(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Massachusetts General Hospital"

?ierla! 



CoIIese of ^^paimn^ anb burgeons: 
Hibrarp 




,.o^8 



M u 



^u. 



^HAHQ^ 



SOUTH PROPERTY 



f^Ui 



^a 




One Hundred and Second Annual Report 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



Massachusetts 
General Hospital 

Including the General Hospital in Boston, 

the McLean Hospital and the 

Convalescent Hospital 

in Waverley 

1915 



SECTION A 



CAMBRIDGE 
THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 



Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Open Knowledge Commons 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr102103mass 




J-33dlS 



S3iyVH0 



NOTICE 

The annual report of the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital is now published in two sections. 
Section B contains the report of the Trustees, 
the signed report of the Administrator, the re- 
port of the Executive Committee, and the 
medical and surgical tables of the General Hos- 
pital. 



One Hundred and Second Annual Report 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



Massachusetts 
General Hospital 

Including the General Hospital in Boston, 

the McLean Hospital and the 

Convalescent Hospital 

in Waverley 

1915 



SECTION A 



CA^IBRIDGE 
THE UXrV^ERSITY 




The legal title of the Corporation is 

" The Massachusetts General Hospital." 

All gifts and bequests, if without restriction, will 
be used as the Trustees deem most for the interest 
of the Corporation and its Beneficiaries. 






CONTENTS. 



SECTION A. 

PAGE 

Accounts. Examination of 61 

Trial Balance 13 

Admission op Patients. General Hospital. Rules and Rates 107 

Annual Reports of 

Administrator and Resident Physician, General Hospital 62 

Advisorj' Committee on General Hospital Training School 95 

Auditor of Accounts 61 

Committee on the Book of Donations 9 

Ladies' Visiting Committee 93 

Medical Superintendent, McLean Hospital 108 

Social Worker in Wards 104 

Superintendent of Nurses 97 

Training School for Nurses, General Hospital 99 

Training School for Nurses, McLean Hospital 134 

Treadwell Library, General Hospital 100 

Treasurer 13-60 

Trustees 5-8 

Board of Consultation 145 

Convalescent Hospital. 

Admissions and Discharges 71 

Expenses and Receipts of 18 

Expense and Revenue Statement for the year 1915 82 

Officers of 156 

Donations and Bequests, Report of Committee on 9 

Free Beds at General Hospital. 

Amounts subscribed in 1915 19 

Subscribers, List of • 19 

Funds. 

Bowditch History Fund 57 

General Fund 22 

Pathological Laboratory and Randall Funds 51 

Restricted Funds 10 

Treadwell Library Fund 57 

Warren Library Fund 57 

Wooden Leg Fund 57 

General Hospital. 

Administrator and Resident Physician, Annual Report of 62 

Birthplace of Persons Admitted 76 

Expenses and Receipts of 18 

Expense and Revenue Statement for the year 1915 83 

Occupations of Persons Admitted, Males 77 

Occupations of Persons Admitted, Females 80 

Officers of 156 

Out-Patients of 68 

Residence of Persons Admitted 76 

Rules for Admission and Rates; ■ 107 

Statement of Stock on Hand 85 

Table of Admissions, Discharges, and Results 82 

Training School for Nurses 99 

Income. 

Amounts of 1^ 

McLean Hospital Fund 4" 

3 



Table of Contents. 

PAGE 

Investments. 

Income from. Amount of 17 

Producing Income 15 

Producing no Income 15 

Laboratories. 

Chemical Laboratory, McLean Hospital 109 

Ladies' Visiting Committee 93 

McLean Hospital. 

Admissions, Discharges, and Results for ten years 121 

Ages of Insane at First Attack 126 

Causes of Death 133 

Causes of Diseases in Persons Admitted 127 

Civil Conditions of Persons Admitted 125 

Cost of Principal Stores 89 

Discharges Classified 131 

Duration of Mental Disease and its Treatment 133 

Expenses and Receipts of 18 

Expense and Revenue Statement for the year 1915 87 

Form of Mental Disease in Patients 129 

General Statistics for 1915 119 

Insane Received on First and Subsequent Admissions 121 

Medical Superintendent's Annual Report 108 

Occupation of Persons Admitted 125 

Officers of 155 

Parentage of Persons Admitted 122 

Probable Duration of Mental Disease Before Admitted 128 

Residence of Persons Admitted 123 

Training School for Nurses, Annual Report of 134 

Ofpicees of the Institution. 

Corporation 144 

Convalescent 156 

General Hospital 147 

McLean Hospital 155 

Out- Patients. General Hospital. Number of, etc ; . . . 74 

Patients. 

General Hospital. 

Admissions, Discharges, and Results 82 

Number of, and Rates 73 

Residences, Birthplaces, and Occupation 76-81 

McLean Hospital. 

Admissions and Discharges 121 

Voluntary 119-120 

Resident Physician. General Hospital. Annual Report of 62 

Statistics. 

McLean Hospital. 

General, Relating to Patients 119 

Training School for Nurses. 

General Hospital. 

Advisory Committee, Report of 95 

Superintendent of Nurses, Report of 97 

Admission to, Training and Instruction 99 

McLean Hospital. 

Admission to, Training and Instruction 137 

Annual Report of 134 

Trbadwell Library. 

Annual Report of 100 

Trustees. 

Annual Report of 5 

List of 144 

Standing Committees of 145 

Visiting Committees. 

Ladies' 146 

Trustees ; 146 



THE ONE HUNDRED AND SECOND 
ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1915. 



In behalf of the Trustees the following report upon the 
condition of the Massachusetts General Hospital is here 
submitted. 

The year has been marked by many important changes 
both in the structures of the Hospital and in the rela- 
tions of the institution to the community in which it is 
situated. One of the most important needs to which 
reference has often been made in these reports, that of 
a convenient administration building, has been met by 
the wise appreciation of our needs on the part of Charles 
W. Moseley, the surviving executor of the estate of 
Mrs. WiUiam 0. Moseley, of Newburyport. The build- 
ing to be erected for this capital service will bear the 
name of The Moseley Memorial Building, in memory of 
Dr. William Oxnard Moseley, the only son of Mr. William 
Oxnard Moseley. This young man served the Hospital 
as one of its house pupils in the year 1878, and his prom- 
ising young life was ended by an accident in Switzerland 
in the following year. It seems to us pecuHarly fitting 
that here, where the important activities of his life com- 
menced, should stand this memorial of a young physician 
thus suddenly cut off from a career which promised to 
be of great usefulness. 

When the Hospital was founded it was the general 
opinion that it was only requisite to provide, on the one 
hand, for those whose means were not sufficient to secure 
proper medical aid, and on the other, for those whose 
circumstances did not admit of the proper care in their 
own residences. In the course of years it has become evi- 
dent that those without sufficient means of support will 

5 



Report of the Trustees. 

receive in the modern hospitals an attention and care 
far beyond the resources of the self-respecting man who 
may be unwilling to ask any measure of relief from a 
charitable institution. The result will unavoidably be 
that two portions of the community are sure to have 
the best medical care — the poor and the very rich. The 
rest of the people must at present be content with what 
they can afford to pay for, and in [many cases the medi- 
cal aid will not be of the highest quality. It has, there- 
fore, been determined to attempt an enlargement of the 
functions of this Hospital by opening a department of 
the out-patient service for the diagnosis of such diseases 
as may present unusual difficulties, requmng all the re- 
sources of skill and scientific apparatus which are not, 
as a rule, combined in any single medical office. It should 
be needless to add that no reflections are made upon the 
charitable zeal and pm-poses of the medical profession, 
but the general practitioner alone cannot give his pa- 
tients the benefits that modern science has distributed 
among a number of specialists. The modern hospital 
combines many especial advantages of medical assist- 
ance, and all of these may be brought to the help of any 
individual. 

The plan which the trustees have in mind has been 
submitted to a large number of active practitioners 
throughout the State and has received their approval, 
and will be carried out, so far as it is possible, in cooper- 
ation with the attending phj'-sician of the patient. The 
fee charged for this service will be as small as is consistent 
with the requirement that the added expense shall not be 
infficted upon the charitable funds of the Hospital. 

In our report for the year 1913 extended mention was 
made of the advantages both to the community and to 
the hospital of a ward for the benefit of patients able to 
pay all Hospital charges. The need of a service of this 
sort has become so evident that contracts have been 
made, and the preliminary operations are already under 
way, for the erection of a pay ward on the western front 

6 



Report of the Trustees. 

of our grounds, upon the site formerlj'- occupied by the 
Gardner Ward. The Gardner Ward has been moved 
to the east, and so remodeled and enlarged that it will 
partially replace the Warren and Jackson Wards, which 
had reached the limit of their usefulness and have been 
destroyed. 

The Ether Day address was given on the 16th of Oc- 
tober by Dr. W. W. Keen, of Philadelphia. No surgeon 
now living could with better authority treat of this great- 
est aid to suffering humanity; but the speaker went 
beyond even his great personal experience, and has given 
one of the most complete statements of the whole sub- 
ject of surgical anaesthesia to our medical hterature. 
It is a much prized addition to the series of notable 
addresses deUvered upon this occasion. 

The total number of patients treated during the years 
1914 and 1915 in the three Hospitals were as follows: — 

1914 1915 

General Hospital, Boston 6,712 6,829 

McLean Hospital, Waverley .... 332 326 
Convalescent Hospital, Waverley . . 697 743 

In the Out-Patient Department of the General Hos- 
pital the number of new^ cases treated was 29,213 against 
24,957 in 1914, and the total number of visits from 
patients was 190,628. 

The expenses of the General Hospital for the year 
exceeded, as usual, the income, and the difference was 
made up from the General Fund. That these annual 
deficits shown by the successive Reports of the Trus- 
tees may be materially decreased, or altogether ehmi- 
nated, the Trustees earnestly appeal for gifts for current 
expenses. 

The great needs of the Hospital now are a Niuses' 
Home at Waverley for the nurses employed at the 
McLean Hospital, and a suitable ward for the Children's 
Department of the General Hospital. 

In conclusion the Trustees call attention to the Treas- 

7 



Report ol the Trustees. 

urer's Report; the Report on Donations; the Report of 
the Ladies' Visiting ComiTiittee; and the valuable reports 
of Doctors Washburn and Tuttle, and through them to 
the detailed reports of medical and surgical cases, rec- 
ords, and statistics. 

Henry P. Walcott, 
David P. Kimball. 




< 


o 


H 


„ 


h-i 


•S 


Oh 


'm 


W 


(U 


O 


^ 


W 






CIS 


3 


;§ 


w 




& 


'hi) 


(x) 


Vh 


o 


3 
W 


w 


=3 


H 


3 


H 


PC| 


pc] 


O 


W 


■•^ 


t3 


fl 


w 


0) 

> 


< 


o 


CO 


-IJ 


CZJ 


2 




^ 

ra 


1 


rt 


1 


^ 


O 


u 




V 

^ 


Q 


W 


3 


1 






W 


3 

pq 


o 






CO 


pi< 


-M 


)4 


Ml 

o 


P 


(U 


m 


P3 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS, 1915 



The Conunittee on the Book of Donations reports that 
the following donations and legacies have been received 
during the year: 

GENERAL FUND. 

Donation of Mrs. David K. Horton $15.00 

Donation of F. W. Hunnewell, 2d 25.00 

Donation of Miss Georgina Lowell 15.00 

Bequest of Francis Skinner, Jr 10,000.00 

Donation of Charles W. Hubbard 50.00 

Donation of Edward B. Alford 20.00 

Donation of Arthur A. Carey 5.00 

Donation of Lawson Frederick Cartter . . . 50.00 

Donation of Francis I. Amory 50.00 

Donation of Miss A. F. Manning 10.00 

Donation of PhiHp S. Sears 25.00 

Donation of Mrs. E. S. Webster 25.00 

Donation of I. Tucker Burr 25.00 

Donation of Mrs. F. S. Mead 5.00 

Donation of Mrs. Stephen S. FitzGerald . . . 10.00 

Bequest of Mrs. Anna S. C. Prince 800.00 

Donation of Mrs. Alex. S. Porter, Jr 25.00 

Donation of Mrs. S. Parkman Blake .... 50.00 

Donation of W. P. B. Weeks 25.00 

Donation of "Anon\anous" -08 

Donation of F. G. Crn-tis 25.00 

Bequest of Charles R. Lawrence 5,000.00 

Donation of Mrs. Gertrude Hunter 2.00 

Donation of "Anonymous" 3.00 

Donation of Mrs. Harcourt Amory 50.00 

Donation of Dr. William E. Reed 9.22 

Bequest of Francis Skinner, Sr 8,308.95 

Donation of "Anonymous" 3.00 

Donation of Hem-y Lyman 200.00 

Donation of "Anonjonous" 50,000.00 

Donation of "Anonjinous" 5.00 

Donation of W. H. Williams 6.00 

Donation of an Out-Patient 3.00 

Donation of Martin J. Foley 1-00 

Donation of Everett Morss 100.00 

Donation of Miss Lois W. Clarke 5.00 

Donation of Annie L. Gonley 5.00 

Donation of Salvatore Maschera 3.00 

Carried forward $74,959.25 

9 



Donations and Bequests, 1915. 

Brought forward $74,959.25 

Bequest of Caroline L. W. French, in memory of 
John Davis WiUiams and Hannah Weld Wil- 

hams French 50,138.89 

Donation of Misag Azzigian 5.00 

Bequest of Lucv F. Simmons 482.50 

Donations for Yearly Free Beds,1915,$19,373.03 
Donations for Yearl> Free Beds,1916, 200.00. 19,573.03 

$145,158.67 

TEN-YEAR FREE BED FUND. 

Donation of Miss Mary S. Ames 1,000.00 

Donation of Mrs. Henry S. Grew 1,000.00 

Bequest of the late Henry R. Dalton .... 1,000.00 

3,000.00 

RESTRICTED FUNDS. 

Bequest of Harriet Otis Cruft 30,000.00 

To be added to the Harriet Otis Cruft Fund. 

Bequest of Joseph C. Storey 10,000.00 

For the establishment of two free beds, to be called the 
"Esther Storey and Jane Elkins Beds." 

Bequest of William N. Felton , 5,000.00 

For the establishment of a free bed, to be called the 
"William N. Felton Bed." 

Bequest of William S. Hills » . . 5,000.00 

Balance of William S. Hills Fund. 

Donation of H. D. Woods 5,250.00 

For the establishment of a free bed, to be called the 
"Jennie A. Pond Free Bed." 

Bequest of John Aiken Preston 5,000.00 $60,250.00 

For the establishment of a free bed, to. be called the __ — . 

"Susan Welles Sturgis Bed." 

RESTRICTED FUNDS — INCOME UNRESTRICTED. 

Donation of Ai-thur T. Lyman 10,000.00 

MOSELET MEMORIAL BUILDING FUND. 

Donation of Charles W. Moseley, surviving 
Executor under the will of Julia M. Moseley, 
in memory of Dr. Wilham Oxnard Mose- 
ley, Jr $185,000.00 

DR. JOHN M. HARLOW FUND. 

Bequest of Dr. John M. Harlow and Frances K. 

Harlow 15,000.00 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES' FUND. 

Donation of "A Graduate" $200.00 

Donation of Miss Louise C. May 80.00 

Carried forward $280.00 $418,408.67 

10 



Donations and Bequests, 1915. 

Brought forward $280.00 $418,408.67 

Donation of Miss Susan L. Mills 5.00 

Donation of Miss Louie W. Wellington . . . 25.00 

Donation of Miss Sara E. Parsons 100.00 

Donation of Dr. Benjamin Brown 10.00 

Donation of "A Graduate" 1.00 

$421.00 

CHARLES P. JATNES FUND. 

Bequest of Charles P. Jaynes . 8,200.00 

HOUSE OFFICERS ALUjMNI FUND. 

Donation of House Officers Alumni 446.00 

Toward furnishing the House Officers room in the 
Moseley Memorial Building. 

SUNDRY DONATIONS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES 

Donation of Dr. Putnam and Mr. Storey, trus- 
tees of the A. W. Blake Fund $500.00 

To be applied to the salary of Dr. Emerson, Psychologist. 

Donation of Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer 50.00 

For a Scholarship — General Hospital Training School 
for Nurses. 

Donation of Mrs. Carohne L. Weld 2,712.31 

For the purchase of Surgical Instruments. 

Donation of George Wigglesworth . . 500.00 

For a Babies' Milk Fund. 

Donation of "AnonjTnous" 37.11 

To be added to this Fund. 537.11 

Donation of George Wigglesworth 1,200.00 

For X-Ray Apparatus. 

Donation of Dr. Hugh Cabot 500.00 

To be applied toward the salary of the House Surgeon of 
the Genito-Urinarj' Dept. 

Donation of A Friend 1,000.00 

"To extend help to worthy patients as their needs may 
become known through their attendance at the 
Hospital." 

Donation of Friends of the Hospital (through 
Mrs. Hugh Cabot) 167.00 

For refitting part of the Genito-Urinary Out-Patient 
rooms. 

Donation of Training School for Nurses . . . 74.82 

Proceeds of May Party given for roof-garden furniture. 

Donation of "Anonymous" 30.00 

To pay expense of X-Raying a series of cases in the 
Out-Patient Department. 

Donation of Junior Girls of Camp Abena, a 

summer camp in Maine 6.46 

For books for patients' library. 

Donation of Mrs. Edith L. Coohdge 75.00 

For Social Service work — in memory of the late Amorj' 
A. Lawrence. 

Donation of The Board of Visiting Ladies . . 500.00 $7,352.70 

Toward the salary of a social worker in the house. 

Carried forward $434,828.37 

11 



Donations and Bequests, 1915. 

Brought forward $434,828.37 



MCLEAN HOSPITAL FUND. 

Bequest of Sarah A. Matchett $23,376.05 

To be added to the Matehett Memorial Fund. 



AELINGTON HOUSE FUND. 

Donation of Frank E. Peabody $71,577.56 

For patients at the McLean Hospital 

NUESES' HOME FUND — MCLEAN HOSPITAL. 

Donation of Miss Louise W. Case $100.00 

Donation of Sundry Donors (through Mrs. E. 
Stanley Abbot) : 

AnonjTiLous 16.00 

Edward B. Field 15.00 

Mrs. A. H. Hews 25.00 

Mrs. Charlotte Nichols Greene 10.00 

Mrs. Isabel B. Richardson 10.00 176.00 



LOVERING FUND. 

Bequest of Miss Sarah C. M. Lovering . . . 1,828.72 

To be expended in a way that will promote the comfort 
and happiness of the patients at the McLean Hospital. 



SOCIAL SERVICE FUND. 

Donation of Mrs. Shepherd Brooks 15,000.00 

Bequest of Susan C. Dove 5,000.00 20,000.00 



$551,786.70 

These sums have been entered in the Book of Donations 
in the usual form. 

George Wigglesworth, 

Committee on the Book of Donations. 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 
December 31, 1915. 



12 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



In accordance with the Fifth Article of the By-Laws, 
the Annual Report of the accounts of the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, made up to the last day of December, 
1915, is respectfully submitted, to be laid before the 
Corporation at its annual meeting. Among the assets 
enumerated are many gifts to the Corporation, which 
for various reasons have been retained as originally 
received. 



TRIAL BALANCE, JANUARY 1, 1916. 



Land and Buildings, 
General Hospital . 

Ward F. Alterations 
(Cost to date) . 

Moseley Memorial 
Building (Cost to 
date) 

Land and Buildings, 
McLean Hospital . 

Arlington House (Cost 
to date) .... 

Land and Buildings, 
Convalescent Hos- 
pital 

Administrator's Bal- 
ances 

Annuities . 

Insurance Stocks . 

Railroad Bonds 

Miscellaneous Bonds 

Railroad Stocks . 

Maniifacturing Stocks 

Bank Stocks . 

Real Estate Stocks 

Miscellaneous Stocks 

Real Estate 

Pay Pavilion 

Notes Receivable . 

Certificates of Deposit 



Income. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Principal. 
Dr. Cr. 



$2,275,170.84 
32,369.02 

87,088.97 

1,937,531.78 

50,498.94 

50,000.00 

20,908.66 

160,000.00 

50,000.00 

290,329.09 

147,937.50 

122,307.50 

94,171.32 

27,636.00 

26,710.40 

72,050.03 

2,666,312.43 

2,021.70 

109,088.02 

125,000.00 



Carried forward $8,347,132.20 

13 



Report of the Treasurer. 



Brought forward 

Cash i 

Sundry Accounts, Lucy 
F. Simmons Estate. 

Lucy F. Simmons Es- 
tate 

General Fund . 

Arlington House Fund 

Art Room Fund . 

Bowditch History 
Fund .... 

Samuel Cabot Fund. 

Children's Medical 
Ward Building Fund 

Clinical Laboratory 
Fund 

Codman Fund 

Convalescent Hospi- 
tal Fund 

Dalton Fund . 

Dr. John M. Harlow 
Fund .... 

House Officers Fund 

Charles P. Jaynes 
Fund 

Sarah Proctor Joslin 
Fund .... 

McLean Hospital Fund 

Euphemia Millar Fund 

Moseley Memorial 
Building Fund . 

Nurses' Home Fund, 
McLean Hospital . 

Orthopedic Ward Fund 

Pathological Labora- 
tory and Randall 
Funds .... 

Restricted Funds . 

Shattuck Fund 

Social Service Depart- 
ment Fund . 

Susan Smith Fund 

Surgical Instrument 
Fund .... 

Training School for 
Nurses Fund 

Treadwell Library 
Fund . '. . . 

Warren Library Fund . 

Warren Prize Fund . 

Dr. J. H. Whittemore 
Memorial Fund. 

Wooden Leg Fund 

Ten-year Free Bed 
Fund .... 

Sundry Funds for 
Special Purposes 



Income. 
Dr. Cr. 

22,483.71 



$1,003.37 
227.76 

2,543.69 
34.17 



5,616.25 
1,631.57 

202.81 

48.67 

4,226.18 
3,716.28 



137.94 
145.22 



507.59 
689.02 

1,753.19 



Principal. 
Dr. Cr. 

5,347,132.20 
58,412.52 



350.00 



$350.00 

4,404,075.96 

71,577.56 

1,018.35 

2,000.00 
10,000.00 

250.00 

10,000.00 
29,186.38 

151,811.13 
25,000.00 

35,090.00 
446.00 

8,200.00 

1,000.00 

562,223.34 

1,557.74 

185,000.00 

54,860.70 
26,470.92 



83,875.41 

2,595,967.49 

2,000.00 

20,000.00 
13,703.98 

6,475.00 

40,443.92 

5,305.00 
1,000.00 

4,685.84 

33,720.00 
7,600.00 

11,000.00 



2,483.71 $22,483.71 $8,405,894.72 $8,405,894.72 
14 



Report of the Treasurer. 

INVESTMENTS PRODUCING NO INCOME. 

General Hospital : 

Land and Buildings occupied for Hos- 
pital $2,275,170.84 

Ward F. Alterations (Cost to date) . . 32,369.02 

Moseley Memorial Building (Cost to 

date) 87,088.97 $2,394,628.83 

McLean Hospital: 

Land and Buildings at Belmont . . 1,937,531.78 

Arlington House (Cost to date) . . . 50,498.94 1,988,030.72 

Convalescent Hospital: 

Land and Buildings at Beknont. . . 50,000.00 

Administrator's Balances 20,908.66 

$4,453,568.21 
INVESTMENTS PRODUCING INCOME. 

Policies Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co. . . . $160,000.00 
500 Shares Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co. . . 50,000.00 

Railroad Bonds: 
$2,000 Cedar Rapids & Missouri River R. R. Co. 3d Div. 

1st M. 7's of 1916 2,140.00 

$5,000 Central Vermont Railway Co. 1st M. Gold 4's of 

1920 2,500.00 

$48,000 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R. Gen. M. 4's 

of 1958 . 48,000.00 

$28,000 Chicago Junction Railway & Union Stock Yards Co. 

1st M. Coll. Gold 4's of 1940 27,580.00 

$5,000 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R., Dub. Div., 

1st M. 6's of 1920 5,000.00 

$1,000 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R. Conv. Gold 

4^'s of 1932 1,006.59 

$40,000 Chicago & Northwestern Ry. Gen. M. 4's of 1987 . 39,500.00 
$3,000 Chicago & West Michigan R. R. 1st M. 5's of 

1921 2,970.00 

$2,000 Danville & Grape Creek R. R. Co. 1st M. 6's of 

1920 2,080.00 

$2,500 Detroit, Grand Rapids & Western R. R. 1st M. 4's 

of 1946 2,050.00 

$3,000 Kansas City, Memphis & Birmingham R. R. Gen. 

M. 4's of 1934 3,000.00 

$3,000 Kansas City, Memphis Railway & Bridge Co. 1st 

M. Gold 5's of 1929 2,850.00 

$1,000 Metropohtan Street Railway Co. of Kansas City 

Cons. M. 5's of 1913 940.00 

$25,000 New York Central & Hudson River R. R. Ref. 

Gold 33^'s of 1997 22,428.75 

$14,000 NewYorkRailwaysCo;Adj.M. 5'sof 1942 . . 0.00 

$3,000 New York Railways Co. 1st R. E. & Ref. M. 4's of 

1942 0.00 

$181.20 New York Railways Co. Adj. M. 5's of 1942 Scrip . 0.00 

$18.60 New York Railways Co. 1st R. E. & Ref. M. 4's of 

1942 Scrip 0.00 

$60,000 Northern Pacific — Great Northern Joint 4's (C. 

B. & Q. CoU.) of 1921 58,283.75 

Carried forward $430,329.09 

15 



Report oi' the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $430,329.09 

$50,000 Richmond — Washington Co. Coll. Trust 4's of 

1943 50,000.00 

$20,000 West End Street Railway Co. Deb. 4's of 1943 . . 20,000.00 

Miscellaneous Bonds: 

$106,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. Coll. Trust 

4's of 1929 105,250.00 

$10,000 Town of Behnont Sewerage Loan 4's of 1938 . . 10,000.00 

$5,000 City of Haverhill 4's of 1919 5,000.00 

$4,000 City of Haverhill 4's of 1920 4,000.00 

$25,000 Illinois Steel Co. Deb. 4K's of 1940 23,687.50 

Railroad Stocks: 

100 Shares Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Ry. Co. 

Common 9,962.50 

50 Shares Boston & Maine R. R. Common . . . 1,650.00 

300 Shares The Canadian Pacific Railway Co. . . 47,737.50 
50 Shares Chicago, Junction Railway & Union Stock 

Yards Co. Preferred 5,525.00 

50 Shares Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R. Pre- 
ferred 6,450.00 

100 Shares Chicago & Northwestern Railway Co. 

Common 12,625.00 

20 Shares Fitchburg R. R. Preferred 1,460.00 

16 Shares New England Investment & Security Co. 

Preferred 800.00 

70 Shares New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. 3,626.00 

21 Shares Old Colony R. R 492.00 

100 Shares Southern Pacific Co. Common .... 8,812.50 

100 Shares Union Pacific R. R. Preferred .... 7,983.00 

100 Shares Union Pacific R. R. Common .... 12,500.00 

32 Shares West End Street Railway Co. Preferred . 2,684.00 

Manufacturing Stocks: 

50 Shares American Sugar Refining Co. Preferred . 6,400.00 

130 Shares American Sugar Refining Co. Common . 14,507.50 

200 Shares Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. Common . 0.00 

2 Shares Appleton Co 200.00 

250 Shares Ballard Vale Mills Co. Preferred .... 25,000.00 

25 Shares Great Falls Manufacturing Co. ... 2,500.00 

13 Shares Heywood Bros. & Wakefield Co. Preferred 1,312.32 

2 Shares Lancaster Mills 210.00 

13 Shares Lanett Cotton Mills 1,365.00 

3 Shares Ludlow Manufacturing Associates . . . 354.00 
140 Shares Merrimack Manufacturing Co. Common . 14,000.00 

60 Shares Pacific Mills 4,200.00 

300 Shares Pepperell Manufacturing Co 24,122.50 

Bank Stocks: 

216 Shares Merchants National Bank 24,800.00 

28 Shares Old Boston National Bank 2,836.00 

Real Estate Stocks : 

50 Shares Board of Trade Building Trust . . . 5,000.00 

20 Shares Boston Ground Rent Trust 1,800.00 

10 Shares Boston Real Estate Trust 9,969.75 

50 Shares Commonwealth Building Trust Preferred . ] r f^f^/^ r^r^ 
25 Shares Commonwealth Building Trust Common . ( o,uuu.uu 

6 Shares Delta Building Trust - 420.00 

25 Shares Hotel Trust 2,500.00 

Carried forward $917,071.16 

16 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward 

12 Shares Journal Building Trust .... 

2 Shares Trimountain Trust 

11 Shares Western Real Estate Trustees . 

Miscellaneous Stocks: 

203 Shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
17 Shares Boston Storage Warehouse Co. 



86 
22 
12 
33 

5 

16 
100 

3 



Shares Boston Wharf Co 

Shares Calumet & Hecla Mining Co. 

Shares Edison Electric Illuminating Co. 

Shares Galveston-Houston Electric Co. Preferred 

Shares Galveston-Houston Electric Co. Common 

Shares Massachusetts Gas Co.'s Preferred 

Shares National Biscuit Co. Common . 

Shares Western Union Telegraph Co. . 



Real Estate: 

Land and Buildings, 1 Faneuil Hall Square 

Land and Buildings, Union and Marshall Streets 
Land and Buildings, 166 and 168 Washington Street 
Land and Buildings, 273 and 275 Washington Street 
Land and Buildings, 474 to 480 Washington Street . 
Land and Buildings, 496 to 500 Washington Street . 

Land and Buildings, 565 Washington Street 

Land and Buildings, 10 and 103^ Common Street 
Land and Buildings, 837 to 847 Washington Street . 
Land and Buildings, Rear 837 to 847 Washington Street 
Land and Buildings, 851 to 859 Washington Street . 
Land and Buildings, 11 and 15 to 23 Warren ton Street . 
Land and Buildings, 70 and 74 Tremont Street .... 
Land and Buildings, 451 to 463 Atlantic Avenue and 163 to 

167 Oliver Street 

Land and Buildings, 307 to 311 Atlantic Avenue 

Land and Buildings, Sundry properties in the vicinity of the 

General Hospital 

Land and Building, 92 Charles St 

Land and Building, 90 Charles St 

Lands and Building, Province House Estate 

Land and Buildings, 15 to 23 Harvard Place 

Land and Buildings, Interest in sundry properties Estate of 

John Eliot Atkins 

Land and Building, Pay Pavilion 

Notes Receivable 

Cash 

Certificates of Deposit 

Interest in Lucy F. Simmons Estate 



$917,071.16 

480.00 

200.00 

1,340.65 



25,815.08 
1,836.00 

11,200.00 

13,430.00 

2,869.80 

2,735.40 

500.00 

1,460.00 

12,012.50 
191.25 



35,000.00 

70,147.51 

45,000.00 

125,860.15 

352,717.92 

387,156.69 

68,600.00 

26,012.83 

59,874.86 

65,115.71 

67,589.26 

48,700.00 

250,000.00 

79,553.08 
84,800.00 

178,226.59 
6,260.00 
9,500.00 

587,490.00 
50,870.33 

67,837.50 

2,021.70 

109,088.02 

58,412.52 

125,000.00 

350.00 



Investments producing Income . 
Investments producing No Income 



$3,952,326.51 
4,453,568.21 



Total, foot of Trial Balance $8,405,894.72 



INCOME FROM INVESTMENTS. 

Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co. Annuities . . $6,800.00 

Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co. Stock . . . 5,000.00 

Railroad Bonds and Notes 15,321.17 

Miscellaneous Bonds and Notes 8,208.35 

Carried forward $35,329.52 

17 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $35,329.52 

Railroad Stocks 5,767.00 

Manufacturing Stocks 5,385.50 

Bank Stocks 3,169.81 

Real Estate Stocks 1,244.50 

Miscellaneous Stocks 3,708.75 

Real Estate 135,350.21 

Notes Receivable 5,360.29 

Interest 2,648.95 

Interest in Lucy F. Simmons Estate 33.22 

$197,997.75 

Less Interest on Notes Payable 12,114.16 

$185,883.59 

THE INCOME HAS BEEN DISTRIBUTED AS FOLLOWS: 

J. H. F. Adams Fund $2,000.00 

Arlington House Fund 1,003.37 

Art Room Fund 49.55 

Bowditch History Fund 97.34 

Samuel Cabot Fund 486.70 

Children's Medical Ward Building Fund 12.17 

Codman Fund 1,420.48 

Convalescent Hospital Fund 7,388.64 

Dalton Fund 1,216.75 

Dr. John M. Harlow Fund 1,525.32 

Charles P. Jaynes Fund 202.81 

Sarah Proctor Joslin Fund 48.67 

McLean Hospital Fund 26,017.42 

Moseley Memorial Buildmg Fund 4,226.18 

Euphemia Millar Fund (Annuitv) 60.00 

Nurses' Home Fund — McLean Hospital 2,669.01 

Orthopedic Ward Fund 1,288.34 

Pathological Laboratory and Randall Funds 4,082.20 

Restricted Funds . . ' 125,775.84 

Shattuck Fund 97.34 

Social Service Fund 815.22 

Susan Smith Fund (Annuity) 720.00 

Surgical Instrument Fund 315.14 

Training School for Nurses Fund 1,960.28 

Treadwell Library Fund 258.19 

Warren Library Fund 48.67 

Warren Prize Fund 228.07 

Dr. J. H. Whittemore Memorial Fund 1,500.00 

Wooden Leg Fund 369.89 



$185,883.59 
HOSPITAL INCOME AND EXPENSES. 

Total Expenses of Hospitals $873,147.11 

Total Receipts of Hospitals $599,379.74 

Income from Invested Funds: 

Free Bed Funds .... $125,775.84 

Codman Fund .... 933.78 

Special Funds 20,823.88 

McLean Hospital Fimd . . 26,017.42 

Convalescent Hospital Fund 7,388.64 180,939.56 

Balance from General Fund . . 92,827.81 



,147.11 



18 



Report of the Treasurer. 



GENERAL FUND. 



Balance, January 1, 1915 $3,947,234.36 

Donations and Bequests to this Fund 145,158.67 

Income INIassachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co. . . . 10,000.00 

Profits from sale of Investments 28,707.42 

Transfer from Ten-year Free Bed Fund 3,000.00 

Province House Estate Reversionary Interest .... 384,803.32 

$4,518,903.77 
Excess of Expenses over Receipts at the Hospi- 
tals paid from this Fund $92,827.81 

Transfer to McLean Hospital Fund . . . 20,000.00 

Transfer to Restricted Funds 2,000.00 

Balance, January 1, 1916 4,404,075.96 

$4,518,903.77 



SUBSCRIBERS FOR FREE BEDS FOR 1915. 



(Yearly subscription of one hundred dollars or over.) 



$100.00 



100.00 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



100.00 



Arthur Adams . . . 

Mrs. George R. Agas- 
siz 

Miss Martha A. Al- 
ford 

Mrs. 0. H. Alford . . 

Mrs. Bryce J. Allan . 

Hobart Ames .... 

Mrs. C. W. Amory . 

William Amory . . . 

Mr. and Mrs. Larz 
Anderson .... 

Francis Henry Apple- 
ton 

E. S. B 

Walter C. Baj^lies . . 

Mrs. James H. Beal . 

Thomas P. Beal . . 

E. Pierson Beebe . . 

Dr. WilHam Sturgis 
Bigelow 200 

George Nixon Black . 100 

Mrs. Wilmon W. 
Blackmar .... 

Mrs. Arthur W. Blake 

Mrs. Francis Blake 
(Francis Blake Free 
Bed) 

William P. Blake . . 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



100, 
100. 
100, 
100, 
100, 
100, 



100 
100 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

00 
00 

00 
.00 



100 
100 



.00 
00 



Boston Firemen's Re- 
lief Fund .... 
Mrs. A. H. Bowditch 
F. W. Bradlee . . . 
Mrs. John L. Bremer 
Miss Sarah F. Bremer 
Miss Fannie R. Brewer 
(John R. Brewer 
Free Bed) . . . . 
Mrs. Peter C. Brooks 
Shepherd Brooks . . 
Mrs. WiUiam S. Bul- 

lard 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 

Carr 

Horace D. Chapin 
Mrs. Edith L. CooHdge 
(an annual gift in 
memory of the late 
Amory A. Lawrence) 
J. Randolph Coolidge 
T. Jefferson CooHdge 
Mrs. T.J.CooHdge,Jr. 
Charles E. Cotting . 
Estate of Ethel H. 
Crane (for the bene- 
fit of Parishioners of 
St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church, Dedham) . 



$200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



100.00 
100.00 
100.00 

100.00 

100.00 
100.00 



673.03 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
100.00 



100.00 



19 



Report of the Treasurer. 



Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby $100.00 
Mrs. Charles P. Curtis 100.00 
Mrs. G. S. Curtis . . 100.00 
Mrs. G. S. Curtis, Jr. 100.00 
Louis Curtis .... 100.00 
Mrs. John G. Gushing 100.00 
Mrs. Charles H. Dal- 

ton 200.00 

Henry R. Dalton . . 100.00 
Mrs. Edward L. Davis 100.00 
Mrs. Joseph E. Davis 100.00 
Charles A. Dean . . 100.00 
Franklin Dexter and 

Gordon Dexter, 

Jointly 100.00 

Philip Dexter .... 100.00 
Howard Elliott . . . 100.00 
Mrs. R. W. Emmons, 

2d 100.00 

WiUiam Endicott . . 100.00 
Mrs. Ehzabeth E. Fay 100.00 
Henry H. Fay . . . 100.00 
S. Prescott Fay . . . 100.00 
Wilham Rodman Fay 100.00 
Estate of Lawrence 

Carteret Fenno . . 100.00 
Miss Marion H. Fenno 100.00 
Mrs. Desmond Fitz- 

Gerald (in memory 

of Dr. and Mrs. 

Stephen Salisbury) 100.00 
J. Murray Forbes . . 100.00 
C. H. W. Foster . . 100.00 
Mrs. C. H. W. Foster 100 00 
George A Gardner . 100.00 
George P. Gardner . 100.00 
John L. Gardner . . 100.00 
Wilham A. Gardner . 100.00 
Mrs. Reginald Gray . 100.00 
Charles P. Greenough 100.00 
Edward S. Grew . . 100.00 

S. E. Guild 100.00 

Mrs. G. G. Hammond 100.00 
Miss Clara Hemenway 100.00 
Miss Hett}^ L. Hemen- 
way 100.00 

F. L. Higginson . . . 100.00 
Mrs. A. S. HiU . . . 100.00 
James R. Hooper . . 100.00 



100.00 
100.00 
100.00 

100.00 

100.00 
100.00 
100.00 

100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



100.00 
100.00 



Wilham Hooper . . . $100.00 

Henry S. Howe . . . 100.00 

Mrs. Arthur Hunne- 
well 

F. W. Hunnewell . 

Henry S. Hunnewell 

Mrs. Henry S. Hunne- 
well 

Mr. and Mrs. James 
Jackson .... 

Arthur S. Johnson 

Edward C. Johnson 

Mrs. Wolcott H. John- 
son 

Charles A. Kidder . 

Nathaniel T. Kidder 

David P. KimbaU . 

L. C. KimbaU . . 

The Misses King (in 
memory of Jennie 
W. Iving) .... 

Mrs. H. A. Lamb . . 

Mrs. Amory A. Law- 
rence 100.00 

John Lawrence and 
Francis Peabody, 
Jr., Trustees under 
will of Abbott Law- 
rence 500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. George 

C. Lee 100.00 

George V. Leverett . 100.00 

In memory of Mrs. 
Anna Cabot Lodge, 
from H. C. L. and 
G. A. J 100.00 

Augustus P. Loring . 100.00 

Wilham Caleb Loring 100.00 

Miss Mary B. Lothrop 100.00 

Mrs. Thornton K. 

Lothrop 100.00 

Mrs. Charles T. Lov- 

ering 100.00 

Mrs. Francis C. Low- 
ell ....... . 100.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John 

Lowell 100.00 

Arthur T. Lyman . . 100.00 
Mrs. Henry Lyman . 100.00 



20 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Henry and Theodore 

Lyman $100.00 

Mrs. WiUiam H. Lyon 100.00 
Mrs. Charles E. Mason 500.00 
Miss E. F. Mason . . 100.00 
Miss Fanny P. Mason 100.00 
Miss Ida M. Mason . 100.00 
Laurence Minot . . 100.00 
Miss Madeleine Curtis 

Mixter 100.00 

Mrs. Frank Morison . 100.00 
Mrs. John Holmes 

Morison 100.00 

The Misses Morrill . 100.00 
Mrs. E. P. Motley . 100.00 
Mrs. Thomas Motley 100.00 
Mrs. Otis Norcross . 100.00 
Richard Olney . . . 100.00 
Herbert Foster Otis . 100.00 
Charles J. Paine . . 100.00 
Mrs. Francis S. Parker 100.00 
Frank E. Peabody . 100.00 
Francis Peabody . . 100.00 
Mrs. Francis Peabody 100.00 
Charles Lawrence 

Peirson 100.00 

Dudley L. Pickman . 100.00 
S. S. Pierce Company 

(not for employees) 100.00 
Mrs. George Putnam . 100.00 
Mrs. F. L. W. Rich- 
ardson 100.00 

Mrs. A. Lawrence 

Rotch 100.00 

Mrs. Robert Shaw 

Russell ...... 100.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert 

SaltonstaU .... 100.00 

C. S. Sargent .... 100.00 

Mrs. Francis W. Sar- 
gent 100.00 

Richard and Francis 

P. Sears 100.00 

F. R. Sears 100.00 

Mrs. Frederick R. 

Sears 100.00 

Dr. Henry F. Sears . 100.00 



Herbert M. Sears . . 
Mrs. Knyvet W. Sears 
Miss Phyllis Sears . 
Richard D. Sears . 
Mrs. G. H. Shaw . 
Henry S. Shaw . . 
Robert Gould Shaw 
Sons of St. George 
WilHam S. Spaulding 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
H, Stevenson . . . 
Galen L. Stone . . . 
The Misses Sturgis . 
Bayard Thayer . . . 
Bayard Thayer (1916) 
Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer 
Mrs. Charles Linzee 

Tilden 

Unity Lend-a-hand 
Society of Lexing- 
ton 

Victorian Memorial 
Association .... 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilham 
Bentley Walker . . 
Miss Mary Lee Ware 
Mrs. Bayard Warren 
F. G. Webster . . . 
Stephen M. Weld . . 
Agnes D. West (1916) 
(in memory of Mar- 
ion M. West. Nom- 
inations for bed to 
be made by the 
authorities of St. 
Stephen's Church) 
Mrs. Charles T. White 
George Wigglesworth 
John D. Wilhams . . 
Moses Wilhams . . . 
Mrs. R. C. Winthrop, 

Jr 

Mrs. Thomas Lindall 
Winthrop .... 



.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
250.00 
100.00 

100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 

100.00 



100.00 

250.00 

100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 



100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 

100.00 

100.00 



$19,573.03 



21 



Report of the Treasurer. 

FREE BED SUBSCRIBERS FOR TEN YEARS. 

William S. Dexter (1908-1918) 1,000.00 

Walter Hunnewell (1909-1919) 1,000.00 

Mary G. Pickering (1909-1919) 1,000.00 

Mrs. Charles H. Dalton (1910-1920) 1,000.00 

Frances E. (Cutler) Sprague Fund (1911-1921) . 1,000.00 

Mrs. C. G. Rice (1912-1922) 1,000.00 

Mrs. W. Scott Fitz (191-3-1923) 1,000.00 

James Longley (1914-1924) 1,000.00 

Miss Mary S. Ames (1915-192.5) 1,000.00 

The late Henry R. Dalton (1915-1925) 1,000.00 

Mrs. Henry S. Grew (1915-1925) 1,000.00 

$11,000.00 

A subscriber of "one hundred dollars may nominate a patient to a free 
bed for one year; a subscriber of one thousand dollars to a free bed for 
ten years; and a subscriber of five thousand dollars to a free bed for one 
life, with right upon nomination to extend the same to two lives. 

The terms for a free bed for one life without right upon nomination to 
extend the same to two Hues are $2,500. The terms for a free bed in a 
private room are $500 annually or $10,000 for life. 

All free beds shall be subject to the approval of the Trustees and the 
Rules of the Hospital. 

GENERAL FUND. 

1811 Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Province House Estate .... $40,000.00 

Cutting stone for Hospital . . . 35,070.27 

1811-1843 Subscribers for Foundation 

($146,992.55) 

Benjamin and Caleb Adams . . . 100.00 

Joseph Allen 100.00 

Hannah R. Amory 100.00 

John Amory 200.00 

Jonathan Amory 200.00 

Ebenezer T. Andrews .... 300.00 

Nathan Appleton 500.00 

Samuel Appleton 2,000.00 

William Appleton, for himself . . 100.00 

William Appleton, for an unlmown 200.00 

Samuel T. Armstrong .... 100.00 

Nathaniel Austin 100.00 

Adam Babeock 300.00 

Baker, Brown, and Co 100.00 

Aaron Baldwin 110.00 

Charles Barnard 100.00 

John Bartlett 100.00 

Thomas Bartlett 300.00 

Stephen Bean . 100.00 

Jeremiah Belknap 100.00 

, John Belknap . . 100.00 

John Bellows 100.00 

Amos Binney 300.00 

John Bishop 100.00 

George Blake 100.00 

Carried forward $80,980.27 

22 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $80,980.27 

1811-1843 George Bond 180.00 

Boott, Kirk, and Sons .... 300.00 

Mary Boott 300.00 

Charles Bradbury . . . . . . 100.00 

Gamaliel Bradford 100.00 

Joseph P. Bradlee 100.00 

Josiah Bradlee 200.00 

Thomas D. Bradlee 100.00 

Nathan Bridge 100.00 

Andrew Brimmer 100.00 

John Brooks 100.00 

Peter C. Brooks 2,000.00 

Moses Brown 100.00 

Samuel Brown 100.00 

John Bryant 100.00 

Thomas Bumstead 125.00 

Benjamin Bussey 1,000.00 

George Cabot ....... 100.00 

John Cabot 150.00 

Sarah and Susan Cabot .... 100.00 

William Cabot 100.00 

Francis Carnes 200.00 

Richard Chamberlain .... 100.00 

Walter Channing 100.00 

William E. Channing .... 100.00 

Henry Chapman 100.00 

Town of Chelsea 145.42 

David W. Child 100.00 

Samuel Cobb 200.00 

William Cochran 100.00 

Charles R. Codman 100.00 

Margaret Coffin (and Ann Smith) . 100.00 

Collections in Ward 4 . . . . 340.00 

Collections in Ward 10 ... . 373.00 

Joseph Coolidge 2,000.00 

Joseph Coolidge, jun 1,000.00 

Thomas Cordis . . . . •■ . . 100.00 

Uriah Cotting 100.00 

Allen Crocker 100.00 

Benjamin W. Crowninshield . . 200.00 

George Crowninshield .... 500.00 

Thomas Curtis 100.00 

John P. Gushing 5,000.00 

Thomas Gushing, a share in Ex- 
change Coffee House, worth . . 300.00 

William Dall 100.00 

Benjamin Dana 100.00 

Nathan Dane 200.00 

Amasa Davis 100.00 

A. and C. Davis 150.00 

Charles Davis 100.00 

Daniel Davis 100.00 

Eleanor Davis 200.00 

Joshua Davis 100.00 

William Davis 150.00 

Thomas Dawes 100.00 

H. A. S. Dearborn 150.00 

Carried forward $99,543.69 

23 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward . . . . . . $99,543.69 

1811-1843 P. P. F. Degrand 175.00 

Tliomas Dennie 100.00 

John Derby 300.00 

Richard Derby 100.00 

Richard C. Derby 300.00 

Humphrey Devereux 100.00 

Aaron Dexter 100.00 

Katharine Dexter 100.00 

Pickering Dodge 300.00 

John Dorr 110.00 

Samuel Dorr 100.00 

Catlierine Eliot 200.00 

John S. Ellery 100.00 

David Ellis 100.00 

Samuel Endicott 100.00 

Otis Everett 100.00 

Exhibition of Mummy .... 1,257.87 

Samuel Fales 100.00 

Ebenezer Farley 125.00 

Female Association 753.08 

Joseph Field 100.00 

Joshua Fisher 100.00 

Simon Forrester 2,000.00 

Ebenezer Francis 200.00 

John French 100.00 

French and Weld 120.00 

Robert H. Gardiner 200.00 

Samuel P. Gardiner 100.00 

Abraham Gibson 100.00 

Nathaniel Goddard 200.00 

John Gore 200.00 

Francis C. Gray 100.00 

Henry Gray 1,000.00 

Horace Gray 1,000.00 

John C. Gray 100.00 

John C. Gray 300.00 

William Gray 500.00 

Gardiner Greene, $1,000 in three 

per cents 650.00 

David Greenough 200.00 

David S. Greenough 200.00 

Dudley Hall . 200.00 

Samuel Hammond 200.00 

John Hancock 200.00 

Harvard College 213.32 

Lemuel Hayward 100.00 

Joseph Head 1,000.00 

Joseph Head, jun 100.00 

Augustine Heard 100.00 

Barnabas Hedge 150.00 

David Hinckley 1,000.00 

Hingham, Third Parish .... 504.44 

John Holland 200.00 

Benjamin P. Homer 100.00 

Henry Homes 100.00 

John Howe 100.00 

Henry Hubbard 100.00 

Carried forward $116,002.40 

24 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $116,002.40 

1811-1S43 John Hubbard 200.00 

Humane Society of Massachusetts . 5,140.56 

Humane Society (Merrimack) . . 2,000.00 

Jonathan Hunnewell 100.00 

John Hurd ." ioo!oO 

Joseph Hurd 200.00 

Charles Jackson 400.00 

James Jackson 420.00 

Patrick T. Jackson 220.00 

Samuel Jacques, jun 100.00 

John CofEn Jones 500.00 

Thomas Kilby Jones 200.00 

Abigail Joy and family .... 300.00 

Benjamin Joy 250.00 

John Kidder, jun 100.00 

Josiah Knapp 100.00 

Seth Knowles 100.00 

William Lambert 100.00 

Amos and Abbott Lawrence . . . 200.00 

William Lawrence 100.00 

Francis Lee 100.03 

George Lee 15o!oO 

Joseph Lee SOQ.OO 

Tliomas Lee, jun 100.00 

Winslow Lewis 100.00 

Lincoln and Wheelwright . . . 100.00 

James Lloyd 1,000.00 

Caleb Loring 100.00 

Francis C. Lowell 400.00 

John Lowell 450.00 

George W. Lyman 15o!oO 

Theodore Lyman 2,000.00 

Theodore Lyman, jun 150.00 

Josiah Marshall 100.00 

Massachusetts Charitable Fire So- 
ciety 900.00 

Perrin May 100.00 

Samuel May 100.00 

Samuel R. Miller 100.00 

William Minot 100.00 

John Morse 100.00 

Thomas Motley 100.00 

Israel Munson 1 000.00 

Caleb Oakes . . 100.00 

John Odin 200.00 

George Odiorne 100.00 

Joseph Orne 200.00 

Samuel Orne 200.00 

John Osborn 200.00 

H. G. Otis 500.00 

Daniel P. Parker 500.00 

John Parker 500.00 

Samuel Parkman 2,000.00 

Samuel Parkman, jun 200.00 

Nehemiah Parsons 200.00 

William Parsons 1,500.00 

M. Payne 100.00 

Carried forioard $141,032.96 

25 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forrcard . 
ISl 1-1843 William Payne 
Joseph Peabody 
James Perkins 
Samuel G. Perkins 
Thomas H. Perkins 
John Perry 
John Phillips . 
Jonathan Phillips 
Stephen Phillips . 
William Phillips, including 

legacy of his father 
Henry Pickering . 
Benjamin Pickman, jun 
Dudley L. Pickman 
William Pickman 
Paschal P. Pope 
John Pratt 
William Pratt 
William Prescott 
James Prince 
John Prince 
Josiah Quincy 
Isaac Rand 
John Randall 
John T. Reed 
Joseph W. Revere 
Paul Revere 
Henry G. Rice 
Benjamin Rich 
John Richards 
Andrew Ritchie 
Nathan Robinson 
Daniel D. Rogers 
William Ropes 
Nathaniel P. Russell 
Samuel Salisbury 
Samuel Salisbury, jun 
Samuel Sanford 
Daniel Sargent 
Ignatius Sargent 
William Sawyer 
David Sears 
Joseph Sewall . 
Robert G. Shaw 
Michael Shepherd 
William Shimmin 
Nathaniel Silsbee 
John Skinner . 
Barney Smith . 
Samuel Snelling 
Washington Benevolent 

Charlestown Branch 
Hollis-street Society . 
First Church Society . 
King's Chapel Society 
West Church Society . 
Roman Catholic Society 



Soc 



$141,032.96 

100.00 

2.000.00 

5,000.00 

100.00 

5,000.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

200.00 



000 



etv 



20,000.00 
100.00 
1,000.00 
150.00 
300.00 
100.00 
135.00 
400.00 
150.00 
250.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
300.00 
100.00 
500.00 
200.00 
1,000.00 
150.00 
500.00 
500.00 
100.00 
300.00 
200.00 
400.00 
100.00 
5,000.00 
500.00 
500.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
400.00 
100.00 

200.00 
148.05 
100.67 
114.44 
190.06 
100.40 



Carried forward $189,421.58 

26 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $189,421.58 

1811-1843 First Parish Society, Dorchester . 168.48 

Dr. Bancroft's Society, Worcester . 140.60 

Dr. Pierce's Society, Brookline . . 173.38 

John Soley 100.00 

Samuel Spear 100.00 

Phineas Spelman 100.00 

William Spooner 100.00 

Francis Stanton 100.00 

Russell Sturgis 200.00 

William Sturgis 100.00 

George Sullivan 200."D0 

Richard Sullivan 400.00 

William Sullivan . . ... 200.00 

John Tappan 350.00 

Lewis Tappan 100.00 

Charles Taylor 300.00 

Boston Theatre 1,190.00 

Abraham Thompson 100.00 

Israel Thorndike 2,000.00 

Israel Thorndike, jun 100.00 

Joseph Tilden 100.00 

Catherine Torrey 200.00 

John G. Torrey 100.00 

Samuel Torrey ....... 100.00 

Abraham Touro 300.00 

George Trott 100.00 

Gideon Tucker 200.00 

Richard D. Tucker 100.00 

Edward Tuckerman 100.00 

Edward Tuckerman, jun. . . . 500.00 

William and Gustavus Tuckerman . 100.00 

Town of Concord 200.00 

Town of Maiden 193.80 

Cotton Tufts 135.00 

Nathan Tufts 100.00 

Phineas Upham 100.00 

Vose, Coates, and Co 100.00 

Daniel Waldo 200.00 

Thomas B. Wales 100.00 

Timothy Walker 150.00 

William J. Walker 400.00 

Artemas Ward 100.00 

Nahum Ward 100.00 

Thomas W. Ward 150.00 

William Ward 100.00 

John C. Warren 400.00 

Bedford Webster 153.00 

Francis Welch 200 00 

Benjamin Weld 500.00 

John Welles 300.00 

Nathaniel West 1,000.00 

Eliza Wetmore 200.00 

Elisha WTieeler 100.00 

Moses Wheeler " 100.00 

James White 300.00 

Asa Whitney . 100.00 

Benjamin Wiggin (Exhibition of 

Picture) 1,604.07 

. . . . $204,629.91 



Carried forward 



27 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $204,629.91 

] 811-1843 Thomas Wigglesworth .... 200.00 

Eliphalet Williams 100.00 

John D. Williams 1,000.00 

Moses Williams 100.00 

Samuel G. Williams 100.00 

Thomas Williams 100.00 

Timothy Williams . . . . 100.00 

Amasa Winchester 100.00 

Edmirnd Winchester 100.00 

Thomas L. Winthrop .... 100.00 

John Wood 100.00 

Sundry subscribers, less than $100 15,332.91 

1813 John Lucas 900.00 

1819 Polly Russell 400.00 

1820 Samuel Eliot 10,000.00 

Beza Tucker 5,350.00 

1822 Seth Webber 1,000.00 

1823 Abraham Touro 10,000.00 

1824-1835 John McLean 119,858.20 

1826 Thomas Oliver 22,438.70 

Allan Crocker 100.00 

1829 James Savage 100.00 

1831-1849 Isaiah Thomas 6,370.33 

1832-1833 Mary Belknap 89,882.60 

1834 Jonathan Moseley 753.46 

1836 Susan Richardson 250.00 

1838 Ambrose S. Courtis 2,500.00 

1841 Peter Westerfield 165.67 

1844 Subscribers for Enlargement of Hos 

pital ($62,450.00) 

Charles Amory 

James S. Amory . 

William Amory 

Ebenezer T. Andrews 

Nathan Appleton 

Samuel Appleton . 

Samuel A. Appleton 

William Appleton 

Samuel T. Armstrong 

Edward Austin 

Richard Aylwin 

Daniel C. Bacon 

Benjamin Bangs 

Charles Barnard 

Francis Bassett 

John D. Bates 

Amos Binney . 

Mrs. Joshua Blake 

Edward Blanchard 

William H. Boardman 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch 

N. I. Bowditch 

Ihvight Boyden 

Josiah Bradlee 

James B. Bradlee 

Martin Brimmer 

P. C. Brooks . 



Carried forward 



500.00 

250.00 

500.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

2,000.00 

100.00 

2,000.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

200.00 

500.00 

100.00 

250.00 

200.00 

200.00 

500.00 

100.00 

100.00 

500.00 

100.00 

1,000.00 

200.00 

500.00 

2,000.00 

$506,331.78 



28 



Report of the Treasurer. , 

Brought forvxird $506,331 78 

1844 P. C. Brooks, jun 500.00 

John Bromfield 100.00 

John Bryant, jun 25o!oO 

Henry Cabot 200.00 

Thomas G. Gary 100.00 

Carney and Sleeper 100.00 

Caleb Chase 200.00 

Eben Chadwick 500.00 

Abiel Chandler 100.00 

Jonas Chickering 500.00 

Charles R. Godman 100.00 

Edward Godman & Co 100.00 

Henry Godman 100.00 

Gardner Colby 100.00 

B. W. Crowninshield .... 300.00 

A. and C. Cunningham .... 100.00 

Charles P. Curtis 100.00 

Thomas B. Curtis 100.00 

Peter R. Dalton 100.00 

Samuel Dana 100.00 

John James Dixwell 100.00 

J. W. Edniands 200.00 

Samuel A. Eliot 500.00 

Moses Everett 100.00 

Samuel Fales 200.00 

Richard Fletcher 100.00 

John M. Forbes 100.00 

Ebenezer Francis 1,000.00 

George Gardner 100.00 

John L. Gardner 1,000.00 

John Goodenough 100.00 

Benjamin Goddard 500.00 

Ozias Goodwin 500.00 

Francis C. Gray 500.00 

Horace Gray 300.00 

John C. Gray 1,000.00 

Samuel C. Gray 100.00 

William Gray 100.00 

Elizabeth C. Greene 500.00 

Sarah Greene 1,000.00 

David S. Greenough 100.00 

Henry Hall 100.00 

George Hallett 200.00 

George Hay^vard 100.00 

Nathaniel Hooper 100.00 

Robert Hooper 250.00 

Robert C. Hooper 100.00 

Samuel Hooper 250.00 

George Howe 500.00 

Jabez C. Howe 200.00 

lasigi and Goddard 100.00 

P. T. Jackson 100.00 

James Johnson 100.00 

Samuel Johnson 100.00 

Abigail Joy 100.00 

Abel Kendall, jun 100.00 

George H. Kuhn 100.00 



Carried forward $520,681.78 

29 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $520,681.78 

1844 Lane and Reed 100.00 

Abbott Lawrence 2,000.00 

Amos Lawrence 1,000.00 

Amos A. Lawrence 100.00 

William Lawrence .... 1,000.00 

Lawrence and Stone 500.00 

George Lee 1,000.00 

Thomas Lee . 500.00 

Isaac Livermore 100.00 

Elijah Loring 100.00 

Francis C. Loring 100.00 

John J. and Francis Low . . . 100.00 

Francis C. Lowell 500.00 

John A. Lowell 1,000.00 

Charles Lyman 500.00 

George W. Lyman 500.00 

Theodore Lyman 1,000.00 

John Marland 100.00 

Robert M. Mason 100.00 

William P. Mason 500.00 

Charles H. Mills 100.00 

Milton and Slocumb 100.00 

Benjamin R. Nichols 100.00 

William Oliver 100.00 

William F. Otis 100.00 

Daniel P. Parker 500.00 

James Parker 500.00 

John Parker 1,000.00 

George Parkman 150.00 

William Parsons 100.00 

William P. Perkins 100.00 

Edward D. Peters 100.00 

William Phipps 100.00 

C. Gayton Pickman 100.00 

Paschal P. Pope 500.00 

Mary Pratt 500.00 

William Prescott 500.00 

William H. Prescott 100.00 

Samuel R. Putnam ..... 100.00 

Josiah Quincy, jun 1,000.00 

Joseph W. Revere 100.00 

Rice and Thaxter 100.00 

Richardson, Jeffrey, and Brother . 100.00 

Edward H. Robbins 100.00 

Henry B. Rogers 500.00 

James D. Russell 100.00 

Richardson, Burrage, and Co. . . 100.00 

Stephen Salisbury 500.00 

Ignatius Sargent 1,000.00 

Lucius M. Sargent 100.00 

James Savage 100.00 

Willard Sayles 500.00 

David Sears 2,000.00 

R. G. Shaw 1,000.00 

Francis Skinner 250.00 

Josiah Stickney 100.00 

Charles Stoddard 100.00 



Carried forward $544,081.78 

30 



Report of the Treasurer. 





Brought forward . 










$544,081.78 


1844 


William Sturgis . 






1,000.00 




John E. Thayer . . 








500.00 




Nathaniel Tiiayer . 








100.00 




Joseph Tilden . 








100.00 




Henry Timniins 








500.00 




Phineas Upliam 








1,000.00 




Daniel Waldo and sister 








200.00 




Thomas B. Wales 








1,000.00 




William J. Walker 








200.00 




Waterston, Pray, and Co 








100.00 




John C. Warren . 








500.00 




John Welles 








500.00 




Thomas Wetmore . 








100.00 




William F. Whitney . 








100.00 




Edward Wigglesworth 








100.00 




Thomas Wigglesworth 








300.00 




John D. Williams 








2,000.00 




Moses Williams 










100.00 




Sundry subscriber. 


3, 


less 


t 


hai 


1 




$100 . . . 










2,100.00 




Moses Everett 










IIG.OO 




Israel Munson 










20,000.00 


1844-1866 


Mrs. E. G. Everett . 










475.00 


1845 


William Russell 

John Brown .... 










100.00 
100.00 


1847-1849 


Sarah Clough 










601.16 


1851 


Elizabeth Salisbury . 










4.000.00 


1852 


James Ingersoll . 










2,000.00 


1854 


Judah Touro . 










10.000.00 


1855 


William Appleton 
Elizabeth Pratt . . 










20,000.00 
20,000.00 


1856 


Subscribers for Brick Fence 






($3,250 


00) 




Nathan Appleton ... 


. . 500.00 




William Appleton 










500.00 




Josiah Bradlee 










500.00 




P. C. Brooks . . 










250.00 




John P. Gushing . 










250.00 




Jonathan Phillips 










500.00 




David Sears 










500.00 




William Sturgis . 










250.00 


1857 


William Pickman 
Ellison Lassell . 










4.000.00 
6.888.60 


1858 


Agnes Austin 










7,500.00 


1858-1879 


M. P. Sawyer 










. 119,687.93 


1859 


George Hills . 










1,000.00 


1860 


William I. Bowditch 










274.25 


1861 


J. Poland .... 
J. Bowdoin Bradlee . 










15.00 
500.00 


1863 


Subscribers for Cottage for Males at 




Asylum ($44,450.00^) 




William Amory 500.00 




Francis Bacon 500.00 




William B. Bacon 250.00 




Benjamin E. Bates 1,000.00 




John Ballard 300.00 




James M. Beebe 

Carried forioard . . . . . 


. 2,000.00 




$779,639.72 



31 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $779,639.72 

1863 Mrs. Nath. I. Bowditch .... 5,000.00 

J. Bowdoin Bradlee 500.00 

Gardner Brewer 2,000.00 

Martin Brimmer 1,000.00 

Peter C. Brooks 1,000.00 

William S. BuUard 2,000.00 

J. Amory Davis 500.00 

J. Edgerton 1,000.00 

J. Wiley Edmands 500.00 

Joseph S. Fay 500.00 

John C. Gray 1,000.00 

Mrs. Henry Grew 300.00 

George Higginson 500.00 

Robert Hooper 250.00 

George Howe 1,000.00 

Jabez C. Howe 1,000.00 

Peter Hubbell 500.00 

H. H. Hunnewell 1,000.00 

Miss Anna P. Jones 400.00 

James Lawrence 1,000.00 

Abbott Lawrence 1,000.00 

Charles Lyman 300.00 

George W. Lyman 500.00 

Robert M. Mason 500.00 

Ex'rs of Henry P. Oxnard . . . 500.00 

J. W. Paige 500.00 

Benjamin T. Reed 250.00 

George C. Richardson .... 1,000.00 

Henry B. Rogers 1,000.00 

David Sears 1,000.00 

G. Howland Shaw 1,000.00 

Francis Skinner 1,000.00 

Henry P. Sturgis 500.00 

William Sturgis 1,000.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 3,000.00 

George W. Wales 500.00 

Miss Marv Anne Wales .... 500.00 

William F. Weld 1,000.00 

B. C. White 300.00 

Joseph Whitney 500.00 

Misses Wigglesworth 1,000.00 

Edward Wigglesworth .... 500.00 

Thomas Wigglesworth .... 300.00 

Moses Williams 1,000.00 

J. Huntington Wolcott .... 300.00 

Elizabeth Hill 237.50 

1864 William S. Bullard 800.00 

William Oliver 57,760.04 

1865 Hannah F. Lee 1,000.00 

William Minot 100.00 

Stephen Salisbury 5,000.00 

Edward Whitney 5,000.00 

Edward Wigglesworth 1,000.00 

1866 Subscribers in Aid of Funds 

($100,800.00) 

William Amory 250.00 

William T. Andrews 500.00 

^ Carried forward $891,187.26 

32 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $891,187.26 

1866 Charles H. Appleton 500.00 

Nathan Appleton, jun 250.00 

Thomas G. Appleton 1,000.00 

William Appleton, jun 500.00 

William S. Appleton 500.00 

Anonymous, by W. S. B. ... 500.00 

Francis Bacon 500.00 

James M. Beebe 5,000.00 

George B. Blake 100.00 

John Borland 300.00 

Boston Stock Exchange Board . . 1,000.00 

Mrs. N. I. Bowditch 5,000.00 

F. H. and J. B. Bradlee .... 500.00 

Martin Brimmer 1,000.00 

Edward Brooks 500.00 

Peter C. Brooks 1,000.00 

Peter C. Brooks, jun 1,000.00 

Shepherd Brooks 1,000.00 

William S. Bullard 5,000.00 

Edward A. Codman 500.00 

Caleb A. Curtis 100.00 

Greely S. Curtis 500.00 

John G. Gushing 500.00 

Robert M. Gushing 500.00 

Thomas F. Gushing 500.00 

Otis Daniels 500.00 

Isaac Warren Danforth .... 500.00 

F. Gordon Dexter 500.00 

Albert Fearing 500.00 

Augustus Flagg 100.00 

William H. Gardiner 250.00 

George Gardner 300.00 

Henry J. Gardner 500.00 

John L. Gardner 5,000.00 

Joseph B. Glover 300.00 

The Misses Eliza and Lucy Goodwin 500.00 

Mrs Henry Grew 500.00 

Andrew T. Hall 100.00 

Augustine Heard 250.00 

]\Irs. Augustus Hemenway . . . 1,000.00 

George Higginson 250.00 

Robert Hooper 200.00 

C. F. Hovey & Co 1,000.00 

George Howe 1,000.00 

Jabez C. Howe 2,000.00 

Thomas Howe 250.00 

Horatio H. Hunnewell .... 2,000.00 

lasigi, Godda'rd, & Co 500.00 

Herman B. Inches 250.00 

Abbott Lawrence 500.00 

Amos A. Lawrence 500.00 

James Lawrence 1,000.00 

James L. Little 1,000.00 

Mrs. John E. Lodge 300.00 

Francis C. Lowell 250.00 

John Amory Lowell 1,000.00 

George W. Lyman 1,000.00 

Carried forward $942,737.26 

33 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought fonoard $942,737.26 

1866 Theodore Lyman 200.00 

Robert M. Mason 1,000.00 

William P. Mason 500.00 

Theodore Matchett . " . . . . 200.00 

Nathan Matthews . . . . • . 200.00 

James McGregor 250.00 

Charles H. Minot 100.00 

George R. Minot 200.00 

Enoch R. Mudge 1,000.00 

Charles Merriam 250.00 

E. Francis Parker 100.00 

John Brooks Parker 500.00 

Samuel R. Payson 1,000.00 

William Perkins 500.00 

Andrew Pierce, jun 100.00 

Miss Sarah P. Pratt 1,000.00 

Miss Mary Pratt 1,000.00 

Jeffrey Richardson • 1,000.00 

Henry B. Rogers 1,000.00 

George C. Shattuck 500.00 

Francis Skinner & Co 2,000.00 

Henry P. Sturgis ...... 500.00 

Samuel W. Swett 250.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 25,000.00 

William Thomas 100.00 

Mrs. William Thomas .... 100.00 

Mrs. William W. Wadsworth . . 500.00 

Miss M. A. Wales 300.00 

William G. Weld 250.00 

George D. Welles 100.00 

Miss Susan J. Welles . . . . 500.00 

Miss Jane Welles 500.00 

Benjamin C. White 200.00 

Joseph Whitney 500.00 

Miss Anne Wigglesworth . . . 1,000.00 

Miss Mary WMgglesworth . . . 1,000.00 

Edward Wigglesworth .... 1,000.00 

Thomas Wigglesworth .... 1,000.00 

Moses Williams 3,000.00 

Robert C. Winthrop 100.00 

Rev. Mr. Spaulding 500.00 

Rev. S. M. Worcester 1,900.00 

F. N. Mitchell 67.50 

1867 Sarah Pratt 18,800.00 

Charles Harris 1,000.00 

J. Mason Warren ....... 2,000.00 

1868 Abigail Loring 38,901.67 

St. Stephens Chapel .... 2,000.00 

Morrill Wyman 200.00 

1870 Amateur Dramatic Association . 450.00 
H. J. Bigelow 500.00 

1871 Sidney Homer 1,000.00 

1871-1915 Massachusetts Hospital Life Insur- 
ance Co 390,000.00 

1874-1886 Hospital Sunday 10,798.28 

1875 Miss M. C. Bryant 500.00 

1877-1883 Charlotte Harris 274,457.33 

Carried forward $1,734,312.04 

34 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward 

1877 Elizabeth Powers 

1878 Edward Blanchard 

1879 J. T. Coolidge . 
Margaret Tucker 
Miss Marian Hovey 
Henry S. Hovey . 
Mrs. .John T. Morse, Jr. 

1880 F. James . . . 

1881 John C. Gray 
Thomas D. Quincy 
E. R. Mudge . . 
Sir Moses Montefiore 

1882 Mary Pratt . 
jNIiss j\larv Wigglesworth 
G. H. Gay Fund . 
Edwin Fiske . 

1883 Jerome G. Kidder 

1884 Amasa Guild . . 
Tliomas G. Appleton 

1885 A. W. Folsom 
])r. Francis P. Hurd 
John Wilson . 

1887 E. W. Hooper 
1888-1898 Helen C. Bradlee 

1888 Mrs. Eliot Hubbard 
Francis C. Balch 

1891 Abraham Goldsmid 
Joseph Schofield . 
Anne Wigglesworth 
Augustus L. Case 
Mrs. J. S. Cabot . 

1892 Elizabeth B. Bowditch 
1893-1894 Georsre A. Gardner 
1893-1915 Anna S. C. Prince 

1894 Henry P. Kidder 

1895 George W. Ellis . 
Benefit Performance — Henry 
Henry C. Hutching 
Walter Hunnewell 

1897 Louisa C. Palfrey 

Ellen Flint . 
1897-1901 Mary B. Turner 

1897 Ellen F. Mason 
E. B. Bush . 
J. W. Quimby 

1898-1911 Henry L. Pierce 
1898-1905 Subscribers to Eliot Chapel 

1898 Thomas E. Proctor 
A. C. Slater . . 
Thomas F. Wyman 

1899 Otis E. Weld 
1900-1908 J. Putnam Bradlee 

1900 Robert C. Billings 
Francis E. Bangs 
Daniel Sharp Ford 

1901-1906 Robert Henry Eddy 
1901-1913 Mrs. John: B. Tileston 



Irvin 



$1,734,312.04 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
100.00 
49.63 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
846.07 
25,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
5.97 
20,000.00 
5,000.00 
25,000.00 
50.00 
25,000.00 
40.00 
5,000.00 
125.00 
10,030.56 
13,600.00 
1,500.00 
75,000.00 
1,000.00 
50.00 
150.00 
3,000.00 
5.000.00 
500.00 
50.00 
5,000.00 
50,000.00 
11,800.00 
10,000.00 
50.00 
884.25 
2,000.00 
1,000.00 
2,000.00 
28.86 
2.580.61 
1,000.00 
50.00 
50.00 
798,100.00 
33,220.07 
145,000.00 
1,000.00 
119,720.41 
1.003.50 
243,391.24 
50,000.00 
2,000.00 
7.000.00 
56,788.00 
505.00 



Carried foncard $3,505,641.21 

35 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $3,505,641.21 

190] Euplieniia Millar 1,000.00 

Robert Codman 5,000.00 

19*2 Mrs. S. D. Warren 20,000.00 

Edward I. Brown 10,000.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. Wyman .... 250.00 

George Gardner 1,000.00 

Mrs.^Nathaniel Thayer 1,000.00 

Edward F. Daland 1,000.00 

Children of Mrs. Henry Winsor 

(Phila.) 1,000.00 

1903 William S. Dexter 4,000.00 

C. H. W. Foster 500.00 

Jacob Heeht 500.00 

Merchants' & Miners' Transportation 

Co 50.00 

Sarah A. Matchett 1,000.00 

1904-1905 Charles H. Hayden 102,133.33 

1904-1907 Thomas Wisglesworth 15,000.00 

1904 Mrs. Alice B. Chase 1,000.00 

Harriet 0. Cruft 2,000.00 

Mrs. Henry Lee 2,000.00 

1905 Mrs. William Caleb Loring . . . 100.00 

Ellen V. Smith 50.00 

J. H. T. Adams 58,256.46 

Edward W. Codman 283,887.53 

1905 Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Grew . . . 1,000.00 

1906 Mrs. H. Kuhn 50.00 

Desmond FitzGerald 25.00 

Laura M. Moore 2,500.00 

Martin Brimmer 20,000.00 

William Bolton 555.22 

Edward Woodman 1,000.00 

Henry L. Higoinson 1,000.00 

Mrs. George D. Howe 1,000.00 

1907 Charles E." French 10,000.00 

Mrs. J. J. Storrow 25.00 

1907-1912 Henry B. Mulliken 113,424.21 

1907-1915 Georgina Lowell 170.00 

1907 William Amory 50.00 

Alice M. Longfellow 5.00 

Mrs. R. G. Shaw 50.00 

1907-1914 William P. Blake 250.00 

1907 Anna Dehon Blake 25.00 

1908-1915 Philip S. Sears 125.00 

1908-1911 Mrs. B. L. Young 75.00 

1908-1915 Charles W. Hubbard 225.00 

1908 Mrs. John H. Sturgis 10.00 

Subscribers to Orthopedic Ward . . 38,577.72 

Luther Farnham 466.63 

19f>9 Cash 1.00 

C. 0. Brewster 12.00 

George F. Parkman 50,000.00 

J. P. Reynolds, Jr 50.00 

1909-1915 Francis Skinner 12,000.00 

1910 T. C. Thatcher 25.00 

Howard Child ' . . 25.00 

George W. Boyd 2,000.00 

Carried fonoard $4,271,090.31 

36 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $4,271,090.31 

IfllO Mrs. Frances R. Jones 35.00 

1910-1911 Charity Contest — Henry Siegel Co, . 30.00 

1910 Mrs. G. W. W. Dorr 25.00 

Ellen T. Emerson 10.00 

William J. Cliever 8,110.95 

1910-1913 John E. Atkins 89,420.08 

1910 George De.xter 10,000.00 

Mrs. Frederick C. Shattuck . . . 300.00 

R. M. Burden 50.00 

1910-1915 Lucy F. Simmons 4,957.04 

1911^1914 Miss M. L. Blake 75.00 

1911 John Ashton 22,170.47 

E. C. Lee 500.00 

Vicomtesse Treilhard 400.00 

Harvey H. Baker 10.00 

Lionel Norman 9.00 

Dr. Frederick C. Shattuck .... 200.00 
Estate of Joseph G. Dalton, by A. P. 

Loring . . . . • 1,000.00 

Thomas J. Knudsen 4.00 

1912-1915 ]Mrs. Edwin S. Webster .... 75.00 

1912 Dorothy King and Olivia Churchill . 1.00 

Victor Govignon 50.00 

Pedro Tosea . 10.00 

Dr. E. M. Vrooman 10.00 

Drs. Wasener and Tongs .... 40.00 

Paul W. Reimer ....... 1.00 

Josephine Pitman 2.00 

Rosamond Clark 2.00 

Oliver S. Roberts 3.00 

Henry H. Hills 100.00 

Clara Barton Fund 3,241.00 

1913-1915 F. W. Hunnewell, 2d 60.00 

1913 Edward W. Grew 20.00 

Mr. Countwav 1.00 

1913-1915 L Tucker Burr 50.00 

1913 Charles T. Lovering 30 00 

A former Out-Patient 2.00 

Miss Mary Thomas 10.00 

Francis I. Amory 100.00 

1913-1915 Mrs. Harcourt Amory 150.00 

1913 Mrs. Peter C. Brooks 50 00 

1913-1915 Mrs. Stephen S. FitzGerald . . . 30.00 

1913-1914 Frank E. Langley 30.00 

1913 Josef Henrik Jolmsan 5.00 

A Friend . 25.00 

1913-1914 Humane Society of Commonwealtb 

of Massachusetts 700.00 

1913 Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Eustis . ... 1000 

Mrs. Henrv S. Grew 1,000 00 

1913-1914 Mehitable C. C. Wilson 543.75 

1913 Anonymous 2.00 

Mrs. 'f. a. Eustis 10.00 

Theodore Mendelstein 5.00 

The Ninety-Five Sewing Circle . . 20.00 

Rosa A. Mulrey 1.00 

Miss Marjorie B.. van Wickle . . . 50.00 

Carried forward $4,414,849.20 

37 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought foricard $4,414,840.20 

1913 Mrs. W. Scott Fitz 1,000.00 

Subscribers for Nurses' Home: 

($92,880.31) 

Mrs. Andrew C. Wheelwright . . 20.000.00 

Kathaniel Thayer 50,000.00 

Shepherd Brooks 5,000.00 

Ladies' Advisory Committee of the 

Training School for Nurses . . 14,000.00 
In memory of Mrs. Samuel Tor- 

rey Morse 1,000.00 

Interest accrued 2,880.31 

1914 Edith L. Coolidge 748.03 

J. M. Crafts 20.00 

Edward B. Adams 10.00 

A Friend 5.00 

1914-1915 Mrs. S. Parkman Blake .... 100.00 

1914 Mrs. Caroline B. Allen 5,000.00 

H. M. Sears, F. C. Welch and R. E. 
Bullard, Executors u/w of Francis 

Bartlett 10,000.00 

1914-1915 Edward B. Alford 40.00 

1914 Mrs. William P. McKenzie . . . 5.00 

Emily Whiting 5.00 

Anne^ W. Davis 9,030.70 

Mrs. Warren P. B. Weeks .... 25.00 

Out-Patient 1.00 

Mary A. Conlin 10.00 

Francis Skinner, Sr 43,308.95 

Miss Helen Cudahy 500.00 

Anonymous 1.00 

Mrs. Eliza Dean 5.00 

William H. Blacar . . . . . 2.50 

George Wiarglesworth 2,500.00 

1915 Mrs. David^K. Horton 15.00 

Arthur A. Carey 5.00 

Lawson Frederick Cartter .... 50.00 

Miss A. F. Manning 10.00 

Mrs. F. S. Mead 5.00 

Mrs. Alex. S. Porter, Jr 25.00 

W. P. B. Weeks 25.00 

Anonymous .08 

F. G.' Curtis 25.00 

Charles R. Lawrence 5,000.00 

Mrs. Gertrude Hunter 2.00 

Anonymous 3.00 

Dr. William E. Reed . . . . . 9.22 

Anonymous 3.00 

' Henry Lyman 200.00 

Anonymous 50,000.00 

Anonymous 5.00 

W. H. Williams 6.00 

Out-patient 3.00 

Martin J. Foley 1.00 

Everett Morss 100.00 

Miss Lois W. Clarke 5.00 

Annie L. Conley . 5.00 

Salvatore Maschera 3.00 



Carried foricard .... $4,635,551.99 

38 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought foricard $4,635,551.99 

1915 Caroline L. W. French 50,138.89 

Misag Azzigian on-'^o 

1811-1915 Subscribers to Free Beds (Annual) <55,30o.03 

Total Unrestricted Gifts to this Fund, 

1811-1915 inclusive $5,441,000.91 

Profits from Real Estate, Stocks and 

Bonds, etc., etc 1,554,653.18 

$6,995,654.09 
Withdrawals from this Fund repre- 
senting annual excess of expenses 
over receipts at Hospitals, and other 
adjustments, 1811-1915, inclusive 2,591,578.13 

Balance now to credit of this Fund . $4,404,075.96 



39 



Report of the Treasurer. 



MASSACHUSETTS GE:NERAL HOSPITAL. 



RESTEICTED FUNDS TOE, THE GENERAL HOSPITAL. 
INCOME DEVOTED TO FREE BEDS. 

1825 The Davis Fund, a bequest from Mrs. 

Eleanor Davis $900.00 

1827 William Phillips Fund, a bequest 

from William Phillips . . . 5,000.00 
1830 Belknap Fund, a bequest from 

Jeremiah Belknap .... 10,000.00 

1841 Brimmer Fund, a bequest from 

Miss Mary Ann Brimmer . . 5,000.00 

1842 Tucker Fund, a bequest from 

Miss Margaret Tucker . . . 3,312.37 

1849 Williams Fund, a bequest from 

John D. Williams, of Estate 
No. 17 Blackstone Street . . 19,600.00 
Nichols Fund, a bequest from 

B. R. Nichols 6,000.00 

1850 Todd Fund, a bequest from Henry 

Todd 5,000.00 

1851 Wilder Fund, a bequest from 

Chas. W. Wilder . $12,000.00 
1912 and a bequest from 

Florence Elizabeth 
Wilder, his grand- 
daughter . . . 1,000.00 13,000.00 

1856 Bromfield Fund, half of a bequest 

from John Bromfield . . . 20,000.00 
Wm. Reed Fund, a bequest from 

Wm. Reed 5,233.92 

1857 Treadvvell Fund, part of a be- 

quest from J. G. Treadwell . 38,703.91 

1858 Dowse Fund, a bequest from 

Thomas Dowse 5,000.00 

1858-1897' Sawyer Fund, part of a bequest 

from M. P. Sawyer .... 76,966.19 

1859 Tliompson Fund, a bequest from 

S. B. Thompson .... 500.00 

1860 J. Phillips Fund, a bequest from 

Jonathan Phillips .... 10,000.00 

1862 Miss Townsend Fund, a donation 

from the executors of the will 

of Miss Mary P. Townsend . 11,486.50 

1863 Pickens Fund, a bequest from 

John Pickens 1,676.75 

Percival Fund, a bequest from 

John Percival 950.00 

1864 Greene Fund, a bequest from 

Benj. D. Greene .... 5,000.00 

1865 Sever Fund, a bequest from Miss 

Martha Sever 500.00 

Carried forward $243,829.64 

40 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward .... $243,829.64 
1865 The Raymond Fund, a bequest from 

E. A. Raymond 2,820.00 

1868 Harris Fund, part of a bequest 

from Cliarles Harris . . . 1,000.00 
Mason Fimd, a bequest from 

Wm. P. Mason 9,400.00 

Loring Fund, a bequest from 

Abigail Loring 5,000.00 

1868-1875 Miss Shaw Fund, a donation and 
bequest from Miss M. Louisa 
Shaw 5,500.00 

1871 J. L. Gardner Fund, a donation 

from J. L. Gardner .... 20,000.00 
B. T. Reed Fund, a donation from 

Benj. T. Reed 1,000.00 

Read Fund, half of a bequest from 

James Read 1,000.00 

1872 McGregor Fund, half of a dona- 

tion and bequest from James 

McGregor 7,500.00 

Joy Fund, a bequest from Miss 

Nabby Joy 20,000.00 

1873 Parker Fund, a bequest from 

Jonathan Parker, Jr. . . . 10,000.00 

1874 Templeton Fund, half of a be- 

quest from John Templeton . 5,000.00 
Miss Rice Fund, a bequest from 

Miss Arabella Rice .... 5,000.00 
Mrs. J. H. Rogers Fund, a dona- 
tion from J. H. Rogers . . 1,177.50 

1876 Beebe Fund, a bequest from J. M. 

Beebe 50,000.00 

Lincoln Fund, half of a bequest 

from Mrs. F. W. Lincoln . . 85,000.00 

1877 Blanchard Fund, a bequest from 

Mrs. M. B. Blanchard . . . 4,000.00 

George Gardner Fund, a donation 
of $1,000 from George Gard- 
ner, and $11,000 from Shep- 
herd Brooks 12,000.00 

Hemenway Fund, a donation from 
the executors of the will of 
Augustus Hemenway . . . 20,000.00 

Jessup Fund, part of a bequest 

from Dr. Chas. A. Jessup . . 1,000.00 

Tufts Fund, a bequest from 

Quincy Tufts 10,000.00 

1878 Eliza Perkins Fund, a donation 

from Mrs. H. B. Rogers . . 1,000.00 
Ihvight Fund, a donation from 

Mrs. T. Bradford Dwight . . 1,000.00 

1879 Hunnewell Fund, a donation from 

H. H. Hunnewell .... 10,000.00 
R. M. Mason Fund, a bequest ' 

from- R. JL Mason . . . 5,000.00 
Hannah Lowell Cabot Fund, a do- 
nation from i)r. Samuel Cabot 1,000.00 



Carried forward .... $538,227.14 

41 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought foricard $538,227.14 

1879 The Gray Fund, a donation from 

John C. Gray 1,000.00 

1881 Welles Fund, a donation from 

Miss Jane Welles .... 5,000.00 

1882 Black Fund, a bequest from Miss 

Marianna Black 2,000.00 

Eben Wright Fund, an assignment 
of legacies by the children of 
T. Jefferson Coolidge . . . 14,000.00 

1883 Paraclete Holmes Fund, a dona- 

tion from W. S. Adams . . 2,000.00 
Estabrooks Fund, a bequest from 

J. W. Estabrooks .... 1,000.00 
Thayer Fund, a bequest from 

Nathaniel Thayer .... 30,000.00 

1884 John Bertram Fund, a donation 

from Mrs. Clara Bertram 

Kimball 5,000.00 

D. R. Whitney Fund, a donation 

of D. R. Whitney .... 1,000.00 
Ann E. Gray Fund, a bequest 

from Miss Ann E. Gray . . 5,000.00 

1886 Hannah C. Leiand Fund, a be- 

quest from Mrs. Hannah C. 

Leiand 15,000.00 

Esther E. Beebe Fund, a bequest 

from Mrs. Esther E. Beebe . 2,000.00 
Ella F. Roehl Fund, a bequest 

from Ella F. Roehl .... 8,085.02 
Donations from friends, two of 

$100 each and one of $50 . . . 250.00 
Urbino Fund, a bequest of S. R. 

Urbino 6,000.00 

1887 Emily W. Appleton Fund, a dona- 

tion from Mrs. Emily W. 

Appleton 1,000.00 

Henry B. Rogers Fund, a bequest 

from Henry B. Rogers . . . 10,000.00 
John H. Eastburn Fund, a be- 
quest from John H. Eastburn 10,000.00 
Mrs. Susan F. Eastburn Fund,_ a 

bequest from Mrs. Susan F. 

Eastburn 1,000.00 

William B. Craft Fund, a bequest 

from William B. Craft . . . 5,000.00 

1888 McGregor Fund, a bequest of 

Mrs. James McGregor . . . 1,000.00 

Charles R. Hayden Fund, a dona- 
tion from Mrs. Annie Ruth 
Hayden 2,000.00 

Spaulding Fund, a donation of 
Mahlon D. and John P. 
Spaulding 10,000.00 

Anna T. Phillips Fund, a dona- 
tion of Mrs. Anna T. Phillips 1,000.00 

Joel Spaulding Fund, a donation 

of Miss Sarah R. Spaulding . 3,000.00 



Carried forward .... $679,562.16 
42 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought foricard $679,562.16 

1889 The Bartlett Fund, a bequest of Sid- 

ney Bartlett 10,000.00 

Jas. B. and Mary Dow Fund, a 

gift of Mary Dow, under the 

will of James B. Dow . . . 5,000.00 
Shattuck Fund, a donation of 

Mrs. George C. Shattuck . . 500.00 

1890 Elisha T. Loring Fund, a bequest 

of Elisha T. Loring .... 10,000.00 
Ellen M. Gifford Fund, part of 

bequest of Ellen M. Gifford . 10,000.00 
Turner Sargent Fund, a bequest 

of Amelia Jackson Sargent . 5,000.00 
Sarah E. Allen Fund, a bequest 

of Sarah E. Allen .... 5,000.00 
Jordan, Marsh and Co. Fund, a 

donation of Jordan, Marsh and 

Co 1,000.00 

Wm. S. Dexter Fund, a donation 

of Wm. S. Dexter .... 5,000.00 
Wm. B. Spooner Fund, a bequest 

of Wm. B. Spooner .... 3,000.00 

1891 Caroline Merriam Fund, a dona- 

tion from Frank Merriam . . 1,000.00 

1892 Stephen P. H. May Fund . . . 1,000.00 

1893 Waldmeyer Fund, a bequest of 

Philip Waldmeyer .... 1,000.00 
Elizabeth W. Gay Fund, a be- 
quest of Elizabeth W. Gay . 7,931.19 

1894 Lawrence Fund, a bequest of 

Abbott Lawrence .... 10,000.00 
Isaac Sweetser Fund, a bequest of 

Mrs. Anne M. Sweetser . 46,913.14 

1895 Burnham Fund, a bequest of 

T. 0. H. P. Burnham . . . 250,000.00 
Moseley Fund, a bequest of Wm. 

O. Moseley 20,000.00 

Snow Fund, a bequest of Sophia 

J. Snow 5,000.00 

1896 Glover Fund, a bequest of Albert 

Glover 5,000.00 

R. W. Turner Fund, a bequest of 

Royal W. Turner .... 21,086.48 
Coolidge Fund, a bequest of Susan 

G. Coolidge 176,000.00 

Vose Fund, half of a bequest of 

Ann White Vose 38,983.09 

Cheney Fund, a bequest of B. P. 

Cheney 10,000.00 

Mary B. Turner Fund, a bequest 

of' Mary B. Turner .... 5,000.00 
Theodore Chase Fund, a donation 

of Alice Bowdoin Chase . . 5,000.00 
Henrv E. Moody Fund, a bequest 

of Jane C. IMoody .... 2,091.42 

1897 Benj. Jos. Gilbert Fund, a dona- 

tion of Mrs. Susan B'. Richards 5,000.00 



Carried forward .... $1,345,067.48 

43 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward ... . $1,345,067.48 

1897 The Harriet T. Andrew Fund, a be- 

quest of Harriet T. Andrew . 5,000.00 

Wm. Hilton Fund, a bequest of 

Wm. Hilton 22,553.66 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer Fund, a be- 
quest of Mrs. C. V. R. Thayer 25,000.00 

Chas. Paine Cheney Fund, a dona- 
tion of Mrs. B. P. Cheney . . 5,000.00 

Chas. B. Porter Fund, a bequest 

of W. L. Chase 5,000.00 

1898 Henry L. Pierce Fund, part of a 

bequest of Henry L. Pierce . 50,000.00 
Brown Fund, a bequest of Harriet 

Louisa Bro^^Ti 5,000.00 

1899 Luther Farnura Fund, a bequest 

of Luther Farnum .... 2,637.37 
J. Huntington Wolcott Fund, a 

bequest of Mrs. J. Huntington 

Wolcott 25,000.00 

Geo. A. Newell Fund, a bequest 

of Geo. A. Newell .... 5,000.00 
Ira C. Calef Fund, a donation of 

Ira C. Calef 5,000.00 

1900 J. Collins Warren Fund, a bequest 

of Anna S. C. Blake . . . 10,000.00 

1901 Henry Saltonstall Fund, a be- 

quest of Henry Saltonstall . 10,000.00 
Conrad Mohr Fund, a bequest of 

Conrad Mohr 41,384.18 

Sarah H. A. Burnham Fund, a 

donation of Mrs. Sarah B. 

Whitteraore and Mrs. Theresa 

B. Dodge 5,000.00 

Chas. L. Young Fund, a bequest 

of Chas. L. Young .... 5,000.00 

1902 Henry Woods Fund, a bequest of 

Henry Woods 5,000.00 

Henry Whitman Fund, a bequest 

of Henry Whitman .... 10,000.00 
Jos. B. Glover Fund, a bequest of 

Jos. B. Glover 5,000.00 

Stuart Wadsworth Wheeler Fund, 

a donation of Susan Farnum 

Wheeler 1,000.00 

Wm. Whitworth Gannett Fund, 

a donation of Wm. Whitworth 

Gannett 1,000.00 

1903 Fred'k L. Ames Fund, a bequest 

of Mrs. Fred'k L. Ames . . 5,000.00 
John Ruggles Fund, a bequest of 

Mrs. Mary L. Rnggles . . . 10,000.00 
Robert Chas. Billings Fund, a 
donation of Thomas Minns, 
surviving executor under the 
will of Robert Chas. Billings 5,000.00 
J. Sullivan Warren Fund, Legacy 

of Elizabeth T. L. Warren . . 62,350.00 



Carried forward .... $1,675,992.69 
44 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $1,675,992.69 

1904 The Chas. H. Hayden Fund, part of 

a bequest of Chas. H. Hayden 5,000.00 
1904-1915 Harriet 0. Cruft Fund, a dona- 
tion and bequest of Miss Har- 
riet 0. Cruft 33,000.00 

1904 Shepard Xorwell Fund, a dona- 

tion of John Shepard . . . 5,000.00 

1905 Henry C. Weston Fund, a dona- 

tion of Mrs. Evelyn 0. Weston 5,000.00 
Geo. B. Upton Fund, a bequest of 

Geo. B. Upton 5,000.00 

Hannah Smith-Lexington Fund, a 

bequest of George 0. Smith . 5,000.00 

1906 Coburn Fund, a bequest of Mrs. 

Helen G. Coburn .... 75,000.00 
Nurses' Training School, Free 

Bed Fund 5,000.00 

1907 Charles Merriam Fund, a bequest 

of Charles Merriam . . . 5,000.00 

1908 Moses Williams Fund, a dona- 

tion of Laura L. Case . . . 5,000.00 
Smith and Sarah A. Gerrish 
Fund, a bequest of Edward 

Gerrish 8,000.00 

Harriet 0. Cruft Fund, a dona- 
tion of Miss Harriet 0. Cruft, 
as a Children's Fund . . . 5,000.00 
W. Scott Fitz Fund, a donation 

of Mrs. W. Scott Fitz . . . 5,000.00 
1910-1914 Florence Lyman Fund, a bequest 

of Florence Lyman .... 3,891.41 

1910 Eugene V. R. Thayer Fund, a be- 

quest in memory of Eugene 

V. R. Thayer 5,000.00 

Lucius Clapp Fund, a bequest of 

Lucius Clapp 5,000.00 

Thomas Niles Fund, a bequest of 

Thomas Niles 29,281.67 

William Litchfield Fund, a be- 
quest of William Litchfield . 5,000.00 

Charles H. Draper Fund, a be- 
quest qf Charles H. Draper . 23,934.13 

1911 James Rogers Rich Fund, a be- 

quest of James Rogers Rich . 1,000.00 

Mrs. Bennett H. Nash Fund, a do- 
nation of Mrs. Bennett H. Nash 5,000.00 

Frances Fay and Arthur Kelsey 
Fay Memorial Fund, a dona- 
tion of James H. Fay . . . 1,000.00 

Catherine A. Barstow Fund, a be- 
quest of Catherine A. Barstow 10,000.00 

Mary E. Badger Fund, a bequest 

of Mary E. Badger .... 2,000.00 

Thomas Talbot Fund, a bequest 

of Isabella W. Talbot . . . 5,000.00 

1912 Matchett Fund, a bequest of Mrs. 

Sarah A. Mattihett .... 25,000.00 



Carried forward 



.$1,963,099.90 



45 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward . . $1,963,099.90 

1912 The Waite Memorial Bed, a bequest 

of Harriet E. Goodnow . . 5,091.67 
Caroline M. Martin Fund, a be- 
quest of Caroline M. Martin . 5,094.94 

1913 John S. Ames Fund, a donation 

of John S. Ames .... 5,000.00 

Marv Stieknev Fund, a bequest 

of"^Mar.y Spaulding .... 5,000.00 

George N. Smalley Fund, a be- 
quest of George N. Smalley . 5,000.00 
1914-1915 Wiliam S. Hills Fund, a bequest 

of William S. Hills .... 10,090.00 
1915 Esther Storey Fund, a bequest of 

Joseph C. Storey .... 5,000.00 

Jane Elkins Fund, a bequest of 

Joseph C. Storey .... 5,000.00 

William N. Felton Fund, a be- 
quest of William N. Felton . 5,000.00 

Jennie A. Pond Fund, a donation 

of H. D. Woods 5,250.00 

Susan Welles Sturgis Fund, a be- 
quest of John A'iken Preston . 5,000.00 

$2,023,536.51 

INCGI^IE UNRESTRICTED. 

1845 The Waldo Fund, bequest of Daniel 

Waldo $40,000.00 

1889 Blake Fund, a bequest of Stanton 

Blake 10,000.00 

1892 Charles W. Faulkner Fund, be- 

quest of C. W. Faulkner . . 2,940.00 

1897 John Foster Fund, bequest of 

John Foster 10,000.00 

1898 Elizabeth C. Ware Fund, bequest 

of Elizabeth C. Ware . . . 10,000.00 

1901 Lucretia A. Wilder Fund, a be- 

quest of Lucretia A. Wilder . 9,377.64 
Roger Woleott Fund, bequest of 

Roger Woleott 5,000.00 

1915 Arthur T. Lvman Fund, a dona- 

tion of Arthur T. Lyman . . 10,000.00 



97,317.64 



INCOME DEVOTED TO ANY PURPOSE 
EXCEPT BUILDINGS. 



1862-1872 Tlie Redman Fund, a bequest from 

John Redman 455,113.34 



CHESTER H. DAVIS FUND. 

1903 For Crippled Children, a bequest 

of Chester H. Davis .... 20,000.00 



Total Restricted Fund . . $2,595,967.49 

46 



Report of the Treasurer. 

McLean hospital fund. 

1830 The Joseph Lee Fund, a donation of 

Joseph Lee, as heir of Francis 

Lee 20,000.00 

1843 Appleton Fund, a bequest of 

$10,010 from Samuel Apple- 

1854 ton and a donation of $20,000 

1862 from William Appleton . . 30,010.00 

1851 Bromfield Fund, half of a bequest 

from John Bromfield . . . 20,000.00 

1858 Austin Fund, part of a bequest 

from Mrs. Agnes Austin . . 5,000.00 

1859 Kittredge Fund, a bequest from 

Rufus Kittredge 5,500.00 

1870 Amusement Fund, $5,000 bequest 

of Miss Mary Louise Shaw; 
1875 $5,000 donation of Mrs. Quincy 

A. Shaw and other ladies . . 10,000.00 

1871 Read Fund, half of a bequest 

from James Read .... 1,000.00 

1872 McGregor Fund, half of a dona- 

tion and bequest from James 

IMcGregor 7,500.00 

1874 Templeton Fund, half of a bequest 

from John Templeton . . . 5,000.00 
1876 Lincoln Fund, half of a bequest 

from Mrs. F. W. Lincoln . . 85,000.00 
1885 Proctor Fund, a bequest from 

Mrs. Lydia P. Proctor . . 1,000.00 

1888 Hibbard Occupation Fund . . 1,000.00 

1889 Higginson Fund, a bequest from 

George Higginson .... 10,000.00 

1890 Ellen M. Gifford Fund, part of a 

bequest from Ellen M. Gifford 5,000.00 

1895 Matchett Fund, a donation of 

Sarah A. Matchett .... 15,000.00 
Thomas E. Proctor Fund for 

maintenance of buildings . . 30,000.00 

1896 Vose Fund, half of a bequest of 

Ann White Vose 38,983.09 

1897 Bradlee Fund, part of a donation 

from Helen C. Bradlee . . . 50,000.00 

1900 Abbott Fund, a bequest of Mar- 
shall K. Abbott 2,500.00 

1904 Fund for Department of Scientific 
Research, a donation of Sarah 
A. Matchett 5,000.00 

1906 Samuel Eliot Memorial Chapel 
Fund for maintenance of 
Chapel 10,904.84 

1909 George F. Parkman Fund, part of 
a bequest of George F. Park- 
man 50,000.00 

Elizabeth B. INTaxwell Fund, a be- 
quest of Elizabeth B. Maxwell 1,030.00 
Mercy A. Bailey Fund, a bequest 

of Mercy A. Bailey .... 5,500.00 

Carried foricard .$414,927.93 

47 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward .... $414,927.93 

1911 The Martha R. Hunt Fund, to be used 
for the entertainment of pa- 
tients at McLean Hospital . . 10,135.00 

1912-1915 Matcliett Memorial Fund, part of 

a bequest of Sarah A. Matchett 73,376.05 

1913 Sarah E. Cazenove Fund, a be- 
quest of Sarah E. Cazenove . 63,784.36 

Total McLean Hospital Fund . $562,223.34 

CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL FUND, 

1879 Sundry Donors (through Miss 

Russell) $3,446.00 

Executors of George 0. Hovey . . 2,000.00 

1880 Sundry Donors (through Miss 

Russell) 2,513.00 

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Ware .... 1,000.00 

Mrs. Sarah S. Fay 1,000.00 

J. L. Gardner 1,000.00 

Mrs. E. B. Bowditch 1,000.00 

H. B. Rogers 1,000.00 

Anne S. Hooper 1,000.00 

E. Pierson Beebe and Mrs. Beebe . . 1,000.00 

W. S. Bullard 500.00 

Samuel W. Swett 500.00 

William Amory 500.00 

C. H. Dalton '. 500.00 

Chas. P. Curtis 500.00 

T. K. Lothrop 500.00 

H. L. Higginson 300.00 

F. L. Higginson 300.00 

0. W. Peabodv 250 00 

J. R. Hall ". 200.00 

George Dexter 200.00 

]\Irs. JMary M. McGregor .... 200.00 

Mrs. Frank Morison 200.00 

Eliza Goodwin 150.00 

Friends 2,050.00 

]\Irs. Augustus Hemenway . . . 100.00 

T. G. Appleton 100.00 

J. R. Coolidge 100.00 

H. P. Kidder and C. J, Morrill, 

Trustees 3,713.85 

Margaret Curtis account Mrs. C. P. 

Curtis, Senior 25.00 

D. F. Appleton 50.00 

1881 Sundry Donors (through Miss 

Russell) 3,750.83 

C. J. Morrill and Friend, one-half 

each 5,000.00 

Moses Williams 1,000.00 

A. T. Lyman 200.00 

A. Cochrane 250.00 

J. C. Gray 300.00 

B. Schlessinger 500.00 

Carried forward $36,898.68 

48 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward .... $36,898.68 

1881 Henry Saltonstall 500.00 

Mrs. P. C. Brooks 300.00 

T. J. Coolidge 300.00 

Mrs. J. B. H. James 100.00 

R. P. Wainwright 50.00 

Ezra H. Baker 500.00 

William S. Houghton 1,000.00 

Elijah Smith 500.00 

Mrs. Samuel Cabot 100.00 

Charles Merriam 100.00 

Caroline Merriam 100.00 

W. G. Weld 250.00 

Mrs. Theodore Chase, Sr 50.00 

Miss Cochrane (musical) . . . 500.00 

Alice M. Longfellow and sister . . 1,000.00 

Leopold Morse 50.00 

Samuel Eliot 500.00 

Eliza Ashton \ , ni,„^i„, -p r„,f;a 500.00 

A Bostonian / ^^ Charles P. Curtis g^Q qq 

W. E. Bright 200.00 

G. A. NickLTSon 200.00 

S. R. Payson 300.00 

George C. Richardson 300.00 

Edward Austin 500.00 

Charles P. Hemenway . ... 250.00 

Nathaniel Thayer . . ... 20,000.00 

H. P. Kidder 5,000.00 

J. L. Bremer 1,000.00 

Henry Lee - . 1,000.00 

Martin Brimmer 300.00 

Miss Anne Wigglesworth .... 300.00 

Quincy A. Shaw 5,000.00 

F. H.'Peabody 500.00 

S. B. Rindge 500.00 

S. D. Warren 2,000.00 

Elisha Atkins 500.00 

H. H. Hunnewell 10,000.00 

Nevins & Co 500.00 

W. Endifott. Jr 2,500.00 

Henry Woods ....... 1,000.00 

Samuel Johnson . 500.00 

R. C. Greenleaf ....... 500.00 

Henry Endieott 100.00 

1882 Ezra Farnsworth ". 500.00 

W. C. Grover 1,000.00 

Josejdi B. Glover 100.00 

Sundry Donors (through Miss 

Russell) 450.00 

Miss Anne Wigglesworth .... 100.00 

Frank L. Ames 3,000.00 

Cornelia Dehon 75.00 

1883 Jerome G. Kidder, bequest . . . 15,000.00 

1884 Samuel W. Swett, bequest 50,000.00 

1885 "Francis," donation 20.00 

1886 George A. Gardner, donation . . . 5,000.00 
Miss Mary Russell, donation . . . 40.00 

1888 Elizabeth *B. I. B. Dixwell, bequest . 1,000.00 



Carried forward 



$173,033.68 



49 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward .... $173,033.68 

1889-1895 Miss Helen C. Bradlee, donation . . 1,300.00 

1892 Elizabeth B. Bowditch, bequest . . 5,000.00 

1893 Mrs. Isaac Sweetser, in memory of 

Dr. Edw. H. Clarke, donation . . 1,000.00 

1912 Julia M. Moseley, bequest . . . 6,190.47 



$186,524.15 
Cost of Building 34,713.02 



Total Convalescent Hospital Fund $151,811.13 



DR. J. H. WHITTEMORE MEMORIAL FUND. 

1886 William S. Bullard $500.00 

Peter C. Brooks 200.00 

Martin Brimmer 300.00 

Arthur T. Lyman 250.00 

Geo. P. Metcalf 100.00 

Benton, Caverly & Co 100.00 

B. Johnson 100.00 

A Friend 1,000.00 

David P. Kimball 500.00 

T. Jefferson Coolidge 500.00 

James L. Little . . . . . . . 100.00 

Caroline G. Curtis 100.00 

Theodore Lyman 100.00 

E. F. Mason 100.00 

T. K. Lothrop . 500.00 

C. J. Morrill 1,000.00 

George Hisginson 5,000.00 

Edmund Dwight 1,000.00 

S. D. Warren 1,000.00 

Mrs. J. E. Lodge 100.00 

Dr. Charles V. Bemis 50.00 

George S. Hale 50.00 

Miss Anne Wigglesworth .... 500.00 

H. H. Hunnevvell 1,500.00 

J. A. Emmons 500.00 

Mrs. Gardiner Brewer 100.00 

Miss C. A. Brewer 20.00 

Mrs. E. B. Bowditch 500.00 

Sands, Furber & Co 100.00 

J. B. Fletcher 100.00 

Sliattuck & Jones 100.00 

D. R. Whitney 100.00 

Nathan Robbins 100.00 

William Perkins 100.00 

Chas. P. Curtis 100.00 

Otis E. Weld 500.00 

Ida M. Mason 100.00 

George B. Brown 50.00 

A Friend 50.00 

A Friend, through Mr. Endicott . . 100.00 

John L. Bremer 500.00 

Miss Anna Hallowell 100.00 

N. P. Hallowell 100.00 



Carried forward $17,970.00 

50 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $17,970.00 

1886 G. W. Wales 100.00 

A Ladv, tlirough Mr. Dalton . . . 50.00 

Frankiin Haven, Jr 100.00 

Charles Meiriam lUO.OO 

Edward Austin 300.00 

C. H. Dalton 300.00 

Mrs. C. H. Dalton 50.00 

Augustus Lowell 250.00 

Henry Saitonstall 200.00 

Mrs. G. H. Sliaw . . . . . . 100.00 

Mrs. Frank Morison 50.00 

Mrs. J. H. Wolcott ...... 100.00 

Mrs. W. W. Vaughan 250.00 

R. T. Paine 200.00 

Francis Blake 100.00 

Roger Wolcott 100.00 

Henry Lee 500.00 

A. A. Lawrence 300.00 

William Endicott, Jr 1,000.00 

Henry Woods 500.00 

Ezra Farnsworth 1,000.00 

Ihomas E. Proctor 500.00 

Henry B. Rogers 500.00 

INIary Anne Wales 200.00 

]\lrs. James McGregor . . . . . 100.00 

Mrs. Caroline Merriam .... 100.00 

Mrs. J. Elliot Cabot 1,000.00 

J. M. Sears 1.000.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 1,500.00 

John E. Thaver . 1.000.00 

Bayard Thayer 1,000.00 

E. V. R. Thayer 500.00 

Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer 500.00 

Mrs. J. F. Andrews 500.00 

R. C. Greenleaf 1,000.00 

Samuel Johnson 500.00 

Mrs. Francis Brooks 100.00 

J. H. Wolcott 100.00 



$33,720.00 
SAMUEL CABOT FUND FOR PATHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION. 

1888 Donation of Samuel Cabot and Dr. 

Arthur T. Cabot. Income devoted 
to salary of Surgical Pathologist . $10,000.00 

JOHN CALL DALTON AND EDWARD BARRY DALTON FUND. 

1891-1909 A donation from Charles H. and 
Henry R. Dalton. Income devoted 
to Investigation in the Science of 
Medicine $25,000.00 

PATHOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND RANDALL FUNDS. 

1895 Fanny G. Villiard $1,000.00 

Charles U. Cotting . " 500.00 

Carried forward $1,500.00 

51 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $1,500.00 

1895 Thomas Nelson 200.00 

A. S. Bigelow 500.00 

William S. Bullard 500.00 

Henry C. Weston 500.00 

" A Western Friend " (J. M. Forbes) . 5,000.00 

R. H. White 1,000.00 

Wallace L. Pierce 500.00 

Caleb A. Curtis 500.00 

Charles Merriam 500.00 

Elizabeth R. Cabot 200.00 

Elizabeth C. Ware 100.00 

John C. Ropes 100.00 

George G. Kennedy 1,000.00 

J. Morris Meredith 100.00 

William Powell Mason 1,000.00 

' W. B. Thomas 500.00 

Mrs. F. L. Ames 5,000.00 

Miss Mary S. Ames 1,000.00 

Thomas Wigglesvvorth 1,000.00 

H. H. Hunnewell 10,000.00 

John L. Gardner 1,000.00 

1896 C. W. Amory 500.00 

Mrs. S. D. Warren 5,000.00 

Augustus Lowell 1,000.00 

Henry Lee 1,000.00 

T. Jefferson Coolidge 1,000.00 

Henry L. Pierce 5,000.00 

Charles Head 1,000.00 

Martin Brimmer 1,000.00 

Dr. Charles G. Weld ...... 5,000.00 

O. H. Alford 500.00 

John A. Burnham 500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Scott Fitz . . . 1,000.00 

Oliver Ames 1,000.00 

D. L. Pickman 200.00 

W. D. Sohier 100.00 

George F. Fabyan 1,000.00 

Miss A. P. Rogers 500.00 

A Friend 400.00 

Mrs. W. D. Pickman 1,000.00 

Frank Simpson ....... 1,000.00 

A. A. Lawrence 500.00 

E. Pierson Beebe 1,000.00 

J. Reed Whipple 500.00 

A. Hemenway 1,000.00 

W. H. Forbes 500.00 

Mrs. Frank Merriam 500.00 

Mrs. William C. Loring .... 1,000.00 

Estate of Eben D. Jordan .... 5,000.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 1,000.00 

Mrs. J. N. Fiske 1,000.00 

Through Dr. A. T. Cabot .... 100.00. 

Through Dr. Chas. B. Porter . . . 100.00 

W. Sturgis Bigelow 2,500.00 

Anna S. C. Prince 1.000.00 

Wm. Endicott, Jr 5,000.00 

Interest on Fund added .... 1,947.02 



Carried forward $82,047.02 

52 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward .... $82,047.02 

1897 Henry M. Whitney 1,000.00 

Children of Samuel Parkman . . . 2,000.00 

Laurence Minot 100.00 

Mrs. Henry S. Grew 500.00 

George Wigglesworth 100.00 

William Minot 100.00 

A. Hemenway 1,000.00 

Miss A. P. Carey 500.00 

Allen Danforth 100.00 

1912 Mrs. Mary Upham Johnson, a bequest 3,201.32 

Pathological Fund $90,648.34 

Apparatus and Equipment . . 26,772.93 



$63,875.41 
1898 John W. and Belinda L. Randall Fund 20,000.00 



TEAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES FUND. 

1897 C. P. Curtis, Treasurer, for sundry 

donors $18,386.42 

John Foster 5,000.00 

1902 Francis Skinner 1,000.00 

1904 Francis E. Bangs 2,000.00 

William Amory 25.00 

George A. Gardner 2,000.00 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane 100.00 

Mrs. Robert W. Emmons .... 25.00 

Mrs. Larz Anderson 50.00 

Mrs. John L. Bremer 100.00 

Mrs. George F. Fabyan 50.00 

J. Randolph Coolidge 100.00 

H. D. Chapin 10.00 

A Friend 1.00 

Dr. J. F. Burnham 1.00 

Miss Fannie R. Brewer .... 100.00 

F. L. Higginson 100.00 

Mrs. J. B. Case 100.00 

Miss Georgina Lowell 25.00 

Mrs. E. Preble Motley 50.00 

Arthur A. Carey 25.00 

Mrs. Annie L. Woods 100.00 

Thomas Wigglesworth 500.00 

Miss Isabel Fabyan 50.00 

Charles E. Cotting ...... 50.00 

Mrs. B. P. Cheney 50.00 

T. Jefferson Coolidge 500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Thornton K. Lothrop . 500.00 

Charles H. Dalton 100.00 

Mrs. A. W. Blake 50.00 

Miss B. F. Blake 50.00 

Forbes Lithograph Co 10.00 

Mrs. W. Scott Fitz 100.00 

Miss Eliza W. S. Parkman . . . 10.00 

Walter Hunnewell 100.00 

Henry S. Hunnewell 50.00 

Carried forward $31,468.42 

53 



$83,875.41 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought foru-ard .... $31,468.42 

1904 Mrs. V. B. Harrington 10.00 

Miss Mary S. Ames 50.00 

W. 0. Gay 100.00 

Tiie Misses Minot 25.00 

Miss Sarah F. Bremer 50.00 

Stephen Bullard 50.00 

Samuel VV. Rodman 20.00 

Mrs. F. C. Manning 10.00 

Miss M. L. Blake 10.00 

Miss Mary Brandegee 50.00 

Shepherd Brooks 400.00 

0. H. Alford 100.00 

Mrs. Alford 15.00 

Miss Mary Thomas . . . . . . 10.00 

Miss Sarah C. Paine 25.00 

Miss Mary W. Eastman .... 100.00 

Charles VV. Hubbard 25.00 

Mrs. John C. Phillips 50.00 

George F. Fabyan 1,000.00 

Graduate of School 50.00 

Graduate of School 1.00 

1905 Mrs. Algernon Coolidge .... 10.00 

Luce & Manning 25.00 

Mrs. J. T. Eldredge 5.00 

Mrs. William C. Otis 100.00 

Nurses' Alumnae Association . . . 53.50 

Mrs. Mary Lee Ware . . . . . 500.00 

Miss Alice Longfellow 5.00 

John T. Coolidge 100.00 

Mrs. Theodore Lyman 100.00 

Mrs. G. Howland Shaw .... 100.00 

Clement S. Houghton 25.00 

Louis S. Dabney 25.00 

William S. Dexter ...... 200.00 

Thomas P. Beal 50.00 

Francis Skinner 300.00 

Henry Mulliken ....... 500.00 

Mrs. W. S. Bullard 25.00 

Mrs. H. S. Grew 25.00 

Richard H. Weld 25.00 

Mr. and Mrs. George Putnam . . . 200.00 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Thayer .... 2,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Dudley L. Pickman . 100.00 

F. L. Higginson 250.00 

Mrs. G. G. Hammond 100.00 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Sears .... 200.00 

Mrs. Daniel Merriman .... 50.00 

Arthur Amory 5.00 

Mrs. Otis Norcross, Jr 50.00 

Alexander Cochrane 100.00 

Mrs. S. Parkman Blake . . . . " 100.00 

Grant Walker 100.00 

Mrs. J. J. Storrow ...... 10.00 

Mrs. H. H. Fay 25.00 

Miss M. B. Lothrop 50.00 

Francis W. Hunnewell ..... 100.00 

Nathaniel T. Kidder . . ; . . 500.00 

Carried forward $39,732.92 

54 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $39,732.92 

1906 Mrs. Anna D. Blake 50.00 

William P. Blake 50.00 

E. Pierson Beebe 50.00 

Miss Emma Rodman 25.00 

1907 Mrs. R. G. Shaw 50.00 

1909 Mrs. A. Coolidge 10.00 

1912 Henry A. Wyman 5.00 

1913 Miss Harriet W. Barnes .... 50.00 
1915 ■ Graduate of School 200.00 

Miss Louise C. May 80.00 

Miss Susan L. Mills 5.00 

Miss Louie W. Wellington . . . 25.00 

Miss Miss Sara E. Parsons . . . 100.00 

Dr. Benjamin Brown 10.00 

Graduate of School 1.00 



$40,443.92 
EUPHEMIA MILLAR ANNUITY. 
1901 Part of bequest of Euphemia Millar . $1,557.74 

ART ROOM FUND. 



1904 Mrs. Samuel Eliot ...... $500.00 

Sundry Donors and interest added 518.35 



CODIMAN FUND. 

1905 Bequest of Edward W. Codman . .$313,073.91 
Land and Buildings 283,887.53 



$1,018.35 



$29,186.38 



ORTHOPEDIC WARD FUND. 

1906-1907 Nathaniel Thayer $5,000.00 

Bayard Thayer 5,000.00 

Mrs. Lester Leland 5,000.00 

John and W. S. Spaulding and Mrs. 

H. F. King 5,000.00 

Mrs. W. G. Weld 5,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Sears .... 5,000.00 

Mrs. B. P. Cheney 5,000.00 

Augustus Hemenway 3,000.00 

J. L. Bremer 2.448.04 

E. V. R. Thayer 2,500.00 

H. E. Converse 2.500.00 

Miss Mary Ames 2,000.00 

Mrs. Edward D. Brandegee . . . 1,500.00 

Nelson Curtis 1.500.00 

Max Agassiz 1.000.00 

G. L. Peabody 1,000.00 

F. Gordon Dexter 1,000.00 

C. W. Amory 1,000.00 

William Endicott, Jr 1.000.00 

P. L. Saltonstall 1. 000.00 

Samuel Dana 1,000.00 



Carried foricard $57,448.64 

55 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $57,448.64 

1906-1907 Mrs. J. H. Wright 1,000.00 

Lyman Nichols 1,000.00 

Francis Blake 2,000.00 

Miss Elizabeth Cheney 1,000.00 

Mrs. Roger Wolcott, Sr 1,000.00 

John Parkinson 500.00 

Mrs. Peter C. Brooks 250.00 

John Saltonstall 250.00 

John A. Burnham 100.00 

F. P. Sprague 100.00 

W. 0. Gay 100.00 

Wallace L. Pierce 300.00 



$65,048.64 
Building and Equipment .... 38,577.72 

$26,470.92 

CLINICAL LABORATORY FUND. 
1908 Bequest of Mrs. Grace M. Kuhn . $10,000.00 

SUSAN SMITH FUND (ANNUITY). 

1912 Bequest of Susan Smith .... $13,703.98 

NURSES' HOME FUND — McLEAN HOSPITAL. 

1913 Donation of Miss Elizabeth L. Grant $1,000.00 

1914 A Friend 40,000.00 

Sundry Donors (through Mrs. E. 

Stanley Abbot) 13,679.70 

Donation of Miss Sara E. Parsons . 5.00 

1915 Donation of Miss Louise W. Case . 100.00 
Donation of Sundry Donors (through 

jNIrs. E. Stanley Abbot) . . . 

Anonymous 16.00 

Edward B. Field 15.00 

Mrs. A. H. Hews 25.00 

Mrs. Charlotte Nichols Greene . . 10.00 

Mrs. Isabel B. Richardson ... 10.00 

^ $54,860.70 

SARAH PROCTOR JOSLIN FUND. 
1913 Bequest of Sarah Proctor Joslin . . $1,000.00 

DR. JOHN M. HARLOW FUND. 

1914-1915 Bequest of Dr. John M. Harlow . '. $24,563.00 
Bequest of Frances K. Harlow . . 10,527.00 

$35,090.00 

CHILDREN'S MEDICAL WARD BUILDING FUND. 

1913 Donation of G. S. Talbot .... $250.00 

MOSELEY MEMORIAL BUILDING FUND. 

1915 Donation of Charles W. Moseley, sur- 

viving executor under the will of 
Julia M. Moseley in memory of Dr. 
' William Oxnard Moseley, Jr. . . $185,000.00 

56 



Report of the Treasurer. 

CHAELES P JAYNES FUND. 
1915 Bequest of Charles P. Jaynes . . $8,200.00 

HOUSE OFFICERS' ALUMNI FUND. 

1915 Donation of House Officers' Alumni . $446.00 

ARLINGTON HOUSE FUND. 

1915 Donation of Frank E. Peabody for 

patients at the McLean Hospital . $71,577.56 

INCOME DEVOTED TO BOOKS FOR PATIENTS. 

1841 Warren Library Fund, a donation 

from Dr. J. C. Warren .... $1,000,00 

INCOME DEVOTED TO THE LIBRARY. 

1857 Treadwell Library Fund, part of a be- 
quest of J. G. Treadwell . . . $5,000.00 

1913 Donation of Richard Olney . . . 100.00 

1914 Donation of Dr. Daniel Fiske Jones . 5.00 
Donation of Dr. John M. T. Finney 200.00 

$5,305.00 

INCOME AND PRINCIPAL DEVOTED TO THE PUBLICATION 
OF A HISTORY OF THE HOSPITAL. 

1861 Bowditch History Fund, a bequest 

from N. I. Bowditch $2,000.00 

WOODEN LEG FUND. 

1861 Donation — P. K $100.00 

Bequest of N. I. Bowditch .... 5,000.00 
George A. Newell Fund .... 2,500.00 

$7,600.00 

INCOME DEVOTED TO A TRIENNIAL PRIZE. 

1868 Warren Prize Fund, a bequest from 

Dr. J. M. Warren $1,880.00 

Accumulated interest 2,805.84 

$4,685.84 

INCOME DEVOTED TO SPECIAL SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

1870 Donation of R. M. Moore .... $100.00 

Donation of Lvdia B. and 0. A. Taft 100.00 

Donation of Chas. S. Bixby . . . 25.00 

Donation of Dr. Henry J. Bigelow . 1,250.00 

Arthur Appleton Beebe Fund . . . 5,000.00 



$6,475.00 
INCOME DEVOTED TO MUSIC AT HOSPITAL. 

1894 Georee C. and Anne H. Shattuck 
Fund, donation of Dr. Frederick C. 
Shattuck $2,000.00 

57 



Report of the Treasurer. 



SOCIAL SERVICE FUND. 



Donation of Mrs. Shepherd Brooks 
Bequest of Susan C. Dove . 



$15,000.00 
5,000.00 



$20,000.00 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES. 

1857 J. G. Treadwell : 

Books, valued at $3,000.00 

1870-1875 H. J. Bigelow: 

Instruments, valued at ... . 3,600.00 

1875 Dr. Putnam 21.50 

Dr. John Collins Warren: 

Galvanic apparatus $25.00 

1876 Dr. Samuel Cabot: 

Benefit indigent at Asylum . 1,000.00 

1877 Executors Augustus Hemenway: 

For Nurses' Training School . . 5,000.00 

1878 Frederick De.xter: 

For purcliase of pictures . . . 50.00 

1887 Waldo March: 

For photographic apparatus . . 100.00 

1888-1894 Dr. A. T. Cabot: 

To make up deficiency on income 

Samuel Cabot Fund .... 1,335.00 
1890 George L. Kingsley: 

For photographic studio . . . 802.82 

1895 Miss Helen C. Bradlee: 

Repairs and alterations to Bradlee 

Ward 7,000.00 

1897 By the " Staff," through Dr. A. T. Cabot: 

To make up deficiency in income of 

Pathological Fund 1,070.60 

Charles B. Porter: 

Interest accrued on bequests . . 370.00 

1899 Francis Blake: 

Microtome for Pathological Labora- 
tory 266.30 

"A Patient": 

For Treadwell Library .... 200.00 

1900 Dr. A. T. Cabot: 

Open Ball Court 1,000.00 

1901 Mrs. Mary Hemenway: 

Zander apparatus 5,000.00 

1902-1904 C. H. Dalton: 

Added to income of Dalton Fund . 1,000.00 
1903 Mrs. T. W. Bennett: 

For Treadwell Library .... 100.00 

1911-1914 Late Result Fund: 

Anonvmnus . . $1,500.00 

1912 F. W. Hunnewell . . 500.00 

1914 Frederic Winthrop . . 500.00 



1910 



-1915 Lovering Fund: 

Miss Sarah C. M. Lovering 



2,500.00 



10,149.81 



Carried forward $43,591.03 

58 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought fonoard $43,591.03 

1912-1915 Mrs. Caroline L. Weld: 

For surgical instruments . . . 7,748.97 

1912 Dr. Hugh Cabot: 

For surgical instruments . . . 100.00 

Dr. Fritz 13. Talbot: 

For expense visiting Children's Hos- 
pitals 75.00 

Dr. G. Cheever Shattuek: 

For X-ray work 200.00 

A Friend: 

For X-ray work 100.00 

1913 Staff of Orthopedic Department: 

For expenses of that department . 125.00 

Mrs. Charles G. Weld: 

For an awning on the Weld Ward 

G veranda 70.00 

Mrs. W. F. Waters: 

For a special instrument in Ward G 25.00 

1913-1915 Dr. Putnam and Mr. Storey, Trustees 
of the A. W. Blake Fund, to be ap- 
plied to the salary of Dr. Emerson, 
Psychologist 1500.00 

1913-1914 Mrs. Charles E. Mason: 

.Scholarship, Training School for 

Xurses', General Hospital . . . 200.00 

1913-1915 Dr. Hugh Cabot: 

To be applied toward the salary of 
the House Surgeon to the Genito- 
urinary Department .... 1,000.00 

1913-1915 George Wigglesworth : 

X-Ray Apparatus 2,000.00 

1914 Mrs. John Parkinson: 

Towards salaries of the Children's 

Medical Department .... 40.00 

Ernest B. Dane: 

For certain special uses of the Der- 
matological Department . . . 1,700.00 

Miss Marion H. Fenno: 

Towards the expense of a tennis 

court for nurses 10.00 

1915 Donation of Mrs. Xathaniel Thayer: 

For a Scholarship, General Hospital 

Training School for Nurses . . . 50.00 

Donation of George Wigglesworth : 

For a Babies' Milk Fund $500.00 
Donation of Anonymous : 

For a Babies' Milk Fund 37.11 

537.11 



Donation of a Friend: 

To extend help to Avorthy patients 
as their needs may become known 
through their attendance at the 
Hospital 1,000.00 

Donation of Friends of the Hospital 
through ]\Irs. Hugh Cabot for re- 
fitting part of the G enito-Urinary 
Out-patient rooms 167.00 



Carried forward $60,239.11 

59 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $60,239.11 

1915 Donation of Training School for 
Nurses, Proceeds of a May Party 
given for furniture for the roof 
garden 74.82 

Donation of Anonymous, to pay ex- 
pense of X-raying a series of cases 
in the Out-patient Department . 30.00 

Donation of Junior Girls of Camp 
Abena — a summer camp in Maine — 
for books for the Patients' Library 6.46 

Donation of Edith L. Coolidge, for 
social service work, in memory of 
the late Amory A. Lawrence . . 75.00 

Donation of the Board of Visiting 
Ladies toward the salary of a social 
worker in the house 500.00 



$60,925.39 
Expended 1857-1915 .... 59,172.20 

Unexpended : 

A. W. Blake Fund 250.02 

Training School Scholarship Fund . 100.00 

E. B. Dane Fund 903.17 

A Friend, for worthy patients . 500.00 



$1,753.19 

C. H. W. Foster, 

Treasurer. 



60 



EXAMINATION OF ACCOUNTS. 



Boston, February 1, 1916. 
Moses Williams, Esq. ] 

C. H. W. Foster, Esq. r Committee on Accounts. 
John Lowell, Esq. J 

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Sirs, — In accordance with your instructions, we have made an examina- 
tion of the books and records of the Massachusetts General Hospital, 
comprising the records of the General Hospital, McLean Hospital, Con- 
valescent Hospital, and of the Treasurer, for the year ending December 
31, 1915, for the purpose of verifying the cash transactions and of report- 
ing upon the financial condition at December 31, 1915. 

WE HEREBY CERTIFY: 

1. That all funds shown to have been received have been accounted 
for, and that we have found vouchers, or other satisfactory evidence 
of payment for all disbursements. 

2. That the balance of cash on December 31, 1915, as shown by 
the books of the Hospitals and of the Treasurer, amounting to 
$101,804.89, was on hand at that date. 

3. That Stocks and Bonds (par value $846,849.80) amounting to 
$831,141.84, and Annuities Receivable, consisting of three policies 
amounting to $160,000.00, as shown by the books, are certified by 
the New England Trust Company as being in their custody on 
December 31, 1915. 

4. That Notes Receivable amounting to $109,088.02 were in the 
custody of the Treasurer on December 31, 1915. 

5. That certificates of deposit amoimting to $125,000.00 in the Met- 
ropolitan Trust Company and the Commonwealth Trust Company 
were in the custody of the Treasurer on December 31, 1915. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patterson, Teele & Dennis, 

Accountants and Auditors. 



61 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATOR 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL AND 

RESIDENT PHYSICIAN OF THE GENERAL 

HOSPITAL. 



To THE Trustees of the Massachusetts General Hospital: 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit herewith 
my eighth annual report as Administrator of the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital. 

This year again the annual report will be issued in two 
volumes. Volume A will show the affairs of the Corpora- 
tion, the report of the Trustees, the business affairs at the 
General Hospital, and the reports of the McLean Hos- 
pital and Convalescent Hospital. Volume B will contain 
the medical, surgical, and other scientific statistics of the 
General Hospital in Boston. It will consist largely of the 
Report of the General Executive Committee of the activi- 
ties in which it is engaged. 

The actual operating cost of the three hospitals has been 
$35,919.56 greater than in 1914. The hospital receipts 
have been $40,250.02 larger. 

The following is a resume of the operating cost and 
hospital receipts for the last eight years : 

GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

Operating Cost. Hospital Receipts. 

1908 $317,832.23 1908. ...... $135,002.24 

1909 336,131.35 1909 143,379.56 

1910 350,308.22 1910 151,568.63 

*1911 384,983.51 1911 174,717.56 

1912 414,175.06 1912 173,067.80 

1913 435,360.53 1913 189,841.02 

1914 453,601.69 1914 195,181.65 

1915 482,786.97 1915 219,351.88 

* This year for the first time operating expenses amounting to $6,281.73, 
which in previous years have been charged to Corporation expenses, have 
been charged to operating cost of General Hospital. Insurance at the 
General Hospital — $1,867.76 — previously charged to Corporation ex- 
penses is this year charged to General Hospital operating cost. 

62 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



McLEAN HOSPITAL. 



Operating Cost. Hospital Receipts. 

1908 $286,027.83 1908 $278,722.50 

1909 284,294.64 1909 279,762.41 

1910 303,508.18 1910 303,500.06 

*1911 301,924.87 1911 315,971.52 

1912 321,910.85 1912 326,131.39 

1913 333,310.72 1913 339,285.12 

1914 337,372.92 1914 340,036.55 

1915 343,326.10 1915 355,804.15 

CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL. 

Operating Cost. Hospital Receipts. 

1908 $13,350.64 1908 $3,967.73 

1909 13,548.48 1909 3,901.21 

1910 12,570.36 1910 3,862.90 

1911 13,898.83 1911 4,314.51 

1912 13,970.11 1912 3,991.41 

1913 15,566.52 1913 . . . . . 4,839.10 

1914 13,117.14 1914 5,223.85 

1915 13,898.24 1915 5,536.04 

GENERAL HOSPITAL, BOSTON. 

BUILDING OPERATIONS. 

The year has been an active one for the General Hos- 
pital. The erection of an administration building has 
been started. We expect that the building will be com- 
pleted in 1916. It is the greatest need of the hospital, and 
we are grateful for the generous gifts for the purpose. 
This building is made possible by the gift of a large sum 
in memory of William Oxnard Moseley, who was a house 
pupil at this hospital in 1878. He died in 1879 from a fall 
in the Alps. The money was given through Mr. Charles 
W. Moseley, trustee of the estate of JuHa M. Moseley. 
It is to be known as ''The Moseley Memorial Building." 
In it will be the quarters for the house pupils and resident 
doctors, the Treadwell Library for the use of the staff, 
fireproof record rooms and vaults, an emergency ward, 

* This year for the first time operating expenses amounting to $7,666.05, 
and insm-ance — $1,168.07 — which in other years have been charged to 
Corporation expenses, have been charged to operating cost at McLean 
Hospital. 

63 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Phj-sician. 

the administration offices, and waiting-rooms for friends 
of patients. In accordance with the custom of the hospi- 
tal, plans of the building will appear in the next report 
after the building is completed. 

The Warren Ward A and Jackson Ward B, erected as 
temporary construction in 1873 and occupied ever since, 
have been demolished. The Gardner Ward F has been 
moved back on the site of Ward B, raised, and a story 
built under it. This new ward is to take the place of Ward 
A. The building is not yet completed and therefore will 
not be described in this report. These changes have been 
made in order to make room for a private ward. The 
contract has been awarded, and its erection is now in 
process on the Charles Street front, just north of the Mas- 
sachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary. It is to be 
a one-hundred-bed, eight-story building, fireproof, and 
modern in all respects. 

During the spring, summer, and autumn months tents 
were erected in the garden to care for the patients from 
the wards which had been demolished. During Decem- 
ber and a part of November, when it was no longer possi- 
ble to keep the patients in the tents, the number of beds 
available for patients was materially reduced. This ac- 
counts for the decreased number of patients' days treat- 
ment. 

NEEDS OF THE HOSPITAL. 

We are very thankful for the liberality of benefactors 
which has made it possible for us to undertake the impor- 
tant works which have been described above, but we have 
other and pressing needs and we are confident that the 
community will meet them. 

A COUNTRY BRANCH WHERE WE CAN MOVE BED PATIENTS 
FOR CONVALESCENCE. 

The land for such an institution is now owned by the 
hospital and is reserved for this purpose. It is a beautiful 
situation upon a hill on the Concord Turnpike in Belmont, 

64 




CO 

<J 

Eh 
I— I 

o, 

O 
W 



o 

O 

pq 
Q 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

in the rear of the land at McLean Hospital. Such an in- 
stitution maybe begun in a small way if it is wisely planned 
to allow for growth. 

A HOSPITAL FOR THE CARE OF PEOPLE OF MODERATE MEANS. 

This building should be erected in connection with the 
General Hospital for patients who should pay something 
to the physicians for their medical and surgical care, but 
who are unable to pay the full price for care in the new 
private ward which we are building. Such a hospital 
would meet a want which is greatly felt, as people of 
moderate means are getting to-day the least efficient care 
in case of sickness of any class in the community. This 
group of individuals must often be ill in their homes de- 
pendent upon physicians who cannot provide the neces- 
sary laboratory tests and scientific examinations which 
are readily available in a general hospital. I would make 
an urgent appeal to the generosity of the conmaunity for 
a special gift to erect a building for this object. 

A children's HOSPITAL. 

A building for children should be erected in connection 
with the General Hospital. The Children's Medical De- 
partment has but seven cribs for bed patients and these 
are in an unsuitable location. The need for a building for 
children is very considerable. It should be distinct from 
the buildings for adults, as the problem in the care of chil- 
dren — the ease with which they contract contagious dis- 
eases — makes a special plan of construction necessary. 

" A nurses' home. 

The addition of one hundred beds in the private hos- 
pital and sixty beds in the Bulfinch Building, which can 
be added when the Moseley Memorial Building is occu- 
pied, will make necessary an increase of about eighty-five 
nurses. A new home should be provided, perhaps upon 

65 



Report of the Admiiiistrator and Resident Physician. 

the land owned by the hospital on North Grove Street. 
This home should be large enough to accommodate the 
immediate increase in the size of the school, and the increase 
which will be necessary if we are able in the future to build 
a hospital for people of moderate means and a children's 
hospital so urgently required. It should also contain a 
kitchen and dining-room for all the nurses in the training 
school. Such a procedure would enable us to use our pres- 
ent dining facilities so that we could give our male nurses 
a proper dining-room, something which they have long 
needed. 

CONSULTATION CLINIC. 

Upon recommendation of the General Executive Com- 
mittee the Trustees have authorized a Consultation Clinic 
for people of moderate means. The cost of the necessary 
laboratory tests and consultations with recognized experts 
has become so great that people of small means cannot 
obtain them individually. Our out-patient building 
stands idle in the afternoon. By grouping consultants 
and placing the laboratories of the hospital at the disposal 
of this Clinic it seems possible to do a great good to this 
section of the community. The plan proposes that the 
family physician shall bring or send his patient by letter 
to this Clinic in order that he may obtain a correct diag- 
nosis by modern methods and an outline of treatment, if 
he desu'es it. The patients are to pay a fee of five dollars 
each. From this sum the doctors will be remunerated 
after the cost to the hospital has been met. The Clinic 
should be of the greatest benefit to the practitioner of 
medicine because it will place at his disposal as good facili- 
ties and as good talent as is available in the community. 
The Clinic will start on January 25, 1916, and its result 
will be watched with great interest. 

The Ether Day address was delivered by Dr. W. W. 
Keen, of Philadelphia. The subject of his address was 
"The Dangers of Ether as an Anesthetic." 

The following are comparative tables: 

66 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



No. Patients Ad- 
mitted TO Wards. 



1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 



5,362 
5,87] 
6,092 
6,495 
6,629 
6,251 
6,413 
6,503 



Total Patients' 
Days Treatment. 

106,034 
105,295 
105,617 
107,671 
107,797 
111,364 
116,164 
113,941 



Average Stay 
IN Hospital. 

20 -days 

18- 

17+ 

17- 

16- 

18+ 

18+ 

18- 



No. Opeeatons 
House Cases. 

3,634 

3,841 

4,016 

3,948 

4,063 

3,887 

3,993 

4,046 



Average Daily 
Cost per House Patient. 



1911 $2.65+ 

1912 3.00+ 

1913 3.01 + 

1914 3.09+ 

1915 3.31 + 



Daily Cost per Capita for Provi- 
sions FOR ALL Persons Supported. 

S0.28- 
0.31 + 
0.33+ 
0.34+ 
0.32+ 



Number 
Ambulance Trips. 

1908 1,747 

1909 1,539 

1910 1,639 

1911 1,513 

1912 . . • 1,477 

1913 1,576 

1914 1,378 

1915 1,502 



Number 
OF Miles. 



Average 
Trips per Day. 



1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915' 



Number of 
Patients Treated 
in Accident Ward. 

5,313 
5,314 
5,590 
6,029 
5,501 
5,424 
5,278 
4,815 



Average 
Daily Cost 
PER Patient. 

$0.78- 
0.83- 
0.82- 
0.72- 
0.78+ 
0.86+ 
0.96+ 
1.03+ 



5,442 
5,615 

4,452 
4,870 
4,796 
4,888 
4,182 

Cost of Main- 
tenance of Ac- 
cident Ward. 

$4,141.03 
4,389.78 
4,555.97 
4,331.75 
4,343.15 
4,665.50 
5,090.52 
5,006.69 



5- 

4+ 
4+ 
4+ 
4+ 
4+ 
3 + 
4+ 



Total 
Receipts. 

$518.23 

488.88 

571.80 

618.80 

770.17 

1,560.07 

1,867.38 

2,297.97 



Number of X-Ray Cases 
Out-Patient Department. 

1908 2,902 

1909 3,323 

1910 3,414 

1911 4,138 

1912 4,587 

1913 6,286 

1914 7,951 

1915 7,618 

67 



Number of X-Ray 
Cases in House. 

1,353 
1,441 
1,363 
1,643 

1,987 
4,015 
5,985 
4,597 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 



building: 

New Cases. 

1904 25,082 

1905 21,874 

1906 20,010 

1907 20,358 

1908 20,729 

1909 21,518 

1910 22,302 

1911 22,232 

1912 22,639 

1913 24,887 

1914 24,957 

1915 29,213 

During the year 1915 there were 3,660 operations under 
an anesthetic in the Out-Patient Department, of which 
number 1,614 were performed under a local and 2,046 
under a general anesthesia. 

The following is a comparative financial table : 

Cost of Maintenance 
Out-Patient Department. 



sties shows the work in the 


3e the opening 


of the new 




Total Number 


Total Number 


Prescriptions 


OF Visits. 


Filled. 


106,174 


53,321 


110,631 


49,793 


99,251 


43,063 


107,063 


43,764 


116,008 


46,390 


121,327 


48,250 


124,584 


48,676 


135,809 


49,858 


136,095 


48,270 


147,428 


51,798 


158,090 


62,112 


190,628 


73,914 



1908 








$50,902.61 


1909 








54,739.32 


1910 








56,383.06 


1911 








62,476.04 


1912 








62,704.66 


1913 








70,077.00 


1914 








74,710.04 


1915 








84,451.96 
• 1 1 J 



Average Daily 


Total 


Cost per Patient. 


Receipts. 


$0.44- 


S39,955.80 


0.45+ 


42,636.05 


0.45+ 


44.296.92 


0.46+ 


46,643.45 


0.46+ 


47,607.00 


0.47+ 


53,453.20 


0.47+ 


58,668.95 


0.44+ 


73,521.99 



Attention is invited to the very large increase in the 
Out-Patient Department work during the year. The 
number of new patients has increased 4,256 over 1914, 
and the total number of visits has increased 32,538 over 
1914. A part of this increase has been due to the hard 
times so general during the first part of the year, but the 
main part is due to the increased reputation of the hospital 
for thorough and scientific work. 

68 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

The Cement Shop in the Out-Patient Department was 
established on September 9, 1913. The object was to 
help patients of the hospital who were incapacitated from 
their regular work and it was thought that their conva- 
lescence would be hastened. The patients are encouraged 
and they are enabled to earn money during a period when 
otherwise they would have no assistance. The shop has 
aided thirty-eight patients in periods varying from a few 
days to a year, and the sum of $1,917.00 has been distrib- 
uted to those who otherwise would probably have been 
without employment of any kind. 

NURSING DEPARTMENT. 

The school for nurses at the General Hospital has had a 
successful year. We have been able to raise the stand- 
ard of admission so that our school is composed of a very 
high type of young woman. The statistics of our gradu- 
ates show that a very large proportion of them are filhng 
executive and teaching positions in hospitals and that 
those in private nursing are in great demand. The school, 
therefore, seems to meet the true tests. It has been pos- 
sible to get the women who have entered our school, be- 
cause in addition to the valuable training which they have 
received we have been able to make their living condi- 
tions most attractive. It is very important that as the 
hospital adds to its functions and requires more niu-ses 
it should not fail to continue to provide attractive Uving 
conditions. 

The following table shows the increase in the number 
of nurses during recent years : 

Average 
AvEEAGE Number Number of Average 

OF Pupils. Graduates. Total. 

1908 116 19 135 

1909 117 19 136 

1910 126 25 151 

1911 140 31 171 

1912 158 29 187 

1913 167 29 196 

1914 181 28 209 

1915 179 29 208 

69 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

TREAD WELL LIBRARY. 

The library looks forward to moving into the commodi- 
ous quarters planned in the Moseley Memorial Build- 
ing. It will be a great satisfaction to know that our 
records are in a safe place. 

The following table indicates the number of records 
copied or abstracted during recent years: 

NtjSiber of Records 
Copied or Abstracted. 

1908 358 

1909 497 

1910 532 

1911 559 

1912 756 

1913 923 

1914 1,226 

1915 1,572 

McLEAN HOSPITAL, WAVERLEY. 

The only notable building during the year at McLean 
Hospital has been the construction of a cottage for a single 
patient. This was made possible by a special gift for the 
pmpose. This building will be completed and occupied 
early in 1916. 

A nurses' home at McLean Hospital is badly needed. 
There is a considerable fund already estabUshed for this 
purpose, and it is hoped that benefactors of the hospital 
may add to this in the near future, so that your Board will 
feel justified in beginning construction. 

The Medical Superintendent's detailed statement ap- 
pears in Volume A of this report : 

The foUomng are comparative tables: 

Number of Number of Patients' 

Patients Adiutted. Days Treatment. 

1908 168 ' 78,897 

1909 169 79,515 

1910 166 80,978 

1911 188 80,245 

1912 168 81,358 

1913 144 80,618 

1914 ...... 117 77,621 

1915 123 77,807 

70 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 







Daily Cost per Capita 




Average Daily Cost 


FOR Provisions for all 




PER Patient. 


Persons Supported. 


1911 . . 


. . . $3.59 + 


$0,479 


1912 . . 


. . . 3.79+ 


0.487 


1913 . . 


. . . 3.90+ 


0.511 


1914 . . 


. . . 4.07+ 


0.517 


1915 . . 


. . . 4.22 + 


0.516 



CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL, WAVERLEY. 

There is nothing of special importance to which I would 
call attention here. This hospital does not provide for the 
bed treatment of patients. It cares only for those who 
can get up and dress themselves daily. In this way its 
possible service is very limited. It should sometime be 
replaced by a country branch, of the need of which I have 
spoken in the body of this report. 

The following are comparative tables: 

Number of Total Patients' 

Patients Admitted. Days Treatment. 

1908 508 10,106 

1909 636 11,428 

1910 638 11,331 

1911 647 11,336 

1912 678 10,785 

1913 733 10,260 

1914 681 10,226 

1915 719 10,061 

Daily Cost per Capita 
Average Daily Cost for Provisions for all 

PER Patient. Persons Supported. 

1911 $1.23 $0.34+ 

1912 1.21 0.40+ 

1913 1.51 0.40+ 

1914 1.36 0.38+ 

1915 1.43+ 0.37+ 



I would invite attention to the tables 
of statistics and to the interesting and valuable appended 
reports. 

The thanks of the hospital are due to many friends. I 
would speak especially of the ladies upon the hospital 

71 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

committees, whose devoted service has been marked for 
many years, and to the ladies of Cambridge who have 
done so much for the patients' Christmas each year. 

I would invite the attention of your Board to the faith- 
ful service given to the hospital by its officers, physicians 
of the staff, house pupils, nurses and employees. The 
spirit of all is admirable and I believe that results show it. 

I have to thank you again for the courtesy invariably 
shown to me by your Board. 

Very respectfully, 

Frederic A. Washburn, 

Administrator. 



72 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

Table No. 1. 
comparative statement of statistics. 

Hospital Wards and Single Rooms. 

1915 

Patients in Hospital January 1 : 

Medical 115 

Surgical 211 

Total 326 

Patients admitted during year : 

Medical 2,678 

Surgical - 3,825 

Total 6,503 

Total patients treated in Hospital wards 
and single rooms during year: 

Medical 2,793 

Surgical 4,036 

Total 6,829 

Patients discharged during year : 

Well "104 

Much relieved 

Relieved 

Not relieved 

Against advice 

Died 

Not treated 

Total 6,548 

Patients in Hospital end of year : 

Medical 112 

Surgical 169 

Total 281 

73 



1914 

105 
194 



299 



2,418 
3,995 

6,413 



2,523 

4,189 

6,712 



270 



5,291 


4,980 


521 


491 


59 


42 


405 


425 


168 


178 



6,386 



115 
211 

326 



1915 1914 



36,279 

77,662 


34,398 
81,766 


113,941 


116,164 


32- 

68+ 


29 + 
71- 


100 


100 


99+ 
213- 


94+ 

224- 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Total patient's day's treatment: 

I'ree patients 

Pay patients 

Total 

Percentage : 

Free days 

Pay days 

Total 

Average patients per day: 

Free 

Pay 

Total 312+ 318 

Average time per patient in Hospital . . 18— days 18+ days 
Daily average cost per patient, excluding 

actual cost of running Out-Patient 

Department and Accident Ward, 

heat, etc., furnished Eye and Ear 

Infirmary, and goods furnished Con- 
valescent Hospital and McLean 

Hospital ._ $3.31+ $3.09+ 

Daily cost per capita for provisions for all 

persons supported .32+ .34+ 

Paying patients were admitted at the following rates per 
week: 40 at $42.00; 30 at $35.00; 165 at $28.00; 8 at $23.35; 
7 at $18.66; 1245 at $15.00; 17 at $13.00; 430 at $10.50; 7 
at $10.00; 870 at $7.00; 2 at $8.00; 95 at $5.00; 4 at $4.00; 
140 at $3.50. Some of these patients entered at the rates were 
afterwards made free. 

There were 4,815 patients treated in the Accident Ward. Of 
this number 1,423 were retained in the Hospital. 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

1915 1914 

Number of cases treated (new cases) . . 29,213 24,957 

Americans 14,656 12,932 

Foreigners : . . 14,557 12,025 

Residents of Boston 12,424 11,127 

Residents of other places . . ' 16,789 13,830 

Medical Department 7,416 5,671 

Surgical Department 7,128 6,943 

Department for Diseases of the Skin . . 2,367 1,906 

74 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

1915 1914 

Department for Diseases of the Nerv- 
ous System 

Department for Diseases of the Throat 

Children's Medical Department . . . 

Orthopedic Department 

Genito-Urinary Department .... 

Department of SjT'liiiis 

Dental Department 

Total number of visits from patients . 

Average daily attendance 

Total number of prescriptions filled . 

Number of visits to Hydrotherapeutic 
Room 

Number of visits to Medico-Mechanical 
Room 

Number of applicants 

Number admitted 

Referred to other institutions .... 

Number refused 

Cost of maintenance of Out-Patient 

Department S84, 

Daily average cost per Out-Patient . . 

AMBULANCE. 

Ambulance calls during year .... 
Average calls per day 

ACCIDENT WARD. 

Visits made to Accident Ward during 
year 

Average visits made per day .... 
Number of operations performed: 

Local anaesthesia 679 

General anaesthesia 143 

Cost of maintenance of Accident 

Ward $^ 

Daily average cost per Accident Ward 

patient 

X-RAY. 

1915 1914 

Number of X-Ray cases taken in the 

Out-Patient Department .... 7,618 7,951 

Number of X-Ray cases taken in the 

house 4,597 5,985 

Fluoroscopic examinations 3,997 1,834 

75 



954 


1,000 


3,199 


2,617 


2,294 


2,211 


2,819 


1,968 


1,279 


999 


1,216 


1,128 


521 


514 


190,628 


158,090 


627 + 


520+ 


73,914 


62,112 


3,804 


4,313 


20,605 


16,365 


30,304 


28,666 


29,213 


24,957 


751 


1,063 


340 


2,646 


,451.96 $74,710.04 


.44+ 


.47+ 


1915 


1914 


1,502 


1,378 


4+ 


3+ 



1915 1914 



4,815 
13 + 


5,278 
14+ 


822 


822 
173 

995 


1,006.69 


$5,092.52 


1.03+ 


.96+ 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Table No. 2. 

RESIDENCES. 

Boston • • • 1)378 

Massachusetts (except Boston) 4,902 

Maine 53 

New Hampshire and Vermont 107 

Rhode Island and Connecticut 19 

Other States 17 

British Provinces 27 

Foreign countries 

Total 6,503 

Table No. 3. 

birthplaces. 

Boston 437 

Massachusetts (except Boston) 2,025 

Maine 232 

New Hampshire and Vermont 235 

Rhode Island and Connecticut 95 

New York 155 

Southern and Western States 182 

Other States . 46 

Total in United States 3,407 

British Provinces 609 

Great Britain 297 

Ireland 525 

Norway and Sweden 128 

Italy 453 

Russia and Poland 578 

Germany 73 

France : 47 

Other places 386 

Total Foreigners 3,096 

BIRTHPLACE OF MOTHER. 

Boston Ill 

Massachusetts 939 

Maine 291 

New Hampshire and Vermont 222 

Rhode Island and Connecticut . 59 

Carried forward 1,622 

76 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Brought forward 1,622 

New York 92 

Southern and Western States 157 

Other States 40 

Total in United States 1,911 

Great Britain 504 

British Provinces 807 

Ireland 1,087 

Norway and Sweden 166 

Germany 123 

Italy 587 

Russia and Poland 822 

France 53 

Other foreigners 443 

Total Foreigners 4,592 

Table No. 4 



OCCUPATIONS. 
Mat.f.. 

' Barber Shop Strippers 

Barbers 29 Packers . 



14 
6 



Blacksmith 

Blacksmiths 24 

Horseshoer 1 



Building 

Carpenters 113 

Watchmen 4 

Lathers 2 



Clothing Factory 

Cutters 

Designers 

Hand Sewer 

Inspectors 

Machine Operators . . 

Pressers 

Trimmers 

Stitchers 



5 

7 
1 
8 
5 

12 
4 

12 



Candy Factory 

Candy Makers . . . . 

Foremen 

Packers 

Wrappers 



Cigar Factory 



Filler . . 
Labelers 
Makers . 
Sorters . 



1 

7 

13 

6 



Cotton Mill 

Bobbin boy . . . 
Lappers, Carders . 
DoublerSj Twisters 

Dyers 

Folders, Rollers 
Inspectors .... 
Loom fixers . . . 
Breakers, Cleaners 
Dressers, Slashers 
Rovers, Speeders . 



1 

4 

7 

2 

5 

20 

11 

15 

3 

4 



77 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Spinners 7 

Weavers 136 

Reelers, Winders .... 12 



Department Store 

Floor walkers .... 

Salesmen 

Managers 

Cash Boys 

Errand boys 

Mail order clerks . . . 
Clerks 



Domestic 



Butlers . 

Coachmen 

Stablemen 



Farming 
Farmers .... 
Farm hands . . 



22 
3 
4 

7 
5 
2 



12 

14 

5 



76 

7 



Fishing 
Deep sea 26 



Furniture Factory 

Cabinet makers 
Caners, Seaters 
Carpenters 
Finishers 
Machinists 
Painters 
Packers . . 
Polishers . 
Sanders, Buffers 
Upholsterers 



Garage 

Auto repairers 

Chauffeurs 

Managers 

Painters 

Washers 

Watchmen 



Hospital 

Ambulance men . 
House cleaners 



9 
19 
30 

6 
64 
26 
11 

6 

2 
13 



9 

29 

4 

2 

7 
4 



Gardeners 2 

Messengers 4 

Orderlies 20 



Hotels 



Cooks . . . 
Waiters . . . 
Bell boys . . 
Dish washers 
Elevator men 
Engineer . . 
Clerks . . . 
Kitchen man 
Bar tender 
Cleaners . . . 
Proprietor . . 
Porters . . . 



Ice 



Cutters . 
Teamsters 



Insurance 

Brokers 

Collectors 

Iron Foilndry 

Assemblers 

Boiler makers .... 
Draughtsmen . . . . 

Heaters 

Machinists 

Moulders 

Pattern makers . . . 

Jewelry Factory 

Bench hands .... 

Buffers 

Dippers, Platers . . . 

Enamelers 

Engravers ...... 

PoUshers 



39 
25 
2 
10 
5 
1 
4 
1 
1 
5 
1 
3 



4 
14 



4 
6 

8 

6 

78 

12 

6 



7 
11 
2 
4 
7 
14 



Jobbing 
Teamsters 67 



Knitting Mill 

3 Cutters 

14 Inspectors ..... 
78 



9 
15 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Phj'sician. 



Knitters . . . . 
Loom fixers . . . 
Machine hands 
Menders, Darners 
Winders, Reelers . 



Laundry 



M anglers 
Bleachers 

Starchers 
Washers 



Leather Tannery 

Beamsters 

Curriers 

Glazers 

Rollers 

Tanners 



Paint Factory 
Mixers 

Painting 
House painters . . 

Paper Factory 

Cutters 

Finishers 

Inspectors 

Machine hands . . . 

Sorters 

Trimmers 

Managers 



2 
5 

16 
5 
9 



10 



39 



Plumbing 
Plumbers . . . . 
Plumbers' helpers 

Pottery 

Pressers, Moulders 
Decorators . . . 



Printing 

Compositors . . . 

Cutters 

Engravers .... 
Monotypers . . . 
Press feeders . . 



3 Professional 

10 Actor 

29 Artists 

16 Accountants .... 

17 Clergymen 

Civil engineers. . . 
Detective 

2 Dentists 

11 Instructors .... 
2 Lawyers 

11 Physicians .... 
Musicians 



Public Service 

Laborers, Street . . . 

Gardeners 

PoHce officers .... 
Coast guardsmen . . 
Physical instructor . . 

Firemen 

School attendant officer 
Letter carriers .... 
Newspaper reporters . 
Furniture movers . . 

Newsboys 

Sheriff 



13 

g Rubber Factory 

5 Cementers 

9 Cutters 

6 Inspectors 

4 Mixers 

4 Pohsher 

Tire makers 

Trimmers 

15 Vulcanizers, Curers . . 
3 

Shoe Factory 

Bottom finishers . . . 
4 Cementers 

4 Cutters 

Heel workers . . . . 
Ironers 

10 Lasters 

7 PoHshers 

10 Skivers 

14 Sorters 

5 Stitchers 



1 
6 
2 
6 
4 
1 
4 
7 
2 
43 
3 



260 

36 

10 

3 

1 

14 

1 

10 

4 

2 

2 

1 



7 

14 
7 
4 
1 
5 
7 
3 



12 
10 
38 
24 

2 
31 
14 
14 

6 
121 



79 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Street and Railroad Men 

Firemen 18 

Brakemen 41 

Laborers, General ... 25 

Engineers 16 

Car repairers 9 

Conductors 20 

Motormen 16 

Ticket agents 10 

Tailor Shop 

Tailors 41 

Cutters 8 

Pressors 10 

Woolen and Worsted Mill 

Carders 13 

Dyers 7 

Finishers 9 

Loom fixers 6 

Spinners 7 



Twisters 5 

Warpers 3 

Weavers 44 

Wool sorters 9 

Foremen 2 

Clerks 2 

Others 

Cobblers 6 

Caterers 2 

Florists 4 

Janitors 32 

Liquor dealers 7 

Peddlers, Fruit .... 15 

Students 291 

Sextons 4 

None 408 

Rabbi 1 

Bank president 1 

Seamen 4 



Total 3,521 



Female. 



Candy Factory 

Candy makers . . . 
Coaters, Dippers . . 

Packers 

Wrappers 



Cigar Factory 



Loom fixer 1 

Slasher, Dresser .... 1 

Spinners 13 

Warper 1 

Weavers 28 

Winders, Spoolers ... 9 

Stitcher 1 



Strippers 



2 Domestic and Personal Service 



Clerical 

Clerks 

Stenographers . . . . 

Bookkeepers 

Billing machine opera- 
tors 

Cashiers 

Clothing Factory 

Stitchers 

Pressors 

Finishers 



Folder 
Inspector 



Cotton Mill 



22 
26 

18 

3 

5 



Cooks . . . 
Second maids 
Nurse maids 
Ladies' maids 



63 
41 
25 
26 



Housekeepers ..... 12 



Laundresses 
Janitresses . . 
Parlor maids . 
Chamber maids 
Waitresses . . 



. . 37 

. . 9 

. . 24 

. . 36 

. . 49 

Housewives 1,213 

Department Store 



Bundle girls 
1 Bookkeeper 
1 Buyer . . . 
80 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Demonstrators 
Saleswomen . . . 
Milliners ... • 
Dressmakers . . 
Manicurists . . 
Matron .... 
Stenographers 
Mail order clerks 
Stock clerks . . 



Jewelry Factory 



Polisher 



Knitting Mill 

Cutters 

Inspector . . 

Knitters 

Loom fixers 

Machine hands . . . 
Menders, Darners . . 

Sewers 

Winders, Spoolers . . 
Stitcher 



Laundry 

Ironers, Finishers . 
Manglers . . . . 

Markers 

Washers 

Shakers 

Sorters 

Starchers . . . . 



Payer Factory 

Finishers 

Machine hands . . . 

Trimmer 

Sorters 



Printing 

Compositors, Typeset- 
ters 

Folder 

Press feeder .... 
Editor 



Professional 

Actress 

Social workers . . . 



3 
22 
7 
4 
2 
1 
4 
2 
3 



4 

1 

12 

2 

3 

14 

13 

15 

1 



3 

6 

8 

15 

7 

7 

12 



Physician . . 

Nurses . . . 
Teachers . . 
Dietitians 
Hairdressers 



Public Service 

Postmistresses . . . 
Telephone operators . 

Rubber Factory 

Cementers 

Cutter 

Inspectors 

Trimmer 

Laster 

Heeler 



Shoe Factory 

Cementers 

Cutters 

Heel workers . . . 

Sorters 

Stitchers 

Tippers 



1 

149 

25 

7 
7 



12 
2 
2 

8 
36 

7 



Woolen and Worsted Mill 

Finishers 

Sewers, Menders . . 
Spinners, Twisters 

Warpers 

Weavers 

Wool sorters .... 
Spooler 



11 
8 
4 

20 
2 
1 



Others 

Students .... 
Sewing .... 
Artist's model 
Dressmakers . . 
Sister of Charity 
Superintendent of Home 
Dispenser, Drugstore 

Companions 

Tea room manager 



321 
29 
1 
24 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 



None 365 



Total 2,982 



81 



Report of the .Administrator and Resident Physician. 





?nai}5jj-;no 


106,175 
110,631 
99 251 
107,063 
116,008 
121. .327 
124.. 584 
135,809 
136,095 
147,428 
1,58,090 
190,028 


•ps^Bajx 
siU9i^Bd-ino 


005 0J-*iOMOOOI^i0 02 — 00 — t^OOCCtOOOOOOOMr^iOCCINtOOrCOOl 
t^t^OOOlCSNiCtOCOt^CT. OOIOO — -nr^r^t^iO — OOO— 'NIM!N-<1'^~ 


Patients 
Remaining 

undei 
Treatment 

Dec. 31. 


•aai^ 


CCiOQ0ODC»t^0000r~tDCOC0lOCDlOr^t^t^00^ — '^•^TfOCOIMOOJ-^M 


•SniXBj; 


— <t~.OCt^'*00-*t^OiOCOT)<0 — IN — (M-^OOODC^T)" — GO'COCDIN— 'O 
-H—i— i—i—i,-,(M — (Miomojcnoooooooo — cococomcou;-TC-. — 00 m 


•sjnapiODv 


•*t^CTia:rooooor~cooo — (N-*ict~0(Nn<tji(N>oc<iooMOioococ;'0(M 

•^^^..^.^jiiOOiOOCDiOiOOOOCiO^H— O(N'Mi0O00iCr^O(M05«0^'T' 


•83BJ9AV 


t^roincci^oooo-HMcoict^inro — — iOTi<T}<<Dt^iM05— ixiCT iOTj<mooj" 
ot^QOOiooiocc — oiMcoiocDOioior^r-r-t^r^cnooooo-. oic — 1^' 

— ^ — — i(N— (MiM(NlM<NC^(N(N<N(N(NINCaiN(MNC^(NC>l(NN(MWCC — 

CO 


■[Biox isBa-j 


Tj*CCOiOt^iOt^t-..|>C5t^O — — fOrO — — iOCOCO(NLO>^CDCDCDt^y, Oi'^ 

— _( — rt — ^ — _i — — — c^^c^(Me^(^^(^^eqc^^(N(M(NlNC^(N(M!N(N(N(^)(^^ 


•I^^ox ■JsajBaiQ 


— Cq(MC<llN(N<MC<l(MCqiN<N(NCO(MlMC<l(NmC<3CCCOCOCOCOroc<;cOC<3C<3CO 


•ani[x ano %ts Sui.^bj 
jaqmn^ ■jsa^Eajg 


tooocaoit^toocniNc^tooo- iot^C3iNiO'*-*oooio — — ou^roo 


— rt — — 


•anitx ano ?^ ^^^d 
Jaquin^ jsajBaaQ 


toooeoTjiioo-* — ooo — iNt^oit^t^iooor^ — — t^iot^ioo3-*iM-*o 

tDt^oirooooooo2ooor^t^t^oooomooooocar~ootDt^ooio-*oco 

— 1 — — — IMIM<N<NC^ — —■ — — — — — — — (N — — — — — — — — — —1 — — 


•paj;irapv I^aox 
no aSE^naoia^j 


i-TTj<oocorotootDTf<r^rot^ — ocncDOfN- lo — Muooooo- ooco 
c^_-*r-;U3co — M0500 — ocoioo — NOJOOoqointDcDco«ooco(N 
o6^^o6o6oda5o6ooo30>ojodo6o6o6oo>^^odoiodo5odod^^^^^^^^cDoo 


■sq^saa 


NiNiot^moooooooOT)--;}" — ot^oio — 0005- en — lo — oiooocnio 
— 1 — cj (MO) iN(NM CO mcororo-* ■*■*■*■*■<)<■* T)<-^-<j<-<j<-* TjiTjiTji^n<Tt< 


•o%9 'passirasiQ 
'?gn£i 'paiBajx lON 


OliCWOO- IOCO(N(NOO«0— ■ — lOm — (NOTjiOiTfiO- [^iniO-*Ot^ 

cqt^t^- OTt<(N(MO^oOTj*M*co<Noor^CiOcooi-^ — Tfio — oor^oifN 

— 1 — — INCOINIMIN — IN<MINro(MC<3N(NIN(NCC(NIN(NC^C0(N(N — (M(N(M 


•paAaijaH lo^ 


CO-<l<CTiOO — cD-^MOOOMt^ — toco-*- t^a>0:Ti<00000000 — COIN — 

t>O00O — 0005COCOCOt^I^COOCDOOiflOOOi05-^Ot^ — "D<ooc<)cncq 

— —1 — —1 — — — (^— i(N — — — — (NIN — — (NCOOICO'*-*-*-*^ 


•?JB(j nt paAatiaH 
JO 'paAaijay; qo'nj^ 


— 1 — ioooi->i<(Nma>(NininT)<ioi/^(Noooocooict^ — ooo — — loo- 
to— o-*ot^oocot^iOTi<— (Niocoooocot^iOfNO- ^ooco(Nc-. ooo 

C0Tt*10C0O00 — C'<f'<S*05 — (Nt^OO-^CDI^OOOOO^INfOlO — ooroc^ 
— — — — — CqC<l(NlN(N<NINCOCOINC<3CCCC->3<'a'iCiOTi>Tj<iO 


•pai^tmpv I^iox 
uo aSB^uaDiad 


OOmO-^OJiOCOOOt^O- •*'*COOO>OOOCOCD — oooooocooocoinT 
;DtDCOtOlO'OT)(lO-*COCOCO(N(NC<l(NlNM(N(NINININ(N ^j .^'-'^ 


"IPM. paSJBqosTQ 


■*o>'* — ■<i'OOc<;tDcqt~T)<05iOT}iini-»iotDoooooo(N — oocooooTf 

ooooasiNeocoot^o>t^c-)T)<iocooo-<j>iot^T)<oiiotDco — cno'Oocot^o 
ioto<r>oooo-*cccoc^ — coo; — occTtcoo — coo — — ■*^nlNco<^llN — 


t4 


•aai^ 


•>^<coco— cDooocooot^r^oo- «ci^ooococ<5ooo5ooioioioo>tco5iN 
TfHooiNco — — •q'a!T)<oooco<X) — ooco(Ncnaico — 0(NiO(Nooot^ — CiTt< 
0(Niot^ot^t^r~a>oocccqa>oa> — iococo-;)<c<iffiTtii.o>ocDOt>- — ^o 

(NIN(N(NCON(N(NIN<NINCO(NCO<NCOCOCOCOCOCOINCOCOCOCO'*COCOCOCO 




to-*mTt<TjiTi<iNT!<ot^oooc<nncocoooio<NiOioicoo-*tDt--cocoT)io 

TtltD-^iOOJiO — «Ot)<OCDtH— t^(N — C0 00O0>CDt~t^OtD-<l<O — CCTt<0 
— N(N — — — — — — — (N(NCOC^(N — — — — — (NCOiOtOt~00O3 


•pjBog 3uiXb<j 


<NC5t^O-^05CiCOt^cD — '<J^O00(NTt*CD«-HI^ — oo\oO 05'-<X — Olt^OcOI^ 
00Or}<f^ — 03-*C0iNC0m(NINC000C0C0<NC0CDO'00C0l^r-C0C0r^t^CiN 

CO ■* ■* u5 in lo ■>!< lo to CD o — cq 00 00 lO •* lo t^ 00 C5 — — CI CO CO N t^ cc o (N 

— — — — — — — — — — — (N(N— IN (NIN(NIN(N(N 


•ami T am co-*ior)<Ttir}i(NTi<(NCMoooiML-5mroooiO(NioioinoOT}<tot^<oo-HO 


•aratx aqi 
IJE pjBog Sni^Bj 


— c^oicoo — lOoiTf — 00 — ooo — Miocnco — oooi^t^i^coTjicor^oc: 

t^CilNiOOOOC^)-^- CQC^OiNt^OO-^OOC^iOtDiOiniCCOINiN— OOC-O — 
COCO-«1*»dO»OTj<ir30COOO — t^t^TtiCOrfiOt^OOOOOOiNlN — iOlCt^ — 




•aaj^ 


o-*oo>ioocD(Noocococo — Ti<c^inoit^(N — cooint~oco^O'*iN-^ 

— (NrfTflN-JiO — COOOu:)Ot)<iO — COTfCSC-JiOh-inoO — OOC^t^W — lO(N 
05 — COiOOOiomcOf^tOm — OOCOOOOCOINCqiNOOOlN-^COiOOOTrOIN-* 

— !NC^<NiN<NiN(N<N<N(NCO(NIN<NINC0COCOCOCO(NC0C0COCOC0C0COC0CO 


•naiiirrm-K- IVTOT INOO— ■iO--00ONl>JOTfOr~O-H-<}ic:«00O05t^--«Dr~O-. 03(NiOt-iC 
pd^+iLupY [K+uj^ miooO(N-*ro(Ncoin-*t^cooocoooocno(NOOioc<30oOTj<oc-)^LO 






•lEa^ 


mtD1^000>O-H(NC0-*i0imt^00aiO — iNCOT)<iOcDt>.000:0 — (NCOTfiC 

oococoooooc50o>o;mo5a;oioia>oooooooooo — — — — — — 

OOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOiOiO;050301010503C5050000iC> 



82 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Of 



C3 H 

o 
hi >> 



U 



n 


>i 


o 

n 






X 




a 


W 








rt 




d 














OU 


m 


i-l 



►2 a 2 fe 



a, o 



■a -2 



Q ^ 



S 5 '5. o S 3 












O i-H 







oco 




CO 00 




§"*■' 


xoo 




OC2 




MM 



w 



lo (NcoooNmo 

00 Tj^ c X r; irf o 

00 (NI^O — c — ' 

00 00_^O-HCq_o-# 

»» <N i-H'-'^M 






o a 

XI D. 

a 3 



Q JM 



■S v^a>> 



rl i:-^ ors o-a 3 a 



Mm 
^ a 



P^H 



» M 



00000005010000 >o 

tt ic CO -*_ o t^ (N -H n 

00 CO CC (N ^ OC O <N O 

CO T? (M o o CO en — I r- 

00_co-*C2C:om'* O 

cood-H oococo e<r 



(NrH 



H 



a 



o ^. 






Eh M 



O O fl 3 =3 

g g d gSU 

a c c c3 g 
: oca-ag| 

^ S o =i cS c3 3.23 m 



o) 00 LO X o 



P^ 



O 



lOC^COOOC^XiO 



r^t^omcO'H'^o 

■* I> X 05 C2_ <N CC IN 
C<f 00 05 l^" C<f CO -^ -H 



OX 

(xoo 


iO<N 

COX 


C-. X 
<NO 


(N "O 

X 


Ot^ 


et 



3I-' a g = 
20a2f-iiS 



I .2'-' 



I 03 C <D 



2 11 

■a 2-s 



» 2 



„ ID S 'JTI "— 3 

.2 g 0.5 g-o 3 St^ 
02 

83 



•H rs 



.2 — 

.2 a 



.-'— ' o o 2 
3 a 5.0.3 

S« _- 

C3 d 03 a-X 
_ t- o o 2 



.2 0.2 

~ 'S'a 
.2 n 
03 3 
mm 



°^ 
cQ a 

^ 03 ^ 

a >-. 3 



'a2 — 



•^§•2 



a o g H 



"2 tjj 
a o w 

3 -fcJ o 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



1—1 

CO 

O 
< 

O 



'tS 



■2 2 







t^05O>0 00t^ClOOO 


m 


iOOt)i 




•* 


•0 1 


o> 


1 






t}<aicoorocDcooqt^o 


cc 


coc<io 


CO o> 


CO 




^ 


(Nt^(No6t>.-HIN-*COO 


.-H 


OtDCO 


10 T-i 


co' 




rf'^NOCOM'^OOOO 


cc 


^oct- 


in Tji 






e> 


(N'*--icDooo-<j<moo 


1-^ 


t^ I-HIO 


CD in 


r-i 




iH 


^" CO t> 00 ^" rH* 00 ■* 0>" O 


m 


cicDio 


05 CD 


CO 






(MO lO T-lrH 


o- 


00 


00 


00 






e» 




IN 


-* 


■* 








u 




99 «» 






tOCOMOJt^t^^O'OoO 


cc 


OiOO 


TO s 


IN 






t^cDi-<a;05i>cD'-^ot^ 


oc 


T^rHO 


Tt. <^ 


00 




IS 
Ol 


ci (N o .-! in M id o t--' ■* 


,— 


CDiOO 


CO "2 


06 




cq^O(NOiO(Nco-*T-H 




.-H^O 


ZZ CO 


1^ 




t^T-HOlOCOfNOO-^COO: 


C^ 


como 


in °° 


CO 






cq o t> TO im" >-<" to -^ CO ^ 


CT 


oo'im" 


—' 


IN 






IMCD t^ (Nrt 




CD 


05 


CI 






«» 




IN 


-* 














c^t^ 1 












Tl<CO 1 


» ' 


































coco 




M 


































inca 




04 




























^ 






05TP 

coo 

rt<N 




HH 




























S 






e» 




8 




























3 






Tjlid 




^ 
































05 




s 




























£. 










« 




























H 






,H-H 
































>> 










^ 




























.Q 






d d 

C3 03 




H 






















>. 




■3 






•-s'-s 




1— 1 
























K 




ft 






r-00 
























t- 




HI 






coro 




w 
























ft 




a 
03 






06 ci 




O 






















w 








en CO 

Tt<CD 
























^ 


u 




S 






ox" 
































d 






IN 1-1 






























-0 






in CD 












a 
ft 

0^ 


c 


c 


"3 

■ft 
o 
« 

5 a- 


1 < 

^ c 
1 5 


■fc 

1 


a 


0., 

n 5 






hand Jan. 1, 191 
" Jan. 1, 191 

ind Total . . . 








Private 
Ward P; 
Special : 
Out-Pat 
Acciden 
Ambula: 
McLean 
Convale 
Miscella 


c 


— 03 rj 
•-Op. 

go2 


§- 
HO 






COCOI>C<3 




C3 (NlOCO 1 05 






n,-iioto 




CO IOCOOO_ 


CO 




•* 


-icic^d 




.-H CjilNOi 


CO 






(NOiom 




O lOr-lCO 






rt oiiOOl 




CO t>t-_o 


i"! 






Tf-n'o'to" 




CO CDO(N 


CO 






'^'^05^* 




in cq 




00 






e©i-lr-l 




Tt< 




■* 










e& 


1 69 






a3(Nin.-i 




1^ ooot- 1 CO 






in r-; coo; 




O 00 CO CD 


00 




IS 


ot-^c<ico 




CO coiniN 


00 




0<N'31 w 




00 (Ni-Hin 


t~ 




(N ^.C0 00_ 




t~ COt'.CJ 


CO 






i-To^idcD 




(N" COi-h"' 


-H 


<N 






lOTffcnoo 




X 




03 






s#^^ 




T)H 




'^ 


















e« 








1 e« 


t 


>5 




























pj 




























<! 




























S 




































a> 
















^ 












tn 










w 










& 






















H 




S 
















5 


>> 




H 














■ S 


•p 




b 














a> IB 
m 03 O 




X 


















o 
































dmjnistration 
rofessional Ca 
epartment Ex 
eneral House 




TAL OPERA 

tion Expenses 
Expenditures 


1 1 


\ 

! 






<!fi,QO 




O 03_- 


s & 






^^ 




3 t5 










&-a 


a 






o- - - 




O IS 









Eh 



























c 


c 


S 






. 



84 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



STATEMENT OF STOCK ON HAND. 

1915 1914 

Administeation Supplies $3,690.98 $2,652.06 

Professional Care of Patients' 

Supplies 9,923.15 8,206.41 

Department Supplies 20,718.41 19,201.24 

General House and Property 

Supplies 4,347.76 3,610.20 

General Material 2,121,53 1,296.11 

Total Stock on hand January 1 . $40,801.83 $34,966.02 



85 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



McLEAN HOSPITAL. 

Table No. 1. 
comparative statement of statistics. 

1915 1914 

Patients in Hospital first of year , . . 203 215 

Patients on visit first of year 12 9 



Patients admitted during year .... 

Patients discharged during year . . . 

Not insane 2 

Recovered 36 

Much improved 14 

Improved 31 

Not improved 30 

Deceased 12 

Patients in Hospital end of year . . . 
Patients on visit end of year 



215 




224 


123 




117 


125 


4 
36 
10 

30 

28 
18 


126 


205 




203 


8 




12 



213 215 



Total number days' treatment .... 77,807 77,621 

Free patients 465 525 

Patients paying less than $25 . . 25,151 27,492 

Patients paying $25 or more . . . 52,191 49,604 

Average patients per day 213 213 

Free patients 1 1 

Patients paying less than $25 . . 69 76 

Patients paying $25 or more . . . 143 136 

Average rate of board charged per week $30.86 $29.31 

Average cost per patient per week . . 29.54 28.53 



Daily cost per capita for provisions for 

all persons supported 0.516 



0.517 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physici an. 



o 


no 


o 




CO 


o 


IM 


«) 


r^ 


e# 


lO 


(N 



Pi:) 



^ 


P-( 


^ 


a o 


o 


T) 


f-< 


H 3 


U 


c 

C3 


• OJ 


^^ 


a 


c 


^ 


T3 H 






• !aO 


3 >> 


i 


a 


I; 


eu ^ 



•2 ^ c^ S § 

?? o >; a s 



o .s 



O -3 



s 


c 


H 


o 


o 


_5 


o 


s 




d 
M 


o 


s 


u 


d 


M 


M 


1-1 


CI 




§ 


^ 



C0(MOO(MC<5 00 OUSCNOO 



CO (N -* in .- O 

O X OJ O CO o 
t^ ^» cc 00 1-1 !0 

oo_oqc:r-co_-* 

— '"co .-HLo'cJ' 



00 t^l^OO 

lO 00 CQ C: O 





ocq 




o-^ 


OT 


^(N 


4) 


O 


rn 


^ 


C 





w 






XlM 

coufi 

x^ 


cox 
Oco 


(MM 



o o. 



<a 3 
l-lM 



o a 
■2 »• 

d 3 



w 



■e§ 



^>- S 
2 03 c£ p. 



•O t-2:3 gt^ 3 L. 

I'd g^oefeS 



W 



o 



w 



OS .9 

' Ufa 

•|i 



S S >i t-S " — 



g£ S3 -o w 



H w 3 



;j2.5-:3 .- = S g 

J C3 d-- K 3.n.S 
03.ti>M 03 k^ — "^1^ 



2S_ 

© o3 b c3 



X O -H O rH 

CO t>^ t^ q iO 

O CO — < o o 

Tj^ lO O X ^ 

CO CO (N 0_ i-H 



X 


CD 
X 


X 

to 


O 

CO 
CO 


'^ 


LO 



5 . d o *=^ 
3 2 g-l I 



a, 



X O O Oi "-I o o 

to (M lo »-i *o t^ q 

00 (N O O O "rf O 

t^ ^ O X C^ CO ^ 

(N CO O CO O -H t^ 

CO Lo" t>." (N -JD 

— ' -< c^ 



(M O Tit O 

o CO ■* q 

O O O C<) 

T^ ^H I> C^l 



s ^ 



E 5 "3 -J 
O m H S 



e 3 3 



2:-s 



"C « 9* ^ '^ 



3 3 -r; 

02 M 1-1 



— t- o o 

-a, 



l^tg^SQ^a -S^Scg^ I H 



87 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



h-5 

H 
1—1 

in 
O 

W 

< 



o 



>^ 

P5 
O 

U^ 

H 

:^ 

H 
<1 

12:; 

P> 

w 
P5 

Q 
X 



^ 


CO 


■<1< 


CO 


■o 


lO 




in 




t^ 






m 




t^ 




CO 




«» 





OtOOTO 
O'-JiO o 

dcoooci 
ioooot> 



O lO o lO 

o» oco oou^ 



lO 


IM 


l— 1 


00 




o 


o 


o 


00 


en 


in 


r- 


lO 




CO 




^ 





O °"C ° 





o 


t> 


o 


o 


-!j< 




r^ 


1> 


to 


T_l 


CO 


t~ 




CO 




a» 





OcdO 

oooo 
00 too 

CDcoO 
9S 



£ S d 

H 3 03 S ra 

,^ ^ ^ fl 

fi S a 2-2 

Sr U' 3 2 



S 00102CO 

S IMt^OtO 

2 cotD--<cn 
TjItonH^ 
^cocoeq 



"J ocot^oj 
iccftooo" 

1-1 t^TjlO 



(N tOTtfin 

05 ""lOCO 

oi coco>-< 

t^ cot^co 

CO t-.'-^'n 

t-^ oo"c^io 

CO i-li-l 



g^ o 
Q'o a-ci 

gas I 

•a « ca (D 
B"s ao 

•O u a> (U 



03__ — 

o2 g 

0.0 

O cj (D 

OOO 






►?0 5 



88 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



< 
I— ( 

O 

a 
< 



<: 

CO 

O 

l-H 

o 
:?: 

Ph 

o 

Eh 
CO 

O 
O 

O 

•^ 
I— I 

O 
X 
m 

P5 
< 





to 

bo 
c3 


^'-lO(M'*iOOO-*0500^C5^ 




(N(M(M00»0OOT|Hc0OC5O(Mt^ 




h 


r-l,-Hi— li— ll— IC0'-IO(N'-HrHO»OO 




< 


8 ^ ■ ■ 






io-*.-iTtHTfiiQTtH(roco05(Ncoc^t^ 






>O<lD'-Hp'^'-H00<:qt-;^^<N-^I>; 


lO 


+j 


i-JcOHDOCD-^'i-HOfNOOciiO^t^ 


s 


^(^^cO^OCO(^^^0':t^lMcOT^^cC^O^ 


l>i:O'*f0i-HiO03(NiQi-HiOt^a2'* 






iH 




r-HLQCMCO'^O COt^T-H 


CO 1-1 (M 






>— 1 l-H 


r— 1 






^ 




.^ 


'#fCC0C000OO(Nr-lt^,-IOO05 




*<I3 


(Mt^.-iCDCRia>iOCO-*C5l^^r-<iO(M 




fl 


CD_ <M„ 'S^^ <» t> ■* '^^ 0_ -#^ C» t^ (N CO GO 












cd 


^'' co" o" Tt<~ crT •<*■ oT .-T 00 co" (M 00 CO CO I 




3 


Oi -* (M CO (M CO (N 


CD 1> 




O" 




1— 1 




4) 

bO 

g 


00i-HCDt^COlOO5'T;r^'*<CO"^t^rt 




^^i-lC4t^CDO»-i^iOT-H00'*iOI^ 




t-H,-!,— lT-l,-ICOrHCOc<IC^i-lOt^O 




v 


d ■ ^ * ■ 






> 








< 








i-i^cqcoco-^iooooiot^ooioio 






'-iqioc^t-;r^oc»t^cqa3'*ioa) 


^ 


-t-j 


coTpcor-IoocJoioJcor^c^iooi^t^ 


iH 


o 


c^t^ooocoT-HTt^QOOi-H^^iot^ 


o» 


U 


^_ o c^_^ oi c^j_ 02 r^ t^ ca_ CO -^ '^ ■* ^ 


tH 




O" iri" (m" T^ M oT CO t^ r-T 


(M iM CO 














e© 




1 


i-iCOCOCO-*COiOCOO»Ci-<Ocot^ 






iOCOi-icOt-iOOO-^I>.CO^hiOiOO 




fl 


OiOCOO-^iOC^lOOCJiO-^'I^i-Ht:^ 










ca 


OOCOt^OOCOC^CO OOt^C^lOCOfO 1 




3 


OO iC 1-1 (M i-H CO (M 


CO OO 




O" 








a; 

2 


00ClO<M(M(M00COT}<-<^00Tf<COCO 




C^4<-^0-10t^>-Hi-l-*00(Nt^Tj(rHI^ 




»-H.-(,-l(N.-iCO>-iiCIMCV|.-iOt^O 




^ 


d ■*■ ' ■ 






»^ 






<d 








t--.«oo-iO'^-^iOc<)'>)C5cocooic-i 






lOTjtoj'^-^coiqt^oqt^'^coocq 


CO 


^j 


oodoioot^r^^iocoOTiHcooicoio 


f_l 


OJ 


o.-tc5rtT}Hr-it^Tt'oo-*r^co^oo 


o» 


O 


'*co»0'*oooa_QO»oj>co-* oo'<i<co 


o 






iH 


t-T CO (N tjh" c^f o •>* tC .-T 


(N (M CO 






1—1 1—1 








m 




^ 


00t^O-*(M(M02i-i00iO-<#r^C0CO 




*-*3 


t^'^oooocooicoot^^t^'-i'-ico 




la 


!-<_ t» O^ 00 iO_ O C0_ O CO C0__ CO l^ "* o 










c3 


a^ cT o" r-T CO c^f i>r ,_r tC tC cs 


CO CO 01 




3 


00 iC (M (M 1-1 CO Ol 


CO 00 




O" 










oi N m m en 


ji m 






-Qs:::= o-Q-TS^^: 


3 m +^. 














-c 




^ 


*" 








X 


c 


r 


c 


Q 






























i 


d 
































J 




^ 


























1 


J 




a 


























i 


-t 




03 




en 




















i 


i 




H^ 






















-« 


d 




-d 






























i 




% 
























c 


^■n 
















O t«' « nj « 


, O 






<UL:JooaW)eS^304) 








3 O L^ 






n 


^ > 


Ph 


m 


H 


hJ 


fe 


P5 


O 


Eh 


W 


PLH 


^ 


1 



89 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL. 

Table No. 1. 
comparative statement of statistics. 

1915 1914 

Patients in Hospital January 1 : 

Medical 4 2 

Surgical . 20 14 

Total 24 16 

Patients admitted during the year : 

Medical 150 153 

Surgical 569 528 

Total 719 681 

Total patients treated in Hospital wards 
and single rooms during the year : 

Medical 154 155 

Surgical . 589 542 

Total 743 697 

Patients discharged during the year : 

Medical 143 151 

Surgical 577 522 

Total . . ". 720 673 

Patients in Hospital end of the year : 

Medical 11 4 

Surgical 12 20 

Total 23 24 

Total patients' day's treatment: 

Free patients 6,613 5,572 

Pay patients 3,448 4,654 

Total 10,061 10,226 

90 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

1915 1914 
Percentage : 

Free days 66— 54+ 

Pay days 34+ 46- 

Total 100 100 

Average patients per day: 

Free 18+ 15+ 

Pay 9+ 13- 

Total 27+ 28+ 

Average time per patient in Hospital. 14— days 15+ days 

Daily average cost per patient .... $1.43+ $1.36 
Daily cost per capita for provisions for all 

persons supported 0.37+ 0.38+ 



91 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



-H UO lO -H rl O 

O) lO 00 O CO (N 

-! t>^ CO O !N l6 

(N — I -H 00 T)< 

(M 00 (N ^ 



W 



W 



O 



^ — 

.SPO 



P^ § M 

""Soft S 

(S 03 bD a S ^ 

la fl rt oj § — 









i-H -H 




M 


rf05 


ocs 


(N 


COCO 


-hCO 


1—1 


lOCO 


C;m 










e^ 


e© 


" 



t^ -^ C^ 05 CO t^ 
iC »0 »0 (N lO O 

ci --I d d -H 00 



W 



3 ■ £ 
O ^ 3 



iJM iJM 



w S 



•^fe 



■^3 « S d o 






c> 


03 




>H 


O 


^ 



cot^c» o 




p: ^ 



to ID 






3 a o. a s 5 

M c! a a CT 1^ 

03 oj'a'dT: "d 

-« >- o o 2 "> 

o a^ g" g a 



■a H 



»H ""1 



o 








So 


lO 


So 


CO 


^ lo 




lO 




«^ 





-# t^uoo 



O 

-a S^ H 
CQccS 



^ I 



T-5o3 
OTt< 



■^ to 

05 



(NO 

dd 



into 

05C5 



« 9 

03 IS _ 



o, 3 0) 



-2 c3 t. 1-5I-5 
■3.2 3 CI 

o§Sa 

i gH g: 



. H 



OCSi-Hrjl 

rj t^codd 

"H O O CO rH 



2 codioo 



rt mm 



t-9 
coO 



13 CL to i< 

m'o flT3 
H a> n 9 

oOHg 

ca c3 a o 

.2.2 S- 



92 



a 03 o 

OS o o 
000 



REPORT OF THE LADIES' VISITING 
COMMITTEE. 



The work of the Ladies' Visiting Committee consists 
of routine visits throughout the Hospital and of personal 
service given to the more needy and destitute patients. 
This includes supplying simple handiwork for conva- 
lescent patients. In all their efforts they have been 
greatly assisted by the cooperation of the social workers 
in the wards. The Committee also has a supervision of 
the Warren Library, and for a year has assisted in devel- 
oping the work of the cement shop for the handicapped. 

It is not possible, in so short a report, to speak in detail 
of personal service to the patients. This, however, is 
reported fully at the monthly meetings of the Committee. 
A small sub-committee has been lately formed which will 
be responsible for providing handiwork and games for 
patients. Gifts of wool for knitting, and games, especi- 
ally checkers and cards which are a great diversion for 
the men, will be gladly received. 

There has been a large circulation of books from the 
Warren Library during the year 1915. The total issues to 
patients and employees numbered 14,324 and only 32 
books have been lost, all of which testifies to the efficient 
work of Miss Ellen F. Wiggin, the Librarian. Two hun- 
dred and seventy-two new books have been added. Dr. 
Richard C. Cabot has again shown his interest in the 
Library in various ways and has promised to contribute 
books to the amount of S50 during the coming year. From 
time to time books and magazines have been received from 
friends of the Library, a pleasant instance of this kind 
being a gift of $6.46 for the purchase of books, from 

93 



Report of the Ladies' Visiting Committee. 

"Camp Abena," a camp of young girls in Maine. The 
work of the Library has been somewhat extended this 
year. Magazines are now placed in the reception room 
of the Hospital and once a month foreign books, papers, 
and magazines are sent to the Convalescent Hospital at 
Waverley and are later returned. The removal of the gray 
paper covers from the books, which was made possible by 
varnishing the covers, has been a great success. 

The cement shop for the handicapped is an interesting 
experiment started by the Hospital in the basement of the 
Out-Patient Department. In 1915, through the efforts of 
the Ladies' Visiting Committee, two sales were held — 
one at Easter in a room on Boylston Street procured 
through the kindness of Mr. Oliver Ames, the other at 
Christmas in the workroom of the Hospital. The articles 
on sale were bird baths, flower-pots, and garden seats. 
The receipts of the workshop were more than doubled 
in 1915, and the Hospital has decided to continue this 
undertaking. 

The Ladies' Visiting Committee wishes again to express 
its appreciation of the assistance it has received from 
the Administration of the Hospital and other officers, 
and from those in various departments with whom its 
members are brought in contact. 

Charlotte S. Sprague, 

Secretary. 



94 



REPORT OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

ON THE GENERAL HOSPITAL 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 



The Ladies' Committee on the Training School for 
Nurses desires to present the annual report of its work. 
It has been a year of carrjdng on the work in paths already- 
mapped out, with enlargement of opportunity in various 
ways for the nurses. 

The Committee carefully visits all the wards regularly to 
know and see the nurses at their work; the members meet 
the probationers in their classes under Miss McCrae's ad- 
mirable instruction, they lunch and dine with the nurses 
to keep watch over the food standard, and in every way 
learn to know the nurses. The active cooperation of 
the Superintendent of Nurses at all times with the Ladies' 
Committee, adds much to the practical value of the 
work, as do also the meetings three times a season with 
the larger Advisory Board and a hospital trustee. 

The quality of the apphcants for training has distinctly 
risen in the last ten years, and the high class of training 
given the nurses fits them for positions of trust and re- 
sponsibihty not only connected with hospitals, but in all 
the many forms of pubUc health work. At the same time 
an admirable class of women enter private nursing. More 
than fifty of our graduates are registered at the central 
directory of nursing. 

The proposed new Private Patients' Building will neces- 
sarily largely increase the staff of nurses and provision 
must be made for adequately housing them. 

Last May two head nurses of wards went over to nurse 
for the French Red Cross as part of a unit of six. They 

95 



Report of the Advisory Committee on the General Hospital Training School. 

gave three months' nursing service and now two others 
have gone. 

In September the nurses held an interesting reunion of 
former graduates, with three of the earlier superintendents 
present. 

Through the year they have had many minor enter- 
tainments and dances arranged bj^ themselves or by the 
Committee. 

No report ends without an appeal for funds. Our 
Committee appeals for the gift of scholarships of $100 
each. They are an important aid in carrying out the non- 
payment of nurses system and we need such help. 

Another desire and hope is that the Training School 
shall receive an endowment fund of its own, liberating 
the funds of the Hospital for other work. There already 
exists a small Training School Fund, collected in the very 
early days, and turned over to the Hospital when it took 
charge of the School. It would be a great advantage to 
enlarge that Fund and liberate other money for Hospital 
use. 

The year has been a growing and prosperous one, but 
each year brings new duties and new necessities, and we 
need the constant support and interest of our friends and 
the public to maintain and improve the good standard of 
an occupation and profession for women which has been 
begun and developed in an organized manner in this 
country only within the last forty-three years. 

Ellen T. Vatjghan, 

For the Committee. 



96 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

OF NURSES TO THE RESIDENT 

PHYSICIAN. 



Fifty-three nurses were graduated during the year, in- 
cluding ten who belonged to the 1914 class. There are 
still eleven of the 1915 class who have lost time and have 
not yet received their diplomas. Ninety probationers 
were admitted, sixty-eight of whom are accepted pupils. 
Sixteen pupils have entered from the schools connected 
with the Children's Hospital, FauUmer Hospital, North 
Adams Hospital, and J. B. Thomas' Hospital for courses 
varying from one month to four months. Six McLean 
graduates entered for general training. Three graduates 
of other schools entered for a six months' course; one 
completed the course, another withdrew, and one is still 
with us. 

Graduate head nurses have been put in charge of the 
miedical wards. One thousand three hundred and sixty 
requests for ch'culars have been received and two hundred 
and sixty-six apphcations filed; several applicants came 
personally and were rejected in some cases, but in more 
instances referred to other schools. There are seventy- 
seven on the waiting list. 

We have placed an extra nurse in the diet kitchen, have 
assigned another pupil to the Out-Patient Department, 
have put a pupil on duty in the X-ray rooms and have as- 
signed a senior nurse assistant to the practical instructor. 

When our probationers first enter we are obliged to 
put temporary beds in the double rooms and in the 
sitting-room. On account of the number of nurses that 
will be required for the prospective private ward and the 

97 



Report of the Superintendent of Nurses. 

new wards in the Bulfinch Building, our need for another 
nurses' home and for the teaching laboratory, which we 
hope to have in the private ward, is urgent. There have 
been the usual number of interesting opportunities for our 
graduates. Out of forty-two nurses graduating in 1915, 
twenty-nine are doing some kind of institution or pubhc 
health work. This year the Training School has been put 
in charge of the orderlies' work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Saea E. Parsons, 

Superintendent of Nurses. 



98 



MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL 
TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 



A three year course is maintained, including a three 
month preliminary course, during which time the pro- 
bationers receive instruction in the classroom. 

The pupils receive experience in general medical, 
surgical and obstetrical work; also operating tech- 
nique, dietetics, massage and bandaging. Pediatrics, 
orthopedic and several other branches also receive 
attention. 

Classes and lectures on physiology, anatomy, bac- 
teriology, hygiene and materia medica are given by 
paid instructors. 

Personal applications should be made whenever pos- 
sible on Wednesdays, from 10 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

It is well to write previously to the Superintendent 
of the Training School for the circular of information. 

There is a non-payment system. A tuition fee of forty 
dollars ($40.00) is paid upon entrance for the prehminary 
course. A deppsit of ten dollars (SI 0.00) is made for 
breakage, the balance of which is refunded at graduation. 
The Hospital furnishes the text-books and the uniforms. 
There are several scholarships offered to those who gradu- 
ate with highest honors. 

There is no arbitrary age limit — acceptance depends 
upon education, physique and personal quaUfications. 

A high school education or a good equivalent is re- 
quired, with an elementary knowledge of Latin, anatomy, 
physiology, bacteriology and chemistry. 

There are attractive special courses, affiUations and 
post-graduate opportunities. 

For further particulars apply to the Superintendent 
of the Training School. 

99 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TREADWELL 
LIBRARY. 



The prospect of spacious new quarters for the Tread- 
well Library and the Record Room sometime during the 
coming year brings a feeling of great relief when the pres- 
ent overcrowded condition of things is contemplated. A 
constantly increasing number of people make use of both 
books and records, and it will be cause for congratulation 
when they can all be served more comfortably and with 
greater facility. 

Attention is called to the completion of an index to the 
annual reports of the Hospital from 1873 to date. This 
meets the Bowditch history which ends with 1872. If 
this index were issued in printed form from 1873 to 1915, 
inclusive, it would be found valuable as a reference to the 
later history of the institution. In its present manu- 
script form it is not as available for consultation as its 
importance justifies. The index will be continued from 
year to year. 

The bulletins of literature have been resumed and 
cover, at present, the subjects of all special assignments 
made to surgeons as well as several subjects kept up by 
request. A special catalogue of hospital literature has 
been started for the particular use of the administration. 
This is at present located in one of the administration 
offices. 

The Library Committee has made a revision in rules, 
providing that unbound numbers of periodicals may, 
under certain restrictions, be borrowed. 

Two more pupils in the study of the care of hospital 
records have been received. One came from the New 

100 



Report of the Treadwell Library. 

Haven Hospital and the other from the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. The latter was here for only a few days, having 
come more especially for observation. 

A fine photograph of the late Dr. Reginald H. Fitz has 
been presented to the Library and has been hung. 

The Classification of Diseases is just appearing in its 
third edition, once more enlarged and carefully revised. 
This work has been a great assistance in cataloguing 
records, and would be more valuable still if those writing 
diagnoses would follow the rule to adhere strictly to its 
terms. 

During the past year the three clinical catalogues — ■ 
surgical region, surgical diagnosis and medical — have 
been combined and now form one large catalogue arranged 
to conform to the Classification of Diseases, i. e., in 39 
sections. Diseases under each section are arranged in 
alphabetical order with suitable sub-headings wherever 
necessarj^; and there is a complete index to the whole 
catalogue giving number of Section where any given 
disease may be found. 

Gifts of books have been received from Dr. F. C. Shat- 
tuck. Dr. J. J. Putnam, Dr. R. C. Cabot, Dr. C. L. 
Scudder, Dr. F. T. Lord, Dr. F. B. Talbot, Dr. J. B. 
Hawes, 2d, Dr. G. C. Shattuck, Dr. R. M. Smith, Dr. 
J. B. Howland, Dr. G. L. Walton, Dr. R. L. DeNormandie, 
Dr. Douglas Graham, Dr. E. R. Hayhurst of Columbus, 
Ohio, and Dr. W. E. Post of Chicago. The Exchange of 
the Medical Library Association has suppUed several 
volumes needed to help complete sets, and Societies and 
Associations, both here and abroad, have sent their trans- 
actions. Our thanks for these are hereby expressed, also 
for matter received from several of the universities of the 
country, for many reprints, and for state and municipal 
documents. 

We have borrowed several times from the Surgeon Gen- 
eral's Library at Washington, also from the Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital Medical Library, receiving most courteous 
attention from both places, 

101 



Report of the Treadwell Library. 

The statistical report of the Library, following, is made 
out this year 'in accordance with rules for uniformity in 
medical Ubrary statistics adopted by the Medical Library 
Association at its last meeting, held in May, 1915. The 
usual statistics of work on records will be found at the end 
of this report. 

LIBRARY. 

Increase. 

Number of periodical volumes at beginning of 

year 3,926 

Number of other volumes at beginning of year 4,949 

Number of periodical volumes added during the 
year 177 

Number of other volumes added during the year 112 289 

Number of periodical volumes lost or withdrawn 

during the year 9,164 

Number of other volumes lost or withdrawn dur- 
ing the year 4 

Total number of volumes at end of year . . . . 9,160 

Number of pamphlets at beginning of year 7,110 

Number of pamphlets added during the year . 704 
Number of pamphlets lost or withdrawn during 

the year 125 579 

Total number of pamphlets at end of the year 7,689 

Total number of current serials and periodicals 88 

Use. 

Total number of volumes lent for home use . . . 345 

Number of restricted loans (over night 24 hours) 

(not recorded) 

Number of interlibrary loans (none) 

Recorded use in reading rooms . (not recorded) 

Total attendance of readers 2,687 

Evening attendance of readers 

(separate count not kept) 

Receipts from 

Fees of members (no assessment) 

Trust funds . (approx.) $225.00 

Gifts 217.50 

Other sources 

(balance of expenses paid by the Hospital) 
102 



Report of the Treadwell Library. 



Payments for 



Books 110.46 

Periodicals 437.61 

Binding 182.00 

Completion of files 10.60 

Salaries 1,500.00 

Other maintenance 110.38+ 

Total $2,351.05+ 



RECORDS. 

Number of volumes indexed and prepared for 

binding 195 

Cards written: 

For clinical catalogue 11,167 

For name catalogue 10,507 

Total 21,674 

Number of records copied or abstracted . . 1,572 

Number of individuals consulting records . . 2,479 

Follow-up Work: Number of communications 
sent out: 

Year-ago letters 3,602 

Group cases : letters 1,039 

postal cards 428 

Total 5,069 

Respectfully submitted, 

Grace W. Myers, 

Librarian. 



103 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF HOSPITAL 

SOCIAL SERVICE TO THE RESIDENT 

PHYSICIAN. 



The Social Service Department has undergone several 
changes during the past year both in personnel and organi- 
zation. It is, however, at the beginning of the new year 
on a firmer basis for development than ever before, for 
through the helpful cooperation of other departments of 
the institution we find ourselves in a closer and more 
vital relationship not only with the doctors and nurses, 
but with the Ladies' Visiting Committee and the Training 
School for Nurses. 

Through the generosity of the Ladies' Visiting Com- 
mittee, a social worker. Miss Ruth V. Emerson, was added 
to the staff in February. Miss Dibblee, much of whose 
time was given to the instruction of patients, resigned in 
July. She was succeeded by a nurse, Miss Rosa Shayeb, 
in November. A secretary has been added for steno- 
graphic work and for various helpful services in the 
social work. 

The bulk of the work still consists in arranging for 
patients needing convalescent or sanitorium or chronic 
hospital care after discharge. The addition of the extra 
worker has made it possible for us to give attention to the 
diabetic patients, who have been of special interest to the 
medical staff both in the Out-Patient Department and 
in the wards. 

Since November 1, social service has undertaken to get 
in touch with every diabetic patient entering the ward, 
to discover as early as possible whether conditions at home 
may prevent the patient from remaining long enough in 

104 



Report of the Hospital Social Service. 

the wards for thorough treatment, and whether it is going 
to be possible for him to secure the proper diet after dis- 
charge. It is always important to know who will be re- 
sponsible for preparing the food for the patient at home 
and whether she fully understands the significance of the 
diabetic's diet. The social worker has an opportunity to 
reenforce the doctor's and the dietitian's instruction and 
to establish a basis for intelligent after-care. Home visits 
after discharge and careful correlation with the subse- 
quent treatment in the Out-Patient Department help to 
insure not only that the patient shall continue under su- 
pervision, but also give a more accurate basis for testing 
the efficacy of the treatment. 

Definite pohcies of cooperation between the Hospital 
Social Service Department and the Out-Patient Social 
Service have been formulated. All patients needing social 
service and referred to the wards from the Out-Patient 
Clinics which have continuous medical service, Out- 
Patient and House, are carried socially by the Out-Patient 
social workers. This group includes the Children's Medi- 
cal, Orthopedic, South Medical, Skin and Genito-Urinary 
Chnics. This plan has assured a closer and more con- 
sistent cooperation between the medical and social ser- 
vice for these patients, and to some extent has relieved 
the ward social workers from pressure. In spite of this 
relief, however, the number of patients carried socially 
has greatly increased. 

The relation with the Training School for Nurses has 
been strengthened by the appointment, as assistant to the 
Head Social Worker, of a graduate who had previously 
had three months' experience in the Social Service of the 
Out-Patient Department. Arrangements have also been 
made by which the pupil nurses who are assigned to three 
months' experience in Social Service spend the third 
month in the House Social Service Department. Diu-ing 
this three months' period the nurses' work is under the 
direction of the social workers who are dealing directly 
with the patients. Visits to the patients' homes, the inter- 

105 



Report of the Hospital Social Ser\'ice. 

views with their relatives, friends, employers and clergy- 
men, and the opportunities of seeing various institutions 
and agencies that are concerned wdth the care of the de- 
pendent and the social weKare of the community, — all 
these contacts give to the nurses a new point of view 
towards their work in the wards. Most of the nurses who 
have had this experience have Hved an institutional life 
for a year and a half or two years, and this vital contact 
with the conununity from which the patients come has 
re^dvified their own part in serving the hospital patients. 
They have a deeper appreciation of the significance of 
their skilful care of the mother of a large family, or a wage 
earner who may have others dependent on him. It also 
gives them, as pupil nurses, an opportunity to see some- 
thing of the varied phases of social work and pubhc 
health nursing into which they, as professional women, 
maj^ enter. To the Social Service Department this coop- 
eration has meant that there has graduall}^ grown up an 
increasing appreciation on the part of the nurses of what 
social service is able "to do for such patients as need it. 

The relationship with the Ladies' Visiting Committee, 
which has always been a helpful and cordial one, has been 
strengthened by several definite plans for cooperative 
effort. This has come about largely through the fact that 
Miss Ella L. LjTiian, who has given most generously of 
her time to the Department throughout the year, has 
come to know better how the social workers and the 
Ladies' Visiting Committee can supplement one another. 
Two of the visiting ladies. Miss Gray and Miss Homans, 
have been helpful members of oiu group of volimteers. 

Comparative statistics for the last four years showing 
patients referred to' Social Service Department: 

1912 1913 1914 1915 

222 243 534 812 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ida M. Cannon, 

Chief of Hospital Social Service. 
106 



RULES FOR ADMISSION, ETC. 



Application for admission of patients should be made 
at the Hospital on Blossom Street, Boston, on week days 
between the horn's of 9 a. m. and 3 p. m. 

Emergencies and recent accidents admitted at all 
hom-s. 

The Out-Patient Department is for the poor only and 
is open from 8.30 to 10 in the morning, Sundays and 
holidays excepted. 

Applications from a distance should be made in writ- 
ing, accompanied by a full description of the case by the 
attending physician, with reason of the physician for 
thinking hospital treatment desirable, and when a free 
bed is needed, by a statement of the pecuniary condi- 
tion of the patient. Always wait for a reply before send- 
ing the patient. 

Contagious cases are not admitted to the Hospital, and 
only such chronic cases as can be partially relieved by 
temporary treatment. 

Paying patients in private rooms will be charged $28 
to $35 per week. In the general wards the rate of board 
to paying patients is $15 per week. These rates, cover- 
ing only expenses of board and lodging, may be increased 
or abated in individual cases by the Resident Physician. 

An ambulance, accompanied by a medical officer, will 
be despatched to any point within the city proper for the 
conveyance of cases of accident or urgent sickness, not 
contagious, to this Hospital, or elsewhere, upon notice 
from a physician, the poUce, or other responsible source, 
subject to the approval of the Resident Physician. 

In cases requiring gratuitous treatment no charge will 
be made. 

107 



NINETY-EIGHTH REPORT OF THE 
• SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
McLEAN HOSPITAL. 



To THE Trustees of the Massachusetts General Hospital: 

The following report of the McLean Hospital for the 
year 1915 is respectfully submitted: 

One hundred and twenty-three patients were admitted, 
125 were discharged, and 205 remained in the hospital 
at the end of the calendar year. The whole number of 
patients under treatment was 338. The daily average 
number was 213, which is the same as last year. The re- 
coveries were 29.2 per cent of the admissions and 29 per 
cent of the dismissals. Of the 123 admissions 58 were 
primarily voluntary patients and 3 became such by sign- 
ing an application to remain at the expiration of a legal 
period of observation. Of these 61 voluntary patients 2 
were committed because of a formal demand for discharge 
which, owing to their mental condition, could not properly 
be granted. There remained on this basis at the end of the 
year 66 persons — 26 men and 40 women. During the 
year 11 patients were admitted for temporary care as 
against 10 last year; of these 1 made a voluntary appli- 
cation to remain in the hospital and 10 were committed. 
Of the 123 patients admitted 12 came from hospitals in 
Massachusetts and 8 from hospitals in other states. In 
addition to these, 16 were received from the Psychopathic 
Department of the Boston State Hospital, to which they 
had been admitted for observation. 

Under the law authorizing commitment by a judge for 
a definite period of time for observation 2 persons were 
admitted, each for 30 days. At the expiration of the time 
of observation both signed requests to remain as voluntary 
patients for further treatment. 

108 



for Women 



GROUNDS OF 

Mc. LEAN HOSPITAL 

CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL 

AND ■■ 

PROPOSED COUINTRY BRANCH 
OF THE GENERAL HOSPITAL 

Area 317.8 ± Acres 

A Pierce Building 

B Upham Memorial 

C Bell(nap House 

D Proctor House 

E Bowditch House 

F Gymn 

G Belknap House' 

H Appleton House " " 

I East House " " 

J Wyman House " " 

K Codman House " " 

L Gymnasium ** '• 

M Hope Cottage " " 

N Cottaga for one Patient 

N' Arlington House 

The Samuel Eliot Memorial Chapel 

Entertainment Hall, Kitchen and Laboratory 

Superintendent 

Assistant Physician 

Cottage 

Pumping, Heating and Electric Station 

Stables 

Gate Lodges 

Farm House and Stable 

Green Houses 

Cow Barns 

7 Piggeries 

8 Springs 

9 Ccal Pockets 

10 New Farm Stable 

11 Milk House 




TX 



T 






\ 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

The statistical tables appearing later in this report are 
for the year ending September 30, in accordance with the 
requirement of the State Board of Insanity. 

Among the various forms of treatment hydrotherapy 
still holds an important place. The different procedures 
with the use of apparatus in the bathrooms of the women's 
gymnasium are employed for a tonic effect and appear 
to cause reactions similar to those of vigorous exercise 
without muscular effort on the part of the patient. On 
the other hand the continued warm bath is given, in 
especially prepared rooms adjoining the bedi'ooms of the 
patients, for its soothing influence. It certainly is quieting 
in some instances, lessening noise and violence. It also 
tends to promote the appetite, increase sleep and it en- 
sures cleanliness. The only dangers from these baths as 
they are given here are a possible collapse in cases of 
arteriosclerosis and valve diseases of the heart and a 
tendency to the lighting up of an old inflammation of 
the middle ear. Patients are never fastened in the tubs, 
so that the danger of collapse is minimized by the ability 
of the patient to get out at will, as is also any possible 
danger from a sudden rise in temperature of the water. 
It is interesting to note that this latter danger is now 
being more universally recognized and a prediction is 
made that in time no hospital will restrain its patients in 
these continued warm baths. 

Work in the laboratories has been carried on during 
the past year with some limitations. No chemist has 
yet been appointed, but it is hoped that one may be 
found capable of serological investigations of value. An 
indifferent appointment would be worse than none. 
Laboratory investigation is a legitimate field of hospital 
activity and serves the double purpose of advancing our 
knowledge of psychiatry and stimulating the interest of 
the hospital staff in professional matters. A hospital 
that is not trying to do some research work is in the ruts 
of bygone days. Laboratories are maintained at a con- 
siderable expense and our small fund of S5,000 should be 

109 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

increased to at least $200,000 to yield an income sufficient 
to finance the work which the hospital ought to do. The 
following quotations are from assistants in charge of the 
laboratories : 

''Serological examinations have not been made as a 
matter of routine, but only when indicated. They have 
been made at the laboratory of the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

''The clinical conferences on admitted cases have been 
held weekly as usual. Fully one-fifth of them have pre- 
sented difficulties of diagnosis due partly to lack of de- 
sirable information (often unobtainable) and partly to 
the shortness of the period of observations, but chiefly to 
the still undeveloped state of the science of psychiatry, 
which makes the interpretation and estimate of the rela- 
tive value of symptoms matters of doubt or of disagree- 
ment. It is interesting that in the doubtful cases even 
prolonged observation has usually failed to clear up the 
diagnosis. The cases of disagreement show that there 
are differences in points of view or in fundamental con- 
cepts among the members of this staff as well as in the 
psychiatric world at large, and indicate the great need 
for further investigations and especially for gathering 
more detailed data for them. 

"All behavior is a response to a situation and can be 
fully understood only in the light of the whole situation. 
Hence it is desirable to record that as well as the behavior. 
Furthermore, normal responses are often as significant 
as abnormal ones, and customary normal or abnormal 
behavior under ordinary conditions is often as important 
as special abnormal responses to test conditions. Hence 
it is desirable to record these as well. In our records the 
attempt is made to do this, in the effort to give a more 
complete picture of the patient rather than of the psy- 
chosis or of the symptoms only. Many questions and 
answers are recorded verbatim to give better material 
for subsequent study. 

"The Trustees granted a six months' leave of absence, 

110 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

from July 1, to Dr. Abbot for work requiring uninter- 
rupted time. He has written four papers; one, a popular 
address on 'The Preventable Forms of Mental Disease 
and How to Prevent Them/ was written at the request 
of the Massachusetts Society for Mental Hygiene and 
has been delivered at the annual conference of that so- 
ciety and before two women's clubs. It will eventually 
be published under the auspices of the society. The other 
three, on 'The Causal Relations between Structure and 
Function,' on 'The Dynamic Value of Content,' and 
on 'The Biological Point of View in Psychology and 
Psychiatry,' will probably appear during the coming 
year. Besides these papers a scheme for a course in psy- 
chology, especially designed for the needs of medical 
students, has been sketched, but not completed. The 
lack of such a course is well known and the need is 
growing. 

"During Dr. Abbot's absence Dr. Whitney has had 
charge of the work of the department and under his direc- 
tion the records, which had fallen behind, owing to the 
difficulty in securing a sufficient number of suitable junior 
assistants, have been brought practically up to date. 
He has followed the system in use, making special effort 
in the examination of patients to get at the motives lying 
back of their superficial reactions, especially where the 
acts seemed superficially unmotivated." 

"In the psychological laboratory the original appara- 
tus completed last year has been in very satisfactory use, 
though improvements are being introduced in the con- 
struction of further models desired by another institu- 
tion. The electrically driven multiple pen recorder and 
the variable selective chronograph, being built especially 
for the laboratory, were economically purchased in a 
nearly completed state with much other accessory ap- 
paratus. The experimental problems have been those 
of choice reactions according to the lines indicated in the 
last report. The aim is for measures of mental stability 
that shall be independent of 'intelligence.' Thus far the 

111 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

results are favorable, but the number of cases is not yet 
large enough for generalization. 

''While more laboratory work was done this year than 
during any year since the laboratory has been under the 
present direction, the widening field of psychopathology 
makes it increasingly difficult to give sufficient time to 
the laboratory problems, especially in view of its impor- 
tant developments outside the laboratory. The facilities 
of the hospital laboratory are now far from completely 
utilized and the department could not fully utilize them 
without neglecting every other aspect of its work. Some 
technical assistance was obtained during the past year 
and upon the continuance of this depends the most effi- 
cient conduct of the laboratory work of the department. 

"During the spring an address entitled 'Mental Adap- 
tation' was defivered at Vassar College and later repeated 
at Blooixiingdale Hospital. There is an unusual amount 
of material awaiting publication, including the experi- 
mental work on alcohol and association done with Pro- 
fessor Dodge at the Carnegie Nutrition Laboratory." 

Members of the staff have organized a Journal Club 
for the critical review of psychiatric and psychological 
literature. Abstracts of selected papers are formally 
presented at monthly meetings, followed by a free dis- 
cussion. 

The following is a list of articles published since the 
last report: 

Dr. Wells — -Original Articles: "Common Factors in Mental 
Health and Illness," Popular Science Monthly; "A Note 
on the Retention of Acquired Capacities," American Jour- 
nal of Psychology. Reviews: "Healy's 'The Individual 
Delinquent,'" Psychological Bulletin; "Dynamic Psychol- 
ogy," Psychological Bulletin; "Lang, Josef B., 'Eine Hy- 
pothese zur psychologischen Bedeutung der Verfolgungs- 
idee,'" State Hospital Bulletin; "Lang, Josef B., 'Zur 
Bestimmung des psychoanalytischen Widerstandes,'" 
State Hospital Bulletin. 

Miss Jones — "The Hospital Library — Books for the Pa- 
tients," Modern Hospital; "On Books and Reading, Out- 
Hne of a Course of Lectures for Nurses in Hospitals," 
American Journal of Insanity. 

112 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital, 

Work in the handicraft rooms has been pursued through- 
out the year, with some lessening of activity during the 
summer months when the out-of-door life presents so 
many healthful attractions. With the women, of the 
twenty-three principal occupations offered, the most fre- 
quently chosen have been weaving, clay work and knit- 
ting for the soldiers. The men have done many things 
and it is interesting to note that a number have preferred 
such useful work as reseating chau's to the more artistic 
forms of employment. Two doll houses of elaborate con- 
struction were made during the year by one of the men 
and were then taken to the women's rooms for furnishing. 
They aroused great interest and twenty-four patients 
were employed in the making and furnishing of the second 
house. The first was presented to the Children's Hospital 
in Boston, the second to the New England Peabody Home 
for Crippled Children in Hyde Park. 

Three hundred and one volumes have been added to 
the general library, making the total number on the ac- 
cession book 8,294. About 300 were transferred to book- 
cases on the various wards to make room in the central 
Hbrary for the new books. Of the 301 added, 160 were 
non-fiction, many of them on art or handicrafts. The 
circulation was 9,073. 

The American Librarj^ Association has made our libra- 
rian a member of a recently appointed conuxiittee on insti- 
tution libraries and Miss Jones has written several arti- 
cles and done considerable work on this committee in 
addition to her regular work here. She also is furnishing 
copy and is editing a page of the Modern Hospital, which 
that journal offered because of its interest in the efforts 
to better conditions in hospital libraries. 

The amount available this year from the Lovering be- 
quest, including a balance of $793.41 from 1914, was 
$2,622.13, which has been expended in accordance with 
the terms of the will of Miss Lovering ''to promote the 
comfort and happiness" of the patients. The larger ex- 
penditures were for furnishings and material for the handi- 

113 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

craft rooms, a new billiard table, a new pool table, re- 
pairs to an old table lq the men's recreation rooms, and 
an addition to the greenhouse. 

There is scarcely anything that could add more to the 
attractiveness of the patients' houses than a profusion of 
ferns, palms, flowering plants and cut flowers. The addi- 
tion to the greenhouse was completed rather late in the 
fall, but the patients are already beguming to receive the 
advantage of its lacreased capacity, which wiU be more 
apparent next winter. The enlarged house still can 
scarcely supply all of the many places where flowers are 
welcome. During the summer, as for several years, a 
large flower garden was maintained for the patients, who 
had free access to it at all times for as many flowers as they 
wished. A few were interested in gardening on their own 
account, but the manual labor discouraged most of them 
after a brief experience. 

The loan collection of pictures, begun in 1897, has been 
continued. During the past year loans have been made 
of 4 oils by Mr. Desmond FitzGerald, 4 by Miss Mary 
B. Titcomb and 12 by Mrs. Wilham Stone. The hospital 
gradually has acquired quite a large number of good pic- 
tures, gifts from former collections that have been long 
here, and recently the administrators of the estate of 
Miss Alice Marian Curtis have presented 15 oils, 2 water 
colors and 5 photographs. A gift from the same source 
was recorded in 1913 of 8 oils and 8 water colors. Miss 
Curtis was always greatly interested in the effort to pro- 
vide for the patients the refining influence of good pic- 
tures and had loaned most generously of her work from 
the beginning of this movement. 

Because of a delay in the dehvery of construction steel 
the house for one patient mentioned in the report of last 
year, a most generous gift to the hospital, is only now 
approaching completion and will not be occupied before 
March of 1916. It is a house of two stories, of absolutely 
fireproof construction, spacious and attractive. This is 
the third cottage which the hospital can devote to the 

114 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

care of one patient and it needs others in order to provide 
an income sufficient for all emergencies and to permit it 
to do more charitable work for inhabitants of Massachu- 
setts who are in comfortable, but not affluent, circum- 
stances and who can here obtain a standard of care and 
treatment for members of their familj^ which could not 
be provided at home except at a much larger expense. 
When rates less than the cost are made they are almost 
invariably for residents of Massachusetts, in accordance 
with a long-estabhshed policy of the hospital. In order 
that the hospital may increase its benefactions it is 
again recoromended that two additional cottages be 
built. Working plans for one already are made and the 
location is selected. It is hoped that it may be built in 
1916. 

Mention is again made of the need of a home for the 
women nurses. There are more women than men in the 
service because of a larger number of women patients and 
also because, with one exception, women nurses as well 
as maids are employed in the wards for men. The pro- 
fession of nursing has its interesting side, but there are 
other phases not so interesting and experience only can 
reveal the many distressing and discouraging features of 
the work in a hospital for mental diseases. There is no 
department which, if it is efficient, contributes so much 
to give character and standing to a hospital and the long- 
continued, faithful and capable service of the nurses de- 
serves comfortable hving accomm odations which will 
ensure an opportunity for rest and relaxation between the 
hours of duty. The nurses of the hospital still occupy 
rooms on the thu-d floors of the patients' houses, some of 
them on the third floor of one of the houses for men, and 
are subject to Umitation of movement at those times 
which should be their hours of relaxation. The building 
fimd is now about $54,000. A movement has recently 
been started by some of the older alumnae of the Training 
School for a fund to be used in furnishing two of the rooms 
in the proposed house. This is still in progress. Build- 

115 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

ing the home at an early date, however, will be possible 
only by a large gift, which it is hoped some friend of the 
hospital may make. 

While the plea for a house for the women nm"ses cannot 
be too strongly made, the men should not be forgotten. 
It would seem to be the policy of the hospital to provide 
cottages or tenements for the men who are married, in 
order that they may have a natural home life, to which 
every man is entitled, and be contented to make nursing 
their life work. The hospital would thus be sure of having 
at all times a corps of head nurses who would render in- 
creasingly valuable service. This plan is not merely 
visionary, but has been tried and has stood the test of 
experience. 

The following changes have taken place in the staff 
during the year: Miss Alvira B. Stevens, assistant super- 
intendent of nurses, resigned June 30 to take a service 
with the Harvard Unit in France; Miss Alice M. Coch- 
rane, supervisor of the women's department, resigned' 
June 30 and was on that date appointed assistant super- 
intendent of nurses; Miss Sara J. McCarthy was ap- 
pointed supervisor of the women's department on the 
same date; Dr. Sydney V. Kibby was appointed junior 
assistant physician June 1 ; Dr. V. Edgar Babington was 
appointed junior assistant physician July 1 and resigned 
December 31; Dr. Walter J. Otis was appointed junior 
assistant physician November 2; Mr. Sidney K. Howell, 
apothecary, resigned December 9 and was succeeded by 
Mr. Charles W. Noyes; Mr. Charles E. Frost, store- 
keeper, resigned June 2 and was succeeded by Mr. George 
R. Kinread. 

The following are some of the present needs of the 
hospital : 

A house for the women nurses. 
Houses for married men nurses. 

A fund of $200,000 for research work in the laboratories. 
An increase of the occupation fund to $25,000. 

116 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

An increase of the fund for the art room to $10,000. 
A cottage for the care of one patient. 
Three additional stops to the organ in the chapel. 
A tennis court near the women's gymnasium. 

George T. Tuttle, 

Medical Superintendent. 



117 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1915. 



118 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 







r^Tj<eo 




05 (M 00 


I— ( I-l 




CO 




T* ^ 







lO uO 03 00 




o 


O-* «3 




M to-* 




1— ( 




CO 


CI 00 CO 


E- 


H 






" 








CO 






















< 




















O 


i 


cq oOt}< 




»-l CI ^ 




. . <M <M 




CO 


CI lO 00 Tji uO 


CI 00 CO 




t^ coco 








C5 


Tjl i-( r-l 


o 




















o 




















< 






















d 


i-OO Ci 




00 or- 


1—1 1—1 


lO CO -(N (N 




CO 


CO CI lO CO 




§ 






10 CO i-H 










Ot}( rt rt 




^ 




















O 






coca 




* * * ^H r-H 




CO 


CO CI • "-I ^^ 


» 


H 


















5 






































a 


^ 






C3 T-l 




: : :-^ 




CI 


CI 1-1 • • ^ 








































I— 1 








^^ 








^ 


'-'^ :'"' : 


Pi 


O 






^ . 


1-1 I-l 






1—1 


1— 1 I— 1 . .1-1 


H 


















P,^ 






































2% 
SO 









































c3 
























I— 1 • 


1—1 1— ( 








1—1 1—1 • • 1— 1 




■*^ 


















5^ 


H 


»— f ^ *-H 




>-l . y-< 








CI 


■-I '-I . . . 




















g^^ 
§" 


« 
fe 


- :- 




I— 1 ; i-H 











?-( 1— 1 ; 1 ; 






















.2 o 


c3 




















-|j 


0-* (M 




Tti ct- 




^ fo .toco 







Oi-io 000 




o 


o-<n O 




ci ■* 








CO 


CI 00 CO CI 




E-i 






■"^ 








CO 




a 




















1 




















«5 


1-1 00 CO 




CO ^ c: 




...-< — 




C3 


CO 00 1* '^ 


1— 1 


1—1 












00 


lOTJi ^ rt 


d 


Ltl 0> 




CO Ci 




»C CO ■ Cl C5 




T-H 


^H GO CI •<* CI 




S 


OO ION 




"O Cli-H 








Tfl 


CO 1-1 1-1 
































a . 






cS 








-* • . 






. . 
















4J 






I— 1 




























05 • • 






' 








3 








0. 






o 



















d 




• 3 • 






^ §3 ■ 




fe-n 










"S 




^ 




— 






+>T3 • 




ijTS 


• d 








u» 




en 



eS 


U en 




• OT • 








2 


c-2 > 





L. 




4. 
c 


02 

d 
.2 -« 


S 

d 


S^ 

3 S, 
c p. tr 






o.t: S 
a S^ 


g 


a 


III 


2 Y. = 


m n ^ ■ 

o>>" 



a. 
E 
£ 


E 
3 
d 


^§2S.a 

^ ^ c3 c3 c3 

CO 

1^. 






g.2 










_« 

s 


"5 . 






P-. 




< 














Q 





119 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



f^ 



t^ ^ IC Tf 



1 1^ •* .1-1 t^ (M 00 i-H IV o oi <>' <^ 

I .-H <M CO 1-1 .-I .-I i-H OO 



■-I "^ Oi T* 



IV rt TtH 03 



CO CO 

OOt^i-lOrHOO^^'* 
00 CO CO CO lO i-H t^ IV 



o -T-Hio .t^ .oooc-i .o aaior^-'— icoc^ioivt^ 

.-H • .-H . 00 kO iM .00 CO lO -^ CO »0 1-1 -^ 



CO !M C<1 (M C-l 



M 1—1 7-1 1—1 1-1 



'do 



(M M (M s; 

CO 03 '-' ^ 



o « 

go 



Eh aj 



, O IV CO . O 

. n^ '^ CO . r-H 

(M 1-1 (M 



03 Oi 
(MOOtJHIVCOOOO'^^ 
O CO tv I^ 

o o 



CO T-l 1-1 i-( i-( 



pc, 



CI Oi 
lOiOOiOOgoOi^C^ltM 



! CO 00 CO lo lO ■"* ■ 



o o 

t--C0iOO3'*(NTtHTtiTti 
C0>0-*i0i0i— I ^^ 



bo o 



i2a 



O. CO 

a; CO 

CO"" 

^3 .ti CO 

ca > — 

cj _, e3 
en C H 

s 



,0 4; 






m 








C 




01 












eS 




a 


tn . 


i; 


a 


eS 


o • 


> 


^ . 






a 


& . 



03 O 



'-' ►^ O L- 

CO a +j 

S a C 

§ 3 3 

CO W > 



D, O ■'-' 0) 



• >> 








. 3 


^ 


a 


3 

3 


ti 


Fl 


V 


a 


a) 


8 




<u 


• a 


j3 


o 


o 



_o 
.2 ca 



• 5-2 

m O O 
+J .Is 0) 



T3-0' 



Ah 



Ch C H-> 
3 P c3 



a a a 



cS 

o o fi 

T a Is 

^ 3 a, 

OJ 3 aj 

O c3 > 

cs 1=* : 

S* >> 2 

Q 



a a 

i5 ;s, >> 



«i .^ *> ^ 
r5'3r^'c« 



120 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



Table No. 2. 



TABLE OF ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, AND RESULTS FOR 
TEN YEARS. 









TJ 


• P 




1 '^ 




tc 




Years. 














2! 
> 


ainin 
nd of 












Who 
unde 


-73 
<u 

Q 




8 

P5 


<D ^ ii > O ^ 


Ending Sept. 30, 


1906 . 


129 


131 


309 


17 


42 


38 


184 


185 




' 30, 


1907 . 


179 


159 


338 


20 


56 


42 


205 


193 




' 30, 


1908 . 


177 


170 


382 


21 


60 


42 


218 


214 




' 30, 


1909 . 


165 


156 


389 


32 


54 


28 


219 


216 




' 30, 


1910 . 


169 


165 


388 


16 


56 


37 


217 


223 




• 30, 


1911 . 


182 


182 


399 


23 


63 


44 


217 


220 




' 30, 


1912 . 


172 


165 


389 


14 


58 


40 


221 


221 




' 30, 


1913 . 


154 


167 


375 


17 


60 


45 


218 


221 




' 30, 


1914 . 


117 


133 


335 


16 


35 


44 


207 


217 


" 30, 


1915 . 


122 


114 


336 


15 


37 


30 


211 . 


209 



Total number of admissions from the year 1818, — 10,986. 



Table No. 3. 

INSANE RECEIVED ON FIRST AND SUBSEQUENT 
COMMITMENTS. 



Number of the Commitment. 



Cases Committed. 



Males. 



Females. 



Total. 



First to this Hospital 

Second" " " 

Third " " " 

Fourth" " " 

Sixth " " " 

Total cases 

Total persons 

Never before in any hospital for the insane 

121 



40 
2 
2 
1 
1 



46 

45 
30 



47 

11 

1 

2 



61 
59 

30 



87 

13 

3 

3 

1 



107 

104 

60 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 






Ph 



PL, 



^ 



Ph 



Ph 



Pi 



Ph 



i-H rH (M T-H (M ^ CO 



00 -.-H TjH 



(N ^ Ol --I --I CO 



O 1-1 (M 



(M • ,-1 -i-H t-l ■ T^ 



4) ^ S> 

3 £ eJ 

m ^^ «-i 

" s s 

^g ■a ■s 

^ o o 






<!CiOWC5iJHfipH 
122 



ii^ H 



_>. m ■^ 



:3 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital 



2 
< 

O 




>-i.-(t^(MT}<a5i>c^(M 

(N CO 


o ,-, CO 1-1 --1 CO --1 

GO 


S 


i-HrtCO^'Ct>.cOCDi— 




m 


: : -* ,-1 Ci (M TtH CD T-H 


t^ »-i CO ; i-H ^ ^ 

CO 


CO 

o 

m 
cc 

S 
o 

< 

« 
w 

HI 

o 


13 
■i-i 
o 


rH :(Mi-ITt<t>(Nt>(M 


CO ; ^ rH ,-H ,1 ; 

CO 


a 

fa 


^ : : : ^ lo .-H ■* ^ 


CO ; ; i-i ! i-H : 


02 


: ; (N i-H e<3 (M .-c CO ^ 


fO '.'-*'. ^-' '. '. 


Is 


13 
-i-j 
o 


; th »c 1-H o (M Lo lo ; 




J 

a 
fa 


: ^ CO i-H -^ (N c^ (M : 

tH 




02 

13 


: ; iM : CD ! co co ; 




















+j 




aj .... 

0} 




^ :■;■•■ 


Massachusetts: 

Barnstable County 

Dukes 

Essex " 

Hampton " 

Middlesex " 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Suffolk 

Worcester " 


Total resident in Massac 

California .... 

Canada 

Connecticut . . . 

Iowa 

Maine 

Minnesota . . . . 



123 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 





H 




^; 




w 




^ 




H 




1— 1 




§ 




s 




o 




u 




>^ 




m 


-^ 


Q 


-^ 


9 


^ 

« 




o 


Q 


1 


<1 




r/7 


lo 


iz; 




O 


n 


CO 


"^ 




H 


fL, 




H 


< 


^ 


H 


^ 




M 




^; 




HH 




fe 




o 




H 




CJ 




^ 




w 




Q 




KH 




yj 




W 




tf 



t 
o 
H 


"3 


- 


H C^ ^ 


H M T- 


H C'q 


C2 IM C-l 

^ 00 M 


o 


03 

a 


rt r-l ,-H Ol ^ (M 


1— lO ■* 

,-H TjH T-H 




03 


:-:::: 


00 t> 00 

CO 




to 
o 

< 

a 

H 

o 


13 
1 


T— 1 ! 1— 1 f— 1 I 1—1 


00 05 IC 
(M 1—1 




03 

a 


^H ; ■— 1 >— 1 ; >— 1 


O C73 O 




03 




(N O lO 

I-H 


LO 


S O 


"3 
1 


; Ol ! 1-1 1-1 r-( 


;:: s? '^ 


o 

CO 


03 

a 

0) 




XO CD ■* 


c 

CO 


03 


: ^ : : : : 


CD t^ CO 


o 

CO 






J 
J 


s 

a; 


t 




IS 

o 


"c 

cd 

C 
g 




T. 


01 

C 

O 


.2 

c 

> 

ca 
a 
o 




03 

D 

1 





124 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

Table No. 6. 

CIVIL CONDITION OF INSANE PERSONS FIRST ADMITTED TO 

ANY HOSPITAL. 





Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Unmarried 

Married 

Widowed 


10 

17 

3 


19 
8 
3 


29 

25 

6 


Total 


30 


30 


60 







Table No. 7. 
OCCUPATION OF INSANE PERSONS FIRST ADMITTED TO ANY 

HOSPITAL. 



Occupations. 



At Home 

Broker 

Carpenter 

Clerk (office) 

Clerk (store) . 

Curator 

Financier 

Gas Fitter 

Governess 

Hair Dresser 

Housewife 

Journalist 

Lawyer 

Manager 

Merchant 

Operative 

Pool Room Keeper 

Porter 

Physician 

Real Estate 

Retired 

Storekeeper 

Student 

Teacher 

Teacher (music) 

Tutor 

Upholsterer 

None 

Total 

125 



Males. 



Females. Total. 



30 



30 



60 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



Q 
<, 

o 

<! 

CO 

Pi 
I— I 

H 
12; 

:z; 

I— I 

o 

O 
<1 













CO 




•5 


1 


; ; : : : :r-ro<M^'-HiM 


lO 


CO 
GO 




a 














































"o 




;;!!!!'-' "-I ! iM ; ; 


Tt< 


q 




S 






lO 










lO 




H 






















4^ 

<3 




; : : l i ; I'^cqim^cn 


n 




o 












» 


































Q 










,_, 






O 

Eh 


I ! : ;c5 ;(M»oco(M^ : 


LO 
T-H 


















o 












ai 












+j 
















;ii:i-h;(m;t-<;;; 


r}< 


00 

CO 
05 




2 








CO 




































<: 








00 








; ; '. '. ^ '. :»o(N!M.-H : 


^ 














00 






O 


-,-(,-< lO CO CO >0 C-l LO Oi (M i-H 


O 


o 




'd 


T— 1 I— 1 


O 


CO 




a> 












.«_> 












-i-> 












'a 








o 


o 


"^3 

a 


<i5 


jrH i-^Tfi-icocoort : ; 


o 

CO 


C3 

d 










>4 


^ 








C5 


<5l 




=^ 


: :.-<T-ic^cacsicoicoo<M-H 


o 

CO 


5 


o 






















Q 










(M 


s 




o 


i-li-H-^Ttlt^LO-^^IMOOCO 


o 


Th 




eS 




CO 


CO 


O 


C3 


















< 


-t-> 










^ 

M 


<3l 


1 


i-ii-tcon^cocoioccy-f '. '. 


o 

CO 


in 




;-i 








CO 


£ 


s 




















< 








CO 








I :-i— ii-(cooo<M<©-*t~co ; 


c 
CO 


? 












tn 












(4 












>> 








• t/acocQcnc/3OTmo:o5 




a 








t,t,t-t-t^t-t-,tH(-i 










• c^cdcSc^cjwcjc^cd • 




"~* 






















a; 




?? 




.— OirtOiOOOOOO oj 




cS 




<1 




^CoooooqoooS 




a 






cS {3+^^-'+^^-'+^+-'-*-'+^+^ >j 




o 








• 2 ojiOOiOOi-OOOOO-^ 




a 










M 








Congi 
15 ye 
From 

Over 


'a 


a 
a 








C 



126 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital 







-1-5 






























O 




























H 


























i 1 




























































z 


cd 
























en 


1— 1 


S 










1—1 








































p 
< 




-i-j 
























o 


o !2: 

PS H 
P o 


























g 


f^i 
























O 




























cS 




























^ 
























PL| 


























































-t-> 

O 










eq 








CO '^■ 


00 




»H . 


H 


























^ fe 




















































B ^; 




































'"' 












^ S 


- 


e3 


; ! ; <M ; 


C-l 


IC 


1> 




4-5 

O 






'M 


oi 


t^ 








cc 


r- 


o 


o 


H 


















<M 


cc 


o 


























p 

H 
































(M 


(N 






-^ 




CC 




o 

CO 


Q 


















































<: 




























S 




o; 






t> 








t^ K 


o 




















i—t 1— 


CO 


CO 




























fn 




























m 




























P 




























<( 




























O 




























o 




























iz; 
























































fH 
























































o 










or 














































w 






cr 

C 


C 


a, 

1 


2 






> 


•> 














"3 

1 


< 


a, 
> 
C 


0- 

> 


■1 


1< _j_; 

1 


C 


1 


c 

c- 


C 

c 
) c 


ir 





127 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



Table No. 10. 

PROBABLE DURATION OF MENTAL DISEASE BEFORE 
ADMISSION. 





First Admitted 
Hospital. 


TO ANY 


Previous Duration. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Congenital 

Under 1 month ... . . ... 


5 
7 
6 
4 
3 
2 
2 
1 


1 

6 

10 
3 
3 
4 
2 

1 


1 
11 


From 1 to 3 months 


17 


3 to 6 " 


9 


6 to 12 " 


7 


1 to 2 years 

2 to 5 " . 


7 
4 


5 to 10 " 


2 


Over 10 " 


2 






Total 

Total average known duration (in years) 


30 
1.52 


30 
1.39 


60 

1.45 



128 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



o 

2: 

o 

3 

o 
o 

K 






H 
O 



H i « 

Q3 


o 


1 


1 


fa 


rt.co.-i-Mi-i(N-.-rHcq m 

T-. • • • (N 


c5 


•cqco -OO •lOrlH.-l • ■ -co 







^ 




-^,-H -T)<.-lrt 


00 


fa 




: r-^ ::-:::::: : 


IN 






;^;;-*;'H...... 





c3 
o 

P5 

w 

o 

m 

P 


T3 

!> 
p 


4^ 
o 
H 


-(N -rtr-tr-, -r-H - -Mr-( 


00 


O. 

o 


1 




:-::-^: ::::": 


cc 






.^ :- :-:-:: :- 


l-o 


> 

s 

a 
S 


O 




— cc-Hrt •i>rt • • • ;<M 





^" 




:'-"^::'«:::::: 


l> 


c3 




rH(N -rt -(Mrt - - • -IN 





It 


O 




- • • IM • .-1 (N j lO 


^ 




:::::- -^ :::: : 


(N 


c3 




. . . (M . . _< 


« 


1 
% 

o 

o 

C5 


O 
Eh 


^ 0«----(Nl 


M 


I 


.-H in.-i-.--N 


.OS 


c3 




-H N 


C<5 


1 Q 

a g 

o fj 

^1 


O 1 


- N 


fa 




,-lT)<rH --OM.-H1-I-H -(M 


b 

CO 


J 1 


l>rt -t^ -0000 - ■ • r^ in 



cc 




-< 

a 
m 

O 

b 


s 
« 
o 
fa 




■3 
■ft 

m 
ja .2 

>. 

d A 

ll 

*» r 
1 


Arteriosclerotic psychosis . . . 

Dementia prsecox 

Drug psychosis (acute) .... 

General paralysis 

Involution psychosis 

Manic-depressive depression 
Manic-depressive excitement . 
Manic-depressive, mixed . . . 

Paranoid condition 

Psychopathic inferiority . . . 

Senile dementia 

Undiagnosticated 


< 

c 





129 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 






o 



O 
o 



Q 

o 
o 

w 

K 

K 



Q 




W 




O 




rt 




<i3 




ffi 






d 


Q 


w 




Q 


H 


o 


H 




§ 




>! 


tf 


o 


<! 


o 


w 




o 


ro 


C/J 




Q 


w 








H 




<: 




Q-, 







1 




(M • • t> N "O OJ (N IM • 


^ 


^ 1 


t^ 


co 


CO 


1 
















jog 

-< K ■< 


H 




1 




















o wn 


• 




■lO 


-* 


1> 


t> 


f=^ 






IM 


T)l 
















P^ 




• ■ • ■* IN t> CO <N IM • 


i-lIM 


CO 


o> 


05 


^ 






N 


•* 


M< 




_^ 


• • •T-llNiM.-l • • ■ 


^_l , 


1^ 


IC 


iO 




o 












a 


H 
























m 




T-( rH • • 




(M 


■* 


■* 





fa 












cS 


. . .^C<lrt • • • 


^ . 


lO 


^ 


^ 




§ 








'"' 


'"' 






^ 


. . . C<5 • i-l • • IM 


•CO 1 


CT) 


t^ 


1^ 






o 
















> 


H 
















o 
































a 




,_(... 




CO 1 


■* 


t- 


l> 




fa 
















"^ 










































lO 


o 


o 




:z; 


S 
















^ 


• • -fO -(NTtt • ■ 




^ 


o 


to 


CO 






o 










oq 


(M 




T3 


H 
















> 




































• • -n -rtcq • • 




J-i 


h- 


■* 


Tt< 




Q. 


fa 














o 


fi 


































o3 


i-l(M • • 






CO 


(N 


<M 


< 




S 






























p 




^ 


(N -^ • 














O 








CO 


CO 


00 


» ft 
ft 1 


H 














0) 

fa 








IM 


^ 


-* 
















oJis 
































^03 


d 

s 








rH 


■* 


-* 
















_^ 


(N • • ■ -OO-*!-! ■ 




CO 


00 


o 


o 






o 










c: 


CO 




T3 


H 


































a;' 


















> 




IM • ■ • -roco • • 






03 


X 


00 




o 


fa 










'"' 


^ 




















rt 


03 


lO rt 1-1 - 




•<N 


Oi 


(N 


IM 






^ 














^ 


rt,-l,-lrtlMC0>O(NC^rH 


•lO 


r^ 


l> 


■* 






O) 




■^ 


C 


O 


1 ° 

2 S 


H 
























o £ 








T- 




Oi 


O" 


fa 


•IM 




co 


CO 


U5 


a 


















• -r-H ■ <N to CO N --H i-l 




CO 


CD 


lO 








T* 


^ 








^ ^ to . . m . 

d rj S ?, 

O Sj3 • • S • 












































■ "m 


i S^ • >>'H • 


























g 




ro m.a 


a'S 2 ■■c'-S ■ 










m 

P 




° o » 


-a o c fl.y c 












1111-1^^^1:2 g.-s § 










o 

s 
« 
o 








1 




p: 


6 






































) bD 








c 


1 


1 ID 








n 








s- 


■< 


, < 


1 



130 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 







^ 


oo CO 


CO r-H ^ 


CO CO 05 






o 


!>■ T-H 




(^ 0> "^ 






H 












>-5 






























o 




<p 


CO 00 


C<I ^ 


tr~ tr^ CO \ 




fe 


CO 




■* ■* CM 1 


H 


































a 


(M iC 


.—1 • 1—1 


Oi 05 CO 






S 


T)' 




Tt< ■* M 






O 


CO --> 


1— ( 


LO »o oo 


a 




H 


'"' 




I— 1 I— 1 
















S 




C^ 


fo : 


1 T-i ; 


'^ ^ C^l 


Q 
















03 


O '-' • • • 

T-H ... 


:=! ^! «= 


Q 




o 


"^ ^ 


: : ^ 


t^ t^ CX) 


m 

















H > 
















o O 


#_II> 


t^ 




l>- t^ CO 1 






f=H 


























1— 1 






00 ^ 


! ! '"^ 


O O lO 






-M 

o 


Oi •* 




CO CO CO 


Q 




H 


<M 




(M CM I-H 


U 















1 


> 

o 




aj 


O Tj< 




TjH Tt< t^ 


BJ 




fe 


T— f 




1— 1 i—i 


cu 




























■■ 


















HH 




c3 


!M 




C<1 <M O 






*"* 






fe H 






CO (M 




00 00 lo 


o « 
o 




e2 












W Oh 

















>-5 £ 
















a 




r*^ 


CO ^ 




■* '^ CSI 1 


■«1 CO 




P^ 












< s 






























«2 




e3 


CO -H 




■* Tt< CO 






-i-j 

o 


oq lo 


CO 


O O IM 






e5 


(M 




CO CO I-H 


> 
O 


















a; 


CO CO 


(N 


00 00 CI 




fe 


i-H 






O 

















U 
















rt 




e3 


05 <M 


<-( 


(N (N CO 










1-H 1— I 
































13 




z 












-u 




o 
1 




15 








1 




Q 




■^ 








>i 




<1 




to 


; 2 s 






03 




O 




O 








O 




pj 




m 








"^3 




w 




M 2 


- 2 ; 




05 


<u 




M 




-*-■ 




oa 


o 


-M 




s 




^3 


^ 


§ 
§ 




'a 

c3 








il 


bird 
ourt 
ifth 


"5 
o 


o 


£ 








fe W 


H fe fe 1 


^ 


H 


fa 



131 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



O 

m 
< 



o 

CO 

I 

O 
Q 

iz; 

<j 

Q 

O 

w 

CQ 

< 



•jte(IO!»nv 


Hi 




: - : 


: : ;U 

• 1 


^•| 






; ; ■:! ; 


§ 1 




: - : 


: : : h 


•aYxoi 


f^T-H ■-( .-1 —1 TO ca Ti i-t|>o 


^1 - ; - ; - ; : -h 


s i 


• .-1 • .-1 (M e rt • '"' 


•paXTJ^;; 9ATS 

-saidaa-sniT'K 


h| 




- : : 


: : : h 


[=; 1 




-- : : 


; ; ;h 


^ 1 








•uoissajdaa sais 
-sajdaQ-otuBivr 


H j 




• '• rt • ^ rf M 


^1 




.- ; : ; : -h 


^! 




: i —t '. ^ : (N 




^1 




. V . . .' . 1 


•sisoqo.^s<j 
nonnjOAnj 


^ 1 




: : -^ : : : I- 




^1 








•astasia 

oi'j'Braog qat,vi 

sisoqo.'Csj 


^i 




: - 


; ; ;h 


^' 1 








s| 




; - 


! ; ;h 


IBjanaQ 


H 1 






!D • -CD 


^ 1 








^1 






to • • O 


•xooaeid 
■Bt'^uauiaa 


H 1 


^ ^ : : 


• • ■ (N 


fa 1 


- ; ; i 


: : :h 


S| 


: -- : : 


: : : |- 


•BisoqaiCSfj 
'ojiojaps 
-bua^V 


^ 1 




: : : ^ : : :|^ 


6h' 1 




;;;;;;;!; 


^ 1 




: i ; — ; ;h 


m 

§ 

■< 
O 




o 

i 

o 

p. 

1 

1 ( 


Cerebral hemorrhage 

Exhaustion of Huntington's chorea .... 


General paralysis 

Suicide 

Total 



132 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 





I3g 

















































3 1 




.2 a 


o 


— 1 T)< Tf CO i-O --< 


00 


■ MCO 


• rt ■ ^ -< • M • O) 


t-- 







«1 





























IM 


o 






•1-HC3 •Tf.-i 


OJ 


■ 0^ 




(N 


■No 
















i 


ll 


c3 


— ICO-HCOrt ■ 








._ . .^ .(M .^ 


10 




■ in 'I 


3 

o 

< 


^■o 


S 






t> 








































f- 


« 


■7^ 


















a 


.2 1" 


o 


• <N oq ■* LO lO 


00 


•-2 


. . . rt . C) r-i -co 


t^ 


•t^^ 




1" S 


H 




^ 






• a> 


o 


P4 S 






























J 

< 


re 

i-i a) 

(Uteri 


^ 


•-i.wiM(Mr^ 


C-. 




;::-::::- 


iM 


CO 

•<Md 

eq 

IM 


















■o'^ 


c3 














CO 




1° 


S 


•— ii-((Mcocq 





:~io 


C^l-H N 


la 


■"5 10 












r^ 






00 




o 


-^ 


•Tj<>-nOC<l 


N 


■ cj-o 


■ •^rf^C<l.-iCq 


00 


■X'^ 






^ 




" 


•"■N 












•r3 t) 

°1 


6 












CO 




fe 


• TflrtC^Cvl 


^- 


•^2 


c^ 


!M 


■N C^ 

• X 






















.sS 


















o -^ 


s 
§ 


• • -M • 


co 


• coin 


• .,-(^-HM^ . 


- 



■ 0-=^ 


3 
o 


































W 










._4 









9 


"::^ 


'-iiOCOCO • 


C-l 


■IN t~ 


rf rq c^— 1 • « 


0: 


• X '-; 


!- 


^ 


r^ 






■ I— 1 ^ 






■ X 


Z 


o 












1 


"^ 


< 






























_., 


O 


o 








C^ 






oc 


t< 


r^ 


r^ 


— 1 lo — 1 c^ ■ 





• Ci CO 


IM 


« 


■IMtjh' 


a 


"3 




• 




-J< 






r^ 


^ 


'S. 








r- 






CO 


S 


O 


=3 


■ -(N-H • 


CO 


•coo 


.-hCJ -(M-h . . . 


«r 


■00 


o 


a 


§ 













uo 






















O 


^lOr-icq • 


(M 


CO 
(MO 


c^i ^ rq rt -■ • --1 • 


GO 


■ xq 


£ 


:c £ 




^ 


■■^ CO 






cq 




































o S--5 








x 











c-^ S 


QJ 


CO M w !M • 


^ 




— « - T— t 


M 


■ IMIO 




.l-^'S 


f^ 






-I^ 






■ I> 


















































?q 

•o'-T 




a 


C3 


^n ■ ■ ■ 


CO 


C3 

•CO 03 











^ 






'^ 






N 




















































^ 


























_2 


























-C 















































































a 
a 


























d 






















S 



























Q 






33 










2 














§ 




O 





























































S 






f3_ - t-,. 








a 




C, . "S- . . - 








c 




a 




t. --l ^ 










c 


!3COOIM<N>OOOC 

















. 








r-l ^(NCM 
















>Sooooj 











Sooooooot. 








'0 














" ^^j^-ts+i-pjjc 














T-t A 

T-icotoi-iC 


• 


c 




fcO 


'^ rt CO -M cq 1.0 0^ 

151 




fl 


© 
to 








0> Ih 


, 1 

' 





u 

> 
< 


"c 





c3 
1 








< 












H 




&■ 




n 


















ir 




t- 





133 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE McLEAN HOSPITAL TRAINING 

SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 



The Training School for Nurses, with the completion 
of the thirty-four years of its existence, has a roll of grad- 
uates including 811 names — 532 women and 280 men. 
In the following summary it is shown how many re- 
main in the work of nursing, and into what positions in 
life others have gone. 



Number of graduates in twenty-seven years . 
Graduates remaining in the service as nurses . 
Graduates remaining in the service as officers . 
Pupils in Massachusetts General Hospital 

Training School 

Superintendents of hospitals 

Superintendents of nurses, other hospitals . . 

Employed in other institutions 

Engaged in private nursing 

Instructor of nurses 

Assistant instructor of handicraft 

District nurse 

Social workers 

School nurse 

Anesthetist 

Medical students 

Physicians 

Chiropodist 

Sanitary inspector 

Dentists 

Lawyers 

Clergyman ' . . . . 

Missionary 

Principal of high school 

Druggists , 

In other business 

At home 

Married and left the profession 

134 



Men. 


Women. 


280 


532 


12 


34 


3 


5 




10 


3 


9 




12 


14 


27 


68 


146 


1 


2 


1 


1 




2 




4 




2 




2 


5 




53 


5 


1 






1 


10 




2 




1 






1 


1 




2 




76 






37 




188 



Report of the McLean Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

Deceased 19 33 

Pupils now in this school 44 49 

Unknown 4 2 

Hospital service, European war 4 9 

It will be seen from this table that of the 498 women 
graduates of the school who are now living 5 are phy- 
sicians and 260 are still in the profession of nursing ; 
and that of the 261 men graduates who are now alive 
99 are still nurses, while 68 are students of medicine 
or are physicians or dentists. 

It will be observed that 13 of the graduates of the 
school, 4 men and 9 women, are in the hospital service 
of the Allies in the present European war. Miss Alvira 
B. Stevens, assistant superintendent of nurses, resigned 
her position to take service with the Harvard Unit in 
France and Miss Alice M. Cochrane was appointed her 
successor. Miss Sara J. McCarthy became supervisor 
and Mrs. Sarah M. Hayford succeeded Miss McCarthy 
as instructor in the technique of nursing. 

It is pleasant to record the interest of the alumnae in the 
proposed nurses' home, which has found expression in an 
effort to raise among themselves enough money to furnish 
two rooms in the house. The following circular letter has 
recently been sent to graduates whose address could be 
obtained and is here printed both as a matter of record 
and with the hope that it thus may be brought to the at- 
tention of others who will wish to contribute. 

''A fund has been started for the purpose of erecting a 
Nurses' Home at McLean Hospital. 

''We as graduates feel that this is an urgent need, in 
order to maintain the efficiency and standard of the train- 
ing school. 

"Surely all graduates want a part in this work, and we 
would suggest that we undertake the furnishing of Library 
and Reception rooms as our share. 

"If each graduate will give five dollars or more, a sum 
worthy of the object would be realized, though any 
amount would help. 

135 



Report of the McLean Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

''Miss F. E. Gilbert, who for many years was Clerk in 
the business office of McLean Hospital, has kindly con- 
sented to receive and deposit our contributions, as a 
special fund. 

"Annie Simson Rathbone, Class of 1895. 
"WiLHELMiNA Inch Emery, Class of 1893. 
"Emma Neal Bkigham, Class of 1896." 

Graduates of this school have had the privilege for 
many years of taking a post-graduate course of study 
and experience in the school of the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital and a large number have availed themselves 
of it. When first made it was a reciprocal arrangement 
and included the men as well as the women, but the women 
graduates of the General Hospital School were not then 
interested and the men graduates of the McLean School 
did not care to go to the General Hospital, partly because 
of the living accommodations provided, but chiefly be- 
cause they did not receive instruction in nursing. The 
establishment for men of. a regular course of two years is 
now under consideration at the General Hospital, and there 
probably will be a reciprocal arrangement between the 
. two schools, each of which will offer a course of one year 
to graduates of the other school, with the award of a 
diploma on the successful completion of the prescribed 
course. It will be a mutual benefit. 

All graduates are requested to communicate with the 
Superintendent of Nurses yearly, during the month of 
December, so that correct addresses may appear in the 
annual report. 

George T. Tuttle, 

Medical Superintendent. 



136 



McLean hospital training 

school for nurses, 

waverley, mass. 

1882-1915. 



The Trustees of the Massachusetts General Hospital 
Corporation established a school for the instruction of 
nurses at the McLean Hospital in 1882. It gives to 
men and women desirous of becoming professional nurses 
a two years' course of training in general nursing, with 
special reference to the care of cases of nervous and 
mental disease. The school is conducted by the Super- 
intendent of the Hospital under the authority of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Those wishing to receive such a course of instruction 
should write to the Superintendent of the McLean Hos- 
pital, Waverley, Mass., giving a brief personal history, 
and also the names and addresses of three responsible 
persons, not of their own kin, who know of their char- 
acter and capabilities. If on receipt of this letter it is 
thought advisable for such prospective candidates to 
make a formal application, blank forms especially pro- 
vided for this purpose will be sent to them. 

Candidates must be in sound health, and must send 
with their application a certificate from a physician cer- 
tifying to the fact. They should preferably have had a 
high school education or its equivalent, and should be 
not less than twenty nor more than thirty-five years of 
age. 

On furnishing satisfactory evidence of their probable 
fitness they will be received for two months on proba- 

137 



McLean Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

tion. If accepted at the expiration of this time they 
will sign an agreement to complete the prescribed course 
of two years. At the end of the first six months the record 
of each pupil is again carefully scrutinized and the right 
is reserved to terminate then, or at any other time, the 
connection of any pupil or nurse with the school and 
hospital for inefficiency, misconduct, generally unsatis- 
factory record, or for any other reason which may be 
deemed sufficient. 

The pupils reside in the hospital and are employed 
as assistant nurses in its wards. Men probationers 
while on duty will wear ordinary plain clothing. The 
women are expected to dress plainly and neatly in a 
cotton gown, and are permitted to wear the cap and 
apron of the regular uniform. After formally joining 
the school, at the end of the period of probation, both 
men and women are required to wear the hospital uni- 
form while on duty in the wards. Each woman nurse is 
required to have a gymnasium costume, the material for 
which, if desired, will be furnished at moderate cost by 
the hospital. 

As compensation for their services, both men and 
women receive board, lodging, and laundry, instruction 
in nursing and a certain amount of money, which for 
the women is only sufficient to purchase books and uni- 
forms and to defray other absolutely necessary inci- 
dental expenses. The men, who for the present do not 
receive the preliminary course of study given to the 
women, are paid eighteen dollars ($18) per month dur- 
ing the first two months of probation, twenty-five dollars 
($25) per month during the next ten months, twenty- 
seven dollars ($27) per month for the next six months 
and thirty dollars ($30) per month for the last six months. 
The women receive seven dollars ($7) per month during 
the first and ten dollars ($10) per month during the 
second year of the course. Most graduates engage in 
private nursing or accept positions of trust in other in- 
stitutions. Some are invited to remain in the service of 

138 



McLean Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

this hospital, and to such, especially to those who serve 
as head nurses, there is a material increase in compensa- 
tion. All graduates of this School, who are also graduates 
of the Massachusetts General Hospital Training School 
for Nurses in Boston, are paid thirty-five dollars ($35) 
per month. 

All pupils and nurses are allowed one afternoon, a 
part of Sunday and two or three evenings off duty each 
week. They are also given a two weeks' vacation in 
each year; and no deduction of time is made for sickness 
unless it exceeds two weeks in any given year. 

On completion of the full term of two years, nurses 
who have passed all the required examinations receive 
diplomas certifying to their period of training, their pro- 
ficiency and their good character. 

Women graduates of this school who wish to have 
additional practical experience and instruction in general 
nursing have the privilege, under certain restrictions, of 
entering the Training School for Nurses at the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital in Boston. Such graduates 
will, after eighteen months' satisfactory study, receive 
the diploma from that school, in addition to the diploma 
received from the McLean Hospital Training School. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

Instruction is given for eight months of the year, from 
October 1 to June 1. It is no disadvantage to enter the 
School between May and October, since the pupil will 
get some practical knowledge of the care of patients 
before taking up the required study. 

The course for men differs from that for women. The 
latter receive less money and are allowed more time for 
study. 

A preliminary course of two months is given to the 
women, and during this time the pupil is given no more 
work on the wards than is necessary to put in practice 
the instruction received. This occupies about two hours 

139 



McLean Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

daily. Most of the time is devoted to lectures, recita- 
tions, demonstrations and laboratory work. Instruc- 
tion to both men and women, chiefly by the officers of 
the Hospital, includes courses in anatomy, physiology, 
hygiene, bacteriology, drugs and materia medica, urinaly- 
sis, hydrotherapy, physical exercise (including massage, 
medical gymnastics and Swedish movements), house- 
keeping, dietetics and cookery, general nursing, ob- 
stetrical nursing (to women) and especially nursing of 
cases of nervous and mental diseases. There are written 
examinations in the middle and at the end of each school 
year, and pupils must attain on critical marking at least 
60 per cent. 

Anatomy. Recitations from a text-book on anatomy 
and physiology are required, and a course of lectures is 
given on applied anatomy, in which the general plan is 
to describe the anatomy of the various physiological 
systems, to refer briefly to their origin and use, to ex- 
plain the different injuries and diseases to which they 
are liable and to describe the treatment and nursing 
care of these morbid conditions. There is an articulated 
and a disarticulated skeleton which the pupils can use 
for study. It is intended that each one shall see a 
post-mortem examination. 

Physiology. In addition to recitations from a text- 
book, lectures are given on the blood, heart, circulation, 
vaso-motor system, digestion (mechanical and chemical), 
absorption, secretion, respiration, animal heat, move- 
ment, nervous system and special senses. 

Hygiene. Recitations from a text-book are required, 
and a course of lectures is given which includes a con- 
sideration of water, food, air, ventilation, heating, light- 
ing, sewerage, disinfectants and disinfection and per- 
sonal hygiene. 

Bacteeiology. a text-book is used for recitations, 
and a course of lectures is given on benign and patho- 
genic bacteria, methods of cultivation and examination, 
the relation of pathogenic germs to various medical and 

140 



McLean Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

surgical diseases, with a consideration of some of the 
more common of these diseases. 

Drugs and Materia Medica. Instruction is given 
in the dispensary by lectures, demonstrations and prac- 
tical work. The pupils are taught to use the prescrip- 
tion balance and the various measures, and are given 
practice in weighing and folding powders, the different 
methods of measuring drops, etc. They are taught to 
make weight-to-volume solutions of various strengths, 
also percentage solutions such as are used in the operat- 
ing room or for purposes of disinfection. 

Instruction is also given in elementary chemistry and 
botany, on the drugs in ordinary use, poisons and their 
antidotes. The course is made a laboratory exercise so 
far as is possible. 

Urinalysis. There are brief lectures on normal and 
abnormal urines and the diseases in which they occur. 
These are followed by demonstrations of methods of 
analysis, and the nurse is taught by actual practice to 
make different tests. It is principally a laboratory 
exercise. 

Physical Therapeutics. Lectures and demonstra- 
tions are given on the various hydro therapeutic pro- 
cedures and their effects. The pupils are also given 
instruction in general massage and free standing move- 
ments of the Swedish system, the use of apparatus in 
the gymnasium, and games. They are also taught the 
use of the Zander apparatus, of electricity and later in 
the course a more extended system of medical gymnas- 
tics. During the two years' course of instruction the nurse 
has frequent opportunity for the practical application of 
the knowledge gained in the treatment of patients. 

Housekeeping. Instruction is given by the as- 
sistant superintendent of nurses, the supervisor and 
the head nurses, and consists chiefly in actual demon- 
strations and practice on the wards of general household 
duties and of such special duties as are required for the 
proper care of the patients. 

141 



McLean Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

Dietetics and Cookery. Twenty-four exercises of 
three hours each are given the women each morning for 
one month, during which a lecture of one hour is fol- 
lowed by two hours of practical work. The men receive 
twelve exercises of two hours each. The instruction in- 
cludes a consideration of the purchase of food, utensils, 
kitchen and dining-room furnishings; dietetics and gen- 
eral cookery, with special reference to the preparation 
and serving of food for the sick and the convalescent. 

During the course meals are prepared and served by 
the pupils, to illustrate the laying of trays and tables 
and the duties of the hostess and waitress. 

After sufficient practice in the care of the kitchen and 
dining-room, the pupils are taken to the wards to apply 
their knowledge, and throughout the remainder of their 
service in the Hospital they assist in serving food to the 
patients under the supervision of the instructor. 

Nursing. The theory of general nursing is taught 
by text-books, lectures and demonstrations, and a 
practical application of the instruction is made so far 
as the facilities of the hospital will allow. Much of the 
ordinary routine work of a nurse is the same for patients 
treated here as for those in a general hospital, while in 
the matter of bathing, changing bed and personal cloth- 
ing, serving food, giving enemata, etc., it is often much 
more difficult. 

The lectures on nursing given during the second year 
include a description of various diseases, a consideration 
of methods of prevention, the various remedial measures 
employed in the treatment of these diseases and their 
nursing care. 

The teaching of obstetrical nursing is necessarily by 
the use of text-books and by lectures. Many nurses 
take the post-graduate course in the Massachusetts 
General Hospital School, which now includes practical 
work in obstetrics, while others, after graduation, take 
a three months' course at some maternity hospital. The 
nursing of cases of nervous and mental diseases is taught 

142 



McLean Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

by recitations, lectures, demonstrations in the wards by 
the superintendent of nurses, supervisors and head 
nurses, and actual practice in the care of the patients of 
the hospital. Besides this, wTitten reports of individual 
cases are required, and nurses are taught to observe and 
make daily notes of cases under their care. 

Previous to the consideration of insanity, a brief de- 
scription of the normal mind is given in eight lectures. 
In order to make it as practical as possible, patients are 
assigned to each nurse to observe and to report upon 
verbally as to the condition of the various mental states 
or faculties while they are under discussion. Lectures 
are given on the causation, symptoms, treatment, and 
nursing care of the different forms of mental disease, 
with special attention to the duties of the nurse. 

To better fit the nurses for special work, the care of 
convalescents and for acceptable companionship with 
their patients, courses are given in handicrafts, in Eng- 
lish literature and in art. 



143 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION, 1916. 



President. 
Henry P. Walcott, M.D. 

Vice-President. 
David P. Kimball. 

Treasurer. 
Charles H. W. Foster, 50 State Street. 

Secretary. 
John A. Blanchard, 262 Washington Street. 

Trustees. 

1886 *David p. Kimball, 35 Congress Street. 

1892 Henry P. Walcott, M.D., Chairman, 11 Waterhouse Street, 

Cambridge, Mass. 
1896 George Wigglesworth, 53 State Street, Room 1004. 
1898 Moses Williams, 126 State Street. 
1902 Francis Henry Appleton, 251 Marlborough Street. 

1902 Charles H. W. Foster, 50 State Street. 

1903 Charles P. Greenough, 262 Washington Street. 
1910 Nathaniel T. Kidder, 69 Ames Building. 

1910 John Lowell, 38 Equitable Building, 67 Milk Street. 

1912 *JosEPH H. O'Neil, Federal Trust Company, 85 Devonshire Street. 

1915 *Philip L. Saltonstall, 53 State Street. 

1916 *Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer, 22 Fairfield Street. 

Administrator. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D. 

Assistant Administrators. 

Joseph B. Howland, M.D. 
Byam Hollings, M.D. 

Assistant Treasurer. 
Walter S. Crane. 

* Appointed by the Governor of the Commonwealth. 
144 



Officers of the Institution. 

Board of Consultation. 

William L. Richardson, M.D. James J. Minot, M.D. 

Edward Cowles, M.D. Frederick C. Shattuck, M.D. 

John Collins Warren, M.D. James J. Putnam, M.D. 

John W. Elliot, M.D. John T. Bowen, M.D. 

George L. Walton, M.D. William M. Conant, M.D. 

Elbridge G. Cutler, M.D. Samuel J. Mixter, M.D. 

William W. Gannett, M.D. Herman F. Vickery, M.D. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE TRUSTEES. 

Admitting McLean Hospital Patients. 
Messrs. Appleton, Foster, and Greenough. 

Finance. 
Messrs. Kimball, Williams, and O'Neil. 

Accounts and Expenditures. 
Messrs. Williams, Foster, and Lowell. 

Buildings and Repairs. 
Messrs. Foster, Kidder, and Lowell. 

Free Beds. 
Messrs. Williams, Kidder, and O'Neil. 

Book of Donations. 
Mr. Wigglesworth. 

Nominations. 
Messrs. Wigglesworth, Williams, and Walcott. 

General Hospital Training School for Nurses. 
Messrs. Walcott and Appleton, and Mrs. Thayer. 

General Library and Warren Fund. 
Messrs. Greenough and O'Neil, and Mrs. Thayer. 

Dalton Scholarships. 
Messrs. Walcott, Kimball, and Saltonstall. 

Ether Day. 

Messrs. Walcott, Williams, and Greenough. 

145 



OflBcers of the Institution. 

Legal Affairs. 
Messrs. Greenough, Williams, and Lowell. 



VISITING COMMITTEES. 
1916 

March and September. 
Messrs. Kimball and Wigglesworth. 

April and October. 
Messrs. Appleton and Foster. 

May and November. 
Messrs. Walcott and Greenough. 

June and December. 
Messrs. Williams and Lowell. 

July. 
Messrs. Kidder and Saltonstall. 

August. 
Mr. O'Neil and Mrs. Thayer. 

1917 

January. 
Messrs. Kidder and Saltonstall. 

February. 
Mr. O'Neil and Mrs. Thayer. 



LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE. 

Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer, Honorary Chairman, 22 Fairfield Street-. 
Miss J. L. Motley, Chairman, Chestnut Hill. 
Mrs. Henry H. Sprague, Secretary, 33 Fairfield Street. 
Mrs. John Lowell, Treasurer, 24 Commonwealth Avenue. 
Mrs. Harcourt Amory, 293 Beacon Street. 
Mrs. Francis H. Appleton, Jr., 451 Marlboro Street. 
Mrs. J. Dudley Clark, 32 Hereford Street. 

146 



Officers of the Institution. 

Mrs. Charles A. Coolidge, 82 Marlboro Street. 

Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge, 303 Berkeley Street. 

Mrs. William T. Councilman, 78 Bay State Road. 

Mrs. Lincoln Davis, 217 Beacon Street. 

Miss Elizabeth Gray, 133 Marlboro Street. 

Mrs. Richard W. Hale, Needham, Mass. 

Mrs. Arthur D. Hill, 17 Brimmer Street. 

Miss Helen Homans, 164 Beacon Street. 

Mrs. a. Lawrence Hopkins, 46 Commonwealth Avenue. 

Mrs. George B. Leighton, 127 Beacon Street. 

Miss Ella L. Lyman, 57 Marlboro Street. 

Mrs. William Jason Mixter, 42 Fairfield Street. 

Mrs. John G. Palfrey, 152 Mt. Vernon Street. 

Mrs. Charles Thorndike Parker, South Hamilton. 

Mrs. Robert S. Russell, 20 Commonwealth Avenue. 

Mrs. C. S. Tuckerman, 201 Bay State Road. 

Miss A. N. Ward, 304 Marlboro Street. 

General. 

Mrs. Jeffrey Brackett, 41 Marlboro Street. 

Mrs. John C. Gray, 176 Beacon Street. 

Mrs. Charles P. Greenough, 45 Carlton Street, Longwood. 

Mrs. F. L. Higginson, 274 Beacon Street. 

Mrs. William Lawrence, 122 Commonwealth Avenue. 

Mrs. John H. Morison, 44 Brimmer Street. 



OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

Resident Physician. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physicians. 

Joseph B. Howland, M.D. 
Byam Hollings, M.D. 
Harold W. Hersey, M.D. 
Eugene Walker, M.D. 
John F. Bresnahan, M.D. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of East Medical Service. 
David L. Edsall, M.D. 

Chief of West Medical Service. 

Richard C. Cabot, M.D. 
147 



Officers of the Institution. 

Chief of Children's Medical Service. 
Fritz B. Talbot, M.D. 

Consultant in Syphilis. 
Abner Post, M.D. 

Chief of Syphilis Department. 
C. Morton Smith, M.D. 

Chief of Sub-Department of Tropical Medicine. 
Richard P. Strong, M.D. 

Visiting Physicians. 

William H. Smith, M.D. Roger I. Lee, M.D. 

Frederick T. Lord, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Physicians. 

Arthur K. Stone, M.D. John B. Hawes, 2d, M.D. 

Henry F. Hewes, M.D. George C. Shatttjck, M.D. 

George S. C. Badger, M.D. Louis H. Newburgh, M.D. 

Joseph H. Pratt, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Physician to the Children's Medical Department. 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. 

Physicians to Out-Patients. 

Louis G. Mead, M.D. Harry Linenthal, M.D. 

Theodore J. Eastman, M.D. Gerald Blake, M.D. 

Lesley H. Spooner, M.D. William B. Robbins, M.D. 

Physician to Children's Medical Out-Patient Department. 
J. Herbert Young, M.D. 

Assistant Physicians to Out-Patients. 

Gardner W. Hall, M.D. Malcolm Seymour, M.D. 

Gerardo M. Balboni, M.D. Roger P. Dawson, M.D. 

F. Gorham Brigham, M.D. Hyman Morrison, M.D. 

P. Challis Bartlett, M.D. Willard S. Parker, M.D. 

Donald Macomber, M.D. 

Assistant Physicians to the Children's Medical Out-Patient Department 

Louis W. Gilbert, M.D. John W. Hammond, Jr., M.D. . 

Richard S. Eustis, M.D. Oliver E. Bixby, M.D. 

148 



Officers of the Institution. 

Assistants. 

George A. Dix, M.D. George R. Minot, M.D. 

Henry D. Lloyd, M.D. A. Watson Sellards, M.D. 



Hoxise Physicians. 
Paul D. White, M.D. Orville F. Rogers, Jr., M.D. 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of East Surgical Service. 
Charles L. Scudder, M.D. 

Chief of West Surgical Service. 
Charles A. Porter, M.D. 

Chief of Orthopedic Service. 
Elliott G. Brackett, M.D. 

Chief of Genito-Urinary Service. 
Hugh Cabot, M.D. 

Chief of De-partment of Anaesthesia. . 
Freeman Allen, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons. 

Franklin G. Balch, M.D. Farrar Cobb, M.D. 

George W. W. Brewster, M.D. Robert B. Greenough, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons. 

Daniel F. Jones, M.D. Lincoln Davis, M.D. 

Hugh Williams, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Robert B. Osgood, M.D. 

Assistant Anaesthetist. 
Arthur M. Dodge, M.D. 

Surgeons to Out-Patients. 

Channing C. Simmons, M.D. Edward P. Richardson, M.D. 

Beth Vincent, M.D. Wyman Whittemore, M.D. 

149 



Officers of the Institution. 

Ortho'pedic Surgeons to Out-Patients. 

Z. B. Adams, M.D. Mark H. Rogers, M.D. 

C. Hermann Btjcholz, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgeons to Out-Patients. 

J. Bellinger Barney, M.D. Richard F. O'Neil, M.D. 

George G. Smith, M.D. Edward L. Young, Jr., M.D. 

Assistant Surgeons to Out-Patients. 

John B. Hartwbll, M.D. Edward H. Risley, M.D. 

W. Jason Mixter, M.D. Richard H. Miller, M.D. 

Assistant Orthopedic Surgeons to Out-Patients. 

Harry C. Low, M.D. Murray S. Danforth, M.D. 

Lloyd T. Brown, M.D. Louis A. O. Goddu, M.D. 

Herman W. Marshall, M.D. 

Assistant Genito-Urinary Surgeon to Out-Patients. 
E. Granville Crabtree, M.D. 



Assistants. 



Lewis P. Felch, M.D. Eben W. Fiske, M.D. 

Frederick J. Goodridge, M.D. Victor I. Shapira, M.D. 
ToRR Wagner Harmer, M.D. George A. Leland, Jr., M.D. 
John E. McCartin, M.D. Custis Lee Hall, M.D. 

Oscar R. T. L'Esperance, M.D. Walter J. LaMarche, M.D. 



House Surgeons. 
Elliott C. Cutler, M.D. John J. Morton, M.D. 

House Surgeon to Genito-Urinary Department. 



DERMATOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of Service. 



Dermatologists. 
Charles J. White, M.D. Harvey P. Towle, M.D. 

150 



Officers of the Institution. 

Associate Dermatologist. 
Frederick S. Burns, M.D. 

Assistant Dermatologists. 
E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. John H. Bufford, M.D. 

Assistant. 
J. Harper Blaisdell, M.D. 



NEUROLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of Service. 
Edward W. Taylor, M.D. 

Neurologists. 
Walter E. Paul, M.D. George A. Waterman, M.D. 

Associate Neurologist. 



Assistant Neurologists. 
James B. Ater, M.D. George Clymer, M.D. 

Assistants. 
Frederic B. M. Cady, M.D. Harold B. Eaton, M.D. 

Psychologist. 
L. Eugene Emerson, Ph.D. 



LARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of Service. 
Algernon Coolidge, M.D. 

Laryngologists. 
Harris P. Mosher, M.D. 

Associate Laryngologist. 

D. Crosby Greene, Jr., M.D. 

151 



Officers of the iDstitution. 

Assistant Laryngologists. 

William F. Knowles, M.D. Chandler Robbins, M.D. 

Harry A. Barnes, M.D. Frederick E. Garland, M.D 

Assista7its. 

WiLLiAii J. Harkins, M.D. Edwards W. Herman, M.D 

D. Campbell Smyth, M.D. Walter B. Swift, M.D. 

John L. Lougee, M.D. Joseph L. Goodale, M.D. 

Dentist. 
George H. Wright, D.M.D. 



Otologist. 
D. Harold Walker, M.D. 

Assistant Otologist. 
Oliver A. Lothrop, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist. 
Alexander Qttackenboss, M.D. 

A ssistant Ophthalmologists. 

Robert G. Loring, M.D. George S. Derby, M.D. 

Ralph A. Hatch, M.D. 

Obstetrician. 
Franklin S. Newell, M.D. 

Consultant in Contagious Diseases. 
Edwin H. Place, M.D. 



PATHOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Pathologist. 
J. Homer Wright, M.D. 

Surgical Pathologist. 
William F. Whitney, M.D. 

Assistant Pathologist. 
Oscar Richardson, M.D. 
152 



OflBcers of the Institution. 



Assistant Surgical Pathologist. 
Harry F. Hartwell, M.D. 

Chemist. 
Otto Folin, Ph.D. 

Assistant Chemist. 
WiLLEY Denis, Ph.D. 

Assistant in Clinical Bacteriology. 
Albert E. Steele, M.D. 



Roentgenologist . 
Walter J. Dodd, M.D. 

Assistant Roentgenologist. 
George W. Holmes, M.D. 

House Physician to the X-Ray Department. 
Adelbert S. Merrill, M.D. 



Surgeon in Charge Medico-Mechanical and Hydrotherapeuiic Rooms. 
C. Hermann Bucholz, M.D. 

Assistant to Surgeon in Charge Medico-Mechanical Room. 
Lewis P. Felch, M.D. 



Dentist. 
Leroy M. S. Miner, M.D., D.M.D. 

Assistant Dentists. 
Joseph A. Ring, D.M.D. John A. Breen, D.M.D. 

Out-Patient Dentists. 

Henry J. Skinner, D.M.D. William W. Anthony, D.M.D. 

Chester F. Wolfe, D.M.D. Francis C. Durant, D.M.D. 

Charles W. Ringer, D.M.D. Chatjncey N. Lewis, D.M.D. 
Fred R. Bltjmenthal, D.M-D. 
153 



Officers of the Institution. 

Medical House Pupils. 

Harold W. Stevens. William J. Kerr. 

Lawrence K. Lunt. Adolph G. C, Schnack. 

Arthur E. Strauss. Leonard M. Van Stone. 

Archibald H. Beard. Newton S. Stern. 

Langdon T. Thaxter. Arlie V. Bock. 



Surgical House Pupils. 

George B. Packard, Jr. Paul Appleton. 

BEN.rAMiN H. Alton. Kenneth L. Dole. 

Sumner W. Jackson. Horace K. Sowles. 

John S. Hodgson. Edwin N. Cleaves. 

Floyd F. Hatch. Arthur M. Jackson. 

Edgar C. Cook. William A. Perkins. 

Earl Bloomer. George F. Dwinell. 



House Pupils to Special Departments. 
Orthopedic. Children's Medical. 

Roy C. Abbott Hugh K. Berkley 

Marius N. Smith-Petersen John Moore Lee 



Superintendent of Nurses. 
Sara E. Parsons. 

Chief of Hospital Social Service. 
Ida M. Cannon. 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE. 

General Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

Dr. Henry P. Walcott, Chairman. 

Dr. Frederic A. Washburn, Resident Physician. 

Dr. Joseph B. Howland, 1st Assistaiit Resident Physician 

Miss Sara E. Parsons, Superintendent of Nurses. 

Dr. James J. Minot. Mrs. Henry F. Bigelow. 

Dr. William H. Smith. Miss Marion H. Fenno. 

Dr. Daniel F. Jones. Mrs. Thomas Motley. 

Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer. Mrs. Charles E. Mason. 

Mrs. Alexander Whiteside. Mrs. Freeman Allen. 

Mrs. William W. Vaughan. Mrs. Hugh Cabot. 

Mrs. Herbert L. Burrell. Mrs. G. Tappan Francis. 

Mrs. Robert H. Gardiner. Miss Ella L. Lyman. 
Mrs. Grace W. Myers, Secretary. 
154 



OflBcers of the Institution. 

OFFICERS OF THE McLEAN HOSPITAL. 

Medical Superintendent. 
Geokge T. Tuttle, M.D. 

First Assistant Physician. Second Assistant Physician. 

Frederic H. Packard, M.D. Theodore A. Hoch, M.D. 

Clinical Assistant and Pathologist. 

E. Stanley Abbot, M.D. 

Assistant Physician. 
Ray L. Whitney, M.D. 

Assistant in Pathological Psychology. 

F. Lyman Wells, Ph.D. 

Junior Assistant Physicians. 
Clifford G. Rounsefell, M.D. Sydney V. Kibby, M.D. 
Walter J. Otis, M.D. 

Chaplain. 
Rev. George J. Prescott. 

Superintendent of Nurses, and Matron. 
Jennie McIntosh, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 
Alice M. Cochrane, R.N. 

Clerk. Librarian. 

Margaret E. Clark. E. Kathleen Jones. 

Instructors in Physical Training. 
David H. Holmes. S. May Taylor. 

Instructors in Handicraft. 
Margaret E. Hill. Daniel A. Joy. 

Dietitian. 

Mary E. Reed. 
155 



Officers of the Institutioa. 

Instructor in Cookery. 
Mildred E. Dallinger. 

Supervisor of Women's Department. Supervisor of Men's Department. 

Sara J. McCarthy, R.N. Henry E. Magoon. 

Purveyor. 
John P. Bradbury. 

Apothecary. Storekeeper. 

Charles W. Noyes, Pharm.D. George R. Kinread. 



OFFICERS OF THE CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL. 

Superintendent . 

Frederic A. Washburn, M.D. 

(Resident Physician, General Hospital.) 

Matron. 
Effie Mott Inch. 



156 



One Hundred and Second Annual Report 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



Massachusetts 
General Hospital 

Medical and Surgical Affairs of the 
General Hospital 

Report of General Executive Committee 

1915 



SECTION B 



CAIVIBRIDGE 
THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 



NOTICE 

The annual report of the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital is now published in two sec- 
tions. Section A contains the report of the 
Trustees, the Treasurer, the Administrator and 
appended reports, and complete reports of the 
McLean and Convalescent Hospitals. 



One Hundred and Second Annual Report 



or THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



Massachusetts 
General Hospital 

Medical and Surgical Affairs of the 
General Hospital 

Report of General Executive Committee 
1915 



SECTION B 



CAJVIBRIDGE 
THE UNI\^ERSITY PRESS 



The legal title of the Corporation is 

" The Massachusetts General Hospital." 

All gifts and bequests, if without restriction, will 
be used as the Trustees deem most for the interest 
of the Corporation and its Beneficiaries. 



CONTENTS. 



SECTION B. 

PAGE 

Admission of Patients. General Hospital. Rules and Rates 64 

Annual Reports of 

Administrator and Resident Phj-sioian, General Hospital 9 

Director of Pathological Laboratory, General Hospital 40 

General Executive Committee 30 

Trustees 5-8 

Board of Consultation 291 

Dalton Scholarships, Rules of 65 

General Hospital. 

Administrator and Resident Physician, Annual Report of 9 

Birthplace of Persons Admitted 23 

House Physicians and Surgeons, List of 289 

House Pupils, List of 261-288 

Occupations of Persons Admitted, Males 24 

Occupations of Persons Admitted, Females 27 

Officers of 290 

Out-Patients of 21 

Residence of Persons Admitted 23 

Rules for Admission and Rates '. 64 

Table of Admissions, Discharges, and Results 29 

House Pupils, List of 261-288 

Labohatories. 

Pathological Laboratory, General Hospital 40 

Medico-Mechanical and Htdrotherapeutic Departments, Report of. ... 47 

Officers of the Institution. 

Corporation 290 

General Hospital 293 

Out-P.^tients. General Hospital. Number of, etc 15 

Patients. 

General Hospital. 

Admissions, Discharges, and Results 29 

Number of, and Rates 20 

Residences, Birthplaces, and Occupation 23-28 

Resident Physician. General Hospital. Annual Report of 9 

Roentgenological Department, Report of 46 

Staff Publications, List of 48 

Statistics. 

General Hospital. 

Medical and Surgical 67-260 

Out-Patient Department 67 

Trustees. 

Annual Report of 5 

List of 290 

Standing Committees of 291 

Visiting Committees. 

Ladies' 292 

Trustees 292 

WaBBEN TRIENNL4.L PbIZE 66 

3 



THE ONE HUNDRED AND SECOND 
ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1915. 



In behalf of the Trustees the following report upon the 
condition of the Massachusetts General Hospital is here 
submitted. 

The year has been marked by many important changes 
both in the structures of the Hospital and in the rela- 
tions of the institution to the community in which it is 
situated. One of the most important needs to which 
reference has often been made in these reports, that of 
a convenient administration building, has been met by 
the wise appreciation of our needs on the part of Charles 
W. Moseley, the surviving executor of the estate of 
Mrs. William O. Moseley, of Newburyport. The build- 
ing to be erected for this capital service will bear the 
name of The Moseley Memorial Building, in memory of 
Dr. William Oxnard Moseley, the only son of Mr. Wilham 
Oxnard Moseley. This young man served the Hospital 
as one of its house pupils in the year 1878, and his prom- 
ising young life was ended by an accident in Switzerland 
in the following year. It seems to us peculiarly fitting 
that here, where the important activities of his life com- 
menced, should stand this memorial of a young physician 
thus suddenly cut off from a career which promised to 
be of great usefulness. 

When the Hospital was founded it was the general 
opinion that it was only requisite to provide, on the one 
hand, for those whose means were not sufficient to secure 
proper medical aid, and on the other, for those whose 
circumstances did not admit of the proper care in their 
own residences. In the course of years it has become evi- 
dent that those without sufficient means of support will 

5 



Report of the Trustees. 

receive in the modern hospitals an attention and care 
far beyond the resources of the self-respecting man who 
may be unwilling to ask any measure of relief from a 
charitable institution. The result will unavoidably be 
that two portions of the community are sure to have 
the best medical care — the poor and the very rich. The 
rest of the people must at present be content with what 
they can afford to pay for, and in many cases the medi- 
cal aid will not be of the highest quality. It has, there- 
fore, been determined to attempt an enlargement of the 
functions of this Hospital by opening a department of 
the out-patient service for the diagnosis of such diseases 
as may present unusual difficulties, requiring all the re- 
sources of skill and scientific apparatus which are not, 
as a rule, combined in any single medical office. It should 
be needless to add that no reflections are made upon the 
charitable zeal and purposes of the medical profession, 
but the general practitioner alone cannot give his pa- 
tients the benefits that modern science has distributed 
among a number of specialists. The modern hospital 
combines many especial advantages of medical assist- 
ance, and all of these may be brought to the help of any 
individual. 

The plan which the trustees have in mind has been 
submitted to a large number of active practitioners 
throughout the State and has received their approval, 
and will be carried out, so far as it is possible, in cooper- 
ation with the attending physician of the patient. The 
fee charged for this service will be as small as is consistent 
with the requirement that the added expense shall not be 
inflicted upon the charitable funds of the Hospital. 

In our report for the year 1913 extended mention was 
made of the advantages both to the community and to 
the hospital of a ward for the benefit of patients able to 
pay all Hospital charges. The need of a service of this 
sort has become so evident that contracts have been 
made, and the preliminary operations are already under 
way, for the erection of a pay ward on the western front 

6 



Report of the Trustees. 

of our grounds, upon the site formerly occupied by the 
Gardner Ward. The Gardner Ward has been moved 
to the east, and so remodeled and enlarged that it will 
partially replace the Warren and Jackson Wards, which 
had reached the limit of their usefulness and have been 
destroyed. 

The Ether Day address was given on the 16th of Oc- 
tober by Dr. W. W. Keen, of Philadelphia. No surgeon 
now living could with better authority treat of this great- 
est aid to suffering humanity; but the speaker went 
beyond even his great personal experience, and has given 
one of the most complete statements of the whole sub- 
ject of surgical anaesthesia to our medical literature. 
It is a much prized addition to the series of notable 
addresses delivered upon this occasion. 

The total number of patients treated during the years 
1914 and 1915 in the three Hospitals were as follows: — 

1914 1915 

General Hospital, Boston 6,712 6,829 

McLean Hospital, Waverley .... 332 326 
Convalescent Hospital, Waverley . . 697 743 

In the Out-Patient Department of the General Hos- 
pital the number of new cases treated was 29,213 against 
24,957 in 1914, and the total number of visits from 
patients was 190,628. 

The expenses of the General Hospital for the year 
exceeded, as usual, the income, and the difference was 
made up from the General Fund. That these armual 
deficits shown by the successive Reports of the Trus- 
tees may be materially decreased, or altogether elimi- 
nated, the Trustees earnestly appeal for gifts for current 
expenses. 

The great needs of the Hospital now are a Nurses' 
Home at Waverley for the mu-ses employed at the 
McLean Hospital, and a suitable ward for the Children's 
Department of the General Hospital. 

In conclusion the Trustees call attention to the Treas- 

7 



Report of the Trustees. 

urer's Report; the Report on Donations; the Report of 
the Ladies' Visiting Committee; and the valuable reports 
of Doctors Washburn and Tuttle, and through them to 
the detailed reports of medical and surgical cases, rec- 
ords, and statistics. 

Henry P. Walcott, 
David P, Kimball. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATOR 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL AND 

RESIDENT PHYSICIAN OF THE GENERAL 

HOSPITAL. 



To THE Trustees of the Massachusetts General Hospital: 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit herewith 
my eighth annual report as Administrator of the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital. 

This year again the annual report will be issued in two 
volumes. Volume A will show the affairs of the Corpora- 
tion, the report of the Trustees, the business affairs at the 
General Hospital, and the reports of the McLean Hos- 
pital and Convalescent Hospital. Volume B will contain 
the medical, surgical, and other scientific statistics of the 
General Hospital in Boston. It will consist largely of the 
Report of the General Executive Committee of the activi- 
ties in which it is engaged. 

The actual operating cost of the three hospitals has been 
$35,919.56 greater than in 1914. The hospital receipts 
have been $40,250.02 larger. 

The following is a resume of the operating cost and 
hospital, receipts for the last eight years: 



1908 
1909 
1910 
*1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 



GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

Operating Cost. Hospital Receipts. 

$317,832.23 1908 $135,002.24 

336,131.35 1909 143,379.56 

350,308.22 1910 151,568.63 

384,983.51 1911 174,717.56 

414,175.06 1912 173,067.80 

435,360.53 1913 189,841.02 

453,601.69 1914 195,181.65 

482,786.97 1915 219,351.88 



* This year for the first time operating expenses amounting to $6,281 .73, 
which in previous years have been charged to Corporation expenses, have 
been charged to operating cost of General Hospital. Insurance at the 
General Hospital — $1,867.76 — previously charged to Corporation ex- 
penses is this year charged to General Hospital operating cost. 

9 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



McLEAN HOSPITAL. 



Operating Cost. Hospital Receipts. 

1908 $286,027.83 1908 §278,722.50 

1909 284,294.64 1909 279,762.41 

1910 303,508.18 1910 303,500.06 

*1911 301,924.87 1911 315,971.52 

1912 321,910.85 1912 326,131.39 

1913 . . : . . 333,310.72 1913 339,285.12 

1914 337,372.92 1914 340,036.55 

1915 343,326.10 1915 355,804.15 

CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL. 

Operating Cost. Hospital Receipts. 

1908 $13,350.64 1908 $3,967.73 

1909 13,548.48 1909 3,901.21 

1910 12,570.36 1910 3,862.90 

1911 13,898.83 1911 4,314.51 

1912 13,970.11 1912 3,991.41 

1913 15,566.52 1913 4,839.10 

1914 13,117.14 1914 5,223.85 

1915 13,898.24 1915 5,536.04 

GENERAL HOSPITAL, BOSTON. 

BUILDING OPERATIONS. 

The year has been an active one for the General Hos- 
pital. The erection of an administration building has 
been started. We expect that the building will be com- 
pleted in 1916. It is the greatest need of the hospital, and 
we are grateful for the generous gifts for the purpose. 
This building is made possible by the gift of a large sum 
in memory of William Oxnard Moseley, who was a house 
pupil at this hospital in 1878. He died in 1879 from a fall 
in the Alps, The money was given through Mr. Charles 
W. Moseley, trustee of the estate of Julia M. Moseley. 
It is to be known as ''The Moseley Memorial Building." 
In it will be the quarters for the house pupils and resident 
doctors, the Treadwell Library for the use of the staff, 
fireproof record rooms and vaults, an emergency ward, 

* This year for the first time operating expenses amounting to $7,666.05, 
and insurance — $1,168.07 — which in other years have been charged to 
Corporation expenses, have been charged to operating cost at McLean 
Hospital. 

10 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

the administration offices, and waiting-rooms for friends 
of patients. In accordance with the custom of the hospi- 
tal, plans of the building will appear in the next report 
after the building is completed. 

The Warren Ward A and Jackson Ward B, erected as 
temporary construction in 1873 and occupied ever since, 
have been demolished. The Gardner Ward F has been 
moved back on the site of Ward B, raised, and a story 
built under it. This new ward is to take the place of Ward 
A. The building is not yet completed and therefore will 
not be described in this report. These changes have been 
made in order to make room for a private ward. The 
contract has been awarded, and its erection is now in 
process on the Charles Street front, just north of the Mas- 
sachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary. It is to be 
a one-hundred-bed, eight-story building, fireproof, and 
modern in all respects. 

During the spring, summer, and autumn months tents 
were erected in the garden to care for the patients from 
the wards which had been demolished. Dm-ing Decem- 
ber and a part of November, when it was no longer possi- 
ble to keep the patients in the tents, the number of beds 
available for patients was materially reduced. This ac- 
counts for the decreased number of patients' days treat- 
ment. 

NEEDS OF THE HOSPITAL. ^ 

We are very thankful for the liberality of benefactors 
which has made it possible for us to undertake the impor- 
tant works which have been described above, but we have 
other and pressing needs and we are confident that the 
community will meet them. 

A COUNTRY BRANCH WHERE WE CAN MOVE BED PATIENTS 
FOR CONVALESCENCE. 

The land for such an institution is now owned by the 
hospital and is reserved for this purpose. It is a beautiful 
situation upon a hill on the Concord Turnpike in Belmont, 

11 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

in the rear of the land at McLean Hospital. Such an in- 
stitution maybe begun in a small way if it is wisely planned 
to allow for growth. 

A HOSPITAL FOR THE CARE OF PEOPLE OF MODERATE MEANS. 

This building should be erected in connection with the 
General Hospital for patients who should pay something 
to the physicians for their medical and surgical care, but 
who are unable to pay the full price for care in the new 
private ward which we are building. Such a hospital 
would meet a want which is greatly felt, as people of 
moderate means are getting to-day the least efficient care 
in case of sickness of any class in the community. This 
group of individuals must often be ill in their homes de- 
pendent upon physicians who cannot provide the neces- 
sary laboratory tests and scientific examinations which 
are readily available in a general hospital. I would make 
an lu-gent appeal to the generosity of the community for 
a special gift to erect a building for this object. 

A children's HOSPITAL. 

A building for children should be erected in connection 
with the General Hospital. The Children's Medical De- 
partment has but seven cribs for bed patients and these 
are in an unsuitable location. The need for a building for 
children is very considerable. It should be distinct from 
the buildings for adults, as the problem in the care of chil- 
dren — the ease with which they contract contagious dis- 
eases — makes a special plan of construction necessary. 

A nurses' home. 

The addition of one hundred beds in the private hos- 
pital and sixty beds in the Bulfinch Building, which can 
be added when the Moseley Memorial Building is occu- 
pied, will make necessary an increase of about eighty-five 
nurses. A new home should be provided, perhaps upon 

12 



Report of the Admiaistrator and Resident Physician. 

the land owned by the hospital on North Grove Street. 
This home should be large enough to accommodate the 
immediate increase in the size of the school, and the increase 
which will be necessary if we are able in the future to build 
a hospital for people of moderate means and a children's 
hospital so urgently required. It should also contain a 
kitchen and dining-room for all the nurses in the training 
school. Such a procedure would enable us to use our pres- 
ent dining facilities so that we could give our male nurses 
a proper dining-room, something which they have long 
needed. 

CONSULTATION CLINIC. 

Upon recommendation of the General Executive Com- 
mittee the Trustees have authorized a Consultation Clinic 
for people of moderate means. The cost of the necessary 
laboratory tests and consultations with recognized experts 
has become so great that people of small means cannot 
obtain them individually. Our out-patient building 
stands idle in the afternoon. By grouping consultants 
and placing the laboratories of the hospital at the disposal 
of this Clinic it seems possible to do a great good to this 
section of the community. The plan proposes that the 
family physician shall bring or send his patient by letter 
to this Clinic in order that he may obtain a correct diag- 
nosis by modern methods and an outline of treatment, if 
he desires it. The patients are to pay a fee of five dollars 
each. From this siun the doctors will be remunerated 
after the cost to the hospital has been met. The Clinic 
should be of the greatest benefit to the practitioner of 
medicine because it will place at his disposal as good facili- 
ties and as good talent as is available in the community. 
The Clinic will start on January 25, 1916, and its result 
will be watched with great interest. 

The Ether Day address was dehvered by Dr. W. W. 
Keen, of Philadelphia. The subject of his address was 
''The Dangers of Ether as an Anesthetic." 

The following are comparative tables: 

13 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



No. Patients Ad- 
mitted TO Wards. 



1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 



5,362 
5,871 
6,092 
6,495 
6,629 
6,251 
6,413 
6,503 



Total Patients' 
Days Treatment. 

106,034 
105,295 
105,617 
107,671 
107,797 
111,364 
116,164 
113,941 



Average Stay No. Operatons 
IN Hospital. House Cases. 



20 -days 

18- 

17+ 

17- 

16- 

18+ 

18+ 

18- 



3,634 
3,841 
4,016 
3,948 
4,063 
3,887 
3,993 
4,046 



Average Daily 
Cost per House Patient. 



1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 



^2.65+ 
3.00+ 
3.01 + 
3.09+ 
3.31+ 



Daily Cost per Capita for Provi- 
sions for all Persons Supported. 

S0.28- 
0.31 + 
0.33 + 
0.34+ 
0.32+ 



Number 
Ambulance Trips. 



1908 1,747 

1909 1,539 

1910 1,639 

1911 1,513 

1912 1,477 

1913 1,576 

1914 1,378 

1915 1,502 



Number 
OF Miles. 



5,442, 

5 615 

4,452 

4,870 

4,796 

4,888 

4,182 



Average 
Trips per Day. 

5- 

4+ 
4+ 
4+ 
4+ 
4+ 
3+ 
4+ 



1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 



Number op 
Patients Treated 
in Accident Ward. 

5,313 
5,314 
5,590 
6,029 
5,501 
5,424 
5,278 
4,815 



' Average 
Daily Cost 
per Patient. 

$0.78- 
0.83- 
0.82- 
0.72- 
0.78+ 
0.86 + 
0.96+ 
1.03+ 



Cost of Main- 
tenance OF Ac- 
cident Ward. 

$4,141.03 
4,389.78 
4,555.97 
4,331.75 
4,343.15 
4,665.50 
5.090.52 
5,006.69 



Total 
Receipts. 

$518.23 



571.80 

618.80 

770.17 

1,560.07 

1,867.38 

2,297.97 



Number of X-Ray Cases 
Out-Patient Department. 

1908 2,902 

1909 3,323 

1910 3,414 

1911 4,138 

1912 4,587 

1913 6,286 

1914 7,951 

1915 . ; .... 7,618 

14 



Number of X-Ray 
Cases in House. 

1,353 
1,441 
1,363 
1,643 
1,987 
4,015 
5,985 
4,597 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

The following table of statistics shows the work in the 
Out-Patient Department 
building : 

New Cases. 

1904 25,082 

1905 21,874 

1906 20,010 

1907 20,358 

1908 20,729 

1909 21,518 

1910 22,302 

1911 22,232 

1912 22,639 

1913 24,887 

1914 24,957 

1915 29,213 

During the year 1915 there were 3,660 operations under 
an anesthetic in the Out-Patient Department, of which 
number 1,614 were performed under a local and 2,046 
under a general anesthesia. 

The following is a comparative financial table : 

Cost of Maintenance 
Out-Patient Department. 



3e the opening 


of the new 




Total Number 


Total Number 


Prescriptions 


OF Visits. 


Filled. 


106,174 


53,321 


110,631 


49,793 


99,251 


43,063 


107,063 


43,764 


116,008 


46,390 


121,327 


48,250 


124,584 


48,676 


135,809 


49,858 


136,095 


48,270 


147,428 


51,798 


158,090 


62,112 


190,628 


73,914 



1908 








$50,902.61 


1909 








54,739.32 


1910 








56,383.00 


1911 








62,476.04 


1912 








62,704.66 


1913 








70,077.00 


1914 








74,710.04 


1915 








84,451.96 



Average Daily 


Total 


Cost per Patient. 


Receipts. 


$0.44- 


$39,955.80 


0.45+ 


42,636.05 


0.45+ 


44.296.92 


0.46+ 


46,643.45 


0.46+ 


47,607.00 


0.47+ 


53,453.20 


0.47+ 


58,668.95 


0.44+ 


73,521.99 



Attention is invited to the very large increase in the 
Out-Patient Department work during the year. The 
number of new patients has increased 4,256 over 1914, 
and the total number of visits has increased 32,538 over 
1914. A part of this increase has been due to the hard 
times so general during the first part of the year, but the 
main part is due to the increased reputation of the hospita' 
for thorough and scientific work. 

15 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

The Cement Shop in the Out-Patient Department was 
estabUshed on September 9, 1913. The object was to 
help patients of the hospital who were incapacitated from 
their regular work and it was thought that their conva- 
lescence would be hastened. The patients are encouraged 
and they are enabled to earn money during a period when 
otherwise they would have no assistance. The shop has 
aided thirty-eight patients in periods varying from a few 
days to a year, and the sum of $1,917.00 has been distrib- 
uted to those who otherwise would probably have been 
without employment of any kind. 

NURSING DEPARTMENT. 

The school for mu-ses at the General Hospital has had a 
successful year. We have been able to raise the stand- 
ard of admission so that our school is composed of a very 
high type of young woman. The statistics of oiu- gradu- 
ates show that a very large proportion of them are filling 
executive and teaching positions in hospitals and that 
those in private nursing are in great demand. The school, 
therefore, seems to meet the true tests. It has been pos- 
sible to get the women who have entered our school, be- 
cause in addition to the valuable training which they have 
received we have been able to make their living condi- 
tions most attractive. It is very important that as the 
hospital adds to its functions and requires more nurses 
it should not fail to continue to provide attractive living 
conditions. 

The following table shows the increase in the number 
of nurses dming recent years : 

Average 
Average Number Number of Average 
OF Pupils. Graduates. Total. 

1908 ...... 116 19 135 

1909 117 19 136 

1910 126 25 151 

1911 ...... 140 31 171 

1912 158 29 187 

1913 .167 29 196 

1914 181 28 209 

1915 179 29 208 

16 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

TREADWELL LIBRARY. 

The library looks forward to moving into the commodi- 
ous quarters planned in the Moseley Memorial Build- 
ing. It will be a great satisfaction to know that our 
records are in a safe place. 

The following table indicates the number of records 
copied or abstracted during recent years: 

Number of Records 
Copied or Abstracted. 

1908 358 

1909 497 

1910 532 

1911 559 

1912 756 

1913 923 

1914 1,226 

1915 1,572 

McLEAN HOSPITAL, WAVERLEY. 

The only notable building during the year at McLean 
Hospital has been the construction of a cottage for a single 
patient. This was made possible by a special gift for the 
purpose. This building will be completed and occupied 
early in 1916. 

A nurses' home at McLean Hospital is badly needed. 
There is a considerable fund already established for this 
purpose, and it is hoped that benefactors of the hospital 
may add to this in the near future, so that your Board will 
feel justified in beginning construction. 

The Medical Superintendent's detailed statement ap- 
pears in Volume A of this report : 

The following are comparative tables: 

Number of Number of Patients' 

Patients Admitted. Days Treatment. 

1908 168 78,897 

1909 169 79,515 

1910 166 80,978 

1911 - 188 80,245 

1912 168 81,358 

1913 144 80,618 

1914 117 77,621 

1915 ...... 123 77,807 

17 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Average Daily Cost 
PER Patient. 

1911 S3.59+ 

1912 3.79+ 

1913 3.90+ 

1914 4.07+ 

1915 4.22+ 



Daily Cost per Capita 

FOR Provisions for all 

Persons Supported. 

$0,479 
0.487 
0.511 
0.517 
0.516 



CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL, WAVERLEY. 

There is nothing of special importance to which I would 
call attention here. This hospital does not provide for the 
bed treatment of patients. It cares only for those who 
can get up and dress themselves daily. In this way its 
possible service is very limited. It should sometime be 
replaced by a country branch, of the need of which I have 
spoken in the body of this report. 

The following are comparative tables: 



1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 



1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 



Number of 
Patients Admitted. 

. . 508 

. . . 636 

. . . 638 

. . . 647 

. . . 678 

. . . 733 

. . . 681 

. . . 719 



Average Daily Cost 
PER Patient. 

$1.23 
1.21 
1.51 
1.36 
1.43+ 



Total Patients' 
Days Treatment. 

10,106 
11,428 
11,331 
11,336 
10,785 
10,260 
10,226 
10,061 

Daily Cost per Capita 

FOR Provisions for all 

Persons Supported. 

$0.34+ 
0.40+ 
0.40+ 
0.38+ 
0.37+ 



I would invite attention to the tables 
of statistics and to the interesting and valuable appended 
reports. 

The thanks of the hospital are due to many friends. I 
would speak especially of the ladies upon the hospital 

18 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

committees, whose devoted service has been marked for 
many years, and to the ladies of Cambridge who have 
done so much for the patients' Christmas each year. 

I would invite the attention of your Board to the faith- 
ful service given to the hospital by its officers, physicians 
of the staff, house pupils, nurses and employees. The 
spirit of all is admirable and I believe that results show it. 

I have to thank you again for the courtesy invariably 
shown to me by yoiu- Board. 

Very respectfully, 

Frederic A. Washburn, 

Administrator. 



19 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

Table No. 1. 
comparative statement of statistics. 

Hospital Wards and Single Rooms. 

1915 
Patients in Hospital January 1 : 

Medical 115 

Surgical 211 

Total 326 

Patients admitted during year: 

Medical 2,678 

Surgical . 3,825 

Total 6,503 

Total patients treated in Hospital wards 
and single rooms during year : 

Medical 2,793 

Surgical 4,036 

Total 6,829 

Patients discharged during year: 

Well . 104 

Much relieved 

Relieved 

Not relieved 

Against advice 

Died 

Not treated 

Total 6,548 

Patients in Hospital end of year: 

Medical 112 

Surgical 169 

Total 281 

20 



1914 

105 

194 



299 



2,418 
3,995 

6,413 



2,523 
4,189 

6,712 



270 



5,291 


4,980 


521 


491 


59 


42 


405 


425 


168 


178 



6,386 



115 
211 

326 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

1915 1914 

Total patient's day's treatment: 

I'ree patients 36,279 34,398 

Pay patients 77,662 81,766 

Total 113,941 116,164 

Percentage : 

Free days 32- 29+ 

Paydays 68+ 71- 

Total 100 100 

Average patients per day: , 

Free 99+ 94+ 

Pay 213- 224- 

Total 312+ 318 

Average time per patient in Hospital . . 18— days 18+ days 
Daily average cost per patient, excluding 

actual cost of running Out-Patient 

Department and Accident Ward, 

heat, etc., furnished Eye and Ear 

Infirmary, and goods furnished Con- 
valescent Hospital and McLean 

Hospital .^ $3.31+ $3.09+ 

Daily cost iper capita for provisions for all 

persons supported .32+ .34+ 

Paying patients were admitted at the following rates per 
week: 40 at $42.00; 30 at $35.00; 165 at $28.00; 8 at $23.35; 
7 at $18.66; 1,245 at $15.00; 17 at $13.C0; 430 at $10.50; 7 
at $10.00; 870 at $7.00; 2 at $6.00; 95 at $5.00; 4 at $4.00; 
140 at $3.50. Some of these patients entered at the rates were 
afterwards made free. 

There were 4,815 patients treated in the Accident Ward. Of 
this number 1,423 were retained in the Hospital. 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

1916 1914 

Number of cases treated (new cases) . . 29,213 24,957 

Americans ' 14,656 12,932 

Foreigners 14,557 12,025 

Residents of Boston 12,424 11,127 

Residents of other places 16,789 13,830 

Medical Department 7,416 5,671 

Surgical Department 7,128 6,943 

Department for Diseases of the Skin . . 2,367 1,906 

21 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

1915 1914 

Department for Diseases of the Nerv- 
ous System 

Department for Diseases of the Throat 

Children's Medical Department . . . 

Orthopedic Department 

Genito-Urinary Department .... 

Department of Syphilis 

Dental Department 

Total number of visits from patients . 

Average daily attendance 

Total number of prescriptions filled . 

Number of visits to Hydrotherapeutic 
Room 

Number of visits to Medico-Mechanical 
Room 

Number of applicants 

Number admitted 

Referred to other institutions .... 

Number refused 

Cost of maintenance of Out-Patient 

Department $8^ 

Daily average cost per Out-Patient . . 

AMBULANCE. 

Ambulance calls during year .... 
Average calls per day 

ACCIDENT WARD. 

Visits made to Accident Ward during 

year 

Average visits made per day .... 
Number of operations performed: 

Local anaesthesia 679 

General anaesthesia 143 

Cost of maintenance of Accident 

Ward $1 

Daily average cost per Accident Ward 

patient 

X-RAY. 

1915 1914 

Number of X-Ray cases taken in the 

Out-Patient Department .... 7,618 7,951 

Number of X-Ray cases taken in the 

house 4,597 5,985 

Fluoroscopic examinations 3,997 1,834 

22 



954 


1,000 


3,199 


2,617 


2,294 


2,211 


2,819 


1,968 


1,279 


999 


1,216 


1,128 


521 


514 


190,628 


158,090 


627+ 


520+ 


73,914 


62,112 


3,804 


4,313 


20,605 


16,365 


30,304 


28,666 


29,213 


24,957 


751 


1,063 


340 


2,646 


t,451.96 $74,710.04 


.44+ 


.47+ 


1915 


1914 


1,502 


1,378 


4+ 


3 + 



1915 1914 



4,815 
13 + 


5,278 
14+ 


822 


822 
173 
995 


1,006.69 


$5,092.52 


1.03 + 


.96+ 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Table No. 2. 

residences. 

Boston 1,378 

Massachusetts (except Boston) 4,902 

Maine 53 

New Hampshire and Vermont 107 

Rhode Island and Connecticut 19 

Other States 17 

British Provinces 27 

Foreign countries 

Total 6,503 

Table No. 3. 

BIRTHPLACES. 

Boston 437 

Massachusetts (except Boston) 2,025 

Maine 232 

New Hampshire and Vermont 235 

Rhode Island and Connecticut 95 

New York 155 

Southern and Western States 182 

Other States 46 

Total m United States 3,407 

British Provinces 609 

Great Britain 297 

Ireland 525 

Norway and Sweden 128 

Italy 453 

Russia and Poland 578 

Germany 73 

France 47 

Other places 386 

Total Foreigners 3,096 

BIRTHPLACE OF MOTHER. 

Boston Ill 

Massachusetts 939 

Maine 291 

New Hampshire and Vermont 222 

Rhode Island and Connecticut 59 

Carried forward 1,622 

23 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Brought forward 1,622 

New York 92 

Southern and Western States 157 

Other States 40 

Total in United States . 1,911 

Great Britain 504 

British Provinces 807 

Ireland 1,087 

Norway and Sweden 166 

Germany 123 

Italy 587 

Russia and Poland 822 

France 53 

Other foreigners 443 

Total Foreigners 4,592 



Table No. 4 

OCCUPATIONS. 

Male. 

Barber Shop Strippers 

Barbers 29 Packers . 



Blacksmith 

Blacksmiths 24 

Horseshoer 1 



Building 

Carpenters 113 

Watchmen 4 

Lathers 2 



Candy Factory 

Candy Makers . . . . 

Foremen 

Packers . 

Wrappers 



Cigar Factory 



Filler . . 
Labelers 

Makers . 
Sorters , 



Clothing Factory 

Cutters ....... 

Designers 

Hand Sewer 

Inspectors 

Machine Operators . . 
Pressors ....... 

Trimmers 

Stitchers 



Cotton Mill 



Bobbin boy . . . 

Lappers, Carders . 

Doublers, Twisters 

Dyers 

Folders, Rollers . 

Inspectors .... 

1 Loom fixers . . . 

7 Breakers, Cleaners 

13 Dressers, Slashers 

6 Rovers, Speeders . 

24 



14 
6 



5 

7 
1 
8 
5 

12 
4 

12 



1 

4 

7 

2 

5 

20 

11 

15 

3 

4 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Spinners 7 Gardeners . 

Weavers 136 Messengers 

Reelers, Winders .... 12 Orderlies . 



Department Store 

Floor walkers .... 

Salesmen 

Managers 

Cash Boys 

Errand boys 

Mail order clerks ... 
Clerks 



Domestic 



Butlers . 

Coachmen 

Stablemen 



Farming 
Farmers .... 
Farm hands . . 



22 
3 

4 
7 
5 
2 



12 

14 

5 



76 

7 



Fishing 
Deep sea 26 



Furniture Factory 

Cabinet makers 
Caners, Seaters 
Carpenters 
Finishers . 
Machinists 
Painters 
Packers . . 
Polishers 
Sanders, Buffers 
Upholsterers 



Garage 

Auto repairers 

Chauffeurs 

Managers 

Painters 

Washers 

Watchmen 



Hospital 

Ambulance men . 
House cleaners 



9 
19 
30 

6 
64 
26 
11 

6 

2 
13 



9 

29 

4 

2 

7 
4 



Hotels 



Cooks . . . 
Waiters . . . 
Bell boys . . 
Dish washers 
Elevator men 
Engineer . . 
Clerks . . . 
Kitchen man 
Bar tender 
Cleaners . . . 
Proprietor . . 
Porters . . . 



Ice 



Cutters . 
Teamsters 



Insurance 



Brokers . 
Collectors 



Iron Foundry 

Assemblers 

Boiler makers .... 
Draughtsmen . . . . 

Heaters 

Machinists 

Moulders 

Pattern makers . . . 

Jewelry Factory 

Bench hands .... 

Buffers 

Dippers, Platers . . . 

Enamelers 

Engravers 

Polishers 



2 

4 

20 



39 
25 
2 
10 
5 
1 
4 
1 
1 
5 
1 
3 



4 
14 



4 
6 

8 

6 

78 

12 

6 



7 
11 
2 
4 
7 
14 



Jobbing 



Teamsters 67 



Knitting Mill 

3 Cutters 

14 Inspectors 

25 



95 
1 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Knitters . . . . 
Loom fixers . . . 
Machine hands . 
Menders, Darners 
Winders, Reelers . 



Lawidry 



Manglers 
Bleachers 
Starchers 
Washers 



Leather Tannery 



Beamsters 
Curriers 
Glazers . 
Rollers . 
Tanners 



Paint Factory 
Mixers 

Painting 
House painters . . 

Paper Factory 

Cutters 

Finishers 

Inspectors 

Machine hands . . . 

Sorters 

Trimmers 

Managers 



Plumbing 
Plumbers . . . , 
Plumbers' helpers 

Pottery 

Pressers, Moulders . 
Decorators . . . , 



2 
5 
16 
5 
9 



10 



39 



13 

8 
5 
9 
6 
4 
4 



15 
3 



Printing 

Compositors . . . 

Cutters 

Engravers .... 
Monotypers . . . 
Press feeders . . 



3 Professional 

10 Actor 

29 Artists 

16 Accountants .... 

17 Clergymen 

Civil engineers. . . 
Detective 

2 Dentists 

11 Instructors .... 
2 Lawyers 

11 Physicians .... 
Musicians 



Public Service 

Laborers, Street . . . 

Gardeners 

PoHce officers .... 
Coast guardsmen . . 
Physical instructor . . 

Firemen 

School attendant officer 
Letter carriers .... 
Newspaper reporters . 
Furniture movers . . 

Newsboys 

Sheriff 



Rubber Factory 

Cementers 

Cutters 

Inspectors 

Mixers 

Pohsher 

Tire makers 

Trimmers 

Vulcanizers, Curers . . 

Shoe Factory 



Bottom finishers . 
4 Cementers . . . 

4 Cutters 

Heel workers . . 
Ironers 

10 Lasters 

7 Polishers .... 

10 Skivers 

14 Sorters 

5 Stitchers .... 



1 
6 
2 
6 

4 
1 
4 
7 
2 
43 
3 



260 

36 

10 

3 

1 

14 

1 

10 

4 

2 

2 

1 



7 
14 
7 
4 
1 
5 
7 
3 



12 
10 

38 
24 

2 
31 
14 
14 

6 
121 



26 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Street and Railroad Men 

Firemen 18 

Brakemen 41 

Laborers, General ... 25 

Engineers 16 

Car repairers 9 

Conductors 20 

Motormen 16 

Ticket agents 10 

Tailor Shop 

Tailors 41 

Cutters 8 

Pressers 10 

Woolen and Worsted Mill 

Carders 13 

Dyers 7 

Finishers 9 

Loom fixers 6 

Spinners 7 



Twisters 5 

Warpers 3 

Weavers 44 

Wool sorters 9 

Foremen 2 

Clerks 2 

Others 

Cobblers 6 

Caterers 2 

Florists 4 

Janitors 32 

Liquor dealers 7 

Peddlers, Fruit .... 15 

Students 291 

Sextons 4 

None 408 

Rabbi 1 

Bank president .... 1 

Seamen 4 



Total 3,521 



Candy Factory 

Candy makers . . . 
Coaters, Dippers . . 

Packers 

Wrappers 



Cigar Factory 



Female. 

Loom fixer . . . 
Slasher, Dresser . 
Spinners .... 
Warper .... 
Weavers .... 
Winders, Spoolers 
Stitcher .... 



1 

1 

13 

1 

28 
9 
1 



Strippers 



2 Domestic and Personal Service 



Clerical 

Clerks 

Stenographers . . . . 

Bookkeepers 

Billing machine opera- 
tors 

Cashiers 

Clothing Factory 

Stitchers 

Pressers 

Finishers 



Cotton Mill 



22 
26 
18 

3 
5 



Cooks .... 
Second maids . 
Nurse maids . 
Ladies' maids . 
Housekeepers . 
Laundresses . 
Janitresses . . 
Parlor maids . 
Chamber maids 
Waitresses . . 



. . 63 
. . 41 

25 
. . 26 
. . 12 

37 
. . 9 
. . 24 
. . 36 
. . 49 
Housewives 1,213 

Department Store 



Folder . 
Inspector 



Bundle girls 
1 Bookkeeper 
1 Buyer . . . 

27 ■ 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Demonstrators 
Saleswomen . 
Milliners . . 
Dressmakers 
Manicurists 
Matron . . 
Stenographers 
Mail order clerks 
Stock clerks . . 



Jewelry Factory 



Polisher 



Knitting Mill 

Cutters 

Inspector 

Knitters 

Loom fixers 

Machine hands . . . 
Menders, Darners . . 

Sewers 

Winders, Spoolers . . 
Stitcher 



Laundry 

Ironers, Finishers . 
Manglers . . . . 

Markers 

Washers 

Shakers 

Sorters 

Starchers . . .' . 



Paper Factory 

Finishers 

Machine hands . . . 

Trimmer 

Sorters 



Printing 

Compositors, Typeset- 
ters 

Folder 

Press feeder .... 
Editor 



Professional 

Actress 

Social workers . . . 



3 Physician . . 
22 Nurses . . . 
Teachers . . 
Dietitians . 
Hairdressers 



1 

12 

2 

3 

.14 

13 

15 

1 



3 

6 
8 

15 
7 
7 

12 



Public Service 

Postmistresses . . . 
Telephone operators . 

Rubber Factory 

Cementers 

Cutter 

Inspectors 

Trimmer 

Laster 

Heeler 



Shoe Factory 

Cementers 

Cutters ...... 

Heel workers . . . 

Sorters 

Stitchers 

Tippers 



1 

149 
25 

7 
7 



12 
2 
2 
8 

36 
7 



Woolen and Worsted Mill 

Finishers 

Sewers, Menders . . 
Spinners, Twisters 

Warpers 

Weavers 

Wool sorters .... 
Spooler 



8 
11 
8 
4 
20 
2 
1 



Others 

Students 321 

Sewing 29 

Artist's model .... 1 

Dressmakers 24 

Sister of Charity ... 1 

Superintendent of Home 1 

Dispenser, Drugstore 1 

Companions 3 

Tea room manager . . 1 

None . 365 



Total ..... 2,982 



28 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 






• iOr-ii-imoob--*»mcioo2g 

■r-COlOCDOIMOOOOKNOjIN 

• ^<D (N o o_cc tn 00 o ■* o ^. 
■ CO o OJ t>^ :c -< ■*' lO CO t^" on o 



com — c^05ioo>oor~0i0t^ — «cocor^c^>.TOTj<oooa30oc^<NOit^t 
— c^oor-co-^ — i-ic^ooT}^cooO'»tO'^cococo(Mt^ — iO(M — occcoxL 
oo:05'^Oi»OQOt^io05--oo — r^oocccoooooooccr^tocoMcoxc 
r*r*ooa^fN(N"^cocot>-c. 05O500 — — r-i^t^io — ooo — tNC^c^jTf- 



s^naiiBj-ino 



w a a- 

a c (V, CM 



■aaij 



'j'OscocM — M!N-<r»cOTi<oscoo> — 00 — t^iNOoOT)" — mc<i — t^c^^-i 
eomoooooir-.oooot^coccroiocoot^t^t^oOTj' — •<j'-<j"<i<cOTOiNOO>" 



•SniXBj; 



•B^napiooy 



COi-'OCOO^^»OOOt^CDir't^COCOOO»-'05^0CDt^005CDN'»0050iMCCCO 
^t^OrocOOOOOr^CCOO — (M'^Ot^CDIN'*'*(M'O(N00M0i00C0a:'0(M 
■^T}*^Tj<iOcDO*OcOO»OCOOOCsO:vH— O<N(N»0CD00Ot^cO(NCsc0OTjH 

,— l^Ht-t^Hf-Hi— «r-li-H.-<.-ti-HC^f-H._r-lf-( 



•a3BI3AV 



•JB^OX 1SB81 



■ Of- 

_ .,---_ .:cn-f 



•I^?ox isaiBSjQ 



— (N(MINC^C^(MNIMiN(MM<MCOC^(MIMC4COC<5roMMCCCOCOCCroMC<3CO 



jaqinn^i 'jsa^BaaQ 



•aniix ano 1^ ssJ^ 
jaquin^ isa^BajQ 



COOO(N05t^c0005C^'MC005CO^^iOr^03(N»OTl*T}*OOOiO — — Oi»CC>0 
(MW<a<Tl<lNrocO'^C<JOOO — COMlM'-ii-iMI'COcOOint^OO — oct^t^ 

,-(,-ir-t — — ,-1 — t-Mf-<i-li-ii-i — r-t — C^CQC^ — C^<N 

coooco-^ioo-^ — ooo — (>)r^ost^t^icoot^'-' — t^»ot^ioo5'^fM'»^o 

COt^0503OOOOO0500Ot^t^t^00a;05O0000C0t^00COI>C0OrfC0C0 
— — — — IMN(N(N(N— i-i — — — — I-"-! — (M — — — '-l'-"-"-' — '-"-''-''-I 

>0-^OOC0C0OCD:CTj<t^C0t>. — OC5C0O(N^^»O — eoiocooo^^ooco 

(NTj^t^tOCO — COOOO — OCClOO — <MOCCOOOCOIOCOCOCOCCOC/:CO(M 

o6^^odo6o6o6o6odojo505odo6o6o6ajo:^^odo>o6oiQCo6^^^^^^^-•cDcoco 



•pai^ioipv IBiox 
no a3B^naDja<£ 



•sq^Baa 



— — NC^C<l(NC^(MC>5rocOCOC»3'^'<l>'*Tj<-^Tj<Tl>Tj<Tj>T)iT)<Tj<'^'}'Tt<TfTl"^ 



T K"""'t^=;u. rqt^f,^o-*iN<Na500T)<Tfm<Mcoot~oocooTf — Tj-in — ccr-'MM 

'S^fl Pa^'Ba-lX 1°N — — — Cqc<3C^(NM'-'<NlNO)CO(Nm<M<NlNOCC(M(N(M(NCC(NC^-<C^C<llM 



cO'^ojoo — OTjiroooocor-i-icocoTf — ^^ocnTl<QOoocooo•--lroc3t-l 
paA^II^w lONj t>coooo-<ooo5mccrot^i^c<5a:coooioooc!0-*oi^ — -^cciNOiM 



•?jT?j ni paAa[[ay 
JO 'paAaijay qDnj\[ 



^H^HLOoO'}'iMico5Ciicm'^i^ij^(Nooocooo»ot^ — coco — — ^o — 

CO— COTj*Ot^00C0r^iCr}< — (NiCCOOOOCCr^iCC^O- M^OOfCC^C:oOO 

CCtJ'iCCDCOOO- 0^*^05- (Nh-OO-^cOr^OOXO-^C^JCOiO — OXCJC<) 

— — — — — (N(MC^<N(NINC<lCOCOO)rOCOCO-«>Tl<iCu';'*rt' 1-0 



•paMiinpv IB^ox 
no aSBiuaoiaj 



OOiOO— OJiOCOOOI^O — ■*T}icCC5 02 000COCO — OOOOOOCOCOc«5<N"J' 
COOCOOiOOTl<iO-*COCOM<M(N<NCa(NC^<M<MiM(N(N<N ^ ^'-- 



"IjaM paSiBqosiQ 



^05'^'- ■^OOCOCO<Nt--'^C5»OTj<iOI^mcOCOOOOOO(N— CCOOO^O — 

oocooMNMooor^Cit^c^'^i-ocooCTi'Oi^Ti'oincoco — OiOlCc;JJ^-^ 

lOCOCOOOOO^COCOC^- coo:- OCO-'l^COO- coo — ^^"^iOOCOCvlCN- 



S-d 



•oH 



•aaj^ 



ttccco- cooioocoosor^r^oo — cor^ooc:cocoooocoiOio>oOiccoiC2 

r(.00MCO — — •"TOiTfcOOOCOOO- OOCOtNO: 03M — CCMiOfNOOOt;- — O-l; 

oc^'or~or-t^r^oooco(No:oc» — mooco-*c^a:'*'omcDot-- — 2;co 

(N(NC^C^MC<lC^C^Ol(N(N«<NC0<N00Mmroc0M<NCCCOMM^OTCCC0C0 



•anitx JO u-Bd 



cOTrin"S"^T}<(NT)<cor^oooc^'nrocooo>0(Nmioiooo-*cDf-c<5c2S^^ 

■*cO'*iOC3iO — cOrfOCO-*- t^(N — c0 00 3OcDr-WOc0 3;O — C0;*O 
— (MO) — — — — — — — lMC<lCO<NCq — — — — — (M«iOOt^0CO 



•pjBog gnpCBj 



OJO>t^O'*OCiCDh-CO — "#C00N'*CO — t~ — OOCOOT — 00 — qst^COh- 
ajOrfr^— CJTj<cO(NCOO><NO)CO00COCOOlCOCOCOXCCir^f^COCOt^r;C2J) 

co-*-*iniOio-*iococoo — (NoooomTj-mt^oooi — — C-. cocoiNh-cocooj 

f-Hi— It— li— li— li-Ht-Hi-Hi— (i-H.— tCQC^i-HC^C^C^C^CNOJCN 



•amix 3q* 
JO ^BJ gui.^Bg 



CD'*in'*Tf<-*C^Tl<(MiMOOO!MmroMOOiO<Ni-OiOiOCOr)<CCJ-COC.— o 

tucO'^oos'O — cO'^ocO'*- r^iN- cooooo3cot^t^ocO'*or--«oo 

,-1 iMO)- — — — — — — CSCNCOCQCQ- — — — — (NCCOiOr^t^Ol 



•aniix sq? 
j]B pjBog 3mABg 



— ojocco- mo5T»i — oo — cooo — <Nino5M — ooof^t-r-MT)icoh-oo 
t~ro(NinooO(NTf — cMoicoiNr^MT»<cotMi-2coi2>2SJ2HS"'5S2li 
coMTi..ou3u5^.ncocooo-r^t-2;22;2-2SS2c^?)?3SSSS 



•aaj^ 



OTjtoroincocOiNoowcoco — '^oiiocnt^tN- MOiot~OMTcp-*N--H 

o — roSoomiocor^coin- ooooooc5roo)C<i(NOooiN-*coioo03'02i2' 

— (NiMCNiMIMMINOIiMCqMIMlNiMCaOTCOmrocOCaWCOCOroMCOCOCOM 



•pa^^jmpv l^^ox 



•«3A 



t^OTjfcoro- roin'*cD03Ti<05t>-coC'*coo-#comr-iM — iM'Od — COC2 

MSooST)-«SraS.*t^roooooccDOroo(NOC2iococ»OT!.cD(M;*^ 
e^NNTOcvicoccicororow*'* ■*•*■* lOTjfinmioioioioiocccococc CD CO 



locot^oooo- iNM-ioocor^oooiO- c^im-^iocDh-oo^o — <Nc<;-*io 
ooooooooooc^josoioicnooaiojojoooooooooo- rr — -- — — 
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc:>cno5aio>0)a>050><J>o>05050iC»a2 



29 



REPORT OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. 



Extension of the Hospital's Scientific Opportuni- 
ties TO Physicians at a Distance. 

Very few physicians are able to correct and extend their 
knowledge of disease by seeing autopsies. As a rule only 
those who are connected with one of the larger hospitals 
of the country can confront their beliefs about diagnosis 
and treatment with the truth as revealed post mortem, 
and thus find confirmation or refutation of their hypoth- 
eses. 

For ten years a weekly exercise has been held at the 
Massachusetts General Hospital, at which a typewritten 
(multigraphed) summary of four cases which have re- 
cently come to autopsy is read aloud. This summary 
gives the facts of the patient's history with physical and 
laboratory data, X-Ray findings, etc., all leading up to 
the diagnosis arrived at and the treatment (medical and 
surgical) based upon it. A member of the hospital staff 
reads and discusses these facts and commits himself to a 
diagnosis. Those present — medical students, internes 
of the hospital, and graduate physicians — are each given 
a copy of the full record and invited to state their con- 
clusions about the case on the basis of the data submitted. 

In this way they all get something of the same experi- 
ence which they would have gained had they been in 
actual charge of the patient. When all those present at 
the exercise have committed themselves, the Assistant 
Pathologist to the hospital demonstrates and explains 
the diseases found at the post mortem examination. The 
case is then reviewed once more from the clinical side to 

30 



Report of the General Executive Committee. 

see whether any of the discrepancies between what we 
expected and what we found could have been avoided, 
and to push home the lessons to be learned from the case. 

Two years ago some of our graduate house pupils living 
at a distance wrote to ask that any extra copies of the 
case histories used in these weekly exercises might be 
mailed to them. They missed the stimulus of weekly 
confrontation with the tiMth and wished to keep up the 
discussion of case records among a group of physicians 
situated in one case at Los Angeles, in another at Haverhill, 
Massachusetts. After we had been sending these records 
for some months, it occiu-red to us to ask other physicians 
in different parts of the country whether they would care 
to receive somewhat more extensive records of our weekly 
conferences, with stenographic report of the discussion in 
addition to the case history and autopsy report. 

The response to this invitation was so favorable that 
in April, 1915, the hospital began sending four printed 
case records each week to about 800 physicians, who 
paid five dollars a year to defray the cost of preparing 
and mailing the material. By the end of the year the 
number had grown to 1092, and includes physicians in 
every state of the Union, as well as in Canada, Alaska, 
the Canal Zone, and England. The United States Army 
has recently ordered 25 sets of the records to send to 
army posts throughout the country. 

Practically every mail brings additional applications 
and subscriptions. But the influence of these teaching 
exercises is not measured by the number of envelopes 
mailed each week from the hospital. One subscriber 
writes: ''My set of case records passes each week around 
a circle of forty physicians in my neighborhood." An- 
other says, "Ten of us sit down every Friday night at my 
house to discuss your case records." Another: "Our 
County Medical Society uses yoiu" records instead of 
prepared papers at its monthly meetiags." 

We now exchange our weekly set of case records with a 
similar set multigraphed for a Uke exercise at the Johns 

31 



Report of the General Executive Committee. 

Hopkins Hospital. Out of such an exchange, which ought 
to mirror the daily work and current standards of 
each hospital, we expect much profit. It should keep a 
steady current of criticism and suggestion flowing in 
each direction. i 

Consultation Clinic for Persons of Moderate 

Means. 

The Executive Committee has been working since the 
Spring of 1914 on a plan fqr givmg to persons neither rich 
nor ver}^ poor — that is to about 90 per cent of the com- 
munity — the opportunity of sharing the medical bene- 
fits now open only to the poor who attend out-patient 
chnics, and to the rich who can command the services 
of expert diagnosticians. In obscure cases of disease a 
modern scientific diagnosis is not so much made by one 
man as assembled like the parts of a machine, each part 
being made separately by a man specially skilled through 
practice on that one thing. No one man can do the X- 
Ray work, the Wassermann tests, the analyses of spinal 
fluid, the cystoscopic and proctoscopic examinations, 
and the electrocardiographic measurements; no one can 
give an accurate report on the eye, the ear, the nose, 
the throat, in addition to the ordinary tests of heart, lungs, 
abdominal organs, nervous system, bones, joints, muscle, 
blood, urine, sputa, stomach contents, and feces, which a 
single well traiiied physician is supposed to compass. 

Yet it is by the combination of many such expert ex- 
aminations that complicated cases of disease are un- 
ravelled and their proper treatment found. Even a 
''simple headache" or stomach ache may be impossible 
of diagnosis without using a considerable part of the 
special diagnostic methods mentioned above. This 
means that accurate diagnosis is group-diagnosis not only 
in rare cases, but in a proportion of all cases that is be- 
coming steadily larger as we reahze what deep and com- 
pUcated problems have often been hidden and left un- 
solved behind such familiar names as dyspepsia, rheu- 

32 



Report of the General Executive Committee. 

matism, neurasthenia, — names that no longer screen our 
ignorance even from the man in the street. 

Diagnosis by a single unaided physician, without con- 
sultants, laboratories, and machines behind him, is be- 
coming more and more obviously impossible. But group- 
diagnosis, which is the only satisfactory alternative, is 
ruinously expensive when the patient goes to each of a 
group of specialists at his office. The hospital offers 
the only opportunity for the reasonably accurate diagnosis 
of obscure cases in persons of moderate means. 

During the past year the Trustees have given their con- 
sent to the opening of a Consultation Clinic for Persons 
of Moderate Means. This clinic is to be held in the after- 
noons when our Out-Patient Department ordinarily 
stands idle. Physicians are invited to bring or send to 
it persons for whose disease they desire a low priced con- 
sultation with the advantages above described. After 
diagnosis the patient is to be referred back to his physi- 
cian with a letter giving our opinion and suggestions for 
treatment. No treatment will be given at the hospital 
unless at the desire of the patient's physician, and in 
cases which require such help as the hospital through 
its Zander apparatus or X-Ray machines is especially fitted 
to give. 

The fee for examination and consultation is five dollars. 
This is to include the services of as many different special- 
ists as the case requires. Wassermann tests one dollar 
extra, and X-Ray plates two to three dollars extra. Out 
of these fees the hospital is to reimburse itself for the ac- 
tual running expenses of the clinic (heat, light, nurses, 
etc.). The money remaining after these expenses are 
allowed for is to be divided among the physicians in 
attendance according to the amount of work they are 
called on to do. 

We believe that as soon as the physicians and the public 
realize the advantages, medical and financial, of this 
clinic, they wdll give it cordial support and thus enable 
the hospital to extend its usefulness, 

33 



Report of the General Executive Committee. 

Special Medical Assignments and the Class Treat- 
ment OF Particular Diseases. 

The assignment of all cases of a particular disease or 
group of diseases to members of the staff, has been for 
several j^ears the custom upon the surgical side of the 
hospital, but on the medical side it has made little progress 
from its beginnings with a Tuberculosis Class in 1905 to 
within the present year. 

Definite assignments to members of the staff have been 
made in diabetic cases and thyroid disease. This means 
that all cases of each of these diseases, whether men or 
women, and regardless of the division in the wards and 
services, whether treated in the House or Out-Patient 
Department, are grouped in classes and all cared for by 
two definite physicians of the staff to whom the work is 
assigned. 

In addition to these definite classes, most of the gastric 
cases are seen by another two men of the staff. Cases of 
lead poisoning, sterility, and the question of the diagnosis 
of phthisis are treated in a similar manner. 

The Out-Patient Department. 
Standard Ratio of Physicians to Patients in Medical Clinics. 

In the medical clinics we have at last worked otit, we 
believe, the proper proportion of doctors', externes and 
other assistants to a clientele of a given size and kind. 
In the wards this was done some years ago, and we have 
been working there in the belief that for a service of fifty 
beds with adequate assistance from nurses and clinical 
clerks, we need a chief, a visiting physician, a resident 
physician, three house officers, and half the time of a 
fourth — in all six medical men and part time from a 
seventh. This means about three hours a day for the 
visiting physician. 

In the Out-Patient Medical clinics we find that a staff 
of three physicians with one externe and no teaching 

34 



Report of the General Executive Committee. 

duties can, with the assistance of one paid technician 
and one unpaid cHnic secretary (in the Women's De- 
partment two or thi'ee nurses), deal satisfactorily and 
unhurried!}^ with a clinic of fifty to one hundred patients 
a day (old and new cases) wdthout keeping any one but 
the house officer more than three hours in the clinic daily. 
As soon as the clinics begin to range from seventy-five to 
one hundred and twenty-five, another physician should 
be added. No physician should see more than six new 
cases or twenty ''old" ones (requiring little or no physi- 
cal examination) wdthin three hours. We have left 
student-assistants out of account in this calculation be- 
cause the help they give is just about balanced by the 
time that must be spent in teaching them if they are to 
be given any fair return for their labor. 

In every department in the Out-Patient Department 
women volunteers as clinic secretaries or social workers 
have been increasingly useful. 

Clinic for Treatment of Non-Pulmonary Tuberculosis. 

This clinic reports the following figures: 
Number of patients under treatment: 

December 1, 1913 98 

December 1, 1914 172 

December 1, 1915 213 

This shows a striking growth. The clinic is, so far as we 
know, a unique one in that it is devoted to treating what 
is ordinarily called surgical tuberculosis (lesions of the 
glands, bones, and urinary apparatus, for the most part) 
by medical means, that is, by a hygienic regime and by 
tuberculin. Life is prolonged, symptoms alleviated, and 
in some cases actual cure results. Women volunteers 
have done invaluable work in keeping track of patients, 
cataloguing records, and taking charge of details of the 
clinic management. The hospital also provides a nurse. 
The strong personal relationship which exists in this 

35 



Report of the General Executive Committee. 

clinic between physician and patient is largely responsible 
for the faithful and regular attendance of the patients. 

Industrial Disease. 

Two physicians divide the year between them in their 
study of the effects of lead poisoning upon the blood, 
teeth, eyes and ui'ine. Wassermann reactions are taken 
in every case, and the functions of the kidney are receiv- 
ing special study. 

One physician has followed up most of the cases of 
occupational disease during his term of service, and has 
studied the records of about one hundred and fifty cases 
diagnosed as "occupational neurosis." He is trying to 
ascertain and classify the many conditions that are in- 
cluded in that diagnosis, to determine the duration of 
each type, and the industries in which they occur. This 
same man is also studying a group of patients whose 
occupation exposes them to naphtha or benzine, and is 
attempting to ascertain which, if any, of the symptoms 
complained of are due to the fumes of these substances. 

Syphilis Clinic. 

Our clinic for syphilis has continued to grow rapidly, 
the average daily attendance being now sixty-five, with 
ninety-nine as the largest daj^'s attendance. The chief 
of this clinic says, in his report for that department, ''The 
number of cases of primary syphilis coming for diagnosis 
and treatment, and diagnosed at once by the demonstra- 
tion of spirochaetes, is most gratifying. In ninety-six 
per cent of a series of ninety-seven cases of primary syph- 
ilis, the organism was demonstrated at once with the 
dark field microscope. This department also does many 
dark-field examinations for the Throat Department when 
Vincent's Angina is suspected." 

The department has also collected a large number of 
mounted microscopic specimens showing the histo- 
pathology of the various syphilides. 

36 



Report of the General Executive Committee. 

The department has continued to examine other mem- 
bers of the syphilitic's family, holding the patient re- 
sponsible for bringing in the person from whom the disease 
has been received. 

In cooperation with the Pregnancy Clinic carried on 
at the Boston Lying-in Hospital, many of those who 
have there been found to have a positive Wassermann 
reaction have been sent to our department for examina- 
tion and treatment. It is the intention of the depart- 
ment to have all members of syphilitic families thus dis- 
covered brought in for treatment, and as the Ljang-In 
Hospital now does Wassermann reactions on the whole 
of its pregnancy clinic, the number of cases referred to 
our Syphilis Department is likely to be large. 

Cooperation with the Eye and Ear Infirmary is also 
increasingly close, many cases of iritis and interstitial 
keratitis being sent to us from that institution for con- 
stitutional treatment. A combined study of the disease 
last mentioned is being made. 

During the first six months of this year a medico-social 
survey of three hundred cases of syphilis at the State 
Infirmary at Tewksbury was made. 

The clinic is watching the relations of syphilitic dis- 
ease to various employments, and especially to idleness. 

The most important and gratifying of all the accom- 
phshments of this clinic has been its success in following 
ninety per cent of all the patients who come there for 
treatment. We do not know the equal of this in any other 
clinic, and surely there is no disease in which the careful 
following and prolonged treatment of patients is more 
important. This success is due in part to the systematic 
methods employed, but still more to the astonishing de- 
gree to which the workers in this chnic have succeeded 
in establishing a personal relation with their patients, so 
that of all who come there, there is scarcely one who 
cannot be called by name by one or more members of the 
clinic staff. 

37 



Report of the General Executive Committee. 

Throat Department. 

In addition to the regular work of the clinic there has 
been added a special clinic for cases of vaso-motor rhinitis 
and asthma. The important subject of anaphylactic re- 
actions to different proteins includes not only the different 
pollens and other external irritants, but also the possi- 
bilit}^ that the offending protein may come from the 
bodies of the micro-organisms in certain cases of chronic 
infections of the air passages. It is desirable that the 
whole subject be studied in advance of a popular demand 
for treatment by injections of preparations of these 
various proteins. 

There has also been started in the Department a weekly 
clinic for the treatment of defects in speech. It is desir- 
able that this clinic should be better known, as cases 
especially among children are not infrequent, and proper 
diagnosis and instruction are important and hard to 
obtain. 

Sub-Chiefs of the Surgical Out-Patient Department. 

These positions, established a year ago, have served to 
increase the efficiency of the Surgical Out-Patient De- 
partment by greater supervision of the conduct of the 
clinic. A more intimate relationship between the sur- 
gical work in the Hospital proper and in the Out-Patient 
Department has thi'ough these positions been maintained. 
An important part of the work of the Surgical Out- 
Patient Department is consultation with other depart- 
ments. Through these established positions this consul- 
tation work has been made more satisfactory. 

The Special Assignment of Cases in the Surgical Division. 

The plan of assigning to certain members of the sur- 
gical staff special groups of cases for study and operation 
has been successfully followed during the past year. 
There is no doubt that this plan contributes very mate- 

38 



Report of the General Executive Committee. 

rially to greater efficiency in the care of patients, and that 
it is leading to investigations which will add to surgical 
knowledge. 

Hospital Courses for Practitioners. 

The medical and surgical courses w^hich have been 
given during the past year have attracted an increasing 
number of physicians. One new course in surgery has 
been added this year. 

The development of courses in medicine and surgery 
suitable for graduate work is a matter which the Com- 
mittee regards as of great importance, and it is gratifying 
that these courses have sprung up spontaneously from 
the interest which individual members of the staff have 
had in the subjects presented. The gradual growth of 
graduate teaching at the hospital has been a normal 
growth and not one which has been forced. It is desira- 
ble that other courses be instituted in order that the 
hospital may directly serve the community of physicians 
in this educational way. 

The New Private Ward. 

The Committee is glad to know of the intention of the 
Trustees to establish a new Private Ward. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Algernon Coolidge, 

Richard C. Cabot, 

David L. Edsall, 

Charles L. Scudder, 

Charles A. Porter, 

Frederic A. Washburn, Secretary, 

General Executive- Committee. 



39 



REPORT OF THE PATHOLOGICAL 
LABORATORY. 



The usual routine, bacteriological, chemical, micro- 
scopical, and pathological examinations in connection 
with the study of diseases of the patients in the Hospital 
have been carried on as in previous years. 

During the year 115 autopsies, three of which were on 
cases from other hospitals, were performed in the Labora- 
tory and the post mortem appearances recorded. The per- 
centage of autopsies among the deaths occurring in the 
Hospital is 28.5 per cent and is a repetition of the low 
percentage of 28 of last year as compared with 37 per 
cent in 1913. This continual small proportion of cases in 
which an autopsy was permitted is to be regretted, for it 
hampers the progress of medical knowledge among phy- 
sicians, surgeons, and students who frequent the Hospital, 
and also lessens the value for medical research of the 
clinical records of the Hospital. 

Of microscopical preparations from autopsy material, 
1,282 have been prepared and filed during the year. 

Reports rendered of bacteriological examinations for 
the micro-organisms of diphtheria, typhoid fever, and 
other diseases number 2,665. 

For testing various specimens for the presence of tuber- 
cle bacilli, 260 guinea pigs were used. 

Reports of gross and microscopical appearances and 
the pathological diagnosis of 1,891 specimens from the 
surgical clinic were rendered. From this material, 2,315 
microscopical preparations were made and filed. 

The number of specimens of blood tested for evidence 
of infection with syphihs has been again increased, 9, 776 

40 



Report of the Pathological Laboratory. 

specimens being tested as compared with 7,496 in 1914; 
1,213 specimens of blood were also tested for evidence of 
infection with gonorrhea. 

Chemical examinations of specimens to the number of 
531 were made by Dr. W. Denis as compared with 102 in 
1914. 

Other statistics are: 

Colloidal gold tests of spinal fluid, 583. 

Complement fixation tests for infection with tenia 
echinococcus, 41. 

Bacteriological tests of milk, 211. 

The treatment of patients with bacterial vaccines has 
been continued and during the year 115 cases were so 
treated as compared with 157 in 1914. Although con- 
tinued experience with this method of treatment has nar- 
rowed the range of its application, it continues to appear 
to have some value in certain kinds of disease. 

The facilities and material offered by the Laboratory 
for the instruction of physicians and students of the 
Harvard Medical School in bacteriology, pathology, and 
diagnosis by laboratory methods have continued to be 
extensively utilized. 

The weekly demonstrations of pathological material 
and discussions of the clinical pathological aspects of the 
cases conducted in the Amphitheater of the Laboratory 
before fourth-year students and others have been con- 
tinued during the academic year by Drs. R. C. Cabot, 
Oscar Richardson, and Hugh Cabot. These exercises have 
been more largely attended and have excited greater 
interest. 

The two courses in Medicine and Pathology for prac- 
titioners given by Drs. W. H. Smith and Oscar Richard- 
son during four months of the year have been as well 
attended as in other years. Many of these physicians 
come from distant cities and towns. These courses are 
regarded as highly successful. 

Dr. Oscar Richardson also participated in similar ex- 
ercises with Dr. R. C. Cabot in the latter's course in 

41 



Report of the Pathological Laboratory. 

Clinical Medicine during July, and gave a special course 
to one graduate student. 

Dr. A. E. Steele gave a course to one graduate student. 

Instruction in Pathology to sections of second-year stu- 
dents and special courses to nine fourth-year students of the 
Harvard Medical School have been given by Dr. J. H. 
Wright. Special attention has been given to this instruc- 
tion and it is gratifying to state that the Professor of 
Pathology has recently expressed his satisfaction with 
the results. 

The room for students in Clinical Medicine, which was 
fitted up in the fall of 1914, has been in use by them dur- 
ing then- course. 

Apparatus, material, reagents, and other facilities have 
been provided in the Laboratory for special work on va- 
rious subjects of medical research for 17 men in addition 
to the Staff of the Laboratory. 

The following publications containing the results of 
observations and studies made in the Laboratory have 
appeared dming the year: 

"The Histopathology of some of the Secondary Skin Eruptions 
of Syphilis," by C. C. Dennie, M.D. (Journal of Cuta- 
neous Diseases, Vol. XXX, p. 509.) 

"Study of a Case of Paroxysmal Hemoglobinuria. Serum 
Reactions: Urobilin and Hemoglobin Excretion," by 
C. C. Dennie, M.D., and 0. H. Robertson, M.D. (Ar- 
chives of Internal Medicine, Vol. XVI, p. 205.) 

"Urobilin in the Stool in Pernicious Anaemia as Influenced by 
Splenectomy, Transfusion and Salvarsan," by 0. H. Rob- 
ertson, M.D. (Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. XVI, 
p. 429.) 

"Urobilin in the Stool — An Index to Blood Destruction," by 
0. H. Robertson, M.D. (Archives of Internal Medicine, 
Vol. XV, p. 1072.) 

"Immediate Results of Splenectomy in Pernicious Anaemia," 
by R. I. Lee, M.D., Beth Vincent, M.D., and 0. H. Rob- 
ertson, M.D. (Journal of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, Vol. LXV, p. 216.) 

"The Relation of Calcium to the Delayed Coagulation of Blood 
in Obstructive Jaundice," by R. I. Lee, M.D., and Beth 

42 



Report of the Pathological Laboratory. 

Vincent, M.D. (Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. XVI, 
p. 59.) 

"A Study of the Effect of Anaphylaxis and Leech Extract on 
the Coagulation of the Blood," by R. I. Lee, M.D., and 
Beth Vincent, M.D. (Journal of Medical Research, Vol. 
XXXII, No. 3 (New Series, Vol. XXVII, No. 3) p. 445.) 

"A Study of the Several Factors of Acid Excretion in Nephri- 
tis," by W. W. Palmer, M.D., and L. J. Henderson, M.D. 
(Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. XVI, p. 109.) 

"On the Several Factors of Acid Excretion in Nephritis," bv 
L. J. Henderson, M.D., and W. W. Palmer, M.D. (Jour- 
nal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. XXI, No. 1, May, 1915.) 

"On the Retention of AlkaH in Nephritis," by W. W. Palmer, 
M.D., and L. J. Henderson, M.D. (Journal of Biological 
Chemistry, Vol. XXI, No. 1, May, 1915.) 

"The Influence of Sahcjdates on the Ehmination of Uric Acid 
and Other Waste Products from the Blood," by W. Denis, 
Ph.D. (Journal of Pharmacologv and Experimental Thera- 
peutics, Vol. VII, No. 3, Oct., 1915.) 

"The Effect of Ingested Purines on the Uric Acid Content of 
the Blood," by W. Denis, Ph.D. (Journal of Biological 
Chemistry, Vol. XXIII, p. 47.) 

"Phenols in Urine." Proceedings of the 100th Meeting of the 
American Chemical Society. 

"The Diagnostic Value of Uric Acid Determinations in Blood," 
by Otto Folin, Ph.D., and W. Denis. Ph.D. (Archives of 
Internal Medicine, Vol. XVI, p. 33.) 

"An Apparatus for the Quantitative Collection of Urine from 
Women," by Otto Folin, Ph.D., and W. Denis, Ph.D. 
(Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. XVI.) 

"Some Observations on the Selective Activity of the Human 
Kidney," by Otto Fohn, Ph.D., and W. Denis, Ph.D. 
(Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. XXII. , No. 2, Sept., 
1915.) 

" A Colorimetric Method for the Determination of Phenols (and 
Phenol Derivatives) in the Urine," by Otto Folin, Ph.D., 
and W. Denis, Ph.D. (Journal of Biological Chemistry, 
Vol. XXII, No. 2, Sept., 1915.) 

"The Excretion of Free and Conjugated Phenols and Phenol 
Derivatives," by Otto Fohn, Ph.D., and W. Denis, Ph.D. 
(Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. XXII, No. 2, Sept., 
1915.) 

"On Starvation and Obesity, with Special Reference to Aci- 
dosis," by Otto Fohn, Ph.D., and W. Denis, Ph.D. 

43 



Report of the Pathological Laboratory. 

(Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. XXI, No. 1, May, 
1915.) 
"Note on Perca Globulin," by Otto Folin, Ph.D., and W. 
Denis, Ph.D. (Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 
XXI, No. 1, May, 1915.) 

"A Case of Thrombophlebitis of the Veins of the Cord Asso- 
ciated with Colon Bacillus Infection of the Epididymis," 
by E. G. Crabtree, M.D. (Boston Medical and Surgical 
Journal, Vol. CLXXIII, p. 705.) 

"The Medical Aspects of Empyema and Pulmonary Abscess," 
by F. T. Lord, M.D. (Boston Medical and Surgical Jour- 
nal, Vol. CLXXIII, p. 798.) 

"Lobar Pneumonia," by F. T. Lord, M.D. (Boston Medical 
and Surgical Journal, Vol. CLXXIII, p. 153.) 

"The Effect of Chloroform on the Factors of Coagulation," by 
G. R. Minot, M.D. (American Journal of Physiology, 
Vol. XXXIX, p. 131.) 

"Diseases of the Bronchi, Lungs, and Pleura," by F. T. Lord. 
Lea & Febiger, Phil, 1915. 

"Pathological Technique," by F. B. Mallory, M.D., and J. H. 
Wright, M.D., Sixth Edition. W. B. Saunders Company, 
Phil, 1915. 

Of other special studies and work carried on in the 
Laboratory during the year and not represented in the 
foregoing list of publications, the following may be 
mentioned : 

Drs. R. I. Lee and 0. H. Robertson worked on the 
experimental production of purpura. 

Dr. G. R. Minot worked on certain problems in the 
pathology of the blood. 

Dr. E. G. Crabtree has studied certain subjects in 
genito-urinary pathology. 

Dr. A. H. Rowe has carried on an investigation of the 
refractive index of the blood in various diseases. 

Dr. H. F. Hartwell has continued his work on experi- 
mental syphiUs. 

Dr. F. T. Lord has studied certain problems in the path- 
ology of pneumonia. 

Dr. W. Denis has carried on investigations on the fol- 
lowing subjects: factors influencing the production of 

44 



Report of the Pathological Laboratory. 

acidosis; metabolism in sprue; on the influence of dis- 
ease on the creatin content of human muscle; on the 
influence of salicylates and of quinine on metabolism; 
a method for the determination of phenols in faeces; and 
the excretion of nitrogenous bodies by the intestine in 
nephritis. 

Dr. J. H. Wright has studied the influence of sj-philitic 
blood serum on the formation of thrombin and on the 
reduction of silver nitrate and gold chloride; also meth- 
ods for shortening the time required for the preparation 
of microscopical specimens. He has given much atten- 
tion to the study of the histology of lesions from autopsies, 
and to the revision of autopsy records. 

In the absence of Dr. W. F. Whitney and Dr. H. F. Hart- 
well during the summer, Dr. J. H. Wright and Dr. A. E. 
Steele had charge of the work in surgical pathology. 
Respectfully submitted, 

J. Homer Wright, M.D., S.D. 

Pathologist. 



45 



REPORT OF THE ROENTGENOLOGICAL 
DEPARTMENT. 



During the past year much progress has been made 
in this Department. All the machines have been placed 
in the basement and in fireproof rooms, thus eliminating 
much noise and discomfort both to the patients as well 
as to the Staff. A new, large unit has been installed. 

As time goes on it will be necessary to install still more 
apparatus. It is the only way that progress can be made 
in this great department of medicine. 

The following figures, when compared with the report 
of last year, show the increase in work which the Depart- 
ment has been called upon to do. The addition to the 
force of a Resident Roentgenologist has been a great help. 

Nine thousand three hundred and sixty-two people 
came to the X-Ray Department this year for various 
reasons. Of these five thousand one hundred and twenty- 
four were physicians who came to see and discuss plates; 
six hundred and thirty-four were students, or visitors 
outside of the hospital, who came to study or observe the 
work in the Department. There were thirteen thousand 
three hundred and seventy-one plates sent out of the 
Department for use in wards, clinics, and in the Out- 
Patient Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter J. Dodd, 

Roentgenologist. 



46 



REPORT OF THE MEDICO-MECHANICAL 

AND THE HYDROTHERAPELTIC 

DEPARTMENTS. 



During the year 1,206 new patients have been admitted 
to the Medico-Mechanical Department, a gaui of 203 
cases over the previous year. The number of cases of 
arthritis, fractures, and subacromial bursitis has been 
especially large, while as usual only a very small number 
of internal affections has been treated. This is very much 
to be regretted, as most of these cases which have been a 
sufficiently long time under treatment have been greatly 
improved. 

Two courses of lectures have been given to the students 
of the Harvard Graduate School of Medicine, and the 
students of the Harvard Medical School have been in- 
structed in massage and exercise treatment. It is very 
much to be regretted, however, that the large and ex- 
tremely interesting material of the departments is so Uttle 
used for practical and scientific work. 

The Zander Department has been fortunate in having 
an unusually large number of excellent volunteer assist- 
ants, and it is only through their untiring efforts that it 
has been possible to give sufficient attention to such a 
large number of cases. The Postural Clinic has had a 
much larger attendance than in slbj pre\dous year. 

The Hydrotherapeutic Department has been used a 
great deal less than in previous years, which shows the 
reduction of new patients as well as of single visits. 

I wish to express my thanks to the members of the de- 
partments for theu^ willing and faithful cooperation. 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. Hermanx Bucholz, M.D. 

Director. 

47 



LIST OF STAFF PUBLICATIONS 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

RiCHAKD C. Cabot, M.D. 

James Gregory Mumford. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 
clxxii, 470. 

Women in medicine. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, 
Ixv, 947. 

Obituary of Edward Livingston Trudeau. Amer. Jour. 
Med. Sciences, 1915, cl, 781. 

Some functions of social work in hospitals. Mod. Hosp., 
1915, iv, 188. 

General pathology of the blood-forming organs. 

Pernicious and secondary anaemia, chlorosis, and leucae- 
mia. Revision of Osier's Modern Medicine, 1915. 

Health and medical social service. In the field of social 
service. Ed., Philip Davis, 1915. 

David L. Edsall, M.D., and James H. Means, M.D. 

Observations on a case of family periodic paralysis. Amer. 
Jour. Med. Sciences, 1915, cl, 169. 

John B. Hawes, 2d, M.D. 

Treatment of tuberculous cervical adenitis. Bos. Med. & 

Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 6. 
Tuberculosis in the aged. Amer. Jour. Med. Sciences, 

1915, cxlix, 664. 
"Do's" and ''don'ts" in the diagnosis of early pulmonary 

tuberculosis in adults and children. Bos. Med. & Surg. 

Jour., 1915, clxxii, 731. 
The responsibility of the general practitioner for the care 

and supervision of the discharged sanatorium patient. 

Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 779. 
Mesenteric gland tuberculosis. Interstate Med. Jour., 

1915, xxi. 
Errors in the diagnosis of chronic pulmonary disease. 

Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 650. 
Consumption. What it is and what to do about it. Small, 

Maynard & Co., Bos., 1915. 
Progress in tuberculosis. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 

clxxii, 138. 
Present situation in regard to local tuberculosis hospitals. 

Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 229. 
48 



List of Staff Publications. 

Henry F. Hewes, M.D. 

Study of disturbances of the stomach. Bos. Med. & Surg. 
Jour., 1915, clxxii, 286. 

Roger I. Lee, M.D. 

Subdiaphragmatic inflammation with a syndrome of phys- 
ical signs and spontaneous recovery without suppura- 
tion. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, Ixiv, 1307. 

Preventable heart disease. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 
cbcxiii, 157. 

Blood pressure determinations, urinarj^ findings and dif- 
ferential blood counts in a group of 662 young male 
adults. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 541. 

Roger I. Lee, M.D., and Beth Vincent, M.D. 

Relation of calcium to the delayed coagulation of the 

blood in obstructive jaundice. Arch. Int. ]\Ied., 1915, 

xvi, 59. 
Study of the effect of anaphjdaxis and leech extract on the 

coagulation of the blood. Jour. Med. Res., 1915, 

xxvii, 445. 

Roger I. Lee, M.D., Beth Vincent, M.D., and Oswald H. 
Robertson, M.D. 
Immediate results of splenectomy in pernicious anemia. 
Jour. Amer. Ass'n, 1915, Ixv, 216. 

Roger I. Lee, M.D., Walter J. Dodd, M.D., and Edward 
L. Young, Jr., M.D. 
Study of the effect of rowing on the heart. Bos. Med. & 
Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 499. 

Harry Linenthal, M.D. 

Case of human rabies. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 
clxxii, 221. 

Dangers in handhng food by persons afflicted with com- 
municable diseases. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 
clxxii, 544. 

Use of the Schick test in a children's institution. Bos. 
Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 427. 

Frederick T. Lord, M.D. 

Lobar pneumonia. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 

153. 
Diseases of the bronchi, lungs and pleura. Lea & Febiger, 

Phil., 1915. 
Medical aspects of empyema and puhnonary abscess. 

Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 798. 

James H. Means, M.D. 

Studies of the basal metabolism in obesity and pituitary 
disease. Jour. Med. Research, 1915, xxxii, 121. 
49 



List of Staff Publications. 

Basal metabolism and body surface. Contribution to the 
normal data. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxi, 263. 

James H. Means, M.D., and Harold L. Higgins, M.D. 

Effect of certain drugs on the respiration and gaseous 
metabolism in normal human subjects. Jour. Pharm. 
& Exper. Therap., 1915, vii, 1. 

James H. Means, M.D., L. Harry Newburgh, M.D., and 
W. T. Porter, M.D. 
On the state of respiratory mechanism in pneumonia. 
Bos., Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 742. 

James H. Means, M.D., and L. Harry Newburgh, M.D. 

Blood flow in a patient with double aortic and double 
mitral disease. Jour. Phar. & Exper. Ther., 1915, vii, 
441. 

Effect of caffein upon the blood flow in normal human 
subjects. Jour. Phar. & Exper. Ther., 1915, vii, 449. 

George R. Minot, M.D., and F. M. Rackemann, M.D. 

Respiratory signs and symptoms in trichinosis. Amer. 

Jour. Med. Sciences, 1915, cl, 571. 
Effect of chloroform on the factors of coagulation. Amer. 

Jour. Physiol., 1915, xxxix, 131. 

L. Harry Newburgh, M.D. 

Vasomotor mechanism in pneumonia. Amer. Jour. Med. 

Sciences, 1915, cxiix, 204. 
Use of strychnin and caffein as cardiovascular stimulants 

in the acute infectious diseases. Arch. Int. Med., 1915, 

XV, 458. 
On the use of strychnin in broken cardiac compensation. 

Amer. Jour. Med. Sciences, 1915, cxlix, 696. 

L. Harry Newburgh, M.D., and W. T. Porter, M.D. 

Heart muscle in pneumonia. Jour. Exper. Med., 1915, 
xxii, 123. 

L. Harry Newburgh, M.D., James H. Means, M.D., and 
W. T. Porter, M.D. 

On the state of respiratory mechanism in pneumonia. 
Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 742. 

L. Harry Newburgh, M.D., and James H. Means, M.D. 
Blood flow in a patient with double aortic and double 
mitral disease. Jour. Phar. & Exper. Ther., 1915, vii, 
441. 
Effect of caffein upon the blood flow in normal human 
subjects. Jour. Phar. & Exper. Ther., 1915, vii, 449. 
50 



List of StaS Publications. 

Walter W. Palmer, M.D. 

Studies in paroxysmal edema. Arch. Int. Med., 1915, xv, 
329. 

Walter W. Palmer, M.D., and L. J. Henderson, M.D. 

On the several factors of acid excretion in nephritis. Jour. 

Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxi. 37. 
On the retention of alkali in nephritis. Jour. Biolog. 

Chem., 1915, xxi, 57. 

WiLLARD S. Parker, M.D. 

Urinary acidity in recurrent vomiting. Bos. Med. & Surg. 
Jour., 1915, clxxii, 164. 

Orville F. Rogers, Jr., M.D. 

Study of children with positive skin tuberculin reactions. 
Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 161. 

Frederick C. Shattuck, M.D. 

Treatment of heart disease. Bos. Med, & Surg. Jour., 
1915, clxxiii, 316. 

George C. Shattuck, M.D. 

Synopsis of medical treatment. Revision of second edi- 
tion. W. M. Leonard, Boston, 1915. 

William H. Smith, M.D., and Alson R. Ktlgore, M.D. 

Dilatation of the arch of the aorta in chronic nephritis 
with hj'pertension. Amer. Jour. Med. Sciences, 1915, 
cxlix, 503. 

Arthur K. Stone, M.D. 

Tuberculosis: the policy of the State of Massachusetts re- 
garding tuberculosis. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 
clxxiii, 159. 

Contributing editor to Appleton's Medical Dictionary, 
1915. 

Paul D. White, M.D. 

Alternation of the pulse: a common chnical condition. 
Amer. Jour. Med. Sciences, 1915, cl, 82. 

Relationship of the abnormal heart beat to prognosis. 
Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 312. 

Auricular fibrillation and complete heart block. Bos. 
Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 431. 

Synchronous inspiration and systole in a patient exhibit- 
ing equal respiratory and pulse rates. Bos. Med. & 
Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 548. 

Unusual t3rpe of gross cardiac arrhythmia. Jour. Amer. 
Med. Ass'n, 1915, Ixv, 1276. 

Study of atrioventricular rhythm following auricular flut- 
ter. Arch. Int. Med., 1915, xvi, 517. 
51 



List of Staff Publications. 

Observations upon the etiology and treatment of heart 
disease. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 851. 

SOUTH MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Charles C. Dennie, M.D. 

Histopathology of some of the secondary skin eruptions of 
sj^phiUs. Jour. Cutaneous Dis., 1915, xxxiii, 509. 

Charles C. Dennie, M.D., and Oswald H. Robertson, M.D. 
Study of a case of paroxysmal hemoglobinuria. Serum re- 
actions: urobihn and hemoglobin excretion. Arch. Int. 
Med., 1915, xvi, 205. 

Charles C. Dennie, M.D., and John H. Bufford, M.D. 
Bacterin treatment of certain chronic pyogenic dermatoses. 
Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 910. 

Abner Post, M.D. 

Syphihs. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 161. 
Notes of a conference on the medical and social aspects of 

sjTphihs of the nervous system. Bos. Med. & Surg. 

Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 867. 
Symmetrical synovitis in hereditary syphilis. Bos. Med. 

& Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 941. 

CHILDREN'S MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Richard S. Eustis, M.D. 

Differentiation of human and cows' milk by color tests. 

Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 92. 
Endocarditis in children: its prophylaxis and treatment in 

an out-patient department. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 

1915, ckxiii, 348. 

Richard M. Smith, M.D. 

Progress in pediatrics. Literature of 1913 and 1914 on 
infections of the genito-urinary tract in children. Amer. 
Jour. Dis. Child., 1915, ix, 331. 

Fritz B. Talbot, M.D., and John L. Morse, M.D. 

Bacteriology of the gastro-intestinal tract in infancy. Bos. 
Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 171. 

J. Herbert Young, M.D. 

Tonsillectomy as a therapeutic measure in the treat- 
ment of chorea and endocarditis. Bos. Med. & Surg. 
Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 356. 
52 



List of Staff Publications. 

SUB-DEPARTMENT OF TROPICAL MEDICINE. 

Richard P. Strong, M.D. 

Recent developments in relation to the study of tropical 
medicine in the United States. Bull. Johns Hopkins 
Hosp., 1915, xxvi, 148. 

Work of the Serbian Sanitary Commission. Bos. Med. & 
Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 259. 

Richard P. Strong, M.D., and E. E. Tyzzer, M.D. 

Pathology of oroya fever. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, 

Ixiv, 965. 
Experiments relating to the virus of verruga peruviana. 

Fourth report. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, Ixiv, 

1124. 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Franklin G. Balch, M.D. 

Report of some cases of perineal prostatectomy. Bos. 
Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 507. 

Farrar Cobb, M.D. 

Surgical treatment of cancer of the cervix uteri. Bos. 
Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 85. 

Lincoln Davis, M.D. 

Two cases of rupture of the intestine. Bos. Med. & Surg. 
Jour., 1915, clxxii, 163. 

Study of 260 cases of acute appendicitis at the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 
clxxii, 737. 

Robert B. Greenough, M.D. 

Report of Harvard University service at the American 
Ambulance, Lycee Pasteur, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. 
Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 742. 

ToRR Wagner Harmer, M.D. 

Study of the efficiency of mixed toxins (Coley) in inopera- 
ble sarcoma. A critical analysis of 130 microscopically 
proven cases. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 
331. 

Daniel F. Jones, M.D. 

Two-stage combined abdomino-sacral operation for car- 
cinoma of the rectum. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, 
Ixv, 757. 

53 



List of Stafif Publications. 

Richard H. Miller, M.D., and Hugh Cabot, M.D. 

Effect of anesthesia on the kidney function. Arch. Int. 
Med., 1915, XV, 369. 

Samuel J. Mixter, M.D. 

Points in surgical treatment of acute intestinal obstruc- 
tion. Surg., Gynecol. & Obstet., 1915, xx, 268. 

Laparotomy in tjT^hoid fever. Ann. of Surg., 1915, Ixii, 
143. 

Intestinal tract. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, Ixv, 1607. 

William J. Mixter, M.D. 

Review of literature on pericecal bands and adhesions. 

Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 244. 
Surgical experiences in France. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 

1915, ckxiii, 413. 

Charles A. Porter, M.D. 

Study of the serum treatment of tetanus. Harvard Alumni 
Bulletin, 1915. 

Edward P. Richardson, M.D. 

Perinephritic abscess: a review of cases operated on at the 
Massachusetts General Hospital from 1899 to 1913. 
Surg., Gynecol. & Obstet., 1915, xxi, 1. 

Edward H. Risley, M.D. 

Diabetes and surgery. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 

clxxii, 90. 
Preoperative diagnosis of tabes mesenterica. Bos. Med. & 

Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 253. 
Skeletal cancer. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 

584. 
Common shoulder injuries. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 

1915, clxxiii, 418. 

Charles L. Scudder, M.D. 

Significance of X-Ray examination following operation 

for congenital pyloric tumor. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 

1915, clxxii, 166. 
Red stippling sign of chronic gastric and duodenal ulcer. 

Trans. Amer. Surg. Ass'n, 1915. 
Report of a case of splenectomy. Trans. Amer. Surg. 
• Ass'n, 1915. 
Operative treatment of fractures. Bos. Med. & Surg. 

Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 346. 

Channing C. Simmons, M.D. 

Treatment of osteomyelitis; observations on 97 consecu- 
tive cases with end results. Surg., Gynecol. & Obstet., 
1915, XX, 129. 

54 



List of Staff Publications. ; 

Beth Vincent, M.D., and Roger I, Lee, M.D. 

Study of the effect of anaphylaxis and leech extract on 

the coagulation of the blood. Jour. Med. Res., 1915, 

xxvii, 445. 
Relation of calcium to the delayed coagulation of the 

blood in obstructive jaundice. Arch. Int. Med., 1915, 

xvi, 59. 

Beth Vincent, M.D., Roger I. Lee, M.D. and Oswald H. 
Robertson, M.D. 
Immediate results of splenectomy in pernicious anemia. 
Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, Ixv, 216. 

Wyman Whittemore, M.D. 

Lung abscess and bronchiectasis from a surgical point of 

view; certain end results of acute and chronic empyema. 

Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, cbcxiii, 811. 
Acute and chronic empyema. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 

1915, clxxii, 168. 

ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT. 

Z. B. Adams, M.D. 

Causes of scoliosis and their relation to treatment. Jour. 
Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, Ixiv, 26. 

Elliott G. Brackett, M.D. 

Operative treatment of osteoarthritis. Amer. Jour. Orth. 
Surg., 1915, xiii, 46. 

Elliott G. Brackett, M.D., and Herman W. Marshall, 
M.D. 

Late results of operations upon hip joints for hypertrophic 
arthritis. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 688. 

Lloyd T. Brown, M.D.. and Walter J. Dodd, M.D. 

Fracture of the transverse process of the fifth lumbar ver- 
tebra. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 922. 

Louis A. 0. Goddu, M.D. 

Enchondroma. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 
402. 

Harry C. Low, M.D. 

Study of the scope and efficiency of a large orthopedic 
clinic. Amer. Jour. Orth. Surg., 1915, xii, 396. 

Herman W. Marshall, M.D. 

Importance of vascular conditions in orthopedic cases. 

Amer. Jour. Orth. Surg., 1915, xii, 725. 
Late results of surgical treatment for flexed scapulae, with 

55 



List of Staff Publications. 

a discussion of the subject. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 
1915, clxxii, 812. 
Foot strain and other common foot defects. Bos. Med. & 
Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii; 979. 

Herman W. Marshall, M.D., and Elliott G. Brackett, 
M.D. 

Late results of operations on hip joints for hypertrophic 
arthritis. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 688. 

Herman W. Marshall, M.D., and Robert B. Osgood, M.D. 
f/ate results of operations for correction of foot deformities 
resulting from poliomyelitis. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 
1915, clxxiii, 375. 

Egbert B. Osgood, M.D. 

First impressions of the opportunities for orthopedic work 
in the American Ambulatory in Paris. Bos. Med. & 
Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 7. 

Robert B. Osgood, M.D. , Albert H. Freiburg, M.D., and 
David Silver, M.D. 

Second report of Committee on Treatment of Structural 
Scoliosis to American Orthopedic Association. Amer. 
Jour. Orth. Surg., 1915, xiii 6. 

Robert B. Osgood, M.D., and Herman W. Marshall, M.D. 

Late results of operations for correction of foot deformities 
resulting from poliomyelitis. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 
1915, clxxiii, 375. 

Robert B. Osgood, M.D., et al. 

Seventh report of progress in orthopedic surgery. Bos. 

Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 59 and 97. 
Eighth report of progress in orthopedic surgery. Bos. 

Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 448. 

Mark H. Rogers, M.D. 

Tuberculosis of the knee-joint in adults: prognosis and 
treatment. Amer. Jour. Orth. Surg., 1915, xii, 589. 

GENITO-URINARY DEPARTMENT. 
J. Dellinger Barney, M.D. 

Infections of the testicle. Amer. Text-Book of Urology, 

1915. 
Genital tuberculosis in the male. Amer. Text-Book of 

Urology, 1915. 
Cystitis. Pan-Amer. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915. 

56 



List of Staff Publications. 

J. Bellinger Barney, M.D., and James B. Ayer, M.D. 
Unusual case of obstructing prostate diagnosticated with 
difficult}^ from tabes. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 
clxxiii, 620. 

Hugh Cabot, M.D. 

Anuria: its etiologic and surgical phases. Amer. Jour. 
Urol., 1915, xi, 89. 

Errors in diagnosis of renal and ureteral calculus. Surg., 
Gynecol. & Obstet., 1915, xxi, 403. 

Critical review of 157 cases of stone in the kidney and 
ureter. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, Ixv, 1233. 

Medicine — a profession or a trade. . Bos. Med. & Surg. 
Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 685. 

Differential diagnosis of lesions of the right upper quad- 
rant of the abdomen, based upon clinical, laboratory 
and X-Ray evidence. (To appear in the Lancet-Clinic.) 

Some observations upon diverticulum of the bladder. 
Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 300. 

Stone in the kidney and ureter. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 
1915, ]xv, 1233. 

Hugh Cabot, M.D., and E. Granville Crabtree, M.D. 

Frequency of recurrence of stone in kidney after opera- 
tion. Surg., Gynecol. & Obstet., 1915, xxi, 223. 

End results of 70 cases of renal tuberculosis treated by 
nephrectomy. Surg., Gynecol. & Obstet., 1915, xxi, 669. 

Mechanism of the protection afforded by the drainage of 
prostatics as a preliminary to operation. (No reference.) 

Consideration of the production of immunity. (No ref- 
erence.) 

Hugh Cabot, M.D., and Edward L. Young, Jr., M.D. 

Chapter on Prostate. (Reference Handbook of Med. 

Sciences.) 

Hugh Cabot, M.D., and Richard H. Miller, M.D. 

Effect of anesthesia on the kidnej^ function. Arch. Int. 
Med., 1915, XV, 369. 

E. Gr.'^j^ville Crabtree, M.D. 

Case of thrombophlebitis of the veins of the cord associated 
with colon bacillus infection of the epididymis. Bos. 
Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 705. 

E. Granville Crabtree, M.D., and Hugh Cabot, M.D. 
Frequency of recurrence of stone in kidney after opera- 
tion. Surg., Gynecol. & Obstet., 1915, xxi, 223. 
End results of 70 cases of renal tuberculosis treated by 
nephrectomy. Surg., Gynecol. & Obstet., 1915, xxi, 
669. 

57 



List of Staff Publications. 

Mechanism of the protection afforded by the drainage of 
prostatics as a preliminary to operation. (No reference.) 

Consideration of the production of immunity. (No inf- 
erence.) 

Richard F. O'Neil, M.D. 

Bladder tumor in the young. Trans. Amer. Urological 

Ass'n 1915. 
Renal tuberculosis. Amer. Text-Book of Urology. (Not 

yet pubhshed.) 

George G. Smith, M.D. 

Separate renal function. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, 

Ixiv, 223. • , , 

CUnical and experimental observations on the blood pres- 
sure in spinal anesthesia. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 
1915, ckxiii, 502. 
George G. Smith, M.D., and W. T. Porter, M.D. 

Spinal anesthesia in the laboratory. Amer. Jour. Phys., 
1915, xxxviii, 108. 

Edward L. Young, Jr., M.D. 

Echinococcus of the kidney. Amer. Text-Book of Urology. 
Urethral caruncle. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 
clxxii, 822. 
Edward L. Young, Jr., M.D., and Hugh Cabot, M.D. 
Chapter on Prostate. (Reference Handbook of Med. 

Sciences.) 
New preparation for pyelography. Bos. Med. & Surg. 
Jour., 1915, clxxii, 539. 

Edward L. Young, Jr., M.D., Roger I. Lee, M.D., and 
Walter J. Dodd, M.D. 
Study of the effect of rowing on the' heart. Bos. Med. & 
Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 499. 

NEUROLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

James B. Ayer, M.D. 

Lumbar puncture and the examination of the spinal fluid 

in disorders of the eye. Arch, of Ophthal., 1916. 
Neuroma of ulnar nerve: analysis of a case. Bos. Med. & 

Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 585. 
Cerebral hemorrhage simulating tumor of the brain. 

(Read before the Bos. Soc, Psychiatry and Neurology, 

1915.) 
Significance of serous, non-inflammatory spinal fluid. 

Worcester Collection of Danvers Hospital, 1915. 
58 



List of Staff Publications. 

James B. Ayer, M.D., and J. Dellinger Barney, M.D. 

An unusual case of obstructing prostate diagnosticated 
with difficulty from tabes. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 
1915, clxxiii, 620. 

George Clymer, M.D. 

Neurasthenia. Third edition, Reference Hand Book of 
Medical Sciences. (Now in press.) 

L. Eugene Emerson, Ph.D. 

Psychopathology of family. Jour. Abnorm. Psychol., 
1915, ix. 

Philosophy of psychoanalysis. Psychoanalytic Review, 
1915. 

Psychoanalytic treatment of hysteroepilepsy. Jour. Ab- 
norm. Psychol., 1915, ix. 

Abstracts of the Internationale Zeitschrift fiir Arztliche 
Psychoanalyse, 1915, ii. 

Edward W. Taylor, M.D. 

Progressive vagus-glossopharyngeal paratysis with ptosis. 
Contribution to the group of family diseases. Jour. 
Nerv. & Mental Dis., 1915, xlii, 129. 

LARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Harry A. Barnes, M.D. 

Radical treatment of peritonsillar abscess by tonsillectomy 
during the acute stage of the disease. Amer. Laryngo- 
logical Soc, 1915. 

Algernon Coolidge, M.D. 

Diseases of the Nose and Throat. Text-Book. W. B. 
Saunders & Co., Phil, 1915. 

Joseph L. Goodale, M.D. 

Parenteral administration of horse serum in cases of horse 

asthma. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 751. 
Pollen therapy in hav fever. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 
1915, ckxiii, 42. 

D. Crosby Greene, Jr., M.D. 

Case of death following the removal of tonsils under local 
anesthesia with novocain and adrenalin. N. E. Oto- 
Laryngolog. Soc, 1915. 

Harris P. Mosher, M.D. 

Operation for draining the lacrimal sac and nasal duct into 
the unciform fossa. Laryngoscope, 1915, xxv. 

59 



List of Staff Publications. 

Walter B. Swift, M.D. 

Studies in speech disorder. No. 2. Progressive muscular 

atrophy; case and treatment. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 

1915, clxxiii, 704. 
Studies in speech disorder. No. 3. The development of 

a mental defective by vocal drill. Bos. Med. & Surg. 

Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 745. 
Studies in speech disorder. No. 4. Ehmination of voice 

defects following adenoid and tonsil operations. Bos. 

Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 782. 

George H. Wright, D.M.D. 

Tuberculosis from a dentist's viewpoint. Bos. Med. & 
Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 8. 

DERMATOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

J. Harper Blaisdell, M.D. 

Menace of syphilis to the clean-living public. Bos. Med. & 
Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxii, 476. 

John T. Bowen, M.D. 

Epidemic alopecia in small areas in schools, regiments, etc. 

Jour. Cutan. Dis., 1915, xxxiii, 343. 
Report on dermatology. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 

clxxiii, 358. 
Precancerous dermatoses: a sixth case of a type recently 

described. Jour. Cutan. Dis., 1915, xxxiii, 787. 

John H. Bufford, M.D., and Charles C. Dennie, M.D. 
Bacterin treatment of certain chronic pyogenic dermatoses. 
Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 910. 

John H. Bufford, M.D., and C. G. Lane, M.D. 

Calomel poisoning. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, Ixv, 

161. 
Cutaneous tuberculosis. Report of a case of folliclis and 

erythema induratum. Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, 

clxxii, 825. 

Frederick S. Burns, M.D. 

Case of generalized congenital keratoderma, with unusual 
involvement of the eyes, ears, and nasal and buccal 
mucous membranes. Jour, of Cutan. Dis., 1915, 
xxxiii, 255. 

Harvey P. Towle, M.D. 

Epithehoma in the cancer problem. St. Paul Med. Jour., 

1915, xvii, 501. 
Heliotherapy in diseases of the skin. Jour. Cutan. Dis., 

1915, xxxiii, 847. 

60 



List of Staff Publications. 

Charles J, White, M.D. 

Use of mercury in verrucae planae juveniles. Jour. Cutan. 

Dis., 1915, xxxiii, 738. 
Anaphylactic phenomenon in eczema. Jour. Cutan. Dis., 
1916. . 



ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Walter J. Dodd, M.D., and Lloyd T. Brown, M.D. 

Fracture of transverse process of fifth lumbar vertebra. 
Bos. Med. & Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 922. 

Walter J. Dodd, M.D., Roger I. Lee, M.D., and Edward 
L. Young, Jr., M.D. 

Study of the effect of rowing on the heart. Bos. Med. & 
Surg. Jour., 1915, clxxiii, 499. 

George W. Holmes, M.D. 

Roentgen findings in the examination of the stomach and 

duodenum. (In press.) 
Preliminary report on the movements of the diaphragm, 

particularly in its relation to adhesive pericarditis. (In 

press.) 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

George S. Derby, M.D. 

Some aspects of ophthalmia neonatorum. Trans. Amer. 
Med. Ass'n, Sec. on Ophthalmol., 1915. 

George S. Derby, M.D., and F. H. Verhoeff, M.D. 

Plasmona of the lacrimal sac. Arch, of Ophthalmol., 1915, 

xliv. 
Massive granuloma of the sclera (brawny scleritis) with 

report of an unusual case. Trans. Amer. Ophthalmolog. 

Soc, 1915. 

Franklin S. Newell, M.D. 

Blood pressure during pregnane}^, based on observations 
on 450 cases from the records of the committee in charge 
of the prenatal work carried on by the Women's Munic- 
ipal League of Boston. Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, 
Ixiv, 393. 

D. Harold Walker, M.D. 

Chronic deafness: the present status of its treatment 
Jour. Amer. Med. Ass'n, 1915, Ixv, 663. 

61 



List of Staff Publications. 

PATHOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

WiLLEY Denis, Ph.D. 

Influence of salicylates on the elimination of uric acid and 

other waste products from the blood. Jour. Pharm. & 

Exper. Therap., 1915, vii, 255. 
Effect of ingested purines on the uric acid content of the 

blood. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxiii, 47. 
Phenols in urine. Proceedings 100th meeting of Amer. 

Chem. Soc. 

WiLLEY Denis, Ph.D., and Otto Folin, Ph.D. 

Diagnostic value of uric acid determinations in blood. 
Arch. Int. Med., 1915, xvi, 33. 

Apparatus for the quantitative collection of urine from 
women. Arch. Int. Med., 1915, xvi, 195. 

Some observations on the selective activity of the human 
kidney. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxii, 321. 

Colorimetric method for the determination of phenols (and 

. phenol derivatives) in urine. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, 
xxii, 305. 

Excretion of free and conjugated phenols and phenol de- 
rivatives. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxii, 309. 

On starvation and obesity, with special reference to aci- 
dosis. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxi, 183. 

Note on perca globulin. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxi, 
193. 

WiLLEY Denis, Ph.D., and Oswald H. Robertson, M.D. 
Study of a case of paroxysmal hemoglobinuria. Serum 
reactions: urobilin and hemoglobin excretion. Arch. 
Int. Med., 1915, xvi, 205. 

Otto Folin, Ph.D. 

Note in defense of the Folin-Farmer method for the de- 
termination of nitrogen. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, 
xxi, 195. 

Quahtative (reduction) test for sugar in normal human 
urine. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxii, 327. 

Otto Folin, Ph.D., and Willey Denis, Ph.D. 

Diagnostic value of uric acid determinations in blood. 

Arch. Int. Med., 1915, xvi, 33. 
Apparatus for the quantitative collection of urine from 

women. Arch. Int. Med., 1915, xvi, 195. 
Some observations on ,the selective activity of the human 

kidney. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxii, 321. 
Colorimetric method for the determination of phenols (and 

phenol derivatives) in urine. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, 

xxii, 305. 

62 



List of Staff Publications. 

Excretion of free and conjugated phenols and phenol de- 
rivatives. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxii, 309. 

On starvation and obesity, with special reference to aci- 
dosis. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxi, 183. 

Note on perca globulin. Jour. Biolog. Chem., 1915, xxi, 
193. 

J. Homer Wright, M.D., and F. B. Mallory, M.D. 

Pathological technique. Sixth edition. W. B. Saunders 
Co., Phil., 1915. 



63 



RULES FOR ADMISSION, ETC. 



Application for admission of patients should be made 
at the Hospital on Blossom Street, Boston, on week days 
between the hours of 9 a. m. and 3 p. m. 

Emergencies and recent accidents admitted at all 
hours. 

The Out-Patient Department is for the poor only and 
is open from 8.30 to 10 in the morning, Sundays and 
holidays excepted. 

Applications from a distance should be made in writ- 
ing, accompanied by a full description of the case by the 
attending physician, with reason of the physician for 
thinking hospital treatment desirable, and when a free 
bed is needed, by a statement of the pecuniary condi- 
tion of the patient. Always wait for a reply before send- 
ing the patient. 

Contagious cases are not admitted to the Hospital, and 
only such chronic cases as can be partially relieved by 
temporary treatment. 

Paying patients in private rooms will be charged $28 
to $35 per week. In the general wards the rate of board 
to paying patients is $15 per week. These rates, cover- 
ing only expenses of board and lodging, may be increased 
or abated in individual cases by the Resident Physician. 

An ambulance, accompanied by a medical officer, will 
be despatched to any point within the city proper for the 
conveyance of cases of accident or urgent sickness, not 
contagious, to this Hospital, or elsewhere, upon notice 
from a physician, the pohce, or other responsible source, 
subject to the approval of the Resident Physician. 

In cases requiring gratuitous treatment no charge will 
be made. 

64 



DALTON SCHOLARSHIPS. 



The income of this fund, amounting to $1,000 annu- 
ally, is devoted to investigation in the science of medi- 
cine. The rules of the Trustees applicable to it are as 
follows: • 

Article 1. Candidates shall be nominated to the Board 
of Trustees by the General Executive Committee with their 
recommendations. They shall be either internes of the Gen- 
eral Hospital or male graduates of a regular American Medi- 
cal College. 

Article 2. The nature of the work in medical investiga- 
tion proposed to be prosecuted by each candidate shall be 
designated by the candidate. 

Article 3. The Scholarship year shall begin September 15. 
Scholars shall work not less than ten hours per week, from 
the last Wednesday in September to the last Wednesday in 
June; and if a scholar performs a part only of this prescribed 
work, he shall be entitled to a proportionate part only of the 
income. 

Article 4. The results of work of scholars shall appertain 
to the Hospital, and when made public the name of the scholar 
shall accompany the publication, but no publication shall be 
made unless approved by the General Executive Committee. 

Article 5. When the income is insufficient, appointments 
for the year may be omitted. 

Article 6. Any income not used shall be cumulative and 
not added to the principal. 

Article 7. Scholars shall be eligible for renomination and 
reappointment. 

Further information may be had by applying to 
the Resident Physician of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital. 



65 



WARREN TRIENNIAL PRIZE. 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL. 



The Warren Triennial Prize was founded by the late 
Dr. J. Mason Warren in memory of his father, and his 
will provides that the accumulated interest of the fund 
shall be awarded every three years to the best disserta- 
tion considered worthy of a premium, on some subject in 
Physiology, Surgery, or Pathological Anatomy; the arbi- 
trators being the General Executive Committee of the 
Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Theses submitted for competition for the year 1919 
shall be on some special subject in Physiology, Surgery, 
or Pathology. 

Dissertation must be in either the English, French, 
or German language, and must be typewritten and 
suitably bound, so as to be easily handled. Work that 
has been published previously will not be considered in 
competition. The name of the writer must be enclosed 
in a sealed envelope, on which must be written a motto 
corresponding with one on the accompanying dissertation. 

Any clew given by the dissertation, or any action on 
the part of the writer which reveals his name before the 
award of the prize, will disqualify him from receiving the 
same. 

The amount of the prize for the year 1919 will be 
$500. 

In case no dissertation is considered sufficiently 
meritorious, no award will be made. Dissertations will 
be received until April 15, 1919. 

A high value will be placed on original work. 

Frederic A. Washburn, 

Resident Physician. 
66 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL. 



OUT-PATIENT BEPORT. 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1915. 



NUMBER OF NEW PATIENTS, 29,193. 




Men, 13,147 


Women, 10,13.5 Children, 5,911 


American, 


14,656 Foreign, 


14,537 


Residents of Boston, 


12,404 Residents of other places 
Total attendance, 190,627 

Male Surgical. 


1, 16,789 


No. of new patients, 


3,521 No. of old patients, 
Pemale Surgical. 


16,257 


No. of new patients. 


3,607 No. of old patients, 
Male Medical. 


13,613 


No. of new patients, 


3,690 No. of old patients, 
Pemale Medical. 


8,965 


No. of new patients, 


3,726 No. of old patients, 
Skin. 


11,585 


No. of new patients, 


2,367 No. of old patients, 
Nerve. 


9,449 


No. of new patients. 


954 No. of old patients, 
Laryngological. 


8,434 


No. of new patients, 


3,199 No. of old patients. 
Orthopedic. 


9,195 


No. of new patients, 


2,819 No. of old patients, 
Dental. 


15,426 


No. of new patients, 


521 No. of old patients. 
South Medical. 


4,525 


No. of new patients. 


1,216 No. of old patients, 
Genito-ITriiiary. 


14,908 


No. of new patients. 


1,279 No. of old patients. 
Children's Department. 


21,043 


No. of new patients, 


2,294 No. of old patients, 
Zander. 


7,084 




No. of old patients. 


15,273 




Hydrotherapeutic. 






No. of old patients, 


3,169 




X-Bay. 






No. of old patients, 


706 




Vaccine. 






No. of old patients. 


194 




Tuberculosis Class. 






No. of old patients. 


1,194 




Electrical Treatments. 






No. of old patients, 


344 


Records lost, of new 


29,193 Records lost, of old 


161,364 


patients 


20 patients 


50 



29,213 



67 



161,414 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



EXPLANATION OF TABLES OF MEDICAL AND 
SURGICAL STATISTICS. 

The Medical and Surgical statistics appear, as last year, in 
four tables, A, B, C and D. 

Table A is a record of all diseases treated in both House and 
Out-Patient Department, and arranged on parallel pages. 
List of diseases is given according to the Classification now 
in use in this Hospital, and which appears in 39 "Sec- 
tions." Diseases are numbered, first, according to Section; 
second, according to number of disease in Section (which is 
our own serial number) ; and third, according to the Inter- 
national Classification. It may be noticed that many serial 
numbers are omitted, which means that no cases of the diseases 
corresponding to these numbers have occurred during the past 
year. In this Table, no attention is paid to transfers or re- 
entries, and it does not represent the number of individuals 
treated, but the number of times a given disease has been 
treated in each of the various Services of the Hospital. For 
above reasons, no addition of House and Out-Patient Depart- 
ment figures should be made. They are two distinct depart- 
ments, and statistics are separately totalled. 

Table B is a table of diseases treated in the House only, and 
is here presented in terms of the International Classification. 
As this classification is the one that has been adopted by most 
of the civiHzed governments, these statistics are thus com- 
parable with governmental reports and may be used by State and 
Civil Registrars for vital statistics. 

Table C, Surgical Operations, appears in its usual form. 

Table D is an appendix of Table C, and gives brief abstracts 
of operated cases resulting in death. These individual cases 
are referred to from Table C by footnotes. 



69 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



TABLE A 

DISEASES OCCURRING IN 



Classification op Dise-^ses Me 
WITH Nos. 


dical Si 


irgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 

Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 


(For explanation, see page 69.) 

M. D 


p. D. M. 


D. F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 
1 


D. 

1 


P. 


D. 


M. 

1 

2 

1 
18 

5 


D. 

3 
3 


F. 

1 

1 
1 

3 

12 

1 


D. 

2 

1 


M. 


D. 


P- 


D. 


SECTION I. 

SPECIFIC INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 
GENERAL DISEASES. 

1-1-1 Typhoid fever ... 26 S 

1-4-1 Paratjiihoid fever 

1-5-1 Colon bacillus infec- 


i21 1 .. 

2 .. . . 


1 2 




1-6-2 Typhus fever 

1-9-6 Measles 

1-10-7 Scarlet fever .... 1 . 

1-11-8 Whooping cough . . 1 . 

1-12-9 Diphtheria (including 

croup) 1 . 

1-15-9 Postdiphtheritic 

paralysis .... 1 . 

1-16-10 Influenza 

1-20-92 Lobar pneumonia . . 38 1 

1-21-91 Lobular (broncho-) 

pneumonia ... 20 

1-22-98 Interstitial pneumonia 2 . 

1-23-14 Dysentery (cause un- 
known) .... 2 . 

1-25-14 Entamebic dysentery 2 . 

1-29-1" Leprosy 


1 .. .. 

2 . . 2 
2 .. 1 

.... 1 

. 1 . . . . 
10 5 13 

4 20 3 8 
. 2 .. .. 

. 1 .. 1 

1 


.. 1 

6 5 
3 2 

.. 3 

.. 2 


1 

1 












1-30-1 8 Erysipelas 2 . 

1-31-19 Other unclassified in- 
fectious diseases . 9 . 

1-32-20 Aerogenes capsulatus 
(gas bacillus infec- 
tion) 


. 1 .. 9 
. 22 . . . . 




1-33-61 Epidemic cerebrospi- 
nal meningitis .... 

1-34-63 Poliomyelitis. Polioen- 
cephalitis . . ." . 2 . 


1 






5 




12 






1-36-19 Mumps (epidemic par- 
otitis) . . 1 . 




. . 1 


1 




1-40-19 RubeUa 

1-42-20 Vaccination 

1-43-19 Varicella . 

1-49-20 Purulent infection: 

Ankle 


2 


1 . . 




Elbow . . 


1 




Knee 


5 




Pyemia 


1 





70 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



THE HOUSE 



TABLE A 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



d 

< 
S 

1 

4 

5 

6 

9 

10 

11 

12 

15 
16 
20 

21 
22 

23 
25 
29 
30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

36 
40 
42 
43 
49 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
SjTjhiUs 


< 

O 


"3 


' 


J 
3j 


c 
o 




o 


't- 


2 


■6 


3 


tic 




3 


i 


M 


"o 


a 


Q 













50 
2 

1 
1 
7 
5 
3 

2 

1 

5 

96 

58 
4 

4 
2 

1 
17 

33 

1 

19 
2 

3 

1 
5 

1 


-c 

5 

4 

27 
15 

2 
1 

1 
2 


fS 


-Ji 


w-S 


0-> 


o« 










< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 

1 
1 


F. 
1 

2 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

7 

4 
5 

1 
2 

2 

1 
36 

2 

1 
1 


F. 

3 

1 

3 

4 

1 

8 

1 
1 


M. 

1 

4 

1 

1 


F. 

1 

3 

2 


M. 

26 


F. 
1 

22 


M. 

4 


F. 

2 


M. 

3 

2 
44 

6 
14 

2 

2 

3 

1 

67 

3 


F. 

2 

8 

2 

36 

8 

10 
2 

1 

3 

5 
2 

74 
3 


ii. 
6 


F. 

4 


M. 
1 

2 
5 


F. 
1 

2 


M. 
1 

4 

1 


F. 

6 
6 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

12 

12 

5 

82 

26 

9 
34 

4 
2 

2 

2 

1 

19 

52 

61 

14 

3 

141 

14 

1 



71 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



CL.V8SIFICATI0N OP DISEASES 
WITH NOS. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 

2 
3 


D. 

2 


F. 

2 
2 


D. 
1 

2 
2 


M. 

3 

2 
1 

1 
1 

1 

7 

1 

10 
4 

1 
2 

1 

1 

1 

2 


D. 

4 

1 

1 

2 
3 


F. 

1 

9 
1 
2 
1 

10 
1 

1 

1 

1 
2 


D. 

2 

1 
1 

1 


M. 

21 

7 
13 

1 
1 


D. 
1 


F. 

15 

1 

13 
6 

2 
2 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 

3 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 

2 

3 

1 
1 

1 

1 


D. 

1 

1 
1 


F. 

1 
1 

1 

2 
1 


D. 
1 

2 
1 


M. 


D. 

1 


F. 


D. 


1-49-20 Purulent infection: 
Septicemia: 

general 

puerperal 

Streptococcus infec- 
tion 

1-55-22 Anthrax 




1-5S-75 Trachoma 

1-59-24 Tetanus 












1-61-25 Mycoses: 
1-62-25 Actinomycosis : 

Abdominal wall . 

Face 

Neck 












1-64-25 Erysipeloid 

1-65-25 Tinea favosa of scalp 
1-66-25 Tinea tricophytina . . 
1-67-25 Tinea versicolor . . . 

1-73-26 Pellagra 

1-75-34 Tuberculosis (unspeci- 
fied) . . 


1 
2 




1 
2 






1-76-28 Tuberculosis of lungs, 

etc 

Fibroid 

Larynx 

Lungs 

Lungs and pleura 

Pleura 

Tonsils 

1-77-29 Acute miliary tubercu- 
losis 

1-7S-30 Tuberculous meningi- 
tis 

1-79-31 Abdominal tuberculo- 
sis 

1-80-32 Pott's disease .... 
1-81-33 Tuberculosis of joints: 

Ankle 

Elbow .... 


30 
6 
18 

2 
2 

15 

5 


1 
3 


24 
4 
8 

1 

3 
1 


1 




Hip 

Knee 


1 


1 








Metacarpo-phalan- 

geal 

Sacro-iliac . . . . 

Shoulder 

Wrist 

1-82-34 Tuberculosis of bones: 






Femur 

Ilium 












Ischium 

Metacarpals . . . 
Metatarsals . . . . 

PateUa 

Ribs 













72 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 
2: 

« 

a 

tn 

49 

55 
58 
59 
61 
62 

64 
65 
66 
67 
73 

75 

76 

78 

79 
80 

81 

82 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
S\-philis 


fj 

^ 


C3 


3 
1 


5 




o 


.5 


2 


-i 




M 




1 


M 




-/■' 


CS 

o 

Q 










9 
2 

4 
2 

1 

1 
2 
1 

2 

8 

5 

76 

12 

29 

1 

4 

6 

44 

48 

3 
22 
21 

2 

1 

1 
3 

1 

2 
2 
2 


-3 

.£ 
'^ 

16 
2 

4 

2 

7 
5 

1 
1 
























M. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 
1 

1 


D. 
1 


F. 


D. 

1 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 

1 

2 
391 

2 

18 
5 

2 

1 
1 

2 


r. 

1 

3 

239 

2 

8 

1 

2 
1 


1 

1 

1 

2 

3 

1 

1 
3 
2 

1 


F. 

1 

8 

2 
2 


M. 

3 

30 

3 
2 

18 
24 

1 
4 

1 

1 
2 


F. 

2 

20 

5 

3 

12 

10 

1 
2 


M. 

1 


F. 
1 


M. 

41 

2 
1 
6 

1 


F. 

38 

1 
4 

1 


M. 

15 
11 


F. 

1 
1 

3 


M. 
1 

2 

1 


F. 


M. 
1 

19 

2 

34 

16 

1 


F. 

1 

1 
1 

4 
3 
17 

12 

1 

■ ■ 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




2 
3 

1 

1 

1 
24 

5 
51 
28 

3 

4 

1 

21 

741 

4 

3 

5 

35 
61 

9 

6 

40 

36 

1 
1 
6 
3 

1 
1 
3 




1 
3 


1 


1 
6 



73 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 

2 


F. 

1 

2 

1 

14 
1 
2 
6 
1 
2 
1 

2 

2 
2 
3 

4 

2 


D. 


M. 

1 

8 
5 

1 
2 

2 
1 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 

1 
1 

3 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

1 
1 

4 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 

8 

5 
2 

2 


D. 


F. 

10 


D. 


M. 

1 

4 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


1-82-34 Tuberculosis of bones: 

Sacrum 

Sternum 

Tarsals 

1-84-34 Tuberculosis of the 
skin: 
Tuberculosis verru- 
cosa 

Lupus vulgaris . . 
1-86-34 Tuberculosis of mam- 
mary gland . . . 
1-87-34 Tuberculosis of lymph 

nodes 

1-88-34 Genital tuberculo- 
sis: 
Fallopian tubes . . 

Testicle 

1-89-34 Urinary tuberculosis: 

Bladder 

Kidney 

Urethra 

1-90-34 Genito-iu-inary tuber- 
culosis 

1-91-31 Tuberculosis of rectum 
and anus .... 
1-92-34 Tuberculosis of mou^ 
and pharynx (lu- 
pus) 

1-100-37 Syphilis 

primary .... 

secondary . . . 

tertiary .... 

1-101-37 Bones and joints 

1-102-37 Nervous system . . 

1-103-37 Nose and throat . . 

1-104-37 Skin 

1-105-37 Testicle . . . . . 
1-106-37 Eye and ear ... 
1-107-37 Wassermann reac- 
tion 

1-108-38 Injection of "606," 
salvarsan . . . 
1-109-37 Congenital .... 
1-110-37 Circulatory system 
Aortitis .... 
1-111-37 Digestive system . . 
1-112-37 Respiratory system 
1-113-37 Other lesions, gum- 
mata, etc. . . 
1-120-38 Gonococcus infection 
(unspecified) . 
1-121-38 Urethritis, acute go- 
norrheal . . . 
1-122-38 Urethritis, chronic 
gonorrheal . . 


6 

1 

2 

19 

2 
6 
3 

12 

2 
1 

3 
10 
26 

1 
1 

2 

5 

2 

2 




1 

13 

5 

1 
3 

1 

2 
1 
2 
6 

1 

1 
2 
2 





74 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

^; 

< 
S 
« 

82 

84 

86 
87 
88 

89 

90 
91 

92 
100 

101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 

107 

108 
109 
110 

111 
112 

113 

120 

121 

122 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 

Syphilis 


< 

o 


'a 
■3 

o 


"3 

'Si 


a 

O 

6 


u 


o 

■|.s 
o5 


2 
IS 


-3 

o 




M 

O 

o 
tr 




a 

Q 


1 
o 


o 
a 
Q 


a 


"3 
c 

Q 


>J 








5 
1 

3 
1 

3 
21 

33 

5 
14 

1 

21 

2 

3 
3 

1 
93 

4 

29 

77 

10 

43 

7 

1 

2 

2 

4 

31 

15 

29 

7 

1 

9 

12 
2 
2 


-a 
Q 

1 

1 
3 

4 
2 






















< 


M. 

3 

1 
12 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 
1 

6 

1 


D. 


M. 

2 
6 

3 

3 

1 
1 


D. 
1 


F. 
1 

15 

1 

1 

1 


D. 


M. 

38 
1 
12 
42 
3 
6 
1 

1 
2 


D. 

2 


F. 

10 

8 
10 

1 
1 
1 

1 
10 

1 
1 


D. 

3 


M. 
1 

22 

3 
1 

33 
2 

19 

1 
1 

9 

1 
15 
10 

1 

3 

4 
3 


F. 

1 

1 

29 

17 

1 
3 

6 

4 

1 

2 
5 


M. 
1 

3 

37 
2 

2 

1 
5 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 


F. 
1 

20 
2 

12 

1 
3 

1 

1 

1 


M. 

2 
2 

1 
1 


F. 

1 
1 

2 

1 


M. 

1 

8 

1 

9 

1 

10 
2 

18 

185 

8 


F. 

1 
1 

9 

8 

31 

2 


M. 

4 

6 
2 
2 

2 


F. 
1 

3 

1 
3 


M. 

2 
1 

1 
16 

1 
1 


F. 

3 

3 

1 

19 


M. 

4 

1 

23 

2 

8 


F. 

3 
2 

1 
6 


M. 

7 

1 
1 
2 

1 


F. 
1 

7 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

2 
3 

9 










16 


ISO 
80 

173 

90 

3 

2 

1 

411 

61 
1 
6 
1 


104 

6 

84 

61 

2 

1 
2 






1 
119 

1 
8 

2 

26 

1 

11 

2 
370 

90 

290 

151 

26 

26 

38 

6 

3 


218 

1 
53 






641 

1 

128 
18 
)? 








7 








99 








37 

219 

11 



75 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 

WITH NOS. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 

1 

1 

5 

24 
4 
1 


D. 


F. 

4 

20 
2 


D. 


M. 

2 


D. 


F. 
1 

9 

1 

2 
1 

1 


D. 


M. 

6 

2 

1 

7 
1 

1 
3 

2 

1 

7 


D. 


F. 

1 

3 

3 

1 
2 

5 

1 
5 

7 
1 

2 
1 


D. 


M. 

2 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


1-123-3S Vaginitis, gonor- 
rheal. Vulvo- 
vaginitis . . . 

1-124-38 Epididymitis, gonor- 
rheal 

1-125-38 Prostatitis, gonor- 
rheal 

1-126-38 Conjuncti^^tis, gon- 
orrheal . . . 

1-127-38 Arthritis, gonorrheal 

1-128-38 Gonococcus comple- 
ment fixation 
test 

1-129-38 Salpingitis, gonor- 
rheal 

1-134-38 Vesiculitis, gonor- 
rheal 

1-135-38 Folliculitis, gonor- 
rheal 

1-140-38 Chancroid .... 

1-141-38 Inguinal adenitis. 
"bubo" . . . 

1-144-47 Acute infectious ar- 
thritis .... 

Ankle 

Elbow 

Foot 




Hip 

Knee 

Metacarpo-phalan- 
geal joints . . 

Phalangeal joints . 

Shoulder 

Vertebrae .... 

Wrist 

1-145-48 Chrome infectious ar- 
thritis .... 

Ankle 

Elbow 

Hip 

Knee 

Metacarpo-phalan- 
geal joints . . 

Phalangeal joints . 

Shoulder 

Vertebrae .... 

Wrist. 


10 

1 
1 

2 

12 

4 




4 
2 

9 

1 

1 
3 

1 




1 
1 






1-146-48 Atrophic type .... 
1-147-48 Hypertrophic type . . 

Ankle 

Elbow 

Hip 

Knee 

Metacarpo-phalan- 
geal joints . . 


1 
1 







76 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



c 

< 
5 
m 

123 
124 

125 

126 
127 

128 

129 

134 

135 
140 

141 

144 

145 

146 
147 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 

SjTshilis 


.J 
O 


"3 

o 

■5 

o 


"3 


o 
a 
o 

n 




o 

'S.2 


2-d 




1 


"o 
c 


2 


ii 


a 

a 


p. 


"3 

p 










S 

2 
2 

1 

1 
20 

9 

1 

55 
7 
1 
1 
2 

16 

2 
1 
2 
2 
2 

34 
1 
1 
4 
5 

1 

1 
8 
4 

10 
3 


5 






- ■ 
















-< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

3 
17 

2 

1 

31 
3 

1 
1 

3 

3 
6 
2 

9 
2 

1 
1 

1 

1 

3 

4 

1 
1 


F. 

2 

3 

2 

44 
4 

1 
2 

4 

3 

1 

21 
3 

3 
3 

4 
2 

2 

1 

1 


XI. 

1 

2 
11 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 


F. 

1 

9 

1 

1 


M. 

9 

14 

16 

1 

11 
5 

16 
1 
1 

17 
2 

2 
1 
5 

2 

1 

3 

2 
5 
1 
1 
12 
13 


F. 

1 

23 
12 

2 

11 

12 
1 

4 
9 
5 

6 

2 

2 

1 
2 

2 
3 
2 

5 
17 

2 


M. 

51 

221 

3 

17 

2 

8 

12 


F. 

47 

6 
10 
10 


M. 
1 

2 

1 

1 
1 


F. 

5 

1 

S 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 


F. 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 

3 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

54 
52 

225 

1^ 
3l' 

23 

13 

10 

2 
15 

36 

123 

37 

2 

15 
19 

37 
2 

8 
37 
12 

38 
6 

7 
1 

8 

6 

3 

1 

8 

2 

7 

15 

3 

1 

19 

33 

2 



77 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



C1.A8SIFICATION OP DlSE-VSES 

WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med; 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


p. 
5 

2 

4 

3 


D. 


M. 

3 

1 

1 
1 

9 
2 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 

2 


M. 
1 

6 
4 

1 

1 


D. 


F. 

2 
1 

1 


D. 


M. 
1 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

1 
1 


D 


F. 

1 

1 


D. 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


1-147-4S HjTjertrophic tj^e: 
jNIetatarso-phalan- 

geal joints . . 
Phalangeal joints 

Shoulder 

Vertebrae .... 

1-148-48 Villous type .... 

Knee 

Shoulder 

1-149-48 Arthritis deformans 

SECTION II. 

DISE.VSES DUE TO ANIIL^L 
PAR.4.SITES. 

2-1-4 Malaria 

Tertian 

2-5-107 Ascariasis 

2-6-107 OxjTiris vermioularis . 
2-7-107 Tenia bothriocephalus 
2-8-112 Tenia echinococous 


6 

2 
6 






1 

1 
1 

8 
1 




Liver 

2-9-107 Tenia saginata. . . . 

2-11-107 Tnchiniasis 

2-16-107 Other animal parasites 
2-22-145 Parasitic insect . . . 
2-28-145 Scabies 

SECTION III. 

DISEASES OF METABOLISM. 

3-1-50 Diabetes mellitus . . 
3-2-50 Diabetic gangrene . . 

3-3-50 Glycosuria 

3^-50 Lactosuria 

3-5-48 Gout 

3-6-55 Obesity 

3-7-55 Adiposis dolorosa . . 
3-9-36 Rickets (2 \Ts.+) . . 
3-12-36 HjTjertrophic osteoar- 
thropathy . . . 
3-13-49 Scurvy 

SECTION IV. 

CONDITIONS PECTTLIAK TO INFANCY. 

(For children under 2 years of age 

only.) 
4-1-151 Prematurity .... 
4-2-151 Nursling (wdthout dis- 
ease) 


2 

8 
2 

1 

1 

39 
2 

8 

2 

8 


3 


6 
3 
2 

29 
3 

12 


2 





78 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 

3 
a 

147 

148 
149 

1 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
11 
16 
22 

28 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
9 

12 
13 

1 
2 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj-p hills 


< 




i5 


1 
X 


o 
C 




i 


.d 


1 


< 


> 


U 


_o 






"o 


-r 


"3 










Q 

1 

20 

5 

8 
10 

3 

1 
1 
4 
18 
5 
4 
3 
5 

87 
4 
14 

2 

20 

3 

1 
2 

1 


-3 

G 

6 
2 






















< 


1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

2 


D. 


F. 

1 

2 
1 


D. 


ii. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

4 

1 

12 
1 

2 

12 

3 

1 

46 
2 
17 

2 

32 

10 


F. 

1 

1 

1 

5 

1 
3 
2 

13 

9 
3 

33 

25 

1 


il. 

1 

1 


F. 
1 

4 

1 

5 


M. 

2 
16 

18 

1 

3 

1 

5 


F. 

1 

7 

2 

12 

45 

2 

2 

7 

2 
1 


1 


F. 

1 


M. 

1 
1 

4 

3 
5 

2 
16 


F. 
1 

2 

1 

14 
3 

1 
5 

3 
23 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 

2 
3 


F. 

2 


M. 

49 
109 


F. 

■ • • 

147 
76. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


C 

1 

7 

6 

35 

67 
1 
5 

19 
5 

4 
2 

2 

28 
3 

224 
191 

88 
3 

43 
1 

7 


129 
1 

8 


2 


1 


ISO 

1 
28 

10 

2 

39 



79 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


!Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

9 
1 

1 
2 

1 


D. 
1 

1 

3 


F. 

1 
1 

11 


D. 
1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

28 

1 
1 
S 
3 

1 
2 

4 

1 

1 
2 


D. 

1 

2 

1 


F. 

1 

11 

2 

2 
2 

1 

1 

1 
1 


D. 

1 

1 
1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 






4-5-151 Icterus neonatorum 

4-9-151 Improper feeding . . 

4-10-151 Regulation of feeding 

4-11-151 Disturbances of diges- 
tion 

4-13a-151 .4. Fat 

4-136-151 B. Carbohydrates . 

4-14-104 Infectious diarrhea 

4-14a-104 a. Dysentery bacil- 
lus 

4-14b-104 b. Gas bacillus . . 

4-15-104 Unclassified diarrhea . 

4-16-103 Recurrent vomiting . 

4-17-36 Rickets (2 yrs.—) ... 

4-18-71 Convulsion (cause un- 
known) .... 

4-19-152A Cerebral hemorrhage, 
due to birth injury 

4-20-152A Cephalematoma . . . 

4-24-152B Sepsis of umbihcus 

4-26-145 Pemphigiis neonato- 
rum 

4-28-151 Unclassified diseases of 
infancy 

4-29-151 Marasmus 

4-30-151 Malnutrition (2 yrs.— ) 

SECTION V. 

DISEASES DUE TO PHYSICAL 
AGENTS. 

5-1-167 Burns, scalds, etc. . . 
5-3-167 X-ray burns .... 
5-5-167 Burns from caustic 

agents 

5-6-178 Frostbite 

5-8-165 Insect sting 

5-10-179 Insolation 

SECTION VI. 

POISONINGS. INTOXICATIONS. 

6-1-56 Alcoholism (acute, 

chronic) . . . . 
6-2-56 Delirium tremens . . 
6-3-56 Intoxication psychoses 
6-7-57 Chronic lead poisoning 
6-8-165 Acute poisonings: 

Acetanihde . . . . 

Ammonia 

Belladonna . . . . 

Benzoin 


1 

4 
3 


1 


1 

1 


1 

1 





80 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



1° Neurolog. 



M. D. F. D 



Dermato- 
log. 



Dept. of 
Sj-philis 



M. D. F. D. 



M. F. .M. F. 



M. F. M. F. M. F, 






QS 



9 
10 

11 
13o 
136 

14 

14a 

146 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 
20 
24 

26 

28 
29 
30 



2 
3 2 
3 1 



'3 

2 

19 

210 

18 
3 



12 3 
2 



12 



121 
5 
3 



35 

61 
1 



48 
1 
1 

66 



81 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


LarjTi- 
golog. 




M. 

2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

3 

1 

1 
1 


D. 


F. 

1 

1 

1 

1 


D. 


M. 
1 

3 

15 
9 
4 

7 
3 

6 

5 

23 

1 

1 
5 

3 


D. 

1 
1 


F. 

1 

1 

2 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


m. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

* 


D. 


\ 
6-S-165 Acute poisoning: 

Corrosive sublimate 

Digitalis 

Emetin 

Lead 

Mercury 

Morphia 

Strychnine .... 
6-9-58 Chronic poisonings (in- 
dustrial) : 

Bronze 

6-10-59 Chronic poisonings 
(non-industrial) : 

Cocaine 

Drug (unspecified) . 

Heroin 

Mercurj' 

Morphia 

Tobacco 

6-11-16S Gases, non-industrial: 

Carbon monoxide . 

Ether 

Illuminating gas . . 
6-12-164 Food poisonings . . . 
6-19-164 Mushroom poisoning . 

SECTION VII. 

Caecinoma, Sarcoma, and Other 

M.\LiGNANT Growths, and 

Benign Tumors. 

7-1-39 Op the Buccal Cav- 
ity. 

7-2-39a Carcinoma: 

Cheek 




Fauces 

Jaw .... 
























Mouth 












Palate 

Tongue 












Tonsil 












7-4-39C Epithelioma: 

Cheek 












Jaw 












Lip 












Mouth 












Palate 












Tongue 












7-5-39/ Sarcoma: 

Jaw 













82 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



Xeurolog. 



'^ M. D. F. D. 



Dermato- 
log. 



M. D. F. D, 



Dept. of 
SjTjhilis 



M. D. F. D. 



M. F. M. F. M. 



10 



20 
1 



26 
1 
1 



2 

1 

40 



83 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Cl.\ssification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. D. 


F. D. 


M 


D. 


F. 


D. 
1 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

7 


D. 

2 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

6 
1 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


7-6-39ff Mixed malignant 
growth: 
G\im 

7-7-40 Of Stoilvch, Liver, 

ETC. 

Malignant tumor (un- 
specified) of liver 
7-8-<0a Carcinoma: 

Esophagus . . . . 
Gall bladder .... 
Gall duct . 


2 . . 

5 .. 
1 .. 


1 .. 


4 

1 

1 
20 


2 
2 
1 


2 
6 

3 

14 

2 
1 
2 
2 

1 
6 

2 




Liver ...... 

Pharynx .... 


2 . . 


2 .. 




Stomach 

7-10-40C Epithelioma: 

Esophagus . . . . 
7-12^0/ Sarcoma: 

Liver 


43 2 


14 .. 




7-14-41 Of Peritoneum, In- 
testine, Rectum, 

ETC. 

Malignant tumor (un- 
specified) : 

Abdomen 

Intestine 

Peritoneum .... 

Rectum 

7-15-41a Carcinoma: 

Abdomen (general) 


1 . . 
1 . . 
1 .. 

3 . . 








Amis , 












Intestine 

Pelvis 


2 1 


2 . . 


3 






Peritoneum .... 






1 
16 

1 
2 

1 


1 




Rectum 

7-lS-41e Hypernephroma: 

Abdomen 

7-19-41/ Sarcoma: 

Abdomen 

Intestine . . . 


5 ., 
1 .. 


4 . . 
1 . . 




Peritoneum .... 
Retroperitoneal 
glands 


2 . . 






7-20-41s Mixed malignant 
growth: 

Intestine 

Peritoneum .... 








7-21-45 Of Urinary Organs. 

7-22 -4oa Carcinoma: 

Bladder 

Kidney 


1 . . 


1 . . 


3 

1 







84 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 
2 

m 
6 

8 

10 
12 

14 

15 

IS 
19 

20 

2' 
22 


Neurolo 


g- 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj-philis 


< 

o 


'-3 




o 
a 

o 




2 

5 


c 


1 


■6 






2 


g 


y 


a 


-r 


"3 

Q 


J 








2 

IS 
8 
1 
7 
1 

91 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

5 
1 
9 
3 
2 
31 

2 

1 

4 

1 
2 

13 
1 


2 

1 

4 

1 

1 
2 

2 
























M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 

4 
2 
1 
4 

30 

2 
3 


F. 

1 
1 

4 
10 

1 

1 
3 

1 

1 


M. 

1 

1 

21 

1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


F. 

1 

3 

1 

3 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

4 


F. 
1 

2 


M. 


F. 


M. 

3 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

2 

9 

7 
1 
8 
1 
65 

1 

2 

4 
9 

5 
2 

1 

2 

6 

1 



85 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 

Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 
1 

1 

4 
1 

3 

1 


D 

1 


P. 

50 
4 
3 
4 

1 

2 
2 

1 
1 

46 

1 


D. 

2 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 

2 

7 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 

■ ■ 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


7-25-45e Hypernephroma: 




7-26-45/ Sarcoma: 

Bladder 

Kidney 

7-28-45 Or Male Genital 
Organs. 

Malignant tumor (un- 
specified) of pros- 
tate 

7-29-45a Carcinoma: 


2 










Prostate 


2 










7-31-45C Epithelioma: 
























7-33-45/ Sarcoma: 

Testicle 

7-35-42 Of Female Genital 
Organs. 

7-36-42a Carcinoma: 

Cervix 

Ovary 


1 




2 






Vagina 

7-38-42C Epithelioma: 

Cervix 

Vagina 








7-i2-42er Mixed malignant 
growth: 

Uterus 

7-43-42^1 Hydatid mole .... 

7-44-43 Op the Breast. 
7-45^3a Carcinoma .... 










2 

1 
1 




7-48-43/ Sarcoma 

7-50-44 Op the Skin .... 

7-51-44a Carcinoma: 

Abdominal wall . . 

Buttocks 

Ear 













86 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 
Z 

^ 

S 

H 

25 

26 

28 

29 

31 
33 

35 
36 

38 

42 

43 

44 

45 
48 

50 
51 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. 

Syphil 


of 

IS 


< 

H 
O 
Eh 


"3 

■3 


'So 


a 
o 


O 

n5 


IS 


-a 


> 




to 
o 
"o 

o 


c3 


1 
O 


Q 


1 


a 



h} 








5 

3 

1 

2 

1 
13 

1 

3 

1 

1 

50 

4 
5 

4 

1 
2 
2 

1 
1 

48 

1 
1 
1 


-d 
a) 

5 

1 
2 






















<! 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 


F. 
1 


M. 

3 

1 

3 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 


F. 
1 

8 

1 
1 

43 


M. 


F. 


11. 

8 


p. 


M. 


r. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F 


M. 


F. 


H 
O 

3 
2 

3 

10 

1 

10 

1 
1 

44 
1 

1 

1 



87 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification op Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


^ledical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D 


F. 


D 


M. 

3 

1 

4 
4 
11 
3 

1 


D. 


F. 
4 

4 
2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 


D 

1 


M. 


D 


F. 


D 


M. 
1 


D 


F. 


D. 


M 


D 


F. 


D 


M. 

5 

1 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


7-51-44a Carcinoma: 




Nose 

7-52Hi46 Endothelioma: 

Abdominal -n-all . . 
7-53^-lc Epithelioma : 

Buttocks 

Ear . . . . 












Eyelid 
























Hand 












Neck 
























Scalp 










1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
2 
3 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 






7-54-44/ Sarcoma: 
























Thoracic waU . . . 

7-56-45 Or Other Okgans, 
and op Organs 
NOT Specified. 

Malignant tumor (un- 
specified) : 

Lung 

LjTnph nodes . . . 


1 




1 
1 






Pancreas 

Pleura 

Spinal cord .... 
ThjToid gland . . 
7-57-45a Carcinoma: 

Brain 


1 
1 


















Hand . . 












Larj-nx 

Lung 

Lymph nodes . . . 


1 
2 










Pancreas 

Spinal cord .... 

Sternum 

Thyroid gland . . 
Vertebrae .... 
7-58-456 Endothelioma: 


4 




1 






7-59-45C Epithelioma: 












Larynx 












Lymph nodes . . . 
7-61-45/ Sarcoma: 

Abdominal wall . . 


1 











Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 
2 

J 
< 

5 
a 
cc 

51 

52 
53 

54 
56 

57 

58 
59 

61 


N 


eurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj-philis 


r* 


'S, 


'3; 


(5 




i 


=• 


■± 


s 


b 


si 




\ 


M 


cT 




a 










7 

1 

4 
5 
20 
4 
3 
4 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
2 
5 
2 
4 
3 
7 
1 

3 
2 

1 

3 
2 
3 

2 


j5 

1 
1 






















^ 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
2 
1 

1 
2 

1 


D. 


F. 

3 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 


F. 


M. 
10 

1 
1 

2 
1 
3 

2 

1 
1 

5 

2 


F. 

1 
1 

2 

1 

2 

1 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

2 


F. 


M. 

6 


F. 

4 


M. 

9 

1 

3 

4 
1 
9 
3 

9 
2 

2 


F. 


1 
1 

3 
5 

5 

1 


M. 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


26 
1 

5 
6 
4 

15 
6 
1 

19 
3 

2 

1 
12 

2 

1 

9 

1 

4 



89 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification op Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 
1 

3 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
2 


D. 


F. 

1 
1 

1 

2 
2 

1 

1 

1 
l' 

1 

1 
1 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 


P. 
1 


D. 


M. 




D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 
1 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


P. 


D. 


7-61-45/ Sarcoma; 

Accessory sinus . . 




Ear .... 
























Finger 












Ilium 

Knee 












Lymph nodes . . . 

Neck 

Phalanges (finger) . 

Radius 

Scapula 

Shoulder 

Skull 

Spinal cord .... 
Thigh 


1 










Ulna 












Vertebrae .... 
7-62-53 Malignant lymphoma 
(Hodgkin's dis- 
ease) : 
Axillary lymph nodes 
Inguinal lymph 












Neck 

Rectum 

(region unspeci- 
fied) 
7-63-455 Mixed malignant 
growth : 

Antrum 

Femur 


2 

9 




1 






Leg 












Scapula 

Tibia 

7-64-^6 Non-Malignant Tu- 
mors. 

(Unspecified) .... 

Abdomen 

Arm 

Axilla 

Back 






2 






Bladder 

Brain 

Breast 

Clavicle 

Ear 

Face 

Finger 


2 








3 


5 





90 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 
S 

H 
OO 

61 

62 
63 

64 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Syp.liilis 


< 
O 




■fl 


2 


c 
C 


"u 




< 


C 


ii 

■ o 
■3 


si 

_o 
■3 

3 


c 






- C. 




;: 


>J 








a 

1 
1 
1 

3 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 

2 
3 
1 

1 

2 

1 
4 
1 

3 

1 

1 
2 

1 

2 

1 

11 

1 


5 
















C 


< 


M. 

3 


D 


F 

1 


D 


M 


D 


F 


D 


M 


D 


F 

1 
1 


D 


M 

1 


F. 


M. F. 
1 1 


H. F 


M 


F 


M 


F 
1 


M 
1 


F 


M. 

1 

1 
1 

3 


F 
1 


M 
1 


F. 


M 
1 


F 


M 


F 




H 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 








. 1 . 


1 




7 


2 


. 1 . 

3 .. . 
1 .. . 

. 1 . 


1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

12 
1 

1 


5 


2 

3 

1 
1 
2 




4 


1 

1 


1 .. . 

2 .. . 

2 3 . 
I 2 . 
1 . . . 
I 10 . 
I 2 . 


2 


1 




2 


1 
2 

15 
6 
3 

13 
3 

1 
5 






8 . 

2 1 

5 . . . 

3 2 . 
1 . 








S 








4 
5 
5 
2 



91 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 
1 


D. 


F. 

1 

1 
1 

3 

12 
2 

2 

1 
2 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


u. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


7_64_46 Non-Malignant Tu- 
mors, (unspeci- 
fied): 

Foot 

Gum 

Hip ....'... 

Intestine 

Jaw 

Kidney 

Larj-nx 

Leg 

Lip 

Lung 

Mediastinum . . . 

Neck 

Parotid gland . . . 
Peritoneum .... 

Pharynx 

Pleura 

Popliteal space . . 




Scrotum 

Spinal cord .... 

Spleen 

Sternum 

Testicle 

Thorax 

Thyroid gland . . 

Wrist 

7-65^6 Keloid 


1 
1 




1 






7-66-46 Adenoma 

Intestine 

Neck 

Rectum 

Thyroid gland . . 
7-66C-131 Cyst-adenoma of 

ovary 

7-66d-133 PapUlary cyst-adeno- 
ma of breast . . 
7-67-46 Angioma: 

Arm 

Back 






1 




1 
1 






Eyelid 

Face 












Finger 

Leg 
































Nose 

Vocal cord .... 
7-70-46 Cyst: 

Appendix . . . 










1 






Bartholin's gland . 

Breast 

Ear 

Face 













92 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 

s 

m 
64 

65 
66 

66c 

66d 
67 

70 


Neurolog. 


Dermat 
log. 


0- 


Dept. of 
Sj-philis 


< 

O 


"^ 

s 


"3 

3 
CO 




~1 


o 


.s 


cl 


> 




si 

o 


2 


tx 


'o 


T 


1 
C 
o 


J 








(5 

1 
1 

3 

1 

1 

1 
1 
4 
2 

1 

1 

1 
5 

12 

2 

1 

2 

1 
2 

1 
1 


.2 
























M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


.M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


XI. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

3 

1 


F. 

4 

2 

12 

1 


M. 

2 

2 

S 

2 
1 
2 

4 
3 

3 
7 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 


F. 
1 

4 
1 

3 

1 
3 
2 

1 

3 

1 
4 

1 

15 

2 

1 
1 
2 

6 
2 

3 


M. 

1 
1 


F. 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 

1 
1 


F. 


M. 
12 

1 

1 


F. 

2 
2 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 
1 

2 

1 


F. 

5 

1 
5 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

2 
1 
1 
2 

12 
6 

16 
5 
2 

1 
6 
6 
3 

1 

4 

1 
1 

8 

1 

11 

6 

1 

1 

1 

28 

2 

1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
3 
6 
4 

6 
3 
5 



93 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Cl.\ssific.\tion op Dise.\sbs 

WITH NOS. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


f. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


D. 


P. 
1 

1 
1 

15 
1 

42 

1 

5 

1 

1 
2 

1 

71 
6 


D. 

1 

1 


M. 


D. 


P. 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


-70-16 Cyst: 

Femur 

Fibula 

Finger 

Foot 
















Lip 

Metatarsal bone . . 

Neck 

Parotid gland . . . 

Peritoneum .... 

Sacrum 

Scrotum 

Sublingual .... 

Submental .... 

Thyroid gland . . 

Tibia 

Tongue 

Vagina 

Viilva 

7-70a-131 Ovarian cyst. Parova- 
rian cyst .... 
7-71-46 Dermoid cyst: 






3 
3 






Sublingual gland 
7-71-131 Dermoid cyst of 

ovary 

7-72-46 Epulis . 












7-73-46 Fibroma: 

Abdominal wall . . 
Back 










1 

1 

1 






Breast 












Broad ligament . . 

Buttock 

Cervix uteri . . . 

Face 

Finger 

Groin 

Ilium 

Jaw 

Leg 












Ovary 

Pharynx 

Rectum 

Thigh 










1 






Vocal cord .... 

Vulva 

7-73a-129 Fibromyoma of 

uterus 






4 






7-73b-133 Periductal fibroma, 
adenofibroma, 
and myxofibroma 
of breast .... 









94 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

« 

H 

cc 
70 

70a 
71 

71 

72 
73 

73a 

736 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Syphilis 


< 
O 


"3 


"3 

o 


1 

o 




O 

o5 


2^" 


rt 
>, 
S 




tij 

o 
"o 

u 
3 
a 


S 
Q 


1 
O 


O 
G 
Q 


>. 


"3 
d 
Q 


< 








Q 

19 
1 

46 

1 
1 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 

76 

6 


-a 

5 
1 

1 






















o 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 


F. 

3 
1 

32 
10 

2 
2 


M. 

1 

2 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 


F. 

1 

,4 

3 

1 

4 

1 
1 
1 

26 

2 

17 

2 
2 
3 
3 

1 
1 

2 


M. 

1 

1 


F. 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

2 


F. 
1 

2 


M. 


F. 

2 


M. 

1 
1 

1 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


r. 


H 

2 
2 
1 
5 
3 
6 

4 

41 
37 

2 

19 

2 
2 
5 
6 
3 

2 



95 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification op Dise.\ses 

WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 

Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




-M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 

1 


F 

1 

1 

2 

3 

2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

3 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 

1 
1 

2 


D. 


7-74-46 Lipoma: 

Multiple 

Abdominal wall . . 

Arm 

Axilla .... 










1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

1 








Back 




































Head 

Knee 

Neck 












Perineum 

Shoulder 

Thigh 

Thoracic wall . . . 
7-75-46 Lymphangioma : 












Mouth .' 

Lip 

7-76^6 Lymphangioma cir- 
cumscriptum . . 
7-77-46 Myoma: 

Uterus 

7-7S-74 Neuroma 

7-79^6 Glioma: 

Brain 

Eve 


1 
1 










Nose 

7-80-46 Papilloma: 

Abdominal wall . . 

Anus 

Bladder 

Buttock 

Face 

Finger 

Foot 

Gum 

Hand 

Larynx 

Lip 

Mouth 

Nose 


1 








1 






' Rectum 

Scalp 

Thigh 

Tongue 

Urethra 

Uvula 

7-81-46 Polypus: 

Cervix uteri . . . 

Nose 

Rectvun 

Umbilicus .... 

Uvula 

Vocal cord .... 


1 
1 















96 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 
S 
m 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 
79 

80 

81 

::: 


Neuxolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Syphilis 


< 

O 






"3 
1 


o 

o 




O 

"2 d 

o5 


2 


■5 




i 


1 
o 


13 
o 


1 


Q 


>■ 


1 

O 
Q 


J 








Q 

1 

1 
1 
1 

2 

1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

3 
6 

2 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

4 
1 


5 
1 

6 


1 






■ 


■- 


■ 1 


'- 






M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


P. 

1 

1 

1 
1 


M. 

4 

1 

2 

1 

3 
1 

2 

1 

1 
3 

1 
2 

1 
1 


F. 

4 

1 
1 

1 
1 
3 

3 

5 
4 
3 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

2 

1 

43 
3 


F. 
1 

20 
2 


M. 


F. 


M. 
1 

2 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F 


O 

8 
3 
2 

1 
1 
5 
2 
5 

8 
5 
3 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
3 

15 

64 
2 
1 
2 
3 



97 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical Ortho- 
pedic 


Genitc 
Urin. 


Chil 
Me( 


d. Laryn- 
i. golog. 




M. D. F. D. 


\1. D. F. D. M. D 


F. D 


M 


D. F 


D. M. D. 


p. D. M. D 


F. D. 






. , 7 














7-82-46 Wen: 




































Axilla 


















Back 


















Ear 






























































































































Lip 






















2 


















































Thigh 




































7-83-46 Chondroma: 






















1 . . 


















1 . . 2 














Thorax 




. . . 1 














7-85^6 Osteoma: 




1 . . 1 


















































Skull 


















Tibia 




. . . 1 














Ulna 


















SECTION VIII. 

Congenital Malformations. 

8-1-150 Anomaly of form . . 


. . . . 1 . . . 




1 . . 












8-3-150 Anomalies of verte- 
brae 




2 . . 














8-5-150 Atresia of vagina . . 




. . . 1 














8-6-150 Branchial cyst . . . 




1 














8-7-150 Cervical rib 


2 . . . 
.. .. 2 .. 


. . . 3 














8-8-150 Cleft palate 


1 . . 5 








] 






8-9-150 Harelip 










1 






8-10-150 Cleft palate and hare- 
lip 




1 . 2 . . . 














8-15-150 Congenital fracture: 

Femur 




1 














8-16-150 Congenital disloca- 
tion: 

Hip 




3 . . 


21 . . 




. . 1 








Shoulder 




3 .. 


. 1 . . . . 







98 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

2; 

< 

S 
a 

81a 

82 

83 

85 

1 

3 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
15 

16 


Neurolo 


S- 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
SjTDhilis 


;< 


t 




"3 
"3) 

3 


o 
n 
o 

t-t 




3 

■a 

G 


s. 


2 
IS 

n 


d 


>> 


til 

o 


"o 

o 


IS 

s 

o- 


ti 




"o. 

ft' 


a 


c 
c 

C 




J 


1 






5 

7 

2 

1 
3 

1 

2 
1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

5 

12 

1 

3 
1 

26 

4 




1 




■ ■ 1 


- 1 


1 


■| 




1 


"" 1 


1 


< 


M. 


U. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 

2 


F. 

4 
2 


M. 

3 
2 

1 
6 

12 
2 

27 
2 
3 

19 
2 
2 

21 

3 
1 

1 
1 
1 

4 

1 


F. 

8 

1 

2 
2 
2 
12 

9 

2 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

8 
4 


M. 

1 
1 

1 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 
1 


M. 

1 

2 


F. 

2 
2 

1 


M. 
1 


F. 

3 


M. 


F. 


M. 
1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

12 

3 
3 

1 
8 

14 
4 

39 
2 
4 

30 
2 
2 

24 
1 
4 
2 
2 

2 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

2 
1 
2 
5 
18 
6 

1 



99 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Cl.\ssific.\tion of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

8 

1 

10 

1 
1 

19 
9 


D. 

1 


P. 

1 
1 

3 

1 

2 
3 


D. 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 

2 

1 
1 

2 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 
1 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


8-17-150 Congenital heart le- 
sions, unspecified. 
Congenital oyano- 




8-24-150 Congenital pyloric ste- 
nosis 

8-25-150 Diverticulum of blad- 
der 

8-28-150 Congenital polycystic 
kidney 

8-29-150 Epispadias 

S-32-150 HjTOspadias . . . . 

8-34-150 Hydrocephalus . . . 

8-35-150 Imperfect develop- 
ment of female 
generative organs 

8-39-150 Microcephalus . . . 

8-41-150 Para-urethral duct . . 

8-42-150 Persistent thyro-glos- 


1 






8^3-150 Pilonidal sinus . . . 

8-44-150 Spina bifida 

8-45-150 Undescended testicle . 
8-46-150 Webbed fingers and 

toes 

8-47-150 Unclassified 

Absence of kidney . 

Congenital deform- 
ity of nose . . . 

Horse-shoe kidney . 

Malformation of in- 












Megacolon .... 
Supernumerary fin- 
ger 

Tongue-tie .... 
Trigger finger . . . 

SECTION IX. 

General Injuries and Diseases 
OP THE Skin and Subcuta- 
neous Tissues. 

9-1— Abrasions .... 


1 










9-2-144 Abscess: 

Multiple 

Abdominal wall . . 

Back 

Ear 

Eye 

Face 

Head 

Parotid gland . . . 


1 











100 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

ij 

■«: 

5 
a 

17 

24 

25 

28 
29 
32 
34 

35 
39 
41 

42 
43 
44 
45 

46 
47 

1 
2 


N 


eurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. 
Sj'phil 


of 

IS 


< 

b 




'3i 


a 

a 
c 

i-2 


O 


.=■ 


2 


c 


d 
> 


y 


;5 


k 


M 


c 


>. 


"3 
d 

Q 


J 








Q 

2 
1 
2 

1 

1 
3 

1 
1 

1 

S 

4 

10 

1 

1 
2 

1 

1 

1 
1 

21 
14 


5 

2 












~ 










< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 
1 

1 

4 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


F. 

1 

1 
1 

2 


M. 

2 

1 

14 
2 

18 

2 
5 

11 

4 
5 

1 
1 
2 


F. 

2 

1 

4 
5 

1 
6 

23 

3 

4 

1 


M. 

3 

1 


F. 

1 


M. 

6 

1 

8 

3 
3 


F. 
1 


M. 
10 

1 
1 

2 
1 

3 
1 


F. 

9 
1 


M. 

1 

2 


F. 


M. 

1 
1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

21 

6 

1 

12 
5 

9 

1 
3 

1 
14 

6 
33 

3 
15 

12 

104 

8 
10 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



101 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Cl.\ssific.\.tion of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

1 

1 
2 

11 
4 
3 
4 
1 
1 
4 

1 
1 
9 

7 

1 

4 

1 
1 

1 
2 

1 

1 
2 

4 
2 
4 
1 

2 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


9-2-144 Abscess: 


2 


1 

2 
4 
1 
3 

4 

1 
1 

4 
1 

4 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 




Popliteal space . . 

Scalp 

Shoiilder 

Submaxillary . . . 
Submental .... 
Thigh ...... 






1 
1 






Thoracic waD . . . 
9-3-144 Cervical abscess . . . 
9-4-144 Axillary abscess . . . 
9-7-144 Abscess of arm . . . 
9-8-144 Abscess of buttock . . 
9-9-144 Abscess of back . . . 
9-10-144 Abscess of groin . . . 
9-11-144 Abscess of leg . . . . 
9-12-144 Abscess of foot . . . 
9-14-176 Bites (dog, cat, etc.) . 
9-16-143 Furunculosis .... 

9-18-143 Carbuncle 

9-20- Blisters ...... 

9-21- Septic blisters .... 

9-22- Contusions 


1 
1 

1 

1 
1 






Abdominal wall . . 

Ankle 

Arm . ■ 












Elbow 












Face 












Foot 

Hand 

Head 












Hip 












Knee 

Leg 

Scrotum 

Shoulder .... 












Spine 

Thigh 

Thorax 

Wrist 












9-24- Crush of finger . . . 
9-25- Crush of hand . . . 
9-26- Crush of arm .... 
9-27- Crush of foot .... 
9-28- Crush of leg .... 

9-29- Crush of toe 

9-30-145 Erysipeloid (Fish- 
hand) 

9-31-186 Foreign body: 

Abdomen 

Arm 












Breast 

Buttock 













102 



Aledical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 
S 

2 

3 

4 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

14 

16 

18 

20 

21 

22 

24 
25 
26 
27 

28 
29 

30 
31 


Neurolog. 


Dermato 
log. 


Dept. of 

SjT)hilis 


J 
< 
H 

O 
Eh 


"3 


"3 

CO 


g 


o 




3 


r^. 


> 


1 


y. 




te 


c 


-/-■ 


1 

3 


J 








3 
1 

1 

1 

2 
6 
16 
5 
6 
8 
2 
4 
5 

1 
18 
10 

11 

2 
3 

2 
5 
2 
5 
1 

1 

2 


-3 

5 






















■< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

_ 


D. 


M. 
1 


F. 
1 


M. 
1 

2 

2 

2 

1 

3 

5 

3 

33 

20 

18 

1 

4 

4 

5 

3 

13 

182 

38 

16 

3 

6 

4 

11 

1 

14 

7 

6 

29 

28 

3 

7 

3 

14 

2 

26 

2 

7 

8 

20 

10 

5 

5 

1 
5 

1 


F. 

6 
1 

2 

3 

1 

42 

21 

6 

4 

5 

1 

4 

1 

1 

45 

5 

17 

12 

2 

4 

9 
5 
18 
2 
6 
6 
5 
2 
7 
5 

14 

5 
3 

1 

2 
1 
1 


M. 

2 

3 

2 

1 
2 
3 

2 

1 
1 
6 


F. 

1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

2 
3 

2 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 
1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

6 

147 

3 


F 

4 
55 

1 


M. 


F. 

< 


M. 


F. 


a 

1 

4 

8 

4 

1 

5 

8 

4 

75 

41 

24 

5 

9 

5 

9 

4 

24 

431 

51 

33 

15 

11 

4 

16 

1 

28 

14 

27 

9 

37 

35 

9 

10 

14 

25 

2 

45 

1 

3 

14 

14 

23 

10 

6 

5 

4 

1 

1 
2 



103 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


;dical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- Child. 
Urin. Med. 


LarjTi- 
golog. 


M. D 


. F. D. M 


D. 


F, 


D. 


M. D. 


F. D. 


M. 


D. 


F. D. M. D. F. 


D. M. D. F. D. 


&-31-18p Foreign body: 


























































1 


































TViio-Vl 
















































1 














































1 




















1 




















4 .. 
1 .. 


1 
1 

1 


































9-40-142 Raynaud's disease 


1 






































3 .. 

7 1 

2 .. 

3 1 

4 .. 


4 
6 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 

3 

1 






















































1 








































































9-50-144 Other localized sepsis. 

"Cellulitis" 1 




2 .. 
2 
















9-51- Hematoma: 


































Axilla 






1 
2 
























































-Elbow 1 






































































9 












































1 




















9 








































Thigh 


































































9-53-145 Sinus: 

Back ' . . . 




1 


















Perineum 




9 










4 








9-53-189 Sinus, post-operative: 




1 . . 


1 














Anus 


















Face 






















Groin 




1 


















Jaw 






















Kidney 




1 










1 








Neck 




















Thoracic wall 




4 


















Urethra 














1 









104 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House (Continued) 






















Out-Patient Department 












6 

■< 
»-* 

K 

m 

02 

31 

33 
36 
37 
38 
40 
41 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 

50 
51 

52 
53 

53 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj-philis 


< 



Is 
1 


"3 
'3) 

CO 


i 

a 

O 

■£ 2 


o 
'5 S 








c3 


a'a 


3 

a 
Q 


J 


Q 

2 

1 

1 
1 
5 
2 

2 

& 
13 
3 
14 
6 
2 
1 

6 

3 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 
2 

1 

1 

6 

2 

1 

2 

4 
1 


Q 

1 
2 


< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

1 

1 


F. 

4 


M. 

3 

2 

40 

2 

1 
1 
2 

4 

6 

1 
23 
89 
166 
22 

6 
28 

4 

8 

4 
1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
2 

2 
3 

60 
1 


F. 

7 

38 

1 

1 

7 
27 

77 

1 

12 
4 

2 

1 

39 

5 
1 
1 

1 

2 


1 

2 

1 
2 

2 


F. 

2 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 
1 
1 

1 


F. 


M. 

2 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

4 
9 
78 
3 
1 
2 
2 

5 

6 

4 

3 

34 

117 

245 

26 

8 

40 

8 

18 

5 
2 

1 

2 

1 

2 

2 
2 
2 
3 

101 

5 
1 

1 

1 

2 
1 



105 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


LarjTi- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 
2 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

3 
4 


D. 


F. 

2 
1 


D. 


M 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


-M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


9-54-145 Ulcer: 

Coccyx 




Leg 


1 










Neck 

Penis 

Perinexmi 












Toe 

9-55- Wounds: 

Granulating: 

Abdominal wall . 

Ankle 

Arm 

Back . 












Face 

Foot 

Groin 

Hand 

Leg 












Gunshot: 












Arm 

Back . 












Face . . . 












Hand 

Neck 












Scalp 

Thigh 












Incised: 

Arm 

Buttock .... 

Face 

Finger 

Hand 

Leg 

Lip 

Neck 

Scalp 

Lacerated: 

Multiple .... 

Abdominal -n-all . 

Arm . . . 












Buttock .... 
Ear 












Eyelid 

Face 












Finger 

Foot 












Groin 

Hand. . . . 












Leg 












Lip 












Neck 













106 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

< 

54 

55 


Neurolo 


g- 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Syphilis 


< 
O 




"3 


a 
o 




6 


C 


;|' 


^ 


>> 


U 






y 


"o 


r 


"3 


J 








5 
1 

3 
11 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

3 

4 

1 
1 
7 

2 

1 
6 
1 

1 


-a 

5 






















H 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


F. 
1 

3 

1 


D. 


M. 

2 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 


F. 

2 


M. 

53 

1 

4 
4 
2 
1 
3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

16 

1 

1 

14 

44 

11 

3 

2 

6 

1 

21 

1 

7 

45 
90 
18 
33 
31 
16 
20 


F. 

2 

2 
2 

7 

12 

13 

8 
5 
10 
11 
2 
8 
1 


M. 
1 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 

2 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 

3 


M. 

3 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


p 

74 

1 
1 
1 
4 
5 
2 
1 
3 

2 
1 
1 

1 
2 
1 

18 

1 

3 

16 

51 

12 

4 

2 

7 

1 
34 

1 
7 

58 
98 
23 
43 

42 

18 

28 

1 



107 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Cl.\SSIFICATION of DISE.4.SES 
WITH NOS. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

18 
2 

1 

1 

1 
2 


D. 


F. 

8 
2 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


9-55- Wounds, lacerated: 

Penis 

Popliteal space 
Scalp 








Thigh 












Punctured : 

Arm 

Finger 

Foot 

Hand 












Leg 

Lip 

Neck 

Perineum .... 

Scalp 

Thorax 

SECTION X. 

Specl^l Skin Diseases. 

10-2-145 Acne varioliformis . . 

10-3-145 Acne vulgaris .... 

10-8-145 Alopecia 

10-9-145 Alopecia areata . . . 

10-10-145 Alopecia furfuracea . 

10-21-145 Bromidrosis 

10-22-145 Callositas 

10-25-145 Chloasma 

10-27-145 Cicatrix 

10-28-145 Clavus 

10-29-145 Comedo 

10-30-145 Condyloma acumi- 
natum 

10-31-145 Cornu 

10-33-145 Dermatitis (unclassi- 
fied) 

10-35-145 Dermatitis calorica 

10-37-145 Dermatitis exfolia- 
tiva 

10-38-145 Dermatitis factitia . 

10-40-145 Dermatitis herpeti- 
formis .... 

10-42-145 Dermatitis medica- 
mentosa . . . 

10-44-145 Dermatitis repens . 

10-45-145 Dermatitis trauma- 
tica 

10—46-145 Dermatitis vene- 
nata 

10-48-145 Ecthyma 

10-49-145 Eczema 


1 

1 
1 




1 
1 







108 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Hous3 (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

2; 

< 

S 

m 
w 

55 

2 

3 

8 

9 

10 

21 

22 

25 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

33 
35 

37 
38 

40 

42 
44 

45 

46 

48 
49 


Neurolo 


g- 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
SjTjhilis 


< 


"3 

o 




"3 


o 
a 
o 

J3 


a 


o 


g" 


2 


■a 

o 






"o 

a) 


k 

B 

o 




o 
ft 


1 


"3 


►J 








1 

26 
2 

5 

3 

11 
1 

8 
1 

3 

1 

11 

1 
90 


Q 
1 
















u.. 


< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


3 

1 

3 
1 

5 

2 

1 

6 

1 

47 


D. 


F. 
1 

5 

3 

1 

1 

4 
35 


D. 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 
1 


D. 


M. 

2 


F. 

3 

1 

1 

2 


M. 

1 

6 
125 

6 
6 
29 
17 
3 
1 
1 

4 
2 

11 
10 

1 

1 

3 

3 


F. 
1 

39 

1 
1 
3 

4 
2 

2 

2 

1 

18 
4 

3 


M. 

1 

8 


F. 

4 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 
1 


F. 

2 


11. 


F. 


M. 

1 


F. 

1 


M. 

1 

133 

7 

36 

23 

2 

2 
3 
3 

1 

24 
6 

2 

3 

21 
1 

6 

134 

1 

457 


F. 

159 

19 

12 

18 

1 

12 
6 
1 

1 

1 

14 
11 

1 

1 
6 

2 

89 

544 


M. 

1 


F. 
1 


M. 


F. 


O 


164 

33 
21 

6 
2 

1 

297 

28 

48 

41 

3 

5 

12 

37 

27 

4 

3 

3 

44 
17 

3 

4 

27 
1 

8 

223 

1 

1013 



109 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



ChASSIPICATION OF DISEASES 
WITH NOS. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 

2 

1 


D. 


P. 
1 

4 
2 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D 


10-50-145 Eczema seborrhoi- 

cum 

10-51-145 Edema circiimscrip- 
tum aeutum . . 

10-52-145 Elephantiasis .... 

10-53-145 Erythema exudati- 
vum 

10-54-145 Erythema hyperemi- 
cum 

10-55-145 Erythema induratum 
scrofulosorum . . 

10-56-145 Erythema multiforme 

10-57-145 Erji;hema nodosum . 

10-59-145 Erythema toxicum . . 

10-60-145 Erj'thema (imclassi- 
fied) 

10-62-145 FoUiclis 

10-63-145 Folliculitis 

10-65-145 Granviloma coeoidioi- 
des 

10-68-145 Herpes shnplex . . . 

10-73-145 Hyperidrosis .... 

10-74-145 Hypertrichosis . . . 

10-75-145 Ichthyosis 

10-76-145 Impetigo 

10-77-145 Impetigo contagiosa . 

10-79-145 Intertrigo 

10-81-145 Keratosis plantaris 

10-82-145 Keratosis pilaris . . . 

10-83-145 Keratosis senilis . . . 

10-84-145 Keratosis, unclassi- 
fied 

10-86-145 Lentigo 

10-88-145 Leukoderma 

10-90-145 Lichen planus .... 

10-94-145 Lupus erythematosus 

10-9.5-145 Miliaria (prickly heat) 

10-96-145 Milium 

10-97-145 MoUuscum contagio- 
sum 

10-99-145 Morphea 

10-100-145 Mycosis fungoides . . 

10-101-145 Nevus fibrosus . . . 

10-102-145 Nevus linearis . . . 

10-104-145 Nevus papillaris . . 

10-105-145 Nevus pigmentosus . 

10-106-145 Nevus pilosus .... 

10-107-145 Nevus vascularis . . 

10-108-145 Nevus, unclassified . 

10-110-145 Onychia 

10-113-145 Paronychia 

10-114-145 Pemphigus 

10-116-145 Pemphigus vegetans . 

10-117-145 Pernio 

10-119-145 Pityriasis rosea . . . 





110 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

< 
S 
m 

CO 

50 

51 
52 

53 

54 

55 
56 
57 
59 

60 
62 
63 

65 
68 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
79 
81 
82 
83 

84 
86 
88 
90 
94 
95 
96 

97 
99 
100 
101 
102 
104 
105 
106 
107 
lOS 
110 
113 
114 
116 
117 
119 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 

Syphilis 


< 
O 


'a 
o 




c 
c 

o 




O 

'3.S 

OP 


2^ 




o 


tb 
o 

1 


c: 
E 

Q 


o 


D 

Q 


2 


"3 
a 
Q 










G 
6 
1 

1 
2 

8 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

10 

2 

7 
4 

1 
1 


■a 

0) 

5 
1 






















< 


u. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

7 

2 

1 

1 
1 


D. 


F. 
1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

3 
1 
2 

5 
1 

1 


D. 

1 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 


F. 
1 

2 
1 

1 
1 


M. 

1 

1 
1 

26 


F. 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 
16 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 

4 


F. 


M. 

6 
1 

1 


F. 

1 

2 

2 
1 

2 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

40 

1 

3 
7 
1 
2 

3 

2 

15 
8 
6 
7 
1 
125 
1 
1 
7 

19 

2 
11 
15 
11 

3 

2 
1 
1 

1 

2 

8 

1 

4 

5 
29 


F. 

12 

1 

1 

5 

16 

2 

3 

4 

1 

1 
10 
4 
6 
6 
3 
153 

10 
6 

2 
1 
9 
10 
8 
2 

5 

18 

19 

1 

1 

10 

4 
24 


M. 

2 
1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

52 

1 
1 

1 

1 

9 

24 

5 

7 

8 
1 
3 

1 
37 
14 
12 
13 

4 

284 

14 

1 
17 
25 

2 

2 

3 

20 

25 

19 

2 

9 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

20 

28 

7 

2 

58 

9 
53 



111 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


jMedical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urm. 


ChUd. 

Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 

2 

3 
6 


D. 


F. 
1 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

5 
1 


D. 

1 


F. 

1 
1 

2 


D. 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


10-122-145 PitjTiasis simplex . . 

10-123-145 Pompholyx 

10-125-145 Prurigo 

10-126-145 Pruritus 

10-127-145 Psoriasis 

10-128-145 Rosacea 

10-129-145 Scleroderma .... 

10-130-145 Seborrhea 

10-134-145 Sycosis vulgaris . . . 
10-135-145 Telangiectasis .... 

10-138-145 Urticaria 

10-139-145 Urticaria pigmentosa . 

10-140-145 Verruca 

10-142-145 Vitiligo 

10-143-145 Xanthoma 

10-144-145 Xeroderma pigmento- 
sum 

10-145-145 Unclassified 

Desquamation . . 

Erythrodermie . . . 

Fordyce's disease 

Granuloma annulare 

Parapsoriasis . . . 

RhinophjTna . . . 

Sporotrichosis . . . 

Trichotillomania . . 

SECTION XI. 

Diseases of the Circulatory 
System. 

1 1-1-Sl Diseases of the arteries 
(unclassified) . . 
1 1-2-8 1 Aneurism : 

Aortic 

Carotid 

Innominate .... 




11-.3-81 Aortitis 

11-4-81 Arteriosclerosis (gen- 
eral) 

11-5-81 Cerebral arteriosclero- 
sis 

11-6-81 Cerebral arteriosclero- 
sis with cerebral 
hemorrhage . . . 

11-8-81 Renal arteriosclerosis . 

11-9-81 Dilatation of aortic 
arch 

11-10-81 Endarteritis, oblitera- 
tive 

11-12-81 Senile gangrene . . . 

11-13- Wounds of arteries 


80 
2 

3 
2 

5 

1 


2 
3 


37 
2 

4 
1 

1 


1 





112 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 
IS 

< 
a 

H 

■a 

122 
123 
125 
126 
127 
12S 
129 
130 
134 
135 
13S 
139 
140 
142 
143 

144 
145 

1 
2 

3 
4 
5 

6 
8 

9 

10 
12 
13 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 

log. 


Dept. of 

Syphilis 


< 

O 


"3 

o 


"3 
'Sb 




c 


O 


d 


2 




a 


5: 


3 


i 

C 


M 





X 


"a 










Q 

1 

1 
17 

3 
5 

2 

1 

3 

120 

4 

7 
3 

9 

6 

1 


-a 
o 

S 

1 
1 

3 
3 






















< 


M. 

1 
1 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 
1 

12 

3 
2 

1 


D. 


F. 

5 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

3 
2 

16 

6 

184 
3 

2 
1 

2 

1 
1 


F. 

1 

2 

4 
2 

2 

4 

3 

118 
4 

4 
1 
5 


M. 
10 

6 

1 


F. 

6 


M. 

2 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 

2 
2 

1 

14 

1 


F. 
1 

2 

7 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

3 

8 

1 

37 

85 

16 

40 
30 

1 
75 

1 
43 

6 

1 

1 

1 

1 


F. 

6 

1 

27 
70 
25 
1 
36 

3 
69 

2 
48 

3 

2 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

3 
15 

2 

81 

158 

43 

1 
80 
30 

4 
153 

3 

106 

10 

2 

3 
2 

1 

2 
20 

1 
9 

326 

9 

2 
5 

3 

6 

1 



113 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Larj-n- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 

12 
1 

11 

1 
5 

1 


D. 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

3 


D. 
1 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 

7 
2 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


11-14-81 Transfusion donor . . 
11-15-82 Embolism and throm- 
bosis 

Embolism: 

cerebral 

mesenteric . . . 

retinal 

Thrombosis: 

anterior tibial (?) 

cavernous sinus . 

lateral sinus . . 

femoral .... 

inferior vena cava 

superior vena cava 

mesenteric . . . 
11-16-82 Diseases of veins (un- 
classified) . . . 
11-17-83 Aneurismal varix . . 
11-18-83 Phlebosclerosis . . . 
11-19-83 Phlebitis: 


1 

1 
1 

1 

1 


1 
1 


3 
2 

1 

1 

1 


2 


1 


1 

1 




1 




Leg 

11-21-83 Varicose ulcer: 

Leg . ... 


3 




5 

1 

1 

4 

1 

5 

1 
2 
2 

17 
17 
32 

46 
11 

2 


2 

2 

1 
1 


4 
5 

1 

1 


2 




11-22-83 Varix: 

Esophageal .... 

Leg 

11-24-77 Pericarditis, dry . . . 
11-25-77 Pericarditis with effu- 


1 
1 






1 1-26-77 Pericarditis (unclassi- 
fied) 

11-28-77 Chronic adhesive peri- 
carditis 

11-31-77 Purulent pericarditis . 

11-33-77 Hydropericardium . . 

11-35-78 Acute endocarditis . . 

ll-37-79a Chronic valvular dis- 
ease (unclassified) 

11-38-79 Aortic stenosis . . 

11-39-79 Aortic insufficiency 

11-40-79 Aortic roughening . 

11-41-79 Aortic disease . . . 

11-42-79 Mitral stenosis . . 

11-43-79 Mitral insufficiency 

11-44-79 Mitral disease . . . 

11-45-79 Tricuspid insuf- 
ficiency . . . . 

11-49-79 Combined valvular 
lesions 

11-50-79 Chronic endocarditis 
(unclassified) . . 

11-51-79 Aneurism of the heart 

11-52-79 Acute dilatation of 

heart 


4 

7 

4 

1 
2 
6 
1 
1 
6 
18 
19 

1 

54 

5 


1 

1 
1 





114 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 

S 

m 

14 
15 

16 
17 
IS 
19 

21 
22 

24 

25 

26 

28 
31 
33 
35 

37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 

45 

49 

50 
51 

52 


Neurolo 


g- 


Dermat 
log. 


0- 


Dept. of 
Syphilis 


■< 
O 


"3 


'3) 


a 
ft 

o 

o 


u 


■s.s 






ti 

"o 
tn 


3 

Is 


c 


"o 






O 

Q 


.J 








Q 
1 

3 
2 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

27 

2 

1 
17 

1 
8 
9 

16 

2 

3 

9 

3 

1 

29 

36 

52 

1 

100 

19 

3 


Q 

1 

3 
1 

2 

1 

1 
3 

1 
2 

2 
2 

3 
























M. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 
1 

2 

7 

5 

4 

1 
16 

13 
13 

28 
6 
17 
33 
69 
22 

16 

1 

12 


F. 

4 

1 

26 

1 

3 

9 

7 
5 
6 
3 
2 
67 
85 
15 

20 

4 


M. 

1 

1 

1 

8 
6 

35 


F. 

13 
22 

81 


M. 
1 


F. 

1 
1 

8 


iM. 
1 


F. 


M. 
1 

5 

1 
1 

1 
3 
9 
6 

12 
1 


F. 
1 

10 

3 

2 
20 
11 

13 


M. 


F. 


M. 

3 


F. 
1 


M. 

3 

5 


F. 

2 

1 
21 

4 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

H 
1 

3 
1 

1 

1 
4 

32 

64 

161 

1 

1 

8 

1 
40 

20 

19 

39 

9 

20 

105 

185 

54 

61 

2 

16 



115 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 

1 
1 

19 

33 

2 

23 
2 

49 

1 
2 
1 
1 

3 

7 

5 

3 
3 
9 


D. 

2 

. 7 

1 
1 


F. 
1 

16 

29 

3 

10 

1 

42 

1 

3 
3 

3 

1 
1 


D. 
1 

5 


M. 

1 
1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

2 

2 
3 

1 


D. 
1 

2 

1 


p. 
3 

1 
1 

1 

4 

1 


D. 

5 

2 


M. 


D. 


r. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

4 

1 


D. 
1 


P. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


11-53-79 Chronic dilatation of 
heart 

11-55-79 Hypertrophy of heart 

11-56-85 Hypertension .... 

11-57-S5 Auricular fibrillation . 

11-58-85 Auricular flutter . . . 

11-59-79 Hypertrophy and dila- 
tation of heart 

11-60-79 Chronic myocarditis . 

11-61-79 Chronic fibrous myo- 
carditis 

11-62-79 Myocardial insufl5- 
ciency 

11-63-189 "Weak heart." "Car- 
diac failure" . . 

11-65-85 Arhythmia 

11-66-85 Bradycardia . . . . 

11-67-85 Tachycardia 

11-68-85 Paroxysmal tachycar- 
dia 

11-69-85 Palpitation 

11-70-85 Heart block 

11-71-85 Adams-Stokes syn- 
drome 

1 1-72-80 Angina pectoris . . . 

11-73-80 Angina pectoris, func- 
tional (unclassi- 
fied) 

11-74-79 Cardiac neurosis . . . 

11-75-79 Unclassified diseases ol 

the heart .... 

Cardioptosis . . . . 

Pulsus alternans . . 

SECTION XII. 

Diseases of the Lymphatic 
Ststem. 

12-1-84 Lymph adenitis, acute; 

Axillary 

Cervical 

Femoral 

Popliteal 

12-2-84 Lymph adenitis, 
chronic: 

AxiUary 

Cervical 




12-3-84 Lymphangitis, acute: 
Arm 












Foot 

Leg 

12-11-84 Hypertrophy of the 

thymus .... 

12-13-84 Status lymphaticus . . 


1 











116 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

< 

H 

to 

53 

55 
56 
57 

58 

59 
60 

61 

62 

63 
65 
66 
67 

68 
69 
70 

71 
72 

73 

74 

75 

1 

2 
3 

11 
13 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj-philis 


< 

O 




'Si 


CI 

o 

o 

o 




i 

■a.s 

OP 


2 


T3 

^ 


a 
& 




ii) 

_o 
"o 


k 

a 
Q 


_o 
"o 


a 


a 


"3 

d 
Q 










Q 

1 

3 

38 

62 

6 

34 
3 

93 

10 
3 

1 
4 

7 

7 

8 

4 

3 

10 

3 

5 

1 
7 

3 
1 
2 

1 

1 


T3 
Q 

1 

3 
2 

12 

8 

1 
1 

2 


















■ 




?i 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

1 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 
1 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 

4 
19 
36 
22 

1 

9 
24 

2 

31 

7 

3 

1 
1 
3 

10 

10 
19 

19 

2 
8 

15 


F. 

3 
10 
94 
49 

2 

14 

1 

IS 

11 

1 
4 

4 
2 

2 

1 
11 

12 

11 
19 


M. 
1 

6 

11 

3 

1 

1 
72 

2 
1 


F. 

6 
20 

2 
71 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

27 

2 

47 

1 


F. 

1 

1 
1 

2 
33 

42 

5 


M. 

17 


F. 

6 
16 


M. 

5 


F. 

3 

1 


M. 


F. 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




H 

7 
31 

138 
71 

1 

11 
40 

3 

49 

18 

2 

8 

1 
5 
6 

12 

11 
33 

32 

17 

116 

3 

1 

5 
300 

3 
1 

6 



117 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification op Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 
1 

1 
1 


F. 

1 

3 
5 

1 

1 

12 
2 

1 

1 


D 

1 


M 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


-M. 

1 

4 
1 

1 

1 

1 
2 


D. 

1 
1 


F. 
1 

3 

1 


D. 
1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


12-14-84 Hypertrophy of lymph 
nodes 

12-15-84 Unclassified diseases of 
the lymphatic sys- 
tem 

SECTION XIII. ^ 

Diseases of the Blood. 

13-1-54 Anemia, pernicious 
13-2-54 Anemia, secondary 

13-3-54 Chlorosis 

13-4-53 Pseudoleukemia, in- 
fantile 

13-6-54 Leukemia, lymphoid . 
13-7-54 Leukemia, myeloid 
13-9-54 Unclassified diseases of 
the blood .... 

SECTION XIV. 

Diseases or the Ductless 
Glands. Spleen. 

14-1-116 Enlarged spleen (Hy- 
pertrophy) . . . 
14-3-54 Splenic anemia . . . 
14-6-116 Rupture of spleen . . 
14-10-116 Perisplenitis . . . . 
14-12-54 Banti's disease .... 

Suprarenal Gland. 
14-14-52 Addison's disease . . 

Thyroid Gland. 

14-16-74 Cretinism 

14-17-88 Myxedema 

14-18-51 Exophthalmic goitre . 
14-19-88 Dysthyroidism . . . 

14-20-88 Thyroiditis 

14-21-88 Unclassified 

Parathyroid Glands. 

14-23-88 Disease of 

14-24-74 Tetany 

Pituitary Gland. 

14-26-55 Acromegaly 

14-27-55 Infantilism 

14-28-55 Dyspituitarism . . . 
14-30-55 Hypopituitarism . . 
14-31-55 Unclassified 


24 
9 

4 
1 

2 

2 
3 

1 
3 

6 

1 

1 


2 


12 
12 

2 

1 
2 

2 

1 
18 
8 
1 
2 


1 
1 


8 
4 

1 
1 

3 
1 





118 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

< 

« 

14 
15 

1 
2 
3 

4 
6 

7 

9 

1 
3 
6 

10 
12 

14 

16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 

23 
24 

26 
27 
28 
30 
31 


Neurolo 


g- 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Syphilis 


J 
< 

O 


"3 


"3 

CO 


a 


t-. 

O 


-3 


O 

'2 '^ 
3"C 
OS 


5 


1 


h. 




o 


£ 
Q 


til 
"3 


Q 


a 


"3 
a 

a) 

Q 


J 








a 

2 

1 

48 
38 

1 
4 
4 

4 

4 

7 

1 
3 

5 

1 

1 
39 

8 
1 
4 

3 

1 
1 
1 
2 


T3 

5 

3 
3 

1 

1 

1 

2 






















■< 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 

1 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

15 

20 

2 

4 
2 

5 

2 

2 

1 

14 

1 

1 

2 
2 


F. 

9 
86 
11 

1 

1 

11 

92 

1 

4 

1 
4 
1 


M. 

2 

4 

1 
1 

1 


p. 

1 

9 
2 


M. 
1 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 

33 

3 

3 

1 

1 

1 


F. 

35 

1 
1 

8 

1 

1 


M. 

1 


F. 

2 


M. 


F. 

2 
3 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

24 

176 

14 

4 
3 

4 

8 

3 

13 

14 

125 

1 

9 

1 
2 

3 

7 
2 
3 



119 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



CuiSSIFICATION OF DISEASES 
WITH NOS. 


Aledical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 

Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


r. 


D. 


M. 


D. 

12 
2 

1 


F. 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

4 
4 

2 
1 


1 


M. 

1 
1 

3 
4 


D. 


F. 

2 


D 


M. 


D. 


r. 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 

3 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


SECTION XV. 

Diseases of the Nervous 
System. 

15-2- Injury to spinal nerves 
15- 3-73 Crutch paralysis . . 
15-4-73 Obstetrical paraly- 
sis 

15-5- Injuries to special 

nerves 

Brachial plexus . . 
Digital 










5 

1 

1 
3 

2 

14 
1 

10 
1 

38 

1 

1 
2 




Musculo-spiral . . . 

Optic 

Peroneal 

Popliteal 

Ulnar 












15-6- Injury to spinal cord . 

15-7- Dislocation of verte- 
brae 

15-8- Fracture of verte- 
brae 

15-9- Hematomyelia . . 

15-10- Injury to brain . . . 

15-12- Laceration .... 

15-14- Skull fracture . . . 
compound . . . 

Infections op the Nervous 
System. 

15-15-72 Chorea 

15-16-60 Encephalitis .... 
15-17-63 Landry's paralysis . . 
15-18-61 Meningitis 

Inflammation and Degenera- 
tion of Nerves. 

15-19-74 Choked disc . . . . 
15-20-66 Facial paralysis (cause 
unspecified) . . . 
) 5-21-145 Herpes zoster .... 
15-22-73 Neuritis (unspecified) . 
15-24-73 Lead 


1 

4 

1 
1 




16 

1 
4 
1 


1 




15-25-73 Multiple neuritis . . 

15-26-66 Paralysis of individual 
nerves (non-trau- 
matic) 

Brachial plexus . . 









120 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 

S 

H 

m 

2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 
10 
12 
14 

15 
16 
17 
18 

19 

20 
21 
22 
24 
25 

26 


N 


euTolc 


g- 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj-philis 


< 
O 


C5 


C3 

'5 


a 



c 





C 


2 




>. 
rt 


1 




2 


1 


0" 


"5. 


"3 


>J 








5 
1 

6 

1 
1 

■5 

1 

9 

19 

1 

14 

1 

42 

23 

1 

1 

2 

4 
1 

7 

1 

1 


S 

12 
2 

3 












■ 










<! 


M. 
1 

1 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


-M. 
1 

6 

1 
5 
6 


F. 
1 

19 

4 
3 
3 


M. 

1 
1 

13 
1 
3 
2 

16 

9 


F. 
1 

2 
1 


M. 

1 

3 

17 

6 

11 

1 

1 

1 


F. 

9 

2 
1 

1 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 
2 

32 
3 

1 
1 


F. 

2 

42 
1 

1 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 

3 

2 

2 

3 

3- 

1 

1 
1 

5 

1 

2 
2 
5 

8 

1 

20 
2 
5 

4 
2 

9 


F. 

2 

1 
-1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

8 

17 

26 

4 


M. 

9 


F. 

5 


M. 
1 


F. 


11. 


F. 




3 

4 

IS 

6 

1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
39 

9 

16 
2 

8 

21 

115 

1 
4 

2 

44 

26 

51 

5 

3 

13 



121 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
■WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 

Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Lar\-n- 
golog. 




.M. 

2 

2 

7 

1 

1 
6 
1 

2 

4 


D. 

3 


F. 

1 
1 

3 

1 

4 

1 

1 
2 


D. 

2 


M. 

1 

1 
1 

2 

2 

1 

1 


D. 
1 


F. 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


D. 
1 

2 
1 


M. 
1 

2 

1 


D. 


F. 

3 
3 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 


D. 


F. 

4 
2 


D. 


ii. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


15-26-66 Paralysis of individual 
nerves (non-trau- 
matic) : 

Facial 

Median 

Musculo-spiral . . . 

Oculo-motor. . . . 

Perineal 

Ulnar 

15-27-73 Sciatica 

Spinal Cord Disease. 

15-28-63 Amyotrophic lateral 
sclerosis .... 

15-30-66 Diffuse combined de- 
generation (ataxic 
paraplegia) . . . 

15-31-63 Friedreich's ataxia . . 

15-32-63 Lateral sclerosis (spas- 
tic paraplegia) 

15-34-63 Multiple sclerosis . . 

15-35-63 Progressive muscular 
atrophy 

15-36-63 SjTingomyelia .... 

15-37-62 Tabes 

15-38-63 Myehtis 

15-39-63 Unclassified 

Brain Disease. 

15-40-60 Abscess 

15-41-74 Aphasia 

15—42-81 Arteriosclerosis . . . 

15-43-63 Bulbar paralysis . . . 

15-46-67 Dementia paralj-tica 
(general paresis) . 

15-47-66 Diplegia 

15-48-66 Hemiplegia. "Cere- 
bral hemorrhage" 
with unspecified 
cause; non-trau- 
matic 

13-49-66 InfantUe 

15-50- Travmiatic .... 

15-51-74 Hydrocephalus. (For 
congenital, see 8- 
34-150.) .... 

15-52-74 Idiocy and imbecility. 

15-53-74 Retarded mental de- 
velopment . . . 

15-54-66 Monoplegia 

15-55-74 Jacksonian epilepsy 

15-55a-74 Hernia of brain . . 





122 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



m 
26 

27 

28 

30 
31 

32 
34 

35 
36 
37 
38 
39 

40 
41 
42 
43 

46 

47 

48 
49 
50 

51 
52 

53 

54 

55 

55a 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj-philis 


< 

C 


■=3 


'5 


5. 




.| 


s 


S 


■=• 


^_ 


U 
& 




1 


M 


'c 


£' 


C 












3 

1 
4 

16 
2 

6 
5 

2 

3 

55 

3 

1 
1 

1 

5 

17 
5 

1 

6 
4 

3 

1 


-3 

1 
1 

7 

1 






















< 


ii. 

1 

4 
2 

1 

2 

35 
1 

1 
3 

3 
1 


D. 


F. 

2 

2 

2 
5 

3 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

3 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

12 

1 
2 

14 

1 
1 
2 
2 

1 
2 


F. 

9 

1 
1 

7 
1 

3 

3 

4 


M. 

1 
1 

1 
1 


F. 
1 


M. 

7 

2 
6 
2 

1 

1 

1 
1 


F. 
1 

2 

1 
7 

1 

1 


M. 

6 
1 


F. 


M. 

1 

5 
13 

11 


F. 

1 

1 
11 

15 


M. 

1 


F. 

1 
1 


M. 

2 

1 

4 
4 

15 

4 
6 

3 

1 

59 

3 

11 

7 

26 
1 

42 

4 
14 

31 

1 
4 


F. 

1 

2 

1 
4 

8 

3 

7 

5 

9 

~ 

21 

1 

1 
7 

6 
2 

22 

12 

13 

1 
3 


M. 


F. 


M. 
1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


C 

1 
1 

6 

1 

5 

38 

2 

29 

20 
13 

13 

3 

109 

2 

5 

1 

1 

15 

17 

33 
5 

76 

12 
54 

79 
2 

7 



123 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Med 
Classification of Diseases 

■NVITH Nos. 


ical Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 


M. D. 


F. D. M. D. 

2 


F. D. 


M. D. 


F. D. 


M. D. 


F. D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


.M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


Psychoses. 

15-56-68 Dementia praecox . . 1 . . 
15-57-68 Involution melancho- 
lia 
































15-58-68 Manic depressive in- 
sanity 1 . . 

15-59-68 Paranoid states . . . 2 . . 
15-60-154 Senile states 


2 1 . 




























1 




























2 1 . . 
























































15-62-68 Other forms .... 2 . . 
Nutritional Distuhbances. 


1 


3 .. 


























15-64-74 Pseudomuscular hy- 






























15-65-74 Dystrophies of other 






























Vaso-Neukotic Disorders. 
15-66-74 Acroparesthesia 


1 
























































Miscellaneous. 
15-68-74 Arthritic atrophy 


1 


1 . . 


























15-71-74 Speech defect (not ana- 
































1 




























15-73-74 Vertigo 1 . . 

15-74-74 Unclassified nervous 


1 . 
































1 . . 












1 












Nervous Diseases ■without 
Recognized Pathologt. 

15-75-69 Epilepsy 6 . . 


.... 1 . . 


1 . . 




















15-77-63 Family periodic paral- 
































9 




























15—80-63 Myasthenia gravis ... 






























15-83-149 Myotonia (Thom- 






























Neuralgia: 
15-85-73 Trigeminal .... 1 . 
15-86-73 Occipital 


.... 6 . 


5 . . 


























15-87-73 Brachial 1 .' 


.... 1 . 




























15-88-73 Intercostal 






























15-89-73 Lumbar and sacral . . . 






























15-90-73 Coccygod.vnia 































124 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 
2; 

< 

a 

56 

57 

5S 
59 
60 
61 
62 

63 

64 
65 

66 

67 

68 
70 

71 
72 
73 

74 

75 
76 

77 
79 
80 

83 

85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 


Xeurolo 


?■ 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj-philis 


<: 

c 


5 




'5i 


o 

a 




^_ 


o 


s 


2 


r 


b 


if. 


t'c 


2 




5 


/^ 


j: 


c 
c 






1 






3 

4 
3 
3 

1 
6 

1 

1 

2 

1 
5 

1 

12 

9 
1 

14 
2 








1 


! 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




M. 
1 

3 
2 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 

1 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


11. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 

2 

11 

4 

15 

1 

2 
9 

4 

1 
1 


F. 

1 

2 
1 

1 
3 

1 
2 
11 

1 

4 

21 

2 

13 
5 


M. 

1 

1 

3 


F. 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 


M. 

1 

3 

1 
1 


F. 
1 

3 


M. 


F. 
1 


M. 
1 

8 
2 


F. 

3 

4 
1 

5 

1 
1 


M. 

8 

1 
1 


F. 

7 

1 

5 
1 


M. 

2 
3 
3 
1 
3 

1 

3 

5 
5 

12 

7 

69 

1 

6 
2 

1 

14 
1 
2 

1 


F. 

6 

4 
2 

4 

1 

17 

1 
1 
1 

3 

45 

1 
16 

15 
3 

4 

1 

1 


M. 

1 


F. 
1 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


C 

12 

5 

7 
2 

1 

12 

2 

1 
1 

22 

7 

1 

34 

8 

36 

16 

140 
2 

14 
51 

1 

1 

44 
4 
6 

16 
9 
8 



125 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification op Dise.ases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 


D. 
1 


F. 

2 
1 

1 
2 
6 

2 

1 
6 


D. 


M. 

1 

4 

2 
2 

1 

2 

5 


D. 


P. 

1 

1 

1 

1 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F 


D. 


Neuralgia: 
15-91-73 Other forms of neu- 






15-92-74 Occupation neuroses . 

15-93-63 Paralysis agitans . . 

15-94-74 Tic convulsif (Tou- 
rette's disease) . . 

15-95-149 Torticollis 

15-96-74 Psychoneuroses (un- 
specified) . . . 

15-97-74 Anxiety t>-pe . . . 

15-98-74 Hypochondriacal 

t^-pe 

15-99-73 Hysteroid type . . 

15-100-74 Neurasthenic tj^pe . 

15-101-74 Sex-hypochondriac 
type 

SECTION XVI. 

Diseases of Bones, Joints, 

Muscles, Tendons and 

Fascia. 

16-1-146 Abscess: 

Nasal bone .... 
16-2-146 Exostosis: 


1 

3 
2 

3 

10 




1 
1 

s 

15 

25 

1 






Fibula 

Jaw 

Metacarpal .... 

Os calcis 

Patella 

Phalanx 

Radius and ulna . . 

Scapula 

Skull 

Tibia 

Ulna 

16-3-146 Fragilitas ossium: 
Femiir . . . 












16-4-146 Necrosis: 

Jaw 










2 

1 
1 




Metatarsals .... 
Phalanges (fingers) . 
Phalanges (toes) . . 
Rib 












Skull 












16-5-146 Osteitis deformans . . 

Tibia 

16-6-146 Osteomyelitis: 

Multiple 










2 

16 

1 






Femur 

Fibula 






2 







126 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 
% 

<: 

91 
92 
93 

94 
95 

96 
97 

98 
99 
100 

101 

1 
2 

3 

4 

5 

6 


Neiirolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 

SjTjhilis 


< 




o 


c5 






1 

2 

6 


g 


C 




c 
>> 


■-f 


'k. 


^ 




o 

Q 


2 


Q 


iJ 








5 

1 

1 
1 

6 

8 
6 

13 
20 
44 

1 

3 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

4 

1 
1 
1 
1 

5 
29 

1 


5 

5 






















-«! 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


XI. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

2 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

26 
3 

2 

58 
9 

3 
31 
33 

5 
1 


F. 
O 

6 
2 

1 

58 
25 

1 
33 
22 

5 
1 


M. 

1 
1 

3 
1 

4 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
3 

1 

9 
1 

1 

1 

2 

6 
4 

1 


F. 

1 

5 

1 

2 
1 

4 
1 

4 
1 
1 

3 
4 

1 


M. 

8 

1 

2 

4 

1 

1 

1 
3 


F. 

4 
6 

1 

1 

2 

4 

1 
1 

1 
2 


M. 

6 
1 

1 


F. 

2 


M. 

1 
1 

9 


F. 

3 
2 


M. 

1 
1 


F. 

1 

2 
3 

1 


24 
9 

7 

1 

83 

7 

8 
8 
9 

4 


F. 

8 
6 

9 
1 

127 
3 

2 
19 

7 


11. 
1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

6 
69 
20 

16 
24 

330 

44 

15 

m 

81 
26 

1 

3 

1 
1 
6 
9 
1 
4 

1 
1 
6 

1 

7 
2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

10 

13 

2 



127 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



^ IMedical Surgical °''!;'?°" 
Classification op Diseases pedio 

WITH No8. 


Genito- Child. Laryn- 
Urin. Med. golog. 


M. D. F. D. M. D. F. D. M, D. P. 


D. M. D. p. D. M. D. F. D. M. D. P. D. 


16-6-146 Osteomyelitis: 

Humerus 5 




Jaw 3 . . 1 




Metacarpals 




jNIetatarsals 2 . . 1 . . . . 




Os innominatum 3.. 1.. 1 




Patella 1 




Phalanges (fingers) 2 




Phalanges (toes) 




Radius 4 




Ribs 3 




Scapula 1 , . 3 . . . . 




Sternum 




Tarsals 2 




Tibia 1 . . 12 . . 3 . . 1 . . . . 




Tibia and fibula 




Ulna 1 . . 1 




Vertebrae 1 




16-7-146 Periostitis (non-trau- 
matic) : 
Clavicle 




Elbow 




Humerus 




Jaw 




Metacarpals 




Olecranon 




Radius 








16-8- Periostitis (traumatic) : 

Elbow 




Fibula 




Orbit 




Phalanx 




Sternum 




Tibia 1 




16-9-146 Faulty union: 

Femur 1 j 




Os calcis 1 




Patella 1 








Tibia 2 1 




16-10-146 Non-union: 

Clavicle 1 1 




Femur, neck of 2 . 




Humerus 4 




Radius and ulna 3 2 




Tibia 11 




Tibia and fibula 2 . 




Ulna 9 




16-11-146 Unclassified bone dis- 
eases 1.. 2.. 1. 1 


1 . 


16-12- Injuries 1 2 




16-13-146 Sinus leading to bone: 

Tibia | 2 






128 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

>J 

S 

a 

-Ji 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 

11 
12 
1.3 


Xeiirolog. 


Derma t 
log. 


0- 


Dept. 

Sj-phil 


3f 

S 


< 
O 


75 

,^5 


d 


c 

o 


o 


o 
c 

o 


3 


^1 


h. 


1 
O 




n 




a 


Q 


>. 


Q 


>J 








Q 

5 
4 

3 
5 
1 
3 

4 
3 
4 

2 
17 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 
1 
1 

1 
3 

2 
2 

4 
5 
2 
2 
2 

6 
3 

2 


0) 

5 






















< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


p. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

2 


F. 
1 

3 

1 


5 

10 

5 

1 

1 
3 

1 

2 

15 
1 
2 

2 

2 

1 

1 
2 

1 

4 
9 


F. 

1 

3 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

3 


M. 

2 

1 
1 
1 

5 

1 
3 

1 

1 
2 

1 

21 

28 


F. 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

13 
1 


11. 


F. 


M. 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




7 
13 

7 
4 

4 
6 
2 

1 
3 
4 

1 

22 
2 
5 
2 

1 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
5 
6 

3 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 

42 
44 



129 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



CliASSIFICATION OF DlSE.\SES 
WITH NOS. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 

Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


LarjTi- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


.M. 

1 
2 

7 

1 

26 

2 

12 
26 

2 

9 

12 

6 

4 

11 

23 

3 

7 

12 

29 

3 

2 

1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

5 
1 

2 
2 
1 

1 
1 


D. 
1 


F. 

2 

11 
9 
1 
3 

12 

2 

1 
2 

3 
3 
1 
1 

5 

8 
1 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 
1 

4 
2 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 

1 

1 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


16-14- Fractures: 

Simple 




























Elbow . . . 




































Fibula 

Pott's 
























]Malar bone .... 
Metacarpals . . . 
Metatarsals .... 
Os innominatum 












Phalanges .... 












Colles' 












Radius and ulna . . 
Ribs 


1 






















Tibia . . 












Tibiar and fibula . . 
Ulna . . . 












Compound 












Fibula 

Pott's . . 
























Patella 












Phalanges (fingers) . 
Radius (Colles') . . 
Raditis and ulna . . 
Tibia 












Tibia and fibula . . 
Ulna 












Comminuted 












Tibia 












Tibia and fibula . . 
Separation of epiphy- 
sis: 
Femur (lower) . . 
Humerus (upper) 

Radius 

16-15-36 Achondroplasia . . . 
16-16-147 Arthropathies, Char- 
cot's 

16-17-147 Hemorrhage into j oints 
16-18-147 Ankylosis: 

Ankle 













130 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

5 

a 

02 

14 

15 

16 

17 
18 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of. 
Sj'phiUs 


O 
Eh 


^ 


3 

■& 

d 


O 

a 
o 


o 


g 

n 


2 


T3 




1 
O 


ii 

_o 
b 




1 




"a 


3 

a 











1 

3 

9 

1 
38 
13 

1 
20 
40 

2 

2 

10 

14 

9 

7 

13 

25 

3 

7 

19 

37 

4 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

5 

1 

2 
3 
1 

1 
1 

3 


■a 

a 

5 
1 
























M. 

1 
3 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 


F. 

1 


M. 

12 

9 

38 

27 

17 

2 

24 

13 

70 

1 

64 

22 

12 
39 
79 
50 
35 
59 
5 
8 
16 
24 
18 

4 

2 

6 
6 

1 


r. 

24 
4 
9 

2 

4 
53 

15 
5 

6 
32 
45 
14 
10 

1 

4 
15 

8 

5 
3 


M. 

3 
6 

8 

7 

6 
13 

5 
4 

3 
6 

8 
2 

1 

4 
5 

8 
1 

1 

1 

3 

1 


F. 

2 

4 
5 

5 
4 
3 

3 

1 

1 
4 

19 
2 

2 

5 
2 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

2 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

2 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Eh 
O 

H 

13 
14 

68 
43 
38 

2 

38 

27 

139 

1 
87 
32 

16 

55 

111 

122 

sa 

70 
9 
12 
30 
49 
28 

2 
1 
1 

5 

3 
11 
10 

1 

9 

1 

3 



131 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification op Dise.\ses 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

3 
1 


D. 


F. 

2 

1 
1 

2 

1 


D. 


M. 

1 
2 

1 
2 

2 

10 
5 

1 

1 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 

2 

1 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 



1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


16-18-147 Ankylosis: 

Elbow 




Hip ■ • ■ 


































1 

2 

3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

4 

4 
3 






Metacarpo-phalan- 

geal 

Phalangeal (finger) . 
16-19-147 Arthritis and syno^^tis 
(non-traumatic, 
non-infectious, 
or organism un- 
known) .... 
16—20-147 Acute . ... 


1 




2 

1 






16 21 147 Chronic 








16-22-147 Arthritis and synovitis 
(traumatic) : 

16-23-146 Acute 

16-24-147 Chronic 

16-25-147 Unclassified joint dis- 
eases 

16-26-147 Displaced cartilage: 

Jaw 


1 










16-27-147 Loose body in joint: 
Knee 

16-28- Dislocation: 

Acromio-clavicular . 

Ankle 

Elbow 

Hip 












Jaw 












Knee 

Metacarpo-phalan- 












Phalangeal .... 












Sterno-clavicular. . 
Tibia, head of . . . 
Wrist. . . . 












16-29- Non-tuberculous joint 
disease (traumatic 
type) 

16-31- Strains and sprains: 

Relaxed sacro-iliac . 

Sprain: 

Ankle 

Elbow 

Finger 

Knee 

Shoulder .... 






1 







132 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 
IS 

< 
S 
m 

OQ 

18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 

24 

25 
26 

27 

2S 

29 
31 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Syphilis 


O 


o3 


"3 
o 

1 

02 


o 

0-3 


o 

o5 


o 




cl 
> 

7 


_o 


o 
"o 

3 

c 


C 

O 

r 


1 

O 




P 










o 

5 
3 
3 

4 

5 
1 
5 

1 
1 

S 

12 
6 

1 

1 

1 

3 

4 

4 

1 
2 
5 

1 


■a 

a 

Q 






















->i 


M. 


D 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M 


D 


F. 


D. 


M. 

12 
15 
11 

7 
5 
4 

1 
1 

2 
1 


F. 

13 
9 

8 

2 
13 
5 

1 


M. 

13 

9 
5 
1 

12 

2 

1 

13 

1 

1 
14 
20 

2 

4 

41 
12 
29 
21 
9 


F. 

2 

5 
1 
2 

3 
2 
1 

1 

1 

6 

2 
1 

1 

22 
11 

7 
8 
4 


M. 

2 
6 
1 

22 
20 
15 

25 
17 

7 

18 

29 
? 
2 

5 
1 

1 
5 

1 
1 

6 

1 

5 


F. 

1 

2 
1 
1 

19 
9 
3 

4 
14 
6 

6 
11 

3 

4 

1 
1 

7 
1 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 
1 

4 

6 

15 

1 


F. 

1 

6 
13 

1 

4 

1 

1 


M. 


F- 
1 


M 

1 

2 


F 

1 

1 


M 


F. 


M 


F. 


M 


F. 


3 
8 
2 
1 

1 
2 

89 
66 
67 

51 

64 
24 

32 

1 
60 

7 

5 

1 

23 

9 

3 

1 

1 
16 
33 

3 

1 

6 

1 

78 
24 
37 
35 
13 



133 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Cl.^SSIFIC.\TION of DiSE.iSES 
WITH NOS. 


JNIedical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 

1 

6 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 
1 

3 
2 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


D. 


M. 

2 
3 

1 
5 
2 

5 
5 


D. 


F. 

1 

2 

6 

S 
6 

5 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


16-31- Strains and sprains: 

Wrist 

Strain: 

Ankle 

Costo-sternal . . 

Hip 

Knee 

Lumbo-sacral . . 
Metatarso-pha- 

langeal .... 
Sacro-iliac . . . 
Shoulder .... 
16-32- Sinus: 

Ankle 


1 
1 




16-33- Contusions and 
wounds: 
Ruptured ligament 
of knee .... 
Wounds: 

Ankle 

Elbow 

Knee 

Shoulder .... 
Wrist 












16-35-147 Coxa vara 

16-36-36 Deformities due to 
rickets .... 
16-38-147 Genu valgum .... 
16-39-147 Genu variim .... 
16-40-36 Acquired deformities 
of vertebrae: 

Imperfect poise . . 

Kyphosis 

Scoliosis ..... 

Other Diseases of the Org.\ns 
OF Locomotion. 

16-41-149 Amputation stump, 
painful: 
Finger 


1 
1 




3 

4 






Foot 












Leg 

16-43-149 Bursitis (unspecified): 

Ankle 

Elbow 

Finger 

Gluteal 

Leg 

Metatarsal .... 

Popliteal 

Prepatellar .... 
Subacromial . . . 













134 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 
Z 

< 

5 
a 

CO 

31 

32 
33 

35 

36 
38 
39 

40 

41 
43 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
S>'philis 


< 

O 




"3 


c 




i 


g 


;2 


^ 


t- 


1 

M 


'o 


a 


1 


'S 


t;' 


-r 










3 

1 

1 

4 
14 

1 

1 

1 

3 
1 
3 

7 
13 
8 

5 

1 
16 

1 

1 

2 

5 


_S 
























M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 
11 

17 

1 

1 
9 

2 


F. 

10 
15 

10 
2 


M. 

1 

1 

1 

11 

10 
3 

3 

5 
4 

1 
4 

2 
1 

1 

8 
12 


F. 

2 
6 

13 

2 

1 

1 

13 


M. 

20 

2 
5 

82 

129 
3 

2 

13 

21 
8 

29 
33 

1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

5 
9 


F. 

24 

2 
26 

1 

33 

5 

1 

2 

9 
22 

8 

34 
73 

15 


M. 


F. 


M. 
1 

1 

10 


F. 

1 

8 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 

4 


F. 

1 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




46 

4 

10 

149 

1 

222 

13 

3 

1 
5 

4 
4 

24 
43 
16 

63 
145 

1 

5 

1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
13 
53 



135 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



CLAS81FIC.4.TION OP DISEASES 
WITH NOS. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 

Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 

2 


D. 


^■ 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 
2 

11 
2 

1 
1 


D. 


F. 

6 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

2 

2 
15 
1 
2 
1 
2 
4 

1 


D. 


F. 

2 

4 
1 

4 
1 

2 

1 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


16-44-149 Acute: 

Elbow 

Leg 

Prepatellar .... 

Subacromial . . . 

Subcoracoid . . . 
16-15-149 Chronic: 

Elbow 

Gluteal 




Prepatellar . . . . 

Subacromial . . . 

Subcoracoid . . . 
16-46-149 Contraction (to in- 
clude cicatricial) . 
16-48-149 Dupuytren's contrac- 






1 






16-49-149 Ganglion 

16-50-149 Hallux valgus .... 

16-52-149 Hammer toe .... 

16-54-149 Mallet finger . . . . 

16-55-149 Metatarsalgia .... 

16-56-149 Myositis (unspecified) 

16-57-149 Acute 

16-58-149 Chronic 

16-59-149 Myositis ossificans 
(traumatic) . . . 

16-60-149 Myositis ossificans 

(non-traumatic) . 

16-62-150 Talipes (congenital) . 

16-63-150 Equino-varus . . . 

16-64-150 Equino-valgus . . 

16-65-150 Calcaneo-varus . . 

16-66-150 Caleaneo-valgus . . 

16-67-150 Cavus 

16-68-149 Acquired club-foot . . 

16-69-149 Tenosynovitis .... 

16-70-149 Trigger finger .... 

16-71-149 Strain of ligaments, 
muscles and ten- 
dons; attitudi- 
nal, occupational, 
etc.: 

Arm 

Back 


1 

1 

1 










Foot 












Hand 

Leg 

Supraspinatus ten- 
don 

Tendo-Achillis . . 

Thoracic wall . . . 

(unspecified) . . . 
16-72-149 Pronated feet .... 
16-73-146 Flexed scapula. . . . 


2 




3 




1 







136 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

m 
44 

45 

46 

48 
49 
50 
52 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 

59 

60 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 

71 

72 
73 


N 


eurolog. 


Dermato- 
iog. 


Dept. of 
Syphilis 


< 

O 


'-3 

a 


"5i 


c 
o 


^ 


'c 




d 




> 


si 

o 
"o 
tr 


s 


Q 


ti 

c 




T 


C 
O 

Q 


J 








5 
1 

2 

1 
2 
2 

19 

2 
1 
6 
3 

1 
1 
1 

1 

2 
19 
2 
2 
3 
2 
4 
3 

2 
1 

8 


■a 
P 
























M. 


D. 


r. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

7 
1 

1 
11 

4 
2 

1 

1 

14 
2 

2 

5 
22 


F. 

1 

1 

6 

3 

7 
6 

2 

2 
3 

6 
31 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 


F. 

2 

1 

29 

1 

4 
49 

S 

1 

1 

41 

3 
3 

1 

3 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
14 

153 

121 

2 

3 

1 

408 
5 


XI. 

1 


F. 


M. 

3 


F. 

2 


M. 


F. 


M. 

3 

1 

1 
1 


F. 

1 

4 

1 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 
Eh 

1 
3 


2 

19 

12 

1 

17 
17 

1 

7 

5 
14 
2 

1 

1 

1 
1 

22 

2 
1 

2 

1 
1 
10 
6 
1 


14 

2 

6 
8 

8 

43 
2 

2 

6 
1 

7 
2 

1 
9 
2 


9 

32 

1 

2 

19 

38 

2 

14 

1 

28 
3 
1 

16 
1 
1 
1 

4 
6 
1 

3 

4 

6 

12 

2 

1 

159 

103 

2 

5 

6 

1 

3 

355 

5 


12 
106 

4 

16 

1 

47 

134 

S 

39 

7 
59 
73 

4 

1 
19 
11 
14 

8 

1 
9 
9 
2 
2 
4 
5 
9 
57 
3 

2 

337 

232 

2 

9 

11 
2 
3 

33 

824 
11 



137 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 

Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 

6 
1 

3 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 

2 


D. 


M. 

1 
2 

1 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 

2 


D. 


P. 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


p. 


D. 


16-74- Wound of muscles and 
tendons. . . . 

Ruptured crucial lig- 
ament .... 

Ruptured supraspi- 
natus tendon . 

Severed tendons . . 

Woiinds: 




16-75-149 Unclassified 

SECTION XVII. 

DisE.^SES AND Injuries op the 
Eye and Ear. 

Diseases op the Eye. 

17-1-75 Conjunctivitis (acute 
and chronic) . . 

17-2-75 Conjunctivitis, follicu- 
lar 

17-3-75 Conjunctivitis, phlyc- 
tenular 

17-6-75 Astigmatism .... 

17-7-75 Hypermetropia . . . 

17-10-75 Amaurosis (to include 
hysterical) . . . 

17-11-75 Amblyopia 

17-12-75 Blepharitis 

17-13-75 Cataract 

17-19-75 Ectropion 


1 

1 

2 




1 






17-24-75 Glaucoma (acute, 

chronic) .... 

17-25-75 Hemorrhage into ret- 
ina) 

17-27-75 Hemianopsia . . . . 

17-28-75 Iritis (cause unknown) 

17-32-75 Keratitis (cause un- 
known) .... 

17-33-75 Keratitis, phlyctenu- 
lar 

17-34-75 Keratitis, interstitial . 

17-35-75 Neuritis, optic . . . 

17-36-75 Atrophy of optic 
nerve 

17-37-75 Neuroretinitis .... 

17-39-75 Nystagmus 

17-40-75 Opacity of vitreus . . 

17-41-75 Ophthalmoplegia. . . 

17-43-75 Paralysis of 3d nerve . 

17-47-75 Retinitis 

17-54-75 Ulcer, corneal .... 


2 
3 

1 

1 

1 




2 

1 
1 







138 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

2: 

< 

H 

74 
75 

1 

2 

3 
6 

7 

10 
11 
12 

13 
19 

24 

25 

27 

28 

32 

33 
34 
35 

36 
37 
39 
40 
41 
43 
47 
54 


Neiirolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 

SjTjhilis 


.J 
< 




u 


'3) 


a 

ft 
o 

o 


g 


o 


C 


rS 


?; 




g; 


ii, 

■3 


a 


_0 




a 


"5. 

-r 


"3 

G 










5 
1 

2 
6 

1 
1 

3 

1 

1 

2 
3 

4 

3 

1 
1 

1 
2 

3 
3 
1 

1 
1 

2 


-a 

(5 






















< 


M. 

1 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 

2 

2 

3 
2 

1 

1 
3 

2 

1 
4 

1 

3 
1 

1 

3 


F. 

2 

1 
1 

1 
3 
3 

1 
1 

2 


M. 

18 

1 
1 

2 


F. 

12 
1 


M. 

2 


F. 
1 


M. 

1 
1 


F. 


M. 

4 

1 
5 

3 

3 

20 

1 
1 


F. 

6 
18 

3 

5 
34 

1 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 

2 

1 
10 

1 


F. 
1 

2 

4 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 

1 
3 


M. 


F. 


6 
35 

13 

1 

28 
2 
1 

1 
1 
8 
4 

3 
3 

9 

13 

55 
5 
6 

18 

1 

2 

1 
5 
1 



139 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Cl.\ssification op Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 

Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 

11 

1 


D. 


P. 

1 

9 
3 

1 


D. 


M. 

1 

5 

1 

1 
2 

1 
2 


D. 


P. 

6 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 

21 


D. 


P. 

10 

1 


D. 


M. 

5 
1 

9 
1 

2 

1 
1 


D. 


P. 

1 

5 

4 
3 

2 


D. 


17-56-75 Unclassified diseases of 
the eye 

Diseases of the Ear. 

17-60-76 Accumulation of ceru- 
men 

17-63- Trauma to membrana 
tympani .... 

17-65-76 Otitis media (acute, 
chronic, suppura- 
tive) 

17-70-76 Vertigo auditiva . . . 

17-72-146 Mastoiditis 

17-73-76 Unclassified diseases of 
the ear 

SECTION XVIII. 

Diseases op the Nose and 
Naso-Pharynx. 

18-3-86 Hypertrophy of bul- 
bous middle turbi" 




18-4-86 Deformity of nose (ac- 








18-5-85 Epistaxis 

18-7- Fracture of nasal bones 
Septum: 

18-9-86 De\aation .... 

18-10-86 Perforation .... 

18-11-86 Abscess 

18-12-86 Spur 

18-13-86 Ozena (atrophic rhini- 
tis) 

18-14-86 Rhinitis (acute, 

chronic) .... 

18-15-86 Vasomotor rhinitis (to 
include hay fever) 

18-18-86 Ulcer of septum . . . 

18-19-86 Sinusitis (acute, 

chronic) .... 
Empyema of antrum . 

18-20-86 Unclassified disease of 
nose and naso- 
pharynx .... 

18-21-143 Furuncle 

18-22-146 Ethmoiditis 

18-23-143 Furunculosis of resti- 
bule 

18-24-145 Eczema of vestibule . 

18-25- Wounds and injuries . 


1 

5 

1 

1 




1 
4 







140 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 
5 
a 

56 

60 
63 

65 
70 
72 

73 

3 

4 
5 

7 

9 
10 
11 
12 

13 

14 

15 
18 

19 

20 
21 

22 

23 
24 
25 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 

Sj-philis 


< 


a 

^ 


'3 


2 




O 


d 


2 


§ 


>> 




"3 




y 


'o 


r 


"3 

o 


J 








5 

2 

1 

63 
6 

1 

7 
1 
3 
14 
1 

2 

16 

4 

2 
3 

3 


a 






















<! 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

7 

3 

1 
5 

1 
3 

4 

1 

31 

2 
13 

1 


F. 

5 

3 
5 

1 
3 

1 

18 

9 

1 


ii. 

1 

1 

1 

1 
3 


F. 

1 

2 

1 

1 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

5 

52 
2 

3 

1 

1 
44 


F. 

7 

52 

4 

3 
72 


M. 

2 

3 
1 

7 

11 
82 
16 

1 

3 

7 

391 

39 

450 

42 

1 

96 

1 

6 
38 


r. 

1 

4 
1 

5 

4 

34 

5 

133 
1 

2 

53 

364 

54 

81 

1 

3 
35 


M. 

1 

1 

2 


F. 
1 

2 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 


F. 




27 

3 

119 
1 
2 

20 

12 

17 
129 
25 

530 
5 
9 
3 

141 

930 

98 

1 

203 
5 

10 

74 



141 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification- of Diseases 
■WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

6 

1 

1 

1 


D. 


F. 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

8 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 

1 

4 


D. 


F. 

1 

1 
1 

2 


D. 


M. 

2 
3 
6 
2 

1 


D. 


F. 

3 

4 
13 
8 

1 


D. 


SECTION XIX. 

Diseases of the Mouth, Lips, 

Cheeks, Phabtits:, Tonsils, 

Palate. 

19_X-99 Abscess of mouth . . 
19-2-99 Abscess of lip . . . . 
19-3-99 Abscess of salivary 




19-4-99 Abscess of cheek . . 

19-8-99 Inflammation of sali- 
vary gland . . . 

19-9-99 Salivary cyst (Ranula) 

19-10-99 Stomatitis (not to in- 
clude poisonings) 

19-11-99 Stomatitis, herpetic 
(canker) .... 

19-12-99 Ulcer of mouth . . . 

19-13- Wounds and injuries of 
mouth 

19-14-99 Unclassified diseases of 


1 
1 










19-16-100 Abscess of pharynx. . 
19-20-100 Elongation of uvula . 
19-21-100 Hypertrophy of ton- 






2 

3 

38 

3 

1 


1 




19-22-99 Enlarged lingual ton- 
sil 

19-23-100 Peritonsillar abscess . 

19-24-100 Tonsilhtis (acute, 

chronic, unclas- 
sified) 

19-25-100 Keratosis tonsilla- 
ris 

19-26-100 Tonsils and adenoids . 

19-27-86 Adenoids 

19-28-86 Adenoids (hypertro- 
phied) 

19-28a-100 Unclassified diseases of 
the tonsUs . . . 

19-29-100 Pharyngitis (acute, 
chronic, unclas- 
sified) 

19-31-100 Vincent's angina . . 

19-33-100 Herpes of pharynx . . 

19-34-100 Neurosis of pharynx . 

19-35-100 Retropharyngeal ab- 
scess 

19-36- Wounds and injuries of 
pharynx . . . . 

19-37-99 Impediment of speech, 
of anatomical ori- 
gin 


2 

17 

1 

1 
2 







142 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

< 
s 

B 
1 

2 

3 

4 

8 
9 

10 

11 
12 

13 

14 
16 
20 

21 

22 
23 

24 

25 
26 
27 

28 

28a 

29 
31 
33 
34 

35 

36 

37 


Neurolog. 


Dermat 
log. 


0- 


Dept. 
Sj-phili 


f 

S 




s 


'.3i 


O 


2 


1 


d 


2 

" 


S 


>; 


1 




£ 


M 


"r 


X 


- 










IB 

Q 

1 
4 

3 
2 

4 

2 
2 

8 

13 

90 

11 
3 

2 

11 

1 

1 
1 


o 
P 

1 












' 










<; 


M. 


D. 


p. 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 
1 

28 
3 

25 

3 

1 

61 


F. 

2 

1 

20 

25 
2 

37 

1 


M. 

21 

16 

5 

2 

1 
3 

2 

1 


F. 

21 

14 

2 

5 

1 
1 

1 

1 


M. 


F. 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 

13 

1 
1 

32 

33 

18 
34 

3 
144 

1 


F. 

13 

1 
1 

52 

36 

12 
25 

127 
3 


M. 

8 
6 

1 

3 

20 

12 
41 

266 

1 
371 
160 

2 

133 
1 

9 

5 

2 


F. 

2 

4 
1 

32 

10 
24 

272 

1 
411 
181 

2 

113 

7 
1 
3 

5 

1 


M. 

1 


F. 

1 

2 


ii. 


F. 


M. 
1 


F. 

1 


M. 


F. 


o 

43 

30 

9 

48 

17 

7 

1 

4 

1 
3 

185 

25 

65 

658 

815 
403 

7 

615 

8 

1 

15 

15 
3 



143 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Dise.\ses 

■WTTH NOS. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 

Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




.M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M 


D. 

1 


F. 

7 

1 

2 
1 


D. 


.M 


D. 


r. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

4 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 

2 

1 


D. 


SECTION XX. 

Diseases of the Jaw, Teeth 
ANo Gums. 

20-1-99 Alveolar abscess . . . 
20-2-99 Pyorrhea alveolaris . . 
20-3-99 Caries of teeth .... 

20-^-99 Gingi-i'itis 

20-5- Fracture of jaw: 


2 
6 




2 
2 
11 




1 
1 

3 

2 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 




Compound . . . . 

20-7-99 Pulpitis 

20-S-99 Pericementitis .... 
20-11-99 Impacted and imbed- 
ded teeth .... 
20-12- Contusion of jaw . . 
20-13-99 Unclassified 

SECTION XXI. 

Diseases of the Tongue. 

21-3-99 Glossitis (acute, 

, chronic) .... 
21-5-99 Leukoplakia . . . . 
21-6-99 Wandering rash . . . 
21-7- Wounds and injuries . 

21-8-99 Ulcer 

21-9-99 Unclassified 

SECTION XXII. 

Diseases op the Esophagus. 

22-2-101 Diverticulum .... 
22-3-101 Foreign body .... 

22-6-101 Stricture 

22-8-103 Cardiospasm .... 

SECTION XXIII. 
Diseases of the Stomach. 

23-2-117 Adhesions 

23-5-103 Cribbing (pneumopha- 
gia) 

23-6-103 Deformity, acquired . 

23-7-103 Dilatation, acute and 
chronic (gastrec- 
tasis) 

23-8-103 Fermentation, gastric . 

23-9-103 Foreign body .... 

23-10-103 Gastritis (unclassified) 

23-11-103 Gastritis, acute ca- 
tarrhal 


2 
1 

1 
1 




2 

1 

1 







144 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

2; 

J 
< 
5 

a 

1 
2 
3 
4 

5 

8 

11 
12 
13 

3 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

2 
3 
6 

8 

2 

5 
6 

7 

9 
10 

11 


Xeurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
SjTDhilis 


< 

C 


"a 


35 


1 




o 


s 




s 






y 
^ 


c 


a 


•r 


T: 

r 


Q 










11 

4 

20 

3 
2 

4 
1 

1 
1 

S 
4 

7 

1 

1 

2 
1 


1 






















< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 



1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

7 

29 

6 

1 
1 

1 

5 
3 

1 

1 

11 
5 


F. 

2 

21 

128 

6 

1 

4 

1 
12 


M. 

26 
3 
6 

7 
3 

1 

1 
2 

4 

1 

1 


F. 

18 

1 
1 

6 

1 

1 
1 

2 
3 

1 


M. 


F. 

2 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 

202 
4 

1 
5 

1 

1 


F. 

1 
1 

221 
2 

2 

1 

6 
1 

1 


M. 

3 
2 

5 

1 
3 

2 

4 

11 

1 


F. 

4 
2 

3 

1 
2 

2 

4 
1 


M. 
1 


F. 


M. 

5 
1 

2 


F. 

1 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 

21 

2 

160 

1 

5 
1 

1 

1 


F. 

34 

4 

316 

2 

1 


o 

Eh 

111 

40 

1063 

23 

13 
5 

1 
8 

10 
1 

1 

4 
14 








3 
5 
3 
2 

4 
16 
23 

6 

6 
5 

2 

1 

2 

24 

5 



145 



Medical and Siirgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification op Dise.4.ses 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 
1 


F. 

2 
18 

8 

3 
2 
2 

4 

1 

21 


D. 

2 


M. 

1 

1 
1 

2 
22 

I 


D. 
1 


F. 

11 
1 

2 

4 
1 
1 

12 

2 

71 

4 
169 
37 
7 
2 
1 

2 

16 

10 


D. 

1 

1 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 

1 


F. 

1 

1 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


23-13-103 Gastritis, chronic ca- 
tarrhal 

23-14-103 Hj-peremesis .... 

23-15-103 Gastroptosis 

23-16-103 Hematemesis .... 

23-18-103 Hj'perchlorhydria . . 

23-20-103 Hj^erohylia gastrica 
(hjTDersecretion) . 

23-21-103 HjTJOchlorhydria . . . 

23-22-103 Dyspepsia 

23-23-103 Dyspepsia, nervous . 

23-24-103 Gastric stasis (hypo- 
motility) .... 

23-26-189 Improper feeding or 
diet 

23-27-103 Neurosis 

23-28-103 Perversion of appetite 
(anorexia nervosa) 

23-30-103 Pylorospasm .... 

23-31-103 Pyloric stenosis . . . 

23-33-103 Vomiting, recurrent . 

23-34-102 Ulcer, peptic .... 
Perforating .... 

23-35- Wounds 


1 

3 

1 

25 

1 
2 
2 

2 
4 

37 




23-36-103 Unclassified diseases of 






2 
2 






SECTION XXIV. 

Diseases of the Intestines. 

24-1-109 Intestinal obstruction: 




3 

1 

15 

2 

125 

17 
71 
34 

1 


1 

4 




Chronic 

Intussusception . . 








24-2-110 Intestinal adhesions . 
24-3-108 Appendicitis 






14 






24-4-108 Appendicitis, acute 
24-5-117 Appendicitis, acute, 

with peritonitis . 
24-6-108 Appendicitis, chronic . 
24-7-108 Appendicitis, subacute 
24-8-110 Cecum mobile .... 
24-9-105 Colitis, acute .... 


2 

6 

2 
6 

1 

1 

4 

12 

2 
17 




4 

5 

1 
2 

3 

10 

1 

12 






24-10-105 Colitis, chronic . . . 

24-11-105 Entero-colitis . . . . 

24-12-105 Mucous colitis . . . 
Ulcerative colitis . . 

24-13-110 Constipation . . . . 

24-14-104 Diarrhea (vmclassified) 

24-15-150 Dilatation of colon, 
congenital. . . . 

24-16-105 Duodenal ulcer (pep- 
tic) 




1 

1 

8 

36 


1 





146 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

■< 

S 
s> 

OD 

13 
14 
15 
16 
18 

20 
21 
22 
23 

24 

26 
27 

28 
30 
31 
33 
34 

35 

36 

2 
3 

4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 
14 

15 

16 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. 

SjTphdl 


of 
is 


J 

o 




o 

■3 


c5 
c 

3 


o 


O 

'S.d 
OP 


ol 




"o 

3 

o 




G-f 


"3 
c 
Q 


J 








a 

3 
21 

1 
33 

5 

4 
4 

2 

9 

3 
1 
2 
91 
4 
2 

4 

10 
3 

1 

1 

49 

4 

202 

21 
251 

71 
8 
5 

10 
1 
3 
8 

47 
1 

2 

75 


-a 

a 

Q 


1 










M. 


D. 


p. 


D. 


M 


D. 


F. 


D 


M. 
1 


D 


F. 


D. 


M. 

5 


F. J 


J. r. 


M 


F 


M 


F. M. F 


M 


F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F 




5 






























3 

1 

2 


3 

153 

9 

5 

125 

4 

2 
16 

2 
115 


5 . 

1 . 

98 . 


. 3 
1 
























11 
























2 










. 1 






1 . . . 








253 


21 . 




















30 


11 . 












1 














17 


59 
6 . 




4 . . . 






1 




5 15 














209 


1 


















11 






1 


















5 


7 
17 . 
























8 


























33 


11 . 
53 ' 


L ... 
' 5 








■ ; 
















1 


5 4 

I 1 
I 2 














7 














6 














16 














180 


























16 
1 


1 . 
14 . 


8 
























9 
























30 


1 ] 


1 
























2 
























2 




























































2 

5 


21 
14 
10 

2 
20 
11 


17 . 
15 li 
121 

1 : 

17 4-J 

2 K 


10 

21 
18 






2 


1 . 
.. ] 


1 
1 














52 














70 














50 
























6 


76 
12 










2 














159 






















44 




























9 
3 
1 
3 




























16 


1 . 


























4 


4 : 


1 
























2 
























8 






























557 
29 


739 31 
13 . 


I 111 


1 




3 


3 3; 


3 38 
5 24 




- 










1520 










92 




1 

7 . . . 






















1 


1 


45 


13 ' 
























65 



147 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. D. 


F. D. 


M. 

5 
1 

4 


D. 


F. D 
1 . 
6 . 


M. D 


. F. 


D. 


M. D 
1 . 


. F. 
. 1 


D. 


M. 

2 

1 


D. 


F. 


1 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


24-17-105 Duodenal ulcer (per- 




24-20-105 Enteritis, acute and 

chronic 

24-21-110 Enteroptosis .... 
24-22-110 Splancnoptosis . . . . 
24-24-110 Fecal fistula .... 


1 .. 

5 .. 
3 .. 
1 .. 


1 .. 

25 . . 
16 . . 




4 . 

1 . 

2 . 

1 . 

3 . 

78 . 

2 . 

3 

7 

3 

23 

2 

8 


1 .. 








24-26- Ruptiire 






2 
1 

1 


1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 












34-27-104 Intestinal autointoxi- 
cation 

24-28-105 Gastroduodenitis . . . 

24-29-105 Gastro-enteritis . . . 

24-32-105 Ulcer of intestine, per- 
forating 

24-33-105 Indigestion, intestinal . 

24-35-110 Impacted feces . . . 

24-36-110 Neurosis, intestinal . . 

24-37-110 Diverticulitis . . . . 

24-38-110 Diverticulum, ac- 


1 .. 

1 .. 






24-41-110 Uiiclassified diseases of 
intestine . . . . 

SECTION XXV. 

Diseases of the Liver and 
Gall Ducts. 

25-1-115 Abscess of liver . . . 
25-3-115 Jaundice (unspecified) 
25-4-115 Catarrhal jaundice . . 
25-6-114 Cholelithiasis . . . . 


1 .. 

2 1 
1 .. 
4 . . 

22 .. 
10 .. 

1 .. 
1 .. 
1 . . 
1 . . 


4 .. 

2 .. 

3 .. 
24 . . 

5 . . 

2 .. 
1 .. 

1 .. 

2 .. 
1 . . 


1 

1 

1 

28 
1 

8 

1 

13 




• 25-7-113 Cirrhosis 








1 






25-8-113 Fatty liver 

25-9-113 Passive congestion . . 
25-10-111 Acute yellow atrophy . 
25-12-115 Hereditary jaundice 

(family jaundice). 

25-13-115 Cholangitis, acute . . 

25-15-1 15 Hydrops of gall bladder 

25-16t115 Cholecystitis, acute . 

Empyema. . . . 










. 25-17-115 Cholecystitis, chronic 
25-18-115 Displacement of livei 
25-19-115 Biliarv fistula . . . . 


3 .. 


5 .. 




25-24-115 Adhesions about gal 

bladder . . . . 

25-26-115 Unclassified 




4 . . 


1 






SECTION XXVI. 

Diseases op the Pancbeas. 

26-4-118 Pancreatitis (acute anc 
chronic) . . . . 






1 


1 


4 

















148 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 

17 

20 
21 
22 

24 
25 
26 

27 
28 
29 

32 
33 
35 
36 
37 

3S 

11 

1 
3 
4 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

12 
13 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 

24 
26 

4 


Neurolo 


g- 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Syphilis 


< 







"3 


C 

o 




O 


_C 


;i 








12: 


1 


i 




-r 


"cj 

G 


J 








6 

3 
36 
23 
9 
1 
2 
3 

1 

2 
3 

1 

9 

3 
3 

8 

155 

19 

2 
1 

2 
6 
2 

16 

4 

44 

2 

13 

1 

5 


o 

5 

1 
1 

2 

1 

1 

3 

1 






















< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


r>. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 

3 

2 
IS 
26 

2 

115 

1 
1 

3 

5 
14 

48 
12 

4 

6 

1 
1 

1 


F. 

1 
1 

17 
12 

2 

1 

25 
2 

7 

5 
6 

82 
1 
2 
1 
1 

2 

1 


M. 

2 

2 
2 

2 

16 
1 
1 

2 
5 


F. 

1 

6 

4 

3 

1 

1 

1 

60 

5 
3 


M. 

3 


F. 

1 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 
1 

21 

5 
1 


F. 

19 
8 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 
1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

7 

3 

41 

45 

2 

6 

3 
1 
3 

181 
3 
1 
2 

10 

12 

35 

207 

14 

3 

6 

1 

15 

9 

1 

1 
1 



149 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Cl.\.ssification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


d. 


r. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

6 
6 

3 
192 

18 

3 

.10 
2 


D. 


F. 

3 

1 

9 

1 
25 

3 

15 
1 

28 

1 

4 
1 

3 
2 

1 
3 
3 

6 


D. 

5 
1 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

1 

1 


D. 
1 


F. 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


26-5 lis Unclassified . . . 
















SECTION XXVII. 

Diseases of the Abdomen and 
Peritoneum in General. 

27-1-187 Ascites 

27-2-149 Diastasis of recti . . 
27-3-109 Hernia (unclassified) . 
27-4-109 Hydrocele of canal of 

Nuck 

27-5-109 Epigastric hernia . . 
27-7-109 Femoral hernia . . . 
27-8-109 Femoral hernia, stran- 


3 




2 
1 






27-9-109 Inguinal hernia . . . 
27-10-109 Inguinal hernia, stran- 


2 










27-11-109 Internal hernia . . . 

27-13-109 Umbilical hernia . . 

27-14-109 Umbilical hernia, 

strangulated . . . 

27-15-109 Ventral hernia (includ- 
ing hernia in scar) 

27-16-109 Ventral hernia, stran- 






3 






27-17-117 Peritonitis (unclassi- 
fied) 












27-18-117 Peritonitis, acute gen- 
eral 

27-19-117 Peritonitis, acute local 

27-20-117 Peritonitis, acute and 

chronic, local and 


1 








7 
2 


5 
2 




27-21-117 Peritonitis, adhesive . 
27-22-117 Peritonitis with adhe- 
sions 

27-23-117 Peritonitis, pelvic . 


2 

1 

1 




1 

2 
1 

1 






27-24-117 Hemoperitoneum . . 

27-25- Injuries and wounds of 
abdomen and ab- 
dominal wall . . 

27-26-118 Subphrenic abscess . 

27-29-117 Abdominal sinus . . 

27-30-117 Unclassified 

SECTION XXVIII. 

Diseases op the Rectum and 
Anus. 

28-1-110 Anal abscess .... 
28-2-110 Fissure of anus . . . 




1 

2 
2 

10 
5 


1 





150 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



121 Neurolog . 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept 
Syph 


Of t 
ilis ° 


f3 


■^ 
•^ 

■& 

3 


Orthope- 
dic 

Gonit.o- 
Urin. 

Child. 
Mod. 

Laryn- 
golog. 

Neurolog. 


'3^ _ 

2 ax' a i 


w 










a 

-Jl M 

5 ■ . 


D 


F 


D 


M. 


D. F 


D 


M. D. 


^ D. p g 
. . . 1 . . 


M. F. 


M. 


F. 


M. F. M. 


F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. 


o 

F. M. F. M. F. H 


























. . . 1 . . 














1 . . 
















. . . 9 . . 


6 










. . . 6 


2 . . 
















1 . . 


1 
1 ... 


2 

4 


2 
3 






5 


3 . . 
















. . . 1 . . 






8 


4 . . 
















1 . . 


























6 2 
.. 6 


11 

7 


1 . 

4 . 


. 1 .. . 


.2 


22 


7 . 
















. . . 15 . . 


. . . 1 . 


19 


8 . . 
















4 . . 






9 . . 
















. . 221 . . 


33 226 


12S 


51 . 


... 7 . 


. 13 1 ... . 


459 


10 . 
















. . 21 . . 






11 . . 




















1 
14 








. . . . 1 


13 . . 
















. . 22 . . 


1 3 

1 

2 4 

1 


17 . 




1 31 40 ... . 


. . . . 107 


14 . . 
















1 . . 




1 


15 . . 
















. . 39 . . 


9 

1 


22 . 
5 . 






. . . 37 


16 . . 
















2 . . 






7 


17 .. 
IS . . 










1 






. . 2 . . 












. . 12 11 














19 . . 
















12 














20 . . 
















2 1 






1 






1 


21 . . 
















3 . . 














22 . . 




















1 








1 


23 . . 
















. . 3 . . 


. . 7 


1 






.. . . 8 


24 . . 
















1 . . 










25 . . 
















6 


2 . .. 


4 


2 . 


1 . . . 




9 


26 . . 
















7 2 








29 .. 
















3 . . 






1 






1 


30 .. 
















. . 15 . . 


10 19 


1 

2 
22 


1 
1 


11... 


. . 1 . . . . 


34 


1 . . 




















3 


2 . . 




1 








. . 11 . 


3 5 


25 . 




1 


56 



















151 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Cl.\ssification of Diseases 
■WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 

Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 

5 
2 


D. 


F. 

6 
1 

5 


D. 


M. 

17 

IS 
12 
28 
10 

6 
3 

1 


D. 


F. 

13 

8 

21 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

2 

1 

2 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


D. 


2S-3-110 Fistida in anus . . . 
2S-4-S3 Hemorrhoids (unclassi- 
fied) 

2S-5-83 Hemorrhoids, external 
28-6-S3 Hemorrhoids, internal 
28-7-110 Ischio-rectal abscess . 

2S-8-110 Proctitis 

28-9-110 Prolapse of rectum 
28-11-110 Stricture of rectum 
28-12-110 Ulcer of rectum . . . 

28-13-110 Unclassified 

28-14- Ruptured sphincter . 

SECTION XXIX. 
Diseases of the Larynx. 

29-6-87 Hysterical aphonia 

29-7-186 Foreign body .... 

29-8- Injury ....... 

29-9-87 Laryngitis (unclassi- 
fied) 

29-10-87 LarjTigitis (acute and 
chronic) .... 

29-11-87 Neurosis of larynx . . 

29-12-87 Edema 






1 








1 

3 


1 


^ 


29-14-87 Paralysis (unclassified) 
29-15-87 Abductor paralysis 
29-16-87 Recurrent paralysis . 
29-17-87 Singer's node .... 
29-18-87 Stenosis 


1 

1 




1 

1 
1 

14 
6 

2 
2 

9 
3 




1 
3 

5 

1 






29-20-87 .Unclassified diseases of 
the larynx . . . 

SECTION XXX. 

Diseases of the Trachea and 
Bronchi. 

30-1-96 Asthma 

30-2-90 Bronchiectasis . . . 

30-3-90 Bronchitis (unclassi- 
fied) 

30-4-90 Bronchitis, chronic 

30-6-90 Bronchitis with em- 
physema .... 

30-7-89 . Bronchitis, acute . . 

30-8-89 Tracheitis 

30-10-98 Stenosis of trachea . . 

30-15-186 Foreign body in bron- 
chus 

30-16-98 Sinus 

30-18- Wounds and injuries . 


8 
4 

1 
2 

6 

8 







152 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

< 
S 

OQ 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

11 

12 

13 

14 

6 

7 
8 

9 

10 
11 
12 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 

20 

1 
2 

3 

4 

6 

7 
8 
10 

15 
16 
18 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. 

SjTjhil 


3f 
IS 


O 


'■5 

o 






O 


O 

r^5 






o 


til 
_o 
"o 

a 

o 

Is 


G 


i 




"E 


o 


>J 








5 

30 

36 
21 
51 
13 

8 
5 

1 

7 

1 
3 
1 
2 

2 

1 

23 
11 

10 
5 

16 
22 

1 

2 

1 


5 
1 






















«1 


M. 


D. 


P. 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 
2 
1 
2 

1 

11 
3 

1 

43 
16 

192 
75 

73 

18 

1 


F. 

10 

1 

20 

1 
1 
1 

2 

3 
11 

41 
3 

109 
19 

25 
2 


M 

53 

64 
39 
31 

1 
1 
8 

2 

1 

1 
1 


F. 

19 

28 
13 
30 

7 
2 
1 

1 


M. 


F. 


M 


F. 


M. 
1 

3 

5 
3 
2 

3 

1 

84 
11 

24 


F. 

1 
1 

6 

9 

11 

SO 
3 

20 


M. 
10 

71 
3 

1 

1 

4 
4 
1 

4 

1 

1 


F. 

5 

57 
5 
1 
1 

2 
6 

1 
1 

1 


M. 


P. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

H 
74 

105 

53 

62 

21 

4 

19 

3 

4 

2 

1 

9 
5 

41 

142 

10 

2 

3 

6 

10 

1 

103 
20 

465 
109 

142 
23 

1 

1 
1 



153 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Medical Surgical Oj^?" 
Classification of Diseases pbuil 

WITH Nos. 


Genito- Child. Laryn- 
Urin. Med. golog. 


M. D. F. D. M. D. P. D. -M. D. P. 


D. M. D. P. D. M. D. p. D. M. D. P. D. 


SECTION XXXI. 

Diseases of the Lxtngs. 
31 1 98 Abscess 10 2 11 4 2 2 


.... 1 1 


31 3 98 Atelectasis (2 'sts.+) 












31-S-94 Infarct (pulmonary 








31 10 94 Edema 13 1 1 


1 2 


31-11-98 Unclassified diseases of 

the lungs . . . . 1.. 3.. 1 1 1 




SECTION XXXII. 

Dise.\ses op the Pleuba and 
Mediastinum. 

32-1-93 Empyema 10 . . 4 21 3 4 2 


1 . . 2 


32-2-93 Hydrothorax ... 3.. 4. 1 




32-3-93 Hemothorax. ... 1 .. 1 








32-6-93 Pyopneumothorax 1 




32-7-93 Pleurisy (unclassified) 13.. S.. 2 .. 3 


1 


32-8-93 Pleurisy, acute . . . 4.. 6 1 


1 


32-9-93 Pleurisy, chronic . . 1 




32-10-93 Pleurisy, acute and 




32-11-93 Pleurisy with adhe- 
sions 




32-12-93 Pleurisy, sero-fibrinous 1 




32-13-93 Mediastinitis . . . . 1 




32-14-85 Unclassified 1 




SECTION XXXIII. 

Diseases op the Kidney and 
Ubeter. 

33-1-122 Abscess of kidney .... 1 3 1 




33-2-122 Perinephritic abscess . 2 . . 2 5 1 


1 . . 1 


33-»-3-122 Acute hematogenous 

infection 1 . . 




33-4-122 Anuria 1 




33-6-189 Polyuria . . . 




33-7-122 Albuminuria ..." 3 3 




33-8- Injuries of kidney . . 3 


.... 1 


33-9-122 Hematuria 3 . 2 1 


3 . . . 


33-10-122 Bacteriuria. Bacilluria 1 




33-13-122 Hemoglobinuria . . 




33-14-124 Pyuria .... 




33-16-122 Hydronephrosis (Uro- 
nephrosis) . . . . 1.. 2.. 1.. 4 


.... 2I. . 1 



154 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

< 

S 

H 
1 

3 

4 
5 

8 

9 

10 

11 

1 
2 
3 

4 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 

11 
12 
13 
14 

1 

2 

3 
4 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
13 
14 

16 


Neurolo 


g- 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj^hilis 


<: 

o 






1 


2 


o 


g 


2 


■6 

o 


>> 


1 


3 

a 




si 




T 


3 


J 








27 

11 

1 

2 
2 
6 

6 

42 

S 
2 
8 

27 

12 

1 

2 

1 

1 

5 
12 

1 
1 

6 
4 
9 
1 

11 


-3 

5 

6 

9 
3 
1 






















;«! 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


r. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

3 

47 
13 

7 
1 

2 
3 

57 
35 
IS 

1 

8 

1 
12 


F. 

3 

1 

13 

7 

4 

1 
1 

20 
5 

S 

7 
2 

1 

1 
7 

1 

1 

1 


M. 

1 

8 

2 
1 

1 


F. 

1 

1 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 

1 
11 

5 
2 


F. 

1 

2 

4 
1 


M. 

1 

5 
1 

1 


F. 

1 

3 

1 

1 

3 


M. 

2 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


o 

Eh 

9 

2 

63 

20 

27 
1 

3 
5 

81 
40 

27 

7 

1 
10 

1 

8 

1 

1 
24 
5 
23 
6 
2 
1 

3 



155 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Ctji.ssiFiCATiON OP Diseases 
■WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




.\i. 
3 

17 

2 

10 

6 
10 

5 
5 

7 

17 

1 
7 
1 
2 

1 
1 

3 


D. 

3 
1 

1 

5 

1 
1 

1 


F. 

17 
2 
13 

7 
14 

5 
7 
1 
4 

3 

19 
5 

2 

1 


D. 
1 
1 
1 

2 

1 
2 


M. 

1 
2 

1 
7 
2 

9 
1 
5 

6 

4 
2 

5 
2 

1 

1 


D. 


P. 

2 

1 

8 
7 

4 
2 
6 

4 

1 

3 

1 
1 

1 


D. 

1 


M. 


D. 


p. 


D. 


M. 

17 

3 
6 

12 
1 
1 
1 

8 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
2 
9 


D. 
1 


P. 
1 

4 

4 

2 
1 

4 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

4 

3 


D. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 

2 
12 


D. 


M. 


D. 


p. 


D. 


33-17-119 Nephritis, acute . . . 

33-18-120 Nephritis, chronic (un- 
specified) .... 

33-19-120 Nephritis, arterioscle- 
rotic 

33-20-120 Nephritis, chronic in- 
terstitial .... 

33-21-122 Nephritis, suppurative 

33-22-119 Nephritis, glomerulo . 

33-23-119 Acute 

33-24-119 Subacute 

33-25-120 Chronic 

33-26-122 Nephroptosis (mova- 
ble kidney) . . . 

33-27-123 Nephrolithiasis . . . 

33-28-120 Uremia, acute .... 

33-29-120 Uremia, chronic . . . 

33-30-120 Cardio-renal insuffi- 
ciency 

33-34-122 Infarct of kidney . . 

33-35-122 Pyelitis 

33-36-122 Pyelonephritis . . . 

33-37-122 Pyonephrosis .... 

33-38-83 Varix of papilla . . . 

33^2-122 Stricture of ureter . . 

33^3-122 Ureteritis 

33-44-123 Calculus in ureter (im- 
pacted) .... 

33-45-123 Ureteral colic (to in- 
clude renal colic) . 

33-47-122 Unclassified diseases of 
kidney and ureter 

SECTION XXXIV. 

Diseases op the Bladder. 

34^1-124 Atony 

34-2-124 Cystitis .- 

34-4-1246 Chronic 

34-5-124 Diverticuliim (ac- 




34-6-124 Foreign body .... 
34-8-124 Enuresis, functional . 
34-9-124 Frequent micturition . 
34-10-124 Painful micturition . 
34-11-124 Incontinence .... 

34-12-124 Retention 

34-13-123 Calculus 


1 




1 






34-15-124 Ulcer 








34-17-125 Fistula 

34-18- Wounds, injiu-ies and 

rupture .... 
34-19-124 Unclassified diseases of 

the bladder . . . 













156 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 
Z 

< 

5 
a 
m 

17 

18 

19 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 

26 
27 
28 
29 

30 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
42 
43 

44 

45 

47 

1 
2 
4 

5 

6 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

15 

17 

18 

19 


Xeurolo 


g- 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
S>T)hilis 


< 




S 


'5; 

X 


3" 




i 


1 


2 


S 


I 




y 
Z 


i 


u 


=■ 


/: 














14 

41 

5 

25 

13 

24 

19 

47 

8 

11 

20 

1 

55 

17 

26 

1 

1 

2 

25 

9 

2 

1 
12 

1 

3 
2 

1 

3 

10 

17 

1 

1 

4 


1 
5 
2 

1 

3 
4 

1 

1 
1 


















1 


1 




M. 

2 


D. 


r. 


v>. 


M. 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 

1 


ii. 


D. 


F. 

1 

1 


D. 


M. 

9 

76 

2 

9 

2 

4 

30 

18 
4 

1 
1 

1 

9 
1 

2 

1 


F. 
11 

45 
2 

25 

1 
1 

5 
3 

7 

20 

1 

2 

12 


M. 

2 
2 

9 

2 

1 

1 

2 


F. 

1 

7 
IS 

1 

1 
1 
1 

3 
2 


M. 



1 


F. 

1 
1 


M. 

7 
61 

9 

1 
7 

3 
4 

12 
1 

2 

1 
6 
23 
4 
2 
3 
5 

1 
2 


F. 

1 

8 
18 

29 
2 
1 

2 
3 

2 

15 

1 

10 
11 
13 

2 

1 


M. 

1 

3 

1 

2 

1 

38 
1 


F. 

2 
3 

2 

1 

1 
IS 

33 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 

1 

2 


F. 

1 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


^ 




1 














23 

128 

4 

34 

1 

1 

5 

12 

10 

31 

166 

1 

22 

72 
4 
13 

2 

11 

2 

12 

44 

1 

3 
1 
97 
35 
16 
18 
3 
12 

3 
4 



157 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification' of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

3 
22 

1 

7 

2 

22 
1 

18 
3 


D. 

1 


F. 

5 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

4 

20 

6 

1 

1 
1 

3 
3 

24 

3 

1 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


-M. 

1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


SECTION XXXV. 

Diseases of- the Urethra 
(Male and Female). 

35-1-125 Caruncle 

35-3-125 Extravasation of urine 
35-4-125 Fistula 






35-6-125 Stricture 

35-7-125 Periurethral abscess . 

35-9-123 Calculus 

35-11-125 Urethritis 

35-12-125 Acute 

35-14- Wounds, injuries and 
rupture .... 

SECTION XXXVI. 

DlSRASES OF THE MaLE GEN- 
ERATIVE Organs. 

General. 

36-1-127 Impotence 

36-2-127 SteriUty 

36-3-127 Nocturnal emissions . 
36-6-127 Unclassified 

Penis. 

36-7-127 Abscess 

36-8-127 Balanitis 

36-12-150 Phimosis 


3 










36-13-127 Paraphimosis .... 
36-14-127 Venereal warts . . . 
36-15-127 Unclassified 

Prostate. 

36-16-126 Abscess 

36-17-126 Atrophy (Fibrosis) . . 

36-18-126 Calculus 

36-19-126 "Obstructing pros- 
tate." "Hyper- 
trophy."_ "Ade- 
noma." 

36-20-126 Prostatitis 

36-21-126a Acute .... 


1 

4 
1 










36-22-1266 Chronic 

Seminal Vesicles. 
36-26-127 Vesiculitis 

Scrotum. 

36-29-127 Hydrocele 

36-30-127 Hydrocele of cord . 
36-31-127 Hematocele 













158 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

2: 
>j 

s 

m 

1 
3 
4 

7 

9 

11 

12 

14 

1 
2 
3 
6 

7 
8 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 
22 

26 

29 
30 
31 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Sj-philis 


< 




h 


'Si 


o 

a 

o 


O 

•|.s 
c5 


2 


■d 

?! 


> 


ti 

O 

"o 


c 


c 


1 


Q 


"3. 


c 


J 








5 

5 
1 
8 
46 
6 

1 

1 

9 
1 

6 
3 

50 
1 
1 

21 
4 


1 






















< 


M. 


D. 


F 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 
1 
1 
1 

4 

1 

4 
1 
3 

4 

5 

4 

3 


F. 

4 


M. 

1 

1 

1 

5 

76 

8 

1 

1 

1 

31 

7 
1 


F. 

4 
1 
1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 

8 

1 
3 

3 

6 


M. 

1 

30 

5 

2 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 
1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

5 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 

17 






4 
102 
9 
5 
6 
25 

5 

2 
2 

9 
15 
8 
5 
2 

6 
2 

52 

122 

4 

19 

S 

38 

4 


6 

107 

11 

9 
11 
26 

10 
1 
5 
2 

1 

24 

121 

16 

6 

3 

6 
2 

57 

126 

4 

19 

15 

77 
9 
5 



169 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
•WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

16 

1 
1 

2 

7 
1 

1 


D. 


F. 

1 
1 

1 

15 

6 

20 

3 
2 

2 
1 

5 
4 
3 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

2 

2 

1 
1 


D. 


F. 

1 

2 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F, 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


36-32-127 Spermatocele .... 








36-34-127 Abscess 












36 36 127 Unclassified . . . 












Testicle. 

36-37-127 Epididymitis .... 

36-38-1270 Acute 

36-39-1276 Chronic 


1 










36^0-127 Orchitis 

36-42-127b Chronic 

36-43-127 Torsion of spermatic 

cord 

36-44-127 Abscess of testicle . . 
36-45-127 Atrophy of testicle . . 
36-46-127 Unclassified 












SECTION XXXVII. 

Diseases of the Female Gen- 
erative Organs. 

Vulva. 
37-1-132 Abscess, or sepsis . . 
37-2-132 Abscess of Bartholin's 

gland 

37-3-132 Vulvitis 

37-4-132a Acute 

37-6-132 Vulvo-vaginitis . . . 
37-10- Wounds and injuries . 
37-11-132 Unclassified 

Vagina. 

37-12-132 Abscess 

37-13-124 Cystocele 






1 
1 

1 






37-14-110 Rectocele 

37-15-132 Cystocele and rectocele 
37-16-186 Foreign body .... 

37-18-132 Vaginismus 

37-19-125 Vesico-vaginal fistula . 
37-20-110 Recto-vaginal fistula . 
37-21-132 Atresia (non-congeni- 
tal) 

37-23- Wounds 

37-24-132 Unclassified 

Uterus. 

37-26-130 Endocervicitis .... 

37-27-130 Erosion 

37-28-130B Anteflexion of cervix . 









160 



Medical and Surgical Statistics, 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



c 

2; 

< 

S 
m 

32 
33 
34 
35 
36 

37 
38 
39 
40 
42 

43 

44 
45 
46 

1 

2 
3 
4 
6 
10 
11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
18 
19 
20 

21 
23 

24 

26 
27 

28 


Neurolog. 


Dermato- 
log. 


Dept. of 

Syphilis 


< 




u 


L 


c; 




c 


:r 


?! 


Urn 


bi 

_c 


ST 
C 


Q 




"0 

a 



"B. 


1 

a 

a 


J 








18 

1 
1 

2 
10 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 
18 

6 
20 

1 

4 
2 

2 

1 

7 
4 
3 


-3 






















< 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 


D. 


M. 

2 
4 

1 


F. 
1 

8 
1 

1 
25 
23 

4 

1 

12 
11 
10 


M. 

1 

23 
2 

4 
2 

1 

1 

1 


F. 

» . 

2 
6 

6 

1 

62 
30 

1 

1 

20 
3 
11 


M. 


F. 


M. 

7 

37 

1 

14 
4 

2 

3 

1 


F. 

1 

1 

1 

27 

1 

11 

5 

1 

1 

1 

84 
8 


M. 


F. 

5 

1 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 



Eh 

10 

64 

3 

18 
6 

3 

4 

1 
1 
1 

3 

7 

1 

1 

46 

2 

2 

98 

58 

2 

6 

1 
1 
1 

116 
22 
21 



161 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification op Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 

Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




.M. 


D. 


F. 

1 

1 
1 

2 
1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 
1 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 

16 
14 

1 
83 

7 
33 

1 

19 
4 
7 
10 
10 

1 

2 
2 

6 

14 

56 

28 

5 

2 

1 
1 
3 

14 

3 
2 

1 
7 

2 

1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


37-30-130B Prolapse 

37-31-130B Procidentia 

37-32-130B Retroflexion .... 
37-33-1 30S Retroversion .... 
37-34-130.4 Endometritis .... 
37_36-i30A Chronic 




37-37-130.4. Septic endometritis 

(non-puerperal) . 

37-38-130A Hypoplastic endome- 
tritis 

37^1-130A Chronic metritis . . . 

37^3-1305 Pelvic ceUulitis . . . 

37-^5-1305 Pelvic abscess .... 

37-46-128 Metrorrhagia .... 

37-47-130 Hypertrophy of cer- 
vix 

37-48-130 Fibrosis 

37-49-130 Stricture of uterine 
canal 

37-50-130 Unclassifie(i 

Fallopian Tubes. 

37-51-132 Salpingitis (unclassi- 
fied) 

37-52-132 Acute 

37-53-132 Chronic 

37-54-132 Pyosalpinx 

37-55-132 Hydrosalpinx .... 
37-56-132 Hematosalpinx . . . 
37-58-132 Unclassified 

Ovary. 

37-59-132 Prolapse 

37-60-132 Abscess '. 

37-67-132 Pelvic adhesions . . . 

General and Functional. 

37-69-130 Amenorrhea . . . . 
37-70-130 Dysmenorrhea . . . 

37-71-130 Menopause 

37-72-128 Menorrhagia . . . . 
37-73-130 Menstruation . . . . 

37-75-130 Irregular 

37-76-132 Sterility 

37-77-130 Leucorrhea 

Breast. 
37-81-133 Abscess (non-puer- 








37-84-133 Hypertrophy . . . . 













162 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



6 

Z 
J 

<: 

s 

■Jl 

30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
36 

37 

38 
41 
43 
45 
46 

47 
48 

49 
50 

51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
58 

59 
60 

67 

69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
75 
76 
77 

81 

84 


Neurolog. ^erm 


ato- Dept. of h 
Syphilis ^ 




'Si 

3 

CO 




^ 


■~-) 


u, 


5S 


> 


si 




o 

3 
o 


k 


It 


C 
a 


T 


3 

C 

o 

Q 


J 




-0 

5 


















< 


M. D. F. D. M. D. 


F. D. il. D. F. D. -^ 

17 


\I. F. i 
. 6 . 


I. F. 

. 28 


ii. 


F. 


il. 


F. 

2 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F 


O 

36 




. . 14 






2 




7 . 
45 . 


1 

. 105 
. 15 








1 
7 


























8 




S4 


151 




9 




. 19 . 


41 










1 






2 

5 
. 29 

1 
. 37 

3 

. 50 

. 8 

. 38 

2 

1 

1 

. 9 

5 
. 44 
. 8 
27 
1 
. 1 
. 27 
. 11 

. 3 
2 








2 

1 

1 

3 

1 

2 

1 
6 












2 


















19 






4 






9 


2 




10 




. 1 . 
. 11 . 

. 2 . 
. 25 . 


S 




12 


40 




2 


3 






63 




2 










3 


4 




6 




. 20 . 
. 4 . 
. 10 . 


73 




14 


12 




56 


49 




28 


7. 










1 




2 




. 1 . 








1 




1 






1 




1 




. 1 . 

. 25 . 
. 23 . 
. 62 . 
. 17 . 
. 2 . 
. 4 . 
. 85 . 
. 32 . 






3 


10 




1 

14 

2 

4 

2 

1 

7 

3 


30 

69 

72 

44 

3 

5 

113 

49 

3 




1 






? 



























163 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


f. 
2 

18 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

9 
9 

1 

18 

1 

35 
19 

3 

24 
37 

46 

1 
1 
1 

4 

1 


D. 

1 
1 


-M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 

1 
1 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


37-85-133 Mastitis (non-puer- 
peral) 

37-86-133 Acute 

37-87-133 Chronic 

37-88-133 Cystic disease .... 

37-90-133 Paget's disease of nip- 
ple 

37-91-133 Unclassified 

SECTION XXXVIII. 

Puerperal State. 

38-1-134A Pregnancy 

38-4-134 Accidents of pregnancy 

38-5-134 Hyperemesis . . . . 

38-6-138 Albuminuria of preg- 
nancy 

38-9-134 Miscarriage 

38-10-134 Extra-uterine preg- 
nancy 

38-11-134B Abortion . 




38-12-134 Abortion, threatened . 
38-17-134 Premature delivery. . 
38-19-135 Placenta previa . . . 
38-20-135 Retained secundines . 
38-21-136 Laceration of cervix . 
38-22-136 Laceration of perineum 
38-23-136 Laceration of cervix 

and perineum . . 
38-24-136 Rupture of uterus . . 
38-26-137 Pelvic abscess .... 
38-27-138 Toxemia of pregnancy 
38-29-136 Subinvolution .... 
38-30-141 Mammary abscess . . 

38-33-141 Galactocele 

38-34-141 Mastitis, acute laota- 

tive 

38-35-141 Mastitis, subacute lac- 

tative 

38-36-141 Mastitis, chronic lac- 

tative 

38-37-141 Unclassified diseases of 

the puerperal 

state 

SECTION XXXIX. 

Ill-Defined, ob Unclassified 
Diseases. 

39-3-189 Fever (cause un- 
known) .... 

39-4-189 Headache (cause un- 
known) .... 


1 







164 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 
2: 

< 

S 
m 

85 
86 
87 
SS 

90 
91 

1 
4 
5 

6 
9 

10 
11 
12 
17 
19 
20 
21 
22 

23 
24 
26 
27 
29 
30 
33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

3 

4 


Neurolog. 


Derniato- 
log. 


Dept. of 
Syphilis 


J 

< 

O 




"3 
■3 




o 

rfi 


a 

O 


o 
OP 


3 
U 




1^ 

H-4 tC 


o 

0) 


CI 

E 
Q 




0;2 


"3 

a 
Q 


>J 








5 
11 

9 

1 

36 
1 
1 

35 

19 
1 

3 

24 
39 

46 
2 
2 
2 
1 
4 

1 

1 
2 


T3 

0) 

5 

1 

1 
























M 


D. 


F 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 

3 

64 


F. 

2 

4 
1 

2 

92 

13 

44 
22 

5 

1 

1 
110 


M. 

1 


F. 

3 

3 

16 

4 

2 
2 

SO 

12 

7 

92 
105 

1 
3 

1 

2 

4 

1 


M. 


P. 


M. 
1 


F. 

17 

9 

9 

2 
12 

7 
1 


M. 

3 


F. 

3 


M. 


F. 

4 


M. 

6 


F. 
1 

20 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


O 
Eh 

5 

3 

20 

5 

2 

4 

190 

1 
25 

8 

1 
1 

1 
145 
136 

1 

10 

13 

1 

7 

3 

4 

1 

4 
^13 



































165 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



House 



Classification of Diseases 
WITH Nos. 


Medical 


Surgical 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Genito- 
Urin. 


Child. 
Med. 


Laryn- 
golog. 




M. 


D. 


F. 

1 

3 

9 

1 

4 

18 

1 
1 

1 


D. 


M. 

13 

1 
6 

1 
1 


D. 

16 
2 


F. 

5 

1 

1 
5 

1 

1 
1 
2 

1 


D. 

14 

1 


M. 


D. 


F. 
1 


D. 

O 


M. 


D. 

1 

O 


F. 

CD 


D. 

O 


M. 

3 
1 

1 

o 

00 


D. 

O 


F. 
1 

2 
1 

1 

00 

m 


D. 

1 

00 


M. 
1 

3 

00 

CO 


D. 


F. 

CO 


D. 


39-5-189 Insomnia 

39-6-189 Malnutrition (2 yrs. +) 




39-9-189 Unknown disease. No 
diagnosis .... 

39-10-189 Skin donor 

39-12-189 Operation wound . . 

39-15-189 No disease 

39-16-55 Diabetes insipidus . . 

39-17-55 Hemophilia 

39-18-55 Purpura (including 

hemorrhagica and 
rheumatica) . . 

39-19-154 Senility (not arterio- 
sclerotic) . . . . 

39-20-55 Acidosis (non-diabetic) 

39-22-177 Starvation 

39-23-189 Debility 

39-25-189 Hemorrhage, post-op- 
erative 

39-26-187 Anasarca (dropsy) . . 


4 

6 
2 

2 

12 
2 


1 




39-27-149 Myalgia 

39-31-189 Acute delirium . . . 


1 






Total 

Grand total .... 


CO 


1^ 


en 


s 


(M 


CO 


C3 








O 
03 


O 



166 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

House (Continued) 



Out-Patient Department 



d 

< 

S 

a 

Oj 

5 
6 

8 

9 
10 
12 
15 
16 
17 

IS 

19 
20 
22 
23 

25 
26 

27 
31 


Neurolo 


g- 


Dermat 
log. 


o- 


Dept. ol 
Sj-philis 


< 


■3 




'J2 




a 


,-1 


c; 


i 

'c 


\, 


^ 


s 


>> 


bi 

3; 


1 

C 




ii 










1 

d 


Q 


J 








5 
1 

19 

8 

5 

29 

1 

4 

8 

5 

1 

31 

6 
3 
2 
1 

1 

G5 
CO 
lO 

o 


C 
30 

1 
1 

5 

10 

-^ 






















H 

4 
8 

682 

1 

417 

343 

1 

12 


M. 

05 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 
1 


D. 


F. 


D. 


M. 


D. 

1 


F. 


D. 


M. 

1 

155 

11 

108 
1 

3 

3 

3 
95 

1 

27 

CO 


F. 


4 

189 

4 
88 

4 

1 
349 

2 

«5 
10 






M. 

29 

1 

284 

22 


F. 

30 

89 
30 


M. 

21 

1 

9 


F. 

28 

7 

1 
2 

CO 


M. 

28 

3 
15 

6 


F. 

17 

3 

12 

6 

CO 
10 


M. 
1 

42 
11 

1 

4 
2 

1 






F. 

3 

35 

10 
15 

3 

2 
1 
4 

1 

00 

CO 
IM 


M. 

12 

4 



LO 


F. 

15 
3 

?5 


M. 

1 

3 
11 

4 

CO 


F. 

70 

1 

S 

3 

2 

■•0 


.M. 

2 
1 

?5 


F. 

2 


M. 
4 

c 


F. 

2 
1 

CO 


M. 

05 


F. 

CO 


1 

CO 
10 


1 
18 

CO 


2 

7 

§ 


10 

21 

4 

449 

1 
1 

39 


O 


in 

CO 


O 


t^ 


■* 




ifj 


CO 


CO 


CO 

CO 


-# 


10 
CO 


CO 


9944I 





167 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 



TABLE B. 

REPORT OF MEDICAL AND SURGICAL DISEASES L\ 

TERMS OF INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION. 



1 

2 

4 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
14 
17 
18 
19 
20 

22 
24 
25 
26 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
33 
34 

36 
37 

38 
39A 

39C 

39F 
40A 



Typhoid fever . . . . 

Typhus fever 

Malaria 

Measles • 

Scarlet fever 

'Whooping cough . . . 

Diphtheria and croup 

Influenza 

Dysentery 

Leprosy 

Erysipelas 

Other epidemic diseases 

Purulent infection and 
septichaemia . . . . 

Anthrax 

Tetanus 

Mycoses 

Pellagra 

Tuberculosis of lungs 

Acute miliary tubercu- 
losis 

Tuberculous meningitis 

Abdominal tuberculosis 

Pott's disease .... 

White swellings . . . 

Tuberculosis of other 



organs 

Rickets 

Syphilis 

Gonococcus infection 
Carcinoma of buccal 

cavity 

Epithelioma of buccal 

cavity 

Sarcoma of buccal cavity 
Carcinoma of stomach, 

liver 



51 
1 

17 
7 
4 
4 
3 
5 
5 
1 

19 

35 

24 
2 
1 
5 
8 
112 



39 

44 

48 

123 

40 

353 



43 

42 
4 

102 



40C 

40F 
41A 



41F 
41G 

42A 
42C 
42G 



42H 
43A 

44A 
44B 
44C 
44F 
45A 



45B 



45C 



45E 



45F 



Epithelioma of esoph- 
agus 

Sarcoma of stomach . . 

Carcinoma of perito- 
neum, intestines, rec- 
tum 

Sarcoma of peritoneum, 
intestines, rectum . . 

Mixed malignant 

growth of peritoneum, 
intestines, rectum . 

Carcinoma of female 
genital organs . . 

EpitheUoma of female 
genital organs . . 

Mixed malignant 
growth of female 
genital organs . . 

Hydatid mole ... 

Carcinoma of breast . 

Carcinoma of skin . . 

Endothelioma of skin 

Epithelioma of skin . 

Sarcoma of skin . . . 

Carcinoma of other or- 
gans and of organs 
not specified . . . 

Endothelioma of other 
organs and of organs 
not specified . . . 

Epithelioma of other or- 
gans and of organs 
not specified . . . 

Hypernephroma of 
other organs and of 
organs not specified 

Sarcoma of other or- 



47 



64 



62 



11 



168 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table B — Medical and Surgical Diseases, 1915 — Continued. 



gans and of organs 
not specified . . . . 
45G MLxed malignant growth 
of other organs and of 
organs not specified 

46 Other tumors (tumors 

of the female genital 
organs excepted) . . 

47 Acute articular rheuma- 

tism 

48 Chronic rheumatism 

and gout 

49 Scurvj' 

50 Diabetes 

51 Exophthalmic goitre . . 

52 Addison's disease . . . 

53 Leuchasmia 

54 Anemia, chlorosis . . . 

55 Other general diseases . 

56 Alcoholism (acute or 

chronic) 

57 Chronic lead poisoning . 

58 Other chronic occupa- 

tion poisonings . . . 

59 Other chronic poison- 

ings 

60 Encephalitis 

61(1) Simplemeningitis . . . 
61(2) Cerebrospinal menin- 
gitis 

62 Locomotor ataxia . . . 

63 Other diseases of the 

spinal cord 

66 Paralysis without speci- 

fied cause 

67 General paralysis of in- 

sane 

68 Other forms of mental 

alienation 

69 Epilepsy 

71 Convulsions of infants 

(under 5) 

72 Chorea 



26 



117 

83 

101 

1 

103 

37 

5 

14 
87 
43 

9 
6 



73A 
73B 

74 

75 

76 

77 
78 
79 

80 
81 



82 
83 

84 
85 

86 

87 
88 

89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 

96 
97 



Hysteria 

Neuralgia and neuritis . 

Other diseases of the 
nervous system . . . 

Diseases of the eyes and 
their annexa .... 

Diseases of the ears . . 

Pericarditis 

Acute endocarditis . . 

Organic diseases of the 
heart 

Angina pectoris . . . . 

Diseases of the arteries, 
atheroma, aneurysm, 
etc 

Embolism and throm- 
bosis 

Diseases of the veins 
(varices, hemorrhoids, 
phlebitis, etc.) . . . 

Diseases of the lym- 
phatic system . . . . 

Hemorrhage; other dis- 
eases of the circula- 
tory system . . . . 

Diseases of the nasal 
fossae 

Diseases of the larynx . 

Diseases of the thyroid 
body 

Acute bronchitis . . . 

Chronic bronchitis . . 

Bronchopneumonia . . 

Pneumonia 

Pleurisy 

Pulmonary congestion, 
pulmonary apoplexy . 

Asthma 

Pulmonary emphysema 

Other diseases of the 
respiratory system 
(tuberculosis ex- 
cepted) 



19 
26 

118 

51 
63 1 

17' 2 
15 3 

318 26 
8 1 



156 
11 

174 
26 

123 



52 
14 

11 
21 
41 
58 
94 



4 

23 

6 



24 



169 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table B — Msdical and Surgical Diseases, 1915 



Continued. 



99A Diseases of the teeth 
and gums 

99B Diseases of the mouth 
and annexa .... 

100 Diseases of the pharynx 

101 Diseases of the esoph- 

agus 

102 Ulcer of the stomach . 

103 Other diseases of the 

stomach (cancer ex- 
cepted) 

104 Diarrhea and enteritis 

(under 2 years) . . 

105 Diarrhea and enteritis 

(over 2 years) . . . 

107 Intestinal parasites . . 

108 Appendicitis and typh- 

litis 

109(1) Hernia 

109(2) Intestinal obstruction 

110 Other diseases of the 

intestines 

111 Acute yellow atrophy 

of liver 

112 Hydatid tumor of the 

liver 

113 Cirrhosis of the liver . 

114 Biliary calculi . . . . 

115 Other diseases of the 

liver 

116 Diseases of the spleen . 

117 Simple peritonitis (non- 

puerperal) 

118 Other diseases of the 

digestive system 
(cancer and tuber- 
culosis excepted) . . 

119 Acute nephritis . . . 

120 Bright's disease . . . 

122 Other diseases of the 

kidney and annexa . 

123 Calculi of the urinary 

passages 



30 

25 
132 

7 
71 



91 



106 
33 

514 

331 

13 

242 

1 

5 

20 

131 

95 
5 

65 



13 

27 
110 

151 

85 



124 
125 



126 

127 

128 
129 
130 
131 
132 

133 

134A 
134B 

135 
136 

137 

141 

142 
143 
144 
145 

146 

147 



Diseases of the bladder 

Diseases of the ure- 
thra, urinary ab- 
scess, etc 

Diseases of the pros- 
tate 

Nonvenereal diseases 
of the male genital 
organs 

Uterine hemorrhage 
(nonpuerperal) . . 

Uterine tumor (non- 
cancerous) . . . 

Other diseases of the 
uterus 

Cysts and other tu- 
mors of the ovary 

Salpingitis and other 
diseases of the fe- 
male genital organs 

Nonpuerperal diseases 
of the breast (cancer 
excepted) .... 

Normal labor . . . 

Accidents of preg- 
nancy 

Puerperal hemorrhage 

Other accidents of 
labor 

Puerperal septichse- 
mia 

Puerperal diseases of 
the breast .... 

Gangrene 

Furuncle 

Acute abscess . . . 

Other diseases of the 
skin and annexa . 

Diseases of the bones 
(tuberculosis ex- 
cepted) 

Diseases of the joints 
(tuberculosis and 



52 

65 
56 

45 
15 
83 
212 
61 

144 

30 
34 

57 
3 

112 

2 

5 

10 

29 

125 

246 
146 



170 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table B — Medical and Surgical Diseases, 1915 — Continued. 



Q 



rheumatism ex- 
cepted) 

149 Other diseases of the 

organs of locomo- 
tion 

150 Congenital malforma- 

tions (stillbirths not 
included) : 

150(1) Hydrocephalus . . 

150(2) Congenital malforma- 
tions of the heart 

150(3) Other congenital mal- 
fonnations . . . 

151 Congenital debility, 

icterus, and scle- 
rema: 

151(1) Premature birth (not 
stillborn) .... 

151(2) Congenital debiUty. 

154 Senility 

164 Poisoning by food . 

165 Other acute poison- 

ings 

167 Burns (conflagration 

excepted) .... 

168 Absorption of deleteri- 

ous gases .... 



74 



87 



4 
127 

1 

1 

65 

3 

2 

6 
21 



170 Traumatism by fire- 

arms 

171 Traumatism by cut- 

ting or piercing in- 
struments 

172 Traumatism by fall . . 

173 Traumatism in mines 

and quarries . . . . 

174 Traumatism by ma- 

chines 

175 Traumatism by other 

crushing (vehicles, 
railways, landslides, 
etc.) 

176 Injuries by animals . . 

177 Starvation 

179 Effects of heat . . . . 

185 Fracture and disloca- 

tion (cause not spe- 
cified) , 

186 Other external violence 

187 Ill-defined organic dis- 

ease 

189 Not specified or ill-de- 
fined 

Total, all causes 
Grand total 



13 

15 
109 

1 

13 



25 

94 

12 
133 



10 



8654 
9059 



405 



171 



TABLE C. 
SURGICAL OPERATIONS. 



FROM JANUARY 1, 1915, TO DECEMBER 31, 1915, INCLUSIVE. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 

(All nximbered footnotes refer to 

Table D.) 
(All starred footnotes wilt be foiind 

at end of Table C.) 


en 


J 

a 


'3 

e2 


3 

o 

a 

3 


-6 
> 


> 
a> 

3 

o 


s 


O t-i 

1— ( 1-3 


"3 


OPERATIONS ON THE BLOOD 

\^SSELS. 

Total number . . . 




9 

1 

1 

8 

5 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 


1 

13 

1 

1 

8 

1 

5 

1 
5 
1 
2 
2 

1 
2 

2 
7 

53 


54 












Excision of aneurismal varix of scalp 1 1 


1 
13 

1 








1 


Excision of varicose veins of leg . . 
Incision and drainage of septic 
thrombus of anterior tibial artery 
Ligation: 

of innominate and common car- 
otid arteries, for aneurism . . 


4 








13 








1 




1° 




1 


of internal iliac arteries, for in- 
operable carcinoma of cervix 
uteri 




6 


2 
1 

2 


8 


of popliteal arterj* and vein, for 
aneurism 


1 






1 


of superior thjToid vessels, for 
exophthalmic goitre .... 
Transfusion of blood 


1 
2 

2 

1 

2 
5 


23 


2 


1^ 




5 


for pernicious anemia .... 


1 
5 

1 








1 


for secondary anemia .... 








5 


for general weakness 








1 


for hemophiha 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1' 




9 


for hemorrhage, post-operative 




1 


9 


for hemorrhage from extra-uter- 
ine pregnancy 






1 


for hemorrhage from umbilicus 




1 
2 
3 

37 






?. 


for purpura hemorrhagica . . 






? 


for shock 


2 
11 


2d 
5 




7 






Carried foncard 


19 


34 


53 



a See No. 11.3. 



6 See No. 114. 



c See No. 162. 



d See Nos. 163 and 164. 



172 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 







Admi 


tted 






Discharged. 




Surgical Operations. 




in 

V 

a 


"3 


"3 

a 


1 


1 
3 

o 


.1 

Q 


—TO 

a .-1 

m . 

a c3 

l-Hl-S 




Brought forward 

OPERATIONS OX THE L\':M- 
PHATIC SYSTEM. 

On the Cervxcal Nodes. 

Total number . . 


19 


34 


53 


14 

4 
3 


37 


11 


5 




53 


Excision: 

for calcification 


1 
3 


1 

1 
8 


1 

1 

1 

11 


1 

1 

1 

10 








1 


for diagnosis 

for malignant lymphoma . . . 
for tuberculosis 

On the Axillary Nodes. 

Total number . . 








1 








1 




1° 




11 


Excision: 

for adenitis 


1 


1 
2 


1 
1 
2 


1 

1 
2 








1 


for malignant lymphoma . . . 
for tuberculosis 








1 








9 


On the Inguinal Nodes. 

Total number . . 


1 • ■ " 










Excision: 

for adenitis 


1 
1 

1 


1 


1 
1 
1 

1 








1 


1 


for malignant lymphoma . . . 
for sarcoma * • • 


68 
17 


1 

1 

1 






1 








1 


On the Iliac Nodes 

Laparotomy with excision of iliac 
nodes, for sarcoma 








1 


OPERATIONS ON THE 
GLANDS. 

On the ]\LvM.M.tRT Gland. 

Total number . . 










Amputation of breast 

for abscess, chronic 




1 


1 














1 








1 




i 




















1 







Carried foncard 



27, 49 7( 



58 11 



V 76 



a See No. 61. 

173 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Brought fonvard 
Amputation of breast: 

for carcinoma 

for cystic disease 

for fibroma 

for hypertrophy 

for mastitis, chronic .... 
Amputation of breast with dissection 
of axilla 

for carcinoma 

for cyst-adenoma 

for cystic disease 

for mastitis, chronic .... 
Excision: 

of fibroma 

of specimen for diagnosis . . 

of tissue, for mastitis, chronic 
Incision and drainage of abscess . . 
Secondary suture of granulating 
wound 



Admitted. 



27 



On the Salivaey Glands. 
On the Parotid Gland. 

Total number . 
. Excision : 

of chondroma 

of cyst 

Incision and drainage of abscess . 

On the Sublingual Glands. 

Total number . 
Excision of dermoid cyst .... 
Partial excision of ranula, and re- 
section of gland 



On the Thyroid Gland. 

Total number 
Excision of cyst 



fe 



76 



41 



33 



Discharged. 



P5 



rt 



11 



00 « 

O 1-1 



Carried forward 



31 126 157 



133 13 



2 157 



a See Nos. 2 to 4. 

174 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


1 


a 


"3 


3 

a 

3 


> 


-d 

3 
1 




03 ^ 
O ^ 

^4 




Brought forward 

Hemithyroidectomy 

for carcinoma . . .... 


31 

1 

1 
1 
2 


126 

3 

12 
6 
1 

1 

1 


157 

. 1 

4 

13 

8 

1 

1 

1 


28 


133 


13 


9 


2 


157 


1 

4 

12 

7 








1 


for cyst-adenoma 

for goitre 








4 




1" 
1* 


1 
1 


13 


exophthalmic 

for inflammntioTi, chrnnif' 


8 
1 


for malignant disease (unspeci- 
fied) 










1 


Thyroidectomy 

for adenomata 




2 














r 




1 


for exophthalmic goitre . . . 
On the Spleen. 

Total number 


1 1 


11 


1 




1 




■ 










Laparotomy mth drainage, for rup- 
ture 


1 

1 

7 


1 
1 


1 

1 
8 
1 






Id 




1 


Splenectomy 

for hypertrophy 

for pernicious anemia .... 
for splenic anemia 


10 








1 

7 


1 


1" 




1 

8 
1 


OPERATIONS ON THE NERV- 
OUS SYSTEM. 

On the Brain. 

Total number . . 


50 
.... 

9 










Craniotomy with excision of endo- 
thelioma .... 


1 


1 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
6 


1 
1 








1 


Craniotomy with separation of adhe- 
sions and fat transplantation, for 
epilepsy . . . 








1 


Craniotomy, exploratorv . . . 


1 

1 
] 
6 




for epilepsy 

for fracture of skull 


1 

1 








1 








1 


for pituitary tumor 

for tumor of brain 




1^ 

2" 




1 




3 


1 


6 


Carried forward 


55 


154 209 




173 


15 


17 


4 


209 



o See No. 76. 

e See No. 145. 



6 See No. 75. 

/ See No. 50. 



See No. 160. d See No. 93. 

ff See Nos. 51 and 52. 



175 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 







Admitted 






DlSCH.\RGED. 
















9 


— rcD 




SuKGiCAL Operations. 




n 




03 
O 


ID 


.2 


.« <="- 1 
c^ 




i 


'3 

S 




a 

3 


> 


P3 
o 




1-2 "^ 

C rt 

1— |I-S 


o 


Brought forward 


55 


154 


209 




173 


15 


17 


4 


209 










34 
















1 


1 




1 








1 


for fracture of skull ..... 


21 


1 


22 




7 




15" 




22 


for gunshot wound ..... 

for hydrocephalus 

for intracranial pressure . . . 
for Jacksonian epilepsy . . . 
for tumor 




1 










1'' 






1 












1" 






1 














1 




1 








1 










7 








3 


1 


3-^ 




y 


Excision of glioma (secondary oper- 






1 




1 




1 








1 


Ventricular puncture: 










for diagnosis 

for hydrocephalus ....'.. 

On the Spinal Cord. (See also 


9 




9 




1 


1 






2 


1 


1 


9 






1 


1^ 




9 




















Operations on the Vertebrae.) 




















Total number 








4 












Excision of sac of spina bifida . . . 




1 


1 






1^ 




1 


Laminectomy vrith exploration of 




















cord, for diagnosis 

Plastic operation, for spina bifida . 

On Peripher.\l Nerves. 


1 




1 






1 






1 


1 


1 


9 




1 


1 






9 




















Total number 








23 












Excision of neuroma 


3 


1 


4 


3 


1 






4 


Exploratory of brachial plexus : 








for diagnosis 


1 




1 




1 








1 


for rupture 







9 




9 








9 


Operations for trigeminal neuralgia 
evulsion of 5th nerve .... 








10 












2 




2 




2 








9 


excision of alveolar process and 










destruction of inferior dental 




















nerve 


1 

9 


9 


1 

4 




1 
1 








1 


injection of alcohol 


3 






4 


resection of 5th nerve .... 


2 


1 


1 

9 




1 

9 








1 


resection of Gasserian ganglion 








9 








5 




Carried forward 


105 


164 


269 




201 


24 


39 


269 



a See Nos. 30 to 44. 6 See No. 45. 
« See No. 167. 



c See No. 46. d See Nos. 47 to 49. 
/ See No. 63. 



176 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



Admitted. 



Discharged. 



Stjkgicax, Opekations. 



(^ 



tf 



—-co 

«J.-I 
a-" 

X ■ 
^ c 
c a 

t-i>-s 



Brought forward 
Resection of brachial plexus, for in- 
jury 

Resection of recurrent larjTigeal 

nerve for carcinoma 

Stoeffel's operation for spastic paral 



OPERATIONS OX THE AIR 
PASSAGES. 

On the Nose and Accessory Si- 
nuses. 

On the Nose. , 

Total number . 

Correcting deformity 

Curettage of septum and hard palate 

for chondro-sarcoma 

Excision: 

of ghoma 

of papilloma 

of polypus 

Plastic operation, for incised wound 
Submucous resection, for de%-iated 
septum 

Ox the Accessory Sintses. 

Total number . 

Curettage, for sinusitis 

Incision and drainage: 

for empyema of antrum . . 
for frontal sinusitis .... 
KilUan operation for empyema of 
frontal sinus 



On the Larynx. 

Excision : 

of carcinoma 



Total number 



105 
1 
1 
2 



164 



269 
1 
1 
4 



25 



13 



201 



5 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

15 



39 



Carried forward \ 130' ISSl 315 



245 26 391 5 315 



177 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



i 


Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 




-3i 

a 


"3 
o 


3 

i 


<u 

3 


1 




-it 

*^ a 


3 
^ 


Brought forward 
Excision : 

of papilloma 

of persistent thyro-glossal duct 
LarjTigoscopy vnth. excision of speci- 


130 

1 

1 


185 
1 


315 

1 
1 

1 




245 

1 
1 


26 


39 


5 


315 

1 








1 


1 






1 


On the Trachea. 


11 

29 

• 










Tracheotomy : 

for carcinoma of esophagus . . 
for carcinoma of larynx . . . 


3 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
4 
1 
1 

1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


1 
3 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 








1 


1 

1 






4 






1 


for paralysis of vocal cords . . 
for stenosis of larynx .... 
for syphilis of larynx .... 
with removal of foreign body 






1 








1 


] 






9 






1 


On the Bronchi. 

Bronchoscopy, for foreign body . . 

OPERATIONS ON THE HEAD 
AND FACE. 

On the Head. 

Excision of * epithelioma of scalp . 

On the Face. 

Total number 








1 








1 










Cauterization: 

for angioma 


1 

1 

1 

6 
5 


2 
3 

2 
1 


2 
1 
4 

1 

8 
6 


2 
1 

4 

1 

8 
6 








9 


for carcinoma 








1 


for * epithelioma .... 








4 


Cauterization with dissection o\ 
neck, for carcinoma . 








1 


Excision : 

of carcinoma 








8 


of * epithelioma 








6 












Carried forward 


155 


198 


353 




279 


30 


39 


5 


353 



178 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 







Admitted 






Discharged. 




Surgical Operations. 


J 


S 
"3 

1 


"3 


3 
a 

3 

CO 


> 

Si 

3 


73 

I 

O 


5 


—TO 

.t: <3> 
a—' 

tn - 
O^ 

^ C 




Brought forward 
Excision: 

of lupus 


155 


198 

1 

1 
1 


353 


6 

9 


279 

1 
1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


30 


39 


5 


353 
1 


of sarcoma 


1 

1 
1 

1 








1 


Plastic operation: 

for carcinoma 








1 


for cicatricial contraction . . 








9 


for deformity: 

from facial paralysis . . . 
post-operative 

OPERATIONS ON THE EYE 
AND EAR. 

On the Eye. 

Total number . . 








1 








1 










Plastic operation: 

for deformity, congenital, of 
eyelid 




1 


1 


1 

1 

1 

2 








1 


for ectropion 


1 
1 

3 


....| 1 
i 1 








1 


for * epithelioma of eyelid . . 








1 


secondary, follow-ing excision of 
* epithelioma 

On the Ear. 

Total number . . 




3 


1 






3 








Cauterization, for * epithelioma . . 


3 

1 
3 
1 

1 


.... 3 

....! 1 

: 3 


3 
1 

3 








3 


Excision of ear for * epithelioma . . 
Excision of * epithelioma 








1 








3 


Mastoid operation, exploratory . . 




1 

1 


1 






1 


Suturing lacerated wound .... 


5 


1 






1 


OPERATIONS ON THE MOUTH, 
LIPS, TONGUE, PALATE, ETC. 

On the Mouth. 

Total number . .. 










Cauterization of carcinoma (exten- 
sive) . . 


1 




1 


1 








1 












Carried forward 


174 


1 

202 376 1 


300 


32 


39 


5 


376 



179 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 




1) 
1 


3 


a 

m 




T3 

> 
o 

:5 


-a 

0) 

5 


13 2 
a-' 

en ., 

O —1 

a 03 


1 


Brought forward 
Dissection of neck for carcinoma of 
floor of mouth (1st stage) . . . 
Plastic operation for congenital de- 
formity 


174 
1 


202 

1 


376 
1 
1 

2 


39 
12 


300 
1 
1 
2 


32 


39 


5 


376 
1 








1 


Radical operation for carcinoma of 
floor of mouth 


2 








9 


On the Lips 

Total number . . 










Cauterization of reciurent * epitheli- 
oma 


1 

4 
1 
1 

10 

2 

6 

7 

1 


1 

1 

2 


1 

4 
1 
1 

11 

2 

6 

7 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


1 

4 
1 

1 

11 

2 

6 

7 

.1 

1 
2 

1 

1 








1 


Cauterization and excision: . . . . 
of * epithelioma 








4 


of leukoplakia 








1 


of ulcer, chronic 








1 


Excision: 

of * epithelioma 








11 


of ulcer 








9 


Excision with dissection of neck : 
of carcinoma 








6 


of * epithelioma ........ 








7 


Plastic operation: 










following excision of *epithelioma 


1 


for cicatricial contraction . 








1 


harelip 








2 


for redundant mucous mem- 
brane 


1 

1 








1 


Replacement and wiring of pre- 
maxillary bone, for harelip and 
cleft palate (1st stage) 








1 


On the Tongue. 

Total number . . 










Cauterization: 

for carcinoma . . . 


1 


1 
1 


1 
2 


1 
2 








1 


for * epithelioma 








2 












Carried forward 


213 


209 


422 




346 


32 


39 


5 


422 



180 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 



Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 














i 




— rco 




Surgical Operations. 




m 
"3 


"3 


1 
a 

3 

m 


> 

3 


1 

o 


-a 

s 


.^55 

to - 

O 1-H 

111 • 

C c« 

l-Hl-S 


"3 
1 


Brought forward 


213 


209 


422 




346 


32 


39 


5 


422 


** Excision, for carcinoma .... 


1 




1 




1 








1 


with dissection of neck 


1 




1 








1" 




1 


** Resection, with dissection of 










neck, for carcinoma 


7 




7 




4 


1 


2^ 




7 


On the Palate. 




















Staphylorrhaphy 


5 


7 


12 




10 .... 


1^ 


1 


12 


On the Pharynx. 




















Incision and drainage of retropha- 




















ryngeal abscess 


1 




1 




1 








1 


On the Tonsils. 




























48 












Incision and drainage of peritonsillar 


















abscess 


2 


4 


6 




5 




1-^ 




6 


Suturing pillars for post-operative 




hemorrhage . . 


1 




1 




1 








1 


Tonsillectomy 

for cervical adenitis 








40 












9 


1 
3 


1 

5 




1 








1 


for hypertrophy 

for peritonsillar abscess 








5 


1 


1 


9 




9 








?. 


for tonsilHtis, chronic .... 


9 
1 

8 


12 
9 


14 

1 

17 




14 

1 

17 








14 


for tuberculosis 








1 


with excision of adenoids 








17 


Tonsillectomy with dissection of 










neck, for carcinoma of tonsil . . 


1 




1 








\' 




1 


On the Esophagus. 










Total number . . 








15 












Dilatation, for stricture 


4 


1 


5 


5 








5 


Esophagoscopy: 










for carcinoma 


4 
1 




4 
1 




3 
1 


1 






4 


for cardio-spasm 

for diagnosis 

for stricture 






1 


1 


1 


9 




1 


1 






2 


3 




3 




1 


2 






3 










Carried forward 


259 


248 


507 




419 


37 


45 


6 


507 



a See No. 64. 6 See Nos. 139 and 140. c See No. 146. d See No. 87. e See No. 161. 

181 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



Surgical Opekations. 



Brought forivard 



OPERATIONS ON THE NECK. 



Total number . 
Cauterization, for * epithelioma . 
Dissection: 

for carcinoma 

for sarcoma 

for tuberculosis 

Excision: 

of branchial cyst 

of carbuncle 

. of carcinoma 

of keloidal cicatrix .... 

of lipoma 

of wen 

Incision and drainage: 

of actinomycosis 

of abscess 

of carbuncle 

of cellulitis 

Myotomy, for torticollis .... 
Suturing lacerated wound . . . 

OPERATIONS ON THE THO- 
RAX AND THORACIC WALL. 

On the Thorax. 

Total number . 
Incision and drainage: 

of abscess 

of persistent sinus 

Operations for abscess of lung 

thoracotomy with resection of 
ribs and drainage .... 
Operations for empyema .... 

aspiration 

thoracotomy with drainage . 



Admitted. 



259 



248 



18 



507 



22 



Discharged. 



43 



56 



22 



26 



419 



P5 



37 



45 



ca 1-1 

o.-r 



i« 



Carried forward 314 265 579 



475 45 52 7 579 



a See No. 83. 



b See Nos. 147 to 152. 



182 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 



Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Admitted. 



Discharged. 



Brought forward 
Operations for empyema: 

thoracotomy ^Hith resection of 

rib and drainage 

thoracotomy with resection of 

rib and decortication of lung 

Operations for subphrenic abscess . 

(See also Abdominal Operations.) 

laparotomy, exploratory, with 

thoracotomy and resection of 

rib 

thoracotomy with resection of 

rib and incision of diaphragm 

Thoracotomy ■ndth excision of ribs 

and resection of thoracic wall, for 



314 



14 



sarcoma 

Thoracotomy wnth resection of ribs 

and excision of tract of sinus . . 
Thoracotomy, exploratory, wath 

puncture of pericardium .... 

On the Thoracic Wall. 

Total number . . 



Excision: 

of cicatrix 

of lipoma 

Incision and drainage of abscess . 

ABDOMINAL OPERATIONS. 

On the Stomach and Duodenum. 

Total number . . 

Gastrectomy (partial), for ulcer 
(Gastro-enterostomy at previous 
operation.) 

Gastrectomy (partial) ^\'ith gastro 
enterostomy 



265 579 

7 21 
1 



rt 



475 



15 



121 



11 



rt 



45 52 
1 



a-" 



Carried forward 336 276 612 499 46 59 8 612 



a See Nos. 153 to 156. b See No. 157. c See No. 158. d See No. 159. 

183 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


3 


03 

a 


B 


bum iotal. 
Relieved. 


Not Relieved. 
Died. 


-is 

Co »— 1 

.•sen 
a'-' 

C e8 
H- ll-B 




Brought forward 
Gastrectomy (partial) , etc. : 

for carcinoma 


336 

3 

2 

1 

1 

6 

14 

2 

13 
9 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 


276 

1 
3 
2 

4 
5 

4 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 


612 

4 . 

5 . 
2 . 

1 . 


499 

3 

4 

2 

67 ... . 




i6 59 
1" 


8 

1 


612 

4 
5 


wnth hour-glass stomach . 
Gastro-enterostomy 






9 










for duodenal obstruction due to 

carcinoma of head of pancreas 

for carcinoma of pylorus (?) . . 






1^ 




1 


1 . 

10 . 
19 . 

2 . 

17 . 

11 . 
2 . 
2 

1 . 

1 . 


1 

6 

18 

2 

.. 15 

.. 10 

1 

1 

1 






1 


for carcinoma of stomach . . 
for duodenal ulcer 




V 


3 

1 


10 
19 


perforating 






'? 


with infolding of ulcer . . 

for gastric ulcer 

with infolding of ulcer . . 




. 1'^ 
1« 


1 

1 
1 


17 

11 

9 


for gastric and duodenal ulcers . 






2 


for possible intestinal ulcer . . 






1 


for obstructing retroperitoneal 
sarcoma 




V 




1 


Gastro-enterostomy with infolding 
of duodenum and pylorus, follow- 
ing lysis of adhesions 


1 .. 

2 

1 . . 


1 
4 .... 






1 


Gastro-enterostomy and . pylorec- 
tomy 










for duodenal ulcer 


2 








9 


for malignant disease of pylorus 






1 


1 


for perforating gastric ulcer . . 


1 .. 
1 .. 

2 
7 . . 

1 .. 

2 .. 

708 


1 
1 

2 

1 

2 

573 






1 


Gastro-gastrostomy, for hour-glass 
stomach 








1 


Gastrorrhaphy, for perforating gas- 
tric ulcer 


1 
6 

2 




1 l" 

2 3^^ 




2 


Gastrostomy, for carcinoma of 
esophagus 


7 


Gastrotomy: 

with cauterization of ulcer . 


1 


with excision of ulcer .... 








2 




4 


9 69 


17 




Carried forward 


402 


306 


708 



o See No. 65. 
e See No. 68. 



6 See No. 67. 
/ See No. 69. 



c See No. 66. 
g See No. 71. 



d See No. 70. 

h See Nos. 72 to 74 



184 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


i 




3 

o 


3 


1 

1 


> 

3 

1 


Q 


^4 




Brought forward 
Laparotomy : . . 

■n-ith disconnecting of old gas- 
tro-enterostomv . . 


402 

1 

1 
2 

7 
1 

2 

1 
1 


306 
1 

1 

5 
1 


708 
2 

1 
3 

12 
2 

2 

1 

1 


6 


573 

1 

1 
3 

1 

1 
1 
1 


49 
1 


69 


17 


708 

9 


w^ith reconstruction of gastro- 
enterostomy and pylorec- 
tomy, for duodenal ulcer . . 

w-ith separation of adhesions . 
*** Laparotomy, exploratory: 

for carcinoma of stomach . . 

for duodenal ulcer 

with infolding of perforating 
duodenal ulcer 






1 








3 


9 
1 


1^ 




12 

2 


with lysis of adhesions about 






1 


-nith suture of punctured wound 








1 


On the Pancreas. 

Total number 










Laparotomy with drainage of chronic 


2 
2 

1 
1 




2 
2 

1 

1 






1' 


1 


9 


*** Laparotomy, exploratory: 






2 


9 


for pancreatitis, acute hemor- 
rhagic 








1 


1 


for rupture 


762 
6 


1 






1 


On the Intestines. 

Total number 










Anastomosis, lateral 


1 
1 


1 
1 

1 
1 

1 


1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 












for carcinoma (inoperable) . . 

for enteroptosis 

for malformation, congenital . 
for obstruction 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 








1 








1 








1 








1 










9 


Appendicostomy, for chronic colitis 


1 






1 








Carried forward 


426 


319 


745 




589 


63 


74 


19 


745 



a See Nos. 99 to 101. 



b See No. 103. 

185 



c See No. 90. 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. j Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


03 

a 


'a 


3 


3 

o 
H 


13 


13 
> 

.s 
1 


■6 

s 


03 1— ( 

.-SOS 

o r-T 

C c8 

1— 1 1-5 


3 


Brought forward 
Closing fecal fistula 


426 
1 

1 
5 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

2 
3 
1 


319 
6 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


745 

1 

1 

11 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

1 

2 
1 

3 

1 
3 

1 

782 j 




589 

1 

14 


63 


74 


19 


745 
1 


















1 


for carcinoma of rectum . . . 


2 


10 

1 
1 




1° 


11 
1 


for multiple strictures of rectum 
Enterorrhaphy 

for perforating typhoid ulcer . 

for punctured wound .... 
Enterostomies w-ith closure of diver- 
ticulum of sigmoid 

Enterostomy 








1 














1* 




1 




1 




1 




1<^ 




1 


3 








for carcinoma of esophagus and 
stomach 


1 








1 


for gastric ulcer 




1^ 


.... 
1 


1 


for obstruction with general 
peritonitis 








1 


Excision of tract of fecal fistula . . 




1 
1 




2 


Laparotomy: 

w^th appendicostomy, for ileal 
stasis and chronic arthritis . 






1 


with excision of gangrenous 
Meckel's diverticulum . . . 




1^ 




1 


with incision and drainage of 
abscess about sigmoid . . . 




1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

613 




1 


with incision and drain- 
age of residual appendix 
abscess 


1 






2 


with suture of multiple perfora- 
tions from gunshot wound . 






1 


*** Laparotomy, exploratory: 

for obstruction 

for pancreatitis, chronic . . 




1^ 


1 


3 
1 


for tuberculosis 

•ssath cecostomy (for carcinoma 
of sigmoid?) 


1 


1" 




3 
1 




65 


82 


22 




Carried forward 


450 


332 


782 



a See No. 29. 
e See No. 59. 



6 See No. 56. 
/ See No. 97. 



c See No. 57. 
a See No. 104. 



186 



d See No. 58. 
» See No. 108. 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Adm] 


TTED. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


CO 


J 

a 

pE4 


t 
^ 


5 

a 

3 
02 


-6 

s 


1 

2 

1 


s 


-TO 

a-' 

O'-i 

c « 


3 
e5 


Brought forward 
Laparotomy, exploratory: 

with closure of perforating ty- 
phoid ulcer and drainage of 

peritonitis 

with colostomy, for congenital 


450 

1 
1 

132 
19 
46 
20 
34 
23 

2 


332 

1 

69 
4 

119 
32 
40 

150 

3 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

■ 1 


782 

1 
1 
1 

201 
23 

165 
52 
74 

173 

2 
3 




613 


65 


82 

1° 
1^ 


22 


782 
1 








1 


with incision and drainage of 

periduodenal ulcer 

Operation for appendicitis .... 

acute 

acute, with peritonitis .... 
chronic 


515 
6 


1 




1 










186 
17 

159 
52 
71 

165 


2 


3^ 
4d 


12 
6 


201 

23 

165 


operation during interval . . 

subacute 

(routine appendectomy) . . . 
Operation for cecum mobile . . . 






52 


1 
3 


1" 


1 
5 


74 
173 


cecopexj' 


2 
3 

1 

1 








2 


plication of cecum 








3 


plication of ascending colon 










Reducing intussusception, with ileos- 
tomy 










Reducing prolapse of intestine 
through colostomy wound 




1 








** Resection, for prolapsed colos- 
tomy, ^-ith formation of new arti- 
ficial anus 


2 


1 








** Resection with anastomosis, end- 
to-end 


1 
1 
1 


, 








for carcinoma 






1^ 






for strangulated femoral hernia 






1 




** Resection w-ith anastomosis, lat- 
eral 


2 










for carcinoma 


1 
1 










for chronic adhesive peritonitis 










** Resection -nith enterostomies for 
(tabes mesenterica and necrosis?) 




1" 


















Carried forwa rd 


731 756 


487 




1274 


73 


94 


46 


1487 



a See No. 110. 6 See Xo. 111. c See Nos. 11 to 13. 
e See No. 18. / See Xo. 137. 

187 



d See Xos. 14 to 17. 
g See No. 141. 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 




m 

1 


3 

1487 

1 
13 


la 

3 


1 
& 

1274 


-a 
> 

1 

73 


Q 
94 
1° 


03 T-H 

m - 

o<-i 
Kb 

46 
1 


"3 
1 


Brought forward 
** Resection ^-ith tube drainage, for 

mesenteric thrombosis 

Separating adhesions 

On the Liver. 


731 
6 


756 

1 

7 


1487 
1 


7 


11 


1 


13 


Laparotomy with excision: 

of cyst-adenoma 

of echinococcus cyst 

*** Laparotomy, exploratory, with 
drainage of abscess 

Omentopexy, for cirrhosis .... 

On the Gall Bladder and Bile 
Ducts. 


1 

2 

1 


1 

1 

1 


1 

2 

2 
2 








1 


1 


136 

88 

24 
2 


1 

1 
2 




1^ 


2 

2 
2 










Cholecystectomy 

for adhesions about gall bladder 


1 

5 

18 

2 
1 
4 
5 
1 

778 


1 

2 

4 
15 

42 

7 

1 
9 
2 

850 


1 
2 

5 
20 
60 

9 

1 

4 
1 
14 
2 
1 

1628 












1 
1 

4 
17 
57 

8 

1 








1 


1 






2 


for cholecystitis: 

acute 


1« 
1^ 

1^ 


2 

2 


5 


chronic 

for cholelithiasis 

Cholecystectomy and choledochos- 

tomy, for cholelithiasis 

Cholecystoduodenostomy, for car- 
cinoma of common duct 


20 
60 

9 

1 


Cholecystostomy . . 










for cholecystitis 

for cholecystitis and pancreatitis 

for cholelithiasis 

for empyema 

for jaundice 


3 
1 
12 
1 
1 




^n 




4 

1 




1* 
1^ 


1 


14 
2 

1 


Cholecystostomy and choledochos- 
tomy 












1396 


75 


104 


53 




Carried forward 


1628 



o See No. 142. 
e See No. 22. 

j See No. 26. 



h See No. 96. 
/ See No. 23. 



c See No. 112. 
g See No. 24. 



d See No. 21. 
h See No. 25. 
> See No. 27. 



188 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


















ri""^ 




Surgical Operations. 


n 


m 

0) 

a 


3 


O 

a 


> 

_4J 


3 


^3 


a—' 


3 




% 




^ 


3 


^ 


^ 


Q 


>a4 


H 


Brought forward 


778 


850 


1628 




1396 


75 


104 


53 


1628 


Cholecystostomy and choledoclios- 




















tomy: 




















for cholecystitis 

for pancreatitis 

Choledochostomy, for cholelithiasis 




1 


1 




1 








1 


1 




1 




1 








1 


3 


2 


5 




3 




1° 


1 


5 


*** Laparotomy, exploratory, for 
carcinoma 




1 


1 






1 






1 


Separating adhesions 

On the Peritoneum. 


1 


7 


8 




8 








8 




























22 












Laparotomy: 


















■nath drainage of retroperitoneal 




















abscess 


1 




1 




1 








1 


with excision: 










of cyst of canal of Nuck . 
of retroperitoneal myxoma 
of retroperitoneal sarcoma . 
*** Laparotomy, exploratory: 




1 


1 




1 








1 


1 




1 






1 






1 




1 


1 




1 








1 




















for malignant retroperitoneal 




















tumor (unspecified) .... 

for retroperitoneal carcinoma . 

for retroperitoneal sarcoma . . 

Operation for peritonitis 


1 




1 




1 








1 


1 




1 






1 






1 


"> 




"> 






"> 






9 








14 














1 


1 




1 








1 


general 


1 


3 


4 








46 




4 


pelvic 




1 


1 




1 








1 


tuberculous 


2 


6 


8 




5 


2 


1^ 




8 


On the Abdominal Wall. 




























18 












Curettage of actinomycosis .... 
Excision : 


1 




1 


1 








1 
























1 


1 




1 








1 


of lipoma 




1 


1 




1 








1 




2 


'^ 




2 








2 




1 




1 




1 








1 












Carried forward 


794 


878 


1672 




1426 


82 


110 


54 


1672 



a See No. 28. 



6 See Nos. 89, 91, 92 and 107. 

189 



c See No. 109. 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


J 


1 


"^ 

1 


3 
a 

3 


P5 


> 

3 
1 


a> 

s 


— TtO 

to . 

o ^ 


3 


Brought forward 
Incision and drainage: .... 


794 
6 


878 

4 
1 


1672 

10 

1 


371 


1426 

10 

1 


82 


110 


54 


1672 

in 










1 


On the Abdomen (not otherwise 
specified) 










Excision of tract of persistent sinus . 

Exploring cicatrix 

Exploring sinus with removal of for- 


2 

2 

4 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

13 

2 

1 

1 


I 

1 



25 
1 
1 


1 
1 

3 

1 

1 

3 

1 

5 

1 

1 

1 

3 

3 

38 

2 
2 

1 
1 


1 

1 

3 








1 








1 








3 


Herniotomy, for strangulated in- 
guinal hernia 

Internal ligation of neck of sac of um- 




1° 




1 




1 

2 




1 


Laparotomy: 

with drainage of pelvic abscess . 


1 
1 

1 






3 






1 


with drainage of subphrenic ab- 
scess. 




1 
1 
1 


2^ 


1 


5 


with marsupialization of retro- 
peritoneal echinococcus cyst . 
Laparotomy with plastic, for adhe- 
rent tuberculous mesenteric glands 
Laparotomy, exploratory: . . . . 
for aneurism of abdominal aorta 


1 








1 




V 




1 


for carcinoma 




1 

1 

33 

2 


2 
1 
2 


3 


for carcinomatosis 

for diagnosis 

for gunshot wound, with drain- 
age of peritoneal hematoma . 


"l' 


1 
2 


3 
38 


for mesenteric thrombosis . . . 




2^ 




?. 


for pernicious anemia (further 
operation inadvisable) . . . 




1 
1 




1 


for post-operative hemorrhage? 








1 












Carried forward 


831 


921 


1752 




1487 


90 


117 


58 


1752 



a See No. 77. h See Nos. 94 and 95. c See No. 98. 

d See No. 102. e See Nos. 105 and 106. 

190 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Admitted. 



Brought forward 
Laparotomy, exploratory: 

for ptosis 

for tabes mesenterica . . . 
with lysis of adhesions, for mul- 
tiple arthritis 

with reduction of eviscerated 
intestines and repair of stab 

wound 

Radical cure of hernia 

epigastric 

femoral 

strangulated 

inguinal 

strangulated 

with orchidopexy . . , 

umbilical 

strangulated .... 

ventral 

strangulated .... 
Repair of diastasis recti . . . 
Resuturing wound of operation 
Separating pelvic adhesions 



OPERATIONS ON THE REC- 
TUM AND ANUS. 

On the Rectum. 

Total number . 
Cauterization : 

for carcinoma 

for papilloma 

for prolapse 

Dilatation of stricture 



831 



PCH 



921 



Carried forward 



6 
7 
1 
172 
9 



1058 



1752 

1 
1 



6 
17 

2 

196 

11 

8 
15 

1 
35 

2 

1 

2 



293 



1002 



2060 



Discharged. 



tf 



1487 

1 
1 



132 



tf 



6 
16 

2 

191 

11 

8 
15 

1 
35 

2 

1 



11789 



90 



1 &^ 

l|— |l-5 



1171 58 



1752 

1 

1 



1 



90 



6 

17 

2 

196 

11 

8 

15 

1 

35 

2 

1 

2 

9 



118 



63 



2 
1 
3 
1 

2060 



a See No. 133. 

191 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


en 


a 


3 
e2 


"3 

a 

3 


1 
3 


13 

> 

1 


13 
Q 


Ol-H 

^ a 


'a 


Brought forward 
Excision of recurrent carcinoma (in 
scar) 


1058 

1 

8 

45 

8 


1002 

1 

30 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


2060 

1 
9 

75 
1 
9 
1 
5 

8 
1 

1 

4 
3 

3 

1 
2 

1 


91 
35 


1789 

1 

7 


90 


118 


63 


2060 
1 


** Excision of rectum, for carcinoma 
Operations for hemorrhoids .... 

clamp and cautery 

dilatation of sphincter .... 

excision 




P 


1 


9 


73 
1 
9 
1 
5 

8 
1 

1 

3 

3 

3 
1 

2 

1 






2 


75 






1 








9 


incision 








1 


^Vhitehead's operation . . . 


5 

7 
1 

4 
3 

2 
1 
1 

1 








5 


Incision and drainage of abscess : 
ischio-rectal ....'.... 








8 


perirectal 








1 


Lysis of adhesions, for stricture . . 








1 


Mobilization of sigmoid and rectum 
for carcinoma, with colostomy 

Mobilization of sigmoid and rectum 
for carcinoma, without colostomy 




1^ 




4 
8 


Rectal puncture: 

for drainage of pelvic abscess . 


.... 






3 


for drainage of prostatic abscess 








1 


Rectopexy, for prolapse 








? 


Resection of mucous membrane, for 
prolapse 








1 


On the Anus. 

Total number . . 










Operations for fissure: 

cauterization 


3 

1 

3 
9 
4 


1 
2 
1 

1 
9 
1 


1 

5 
2 

4 

18 

5 


1 

5 

2 

4 

17 

5 








1 


dilatation of sphincter .... 








5 


excision 








9 


Operations for fistula : 
curettage . . . 








4 


excision of tract 






1 


18 


incision and drainage .... 






5 










Carried forward 


1165 


1056 


2221 




1944 


90 


120 67 


2221 



o See No. 62. 



b See No. 115. 



192 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


Is 


a 

Em 


3 


eS 

3 


1 

1 


T3 
> 

o 

:2i 




o T-T 

C cS 

>— 1 1-3 


"3 
1 


Broughi forward 

OPERATIONS ON THE 
GENITO-URESTARY SYSTEM. 

On the Kidney. 

Total number . . 


1165 


1056 


2221 


89 
3 

34 


1944 


90 


120 


67 


2221 


Decapsulation 


1 
2 

1 

1 

7 

1 

1 

2 
3 
5 
3 
3 
1 

6 
1 

1 

1 
1 


1 
1 

2 

1 

2 
2 

10 
10 

1 


1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

8 
1 

1 

2 
2 
4 
7 
5 
13 
11 

7 
1 
1 

1 
1 












for varix of papilla 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

8 
1 








1 


^dth drainage of perinephritic 
abscess 


1 






9 


Excision: 

of cyst 






1 


of tract of post-operative sinus . 








1 


Exploratory, revealing congenital 
absence of kidnev 








1 


Incision and drainage of perine- 
phritic abscess 








8 


*** Laparotomy, exploratory, for 
staphylococcus infection of kidney 








1 


Nephrectomy 










for hematuria 






la 




1 


for hydronephrosis 




2 
1 
4 
6 
4 
12 
10 

6 




9 


for hypernephroma 

for pyelonephritis 




1* 




2 

4 


for pyonephrosis 

calculus 

for tuberculosis 




1^ 
Id 


1 
1 

1 


7 

5 

13 


Nephropexy 






11 


Nephrotomy : 

for calculus . 






7 


for calculous pyonephrosis . . 




1^ 


1 


for pyonephrosis 




1 




1 


Nephrotomy, exploratory : 

for diagnosis 


1 
1 






1 


for hypernephroma 










1 














Carried forward 


1206 1086 


2292 




2004 


93 


125 


70 


2292 



a See No. 116. 6 See No. 117. c See No. 118. 

d See No. 119. e See No. 120. 



193 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 







Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


o5 

% 

1206 

1 

8 
1 

2 

1 

2 

2 

1 
6 


tn 

0) 

"3 
i 

1086 
2 

- 2 
1 

3 


3 
o 
H 

2292 

1 

10 

1 

2 
3 
1 

2 

2 

1 
9 


13 

i 

14 


> 

P5 
2004 

1 

10 
1 

1 

3 

1 


> 

3 

o 
93 


-6 

5 

125 


K • 
*^ c 
a cs 

hHl-j 

70 


o 


Brought forward 
Nephrotomy, exploratory : 

with decapsulation, for hema- 


2292 
1 


Pyelotomy: 








10 


in horse-shoe kidney . . . 
■R-ith decapsulation, for renal 








1 




1° 




9 


Pyelotomy and ureterotomy, for 


3 


Removing foreign body from ne- 
phrectomy wound 

On the Ureter. 








1 










Cystotomy and ureterotomy, for 


2 








9 


Ureterostomy: 

for carcinoma of bladder 


2 






2 


for recurrent papilloma of blad- 
der 






1^ 




1 


Ureterotomy, for calculus .... 

On the Bladder. 

Total number . . 


50 


. 8 




9 


Cystectomy, for carcinoma . 


1 
1 

6 

2 

1 
1 


1 


1 

1 

1 
6 

2 

1 
1 






1'^ 




1 


Cystectomy and prostatectomy for 
carcinoma of bladder 


27 


1 




1 


Cystotomy, suprapubic 

for calculus 










1 
5 
2 








1 


for carcinoma of bladder . . . 
for carcinoma of prostate . . . 




V 




6 

9 


for cystitis and stricture of ure- 
thra 


1 






1 


for dilated ureters .... 




1 






1 












Carried forward 


1242 


1095 


2337 




2041 


96 


130 


70 


2337 



a See No. 132. b See No. 16.5. c See No. 166. 

d See No. 53. e See No. 54. 

194 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. Discharged. 


Stjrgical Operations. 


i 


S 


"3 
1 


e8 
O 

H 

a 

3 
CO 


3 


T3 
> 

o 


-d 

s 


—-co 

o3 ^ 

CO . 

O r-( 

■^ a 
a c3 

l-Hl-5 


"3 


Brought forward 
Cystotomy, suprapubic: 

for hypertrophy of prostate . . 
with drainage of abscess of pros- 
tate 


1242 

4 

1 
3 
3 

1 

1 
10 

1 
3 


1095 

] 
1 

1 

2 

5 


2337 

4 

1 
3 
4 
1 

1 

1 

1 

12 

1 
5 

3 




2041 

3 

1 
3 
4 
1 


96 

1 


130 


70 


2337 
4 






1 


with excision of diverticulum 








3 


with excision of papilloma . . 
with excision of sarcoma . . . 








4 








1 


with excision of specimen from 
prostate, for diagnosis . . . 

with removal of calculus on for- 
eign body 

with removal of foreign body . 
Litholapaxy . . 


1 






1 




1 

1 
12 






1 








1 








T? 


Perineal section and suprapubic cys- 
totomy, for retention 

Plastic operation, for incontinence . 

Suprapubic puncture, for acute re- 
tention 




1" 




1 


41 

22 

43 


4 
2 


1 
1 


5 






3 


On the Prostate. 








Perineal section with exploration 

of prostate 

Prostatectomy, perineal 

for adenoma 

for carcinoma 

Prostatectomy, suprapubic, for 
adenoma 


1 

20 
2 

14 

2 
2 




1 

20 
2 

14 

2 
2 


- 
1 








1 










17 
1 

11 

2 
1 




3^ 


3 


20 
2 

14 


Prostatotomy: 

for adenoma 






?. 


for drainage of abscess 


1 






9 


On the Male Urethra. 

Total nuinher . 








Incision and drainage of periurethral 
abscess 


2 




2 


2 








9. 












Carried forward 


1312 


1105 


2417 




2108 


101 


135 


73 


2417 



a See No. 126. 



6 See Nos. 128 to 130. 

195 



c See No. 131. 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


03 


'a 
1 


3 


3 
i 

CA2 


> 

1 


T3 

3 



-d 

5 


— r«5 
a,'-' 

*^ c 

C d 
h-ii-s 


"^ 

1 


Brmight forward 
Operations for stricture 


1312 

2 

19 

13 

6 

1 


1105 


2417 

"2 

19 
13 

6 

1 


40 

13 
43 

33 
3 


2108 


101 


135 


73 


2417 


2 

18 

12 

6 

1 








9 


urethrotomy : 


1 






1Q 






1 


13 


internal 






6 


Urethrotomy, external, with cystot- 
omy, for traumatic stricture -n^th 
extravasation of urine 








1 


On the Penis. 

Total number . . 










Amputation, for carcinoma .... 


3 
1 

7 
1 
1 




3 

1 
7 
1 
1 


2 

1 
7 
1 
1 


1 






3 


Cauterization, for carcinoma . 






1 


Circumcision 








7 


Incision and drainage of abscess . . 








1 


Plastic operation, for hypospadias . 








1 


On the Scrotum. 

Total number . . 










Excision: 

of carcinoma 


1 
1 

13 
4 

16 

9 

6 




1 

1 
13 

4 
16 

2 
6 


1 
1 

13 
4 

16 

2 
6 








1 


of *epithelioma ....... 








1 


of hydrocele 








13 


of hydrocele of cord . . . . . 








4 


of varicocele 








16 


Incision and drainage: 

of abscess 








9 


of hydrocele 








6 


On the Testicle. 

Total number . . 










Epididymectomy 


1 
2 

5 


1105 


1. 
2 
5 

2522 












for epididymitis, chronic . . . 


1 
2 








1 


for tuberculosis 








9 


Epididymotomy, for epididymitis . 












2210 


103 


135 


74 




Carried forward 


1417 


2522 



196 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


m 

ID 


a 

1^ 


3 

o 


3 
s 

3 
02 


> 

P5 


12; 


-d 
Q 


O T-H 


t 
o 

Eh 


Brought forward 
Epididymo-vasectomy, for tubercu- 


1417 

6 

1 

1 

1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
5 

2 

1 


110^ 


)2522 
6 
1 

1 

1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
5 

2 

1 


14 


2210 
6 
1 
1 


103 


135 


74 


2522 
6 


Epididymo-vasotomy, for epididy- 
mitis 








1 


Incision and drainage of abscess of 

tunica vaginalis 

Orchidectomy 








1 










1 
1 
3 
2 








1 


for epididymitis ........ 

for gumma 








1 








3 








2 






1° 




1 




5 
6 


1 
5 

2 

1 




1 










5 


Orchidopexy (see also Radical cure 
of inguinal hernia) 

Vasotomy, bilateral, preliminary to 
prostatectomy 

On the Male Perineum. 








2 








1 










Excision: 


1 
3 

1 




1 

3 

1 


1 
3 

1 








1 










3 


Incision and drainage of residual 








1 


GYNECOLOGICAL OPERA- 
TIONS. 

On the Urethra. 

Total numbeT 










Operations for caruncle: 

cauterization 




1 

5 


1 

5 


1 

4 








1 


excision 






1 


5 














Carried forward 


1447 


1111 


2558 




2244^ 103 


136 


75 


2558 



a See No. 121. 

197 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discil^rged. 


SxmGicAL Operations. 


03 


a 


1 


"3 

a 

D 


> 

1 


1 

CD 

1 
1 




a r-t 

m « 

O -H 

*^ c 

H-ll-S 


o 

H 


Brought forivard 
On the Vulva. 


1447 


nil 


2558 


5 

80 


2244 


103 


136 


75 


2558 


Excision of Bartholin's gland, for 




1 
1 

3 


1 

1 
3 


1 
1 
3 








1 


Excision of cyst of Bartholin's gland 
Excision of * epithelioma .... 

On the Vagina 

Total number 








1 








3 










Cauterization, for carcinoma . , . 




2 
11 

49 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 
9 

2 


2 
11 
49 

2 
9 

2 


1 

9 

49 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1 






9 


Colpo-perineorrhaphy 

Colporrhaphy 

Excision of * epithelioma 

Incision and drainage of abscess of 
vaginal wall 




2 


11 






4Q 


















Plastic operation, for vesico-vaginal 
fistula 










Plastic operation ^ith resection and 
transplantation of small intestine, 
for atresia 












Removing foreign body 












Vaginal puncture: 

for diagnosis 


2 






? 


for drainage of pelvic abscess . 


374 
150 


9 

1 






q 


for drainage of ruptured extra- 
uterine pregnancy 


1 






2 


On the Uterus. 

Total number . . 








Abortion, therapeutic, on account of 
tuberculosis 




2 

34 
13 
53 
30 

1328 


2 

34 
13 
53 
30 

2775 


2 








2 


Dilatation and curettage 










for diagnosis 

for dysmenorrhea . . . 


31 
13 
51 

28 

2448 


2 




1 


34 
13 


for endometritis 

for incomplete miscarriage . . 


1 




1 
2 

81 


53 
30 




110 


136 




Carried forward 


1447 


2775 



198 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 



Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


03 


i 
a 


"3 

1 


3 

3 


1 


■!-> 
O 

J2i 


•T3 

Q 


_-«5 
5.'-' 

O 1-1 


t 
^ 


Brought forward 
Dilatation and curettage: 

for menorrhagia 


1447 


1328 

3 

8 
5 
1 
3 

2 
3 

1 

21 

1 

1 
2 

1 

5 

1 
2 

2 

1 

2 

31 

1 
1 
6 

2 


277.5 

3 
8 
5 
1 
3 

2 
3 

1 
21 

1 
1 
2 

1 
5 

1 
2 

2 

1 

2 

31 

1 
1 
6 

2 


26 

7 

44 


2448 

3 

8 
5 
1 
3 

2 
3 


110 


136 


81 


2775 








8 


for retained secundines 








5 


for stenosis of cervix 








1 


for sterility 

Excision : 

of cyst of broad ligament . . . 

of polypus 

Hysterectomy (abdominal) .... 








3 








2 








3 










1 
18 
1 
1 
2 








1 


for fibromyoma 

for metritis, chronic 




ja 


2 


21 
1 


for perforation 

for prolapse 

Hysterectomy (vaginal) 

for endometritis, chronic 








1 








2 










1 
5 

1 
2 








1 


for procidentia 

with abortion, for pernicious 

vomiting of pregnancy . . . 

Hysterectomy and salpingectomy, 

for salpingitis 

Hysterectomy and salpingo-oopho- 

rectomy 

for carcinoma 








."S 








1 








9 










2 

1 

2 

26 

1 
1 
6 

2 








9 


for cyst-adenoma of ovary . . 
for endometritis, chronic . . . 








1 








■> 


for fibromyoma 

for hyperplasia and subinvolu- 
tion . . 


1 


2* 


2 


31 
1 


for pyosalpinx 










1 


for salpingitis, chronic .... 
Hysterotomy (vaginal): 

for interruption of pregnancy . 










6 








2 










Carried forward 


1447 


1434 


2881 




2675 


112 


144 


90 


3021 



a See No. 78. 



199 



6 See Nos. 79 and 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 




o5 

a 


1 


a 

3 
CO 


1 


.Si 

1 


Q 


—TO 

^4 


"5 
1 


Brouf/ht forward 
Hysterotomy (vaginal) with abor- 
tion, for placenta previa . . 
Laparotomy, with drainage of cyst 

of broad Hgament 

*** Laparotomy, exploratory, for 
carcinoma of uterus 


1447 


1434 
1 

1 

1 
11 

1 

7 
4 
2 
3 
1 

1 
33 

1 
17 
46 


2881 

1 

1 

1 
11 

■1 

7 
4 
2 
3 
1 

1 
33 

1 
17 
46 




2675 


112 


144 

r 


90 


3021 
1 




1 


1 


1 
1 


Myomectomy 

Panhysterectomy 

for arteriosclerosis 


19 

10 

121 
10 


10 




1 


11 








1 

5 
2 
2 
3 
1 

1 

33 

1 

16 

43 








1 


for carcinoma: 

of cervix 

of uterus 

for endometritis, chronic . . . 




96 

2c 




7 
4 
? 


for fibromyoma 








3 


for hydatid mole 








1 


for hypertrophied cervix and 
prolapse 








1 


Round ligament suspension .... 








33 


Suturing perforation 








1 


Ventral fixation 






1 
3 


17 


Ventral suspension 






46 


Watkins-Wertheim operation . . . 








for cystocele 




1 
6 
3 


1 
6 
3 


1 

. 6 

3 








1 


for procidentia 








6 


for retroversion 








3 


On the Cervix Uteri. 

Total number . . 










Amputation 




1 
1 
1 
2 
5 


1 
1 
1 
2 
5 












for cystic disease . . . 


1 
1 
1 
2 
5 








1 


for erosion 








1 


for hyperplastic endometritis . 








1 


for hypertrophy and prolapse . 








9 


for laceration 








5 












Carried forward 


1447 


1584 


3031 




2685 


112 


144 


90 


3031 



a See No. 81. 



b See Nos. 122 and 123. 

200 



c See Nos. 124 and 125. 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 



Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Admitted. 



Brought forward 
Cauterization : 

for carcinoma 

for endocervicitis 

for erosion 

Curettage with excision of specimen 

for diagnosis 

Dilatation: 

for dysmenorrhea 

for stenosis 

for sterility 

Excision of polyp 

*** Laparotomy, exploratory, for in 

operable carcinoma 

Low heat cauterization, for carci- 



1447 



with ligation of iliac arteries 

Tracheloplasty 

Trachelorrhaphy 

Trachelorrhaphy and perineorrha- 
phy 



On the Fallopi.vn Tubes and 
Ovaries. 

Total number . . 

Excision of cyst of ovary 

Excision of cyst-adenoma of ovary . 
Laparotomy with incision and drain 

age of cyst-adenoma 

*** I.,aparotomy, exploratory, for 

carcinoma of ovary 

Oophorectomy 

for cyst 

for cyst-adenoma 

for fibroma 

Plastic operation, for adhesions . . 

** Resection of ovary, for salpingo- 

oophoritis 



fe 



1584 

17 
1 
1 



8031 

17 
1 
1 



140 



22 



Discharged. 



2685 



24 



112 

4 






o ^ 



144 



3031 

17 
1 
1 

4 

1 
1 
1 

2 



12 
6 
1 

36 

26 



16 
4 
1 
1 



Carried forward 1447 1725 3172 

201 



2817 116 144 95 3172 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 



Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 

J 


\ a 
\ ^ 

47 1725 
1 


13 
1 

3172 

1 


'a 

a 

3 
CO 

31 

77 

27 
4 


t 

2817 
1 


T3 

> 
_aj 

116 


Q 
144 


-is 

TO 1-H 

Cl'-' 
o t-T 

a a 

HH 1-5 

95 


1 


Brought forward 14 


3172 
1 












for extra-uterine pregnancy . . . . 

for hydrosalpinx 

for pyosalpinx 

for ruptured intraligamentous 

cyst 

for salpingitis 


7 
3 
3 

1 

.. 14 

3 

2 

.. 17 

.. 10 

1 

2 

1 

14 

.. 23 

5 

2 

1 


7 
3 
3 

1 

14 

3 

9 

17 

10 

1 

2 

1 

14 

23 

5 

2 

1 


7 
3 
3 

1 

14 
3 
















3 








3 








1 








14 








3 


Salpingo-oophorectomy 

for carcinoma of ovary 

for cyst of ovary 

for extra-uterine pregnancy . . . . 

for fibroma of ovary 

for hematosalpinx 

for hydrosalpinx 

for pyosalpinx 










2 

14 
9 
1 

2 

1 

14 

21 

5 

1 

1 








9 




1° 
l*- 


2 


17 

10 

1 








2 








1 








14 


for salpingitis 

for salpingo-oophoritis 


1 




1 


23 

5 


for tuberculosis 






1 


? 


Stab wound for drainage of salpin- 
gitis 






1 


On the Perineum. 

Total number . . . . 










Perineorrhaphy: 

for laceration 


.. 24 
3 


24 
3 


24 
3 








'>4 


for rectocele .... 








8 


OPERATIONS ON THE UPPER 
EXTREMITY. 

On the Shoulder. 

Total number . . . . 










Excision of lipoma .... 


1 1 

2 . . . . 


2 


2 
2 








2 


Incision and drainage of abscess . 








?. 












Carried forward 14 


50 1863 


3313 




2951 


117 


146 


99 


3313 



a See No. 143. 



6 See No. 144. 



202 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 




m 

a> 

a 


3 
e2 


a 


0) 

> 

1 


O 


5 


O --H 

hS4 


3 
o 


Brought forward 

On the Axilla. 

Total number . . 


1450 


1863 


3313 


4 


2951 


117 


146 


99 


3313 


Excision of lipoma 

Incision, exploratory, for inoperable 
recurrent carcinoma 


1 

1 


1 
1 


1 

1 
2 


1 








1 




1" 




1 


Incision and drainage of abscess . . 


16 

4 


2 




9 


On the Arm. 

Total number . . 










Amputation 

for crush 


1 

1 

1 
2 
1 
2 

1 


1 
6 


1 
1 

1 

1 

8 
1 
2 

1 
















1* 




1 


for compound fracture of hu- 
merus with crush of hand . . 


4 
4 

29 


1 
1 

1 

8 
1 
2 

1 




1 


Amputation, shoulder-girdle, for 
sarcoma of scapula 

Amputation at shoulder-joint, for 
crush 








1 








1 


Incision and drainage, for sepsis . . 
Removing foreign body 








8 








1 


Repairing lacerated wound .... 








9 


Transplantation of fascia lata to 
wound of arm 








1 


On the Forearm. 

Total number . . 










Amputation 


2 
1 
1 




2 
1 
1 












for crush 


2 
1 

1 








9 


for * epithelioma of hand . . 








1 


for tuberculosis of carpal bones 

On the Hand. 

Total number . . 








1 










Amputation, for crush 


1 
1 




1 
1 


1 
1 








1 


Amputation, partial, with dissection 
of axilla, for * epithelioma . . . 








1 












Carried forward 


1467 


1872 


3339 




2975 


117 


148 


99 


3339 



a See No. 88. 



6 See No. 1. 



203 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Admitted. 



fe 



Discharged. 



rt 



tf 






Brought forward 
Cauterization, for * epithelioma . 
Excision: 

of * epithelioma 

with dissection of axilla 
of cicatrix with skin grafting, for 

contraction . 

of palmar fascia, for Dupuy 
tren's contraction .... 

Incision and drainage: 

for carbuncle 

for sepsis 

Plastic operation, for contraction , 
Repairing crush 

On the Fingers. 

Total number . . 

Amputation 

for compound fracture .... 

• for contraction 

for crush 

for gangrene . . ■ 

for sarcoma 

Arthrodesis, and repair of trans- 
planted supernumerary finger . . 
Excision of painful cicatrix .... 
Incision and drainage for sepsis . . 
Transplanting supernumerary finger 
to correct deformity of thumb . 



OPERATIONS ON THE LOWER 
EXTREMITY. 

On the Gluteal Region. 



Total number 
Cauterization of carcinoma . . 



1467 
1 



1872 



Carried forward 



1493 



3339 
1 

1 

1 



1884 



3377 



2975 
1 

1 
1 



18 



3008 



117 



148 



99 



117 



1° 



149 



3339 
1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

11 

6 

3 



103 



1 
3377 



a See No. 136. 

204 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Brought forward 
Excision : 

of fibrosarcoma 

of pilo-nidal sinus 

Incision and drainage of abscess . 
Removing bullet 



On the Thigh. 



Admitted. 



1493 

1 

8 



1884 



Total number . 

Amputation 

for crush 

for gangrene of foot .... 
for sarcoma: 

of femur 

of leg 

of tibia 

for septic knee 

for tuberculosis of knee . . . 
Re-amputation, for osteomyelitis of 

femur 

Excision: 

of carcinoma 

of fibrosarcoma 

of tract of tuberculous sinus 
Exploratory of ilio-psoas bursa . . 
Fasciotomy and myotomy for polio- 
myelitis 

Incision and drainage: 

of abscess 

of sinus 

Removing foreign body 

Repairing lacerated wound .... 

Strengthening fascia lata, for slipping 

over trochanter 



Carried foricard 



1537 



3377 

1 

8 
7 
1 



1892 3429 



Discharged. 



P^ 



3008 

1 

8 
7 



rt 



117 



3053 



.-TCD 



I— I i-s 



149 



103 



3377 

1 

8 
7 
1 



118 



153 



105 3429 



o See No. 7. 



6 See No. 8. 



c See Nos. 9 and 10. 

205 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 



Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


m 

1537 


i 

a 

1892 


3429 


"3 
1 

a 

3 

29 
16 

18 
6 


> 

3053 


1 

O 

;^ 

118 


s 

153 


O "^ 

^ c 
a a 

t-(l-5 

105 


"3 
1 


Brought forward 
On the Leg. 


3429 


Amputation 

for crush (both legs) 

for gangrene 


2 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

2 
3 


2 
1 

1 
1 

1 


2 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
] 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 
1 
3 

1 
1 
1 












1 
5 


1 


1° 
1^ 


1 


2 

8 
1 


for osteomyeHtis of bones of foot 
, for septic ankle 








1 








1 








1 


for ulcer, persistent 

Amputation at knee-joint, for anky- 
losis follcndng tuberculosis . . . 
Re-amputation: 








1 








1 








1 


for painful stump 

for sepsis 

Excision : 








1 








1 








1 


of sarcoma . . 


1 






2 


of tumor (unspecified) .... 
Incision and drainage of abscess . . 
Plastic operation for adherent ci- 
catrix 






1 


1 






3 






1 


Repairing lacerated wound .... 


1 
1 








1 


Secondary suture of stump .... 








1 


On the Foot. 

Total number . . 










Amputation 


1 

2 

1 

1 


1 

1 

1 


1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 












for crush 


1 








1 


for endarteritis, specific . . . 






1 


1 


for gangrene 




1 
1 
1 
1 


1 




9. 


for osteomyelitis, chronic . . . 




1 


?. 


Excision of fibroma 






1 


Fasciotomy, for taUpes 








1 












Carried forward 


1565 


1901 


3466 




3081 


122 


155 


108 


3466 



o See No. 5. 



b See No. 6. 



206 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 







Admi 


TTED 






Discharged 




Surgical Operations. 




a 




o 

a 

3 


s 


O 

:2i 




a ^ 

£4 


"3 

1 


Brought foncard 
Manipulation : 

for rigid valgus 


1 
1565 

1 

4 

1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 


1901 
2 


3466 

1 
6 

1 
2 


8 
5 


3081 

1 
6 

1 

1 


122 


155 


108 


3466 
1 


for talipes 








6 

1 
2 


Plastic operation, for persistent ulcer 
of stump 








Repairing crush .... 


1 






On the Toes. 

Total number . . 






Amputation 


1 
1 

1 

1 


1 
] 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 












for crush 




1 






1 
1 


for obliterative endarteritis . 


14 
6 


1 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 






for osteomyelitis 








9 


for Raj^naud's disease .... 








1 


Arthrodesis of great toe with teno- 
plasty, for hammer toe .... 








1 


Excision of joint, for hammer toe . 








1 


Removing thickened nail 








1 


OPERATIONS ON THE JOINTS. 
On the Shoulder. 

Total tnimher . . 










Arthrodesis, for poliomyelitis . . . 


1 

2 

1 


1 
1 

1 


1 
1 

1 

2 

1 
1 












Arthrotomy, exploratory, for infec- 
tious arthritis 










Aspiration : 

for diagnosis 










for tuberculosis 


1 








Manipulation : 

for arthritis, infectious .... 








for dislocation, congenital . . 










Operations for subacromial bursitis . 










bursotomy .... 


1 

1 
3 
1 




; 

3 

1 
1 


3 










excision of adhesive bands . . 








excision of bursa 








3 


manipulation 




1 
1 

127 








Removing bullet 1 


















155 


108 : 




Carried fonvard lo8S' 


1910. 


M9S 


. 


31 OS 


5498 



207 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 







Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Opkrations. 




m 

a 


3498 


3 

o 

a 

3 
CO 

9 


3 

3108 


-a 
> 

O 

127 


-d 

5 

155 


-TCO 

a eJ 
108 


1 


Brought forward 

On the Elbow. 

Total number . - 


1588 


1910 


3498 


Arthrodesis, for tuberculosis . 
Arthroplasty, for ankylosis . . 
Cauterization, for sepsis . . . 

Excision of joint 

for ankylosis 




1 
1 
1 

2 
1 

1 


1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 






1" 




1 


2 


1 
1 




1 








1 










1 
1 
2 








1 








1 










?. 


Plastic operation for chronic ulcer . 
Reducing fracture-dislocation (open 






1 


1 


6 

32 

8 


1 






1 


On the Wrist. 

Total number 
Excision of dislocated semilu 












aar 


1 


1 

2 

1 


1 

1 
2 
1 
1 


1 

1 

2 
1 

1 








1 


Incision and drainage: 








1 


for tenosynovitis 


1 








7. 


Reducing dislocation (open method) 








1 


Removing bullet 








1 


On the Hip. 

Total number 
Arthrodesis 














3 

2 
1 

1 

1 
1 


1 

1 
1 


1 
3 
2 
2 

2 

1 

1 












for ankylosis 


1 
1 
2 
1 

2 

1 

1 








1 


for arthritis, infectious . . . . 






2 


3 


for osteoarthritis 






2 


for tuberculosis 


1 






9 


Arthrotomy : 

for arthritis, infectious . . . . 






9 


with removal of bony growth 
from acetabulum (osteoar- 
thritis) 








1 


with resection of head of femur 
for osteoarthritis 








1 












Carried forward 


1606 


1919 


3525 




3130 


128 


156 


111 


3525 



a See No. 19. 

208 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. Discharged. 


Stjrgical Operations. 


CO 

<u 

1 


a 


1 


Sum Total. 
Relieved. 





-6 

s 


-J' CD 
eS .-1 

—T 
^ c 

C cS 

t—l *-5 

111 


'3 
1 


Brought forward 
Arthrotomy, exploratory, for resi- 


1606 

2 

1 


1919 
1 
2 


3525 

1 
2 
2 

1 


3130 


128 


156 

1» 


3525 
1 


Incision and drainage of abscess . . 

tuberculous 

Manipulation, for osteoarthritis . . 
Operations for congenital dislocation 


....i 2 

.... 1 

1 




-y 


1 






9 






1 


11 














2 

6 
2 

1 


2 

7 
2 

1 
1 

1 


9 








9 


reduction: 


\ 6 


1 






7 


open method i . . . . 

Operations for flexion of joint: 

fasciotomy and myotomy . . 1 
fasciotomy and tenotomy . .1 1 
Reducing dislocation from polio-! 
myelitis (open method) 

On the Knee. 


•^ 








9 


....; 1 

....! 1 

i 








1 








1 


1 






1 


79 










Arthrotomy: 


1 
1 

1 

1 

3 

1 
4 
1 


1 
1 
4 

1 

1 

2 
3 
1 
1 

8 

1 
1 




1 








1 


with curettage, for osteomyelitisi .... 


.... 1 

.... 4 








1 








4 


with suture of ruptured crucial 






1 


1 


Arthrotomy, exploratory, for infec- 
tious arthritis 


1 




1 

2 
2 
1 
1 






1 


Arthrotomy with injection of oil: 


1 








9 






1 






8 








1 


for intermittent hydrops 

for synovitis, chronic .... 1 








1 


1 






1 




7 
1 




1 


8 


Arthrotomy and arthroplasty, for 
ankylosis . . 1 






1 


Aspiration, for diagnosis 


1 


1 






1 












Carried forward 


1675 


1968 


3643 




3223 


145 


157 


118 


3643 



a See No. 20. 

209 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


CO 

4) 


J 

S 


1 


15 

s 


1 


T3 
> 

1 




tn - 
O ^ 

■^ C 
C rt 
1-1 i-s 


3 


Brought forward 
Excision: 
of bursa 


1675 

3 

1 

13 

1 

5 
1 

8 
1 
2 
1 
1 


1968 

1 

1 

1 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 


3643 

4 
1 
14 
1 
1 

1 

7 
2 
9 
1 
2 
2 
1 


8 

6 
.... 

29 
10 


3223 

4 
1 
14 
1 
1 


145 


157 


118 


3643 
4 


of chondroma 








1 


of displaced cartilage .... 
of loose fragment of bone . . 
of sarcoma 








14 








1 








1 


Excision of joint 

for deformity folloTving fractm^e 










1 
6 

3 

2 
1 

1 








1 


for tuberculosis 






1 


7 


Forcible flexion, for ankylosis . . . 
Incision and drainage, for sepsis . . 
Injection of formalin, for sepsis . . 
Removing bone plate 


2 
5 
1 









1 


9 
1 






9 


Remo\'ing foreign bodv 






1 


9 


Suturing ruptured ligament . . . 






1 


On the Ankle. 

Total number . . 










Arthrodesis for poliomyelitis . . . 


4 
1 


1 


1 
4 
1 


1 

1 
1 








1 


Incision and drainage, for sepsis . . 


3 






4 


Removing foreign body 






1 


OPERATIONS ON THE BONES. 
On the Vertebrae. 

Total number . . 










Bone grafting 


1 
7 

2 
1677 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1960 


1 
8 
1 

1 

1 
2 

3637 












for fracture of lumbar vertebra 
for Pott's disease 


1 
8 
1 

1 

1 

2 

3219 








1 
8 


for scoliosis .... 








1 


Excision : 

of exostosis 








1 


of dead bone graft, following op- 
eration for scoliosis .... 








1 


Incision and drainage of psoas ab- 
scess 








9 




145 


157 


116 




Carried foncard 


3637 



210 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


i 

i 

167' 

i. . . 
] 

f 

1 ^ 

1 1 

1 
4 

1 


m 

S 

■196C 

.... 
) 2 

3 
1 


3 

)363/ 

1 

1 

7 
1 
1 


3 

s 

3 


"3 

321£ 

) . . . . 


> 

s 

o 
141 


-d 
Q 

) 157 


.■S5- 

O — 

^ c 
a a 

1—11-5 

■ lU 




Brought forward 
Laminectomy 


)3637 


for fracture-dislocation . . . . 




1 

2 






1 


for tmnor of spinal cord . . . 

^•ith division of nerve roots for 

painful stump of arm . . . 


.... 


1 




1 
1 


4 
1 


Osteotomy (Hibb's) for Pott's 
disease 


4 


7 
1 
1 






7 
1 


Reducing dislocation (atlas on axis) 








Removing foreign body 








1 


On the Clavicle. 

Total number . . 










Gurettage, lor osteomyelitis . . . 


1 
1 
1 


1 


1 
2 
1 


1 
1 








1 


Reducing fracture 

ununited 


1 




1 


2 
1 


On the Ribs. (See also Operations 
on the Thorax.) 

Total number . 


5 

2 
3 








Excision : 

of cer\'ical rib 


1 
1 

1 


2 


2 
1 

1 

1 


2 
1 
1 

1 








2 


of costal cartilage, for necrosis . 








1 


of tract of osteomyehtic sinus . 








1 


Incision and drainage, for osteomye- 
litis 








1 


On the Sternum. 

Total number . . j 












1 


1 


1 

1 


1 

1 








1 


Incision and drainage, for tubercu-j 
losis 1 








1 


On the Skull. (See also Opera- 
tions on the Brain.) 

Total number . . . 








Removing fragments of bone, and 
suturing lacerated dura .... 


1 




1 






1" . 
158 


119 3 


1 












Carried forward 1 


6941 


970 3 


664 


S 


238 149 


664 



a See No. 135. 

211 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Admitted. 



Brought forward 



Sequestrectomy .... 

On ihe Nasal Bones. 

Turbinectomy .... 



1694 



On the Maxillary Bones. 

Total number . 
Arthroplastic operation, for ankylo- 
sis of temporo-maxillary articula- 
tion 

Cauterization for carcinoma . . , 
■with dissection of neck .... 
Curettage: 

for necrosis 

for osteomyelitis 

Dissection of neck, for carcinoma of 

jaw 

Excision : 

of epulis 

of odontoma 

of sarcoma 

of small piece of bone, for infra- 
orbital neuralgia 

Excisionof upper jaw, for sarcoma . 
Extraction of tooth, for impaction 

and necrosis 

Incision and drainage: 

of alveolar abscess 

of infected cyst 

Resection 

for ankylosis 

for carcinoma 

with dissection of neck . . 
Spb'nting jaw, for fracture .... 
Wiring teeth, for fractured jaw . . 
Wiring upper jaw, for cleft palate . 



1970 3664 

9 1 



42 



Discharged. 



P5 



3238 



P5 



149 



158 



a-"-" 

Ol-H 

M • 

■^ a 



119 



3664 
2 



Carried forward 1717 1995 3712 



3277 152 162 1213712 



a See No. 55. 



h See No. 60. c See No. 82. 

212 



d See No. 138. 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



1 


Admitted. 


j 




Discharged. 




Surgical Operations. 


03 


a 


Total. 
Sum Total. 


P5 


'6 
> 

s 

o 


o 

Q 


IS 

Ot-H 

^« 
— i>-ti 


3 


Brought forward 
On the Scapttla. 


1717 1995 


3712 


4 


3277 152 


162 


121 


3712 


Excision of superior angles, for flexed 

scapulae 

Incision and drainage, for osteomye- 
litis 


1 


l' 


1 
1 








1 




1 

2 


1 

2 


29 


1 
2 








1 


Sequestrectomy 

On the Humerus. 

Total number 










?, 










Bone graft (autogenous) mth appli- 
cation of plate, for non-union . . 

Excision of capitellum, following 
fracture 


1 
2 
1 
3 

7 

1 

1 
1 
1 


2 

2 

. 5 
2 


1 
4 

1 

3 
2 

5 
9 

1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
l' 








1 


3 






1 
1 


4 


Excision of head of bone, for fracture- 
dislocation 






1 


Incision and drainage: 

for osteomyelitis 

for tuberculosis 


13 


2 
2 

5 
6 

1 

1 

1 

1 




1" 


3 

2 


Reducing fracture: 

closed method . . . 








5 


open method 

Reducing fractured epiphysis (open 
method) 


3 






9 






1 


Reducing separation of upper epi- 
physis (open method) 

Removing bone-plate 

Sequestrectomy 

On the Radius. 

Total number 








1 








1 








1 










Bone grafting, from tibia, for sar- 
coma 




1 


1 
2 

1 


1 
2 

1 








1 


Curettage, for osteomyelitis . . . 
Excision of fragment of bone, follow- 
ing fracture 


2 

1 








9, 








1 












Carried forward 


1739 


2010 


3749 




3308 


155 


163 


123 


3749 



a See No. 85. 

213 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 



Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Admitted. 



Discharged. 



rt 



P^ 



O i-H 

"^ a 

I— I 1-5 



Brought forward 
Excision of shaft of bone, for osteo- 
myelitis 

Incision and drainage, for osteomy- 
elitis 

Reducing dislocation of head of bone 

(open method) 

Reducing fracture (open method) 
Reducing Colles' fracture (closed 

method) 

Removing bone plate 



1739 

1 

1 

1 
1 



2010 



On the Ulna. 

Total number . 
Excision of head of bone, for sarcoma 
Incision and drainage, for osteomy- 
elitis 

Reducing fracture (open method) 

Sequestrectomy 

Suturing fractured olecranon . . , 



On the Radius and Ulna. 

Total nuviber . . 
Bone plating, for non-union . . . 
Excision of exostosis uniting bones . 
Freshening ends of bones, for non- 

imion 

Osteotomy, for deformity following 

fracture 

Pegging ununited fracture . . . 
Reducing fracture: 

closed method 

open method 

Removing bone plate 

Removing wires 

Shortening bones, for contraction 



Carried forward 



1762 



3749 
1 



2020 3782 



3308 



19 



3337 



155 



163 



123 



158 



3749 
1 
2 



163 1243782 



214 



Medical and Sxirgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. j 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 


4) 


03 

"3 

1 


3 
e5 


03 
O 

a 

m 




> 

o 




*^ a 
a c3 


"3 
o 


Brought forward 

On the Carpal Bones. 

Total number . . 


1762 


2020 


3782 


2 
2 

6 


3337 


158 


163 


124 


3782 


Excision of fragment of scaphoid, fol- 
lowing fracture 

Excision of scaphoid, for old fracture 

On the Metacarpal Bones. 


1 

1 




1 
1 


1 

1 








1 








1 










Curettage, for tuberculosis .... 
Excision of 4th bone, for osteomye- 
litis . ... 




1 
1 

1 


1 
1 

1 


1 
1 

1 








1 








1 


On the Phalanges (fingers). 
Sequestrectomy 

On the Os Innominatum. 

Total number . . 










1 










Incision and drainage : 

of osteomyelitis of ilium . . . 
of tuberculous abscess of is- 
chium 


1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
2 


1 
1 

2 
1 


2 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

2 

2 
2 


2 

1 








9 








1 


TJeducinp' fracture of ilium 






1 


1 


Sequestrectomy of acetabulum . . 

Wiring pubic bones, for separation 

of symphysis 

On the Femur. 

Total number . . 


82 


1 
1 






1 








1 










Bone graft from tibia, for non-union 
Bone plating following osteotomy for 

flexion deformity 

Curettage: 

for cyst . . . 


1 

1 

2 
2 








1 






1 









9 


for osteomyelitis 


1 






9 










Carried forward 


1772 


202813800 

] 


1 


33.53 


158 


163 


126 


3800 



215 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 




o 

a 


o 
H 

3800 

4 
2 

1 
1 

] 
13 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
9 
3 
1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

7 

14 

1 
3 

1 
3 


o 

a 

3 
CO 

2 


> 

3353 

4 

2 


"a; 

Pi 

o 
158 


Q 
163 


— CO 
O --H 

1— 1 >-i 

126 


1 
^ 


Brouqht forward 


1772 

3 
2 

1 
1 

1 
12 

1 
4 
1 


2028 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

5 

2 
1 

1 

5 

2 

1 


3800 




4 































1 

1 


1 












1 


Incision and drainage: 

for neuro-cytoma 

for osteomyelitis 

Manual osteoclasis through epiphy- 
seal line: 






1 
3 




1 


16 


9 

1 
1 


1° 




13 

1 










1 


Osteotomy 

for ankylosis: 

of hip . 










1 
1 

9 
3 
1 








1 








1 


for flexion deformity 

for genu valgum 

for genu varum 

for tuberculosis of hip .... 
Osteotomy, exploratory, for diag- 
nosis 


1 






1 






9 




. 




3 








1 


1 






1 


Plastic operation, for osteomyelitis, 
chronic .... 


2 

2 

1 
2 

12 

1 
3 

1 

2 


24 


2 






■? 


Operations for fracture 

pegging, for fracture of neck 










2 

1 

6 

13 

1 
.3 








^ 


pinning, for fracture of shaft 








1 


reduction by closed method 
reduction by open method . . 
Reducing separation of epiphysis 
(open method) .... 


1 


1^ 




7 
14 






1 


Removing bone plate . . 








3 


Resection of head of bone, for tuber- 
culosis 


1 
2 








1 


Sequestrectomy 






1 


3 










Carried forward 


1824 


2051 


3875 




3416 


165 


165 


129 


3875 



a See No. 84. 



b See No. 134. 



216 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Surgical Operations. 




to 

a 


o 


'5 
o 

S 

3 


> 

HI 

s 


3 

o 

:2i 


-6 


— Tco 
03 ^ 

O .-1 

c a 


c3 
1 


Brought forward 
On the Patella. 

Total nuviher . . 


1824 


2051 


3875 


12 

24 
5 

8 
27 


3416 


165 


165 


129 


3875 


Osteotomy, for ankylosis 


1 

1 

8 


2 


1 

1 
10 


1 

1 

9 








1 


Suturing patellar tendon with reduc- 
tion of fracture 








1 


Suturing periosteum, for fracture . 






1 


10 


On the Tibia. 

Total number . . 








Bone grafting, for non-union . . . 


6 

1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1 


1 

1 
1 

1 
2 

9 


1 

1 
1 

7 
2 

1 
3 
1 

2 
4 
1 


1 
1 

1 

6 
2 








1 


Curettage, for osteomyelitis . . . 


1 
.... 1 ... . 




1 


Excision of exostosis 


. . .i. 




1 


Incision and drainage, for osteo- 
myelitis 


1 






7 


Osteoclasis, for double genu varum . 








9 


Osteotomy 










for genu valgum 


1 
3 

1 
2 

4 

1 








1 


for genu varum 








3 


for poliomyelitis 








1 


Reducing fracture (closed method) . 








•> 


Removing bone plate 








4 


Sequestrectomy 








1 


On the Fibula. 

Total number . . 










Bone grafting, for non-union . . . 


1 

1 

4 
1 


1 


1 

1 

5 
1 


1 

1 

5 
1 








] 


Incision, exploratory, for (osteo- 
myelitis?) 








1 


Reducing Pott's fracture: . . . . 
simple (closed method) . . . 








5 


compound (open method) . . 








1 


On the Tibia and Fibula. 

Total number . . 










Bone transplantation, for mal-union 


1 


1 


1 
1 


1 
1 








1 


Incision and drainage, for osteomy- 
elitis 








1 












Carried forward 


1858 


2063 


3921 




3460 


166 


165 


130 


3921 



217 



Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



Admitted. 



Surgical Oferhtions. 



Brought fonvard 
Osteoclasis, for genu valgum . . 
Osteotomy and bone plating for de- 
formity following fracture . . 
Reducing fracture: 

closed method 

open method 

Removing bone plate 

Removing Parham band .... 



1858 
1 



On the Taksal Bones. 

Total number . 

Astragalectomy, for talipes . . 

Bone grafting, for deformity follow- 
ing fracture 

Excision of astragalus and os calcis, 
for osteomyelitis 

Excision of exostosis of os calcis . . 

Reducing fracture of astragalus 
(closed method) 



On the Metatarsal Boxes. 

Total number . . 

Excision of head of bone: 

for arthritis, chronic infectious 
for hallux valgus 

Excision of 3d bone, for osteomyelitis 



OPERATIONS ON THE 
TENDONS. 

Total number . 
Lengthening peroneal tendons, for 

peroneal spasm 

Lengthening tendo-A chillis: 

for contraction 

for spastic paralysis .... 
for talipes 



fe 



2063 
1 



3921 

9 



Discharged. 



P5 



3460 

9 



50 



166 



165 






130 



3921 
2 



1 4 
1 



Carried forward 1891 2079|3970 
218 



3503 169 165 133 3970 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1215 — Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Admitted. 



f^ 



Discharged. 



P^ 



O r-l 



UNCLASSIFIED. 
Excision : 

of carcinoma of groin 
of cicatrix of groin 
of fibroma of back 
of lipoma: 

multiple .... 

of groin .... 
of papilloma of groin 
of sarcoma: 

of back .... 

of groin .... 



Brought forward 18912079 
L engthening tendo-Achillis : 

with arthrodesis of great toe, for 

contraction 

Lengthening other tendons, for ta 

lipes 

Suturing extensor tendons into heads 
of metatarsals, for contracted toes 
Tendon fixation, for talipes . . 
Teno-myotomy : 

for spastic paraplegia . . 

for talipes 

Tenoplasty: 

for hammer toe 

for ruptured tendon . . . 

for talipes 

Tenorrhaphy: 

for ruptured supraspinatus 

for severed tendon . . . 
Tenotomy : 

for contraction 

for talipes 

Tenotomy and osteotomy: 

for deformity following fracture 

for talipes 



3970 



3503 



169 



165 



133 



3970 



16 



Carried forward 1933 2095 4022 

219 



3553 



169! 165 135 4022 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

Table C — Surgical Operations, 1915 — Continued. 



Surgical Operations. 



Admitted. 



Brought forward ,1933 



Incision and drainage of abscess : 

lumbar 

of back (tuberculous) . . . 

of groin 

Incision and drainage of carbuncle 

of back 

Myotomies, for scoliosis .... 
Plastic operation, for decubitus over 

sacrum 

Removing bullet from back . . . 
Skin grafting: 

sliding 

Thiersch 

Wolfe 



Total 



1946 



fe 



2095 4022 



21C0 4046 



3553 



Discharged. 



3572 



169 



170 



165 
1 



16: 



O rt 



135 



137 



4022 



2 

12 

3 

4046 



o No. 



6 See Xo. 127 



* In the 1915 list of operations, the term "epithelioma" is used to indicate epidermoid 
carcinoma. 

** The term "excision" is used to denote removal of entire organ; "resection" to denote 
removal of a portion of an organ. 

*** " Exploratorj- laparotomy" performed for disease of special organs (e.g., uterus, Tddney, 
etc.) is listed under the operations performed on that special organ, and not under operations 
performed on the abdomen in general. 



220 



TABLE D. 

SURGICAL OPERATIVE FATALITIES FOR 1915. 



AilPUTATIOX OF 
Arm, for crush. 

1. Male. 52 years. One-half hour before entrance was in- 
jured by railroad engine. Examination showed patient delirious: 
traumatic amputation of left forearm; lacerated wounds of left 
side of face; bleeding from right ear; reflexes not obtainable. 
Operation, day of admission. Ether. Left arm amputated at 
point of election. X-ray showed fracture of skull in right frontal 
region. Died few hours after operation. Xo autopsy. 

Breast, with dissection of axilla for carcinoma. 

2. Female. 42 years. Lump in right breast of seven months' 
duration. Operation. Gas and ether. Amputation of breast with 
dissection of axilla. Patient took ether badly and never recovered 
consciousness, dying about 12 hours later. Pulse gradually failed 
and respirations became more labored. Clinical cause of death: 
Shock. Pathological report showed carcinoma of breast. Anat. 
diag. : Hypertrophy and dilatation of heart. Slight hemothorax, 
right. Syphilitic aortitis. 

3. Female. 58 years. Patient operated on for cyst of breast, 
a year before entrance. Following this, wound broke down and 
there was considerable hemorrhage. Examination showed scars 
on left breast; hard mass above and to outer side of nipple, ad- 
herent to skin and ribs : glands in left axilla ; many rales in both 
lungs. Operation. Ether. Breast, axillary contents and both 
pectoral muscles removed. Following operation, some sloughing 
of 'flap, and a week later, tjT)ical septic temperature. More 
thorough drainage of wound introduced. Later, examination of 
lungs showed consolidation at both bases. Diagnosis of broncho- 
pneumonia made. Died twenty-six days after operation. Xo 
autopsy. 

4. Female. 45 years. Lump in breast noticed for two years. 
Examination showed mass in central portion of breast with con- 
traction of nipple. Preoperative diagnosis: Carcinoma of breast. 
Operation. Ether. Amputation of breast with dissection of axilla 
for carcinoma. Sepsis and erysipelas developed in wound. Patient 
died on twenty-fourth day. Pathological report showed diffuse 
fibrinous and glandular hyperplasia. Xo autopsy. 

Leg, for crush. 

5. Male. 72 years. Brought to Accident Room with history of 
having been thrown from train and both legs amputated by car. 
Examination showed patient in profound shock; both legs ampu- 
tated at junction of middle and lower thirds. Operation, day of 
admission. Spinal anesthesia. Reamputation of both legs. Trans- 
fusion, afternoon of operation. Patient gradually failed and died 
on fourth day after operation. Xo autopsy. 

221 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

Leg, for gangrene. 

6. Male. GO years. Transfer from medical service with diag- 
nosis of diabetic gangrene. Severe carbuncle on neck 12 years 
previously. Eight months previously first began to notice general 
Aveakness with abnormal appetite, thirst and polyuria. At same 
time began to lose weight. Blister developed on middle toe of 
riglit foot. Other toes became affected and began to turn black. 
At entrance 2.42% sugar. Sugar-free at end of a week's treat- 
ment. Operation on day of transfer. Spinal anesthesia. Ampu- 
tation of riglit leg for diabetic gangrene four inches below tubercle 
of tibia. No tourniquet. Good immediate recovery. Considerable 
post-operative pain in stump. Flaps showed discoloration. No 
sepsis. At end of 19 days definite line of demarcation appeared 
in flaps. Operation. Spinal anesthesia. Reamputation at mid- 
thigh for sloughing flaps. Flaps again sloughed following this 
operation. Patient weak and occasionally irrational; restless. 
Eemained sugar-free after operation. Gradually failed and died 
two weeks after second operation. Anat. diag. : Fibrous myo- 
carditis. Endocarditis of mitral valve. Arteriosclerosis. Diabetes 
mellitus. 

Thigh, for crush. 

7. Male. 46 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with 
history of having been struck by locomotive about one hour previ- 
ously. Conscious, but in marked shock. Multiple contusions of 
face; crush of right lower leg; lacerations of soft parts of thigh. 
Treated for shock. Wound cleaned. Popliteal artery tied. In- 
direct transfusion, 20 ounces. Large doses of morphine required 
to keep patient quiet. Operation. Gas and oxygen. Amputation 
at mid-thigh. Good immediate recovery. Some infection about 
stump with moderate sloughing. Patient seemed to be gaining 
at first. Somewhat irrational. On seventh day showed signs of 
pneumonia, both sides. Incontinence of urine and feces. Grew 
progressively worse and died on eleventh day. Clinical diagnosis: 
Sepsis of stump. Pneumonia. No autopsy. 

Thigh, for gangrene of foot. 

8. Male. 68 years. Transfer from medical service with diag- 
nosis of diabetic gangrene. Immediate operation. Spinal anes- 
thesia. Amputation at mid-thigh for diabetic gangrene. No 
immediate shock. Patient had chill 24 hours after with high 
temperature and labored respiration. Died on second day. Signs 
of pneumonia. No autopsy. 

Thigh, for septic knee. 

9. Female. 30 years. Shortly before entrance patient fell and 
was unable to rise. Examination showed transverse fracture of 
right femur in lower third. Good position could not be obtained 
by apparatus. Operation. Ether. Open reduction of fracture 
which extended into knee joint; septic hematoma drained. After 
operation, ran high temperature. Wound explored again three 
weeks later and further pockets drained. Leg amputated two 
weeks after second operation. Patient continued to run septic 
temperature, gradually failed, and died three weeks after amputa- 
tion. No autopsy. 

10. Male. 32 years. Operated on for large perinephritic abscess 
three months before entrance. This followed pneumonia and 
empyema. After discharge, patient complained of pain in right 
lower leg which steadily increased keeping him awake at night. 

222 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

Examination: Right leg flexed, marked tenderness on pressure 
over upper end of tibia and knee; no redness or swelling. Opera- 
tion. Gas and ether. Bone trephined but no frank pus found in 
medulla. Pus commenced to drain from wound three days later. 
Still complained of pain. Two weeks after operation, knee which 
had been swelling steadily was tapped and considerable cloudy 
fluid withdrawn. Abscess opened over head of fibula. A week 
later, it was necessary to drain knee-joint for sepsis. Two other 
drainage operations on knee performed and leg amputated at 
thigh, seven weeks after first operation. Patient did not rally 
after amputation; died three days later. No autopsy. 

APPENDECTOMY FOR 

Appendicitis, acute. 

11. Male. 22 years. Nine days before entrance, acute attack 
of abdominal pain with diarrhea. Some fever. Vomited day 
before entrance. Examination showed tender mass in right lower 
quadrant, dull on percussion, slight spasm. Operation, day of 
admission. Ether. Appendix abscess found extending into pelvis. 
Appendix removed; wound drained. Patient did well for seven 
days, after which temperature rose again. On seventeenth day, 
large residual abscess opened in right flank. Patient failed and 
died on second day after secondary operation. No autopsy. 

12. Male. 65 years. Pain in right lower quadrant for three 
months. For last three days, pain severe with vomiting. Definite 
tenderness and spasm in right lower quadrant. Preoperative 
diagnosis: Appendix abscess. Immediate operation. Gas and 
ether. Appendectomy with drainage of appendix abscess. Con- 
siderable post-operative gas pain and distension. Acute dilatation 
of stomach on second and third days. Patient gradually failed and 
died on sixth day. Clinical cause of death: Peritonitis. Acute 
dilatation of stomach. No autopsy. 

13. Male. 29 years. Well until one year previously when he 
began to cough and lose weight. Treated in sanatorium for tuber- 
culosis for one year. Attack of sharp, severe pain in right side 
one month before admission. Examination showed slight dullness 
at both apices with fine rales. Tender mass in abdomen about 
siz6 of kidney, lying level with umbilicus. Preoperative diag- 
nosis: Appendix abscess. Operation. Gas and ether. Appen- 
dectomy with drainage of old retrocecal appendix abscess. On 
second day after operation, rise of temperature and cough. Ex- 
pectoration and pain in chest. On fourteenth day, signs of fluid 
in chest. Tapped; only bloody serum obtained. Fecal fistula 
developed in wound. Chest conditions continued. Strength gradu- 
ally failed and patient died on twenty-fifth day. Clinical diag- 
nosis: Tuberculosis of lungs. Appendix abscess. Fecal fistula. 
No autopsy. 

Appendicitis, acute, with general peritonitis. 

14. Female. 12 years. Abdominal pain and vomiting for three 
days. Tenderness and spasm over McBurney's point. Tempera- 
ture 102.3. White count 24,000. Immediate operation. Ether. 
Perforated appendix removed. Abdomen full of pus. Cigarette 
wick drainage. Fecal fistula developed on seventh day. Acetone 
found in urine on twenty-seventh day. Patient refused nourish- 
ment, became irrational and gradually failed; died on fortieth day 
after operation. Clinical diagnosis: Septicemia. Acidosis. No 
autopsy. 

223 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

15. Male. 29 years. Two days previously had attack of acute 
abdominal pain with vomiting. Pain located in right lower 
quadrant. Examination showed abdomen distended; general 
tenderness with spasm in lower half. Operation, day of admission. 
Ether. General peritoneal cavity contained small amount of thin, 
foul smelling fluid ; appendix gangrenous ; wound drained. Pa- 
tient failed steadilj' and died three days after operation of general 
peritonitis. No autopsy. 

16. Female. 33 years. Two days previously, attack of pneu- 
monia and severe abdominal pain in right lower quadrant. Simi- 
lar attack eight years previously. Examination showed abdomen 
distended and generally tender, more marked in right lower quad- 
rant; extreme tenderness in both cul-de-sacs by vagina. Opera- 
tion, day of admission. Ether. Appendix abscess opened and 
drained; cecum opened and drainage tube fastened into it; some 
general peritonitis. Patient failed and died three days after 
operation for general peritonitis. Anat. diag. : General fibrino- 
purulent peritonitis. 

17. Male. 55 years. History of abdominal cramps of two days' 
duration with nausea and vomiting. Given castor oil. Examina- 
tion showed general abdominal tenderness and rigidity, most 
marked in right lower quadrant. Preoperative diagnosis: Acute 
appendicitis with peritonitis. Immediate operation. Ether. Ap- 
pendectomy with drainage for perforated appendix with peritonitis. 
Marked post-operative shock. Indirect blood transfusion, 30 ounces 
of blood. Only temporary benefit, patient d_ying during night. 
Clinical cause of deatli: General peritonitis. No autopsy. 

Appendicitis, subacute. 

18. Female. 69 years. Patient operated on six weeks before 
entrance for acute appendicitis with drainage of abscess. Admitted 
to hospital with discharging sinus whicli she wished closed. Opera- 
tion. Ether. Sinus explored; several fecoliths found at bottom 
with adherent, perforated appendix and large numbers of adhe- 
sions; appendix removed. Day after operation, patient's color 
became dark. Shortly after that, breathing labored. Percussion 
of heart showed acute dilatation. Patient grew rapidly worse and 
died in a few hours. Anat. diag. : Fibrino-purulent peritonitis. 
Hemorrhagic edema of lungs. Hypertrophy and dilatation of heart. 
Defective closure of foramen ovale. 

ARTHRODESIS OF ELBOW FOR 
Tuberculosis. 

19. Male. 30 years. Pain and stiffness of elbow after a fall, 
nine months before entrance. Ankylosis of arm with five degrees 
of flexion. Preoperative diagnosis: Tuberculosis of elbow. Opera- 
tion. Gas and etlier. Artlirodesis of elbow. Bone plates inserted. 
Plaster bandage. Much post-operative pain and swelling of hand. 
Sloughing of wound. Patient died suddenly on seventh day follow- 
ing operation. Anat. diag.: Septic arm. Double hydrothorax. 
Acute degeneration of kidneys. 

ARTHROTOMY, EXPLORATORY, AND DRAINAGE OF 
Residual abscess of hip. 

20. Female. 34 years. Excision of head of femur for tuber- 
culosis, 9 years previously. Fairly well until a month before 
entrance, when she began to have severe pain in hip. Examination: 
Femur is held flexed on abdomen; movements of hip-joint very 

224 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

painful; much pain over fold of buttock. Operation. Gas and 
oxygen. Incision and drainage of abscess of hip-joint. Patient 
ran irregular high temperature following operation. Drainage 
unsatisfactory. X-ray showed osteomyelitis of acetabulum. 
Twenty-four days after first operation, counter incision made an- 
terior to previous one. Very little pus found. Patient seemed to 
be making some improvement with less pain and fever, wlien on 
seventeenth day after second operation, there was sudden increase 
of respirations and failure of circulation. Cyanosis deepened and 
patient died about 3 hours after beginning of attack. Clinical 
diagnosis, pulmonary embolism. No autopsy. 

CHOLECYSTECTOMY FOR 
Cholecystitis, acute. 

21. Male. 59 years. In hospital 14 months previously with 
symptoms of abdominal pain and tenderness in region of gall- 
bladder. No operation. Two days before second admission had 
severe attack of pain in right "upper quadrant. Examination 
showed acute tenderness and rigidity in gall bladder region where 
mass size of pear could be felt. Operation, day of admission. 
Ether. Gall bladder much distended and covered with fibrin flakes. 
Cholecystectomy. Bleeding controlled with difficulty. Following 
operation, considerable bleeding from wound. Respirations became 
high, pulse faint. Death, 12 hours after operation. Clinical cause 
of death, shock and hemorrhage ( ? ) . No autopsy. 

Cholecystitis, chronic. 

22. Female. 53 years. Attacks of indigestion for several years. 
Severe pain in epigastrium and vomiting. About nine months 
previously, very severe attack of pain in right upper quadrant 
radiating to back with vomiting. Several attacks after that re- 
quiring morphia. Examination showed a rather obese woman with 
definite spasm over right upper quadrant. No definite mass felt. 
Pre-operative diagnosis: Cholelithiasis. Operation. Ether. Cho- 
lecystectomy. Some leakage of bile from bed of gall bladder. Poor 
recovery from ether. Pulse weak and rapid. Patient restless on 
second day, much pain. Some staining of bile through wick. 
Transfusion, 10 ounces of blood for post-operative shock, without 
benefit. Died on second day. Clinical cause of death, shock. 
Examination of gall bladder showed chronic cholecystitis without 
stones. No autopsy. 

Cholelithiasis. 

23. Female. 54 years. Fifteen months previously had an 
acute attack of epigastric pain lasting four hours. After that had 
similar attacks lasting a few hours, every four to ten days. Never 
jaundiced but pain radiated to shoulders. No vomiting. Examina- 
tion negative. Operation. Ether. Gall bladder found dilated, 
containing many stones. Cholecystectomy. Good ether recovery. 
Twelve days after operation, developed pain in back and a small 
patch of pneumonia on right. This was clearing up when suddenly 
patient became cyanotic and died in a few minutes, on twenty-third 
day after operation. Clinical cause of death, pulmonary embolism 
( ?) . No autopsy. 

CHOLECYSTECTOMY AND CHOLEDOCHOSTOMY FOR 
Cholelithiasis. 

24. Male. 40 years. Transfer from medical service with diag- 
nosis of gall stones. Well until two weeks before entrance when 
he had an attack of epigastric pain with chills, fever and vomiting 

225 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

followed by jaundice. Pain and jaundice lias persisted since. 
Operated on day of transfer. Gas and ether. Walls of gall bladder 
thickened and contained stones. Gall bladder removed. Common 
duct opened and four or five stones removed. Probe passed to 
duodenum. Catheter drainage of common duct. Sent to ward in 
fair condition. Free drainage of bile. Some cough and frequent 
vomiting. Distention. Jaundice cleared up. Infection in wound. 
Irrational and drowsy. On eighth day began to bleed from wound. 
Temperature subnormal. Gradually failed and died on tenth day 
after operation. Anat. diag. : Stones in common and hepatic 
ducts. Localized peritonitis. Lobar pneumonia, left lung. Chronic 
interstitial pancreatitis. 

CHOLECYSTOSTOMY FOR 
Cholecystitis. 

25. Male. 60 years. Four days before entrance, acute attack of 
abdominal pain relieved by morphine. Considerable vomiting. No 
chills. Examination showed abdomen distended with large dull 
mass in right iliac fossa, considerable tenderness on deep pressure. 
Operation, day of admission. Gas and oxygen. Some free fluid in 
abdomen; cecum dilated; appendix appeared normal; gall blad- 
der distended; band of adhesions found extending from it holding 
down the colon and probably causing obstruction; gall bladder 
drained; band divided. Patient steadily improved for two weeks 
after which complained of some pain in region of wound. Vomit- 
ing began shortly after this. Examination showed probable pneu- 
monia of right base. From this time on patient failed, and died 
17 days after operation. Pneumonia. Empyema. No autopsy. 

Cholelithiasis. 

26. Female. 55 years. Few days before entrance, attack of 
pain in right upper quadrant requiring morphine. No jaundice. 
Urine dark. Examination showed slight jaundice; heart enlarged; 
abdomen distended; extreme tenderness and rigidity in gall-blad- 
der region where mass could be felt. Operation, day of admission. 
Ether. Very large gall bladder exposed; stone removed; gall 
bladder drained. At end of operation, patient ceased breathing 
and could not be resuscitated with artificial respiration or mas- 
sage of heart. No autopsy. 

Empyema. 

27. Female. 71 years. Severe pain in right upper quadrant 
for six weeks requiring morphine. Considerable vomiting; slight 
jaundice; rounded tender mass in region of gall bladder. Pre- 
operative diagnosis: Empyema of gall bladder. Operation. Anes- 
thol. Incision and drainage of empyema of gall bladder. Became 
jaundiced after operation. Irrational; restless. Gradual loss of 
strength. Died 12 days after operation. Anat. diag. : Cholelithia- 
sis. Gall stone in duodenal papilla. Fat necrosis in pancreas. 
Abscess of liver. 

Cholelithiasis. 

28. Male. 36 years. Nine years previously, cholecystotomy 
and choledochotomy for calculus. Two years previously, opera- 
tion for hernia in scar, and cholecystectomy. For 18 months fre- 
quent attacks of pain in gall-bladder region, never jaundiced. 
Last attack one week before entrance. X-ray examination nega- 
tive. Operation. Gas and ether. Common duct dilated; con- 
tained several small calculi. Calculi removed; common duct 
drained. Died in 24 hours from shock and cardiac failure. No 
autopsy. 

226 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

COLOSTOMY FOR 
Carcinoma of rectum. 

29. Female. 48 years. Had bloody discharge from rectum for 
two years, with gradually increasing pain and diflSculty in defeca- 
tion. Emaciated and anemic. Rectal examination disclosed large 
cauliflower mass filling lower rectum. Attack of sudden abdominal 
pain and subnormal temperature, distention and obstipation. Im- 
mediate colostomy advised. Operation. Novocain. Colostomy. 
Patient failed rapidly after operation and died within 24 hours. 
Clinical diagnosis: Intestinal obstruction. Carcinoma of rectum. 
No autopsj'. 

CRANIOTOMY AND DECOMPRESSION FOR 
Fracture of skull. 

30. Male. 37 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with 
history of having been knocked from freight train by striking 
bridge. Unconscious. X-ray showed no definite fracture of skull. 
In absence of localizing symptoms, patient was kept under ob- 
servation. On fifth day, signs of increasing pressure. Decom- 
pression operation advised by neurologist. Operation. Ether. 
Right temporal decompression. No evidence of hemorrhage found. 
Breathing stopped during operation, requiring artificial respira- 
tion. Patient died on table. Anat. diag. : Subdural hemorrhage 
of brain on left side. Thrombosis of superior longitudinal sinus 
and lateral sinus on right. Fracture of skull, occipital bone. 
Contusions of brain, — frontal, parietal, and temporal regions on 
left. 

31. Male. 45 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with 
history of having been struck b}^ electric car one hour previously. 
Unconscious. Considerable shock. Abrasions of scalp with hema- 
toma in occipital region. Crush of left foot. Immediate opera- 
tion. Ether. Subtemporal decompression, right, for fracture of 
skull. Repair of crushed foot. Subdural hemorrhage found. 
Failed rapidly and died in a few hours. Fractured skull. No 
autopsy. 

32. Male. 25 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with 
history of having fallen 15 feet from staging. Unconscious. De- 
pressed fracture of skull over right temporal region. Lacerated 
wound four inches long. Profuse bleeding from b9th ears. Knee 
jerks present and equal. Right leg can be moved, left motionless. 
Immediate decompression advised by neurologist. Subtemporal 
decompression, left. Right, frontal decompression. Ether. Extra- 
and intradural hemorrhage found. Patient failed rapidly and died 
in a few hours. No autopsy. 

33. Male. 33 years. Found unconscious in street and brought 
in by police. Examination showed fracture of skull, Pott's frac- 
ture, and multiple abrasions and lacerations of face and scalp. 
All reflexes abolished. Immediate subtemporal decompression, 
left, for fractured skull. No anesthesia. Marked laceration and 
contusion of brain tissue. Failed to regain consciousness and died 
one hour after operation. No autopsy. 

34. Male. Age unknown. Patient supposed to have fallen from 
electric light pole. Brought in unconscious and in moderate shock. 
Bleeding from right ear and lacerated wound OA'er right parietal 
region. Abduction of right leg with shortening. X-ray showed 
dislocation of hip which was reduced under ether. Immediate 
operation. Novocain. Decompression for fracture of skull with 

227 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

hemorrhage. Irrational and restless after operation. Marked 
elevation of temperature. Gradually failed and died on second 
day. iS!"© autopsy. 

35. Male. Age unknown. Brought to Accident Room by police. 
No history obtainable. Unconscious. Small abrasions and lacera- 
tions of face and lip. Lumbar puncture showed slightly bloody 
fluid. X-ray suggestive of fracture of skull. Immediate opera- 
tion. Ether. Subtemporal decompression. Brain under much 
tension. No hemorrhage found. Patient gradually failed and 
died in 24 hours. Clinical diagnosis: Fracture base of skull. 
No autopsy. 

36. Male. 38 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with 
history of having been struck by signal post while riding on freight 
car. Examination showed wounds of scalp, face and left arm. 
Reflexes normal. X-ray showed fracture of occipital, parietal, and 
temporal bones on right. Vomited several times. Became irra- 
tional. Spinal puncture showed bloody fluid. Neurologist ad- 
vised decompression. Operation. Ether. Right temporal decom- 
pression. No extradural hemorrhage. Slight amount of subdural 
clot. Fair ether recovery. Cheyne-Stokes respiration developed. 
Patient became very restless and died on following day. Clinical 
diagnosis: Fractured skull. No autopsy. 

37. Male. 25 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with 
history of having been thrown from motor cycle and knocked un- 
conscious, four days before entrance. Recovered consciousness on 
second day and developed temperature. X-ray showed reflexes on 
left more active than right. Lumbar puncture showed bloody 
fluid. Immediate operation. Ether. Brain bruised and contused. 
Considerable inflammatory exudate. Left subtemporal decompres- 
sion for fractured skull. Patient gradually failed and died on 
third day after operation. Clinical cause of death : Fractured 

i skull. Meningitis. No autopsy. 

38. Male. 5 years. Brought to Accident Room with history 
of having been struck by automobile about four hours previously. 
Unconscious. Lacerated wounds of scalp. X-ray showed fracture 
of skull. Spinal puncture showed bloody fluid. Immediate opera- 
tion. Ether. Subtemporal decompression and removal of bone 
fragments for fracture of skull. Failed rapidly and died a few 
hours later. No autopsy. 

39. Male. Age unknown. Brought to Accident Room with 
history of having been struck on the head about six hours previ- 
ously by falling tree. Patient was conscious and rational imme- 
diately after injury, becoming unconscious about three hours 
later. There was a lacerated wound in occipital region which had 
been sutured. Knee-jerks active on right, absent on left. No 
paralyses. Pupils circular and equal. X-ray showed probable 
fracture. Immediate operation. No anesthetic. Left subtemporal 
craniotomy. Large extradural blood clot removed. Anterior 
branch of middle meningeal ligated. Profuse hemorrhage from 
region of vault. Right craniotomy performed disclosing no extra- 
dural hemorrhage. Patient became progressively weaker and died 
about an hour after operation. Clinical diagnosis: Fracture, base 
of skull. Extradural hemorrhage. No autopsy. 

40. Male. 10 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with 
history of having fallen from tree a short time previously. Pa- 
tient semiconscious but could be aroused. Bleeding from right 

228 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

ear. Examination showed depressed ^fracture in occipital region. 
Pupils equal. Reflexes normal. No vomiting. Blood pressure 94. 
Operation, day of admission. Ether. Curved incision over ear 
towards occiput exposing crack running through parietal bone. 
Decompression below crack, and longitudinal sinus injured with 
profuse hemorrhage. Sinus had probably been torn by fracture. 
Hemorrhage controlled with difficulty. Patient left table in poor 
condition, became steadily worse and died four hours after opera- 
tion. Xo autopsy. ^ 

41. Male. 5 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with a 
history of having been hit by automobile, sustaining multiple in- 
juries. Unconscious, bleeding from nose. Large hematoma in both 
parietal regions. Pupils dilated. Eyes turned towards left. Heart 
sounds feeble and rapid. Compound fracture both bones of right 
forearm and lacerated wound of right leg. Babinski present; knee- 
jerks active; superficial reflexes absent. Operation, day of admis- 
sion. Ether. Incision over right temporo-parietal region and 
crack found running evidently to base of skull and up over vertex. 
Longitudinal sinus probably torn as there was profuse hemorrhage 
through crack. Decompression, about two inches above right ear. 
Patient died on way to ward. No autopsy. 

42. Male. 46 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with 
history of having fallen from roof two hours previously. Examina- 
tion : Unconscious man, breathing stertorously. Pupils contracted, 
did not react. A two-inch lacerated wound over temporal region. 
Superficial reflexes present: left knee-jerks very active. Blood 
pressure 110. Operation, day of admission. Ether. Subtemporal 
decompression. Considerable bloody cerebrospinal fluid found ex- 
ternal to dura. Brain somewhat contused. No fracture seen. 
Patient did not recover consciousness. Failed rapidly. Died in 
18 hours. No autopsy. 

43. Male. 40 years. Patient brought to Accident Room with 
history of having fallen from street car 19 hours previously. 
Examination: Unconscious; hematoma of eyes and subconjunc- 
tival hemorrhage on left; several contusions on body; fracture 
of OS calcis. Discharge of blood from urethra. Operation, day of 
admission. Gas and ether. Subtemporal decompression on left. 
Patient did not regain consciousness and died in 36 hours. No 
autopsy. 

44. Male. 44 years. Patient brought to Accident Room un- 
conscious, having been injured in some manner the same morning. 
Examination showed iinconscious man on accident table bleeding 
from left ear and nose. Vomiting of dark blood. Multiple con- 
tusions of skin. Abdomen negative. Fracture both bones of left 
leg and severe laceration of foot. Operation, day of admission. 
Ether. Subtemporal decompression. Patient never regained con- 
sciousness and died in 18 hours. No autopsy. 

Gunshot wound of brain. 

45. Female. 34 years. One hour before entrance was shot in 
head three times with revolver. Examination showed unconscious 
woman having clonic convulsions. Right pupil dilated and showed 
marked external strabismus. Double Babinski. Knee-jerks absent. 
Scalp wounds on forehead, and wound of entrance of bullet over 
left ear, and bullet wound of left hand. Operation, day of admis- 
sion. No anesthesia. Subtemporal decompression and exploration 
of bullet wound. Extensive fracture of skull found with laceration 
of brain. Died few hours after operation. No autopsy. 

229 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

Hydrocephalus. 

46. Male. 2 montlis. Premature infant. Head increased 
markedly in size first few weeks after birth. Tapped several times. 
Examination showed head markedlj^ hydrocephalic; fontanelles 
continuous. Operation. No anesthetic. Subtemporal decompres- 
sion. Large external hydrocephalus. Silk drain inserted under 
dura which led out into neck. Considerable post-operative shock 
and recurrence of hydrocephalus in few days. Gradually grew 
weaker and died on thirteenth day. Anat. diag. : Partial agenesis 
of brain. Otitis media. Patent ductus arteriosus. 

Tumor of brain. 

47. Male. 32 years. Transfer from medical service with 
diagnosis of brain tumor. History of headaches and deafness for 
two months. General weakness, and dizziness. Pupils unequal 
Choked discs. Ataxic gait. Romberg. Operation, day of transfer 
Ether. ■ Exploratory mastoid operation for sinus thrombosis ( ? ) 
Normal condition found. Eight subtemporal decompression 
Ether. Brain under enormous pressure; hernia of brain. Left 
sided facial paralysis following operation; weakness of left arm 
Much drainage of cerebrospinal fluid through wound. Marked 
hernia of brain. On twentietli day following operation, there 
was a rupture of scalp at line of suture with protrusion of brain 
tissue. Infection took place. Temperature and pulse rose. Death 
ensued at end of a week. Clinical diagnosis : Brain tumor. Hernia 
of brain. Infection. No autopsy. 

48. Male. 33 years. Attacks of frontal headache one month 
previously. Attacks of dizziness and trouble with vision two weeks 
later. Examination showed left knee-jerks increased; Babinski 
on left. Speech thick. Slight ataxia. Double optic neuroretinitis. 
Wassermann negative. Operation. Ether. Subtemporal decom- 
pression and tapping of lateral ventricle on left. After operation, 
patient apparently unconscious and paralysed on right. Did not 
regain consciousness and died four days later. Anat. diag. : Gum- 
mata of cerebral hemispheres. 

49. Male. 52 years. Ten weeks previously had a sudden 
attack of dizziness accompanied by vomiting. Impaired vision. 
Symptoms persisted and grew worse. No paralyses. Memory al- 
leged to be bad. No vomiting after onset of disease. Examination 
showed vision poor; no hemorrhages in eye grounds; no aphasia 
or astereognosis; reflexes sluggish but not remarkable. Slightly 
ataxic. Operation. Ether. Subtemporal decompression on right. 
Brain very tense. Trephine opening behind left ear. Patient 
improved for two or three days, then became irrational. Twelve 
days after operation, ventricles were tapped through trephine 
opening. Tension reappeared about 12 hours after tapping to a 
higher degree than before. The next day, trephine opening made 
near posterior fontanelle and later ventricles tapped. Following 
this, patient grew steadily worse and died 12 hours after operation. 
No autopsy. 

CRANIOTOMY, EXPLORATORY, FOR 

Pituitary tumor. 

50. Male. 32 years. Blurring of vision for seven years, slight 
frontal headaches and occasional attacks of dizziness. During 
year before entrance attacks became more severe and frequent, 
accompanied by vomiting. Marked confusion. Neurological exam- 
ination and X-ray pointed to slow growing tumor in neighborhood 

230 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

of hj'popliTsis. Operation. Ether. On opening dura, large quan- 
tity of fluid escaped. Attempt at exploration at base of brain 
abandoned as being too difficult and dangerous. Nothing definite 
found. Patient failed rapidly and died in 48 hours. Anat. diag. : 
Neuroblastoma of right cerebral hemisphere. 

Tumor of brain. 

51. Male. 7 years. When eight or nine months old had con- 
vulsions. About three weeks previous to entrance suddenly com- 
plained of pain in back of neck, and mother noticed gait was un- 
steady. Spastic gait, with marked tendency to fall. Slight ankle 
clonus. Right Babinski. Marked Romberg symptoms. Ocular 
s^Tnptoms: Neuroretinitis and right facial paresis. No evidence 
of tuberculosis. Wassermann negative. Operation. Ether. Small 
trephine opening first made behind ear and ventricle tapped; large 
amount of fluid withdrawn. Incision over occipital bone and flaps 
turned down; large decompression opening made over cerebellum. 
Cyst found in right cerebellar hemisphere on bottom of which 
was tumor close to peduncles, which could not be removed. 
Patient did not regain consciousness after operation and died in 
about six hours. No autopsy. 

52. Male. 50 years. Occasional severe cramps in legs from 
childhood. For three years previously had dizzy spells : never 
lost consciousness. Four months ago began to have disturbance 
of vision and later, headaches, occipital and frontal: also sharp 
pains in back radiating to . groin, accompanied with numbness. 
Some disturbance of sensation of foot. Examination showed 
patient weak and unable to stand; marked hemianopsia; reflexes 
normal; Romberg present. X-ray showed mvich thickened skull. 
Some mental hallucinations. Wassermann negative. Preliminary 
operation. Ether. Large bone flap elevated in left parietal region. 
Ten days later second operation. Ether. Attempt at ventricular 
puncture unsatisfactory. Exploration of brain negative. Follow- 
ing operation, patient unconscious with incontinence. Failed 
slowly and steadily, dying ten days after second operation. Anat. 
diag. : Glioma of right cerebral hemisphere with extension into pia 
and glioma of spinal cord to region of cauda equina. Lobar 
pneumonia. Emphysema. 

CYSTECTOMY FOR 
Carcinoma of bladder. 

53. Male. 60 years. Entered with diagnosis of papilloma of 
bladder. Intermittent hematuria for nine months with frequency 
of micturition. Dysuria just before entrance. Loss of weight. 
Operation. Spinal anesthesia unsuccessful. Exploratory laparot- 
omy with local anesthesia. Double ureterostomy for carcinoma of 
bladder, under gas and oxygen. Uneventful convalescence. Free 
flow from both ureters. Twelve days later, total cystectomy for 
carcinoma of bladder. Spinal and ether. Considerable post-opera- 
tive shock. Patient failed to rally, grew progressively weaker and 
died nine days later. Pathological report of bladder and prostate 
showed carcinoma of bladder, prostate not involved. No autopsy. 

CYSTOSTOIMY, SUPRAPUBIC, FOR 
Carcinoma of bladder. 

54. Male. 33 years. Stone removed from bladder three years 
ago, at another hospital. Since then, gradually increasing pain, 
frequent and painful urination. Several attacks of hematuria, 
severe four weeks before entrance. Rectal examination showed 

231 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

prostate enormously enlarged. Pre-operative diagnosis: 1. Cancer 
of prostate. 2. Chronic inflammation of prostate. Operation. 
Sacral anesthesia, and local to abdominal wall. Suprapubic cystos- 
tomy, partial excision of tumor of bladder. ^Moderate post-opera- 
tive bleeding. Refused nourishment. Complained of much pain. 
Died on third day. Clinical diagnosis: Carcinoma of bladder. 
Pathological report: Carcinoma. No autopsy. 

DISSECTION OF NECK FOR 
Carcinoma of jaw. 

55. Male. 47 years. Four years previously patient noticed 
small tumor around left lower molar tooth. This was removed 
locally but recurred, and three other recurrences have been re- 
moved. Examination: On gum just behind left canine tooth, two 
ulcerated areas surrounded by an area of leukoplakia; firm nodule 
at angle of jaw non-adherent to skin. Operation. Ether. Com- 
plete dissection of neck with removal of glands and internal jugu- 
lar vein. At end of this stage of operation, patient suddenly 
stopped breathing, failed to respond to all treatment and died. 
No autopsy. 

ENTERORRHAPHY FOR 
Perforated typhoid ulcer. 

56. Male. 44 years. Entered Accident Room with history of 
chills and fever for two weeks. Nausea and vomiting for two 
days. Pain in right lower quadrant. Abdomen distended; tym- 
panitic throughout; board-like rigidity. Pre-operative diagnosis: 
Acute appendicitis, general peritonitis. Immediate operation. 
Gas and ether. Drainage of general peritonitis. Closure of per- 
forated typhoid ulcer of intestine. Considerable post-operative 
distention. Very profuse discharge from wound. Gradually failed 
and died on seventh day. Clinical cause of death: Perforated 
typhoid ulcer. General peritonitis. No autopsy. 

ENTEROSTOMIES WITH CLOSURE OF 
Diverticulum of sigmoid. 

57. Male. 48 years. Diarrhea with passage of mucus for six 
months. No vomiting or nausea. Constant pain in lower abdomen 
for six weeks. Considerable loss of weight. Examination showed 
questionable mass and tenderness in left lower quadrant. X-ray 
showed obstruction in sigmoid. Operation. Ether. Mass found 
in lower left quadrant involving ileum, sigmoid and rectum. Ileum 
ruptured in attempt to free it from mass. Mass dissected out and 
Mixter tube introduced into both ends of ileum and lower end of 
sigmoid. Patient failed and died on fifth day after operation. No 
autopsy. 

ENTEROSTOMY FOR 
Gastric ulcer. 

58. Male. 23 years. Transfer from medical service. For one 
year and a half had distress after eating lasting two or three 
hours. Claimed it was relieved by food. Occasional vomiting. 
Bismuth X-ray showed diverticulum lower end of esophagus; 
pathological process at pylorus suggestive of malignant disease. 
One month previously posterior gastro-enterostomy. Clinical diag- 
nosis: Gastric and duodenal ulcer. Discharged relieved. Three 
weeks later, re-entered through Accident Room, on account of pain 
after taking food. Bismuth X-ray showed almost complete ob- 

232 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

struction of lower end of esophagus. Patient unable to eat. Opera- 
tion, day of transfer from medical service. Ether. Jejunostomy 
for obstruction of cardiac orifice of stomach. Poor ether recovery. 
General abdominal pain and elevation of pulse. On second day, 
signs of pneumonia appeared in both bases. Patient grew steadily 
worse, failed to respond to stimulation and died on third day. 
Clinical diagnosis: Gastric ulcer obstructing cardiac orifice. Pneu- 
monia. No autopsy. 

Partial intestinal obstruction with, general peritonitis. 

59. Male. 58 years. Patient entered Accident Room with 
history of having pain in right groin of two davs' duration. A 
lump appeared at same time. Vomited several times. Bowels did 
not move after onset of attack in spite of castor oil. Examination 
showed man in fair general condition with moderately distended 
abdomen. Dense, tender, hernial protrusion under Poupart's liga- 
ment. Pre-operative diagnosis: Strangulated femoral hernia. Im- 
mediate operation. Spinal anesthesia. Resection of gangrenous 
small intestine; end-to-end anastomosis; closure of femoral canal. 
Poor ether recovery. Patient continued to vomit and bowels moved 
with enema. Evident signs of obstruction developed. Secondary 
operation. Local anesthesia and anesthol. Enterostomy for partial 
obstruction wdth general peritonitis. Patient died few hours after 
secondary operation. Clinical cause of death: General peritonitis. 
No autopsy. 

EXCISION OF ' JAW, UPPER, FOR 

Sarcoma. 

60. Male. 2 years. One year previously tumor appeared on 
side of nose which progressively grew larger, in spite of treatment. 
Examination showed large tumor of left upper jaw which nearly 
closed left eye, and deformed upper lip and nose; hard palate 
pushed downward. No tenderness. Operation. Rectal and in- 
halation ether. Excision of upper jaw by rapid dissection. Little 
hemorrhage or shock. During night, patient suffered considerably 
from shock and died 24 hours after operation. Anat. diag. : Opera- 
tion wound and rachitis. Pathological report: Giant cell sarcoma. 

EXCISION OF LYMPH NODES, CERVICAL, FOR 

Tuberculosis. 

61. Female. 33 years. History of swelling in right side of 
neck of about nine months" duration. Examination showed large 
mass of glands in right side of neck. Chest negative. Operation. 
Ether. Excision of tuberculous glands of neck. Fair ether re- 
covery. Complained of soreness in throat. On fifth day after 
operation, temperature being normal and general condition excel- 
lent, patient suddenly fell while Avalking. Picked up unconscious 
with wound on back" of head. Right side of body spastic. Right 
hand and arm moved convulsively. Some spasm of left side of 
face. This persisted for 10 to 15 minutes and breathing became 
slower. Pulse weaker, entirely failing in a few minutes. Clinical 
diagnosis: Tuberculous cervical adenitis. Cerebral hemorrhage. 
No autopsy. 

EXCISION OF RECTLHM FOR 
Carcinoma. 

62. Male. 65 years. Rectal symptoms for 18 months. Occa- 
sionally noticed blood. No pain. Slight loss of weight. Clinical 
diagnosis: Carcinoma of rectum. Operation. Ether. Laparotomy 

233 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

for mobilization of rectum and sigmoid with colostomj', first stage ' 
operation. One week later, second stage operation. Spinal and 
ether. Kraske operation Avith excision of rectum. Considerable 
shock following second operation. Patient gradually failed and 
died one week later. Clinical signs of pneumonia. Xo autopsy. 

EXCISION OF SAC OF 

Spina bifida. 

63. Female. 4 months. Recommended from Out-Patient De^ 
partment with diagnosis of spina bifida and paralysis of left leg. 
Well developed and nourished child. Large spina bifida, size of 
grape fruit in lumbar region. Rupture of tumor with escape of 
several ounces of fluid. Immediate operation. Ether. Excision 
of sac of spina bifida. Plastic closure of defect. Temperature rose 
to 108 just previous to death. Failed rapidly and died on second 
day. No autopsy. 

EXCISION OF TONGUE WITH DISSECTION OF NECK FOE 
Carcinoma. 

64. Male. 50 years. Transfer from medical service with diag- 
nosis of epithelioma of tongue. Ulceration of tongue with marked 
induration reaching nearly back to circumvallate papillae. Was- 
sermann positive. Operation. Intrapharyngeal ether. Amputa- 
tion of tongue and dissection of neck. Marked post-operative 
shock. Died within a few hours. Clinical diagnosis: Carcinoma 
of tongue. Shock. Pathological report: Epithelioma. No autopsy. 

GASTRECTOMY, PARTIAL, WITH GASTRO-ENTEROSTOMY FOR 

Carcinoma of stomach. 

65. Male. 46 years. Transfer from medical service. Diag- 
nosis, gastric carcinoma. Attack of vomiting six years previously. 
Began to have attacks of epigastric pain two years later. Few 
days before entrance, vomited frequently. Stools black. Exam- 
ination: Guaiac test positive. No free hydrochloric acid. Small 
mass palpable in epigastrium. Operation. Gas and ether. Par- 
tial gastrectomy with gastro-enterostomy for carcinoma of stomach. 
Good ether recovery. Slight bronchitis developed on second day. 
No nausea or vomiting. Condition very satisfactory for a week. 
Stitches removed on eighth day. Patient began to vomit. After 
an attack of vomiting, wound found wide open ; intestines protrud- 
ing. Woimd resutured. Patient failed to rally and died shortly 
after. Anat. diag. : Localized fibrinous peritonitis. Fibrino- 
purulent pleuritis. 

GASTR0-ENTER0ST02kIY FOR 
Carcinoma of stomach. 

66. Male. 40 years. Transfer from medical service. Diag- 
nosis: Carcinoma of stomach. Anorexia for six months. Vomit- 
ing began 10 days before entrance. Considerable blood in vomitus. 
Examination : Mass felt to right of median line in epigastrium. 
Guaiac test positive. Free hydrochloric acid absent. Operation, 
day of transfer. Ether. Anterior gastro-enterostomy for obstruct- 
ing carcinoma of stomach. Poor recovery from ether. Pulse 
barely perceptible. Considerable post-operative vomiting. On fifth 
day wound became septic; opened. Tenth day, some improvement 
in stomach condition. Irrational and restless. Gradually failed 
and died on sixteenth day. Clinical diagnosis : Cancer of stomach. 
Asthenia. Septic wound. No autopsy. 

234 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

Duodenal obstruction due to carcinoma of liead of pancreas. 

67. Male. 63 years. Transferred from medical service with 
diagnosis of duodenal ulcer. Epigastric pain; vomiting; blood 
found in vomitus; loss of weight; free hydrochloric acid present. 
X-ray diagnosis, pathological process in duodenum. Operation. 
Ether. Anterior gastro-enterostomy for obstruction of duodenum 
due to carcinoma of head of pancreas. Poor recovery after ether. 
Marked distension. Cardiac weakness. Died on third day. Anat. 
diag. : Ulcer of pyloric ring with perforation. Acute general 
peritonitis. 

Gastric ulcer. 

68. Male. 34 years. Gastric symptoms for two years previ- 
ously. Pain and distress. Persistent vomiting for two months. 
Diagnosis, ulcer of stomach. Operation. Gas and ether. Ulcer 
found on lesser curvature. Excised, and posterior gastro-enteros- 
tomy done. Signs of pneumonia appeared immediately after opera- 
tion. Patient died at end of a week with clinical signs of pneu- 
monia. Some breaking down of upper portion of wound. Anat. 
diag.: Fetid bronchitis. General fibrino-purulent peritonitis. 
Subdiaphragmatic abscess. Streptococcus septicemia. 

Obstructing retroperitoneal sarcoma. 

69. Male. 20 years. Transfer from medical service with diag- 
nosis of splenomegaly. Symptoms of indigestion for two months; 
frequent vomiting; pain in epigastrium. Noticed tumor in left 
side of abdomen. Examination: Mass in left upper quadrant; 
nodular mass in lower pole of left epididymis. Bismuth X-ray 
showed gastric dilatation and atony with stasis. Obstruction of 
pylorus due to ulcer or malignant disease. Operation, day of 
transfer. Gas and ether. Large retroperitoneal tumor partially 
obstructing the duodenum. Anterior gastro-enterostomy. Con- 
siderable post-operative vomiting with moderate distention. On 
fifth day complained of pain in epigastrium. Vomited a consider- 
able quantity of old blood. Some blood oozed from abdominal 
wound. Failed rapidly and died on seventh day. Retroperitoneal 
sarcoma. Post-operative hemorrhage. No autopsy. 

GASTRO-ENTEROSTOINIY WITH INFOLDING OF 
Duodenal ulcer. 

70. Male. 43 years. Clinical diagnosis, duodenal ulcer. Pain 
in region of stomach for three or four years. Occasional vomiting. 
Severe attack during two weeks previous to entrance. Operation. 
Ether. Posterior gastro-enterostomy for duodenal ulcer with in- 
folding of ulcer. Good ether recovery. Considerable post-operative 
vomiting in spite of stomach washing. Third day, stomach obvi- 
ously dilated. Wound opened with negative iindings. Patient 
failed steadily and died on fourth day. Clinical diagnosis: Acute 
dilatation of stomach. Peritonitis. Anat. diag.: Ulcers of duo- 
denum with perforation of one of them. General fibrino-purulent 
peritonitis. Gastro-enterostomy suture intact. 

GASTRORRHAPHY FOR 
Perforated gastric ulcer. 

71. Male. 67 years. Brought to Accident Room with history 
of dyspnea for five or sis years, not severe. Nine hours before 
admission, Avhile at work, was seized with terrific epigastric pain 
with vomiting. Examination showed abdomen tense, rigid and 
tender; diminution of hepatic dullness. Pre-operative diagnosis: 
Perforated gastric ulcer. Immediate operation. Ether. Plication 

235 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

of perforated gastric ulcer. Good immediate recovery. On eleventh 
day patient had attack of vomiting. Tube showed gastric stasis. 
Patient gradually failed. Retained no nourishment. Died 21 days 
after operation. Anat. diag. : Ulcer of duodenum. Acute general 
peritonitis. 

GASTROSTOMY FOR 
Carcinoma of esophagus. 

72. Male. 55 years. Transfer from throat service for gastros- 
tomy. Diagnosis, carcinoma of esophagus. Dysphagia for seven 
months. Some hoarseness. No regurgitation. Considerable loss 
of weight. Esophagoscope showed mass at level of the arytenoid. 
Operation, day of transfer. Gas and ether. Witzel gastrostomy 
Patient failed to rally from operation and died on second day from 
shock and exhaustion. No autopsy. 

73. Male. 59 years. Transfer from medical service with diag- 
nosis of carcinoma of cardiac end of stomach. For six months had 
difficulty in swallowing solid foods. Regurgitation of food. For 
last two months, unable to swallow solid food. Never vomited 
any blood. Examination, indefinite resistance in right side of 
epigastrium. Stomach tube could not be passed. Operation, day 
of transfer. Novocain and ether. Stomach very small and con- 
tracted. Large mass involving cardiac end, undoubtedly carcinoma- 
tous. Gastrostomy. Good ether recovery. Feeding through tube 
caused some pain. General condition poor. Respiration and pulse 
elevated. Signs of ulceration at base. Patient rapidly grew worse 
and died on fourth day. Clinical cause of death : Pneumonia. 
No autopsy. 

74. Male. 62 years. Transfer from throat service. Diag- 
nosis, carcinoma of esophagus. Esophagoscope showed growth 
14 inches from mouth. Operation. Ether. Gastrostomy. Ampu- 
tation of penis for carcinoma. Catheter in stomach failed to work 
satisfactorily. Secondary gastrostomy, three weeks later. Novo- 
cain, anesthol, and ether. Operation difficult on account of contrac- 
tion of stomach and adhesions. Some leakage of gastric juice about 
catheter. Profuse leakage through gastric fistula. Operation, 
one month later. Ether. Suture of gastrostomy wound. Patient 
failed to rally and died two days after last operation. Clinical 
diagnosis : Carcinoma of esophagus. Carcinoma of penis. Gastric 
fistula. No autopsy. 

HEMITHYROIDECTOMY FOR 
Exophthalmic goitre. 

75. Male. 46 years. For several years had occasional attacks 
of palpitation. Small lump appeared in neck 12 years previously. 
Increased slowly in size. Always nervous. Tremor of hands and 
headache for three months. Lost considerable weight. Tumor 
size of orange occupying position of thyroid gland, firm, not pul- 
sating; smaller tumor just above it. Operation. Ether. Kocher 
incision. Ligation of upper and lower poles of thyroid gland, and 
tumor with half of gland removed. Wound drained. Marked 
thyrotoxic symptoms. Died in six hours. Anat. diag.: Hyper- 
trophy of thyroid gland. Compression of trachea. Some hemor- 
rhage into subcutaneous tissues near wound and mediastinum. 
Enlarged thymus gland. Dilatation of heart. 

Goitre. 

76. Female. 20 years. Five months previously, right side of 
neck became swollen and later, left side. Examinatiqn showed 

236 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

symmetrical enlargement of thyroid with slight pulsation. No 
exophthalmos. Slight line tremor of fingers. Pre-operative diag- 
nosis: Colloid goitre. Operation. Gas and oxygen. Hemithy- 
roidectomy for colloid goitre. Patient became very cyanotic during 
operation; pulse nearly imperceptible. Anesthesia removed. Pa- 
tient began to breathe about five to the minute. Complained of 
being unable to see; irrational; insisted that she was blind, al- 
though recognized her mother. Eye grounds normal. Pulse rapid. 
Areas of anesthesia. Wound clean. Seemed hysterical. Some 
rigidity of muscles of hands and forearm. Took very little nour- 
ishment. Four days after operation had spasms not characteristic 
of tetany. Failed rapidly. Refused nourishment. Incontinence 
of urine and feces. On eighth day, temperature rose to 106. Died 
on ninth day. Blood count varied from 25,000 to 18,000. No growth 
appeared from culture from wound. Pathological report showed 
intraglandular hypertrophy. Clinical diagnosis: Cerebral em- 
bolism ( ? ) . No autopsy. 

HEENIOTOMY FOR 

Strangulated inguinal hernia. 

77. Female. 47 years. Admitted through Accident Room with 
diagnosis of strangulated inguinal hernia. Operated on for in- 
guinal hernia three years previously. Recurrence. Wore truss 
until time of second operation. Was unable to reduce hernia two 
days previously. Very painful. Vomited several times. Attempts 
at reduction by local doctor failed. Examination : In right groin, 
irreducible tumor size of small orange, very tender. Immediate 
operation. Ether. Excision of necrotic omentum. Drainage of 
abscess through inguinal canal. Some post-operative distention. 
Foul discharge through wound. Patient refused nourishment. 
Gradually grew weaker and died on tenth day. Clinical diagnosis: 
Strangulated inguinal hernia. Appendix abscess (?). No autopsy. 

HYSTERECTOMY FOR 
Fibromyoma. 

78. Female. 47 years. Irregular flowing for two months. 
Symmetrical tumor reaching nearly to umbilicus. Pre-operative 
diagnosis: Fibroid of uterus. Operation. Ether. Supravaginal 
hysterectomy; double salpipgo-oophorectomy. Considerable post- 
operative distension and vomiting. On fifth day. there was separa- 
tion of wound. Secondary operation. Ether. Resuture of wound. 
Patient suddenly failed on evening after second operation ; respira- 
tions became gaspy; patient died about an hour after first appear- 
ance of alarming symptoms. Pathological report: Fibromyoma. 
Anat. diag. : Hemorrhagic edema of lungs. Anemia. 

HYSTERECTOMY WITH SALPINGO-OOPHORECTOMY FOR 
Fibromyoma. 

79. Female. 38 years. History of large abdominal tumor for 
eight years. Three weeks previously suddenly seized with chills 
and fever. No abdominal pain. Operation advised at another 
hospital at that time, but refused. Retention of urine for last 
four or five days. Examination showed large, symmetrical, ab- 
dominal tumor extending from pubis to costal margin. Pre-opera- 
tive diagnosis: Ovarian cyst. Operation. Ether. Hysterectomy 
for fibroid; double salpingo-oophorectomy; removal of double 
intraligamentary cysts, necrotic. Immediate elevation of tempera- 
ture following operation. Considerable shock On the second day 

237 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

there was embarrassment of respiration with slight cyanosis. No 
vomiting. Gradually failed and died on fifth day. Clinical diag- 
nosis: Pneumonia. Anat. diag. : Localized peritonitis. Lobar 
pneumonia, left lung. 

80. Female. 61 years. Seven years previously had temporary 
hemiplegia. Two years later tumor was removed from spinal cord 
at level of fourth cervical vertebra. Toe-drop on right side and 
slight contraction of right hand. About three months previously 
abdominal tumor was noticed. Pre-operative diagnosis: Ovarian 
cyst. Operation. Gas and ether. Supravaginal hysterectomy and 
double salpingo-oophorectomy for ovarian cyst and fibroma. Chol- 
ecystectomy for cholelithiasis. Moderate post-operative vomiting. 
Abdomen quite distended. Signs of pneumonia on fifth day. 
Patient failed steadily and died on eighth day. Clinical cause of 
death : Pneumonia. Xo autopsy. 

HYSTEROTOMY, VAGIXAL, WITH ABOPvTION FOR 
Placenta previa. 

81. Female. 32 years. Patient entered hospital with diagnosis 
of fibroids. History of profuse flowing for six weeks. Missed two 
periods previous to onset of flowing. Patient put to bed for eight 
days. Flowing continued. Pre-operative diagnosis: Threatened 
miscarriage. Operation. Gas and ether. Vaginal hysterotomy with 
abortion. Moderate amount of bleeding during operation. Con- 
dition fair at close of operation. An hour later, patient pulseless 
with very shallow respirations, dying soon afterward. No definite 
cause for death could be made out; possibly embolism. No autopsy. 

INCISION AND DRAINAGE OF 
Alveolar abscess. 

82. Female. 29 years. Admitted with diagnosis of alveolar 
abscess. History of pain and swelling of jaw for six days. Very 
difficult to open mouth. Examination showed marked swelling on 
right side of face and jaw. Breath very foul. Temperature 103.4. 
Extraction of four teeth and incision and drainage of alveolar 
abscess. Ether. Abscess cavity extended under chin and floor of 
mouth to opposite side of jaw. Good ether recovery. Toxic. 
Vomited everything. Failed and died on fifth day. Anat. diag. : 
Suppurative pneumonia of lower l6bes with small abscess formation. 

Cellulitis, cervical. 

83. Male. 53 years. Four days before entrance patient noticed 
slight lump in right side of neck which increased rapidly in size. 
For two days previously had considerable difficulty in breathing 
and swallowing. Some fever. Examination shows hard, indurated 
mass under right side of jaw involving tongue, which also was hard. 
Operation, day of admission. Anesthol. Incision at angle of jaw. 
Large abscess opened. Two hours after operation, had an attack 
of intense dyspnea. An emergency tracheotomy was performed for 
edema of glottis. Had fairly comfortable night but died suddenly 
18 hours after second operation. No autopsy. 

Osteomyelitis of femur. 

84. Male. 15 months. One week before entrance, left leg began 
to swell confining child to bed for five days. Examination: Very 
sick looking child. Left thigh swollen and extremely tender in 
upper portion. Motions of leg painful. Operation, day of admis- 
sion. Gas and ether. Fluid found under periosteum" and thick 
yellow pus in medulla of femur. Wound drained. Temperature 

238 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

did not come down after operation and child seemed very sick. 
Two days later left ankle and right wrist became swollen and 
tender, and a large abscess was opened at ankle-joint. Condition 
slowly grew worse and child died one week after first operation. 
Ko autopsy. 

Osteomyelitis of humerus. 

85. Male. 9 months. Swelling of arm noticed two days before 
entrance. Marked tenderness. Pre-operative diagnosis : Osteomy- 
elitis. Immediate operation. Ether. Incision and drainage for 
acute osteomyelitis. Patient failed rapidly after operation and 
died in 24 hours. Clinical cause of death: General septicemia. 
No autopsy. 

Lumbar abscess. 

86. Male. 32 years. Transfer from medical service. Pain and 
stifi'ness in lumbar region, with abscess of soft parts. Immediate 
operation. Ether. Incision and drainage of lumbar abscess. Ran 
septic temperature after operation and died one week later. Blood 
culture showed staphylococci. Clinical diagnosis: Lumbar abscess. 
Osteomyelitis (?) of spine. Septicemia. No autopsy. 

Peritonsillar abscess. 

87. Male. 27 years. Twelve days before entrance patient had 
acute laryngitis followed by chills and difBculty in swallowing. 
Three days previously spit up pus and blood. Examination: Poorly 
nourished man. Several large, tender glands in right side of neck. 
Considerable bloody, purulent discharge in throat. Large, red, 
tender swelling in region of tonsils. Operation, day of admission. 
Peritonsillar abscess opened without anesthesia. Following opera- 
tion, temperature and pulse remained high. Patient died on fifth 
day. Blood culture showed no growth. Xo autopsy. 

INGISIOX, EXPLORATORY, FOR 

Inoperable recurrent carcinoma of axilla. 

88. Female. 40 years. Three years previously had amputation 
of breast with dissection of axilla for tumor of breast. Seven 
months previously, lump appeared in axilla. At time of entrance, 
tumor size of orange in right axilla, firmly attached to deeper 
structures. Operation. Gas and ether. Mass exposed, found ir- 
removable. Wound partially closed. Infection took place in 
wound. vSigns of septicemia developed and patient died in three 
weeks' time. Clinical diagnosis: Septicemia. Xo autopsy. 

LAPAEOTOMY FOR 
General peritonitis. 

89. Female. 31 years. For 10 years following an isehio-rectal 
abscess became more and more constipated. For last three years 
bloody, mucous discharge from rectum. Three days before entrance, 
began to have acute abdominal pains which increased steadily in 
severity. Vomited. Patient very weak. Examination : One inch 
and a half above sphincter of rectum was an annular stricture not 
admitting tip of finger. Operation, day of admission. Ether. 
Pelvis found filled with hard irregular mass matting together all 
organs; pus in peritoneal cavity. Second incision made in right 
lower quadrant and more pus obtained. Appendicostomy per- 
formed. Patient failed and died in 28 hours with symptoms of 
general peritonitis. Xo autopsy. 

239 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

LAPAROTOMY WITH DRAINAGE FOR 

Pancreatitis, chronic. 

90. Male. 37 years. Two months before entrance had acute 
attack of epigastric pain lasting several hours accompanied by 
nausea and vomiting, followed by several similar attacks. One 
month later cholecystostomy was done for chronic pancreatitis. 
FolloM'ing operation patient somewhat relieved but attacks recurred 
witli increasing severity. Examination showed patient draining 
from cholecystostomy wound. Abdomen extremely enlarged and 
bowels moved with difficulty. Appetite poor. Abdomen tapped 
and 2160 c.c. of turbid fluid withdrawn. Patient continued, how- 
ever, to complain of pain in left flank and loin. Operation. Gas 
and ether. Peritoneal cavity contained considerable cloudy fluid. 
In region of pancreas was large tumor which was punctured and 
found to be solid and composed of inflammatory tissue. Wick 
inserted. Following operation, patient slowly failed and died on 
eighteenth day. No autopsy. 

Peritonitis, general. 

91. Female. 51 years. Admitted with diagnosis of acute peri- 
tonitis. Abdominal pain in region of umbilicus five days previ- 
ously accompanied by nausea and vomiting. Pain shifted to left 
lower quadrant. Vomiting continued. No movement of bowels for 
three days. Abdomen markedly distended. Generalized spasm 
and tenderness most marked in left lower quadrant. Immediate 
operation. Ether. Exploration and drainage of localized pelvic 
peritonitis. Patient reacted poorly. Gradually failed and died 
on third day. Clinical diagnosis : Pelvic and general peritonitis. 
Anat. diag. : Localized enteritis of ileum with perforation. Gen- 
eral fibrino-purulent peritonitis. Lobular pneumonia. 

92. Female. 26 years. Four months before entrance had a 
miscarriage. Was in another hospital for some Aveeks. One month 
previously sinus developed at umbilicus which discharged up to 
time of entrance. Abdomen tender; patient gradually failing. 
Abdominal examination showed sinus at umbilicus discharging 
foul, yellowish pus. Vaginal examination showed some tenderness 
in vault. Operation. Ether. Cavity filled with thin, yellow pus. 
Peritoneum much thickened. Source of infection not sought after. 
Wound drained. Two days after operation, some discharge of 
fecal matter from drains. Patient failed, although abdomen re- 
mained soft and wicks drained thoroughly. Died one week after 
operation. No autopsy. 

Rupture of spleen. 

93. Male. 28 years. Patient kicked in abdomen, 10 hours 
before entrance. Felt faint. Considerable pain over abdomen. 
Bowels moved after accident. Vomited twice. Examination. Skin 
and mucous membranes pale. Abdomen tympanitic. No spasm 
or tenderness made out, except in left lower quadrant where there 
was marked tenderness. Some dulness in left flank. Operation, 
day of admission. Ether. Peritoneal cavity contained large 
amount of blood. Spleen found ruptured; packed with gauze. 
Patient did well for six days. Following removal of wicks and 
packs, abdomen became tender and distended and patient died on 
eighth day after operation. No autopsy. 

Subphrenic abscess. 

94. Female. 52 years. Six weeks before entrance began to lose 
appetite, followed shortly by shooting pains in left thorax. One 
week before entrance had a chill followed by vomiting. Examina- 

240 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

tion showed area of dulness over right lower back with broncho- 
vesicular breathing and crackles. Operation, day of transfer from 
medical service. Anesthol. Incision in gall-bladder region. Ab- 
scess between liver and diaphragm drained. Following operation, 
patient failed slowly. Respirations rose and patient showed signs 
of edema of lungs. Died six days after operation. No autopsy. 

95. Female. 16 years. Two weeks before entrance, attack of 
abdominal pain on right side accompanied with vomiting, chills 
and fever. Legs became numb and paralyzed four days previously. 
Examination showed abdominal tenderness on entire right side, 
not severe; extreme tenderness in right costovertebral angle: 
spine rigid, movements painful; liver enlarged; edema of legs. 
Patient incontinent. Operation. Gas and oxygen. Large abscess 
opened to the right of spine extending downward to kidney. Pa- 
tient's general condition improved somewhat for a week. Then 
failed rapidly and died on fifteenth day after operation, of sepsis 
and pneumonia. No autopsy. 

LAPAROTOMY WITH EXCISION OF 
Echinococcus cyst of liver. 

96. Male. 44 years. Eight days before entrance, acute attack 
of pain in epigastrium radiating ito right shoulder. Two similar 
attacks previously. Vomited daily. Jaundiced for two days. 
Examination showed extreme tenderness in epigastrium in region 
of gall-bladder. Operation. Ether. Gall-bladder dilated, re- 
moved; irregular, cystic mass on under surface of liver which 
was broken, removed, and found to contain many daughter cysts; 
much of main cyst as jjossible removed. Considerable shock. 
Transfused for secondary hemorrhage, day after operation. Died 
three days later. Anat. diag. : Echinococcus cyst of liver. Ab- 
scesses of liver. Acute, general peritonitis. Defective closure of 
foramen ovale. Septicemia. 

Gangrenous Meckel's diverticulum. 

97. Male. 69 years. Three days before entrance had attack of 
bronchitis. Day before entrance had acute attack of pain followed 
by vomiting. Cathartics without result. Pain constant. Abdomen 
became distended. Examination: Slight tenderness in right lower 
quadrant; no masses palpable. Operation. Spinal and anesthol. 
Peritoneal cavity contained free pus; gangrenous, perforated 
Meckel's diverticulum found on portion of ileum: diverticulum 
removed and opening into intestines closed; abdomen drained. 
Patient became steadily Avorse and died 12 hours after operation. 
Anat. diag. : Fibrino-purulent peritonitis. Arteriosclerosis. Fi- 
brino-purulent pleuritis. 

LAPAROTOMY, EXPLORATORY, FOR 
Aneurysm of abdominal aorta. 

98. Male. 35 years. One year previous to entrance, had sudden 
attack of severe abdominal pain in left hypochondrium. Pain 
persisted for one year, requiring morphine for its control. Exam- 
ination of abdomen showed tender, pulsating tumor filling epi- 
gastrium; systolic murmur heard over it. Wassermann, suspi- 
cious. Operation, day of transfer from medical service. Novocain 
and anesthol. Fusiform aneurysm of abdominal aorta six inches 
in greatest diameter. Operation only exploratory. Following- 
operation patient was violently delirious for one day and later 
became comatose, dying in four days. Anat. diag. : Aneurysm of 
superior mesenteric artery. Syphilitic aortitis. 

241 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 191o. 

Carcinoma of stomach. 

!)fl. Male. 5!) years. TransftT from medical service. Gradu- 
ally lost strength for two years. Occasional pain in epigastrimn ; 
later frequent vomiting. Seven weeks previously became so weak, 
had to give up work. Pre-operative diagnosis: Carcinoma of 
stomach. Operation. Gas and ether. Indurated mass involving 
posterior wall of stomach and pancreas; posterior wall of stomach 
perforated during manipulation. Patient failed rapidly and died 
on third day. Anat. diag. : Adeno-carcinoma of stomach with 
ulceration and perforation. Metastases in liver. General peri- 
tonitis. 

100. Female. 28 years. Patient treated in hospital four 
months previously and diagnosis of peptic ulcer made. Examina- 
tion showed liver somewhat enlarged; small palpable tumor in 
region of gall bladder. X-ray showed definite pathological process 
wdiich involved pylorus and stomach. Operation. Ether. Mass 
size of orange occupying pyloric antrum and chain of glands along 
both greater and. lesser curvature; mass in region of pancreas. 
Xo radical operation deemed advisable. Small mass removed from 
left lobe of liver. Patient made an uninterrupted recovery and was 
up and about in two weeks. Shortly after that, pain in right 
chest and temperature rose. Examination showed fluid in left 
side of chest. Patient became more emaciated. Xecessary to tap 
chest twice. Died three and one-half weeks after operation. Anat. 
diag. : Carcinoma of stomach with extensive metastases. Sero- 
fibrinous-pleuritis. Ascites. Ovarian cyst. 

101. Male. 53 years. Transfer from medical service. For six 
months attacks of dizziness with vomiting and faintness. Sore- 
ness and distress in epigastrium. X-ray diagnosis, extensive malig- 
nant process involving pylorus. Exploratory laparotomy on day 
of transfer. Gas and ether. Patient cyanotic during operation. 
Enormously dilated stomach. Mass size of tangerine at pylorus. 
On account of poor condition, wound was closed immediately. 
Patient made poor recovery from ether. Failed to respond to 
stimulation and died on second day after operation. Anat. diag. : 
Carcinoma of stomach. Pyloric obstruction. Marked dilatation of 
stomach. Metastases in retroperitoneal lymphatic glands. Edema 
of lungs. 

Diagnosis. ( Abdominal tumor ) . 

102. Female. 37 years. Ten days before entrance, patient had 
acute abdominal pain with vomiting, lasting two days. Pain per- 
sisted. Abdomen had increased in size during previous year. 
Catamenia regular. Examination: Abdomen fat; smooth, dull 
mass above pubis extending half way to umbilicus. Vaginal exam- 
ination showed small cervix and large mass in right cul-de-sac. 
Operation. Ether. Fimdus of uterus found large, soft and red. 
Abdomen closed without further operation. Patient did well for 
two days. Temperature rose somewhat. Died suddenly six days 
after operation. Anat. diag.: Fibromyomata of uterus. General 
peritonitis. 

Duodenal ulcer. 

103. Male. 53 years. Admitted to Accident Room with diagno- 
sis of intestinal obstruction. Xo bowel movement for six days. 
Pain for past three days with vomiting. Patient evidently in 
severe pain. Whole right side of abdomen rigid and board-like. 
Tympanitic. Xo free fluid made out. Patient in considerable 

242 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

shock. Immediate operation. Ether. Exploratory laparotomy 
with drainage for perforated duodenal ulcer. Poor recovery from 
ether. Became cyanotic with difficult respiration. Gradually 
failed and died on second day. Anat. diag. : Ulcers of duodenum 
with perforation of one. General peritonitis. Lobar pneumonia. 

intestinal obstruction. 

104. Male. 71 years. Patient brought to Accident Eoom with 
history of bowels not having moved for three days. General ab- 
dominal pain and fecal vomiting. Examination showed abdomen 
distended, tender throughout: visible peristalsis; no masses. 
Operation, day of admission. Local anesthesia. Fecolith removed 
from upper portion of jejunum. Condition at end of operation 
poor. Died in 12 hours. Anat. diag.: Operation wound for in- 
testinal obstruction due to concretion in small intestine, probabl>' 
gall stone. Endocarditis. Carcinoma of stomach. Necrosis of 
gall bladder. 

Mesenteric tlirombosis. 

105. Female. .39 years. Transfer from medical service. For 
seven or eight years previously was able to do but little work on 
account of dyspnea and weakness. Five years previously was in 
hospital with diagnosis of mitral stenosis and regurgitation. Sud- 
den attack of sharp pain in left leg 20 days previously, accompanied 
by numbness and coldness. Relieved by morphia. Gradual return 
to normal. Great toe began to swell and became black. Three 
days later, sudden attack of hemoptysis which continued. Dyspnea 
and palpitation on slight exertion. Three days before entrance 
blood was noticed in stools. Examination showed moderate cyano- 
sis with systolic and diastolic murmurs. Corrigan pulse. Dry 
gangrene of right great toe. Abdomen distended, tympanitic; 
dulness in flanks. General tenderness Avith spasm in both lower 
quadrants. Operation, day of transfer. Spinal anesthesia. Large 
quantity of bloody fluid in peritoneal cavity. Large portion of 
small intestine found dark and edematous. Woimd closed. Dis- 
tention increased; patient grew gradually weaker and died in few 
hours. Clinical diagnosis: Mesenteric thrombosis. ^Mitral steno- 
sis. No autopsy. 

106. Male. 28 years. Operation for acute appendicitis 10 years 
previously. Five weeks after operation, severe attacks of pain in 
epigastrium; no relation to meals: gradually subsided. One 
week previous to entrance similar attacks of pain; slightly jaun- 
diced for three days; abdomen distended; tympanitic; slight 
tenderness in epigastrium: spleen enlarged; general condition 
poor. Patient failed rapidly and was operated on. Novocain 
and ether. Several quarts of straw colored fluid in al;>domen: 
upper portion of jejunum dilated and thickened and of dark color; 
vessels of omentum and stomach engorged, evidently thrombosis. 
Patient failed and died 17 days after operation. Anat. diag.: 
Chronic purulent thrombo-phlebitis of superior mesenteric vein 
and portal vein. Abscesses of mesenteric lymphatic glands, liver 
and head of pancreas. 

Peritonitis, general. 

107. Male. 7 years. Twelve hours before entrance patient had 
ah attack of acute abdominal pain accompanied by vomiting. 
Symptoms became progressively worse. Examination : Child well 
nourished but sick looking. Examination negative except for 
abdomen which was distended, rigid and tender in right lower 
quadrant. Operation, day of admission. Gas and ether. Abdom- 
inal cavity contained considerable purulent fluid. Appendix found 

243 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

normal. Large mesenteric glands felt. Wound drained. Patient 
failed steadily after operation and died 18 hours after admission. 
No autopsy. 

Tuberculosis of intestine. 

108. Male. 38 j^ears. Was in hospital a year previously suffer- 
ing from bloody diarrhea with marked loss of weight. Discharged 
without operation. Diagnosis, tuberculosis of intestines. After 
discharge, gained weight but was readmitted because of involuntary 
discharge of pus and mucus. Old colostomy wound in right lower 
quadrant in good condition. Exploratory laparotomy. Ether and 
novocain. Colon found infiltrated with chronic inflammatory tis- 
sue, much more marked near rectum which was firmly bound down 
by adhesions. Disease so extensive that excision of colon not 
deemed advisable. Wound closed. Good ether recovery. Three 
days after operation, wound became slightly septic. Two days 
later, patient began to vomit and pulse became rapid. This con- 
tinued for 12 hours, vomitus becoming fecal in character. Patient 
died seven days after operation. No autopsy. 

Tuberculosis of peritoneum. 

109. Male. 48 years. Constipated for past six months. At- 
tacks of abdominal pain with remission for four months. Worse 
before entrance. Abdomen increased in size. Patient alcoholic. 
Examination showed abdomen swollen, tense, shifting dulness. 
Operation. Novocain and anesthol. Abdomen contained consider- 
able clear fluid; intestines closely matted together with adhesions. 
Following operation, patient vomited almost continuously and died 
on twentieth day. No autopsy. 

LAPAROTOMY, EXPLORATORY, WITH CLOSING OF PERFOR- 
ATED TYPHOID ULCER AND DRAINAGE OF 

Peritonitis. 

110. Male. 25 years. Walked into hospital with history of 
having had diarrhea, fever, anorexia and cough for three weeks. 
Acute abdominal pain for 24 hours. Examination showed abdomen 
dull in flanks; board-like rigidity; somewhat tender. Operation, 
day of admission. Gas and oxygen. Considerable dirty, brownish 
fluid in peritoneal cavity. Lymphoid follicles of intestine en- 
larged. Lower part of ileum perforated. Opening sutured. Ab- 
domen drained. Failed after operation and died on eleventh day. 
Anat. diag. : Typhoid ulcers with perforation. Acute fibrinous 
peritonitis. Pelvic abscess. Acute glomerulonephritis. 

LAPAROTOMY, EXPLORATORY, WITH COLOSTOMY FOR 

Congenital dilatation of the colon.- 

111. Male. 9 months. When one month old abdomen began to 
enlarge and patient became badly constipated. For last three 
months has had no gain in weight. Examination showed emaciated 
child. Abdomen symmetrically enlarged; superficial veins dilated; 
inflated mass extending from epigastrium to right iliac fossa, which 
seemed to be dilated colon. Visible peristalsis. Operation. Local 
anesthesia. Sigmoid greatly dilated and thickened; thickening 
extending to cecum. Colostomy. Patient did not react well after 
operation; seemed weak and exhausted. Took feeding well but 
gradually lost strength and died three days after operation, of 
inanition. Anat. diag.: Tuberculosis of lungs, spleen and lym- 
phatic glands. Streptococcus septicemia. Megacolon. 

244 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

LAPAEOTOMY, EXPLOEATORY, WITH DEAINAGE OF 
Abscess of liver. 

112. Male. 23 years. Transfer from medical service, with 
diagnosis of subdiaphragmatic infection. History of acute symp- 
toms of one month's duration. Chills and pain in "chest. Vomiting. 
Examination showed dulness and diminislied breath sounds in 
neighborhood of tenth rib, posteriorly, right side. Operation, day 
of transfer. Ether. Exploratory laparoto)ny with rib resection for 
drainage of abscess of liver. Considerable difBculty in respiration 
after operation. Chills continued. Free drainage of pus from 
liver. Patient steadily grew weaker and died at the end of 10 days. 
Clinical diagnosis : Abscess of liver. No autopsy. 

LIGATION OF INNOMINATE AND COMMON CAEOTID AETEE- 
lES FOE 

Aneurysm. 

113. Female. 63 years. For one year noticed throbbing sensa- 
tion in region of right clavicle Avith some difficulty in breathing. 
Examination showed pulsating tumor about size of walnut at base 
of right neck. Pre-operative diagnosis: Aneurysm of carotid 
artery. Operation. Novocain. Ligation of innominate and com- 
mon carotid arteries. Patient complained of numbness and tingling 
in right hand about 20 minutes after operation. Transient. Hand 
somewhat blue. No radial pulse. On sixth day, transient paralj'- 
sis of left hand and leg lasting 20 minutes. Complete recover}'. 
Next day, absolute left hemiplegia. Failed rapidly from that time. 
Semiconscious. Incontinent. Died on thirteenth day. Anat. diag. : 
Arteriosclerosis of aorta and large arteries. Head not opened. 

LIGATION OF SUPEEIOR THYEOID VESSELS FOE 
Exophthalmic goitre. 

114. Female. 29 years. Transfer from medical service with 
diagnosis of exophthalmic goitre. Symptoms began eight years 
previously. Tachycardia; palpitation; increasing nervousness; 
fatigue; tremor; considerable exophthalmos: skin markedly 
broijzed. Operation. Novocain. Ligation of left superior thyroid 
vessels. Second operation. Gas and oxygen. Ligation of right 
superior thyroid vessels. Patient stopped breathing during opera- 
tion; resuscitated by artificial respiration. Restless, and pulse of 
poor quality after operation. Became cyanotic on second day : 
semiconscious; did not respond to treatment and died on second 
day after operation. Anat. diag. : Purulent pericarditis and 
pleuritis. Status Imyphaticus. 

MOBILIZATION OF SIGMOID AND EECTUM WITH COLOS- 
TOMY FOE 

Carcinoma of rectum. 

115. Male. 62 years. Admitted with diagnosis of carcinoma of 
rectum. For four months has had blood and pus in movements 
with marked constipation. Operation. Ether. Laparotomy and 
mobilization of sigmoid and rectum with colostomy, first stage. 
Considerable vomiting and distention. Colostomy worked poorly. 
Patient became progressively weaker; distention greater. Died 
on fourth day. Clinical diagnosis: Carcinoma of rectum. Peri- 
tonitis (?) or intestinal obstruction. Anat. diag.: Adeno-car- 

245 



.Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

c'inoma of rectum. Bronchopneumonia. Purulent infiltration of 
retroperitoneal tissues, slight. 

Hematuria. 

116. Male. 22 years. Attack of right-sided abdominal pain 
one year before entrance. Since then, recurring attacks. Urine 
contained leucocytes and blood. X-ray showed shadow (?) in 
pelvis of right kidney. Operation. Gas and ether. Nephrotomy. 
No stone found. Incision in kidney closed with mattress sutures. 
Moderate post-operative staining from wound, and hematuria. 
Eighteen days after operation, severe hematuria. Bladder filled 
with blood clots. Eise in pulse from 80 to 120. Immediate opera- 
tion. Ether. Some infection surrounding kidney. Pelvis of kid- 
ney found filled with blood. Nephrectomy. Considerable post- 
operative shock. Patient continued to pass blood. Marked cysti- 
tis. Continued to fail and died six days after secondary operation. 
Pathological report showed areas of necrosis in kidney with one 
small stone in calix. Anemic necrosis. Clinical diagnosis : Post- 
operative hemorrhage. Nephritis, and infection of opposite kid- 
ney. No autopsy. 

Hypernephroma. 

117. Male. 65 years. Five weeks previously noticed bloody 
urine without cause which continued for three days. Examination 
showed a poorly nourished man ; firm, rounded mass size of grape 
fruit in right kidney region. Operation. Ether. Large tumor of 
right kidney delivered with considerable difficulty and removed. 
Did well for about three weeks after which he gradually failed 
and died one month from date of operation. Anat. diag. : Strepto- 
coccus septicemia. Abscess of right knee. Suppurative pneumonia. 
Hypernephroma of renal vein and inferior vena cava. Thrombosis 
of portal vein. Diverticulum of esophagus. 

NEPHRECTOMY FOE 

Pyonephrosis. 

lis. Male. 65 years. Syphilis and gonorrhea 40 years previ- 
ously. Severe pain in right side of abdomen for two weeks. Urine 
bloody. Examination showed mass in region of right kidney. 
Operation. Gas and oxygen. Incision over right kidneV. Con- 
siderable perirenal inflammation. Hvdronephrotic kidney removed 
Avith difficulty. Considerable shock following operation. Died six 
hours later. Anat. diag. : Operation wound. Arteriosclerosis. 
Hemorrhage. Shock. 

Pyonephrosis, calculous. 

119. Male. 30 years. Transfer from medical service. Diagno- 
sis: Pyonephrosis and diabetes. Three years previously, began 
having pain in right side of abdomen. Stone removed from right 
kidney, one year before. Four months before entrance had explora- 
tion of right kidney, pelvis and ureter for ureteral stone. Time 
of entrance, urination frequent and painful; urine bloody. Pre- 
operative diagnosis: Multiple calculi of right ureter. Right 
pyonephrosis. Operation. Gas and oxygen. Right nephrectomy 
and ureterolithotomy for calculus and pyonephrosis. Marked 
elevation of temperature and pulse, night of operation. Consider- 
able post-operative vomiting. Abdomen distended and tender. 
Wound opened under anesthol and incision and drainage for gen- 
eral peritonitis done. Died on tliird day after secondary operation. 
Clinical cause of death, general peritonitis. No autopsy. 

246 



Surgicpl Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

NEPHROTOMY FOE 
ryonephrosis, calculous. 

120. Male. 43 years. Occasional attacks of chills and fever 
with night sweats for three years. Vomited occasionally. Had 
passed blood in urine. Three months previous to entrance, had 
attack of pain in right lumbar region radiating toward groin. 
Lost some weight. Examination: In left upper quadrant, mass 
extending from costal margin to point below umbilicus, descending 
with respiration. X-ray showed large right kidney containing a 
calculus. Operation. Gas and oxygen. Kidney enlarged. Incision 
made through cortex which was thin and calculus removed. Pelvis 
contained pus. In afternoon of operation there was considerable 
hemorrhage in wound and it was necessary to pack. Patient, liow- 
ever, rapidly failed and died five hours after operation. Anat. 
diag. : Right renal calculus with pyonephrosis. Hypertrophy of 
spleen. Chronic interstitial hepatitis. Ankylosis of right hip 
joint. 

ORCHIDECTOMY FOR 
Sarcoma. 

121. Male. 30 years. Five months previously small growth 
appeared in supraclavicular region which for five weeks had in- 
creased rapidly in size. Lost 10 pounds weight in three weeks. 
Had cough in morning, raising considerable bloody sputum. Exam- 
ination: In left supraclavicular region, firm, hard tumor size of 
orange, adherent to underlying tissues. Left arm hung limply by 
side and was paralyzed. Lungs showed generally diminished 
resonance and moist rales in both bases. Breathing harsh through- 
out. Left side of scrotum presented large, firm tumor size of goose 
egg. Operation. Spinal anesthesia. Left orchidectomy. Follow- 
ing operation, patient had poor night and looked badly, having a 
great deal of bloody sputum. Did fairly well for five days. Died 
suddenly on ninth day after operation. Pathological report showed 
sarcoma. Diagnosis, sarcoma of mediastinum and testicle. No 
autojisy. 

PANHYSTERECTO^VIY FOR 
Carcinoma of cervix. 

122. Female. 51 years. ^Menopause, 12 years previously. For 
three months, excessive flowing with many clots. Lost 15 pounds 
in weight. Examination showed upper vaginal wall and cervix 
infiltrated by hard, stony mass. Operation. Ether. Abdominal 
incision. Uterus, parametrium and vagina removed. Died on 
seventh day after operation. Peritonitis. Anat. diag. : Fibrino- 
purulent peritonitis. Syphilitic aortitis. Arteriosclerosis. 

123. Female. 40 years. Constant flowing for six months. In- 
definite pelvic pain during few weeks before entrance. Examina- 
tion of cervix showed it ■ to be ulcerated and moderately fixed in 
pelvis. Pre-operative diagnosis : Carcinoma of cerv'ix. Operation. 
Ether. Panhysterectomy for carcinoma of cervix. Extension of 
disease in bladder. Severe post-operative shock, from which patient 
failed to rally in spite of stimulation. Died, night of operation. 
Clinical cause of death : Post-operative shock. Xo autopsy. 

Carcinoma of uterus. 

124. Female. 43 years. Flowing for four" weeks. Xo pain. 
Obese, with large abdomen. Cervix nodular and indurated with 
induration in vault of vagina. Pre-operative diagnosis: Carcinoma 

247 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

of cervix. Operation. Ether. Malignant disease had perforated 
uterus at level of internal os. During operation uterus tore across 
at this point making removal of cervix difficult, ilarked shock 
following operation. Patient did not respond to stimulation and 
died in a few hours. Clinical cause of death, shock. No autopsy. 

125. Female. 62 years. Had scanty flowing for nine months 
previously. No other symptoms. Operation. Gas and oxygen. 
Curettage of uterus. Examination of specimen showed adenoma, 
probably malignant. Second operation on eighth day. Ether. 
Total hysterectomy. Considerable post-operative shock. Patient 
gradually failed and died in 12 hours. Clinical diagTiosis: Hemor- 
rhage and post-operative shock. Pathological report: Malignant 
adenoma of uterus. Xo autopsy. 

PEEIXEAL SECTION AND SUPRAPUBIC CYSTOSTOMY FOPv 
Eetention. 

126. Male. 49 years. Entered Accideiat Pioom with retention 
of urine. Bladder distended nearly to umbilicus. Able to void 
urine in hot bath. Operation. Ether. External urethrotomy for 
stricture of urethra. Catheter slipped out of woimd. Patient had 
two chills. Catheter out on seventh day. Some brawny induration 
appeared on perineum at end of two weeks. Chills followed pas- 
sage of sound. Secondary operation, 38 days later. Gas and 
oxygen. Wound reopened and Xo. 24 soft catheter to bladder 
fastened in place. Catheter failed to drain. Bladder distended to 
umbilicus. Third operation, same day. Ether. Attempt to reach 
bladder through perineal wound failed on accoimt of false passages. 
Suprapubic cystotomy. Large tube fastened in bladder. Post- 
operative bronchitis. Perineal suprapubic wound very foul. Gen- 
eral condition rather poor. Low urinary output. Patient refused 
nourishment. Semiconscious and toxic. Died on twenty-first day 
after second operation. Clinical diagnosis: Stricture of urethra. 
Uremia. Xo autopsy. 

PLASTIC FOR 

Decubitous ulcer of sacrum. 

127. Male. 66 years. Patient came to Accident Room with 
history of having fallen two hours previously from staging, a 
distance of 25 feet. Diagnosis at admission: Fracture of ribs. 
Fracture (?) of spine. Fracture of astragalus. Shock. No 
paralyses or loss of sensation. Incontinence of urine developed 
within 24 hours. Patient in poor general condition. Plaster 
jacket applied. Decubiti developed on back. At end of three 
months, patient was up and able to get about on crutches. Plastic 
operation for decubitous ulcer over sacrum. Gas and ether. Wound 
slightly infected. Patient gradually began to fail. Signs of 
uremia. Died one month after operation. Clinical diagnosis: 
Uremia. Xo autopsy. 

PROSTATECTOMY. PERINEAL, FOR * 
Adenoma. 

128. Male. 59 years. Some pain and frequency of urination for 
10 years. Treated 41 years previously for acute nephritis. Many 
attacks of cystitis, last one four weeks previously. Rectal exam- 
ination showed prostate much enlarged. Residual, two ounces. 
Operation. Spinal anesthesia. Perineal prostatectomy. Post- 
operative hemorrhage from wound on sixth day. Hiccough devel- 
oped on eighth day. Patient became irrational and failed rapidly, 

248 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

dying on eleventh day. Anat. diag. : Diffuse aneurysm of arch of 
aorta. Dilatation and fatty infiltration of heart. Septicemia. 

129. Male. 73 years. Slight urinary symptoms for two or 
three years. For four weeks, frequency of urination with drib- 
bling. Examination showed poorly nourished old man : distended 
bladder rising to above umbilicus: moderate enlargement of pros- 
tate, by rectum. Urine gradually drawn off. i'unctional test 
appearance time, 28 minutes, one hour, 20%. Operation. Spinal 
anesthesia. Perineal prostatectomy. Very little post-operative 
shock. Xo gain in strength. Surgical condition good. Drained 
entirely through perineum. One month after operation, while 
being helped from a chair into bed, patient fell. Stertorous respira- 
tion. Spasmodic contraction of limbs. Died in a few moments. 
Clinical cause of death, embolism or acute dilatation of heart. Xo 
autopsy. 

130. Male. 58 years. Difficulty in urination for one year. 
Acute retention four days before entrance, relieved by catheter. 
Entered hospital with markedly distended bladder. Suprapubic 
puncture under local anesthesia. Operation. Spinal anesthesia. 
Perineal prostatectomy for obstructing prostate. Perineal abscess 
developed on ninth day. Phlebitis of right leg. Showed signs of 
infected ankle joint. Incision and drainage of septic ankle joint. 
Gas and oxygen. Failed rapidly and died on twenty-third day. 
Clinical cause of death: Periurethral abscess. General septicemia. 
Xo autopsy. 

Carcinoma. 

131. Male. 75 years. Attack of acute retention 11 years 
previously relieved by catheter. An interval of comparative com- 
fort for five years, then frequency and urgency of micturition which 
gradually increased until it became intolerable. Prostate large, 
very hard, suggesting malignancy. Operation. Spinal anesthesia. 
Perineal prostatectomy. Considerable post-operative vomiting. In- 
fection of chest wall from subpectoral infusion. Patient died on 
seventh day. Infection and hypostatic pneumonia. Pathological 
report, carcinoma of prostate. Xo autopsy. 

PYELOTOMY WITH DECAPSULATIOX FOR 

Renal colic. 

132. Male. 41 years. Reentry. Previous diagnosis: Stone in 
lower end of ureter. Operation refused. Patient returned shortly 
after discharge. Cystoscopy. Catheterization of ureter negative. 
Pre-operative diagnosis : Renal calculus ( ? ) . Operation. Ether. 
Exploratory pyelotomy and decapsulation of kidney. Xo stone 
found. Poor anesthetic recoA'ery. Signs of double basal pneumonia 
appeared on second day. Rapidly grew worse and died on fifth 
day. Clinical diagnosis: Pneumonia. Xo autopsy. 

RADICAL, CURE OF 

Inguinal hernia. 

133. Male. 60 years. Had right inguinal hernia all his life. 
For 18 months was reduced with difficulty. Examination shows 
large, scrotal, inguinal hernia not easily reduced. Small umbilical 
hernia. Operation. Ether. Bassini operation for inguinal hernia. 
As incision was being made for operation on umbilical hernia, 
patient stopped breathing and could not be resuscitated. No 
autopsy. 

249 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

REDUCING FRACTURE OF 

Femur. 

134. Female. 65 years. Patient admitted to Accident Room ' 
with diagnosis of fracture of neck of femur, right. Four days 
previously, accidentally knocked down and was imable to get up. 
X-ray showed fracture of neck of femur. Fracture reduced under 
ether; put up in Buck's extension. Immediate rise of temperature 
following operation. Signs of pneumonia developed. Patient 
gradually failed and died on twelfth day. Clinical diagnosis: 
Pneumonia. No autopsy. 

REMOVING FRAGMENTS OF BONE AND SUTURING LACER- 
ATED DURA FOLLOWING 

Fracture of skull. 

135. Male. 5 years. Brought to Accident Room with history 
of having been struck by automobile about % hour previously. 
Examination: Depressed fracture of skull in parietal region. 
Fracture of left humerus and femur. Unconscious and in profound 
shock. Immediate operation. No anesthesia. Removal of frag- 
ments of depressed fracture of skull and suture of dura with drain- 
age. Steadily grew worse and died in about three hours. Clinical 
cause of death, shock. No autopsy. 

REPAIRING 

Crush of hand. 

136. Female. 54 years. Shortly before entrance, patienfs hand 
caught in steam laundry mangle. ' Examination showed fingers 
crushed; evulsion of skin on back of hand extending from knuckles 
to wrist. Operation. Ether. Plastic on dorsum of hand. Follow- 
ing this, skin sloughed and wound became septic. Blood culture 
showed streptococci. Focal abscesses on great toe and knee joint. 
Failed gradually and died forty-six days after admission. No 
autopsy. 

RESECTION OF INTESTINE WITH END-TO-END ANASTOMO- 
SIS FOR 

Carcinoma. 

137. Female. 33 years. History of ])assing blood and pus by 
rectum for four months. Abdominal examination, negative. Bis- 
muth X-rays negative. Pre-operative diagnosis: Malignant disease 
of colon. Operation. Gas and ether. Excision of sigmoid for 
carcinoma, with end-to-end anastomosis. Rather poor condition 
immediately after operation. Pulse steadily rose. Failed rapidly 
and died on third day. Anat. diag. : General fibrino-purulent peri- 
tonitis. Examination of specimen removed showed mucous adeno- 
carcinoma. 

RESECTION OF JAW AND DISSECTION OF NECK FOR 
Carcinoma. 

138. Male. 69 years. Noticed small, white spot on inner side 
of left cheek, 10 years previously. Grew very slowly. Cauterized 
with acid a few years before entrance; excised three years before. 
Recurred in seven months. Again excised a few months later. 
After that, radium treatment used. Again excised one year later. 
All incisions under local anesthesia. Again radium treatment, 

250 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

with slow increase of growth. At entrance, tumor size of small 
walnut on outside of cheek; on inside, sloughing cauliflower growth 
occupying whole cheek. Operation. Gas and ether. Excision of 
cheek and lialf of jaw, and dissection of neck. Good ether recov- 
ery. Signs of pneumonia two days later. Died very suddenly on 
fourth day. Clinical diagnosis : Carcinoma of cheek and jaw. 
Pneumonia. Pulmonary embolism. Pathological rei)ort: ]']pi- 
tlielioma. No autopsy. 

EESECTION OF TONGUE AND DISSECTION OF NECK FOR 

Carcinoma. 

139. Male. 50 years. Two months before entrance, sore ap- 
peared under tongue which increased in size. Examination showed 
ulcerated mass on floor of mouth -, no palpable glands in neck. 
Operation. Gas and ether. Complete dissection of right side of 
neck; jaw divided and portion of tongue and growth removed. 
Failed and died four days after operation. Anat. diag. : Suppura- 
tive mediastinitis. Broncliophevuuonia. Septicemia. 

140. Male. 45 years. For three months noticed swelling and 
soreness beneath edge of tongue on left, which gradually increased 
in size. Lost 10 pounds. Examination showed an irregular, red- 
dened, thickened ulceration on left side of tongue, near base, ex- 
tending on cheek and alveolar process. One enlarged palpable 
gland in left submaxillary region. Operation. Gas and ether. 
Complete dissection of left side of neck with removal of glands, 
internal jugular vein and external carotid artery. Lower jaw 
divided on left side to expose tongue and one-half of tongue re- 
moved. Jaw secured by wire. Patient made a good ether recovery 
but died suddenly 18 hours after operation. No autopsy. 

RESECTION OF INTESTINE WITH ENTEROSTOMY FOR 

Tabes mesenterica ( ? ) . 

141. Male. .30 years. Sudden abdominal pain and vomiting 
three weeks previously. Refused operation at another hospital and 
was discharged against advice. After leaving hospital, unable to 
keep food on stomach. Had very little pain. Examination showed 
mass in right lower quadrant, very tender. Immediate operation. 
Ether. Drainage of appendix abscess. Resection of small intestine 
for necrosis and abscess of mesentery. Considerable post-operative 
shock. Gradually failed and died on second day. Clinical diag- 
nosis: Peritonitis. No autopsy. 

RESECTION OF INTESTINE WITH TUBE DRAINAGE FOR 

Mesenteric thrombosis. 

142. Female. .37 years. One week before entrance seized with 
severe abdominal pain. Symptoms subsided wath treatment. Two 
days ago, second attack of pain accompanied by nausea and vomit- 
ing of blood. Examination: Very sick appearing woman: vomit- 
ing coffee ground material: skin clammy. Abdomen full and 
rigid throughout, somewhat tender. Operation, day of admission. 
Ether. Stomach and duodenum normal. Second incision belo^^■ 
umbilicus. Six feet of jejunum found gangrenous: mesentery 
thrombosed. Intestine removed. Patient failed rapidly and died 
10 hours after operation. Anat. diag.: Thrombosis of portal vein. 
Hemorrhagic infarction of stomach and small intestine. Hemor- 
rhage into stomach and intestines. 

251 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

SALPIXGO-OOPHORECTOMY FOR 

Cyst of ovary. 

143. Female. 24 years. Admitted to Accident Room with 
history of having had good health until five weeks previously when 
she began to have general abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. 
Symptoms continued. Cliills and fever for one week. Irregular 
flowing for two weeks. Examination showed poorly developed and 
nourished girl; spasm over lower abdomen most marked in right 
lower quadrant: tender bulging mass in posterior cul-de-sac. 
Diagnosis of salpingitis made. Operation. Gas and ether. Right 
salpingo-oophorectomy for cyst. Appendectomy. Some post-opera- 
tive shock. Considerable post-operative elevation of pulse with 
vomiting. Patient failed to rally, vomiting continued and death 
occurred on third day. Anat. diag. : Necrosis of wall of small 
intestine with perforation. General fibrino-purulent peritonitis. 
Pathological report: Chronic salpingitis. 

Extra-uterine pregnancy. 

144. Female. 25 years. Brought to Accident Room with his- 
tory of having missed last two menstrual periods. Day before 
entrance, acute attack of abdominal pain : became weak and faint. 
Examination showed shifting dulness in flanks. Vaginal exam- 
ination showed tenderness in both cul-de-sacs. Cervix soft: con- 
siderable discharge from external os. Operation. Ether. Large 
amount of blood in abdominal cavity. Fetus found loose in pelvis 
and right tube ruptured. Following operation, patient was in 
good condition for 24 hours. On second day pulse suddenly rose 
and patient died in a few hours. Anat. diag. : Hemorrhage into 
peritoneal cavity. Anemia. Persistent thymus gland. Small 
ulcer of stomach. 

SPLENECTOMY FOR 
Pernicious anemia. 

145. Male. 40 years. Transfer from medical service with 
diagnosis of pernicious anemia. Symptoms of general weakness 
of six years' duration. Spleen 3 cm. below costal margin. Opera- 
tion, day of admission. Ether. Splenectomy. Some post-operative 
cough. Poor pulse. Patient failed in spite of stimulation and 
died on second day. Red corpuscles 928,000. After transfusion, 
1,440,000; falling again to 896,000. Clinical cause of death, shock. 
No autopsy. 

STAPHYLORRHAPHY FOR 
Cleft palate. 

146. Female. 9 years. Entered with diagnosis of cleft palate. 
Plastic operation for repair of harelip one year previously. Opera- 
tion delayed for three weeks on account of cold. Staphylorrhaphy 
for cleft palate. Ether. Fair ether recovery. Patient restless. 
Steadily rising temperature and pulse, the former reaching 107.8. 
Patient became very restless with spasmodic twitching of leg. 
Died the next morning. Clinical diagnosis: Shock. Anat. diag.: 
Status lymphaticus. 

THORACOTOMY WITH RESECTION OF RIBS FOR DRAIN- 
AGE OF 

Abscess of lung. 

147. Male. 35 years. One year previously had cough with 
hemoptysis. Cough for two and one-half months with pain in left 

252 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

chest. About a pint of sputum during day. Examination and 
X-ray showed evidence of lung abscess in left base. Operation. 
Ether. Eesection of ribs and suture of parietal and visceral pleura. 
Secondary operation. Novocain. Abscess of lung opened. Patient 
failed and died three days after secondary operation. No autopsy. 

148. Male. 25 years. Peritonsillar abscess two years previ- 
ously. Lost 22 pounds in three months. Tonsils removed, three 
months previous to entrance. Following this, cough developed and 
persisted. Raised a cup of sputum daily. Examination : Nega- 
tive except for oflFensive breath. Rapid breathing and signs of 
increased density of lung at right base. Operation, day of transfer 
from medical service. Anesthol. Incision in right chest and two 
and one-half inches of fifth rib resected. Parietal and visceral 
pleura sutured together. Five days later, incision was made be- 
tween these stitches and what appeared to be a pneumothorax was 
opened. Lung explored by needle and abscess cavity found and 
drained. Following operation, drainage was not as profuse as 
desired. Patient gradually failed and died on seventh day after 
second operation. No autopsy. 

149. Male. 55 years. Pneumonia, 20 years previously. For 
one year, attacks of dyspnea and precordial pain followed by 
expectoration of blood and mucopurulent sputum. Examination 
showed area of dulness with diminished breath sounds on lower 
angle of scapula on left. X-ray showed lung abscess on left. 
Operation. Novocain and anesthol. Resection of fourth rib and 
suture of two pleural surfaces together. Second stage operation, 
nine days later. Ether. Pleura opened, lung explored for abscess. 
Considerable hemorrhage, requiring packing. Good ether recovery. 
Day following had profuse hemorrhage in lung and died in few 
minutes. No autopsy. 

150. Female. 22 years. Entered hospital, five years previously 
for chronic bronchitis and question of empyema. No operation. 
Had severe cough after that raising three to four ounces of foul 
sputum daily. Lost strength and weight. X-ray showed extensive 
pathological process in right chest, probably old abscess with 
thickened pleura. Clinical findings corresponded. Operation, day 
of transfer from medical service. Novocain. Exploratory thoracot- 
omy, first stage. Portions of sixth and seventh ribs excised. 
Three days later, pleura incised. Incision carried into lung. Pus 
reached. Drainage of abscess of lung, second stage. Good imme- 
diate recovery. At end of week complained of headache, became 
very apathetic and restless. Speech thick. Some stift'iaess of neck. 
Occasional vomiting. Question of metastasis in brain. Symptoms 
gradually increased. On fifteenth day, diagnosis of brain abscess 
made. Operation. Ether. Exploratory craniotomy for drainage 
of cerebral abscess. About two drams of pus evacuated. Right 
hemiplegia followed this operation. Patient failed rapidly and 
died on third day. Anat. diag. : Chronic bronchitis with abscess 
of right lung. Multiple abscesses of brain. 

151. Male. 57 years. Operated on 10 days previously for 
carcinoma of lower lip. After operation, complained of cough 
with considerable mucopurulent sputum. Examination showed an 
area of consolidation below angle of right scapula. Kept under 
observation for 10 days during which time, physical signs became 
more marked. Sputum bloody. X-ray showed distinct pathological 
process near left bronchus. Operation. Anesthol. Resection of 
eighth and ninth ribs and drainage of lung abscess cavity, lower 
lobe of right lung. Died 24 hours after operation. No autopsy. 

253 



Svirpicul Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

152. Female. 33 years. A year and a half previously, patient 
etherized for extraction of tooth. Following this had what was 
thoiiglit to be pneumonia. For eight montlis raised large amounts 
of yellowish sputum. For three weeks was in bed witn chills and 
fever. Examination showed evidence of lung abscess at base of 
left lung. X-ray sliowed pathological process resembling tuber- 
culosis in left apex: in second process left base suggesting empy- 
ema. Operation. Anesthol. Portions of eighth and ninth ribs 
in left axilla removed. Parietal and visceral pleura sutured to- 
oether. During operation condition became serious. Died 15 
minutes after closure of wound. No autopsy. 

Empyema. 

153. Female. 56 years. Attacks of dyspnea for nine years; at 
times, precordial pain and some edema of legs. Two days previ- 
ously became dyspneic and feverisli and had chill. Examination 
showed dulness over base of left lung. Chest tapped and pus 
obtained. Operation. Novocain. Left pleural cavity opened and 
large amount of pus evacuated. Eight days after operation, tem- 
perature suddenly went up: patient became drowsy, and later 
comatose. Died 12 days after operation. Anat. diag. : Right 
empyema. Dilatation of heart. Osteosclerosis of skull. 

154. Female. 55 years. Sick for some weeks before entrance. 
Chest had been tapped with evacuation of pus. Signs of fluid in 
left chest. Operation, day of admission. Local anesthesia. Resec- 
tion of ribs for empyema. Marked post-operative respiratory em- 
barrassment. Failed during night and died early the next morn- 
ing. Clinical cause of death: Cardiac. No autopsy. 

155. Male. 42 years. Transfer from medical service. Diag- 
nosis: Pneumonia and empyema. History of j>neumonia for eight 
days. Patient obese. Cyanotic and dyspneic. Slight jaundice! 
Signs of fluid in left chest. Immediate operation. Novocain. 
Resection of eighth rib with drainage of about 30 ounces of foul 
pus. Patient gradually grew worse and became delirious. Died 
in 48 hours. Clinical diagnosis: Empyema. Acute dilatation of 
heart. No autopsy. 

156. Male. 61 years. Indigestion for two years, never severe. 
No vomiting. Pain usually comes on two hours after eating. 
Severe attacks of pain for three days, after each meal. Examina- 
tion showed patient in considerable shock; pulse poor; abdomen 
tympanitic and board-like, tender. Operation, day of admission. 
Gas and oxygen. Considerable gas in peritoneal cavity. Perforated 
duodenal ulcer sutured. Somewhat stormy convalescence for five 
weeks; at end of that time, empyema developed. Thoracotomy 
with resection of rib for drainage of empyema. Local anesthesia. 
Died 12 days after operation for empyema. Anat. diag.: Duodenal 
ulcer. Left empyema. Right hydrothorax. Septicemia. 

THORACOTOMY WITH RESECTION OF RIBS AND DECORTI- 
CATION OF LUNG FOR 

Empyema. 

157. Male. 54 years. History of operation for empyema a year 
previously. Nine months later, exploratory thoracotomy witli 
resection of ribs for old empyema. Patient relieved for "a time 
after second operation. Wound then reopened with considerable 
discharge and pain. Operation. Ether. Resection of three ribs 
with partial decortication of lung. High temperature after opera- 

254 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

tion. Patient refused nourishment and began to fail, dying on 
thirteenth day. Signs of bronchitis. Clinical diagnosis : Septic 
pneumonitis with signs of pneumonia and bronchitis. No autopsy. 

THORACOTOMY WITH RESECTION OF RIB AND INCISION 
OF DIAPHRAGM FOR DRAINAGE OF 

Subphrenic abscess. 

158. Male. 16 years; Six days before entrance patient had 
acute attack of abdominal pain with vomiting. Pain persisted and 
became localized in right lower quadrant. Bowels moved with 
cathartics. Examination: Abdomen board-like and tender through- 
out, most marked at McBurney's point. Operation, day of admis- 
sion. Ether. Abdomen full of foul smelling pus. Intestines red. 
Appendix perforated and swollen, removed. Wound drained. Tem- 
perature did not become normal and nine days after operation, 
pleural cavity was opened on left for question of empyema. Noth- 
ing found. On opening through diaphragm large abscess was 
drained. Patient failed and died 12 hours after second operation. 
No autopsy. 

THORACOTOMY, EXPLORATORY, WITH PUNCTURE OF PERI- 
CARDIUM FOR 

Pericarditis. 

159. Female. 20 months. Transfer from Children's Dejiart- 
ment with diagnosis of empyema. Slight amount of pus obtained 
by tapping chest. Three subsequent attempts to locate pus with 
needle unsatisfactory and unsuccessful. Child in very poor condi- 
tion. Pulse 190, respiration about 80. Operation. Ether. Por- 
tion of eighth rib under angle of scapula resected. Adhesions 
between lung And pleura but no pus found. On seventeenth day, 
child showed signs of pus in chest. Secondary operation. Ether. 
Exploration of wound. No pus found. Exploratory puncture of 
pericardium. Turbid fluid removed. Gradualh' failed, and died 
16 days after second operation. Anat. diag. : Chronic pleuritis 
and mediastinitis. Chronic adhesive pericarditis. Double otitis 
media. Abscess of brain. 

THYROIDECTOMY FOR 

Adenomata. 

160. Female. 55 years. Transfer from medical service, with 
diagnosis of carcinoma of thyroid gland and auricular fibrillation. 
Cardiac and stomach symptoms for four months. Enlargement of 
thyroid gland with dilatation of veins. Operation, day of transfer. 
Ether. Thyroidectomy. Poor recovery from ether. Very restless. 
Pulse poor and intermittent. Patient died night of operation. 
Clinical cause of death, cardiac. Pathological report: Adenoma 
of thyroid. No autopsy. 

TONSILLECTOMY AND DISSECTION OF NECK FOR 

Carcinoma of tonsil. 

161. Male. 56 years. Swelling in region of right tonsil noticed 
for nine months. Pre-operative diagnosis: Carcinoma of tonsil. 
Operation. Rectal ether. Section of neck with excision of car- 
cinomatous glands and tonsillectomy for carcinoma of tonsil. 
Good recovery from ether. Died suddenly in afternoon of day of 
operation. Clinical cause of death : . Pulmonary embolism. No 
autopsy. 

255 



Surgical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

TRANSFUSION FOR 

Hemophilia. 

162. Male. 3 years. Marked history of hemophilia. Eleven 
out of 28 males in the family bled to death. Previous enlry, in- 
tractable bleeding from gums" following fall. Indirect transfusion 
with marked benefit. Thirty-six hours previous to entry, fell and 
bit tongue. Profuse bleeding since then. Immediate transfusion. 
Ether. Tongue still oozing. Three days later, another transfu- 
sion. Patient began to vomit in recovering from ether. Became 
dusky. Tracheotomy became necessary. Artificial respiration 
kept' up for 30 minutes but without sign of life. Clinical diag- 
nosis: Hemophilia. Hemorrhage. Asphyxia. Anat. diag. : Status 
lymphaticus. 

Shock. 

163. Male. 72 years. Admitted to Accident Room with history 
of having been struck two hours previously by a freight train. 
Fracture of skull (?). Compound fracture of right olecranon, 
ilium and ribs. Multiple contusions and abrasions. Marked 
shock. Transfusion, 10 ounces of blood. Patient rallied from 
shock on fourth day. Marked elevation of pulse and temperature 
with distention. Died. Clinical diagnosis: Rupture of bladder 
(?). Infection (?). No autopsy. 

164. Male. 18 months. Patient brought to Accident Room 
with history of having been struck by wagon. Extensive evulsion 
of skin involving thigh and leg. Evulsion extends nearly around 
leg. Sartorius muscle ruptured. Considerable shock. Under light 
ether anesthesia, wound cleaned up. Skin drawn together loosely. 
Transfusion, eight ounces of blood from mother. Patient seemed 
to react at first. High temperature. Flap of skin dark and 
apparently beginning gangrene. Temperature remained very high. 
Patient grew steadily worse and died on third day. Clinical cause 
of death: Shock. Sepsis. No autopsy. 

URETEROSTOMY FOR 

Recurrent papilloma of bladder. 

165. Male. 45 years. Papilloma of bladder excised, six years 
previously, showed beginning cancer. Recurrence, two years later 
with excision. Multiple recurrences found by cystoscope. Many 
unsuccessful attempts to remove growth by high frequency cur- 
rent. Total cystectomy decided upon as only means of relief. 
Operation. Gas and oxygen. Bilateral ureterostomy followed 
by general septicemia and death on the seventeenth day. Anat. 
diag. : Pyonephrosis. Pyelonephritis. Bronchopneumonia. 

URETEROTOMY FOR 
Ureteral calculus. 

166. Male. 43 years. One year previously had an attack of 
acute abdominal pain in left lower quadrant lasting five days and 
accompanied by nausea and vomiting. Two months later similar 
attack. Present attack began one week before entrance and was 
of same character but accompanied by retention. Examination 
showed six ounces of residual urine and evidence of stone in left 
ureter, one inch above bladder. Extra-peritoneal operation. Gas 
and oxygen. Stone located and removed. Wound drained. Two 
days later abdomen became much distended and it Avas impossible 
to move bowels. Urine became scanty and finally patient stopped 

256 



Sur-^ical Operative Fatalities for 1915. 

secreting any. Death, four days after operation. Anat. diag. : 
Marked distention of intestines and edema of lungs. 

VENTRICULAR PUNCTURE FOR 
Hydrocephalus. 

167. Female. 2 months. Spina bifida with tumor size of 
orange in lumbar region. Slight erosion of skin. Legs can be 
moved. Operation. Ether. Plastic closure of neural canal. In- 
crease in size of head noticed after operation. Two weeks later, 
second operation. No anesthesia. Puncture of ventricle for 
hydrocephalus. Four ounces of clear fluid withdrawn. Patient 
gradually failed and died two weeks later. Clinical diagnosis: 
Spina bifida. Hydrocephalus. No autopsy. 



257 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

REPORT OF THE RADIOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT. 

1914 1915 

Number of cases radiographed in Out- 

Patient Department 6,127 7,618 

Number of eases radiographed in House 3,765 4,597 

9,892 12,215 
Number of X-Ray treatments .... 923 1,220 

Total number of visits ......... 10,815 13,435 

Total number of new cases 7,417 7,759 

Total number of X-Ray plates developed 16,234 19,826 

Fluoroscopic examinations 1,834 3,997 

REPORT OF THE MEDICO-MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1914 1915 

Out-Patient Department ....... 13,872 17,887 

Hospital patients '. . . . 1,666 1,764 

Private patients 827 954 

16,365 20,605 

REPORT OF THE HYDROTHERAPEUTIC DEPARTMENT. 

1914 1915 

Male. Female. Male. Female. 
Out-Patient Department . . 2,499 1,421 1,857 1,846 

Hospital patients 226 228 32 54 

Private patients 31 8 13 2 

2,756 1,657 1,902 1,902 
Total 4,413 3,804 



NEW CASES TREATED IN THE MEDICO-MECHANICAL 
DEPARTMENT. 

(1) Arthritis 

(1) Infectious 46 

(a) Monarticular , 10 

(b) Polyarticular 12 

(2) Synovitis 9 

(3) Gonorrheal 27 

(4) Hypertrophic 52 

(5) Arthroplasty 3 

258 



Mec'ioal and Surgical Statistics. 

(2) Back . . 

(I) Faulty Posture 91 

(2) Lateral Curvature 48 

(3) Sacro-iliac Strain 16 

(4) Strain or Weak 20 

(5) Other conditions 1 

(3) Burns 3 

(4) Contusions . . : 27 

(5) Contractions 

See burns 

" Dupuj^tren's 

" infectious arthritis 3 

(6) Deformities 2 

(7) Dislocation 31 

(8) Diseases of the Nervous S3^stem 

(1) Neurosis 4 

(2) Hemiplegia 27 

(3) Obstetrical Paralysis 6 

(4) Infantile " 36 

(5) Spastic " 17 

(6) Other " 11 

(7) Other diseases of the Nervous System 9 

(9) Dupuytren's contraction 1 

(10) Feet 

(1) Flat 47 

(2) Contracted 8 

(3) Pes Varus 4 

(11) Fractures 

(1) CoUes' : 88 

(2) Elbow 60 

(3) Femur . 25 

(4) Forearm 13 

(5) Foot and Toe 9 

(6) Hand and Finger . 20 

(7) Patella 11 

(8) Pelvis 1 

(9) Potts' 16 

(10) Tibia or Fibula 30 

(II) Other 4 

(12) Humerus, scapulae, clavicle, spine ...... 35 

(12) Internal Diseases 

(1) Circulatory - . . 5 

(2) Convalescence and Debility- 2 

(3) Constitutional :'..... 1 

(4) Gastro-intestinal 7 

(5) Respiratory 1 

(6) Other 1 

(13) Miscellaneous 25 

259 



Medical and Surgical Statistics. 

(14) Osteomvelitis 6 

(15) Sepsis/ 34 

(16) Shoulder 

(1) Subacromial bursitis 130 

(a) Traumatic 

(b) Non-traumatic 

(2) Ruptured supraspinatus 3 

(17) Skin 5 

(18) Sprain 35 

(19) Specific 1 

(20) Stiff joints 

(1) Due to wounds 26 

(2) Operations 21 

(3) Burns 3 

(21) Tenos\Tiovitis 8 

(22) Tuberculosis 9 

1,206 

XEW CASES TREATED IX THE HYDROTHERAPEUTIC 
DEPARTAIEXT. 

Male. Female. Total. 
1914 1915 1914 1915 1914 1915 

Diseases of the vascular sys- 
tem 

DebiUty and convalescence . 

Other internal diseases . . 

Functional neuroses . . . 

Other diseases of the nervous 
system 

Hypertrophic arthritis . . . 

Other forms of arthritis . . 

Subacromial bursitis . . . 

Sequelse of fractures, disloca- 
tions, sprain, etc 

Back and sacro-iliac strain . 

Weak and flat feet .... 

Other orthopedic diseases . 

Not classified 

302 249 199 186 501 435 



7 


10 


1 


17 


8 


27 


7 


2 


17 


30 


24 


32 


29 


12 


38 


25 


67 


37 


21 


9 


29 


19 


53 


28 


14 


16 


10 


12 


24 


28 


53 


45 


12 


18 


65 


63 


60 


63 


31 


28 


91 


91 


12 


5 


7 


2 


19 


7 


6 


4 


2 




8 


4 


67 


56 


18 


16 


85 


72 


7 


8 


16 


15 


23 


23 


15 


15 


12 


4 


27 


19 


1 


4 


6 




7 


4 



260 



LIST OF HOUSE PUPILS. 



Adams, Benjamin Fanenil Dunkin . . Surg. 1863 

Died 1895. 

Adams, Charles Goldthwaite .... Surg. 1850 

657 Boylston St., Boston. 

Albee, Fred Houdelett . . . . . South Surg. 1904 

40 East 41st St., New York City. 

Alden, Eliot West Surg. 1902 

1012 Brockman BIdg., IjOS Angeles, Cal. 

Allen, Arthur Wilbum West Surg. 1915 

657 Boylston St., Boston. 

Allen, Dudley Peter West Surg. 1880 

Died 1915. 

Allen, Freeman South Surg. 1900 

509 Beacon St., Boston. 

Allen, Seabury Wells West Surg. 1898 

509 Beacon St., Boston. 

Andrews, Thomas Surg. 1847 

Died 1852. 

Aub, Joseph Charles East Med. 1915 

23 Crescent Apmts., Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Ayer, James Bourne Surg. 1872 

Died 1910. 

Badger, George Sherwin Clark . . . West Med. 1898 

48 Hereford St., Boston. 

Bagg, Edward Parsons, Jr East Med. 1913 

243 Linden St., Holyoke, Mass. 

Bain, John Baxter East Med. 1903 

348 Havertiill St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Balch, Franklin Greene West Surg. 1893 

99 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Baldwin, Henry Cutler East Surg. 1885 

Died 1915. 

Baldwin, Walter Isaac Orth. 1913 

135 Stockton St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Barker, Williston Wright West Med. 1908 

4 Lyndhurst St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Barnes, Allan Foster South Surg. 1903 

Died 1914. 

Barney, Charles Norton West Med. 1896 

Major, U.S.A., Coles BIdg., El Paso, Tex. 

Barney, George Lawrence East Surg. 1895 

Died 1898. 

Barney, James Bellinger East Surg. 1905 

374 Marlboro St., Boston. 

261 



List of House Pupils. 

Barrett, Benjamin Apothecary 1823 

Died 1S69. 

Barrett, Henry Augustus Med. 1844 

Died 1899. 

Bartlett, Lyman Med. 1832 

Died 1865. 

Bartol, Edward Francis Washburn . . East Surg. 1901 

Milton, Mass. 

Bartol, John Washburn East Surg. 1891 

3 Ctiestnut St., Boston. 

Barton, Lyman Guy, Jr. East Surg. 1914 

Willsboroush, N. Y. 

Bates, Everett Alanson East Med. 1891 

57 Ctiestnut St., Springfield, Mass. 

Beach, Henry Harris Aubrey .... Surg. 1867 

Died 1910. 

Beal, Howard Walter South Surg. 1899 

452 Main St., Worcester, Mass. 

Beals, Lynn Staley West Med. 1905 

177 Dearborn St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Beebe, Arthur Appleton East Surg. 1899 

Died 1900. 

Belknap, James Lyman West Med. 1904 

Died 1911. 

Bell, Charles Surg. 1854 

Benner, Eichard Stanwood .... West Surg. 1903 

25 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 
Berger, Harry Calvin Child. Med. 1914 

Bellevue Hospital, New York City. 

Bertody, Charles . Surg. 1846 

Died 1893. 

Bigelow, Henry Jacob Med. 1838 

Died 1890. 

Bigelow, Leslie Lawson West Surg. 1908 

185 E. state St., Columbus, Ohio. 

Binger, Carl Alfred Lanning . . . East Med. 1915 

75 Cliff St., New York City. 

Binne}^, George Hay^vard West Surg. 1913 

447 Beacon St., Boston. 

Binney, Horace South Surg. 1902 

205 Beacon St., Boston. 

Blaisdell, John Harper Dermatolog. 1911 

4."> Bay State Road, Boston. 

Blake, John George Surg. 18G0 

212 Beacon St., Boston. 

Blake, Samuel Coleman Med. 1852- 

Died 1897. 

262 



List of House Pupils. 

Blanchard, Albert Henry ..... :Mea. 1850 

Died 1909. 

Blodgett, Albert Novatus Surg. 1870 

51 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 

Boos, William Frederick West iled. 1902 

374 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Booth, Edward Chauncey West Med. 1877 

40 Boston St., Somerville, Mass. 

Borden, EusseU Potter West Surg. 1914 

Lower Canard, Nova Scotia. 

Borland, John Xelson Med. 1850 

Died 1S90. 

Boutelle, James Thacher Surg. 1870 

Hampton, Va. 

Boutwell, Henry Thatcher .... Surg. 1869 

164 Myrtle St., Manctiester, N. H. 

Boutwell, Horace Keith East Med. 1905 

39 St. Paul St., Brookline, Mass. 

Bowditch, Harold West Med. 1911 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Bowditch, Henry IngersoU .... Med. 1830 

Died 1892. 

Bowditch, Vincent Yardley .... East Med. 1879 

506 Beacon St., Boston. 

Bowen, John Templeton West Med. 1883 

14 Marlboro St., Boston. 
Bradford, Edward Hickling .... Surg. 1872 

133 Newbury St., Boston. 

Brannan, John Winters East Surg. 1878 

48 West 51st St., New York City. 

Brewster, George Washington Wales . . East Surg. 1893 

213 Beacon St., Boston. 

Bridge, Horace Med. 1870 

Augusta, Maine. 

Briggs, Charles Edwin East Surg. 1898 

118 Lenox Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Briggs, Frederick Melancthon . ... East Surg. 1884 

536 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Brigham, Francis Gorham .... East Med. 1910 

355 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Bright, George Adams Med. 1859 

Died 1905. 

Brooks, William Allen East Surg. 1893 

167 Beacon St., Boston. 
Broughton, Arthur Xicholson . . . South Surg. 1898 

10 Roanoke Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

263 



List of House Pupils. 

Brown, Dillon West Surg. 1885 

Died 1909. 

Brown, Francis Henry Med. 1860 

15 state St., Boston. 

Brown, Lloyd Thornton South Surg. 1908 

372 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Bryant, John West Surg. 1910 

338 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Buckingham, Edward Marshall . . . West Surg. 1874 

342 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Buffum, William Henry East Med. 1903 

37 George St., Providence, R. I. 

Bullard, William Norton East Med. 1880 

89 Marlboro St., Boston. * 

Bumstead, Freeman Josiah . . . . Surg. 1850 

Died 1879. 

Burlingham, Louis Herbert .... West Med. 1907 

Peter Bent Brigliam Hospital, Boston. 
Burnett, Francis Lowell South Surg. 1908 

82 Beacon St., Boston. 

Burnett, Waldo Irving Med. 1849 

Died 1854. 

Burnham, Elmond Arthur .... West Med. 1893 

154 Huntington Ave., Boston. 

Burrage, Thomas Jayne East Med. 1904 

139 Park St., Portland, Maine. 

Bush, John Standish Foster .... East Surg. 1874 
651 Boylston St., Boston. 

Butler, Charles Shorey . . ... . East Surg. 1899 

257 Newbury St., Boston. 

Butler, Joel Ives South Surg. 1905 

123 S. Stone Ave., Tucson, Arizona. 

Cabot, Arthur Tracy . ... . . West Surg. 1876 

Died 1912. 

Cabot, Hugh South Surg. 1899 

87 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Cabot, Eichard Clarke East Med. 1894 

1 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Capps, Joseph Almarin East Med. 1896 

122 S. Michigan Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

Carney, Sidney Howard Med. 1860 

Died 1912. 

264 



List of House Pupils. 

Caryl, Lucian Willard Surg. 1829 

Died 1837. 

Caswell, Charles Orthop. 1909 

121 Spring St., Portland, Maine. 

Chadbourne, Arthur Patterson . . . East Med. 1890 

193 Beacon St., Boston. 

Chadwick, James Eead Surg. 1870 

Died 1905. 

Chamberlain, Weston Percival . . . West Med. 1898 

Major, Medical Corps, United States Army. 

Chandler, Norman Fitch West Med. 1888 

82 High St., Medford. Mass. 

Channing, Walter ...'.... Surg. 1871 

Channlng Sanatorium, Brookline, Mass. 

Chapin, Lawrence Dudley .... East Med. 1908 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

Chase, Henry Melville West Surg. 1902 

409 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Chauncey, Charles William .... Apothecary 1823 

Died 1864. 

Churchill, Frank Spooner .... West Med. 1891 

1259 N. State St., Chicago, 111. 

Chute, Arthur Lambert South Surg. 1895 

350 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Clap, Edmund Wright East Med. 1895 

390 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 
Clark, DeAVitt Scoville, Jr East Surg. 1915 

Washington Square, Salem, Mass. 

Clark, George Oliver East Surg. 1904 

142 Beacon St., Boston. 

Clark, John Howe Med. 1861 

1537 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Clark, Joseph Payson East Surg. 1887 

71 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Clark, Nelson Henry West Med. 1905 

212 N. Highland Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Cobb, Farrar East Surg. 1893 

28 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 
Codman, Ernest Amory East Surg. 1895 

227 Beacon St., Boston. 

Cogswell, William South Surg. 1896 

151 Merrimac St., Haverhill, Mass. 

Coller, Frederick Amasa West Surg. 1914 

658 West Jefferson St., Los Angeles. Cal. 

Conant, William Merritt West Surg. 1884 

486 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Congdon, Eussell Thompson .... West. Surg. 1909 

Wenatchee, Wash. 

265 



List of House Pupils. 

Cooke, Henry Arnold East Med. 1897 

234 Benefit St., Providence, R. I. 

Coolidgc, Algernon East Surg. 1886 

613 Beacon St., Boston. 

Coolidge, Frederick Shurtleff .... West Surg. 1891 

Died 1915. 

Cooper, Charles Wendell West Surg. 1877 

Died 1S07. 

Cotton, Frederick Jay West Surg. 1894 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Cogues, William Pearce . . . . . . West Surg. 1895 

31 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 

Crabtree, Ernest Granville . . ' . . . East Surg. 1913 

S7 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Crabtree, Harvard Hersey East Surg. 1913 

31 Central St., Bangor, Maine. 

Crandell, Arthur Eichmond .... South Surg. 1898 

48 Church Green, Taunton, Mass. 

Crane, Phineas Miller Apothecary 1826 

Died 1882. 

Crosbie, Arthur Hallam East Surg. 1907 

260 Clarendon St., Boston. 

Crothers, Bronson West Med. 1911 

Lowry Bldg., St. Paul, Minn. 

Cummin, John White South Surg. 1897 

9 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 

Curtis, Hall Surg. 1856 

Died 1906. 

Cushing, Edward Fitch East Surg. 1888 

Died 1911. 

Cushing, Edward Fitch West Med. 1890 

Died 1911. 

Cushing, Harvey Williams South Surg. 1896 

305 Walnut St., Brookllne, Mass. 
Cushing, Joseph Whitney ..... Surg. 1860 

Died 1897. 

Cusick, Lawrence Francis East Surg. 1906 

99 Newbury St., Boston. 

Cutler, Elbridge Gerry Med. 1871 

214 Beacon St., Boston. 

Cutler, George David East Surg. 1913 

384 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Cutler, William Ward Med. 1835 

Died 1870. 

266 



List of House Pupils. 

Dalton, John Call Surg. 1847 

Died 18S9. 

Dana, Francis Med. 1829 

Died 1872. 

Dane, John East Surg. 1893 

29 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Davenport, Francis Henry .... Med. 1875 

390 Commonwealtli Ave., Boston. 

Davis, Abel Albert East Surg. 1894 

Calumet, Mich. 

Davis, Lincoln East Surg. 1899 

205 Beacon St., Boston. 
Davis, William Augustus Med. 1840 

Died 1898. 

Davis, William Horace West Surg. 1898 

23 Beaumont St., Ashmont, Mass. 

Day, Charles Orrin, Jr East Surg. 1909 

North St., Hingham, Mass. 

DeCourcillon, Eugene Med. 1857 

Died. 

Dennen, Ealph Waite East Surg. 1911 

258 Moody St., Waltham, Mass. 

Dennie, Charles Clayton Dermatolog. 1914 

98 Mountford St., Boston. 

Denny, Francis Parkman . . . West Med. 1895 

111 High St., Brookline, Mass. 

DeNormandie, Eobert Laurent . . . East Surg. 1903 

357 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Derby, George Strong East Surg. 1901 

7 Hereford St., Boston. 

Derby, Hasket Surg. 1857 

Died 1914. 

Derby, Eichard Henry Surg. 1866 

Died 1907. 

Dexter, Eichard East Med. 1906 

1003 Rose Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Dolliver, George Carroll South Surg. 1895 

Died 1897. 

Donoghue, James Crowley East Med. 1897 

Died 1911. " ^ 

Duke, William Waddell East Med. 1910 

500 E. Armour Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo. 

Dunbar, Franklin Asaph East Med. 1883 

Bonita, Cal. 

Dunn, Charles Hunter . .... West Med. 1901 

178 Marlboro St., Boston. 

267 



List of House Pupils. 

Dunn, William Aloysius West Surg. 1875 

139 Beacon St., Boston. 

Dunn, William Milos East Surg. 1912 

602-3 Candler Bldg., Atlanta. Ga. 

Dupee, Horace Surg. 1835 

Died 1891. 

Durand, Henry Strong West Surg. 1887 

Security Trnst Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Durkin, Harr}^ Anthony Child. Med. 1915 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Dwight, Thomas Surg. 1866 

Died 1911. 

Dyer, Ezra Surg. 1858 

Died 1887. 

Eastman, Theodore Jewett .... West Med. 1907 

71 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Easton, Charles Daniel East Med. 1905 

36 Ayrault St., Newport, R. I. 

Eaton, William Edward Dermatolog. 1908 

Care Surgeon General, United States Navy. 

Edes, Eichard Edward East Surg. 1895 

Died 1901. 

Ela, Walter East Surg. 1875 

13 Ash St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Eliot, George West Surg. 1890 

Died 1891. 

Elliot, John Wheelock West Surg. 1878 

124 Beacon St., Boston. 

Ellis, Calvin Med. 1849 

Died 1883. 

Ellis, Joshua James Med. 1851 

Died 1861. 

Emerson, Benjamin Kendall, Jr. . . . East Surg. 1902 
37 Pearl St., Worcester, Mass. 

Emerson, Edward Waldo West Surg. 1874 

Concord, Mass. 
Emmons, Arthur Brewster, 2d ... West Surg. 1905 

86 Bay State Road, Boston. 

Eustis, John Fenwick Med. 1839 

Died 1844. 

Eustis, Eichard Spelman West Med. 1912 

329 Beacon St., Boston. 

Eustis, Eichard Spelman Child. Med. 1913 

329 Beacon St., Boston. 

Eveleth, Charles Wilson West Med. 1904 

1 Madison Ave., New York City. 

268 



List of House Pupils. 

Everett, Oliver Hurd East Surg. 1877 

53 Pearl St., Worcester, Mass. 

Fabyan, Marshall East Med. 1905 

379 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Fallow, William Gilson Surg. 1869 

24 Quincy St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Famsworth, George Bourne .... East Surg. 1909 

2047 E. Ninth St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Favill, John East Med. 1914 

78 E. Elm St., Chicago, 111. 

Pelch, Lewis Perley Orthop. 1909 

* 355 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 

Ferguson, Luther Mitchell .... East Surg. 1915 

91 Arlington St., Newton, Mass. 

Finney, John Miller Turpin .... West Surg. 1889 

1300 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Fisk, Arthur Lyman West Surg. 1890 

41 West 50th St., New York City. 

Fitch, Ealph Eoswell West Med. 1904 

365 East Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 

Fitz, Reginald East Med. 1911 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston. 

Flagg, Elisha East Surg. 1902 

190 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Fletcher, Ezra Wood Med. 1841 

Died 1847. 

Flint, Carleton Phillips South Surg. 1898 

Died 1908. 

Flint, John West Surg. 1903 

Died 1911. 

Flint, John Sydenham Med. 1845 

Died 1887. 

Floyd, Cleaveland West Med. 1904 

246 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Foley, Thomas Madden Orthop. 1915 

1341 New Hampshire Ave., Washington, D. C. 

Folsom, Norton Med. 1863 

Died 1903. 

Ford, Lester Sackett East Surg. 1882 

Died 1882. 

Foster, Bumside West Surg. 1887 

90 Lowry Arcade, St. Paul, Minn. 

Francis, George Ebenezer Surg. 1862 

Died 1912. 

Francis, George Hills East Surg. 1887 

295 Walnut St., Brookline, Mass. 

French, Ealph Winward S. & E. Surg. 1911 

151 Rock St., Fall River, Mass. 

Frost, Harold Maurice West Surg. 1915 

Tiverton, R. I. 

Frost, Horace Bird East Surg. 1897 

30 N. Michigan Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

269 



1888 
1851 
1910 



List of House Pupils. 

Gage, Homer East Surg. 

72 rearl St., Worcester, Mass. 

Gage, Thomas Hovey Surg. 

Died 1909. 

Gallison, James Murry West Surg. 

49 Hereford St., Boston. 

Galloiipe, Charles William .... West Surg. 1884 

ISS Commonwealtli Ave., Boston. 

Gamble, James Lander West Med. 1912 

Children's Hospital, Boston. 

Gannett, William Whitworth .... West Med. 1879 

274 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Gardner, Edwin Daniels . . . • . S. & W. Surg. 1912 

59 Campbell St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Garland, Frederick Eugene .... South Surg. 1903 

483 Beacon St., Boston. 

Garland, Joseph Everett West Surg. 1876 

Died 1907. 

Garland, Eoy West Surg. 1904 

96 Middle St., Gloucester, Mass. 

Gaunt, Frank Fejton West Surg. 1913 

Methodist Hospital, Nanking, China. 

Gay, George Henry Surg. 1844 

Died 1878. 

Gay, Warren Fisher West Surg. 1893 

409 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Gibson, Eobert Francis . ... . . West Med, 1902 

Died 1914. 

Gibson, William Borrowe Surg. 1861 

Died 1862. 

Giddings, Harold Girard South Surg. 1909 

Copley Square Hotel, Boston. 

Gilbert, Louis Whitmore West Med. 1897 

1470 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

Godding, Clarence Miles East Surg. 1883 

312 Benefit St., Providence, R. I. 

Goddu, Louis Adilore Oliver .... Orthop. 1910 

407 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Goodale, Joseph Lincoln West Med. 1893 

258 Beacon St., Boston. 
Goodall, Harry Winfred ..... West Med. 1903 

205 Beacon St., Boston. 

Goodridge, Frederick James .... South Surg. 1904 

5 Appian Way, Cambridge, Mass. 

270 



List of House Pupils. 

Goodridge, Frederick James .... Dermatolog. 1905 

5 Appian Way, Cambridge, Mass. 

Gould, Alfred Henry South Surg. 1901 

Died 1907. 

Gould, Augustus Addison Med. 1828 

Died 1866. 

Graves, James Chapman, Jr East Surg. 1906 

416 Paulsen Block, Spokane, Wash. 

Graves, Eobert John East Surg. 1904 

3 N. state St., Concord, N. H. 

Graves, William Phillips East Surg. 1900 

244 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Gray, Francis Henry Med. 1833 

Died 1880. 

Greeley, Hugh Payne West Med. 1910 

46 Pilgrim Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Green, John Orne Surg. 1865 

267 Newbury St., Boston. 
Green, Joshua Apothecary 1821 

Died 1875. 

Green, Eobert Montraville South Surg. 1907 

78 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Green, Samuel Abbott . . . . . . Surg. 1853 

1154 Boylston St., Boston. 

Greene, Edward Miller East Med. 1889 

45 Chestnut St., Boston. 

Greenough, Francis Boott Med. 1865 

Died 1904. 

Greenough, Eobert Battey East Surg. 1896 

10 Gloucester St., Boston. 

Greenough, Eobert Battey West Med. 1897 

10 Gloucester St., Boston. 

Greenwood, Arthur Moses West Surg. 1904 

69 Pleasant St., Marblehead, Mass. 

Gregg, Donald West Med. 1909 

701 Boylston St., Brookline, Mass. 

Habersham, Joseph Clay Med. 1852 

Died 1881. 

Hale, Josiah Little ....... Surg. 1867 

Died 1903. 

Hall, Custis Lee Orthop. 1915 

Massachusetts Chambers, Boston. 

Hall, Herbert James East Surg. 1896 

69 Pleasant St., Marblehead, Mass. 

Hall, Eobert Granville West Med. 1910 

907 Journal Bldg., Broadway and Yamhill, Portland, Ore. 

271 



List of House Pupils. 

Hamilton, Eobert De Lancey .... East Med. 1904 

210 High St., Newburyport, Mass. 

Hammond, John Wilkes, Jr Child. Med. 1911 

65" Boylston St., Boston. 

Hammond, John Wilkes, Jr West Med. 1914 

657 Boylston St., Boston. 

Harmer, Torr Wagner East Surg. 1908 

192 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Harrington, Charles East Med. 1881 

Died 1908. 

Harrington, Francis Bishop .... East Surg. 1881 

Died 1914. 

Harris, Francis Augustine Surg. 1871 

Died 1911. 

Harrison, Paul Wilberforce .... East Surg. 1909 
Muscat, Arabia. 

Hartwell, Harry Fairbanks . . . . South Surg. 1899 

393 Beacon St., Boston. 

Hartwell, John Bryant West Surg. 1905 

260 Clarendon St., Boston. 

Haskins, Alfred Leonard Med. 1864 

Died 1876. 

Hastings, William Henry Howe . . . Med. 1867 

Died 1900. 

Hatch, Eoyal West Med. 1906 

572 Washington St., Wellesley, Mass. 

Haven, Henry Cecil East Surg. 1877 

Stockbridge, Mass. 

Haven, Samuel Foster Med. 1854 

Died 1862. 

Hawes, John Bromham, 2d ... . East Med. 1904 

29 Gloucester St., Boston. 

Hay, Gustavus Med. 1856 

Died 1908. 

Hayden, David Hyslop Surg. 1862 

Died 1912. 

Hayward, George Surg. 1841 

Died 1901. 

Hayward, George Griswold .... East Surg. 1880 

Died 1910. 

Head, John Frazier Med. 1843 

Died 1908. 

Heard, John Theodore Surg. 1858 

Died 1906. 

Hedblom, Carl Arthur East Surg. 1913 

Care Harvard Medical School. Shanghai, China. 

272 



List of House Pupils. 

Hellmann, Eobert Eichard .... Child. Med. 1910 

Died 19H. 

Hellmann, Eobert Eichard S. & E. Surg. 1911 

Died 1911, wliile on service. 

Hersam, Norman Paul Dermatolog. 1912 

Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R. I. 

Hewes, Henry Fox East Med. 1895 

416 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Heywood, Charles Frederick .... Surg. 1846 

Died 1893. 

Hildreth, Charles Hosea Surg. 1850 

Died 1884. 

Hill, George Hillard West Surg. 1895 

15 High St., Worcester, Mass. 

Hill, George Sumner East Med. 1901 

295 Beacon St., Boston. 

Hill, Lewis Webb West Med. 1915 

23 St. John St.. Jamaica Plain. Mass. 

Hodgdon, Andrew Hall West Med. 1882 

110 Maple Place, Dedham, Mass. 

Hodges, William Donnison .... East Surg. 1881 

Died 1893. 

Holbrook, Charles Albert East Surg. 1910 

50 Merrimac St., Haverhill, Mass. 

Holden, Charles Sumner West Surg. 1883 

24 So. Main St., Attleboro, Mass. 

Hollings, Charles Byam West Surg. 1908 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Holmes, Christopher Columbus . . . Surg. 1839 

Died 1882. 

Holmes, Edward Lorenzo Surg. 1853 

Died 1900. 

Homans, Charles Dudley Surg. 1849 

Died 1886. 

Homans, John Surg. 1861 

Died 1903. 

Homans, John South Surg. 1904 

154 Riverway, Boston. 

Homans, John, 2d East Surg. 1882 

Died 1902. 

Hooker, Anson Parker Med. 1857 

Died 1873. 

Hooker, Edward Med. 1858 

Died 1858, while on service. 

Hooper, Henry Surg. 1868 

1210 Astor St., Chicago, 111. 

273 



List of House Pupils. 

Hosmer, Alfred Surg. 1855 

Died 1S91. 

Houghton, Henry Lincoln West Surg. 1895 

176 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Howard, Herbert Handy West Surg. 1914 

23 Franklin St., Somerville, Mass. 

Howe, Estes Med. 1834 

Died 1887. 

Howe, Octavius Thorndike .... West Surg. 1877 

154 Beacon St., Boston. 

Howe, Samuel East Surg. 1875 

Died 1879. 

Howland, Joseph Briggs West Surg. 1897 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Hoyt, Charles Wentworth West Surg. 1906 

383 Park Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 

Hubbard, Joshua Clap South Surg. 1897 

86 Bay State Rd., Boston. 

Huntington, James Lincoln .... South Surg. 1908 
8 Gloucester St., Boston. 

Huntington, Thomas Waterman . . . East Med. 1876 

Union Square Bldg., 350 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Hutchinson, Marcello East Med. 1877 

Died 1908. 

Hyde, George Smith Med. 1855 

Died 1905. 

Inches, Charles Edward . . . . . Surg. 1864 

Died 1911. 

Irving, Frederick Carpenter .... West Surg. 1911 
96 Bay State Rd., Boston. 

Jackson, Henry East Med. 1885 

380 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Jackson, James Marsh ..... West Med. . 1891 

230 Beacon St., Boston. 

Jackson, John Barnard Swett . . . Apothecary 1827 

Died 1879. 

Jacobs, Henry Barton East Med. 1888 

11 Mt. Vernon Place, W. Baltimore, Md. 

Janes, Benjamin Franklin .... Dermatolog. 1909 

2192 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

Jaques, Henry Percy West Med. 1880 

Lenox, Mass. 

Jelly, Arthur Carleton East Med. 1892 

10 Arlington St., Boston. 

Jennings, Alpheus Felch . . . . . West Med. 1912 

437 Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

274 



List of House Pupils. 

Jolmson, Harold Abbott West Surg. 1901 

70 Broad St., Lynn, Mass. 

Johnson, John Bates Surg. 1838 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Johnson, Walter Sidney . . . . • . West Surg. 1899 

story Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Johnson, William Otis Med. 1848 

Died 1873. 

Jones, Claudius Marcellus East Med. 1875 

Died 1892. 

Jones, Daniel Fiske West Surg. 1897 

195 Beacon St., Boston. 

Jones, Ealph Kneeland Med. 1846 

Died 1888. 

Joslin, Elliot Proctor West Med. 1895 

81 Bay State Rd., Boston. 

Jouett, Frederic Eobert West Med. 1900 

3 Garden St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Keller, Ernest Tictor Orthop. 1914 

72 W. Peachtree St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Kennedy, Arthur Lemuel East Med. 1902 

835 Gaylord Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Kent, Barker Brooks Surg. 1868 

Died 1873. 

Kidder, Edward Hamilton .... West Surg. 1894 

Died 1898. 

Kidner, Frederick Clinton .... South Surg. 1905 

32 Adams Ave. VT., Detroit, Mich. 

Kilgore, Alson Eaphael West Med. 1914 

4025 Lyon Ave., Fruitvale Station, Oakland, Cal. 

Kilgore, Eugene Sterling West Med. 1911 

Berkeley Nat'l Bank Building, Berkeley, Cal. 

Kimball, George Morrill West Surg. 1885 

226 No. Main St., Concord, N. H. 

Kingman, Lucius Collinwood . . . West Surg. 1905 

212 Benefit St., Providence, R. L 

Kingsley, George Lyle West Surg. 1891 

Died 1890. 

Kinnicutt, Eoger East Med. 1908 

72 Cedar St., Worcester, Mass. 

Ladd, Maynard West Med. 1900 

270 Clarendon St., Boston. 

Lambert, Alfred Surg. • 1845 

Died 1885. 

Lamson, Paul Dudley . . . . . . East Med. 1910 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston. 

275 



List of House Pupils. 

Lane, Jonas Henry Apothecary 1824 

Died 1801. 

Lane, William JSTourse Surg. 1852 

Died 1862. 

Langmaid, Samuel AVood Surg. 1863 

Died 1915. 

Langnecker, Harry Lesley .... Orthop. 1908 

67" Melville Ave., Palo Alto, Cal. 

Lawrence, Charles Henry, Jr. ... West Med. 1910 

522 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Lecompte, Walter Augustus .... West Surg. 1899 

Died 1907. 

Lee, Eoger Irving East Med. 1907 

51 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Lee, William George East Surg. 1905 

4557 Broadway, Chicago, III. 

Leland, George Adams, Jr West Surg. 1912 

483 Beacon St., Boston. 

Lennox, William Gordon East Med 1915 

61 Toxteth St., Brookline, Mass. 

Leonard, Edward DeWitt East Surg. 1915 

Care Dr. G. L. May, Commonwealth Ave., Xewton Centre, Mass. 

Levek, Joseph Arthur Child. Med. 1915 

32 Lawrence St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Lincoln, Merrick West Med. 1901 

2 Linden St., Worcester, Mass. 

Lincoln, Eufus Pratt Surg. 1867 

Died 1900. 

Lingenfelter, George Price .... Dermatolog. 1910 

Metropolitan Building, Denver, Colo. 

Little, John Mason South Surg. 1902 

St. Anthony's Hospital, St. Anthony's, Newfoundland. 

Locke, Edwin Allen East Med. 1902 

311 Beacon St., Boston. 
Locke, Harry Lesley Franklin . . . Child. Med. 1912 

Hartford Isolation Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 

Lombard, Frederick Howard .... West Surg. 1882 

Died 1885. 

Lord, Frederick Taylor East Med. 1901 

305 Beacon St., Boston. 

Lord, Sidney Archer South Surg. 1894 

151 Mt. Vernon St., Middletown, Conn. 

Loring, Eobert Gardner West Surg. 1896 

10 Arlington St., Boston. 

Lothrop, Howard Augustus .... East Surg. 1892 

101 Beacon St., Boston. 

Lothrop, Oliver Ames West Surg. 1909 

101 Beacon St., Boston. 

Lund, Fred Bates West Surg. 1893 

527 Beacon St., Boston. 

276 



List of House Pupils. 

Lyman, Frank West Surg. 1893 

Alwaith BIdg., Duluth, Minn. 

MacAusland, Andrew Eoy West Surg. 1911 

240 Newbury St., Boston. 

Mack, William Surg. 1837 

Died 1895. 

Macomber, Donald South Surg. 1911 

76 Prince St., West Newton, Mass. 

Manahan, Thomas James South Surg. 1900 

Died 1911. 

Manton, Walter Williamson .... South Surg. 1910 

45 Watson St., Detroit, Mich. 

Marble, Henry Chase West Surg. 1912 

28 Commonwealtla Ave., Boston. 

Marks, Henry Koval ...... East Med. 1909 

565 Park Ave., New York City. 

Marshall, Herman Weston .... West Surg. 1907 

8 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Marshall, Herman Weston .... Orthop. 1908 

8 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Marvin, Frank William West Surg. ' 1915 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston. 

Mason, Amos Lawrence Med. 1871 

265 Clarendon St., Boston. 

Mason, George Edward Surg. 1864 

Died 1882. 

Mason, William Castein . . .* . . East Surg. 1878 

70 Main St., Bangor, Maine. 

May, William Eopes East Med. 1900 

121 E. 38th St., New York City. 

Mayo, Thomas Franklin Orthop. 1911 

305 Cabot St., Newtonville, Mass. 

McCartin, John Edward Orthop. 1912 

467 Columbia Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

Mead, Louis Guy East Med. 1901 

259 Beacon St., Boston. 

Meader, Charles Nash East Med. 1912 

McPhee Bldg., Denver, Colo. 
Means, James Howard East Med. 1913 

196 Beacon St., Boston. 

Mears, Elijah Eaymond . . . . . Surg. 1840 

Died 1841. 

Metcalf, Carleton Eay East Surg. 1907 

4 N. State St., Concord, N. II. 

Millard, Jean Sears Dermatolog. 1911 

111 Highland Ave., Akron, Ohio. 

277 



List of House Pupils. 

Miller, Ernest Parker .... , West Med. 1877 

408 Main St., Fltchburg, Mass. 

Miller, Eichard Henry East Surg. 1911 

279 Clarendon St., Boston. 

Minot, George Eichards East Med. 1913 

18S Marlboro St., Boston. 

Minot, James Jackson . . . . . . East Med. 1878 

188 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Mixter, Charles Galloupe West Surg. 1907 

180 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Mixter, Samuel Jason West Surg. 1879 

180 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Mixter, William Jason South Surg. 1907 

180 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Moffitt, Herbert Charles East Med. 1895 

1818 Broadway, San Francisco, CaJ. ^ 

Monks, George Howard East Surg. 1880 

67 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Moore, Frederick Fiske West Med. 1876 

Moore, George Albert West Surg. 1911 

202 Spring St., Brockton, Mass. 

Moorehouse, George Wilton .... East Med. 1899 

1110 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Morrill, Ferdinand Gordon .... Surg. 1868 

Died 1907. 

Morrill, Gordon Niles Orthop. 1908. 

2047 East 9tli St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Morse, George W East Surg. 1910 

30 Pinckney St., Boston. 

Morse, Henry Lee ........ West Surg. 1878 

112 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Morton, William James Surg. 1871 

19 East 28th St., New York City. 

Moseley, William Edward East Med. 1874 

301 West Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

Moseley, William Oxnard . . . . . West Med. 1878 

Died 1879. 

Mosher, Harris Peyton . . . . . East Surg. 1897 

828 Beacon St., Boston. 

Mumford, James Gregory East Surg. 1890 

Died 1914. 

Murphy, Fred Towsley ...... West Surg. 1901 

1806 Locust St., St. Louis, Mo. 

278 



List of House Pupils. 

Musgrave, Percy East Med. 1899 

Bar Harbor, Maine. 

Newburgh, Louis Harry West Med. 1909 

419 Beacon St., Boston. 

Newell, Franklin Spilman .... South Surg, 1896 

443 Beacon St.. Boston. 

Newell, Otis Kimball East Surg. 1883 

Newhall, Harvey Field East Surg. 1906 

51 Nahant St., Lynn, Mass. 

Newhall, Herbert William .... West Med. 1883 

82 Broad St., Lynn, Mass. 

Nichols, Arthur Howard Surg. 1865 

55 Mt. Vernon St., Boston. 

Norton, Chauncey Williams .... West Surg. 1902 

Saranac Lalie, N. Y. 

Oakman, Carl Shepard East Surg. 1904 

62 Bagg St., Detroit, Mich. 

Odin, John Surg. 1832 

Died 1864. 

Odiorne, Walter Burlingame .... East Surg. 1900 

Died 1906. 

OTerrall, John Tolson ...... Orthop. 1913 

2341 Camp St., New Orleans, La. 

Oliphant, Eobert Woodruff .... Med. 1848 

Died 1883. 

Oliver, Everard Lawrence . . . • . . Dermatolog. 1907 

362 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Oliver, Henry Kemble Med. 1854 

East Jaffrey, N. H. 

Oliver, Joseph Pearson Med. 1870 

Died 1903. 

Omer, Joy Alva Orthop. 1912 

George Washington Univ. Hosp., Washington, D. C. 

O'Neil, Eichard Frothingham .... West Surg. 1895 

379 Beacon St., Boston. 

O'Neil, Eichard Frothingham .... East Med. 1896 

379 Beacon St., Boston. 

Ordway, Clarence Eugene West Surg. 1906 

371 Main St., Winchester, Mass. 

Osgood, Eobert Bay ley West Surg. 1900 

372 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Otis, Walter Joseph West Surg. 1880 

267 Beacon St., Boston. 

279 



List of House Pupils. 

Overlander, Charles Leonard .... West Med. 1906 

520 Beacon St., Boston. 

Page, William Hussey Surg. 1852 

Died 1888. 

Painter, Charles Fairbank .... East Surg. 1896 

522 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Palfrey, Francis Winslow West Med. 1903 

so Marlboro St., Boston. 

Palmer, Walter Walker East Med. 1911 

Rockefeller Inst, for Med. Research, New York City. 

Park, John Gray Med. 1861 

Died 1905. 

Parker, Willard Med. 1829 

Died 1884. 

Parker, Willard Stephen East Med. 1911 

128 Bay State Rd., Boston. 

Parkman, Samuel Med. 1836 

Died 1854. 

Peabody, Francis Weld East Med. 1908 

Peter Bent Brigham HospitaJ, Boston. 

Pearl, Frederick Warren East Surg. 1895 

125 East 36th St., New York City. 

Pease, Edward Allen West Surg. 1892 

431 Beacon St., Boston. 

Pegram, John Combe, Jr . West Surg. 1896 

Died 1906. 

Pemberton, Frank Arthur South Surg. 1911 

128 Bay State Rd., Boston. 

Percy, Karlton Goodsell East Med. 1912 

195 Aspinwall Ave., Brookline, Mass. 

Peterson, Hugo Oliver East Med. 1912 

41 Pleasant St., Worcester, Mass. 

Pfeiffer, Oscar Joseph East Surg. 1884 

521 Colfax Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Phillips, Jerrie Knowlton West Surg. 1886 

Died 1899. 

Phippen, Hardy East Surg. 1889 

84 Washington Sq., Salem, Mass. 

Phippen, Walter Gray South Surg. 1906 

31 Chestnut St., Salem, Mass. 

Pierce, George Burgess ... . . . West Surg. 1900 

178 Devonshire St., Boston. 

Pierson, Edward Brooks Surg. 1842 

Died 1874. 

280 



List of House Pupils. 

Pierson, Philip Hale East Med. 1915 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Porter, Charles Allen East Surg. 1893 

116 Beacon St., Boston. 

Porter, Charles Burnham West Surg. 1864 

Died 1909. 

Porter, Francis Edward Surg. 1872 

409 Auburn St., Auburndale, Mass. 

Post, Abner Surg. 1869 

16 Newbury St., Boston. 

Potter, Alexander Carleton .... South Surg. 1900 

522 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Potter, Nathaniel Bowditch .... East Med. 1898 

.591 Park Ave., New York City. 

Pratt, Calvin Surg. 1865 

South St., Bridgewater, Mass. 

Pratt, Herbert James Med. 1867 

Denver, Colo. 

Pratt, John Washburn West Surg. 1886 

Dedham, Mass. 

Prescott, Henry Dudley East Surg. 1904 

176 William St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Putnam, Charles Pickering .... Med. 1868 

Died 1914. 

Putnam, Charles Eussell Lowell . . . South Surg. 1895 

121 East 38th St., New York City. 

Putnam, James Jackson Med. 1869 

106 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Quinby, William Carter East Surg. 1903 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Quincy, Henry Parker Surg. 1866 

Died 1899. 

Eackemann, Francis Minot .... East Med. 1914 

Rockefeller Inst, for Med. Research, New York City. 

Eay, Benjamin Lincoln Med. 1858 

Died 1879. 

Eeggio, Andre William West Surg. 1914 

40 Fairfield St., Boston. 

Reynolds, Edward East Surg. 1885 

321 Dartmouth St., Boston. 

Reynolds, John Phillips Med. 1851 

Died 1909. 

Reynolds, Joseph . Apothecary 1825 

Died 1872. 

Rice, Alexander Hamilton East Surg. 1905 

688 Boylston St., Boston. 

Eichards, Dexter ISTewell East Surg. . 1912 

475 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Richardson, Edward Pierson .... East Surg. 1907 

224 Beacon St., Boston. 

281 



List of House Pupils. 

Richardson, Mark WyTnaii .... West Med. 3895 

Room 23, 67 Milk St., Boston. 

Richardson, Maurice Howe .... East Surg. 1877 

Died 1912. 

Richardson, William Lambert . . . Med, 1866 

225 Commonwealtli Ave., Boston. 

Riley, Augustus South Surg. 1909 

530 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Risley, Edward Hammond .... East Surg, 1908 

31 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 

Robbins, Chandler South Surg, 1905 

356 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Robertson, Oswald Hope West Med, 1914 

2744 Dohr St., Berkeley, Cal. 

Robinson, Carl Merrill West Surg. 1913 

660 Congress St., Portland, Maine. 

Robinson, Samuel South Surg, 1902 

St. Mary's Hospital, Rochester, Minn. 

Robinson, Samuel Quincy Surg, 1876 

Died 1899. 

Rockey, Eugene Watson East Surg, 1914 

Electric Bldg., Portland, Ore. 

Rogers, Orville Forrest, Jr West Med, 1913 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Ropes, Francis Codman Surg, 1859 

Died 1869. 

Rotch, Thomas Morgan West Med. 1874 

Died 1914. 

Sabine, George Kraus Surg, 1872 

30 Irving St., Brookline, Mass. 

Sadler, Roy Angelo East Med, 1909 

1750 Washington St., Boston. 

Salisbury, Stephen Surg, 1834 

Died 1875. 

Sanford, Henry Lindsay East Surg, 1901 

Osborn Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Sargent, Joseph Med, 1837 

Died 1888. 

Sargent, Lucius Manlius Surg, 1855 

Died 1864. 

Sawyer, Albert Franklin Surg, 1851 

Died 1903. 

Sawyer, Wilbur Augustus West Med, 1908 

3123 T St., Sacramento, Cal. 

Sayward, William Henry, Jr. . . , West Med, 1900 

Wayland, Mass. 

Schram, Charles West Med, 1886 

52 East 82d St., New Tork City. 

282 



List of House Pupils. 

Schwartz, Abraham Bernard .... Child. Med. 1914 

Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, II. 

. Scott, Zaccheus Eoscoe Child. Med. 1915 

Dravusburg, Pa. 

Scudder, Charles Locke . . . . . East Surg. 1889 

209 Beacon St., Boston. 

Scudder, Gardiner Hubbard .... West Med. 1896 

Died 1896. 

Sears, George Gray West Med. 1885 

426 Beacon St., Boston. 

Seaverns, Joel Med. 1853 

Died 1894. 

Seelye, Ealph Holland East Surg. 1891 

73 Chestnut St., Springfield, Mass. 

Seelye, Walter Clark West Surg. 1900 

66 William St., Worcester, Mass. 

Sewall, John Gallison Med. 1847 

Died 1872. 

Shattuck, Frederick Cheever .... Med. 1872 

135 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Shattuck, George Cheever East Med. 1906 

205 Beacon St., Boston. 

Shaw, Henry Alden West Surg. 1891 

Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps, United States Army. 

Sheahan, George Maurice West Surg. 1908 

12 School St., Quincy, Mass. 

Sheldon, Eussell Firth East Surg. 1912 

• 30 Pinckney St., Boston. 

Sherman, Thomas Foster West Med. 1881 

Died 1893. 

Sherrick, Joseph Leslie West Med. 1915 

317 East Broadway, Monmouth, 111. 

Sibley, Benjamin Ernest South Surg. 1906 

1595 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
Simmons, Channing Chamberlain . . East Surg. 1900 

317 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Sinclair, Alexander Doull Med. 1856 

Died 1911. 

Sisson, Warren Eichards Child. Med. 1912 

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Slade, Daniel Denison Surg. 1848 

Died 1896. 

Smith, George Gilbert West Surg. 1909 

309 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Smith, Harold Wellington .... South Surg. 1903 
Care Surgeon General, United States Navy. 

Smith, Hervey Lewis West Med. 1907 

249 Union St., Springfield, Mass. 

Smith, Ira St. Clair Surg. 1868 

Died 1891. 

283 



List ot House Pupils. 

Smith, Eichard Mason West Med. 1909 

329 Beacon St., Boston. 

Smith, William David West Med. 1913 

99 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Smith, William Henry West Med. 1897 

10 Gloucester St., Boston. 

Smith, William Lord West Surg. 1892 

2 Newbury St., Boston. 

Spalding, Eoger East Med. 1903 

Duxbury, Mass. 

Sparhawk, Thomas Med. 1831 

Died 1874. 

Spear, Louis Mahlon East Med. 1906 

483 Beacon St., Boston. 

Spooner, Lesley Hinckley East Med. 1909 

260 Clarendon St., Boston. 

Sprague, Eichard West Surg. 1888 

Died 1892. 

Sprague, Eussell Bradford .... Orthop. 1911 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Steams, John Surg. 1859 

Died 1898. 

Stearns, Thornton ....... East Surg. 1913 

University Hospital, San Francisco, Cal. 

Stearns, Thornton Orthop. 1914 

University Hospital, San Francisco, Cal. 

Stedman, Charles Ellery . . . . . Surg. 1854 

Died 1909. 

stedman, George West Surg. 1875 

380 Newbury St., Boston. 

Stedman, Henry Eust East Surg. 1874 

48 Beacon St., Boston. 
Steenberg, Donald Benjamin .... East Surg. 1915 

Aurora, Neb. 

Stevens, Harold Wentworth .... Child. Med. 1914 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Stevens, Horace Paine West Surg. 1907 

14 Garden St., North Cambridge, Mass. 

Stevens, Lewis Tebbets West Med. 1887 

Died 1898. 

Stickney, Josiah Henry Surg. 1857 

Died 1901. 

stone, Arthur Kingsbury West Surg. 1888 

44 Fairfield St., Boston. 

Stone, James Savage East Surg. 1894 

234 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Storer, Malcolm East Surg. 1890 

476 Boylston St., Boston. 

284 



List of House Pupils. 

Stowell, Edmund Channing .... East Med. 1893 

Dublin, N. H. 

Strong, Charles Pratt West Surg. 1881 

Died 1893. 

Sturgis, Frederick Eussell .... Surg. 1866 

530 Fiftli Ave., New Yon-k City. 

Sutter, Loe Albright Dermatolog. 1913 

Wiclilta, Kansas. 

Swaim, Loring Tiffany West Surg. 1912 

379 Park Ave., New York City. 

Swain, Howard Townsend East Surg. 1898 

226 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Swain, Howard Townsend .... West Med. 1899 

226 CommonweaJtti Ave., Boston. 

Swan, Charles Walter Med. 1863 

119 Livingston Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

Swan, William Donnison East Surg. 1886 

167 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Sweet, Clifford Daniel Child. Med. 1913 

710 Griffith McKenzie Building, Fresno, Cal. 

Swett, Samuel Surg. 1831 

Died 1866. 

Swift, John Baker, Jr South Surg." 1909 

419 Beacon St., Boston. 

Swift, William Nye East Med. 1881 

Died 1911. 

Talbot, Fritz Bradley East Med. 1907 

311 Beacon St., Boston. 

Talbot, John Edward East Med. 1914 

Holliston, Mass. 

Tarbell, George Grosvenor Surg. 1864 

Died 1900. 

Taylor, Frederick Weston East Med. 1882 

1735 Massachusetts Ave., N. Cambridge, Mass. 

Temple, William Franklin, Jr. . . . West Surg. 1913 

499 Beacon St., Boston. 

Thayer, William Henry Med. 1842 

Died 1897. 

Thayer, William Sydney West Med. 1889 

406 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md. 

Thomas, Thomas Kemble Surg. 1830 

Died 1863. 

Thompson, Frederick Henry .... Surg. 1869 

3 Pleasant St., Fltchburg, Mass. 

Thomdike, Augustus ....... West Surg. 1889 

601 Beacon St., Boston. 

285 



List of House Pupils. 

Thorndike, William Surg. 1856 

Died 1884. 

Thorndike, William Henry .... Surg. 1848 

Died 1884. 

Tilden, George Horton East Surg. 1876 

Naples, Italy. 

Tileston, Wilder East Med. 1900 

424 Temple St., New Haven, Conn. 

Tobey, James Edwin . . . . . . Surg. 1871 

Died 1891. 

Toppan, Eoland Lesley South Surg. 1910 

10 Toppan's Lane, Newburyport, Mass. 

Torbert, James Eockwell East Surg. 1902 

252 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Tower, Charles Carroll Med. 1858 

Died 1893. 

Townsend, Charles Wendell .... East Med. 1886 

76 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Townsend, William Edward .... Surg. 1843 

Died 1866. 

Tuck, Henry Surg. 1833 

bled 1845. 

Tuck, Henry Med. 1866 

Died 1904. 

Van Niiys, Fresenius East Med. 1907 

Weston, Mass. 

Vaughn, Charles Everett Med. 1862 

Died 1904. 

Vickery, Eugene Augustus .... West Surg. 1904 

Naval Hospital, New Yorls City. 

Vickery, Herman Frank West Med. 1882 

263 Beacon St., Boston. 

Vincent, Beth West Surg. 1903 

295 Beacon St., Boston. 

Vose, Eobert Henry East Surg. 1897 

443 Beacon St., Boston. 

Wadsworth, Oliver Fairfield .... Med. 1863 

Died 1911. 

Wadsworth, Eichard Goodwin . . . South Surg. 1901 

522 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

Wakefield, Alley Talbot West Surg. 1883 

Died 1886. 

Walcott, William Walter South Surg. 1906 

32 West Central St., Natick, Mass. 
286 



List of House Pupils. 

Walker, Melvin Harvey, Jr East Surg. 1914 

35 Summer St., Westboro, Mass. 

Warren, Charles Fletcher West Surg. 1915 

49 Gloucester St., Boston. 

Warren, Hobart Endicott East Surg. 1894 

Ashburnham, Mass. 

Warren, John Collins Surg. 1865 

58 Beacon St., Boston. 

Washburn, Frederic Augustus . . . South Surg. 1897 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Waterman, George Arthur West Med. 1901 

410 Beacon St., Boston. 

Waterman, Thomas Surg. 1867 

Died 1901. 

Watson, Francis Sedgewick .... East Surg. 1879 

92 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Webster, Fred Patterson West Med. 1902 

12 Pine St., Portland, Maine. 

Webster, Harrison Briggs East Surg. 1910 

Castine, Maine. 

Weis, Joseph Deutsch West Med. 1899 

1448 Jackson Ave., New Orleans, La. 

Wells, Charles Edward ...... Orthop. 1910 

Mass. Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston. 

West, George Webb West Surg. 1879 

Died 1897. 

Wheeler, Alfred Augustus South Surg. 1894 

48 Mt. Pleasant St., Leominster, Mass. 

Wheeler, John Brooks East Surg. 1879 

210 Pearl St., Burlington, Vt. 

Wheeler, Leonard . Med. 1869 

12 Chestnut St., Worcester, Mass. 

Whipple, Jeremiah Med. 1865 

Died 1871. 

White, Franklin Warren East Med. 1896 

322 Marlboro St., Boston. 

White, James Clark Med. 1855 

Died 1916. 

White, John Lane Med. 1854 

Died 1902. 

Wliite, Paul Dudley Child. Med. 1911 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 

White, Paul Dudley West Med. 1913 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Whiteside, George Slinttnck .... West Surg. 1898 

Journal Bldg., Tortland, Ore. 

287 



List of House Pupils. 

Whitne3% James Lyman "West Med. 1906 

240 Stockton St., San Francisco, Cal. 

\Vliitney, William Fiske West Med. 1875 

228 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Wliittemore, James Madison .... Apothecary 1822 

Died 1863. 

Wliittemore, AVilliam Stewart .... South Surg, 1910 

39 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Wliittemore, Wyman West Surg. 1906 

330 Dartmoutli St., Boston. 

Whittier, Edward Newton Med. 1868 

Died 1902. 

WiUard, Josiah Newell Med. 1859 

Died 1870. 

Willard, Eobert Med. 1862 

Died 1892. 

WiUiams, Hugh West Surg. 1899 

301 Beacon St., Boston. 
Wilson, Philip Duncan East Surg. 1914 

594 E. Town St., Columbus, Ohio. 

Winn, William Adams East Surg. 1876 

Died 1889. 

Winslow, Fred Bradlee South Surg. 1901 

275 Clarendon St., Boston. 

Witherle, Charles Br5'ant West Surg. 1881 

21 Deering St., Portland, Maine. 

Wood, Edward Stickney Surg. 1870 

Died 1905. 

Wood, James Augustus Child. Med. 1915 

Yankton, S. Dakota. 

Woodbury, Frederick Clinton .... East Med. 1887 

Died 1886. 

Woodbury, Willard Porter East Surg. 1908 

Died 1910. 

Workman, William Hunter .... Med. 1871 

Worcester, Mass. 

Wyman, Morrill Med. 1836 

Died 1903. 

Yost, Jno. Dixon East Surg. 1898 

452 Main St., Worcester, Mass. 

Young, Edward Lorraine, Jr West Surg. 1910 

87 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Young, Ernest Boyen West Surg. 1897 

434 Marlboro St., Boston. 

Young, James Herbert West Med. 1908 

430 Centre St., Newton, Mass. 
288 



List of House Physicians and Surgeons. 

LIST OF HOUSE PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 



Morse, George W . 
Cutler, George David . 
Leland, George Adams, Jr. 
Crabtree, Harvard Hersey 
Palmer, "Walter Walker . 
Crabtree, Ernest Granville 
Coller, Frederick Amasa . 
White, Paul Dudley . . 
Harrison, Paul Wilberforce 
Cutler Elliott Carr .... 
Morton, John Jamieson . 



East Surg. 
West Surg. 
East Surg. 
West Surg. 
East Med. 
Genito-Urinary 
West Surg. 
West Med. ■ . 
Genito-TJrinary 
West Surg. 
East Surg. 



1911-1912 

1912-1913 

1912-1915 

1913-1914 

1913-1915 

1913-1915 

1914-1915 

1911- 

1915 

1915- 

1915- 



289 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION, 1916. 



President. 
Henky p. Walcott, M.D. 

Vice-President. 
David P. Kimball. 

Treasurer. 
Charles H. W. Foster, 50 State Street. 

Secretary. 
John A. Blanchard, 262 Washington Street. 

Trustees. 

1886 *David p. Kimball, 35 Congress Street. 

1892 Henry P. >Walcott, M.D., Chairman, 11 Waterhouse Street, 

Cambridge, Mass. 
1896 George Wigglesworth, 53 State Street, Room 1004. 
1898 Moses Williams, 126 State Street. 
1902 Francis Henry Appleton, 251 Marlborough Street. 

1902 Charles H. W. Foster, 50 State Street. 

1903 Charles P. Grebnotjgh, 262 Washington Street. 
1910 Nathaniel T. Kidder, 69 Ames Building. 

1910 John Lowell, 38 Equitable Building, 67 Milk Street. 

1912 *Joseph H. O'Neil, Federal Trust Company, 85 Devonshire Street. 

1915 *PniLip L. Saltonstall, 53 State Street. 

1916 *Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer, 22 Fairfield Street. 

Administrator. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D. 

Assistant Administrators. 

Joseph B. Howl.a.nd, M.D. 
Byam Hollings, M.D. 

Assistant Treasurer. 
Walter S. Crane. 

* Appointed by the Governor of the Commonwealth. 
290 



OflBcers of the Institution. 

Board of Consultation. 

William L. Richardsox, M.D. James J. Men'ot, M.D. 

Edward Cowles, iNI.D. Frederick C. Shattuck, M.D. 

JoHX CoLLixs Warrex, ^.I.D. James J. PrTXAM, M.D. 

JoHx TV. Elliot, M.D. Johx T. Bowex, M.D. 

George L. Waltox, M.D. William ^NI. Coxaxt, M.D. 

Elbridge G. Cutler, M.D. Samuel J. Mixter, M.D. 

William W. Gax-xett, M.D. Hermax F. Vickert, M.D. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE TRUSTEES. 

Admitting McLean Hospital Patients. 

Messrs. Appletox, Foster, and Greexough. 

Finance. 
Messes. Kimball, Williams, and O'Xeil. 

Accounts and Expenditures. 
Messrs. Williams, Foster, and Lowell. 

Buildings and Repairs. 
Messrs. Foster, Kidder, and Lowell. 

Free Beds. 
^Iessrs. Williams, Kidder, and O'Xeil. 

Book of Donations. 
Mr. Wigglesworth. 

Nominations. 
Messrs. Wigglesworth, Williams, and Walcott. 

General Hospital Training School for Nurses. 
Messrs. Walcott and Appletox, and ^Mrs. Thater. 

General Library and Warren Fund. 
Messes. Greexough and O'Xeil, and ^Irs. Thater. 

Dalton Scholarships. 
Messes. Walcott, Kimball, and Saltoxstall. 

Ether Day. 

Messrs. Walcott, Williams, and GpuEexough. 

291 



Officers of the Institution. 

Legal Affairs. 
Messrs. Greexough, Williams, and Lowell. 



VISITING COMMITTEES. 

1916 

March and September. 
Messrs. Kimball and Wigglesworth. 

April and October. 
Messrs. Appleton and Foster. 

May and November. 
Messrs. Walcott and Greenoxjgh. 

June and Deconber. 
Messrs. Williams and Lowell. 

July. 
Messrs. Kidder and Saltonstall. 

August. 
Mr. O'Neil and Mrs. Thayer. 

1917 

January. 
Messrs. Kidder and Saltonstall. 

February. 
Mr. O'Neil and Mrs. Thayer. 



LADIES' VISITING COMMITTEE. 

Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer, Honorary Chairman, 22 Fairfield Street 
Miss J. L. Motley, Chairman, Chestnut Hill. 
Mrs. Henry H. Spragtje, Secretary, 33 Fairfield Street. 
Mrs. John Lowell, Treasurer, 24 Commonwealth Avenue. 
Mrs. Harcoxjrt Amory, 293 Beacon Street. 
Mrs. Francis H. Appleton, Jr., 451 Marlboro Street. 
Mrs. J. Dudley Clark, 32 Hereford Street. 

292 



Officers of the Institution. 

Mrs. Charles A. Coolidge, 82 JMarlboro Street. 

Mrs. Harold J. Coolidge, 303 Berkeley Street. 

Mrs. William T. Councilman, 78 Bay State Road. 

Mrs. Lincoln Davis, 217 Beacon Street. 

Miss Elizabeth Gray, 133 Marlboro Street. 

Mrs. Richard W. Hale, Needham, Mass. 

Mrs. Arthur D. Hill, 17 Brimmer Street. 

Miss Helen Homans, 164 Beacon Street. 

Mrs. a. Lawrence Hopkins, 46 Commonwealth Avenue. 

Mrs. George B. Leighton, 127 Beacon Street. 

Miss Ella L. Lyman, 57 Marlboro Street. 

Mrs. William Jason Mixter, 42 Fairfield Street. 

Mrs. John G. Palfrey, 152 Mt. Vernon Street. 

Mrs. Charles Thorndike Parker, South Hamilton. 

Mrs. Robert S. Russell, 20 Commonwealth Avenue. 

Mrs. C. S. Tuckerman, 201 Bay State Road. 

Miss A. N. Ward, 304 Marlboro Street. 

General. 

Mrs. Jeffrey Brackett, 41 Marlboro Street. 

Mrs. John C. Gray, 176 Beacon Street. , 

Mrs. Charles P. Greenough, 45 Carlton Street, Longwood. 

Mrs. F. L. Higginson, 274 Beacon Street. 

Mrs. William Lawrence, 122 Commonwealth Avenue. 

Mrs. John H. Morison, 44 Brimmer Street. 



OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

Resident Physician. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physicians. 

Joseph B. Howland, M.D. 
Byam Hollings, M.D. 
Harold W. Hersey, M.D. 
Eugene Walker, M.D. 
John F. Bresnahan, M.D. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of East Medical Service. 
David L. Edsall, M.D. 

Chief of West Medical Service. 

Richard C. Cabot, M.D. 
293 



Officers of the Institution. 

ChieJ of Children's Medical Service 
Fritz B. Talbot, ^I.D. 

Consultant in Syphilis. 
Abner Post, M.D. 

Chief of Syphilis Department. 
C. Morton Smith, M.D. 

Chief of Sub-Department of Tropical Medicine. 
Richard P. Strong, M.D. 

Visiting Physicians. 

William H. Smith, M.D. Roger I. Lee, M.D 

Frederick T. Lord, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Physicians. 

Arthur K. Stone, M.D. John B. Ha^\tes, 2d, M.D. 

Henry F. Hewes, M.D. George C. Shattuck, M.D 

George S. C. Badger, M.D. Louis H. Newburgh, M.D. 

Joseph H. Pratt, M.D, 

Assistant Visiting Physician to the Children's Medical Department. 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. 

Physicians to Out-Patients. 

LoTJis G. Mead, M.D. Harry Linenthal, M.D. 

Theodore J. Eastman, M.D. Gerald Blake, M.D. 
Lesley H. Spooner, M.D. William B. Robbins, M.D. 

Physician to Children's Medical Out-Patient Department. 
J. Herbert Young, M.D. 

Assistant Physicians to Out-Patients. 

Gardner W. Hall, M.D. Malcolm Seymour, M.D. 

Gerardo M. Balboni, M.D. Roger P. Dawson, M.D. 

F. GoRHAii BRiGHAii, M.D. Hyiman Morrison, M.D. 

P. Challis Bartlett, M.D. Willard S. Parker, M.D. 

Donald Macomber, M.D. 

Assistant Physicians to the Children's Medical Out-Patient Department 

Louis W. Gilbert, M.D. John W. Hammond, Jr., M.D. 

Richard S. Eustis, ]\LD. Oliver E. Besby, M.D. 

294 



Officers of the Institution. 

Assistants. 

George A. Dec, M.D. George R. Mixot, M.D. 

Henry D. Lloyd, INI.D. A. Watsox Sellards, M.D. 



House Physicians. 
Paul D. White, jNI.D. OR^^LLE F. Rogers, Jr., M.D. 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of East Surgical Service. 
Charles L. Scudder, M.D. 

Chief of West Surgical Service. 
Charles A. Porter, INI.D. 

Chief of Orthopedic Service. 
Eluott G. Brackett, M.D. 

Chief of Genito-Urinary Service. 
Hugh Cabot, M.D. 

Chief of Department of Anaesthesia. 
Freeiiax Allen, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons. 

FiiANKLiN G. Balch, ^M.D. Farrar Cobb, ^I.D. 

George W. W. Brewster, M.D. Robert B. Greexotjgh, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons. 

Daxtel F. Joxes, M.D. Lixcolx DA"\as, M.D. 

Hugh Williams, M.D. • 

Assistant Visiting Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Robert B. Osgood, M.D. 

Assistant Anaesthetist. 
Arthur M. Dodge, M.D. 

Surgeons to Out-Patienfs. 

Channixg C. Siimoxs, M.D. Edward P. Richardsox, !M.D. 

Beth Vixcext, ^I.D. Wy:max Whittemore, M.D. 

295 



Officers of the Institution. 

Orthopedic Surgeons to Out-Patients. 

Z. B. Adams, M.D. Maek H. Rogers, M.D. 

C. Hermann Bucholz, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgeons to Out-Patients. 

J. Bellinger Barney, M.D. Richard F. O'Neil, M.D. 

George G. Smith, M.D. Edward L. Young, Jr., M.D. 

Assistant Surgeojis to Out-Patients. 

John B. Hartwell, M.D. Edward H. Risley, M.D. 

W. Jason Mixter, M.D. Richard H. Miller, M.D. 

Assistant Orthopedic Surgeons to Out-Patients. 

Harry C. Low, M.D. Murray S. Danforth, M.D. 

Lloyd T. Brown, M.D. Louis A. O. Goddu, M.D. 

Herman W. Marshall, M.D. 

Assistant Genito-Urinary Surgeon to Out-Patients. 
E. Granville Crabtree, M.D. 



Assistants. 



Lewis P. Felch, M.D. Eben W. Fiske, M.D. 

Frederick J. Goodridge, M.D. Victor I. Shapira, M.D. 

ToRR Wagner Harmer, M.D. George A. Leland, Jr., M.D. 

John E. McCartin, M.D. Custis Lee Hall, M.D. 

Oscar R. T. L'Esperance, M.D. Walter J. LaMarcke, M.D. 



House Surgeons. 
Elliott C. Cutler, M.D. John J. Morton, M.D. 

House Surgeon to Genito-Urinary Department. 



DERMATOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of Service. 



Dermatologists. 
Charles J. White, M.D. Harvey P. Towle, M.D. 

296 



Officers of the Institution. 

Associate Dermatologist. 
Frederick S. Burns, I\I.D. 

Assistant Dermatologists. 
E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. John H. Bufford, M.D. 

Assistant. 
J. Harper Blaisdell, M.D. 



NEUROLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of Service. 
Edward W. Taylor, M.D. 

Neurologists. 
Walter E. Paul, M.D. George A. Waterman, M.D. 

Associate Neurologist. 



Assistant Neurologists. 
James B. Ater, M.D. George Clymer, M.D. 

Assistants. 
Frederic B. M. Cady, M.D. Harold B. Eaton, M D. 

Psychologist. 
L. Eugene Emerson, Ph.D. 



LARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Chief of Service. 
Algernon Coolidge, M.D. 

Laryngologists, 
Harris P.^Mosher, M.D. 

Associate Laryngologist. 

D. Crosby Greene, Jr., M.D. 

297 



OflBcers of the Institution. 

, Assistant Lanjngologists. 

William F. Knowles, M.D. Chandler Robbins, M.D. 

Harry A. Barnes, M.D. Frederick E. Garland, M.D. 

Assistants. 

William J. Harkins, M.D. Edwards W. Herman, M.D. 

D. Campbell Smyth, M.D. Walter B. Swift, M.D. 

John L. Lougee, M.D. Joseph L. Goodale, M.D. 

Dentist. 
George H. Wright, D.M.D. 



Otologist. 
D. Harold Walker, M.D. 

Assistant Otologist. 
Oliver A. Lothrop, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist. 
Alexander Quackenboss, M.D. 

Assistant Ophthalmologists. 

Robert G. Loring, M.D. George S. Derby, M.D 

Ralph A. Hatch, M.D. 

Obstetrician. 
Franklin S. Newell, M.D. 

Consultant in Contagious Diseases. 
Edwin H. Place, M.D. 



PATHOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Pathologist. 
J. Homer Wright, M.D. 

Surgical Pathologist. 
William F. Whitney, M.D. 

Assistant Pathologist. 

Oscar Richardson, M.D. 
298 



Officers of the Institution. 



Assistant Surgical Pathologist. 
Harry F. Hartwell, ]\I.D. 

Chemist. 
Otto Folin, Ph.D. 

Assistant Chemist. 
WiLLET Denis, Ph.D. 

Assistant in Clinical Bacteriology. 
Albert E. Steele, M.D. 



Roentgenologist. 
Walter J. Dodd, M.D. 

Assistant Roentgenologist. 
George W. Holiies, M.D. 

House Physician to the X-Ray Department. 
Adelbert S. Merrill, M.D. 



Surgeon in Charge Medico-Mechanical and Hydrotherapeutic Rooms. 
C. Hermann Bucholz, M.D. 

Assistant to Surgeon in Charge Medico-Mechanical Room. 
Lewis P. Felch, M.D. 



Dentist. 
Leroy M. S. Miner, M.D., D.M.D. 

Assistant Dentists. 
Joseph A. Ring, D.M.D. John A. Breen, D.M.D. 

Out-Patient Dentists. 

Henry J. Skinner, D.M.D. William W. Anthony, D.M.D. 

Chester F. Wolfe, D.M.D. Francis C. Durant, D.M.D. 

Charles W. Ringer, D.M.D. Chauncey N. Lewis, D.M.D. 
Fred R. Blumenthal, D.M.D. 
299 



Officers of the Institution. 

Medical House Pupils. 

Harold W. Stevens. . William J. Kerr. 

Lawrence K. Lunt. Adolph G. C. Schnack. 

Arthur E. Strauss. Leonard M. Van Stone. 

Archibald H. Beard. Newton S. Stern. 

Langdon T. Thaxter. Arlie V. Bock. 



Surgical House Pupils. 

George B. Packard, Jr. Paul Appleton. 

Ben.iamin H. Alton. Kenneth L. Dole. 

Sumner W. Jackson. Horace K. Sowles. 

John S. Hodgson. Edwin N. Cleaves. 

Floyd F. Hatch. Arthur M. Jackson. 

Edgar C. Cook. William A. Perkins. 

Earl Bloomer. George F. Dwinell. 



House Pupils to Special Departments. 
Orthopedic. Children's Medical. 

Rot C. Abbott Hugh K. Berkley 

Marius N. Smith-Petersen John Moore Lee 



Superintendent of Nurses. 
Sara E. Parsons. 

Chief of Hospital Social Service. 
Ida M. Cannon. 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE. 

General Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

Dr. Henry P. Walcott, Chairman. 

Dr. Frederic A. Washburn, Resident Physician. 

Dr. Joseph B. Howland, 1st Assista7it Resident Physician. 

Miss Sara E. Parsons, Superintendent of Nurses. 

Dr. James J. Minot. Mrs. Henry F. Bigelow. 

Dr. William H. Smith. Miss Marion H. Fenno. 

Dr. Daniel F. Jones. Mrs. Thomas Motley. 

Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer. Mrs. Charles E. Mason. 

Mrs. Alexander Whiteside. Mrs. Freeman Allen. 

Mrs. William W. Vaughan. Mrs. Hugh Cabot. 

Mrs. Herbert L. Burrell. Mrs. G. Tappan Francis. 

Mrs. Robert H. Gardiner. Miss Ella L. Lyman. 
Mrs. Grace W. Myers, Secretary. 

300 



One Hundred and Third Annual Report 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Massachusetts 
General Hospital 

Including the General Hospital in Boston, 

the McLean Hospital and the 

Convalescent Hospital 

in Waverley 

1916 



SECTION A 



BOSTON 

GRIFFITH-STILLINGS PRESS 



NOTICE. 

The annual report of the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital is now published in two sections. 
Section B contains the report of the Trustees, 
the signed report of the Administrator, the report 
of the Executive Committee, and the medical and 
surgical tables of the General Hospital. 



One Hundred and Third Annual Report 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Massachusetts 
General Hospital 

Including the General Hospital in Boston, 

the McLean Hospital and the 

Convalescent Hospital 

in Waverley 

1916 



SECTION A 



BOSTON 

GRIFFITH-STILLINGS PRESS 



The legal title of the Corporation is 

"The Massachusetts General Hospital" 

All gifts and bequests, if without restriction, will be 
used as the Trustees deem most for the interest of the 
Corporation and its Beneficiaries. 



CONTENTS. 



SECTION A. 

PAGE 

AccotTNTS. Examination of 68 

Trial Balance 18 

Admission of Patients. General Hospital. Rules and Rates 141 

Annual Reports of 

Administrator and Resident Physician, General Hospital 74 

Advisory Committee on General Hospital Training School 123 

Auditor of Accounts 68 

Committee on the Book of Donations 12 

Ladies' Visiting Committee 121 

Medical .Superintendent, McLean Hospital 143 

Social Worker in Wards 132 

Social Service in the Out-Patient Department 136 

Superintendent of Nurses 125 

Training School for Nurses, General Hospital 127 

Training School for Nurses, McLean Hospital 169 

Treadwell Library, General Hospital 128 

Treasurer 12-6S 

Trustees 5—11 

Dalton Scholarships, Rules of 92 

Boabd op Consultation 180 

Convalescent Hospital. 

Admissions and Discharges 87 

Expenses and Receipts of 22 

Administration Account for the year 1916 112, 117 

Officers of 192 

Donations and Bequests, Report of Committee on 12 

Free Beds at Gener.\.l Hospital. 

Amounts subscribed in 1916 23 

Subscribers, List of 23 

Funds. 

Bowditch History Fund 62 

General Fund 26 

Pathological Laboratory and Randall Funds 56 

Restricted Funds 13 

Treadwell Library Fund 62 

Warren Library Fund 62 

Wooden Leg Fund 62 

General Hospital. 

Administrator and Resident Physician, Annual Report of 74 

Birthplace of Persons Admitted 94 

Expenses and Receipts of 22 

Administration Account for the year 1916 112, 117 

Occupations of Persons Admitted, Males 97 

Occupations of Persons Admitted, Females 107 

Officers of 183 

Out-Patients of 82 

Residence of Persons Admitted 96 

Rules for Admission and Rates 141 

Statement of Stock on Hand 114 

Table of Admissions, Discharges, and Results Ill 

Training School for Nurses 127 

Income. 

Accounts of 21 

McLean Hospital Fund 52 



Table of Contents. 

PAGE 

Investments. 

Income from, Amount of 21 

Producing Income 19 

Producing no Income 19 

Laboratories. 

Chemical Laboratory, McLean Hospital 144 

Ladies' Visiting Committee 121 

McLean Hospital. 

Admissions, Discharges, and Results for ten years 156 

Ages of Insane at First Attack 161 

Causes of Death 167 

Causes of Diseases in Persons Admitted 162 

Ci-\al Conditions of Persons Admitted 160 

Cost of Principal Stores 118 

Discharges Classi6ed 166 

Duration of Mental Disease and its Treatment 168 

Expenses and Receipts of 21 

Administration Account for the year 1916 116, 117 

Form of Mental Disease in Patients 164 

General Statistics for 1916 154 

Insane Received on First and Subsequent Admissions 156 

Medical Superintendent's Annual Report 143 

Occupation of Persons Admitted 160 

Officers of 191 

Parentage of Persons Admitted 157 

Probable Duration of Mental Dise'ise before Admitted 163 

Residence of Persons Admitted 158 

Training School for Nurses, Annual Report of 172 

Officers of the Institution. 

Corporation 179 

Convalescent Hospital 192 

General Hospital 183 

McLean Hospital 191 

Out-Patients. General Hospital. Number of, etc 94 

Patients. 

General Hospital. 

Admissions, Discharges, and Results Ill 

Number of, and Rates 94 

Residences, Birthplaces, and Occupations 96—110 

McLean Hospital. 

Admissions and Discharges 156 

Voluntary 154-155 

Resident Physician. General Hospital. Annual Report of 74 

Statistics. 

McLean Hospital. 

General, Relating to Patients 154 

Training School for Nurses. 

General Hospital. 

Advisory Committee, Report of 123 

Superintendent of Nurses, Report of 125 

Adjnission to. Training and Instruction 127 

McLean Hospital. 

Admission to. Training and Instruction 172 

Annual Report of 169 

TrEA DWELL LiBRART. 

Annual Report of 128 

Trustees. 

Annual Report of 5 

List of 179 

Standing Committees of 180 

Visiting Committees. 

Ladies' 182 

Trustees ] 82 



THE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRD 
ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1916. 



In behalf of the Trustees the following report upon the 
Massachusetts General Hospital is here submitted. 

Last year's report referred to the fact that one of the 
most important needs of the hospital, viz., that of a 
convenient administration building, had been met by the 
wise appreciation of our needs on the part of Charles W. 
Moseley, the surviving executor of the estate of Mrs. 
William 0. Moseley, of Newburyport. It is a pleasure 
to report now that the building so much needed, and 
bearing the name of the Moseley Memorial Building, in 
memory of Dr. William Oxnard Moseley, has been com- 
pleted and is now in full use. The great benefits resulting 
to the hospital from this building are set forth in the re- 
port of the Administrator, but the Trustees wish again 
to express their high appreciation of the great value of 
this most liberal gift. The day for the dedication of the 
building was the date of the annual Ether Day address, 
given this year by Dr. Haven Emerson and constituting 
an appropriate part of the dedication exercises. 

During the year the hospital in its Boston branch has 
in its hospital wards and rooms cared for 6,788 patients; 
in the Out-Patient Department, for 31,061 new cases, 
involving 201,375 visits. In the McLean Hospital, 
Waverley, there have been 338 patients; in the Convales- 
cent Hospital, Waverley, 672. The ambulance has re- 
sponded to 1,413 calls, and the visits to the Emergency 
Ward have numbered 5,123. In the Out-Patient Depart- 
ment 10,616 patients have received the benefit of the 
X-ray, and in the hospital itself 4,986 have had similar 
treatment. There have also been 4,689 fluoroscopic 
examinations. 



Report of the Trustees. 

In 1905 a social service was established in the Out- 
Patient Department by Dr. Richard C. Cabot. This was 
the first social service in any hospital and was the fore- 
runner of the whole hospital social service movement in 
this country. Through this department not only are the 
physicians helped in the care of the patient by a knowledge 
of all the home conditions and influences, but after the 
patient leaves the hospital care is taken to see that the 
treatment prescribed is carried out and that all the con- 
ditions are made as favorable for the patient as possible 
in home or school or industrial life, and, besides this, 
wise counsel and advice are given to guide the patient in 
the future. 

The hospital from its earliest days has cared for those 
in the community who were unable to pay for such medical 
service, but in the report of last year reference was made 
to an extension of hospital work in the out-patient service 
to be made, and called the Consultation Clinic. The 
object of this was to give to patients who desire to pay 
for their medical care, but who are not able to afford the 
services of specialists and the use of the expensive and 
complicated apparatus possessed by a great hospital, the 
same privileges enjoyed by those who do not pay. The 
Consultation Clinic has now been in operation two after- 
noons a week for a year. It has made diagnoses in puzzling 
cases and outlined treatment for the patients' own phy- 
sicians to carry out. It has achieved a real success and 
has proved itself of value to the great majority of physi- 
cians who have used it. One thousand foiu- hundred 
and eighty-six patients have been referred to this cHnic 
by 687 physicians. It is hoped that in the future some 
beds can be established for patients of the same class. 

In 1864 the Trustees of the General Hospital spoke of 
the possibility that in the future a building might be 
erected by the hospital and devoted to pay patients, for 
whom the hospital has always made some provision, such 
building to combine the comforts of a home with the ad- 

6 



Report of the Trustees. 

vantage of being attached to a well-appointed and well- 
regulated hospital. The Trustees feel that the time has 
now arrived for such a building, and that there is no reason 
why persons of means should be debarred from the hos- 
pital privileges wliich are accorded to those without means. 
A pay ward is accordingly in process of construction and 
will probably be ready for use in the present year. Here 
patients may employ their own physicians, but get the 
benefit of connection with the hospital and reimburse the 
hospital for all its expense. The hospital will thus be giv- 
ing the use of its facilities to all portions of the community, 
but besides such direct service it is already benefiting the 
whole community through the training which it gives to 
surgeons, physicians, and niu"ses for future work in private, 
institutional, or social service, and also through the re- 
search work which it is carrying on and which inures to 
the benefit of all mankind. 

Another branch of public service has been developed 
during the past year by the establishment -at the hospital 
of the nucleus for a base hospital. This last has been or- 
ganized under the Red Cross. It consists of a medical 
staff of 26 physicians, 2 dentists, 50 nurses, 25 nurses' 
aids, 25 in reserve, 1 chaplain, 77 male administrative 
personnel, and 14 civilian employees. This base hospital 
can only be called in case of war in which the United States 
is a party. If so called, the physicians of the staff, who 
are required to be members of the officers' reserve corps, 
become officers of the Medical Department of the United 
States Army. The nurses become members of the Army 
Nurse Corps, and the male personnel become enlisted men 
of the Medical Corps. We thus automatically have the 
nucleus of a 500 bed base hospital for the service of the 
government. Money has been subscribed for the Red 
Cross to purchase the equipment for this hospital through 
another agency. It has cost our hospital nothing, and 
will, we believe, give the army an efficient 500 bed base 
hospital when the need comes. 



Report of the Trustees. , 

On December 18th the hospital suffered a great' loss in 
the death of its Roentgenologist, Dr. Walter J. Dodd. 
Starting with nothing but high character and ability, he 
worked his way to a position of leadership and great use- 
fulness. The fineness of his life was but emphasized by 
the pathos of his death. He had been connected with the 
hospital since 1892, first as assistant apothecary, then as 
apothecary, and later as Roentgenologist. A pioneer in 
the use of the X-rays he began to experiment immediately 
after Roentgen's publications, in 1896. Like others of the 
early workers he was severely burned by the rays, and 
cancerous disease followed. During the eighteen years 
following his first burns he underwent many operations 
and great suffering. His cheerful bearing of pain and his 
devotion to science are an inspiration to all at the hos- 
pital. In spite of the difficulties and hardships of his early 
life, of the pain and distress of his later years, he became 
an acknowledged authority on X-ray interpretation, and 
under his leadership the Roentgenological Department at 
the Massachusetts General Hospital grew from one occu- 
pying a previously unused space behind the stairs to one 
which requires eight large rooms and which has during the 
past year given aid to 17,516 patients. He went with one 
of the units to France, and it was said by his associates 
that his admirable interpretations of his excellent X-ray 
work contributed to a large extent to the very successful 
work done by the unit. His life was full of self-renuncia- 
tion and service to others, and he died a martyr to the 
cause of science. 

There have been certain other changes at the hospital 
caused by resignations during the year. Dr. William F. 
Whitney, surgical pathologist, after a very valuable service 
at the hospital, extending from March, 1888, to October 1, 
1916, felt it best to resign, and his resignation was ac- 
cepted with real regret. Dr. J. Payson Clark had served 
the hospital for a nearly equal time, viz., from September 
13, 1889, to February 18, 1916, and his retirement from 

8 



Report of the Trustees. 

the force of laryngologists is a great loss to the hospital. 
Dr. George A. Waterman served in the Neurological De- 
partment from November 28, 1902, to May 26, 1916, and 
through his retirement the hospital loses a very helpful 
member of the staff. The Trustees also regret the with- 
drawal of Dr. L. H. Newburg, assistant visiting physician, 
and holder of the Dalton Scholarship. 

The Industrial Clinic, which was established through 
the generosity of a friend of the hospital, is to be supported 
for another j^ear by the same friend. Much interest has 
been expressed by officers of other hospitals and by public 
authorities in the work accomplished, and valuable aid has 
been rendered in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. 
About 4,000 patients have been under the care of this 
clinic, and much study has been given to the promotion of 
industrial hj^giene and the prevention of industrial disease. 

The Medico-Mechanical and Hydrotherapeutic Depart- 
ment has come into additional prominence and useful- 
ness through the recent epidemic of infantile paralysis. 
New and interesting work has been done in this connec- 
tion and 115 children are now receiving the benefit of its 
care with very encouraging results. 

It is also hoped within a few months to open a special 
psychiatric clinic under the general charge of the staff of 
the McLean Hospital. 

One interesting occurrence in the financial affairs of 
the hospital which has occurred during the year has been 
the reversion to it of the property known as the Province 
House Estate, about which Hawthorne's Legends of the 
Province House have cast such a charm. This former resi- 
dence of the Royal Governors was confiscated during the 
Revolution and in 1796 was sold to one Peck for $16,600, 
but not being a profitable investment it was sold back to 
the Commonwealth in 1799 for the same price. In 1811 
the Commonwealth granted a charter to the hospital and 
at the same time granted to it the Province House Estate, 
on condition that the hospital should raise $100,000 to 

9 



Report of the Trustees. 

construct buildings within five years. This time was ex- 
tended later for five years more. In 1817 the hospital made 
a lease of the estate to David Greenough for ninety-nine 
years on the condition that within two years thereafter he 
would build substantial brick buildings to cost not less 
than $16,000 and with the privilege of commuting the 
entire rent for the sum of 133,300. Mr. Greenough had 
great difficulty in raising the money to complete the re- 
quired buildings and assigned the lease many times as 
security for loans, and it was not until 1824 that the build- 
ings were finished. For many years the property was un- 
profitable, but the buildings were subsequently fully and 
profitably occupied. A portion of the original Governor's 
House is still standing, though altered and forming a part 
of a block of brick buildings. A part of the wall in its 
original condition, and evidently built of English bricks, 
can be seen from the httle alleyway on the easterly side 
of the block on Province Court, and the curious vane 
representing an American Indian, and constructed by 
Shem Drowne, is now in the collection of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society. 

THE FINANCIAL SITUATION. 

The Trustees are most grateful to all the friends who 
by their generous gifts have helped on the work of the 
hospital during the past year, but it is necessary to caU the 
attention of the community to the great needs of the hos- 
pital and its very serious financial danger. Not only has 
the increased cost of everything used increased the financial 
burden, but a more complete medical care involves a 
larger expenditure. Added to this there has been an at- 
tempt to impose on the hospital a tax amounting to 
S53,000, litigation as to which is now pending. This at- 
tempt involves, your Trustees believe, a departure from 
the policy which has existed in this Commonwealth from 
early days, and is a direct menace to every charitable and 
educational institution in the State. The result of all the 

10 



Report of the Trustees. 

causes above referred to is a deficit in the current expense 
account of about $202,000, or if we oniit the $53,000 paid 
for taxes, then the deficit is $149,000. The Trustees be- 
lieve that the vital character of the service rendered by 
the hospital, its far-reaching influence for good, and the 
thoroughness and effectiveness of its work, affecting as 
it does directly or indirectly the health and safety of the 
whole community, constitute the strongest reasons for a 
liberal and increased support, and if the service hitherto 
rendered by the hospital is to be continued, the expense 
cannot be diminished, and a large endowment is a matter 
of necessity. 

In closing, the Trustees wdsh to express their apprecia- 
tion of the great amount of voluntary service which has 
been given to the hospital during the year by those who 
have acted as clinic secretaries, social workers, and in 
other positions. This voluntary work has increased 
greatly in the last few years and has been of great help to 
the hospital. They also desire to call attention to the 
Treasurer's report, the report on donations, the report of 
the Ladies' Visiting Committee, the report on social 
service, and also to the admirable reports of Drs. Wash- 
burn and Tuttle, and the other reports published in con- 
nection herewith. 

Henry P. Walcott. 

George Wigglesworth. 



11 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS, 1916. 



The Committee on the Book of Donations reports that 
the following donations and legacies have been received 
during the year: 

GENERAL FUND. 

Donation of Anonymous $1.00 

Donation of W. b'. P. Weeks 25.00 

Donation of F. W. Hunnewell, 2d 25.00 

Donation of Mrs. Stephen G. Wheatland . . . 50.00 

Donation of Mrs. Wallace Dunbar Dexter, Jr. . 5.00 

Donation of Mrs. Richard B. Fuller 5.00 

Donation of J. M. Crafts 20.00 

Donation of Miss Abby F. Manning 10.00 

Bequest of Carohne L. W. French, in memory of 
John Davis WilUams and Hannah Weld 

WiUiams French 50,704.45 

Donation of Mrs. Arthur N. Hood 5.00 

Donation of I. Tucker Burr 25.00 

Donation of Charles W. Hubbard 50.00 

Donation of Elmer P. Howe 20.00 

Donation of Mrs. E. S. Webster 25.00 

Donation of Mrs. Atherton Thayer Brown . . 10.00 

Donation of Charles A. Vialle 25.00 

Donation of Mrs. F. G. Curtis 25.00 

Donation of Mrs. Barrett Wendell, Jr 10.00 

Donation of Mrs. S. Parkman Blake 50.00 

Donation of Miss Helen Peabody 2.00 

Donation of Mrs. Waldo E. Forbes 50.00 

Bequest of Mrs. Anna S. C. Prince 900.00 

Donation of Archibald Cary CooUdge .... 10.00 

Donation of Malcolm G. Peabody 10.00 

Donation of Mrs. Ezra Ripley Thayer .... 10.00 

Donation of Ehase Jacques 25.00 

Donation of Mrs. Harcourt Amory 50.00 

Donation of Edward B. Alford 20.00 

Donation of a former patient 5.00 

Bequest of Charles R. Lawrence 6,000.00 

Bequest of Francis Skinner, Sr 152.02 

Carried forward $58 324.47 

12 



Donations and Bequests, 1916. 

Brought fonvard $58,324.47 

Donation of E. S. C 100.00 

Bequest of John W. Wheelwright 2,000.00 

Donation of Mrs. J. T. CooUdge 50.00 

Donation of F. W. Webster 25.00 

Donation of The Humane Society' of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts 500.00 

Donation of Bartlett C. RejTiolds 1.00 

Donation of Miss Effie A. McDonald .... 1.00 

Donation of a Patient 1.00 

Bequest of Thomas Mack 1,000.00 

Bequest of CaroUne E. Da\as 33,517.15 

Bequest of Lucy F. Simmons 50.00 

Donations for Yearly Free Beds, 1915 $100.00 
Donations for Yearly Free Beds, 1916 24,023.03 



24,123.03 



$119,692.65 



TEN YEAR FREE BED FUND. 

Donation of Mrs. 0. H. AKord SI, 000.00 

Donation of Miss Martha A. Alford 1,000.00 

Donation of Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd Brooks . 1,000.00 
Donation of Mrs. George D. Howe, in memory 
of George D. Howe '. 1,000.00 



RJESTRICTED FUNDS. 

Bequest of Miss Isabella W. Dillingham . . . $5,314.44 

For the establishment of a free bed in the Maternity 
Ward, to be called the Isabella Freeman Dillingham 
Bed. 

Bequest of WiUiam Endicott 25,000.00 

Income to be used for the support of Free Beds. 

Bequest of Sylvester BowTnan 50,900.00 

Income to be used for the support of Free Beds. 

Donation of Mrs. W. Scott Fitz 5,000.00 

For a second Life Free Bed. 

Bequest of Miss EUen Channing 5,000.00 

For the establishment of a Free Bed. 



14,000.00 



.$91,214.44 



RESTRICTED FUNDS — INCOME UNRESTRICTED. 

Bequest of Mitchell A. Dearborn $525.00 

DR. JOHN M. HARLOW FUND. 

Bequest of Dr. John M. Harlow and Frances K. 

Harlow $5,000.00 

Carried forward $220,432.09 

13 



Donations and Bequests, 1916. 

Brought foncard $220,432.09 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES ENDOWMENT FUND. 

Donation of Miss R. Helen Cleland $200.00 

Donation of A Graduate of 1880 50.00 

Donation of Miss Annabelle McCrae .... 100.00 

Donation of Miss Jane F. Rilej^ 100.00 

Donation of Miss Grace Nichols 110.00 

Donation of INIrs. John Bartol 15.00 

Donation of Miss E. AV. Allen 2.00 

Donation of Miss Mary F. Emery 12.00 

Donation of Miss Alice C. S. Cushman ... 5.00 

Donation of JNIiss Grace Stackpole 15.00 

Donation of IMiss Helen B. Fenton 5.00 

Donation of iVIiss Frances C. Dailey 7.50 

Donation of Mrs. WilUam S. Ely 500.00 

Donation of Mrs. Samuel Cabot 100.00 

Donation of Miss Fannie R. Slajii-on 10.00 

Donation of Miss Helen G. O'Dea 2.00 

Donation of Miss Helen T. Niverson .... 10.00 

Donation of Miss V. C. HaU 4.00 

Donation of Miss Helen Wood 15.00 

Donation of Miss Harriet J. AlljTi 25.00 

Donation of Mrs. Helen A. Wayland Hudson . 10.00 • 

Donation of Miss Agnes J. TruU 10.00 

Donation of Miss Ahce M. Watson 10.00 

Donation of Mrs. and Miss Alford 200.00 

Donation of Mrs. Jessie E. Grant 10.00 

Donation of Miss Eileen R. Curley 5.00 

Donation of Miss Charlotte M. Perry .... 20.00 

Donation of Miss Olga Olson 5.00 

Donation of Miss Josephine Muhdlle .... 10.00 

Donation of Miss Ruth C. Blair 5.00 

Donation of Miss Helen M. Finlay 1.00 

Donation of Miss Hannah Ward 10.00 

Donation of Miss Mary L. Keith 100.00 

Donation of Miss Jessie L. Brown 25.00 

Donation of Miss Harriet L. P. Friend .... 100.00 
Donation of Mrs. Isaac PhilUps, in memory of 

Ethel May Fixter 10.00 

Donation of Miss Rose K. Butler 10.00 

Donation of Miss Mary E. Higson 10.00 

Donation of Miss Sara E. Parsons 100.00 

Donation of Miss MeUssa J. Cook 5.00 

Donation of Miss Christina J. McDonald . . 2.00 

Donation of Miss Anna G. Griffin 5.00 

Donation of Mrs. Oscar Feuerstein 10.00 

Carried forward $1,960.50 $220,432.09 

14 



Donations and Bequests, 1910. 



Brought forward 

Donation of Miss Esther Dart . . . 
Donation of Miss Hannah J. Brierley 
Donation of Miss Ahce Scott .... 
Donation of Mrs. Frederick A. Driscol 
Donation of Miss Maria Brown . . . 
Donation of IMrs. Daniel Coaklej'' . . 
Donation of Mrs. Webster H. Carney 
Donation of Miss Adele Richardson . 
Donation of Miss Ehzabeth P. Hamlen 
Donation of Mrs. John R. MacKinnon 
Donation of Mrs. Marv 0. Clark . . 



$1,960.50 $220,432.09 
50.00 
10.00 
25.00 
10.00 

5.00 
102.00 

5.00 
10.00 
10.00 

5.00 
20.00 



CHARLES P. JAYNES FUND. 

Bequest of Charles P. Jaynes 

HOUSE OFFICERS ALUMNI FUND. 

Donation of House Officers' Alumni 

Toward furnishing the House OflScers' room in the 
Moseley Memorial Building. 

X-RAY ENDOWMENT FUND. 

Donation of Mrs. Walter J. Dodd, in memory of 
her husband, Dr. Walter J. Dodd 



2,212.50 
$3,277.00 



346.00 



100.00 



SUNDRY DONATIONS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES. 

Donation of General Hospital Training School 
Alumnge $100.00 

For a Scholarship. 

Donation of Mrs. Carohne L. Weld 1,945.87 

For the purchase of Surgical Instruments. 

Donation of George Wigglesworth 800.00 

For X-Ray Apparatus. 

Donation of George Wigglesworth 500.00 

For a Babies' MLIk Fund. 

Donation of The Board of Visiting Ladies ,. . 500.00 

Towards the salary of a Social Worker in the house. 

Donation of Dr. George C. Shattuck .... 50.00 

For apparatus for Special X-Ray Work. 

Donation of A Friend 150.00 

For the X-Ray Department. 

Donation of A Friend (additional) 900.00 

For certain special uses of the Dermatological Depart- 
ment. 

Donation of Mrs. Malcohn Donald 1,000.00 

For special technical apparatus, as desired by Dr. 
EdsaU. 



earned forward $5,945.87 $226,367.59 

15 



Donations and Bequests, 1916. 

Brought forward $5,945.87 $226,367.59 

Donation of Dr. Hugh Cabot 500.00 

To be applied toward the salary of the House Surgeon 
of the Genito-Urinary Department. 

Donation of W. F. Watters 600.00 

To pay the salary of a stenographer and certain ex- 
penses in the Dermatological Department. 

Donation of United Fruit Co 2,500.00 

For the Department of Tropical Medicine through 
Harvard University. 

Donation of Dr. Putnam and Mr. Storey, Trus- 
tees of the A. W. Blake Fund 200.00 

To be applied to the salary of Dr. Emerson, Psychologist. 

Donation of Moses Williams 25.00 

For Social Worker. 

Donation of Mrs. Charles H. Dalton .... 20.00 

For Social Worker. 

Donation of Dr. Fritz B. Talbot 150.00 

Toward the changes in the Children's Medical Out- 
Patient Department. 

Donation of Dr. Richard Cabot 50.00 

For the Warren Library. 

Donation of Mrs. Charles E. Mason 350.00 

Toward the changes in the Children's Medical Out- 
Patient Department. 

Donation of Patrick Donovan 2.79 

For the Warren Library. 

Donation of Friends of the Hospital, through 
Miss Ella L. Lyman: 

Mrs. Ralph B. WilUams .... $10.00 

Mrs. Henry Lyman 25.00 

Mrs. S. D. Warren, Jr 10.00 

Mrs. Waldo E. Forbes 25.00 

A Friend 20.00 

Mrs. EUery Sedgwick 25.00 

Mrs. John S. Lawrence .... 25.00 

Mrs. Gorham Brooks ..... 25.00 

Mrs. Thomas Barlow 20.00 

185.00 

Half salary for one year for a special worker in the Chil- 
dren's Medical Room, who is to be Clinical Secretary 
and do follow-up work. 

Donation of Mrs. CaroUne L. Weld . $250.00 

For instruments for the Out-Patient Throat Department. 

Donation of A Friend 500.00 750.00 

To be added to this Fund. 



Carried forward $11,278,66 $226,367.59 

16 



Donations and Bequests, 1916. 

Brought forward $11,278.66 $226,367.59 

Donation of Suncliy Donors: 

For Infantile Paralysis Research Fund. 

W. :MmTay Crane $500.00 

Alvah Crocker 500.00 

William Endicott 500.00 

Albert Strauss 500.00 

Frank G. Webster 250.00 

Charles Jackson 200.00 

Arthur Perry 100.00 

WaUace L. Pierce 100.00 

Robert L. Studley 50.00 

James H. Proctor 100.00 

George R. Wallace 250.00 

James J. Storrow 500.00 

Allan C. Emery 50.00 

J. P. Morgan 500.00 4,100.00 

Donation of Mrs. T. H. Gray 

Donation of B. T. Stephenson 

Donation of Mrs. H. V. RejTiolds 51.00 15,429.66 

For molds and other expenses of the Cement Shop. 

McLean hospital fund. 
Donation of A Friend 3,000.00 

To be called the John Milton Hall Fimd. 

.IRLINGTON HOUSE FUND. 

Donation of Frank E. Peabody 5,643.79 

For patients at the McLean tlospital. 

NURSES' HOME FUND — McLEAN HOSPITAL. 

Donation of Sundry Donors through Mrs. E. 
Stanlej^ Abbot : 

A Friend $2,500.00 

Miss Florence N. Putnam 100.00 2,600.00 



LOVERING FUND. 

Bequest of Miss Sarah C. M. Lovering .... 1,500.00 

To be expended in a way that will promote the comfort 

and happiness of the patients at the McLean Hospital. 

$254,541.04 

These sums have been entered in the Book of Donations 
in the usual form. 

George Wigglesworth, 

Committee on Book of Donations. 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 
December 31, 1916. 

17 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



In accordance with the Fifth Article of the By-laws, 
the Annual Report of the accounts of the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, made up to the last day of December, 
1916, is respectfully submitted, to be laid before the 
Corporation at its annual meeting. Among the assets 
enumerated are many gifts to the Corporation, which 
for various reasons have been retained as originally 
received. 

TRIAL BALANCE, JANUARY 1, 1917. 

Income. Principal. 

Dr. Cr. Dr. Cr. 

Land and Buildings, 

General Hospital . . $3,100,241.96 

Land and Buildiags, 

McLean Hospital . . 2,015,756.50 
Land and Buildmgs, 
Convalescent Hospi- 
tal 50,000.00 

Administrator's Bal- 
ance 9,756.54 

Annuities 160,000.00 

Insurance Stocks . . . 50,000.00 

Railroad Stocks . . . 122,307.50 

Manufacturing Stocks . 94,041.82 

Bank Stocks 24,800.00 

Real Estate Stocks . . 48,010.40 

Miscellaneous Stocks . 46|607.53 

Real Estate 2,775,712.63 

Notes Receivable ... 75 354 84 

Cash $33,218.02 117^889.85 

General Fund .... $4,834,443.04 

Art Room Fund . . . $284.04 1,018.35 

Bowditch History Fimd 2,654.25 2,000.00 

Samuel Cabot Fund . . 10 000 00 

Children's Medical ' 

Ward Buildmg Fimd 47.99 250.00 

Clinical Laboratory 

^^und 10,000.00 

CodmanFund .... 29,186.38 

Convalescent Hospital 

T^^.™"^!.- -^ 151,811.13 

Dalton Fund 6,123.30 25,000.00 

Carried forward . . . $33,218.02 $9,109.58 $8,690,479.57 $5,063,708.90 

18 



Repoi t of the Treasurer. 



Income. Principal. 

Dr. Cr. Dr. Or. 



Brought forward . . $33,218.02 S9,109.5S $8,690,479.57 $5,063,708.90 
Dr. John M. Harlow 

Fund 3,778.72 40,090.00 

House Officers' Fund . 36.04 44.00 

Charles P. JajTies Fund 776.75 11,477.00 

Sarah Proctor Joshn 

Fund 103.95 1,000.00 

McLean Hospital Fund 565,223.34 

Euphemia ISIillar Fund 1,557.74 

Nurses' Home Fund, 

McLean Hospital . . 6,868.90 57,079.09 

Orthopedic Ward Fund 26,470.92 

Pathological Laboratory 

and Randall Fund. ". 83,875.41 

Restricted Funds . . . 2,721,426.93 

ShattuckFund .... 188.50 2,000.00 

Social Service Depart- 
ment Fund .... 305.64 20,000.00 
Susan Smith Fund . . 13,703.98 
Surgical Lostrimient 

Fund ' 6,475.00 

Training School for 

Nurses Fund .... 40,022.92 

Training School for 

Nurses' Endowment 

Fund 65.34 2,633.50 

Treadwell Library Fxm^d 5,305.00 

Warren Library Fund . 1,000.00 

Warren Prize Fund . . 766.64 4,685.84 

Wooden Leg Fund . . 974.16 7,600.00 

X-Ray Endowment 

Fund 100.00 

Ten-year Free Beds . . 15,000.00 

Sundry Funds for Spe- 

cialPurposes .... 10,243.80 



$33,218.02 $33,218.02 $8,690,479.57 $8,690,479.57 

INVESTMENTS. 

General Hospital: 

Land and Buildings occupied for Hospital $3,100,241.96 

McLean Hospital: 

Land and Buildings at Belmont 2,015,756.50 

Convalescent Hospital: 

Land and Buildings at Belmont 50,000.00 

Administrator's Balance 9,756.54 

PoUcies Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co 160,000.00 

500 Shares Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co 50,000.00 

Railroad Stocks: 

100 Shares Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry. Co. Com- 
mon $9,962.50 

50 Shares Boston & Maine R.R. Common 1,650.00 

Carried forward $5,397,367.50 

19 



Report of tlie Treasure! . 

Brought forward $5,397,367.50 

300 Shares The Canadian Pacific Railway Co. .... 47,737.50 
50 Shares Chicago Junction Railway & Union Stock 

Yards Co. Preferred 5,525.00 

50 Shares Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R.R. Pre- 
ferred ■ 6,450.00 

100 Shares Chicago & Northwestern Railway Co. Com- 
mon 12,625.00 

20 Shares Fitchburg R.R. Preferred ........ 1,460.00 

16 Shares New England Investment & Security Co. 

Preferred 800.00 

70 Shares New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. . 3,626.00 

21 Shares Old Colony R.R 492.00 

100 Shares Southern Pacific Co. Common 8,812.50 

100 Shares Union Pacific R.R. Preferred 7,983.00 

100 Shares Union Pacific R.R. Common 12,500.00 

32 Shares West End Street Railway Co. Preferred . . 2,684.00 

Manufacturing Stocks: 

50 Shares American Sugar Refining Co. Preferred . . 6,400.00 

130 Shares American Sugar Refining Co. Common . . 14,507.50 

200 Shares Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. Common . . 0.00 

2 Shares Appleton Co 70.50 

250 Shares Ballard Vale Mills Co. Preferred 25,000.00 

25 Shares Great Falls Manufactiu-ing Co 2,500.00 

13 Shares Heywood Bros. & Wakefield Co. Preferred . 1,312.32 

2 Shares Lancaster Mills 210.00 

13 Shares Lanett Cotton Mills . . . 1,365.00 

3 Shares Ludlow Manufacturing Associates .... 354.00 
140 Shares Merrimack Manufacturing Co. Common . 14,000.00 

60 Shares Pacific MiUs 4,200.00 

300 Shares Pepperell Manufacturing Co 24,122.50 

Bank Stocks: 

216 Shares Merchants National Bank ........ 24,800.00 

28 Shares Old Boston National Bank, In Liquidation . 0.00 

Real Estate Stocks : 

50 Shares Board of Trade Building Trust 5,000.00 

23 Shares Boston Groimd Rent Trust 2,100.00 

10 Shares Boston Real Estate Trust 9,969.75 

12 Shares Boylston Market Association 16,800.00 

21 Shares Central Whari & Wet Dock Corporation . 4,200.00 

50 Shares Commonwealth Building Trust Preferred . ) r nnn no 

25 Shares Commonwealth Building Trust Common . ( ^,uuu.uu 

6 Shares Delta Building Trust 420.00 

25 Shares Hotel Trust 2,500.00 

12 Shares Journal Building Trust 480.00 

2 Shares Trimountain Trust 200.00 

11 Shares Western Real Estate Trustees 1,340.65 

Miscellaneous Stocks: 

203 Shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. . . . 25,815.08 

17 Shares Boston Storage Warehouse Co 1,836.00 

86 Shares Boston Wharf Co . 11,200.00 

12 Shares Edison Electric Illuminating Co 2,869.80 

33 Shares Galveston Houston Electric Co. Preferred . 2,735.40 
5 Shares Galveston Houston Electric Co. Common . 500.00 

16 Shares Massachusetts Gas Co.'s Preferred .... 1,460.00 

3 Shares Western Union Telegi-aph Co 191.25 

Carried forward $5,721,522.25 

20 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward So, 721, 522.25 

Real Estate: 

Land and Buildings, 1 Faneuil Hall Square 35,000.00 

Land and Buildings, Union and Marshall Streets 70,147.51 

Land and Buildings, 273 and 275 Washington Street . . . 125,860.15 

Land and Buildings, 474 to 480 Washington Street .... 423,261.50 

Land and Buildings, 496 to 500 Washington Street .... 463,193.20 

Land and Buildings, 565 Washington Street 68,600.00 

Land and Buildings, 10 and 103^ Common Street 26,012.83 

Land and Buildings, 837 to 847 Washington Street .... 59,874.86 

Land and Buildings, Rear 837 to 847 Washington Street . . 65,115.71 

Land and Buildings, 851 to 859 Washington Street .... 67,589.26 

Land and Buildings, 11 and 15 to 21 Warrenton Street . . 48,700.00 

Land and Buildings, 70 and 74 Tremont Street 300,000.00 

Land and Buildings, 451 to 463 Atlantic Avenue and 163 to 

167 Ohver Street 82,670.12 

Land and Buildings, 307 to 311 Atlantic Avenue 84,494.00 

Land and Buildings, Sundry Properties in the vicinity of the 

General Hospital 155,652.90 

Land and Buildings, Province House Estate 587,490.00 

Land and Buildings, 15 to 23 Harvard Place ....... 44,213.09 

Land and Buildings, Interest in sundry properties Estate of 

John Ehot Atkhis 67,837.50 

Notes Receivable 75,354.84 

Cash 117,889.85 

Total, foot of Trial Balance $8,690,479.57 



INCOME FROM INVESTMENTS. 

Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co. Annuities . . . S6,800.00 

Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co. Stock 5,000.00 

Railroad Bonds and Notes 9,594.83 

Miscellaneous Bonds and Notes 4,671.31 

Raikoad Stocks 7,189.00 

Manufacturing Stocks 10,084.00 

Bank Stocks 3,081.05 

Real Estate Stocks 2,007.75 

Miscellaneous Stocks 3,220.00 

Real Estate 163,520.81 

Notes Receivable 4,616.54 

Interest 4,019.49 

$223,804.78 

Less Interest on Notes Payable 12,000.00 

$211,804.78 

THE INCOME HAS BEEN DISTRIBUTED AS FOLLOWS: 

J. H. F. Adams Fund (Annuity) $2,000.00 

Art Room Fund 56.28 

Bowditch History Fund 110.56 

Samuel Cabot Fund 552.82 

Children's Medical Ward Building Fund 13.82 

Clinical Laboratory Fund 552.82 

Codman Fund 1,613.46 

Carried forward $4,899.76 

21 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought fonvard $4,899.76 

Convalescent Hospital Fund 8,392.42 

Dalton Fund 1,382.05 

Dr. John J\I. Harlow Fund 2,147.15 

House Officers' Alumni Fund 36.04 

Charles P. JajTies Fund 573.94 

Sarah Proctor JosUn Fund 55.28 

McLean Hospital Fund 31,205.20 

Moseley Memorial Building Fund 416.17 

Euphemia Millar Fund (Annuity) 60.00 

Nurses' Home Fund — McLean Hospital 3,152.62 

Orthopedic Ward Fund 1,463.37 

Pathological Laboratory and Randall Funds 4,636.78 

Restricted Funds 147,034.22 

ShattuckFund 110.56 

Social Seriace Fund 1,105.64 

Susan Smith Fund (Annuity) 720.00 

Sm-gical Instriunent Fund 357.95 

Training School for Niu-ses Fund 2,212.55 

Training School for Nurses Endowment Fund 65.34 

TreadweU Library Fund 293.27 

Warren Library Fund 55.28 

Warren Prize Fund 259.05 

Dr. J. H. "VMiittemore Memorial Fund (Annuity) 750.00 

Wooden Leg Fund 420.14 

$211,804.78 



HOSPITAL INCOME AND EXPENSES. 

Total Expenses of Hospitals $1,052,021.54 

Total Receipts of Hospitals $641,588.91 

Income from Invested Funds: 

Free Bed Funds $147,034.22 

Codman Fund 1,060.64 

Special Funds 20,186.71 

McLean Fund 31,205.20 

Convalescent Fund .... 8,392.42 207,879.19 

Balance from General Fimd . . 202,553.44 

$1,052,021.54 



GENERAL FUND. 

Balance January 1, 1916 $4,404,075.96 

Donations and Bequests to this Fund 119,692.65 

Income — Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Co. . . . 10,000.00 

Profits from Sale of Investments 37,618.35 

Arlington House Fimd 78,224.72 

Moseley Memorial Building Fund 189,642.35 

Productive Real Estate 197,742.45 

$5,036,996.48 

Excess of Expenses over Receipts at the Hos- 
pitals paid from this Fund $202,553.44 

Balance, January 1, 1917 4,834,443.04 

'- $5,036,996.48 

22 



Report of the Treasurer. 

SUBSCRIBERS FOR FREE BEDS FOR 1916. 
(Yearly subscriptions of one hundred dollars or over.) 

Arthur Adams . . . SIOO.OO Gorham Brooks . . . SIOO.OO 

Charles F. Adams . . 100.00 :\Iiss Katherine E. 

A Friend 100.00 BuUard 100.00 

Mrs. George R.Agassiz 200.00 Mrs. Samuel Cabot . 100.00 
Mrs. Bryce J. Allan . 100.00 Horace D. Chapin . . 100.00 
Hobart Ames .... 100.00 Alexander Cochrane . 200.00 
Oliver Ames .... 100.00 Mrs. Edith L. Coolidge 
Wilham Amory . . . 100.00 (an annual gift in 
yir. and ]\lrs. Larz memor}^ of the 
Anderson .... 100.00 late Amory A. 
AnonjTiious .... 100.00 LawTence) .... 748.03 
Francis Henrj" Apple- Airs. Francis L. Cool- 
ton 100.00 idge (in memory of 

S. E. B 100.00 :\Irs. Charles ' T. 

Walter C. Bayhes . . 100.00 White) 100.00 

Mrs. James H. Beal . 100.00 J. Randolph Coolidge. 100.00 

Thomas P. Beal . . . 100.00 T. Jefferson Coohdge . 100.00 

Charles Philip Beebe Mrs. T. J. Coolidge,Jr. 500.00 

(in memory of Dr. Charles E. Cotting . . 100.00 

Arthur Applet on Estate of Ethel H. 

Beebe) 200.00 Crane (for the bene- 

E. Pierson Beebe . . 100.00 fit of Parishioners of 
Dr. Wilham Sturgis St. Paul's Church, 

Bigelow 100.00 Dedham) .... 100.00 

George Nixon Black . 100.00 Airs. S. V. R. Crosby . 100.00 

Mrs. Wilmon W. Airs. Charles A. Cum- 

Blackmar .... 100.00 mings (in memorv of 

Mrs. Arthur W. Blake 100.00 F. H. K.) . . \ . 100.00 

Mrs. Francis Blake Airs. Charles P. Curtis 100.00 

(Francis Blake Free Airs. G. S. Curtis . . 100.00 

Bed) 100.00 Airs. G. S. Curtis, Jr. . 100.00 

Airs. J. A. Lowell Blake 100.00 Air. and Airs. Louis 

Mrs. Reginald Board- Curtis 100.00 

man 100.00 Airs. John G. Gushing 100.00 

Boston Firemen's Re- Airs. Charles H. Dal- 

hef Fund 200.00 ton 200.00 

Airs. A. H. Bowditch . 100.00 Henrv R. Dalton . . 100.00 

F. W. Bradlee . . . 100.00 Airs. Edward L. Da\-is 100.00 
Air. and Airs. J. D. Airs. Joseph E. Da^^s. 100.00 

Cameron Bradley . 100.00 Charles A. Dean . . 100.00 

Airs. John L. Bremer . 100.00 Franklin Dexter and 

Aliss Sarah F. Bremer 100.00 Gordon Dexter, 

Aliss Fannie R. Brewer 100.00 jomtlv 100.00 

(The John R. Brewer Phihp Dexiier . . . . 100.00 

Free Bed) Aliss Rose L. Dexter . 100.00 

23 



Repoit of the Treasurer. 

Mr. and ]\Irs. Howard 

Elliott $100.00 

]\Irs. R. W. Eimnons, 

2d 100.00 

William Eudicott . . 100.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth E. Fav 100.00 

Henry H. Fa V. . . . 100.00 

S. Prescott Fay . . . 100.00 

WiUiam Rodman Fay 100.00 
Estate of Lawrence 

Carteret Fenno . . 100.00 

Miss Marion H. Femio 100.00 
Mrs. Desmond Fitz- 

Gerald (in memory 

of Dr. and Mrs. 

Stephen Salisbury) 100.00 

J. Murray Forbes . . 100.00 

C. H. W.' Foster . . 100.00 

Mrs. C. H. W. Foster . 100.00 

Miss Edith H. Foster . 100.00 

George A. Gardner . 100.00 

George P. Gardner . 100.00 

John L. Gardner . . . 100.00 

Mrs. Reginald Gray . 100.00 

Charles P. Greenough 100.00 

Edward S. Grew . . 100.00 

S. E. Guild 100.00 

Mrs. G. G. Hammond 100.00 

Miss Anna Harvie . . 100.00 

A. Hemenway . . . 100.00 

Miss Clara Hemenway 100.00 

F. L. Higginson . . ". 100.00 

F. L. Higginson, Jr. . 100.00 

Mrs. A. S. Hill . . . 100.00 

James R. Hooper . . 100.00 

William Hooper . . . 100.00 
Mrs. A. Lawrence 

Hopkins 100.00 

Hemy S. Howe . . . 100.00 
F. W. Hunnewell . . 100.00 
Henry S. Hunnewell . 100.00 
Mrs. Henry S. Hunne- 
well 100.00 

Mrs. Oscar lasigi . . 100.00 
Mr. and Mrs. James 

Jackson 100.00 

Arthur S. Johnson . . 100.00 

Edward C. Johnson . 100.00 



Mrs. Wolcott H. John- 
son $100.00 

Jordan Marsh Co. . . 500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward 

L. Kent 100.00 

Charles A. Kidder . . 100.00 

Nathaniel T. Kidder . 100.00 

Dayid P. Kimball . . 100.00 

L. C. I^mball . . . 100.00 

The Misses Kimball . 100.00 

The Misses King (in 
memory of Jennie 
W. King) .... 100.00 

Mrs. H. A. Lamb . . 100.00 

Mrs. Amorj' xA.. Law- 
rence 100.00 

John Lawrence and 
Francis Peabody, Jr. 
(Trustees under will 
of Abbott Lawrence) 500.00 

Mr. and IVIrs. George 

C. Lee 100.00 

George V. Leverett . 100.00 

In memory of Mrs. 
Anna Cabot Lodge, 
from H. C. L. and 
G.A.J 100.00 

Augustus P. Loring 100.00 

Wilham Caleb Loring 100.00 

Miss Mary B. Lothrop 100.00 

Mrs. Thornton K. 

Lothrop 100.00 

Mrs. Charles T. Loyer- 

ing 100.00 

Mrs. Francis C. Lowell 100.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John 

Lowell 100.00 

Henry and Theodore 

LjTiian 100.00 

Theodore Lyman . . 500.00 

Mrs. Samuel P. Man- 
dell (in memory of 
Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam D. Mandell) . 500.00 

Mrs. Charles E. Mason 500.00 

Miss E. F. Mason . . 100.00 

Miss Fanny P. Mason 100.00 

Miss Ida M. Mason . 100.00 



24 



Repoit of the Treasurer. 



Laurence Minot . . . 


$100.00 


Miss PhyUis Sears . . 


$100.00 


Mrs. Frank ]\Iorison . 


100.00 


Richard D. Sears . . 


100.00 


Mrs. John Holmes 




Richard and Francis 




Morison 


100.00 


P. Sears 


100.00 


The :Misses ^lorrill . 


100.00 


Mrs. G. H. Shaw . . 


100.00 


Mrs. E. P. :vIotley . . 


100.00 


Henry S. Shaw . . . 


100.00 


Mrs. Thomas Alotley . 


100.00 


Mrs. George S. Silsbee 


100.00 


Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 




A. Ledj^ard Smith . . 


100.00 


Motley 


100.00 


Sons of St. George . . 


250.00 


Mrs. Otis Norcross . 


100.00 


William S. SpaulcUng . 


100.00 


Richard Olney . . . 


100.00 


Mr. and ]\Irs. Robert 




Charles J. Paine . . . 


100.00 


H. Stevenson . . . 


100.00 


Mrs. Francis S. Parker 


100.00 


Galen L. Stone . . . 


100.00 


Frank E. Peabody . . 


500.00 


^^loorfield Storey . . 


100.00 


Francis Peabody . . 


100.00 


The ]\Iisses Sturgis . 


100.00 


Mrs. Francis Peabody 


100.00 


Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer 


100.00 


George A. Peabody . 


100.00 


Mrs. Charles Linzee 




Charles La\\Tence Peir- 




Tilden (in memory 




son 


100.00 


of Daniel Demiy) . 


100.00 


Dudley L. Pickman . 


100.00 


United Fruit Co. . . 


375.00 


S. S. Pierce Co. (not 




Unity Lend-a-hand 




for employees) . . 


100.00 


Society of Lexington 


100.00 


Mrs. James H. Proctor 


100.00 


Victorian Memorial 




Thomas E. Proctor . 


100.00 


Association .... 


250.00 


Mrs. George Putnam. 


100.00 


]\Ir. and Mrs. William 




Miss Ida B. Reed . . 


100.00 


Bentley Walker . . 


100.00 


Mrs. F. L. W. Rich- 




]vliss ]Mary Lee Ware . 


100.00 


ardson 


100.00 


Mrs. Bavard Warren . 


100.00 


Miss Emma Rodman . 


100.00 


F. G. Webster . . . 


100.00 


Mrs. Robert Shaw 




Stephen M. Weld . . 


200.00 


Russell 


100.00 


Frank Whitney . . . 


100.00 


Mr. Phihp L. Salton- 




George Wigglesworth . 


200.00 


stall 


100.00 


John D. Williams . . 


100.00 


Mr. and ]\Irs. Robert 




Moses Williams . . . 


200.00 


Saltonstall .... 


100.00 


Mr. and ]\Irs. Arthur 




C. S. Sargent .... 


100.00 


Winslow 


100.00 


Mrs. Francis W. Sar- 




Mrs. Robert C. Win- 




gent 


100.00 


throp 


100.00 


F. R. Sears 


100.00 


Airs. Thomas Lindall 




Dr. Henry F. Sears . 


100.00 


Winthrop .... 


100.00 


Herbert M. Sears . 


100.00 


X. Y. Z 


200.00 


Mrs. J. ^Montgomery 












Sears 


100.00 


$24,123.03 


Mrs. Knyvet W. Sears 


100.00 






Mr. and Mrs. Philip 








S. Sears 


100.00 







25 



Report of the Treasurer. 

FREE BED SUBSCRIBERS FOR TEN YEARS. 

William S. Dexter (1908-1918) $1,000.00 

Walter HunneweU (1909-1919) 1,000.00 

Mary G. Pickering (1909-1919) 1,000.00 

Mrs. Charles H. Dalton (1910-1920) .... 1,000.00 

Frances E. (Cutler) Sprague Fund (1911-1921) 1,000.00 

Mrs. C. G. Rice (1912-1922) 1,000.00 

Mrs. W. Scott Fitz (1913-1923) 1,000.00 

James Longley (1914-1924) 1,000.00 

Miss Mary S. Ames (1915-1925) 1,000.00 

The late Henry R. Dalton (1915-1925) . . . 1,000.00 

Mrs. Henry S. Grew (1915-1925) 1,000.00 

Mrs. O. H. Alford (1916-1926) 1,000.00 

Miss Martha A. Alford (1916-1926) 1,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd Brooks (1916-1926) . 1,000.00 
Mrs. George D. Howe (1916-1926), 

Memory of George D. Howe 1,000.00 

$15,000.00 

A subscriber of one himdred dollars may nominate a patient to a free bed 
for one year; a subscriber of one thousand doUars to a free bed for ten 

years; and a subscriber of five thousand doUars to a free bed for one life, 
with right upon nomination to extend the same to two lives. 

The terms for a free bed for one life without right upon nomination to 
extend the same to two lives are $2,500. The terms for a free bed in a private 
room are $500 annually or $10,000 for life. 

All free beds shall be subject to the approval of the Trustees and the 
Rules of the Hospital. 

GENERAL FUND 

1811 Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Provmce House Estate .... $40,000.00 

Cutting stone for Hospital .... 35,070.27 

1811-1843 Subscribers for Foundation 

($146,992.55) 

Benjamin and Caleb Adams . . 100.00 

Joseph AUen 100.00 

Hannah R. Amory 100.00 

John Amory 200.00 

Jonathan Amory 200.00 

Ebenezer T. Andrews 300.00 

Nathan Appleton 500.00 

Samuel Appleton 2,000.00 

William Appleton, for himself . . 100.00 

Wilham Appleton,f or an unknown 200.00 

Samuel T. Armstrong 100.00 

Nathaniel Austin 100.00 

Adam Babcock 300.00 

Baker, Browm, and Co 100.00 

Aaron Baldwin 110.00 

Charles Barnard 100.00 

John Bartlett 100.00 

Thomas Bartlett 300.00 

Stephen Bean 100.00 

Jeremiah Belknap 100.00 

John Belknap 100.00 



Carried forward $80,380.27 

26 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $80,380.27 

1811-1843 John BeUows 100.00 

Amos Binney 300.00 

John Bishop 100.00 

George Blake 100.00 

George Bond 180.00 

Boott, Ivirk, and Sons 300.00 

MaryBoott 300.00 

Charles Bradbury 100.00 

Gamahel Bradford 100.00 

Joseph P. Bradlee 100.00 

Josiah Bradlee 200.00 

Thomas D. Bradlee 100.00 

Nathan Bridge 100.00 

Andrew Brimmer 100.00 

John Brooks 100.00 

Peter C.Brooks 2,000.00 

Moses Bro-R-n 100.00 

Samuel BroTSTi 100.00 

John Bryant 100.00 

Thomas Bumstead 125.00 

Benjamm Bussey 1,000.00 

George Cabot 100.00 

John Cabot 150.00 

Sarah and Susan Cabot .... 100.00 

WiUiam Cabot 100.00 

Francis Carnes 200.00 

Richard Chamberlain 100.00 

Walter Channing 100.00 

Wilham E. Channing 100.00 

Henry Chapman 100.00 

Town of Chelsea 145.42 

Da^dd W. Child 100.00 

Samuel Cobb 200.00 

Wilham Cochran 100.00 

Charles R. Codman 100.00 

Margaret Coffin (and Ann Smith) 100.00 

Collections m Ward 4 340.00 

Collections in Ward 10 .... 373.00 

Joseph Coolidge 2,000.00 

Joseph Coohdge, Jr 1,000.00 

Thomas Cordis 100.00 

Uriah Cottmg 100.00 

Allen Crocker 100.00 

Benjamin W. Crowninshield . . 200.00 

George Crowninshield 500.00 

Thomas Ciu-tis 100.00 

Jolm P. Cushmg ....... 5,000.00 

Thomas Gushing, a share in Ex- 
change Coffee House, worth . 300.00 

WiUiam DaU 100.00 

Benjamin Dana 100.00 

Nathan Dane 200.00 

Amasa Davis 100.00 

A. and C. Davis 150.00 

Charles Davis 100.00 

Daniel Davis 100.00 

Eleanor Da^-is 200.00 

Joshua Davis 100.00 

earned forward $99,143.69 

27 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward . , $99,143.69 

1811-1843 William Davis 150.00 

Thomas Dawes 100.00 

H. A. S. Dearborn 150.00 

P. P. F. Degrand 175.00 

Thomas Dennie 100.00 

John Derby 300.00 

Richard Derby 100.00 

Richard C. Derby 300.00 

Humphrej^ Devereux 100.00 

Aaron Dexter 100.00 

Katharine Dexter 100.00 

Pickering Dodge 300.00 

John Dorr 110.00 

Samuel Dorr 100.00 

Catherine Eliot 200.00 

John S. Ellery 100.00 

David Ellis 100.00 

Samuel Endicott 100.00 

Otis Everett 100.00 

Exhibition of Mummy .... 1,257.87 

Samuel Tales 100.00 

Ebenezer Farley 125.00 

Female Association 753.08 

Joseph Field 100.00 

Joshua Fisher 100.00 

Simon Forrester 2,000.00 

Ebenezer Francis 200.00 

John French 100.00 

French and Weld . , 120.00 

Robert H. Gardiner 200.00 

Samuel P. Gardiner 100.00 

Abraham Gibson 100.00 

Nathaniel Goddard 200.00 

John Gore 200.00 

Francis G. Gray 100.00 

Henry Gray 1,000.00 

Horace Gray 1,000.00 

John C. Gray 100.00 

John C. Gray 300.00 

Wilham Gray 500.00 

Gardiner Greene, $1,000 in three 

per cents 650.00 

David Greenough 200.00 

David S. Greenough 200.00 

Dudley Hall 200.00 

Samuel Hammond 200.00 

John Hancock 200.00 

Harvard College 213.32 

Lemuel Hayward 100.00 

Joseph Head 1,000.00 

Joseph Head, Jr 100.00 

Augustine Heard 100.00 

Barnabas Hedge 150.00 

David Hinckley 1,000^00 

Hmgham, Third Parish .... 504.44 

John Holland 200.00 

Benjamin P. Homer 100.00 

Henry Homes 100.00 

Carried forward $115,802.40 

28 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $115,802.40 

1811-1843 John Howe 100.00 

Hemy Hubbard 100.00 

John Hubbard 200.00 

Humane Society of Massachusetts 5,140.56 

Humane Society (Merrimack) 2,000.00 

Jonathan Htmnewell 100.00 

John Hurd 100.00 

Joseph Hurd 200.00 

Charles Jackson 400.00 

James Jackson 420.00 

Patrick T. Jackson 220.00 

Samuel Jacques, Jr 100.00 

John Coffin Jones 500.00 

Thomas KUby Jones 200.00 

Abigail Joy and family .... 300.00 

Benjamin Joy 250.00 

John Kidder, Jr 100.00 

Josiah Ivnapp 100.00 

Seth I^owles 100.00 

William Lambert 100.00 

Amos and Abbott La\\Tence . . 200.00 

William Lawrence 100.00 

Francis Lee 100.00 

George Lee 150.00 

Joseph Lee 300.00 

Thomas Lee, Jr 100.00 

Winslow Le-n-is 100.00 

Lmcoln and WTieelwright . . . 100.00 

James Lloyd 1,000.00 

Caleb Loring 100.00 

Francis C. LoweU 400.00 

John Lowell •. 450.00 

George W. L^Tuan 150.00 

Theodore L^Tnan 2,000.00 

Theodore LjTnan, Jr 150.00 

Josiah Marshall 100.00 

^lassachusetts Charitable Fire 

Society 900.00 

Perrin May 100.00 

Samuel Mav 100.00 

Samuel R. MiUer 100.00 

WiUiamMinot 100.00 

John Morse 100.00 

Thomas Motlev 100.00 

Israel Munson" 1,000.00 

Caleb Oakes 100.00 

John Odin 200.00 

George Odiome 100.00 

Joseph Ome 200.00 

Samuel Ome 200.00 

John Osbom . 200.00 

H. G. Otis 500.00 

Daniel P. Parker 500.00 

John Parker oOO.OO 

Samuel Parkman 2,000.00 

Samuel Parkman, Jr 200.00 

Nehemiah Parsons 200.00 

William Parsons 1,500.00 

Carried forward $140,932.96 

29 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $140,932.96 

1811-1843 M. Pavne 100.00 

William Pa^e 100.00 

Joseph Peabody 2,000.00 

James Perkins 5,000.00 

Samuel G. Perkins ...... 100.00 

Thomas H. Perldns 5,000.00 

John Perry 100.00 

John Phillips 100.00 

Jonathan Phillips 100.00 

Stephen Phillips 200.00 

William PhiUips, including $5,000 

legacy of his father 20,000.00 

Henry Pickering 100.00 

Benjamin Pickman, Jr 1,000.00 

Dudley L. Pickman 150.00 

William Pickman 300.00 

Paschal P. Pope 100.00 

John Pratt 135.00 

William Pratt 400.00 

Wilham Prescott 150.00 

James Prince 250.00 

John Prince 200.00 

Josiah Quincy 200.00 

Isaac Rand 100.00 

John Randall 100.00 

John T. Reed 100.00 

Joseph W. Revere 100.00 

Paul Revere 100.00 

Henry G. Rice 100.00 

Benjamin Rich 300.00 

John Richards 100.00 

Andrew Ritchie 500.00 

Nathan Robinson 200.00 

Daniel D. Rogers 1,000.00 

William Ropes 150.00 

Nathaniel P. Russell 500.00 

Samuel Salisburv 500.00 

Samuel SaHsbury, Jr 100.00 

Samuel Sanford 300.00 

Daniel Sargent 200.00 

Ignatius Sargent 400.00 

William Sawyer 100.00 

David Sears 5,000.00 

Joseph Sewall 500.00 

Robert G. Shaw 500.00 

Michael Shepherd 100.00 

Wilham Shimmin 100.00 

Nathaniel SUsbee 100.00 

John Skinner 100.00 

Barney Smith 400.00 

Samuel SneUing 100.00 

Washington Benevolent Society, 

Charlestown Branch .... 200.00 

HoUis-street Society 148.05 

First Church Society 100.67 

King's Chapel Society 114.44 

West Church Society 190.06 

Roman Cathohc Society .... 100.40 

Carried forward $189,421.58 

30 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $189,421.58 

1811-1843 First Parish Society, Dorchester 168.48 

Dr. Bancroft's Society, Worcester 140.60 

Dr. Pierce's Society, Brookline . 173.38 

John Soley 100.00 

Samuel Spear 100.00 

Phineas Spehnan 100.00 

WiUiam Spooner 100.00 

Francis Stanton 100.00 

RusseU Sturgis 200.00 

William Sturgis 100.00 

George Sulhvan 200.00 

Richard Sulhvan 400.00 

Wilham Sulhvan 200.00 

John Tappan 350.00 

Lewis Tappan 100.00 

Charles Taylor 300.00 

Boston Theatre 1,190.00 

Abraham Thompson 100.00 

Israel Thorndike 2,000.00 

Israel Thornliike, Jr 100.00 

Joseph Tilden 100.00 

Catherine Torrey 200.00 

John G. Torrey 100.00 

Samuel Torrey 100.00 

Abraham Touro 300.00 

George Trott 100.00 

Gideon Tucker 200.00 

Richard D. Tucker 100.00 

Edward Tuckerman 100.00 

Edward Tuckerman, Jr 500.00 

Wilham and Gustavus Tuckerman 100.00 

Town of Concord 200.00 

Town of INIalden 193.80 

Cotton Tufts 135.00 

Nathan Tufts 100.00 

Phineas Upham 100.00 

Vose, Coates, and Co 100.00 

Daniel Waldo 200.00 

Thomas B. Wales 100.00 

Timothy Walker 150.00 

Wilham J. Walker 400.00 

Artemas Ward 100.00 

Nahum Ward 100.00 

Thomas W. Ward 150.00 

WiUiam Ward 100.00 

John C. Warren 400.00 

Redford Webster 153.00 

Francis Welch 200.00 

Benjamin Weld 500.00 

John Welles 300.00 

Nathaniel West 1,000.00 

. Eliza Wetmore 200.00 

Elisha "V^Tieeler 100.00 

Moses "V^Tieeler 100.00 

James WTiite 300.00 

Asa TMiitney 100.00 

Benjamin Wiggin (Exhibition of 

Picture) 1,604.07 

Carried forward $204,629.91 

31 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $204,629.91 

1S11-1S43 Thomas Wigglesworth 200.00 

Eliphalet Williams 100.00 

John D. Williams 1,000.00 

Moses Williams 100.00 

Samuel G. WiUiams 100.00 

Thomas Williams 100.00 

Timothy Williams 100.00 

Amasa Winchester 100.00 

Edmund Winchester ..... 100.00 

Thomas L. Winthrop 100.00 

John Wood 100.00 

Sundry subscribers, less than $100 15,332.91 

1813 John Lucas 900.00 

1819 PoUv Russell 400.00 

1820 Samuel Eliot 10,000.00 

Beza Tucker .5,350.00 

1822 Seth Webber 1,000.00 

1823 Abraham Tom-o 10,000.00 

1824-1835 John McLean 119,858.20 

1826 Thomas OUver 22,438.70 

AEan Crocker ; . . 100.00 

1829 James Savage 100.00 

1831-1849 Isaiah Thomas 6,370.33 

1832-1833 Marv Belknap . 89,882.60 

1834 .Jonathan ^vloseley 753.46 

1836 Susan Richardson 250.00 

1838 Ambrose S. Courtis 2,500.00 

1841 Peter Westerfield 165.67 

1844 Subscribers for Enlargement of Hos- 

pital (S62,450.00) : 

Charles Amory 500.00 

James S. Amory 250.00 

WiUiam Amorv 500.00 

Ebenezer T. Ajadrews 1,000.00 

Nathan Appleton 1,000.00 

Samuel Appleton 2,000.00 

Samuel A. Appleton 100.00 

William Appleton 2,000.00 

Samuel T. Armstrong 100.00 

Edward Austin 100.00 

Richard Ayl-ndn 100.00 

Daniel C. Bacon 100.00 

Benjamin Bangs 200.00 

Charles Barnard 500.00 

Francis Bassett 100.00 

John D. Bates 250.00 

Amos Binney 200.00 

Mrs. Joshua Blake 200.00 

Edward Blanchard 500.00 

WiUiam H. Boardman- 100.00 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch 100.00 

N. I. Bowditch 500.00 

Dwight Boyden 100.00 

Josiah Bradlee 1,000.00 

James B. Bradlee 200.00 

Martin Brinmier 500.00 

P. C. Brooks ■ 2,000.00 

P. C. Brooks, Jr 500.00 

Carried forward $506,831.78 

32 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought fonvard $506,831.78 

1844 John Bromfield 100.00 

John Bryant, Jr 250.00 

Henry Cabot . 200.00 

Thomas G. Gary 100.00 

Garney and Sleeper 100.00 

Galeb Ghase 200.00 

Eben Ghadwick 500.00 

Abiel Ghandler 100.00 

Jonas Ghickering 500.00 

Gharles R. Godman 100.00 

Edward Godman & Go 100.00 

Henry Godman 100.00 

Gardner Golby 100.00 

B. W. GroNNTiinshield 300.00 

A. and G. Gunningham .... 100.00 

Gharles P. Gurtis 100.00 

Thomas B. Gurtis 100.00 

Peter R. Dalton 100.00 

Samuel Dana 100.00 

John James Dixwell 100.00 

J. W. Edmands 200.00 

Samuel A. Eliot 500.00 

Moses Everett 100.00 

Samuel Fales 200.00 

Richard Fletcher 100.00 

John M. Forbes 100.00 

Ebenezer Francis 1,000.00 

George Gardner 100.00 

John L. Gardner 1,000.00 

John Goodenough 100.00 

Benjamin Goddard 500.00 

Ozias Goodwm 500.00 

Francis G. Gray 500.00 

Horace Gray 300.00 

Jolm G. Gray 1,000.00 

Samuel G. Gray 100.00 

William Gray . 100.00 

Elizabeth G. Greene 500.00 

Sarah Greene 1,000.00 

David S. Greenough 100.00 

Henry Hall 100.00 

George HaUett 200.00 

George Hayward 100.00 

Nathaniel Hooper 100.00 

Robert Hooper 250.00 

Robert G. Hooper 100.00 

Samuel Hooper 250.00 

George Howe 500.00 

Jabez G. Howe 200.00 

lasigi and Goddard 100.00 

P. T. Jackson 100.00 

James Johnson 100.00 

Samuel Johnson 100.00 

AbigaHJoy 100.00 

Abel KendaU, Jr 100.00 

George H. Kuhn 100.00 

Lane and Reed 100.00 

Abbott Lawrence 2,000.00 

Carried forward $522,781.78 

33 



Report of the Treasurer. 

1844 Brought forward $522,781.78 

Amos Lawrence 1,000.00 

Amos A. Lawrence 100.00 

William Lawrence 1,000.00 

Lawrence and Stone 500.00 

George Lee 1,000.00 

Thomas Lee 500.00 

Isaac Livermore 100.00 

EUjahLoring 100.00 

Francis C. Loring 100.00 

John J. and Francis Low . . . 100.00 

Francis C. LoweU 500.00 

John A. LoweU 1,000.00 

Charles Lyman 500.00 

George W. LjTnan 500.00 

Theodore Lj^man 1,000.00 

John Marland 100.00 

Robert M. Mason 100.00 

WiUiam P. ^lason 500.00 

Charles H. MiUs 100.00 

:Milton and Slocumb 100.00 

Benjamin R. Nichols 100.00 

Wilham Oliver 100.00 

WiUiam F. Otis 100.00 

Daniel P. Parker 500.00 

James Parker 500.00 

John Parker 1,000.00 

George Parkman 150.00 

WiUiam Parsons 100.00 

WiUiam P. Perldns 100.00 

Edward D. Peters 100.00 

Wmiam Phipps 100.00 

C. Gayton Pickman 100.00 

Paschal P. Pope 500.00 

Marv Pratt 500.00 

WiUiam Prescott 500.00 

wmiam H. Prescott 100.00 

Samuel R. Putnam 100.00 

Josiah Quincy, Jr 1,000.00 

Joseph W. Revere 100.00 

Rice and Thaxter 100.00 

Richardson, Jeffrey, and Brother 100.00 

Edward H. Robbing 100.00 

Henry B. Rogers 500.00 

James D. RusseU 100.00 

Richardson, Burrage, and Co. . 100.00 

Stephen SaUsbury 500.00 

Ignatius Sargent 1,000.00 

Lucius M. Sargent 100.00 

James Savage 100.00 

WUlard Sayles 500.00 

David Sears 2,000.00 

R. G. Shaw 1,000.00 

Francis Sldnner 250.00 

Josiah Stickney 100.00 

Charles Stoddard 100.00 

Wflliam Sturgis 1,000.00 

John E. Thayer 500.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 100.00 

Carried forward $545,681.78 

34 



Report of the Treasuier. 

Brought forward §545,681.78 

1844 Joseph Tilden 100.00 

Heiirv Timmins 500.00 

Phineas Upham 1,000.00 

Daniel Waldo and sister . . . . 200.00 

Thomas B. Wales 1,000.00 

Wilham J. Walker 200.00 

Waterston, Prav, and Co. . . . 100.00 

John C. Warren 500.00 

John Welles 500.00 

Thomas Wetmore 100.00 

William F. TMiitney 100.00 

Edward Wigglesworth 100.00 

Thomas Wigglesworth 300.00 

John D. Williams 2,000.00 

Moses Williams 100.00 

Sundry subscribers, less than 

8100 2,100.00 

Moses Everett 116.00 

Israel Munson 20,000.00 

1844-1866 Mrs. E. G. Everett 475.00 

1845 WiUiamRusseU 100.00 

John Bro^-n 100.00 

1847-1849 Sarah Clough 601.16 

1851 Elizabeth SaHsbury 4,000.00 

1852 James IngersoU 2,000.00 

1854 Judah Touro 10,000.00 

1855' Wilham Appleton 20,000.00 

EUzabeth Pratt 20,000.00 

1856 Subscribers for Brick Fence 

(§3,250.00) 

Nathan Appleton 500.00 

Wilham Appleton 500.00 

Josiah Bradlee 500.00 

P. C. Brooks 250.00 

John P. Cushmg 250.00 

Jonathan Phillips 500.00 

Da^-id Sears 500.00 

William Sturgis 250.00 

1857 WiUiam Pickman 4,000.00 

EUisonLasseU 6,888.60 

1858 Agnes Austin 7,500.00 

1858-1879 M. P. Saw^-er 119.687.93 

1859 George Hills 1,000.00 

1860 Wilham I. Bowditch 274.25 

1861 J. Poland 15.00 

J. Bowdom Bradlee . 500.00 

1863 Subscribers for Cottage for ]Males at 

Asvlum (.544,450.00) : 

WiUiam Amorj' 500.00 

Francis Bacon 500.00 

WiUiam B. Bacon 250.00 

Benjamm E. Bates 1,000.00 

John BaUard 300.00 

James ^I. Beebe 2,000.00 

Mrs. Xath. I. Bowditch .... 5,000.00 

J. Bowdom Bradlee 500.00 

Gardner Brewer 2,000.00 

Martin Brimmer 1,000.00 

Carried forward §788,139.72 

35 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $788,139.72 

1863 Peter C. Brooks 1,000.00 

\\'i]Uam S. Bullard 2,000.00 

J. Amory Davis 500.00 

J. Edgerton 1,000.00 

• J. Wiley Edmands 500.00 

Joseph S. Fay 500.00 

John C. Gray 1,000.00 

Mrs. Henry Grew 300.00 

George Higginson 500.00 

Robert Hooper 250.00 

George Howe 1,000.00 

Jabez C. Howe 1,000.00 

Peter HubbeU 500.00 

H. H. Hunnewell 1,000.00 

Miss Anna P. Jones 400.00 

James Lawrence 1,000.00 

Abbott Lawrence 1,000.00 

Charles Lyman 300.00 

George W. Ljrman 500.00 

Robert M. Mason 500.00 

Ex'rs of Henry P. Oxnard . . . 500.00 

J. W. Paige 500.00 

Benjamin T. Reed 250.00 

George C. Richardson 1,000.00 

Henry B. Rogers 1,000.00 

David Sears 1,000.00 

G. Howland Shaw 1,000.00 

Francis Skitmer 1,000.00 

Henry P. Sturgis 500.00 

WiUiam Sturgis 1,000.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 3,000.00 

George W. Wales 500.00 

Miss Mary Anne Wales .... 500.00 

Wnham F. Weld 1,000.00 

B. C. White 300.00 

Joseph Wliitney 500.00 

Misses Wigglesworth 1,000.00 

Edward Wigglesworth 500.00 

Thomas Wigglesworth 300.00 

Moses Williams 1,000.00 

J. Huntington Wolcott .... 300.00 

Ehzabeth Hill 237.50 

1864 WiUiam S. Bullard 800.00 

Wilham Ohver 57,760.04 

1865 Hannah F. Lee 1,000.00 

William Minot 100.00 

Stephen Salisbury 5,000.00 

Edward Whitney 5,000.00 

Edward Wigglesworth 1,000.00 

1866 Subscribers in Aid of Funds 

($100,800.00) 

Wilham Amory 250.00 

WiUiam T. Andrews 500.00 

Charles H. Appleton 500.00 

Nathan Appleton, Jr 250.00 

Thomas G. Appleton 1,000.00 

WUliam Appleton, Jr 500.00 

WiUiam S. Appleton 500.00 

Carried forward $893,937.26 

36 



Repoit of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $893,937.26 

1866 Anonymous, by W. S. B. ... 500.00 

Francis Bacon 500.00 

James M. Beebe 5,000.00 

George B. Blake ....... 100.00 

John Borland 300.00 

Boston Stock Exchange Board . 1,000.00 

Mrs. N. I. Bowditch 5,000.00 

F. H. and J. B. Bradlee .... 500.00 

Martin Brimmer 1,000.00 

Edward Brooks 500.00 

Peter C. Brooks 1,000.00 

Peter C. Brooks, Jr 1,000.00 

Shepherd Brooks 1,000.00 

WiUiam S. BuUard 5,000.00 

Edward A. Codman 500.00 

Caleb A. Curtis 100.00 

Greely S. Curtis 500.00 

John G. Gushing 500.00 

Robert M. Gushing 500.00 

Thomas F. Gushing 500.00 

Otis Daniels 500.00 

Isaac Warren Danforth .... 500.00 

F. Gordon Dexter 500.00 

Albert Fearing 500.00 

Augustus Flagg 100.00 

WiUiam H. Gardiner 250.00 

George Gardner 300.00 

Henry J. Gardner 500.00 

John L. Gardner 5,000.00 

Joseph B. Glover 300.00 

The Misses EUza and Lucy Good- 

^n 500.00 

Mrs. Henry Grew 500.00 

Andrew T. Hall 100.00 

Augustine Heard 250.00 

Mrs. Augustus Hemenway . . . 1,000.00 

George Higginson 250.00 

Robert Hooper 200.00 

C. F. Hovey&Co 1,000.00 

George Howe 1,000.00 

Jabez C. Howe 2,000.00 

Thomas Howe 250.00 

Horatio H. HmmeweU 2,000.00 

lasigi, Goddard & Co 500.00 

Herman B. Inches 250.00 

Abbott Lawrence 500.00 

Amos A. Lawrence ...... 500.00 

James Lawrence 1,000.00 

James L. Little 1,000.00 

Mrs. John E. Lodge 300.00 

Francis C. LoweU ....... 250.00 

John Amory Lowell 1,000.00 

George W. Lyman 1,000.00 

Theodore Lyman 200.00 

Robert M. Mason 1,000.00 

W^illiam P. Mason 500.00 

Theodore Matchett 200.00 

Nathan Matthews 200.00 

Carried forward S944,837.26 

37 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought J orward $944,837.26 

1866 James McGregor 250.00 

Charles H. Minot 100.00 

George R. Minot 200.00 

Enoch R. Mudge 1,000.00 

Charles Merriam 250.00 

E. Francis Parker 100.00 

John Brooks Parker 500.00 

Samuel R. Payson 1,000.00 

William Perkins 500.00 

Andrew Pierce, Jr 100.00 

Miss Sarah P. Pratt 1,000.00 

Miss Mary Pratt 1,000.00 

Jeffrey Richardson 1,000.00 

Henry B. Rogers 1,000.00 

George C. Shattuck 500.00 

Francis Skinner & Co 2,000.00 

Henry P. Sturgis 500.00 

Samuel W. Swett 250.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 25,000.00 

WiUiam Thomas 100.00 

Mrs. WiUiam Thomas 100.00 

Mrs. WiUiam W. Wadsworth . . 500.00 

Miss M. A. Wales 300.00 

WiUiam G. W^eld 250.00 

George D. Welles 100.00 

Miss Susan J. WeUes 500.00 

Miss Jane WeUes 500.00 

Benjamin C. White 200.00 

Joseph ^^Tiitney 500.00 

Miss Anne Wigglesworth . . . 1,000.00 

Miss Mary Wigglesworth ... 1,000.00 

Edward Wigglesworth • 1,000.00 

Thomas Wigglesworth 1,000.00 

Moses WUliams 3,000.00 

Robert C. Winthrop 100.00 

Rev. Mr. Spaulding 500.00 

Rev. S. M. Worcester 1,900.00 

F. N. MitcheU 67.50 

1867 Sarah Pratt 18,800.00 

Charles Harris 1,000.00 

J. Mason Warren 2,000.00 

1868 AbigaULoring 38,901.67 

St. Stephen's Chapel 2,000.00 

MorrUl Wyman . _ 200.00 

1870 Amateur Dramatic Association . . 450.00 
H. J. Bigelow 500.00 

1871 Sidney Homer 1,000.00 

1871-1916 Massachusetts Hospital Life Insur- 
ance Co 400,000.00 

1874-1886 Hospital Sunday 10,798.28 

1875 Miss M. C. Bryant 500.00 

1877-1883 Charlotte Harris 274,457.33 

1877 Elizabeth Powers 3,000.00 

1878 Edward Blanchard 3,000.00 

1879 J. T. Coohdge 100.00 

Margaret Tucker 49.63 

Miss Marian Hovey 1,000.00 

Henry S. Hovey 1,000.00 

Carried forward $1,752,461.67 

38 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $1,752,461.67 

1879 Mrs. John T. Morse, Jr 1,000.00 

1880 F. James 846.07 

1881 John C. Gray 25,000.00 

Thomas D. Quincy 1,000.00 

E. R. Mudge 1,000.00 

Sir Moses Montefiore 5.97 

1882 Mary Pratt 20,000.00 

Miss Mary Wigglesworth .... 5,000.00 

G. H. Gay Fimd 25,000.00 

Edwin Fiske 50.00 

1883 Jerome G. Kidder 25,000.00 

1884 Amasa Guild 40.00 

Thomas G. Appleton 5,000.00 

1885 A. W. Folsom 125.00 

Dr. Francis P. Hiu-d 10,030.56 

John Wilson 13,600.00 

1887 E. W. Hooper 1,500.00 

1888-1898 Helen C. Bradlee 75,000.00 

1888 Mrs. Ehot Hubbard 1,000.00 

Francis C. Balch 50.00 

1891 Abraham Goldsmid 150.00 

Joseph Schofield 3,000.00 

Anne Wigglesworth 5,000.00 

Augustus L. Case . ' 500.00 

Mrs. J. S. Cabot 50.00 

1892 Ehzabeth B. Bowditch 5,000.00 

1893-1894 George A. Gardner 50,000.00 

1893-1916 Anna S. C. Prince 12,700.00 

1894 Henry P. Kidder 10,000.00 

1895 George W. Elhs 50.00 

Benefit Performance — Henry Irving 884.25 

Henry C. Hutchms 2,000.00 

Walter Hunnewell 1,000.00 

1897 Louisa C. Palfrey 2,000.00 

EUen Flint 28.86 

1897-1901 Mary B. Turner 2,580.61 

1897 Ellen F. Mason 1,000.00 

E. B. Bush 50.00 

J. W. Quimby 50.00 

1898-1911 Henry L. Pierce 798,100.00 

1898-1905 Subscribers to EUot Chapel . . . 33,220.07 

1898 Thomas E. Proctor 145,000.00 

A. C. Slater 1,000.00 

Thomas F. Wyman 119,720.41 

1899 Otis E. Weld 1,063.50 

1900-1908 J. Putnam Bradlee 243,391.24 

1900 Robert C. Bilhngs 50,000.00 

Francis E. Bangs 2,000.00 

Daniel Sharp Ford 7,000.00 

1901-1906 Robert Henry Eddy 56,788.00 

1901-1913 Mrs. John B. TUeston 505.00 

1901 Euphemia Millar 1,000.00 

Robert Codman 5,000.00 

1902 Mrs. S. D. Warren 20,000.00 

Edward I. Brown 10,000.00 

Mrs. Ehzabeth L. Wyman .... 250.00 

George Gardner 1,000.00 

Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer 1,000.00 

Carried forward $3,544,791.21 

39 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $3,554,791.21 

1902 Edward F. Daland 1,000.00 

Children of Mrs. Henry Winsor 

(Phila.) 1,000.00 

1903 William S. Dexter 4,000.00 

C. H. W. Foster 500.00 

Jacob Hecht 500.00 

Merchants' & Miners' Transporta- 
tion Co 50.00 

Sarah A. Matchett 1,000.00 

1904-1905 Charles H. Hayden 102,133.33 

1904-1907 Thomas Wigglesworth 15,000.00 

1904 Mrs. Alice B. Chase 1,000.00 

Harriet O. Cruft 2,000.00 

Mrs. Henry Lee 2,000.00 

1905 Mrs. WiUiam Caleb Loring . . . 100.00 

Ellen V. Smith 50.00 

J. H. T. Adams 58,256.46 

Edward W. Codman 283,887.53 

1905 Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Grew . . 1,000.00 

1906 Mrs. H. Kuhn 50.00 

Desmond FitzGerald 25.00 

Laura M. Moore 2,500.00 

Martin Brimmer 20,000.00 

WiUiam Bolton 555.22 

Edward Woodman 1,000.00 

Henry L. Higginson 1,000.00 

Mrs. George D. Howe 1,000.00 

1907 Charles E. French 10,000.00 

Mrs. J. J. Storrow 25.00 

1907-1912 Henry B. MuUiken 113,424.21 

1907-1915 Georgina Lowell 170.00 

1907 Wilham Amory 50.00 

Alice M. Longfellow 5.00 

Mrs. R. G. Shaw 50.00 

1907-1914 William P. Blake . 250.00 

1907 Anna Dehon Blake 25.00 

1908-1915 Philip S. Sears 125.00 

1908-1911 Mrs. B. L. Young 75.00 

1908-1916 Charles W. Hubbard 275.00 

1908 Mrs. John H. Sturgis 10.00 

Subscribers to Orthopedic Ward . . 38,577.72 

Luther Farnh.nm 466.63 

1909 Cash 1.00 

C. O. Brewster 12.00 

George F. Parkman 50,000.00 

J. P. Reynolds, Jr 50.00 

1909-1915 Francis Skinner 12,000.00 

1910 T. C. Thatcher 25.00 

Howard Child 25.00 

George W. Boyd 2,000.00 

Mrs. Frances R. Jones 35.00 

1910-1911 Charity Contest — Henry Siegel 

Company 30.00 

1910 Mrs. G. W. W. Dorr 25.00 

Ellen T. Emerson 10.00 

William J. Cheever 8,116.95 

1910-1913 John E. Atkins 89,420.68 

1910 George Dexter 10,000.00 

Carried forward $4,389,677.94 

40 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $4,389,677.94 

1910 Mrs. Frederick C. Shattuck . . . 300.00 
R. M. Burden 50.00 

1910-1916 Lucy F. Simmons 5,007.04 

1911-1914 Miss M. L. Blake 75.00 

1911 JohnAshton 22,176.47 

E. C. Lee 500.00 

Vicomtesse Treilhard 400.00 

Harvey H. Baker 10.00 

Lionel Norman 9.00 

Dr. Frederick C. Shattuck .... 200.00 
Estate of Joseph G. Dalton, by A. P. 

Loring 1,000.00 

Thomas J. Knudsen 4.00 

1912-1916 Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 100.00 

1912 Dorothy King and Ohvia Churchill 1.00 

Victor Govignon 50.00 

Pedro Tosea 10.00 

Dr. E. M. Vrooman 10.00 

Drs. Wasener and Tongs .... 40.00 

Paul W. Reimer 1.00 

Josephine Pitman 2.00 

Rosamond Clark 2.00 

OUver S. Roberts 3.00 

Henry H. Hills 100.00 

Clara Barton Fund 3,241.00 

1913-1916 F. W. HunneweU, 2d 85.00 

1913 Edward W. Grew 20.00 

Mr. Countway 1-00 

1913-1916 I. Tucker Burr 75.00 

1913 Charles T. Lovering 30.00 

A former Out-Patient 2.00 

Miss Mary Thomas 10.00 

Francis I. iVmory 100.00 

1913-1916 Mrs. Harcourt Amory 200.00 

1913 Mrs. Peter C. Brooks 50.00 

1913-1915 Mrs. Stephen S. FitzGerald . . . 30.00 

1913-1914 Frank E. Langley 30.00 

1913 Josef Henrik Johnsan 5.00 

A friend 25.00 

1913-1916 Humane Society of Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts 1,200.00 

1913 Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Eustis .... 10.00 

Mrs. Henry S. Grew 1,000.00 

1913-1914 Mehitable C. C. Wilson 543.75 

1913 Anonymous 2.00 

Mrs. F. A. Eustis 10.00 

Theodore Mendelstein 5.00 

The Nuiety-Five Sewing Circle . . 20.00 

Rosa A. Mulrey 1-00 

Miss Marjorie R. van Wickle . . 50.00 

Mrs. W. Scott Fitz 1,000.00 

Subscribers for Nurses' Home : 
($92,880.31) 

Mrs. Andrew C. Wheelwright . 20,000.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 50,000.00 

Shepherd Brooks ....... 5,000.00 

Ladies' Advisory Committee of 

the Training School for Nurses 14,000.00 

Carried forward $4,516,474.20 

41 



Report of the Treasuier. 

Brought forward $4,516,474.20 

1913 In memory of Mrs. Samuel Tor- 

rey Morse 1,000.00 

Interest accrued 2,880.31 

1914 Edith L. CooUdge 748.03 

1914-1916 J. M. Crafts 40.00 

1914 Edward B. Adams 10.00 

A Friend 5.00 

1914-1916 Mrs. S. Parkman Blake 150.00 

1914 Mrs. Caroline B. Allen 5,000.00 

H. M. Sears, F. C. Welch, and R. E. 
BuUard, Executors u/w of Francis 

Bartlett 10,000.00 

1914-1916 Edward B. Alford 60.00 

1914 Mrs. Wilham P. McKenzie . . . 5.00 

Emily "VMiiting' 5.00 

Anne W. Davis 9,030.70 

Mrs. Warren B. P. Weeks .... 25.00 

Out-Patient 1.00 

Mary A. Conlia 10.00 

Francis Skinner, Sr 43,460.97 

Miss Helen Cudahy 500.00 

Anonymous 1.00 

Mrs. Ehza Dean 5.00 

WUHam H. Blacar 2.50 

George Wigglesworth 2,500.00 

1915 Mrs. David K. Horton 15.00 

Arthur A. Carey 5.00 

Lawson Frederick Cartter .... 50.00 

1915-1916 Miss A. F. Manning 20.00 

Mrs. F. S. Mead 5.00 

Mrs. Alex. S. Porter, Jr 25.00 

1915-1916 W. B. P. Weeks . 50.00 

1915 Anonymous .08 

F. G. Ciu^is 25.00 

Charles R. La^Tence 11,000.00 

Mrs. Gertrude Hunter 2.00 

Anonj-mous 3.00 

Dr. William E. Reed 9.22 

Anonymous 3.00 

Henry Lyman 200.00 

Anonymous 50,000.00 

AnonjTnous 5.00 

W. H. Williams 6.00 

Out-Patient 3.00 

Martin- J. Foley 1.00 

Everett Morss 100.00 

Miss Lois W. Clarke 5.00 

Annie L. Conley 5.00 

Salvatore Maschera 3.00 

1915-1916 Caroline L. W. French 100,843.34 

1915 Misag Azzigian 5.00 

1916 Anonymous 1.00 

Mrs. Stephen G. Wheatland . . . 50.00 

Mrs. Wallace Dunbar Dexter, Jr. . 5.00 

Mrs. Richard B. Fuller 5.00 

Mrs. Arthur N. Hood 6.00 

Elmer P. Howe 20.00 

Mrs. Atherton Thayer Brown . . 10.00 

Carried forward $4,754,398.35 

42 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $4,754,398.35 

1916 Charles A. Vialle 25.00 

Mrs. F. G. Curtis 25.00 

Mrs. Barrett Wendell, Jr 10.00 

Miss Helen Peabody 2.00 

Mrs. Waldo E. Forbes 50.00 

Archibald Gary Coohdge .... 10.00 

Malcolm G. Peabody 10.00 

Mrs. Ezra Ripley Thayer .... 10.00 

Ehase Jacques 25.00 

A former Patient 5.00 

E. S. C 100.00 

John W. Wheel^Tight 2,000.00 

Mrs. J. T. Coolidge 50.00 

F. W. Webster 25.00 

Bartlett G. Rejiiolds 1.00 

Miss Effie A. McDonald 1.00 

A Patient 1.00 

Thomas Mack 1,000.00 

Caroline E. Davis 33,517.15 

Frank E. Peabody 77,221.35 

Interest accrued 1,003.37 

Charles W. Moseley, surviving ex- 
ecutor imder the will of Juha M. 
Moseley, in memory of Dr. Wil- 

ham Oxnard Moseley, Jr. ... 185,000.00 

Interest accrued 4,642.35 

1811-1916 Subscribers to Free Beds (Aimual) . 779,428.06 

Total Unrestricted Gifts to this 

Fund, 1811-1916 inclusive . . . $5,838,560.63 
Profits from Ileal Estate, Stocks and 

Bonds, etc 1,790,013.98 



$7,628,574.61 
Withdrawals from this Fund repre- 
senting annual excess of expenses 
over receipts at Hospitals, and 
other adjustments, 1811-1916, in- 
clusive 2,794,131.57 



Balance to credit of this Fund . . $4,834,443.04 



43 



Report of the Treasurer. 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL. 



RESTRICTED FUNDS FOR THE GENERAL HOSPITAL 
INCOME DEVOTED TO FREE BEDS. 

1825 The Davis Fimd, a bequest from 

Mrs. Eleanor Davis .... $900.00 

1827 William Phillips Fund, a be- 

quest from Wilham Phillips . 5,000.00 

1830 Belloiap Fund, a bequest from 

Jeremiah BeUmap .... 10,000.00 

1841 Brimmer Fund, a bequest from 

Miss Mary Ann Brimmer . 5,000.00 

1842 Tucker Fund, a bequest from 

Miss Margaret Tucker . . . 3,312.37 

1849 WilUams Fund, a bequest from 

Jolm D. Wilhams, of Estate 
No. 17 Blackstone Street . 19,600.00 
Nichols Fund, a bequest from 

B. R. Nichols 6,000.00 

1850 Todd Fimd, a bequest from 

Henry Todd 5,000.00 

1851 Wilder Fund, a bequest from 

Chas. W. Wilder, $12,000.00 
1912 and a bequest from 

Florence Eliza- 
beth WUder, his 
granddaughter . 1,000.00 13,000.00 

1856 Bromfield Fimd, half of a be- 

quest from John Bromfield . 20,000.00 
Wm. Reed Fund, a bequest 

from Wm. Reed 5,233.92 

1857 TreadweU Fund, part of a be- 

quest from J. G. TreadweU . 38,703.91 

1858 Dowse Fund, a bequest from 

Thomas Dowse 5,000.00 

1858-1897 Sawyer Fimd, part of a bequest 

from M. P. Sawyer .... 76,966.19 

1859 Thompson Fund, a bequest 

from S. B. Thompson . . . 500.00 

1860 J. Phillips Fund, a bequest from 

Jonathan Phillips 10,000.00 

1862 Miss Townsend Fund, a dona- 

tion from the executors of the 
will of Miss Mary P. Town- 
send 11,486.50 

1863 Pickens Fxmd, a bequest from 

John Pickens ....... 1,676.75 

Percival Fimd, a bequest from 

John Percival 950.00 

1864 Greene Fimd, a bequest from 

Benj. D. Greene 5,000.00 

1865 Sever Fund, a bequest from 

Miss Martha Sever .... 500.00 

Carried forward $243,829.64 

44 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $243,829.64 

1865 The Raymond Fund, a bequest 

from E. A. Raymond . . . 2,820.00 

1868 Harris Fund, part of a bequest 

from Charles Harris .... 1,000.00 

Mason Fund, a bequest from 

Wm. P. Mason 9,400.00 

Loring Fund, a bequest from 

Abigail Loring 5,000.00 

1868-1875 Miss Shaw Fund, a donation 
and bequest from Miss M. 
Louisa Shaw 5,500.00 

1871 J. L. Gardner Fund, a donation 

from J. L. Gardner .... 20,000.00 
B. T. Reed Fund, a donation 

from Benj. T. Reed .... 1,000.00 

Read Fund, haK of a bequest 

from James Read 1,000.00 

1872 McGregor Fund, half of a dona- 

tion and bequest from James 

McGregor 7,500.00 

Joy Fund, a bequest from Miss 

NabbyJoy 20,000.00 

1873 Parker Fund, a bequest from 

Jonathan Parker, Jr. . . . 10,000.00 

1874 Templeton Fund, half of a be- 

quest from John Templeton . 5,000.00 

Miss Rice Fund, a bequest from 

Miss Arabella Rice .... 5,000.00 

Mrs. J. H. Rogers Fund, a do- 
nation from J. H. Rogers . 1,177.50 

1876 Beebe Fimd, a bequest from 

J. M. Beebe 50,000.00 

Lincoln Fund, half of a bequest 

from Mrs. F. W. Lincohi . . 85,000.00 

1877 Blanchard Fund, a bequest 

from Mrs. M. B. Blanchard . 4,000.00 

George Gardner Fund, a dona- 
tion of $1,000 from George 
Gardner, and $11,000 from 
Shepherd Brooks ..... 12,000.00 

Hemenway Fund, a donation 
from the executors of the will 
of Augustus Hemenway . . 20,000.00 

Jessup Fund, part of a bequest 

from Dr. Chas. A. Jessup . . 1,000.00 

Tufts Fund, a bequest from 

Quincy Tufts 10,000.00 

1878 Ehza Perkins Fund, a donation 

from Mrs. H. B. Rogers . . 1,000.00 

Dwight Fund, a donation from 

Mrs. T. Bradford Dwight . 1,000.00 

1879 HunneweU Fund, a donation 

from H. H. HunneweU . . . 10,000.00 
R. M. Mason Fimd, a bequest 

from R. M. Mason .... 5,000.00 

Hannah LoweU Cabot Fund, a 

donation from Dr. Samuel 

Cabot 1,000-00 

Carried forward $538,227.14 

45 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $538,227.14 

1879 The Gray Fund, a donation from 

John C.Gray 1,000.00 

1881 Welles Fund, a donation from 

Miss Jane Welles 5,000.00 

1882 Black Fund, a bequest from 

Miss Marianna Black . . . 2,000.00 

Eben Wright Fund, an assign- 
ment of legacies by the chil- 
dren of T. Jefferson Coolidge 14,000.00 

1883 Paraclete Holmes Fund, a do- 

nation from W. S. Adams . 2,000.00 

Estabrooks Fund, a bequest 

from J. W. Estabrooks . . 1,000.00 

Thayer Fund, a bequest from 

Nathaniel Thayer 30,000.00 

1884 John Bertram Fund, a donation 

from Mrs. Clara Bertram 

KimbaU 5,000.00 

D. R. Whitney Fund, a dona- 
tion of D. R. Whitney . . . 1,000.00 

Arm E. Gray Fund, a bequest 

from J\Iiss Ann E. Gray . . 5,000.00 

1886 Hannah C. Leland Fimd, a be- 

quest from Mrs. Hannah C. 

Leland 15,000.00 

Esther E. Beebe Fimd, a be- 
quest from Mrs. Esther E. 

Beebe 2,000.00 

Ella F. Roehl Fimd, a bequest 

from EUa F. Roehl .... 8,085.02 

Donations from friends, two of 

$100 each and one of $50 . 250.00 

Urbino Fund, a bequest of S. R. 

Urbino 6,000.00 

1887 Emily W. Appleton Fund, a do- 

nation from Mrs. Emily W. 

Appleton 1,000.00 

Henrj' B. Rogers Fund, a be- 
quest from Henry B. Rogers 10,000.00 

John H. Eastburn Fimd, a be- 
quest from John H. Eastburn 10,000.00 

Mrs. Susan F. Eastburn Fund, 
a bequest from Mrs. Susan 
F. Eastburn 1,000.00 

WiUiam B. Craft Fund, a be- 
quest from WUUam B. Craft 5,000.00 

1888 McGregor Fund, a bequest of 

Mrs. James McGregor . . . 1,000.00 

Charles R. Hayden Fund, a do- 
nation from Mrs. Annie Ruth 
Hayden 2,000.00 

SpauJding Fund, a donation of 
Mahlon D. and John P. 
Spaulding 10,000.00 

Anna T. PhiUips Fund, a dona- 
tion of Mrs. Anna T. PhiUips 1,000.00 

Joel Spaulding Fund, a donation 

of Miss Sarah R. Spaulding . 3,000.00 

Carried forward $679,562.16 

46 



Report of the Trea^uier. 

Brought forward S679,562.16 

1889 The Bartlett Fund, a bequest of Sid- 

ney Bartlett 10,000.00 

Jas. B. and Mary Dow Fund, a 

gift of Mary Dow, under the 

wiU of James B. Dow . . . 5,000.00 

Shattuck Fund, a donation of 

Mrs. George C. Shattuck . 500.00 

1890 Elisha T. Loriug Fund, a be- 

quest of EUsha T. Loring . 10,000.00 

EHen INI. Gifford Fund, part of 

bequest of EUen ^l. Giflford . 10,000.00 

Turner Sargent Fund, a bequest 

of Amelia Jackson Sargent . 5,000.00 

Sarah E. AUen Fund, a bequest 

of Sarah E. Allen 5,000.00 

Jordan, Marsh and Co. Fund, a 
donation of Jordan, Marsh 
& Co 1,000.00 

Wm. S. Dexter Fund, a dona- 
tion of Wm. S. Dexter . . . 5,000.00 

Wm. B. Spooner Fund, a be- 
quest of Wm. B. Spooner . . 3,000.00 

1891 Caroline ^Merriam Fund, a do- 

nation from Frank Merriam . 1,000.00 

1892 Stephen P. H. May Fund . . ' 1,000.00 

1893 Waldmever Fund, a bequest of 

Phihp^Waldmeyer .... 1,000.00 

EUzabeth W. Gay Fimd, a be- 
quest of Ehzabeth W. Gay . 7,931.19 

1894 Lawrence Fimd, a bequest of 

Abbott Lawrence 10,000.00 

Isaac Sweetser Fimd, a bequest 

of Mrs. Anne M. Sweetser . 46,913.14 

1895 Burnham Fimd, a bequest of 

T. O. H. P. Burnham . . . 250,000.00 
Moseley Fund, a bequest of . 

Wm. O. Moseley 20,000.00 

Snow Fimd, a bequest of Sophia 

J. Snow 5,000.00 

1896 Glover Fund, a bequest of Al- 

bert Glover 5,000.00 

R. W. Turner Fund, a bequest 

of Royal W. Turner .... 21,086.48 

Coohdge Fund, a bequest of 

Susan G. Coohdge .... 176,000.00 

Vose Fund, half of a bequest of 

Ann White Vose 38,983.09 

Cheney Fund, a bequest of 

B. P. Cheney 10,000.00 

Mary B. Turner Fund, a be- 
quest of Mary B. Turner . . 5,000.00 

Theodore Chase Fund, a dona- 
tion of xAlice Bowdoia Chase 5,000.00 

Henry E. Moodj^ Fund, a be- 
quest of Jane C. Moody . . 2,091.42 

1897 Benj. Jos. Gilbert Fund, a 

donation of Mrs. Susan B. 

Richards 5,000.00 

Carried forward S1,345,0G7.48 



47 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $1,345,067.48 

1897 Thp Harriet T. Andrew Fund, a be- 

quest of Harriet T. Andrew . 5,000.00 

Wm. Hilton Fund, a bequest of 

Wm. Hilton 22,553.66 

Cornelia V. R. Thayer Fund, a 
bequest of Mrs. C. V. R. 
Thayer 25,000.00 

Chas. Paine Cheney Fund, a do- 
nation of Mrs. B. P. Cheney . 5,000.00 

Chas. B. Porter Fund, a be- 
quest of W. L. Chase . . . 5,000.00 

1898 Henry L. Pierce Fund, part of a 

bequest of Henry L. Pierce . 50,000.00 
Brown Fimd, a bequest of Har- 
riet Louisa Brown .... 5,000.00 

1899 Luther Farnum Fund, a be- 

quest of Luther Farnum . . 2,637.37 
J. Huntington Wolcott Fund, a 
bequest of Mrs. J. Hunting- 
ton Wolcott 25,000.00 

Geo. A. Newell Fund, a bequest 

of Geo. A. NeweU .... 5,000.00 

Ira C. Calef Fund, a donation 

of Ira C. Calef 5,000.00 

1900 J. Collins Warren Fund, a be- 

quest of Anna S. C. Blake . 10,000.00 

1901 'Henry Saltonstall Fund, a be- 

quest of Henry Saltonstall . 10,000.00 
Conrad Mohr Fund, a bequest 

of Conrad Mohr 41,384.18 

Sarah H. A. Bumham Fund, a 
donation of Mrs. Sarah B. 
Whittemore and Mrs. The- 
resa B. Dodge 5,000.00 

Chas. L. Young Fund, a be- 
quest of Chas. L. Young . . 5,000.00 

1902 Henry Woods Fund, a bequest 

of Henry Woods 5,000.00 

Henry Wliitman Fund, a be- 
quest of Henry Whitman . 10,000.00 

Jos. B. Glover Fund, a bequest 

of Jos. B. Glover 5,000.00 

Stuart Wadsworth Wlieeler 
Fund, a donation of Susan 
Farnum Wheeler 1,000.00 

Wm.Whitworth Gannett Fund, 
a donation of Wm. Whit- 
worth Gannett 1,000.00 

1903 Fred'kL. Ames Fund, a bequest 

of Mrs. Fred'k L. Ames . . 5,000.00 

John Ruggles Ftmd, a bequest 

of Mrs. Mary L. Ruggles . 10,000.00 
Robert Chas. Billings Fund, a 
donation of Thomas Minns, 
surviving executor under the 
will of Robert Chas. Billings 5,000.00 

J. SuUivan Warren Fund, legacy 

of Elizabeth T. L. Warren . 62,350.00 

Carried forward $1,675,992.69 

48 



Repoit of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $1,675,992.69 

1904 The Chas. H. Hayden Fund, part of 

a bequest of Chas. H. Hayden 5,000.00 

1904-1915 Harriet O. Cruft Fund, a dona- 
tion and bequest of Miss 
Harriet O. Cruft 33,000.00 

1904 Shepard Norwell Fund, a dona- 

tion of John Shepard . . . 5,000.00 

1905 Henry C. Weston Fund, a 

donation of Mrs. Eveljoi O. 

Weston 5,000.00 

Geo. B. Upton Fund, a bequest 

of Geo. B. Upton 5,000.00 

Hannah Smith-LexingtonFund, 

a bequest of George O. Smith 5,000.00 

1906 Coburn Fund, a bequest of 

Mrs. Helen G. Coburn . . 75,000.00 
Nurses' Training School, Free 

Bed Fund 5,000.00 

1907 Charles Merriam Fimd, a be- 

q\iest of Charles Merriam . 5,000.00 

1908 Moses WiUiams Fund, a dona- 

tion of Laura L. Case . . . 5,000.00 

Smith and Sarah A. Gerrish 
Fund, a bequest of Edward 

Gerrish • 8,000.00 

Harriet O. Cruft Fund, a dona- 
tion of Miss Harriet O. Cruft, 
as a ChUdren's Fund . . . 5,000.00 

1908-1916 W. Scott Fitz Fund, a donation 

of Mrs. W. Scott Fitz . . . 10,000.00 

1910-1914 Florence Lyman Fund, a be- 

quest of Florence Lyman . . 3,891.41 

1910 Eugene V. R. Thayer Fund,^ 

bequest in memory of Eugene 

V. R. Thayer .' 5,000.00 

Lucius Clapp Fund, a bequest 

of Lucius Clapp 5,000.00 

Thomas Niles Fund, a bequest 

of Thomas Xiles 29,281.67 

William Litchfield Fund, a be- 
quest of WiUiam Litchfield . 5,000.00 

Charles H. Draper Fund, a be- 
quest of Charles H. Draper. 23,934.13 

1911 James Rogers Rich Fund, a be- 

quest of James Rogers Rich . 1,000.00 

Mrs. Bennett H. Nash Fund, a 
donation of Mrs. Bennett H. 
Nash 5,000.00 

Frances Fay and Arthur Kelsey 
Fay Memorial Fund, a dona- 
tion of James H. Fay . . . 1,000.00 

Catherine A. Barstow Fund, a 
bequest of Catherine A. Bar- 
stow 10,000.00 

Mary E. Badger Fund, a be- 
quest of Mary E. Badger . 2,000.00 

Thomas Talbot Fund, a bequest 

of Isabella W. Talbot . . . 5,000.00 



Corned forward $1,943,099.90 

49 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $1,943,099.90 

1912 The Matchett Firnd, a bequest of 

Mrs. Sarah A. Matchett . . 25,000.00 
Waite Memorial Bed, a bequest 

of Harriet E. Goodnow . . 5,091.67 

CaroUne M. Martin Fund, a be- 
quest of Carohne M. Martin 5,094.94 

1913 John S. Ames Fund, a donation 

of John S. Ames 5,000.00 

]\lary Stickney Fund, a bequest 

of Mar>' Spaulding .... 5,000.00 

George N. SmaUey Fund, a be- 
quest of George N. Smalley . 5,000.00 
1914-1915 Wilham S. HUls Fund, a be- 
quest of WilHam S. Hills . . 10,000.00 

1915 Esther Storey Fund, a bequest 

of Joseph C. Storey .... 5,000.00 

Jane Elkins Fund, a bequest of 

Joseph C. Storey 5,000.00 

William N. Felton Fund, a be- 
quest of WiUiam N. Felton . 5,000.00 

Jennie A. Pond Fund, a dona- 
tion of H. D. Woods . . . 5,250.00 

Susan Welles Sturgis Fund, a 
bequest of John Aoken Preston 5,000.00 

1916 Isabella Freeman Dillingham 

Bed, a bequest of Isabella W. 

Dillingham 5,314.44 

William Endicott Fund, a be- 
quest of Wilham Endicott . 25,000.00 

Sylvester Bowman Fund, a be- 
quest of Sylvester Bowman . 50,900.00 

Ellen Charming Fund, a be- 
quest of EUen Charming . . 5,000.00 

S 

INCOME UNRESTRICTED. 

1845 The Waldo Fimd, bequest of Daniel 

Waldo $40,000.00 

1886 Dr. J. H. Whittemore Memorial 
Fund: 

William S. Bullard . $500.00 

Peter C. Brooks . . 200.00 

Martin Brimmer . 300.00 

Arthur T. Lyman . 250.00 

Geo. P. Metcalf . . 100.00 
Benton, Caverly & 

Co 100.00 

B. Johnson .... 100.00 

A Friend 1,000.00 

David P. Kimball . 500.00 

T. Jefferson Coolidge 500.00 

James L. Little . . 100.00 

Caroline G. Curtis . 100.00 

Theodore Lyman . 100.00 

E. F. Mason . . . 100.00 

T. K. Lothrop . . 500.00 

C. J. Morrill . . . 1,000.00 
George Higginson . 5,000.00 
Edmund Dwight . 1,000.00 
S. D. Warren . . . 1,000.00 



2,114,750.95 



Carried forward 



$12,450.00 
50 



$40,000.00 $2,114,750.95 



Report ■of the Treasurer. 



Brought forward . . 


$12,450.00 


$40,000.00 $2,114,750.95 


Mrs. J. E. Lodge 


100.00 




Dr. Charles V. BemiK 


3 50.00 




George S. Hale . 


50.00 




Miss Anne Wiggles- 






worth .... 


500.00 




H. H. HiinneweU. 


1,500.00 




J. A. Emmons . . 


500.00 




Mrs. Gardner 






Brewer .... 


100.00 




Miss C. A. Brewer 


20.00 




Mrs.E. B. Bowditcl 


I 500.00 




Sands, Furber & Co. 


100.00 




J. B. Fletcher . . 


100.00 




Shattuck & Jones 


100.00 




D. R. Whitney . 


100.00 




Nathan Robbins . 


100.00 




William Perkins . 


100.00 




Chas. P. Curtis . 


100.00 




Otis E. Weld . . 


500.00 




Ida M. Mason . 


100.00 




George B. Brown 


50.00 




A Friend .... 


50.00 




A Friend, through 






Mr. Endicott . 


100.00 




John L. Bremer . 


500.00 




Miss Anna Hallowel 


I 100.00 




N. P. HaUowell . 


100.00 




G. W. WeUs . . 


100.00 




A Lady, through Mr 






Dalton .... 


50.00 




Franklin Haven, Jr. 


100.00 




Charles Merriam 


100.00 




Edward Austin . 


300.00 




C. H. Dalton . . 


300.00 




Mrs. C. H. Dalton 


50.00 




Augustus LoweU . 


250.00 




Henry Saltonstall 


200.00 




Mrs. G. H. Shaw 


100.00 




Mrs. Frank Morisor 


I 50.00 




Mrs. J. H. Wolcott 


100.00 




Mrs.W. W. Vaughar 


I 250.00 




R. T. Paine . . . 


200.00 




Francis Blake . . 


100.00 




Roger Wolcott 


100.00 




Henry Lee . . . 


500.00 




A. A. La'RTence . 


300.00 




WiUiam Endicott,Jr 


1,000.00 




Henry Woods . . 


500.00 




Ezra Farnsworth 


1,000.00 




Thomas E. Proctor 


500.00 




Henry B. Rogers 


500.00 




Mary Anne Wales 


200.00 




Mrs. Jas. McGregor 


100.00 




Mrs. Caroline Mer- 






riam 


100.00 




Mrs. J. ElUot Cabol 


i 1,000.00 




J. M. Sears . . . 


1,000.00 




Nathaniel Thayer . 


1,500.00 




John E. Thayer . 


1,000.00 




Carried forward . 


$29,520.00 


$40,000.00 $2,114,750.95 



51 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward . S29,o20.00 $40,000.00 $2,114,750.95 
Bayard Thayer . . 1,000.00 
E. Y. R. Thayer . . 500.00 

Mrs. Nathaniel 

Thayer 500.00 

Mrs. J. F. Andrews 500.00 

R. C. Greenleaf . . 1,000.00 
Samuel Johnson . . 500.00 

Mrs. Francis Brooks 100.00 

J. H. Wolcott . . . 100.00 

$33,720.00 

1889 Blake Fimd, a bequest of Stanton 

Blake 10,000.00 

1892 Charles W. Faulkner Fund, bequest 

of C. W. Faulkner 2,940.00 

1897 John Foster Fund, bequest of John 

Foster 10,000.00 

1898 Ehzabeth C. Ware Fimd, bequest 

of EHzabeth C. Ware .... 10,000.00 
1901 Lucretia A. Wilder Ftmd, a bequest 

of Lucretia A. Wnder .... 9,377.64 

Roger Wolcott Fimd, bequest of 

Roger Wolcott 5,000.00 

1915 Arthur T. LjTnan Fund, a donation 

of Arthur T. Lyman 10,000.00 

1916 Mitchell A. Dearborn Fund, a be- 

quest of Mitchell A. Dearborn. 525.00 

$131,562.64 

INCOME DEVOTED TO ANY PURPOSE 
EXCEPT BUILDINGS. 

1862-1872 The Redman Fund, a bequest from 

John Redman $455,113.34 

CHESTER H. DAVIS FUND. 

1903 For Crippled Children, a be- 

quest of Chester H. Davis . 20,000.00 

Total Restricted Fund . $2,721,426.93 

McLEAN HOSPITAL FUND. 

1830 The Joseph Lee Fimd, a donation of 

Joseph Lee, as heir of Francis 

Lee $20,000.00 

1843 Appleton Fund, a bequest of 

$10,010 from Samuel Apple- 
1854 ton and a donation of $20,000 

1862 from WiUiam Appleton . . 30,010.00 

1851 Bromfield Fund, haK of a be- 

quest from John Bromfield . 20,000.00 

1858 Austin Fund, part of a bequest 

from Mrs. Agnes Austin . . 5,000.00 

1859 Kittredge Fund, a bequest from 

Rufus Kittredge 5,500.00 

1870 Amusement Fund, $5,000 be- 

quest of Miss Mary Louise 
Shaw; 
1875 $5,000 donation of Mrs. Quincy 

A. Shaw and other ladies . 10,000.00 

Carried forward $90,510.00 

52 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $90,510.00 

1871 Read Fund, half of a bequest 

from James Read 1,000.00 

1872 IMcGregor Fund, haK of a dona- 

tion and bequest from James 

McGregor 7,500.00 

1874 Templeton Fund, half of a 
bequest from John Temple- 
ton 5,000.00 

1876 Lincoln Fund, half of a bequest 

from Mrs. F. W. Lincohi . . 85,000.00 

1885 Proctor Fund, a bequest from 

Mrs. Lydia P. Proctor . . . 1,000.00 

1888 Hibbard Occupation Fund . . 1,000.00 

1889 Higginson Fund, a bequest 

from George Higginson . . 10,000.00 

1890 EUen M. Giiford Fund, part 

of a bequest from Ellen M. 

Gifford 5,000.00 

1895 Matchett Fund, a donation of 

Sarah A. Matchett .... 15,000.00 
Thomas E. Proctor Fund for 

maintenance of buildings . 30,000.00 

1896 Vose Fund, half of a bequest of 

Ann White Vose 38,983.09 

1897 Bradlee Fund, part of a dona- 

tion from Helen C. Bradlee . 50,000.00 

1900 Abbott Fund, a bequest of Mar- 

shaU K. Abbott 2,500.00 

1904 Fund for Department of Scien- 

tific Research, a donation of 
Sarah A. Matchett .... 5,000.00 

1906 Samuel EUot Memorial Chapel 
Fund, for maintenance of 
Chapel 10,904.84 

1909 George F. Parkman Fund, part 

of a bequest of George F. 

Parkman 50,000.00 

Ehzabeth B. Maxwell Fund, a 
bequest of Ehzabeth B. Max- 

weU 1,030.00 

Mercy A. Bailey Fund, a be- 
quest of Mercy A. Bailey . 5,500.00 

1911 Martha R. Hunt Fund, to 
be used for the entertain- 
ment of patients at McLean 
Hospital 10,135.00 

1912-1915 Matchett Memorial Fund, part 
of a bequest of Sarah A. Mat- 
chett 73,376.05 

1913 Sarah E. Cazenove Fund, a 
bequest of Sarah E. Caze- 
nove 63,784.36 

1916 John Milton Hall Fund, a do- 

nation of a Friend .... 3,000.00 



Total McLean Hospital Fund $565,223.34 



53 



Report of the Treasurer. 



1879 
1880 



1881 



CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL FUND. 

Sundry Donors (through Miss 

RusseU) $3,446.00 

Executors of George O. Hovey . . 2,000.00 
Sundry Donors (through Miss 

RusseU) 2,513.00 

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Ware .... 1,000.00 

Mrs. Sarah S. Fay 1,000.00 

J.L.Gardner 1,000.00 

Mrs. E. B. Bowditch 1,000.00 

H. B. Rogers 1,000.00 

Anne S. Hooper 1,000.00 

E. Pierson Beebe and Mrs. Beebe . 1,000.00 

W. S. BuUard 500.00 

Samuel W. Swett 500.00 

William Amory 500.00 

C. H. Dalton 500.00 

Chas. P. Curtis 500.00 

T. K. Lothrop 500.00 

H. L. Higginson 300.00 

F. L. Higginson 300.00 

O. W. Peabody 250.00 

J. R. HaU 200.00 

George Dexter 200.00 

Mrs. Mary M. McGregor .... 200.00 

Mrs. Frank Morison 200.00 

Eliza Goodwin 150.00 

Friends 2,050.00 

Mrs. Augustus Hemenway .... 100.00 

T. G. Appleton 100.00 

J. R. CooHdge 100.00 

H. P. Kidder and C. J. Morrill, 

Trustees 3,713.85 

Margaret Curtis account Mrs. C. P. 

Curtis, Sr 25.00 

D. F. Appleton 50.00 

Sundry Donors (through Miss 

Russell) 3,750.83 

C. J. Morrill and Friend, one half 

each 5,000.00 

Moses WilHams 1,000.00 

A. T. LjTuan 200.00 

A. Cochrane 250.00 

J. C. Gray 300.00 

B. Schlessinger 500.00 

Henry Saltonstall 500.00 

Mrs. P. C. Brooks 300.00 

T. J. CooHdge 300.00 

Mrs. J. B. H. James 100.00 

R. P. WainwTight 50.00 

Ezra H. Baker 500.00 

WiUiam S. Houghton 1,000.00 

Ehjah Smith 500.00 

Mrs. Samuel Cabot 100.00 

Charles Merriam 100.00 

Carohne Merriam 100.00 

W. G. Weld 250.00 

Carried forward $40,698.68 

54 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $40,698.68 

1881 Mrs. Theodore Chase, Sr 50.00 

Miss Cochrane (musical) .... 500.00 

Alice M. Longfellow and sister . . 1,000.00 

Leopold Morse 50.00 

Samuel Eliot 500.00 

Ehza Ashton \ u r<u i -d r< a- 500.00 

A Bostonian I ^^ ^^^^^^^ ^- ^"^'^ 500.00 

W. E. Bright 200.00 

G. A. Nickerson 200.00 

S. R. Payson 300.00 

George C. Richardson 300.00 

Edward Austin 500.00 

Charles P. Hemenway 250.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 20,000.00 

H. P. Kidder 5,000.00 

J. L. Bremer 1,000.00 

Henry Lee 1,000.00 

Martin Brimmer 300.00 

Miss Anne Wigglesworth .... 300.00 

Quincy A. Shaw 5,000.00 

F. H. Peabody 500.00 

S. B. Rindge 500.00 

S. D. Warren 2,000.00 

Elisha Atkins 500.00 

H. H. HunneweU 10,000.00 

Nevins & Co 500.00 

W. Endicott, Jr 2,500.00 

Henry Woods 1,000.00 

Samuel Johnson 500.00 

R. C. Greenleaf 500.00 

Henry Endicott 100.00 

1882 Ezra Farnsworth 500.00 

W. C. Grover 1,000.00 

Joseph B. Glover 100.00 

Sundry Donors (through Miss 

Russell) 450.00 

Miss Anne Wigglesworth .... 100.00 

Frank L. Ames 3,000.00 

Corneha Dehon 75.00 

1883 Jerome G. Kidder, bequest .... 15,000.00 

1884 Samuel W. Swett, bequest .... 50,000.00 

1885 "Francis," donation 20.00 

1886 George A. Gardner, donation . . . 5,000.00 
Miss Mary RusseU, donation . . . 40.00 

1888 EUzabeth B. I. B. Dixwell, be- 
quest 1,000.00 

1889-1895 Miss Helen C. Bradlee, donation . 1,300.00 

1892 EHzabeth B. Bowditch, bequest . 5,000.00 

1893 Mrs. Isaac Sweetser, in memory 

of Dr. Edw. H. Clarke, do- 
nation 1,000.00 

1912 Juha M. Moseley, bequest .... 6,190.47 



Cost of Building 

Total Convalescent Hospital Fund 



$186,524.15 
34,713.02 



$151,811.13 



55 



Report of the Treasurer. 

SAMUEL CABOT FUND FOR PATHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION. 

1888 Donation of Samuel Cabot and Dr. 

Arthur T. Cabot. Income devoted 
to salary of Surgical Pathologist . $10,000.00 

JOHN CALL DALTON AND EDWARD BARRY D.ALTON FUND. 

1891-1909 A donation from Charles H. and 
Hem-y R. Dalton. Income de- 
voted to Investigation in the Sci- 
ence of Medicine $25,000.00 

PATHOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND RANDALL FUNDS. 

1895 Fanny G. ViUiard $1,000.00 

Charles U. Cotting 500.00 

Thomas Nelson 200.00 

A. S. Bigelow 500.00 

WiUiam S. Bullard 500.00 

Henry C. Weston 500.00 

"A Western Friend" (J. M. Forbes) 5,000.00 

R. H. White 1,000.00 

WaUace L. Pierce 500.00 

Caleb A. Curtis 500.00 

Charles Merriam 500.00 

Ehzabeth R. Cabot 200.00 

EUzabeth C. Ware 100.00 

John C. Ropes 100.00 

George G. Kennedy 1,000.00 

J. Morris Meredith 100.00 

WilUam Powell Mason 1,000.00 

W. B. Thomas 500.00 

Mrs. F. L. Ames 5,000.00 

Miss Mary S. Ames ■ 1,000.00 

Thomas Wigglesworth 1,000.00 

H. H. Hunnewell 10,000.00 

John L. Gardner 1,000.00 

1896 C. W. Amory 500.00 

Mrs. S. D. Warren 5,000.00 

Augustus Lowell 1,000.00 

Henry Lee 1,000.00 

T. Jefferson Coolidge 1,000.00 

Henry L. Pierce 5,000.00 

Charles Head 1,000.00 

Martin Brimmer 1,000.00 

Dr. Charles G. Weld 5,000.00 

O. H. Alford 500.00 

John A. Bm-nham 500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Scott Fitz . . . 1,000.00 

OUver Ames 1,000.00 

D. L. Pickman 200.00 

W. D. Sohier 100.00 

George F. Fabyan 1,000.00 

Miss A. P. Rogers 500.00 

A Friend 400.00 

Mrs. W. D. Pickman 1,000.00 

Frank Simpson 1,000.00 

A. A. Lawi-ence 500.00 

Carried forward $59,900.00 

56 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $59,900.00 

1896 E. Pierson Beebe 1,000.00 

J. Reed Whipple 500.00 

A. Hemenwaj^ 1,000.00 

W. H. Forbes 500.00 

Mrs. Frank Men-iam 500.00 

Mrs. WilUam C. Loring 1,000.00 

Estate of Eben D. Jordan .... 5,000.00 

Nathaniel Thayer 1,000.00 

Mrs. J. N. Fiske 1,000.00 

Through Dr. A. T. Cabot .... 100.00 

Through Dr. Chas. B. Porter . . . 100.00 

W. Sturgis Bigelow 2,500.00 

Anna S. C. Prince 1,000.00 

Wm. Endicott, Jr 5,000.00 

Interest on Fund added 1,947.02 

1897 Henr}^ M. Whitney 1,000.00 

Children of Samuel Parkman . . . 2,000.00 

Laurence Minot 100.00 

Mrs. Heni-y S. Grew 500.00 

George Wigglesworth 100.00 

W^iUiam Minot 100.00 

A. Hemenway 1,000.00 

Miss A. P. Carey 500.00 

AUen Danforth 100.00 

1912 Mrs. Mary Upham Johnson, a be- 
quest 3,201.32 



Pathological Fund $90,648.34 

Apparatus and Equipment .... 26,772.93 

$63,875.41 
1898 John W. and Behnda L. Randall 

Fund 20,000.00 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES FUND. 

1897 C. P. Curtis, Treasurer, for sundry 

donors $18,386.42 

John Foster 5,000.00 

1902 Francis Skinner 1,000.00 

1904 Francis E. Bangs 2,000.00 

William Amory 25.00 

George A. Gardner 2,000.00 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane 100.00 

Mrs. Robert W. Emmons .... 25.00 

Mrs. Larz Anderson 50.00 

Mrs. John L. Bremer 100.00 

Mrs. George F. Fabyan 50.00 

J. Randolph CooUdge 100.00 

H. D. Chapin. . 10.00 

A Friend 1.00 

Dr. J. F. Burnham 1.00 

Miss Fannie R. Brewer 100.00 

F. L. Higginson 100.00 

Mrs. J. B. Case 100.00 

Mrs. Georgina Lowell 25.00 

Mrs. E. Preble Motley 50.00 . 

Carried forward $29,223.42 

57 



5,875.41 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $29,223.42 

1904 Arthur A. Carey 25.00 

Mrs. Annie L. Woods 100.00 

Thomas Wigglesworth 500.00 

Miss Isabel Fabyan 50.00 

Charles E. Cotting 50.00 

Mrs. B. P. Cheney 50.00 

T. Jefferson CooUdge 500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Thornton K. Lothrop 500.00 

Charles H. Dalton 100.00 

Mrs. A. W. Blake 50.00 

Miss B. F. Blake 50.00 

Forbes Lithograph Co 10.00 

Mrs. W. Scott Fitz 100.00 

Miss Ehza W. S. Parkman .... 10.00 

Walter HunneweU 100.00 

Henry S. HunneweU 50.00 

Mrs. F. B. Harrington 10.00 

Miss Mary S. Ames 50.00 

W. O. Gay 100.00 

The Misses Minot 25.00 

Miss Sarah F. Bremer 50.00 

Stephen Bullard 50.00 

Samuel W. Rodman 20.00 

Mrs. F. C. Manning 10.00 

Miss M. L. Blake 10.00 

Miss Mary Brandegee 50.00 

Shepherd Brooks 400.00 

O. H. Alford 100.00 

Mrs. Alford 15.00 

Miss Mary Thomas 10.00 

Miss Sarah C. Paine 25.00 

Miss Mary W. Eastman 100.00 

Charles W. Hubbard 25.00 

Mrs. John C. PhilUps 50.00 

George F. Fabyan 1,000.00 

Graduate of School 50.00 

Graduate of School 1.00 

1905 Mrs. Algernon Coohdge 10.00 

Luce & Manning 25.00 

Mrs. J. T. Eldredge 5.00 

Mrs. WiUiam C. Otis ...... 100.00 

Nurses' Alumnse Association . . . 53.50 

Miss Mary Lee Ware 500.00 

Miss Alice Longfellow 5.00 

John T. Coolidge 100.00 

Mrs. Theodore Lyman 100.00 

Mrs. G. Howland Shaw 100.00 

Clement S. Houghton 25.00 

Louis S. Dabney 25.00 

William S. Dexter 200.00 

Thomas P. Beal 50.00 

Francis Skinner 300.00 

Henry MuUiken 500.00 

Mrs. W. S. BuUard 25.00 

Mrs. H. S. Grew 25.00 

Richard H. Weld 25.00 

Mr. and Mrs. George Putnam . . 200.00 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Thayer .... 2,000.00 

Carried forward $37,992.92 

58 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought fonoard S37,992.92 

1905 Mr. and Mrs. Dudley L. Pickman . 100.00 

F. L. Higginson 250.00 

Mrs. G. G. Hammond 100.00 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Sears .... 200.00 

Mrs. Daniel Merriman 50.00 

Arthur Amory 5.00 

Mrs. Otis Norcross, Jr 50.00 

Alexander Cochrane 100.00 

Mrs. S. Parkman Blake 100.00 

Grant Walker 100.00 

Mrs. J. J. Storrow 10.00 

Mrs. H. H. Fay 25.00 

Miss M. B. Lothrop 50.00 

Francis W. Hunnewell 100.00 

Nathaniel T. Kidder 500.00 

1906 Mrs. Anna D. Blake 50.00 

WiUiam P. Blake 50.00 

E. Pierson Beebe 50.00 

Miss Emma Rodman 25.00 

1907 Mrs. R. G. Shaw 50.00 

1909 Mrs. A. CooUdge 10.00 

1912 Henry A. Wyman 5.00 

1913 Miss Harriet W. Barnes 50.00 

$40,022.92 

EUPHEML\ MILLAR ANNUITY. 
1901 Part of bequest of Euphemia MiUar $1,557.74 

ART ROOM FUND. 

1904 Mrs. Samuel Ehot $500.00 

Sundry Donors and interest added . 518.35 



CODMAN FUND. 

1905 Bequest of Edward W. Codman . . $313,073.91 
Land and Buildings 283,887.53 



ORTHOPEDIC WARD FUND. 

1906-1907 Nathaniel Thayer $5,000.00 

Bayard Thayer 5,000.00 

Mrs. Lester Leland 5,000.00 

John and W. S. Spauldiag and Mrs. 

H. F. Iving 5,000.00 

Mrs. W. G. Weld 5,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Sears .... 5,000.00 

Mrs. B. P. Cheney 5,000.00 

Augustus Hemenway 3,000.00 

J. L. Bremer 2,448.64 

E. V. R. Thayer 2,500.00 

H. E. Converse 2,500.00 

Miss Mary Ames 2,000.00 

Mrs. Edward D. Brandegee . . . 1,500.00 

Nelson Curtis 1,500.00 

MaxAgassiz 1,000.00 

Carried forward $51,448.64 

59 



$1,018.35 



$29,186.38 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought Jorward $51,448.64 

1906-1907 G. L. Peabody J'^°°°° 

F. Gordon Dexter 1,000.00 

C. W. Amorv 1,000.00 

William Endicott, Jr 1,000.00 

P. L. Saltonstall 1,000.00 

Samuel Dana 1,000.00 

Mrs. J. H. Wright 1,000.00 

Lyman Nichols 1,000.00 

Francis Blake 2,000.00 

Miss EUzabeth Cheney 1,000.00 

Mrs. Roger Wolcott, Sr 1,000.00 

John Parkinson 500.00 

Mrs. Peter C. Brooks 250.00 

John SaltonstaU 250.00 

John A. Burnham 100.00 

F. P. Sprague 100.00 

W. O. Gay 100.00 

WaUace L. Pierce 300.00 

$65,048.64 

Building and Equipment .... 38,577.72 



$26,470.92 



1908 



CLINICAL LABORATORY FUND. 

Bequest of ]\Irs. Grace M. Kuhn . 



$10,000.00 



1912 



SUSAN SMITH FUND (ANNUITY). 
Bequest of Susan Smith 



$13,703.98 



1913 
1914 



1915 



1916 



NURSES' HOME FUND — McLEAN HOSPITAL. 

Donation of Miss EUzabeth L. Grant $1,000.00 

A Friend 40,000.00 

Sundry Donors (through JNIrs. E. 

Stanley Abbot) ......... 13,679.70 

Donation of Miss Sara E. Parsons . 5.00 

Donation of Miss Louise W. Case . 100.00 
Donation of Svmdry Donors 
(through Mrs. E. Stanley Abbot) : 

Anonymous 16.00 

Edward B. Field 15.00 

Mrs. A. H. Hews 25.00 

Mrs. Charlotte Nichols Greene . 10.00 

Mrs. Isabel B. Richardson . . . 10.00 

A Friend 2,500.00 

Mrs. Florence N. Putnam .... 100.00 



$57,460.70 



1913 



SARAH PROCTOR JOSLIN FUND. 

Bequest of Sarah Proctor Joshn 



$1,000.00 



DR. JOHN M. HARLOW FUND. 



1914-1916 Bequest of Dr. John M. Harlow 
Bequest of Frances K. Harlow . 



$28,063.00 
12,027.00 



$40,090.00 



60 



Report of the Treasurer. 



CHILDREN'S MEDICAL WARD BUILDING FUND. 
1913 Donation of G. S. Talbot .... $250.00 



CHARLES P. JAYNES FUND. 
1915-1916 Bequest of Charles P. Jaynes ... 



$11,477.00 



HOUSE OFFICERS' ALUMNI FUND. 



1915-1916 Donation of House OflBcers' Alumni 
Expenses 



$792.00 
748.00 



$44.00 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES ENDOWMENT FUND. 

1915 Graduate of School $200.00 

Miss Louise C. May 80.00 

Miss Susan L. Mills 5.00 

Miss Louie W. Wellington .... 25.00 

Miss Sara E. Parsons 100.00 

Dr. Benjamin Bro-mi 10.00 

Graduate of School 1.00 

1916 Miss R. Helen Cleland 200.00 

A Graduate of 1880 50.00 

Miss Annabelle McCrae 100.00 

Miss Jane F. Riley 100.00 

Miss Grace Nichols 10.00 

Mrs. John Bartol 15.00 

Miss E. W. AUen 2.00 

Miss Mary F. Emery 12.00 

Miss Ahce C. S. Cushman .... 5.00 

Miss Grace Stackpole 15.00 

Miss Helen B. Fenton 5.00 

Miss Grace Nichols 100.00 

Miss Frances C. Dailey 7.50 

Mrs. WiJham S. Ely 500.00 

Mrs. Samuel Cabot 100.00 

Miss Fannie R. Slayton 10.00 

Miss Helen G. O'Dea 2.00 

Miss Helen T. Xiverson 10.00 

Miss V. C. Hal] 4.00 

Miss Helen Wood 15.00 

Miss Harriet J. Allyn 25.00 

Mrs. Helen A. Wavland Hudson . 10.00 

Miss Agnes J. Trull 10.00 

Miss Ahce M. Watson 10.00 

Mrs. and Miss Alford 200.00 

Mrs. Jessie E. Grant 10.00 

Miss Eileen R. Curley 5.00 

Miss Charlotte M. Perry .... 20.00 

Miss Olga Olson 5.00 

Miss Josephine Mulville 10.00 

Miss Ruth C. Blair 5.00 

Miss Helen M. Fuilay 1.00 

Miss Hannah Ward 10.00 

Miss Mary L. Keith ...... 100.00 

Miss Jessie L. Brown 25.00 

Miss Harriet L. P. Friend .... 100.00 

Carried Jorward $2,229.50 

61 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $2,229.50 

1916 Mrs. Isaac Phillips, in memory of 

Ethel May Fixter 10.00 

Miss Rose K. Butler 10.00 

Miss Mary E. ffigson 10.00 

Miss Sara E. Parsons 100.00 

Miss Mehssa J. Cook 5.00 

Miss Christina J. McDonald . . . 2.00 

Miss .\nna G. Griffin 5.00 

Mrs. Oscar Feuerstein 10.00 

Miss Esther Dart 50.00 

Miss Hannah J. Brierley .... 10.00 

Miss Ahce Scott 25.00 

Mrs. Frederick A. Driscol .... 10.00 

Miss Maria Brown 5.00 

Mrs. Daniel Coakley 102.00 

Mrs. Webster H. Carney .... 5.00 

Miss Adele Richardson 10.00 

Miss Elizabeth P. Hamlen .... 10.00 

Mrs. John R. MacKinnon .... 5.00 

Miss Marv O. Clark 20.00 



$2,633.50 



X-RAY ENDOWMENT FUND. 



Donation of Mrs. Walter J. Dodd, 
in memory of her husband. Dr. 
W^alter J. Dodd $100.00- 

INCOME DEVOTED TO BOOKS FOR PATIENTS. 

1841 Warren Library Ftrnd, a donation 

from Dr. J. C. Warren .... $1,000.00 

INCOME DEVOTED TO THE LIBRARY. 
1857 Treadwell Library Fund, part of a 

bequest of J. G. TreadweU . . . $5,000.00 

1913 Donation of Richard Olney . . . 100.00 

1914 Donation of Dr. Daniel Fiske Jones 5.00 
Donation of Dr. John M. T. Finney 200.00 



$5,305.00 

INCOME AND PRINCIPAL DEVOTED TO THE PUBLICATION 
OF A HISTORY OF THE HOSPITAL. 

1861 Bowditch History Fund, a bequest 

from N. I. Bowditch $2,000.00 

WOODEN LEG FUND. 

1861 Donation — P. K $100.00 

Bequest of N. I. Bowditch .... 5,000.00 

George A. Newell Fund 2,500.00 

$7,600.00 

INCOME DEVOTED TO A TRIENNIAL PRIZE. 

1868 Warren Prize Fund, a bequest from 

Dr. J. M. Warren $1,880.00 

Accumulated interest 2,805.84 

$4,685.84 

62 



Report of the Treasurei . 

INCOME DEVOTED TO SPECIAL SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

1870 Donation of R. M. Moore .... $100.00 

Donation of Lydia B. and O. A. Taft 100.00 

Donation of Chas. S. Bixby . . . 25.00 

Donation of Dr. Henry J. Bigelow . 1,250.00 

Arthur Appleton Beebe Fund . . 5,000.00 

$6,475.00 

INCOME DEVOTED TO MUSIC AT HOSPITAL. 

1894 George C. and Anne H. Shattuck 

Fund, donation of Dr. Frederick 

C. Shattuck $2,000.00 

SOCIAL SERVICE FUND. 

Donation of Mrs. Shepherd Brooks . $15,000.00 
Bequest of Susan C. Dove .... 5,000.00 

$20,000.00 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES. 

1857 J. G. TreadweU: 

Books, valued at $3,000.00 

1870-1875 H. J. Bigelow: 

Instruments, valued at .... 3,600.00 

1875 Dr. Putnam 21.50 

Dr. John Collins Warren: 

Galvanic apparatus 25.00 

1876 Dr. Samuel Cabot: 

Benefit indigent at Asylmn . . 1,000.00 

1877 Executors Augustus Hemenway: 

For Nurses' Training School . . 5,000.00 

1878 Frederick Dex-ter: 

For pm-chase of pictures .... 50.00 

1887 Waldo March: 

For photographic apparatus . . 100.00 

1888-1894 Dr. A. T. Cabot: 

To make up deficiency on income 

Samuel Cabot Fund .... 1,335.00 

1890 George L. Ivingsley: 

For photographic studio .... 802.82 

1895 Miss Helen C. Bradlee: 

Repairs and alterations to Bradlee 

Ward 7,000.00 

1897 By the "Staff," through Dr. A. T. 

Cabot : 
To make up deficiency in income 

of Pathological Fund .... 1,070.60 

Charles B. Porter: 

Interest accrued on bequests . . 370.00 

1899 Francis Blake: 

Microtome for Pathological Lab- 
oratory 266.30 

"A Patient" : 

For TreadweU Library .... 200.00 

1900 Dr. A. T. Cabot: 

Open BaU Court . 1,000.00 

earned forward $24,841.22 

63 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $24,841.22 

1901 Mrs. ISIary Hemenway: 

Zander apparatus 5,000.00 

1902-1904 C. H. Dalton: 

Added to income of Dalton Fund 1,000.00 

1903 Mrs. T. W. Bennett: 

For Treadwell Library .... 100.00 

1911-1914 Late Result Fund: 

Anonvmous .... §1,500.00 
1912 F. W" HunneweU . . 500.00 

1914 Frederic Winthrop . 500.00 

2,500.00 

1910-1916 LoveringFund: 

Miss Sarah C. M. Lovering . . 11,649.81 
1912-1916 Mrs. Caroline L. Weld: 

For surgical instruments .... 9,694.84 

1912 Dr. Hugh Cabot: 

For surgical instruments .... 100.00 

Dr. Fritz B. Talbot: 

For expense ^^situlg Children's 

Hospitals 75.00 

Dr. G. Cheever Shattuck : 

For X-ray work 250.00 

A Friend : 

For X-ray work 100.00 

1913 Staff of Orthopedic Department: 

For expenses of that department . 125.00 

Mrs. Charles G. Weld: 

For an awning on the Weld Ward 

G veranda 70.00 

Mrs. W. F. Waters: 

For a special instrimaent in 

Ward G 25.00 

1913-1916 Dr. Putnam and Mr. Storey, Trus- 
tees of the A. W. Blake Fund, to 
be apphed to the salary of Dr. 
EmersoD, Psychologist .... 1,700.00 

1913-1914 Mrs. Charles E. Mason: . 

Scholarship, Training School for 

Nurses, General Hospital . . 200.00 

1913-1916 Dr. Hugh Cabot: 

To be appUed toward the salary of 
the House Surgeon to the 
Genito-Urinary Department . 1,500.00 

1913-1916 George Wigglesworth: 

X-ray Apparatus 2,800.00 

1914 Mrs. John Parkinson: 

Towards salaries of the Children's 

Medical Department .... 40.00 

1914-1916 A Friend: 

For certain special uses of the 

Dermatological Department . 2,600.00 

Miss Marion H. Fenno: 

Towards the expense of a tennis 

court for nurses 10.00 

1915 Donation of Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer: 

For a Scholarship, General Hos- 
pital Training School for 
Nurses 50.00 

Carried forward $39,589.65 

64 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $39,589.65 

1915—1916 Donation of George Wigglesworth : 
For a Babies' Milk Fund §1,000.00 
Donation of Anonymous : 

For a Babies' Milk Fund 37.11 

1,037.11 

1915 Donation of a Friend: 

To extend help to worthy patients 
as their needs may become 
known through their atten- 
dance at the Hospital .... 1,000.00 

Donation of Friends of the Hospital 
through Mrs. Hugh Cabot for re- 
fitting part of the Genito-Urinary 
Out-Patient rooms 167.00 

Donation of Training School for 
Nurses, Proceeds of a May Party 
given for furniture for the roof 
garden 74.82 

Donation of Anonymous, to pay ex- 
penses of X-rajdng a series of cases 
in the Out-Patient Department . 30.00 

Donation of Jimior Girls of Camp 
Abena — a summer camp in 
Maine — for books for the Pa- 
tients' Library 6.46 

Donation of Edith L. Coolidge, for 
social ser^dce work, in memory of 
the late Amorj' A. Lawrence . . 75.00 

1915-1916 Donation of the Board of Visiting 
Ladies toward the salary of a so- 
cial worker in the house .... 1,000.00 

1916 General Hospital Training School 

Alumnce: 

For a scholarship 100.00 

A Friend : 

For the X-Ray Department . . 150.00 

Mrs. Malcolm Donald: 

For special technical apparatus . 1,000.00 

W. F. Watters: 

Salary of stenographer, etc., in the 

Dermatological Department . 600.00 

United Fruit Company: 

For Department of Tropical 

J^Iedicine 2,500.00 

Moses WilUams: 

For Social Worker 25.00 

Mrs. Charles H. Dalton: 

For Social Worker 20.00 

Dr. Fritz B. Talbot: 

Toward the changes in the Chil- 
dren's Medical Out-Patient De- 
partment 150.00 

Dr. Richard Cabot: 

For the Warren Library .... 50.00 

Mrs. Charles E. Mason: 

Toward the changes in the Chil- 
dren's Medical Out-Patient De- 
partment 350.00 

Carried forward S72, 766.26 

65 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward 

1916 Patrick Donovan : 

For the Warren Library .... 

Friends of the Hospital (through 
Miss Ella L. Lyman) : 
For half salary for one year of a 
special worker in the Children's 
Medical Ward — who is to be 
clinic secretary and do follow- 
up work: 

Mrs. Ralph B. WiUiams $10.00 
25.00 
10.00 
25.00 
20.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
20.00 



$72,766.26 
L2.79 



Mrs. Henry Lyman 
Mrs. S. D. Warren, Jr. . 
Mrs. Waldo E. Forbes . 

A Friend 

Mrs. Ellery Sedgwick . 
Mrs. John S. Lawrence . 
Mrs. Gorham Brooks . 
Mrs. Thomas Barlow . 



185.00 



Mrs. Caroline L. Weld: 
For instrimaents for the 
Out-Patient Throat 
Department .... $250.00 

A Friend : 

To be added to this Fimd 500.00 



Sundry Donors: 




For molds and other expenses of 


the Cement Shop : 




Mrs. T. H. Gray 




Mrs. B. T. Stephenson 


Mrs. H. V. Reynolds 




Sundry Donors: 




For Infantile Paralysis 


Research 


Fund: 




W. Murray Crane . 


$500.00 


Alvah Crocker . . 


500.00 


WiUiam Endicott . 


500.00 


Albert Strauss . . 


500.00 


Frank G. Webster 


250.00 


Charles Jackson . 


200.00 


Arthur Perry . . . 


100.00 


Wallace L. Pierce . 


100.00 


Robert L. Studley 


50.00 


James H. Proctor . 


100.00 


George R. Wallace 


250.00 


James J. Storrow . 


500.00 


Allan C. Emery 


50.00 


J. P. Morgan . . . 


500.00 



750.00 



51.00 



4,100.00 



$77,855.50 



66 



Report of the Treasurer. 

Brought forward $77,855.05 

1916 Expended 1857-1916 67,611.25 

Unexpended : 

Salary stenographer, etc., Derma- 

tological Department .... $143.30 
Nurses' Training School Scholar- 
ship Fund 50.00 

Special Technical Laboratory Ap- 
paratus .• • • • 1,000.00 

Special Uses Dermatological De- 
partment 628.13 

Instruments Out-Patient Throat 

Department 750.00 

Babies' MHk Fund 222.37 

Apparatus Special X-Ray Work . 50.00 

X-Ray Apparatus 800.00 

Tropical Medicine 2,500.00 

Infantile Paralysis Research Fimd 4, 100.00 

$10,243.80 

C. H. W. Foster, 

Treasurer. 



67 



EXAMINATION OF ACCOUNTS. 



Boston, February 1, 1917. 
David P. Kimball, Esq. ') 

Moses Williams, Esq. r Committee on Finance. 
Joseph H. O'Neil, Esq. ) 

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Sirs: 

In accordance with your instructions, we have made an examination 
of the books and records of the Massachusetts General Hospital, the 
records of the General Hospital, McLean Hospital, and of the Treas- 
urer for the year ending December 31, 1916, for the purpose of verifying 
the cash transactions and of reporting upon the financial condition at 
December 31, 1916. 

WE HEREBY CERTIFY: 

1. That aU funds shown to have been received have been accounted 
for, and that we have found vouchers or other satisfactory evidence 
of payment for aU disbursements. 

2. That the balance of cash on hand December 31, 1916, as shown by 
the books of the Hospitals and of the Treasurer, amounting to 
$160,864.41, was on hand at that date. 

3. That Stocks (par value $383,450.00), amounting to $385,767.25, 
and Annuities Receivable, consisting of three pohcies amounting 
to $160,000.00, as shown by the books, are certified by the New 
England Trust Company as being in their custody on December 
31, 1916. 

4. That Notes Receivable amounting to $75,354.84 were in the cus- 
tody of the Treasurer on December 31, 1916. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patterson, Teele & Dennis, 

Accountants and Auditors. 



68 



Repoit of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 










Pi 

o 






ft, 

o 



is 

oSgS 



" is 

.s sl 

S g.a m-5 S.B 



.sss 
a o 2 

S o '- 

V- a> N S 
C3 etf <u M 



2 S' 



to j> a 

OJ Vj 5, 



^S2 

O L!,^- 
03 13 v4- «.o 



Su^g-^OJ 0*i-^^--JL— 4=3 ^!i.0= 



GBB 

a> «_ 

■ a aB 
ova 
BB£ 



0*j 






la p. 

^^ o 3 o 

■*-" u^^ u O bfl 
S-K oJ C oj ol d 

CO (u fe d > -a 
oo i,o ji,o = 

. ^ o " o -S 

i- " 4) d I" a-" S 

g.is§S2^g 
I^SSHdS^ 



69 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



0= 







C5 

I— I 
O 

B 

pp 

o 

H 
<d 



W PJ 






K 



•-I 5 S o o 



u o 



11 
p. u 






§5 



S^ S t-T3 3 41 o C8 



k, 4) 0) O 

o oj <y 

wmmo 



•o S 

■» o - 

13(5 "-r 

•5>4-, w. 

.5 o <u 

OHf 






5 =i 



^ (!(«•< 



a o 



=s mP< 5- 



o 

gj O O ^ 

<3 2-5,< 






. o o U o ° <-> o 

I S S S S &rt s 

OOO OHgO 



n 

S.S3 
o.S S 



rnejM^ io»H « M ^ 10 <e b- 00 OS OiHeJtOTtdoo c-ooo)»He«MT)i 



o cq C4 e^ eq M d e^OMnMneo 



70 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 







si 



o 
o 

o 

o 
o 

w 

o 

< 
a, 



"S H p 



2 SS^ac 
ca ts « s** I- »> 



lU c S 
^S ->« 

3ai E o 
-> o 

s"^ iyj 5 S 

3 '-' .-t; t- e 



55 s 

W S ••ja 
o S « 

T-( •-< Q > 

-CO 



o 2" eoio 



1-1 e^co tH IS c- 00 n o 1-1 U3 00 ci« 



71 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 







o 

<; I— ( 

3 

S CO 

^^ 
S '=^ 

O m 



(A 
O 
O 
1^ 

Q 

I— « 

w 

H 

PC4 

o 

PL. 



Soo 

as?: 

o P 
P..-HU9 

taw - 



> S 



d'^'^ erf j3 

^ * S t^ w +^ 
joS^-O^oo-a 



da; 
d « 



^w' 



ig5 



i-INWOt-OiHN 



72 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Phj'sician. 







o ■ 

>^ 

w 



n 

o 
I— ( 

H 
. . < 



o a 



S-H- « 



2« 4) . 



a g 






3-a'S-ca S^ 



tu G <D 
3-3 

CO gw 






"SS 



w^" ^- S J: a 



V <u tn 

O O rt 

OOp 



M ^ V V -I 

g>o g § § 1 

'.B (u -S o o S 



a> CO 

3o 



73 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATOR 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL AND 

RESIDENT PHYSICIAN OF THE GENERAL 

HOSPITAL. 



To THE Trustees of the Massachusetts General Hospitai,: 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit herewith 
my ninth annual report as Administrator of the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital. 

It is impossible this year to give the tables of operating 
cost and hospital receipts so that they would be of value in 
comparing them with former years. It has seemed wise 
to adopt a new system of accounting. This is necessary 
because of adding to the hospital the new departments of 
the Private Ward and the Consultation Clinic. In our ac- 
counting it has now seemed best to separate the Out- 
Patient Department from the General Hospital and charge 
its supplies directly to it, as is now done with all the 
departments of the Institution. 

The year 1916 has shown a very large increase in the 
cost of labor and supplies. Every effort has been made to 
conduct the affairs of the Institution upon as economical 
a basis as is consistent with the great work done and the 
standard which we have always had. Although the re- 
ceipts at the hospitals have been greater than ever before, 
nevertheless the expenditures are unprecedented. 

74 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Table showing the increase in cost of certain staples. 











Percentage 




1915 


1916 


Increase 


of Increase 


Beef 


. $ .12 1b. 


$ .13 lb. 


$ .01 lb. 


9 


Dried Beef .... 


.26 " 


.31 " 


.05 " 


19 


Ham and Bacon . 


.14 " 


.19 " 


.05 " 


36 


Mutton and Lamb 


.10 " 


.12 " 


.02 " 


20 


Sausage 


.13 " 


.16 " 


.03 " 


23 


Butter 


.31 " 


.39 " 


.08 " 


26 


Eggs 


.31 doz. 


.40 doz. 


.09 doz. 


29 


Flour 


. 5.25 bbl. 


8.60 bbl. 


3.35 bbl. 


64 


Sugar 


.06 lb. 


.08 lb. 


.02 lb. 


331 


Potatoes 


.95 bu. 


1.75 bu. 


.80 bu. 


84 


Milk 


.07 qt. 


.08 qt. 


.01 qt. 


14 


Cream 


.38 '• 


.41 " 


.03 " 


8 


Bread 


.041 lb. 


.05 lb. 


.OOi lb. 


11 



Average increase 29-% 

There has been a marked increase in the cost of all medi- 
cal and surgical supplies. A few of the many items with 
the percentage of increase are shown in the following table : 











Percentage 




1915 


1916 


Increase 


of Increase 


Bromide Potass. . 


$ .80 lb. 


$1.36 lb. 


$ .56 lb. 


70 


Bromide Sodium . 


.45 " 


.80 " 


.34 " 


74 


Cream Tartar . . 


.24 " 


.44 " 


.20 " 


83 


Boric Acid .... 


.08 " 


.13^ " 


.051 " 


68 


Carbolic Acid . . 


.23 " 


.57 " 


.34 " 


147 


Turpentine . . . 


.44 gal. 


.611 gal. 


.171 gal. 


40 


Alcohol, taxed . . 


2.58 " 


2.72 " 


.14 " 


5 


Alcohol, untaxed . 


.40 " 


.56 " 


.16 " 


40 


Citric Acid , . . 


.55 lb. 


.66 lb. 


.11 lb. 


20 



Average increase 61-% 

Comparative prices of coal, month of December. 

Percentage 
1915 1916 Increase of Increase 

Soft Coal $4.65 ton $6.50 ton $1.85 ton 40— 

Screenings 3.25 " 4.00 " .75 " 23 + 



GENERAL HOSPITAL, BOSTON. 

BUILDING OPERATIONS. 

The main event of the year has been the opening of 
The Moseley Memorial Building. Pictures of the building 
and floor plans appear with this report. The different 
departments of the hospital which are housed here 

75 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

In February and March we began to use the new build- 
ing made by moving the Gardner Ward F back, raising it 
and building a new ward beneath it. The new ward has 
retained the name of the Warren Ward A which it re- 
places. This building accommodates twenty-five pa- 
tients in the Warren Ward and twenty-two patients in 
the Gardner Ward. Each ward has a spacious veranda, 
arranged so that the beds may be easily rolled upon it. 
The veranda of the Gardner W^ard is made from the roof 
of the long corridor wliich connects the lower wards. A 
picture of this veranda with patients upon it appears in 
this volume. 

Anew section of connecting corridor running from Wards 
A and F to the new Private Ward has been completed and 
put in use this year. It is an open corridor, making an 
excellent veranda for the use of the patients in the lower 
wards. The roof of the corridor is arranged to be acces- 
sible for the beds of patients on the second floor of the 
Private Ward. 

The Gate Lodge on Blossom Street which ceased to be 
used for the admitting of out-patients when the new 
Out-Patient Department was opened in 1903 has since 
that time been used as quarters by two Assistant Resident 
Physicians. These officers are now accommodated in 
The Moseley Memorial Building and the Lodge is being 
rearranged as a diet laboratory for nurse probationers. 
It will be ready for this use early in January, 1917. 

The Private Ward is still in the process of construction. 
We expect to open it in the year 1917. It is to be a one 
hundred bed, eight story building, fireproof and modern 
in all respects. 

NEEDS OF THE HOSPITAL. 

We are very grateful for the generosity of our bene- 
factors, but we still have many needs if we are to meet 
the demands made upon this great hospital today. 

77 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

ALTERATION OF THE BULFINCH BUILDING. 

The first floor of this building should be made fireproof 
and now is the time to do it while it stands empty. It is 
planned to use this floor for patients' beds in the west 
wing and a clinical laboratory in the east wing. Neither 
of these should be done until the floor has been made fire- 
proof. The sanitary tower which serves the medical wards 
was built in the year 1886 and has long been outgrown. 
It is now possible to construct an addition to this tower 
because of the fact that the driveway of the former en- 
trance to the hospital is no longer used. When these al- 
terations are made, elevators should be installed in the 
building so that the patients in their beds can be taken out 
in the open air. On these elevators beds can be brought 
down to the first fioor and wheeled out upon the beauti- 
ful sunny terrace in front of the Bulfinch Building. 

The room where was the Treadwell Library, in the cen- 
ter of the old building, should be made into a medical ward 
for children. 

A nurses' home. 

During the year it has been necessary to again use the 
two houses belonging to the hospital at Numbers 90 
and 92 Charles Street for the residence of nurses. We 
have been enlarging our staff of nurses in order to meet 
the demands of the Private Ward when it shall be fin- 
ished. Our school for nurses stands very high. It was 
never better than now. The young women of today who 
are thinking of entering the profession of nursing care- 
fully inquire, and in many instances visit the leading hos- 
pitals of the country, to see where it is best for them to 
be trained. We must keep our school to the front and 
we cannot do this unless we build in the immediate future 
another nurses' home. This building should be large 
enough to accommodate the increase which is now being 
made in the size of the school and constructed in such a 
way that we may add to it if we are able in the future to 

78 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

build a hospital for people of moderate means, a chil- 
dren's hospital, and possibly an obstetrical hospital. 
This new nm^ses' home should contain an infirmary for the 
nurses and a kitchen and dining room for all the nurses in 
the training school. Such a procedm-e would enable us to 
use our present dining facilities, so that we could give our 
male nurses a proper dining room, something which they 
have long needed. 

A COUNTRY BRANCH W^HERE WE CAN MOVE BED PATIENTS 
FOR CONVALESCENCE. 

The land for such an institution is now owned by the 
hospital and is reserved for this purpose. It is a beautiful 
situation upon a hill on the Concord Turnpike in Belmont, 
in the rear of the land at McLean Hospital. Such an in- 
stitution may be begun in a small way if it is wisely planned 
to allow for growth. 

A HOSPITAL FOR THE CARE OF PEOPLE OF MODERATE MEANS. 

This building should be erected in connection with the 
General Hospital for patients who should pay something 
to the physicians for their medical and surgical care, but 
who are unable to pay the full price for care in the new 
Private Ward which we are building. Such a hospital 
would meet a want which is greatly felt, as people of mod- 
erate means are getting today the least efficient care in 
case of sickness of any class in the community. This group 
of individuals must often be ill in their homes dependent 
upon physicians who cannot provide the necessary labora- 
tory tests and scientific examinations which are readily 
available in a general hospital. I would make an urgent 
appeal to the generosity of the community for a special, 
gift to erect and endow a building for this object. 

A children's hospital. 

A building for children should be erected in connection 
with the General Hospital. ^\Tiile it is proposed to make 

79 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

a medical ward for children where the Treadwell Library- 
has been, in the center of the Bulfinch Building, this is 
only a temporary measure and does not solve the problem. 
A children's hospital should be distinct from the buildings 
for adults, as the problem in the care of childi-en — the 
ease with which they contract contagious diseases — 
makes a special plan of construction necessary. 



In the autumn the hospital was confronted with the 
alternative of making extensive alterations in its power 
plant or discontinue making its own electricity. Careful 
analysis of the cost of our electric current and comparison 
with that of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of 
Boston revealed the fact that this company had reached 
a point in development which would enable it to sell us 
electricity a trifle cheaper than we could make it. There- 
fore it seemed advisable to enter into a contract with the 
Edison Company to furnish our current and this has been 
done. 

Upon moving into The Moseley Memorial Building, by 
authority of your Board, the visiting hour was changed 
from 2 to 3 p.m. to 1 to 2 p.m. It is thought that this is 
for the benefit of the patients, in that it gives an oppor- 
tunity for the physicians to study their cases for a longer 
period in the afternoon. 

CONSULTATION CLINIC. 

The Clinic has been in operation two afternoons a week 
since January 25, 1916. The out-patient building has 
been utilized for it. The Clinic is for people of moderate 
means, those to whom it would be a hardship to go to 
the offices of specialists. Our fee is $5.00, and we receive 
only such persons as are vouched for by their own physi- 
cians. Staff men from all departments of the hospital 
are present at this Chnic and the laboratories are at its 
disposal. The Clinic held 95 sessions and 1,486 
cases were recorded. The success has been most grati- 

80 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



fying. We have many letters from physicians stating the 
benefit which they and their patients have received. This 
Clinic does not treat the patient; it attempts to make a 
diagnosis in puzzling cases and to outline the treatment 
for the patient's own physician to carry out. A report of 
this Clinic in detail is made by the General Executive 
Committee. 



The Ether Day address was delivered by Dr. Haven 
Emerson, of New York City. The subject of his address 
was: ''Preparedness for Health." 

The following are comparative tables: 



No. Patients Ad- 


Total Patients' 


Average Stay 


No. Operat 


mitted TO Wards 


Days Treatment 


in Hospital 


House Ca 


1908 . . 5,362 


106,034 


20 — days 


3,634 


1909 


. 5,871 


105,295 


18— " 


3,841 


1910 


. 6,092 


105,617 


17+ " 


4,016 


1911 


. 6,495 


107,671 


17— " 


3,948 


1912 


. 6,629 


107,797 


16— " 


4,063 


1913 


. 6,251 


111,364 


18+ " 


3,887 


1914 


. 6,413 


116,164 


18+ '' 


3,993 


1915 


. 6,503 


113,941 


18— " 


4,046 


1916 


. 6,507 


111,875 


17+ - 


4,094 



Average Daily Daily Cost per Capita for Pro- 

Cost PER House Patient visions for all Persons Supported 

1911 $2.65+ $0.28 — 

1912 3.00+ 0.31 + 

1913 3.01+ 0.33 + 

1914 3.09+ 0.34 + 

1915 3.31+ 0.32 + 

1916 4.05+ 0.37 + 

Number Number Average 

Ambulance Trips op Miles Trips per Day 

1908 1,747 .... 5 — 

1909 1,539 5,442 4 + 

1910 1,639 5,615 4 + 

1911 1,513 4,452 4 + 

1912 1,477 4,870 4 + 

1913 1,576 4,796 4 + 

1914 1,378 4,888 3 + 

1915 1,502 4,182 4 + 

1916 1,413 5,032 4 — 

81 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Number of 

Patients Treated 

IN Emergency Ward 



1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 



5,313 
5,314 
5,590 
6,029 
5,501 
5,424 
5,278 
4,815 
5,123 



Average 
Daily Cost 
PER Patient 

$0.78 — 
0.83 — 
0.82 — 
0.72 — 
0.78 + 
0.86 + 
0.96 + 
1.03 + 
1.21 + 



Cost of Main- 
tenance OP 
Emergency Ward 

$4,141.03 
4,389.78 
4,555.97 
4,331.75 
4,343.15 
4,665.50 
5,090.52 
5,006.69 
6,210.98 



Total 
Receipts 

$518.23 

488.88 

571.80 

618.80 

770.17 

1,560.07 

1,867.38 

2,297.97 

2,91160 



Number of X-Ray Cases 
Out-Patient Department 

1908 2,902 

1909 3,323 

1910 3,414 

1911 4,138 

1912 4,587 

1913 6,286 

1914 7,951 

1915 7,618 

1916 10,616 



Number of X-Ray 

Cases in House 

1,353 
1,441 
1,363 
1,643 

1,987 
4,015 
5,985 
4,597 
4,986 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

The work in the Out-Patient Department has increased 
this year as usual. We have nearly reached the limit of 
our capacity without an addition to our building and con- 
siderable addition to our staff. 

The rooms devoted to the Children's Medical Depart- 
ment have been remodeled and rearranged, making them 
much more convenient for the work. 

The hospital is caring for a number of the unfortunate 
victims of the recent epidemic of infantile paralysis. At 
the end of the year there were about one hundred and 
fifteen children under our care; some for daily treatment, 
others for two or three times a week. Much painstaking 
work is required to restore to these patients as much of the 
function of the paralyzed parts as it is possible to give. 

The following table of statistics shows the work in the 



82 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



building : 



New Cases 

1904 25,082 

1905 21,874 

1906 20,010 

1907 20,358 

1908 20,729 

1909 21,518 

1910 22,302 

1911 22,232 

1912 22,639 

1913 24,887 

1914 24,957 

1915 29,213 

1916 31,061 



3e the opening 


of the new 




Total Number 


Total Number 


Prescriptions 


OF Visits 


Filled 


106,174 


53,321 


110,631 


49,793 


99,251 


43,063 


107,063 


43,764 


116,008 


46,390 


121,327 


48,250 


124,584 


48,676 


135,809 


49,858 


136,095 


48,270 


147,428 


51,798 


158,090 


62,112 


190,628 


73.914 


201,375 


79,736 



During the j^ear 1916 there were 2,788 operations under 
an anesthetic in the Out-Patient Department, of which 
number 589 were performed under a local and 2,199 under 
a general anesthesia. 

The following is a comparative financial table: 

Cost of Maintenance 
Out-Patient Department 



1908 






$50,902.61 


1909 






54,739.32 


1910 






56,383.06 


1911 






62,476.04 


1912 






62,704.66 


1913 






70,077.00 


1914 






74,710.04 


1915 






84,451.96 


1916 






103,233.15 



Average Daily 


Total 


Cost per Patient 


Receipts 


$0.44 — 


$39,955.80 


0.45 + 


42,636.05 


0.45 + 


44,296.92 


0.46 + 


46,643.45 


0.46 + 


47,607.00 


0.47 + 


53,453.20 


0.47 + 


58,668.95 


0.44 + 


73,521.99 


0.51 + 


88,256.24 



CEMENT SHOP. 

The cement shop has employed and consequently helped 
thirty-six handicapped men during the year. The shop 
employed from seven to twelve men during the Easter 
sale, which extended from April to September. At present 
it employs five men. It is our intention to keep a work- 
man in the shop for only one month; but in an exceptional 

83 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

case he may be employed for as long as three months. 
The object is to tide them over that period of depression 
and discouragement which comes to almost all recently 
injured men with dependents. WTiile with us they cease 
work early in the afternoon and are supposed to devote 
the remainder of the day in searching for permanent 
employment. The workshop has been moved to an old 
house at Number 21 North Grove Street, owned by the 
hospital. Although this building is only a makeshift, it 
has the advantage of sunshine and fresh air all day which 
the former room in the Out-Patient Department did not 
enjoy. 

ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Dr. Dodd's death, on December 18th, cast a gloom over 
the hospital. He had been intimately associated with us 
for many years. We greatly feel his loss. 

The rooms in the old Gay Ward building recently used 
by house surgeons, across the corridor from the present 
X-ray rooms, are being equipped for additional X-ray 
apparatus, and early in 1917 will be ready for the use of 
the department. 

Attention is invited to the detailed report of this de- 
partment, which is appended. 

NURSING DEPARTMENT. 

The school for nurses at the General Hospital has had 
a successful year. The numbers have been increased in 
preparation for the increased number of patients' beds 
which will be added to the Institution by the opening of 
the Private Ward and the utilization of the first floor of 
the Bulfinch Building. 

The hospital houses at Numbers 90 and 92 Charles 
Street are again in use as quarters for nurses. 

The following table is of interest in that it shows the 
decrease in the number of nurses leaving the school for 
any cause. It indicates that while the total number of 

84 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

our nurses has largely increased in the last seven years, 
the total number of probationary nurses admitted to the 
school has not increased in proportion. In other words, 
a more careful selection has been made and we have ac- 
cepted a type of woman who has been sufficiently satis- 
factory to be continued in training and graduated. This 
fact reflects credit upon our capable Superintendent of 
Nurses, Miss Sara E. Parsons. 

Probs. and 

Average Average Average Average Total Nurses 
No. OP No. OF No. OF Total Probs. Who Left 
Graduates Pupils Probs. During During 

Year Year 

1911 31 140 12 183 90 53 P. 

16 N. 

— 69 

1912 29 158 15 202 100 51 P. 

7N. 

— 58 

1913 29 167 28 224 97 30 P. 

8N. 

— 38 

1914 28 181 24 233 92 SOP. 

ION. 

— 40 

1915 29 179 33 241 90 24 P. 

6N. 

— 30 

1916 30 210 27 267 106 19 P. 

4N. 

— 23 

TREADWELL LIBRARY. 

The Library has been moved to its commodious quar- 
ters in The Moseley Memorial Building. The report of 
the Librarian appended gives the state of the Library in 
detail. 

The following table indicates the number of records 
copied or abstracted during recent years: 

Number of Records 
Copied or Abstracted 

1908 358 

1909 497 

1910 532 

1911 559 

1912 . . .^ 756 

85 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

1913 923 

1914 1,226 

1915 1,572 

1916 1,754 

McLEAN HOSPITAL, WAVERLEY. 

During the year the Arhngton House has been com- 
pleted and is now occupied by the patient and attendants 
for whom it was designed. This building is large and very 
attractively located with a fine outlook. 

Progress has been made toward the new nurses' home. 
Ground has been surveyed and the plans have been com- 
pleted, so that the work may begin at the earliest favor- 
able opportunity. This home will accommodate ninety 
nurses and enable them to be in attractive and restful 
surroundings when the day's w^ork is done. 

The greenhouse has been enlarged so that the supply 
of cut flowers and plants for the wards is now more ade- 
quately cared for. 

The Medical Superintendent's detailed statement ap- 
pears in Volume A of this report. 

The following are comparative tables: 

Number of Number op Patients' 

Patients Admitted Days Treatment 

1908 168 78,897 

1909 169 79,515 

1910 166 80,978 

1911 188 80,245 

1912 168 81,358 

1913 144 80,618 

1914 117 77,621 

1915 123 77,807 

1916 133 76,477 

Daily Cost per Capita 
Average Daily for Provisions for all 

Cost per Patient Persons Supported 

1911 $3.59+ $0,479 

1912 3.79+ 0.487 

1913 .3.90+ 0.511 

1914 4.07+ 0.517 

1915 4.22+ 0.516 

1916 ...... 4.75+ 0.615 

86 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL, WAVERLEY. 

There is nothing of special importance to which I 
would call attention here. This hospital does not provide 
for the bed treatment of patients. It cares only for those 
who can get up and dress themselves daily. In this way its 
possible service is very limited. It should sometime be 
replaced by a country branch, of the need of which I 
have spoken in the body of this report. 

The following are comparative tables: 

NujMber of Total Patiexts' 

Patients Admitted Days Treatment 

1908 508 10,106 

1909 636 11,428 

1910 638 11,331 

1911 647 11,336 

1912 678 10,785 

1913 733 10,260 

1914 681 10,226 

1915 719 10,061 

1916 649 9,185 

Daily Cost per Capita 
Average Daily for PRO^^SIONS for all 

Cost per Patient Persons Supported 

1911 $1.23 $0.34 + 

1912 1.21 0.40 + 

1913 1.51 0.40 + 

1914 1.36 0.38 + 

1915 1.43+ 0.37 + 

1916 1.73+ 0.35 + 



I would invite attention to the tables of statistics and to 
the interesting and valuable appended reports. 

The thanks of the hospital are due to many friends. 
The ladies on the different committees have given devoted 
service. I would particularly invite attention of the 
Board of Trustees to the very considerable amount of vol- 
untary service given to the hospital by young ladies as 
clinic secretaries, social workers, and in other positions. 
There has been a marked increase of this gratuitous service 
in the last few years and it has been of great value to the 
hospital. 

87 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

I would call attention of your Board to the faithful 
service given to the hospital by its officers, physicians of 
the staff, house pupils, nurses and employees. 

I have the honor to thank your Board for the courtesy 
shown to me. 

Very respectfully yours, 

Frederic A. Washburn, 

Administrator. 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 




X. " 
H lot- 



OS tap, 



O <l> 
(U o 

mm 



60 



•H« 



89 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



.2 *« 

(DOS 
IH d h 

o cs o 
HPQH 




90 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 




►^ ^1 ,ii ■-- 



91 



DALTON SCHOLARSHIPS. 



The income of this fund, amounting to $1,000 annu- 
ally, is devoted to investigation in the science of medi- 
cine. The rules of the Trustees applicable to it are as 
follows : 

Article 1. Candidates shall be nominated to the Board 
of Trustees by the General Executive Committee with their 
recommendations. They shall be either internes of the Gen- 
eral Hospital or male graduates of a regular American Medi- 
cal College. 

Article 2. The nature of the work in medical investiga- 
tion proposed to be prosecuted by each candidate shall be 
designated by the candidate. 

Article 3. The Scholarship year shall begin September 15th. 
Scholars shall work not less than ten hours per week, from 
the last Wednesday in September to the last Wednesday in 
June; and if a scholar performs a part only of this prescribed 
work, he shall be entitled to a proportionate part only of the 
income. 

Article 4. The results of work of scholars shall appertain 
to the Hospital, and when made public the name of the scholar 
shall accompany the publication, but no publication shall be 
made unless approved by the General Executive Committee. 

Article 5. When the income is insufficient, appointments 
for the year may be omitted. 

Article 6. Any income not used shall be cumulative and 
not added to the principal. 

Article 7. Scholars shall be eligible for renomination and 
reappointment. 

Further information may be had by applying to 
the Resident Physician of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital. 



92 




(/I 

H 

m 

H 

< 

Q 
< 

Pi 

o 

o 
o 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



GENERAL HOSPITAL. 
Table No. 1. 

comparative statement of statistics. 

Hospital Wards and Single Rooms. 

1916 1915 

Patients in Hospital January 1st : 

Medical 112 115 

Surgical 169 211 



Total 281 326 

Patients admitted during year : 

Medical 2,562 2,678 

Surgical > 3,945 3,825 

Total 6,507 6,503 

Total patients treated in Hospital wards 
and single rooms during year : 

Medical 2,674 2,793 

Surgical 4,114 4,036 

Total 6,788 6,829 

Patients discharged during year: 

Well 

Relieved 

Not relieved 

Against advice 

Died 

Not treated . 

Total 6,465 6,548 

Patients in Hospital end of year : 

Medical 120 112 

Surgical 203 169 



12 


104 


5,436 


5,291 


377 


521 


44 


59 


409 


405 


187 


168 



Total 323 281 

93 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

1916 1915 

Total patients' days treatment: 

Free patients 40,941 36,279 

Pay patients 34,171 77,662 

Patients paying something 36,763 

Total 111,875 113,941 



Percentage : 

Free days 37 — 32 — 

Paydays 30+ 68+ 

Paying something 33 — 

Total . 100 100 

Average patients per day: 

Free 112— 99+ 

Pay 93+ 213— 

Paying something 100+ 

Total 305+ 312+ 

Average time per patient in Hospital . . 17+ days 18 — days 

Average daily cost per patient $4.05+ $3.31+ 

Daily cost 'per capita for provisions for all 

persons supported .37+ .32+ 

Paying patients were admitted at the following rates per 
week: 50 at $35.00; 180 at $28.00; 3 at $23.35; 24 at $18.66; 
1,710 at $15.00; 16 at $13.00; 12 at $10.00; 450 at $10.50; 1 
at $8.00; 2 at $7.50; 920 at $7.00; 90 at $5.00; 138 at $3.50; 
4 at $3.00. Some of these patients entered at the rates were 
afterward made free. 

There were 5,123 patients treated in the Emergency Ward. 
Of this number 1,351 were retained in the Hospital. 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Number of cases treated (new cases) . 

Americans 

Foreigners 

Residents of Boston 

Residents of other places 

Medical Department 

Surgical Department 

Department for Diseases of the Skin . 

94 



1916 


1915 


31,061 


29,213 


15,672 


14,656 


15,389 


14,557 


13,498 


12,424 


17,563 


16,789 


8,083 


7,416 


7,691 


7,128 


2,269 


2,367 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

1916 1915 

Department for Diseases of the Nerv- 
ous System 1,192 954 

Department for Diseases of the Throat 3,322 3,199 

Children's Medical Department . . . 2,387 2,294 

Orthopedic Department 2,515 2,819 

Genito-Urinary Department .... 1,466 1,279 

Department of Syphihs 1,458 1,216 

Dental Department 678 521 

Total number of visits from patients . 201,375 190,628 

Average daily attendance 662+ 627+ 

Total number of prescriptions filled . 79,736 73,914 
Number of visits to Hydrotherapeutic 

Room 2,812 3,804 

Number of visits to Medico-Mechani- 

calRoom 21,109 20,605 

Number of apphcants 33,307 30,304 

Number admitted 31,052 29,213 

Referred to other institutions .... 1,425 751 

Referred to Consultation Clinic ... 6 .... 

Number refused 824 340 

Cost of maintenance of Out-Patient 

Department $103,233.15 $84,451.96 

Daily average cost per Out-Patient . .51 -f- .44-1- 

AMBULANCE. 

1916 1915 

Ambulance calls during year .... 1,413 1,502 

Average calls per day 4 — 4+ 



EMERGENCY WARD. 

Visits made to Emergency Ward dur- 
ing year 

Average visits made per daj^ .... 

Cost of maintenance of Emergency 
Ward 

Daily average cost per Emergency 
Ward patient 

X-RAY. 

Number of X-ray cases taken in the 
Out-Patient Department .... 

Number of X-ray cases taken in the 
house 

Fluoroscopic examinations 

95 



1916 1915 



5,123 
14— 


4,815 
13+ 


1,210.98 


$5,006.69 


1.21+ 


1.03+ 


1916 


1915 


10,616 


7,618 


4,986 
4,689 


4,597 
3,997 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Table No. 2. 
residences. 

Boston 1,227 

Massachusetts (except Boston) 4,960 

Maine 68 

New Hampshire and Vermont 178 

Rhode Island and Connecticut 31 

Other States 29 

British Provinces 14 

Total 6,507 

Table No. 3. 
birthplaces. 

Boston 444 

Massachusetts (except Boston) 1,922 

Maine 277 

New Hampshire and Vermont 298 

Rhode Island and Connecticut 83 

New York 116 

Southern and Western States 220 

Other States • • • H 

Total in United States 3,371 

British Provinces 614 

Great Britain 372 

Ireland ; 537 

Norway and Sweden 188 

Italy 399 

Russia and Poland 567 

Germany 60 

France 19 

Other places 380 

Total Foreigners 3,136 

BIRTHPLACE OF MOTHER. 

Boston 182 

Massachusetts 965 

Maine 304 

New Hampshire and Vermont 271 

Rhode Island and Connecticut 43 

Carried forward 1,765 

96 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Brought forward 1,765 

New York 112 

Southern and Western States 187 

Other States 11 

Total in United States 2,075 

Great Britain 417 

British Provinces 947 

Ireland 1,026 

Norway and Sweden 226 

Germany 117 

Italy 506 

Russia and Poland 712 

France 22 

Other foreigners 459 

Total Foreigners 4,432 



, Table No. 4. 
OCCUPATIONS. 
Male. 



Amviunition Factory 

Rifle cleaner 

Shellmaker 

Apartment House 
Janitor 



Asbestos Works 
Asbestos worker . . . 

Automohile Co. 
Auto adjuster . . . . 

Bookkeeper 

Chauffeur 

Painter 

Repairers 

Wheelmakers . . . . 



Automobile Garage 
Night watchman . . . 
Washers 



Building and Contracting Co. 

Bricklayers 4 

Cement workers . . . 

Lathers 

Plasterers 

Stone masons .... 
Stone layer 



1 Bobbin Factory 

General work .... 
Night watchman . . . 



Bakery 



Cooks 
Clerk . . 
Helper . 
Manager 
Packer . 



Barber Shop 



2 Barbers 
97 



17 
1 
1 
1 
1 



47 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Barroom 



Clerks 



Blacksmith Shop 

Forgemen 

Helper 



Bleachery 



Casket Co. 

4 Embalmer 1 

Lumper 1 

Undertaker 1 

17 
1 Chemical Works 

Acid maker 1 

Yard man 1 



Bleachers 



Blind Shop 
Mopmaker .... 
Woodworker . . . 



Bootblack 



Bootblacks 



Bowling Alley 
Pin setters 



Box Factory 

Nailer 

Shippers 

Braid Manufacturing Co. 
Trimmer 



Broom Factory 
Broom makers . . . , 



Building 
Contractor . . . 

Driller 

Elevator men . . 
Interior finisher . 
Laborers .... 

Porter 

Riggers 

Ironworker . . . 
Stone masons . . 
Watchman . . . 



Butter and Egg Store 



Clerk 



Book Bindery 
Stock cutter .... 
Shipper 



Confectionery Co. 
Shipping clerks 2 

Cemetery 
Teamsters 10 

Clothing Store 

Proprietor 

Salesman 



Club 



1 Clerk . 

2 Waiter 



Cabinet Maker 

1 Cabinet maker . . . . 

Chair maker 



3 Candy Factory 

Dippers 3 

Makers 5 

1 Receiving clerks .... 4 
1 

2 Carpenter Shop 

^ Carpenters 135 

^ Carpenter's helpers ... 2 

2 

^ Carpet Factory 

2 Weavers 2 

Cartage Co. 
Yarn weigher 1 

1 

Cartridge Co. 

Ammunition maker ... 1 

1 Laborer 1 

1 Shell inspector 1 

98 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Cigar Factory Dye House 

Makers 10 Mixer 

Packer 1 

Shippers 2 Delicatessen Store 

Cook 

Cigar Store 

Clerks 3 Dealers 

Dry goods 

Clock Co. Fruit 



Polishers 



Clothing Store 



Cutter 



Coal Heaver 
Coal heaver .... 



Cotton Mill 



Braider ... 
Bookkeeper . 
Bleacher . . 
Cotton graders 
Checker . , , 
Carder . . . 
Dyer .... 
Framers . . 
Helper . . . 
Knitter . . . 
Laborers . . 
Lapper . . . 
Loom repairers 
Piecework . . 
Roper . . . 
Shipper . . . 
Spinners , . 
Starcher . . 
Sweepers . . 
Trimmer . . 
Watchman . 
Weavers . . 



1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
5 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
7 
1 
2 
1 
1 
12 



Custom House 



Officers 11 



Comh Factory 



Rubber 



Junk 



Department Store 

Collectors 

Errand boys .... 
Elevator men .... 

Floorman 

Mail order clerk . . . 

Manager 

Porter 

Salesmen 

Stock clerk 

Teamster 



Drug Store 

Clerk 

Pharmacists .... 
Assistant pharmacist 

Engraving Co. 
Plate printer . . . 



5 
25 
10 



2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
20 
1 
1 



Electrotyper 
Electrotyper .... 



Electrician 
Electricians . . . . 



Electric Co. 

Clerk 

Timekeeper . . . . 
Receiving clerk . . 
Wireman 



Engineer 
Electrical engineers 
Marine engineers 
Mechanical engineer 
Stationary engineers 



99 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Electric Supply Co. 

Cutter 1 

Clerk 1 

Repairmen 3 Ferry Boat 

Tappers 6 Manager 1 



Furnace Co. 
Furnace setter . . . 



Express Co. 

Chauffeurs 2 

Expressmen 25 

Manager 1 



Frame Factory 



Bronzer 



Florist 



Estate 



Caretakers 



Electric Light Plant 
Manager 

Food Products 

Peddler 

Salesman 



Teamsters .... 

Granite Shed 
Chainer 



Grain Store 



Furniture Co. 

Dealer 

Finishers 

Foreman 

Movers 

Salesman 



Fish Market 

Clerks 

Fish cutters .... 
Shipper 



Laborers 

Gum Shop 
Machine operator . 

Gas Light Co. 

Foreman 

Meter tester .... 



Glass Factory 
Glass beveler . . . 



Granite Foundry 



Cutters 



Farm 
Farmers . . . . 
Farm laborers . 



Flower 



Grocery Store 

Clerks 10 

99 Managers 5 

9 Salesman 1 

Hardware Business 



Gardeners 18 Manager 1 

Fishermen Hotel 

Deep sea fishermen . . 14 Butcher 1 

Fishermen^ 16 Bellboys ....... 2 

• • 1 Cashier 1 

Busboy 1 

Bartenders 2 

Shaver 1 Clerks 2 

100 



Lobster fisherman 
Felt Co 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Phy 

Hotel (.continued) 

Cooks 7 

Firemen 4 

Houseman 1 

Kitchenman 1 

Messenger 1 

Porters 2 

Waiters 35 

Hospital 

Attendants 3 

Cleaners 26 

Chauffeurs 10 

Gardener 1 

House officers .... 

Kitchenmen 

LaundrjTnen .... 

Messenger 

Orderlies 18 

Waiters 4 



House 

Butlers 

Cleaners . . . . 
General man . . 
Janitors . . . . 
Paper hangers 
Painters . . . . 



3 
1 

18 
6 

69 



Ink Co. 



Shippers 3 

Installment House 
Collector 1 



Iron Pipe Co. 
Night watchman . . 

Insurance Co. 

Agent 

Clerk 

Inspectors .... 



Ice Co. 
Eill collector . . . 

Laborer 

Truckman .... 
Teamster . . . . 



Iron Foundry 
Brass moulders . . 

Driller 

Decorator 

^Moulders 

Machinists .... 
Machinist helpers . 
Metal moulder . . . 

Shipper 

Scrap-iron worker . 
Truckman 



Jewelry Shop 

Clerk 

Pohsher 

Stamper 

Watchmakers . . . 



3 
1 
1 
10 
94 
5 
1 
1 
6 
1 



Lumber Yard 
Team loader .... 



Lodging House 
Lodging-house manager 



Laundry 



^Manager . 
Shirt ironer 



Liquor House 

Dealer 

Shipper 

Laboratory 
Assistant chemist 

Laborers 

Building 

Ice plant 

General 

Street pa^dng . . . 

Subway 

Water department . 
Wharf 



14 
7 

86 

202 

9 

3 

19 



Law Office 
Office boYS . . . . 



Longshoremen 
Longshoremen . . . 



10 



101 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Log Camp 
Woodsmen 



Leather Factory 

Finishers 

Machine hands . . . 

Salesmen 

Sorters 



Milk Co. 

Managers 4 

Shippers 2 

Teamsters 3 



Machine Shop 
Lathe hands . . . . 

Laborers 

Machinists .... 
Machinist helpers . 

Polisher 

Repairmen .... 

Shipper 

Truckman .... 



5 

4 
28 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 



Mop Factory 
Mopmaker .... 



Market 



Grocers . 
Gardeners 
Porters . 



Meat Store 

Butchers 

Ham boner . . . . 

Manager 

Meat cutters . . . . 
Salesman 



Marhle Yard 
Polisher 

Military Archives 
Custodian 



Morocco Shop 
Skin hanger .... 



Tree setters 



Nursery 



None 
None 504 



Clerk . 
Editor 
Printer 
Paper boy 



Newspaper 



Reporters 2 

Office 

Bookkeepers 10 

Clerks o 

Watchmen 2 



Oil Business 



Teamster 



Optical Co. 

Optometrist 

Finisher 



Professional 

Attorney 

Artists 

Actor ....... 

Accountant .... 

Architect 

Baseball player . . 
Cashier (Sec. of State) 
Clergymen .... 
Civil engineers . . 
Draftsmen .... 

Dentists 

Dancing teachers 
Hebrew teacher . . 

Lawyers 

Landscape gardeners 

Musicians 

Physicians .... 
Treasurer (town) 
Teachers (school) . 
Veterinary surgeons 
Writers 



3 
2 
1 
5 
4 
4 
59 
1 
2 
5 
2 



Pawn Shop 

1 Pawnbroker .... 

Photograph Co. 

2 Canvasser 

102 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Pork Factory 
Ham skinners .... 



Painters 



Paint Shop 



Piano Factory 

Cleaner 

Jobber 

Mover 

Piano tuners ... 
Regulator , 



Paper Mill 

Beaders 

Delivery man . . . 

Finishers 

Glazer 

General work . . . 
Machinehands . . . 
Paper finishers . . . 

Shippers 

Truckman 



Peddlers 

Coal 

Card 

Dry goods .... 
General produce . 

Jewelry 

Kitchenware . . 
Umbrella .... 



Print JVorks 
Bookbinders . . . 
Press feeders , . . 

Printers 

Starcher 



Paper Box Factory 

Bundle boy 

Makers 

Night watchmen . . . , 
Press feeders .... 
Stayers 



3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
11 
2 
1 



Post Office 
Clerks ...... 

Letter carriers . . . 



Pool Room 



2 Manager 



Private Family 

Coachmen 

Chauffeurs 



Plumbers 

Plumbers 

Plumber's assistants 

Public Works 
Assessor's clerk 
Firemen .... 
Garbage collectors 
Revenue officer 
Instructors . . . 
Meter inspector . 
Police ofiicers . . 
Sergeant instructors 
Superintendents . 
Street foreman . . 



Quarrymen 
Quarryman . . . . 
Stonecutters . . . 



Roundhouse 



Worker 



Reformatory 

Farmer 

Watchman .... 



Raincoat Factory 
Stitcher 



Restaurant 

Chefs 

Cashier 

Dishwasher . . . . 
Kitchen work . . . 

Porter 

Waiter 



2 Radiator Factory 

4 Clerk 

103 



2 

14 



13 
3 



1 
12 
4 
1 
2 
1 
26 
2 
3 
1 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



Rattan Factory 
Chairniaker 



Roofer 



Roofer 



Rubber Factory 



Belt maker .... 

Cutter 

Hosemalcer .... 
Heelmaker .... 

Laborer 

Mixers 

Machinists .... 

Refiner 

Stamper 

Solers 

Shipper 

Stationary firemen . 
Tubeworker .... 
Travehng salesman . 
Weigher 



Real Estate 



Agents 

Brokers 

Dealers 



Peddlers 

Sorter 



Rag Shop 



Suspender Factory 

Finisher 

Weaver 



Soap Factory 



Laborer 

Structural Works 
Laborer 



Silver Shop 
Silversmith .... 



Stable 



Horse feeder 
Hostlers 



Stationenj Co. 
Salesman 



Shoe Store 
Credit man . . . . 
Salesmen 



Shoe Factory 

Buffer 1 

Breasters 3 

Bottom finisher .... 1 

Cutters 27 



Clerk 

Cleaner 

Elevator man . . 
Edge trimmers 
Edge setter . . . 
Fireman .... 

Finisher 

Goodyear operators 

Heeler 

Heel scourer . . . 
Heelmaker .... 

Ironers 

Indenting 



. 1 

1 

1 

. 5 

1 

1 

1 

. 8 

. 1 

1 

1 

. 6 

1 

Lasters 14 

Laborers 5 

Machinist 1 

Moulder 1 

Manager 1 

Presser 1 

Puller over 1 

Peggers 6 

Packers 2 

Repairer 1 

Shippers 5 

Sole cutter 1 

Sweeper 1 

Stitchers 22 

Stamper 1 

Sorters 3 

Stock boy 1 

Sewing-machine operators 3 

Solers 12 

Trimmers 5 

Turners 5 

Traveling salesmen ... 2 
Vampers 5 



104 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Sheet Metal Co. Suits, Cloaks, etc. (continued) 

Cutter 1 Tailors 45 

General work 2 Traveling salesman ... 1 

Religious and Charity Workers Scale Factory 

Social reformer .... 1 Scale repairer 1 



Sash and Blind Manufacturers Slate Co. 

Proprietor 1 Milhwght ...... 1 



Steam Fitter 
Master steam fitter . 
Steam fitters . . . 



Shoe Shop 



Cobblers 10 

Sewing Machine Co. 
Salesmen 2 



Sawmill 

Laborer 

Lumber grader . . . 
SaAv^^ers 



School and College 
Students 



Steamship Co. 

Clerk 

Manager 

Reamer 

Watchman .... 



Shipyard 

Boat tier 

Calker 

Decorator 

Ironworkers . . 
Machine hand . . . 
Truckman . . . . , 



Silver Novelties 

Bobber 

Silversmiths 



Suits, Cloaks, etc. 



338 



Cutter 
Presser 



Stove Factory 

Polisher 1 

Steam Railroad 

Air iDrake inspectors . . 2 

Brakemen 44 

Baggagemen 3 

Coal shoveler 1 

Crossing tender .... 1 

Conductors 19 

Clerks 3 

Chauffeur 1 

Car cleaners 5 

Cableman 1 

Engineers 10 

Engine cleaner 1 

Freight handlers .... 18 

Freight brakemen ... 12 

Firemen 9 

Foremen 2 

Iron separator 1 

Lineman 1 

Laborers H 

Oil room man 1 

Pullman porters .... 5 

Painters 2 

Receiving clerk .... 1 

Section hands 5 

.... 1 

.... 1 

.... 1 

.... 1 

.... 1 



Switchman 

Shipper 

Switch fitter 

Train master .... 
Transferman .... 

Watchmen 4 

Yard masters 5 



Street Railroad 

1 Conductors 

1 Foremen 

105 



12 
2 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Street Railroad (continued) Tannery (continued) 

Inspectors 3 Skin seasoner 

Motormen 14 Tanners 

Night watchman .... 1 Teamster 

Stsam Gauge and Valve Co. 
Foreman 



Steel Yard 

Shipper 

Yard man .... 



Pressers 



Tailor Shop 



Telephone Co. 

Installers 

Labelers 



Bottler 



Tonic Factory 



Cutter 
Solderer 



Tin Factory 



Tug Boat Co. 



Fireman 

Telegraph Co. 
Messengers 5 



Maker 



Tool Factory 



Teamsters 



Teamsters 



80 



Tinsmiths 



Tinsmiths 



Tannery 
Barkman .... 
Embosser .... 
Elevator boy . . 
Hide sorters . . 
Hide handlers . . 
Hide shavers . . 
Laborers .... 



Tobacco House 

Shipper 

Salesman 



Upholsterer 
Upholsterers . . . 



Machinist 
Mariners 
Sailors . 



U. S. Navy 



Major 



U. S: Army 



Vacuum Cleaner Co. 
General work 



Wheel Factory 
General work ... 



Water Pail Factory 

General work 

Turner 



Wholesale Beef Co. 
Watchman 



Warehouse 
Freight handler .... 

Wholesale Paper Co. 
Salesman 

Woolen and Worsted Mill 
Cloth measurer .... 

Carders 

Comber 

Finisher 

Inspectors 4 

Knitter 

Laborers 

Manufacturers .... 
Stitcher 



106 



P-epoi J the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



W'Wlen and Worsted Mill 
(continued) 

Spooler 1 

Spinners 5 

Sorter 

Shearer 

Salesman 

Shipper 

Truckman 

Waste picker 



Wool washer 1 

Weavers 25 

Wool scourer 1 

Weighers 2 



Watch Factory 

Finisher 

Inspector 

Watchmaker , . . , 



Female. 



Apron Factory 
Forewoman 



Stitcher 



Matron 



Bleachery 



Box Factory 
Bench hand .... 
Cover maker . . . 

Inspector 

Stainer 



Book Bindery 
Gold layers 



I Stitcher 



Bath House 



Cleaner 



Building 



Brush Factory 
Bristle puller ... 



Labeler 



Chemical Co. 



Court House 



Stitcher 



Curtain Factory 



Carpet Factory 



Candy Factory 



I Boxer 
Dippers 
Labelers 

I Packer 



Clothing Factory 
Stitchers 



Convent 



Cook 



1 

I Cotton Mill 

1 Burlers 

Cloth inspector . . 
Forewoman .... 

2 Mender 

Tacker 

Spoolers 

1 Twister ....... 

Weavers 

Winder 

I Warpers 



Coat Factory 



I Finisher 1 



Copyist 1 Stitcher 



1 Clerk 

5 Cooks 
107 



Cap Factory 



Drug Store 



Delicatessen 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Pliysician. 

Department Store 

Buj^er 1 

Bundle girls 2 

Checking clerk .... 1 

Clerks 5 

Examiner 1 

Fitter 1 

Saleswomen 20 



Electric Co. 
Bench worker . . . 
Winder 



Fruit Store 
Saleswoman . . . . 



Clerk 



Grocery Store 



Hotel 

Cashier 

Chambermaids 

Clerk 

Dishwiper . . . . 
Housekeeper . . . 
Linen-room girl . 

Maids 

Waitresses . . . 



Hairdressing Parlor 
Hairdresser 1 

Home 
Home 32 

House 
Housewives 1,414 



Hospital 
Attendants . . . 

Clerks 

Matrons .... 

Maids 

Nurses 

Medical gymnast 
Serving-room maid 
Seamstresses . . . 
Superintendents . . 



5 
2 
4 
15 
122 
1 
1 
3 
2 



Hospital (continued) 
Superintendent nurse . . 
Waitresses 

Hardware Factory 
Bill clerk 



Hosiery Mill 
Inspectors 2 

Insurance Office 

Office clerk 1 

Stenographers 4 



Jewelry Factory 

Clerk 

Order clerks 

Packer 

Purse maker 



1 Stenographers 3 



Lodging House 
Lodging-house keeper 

Lunch Room 
Kitchen maids . . . 

Library 
Assistant librarian . . 



Law Office 



Secretary 



Lithograph Co. 
Envelope inspector . . 

Leather Factory 
Sole worker 



Laundry 

Folder 1 

Forewoman ...... 1 

Ironers 2 

Laundresses 14 

Marker 1 

Mangier ....... 1 

Seamstress 1 



108 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Medical Gymnasium Paper Cup Factory 
Teacher 1 Paraffiners 



Merchandise Prison 
Examiners 5 Officer 



Millinery Store Po^V^r Mill 

Milliners . 2 Pl^^^r 

Saleswoman 1 -tracker 



Necktie Factory ^''P'' ^^^ ^«^^^^^ 

rp^j-j^gj. 1 Machme operator . . 

^one Plumbing Co. 

None 386 Bookkeeper 



Overall Factory 
Stretcher 



1 



Office 

Bookkeepers 11 

Cashiers 3 

Clerical work 10 

Stenographers 9 

Professional 

Circus rider 1 

Masseuse 1 

Nurses (graduate) ... 9 

Physicians 3 

. . 3 

. . 1 

, . . 1 

... 2 

. . 5 

... 1 



Printing Press 
Feeders 

Public Library 
Proofreader 



Peddler 



Dry goods 



Piano teachers 
Psychologist . . 
Singer . . . . 
Sewing teachers 
School teachers 
Viohn teacher . 



Restaurant 

Cashier 1 

Kitchen work 1 

Manager 1 

Pastry cooks 2 

Waitresses 22 

Religious and Charity Worker 
Collector (Salvation Army) 1 
Sister of Charity .... 1 
Settlement workers . . 3 



Private Family 

Children's nurses ... 3 

Cooks 33 

Day work 2 

Governesses 3 

Graduate nurses .... 2 

General housework . . . 255 

Housekeepers ..... 44 

Maids 5 

Seamstresses 12 



Rubber Factory 

Cementers 

Loom operator . . . . 

Office clerk 

Quarter maker . . . . 

Stitcher 

Stamper 

Stenographers . . . . 
Tube packer . . . . 



Wrapper 



Soap Factory 



109 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

Sardine Factory 
Packer 



Silk Factory 



Inspector 
Stock girl 



Suit Factory 

Finishers 

Stitcher 

Tailoresses .... 



Shoe Factory 
Bottom finisher 
Benchworker 
Cementing soles 
Closers . . 
Dressing . 
Finisher . . 
Hand sewers 
Heel maker 
Liner . . 
Lacers . 
Stitchers 
Sorters , 
Tacker 
Tip repairer 
Typewriters 
Vampers . 



School and College 
Students 



1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
4 
15 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 



221 



Tailor Shop 



Theater 



1 Mat. jns 



Tobacco Factory 



Stripper 



Telephone Co. 
2 Operators 

4 Undertaker 
Embalmer 



Underwear Factory 

Stitchers 

Trimmer 



Watch Factory 

Assembler 

Bookkeeper , . . . , 
Clerical work . . . , 
Timer , 



Cleaner 



Woolen Mill 

Burlers 

Mender 

Machine operator . 

Quiller 

Spinners 

Specker 

Spooler 

Stenographers . . . 

Twister 

Weavers 



110 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 







U5 1-H .-1 CO GO t^ •* O) lO 00 O 00 U5 

t^ ma CD o c<) CO o Oi oi o 0^ t>- 

; ; ; ; ; ^_cq(NO_o_TOiooqOT)<_cqoco 

I I I ! ! ; 1 ; ! ; ; ! i ; ; ; ; ; ;ooort-^cDrJ-*ioot-rc<jo>-< 

•. .O—iOO— iC^OqcOMTfiOOO 

rH,-l r-l 1-1 i-Hi-l >-l i-H i-Hi-H i-H <N 


•Rjuai^Bj-^no 


'°"'ri?'^'''o>oot^ocor--Hi-icomiN.c<iioorfoooo5(»iNoq»t^i^c<o-H 

'-i(MOOh-CO-+r-i.-i(MOO"*iOOO-*OTt>COOO(Nt~.-iioC<l"OrocOCOiO-Hto 

Oas05^0iiOCCt^i003T-<X^t>.OOOOCCOOOOCOt^LOCO'M00005'MO 

rtrt,-irH(N(NC<liMC<IOJ(MC<l(N<MC<3C0Cq(MC^IN!NlN<NiMCqcqClNNN(NM 




CO— lOOO— li/5<»t>.!DlCt»eOC<500^05-<i'050t^OO«Ot>>nO)OSCOOOC<5-H 
■*l>oOr300lOOt^OOOrt(N'*iQt^001'^T)'(NiO(MOOMO)OOC005iO(MU5 


•83BI9AV 


«>ro»nroi^oooo— imMi-'3i^iOMi-ii-iu;-*-<tot^M05'HC005>n-*iooo(Nu5 
oi>ooo50occo--o<Nooioo«Mn>nt-.t^t>t^t~05ooa)o)SoSr-5o 

«rtrt,_,Cv)rt(NlN(N(NINCq<NNNIN(N(N(NCq<NN<Ne!llN?iN^MC0COCO 


•IB:jOi %SB9-J 


t^C0OaDO00iO-^l0(NC0OMIM50U5l>t^rfr-<0ffl(NCq-iSvlCO-HOt^'* 




•inox !^e^!^B^JO 


000-i'-(N(NCT3-<0)CO«nninOOOOOOOOOOOOOO<Nrt.^cqSc<IM'5<0 


•pawttnpv l^iox 
no eS^^uaoiad; 


iO-*OOe«3C«5tOCOtD-*t>COI^-HOaitOO(N— liO'-iCOiOOCOO'-lOOOOOO 
(N-*t^iOCC^C<30500T-iOC<3lOO^<NO>C=OOOOiOOa;MCCOOOOC^C<I 


(»t»ooooooooooooaici0500Mooooosost»oooooaioooor»t>t»t»ffltooffl 


•Bn^'Baa 


(N(MlOt^lOOOOCOOOCi'*-<J<^Ot»05!0-H0001^05-nn-HOi-'5 000iOlOa> 
ffiOTt-t^OOt^cOC-.C^IMTjicCtDMO-^OSi-iMOmoor-CCLOiOI^t^C^KNOO 


3 «? 

"oH 


•aai_j 


•*COC<5i-i00500i?OCTiOr^t-OO^COt^0005C<5MOOO>OOmiOiOOJ®05(N»H 

•<i<oo(NcortrHT;-a>Tcooowoo-HoococQOO)«>rtO(>iO(Nooot~>-^c»-*io 

OCQint~Ot^t-t-0500!D(M0500'-iiOMCO-*(N05-*«nm!OOt~-HT)-Oi-l 


JO ubj: 
pxBog 

•pxBog 


tDTjiLOTjfTf-fNTii^ct^oooiNincorooointMoioooo-^ot^roiro-^oco' 


C<5'a<-*lOiOlO-*iO<0«OOrt<NOCCOiO-*LOt~000---HOCOCOC<lt>OtONr}( 
i-li-(i-li-li-(>-li-li-Hi-(i-li-(KlC<)— l!NCq(NNC^(M<N(N 


JO ^XBj[ SuiXbj 


tOT)<^OT(<■*■*C<I■*(M(NOOOlM^<:lC0^300^nC<^^-OlOlOOOT)^0^--^0 0-^00 


•attnx 9^% 




•98IJ 


0-<i(Oai>n5DOlMOOCOM«)i-lTi<(N>005l*IN^COO>Ot^OCO-*OTjl(N'*r- 
^(N-1(r)<IMT}-O^OOOiOO'S<iO-(00-*lMC<Hnt^inoO-^OOC<IWt--Hu:)(MTj( 

03r-cc<3inooioinoivOu;i-'oooooC'0!M(N(M(Nooo<MT)Hc<5moo-*o<N-*o 

rt(N(N(N(N(NCIC<l(N<NlMC<3N(MiM(NCOMroMC<3(NCO«IMC<5MCOCOC<DC<5CO 


•pannnpv I^^ox 


(NiM(NC<3iMCOCOC<5c<3COCC-«'-<l'-a<-*-*iC'a"0'OiOiOi.-5iOiOtt5tOOOOOO 




•«8A 


intDt^oooio— (<NM^iOffli>ooe50-Hc<ico^oor~ooc50'HoqMTjiioo 

OOX'OCOOOCOiCOOOC: C CiOClOOOOOOOOCOC'-i— i-H^T-i-H— 1 



111 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



<J3 CO O 
CO TtH lO 

(MOi 



CO lo i-H CO 

• -^ lO Tt< 05 
-* CO T-H 



>-5 g- 



• q 
■CO 



o 


^ 


o 


(N 


o 


rH 


CO 


CO 


00 


(>4 








^ 




m 



CO CO CO 



00 t^ '^ 00 T-i<ri 00 

CO 02 05 CO 1-H 

CO CO r^ i-H 



SO 



00 (M O 

^ -^ lO 

<^^ 00 !;;;!!! <^ 



■ OOOOrtl 

■ (M OiOOO 
CO C5 (M O 



■ CO 00 CO CO 

■ (M OO'-H CO 
CO t^ CO CO 



CO lO O CO (M (M CO --I 00 (M O " ■ O (M 00 CO lO 

1— I C5 T-H OJ 02 CO CO ^ lO CO 1— I ■ ' O 00 (N (N O 

lq_(^^_cO^T^^^00^>-^^C0__Ol_O5 'O^'O^ '^„°^<^„'^„'~1, 

'*"i-H~c<rorcri>rco'~(M'~ co"c<r icrocTco^co'r-r 



l^OCO 

1— I 00 CD 



' 'rt* CO iCi l> CO 1— I <N 

■ 1-H (M ^ r-l CO t^ 00 

(M CO C^ ^ 00 --KM 



coict^oo>oo>cococooii^ 
lOo^ooi-H^iocsoqcoooq 
cdcocoooi-Hi-HcioocoTiHai 

(Mr-HC003C0'-H(MC0Ot>C0 
C3I>1>C21>C010003C5C<1 



• r^cOCOOO(MCOt^OOt>OCOTt<CO(NQOOiLO 

■ t>coaicoco'*(MOTtH'-H(N>cia5co(MOco 

icOt^^COi— ICOO(MCD>OCOOOCOCOC<103^ 



OOi— i0000»CiO5»Ot— iC2(MO 
COCOCDC^KNtXMC^u^cOO 
t^Ci^030COCOiOI>T-iO 



go 



EC CS 

S ss 

03C/2 



^o 






PhCJ to 



ri4 



aS ■ 
o o 

m g 

■ fl ft o 



■^1 02 ■ 

. - t>i a; 
■ o3 S d 



fin 



o o o) 



Q ^ M) MM ~H 

^r: M a i-i< o f^ -1^ fti> " S 2 

Si|a°sia5b-tii 






SH 


W) 


CIJ 


a; 


a 




X 


O, 


W 


a 


o 


3 
CO 






-M 


in 


a 


CJ 


;h 


•rt, 



CO 

a) 

ft 

ft 
. s 



• n -If o; 

^ '-^ d 43 ^ 



Ph 



Ph 



•-3 S-o 5PST3 „- 



i^S'!^s.a 



TS cj ft <1> o3 
<| o3 P "' 



ftCB 



^^ rH to 43 ^ CO 

^, . CQ H r1 CD >^ Q 

rT ti CJ ^ M '-' 4) T3 S 

13 a^P^-^^ g § o 



13 sa 
c 3 o 



112 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



fc, 






















'rt* 


^ 


^J 


C5 


05 


:!:!:;:::!! iiss 


05 




lO 


>o 


00 


on 


CO 


CO 


>.>-3 






H 


^ 


m 


ars 






C3^ 












"-1 & 






^^ 






» — 


iM(M r~- 


,_, 


rHlO U5- 


CO 


g i 


•^^ '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '.<^ '. 


CC) 


"'S 


c^tcc CO 


05 


C3 CO 


05^ 1-H 


-* 


> o 

affi 


CO.-I 


LO 


m 


۩ 


O 






d 


OiO • 


lO 






GO 


o3 H 


; ; ! : ;coo ■ 


CO 


-*^ d 




o 


-. .— 


COCCI 


o 


SO 


i> 


h- 


o 


^ 


m 


O 






_^ 


. . -Oi .lO -00050 -t^ • 


'^ 




. . .lO -lO -(NOOOS -Oi • 


C^J 


■-3 *; 


; ;o ;t^ ;cooi> "o ■ 


o 


c3 a 


1-1 CO '^ oot^ 05 ■ 


lO 


PL, o 


i> 00 (M r^io o 


(N 


^U 






1> 00 T-H OiO Tj< 


on 


o 


r-l (M>-H(M 


ai 


m 


^=> 




(N00>0050^0 . ■ ■ .1^- . 


lO 


_ — 


iOt>iOO(MC003 ■ ■ ■ -o ■ 


(M 




--D 00 O '-H CC ci ci ■ ■ •* ■ 


O 






CO 


S s 


C^iMO'-HCC^CO 1> 


(N 








OS 


r-HlOt^ai.-lt^.-l lO 


00 




(Mt> (N 


rtl 




^ 






■^0100000500005000-* 


<T5 




O^iOO(Ni-HO(M0005i-0'*05 


>o 


--^ 


OTtHOi-Hcor-OJcoost^roTfio 


(M 


-2 


cot^iococo(Mio-*icor^oocoio 


C-; 


o 


i-HOOOOCOOCOC^lt^LOCCC^OC 


lO 


H 






iOOl^Oi-lO.-H'-iO»Ct>OCO 


CO 




(Ml> C^ 1-1 (Nt-<(M COi-H 


O 




^ 






^n 
























-^ 
























a 
























o 
























c; 
















































rt 














-^ 










^^ 














a 










C3 














« 


















m 






« 










a 








o 






-tf 










C 








a 






s 








w 






3 
02 




'1 

m Cu 
QJ 1 




[0 


c5 


o 






a 




^"^ rr, 


o 


1— 1 

ci 
o 


ECEIPTS 

Private Room Pat 
Wfl.rd Pfl.tienta . 


1 

. — I 

1 


d a. 

o - 


XT. 

1 


?? C a^ C 


11 

6i 




1 (4 



























<: 



o 

O 

o 
u 

< 

g 



Q 

< 



u 


CC 


^ 


Tt* 


'^t 


. 








r^>> 


t^oq 


05 


05 • 








li 


coo 


05 


OS ■ 








OiO 


10 


10 








CO 10 


00 


00 








«>« 














ot^ 


CO 


CO 










m 


r-^ 


i-H 








H 




^ 


^ 










^0 


1-H 










c~ 


005 


05 












t-(M 


05 












^ 


t^ 












I> 


CO 
























Ss 


(MtJ< 


I^ 










a& 


«^ 












rHrtl C 


10 


1-H 








(MO 


00 


CO • 










r-<I> O- 


t^ 


c<i : 








-'a 


coco 1- 


00 


05 








^ m 


(Nio CO 





-<* 








> o 














■*t^ 


(M 


»o 








^ 


T— 4 


©# 








o 




^ 










c 


00 10 


10 


lO . 










(MTt< -* 





00 • 








=^ 2 


00 


Ir^ 


CO ■ 










C5 10 1- 


10 











^■"^ 


CO.-I -- 














'd^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 








o 
O 


m 


m 


^ 








^ 


-HO '^ 


LO 


Tt< • 








a 

o 


000 CO 




(N • 








00 oc 


CO 


"^ '. 








c3 a 


000 CO 


CO 


10 










t^05 »0 


(N 


(N 








iQ 














00(N r- 


CO 


00 








O 


^ lO 





00 








s@ 




^ 












m 












I>00 "O 





10 • 








___ 


coo t- 


00 


(N • 








£^ -3 


Ot^ GC 





: : 










(MLO C 


00 


CO 










-^'^ 1- 


05 


(N 






















oa 


t^(M — 





00 








l>-0 1- 


10 


^^ 










--H (N 


^ 


1-H 










m 


€^ 


m 










COCO -* 





050 -* 


CO 


• I> 







COIN -- 


1> 




l^ 


•Oi 


t^ 


■3 


-HO CO 


■* 


(NO CO 


10 


:o6 


-* 


"Ot- oc 





00 00 


Of) 


1— 1 








t^co c 


(N 


100 


»o 





(N 


H 














010 CO 


lO 


CO (M CO 


on 





KJ 




'^i CO 1- 


05 


!r>y-l 1-H 


0!) 




05 




(NCO 


lO 


(NCO 


>o 








m 


^ 


^ 


s^ 




^ 






50 




"5 ■ 




05 

00 












• iS • 


cr>o 








SJ 








CO(N 


f— 1 




c3 


a 






(1) 


(NO 






. a 


X 




• m • 


rt 


05(N 








H 




cl 


tH tH 












. a) . 




€# 












Cu 


f^ " 














■ X • 


-t^ 








• 3 







.w . 



H 








. 2 




•§ • 




oi> 






c 








-H i-H 






1— 1 








05 05 






















-c 






^ 


























1^ 




- -1 • 




>>>> 










.& -S . 










• <o 






iS ^ 




03 . C 




g .0 . 

a) 








M'-e^ 




p^.fe- • 




03 eS 
1-5 1-5 




es and W 

ies . . . 
ration E 
asurer . 












xlari 
Lippl 
orpc 




1? g sg 




-^-^ 








53 03 




1 


m 


02O 




r-i 


fef^ 




ao 





113 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



STATEMENT OF STOCK ON HAND 

1916 1915 

Administration Supplies $3,600.93 $3,690.98 

Professional Care of Patients' 

Supplies 9,918.80 9,923.15 

Department Supplies 29,636.05 20,718.41 

General House and Property 

Supplies 5,806.07 4,347.76 

General Material 2,736.38 2,121.53 



Total Stock on hand January 1st . $51,698.23 $40,801.83 



114 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



McLEAN HOSPITAL. 

Table No. 1. 
comparative statement of statistics. 



Patients in Hospital first of year 
Patients on visit first of year . . 



Patients admitted during year .... 

Patients discharged during year .... 

Not insane 7 

Recovered 34 

Much improved 22 

Improved 24 

Not improved 22 

Deceased 24 

Patients in Hospital end of year . . . 
Patients on visit end of vear 



Total number days' treatment .... 

Free patients 

Patients paying less than $25 . . . 
Patients paying S25 or more . . . 

Average patients per day 

Free patients 

Patients paj^ing less than $25 . . . 
Patients paying $25 or more . . . 

Average rate of board charged per week . 
Average cost per patient per week . . 

Daily cost per capita for provisions for 

all persons supported 0.615 0.516 

115 



1916 


1915 


205 


203 


8 


12 


213 


215 


133 


123 


133 


125 




2 




36 




14 




31 




30 




12 


203 


205 


10 


8 


213 


213 


76,477 


77,807 


1,036 


465 


23,191 


25,151 


52,250 


52,191 


209 


213 


3 


1 


63 


69 


143 


143 


$32.37 


$30.86 


33.25 


29.54 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 































or- 




TtH 






t^ 











CO coo50io-<# 








• Tj 


c 




'. t^ p . • • 


"* 


10 . . ■ (N '-^ p t>; M CO • • ■ -a 


o 


■3 


oo6"»o:; 


Tti 


IN ■ ■ CD oi rH 06 r-i • • ■ 'o 


aj 


"ti 


ICO OS 


10 


^ ■ ■ ■ CO CO CO 00 


--; 


c 


^i> 00 


cq^ 


CO C5 »Cl 1- 


> 







,_^ 


Cv 


c 
o 
O 






«# 


^ 






..0 ,-hO--. 


1— ( 


. - . .lO -CifMOO • ■ • ■ 






. .10 COO--' 


T-H 


. . . .TJ^ .oicoqio • ■ • •■<d 


"3 


■3 


■ "io ; : ; 


(N 


■ ■ ■ 'OS 'o-*-^-^ ■ ■ ■ ' c 




^ 




CO 


■■■■«^'CDrHt^ •■••c: 


S 


a 


(M COCO 


OS 


CD CO^ C 


£ 


6 


m 


^ 


id" of o( 


O 


3 






€C 






^i-l(N(Mt^OiCO00O(MOC0OOC2OO 


(M 


GOlC)l005COC<llOTt<(MCDGOa51:^>0 r- 






CDt^-*I>0'*050(MOCO-^pcOt---»0 


cc 


TJ^(^^oo^-;l>;Tt^l-^(^jQqco^o>ooq ^ 


c 


"H 


Q6o6^ioc<io2'*Oi-HOLOoO'^iooi-*o 


ci 


co-^TiHoaoiTjHTtHQO'-Hcoocicoco o 


^. 


— 


-TticoiO:0000>0(Mi— iO-*00C0O'OO(MCD 


■•^ 


OOCOt^cCCOi-Ht^OOCDt^OCOiOGO 1- 


H^ 


^ 


00 -^jx> >o C5 r- -^^t^ t>;^pi-<^co^i-o^o_o_ 


^' 


(M 00 l> CD CO t^ Cg^iq^LO »0_.-H (N^-*_CO <- 


1 


c 


i-Tofot^o co" t>Tjrcoc6~(M"t^'-r 


co" 


^ 00(N00C^l>O of CD C£ 


^ 


^^ r-4C^ (M ^(N 


CD 


^ T-l 05 I-H LO T— 1 r- 






m 


^ 









•<tli-H(M(Nt^O>OO00O(MOC»I>OC0OO 





ooioiooi-^ocor-icooooojt^io ^ 






OI>pt>;P'*ppO?po0^t^COt^iNiOO 


-# 


oc<ioot-;-^pp»op(N-^picoq c 






o6g6i>^>-6c<jo5'#Ot-hoioocog6ioio'^o 


'-0 


iCTiiT)H(NidcO^TH^'#OOicOCO c 




3 


TfCO'-H^SOOL'TXMi-lOTtHCCrHr^CC-OC-IO 


CO 


OOcDt^cDOOOCDOCMOOOCOiCOO 01 


■g 


GO lo co^Tj^_oo 10 1^ ^_^t^ i> c<j^M_co Lo 


(N 


C^OOt^CDCDt^iQCDCSOi-KM-^CO C 


H 


T-TrvTco^tCcr co~ r-^TtTortrcfooi-r 


CD 


TjT ooc^^c-igt-^ ofco" Ci 






'--'-< >-H(M CCI T-HIM 


<r> 


^i i-lOi-Hr-llO T-l 






m 


T— I 


i-H 








































OI 




























• 
_C 








































M 




























1 








































^ 




























• ] 








































-- 




























• d 








































^ 




























c 






































33 




























C 








2 































_2 




















4^ 









































"S 




CO 




















a 














s 
























CS 
























c3 












;h 
























<-i 


































43 
03 
























fM 




^ 










m 








S 










1 


h-l 
















03 
ID 











^0 


m 












§3 












i 


T3 
















PI 












<0 

a 

<D 


c 




u 






1 






•1 




00 


< 
















13 

-d 




c 




m 






;ical Su] 
s and E 
d Kitcl 





p. 


ft 





02 • 

'■+2 ■ 




< m - 














fl 


« u 


Q. 




03 


gJ a C « s-i 


0) ^ 




o3 




& 5 <D <l^ <D 








• =3 g 






'3 


'H^ ■ 


fw ■ 










fcDMl 




'a 

< y 


CZ2 bD S<t3 


t- 03 






03 


03 c 03 

« . 






c3 i-J OJ . m 






2|?|igS|ll|ipp|& 




_2<^ a>>i(D -oajsosicsi 






UPPLIES 

Genera] 
Libraric 
Medica 
Nurses' 
Housek 
Laundr 
Groceri 
Stables 
Farm a 
Mainte 
Labora 
Diversi 
Purchai 
Miscell; 




02 








































1 zc 


























1 



116 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 









































.«in, 






a 00 






> o 






as 












O 






gl 






SS- 












OK 








OOOiOi-ioO 


0-1 




I> O O CO rH 


CO 


S'3 


ooooo^ 


o 


^ •"— 


(N CO t^ 00 CO 


r/^ 


1-: £■ 


•^ t> CO i>- ic 


O 




O COGO ^ 


00 


<s3 


'N^ 






^ 


€^ 




CO O O 1-H 00 


fN 




t^iCOOO^ 


CO 




--o d 00 C2 -< 


-o 


c3 


CO cor^ooco 


no 




O t^ CO I> lO 


C 








H 


OfO 00 -* 


en 




O .-H 


1^ 




CO 


'N-l 




€# 


m 












02 












;^ 
























C 












O 
























K 












, 
























-4-2 




















































































^ 
























^^ 
























■4-3 










o 








-u ■ 


H 








c 










<a • 










s 










&, 




















s • 










cr . 








"H ■ 








-S-d • 






















<0 c3 














C n, C • 
4) to '^ tH 




l>Sf2| 




e^QSPi 




ECEIPTS 

Board o 
Private 
Purchas 
Nurses' 
Miscclla 






1 rt 



















l^rtl 




















fi_ 


^Oi ■ 


■* 












pj 


•^ oi ■ 


'^ 








• 




i ■;=; 


LOO 


ic 












-— ^ 


w T— 1 


00 












> o 




co" 












o 


















--KN • 


CO 














,-HTj< . 


lO 












"5"^ 


c^co : 


lO 












r" • — 


CO o 


05 












C m* 


C50 


05 














^co 


ocT 


























'M 




(Mi-H t-- 


o 










c 




cqi>co 


C5 










11 


OJcJt^ 


CO 










'^ ^a> 


CD 












~i « 


^-'"I'l, 


05 


























C«i 


^ -^ 


COOtJh" 


co" 










^; 


<=;5 


-X)t-<CO 


^ 












— i(M 


Tfl 










t) 




^ 


^ 










o 
















o 
















o 
















< 




















O t^t^ 


■* 


(M Ol^ 


Oi 


•IC 


-* 


:z; 




-<^_qco 


00 


cooco 


CO 


• '-; 


CO 


o 




coco t-^ 


CO 


codt-^ 


CO 


;w 


CO 


"5 


CO CO C5 




00002 


00 


CO 


t— ( 


r^ 




05 CO T-^ 


X 


o_o_^_ 


(N 


i-O 


00 


















< 


H 


CD --O'*" 


CO" 


00 o"^" 


(M 


'^ 


CD 




CO (M CO 


lO 


t^i-lCO 


lO 




iC 


Ch 




^ (N 


Tf< 


CO 


■^ 




'^ 


^ 




^ 


m 


€^ 


^ 




^^ 


2h 
































g 


. . tH 




• • to 




Old 










o 


m 




u 


CQ 


o >-; 




<5 

Q 






3 


tc 




c3 


.9* 


d ^ 


-S 






to 


^ 




.T3 

. 53 


'E3 

O 

c 


coco 


^— 


-< 






n 
o 


o 
>? 

a 




CO CO 

T-Tco" 


" 


<1 






>. 
^ 








"^ 














'3 


+2 
O 




•§ 


o 








§ 






& 














P 






to 






. to 










cc 






i 

o 

c 






. 1— 1 

to" 

(D 
!0 

• C 

• a 






4 










c3 






■ c 




' CO 










^^ 






a 




T— ( 










S 








+^ CO 










to 




-t-3 




to 










1— 1 




. c3 




T— ( ?-< 












B .g 












t»r 








SS 






CO 


to 




1 :6 










c3 






f^..- 












'-2 




ospital 
reasure 
reasure: 










§JS 




KHH 




o c 






._,--; O 














^ 3 O 




c3 a a 




-a -a 








o S 2 




CO CO 








02 


OQ 


o 




E-' 


^^ 




D "^ 


o 





t. 


T}< . 


^1 


Tf< • 


"^ 


w^ 


CD . C5 


05 • 





^S 


Oi • c: 


C5 ; 


05 


uO 





10 


^.j= 




X 


X 


X 


^ ^ 






CO 


CO 












H 


^ 


m 


m 


m 




— 1 


^ 


■ CO 


CO 


« — 




X 


• CO 


CO 


S -3 


Oi CO 


CD 


■ ^ 


CO 


3'o- 


r^ CD 


'Tf 


■ X 


X 




CO c; 


CO 


















^a 


!> CO 


T— 1 


X 


X 






l> 


r^ 




'^ 




^^ 


CO 






€^ 


m 


^ 


^ 


lOt-h 


CO 


^^ 


^ 


C 1 


00^ 


CO 


CO ■ 


CO 


5 -:^ 


t^-vH 


CO 


CO ■ 


CO 




COLO 


^ 


C5 


rn 


? s 


OQO 


C2 


^ 


■^ 














C^CO 


LO 


10 


10 




f— H 




^ 


ft^ 


O 


^ 


m 






^ 


LO .ko 


LO ■ 


LO 




. 


w 


X • 


X 


■^ c 


r-^ ■ 


r^ 


CO ■ 


CO 




LO 


LO 


CO 


CO 







CO 


CD 


CO 


:io 


r^ 


r^ 


1> 


r- 


o 


m 


m 


m 


a^ 


U 










.+^ ^ 


lO 


LO 


-^ • ^\ 


r ? 


.—1 . 




CO • 


CO 


■42 c 


CO ■ 


CO 


■ 


CO 


-i ,i^ 


CO 


CO 


lO 


lO 


r-i "^ 


CO 


CO 


C-1 


CO 














CO 




X 


X 


oa 





•^ 


X 


X 


r— ■ 


T-~ 


m 


s^ 


^ 1^ 






1— .,- 


-s^ 


•0 • 


LO 


_— 


X LO 


CO 


01 • 


CO 


,— --; 


COLO 


cq 


■ 





C " 


yjc~. 


X 


rr* 


CO 


!^ a: 


CiOi 


c^ 


01 


CO 












OS 


ox 





X 


X 


iC 


IC." 


'^ 


-* 




^ 


M- 


1—1 






a& 


m 


s# 


m 




O'* 


^ 


O5C0 


I— 1 




t^x 


KJ 


»oco 


Oi 




ttH CD 


r-H 


coco 


X 


C3 


0^ 


Ol 


ox 


X 


COX 





LOO 


LO 


r'i 










LOCO 


CO 


CO X 


I— 1 




in 


LO 


CO ro- 


"* 




lOtJ< 





coco 


CD 




^ 


^ 


^ 


m 




CO 




m 
















_a 












a 





P^ 


^; CO 




.-HCO 


"3 







6 6 








1 







t3 
G 




<!i<< 




<1<J 




to to 

OJ 

03 CO 




aa 
















<» 




aa 




u 




X X 









WH 




p^p^ 




, , 1 1 




f— 4 ^^ 




c3 rA 




c3 ca 
























HH 




HH 





117 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



<; 

P5 
O 

< 

Ph 

I— ( 

o 
!^ 

P5 

o 

O 

o 

o 
I— I 

o 

w 

cc 

H 
h^ 
pq 

Eh 



O 



Q 



O" 



O 



G" 



1— icooococoocnocooi^r^ 

^C^i-irC^'0(M'-!iMOC0C 



(N 00 00 

rooocicoo-^T-HGOoooio-rtiCiO 
(m" cd" c<r cT ri<" i-T i-h" !>■ o6~ rH~ ^~ -^ TtT 

I— 1 1— I 1—1 
€^ 



^HCO^GOC^OOO-*^<M<MOOCCi 
O" i-T (m" cT iO~ t)h~ o" rH~ oT l>r (m" 00 (M" c^" 



T}i^O<M-*L'2OO^G;00'*Ci 
(MCSllMOOiCOO-^COCOOliOiM 

,-<,-l,-lr-l,-HCO.-HO(M'-l'-HOlO 



i-OCOi-;P'#i-iOOCDl>;-*'*C^-*I> 

i-Ho6ocDo-<#i-Joc<io6cio»-Hi>I 

l>^«D-*COi— itOOJlMiCi— iiCt^02_-^ 

i-T ic' c<r co~ -^"^ o~ ccf 1>^ i-T oo" i—" cf 



0_ C^__ ^_^ QO^ I>._^ T#_^ '^^'^ ^^ °°, 

'*" to" o" TiT co" TjT cT r-T Qo" cT 
o Tt< c^ CO <M ro rM 



.-H O C £ 
t^ i-( O <M 
t^ C^ CO^ 00 

of oT ec~ co' 



00 1-1 o t^ 

,-1 1-1 (M 1> 



0»-OC5rHt>^CO'<tlt^ 

OOi— iCOiOi— lOO-^O 
i-<C0^i^(M(Mi-^Ot^ 



1— ii— icvtocc-^iocooict^ooLOio 
i-;OL'tc^)t--;l>;pciqi>C^)0'st^iqoo 
CO-^CDi-lo6oioJoioi>(No6l>l>^ 
(Mt^OOOCOi— iTtiOOCDi— i-^i-iiOt> 
-*^03_<N_05^(M_^Ci^r^ I>^C<)^p_Tti 1> Tf 1-1 

o»oc<r-^c<rcr cot-^i-r ofofco^ 

1—1 T— I 



i-iCOOO^tiCCiCCOOO^OcOt^ 

iocst— lOi— lOooi— ii>coi— iicmo 
cc CO t~^ oo CO oi ^ CO t~^ o^ O CO CO 

OOiOi-i(M.-iCO IM ^ 00 



^ :: - - - 



^ ^ -D 

■~" -c — 



-c =5 "S — 






<U -3 a 73 



'='_ '7^ 02^ 



f; if ^ ci 



118 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 



CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL. 

Table No. 1. 
comparativb statement of statistics. 

1916 1915 

Patients in Hospital January 1st : 

Medical 11 4 

Surgical 12 20 

Total 23 24 

Patients admitted during the year : 

Medical 127 150 

Surgical 522 569 

Total 649 719 

Total patients treated in Hospital wards 
and single rooms during the year: 

Medical 138 154 

Surgical 534 589 

Total 672 743 

Patients discharged during the year : 

Medical 136 143 

Surgical 516 577 

Total 652 720 

Patients in Hospital end of the year: 

Medical 2 11 

Surgical 18 12 

Total 20 23 

Total patients' days treatment : 

Free patients 4,591 6,613 

Pay patients 4,594 3,448 

Total 9,185 10,061 

119 



Report of the Administrator and Resident Physician. 

1916 1915 
Percentage : 

Free davs 50 — 66 — 

Paydays 50+ 34+ 

Total 100 100 

Average patients per day: 

Free 13— 18+ 

Pay 13— 9+ 

Total 26— 27 f 

Average time per patient in Hospital : 14 — daj's 14 — days 

Average dail}^ cost per patient .... $1.73 $1.43+ 
Daily cost yer capita for provisions for all 

persons supported 0.35+ 0.37+ 



120 



REPORT OF THE LADIES' VISITING 
COMMITTEE. 



The Ladies' Visiting Committee have continued their 
efforts in behalf of the patients, with the assistance and 
co-operation of the Social Workers in the wards, and this 
year, through the Occupational Committee, their work 
has been somewhat extended. They have also continued 
their supervision of the Warren Library. They have 
tried, in various ways, to assist in the development of 
the Cement Shop for the handicapped. The value of 
this interesting experiment, started by the hospital, has 
now been proved and reference to its work will be found 
in the report of the Administrator. The efforts of the 
Ladies' Visiting Committee are largely directed towards 
personal service to the patients in the wards. This ser- 
vice is always reported fully at the monthly meeting of 
the committee, but cannot be given here in detail in so 
short a space. 

The benefit of some simple occupation for convalescent 
patients, in certain wards, has been recognized by the 
hospital, and in supplying this need much assistance has 
been given by Miss Brackett, workers from the Tide Over 
League, and by several volunteer workers in the hospital. 
As a result crocheted rugs have been made for which the 
patients have been paid, and fancy work of various kinds 
which has been given to the patients to take home. 
Many useful articles have been contributed to the Red 
Cross; among these were 29 comfort bags for the soldiers, 
besides bandages, washcloths, socks, and muj93.ers. This 
work of the patients is entirely voluntary on their part, 
is done with the approval of physicians and nurses, and 
is greatly enjoyed by the patients themselves. The 

121 



Report of the Ladies' Visiting Committee. 

necessary funds for carrying this on have been contri- 
buted largely by the Ladies' Visiting Committee, and as 
they hope to continue and extend the work another year 
contributions for this purpose would be gratefully re- 
ceived and may be sent to the treasurer of the com- 
mittee, Mrs. John Lowell. 

The circulation of books from the Warren Library again 
increased in 1916. The total issues to patients and em- 
ployees numbered 15,739, an increase of 1,415 over last 
year. It wUl readUy be seen that this small library, 
which numbers but 2,796 volumes, has been a means of 
relaxation and diversion for many patients. Four hun- 
dred and seventy-three new books have been added and 
but 32 have been lost. Dr. Richard C. Cabot has again 
contributed S50 for the purchase of books, and other 
friends have shown their interest by gifts of books and 
magazines. The Warren Library lost the services of 
Aliss Wiggin early in the autumn. She had been in 
charge for six years. Miss Wiggin had a good knowledge 
of current fiction, and she always took pleasure in supply- 
ing to an inquiring patient a "pleasant story" or a book 
of adventure, both often asked for. Her efforts were 
personal and never merely perfunctory, and her retire- 
ment from work was regretted by all with whom she 
came in contact. 

The Ladies' Visiting Committee wish again to record 
their appreciation of the assistance they have received 
from the Administrator and from other officers of the 
hospital. 

Charlotte S. Sprague, 

Secretary. 



122 



REPORT OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

ON THE GENERAL HOSPITAL 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 



The Ladies' Committee on the Training School reports a 
year of steady, good work of the nurses in the hospital, 
under the able training of Miss Parsons and her assistants. 
There have been no great events to record, but a constant 
"preparedness" is the aim of all those concerned in the 
nursing work of the hospital. 

There is now a very large group of women connected 
with the nursing in this hospital. They must be selected 
with care, w^ell taught and trained in an arduous pro- 
fession, guarded in their health during the three years of 
training, and then sent out fitted for whatever line of 
nursing work they elect — be it private work, institutional 
work, or that great new line of "social service" work. 
This is no small task for those in charge and the powers 
and abilities of all the teachers and superintendents must 
be and are of a high level. The hospital is fortunate in 
having the service of such women. 

The demand for nurse service in hospitals increases all 
the time. Research work is now essential in all teaching 
in hospitals such as ours, and it adds much to the work of 
the nurses, although at the same time it gives them 
valuable training. As the demands for nursing service 
increase, new needs come for the nurses themselves. 

The hospital is about to open a new paying ward, or 
rather, a large building which will need a staff of fifty more 
nurses than we now have to care for it, and immediately 
comes the need of more housing room. The nurses need 
at once a large building for rooms, their own kitchen and 

123 



Report of the Advisory Committee on the General Hospital Training School. 

dining room, and especially an infirmary. The land is 
there but no money to build with, and meanwhile many 
nurses are obliged to room outside the hospital. Will not 
some friends of nurses unite to give the money for a 
building so needed for the welfare of devoted and hard- 
working women to whom we all turn for help in many 
crises of our lives? 

Moved as every one is to help in the war, various of 
our nurses have gone over with the Harvard Unit and 
with the Red Cross. 

Last spring a unit was organized, called the Base Hos- 
pital of the Massachusetts General Hospital, with the Red 
Cross in charge, under the Government. Fifty nurses are 
enrolled, thirty aides, and twenty-five in reserve, ready to 
move at any moment. We hope this shows true "pre- 
paredness," and will commend itself to the public and 
command their interest in nurses who must look to the 
public for intelligent support. 

Ellen T. Vaughan, 
For the Committee. 



124 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 

NURSES TO THE RESIDENT 

PHYSICIAN. 



December 31, 1916. 

Number of graduates in school 30 

Number of student nurses 210 

Number of probationers 27 

Total 267 

Graduated in 1916 47 

Probationers admitted 106 

Probationers accepted 88 

Probationers rejected 19 

Pupils mthdra"s\Ti 3 

Pupils died 1 

Forty-two pupils took courses varying from one to four 
months from the Children's Hospital, Boston; Faulkner 
Hospital, Jamaica Plain; North Adams Hospital; Mor- 
ton Hospital, Taunton; Sturdy Memorial Hospital, North 
Attleboro; J. B. Thomas Hospital, Peabody; and six 
graduates of McLean Hospital entered for the eighteen 
months course. 

The increase in number of student nurses has necessi- 
tated another pupil assistant to the practical instructor. 
The increased capacity of the hospital has created new 
demands on the school. Besides meeting these, several 
nurses have been assigned to the affliated hospitals until 
they shall be recalled for the opening of the private 
pavilion. A noteworthy feature of the school at present is 
its increasing stability, as evidenced by the decreasing 
nimaber of nurses who drop out for various reasons each 
year. 

125 



Report of Superintendent of Nurses. 

During the year 1911 we had a staff of 151 student 
nurses, and 69 dropped out for various reasons during the 
year (16 of whom were capped nurses, — the others 
being probationers). Through the succeeding years the 
staff of nurses has steadil}^ increased as the number 
dropping out has decreased. Now we have a staff of 236 
pupils, and during 1916 only 23 dropped out (4 of whom 
were capped nurses). 

The Marion Moir West Loan Fund, in charge of Mrs. 
W. W. Vaughan, amounts to $180. 

The Training School Endowment Fund, which was 
started by the Alumnse Association last August, now 
amounts to $2,678.50, which has been contributed almost 
entu'ely by graduates who have pledged themselves to 
contribute several thousands more. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sara E. Parsons, 
Superintendent of Nurses, 



126 



MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL 
TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 



A three year course is maintained, including a three 
month preliminary course, during which time the pro- 
bationers receive instruction in the classroom. 

The pupils receive experience in general medical, 
surgical, and obstetrical work; also operating technique, 
dietetics, massage, and bandaging. Pediatrics, orthopedic 
and several other branches also receive attention. 

Classes and lectures on physiology, anatomy, bac- 
teriology, hygiene, and materia medica are given by paid 
instructors. 

Personal applications should be made whenever pos- 
sible on Wednesdays, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

It is well to write previously to the Superintendent of 
the Training School for the circular of information. 

There is a nonpayment system. A tuition fee of forty 
dollars ($40.00) is paid upon entrance for the preliminary 
course. A deposit of ten dollars ($10.00) is made for 
breakage, the balance of which is refunded at graduation. 
The Hospital furnishes the text-books and the uniforms. 
There are several scholarships offered to those who gradu- 
ate with highest honors. 

There is no arbitrary age limit — acceptance depends 
upon education, physique, and personal qualifications. 

A high school education or a good equivalent is re- 
quired, with an elementary knowledge of Latin, anatomy, 
physiology, bacteriology, and chemistry. 

There are attractive special courses, affihations, and 
post-graduate opportunities. 

For further particulars apply to the Superintendent of 
the Training School. 

127 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TREADWELL 
LIBRARY. 



The Treadwell Library and the valuable clinical records 
of the hospital were safely moved into their new and 
ample quarters in the Moseley Memorial Building during 
the early part of October. The new reading room is large, 
handsome, comfortably furnished, and well lighted and 
ventilated. There are convenient additional rooms for 
committee meetings and other purposes, and the clerks 
have a room by themselves where the sound of type- 
writers is no longer a disturbance to readers. 

The records are at last shelved in a fireproof vault; 
accessible, during business hours, to all those authorized 
to consult them. 

The portrait of Dr. John C. Warren, one of the founders 
of the hospital and its first Acting Surgeon, hangs at one 
end of the library, and that of Dr. James Jackson, the 
other founder and its first Acting Physician, will soon be 
hung at the opposite end. 

With the long needed extra shelf-room supplied for 
books, and with time soon available to the librarian for 
attention to cataloguing and other work, it is hoped that 
the coming year will open the resources of the library 
to a larger extent than ever before. Suggestions which 
will in any way tend to serve the wants and conven- 
ience of readers will be received cordially by the librarian, 
and acted upon if possible. 

The nurses of the Training School are now allowed the 
privilege of using books during the afternoon hours. 

The catalogue of hospital literature, mentioned in last 
year's report, has been kept up, and in connection with it 

128 



Report of the Treadwell Library. 

references have been made to ''war" literature insofar 
as it concerns hospitals and the treatment of soldiers. 
This catalogue is still kept in one of the administration 
offices. The so-called "administration library" is to be 
moved to a stack on the first tier of the Treadwell Library, 
where it will easily be accessible from the offices. 

Readers have appreciated the privilege of borrowing 
unbound numbers of periodicals; 100 have been loaned 
during the year, and all safely returned. 

Gifts, other than books, have been received as follows: 
From Gen. Francis H. Appleton, a photograph of a house 
at Topsfield, Mass., once owned by Dr. John G. Treadwell 
(the founder of this library) and now the property of the 
Essex Agricultural Society. From Dr. J. Collins Warren, 
a full-length silhouette of Dr. John D. Treadwell, father 
of Dr. John G. Treadwell. This is a photograph of the 
origiaal in the Ropes Mansion, Salem, Mass. Dr. Warren 
has also presented two students' "tickets of admission to 
the Massachusetts General Hospital," made out to 
Mr. Benjamin Cutter, one dated November, 1824, and 
the other November, 1825. 

It would be interesting if a small showcase could be 
added to the furniture of the library, where old books, 
manuscripts, papers, pictures, book-plates, etc., could 
from time to time be shown. We have now a good many 
students using the library who w^ould appreciate an 
attraction of this kind, and we have enough material to 
make quite a variety in exhibition. 

Gifts of books have been received from Dr. F. C. 
Shattuck, Dr. Algernon Coolidge, Dr. G. L. Walton, Dr. 
G. C. Shattuck, Dr. Freeman Allen, Dr. W. P. Graves, 
Dr. E. P. Joslin, Dr. W. J. Morton, Dr. R. H. Ferguson, 
Miss R. S. Eckman, and Mrs. Michael F. Gavin. Pub- 
lications have been received from Harvard University, 
Cornell University, Stanford University, New York Uni- 
versity, University of Michigan, Rockefeller Foundation, 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, Carnegie 

129 



Report of the Treadwell Library. 

Institution, Mayo Clinic, jMellon Institute of Industrial 
Research, Pittsburgh, and the Georgia Medical Society. 
The Medical Library Association has once more been of 
great assistance in supplying missing numbers of periodi- 
cals and society transactions; and we have borrowed 
several times from the Surgeon General's Library at 
Washington. Many state and municipal reports and 
documents have been received, also transactions of 
various societies, for which our thanks are hereby cordially 
offered. 

The expense of foreign periodicals has been considerably 
augmented since the European War began, and for some 
months past very few numbers have been received. But 
in order to secure them it has been necessary to place sub- 
scriptions as usual and pay for them, for it is understood 
that while the publication goes on as usual, it is in a 
quantity only sufficient to supply the demand. Foreign 
orders are stored, and when an opportunity comes for 
them to be shipped we shall received our orders complete. 
The price of binding has also advanced, owing to a steady 
increase in all the materials used. 

The statistical reports follow : 

LIBRARY. 

Increase. 

Number of periodical volumes at beginning of 

year 

Number of other volumes at beginning of year 
Number of periodical volumes added during 

the year 

Number of other volumes added during the 

year 

Number of periodical volumes lost or with- 
drawn during the year 

Number of other volumes withdrawn during 
the year 

Total number of volumes at end of year . . 

Number of pamphlets at beginning of year . 

Number of pamphlets added during the year 1,001 

130 





4,103 
5,061 


127 




137 


264 





9,428 


22 




9,406 

7,689 



Report of the Treadwell Library. 

Number of pamphlets withdrawn during the 
year 268 733 

Total number of pamphlets at end of year . 8,422 

Total number of current serials and periodicals 93 

Use. 
Total number of volumes lent for home use 416 

Number of restricted loans (over night 24 

hours) 100 

Number of interUbrary loans 1 

Recorded use in reading rooms (not recorded) 

Total attendance of readers 3,149 

Evening attendance of readers 825 

Receipts from 

Fees of members (no assessment) 

Trust funds (approx.) S225.00 

Gifts 117.95 

Other sources 

(balance of expenses paid by the hospital) 

Payments for 

Books $134.37 

Periodicals 573.17 

Binding 121.50 

Completion of files 13.00 

Salaries 1,620.00 

Other maintenance 122.70+ 

Total $2,584.74+ 

RECORDS. 

Number of volumes indexed and prepared for 

buiding * 207 

Cards written: 

For clinical catalogue 9,869 

For name catalogue 7,201 

Total 17,070 

Number of records copied or abstracted . . 1,754 

Number of individuals consulting records . 2,539 

Follow-up work : Number of communications 
sent out: 

Year-ago letters 3,222 

Group cases: letters 985 

postal cards 42 

Total 4,249 

Respectfully submitted, 

Grace W. Myers, 
Librarian. 
131 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF HOSPITAL 

SOCIAL SERVICE TO THE RESIDENT 

PHYSICIAN. 



The Social Service Department has carried on through 
the year the lines of work spoken of in the last report ; we 
have done thorough work in instructing the diabetic 
patients, have gone a little further in meeting our responsi- 
bility toward the Training School for Nurses, and with 
volunteers have furthered the desires of the Ladies' 
Visiting Committee to have occupations in the wards for 
those patients who need something to occupy their atten- 
tion. In addition we have carried on the regular case 
work, such as securing sanitorium or chronic hospital care 
for patients about to be discharged, arranging for the 
care of children while the mother is in the hospital, and 
have undertaken two new lines of work that are urgently 
needed. These are the accumulation of information for a 
registry of institutions, public, private, and semiprivate, 
where patients with chronic diseases can be cared for; and 
the placing under suitable care of patients who are refused 
admission here, either because of lack of room or un- 
suitability. 

SOCIAL SERVICE AND TEACHING FOR DIABETIC PATIENTS. 

We have had in the wards 114 diabetic patients, 94 
of whom have been carefully instructed and subsequently 
followed by our special worker. Forty-eight of these per- 
sons live in Greater Boston, 36 in more distant parts of 
the State, and 10 in other States. Fifty-three were women, 
37 men, and 4 children. At the present time 63 are 
reporting to the special Diabetic Clinic in the Out- 

132 



Report of the Hospital Social Service. 

Patient Department, and 31 are under the supervision of 
their own private physicians. Fifty-nine patients are 
discharged on a very restricted diet, — an allowance of 
less than 60 grams of carbohydrates per day. On De- 
cember 1st, 40 of these patients were doing the same 
work as before their illness, and apparently well; 41 
others reported by letter that they were sugar free and as 
far as their diabetic condition was concerned were doing 
weU, but because of other complications, as heart disease 
or ''temperament," never will be well. Of 9 we have 
lost track; 4 have died. 

In every instance the patient has been seen at least twice 
during his stay in the hospital, and taught as much about 
the physiology and treatment of his disease as he is able 
to understand. Whoever prepares his food at home has 
also been seen. If the patient is to be under the care of 
his own physician, upon discharge, full details of his 
treatment in the wards are sent to him. 

SOCIAL SERVICE FOR PUPIL NURSES. 

In last year's report we reported on the experience in 
Social Service that is offered to selected pupil nurses during 
the second and third year. In co-operation with the 
Training School for Nurses, Miss Emerson has this year 
established as routine the instruction, through a series of 
talks, discussions, and visits to social agencies, of all pupU 
nurses during their first few months. The object s to 
give them an idea of the background of the patients for 
whom they are to care, and of the function of the Depart- 
ment, that they may know how to use such a department 
either in this hospital or the hospitals to which they may 
go as graduates. 

OCCUPATION FOR PATIENTS IN THE WARDS. 

Many of the patients in the wards are restless and idle, 
yet willing and glad to be busy. For their benefit the 

133 



Report of the Hospital Social Service. 

Ladies' Visiting Committee has always supplied yarn 
for knitting, embroidery materials, games, and so forth. 
This year Miss Brackett and other volunteers have done 
much in carrying on this work. The articles made have 
been sent to the American Red Cross Society, except 
those that could be used by the hospital here. Many of 
the patients have responded to this opportunity to serve 
the hospital and the war sufferers. 

REGISTRY OF INSTITUTIONS FOR CHRONIC PATIENTS. 

There is in Boston a dearth of chronic hospitals where 
patients may be well cared for free of charge. There are, 
however, many small hospitals or private homes where 
for a moderate price patients may be cared for. Many of 
the hospital patients can afford to pay a little. Doctors 
and the general public are increasingly turning to us for 
information concerning such resources. We are, there- 
fore, gradually accumulating data for a Registry of 
Chronic Hospitals which may be a valuable resource, not 
only for our own work, but for those in the coimnunity 
who turn to the hospital for such information. 

The data secured through visits to the institution and 
through references covers, not only the physical plant, but 
information concerning the personnel in authority, the 
medical service and equipment. Such information as this 
will be gradually increased for the use of private physicians 
as the opportunities for social service for private patients 
are developed. 

NEED OF SPECIAL WORK FOR CARDIAC PATIENTS. 

One of our largest problems is that of the adult patient 
with heart disease, the man or woman between thirty and 
sixty who is in and out of the hospital, receiving the best 
possible nursing and medical care during a brief stay, 
and then discharged "relieved" or "heart compensated." 
These patients are practically never discharged cured, and 

134 



Report of the Hospital Social Service. 

are to be classed among the handicapped. In a group of 
50 male cardiac patients last year, 9 were readmitted. 
The bulk of patients is so large and the social problem 
so far-reaching that we have not been able to do much for 
these patients. Now that some members of the medical 
staff are carrying on an intensive study from the medical 
side, it is earnestly hoped that it may be made possible 
to add to our staff so that the Social Service Department 
may help in the study of the social aspects of this wide- 
spread disease. In New York City an association has 
been formed for the medical-social study and prevention 
of heart disease. It is most desirable that a similar study 
should be undertaken here in Boston, where every year 
our hospitals are caring for hundreds of cardiac patients. 
During the past year and a half the bulk of work has 
increased 75 per cent, with no increase in the paid staff. 
Volunteer service has been increased and proved of great 
help. An additional full-time trained social worker is very 
much needed to assist Miss Emerson. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ida M. Cannon, 

Chief of Hospital Social Service. 



135 



REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 



Social Service was established in the Out-Patient De- 
partment in 1905 by Dr. Richard C. Cabot. This was 
the first social service department and the forerunner of 
the Hospital Social Service movement in this country. 
The department was initiated and has been maintained 
during the past eleven years by private subscriptions and 
has been under the general supervision of a committee 
composed of representatives of all the interests involved, 
i.e., the administration, the medical staff, the board of 
lady visitors, two representative social workers, and a 
business man. The committee at present consists of 
Dr. Richard C. Cabot, Chairman, Mr. Francis P. Sears, 
Treasurer, Mr. Jeffrey R. Brackett, Dr. Daniel F. Jones, 
Dr. Roger I. Lee, Mrs. William H. Lothrop, Dr. Robert B. 
Osgood, Dr. James J. Putnam, Dr. C. Morton Smith, 
Dr. Richard M. Smith, Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer, Dr. 
Frederic A. Washburn. 

As the department has not been officially under the 
jurisdiction of the hospital trustees, its report has not 
been included in the hospital report, but has been 
published separately. This fact has caused some con- 
fusion as to the status of the department, and it has 
seemed best this year to make a statement that will clarify 
this matter. 

FUNCTIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

The first function of the Social Service Department is 
to supplement medical treatment by social treatment; it 
accepts only such patients as the doctors wish to refer 

136 



Report of the Out-Patient Social Service. 

to it. The worker's aim is to add to the doctor's know- 
ledge of the patient's physical condition an understanding 
of his mental and psychological state, his physical environ- 
ment, such as work, wages, food and housing, and his 
mental environment, such as the influences, good and 
bad, of his family, friends and companions. With this 
combined understanding of the whole man, medical-social 
treatment is thus made possible, and the standard of dis- 
pensary medical service approaches that of the physician 
in private practice. 

The second function of the Social Service Department 
is to take a measure of the conditions in the community 
which are detrimental to social welfare, and, through the 
evidence accumulated by contact with the patient in his 
home and work, to join forces with other pubUc health 
improvements. 

The third function of the department is educational. 
In keeping with the traditions of the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, the department has been made avail- 
able for the training of students in the profession of social 
work, and the social instruction of nurses and medical 
students. Through an affiliation with the Boston School 
for Social Workers a special course is given in Medical 
Social Service, of which the Chief of Social Service is 
Director. 

de^':elopment of the department. 

The Social Service Department, originally located in the 
main corridor of the Out-Patient Department, has been 
gradually extended during the last six years. At the 
request of the medical staff, social workers have been 
placed in the following clinics: Children's Medical, 
Neurological, Orthopedic, Genito-Urinary, Syphilitic 
and Industrial. Patients are referred from the remaining 
chnics to the general department, which is still main- 
tained as headquarters. 

137 



Report of the Out-Patient Social Service. 

Beginning in 1905 with one paid worker, the staff now 
includes 14 paid social workers and 4 clerical. There is 
also a group of about 50 volunteers, who under direction 
of the paid workers are doing valuable service. In 1914 
the position of Chief of Social Service was created 
by the Trustees, and through that position social service 
in the wards and Out-Patient Department was correlated. 
In 1915 this position was extended to cover the Social 
Service Department at the Eye and Ear Infirmary. The 
three departments, although supported by separate funds, 
are thus co-ordinated. 

TYPES OF PATIENTS WHO HAVE BEEN SERVED. 

During the eleven years 11,448 out-patients have been 
referred to the department. Of this number 1,809 were 
referred during 1916. This number is exclusive of 
those patients from the Genito-Urinary and Sj^DhiUtic 
Clinics, of whose social treatment no special record was 
made. The types of service rendered may be indicated 
as follows: 

General Department: all patients with tuberculosis are 
referred for arrangements for sanitorium care or home 
supervision; all unmarried pregnant girls; and patients 
recommended to the hospital who feel that they cannot 
come because of responsibilities at home. 

The Neurological Clinic: feeble-minded patients needing 
institutional care or supervision; patients with chorea, for 
whom successful treatment is impossible without careful 
hygiene supervision or placing temporarily away from 
home; patients with border-line mental condition, whose 
status cannot be determined in the clinic without reliable 
data concerning their behavior in the coimiiunity; 
epileptics and the insane. 

The Children's Clinic: a special worker is assigned to 
the instruction of mothers in the care of babies and to 
their supervision during the first two j^ears. Another 

138 



Report of the Out-Patient Social Service. 

worker is assigned to the convalescent care of children 
with endocarditis and chorea. This involves supervision 
at home and at school, and guidance on entering industrial 
life. A third worker acts as executive for the social work 
of this clinic; in addition she attends to tubercular and 
feeble-minded children and those needing general hygiene. 

The Orthopedic Clinic: all patients with bone tuber- 
culosis are referred for general hygiene and for instruc- 
tion for heliotherapy; also all patients needing braces 
and apparatus for which they cannot pay cash; social 
service for all patients referred to the Orthopedic Ward. 
Two special workers have now been added for the group 
of infantile paralysis patients incident to the recent 
epidemic. 

The Syphilis Clinic: social service for all out- 
patients entering Weld Ward G with syphilis. The social 
worker is responsible for arranging with the patients for 
payment for salvarsan, and for seeing that no infectious 
patient leaves the chnic without treatment, whether he 
can pay for salvarsan or not. Special attention is given 
to women and children coming in for examination. The 
number of patients passing through the Social Service in 
this clinic for the last year was 3,478. 

The Genito-Urinary Clinic: one worker assigned to 
this clinic to assist the doctors in keeping under treatment 
all children with vaginitis, all women with gonorrheal 
infection, and all patients with renal tuberculosis. This 
group totaled 494 during the past year. 

The Industrial Clinic: a special worker has been em- 
ployed since 1913 to consider the industrial aspects of 
patients' disease. Her work formed the background for 
the recently organized Industrial Clinic, to which she is 
now assigned as an assistant to the physician. 

Special reports of the department's activities have been 
published each year and may be secured on application. 
In addition to Dr. Cabot's contributions to the literature 

139 



Report of the Out-Patient Social Service. 

of the subject, the workers in the department have 
pubUshed the following : 

"Social Work in Hospitals," by Ida M. Cannon. Published 
by the Russell Sage Foundation. 

"Neurological Social Service at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital," by Margherita Ryther; published in the Boston 
Medical and Surgical Journal, March 19, 1914. 

"Is Sanatorium Treatment Worth While?" by Gertrude L. 
Farmer; pubhshed in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, 
March 19, 1914. 

"Social Problems involved in the Treatment of Children with 
Heart Disease from the Point of View of an Out-Patient De- 
partment," by Clara M. Welsh; pubhshed in the Boston 
Medical and Surgical Journal, September 2, 1915. 

In co-operation with the doctors the medical-social 
sm-veys have been made of the Children's, Neurological, 
and Orthopedic Departments as a basis for improving the 
efficiency of the clinic. 

The department is supported entirely by the income of 
an endowment of $20,000 and private subscriptions, for 
which appeal is made each year. It is the earnest hope of 
the committee that eventually the department will be 
endowed and become officially a part of the hospital 
organization. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ida M. Cannon, 
Chief of Hospital Social Service. 



140 



RULES FOR ADMISSION, ETC. 



Applications for admission of patients should be made 
at The Moseley Memorial Building, Fruit Street at North 
Grove Street, Boston, on week days between the hours 
of 9 A.M. and 3 p.m. 

Emergencies and recent accidents admitted at all 
hours. 

Applications from a distance should be made in writ- 
ing, accompanied by a full description of the case by the 
attending physician, with reason of the physician for 
thinking hospital treatment desirable, and when a free 
bed is needed, by a statement of the pecuniary condition 
of the patient. Always wait for a reply before sending 
the patient. 

Contagious cases are not admitted to the hospital, and 
only such chronic cases as can be partially relieved by 
temporary treatment. 

Paying patients in private rooms \sdll be charged $28 
to $35 per week. In the general wards the rate of board 
to paying patients is $15 per week. These rates, covering 
only expenses of board and lodging, may be increased or 
abated in individual cases by the Resident Physician. 

In cases requiring gratuituous treatment no charge will 
be made. 

An ambulance, accompanied by a medical officer, will 
be despatched to any point within the city proper for the 
conveyance of cases of accident or urgent sickness, not 
contagious, to this hospital, or elsewhere, upon notice 
from a physician, the pohce, or other responsible source, 
subject to the approval of the Resident Physician. 

The Out-Patient Department is for the poor only and 
is open from 8.30 to 10 in the morning, Sundays and 
holidays excepted. 

The Consultation Clinic, for diagnosis and advice with 

141 



Rules for Admission. 

respect to treatment, meets on Tuesday and Friday 
afternoons, excepting holidays, 1.30 to 3 p.m. Patients 
are admitted o?ily on recommendation of physicians 
This is a pay clinic — $5.00 consultation fee — additional 
charges of S3.00 for X-ray, $1.00 for laboratory tests, 
and $3.00 for electrocardiogram when advised by con- 
sultants. 



142 



ninety-ninth report of the 

superintendent of the 

McLean hospital. 



To THE Trustees of the Massachusetts General Hospital: 

The following report of the McLean Hospital for the 
year 1916 is respectfully submitted: 

One hundred and thirty-three patients were admitted, 
133 were discharged, and 203 remained in the hospital at 
the end of the calendar year. The whole number under 
treatment was 346. The daily average was 209, which is 
4 less than that of last year. The recoveries were 25.6 per 
cent of the admissions and of the dismissals. Of the 133 ad- 
missions 63 were primarily voluntary patients and 5 be- 
came such by signing an application to remain under care at 
the expiration of a legal period of observation. Of these 68 
voluntary patients 3 were committed because of a formal 
request for discharge which, because of their mental con- 
dition, could not properly be granted. There remained 
on this basis at the end of the year 65 persons, 24 men and 
41 women. During the year 12 patients were admitted 
for temporary care (Acts 1915, ch. 174), one more than 
last year. Of these, 5 made a voluntary application to re- 
main in the hospital, 2 were discharged, and 5 were for- 
mally committed. Of the 133 patients admitted 14 came 
from hospitals in Massachusetts and 9 from hospitals in 
other States. In addition to these, 7 were received from 
the Psychopathic Department of the Boston State Hos- 
pital, to which they had 'been admitted for observation. 

The statistical tables appearing later in this report are 
for the year ending September 30th, in accordance with 
the requirement of the Massachusetts State Commission 
on Mental Diseases. 

143 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

The medical treatment during the year presents no 
unusual features except that special attention has been 
paid to general paralysis. The laboratories have been 
administered on hnes mentioned in the report of last year. 
The following are quotations from the reports of Dr. 
Abbot and Dr. Wells. 

''There have been no innovations in the work of the 
clinical department during the year. 

''The routine laboratory examinations of urine, etc., 
have been made whenever indicated; the Wassermann 
tests of blood and spinal fluid are made as heretofore at 
the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

"Twenty-one of the admissions and 9 of the discharges 
were undiagnosticated ; 6 cases occurred in both lists. 
The causes of the large number of failures to make a posi- 
tive diagnosis were various. We do not here make the 
diagnosis of 'allied to' manic-depressive or dementia 
prsecox. Those terms really mean that a positive diagnosis 
cannot be made. Some 5 or 6 cases could have been as- 
signed to these categories had we used them. In 3 cases 
the diagnosis was cleared up by prolonged observation. 
In 2 cases the friends or relatives could not give adequate 
information about the patients, the patients themselves 
either would not or could not do so, and the symptoms 
that were presented were of doubtful significance. One 
patient came one day and went the next. In the re- 
mainder there were either equivocal symptoms to which 
some members of the staff attached one value and others 
another, or there were strong indications of a multiple 
psychosis. 

"The conferences have been held regularly once a week 
as heretofore. The aim is not so much to attach a diag- 
nostic name to the case for purposes of classification as 
to interpret the individual as a human medico-sociological 
problem, — a problem in faulty adjustment to environ- 
ment, — to bring out the manner, nature, and causes of 
the person's maladjustment, and to emphasize those fea- 

144 



Report of the Superintendent of the JNIcLean Hospital. 

tures that may be of scientific or of sociological or thera- 
peutic interest and value. 

''To this end the effort is made to embody in the records 
of each patient a sufiicient number of facts. It is com- 
paratively easy to make briefly a vivid picture of the pa- 
tient by giving terse judgments of the observer, but for 
purposes of study such judgments are almost valueless. 
The facts on which the judgments are formed are the 
only things of permanent scientific value. They will still 
be useful when om' present interpretations of them shall 
have been superseded and thrown into the scrap heap of 
bygone theories. 

"Hence, in accordance with modern trends, there is 
an effort at more intensive study of the patient on ad- 
mission, with the view of determining more minutely the 
adaptive mechanisms of the patient, and the type, nature, 
and causes of the alterations in them. The patient has 
been able to adapt himself to the circumstances of his 
fife as successfully as the average up to the time of his 
illness. He then began to adapt himself less well. In 
his past life we try to find what general situations he has 
had to adjust himself to, what special or significant ex- 
periences or difficulties he may have had, what sort of 
make-up he has had with which to meet them, what his 
methods and success in meeting and handling these diffi- 
culties have been, and what handicaps he may have had 
in the way of inherited endowment or tendency to disease 
of physical disabilities, of mental deficiencies or tendencies. 
Of the illness itself we try to get as many details of fact 
as possible concerning his attitude, his general and particu- 
lar behavior in immediate reaction to his situation, and 
his comprehension of his situation and condition. From 
the patient himself we try to get as full an expression as 
possible of his own comprehension of his present and past, 
near and remote situations, of himself as related to them, 
of his reactions to them; of his own condition, and of the 
causes for his failure to adapt himself well. We of course 

145 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

note also his present behavior, disorders, and other symp- 
toms, mental and physical. In other words, we continue 
to study the patient from the biological point of view 
and to try to express his total reaction to his total en- 
viroimient. We are trying to gather data for an inter- 
pretative as well as a descriptive psychiatry. 

''Upon this department will devolve the details of con- 
ducting the psychiatric out-patient clinic at the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital. This is looked forward to 
with great interest, and it is hoped that the staff will soon 
be large enough to take it up. It will bring the staff in 
closer touch with specialists in other fields as well as with 
men in general medicine and surgery, and also with med- 
ical students, who have ceased to come to clinics here 
since the estabhshment of those at the Psychopathic 
Hospital. It will also broaden the experience of the staff 
by presenting to them border-line cases and others which 
do not come to this hospital. It also has its sociological 
value, which is by no means to be ignored. 

"By invitation Dr. Abbot read a paper on 'The Me- 
chanism of Paranoia' last May before the Philadelphia 
Psychiatric Society. This paper has been accepted by 
the Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases but has 
not yet been published. 

"A paper on 'The Dynamic Value of Content' was ac- 
cepted some months ago by the Journal of Philosophy, 
Psychology, and Scientific Methods, but has not yet been 
published." 

"During the year the work of the psychological de- 
partment has broadened in scope, so that from time to 
time it has required outside assistance mainly of a clerical 
nature which has been supplied as needed. 

"Early in the year an experimental study was begun 
of fluctuations in the content of the conscious (i.e., that 
of which one can voluntarily become aware). Technical 
considerations demanded the construction of new appa- 
ratus, pending which further work on this topic is deferred. 

146 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

"The work on the pathology of choice reactions, the 
experimental part of which was carried through in 1915, 
is being prepared for publication and should be ready 
during the coming year. 

'^ Although not designed for this purpose, the so-called 
'Intelligence Scales' have developed some usefulness for 
the formal aspects of mental examination in the psy- 
choses. A small number of examinations, of normal and 
pathological cases, were made with the Yerkes Adolescent 
and Adult Scales. The best adapted for our purposes 
seems to be the Stanford Revision of the Binet-Simon 
Scale. Since early in September such examination has 
been made with those new admissions whose condition 
permitted it, about 60 per cent of all admissions, as weU 
as in other cases of longer standing. 

'^ Besides the uncompleted work before mentioned the 
chief present task of the department is the treatment of 
various methods of mental examination in the higher in- 
tellectual levels, with reference to preventing their invali- 
dation through 'coaching.' 

''In connection with the establishment of a Psychiatric 
Clinic by the hospital the dispensary of the Phipps Clinic 
in Baltimore was visited, and a report upon its work sub- 
mitted to the Medical Superintendent. 

"The volume begun last year, to present a systematic 
discussion of mental processes from the standpoint of 
their adaptive value, has been completed and is in press. 

"By invitation, papers were presented at a Division 
Meeting of the Departments of Philosophy, Psychology, 
and Anthropology of Columbia University, and before 
the meeting of the American Psychopathological Associa- 
tion, in Washington, and an address was delivered at the 
organization of the Association of Life Agency Officers, in 
Chicago." 

The Journal Club has continued its regular meetings 
for the review and discussion of current literature. 

147 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

The following is a list of articles published since the 

last report: 

Dr. Abbot : " Preventable Forms of Mental Disease and How to 
Prevent Them," Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, 
also reprinted as Publication No. 12 of the Massachusetts 
Society for Mental Hj'giene; "The Biological Point of 
View in Psychology and Psychiatry," Psychological Re- 
view; "The Causal Relations between Structure and Func- 
tion," American Journal of Psychology. 
Dr. Wells: Original Articles: "On the Psychomotor Mechan- 
isms of Type^\Titing," American Journal of Psychology; 
"Von Bechterew and Uebertragung," Journal of Philosophy, 
Psychologv, and Scientific IMethods; "The Instinctive 
Basis of Pacifism," Atlantic Monthly; "The Child Nation," 
School and Society; "Effect of Alcohol on Free Associa- 
tions" (Dodge, Benedict & Wells, being Chapter IV in 
Dodge & Benedict; Psychological Effects of Alcohol, 
Carnegie Institution of Washington) ; " Mental Regression : 
its Conception and Types," Psychiatric Bulletin. 

Discussio7is: "Association and Personality," Psj'cho- 
logical Bulletm; "The Analysis of a Successful Agent," 
Life Association News. 

Reviews: " Terman's ' The Measurement of InteUigence,' " 
School and Society; "Jung's 'Psychology of the Uncon- 
scious' (tr. Hinkle)," Psychiatric Bulletin; "Dynamic 
Psychology," Psychological Bulletin. 

Abstracts of Literature in Periodicals: Psychiatric Bulletin, 
9 titles; Psychoanalytic Review, 3 titles; American 
Journal of Psychology, 7 titles. 
Miss Jones: "What Can I Find to Read Aloud?" The Nurse; 
"The Importance of Organized Libraries in Institutions," 
Proceedings National Conference Charities and Correc- 
tions, The Library Journal, Southern Hospital Record; 
" Hospital Libraries. Their Relation to Patients and Train- 
ing Schools," Proceedings Twenty-Second American Con- 
vention National League of Nursing Education. 

The libraries have been maintained at an expense of 
$1,535.27, which includes bills for binding and the libra- 
rian's salary. Sixty-seven volumes were added to the 
medical library, which now numbers 5,904. Two hundred 
and sixty-six were added to the patients' library, which 
now has 8,562 volumes. The circulation increased from 
9,192 in 1915 to 10,053 in 1916. It is an invaluable 
diversional occupation and means of treatment. 

148 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

In the handicraft rooms 50 men and 94 women found 
congenial and beneficial employment. There is now a 
wide range for choice in the kind of occupation possible, 
and it is exceptional that something cannot be suggested 
which will appeal to each mdividual and which will serve 
for the time being to stunulate healthful and normal trains 
of thought. The men have done much work in wood and 
m the repair of cane, rattan, and willow furnitm'e. It is 
proposed to install a steam box in the basement, so that 
larger baskets, like those used in a laundry, can be made 
and thus meet the demand of most of the men for really 
useful work and for an opportunity to make sizable things. 
Small raffia and reed baskets do not appeal to them. The 
women have been chiefly interested in weaving, basketry, 
pottery, and knitting. A loom of oriental tj^pe has been 
set up in the women's department, on which a rug is being 
made with Turkish knot and Anatolian pattern. The 
scarcity of dyestuffs and the difficulty of obtaining colored 
material has led to the installation of a simple equipment 
for dyeing cottons and wools. Many patients require 
careful attention and much help, and it is a question if 
additional assistants should not be given the instructors 
during the winter months. 

The patients of the hospital for another year have en- 
joyed the wise benefaction of Miss Sarah C. M. Lovering. 
The siun received from her estate has been expended in 
a way best calculated ''to promote their comfort and hap- 
piness" and to be of lasting benefit. A south piazza of 
one of the houses has been screened and glazed for use in 
summer and winter. Three stops were added to the 
organ in the chapel, making possible a few organ recitals 
on Saturday afternoons, which were greatly enjoyed. A 
part was expended for the maintenance of the baseball 
team, the purchase of picture frames for the patients' 
sitting rooms, a loom for the handicraft room, books for 
the hbrary, and heavy wraps for automobile riding. There 
are many ways in which a further sum could be expended 

149 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

to procure for the patients what could not otherwise be 
provided, especially in these days of increased cost of 
living. 

The loan collection of pictures again received an addi- 
tion of 12 oils from Mrs. William Stone, which remained 
from May until November; and gifts to the art room 
were made by Miss Bessie E. Hazen of one of her water 
colors, a canyon in San Diego, and by Mr. and Mrs. 
Shepherd Brooks of an oil, an excellent copy of Titian's 
Pessaro Madonna. 

The Arlington House, for one patient, was completed 
and occupied April 12th. The house itself has proved en- 
tirely satisfactory and the location even more so than was 
anticipated. There are many other desirable building 
spots on the estate and it would seem to be a wise expendi- 
ture of money to build more of these houses for one pa- 
tient in order that the hospital may be able to provide 
desirable accommodations for people of large means. 
There is no doubt that they will be in demand when the 
public becomes aware of their existence. 

The building of a house for the women nurses, for which 
so many pleas have been made in years past, is not yet 
authorized, but there seems to be reason to hope with a 
high degree of expectation that it will be erected in the 
near future. The plans have been carefully studied and are 
practically completed. The great increase in cost of ma- 
terial and labor appears to be the chief and controlling 
objection to an immediate prosecution of the work. 

During a part of the year two junior assistant physi- 
cians have been needed on the medical staff, and at the 
present time in addition to these a man of more experience, 
so that the hospital can take charge of the psychiatric 
clinic which is to be established in the Out-Patient De- 
partment of the General Hospital. There is a scarcity 
of applicants for such positions, not only in Massachu- 
setts, but in other Eastern States. Either there really are 
not enough men to fill all positions offered in general and 

150 



Eeport of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

special hospitals, or service in hospitals for mental dis- 
eases is not attractive to the recent graduate. It may be 
interesting in this connection to note that because of the 
movement for the advancement of medical education in 
this country the number of schools has fallen in the last 
twelve years from 160 to 95 and the number of students 
in that time has decreased a Httle more than one half. 

The following changes have taken place in the staff 
during the year: Dr. Sydney V. Kibby, junior assistant 
physician, resigned February 29th; Miss Mary E. Reed, 
dietitian, resigned September 11th, and was succeeded by 
Miss Mildred E. Dallinger, who had been instructor in 
cookery; Miss Florence G. Churchill was appointed in- 
structor in cooker}^ on the same date; Dr. Clifford G. 
Rounsefell, junior assistant physician, resigned September 
13th; Mr. George R. Kinread, storekeeper, resigned 
November 16th and was succeeded by ]Mr. Charles E, 
McDougal. 

The following are some of the present needs of the 
hospital : 

A house for the women nurses. 
Houses for married men nurses. 

A fund of $200,000 for research work in the laboratories. 
An increase of the occupation fund to $25,000. 
An increase of the fund for the art room to $10,000. 
A cottage for the care of one patient. 
A tennis court near the women's gymnasium. 
A sun room in connection with the East House. 
A cold storage room for the safekeeping of the patients' 
furs and clothing. 

George T. Tuttle, 

Medical Su'perintendent. 



151 



i 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1916. 



Report of the Supei intendent of the McLean Hospital. 



P5 
< 

W 

Pm 
O 

CO 

O 
I— I 

I— I 

<l 
P^ 

o 





. 


T-H 1^^ ■*! 03 Tt< ■* ■* r-l CO O -*l t^ 1> 


o 


QC '^ C3i t^ (M 05 b- 




o 


T-H -^ O "^ »0 IV 


o 


^ OCOi-H C^T-H 


H 


Ch 


(M.-I 


T-H 


CO 


1—1 1— ( 


<5 






















O 


• 


i-iO(M OO'-li-H ■ • -IM "^T 


1 CJ5 


(M^ OOTtH 1-1 • 


H 


f^ 


CO 00 "*i CO C^ rfl ■ • • 


C3 


t^ lO <N 1-1 1-1 • 


K 






1—1 




O 

o 






















< 




OOOIM T-iCOCO-^r-iCO^'^COO' 


J i-H 


CO O 05 CO 00 00 1> 


s 


ooiO(M oococo 


CO 


t^ LOl-< 








tH 










• OCOIM ^r- 


^ CO 


CO CO 1—1 ■ 1-H • •* 




o 










a 

E-i 
< 


H 
























• T-H 1— 1 1- 


4 1— 1 


1— 1 T— 1 1-4 • • ■ ■ 














1— 1 












ci 




• LO CO !M 


iCi 


lOiC ■ • i-< •-* 




^ 












■+i 




^ • --^ T-H CO • • • 


^ 


^^ • ■ -(NKN 














< • 


H 




















B H 












O K 


o 










&; < 


tin 










so 






















H 


c3 




• Ttl • • -^ I-l CO • • • 


Tt< 


^-* • • • C<l (M 




_^j 


,_(.^rt.TH 


(M 


1—1 1—1 • ■ • -1—1 




O 




















E-i aj 








^_^ 




^ :z; 


1*^ 










pi-H 


Mh 






















o3 




1— ( • I— 1 


1—1 


1— 1 I— 1 ■ • • ■ I— 1 




§ 












-t^ 


oi>c<: 


GO^ r-H ■ • • COTt^ CD CC 


GO 


t^ CO 00 1^ 1-1 1^ • 




O 


"H^ ^ 


CO lo i> • • • 


-^ 


CO 05 CO T-H IM 1-1 • 


< 

CO 


H 


IMt-H 


'"' 


CO 


1-1 




OC:-- 


t^ T-H T-H • • ■ C^ -coco 


J> 


rH CO C» O) ■* 1— 1 • 


P^ 


COGO-=t 

1— 1 


003 rt< • • • 


OS 


t^ iO >— 1 T-H 1—1 • 
















03 


OOOIM 


1-H OO ■ • "* '^ CO CO 


^ 


COOOlGOt^cO • 




OOiOlM 


t^ coco 








LO 


corrii-i 






















-_^ 






























c3 






























« 






-tJ 






















ID 


t>i 






!-< 








lO ■ 














bO 








o 






























a 








05 ■ 














03 


-C 






a 
3 






















^ 














^ 
















c 






w 








o 






























CO 0) 


'si 




o 






T3 

o 


CQ 


.-5 bi 

^• 
■£.£ 

Q 


-^ 


cc 








^-^ 

»3 " ^ 

§.2- 


III 

-1-= • 


i, 

;h 
c; 

> 

c 
£ 

c. 


oi 

> 

a. 
■J a; 

o 


z 

"o 


> 


'a 

£ 


.2 

CO c/ 

■£■> 
c 


0) 
CC 

« 

O 

!-. 
O 

g 

c 
'o 


c 

c 
o3 


CQ tC 

03 03 


a o3 
.§.£ 

O O 

a a 

cc tc 
c3 03 



154 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

























COCO 






-1^ 

o 


^ C5^ 


(MC^IO <M iOt^XOCCiOI>005 


O lO 




(M 1-1 


-.-HfOOO rH ^ CO (M CCl(M CO 1-H • ■ 


00 "^ (M 






• C^ 1-1 (M co^T-i'-Hi-i 0000 


I>t^TH 


a 


E-I 




O O 


CO O 


% 






!M(N 








00 00 




o 




'OTt< Ci 


t^O— 1 t^ -MCO-Ht^fOOOSOOOO 


(M O 


H 


6 




• (M t> O (M C5 CO O O X> (M ■ • 


(M -CO O 


« 


Ps< 




■1-1 r-l ,-i 0«D 


■rt< CO 


O 






iM (N 


rt< O 


< 






^H ^H 








»OiO 


00 CO 


ci 


coioo 


•lOCDOi lO CO "* t^ .-H CO 05 00 O O 


CO ■ 00 y-< 




§ 


T-H 


•OOiOCI 00 I01>01>0rt • • 


COCO 






1-H (M C^ 


C<l O 








00 00 










1-H T— 1 










• ■ • • • lOiOiOtCiOi— 1 -cOcO 




a 




do 




< 














,_,... 






q5 








a 














1-H 1-H 




1— ( 






• • • • • LC lO lO O O • • CO o 

do 










1-H r-H 










• • • • T# r)H -^ ■^ -^ • • 1-H 1-H 








'd>d> 




<J 4 










« s 










o ^ 


aj 








S o 


PlH 








so 

a 














1-H T-H 




H 


d 




' ' <6d> 










(MIM 






o 




.„ .^ ^ CI 1-1 T^^^ ■ -oo 




>< a 




1-H 1-H 








oo 




E-i t» 








oo 




>-H 1-H 




|o 














(M(M 




>^ 


03 




• - • 1-H 1-H 1-H 1-H 1-H • O O 










C2 CR 






• 


^O'* 


^(MO ^ iO00OC5OCCt^T-H^ 






O 


oa 1-1 


i-HCOt> r-l CO 05 1-H (M C^ CO 1-H ■ • 








(M 1-H <M COrti-Hi-Hi-H i>r^ 






r-i 




oo 




a 






C^l IM 








00 00 




Z 




I-':;'* c» 


COCOO CO 1-HCO-Ht^cOOOOOOO 




<5 


a3 




(M t^ O C^l C: to CO CO CO 1-H 




03 


fe 




1-H ^ rt lOlO 




Z 




(M<M 




1— ( 






1-H r-t 








1-H 1-H 






03 


OiO LO 


LOCOCl LO '*iOOO(NI>OiOOCOCO 








00 ^ Oi CO I* CO lO CO lO 1-H • • 








1-H 1-H r-4 








00 00 










50 . . . . . . . . . uu • 


EC to • 




















>> 




03 


c!-^^.S2 as 










• I 

s 

_ o 

1-H 


CT> • 


a, 

c3 


c 
o 




3 


'a 


O « C Sh . 

•S Qj a 03 
^•^-^ " . 
•:3 c3 rf j^ 










2| 


^p 






a 

o 


a 
p 

o 

Ci c 
tc ^^ 

II 


I'o^ 


^ 5;? « o 

=s 3-*^ a . 

^ 2 ° § 
o 5 o ^^ 

fl ^ ^ fe C3 






CO 


a 

C 
o3 


o § E 


s g s 

Ph 


72 


53 t. 

i'1 


a. 


o 
1 

11 

03-3 


III 
s a rt 

si 2 «^ 
dj c (ij 

cc a; -»^ 

=4^ b£ o3 
O 03 > 

^ la 
a>> N 
S-1> 














^ 








Q 


^Q^P 



155 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

Table No. 2. 

TABLE OF ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, AND RESULTS FOR 
TEN YEARS. 





















_^ 






















^ !J: 




Year. 




73 




. o 

O in 

-2 ^ 






-6 

CO 

> 


.S>H 


1-1 








< 


o 

Q 


^1 


Q 




o 
o 

CO 




ajpLH 


Ending Sept. 30, 


1907 . 


179 


159 


338 


20 


56 


42 


205 


193 




' 30, 


1908 . 


177 


170 


382 


21 


60 


42 


218 


214 




' 30, 


1909 . 


165 


156 


389 


32 


54 


28 


219 


216 




' 30, 


1910 . 


169 


165 


388 


16 


56 


37 


217 


223 




' 30, 


1911 . 


182 


182 


399 


23 


63 


44 


217 


220 




' 30, 


1912 . 


172 


165 


389 


14 


58 


40 


221 


221 




' 30, 


1913 . 


154 


167 


375 


17 


60 


45 


218 


221 




' 30, 


1914 . 


117 


133 


335 


16 


35 


44 


207 


217 




' 30, 


1915 . 


122 


114 


336 


15 


37 


30 


211 


209 




' 30, 


1916 . 


138 


134 


360 


21 


39 


39 


212 


209 



Total number of admissions from the year 1818, — 11,124. 



Table No. 3. 

INSANE RECEIVED ON FIRST AND SUBSEQUENT 
COMMITMENTS. 





Cases Committed. 


Number of the Commitment. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


First to this Hospital 

Second " " " 

Third " " " 

Fourth " " " 

Sixth " " " 

Seventh" " " 


50 
3 

4 
1 
1 

1 


50 
9 

1 
2 


100 

12 

5 

3 

1 
1 


Total cases 


60 

58 

40 


62 
61 

36 


122 


Total persons 


119 


Never before in any hospital for the 
insane 


76 







156 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

































1 




s 




























+2 


i-H 00 a 


3 00 TjH -,-1 •Tj<-*rH(N|0(> 


CO 




o 


CO --1 


iO 


1—1 


l> 


< 


^ 












s 


I— 1 lO I> 


CO ^ • ^ • I> Tt^ • cs 


1 1-1 CS 


CO 


c 


c3 


CO 1-1 


o • • 


CO 


I> 


E-i 


fe 












_^ 














C 














.S 


C5 »o a 


) (M lOi-Hr-ii-ii-ico ■(?; 


^ 


CO 




'43 


CO rt 


CD 




1> 




Pi 














;-) 














<u 




























^ 


C<) t^ 1> 


CO CO ■ T-H ■ CO i-H ■ c\ 


o 


CO 




o 


I— 1 


(M • • 




CO 


-J2 


§ 
























^ 


;J 












< 




CO CO (>. 


o: 


(M • (N • CD rH • CQ 


CO 


CO 


s 


c3 


t— 1 


c^ 




1—1 


CO 


H 


fe 












y^ 














H^ 










































o 


t^ O ir 


CO CO i-H ■ ■ ,-1 T-i • cs 


00 


CD 




'-3 

c3 




Cv 


. 




CO 




Plh 














;-^ 














o 














+3 


C5 i-H CV 


CS 


I-H • 1-H CO r-l 


o cs 


O 




O 




0- 


• 




'CfH 


m 


% 












C 












B 


o 












J 


rC 


00 1> L'- 


O <M • (M • 1-H CO ■ 


00 cs 


o 


< 


c3 


1—1 


0- 


• 




Tfl 


% 


P=H 












^ 














c 














.'^ 


CM 03 CC 


'^ 


(M • T-H ,-1 • (M • 


CD 


O 




'■+3 


(M 


CO 


• 




'Ct< 




Ph 


















03 


























kH 






O 


























Eh 






-t^ 


























t-t 






c3 


























> 






-i-i 


























H 






m 


























< 






■T3 




















a 






^ 






a 




















hp 










.jlj 


0. 


















"o 






fe 




bC 


_> 


















^ 






O 






'43 

03 


















=2 






<U ^ (L 


d 


















Is 


'^ 






02 fe +i 

:3 £ ca 


(7 














O 


Ph 




^ ^ ^ 
ill 


"c 


1 c. 1 S 1 .S 1 1 


c 


H 






2 


O C 




c 


u 


p:^ 


f=H 


1- 


Ph 


a; 


02 


1— ' 




' 



157 



Report of tlie Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



H SO 



a; 

< 
o 


"o 


^ rc o o ro o CO -^ o <M 


o 


iM 7-1 CO (M 


s 


1—1 1-H 


00 


7-1 7-1 CO T-H 


03 


1— 1 T-H 


oc 


7-H • CO T-l 


o 

O 


'3 
o 


1— 1 


CO 

CO 


7-H 7-< (M tH 


03 

a 


• 7—1 • ■ 1— 1 1> T}H T— 1 -^ 1— 1 


C3 

7—1 


7— 1 7— 1 r-l 


03 


■ 7-1 -7-1 • CO (M 7-1 ro • 


7—1 


• 7-1 1-1 


O 




7-l7-IC003C<100-sl^C07— 1 


CO 
o 


7-i .• Tt< iH 


to 

s 

a; 


• • Tj< rt< • CO »0 CO CO 7-1 




• • (M 1-1 




7-(7-i(MiO<MOi07-Hl> ■ 


CO 


1-1 • IM • 


h 


-1 




03 

-►^ 

i 
1 

c 
73. 

O 

H 


c3 
c3 

i 

o 




'5 


O 
a; 
<U 

C 










Massachusetts: 

Barnstable Cou 
Berkshire ' 
Bristol ' 
Essex ' 
Hampden ' 
Middlesex ' 
Norfolk ' 
Plymouth ' 
Suffolk 
Worcester ' 



158 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



O 
U 



Q 

< 

O 

r^ 

K' 
Ph 

CO 
I— I 

O 

o 

Q 
I— I 

m 
H 





03 






















-i^ 


(M CC- CC rH O' 


3 CO 30 1- 


< 05 




O 




(M 00 O- 


■) rH 




H 






'^ 


02 








H 


:3 
g 


1-1 rH N i-( C^ 


1 CO »o C 


^ ,^ 




T-l ^ r- 


H O 


^— ' 


3 










f^ 








72 










r2 










c3 


l-H (M T-t • T- 


< O CO IT 


5 OO 






r-< MH T- 


lO 






















'S 










+i 


• (M .-H rH T- 


< o o r- 


CO 


02 

2; 


O 




rH CO 


^ 


o 










t-4 










m 




















Q 


03 


• rH T—l T- 


( O O u" 


) lO 


< 




<M 


(N 




o 








« 


p^ 








a 






























H 










O 


-2 










"3 


• <M • ■ 


tH O (^ 


00 




§ 






1—i 


>< 


'rt 








z 


-fj 


(M --H (N • C5 


CO (M -+ 


o 


<; 


O 




rH lO IM 


t^ 
































0) 










1 


T-H T-H rH ■ 1— 


1> lO r- 


o 


3 cc 
a 3 




(M r- 


CO 










< ^ 










fn 










m 


CQ 








& 


rS 








hH 


03 


rH • I— 1 • T- 


o t^ cc 


o 


fe 




<M r^ 


rtH 






P 


















<: 




S 


c3 




-|J 








P^ 




^M % 8 




cc 








W >^ ^^ c 

^ ^ fl "S ^ 


O JH > 


o 






« « S O 4, 


d O C 


Oh 






;zi ;zi Ph p4 > 


o ti o 


o 














H 


O 


O 


H 


1 



159 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 

Table No, 6. 

CIVIL CONDITION OF INSANE PERSONS FIRST ADMITTED 

TO ANY HOSPITAL. 





Males. 


Females. 


Tota 


Unmarried 


16 

22 

2 


13 

18 

4 

1 


29 


Married 


40 


Widowed . . ■ 


6 


Separated 


1 


Total 


40 


36 


76 



Table No. 7. 

OCCUPATION OF INSANE PERSONS FIRST ADMITTED TO 

ANY HOSPITAL. 



Occupations. 



Males. 



Females. 



Total. 



Advertising Agent 

At home 

Auditor , 

Aviator 

Bookkeeper 

ClergjTnan 

Conductor, street railway 

Contractor 

Crossing tender 

Deputy Sheriff 

Domestic 

Farmer 

Housekeeper 

Housewife 

Interior decorator 

Lawyer 

Librarian 

Liveryman 

Manager, business 

Manager, efficiency 

Mechanic 

Merchant 

Nurse 

Physician 

Physicist 

Salesman, saleswoman 

Secretary, civil ser\'ice 

Stenographer 

Student 

Superintendent, shoe factory 

Teacher 

Upholsterer 

None 

Total 

160 



2 
20 



1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
20 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
6 
1 
2 
1 
4 



40 



36 



76 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



< 

H 
Q 

Q 

< 

o 



Q 

<; 

o 

< 

^2 



(—1 
O 

CO 

O 













CTi 




-d 


-1^ 

o 


; I •^(Mt^t^r-i 


1—1 


»o 




-hi 

a; 


H 






CO 




Q 




















a 






lO 


CO 

00 






>*I!!!!!** 












t^ 




H 






















-<j 








t^ 




<i 




• • • • ■ • Trt^C^t^fO • 


CO 

T— 1 


CO 

I— 1 


R 










o 
























« 










lO 






-ij 


1-1 •(M'-l ■ •<-(>OCO00 • ■ 


1—1 


(M 






o 




(M 








H 










-ii 




















-< 


aj 


i-H (N(N-- 


lO 


1> 




02 


f^ 






d 












lO 




S 




















-t= 








lO 




-< 


ci 


• (N i-H • 1— 1 iC 1— 1 O 


CO 


(N 






§ 




1—1 


CO 












TiH 






-♦i 


■ •C01>C^(MOI:^t^OTt<rH 


o 


<M 






o 


1— 1 T-H I— ! »— 1 


i> 














CO 




O 


■- 






TJ^ 


^_^ 
























"^ 












H 


rH 








1—1 


E 


-^ 


6 


• -T-H-tH -CMiCOOOOTtlCOT-H 


CO 

CO 


CO 


c 


H< 


f^ 






K 


s 






























>< 

2 


$ 


^ 


• • l-'5 CO (M • lO O C5 CO 1-1 ■ 


o 


05 
CO 


< 




§ 




^ 


^ 


C 










^ 


B 

o 




















-* 


K 




-fci 


coi-ic;i-ooo^©oot>coi-i 


CO 


'It^ 


Eh 
E-i 

M 




O 


I— 1 I— 1 


1> 




M 

o 


H 






CO 






















-< 






i-l'-lC0C^'#<M'#C2^C0C<|i-l 


CO 


00 

CO 


Eh 

tj2 


-1-2 

02 






CO 


d 


(s 


tl 








-* 


S 


s 




















-t^ 








C2 




< 


c3 


(M •--DfO'*(MiOI>:C:TrrH 


o 


30 






§ 




•* 


CO 












02 












Cl 












o 














.xnxnmmTiixnxn^yi 








• -^ ^ ^ u -^ i* -^ ^ •:* 












c3i:3c3c3c3rt!:3i:3<:S 




32 




CC 








O 




a 














■ ^ O LO O O O O O o O „ 




= 






^cooooooooog 




% 








^ 3-^^-*^-^-^-*^-*^-*^"*^"^ >^ 




o 








rS a!>-0 0»OOiOOOOO-- 
C SH,-i(N(MCOCOTt<i-OCOI>0 
o rt _ GO 




g 








-t2 


i 








6S;S o 


o 
H 


§ 



161 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



in 

. O 
o ^ 

^ w 



ri 


H 


IS 


^ 


02 


P 


O 


a 


P4 

013 


!? 


h- ( 




o 




w 




K 




PtH 








fil 



1^ 



p^ 



c^ T-H • • CO i-< c^ 



CO CO T— < 1— I o fo 00 



• CO 1— I 1— I ■^ 1— I 



CO lO • • CC (M 00 















.52 bc 


• 03 



—H O 



S 3 °^ t^ tp 43 

-g .22 ;2 ^ ^ a 
<1 ^ O O K w 



162 






d 

-tJ i^ -t^ 

o c o 

H t* H 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



Table No. 10. 

PROBABLE DURATION OF MENTAL DISEASE BEFORE 

ADMISSION. 



Previous Duration 


First Amitted to ant 
Hospital. 




Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Congenital 


2 

7 
8 
3 
4 
5 
8 
1 
2 


1 
8 
3 
7 
6 

7 
1 
3 


3 


Under 1 month 


15 


From 1 to 3 months 

3 to 6 " 

6 to 12 " 

1 to 2 years 

2 to 5 " 


11 
10 
10 
5 
15 


5 to 10 " 


2 


Over 10 " 


5 






Total 


40 Sfi 


76 


Total average knowm dm-ation (in years) 


4.14 


3.33 


3.76 



163 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



Q 
O 

o 



Q 



o 

H 

fq 
■< 
H 



02 






O 







^ 


C<,t~^,-l,HOO-*,-iiO,-lrt-* 


CO 


1 










J ° H 
5k< 


H 












f- ;S >* 








h 




CO 








Q 5 


03 


NT}irti-H -iCiO •'-i(N.-l ■ y-l 


CO 




§ 


. rt . 


00 

















r-i 


a' 


H 














(^ 


•T— (••1— (••••1-H<>< 




Q 


[::< 






c3 









§ 








13 


^ 


.H (N 


OS 














> 


H 








a 

a 
















(i^ 


CO (M 


i-O 










^ 


c3 


CO ^ 


■* 




+=' 


■ N ^ • • • • ■ N • .-H . 


CO 















-a 


H 








> 
















a 

a 




.(M...O---^-rt- 





Q 
S 



fci 












K 


>~f 


c3 


■ r~1 > -T— ( • • •1—1 




< 
K 




S 
















£ 




.^j 


■-I . . ■ .{Di-lrH .(N • • • 


,_, 





a 
af 


H 




" 




fe 


: : : : :--- :- : : : 


"# 














Co 


c3 


^....^■••^••- 


t^ 






_j 


t^ CO • ■ • • (M 


<M 










(N 






H 














^ 





l-O TjH CO • • • ■ .-1 


CO 




(^ 








a 
















K 


§ 


i-o CO ^ 







_^* 


(nooti<i> ■ t-i ic a t-i n 7-1 -im 


to 






■ (N rH . rt 






H 






. 

"1 










■ CON ■ -^xc-i -rtrt .00 





fe 




CO 










rt 


(MiO(Nl> -Otv -.-iiM . .T}( 







^ 




Tt< 






. a . . 










^ fl rt § fl 










cj oS'o-*o- 










l-i-1 • • 'I i-S^s^ -1 • 










5 -2 -2 i >. 1 -3 -S 1 ^ -9 -1 ^ ^ 






H 
















Q 




















1 g-i s ag |&&l^ 1 s § 



















^ -n t. .3 -2 .2 .2 ^ .a =3 =3 

Il^ig|l||liil1 






3 












1 











-4 


i- 


1 



164 



Report of the Superint€ndent of the ^McLean Hospital. 



Q 
O 



Q 

C 
pi 

w 

O 

02 



Q 

w 

I— ( 

Q 

c 



o < 
o 

H 
Ph 



H 

<: 

CO 



O 







_j 


cqco— it^oo ■ -rtrtF-icq 


o 




N 


1 


OQ CC 




N • • 








a s 


Eh 






^ 


i—t 


^25 
























c 


• IN • o ^; • -H ,-1 rt . 








fa 


. rt . . 


N 


•-0 


lO 


d 


05 -H ^ (M O (N 


M 


o 


lO 




<; 


'"' 


C^ 


llj 


lO 




_j 


^,^w„ . . . .^ . . 


-r. 




_ 










ec 


IM 


a 


H 




















c 


• «—(■••■,—(•• 


r.^ 


lO 


O 


Q 


fa 










c3 


e^ — 1 rt (N 


._ 




CO 














^' 


^* 


■ ^ ■ O -H 


X 


t> 


o 


















> 


L-i 








































P 


C; 


■ ^ ■ -:)< r-1 






o 




tn 












'"' 
























O 


§ 


• • • c^ 


!N 




o 




X 












^ 


■ —1 • CO !N • • " • — 1 


OC 




o 












c^ 


<N 




-3 
O 
> 


r-i 












^H 












o 


• — • IM ■ • ■ ... 


■* 


-:t< 


-»< 




C. 


h^ 








»— < 


Q 


P 






















5 


" 


^ 


■ • • -H C^ r-( 


■* 


t> 


to 






<s 






















a 




^ 


. -* rt . . . . r-^ ■ 


a 


b- 


t- 














£ 




H 










« 












CE 


... cc -<■•.- ^ • 


o 


o: 


o 




-1 












1 


::: -^ :::::; : 


-- 


oc 


w 




^• 


• — 1 ^ i-< 




oc 


00 












« 


C<5 




-3 

2 


r-< 
























> 


o 


• • . o -^ 






c; 




o 


fa 












o 














r;^ 














" 


. O re ^H 


c 




C5 






% 




'^ 




'"' 




J, 


. O r-l O t^ -H ,-1 . . . lO 


._ 


C-5 


X 






OJ ... 


Tji 


c< 






^ 








'"' 














C tH 

OS 




.1.-5 ■ o ro (M 




cq 


,_, 




■ '"' 


(M 


ffl 


o 
















. ^ ^ o ^ 'H rt . ■ -co 


C 


c 


t- 




§ 




(N 


SC 


lO 






a 












e a § d 














• • • O o js ■ • • o • 














ID . . "S 3 a . . 'S . 


























— a '3 .2 'S P< 










!a 




>> -3 o S a -s -o 








































g -^ 3 .S" -i 1 '1 ^ •; § g g 
.2gftg2£gs:a^-2-H 










Q 












b 




^'^...Saaaot^^cnic 








O 




^ -d o ^ .2 .2 .2 fl .3 D * ■A 






s 


s 

K 
C 






? 


8. 


^^ 




^ ^ Q o S S S ^ £ i£ p 5 




s 


.g 






o 


K 


? 


=3 


































t 


M 










b 


i] 








pq 


H 


< 


•< 


1 



165 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



O 

m 
< 



CO 

w 

H 
<1 

P 

Q 

Q 
O 



Q 

m 

Q 
I— I 

hH 
CO 

<^ 

O 
H 

I— I 

w 

w 

O 

o 

K 
O 

CD 





-lj 


^ t-H (M lO (M 


^ C<> Ci 




o 


(32 i-H 


.-H r-H CD 




H 




rH T-H 


< 






















Eh 


QJ 


00 O T-H CO ■ 


GO t^ lO 1 


O 


P^ 


Th 


lo »o CO 1 


H 










1 




c3 


CD lO i-H (N (M 


CD lO CO 




'^ 


>0 lO CO 




+i 


Oi T-H T-H 


T-H rH CO 




O 


7-H 


(M (M i-H 




H 










o 












w 


a5 


lO • ■ • • 


lO lO CO 1 


p 


N 











03 


•* i-H l-H 


CD CO O 




S 


rH 


T-H T-H 1-H 




_^ 


CO CO • 1-1 • 


t^ CD Ci 




O 


I-H 


T-H ,-H 




H 


















1 


1^ 


q5 


00 CQ ■ T-t ■ 


T-H O lO 


Ph 




T-H 1-H 


s 










1 


1— 1 


o3 


lO rH ■ • • 


CD CD Tfl 




_j^ 


00 (N • • r-* 


T-H O CO 




O 


T-H 


<>) (N I-H 


a 


H 










w 












i> 












o 


6 


CO .-H ■ • ■ 


-* '* O 1 


« 


f=H 


I-H ... 


I-H T-H I-H 1 


hH 










1 


o3 


IC 1— 1 -1—1 


t^ CD CO 


r ^ 


-|j 


lO T-H -T-H 


1> t^ I-H 


& K 


O 


i-H 


T— 1 I-H I-H 


o o 


H 










3 & 






















M ^ 


dj 


1> I-H -T-H 


a a ^ I 


< CO 


fe 










02 










1 




00 ■ • • • 


00 00 t^ 




-i-= 


05 Th T-1 CO rH 


00 00 (N 


Q 


O 


(M 


CO CO <M 


w 


H 










P3 












H 












> 


OJ 


kC (N i-H T— 1 


Oi 05 CO 1 


O 


f^ 


>-H 






I-H 


O 
H 
P^ 












o3 


^ C<J • (M 1-H 


C5 o- 


a 


^ 


T-H 






























'S 












-1-2 














z 










A 


o 










m 












O 


03 




,__, 






,£3 


M 




o3 


















>i 




•a^ - ^ - 






§ 


o 










^ 




o 






o 


ElH 




w 






-I-3 


o 




03 






T3 










oc 


(B 






^' ' ' ' 


CO 


s 


'a 


:§ 

p 






8 


55 


oS 


^ 




-Lj fs '^ "£ ^ 


O 


O 


-1-2 


1 




Ph 02 H P^ m 


H 


H 


K 



166 



Report of the Superintendent of the McLean Hospital. 



o 

Q 

O 

a:! 

o 

w 

PL, 



CO 






o 

o 
ft* 

n 

w 

w 
fl 

O 

CG 
W 
CO 

p 

O 



•Asdo^ny 


H 








fe 










§ 








•lYIOX 


fn' 


■-< T}< Ol .-1 T-H CO 1-1 -< "-1 <N "-H r-) r-l ^ r-l 
1 C<l 


fe 


■-l,-( ■ . --H i-l,-l -O 


§ 


•WlN^'-HIM^'H^tNrt • '-^O 


•sisoqoiCsj 
airaag 


H 









(ii 










^ 










•aSBSSIQ 
Ol^BUIOg qjLM. 

BisoqoAsj 


^' 


:::;::-::::::: h 


[i; 










s 


::::;:-::;:::: h 


■j^iuouajui 
OTq:jBdoqoAs£]; 


H 










fe 










s 








•^uaraaiioxg aAis 
-ssjd9p-oniBi\[ 


H 


::::::::-::::: h 


&H 










§ 


;;; i!: i ;-;;!: !h 


•uoissajdaQ qais 
-saidap-araBj^ 


H 


"^ :^ : : : i'^ : i'^ : : : p*' 


fa 










^ 


.■r^-.--^--rt-.-CO 


BisoqojCsj 
uoijnioAuj 


H 


:::::-;::::::: h 


fa 


:::::-:::::::: h 


§ 










•SIS^lBJBjJ 

IBjauar) 


H 


••••■'•■• -c-) •'••• oq 


fa" 










S 


:;!.'.■;;; .'cq :;;; iM 


•xooasij 
Bt^uaraaQ 


H 


:^ ::::::::::;: 1 ^ 




fa' 










§ 










sisoqoAsj; 
bi^ojajos 
-bua^ay 


h 


• -.-CT-lrHCq ,-1 .,-1 t> 


fa' 


:::::::::: i-^ :: h 


§■ 


. ..-li-HrHCq .-lO 


•sisoqo^^sj 

oi|oqoo[y 

a^noy 


H 


:^ ::::::::::: :h 


fa" 










§ 






1 


i