst of a crooked and 
perverse generation among whom ye shine as lights in the world, holding 
forth the Word of life " If we be noly men, the Church must prosper. 

In conclusion, we may express our opinion that the Ciiurch of God among 



ns Is fulfilling its mission, notwithstanding deficiencies -uotwlthstanding 
shortcomings. The Spirit of God Is among the people and the revival 
Influences of the year Just closing promise great results. 



J. H. Gill 
G. C. Hewbs 
Wm. Petbbs 



Report of Conference Stewards. 

The Board of Conference Stewards have not found It an easy matter to 
do their work at this session of conference for the following reasons i-Ffrst, 
there Is some uncertainty abont the amount available for distribution both 
In regard to Conference claimants and in regard to the Pension Fund ; 
seeoadli/. the requests for aid far exceed the amount at the disposal of the 
Board. The collections from the Districts aggregate Rs. 749-6-0 while the ap* 



46 



REPORTS OP COMMITTEES 



glications presented by the Presiding Elders amonnt to Rs. 1,284 for the 
^ension Fand alone. This sum has been reduced to Rs. 1,005, a larger 
amount tban the Board of Stewards has ever distributed ; and Presiding 
Elders are reo nested to do all in their power to lessen the demands upon the 
Pension Fund. The attention of the Conference is called to the fact that 
Rs. 2,002 are distributed to claimants this year. It is imperatively necessary 
that the Conference do something to protect itself from further increase of this 
burthen. At present Rs. 183 per mensem are paid to claimants. This is 
nearly one-half the amount the Garhwal District receives for all branches of 
work. If we do not take some definite step to arrest the increase of expenditure 
upon pensions, it will not be long before the men in active work will have 
to be dismissed in order to provide support for those whose days of active 
service are past. 













J. H. MsagiioKB. 












H. A. CuTTiHe. 












J. F. Samuel. 


DlitrlbvtloB -PtMSlOB Pnii 








1906. 








Diitriot BIJaor. 


Rs. a. p. 




Rs. a. 


p. 


B. McUreggor 


. . 


12 


• • 


12 





BviiOB. 












Mrs. Gobind Ram 
„ Pohpi Singh 
„ Mohan Singh 


• a 

• • 


3 

2 0. .. 

2 


7 





Pill¥kit. 












Mrs. Jhabbu Lai 
„ S. Lincoln 




5 
4 


• • 








Hariol. 












Mrs. Tilok Singh 


• • 


2 


• • 


2 





Qarhwil. 












Bhajni 


• . 


4 


• • 


4 





■ortdtbii. 












Bala Das 

Mrs. Phebe 
„ Kancy 
„ Kallu Das 
„ Sadiq Uaslh 
„ Manphul Singh 
„ Mathlya Singh 




6 01 

5 

6 

2 

3 
6 
3 0, 


1 
1 
1 


80 





BareiUy-Kuumi. 












Mrs. Oulab Singh 
„ Dulla Singh 
„ Balln Singh 
„ Pamuchai 




1 8 01 
18 
18 

2 4 0. 


► .. 


6 12 





Ondli. 












Mrs. Isa Das 
„ McOee 

„ Chidda Singh 
„ Mangal Singh 
„ Jawahir Lai 


• • 

• • 

• • 
« • 


1 01 
4 

2 
2 
4 0. 

Total 


1 

1 
^ .. 


13 







83 12 


Rs. 1,005 


Collections 

Interest on Endowroe 


nt.. 




• • 




749 8 
255 8 




1,005 



REPOBTS OF OOMMITTSGS 



1906. 



Mrs. Haqq 
t, Jmeob 
A* Swoot 
Mn-CoUer 

»• 2?T 

Fnnk Children 
Cbowi Ul kt ifD Ur^riyifi 
AablkmChum 
llrs.B.& Budden 
19 A* Solomon 



Bs. 


a. 


p. 


It 








13 








8 








9 








4 








10 








19 








8 








13 








6 








6 








100 









ToUl 100 » Bs. 1,900 



Report of Board of BxtmiMrs 

W. A. Bevis passed in Discipline and Miley's Theology of the first year. 

T. C. Badley passed in Harman's Introduction and Discipline of the first 

year. 

H. G. Ozanne passed In all the vernacular of the first year, except Grammar 

and Christian Purity, and in all the required English sub- 
jects of the second and third years. 

G. W. Briggs passed in all the vernacular and Bngllsh subjects of the second 

year, and in all the vernacular subjects of the third year, 
except Grammar and Sakuntula. 

C. £. Simpson passed in all the required English subjects of the second yaar, 

except Barman. 
P. 8. Hyde passed in all the required English subjects of the third year, 

except Church History, and completed all the vernacular 
subjects of the third year. 

I Year.— J. W. Norton passed in all the subjects, except Church History and 

Scripture. (Bemains in the same class to give all subjects 

again.) 
Dhappan Wilson passed in all the subjects, except Church History and Scrip* 

ture. (Bemains In the same class to glvo all subjects 

again.) 
Prabhu Dass passed in all the subjects. 
J. B. Chltambar passed in all the subjects. 

II Year.— Ferris Wittke passed in all the subjects. 

Ishwari Dass passed in Philosophy of Salvation in the first year, and all 

subjects of the second year, except Makhzan *Ilm I IIAhf. 

III Year.— John Bobert passed in all the subjects. 

D. S. Hukill passed in all the subjects. 

H. C. Sigler passed In all the subjects except Tswf Subfil. 
Yaqub Singh passed in all the remaining subjects. 

IV Year.— Misri Charan passed in all the subjects. 
Prem Maslh passed in all the subjects. 

W. A. Mamsell, lUitlatrar. 

Report of the Auditing Conuftittee 

Your Committee report that the Presiding Elders have audited tho ac- 
counts of their districts as follows :— 

Budaon District, Woman*s Foreign Missionary Society accounts for 
four quarters, all circuits for three quarters, and some for four. 

Bijnor District for three quarters. 

Garhwal District. Woman's Foreign Missionary Society Accounts for 
four, and Pauri Glrls^ School for three quarters. 



i 



48 REPORTS OF COMMlT4?fl£i8 

Hardoi District for three qnitrterB and some drtaltetor four quarters. 

Moradabad District to end of the year, except Preacher-ln-charge of 
Moradabad and the Principal of Boys* Htgb School. 

Barellly-Kumaun District, Pithoragarh through first quarter, most 
others for two quarters, and some for three quarters. 

Oudh District, Woman's College accounts and all circuits to the end 
of 1905, except Uonda Girls* School, which was audited through the third 
quarter, 1904. 

Pilibhit District, Woman*s Foreign'Mlssionary Society accounts and all 
circnit accounts for four quarters. 

The Committee have themselves audited the following : — 

Panri General Le<lger, Budaon Presidini; Elder*8 acoount* Barellly-Kn- 
maon Presiding Elder's accounts, Bijnor Woroan*s Foreign MlssHNiary So* 
clety and Presiding.Elder't accounu, Theological Seminary, Hardoi Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society and Presiding Elder's accounts, .Pilibbit Wo- 
man's Foreign Missionary Society Distrl>*t and Presiding Elder's accounts. 
Jubilee Fund, Secretary of Bishops' Special Fond, and Moradabad Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society's accounts to the end of 1905. 

Reid Christian College for three quarters. Moradabad Presiding Elder's 
account for two quarters Conference Treasurer's Book for the Conference 
of 1905. Mission Treasimr's Gash Book was ezaoilned to the end of second 
quarter. 

G. C. HKWES & COMMnXBB. 

Report of the Domestic Missfonary Sodety . 

1. Contributions recelvml by the Domestic Missionary Society in 1905 
amount to Rs. 146-2 0, which has been spent in support of a preacher, Brother 
Dharam Singh, in the Pilibhit district. 

2. Brother Dharam Singh works at Siraali, and his Presiding Elder 
gives a good report of his work. 

3. The following is the amount received from the following distrlols :— 

Bs. a. p. 

Bareilly .. .. .. 45 4 

Bijnor •• .« •• .. .. 11 

Oudh .. .. .. .. 16 7 

Budaon .. .. .. .. 18 8 

Hardoi .. 8 16 

Pilibhit «. .. .. .. .. 47 

Moradabad •• •• •• .. •• 10 o 

Totol .. 146 2^0^ 



4. Report of Brother Dharam Sluffh : ~" I have this year preached Christ 
in the Sirauli circuit of the Pilibhit district. Twenty-four persons received 
baptism, and twelve persons, who are genuine Inquirers, are under Instrnction, 
and I have stroughope of their baptism next year. My work is done in 
twelve villages, where two hundred and eight Christians live. These are re- 
gularly visited for religious instruction. Eighteen boys and nine girls of this 
communltv receive secular training under me. I go to each village thrice a 
month. Eleven persons were received into the full connection. Two mar- 
riages were celebrated in this circuit with Christian ceremonies. Our people 
are improving in leaving the idolatrous rites and ceremonies." 

5. The Presiding Elders and the Preachers-in-charge are requested to 
recommend this Society in their districts and circuits, to establish branch 
societies in their circuits, so that the If isiion workers and the Ciurch mem- 
bers may know more about it, and feel an Interest in It, and gladly contribute 
for the Master's work. 

6. The Presiding Elders and the Preachers«in-charge are fni*ther re- 
quested to hold a special annual meeting in their Churches in Uie Interests 
of this Society, at which collections be taken. 

7 The Presiding Elders are also requested to hold a special ineetltig 
for this Society during their District conferences. 

VL. I*. UuK&BjBB, Seoreiary, 



RSPORTS OP COMMITTEES 40 

E^orc of VisHon to the Theoloiical Seminary. 

SKHINABY KB UOLABIZE If! RiPORT. 



FDir&n cband tillb ul 'llmon ko bbal Umiali« 
gfte, iB»eiiift1t)De;lh Dfttfjanlktlli, kiykbin 
httmire tuUbi ki tatiduruatf k& bhf irhlyiT 



ek biiznrgog ne jo waMB us wsqt fiixlrlhe, 

Jo UB madrMe men ^hldmat k[ tslriri be live 
larmusU'ldd harg. aor rfihial baata llAe 
usUldoo h« namfi.ie kA Jo wahiQ la'H m aeae 
m ki. ]o wabin >i&t kann halo, natfja bat. 
tiig hat. kl kail Jo Maslhl kbidmat karne ki 
t lUhl darai-gfh men tafTArl biili karen, 



The Snd«y School ContDlttoe Renort 



noted for ita etTorta to get tha yoang people taught Id thoto tundamental 
doetflnesof tboScrtpturea whtchare the baits at oara or oor Church and 
Christian experience. The great work being done among our young people 
In thia regard cannot be overK«tlniated. 
Ittathc--'-" -- ■--■—■-•— 



loaght beat to bring betore our Conference some of the needs of oar 
, _.;hooU, and to rpqueat that they be met in the year to coma : — 
The placing of teachers En charge who are full of desire to save 



SnDdar Hchools, and to rpqueat that they be met in the year to coma : — 

1. The placing of teachers En charge who are full of desire to i_. 
sodIs, and who will bring their class to the personal koowledge of satvaUon. 



To havedeflnlte teachingln thoglvlngof the dltfereol colleotiona of 
the Church. 

' " It only the lotson leavw, but also Jo ^t our Sanday School 

_ inni 

Intereit and nnlty. 

The Revival should have Its starting plac 

and Itamembers.so let our efforts --■" 

reaped for Qod this coming year. 



Report of Tenqteruice Comndttee. 

Tonr Committee is very glad to note that there is progress on the 
amperaDeeQuesUoa in the class of people among whom we work, and we 
jutfthat the coming revivals will give addltonal Impetus to every phaae 



nvemie and the health and morals of the people, and Inasmuch a« the 
EbwCBllve Board of our Hlsslon has rooently appointed a strong committee, 
with Dr. B. Q. Saunderson, editor of the Indian WitneM, as Secretary, spd 
Dr- W. A. Mansell, editor of tixo KauJuUt-i-Blnd, as member from our 
Conterenoe, 



60 REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 

Youc CoavaUtee would orga that enoh of oar jMraachars 4^)naldBr^hii|86lf 
a committ^6 of one to collect and for^Ard to Dr. W. A. MaoselliSeWlKtit as 
called for la the forms already sapplfed ; also that he hold himself la 
readlaess toco-operate heartily with the Gortimlttee of the Executive Board 
In any other plans which they may propose ; that our Church may be true to 
her traditions and policy as an uncompromising foe of the traffic In 
intoxicants. 

Fbahk S. Ditto. 

H. A. Cutting. 

NlSAM Au. 
8. B. FlROH. 

R6|KMt of the Board of Deaconesses, 

The Board of Deaconesses of the North India Conference met In Morad- 
abad, January 9th, 1906. 

The Board reports that they have passed the charactelrs and renewed 
the licenses of the following : — 

Deaconesses :-^Mis8 Hoge, Miss Scott. Miss Bardie, Miss Mary Means, 
Miss Brown, «i|8S "ialU van. Miss [ngrarn. Miss Sheldon. MUs Buddlcic. 

Associate DerieoiiiMses : Mrs. Tucker, Mrs. Caroline Richards 

The following members of the Board were appointed : -Dr. Uease, Presi- 
dent : Mrs. Parker, Secretary ; S. Tupp^r, M. Stephen, W. R. Bowen, Mrs. 
Neeld, Miss Sullivan, Miss Bardie and Miss Ruddlck. 

L. S. Pabkeb, Secretary. 

TlM Mfnntes of the Commissidii oh the 

Agra Medical Home 

Hbld in Babbillt, July 25th and 26th, 1905. 

MoBNure Session. 

The meeting of the Commission on the Agra Medical Home convened at 
7 A.1C. in the Methodist Eoiscopal Church, Bareilly, July 25th, 1905. Those 
present from the North India Conference were Mesdames L. S. Parker, 
W. A. Mansell, Dease, M.D., Neeld, Oillaud Chew, Misses Hoge and Scott, 
Messrs. Neeld, Dease, M.D., Core, Robinson, Gill and Tupper Those from 
the North- West India Cooference were Mesdames Buck, Matthews, Robertson 
and Wilson, M isses Wlnslow, Lawson, Scott, M. D^ Bobenhouse and Pool. 
Messrs. Thomas, Rockwell Clancy, Dennis Clancy, Buck, e^tt, Robertson 
and Butcher, M.D. 

After devotional exercises conducted by Bishop F W. Waroe, the Con- 
ferenee proceeded to organise. Miss Pool was elected Secretary. On motion 
all our missionaries in the station were invited to be present and tak^ part 
in theVliscusslons. On motion of Dr. Neeld those members of the Commission 
who had not been notified, were called by telegram. It was moved, seconded 
and carried that Dr. W. Huntley, of the Agra Medical Mission Training 
Institution, be invited to attend and take part In the discussions of this Con- 
ference. 

A historical sketch of the Agra Medical Bome was given by Mrs. L. S. 
Parker, telling tndtdehts of the Instttutlonnf tl^at home. 

The Committee appointed at the North- West India Conference to visit 
medical Institutions reported having visited Agra and Lndhiana. Mrs. 
Mansellgave a minute account of a conference with Miss Yerbi^ry In chariie 
of the Woman's Department of the Agra Medical College, as well as with 
Dr. Browne, of Ludhlana. The Committee gave information gained by 
correspondence with medics 1 missionaries and other missionaries of long 
experience in various parts of Northern India regarding the moral status 
of medical assistants and nurses. 

Dr. Stokes read a letter from Dr. Huntley written to Mrs. Parker in 
which he discouraged the idea of abandoning the Methodist Home since the 
majority of the girls come from Methodist families. A letter was read from 
Mrs. J. S, Scott strongly encouraging the continuance and enlargemeoi of 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 51 

Uie Home in Asra. A letter was also read from Miss English. Miss Mary 
Biulden's expression of approval of the Anra Home was given. 

A memorial was presented from the Teachers* Association of the United 
Provinces held in Allahabad, recommending that we impress upon our Indian 
Christians that girls shoald noi be sent to the Agra Medical School onder 
eighteen vears of age and without a certificate of having passed the Entrance 
examination. In the discussion that followed, Dr. Dease spoke of the former 
plan of having a training class where medical missionaries were stationed 
and sending only the best to Agra Rev. Rockwell Clancy brought out 
the fact that the matter of sending them was not under our control. The 
motion carried that the resolution be divided Into two sections and the 
question of age be considered first. On motion the section of the resolution 
regarding the age- limit was adopted. The motion that we adopt the second 
section of the resolution advising that only Entrance-pass girls be admitted In 
Agra College was laid on the table. A committee was appointed to consider 
the<^uestlon of starting elementary medical training schools at Barellly 
and at Brindaban. Drs. Dease, Lewis and Neold, Mi9s B. Scott, M.D., 
Roclcwell Clancy and Dr. Scott were appointed with Dr. Butcher as convener. 

Motion carried that the next session be held at 4-30. 

On motian a committee of seven was appointed to bring la resolutions al 
our next meeting regarding the steps to be talcen with respect to the Agra 
Medical Home. Rev. J. B. Thomas, Mrs. L S. Parlrer, Miss A. B. Lawson, 
Mr. Tupper, Mrs. U. J. Wilson, Rov. J. W. Robinson and Mrs. Dease com- 
posed tne committee. On motion a committee of three was appointed to 
receive and prepare any memorials to bo presented to Government. Mrs. 
Mansell, Drs. Dease, M.D Lewis, and E. Scott were appointed. 

The Commission adjourned with the Doxology ana Benediction. 

Aftbrmoon Sbssion. 

The Commission met fi.t4-30 p.m., and after hymn and prayer, the report 
of the Committee on elementary training school wasgiven. (See B^ort ^o. i.) 
After being considered item, by Item the report was adopted. The Committee 
on the Agra Medical Home presented two resolutions which brought lengthy 
discussion. Since the discipline of the Home seems to be the problem, made 
more dIflQcult by the factor the ro^l management being In the hands of the 
Inter -Conference Committee, it was moved, seconded and carried that a com- 
mittee of five be appointed to considor the problem of discipline. Rockwell 
Clancy Dr. Neeld, Miss bawson, Mrs Parker, and Mrs. Wilson composed the 
committee. On motion we adjourned with Doxology and Benediction. 

July 36th Mobning Session. 

The Commission was called to order by Bishop F. W. Warne at 6-30 a.m. 
After devotional exercises lend by Rev. L. A Core, the Minutes of yesterday's 
sessions were read, corrected and approved. The motion carried that the 
Minutes of the meetins of this Commission be sent to the four Secretaries of 
the North and North- West India Conferences for incorporation in next annual 
Conference Minutes and be filed with the Corresponding Secretary. The 
Secretary was ordered to send a summary of the action taken here to the 
Indian Witness and The Kankdb, The committee appointed to consider 
the discipline of the Agra Medical Home then gave their report. (See Report 
No, 3.) The report was considered Item by Item and adopted. Dr. W. 
Huntley. Superintendent of the Agra Medical Mission Training Instttotloo, 
was Introduced to the Commission. The report of the Committee to draft 
resolutions for the disposition of the Agra Medical Home was then taken up. 
(SeeHeiporejyo.3.) The report was adopted 

On motion a sub- committee of all the ladies present was appointed to 
draft a set of rules as suggestive to the Board of Trustees to be presented to 
this Commission. Dr. Huntley was then Invited to speak. He suggested that 
tlie girls guing Into Government work possibly necid more care than those 
going into Mission work; that other Missions might unite in the Agra Home, 
and also spoke of the improved conditions of the staff and equipments In 
Aprra. A vote of thanks was extended to Dr. Huntley for dls eceellent 
address. 

The Committee on disposition to be made of the Agra Medical Home, then 
gave the remainder of tiieir report. (See Report No, 3.) On motion the part 
Of the report referring to co-operation with Ludhiana was refsrred to a 
committee of five including the Presiding Elder of the Punjab DIstrtet, to 



52 REPORTS OF COMMiTrMfeSS 

be appointed by Bishop Warne who shall make Inquiries and report to the 
North and North- West India Conferences as to the best methods of co-opera- 
tion with the North India School of Medicine. Dr. J. G. Rntcher, Hiss A. E. 
Lawson, Dr. S. S. Dease. Mrs W. A. Mansell, and Rev. T. 8. Molesworth 
were appointed with Dr. Batcher as Chairman. 'Hie committee on memori- 
als to be presented to Government then reported. (See Aeport No 4.) The 
report was taken up by sections and adopted with conditions that the Civil 
Surgeon of Agra be reqnested to present the memorials 1 and 2 to the 
Government, and that sections 3 and 4 be sent to the Trustees of the Agra 
Medical College. 

A letter was read from Mrs. J. B. Thomas. Th«) meeting adjourned 
with the Do.xology and Benediction. 

Aftbbsoon Session. 

The meeting was called to order by Bishop F. W. Warne at 5-15. After 
prayer the report of the Committee, which was appointed to formulate rules 
suggestive to the Board of Trustees for management of the Agra Medical 
Home, was given. (See Report No, 5.) The report was adopted. 

Mrs. Mansell was appointed to formulate the memorials to be presented 
to Government Moved, seconded and carried that the Presiding Elders be 
Instructed to prevent homes being broken up by the wife of any Mission 
employ^ going to medical school. 

The loliowing resolution was presented and adopted :~ 

RcBolved, that the wives of students in the Theological Seminary, able 
to pursue a simple course of study in medicine, be encouraged to do so, provid- 
ed they do not go later to the Medical School In Agra, and that they do not 
receive medicalscholarshlps whll^ pursuing the said course. 

Minutes of the day were read, correctedfand approved. 

The Commission adjourned with the Doxology and Benediction. 

Lydia 8. Pool. 
REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

lOf l.—Bltflieilary Trtliiig SdMls. 

ir/tereas, in the opinion of this Commission, girls who have not reached 
the age of eighteen years, are too young to begin their studies in a Medical 
College. Therefore be It resolved : 

First.— That we should have Preparatory Medical Training classes for 
girls from our schools who have passed the Anglo- Vernacular Middle Examin- 
ation, and who wish to pursue a medical course, but have not yet reached 
the age of eighteen years. 

Second.— We recommend that for the present two classes be formed : one 
in the North India Conference, and one in the North- West India Conference. 

jn^ird.--That the Finance Committees of the two Conferences be reanested 
toeetlmate for twenty- five scholarships, fifteen for the North India Confer- 
ence and ten for the North- West India Conference, and that Bs. 8 per month 
for each girl be the amount of the scholarship. 

Founh.— That girls in these Training classes. If they prove satisfactory 
in character and ability, may be sent to a medical school after they reach 
the age of eighteen years. 

Fift^.— Nothing in the above paragraph shall exclude candidates from 
other Missions, providing their own scnolarships, who In all respects meet 
the requirements. 

Sixth.—J^or shall this plan interfere with the existing arrangements for 
training of Compounders and Nurses. 

SeveniK —That we request the Finance Committees concerned, to estimate 
for soch additional staff and equipment as Is required, and that in the opin- 
ion of this Commission there ought to be two medical misslcmaries Ineacn of 
these training centres. 

lo. 2.— Dliolfllat of th9 Agri Meilctl Emm. 

Htsolved^ that In view of ibe anioma\o\)A coxidlUoYi heretofore existing in 
tbe aiAiuiffeinent of the Agra )A«4Vca\ lio^^^^^ i^xi«^\> >^^ Xs^r^ vtsc^>^ 
Conferences concerned to tai\selotm^\«icX\ot\t^«WiVL\Ti%\V%X ^!^l^ %v\\«t\xi- 




BKPORTS or OaMMITTEKS M 

omiftl proffiriott f of iW Dlnclplia^ and tt»dw Ui^ YHtiiml «iip«>rtl»IMi <(^ Uh> 
Preacb«r-l»-ekaii« audi Um^ PrnidiM Sl<t<*r tit tktt dUUricV 

R tmaw & i ^ >kat Ike pfMcai jotot Oiwiitl»p» ot Mm>t»ww^l <^t tW» Atf% 
Medieal Bomtt besapmedcd bf a Board oC Tmsw^k mkI Hoaid li» b<» rnmii^ 
poaedoftix ■•■ibarsdwo MMibers of Uio WooiaaNt OHif«^rt^iK^ and mM» 
■ea bar of thm Pareal Board) for cacli aaaual coaf«^^ac«^ wlUi lli<ik T««ldtik|il 
BWiop cs«Ma Ckainsaii, and (he Pr>Mtldlv^r Kld«« of tliii« dt^irlcl ror «ifM«i 
Secretary. The SaperiotendeDt of the Hone fthaH a)«o be <ur (^|Mo a newber 
of Ihe Board of Trustees. 

■• S.-BlipMltiMitt hi Mi« tl tit liM. 

Whereas It aeems important to provide a Homo for the Chrlull^ tltta of 
oar MIssioDllehl who may desire to study In the Agra Medical Colleitei ther« 
foreb 

RemAved^ that the Agra Home be continiied and manaired In acconlanee 
with the rules adopted by this Commission, and that special efforts be made 
to Improve the condition of the Home, so that it may be more attractive and 
homelike for the clrls who mav reside there. 

IThereas the North India School of Medicine at Ludhlana has requested 
and urged oar Mission to join them in their efforts to build up aslrouf 
loter-denominationsl Christian Instttutiou. whereglrls may receive a gooa 
medical edacation and preparation (or this form of CnrUtlan work ; 

Resotoed that we recommend that the aathorl ties of the Woman's Korettn 
Missionary Society send oat a lady doctor qaallfied to act on the staff of this 
school as soon as possible. 

■•. 4 — ■•Borlalt to h« prtttiHi U •rrinuiiil 

IZesotoed, that a preamble be prepared setting forth the facts, ^rst, that 
girls in Government medical service when sent out to lonely stations with- 
out members of their own families are often subject to extreme temptation 
by which they are overcome, that the moral danger connected with this work 



ts so real, that many of our missionaries feel grave doubts as to whether It Is 
right for them to continue to send girls for training for Government Medical 
work ; seeofid. as our Mission has been foremost, we believe, In sending girts 



to the Agra Medical School, we beg to make the following requests :•- 

1. That a candidate for entrance to the Agra Medical donool should be 
required to have passed the Anglo -Vernacular Middle Examination and 
to present a certificate of moral character from the manager of the institu- 
tion in which she was educated. 

2. That the former custom be revived in aeoordancs with which the 
Secreiarr ofithe United Provinces, Dufferin Fund Association, conferred with 
the Mission as to the places to which Mission girls passing the Medloa 
EzaminatioD should be sent for work. 1 

3 That it be arranged that no Christian Medical Assistant will be urged 
to take up the medical cantonment inspection work which we firmly believe 
to be lowering to true womanhood. 

4. That efforts be made to provide for the oversight and moral care of 
medical young women in out-stations by a committee of suitable persons. 

Mf 9.- ft fomiiatg Silei 9M§§mMw t$ tho iMrd •! ffnit##f fir 

MaiaomMt »f fk9 Emm: 

Eeeommended : 

IVM— That the Superintendent of the Home be the medium of commu* 
nleatioo with the Government. 

iSteotui.— That each girl asking for admission to the Home shall present 
• eertifieato from the Superintendent of the school in which she was last a 
student or teacher. 

TfcfnL— That other Missions sending girls shall be reqnired to pay ihe 
el Bj. SO a year for each student toward the %ai^t%\ «iv^xai^ ^ >2^% 



54 REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 

Report* of Lhe Muttra BiOssioii Tirdmiis Sdboci. 

The year just completed, has broaght with it marked changes- fiarlf fn 
February, Miss Saxe Joined us, and began at once teaching in the ttngil^h 
Department, where, in addition to many other duties, she has taught faith* 
fully throughout tlie year. In May« Miss Gregg left for her furlough, and 
though we miss her greatly here, we are glad to Know that she is arousing 
much interest at home in our work. We nope that one of the results of this 
may be a much-needed third missionary. 

English Depabtmbnt. 

jE7nrolm6ut.-*There have been nine or ten studentg present throughout 
the year, varying from time to time in persormel Two of our senlorsof 
whom we hoped great things, have not been able to attend regularly since 
July on account of illness. 

Afis8io7i« represented, -Among the students of this department four come 
to us from the hurcb of England, one is a Baptist, and the rest are from our 
own Mission. 

Studiee. -The class -work has been going on as usual Most of the 
students have two hours Bible and two hours language work daily, besides 
practical work, which often requires a good deal of preparation. 

Practical TTorfc.- This includes zenana, mohulla and village visitation, 
with occasional opportunities for mela work. During the fall, a number of 
young women have bad opportunities to go out and help In the district evan- 

?:elistic work, and have comeback full of entbnslnsm over the things which 
bey have seen and heard. T|iey also teach the Bible in the Boarding 
School, and Hindustani Training and Summer School. During Mrs Clancy's 
absence in Naini Tal. one young woman had entire charge of the fifteen vil- 
lage women who stayed after summer school to continue their studies. 
Through most of the year, another did the housekeeping for our large 
family of sixteen to eighteen. In all these different ways they gain much 
valuaole experience. 

Grrtdtiates.— Two students have gone out from us at this time ; both will 
enter our Mission work. A third, who was unable on account of her health 
to complete the course, is looking forward to taking up work In Pauri. 
Two others have entered the work during the year, one in A jmere, the other 
In Kudaon. One p«<pecially has the passion for souls, and her work has been 
much blessed. Only recently we had a letter from her full of rejoicing and 

f»raise to God for the wonderful way He has answered their prayers in send- 
ng a great revival among the girls. We would add our thanksgiving to 
hers for His abundant goodness and mercy. 

Hindustani Dbpabtmbnt. 

J!7nrolment.- Wa have at present thirty ^eight in attendanoe In this 
department of the Training School, exclusive of stsveral village women who 
remained after summer school -an Increase of six over last year's record. 
Of tbis number eleven are from bill stations, five from Piihoragarh. four 
from Pauri, and two from Almorah. Others come from AJmere, Aligarh, 
Allahabad, BareiUy, lienares, Hudson, Cawopore and Debra Dun. 

No fewer than seven Missions are represented at the present time, namely, 
Methodist, Church of England, Presbyterian, ILiondon, Union, Rurku and 
Swedish, the two last being In the Central Provinces. 

There are four girls in the Preparatory Department, three of whom are 
coQverts, yho were baptiied bv Bishop Warne at our last District Con- 
ference. Tftie of thela^ a young Brahmin widow, oame to ns from Bdndiiban 
more than a year ago. Our old Bible-reader -there, brought her away 
secretly, when she was on the eve of being sold Into a life of sin 

Sttidies.- These have gone on much as usual Miss Ogil vie, one of our 
own Eiiglish-training graduates, has been for many years an Invaluable 
assistant In this department. The plnce of the second assistant has ie«>n 
supplied for the entire year by tiie students of the English Training. The 
exarolnntlons In the subjects t» ey have taught, show excellpnt results. We 
hope to keep one of tLose young ladies with us on the compleUon of her 
course. 

Field Work,''Th\% Is pracUeaW'^ lh« same in both departments, though 
tbe H/nd Qstani girls are ot necesaWii moT« T^\t\^v«^\xi\Xi^T ^n^tV TV^a fiitU 
enjoy field work, and, on the whoVe, ^^X. on •oexM \»eU VciW.. 



BBPORTS OF C0MldITT££2S 55 

Oro<iuat0t.—£lsht girls weot oat from the school last May— six ODtlrely 
and two almost completing the course. These eight are now In the work. 
Two have married and are making good Bible- readers. Two Pitboragarh 

girls have been teaching in Miss Sudden's Hill Traiuloff School during the 
ummer, and are now out in village evangelistic work with her. One is 
working In the Village Mission near Lucknow, and one Is a nurse Bible-reader 
in Barelllv. Another at Brindaban has been working faithf uilv In the zenanas 
and mohuilas, and so attached is she to her work, that even illness does not 
keep her from it. The eighth, our cheery willing little Nathlya, is doing 
splendid work here, teaching village women who have stayed on after our 
sammer school for further study. In closing the report, we would add a 
word about our needs. 

Applications for trained workers are constantly being received. A 
bodffet of them is now on file. The supply, especially in tbe English Train- 
ing Department, is not nearlv equal to the dem>ind. Will you not pray that 
God may lead young women here, and then help to answer tbpse prayers 
by using your Influence to send more consecrated lives to this open door of 
wldeposslbtlltiea and great privileges. 

The need of a third missionary has already been referred to. This can 
readily be understood, If it Is borne in mind that, in addition to the two de- 
partments of the Training School, a large boardlni? school, zenaot nud other 
form^ of practical work have to be supervised and a household of from sixteen 
to twenty must be cared for. Will you not add your prayers to onrs that the 
Lord may BImsetf send the one whom Be shall choose for this great work ? 

Memorandum of Association of tJie Board of 
Governors of tJie Isabella Thobom Ccdiege 

for Women* Lucknow. 

(Beqibtbbbd under Act XXI of 1800.) 

I.—Name, 

The name of this Society shall be ** The Board of Governors of the 
Isabella Thoburn College for Women, Lucknow." 

II. -Object 

The object of the Board of Governors shall be to maintain the Isabella 
Thoburn College for Women, Lucknow, as an Institution for the education 
0^ womev, together with such afllllated schools and departments as maf be 
considered necessary and advisable. 

m.—Board of Oovertwrs. 

The Board of Governors shall '^onslst of twelve members, to be elected 
for terms of three years by the North India Conference of the Metnodist 
Episcopal Church, together with the Bishoos of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church resident in India, tbe Principal of the College, and the Presiding 
Eldf^r of the district In which the College is situated, all of whom shall be 
exrofJUcio members. The Board shall include in its membership at least 
three mem tiers. After the first election of twelve members by the North 
India Conference, the four senior members shall retire annually, their places 
being filled by the said Conference at its annual session. Retiring members 
shall be eligible for recelection. Vacancies through any cause shall be filled 
bv the Conference. All persons to be elected membi'rs of the Board of 
Governors shall be first nominated by the Presiding Elder of the district 
and the Principal of the College. 

IV. ^DvJiitB of the Board of (Governors. 

It shall be the duty of the Board of Governors to direct as to the invest- 
ment of the endowment and scholarship funds of the college, and to devise 
measures for the increase of the same ; to sanction all purchases of prdperty, 
and extensive additions to, and alterations of, exlsUag \>\xVVd.Vi!k%% \ t^ %jiH\sft^ 
/<0 regard to tbe scope and status of the coWeg^, aa c\t(^wav^XMx<isi^^ \^^\^ voe^^ 



66 BKP0BT8 OF OOMMFTTISflS 

to indicate to the President of the Conference their wishes respeetfuff the 
appointment of the Principal and other missionary members of the staff : to 
counsel with the Principal rei^ardlng snch matters as she may bring before 
them from time to time ; and in general to foster and develop the college in 
harmony with the requirements of the times, the interests of the Mission and 
the regulations of the educational code. 

V.—Secretary. 

The Presiding Elder of the district In which the college is situated ahfil 
be Secretary ex-offlcio of the Board of Governors and of the EUecatlve Coa- 
mittes, and shall represent the Board in all legal matters. 

VL—AnntMl Meeting. 

The Board of Governors shall hold at loastone meeting annually, at 
such time and place as the Secretary and the Principal may appoint. Doe 
of the Bishops shall preside. In the absence of the Bishops, the mem1>er8 
present shall elect one of their number to preside. At the annual meeting 
the Principal shall submit to the Board a report of the college for the 
previous year, with an audited statement of the finances showing current 
receipts and expenditures, and particularly of endowment and scholarship 
funds Invested Seven members of the Board shall form a quorum for the 
transaction of business. Notice of the annual meeting shall be circulated by 
mail to the members of the Board by the Secretary three weeks before the 
date Siie^ for the meeting. 

VU.—ExeeiUive Committee. 

At their annual maeting. the Board of Governors shall appoint three 
members, together with the Secretary and the Principal, who snail be an 
Executive Committee to act for the Board In the Intervals of the annual 
meetings. 

VIIL-Ametidment of the ConatUtUiim, 

This constitution can only be amended by the North India Conference 
convened In annual session, on the recommendation in writing of all the 
members of the Executive Committee, or of two-thirds of the members of the 
Board of Governors present at an annual meeting. 

Rides to Govern the TravelKng Eaq^iises of Women 

to District Conference. 

1. All must come In the cheapest possible way. 

8. Those coming in ox-carts shall he given only Government rates. 

3. Women drawing Itinerating allowance shall be entitled to no help till 
they have expended all their monthly allowance, and then as per Ruled. 

4. No garUhire shall be given to those living within one mile of the 
station, but a maximum of 3 annas may be allowed for eooly-hire. 

5. No cooly-hire shall be allowed at the station, save where a change 
of trains has to be made, and then not more than 4 pice per change shall 
be allowed. 

0. Help will be given In accordance with the above rules as follows :— 

(1) When the family income Is Rs. 8 or less, they shall pay out of 

their own pocket 5 pice per rupee of salary oefore any help Is 
received, the remainder of the expense may be borne by the 
Mission. 

(2) From Rs. to Rs. 12 the rate before receiving help shall be 6 pice. 

(3) From Rs. 13 to Rs. 25 upwards, no help shall be given. 

(4) Help will be given only when there are funds available for this 

purpose in the district. 
7. Each Preacber-In-charge, and, as far as possible, each lady in charge 
of the city and circuit work may meet with the workers at least one 
month before the District Conference, to plan for the cheapest way of travel- 
ling. 



ll^POBI^ or OOMMlTYEfiS BT 

Order Concendng Marriage Res^atrors. 

(Printed by order of the Conference.) 

A% the reqae#t of the Joint Commissioo appointed 'by the North Indii^ 
Mii the NorUi-West India Conferences, at their sessions in 1905, Qlshop 
Wp^ni^tt issued lostructions on the m%tter of Marriage Registrars, which, as 
lia4l4ed by reoeot Gk)vernment Orders, are as below, and the same was 
l^t^twd by the Conference : - 

When a Preacher-in-charge is duly appointed to a circuit within the 
)^Qndi» of the Conference, t^ie atipointm^nt shall ctrry with it the authority 
9l the Church for the Preacher-in-charge to oe Marriage Registrar of that 
fi^fooit. No other ordained man shall solemnize raarriage within that eircuit« 
fl^Vfi in the presence of the R4gi{strar,.or wiih his written consent. 

Qamn Marriage Regiatrar Id idabat 

Ba^artil|w6st North India aor North WeHt India KAnfaransoa kf mu- 
qarrar*Bhnda IcamiU^OQ Ice, jo 1005 mea manzfir hfii tbfo, Bishop Warne 
ji&hib ne marriage registrars (we P&drf s4bib4n Jin ke p48 sii&df k6 registar 
haf, aur tMdi bhf de sakte baig,) ke mirimale meo, bMm6Jib sarkArl nae^qft- 
niin ke, sail kf hidAyat df bal, jise Rdnfarnns ne manznr bbf kiy4 hai. 

KAnfaraqs'kf hadd meo, Jab kof P&drf sabib kisf circuit k& Prfchar-in« 
chirj muqarrar ^ot4 hai, samajbn& chdhiye, kl yih muqarrar kiy& biii Prf- 
cbar-in*chArj as elrouii k4 marriage Registrar hai. KoC dfisri P&drf sAhib us 
eireait kf hadd ke andar tfhAdf kf rasm ad& karne kA Ikbtiy&r nahfg rakhtA, 
Jab tak kl it«g)«trar ^hud bhf mauJ6d na ho, y& likhkar shadf dene ke liye 
'IjiMi Ba dl liQ. 






MEMOIRS. 

Ri&v. David Lyle Thobubn. 

Qftv, David Lyle TliobxirQ was born, July 13th, 1863, in 8t. Clsir^ville, 
Oblo, U.B. A. Be Was ¥()f«^ orpb^ii at thee>ir)y age of sit -ypltrs.- He 
loutMl ik homid hi i:^ drnfrsville wftb.bis brother aod Mis Ia<ibellA Thobura. 
I^tien tiis» Thoburn cinie to India h^ went to live wi^b bis annt^^Alrs. 
Qratt7,*Jn Beflaire Obio. Hiire ho attended public 8cho3l, and in dae time 
grwdJBMwd trom high school. His eyes failing him, be gave np stifdy for 
awhile. On Mis^ Tboburn*d returning from India, she secared saltable 
glamea for his eyes, and Bro. Tboburu enteredjAIegbeny College from which 
he received the Bachelor of Ari:s dei^ree in 18Si. He soon after graduating 
entered the Ministry, and sp3nt some tlma preaching on a circuit near 
Beflaire. 

*■ in 1888, Bro. Thobnrn was married to Miss Arlie Meade, who lived ooly 
about a year and a half. ]e4ving him an Infant daughter, Mary, who Is now in 
school in America. Mary, now left an orphan, as her father was years 
before, has our lovingsympatdy and prayers in this sore bereavement. 

On the death of his micle, Charles Cratty, Bro. Thoburn felt it bis duty 
to turn aside from the Miiii^try for a time, and take over tbe management 
of his uncle's business. H re he no doubt laid the foundation for that 
Splendid business ability whicti w.istostiud him in such goo I stead in after 
years in India. Later be found opportunity, and ente'ed Boston School of 
Theology, from which be graduatud in 1893. 

On November 19th of ihh ye ir lie arrivt-d in India, and in January 1804 
, he was appoint^^d a Professor in Beid Christian College Lucicnow He brought 
to this appointment ripe schoUrsbip, and for three years discharged his 
auties with marked success. 

' In January 1897, he was appointed Agent of the Methodist' Publishing 
House, Lucknow, and at tiie same time Mission Treasurer of tbe.Nur^ 
India Conference. B'or the next seven years he performed tbeiie double and 
exceedingly heavy and responsible duiies with ever-increasing usefulness 
and acceptability to the Mission. 

Bro. Thoburn was married in Lucknow, December 2l8t, 1899. to Miss Bath 
Collins, a Mssionary of the W. F. M. S., at that time a Professor in tbe 
Isabella Thoburn College. To tbem were born two sons, Wilbur and Stanley. 
We extend our loving sympathy and prayers to Sister Thoburn in her sore 
bereavement. May ihat kind Providimce who watched over and cared for 
Bro- Thoburn, when left an orphan, now care for the fatherless children. 

In February j904. Hro. and Sister Thoburn left India for a season of much- 
needed r^st in America. After about a year spent in Ohio, where tbey did 
much excellent work f-ir the cause of our mssions, they were called upon 
to return to India. They accnrdiugly turned their faces toward India, and 
arrlv< d here early in April 1905 de at once resumed the duties of Agent of 
the Press and of Mission Treasurer. 

It was manifest from the start that he took up his work with great 
zeal and devotion. So devoted wa4 he at times to His Master^s work, that he 
seemed to feel that his time on earth was short, and that what he did he 
must<io quickly It became known to a few of us in Lucknow, ani by us 
greatly regretted, that almost from the day he arrived, sleep left his weary 
eyes and refused to return. As a consequence no one tint himself knew how 
much he suflfered. He desrled very much to bring bis Treasury work up to 
dato that he might the better serve his brethren at the mid-year meeting of 
the Finance Committee. He worked day and night to compass this object. 
It is possible that the effort to discharge these exacting duties made heavy 
drafts upon bis strength, and that the dread disease, which laid him low, 
found his system already predisposed to attack from any malady which 
might come Hlong. Soon after retiring to rest at 10 o'clock on the evening 
of Auuu!>t3nd, hn was seized with cholera, and aftor a heroic struggle for 
nearly twenty-six hour!*, entered into rest at m diilgbt, August 3rd. 1905. 

ouch is tiie brief record of one cf the purest sonis that ever entered our 
Mission. Of him as a man, a missionary, a husband and a father tbe fallowing 
may be truthfully said :— 

He brought to India as an equipment fo* missi nary servlf*.e rare 
scbolarshlp. He was a graduate, from two of our best educatioU'ti institu- 
tfous, and beside this, be read ^V^eX'^ ^.n^ -^X^^Xl \ ^>\^ \\i V^u^ua^es he 
was a flpeclalist. He brougVil mx^ \i\\%\Tve>%% ^W\\V3> ^w^ Vckws.^\^'^ 



MEMOIRS 59 

PKetoencea were for literary and iiiiuUt«rial work, yet at the call of the 
(H^brch be w^t against his parsonat pretetances loto the business of the Press 
aad Mtedetatts.of the Treasufyship of tket^oferenoe, unci gave much of' the 
titoe of bla mlfisionary life to the busdnesi Aide of Mission work, and pot 
into tt htswQpIe heart and stranxth. He WM a model of eon.«ecration to 
t^jTnfed^of tffte work. Combfnad with his rare Oulturo and buslDesa aMIfty. 
herhadia grant capacity for lout -continued And close application to irerv 
b^rdwork. Added'to these qualifications asascUoIar and a man of bMH 
ness; MUte a >iieek and «entle spirit which waa even and regular* A nknl* 
Ohrlstfaii, Wno work^ with him In the Press, said of him : -*' He Is the moM 
patient man I haye ever known " He was gentile, generous, mngnanimoos^ 
and thoughtful of others He was spoken of as in the highest seasa a 
**• Ghrfattah gentleman." He was a sttccessful missionary having, tn addition 
to his many excellent equipments, a genuine love for the people among 
whom be worked. Wh^n he was lying 111, a deputation from the Press came 
to see him and, as they pa8s<>d through his room, these strong men, -Christian 
and non^hristian who wcffked with him, wept like children A marvelloas 
tribute were thrse tears. Ele was a prencher of a high order. A sermon which 
ha preached before the Ndrth Innia Conference will be long remembered. 
Some here will remember hearing Dr. Scott speaking enthusiastically of hia 
deep and accurate insight in- o the Atonement, and wishing that he mlgblr 
be a professor in the Theological Seminary. 

As a father and husband he was a model, and, if his model could be 
imitated by all husbands and homes, It. would change the lives of many. 
What a trfbnte to his precious memory is t^te following from her who now siU 
In the shadow of this great sorrow ! *' He was a patient, long-suffrtrlnK. and 
most affectionate father and husbiind. In the rieven years that I have known 
him intimately, there has never been a sinsrle cross worl from h's lips for 
me. There has never been a single misunderstanding between us " 

He attend^'d choir practice in the Lncknow Church on Wednesday even- 
ing, after the prayer meeting, to sins? at the following Sundav evening 
service. Thl^ proved to be his own memorial service. One of those who 
were with him the night he passed away, thoustht it would be a comfort ta 
hl8 friends to have a parting word about bis spiritual condition, though we 
kn^w that all was well. And whpn asked about his spiritual condition, he, 
withont a moment's hesitation, in the midst of intense pain and snfferlns. 
nttered the clean-cut and all-comprehe ^slve sentence. " Eoerything Is nli 
rfg/U." Like the true Christian he was he could look the last enemy in the 
face and say, with perfect composure and confld<>nce, ^* Everything is all 
right,** How like the Apostle, *' I have fought a good fight. Itmvf^ finished 
my cours \ I have kept the faith; henceforth there Is laid up for me a 
Crown if irlghteonsness.'* 

Miss Margarrt a. Sbtmour. 

Miss Margaret A. Seymour, who loft us early in September 19^ for her 
home In Jhansl; had been engaged in Mission work for more than twenty-fiv« 
years. She was the daughter of Charles Crossley Seymour, who was Superin* 
tendentof the Accountant-General's Office in Calcutta, where she was born» 
•During the Sepoy Rebellion the whole family were in the fort at Agra. 
Margaret and her sister Maria, who survives her, were in the High Schom in 
Agra for a time, but most of their education was gained at home under the 
care of their piout^ parents, who were m'^mbers of the Baptist Church* 
The d mghters early gave their he irt< to Qod and Joined the church to which 
^helr parents belonged. Rut later, when engaged In work In the Methodlat 
.Mission, they Joined the Methodist Church, A which they have been falthfal 
members. 

Margaret's first mission work was in the Presbyterian Mission In LahorOi 
hnt with the exceotion of a few years In the Church Missionary Society in 
Agra she was connected with the Methodist Boiscopal Church Mission. S]|^ 
■worked in Moradahad several ye>«rs, tilling at diffe ent t*me8 responsible 
positions She proved a faithfnl, efficient worker, not only In lier own smicial 
.WOTK In s^chools and zenanas, but as a .Sunday-school teacher, aHd asA 
worker in all church work. Her manner with chlldrnn was pleasing and at- 
tractive, and shA soon won their hf^arts. Thn women iu the Z'^nanus always 
welcomed her visits with joy. Hi^r knowlpdi^eof the Hindustani language, 
•both written and oral, made her very etficlent in zenana and school work. 
She was very kind and sympathetic with the sick, and spared no pains in 



cftttivtor Blalc itlrU uiuiM h«rMn._AM,a<tbalut AoleaC her lUa « 
praporlnn nnniiKhmaat for k ttck rfM. -41* aMv aaM of her>'^Si 
WM wi nnselflih that her pvory thought w*~- ■ " ' ■ •* 

• In Sb»hjith*npnr«>, SlUpr— ■ 

comeieKtloas. tatihful work _, „ ._ 

UtKlnn In Agra hu written very apprpclatlvel; ol t>er work knd h» hAlp- 
fnlnrn Id every dppnrtmenl of work where help wk« needMl. Since Ootoher 
teoi ibe inil her sliter btiv worked In the mnantaln station of Dwarfthatk. 
8tie had special charse ol tbe girls in the school by whom shn wa* sreatlr 
* * ' » been mourned b; all who knew her there. 

„ ,.Lim her work, all was found in perb^t order. 

Ber midden trinslHtion muRt have been as much a anrprlte to her M to her 
friend* who were left. 

Her lister who his been her constnntronipaQlon forsomanr yeare, haa 
our heiirt-reit STinpnthv and prayer* that (tod may hie** her amindaatly 
and give her the perfect poace that nnueth ali nnderataadlni. Hisa 
Seymour waa one nt Indlfl's own gift* to the work nfteaefalnR anH aarlng 
Indfn's women. Woiiin that mnny of those who a e prepared to work might 
hear the Master's eail and learn the Joy of teaching lodU's girls and women 
aa did Mln Margaret A. Seymour. 

Vaimab -Mrs. Wahtbil Haqq. 

^ndiwand Qidir i mntlao AlfA anr Omesi, J's k( lAt galr-tabdfl bai, 
Jo tainim lamfn o ismin hi KhAllq anr paldftlfaroewAli bai, tamim man 
Jbda anr gn»*bu cbh<>D aar UudAroQ bo oddI qudrnt I kamlli ae nestt ae 
ha)>t(meiiliyi,aur liirek ziraii ke waste ylh inaqiirrar klyi.klklsf (Fhlaa 
waqt par maut Vi ablk^r bohar us ke ptn pahupchaf line. Chunfinchl Is hf 
qiam liinaiAra har roi hamirf naiaraa ke jimbne mnuJAd hal. Ooyi klhar 
ek masiSr, Jo kl dir I ndpiedir se 'ilam I JiwIdinI ko sidhirU hal, ham se 
kahti hal, pa> tnn bhitalyir raba 

Bahin Martbi Hnqq Pidrl H. J, Ad«m« sihib kf be(t thfa, ]a kt qssbal 
Tllharxlla' SiiAbJBliinvQrmeosHn ISesr^wf mi-apsirli hfifg. Das bxraa kf 
'umr tak aiiMB wiliiialn Kei-ith riihk rghnr meg pitrwarlsh p*!, ba'd aiin 
Lacknow TJi Big mir Hareitly ke lakfil men '11m bisll ^iji. Jabtak 
iakbl men rahto. sime ii-tiidi)0 kof buinnfOQ kl iii'at Hilr farmiabardirf 
pbre taur par ksrtf rahfQ, iin kf IskAl kl Kadaid qAbil i la'rif tht. In <8klklon 

^ ._...„_,_. .. -ntJrdb. Hhidlaur Raman kl hisll kl, 'alf- 

flh raihir ihfL 

Haqqsihlbke 

ipun sbauba L_ _ , 

- . ._ _. ._ . . _. anr Moridibfd men rahe, 

ba'd aiiQ un ki tiiqurriir snml'hal, HasunpAr. Ammbi. UnhMibfa] ko 
■-''' 'n maqimon men Mastbf Ifbidmat par aartarii hohar sakbnat-pltlr 



[iPQunhoi! D- Nalit^nihlnda kl Ifhiishfbabarl aur Pilt 



, _. ., .. , ._ iyiu 

luhailoD ki bablni>D un ke nek aiwir anr waca' I EindagI 

■htadiroodedarmlyin un bi mizi] aur bartio namfina ke 
ridbtadirta'rff ke B&th kKhti bai. hi woh apne shaahai 
bataurmeUerithln, hnbhl kisi glsm kf ranllsh aur oi- 
ik uiiKpdHrraly&n piyi nasayi, apne tiuxiirioQ ki hadd 
Hi kt m'lnislli nur zet>A hnl, bar tttit par ma M'llm aut 
farm*nbardnil ke kartl rahig, hargli ki»l s[irat ineo klal taur kt bad-mlsfc- 
]t o nitarmiiil kabbi zxl.fir mcq na il 

Anne bacbcbng ke wAste kh<ii>n4 n un hf dfnl aur donyiwl ta'lfm o tal- 
Qlnkf hurilamliiyiDtnEn. kl w»dliidnranr 'll^ndir bovren Subh sawers 
UthhKr KxlAtn kn parbnft un kf rQiif>nf zhidasf kl roiina Vblirik tbf. Un kt 
du'i karnewftli tatif'at an kl 'ajfh rQh*t)t zlndagi kl izliir Ixf. din ko rit ko 
Uh manga' m US. k~f mHrtn'ii d'.'i k^:rtf ibin, Ytb bul raa'lft-n hfii bal. kl 
' ■ ■(sbbt ui. ka k 



ir muDAalblntlztm rakhtf thfo, un ke psrost 



tbi. 

nt ke qtrfb- thlj}. &pna shauhar se kabi, kl 
oJhahAn, main tutni Are mir apne bHChchiiB 
bl 111 nagt iin i>f znbAii zu't ke sahib hikaHi 
unhnn ne atmCiirx ten ljhudAw-<nd Ueib b* lb 
inuh-r se xabft, kl Ma^ib tnujb kn b.>1 .U iial, 
da, malg tuui sali ku Ui b[ ke bath met) gaaop- 

koSbachcbng aur gamzada rttihteHfrog ko 
pne iS'nAnf ahiir ko sid.'iAriD, la raea kuciib 
dmAaf Hip k( god meg Dioistit meg irSm karll 

e, kl 'aziz bahiD Marthil, turn kahig bo. to ift- 
1 par nIgAh mntr ylh jawitt> preR*. hi ab 



tidd iiokarbiblabt Tneg &rim hartl bfin. 

^ Bfl mnhabbit rakbtn bnln. jagab tHijtKr 

irehukt, mala ne duar ko tamAm k\jh. 



hsrihal 

wuh, JuMsathmefiDiBrtehalg, B6bkahtfbal, 

krtm pfttelialD. 

iarolDl gtaar men dilrbll hone ke wAste Is ba> 

Hatia. 

TAOflAB Ubs. Lizzie Sprakb. 

Hia-L<ule Speakene Girls' Boarding School MorAdAbAd men Anglo- 
VcraacDlar Middle kl Ifbw&gdngl tak ta'llin pAi, aur 2ri May 1S8S ko ia kf 
ahtdf Kev. W. T. Speake kesttblS barus ki 'umrmpQ h6i. Aur tab iin ki 
laqarrarShadAwaDd kflinlb se Nastna District Rijnor k<i btik. Wai.Ag 
parunbOOMApne'ailtsbuDharkesAtb rabkarapiie Wunjl kl (chidmnt ko 
aDjimdljrt, aur T barns bsmatan inasrArrablp, jti kt r^dgar Maalhl kkm ke 
darmijAn bamesbatak qilm rabegf. AgiireiiT Apia wsqt iamtii par balg, 
tan bhf atine kim ko, Jo uiibofi ne la ctrralt meg klvA. Maaib nn-^ boHar 
dekhTahl ball). Anr usko sai>ab»allp ke d't meo kimM taral'I, ArAm aur 
kbwhihal. Ba'd knlp k( tibdlll Btlii circuit zlla' B^daiui ko •ipii(> 'aili 
■baabar ke alth hfit. Yabig par bhl unhnn "" apue MhIiIi kl ^lildmat ko 
ba dllojin anJAmdlyt aur apuf kodhlsh anr mlbn^itae aiae kbAndanup men 
Jahinlnjllaharltklroabanl pibiiqcbAiiA aur clidrnkAan gHir-iau.rikIn niiT 
mnhal tht, p&hugcbSrA, nur babut !« Mnalhl kliita<iaiiug aur guir-Mnalblon 
ko apne nek cbalau BurVhu^li-aklilAgl ae kAO'll Mtialhl banftyS ^budAwHpd 
Tlab' Uaslh Ap kl labin aur cbslan mea liokar AsbkArA tiuti tha, aui huds 
Mm koon kezarl'e karlAtbA. YhMAd bbl Ap nn qaribT haras tak KbudA'^ 
wand kl kbidmatkl. Aur tabAp kl tabdlll blsauU circuit tlla' mHiMQr ko 
hAf. JAhinApqarfbdo bams apne MAIlkkt lalAli kbidmat ko anjAm detl 
rabfli, Tah^ tafe lil jab tilsauU meg hfmAri pball guf. us aivAm meg bbl Ap 
ftpnema'mDif tan BegAfllnarahfu. Magur haiin knbaaktA thA. kl Apkf bn- 
lAattsIwHt mepbogf. A'nan-fZnan Ap kt hulAhaf miilk I lAwldanl Kwla 
March laniSOSkobfil. aur yfiB 16 i<ara« aur Muchh ninhliie Uuslbl Ifbldmat 
ko tamim karke A'aminf KallKif A mOL sbAmll iio galg- 

Afp hebasnIakhlAQ aur maslhlmUA] qAhll l ti'nt aur namfina thA. nD 
kBbtrtAoselcabblkotnA-lfbuah nablg mu'lAm botA tuA. A'p bar-dll 'ailt 
tbiD- 

JfpBatbal meDbahufumdallyAqatrnkhifthlg, ]l8 men ak a'lA dnrja hi 
ln'AiapAfA,Aratoa keblrz ki-rnemep, bolki Balbal ku kafeM hisselilll the. 
AnrKalAm I PAk serozAnEkTiIAwac hurnA Ap kAk"As-< ktim tUA 

IntlzAm khAnagl men bill Ap nnmbue ke lAlii.IliIO' U'-clichnn kf to'ltm 

WirialqfpsejAflTDaiahlQ, aur gbar keaAre kAmmeD Ap hA mlzal'^ 

fhhdlwfjid TIsft' HasIbGA naqsl i qadam tbA. 



COURSES OP STUDY. 



For Foragn Missionaries. 

BVOLIBH 8TUDIB8. 

Year, 1. In trod action to the floly Scrlptares (Old Testatnent, pp. 
1-447) Harman. 
a. Systematic Theology, Vol. I. Miley. 
8. IJecturt'Son Homiletlcs Kem. 
4. OisclpiiDeof the M. B Church, 1904 (Partft I-V). 
To be rend : Sermons (Vol I), 1 -xxxili. fFesl^y. 

II Tear, 1. Introduction to the Holy Scriptares (New Testament, pp 

448-770) B'irmitn. ' -* ^ 

2. Systematic Theology. Vol II. Mileu. 

3. Discipline of the M. B. Chnrcb, IMuPart VI to end). 

4. Digest of Methodl.^t Law. (Bdition of 1900 ) Merrill, 
To be read : Sermons (Vol. I), xxxlv— Iviil. Wesley, 

III Tear, 1. Biblical Bermeneutlcs. Terry. 

2, History of the Christian Church, Vol. I. Surtt. 

5. Analogy of Religion. BtUler, 

To be read : 'rbe Snpernatural Book. Foster, 

IV Tear, 1. History of tho Christian Church, Vol. II. Hurst. 

2. Grounds of Thelstic and Christian Belief. Pifher, 

3. Christian Ethics Smytt^, 

To be read : Life and Epistles of St. Paul. Conybeare 
and Howson, 

YBBNACXriAB STUDrBS. 

I.— This coarse shall consist of three standards of two sections each. vf2., 
Lower, Middle, and Proficiency Standards, in both the Urdu and Hindi 
lantfoages. 

II.~The Urdu and Hindi of the Lower Standard shall be compulsory, 
and one section, either the Urdu or the Hindi, of the Middle and Ph>f^eieiiey 
Standards respectively. -^ 

III. — The candidate will be expected to pass the first section 6( the 
Lownr Standard examination witnin, or at the cio^e of, his first jMfs 
residence, and he may be allowed to complete both sections In thiit tfi^e • 
but must PUSS in both within t«^o years from the time of joining 'hiii cdo^ 
ference In India. . .'' 

IV —Ail conference examination* shall take place under the direction q^ 
a bonrdof six or more examiners appointed by th<» Bishop, which board aha)f, 
as far as posslbtf^, remain tinehyiged f ro n y^ar to year. 

V. The annual Confi*r(^(lexHmination shall begin on the morning of 
the day preceding the (fay fixed fur the opening of the conference, a majority 
of tvie board boing prosenr 

VI.— The fcrffowlng course of study, In accordance with Rule I, is por- 
posed: . 1 • 



COURSES O^ STUDY 68 

LOWXm STAVBABD. 

A.— URDU : FIRST YEAR. 

1. GRAMMAR, Flatt's, omfttfng chapters on Arabic and Persian 

ConstrQctions, and Derivations and Syntax .... .... lOo 

2. READING (Uornan Lithogrnph and Type) : 

Matthew and Muriel Gospels 

Haqaiq nl Maujudat — .... .... .... 100 

t, TRANSLATION .. 150 

U) Urdu-Enffllsh : 10 lines from Urdu Sec. Dk. C. L. S 50 

(2) EnglishUrdu : 10 lines from Eng. Sec. Bk. C. L. S , half 

written In Persian and half written in Roman .... 60 

(8) Definition .... .... .... — .... 40 

4. PRONUNCIATION 10 

5. CONVERSATION 10 

Read : Bishop Thoburu's India and Malaysia. 

B.- BIND! : SECOND YEAR. 

.. GRAMMAR, Eellogg's .... .... .... .... 100 

f. READING. (Nagri) Matthew and Mark's Gospels and Dharm Tula 100 

*. TRANSLATION .*.. .... 150 

(1) Hindi-English : 10 lines from Hindi Sec. Bk. C. L. S , 50 

(3) English- Hindi : 10 Hoes from Eng. Sec Bk. C. L S., 

half written in Nagii and half written in Roman 60 

(3) Definition .... .... ... .... .... 40 

4. PRONUNCIATION 100 

5. CONVERSATION ... 100 

Read : Hunter's Brief History of the Indian People. 

MIDDLE 8TAHDABD.-THIBD TSAB. 

(Urdu or Hindi Optional.) 
A.-URDU. 

1. GRAMMAR : Piatt's the whole, Kempson's Syntax and Idioms, 

Forbes' Persian .... .... .... • • • • • • • • 100 

Z. READING (Litho and Tvpe): 

Lnlre and John's Gospels. 

Din-i-Haqo ki tahglq. 

Tanbat un NMSih. 

Markand John in Persian .... 100 

3. TRANSLATION.... .... .... .... .•• .... 150 

(1) Urdu-English : 10 lines from Urdu Thlfd Bk C. L. S., 50 

{2) English-Urdu : 10 lines from Eng. Third Bk. C. L. S., 

halt written in Persian and half in Roman .... 60 

(3) Definition .... .... .... •.** *.*• ^ 

4. PRONUNCIATION 100 

5. 'CONVERSATION .... 100 

Read : Muir's Life of Mohammad. 

B.-HINDL 

1. GRAMMAR: Review .... <.. .... .... ••.• 100 

Ballantyn's Elementary Sanskrit. 

2. READING: Luke and Jotin's Gospels .... .... •••• 100 

Saknntala (edited by Raja Lakshman Singh). 

3. TRANSLATION , ... , ISO 

(1) Hiiidi-Ei.glish : 10 lines from Hindi Third Bk C. L. S.. 50 

(8) English- Hindi : 10 lines from English Third Bk. C. L S., 

half written iu NagrI and half In Roman •«.. *w 

(3) Definition .... .... ...-. *.•• •••• *0 

4. PRONUNCIATION • 100 

5. CONVERSATION 100 

Read : Wllkins* Hindu Mytholdgy. 



Ql OOUBSES 0£^ SXUDY 

PBOFIOISHOT 8TANBMID.-V0VBTH TBAB. 

(Urdu or Hindi Optional.) 

A.-URDD. 

1. GRAMMAR: Palmer's Arabic. (Optional.) 

2. HEAt'ING : Mizau-ul-Haqq. 

Guiistan • 

Forbes* Arabic Reader. (Optional.) ..«• ...• ...• UJO 

3. TRXNSLATION .... .... .... .... .... ISO 

(t) Urdu Kiig< sh : W lines from Urdu Fourth Bk. C L. 8., 50 

(2) E.igiish Urdu : 20 lines fro n Bnglish Fourth Blc. C. L. 8., 

liHlf written in Persian and half in Roman .... 60 

Short Sermon in Persian character. 

(3) Dpflultion ... .... ... ... 40 

4. PRONUNCIATION 100 

5. CONVERSATION 100 

Read : Sell's Faith of Islam. 

B. -HINDI. 

1. GRAMMAR: Hindi Review ... .... 100 

Monier WiM ims' Sanskrit. (Optional.) 

2, READING : Sat Mat Nirupan .... ... .... .... 100 

Prem Sagar. 

Hithopadesba. First Book. (Optional.) 

3* • J^JwANol-iA L Ivl N .... .... .... .... .... luM 

(t) Hindi English : 20 linen from Hindi Fourth Bk. C L. 8., 50 

(2) Enicllsh Hindi : 20l>oes from English Fourth Bli. C. L.S., 

half written In Nasrl and half in Roman .... 00 

Short Sermon in Nagrl character. 

(3) Definition .... .... .... ... .... 40 

4. PRONUNCIATION 100 

5. CONVERSATION 100 

Re^d : Monier Williams' Religious Life and Thought in India. 

VII.— The candidate, in order to pass, must obtain at least one half the 
aggr^'ffate marks in each subject. 

VIII.— The Board of Examiners, through thts Registrar, shall, at the 
close of the examination, inform the candidate and the Secretary of the 
Conference of the result 



Sdana KonfaroAs Id Khwondasi* 

DAKHILE KB LIYS, 

la Ummedw&r Middle pass shuda,y& US kebar6bar ho. 

2. Masfhi K&miliyat. (Wesley.) 

3. General Knowledge of English History, loglistAn kf Tawirf t^h »e *Amm 

wiqiflyat. (Badley y&kof aur.) 

4. Discipline. 

5. Scripture History. 

6. Man4hf Isti'm&I Tambdki^. 

Pahla Sal. 

1. Fll&saff dar b&b Tadbf r i NaJAt, or Walker*s Philosophy of the Plan of 

Salvation. 

2. Ihtl^hab i KaUsiyft. (Caleb.) 

3. Moral Science' in English or in Lithograph- Urda. (Wayland yA aor 

kof.) • 

4. Baibal Bar HaoQ. 

5. Ttihann^ Kl PablA Kh«tt ma* Dr. T. J. Scott s&hib kf Tafsfr* 

6. MadfhlTaMfmAtkiKhultea, (Buck,) First Half. 

7. Qadf u Taw&rfVh kal^htis&r. 

8. Tahrfrf Wa*z. 



COURSES OF STUDY 66 

MutdWa ke Hye. 

1. Stobart*8 Isl&m or Taw&rfkh Mohamnadf or HwAui^wnn BIcbAr. 
3. Dfn i IslAxn aur us kf tardid in Roman-Urdu or io Lithograph -Urdu. 
3. Popiyat kk Ahw&J, (OllmaiL) 

DusRA Sal. 

1. Bioney's Com pond, or Makhzao 'llm i lUhf. 

8. What thinkye of Christ ?(Vaagban'8) or Masfh Ibn Ullih, yA Dharam 

Pustak se ^dh& bh&g meo Q[hrist ka SamdchAr. 

3. Masfhl Ta'lfmAt kk ^tiulAsa. (Buck) Second half. 

4. Paidilsh aur Khur6J par 8uwal o Jaw4b, (Lncas.) 

5. HId&yat ul Wi'lzfu, ( V. J. Scutt.) 

6. R6mi(jn k& ^hatt ma' Tafsfr. 

7. TahrfrrWa'z. 

AftOdla'a ke liye. 

1. ^ry& Sam&J, (Clark y& Forman yk kof aar.) 
3. AsuQ&r I dhfriQ. (Sweet i^lrst FruU:i.) 
3. TawM^h f KaUsiyA, ( Wberry.) 

TiSBA Sal* 

L BashnelPs Character of Jesus or Tsft kf Sfrat. 
3. Butler's Analogy yk Millat I Tashbftf. 

3. Fisher's Manual of Christian Bvideuces in English, or Tswf Subiiit Roman 

Urd& men. (Hoskins ) 

4. Il&hiyAt 1 B«iibal, tlisda Auwal, (T.* J. Scott.) 

9. T<>goSipar. 

6. 'Ibr4nfonJc4 ^hatt* ma' Tafslr. 

7. TahrlriWa'j. 

Miadla*a ke liye. 

1. Murdoch's Popular Hiduism or Lakhshml Shankar's Primer or Biology 

in Urdfi or in Hindi. 
3. With Christ in the School of Prayer, (Murray.) ;Maktab I Masfh meo 

Du'A kf Ta'lfm. 
a. ArfnaiDll. 

SUWAXin? CHAUTHE SATL KE LITE. 

1. R&h&nf zindagi ky4 h*! ? U* kf asllyat bay4n karo. 

3. RytiQkar ma'mm hoik hni, ki ham meQ r6h&nf zindagf bal ? 

3. W&'iz ko kis tarah ma'l 6m hot4hai, ki ^undine mujh ko wa's ke 
kkm ke wAste talab Klyk hai. 

FaslL 

DraOi^Rr AUR AUQAT-GUZA'Rr KE BATi^ MES :-4. KhAdlm 
Qd dfn ke )(hkM kkm b«yAn karo, aur ?ih batio. ki is ^hidmat ke w&ste kann 
kann se waaf chAbiyen r 

5. We kaun se tanqe haifi, jin se yih ans&f barhte j&te hafo? 

6. Hatlio, ki iogoQ Kegharop par ahw41 pursike live jina kaisi zar6r 
hiU, aurylh kaho. ki tumiin is kam moQ kis q»dr tawajjuh hai ? 

7. Yih batio ki kis Urah partite liknte ho ? 

8. Jab se turn kinfarans kf iiutih&n-bard&rf meo ho, tab se tum ne Jftnf 
kitftbenhAr sil dekhf haia, un sab ke nam batao ? 

9. Kutub 1 MuQaddasa ke parhne meq tumh&ri;kitn6 waqt sarf hotft hai? 
aur kis tarfqe se paphte ho ? 

FA8L 3. 

BAIBAL KK IMTIHATN-L Kis i'ttbir se turn Baibal ko Kalim f llihf 
Jinte ho. anr kin daliil se tum vih rke rakbte ho? 

8. KlfldaHlie Majmti'a i'Abd 1 'Atfq ko, Jo ham men morauwl] hai, 
mu'tabar J&nte ho? I^tiulisa bay&n kara 

8. Kis daia se we sab ktt4>>eo, Jo fs Hajmil'a i 'Ahd I Jadfd men dAlrhfl 
kaiD, mu'iabar o S tiifh Jant^ ho? Mul^hiaaar I'ay&a karo. 

4. Kis tarah Mohammadion ka i^ da'wa ko ki Kntub I Mnqaddasa man 
6|^ ho caf kalfi, galat eAbit karte ho ? 



ee COURSES OF STDDY 

5. Khurfi] 1 UlHEs Yash&' kf mftut Mk, Isr&elloD kl tCH^h ki Vhnlisa 
bftlAo. 

0. DesOcgog kf bftg&wat ko muta'alllq Jo Ifh&u wfiql'it hitOt nnheo 
bKy&a karo. 

7. Vfth6dfoakIsi1Ana'(deii nar dIz yih, kl kla bit ke wlate mugarru 
h6[ thfq,aurkJaiarBhiiar adA kl Jitr tbfn, batAo. 

8. Khis3kbAssDabfoiik«nimaur]isz&m(iDeineii unhoQ ne Dubfiwftton 
kfo.wab ttaiiaeaur nfz yih, kl we Dubftw«teQ kts biremeD itafi), bayta 
karo. 

9. kbudAw&ndMasibkEb&toQse kuchbaist mlsAleo do, ]1a se z&hlr 
hoUbal.klwub Purine 'AhdkeDawlsbtoQko mu'UbKT umalbti thi. 

ID. Kaunal pesb-^babarltQ Uasfb se nubtt'all] hatQ, Ifhnibs&a Ul kl 
imftd aur slrataur k&m aur niaut se? 

11. Moslbklzindad keh&l&tkls kis waqt ke ma'l&m balQ anr muddat, 
'ahd riB&lat kis aadr tbf ? 

12. Us ki rlsilat ke lihfiss w&ql'&t aar JabiQ Jahia ^i ne gucre balD< 
batdo. 

13. ^hias If hiss biteg mundarlja I A'atnil I BasOl batlio. 

14. Mu'jiza klyA bal aor mu'JlzoQ se kyljQk&r m&'Kim bolA hal, kl kntab 
Huqaddasa ralD-]inlb Allfih halg 7 

PablS 
BAIBAL KF TA'LFMA'T KE BAVA'N MBH ;-l. ghudAkd WQ]4d 
Baibal se kis larab sAbit botA bal ? 

~ ^ Balbal se Taslfa kA kf A sub6t b&i, ya'ae kl ek Kl>adA meo tta Bqnfim 

IfaudAktsifatbiLCIAoaurharsltat k&subfit PAh Nawlahton se do ? 
:hndA ke muja^sftm hoae kA maaala ]o Kutubt Muqaddasa meg 



'V: 



pAvA jAlAhal, use bavin karo.aur fib batlAo, kl us ta'llm ko nalAt ke baa- 
dobaatsekTA'MAqA bal7 

f.. Maalh k! UIQhfyat , 

Baibalkf kt-uukauQsf Ayat Ul^hlyati Masfb ke mukAlir HasalmAn 



iekrA'MAqA bal7 

' lib ki UIQhiyat Kulub 1 Muooddasa se sAblt karat 



pesb kftrtehalD, anr turn ud ke kyi ma'nelete ho? 

UlfihlyatkAaoruske kim kA pik 



FAIda, jalaf Eutub t Muqaddasa mes 



kyit&'Hmodalilbal? 
Wesley sAbIb ne glkhlAyi haf, 
uskAsubatdo? 
ke darmlyAa, Jo farq bal, use si 

15. Is da' <re ke bAre meji k[ " Jo kof a; 

nahifl BlregA, kl ftkblr 1 kfir halAk ho Jfie." Han. 

bal ? Sibltkaro kl yih rAe KalAm 1 Il&bf ke ba-mbjfb bal. 

16. BitlAo kl baptlsma kalslrasmhal, aur kia garai se bat, aor kyfiD 
farz bal bar bAt kA sub&i do ? 

17. HAbit karo, kl bacbchop ko baptlsma deoA munAsIb bal ? 

18. Balbal meg 'AahA 1 EabbAni ki nlabat kaun kauD se muhiware ie 
haln. aur wuh kis garai se haig, aur Haalhfoa par as kA mAniiA KyfiJi tan 
h»l7 

IB. UlndfioQ ke masala 1 taaAauVti, ya'aa kiyA-palat ko kyADkar niat 
aAbll karte ho ? 

20. Jlsmke jt utbdekebAbraeoEutubl Uuqaddasa meo kyA ta'lfm bal? 
bawAla do. 

Fabl 1, 
KALr8I7A'KE INTIZA'M O TARTrB EB BAZA'N UEI«:-1 KallslyAr 
ke tarah tarah ke IntlzAmAt bay An karo. 

3. Methodist Eptscooal KalfslyA meg Ueeeral Conference aar ADnaal 
Conference aur Kwftrtarll tCAuTaraos ke mtita'alllq k;A ky& kAm halo 7 

3. KatfslyA ke 'uhdedAron men " Bishop" '> PrliAldlDK Eldar" aur 
"El^ar" aiir "pikaii" aur ■' EhSdira-ud-dtn" aur "Lokal WA'Ib" aur 
"MukbtArkAr" aur "AmAnatdAr" aur KilAs ke BAdf ]o bain, nn men bar ek 
kA kltnA llfbtlyAr hal, aar kyA kAm muta'IIEq bal, aur kia ke sAmhne lawAb 
dibfhtl. 



COURSES OF STUDY 67 

Fasl5 

TAWA'RF^H lEALFS[YA':-I.-Tahfidfoa ke l\^h&88 firqe Masfh ke 
waqt mes kitne the, an k& bay&n karo ? 

2. Aw&il zamAnoD meg jo azfyaten MasfhfoQ ne xi\hki haig* nn k& 
kuchh bay6n karo. 

3. Ud was&il k& bay&n karojin ke aabab ae ibtid& meQ Masfhf mazhab 
bahnt ph%Il&, (Mather s&hlb kf Tiaw^irf^h I Kalfsfyft, tfsri bAb, daf*al, 2, 3, 
5, ko dekh.) 

4. Gaostlkon kf kv& taMim tbf aur us se qadf m kalfsiyi par ky& ^har&b 
asarpir&. (Mather sahib kf Taw&rfkh i Kallsiy&, tfsr& b&b dafa 85.) 

5. Lather s&hib se *aiQ oabl Dfn i Tswf kk k>& h&l haf ? 

6. Barf Isl&h i mazhabf jo Luther s&bib ke waqt men hfif, us k& h&l 
batl&o, kis sabab se wuh isl&n h6f thf, aur kaun kaun log us meg sbarfk i 
h&l the ? 

7. Brit&nlya l'Uzm& men Methodist Kalfsivft kc muqarrar hone k& 
aabab batl&o aur Wesley s&hib kf T&rfkh meo l^hass los kaun the? 

8. Methodist Episcopal Ka1fsiy& kls sabab se aur -kis waqt meg auwal 
kah&Q banf ? (Discipline k& b&b i auwal dekbo.) 

9. Hln6d ke mu1j:htalir firqe aur ylh ki we kah&Q se nikle aur an k& 
b&nf aur an ke ^h&ss 'aqfde batl&o. 

10. Mohammadfon ke dfn kf ibtid& aur Mohammad s&hib k& kuchh 
bay&n karo aur mu^hialif firqoa k& aur un ke h&dfop k& kuchh zikr karo? 

11. Sikhon ke mazhab kf ibtid& kah&Q se hai aur use Hintid o Isl&m ke 
mazhab se kya Ml&qa hai ? 

\2, Brahmo mazhab k& &g&z o taraq7f aur h&Iat miujiida aur l^h&ss 
aqfdon k& bay&n karo. 

Hiadyot.— Ch&hiye ki chauthe s&l kf ^hw&ndagf ke suw&l&t ke Jaw&b ek 
kit&b men sahfh taur se likhe j&eo, aur imtih&n kf kamiUf ko dfye J&en. 
Kami^t^ is kit&b ko j&ache, aur agar mun&sib j&ne, 'al&wa in ke aur bhf 
SQw&l kar saktf hai 

Amm Hiddyat.— (Har s&l ke liye) Har ek mut&Ia'a kf kit&boQ k& 
khul&sa tahrfr karke kamltM ^o den& ch&hiye. 



LIST OF LOCAL PREACH£RS. 



Kamb, 



t • 

m 9 



BireUly-KttmioB District. 

Fazl Ullah 
A. Sweet 
J. W. Todd 
LakhaD Singh 
8. Lawrence 
Balli M. Dass 
Daniel Sigler 
C. Wilson 
Kandan Lai 
Sadal Singh 
E. Wilkinson 
J. Barker 
Kallu Porter 
LaIJi Mai 
SadHi Masih 
J. Fr derick 
Dbappan Wilson 
6. Luke 
S. Bowen 
N. K. Mukerjee 
G. B. Qreenwuld 
Qur Bakbsh 
GopI Charan 
Balmukand 
Baldeo Parshad 
Rahu Singh 
Sewa Ram 
Ram Parshad 
Tbakurl Kesri 
Daiilat Mnsh 
Gulam Masih 
Bhup Singh 
Thamman Dass 
Abrnhann Peter 
Wazir Khan 
Pnran Dass 
Devi Din 
Devi Dass 
Risali 
W. Newton 
Jai Singh 
Ueli Jacob 
8. L. Harris 
Prem Singh 
Mangal Sain 
Tusuf 
J. Aoraham 
Dungar Singh 
Bhawani Datt 
Ratan Singh 
Jitar Singh 
W. T. Gowan 



Obdbbs. 



Local Elder, 1895 
1896 
1901 
19(ift 
,, 1893 

Local Deacon, 1898 
lb96 
1899 
1899 
1890 
19IX) 
1890 
1903 
1903 
19UH 
19(5 
„ 1902 

Local Preacher 






II 

ti 
»> 
»» 
»i 
II 
II 
11 
II 
II 






« • 
« • 



II 

It 

II 

II 

II 

It 

II 

It 

II 

ti 

II 

It 

It 

II 

It 

II 

It 

It 

II 

II 

•I 

If 

II 

II 

19 
II 
II 
I* 

II 
•I 
II 
It 
II 
It 



Appoiktmbrt. 



To live in Moradabad 

Panahpur. 

Umeri. 

Ramapnr. 

Dhapla Kaladhnngf. 

Rantkhet. 

Panabpur. 

Bbim Tal. 

Barellly. 

Panahpnr. 

Raunstok, Bajethf. 

Uprari. 

KhudaganJ. 

Madnapur. 

Lodblpnr. 

Ebera Bajhera. 

IMlawarganj, 

Barellly. 

It 

II 

Kandharpur. 

Gauntiya. 

Sanha 

Fatehgan] East. 

Mlrnnpur Katra. 

Jnitlpur. 

Tilbar, Akbarpur. 

Bbains Sarae. 

Powayan. 

Jeroa. 

NahHi. 

Kliutar. 

Rnnmastpur. 

Shahjehanpur. 

Kamarlainpnr. 

Jalalabad* 

Manpur. 

Deoras. 

Lodhipiir. 

Sbahjehanpnr. 

Pasgawan. 

Shahpnr. 






II 
II 



I 



Kela^. 
Lobhfu 
aialn Tal, Isainagar. 



LIST OF LOCAL PRBAOHERS 



69 



Nams. 



BIr Singh 
Chhidda Singh 
J. C. Smith 
A. Osborne 
Qeorge Moore 
Ynhanna 
A. Miller 
T. B. Kirk 
Banjit Singh 
Jawabir Singh 
Chandar Singh 
Santok Ram 
Umrao Singh 
Henry Padi 
Raldeo Dass 
Kanbai Singh 
Alfred Nelson 
Cblddu Mai 
Udal Singh 
Gokal Parshad 
Yaonb Singh 
J H. Pearson 
John William 
Jiwan Dass 
Mare Singh 
Mitthan Lall 
Niamat Maslh 
Nain Sakh 
Bikkba Singh 
Nathaniel Jacob 
Hulasi Singh 
Hira Lfkll 
Manga) Singh 



OBDBBg. 



Appoibtmbnt. 



Local Prescher. 






••• 
• ■ 









Bllamr Mstriet. 



B. MacOregor 
Peter Merrill 
Oulab Singh 
Jhabbn Lall 
John Netram 
Nadir Sbah 
Albert Golab 
Kalyan Singh 
Khnshali Banyan 
Hiram Barrow 
Cbldda Singh 
Baddha^kM^ 
Mdhn Singh 
B. Gatler 
Bahal Singh 
M. Johnson 

B. Johnson 
Samuel Falls 
Silas Solon David 
Kanbai Singh 

C. S Walter 
Daniel 

Maslh Oharan 
James Rose ^ 
Gnlab Singh II 



• « 



• m 



»• 
«* 
«« 
• f 
»» 
»» 
»» 
ft 
»» 
It 
If 
ft 
tt 
1* 
tt 
II 
I* 
11 
II 
»• 
♦ I 
l« 
11 

!• 
fl 
»• 
II 
II 
l« 
II 



Local Elder, 


1887 


ti 


1893 


*i 


1894 


It 


1894 


i« 




•f 


1906 


It 


1906 


Local Deacon 


,1896 


tt 


1895 


tt 


1905 


If 


1906 


Local Pfencher. 


II 




II 




II 




tt 




tt 




II 




ti 




II 




♦1 




II 




tt 




It 




tt 





Debl Dbnra. 
Rani Hng, Ganja. 
Nalni Tal. 

I* 
11 



Oorang, Jagtar. 



*» 



Cbandag. 

Askot. 

DIolthal. 

Oangolihat. 

Lohaghat. 

Cbaundas. 

Bareilly. 



It 
It 
If 
II 
tf 

19 
tt 
II 

It 
II 
II 

It 
It 
11 
tt 
II 
tt 
tt 
II 



Najibabad. 

Jhalu. 

Niirpar. 

Seohara. 

Naglna. 

Kirtttpar. 

Nurpiir. 

Afzalgarh. 

Akbarabad. 

Nagal. 

Nurpur. 

BIJnor. 

Dhampnr. 

Barhapnr. 

Daranagar. 

Puraini. 

Najibabad. 

Nibtanr. 

BIJnor. 

Sanlspnr. 

Tajpor 

Dhampnr. 

Daranagar. 

Rijoor. 

Mandawar. 



70 



LIST OF LOCAL PREACHERS 



Namb. 




Obde^ 


■ 


Appointment 


Badion District. 












Baldeo Dass 


• • 


Local Deacon 


1 1903 


Bhatauli. 




Bahal Singh 


• • 


t« 


1902 


Eachla. 




Mangal Singh 


• • 


II 


1894 


Binawar. 




C. M. Parmanand 


• • *» 


1903 


Bodaon. 




Jhandu Singh 


%% 


1905 


Sahaifwan 




Chet Ram 


• • 


Local Preacher. 


Bhamora. 




Sohan Singh 


• • 


ft 




Dataganji 




Yaquh Singh 


• • 


11 




Sahaswan. 




Cornelius Singh 


« • 


ti 




Aonla. 




Munna Lai I. 


• • 


i« 




Bisauli. 




Bihari Lai 


• • 


9 f 




Kakrala. 




Randhir Singh 


• • 


tl 




KadirChauk. 




Puran Mai 


• • 


t« 




DataganJ. 




Eanhai Lai 


• • 


tl 




Rilsi. 




Allan Jan 


• ■ 


II 




Vazirgan] . 




Kharaani 


• • 


1 1 




Bhamora. 




Gulab Singh 


• • 


11 




DataganJ. 




Jai Mall 


• • 


1 f 




Aonla. 




Baldeo Pershad 


• • 


II 




Bhamora. 




Day a Ram I. 
Rohan Singh 


• • 


1 1 




BiSHUlI. 




• • 


II 




Budaon. 




GarhwAl District 












E. Thomson 


• • 


Local Elder 


,1896 


Pauri. 




Ewankin 


• • 


11 


1904 


Kainur. 




Ghuugar Man! 
C. Khiyali 


• • 


11 


1904 


Lansdowne. 




■ • 


II 


1902 


Pauri. 




Sangram Mani 

Bhalni 

Daud 


• • 


Local Deacon, 1899 


NIshn'. 




• • 


Local Preacher. 


Bagi. A] mere. 
Nana pry ag. 




■ • 


1 1 






Kimanl Robert 


• • 


1 1 




Srlnasar. 
Lansdowne. 




Pancham Sinba 


• • 


1 1 






L Silas 


• • 


II 




Th6n. 




Dhan Sinha 


• • 


11 




Dhlkwali. 




Htrdoi District. 








■ 




R. Turner 


• • 


Local Elder, 


1895 


Sandi. 




Chhote Lall 


■ • 


Local Deacon, 


1894 


Rani it Purwa. 
Tanaiyaon. 




G. L. Samuel 


• • 




1897 




Baldeo Prasad 


» • 




1900 


HasanganJ. 




H. Andrew 


• t 




1900 


Mallawan. 




B. Cornelius 


• • 




1905 


Tod ar pur. 




Bam Gopal 


• • 




1904 


Balamau. 




Nand Ram 


• • 




1905 


Bawan.' 




Kesri Singh 
D. S. Paul 


• • 


11 


1896 


Pali. 




• • 


Local Preacher. 1 


Plhanl. 




Gurdiyal Singh 
Misri Lall 


• t 


II 




Hardoi. 




• t 


11 




Maujhia. 




Mohan Nathan 


• • 


11 




Rasulabad. 




P. M. Lawrie 


• • 


II 




Rndamau. 




J. Jonothan 


• • 


If 




Hardoi. 




S. J. Shaw 


• • 


If 




Unao. 




Chandan Dass 


« • 


II 




Para. 




W. Peter SIhgh 


• • 


11 


• 


Rudaman, 




Mulchand 


• • 


11 




Bangarmau. 




GarlbDass 


• • 


1 1 




Bbagaali. 
Sandi. 




Maqbul Singh 


• m 


11 






Boaz 


• • 


11 




AchalganJ. 





USr OF UtCAL PKSACBKSS 



n 



Xaa 


OKiNsma 


Arir^jmiExr^ 


■miifttti IMritl 








BalaDass 


' Local Eld<4r, 


1;^ Mv>radabad. 


If aaladad Kkmn 


»» 




l^m ^r^l 


Uohao SiBsk 


»• 




ISM Kanlb. 


Nirmil Sfosh 
Lachman sTogb 


- * 1 »» 
** 1 » *• 




1«)6 HabukVra. 


Prabbo Dass 


.. Local Deacon l$«» Mi>rai^abad. 


Dalla Sioffb 


! 




1^1 


Malbra Prasbad 


•♦ 




1$^ Rasulpvir. 


R Millon 


%» 




19(n 1 Raj|>ura. 


P. S. Maorice 


• • 


%« 




1900 i Atncbola* 


Pains Siogb 


• % 


»% 




1909 . NaraulL 


Cbirag Masib 


• « 


a« 




1906 1 


Bbojpur* 


S. Hastings 


Local' Preaeber 1 


Moradabad. 


Baldeo Prasbad 


• • 




%% 




%» 


Tbomas Jacob 


• * 




*« 


1 


tt 


JobQ Little 


% % 




%t 




tt 


Isbri Prasbad 


•M 




tl 




tt 


M. L. Harrison 


• • 




tt 




tt 


M.rC. Hermit 


• • 




tt 




tt 


Molina Lai 






t* 




tt 


Gurmukh Dass 


• • 




tt 




It 


Charan Sakb 


• • 




It 




It 


N. R. Williams 


• • 




tt 




II 


Samuel Bowen 


• • 




tt 




t « 


Ata Ullab 


• • 




It 




Kasbtpur. 


Narain Dass 


• • 




It 




Knndarkt, 


William Rose 


• • 




tt 




HilarL 


Oatru Lai 


• • 




tl 




Cbandausl. 


D. C. Robinson 


• • 




tt 




Sambbal. 


8. 8. Manrice 


• • 




tt 




t» 


M. S. Cntting 


• • 




tt 




CbaiulauHi. 


Plyare Lai 
John Williams 


• • 




tl 




Bahjul. 


• • 




II 




RaJpura. 
Balrampur. 


Mowashi Singh 


« • 




«i 




Dbarm Dass 


• • 




It 




Dbanaura. 


B. Benjamin 


• • 




ti 




Amroha. 


M it ban Lai 


• • 




tl 




Kathtpur. 


Gajjn Lai 


• • 




It 




Salndri. 


Simon Lai 


• • 




fi 




Ilayatnagar. 


Mare Singb 


• • 




ii 




Rajabpur. 


Fazl Masih 


• • 




It 




Hayud Nagll. 
Ha oral a. 


Ram Bux 


• • 




It 




Buddba Singh 


a* 




II 




Gunnaur. 


Oadh Dlitriot. 












W. A. Comfort 


• • 


Local Deacon, 1803 


SItapiir. 

LUCKIIOW. 


Qalsar 
Jlya Lai 


• • 


14 




1894 


■ • 


IT 
ft 




1897 


Kbirl. 


Jawabar Lai 


• • 


,f 




1899 


Hitupur. 


W. Gansalvis 


• • 


ft 




19<)3 


Sataon. 


H. L. Matthews 


• • 


tl 




190ft 


Hliwan. 


Lewis J. McGee 


• • 


tt 




1H9» 


Nan para. 


D.C Richards 


• • 


tt 




1899 


Paraspur. 


Bnddha Singh 


• • 


It 




1898 


Kaiirlai Gonda. 
Klhnipiir 1, 


John Higginbotham 
J. J. Todd 


• • 


If 




1895 


• • 


t« 




WH 


TiilHlpiir. 
Harabankl. 


Din Dajal 
iCeafaoLall 


• • 


Local 


Preacber 


• • 




If 




Lai GanJ. 


fiharafuddin 


• • 


■ 


f 1 




Dalmaij, 


Sunder Lai 


• • 


ff 




Labarpiir* 



I 

72 



UST OF LOCAL PRBACHBltS 



N*lfB. 



E. T. Joel 
H. D.Jacob 
W B. Crawshaw 
Moti LhI 
Nanhe Lai 
GnrSHliae 
I. R. Mayal 
J. David 

C. L Lnmbert 
B. Todd 

J. T(»dd 
Bnldco Sinffh 
DwHrka ParRhad 
Bhola NMth 
J. Barrow 
TIka Bam 
Ridda Singh 
Bhopal Siugh 
Prem Dhs 
Khandhnri Singh 
Lai Kiiran 
Natha Ma8ib 
Pranic A Peters 
Isaac A. Birkett 
James Paai 

PiUWt Diitriet 

Asa Ram 
Rallu Singh 
KHiyNn Singh 
Girdhari Lall 
Moti Lall 
Sohan l^all 
Gharl Ram 

D. R. Rodgers 
BHbadurShah 
Baldeo Parshad 
Baljit 
BarnabRS 

Hsr SHh«e 
James Morgan 
Jlian Lall 
Earhe Mall 
Earbe Ram 
Khiyali Ram 
Kiindan 
Lacbhman I 
Moti Lall 
Munna M ah tab 
8. A. Judffon 
Mob an Singh 
Hari Lall 
Nannhe 
Jagmoh«n 
Moban Lall 
Hnlasi Ram 
Baldeo Dass 



• ■ 

■ • 

• ■ 



0KDBB8. 









Local Preacher 
ti 
I* 
I* 
t< 
«t 
It 
It 
t« 
tt 
tt 
It 

tt 
tt 
tt 
It 
It 
It 
•I 
II 
tt 
tt 
It 
It 



Local Bldar, 1896 
1806 
1902 
1896 
1894 
1904 

Local Deaorn 1897 
V 1905 

Local Preacher 

11 

11 

»» . 

•1 ' 

>i 

II 

t 

11 

tt 

It 

It 

II 

»» ; 
It 

II 

II 

tt *' 

11 

II 

It 

tt 



ApponmcsMT. 



Tflokpur. 

Harchandpur. 

Lncknow. 

Bahramghat. 

Naorangabad. 

FarsatganJ. 

Locknow. 

Lncknow. 

Fakhrpnr. 

Rae-Barell. 

Bhanmai, Saralon. 

Kamalpar. 

Sltapar. 

Jbakrast. 

Lackqow. 

Sidhanli. 

SainsiyaganJ. 

Ikona, Bahraleh. 

Ropaldiha „ 

Kirpor ,1 

Gonda. 

Pacbplrwa, Oonda. 

Babraich. 

FatebsanJ. 

Bahraleh. 



Baberi. 

Jahanabad. 

Rampur. 

BiSMipur. 

Bhojipur. 

Shahl. 

Neuria. 

FatehganJ. 

Bi^alpur. 

Sagaipur. 

Siranli. 

Rampar. 

Pnranpar. 

Rampur. 

Saidpar. 

Bilaspar. 

Barkhera. 

Shabt. 

NawabganJ. 

Dalel Nagar. 

Basdharao. 

Rampar. 

Pardbanll. 

Mirganj 

Fatebgaoj. 

Mlrgan]. 

Fatebgaoj. 

Pilib&lt. 
Gnrganw. 



PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 
BardUy-Kumaon District. 

Rev. p. L. Neeld, Presidiny jE^^der.— The question again'^comes 
asking us what is being done that the world may *' Know Thee the 
only true God and Him whom Thou didst send even JesusC hrist ?" j 

This year has brought some changes to the worls within the dis- 
trict. Early in the year our two European boys' schools — Oalj Open- 
ings and Philander Smith— were amalgamated under the name of 
Philander Smith College andjoccupied the plant of Oak Openings, 
Naini Tal, with Professor Ditto as Principal, and Dr. J. C. Butcher, 
Financial Agent. 

In July the health of Rev. J. B. Thomas failed, and Dr. Butcher 
was transferred to take his Punjab District. This left a vacancy in 
Naini Tal Circuit and the financial agency of the College, which 
were filled by the Presiding Elder. I am thankful to Dr S. S. Dease 
and Dr. W. A. Mansell for valuable help in other parts of the dis- 
trict, thus enabling me togive closer attention to local affairs con- 
nected with Naini Tal and the College During May and June, 
Bishop Wsrne and Mrs. Warne accompanied me on my annual visit 
to Eastern Kumaon, and the visit of the Bishop to Pithoragarh and 
Bhot was very much appreciated by all our people, the revival 
services resulted in bringing clear witness of conversion to many 
nominal Christians, and spiritual refreshment to devoted faithful 
Christian workers in that hard field. This was my tenth visit to 
this field. We believe that Hishop Warne has the honor of being 
the first Bishop to reach Pithoragarh and Bhot. We could not 
enter Tibet at tnat time of the year ( May 20th), as the roads were not 
open and Government orders forbade Europeans crossing the border. 
But within [three months of our visit to Chandae, I received the 
following from Miss Lucy Sullivan, dated '* Taklakot, Tibet, August 
13tb, 1905 " : ** Yours of July 29th finds me with Miss Browne away 
up on the * ridge-pole,' the wind blows as you might expect it : the 
skies are blue, the air so clear, one can scarcely judge distances." 
'* Taklakot Is 35 miles within the border of Tibet. Soon after our 
arrival the petty Raja here sent for us to come up to see him. We 
went, presented him with a few English trinkets and a Gopsel and 
Catechism in Tibetan.'* 

The Uvangelistic and Educational agencies of the district have all 
grown in strength, and the results of their working show a good in- 
crease. Last year we had 4^8 baptisms ; this year 512, which is an 
increase of 14. Last year the Christian community was' 6,515; this 
year 7,098, an increase of 583. Last year Sunday-school scholars 
were 8,830, this year 11,136, an increase of 2,306. Last year collections 
for ministerial support were Rs. 4,346 ; this year Rs. 5,222, an increase 
of Rs. 876. 

In the JBducoctional work we have succeeded in raising the Shah- 
jahanpurand Naini Tal Middle School to the grade of High School, 
and the Bareilly Middle School has been strengthened. Nearly all 
of the aided schools have earned a larger amount of grant-in-aid from 
Government, which will mean better support and better quality of 
education. There is great need for more Christian teachers in our 
Mission schools ; there is an increase of 28 boys in the attendance 



I 



ii PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

and a small decrease of 48 girls, We have 3,091 boys and girls in 
our schools. 

Next y«ar, 1906, belagour Jubilee year, [ would like to have the 
various departments of the work in the dit^trict stand out prominently, 
and hence have asked the persons in local charge to represent their 
work : their reports which follow will be read with interest. 

Bareilly Circuit, 

Rev. Dr. S. S. Dease, In C/iar^e. — Mission work, as carried 
on in this circuit, may be put under three heads, vu.. Pastoral, Educa- 
tional and Evangelistic. Under the first head, would come all duties 
connected with the oversight of the Eoglish aod Bindustani congrega- 
tions. The attendance at our English services has been fairly good, 
while the Sunday-school, under the superiDtendence of Mr. F. Welsh, 
may be pronounced a great success Never before have we been able 
to keep up an English Sunday-school for so long a time. There has 
been a great interest shown in the work of temperance and a full at- 
tendance has characterized the meetings of the Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union. The Hindustani congregation is among the largest, 
if not the largest, of any connected wiih our church in this land. We 
are privileged in that we have the assistance of the Professors con- 
nected with the Theological Seminary, and the preaching may be de- 
scribed as of an unusually high order Revival services have been of 
great spiritual benefit, especially to the young people in our schools. 

Regarding education, the City School is aspiring to become a 
Bigh School and the outlook is promising— a ninth cla^s has been 
carried on with a good attendance. The grant received from the 
Government this year has been the highest ever received by this 
school. A large number of Christian bo^s are in attendance, mostly 
the sons of our mission workers. These boys live in our boarding 
school under the care of Mr. Bowen, the Pastor of the Hindustani 
Church. At the commencement of the year, we were much troubled 
by the prevalence of the plague, and it became necessary to send our 
Christian boys to Shahjahanpur, where Mr. Blackstock kindly look- 
ed after them. 

Under the head of Evangelistic work, will come the work that is 
carried on in the city and in the villages. We have two churches in 
the city for our Christians, and any others who choose to attend We 
plan to have another small building at some distance from these, for 
those who think they live too far away to attend. The workers are 
too few to do much aggressive work ; in fact it is difficult to look after 
the Christians we have already. We hope to have the salary of a 
worker who was removed two years ago, whose place we have been 
unable to fill, by reason of his salary going with him. The students 
of the Seminary and the workers connected with the Woman's ^^is- 
sionary Society, constantly visit the centres and the nearer villages, 
and their labours are very helpful in building up our converts in the 
Christian faith. Bareilly has the largest number of Sunday-schools 
of any of our stations ; thousands of children are under instruction, 
and the effects of this instruction are very apparent in the dying out 
of the bioter opposition that characterized the people of this city in 
former years. 

Bareilly Theological Seminary. 

Rev. Dr. W. A. Mansell, Principal. — We are just completing 

another successful year, the Thirty-fourth in the history of the 

Seminary. Our attendance remains about the same, being limited 

by our accommodations and resources. Last year we were obliged 

to reject one-third of the candidates recommended for admission 



BAREILLY-KUMAON DISTRICT. ili 

by the various District Conferencea, because we bad not tbe room 
or tbe scbolarsbips to provide for tberu. From pre^^ent appearaDces 
it seems likely tbat we sball be obli^^ed to do the same again this year. 

There can be no doubt that the field demands a rapid increase in 
the number of educated and trained men available for the ministry ; 
the candidates are forthcomingr, but we need {s^reatly increased 
resources for the Seminary, both in accommodations and scholar* 
ships, if we are to meet the demand. When and how will the need 
be met? Who will supply— respond ? We pray and wait, and we 
believe that the answer will not be long: in coming. 

The total number enrolled during the past year has been 8'i in 
the Seminary proper, 45 in the Woman's Department— a total of 127. 
Besides these, 39 children of tbe students have received instruction 
in the Kindergarten A class of eighteen men graduates in December, 
and before these words will appear on the printed page, will have 
received their widely scattered appointments from the Punjab to 
Bengal and Central India. 

The year has been a good one spiritually and eduoationally. 
The classes have all done good work. Regular religious work 
under proper supervision and direction has been carried on by our 
students every week since the disappearance of the plague from 
Bareilly. This work has been conducted in thirty -two Sunday •schools 
and about twenty street-preaching centres in the city and neighbour- 
ing villages. The average weekly audiences reached by our pupils in 
these Sunday-schools and street-preaching services amounted to 1,8U0 
Bouls. 

The outlook for the future is bright. There are indications that 
the present revival in the Christian Church in India will result in tbe 
raising up of candidates for the ministry, of a higher educational 
standard than the nrajority of those who have been coming to us ; we 
will welcome them gladly and hasten to make provision for them. 
Our needs are many, but tbe Master of Treasure knows what they 
are, and our prayers are to Him to lead Bis stewards to unlock the 
vaults of the Lord's treasure and send the supplies needed. 

Briefly stated, our immediate needs are as follows :— 

Two endowed professorships for missionary professors. The 
Jubilee Committee has authorized us to call for one such professor- 
ship as a Jubilee offering to be named Tke William Butler Professorship ^ 
in memory of the founding of the Mission in Bareilly in 1856. No 
better memorial of the early labors of Dr. Butler could be devised, 
and it is earnestly hoped that the amount asked for will be fully and 
quickly raised. A second professorship endowment is also being 
raised, and is called the " T. J Scott Professorship*' in honor of the 
veteran Principal who gave thirty years of his life to building up the 
institution and putting it on its present broad foundations. 

More permanent gcholarbhips are needed. 

A permanent endowed scholarship may be endowed by the gift of 
from $750 to $1,000, the income of each such endowment keeping a 
student in the Seminary in perpetuity. 

Many of the students need to be supf:orted oy annual donations. 
Amounts of from $30 to $40 will support a student for a year accord- 
ing to the varying conditions of students supported. 

Any who desire to send contributions to this institution may send 
them in any amount to the l^ev Dr. A. B. Leonard, Mission Rooms, 
J 50, Fifth Ave., New York, stating for what purpose the gift is intended; 
or, if preferred, direct to the Principal, Rev. W. A. Mansell, Bareilly, 
India, by foreign money-order or bill-of-exchange. 

The Seminary has for its watchword, '* The rbisin^ up of a Native 
Ministry is of supreme importance for the evangelization of India." 



IV PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

Girls' Ob ph an age, Bareilly. 

Mrs. Chew, In Charge.— The Girls' Orphanasre, Bareilly, has 
had a good and prosperous year. Very early in the year, io Febru- 
ary, when plagfue was so very bad all about us as to cause us to 
close school and go into camp for six long weeks, we took every 
precaution, aud not one victim did it claim from our midst. In 
March, while we were still in camp, the Government examination 
came. We sent up six girls and all were successful. Never before 
in the history of the school, so far as I find recorded, had we done 
BO well. Good faithful work still continues from the least to the 
greatest : and the girls themselves are showiug a spirit born of the 
Master. This year we will send twelve girls for the Government Ex- 
amination which takes place in March. We hope for the same 
result as last year— expect that we do even better and take some 
'^honours ** I 

We have girls in Benares, Muttra, and Moradabad studying 
higher branches that we cannot teach them. One of our passed girU 
went to Phalera as a teacher, and good reports came from her and her 
work 

Death has claimed nine of our number since January, and some of 
our brightest and best were taken for higher service. 

One girl is now in Almora trying that climate for a ** Consump- 
tion cure '' This is the third month, and so far it is all that it is 
claimed to be, and better than we feared. We now have every hope 
that the girl will return to us in another three months entirely cured. 
We feel we cannot be thankful enough for the Hand and Eye that has 
been upon us this past year in guiding and helping in the many 
difficulties that must come to so large a family as ours. 

To Him be all praise I 

Zenana Mission Hospital and Dispensary, Bareilly. 

Margaret D. Lewis, M.D. } Tu;.-e«-^^^«..»-„ .•» rh»^^ 
ESTHER GiMSON, M.D. [ ^»««»^^«^»^ »^ ^^a^«- 

Our work consists of dispensary aod hospital work, visits to the 
homes of patients in the city and near villages, and medical super- 
vision in the Bareilly Orphanage and the Woman's Department of 
the Theological Seminary. 

The dispensary is open five hours a day, and the attendaoce varies 
from forty or fifty in the healthy eeasous to one hundred or one 
hundred and fifty, occasioually higher, dally, during the less healthy 
months. In this department our helpers consist usually of a trained 
native medical assistant, a compounder traiued in our own work, two 
pupil nurses, and a Bible-reader. The Bible-reader sits in the 
waiting-room during dispensary hours, reading and explaining por- 
tions of the Bible, singing Gospel songs, and answering questions of 
inquirers while they await their turns to be seen by the doctor In the 
adjoining room. Our patients are of all castes : Hindus, Moham- 
medans, and Christians, but largely from the better classes. The 
Mohammedan women of all except the lowest classes, and many of the 
high-caste Hindu women are *^ in Pardah," that is, they may never be 
seen by any men except their nearest relatives, and for this reason 
nearlv all who come must ride, and often one small two-wheeled 
vehicle, in which one of us might be comfortably seated, will carry 
six, seven or even more women and children all securely hidden from 
the gaze of men by a curtain (a pardah) hanging all around them. 
Others come in oxcarts, closed carriages, tiny *' doolies** in which the 
woman sits crosslegged in a tiny chair carried by two men, or In 
the more pretentious ** palanquin ** carried by four men, but all 



BARBILLY-EUMAON DISTRICT. V 

this carefully shut in from the outside world, Because we have our 
dispensary so arranged as to protect them in this matter, many 
women from the highest families are allowed to come to us, who never 
for any other purpose are allowed t ) go outside the four walls of 
their homes. We are thus enabled to give the "Good Newd'' to 
thousands who could never hear it in any other way. Although our 
numbers were decreased 50 per cent, for three months on account of 
the Plague epidemic, during the last year our attendances have been 
20,326, of whom 17,579 have been seen at our main dispensary, and 2,747 
in the school dispensaries. 

Our hospital work has been more satisfactory than in anv previous 
year, although the numbers have not been as large as last year, 
chiefly because of the plague for three months, and hospital repairs 

{preventing our receiving in-patients, more than four or five at a time, 
or many weeks. 

We have had 211 in-patients, all but ten or twelve during the eight 
months of regular work, with an average residence of 26 days each, 
and an average of 22 patients daily. Our hospital helpers are one 
trained nurse and three pupil nurses— one for night, two for day duty. 
These and ihedispensary nurses form our " training class.'' We have 
had over 150 operations in hospital and dispensary work, besides a 
number in our outside practice. Nearly every patient has one woman, 
sometimes two, staying with her, so the whole number taught in the 
hospital is more than double the number of patients. We have a 
Bible-reader for the hospital, who teaches daily those able to listen, 
and when patients leave the hospital, we hope to send her to their 
homes, thus keeping in touch with those who have been instructed in 
the hospital, and also with those among the dispensary patients who 
show an interest in the Christian religion. 

We have seen 745 patients in their homes since January 1st, and 
have visited three of our Mission schools, in two of which examining 
more than 200 pupils separately. 

iSttmmary ; -Dispensary patients .. .. 20,326 

Hospital patients .. .. 211 

Patients visited in homes . . 745 



Total .. 21,282 



The entire cost of this work, exclusive of the salaries of two 
missionaries, has been Rs. 4,685-14-7 (about $1,562.00) of which 
Rs. 3,924-12-0 is provided by the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
(North- Western Branch), Fees from city calls and donations from 
patients have amounted to Rs. 1,140-2-0 ($380.00). 

To save both soul and body is the object of our work. 

East Shahjahanpur Circuit. 

Rev. J. Blackstock, In C^r^e.— Evangelistic work on the East 
Shahjahanpur Circuit has been carried on in the usual way during 
the year, nothing out of the ordinary has occurred, save at the earnest 
request of the leading men of the village of Ping Ramapore, a Primary 
school was opened in the early part of the year, which bids fair 
to be a very interesting centre of our evangelistic work. The school is 
composed of Brahmans^ Thakurs and others. At first the parents 
objected to any religious teaching of a Christian character ; some left, 
but when firmness on our part was insisted on, the boys returned to 
the school : the Scripture catechism, hymns and hhajans are taught 
everyday. The teacher's labours are not confined exclusively to the 
school, as the teacher visits other villages, and is pastor of the sub- 
circuit of Deoras in which there are over twenty Christians. Already 
one boy and also a Thakur have intimated their desire to become 



Vi PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

Christians. Of course this with many other villagres has been frequently 
visited by that grand man Lakban Singrh, whom they all know and 
believe in Oh for a thousand more i^akhan Singfhs ! 

At their earnest recjuest thirty-five JIabhuras were baptized last 
month ; four of the bij^rgest boys were made over to us ; they eeem to be 
bright and alert. We are of the opinion that a very interesting work 
among this class may be secured in the future. 

English-preaching services are held every Sabbath evening for 
the non-conformist troops, Railway people, missionaries and others 
who wish to come. A few English-speaking Indiana sometimes attend 
this service. 

City .viission High School. 

Through the earnest and active labours of our Christian Head 
Master, Mr. C. M. Lall, B. A., our city school has taken a prominent 
place in the late Entrance Examination of the Allahabad University. 
Out of the whole class of nine sent up, six passed, one in the first 
division, one in the second and four in the third division ; out of the 
number two were Christians. There are over two hundred on the roll, 
and the number is constantly increasing. The income from fees has 
risen from Rs. 90, when a middle school, up to l^s, 170. 

The Inspector has recommended as a grant Rs. 140 per mensem; 
but unfortunately for lack of fuuds in the District Board only the 
Middle School Grant is continued. However, this will Le adjusted the 
next school year. 

The Orphanage and Industrial school are doing well. The In- 
spector's report for a school of this station is always favorable. 
Were it not for the Support from our I ndustrial school and that derived 
from the English Church, this work could not be carried on without 
an increase in the appropriations. Taking all the circumstances into- 
consideration, the work on East shahjahanpur Circuit is in a fairly 
prosperous condition, for all of which thanks to the " Giver of every 
good and perfect gift." 

Panahpore. 

Rev. J. Blackstock, In Charge. -It may be stated that the spirit- 
ual condition of the people of this Christian village is in about as 
good a state as at any previous period of its history. The present 
pastor, Daniel Sigler, is a good, humble man, and is doing his best to 
help the people in their spiritual life. 

A very iDterestingr Children's Day Service was held in the month of 
April. The large district tent was fairly well filled ; it was thought that 
not fewer than three hundred were present, all comparatively clean and 
well dressed. Outside of our principal stations no such congregation of 
Indian Christians could be seen within the bounds of our conferences. 
Whatever faults these people may have, idolatry In any of its forms 
has no place or sympathy with the Panahpore people, the smell of 
idolatry is not found on their garments. Compared with the other 
villages they have the appearance of comfort and prosperity. 

There is a Christian farming community of 567 persons. 

MOHAMMADI. 

Revs. J. Blackstock and K. S. Franklin, /n Charge —The 
work on this circuit cannot be said to be of a progressive or aggressive 
character; under the labors of the present pastor, Rev. R. S. Franklin, 
improvement in every way is hoped for. 

The most promising part of the work on this circuit, is work 
amongst the Ilabhurais (roving gypsies) who have settled down on land 



BARKILI-\ KTMAOK nK^TKKn\ YU 

within the bouDds of tfcis ciTvni:t : th^$o |'«<h>|>1o »ry» Ohri$|iM:i$. lh*T %rt 
careloliT iD^iruci^ in t^e prico:pl^> of ;ho Ohri^iiriAu r^H^iott both by 
the pi^^ior, ReT. R S. F.ack.in, ar.ti MjiniTJi} Sui^rh, Kx^nl |vn^ohi^«\ 
MaDj of the people of this iiv.iii who hjivo Ihhu « hrt$il»x\$ for *t>v^r«^l 
jears, seem lo hmve no interesi in :hoir sririuml jrn^mh »nd h«|vrv>vi^* 
meci We can odIt work acd pra^r for tbeiu. 

BmWEIX. MEIMORIAL SCHOOU ^HAHJAHANrrit 

Miss CM Organ, In Char^yt. -Thc^ \Mk\xc^\\ M<»mv>rl*l Soht>ol 
is tio( &D orph%Dage but m boarding ^^chool for Ohristinn ^rirU Ihtft 
daughters of our Missioa preachers, teachers and servants, aud of ouf 
Cbristian farmers. Most of them live in villa^res from tivo to Iw^M^ly 
miles awaj aud go htime only for the sh«>ri rhrisimas hoHii«>i'» aud for 
the long vacation during the h <t m«>nths of ^^ay and June. 

But although the girls do not go home often, lest they l>o tetiu>t<Kl 
to stay too long, yet the last Saturday of each month i;* \ iaUln^f ntt^i 
and it is then that the relatives of the girls oome to vi^it them, brintf« 
ing their gifts of sweets, cooked and uncooked food, aud th<^ a/H^t^» 
necessary cocoanut-oil for the hair ; and, seitlin;: down in ooiupaniiia 
nnder the trees in the Mission c impound, have a doUghtful vlsiit which 
lasts several hours, forming a picturesque ^ceno which our patrona 
would be glad indeed to see. 

Among the bigger girls there are many whose parents wore Oie tint 
to leave their ancestral faith in order to* become Christiann ; but the 
smaller children are chietly of the third generation of Chrittliin*, their 
grand-parents having turned from idolatry in the early days whoti 
Drs. Johnson, Parker and Humphrey were labouring earue«tly In thia 
section for the spread of the Gospel. 

Wehave 95girlswithastafTofeightIndiantoacher8und two Kuraalat) 
assistants, the latter living in the home of the Lady Missionary. All 
studies are carried on according to a Govoromont code, an lns|>eotrc«a 
making an annual vibit aod reporting to Government the rosultn of hor 
examination. Because of this conformity to Ctovernmant rul«H| the 
school receives a small grant of money annually,— about one hundit)d 
and eighty dollars. 

The Bible and Catechism have a prominent place in the curriculum, 
and the girls, who in their villages are surrounded bv heathonlvm 
with its degrading influences, are hero luHtructed in the truths and 
ethics of Christianity. And it is one of the joyH of tho misHlonary to 
see our little girls, many of whom are naughty, untruthful, and thlov- 
ing, changing gradually (for character is not built up in a day and tho 
habits learned in childhood are hard t } shako olT) into the thoughtful, 
intelligent, helpful girls composing our highest olaKSON, and who are 
trying to boreal Christians and to show a good example in the school. 

School work is full of encourai/emcnt. becaufO wo have pi antic 
natures to work upon, and we should be hopoloHS indeod concornlng 
the future of the Indian Church did not our MlHslon maintain theno 
schools, for those who have no other chance to he trained in. matters 
pertaining to Christianity and their obligaticms and their fellows. 

English Church, Naini Tal. 

Rev. p. S. Hyde, In Charge.— The Koftllsh Church, NainI Tal. hae 
had a prosperous year. It is entirely self-supporting, and has raised, 
during the year for paitor's salary and current expennCM, over 
Rs. 3,600. For pa-tor's salary it has paid lU Hi'M more than 'hft year 
before. Bishop Waroe conducted evangcdihiic m*,«Hini^H, which wure 
of great spiritual benefit to the congret^atiruj. An thi« in the only 
non-confirmist Church in Naini Tal, the i»eat of Governntent of the 
United Provinces of Agra and Oudh during the hot season, it occupief 



Viii PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

a peculiarly strategic position from which it may radiate Influenoe 
throughout the Provinces. 

The Ansrlo-Vernacular School, Naini Tal, has been recognized as 
a High School by Government, and has been allowed a Grant-in-aid of 
Rs. 138 a month. Three out of five candidates passed the Entrance 
Examination. It is probably through this agency that we keep our 
strongest hold upon the Hindu and Mohammedan communities of 
Nainf Tal ; 130 heathen boys in the school daily. hear the Gospel set 
forth. It is the oldest school in our Mission in India. 

Philander Smith College, Naini Tal. 

Rev. F. S. Ditto, PHncipaZ.— Permit me to submit herewith my 
Fifth Annual Report. In compliance with the instructions of the Com- 
mittee which met at the Meerut Conference in January last and 
effected the amalgamation of the Philander Smith Institute, Mussoorie, 
with the Oak Openings High School, Naini Tal, I arrived in Naini 
Tal on the L7th day of February. The snow was nearly three feet 
deep. Roads were blockaded and all out-door labour practically 
suspended. 

The term opened as planned, on March let, the weather having 

f:reatly improved by that date. The staff of teachers arrived prompt- 
y on time and began organizing under the new conditions, but much 
of our furniture was delayed as long as a month or six weeks. 

Our total enrolment for the >ear has been 117, of whom as many as 
172 have been enrolled as boarders. 

Our examination results, though not making so good a showing 
as the previous year, were about what we expected, and show a passing 
of 85 per cent, of the candidates in the Government examinations. 

** Wellesley " Girls' High School. 

Miss Easton and Miss Sellers, In Charge.— The total enrol- 
ment for 1905 was 131, with an average attendance of 113 

The following ia quoted from the Government Inspector's report :— 
** I fouDd excellent work being done throughout the school, and every 
thing in good order," He made particular mention of the admirable 
discipline in the Primary Department.. where two sections of the infants 
and the 1st and Ilnd standards are all taken together in one large 
room. He also spoke of the memory work and the mathematics in the 
upper standards. 

Although we have presented three *F.A. classes for examination, 
and so far passed 100 per cent., we have not yet been affiliated to the 
University of Allahabad. We have applied for affiliation, and hope by 
next year to be a college, not only in reality but in name as well. 

This year a class <>f ten will be presented for the * Government 
High School Examination, seven for the * Middle School and thir- 
teen for the Primary. 

The course of Scripture prescribed by the Conference Committee is 
studied, and at the end of the year examinations are held. The results 
this year have been very satisfactory, 85 per cent, of the number pre- 
sented receiving certificates. 

Ever since Wellesley has been a school, the department of music 
has been a specialty. The Directress holds a certificate from the Royal 
Academy, London. She has three capable and experienced teachers to 
aid her in the department. Both violin and piano are taught. The 



• The F. A. corresponds roughly to the Sophomore year in CJollefire. The Hi^h School 
to the last year of a four-year High School course, and the Middle School to the second 
year of the High School. 



BIJNOR DISTRICT. IX 

singlDg classes are free, and every year a public concert or cantata is 
given. 

Our CoUeg'e branch of the Young Woman's Christian Associatloa 
has held regular weekly meetings throughout the term. The pupils 
themselves are the officers, and meetings are conducted by the girls, 
the older members of the school taking turns in arranging the lessons 
and leading the meetings. 

The girls from the Vlth standard up, attended the Church Sunday- 
school. The younger ones hold Sunday-School in the school chapel. 
At their Children's Day Exercises, the liitle ones recited in concert the 
Beatitudes, the Commandments, the 23rd Psalm and the Magnificat. 
They have committed to memory the words of ten hymns. Different 
members of the Vth standard gave the t2th Chapter of Romans, the 6th 
Chapter of Epheaians, the 25th and 103rd Psalms, the 7th Chapter of 
Matthew, and other select passages. These long chapters were recited 
from memory without a mistake. 

During the year the collections of the Junior Sunday-school 
amounted to Rs. 87, which will be used In educating some native 
Christian girl. Last year the expenses of a girl in the Ludiana Medi- 
cal College were met by this fund. 

Many of the girls received a new spiritual awakening in the 
meetings held by Bishop Warne last June. The results could be seen 
during the year in the greater interest shown in the Young Woman's 
Christian Association meetings as well as in a more thoughtful attitude 
towards the responsibilities of life. 

la Jhoarahaih there was a Summer School held during October by 
Rev. Dr. Dease and Mrs. Dease with excellent results and much 
refreshmeni to all. The death of Miss Maggie Seymour, of Dwara- 
bath, was greatly felt by all. 

In PiUwragarh there have been revivals, and the work there is not 
only expanding but deepening also. A very successful Summer 
school was held there. This gateway to closed lands is widenin£^ 
rapidly. The Word reaches beyond the border into Nepal and 
Tibet. 



Bijnor District. 

Rev. J. H. Gill, Presiding JB/rfer.— This civil district is a part of 
that portion of Northern India, called Rohilkhund. It contains a 
population of 779,951 souls. All the castes and classes found in 
Northern India are fully represented here. Only in recent years has 
Bijnor been made into a Mission district by itself. When it was 
connected with Moradabad, not a few of the workers raised up here 
were drawn on to fill gaps in the force of workers in other places. 
Work here has been carried on for about forty years. 

Judging of the history of the work from those now enrolled, I con- 
clude that in all these years we have not succeeded in making much 
impression on the higher castes, nor among the monied people, yet I 
know of no field where more wealthy people live, their chief source 
of income being agriculture. In two instances wealthy landholders 
became Christians, both connected with tbe Tajpur estate, but neither 
of them is in Church relation with our Mission. I think the fact that 
these two instances exist does in a measure smooth the way of access 
to the others. It remtiins for us to cultivate this part of this inviting 
field. 

Providence seema to have led our workers to the lowly but not 
less valuable souls of three castes— Mazabi Sikhs, Lall>egi8 and 
Chamars ; and with these for the material a church organization of 



i PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

5,653 precious souls has been built up. But a generation has past 
away, else our figures would be doubled. 

Only a short time ago the writer had the privilege of meeting, in 
the October District Gonfereace here, the workers of nine separate 
circuits, each and all of these circuits being well organized in 
accordance with our Methodist methods. Together we had assembled 
about sixty graded workers who are men, and about forty women. Each 
sex met in an assembly of its own for business. We united together for 
religious and literary meetings. With others added, our largest gather- 
ing numbered between 200 and 250. 

Those workers, scattered all over the territory assigned us, are 
constantly on the move, and through them a great deal of Gospel seed 
has been scattered. Gospel teaching has been given, and a little 
fruit has been garnered. The Holy Scriptures in the language of the 
people, together with many books and tracts, have been freely sold 
and circulated. Outlying villages and hamlets to the number of 680 
have been regularly visited. In 4.S5 of these villages Christians are 
more or less faithfully shepherded. Audiences in the Sabbath services 
alone have numbered 1,371 weekly. In our Sunday-schools we have 
2,263 pupils, many of them being non-Christians. 

Thebaptisms of the year have numbered 313 souls, the deaths, 102. 

It is cause of great gratitude to God that we have been able to 
keep our ranks of workers in line and unbroken, for the district has 
been affiicted beyond measure during the year through the visitation 
of * Bubonic Plague. During the last ten months, no less than six 
thousand seyen hundred and fifty-nine (6,759) cases proved fatal. Our 
Christians did not entirely escape, thoucrh deaths from this cause were 
few. The difficulties which this situation presented, were a trial to 
some of our workers, and yet the great majority of them stood bravely 
to their duty. Such a season of severe and widespread affliction is 
a supreme opportunity for the Christian to show the superiority of his 
faith over that of non-Christian neighbours. It is a time when 
sympathy and practical help would open many a heart and many 
a door which in ordinary times is closed. The methods of the 
Government now used for lessening the spread of the plague leave 
little for non-officials to do, except, as the Magistrate said to the 
writer, to set an example to others by moving out of one's usual 
dwelling, and occupying grass-huts and exercising great vigilance 
in cleanliness and sanitation. 

The truth is, that the inhabitants generally wished to be let alone 
which, if interpreted, means that they thought that what is to be will be, 
and man cannot turn away what is fated. However, the reports from 
all sides show that a great many people wished to listen to the preach- 
ing of the Gospel in the time of their troubles, and not a few welcomed 
our preachers and their preaching, prayers and singing. 

Many melaswere visited during the year, and in them multitudes 
heard the evangel. 

* Deaths from Plague have been :— 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 







995 






938 






2,031 






1,604 






920 






131 






21 






9 






16 






44 


Total 


6,759 



BIJNOR DISTRICT. xi 

I was glad to distribute a useful pamphlet * to all our preachers in 
charge with suggestioDs what to do when plague appeared, and hope it 
did good. With the aid of an English geutlemaD we have opened a shop 
in the bazaar of Bijnor for the sale of the Holy Scriptures and Christ- 
ian literature. Two Colporteurs of the Norih India Bible Society are 
touring elsewhere in the district. One of them reported his sales to 
exceed rupees fifty, and the number of Scriptures and parts of Scrip- 
tures sold to exceed 1,500 copies. 

Tlie fourth of April 1905 was in Bijnor a memorable day, as it was, 
sad to relate, in other parts of India. The earthquake of that date 
passed through Bijnor, and we were rudely shaken. When the wave 
had passed and the motion subsided, we gathered up in a basket the 
fallen pJ aster in the missionary's residence and the girls' school 
building, and it weighed over SO-lbr, Some walls and arches 
were badly cracked, but I am glad to say that for the most part these 
have been repaired. The rains revealed the damage to our roofs where 
we had not suspected it. We are very thankful that it was no worse, 
for some of our near neighbours, whose premises are not a gun-shot 
distant, had damage to the value of a thousand or two of rupees done 
to their property. Happily, no bodily harm occurred to any of us. 

Our girls' boarding school has done a good work during the 
year, and has earned a slight increase in its grant-in-aid. 

Notwithstanding the sickness so prevalent, we report 665 pupils in 
our little elementary schools over the district. 

Our people are learning to appreciate the Christian burial services, 
and in a number of cases now our preachers officiate where before no 
such rites or ceremonies existed. We keep preaching the propriety 
of Christian converts being married by Christian ceremonies, and 
in this year a very few such marriages took place. 

We are glad to record that a few heathen altars have during the 
year been abolished. 

The Zenana Work in Bijnor which has been carried on regularly 
for about five days in every week, has been of special interest and will 
bespolcen of separately. 

We subscribe for twenty copies of our Church paper, the £aulcab i 
Hindi which is six more than last year. 

Our collections for pastoral support equal those of last year. Our 
benevolent collections are practically the same as last year. 

We have begun to gather a Jubilee collection. 

I must cot omit mention of our District Conference gathering in 
October. The themes of the prayer meetings and the sermons began 
with repentance toward God and Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, and, 
covering the steps in the Christian life, set forth the privileges of perfect 
love and a life of holiness. The Conference love feast was preceded 
by the sacrament of baptism and the Lord's Supper. In the love 
feast many testified to the blessedness of the Christian life, their joy 
in Christ's service, their thankfulness to be delivered from idolatry, 
their gratitude for the ideals of New-Testament Christianity. When 
the leader of the meeting rose to close it, over twenty stood up waiting 
for the privilege to speak, which they did in brief but telling testi- 
monies. 

During the District Conference we held a night meeting between 
7-30 and 9 p.m., when the following themes were discussed by select- 
ed speakers and volunteers :— ** Self-Support," ** Home and Foreign 
Missions," ** Roman Catholicism compared with New- Testament 



• •* Bubonic Plague." a pamphlet by Dr. D. N. P. Datta Iq ^^Dglish-Roman t^id 
Persian-Urdu and Hindi : IfUdhiani^ Mission Press, 



Xii PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

Christianity," "Temperance," ** Idolatry," " Successful Evangel- 
ism." These assemblies were full of enthusiasm ; several times it was 
difficult to close the meeting owing to the interest manifested. 

Personally I feel as if the evangelization of Bijnor District had 
hardly begun, our less than 6,000 Christians being so small a propor- 
tion of the great population, and of such humble classes, that their 
fluence although felt is but small. I am encouraged by the knowl- 
edge that there are hearts here who call Christ Lord, although it be 
in secret and not openly. I am encouraged by the fact that we have 
some conscientious faithful workers. 

I have enjoyed tent life and touring through the district. After 
JBO long a residence in the hills I appreciate the greater facilities for 
travel afforded by the plains. All the circuits were visited, and where 
need appeared, I urged the people to cleanliness and sanitation as a 
preventative of the plague. 

We are in need of four chapels in four of our unsupplied circuits, 
and indeed of several others in the sub-circuits ; but at present there 
are four circuits' headquarters * that never have had church or 
chapel building. Besides these, Bijnor City ought to have a chapel 
on a prominent site close to the bazaar. 

We have five or six hundred inquirers for whom teachers and 
pastor-teachers would be a great blessing. Our force of helpers is 
smaller than it ought to be seeing the open door before us. At pre- 
sent only one person in every 133 is a nominal Christian. We live 
and labor in the hope that our baptized membership may be speedily 
truly converted, ana that the leaven of true Christianity may affect 
the whole remaining population. 

To this end we work and pray. 



Budaun Dbtrict. 

Rev. Wm. Peters, Presiding Elder, —We have spent another 
year in Ood's service in these parts, and we can say, ** Hitherto hath 
the Lord helped us.'' This has been a year beset with difficulties. 
Bubonic plague set its foot here and raged so violently, that thousands 
were made victims. No village or town escaped, nor did Budaun it- 
self. It continued its work of destruction till May 1905. 

Non-Christians were filled with fear, and no one was certain of 
immunity from the disease. In spite of all this desolation, the grace 
of God was upon our Christians, and very few i^uccumbed to the epi- 
demic. This led to a wrong idea among non Christians who began to 
think that the Europeans purposely spread the disease among the 
people, but saved the Christians. 

There were some, however, who aclcnowledged that our God was 
Mighty and saved us from the disease, and that every one should obey 
and pray to Him. This was good out of evil. Still we bad hard 
times, and God in His mercy taught us many things. Many found 
Him a very present help in trouble. For four months it was almost 
impossible to work ; but, as far as possible, our workers did their best. 
In several things we saw hopeful signs in the midst of hopelessness. 
Several marriages were conducted according to Christian rites. Our 
Christians were very helpful in persuading the people not to join any 
marriage that was not in accordance with Christian rites. A number 
of such marriages were thus stopped. 

The Preacher-in-charge of Bhamora was specially successful in 
this direction. Others are also trying their best and have been suc- 



* Mandawar, Nurpur, Nagina and Kiratpur. 



BCDAON DISTRICT. XIU 

oessfal, bQl io a very small extent, in gettinpr all our Chrlstlao 
rites observed by the people. Though we are grateful to Ood, aod 
oar hopes have beea strengtheoed, yet 1 am not qui e satisfied. 

Our people received a great spiritual uplift this year. Since 
August they have been abundantly blessed by God The revival 
movement is wonderfully exerting its influence over men, women« boys 
and girls, which I have never witnessed since the foundation of 
MethMism in India, especially in North India. Every one seems to 
have realited his weakness and unworthiness, and has been blessed ao- 
oording to his need This is still going on. 

We assembled for our Workers' Meeting and District Conference 
in October. These were times of great literary and spiritual advance- 
ment for our workers. The Holy Spirit was in evidence. We are 
very thankful that our beloved Bi-bop Warne and Dr. W. A. Mansell 
honoured us with their presence, and fed those present, five hundred and 
sixty-two in number, with intellectual and spiritual food. 

It made us thankful to hear our grown-up bovs and girls testifying 
to sine forgiven, and hearts cleansed and filled with a new joy. About 
thirty expressed their readiness to serve Christ, to whom they have 
entirely consecrated themselves. Preichers-in-cbarge conducted spe- 
cial revival services in different centres, which reitulted in the con- 
version of many workers and village Christians. This gives me fresh 
hope for more successful work, for the old carnal heart is a demon, 
*' which can come forth by nothing, but by prayer and fasting.'* No 
success will attend our work, unless all our Christians are thoroughly 
converted and filled with the Holy Spirit. But now the great moun- 
tain of sn obstacle has begun to be removed, for many workers have 
realized their shortcomings, consecrated themselves anew, and pro- 
mised to live in future not for themselves but for Christ. In our Dis- 
trict Conference, I was unusually impressed with the new experience 
and joy of the people. 

This assures me that God wants to accomplish some great work 
through us, and is preparing us for it. In many places baokslldicg 
Christians were brought back to Chrint, and many new converts were 
baptized, whose number is given in the statistical report. In every 

Slace that is occupied, there are enquirers whom we soon expect to 
aptize. 

E>rimary schools are very badly needed in this district for the 
instruction of boys, and the people are ready to help according to 
their means, if we give them these schools. I think the people should 
be required to undergo a part of the burden where such schools are 
established. The Government has also endowed many primary schools 
in villages on the same principle, but tbeae are mostly inaccessible, 
and the children of our poor village Cbribtians, unless they give up 
their profession aod sever their entire connection with their former 
oaste-people. 

Our Central Mission School has greatly improved in enrolment 
and tuitional results. The Government Inxpector was quite pleased 
with the school during the last inspection, and gave us a little incre- 
ment of grant-in-aid. Next year we hope to raise the school to the 
standard of a High School, which will enable us to effect more improve- 
ments. 

We have twenty -two more boarders than last year. Their parents 
are made to contribute something for their support and education. 
Under the present circumstances, it is impossible to admit all Huch boys 
free, and it is wise to lay a part of the burden on the parents. The people 
give according to their means. We must, however, remember that they 
are poor, and even the workers are men with low salaries unable to 
support themselves, and at the same time pay the entire schooling ex- 
penses of their children. This is a present difficult problem. We try 



( 



Xiv PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

however, to teach the principle that parents are responBible for the 
education of their children. 

Our collections show some progress. The unusually severe frost 
in the early part of the year accounts for a soantv harvest. The 

f)eople, however, did well in their Pastor Fund, Jubilee and other col- 
ections, and the prospect for the next vear is hopeful. Success in 
collections depends on wise methods adopted by the worlcers, and 
supervision by the Presiding Elder. This is how we manage and suc- 
ceed. 

We find decided improvement in E worth League and Sunday- 
school worlE. In this we are laying the foundation of the future 
strength and prosperity of our church, on which a strong and beauti- 
ful building is being constructed, which will stand for ever and re- 
dound to the glory and honour of our Master. 

Miss Ruddiclc took over the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
work of the district from the beginning of the year in which she has 
been successful on account of her hard and faithful work. The plans 
are so laid that we expect better success in our work and workers in 
future. 

Miss Wright was in charge of the girls' boarding school. She 
admitted twenty more girls in the Boarding-house than last year. 
The teachers are better equipped for their work, and the spiritual at- 
mosphere has been very wholesome. 

The plague filled us with anxiety, but the God of Peace kept us 
all safe. 

We worked in harmony, helping each other and raising the fallen. 
Our aim was to strengthen every man and woman, boy and girl, In 
Christ, 

Our God's Word and work is carried on through us. We work 
for its advancement, our hearts having the seal of assurance that our 
Lord is ^* with us always, even unto the end of the world." 



Garhwal IMstrict. 

Rev. J. H. Messmore, Presiding J^2der.~The reclamation of lapsed 
converts is at the present time the most urgent form of evangelistic work 
in the Garhwal dit'trict. At the last session of the District Conference, 
the committee on the state of the Church reported that one-fourth of the 
nominal Christian community is still in the bonds of heathenism, 
while a large number who were once professing Christians have de- 
finitely renounced the Christian faith and have gone back to heathen- 
ism. It is pprhaps incorrect to say they have gone back to heathen- 
ism, for in truth, most of them never left it. About twenty years 
{ go, in time of famine, a number of children were gathered in tind 
kept for a few years in the Mission Boarding-house or Orphanage. A 
few remained permanently, and most of these have done well. Quite a 
number went back to their village homes and soon forgot what they 
had learned ; and naturally enough in such environment they revert- 
ed to their original condition and creed. 

This deplorable result shows some of the evils which follow two 
mistakes often made in mission work, viz., undue haste in baptizing 
converts, and failure in following up, instructing and looking after 
converts. And just here appears another mistake in mission adminis- 
trati n, and that is, ** occupying more territory than can be properly 
oared for." These Garhwal converts went back, because they were 
neglected ; and they were neglected because the money that should 
have been used to provide teachers and pastors for them was used in 
opening new work. Garhwal is, unfortunately, not the only place in 



HARDOI DISTRICT. XV 

North lodla where old work haa suffered because new work has absorb- 
ed so large a portion of the MissioDary Society *s fuods. 

The statistical returns from the circuits on the district give a total 
Church membership of four hundred and sixty-five and a Christian com- 
munity of six hundred and oinety-iwo The large number of children 
Is noticeable, being two hundred and tweoty-seven, or thirty -three per 
cent, of the whole. The thirty-nine Sunday-schools reported, have an 
aggregate attendance of eight hundred and thirty-three. At only two of 
these schools have a pice of income, the unfairness of the arrangement 
which makes all these schools pay tax to the India Sunday School Union 
is so obvious, that it is surprising that the officers of the Union do 
nothing to relieve the situation. 

The total number of Mission agents employed on the district Is 
eighty, last year seventy -four was the number. There were fortv-flve 
baptisms during the year, but only four of the number were adults. 
At the District Couference plans were made for re-opening work In 
two localities which have remained unoccupied for several years past. 
Three years ago a good site was purchased at Dogadda, a central 
point on the Lansdowne Circuit which has hitherto remained unoc- 
cupied. From the property grant to the North India Conference in 
1905, the Garhwal District received three hundred rupees, and with 
this money the school-house and teachers* quarters have been com- 
menced. The rupees one thousand two hundred additional, needed to 
complete the building, will be furnished from the local Jubilee collec- 
tion. The buildings will doubtless be ready and school opened early 
in 1906. 

The earthquake of 4th April, which destroyed more than twenty 
thousand lives, some two hundred miles west of Pauri, did much 
damage to our Mission buildings at Pauri. A special grant of rupees 
six hundred and ten was received from New Yorlc, and with this sum 
the shattered buildings have been partially repaired. At the District 
Conference it was reported that the earthquake had caused much 
serious feeling among the people and turned their thoughts Godward. 
Almost without exception, the Christiana of Garhwal are from the 
depressed classes, ana nearly all are made to suffer in some way or 
other through the intolerance of their Hindu neighbours, and for the 
same reason many are deterred from taking decisive steps towards 
Christ. 

Both of the Anglo- Vernacular schools at Pauri were very successful 
at the examinatioos in May The Boys' High School passed eleven out 
of thirteen candidates for University matriculation, three of the num- 
ber being Christians ; and the girls' school won two Government 
scholarships at the Middle examination. 



Hordoi District. 

Rbv. S. Tupper, Presiding Elder. -^The work for the year 
past has not taken the shape we anticipated it would. The plague has 
paralyzed our work to some extent. The people leave their houses 
when the rats begin to die and the fever attacks the members of their 
household. It was severe in two circuits, and fifteen of our Christians 
also died. But we are further advanced to-day than we should have 
been, had we baptized many more and developed less. The baptisms 
have numbered 122; and 311 enquirers are reported. We have been 
pushing our work especially among the Chamars who number over 
dOO,000 in the district, and we have up to this time succeeded in baptiz- 
ing 1,400 only, but almost half the class is open to Gospel effort. 

The Chamars, though they derive their name from tanning leather, 
are, as a matter of fact, mostly small cultivators. If this class is 



( 



XVi PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

turned bo Christianity, it will be a very great work in the district. Oar 
whole Christian community numbers 1,827 souls. They live in one 
hundred and thirty villages and towns. The Sabbath is observed by 
our Christians, the day laborers &lso attend Sunday services. On a 
certain Sunday a Christian cultivator neglected the service and went out 
with his axe to cut a jungle t.ree ; by chance he hit his instrument against 
nis ankle and was in his bed for about three weeks- When he was 
cured he went about teaching people that they must not work on 
Sunday. 

There are S3 Sunday-schools with an attendance of 5,865 pupils 
of all ages; 35 day schools for boys and girls with an attendance of 
735, out of which 21 are Holmes' schools still in existence, but for this 
year only through the kindness of Vlr. Holmes' widow. These Holmes' 
schools have done an immense good in the district. 

The average attendance of these Holmes' schools Is 421, out of 
which 352 are Christian pupils : 10 pupils of these schools were sent up 
to the Theological Seminary at Barellly, and II have been recommend- 
ed this year to the Seminary ; 20 are teachers of these schools and 6 
are being trained for teacbership. Something must be done to carry on 
these schools, or else it will be a great loss to the district and to the 
Saviour's cause. Self-support is one of the foundation-stones of the 
future church. There has been slow but substantial progress in 
this line of work. The contributions from the people themselves have 
been 488 rupees. 

The Mission payees have pledged one month's salary for the 
Mission Jubilee which it!i to be held next year, and have promised to 
collect one rupee per Christian at an average. 

(n the last week of April and the first week of May we held our 
Summer School, and bad a profitable time. Several good courses of 
lectures on Scripture subjects were delivered. Eight classes of men 
and women were taught by different teachers for four hours every day. 
Bishop Warne and Kev. Mr. Rockey held revival meetings for men 
and women, and Mrs. Bishop Parker and Mrs. Tupper for boys and 
girls, audit was a season of great blessing. 

The girls' school at Hardoi has made excellent progress. The 
four girls, who had passed the Upper Primary examination, were 
sent un to the Moradabad School. The pupils number 73. The Govern- 
ment 6 iris' School Inspectress, United Provinces, vistited the school 
in July last, and was much pleased and recommended a Government 
grant. 

The Zenana Work is regularly carried on, and we have a constant- 
ly increasing number of women and girls more or less familiar with 
Bible truths and Christian hymns. We are sowing the seed, but 
when the harvest comes, we shall find a good number of these ready to 
Intelligently accept Christ Jesus. 

Each of our circuits has a branch of the Epworth League : the 
meetings are held once a month. The attendance at the District League 
anniversary was over six hundred. Our District Conference and Isai 
Mela was visited by Bishop Warne, Mrs. Bishop Parker, Mrs. 
Blackstock, Rev. W. A. Mansell, D.D., Mr J. R. Chltamber, B.A., 
and all of them were means of great blessings to our camp meetings. 

The Colportage work in the district is carried on by two Bible 
Societies, one the North India Bible Society, and the other the N. B. S. 
of Scotland ; there are four Colporteurs who are doing excellent work. 
During the year they have sold and distributed 123 copies of the 
Bible, 139 of the New Testament, and 4,198 Bible portions. Including 
all kinds of books, tracts, and leaflets a total of 11,916 have been sold 
and distributed. 

H. S. Rix, Esq., Deputy Commissioner of Hardoi, has made us a 
grant of two bigahs of land in two places for Christian grave-yards • 



MOIUIVAIUO i^isrHKT> xvii 

and a smaiodmr %t Bawaa of v^ci« hi^mh : ««> w^ h»>^ ^^ K\\)r l<\^h« 
and a half of laad in foar plao<^i fv>r c^mM^^ry pur|HVN« wUh<mi lUy 
chari^a. 

Boildio^^v^ haT« «r«ct#d ih^ y^r^aoM^r'^ hou»tMi ai !ftaA|^«f aad 
Pali, and three Butler chapel*^ ai Saudis Pali aud t\Hiar|>uiN la 
Hardoi luelf ihe new lar)r» Cj^"^^* church ia betuir hutU. rhvs^u^rh Iha 
ffreat etfort of our helorad Bishop Warue, a ladi of Uvi Antf<4e«« 
California, Mrs. Uough, made a ^rani of lkt,«HM for a churoh «A 
Bardoi, for which ihe whole Chrlsliau oommuutl^* t« vorv U\anlkf\il 

'- Ask and ii shall be giren.* This precious pr\muse has lieaa 
fulfilled lo us ihis year about ihe Uardoi Church build iuir. 



Monidiited District 

Bbv. L. a. Oorb, Prestdiiiy JtMtfr.— MlssioQ work, moro |>arhaps 
than an J other form of religious work, has lis lights and shadows, ht)|HNi 
and disappointments ; many cherished plans from whloh no muoh was 
hoped come to nought, while suocess orowus others from which Hllle 
had been expected. This, in a greater degree thau usual, ha» bosil the 
experience in this field during the eleven montht under review 

Through the early part of the year the plng\i$^ llko a great heavy 
storm-cloud, overhung the land. Plaoen of buMiueas werttoloMod, trade 
paralysed, villages and towns almost doaertod. Thousands loft thoir 
homes and aought safety in flight, thut infecting hundreda of villages 
and towns that might otherwise have escaped, and bringing the dread 
visitor into the very homes of the dear ones tu whom they had llitd ft>r 
refuge. A day or two after the outbreak in Chandaual, some one 
counted nearly one hundred carts on the road to Bambhal bearing tlie 
refugees from the stricken city. The town of Dhanaura Is a noiirslilntf 
grain mart. There arj perhaps fifty grain shops In the placsi and 
ordinarily it is difficult to get through the streets on aooount of the 
throng, carts and other traffic filling the streets. On the ouoaslon of 
my visit in February, every shop was closed and barred, and hardly » 
cart or person was to be seen in the whole bazar. It seemed like • 
city of the dead. 

Nor did our work escape the general confusion In many plaooe 
it came practically to a standstill. The insane notion that the 
Government was interested in the spread of the disease^ and ihal 
Mission agents were in the employ of the Qovernmeot receiving so 
mnch per village into which it was carried, prevailed lo these ae lo 
most other parts of the country. Hundreds of villages were closed to 
onr workers. In some places they were mei as they entered, aod 
politely requested to go awav, but in other pla^^es the request was lees 
polite than emphatic. lAthts were treelf aisplay«rS Wi secure m^/re 
prompt compliance ! One of my fellow- missionaries had two raiber 
narrow escapes from the violence of the unreasoning mob. Ooe of mf 
meo waa met, as he was about to enter a village, by an old mao of hign 
caale, and in the hamble attitude, peculiar Uf %hh orient^ bes#/tighi bim to 
dapari in peace and not to molest them more. ** Itor^** said Am, ** y/m 
haire already taken away my two sons. Are tlM^y not eooiigh '/ Hav# 
JOB no merey ? Most yon take away the only s'/la/^^ ttiat U l^rft m« I0 
OBJ old age ! " Wliere ibis prejodioe and self'de^piiofi were f//oe4 io 
mmj gr ea t extent, I have not «rDC'/arag«l tb« woriuff t/> go, ae f/blp ftMfm 



iolt from mnniog op a^a^cti s-jcb deep-ro^/t^d d«Jesi//ftS/ la 
tkis state of mind every talcig «s mjsunder*VX/d ao4 tf/t^ifoUffpftiA^iS 



¥erT bible and Hjan-book earned by \Mr wf/ru^r. w^e eeMf^^sl 
to te fiUod Willi tte flsystcrions piag oe gtrmB whiefa miiitA^mi/tH isi 



XViii PRESIDING ELDERS* REPORTS. 

the air or dropped into the wells at any minute, and then there would 
be no escape. One day as I was leavinf^ the house of the Preacher, I 
was given a bottle of milk. Having no plaoe to bestow it, I carried it 
in my band as I rode my wheel through tUe town. At once the rumour 
spread that the sahib had been there to establish the plague, and as 
evidence the bottle with che white fluid was cited. Onr workers there, 
were not permitted for some d ays to go freely into the bazar. 

In connection with the Jubilee Forwai d Movement an evangelisiie 
campaign among the chamars had been planned at the suggestion of 
Bishop Warne. The chamars form about one-eighth of the population 
of the district, and as a class, are open to the Gospel. Thousands of 
them are numbered among our inquirers, and some are inwardly 
Christians, but have not yet made the confession. It seemed to us that 
if a concentrated aggressive effort were made in some of the centres, 
there would surely oe a great break in their ranks, and that hundreds 
would come out for Christ. We selected three centres which seemed to 
be the key -stones to the arch, and early in March we were joined by 
Bishop Warne and a company of preachers, tbgether with a band of 
singers and players on native instruments, and opened the campaign 

The first village was Sihora Milak, some eighteen miles east of 
Moradabad. We encamped about a mile from the village, and three 
times a day we wont for meetings, each of which lasted from one to two 
hours Our preachers and singers for the most part remained in the 
village and often kept up the meetings and conversation and music till 
long after midnight, we were warmly welcomed at first. But on the 
second day the headman had to go away to attend a wedding, and 
would be gone for two days. He came to the camp on his way and 
We had some conversation and prayer with him, and he promised that 
on his return he would openly accept Jesus as his Saviour as he had 
Ulready years ago accepted Him in his heart. 

The situation there is peculiar. This padhan or headman had 
ih some way acquired a strange power and influence over the people 
Of his village such as is noi often found outside of municipal politics. 
And in his absence, while they came freely to the meetings and many 
were really blessed, yet not a mnn dared make a move till the return of 
the headman. Several of the most promising of the young men were 
ready, and one, in the intensity of his desire to become a Christian, 
wept. In one of our mid-day meetings of unusual power, where all were 
kneeling in prayer and many of those non-Christians were getting 
a blessing, the rumour went like a whirlwind through the vili age that 
the men were all becoming Christians. The wives and mothers became 
so alarmed that they began, in shrill voices from all parts of the 
village, to call out their relatives, stating that an ox had broken loose 
and run away, or that a friend from a distant village had come, or 
that a child had fallen into the fire, etc. Each as he heard his name, 
silently arose and deoarted until in a few minutes only the band of 
workers remained. On the fourth day the headman returned, but 
a different man. It suon became apparent that further work in this 
place would not be profitable. 

In the next village of Mausampur we had much the same experi- 
ence. But with this difference that here there was no headman 
coDtrolling the very souls of his people. The most promising young 
man in the place was moved to confess Christ, but for some time was held 
back by his family. The Spirit so worked upon him that in one meet- 
ing he literally came running and fell down at Bishop Warners feet 
and besought him to baptize him at once, which was done. The mother 
came shrieking into the meeting like one possessed by an evil spirit. 
When she saw what was done she ran in the dark across the fields, say 
ing, she was going to throw herself into a well. His wife promptly left 
him, and there he was deserted by his family, outcasted and denounced 



UOiUDABAD MSTiUCT. XIX 

liy hit fellow-Tilla|!«rs« and pm«ciiK»d bY alt AfN^r our d^%iiiiH^ Mm 
whole Tilla^ nniied io inmk« \\(^ mi«^r%W fv>r IVvi iiu<( to win hiM 
back, for h^ was a ^iienU farouri^« AfWr ^ndurinigr tor AOWMk wWka 
all Uke priTmUoDS thai ihese people know to weU how lo l«iAI<'khe 
in a haif-hearied waj jielded, aaa was reioaiaied iau> lh<|k oa«Ns ou% 
ha still regularlj attended the services and n^ad ihe Ulble w(th Ihe 
Preacher, bat was not happy. His wife and moibirr r«iarned« and all 
seemed well from the poiot of view of the viUatfers^ But meanwhila 
special prayer was being made, aod his wife and inotber were belnc 
instrnded. Devi came to the Christian Mela lo November, sad there 
received a great ble^ing, and now has openly confessed Christ and| 
better still, his wife and mother will soon be baptised. 

Sambhal was the third place oboten. The plague was ragtag 
there, and our work was greatly hindered by lt« still we did several 
days of splendid work. Brotber Mantell joined our party and 
worked with n^ while we remained here. One of the most en* 
conraging features of thia special campaign was, that all tbe moti 
intelligent and promising of the younger men were ready, and wanted 
to accept Cbrlst. but for tbe time were held back by tbe older men. Tbls 
restraint cannot go on much longer. On tbe whole, while tbe immedi* 
ate outcome of tbe special effort was not wbat we nad hoped, yet II 
was distinctly encouraging, and the good seed sowed will bring an 
abundant harvest in the near future. While I write, news comes tbal 
ihe headman of the first village has declared that be li now ready to 
be baptized. The time Is near when this great harvest whiob is now 
ripening must be gathered into the M aster* s store-bouse. One of tba 
greatest hinderances we found, was tbe ignorance of tbe women. In 
Hinduism generally, the women are tbe sticklers for tbelr old faith. 
But for them, the men in many oases would gladly oome out for 
Christ. Among the people above mentioned, they are poorly informed 
in regard to Christianity and are much more dlillcult to ffet out to ih« 
meetings. We need more workers among tbe women. ]f tbe women 
were as ready as the men, I believe tbat hundreds, if not thousands 
from among theChamars and other castes as well, oould be baptised 
this coming year. 

The following brief ouromary of the atatisticB will help to make 
clear what has been done, and the present condition of the work:^ 
Missionaries, men three ; women, five. Miss Kuok Joined our force 
this year and began her work with great zeal and enthusiasm, but 
sickness soon compelled her to go on leave for some months. It was 
hoped that in October she might resume her work as District Evangel- 
ist, but it soon tiecame apparent that for her own good she would 
have to take some months more of perfect quiet andreit. Ordained 
workers, twenty-three ; unordained, ninety-nine; zensna workers, teach- 
ers and Bible-readers, one hundred and tbirty-slz ; baptisms, one thous- 
and two hundred and twenty-three : totsl Christian community, fourteen 
thuosandone hundred and sixty-one ; villages in which Cbristiani live, 
one thousand one hundred and fifteen ; villages in which we work regu- 
larly, one thousand five hundred and thlrty-tbree ; total collections, two 
thousand one hundred and twenty-five rupees (for pastoral support) $ 
total collected from village Christians, three hundred rupees Pupils lo 
schools, hoys and girls. Christians and non-Christians, two thousand 
four hundred snd forty-eight : pupils in the Sunday-scbools, eight 
Ibonsand five hundred snd oinety-six. 

The Anglo- Vernacular SchooU^ of which there arothreei bare had a 
prosperous year. The total enrolment is five hundred aod seventy- 
lour, of whom three hundred and eight are ooo-Cbristians. The scbool 
in Sambhal has this year earoed a grant of tblrty'tbree ropees per 
month, bnt for some reason the attendance does not grow, i be girls' 
•ehcwl in Moradabad has had an uonsnally large attendaoce. When 



XX PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

school opened in July so many girls came, that there was no room for 
them and some had to be sent to other schools and some had to be 
returned to their homes. An Entrance class has been re-opened with 
an enrolment of twelve girls. The attendance in the Bishop Parker 
Memorial High School continues to grow under the guidance of the 
headmaster N. Jordan, M.A., and an able set of fellow-teacheri. The 
present enrolment is greatly in excess of previous attainments. In 
the Entrance examination this year ten out of sixteen candidates were 
passed, of whom three were Christians. Brother Simpson, the Principal, 
writes : — " There are at present throe hundred and eighty boys enrol* 
ed, of whom one hundred and thirty are Christians. A Science Depart- 
ment has been opened. We are trying to build up a school library 
where our boys may have access to good boolcs and papers, both 
secular and religious, but find it slow work on account of the lack of 
funds. We need more Christian teachers, but as a Christian man 
commands a much higher salary than a Hindu or Mohamedan of the 
same grade, we are compelled to employ a large number of noo-Cbrist- 
ian teachers. Tbe Bible is taught in every class for an hour each 
day and the work of the day is opened with prayer. 8ome thirty boys 
have been added to the Christian Boys' Boarding Department owing 
to the generosity of friends of the school at home. There is no want 
of boys. A score or more have been turned away as we had no 
scholarships for them. We^ave the room for fifty more at least, had 
we the money for their food and clothes." 

Brother Faucett writes of the work in the Aforadabad Oircuit : — 
** There have been four hundred and forty-five baptisms this year, 
and had not the plague in a measure stopped aggressive work, twice 
that number might have been baptized. We do not feel free to move 
along this line as fast as we might, for the reason that we have an 
insufficient number of workers to teach our converts the fundamental 
truths of our faith which must be tbe beginning of all real progress 
in the Christian life. 

** The class from which our Christians chiefiy come, follows one, 
Lai Beg, who lived, or was supposed to have lived, ^ome hundreds of 
years ago. He was a Mohamedan of disreputable character and evil 
life. To him they erect a low platform of mud or sometimes of brick 
with low figures at each corner and another in tbe middle. On this 
they sacrifice to this Lai Beg, pigs, goats, fowls, etc., Aside from this, 
men of high castes, often bring offerings of grain, ghi and money, which 
form a considerable income to the followers of Lai Beg. He does not 
enjoy the dignity of being a god nor even that of a hero, but is an or- 
dinary mortal around whose name trsdition has accumulated some 
stories of doubtful authenticity. This is as near as these people come 
to having a religion. During the past year, twelve of these mud plat- 
forms or ihdns have been broken up, mostly by their former de- 
votees." 

Brother Cutting writes of the Chandau8i Circuit :— *' Cbandsusl is 
a place very dear to me. It was here I received my license to preach 
and began work among the sweepers and chamars. In three years, 
only three sweepers were baptized, but many from each class becave 
enquirers, and afterwards received baptism. Thus one sows and 
another reaps. After thirty years I come again to my old field and 
find a great change. Instead of three Christians as there were when 
I left, I found over six hundred and fifty, and in the three years since 
I have been here, more than three hundred more have accepted Christ 
as their Saviour. We now have in the Circuit one thousand and 
twenty-six Christians and a great army of enquirers.'* 

This year while we have in no sense relaxed our vigor in aggres- 
sive evangelism, yet we have la\d frteater stress than in preceding years 
oo the imperative need of OYitVsUan Vn%\)t\]L<(^\\ou Xx> >^^ «cA \XiVk o^t 



MORADABAD DISTRICT. XXl 

people may make greater progress in things spiritual. The followingf are 
some of the measures employed :-(i) Greater care for, and attention 
to, the religious instruction of the children. The life of the child in 
this land is generally a hard one— neglected one Clothes are not con- 
sidered necessary to well-being; of soap and water he has little knowl- 
edge, while his sicknesses and ills are either not understood or nol 
oared for. It Is Christ who taught men the value of the child. (2) More 
systematio religious instruction to the people of the villages. Each man 
has this year written the names of all the Christians in nis work and 
has made out a form showing who know the Ten Commandments, the 
Lord*s Prayer, a brief account in st-^ry form of the life and mission 
of Christ, etc. As a man learns any one of these fundamental things, 
he Is given credit for it in the form. These forms are inspected and 
tested by the Preacher and Presiding Elder at the Quarterlies, or as 
they go to the villages. In this way we hope soon not to have a 
single convert or inquirer who is not acquainted with these funda- 
mental doctrines. Experience has shown the necessity of taking the 
individual into account in the matter of religious instruction. (3) 
All night Bible readings have been inaugurated in some parts of the 
district to the great profit of the people. I attended one of these in a 
Tillage some time ago. The reader bad a small platform erected on 
which was spread a quilt covered with a sheet. On this he took his 
place, sitting Pandit fashion, and the people came near and sat on the 
ground or on charpois. There were about a hundred men present. 
The reading was in the Gospel of Matthew with running exposition- It 
began at 8 and went on till 10, when there was a recess of an hour for 
dinner. The reading was resumed at 11 and continued till 3 In the 
morning (so I was told, for I went to bed at midnight). This is a 
Hindu custom in which the Pandits read the Shastras to the peoj^le. 
Bat some of our preachers have adopted it, and the people enjoy 
it, and, wisely used, may become s means of giving wide circulation 
to the Word among Christiaas and non-ChrlBtians, for both come in 
large numbers. (4) Efforts to bring home to the hearts of the village 
Christians the ^reat importance of telling to their non-Christians, 
relatives and friends, the ^^ great things Christ has done for them,'* 
The great portion of the evangelization of India must be done by the 
unpaid workers. We roust spare no efforts to bring home to them 
their duty to Christ and to His people in this regard. 

Many things have happened this year, especially toward the close, 
that have brought great encouragement and good cheer. I select a few 
illustrations of this, and as the events of the last month's work are 
freshest in mind, I select from that. Our District Conference and 
Christian Mela was a season of great spiritual ref'^eahment. Hearts 
were melted, old differences were settled, pardon for long-standing 
offences asked, and many were baptized with a new spiritual poWer. 
Some one hundred or more villagers were present and shared in the 
good things. 

In a village in the last ronnd of Quarterlies, Mrs. Core and the 
wife of the Preacher went to visit some zenanas. In one of the homes 
the wife of aChaudri—a man of considerable local influence— told them 
about the effect which a service her husband attended a few weeks 
before had on him. She said he had come home all out of breath 
from running, and when asked what was the matter, replied that he 
had been at a Christian service and that he had to run away, for had 
he remained longer, he would have been compelled to exchange Mnham- 
ed for Christ. When asked if she would become a Christian if her 
husband would, she replied without hesitation that she was ready 
now. This is not by any means an isolated instance of this 
character. 
Another thing that has greatly encouraged ua ^ «»% ttO \&i^ dvavac^t <A ^>\x 



XXii PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

Christians, was the unsolicited testimony of a Hindu Judge of twenty 
years' experience. He said that in the cases that* came up in his court, 
if there was a Christian witness, he almost invariably rendered his 
decision in accordance with his testimony, and that in all his experi- 
ence he had rarely made a mistake in so doing. He then went on to 
say, that it would be difficult to find five men from among Hindus and 
Mohamedans in every hundred who will speak the truth in the courts, 
while among Christians ninety-five in every hundred give true testi- 
mony. He confessed that among the same people, and having the same 
manners and customs, and speaking the same language, this great dif- 
ference had always been a mystery to him and could be accounted for 
by none of the maxims and principles of life and duty with which be 
was familiar. At the time of this conversation we were holding revi- 
val services in our District Conference and Christian Mela. This 
same Hindu Judge was in constant attendance on the^e meetings. The 
altar was crowded with penitents confessing their sins and seeking 
pardon and making up old enmities. After one of these meetings the 
Judge said, ** Now I understand the secret.'* The same problem came 
up before the elders and rulers two thousand years ago. They too 
could not understand why Peter and John acted and spoke so unlike 
all others with whom tbey had had to do, until they remembered One 
who had a few months before stood before them, perhaps in that same 
place. Then tbey *' took knowledge of them that tbey had been with 
Jesus" The problem is the same in both cases, and the solution the 
same. The only cure for false witness, as well as for all the other 
countless forms of sin that curse this otherwise fair ESden, is found at 
the foot of the Cross. 

This report would not be complete without a brief statement of 
a few of our pressing needs. It is almost impossible to select the 
most urgent, for there are so many, and all are imperative. But the 
following are perhaps the most urgent : -(1) A Bible Training sohooi 
for pastor- teachers, to fit them for the Master's work. There Is no 
want of the raw material, but it needs to be fitted and shaped, and that 
requires funds. (2) Fifty more workers are required at once to go 
with the sickle into the great ripening harvest field. Souls who are 
ready to receive the message, are perishing for want of the saving 
truth. The work is seriously hindered for want of workem, bo% men 
and women. (.3) Fifty more scholarships of $20.00 each are needed 
for our boys' high school. Likely boys by the score have to be turned 
away and refused admittance to our schools, not for want of room 
—we have plenty of that— but for lack of funds for their food and 
clothes. 

in closing, we heartily thank our friends and fellow- workers in the 
home-land, who have by their money and prayers helped us in the 
work of the district in the past year. But for their co-operation and 
sympathy our report would be far less encouraging and the outlook 
less hopeful. 



Oudh District. 



Rev. J. W. Robinson, Presiding iJWer.— Thepast year on the 
Oudh District has been one of lights and shadows. Hopeful openings 
among new peoples, solid, though perhaps slow, progress in our gener- 
al evangelistic work, and very good results in our higher institu- 
tions of learning, have cheered us. The death of one of our mission- 
aries, and the invaliding of three others, has caused us much sorrow 
and greatly iocrea^^ed the burdens resting upon those who remained. 
The early part of the year our wotV ^Sb% ^t^^W^s >[iVa^«t^ v^ U)<^ 



» of tte iwrtVie Kick P:i^r» m:t t^Tiwr )^ ^^,*5?x^v ^^'^iitt-^ 

pari of ibe yt*r, fnast. ml9»«>$) »a !i9pf^>(^j^)ih2 ^fc^r^ xta ^5ix* y^^^H v\t 
India, destrored ih* c^M 9e&M>B crv^i*. »e4 ia rHi*;XT tviurt:^ Nx^;x^hl 
OD fmsiae prices 8;ii. ta sptli? of liw^^ t^wtt smm^kv^^ hicsir^^avMx^^ w^ 
hsTe perhaps had tihe i)«sa r«ar^$ work tst o:2r ht^lvv^^ 

Ooe of the ihiafs that ^.T>et$ us ;r^ii) ^v't ij; i^lm )h^ »))Uu4t^ ot ovk 
position to oar work, ooee *v> prerAiimi ;iincior^ xh^f p*\'»p> of V\i>ilc ;* 
rapidly disappear? c^. and tbe'^rr^at mass i>f ih^ |>^>|^> n^aohi^d bjr o>Ar 
workers respectfallj. aad oheo most ^ adij, h^ar )h^m<pssa^ \Vh.^# 
there are no' indications yetn of the mass raoT^Knenl w^ h«r^ l^n pra^^ 
in^ for and expecting, there are mmnj indtcattons ih«l indicate cl<^Mr«> 
ly that God's Spirit is morin^ the people and preparing them for a 
rreat work. The fewness of our workers mmkes \t exvVi^Uujfiy d^f* 
oenli vo do more than resch the frio^^e of the ipreat maUilu4e«\ and 
when it is recalled that within the bounds of the district there aie over 
ten millions of hnman bein?^, perhips nine^temhs of whom have never 
heard a mis^sionsry, and but a frmciion of whom have ever hear^ 
anything^ about the Gospel the task seems almost a hopeless orn^ 
But the way is open. If we hsd the men and money « we ov>ul«) o|>ea 
np five hundred new centres at once, in places where we would be we\« 
corned, and where there would be in time msnr inquirers and oouverts^ 

Lack of mooey and suitable men lei) us this ^ear lo reduiH^ the 
nmnber of circuits on the district from seventeen to fourteen, the three 
thus disappearing being united with other work and plaiH^d under iuei\\« 
hers of conference who could jrive them better ^supervision. Ott lh<HM 
fourteen circuits this year work has been carried on alonir evan|{eli«tio 
and educational lines, and in half a dosen of the circuit* the work 
has been such as to cause us great rejoicing. Mention was made lasl 
year of an attempt to get work started among a penal colot^y of 
Sainsiyas, or hereditary thieves. Already a tenth of the village haa 
been baptized, and the outlook is that in the uear future thin village 
of confirmed criminals will be transformed into a village of law-abid- 
ing Christians. For many years the strictness of the Oovernmeitii 
oversight and discipline failed to effect a change, but we are con* 
vinced that what the Gospel has done with a part, it oan do to all the 
community, and that without years of del a v. Uelativoi of these oolo* 
nists, living in other places, have been so interested In what ha« been 
done, that we have been invited to another of th«^ir centres and have 
already a large number of inquirers, but the diflloulty in the way of 
success is that we have not the money to place there a regular teacher. 
Indeed, this is the difficulty that faoss us at every turn. 

Some years ago a large number of farmers were driven out of 
Rajputana by the famine, and took up the vocation of wan^lorlng 
traders aod came to Oudh At the end of last year we llrsl oamo In 
contact with them, and they seemed much interested In the Oohpul. 
This year we have watched for them in their rounds, and have already 
half a hundred converts from them. As they are a reNptKstuble peo- 
ple, and wherever they go, boldly declare themMolves ChrUtlans, they 
are proving a great help to all our evangeli2ing work We ought to 
have a teacher with them to more thoroughly teach thorn ; l)ut lierct, 
again, we are hindered for lack of means. 

Our work among the TaruH on the border han boon almoMt at a 
standstill, because of the illness of our workers Horit to thopeMtllontlitl 
districts they occupy. But they are a most interesting people. Free 
from the deception and immorality and dishonoNty so prevalent iu 
other parts, they ought to have a score of workers among them Iti- 
BteAd of two. la a number of placet tbey hav<^ QQUk!^ \oti^AViX^u^A%\^ 



xxiv PRESIDING ELDERS' REPORTS. 

hunt up our workers and inquire about our religion. The entire class 
is not only aooeasible, but ready for the Gospel. The Mohammedans 
are attempting to get them, and will probably succeed, unless we can 
get a larger working force among them. 

Our work among the ordinary peoples of the district hai progres- 
sed, and we have had about three hundred and fifty baptisms from all 
castes. One of our converts was an inspector of police, a Brahman, 
and 80 satisfactory was he in his life, and so earnest in the work, thai 
we sent him to the Theological Seminary for training. Another was a 
very bright Mohammedan youth, who at once had to undergo fierce 
persecution and lose all he had but he has remained faithful. Many 
iDteresting instances might be cited to show that in difiBcult Oudh this 
part of our work is making real progress. We are hoping for and 
expecting a movement that will bring us thousands from these castes. 
But should the movement begin to-morrow, we would be unable to care 
for it, because of lack of men and means. 

The revival ttiat seems to be kindling in so many castes of India, 
has reached us in a measure. The annual Dasehra meetings were 
seasons of deep and earnest consecration on the part of both foreign 
and native workers, and an item very significant was the fact tlu^ 
during these meetings nineteen of the best young men of our Reid 
Christian College consecrated themselves to the ministry. Shortly 
after the Dasehra meetings the revival broke out in a remarkable way 
in the Boys* High School, and when we came together for our District 
conference earlv in November, we agreed that, during the session, we 
would devote all our time, aside from that required for business, to 
earnest supplication that God's Spirit might come upon us in great 
fulness. For five days the praying conticued with great earnestness 
on the part of all, and on the sixth day, during the services conduct- 
ed by Bishop Warne, the blessing came. Its effects on the workers 
were so remarkable that we can but be convinoed that it will tell 
greatly on our work next year. All over the districts this revival 
fire is spreading, and there is an earnestness in the work we have not 
before witnessed. 

Our village school work has suffered from lack of funds, and we 
have had to close many small schools. This is to be regretted, as they 
are good evangelizing agencies. Because of the failure of local 
income at Sitapur our boys' boarding school was threatened with 
disaster, but the timely gift of a friend in New York has enabled ns to 
keep all our boys for the year. Both our Sitapur and our bahraich 
boardinc^ schools have this year furnished us young men for our work, 
and aside from this both are doing an excellent work in educating 
the mere promising element of our Christian village communities. 

Our Publishing House in Lucknow has had a series of changes in 
management during the year, but has done a successful work. Brother 
Guthrie kept the press work in hand until April, when Brother Thoburn 
arrived from America and took over. But early in August he was 
called from us by that dread disease, cholera, and as no one was 
available who could be appointed to the post of Agent, the Presiding 
Elder, in company with Brother T. C. Badley, assumed the duties, untU 
early in November, when Brother West arrived from America and was 
appointed to this work. The accounts of the press show it to have 
earned about sixteen thousand rupees above its running and religious 
periodical expenses, and this has been put into new machinery and 
plant. 

In September, Brother Guthrie, in charge of our work in Sitapur, 
was ordered from the country by his physicians as the only hop* of 
his recovery, and it was necessary to make some arrangements for his 
work. No missionary being available. Brother Revis, of Lucknow, as- 
sumed the duties of pastor of the English Church ana Chaplain to the 



OUDH DISTRiCrt. XXV 

Doo<<K>oformi8t troopsi and the Presidio^ Elder took those connected 
with the school and circuit. Mrs. Guthrie, who had been so efficient- 
ly conducting the g\r\s* boarding school, had to accompany heit 
hnsband, and Miss Hoge, of Lucknow, has taken her work. We ex- 
ceedingly regret to lose these two most efficient missionaries. 

Our two girls' boarding schools, at Qonda and Sitapur, have had 
a good year* and the number of girls in the latter has increased to 
alK>ut Ode hundred. Both the tuitional and religious work of %hese 
acboola is most important to the welfare of our community, and so it 
is a great joy to see them prospering. 

The Lucknow institutions of the Mission have also prospered. The 
English-speaking Church has reorganized its official membership, and 
financially is stronger than it was last year. The most promising 
part of this congregation is its fine band of young people, but aside 
from any single characteristic, the church is most important as a 
nueleos for our whole Lucknow work. The Dasehra meetings did not 
thia year result in the conversion of as many persons belonging to 
ilie local congregation as usual, but nevertheless strengthened the 
^urch. 

The Deaconess Bome, as usual, has been a veritable bee-hive of 
industry and effort. Special effort has been made to get into the 
homes of our Hindustani Christians and teach them more fully the 
Bible and get their children ioto our schools. In cases where mem- 
bers ol the family were not yet Christian, efforts have been made to 
win them. The Deaconess work proper has prospered, and in a city 
like Lucknow opportunities are abundant. Special juvenile and 
temperance meetings, as well as class and other regular Church meet- 
ings, have been maintained. The Home for homeless women has 
sheltered some fifty outcastes during the year, and while it will not 
keep all that have appreciated the help it gave, yet the minority who 
oasee have been helpcid. Some were truly converted and some have 
gone out, after training, into lives of usefulness. In the Home the 
woBsen desired a part in the Jubilee Fund, and by self-denial in their 
food they have already collected rupees twenty-five. 

The ECindustani work in Lucknow has suffered greatly from our 
lackof abilitv to give it adequate supervision. In the middle of the year 
Brother Hockey had to go to America on furlough, and the circuit work 
had to be taken up by Brother B. T. Badley, already overloaded with 
College work. Until we can have more supervision of our work here, 
it will fail to make progress. In this connection it is in place to say 
that this district is most seriously undermanned with missionari^. 
Every missionary within its borders, save one, is entirely weighted 
down with institutional work, and that one has a good part of his 
time oooupied with the work of the Conference finances. Almost every 
missionary within the district this year has been forced to assume 
heavy buxdens in addition to his own, and while this can be done 
temporarily, it is not the best way to accomplish work. Indeed, un- 
less relief soon comes to us, not only the work but the health of the 
overburdened workers will suffer beyond possibility of repair I 

Our two colleges and high schools in Lucknow have had a year 
of greafe success. The Government has given us a grant of Rs. 11,000 
toward the building of an upper story on the old girls' college build- 
ing, and we also have a pmmisefrom the Qovernment of Bs. 5,000 
iow^d new dormitories for the boys' high school this year, and a 
oondiftionsJ promise for more help next year. 

Concerning the Held Christian College) Brother Bare, the Princi- 
pal, writes : **The best in our history 1" This is the thought that 
occurs again and again as I think of the past year. It was best in 
point of attendance, and reached a full third more than last year. 
The I. and II. year classes have never been so large as now, and at 



XXViii i^RESlDlNG iSLDERS' BEP0B1*S. 

The Lord, even in that stony field, has worked among ihe people. 
This year, in the Rampur Circuit, forty-six young men and women 
have been baptized. These men are all in the Nawab's service. 
They gladly confess before the people that they are Christians* They 
are neither ashamed of the taunts of the Pathans nor do they care 
for their fury. These people, the day they were baptized broke their 
shrines with their swords. In a short time all the Idols were thrown 
On a heap of refuse. An old woman, aged sixty years, as aoon as 
she was baptized, went to her shrine and broke it down, and said 
with tears in her eyes, *' May the Lord Jesus hasten the day when aU 
my relatives shall accept film." 

Very few Christians from the British dominion like to go to Ram- 
pur to work in Christ's cause. The new Christians have now begnn 
to appreciate the importance of Sunday observance. There are 
many labourers who work all six davs, daily saving a portion of 
their wages for Sunday, when they ao not go out to work. They 
teach Hindus and Mohamedans the importance of the Sabbath and teu 
of the blessings which come to them who faithfully observe 1%, 

The workers go out preaching, whenever they get an opportunity, 
to the bazars, muhallas (section of a city), melas (fairs), ete. There 
are twelve places where our people go to preach. This is one of the 
means by which Christ has reached so many hearts. This is one 
of the best methods to preach the Gospel alike to the rich and ihe high 
oaste people. Many of the Hindus and Mohamedans confess that they 
love Jesus, but say they are hindered by their relatives from confeaa- 
ing Christ openly. If such people came at all, they will all oome 
together to Christ. 

With such a small number pf workers as we have, it Is ditBciilt 
to arrange satisfactorily for the secular and religious training of ibis 
vast multitude. For some years Mission schools have been closed, 
the paid workers have been removed because of the lack of fiindat sAd 
unpaid leaders, the new converts, have been appointed instead. In 
fact these leaders themselves know very little of Christianity. They 
are yet slaves to some of their old idolatrous praotioea. How can 
such leaders train those poor people who are in their charge ? Caste 
feeling is so strong among them, that they cannot act contrary to 
their old principles of faith. 

There is snother drawback ; the people from aauHig the new 
converts have been placed among their own people as an example. 
These so-called leaders know so little of the Cuiristian ezperienoe 
that those under their charge have very little regard for them. In 
fact the new converts exercise their influence over the leadera to such 
an extent that they make them do just as thev desire. These weak, 
cowardly and inexperienced leaders, stealthily participate in their 
idolatrous customs and, gradually, they come to depend upon these 
new converts for their own maintenace. This is tiie reason why so 
little of real Christian life is found among this class of Chriatians. 
We are constantly praying Ood to remove these things, for we think 
so long as they are not removed there will be no real success. 

Our Christians always try to have only one Christian wife, and 
they never pay anything for a wife. They always call upon ministers 
to solemnize marriages according to Christian rites. There are 
a few nominal Christians who prefer their old ways. Our Christians 
no longer perform those fearful and heathen ceremonies of burning 
their dead which they used when among their own people. 

Our Workers' Meeting and the District Conference besan on the 
sixteenth day of October, lasting until the seventh or November. 
During this time we came to realise the extent to which our workers 
were in need of Instruction, even they themselves realized the fact. 
Whatever was taught to them from the Word of God, they beard 



PILIBHIT DISTRICT. XXIX 

with ^reat interest aad tried tO'digent it. We were greatly helped by 
Rev. H. L. Mukerjee, Rev W. reters, and Rev. Jhabbu Lall. These 
gentlemen suggested many plans for attaining success in the work. 
We are very thankful to Rev. Bishop F. W. Warne, D.D., for his 
»tay with us. He helped many to quench their thirst in the spring of 
the Holy Spirit. Many who felt the hunger were fully satisfied by 
the Redeemer. Many received clean hearts for the first time. Many 
boys received the second baptism of the Holy Ghost. These boys 
were given back to their parents and the Bishop instructed them to 
walk together hand-in* hand with their children on the heavenly journey. 
All those who once received life, but had lost it through their care- 
lessness, received that life again. 

There are eighty-six Sunday-schools with an averatre attendance 
of four thousand five hundred. Able and learned men are required to 
work in these schools, for this is the time when the seed should be 
sown in young hearts. This seed will germinate there and bring 
forth good fruit in youth and in old age. 

There are ten circuits in this district, and each circuit has an 
Kpworth League. The Epworth League furnishes volunteer workers. 
Bands go out preaching from village to village, they help the poor and 
ihe helpless ones ; and the Mercy and Help department attends to the 
sick and weak persons in the villages. In every circuit sermons weie 
delivered on Temperance^ and the people learnt about total abstinence 
and its benefits. There are many who have signed the temperance 
pledge When we had our workers' meetings, a meeting was held In 
which a large number of people were present. The speakers taught 
many good things. Mrs. Mansell gave us good instruction and guve 
books to be used by those who wanted to be total abstainers. 

In Blsalpur, one of the old stations, there was a time when there 
had been much work in the circuit, but now there are only eleven 
workers, and even they are weak and cannot devote tneir whole time 
to the blessed work. Somn years ago, there was a reduction in the 
funds. In order not to incur the risk of running into debt, it was 
arranged that the Mission should give only a little help to her 
workers, and so the workers were allowed to carry on at the same time 
any work they liked in order to support their families. Ihis is the 
cause of the slow work in the circuit. This is not the only station 
where the people are getting very little help, but theie are others 
which are in the same category — Kampur, Pilibhit ('ity, Shahi, 
Puranpur and Nawabganj. Whatever has been accomplished has been 
done by the workers of the early days wno laid the foundation of the 
work. It is the result of the labours of the old people that we see 
Churches In so many places. The workers who are in our district 
are not sufficient, for they cannot go out to visit each of the members 
in their circuit even once in a month. 

When we see our country improving socially and morally, we feel 
that our Church stands in great need of spiritual and well educated 
workers who can teach and preach to the cultured classes. 



I 



Statistics. 



N. B.—For explantions, apparent errors and remarks, see Statististical Report 

Many reports of collections contained annas. These cannot be shown here. 
They are represented in the columns by an x. The totals contain the sums of all 
these omitted fractional parts of a rupee. 

The total income from all sources is for the most part the income of fees in 
schools and is used in the running expenses. These schools are practically self- 
supporting. The real income is shown in the regular collections which are dis- 
posed of according to disciplinary usage. 

\o//. - Statistics reported are for ii months only, as the conference ordered 
the year to close on the 31st of October instead of 30th Novenber as heretofore. 



XORTB IXDU COHFSSXXGS 8TATI8TICB 
CaUBCH HBHBBBSaiP 



nw m lui wxtaa tut tcna* an. 
AND wotc. 






m TSM Jlii X»7ii»V «jff rt-TWJCCJ :!V<' 






- . . Hi^. nil 

^ s :; K S !^,i A t t t I !* 



yOSTH IJfDlA COXFBRS^CE STATISTICS 
CUUECH MBHBEB8BIP 



s I 



F»M TSI TMJt XXK-Vb Sia iHTi''JiXX J*A«- 
AKD WOBK. 



-m,Li'jnLyLgr^jf 




NORTH IXDJA COXFBREXCE STATISTICS 

SDMMARY OF CHURCH 



NAMES OF DISTKICTS. 



Rarellly-Kumaon 



Rljnor 



Rndaoi» 



Hartl^oi 



Moraflahnd 



OiKlk 



i^Rrhwal 



IMiibhit. 



c;ran(! Total HKr» 



Tdtal H»n4 



Ifion*aso 



Doereasft 



CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY. 



CHnRCH 






Mrmbrb- 






8HIP. 




on 












a 








eS 








•^H 






• 


^a 






^* 


CO 






« 


k< 


• 

en 


2 


2 




c 

c 
o 


a 


o 


o 
6 


•*9 




s 


?5 


efl 


^ 






O 


— 


a. 


e8 


u 


S 


59 


O 


CU 


ES4 


n 


H 



Deaths 



CO 

c . 

^ CO 

S a> 

bCs9 

o c 

Si 

25 



•a 

a . 

o c 



BAPTISM 


8. 


• 

c6 


• 




Oi 


o 
ZJ 






o 








CO 


bo 






*» 


a 






CO 


3 






*»^ 


6 






ja 


:e 




• 




a . 

o « 




QO 

a 

CO 


o 


u c 




•« 




•*- flS 




Q. 


s« 


ren 
isti 


00 




-o a 


^ - 




d 


— a; 


~^ ""i"^ 


•^^ 




'J L. 


-O 


"O 


O 


o 


o 


< 


H 



I 



6 



I 

• • 

ce 
•a 

so o 
o 
V i & ca 

a !Si 
?5 j2; 



2.503 



2.660 



4.141 



825 



. 6.481 



l,4.r' 



2,461 



1,591 



2,376 



495 



3.690 



959 



:*23 242 






30,489 



. |S,859 



I 



2.334 



14,148 



2,135 



1,401 



3,8%) 



.W7 



3,990 



\rn 



•>07 



2.(a5 



7,098 



5,652 



101 



64 



10,406 117 



15.161 



14 295 14,465 



696 



141 



1,827 



14,161 



3,.373 



092 



6„'i89 



33 



131 



91 



10 



65 



49,798 



618 



47,619. 519 



2.179 99 



,50 



44 



66 



25 



1.35 



38 



8 



50 



200 110 



129 



186 



64 



81 



32 16 



441 419 



55 



31 



5 1 



141 130 



416 1221 881 



348 



(W 



1007 

1 WW I 



6 



729 



l.'i2 



202 



120 



124 



512 



313 



391 



74 122 



,363,1223 



*>oo 



334 



45 



2431 514 



1 uOaM I •rT>)*T 



1510,.34(V5 






198 



88 



104 



83 



215 



207 



,39 



86 



328 



85 



106 



81 



215 



241 



52 



88 



1020 ll(« 



996 



24' 



1200 



1.58 



12 



JP9ff TSB ySAU WXDIXQ 5Ui OCfOBSR 1905. 
HEHBSSBSUIP AND WORK. 



HORTR IHDU CONFS&SXOM SFATI8TIC8 
CHURCH 



FOS TBS YEAR gyDDfS Shi OCTOBSR 1905. 
FINANCES. 



. yORTff irOJA^ VOyFg&EKCS^STjtnSTTCS 
CaVBCH ■ 



rOK TBS YEAR SJfDIXeaitt OCT0BSS19O5. 
FINANCES. 



XOSTS IXJilA CQXFS&SXOS STATlSTtCa 
_ CBUBOB 



FOR TEX YUB XXSimSUt OCTOSSR 1905. 
FINANCES. 



TfORTB IJTDIA COyPESSMCff STATIBT1C8 
SCHOOLS 



FOR THE YEAR EXDIXQ WITH 3 1st OCTOBER, 1905. 
STATISTICS. 



EUROPEAN AND ANGLO- VERNACULAR 

SCHOOLS. 


GRAND TOTALS. 


BoTB* Schools. 


GiBLS' Schools. 


• 
00 

'0 







u 

a 

"3 


H 


Total Number of Teachers. 

Total Number on Bolls at 
end of year. 




oo 

O 
O 

.a 

O 

•i-i 
. o 

CD 

9 

55 


No. ON Roll at 

END OP YEAB. 


1 

< . 

zz 
08 >* 

> CO 

<1 


00 




ja 
u 

OS 

« 
5 



a 

;z5 


No. ON Roll at 

END OF YEAR. 


a 

s 

< 

Q 

OJ C 
> e8 


< 


• 

en 

a 

£. 

"u 
O 


• 
00 

a 

% 

o 

"A 


• 

IS 


JO 



• 
CO 

a 

US 



• 

a 



• 




"3 

Q 
9 

60 

flO 

< • 

Is 

So 
«s 


*' 1 
" 1 


*i30 
" 6 


'244 
"62 


'374 

"68 
442 

"38 

38 
164 

• • 

• • 

• • 
■ • 

164 


• • 

'355 
"54 

409 
"30 

30 
131 

• ■ 

• • 

• • 

• • 

131 


■ 


' 1 




i32 






• 
* 


i32 


' 


i30 


11 
2 
2 

10 
3 
5 
6 
6 
6 

45 
8 
5 
6 
9 
5 
4 
8 


10 
2 

2 

10 
3 
5 
6 
4 
5 

71 
8 
4 
6 

15 
5 
4 

10 


146 
25 
21 

128 
20 
68 
90 
40 
60 
1,166 
55 
45 
59 

190 

190 
39 

106 


130 
18 
14 

104 
16 
55 
63 
34 
49 
1,090 
47 
33 
44 

153 

ISO 
17 
75 


2 


136 
'*23 

23 
36 

• • 

« • 

• • 
• 

36 


306 
*'l5 


1 


132 


• • 


132 


130 


141 

8 
2 
7 
4 
4 

10 
9 
8 

10 
7 

69 


170 

8 
2 
9 
4 
4 
8 
9 
8 

10 
7 

69 

29 
5 
5 
3 

• • 

42 


2,448 


2,092 


" 1 

1 






















102 
36 

118 
38 
87 

187 
86 
80 

122 
81 

937 

297 
62 
33 
57 

• • 

449 


50 
22 
97 
29 
60 
147 
31 
.59 
90 
68 


15 


• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 


• • 

51 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 

51 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 


653 


1 

• • 

• 
■ ■ 


128 

• • 

■ • 

• • 

128 






51 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 


6 
5 
3 
3 

• • 

17 


248 
52 
20 
30 

•• 


1 


1 




51 


• 


• 


51 




51 


350 



mnTH IXDIA COHFERSUCS STATISTICS 
SCHOOLS 



FOR THE ISAS BXLIXQ 3Ui OCTOBER. 1905, 
STATISTICS. 



EUROPEAN AND ANGLO- VERNACULAR 

bCHOOLS. 


GRAND TOTALS. 




Boys' 


' SCBOOLR. 


( 


QlRI«8* 


Schools. 


• 

m 
o 


• 
00 

b« 
© 

X) 




a 


1 en 

O 


No. ON Roll at 


• 




No ON Roll at 


t 

73 


§ 


o 
c 

GG 

> 

C 

PC 

c 

■ a 


KND OP TRAB. 


a 
5 


o 


END OF TEAR. 


2 


XI 


o6 

O 
© 

a 

s 
55 


Q 


< 


1 

1 

1 

> i 


• 

09 

a 

*» 

■r. 

••— 
u 




< . 

ZZ © 


u 

5 

o 


09 

a 

08 


• 
09 

B 




ge Dally At 
1 for year. 


en 
*o 

« 

a 

7^ 


Number OQ 
[)( year. 


Average Dall 

1. 


X 

E 


1 * 


1 

a 


• 

5 


ifi © 


S 


b« 


• 


• 


ofl * 

© c 


"3 






31 


= 


5 


o 


o 


> ca 


c 


A 


o 


O 


> 08 




O 


o© 


O* 


2 


i s 


525 


H 


< 


:z« 




Pzi 


H 


< 


Eh 


H 


H 


H 


• 


• • • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• ■ 


1 
3 


3 


85 


70 


1 • 


• • • 


• • 


■ • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


3 


3 


53 


40 


1 • 


• • • 


• • 


■ • 


• • 




• • 


• • 


• • 


« • 


4 


4 


115 


90 


1 • 


• • • 


• • 


• • 


■ • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


1 


5»5 


20 




1 m 


109 


169 


142 


1 


76 


• • 


76 


64 


18 


33 


594 


430 


, • 


• • 


• • 


• • « • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


2 


2 


35 


26 


■ 


• ■ • 


.. 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


■ • 


o 


2 


42 


35 


1 


• ■ • 


• • 


• • 


• ■ 


• • 


• 


• • 


• • 


• • 


2 


2 


38 


30 




1 60 


109 


169 


142 


1 


76 


• • 


76 


64 


35 


50 


987 


741 




• • • 


• • 


• • 


1 




• • 


• • 


• • 




1 


4 


.^5 


44 




• • • 

1 48 


• • 

78 


*i26 


*ii5 


1 


• • 

93 


• • 


• • 

a3 


"*88 


• • 

3 


• • 

18 


243 


• • 

221 




• • • 


• • 


• • 






• • 


• • 


• • 




1 


3 


36 


25 




• • • 


• • 


• • 






• • 


• • 


• • 




1 


1 


26 


19 




• • * 


• • 


• • 






• ■ 


• • 


• ■ 




4 


10 


202 


168 




3 '*93 


• • 

291 


384 


335 


" 1 


• • 

164 


• • 

30 


• • 

194 


176 


• • 

7 


• • 

55 


652 


• • 

571 


j 


• ■ • 


• • 


• • 






• • 


• • 


• • 




3 


3 


56 


'46 


! 


• • • 

• • * 


• • 


• • 

• • 




1 


65 

• • 


• • 

• • 


65 

• • 


59 


5 

• • 


16 

• • 


296 

• • 


244 

• • 


. 


• • • 

• • • 


• • 

• • 


• • 

• t 






• • 

• ■ 


• • 

• • 


• • 

• • 




• • 

3 


• • 

5 


• • 

88 


• • 

73 


[ 


• * * 


• • 


• • 






• • 


• • 


• 




1 


1 


55 


40 




4 141 


369 


510 


45(1 


3 


322 


30 


352 


323 


29 


116 


1.709 


1,451 


1 
1 


• • • 


• • 


• • 


1 

• • 


■ • 


1 

• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


3 


i 

1 

3 


50 


44 




• • • 






• 






1 


73 


• • 


73 


68 


6 


11 


2l8 


192 




• • • 






• • 










■ • 


• • 




3 


3 


40 


33 




• • • 






• • 










• • 


• • 




1 


1 


28 


23 




• • • 






• • 










• • 


• • 




3 


3 


49 


41 


• 


» • • ■ 






• « 










• t 


• • 




1^ 
1 


10 


«53 


230 




1 • • • 






• • 










• • 


• • 




4 


4 


110 


97 




> • • • 






• • 










• • 


• • 




3 


3 


43 


35 




1 6 


74 


80 
80 


66 


1 


73 


■ • 
• • 


• • 

73 


68 


5 
35 


10 
48 


163 
954 


135 




1 6 




74 




66 


830 



XORfilHBlA COyFJS&iMCS STATlSfWS 

SCHOOLS 







VERNACULAR SCHOOLS. 






BOYfi 


' Schools. 






GlRL« 


I' Schools. 




09 

1 


No. ON Roll at 


1 


« 

§ 


No. OR Roll at 


-6 




END of YEAR. 




BHD OF YEAR. 


P 


NAM ES OF 








1 


1 


o 




1 


s 
















^ 








< 


m> 








< , 


DISTRICTS 


so 




• 
09 

c 




>%c8 


en 
1^ 




• 

oo 
a 








PC 




a 

^ 




flS >* 


5 




iS 




S3 9 
e8 >* 




o 

S 
a 


• 

as 

C 

CO 


xi 
• 


• 

s 


erage D 
nee for 


o 
E 


CO 

c 


O 

• 


• 


erage D 
nee for 




s 


JS 


o 


o 


>. eo 


9 


JB 


o 


' O 


> 88 




S5 


O 


^ 


H 


< 


^ 


o 


55 


Eh 


< 


Barrillt-Kumaon 






















District. 






















BareiXly Section. 






















Barellly 


2 


38 


7 


45 


30 


13 


27 


190 


217 


149 


Bareilly Sadar Bazar 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


■ • 




■ • 


« • 


• • 


Faridpiir 


1 


11 


4 


15 


2 


• • 




« • 


• • 


• • 


Jalalabad 


• • 


• 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 




15 


15^ 8 


Ehera Bajhera 


1 


• • 


27 


27 


20 


1 




18 


18 12 


Miratipur Katra, 


• • 


• 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 




■ • 


• • 


• • 


Mobamdf 


m • 


• • 


■ 


• • 


• 


• • 




• • 


• • 


• ■ 


Panahpar 


1 


17 


• • 


17 


15 


1 


' 7 


• • 


7 


5 


Powayan 


• • 


• • 


• ■ 


• ■ 


• ■ 


1 


6 


5 


11 


5 


Shahj 


ahanpur East 


1 


■ • 


16 


16 


10 


4 


■ • 


140 


140 1101 


Shah 


ahanpur VVPst 


1 


10 


• • 


10 


6 


• • 


» • 


■ • 


• • 


■ ■ 


Shah] 


ahanpur Dilawar- 






















gan j 
Tflhar 


1 


10 


o 


12 


9 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


1 


4 


4 


8 


5 


• • 


• • 


• • 


■ • 

408 


• • 

289 

1 

1 
1 


Bareilly Section Total . . 


9 


90 


60 


1.50 


97 


21 


40 


368 


Kumaon Section. 




Bhot 


4 


o 


141 


143 


65 


1 


• • 


15 


15 


12 


Dwarahath Lobha 


1 


• • 


24 


24 


21 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• ■ 


NalniTal English 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 




• • 


• • 


• • 


NalnlTal HaldwanI 


3 


8 


46 


54 


35 


4 


3 


127 


130 


110 


Pithoragarh 


JO 


4 


479 


483 


323 


11 


3 


295 


298 


181 
303 


Kumaon Section Total 


18 


14 


690 


704 


444 


16 


6 


437 


443 


Bareilly Kumaon Total .. 


27 


104 


7.W 


854 


541 


37 


46 


805 


851 


592 


BiJNOR District. 




















t 


Bashta 


3 


18 


fi 


23 


18 


1 


9 


• • 


9 


6 


Bijnor 


3 


24 


20 


44 


32 


4 


17 


32 


49 


40 


Dhampur 


9 


60 


30 


9.) 


88 


5 


20 


10 


30 


28 


Kirathpur 


3 


17 


32 


49 


41 




12 


8 


20 


161 


Mandawar 


6 


35 


19 


M 


40 


2 


12 


6 


18 


12 


Nagina 
Najibabad 


3 


32 


15 


47 


38 





15 


5 


20 


15 




2r> 


14 


39 


30 


2 


21 


1 22 


19 


Nurpur 


4 


22 


IH 


3:> 


30 


o 


10 


2 12 


9 


Seobara 


5 


44 


• • 


44 


35 


o 


15 


• • 


15 


14 


Total 


38 


277 


148 


425 


352 


22 


131 


64 


195 


159 



FOR THE \EAS SXMXQ SM OCTOBER, 1905. 
STAT18TIC8. 



NAMES OF 
DISTRICTS. 



BRn»illy-Knmaon 



BIjnor 



Budaoii 



Hardoi 



Moradabad 



Oiidh 



Garbwal 



Flllbhtt 



<4rand Total 1905, 



Total 1904 



Increase 



Decrease* 



XORTH IXBIA COyFBRSJiCS STATISTICS 

SUMMARY OF SCHOOLS 



VERNACULAR SCHOOLS. 



BoTB* Schools. 



"o 

O 
JA 
O 

O 

a 

9 



No ON Roll at 


END OF TBAB. 




• 

en 






C3 






08 






■•» 




09 


er 




c 


b« 




eS 


.a 




09 

MM 


t 

C 


• 

"3 


Im 


•*» 


A 


o 


o 


o 


» 


H 



■ I 

•a 

< . 

> * 

< 



Gibla' Schools. 



9, 

1 

.a 

GO 



o 

a 

iz; 



No. ON Roll at 

BMDOFTKAB. 



oo 

a 

* 

.a 
O 



a 



c 
o 



o 



a 



< 



27 



38 



104 7fiO 



30 



80 



15 



14 



51 



27U 



276 



277 



284 



300 



654 



83 



43 



584 



148 



119 



3£6 



2S)3 



624 



854 



425 



541 



352 



403' 313 



7161 62f 



11 



2!. 



461 805 851 



131 



111 



64 



228 



193 



339 



5C 45' 85 



947 768 58 



122 



2,389 2,587 



2.298 2.522 



91 



65 



ro7 



218 



r06 



4,976 



4,820 



156 



567 



152 



497 



2171 710 



583 



159; 



19 



3,818 



4,6?3 



865 



163 



167 



27 



5 



133 



720 



775 



55 



113 



11 



60 



927 



140 



16 



193 



2,036 



2,059 



23 



"tool 



♦«• 



785 



ml 



101 



120: 



2,746 



2,854 



lOS 



2.079 
2. 



\,m 



241 



"US \SAR S.VDI\6 3ht OCTOBSS, 190S. 
ISTICS. 






V 'i>^